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THE COCK COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

CoCo Home Companion 




Get 

Organized: 

Tournament tracking, 
Freezer rotation schedules, 
And systematized yard sales 

Take a spring break 

Down the Bunny Trail, 
Battlin' Blue Bert, 
And Saucer, Saucer 

Plus: 

H.G. Williamson's 

Hurricane Tracker, 

Edward Samuels on 

Copyright Law, and 

Bill Reed's 

Spreadsheets Made Simple 

Including: hints, tips, 
Q &A columns, 17 new 
product reviews and more! 

OA 



0 



II 

44254"00001 



Our 

Home 
Help 

Issue 



vESTLE maniac 




j core * 9 8 




I i Hj*i_s*£_L_L 



Bouncing Boulders is a new, fast paced arcade- 
style game for your Coco. As you race your man 
around the screen you try to collect enough stars 
to open the exit to the next level. You can drop 
rocks to kill aliens that follow you around the 
screen trying to catch you. But beware of the fall- 
ing and bouncing boulders as they will crush your 
man if you get trapped under one. The many dif- 
ferent screens with lots of puzzles will keep you 
playing for hours on end. 

64 K REQUIRED . $2S.§i 

TAP 





■ m. . r if tr ■i.v 





■ + J 




f — 


XT^ 


£/ 


" 


f 


4 








You've asked for it and now it's here, a wrestling 
game for your color computer. Play a single match 
or play a tag team match in this 1 to 4 player game. 
Wrestle against the computer or wrestle against 
your friend in a single or tag team match. Use pun- 
ches, kicks, body slams, back breakers and many 
other moves as you attempt to pin your opponent. 
Super graphics and realistic play action make this 
a great game for all. 

64 t< AMD JOYSTICK 

$28.95 u.s 
$38.95 can 



SB 



OK UtoK 




Travel through towns and ex- 
plore strange lands in the 
ultimate fantasy role-playing 
game for the color computer. 
As you travel the land you will 
meet different characters that 
you may convince to join you in 
your quest. During your quest 
you will learn the secrets of 

magic spells and ultimately, 
your final goal. 

Enter The Gates of Delirium 
contest! The first person to 
solve the game shall be our 
grand prize winner of a Coco 3. 
There will be 5 second prizes of 
one free game from Diecom 
Products and 5 third prizes of 
one free hat from Diecom Pro- 
ducts. 

64K 

required $38.95 u.s. 

$52.95 can 

available on disk only 



ALSO AVAILABLE 

— Paper Route, Knock Out, 
Karate, each game requiring 
64K. Tape or disk. 

$28.95 u.s. 
$38.95 can. 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 

We accept: 





choque or money order 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878*8358 
personal service 9-5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax. 
C.O.D. Canada only. 
Dealer inquiries invited 
Looking for new software. 



From Computer Plus to YOU 




after 




after 





Tandy 200 24K $649 
Tandy 600 32K $1,269 
Tandy 102 24K $395 






BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 759.00 

Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1229.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-105 80 CPS 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel3l0.00 

Star LV-1210 120 CPS 199.00 

Star NX-10 120 CPS 259.00 

Star SG-15 120 CPS 410.00 

Panasonic P-1091 i 160 CPS 299.00 

Panasonic P-1092 180 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 292 200 CPS 529.00 

Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 375.00 

Epson LX-80 100 CPS 275.00 

Epson FX-85 160 CPS 419.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-7 Modem 85.00 
Radio Shack DC Modem 

Program Pac 99.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 212 179.00 

Hayes 300 Baud Modem 169.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 
BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 
TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Mark Data Graphic Adven.24.95 27.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTerm by PXEComputing39.95 49.95 

TelePatch II by Spectrum 29.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 99.95 

Deft Extra 39.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 59.95 

Max Fonts (72 COCO Max Fonts) 64.95 

Elite Calc 69.95 69.95 

Elite Word 69.95 69,95 

Elite File (disk only) 74.50 

DynaCalc (disk only) 99.95 

Word Pack RS by PBJ 99.00 

VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 

VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pack Interface 89.00 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 
Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber MonitoM49.00 
Goldstar Green Monitor 85.00 
Panasonic Amber Monitor w/audio99.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Order any 2 software pieces listed and 
take 10% off their listed price. All Radio 
Shack software 10% off list. Send for 
complete list. 






P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 



26 




52 





116 




Cover illustration copyright © 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



r *to The cassette tape/disk symbols 
U^jf beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's rainbow on 
tape and rainbow on DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on TAPE. For details, check the 

RAINBOW O N TAPE and RAINBOW O N DISK 

ads on pages 110 and 168. 



FEATURES 

Enter the Fifth Dimension/ftoberf E. Laun 

TUTORIAL Five-dimensional arrays explained for all 

Tracking the Tempest//-/. G. Williamson, M.D 

WEATHER A perfect way to predict hurricane landfall 

qJJ Banishing Freezer Burn Blues/Robert Giffard 

HOME HELP No more mystery meat surprises 

The Well-behaved Yard Sale/£r/c White 

HOME HELP Great for inventory control; prints price tags, too 

Explosive Word Fun/Kent Baumgardt 



GAME Better guess fast because the fuse is lit 

Disabling the Color Burst Signal/floberf Gault 

COCO 3 UTILITY Eliminate distortion on the screen 

A How-to Guide/Edward Samuels 

COPYRIGHT LAW Practical information on protecting your work 
It All Adds Up/Bill Carrigan 



HOME HELP An easy-to-use CoCo calculator 

Down the Bunny Trail/Laura and Chris Petit 

GAME A fun drill of pattern discrimination 

Battlin' Blue Bert/James A. Noble . 

GAME Woe be unto those he captures 

Saucer, Saucer/ John T. Wells 

GAME The more you play, the trickier it gets 

The Tournament Master/ Richard Stein bruck 

ORGANIZATION Round robin tracking made easy 

^ The Write Stuff/B/7/ Cook 

COCO 3 UTILITY A simple word processor for the new CoCo 

(•^ Cipher Fun/John Collicot 

EDUCATION Positive rewards reinforce early math skills 

Counting With Caesar/Thomas Hood 

EDUCATION Refresh your Roman numeral skills 

Plottin' and PlanninVB/7/ Reed 

ORGANIZATION Spreadsheets have never been so simple 

NOVICES NICHE^| 

Graphics Trio. 



Randy Cassel 
Grocery 



Donald Large 

Who's On First 

John Fugh 

Recipe Printer 

Keith March 



66 



68 



70 



72 



Auto Economy 

J.E. Borger 

CoCo Yields The Floor 

Burt Gonce, Jr. 

Checks And Balances _ 

John Musumeci 



20 



26 



37 



52 



59 



64 



82 



90 



99 



105 



116 



120 



156 



166 



172 



174 



73 



74 



75 



NEXT MONTH: Screen dumps, graphics, dot matrix, cpi, near letter- 
quality, parallel, serial .... If these things set your mind a-whirl, then 
check out our May Printer issue. We uncover the mysteries of that 
indispensable peripheral and highlight its many capabilities. And, as 
usual, May's issue will be packed full of useful and interesting 
programs, utilities, games, reviews and much more! 

Discover the power of the printed word — discover the rainbow, 
the best information source for your Color Computer 1, 2 and 3! 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Joseph Kolar 

Exploring Co Co graphics 



Building April's Rainbow/Jo Anna Arnott 

Associate Editor's comments 



CoCo Consultations/Marfy Goodman 
Just what the Dr. ordered 



Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 

Checking into Conference and Goodman's database report 

Doctor ASCW/Richard E. Esposito 

The question fixer 

Education Notes/Sfeve Blyn 

Teaching line graphs 

Education Overview/M/c/7ae/ Plog, Ph.D 

Studies in learning transfer 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/Tony DiStefano 

Transistor buffers 

Wishing Well/Fred 8. Scerbo 



Co Co conquers the metric system 

RAINBOWTECH 



[±J Bits and Bytes of BAS\C/Richard White 

Making the most of Co Co 3 features 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 
KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 



Back to the beginning 

Memory Management/Pefer Dibble 

Understanding OS-9's memory system 

"Barden's Buffer " will return next month, 

DEPARTMENTS 



Advertisers Index 

Back Issue Information 

Clubs, Clubs, Clubs 

CoCo Cat 



CoCo Gallery 
Corrections _ 



Letters to Rainbow 
One-Liner Contest 
Information 



208 
137 
149 
140 

_18 
128 

_6 



The Pipeline 

Rainbow Info 

Received & Certified 
Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



Subscription Info 
These Fine Stores 



155 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

Product Review Contents. 



112 



16 



186 



94 



161 



46 



86 



12 



88 



76 



194 



189 



197 



192 



127 
_14 
130 
183 



_24 
_36 
206 



_129 




April 1987 



Vol. VI No. 9 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Copy Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Editorial Assistants Sandra Blackthorn, 
Wendy Falk, 

Angela Kapfhammer, Julie Tallent, 

Monica Wheat 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Technical Consultant Dan Downard 
Editorial Consultants Ed Ellers, 

Belinda C. Kirby, Joe Pierce 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 
Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Sandra Underwood, Denise Webb 

Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 
Typesetting Services Jill Hopkins 
Suzanne Benish Kurowsky, Karen Semones 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 



Editorial Director James E. Reed 

Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 

Creative Director Heidi Maxedon 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Customer Service Mgr. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Pam Workhoven 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
President Cindy J. Shackleford 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 208 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, R AINSOWtest and therainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color BASIC, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
the rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/1 2ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 




ERS TO THE 





ome New Trie 





om t 





inb ow Trainer 



Editor: 

I think rainbow can teach an old dog new 
tricks. I'll be 73 this year and purchased a 
computer after I retired. I'm too old to learn 
programming but the information in rain- 
bow shows me how to come up with a 
program I would like to write. 

In the December 1986 issue [Page 62], 
Iiene Fortin's program showed me how to 
make a card. In the December 1985 issue, 
Chuck Hawley [Page 7] wrote a screen dump 
program in his "Letter to the Editor." Put 
them together with graphics drawn in Old 
English and I think you can have a cute 
program for any type of card you wish to 
make. I save my programs on tape and add 
a new name when necessary. 

Retired people seem to be afraid to try 

playing with a computer. It's a whole new 

world and is a great help for keeping the 

mind alert. . „ . . . 

Charles F. Muisener 

Newington, CT 



It AM Crashes 



Editor: 

I'm interested in hearing from anyone 
who was able to get the program CON- 
VERT.64K by Jorge Mir in the October 
1983 issue [Page 317] to work. I have a CoCo 
2 ECB that I upgraded to 64K. Everything 
works fine after I run the program until \ try 
to make an entry, then all crashes. If you can 
help me, please write. 

Jo Ann Kara/fa 
220 Card A venue 
3rd Floor 
Wilmerding, PA 15148 



New Kid on the Block 

Editor: 

The January 1987 columns from Lonnie 
Falk and Jim Reed were excellent. When 
something decidedly better comes along 
(like the CoCo 3) I also want it. Retiring the 
old gray CoCo will be difficult, but I'll soon 
be doing it. 



Jim's article on meeting the CoCo 3 
challenge was also very good, but I have a 
few reservations about the enthusiasm of a 
few of your advertisers. My hat is off to 
advertisers like J&M Systems LTD, Spec- 
trum Projects and others for ads that address 
the CoCo 3. There's a new kid on the block 
out there called CoCo 3 — it's time for the 
ads to reflect which model computer their 
product is for and discuss compatibility. I'm 
sure that there are a Jot of hackers out there 
who will be joining the challenge to solve 
some of these third party incompatibility 
problems. In the meantime, advertisers 
should update their adsso potential custom- 
ers are given more answers than questions. 

Roger Rosenquist 
Southborough, MA 01772 



such as local BBSs or national 
information networks, also pro- 
vide avenues for review of these 
programs. 



I 



Public Domain Reviews 

Editor: 

I have been a reader and fan of rainbow 
for four years. It has been indispensable for 
me. 

Why don't you have any reviews of publ 
domain software in rainbow? This wou 
be of great value to your readers and to 
Delphi/CoCo members. 

Chuck Silver 
Portland, ME 

Two reasons: First, we feel that 
the primary purpose of our reviews 
should be to help you make a 
decision on what programs you 
wish to purchase, in order to get 
the most for your investment . 
Second, any truly public domain 
programs are public property and 
subject to modification and alter- 
ation such that no standard, "offi- 
cial" version really exists for re- 
view purposes; we might review 
one version only for you to acquire 
a different version, since anyone 
can change these programs with- 
out regard to the original author's 
wishes. 

Our observation is that sources 
offering public domain programs, 



HINTS AND TIPS 



Editor: 

Here is a tip for people who have a CoCo 
3 and would like to use basic programs that 
were written for the CoCo 1 or 2, Just insert 
WIDTH 32 as a command at the beginning 
of the program and resave it. They should 
then work no matter which text screen you 
run them from. 

Does anyone know how to change the 
default baud rate of the CoCo 3 printer port 
to 2400? Any help will be greatly appre- 
ciated. , T 

A nay Leary 

19 Oak Drive 
N. Stonington, CT 06359 

Try POKE 150 , IB. For more de- 
tails, see the Hint on Page 24 of this 
issue. 

Border Blackout 

Editor: 

Here's a way to black out the border on 
VIP Writer's Hi- Res screen. I know it's 
something everyone has wanted to do and 
it's possible on the CoCo 3. Save the follow- 
ing programs to your VIP Writer disk: 

10 'DOS.BAS 
20 

40 POKE 359 ,57: POKE 65314,60 
70 POKE &HE033,PEEK(&HE033] OR 
&H10 

90 PRINT"Nou RUN program W" 

10 'W.BAS 
20- PALETTE 9,0 
30 PALETTE 8,63 
40 PALETTE 11,63 
50 PALETTE 10,0 
60 LOADIT'WRITER 

Now type RUN"D0S; it will prompt you to 
type RUN"W. Last, type C from the command 
mode and you can feast your eyes on the way 



6 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




UTOTER^ 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

va/ori o ^ 

SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 



NOW HI-RES 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 
XMODEM for machine language 
files, 128 ASCII characters, 1200 
baud, etc. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Handles files larger 
than memory. Print on line with J&M 
or RS232 Pak. Screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, 64. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! _ 4f . 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 

DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 
MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sieep or play, No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



an inverse screen is supposed to look. Note: 
don't combine the programs into one pro- 
gram; for some reason it will not work. 

Doug Thorsvik 
Biloxi, MS 



A Grab Bag of Help 

Editor: 

The program Lovecard on Page 36, Feb- 
ruary I987 issue, will work on the CoCo 3 
by changing lines I00 and 220 to EXEC 
44539. 

A friend has shown me how to boot OS- 
9 Version 0L0I.00 on the CoCo 3. Run the 
Bootprogram, theninsert an OS-9 disk such 
as Rocky s Boot and press a key. When it 
loads, remove it, insert your OS-9 disk and 
press reset. OS-9 comes up ready for use. 

VIP Database works on the CoCo 3 under 
JDOS. You can use JDOS on the CoCo 3 
by the following procedure. Switch the 
system on. The JDOS logo or garbage will 
come on according to your version. Press the 
break key twice, the Auxiliary Selection 
Menu will come up, Press 9. This was meant 
to load the Memory Minder disk drive 
analysis program into RAM but it loads the 
ROM into RAM and you are ready to 
operate in JDOS. JDOS does not recognize 
the new commands for the CoCo 3, 

1 hope these hints will help someone. I 
enjoy the rainbow and would like some 
truly beginner instruction programs on OS- 
9 such as how to get a program up and 

rUnnmg ' Ernest D. Wilkes 

Macon, GA 



Easy Access 

Editor: 

As a RAINBOW subscriber since June 1984, 
1 have about 33 issues of this great magazine 
on file. To save time finding small articles, 
hints, reviews, questions and answers or 
one-liners that are not listed in the Table of 
Contents, 1 use a self-stick address mailing 
label which attaches to the front cover where 
it doesn't cover any printing or graphics. 
This can be used to list the desired article, 
a small description and the page number of 
articles that are of special interest to me. K 
saves me time and frustration in locating 
things I know I read in back issues. 

Joe Perevosnik 
Parma, OH 



COCO 3 

Editor: 

If a CoCo-PC card can be made for IBM 
compatibles (I'm referring to Compusense's 
advertisement in the January 1987 issue, 
Page 95), then it's only fair that they also 
make a ROM pack card to plug in the 
MultiPak so that the CoCo can run IBM 
compatible software. 

How about it? The CoCo 3 has the same 
high resolution and memory capabilities as 
the IBM so let's have some hardware and 
software that will let us emulate IBM. Also, 
whatever happened to the CP/M ROMPak 
that used to be advertised for the CoCo? 

The CoCo's no kid any more. Let's see 
some FORTRAN, COBOL, Modula-2, Ada 
and Prolog software. Also, let's have some 
Apple, Commodore and Atari emulators. 



Turn about is fair play. They've had their 
fun at our expense long enough, it's our turn 
now. Let's show them what the CoCo can 

really do. Donald R. Adams 

Kokomo, IN 

A Vote of Confidence 

Editor: 

As I sit here at my CoCo 3 using VIP 
Writer, I'm amazed at all the negative 
comments about Tandy's latest offering. I 
own a CoCo I , which was upgraded to 64K, 
and a 64 K. CoCo 2; the worst thing 1 can say 
about the CoCo 3 is that it will take some 
getting used to. 

I have the old gray drives and multipack, 
and using the information in the January 
RAINBOW I changed the PAL chip. Now the 
disks work perfectly and the whole VIP 
Library stems to run as it's meant to. At least 
I have yet to find any bugs. As for more keys, 
I have four just sitting here that Tandy 
forgot to mention in their manual, and the 
old CoCos had all the keys I could keep up 
with. 1 wouldn't be surprised if Tandy made 
the extra alphanumeric characters available 
from the keyboard in the near future. It 
would be nice if they would drop you a line 
and explain what to do with the alt and 
CTRL keys. 

So far I've found that the SHIFT-ALT 
combination will repeat the last function 
used in VIP Writer, 

Richard M. Johnson 
Clifton CO 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

Does anyone know of a program to keep 
track of a stock portfolio that would work 
on my 64K CoCo 2 with cassette? 

John G. Wood 
8 White Birch Court 
Schenectady, NY 12306 

Check out ''See How Your Stocks 
Stack Up" in the March 1987 issue. 
Also, our March 1984, '85, } 86 
'87 Business/ finance issues all 
have related programs, including 
"Stock index " (March 1985, Page 
170), 

The CoCo Landlord 

Editor: 

I would like to know if you have any tapes 

relating to rental properly, I am interested 

in being able to keep a ledger and journal 

on rental property plus spreadsheets, etc, 1 

have a 64K CoCo. _ , _ _ 

Barbara E, radis 

2678 Floribunda Drive 

Columbus, OH 43209 

You need "Landlord's Helper/' 
which appeared on Page 106 in our 
March 1985 issue. 

Parlez-vous CoCo? 

Editor: 

I am looking for some foreign language 
software, particularly Spanish or French. 
Can you tell me if there is anything available, 
and who I should write t« for more infor- 
mation. 

Dorothy M. Conmff 
1614 N, Hermitage Road 
Ft. Myers, FL 33907 

See Dor set i Educational Systems 
Introductory Spanish Courses 
review on Page 146 of this issue. 

Looking for a Hitchhiker 

Editor: 

Is there a version of Hitchhikers Guide to 
the Galaxy available for a 64K cassette 
based system? 1 am looking for a golf game 
similar to the one that is currently in the 
arcades with real time action and a version 
of Leader Board that is for the same system. 
Leader Board does exist for the Commo- 
dore. Also, any information or help on 
where t« find a screen-dump for an Okidata 
Microline 92? Responses would be greatly 
appreciated. 

Frank A. Mazotti, III 
107 Clearview Drive 
N. Syracuse, NY 13212 

CoCo Kegier 

Editor: 

1 have a 64K CoCo 2 with a cassette 

recorder and a printer. I am looking for a 

company that sells a bowling game. Does 

anyone know of one? , „ 

Andy Rostar 

308 Prince Road 

Greenville \ NC 27858 



BOUQUETS 

Editor: 

I would like to express my appreciation 
and satisfaction for the outstanding service 
and speed from Canyon County Devices. 1 
found theiradvertisementin your December 
1986 issue after a long search through 
several other sources to find colored ribbons 
for my SG-IO printer. Outstanding service, 
quality products, who could ask for more? 

John S. Taylor 
Wausau, Wl 



A+ for Promptness 

Editor: 

Cray Augsburg's hardware review [Oc- 
lober 1986, Page 148] of the Seikosha SP~ 
I000A printer [furnished to rainbow by 
Cinsoft, Inc.] convinced me, f ordered the 
1 000 A from Metric Industries, Inc., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio on Tuesday. The printer was at 
my front door on Friday. Subsequently, on 
a Wednesday, I ordered several extra rib- 
bons for the printer; the ribbons arrived on 
Monday. Hurrah! for this company. It's nice 
to know that there are still some people like 
Metric around who provide good customer 
service. 

Milton W. Kurtz 
Baltimore, MD 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

I just want to compliment the author of 
A UTOTERM, The program does much more 
than advertised, it is much better than 1 
expected. 

Curtis E. Barmes 
Ladd, IL 

Found Pot-of-Gold 

Editor: 

I bought a new CoCo last year and have 
since added a CCR-82 cassette recorder and 
a DMP-130 printer. 1 discovered rainbow 
last November and have been fortunate 
enough to locate some back copies. I have 
enjoyed typing in the programs and partic- 
ularly the games which my grandchildren 
and I enjoy playing. I want to compliment 
you on your program format. It's easy on the 
eyes. I read Eugene Vasconi's excellent 
article on the "Bug Zone" in the January 
1987 issue [Page 58] and I want to tell you 
I've been there. I appreciate your recogni- 
tion that there are beginners out here. I have 
found a wealth of information in your 
"Rainbow Tech" and "Letters to Rainbow" 
departments. From a retiree of 10 years and 
a senior citizen pushing 70 — keep up the 

good work! ~, „ D . ,. 

° Chester E. Bidigare 

Mt. Clemens, Ml 
The Boctor Was Right 

Editor: 

I was glad to see Dr. Marty Goodman's 
comment on the Multi-Pak interface in 
September 1986 [Page 178] "CoCo Consul- 
tations." I bought CoCo Max 11 in January 



along with a Y box. I had lots of trouble with 
it and tended to blame it on CoCo Max. On 
the strength of Marty's comment in rain- 
bow, I sent for a Multi-Pak interface from 
one of your advertisers. It made a tremen- 
dous difference, worked perfectly and so did 
CoCo Max. I had never before read any- 
thing that so much as suggested that Y cables 
and Y boxes were not in every way as good 
and effective as the Multi-Pak interface, 
although I have only been a regular reader 
of RAINBOW since November 1984 and could 
easily have missed a comment in some 

earlier issue. ~ ~ . 

Dave Otis 

Montpelier, VT 
It's a Pleasure 

Editor: 

It is a pleasure for me to read the Kudos 
letters. The writers praise the prompt atten- 
tion given them by your many advertisers. 
My letter is different. I am praising the 
responsibility and the prompt attention 
given to me by the world's greatest Color 
Computer magazine — rainbow, 

I receive my copy of next month's issue 
of the rainbow by the middle of each 
month. My December issue never arrived, f 
waited patiently till the first week of De- 
cember at which time I wrote to Falsoft. 
Shortly thereafter my doorbell rang. Upon 
opening the door, there stood a man from 
United Parcel Service who handed me my 

precious December issue. „ , x . 

Bob Nevin 

Bay side, NY 



PEN PALS 



• I'm I 6 years old and interested in hearing 
from fellow game nuts, I have a CoCo I and 
2, disk drive, cassette recorder, Prowriter 
8510 printer and lots of games. I am also 
interested in music programs. 

Daniel Bouges 
26 Park Place 
Niantic f CT 06357 

• I am 16 years old and looking for a pen 
pal. I have a 64K CoCo I, cassette player, 
printer, modem, and lots of games and 
utilities. I am also looking for a screen dump 
program for the DMP- 105. 

Chuck A Id rich 
P. O. Box 225 
Magnolia, DE 19962 

• Any Color Computer I, 2 or 3 users 

interested in joining a program/ pen pal 

club? For more information, call me at (8 1 3) 

530-5349 or write me. ~. c , 

Dino Sanchez 

2070 62nd Street M 

Apt. 1503 

Clearwater, FL 33520 

• I have a CoCo 2 with one disk drive, 
modem, printer and tape. I am 1 6 years old 
and love all kinds of Adventure games. 

Peter J. Hernandez, Jr. 
237 N.E. 110 Terrace 
Miami, FL 33161 



8 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



500 

POKEs # 

PEEKS, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you 'GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs tc: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Baslc/ECB/Dlsk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USING. DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD. 
MERGE, RENAME, DSKINI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (Tor 
64K only). 

Speed Up your programs. 

Reset, MOTOR ON/OFF from 
keyboard. 

Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW. 

Set 23 different 
GRAPH IC/SEMIGRAPHIC modes 
Merge two Basic programs. 

AND MUCH MUCH MOREIM 
COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1 . 2. Sf 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 



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★ 



00* 



""$9.95 



ft! 





200 additional Pokes, Peeks 'n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER. 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/ double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®. Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (tor DMP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• ANO MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES. PEEKS ' N EXECS is a prerequisite 

DISK TUTORIAL 

(2- Disk Package) 

An indispensable tutorial for serious disk 
Basic/ ML programmers. Gives almost 
everything you MUST know about the disk 
system Some features: 

• Learn about track/sectors/granules 

• How the Directory is organized 

• Useful disk utilities 

• Useful ROM routines 

• How to use double sided/40/80 track drives 

• Information security on disk 

• Insight into common disk errors 

• Many Tips/ Hints/ Secrets you won't find 
elsewhere! 

• And Much Much More! 

CoCol, 2 & 3 ONLY $36.95 

RUN COCO MAX II 
On CoCo III 

The kit contains software & replacement 
PAL chip for 26-3024 Multipack interface. 

only $29.95 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures. Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III 0RTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER, compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JD0S. 
Supports the following printers: EPSON 
RX/FX, GEMINI 10X/SG-10, NX-10, 
C-ltoh 8510, DMP-100/1 05/400/430, 
SEIK0SHAGP-100/250, LEGEND 808 
and GORILLA BANANA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1 

This disk includes OVER 100 pre-drawn 
pictures for use with the CoCo Graphics 
Designer. 

DISK ONLY $14.95 



512K UPGRADE 

Fo CoCo III. Easy Installation. 

ONLY$99.95 
Upgrade W/0 Chips- $44.95 

512K RAM DISK 

Have two super-fast in-memory disk drives. 
Requires 51 2 K CoCo III. 

ONLY $24.95 



COCO DISKZAPPER 




Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk. Its indespensable! 

Requires minimum 32 K/64 K disk system 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $24.95 



VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
CANADA, other countries $5.00). COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited, i~ 



! 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1 -800-654-52449 am- 9 pm est i days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information, NY orders & after- hours 1-71 6-223-1 477 



• I would like to get in touch with other 
CoCo users around Tampa. Call (813) 920- 

Andy Ellinor 
Tampa, FL 

• I would like to know if there are any 
CoCo users in Montgomery County who 
would like to have a pen pal. I have a CoCo 
1 with 16K ECB and tapes. I am about to 
get a CoCo 2 with 64K. I am 14 and go to 
Sherwood High School. 

Michael DiGiovanni 
4008 Clover Hill Terrace 
Olney, MD 20832 

• I own a 64K ECB CoCo with 1 disk drive 
and a cassette player, and I would like to 
have a pen pal. QHp 

BoxX 
Palmer Hill Road 
Au Sable Forks, NY 12912 

• I live in Kaiserslautern, Germany, and 
want to meet other CoCo enthusiasts who 
live around the world. Please write. I have 
a few interesting OS-9 files that I have 
written (along with a Dragon translator). 

Chris Ah rend t 
Psc Box 997 
APO, NY 09130 

• I have just arrived in Germany and I am 
looking for other CoCo nuts that are in the 
service. I am at Herzogenaurack near 
Nuernberg. I have a 64K CoCo 2, two disk 
drives, printer, Multi-Pak and cassette. 

SFC Edward MacKay 
HHB 2 1 0th FA Bde 
APO, NY 09352 

• It's sad to be alone; all of my friends have 
either Commodores or IBM clones. Any of 
you CoCo nuts who are interested in sharing 
public domain software (especially Adven- 
tures) or who live in the Fayetteville area, 

please write me. ~ x/ 

r Drew Norris 

Rt. 3, Box 424- C 

Fayetteville, NC 28306 

• I'm 13 years old, have a CoCo 3 and I'm 



looking for pen pals. 



David Little 
208 W. Garden Street 
Landis, NC 28088 



• I am 15 years old and have a 64 K ECB 

CoCo, FD-501 disk drive, DMP-105 printer 

and a CCR-82 tape system and want to 

correspond with all you CoCo nuts out 

there. i s~* * • 

Chris Curtis 

Route 7 

Walling, TN 38587 

• I would like to have some pen pals. I own 
a CoCo 3 and I'm interested in hearing from 
other people with the new computer. 

Dave Bell 
161 ''A South 300 East 
Smithfield, UT 84335 

• I will answer all letters that are sent to me. 
I am 151/2 years old. I have a 64K CoCo 2, 
cassette recorder, printer and over 200 
games on tape. I also love good Adventures. 



By the way, have you hugged your CoCo 

today! ^ „ . 

J Tony Fortino 

6805 S. 'G' Street 

Tacoma, WA 98408 

• I am looking for pen pals that are inter- 
ested in any Adventures and all forms of 

heavy metal. ^ . 

Jim Doyle, Jr. 

P.O. Box 9 

Barrackville, WV 26559 

• I am 27 years old and would enjoy ex- 
changing letters with a computer pen pal. I 
have a 128K CoCo 3, RGB monitor, disk 
drive, cassette recorder, printer and modem. 
Because your outstanding magazine has 
been so helpful to my understanding of the 
CoCo, I would like to pass on the favor by 
helping beginners who might be learning 
BASIC or assembly language programming. 

10 PRINT "THANKS" 

20 GOTO 10 r\ ' j w ii 

David Mills 

2236 Washington Avenue 

Huntington, WV 25704 

• Do you need help on your Adventure 

games? Maybe you need one last treasure or 

a key word to open a locked door. I have 

solutions to 57 out of 135 Adventure games. 

I need help too. Let's help each other. Please 

send an SASE. 0 . , 

B. Mart 

715 56th Street 

Vienna, WV 26105 

• Anybody wanting a CoCo pen pal, please 

write to me. I have a64K ECB CoCo I, disk 

drive, DMP-105 printer and a cassette 

recorder. x . A , 

Marc Andreessen 

Rt. 2, Box 103 W 

New Lisbon, WI 53950 

• I'd like to find a pen pal in Alberta who 
is below the age of 20, has 64K, one drive, 
DMP-105 printer and knows something 



about programming with EDTASM-*- (cart- 
ridge). The last isn't very important but I'm 
not too great at machine language program- 

mm ^' Douglas Cosh 

Box 456 
Olds, Alberta 
Canada TOM IPO 

• I would like to have some pen pals. I have 
a CoCo 2 and 3, disk drive, modem, printer 
and cassette. We could talk about the newest 



games, 



Jim Kung 
132-43 A venue N. W. 
Calgary, Alberta 
Canada T2K 0H6 



• I am 14 years old and looking for a girl 

pen pal who lives in the United States or 

Canada. I have a CoCo 2 and I'm hoping 

to get a disk drive soon. I'm interested in 

almost all subjects of life and I have a good 

sense of humor. yt TT , 

Marc Hodgson 

RR 1, 8th Line 

Georgetown, Ontario 

Canada L7G 4S4 



THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type Rfll to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



ARTS AND LETTERS 




mm 



Envelope of the Month 



Sage Radachowsky 
Bantam, CT 



10 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



UTILITIES/BOOKS 





UTILITY ROUTINES for the 
TANDY & TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

• COMMAND KEYS • CURSOR STYLES • ERROR SKIP 

• FULL LENGTH ERRORS* KEY CLICKER 

• REPEAT KEY* REVERSE VIDEO (Green & Red) 
SPOOLER • SUPER SCROLLER • TAPE-TO-DISK 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE III 

For 16K/32K/64 K Cassette or Disk Systems, 

CoCo1,2&3 BOOK $19.95 

ROUTINES ON CAS/DISK:$24.95 
BOTH BOOK AND CAS or DISK: $36.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES (Volume II) 

Includes 20 oft-used utilities such as 

• PAINT with 65000 styles 

• Add SUPERSCRIPTS to your DMP printer 

• Design your own commands! • Programming Clock 

• Fast Sort for Basic Strings • CoCo Calculator 

• Create a character set for your DMP printer 

• Find/ Replace phrases in your Basic Program 

• Let the computer locate your errorsl 

• Super EDITing Basic Programs 

• Automatic Directory Backup • And much much more! 

64 K DISK ONLY $29.95 

UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best-selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 

• Super Tape-to-Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 

• LList Enhancer • X-Ref for Basic Programs 

• Graphics Typesetter (two text sizes!] 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Dump • Basic Stepper 

• Hidden 32 K (Use the "hidden" 32 K from your 64 K CoCo) 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

• And much, much more I!! 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 

DISK (64 K Reg.) ONLY $29.95 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 

(Except those marked with *) 



MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLEO SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/EDB and DISK ROMs 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: S39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: S19.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: S49.95 
SUPER ECB(CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: S24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: S59.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 (Book): S1B.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 (2 Disks): S29.0D 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS: Tips and tricks for Basic 
Programmers Only SI 4.95 
CoCo 3 SECRETS REVEALED: S16.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: $1 6.00 





SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1-3 passes) 

• Tape-to-Disk Copy 

• Tape-to-Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• Tape-to-Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files. 
CoCo 1 f 2 & 3 32 K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY 

$24.95 



CABLES/HARDWARE 

AVATEX MODEM: Hayes compatible 

300/1200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ Answer/RediaL 

ONLYS1Z9.95 

MODEM CABLE: $19.95 

DS-B9B DIGISECTOR: Microworks Digitizer 

for CoCo 1, 2 & 3. Includes software. 

ONLYS149.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
ONLYS19.95 

15 PRINTER/MODEM EXTENDER CABLE: 

ONLYS16.95 

DNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: Use your 
monochrome or color monitor with your 
CoCo (ALL CoCos). Includes audio 
connection. Easy installation- no 
soldering ONLY $29.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 
Lowest Price Anywhere- $137.95. 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95. 

3-P0SITI0N SWITCHER: 

Select any one of three RS232 devices 
(printers/modems) from the serial port 
ONLY$37.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc. ONLY $24.95 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600). 
Comes with all cables. $39.95 



© 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewriter-64 (Cas)S47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 

19.95 
29.95 
29.95 
67.95 
77.95 
18.95 
29.95 
39.95 
22.95 



Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64 
Telepatch III 
Telepatch II* 
CoCo Max(Cas)* 
CoCo Max II (Dsk)" 
CoCo Max Upgrade (Dsk)* 
Autoterm Terminal Prog(Cas) 
(Latest Version) (Dsk) 
Graphicom II 
SPIT'N IMAGE: Makes a mirror image 
(BACKUP) of ANY disk even protected ones. 
Will also initialize and BACKUP in one pass 
ONLY $32.95 

COCO UTIL II (Latest Version): Transfer CoCo 

Disk files to IBM compatible computer. 

Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 

CoCo 1,28,3 ONLY $36.95 

EARS: Speech recognition system. 

ONLYS99.95 

SUPER VOICE: Speech synthesizer. 
ONLY $79.95 

LYRA: Best music composition program. 
ONLY $54.95 

SYMPHONY 12: A real hardware music 
synthesizer. ONLY $69.95 
ADOS: Advanced disk operating system. 
ONLY $27.95 

DISK ANTI- PIRATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs 
CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 ONLY $59.95 

COLOR SCRIRE III: The Coco3 Word- 
Processor 

ONLY $49.95 

GAMES (DISK ONLY) 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION H6 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $28.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLOS OF FLIGHT. $34 95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE To orden A " ordersS50 & above shipped by2nd day Air UPS with no extra charge. Last minute shoppers 

P.O. Box 214 can benefit VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling 

Fairport, N.Y. 14450 (USA& CANADA, othercountries$5.00) C0Dadd$2.50 extra NYS residents please add 

Phone (71 6) 223-1477 Sales Tax Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 



MoitwCottl 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM -9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information, NY orders & after-hours 1 -71 6-223-1477 



A Few Bad Apples 
Can Spoil Community Spirit 



"W" a has been quite a while since 1 have written on this particular subject, but 
I T a couple of things have happened in the past few weeks, so I suppose it 
^is indeed time to talk about it again. 

Recently, I got a letter from a young woman who had previously written to 
us asking that her name be included in our "Pen Pal" section. She thanked us 
for doing so because she had met a number of interesting people but was 
concerned about some of the letters she had received. 

"Several of them," she wrote, "were pretty much nothing more than offers to 
swap software. One of the people even had a mimeographed list of software he 
had and was willing to swap for software he didn't have. He sure had a lot of 
stuff. Most of it was stuff that I see for sale. He even had stuff from THE RAINBOW 
on the list. I thought you couldn't swap this kind of stuff. Is that right? Or can 
you?" 

Just the other day, Jim Reed walked into my office to report a "little research 
project." It seems that several people had called BBSs in their towns one was 
operated by a CoCo Club — only to find that there was a great deal of commercial 
software available on two of them. 

Jim called the operators of the boards. One said he didn't know he could not 
give away commercial software. The other flatly told Jim he was "legally right" 
to do so. 

"Why?" asked Jim. "There's a copyright clearly visible on it." 

"Well,"the person replied, "I know it's OK, because I got them off another BBS, 
so they are obviously public domain or they wouldn't be on there! I mean, why 
would it be on a BBS if you can't make copies?" 

To both the young lady and the Club BBS SysOp, the answer is the same: NO! 

All this puts me in something of a quandary. I say this because through the 
years one of the consistent themes of THE RAINBOW has been against software 
piracy. Jim believes piracy is rampant, and I know others who agree with him. 

And what is piracy? Piracy is simply giving or selling copies of software you 
yourself have not written or do not hold the rights to — unless that software is 
expressly placed in the public domain by the author who did write it. 

By the way, public domain and copyright are mutually exclusive. Material is 
either one or the other; it cannot be both. You cannot place something in the public 
domain and still retain the copyright — contrary to whatever you may have heard. 

Piracy is also accepting or buying software unless it is given or sold to you by 
the person who wrote the program, unless you have legally obtained a license to 
distribute it, or unless the program has been specifically placed in the public 
domain. 

Any piece of software that has a copyright on it cannot be copied and then given 
or sold in any way to anyone else. Period. No, not even if you typed it in! All 



Metric Industries 



commercial programs are generally copy- 
right — those you see for sale, those in this 
magazine, and most of those that appear on 
services such as Delphi and CompuServe. 
You can use the program yourself^ but the 
right to make copies (the copyright) does not 
transfer to you! The key to whether these 
programs can be copied is usually whether 
or not there is a notice of copyright with 
them. That notice can be made through 
printing in a magazine, on a disk label, in 
documentation, within the program itself or 
in a variety of other ways. 

If you seJ I, buy, give or receive a copyright 
program, you are in violation of laws — in 
this country and internationally, as well. 
Here in the United States, there are very, 
very stiff penalties for violation of those 
laws. 

So don't violate them. Don't make copies 
of programs and give or sell them to some- 
one else. Don't buy or accept copies, either. 

There is the legal aspect, of course. But, 
in addition, there is another aspect. And it 
is just as important as the legal one: If you 
make copies of programs, you deprive those 
who hold the copyright of income — income 
that can be used to pay for the next program. 
Whether we are talking about someone who 
has written one program or THE RAINBOW, 
which publishes 20 or more programs a 
month, the situation is the same. 

If someone writes a good program and 
doesn't make any money on it, then he or 
she probably won't write another. It is as 
simple as that. Who will be deprived the use 
of that program? 

You will, of course. 

As I said, there are those who feel piracy 
is rampant in the CoCo Community. There 
is a faction who also believes that our listing 
of Clubs, BBSs and Pen Pals is not much 
more than a way for pirates to get together. 
They would like for us to end such listings 
in THE RAINBOW. 

I don't happen to think so, but I am aware 
this activity exists. It is morally wrong. It is 
illegal. But it does exist. I just hope we don't 
have to "do something about it." 

We list Clubs, BBSs and Pen Pals to bring 
the CoCo Community together. I would 
hate for us to stop. However, if such listings 
ultimately harm the CoCo Community 
more than they help, then stop we will. 

I would appreciate being notified by you 
if you know of a Club, a BBS or a Pen Pal 
illegally trafficking in software. I intend to 
ban mention of that Club, BBS or Pen Pal 
from our pages. What 1 am suggesting is we 
all clean up our own act and not allow a few 
bad apples to spoil things for our entire 
Community. 

This is an important issue. 1 know I can 
count on the CoCo Community to do the 
right thing. 

— Lonnie Falk 



Model 101 Interface $39.95 



The Model 101 is a serial to 
parallel interface intended for use 
with a COCO and any Centronics 
compatible parallel input printer. 
The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
baud rates (300-9600). The 101 
is only 4" x2" x 1" and comes 



with all cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer. 



The Model 104 Deluxe Interface $51.95 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
of a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch) 
This feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 



etc.) to your computer. You may 
then select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 
and comes with all cables and 
connectors lor your computer. You 
supply the serial cable for your 
modem or other serial device 



Model 102 Switcher $35.95 



The Model 102 has 3 switch 
positions that allow you to 
switch your computer's serial 
output between 3 different 
devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has 
color coded lights that indicate 
the switch position. These 



lights also act as power 
indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with 
the 102 are color coded labels 
that can be applied to your 
accessories. The 102 has a heavy 
guage anodized aluminum cabinet 
with non-slip rubber feet. 




Cassette Label Package $15.95 



Organize Your Tapes, Label Your Save $8.40 when you purchase the you pay only $15.95. When 



Data Tapes, Color Code Your 
Tapes, Label Your Audio Tapes 




Cassette Label program and label 
package. You get the Cassette 
Label program, 100 WHITE labels, 
100 RED labels, 100 BLUE labels, 
100 YELLOW labels, and 100 TAN 
labels. A value worth $24.35, but 



ordering, specify the Cassette Label 
PACKAGE 



Cassette Label Program $6.95 



New Version 1.2-Tape transfera- 
ble to disk. Now save and 
load Labels from tape or disk. 

This fancy printing utility prints 
5 lines of Information on 
pinfeed cassette labels. "Cas- 
sette Label" is menu driven and 
is very easy to use. It uses the 
special features of your 
printer for standard, expanded 
or condensed characters. Each 
line of text is automatically 
centered. Before the label 
is printed, it is shown on your 



THE 101, AND 104 
REQUIRE POWER IN ORDER TO 
OPERATE. MOST PRINTERS 
CAN SUPPLY POWER TO YOUR 
INTERFACE. STAR, RADIO 
SHACK, AND OKI DATA ARE JUST 
A FEW THAT DO. EPSON DOES 
NOT. THE INTERFACES CAN 
ALSO BE POWERED BY AN AC 
ADAPTER (RADIO SHACK MODEL 
273-1431 PLUGS INTO ALL 
MODELS). IF YOU REQUIRE A 
POWER SUPPLY, ADD A "P" TO 
THE MODEL NUMBER AND $5.00 
TO THE PRICE. (MODEL 1 01 P 
$44.95. MODEL 104P $56.95) 



CRT — enabling you to 
make changes if you like — 
then print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The 
program comes on tape and it 
is supplied with 24 labels to 
get you started. 16K ECB 
required. 

• «► 

CASB.ELT1>. L.«E»*i.l_ 



nn ■ 



Other Quality Items 

High Quality 5 Screw Shell C-10 
Cassette Tapes $7.50 per dozen 

Hard Plastic Storage Boxes for 
Cassette Tapes $2.50 per dozen 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00 per 100 
Colors $3.60 per 100 (Red, Blue, 
Yellow or Tan) 



• • • • 









I 



The Model 101, 102 and 104 
will work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory size 
These products are covered by 
a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel input 
printer including Gemini, Epson. 
Radio Shack, Okidata, C. loth and 
many others. They support 
BASIC print commands, word 
processors and graphic com- 
mands. 

We manufacture these products. 
Dealer inquiries are invited. 



To order call our 24 hour order 
line 513677-0796 and use 
your VISA MASTERCARD 
request C.O.D. or send check or 
money order to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Free shipping on orders over 
$50,00. Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. 

Orders under $50.00 please add 
$2.50 for shipping. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 13 





How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program 
listings in the rainbow are formatted for 
a 32-character screen — so they show 
up just as they do on your CoCo screen. 
One easy way to check on the accuracy 
of your typing is to compare what char- 
acter "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings 
come out the same — you have a pretty 
good way of knowing that your typing is 
accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But, do read the text before you start 
typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette 
symbols on the table of contents and at 
the beginning of articles indicate that 
the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISK Or RAINBOW ON TAPE 

service. An order form for these services 
is on the insert card bound in the mag- 
azine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was 
first given to the Tandy Color Computer 
by its many fans, users and owners. 

However, when we use the term 
CoCo, we refer to both the Tandy Color 
Computer and the TDP System-100 
Computer. (While many TDP-100s are 
still in service, the TDP Electronics 
division of Tandy no longer markets the 
CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
both of the "given" names throughout 

THE RAINBOW. 

In most cases, when a specific com- 
puter is mentioned, the application is for 
that specific computer. However, since 
the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer 
in a different case, these terms are 
almost always interchangeable. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



4T~ 



T 



The small box accompanying a pro- 
gram listing in the rainbow is a "check 
sum" system, which is designed to help 
you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the 
rainbow. On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given. When you 



reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in 
the program and save it for later use, 
then type in the command run and press 
enter. Once the program has run, type 
new and press enter to remove it from 
the area where the program you're typ- 
ing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the 
rainbow, whenever you press the down 
arrow key, your CoCo gives the check 
sum based on the length and content of 
the program in memory. This is to check 
against the numbers printed in the 
rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure you 
typed in the correct basic program code. 
For more details on this helpful utility, 
refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on Page 
21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
in the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=25G*PEEI<(35)+178 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X = 256*PEEI< ( 35] +178 

40 FOR Z = X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

60 POKE Z , Y : NEXT 

70 IFW=7585THEN80EL5EPRINT 

"DATA ERROR" : STOP 
B0 EXEC X : END 

90 DATA 182, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 125 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 12B 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



Using Machine Language 



Machine language programs are one 
of the features of the rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these pro- 
grams into memory so you can operate 
them. 

The easiest way is by using an editor/ 
assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor/assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into the CoCo and 
then have the editor/assembler assem- 
ble them into specific instructions that 
are understood by the 6809 chip, which 
controls your computer. 



When using an editor/assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the rainbow's 
listing into CoCo. 

Another method of getting an assem- 
bly language listing into CoCo is called 
"hand assembly." As the name implies, 
you do the assembly by hand. This can 
sometimes cause problems when you 
have to set up an ORIGIN or EQUfiTE 
statement. In short, you have to know 
something about assembly to hand- 
assemble some programs. 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand-assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS : " ; HEX$ ( I ) ; 

30 INPUT "8YTE";8$ 

40 POKE I , VAL ( "&H"+B$ ) 

50 1 = 1 + 1: GOTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K 
CoCo. If you have 32K, change the 
&H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 and change 
the value of I to &H7F80. 



The Rainbow Seal 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our 
way of helping you, the consumer. The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product that carries the Seal 
has actually been seen by us, that it 
does, indeed, exist and that we have a 
sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hard- 
ware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for fcertif ication. We 
ascertain that their products are, in 
actuality, what they purport to be and, 
upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction." The certification pro- 
cess is different from the review process. 
You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is 
right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the rainbow and 
the certification process. Certification is 
open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded 
to any commercial product, regardless 
of whether the firm advertises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of in- 
stances of violation of Seal use. 



14 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



PLUS-100 



THE PREMIER COCO 3 512K MEMORY UPGRADE 




1 00% 



1 00% 



1 00% 



1 00% 



Prime Factory Fresh 120 ns Chips 

No seconds or surplus chips 



*119 



oo 



plus $ 2 50 S/H 
CA Residents add Sales Tax 
C.O.D. add $ 2 00 



Gold Plated Connectors 

Eliminates Corrosion and Intermittent Performance with Age 

Tested 

All boards are assembled and flow soldered in an ultra high quality 
U.S. manufacturing facility producing thousands of computer boards 
per week. Each and every board is 100% visually inspected by Quality 
Control and then 100% tested in a COCO 3 Computer. 

Use of Zig zag Package Chips 

Smallest overall board size 
Shortest data paths 

Superior decoupling due to shortest distance between decoupling 
capacitors and power pins 

Cooler operation due to package orientation 

Easy to install — Solder less plug in card. 



* Price includes a $30.00 credit certificate toward the purchase of a DISKM ASTER Disk Drive System for 
the COCO 3. This System features 1 MB High Density, High Speed ( IBM- AT) Type Floppy Drives, A 
Hardware Disk Cache, A 20 MB Hard Disk, A Hardware Real-Time Clock with Battery Backup, A Parallel 
Port, 3 Serial Ports, up to 1.5 MB of Ram Disk and Highly Sophisticated Software in a Single Package with a 
Single Interconnection Cable. See this System, WHICH WILL SET THE STANDARD for COCO 3 Disk 
Drives, at the Chicago Rainbowfest in April 1987. 



1922 Cogswell Road, 

* ... . _ - ..^^x South El Monte, C A 91733 

HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS, INC. (818)575-4530 



MAC INKER" 

MAC INKER™, Automatic 
Ribbon Re-inker. Re-ink any fabric 
cartridge or spool for less than 5 
cents. Over 70,000 in the field and 

we support 
ALL printers. 
Universal 
Cartridge or 
Universal Spool 
MAC INKER 

$68.50. k ave cartridges 
re-inkable in 10 colors. Ask for your 
printer type or for complete listing. 
Bottle ink $3.00/each. shipping $3.00. 





PROTEUS™, the Siamese' Buffer. 
It is a Data Switch with buffer on 
both ports. Switch manually or via 
software. Saves time, space and 
money. Or ask 
about our MAC 
MASTER line 
of Universal 
Buffers and 
Printer Controllers (serial or parallel 
up to 1 MEG). 
PROTEUS 64 K-199.00 

256 K-299.00 Shipping $4.00 
Of course we have Data Switches, 
serial/parallel, 2 way, 4 way, crossed 
etc., at most competitive prices (all 
lines switched). 

CABLES priced $10-25. We carry 
cables for all common computers 
and peripherals. Rapid turn-around 
on custom orders. 



MERCURY MODEM. Really 100% 
Hayes* Compatible. 300/1200 baud, 
speaker, full status light display 
and 2 years warranty. Includes 

rtllfljH QUICK LINK, 

easiest and 
most reliable 
Comms Soft- 
ware (available 
for IBM PC or 
Macintosh) $149.00 Shipping $4.00. 

*Hayes is a trademark of Hayes Microproducts. 




MAC THE RIPPER. Our newest, original 
and welcome printer companion. Pulls off 
paper perforations and tears the sheets 
•apart. Takes little space and will pay for 
itself almost immediately in saved time and 
tedium. Ask for brochure. Introductory 
Price $299.00. Shipping $10.00. 



Order Toll Free. 

Call or write for free brochure. 

1-800-547-3303 

In Oregon 503-626-2291 (24 hour line) 
We are and always will be your 

Computer 



Friends 



® 



14250 N.W. Science Park Drive 
Portland, Oregon 97229 Telex 4949559 
Dealer inquiries welcome. 



BUI^IN^PRI^^^INBO W 

Heralding the arrival of spring . . . 

. . . and happy Jo Anna-versary 
— reflections on a year of Rainbow experience. 



Jim Reed has asked me to fill in for him while he's busy preparing for the 
Chicago RAINBOWfest. It's particularly appropriate that he picked this 
issue, our Home Help issue, because I am celebrating my one-year 
anniversary with Falsoft and THE RAINBOW. This gives me a chance to stand 
back and realize how much I've learned and come to depend on my C0C0 during 
my time here, first as copy editor and now as associate editor. 

One year ago, my knowledge of computers was limited to a programming 
course in college. But I have learned fast; I had to, just to be able to read the 
magazine! Even though I am in the thick of things here at "computer central," 
I am still amazed by my discoveries about our wonderful little machine. 

For the first month or two, I stuck to games and simple programs I could 
type in and play with. Then I discovered word processing. I had always been 
a staunch champion of the typewriter, but lately I notice my old Smith-Corona 
has accumulated a pretty thick layer of dust. So much for that! Next came 
spreadsheets, graphics and some simple animation. I couldn't wait to share my 
discoveries with my family, so I had to have a C0C0 at home, too. And it was 
the 1986 Home Help issue I used to show them how a computer is more than 
just a game machine. I like to think that with this year's issue, THE RAINBOW 
is going to help someone else discover the CoCo's charm and versatility. 

For that purpose, we have included programs to help around the house in 
many ways. Maintain a freezer food-rotation schedule, control inventory and 
print price tags for that spring yard sale, and find out how to convert your 
C0C0 into an easy-to-use calculator. For the little ones, be sure to check our 
offerings from John Collicot, Laura and Chris Petit, Thomas Hood, Fred 
Scerbo and Steve Blyn. Don't neglect your own education, either. We have 
tutorials, utilities, question-and-answer columns, and an enlightening article on 
copyright law. No matter whether you're an old-timer or the new kid on the 
block, I'm sure you'll enjoy our games and the program shorties in "Novices 
Niche." I could go on and on, but I'd use the whole magazine telling you what's 
in it! Suffice it to say, I think there's something here for everyone. 

This past year at Falsoft has been a fun one. I've had the opportunity to 
discover interesting ideas and authors, and to learn not only about computers, 
but also about a great group of people — the C0C0 Community. There is 
enthusiasm and excitement in the Community. It's full of sharing and a zest 
for learning that is impressive. We receive hundreds of letters each week from 
readers of all ages and backgrounds, from the wide-eyed 11-year-old wanting 
games for his new birthday present, to the electrical engineer with OS-9 
questions, to the 83-year-old grandmother with comments about her new hobby. 
I've witnessed the introduction of the Color Computer 3, and I'm glad to be 
a part of the team that's making the growing pains a little easier to bear. 

If it sometimes seems we're moving ahead too fast, take heart; I'm a beginner, 
too. I keep my eagle eye on the lookout for programs of interest to beginners 
— they're my special province. Thank you for making my first year in the C0C0 
Community so pleasant and educational. I enjoy your articles, programs and 
letters, and I look forward to hearing about the latest innovations and 
advancements right along with the rest of the Community. 

Don't miss out on the newest techniques and advances for the Color 
Computer. Ensure your place in the C0C0 world with a subscription to THE 
RAINBOW, the place where great C0C0 minds come together. And now we've 
made it even easier with a new order envelope. It will handle better in the mail 
than our old postcard, and it will keep your credit card number safe from prying 
eyes. Here's some real help for you, your home and your C0C0 — a RAINBOW 
subscription. Try it today! 

— Jo Anna Arnott 



16 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




HOW DO YOU 6IVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . . . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source forthe Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 

and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by April 
25 and we'll begin your friends' 
subscriptions with the June 
issue of RAINBOW. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



i 

I 

From: 

i 

Name 



.State 



ZIP 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 
J Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
l Acct. # Exp. date 

I Signature 



Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



CoCo Gallery 




Sugar House 



John Murvine, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania 



John illuminates the gallery again this month with the scene of a rustic old sugar 
house in New England. This graphic was created with basic on the CoCo 3. 



Honorable Mention 



A -A -A A. A J 2- «. 



• ir i i • 

1 I'YYYV* 



: A. A A A A 

•*• . 

mil ■■■iwi ^aii 




USA 



Mario Stueve 

Minnesota City, Minnesota 



We pay tribute to the U.S. with Mario's unique 
illustration, which was created with BASIC. 



r 



Honorable Mention 




World 



Chris Foster 

Texarkana, Texas 



On a more "global" note, we present this 3-D view of the 
world. Chris created this using BASIC and the CoCo 3. 



18 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 




Downtown Columbus 



William Savage 

Columbus, Ohio 



Graphicom and Graphicom II were used 
to create this remarkable depiction of 
downtown Columbus. William is retired 
from the telephone company and has had 
his CoCo for about four years. 




Still a newcomer to the CoCo, Wally used 
basic and the CoCo 3 to create this majestic 
representation of our national symbol. 



THE: mIIERJChH , EhGLE 



Eagle 



Wally Mayes 

Hamilton, Ohio 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your creations with the 
CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you 
used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of $15 and a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions may also be given. 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE R Al NBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember that this is a contest; therefore, 
your entry will not be returned. 

Angela Kapfhammer, Curator 

April 1987 THE RAINBOW 19 



Five-dimensional arrays hold no 
mysteries when you . . . 




By Robert E. Laun 



Bam able to visualize two- or three- 
Bdimensional objects. However, when 
I it comes to trying to visualize four or 
five dimensions my brain refuses to 
cooperate. When I was first learning 
about my CoCo I had a hard time 
understanding a single-dimension 
array, let alone one with two or more 
dimensions. Yet it is an important 
concept for storage and use of data in 
a computer's memory. 

I sometimes suspect there are quite a 
few computer programmers (including 
a few professional ones) who don't 
understand arrays. For example, in my 
daily job I have occasion to use 
computer-controlled, electronic test 
equipment. The programs for these 
computers are written in basic. Many 
of these programs are long and sloppy. 
Had they used an array for holding and 
manipulating data, the programs would 
have more test capacity and would run 
faster. 

I have written a short demonstration 



Robert Laun is a retired Air Force 
Electronics technician. He has been 
using a Color Computer since 1981. He 
enjoys writing utility and instructional 
programs. 



program that uses the computer to keep 
track of a five-dimensional array. The 
statement DIM Z(l,l) would in fact be 
a two-dimensional array that could 
hold four different numbers. Z(0,0) 
could hold a number. So could Z ( 0 , 1 ) , 
Z(1,0) and Z(l,l) each hold a 
number for later use. 

Look at Line 10 of the program: 10 
DIM Z(2,2,2,2,2). For the moment, 
ignore the size of the array and note 
only that I used the number 2. The 
depth of each element in the array is 
actually three. That is 0, 1 and 2. For 
purposes of illustration, however, I will 
not use the 0 element in the program. 
This makes it a little easier to follow the 
[low of the program and see what is 
taking place. 

Look at Line 10 again. Note that it 
has five elements — sort of like length 
by width by height by ? by ?, You can 
fill in the question marks with the 
appropriate words. 

Examine lines 20 through 1 15. These 
lines allow you to specify a particular 
element in the array. Since I allow for 
two possibilities in each element in the 
array, it gives 32 possible places to store 
a data element (2 to the 5th power 
equals 32). 

Line 35, 35 IF FI<1 OR fl>2 THEN 30, 



is an error-trapping routine that ensures 
the user cannot crash the program by 
specifying a place outside of the array. 
I could have specified less than 0: 35 IF 
fl<0 DR A>2 THEN 30. Since the depth 
of the first element allows for 0, 1 or 2 
this would be permissible, but as I said 
earlier, I am only using 1 and 2 to make 
the program easier to follow. 

Line 1 17 checks the specified element 
to see if there is any data there; if it is 
empty, program flow is routed to Line 
120 where you finally get to tell the 
computer what number you want to 
store. In Line 125, I limited the size of 
the number so it would be easier to 
display later in the program. 

Line 140 puts the data in the proper 
element within the array. Lines 200 
through 300 display each element of the 
array and what number is stored there. 
After the display is done, the program 
jumps back to Line 20 for more data. 

I doubt that many people will ever 
need to use a five-dimensional array, 
especially since it does use a lot of 
memory, but the power is there if you 
need it. 

(Questions may be directed to Mr. 
Laun at 2225 North 67th Circle, Phoe- 
nix, A Z 85035. Please enclose an SA SE 
for a reply.) □ 



20 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



The Amazing A-BUS 




An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A- BUS system works with the original CoCo, 
theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

Aboutthe A-BUS system: 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use INP and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-1 23) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re-140: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts, SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad-142: $129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5Vrangecan be expanded to 1 00V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-146: $139 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is -4Vto 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. Hie on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 130ms. Ideal for thermocouple, 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card). 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set tor. input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-144: $89 

Powerful ciock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Oate and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1/100 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45:$79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-152: $15 

3V2 by 4Vz in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




RE-140 




IM-141 




Smart Stepper Controller soi49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half. full. wave), 
scale factor, units, holding power, etc Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350 mA) for small steppers (MO-1 03). Send for SC-149 flyer, 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-122: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V. bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase) 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-1 03) + ST-143: PA-181: $99 

Stepper Motors mo-i 03: $1 5 or4 for$39 

Pancake type, 2V4" dia. 'A" shaft. 7 5°/steo. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec. 1 2V. 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 1 4 Bit Analog to Digital converter. 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC. XT, AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot 
Tandy 1 000, 1 000 EX& SX, 1 200, 3000. Usesoneshort slot. 
Apple 1 1, II +. He. Uses any slot. 
TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus". 
Model 1 00. Uses 40 pin socket (Socket is duplicated on adaoter). 
TRS-80 Mod 3,4 ,4 D. Fits 50 pin bus. (With hard disk, use Y-cable). 
TRS-80 Model 4 P. includes extra cabie. (50 pin bus is recessed). 
TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l. 
Color Computers (Tandy). Fits ROM slot. Muitipak. or Y-cable. 



AR-133...S69 
AR-133...S69 
AR-134...$49 
AR-136...S69 
AR-135...S69 
AR-132...S49 
AR-137...S62 
AR-131 ...$39 
AR-138..S49 



m i m 1 

moss* ? *r 1 / 



'I 



AD-142 



A-BUS Cable (3 ft, 50 cond.) CA-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-120:$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-oak 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Overseas add 1 0% 




ALPHA 




Technical info: 



J 0X0 

a division of Sigma Industries, fnc 

242 W. Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



(203) 656-1806 



ESMW 800 221-0916 

New York orders: (718) 296-5916 

All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What isCoCoMax? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 





CoCo Max disk *y»t»m» with Y-cabl*, 

Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
pull down menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantlycreate many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 
The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 




Pull down menus 



Zoom In / 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fat bits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 15, you can even 
print your work in full color! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




insld« tha Ht-Ras input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack ? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
10% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
49152 points! (256x1 92). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi-Res Pack. 

Electronic Typesetting... 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 1 4 built in fonts each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles ! 




Examples of printout* 



Printing Your 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers ! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80). 




Jettison Report 

fn«i arUf* aW >n laaap* 



no mflJOHnEws today 

Reporters Despercie 

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lika.* * I MM »l« »••.•• 
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tr.«.r t»a imh 

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ItMM* ««tl IM|ri •■ •«»-.l| 

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77ie whole family will enjoy 
CoCo Max. Here are a few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80). 



WMtRKflN 



SCHNOID 



CORP.! 



1985 



PROFIT 

2>. 




Pulley 



Siring 




mtn: ini 1 mm Bar 



Tabl-i 



T '*| I 



E3 



Business graphs, charts, 
diagrams. Also memos 



Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity. 



© 



COCO MAX 



Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 



COCO HflM 

CoCo NiH 



CoCd max 
CoCo 171 ax 

flfla^ 



CoCo Mo* CoCo Tla\ 
CoCo Mat CoCo Max 

coco m.i CoCo Max 
CoCo Mm 



CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



_ Over 200 typestyles to 
ft) choose from I 

generate flyers. 





■ 



ruurr 



Junior's homework 
and science projects. 
Term papers too I 



0 



V/deo portrait 

(with optional digitizer). 



this »$ 



T/i /s /s a cartoon. 



. i l ■ - - m 



CoC. P0RT| 



©A new way to express 
your imagination. 




CdColkolL 




q schematics 



and f loor plans. 



CoCo Max II 

Logos and letterheads. 



System Requirements: 

Any 64K CoCo and a standard joystick or 
mouse. (The koala pad and the track ball work, 
but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a Multi-Pak or our Y-Cable. 
CoCo Max is compatible with any Radio Shack 
DOS and ADOS. 

Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes 
almost all the features of CoCo Max II except 
Shrink, Stretch, Rotate, and Glyphics. Also, it 
has 5 fonts instead of 14. 
CoCo Max is not compatible with JDOS, 
DoubleDOS, MDOS, OS-9, the X-pad, and 
Daisy Wheel Printers. 

Printers Supported: 

Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronix, Delta 10, 10X, 15, 15X, SG- 
1 O.Okidata 82A, 92, 93, C. Itoh Pro-writer, 
Apple Image-writer, Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet, 
Radio Shack DMP 1 00, 1 05, 1 1 0, 1 20, 200, 
400, 500, Line Printer 7, Line Printer 8, TRP- 
100, CGP-220. (DMP-130 use Line Printer 8), 
PMC printers, Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 1 5 



Pricing 

CoCo Max on tape $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max II (disk only) $79.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max to CoCo Max II 

New disk and manual $1 9.95 

New features of CoCo Max II: 14 fonts and glyphic 
font, dynamic shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive 
capability, 68 page scrapbook, point and click file 
load, color printer drivers, full error reporting. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to disk 

manuals, disk and binder $24.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price $1 9.95 

Super Picture Disks #1 , #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks $29.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with It, 
we will refund every penny. 



Font Editor Option 

A font is a set of characters of a 
particular style. CoCo Max includes 
1 5 fonts. You can create new fonts of 
letters, or even symbols or graphics 
with the font editor. Examples: set of 
symbols for electronics, foreign 
alphabets, etc $19.95 

Video Digitizer DS-69 

This new Low Cost Digitizer is the 
next step in sophistication for your 
CoCo Max system. With the DS-69 
you will be able to digitize and bring 
into CoCo Max a frame from any video 
source: VCR, tuner, or video camera. 
Comes complete with detailed 
manual and C-SEE software on disk. 
Multi-Pak is required. 

New Low Price Save $50 $99.95 

New: faster DS-69A $1 49.95 



Colorware Incorporated 

COLORWARE 7g ' 0 t* Ja ™ c ^ 

Woodhaven, NY 11421 



800 221-0916 

Orders only. 

NY & Info: (718) 296-5916 
Hours: 9-5 Eastern time. 



Add S 3.00 per ofider tor shipping. 
Wb accept Visa, MC, checks, M. O. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
NY and CT : add sales tax. 
Shipping to Canada is $5.00 "^KAf 
Overseas. FPO. APO add 1 0^ '^AW\ 




The listing: FIFTHDIM 
0 CLS 

10 DIM Z(2,2,2,2,2) 

20 PRINT" THERE ARE TWO DIFFERENT 

OFFICE BUILDINGS WHERE DATA IS 

STORED . " : PRINT 
30 INPUT" 1 WHERE WILL YOU STORE 
THE DATA BUILDING 1 OR BUILDIN 
G 2";A:PRINT 

35 IF A<1 OR A>2 THEN 3J3 
40 PRINT" 2 EACH BUILDING HAS TWO 
FLOORS . " 

50 INPUT" WHICH FLOOR? 1 OR 2"; 
B: PRINT 

55 IF B<1 OR B>2 THEN5j3 

60 PRINT "3 EACH FLOOR HAS TWO OF 

FICES. " 

10 INPUT" WHICH OFFICE? 1 OR 2" 
; C : PRINT 

75 IF C<1 OR C>2 THEN 70 

80 PRINT" 4 EACH OFFICE HAS TWO F 

ILES . " 

90 INPUT" WHICH FILE? 1 OR 2";D 
: PRINT 

95 IF D<1 OR D>2 THEN 90 



100 PRINT "5 EACH FILE HAS TWO DR 
AWERS . " 

110 INPUT" WHICH DRAWER? 1 OR 2 
" ; E : PRINT 

115 IF E<1 OR E>2 THEN11J3 

117 IF Z(A,B,C,D,E)<>J3 THEN PRIN 
T"THERE IS ALREADY DATA THERE": I 
NPUT" SHALL I DISCARD THAT DATA? 

Y / N" ;AN$:ELSE120 

118 IF AN$<>"Y" THEN 20 

12 0 INPUT"OK! NOW WHAT IS THE NU 

MBER THAT YOU WANT TO STORE IN T 

HIS SPOT (3 DIGITS MAXIMUM) ";N 

125 IF N<-999 OR N>999 THEN 120 

140 Z(A,B,C,D,E)=N 

200 CLS' DISPLAY DATA 

210 F0RA=1T02 : F0RB=1T02 : FORC=lTO 

2 : F0RD=1T02 : F0RE=1T02 

22 0 PRINT§48j3, "" ; : PRINTA ; : PRINTT 

AB ( 5 ) B ; : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) C ; : PRINTT AB ( 

15 ) D ; : PRINTTAB (2j3) E ; : PRINTTAB ( 2 5 

) " = "Z (A,B,C,D,E) :G0SUB3J3J3 

225 FORX=lT01j3j3:NEXT 

23 0 NEXT E,D,C,B,A 

240 CLS:GOT02j3 

300 PRINT@j3," BL FL OF FI 
DR" : RETURN ^ 



Hint . . . 




RS-232 Baud Rates 


These poke v 


alues for the CoCo will create the 16 


most commonly used baud rates. They are as follows: 


Baud Rate 


P#kel49 P#ke 150 


50 


4 88 


75 


2 227 


110 


1 246 


134.5 


1 153 


! 150 


1 110 


300 


180 


600 


87 


1200 


40 


1800 


25 


2000 


23 


2400 


18 


: 3600 


10 


4800 


7 


7200 


3 


9600 


I 


To achieve 19200 baud, one must use the poke's for 


9600 baud and 


then use the bold poke (65497,0) to 


double the CoCo's speed. (Use PDKEG549G,0 to 


restore normal speed.) 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Tnose wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



24 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



The Ultimate 

Color Computer 



Enhancements 

for Productivity 
from HJL Products 





PRODUCTS 




i 






To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get information 
into and out of the system. 

This is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer. ^ J?at& 

The Keyboard - $71 

The overwhelming favorite of serious 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program. 
Installs in just a few minutes with no 
soldering. ^ 

The Numeric Keypad - $0O.0G jf^frg 

The Number Jack is a self^containedT" 1 ^^ 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshifted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
all necessary connectors for quick and 
easy installation without soldering. 



The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, and is easily 
installed without clips, jumpers or 
soldering (except in some later CoCo 2s 
with soldered-in video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor - $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used it you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
above) ^ ff^ 



The BASIC Utility - $25.95 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any color computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, word wrap, global search, 



Now available for all 
models, including CoCo 3 

and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-legendable 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 



Ordering Information: Specify model (Original, F-verslon, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3.50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 

Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800-462-4891 
International calls: 716-235 8358 




PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 





32K 
ECB 



mm 



t 



V 



- 



\ 



Irackin 



11 



V V 



e 



n 



1 



• 



( 



j 



J 



f. 



A— t 



H.G. Williamson, M. 

/ 



V 



r v 



■v. 





■ 











\ 



THE RAINBOW 



u 

urrtrak has everything you 
M m need? to track a hurricane ex- 
JL JL cept an auxiliary power 
supply. It uses a Hi-Res (PM0DE4) map 
extending from 10-40 degrees north 
latitude to 60-100 degrees west longi- 
tude. This area includes the Atlantic 
Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico 
and land masses which are colored red 
using moire color: POKE 178, PC. 

Eight graphics pages are cleared and 
PM0DE4 , 5 is used to draw the map, the 
boxes for data display and the sequen- 
tially connected circles indicating the 
actual track of the hurricane (see Figure 
1). When data is entered, pages 5 to 8 
are copied to pages 1 to 4 to give a clean 
map before new data is drawn. Prompts 
are drawn on the lower screen to allow 
use of subroutines to update weather 
data, review all data that has been 
entered, print a copy of the map, iden- 
tify costal cities and to quit in an 
organized shut-down process. 

The heart of H urrtrak is an INKEYS 
loop that monitors TIMER to estimate 
elapsed time. Every hour, on the hour, 
the hurricane is repositioned on the 
screen. This is a mathematical correc- 
tion and no attempt has been made to 
incorporate meteorological data. 

Dr. H.G. Williamson is an orthopedic 
surgeon and a retired U.S. Army of- 
ficer. He is a self-taught programmer 
and combines this hobby with wood- 
working and auto restoration. 



Whenever TIMER=>3550, the minute 
counter is incremented by one until 
MN=>G0, at which time the hour is 
incremented by one. If your |rogram 
has a time error then change the value 
of TM=>3550 in Line 20. Decrease the 
value to speed up; increase value to slow 
down. 

You will notice that the hurricane 
symbol is superimposed on three radiat- 
ing dotted lines (see Figure 2). The 
longer central line indicates the pre- 
dicted course based on the DIRECTION 
input with the last weather data. The 
shorter lines on either side indicate 
alternate courses. The three-line group 
represents three consecutive directions 
on a magnetic compass rose, e.g., N- 
NNE-NE, etc. Data is drawn in labeled 
boxes along the right margin of the 
screen. The lowermost box, MPD 
(miles per day), indicates the computed 
distance that the hurricane is expected 
to travel during the next 24 hours if the 
speed and direction remain unchanged. 

Ident allows everyone, even a non- 
mathematician, to determine the dis- 
tance from the hurricane to selected 
landmarks and to estimate the hours 
before landfall. You may select any one 
of 30 coastal cities and geographical 
landmarks by typing in a two-letter key 
taken from a submenu (see Figure 4). 
The key, mileage and hours will be 
displayed on the upper screen and a line 
drawn from the landmark to the hurri- 
cane eye (see Figure 3). These will be 
erased when you update or ident 
another city. 

The Hurrtrak print routines are writ- 




28 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 






TIME 



LOMCr 



L AT 



DIG 



HURRICANE 

BIOLUir ID 



SPEED 



Uuir IDS 



MPD 



f LI J PD (VI £ '. P.' E r MEM.I i. T D E J- IT J P t^tli lT ■ QJ Lt 



Figure 1: PMODE4,5 Screen 




mm 

HURRICANE 



B I Zr W I r-ID 




TIKE 
0300 



LOMO 

*5 



■'0 



DIP 
NW 



1PEED 
10 



90 



r-iPD 
2 4 0 



Figure 2: PMODE4,l Screen 




IIIUIIIIIHllll!l!H'l inT PPllV f 

II F\ 
■ \ 



BIO WIND 



;, 1 ^JBinifliik 



Til \E 
1100 



LD NO 



LhT 
2 4 



DIP 

f-mi 



SPEED 

20 



.UK ID- 
1 0 O 



MPD 
430 



f^lpn/jT fPlPlMS'lll i J^iPlFr^T lT" lOlt |T '3 I HIT 



Figure 3: Ident Option 



ten for the DMP-105 printer. If you 
want to print using 2400 baud (fastest 
rate) then set the switch on your printer 
and unmask Line 9. You may print a 
copy of the map displayed on the screen 
by adding a machine language screen 
dump program and editing Line 540. Be 
sure to edit Line 20 (DEFU5R0) to be 
compatible with your program and 
printer. With some programs, you will 
probably want to use the inverse screen 
poke. The first map printed is preceeded 
by a list of all of the landmarks and their 
respective latitudes and longitudes. If 
additional, copies of the landmarks are 
desired, use the Quit option. Don't 
worry. You can return to the main 
program from this subroutine. 

When you are ready to quit, you are 
able to perform any of the onscreen 
options and to save input data on tape. 
DIM D$(25,5) limits you to the start- 
up data and 25 updates during your 
track. However, if you save the data and 
then load it, you will be able to track 
an infinite number of points. When you 
load, the previous track is drawn using 
PMDDE4 ,5 and the counter U is reset to 
zero. You can now enter 26 new up- 



i 



- — +1 — 



■ 



I 



i. — 



■ 



1L ' | I 

dates. You will not, be able to review the 
previous data unless you made a printed 
copy. while, reviewing data before shut 
down (see Figure 3). j _ [__{~--L — 
I have not discussed any of the inter- 
esting mathematics 1 which orre encoun- 
ters in computer map-drawing of the 
westerns-longitudes or northern lati- 
tudes. The horizontal (X). grid- on- the 
video screen is 'numbered from left to 
right and the vertical (Y) grid is num- 
bered from top' to bottom, the exact 
opposite of ( the map needed. Trigono- 
metric functions take a little experi- 
menting because the screen grids have 
no provisions for negative "(X) and (Y) 
values. Suffice it to say that each space 
on the- 256 -by- 192 grid represents 13 
miles and each five spaces represents 
one degree of. latitude; or longitude. 

Hurrtrak may be modified for Ex- 
tended Disk BASIC by changing-tHl to 
Ml and PRIt^T to WRITE whfcre they 
appear in lines 63.6 and J 000. 

(Questions may be ^ directed to the 
author at 67 Plantation Road, Myrtle 
Beach, SC 29577, Please enclose an 
SASEfor a reply.) \ \ 1 □ 





LAN L> MARKS 








LONG 


LAT 




LOMtS 


LAT 


CBA .) Rl'.AOOS 


S9.5 


.1 3 - 4 


(KE)Y WEST 


a .1 . a 


.24 . 7 


( Bll ) RHUIW 


64 « 6 


32 - 4 


( Ml ) AMI 


BM W 


25 . 8 


( S J > L. .01 1 


88 . 7 


30. 6 


(MO). BILE 


87 . 8 


3 1 - ia 


( BR ) OWMBV 1 LLE 


97.2 


26. IZ1 


(MY) RILE BEACH 


79. t) 


33 - 5 


( CA ) PL MATT Eft A 


3 73 - 3 


v5-J5 M ..3 


(NA)BSAU 


79.. 2 


L~ k - 


( co) hp us am 


97 . 3 




(NEJIrJ 0 RL.l-i.ANS 


913. 0 


30 h t? 


( (.:U)BA 


79 . ft 


22.0 


(NI ) GARA6UA 


B c 'i . 0 


1. 3.0 


(£0)11 REPUBLIC 


70. id 


19.® 


( NO ) RF OLK 


7 6 „ (/) 


36 .a 


(GA)LVESION 


94 . 7 


29-3 


< P£)NSACOLA 


87. 0 


30- 6 


( GO AY MEN IS 


B 1 * 2 


19-3 


(PU)ERTO R I CO 


66.. 5 


18 . 5 


( GR) AM AD A 


61 >■ 6 


J. .*... n x.J 


(SA)VANIMAH 


a 1 . ra 


32.. 13 


(HA) IT I 


7 ■ ;■■ "■ 


). 8 .. 7 


(TA)MPA 


82. W 


28 .. 0 


( HONDURAS 


86 .. M 


j. 5 . ia 


(TR) I NIP AD 


61.3 


.1. Q n 


( JA.) CI \ BOM VI LLE 


8 1 „ :-3 


30 .. 3 


( WI ) LM1 MGTON 


78. 0 


3-'i . 1 


( JM) a:i; ca 

■ 


7 7 . CO 


1. 0 ,. 0 


( YU ) CATAN PEN 


88- m 


2 1 - 0 



Figure 4: Coastal Cities and Geographical Landmarks 



— — - " 



HURRI CANE 


BI G WIND 


DATE : 


1 1 Z22/86 








TIME 




LONG 


LAT 


D .1 R 


VEL 


WINDS 




mm 




65 


20 


IMW 


10 


90 




0900 




67 


122 


MNW 


15 


93 








69 


23 


WWW 


IB 


98 




1 3. Q0 




71 


24 


NW 


20 






















Figure 5: Review Option 






40 238 

120 136 

215 253 

260 50 

365 247 

450 146 

520 128 

565 75 



625 84 

720 72 

850 22 

920 .. ...170 

970 232 

1065 .....157 

1130 44 

END 112 



The listing: HURRTRRK 



* ***************************** 



1 



< HURRTRAK > 



BY 



0 
1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

D 

10 GOTO 640 

15 CLS6:DIM D$ (25 , 5) , Dl (25) , D2 (2 
5) :R=57. 29577951 

2 0 TM=3 550 : MH=60 : U=-l : DEFUSR0=3 1 
913 : 'PRINT MAP 

25 PRINT@160," ENTER NAME OF HUR 
RI CANE 11 : PRINT" " ; : LINEINPUTHN$ : P 
RINT: PRINT" ENTER DATE [MM/DD/Y 



H. G. WILLIAMSON 

67 PLANTATION ROAD 

MYRTLE BEACH, SC 29577 

COPYRIGHT OCT 1986 
***************************** 

POKE149,0:POKE150, 18 : f 2400BAU 



R] " : PRINT@3 02 , " " ; : LINEINPUTDA$ 
30 SOUND150, 1:CLS:PRINTTAB(5) "** 

INSTRUCTIONS **": PRINT : PRINT" 
1. LINES 20,530,540 MUST BE":PRI 
NT" EDITED FOR YOUR PRINTER" 

: PRINT" AND SCREEN DUMP PROG 

RAM. " : PRINT" 2. WHEN MAP IS DIS 
PLAYED" 

35 PRINT" TYPE THE LETTER IN 

THE": PRINT" PARENTHESES TO: 

" : PRINT" (U)PDATE DATA" : PR 

INT" (P)RINT MAP": PRINT" 

(R)EVIEW DATA ENTERED" : PRIN 
T" (I) DENTIFY LANDMARK" : PR 

INT" (Q) UIT" : PRINT: PRINT" 

**** PRESS ANY KEY ****" 
40 GOSUB655:GOSUB210 
45 TIMER=0 
50 A$=INKEY$ 

55 CIRCLE(X,Y) ,4,0, . 8 : CIRCLE (X, Y 
),8,0,.8:IF A$<>""THEN425 
60 FORT=1TO20:NEXT 

65 CIRCLE (X,Y) ,4,1, .8: CIRCLE ( X , Y 
) ,8,1, .8 

70 IFTIMER>TM THENMI=MI + 1 : IFMKM 
H THEN45ELSEMI=0 : GOSUB155 : GOSUB1 
15:GOT045 

75 FORT=1TO200:NEXT:GOTO50 

80 ■ "V " v ' : 7 '■■ 

85 '** ADJUST MIN ** 

90 MI=MI+INT(TIMER/3 550+.5) : PMOD 



— 




i 



April 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



29 





r i 



LL4-H- 1 




Etfl,.l:GOT045 1 
******* SUBROUTINES ****** 

IbfI i j r _,L_] I— 

10 *.*\*.*- UPDATE HOUR *** 




115 H=VAL ( HR.Sj +1,: Mi $= l »-0 0 » : IFH=2 5 

tHenh= i 1 I I l_-U 

12-0 H$=STR$fH) :IFH<10 THEN HR$= kl 
0 * +RT GHT $ ( H 1 ) E LSE HR $=iRTGHT $ ( H 

2 ) i T TT ] 

125 U$ (1) =HR$ f MI $ _ 
130 X$=STR$^T(10*(100-(X/5) ) )/ 
I0)Ty$ (<2 ) ^RIGHT$ (X$ , LEN (X$) -1) 
135- X$=£TR$ ( INT { 10* ( 40- ( y/ 5 ) ) } /X 
0 ) : U$ ( 3i) =RIGHTi(-X$ , LEN ( X$ ) -1 ) : X$ 





T 1 ■ ■ ; — : r 

I 1 1 — 4 — 

HNAN=270-(N*22.5) : : GOT0245 

40 NEXTN-: D$-(U, 3 ) = "UNK"j : AN=22 5 
245 S0UNO15JZf,l: LINE INPUT" SHEED 
— MPH : ",*D$ (Ui4) :S=VAL(P$(U- r 4-) 
_)UIES=0-THENS=(L 

250 SGUND150 JLj.M-NE-INPUT" WINDS 

"MPH : " ;D$i[U,5} 
255 SOUNP150, 1: PRINT"' 1 <E>RROR 





L_ — 1 -1— f— r~i 



_. 1 — ■ 



F 1 I 



L 
— ii .11 



I __1 1__A 





J. ] 



ti 




_ 140 -B=2j0 : X$"=" " }UDj=l ;FORN=lT03 : D$ 

1 =U $ ( N ) : GO S UB 3 10 : NEXTN : UD40 

145 • j 1 i | | | i I 

15jj. i*** MOVE E>YE/HR *** 

155 SOyNDl]50 , l: SOUND';15 0 , 1 
16^ if X<ll OR Ykl THEN 17 '5 ELSE 
X=X+ GOSSAN/ R) * (S/13) : Y=Y+SIN(AN/ 
R)*(S/13) 
165 I FX > 2 0 0 ORX < lORY > 1 5.0 ORY < 1THEN 

17? RETURN. 

'17 5 IFjX<lTHEN^=lELSEIFY< 1-THENY- 1 
-1&0 eiiRctE (X , Y ) „4 , % : QIRCLE, ( X , Y ) ' 

0- •-*** END TRAP *** 
5 tSOUND ±50 ,-1 : FORT - 1 TD100 : NEXT : 

2jd5 f *A IN-PUT DATA ** 

2 3>0 C L3 : U=U+ 1 ^PRI NT @ 3 2 , ' » HURRI CA 
E NAME: 11 ; HN' : $ : PRINT V DATE 

: ■* ; DA$ J SOUND150 , 1 : TilNE INPUT" 
TIMEj<&400> : ";D$(U,j0H 
T^-te ("0 > p) , 2 ) : MI=VAL (RIGHT$ i( D$ ( U 

,0} ,2)) : TI i= MI : li=4 i i 1 



J 

I ,J3K2)_) : TINMl-t-Il=4 'I | 

" |— Sljf LpL+l : SOIJND150 , 1 : LINEINPUT" 
W~LONblTUDE ~T : " F; M ( U , 1 } : pC=VAL ( D 
$(tf,l) ) :IEX>990RX<i55THEN2i5ELSEX 
fS* ,( l|j3-!X) : Dl (U) =X : XD=X 
2-2-0' L4=L+ir:-SOUND150,li LINEINPUT" 
N LAT±TUD_E. - ^ A -;B§ (U , 2 ) :Y=VAL(D 
^ (U, 2) : ) : IFY;>39ORY<ij3THEN2-20ELSEY 
=i-5* 4-0 -Y) _ : D2 (U ) =^Y : YD=jY 1 I \ 
212 5 GX-0 : FDRN= 0 TOl 5 : p'r I NT§, ( GX * 3 2 
— J ^ 2 7 , C $ ( N ) ; : GX=GX+ i : NEXT : BRI NT @ 2 

5f,l\ u i) - 1 , '. | ill'; 

250^ PRINT©. 3.2 *i, " »' j- : SOUND 150 / 3, : LI 
NEINjPUT" DIRECTION _|: M ;Di(U,3 
■ FORN=27TO507 : STEP32 : PRINT @N , » 
j rt L ; : NEXT: PRINTS 3 2* -( L+ 1) , ; 
235 FORN=0T6l5 : lFC$;(N)i=D$ (U , 3) TH 






260 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$=i" "THEN2 60ELSE 
IFX$= T, E " THENCLS : GOTO 2 10 
2^5 CL^ 1 : X $=STR$ ( S *2 4 j rMD$ =RIGHT 
$fX$,"LEN(X$) ! -l) :X$= : »" 

270 ' ' '. 

275 ?*** Track from start *** 
280 pmo.de4 , 5 : screen! , 1 : if u>0 th 
en color0 : forn=0 tou 7 1 : line (dl (n) 

, D2 (N) ) r ( Dl (N+.l ) , D2 (N+1) ) , P$ET : C 
IRCLE ( "Dl ( N) , D2 (;N) ") , 3 , 0 ■: NEXTN :-CIR 
CLE (D;i (N+1) , D2 (iN+itlj, 3 } 0 \ 
,2 85 PMO l!)E 4! , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN! 1 , 1 :" FOR 
~N=i TO 4: PCOPY N+4 TO N-:iNE-X-T 
_ S29-0 1 i " i ' 1 

295 '*** DRAW DATA •**•* 
300, PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : B=20 :',X-$1=" 

m , . - 1 \ — r 1 j \ 1 

305 FORN!=0TO5:D$=D$(U,N 1 ) 

310 L=jLEN (D$) j LjL_, 

3; 1-5 I EVAL ( li$ ) >0 THEN 3 4 5 
3i20 FORZilTb-Ll — j — ]— }■ — t 
325 Z$r=MiD$'(D$ / Z,l) _ j - I- 

_330 FORQ=1T02 6 : IFMID$ i {W$ , Q;, 1) =Z'$ 
THENX$^X^+L$.(q-) :GOTO340 

335 NEXTQ [] - , 

340 NEXTZ:GOT0.3 55 

345 F0RZ=1TQL:Z$^MID$(D$,Z ( 1) : IF 
Z$'= T, I.' "THENW=10EL$E W=VAL ( Z$) 

3-50 X$=rX$+N$ (W) :NEXTZ I J 1 

3 55 COLORl : LINE ( 2 14 ,-B-,7") - ( 2 4 8 , B+ 
1) , PSET , BF : COLOR0 : DRAW" S.4 C0BM 2-20. 
,."+STR^ (-&) +X ! S : X$=i" " : B=B+2 4 : X$=» » _ 

3 60 IF UD=1 THEN- RETURN 
3 65 NEXTN :DRAW''C0BM220 , 164." ': FOR 
N-l TO- ^EN(MD$) : DRAW N$ ( VAT, j(MiD$ 





1 



1 



{MD$ , N f 1) ) ) : NEXT N 
37-0 1 1 ! J 

.3-75 1 f** PREDICT COURSE *** I 
380 D=t=6 :!DD=f D 

385 FORCR=AN+22 * 5TOAN-22 . 5STEP-2- 
2.5:IFAN=CR THENKJp8ELSEKJ=5 
3 90 FORN^lTOKiT :PSET(XD , YD , CL) : A= 
INT (COS ( CR/R) *DD) +XD; i B=IN_T (SIN (C 
R/Rj.*-DD)+YD I ' 

3 .9 5 I FA< fa ORB<0 THEN 1 55, 

400 PSET(A,B,CL)!:pp=DD+p 
405 NEXT Nr DD=D : NEXTCR : I FCL=0 THE 
N RETURN ELSE CL=0 :;GOT03 80 



410 





THE RAINBOW April 1987 






415-"' 
42$ •** 



EN OPTIONS *** 



4 25 IFAfi= , *R t 'THEN.4.75 

ll\F7i$~="p" AND PM=1 THEN.. J5 4,0 E 
LSE W A$=f^ THEN"PM=l:GOT053^ 
435 IFA$="li: ,, G0SUB5 : 55 :GQSUB38p : GO 

I i 1 1 1 



_ L 



j 1 ! _J 1 i — Y — I — 

4 4J3 IFA$;,=^U u TfiEN- G,0SUB2a)3 : GOTO9J0 
t~445 IFA$k> ,, Q" ; THEN65 
-45^ GlLS : T=fl : PRINT@71_, "REAE3Y TO S 
HUT DpWN-'*iPRINT@9"9 /"SELECT ONE 0 
R MORE NUMBERS" : PR : NT : PRINT" 0 
. RETURN" : PRINT" 1. PRINT WE AT 

H/BULL DATA" : PRINT ,f 2 , PRINT L 
ANDMARKS" J.PRINT" ,3'. PRINT MAP'f 
~:PRINT'f 4. RECORD QN. TAPE":PRI 
NT" 5. SHUT"p6WN" 

4 55 A$4lNKEY$-:I-FA l $H'" , 2HEN45;5E^SE 
-QT=VAL(A$j :1SF A$^"j0"TriEN 90 ELSE 

IF QT>5 THEN 455 
46j3 ON QT GOSUB -5)05, 53'p, 540, 625, 

19"5 :GOTO 45j&\ \ 
465—1 

47jb REVIEW---*** 
475 CLS : PRINT "HURRICANE "+KN$ :PR 
INT "DATE'S '"7DA$ : PRIN^T "TIME LONG 

LAT DIR VEL WIND" 
48)3 FOR iN=J3 TO U 

4 85 PRTNTD$( N,p) TAB (6)0$ (N, 2 ) ; TA 
B ( 11) D$(N,2.) ;TAB(17) D$ (N, 3) ; TAB ( 
2 2 ) D$ (N , 4 ) ;. TA B ( 2 7 \ £>$..(. N.., 5 J 
-490 NEXT 'PRINT: PRINT "PRINT COPY? 
<Y/N> 

"4t95 A$,=INKE!Y$:IFA$=""THEN495ELSE 
CLS :-IFA $ < * " Y " TH EN9 0 i 1 

5 j05 PR J NT # - 2 , TAB ',( 10. ) " HURR I CANE V 
-+-^N$+ J " DATE: '?+dA$l i 

5 i 0 PRINT #-i -, -TAB-f-l-^h-" t IME'" ) TAB ( i 
0) "LONG" ;?A$ (3p) '(LAT" ;TAB(4» "DI 
R" -;-TAB ( 50 ) "V ; EL! f i tXbV 6^) "WINDS " 
515 FORN=^TOU :-F0PSM=j3TO,5": PRINT#-2 
, TAB (M*10+10 ) D$ (N, M) : NEXTM: PRlN 
T# - 2- : NEXTN PRINT #'-2 ,. TAB ( 10 ) " ** E 
ND **" :PRlNT#-2 : IF QT>0 THEN RET 
URN ELSE GOTO90 1 
520- ' 

525 •'■*** PRINT MAP *** 
53 ft PRINT #-2 CHR$ (27) CHR$ ( 14 ) TAB 
■( l4-) "LANDMARKS" ; CHR$ ; ( 2 7 ) CHR$ ( 15 ) 
: PRINT#-2 : F0RT= 2 7 TO 6 0 S TK P 3 3 : PRIN 
, ^AB. ( T ) " LONG LAT " ; :.NEXT: PRl 
NT#-2-iFORN=lT0113STEP8 : C- (N+7) / 8 
:X$(1)=I$(C) :X$(2)=I$(C+15) :Y$(1 
) =MID$ ( LC$ ,;N , 8 ) ! Y$ ( 2 )'=MID$ { LC$ , N 
+1-20 , 8 ) 

53 5 A='l0 i E0RZ-.1TQ-2 : PRINT # - 2 , TAB.( 
A,) X$ (Z) TAB (A+17) LEFT$ (Y$ ( Z 1 ) r 4)-TA 



1 



.1 





Keep track with 



Baseball Statpak 



Finally, Big League Stats for your Color Computer! 
Baseball Statpak will make you a winner with your play- 
ers. Keep track of up to 180 batters and 60 pitchers on 
12 teams. Perfect for Little League, high school, ama- 
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Baseball Statpak contains three separate programs 
to track at bats, runs, hits, errors, walks, home runs, 
RBI's, on-base-percentage, innings pitched, earned 
runs, strikeouts and lots more. Also keeps track of 
team standings for league statistics. Store your data on 
tape or disk. 

Lightning-fast machine language sort will order your 
data by any stat for startling screen displays and beauti- 
ful printed reports! 

You've seen these stats in the newspapers. Now 
you can have them for your team! Baseball Statpak re- 
quires 16K Extended Basic for tape version, 32K for 
disk. CoCo 3 compatible. Only $34.95 on tape or disk. 



The Handicapper 



Use your Color Computer to improve your perfor- 
mance at the track! Separate handicappers for Thor- 
oughbreds, Harness Horses and Greyhounds let you 

rank the horses or dogs in each race quickly and easily, 
even if you've never handicapped before! 

All the information you need is readily available in 
the Thoroughbred Racing Form, harness or dog track 
program. Data entry is quick and easy. We even provide 
a diagram showing you where to find the data! 

Written by a veteran handicapper, our programs use 
sound, established techniques and the power of your 
computer to cut handicapping time from hours to min- 
utes. Ratings are displayed on screen or sent to your 
printer. Our instructions and wagering guide tell you 
which races to bet and which to avoid — a real secret of 
good handicapping. 

The handicappers require 16K for tape versions, 
32K for disk. They're all CoCo 3 compatible, too! Thor- 
oughbred, Harness or Greyhound Handicappers, 
$39.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for $59.95, all 
three only $79.95. 

Federal Hill Software 
8134 Scotts Level Road 
Baltimore, Md. 21208 





Toll free orders 800-628-2828 Ext 850 
Information 301-521-4886 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



B(A+~2 3) RIGHT$ (Y$ (Z) ,4) ; :A=A+33:N 
EXTZ : PRINT #— 2 : NEXTNYlFQT>j3THENRE 
TURN L S 

54p I>RINT#-2,CHR$ (18) :POKE32431, 
255:P=USR(j3 ) S PRINT #-2 f CHR$ (3 0) :F 
0RN=1T01J3 : PRINT* -2 : NEXT : IF QT>j3T 
HEN RETURN ELSE GOT09J3 
545 1 ' 
55J3 »*** I DENT *** 

555 LO $ = " BABEBI BRCACOCUDOGAGCGRH 
AHOJAJMKEMIMOMYNANENINOPEPUSATA7.' 
RWIYU" 

56J3 CLS1 : K$=" 11 : F0RN=1T029STEP2 : P 
RINTI$(N) , I$ (N+1) : NEXT 
5 65 IFJ>pTHENCOLORl:LINE(IX / IY) - 
(I, J) , PSET 

57,0 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$= ft "THEN57J3ELSE 
IFASC (A$ ) =13THEN9J3 
575 R$=K$+A$:IFLEN(K$) <2THEN57J3 
58j3 -CLS1 : F0RN=1T059STEP2 : Z$=MID$ 
(LO$,N, 2) :Q=(N+l)/2: IFZ$=K$THENG 
OTO 59 p 

585 NEXT :TFK$=" "THEN9 J3ELSE5 6J3 
59J3 P$=MID$(LC$, (8*Q)-7,8) : I=VAL 
(LEFT$ (P$ , 4 ) ) :J=VAL(RIGHT$(P$,4) 

):P$="" 



595 1=5* (1J30-I) : J=5* (4J3-J) 
6J3J3 SCREEN1,1:C0L0RJ3:LINE(I,J) -( 
X,Y) ,PSET:IX=X:IY=Y:DX=ABS(I-X) : 
DY^ABS(J-Y) :H=SQR(DX A 2+DY A 2) :V=1 
1.3*H:C$=STR$(INT(V) ) :L=LEN(C$) : 
C$.=RIGHT$ (C$ , LrX) : L=L-1 : LX$=C$ : G 
OSUB3 8J3 1 i ! 1 

60,5 C0L0R1:LINE(13J3,8)-(21J3 , 26) r 
P.SET,BF:DRAW"Cj3BMi3j2, 15" : F0RZ=1T 
OL: DRAWN $ (VAL(MID$ (C$,Z, 1) ) ) :NEX 
T : DRAW" BR3 "+L$ (13.) +L$ ( 9 ) +"BR6" 
61J3 LC=INT(VAL(LX$)/S+,5) : LX$=ST 
R$(LC) :L=LEN(LX$) -1 : LX$=RIGHT$ (L 
X$,L) : Y$ = " " :FORZ=lTOL:DRAW N$ (VA 
L(MID$(LX$,Z,1) ) ) : NEXT \ DRAW 11 BR3 11 
+L$(8) :N=ASC(LEFT$(K$,1) ) -64:W=A 
SC (RIGHT$ (K$ , 1) ) -64 : DRAW " C J3 BM 155 
, 25"+L$( ; N)+L$(W) : RETURN 
615 1 

62 J3 '** RECORD ON TAPE ** 

625 CLS: PRINT (3160," READY TO SAV 

E ON TAPE 11 : PRINT" PRESS ANY KEY 

WHEN READY" :EXEC445 3 9 
63 p OPEN"0" , #1, "HURRDATA" : WRITE # 
l,U:FORN=j3TOU:WRITE#l,Dl (N) , D2 (N 
) :F0RW=J3T05:WRITE#1,D$ (N,W) :NEXT 
W , N : CLOS E # 1 : RETURN 
635 1 

64 J3 CLEAR6 5J3:PCLEAR8:G0T0 15 
645 1 

65J3 '*** LETTERS *** 

655 DIML$(28) : F0RN=1T02 8 : READL$ ( 



N) : NEXT 
66J3 DATA U4E2F2D2L4R4D2 BR3 
665 DATA U6R3F1D1G1L3R3F1D1G1L3B 
R7 

67j3 DATA BR4 BU1G1L2H1U4E1R2F1BD 
5BR3 

67 5 DATA U6L1R4 F1D4G1L4BR8 

68J3 DATA BR4 L4U3R3L3U3R4BD6BR3 

685 DATA U3R3L3U3R4BD6BR3 

69J3 DATA BE4BU1H1L2G1D4F1R2E1U2L 

1R2BD3BR3 

695 DATA U6D3R4U3D6BR3 

7J3J3 DATA U6BR3BD6 

7J35 DATA BU1F1R2E1U5BR3 BD6 

71J3 DATA U6D4E4G3F3BR3 

715 DATA U6D6R4BR3 

72j3 DATA U6D1F3E3U1D6BR3 

725 DATA U6F5U5D6BR3 

73J3 DATA BR1H1U4E1R2 F1D4G1L2BR6 

735 DATA U6R3F1D2G1L3BR7BD2 

74J3 DATA BR1H1U4E1R2 F1D4G1H1F2H1 

L2BR6BD1 

745 DATA U6R3F1D2G1L3R2F2 BR3 
75J3 DATA BU1F1R2E1U1H1L2H1U1E1R2 
F1BD5BR3 

755 DATA BR2U6L2R4BD6BR3 

7 6J3 DATA BU6D5F1R2E1U5BR3 BD6 

765 DATA BU6D4 F2E2U4 BR3 BD6 

77J3 DATA BU6D5F1R1E1U5D5F1R1E1U5 

BR3BD6 1 1. . 1 I-': 1 \ 

775 DATA U1E4U1BL4D1F4D1BR3 j 

78J3 DATA BU6D2F2D2U2E2U2BR3 BD6 

785 DATA BU6R4D1G4D1R4BR3 

79J3 DATA BR1H1U4E1BD6BR3 

795 DATA E1U4H1BR5BD6 

Spfi i***** NUMBERS 

8J35 DIMN$(1J3) : F0RN=J3T01J3 : READN$ ( 
N) : NEXT 

81)3 DATA BR1H1U4E1R2 F1D4G1L2 BR 6 
,815 DATA BU5E1D6BR3 
82J3 DATA BU4U1E1R2F1D1G4R4BR3 
825 DATA BU6R4G2L1R2 F1D2G1L2H1BD 
1BR7 

820 DATA BR4U6G4R5BD2BR3 

835 DATA BU1F1R2E1U2H1L3U2R4BD6B 

R3 

84J3 DATA BE4BU1H1L2G1D4F1R2E1U1H 
1L2G1BD2BR7 

845 DATA BR1U1E4U1L5BD6BR8 

85J3 DATA BE3E1U1H1L2G1D1F1R2F1D1 

G1L2H1U1E1BD3BR6 

855 DATA BU1F1R2E1U4H1L2G1D1F1R2 
E1BD4BR3 

86J3 DATA U1R1D1BR3 
865 1 

87j3 '***** TITLES 

875 DIMT$ (12) :F0RN=1T012 :READT$ ( 
N) : NEXT 



32 



THE RAINBOW 



April 1987 



880 DATA 2)3)3913)35, 121514)37 , 12)312 
0,040918 , 1916)35)35)34 ,2 3)3914)3419 , 1 
316)34, 27212 816)34)312)3)35 , 2 718 2 8)352 
2)39)352 3 , 27)39 28)34)35142)3, 2 716 2 818)3 
9142)3, 27172821)392)3 
885 1 

89)3 f ***** DIRECTIONS 

895 DIMC$(15) :FORN=)3T015 .:READC$ ( 

N) :NEXT 

900 DATA N,NNW,NW,WNW,W,WSW,SW,S 
• S.W ; , S , SSE , SE , ESE , E', ENE , NE , NNE 
905 1 

91)3 ****** LOCATE ID 

915 DIM 1$ (3)3) :F0RN=1T03)3: READI $ 

(N) :NEXT 

920 DATA (BA)RBADOS, (BE)RMUDA, (3 
I)LOXI, (BR) OWNSVILLE, (CA) PE HATT 
ERAS, (CO) RPUS CHR, (CU) BA, (DO)M R 
EPUBLIC, (GA) LVESTON , (GC)AYMEN IS 
, (GR) AN AD A, (HA)ITI, (HO ) NDURAS , (J 
A) CKSONVILLE, (JM)AICA 
925 DATA (KE)Y WEST , (MI ) AMI , (MO) 
BILE, (MY)RTLE BEACH, (NA)SSAU, (NE 
)W ORLEANS, (NI) CARAGUA, (NO) RFOLK 
, (PE)NSACOLA, (PU)ERTO RICO, (SA)V 
ANNAH, (TA)MPA, (TR) INIDAD, (WI) LMI 
NGTON, (YU) CAT AN PEN 
930 LC$ = !f 59 .5 13. 464. 632. 488. 7 30. 



697 .226.)375.335.597 .327.979.)322. 
070.019 .09 4 .7 29 .581. 2 19. 561. 612. 
37 2 . 218 . 7 8 6;.)315.)38 1.-530. 37 7 .018 . 
)381 .8 24 . 7 8)3 . )3 2 5 . 887 . &3 1.079 .033 . 
579 .2 25. 29)3 .)33)3.)385 .)313 .)376.)336. 
887.)33)3.666.518. 581 . 03 2 . 082 .028. 
061. 310 . 878 .03A . 188 .021.0 
935 ****** w$ STRING 
940 F0RN=1T02 8 :READA$ :W$=W$+A$ :N 
EXTN 

945 DAT AA ,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L, 
M,N,0,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z, [, ] 
950 1 

955 '** TEST SQUARES ** 
9 60 EXEC4 4 5 3 9: PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : S CR 
EEN1, 1: Z$ = " 23)38)39)33)3 8 XX03 1512151 
8 11 : DRAW 11 C J3BM9 5 , 80 11 : F0RN=1T02 1STE 
P2:X$=MID$ (Z$,N,2) :X=VAL(X$). : IPX 
=)3THENL$ (X)= ff BR8 ff 

965 DRAWL$(X) : NEXT : Z $=" 11 : C0L0R)3 : 
LINE (115,9)3)- (12 5,1)3)3) ,PSET, B:PO 
KE178, 1: PAINT (120, 9 5): , , 0 : COLQRJ3 : 
LINE (13 6, 90) -(146 ,100) ,PSET,B:PO 
KE178,2:PAINT(14 : )3,95) , ,0 : DRAW 11 C0 
BM119, 115 ff +N$ (1) :DRAW ff C)3BM+16,)3 ft 
+N$ (2) :SOUND15)3, 1 

970 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$= ff 11 THEN97)3ELSE 
PC=VAL(A$) : IF PC<1 OR PC>2 THEN 





k)m&k -£@m FOR $149.00 

TM 



Che speech synthesizer that leaves the others tight lipped 



F INALLY . . . 




* No more fumbling with Multi-Pac or Y-Connectors 

* No vocabulary ROM or disk needed 

* Compatible with all operating systems 

* No driver program needed 

* Appears as a printer to Co-Co 



Speak-Easy plugs into the serial 
port of your Co-Co, not the card 
slot, and appears as a printer 
to the Co-Co. Incorporated in 
Speak-Easy is a unique state of 
the art two chip set which 
phonetically converts ASCTI text 
to speech. What this means to 
you is extreme ease of use,! 
virtually unlimited vocabulary,' 
and complete flexability in a 
speech synthesizer. Just look at 
this sample BASIC program: 
10 INPUT A<£ 
20 PRINT W-2 , A'ii 
30 GOTO 10 
and imagine how you could 
upgrade your games and 

applications with simple printer 
statements to use Speak-Easy. It 
can say anything including 
foreign words. rf you can spell 
it, Speak -Easy can say it. 
in RS-232C configuration with 
word length and stop bits. Choose 
DB-25 connectors. It you have a 



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Ohio rtsldanlE gad S.S'-v $alA Tax COD m$ 2 00 




April 1987 THE RAINBOW 33 



Unbeatable Prices from Howard Medical Computer 

Star NX-10 Printer Only $238 



disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER 

The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 
cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 

DC-4 

($2 shipping) 

RS DOS ROM CHIP 

ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compatability. 




$20 



each 



Reg. $40 
($2 shipping) 



DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 

DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only 



$17845 



( s 5 shipping) 
Add $34 for a Disto DC-3. 

Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$98 



( s 5 shipping) 



DD-2 A TEAC 55B Vfc height, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a Vi height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$188 



( $ 2 shipping) 



55B TEAC bare drive, V2 height, double-sided* double 
density with all mounting hardware fits R.S. 501. 



$118 



( s 3 shipping) 



52 MPI's bare drive, full height, double- sided, double 
density with all mounting hardware. 360K. 

$ ^^^J (S4 sh »PP» n 9) 

CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to one drive. 



$2495 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out, test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your 
money back (less shipping). 



Incredible Savings on Printers! 



LX-86 
FX-86E 
FX-286E 
EX-800 



SALE 
PRICE 

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$238 EX-10000 

$ 439 LQ-800 

$ 603 LQ-1000 

$ 503 LQ-2500 



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$692 



$792 
$1246 



Star NX-10 Only $238 



WORD PACK RS 

This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display. It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A. To get started, you need 
OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, and a 
monochrome monitor. 



$89 



($2 shipping) 



New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9. 



$10 



Smith Corona XE 6100 

The Smith Corona 6100 is state of the art for today's 
typewriters. It operates as a standard typewriter or it con- 
nects to the color computer via a serial/parallel convertor 
box. The Smith Corona has a 50,000 word dictionary that 
signals everytime you misspell a word. Then with a one key 
corrector — lifts off the word so it can be retyped correctly. 
The 6100 comes with all the standard selection features like 
auto indent, underline, repeat key, centering and carries a 
90 day warranty on parts and labor. 

Reg. $449 ($7 shipping) 

Messenger Module connects the Smith Corona, XE 6100 
& 6000, SE 2000, SD 3000, and XD 7000 & 8000 to the color 
computer or Tandy 1000/IBMP.C. 




$98 



$78. 45 



Lets the graphic capabilities 
of your CoCo EXPLODE 



Needed to connect CoCo 
Max and disk drive at same 
time. 



COCO 
MAX II 

Y CABLE $19- 45 

MAX O ^% Three sets include 72 different 

FONTS t3 13 fonts tor ty P esetting 

COLORING $15 
BOOK™ 



Twenty-two pictures of clip-art 
by Glenside Color Computer Club 



($2 shipping for each product) 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



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(312) 278-1440 



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ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
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A monthly issue contains more than 200 pages 
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Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
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& Rainbow On Disk! 



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■ 



, I 



970 
975 ' 

980 •*** INPUT RECORDED DATA *** 

■ 985 CLS : PRINTS 194 , "INPUT SAVED D 
ATA? <Y/N>" 

990 A$=INKSY$ : IFA$-" "THEN990ELSE 

IF A$="N |I, THEN lJl5 __| 
1W OPEN'"!^, #1", "HURRDATA" : INPUT 
#I / U;F6RN=j3TOU:INPUT#l,Di(N i ) , D2 ( 
N):FOR,W=0 TO 5: INPUT#1,D$(N,W) 
:NEXTW,N: CLOSE* 1 1 
\m$ '_** DRAW MAP ** 
1015 PM0DE4,5:PCLS1:SCREEN1, 1 : CO' 
LOR0:IF RS=1 GOSUB280:RS=i0:U=-l 
READA, B,.C,,D :-LINE ( A, B) - (C # D) 

, PSET 

1025 PEADC,D:IFC=0THEN1020ELSEIF 
C=-lTHENl i 030iLSEL-iNE- (C, D) ,PSET: 
GOTO 10 2' 5 

1030- -F0RN=1T03: READA, B ,C , B: LINE ( 
A , B) - ( C , D ) / PS E-T : NEXT 
1035 POKE178,PC 

1040 F0RN=1T07 : READ C, D: PAINT (C, 
D) , j 0 : NEXT: PSET ( 192 , 139 >0) 

■ 1045 DATA130, 0,126, 5, 125, 5, 125,4 
r 0.23, 2, 123,4,125,7 , 122 # 15 , 121, 15 
,121,8 , 120 , 8 , 120 , -3-, 119 , 3 ( , 119 , 13 , 
12#, 17 



1050 DATA12 1,20, 111, 25,111, 30,10 
8, 30, 100, ,35,95,40,94, 46 ,94 v 50,96 
,54,98, 58, 100, 65', 100, 74 , 99 , 74 ,96 
,75,93,71 

!j355 DATA92 ,71,88, 62,89, 60, 87, 61 
,87,56,81, 50, 75, 52 , 70) 48,, 62,48, 6 
1,46, 61,48,55,48,50,47,49, 48,55, 
50 

1060 DATA53, 53 , 56 ,54 , 55 , 55 , 52 , 54 
,50,55, 45, 52 , 3 7, 5.1, 32, 51, 26, 53 , 2 
0,156,14,61,14,70,13,89,20, 105,3 0 

, 110 

1065 DATA 4 2 , 106, 43 , 107 , 45 , 106 , 4-4 
,105,48,102,48,97,51,95,57,94,63 
,93, 66, 92,. 67, 94, 67, 95, 64, 100, 60, 
115,59,117 

1070 DATA59 ,119, 61, 120, 80, 120, 82 
, 121, -35, 12 5, 85, 127,83 , 131, 83, 145 
, 85 , 150 , 95 , 154 , 103 , 151, 109 ,152,1 
i5 , ,161 , 117 , 162 , 120 , 160 
1075 DATA122, 159 , 12 4 ,,146 , 126,143 
,13 2, 143, 140, 137, 143,136,144,137 
,143, 139 , 141, 141, 142, 145, 140, 150 
,142, 152,14 3,152,144,149,142,14,6 
1080 DATA143, 144;, 152., 14l, 158, 143 
,161,146,170,146,173,149,180,145 
,189,145, 189, 14 6, 185, 147 , 195, 151 
,195., 155, 198 , 156, 20:0,155, 203, 160 




i~ »~» » — »™» O *~ *~ *C *Z~ *~* O I <C 




DISH DRIVES 

HEW- A DRIVE SYSTEM <£ DSDD DRIVES ACCESSED 
UNDER RS DOS) Sf 

£ DRIVE SYSTEM«<2 DSDD DRIVES IN ONE CASE) 

I3£9.9S 

DRIVE 1 UPGRADE (1 DSDD UPGRADE FOR YOUR 

£G-J1£9.3131, OR 313£-1119.95 PLEASE 

SPECIFY CATALOG NUMBER WHEN ORDERING ! ! 



■DRIVE 0-SSDD F/H DRIVE Sf-J199.9& 



DRIVE 1-SSDD F/H DRIVE <USE W/EXISTING DRO) 

J12S.9E 



X- INCLUDES EITHER R .S. OR DISTO CONTROLLER 



CDCD. 3 

S12K UPGRADE-* 109.9S TECH MANUAL-J£9.9S 
RAM DISK i DIAGNOSTICS -.H9.9S 
MONITOR CONNECTOR FOR CM-£ -J4.9S 

OTHER STUFF 

COCO GRAPHICS DESIGNER-f £9.9S AD0S-J£9.95 
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SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTERS -144.95- 



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ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS* NO CODS. PRICES MAY CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 




April 1987 THE RAINBOW 35 








2)j, 93, 122, 95, 12 





1-085 DATA2 0 5 , 1|65 j 0 ,0 , 0 , 114 ,..2 ,115 
j 2JJ , 120 , 27 , iH3„ 3 3T120 , 40', 1*5,45; 
13,P , pjt , 130 , 6j3j.l3_4 ,61, 133,, 637134 , 
*ifW>71 ,143 j I J _1_J - - 

109.0 DATA71 , 1-48775 , 15 1, 76 , 150 , 74' 
,148; 821,154, 82,155,98 T '(L59-, 100,15 
9yl0^, IF7 ,1104 , 1571 105 , 158 , 113 , 16 
5jjUA^lMVl7f77^-B"r \\ 11 
1095 DATA177 , 39 V 176 T 39 , 17,6"; 7&,p , 
0 , 78 , 91?, 8 1 , 85, , 90 , 83 , 100 , 85 ,.104^8 
|3 ,J!0fil-S8 91 / r 3 

p7^424j^7_JL4-- I 

100 DATA 12 8 , ,9 8 , 13i0 , 98 , 12 5 , 100 , 1 
, r W> ip , 9 9 , 1 15 , 9 7 , 10 9 , 
95 , 108 , 9{3 JL06 , 94, 102 ,92 ( , 95 , 90 , 90 

,88,92,87,88, 87 j 11 1— |— | — I — 

105- DATit83 | ,8^,"8l2 , 88 , 79 , 9 1 , 78 , 90 
,0,0,93,103, a5, 100 ,9 5, , 104 ,93, 104 
, 93 „ 10 3 , 0 , 0 , 10 7 , 10 8 , l'l 107 , 1 1!>L- 

109,119x110 [I I 

1110 DATA l ll£, 110 » 1-0:1 , 109, 107 ,;108 
,0 ,0i, 129 , 107 , 137 > 1#7 ,_i3j&,.102-, 13-3 
L01-„ 13 7 , 10 7 , 13 6 , 10 2 , 1 3 3 ;, 10 1 , 1 3 7 
, 100 , 150 , 10^ ,153 , 104 , 155, 105 , 159 
,107,158,1081,152,107 ! _ _ — Y^T" 
1115' DATA 149 , 109 , 147 , 107 , 14 3 , 111 
,140, ^1^4-40 ,10-9 , 1-30 , I J 09 , 129 , 107 

'■"*"'. 




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which you change your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an account 
number and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
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Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



1 



,0-,0, 164 , 106 , 170,, 106 , 172 ,107-, 172 
jXfi.8 ,169 , 109 ,'164 ,109 , 164 , 10 6 
1120 DATA 0,0,91,77,93,77,92,78, 
9-1,78,91, 77, 0,0, 110', 74, 111, 74;, 11 
3 , 81, 112-, 81, lit, 79 , 109 , 77 , 109> 76 

1125 DATA0 ,0,123,122,124 ,22 ,124-, 2 
3 , 123,23,123 , 2"2 , 0 , 0 i 19 1 , 1 4 5 , 19 6 , 
145, 195 , 146, 195 ,148 , 194 , 149 , 191, 
14?, 19"2|1 48, 192i,146 ' 1 — L— W \ 
1 1^0 bATA-191 , 145 , 070, 20 2 , 1 3 3 , 203 
„ 13 3 , 20 3 , 13 4 / 202-,- 1 3 4„ 2 0 2 , 13 3 , - 1 , 
71*0,115, 0,0", ,0,0, 130,0,112, 165,-2 
05 ,165 r 5 7 5 ,10.0787 , 140 , 105 , 167 , 10 

, 110 * 1019,. Ill , 77 ,194 , 147 
113 5 '** DRAW TITLES ** 

1140- -COLOR0 : FORN=0TO144STEP24 : LI 

NE(2l2,N) -(2 50,N+2 4 ) , PS ET B : NEXT 

31145 B=10:X$='*" :1F0RN=1T07 

lll50 -L=LEN-(¥$ (N) ) 

1155 F0RZ=*1T0L-1STEP2, 

1160" ZS=MID$(T?$ ,Z,2) :W=VAL(Z$ 

)- l :X^=X$+-li$t^)- i 1 

1165 NEXTZ t.DRAW"C0EiM2 15 , "+STR~$ (B 
) +X$ : Xf=" " : B=B+24 : NiEXTN 

70! -DRAWLS 4 C0BM0 , 185" : FORN=8T01 

2 : X$= Li=LBN-<T-$ (N-) )-: F0RZ=*1T0L-1 

STEP 2 : Z;$=MID$ (f $ (N) , Z , 2 ) : W~VAL( Z 
$)'!:-X$=X'$+L$-(W) iNEXT!? :X$=X$+"BR5» 
: DRAW"Cj0Bri+4>-185"+X$ rNEX^HS'^' 

82^18,18090,30114051' :X$=' M ' 
1 175 !DRAW I, S4C0BM0 , 150 » : FQRN=1T01 

7STEP2 : W=VAL(MID$ (H$ , N, 2) ) : DRAWL 

S"(W) : NEXT [ \ LlLj— i-' 1 - 
..1118^0 DRAW"S8C0BM0, 170" :F0RN=1T0L 
EN(iHN$) : N$=MID$ (HN$vN-, 1) : F0RZ=1T 
0'2 6 : IFMID$ ( W$ , Z , 1 ) =N$THENi)RAWL$ ( 
Z):GOTO1190 - j"'. 
1185 NEXTZ_L J,_ '« 



THE RAINBOW 




L j — 1-4 — 1 



r j 



NEXTN : FORT=l TO 500: NEXT T: 



RETURN 
1195 'I 

1200 'END***** 






No more mystery meat surprises 





Banishing the Freezer 

Burn Blues 



By Robert Griff ard 




Some programs have been known 
to convince the non-computer 
user of the value of using a com- 
puter. The Freezer is just such a pro- 
gram. After finding items in the deep 
freeze that had been there too long and 
were suffering from freezer burn, my 
wife accepted the use of this program, 
on an experimental basis, until it elim- 
inated the problem. 

By keeping track of the items being 
placed in the freezer by date, items can 
be rotated through deep freeze storage 
so that the oldest items are removed 
first. Items placed in the deep freeze are 
normally marked with contents of the 
package and date. The only additional 
marking required for control is a pack- 
age number; numbers are easier to 
search for than names when looking for 
an item. 

The program is user-friendly, so that 
just following the screen instructions 
allows even the most inexperienced 
computer user to use the program. The 
only caution is the category of items 
must agree with the categories listed in 
Line 610. Printing the contents by 
category provides an aid to menu plan- 
ning. 

The opening screen, generated by 

Bob Griffard is a retired U.S. A ir Force 
officer. He supervised a large, main- 
frame computer facility supporting the 
military command and control func- 
tion. His current interest is program- 
ming the CoCo for home management. 



lines 1 to 29, is an example of adding 
a little pizazz to the program by using 
the Title Maker program by Fred 
Scerbo in the March 1986 issue. 

This program was originally written 
for the Radio Shack CGP-115. This 
very capable printer uses 4 l A inch wide 
roll paper. This size proved to be a most 
convenient size to hang on the side of 
the freezer, and I still use it with my 
Gemini 10X printer. The printer codes 
in lines 630 and 660 are for the Gemini 
printer and do not establish a page 
break since roll paper is used. Addition- 
ally the type codes used in Line 6 1 0 must 
be used or changed to obtain a print by 
category of the freezer contents. 



The Search for Item function (lines 
670-700) uses the INSTR instruction so 
that any item containing the input string 
will be displayed on the screen. For 
example, if ST is listed as the search 
string, all items containing this combi- 
nation of letters will be displayed. You 
would then see roast, steaks, steamer 
clams, stew meat, etc. 

Different methods have been used to 
control scrolling of the screen display. 
Line 330 compares the division of the 
item number by screen lines with the 
integer of the division of the item 
number by screen lines to control scrol- 
ling. Lines 390 and 680 count the lines 
printed to control the scrolling, □ 



orviT i 
^ s pi 



^ lj c Q fc> 



BEEF. 

HAMBURGER 
STEAK 5(2) 
STEAKS ?2> 
POT ROAST 
STEW MEAT 



POR K 

| COUPJTRY RI6S 
CHOPS 



JUN 86 

J UN 06 

JUN 86 

JUN 86 

JUL. 86 



» RGAST 
. 



JUN 86 
JUN 86 
JUN 86 











WHOLE PRVffl 


13 


JUN 


86 


P ! ECES 


17 


JUN 


86 


MALFS<3) 


34 


JUL 


36 


F" T SH 








FLOUNDER 


16 


JUN 


86 


shrimp 


26 


JUN 


86 










TV DIN STEAK 


22 


JUN 


86 


DEVIL CAKE 


=0 


JUN 


86 


ANGEL CAk'E 


32 


JUL 


86 



NEXT PACI AGE NO [S ~Z 



April 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



37 



-> — 

25 


8 


A JL 

200 , , . 


. .141 


300 . . . 




390 , 


26 


530 ... 


.,.215 


600 


• • .136 


670 . . . 


.196 


END 


...109 




The listing: FREEZER 

1 CLS0 :F0RI=1T0 416 :READ A:PRIN 

TCHR$ (A+128) ; : NEXT 

3 DATA ffffftftfiftftffftftffftff 



i i i i i 
5 DATA , , 

3, ,55,60 

, , , , , 

7 DATA , , 
3 , , 63 , 60 

, , , , , 

9 DATA , , 

0, ,60,48 

i t t f t 
11 DATA, 

,80,95, , 

13 DATA, 

,91,95, , 

15 DATA, 

,84,92, , 
17 DATA, 
112 , 127 , 

19 DATA, 
124,127, 

21 DATA, 
112, 124, 

23 DATA, ,47,44,44, , 47,44,47, ,47, 
44, 44,, 47, 44, 44,, 44, 44, 47,, 47, 44 
,44, ,47,44,47, , , 

25 DATA, ,47,44,44, ,47, 45, 34, ,47, 
44,44, ,47,4 4,4 4, ,35,44,32, ,47,44 



,44, ,47, 
27 DATA, 



, , ,63,48,48,63, ,63,48,6 
59, ,60, 63, 60, ,63, 60, 60, 

, , ,63,54,57,63, ,63,60,6 
63, ,48,63,48, ,60,60,63, 

, , , 52 , 56 , 52 , 56 , , 60 , 48 , 6 
60, ,48,60,48, ,60,60,60, 

, t r r t r , ,84,95,88, ,95,91 

t f I I I t t t t I I 

,,,,,, , ,80,95,80, ,95,84 

ffftf tttflt 

,,,,,,,,84,92,88, ,92,80 

flftf ffttlt 

, , , , , ,124,127,124, ,127, 
127,124,124, f , , , , , , , / , , 

,,,,, ,112,127,112, ,127, 
127,124,124, , , , , , , , , , , , 

, , , ,112,124,112, ,124, 
124,124,124, ,,,,,,,,,,, 



45,34,,, 
44,32,32, ,44,32,44, ,44, 
44,44, ,44, 44, 44,, 44, 44, 44,, 44, 44 

,44, ,44,32,44,,, K\ " 

29 FOR X=l TO 1200 :NEXT 1 ^ 

50 REM ITEM TYPES MUST AGREE WIT 
H TYPES LISTED IN LINE 610 TO PR 

60 REM PRINTOUT FORMATTED FOR NA 
RROW PAPER FOR EASE OF USE 
70 REM CODES IN THE PRINT SECTIO 
N-LINES 600 TO 660 - ARE FOR GEM 

ini i0x WjMBF jmBKP^^r 

80 REM PROGRAM REQUIRES EXTENDED 

COLOR BASIC 
100 REM FREEZER INVENTORY 



110 1 BOB GRIFFARD 

120 ' 129 STAGE RD. NEWPORT NEWS 

VA. 23606 

130 1 PHONE (804) 596 8440 
140 GOTO740 

150 CLEAR3000:DIMT$ (105) ,I$(105) 
,M$(105) ,P(105) ,Y(105) :M=106:Z$= 
CHR$ (13 4) 

200 ID$=" FREEZER INVENTORY" : GO 
SUB750 : PRINTTAB ( 3 ) 11 FILE CONTAIN 

S»;B; M ITEMS": PRINT: PRINT" DO YO 
U WANT TO: ": PRINT: PRINTTAB(5) "<1 
> ADD ITEMS TO THE LIST" : PRINTTA 
B(5)"<2> VIEW TOTAL FILE" 
210 PRINTTAB (5) "<3> VIEW ITEMS B 
Y TYPE" : PRINTTAB (5) "<4> DELETE I 
TEMS FROM FILE" 

220 PRINTTAB (5) "<5> SAVE FILE ON 
DISK" : PRINTTAB (5) "<6> LOAD FILE 
FROM DISK": PRINT TAB(5)"<7> PRI 

NT HARD COPY": PRINT TAB(5)"<8> S 

EARCH FOR AN ITEM" : PRINTTAB ( 5 ) "< 

9> QUIT" 

230 INPUT"ENTER YOUR CHOICE <1 T 

0 9>";A:IF A<1 OR A>9 THEN 200 
240 ON A GOTO 250,3 20,380,450,53 
0,570, 600, 670,760 

250 ID$=" ADD ITEMS" : GOSUB7 

50: PRINT: PRINT" INPUT DATA AS RE 
QUESTED. ": PRINT" TO STOP, ENTER 
end FOR •TYPE 1 . " 

260 PRINT: B=B+1: IF B=M THEN 310 
270 INPUT" TYPE" ;T$ (B) : IF T$(B)= 
"END"THEN 300 

280 INPUT" ITEM" ;I$ (B) : INPUT" PA 
CKAGE NO";P(B) : INPUT" DATE — MONT 
H, YEAR" ;M$(B) ,Y(B) : ID$=" LI 
STING" :GOSUB750:PRINT"TYPE" ;TAB( 
8) "ITEM" ;TAB(21) "PKG" ;TAB(25) "DA 
TE" :PRINTT$ (B) ;TAB(8)I$(B) ;TAB(2 
l)P(B) ;TAB ( 25) M$ (B) ;TAB ( 2 9 ) Y (B) 
290 GOTO 260 
300 B=B-1:GOTO200 

310 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY THE FILE I 
S FULL" : INPUT" PRESS <ENTER> TO R 
ETURN TO MENU" ;R$ : GOTO200 
320 CLS: f LIST OF FILE 
3 30 PRINT" CONTENTS AS OF ";D$:P 
RINT"TYPE" ;TAB(10) "ITEM" ;TAB,(19) 
"PKG" ;TAB(25) "DATE" : PRINT: FOR N= 

1 TO B : PRINTT$ ( N ) ; TAB ( 7 ) I $ ( N ) ; TA 
B(19)P(N) ; TAB ( 24 ) M$ (N) ;TAB(27)Y( 
N):IF N/12=INT(N/12) THEN340 ELS 
E350^H^ a( 

340 INPUT M PRESS<ENTER>TO CONTINU 
E" ;R$:CLS:PRINT"TYPE";TAB(10) "IT 
EM" ;TAB(19) "PKG" ; TAB ( 2 5 ) "DATE" :P 
RINT 

350 NEXT N: PRINT@448 , "<1>=REVIEW 

LISTING <2>= MENU"; 
360 F$ = INKEY$:IF F$= ,f "THEN3 60 
370 IF VAL(F$)=1THEN320 ELSE 200 





38 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



DataPack 1 1 Plus V4.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOPILOTsnd AUTO-LOG Command Processors 
X-MODEM DISK FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
VT-100 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

* No lost data usin$ Hi~ft#s Display, Even at 1 200 Baud on the S»nal porl. 

* 0 Hi-R *s Displays, 28 to 255coiumns by 24 I ines Ik true Upper/Lower cas* 
1 45K Text fluM«r when using the Hi-R«s T«xl Display and Disk 

* ASCII L BINARY disk fib transfer support via XMOQEM. 
Directly record receive data to a disk file while online. 
VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 
VT-1 00/52 cursor keys & position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. Kbd. keys. 
Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rales 300 io 0600. 
Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 
Send full 128 character set from Keyboard with control codes. 
Complete Editor insert, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 
0 Variable tenglfy Programmable Macro Key buffers. 
Programmable Printer rates from HO to 0600 Baud. 
Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Key Buffers or Disk. 
Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

* Fr#ex« Display & Review information On iine with no loss of data. 

* Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

* And much much more. 

Supports: Word-Pak I, II, R.S, and Double Density SO Column Cards 
Disto Controller w/eO column card & parallel printer 
PBJ Parallel PrinlerCard and Dual Serial Port (2£P~Pak) 
R. S. Modem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 32K & Disk, Only $59.95 



HI-RES II Screen Commander 

Tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on your 
CoCo? Wish you could see more lines and characters? Then HI-RES II 
is the answer, it can give you the big screen display you've always 
wanted, tl will display 24 lines of 32, 42, 51, 64 and even 65 true 
upper and lower case characters per line without extra hardware. 

HI-RES II is the most powerf ul screen enhancement package available 
for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is completely 
compatible and transparent to Basic, Once the program is loaded, 
everything works the same as before, only you have a much better 
display l.o work with . It even allows you to have mixed text and 
Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or hav« leparate text and 
graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key repeat 
feature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the screen. 

HI-RES II features over 30 special control code f unctions that allow 
you to change characters per line, protect display lines, change 
background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse video, 
underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works on 
all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides automatic 
reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you press reset. 

Only 24.95 on Tape or $29.95 on Disk 



"The Source" 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine language 
programs directly from disk and generate beautiful. Assembler 
Source Code. And "The Source* has all the features and functions you 
are looking for in a Disassembler. 

* Automatic Label generation and allows specifying FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Disassembles programs directly from Disk or ROrl 

* Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk, or a printed listing. 
M Generated source files ore in standard ASCII formal. 

* Built in Hex/ASCII dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 

* Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation, 

* Written in fast machine language, one of the easiest to use Disassemblers 

Requires 32K Disk $34.95 



The CBASIC Editor/Compiler VI. 1.2 

Do you want to write fast machine language programs but you 
don't want to spend the next few years trying to learn how ??? 
Well with CBASIC, you could be writing them right now! 

CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and program 
editing system available for the Color Computer. It will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available In your color 
computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit and 
convert programs f rom a language you are already familiar with 
Extended Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We added advanced f eatures like a f ull 
blown program editor. Hi -Pes text Displays and BO column hardware 
support for editing, compiling and your compiled programs. Plus we 
made it exceptionally easy to use, CBASIC is the friendliest and 
easiest compiler available for the Color Computer. 

The most complete £ (fit or/Compiler I have seen for the CoCo . . " 

— The RAINBOW, March 1086 

CBASIC is a powerf ul tool f or the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs 
without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory 
allocation and so on, because CBASIC will do it for you automatically. 
Or, CBASIC will let you control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program easily. 

C5ASIC features well over 100 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. CBASIC supports ALL the High and Low 
Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in 
Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET, PUT, PLAY and DRAW, 
all with 99.9% syntax compatibility, CBASIC also supports the built 
in Serial 1/0 port with separate printer & serial I/O baud rates. You 
can send and receive data with PRINT, INPUT and INKEY commands. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 
which allows you to load s edit or create programs f or the compiler. 
It is a full featured editor designed specifically for writing and editing 
Basic programs. It has block move i copy, program renumbering, 
automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control and more. 

'The Editor is a very good one end could be the subject for review 
all by itself. ' - The RA INBOW. tfarch 1 086 

'Comparing ECS s edit mode to CBASlC's text edit oris like comparing a 
World War I! jeep to a modern sedan Both get you to your destination 
but what a difference in the ride. --Hoi Col o, f eburary I 06o 

The documentation for CBASIC is an 8 1/2 * 11 Spiral Bound book 
which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information, 

"CSASIC's manual is easy to read and written with a minimum of 
techmcalese. " - -ffot CoCo f etrvary , 1 066 

The price of CBASiC )$ $ M9.00, It is the most expensive Color 
Basic Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. 
Compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar for dollar, CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 64K & Disk, not JDOS compatible. 

"The- price tag it carries seemed a tit steep for an integer compiler on first 
glance, but when you add 64K 4 hi-res drivers, and full- screen editing, CBASIC 
begins to look more (ike a bargain.. " - - Hot CoCo February, 1 066 
"A Complete Editor/Compiler Welt Worth its Price' —RAINBOW March 1066 



TEXTPRO III 
"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

* 0 Hi-Res Displays from 25 to 255 columns by 24 lines & Upper/Lower Case 

* Three Programmable Header iines that can be re-defined at anytime. 

* Programmable Footer line L Automatic Footnote System. 

* 10 Programmable Tab stops is ? Powerfull Tab Function Commands. 

* Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left and right. 

* On screen display of underline and Double size characters. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc. parameters anytime in the text. 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a full disk. 

* Easily imbed any number of format and control codes. 

* Automatic Hemory sense 16-64K with up to of memory workspace, 
" Fully supports Ihe use of 60 column hardware cords. 

TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, flexability and extensive document processing, It is not like 
most of the ot.her word processing programs available f or the Color 
Computer. If you are looking f or a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better off 
with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what your 
looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally diff erent way than most 
word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character abbreviations 
of words or phrases f or commands and f ormatting information that 
you innbed directly in your text, There are over 50 different 
formating commands you can use without ever leaving the text your 
working on. There are no tima comsuming, and often furstrating 
menu chases, you are In total control at all times. The f ormatted 
output can be displayed directly on the' screen, showing you exactly 
what your printed document will look like' bef ore a single wOrd is ever 
printed. This includes margins, headers^' footers, page numbers, page 
breaks, underlining, column formating and full justification. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49.95 



ED TV ASM 64D 
64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM 64D is a Disk basedco-resident Text Editor & Assembler, 
It has a Hi-Resolution 51, 64 or 05 column by 24 line display, so you 
see your program listings easily and it supports Column cards. The 
disk also contains a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

This is the most powerfull, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/ Assembler package for the Color Computer. It even has 
automatic line number generation for easy entry of program material. 

* Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

* Fu!l screen line editing with immediate Sine update. 

* Easy louse Single keystroke editing commands, 

* Load &Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

* Move or Copy single I* multiple text lines. 

* Create and Edit disk Hies larger than memory, 

« Hi-ftes Text Display 25 to &5 columns by 'N lines. 

* Supports Vord-Pak I ,H. b R.S. and Oisko 60 column display cards. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D features include: 

* Supports the full 6800 instruction set. 
■ Supports conditional IF /THEN/ELSE assembly. 

* Supports Disk library files (include). 

* Supports standard motorola assembler dirtctivti 

* Allows multiple values for FDB & FCB directives. 

* Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 

* Assembles directly to disk or tape in LQAOH format. 

* Supports up to 0 open disk files during assembly. 

* Allows assembly from editor buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 52K Disk $59.95 _ 



CoCo-3 5J2K upgrade $149.95, card wihout Rim |49.95 
Two Drive RAM-DISK prognm for CoCo-3 $19.95 



_er products by mail, send check or money order for the amouni of 
purchase, plus 13.00 for shipping & handling to the address below 
To orderly VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at 17021 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, Aom to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89 1 10 
702-452- 



38)3 ID$ = " ITEMS BY TYPE ,f :GOSUB 
750: PRINT: PRINT: INPUT" ENTER ITE 
M TYPE TO BE LISTED ";S$:PR 
INT H TYPE ,f ;TAB(7) "ITEM" ;TAB(19) "P 
KG " ; TAB (25) " DATE " : V=0 : FOR N=l TO 

B:IF T$ (N) =S$THEN390 ELSE 410 
390 PRINTT$ (N) ;TAB(7) 1$ (N) ;TAB(1 

9) P(N) ;TAB(24)M$ (N) TAB (28) Y(N) ; : 
V=V+1: IF 7=12 THEN 400 ELSE 410 
400 INPUT" PRESS enter TO CONTIN 
UE" ;R$:CLS:V= < 0 
410 NEXT N 

420 PRINT@448 , "<1>=LIST ANOTHER 
TYPE <2>=MENU" 

430 F$ = INKEY$:IF F$="" THEN430 
440 IF VAL(F$)=1 THEN380 ELSE IF 
VAL(F$)=2 THEN 200 ELSE 420 

4 50 CLS : 1 DELETE ITEMS 

460 ID$=" DELETE ITEMS" : GOSUB 
750: PRINT: PRINT" PACKAGE NUMBER 
TO BE DELETED ": INPUT K: FOR X 

=1 TO B:IFK=P(X) THEN 480 

470 NEXT X:GOTO 490 

480 PRINT T$(X); TAB (8) I$(X) ; TA 

B(19) "PKG";TAB(21) P(X) ; " IS DEL 

ETED" : Y=X : X=B : NEXTX : FOR N=Y TO B 

:T$(N)=T$ (N+l) :I$ (N)=I$(N+1) :P(N 

)=P(N+1) :M$ (N) =M$ (N+l) :Y(N)=Y(N+ 

1) :NEXT N:B=B-l:GOTO 500 

490 PRINT"NO PACKAGE NUM. "K" WA 

5 FOUND" 

500 PRINT@448 , "<1>=DELETE ANOTHE 

R ITEM <2>=MENU" 

510 F$=INKEY$:IF F$=""THEN510 

520 IF VAL(F$)=1 THEN 450 ELSE 2 

00 

530 ID$=" SAVE DATA ON DISK": GO 
SUB750: PRINT: INPUT " DATE OF FIL 

E UPDATE" ;D$: PRINT: INPUT" DESTINA 
TION DRIVE FOR DATA " ; DN : DRIVE ( D 
N) :OPEN"0" , #1, " FREEZER/ DAT " : PRIN 
T #1,B 

540 FOR N=l TO B : CLS : PRINT@233 , " 
saving data" : PRINT#1 , T$ (N) : PRINT 
#1,I$(N) :PRINT#1,P(N) :PRINT#1,M$ 
(N) : PRINT #1 , Y (N) : NEXTN 
550 PRINT#l,D$:CLOSE#l 
560 ID$=" ALL DONE" :GOSUB75 

0: PRINT: PRINT" DATA HAS BEEN SAV 
ED ON DISK. ": PRINT: PRINT" PRESS \ 
ANY KEY FOR MENU . " : EXEC4 453 9 : GOT 
O 200 I 
570 ID$=" LOAD DATA FROM DISK" :G 
OSUB7 50: PRINT: INPUT" SOURCE DRIVE 
FOR DATA » ;DN: DRIVE ( DN ): PRINT: I 
NPUT" PRESS enter WHEN READY" ;R$ 
:OPEN"I",#l, "FREEZER/DAT" : IF EOF 

(1)=-1 THEN 590 JBSEE^tBw 
580 INPUT #l,B:FOR N=l TO B:ID$= 
" LOADING DATA FILE" : GOSUB750 : P 
RINT@2 3 3 , Z$"loading"Z$"data"Z$ : I 



NPUT #1,T$(N) :INPUT#1,I$(N) : INPU 
T#1,P(N) : INPUT#1, M$ (N) :INPUT#1,Y 
(N) :NEXT N: INPUT #1,D$ 
590 CLOSE #1:GOTO200 

600 ID$=" PRINT BY CATEGORY": GO 

SUB750: PRINT: PRINT " PRINT OF FR 

EEZER CONTENTS BY CATEGORY" :P 
RINT: INPUT" INPUT TODAYS DATE" ; E 

$ : PRINT # - 2 , CHR$ (27) CHR$ (87) CHR$ ( 

1) :PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (27) CHR$ (45) CHR$ 

(1) 

610 PRINT#-2 , "CONTENTS OF FREEZE 
R" : PRINT#-2 , "AS OF: "?E$:F$(1)=" 
BEEF" : F$ ( 2 ) ="PORK" : F$ ( 3 ) ="CHICK" 
: F$ (4) ="FISH" : F$ (5) ="MISC" 
620 FOR J=l TO 5: PRINT#-2 :PRINT# 
- 2 , CHR$ (27) CHR$ (87) CHR$ ( 1 ) : PRINT 
#-2 ,CHR$ (27) CHR$ (45) CHR$ (1) : PRIN 
T#-2 , F$ ( J ) : PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (27) CHR$ 
(87)CHR$(0) ; : PRINT#-2 , CHR$ ( 2 7 ) CH 
R$ (45) CHR$(0) ; 

630 FORX=lTO 18 : PRINT#-2 , CHR$ ( 2 3 
1) ;CHR$ (232) ; : NEXTX : PRINT#-2 : FOR 

N=l TO B 
640 IF T$(N)=F$(J) THEN 650 ELSE 

660 

650 PRINT#-2,I$(N) ; TAB ( 2 3 ) P (N) ;T 
AB(30)M$(N) ;TAB(33)Y(N) 
660 NEXT N: NEXT J : PRINT #-2 : PRINT 
#-2 / STRING$(40 / 45) : PRINT: INPUT ,f 

WHAT IS THE NEXT PACKAGE NO";U: 
PRINT#-2 / " NEXT PACKAGE NO IS "; 
U : PRINT#-2 , STRING$ ( 12 , 10 ) : PRINT : 
PRINT "PRESS enter TO RETURN TO M 
ENU" : EXEC4 4 53 9 : GOTO 200 
670 ID$=" SEARCH FOR ITEM" : GOSU 
B7 50: PRINT: INPUT" NAME OF ITEM Y 
OU ARE SEARCHING FOR" ; S$ : P=l : C= 
0:V=0:FOR N=l TO B : F=INSTR(P, 1$ ( 
N) ,S$) :IF F=0 THEN 700 
680 PRINT T $ ( N ) ; TAB ( 8 ) I $ ( N ) ; TAB ( 
25)P(N) :C=C+1:V=V+1:IF V=12 THEN 

690ELSE700 
690 INPUT" PRESS enter TO CONTI 
NUE";R$:V=0:CLS 

700 NEXT N:IF C=0 THEN PRINT : PRI 
NT" NO ITEM CALLED "; S$ ; " FOUN 

710 PRINT@448 , "<1>=SEARCH AGAIN 
<2>== MENU" 1 | f 

720 F$=INKEY$:IF F$=" M THEN720 
730 IF VAL(F$)=1 THEN670 ELSE IF 

VAL(F$)=2 THEN 200 ELSE 710 
740 PCLEAR1:GOTO150 
750 CLS : PRINT@0,STRING$ (6, 175) ; : 
PRINT@6 , ID$ ; : PRINT@26, STRING$ ( 6 , 
17 5) ; :PRINT@3 2 , STRING$ (32, 13 4) ; : 
ID$= " " : RETURN 

7 60 CLS : PRINT: PRINT "ARE YOU SURE 
? y/n" : PRINT: INPUT R$ : IF R$="Y" 
THEN ID$==" HAVE A NICE DAY":GOS 
UB750:END:ELSE GOTO 200 



40 



THE RAINBOW Aprif 1987 




1URB 



RAM 



TM $33935 
$1 19.95 



TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3 



512K Fast High Quality Memory. 
Super Easy Solderless Installation. Installs in minutes. 
J> Assembled, tested, and burnecl-in. 
120 ns RAM Chips 

High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreened PC Board. 
i> Ideal tor OS9 Level II 
i> 2 Year Warranty. 

i> Free GIME Chip Technical Specs ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
i> Free 512K Ram Test Program ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
i> Free MUSICA RAM Disk ($ 10.00 without Turbo Ram). 




i> $5 OFF TURBO RAM Disk. 

i> Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. 



$69.95 




INSTALLATION 

It you know how to hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you can 
install Turbo Ram in minutes. However, if you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pay the return 
postage and guarantee it tor I year $15.00 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

If for any reason you wish to return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 15 days and be charged only a 107o restocking charge. You 
may keep the GIME CHIP Technical Specs, 5 1 2 K Ram Test program 
and MUSICA RAM DISK, a $30 value. 



TURBO RAM DISK 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning fast Ram Disks lo your COCO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" for fast access. Single disk system users can 



use TURBO RAM DISK to easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 512K Turbo Charged COCO 3 $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is the most comprehensive modem package for the COCO 3. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto 
dial feature for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk H $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE III 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 80 column'display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 20 line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and more! 

Disk $49.95 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land of Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest to discover the source of 
magic in the Land of Zanth. This intriguing adventure features over 2 
dozen hi-res 16 color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effects. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics look great. 
Disk $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same Junior you've seen in the Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless little monkey must overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens worth) to rescue his father, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before he finally meets 
with his big daddy. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics are superb. 
Disk . . , $34.95 



We accept CASH. CHECK COD, VISA and MASTER CARD ardors 38 W255 DEERPATH ROAD 

Snipping and handling US and Canada S5.00 ^ — -y f\ — y 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Can.xla S3. 00 X/ / V BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

Illinois residents .idd 6'/j"u salon u\. 

s2oo ^— ^ n.y.Fnn tfyyja. (312)879-6880 




TM 



tool 



LEGE 



FILE EDIT HUH HISC 



All Voices On 
T i Me Signature 
Key Signature 

Reset block 



\f YOU |ap 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 




Block delete 



| Block copy 



m 



3 - IA-^ 




I 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA tor musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click, 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 

12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 

drum machines. 
f Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 

channels. t 

Transpose music to any key. 
\S Modify music to any tempo. 
\* Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose. 
\* Key signature lets you specify sharps and 

flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 

Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 

(#LC164). 

ix Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

\S Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 



i> Solo capability 
i> Block edits are highlighted. 
\* Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
Name of note pointed to is constantly 
displayed. 
\S Jump to any point in the score 

instantaneously. 
*> Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece, 
ix Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary 
^ LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 
Music easily saved to tape or disk. 
Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 



i> 

LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 



$54.95 



LYRA OPTIONS 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 tiles to LYRA 
files. 

(T or D) #LC164 $14.95 

LYRA STEREO ENHANCER 

Gives the LYRA stereo output when used with 

the STEREO PAK or ORCHESTRA 90. 

(T or D) #LS149 _ . , . $14.95 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 , _ , $19.95 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(T or D) #LS177 $19.95 

STEREO PAK 

Plugs into the COCO ROM cartridge slot allow- 
ing easy connection to your stereo system. 
#SP 193 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 800 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 

COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack. 



We accept CASH. CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada ... . $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD Charge ( $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/4% sales lax. 





38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



FILE EDIT HIDI HISC 



HIDI Instrunents: 



BJUsLiiUELlS 



8 



UOi Brass 1 

006 Piano 3 

013 E Organ 5 

003 Trunpet 7 

018 Oboe 9 

021 Vibrphn B 

025 Clavier D 

043 Snaredr F 



005 String 
009 Guitar 
014 P Organ 
016 Flute 
019 Clarnet 
026 Harpsch 
032 Tinpani 
045 Percusn 



1 M 






'i 1 ,' i « 




CtVi 





Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



^ Supports 16 Track recording and playback 

V Adjustable tempo. 

w Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible) 

V Record to any track. 

\^ Low Level track editing. 

LYRA editing, (one voice per track) 
Playback from any number of tracks. 

a> Quantizing to '/is, V32, 1 /64 intervals. 



Filter out MIDI data: 

Key pressure Contro1 Change 

Program change Channel Pressure 

Pitch wheel System Message 



V Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

Adjustable Key (Transposition). 

V Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing 

V Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE 



a> Sequencer features. 

100% machine code. 

"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

Metronome 

i> Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64 K C0C0, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 
DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 
TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 



W LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 

Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the rrflfTf keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 



EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 




• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In factyoudo 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. Wemean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 

erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you theSUPER VOICE for$59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 




VISA* 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



<//' 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada S3. 00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/4% sales tax 



Speech. Systems 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 





3 



T.M. 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 



WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 




SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






sure » vorci 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VQICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Device 




SC 01 


SP 256 


SC 01 


Speaking Speeds 






l 


1 


Volume Levels 


If 




1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


— ; — 




1 


1 


Wccai Tract 
Filler Sellings 






1 


1 


Basic unll 
of Spaeth 




I 64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pilch Varmlnn* 


40M (32 ihukil* l«v«it 
mtth 1 inftititDft tpt'dat 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 

Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 





fre£ 
blank djsic 

OR TAP£ 
WITH EVfRY 
ORDER 




VISA' 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'/A 



Sneecli ^uit 



9 



Siem5 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $ 5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 674% sales tax 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS 



EDUCATION NOTES 




1 £If 

loft 




ECB 






1 







V 











V 






! 

1 — | 



gram 




r 



i 

i 1 

j By Steve Blyn | i 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 












Graphs are one of the more inter- 
esting yet often confusing topics 
in mathematics. They appear in 
many of the standardized math tests 
that youngsters are required to take. 
Graphs are an important part of any 
consumer's education. Newspapers, 
especially, contain many examples of all 
types of graphs that should be studied 
and understood. 

This program is an aid in learning to 
understand line graphs. The program 
will generate endless line graphs for you 
to use as you see fit. The last line in the 
program will permit you to save any of 
the graphs on your disk system. You 
may also print out any graphs generated 
if you have a screen print program. 

Although several of the values are 
given after each graph has been drawn, 
there are no formal questions asked by 
this program. The reason for this is 
there are just too many different levels 
that your child or pupils may be on. 

Examples of questions for younger 
students might be: 

1) What is the value of each of the 
variables? 

2) Which is the greatest value? 

3) Which is the smallest value? 
Examples of questions for middle 

grade students might be: 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the. handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



1) What is the difference between the 
highest and the lowest values? 

2) Which is the second highest or sec- 
ond lowest value? 

3) Arrange the values in ascending or 
descending order. 

Examples of questions for older 
students might be: 

1) What is the mean? 

2) What is the median value? 

3) Any other statistical operation you 
desire to teach or test. 

Lines 50 through 90 contain the 
program's opening screen. The user 
may either press ENTER to see a graph 
or press E to end the program. After 
pressing ENTER, lines 120 through 460 
will draw a graph. All of the variables 
will be in multiple^ of five to make 
computing the values easier for all 
students. The values will be random. No 
graphs will be identical. 

Lines 200 through 240 ensure that no 
two scores will be the same. This was 
done so that questions such as, "Which 
is the largest value?" have only one 
answer. If this does not suit your pur- 
poses, then merely shorten these lines to 
remove the IF statements. You will then 
randomly have repeats in the variables' 
values. 

Lines 500 through 640 contain the 
strings to draw the numbers and letters. 
The numbers one through seven are 
needed for the value amounts zero to 70 
and the letters A though F are used as 
the variable names. 

After the graph is drawn, the child 
may answer any of your questions. 
When the ENTER key is pressed, the 



computer will display the amount of 
each variable and the average (mean) of 
the scores. These values may be com- 
puted by the children while the graph is 
still displayed. These values can be used 
as questions to be answered if you 
choose not to make up any of your own 
questions or if the child is using the 
computer alone at this time. 

You are therefore free to have the 
child answer the questions that the 
computer suggests through the list of 
graph data, or answer any preset ques- 
tions of your own design. Lines 680 
through 730 compute the value of each 
of the variables. A2 to F2 are the 
amounts of the variables. "AV" is the 
average of them. Please feel free to use 
these variables to help alter this pro- 
gram to suit the needs of your children. 

If you are using a disk drive on your 
CoCo system, any of the graphs may be 
saved to your disk. The time to save the 
picture is while it is still being displayed 
on the screen. Press the S key and this 
graph will be saved as GRfiPHl.BIN. If 
you want to save more graphs, you must 
change the name of the next graph so 
it does not overwrite the first one. 
Change the name in Line 850 to GRRPH2 
and the next to GRRPH3, and so on. 

If you want to view any of yourgraph 
pictures in the future, merely enter the 
following program: 

10 PCLS5:PMODE 3, 1:SCREEN 1, 1 
20 LQRDM"GRRPH1 . BIN" 
30 GOTO 30 

Then type RUN. 



46 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Almost any screen print program will graphs. We hope you and your children Computer Island always enjoy hearing 
be able to give you a hard copy of these enjoy working with line graphs. We at from our readers. □ 



The listing: GRAPHS 



10 REM" LINEGRAPHS " 

20 REM "STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 
D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1987" 
30 CLEAR2000 
40 GOSUB 500 

50 CLS:PRINT@11, "LINEGRAPHS" ; 
60 PRINT@9 6, "PRESS ENTER TO SEE 
SEE THE GRAPH 

AND PRESS ENTER AGA 
IN TO RETURN . " 

70 PRINT @ 160, "AND PRESS ENTER AG 

AIN TO RETURN." 

80 PRINT@40,STRING$ (16, 255) ; 

90 PRINT@4 19 , "PRESS THE 'E' KEY 

TO END"; 

100 EN$=INKEY$ 

110 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 120 ELS 
E IF EN$="E" THEN 8 30 ELSE 100 
120 PCLS5:SCREEN1,1:PM0DE3,1:CIR 
CLE(90,90) , 10 

130 PCLS5:SCREEN1, l:PMODE3, 1 : COL 
OR7 

140 LINE(25, 170)-(240, 172) , PSET, 
BF 

150 LINE(25, 15)-(27, 170) , PSET, BF 
160 COLOR8:FOR T=30 TO 150 STEP 
20 

170 LINE(27,T)-(235,T) , PSET 
180 NEXT T 

190 A=40:A1=(3+RND(12) ) *10 

200 B=75:B1=(3+RND(12) ) *10:IF Bl 

=A1 THEN 190 



Hint . . . 

Rainbow Check PLUS Fix 

If you are using a Word Pak I or //under Disk 
BASIC (EPROM version), you can also use the 
Rainbow Check PLUS. However, in order to get 
the checksum displayed, you must press the space 
bar before pressing the down arrow key. This is 
because of the full screen editor in the Word Pak. 
If you just pressed the down arrow key, the cursor 
would simply move down one line. But, this only 
occurs if the down arrow key is pressed as the first 
character on a line. By pressing the space bar, you 
eliminate this problem. 

Greg Law 

(GREGL) 

Columbus, GA 



210 C=110:C1=(3+RND(12) ) *10:IF C 
1=A1 OR C1=B1 THEN 190 
220 D=145:D1=(3+RND(12) ) *10:IF D 
1=A1 OR D1=B1 OR D1=C1 THEN 190 
230 E=180 :E1=(3+RND(12) ) *10:IF E 
1=D1 OR E1=C1 OR E1=B1 OR E1=A1 
THEN 190 

240 F=215 :F1=(3+RND(12) ) *10:IF F 

1=A1 OR F1=B1 OR F1=C1 OR F1=D1 

OR F1=E1 THEN 190 

250 COLOR8 

260 CIRCLE(A,A1) ,2 

270 CIRCLE(B,B1) ,2 

280 CIRCLE (C,C1) ,2 

290 CIRCLE(D,D1) ,2 

300 CIRCLE (E,E1) ,2 

310 CIRCLE (F,F1) , 2 

320 COLOR6:LINE(A,Al)-(B,Bl) , PSE 
T 

330 LINE- (C, CI) , PSET 

340 LINE- (D,D1) , PSET 

350 LINE-(E,E1) , PSET 

360 LINE- (F,F1) , PSET 

370 DRAW"BM45, 175 ; C7A2S12 "+A$+SP 

$+B$+SP$+C$+SP$ 

380 DRAW D$+SP$+E$+SP$+F$ 

390 DRAW"BM6 ,22; C8S8 " + Z7 $+0$ 

400 DRAW"BM6,42"+Z6$+0$ 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 



Payout will compute your monthly payments on any 
loan based on the loan amount, interest rate and period 
of the loan. 

The listing: 

10 CLS:INPUT"AMOUNT FINANCED"; A: 
INPUT" INTEREST RATE" ; I : INPUT"MON 
THS FINANCED" ;M: P=A*I/1200/ ( 1-1/ 
( (l+( 1/1200) ) A M) ) :R=P*100:S=FIX 
(R) :V=S/100: PRINT "MONTHLY PAYMEN 
TS" ;V 



Rick A. Walter 
Eielson AFB, AK 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 47 



41j3 DRAWBM6 , 62 " + Z5$+0$ 
42j3 DRAWBM6 , 82 " + Z4 $+0$ 
43^ DRAWBM6, lp2"+Z3$+0$ 
44j3 DRAWBM6 , 12 2 " + Z2 $+0$ 
450 DRAWBM6, 142" + Zl$+0$ 

4 6j3 DRAWBM2J3 , 162 "+0$ 
47J3 EN$=INKEY$ 

48j3 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 67j3 ELS 
E IF EN$ = "S" THEN 850 ELSE 470 
490 REM" THE STRINGS FOR THE LETT 
ERS AND NUMBERS FOLLOW" 



5j3j3 

51j3 

52j3 

53j3 

54j3 

55j3 

560 

570 

580 

590 

600 

610 

620 

4" 

630 

640 



A$= 
B$= 
C$= 
D$= 
E$ = 
F$ = 
0$= 
Zl$= 
Z2$= 
Z3$= 
Z4$= 
Z5$= 
Z6$= 

Z7$= 
SP$= 



11 BEHUNU2R4NU2 DGL2 BGBL6 11 
11 BEHENR3HER3 D4L3 BGBL6 11 
"BU4ER2FD2GL2HBG2BL4 11 
" BEHU2ER3 D4L3 BGBL6 " 
"BER3U2NL2U2L4BG5BL2 11 
"BUR4U2NL3U2BG5BL5 " 
"BEHU2ER2FD2GL2BGBL6" 



' BE2NU3 DEBFBGBL9 11 

'BENR3HER3U2L4BG5BL" 

1 BENR3HENR2HER3 BG5BL5 " 

1 BENU 4E3L4BG4BL2" 

'BER4U2L3HER3BG5BL5" 

■BU2FR2EU2NHGL2HER2BG5BL 

'BUNR4UE3BG5BL4 " 
•BE4BUBG5BL5" ' ***SPACER 



650 RETURN 

660 REM" COMPUTE AND PRINT THE AN 
SWERS 11 

670 CLS: PRINT" HERE ARE THE 

RESULTS 11 : PRINT 

680 A2=(-Al/2)+85 

690 B2=(-Bl/2) +85 

700 C2=(-Cl/2)+85 

710 D2=(-Dl/2)+85 

720 E2=(-El/2) +85 

730 F2=(-Fl/2)+85 

740 PRINT"A="A2 , "B="B2 

750 PRINT"C="C2 , "D="D2 

760 PRINT"E="E2 , "F="F2 

770 AV=(A2+B2+C2+D2+E2+F2)/6 

780 AV=INT(AV+. 5) 

790 PRINT@229 , "THE AVERAGE WAS 11 
AV 

800 PRINT© 4 5 6, "PRESS G TO GO ON. 

n • 

t 

810 EN$=INKEY$ 

820 IF EN$="G" THEN RUN ELSE 810 
830 CLS: END 

840 REM" SAVING THE PICTURE OF TH 
E GRAPH" 

850 S AVEM" GRAPH 1 " , 3584 , 9727 , 3584 
:GOTO 670 



From the Princeton RAINBOWfest . . . 

The CoCo 3 Round-Table Tape! 



YES, Please send me 



copies of the "CoCo 



3 Round-Table Tape" at $5 per copy plus $1.50 

S/H for a total of . 

(U.S. Currency only, please.) 



Name (please print) 



Address 



City 



State 



Telephone 
Company. 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 



Account Number 



Exp. Date 
Signature 



Make checks payable to The Rainbow. Mail to CoCo 3 
Round-Table Tape, The Rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. To place credit card orders, call our toll- 
free number: (800) 847-0309. 



the rainbow recorded the main event 
of RAINBOWfest Princeton, the Satur- 
day evening (Oct. 18) round-table 
discussion: 

"The Design, Development 
and Marketing of the CoCo 3." 

Speakers included Tandy's Barry 
Thompson and Mark Siegel, as 
well as independent CoCo 3 pro- 
grammers Steve Bjork and Dale Lear 
(filling in for Greg Zumwalt). 

This was a lively and informative ses- 
sion and, therefore, we want as many 
people as possible to hear what these 
RAINBOWfest guests had to say. 



48 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Also from the Rainbow makers . . . 




The PC Compatible Magazine 




Not long ago, the al- 
phabet of the world of MS- 
DOS computers was domi- 
nated by only three letters: 
I, B, M, We saw them every- 
where, They stood for a 
great standard in personal 
computers, but they also 
spelled something else: 
high prices and a conserva- 
tive lack of innovation. 

Today things have 
changed. With Tandy, Com- 
paq, ALR, Leading Edge, 
Victor and dozens of others 
the jisl ot PC Compatibles 
stretches from A to Z. With 
lower prices and improved 
performance, these are the 
machines that have truly 
made the PC a "personal" 
computer. 

Yet, when the owner of a 
PC Compatible turns to a 
magazine for information^ 
all they see are those same 
three letters againl But no 
more! 



Now there is SOFT SEC- 



TOR, The PC Compatible 



month of the year 4 SOFT 
SECTOR offers information 
and programs written just 
for the PC Compatibles. 

Each issue of SOFT SEC- 
TOR brings you: 

• Interesting, informative 
features on the ever- 
changing world of per- 
sonal computers, with a 
look at the latest in the 
growing line of MS-DOS, 
PC Compatibles. 

• In-depth product reviews - 
to help you sort through 
the confusing assortment 
of hardware and soft- 
ware, 

• Useful, practical hints 
and tips to help you get 
the most from your com- 
puter with the least frus- 
tration. 



that can be typed in and 
run on your computer: 
utilities, home and busi- 
ness applications, games 
and graphics. And a com- 

ce 



(available separately) for 
those who simply don't 
have the time to type 
those great programs in, 
A spotlight on the best 
product of the month, 
chosen by our editors as 
the most useful, the most 
innovative, and the one 
you should seriously 
consider adding to your 
collection. 



Subscribe now for only $18 — 
50 percent off 



the newsstE 

in, 

st For a limited 



land price! 



For a limited time, sub- 
scriptions for a full year of 
SOFT SECTOR are only 
$18, So don h t wait! Sub- 
scribe today and begin to 
fearn how to release the full 
potential of your PC Com- 
patible, 



O Yes! Siqn me Up lor a one year subscnphon lo SOFT SECTOR, The PC | 
Compai.bl* Magazine At only SIS" lor 12 .ssues, mat's a savings ol 5(1% 
Ob ihe newssland price! Special oiler ends 




NAME 



ADDRESS 



STATE 



□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



'Subscriptions to SOFT SECTOR are $18 in the United States; U.S. $30 in Canada. 
Surface rate to other countries is U.S. $54; air rate, U.S. $75. Allow 6-8 weeks for 
first copy. Subscription begins with next available issue. U.S. funds only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. | 
MAIL TO: SOFT SECTOR, The Falsoft Bldg., P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 R4o7 





Screen Star 



New Screen Editor 
with Smart Speller! 

This is the screen editor everyone has been waiting for! 
Screen Star is clearly the most powerful editing product 
ever available on the Color Computer. 

WordStar Implementation 

What makes it so powerful? Screen Star implements the 
popular WordStar editing capabilities. If you know or use 
WordStar on any other computer, you already know how 
to use Screen Star on your CoCo! Plus, what you learn with 
Screen Star you can use on nearly any other computer 
you use later. 

Edit Files Larger than Memory 

Since Screen Star uses the disk as an extension of 
memory, it will edit files larger than memory. You are not 
confined to small text or program files I 
Block Commands 

With a keystroke you can mark the start and end of a 
block, then move, copy, or delete the block with another 
keystroke. 
Cursor Movement 

An array of powerful cursor commands help you to 
move left or right one character, or one word, or one line; 
scroll forward or back one line, one screen, one block; 
jump to the start or end of the line or the screen, block or 
file. 

Find & Find/Replace Commands 

Full implementation of find and find/replace com- 
mands make mass changes and searches a snap. This is 
so time saving when programming or word processing! 



Parameter Commands 

Personalize your editing environment using the para- 
menter commands. Set tabs, toggle the video, access 
the OS-9 Shell, and choose wordwrap. CoCo 3 users can 
define up to 10 functions keys for fast, repetitive functions. 
Pop-Up Help Menus 

Help is as close as a keystroke. At any time you can 
bring up a concise list of commands and functions to 
help you use Screen Star's full capabilities. 

Closing Commands 

Not only can you exit the editor with or without save, 
but you can import or export files whenever you need 
them. 

Smart Speller Included 

Smart Speller is included in the package too! This is a 
revolutionary new idea in spelling checker programs. 
Unlike most spelling checkers which require a huge dic- 
tionary file containing every word you ever wish to use. 
Smart Speller utilizes a relatively small dictionary which 
contains the most common English misspellings and their 
correct spellings. This makes Smart Speller much easier to 
use, since it will not stop at every word and requires much 
less space. 

Smart Speller will also recognize any abbreviations you 
commonly use and replace them with their full spellings 
automatically! This feature alone can save you countless 
hours of typing time. 
Use with Text Formatter 

Screen Star works especially well with Computerware's 
OS-9 Text Formatter to provide a full word processing 
team. You simply imbed the Text Formatter commands in 
your Screen Star file. It will then be printed in style with 
headers, footers, pagination, justification, etc. We offer a 
special package price for this powerful duo! 
Level 1 for CoCo 1 and CoCo 2 

Screen Star uses OS-9. All Color Computer are sup- 
ported under Level 1. A special 51 x 24 screen driver is 
provided (and required) to make available the added 
screen capabilities. 10 functions keys are available to all 
users. 

Level 2 and CoCo 3 

CoCo 3 users can run Screen Star with either Level 1 or 
Level 2. Level 2 offers extended capabilities for scrolling 
and display features on an 80 x 24 screen. 

All versions Included 

All versions are included in the Screen Star package, so 
you can enjoy its power on any CoCo you use! 
Requires OS-9 $49.95 
With Text Formatter (Save $10) $74.95 



Call or write for your FREE Computerware Catalog 




OS-9 Text Formatter 



OS-9 Text Formatter interfaces with any editor that pro- 
duces standard ASCII text files including Computerware's 
Screen Star, and Radio Shack's TS Edit. 

Supports: 

• Right & Left Justification 

• Automatic Pagination 

• Headers and Footers 

• Macros, Tabs, Etc. 

• Page numbering & Auto Date Insert 

• Send ESC & CTL codes to printer 

Why just print it when you can FORMAT it with OS-9 Text 
Formatter. 

Requires OS-9 $34 .9 5 




We've combined our 2 
most popular OS-9 packages 

Disk Fix + 
Advanced Utilities COMBO 



DISK FIX supports true double-sided/double density, 40 
tracks, and step rates up to 6 ms. KSHELL allows wildcards 
with any utility along with pathing. DMODE allows easy 
drive descriptor modifications. DIRCOPY copies complete 
disks with one command, any subdirectory, sorts direc- 
tory, replaces updated files with current ones, etc. PATCH 
is a very user-friendly program for inspecting and modify- 
ing any disk file. ARCHIVE backs up large disk media onto 
small disk media. Also includes FILELOOK, COMPARE, 
UNLOAD, FLINK, and CPY. Also available from Radio 
Shack Express Order Software. Catalog #900-0900. 
Requires OS-9 $49.95 



OS-9 Connection 3.0 | 




Nuke the Love Boat ! 



The best in communication software is now available for 
the OS-9 user. OS-9 Connection works on either Level 1 or 
Level 2 CoCo OS-9. All of the standard protocols are sup- 
ported including CompuServe Protocol B, XMODEM, and 
XON/XOFF. The dial feature for Hayes compatible and 
some Radio Shack modems is supported. You are able to 
print directly from the buffer, and files bigger than the 
buffer can be uploaded and downloaded. Macros allow 
easy entry to often-used passwords and ID's. Includes a 
51 x 24 hi-res screen, but will work with any OS-9 display. 
OS-9 Connection supports baud rates up to 1 200 out the 
back RS232 port or higher with the RS232 pak. Communi- 
cate with confidence with OS-9 Connection 3.0. 
Requires OS-9 $49.95 

Color Connection — RSDOS 

The #1 communications package for RSDOS users. Works 
on CoCo 1, 2, or 3. Also Available from Radio Shack 
Express Order Software. Catalog #900-0348. 
RSDOS Disk $49.95 



Mitsuba 1200 Modem 



$159.00 




Monitors 

These 12" NAP monochrome 
monitors provide 20 mhz band 
width, 800 line resolution, 80 x 
25 display, and has audio 
input. 

Green or Amber display 

$114.95 
plus shipping $5.00 



Universal Video Plus 

Interfaces any CoCo 1 or Co Co 2 with a color or mono- 
chrome composite video monitor. 

$34.95 




Your pleasure cruise has just turned into adventure on the 
high seas. This strategy simulation is a race against time 
and all the odds. Can you and the crew stop Abdul Mul- 
lah before he nukes the Love Boat? It is up to you to get 
the bomb out of terrorist hands. The entire ship and its 
crew will become involved. Doc, Julie, Issac, and Gopher 
will help you as the battle takes you from the pool side, to 
the dining room, to every deck on the ship. This simulation 
is fully mouse/joystick driven with pull down menus and 
windows. It takes full advantage of the CoCo 3's gra- 
phics. If your CoCo has 512K. it wiil be used as a fast 
ramdisk. Good luck! Don't let them Nuke the Love Boat! 
Requires CoCo 3, mouse or joystick, disk $34.95 




Return of 
Junior's Revenge 

Designed to take advantage 
of the CoCo 3's 320 x 1 92 1 6- 
color display. It brings the ever 
popular arcade game Donkey 
Kong Jr. to life on the CoCo 3. 
Req. CoCo 3, Disk, joystick $34.95 



3 Graphics! 



The Magic 
of Zanth 

You are on a journey to dis- 
cover the source of magic in 
the land of Zanth. Dragons, 
Griffins, Centaurs, and Demons 
abound. This intriguing adven- 
ture features over 2 dozen 320 x 
192 hi-res 16 color animated 
graphic screens. 
Requires CoCo 3, Disk $34.95 
(SSC pak optional) 





Call or Write to: 



★ ★ ★ April Special ★ ★ ★ 
51 2K Memory Expansion 

ONLY $99.50 



51 2 K Memory Expansion for CoCo 3 

Completely assembled with prime 120ns memory chips, 
this board is easy to install. Complete instructions are 
included. 

April Special $99.50 

CoCo 3 Ramdisk and 51 2K Diagnostics 

Ramdisk creates two additional drives that can be con- 
figured as 0 & 1, or 2 & 3. Programs speed up significantly 
when run from a ramdisk! Memory Diagnostics test 
memory 3 ways. Copy Utility makes organizing disks a 
cinch. 

Requires CoCo 3, 51 2K, RSDOS $19,95 




COMPUTERWARE « 619 » *«» 

Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA • 92024 



Name _ 
Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



Yesl Send me your FREE catalog I 

VISA MasterCard 

Card # 

Signature 



CoCo □ 



Exp 



Item 



Format 



Price 



Shipping 

Surface — S2 minimum. 

2% for orders over SI 00 
Air or Canada — S5 minimum 

5% for orders over SI 00 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



6% Calif Sales Tax 
COD Add S5 
Shipping' 
TOTAL 




' 1mr ^^mmmwM - 



Well-Behaved 
Yard Salcj 



■ ■ * i — ^ 



«■-- I* - 



By Eric White 



- 



— — . S \ - »■ K h 




ard sale! Words that can cause almost as much chaos 
as a blue-light special. This time you're holding the blue 
light. Here is a program designed to relieve some of the 
K ;.:,r ^y\- pressure of holding your next yard sale. 

Using a Color Computer, we will keep a complete inventory 
of all the items for sale and the prices of each item. If we add 
a printer, we can print price tags and a tally of sales at the 
end of the day from the computer's inventory. 

First, make a list of everything that will be sold at the yard 
sale and note the prices for each item. Next, load Yardsale into 
your CoCo and run the program. 

Upon running Yardsale, the program will automatically 
open a file called YflRDSflLE - DAT on the disk in Drive 0. If it 
doesn't find the file in the disk, it will create it. 

Eric White is a self-taught programmer with a graphic arts 
background, who has been writing, 
software for jive years. He lives 
in Altamont Springs, Florida, 




52 



THE RAINBOW April 1967 



Press I to start data input. You will 
be asked to input a seller ID code. This 
is a two-character code that signifies the 
original owner of each item. Press 
ENTER to continue. This code is used to 
make separate totals for each seller, 
making it easy to combine several yard 
sales into one big yard sale. The current 
item number is displayed next to the ID 
code. Next, enter the description of the 
item to be sold. This description will 
appear on the price tag and on the tally 
sheet. Next comes the price you want to 
have printed on the price tag ($000.00 
to $999.99). Then, type in the lowest 
price you will sell the item for, and press 
ENTER. This number is used by the 
computer/ cashier person. If someone 
offers a bid on an item lower than the 
price tag, the bid can be checked against 
this price. The prompt "Any More 
Items to Enter (Y/N)?" will appear at 
the bottom of the screen. 

Price tags are printed on standard 
l5 /i6-by-3i4 inch computer labels. The 
printer codes used are in lines 2000 to 
2010 and are for normal and com- 
pressed print on the DMP-200. To print 
price tags for the items currently in the 
computer's inventory, press L (for 
label). Type in the title of the yard sale 
(up to 20 characters) and press ENTER. 
The current print range will be dis- 
played; press N to change the range or 
Y to print this range. 
To sell an item during the yard sale, 



press F for find. Type in the ID number 
printed on the lower left-hand corner of 
the price tag. That item's information 
will be loaded and displayed. If the item 
is not sold, you are prompted for "Sell 



sold, just press T for tally and S to print 
on the screen or P to print to the printer. 
The program will sort the items sold by 
seller ID codes and print the total for 
each seller separately. 



* ADVENTURE GRAPHICS YARDSALE * 

DESCRIPTION: COLLECTION OF KEYS WITH M0 LOCKS 

mi EW.0016 PRICE: $5.(30 



EW- 0009 
EW- 0012 
EW. 0013 



CAN OPENER GREASE 

BROKEN T.V. SET WITH CORD 

UNRAVELLED ROPES AND STRINGS 



$3. 00 
$50. 00 
$52. 35 



EW TOTAL $105.35 



Sample Printouts 



This Item (Y/ N)?" Pressing N clears the 
item's data and returns to standby 
mode. Press Y to sell the item; type in 
the price and press ENTER to record the 
sale. Press CLEAR to abort a sale and 
return to standby mode. If the item has 
already been sold, the prompt will read 
"Re-inventory Item (Y/N)"; pressing Y 
returns the item to the inventory with 
a status of not sold. Pressing N returns 
program to standby mode. 

To see how many things have been 



If at any time you want to exit the 
Yardsale program, press CLEAR to 
abort the current activity, then press E 
for exit. This will not erase the program, 
but will close any disk files that were 
used by the computer before returning 
to BASIC. 

Good luck with your next yard sale, 
and maybe the next time you hear a 
crowd of Sunday afternoon shoppers 
yell "yard sale!" you will be safe behind 
your CoCo. □ 



The listing VRRDSRLE 




ii if 



1020 
1030 
1040 
1050 
1060 
1070 
1080 
1090 
1100 
1110 
1120 



1240 
1300 
1530 
1650 
1820 



219 
199 
88 

243 
,49 



1950 
2130 
2230 
2390 
2570 
END 



.174 
.113 
.202 
72 
.219 
.168 



T 



1 A**********-*************** 

•* YARDSALE INVENTORY p 

I* & PRICE TAG PROGRAM * 
< ************************** 

'# (C) 1987 BY ERIC WHITE * 

'* ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. * 

»* VERSION: 1.00 8701.02 * 
*************************** 

GOSUB1880'DRAW SCREEN 
GOSUB 1970' OPEN FILES 
GOSUB1910:GOSUB2030 
PRINT@480,WB$; 
GOSUB2040 



:ON INSTR("IL 



1130 PRINTG480, 
FTE" ,A$) GOTO 1180,2070,1490,243 
0, 2090 

1140 GOTO 1110 

1 X 5 ' ************************** 

1160 ' ITEM DATA INPUT 

1170 *************************** 

1180 A$=" INPUT ": GOSUB20 60: R=LOF( 

i) - - 

1190 LSET SF$=MKN$(0) 
1200 LSET ST$= ,, I" 

1210 PRINT@481, "SELLER ID CODE ? 

"WB$; :C$= M " 
1220 GOSUB2040:IF A$=CHR$(13) TH 
EN 1260 

12 30 IF A$=CHR$(8) AND LEN(C$) > 
0 THEN C$=LEFT$(C$,LEN(C$)-1) :P 

RINT@498,C$WB$ M » ; : SOUND1 , 1 

1240 IF INSTR(RIGHT$(VK$,26) ,A$) 
AND LEN(C$)<2 THEN C$=C$+A$:PRI 

NT@498,C$WB$; :SOUNDl,l 

1250 GOTO 1220 

12 60 LSET ID$=C$ 

1270 R=R+1:PRINT@205,ID$; :PRINTU 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 




Educational Best-Sellers! 



^ P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations— 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Right Manual Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



* Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Joysticks Required 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II -Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

6 4K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32K TDBl $42 .95 Tape $39.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 
COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed above PLUS. 

Requires 128K - $89.95 



Factpack— Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-»7x" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24 9& Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System— Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

R equires 16K Ext. Basic/ 

32K for Printer Output 
Ta pe $39.95 Disk $42.95 

Fractions— A Three-Program Package. 
1/Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 




# NEW RELEASE 
GOLD FINDER 

Here's the quality you havecome to expect 
from TOM MIX. Another outstanding color 
computer game. This one ranks right up 
there with "Donkey Kong". Listen to this: 
69 levels for one or two players PLUS you 
can create your own levels (up to 306 on 
a disk). Endless possibilities await you in 
this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLD FINDER. . . 

32K & Joysticks: Required 

Disk $27.95 

We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 




NEW RELEASE 

THE BLACK HOLE 

For anyone who enjoys solving a challeng- 
ing logical puzzle, here is a 3-dimensional 
puzzle composed of 63 numbered cubes 
in a 4 by 4 by 4 array that leaves one 
BLACK HOLE. You tell the computer to sort 
the cubes and the computer tells you to put 
them in numerical order. A real brain 
bender. Outstanding color and action. 
Years of entertainment. . . 

For IBM PC & Compatibles 

$24,95 

More Tandy-IBM IPC software available. 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 

• Full use of 64K RAM 

• 100% Machine Language 

• No ROM Calls 

• Selectable Drive 

• Support 1-4 drives 

• Menu Selected functions 

• "Cold Start" exit to Basic 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler— the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT— Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Disk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector— Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast 3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21.95 

Sector Inspector — Alphabetize, back u p an d 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TON NIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors-We pay top 
royalties! 




* CoCo 3 Compatible 





Look What's New at NO 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 




inn ^ifc 



>7 



Saloon, a . BuJt tu Sbtrlff 1 * 



?qu «t« on th* Hi i q ftrf* 
gu «#« a Saigon, a^BanJt 
off I C9> Bat* 1* Q* n* r a 1 Stor 

Tot? nothing. 

Ob^ipu* d irect i pn* to go; 
Sortft, So win, Eamt, Wmtt 

7c] com to Tb# Hi Id V*mtP 




CoCo 3 Compatible only 

NEW RELEASE 

THE WILD WEST 

Get out your six shooter and polish your 
spurs! Journey into the gunslinging land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch, your 
job is to keep the peace. But the notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail 
and is on his way to Dry Gulch to recover 
his hidden fortune! 

Can you set a trap to capture Black Bart? 
Or will he get you! You'll have to use every 
trick in the book, and be quick on the draw 
as well, as you talk to some unsavory 
characters. Decide what items you'll need 
to buy from the General Store, and lay a 
trap for your enemy! 

The Wild West Is designed to be played 
exclusively on the Tandy Color Com- 
puter 3.) It has several features not seen 
In most adventures. 

• Incredible animated 320 x 192 16 color hi 

resolution graphic scenesl 
•Four voice music and sound effects. 
•Save and load games in progress. 
•A vocabulary of over 100 words. 
•Automatically SPEAKS with a Tandy 

Speech Pak. 

Re quires a 128k C oco 3 a nd one disk drive 
Disk $25.95 



* NEW RELEASE 

FOURCUBE 

Now you can play TICTAC-TOE in 3D. The 
board consists of a 4x4x4 grid of cells. Pit 
your wits against the computer with six 
levels of difficulty or against your favorite 
opponent. Sound easy? Try it and you'll 
agree with us when we say its a "real 
challenge". 

Re quires 32K 1 or 2 Player s 

T apo $15.95 Disk $18.95 




^ Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required 
Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 




jfi Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Re q uired 

Disk $21 .95 



^ Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

1 6K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 



* NEW RELEASE 
LUNCHTIME 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surrounded! 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hamburgers. This high res game 
features 7 difficult levels of wild entertain- 
ment. Fast paced action for either one or 
two players. Have a Burger Time. . . 
Re quires 32K & Joysticks ; 

fa p9 $18 95 Disk $21.95 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man -Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. ♦ 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

^Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Jo ystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 

The King— 

32K T ape $24.95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian- % 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze- * 

32K Tape $19.95 D isk $22.9 5 
Kater Pillar II- # 

1 6K Ta pe $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants— $ 

16K Tape $18.95 D i sk $21 .95 
Buzzard Bait- 3fc 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 

^Equals CoCo 3 Compatible 

NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 
Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 

• Dealers welcome 

■ Many more titles-write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/676-8172 



VISA 9 




*CoCo 3 Compatible 




SING".####";R/10000; 
1280 LSET IN$=MKN$(R) 
1290 GOSUB2030 

1300 PRINT@269,WB$; :PRINT@482,"P 

RESS [CLEAR] TO ABORT INPUT" ;:C$ 

=STRING$ (36,32): C=l 

13 10 GOSUB2040HF A$=CHR$(13) TH 

EN1350 

1320 IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN C=C-1:MI 
D$(C$,C,1)=" " :IF C<19 THEN PRIN 
T@2 68+C , WB$ : PRINT@301 , RIGHT$ ( C$ , 
18) ELSE PRINT@300+C-18,WB$" M ; 
1330 IF INSTR((VK$+" !#$%&•()*:- 
=@<>?,/"),A$) AND C<37 THEN MID$ 
(C$ , C , 1 ) =A$ : C=C+1 : PRINT@269 , LEFT 
$ (C$,18) :PRINT@301,RIGHT$ (C$,18) 
:IF C<19 THEN PRINT@268+C,WB$ EL 
SE PRINT© 300+C-18,WB$; 
1340 GOTO 1310 
1350 LSET DI$=C$ 

1360 PRINT@269,LEFT$(C$, 18) : PRIN 
T@301,RIGHT$ (C$,18) :C$="" : C=0 
1370 X=364 :SP=1000:GOSUB14 30:SP= 
VAL(C$)/ 100: LSET SP$=MKN$ (SP) : PR 
INT@372," "? 

13 80 X=375 : C$=" ■ : GOSUB14 30 : LSET 
MP$=MKN$(VAL(C$)/100) :PRINT@383, 




t(VK$,A 



ii M 



1390 PUT #1,R 

1400 GOSUB2030 I PRINT@481 , "ANY MO 

RE ITEMS TO ENTER (Y/N) " ; 

1410 GOSUB2040:IF A$="Y" THEN GO 

SUB1910:GOTO1270 

1420 GOTO 1100 

1430 PRINT@X, USING" $$###. ##";VAL 
(C$)/100; :PRINTWB$; : PRINT@373 , "m 

in" ; 

1440 GOSUB2040:IF A$=CHR$(13) TH 
EN RETURN 

1450 IF A$=CHR$(8) AND LEN(C$)>0 
THEN C$=LEFT$(C$,LEN(C$)-1) :GOT 
01430 

14 60 IF INSTR(LEFT$(VK$, 10) ,A$) 
AND LEN(C$)<5 AND (VAL(C$+A$) /10 
0) < SP+.01 THEN C$=C$+A$:G0T014 
30 

14 70 GOTO 1440 

1480 *************************** 

1490 ' ITEM DATA OUTPUT 

1500 *************************** 

1510 A$="FIND" : GOSUB2060 : PRINT@4 
81, "IDEM CODE NUMBER ?"WB$;:C$«" 
" : L$=C$ 

1520 GOSUB2040 

1530 S0UND1, 1:IF A$=CHR$(13) THE 
N 1580 

1540 IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN PRINT@50 
0," ";:GOTO1510 



IF INSTR(VK$,A$) AND LEN ( L$ 
)<7 THEN PRINTCHR$(8)A$WB$; :L$=L 
$+A$ 

1560 IF INSTR(LEFT$(VK$,10) ,A$) 
AND LEN(C$)<4 THEN C$=C$+A$ 
1570 GOTO 1520 

1580 PRINTCHR$(8) ; :R=VAL(C$) :C$= 
"":IF R < 1 OR R > LOF(l) THEN 1 
100 

1590 GET #1,R 

1600 PRINT@205,ID$; : PRINTUSING" . 
####"; CVN ( IN$ ) / 10000 ; 
1610 IF ST$="I" THEN PRINT" NO 
T SOLD" ELSE PRINTUSING" SOL$$## 
#.##" ;CVN(SF$) ? : PRINT@213 , "SOLD" 

f 

1620 PRINT@2 69,LEFT$(DI$,18) :PRI 

NT@301,RIGHT$(DI$,18) 

1630 PRINT@375,USING"$$### . ##" ;C 

VN(MP$) ;: PRINTS 3 7 3, "mill"; 

1640 PRINT@364,USING"$$###. ##" ;C 

VN(SP$) ; 

1650 GOSUB2030:IF ST$="I" THEN 1 
670 ELSE PRINT@4 81, "RE-INVENTORY 

ITEM (Y/N) ?"WB$; 
1660 GOSUB2040:IF A$="Y" THEN LS 
ET ST$="I":LSET SF$=MKN$ (0) : PUT 
#1,R:G0T0 1590 ELSE GOTO 1100 
1670 PRINT0481, "SELL THIS ITEM ( 
Y/N) ?" f 
1680 GOSUB2040 
1690 IF A$<>"Y" THEN 1100 
1700 GOSUB2030 

1710 PRINT@481,"SELL FOR HOW MUC 
H ? $"WB$; :C$="" 
1720 GOSUB2040 

17 30 IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN C$="":GO 
TO1710 

1740 IF INSTR(LEFT$(VK$,11) ,A$) 
AND LEN(C$)<6 THEN C$=C$+A$ : PRIN 
T@503,C$WB$; 

1750 IF A$=CHR$(13)THEN1760 ELSE 
1720 

1760 IF VAL(C$)<.01 THEN 1100 
1770 IF VAL(C$)+1> CVN(MP$) THEN 

GOTO1830 ELSE GOSUB2030 
1780 PRINT@480,STRING$(31,32) ; :P 
RINT@480,USING"$$### . ##" ;VAL(C$) 
;: PRINT" IS LOWER THAN MINIMUM." 

« 

1790 A$=INKEY$ : PLAY " V5 ; T200ABCD" 

:IF A$="" THEN 1780 

1800 GOSUB2030 : PRINT@481 , "SELL A 

T "; :PRINTUSING"$$###. ##";VAL(C$ 

) ; : PRINT" ANYWAY (Y/N) ?" ; 

1810 GOSUB2040 

18 20 IF A$="Y" THEN 1830 ELSE 17 
00 



56 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




STS= M S":PUT #1,R 
184)3 G0T01W 



L(C$) ) : LSET 




1850 
I860 
1870 
1880 
1890 



• DRAW SCREEN 

■ ************************** 

CLS0 

F0RX=1T09 6 : PRINT@X- 1 , CHR$ ( A 
SC{MID$("J;J;<J=;JGF;HIH=;RWW;LZ 
M;Z; ; ;ZWWH>J;J;J;J>I;@E;J;OWV;Z; 
Z ; Z ; ; ZWW»I ; JGJ ; J ; J ; BFBC ; XNY ; ZW 
Z;ZNN;ZNN",X) )+117) ; :NEXT 
1900 FOR X=128 TO 479 : POKE1024+X 
,32: NEXTX : RETURN 

1910 PRINT§192, "item" ; :PRINT@197 

, "number" :POKE12 27, 58 

1920 PRINT@256, "discription" : POK 

E1291,58 

1930 PRINTl3300, n " 

1940 PRINT0353 , "price" ; :PRINT@35 

9, "list min":POKE13 87,5 

8 

1950 PRINT@416, "Input" ; : PRINT@42 

3 , "Labels" ; : PRINT0431, "Find" ;: PR 

INT@437 , "Tally" ; : PRINT@444 , "Exit 
ii • 

1960 RETURN 

1970 OPEN "D",#l, "YARDS ALE/ DAT", 

59 

1980 FIELD #1,2 AS ID$,5 AS IN$ , 
36 AS DI$,5 AS SP$,5 AS MP$,1 AS 

ST$,5 AS SF$ 
1990 VK$="0123456789.ABCDEFGHIJK 
LMNOPQRSTUWXYZ":WB$=CHR$ (207) 
2000 NM$=CHR$ ( 27 ) +CHR$ ( 19 ) • NORMA 
L PRINT 

2010 CP$=CHR$(27)+CHR$(20) 'COMPR 
ESSED PRINT 
2020 RETURN 

2030 PRINT@128," COPYRIGHT 1987 
BY ERIC WHITE":FORX=1535 TO 150 
4 STEP- 1 : POKEX ,207: PLAY " P200 " : PO 
KEX ,96: NEXTX : RETURN 
2040 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" "THEN2040 
2050 IF A$=CHR$(12) THEN 1100 EL 
SE RETURN 

2060 PRINT@128 , " " : B$=A$ : X=INT (32 
/(LEN(AS)+2) ) :FORY=2 TO X:B$=B$+ 
" " + A$ : NEXT Y : PR I NT @ 1 2 8 + ( 3 2 - LEN ( 
B$) )/2,B$: RETURN 
2070 GOTO2110 

2080 PRINT@481, "TALLY" ; :GOTO 112 
0 

2090 
2100 
2110 
2120 

2130 A$=" LABELS " : GOSUB2060 : PRINT 



CLOSE #1:CLS:END 
*************************** 

' PRINT PRICES LABELS 



@4 81, "TITLE ? "WB$ ; : C$="" 
2140 GOSUB 2040: IF A$=CHR$(13) T 
HEN T$="*»+STRING$(31 / 32)+"*": MI 
D$(T$, 18-(LEN(C$)+9)/2,LEN(C$)+9 
) =C$+" YARDS ALE" : C=l :C$=RIGHT$ (S 
TR$(LOF(l) ) ,LEN(STR$(LOF(l)))-l) 

: PRINTCHR$ ( 8 ) ; : GOT02 1 80 
2150 IF A$=CHR$(8) AND LEN(C$)>0 
THEN C$=LEFT$(C$,LEN(C$)-1) :PRIN 
T@490,C$WB§" "; 

2160 IF INSTR((VK$+" !#$%&'()*:- 
=@<>?,/"),A$) AND LEN(C$)<20 THE 
N C$=C$+A$:PRINT§490,C$WB$? 
2170 GOTO 2140 

2180 GOSUB2030:PRINT@481,"PRINT 

RANGE"C"- "C$" (Y/N)"; 

2190 GOSUB2040:IF A$="Y" THEN 23 

2200 GOSUB2030:PRINT@4 81 
RANGE , FROM : "WB$ " TO : " . 
2210 GOSUB 2040: IF A$=CHR$(13) A 
ND VAL(C$)>0 AND VAL (C$ ) < (LOF ( 1) 
+1) THEN 2250 

2220 IF A$=CHR$(8) AND LEN(C$)>0 
THEN C$=LEFT$(C$,LEN(C$)-1) :PRIN 
T@4 99,C$WB$" "; 



" ENTER 
:C$="" 




A? Software 




C7 



KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— ONLY $24.95 

"Doubtv-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System (or home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement (current & YTD") journal, ledger, 699 accounts & 2350 entries 
on 32k & 64k (710 accounts & entries on 16k) (disk only). Version 1.2 has screen 
printouts. Rainbow Reviews 1.1 - 9/84 : 1.2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95— ONLY $19.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 
fields with 255 characters per field (4060 characters/record). Sort, match & print 
any field. User friendly menu driven. Manual included (32k/64k disk only). 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses. boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
line HELPS at all times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects 
on the screen. Can be used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. 
GRAPHICS EDITOR. Reg. $39.05— ONLY $19.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 
Rainbow Review 7/65, Hot CoCo 9/65 "The graphfci bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK* Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, 
total due sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements. KEEP- 
TRAK' General Ledger tie in. account number checking, credit limit checking & 
more. User friendly/menu driven. Includes manual. $39.95 or $49.95 General 
Ledger & Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key 
board (klicks) and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create 
multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line 
numbering. Four function calculator, with memory. The above options can be 
called anytime whilH running or writing in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. 
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $19.95 (disk or tape) includes manual. 

CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-942-9402 





THE OTHER GUY'S SOFT ware (Add $2.50 for pottage A handling) 

P.O. Box H, 55 N. Main C.O.D., Money Order, Check In U.S. Fund* 

Logan, UT 84321 (801) 753-7820 (Pleaae epeclry If JAM controller) 



I 
I 

■ 

I 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 57 





R(LEFT$(VK$,10) ,A$) 
AND LEN(C$)<3 THEN C$=C$+ A$ : PRIN 
T@499,C$WB$ ? 
224)3 GOTO 2210 

2250 PRINT@499+LEN(C$) , " " ; : PRIN 
T@507,WB$; :C=VAL(C$) :C$="" 
2260 GOSUB2040:IF A$=CHR$(13) AN 
D VAL(C$)+1>C AND VAL(C$) <LOF (1) 
+1 THEN 218J3 

2270 IF A$=CHR$(8) AND LEN(C$)>0 
THEN C$=LEFT$(C$,LEN(C$) -1) :PRI 
NT@507 ,C$WB$" "; 

2280 IF INSTR ( LEFT$ { VK$ , 10 ) , A$ ) 
AND LEN(C$)<3 THEN C$=C$+A$ : PRIN 
T@507 , C$WB$ ; 
2290 GOTO 2260 

2300 GOSUB2030:PRINT@481,"IS THE 
PRINTER READY ? ( Y/N) " ; : GOSUB20 

40 

2310 IF A$<>"Y" THEN 1100 

2320 FOR X=C TO VAL(C$) 

2330 PRINT#-2,STRING$(33, "*'•) 

2340 PRINT#-2,T$ 

2350 PRINT#-2,STRING$(33,"*") 

2360 GET #1,X 

2370 PRINT#-2,CP$"DESCRIPTION: 



GRAFPLOT 



Nil 



— THI 



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preadsheets & 
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2 4 6 

Months Since T-8ill 



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: AUTOHATICALLY LOADB DATA FROM MOST POPULAR BPREADBHEETB. 
291 GRAPHING BVHBQLB AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 
AUTOHATICALLY BCALEB AND LABELS ALL THREE DF THE AXES. 
CALCULATES HATH FUNCTIONS, INTE6RALB AND MOVING AVERAGEB. 
FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN W/ COHPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 
FULL-PAGE SCFEENPRINTB ON ANY PRINTERi SPECIFY 141 TH HRDER - 

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COMPATIBLE WITH COCO III!! 
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2390 
2400 
2410 
2420 



"DI$ 

2380 PRINT#-2,"ID#: "NM$ID$?:PR 
INT# -2 , USING" .####"; X/ 10000 ; : PRI 
NT#-2," "CP$"PRICE: "NM 

$; : PRINT#-2, USING" $$###.##";CVN( 
SP$) 

PRINT#-2 ,NM$:NEXTX:GOTO1100 

• PRINT TALLY 

*************************** 

24 30 A$=" TALLY" : GOSUB2060 : PRINT @ 
481, "TALLY TO SCREEN/PRINTER (S/ 

P)?"« 

2440 GOSUB 2040: IF A$=CHR$(13) T 
HEN 1100 

2450 IF A$="S" THEN DV=0 : GOT0248 

2 4 60 
0 

2470 
2480 
2490 
2500 
2510 



IF A$= n P" THEN DV=2:GOT024 8 



GOTO 2440 
F0RX=1 TO L0F(1) 
GET #1,X:A=0 
IF I$(A)=ID$ THEN 2 540 
IF I$(A)= M " THEN I$(A)=ID$: 
GOTO2540 

2520 IF A>9 THEN 2540 
2530 A=A+1:G0T0 2500 
2540 NEXTX:IF DV=0 THEN CLS 
2550 FORY=0 TO A : TL=0 : F0RX= 1 TO 
L0F(1) ,. . 

2560 GET #l f X:IF ID$=I$(Y) AND S 
T$="S" THEN 2620 

2570 NEXTX: IF TL THEN PRINT#-DV, 
STRING$ (53 , '•-") : PRINT* -DV, STRING 
$(36,32)I$(Y)" TOTAL"; :PRINT#-DV 
,USING"$$#### . ##" ;TL:PRINT#-DV:P 

RINT#-DV 

2580 IF DV=0 AND TL>0 THEN GOSUB 
2040: CLS 
2590 NEXTY 

2600 IF DV=0 THEN GOSUB1880 
2610 GOTO1100 

2620 PRINT#-DV,I$(Y) ;:PRINT#-DV, 

USING" .####" ;X/ 10000 ; 

2630 PRINT#-DV," "DI$ ; : PRINT#-D 

V,USING"$$###.##";CVN(SF$) 

2640 TL=TL+CVN(SF$) :GOTO2570 
2650 *************************** 

2 660 '* YARDSALE INVENTORY * 
2670 '* & PRICE TAG PROGRAM * 

I ************************** 

»* (C) 1987 BY ERIC WHITE * 
'* ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. * 
2710 »* VERSION: 1.00 8701.02 * 




26S0 
2690 
2100 
2110 
2120 




58 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Better guess fast because the fuse is lit 




y Kent Baumgardt 



W"W* Tord Guess is a game in which you have a limited 

^/m/ number of tries to guess a hidden word before 
r r the dynamite explodes. Load the program and 
run it. You will see an orange color screen while the 
computer is setting up the variables. You are then asked to 
enter a level ( 1 -3) and the number of words ( 1 0-80) you want 
to guess. The game now starts. 

On the left side of the screen is the dynamite with a long 
fuse. Under the Words Left indicator, you see several boxes 
in a row This indicates the length of the word you are to 
guess. Begin by pressing any letter key (try vowels to start). 

If your guess is correct, it appears on one of the bottom 
lines (this helps you remember your guess) and in one of 
the boxes. Your score is updated too. 

If you make an incorrect guess, you will hear a sound, 
your letter appears only on the bottom line and the fuse 
burns. If you run out of tries, the screen flashes. You will 
see the level you played on, your score and the word you 
didn't complete. Then you are given the option to end or 
play again. You can press CLEAR during the game to end. 
Here is a listing of variables and what they do in the 
program: 



Variable 

WD$(l-80) 
N$ (0-9) 
AL$ (1-26) 
1$ 

LL$ 
NN$ 
W$ 



Description 

Words to guess 
Number drawing data 
Alphabet drawing data 
Input through INKEVS 
Letters to be drawn 
Numbers to be drawn 
Single character in current word 
(compared with your input) 



Kent Baumgardt is 16 years old and lives in Dayton, Ohio. 
He began working with computers when a 64 K ECB Co Co 
was purchased for the family in January of 1984. In addition 
to ECB programming and graphics, he is interested in 
machine language. 



VI, V2 


Large, small fuse burn 


H, V 


Coordinates for drawing guessed 




letters 


ACU 


Accumulator 


LN 


Length of current word 


GT 


Game total score 


SC 


Word score 


x, y 


Coordinates for drawing 



If you have questions or comments you can call me at 
(513) 252-4848 anytime from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. EST or write 
to me at 3522 East Fifth St., Dayton, OH 45403. □ 




April 1987 THE RAINBOW 59 



f f 14 


.189 


24 


. . 208 


40 


77 


49 


27 


70 


232 


85 


71 


104 


64 


118 


.73 


END 


...214 



The listing: WORDGUES 

0 PCLEAR4 : CLEAR2J30 : DM=8 0 

1 PMODE4,l:PCLS:GOSUB15:PCLS:SCR 
EEN1 , 1 : GOSUB3 1 : PCLS : GOSUB105 : PCL 
S:GOSUB2j3 

2 FORX=lTODM:READWD$ (X) :NEXT 

3 MAIN PROGRAM " ll,M " 

4 F0RNM=1T0D : CIRCLE (15, 14 0 ) ,10, , 
. 5 : WD=RND ( DM) : ACU=0 : LINE (15 ,10) - 
(15,140) , PSET : WJ=0 : LN=LEN (WD$ (WD 
) ) :WD$=WD$ (WD) : IFWD$ (WD) ="X"THEN 
3 

5 FORXX=lTOLN:LINE( (XX*lj3)+lj3j3,l 
20) - ( (XX* 10) +110 ,140) ,PSET,B:NEX 
T 

6 GOSUB38:IFACU=LN THEN13 

7 IFI$=CHR$(12)THENCLS:PRINT@39, 
"YOUR SCORE IS: "GT+SC: PRINT@23 2, 
"HAVE A GOOD DAY ! ! " : END 

8 IFI$>"@"ORI$< IIA "GOSUB87 

9 FORG=lTOLN:W$=MID$(WD$(WD) ,G, 1 
) : IFI$<>W$THENNEXTG 

10 IFI$=W$THENMID$ (WD$(WD) ,G, 1)= 
CHR$ (255) : CI=CL: X=G*lj3+lj33 : Y=138 
: LL$=I$ : BP=0 : GOSUB58 : GOSUB90 : NEX 
TG:GOT06 

11 IFBP=1THENCI=IL:G0SUB67:G0SUB 
90 

12 GOTO 6 

13 LINE (165, 90)- (200, 100 ), PRESET 
, BF : M=M-1 : X=17j3 : Y=100 : NN$=STR$ (M 
) : GOSUB51 : GT=GT+SC+CW : SC=-CL: GOS 
UB9 0 1 GOSUB9 3 : GOSUB9 5 : WD$ ( WD ) = 11 X " 

14 FORPP=lTO10j3£):NEXT:LINE(4j3,13 
0)- (255, 169) , PRESET, BF:H=42 :Y=16 
9:NEXTNM:GOT0115 

15 ' 1 1 INITIALIZE VARIABLES''' 

16 CLS:SCREEN£),1:DIMWD$(DM) ,N$(9 
) ,AL$(27) ,V1(18) ,V2(18) :H=42:V=1 
69 

17 DRAW"BMlj3j3, lj3^NUl^NE7NRl^)NF7N 
D10NG7NLlj3NH7":GET(90,90) -(110, 1 
10) ,V1,G 

18 DRAW"BM2j3j3,lj3j3NU5NE3NR5NF3ND5 
NG3NL5NH3 " : GET ( 190 , 90 ) - ( 2 10 , 110 ) 
,V2,G 

19 F0RX=1T027:READAL$(X) :NEXT:FO 
RX=0TO9:READN$(X) : NEXT: RETURN 



20 ' 1 11 DRAW TITLE ••«••••• 

21 X=54:Y=15:S=lj3:SP=14:LL$=" W 
0 R D G U E S S":GOSUB58 

22 LINE(42,5) -(205,20) ,PSET,B:CI 
RCLE ( 15 , 14,0 ) ,10, , .5: CIRCLE (15,18 
0) ,10, , .5,0, .5:LINE(5, 140) -(5,18 
0) , PSET: LINE (2 5, 140) -(25, 180) , PS 
ET : LINE ( 15 , 10 ) - ( 15 , 140 ) , PSET 

23 FOR X=40 TO 240 STEP lj3:LINE( 
X, 170) -(X+7, 17j3) ,PSET:NEXT 

24 X=35: Y=60:LL$="GAME TOTAL": GO 
SUB58 :GOSUB93 

25 X=16j3: Y=6j3:LL$="THIS WORD": GO 
SUB58 

26 CI=j3:GOSUB9j3 

27 X=100: Y=40:LL$="LEVEL ":GOSUB 
58 

28 X=145: Y=4j3 : NN$=STR$ (LV) : GOSUB 
51 

29 X=8j3: Y=185:LL$="PRESS CLEAR T 
0 END":GOSUB58 

30 X=90: Y=100 : LL$="WORDS LEFT" : G 
OSUB58 : X=17j3 : NN$=STR$ (M) : GOSUB51 
: RETURN 

31 ' 1 ' 1 ' 1 1 LEVEL INPUT ' 1 ' • • • 1 • ' 

32 X=90: Y=70:LL$="SELECT LEVEL": 
GOSUB58 : X=100 : Y=lj35 : NN$="1" : GOSU 
B51 : X=12 5 : Y=lj35 : NN$="2 " : GOSUB51 : 
X=15j3 : Y=lj35 : NN$="3 " : GOSUB51 

33 GOSUB38 : IFI$<"l"ORI$>" 3 "THEN3 
3ELSELV=VAL(I$) 

34 IFLV=1THENX1=98 :Y1=106:X2=106 
: Y2=98 : INC=8 . 5 : CL=2j3 : IL=-2 : CW=lj3 

35 IFLV=2THENX1=123: Yl=lj36:X2=13 
1 : Y2=98 : INC=13 : CL=3j3 : IL=-4 : CW=15 

36 IFLV=3THENX1=148: Yl=lj36 : X2=15 
6 : Y2=98 : INC=26 : CL=40 : IL=-6 : CW=2j3 

37 FORZ=1TO10 : LINE (XI, Yl) -(X2, Y2 
) , PSET , B : FORPP=1TO50 : NEXT : LINE ( X 
1 , Yl) - (X2 , Y2 ) , PRESET, B : FORPP=lTO 
50 : NEXT : NEXT : RETURN 

38 i i i i i INKEY$ i '•»•••• I i • 

3 9 SOUND 200,2 

40 I$=INKEY$: IFACU=LN THEN41ELSE 
IFI$=» "THEN40 

41 RETURN 

42 ''LETTER AND NUMBER DATA • • 

43 DATA BU1U4E1R2F1NG4D4G1L2H1BD 
1 

44 DATAU5E1R2F1D2NL4D3BL4 , U6R3F1 
D1G1NL3F1D1G1L3 , BU1U4E1R2F1BD4G1 
L2H1BD1 , U6R2F2D2G2L2 , U6R4BD3BL1L 
3D3NR4 

45 DATA U6R4BD3BL1L3D3 , BU1U4E1R3 
BD4NL1D2L3 H1BD1 , U6BR4 D3NL4 D3 BL4 , 
BU6BR1R2L1D6NR1L1BL1 , BU6BR4D5G1L 
2H1BD1 , U6D3R1NE3NF3BD3BL1 

46 DATA NU6NR4,U6F2ND1E2D6BL4,U6 
D1F4NU5D1BL4 , BU1U4E1R2F1D4G1L2H1 



60 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen,,. 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVn/VIII. DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smiih-Corona, 
Tcrminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) formal controls for: top, 
boitom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from ihe keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line hepders and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCI! format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sire saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load com/nand only once no 
matier where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, lop of text, 
boitom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, labs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen withoui 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum case of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



... truly a state •/ ihe ar( word processor, 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matier of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. H you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple II is a trademark »f Apple Computer. Inc.; Atari is a trademark 
of Atari. Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark «f Tandy Corp; MX-80 is 2 
trademark of Epson America, Inc 



BD1 ,U6R3F1D1G1L3D3 , BU1U4E1R2F1D3 
G1NH1NF1G1L1H1BD1 

47 DATA U6R3F1D1G1L3R1F3BL4,BU5B 
R4H1L2G1D1F1R2F1D1G1L2H1BD1,BU6R 
4L2D6BL2 , BU1U5BR4D5G1L2H1BD1 , BU6 
BR4D2G1D1G1ND1H1U1H1NU2BD4 , NU6E2 
NU1F2NU6BL4 

48 DATA BU6D1F2E2NU1BD4ND1H2G2D1 
, BU6BR4D1G2ND3H2NU1BD5 , BU6R4D1G4 
D1NR4 

49 DATA BU1U4E1R2F1NG4D4G1L2H1BD 
1, BU6BR2NG1D6R1L2BL1 , BU5E1R2F1D1 
G1L1G2D1NR4 , BU5E1R2F1D1G1NL1F1D1 
G1L2H1BD1 , BU2NR4U1E3D6BL3 

50 DATA BU6NR4D3E1R2F1D2G1L2H1BD 
1 , BU6BR2NR2G2D3U2R3F1D1G1L2H1BD1 
,BU6R4D1G3D2BL1,BU1U1E1NR1H1U1E1 
R2F1D1G1NL1F1D1G1L2H1BD1 , BU4NF1U 
1E1R2F1D2NL3D1G2L2 

51 • ' • DRAWING NUMBERS 

52 F0RNN=1T0LEN(NN$) 

53 N1$=MID$ (NN$,NN, 1) 

54 N=ASC(N1$) -48 

55 IFN<0THEN57 

56 DRAW"BM=X; ,=Y;XN$ (N) ;" 

57 X=X+7: NEXT: RETURN 

58 DRAWING LETTERS •'•»••■ 

59 IFBP=1THENS0UND1 , 2 

60 IFBP=0THENACU=ACU+1:SOUND100, 
2 

61 F0RLL=1T0LEN (LL$) 

62 L1$=MID$(LL$,LL,1) 

63 L=ASC(L1$) -63 

64 IFL<0THEN66 

6 5 DRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; XAL$ ( L) ; " 

66 X=X+7:NEXT:C=0: RETURN 

67 • • • i • i i • i FUSE BURN 1 1 ' 1 ' • • 1 ' 

68 FORBR=1TO10:PUT(5,MV) -(2 5,MV+ 
20) ,V1,PSET:PUT(5,MV) -(25,MV+20) 
,V2,PSET:NEXTBR 

69 MV=MV+INC:IFMV>119THEN70ELSEL 
INE (0,0) -(25,MV+20) , PRESET, BF: RE 
TURN 

10 » I i i • i i M • EXPLOSION 

71 FORX=1TO20:PLAY"L2 55T2 55O1V31 
CGEF" : NEXT 

72 FORX=1TO10:IFC=1THENC=0ELSEC= 
1 

7 3 PLAYSTR$ (RND( 12) ): PCLSC: SCREE 
N1,C:NEXTX 

74 SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS1 : DRAW"C0" : GT=G 
T+SC 

75 X=90:Y=30:LL$="YOU BLEW IT" 
:GOSUB58 

76 X=130: Y=50:LL$="ON":GOSUB58 

77 X=90 i Y=70 : LL$=" LEVEL" : GOSUB58 

78 X=170:Y=70:NN$=STR$(LV) :GOSUB 
51 

79 X=90 : Y=80 : LL$="SCORE" : GOSUB58 



:X=170:NN$=STR$ (GT) : G0SUB51 : IFGT 
<0THENDRAW"BM164, 77R5" 

80 X=40: Y=120:LL$="THE WORD WAS 
":GOSUB58 

81 LINE(130, 112) -(LN*10+123 , 123) 
, PRESET, BF 

82 X=132 : Y=120: DRAW'Cl" : IFLN>4TH 
ENLL$=" "+WD$ : GOSUB58ELSELL$=WD$ 
:GOSUB58 

8 3 X=60: Y=150:DRAW"C0" :LL$ = "PRES 
S ENTER TO REPLAY" : GOSUB58 

84 X=60: Y=160:LL$="PRESS CLEAR T 
0 STOP" :GOSUB58 

85 GOSUB 38 

86 IFI$=CHR$(12)THENCLS:PRINT@23 
2, "HAVE A NICE DAY ! ! " : ENDELSEIFI 
$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENRUNELSE85 

87 «'•■'<• 'GUESSES 

88 X=H:Y=V:IFI$<>""THENLL$=I$ 

89 BP=1:GOSUB58:H=H+10: RETURN 
9^) itiiiii i WORD SCORES •••••••• 

91 LINE (150, 76) -(220, 66) , PRESET, 
BF : SC=SC+CI : X=180 : Y=75 : NN$=STR$ ( 
S C ) : GO SUB5 1 : 1 FS C< 0THENDRAW "BM178 
,72R5" 

92 RETURN 

93 •>•«••»• GAME TOTAL •»•••!••< 

94 LINE (5,0 , 75 ) - ( 1,0,0 , 65 ) , PRESET, B 
F : X=60 : Y=75 : NN$=STR$ (GT) : GOSUB51 
: RETURN 

95 • REWARD ' • • • • 

96 F0RPP=1T05 

97 AA=(LN*10) +115 

98 LINE ( 105 , 125) - (AA, 145) ,PSET,B 
:SOUND10, 1 

99 LINE (100, 120) -(AA+5, 150) , PSET 
,B:SOUND30, 1 

100 LINE(95,115)-(AA+10,155) , PSE 
T,B:SOUND50, 1 

101 LINE (105 , 125) - (AA, 145) , PRESE 
T,B:SOUND10, 1 

102 LINE ( 100 ,120) - (AA+5 ,150) , PRE 
SET,B:SOUND30, 1 

103 LINE(95,115)-(AA+10,155) , PRE 
SET,B:SOUND50, 1 

104 NEXT: RETURN 

105 ' ' ' 1 ' 'NUMBER OF WORDS >»•»'• 

106 X=30: Y=30:LL$="PLEASE ENTER 
NUMBER OF WORDS" : GOSUB58 

107 FORPP=1TODM/10:READX,Y,LL$,N 
N$ 

108 IFLEN(NN$) <3THENNN$=" " 
+NN$ELSENN$=" "+NN$ 

109 GOSUB58 : G0SUB51 : NEXT 

110 GOSUB38 : IFI$<"A"ORI$>"L"THEN 
110 

111 D=(ASC(I$) -64) *10: IFD>DM THE 
ND=DM 

112 DRAW"S6" :FORPP=1TO5:X=200:Y= 



62 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



100 : LL$=I$ : SOUND150 , 1 : G0SUB58 : FO 
RP=1TO50 : NEXT : LINE (195,105)-(210 
, 90) , PRESET, BF : FORP=1TO50 : NEXT : N 
EXT: DRAW'S 4" 

113 M=D: RETURN 

114 DATA60,50,A, 10, 60, 60, B, 20,60 
, 70, C, 30, 60, 80, D, 40, 60, 90, E, 50, 6 
0, 100, F, 60, 60, 110, G, 70, 60, 120, H, 
80 

115 'ENDING' i n i » i i i i 

116 DRAW'Cl" 

117 PCLS:X=30:Y=40:LL$="I DONT H 
AVE ANY MORE WORDS" : GOSUB58 

118 X=65:Y=50:LL$="FOR YOU TO GU 
ESS" :GOSUB58 

119 X=70 : Y=70 : LL$=" LEVEL" : GOSUB5 
8 

120 X=120: Y=70:NN$=STR$ (LV) :GOSU 
B51 

121 X=70 : Y=80 : LL$="SCORE" : GOSUB5 
8 

122 X=120 : Y=80 : NN$=STR$ (GT) : GOSU 
B51 

123 X=40: Y=100:LL$="PRESS E TO E 
ND":GOSUB58 

124 X=40 : Y=110 : LL$=" PRESS R TO R 
EPLAY":GOSUB58 

125 GOSUB38 : IFI$="E"THENCLS : PRIN 



T@232,"HAVE A GOOD DAY ! ! "ELSEIFI 
$="R"THENRUNELSE125 

126 «• i I i i i i • WORD DATA • • 1 ' • ' ' ' • ' 

127 DATA DI VIS ION, HELLO, SIMPLE, L 
AST , GENES IS , TAPE , HOUSE , GENTLE , QU 
IET, HAPPY 

128 DATA SUBTLE, LIZARD, FLOWER, MA 
N, CHILD, WOMAN , BOY , GIRL, GOODNESS , 
THRIFTY 

129 DATA ACHE , BACKGROUND , CABBAGE 
, DAIRY , EAGER , FACT , GAIN , I CY , KEEN , 
LACK 

130 DATA MACHINE, OBJECT, PACE, QUA 
RT , RANGE , SABBATH , TABLET , UGLY , VAI 
N , WAGES 

131 DATA YIELD, ZERO, ABILITY, BAGG 
AGE , CALENDAR , DAILY , EARNEST , FACTO 
R, GARAGE , HANDSOME 

132 DATA IDEAL, JANITOR, KEROSENE, 
MACHINERY , NAMELY , OBSERVATION , PAJ 
AMAS , QUALIFIED, RADAR, SALESMAN 

133 DATA TABERNACLE, UNBELIEVER, V 
ACANT , WANDER, YOURSELVES , ZEBRA , AB 
OARD , BACHELOR , CABINET , DAMNATION 

134 DATA EDUCATIONAL, FACULTY, GEN 
IUS , HARASS , IDENTIFY , JEWELRY , KIDN 
APPED, LEGAL, MAINTENANCE , NATURALL 
Y 



SPECIAL DEAL ON THE GREATEST SOFTWARE DEAL 



500 PROGRAMS! 



GET 50 DISKS OR 50 CASSETTE TAPES FULL OF OVER 
500 PROGRAMS. HERE IS WHAT YOU'LL RECEIVE: 

★ Over 250 Utility/Home Application Programs including a 
Word Processor, DataBase, Spreadsheet, Account Man- 
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Mail List, Machine Language Tutorials, Plus Much More! 

★ Over 200 exciting games including Warlords, Star Trek, 
Super Vaders, Solar Conquest, Horse Races, Football, 
Baseball, Frog Jump, Invader, Plus Much More! (Many 
machine language games) 

★ Over 30 adventures including The College Adventure, Dun- 
geon Master, Space Lab, Ice World, Ship Wreck, Zigma 
Experiment. Plus 32K Graphic Adventures. 

EACH INDIVIDUAL ISSUE SOLD FOR $ 9. 00 
EACH OR *450 FOR ALL 50 ISSUES. WE 
SLASHED THE PRICE TO ONLY 150. 00 . 



REG. $ 450 



mom 



$ 150 



OO 



★★THIS MONTH ONLY** 



Vt$A 



Buy this package of 500 programs and 
receive a free 6 month subscription. 
(A $ 35 value) 




RAINBOW 

CtATlFICATiON 



ON EARTH JUST GOT BETTER! 



THAT'S RIGHT! THIS MONTH WE'VE DROPPED OUR YEARLY 
SUBSCRIPTION RATE AN UNBELIEVABLE $ 1 0. 00 TO ENTICE YOU 
INTO SUBSCRIBING WITH US. GET 12 DISKS OR TAPES A YEAR 
CONTAINING OVER 120 QUALITY PROGRAMS. A SUBSCRIP- 
TION TO T & D SOFTWARE CONSISTS OF 10 READY-TO-LOAD 
PROGRAMS DELIVERED BY FIRST CLASS MAIL EVERY MONTH. 

NO WE ARE NOT THE SAME AS THE RAINBOW ON TAPE. IN 
FACT, MANY SUBSCRIBERS HAVE WRITTEN IN AND SAID THAT 
WE ARE MUCH BETTER THAN RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




LYEAR(12iuu«3) 
6 MO. (6 J mum) 

1 tSSUE 



PRICES- 
TAPE 
OROESK 



THIS 
MONTH ONLV 
60.00 
35.00 
6.00 



Michigan Resident Add 4% 
Overseas a<m £10 to Subscription Prica 
Personal Cfiecks Welcome' 



* 1 6K-64K Color Computer OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

♦ Over 4000 Satisfied Customers 1. Accounts Receivable 6. Foot Race 

* Back Issues Available From 2. Work Mate 7, Flippy the Seal 

♦ July '82 (Over 500 Programs) 3. Calendar 8. Screen Calculator 

4. Invasion 9. AbleBuilders 

5. TripAdventure 10, Super Error2 




RAINBOW 

Clftlif tCAYlOfl 
&£ AL 



Available on COCO 1, 2 and 31 
All Pfograms Include Documentation! 



^oiteTcor^ 



T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 63 




COCO 3 UTILITY 



Disabling the CoCo 3 
Color Burst 5igna 



By Robert Gault, Ph.D 



The color burst is the part of a television 
signal that tells the receiver the signal is in 
color. If the color burst is missing, the TV 
or monitor will turn off its color circuits. 

If a composite monitor is used with the high 
resolution text screens, particularly the 80- 
character screen, there is considerable color 
artifacting of the letters. If a monochrome 
monitor is used, the color information leaves 
distortion on the screen. It is desirable in both 
cases to be able to turn off the color output of 
the CoCo 3. 

The color burst can be controlled with Bit 4 
(0-7) of byte $FF98. When this bit is clear, the 
color burst is on. When the bit is set, the color 
burst is off. What is needed is a way to keep this 
bit set as required. CoCo has not made this easy 
for us. Each time a pass is made through the idle 
loop at command level, Bit 4 of $FF98 is cleared. 
The offending code starts at $E019. First a test 
is made of which text screen is in use: 32-, 40- 
or 80- character. Then, three tables are used to 
obtain values to store into the GIME chip. The 
values stored into $FF98 are located at $E033, 
$E03C and $E045. The following line of code 



Robert Gault holds a doctorate in chemistry and 
works as a forensic toxicologist. He has owned his 
Color Computer since 1 983, and has published several 
Color Computer articles. 



results in the color burst being turned off in all 
three text screens. It must be reused each time you 
push the reset button: 

POKE &HE033,16:POKE &HE03C,19: 
POKE &HE045,19 

To obtain the best contrast, you should use 
black and white for the foreground /background, 
not colors. This can be adjusted with the PALETTE 
command. Even with the color burst off, there 
is enough high frequency information in the 
signal to confuse the monitor if the PALETTE 
colors are not set to black and white. 

For the 32-character screen, use: 

PALETTE12,0:PALETTE13,63:CL5 

or 

PALETTE12,63:PALETTE13,0:CLS. 

For the 40- or 80-character screen, use: 

PALETTE0 , 0 : PALETTEB , 63 : CL51 

or 

PALETTE0 ,63 : PALETTEB , 0CL55. 

(You may direct questions about this article to 
Dr. Gault at 832 N. Renaud, Grosse Pointe 
Woods, MI 48236, 313-881-0335. Please enclose 
an SASE for a reply when writing.) ^ 



64 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Buy the PRO-COLOR- 
SERIES for $79.95 and get 12 
months of The Rainbow FREE! If 
you are an existing subscriber* 
to The Rainbow, well renew your 
subscription for an additional 12 
months. This is a savings to you 
of $31 .00! The PRO-COLOR- 
SERIES consists of three programs. 
PRO-COLOR-FILE 'Enhanced* V2.0 Design a record struc- 
ture up to 60 fields with 1020 spaces per record, 4 custom 
designed data entry screens, math functions on single records with 
IF-THEN-ELSE capability. Extremely flexible reporting capability 
for totals, averages and summaries. Mailing label generation of up 
to 10 labels across and 30 1 ines per label. Use the posting function 
to perform mathematical calculations on the entire database, with 
records updated automatically. Output reports to the printer, disk or 
screen. Send information directly into a DYNACALC^ compatible 
file for use in spread sheets. Design custom menus for report 
selections and streamline repetitive tasks into one keystroke with 
the command processor. Sort 750 records in less than 5 minutes 
and create special indexes of your file for reporting and accessing. 
Store as many records as your disk will ho d! 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS V2.0 This mail-merge feature will 




allow you to write a letter and 
have names from your database 
inserted automatically. Design 
invoices, inventory cards and 
other forms. Or if you use pre- 
printed forms, you can set up a 
template to print information in 
the appropriate places. You can 
use printer codes for features like "bold" and "underline." If you 
have our TELEGRAPHICS® program, you can have hi-res pictures 
included as part of the form! You can even right justify your text for 
a more professional look. 

PRO-COLOR-DIR This utility will read the directory of all 
your diskettes and create a data file that can be accessed by 
PRO-COLOR-FILE. Store up to 1,000 entries on one diskette and 
generate a master report that shows where each program is in your 
library. You can keep track of the date you created a disk and the 
date you last updated it by generating labels for your disks. 
The PRO-COLOR-SERIES gives you database capabilities found on 
larger computers, but at a fraction of the cost. Our PRO-COLOR- 
SERIES lets you organize important information together in one 
place, right at your finger tips. Not only will you be getting the most 
widely used database program for the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3, but also the 
ONLY magazine that can give you all the facts about the CoCo! 



□ Yes, I would like to receive The PRO-COLOR-SERIES and 12 months of the Rainbow magazine 
for just $79.95. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



PHONE 



For software: 

$ 3 shipping/handling 

$12 overseas 

For subscription: 
$37 overseas surface 
$72 overseas air mail 
$ 7 Canada 

No refunds or returns on this offer. 
No CODs. 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



* If renewing, please include the mailing label from your latest issue 
of The Rainbow. 

Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502-5300 
(803) 665-5676 




SIGNATURE 



ACCOUNT NUMBER 




EXPIRATION DATE 




Assorted Shorties 



, ^^^^^ 



s- 



Graphics 



Graphics 1 rio 

ByRa ndy Cassel 



CoCo3 



I thought nothing would make me give up my old CoCo, 
but the CoCo 3 is amazing. The new commands are fantastic, 
and I've written three programs that show off the ways the 
PPLETTE command can be used for animation. 

Spinner is an animated rotating pinwheel. Try changing 
the fraction 1/60 to 1/45, 1/30 or 1/15. Remember to make 
the changes in all lines where it appears, lines 60, 70 and 100. 
Also, try changingthe H/W ration in theHCIRCLE command 
in Line 70. 

The second program, Circles^ is a random circle generator. 
Experiment here by changing HCIRCLE to HLINE- 
(R,B) ,PSET,BF and insert Line 65, HCDLDR RNO(C)0 and 
delete Line 80. Also try H5ET (ABC) and delete Line 80. 

The final program, /Popper, uses the 32-column screen. 1 
think it has possibilities in Adventure games. 



66 



THE RAINBOW April 19B7 




i 




CoCon 

Products ! 



An introduction to the Color Computer III that compares the 
differences between the CoCo I/II and the NEW CoCo III. Includes: 
GIME chip specs, CoCo II to CoCo III converter, CoCo III memory 
map and a 128K/512K RAM test. "Offers some very good information 
to programtters . " - Rainbow Review Feb '87 $19.95 



• C III GRAPHICS 



IBuy 'em both 
for $29.95 



A drawing program for the CoCo III using the new Enhanced graphic 
features: 320x192 graphics, 16 of any 64 colors, plus the ability 
to Save and Load 32K screens. "Paint pr&t by pictures on the 
CoCo3. M - Rainbow Review Dec '86 $19.95 

• ROLLER CONTROLLER 

Meet the challenge of super fast arcade action using the brilliant colors of the CoCo III. Six completely dif- 
ferent maddening mazes with progressive skill levels. 128K DISK $29.95 (see Rainbow Review May '87) 




COCO 




FONT BONANZA - April '87 Rainbow 



Replace the " PLAIN " CoCo III characters from a menu of INCREDIBLE fonts or create your own. 128K DISK $29.95 

• ELITE WORD 80 - #1 COCO III Word Processor 

The thir d gen e ration CoCo Word Processor is here! All the powerful features, advantages and benefits of 
EliteWorcT plus~4~D/BQ column display formats for the CoCo I_II. Available only from Spectrum Projects! $79.95 
Special word processing package of EliteWord and EliteSpel for $99.95 (see Rainbow Review March '87) 



FKEYS 




- Function Keys for COCO 



A productivity enhancement that gives you the capability to add twenty (20) pre-defined functions to the CoCo 
III by using the CTL, Fl and F2 keys! $24.95 (see April '87 Rainbow Review ) 

• 51 2K UPGRADE (NOW $99.95'} 

Eas^ installation with a superior design for a reliable upgrade, processing efficiency and AVAILABLE NOW for 
UTe" CoCo III! $99.95* A 512K upgrade without RAM chips $49.95* (see March f 87 Rainbow Review ) 
*-The lowest, upgrade prices in the Rainbow magazine, period ! ! I 



• RGB PATCH ~ No more BLACK & WHITE dots ... 

Did you buy an expensive RGB monitor ( CM~8 ) just so that you could see your Hi-Res art:ifactir\ g CoCo 2 games in 
BLACK & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. 128K DISK $24.95 

• VIDEO DIGITIZER III - 25 Frames/soc 

Take pictures with speed! The fastest CoCo Video Digitizer ever! Twenty-five (25) frames a second (3 Xs faster 
than the DS-69A!) Now available: for the CoCo III. $149.95 Req. 128K CoCo III with a 40 pin 1 Y 1 cable or Y-Box. 

• RGB MONITOR - Better than CM-8! 

Our monitor is much more versatile than the Tandy CMH3 ! Takes a variety of video inputs, including: RGB 
Analog, Color Composite and RGB TTL. Unlike the CM-8, PMODE 4 artifact colors don't show up BLACK and WHITE 
(when processed through the Color Composite input) $299.95 

• PAL SWITCHER - Designed by Marty Goodman 1 . 

Have the best of both worlds by being able to switch between CoCo II and CoCo III modes when using a Multi-Pak 
Interface. Req. OLDER PAL & NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multi-Pak Interface $29.95/with ^jE^^A^ chip $39.95 



Guide to CoCo III Graphics $19.95 
CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 
CoCo III Monochrame driver $39.95 



CoCo III Unraveled !!!! $29.95 
CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 
512K CoCo III Computer $299.95 



All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



HOWARD BEACH IMY 11414 
COCO HOT LINE 718-835-1344 



Listing 1: SPINNER 

1J3 ON BRK GOTO 14J3 
2j3 C=l 

3j3 POKE65497,j3 

4j3 PALETTE j3 , fS : HSCREEN2 

5j3 FOR X=l TO 15: PALETTE X,RND(6 

3 ) : NEXT 

6j3 FOR X=l TO J3 STEP -1/6/3 

7j3 HCIRCLE (16j3 , 96) , R, C , 1 , X+S , E+X 

+1/6/8 

8/3 C=C+1:IFC>15 THEN C=l 
9/3 NEXT X 

1/3/3 S=S + l/6/3:E=E+l/6/3:C=l:R=R+5: 
IFR>95 THEN 12/3 
11/3 GOTO 5/3 

12/3 FOR X=l T015: PALETTE X,63:PA 
LETTE X,j3:NEXT X 
13/3 GOTO 12/2 

14/3 PALETTE CMP: POKE 65496 ,/3 

Listing 2: CIRCLES 

1/3 ON BRK GOTO 11/3 

2/3 POKE65497,/3 

3/3 PALETTE /3 , /3 : HSCREEN2 

4/3 FOR X=l TO 15: PALETTE X,RND(6 

3) :NEXT X 



5/3 FOR X=l TO 7 5 

6/3 A=RND(32/3)-l:B=RND(192)-l:C=R 
ND(15) 

7/3 HCIRCLE (A,B) ,RND(25) ,C 
8/3 HPAINT(A,B) , RND (15) ,C 
9/3 NEXT X 

1/3/3 PALETTE RND ( 15 ) , RND ( 63 ) : GOTO 
1/3/3 

11/3 POKE 6549 6 ,/3: PALETTE CMP 

Listing 3: IPDPPER 

1/3 WIDTH 3 2 

2/3 ON BRK GOTO 15/3 

3/3 CLS 

4/3 PRINT M TYPE SOMETHING (32 LETT 

ER LIMIT) 11 

5/3 LINEINPUTA$ 

6/3 IF LEN(A$)>3 2 THEN 3/3 

7/3 A=INT( (32-LEN(A$) )/2) 

8/3 PALETTE 13,/3 

9/3 CLS 

1/2/2 PRINT@224 : PRINTTAB (A) A$ 

11/3 FOR X=l TO 63 

12/3 PALETTE 12 ,X 

13/3 NEXT X 

14/3 GOTO 11/3 

15/3 PALETTE CMP 




ome 




Grocery 

By Donald Large 




Several years ago 1 started helping my wife with chores 
around the house. I learned the "right" way to vacuum the 
carpets, wash the dishes and do the laundry. About the only 
weekly chore I couldn't get right was grocery shopping. In 
spite of the various notes that were pinned to my jacket, I 
still managed to forget something, get the wrong brand, or 
neglect to use the proper coupon. 

I looked for a program to make grocery lists, but couldn't 
find one, so 1 decided to write my own. I started by taking 
a tour through the grocery store where we normally shop, 
and took note of where different items were located. I then 
designed a printout sheet to follow this path (except where 
item groupings didn't follow the layout of the store). I then 
added a spot to indicate coupons 1 might have, and a place 
for any special instructions. 

This short program will produce 10 shopping lists. Each 
time you get ready to do your grocery shopping, fill it out. 
It will help you get everything you need, remind you to use 
your coupons, and specify the correct brands you need to 
look for. 



Portion of Sample Printout 



SHOPPING LIST 



ITEM COUPON BRAND 



FRESH VEG. 
CANNED VEG. 

CEREAL 
RICE 

BAKING MIXES 

PUDDING 

JELLY 

CRACKERS 

PICKLES 

MILK 

EGGS 

CGLD CUTS 
FROZEN HEAT 
TUNA 

FROZEN DESERTS 
SUGAR 
PEPPER 
COOKING OIL 



68 THE RAINBOW April 1987 





SHOPPING LIST 



DC 



SUPER CHIP -SALE- ... 

6821 Standard PIA^a»96c $6.95 

Basic ROM Ul Chip~$&rQ5: $9.95 

6847 VDG Chip ^^5: $12.95 

6809E CPU ChipzSiWaS: $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Qrig SAM Chip (6883) z$20*aS: $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

68766 EPROM - (Fits all Basic ROMS) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

New SAM Chip with heatsink (74LS785) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 6809E CPU 

and SAM Chips (BE PREPARED) $39.95 

EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512s ! Super 
fast programming! - See April ? 86 review .$149.95 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of tite CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

Newl 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Prcgramming Tricks Revealed $14.95 

CoCo Memory Map $16.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS $19.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide $19.95 

Newl New! CoCo II Service Manual (Specify CoCo II 

Catalogue model number) $29.95 

CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS9 $19.95 

Guide with Two Disk Package of demo pgms ...$49.95 
Color /Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled - A completely 
ccmnented disassembly of the CoCo ROMS ! Comprehen- 
sive three (3) Book Set - Save $10! $49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WICO Adapter - Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks .$19.95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
WICO Trackball - Regularly $69. 95 , Now only. $24 .95 
Universal Video Drvr - All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin act Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

Computize "Y" Box - Better than a Y cable ..$39.95 

KAMELEON Parallel Printer Interface $49.95 

Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3131) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 

COCO III DISK DRIVE 0 $239.95 

512K COLOR COMPUTER III $299.95 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
COD add $2.00 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



COCO CABLES AND ... 

Printer/Modem 15* Extender Cable $14.95 

Tired of unglugging_ devices from your RS232 port? 

Try a RS232 "Y" Cable $19.95 

TANDY CM-8 RGB Analog 6' Extender Cable ....$19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick / Mouse 10 1 Ext Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

MAGNAVQX 8505 / 8515 Analog RGB cable $24.95 

Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! ) ..$39.95 
15" Multi-Pak/Rom Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
ROM Paks further away $29.95 

40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

Triple RS232 Switcher - Now easily select any one 

of three RS232 peripherals $39.95 

40 Pin Triple " Y" Cable - Hook up any three (3) 
Voice/Wbrd/RS232/Digitizer PAKs ...$39.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

C-10 tapes in any quantity 59 cents 

5 1/4 " Diskettes , any quantity 79 cents 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCol $19.95 

The Magic Box - Load Mod I/III Basic program tapes 

into the CoCo $24.95 

Deluxe RS-232 PAK -^3^95TNow only $29.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs (Disk 1.0 

1.1, JDOS) in a J&M disk controller $29.95 

Qrig CoCol "D" Rev motherboard . Includes all chips 
(SAM, CPU/ PIA's) except RAM and Ext Basicl $39.95 

"D" Rev motherboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

256K RAM Chips (Set of 8) $39.95 

H.JL-57 Keyboard - CoCo III version! Comes complete 
with special FREE Function Key Software ....$59.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 
1200 Baud Modem (Hayes compatible) Auto-dial/answer 
$139.95. Req's Modem cable ( 4pin or DB25 ) ..$19.95 

Amdek Drive System with controller $239.95 

GEMINI Printer - 120cps, NLQ mode $249.95 

MAGNAVQX 8515 RGB Analog monitor $349.95 



HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 



LINE 
1344 



"718-835- 



The program was designed for a DMP-120 printer, but you 
can change the control codes in lines 30, 40, 60, 90 and 210 
to adjust them to your printer. You can also change or add 
items by adjusting the DRTR lines beginning with Line 260, 
Happy shopping! 

The listing: GROCERY 

5 REM GROCERY LIST 

6 REM BY DONALD LARGE 

7 REM NORTH SYRACUSE, NY 1984 
10 POKE 150,41 

20 FOR Z= 1 TO 10 
30 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) CHR$(19) 
40 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) CHR$(14) 
50 PRINT#-2," SHOPPING LIST" 
60 PRINT#-2,CHR$(2 7) CHR$(15) 
70 RESTORE 

80 X$=" ":Y$=" 

n ; Z$ = " " 

90 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) CHR$(20) 
100 PRINT#-2, , "ITEM", "COUPON", M B 
RAND" , , "ITEM" , "COUPON" , "BRAND" 
110 PRINT#-2," ************* 
******************************** 
******************************** 
******************************** 
************* 

120 PRINT#-2 

130 FOR A= 1 TO 41 

140 READ A$,B$ 

150 PRINT#-2,X$,A$,Z$,Y$,X$,B$,Z 
$,Y$ 

160 NEXT A 

170 PRINT#-2, "SPECIAL INSTRUCTIO 
NS: " 

180 FOR A = 1 TO 5 

190 PRINT #-2," 



200 NEXT A 

210 PRINT#-2, CHR$(27) CHR$(19) 
220 FOR V= 1 TO 8 
230 PRINT#-2 
240 NEXT V 
250 NEXT Z 

260 DATA FRESH VEG. , FROZEN VEG. , 
CANNED VEG . , IN . POTATOES , CEREAL, F 
LOUR, RICE, PANCAKE MIX, BAKING MIX 
ES,JELLO, PUDDING, PEANUT BUTTER, J 
ELLY , COOKIES , CRACKERS , SOUP , PICKL 
ES , OLIVES , MILK, CHEESE , EGGS , BUTTE 
R 

2 70 DATA COLD CUTS , MEAT , FROZEN M 
EAT, CANNED MEAT , TUNA, FROZEN DINN 
ERS, FROZEN DESERTS , ART . SWEETN ' R, 
SUGAR, SALT , PEPPER, SPICES , COOKING 
OIL, CATSUP , MUSTARD , MAYONAISE , ST 
EAK SAUCE, SALAD DRESS ING , RELISH , 
SYRUP 

280 DATA BREAD, HOTDOG BUNS , HAMBU 
RG BUNS, DINNER ROLLS , MUFFINS , SOD 
A,LO-CAL SODA, BEER, KOOL AID, DOG 
FOOD, CAT FOOD, CLEANSER, FURN. POLI 
SH , BATTERIES , UTENS ILS , GLUE , TAPE , 
VITAMINS, ASPRIN, SOAP, LAUNDRY DET 
ERG. 

290 DATA SOFTENER, STARCH, BLEACH, 
HAND LOTION, SHAMPOO, RAZOR BLADES 
, SHAVING CREAM, GARBAGE BAGS , STOR 
AGE WRAP, NAPKINS, PAPER PLATES, PA 
PER CUPS, LUNCH BAGS, TO I LET PAPER 
, FEM . PRODUCTS , OTHER , OTHER , OTHER , 
OTHER 



Who's On First 

By J ohn Fugh, Jr. 




This is a program that produces a score card for those who 
keep score of baseball games. It is designed to work on a 
DMP-105 printer. 

The listing: BASEBALL 

10 GOTO 40 

20 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(28) ; 

30 RETURN 

40 POKE 282,0 

50 CLS: INPUT "ENTER THE HOME TEAM 
";HOME$ 



60 INPUT " ENTER THE AWAY TEAM" ; AW 
AY$ 

70 POKE 282,255 
80 J=-2 

90 PRINT#J,HOME$" vs. "AWAY$ 

100 GOSUB 20 

110 K$=CHR$(241) 

120 L$=CHR$(2 43) 

130 H$=CHR$(242) 

140 GOTO 500 

150 PRINT#J,CHR$ (240) ;STRING$(15 
,CHR$ (241) ) ;L$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;L$; 
STRING$ (5,K$) ;L$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;L 
$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;L$;STRING$(5,K$) 
; L$ ; STRING$ ( 5 , K$ ) ; L$ ; STRING$ ( 5 , K 
$ ) ; L$ ; STRING$ ( 5 , K$ ) ; L$ ; STRING$ ( 5 
,K$) ;H$ 
152 RETURN 



70 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 



MULTI-PAK CRAK 



Save ROMPAKs to your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant plugg ing in of ROMPAKs now by 
keeping all your PAK software on disk . Includes POKEs for " PROBLEM " ROMPAKs- including the NEW 16K PAKS! (Demon 
Attack, Dragons Lair, etc) Now CoCo III compatible! (Upgrade $15 w/ proof of purchase ) $29.95 

TELEPATCH III 

All the FEATURES of TELEPATCH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE lowercase! Now CbCo 
III conpatible! (Upgrade $15 w/ proof of purchase > $29-95 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A 

A mu 1 1 1 - f ea tured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively sort, move, rename and 
kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format , copy and backup. Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, 
plus the size, load addresses and entry points of all programs. Sing le conmand execution of both Basic and ML programs. 
32K/64K DISK $29.95 Nov also CoCo III compatible! Upgrade only $15 w / proof of purchase - (see Oct" 84 Rainbow Review) 

SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 

Write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter-64, VIP Writer, etc.) and convert them to special H ig h ly Detailed 
character sets ! Some of the sets supported are Italics , Old English, Futuristic and Block. A character set editor is 
included to create or modify custgi sets! Supports most dot - matrix printers! DISK $29.95 (see Dec "85 Rainbow Review) 

COCO III SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP CoCo III software!!! Get FONT BONANZA, FKEYS III, C III GRAPHICS and 
CoCo III UTILITIES (a $100 plus value) for only $49-95! i I 

COCO GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

Create custom greetings for any occasion: Birthdays, Anniversaries, Holidays, etc. Also BANNERS & SIGNS ! Includes 
" GRABBER " utility - capture Hi-Res CoCo screens for your GRAPHIC LIBRARY ! Easy to use & comes with a set of pre-drawn 
graphics. Includes a screen & font editor. 32K DISK $29,95 

64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 

Take a dvan tage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an additional 8K of RAM available by relocating the Ext Basic ROM from 
$8000 to $D800 . Copy ROMPAKS to disk (even " protected " PAKS) and create a 32K SPOOL buffer for printing. DISK $24.95 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY 

A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy of an entire disk 
of programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to tape & prints tape & disk directories. 
TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 

COCO III UTILITIES 

Terrific utility support programs for the new Color Computer- III ! Includes a CoCo II to CoCo III converter, 32K Hi-Res 
screen saver, 40/80 column Word Processor, RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH scrolling demos. 128K DISK $24.95 

THE OS-9 SOLUTION 

NOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY " environment within OS-9! The OS-9 SOLUTION replaces 19 of the old " USER 
HOSTILE " commands with single keystroke, menu driven cormvands. No more complex long pathnames or remembering complicated 
syntaxes! Set all XMODE parameters at the touch of keys! $39.95 New LOW price! !! $24.95 ( OS-9 Level II compatible! !!) 

SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum pj^^cts TOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the following 12 programs to 
customize your own SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BO NANZ A! CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, 
Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, CoCo Calendar, Schematic 
Drafting Processor, OS-9 Solution, Basic Plus, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value ) for only $99.95!!! 



Spectrum DOS ...$29.95 
Spit 1 N 1 Image ...$34.95 
CoCo Util II ...$39.95 



0> 



CoCo Checker $19.95 

MIKEY-DIAL $19.95 

CoCo Calendar ... $19 .95 



COCO POTPOURRI 

Fastdupe HE ...$19.95 

GRAPHICOM $24.95 

EZ Base $24.95 



160 PRINT#J,G$;STRING$ (15,CHR$ (2 
24) ) ;G$;STRING$ (5,F$) ;G$;STRING$ 
(5,F$) ;G$;STRING$(5,F$) ;G$;STRIN 
G$(5,F$) ;G$;STRING$ (5,F$) ;G$;STR 
ING$(5,F$) ;G$;STRING$ (5,F$) ;G$;S 
TRING$(5,F$) ;G$;STRING$ (5,F$) ;G$ 
162 RETURN 

170 PRINT# J , CHR$ (244) ; STRING $ (15 
,K$) ;D$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;D$;STRING$ 
(5,K$) ;D$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;D$;STRIN 
G$ (5,K$) ;D$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;D$;STR 
ING$ ( 5 , K$ ) ; D$ ; STRING$ ( 5 , K$ ) ; D$ ; S 
TRING$(5,K$) ;D$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;CH 
R$ (249) 
17 5 RETURN 

180 PRINT#J,CHR$ (246) ;STRING$(15 
,K$) ;S$;STRING$ (5,K$) ;S$;STRING$ 
(5,K$) ;S$ ;STRING$ (5,K$) ;S$;STRIN 

G$(5,K$) ;S$;STRING$(5,K$) ;S$;STR 



ING$(5,K$) ;S$;STRING$(5,K$) ;S$;S 
TRING$ ( 5 , K$ ) ; S $ ; STRING$ ( 5 , K$ ) ; CH 
R$ (247) 
182 RETURN 

499 END 

500 S$=CHR$ (248) :D$=CHR$ (250) :F$ 
=CHR$(224) :G$=CHR$ (2 45) :GOSUB150 
510 FORX=1TO5:GOSUB160:NEXTX 
515 GOSUB170 

520 F0RX=1T012:F0RZ=1T05:G0SUB16 

0 : NEXTZ : GOSUB170 : NEXTX 

530 F0RZ=1T05 : GOSUB160 : NEXTZ : GOS 

UB180 

540 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(54) :P 
RINT#-2, "Totals> ";CHR$(15) ;HOM 
E$" "AWAY$;CHR$ (14) 

550 PRINT#-2 , "Hits>" : PRINT#-2 , "E 
rrors>" : PRINT#-2 , "Runs>" 



16K 
ECB 



Recipe Printer 

By Keith March 



Here is a nifty little program to help you print out your 
recipes on continuous 3-by-5 file cards. When you run this 
program, it prompts you for the name of your recipe 
(maximum of 41 characters long), then asks you to set the 
margin. The screen will look like this: 

LM 2 RM 23 

PRESS E TO STOP 

PRESS L TO SET L. MARGIN 

PRESS R TO RUN AGAIN 

Now you can type in the ingredients; press ENTER after each 
one. If you want the ingredients listed on the recipe card in 
two columns, type what you want to go in the left column 
first, then press L and ENTER. The screen should look like 
this: 

LM 25 RM 49 

PRESS E TO STOP 

PRESS L TO SET L. MARGIN 

PRESS R TO RUN AGAIN 

Roll your printer back to the top of the first ingredient in 
the left column, then type in what you want in the right 



column. After you have finished typing in the ingredients, 
press L, then 3. Your screen should look something like this: 

LM 2 RM 49 

PRESS E TO STOP 

PRESS L TO SET L. MARGIN 

PRESS R TO RUN AGAIN 



EGG SALAD SANDWICH FILLING 

h hard-boiled eggs 
1/2 cup chopped celery 
1/3 cup niayonaTse 
1/4 tsp salt 



Mi k all ingredients together. 

Makes enough filling for about 
six 5andwichE5. 



Now type in the instructions for the recipe and press 

ENTER. 

The listing: RECIPE 

1 1 RECIPE MAKER 

2 1 BY KEITH H. MARCH 

3 1 FOR CONTINUOUS 3X5 FILE CARD 
S 

4 1 ON THE NX- 10 PRINTER 

5 ' (C) 12/1/86 

6 CLEAR 2000 



72 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



7 CLS : POKE 15j3, 1 

8 P=-2:POKE 2 82,255 

9 PRINT" RECIPE MAKER 

BY 

KEITH MARCH" 

10 PRINT: LINEINPUT ,! IS YOUR PRINT 
ER ON (Y OR N) ■» ;D$ 

11 IF D$="N" THEN 7 ELSE CLS : GOT 
0 12 

12 PRINT#P / CHR$ (27) ; "8" ; ' 

PAPER-OUT OFF 

13 LINEINPUT 11 RECIPE N 
AME (MAX. CHARS. & OR 
SPACES IS 41) : " ;R$ 

14 PRINT#P,CHR$(2 7) ;CHR$(lpS) ; CH 
R$ (1) ; 1 LEFT MARGIN 

15 PRINT#P # CHR$ (2 7) ;CHR$(81) ; CHR 
$(49) ; 1 RIGHT MARGIN 

16 PRINT#P,CHR$ (27) ; ,f a" ; CHR$ ( 1 ) ; 
' CENTERED PRINTING 

17 PRINT#P,CHR$ (2 7) ;CHR$ (15) ; 1 

COMPRESSED 

18 PRINT#P,CHR$(2 7) ;CHR$(lj24) ;CH 
R$(l) ;R$ f DOUBLE-SIZE 

19 PRINT#P ! 

SPACE 

2j3 PRINT#P, CHR$ (27 ) ; »@» ; 1 

RESET 

21 LL=j3 : RR=j2 



2 2 INPUT ,f LEFT MARGIN (1, 2 OR 

3 ) ,f ; LM 

2 3 IF LM=1 THEN LL=2 : RR=2 3 
2 4 IF LM=2 THEN LL=25:RR=4 9 
2 5 IF LM=3 THEN LL=2 : RR=4 9 

2 6 PRINT#P,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(lj38) ; CH 
R$(LL) ; 1 LEFT MARGIN 

27 PRINT#P,CHR$(2 7) ; CHR$(81);CH 
R$ (RR) ; 1 RIGHT MARGIN 

28 PRINT#P,CHR$(2 7) ; CHR$(65);CH 
R$ (1J3) ; 1 LINE-FEED 

29 PRINT#P,CHR$(2 7) ;CHR$(15) ; » 

COMPRESSED 

30 CLS: POKE 2 8 2,j3 

31 PRINT@1, ,f LM ,f ;LL, "RM" ;RR 

32 PRINT " PRESS <E> TO STOP" 

33 PRINT " PRESS (L) TO SET L. M 
ARGIN" 

3 4 PRINT 11 PRESS (R) TO RUN AGAI 
N« 

35 LINEINPUT ,f ,f ;E$ 

36 IF E$="E" OR E$= lf e li THEN PRIN 
T#P,CHR$(27) ;»@" ; : CLS: NEW 

37 IF E$= M L" OR E$="l" THEN 20 

38 IF E$="R" OR E$="r" THEN PRIN 
T#P,CHR$ (27) ; "@" ; : GOTO 1 

39 PRINT#P,E$ 

40 GOTO 30 




uto economy 

y J.t. tiorger 




At last, everything you always wanted to know about how 
much that car of yours is costing you, but were afraid to ask! 
MPG can figure your average yearly or monthly auto costs, 
and even break it down to cost per mile. 

All you need are approximate costs of yearly insurance, 
maintenance, average price paid for gasoline, monthly car 
payment and number of miles you drive each year. After 
entering this data, CoCo will figure the costs. This is also an 
excellent way to "comparison shop" for a car, since you can 
use this program to figure the cost of any car, not just your 
own. 



ti 3: L . E S P !E! R G A L L 0 N C 0 M P U T E R 



YOUR TOYOTA TERCEL COST YOU;: 



yearlv 



/*"* 



monthly * 243.94 



per mi le * „ 243944194 



The listing: MPG 

lj3 CLS: f m.p.g. (J. E. BORGER 9/85 
) 

2j3 PRINT" MILES PER GALLON CO 

MPUTER" 

3j3 FOR L=l TO 64 : PRINT" * ,f ; 

4j3 NEXT L 

5J2 PRINT#X, 1111 

6j3 PRINT n USE THIS PROGRAM TO FIG 
URE YOUR mpg, (AND A LITTLE BIT M 
ORE! ) 

7J3 PRINT#X, ffff 

8j3 INPUT ,f SCREEN OR PRINTER (S 
/P)" ;a$ 

9j3 IF A$ = n S ,f THEN X=j3 

IjSjd IF A$="P ,f THEN X = -2 

lip IF A$ = "l?" THEN PRINT#-2 / "MIL 

ES PER GALLON COMPUTER" 

12 j3 CLS 

13J3 CLS : PRINT© 22 4 , " ALREADY KNOW 
THE MPG? (Y/ ) " : FOR T=l TO 15J3: 
NEXT T:PRINT@2 24, " ALREADY KNOW 
THE MPG ( /N) " :FOR T=l TO 15j3:N 
EXTT : I$=INKEY$ : IF I$<>"Y"AND I$< 
> M N"THEN 13)8 
14j3 CLS 5 

15J2S IF I$ = "Y"THEN 33j3 ELSE 160 

April 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 



160 CLS 

17J3 INPUT ff WHAT KIND OF CAR DO YO 
U DRIVE 11 ;C$ 
180 CLS1 

190 INPUT 11 HOW MANY MILES SINCE 
YOUR LAST FILL-UP" ;MI 

200 CLS 

21J3 INPUT "EXACTLY HOW MUCH GAS 
DID IT TAKE TO FILL UP THIS TIME 
11 ;GS 

220 PRINI#X, !!!! 
230 CLS 

240 PRINT#X,"YOU DROVE"MI "MILES 

AND CONSUMED "GS" GALLONS OF GAS 
tt 

250 PRINT#X, "" 

2 60 PRINT#X," THE EXACT mpg 

FOR YOUR " 

270 PRINT#X," "C$" IS "MI/GS 

■ 

280 PRINT#X , " M 

29j2 FOR K=l TO 2j3j3j3:NEXT K 

300 1 

310 MG=MI/GS 
320 GOTO 350 

330 INPUT "MAKE OF CAR" ;C$ 
340 INPUT"WHAT'S THE MPG" ;MG 
35j3 PRINT#X, "" 

360 INPUT "HOW MUCH DO YOU NORMA 
LLY PAY FOR GASOLINE (PER GALLON 
) " ;GG 
370 CLS 



380 INPUT" WHAT IS YOUR YEARLY IN 
SURANCE PREMIUM" ; IP 
390 CLS 

400 INPUT "HOW MANY MILES (AVG) D 
O YOU DRIVE PER YEAR"; ML 
410 CLS 

420 INPUT"WHAT IS YOUR MONTHLY C 
AR PAYMENT" ;CP 
430 CLS6 

440 PRINT"WHAT IS YOUR YEARLY MA 
INTENANCE COSTS?" 

450 INPUT" (TUNE-UP, SERVICE, OIL, T 

IRES ETC. ) "; YM 

460 CLS8 

470 PRINT#X,"" 

480 CLS :PRINT#X, "YOUR "C$" COST 
YOU: " 

490 PRINT#X," !i 

500 PRINT#X, "yearly $";:PRINT#X, 
USING" (YM)+(CP*12)+(IP 
)+( (ML/MG) * (GG) ) 
51J3 PRINT#X,"" 

520 PRINT#X, "monthly $";:PRINT#X 
,USING"####. ##"; (YM/12)+(CP)+(IP 
/12)+( (ML/MG) *(GG/12)) 
530 PRINT#X, "" 

540 PRINT#X, ff per mile $"((YM) + (C 

P*12) +(IP)+( (ML/MG) * (GG) ) ) / (ML) 

550 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

560 INPUT"AGAIN" ;A$ 

570 IF A$="Y" THEN 10 ELSE PRINT 

#X, "THANK YOU" 



c 






ields 





h J dHtfL ,IIIHIIIIIIIII IIIIIIlB M ma fl 

e i loor 



By Burt Gonce Jr. 

This program calculates the amount of cement necessary 
for any specific job, All you have to do is enter the length 
and width of the form in f eet, and the depth in inches. Then, 
presto! CoCo tells you how much cement you need, to pour 
the form. 

The listing: CEMENT 

100 REM****THIS PROGRAM WRITTEN 
BY BURT GONCE, JR. RT 1 BOX 137 

BEAVERDAM, VIRGINIA, 2 3J315 
110 REM* *** 198 2 ******** 
120 CLS 

130 ! THIS IS A PROGRAM TO FIGURE 



HOW MUCH CEMENT YOU NEED TO POU 
R A SPECIFIC SIZE FORM. . 
140 PRINT@3 2 , "THIS IS A PROGRAM 
TO FIGURE THE AMOUNT OF CEMENT T 
HAT YOU WILL HAVE TO ORDER FOR 



ii 



YOUR SPECIFIC FORM. 
150 PRINT@192 , "ENTER LENGTH AND 
WIDTH OF THE FORM YOU HAVE BUI 
LT IN feet. . 11 :PRINT@255, 11 ENTER 
THE DEPTH OR THICKNESS OF YOlic F 

ORM IN inches. . . 11 

160 PRINT@487, "ANY KEY TO GO ON' 1 

:EXEC44539 

17j3 SOUND 150,1 

180 CLS 

190 L$="###.##" 

200 PRINT@65, "LENGTH OF FORM IN 
feet " ; :PRINT@138, " " ; : PRIN 

T@139 , ; : INPUT L: SOUND 150 t 1 
210 PRINT@161, "WIDTH OF FORM IN 
feet . " ; : PRINT§2 3 5 , ; : INPUT W : SO 
UND 15j3,l 

220 PRINT@257, "THICKNESS OF FOR 



74 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



M IN inches " : PRINT@3 3 1 ,;: INPUT 
T 

230 X=L*12 
240 Y=W*12 
250 Z=T/12 
260 P=L*W 
270 Q=Z*P 
280 CLS 

290 PRINT@64, ; 

300 PRI NT * 

310 PRINT "YARDS OF CEMENT TOO. 0 



RDER FOR THIS POUR "; 
320 PRINT USING L$;Q/27 

3 30 PRINT 11 *********** * 

*********" 

3 40 PRINT@45 3 , "ANY KEY TO DO ANO 
THER" 

350 PRINT@489, "OR q TO QUIT" 
360 EXEC 44539 

370 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="Q"THEN 390 

ELSE 380 

380 GOTO 180 

390 POKE 113,0:EXEC 40999 




Checks And Balances 

By John Musumeci 

This is a simple program to help balance your bank account 
if you have some pesky outstanding checks. When you run 
the program, it asks for your balance according to the bank 
statement. Then, just enter any outstanding checks, one at 
a time. (There is room for seven.) The program will calculate 
the correct balance for your checkbook. 



The listi 



ng: CHECKS 



1 , » *****CHECKS***** 

2 * k -k k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k 

3 f ***WRITTEN BY*** 

4 ! *JOHN MUSUMECI** 

5 f **103-57 104 ST* 

6 f **OZONE PARK,*** 

7 »***NEW YORK,**** 

8 ■*****11417****** 

9 '**718-738 0212** 

10 CLS (4) 

20 PRINT@172 , "CHECKS" 
30 FOR X=l TO 460*6 
40 NEXT X 
50 CLS 

60 PRINT @ 12 8, "WHAT IS 

BALANCE" 

70 INPUT B 

80 FOR X=l TO 460*5 

9 0 NEXT X 



STATEMENT 



100 CLS 

110 PRINT@32, "LIST OUTSTANDING C 
HECK OR ENTER" 
120 INPUT CA 

130 PRINT@9 6,"NEXT CHECK OR ENTE 
R" 
140 
150 
ER" 
160 
170 
ER" 
180 
190 
ER" 
200 
210 
ER" 
220 
230 
ER" 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 



INPUT CB 

PRINT@160 , "NEXT CHECK OR ENT 
INPUT CC 

PRINT@22 4,"NEXT CHECK OR ENT 
INPUT CD 

PRINT@288, "NEXT CHECK OR ENT 
INPUT CE 

PRINT@35 2 , "NEXT CHECK OR ENT 
INPUT CF 

PRINT@416, "NEXT CHECK OR ENT 
INPUT CG 

FOR X=l TO 460*3 
NEXT X 
CLS 

FOR X= 1 TO 460*5 
NEXT X 

A=B- (CA+CB+CC+CD+CE+CF+CG) 

PRINT@101, "CHECKBOOK BALANCE 
it 



IS 

320 PRINT @268,A 
330 FOR X=l TO 460*30 
340 NEXT X 
3 50 END 



Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed 
in at one sitting and will be useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although the short programs are limited in scope, many 
novice programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but we do not have the time to key in program listings. All programs 
should be supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. If your submission is accepted for 
publication, the payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to publication. _ j utta Kapfhammer 

Submissions Editor 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 75 



oto Con 
the Metric 





s 




By Fred B, Seer bo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the " Wishing Well, " submit it to Fred 
cjo THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 7 forget that 
(his is BASIC. A 11 programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 



■ ust when things look darkest, 
II someone comes to the rescue! 
J| That's the way things sometimes 
seem. Well, the "Wishing Well" is no 
exception to that observation. Those of 
you who have followed the column in 
recent months probably know the prob- 
lem I have been facing: a lack of realistic 
and practical wishes from my readers. 
The clatter of my line printer had barely 
subsided after completing my March 
submission, and already I was starting 
to worry about where the April "Wish- 
ing Well" would go. 

The next day's mail helped solve that 
problem as few letters have in the past. 
Not only did the reader's letter bring an 
uplift to my day, but out of it came a 
very practical wish that sends our 
"Wishing Well" into the world of met- 
rics with a new addition to the Life 
Skills Series: The Metric Sys- 
tem- Measuring in Meters. 



Fred Seer bo is a special needs instructor 
for the N orth A dams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



The Letter 

Mr. John A. McGoldrick of Brook™ 
lyn. New York, wrote me a letter re- 
ceived at the RAINBOW offices on Christ- 
mas Eve (how appropriate!). Mr. 
McGoldrick wrote: 

"First, I should like to express my 
sincere gratitude to you and rainbow 
for the fine educational programs you 
have been supplying my five children 
who are all in elementary school. I have 
one tape devoted to math programs and 
you can be sure that Number Relation^ 
which appeared in this January's RAIN- 
BOW, will join Math Driller and the 
numerous other fine programs which 
have helped my children in learning 
math and in becoming computer liter- 



ate 



11 



Everyone needs a little positive feed- 
back and Mr. McGoidrick's letter was 
a needed shot in the arm. Some of you 
may recall I have stated that when I 
write an educational program, it is my 
hope that it get the widest possible use 
(short of outright piracy by those who 
wouid try to resell it). As a teacher of 
special needs students, I take great 
satisfaction in knowing that someone in 
another city has benefited from an 
educational program I was able to list 
in these pages. You can't put a price tag 
on that kind of satisfaction, believe me. 
Mr. McGoldrick continues . . . 

"My seventh grade daughter, 
Theresa, was recently quizzed on the 
metric system and was totally annihi- 
lated, as were her classmates. I checked 
the past two annual indices of RAINBOW 
magazine hoping for a program on the 
metric system which would help my 
daughter. Unfortunately, there was 
none, 



"I think such a program would be 
very beneficial. If the child could learn 
and understand the relationships that 
are developed between the numbers by 
grasping and understand ing the 
roots — milli, kilo, etc. — the child could 
be taught that by remembering one 
equivalent he can work out the others. 
Hoping you can implement this idea." 

Now here was an idea I could sink my 
teeth into. Quite honestly, I had never 
even thought of doing the metric system 
because most of my math students never 
get that far. (Even though I teach at the 
high school level, many of my learning 
disabled students have severe math 
problems. Progress is slow, with some 
students only reaching a fourth or fifth 
grade math level.) 

So, my thanks go out to you and your 
family, Mr. McGoldrick. Your sincere 
letter helped dislodge a brief mental 
block. Now let's get down to business. 

Typing in the Program 

LIFE5KL6, as it is listed on both 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON 

BISK, is designed to fit in a 16K Color 
BASIC machine without Extended 
BASIC. Those with a I6K Extended 
machine may have to type PCLERR1 and 
press ENTER before using the program. 
The program will also work on the MC- 
10 with 20K. 

You will also notice I have left out use 
of ELSE in the IF-THEN statements as 
well as the STRINGS command, both of 
which are missing from MC-10 BASIC 
Since there are no pokes or peeks, no 
changes are required in the listing to 
make it work on either machine. (This 
does not mean you can load a CoCo 
tape. of this program directly into the 



76 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 



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0DD-000 



MC-10. The tokens are different in each 
machine. Only the written listings are 
the same.) 

One thing you will notice about this 
listing as you type it in, is that there are 
many, many DRTR statements in it. It is 
very important that you type in these 
DRTR statements exactly as you see 
them, even if they do not seem to make 
sense. Every space and every comma 
should line up on your screen exactly as 
they do in the 32-column listing found 
on these pages. 

The program includes a subroutine 
that prevents wordwrap on the senten- 
ces displayed on the screen. Since some 
displays will be charts, it is important 
that you include all the spaces shown in 
the DRTR statements. (In fact, I can't 
remember ever writing a program with 
this much data; however, there is a 
reason for this.) 

Please do not send me your listing of 
this program (even with an SASE) 
asking me to debug your typing errors. 
Sorry, I simply do not have the time to 
answer requests such as these and still 
create a new program each month. 

Using the Program 

This program is designed to do two 
things: instruct and quiz. On running 
the program, you will see our familiar 
Life Skills screen and can choose to 
review or quiz the material. Naturally, 
the first time you use it, you should 
press R for review. 

The program then displays quite a 
few screens with instructional material 
regarding relationships and values in 



the metric system, particularly, measur- 
ing with meters. You may proceed 
through each statement by pressing the 
ENTER key. The user is not expected to 
commit this material to memory. It can 
be reviewed a number of times to make 
the child more familiar with these 
values. 

Some of the material will be dis- 
played in chart form because it can be 
more easily understood that way. All of 
the "root" definitions, such as "kilo" 
and "centi" are clearly defined, with 
examples given. I have attempted to 
coverthis material in as simple and clear 
a manner as possible. If you want to add 
additional statements to this listing, you 
may insert them between any of my 
DRTR statements. However, you must 
always add at least two, or an even 
number of statements. Otherwise, you 
may throw off the remaining data. 

This information is found between 
lines 390 and 515. I have, as a rule, put 
two sentences in each line. Be careful 
not to use any commas in your punc- 
tuation unless you wrap each sentence 
in quotes. For example: 

401 DRTR "ONE, TWO RND THREE" , 
'TOUR, FIVE RND SIX" 

Notice how a comma is used between 
each set of quotes. Remember, you 
cannot add an odd number of sentences. 
Most of you will not need to add any- 
thing to the program. Anything you add 
will be properly spaced on the screen 
automatically. (In fact, this program 



can almost be used as a programmed 
reader.) 

At the end of the information, the 
screen prints out instructions for the 
quiz part of the program. Here is how 
the quiz works. 

Two values are printed on the screen, 
such as: 

R ) 2 MILLIMETERS 
B) 20 METERS 

You must choose the larger value, by 
pressing either A or B. The screen will 
indicate whether or not your answer is 
correct and will highlight the correct 
answer. Press ENTER to move on to the 
next example. 

Pressing the @ key at any time gives 
you the scorecard. It displays our usual 
quiz data, and gives you the choice to 
continue by pressing C, to quit by 
pressing N for no, or to run the whole 
program again by pressing Y for yes. 
The student can use the program as long 
as you want. The two values will never 
be equal, so you do not have to worry 
about that problem coming up. 

Conclusion 

I hope many other families will find 
this kind of educational program useful. 
I hope to do several more involving 
skills in using the metric system. How- 
ever, I always welcome suggestions that 
are as helpful as Mr. McGoldrick's. 
Maybe you can come up with some of 
your own, as well. □ 



10O 
165 
265 
345 
410 



.19 
146 

..3 
. .1 
208 



440 139 

480 235 

510 157 

END 55 



T 



The listing: LIFESKLG 



1J3 REM** 
15 REM* 
2j3 REM* 
2 5 REM* 
3j3 REM* 
35 REM* 
4j3 REM* 
45 REM* 
5j3 REM** 
55 CLSj3: 
) ; : NEXT 



•k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 

LIFE SKILLS MATH DRILL * 
THE METRIC SYSTEM 
MEASURING IN METERS 
BY FRED B.SCERBO 
6j3 HARDING AVE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA j3l247 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 

•k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 

F0RI=1T032 :PRINTCHR$ (188 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



PRINTCHR$ (A+128) ; :NEXT 
FORI=lT03 2 : PRINTCHR$ (17 9) ; : NE 



60 F0RI=1T0192 : READA : IFA=0THENA= 
16 
65 

70 
XT 

75 DATA109,104,96,109,104,100,11 
0,108,106,109,108,109, , ,30,28,2 6 
,29, , ,30,20,30,20,30,16,20,30, ,2 
1,28, 29 

80 DATA101, ,, 101, ,, 106,96, 104,10 



1, ,100, , ,26 
,26/ ,16,26, 
85 DATA1J31, 



1,99,98, , ,27, 19, 18, 21, 22, 16, , ,26 



, , 2 6 , , 16 , 2 6 
9j3 DATAljZJl, 
/ , / f i f 2 6 , 2 1 
6 t j r r 2 1 
95 DATA101, 
,97, ,16, 26, 



, 24, 21, 16 , 22 , 16, , 26, 
21, ,20 

,101, , ,107,106,96,10 



, 21, 19 , 19 

,101, , ,106,104, ,101, 
20, 18, , , 26, , 26, , 16, 2 

106, 101, , ,106, , ,101, 
26,21, ,20,18, ,26, ,26 



,21, 16, 26, 21, 21, ,21 



78 



THE RAINBOW ApriM987 



1)3)3 DATA1)33, 99, 1)36, 1)33 , 98 , 97 , 1)37 
, , ,1)33 , 99 , 1)33, , , 27 , 19 , 26,23 , 18 , , 
27,17,27,17,27,23,17,27,23,21,19 

,23 

1) 35 PRINT@293 , " THE METRIC SYST 
EM " ; 

11) 3 PRINT@325," MEASURING IN MET 
ERS " ; 

115 PRINT@357," BY FRED B.SCER 
BO " ; 

12) 3 PRINT@389, " COPYRIGHT (C) 1 
987 "; 

125 PRINT@453," (R) EVIEW OR (Q) 
UIZ "; 

13) 3 DIMA$(5J3) ,B$(5J3) ,C(7) 

135 Q=143:F0RI=1T07:C(I)=Q+(I*16 
) : NEXT 

14) 3 F0RI=1T07 : READP$ ( I ) , P ( I ) : NEX 
TI 

145 DATA MILLIMETERS , 1, CENTIMETE 
RS, 1)3, DECIMETERS, 1)3)3 , METERS , 1)3)3)3 
, DECAMETERS , 1)3)3)3)3 , HECTOMETERS , 1)3 
J3J3J3J3, KILOMETERS, 1)2)3)3)3)3)3 

15) 3 SW=3)3 
155 GOT019)3 

16) 3 IF LEN(JK$)<=SW THEN18)3 

165 FOR T=SW TO )3STEP-1:IF MID$ ( 
JK$,T, l)= ,f "THEN175 

17) 3 NEXT T:GOT018)3 

175 L$=LEFT$ ( JK$ , T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB1 
85:JK$=" "+RIGHT$ (JK$, (LEN-(JK$ 
) ) -T) :GOT016)3 

18) 3 W$=JK$:PRINTW$: RETURN 
185 PRINTW$ : RETURN 

19) 3 F0RJ=1T05)3 :READ A$(J),B$(J): 
IF A$(J)= ,f END ,f THEN2)3)3 

195 NEXTJ 

2) 3)3 X$ = INKEY$ : IFX$ = ,M, THEN2)3)3 
2)35 IFX$ = "R"THEN22)3 

21) 3 IFX$ = n Q ,f THEN255 

215 MU=RND (-TIMER) :GOT02)3)3 

22) 3 CLSj3:FORI=lTOJ-l:C=RND(7) :FO 
RY=1T03 2 :PRINTCHR$ (C(C) ) ; : NEXTY : 
PRINT@64, ; : JK$ = ,f "+A$ (I) : GOS 
UB16)3 

225 F0RY=1T032 : PRINTCHR$ (12 8) ; :N 
EXTY:F0RY=1T03 2 : PRINTCHR$ (C (C) ) ; 
:NEXTY:F0RY=1T03 2 : PRINTCHR$ (12 8) 
; : NEXTY 

23) 3 IFINKEY$<>CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN2 3 j3 
235 JK$= ,f " + B$ (I) :GOSUB16)3 

24) 3 F0RY=1T032 : PRINTCHR$ (12 8) ; :N 
EXT:F0RY=1T032 : PRINTCHR$ ( C (C) ) ; : 
NEXTY 

245 IFINKEY$<>CHR$ (13) THEN245 

25) 3 CLS)3:NEXT 

255 CLS)3 :N(1)=RND (7 ) 

26) 3 N ( 2 ) =RND ( 7 ) : I FN ( 2 ) =N ( 1 ) THEN2 



6)3 

265 C=RND(7) : :F0RI=1T032 : PRINTCH 
R$ (C(C) ) ; : NEXTI : F0RI=1T03 2 : PRINT 
CHR$ (12 8) ; : NEXTI : PRINT 

27) 3 PRINT' 1 WHICH OF THESE IS G 
REATER ?" 

275 V=RND(9) : NN ( 1 ) =P (RND ( 4 ) ) *V:N 
N(2)=P(RND(4) ) *V 

28) 3 NV(1)=P(N(1) )*NN(1) :NV(2)=P( 
N(2) )*NN(2) : IFNV ( 1 ) =NV ( 2 ) THEN2 75 
285 PRINT: PRINT" A) ,f ;NN(l); 
P$(N(1) ) 

29) 3 PRINT: PRINT' 1 B) n ;NN(2); 
P$(N(2) ) : PRINT 

295 IFNV(l) >NV(2)THENR$ = ,! A ,! 
3)3)3 IFNV (2) >NV(l)THENR$ = "B ,f 

3) 35 F0RI=1T03 2 : PRINTCHR$ (12 8) ; :N 
EXTI : F0RI=1T032 : PRINTCHR$ (C (C) ) ; 
:NEXTI:F0RI=1T03 2 : PRINTCHR$ (128) 
; : NEXTI 

31) 3 X$ = INKEY$ : IFX$ = " "THEN3 1J3 
315 IFX$="@"THEN52J3 

32) 3 IFX$ = ,f A n THEN335 
325 IFX$ = ,f B ,f THEN335 

33) 3 GOT031)3 

335 IFX$=R$THEN345 

3 4)3 PRINT" SORRY, BUT THAT IS N 
OT RIGHT! " :NW=NW+1: GOTO 3 5)3 
345 PRINT' 1 YES, YOUR ANSWER IS 
CORRECT ! " : NC=NC+1 

35) 3 F0RI = 1T032 : PRINTCHR$ (128) ; :N 
EXT:F0RI=1T032 : PRINTCHR$ (C(C) ) ; : 
NEXT 

355 IFR$="A"THEN LC=161 

36) 3 IFR$="B"THEN LC=225 
365 X$=INKEY$ 

37) 3 PRINT@LC, ")=>" ; : F0RI = 1T05)3 : N 
EXTI : PRINT@LC , " " ; : F0RI=1T05)3 : 
NEXTI 

375 IFX$=" @"THEN52)3 

38) 3 IFX$ = CHR$ (13) THEN255 
385 GOT0365 

3 9)3 DATA OUR CENTRAL UNIT OF MEA 
SURE IN THE METRIC SYSTEM IS CAL 
LED THE METER., IT IS EQUAL TO 39 
.37 INCHES 

395 DATA ONE METER IS ALSO EQUAL 
TO 3.2 8 FEET., ONE METER IS ALSO 
EQUAL TO l.j39 YARDS, 

4) 3)3 DATA MOST COUNTRIES IN THE W 
ORLD OTHER THAN THE UNITED STATE 
S USE THE METRIC SYSTEM., THE MET 
RIC SYSTEM IS EASY TO USE BECAUS 
E ALL MEASURING UNITS ARE IN POW 
ERS OF TEN (1)3) . 

4)35 DATA NOW WE WILL LOOK AT THE 
DIFFERENT UNITS WHICH MAKE UP T 
HE METRIC SYSTEM,, WE WILL DEAL O 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 79 



NLY WITH UNITS OF LENGTH BASED 0 
N THE METER. 

410 DATA WE CAN DIVIDE A METER U 
P INTO TEN (10) EQUAL PARTS EAC 
H ONE OF THESE PARTS IS CALLED A 

DECIMETER. 
415 DATA THE ROOT 1 DECI f MEANS ' 
ONE-TENTH ' SO A DECIMETER IS ONE 
-TENTH OF A METER., THERE ARE TEN 

(10) DECIMETERS IN A METER. 
420 DATA WE COULD ALSO DIVIDE A 
METER UP INTO ONE HUNDRED (100) 
EQUAL PARTS . , EACH ONE OF THESE P 
ARTS IS CALLED A CENTIMETER. 
425 DATA THE ROOT 'CENT' MEANS ' 
ONE -HUNDREDTH' SO A CENTIMETER I 
S ONE -HUNDREDTH OF A METER. , THER 
E ARE ONE HUNDRED (100) CENTIMET 
ERS IN A METER. 

430 DATA WE COULD ALSO DIVIDE A 
METER UP INTO ONE THOUSAND (1000 
) EQUAL PARTS . , EACH ONE OF THESE 
PARTS IS CALLED A MILLIMETER. 

4 35 DATA THE ROOT 'MILLI 1 MEANS 
'ONE-THOUSANDTH' SO A MILLIMETER 

IS ONE-THOUSANDTH OF A METER. ,T 
HERE ARE ONE THOUSAND (1000) MIL 
LIMETERS IN A METER. 
440 DATA LET'S LOOK AT THE RELAT 
IONSHIPS BETWEEN THESE UNITS., 1 
METER = 10 DECIMETERS 1 METER 
- 100 CENTIMETERS 1 METER = 10 
00 MILLIMETERS 

445 DATA WE CAN CHANGE METERS (M 
) TO DECIMETERS (DM) BY MULTIPLY 
ING BY TEN (10)., 5 M X 10 = 50 D 
M 

450 DATA WE CAN CHANGE DECIMETER 

5 (DM) TO CENTIMETERS (CM) BY MU 
LT I PLY ING BY TEN (10)., 7 DM X 10 

= 70 CM 

455 DATA WE CAN ALSO CHANGE CENT 
IMETERS (CM) TO MILLIMETERS (MM) 
BY MULTIPLYING BY TEN (10)., 4 C 
M X 10 = 40 MM 

4 60 DATA WE HAVE UNITS WHICH ARE 
LARGER THAN A METER., TEN (10) M 
ETERS IS KNOWN AS A DECAMETER. 
465 DATA THE ROOT ' DECA ' OR ' DEK 
A' MEANS TEN. , DECAMETER OR DEKAM 
ETER MEANS TEN METERS. 
470 DATA THE ROOT ' HECTO ' MEANS 
ONE HUNDRED ( 100) ., HECTOMETER ME 
ANS ONE HUNDRED METERS. 
47 5 DATA THE ROOT 'KILO' MEANS 0 
NE THOUSAND., A KILOMETER IS EQUA 
L TO ONE THOUSAND (1000) METERS. 
480 DATA TO FIND HOW MANY METERS 



IN A NUMBER OF DECAMETERS SIMPL 

Y MULTIPLY BY TEN (10)., 5 DECAMT 
ERS X 10 EQUALS 50 METERS. 

4 85 DATA TO FIND HOW MANY METERS 
IN A NUMBER OF HECTOMETERS SIMP 
LY MULTIPLY BY ONE HUNDRED (100) 
.,7 HECTOMETERS X 100 EQUALS 700 
METERS 

490 DATA TO FIND HOW MANY METERS 
IN A NUMBER OF KILOMETERS SIMPL 

Y MULTIPLY BY ONE THOUSAND (1000 
).,3 KILOMETERS X 1000 EQUALS 30 
00 METERS. 

495 DATA HERE IS A COMPARISON CH 
ART. , KILOMETER = 1000 METERS 
HECTOMETER = 100 METERS DECAM 

ETER ■ 10 METERS METER 

1 METER DECIMETER - 
1/10 METER CENTIMETER = 1/100 
METER MILLIMETER = 1/1000 METER 
500 DATA HERE IS A BRIEF QUIZ AB 
OUT WHAT WE HAVE JUST COVERED.,Y 
OU WILL BE GIVEN TWO METRIC VALU 
ES ON THE SCREEN. 

505 DATA YOU WILL BE ASKED TO PI 
CK THE VALUE WHICH IS GREATER., S 
IMPLY PRESS THE LETTER (A) OR (B 
) NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE. 
510 DATA YOU MAY STOP THE QUIZ A 
NYTIME BY PRESSING THE <@> KEY. , 
PRESS <ENTER> TO BEGIN THIS SHOR 
T METRIC QUIZ. 
515 DATA END, END 

520 CLS : PRINT@10 1 , "YOU TRIED"NC+ 
NW" PROBLEMS &": PRINT@ 165 , "ANSWER 
ED"NC" CORRECTLY" 

525 PRINT@229, "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 
ONG . " 

530 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

535 MS=INT(NC/NQ*100) 

540 PRINT@293,"YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 

o, it 
*o • 

545 PRINT @ 3 57, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 
C) ?"; 

550 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 




80 THE RAINBOW ApriM987 





XTERM 

Communications program, 

Menu oriented • Definable macro keys 

Upload/download. Ascii ■ Works wilh standard serial port, RS232 
or XMODEM protocol PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

Execute OS-9 commands ■ Works wilh standard screen. XSCREEN, or 
from within XTERM WORDPAK 80 column board. 

$49.95 with source $69.95 



'.!.!.!. ,!,.|.-.v 



■ -•■ 



XMENU 



Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 
Create your own menus ' Woiks wilh standard screen, 

y XSCREEN, WORDPAK, O-PAK 

$29.95 with source $59.95 



1 1 "if Mnnip 





I 1 1 1 1 l - i I IIH I I 



XSCREEN 

OS-9 hi-res screen 
5 1 /64/85 chars per line - Easy menu operation 

$19.95 with source $39.95 



fdd ** •* •■ "- 



XDIR & XCAL 

Hicrarchial directory OS-9 calculator 

• Full sorting • Decimal, Hex, Binary 

• Complete pattern matching .+,.,*,/, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 

$24.95 wilh source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works wilh standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overstrike, underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 wilh source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities f or XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 wilh XWORD/XMERGE sourc<$ 199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 wilh source $79.95 




UiiiiiiiiSi 







iHMHiHilHHl 



»,I.IIIIIJ.JI...II,I.IP..,I. 

x.^x-v.-.-^-.x^-xo- ••• •• 







SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for ihe accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting List. $ 7 9 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
wilh user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman records, and 
update the SBAP inventory. $59 95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly ind salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and tax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-dale 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay periods totals 
for straight time, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, ycar-to- 
date federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all states 
except Oklahoma dhd Delaware. $59.95 



These programs vet u&ii friendly and menu 
driven. Sample transactions ire inclgded Bach 
package features & hi-res screen. Each requires 
& printer, a minimum of 32k and at least I diak 
drive. 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates wilh the Small 
Business Accounting package. $59 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prinis checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor Lisi, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $ 5 9 95 



■ ■ ■ 





1906 Jerrold Avenue 
t SL Paul, MN 55112 

Diaidt inqairtrng Inrit*4 
A "J M or Sttbmi$**oH* 4C c$p(ii 
OS'9 is n tradrmark &f MUrowir* 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping <ft handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



(612) 633-6161 



Practical information on 
protecting your work 



Computer Program Copyrights: 



A How-to Guide 



By Edward Samuels 



ipou ve written a nitty computer 
program, you Ve proud of it, and 
JSSL youVe thinking of contacting a 
software house to see if you can sell it. 
What should you do to protect your 
rights in the program? 

Although other avenues of legal 
protection may be available, your most 
effective protection will probably be 
under the federal copyright law. Under 
that law, you have several "exclusive 
rights," including the exclusive rights to 
make copies of your program and to 
distribute copies to the public. As a 
practical matter, anyone may make 
copies of your work ordistribute copies 
to others. However, as a legal matter, 
you have the right to sue them for 
damages if you learn that they have 
"infringed" any of your exclusive rights, 
and to get a court injunction to force 
them to discontinue their infringing 
activities. 

Your copyright, although intangible, 
is like property, in that you can sell it 
to other people. Or you can license 
other people to copy and distribute your 
work for a royalty fee. Your copyright 
generally continues until 50 years after 
your death, so that your heirs will 
theoretically benefit from your rights. 

Edward Samuels, a professor of law at 
New York Law School, has taught 
copyright and other legal subjects for 
more than 10 years. An avid reader of 
RAINBOW, Professor Samuels enjoys 
sharing his Co Co with his children, 8- 
year old Richard and 4-year old Claire, 



How do you get this wonderful legal 
protection? It's actually very simple, 
although what you have to do depends 
to some extent on what you intend to 
do with your program. If you simply 
plan to use your program at home or at 
work, without distributing it to others, 
you really don't have to do anything. 
Federal copyright protection is auto- 
matic, and begins from the moment you 
make a copy of your work. If someone 
sneaks into your home and steals a copy 
of your program and starts selling it 
(assuming you can prove that's what 
they did, which is not necessarily easy 
to do), then you have the right to sue 
them to recover for any damages they 
have caused. You need not have done 
anything to "get" your copyright, be- 
cause you had it all along. 

When you start distributing your 
work to other people, you do need to 
write on all such copies a copyright 
notice, which should look like this; 
"Copyright© 1 987 by Edward Samuels" 

— substituting your own name and the 
date of first publication of your pro- 
gram. If, for example, you make your 
program available to others through a 
computer network, or give it to friends, 
this simple notice informs everyone that 
you retain all rights of copyright, and 
that you may sue them if they infringe 
your exclusive rights by making or 
distributing copies without your per- 
mission. Since it's so easy, and since it's 
absolutely free, you should make a 
habit of always writing the magic words 

— Copyright© (date of publication) 



82 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



(your name) — at the beginning of all 
your computer programs. 

One more thing you can do to protect 
your rights is register your computer 
program with the copyright office. This 
registration is accomplished by filling 
out the appropriate form and sending it, 
with a copy of your program and a $10 
registration fee, to the copyright office 
in Washington. Such registration is not 
a prerequisite to copyright protection, 
but it does enhance your rights to some 
extent. You probably need to register 
only if you plan to sell the program 
commercially, but it's up to you to 
decide if you want to go to the slightly 
greater trouble to more fully protect 
your rights. 

In the following sections of this 
article, I will explain in greater detail the 
few simple steps we have just outlined 
— obtaining your copyright (automat- 
ically), including the magic words of 
copyright notice in your program when 
you publish it, and, if you decide to do 
it, registering your work. In the final 
section, we will briefly consider just a 
few basic copyright principles that, alas, 
may limit your copyright in significant 
ways. 

Some of these principles may be hard 
to understand. But the beauty of the 
copyright law is that it may be used even 
by people who don't fully understand 
how it works! The car, the television 
and the VCR are great inventions pre- 
cisely because they can be used even by 
people who don't know how they work. 
(To some extent, this is true of comput- 
ers, though I've never been able to 
convince my father of this.) If you can 
drive a car without being a mechanic, 
you can have a copyright without being 
a lawyer. Just as you wouldn't set out 
on a long trip without having a me- 
chanic check out your car, you 
shouldn't get into the business of selling 
programs without consulting an attor- 
ney. But for the casual writer of pro- 
grams, getting the copyright is not all 
that difficult. 

When Copyright Protection Starts 

Everything I am about to say is 
governed by the Copyright Act of 1976 
(which I will call "the Act"), so it may 
not apply to works created before 
January 1, 1978, the effective date of 
that act. This is federal law, so it is 
uniform throughout the United States 
and not subject to state variation. If you 
live in or plan to publish the work in 
another country, then obviously you 
need to consult the law of that country. 



Federal copyright in a computer 
program begins as soon as the program 
is "fixed in any tangible medium of 
expression." This means it is protected 
when it has been incorporated into a 
"material object," such as a printed 
listing, or a tape or disk copy, i will 
assume that other CoCo users are at 
least as paranoid as I am, and make 



multiple saves and listings of all pro- 
grams, so that this prerequisite to 
federal copyright protection shouldn't 
be a problem. If you are the rare person 
who trusts your creation to the insides 
of your temperamental CoCo, without 
making at least one copy, then an 
attorney is not the only professional you 
need to consult! 

Copyright Notice 

Although federal copyright protec- 
tion of a computer program is auto- 
matic as soon as the programmer makes 
a physical copy of it, there is an impor- 
tant requirement when the work is 
published (that is, when you distribute 
it or even offer to distribute it to others, 
whether in a magazine, via a bulletin 
board, or by individual copies). At such 
time, the copyright notice generally 
must be written upon all those publicly 
distributed copies. It is obviously easiest 
to assure this by placing the copyright 
notice on all copies, whether they are 
intended for publication or not. 

There is, under the current law, a 
"savings" provision for protecting 
certain works that may have been pub- 
lished without the appropriate notice, 
by registering the work within five years 
of first publication and adding the 
notice to subsequently distributed co- 
pies. However, it is unwise to rely upon 
the savings provision, since it may lose 
you some rights against persons who 
make copies without knowing that you 
claim rights in the work. 

Once a work is published without 
notice, and once the five years for 
invoking the savings provision have 
passed, the work will go into the public 



domain; once a work is in the public 
domain, it can never be retrieved by the 
author. Therefore, it is best always to 
use the copyright notice, since it costs 
you nothing to add it. (I assume that 
you do not intentionally use the notice 
to claim copyright in works which you 
did not write, because if you do that you 
may be subject to criminal penalties.) 



Form of the Notice 

The copyright notice requires three 
things: 1) the symbol © (the letter 'C in 
a circle), the word "Copyright," or the 
abbreviation "Copr."; 2) the year of first 
publication of the work; and 3) the 
name of the owner, or an abbreviation 
or designation by which the owner is 
known. For the first part of the notice, 
you really should try to use both the 
word copyright and the 'C in a circle. 
The symbol is necessary in order to 
trigger international protection under a 
treaty the United States has signed with 
most other major countries. As the 
symbol is not a standard character on 
the CoCo or on most printers, you 
should either design your own character 
for display on a high resolution screen 
and for printing on your printer, or add 
the circle to your listings by hand. Many 
computer programmers use parentheses 
— (c) — but it is not clear that this has 
any significance under the treaty that 
governs the United States' copyright 
relations with most other countries. 

The second part of the notice, the 
year of first publication, refers to the 
year that the work was first made 
available to others by any means. If you 
are in doubt — if, for example, you 
showed a listing to several friends in 
your local computer club in 1985, but 
didn't sell copies of the program until 
1 987 — then it is safer to use the earliest 
possible date. If you pick a year that is 
later than that in which you technically 
"published" the work, your copyright 
notice might be ineffective. 

You will normally be the copyright 
owner, and should use your own name 
in the notice. If you wrote the program 



"If you can a car without 
being a mechanic, you can have a 
copyright without being a lawyer. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 83 



in the course of your work for someone 
else, or for a company, then that person 
or company may be the copyright 
owner. If so, they probably have a 
standard procedure for placing copy- 
right notices on their works. If some 
other person or company is distributing 
your copyrighted computer program, it 
is advisable to provide in writing (saving 



a copy, of course) a statement that, as 
a condition of your authorization to 
distribute copies of the work, the work 
must contain the required notice. Then, 
if the notice is accidentally omitted, 
your copyright will not be invalidated. 

Position of the Notice 

The copyright notice, in the form just 
described, should be placed in such a 
way as to give reasonable notice to 
others. There are at least three likely 
places where you can put the notice, and 
I would recommend using all three. The 
first is in the listing of the program, 
preferably near the beginning. This is 
most easily accomplished using a num- 
bered line with REM or ' (apostrophe) 
followed by the copyright notice, as 
follows: 

10 REN Copyright © 19B7 
by Edward Samuels 

Even if you encode the program so that 
it cannot be easily listed, or you write 
your program in assembly language, it 
should contain the copyright notice 
embedded within it, so that someone 
copying the program will copy the 
notice, or someone disassembling it will 
find it. 

The second logical place to put the 
notice is on the CoCo screen when the 
program is run, most logically as part 
of the sign-on or title screen. The third 
place to put the notice is on the labels 
attached to the tapes or disks on which 
the program is stored, if the program is 
publicly distributed on tapes or disks. 

If you are submitting a program for 
publication by a magazine or newslet- 



ter, the publication's copyright notice at 
the beginning of the issue will also 
protect your individual program. Un- 
less you specifically transfer your copy- 
right in the program to the magazine or 
newsletter, it will be presumed that you 
remain the copyright owner, and that 
the magazine acquired only a limited 
right to reproduce the work as part of 



that particular issue or another issue in 
the same series. If, however, you sign a 
contract transferring your program 
copyright to the magazine or newsletter, 
make sure you are satisfied with what 
you're paid because after you sell it, the 
work is no longer yours. 

Copyright Registration 

So, as we have just seen, a computer 
program is protected from the moment 
it is written down or stored, without any 
formalities whatsoever. If and when you 
distribute copies of the work, you must 
affix the copyright notice to it — a 
relatively simple procedure. In addi- 
tion, you may register your work with 
the copyright office, but it is not neces- 
sary to do so in order to be protected 
by copyright. Why, then, would you 
ever want to go to the trouble of reg- 
istering your work? The answer is that 
you obtain several distinct advantages 
through registration — most of which 
assume that your work is "worth" 
something, and that you may someday 
want to sue someone who copies or 
distributes your program without your 
permission. 

Advantages of Registration 

The major advantages of registration 
are the following: 

1) Registration tends to prove that 
you wrote your program when you say 
you did. This could be indispensable if 
you sue someone who claims that he or 
she wrote the program first, and that 
you're the one who copied. 

2) Even if you don't register your 
work, you will be able to recover for any 



damages caused by someone else's 
unauthorized copying of your work. 
Such damages are often hard to prove, 
and won't include your attorney's fees, 
which could easily cost more than your 
provable damages. If you do register, 
however, you qualify to recover not 
only reasonable attorney's fees if you 
win your suit, but also something called 
"statutory damages," meaning that a 
judge can award you a monetary recov- 
ery even if you can't prove specific 
damages, 

3) If you should accidentally omit the 
copyright notice from some published 
copies of your work, registration of the 
work within five years of publication 
will help you save the copyright from 
being invalidated. 

4) In any event, you must register a 
work before you sue for infringement. 

5) It's awfully nifty getting an official 
certificate of registration from the 
copyright office, formally certifying 
your authorship of the program. 

How to Register a Work With 
the Copyright Office 

Assuming you want to go to the 
trouble of registering, it is really not all 
that difficult. First, you obtain Form 
TX by calling the "Forms Hotline" at 
(202) 287-9100 day or night, or writing 
to Information and Publications Sec- 
tion, LM-455, Copyright Office, Li- 
brary of Congress, Washington, D.C. 
20559. While you're at it, ask for Cir- 
culars Rl (on copyright basics) and R61 
(on computer programs in particular). 
Don't panic when you see that the form 
is for a "nondramatic literary work." 
Under the copyright registration sys- 
tem, that's the category that computer 
programs fall into. If you want to 
separately register the audiovisual 
display of your program, you should do 
so on Form VA, which is for a work of 
the visual arts. (I will not go into the 
protection of audiovisual displays, 
except to mention that in some cases it 
has proven effective in protecting the 
presentation of materials on the screen, 
primarily audiovisual games.) 

Follow the instructions for complet- 
ing and returning the form to the copy- 
right office. Your application must be 
accompanied by a $10 payment and by 
a deposit of one or two copies of the 
program. If you publish a listing of the 
program, you should include two copies 
of the program as published. If the 
program is unpublished, or if you 
distribute copies of your program only 



"It's awfully nifty getting an official 
certificate of registration from the 
copyright office, formally certifying 
your authorship of the program/' 



84 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



on cassettes or disks, then you should 
send one copy of the program "in 
visually perceptible form" — that is, as 
listed to a printer. 

If your program is written in assem- 
bly code, the copyright office wants the 
source code, not merely the unintelligi- 
ble object code. This may result in 
disclosing what you might regard as a 
trade secret. For this reason, many 
computer software companies have not 
generally registered their works, instead 
preferring to preserve their "trade 
secrets" under theories of law other than 
copyright. If you have distributed a 
work written in BASIC, you would nor- 
mally have no expectation that your 
code represents a secret, so you might 
as well register and deposit your work. 
If you have distributed your program 
using limited protection schemes such 
as auto-loaders or programs that pre- 
vent listing, and you honestly think that 
a good programmer wouldn't be able to 
list your program anyway, you might 
decide not to register. 

The copyright office allows the au- 
thors of long programs to deposit only 
portions of those programs, and has 
proposed the adoption of rules that 
would also allow the authors of short 
programs (25 pages or less) to withhold 
up to 50 percent of theirlisting. The rule 
may well go into effect sometime in 
1987. 

Other Copyright Basics 

There are numerous copyright prin- 
ciples that have the effect of limiting 
your rights in your computer program. 
Although these limiting principles are 
too complex to explain fully in this 



short article, I should at least mention 
some of the more important ones. 

For example, the copyright law pro- 
tects only the parts of your program 
that are "original." This doesn't mean 
that the program has to be particularly 
creative or innovative, but it must be the 
result of your own programming. If you 
copy a program listing from RAINBOW 
magazine, it isn't your computer pro- 
gram, and you cannot claim any rights 
in it. 

Similarly, if you use someone else's 
subroutine for writing letters on a 
PMODE A screen, you can't claim author- 
ship of that subroutine either. If you 
develop your own subroutine and char- 
acter set, then that's sufficiently original 
to qualify f or copyright protection, even 
though something similar may have 
been done dozens of times by others. 
Original, in short, means little more 
than "not copied." 

Your copyright is said to protect your 
"expression," but not your "idea." 
Other people are free to write programs 
that do the same thing as yours, so long 
as they don't copy your specific pro- 
grammer example, your copyright in 
a program for solving Rubik's Cube 
won't prevent other people from writing 
programs that solve Rubik's Cube, so 
long as their programs don't copy your 
program. Several recent court decisions 
indicate that the copyright in a comput- 
er program is fairly broad, and not 
limited to verbatim copying of copy- 
righted programs. However, drawing 
the fine line between the protected 
expression" and the unprotected 
idea" can sometimes be quite tricky. 
Purchasers of a particular copy of a 



4 4 



i4 



copyrighted computer program have 
the right to resell that particular copy. 
Purchasers may also make a back-up 
copy (assuming they are able to make 
one, if it is copy-protected) or even an 
adaptation that is "an essential step in 
the utilization of the computer program 
in conjunction with a machine." For 
example, a modification to a program 
written for the CoCo 2 to get it to run 
on a CoCo 3, or the elimination of the 
speed-up poke togetit to run on a CoCo 
that won't handle it, would presumably 
not be considered an infringement of 
the owner's copyright. 

And, of course, no matter what the 
law may say, you just know that people 
out there are copying your program, 
and as a practical matter you will never 
find out and never be able to do any- 
thing about it. But why spoil the fun? 
Let's not dwell on the negative side of 
copyright protection. For now, tape a 
copy of your copyrighted program to 
the wall, beside your copyright certifi- 
cate if you have one, and enjoy the 
special feeling of accomplishment for 
having created something that didn't 
exist before. 

( Questions about this article may be 
addressed to Professor Samuels at New 
York Law School 57 Worth Street, 
New York, NY 10013. Although he is 
interested in discussing copyright mat- 
ters of general interest to computer 
programmers and users, he is not cur- 
rently engaged in the practice of law, 
and will not give specific legal advice. 
If you have a serious copyright prob- 
lem, you should consult an attorney 
who specializes in the field. ffis 



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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 85 



Programming the LOGO Turtle: 
Studies in Learning Transfer 

By Michael Plog, Ph.D 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



ne concept of learning is 
"transfer* 1 — skills we learn in 
one situation are carried over 
(transferred) into another situation. 
The most expansive interpretation of 
this concept is that some subjects actu- 
ally teach students to think better. In the 
past, subjects have been included in 
school curricula because they were 
assumed to help students learn the 
process of thinking or creativity. 
Courses were thought to help in all 
other subjects because they presented a 
logical method of thinking about ever- 
ything. Some of you may have taken 
Latin in school with this justification. 

Some teachers have claimed that 
learning to program a computer would 
change the way students learn every- 
thing else. One influential proponent of 
this position is Seymour Pa pert, devel- 
oper of the computer language LOGO. 
Using the LOGO language, children send 
commands to a "turtle," which then 
draws pictures on a computer screen. By 
learning to program the turtle, the 
argument went, children would learn 
also to think. 



Michael Flog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois, 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



Pa pert developed LOGO during the 
1970s. During the 1980s, researchers 
tested whether or not children program- 
ming the computer actually did think 
any better (or differently) than children 
without that experience. The evidence is 
mixed. 

Roy Pea, Midian Kurland and other 
colleagues at Bank Street College of 
Education in New York City conducted 
experiments with elementary and se- 
condary school students to determine 
the effects of transfer of learning. They 
found no evidence that students learn 
much from programming that can 
transfer to non-electronic problems. 

The first experiment began by expos- 
ing 16 students in grades three through 
six to 30 hours of self-initiated work 
with LOGO. They then gave a task to 
these children and to members of a 
comparison group. The task was to 
design an efficient plan for completing 
six classroom cleanup activities. The 
assumption of the researchers was that 
drawing with the LOGO turtle requires 
the same sort of forethought and anal- 
ysis of a space as organizing housekeep- 
ing chores; however, the LOGO group 
planned no better than the comparison 
children. 

The teachers of the LOGO children, 
once they saw the results of the exper- 
iment, decided to include more struc- 
tured lessons and group discussions in 
the LOGO work the following year, A 
second study was conducted. This time, 



encouraging students to use what they 
learned from LOGO, the planning task 
was put on a microcomputer. Again, the 
LOGO children produced no better plans 
than those in the comparison group. In 
addition, they did not make better use 
of computer feedback, think longer as 
they planned, or revise more intelli- 
gently. 

The researchers conducted a third 
study. This study involved high school 
students with two years of program- 
ming experience and a comparison 
group of students without program- 
ming experience. The researchers were 
looking for improvements in several 
problem-solving skills. The computer 
science students performed better than 
the comparison group only on one test 
that tapped their programming work in 
an obvious way. Other tests came out 
with no difference. 

Pea, Kurland and their colleagues 
concluded that programming instruc- 
tion, as it is now conducted, will not 
improve general thinking skills of stu- 
dents. 

Other researchers have found a more 
positive connection between program- 
ming and thinking. Douglas Clements 
and Dominic Gullo of Kent State Uni- 
versity in Ohio conducted an experi- 
ment with first graders. The students 
worked in groups of two or three on 
LOGO programming tasks for 80 min- 
utes a week. The control group con- 
sisted of children who worked on com- 




86 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



puters for reading and math lessons, but 
did not learn programming. After only 
1 2 weeks, differences were noted among 
the LOGO children and the control 
group. The children learning program- 
ming gave much better directions when 
told to describe the route from A to B 
on a simple street map. They also 
thought longer and made fewer errors 
on a picture-matching task; generated 
more original ideas on a test of creative 
thinking; and asked questions sooner 
when faced with inadequate directions. 
Apparently, programming experience 
seems to make a difference in this study. 



"Low road transfer 
demands little 
conscious thought." 



The Kent State study differed from 
the Bank Street studies in several ways. 
It is impossible to determine which of 
these differences account for the differ- 
ent results. The Kent State study had 
students working in groups of two or 
three with an adult tutor. The tutor 
encouraged them to think aloud about 
mistakes, tracing the source of errors. 
(What did you tell the turtle to do? 
What did it do? How can you change 
your program to get it to do what you 
want?) The students in the Kent State 
study were also younger. (A later study 
involving first and third grade students 
found that first graders learned more 
than older children.) The tasks per- 



formed by the students were different in 
the two studies; different skills were 
measured. 

The major difference seems to be 
involvement of adults. The Bank Street 
researchers found that the elementary 
students learned new ideas as solutions 
to very specific problems and rarely 
generalized to closely related program- 
ming problems. The high school stu- 
dents in the Bank Street study borrowed 
programming code from each other 
without really understanding it. The 
tutors in the Kent State study encour- 
aged a much broader sort of learning. 

Beyond the differences of the studies, 
the contradictory results may be re- 
solved by a consideration of the way 
people learn to transfer skills from one 
context to another. Psychologists des- 
cribe two different methods of knowl- 
edge transfer: the "high road" and the 
"low road." 

Low road transfer demands little 
conscious thought. Once we have 
learned to drive a car, we can drive a 
truck without too much problem. Once 
students can read a book, they can 
easily read words scrolling across a 
computer screen. Low road transfer 
occurs when a skill becomes automatic 
(after practice) and is then applied to a 
new, but similar situation. 

High road transfer involves a con- 
scious effort to apply past experience to 
a particular problem. The learner has to 
consciously abstract a principle learned 
in one context to a different situation. 
For example, in feudal Japan and 
China, military leaders used a board 
game called "Go" to improve perfor- 
mance in battle. Mao Tse-tung actually 
wrote a book about his conquest of 
China by comparing it to a Go game. 



Closer to home, executives apply prin- 
ciples from chess (control of the center 
of the board) to business strategies. 

This high road transfer requires an 
understanding of the principles in- 
volved before applying them to a new 
context. The effort has to be conscious, 
unlike the skill of riding a bicycle. 

Courses in programming typically 
involve little stress on principles of 
problem-solving. Most classes deal with 
fundamentals, leaving the students to 
learn more advanced programming 
skills on their own. As students work in 
computer classes, they are not expected 
to reflect on broader abstractions to 
other problem-solving situations. They 
are expected to write a program that 
will calculate interest payments, alpha- 
betize a list of names or draw a map. 

It seems we can safely disregard the 
low road transfer of skills when consid- 
ering things like problem-solving and 
learning. Might it be possible to design 
a computer class that intentionally tries 
to teach broad problem-solving skills? 
What materials would be used to en- 
courage students to learn principles of 
thinking that could be used for a high 
road transfer? What teaching style 
should be associated with such a class? 
I have no answers, but maybe you do. 
Are you involved with a class that you 
think has potential for high road 
transfer of learning? If you have such a 
class, please tell me about it. Maybe we 
can test your students to see if your 
approach indeed contributes to transfer 
of higher order thinking. 

Your thoughts, comments, ideas and 
suggestions are welcome. Write me at 
829 Evergreen, Chatham, IL 62629. 
Until later, keep thinking of the high 
road. S 



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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 87 



TURN OF THE SCREW 



Transistor Buffers for Stereo 

Amplification 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last time, I showed you how to 
wire digital-to-analog conver- 
ters. A D-to-A converter is a 
device that, when hooked up to a com- 
puter, converts (or changes) a digital 
value, or number into an analog vol- 
tage. In the case of the CoCo, the digital 
value is f rom 0 to 255, represented as an 
eight-bit binary value. Remember bi- 
nary? Anyway, this eight-bit binary 
value is converted into a voltage. The 
voltage output is directly proportional 
to the input value. The lowest possible 
digital value (0) gives the lowest output 
voltage, 0 volts. The highest digital 
value (255) gives the highest voltage. In 
this case it should be about 5 volts. 

This time, I'll show you how to hook 
up a couple of small amplifiers and get 
some sound out of them. If you recall, 
the outputs of the D-to-A converters are 
the sum of several resistors. This has an 
output of about 0 to 5 volts. If you want 
to connect this output to an external 
amplifier, such as a stereo system, then 
you don't need an amplifier but just a 
buffer. The reason you don't need an 
amplifier is the output voltage is high 
enough to drive a stereo. In fact, it is a 
bit too high. The typical input voltage 
of a "line in" on a stereo is about 1 volt. 
It needs to be brought down a little. 
Figure I shows one transistor buffer. It 
is an emitter-follower. It has a lot of 
current gain but no voltage gain. This 
is what we need. R2 in the circuit is used 
to lower the voltage to a usable level for 
the stereo. VI in the circuit is used as 
a volume control. If you only build one 

Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware pro- 
jects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



Parts List 



±) 5V 



From 
D to A 




Part Number 

R1 
R2 
T1 
V1 
J1 



Description 

10K resistor, % watt 
47 K resistor, Va watt 
2N2222 transistor 
10K variable resistor 
RCA female connector 



ji 

-p Output 



Figure 1 



Part Number 


Description 


R3 


100 ohm resistor, 1 A watt 


R4 


10K resistor, V* watt 


C1 


.1 Uf Cap., 50 volts 


C2 


.1 Uf Cap., 50 volts 


C3 


4.7 Uf Cap., 10 volts 


C4 


470 Uf Cap., 35 volts 


C5 


See text 


11 


LM 386 audio amp 


V2 


10K varible resistor 


S1 


2 to 4 inch speaker 


J2 


4-pin connector 



From 
D to A 




© 5V 




S1 




C4 J2 



Figure 2 



J 



88 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



D-to-A converter you only need one 
circuit. If you build two D-to-As then 
you need two circuits. But instead of 
using two volume controls and adjust- 
ing them separately, use a stereo volume 
control that has two potentiometers 
built into one. 

If your stereo is too far away or you 
don't have a stereo, then you may want 
to build a small amp to drive some 
speakers. Figure 2 shows a circuit that 
does just that. It is an amplifier module 
that has just a few milliwatts. In fact it 
has 325 milliwatts, just right for a small 
speaker. 

All of the parts are available at your 
local Radio Shack store. If you used the 
CRC Project board, then there should 
be enough room left on the board to 
mount all of the parts. If you want to 
use a socket for the IC, then use an 8- 
pin socket. There is no special care 
needed in the construction of the amp, 
except the usual care in dealing with 
parts that can be damaged by static 
electricity. The usual project tools will 
be necessary; things like a soldering 
iron, pliers, cutters and a drill to mount 
the variable resistor. Hook up the 
circuit as in the diagram. The capacitor 
C2 should be as close to the IC as 
possible; It's a power supply decoupling 
cap, so the closer the better. Jl is just 
a 4-pin connector so if you want to 
disconnect the speakers, you won't have 
to unsolder the thing every time. 

The way the outputs are connected 
now, the signal coming from the D-to- 
A is very square. That is to say, it is very 
fast to change from one analog state to 
another. This tends to make the music 
very rich in harmonics, sometimes to 
the point that it may sound like distor- 
tion. C5 in the circuit acts as a low pass 
filter by shorting out high frequencies to 
ground. If you like the rich sounds of 
harmonics, leave out C5. Otherwise a 
value from . I uf to 1 uf will soften these 



harmonics. Try several values and use 
the one that you like best. 

Now for the hard part. I say hard 
because for a hardware buff like me, 
software is a pain. But, hardware with- 
out software is not much good, so I have 
to deal with it. I looked around to see 
what I had in terms of musical software. 
After running through my old rain- 
bows, I found that the machine lan- 
guage routines used to generate four 
voices did not have listings, but only 
pages and pages of DflTR statements. 
This makes it hard to find the driver 
routines and change them. 

So I decided to give basic guidelines 
on how to modify them yourself. Inside 
the CoCo there is a built-in D-to-A 
converter. It is located at SFF20 or 
653 12 in decimal. The D-to-A converter 
you have just built is at SFF40 or 65344, 
and if you built two D-to-As, the second 
one is at SFF41 or 65345. The idea is 
to find the location in memory that 
matches the address SFF20 and change 
it to SFF40. One thing to remember is 
that the address SFF40 is divided into 
two bytes, since the CoCo can only 
work with eight bits of information. The 
first is $FF or 255 in decimal and the 
second is $20 or 32 in decimal. I wrote 
a short BASIC program to locate any 
presence of the address SFF20 and 
change it to SFF40. This is the program: 

10 FOR I = &H1500 TO &H7EFF 
20 IF PEEK ( I ) =255 AND PEEK 
( 1+1 ) =32 THEN POKE 1 + 1 , &H40 
30 NEXT I 

There are a few things to remember 
with this program. First, PCLEflR 1 
before typing it in. Then, load in your 
music driver and music and run the 
program. The memory area covered by 
this program starts just after the BASIC 
program and runs to the top of a 32K 
machine. This is only a guideline on 



how to find the memory locations; 
people with good machine language 
skills will be able to find it with no 
problems. 

After looking through my disks of 
software, I found that I had the pro- 
gram Musical. I checked the machine 
language driver and found the point at 
which the program referenced address 
was SFF20. I changed it by typing this 
statement: 

POKE &H3F79 ,&H40 

That redirected the output to the 
external D-to-A I built. It was great. If 
you are using a multipack, you must do 
another poke to change the access of the 
slot that the controller is in, to the slot 
that the D-to-A is in. There is a simple 
way of doing that: 

POKE &HFF7F , ( [ X- 1 ) * 16) 
+ (7-1) 

Where X is the slot number that the 
controller is in (a number from 1 to 4), 
and yis the slot number that the D-to- 
A converter is in. 

To make sure that two D-to-A con- 
verters work, I built two of them. I took 
my machine language disassembler and 
looked at how the program worked. 
After a short time, I came up with a 
stereo version. These are the pokes I did 
to convert the Musical Play program to 
use my stereo D-to-A converter: 

POKE &H3F6F , &HEG 

POKE &H3F73 ,&HEB 

POKE &H3F77 ,&HFD 

POKE &H3F79 ,&H40 

SAVEM"MU2ST'\&H3F00,&H3FBF, 

&H3F00 

This will make the modifications 
necessary to run it on my D-to-As and 
save a copy of it to disk. /^n 



Mowing up to a Turbo PC/XT cumpatibl 
costs less than you think, 
•rf. 77/B Mhz Txirbo (sotKva/e controlled) 
256K Memory (640K Expandable) . (») 
360K DSDD Disk Drive. 
15 OK Power Supply 
Real Time Clock. 

with battery backed Time & Date. 
Parallel Printer Port. 
1 Serial Port (2nd port optional). 
Game Port . 

IT Sty le Keyboard . - , 

Mono Graphics Adapter. («) 1 
High Res. Monochrome Monitor. (**) 
MS-DOS 3.1 

Full 6 Mo. Limited Warranty //J- 




NEU 



LyVTT 



$59750 

• a V a* V W J W W «-U 




(»» ^Substitute 
and 



Colour Graphics Adaptor $ f 7Q£T QO_ 
TTL Colour Monitor for r 



(*) 640K upgrade add S 45.00 

2nd Floppy Disk Drive S 89.00 

2nd Serial Port add S 22.00 



300/1200 Baud Modem SI 12.00 

Mouse (serial port) S 68.00 

MS-DOS 3.2 v#/ GW Basic add.S 65.00 
20Mb Hard Disk w/Controler .9389 . 00 



DSDD 5 1/4 M Disks; $ .48ea./$41 .00 box 100 
with sleeves be lakles . 10 0% GUARANTEED. 

tofcE AD IN LAST ISSUE FOR FRINTER RIBBONS 

Calif, add 6.5% Tax. / C.O.D. ADD $1.50 

Voice (313)904-1393 / Data (305)253-0221 

Canyon County Devices 

P. 0. Box c 

Saugus, Ca. 91 350 

PFilCES APPLY TO LMTED STATES ORDERS ONLY. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 89 



It All Adds Up 

By Bill Canigan 



How many times has someone told you that your 
computer is no more than an oversized calculator? 
They are more or less right, but you and I both 
know that to use the Color Computer as a calculator is no 
easy task. There have been many times when I needed to 
use my calculator but couldn't find it and had to resort to 
the computer (it's always in the same place). But trying to 
perform any volume of calculations was clumsy at best. 

With thanks to Peter Kerckhoff (CoCocad October 1985) 
forthe polling methods and Apple Macintosh (for the idea), 
I went about making my Color Computer work like a 
calculator. 

After typing in the program and running it, you are 
presented with a calculator on the screen. The right joystick 
controls an arrow cursor that can be moved over the key 
pad. To select a key, simply position the arrow over the key 
and press the firebutton. That's all there is to it. The rest 
should be pretty self-explanatory. If you can operate a 
calculator, you can use this program. 

Two keys not normally found on a calculator are the Q 
key, which quits the program, and the left arrow, which 
allows you to delete the last digit entered, rather than 
clearing and reentering the complete number. The program 
is easy to modify, so help yourself. I've left a function key 
empty to do with what you wish. 



Bill Carrigan lives in Batavia, New York, and is a computer 
programmer. His first exposure to computers was a 16 K 
CDC 3100 which filled an entire room. He. has been 
programming large IBM systems for 10 years and has more 
recently developed an interest in micros. 




Lastly, the program uses the high speed poke (POKE 
65495,0) and then restores it at the end of the program. 
If your computer does not accept this poke then delete Line 
10, which sets the high speed, and Line 1740, which restores 
the computer to normal speed when you quit the program. 

I hope you have as much fun using the program as I did 
writing it. 

(Questions about this program may be directed to Mr. 
Carrigan at 202 South Swan, Batavia, NY 14020, 716-343- 
7588. Please enclose an SASE for a reply when writ- 
ing.) □ 



90 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




130 191 

290 43 

510 112 

730 40 



940 237 

1120 126 

1330 90 

1510 87 

END 67 



T 



The listing: COCOCALC 

IfS POKE 65495,0 

20 CLEAR 5000:CLS:GOTO200 

30 X=INT( (JOYSTK(0)+58) *1.31) :Y= 

(JOYSTK(l)+97) :P=ABS( (1 AND PEEK 

(&HFF00) ) *3-3 ) 

40 RETURN 

50 GET (0,0) -(6,6) ,C1,G: LINE (0,0) 

-(6,6) , PRESET, BF: DRAW'S 4 ; BM 3 , 3 NF 

H2D2E2L":GET(0,0)-(6, 6) ,C2,G:PUT 

(0,0) -(6,6) , CI, PS ET: RETURN 

60 GET(X-3,Y-3)-(X+3,Y+3) ,C1,G:P 

UT (X-3 , Y-3 ) - (X+3 , Y+3 ) , C2 , AND : RET 

URN 

70 IF (LXOX) OR (LYOY) THEN PU 
T(LX-3,LY-3) -(LX+3,LY+3) ,C1,PSET 
:LX=X:LY=Y:GOSUB60: RETURN ELSE R 
ETURN 

80 PUT(LX-3 ,LY-3) - (LX+3, LY+3) , CI 
, PSET : RETURN 
90 ' 

100 ' TEXT GENERATION 
110 1 

120 IF ASC(E$)>62 THEN 130 ELSE 
ON ASC(E$)-31 GOTO 850 , 860 , 810 , 8 
80 , 890 , 900 , 910 , 920 , 930 , 940 , 950 , 9 
60 , 910 , 980 , 9 90 , 1000 ,1010, 1020 , 10 
30 ,1040, 1050 , 1060 , 101 0,1080, 1090 
,1100, 1110,1120,1130, 1140, 1150 
130 ON ASC(E$)-62 GOTO 1160,1170 
, 1180 , 1190 , 1200 , 12 10 , 1220 , 12 30 , 1 
240,1250,1260,1270, 1280, 1290,130 
0, 1310, 1320, 1330, 1340, 1350, 13 60, 
1370, 1380, 1390,1400,1410 ,14 20, 14 
30 

140 • 

150 • DRAW CHARACTER STRING 
160 • 

170 FOR C=1T0 LEN ( T $ ) : DRAW " S 4 ; BM 
=TX; ,=TY;":E$=MID$(T$,C, 1) :GOSUB 

120 :TX=TX+SP: NEXT C: RETURN 
180 1 START OF PROGRAM 
190 1 

200 DIM FF$(5,4) ,C1(1) ,C2 (1) ,L1( 
6) , MO (255) :D$="V31L100O3B" :SC=4: 
LX=3 : LY=3 

210 PG=0:GOSUB1470:N=3 :GOSUB50 
220 N=l:FOR Y=3T01 STEP -l:FOR X 
=1T03 : FF$ ( X , Y) =RIGHT$ ( STR$ (N) , 1) 
:N=N+1:NEXT X:NEXT Y : FF$ (2 , 4 ) ="0 
":FF$(3,4)=" ." 



230 SP=8 : TY=80 : LF=5 : B$=" " : A$=" " : 

SC=4 

240 1 

250 1 CURSOR POLLING 
260 1 

270 GOSUB30:GOSUB70:IF P<>3 THEN 

GOTO 270 
280 T$="Y" 

290 FOR 1=83 TO 150 STEP 19: IF ( 
X>I AND X<I+8) THEN T$="N" 
300 NEXT 

3lj3 IF T$="N" THEN 270 

320 FX=INT ( (X-71)/19)+l 

3 30 FOR 1=105 TO 165 STEP 19: IF 

(Y>I AND Y<I+8) THEN T$="N" 

340 NEXT 

350 IF T$="N" THEN 270 

360 FY=INT( (Y-93)/19)+l 

370 RX=(72+(FX*19) -19) :SX=RX+11 

380 RY=(94+(FY*19) -19) :SY=RY+11 

390 GOSUB80:PUT(RX,RY) -(SX,SY) ,M 

0,NOT:PLAYD$:PUT(RX,RY) -(SX,SY) , 

MO,NOT:GOSUB60 

400 ON FY GOTO 410,420,430,440 
410 ON FX GOTO 4 60,460,460,580,5 
90 

420 ON FX GOTO 4 60,460,460,600,6 
10 

430 ON FX GOTO 4 60,460,460,550,1 
740 

440 ON FX GOTO 270,460,460,620,6 
30 

450 1 

460 'ADD A NUMBER 
470 • 

480 IF NC>8 THEN 270 

490 IF (INSTR(A$,". 11 ) > 0) AND ( 

FX=3) AND (FY=4) THEN 270 

500 NC=NC+1 : A$=A$+FF$ (FX, FY) 

510 LINE(73, 63) -(159,81) , PRESET, 

BF 

520 TX=155-(NC*8) : T$=A$ : GOSUB170 

530 GOTO 270 

540 ' DELETE A NUMBER 

550 IF NC=0 THEN 2 70 

560 A$=LEFT$ (A$ , LEN (A$) -1) :NC=NC 

-1 

570 IF NC>0 THEN 510 ELSE LINE (7 

3,63)-(159,81) , PRESET, BF:GOTO270 

580 F=1:GOTO670 

590 F=2:GOTO670 

600 F=3:GOTO670 

610 F=4:GOTO670 

620 F=5:GOTO670 

630 IF A$="" THEN B$="":LF=5 ELS 
E A$="" :NC=0 

640 LINE(73, 63) -(159,81) , PRESET, 
BF: IF B$<>"" THEN T$=B$ : TX=155- ( 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



T TXT / "D C. \ 4? Q \ • C* C\ CTTT5 1 "7 CA 
LIjJN ^ O9 J ^O) • bUbUDl / y) 


C\ O ft T\T^ K T.T II 

9 2^0 DRAW" 


s= 


CO ■ T"> T~)T T >1 HO II > T~> T7> m T T T~> XT 

SC ; BRBU4D2 " : RETURN 


oop bUlUZ / /) 


93p DRAW" 


s= 


SC; BR2HU2E" : RETURN 


£ £ CA 1 

oop 


r\ A ft T>7""k TV T.T II 

94^ DRAW" 


S = 


SC; BU2ED2FU2NR3U2 " : RE 


(A 1 "DTTTDTTO'DM TTT T7\T frpTOMC 

o / jp KEKr UKJYL rUJNL.llUJNo 


TURN 






boj^ ■ 


f\ I - /Tl T^»T*i TV T.T II 

95p DRAW" 


s= 


^1 /—m "i— 1 r— t-^ r~ tt r" II _ T" 1 m T T XT 

SC;E5BD5H5" : RETURN 


by/) lr A9 — 1HEN Lr-r IbUlUz /^) 


C\ f~ ft T^T**« TV T.T II 

9 op DRAW" 


s= 


/-I /—* _ y» TT A T-k r— T" ATT1 T*\ /"II . T~* DITlTTn 

SC; BU2R5L2U3D6" : RETUR 


lr Lr— D IriEN L9-A9 . bUlU / ^/) 


XT 

N 






H 1 CA r\\J T T? H OCTTO "7 Q 01 "7 Q 01 Q CA CA Q 1 CA 

/ ±p UJN Lr bUbUD toy)/ /z)p f opp f o±p 


O 'I ft T"\T"> 7\ TaT II 

97^0 DRAW" 


s= 


CO ■ T5TOTTO II • T"> TTTTITTTO XT 

SC ; BRU2 " : RETURN 


TOrt "DC* — nC^.AC^ — II II • XTP — 01 

/ Zp D9-L9 tii9- • JN p 


f"l O /7J T*\T~> TV T.T II 

9 8^0 DRAW " 


s= 


O O ■ T5TT O T"> C II ■ T"> TTTTITTTOXT 

S C ; BU 2 R5 " : RETURN 


H 1 CA T TMT? / 7Q \ ./"IRQ Q 1 \ T>TO T? C T? rp 

/ jp J_i J_ Jn ill ( / JiDJj "(loy ; bl) , KKEbE 1 , 


O O ft T"\T~> 7\ TaT II 

9 9^0 DRAW " 


s= 


CO ■ T5 T"> TTT~> T™\ II • T"> T7 1 mTTn XT 

SC ; BRURD" : RETURN 


"O TP 

Br 


~\ ft ft ft T\TS TV T.T 

Ippp DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


/—l /^i . tt l r~ 1 1 . T™» TPITITTTO XT 

=SC ; E5 " : RETURN 


'I A ft t tti T T7 1 XT / T~J C* \ "I /T( m T T T7 1 XT rTT\7_ 1 CTCT / T 

74)3 IF LEN(B9)<1)9 THEN TX=155-(L 


T ft "1 ft T*\T*1 TV T.T 

Iplp DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


_ C O ■ TITTTTO T7IT"» O TTI T> O O T O II ■ TTI 

=SC ; BUU3ER2FD3GL2 " : RE 


EN (B?) *8; :GOTO 77)9 


mTTnxT 

TURN 






n r o( -r- t-i T 7 7\ T / "D (* \ v^OOOOOOOOO mTTTT'XT T3 C* 

75^ if val ( B9 ) >999999999 then B9 


1 fX O ft T"\T> 7^ TaT 

±p2p DRAW 


II c 


CO • T> A T OTTCAO II • T> TTTTITTTJXT 

= SC ; R4 L2U5G2 " : RETURN 


T l?T?rn<i / "Q £\j_TDTOTJTnctl/'nc!l A \ T?T CP "D 

— LEr 1 9 ( Dp , 0 ; +Klbn 1 9 ( B9 , 4 ; ELbE B 


±pjp UKAW 


11 c 

0 


CO • "KT"D/1 TTO"DTT?TTXJT Til • 7DT?rp 

— oL / NK4 UZKJEUHLJ • KE1 


9— LEr T9 ( B9 , lp ) 


TTT5XT 
UKN 






/o)9 TX-lOO-o^ 


T fW A fA TMT3 A T*T 

IpQp DRAW 


11 c 


CO»T3TTT7 l "DO'C 1 TT'LTT"C 1 OT A II • "DTT 1 

-bL ; BUr K2EUHLE2L4 : RE 


/ /)9 T9 — B9 : GObUBl / p I Lr — r I GOTO 2 / p 


mTTTJXT 

1 URN 






78p C=VAL ( A$ ) *VAL ( B9 ) :C9=STK9(C) 


T /Tl C ft T>T"V TV T.T 

±pop DRAW 


II c* 

"S 


/—I _ t~\ O TT T /N *™l T™» A II . T™» TTimTTT™»XT 

=SC ; BR3U5G3R4 " : RETURN 


• "D T?rnTT"DXT 

• KE 1 UKN 


1 /- rt 'Pv-o A T*7 

Lpop DRAW 


II c 

"b 


CO • DTTT?DOT?TTUT OTTOD A II • "D 

-bL ; BUr R2EUHL3 U 2R4 I R 


*n r\ ft o C* C (TITO C* / T 7 7\ T / "D C* \ / T 7 7\ T / A c* \ \ •"D"C i rn 

79p C9=STK9 ( VAL ( B9 ; / VALi ( A9 ; ; . KE1 


nmTTr> xt 

ETURN 






UKN 


T ft '"7 ft T"\T"i 7V TaT 

Lpl p DRAW 


11 c 

" s 


CO ■ n TT 1 / TT TOO T"\ O TT>TO O TT 1 T T T T T O 

=SC ; BE4HL2GD3 FR2EUHL2 


Q (% CK C rn"0 d!/T7AT /OCl!\ i T 7 AT / ACi \ \ •"0"C i rn 

opp O9— b IK9 ( VALi ( B 9 ; + VALi ( A9 ; ; IKE1 


II m T"V T7IITITTT*» XT 

" : RETURN 






UKN 


T ft O ft T*\T"V TV T.T 

lpop DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


_ /—I s-*\ _ T5TOTTTP1TTT yl T> II > T™» T7irnTTT™»XT 

=SC ; BRUE3UL4D" : RETURN 


O T f% O mT) <^/T7AT / D<5 \ T7AT / ACi! \ \ • "DT7 1 m 

0 Lp C 9—0 IK9 ( VALi ( B9 ; —VALi (A9 ; ; JKEl 


T ft f\ ft T\T\ TV T.T 

±p9p DRAW 


II c* 

"S 


f~l m T™» T"V T"V TT1T TT TT71 T T T* O TTI XTT"V T*\ 

=SC ; BRR2EUHEHL2GFNRGD 


TTT5TVT 
UKN 


II m T">T7imTTT"»XT 

" : RETURN 






0 *"\ m 1 

82 p 1 


1 1 ft ft T>n TV T»T 

llpp DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


/—I /^i . T-» TTT7IT™» O TTI TTI TTT O O TATTITO Oil 

=SC ;BUFR2EU3HL2GDFR2 " 


83 p 'DRAW STRINGS FOR NUMERICS 


: RETURN 






AND ALPHABETICS 


ft T*\T"i TV TaT 

1 1 lp DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


CO m TOTTT T5TTOTOTTT II a TO TTifTIT TTO XT 

=SC ; RULBU2RUL" : RETURN 


84 p 1 


T T O ft T\T"i TV TaT 

11 2 p DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


CO ■ T5 TT A TO TOT TO TO O TO TO II a TO TTTTITT 

=SC ; BU4RDLBD2RD" : RETU 


n r t~\tt> 7\ t»t 11 0 _c /^i • nn >i II ■ "o tt> mTTT-i xt 

oop DKAW"S=SC ; BK4 " : KETUKN 


T™>XT 

RN 






O d ("A T\T) 7\TiT IIC CO •T"J "DTT OTTO T T> O II • T™> TTTTITTTJXT 

Bop DRAW " S=S C ; RBU 2 U 2 LD2 " : RETURN 


1 1 T /)( T"\T"i TV TaT 

113^ DRAW 


II 0 

" s 


— CO a TOTTO XT T7> O TTI O II a TO TT> mTTTOXT 

=SC ; BU2NE2F2 " : RETURN 


O 7 ri T\T5 7\ TiT IIC? CO • DTTOTTODDOHO II • T™> TTTTITTT) XT 

87)0 DRAW"S=SC ; BU2U2BR2D2 " : RETURN 


~\ ~] A ft T"\T~> TV TaT 

1 1 4p DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


— CO a T5TTTO OT5TTOT O II a TO TT> mTTTOXT 

=SC ; BUR3 BU2L3 " : RETURN 


O O f% T\T} 7\ TiT II C C/^i . T3"T~)TT/1 T3"T~)0'r > \/1TTT~)T A "OTTO T T"> 

8 8^ DKAW"S=SC ; BRU4BR2D4URL4RU2 LR 


1 1 r rt T>T*1 TV TaT 

1 1 op DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


_ C f~y a TTI O T T O II a TO TTI ITITTTO XT 

=SC ; E2 H2 " : RETURN 


A II • "OTTTTITT'OXT 

4 " : RETURN 


T T f ft T*\T"i TV TaT 

116^ DRAW 


II 0 

"S 


_ C /I a T™i TTI TTT** O T*\ **4 T TO T*\ T*\ II a T*» TTI m 

=SC ; BU3UR3 D2LBDD" : RET 


O O f% T*\T~> K TiT ||r»_fjri iDOTTOT TTTOTiT T T™\>1 II •T~>T7TTI 

89^0 DRAW"S=SC ; R 3U2L 3U2R3 LD4 " :RET 


TTT~»XT 

URN 






TTTOXT 
URN 


i i T rt T~\"D A TiT 

1 1 / p DRAW 


II c 

"b 


CO* XTTO OTTOTTDODnOT TO TOT T II • 

— bC ; NR 3U3ER2BD2 LDRU" : 


r\ ft ft T"\T} A TiT HC CO • TP A DT O'Pv DD O'D'PvO'Pvll • T5 TTTTI 

ypp DRAW "b-bL ; hAQBhJUiiRJiiuZ D" : RET 


n ■_, i| 1 ITTT3XT 

RETURN 






URN 


118p DRAW 


"S 


=SC ; U3 ERFDNL3 D2 11 : RETU 


r\ ~\ ft r>T) A TiT HC CO • DDO XTTT / UTm II • T) T7irnTTT)XT 

y 1)3 DRAW M b-bC ; BR2NU4H2R J " : RETURN 


T~\ XT 

RN 







A* 1 





TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



92 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



1190 DRAW"S=SC;U4R2FGNL2FGL2" :RE 
TURN 

12J3J3 DRAW" S=SC;BRREGLHU2 ERF" : RET 
URN 

1210 DRAW"S=SC;U4R2FD2GL2" : RETUR 
N 

1220 DRAW"S=SC ;NR3U2NR2U2R3 " : RET 
URN 

1230 DRAW"S=SC;U2NR2U2R3": RETURN 
1240 DRAW"S=SC;BU4BR3L2GD2FREUL" 
: RETURN 

1250 DRAW"S=SC;U4D2R3U2D4" : RETUR 
N 

12 60 DRAW" S=SC ; R2 LU4NLR" : RETURN 
1270 DRAW"S=SC ; BUFREU3 " : RETURN 
1280 DRAW"S=SC;U2RNF2NE2LU2" : RET 
URN 

1290 DRAW"S=SC;NR3U4": RETURN 
1300 DRAW" S=SC ; U4 FRED4 ": RETURN 
1310 DRAW" S=SC ;U4F3DU4 ": RETURN 
1320 DRAW"S=SC;BUU2ERFD2GLH" : RET 
URN 

1330 DRAW"S=SC;U4R2FGL2" : RETURN 
1340 DRAW"S=SC ; BUU2 ERFD2 GNUNRLH " 
: RETURN 

1350 DRAW"S=SC ;U4R2FGL2RF2 " : RETU 
RN 

13 60 DRAW" S=SC ; R2 EHLHER2 " : RETURN 
1370 DRAW"S=SC ; BU4R2LD4 " : RETURN 
1380 DRAW"S=SC;NU4R3U4" : RETURN 
1390 DRAW" S=SC ; BU4 D3 FREU3 ": RETUR 
N 

1400 DRAW"S=SC;NU4ERFU4" : RETURN 
1410 DRAW"S=SC;UE2UDGHUDF2D" :RET 
URN 

1420 DRAW"S=SC ; BU4DFEUDGD2 " : RETU 
RN 

1430 DRAW"S=SC;NR2UE2UL2" : RETURN 
1440 ' 

1450 1 CREATE SCREEN 



1460 1 

1470 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1 , 1 : COLOR0 
, 1 : PCLS 

1480 LINE(65,50)-(168,170) ,PSET, 
B 

1490 LINE(64, 49) -(169,171) ,PSET, 
B 

1500 LINE(70,60)-(162,84) ,PSET,B 
F 

1510 LINE(73 , 63 )- (159 ,81) , PRESET 
,BF 

1520 FOR X=73 TO 150 STEP 19 
1530 FOR Y=95 TO 155 STEP 19 
1540 LINE(X,Y) -(X+13,Y+13) ,PSET, 
BF 

1550 COLOR 1,0 

1560 LINE(X-2, Y-2) -(X+11,Y+11) ,P 
SET , BF 

1570 COLOR 0,1 

1580 LINE (X-2, Y-2) -(X+11,Y+11) ,P 
SET , B 

1590 NEXT Y 
1600 NEXT X 

1610 A=1:X=75:SC=4 :SP=19 

1620 Tl$ (1) ="789*/" 

1630 Tl$ (2) ="456+-" 

1640 Tl$ ( 3 ) ="123 ) Q" 

1650 Tl$(4)=" 0.=C" 

1660 FOR TY=102 TO 161 STEP 19 

1670 T$=T1$(A) : TX=X: GOSUB170 

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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 



DELPHI BUREAU 



Checking Into Conference 



Welcome to Delphi Bureau! 
Those of you who have been 
with us over the past year or 
so have certainly seen some changes in 
the CoCo SIG. We started with very few 
members, but slowly have gained 
strength and now, are one of the busiest 
SIGs on Delphi. While the SIG staff is 
necessary for such success, the most 
important ingredient to our success has 
been you, the SIG member. Your sup- 
port and suggestions have made the 
CoCo SIG what it is: an excellent place 
to meet other computer users interested 
in the CoCo. Imagine, "talking" online 
with people from across the United 
States. Getting immediate help from the 
CoCo gurus. We have received several 
requests from the SIG membership for 
coverage of the SIG Conference on 
these pages. So, this month, Delphi 
Bureau will be devoted to Conference 
commands. 

Before I get started, however, I would 
like to say that all the requests have 
brought out a very important point. The 
CoCo SIG membership is steadily in- 
creasing. Because of this, we have new 
members each and every day. These 
people need our help in learning the 
ropes. Let us be patient and polite as we 
guide new members so that they, too, 
may enjoy the benefits to be found from 
our SIG. 

The CoCo SIG Conference area is a 
special area on Delphi which is designed 
so that you can directly interact with 
other users just as you might talk over 
a telephone. The main differences are 
that you can "talk" with more people at 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Ky. His username on 
Delphi is RAW BOW MAG. 

94 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

the same time, and that you must type 
instead of vocalize. Conference is just 
one of many important and beneficial 
ways to utilize Delphi for the exchange 
of information. If you need help from 
a specific user, you can arrange with 
him via Delphi Mail for a specific time 
to be online. Then you can page each 
other into a Conference. This can be 
one-on-one or an open meeting between 
several users. Some of you may recall 
the excellent open conference we held 
the night of July 30, 1986, the same day 
the Color Computer 3 was announced. 
Over 30 people attended the online 
conference and were able to hear first- 
hand about the new machine. Yet, 
Conference can be used even if you just 
want to say "hello." 



To get to the CoCo SIG Conference 
area, just enter CO at the CoCo SIG 
prompt. If you are at prompt level three, 
you will be greeted with the Conference 
menu. Items from this menu are: 

WHO — This command lists all users 
online in the CoCo SIG and places 
parentheses around the names of those 
users in the Conference area. It also lists 
the names of the Conference groups 
already created. 

JOIN — Allows you to join a group. 
Just enter JOIN group name. If the 
group exists and is not a private group, 
you will immediately become a member 
of the group. If it doesn't exist, Delphi 
will create it and you will become the 
group leader. 

PAGE — As its name implies, this 



DATABASE REPORT 



Our new OS-9 Online Special Interest 
Group is off to a solid start. We are 
approaching our first thousand messages 
in the forum as I write this and, over the 
last month, the OS-9 Online database has 
grown significantly. We have now offi- 
cially closed down the OS-9 topic area on 
the CoCo SIG and are referring all OS- 
9 uploads and many OS-9 forum mes- 
sages to OS-9 Online. 

Disk Extended Color BASIC users who 
have Color Computer 3s, Multi-Paks, 
and RS-232 packs may be interested in 
checking out our Data Communications 
section of the CoCo SIG, where Rick 
Adams (RlCKADAMS) has just uploaded 
Rickyterm, a "low voltage guiltware 
terminal emulator." Ricky term supports 
40-and 80-column display, as well as 
Xmodem file transfer, and offers some 
unique handling of strings that allows 
you to have instant single-key access to 
any string typed in or received on your 
terminal. This feature can be used to 
produce interesting effects in conference, 



permits auto-dialing, and facilitates a 
number of other applications. 

New in the OS-9 Online Database 

In the OS-9 Online SIG's general topic 
area, Rick Adams has sent us a text file 
describing graphics commands for Level 
II BASIC. Kevin Darling (KDARL1NG) has 
sent us a description of OS-9 Level II 
window codes and also a file that tells 
folks how to extract the Level II kernel 
from the just-released game Rogue. (This 
is for folks who wanted advance access 
to OS-9 Level II.) Jay Truesdale (jay- 
truesdale) has sent us a fascinating 
announcement from Atari about two 
interesting new products. 

In the Applications section of OS-9 
Online, Bill Brady (wbrady) has sent us 
a BASIC09 program to calculate sunrise 
and sunset times, a driver for the Radio 
Shack CGP-115 graph plotter, and a 
simple database program. In the Utilities 
section, Peter E. Durham (pedxing) has 
sent us a program for modifying various 



option allows you to page another user 
to the Conference area. 

NRME — This option allows you to 
change your name while in Conference. 
It doesn't change your username, but 
changes the way other users see your 
name. Most people choose to change to 
their first names. Others have special 
online nicknames they favor. 

EXIT — As with all areas of Delphi, 
you can leave the Conference area by 
entering EXIT or pressing CONTROL-Z. 

This is the basic Conference menu. It 
is available immediately upon entering 
the Conference area. Once you have 
joined a group, however, a more pow- 
erful set of commands and options 
becomes available to you. Some special 
commands, which will be covered in a 
future issue, are only available to the 
group leader. As stated above, the 
group leader is the person who created 
the group in the first place. If that 
person should leave the group for any 
length of time, he will lose his group 
leader status, and the second person 
who originally entered the group will 
take over. Following is a list of the 
immediate commands available while in 
a conference group. To see the list 
online, just enter /HELP. Notice that all 
commands must be prefaced with a 
slash (/). If they are not, the Conference 
software will just send them to all other 
members of the group, thinking it is 
text. 

/RNSNER — Issue this command 



when you want to accept a page from 
someone in another group. 

/BUSY — Use this command to disable 
/SENDs from users outside your confer- 
ence group. You can "ungag" yourself 
by typing /NOBUSY. 

/BYE — This command causes a 
complete logoff from Delphi. 

/CRNCEL — This command cancels 
all pages you have issued that are still 
pending or unanswered. 

/EXIT — Use this or CONTROL-Z to 
exit the group and return to the Con- 
ference menu. 

/GNRME name — This command al- 
lows any member of the conference 
group to change the name of the group. 

/HELP — Causes this list, without 
definitions, to be displayed to your 
screen. 

/JOIN groupname — This command 
allows you to become a member of a 
different group, thereby leaving the one 
you are presently in. You can also use 
/JOIN groupnumber. 

/MAIL — By issuing this command, 
you temporarily leave Conference and 
enter your Mail area. However, anyone 
who joins your group will think you are 
still there. They will see your name as 
being a group member. Because of this, 
it might be wise to use /NRME to change 
your name to something like IN MAIL or 

BE RIGHT BACK. 

/NRME nickname — Allows you to 
change your visible name from your 
username to a nickname. The change is 



not permanent and will not remain in 
effect after you leave the Conference 
area. Similarly, anyone not in the 
Conference area will see your normal 
username if they do a WHO. 

/PRGE username — You can page any 
other user in the CoCo SIG to your 
Conference group by issuing this com- 
mand with their username. The only 
exception is that they won't receive the 
page if they are presently gagged, or 
busy. Rather, you will get a message 
telling you they are not available. 

/REJECT — Allows you to reject a 
/PRGE from another user. If you send 
this command, the other user will re- 
ceive a message telling him you do not 
want to talk with him. 

/REPERT — Causes all text you send 
to other group members to be repeated 
back to your terminal as you sent it. You 
can turn this off by typing /NOREPERT. 

/RNRME nickname — If you want to 
know which nickname corresponds to 
which username, issue this command 
followed by the nickname in question. 

/SEND name-list message — This 
command allows you to send a semi- 
private message to those usernames 
listed in the name list. These usernames 
must be separated by commas if you use 
more than one. A message sent this way 
will be seen only by those people listed 
in name-list. It will not be seen by any 
other members of the Conference 
group. This is a great way to "talk 
behind someone's back," but be careful. 



keyboard server defaults for Level I, 
Version 1 and Version 2. Roger Smith 
(SMUDGER) has provided UNLOAD. 09, a 
procedure to unlink modules until they 
disappear from memory. 

In the Device Driver topic area, Toni 
Ryan (tntrhodan) has provided source 
code for a disk driver, allowing you to 
change stepping rates and number of 
heads and tracks. Michael Dziedzic 
(mjd) has uploaded various 80-column 
screen drivers for OS-9 Level I, including 
a particularly sharp 25-line driver. Vin- 
cent Figundio (vinfig) has sent us a 
RAM disk driver for OS-9 Level I on the 
CoCo 3. 

In the Telecommunications area, Bill 
Brady has been quite busy, uploading 
five new groups that comprise his BigT 
telecommunications package. These 
include BIGT, an Xmodem terminal 
program that allows auto-logs and baud 
rate changes, 510 and 5102. ASM 
(source code for ACIA pack drivers for 
BIGT for Level I and Level II OS-9), 
NUH05T (source code for his auto-log 
files), and NUHDST . I (object modules to 
create the auto-log files for B I GT). 



Lastly, in the Patches topic area, our 
own Don Hutchison (donhutchison) 
has given us Fast Boot, a utility that 
allows you to patch the boot file for OS- 
9 Level I, Version 2, to allow faster 
booting by utilizing 6-ms step rates 
during the boot process. 

New in the CoCo SIG Database 

In the General topic area, Mike 
Fischer (M1KE88) uploaded a discussion 
from a local BBS about the CoCo 3 
versus the IBM PC (with a few misunder- 
standings about the significance of clock 
speeds). 

In the Data Communications section, 
in addition to Rick Adams' debut of 
Rickyterm, we also have received a dialer 
program for MikeyTerm, from Ron 
Bihler (raab) and several Ham radio 
programs (including an RTTY program) 
from Rainbow's Dan Downard (DAN- 
downard). Of course, readers should 
note that, as of last month, we have 
online the latest revision of MikeyTerm 
(Version 4.3) by Mike Ward (mikeward) 
that supports the CoCo 3 in 80-column 
mode. Mike Ward, a SysOp on Compu- 



Serve, visits Delphi's CoCo SIG almost 
daily and is available to answer questions 
about MikeyTerm. 

Our Graphics database has been burst- 
ing with new files. Jim Stewart (wheel- 
jimmer) has sent us a stunning CoCo 3 
picture of a Unicorn (which he noted was 
drawn entirely using mouth control due 
to his disablity). Emery Mandel (eman- 
del) has sent us a Pink Floyd logo and 
a peace symbol for the CoCo 3. Mike 
Fischer has sent a revised driver for his 
bouncingball demo program, now allow- 
ing for a rainbow-colored ball. John 
Snyder (mythrandir) has provided an 
updated and improved version of his 
Hcopy utility for converting graphics 
screens. Pat Leathrum (leathrumra) 
has given us a picture of the Eagle Lunar 
Lander. Richard Trasborg (tras) has 
sent a number of images of women. 

I uploaded some alternate software 
fonts for the CoCo 3 under the HPRINT 
command, including a 128-character set 
that provides for letters in the same fonts 
used by the IBM PC color graphics 
adapter. Raymond Lueders (moon- 
shine) has also given us some female 



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If you forget the slash, or if it isn't the 
first character on a new line, all group 
members will see the message. 

^SQUELCH name — This command 
allows you to "block out" another user. 
Anything he sends you with /SEND or 
anything he says in Conference will not 
be sent to your terminal. To be polite, 
only use this if someone is really bug- 
ging you. It might be more polite to 
simply leave the group. 

/TRLK groupnumber — This com- 
mand allows you to temporarily talk to 
another conference group without leav- 
ing the group you are presently in. You 
may use this any number of times to 
become a semi member of any number 
of groups. You will be "listening" to any 
groups you pick, but you must use 
'TALK groupnumber to talk back. You 
can only talk to one group at any one 
time. You can leave a group that you 
joined with /TALK by using CONTROL- 
Z, /EXIT or /JOIN. You must use the 
group number for this command. As an 
example, if you want to listen and talk 
with group number 3 without leaving 
your present group, just type /TALK 3 
and press ENTER. 

/TIME — When you issue this com- 
mand, you will see what time of day it 
is (handy for long conferences), as well 
as how long you have been logged onto 
Delphi. 

/WHO — This command shows who is 
in Conference and in which groups. 
Each group listing has a unique group 
number. Use this number for /TALK. 



You will also see the usernames of all 
people currently in the CoCo SIG. 

/WHDIS username — This allows you 
to get the Delphi user profile for the 
indicated username. This assumes the 
user has entered a profile at the People 
on Delphi option of the main Delphi 
menu. 

More information can be found for 
these and other commands by typing 
/HELP 'subject while in Conference 
where subject is the command you want 
more information about. 

User Profiles Needed 

It has been pointed out that many 
users, especially newcomers to the SIG, 
have not yet posted their personal 
profiles. It is important that other 
members be able to find out a little 
information about you. It is especially 
useful to have this information when 
talking in Conference with other users. 
It lets you get a little background 
information on the people with whom 
you are communicating. All that is 
necessary is that you answer a few 
simple questions about yourself. First, 
at the CoCo SIG prompt, enter MEMBER 
to get to the membership directory. 
Then type I -AM and answer the 
prompts. Now, this profile is notthe one 
used when someone types /WHDIS in 
Conference. You need to go to the Main 
Delphi menu and enter PEOPLE. Then, 
again, type I -AM and answer the 
prompts. These simple procedures take 



no more than a few minutes and will 
enhance the friendly atmosphere on the 
SIG. While you are in these member 
directories giving your user profile, you 
might also enter WHO 1 5 MART YGOODMAN. 
I think you will find out quite a bit 
about this knowledgeable CoCo per- 
sonality. 

Are you one of the many who would 
like a "cleaner" way to hang up on 
Telenet? Well, in addition to simply 
typing HANG at the Telenet @ prompt 
after you log off Delphi, you can con- 
figure your pad setup to automatically 
hang up on Telenet when you log off 
Delphi. At the SIG > prompt, simply 
type: 



/PADSETUP 0:0,32:1 
/SAVE 



ENTER 
ENTER 



Having done that, the new pad setup for 
you will be saved as the default and 
from then on, until you change it, you 
will get an automatic hangup on Tele- 
net. There is no similar setup to cover 
Tymnet, as far as we know. If you want 
to "undo" the pad setup, use: 



/NDPADSETUP 
/SAVE 



ENTER 
ENTER 



Note: Do not play with these commands 
if you are direct-dialed (not using 
Telenet or Tymnet.) 

Hope this is helpful to you. □ 



images, and some cartoons as well. Bob 
Wharton (bobwharton) uploaded sev- 
eral nice CoCo 3 pictures (including 
Opus of Deathtongue and a set of NCAA 
college logos), and James Kenney (ken- 
ney) sent us his HD I SPLAY utility. 

Bob Montowski (GRAPHICSPUB) sent 
us a utility for viewing 16-level DS-69 
pictures on a CoCo 3. I should note that 
Microworks, the maker of the DS-69, has 
just released a B version of this unit that 
works on the CoCo 3 and, in the official 
driver software, supports display of 16 
gray-level pictures on the CoCo 3. Loren 
Howell (xenos) has sent us his BASIC 
drawing program, Hdoodle, for the 
CoCo 3. In the Music topic area Jona- 
than Griffin (JAG) has sent us his Sleigh 
Ride composition. 

In the Games database, David Ferreira 
(SKEEVE) has provided a Star Trek game 
for the CoCo 3. Jim Thompson (blud- 
geon) has sent two new games, including 
a Game of Life program. Ed Niklas 
(rainmaker) has sent us an Adventure 
game, and Martyn Phillips (norabder) 
has uploaded Starlanes. Steve Macri 



(dracman) has sent us a Chawks foot- 
ball game for the CoCo 3, and our own 
Cray Augsburg and Don Hutchison have 
sent us a number of new games, including 
the Realm of Nauga and a Motorcycle 
Jump game. 

In the Hardware Hacking section, I 
have uploaded instructions on how to 
hook a CoCo 3 RGB port to a Sony XBR 
or Profeel-type monitor. Dennis Skala 
(dennyskala) has sent information on 
modifying a PBJ CC bus for the CoCo 
3. 

In the Utilites and Applications sec- 
tion, Art Flexser (artflexser) has 
provided a program to allow viewing of 
all possible foreground, background, and 
border color sets on an 80- or 40-column 
text screen. This utility is part of Art's 
newly released ADOS3 package of DOS 
enhancements for CoCo 3 systems. 
Roger Haliman (rogerh) sent a Ram 
disk for the CoCo 3. Roger Krupski 
(hardwarehack) has sent a 512K me- 
mory tester, also for the CoCo 3. Ken 
Schunk (kenschunk) sent what I under- 
stand is a definitive patch for CoCo Max 



software to allow it to run on a CoCo 3 
(but only using old PAL chips or a Y 
cable). Don Hutchison has sent us a 35- 
to 40-track patch program, a disk editor, 
and a disk aid utility. Leonard Litberg 
(radical) has sent us a CoCo 3 screen 
utility. Derrick Kardos (DTG) has sent us 
a public domain word processor. Dave 
MacLeod (SCORPION2) has sent us Bac- 
pac Version 2.0. 

In the Source Code for 6809 section, 
Don Hutchison has sent us an RS-232 bit 
banger SEND routine. Alan DeKok 
(alandekok) has sent NE WATT R.R5M, a 
utility for manipulating CoCo 3 text 
attributes. Jim Thompson has sent us the 
source code for his Onedee game and for 
a Game of Life. In the CoCo 3 News and 
Information area, Art Flexser has seni us 
a file about the "reset bug" in the CoCo 
3, Alan Dekok has sent us a program to 
extract the control-alt-reset picture 
of the three Microware Mugs, and Ri- 
chard Trasborg and Jim Shoop (bazar) 
have sent us various sorts of patches for 
CoCo Max. 

— Marty Goodman 
Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 



98 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Hippity Hoppity Down the 

Bunny Trail! 




Children in our school enjoy coming to computer lab 
each week. However, holidays are especially awaited 
by the children. For this reason, my husband and I 
wrote Easter Patterns. Not only is the game enjoyable but 
it is educational as well. 

Easter Patterns includes the Easter bunny, Easter eggs 
and Easter music. The children are drilled in selecting 
patterns. Several eggs are displayed and the child must 
decipher the pattern and chose which egg is next. Each time 
the correct egg is chosen, the bunny hops across the screen 
and places an egg in the basket. If the wrong egg is chosen 
for the pattern, the child is asked to try again. When the 
child answers correctly three consecutive times, the 
difficulty of the pattern increases. If he cannot answer 
correctly more often than incorrectly, the program auto- 
matically defaults to the easier level. With 10 correct 
answers, the bunny completely fills the basket and hops 
away, basket and all, to the tune of "Here Comes Peter 
Cottontail." 

Easter Patterns provides the child with an interesting 
problem and quick rewards. 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
Petits at 135 Davis Drive, Luling, LA 70070. Please enclose 
an SASE for a reply.) □ 

Laura Petit holds a master's degree in curriculum and 
instruction, and is the computer coordinator at Our Lady 
of Prompt Succor School in West we go, Louisiana. Chris 
is a self-taught computer programmer. Together, they enjoy 
writing programs for the school's computer lab. \ 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 




More than a book s . 



A MILESTONE 




•1 




FrOrh Itifl publish £",H,\ 

THE fi.A * T ho C(JlQr Compyltr Vfon'h'y M.;0..-'--l- 



Iso Available! 



INt 




Today's programmers use short modules of 
readable code to build complex programs. The 
OS-9 operating system and the high level 
languages it brings you make the job easy. 

OS-9 has so n y th $ going for it that you 

need a guide as < sjve and thorough 

as The Com p.; , ; ide To OS-9 to 

show you how 

potential of thi- 

implementativu. 

philosophy. ; 

Co-authored : 

Dibble — two of • 

9 — The Cample 

demystifies the dyr 

gives the Color Computer iore-p 

flexibility than many of the high-cost co.n 

on the market :', . an 

confidence to reach 

With The Complete . 'Rainbow G.u?d* ' OS -5 
you will be prepared ke iuH advantage 
the multitask; rig 
standards for GqI . 
For only $ 



The Rainbow Guide To OS-9 Disk. An adjunct tc 
>ok for the tutorials, and the package of t 



ok. You'll want 
urs of typing in 



Coming soon also by Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble: 
A complete Rainbow guide to using OS-9 Level II on the Color Computer 3. 



□ Please send me The Complete 
Rainbow Guide To OS-9 for $19.95. 



Name 



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To OS-9 Disk (a package of two 
disks) for $31.* Does not include 
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Mail to: The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 per book shipping and handling in U.S. Outside U.S. add $4 per book. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. KY residents 
add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. ALL ORDERS IN U.S. FUNDS. 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation. 



13 
29 

48 
60 
76 
86 



142 
195 
209 
112 
179 
.41 



101 95 

109 100 

124 198 

143 41 

END 3 



The listing: EASTER 

1 DIM A$(28) ,N$(10) ,C(7) ,E0(16) , 
El (16) ,E2(16) ,E3 (16) , E4 (16) , E5 (1 
6) ,E6(16) ,E7(16) ,R1(40) ,R0(35) ,E 
X(ll) ,EY(11) ,CC(11) 

2 RESTORE: FOR 1=0 TO 28: READ A$ ( 
I): NEXT: FOR 1=1 TO 9 : READ N$(I): 
NEXT 

3 PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

4 COLOR4: CIRCLE (56, 129) ,40, ,1.2: 
CIRCLE (56, 129) ,2, , . 9 : CIRCLE (56 , 1 
45) ,20, , .3,0, .5. 

5 LINE(72,123)-(112,105) ,PSET:LI 
NE (72, 129) - (112, 129) ,PSET:LINE(7 
2,135) -(112,153) ,PSET 

6 LINE (40, 123 )-(0, 105) , PSET: LINE 
(40,129) -(0, 12 9) , PSET: LINE (40, 13 
5) -(0,153) ,PSET 

7 CIRCLE(30,54) ,20, ,2, .25, . 20 : CI 
RCLE(78,54) ,20, ,2, .35, .23 

8 PAINT (34, 90) ,2,4 : PAINT (79, 89) , 
2,4:PAINT(56,90) ,2,4 

9 CIRCLE (40, 111) ,4,3, .9:CIRCLE(7 
2, 111) ,4,3, .9 

10 'write title screen 

11 A$="EASTER" : DRAWBM120 , 70C4S1 

2 " : GOSUB20 l^^&^ESS^SSi 

12 A$=" PATTERNS": DRAW" BM93, 103": 
GOSUB20 

13 A$="BY":DRAW"BM170, 140S8C3":G 

osub20 ifl^KSSpP mD 

14 A$=" CHRIS AND" : DRAW" BM1 2 5, 160 

15 A$=" LAURA PETIT" :DRAW"BM110, 1 
80":GOSUB20 

16 'music — thanks paula & james 

17 PLAY"L4T303EGP64GAECP64L2CL4A 
P6404CP64CD03AL8FP64L2FL16GP16GP 
16L4GP32L16GP16GP16L4GP3 2BAFAL2G 
" 

18 FORDE=1TO400:NEXTDE:GOTO112 

19 ' subroutine to write to scr 

20 L=LEN(A$) : FOR 11=1 TO L:C=ASC 
(MID$(A$,I1,1))-65:IF C=-33 THEN 

DRAW " BR5 ": NEXT II ELSE IF C<0 T 
HEN C=C+47 

21 IF C=45 THEN C=26 

22 DRAW A$ (C) :NEXTI1: RETURN 



23 PCLS:NR=0 

24 FOR 1=0 TO 7: READ EX(I),EY(I) 
,C(I) 

2 5 'draw eggs 

26 CIRCLE(EX(I) ,EY(I) ) ,13,C(I) , . 
9, .25, .75: CIRCLE (EX (I) ,EY(I) ) ,20 
,C(I) , .5, .75, .25 

27 NEXT I 

28 PAINT(20,20) ,C(0) ,C(0) 

29 PAINT (80, 25) , C(l) ,C(1) : COLOR 
C(l) -1:DRAW"BM80, 25 ;S4 ;BU4L8R24B 
D4R2L27BD4R25" 

30 PAINT(144, 25) ,C(2) ,C(2) : COLOR 
C(2) -1:DRAW"BM144, 25 ;NL12NR16U5 

NU4NL9NR12D10ND4NL9NR12BR6D4U16B 
L12D16" 

31 POKE 178,104:PAINT(200,25) , ,C 
(3) 

32 COLOR C(4) : PAINT ( 25 , 60 ) , ,C(4) 
: COLOR C(4) -1: DRAW" BM2 5,60; NE8NF 
8NG7NH7NL12NR11" 

33 POKE 178,225:PAINT(85,60) , 



5) 
34 

(6) 
35 

7) 
36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 



POKE 17 8, 250: PAINT (14 5, 60) 

POKE 178, 13 : PAINT (200, 60) , 

' store the eggs in arrays 
'each egg array 3 2x19 



,C( 



/ f 



,c( 



8,15)-(40,34) ,E0,G 
68,15)-(100,34) ,E1,G 
128,15)-(160,34) ,E2,G 
188,15)-(220,34) ,E3,G 
8,50)-(40,69) ,E4,G 
68,50) -(100, 69) ,E5,G 
128, 50) - (160, 69) ,E6,G 
188,50) -(220,69) ,E7,G 



GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 

'draw rabbits on screen 
PCLS 



DRAW"BM160, 180 ; C2L4E3R3U 
1H3L7H2U2E2R2E1R2H10E3F12U10E3F3 
D10R2U1R2U1R12F2R1F2R1F2D1G6L6F4 

L14E3M162 , 18 P ""VH0^MhPjBI 

48 PAINT (160, 168) , 2 , 2 : PSET ( 154 , 1 
68, 3) : PSET (154, 167,3) : PSET ( 149, 1 
69,3) 

49 ' store rabbit in array Rl 

50 GET (145,153)-(199,180) , Rl , G 

51 PCLS : DRAW"BM194 , 180 ;C2G2L2H2E 
3U3E1U1E1U2G1L1U1H1U1E4H2L1H2U2E 
2R1E2R3F2R2F2D2G3F4D2G2F2D4F2D2G 
2L2H4G2" 

52 DRAW"BM192 , 153 ; C2H2U2H2U2H3G2 
D2F2D2F4 ;BM196, 153 ;E2U2E2U2E3F2D 
4G2D3G2D2" 

53 PAINT (200, 150) ,2, 2: PAINT (187, 
149) ,2, 2: PAINT (194, 158) , 2 , 2 : PSET 
(193,158,4) :PSET(198,158,4) :PSET 
(196, 160, 3) 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 101 



54 GET(180,140) -(211,183) ,R0,G 

55 FOR 1=0 TO 1 1 : READ EX(I),EY(I 
) ,CC(I) :CIRCLE(EX(I)+210,EY(I) ) , 
5,00(1) : PAINT (EX (I) +210, EY (I) ) ,C 
C(I) ,CC(I) : NEXT 

56 'draw basket 

57 DRAWBM2 6 , 182 ; C4L18M3 , 163R30M 
26,182": CIRCLE ( 16 , 162 ) , 18 , 4 , 1 . 3 , 
.5, .99 

58 A$="EASTER PATTERNS" : DRAW" BM1 
5 , 20 ; C 3 ; S8 " : GOSUB20 

59 A$="WHICH COMES NEXT? " : DRAW" B 
M0,90C4":GOSUB20 

60 GOTO 116 



61 'put eggs on screen 



62 X=X+40 


:0N 


E GOTO 63, 


64, 


65,66, 


67,68,69,70 








63 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E0,PSET: 


RETURN 










64 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E1 


, PSET: 


RETURN 










65 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E2 


, PSET: 


RETURN 










66 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E3 


,PSET: 


RETURN 










67 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E4 


, PSET: 


RETURN 










68 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E5 


, PSET: 


RETURN 










69 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E6 


, PSET: 


RETURN 










70 PUT(X, 


Y)- 


(X+32, Y+19) 


,E7 


, PSET: 


RETURN 











71 'egg pattern chosen here 

El holds the' correct answer 

72 SCREEN1,0:LL=0:Y=40:X=-40:C=R 
ND(5):0N C GOTO 7 3,74,75,76,77 

73 E=RND(6)+l:GOSUB62:GOSUB62 :E= 
E+l : GOSUB62 : E=E-1 : GOSUB62 : E1=E : G 
0T085 

74 E=RND(6)+l:GOSUB62 :E=E+1:G0SU 
B62 : GOSUB62 : E=E-1 : GOSUB62 : E1=E+1 
: GOTO 8 5 

75 E=RND(6)+l:GOSUB62 :E=E+1:G0SU 
B62 : E=E-1 : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : GOSUB62 : 
El=E-l:GOT085 

76 E=RND(4)+2 :GOSUB62 :E=E+1:G0SU 
B62 : E=E+1 : G0SUB62 : E=E-2 : G0SUB62 : 
E1=E+1:G0T08 5 

77 E=RND(8) : GOSUB62 : GOSUB62 : GOSU 
B62 :GOSUB62 :E1=E:G0T085 

78 LL=1:X=-40:C=RND(6) :0N C GOTO 
79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84 

79 E=RND(5) : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : G0SUB6 
2 : E=E+1 : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : GOSUB62 : E= 
E-3 :GOSUB62:El=E+l:GOT085 

80 E=RND ( 6 ) : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : G0SUB6 
2 : E=E+1 : GOSUB62 : GOSUB62 : E=E-1 : GO 



SUB62 : E1=E-1 : G0T085 

81 E=RND(6) : GOSUB62 : GOSUB62 : E=E+ 
l:GOSUB62:GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : GOSUB62 : 
El=E:GOT08 5 

82 E=RND(6) : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : G0SUB6 
2 : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : GOSUB62 : E=E-2 : GO 
SUB62 : E1=E+1 : GOT085 

83 E=RND(7) : GOSUB62 : E=E+1 : G0SUB6 
2 : GOSUB62 : GOSUB62 : E=E-1 : GOSUB62 : 
E1=E+1:G0T08 5 

84 E=RND ( 7 ) : GOSUB62 : GOSUB62 : E=E+ 
1 : GOSUB62 : E=E-1 : GOSUB62 : GOSUB62 : 
El=E+l:GOT08 5 

85 E=RND ( 8 ) :GOSUB62 

86 IF LL=0 THEN DRAW"BM177 , 7 5 ; 04 
S4U10NF5G5" 

87 IF LL=1 THEN DRAW"BM2 17 , 75 ; 04 
S4U10NF5G5" 

88 COLOR 4:LINE(X-4,Y-4)-(X+3 6,Y 
+22) ,PSET,B 

89 B$=INKEY$:IF B$=CHR$(32) THEN 
90 ELSE IF B$=CHR$(13) THEN 92 

ELSE 8 9 

90 X=X-40:E=E+1:IF E=9 THEN E=l 

91 GOSUB 62:GOT08 9 

92 IF E1=E THEN 94 ELSE 109 

93 'right answer 

94 C0L0R1: LINE (180,140)-( 211, 183 
) , PSET , BF: NN=ABS (NR-11) :NX=EX(NN 
)+210:CIRCLE(NX,EY(NN) ) ,5,CC(NN) 
+1 : PAINT (NX , EY (NN) ) , 1 , CC (NN) +1 : C 
IRCLE ( NX , E Y ( NN ) ) ,5,1 

95 FOR 1=150 TO 3 5 STEP -23: PUT ( 
1 , 155) - ( 1+54 ,182) ,R1, PSET: S0UND1 
47,2: LINE (1 , 155) - (1+54 , 182 ) , PSET 
,BF: NEXT: LINE (3 5, 155) - (89 , 182) ,P 
SET , BF 

96 IF NR=11 THEN 104 

97 PUT(35,140)-(66, 183) ,R0, PSET 

98 CIRCLE (EX (NR) , EY (NR) ) , 5 , CC (NR 
) : PAINT ( EX ( NR ) , EY (NR) ) ,CC(NR) , CC 
(NR) :SOUND100,2:NR=NR+1:IF NL<5 
THEN NL=NL+1 

99 FOR DE=1 TO 500: NEXT DE 

100 COLOR1:LINE(3 5,140)-(66,183) 
, PSET, BF : PUT ( 180 , 140) - (211, 183) , 
R0,PSET 

101 IF NL<3 THEN 72 ELSE IF LL=0 
THEN COLORl:LINE(X-4,Y-4)-(X+40 

,Y+36) ,PSET,BF 

102 IF LL=0 THEN NL=5:GOT078 ELS 
E 78 

103 'move rabbit off screen 

104 COLOR1:LINE(0,138)-(40,184) , 
PSET , BF : PUT ( 1 , 155) - ( 1+54 , 182 ) , Rl 
, PSET: GET (1+27, 155) -(1+54 , 182) ,R 
l,G:SOUND147, 3 : LINE (I , 155) -(1+54 
,182) , PSET, BF: PUT (0,15 5) -(27, 182 



102 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



I 




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) ,R1,PSET:S0UND147, 3 :LINE(0, 154) 
-(28, 184) ,PSET,BF 

105 PLAY"L4T303EGP64GAECP64L2CL4 
AP6404CP64CD03AL8FP64L2FL16GP16G 
P16L4GP32L16GP16GP16L4GP32BAFAL2 
G" 

106 A$="PLAY AGAIN? ": DRAW" BM4 2 , 1 
30C3S8" :GOSUB20 

107 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 107 EL 
SE IF A$="Y" THEN 2 ELSE IF A$=" 
N" THEN CLS:PRINT§252,"BYE BYE!" 
: END ELSE 107 

108 'wrong answer 

109 A$="TRY AGAIN": DRAW "BM50, 130 
C4S8":GOSUB20:FOR DE=1 TO 800 :NE 
XT DE:COLORl:LINE(49,117) -(170,1 
31) ,PSET,BF:NL=NL-1:IF NL=-1 THE 
N NL=0 

110 IF NL<3 AND LL=1 THEN COLOR1 
: LINE (X-4 , Y-4 ) - (X+40 , Y+36) , PSET, 
BF:NL=0:GOTO72 

111 GOT089 

112 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ (32 , 17 5) ; : PR 
INT@480,STRING$(31,175) ; 

113 FOR 1=1056 TO 1535 STEP 32 :P 
OKE I, 175: POKE 1+31, 175 : NEXT I:P 
RINT@455 , "one moment please"; 

114 PRINT@65, "HELP THE EASTER BU 
NNY FILL HIS" ; : PRINT@129 , "BASKET 

BY TELLING HIM WHICH" ;: PRINT@19 
3, "EGG COMES NEXT IN THE PATTERN 
. " ; : PRINT@257 , "PUSH THE SPACE BA 
R TO SELECT" ; : PRINT© 3 21," THE EGG 
PRESS enter WHEN THE" ; : PRINT© 
3 9 0, "CORRECT EGG APPEARS."; 

115 GOTO 2 3 SBM Mj Xaw ^l^ai lMM 

116 PRINT@455,STRING$(17,32) ; : PR 
INT@457 , "press any key" ; 

117 IF INKEY$=" " THEN 117 ELSE 7 
2 

118 'data for letters scale=8 

or higher, even #s only 



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119 
120 

R7" 
121 
6" 

122 DATA 

123 DATA 

124 DATA 

125 DATA 
1L2BR6" 

126 DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



127 
128 



DATA "U4E2F2D2NL4D2BR3" 
DATA "U6R3F1D1G1NL3F1D1G1L3B 

DATA "BR1H1U4E1R2F1BD4G1L2BR 

U6R3F1D4G1L3BR7 " 
NR4U3NR2U3R4BR3BD6" 
U3NR2U3R4BR3BD6" 
BR1H1U4E1R2F1BD2NL1D2G 

U3NU3R4NU3D3BR3" 
BR1R1NR1U6NL1R1BR4BD6" 
BU1F1R1E1U5NL1R1BR3BD6 

U3NU3R1NE3F3BR3" 
NU6R4U1BR3BD1" 
U6F2E2D6BR3" 
U6;M+5,+6;NU6BR3" 
BR1H1U4E1R2F1D4G1L2BR6 

U6R3F1D1G1L3BR7BD3 " 
BR1H1U4E1R2F1D3G1NH1NF 

U6R3F1D1G1L2NL1F3BR3" 
BU1F1R2E1U1H1L2H1U1E1R 

BR2U6NL2R2BR3BD6" 
BU1NU5F1R2E1U5BR3BD6" 
BU6D2F1D1F1ND1E1U1E1U2 

NU6E2NU1F2U6BR3BD6" 
U1E4U1BL4D1F4D1BR3" 
BU6D2F2ND2E2U2BR3BD6" 
NR4U1E4U1L4BR7BD6 " 
BU5E1R2F1D1G2BD1D1BR5" 
BR1BU5E1BR4BD6" 
BU3R4BR3BD3" 
BL1BD2R1NR1U6G1" 
BD1BL2NR4U1E1R1E2U1H1L 

BL2BD1F1R2E1H2E2H1L3 " 
BR1BD2U2NR1L3U1E3D4 " 
BD1BL2F1R2E1U2H1L3U2R4 

BR2BU3H1L2G1D4F1R2E1U1 

BL2BD2U1E4U1L4 " 
BL1BD2H1U1E1H1U1E1R2F1 
1D1G1L2 " 

BD1BL2F1R2E1U4H1L2G1D1 

20 , 25 , 0 , 80 , 25 , 2 , 140 , 25 , 
,4,20,60,3,80,60,3,140,6 
60,0 

12,178,2,18,17 8,3,2 4,17 
1,2,15,171,3,21,171,4,26 
,165,3,12,165,4,18,165,2 
3,30,165,4 /S\ 



129 DATA 

130 DATA 

131 DATA 

132 DATA 

133 DATA 
ii 

134 DATA 

135 DATA 
1G1L1BR6" 
13 6 DATA 

137 DATA 
2F1BR3BD5 

138 DATA 
13 9 DATA 

140 DATA 
BR3BD6" 

141 DATA 

142 DATA 

143 DATA 

144 DATA 

145 DATA 

146 DATA 

147 DATA 

148 DATA 

149 DATA 
2G1" 

150 DATA 

151 DATA 

152 DATA 
ii 

153 DATA 
H1L3 " 

154 DATA 

155 DATA 
D1G1NL2F 

156 DATA 
F1R3" 

157 DATA 
3,200,2 5 

0,2,200, 

158 DATA 
8,4,9,17 
,171,2,6 
,24,165, 



104 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Woe be unto those he captures — he doesn 't take prisoners 



Battlin' 
Blue 




Bert hates barriers. Religious, 
social, racial, economic, politi- 
cal .. . it doesn't matter. Bert 
hates them all. Give him half a chance 
and he'll try to win over the Intolerants 
with his winning smile and cool logic. 
But throw a barrier in his way and look 
out. Bert gets mean, real mean. He'll 
leap into a nearby phone booth and 
emerge as Battling Blue Bert, Barrier 
Buster. 

Barriers shatter before him as he 
races after the bigotted and the narrow- 
minded within his range. Woe be unto 
those he catches. Battling Blue doesn't 
take prisoners. 

The only hope the Intolerants have is 
that Battling Blue will calm down and 
become his old, smiling, friendly self 



James Noble is a graphics programmer 
for the U.S. Navy. His work has re- 
ceived spots on national and public 
television as well as write-ups in several 
local papers and Defense Department 
periodicals. He holds a bachelors de- 
gree in electronic engineering and has 
published nearly two dozen short sto- 
ries, mysteries and articles. 



before he reaches them, and that they 
can create enough barriers to prevent 
him from reaching another phone 
booth. 

The Intolerants are tricky. They look 
very much like Bert himself (except they 
don't smile). Often they hide behind the 
phone booths, or even each other, 
hoping the Barrier Busters won't find 
them. Sometimes they'll even stand in 
front of a phone booth so he can't see 
it to transform himself into Battling 
Blue. 

Ultimately, the goal of Bert is to 
break the confines of all prejudice once 
he has eliminated its supporters. 

Game Strategy 

Barrier Buster is an action game 
which will fascinate both children and 
adults for many hours. The game is 
designed with extensive usage of the 
random number generator function call 
(RND) to set up the playing area, thus it 
is highly unlikely that the player will 
ever play exactly the same game twice. 

The object of the game is simple. Bert, 
the smiling, blinking figure, must over- 
come the four Intolerants by occupying 



By James A. Noble 



their positions. Once he has captured all 
four of them, he must break through 
one of the walls making up the playing 
area. 

Random barriers form during the 
course of play which Bert cannot break 
through in his normal form. In order to 
get to the Intolerants behind these 
barriers and in order to break through 
one of the walls of the playing area when 
he has captured them all, he must enter 
one of the four phone booths (by occu- 
pying its space) and be changed into 
Battling Blue Bert, capable of breaking 
through the barriers. Unfortunately for 
Bert, this transformation does not last 
for more than about seven seconds. 

Sometimes the Intolerants hide be- 
hind each other (two or three deep 
occasionally) or behind a phone booth. 
Many times they stand in front of a 
phone booth so the player can't see it 
(although if Bert captures the Intoler- 
ant, he also feels the effect of the phone 
booth). 

The game is designed for a CoCo with 
Extended BASIC. One joystick con- 
nected to the right joystick port is 
required. 

Once you've entered the program, 
simply type RUN to begin the game. A 
title page appears, then after a few 
seconds, the playing area, Bert, four 
Intolerants and four phone booths 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 105 



April 10-12 



U) 

(0 




O 



r 






Come meet 
CoCo Cat 
in person! 



+ 





A A A A A 



V 



eeJ the energy of the city. Fresh, provocative. 

rThis spring, there's another glittering light in 
the Chicago skyline — RAINBOWfest! 
Explore stimulating new ideas and broaden your 
horizons at RAINBOWfest, the only computer 
show dedicated exclusively to your Tandy Color 
Computer. The CoCo Community congregates 
April 10 to 12 at the Hyatt Regency Woodfield and 
we want you to join us. 

This is where commercial distributors gather to 
show off new and innovative products for the first 
time. Where RAINBOW authors and CoCo experts 
come to share their expertise in seminars and one- 
to-one chats. Where hardware and software sell 
for low RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace for visiting exhibits and at- 
tending the many free seminars on ail aspects of 
your CoCo, You'll see demonstrations, have op- 
portunities to experiment with software and hard- 
ware, and meet with some of the most creative and 
forward-thinking people in the industry today, 
RAINBOW publisher and editor Lonnie Falk will 
be there along with many of the Falsoft staff, 
ready to answer your questions and give you the 
1 Inside scoop" on the CoCo. 

Only 15 minutes from O'Hare International Air- 
port. RAINBOWfest provides a perfect get-away 
weekend not only for the computer fanatic, but for 
the whole family. We're right across the street 
from the world's largest mall and just 30 minutes 
from downtown Chicago. 

The show begins Friday evening with the exhibit 
hall open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday's action 
is nonstop beginning with the 8 a,m, CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast (separate tickets required). Our 
featured speaker is Greg Zumwalt r president of 
ZCT software. Exhibits and seminars will be in full 
swing from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 11 a m, to 4 
p.m. on Sunday. That will be hardly enough time 
to see and do everything you'll want to, between 
scheduled events and our new Educational Sand- 
box for the kids — plus a special appearance by 
CoCo Cat, too! 

You can get RAINBOWfest tickets directly from 
THE RAINBOW. We'll include a reservation form 
so you can take advantage of the Hyatt Regency's 
special room rates of $60 for single or double oc- 
cupancy. 

For the same POSH treatment many of our ex- 
hibitors enjoy, have your travel arrangements and 
hotel reservations handled through RAINBOW af- 
filiate POSH Travel Assistance of LouJsviJIe. Call 
POSH at (502) 893-331 1. All POSH services are 
available at no charge to RAINBOWfest patrons. 



•Eli 



CoCo Community Breakfast 

Greg Zumwalt — CoCo 3 Programmer 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Greg Zumwait, 
one of the early CoCo specialists who has created everything from flight simulators 
to computer games. An independent programmer and computer designer, Greg is 
one of the few people Tandy has selected to write software for the new Color 
Computer 3. He owns ZCT Software, of Tulsa, Okla., and also writes software for 
business applications in such areas as aviation, the oil industry and the medical field. 



RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois q 
Dales: April 10-12, 1987 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $60 per night single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: April 3, 1937 

Join us at a future RAtNBQWtestt 

RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: October 9-11, 1987 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $86 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: October 2, 1987 

FREE T-Shirtto first five ticket orders received from each state. 

First 500 ticket orders received get the First Rainbow Book 
of Adventures. 



Authors Dale Puckett, Peter Dibble and Dr. 
Michael Plog will be autographing copies of 
their books both days in the exhibit hall. 



Bill Bernico 

INDEPENDENT PROGRAMMER 

Writing in BASIC 

Peter Dibble 

PROGRAMMER AND AUTHOR 

OS-9 Level II 

Art Flexser 

PRESIDENT, SPECTRO SYSTEMS 

Adding Features to 
the BASIC ROMS 



John Ross 

ROSS COMPUTER SERVICES 

Telecommunications 

Mark Siegel 

TANDY PRODUCT MANAGER 

Selling Programs to Tandy 

Martin Goodman, M.D. 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

CoCo Consultations Line 
Also, Custom CoCo 1, 2, 3 



▲ SPECIAL EVENT! 

We are pleased to announce The Educational Sandbox, a joint Tandy/ 
RAINBOW effort. This is a computer workshop for RAINBOWfest kids. 
There will be two sessions on both Saturday and Sunday. One workshop 
will be for the kindergarten through third-grade set, and the other for fourth 
through seventh graders. Each workshop will last between 45 minutes and 
one hour, and will give the children and their parents hands-on experience 
in using Tandy computers and software. 



Free Seminars 

Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW TECHNICAL EDITOR 

Intro to our Delphi CoCo SIG 



Jim Reed 

RAINBOW MANAGING EDITOR 

Writing for Publication 



Dan Downard 

RAINBOW TECHNICAL CONSULTANT 

Hardware Projects 

A. Buddy Hogan 

INDEPENDENT PROGRAMMER 

Integrating CoCo 3 Into 
Organizational Work 

Dr. Michael Plog 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Educational Uses of the Machine 
Also, Statistics and the CoCo 



Dick White 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Spreadsheets for the CoCo 



Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Beginners Overview of BASIC09 
Also, Beginners Overview of OS-9 



Kevin Darling 
Carl Kreider 

INDEPENDENT PROGRAMMERS 

OS-9 Internals 

Erik Gavriluk 
Greg Miller 

THE MILLILUK PARTNERSHIP 

CoCo 3 Graphics 



William Barden, Jr. 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

OS-9 Languages 



YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance sale price. Breakfast 
tickets require advance reservations. 

Please send me: Name (please print) 



Three-day tickets at $9 each 



total 



One-day tickets at $7 each total 
Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 

Saturday CoCo Breakfast at $12 each total 

Handling Charge $1 $ 1QQ 



TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt Re- 
gency Woodfield ($60, single or double room). 



Address 



City 



State _ 



ZIP 



Telephone 

Company 

□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 



Exp. Date 
Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: April 3, 1987. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will also 
be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky call (800) 847-0309. 



appear. If any of the figures fail to 
appear, it means that one or more of the 
Intolerants or phone booths is hidden 
or has been captured immediately (hid- 
ing behind Bert). Check for small yellow 
markers along the left border. A marker 
will appear each time an Intolerant is 
overcome. 

Using the joystick, maneuver Bert 
(the smiling yellow figure) between the 
points marking the rows and columns 
of the playing area and around the red 
barriers which are forming, and over- 
come the Intolerants (the yellow 
frowners) by positioning him over their 
locations on the playing area. Be certain 
you cover each Intolerant completely. 
Leave any piece behind and you won't 
score a capture. 

Should Bert or an Intolerant become 
trapped behind the forming barriers, 
move Bert to a phone booth and he will 
be transformed. For the next seven 
seconds, Blue Bert may crash through 
the barriers to reach the Intolerant, but 
be careful. The barriers can reform 
themselves and can trap Bert after he 
has returned to his smiling, mild- 
mannered self. 

Once you have captured all four 
Intolerants, you must penetrate the 
outer wall of the playing area in order 
to win the game. This can only be 
accomplished if you have captured all 
four Intolerants and are Battling Blue 
Bert (so keep a phone booth in reserve 
to break through the playing area). 

Should Bert become hopelessly sur- 
rounded, press BREAK to end the game. 
Type RUN to play again. 

Count your phone booths and Intol- 
erants when the game begins. There 
should be four of each. If not, look for 
the markers on the left edge. They will 
indicate whether one or more of the 
Intolerants was captured immediately 
because it occupied the same row and 
column position as Bert. If that is not 
the case, one or more of the Intolerants 
is hidden and that will affect your play. 
Unless you score more than one capture 
when you pick up all the visible Intol- 
erants, you will have to go around 
searching the phone booths to pick up 
the hidden ones. 

If Bert appears at the beginning of the 
game as Battling Blue, it indicates one 
of the phone booths occupied Bert's 
position. If not, it means that a phone 
booth is hidden behind another or that 
it's behind an Intolerant. This will effect 
your play also. 

Go for the Intolerants early in the 
game while there are few barriers. You 
won't get the chance later on when you 



will need a phone booth for just about 
every action you make. 

Given a choice, stay close to the outer 
wall. The probability of a random 
barrier appearing along the outer wall 
is half that of barriers appearing any- 
where else. 



"Go for the 
Intolerants early in 
the game while there 
are few barriers. You 
won J t get the chance 
later on when you will 
need a phone booth 
for just about every 
action you make. " 



The Program 

The first four lines of the program 
provide a title page for the user to look 
at while the variables are being initial- 
ized and graphics figures are being 
created (lines 50 through 450). The 
playing field and figures are revealed by 
the SCREEN command on Line 460. 
Lines 470 through 670 mark the main 
iterative loop for the action which takes 
place. 

First, the position of Bert on the 
playing field (XM and YM) is compared 
with the position of each of the four 
Intolerants (XD and YD) and the four 
phone booths (XNandYN)in a local loop 
running from lines 470 to 500. Should 
Bert's position correspond to that of an 
Intolerant, a subroutine call is made to 
Line 940 where the horizontal variable 
of the Intolerant's position is changed 
to zero. This essentially takes the Intol- 
erant out of the field of play. A PSET 
instruction at Line 950 changes a blue 
dot along the left border into yellow to 
mark the capture of the Intolerant. 

Should Bert's position match that of 
a phone booth, a subroutine call is made 
to Line 850 where the phone booth is 
removed in similar fashion so that it 
may not be reused. 

A combination down-counter varia- 
ble and flag (BF) is set to 20 to initiate 
and maintain Bert as Battling Blue. See 
lines 590 and 650 where BF is checked 
and note the subroutine lines they call. 
When BF is not zero, the ELSE portion 
of an IF-THEN-ELSE statement on Line 



780 calls a subroutine at 800 which 
loads up the Battling Blue figure with 
a PUT. Additionally, the BF flag is 
reduced by a count of one. 

The Kfi variable in Line 510 adds all 
of the Intolerants' horizontal positions. 
If all of the Intolerants are captured, 
then Kfi will equal zero and can be used 
later as a flag to permit Battling Blue to 
penetrate the outer wall of the playing 
area if he is so inclined. 

In Line 520, the random vertical 
position for the starting point of the 
barrier wall to be drawn is selected 
(RND (6) *24 + 12). Likewise for the 
starting horizontal position (RND 
(B)*24+20). These are converted to 
string variables by STR$ function calls. 
The additions of 12 and 20 are merely 
offsets to center the barriers on the 
screen. The multiplication by 24 is to 
keep beginning position of the barrier 
wall to be drawn at evenly spaced 
positions (the distance between the rows 
and columns) over the playing area. The 
direction and distance the barrier is 
drawn is selected by randomly choosing 
one of four array string variables 
(1$ ( RND ( 4 ) ). These were initially set to 
□24, D24, L24 and R24 in lines 130 and 
140. Place DRfiN and BM at the beginning 
and you end up with the complete 
instruction: 

DRfiW"BM"+STR$(RND(B)*24+20) 
+", "STR$(RND(6)*24+12)+I$ 
( RND ( 4 ) ) 

Let's assume RND(B) generates a 
number 4 on one pass, RND ( 6 ) a 1 and 
RND ( 4 ) a 2. Solving for the equation we 
have: 

DRfiW "BM"+STR$(116)+", "+STR$ 
(36)+I$(2) 

Now convert the computed numbers to 
strings and replace I$(2) with the 
proper string constant. 

DRfiW "BM"+"116"+", "+"3S"+ 
"D24" 

Remove the pluses and we get: 

DRfiN "BM116,36D24" 

Many will recognize this as a stand- 
ard Extended BASIC DRfiW command 
which draws a line from Position 116 
horizontal and 35 vertical, down 24 
positions. What we have done is created 
a BASIC command on the fly and then 
executed it. The interpreter makes this 
sort of controlled random drawing 
possible. 



108 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Next, the horizontal and vertical 
position of the joystick is read and 
tested. Depending on these values, IX 
and IY are each set to -12, 0 or +12. 
These numbers are significant in that 
they determine Bert's or Battling Blue's 
movements left, right, up or down by 
IX/2 or IV/2 (lines 680, 700, 730, 780) 
plus they are employed to test for a red 
barrier impeding Bert's movements in a 
PPDINT instruction (lines 680 and 730). 

Should Bert be changed into Battling 
Blue, the PPDINT test is left out and his 
movement is unimpeded (lines 700 and 
780) thus permitting his movement to 
overrun barriers and thereby eliminate 
their appearance on the screen. 



To keep Bert (or Battling Blue) in the 
center of the rows and columns of the 
playing field, two variables, XT and YT, 
are employed in the following manner: 

XR=(XM-B)/24 YR=(YM)/24 
XT=XR-INT(XR) TY=YR-INT ( YR ) 

The INT function converts XR and YR 
to integer. This eliminates any decimal 
fractions. YT and XT will be zero only 
when XM and YM (plus their constants to 
center the playing area) can be divided 
evenly by 24. YT and XT can then be used 
to determine if Bert can be moved 
vertically (XT=0) or horizontally (TY=0). 

If Bert has overcome all the Intoler- 



ants (KA^O), his position is checked to 
see if he exceeds the confines of the 
playing area (Line 660). If so, the 
winning message is displayed. 

There you have it. Don't forget to 
save your program on tape or disk. And 
remember when you start designing 
your own programs that some instruc- 
tions employing strings can be con- 
structed of variables and constants 
generated by the program itself. Good 
luck! 

( Questions about this program may 
be directed to Mr. Noble at 163 Rolling 
Road, Lexington Park, MD 20653. 
Please enclose an SASEfor a reply. )D 



250 . 
490 . 
750 . 
END 



.48 
189 
180 
181 



The listing: BLUEBERT 
10 CLS 

20 SCREEN 0,0 

30 PRINT § 167, "BATTLING BLUE BER 

mil 

40 PRINT@264 , 11 ' BARRIER BUSTER'" 

50 PMODE 1,1 

60 PCLS 

70 DIM I$(4) 

80 DIM XN(4):DIM YN(4) 

90 DIM XO(4):DIM YO(4) 

100 DIM VC(0,28):DIM V(0,28) 

110 DIM 0(0,28) :DIM B(0,28) 

120 DIM VB(0,28) 

130 I$(1)="U24":I$(2)="D24" 

140 I$(3)="L24":I$ (4)="R24" 

150 GET (2,2)-(22,22) ,VC,G 

160 COLOR 2,1 

110 DRAW "BM34,2R16D20L16U20D6BR 

4R2 BR4R2BD2 BL4D4 BD4BR4 L8 " 

180 GET (32,2)-(52,22) ,0,G 

190 DRAW "BM64,2R16D20L16U20D6BR 

4R1BR7R1BD4BL4L1BL4BD2D2R8U2" 

200 GET (62,2)-(82,22) ,V,G 

210 COLOR 3,1 

220 DRAW "BM94,2R16L2D20L12U20D1 
0R12" 

230 GET (92,2)-(112,22) ,B,G 

240 DRAW "BM124,2R16D20L16U20BD4 

BR4R8BD2BL1L1BL3L1BD4BR2R0BD4BL4 

R8" 

250 GET (122,2)-(142,22) ,VB,G 



260 PCLS 

270 COLOR 4,1 

280 DRAW "BM20,12R216D168L216U16 
8" 

290 PAINT (0,0) ,3,4 

300 FOR V=l TO 4 

310 XN(V)=24*RND(8)+32 

320 YN(V) =24*RND(6) +24 

330 XO(V)=24*RND(8)+32 

340 YO(V) =24*RND(6) +24 

350 PUT (XO(V) -10, YO(V) -10) -(XO( 

V)+10, YO(V)+10) ,0,PSET 

360 PUT (XN(V) -10, YN(V) -10) - (XN( 

V)+10,YN(V)+10) ,B,PSET 

370 NEXT V 

380 FOR V=l TO 8 

390 FOR Z=l TO 6 

400 PSET(20+24*V,12+24*Z,4) 

410 NEXT Z:NEXT V 

420 XM=2 4*RND(8)+3 2 

430 YM=24*RND(6) +2 4 

440 CX=XM:CY=YM 

450 CLS 

460 SCREEN 1,0 
470 FOR Z=l TO 4 

480 IF (XM=XN(Z) AND YM=YN ( Z ) ) T 
HEN GOSUB 850 

490 IF (XM=XO(Z) AND YM=YO(Z)) T 
HEN GOSUB 940 
500 NEXT Z 

510 KA=XO(l)+XO(2) +XO(3)+XO (4) 
520 DRAW "BM"+STR$ (RND ( 8 ) * 2 4+20) 
+", "+STR$ (RND (6) *24+12)+I$ (RND (4 

)) 

530 J1=JOYSTK(0) : J2=JOYSTK (1) 
540 IX=0 

550 IF Jl<2 THEN IX=-12 
560 IF Jl>61 THEN IX=12 
570 YR=(YM)/24 



1 

April 1987 THE RAINBOW 109 





Those Great RAINBOW Prog 
Without All the Fuss! 
Subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE! 



Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 



Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe \o rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AN D 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow ontape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $105 for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 
bill. 




DISK USERS: RAINBOW ON DISK 
IS NOW AVAILABLE! 

All the programs from the rainbow — includ- 
ing OS-9 — are now available on disk. For 
more information, see Page 168 of this issue. 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, RAINBOW ON tape can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of the rainbow's Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past April issues are also 
available for immediate download in the rainbow ON tape 
Database area in the rainbow's Color Computer SIG on 
Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



RAINBOW ON TAPE is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOW ON tape, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, (credit card orders only) call 
(800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call (502) 228-4492 



Programs from Our Past April Issues: 



April 1986 — The CoCoZone, Adventure contest Grand Prize 
graphics winner; The Maze of Moycullen, Adventure Contest 
16K winner; IRA/Keogh Estimator, a financial planning 
program that allows for payroll deductions; House Value, a 
program to assess the market value of your home; College 
Expense, shows how to save for a child's higher education; 
Refund-A-File, a filing program for the avid and occasional 
refunder; Electrical Cost Calculator, figures cost projections 
on home utilities; Plantlog, a database for individual plant 
requirements; Bassmate, a program that produces the right 
lure to use by entering water conditions; CoCo-Handiman, a 
utility to estimate materials and costs for home improve- 
ments; Shoplist, prints a shopping list by entering meal 
menus; and Life Skill II, helps analyze the place value of 
numbers and digits. Plus eight additional programs. 

April 1985 — CoCo Payroll, part two of a complete small 
business payroll system; Landlord's Helper, part two of a 
program that manages rental property; Surface, a Simulation 
that takes you to the North Pole; Cardio, a Simulation that 
transforms you into a heart specialist; The Adventure Writer's 
Toolkit, offers routines for writing your own Adventure; Run 
for Your Life, a survival game; Concert, an animated graphics 
program; and Porsche, a graphics representation of the 
Porsche 930 Turbo. Plus five additional programs. 

April 1984 — Seventeen programs from our Gaming 
(gambling) issue. 



580 YT=YR-INT(YR) 

590 IF BF=0 THEN GOSUB 680 ELSE 
GOSUB 700 
600 1Y=0 

610 IF J2<2 THEN IY=-12 
620 IF J2>61 THEN IY=12.| gy 
630 XR=(XM-8)/24 " * 

640 XT=XR-INT(XR) 

650 IF BF=,0 THEN GOSUB 7 30 ELSE 
GOSUB 780 



660 
OR 
670 
680 
T=0 
690 
700 
710 
720 
730 
1=0 
740 



IF XM>23j3 OR XM<26 OR YM>174 
YM<18 THEN GOTO 970 
GOTO 470 

IF PPOINT(XM+IX,YM) <>4 AND Y 
THEN XM=XM+IX/2 
RETURN 

IF YT=0 THEN XM=XM+IX/2 
IF KAOJ3 THEN GOSUB 88 0 
RETURN 

IF PPOINT(XM, YM+IY)<>4 AND X 
THEN YM=YM+IY/2 
PUT (CX-10,CY-lj3) -(CX+10,CY+ 
10) ,VC,PSET 

750 PUT (XM-10, YM-1J3) -(XM+lj3,YM+ 

10) ,V,PSET 

760 CX=XM:CY=YM 

770 RETURN 

780 IF XT=0 THEN YM=YM+IY/2 
790 IF KA<>0 THEN GOSUB 910 
800 PUT (CX-lj3,CY-l£) -(CX+lj3,CY+ 

10) ,VC,PSET 

810 PUT (XM-l£,YM-10)-(XM+lj3,YM+ 
10) ,VB,PSET 
820 CX=XM:CY=YM 
BF=BF-1 
RETURN 
XN ( Z ) =0 
BF=20 
RETURN 

IF XM>224 THEN XM=2 24 
IF XM<3 2 THEN XM=3 2 
RETURN 

IF YM>168 THEN YM=168 
IF YM<24 THEN YM=24 
RETURN 
XO(Z)=j3 

PSET(1£, Z*3j3,2) 
RETURN 
PCLS 

PRINT @225,"BERT BASHES THE 
BARRIERS AGAIN" 
990 FOR 1=1 TO 14j3j3:NEXT I 
1000 CLS 
1010 STOP 



830 
840 
850 
860 
870 
880 
890 
900 
910 
920 
930 
940 
950 
960 
970 
980 



The CoCo Bookkeeper 

A Complete Bookkeeping Pockoge Fof Ihe Co/or Computer 

FEATURES. 

* MtGH WSOHTTtON DISPLAY - A 51x21 M-f&i screen with true upper 
cava choiocters 

* HJSJNESS OfrlENTCD - Ail popuior ledger ond Journals aie included (doufrn* 
entry ooneroi journal. general ledge* . Af. AP sales, purcnoses. cosn receipts A 
disbursements. Income S> expense statement, tnai balance borw recon 
dilation, yeor-end closings & openings 

* USSf-fli1ENDlY-Thepr»grom lidrtven by pop-up menus TronsJe< homonyone 
ledger/journal to any other Is accomplished wtm one or rwo keystrokes 

" POWIHRJL ■ User has the option o< normal or "Megados operation Megooos 
provides an inniol 2i>4 granules or sloroge on a specially (ormoned aisketie 
(Included with the program) and 6 millisecond operational speed This 
pr»grom Is designed to rec»gnUe disk storage space as memory - tt win wrtie 
and rood flies up to 252 granules (560K) long 

* SJMPtlOTY- AJl postings are Inrtiolly mode to the general foumal Postings TO or 
other journals and ledgers. Including preparation of a tnai balance and mo 
statement of Income ond e*pervse is a fully outomcntc. menu-conrro'leo 
function 

* rtMWTCH RJNCTTOfr - The use* can obtain a hardcopy or any work ooauced by 
the p»#gram Changes of baud rate (300-9600) are accomplished wr»h a 
tingle keystroke 

* DOCUMENTATION - Complete and comp/ehensJwe documentation covering 
every aspect of operation Is suppJ»ed In slmpie. non-techrucal terms. Actuo: 
' keyoble" examples are given throughout 

The CoCo Bookkeeper operotes occcxdlng to ger^eroiiy occepted 
cx: counting procedures, tt will take o business from opening day to the 
final balance sheet and profit and loss statement at income tax time 
then open the books tor the following year 

32K ond one disk drive required Supports multl-dnve systems 
CoCo 2, 3 Compatible 



$79.95 



White Fire 

Of Bemlty 




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*y*ng to oo< out- 

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Adventure In 
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An anirinolGC gior.h cs adventure 
Borile monste's ond discover treasures 
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various heroes ir- cxiient Greek myth- 
ic^y 1 Vou goal is ',c j,-r tr.ehondof me 
beauiiful Atalonio the swrft-runnng 
huntress Bui beware ot me penis and 
Obstocles thot stared in your woyos you 
journey through anaen' Greece 1 Four 
voice music and sound efiocis. outo 
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over 250 locotions 64 K Mochme ion- 
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The Andrea CoCo 

By Art Martin 

Another great animated graphics 
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nobody would ever guess that me 
closest thing you owned too real yacnr 
was the one over your fireplace It was 
in the bor that you heard rumors of 
earth-shattermg events about 'o lake 
ploce You stop out onto the wharf to 
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Call Or Write For Free Catalog! 
Authors- We're Seeking Good Software Now! 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 111 




Exploring CoCo Graphics 



By Joseph Holar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



hat better way to prepare you 
beginning CoConauts for a 
voyage through CoCo graph- 
ics than to whet your appetites with a 
preview of coming adventures? 

Belinda Ramsey, my vivacious dance 
instructor at the Fred Astaire Fran- 
chised Dance Studio in Inverness, 
Florida, gave me the original idea and 
inspired and encouraged me to develop 
the forthcoming series of 20 tutorials 
concerning the graphics capabilities of 
the old 16K, ECB, cassette-based 
CoCo, 

Belinda pushed and prodded me to 
keep creating. So, what better way to 
show my appreciation for her support 
than to give her recognition? 

To keep the newcomer salivating in 
anticipation of working with the new 
fun graphics series, we will present a 
graphics panel to perform double duty. 
A heartfelt thank you to Belinda Ram- 
sey and a tutorial for the patient new- 
comer to CoColand. 

Key in Listing 1. Using the Hi- Res 
screen in Line 10, beginning at location 
0,0 in steps of 2 units, we drew a moire 
design around a central point, 1 28,96, 
in a clockwise direction in lines 20 
through 90. 

Four separate LINE loop routines 
were used to move J around the screen. 

We drew the Roman font letters that 
comprise the name "Belinda Ramsey" 
and assigned them variable names of 
our choice in lines 100 through 200. In 
Line 2 10, we located and placed the 
letters onto the screen, in size S8, using 
concatenation. 

Now run this. Note inthelower right- 
hand corner, a pause makes the display 



Florida- based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer and special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 

112 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



hang up for a second before continuing 
on to completion. 

Save Listing 1 . Before you enter NEW, 
let's fool around. Change the 2 to 4 in 
lines 20 and 60, then run and press 
BREAK, Now, try changing the 4 to a 3 
in lines 20 and 60, and run, Why is 4 
the preferred value instead of 3? Press 
BREAK. Why can't you use 4 in place of 
2 in lines 40 and 80? Try it and see! 

Restore the original 2 in lines 20, 40, 
60 and 80, and run. Look at the pause 
that results as CoCo reaches 255,191 
in the lower right-hand corner. Now 
press BREAK. 

Keep in mind that we are in a creative 
frenzy. Suppose we wanted to begin at 
255, 1S1 and go in aclockwise direction 
in order to eliminate that glitch? This is 
one way to make the display appear 
smoothly. On your own, figure out how 
to rearrange lines 20 through 90 to 
create this desired effect. 

Look at Listing 2, If you prefer, 
replace lines 20 through 90 in Listing I 
with those in Listing 2. Change LINE0 
and run. I like this placement better 
because after the moire border is com- 
pleted, CoCo jumps up and to the left 
to display the text. Do you want to save 
Listing 2? 

The sad fact in this true-life situation 
is that the glitch in Listing I was an 
undetected homemade error by yours 
truly, which was overlooked in the loop 
that created the right side of the border, 
Line 40, in Listing 1. The value, 255 
should have been 191. The glitch oc- 
curred because CoCo dutifully marked 
time by counting from 191 through 255 
by 2s, (Step 2), where nothing could 
happen except letting timeelapse. (This 
anomaly of CoCo's will be discussed in 
one of the tutorials.) This was corrected 
in Line 80 in LI5TING2, my preferred 
version. You may also want to change 
lines 20 and 60 from 2 to 4. 

Finally, you may want to type NEW 



and load"LI5TINGl" and remove the 
glitch. If I had done this in the first 
place, I would never have gone on and 
created L I5TING2, which suits my 
aesthetic sensibilities a bit more. Moral: 
Experiment and wander off into un- 
charted territory. The chances are good 
that you will have more fun, create 
something new and learn something 
exciting about CoCo's foibles. 

The brave newcomer may want to 
create the text that spells out his/her 
name and dedicate this tutorial panel to 
him/ herself. Be my guest! 

Note that Line 10 looks strange. You 
could add ,1 after 4 and also after 1 
without changing the resultant H i-Res 
display. CoCo is forgiving and recog- 
nizes the abbreviated Line 10 as the 
default condition. 

I am going to share my favorite 
graphic with you. Sometimes, I call it 
LDVEKNDT. At other times, it is 2SNRKE5 
or TRPE WORM, depending on how cranky 
I am. It is Listing 3. This animated 
graphic uses GET-PUT statements to 
achieve this spectacular effect. I like to 
imagine that it depicts two tapeworms 
that are writhing around in a glass jar, 
always keeping a weather eye on me. 

They are made to slither in opposite 
directions, growing longer and longer 
until they become one intertwined 
Gordian knot. Notice that the eyes and 
mouth of both critters alternate colors 
in a random fashion. 

If you get bored with their antics, 
change - to + in Line 1 10, or change 
Line 1 20 to read either K=90-C*R/90 or 
K=45-C*R/90. To get an optical illu- 
sion, try changing * to + in Line 120. 
Make saves as desired. Type NEW. 

Speaking of optical illusions, one day 
when the screen was blank, in the Hi- 
Res mode, 10 PMODE 4, 1 : SCREEN! , 
1 : PCLS, and my mind was in a fog, I 
began near the center of the screen with 
20 DRRW // S88M120, 102U10R 




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mm »• 


M ... 


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LEDGER 



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TEXT EDITOR Come in today! 

Radio /hack 

The Technology Store' 




A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



Send me an RSC-18 
Software Reference Guide. 

Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-717 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 

Name 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



Piices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and par- 
ticipating stores and dealers. DeskMate/Registered TM 

Tandy Corp. 




10D20L20U30R30D40L4 0U50R50D- 
G0L60U70R70 and 100 GDTD100. I 
doodled an expanding square, and as 
the cobwebs settled on my mind, my 
fingers hovered over the keyboard 
uncertain what to try next. The fog 
lifted a mite and I decided to continue 
Line 20 with D60L10H30 to get to the 
middle of the expanding square. I 
continued to doodle by adding 
BD10F30" to go back to the outer edge. 
Then, I started a new line, 30 DRAW 
"R10U10H30". This brought me back to 



the center with a nearly completed 
three-dimensional bar. As I gazed in- 
tently at the design to try to figure out 
what my next move would be, I was 
astounded to notice that sometimes the 
bar tended to point toward the center 
from the outside and at others it re- 
versed field and seemed to project 
outward. I left it incomplete and en- 
titled it 0'<OPTICRL ILLUSION. 

If you copy lines 0, 10 and 100 and 
then slowly add the elements in lines 20 
and then 30, you will see how a fog- 



enshrouded mind works. Make sure 
after each new directional addition that 
you add a closing quote mark. 

The point I want to make is that you 
never know what will happen when you 
play around with CoCo and try to trick 
him into creating some fun thing. Pre- 
pare to have a lot of fun and get max- 
imum usage out of your faithful Color 
Computer. □ 



Listing 1: BASIC 1 

0 ! <LISTING1> (DEDICATION TO 
BELINDA RAMSEY) 
5 CLEAR500 

10 PMODE4 : PCLS : SCREEN1 

20 FOR J=0TO255STEP2 

30 LINE(J,0) -(128,96) ,PSET:NEXT 

40 FOR J=0 TO 255 STEP2 

50 LINE ( 128 , 96 ) - (2 55 , J ) ,PSET:NEX 

T 

FOR J=2 55 TO 0 STEP-2 
LINE(J / 191)-(128 / 96) ,PSET:NEX 



60 
ljd 
T 
80 
90 



FOR J=191 TO 0 STEP-2 
LINE (0,J)-(128,96) , PSET : NEXT 
100 KB$= ,f U6R3FDGNLNL3 FDGNL3BR4 11 
110 E$ = ff BRHU2ER2FDL3 BD2R2NEBR4 11 
120 L$ = ,f BU6RD6NLRBR3 11 
130 I$ = ff RNRU4LBURBD5BR4 11 
140 N$= ff BU4FND3ERFD3BR3 11 
150 D$ = ff BRNR2HU2ER2FD2NGDU6RBD6N 
LBR3 11 

160 A$= ,f BU4R3FDHL2GDFR2ENU2 FBR3 11 
170 KR$ = ff U6R3FDGL2NLF3BR3 11 
180 M$= 11 BU4 FND3 ERFND3 ERFD3 BR4 11 
190 S$ = ff BUFR2EHL2HER2FBD3 BR3 11 
200 Y$= ff BUNU3FR2ENU3D2GL2HBUBR7 11 
210 DRAW M C2S8BM8 6,90 M +KB$+E$+L$+ 
I$+N$+D$+A$+FA$ : DRAW ff BM86 / 110 ff +K 
R$+A$+M$+S$+E$+Y$ 
220 GOTO220 

Listing 2: BfiSIC 2 

0 ! <LISTING2> (REVISED DEDICA- 
TION TO BELINDA RAMSEY) 
5 CLEAR500 

10 PMODE4:PCLS:SCREENl 

20 FOR J=255 TO 0 STEP-2 

30 LINE(J, 191) -(128,96) ,PSET:NEX 

T 

40 FOR J=191 TO 0 STEP-2 

50 LINE (0, J) -(128,96) ,PSET:NEXT 

60 FOR J=0 TO 255 STEP2 

70 LINE(J,0)-(128,96) ,PSET:NEXT 

80 FOR J=0 TO 191 STEP2 



90 LINE(128,96) -(255, J) ,PSET:NEX 
T 

100 KB$= M U6R3 FDGNLNL3 FDGNL3 BR4 11 

110 E$ = ff BRHU2ER2 FDL3BD2R2NEBR4 11 

120 L$= ,f BU6RD6NLRBR3 11 

130 I$ = ff RNRU4LBURBD5BR4 11 

140 N$ = ,f BU4FND3ERFD3BR3 11 

150 D$ = ff BRNR2HU2ER2FD2NGDU6RBD6N 

LBR3 11 

160 A$= ,f BU4R3FDHL2GDFR2ENU2 FBR3 11 
170 KR$= ff U6R3FDGL2NLF3BR3 11 
180 M$= ff BU4 FND3ERFND3ERFD3BR4 11 
190 S$ = ff BUFR2EHL2HER2 FBD3BR3 11 
200 Y$= ff BUNU3FR2ENU3D2GL2HBUBR7 11 
210 DRAW ff C2S8BM86 , 90 M + KB$ + E$ + L$+ 
I$+N$+D$+A$+FA$ : DRAW" BM8 6 , 110 ff +K 
R$+A$+M$+S$+E$+Y$ 
220 GOTO220 

Listing 3: LOVEKNOT 

0 1 LISTING3 (LOVEKNOT) 
10 1 (C) 1984, J. KOLAR 
20 PMODE4:PCLS 
30 A=94 :B=98 :R=72 :P=1.70 
40 DIM S(7) 

50 CIRCLE (8,8) ,8,1: CIRCLE (7,7) ,8 
,1 

60 DRAW 11 BM 4 , 6R2BR2R2BDL2BL2L2BD4 
BRR4 » 

70 GET(0,0) -(16,16) ,S,G 

80 PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

90 FOR Q=6 TO 4 STEP-2 

100 FORZ=1TO2000 STEPQ:C=Z 

110 C=90-C*P/180 

120 K=C*R/90 

130 X=INT(A+R*COS (C) ) :Y=INT(B+R* 
SIN(K) ) 

140 PUT (X+3 6, Y+10) -(X+52,Y+26) ,S 
,PSET 

150 X=INT ( A+R*SIN (C) ) :Y=INT(B+R* 
COS (K) ) 

160 PUT ( X , Y ) - ( X+ 1 6 , Y+ 1 5 ) , S , PSET 

170 NEXT Z,Q:FOR M=l TO 4000 :NEX 
T:PCLS:GOTO90 ^ 



114 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



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Color Computer 3 



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The Color Computer 3's Ex- 
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Best of all, the new Color 
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The Color Computer 3 
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native. See it today at Radio Shack. 




Send me an RSC-17B Computer Catalog. 



Mail to: Radio Shack, Dept 87-A-716 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Name 




Address 
City 



State 
Zip_ 




Radio /hack 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



TM 



Price applies at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores and dealers. 
Monitor and accessories sold separately. 




Saucer, Saucer, in the Sky 




By John T. Wells 




Saucer Defense is a space game 
written on the CoCo 3, which 
takes less than 150 Extended 
Color BASIC lines of code. The program 
uses the H5CREEN 2 mode (allowing up 
to 16 colors on a 320-by-192 screen) and 
pits flying saucers against our missile 
battery. There is an unlimited supply of 
saucer lasers and missile lasers for both 
sides so the game can go on as long as 
you desire. Each hit you take from the 
saucer costs 100 points, and hits you 
make on the saucer gain 100 points. 

Initially, there is one flying saucer. At 
1,000 points, a second saucer joins the 
first. The saucers move after (but never 
quite catch up to) the missile battery 
and can fire at all angles. However, they 
are only accurate when within a defined 
range of horizontal pixels of the missile 
battery. Initially, this range is set at 10 
for the least difficult game mode. As 
your score increases, this range is in- 
creased so that the game gets more 
difficult. When in range, the saucers are 
quite accurate. The saucers move and 
shoot automatically. The missile battery 
fires laser-like missiles and fires them 
only straight up. The missile battery is 
left-joystick controlled (use the button 



John Wells is a U.S. Navy officer 
stationed in Washington, D.C. He has 
had his CoCos since 1981 and has been 
programming since 1978. He lives with 
his wife and children in Herndon, 
Virginia. 





to fire) and can only fire when contin- 
uously moved. That is, if stopped, no 
missiles can be fired; however, the 
saucers will continue to shoot at the 
missile battery. 

The colors of the background and the 
saucers will change at 1 ,000-point inter- 
vals and 300-point bonuses will be 
awarded. The game will also increase in 
difficulty at each of these intervals (by 
adding to the accuracy of the saucer 
firings). At 5,000-point intervals, the 
program will be interrupted with a little 
fanfare and you will be given the choice 
of continuing or quitting. This is to put 
a break in the action and to allow a 
sense of winning. At any time during the 
game pressing shifts stops the game. 
Press ENTER to resume playing. Use 

ESC BREAK to quit. 

While you can hold the firebutton 



down for continuous firing, it is better 
to move quickly and get in position* 
then shoot and quickly retreat out of the 
saucer's firing range. Also, it may help 
to wait for the saucer(s) to fire, then 
move in, fire quickly and retreat. Since 
■ the saucers' firing is based on random 
numbers, doing this is simply playing 
the odds. The color changing scheme 
occasionally results in cases where the 
explosions don't get full color filling. 
The program is operating normally J 
when this occurs. 

The satellites in the background play 
no part in the game itself. 

Table I is a list of key variables and 
their functions. Finally, note that there 
are four levels of play. The degree of 
difficulty is, far greater at Level 4 than 
at Level 1 . 1 suggest Level 1 or 2 for your 
first few games. ■ □ . 




150 195 

280 129 

470 246 

650 194 



800 51 

1020 174 

1180 45 

END 130 



The listing: SAUCER 

0 'SAUCER DEFENSE 12/07/86 BY JO 

HN T. WELLS, HERNDON VA VERS 1.13 

10 POKE65497,0 

20 ON BRK GOTO 81(5 

3(5 HSCREEN 2 

40 HBUFF 1 ,9(5(5 : HBUFF 2, 900: HBUFF 

3,900:HBUFF 4,900 
5(5 HCLS 8 

6(5 WI=5000:CC=0:SC=0:XS=160:CT=1 
000 : BO=300 : AD=100 

1(5 X=1(5(5:X1=5(5: Y=l(5(5 :SX=15(5 :SY=1 
41:C$="H4G3U3L4E4H4E4U2F4E4D3R4G 
3F2R3G4F3L3D2L2" 

8(5 L1$= M T155 ; V31 ; 04 ; 12 ; 11 ; 1(5 ; 9 ; 8 
; 7 ; 6 ; 5 ; 4 ; 3 ; 2 ; 1" : L2 $="T200 ; V3 1 ; 04 
; 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 6 ; 7 ; 8 ; 9 ; 1(5 ; 11 ; 12 " 

9(5 GOSUB830 : f ****DO TITLE PAGE** 
** 

95 IF AN<1 OR AN>4 THEN AN=1 
1(5(5 IF AN=1 THEN DF=2(5 : Dl=4 : D2 = l 
6:DI=10 

110 IF AN=2 THEN DF=18 : Dl=4 : D2=l 
4:DI=12 

120 IF AN=3 THEN DF=16 : Dl=4 : D2=l 
2:DI=14 

130 IF AN =4 THEN DF=14 : Dl=4 : D2=l 
0:DI=16 

140 EX$= ,f L255T25501V31;7;3 ;3;5;1 



4 : HPAI 



3 



; 2 ; 7 ; 5 ; 5 ; 4 ; 5 ; 7 ; V2 5 ; 5 ; 5 ; 5 ; 7 ; 3 ; 7 ; 4 
; 5 ; 2 ; V 2 j3 ; 3 ; 5 ; 7 ; 7 ; 1 ; 1 ; 2 ; 7 ; 4 ; V 1 5 ; 3 
; 5 ; 2 ; 1 ; 2 ; 2 ; 5 ; 5 ; V10 ; 1 ; 7 ; 4 ; 2 ; 5 ; 8 ; 1 
; 3 ; 5 ; 7 ; 3 ; 5 ; 3 ; V 5 ; 4 ; 6 ; 7 ; 3 ; 7 ; 2 ; 8 " 
150 C£=j3:Cl=l:C2=2 :C3=3 :C4=4:C5= 
5:C6=6:C7=7 

160 HDRAWC3 ; BM165 , 82 ; L8U3 D6L1U6 
D3R16U3R1D6U6D4U1L16R16L4H4G4" :H 
CIRCLE (165, 82) ,3,3 : HPAINT ( 166 , 8 3 
) ,3,3:HPAINT(166,81) ,3,3 
17j3 HCIRCLE(128,82) , 8,C4, . 
NT(128,82) ,Cj3,C4 
180 HGET(j3,0)-(4j3,35) ,1 
190 HGET(15j3,7j3)-(180,l£5) 
200 HGET (110, 76) -(140,91) , 
210 HPAINT (128, 82) , C7 , C4 : HGET ( 11 
0,76)-(140,91) ,4 

220 HPUT(150,70) -(180,105) ,1,PSE 
T 

230 HPUT(110, 76) -(140,91) ,1,PSET 
240 HDRAWC4 ; BM0 , 190 ;E10 ;R5;F5 ;E 
8 ; R3 ; E5 ; R2 ; F15 ; R3 ; E10 ; R5 ; F6 ; R7 ; F 
4 ; R2 ; E18 ; Rl ; F5 ; R3 ; F6 ; E7 ; R5 ; F12 ; E 
2 ;R6 ;F3 ; E 12 ; R4 ; F10 ; Rip ; E 3 ; R2 ; F5 ; 
R3 ; E16 ; F 6 ; R5 ; F10 ; R2 2 ; E5 ; F6 ; R12 ; E 
4;F3 ;R8 ;E6;F6;R20" 

2 50 HPAINT (15, 190) ,C6,4 

26JZJ HCOLOR 1,8: HPRINT (10 , 0 ) , "SCO 
RE : " : HPRINT ( 19 , 0 ) , SC 
270 SA=188 :SB=10 ' **** SATELLITES 
280 FOR CC=1 TO 2 5 : XX=RND ( 3 00 ) : Y 
Y=RND (60) +10 : HCIRCLE (XX, YY) , RND ( 
3 ) , C4 : HPAINT ( XX , YY ) , 4 , C4 : NEXT CC 
290 '**** MAIN LOOP **** 

3 00 A=0 : B=0 

310 XA=X+A:XB=X1+B 

320 ZZ=SX-XA: A=A+ (ZZ/ (RND(4)+2) ) 

3 30 Zl=SX-XB:B=B+(Zl/(RND(4)+2) ) 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 117 



340 DE=XA-XB:IF DE<40 THEN A=A+2 

0:B=B-20 

350 GOSUB410 

360 IF POOXS AND BUTTON (2 ) =1 TH 
EN GOSUB520 

370 HPUT(X+A, Y) -(X+A+35, Y+15) ,1, 
PSET 

380 HPUT(X1+B,Y) - (Xl+B+35, Y+15) , 

1,PSET 

39 0 GOTO310 

400 '**** SAUCER FLYING **** 
410 HPUT(X+A, Y) - (X+A+30, Y+15) ,3, 
PSET 

420 IF SC>=CT THEN HPUT (Xl+B, Y) - 
(Xl+B+30, Y+15) ,4, PSET 
43JZ5 RN=RND(DF) : IF RN<D1 THEN GOS 
UB7 40 ELSE IF RN>D2 AND SOCT TH 
EN GOSUB 1080 

440 »**** OUR MISSILE BATTERY ** 
** 

450 PO=XS:QQ=JOYSTK(0) :J0=JOYSTK 
(2) : J1=J0YSTK(3) : IF J0>53THENXS= 
SX+14ELSEIFJ0<12THENXS=SX-14 
460 IF XS<45THENXS=45ELSEIFXS>24 
0THENXS=2 40 

470 HPUT (SX, SY) - (SX+30 , SY+2 5) , 1 , 
PSET 

480 SX=XS 

490 HPUT(SX,SY)-(SX+30, SY+25) ,2, 
PSET 

500 RETURN 

510 '**** SHOOT MISSILE **** 
520 YY=SY-35 

530 PLAY Ll$ :HLINE( SX+15, YY+40) - 

(SX+15 , YY) , PSET : PP=HPOINT ( SX+15 , 

YY-2) :HCOLORl,8:HLINE(SX+15,YY+4 

0) - (SX+15 , YY) , PRESET 

540 IF PP=C0 OR PP=C4 THEN GOSUB 

570 

550 RETURN 

560 ' **** SAUCER EXPLOSION **** 
570 D$="C2 ;BM"+STR$ (INT (SX+15) )+ 
", "+STR$ (INT(YY+5) ) 
580 HDRAW D$+C$ : HPAINT (SX+15 , YY) 
CI , 2 

590 FOR I=1TO10:NEXTI 

600 HPAINT (SX+15, YY+5 ) ,C3, 2 

610 HDRAW D$+C$ 

620 PLAY EX$ 

630 HPUT(SX-5,YY-15)-(SX+35,YY+1 
5) , 1,PSET 
640 SC=SC+AD 

650 HCOLOR8,1:HPRINT(19,0) , SC-AD 
:HCOLORl,8:HPRINT (10,0) , "SCORE: 
": HPRINT (19,0) , SC 

660 WW=SC/WI:IF WW>0 AND INT (WW) 
=WW THEN 12 20 ELSE CC=SC/CT:IF C 
C>0 AND INT(CC)=CC THEN GOSUB115 



0:GOTO160 
670 RETURN 

680 ***** MISSILE BATTERY EXPLOS 
ION **** 

690 HCIRCLE ( SX+15, YP) ,10, C6:HPAI 
NT (SX+15, YP+2) ,C3,C6: PLAY EX$ 
700 SC=SC-AD 

710 HCOLOR8 , 1 : HPRINT (19,0) , SC+AD 
:HCOLOR1,8:HPRINT(10,0) , "SCORE: 
": HPRINT (19,0) ,SC 
720 RETURN 

730 •**** FIRST SAUCER SHOOT *** 
* 

740 REM PLAY L2$: ' **** DELETE R 
EM FOR SAUCER FIRING SOUND **** 
750 XP=SX+15:YP=SY+10:DP=X+A+18- 
XP:IF ABS(DP)>DI THEN XP=SX+30:' 
IF DISTANCE TOO GREAT THEN SAUCE 
R'S SHOT MISSES 

760 HLINE(X+A+18,Y+9)-(XP,YP) , PS 
ET: Pl=HPOINT (XP, YP+1) 
770 HCOLORl,8 

780 HLINE(X+A+18,Y+9)-(XP,YP) , PR 
ESET 

790 IF Pl=3 THEN GOSUB690 : GOTO80 
800 RETURN 

810 PALETTE CMP: WIDTH32 : POKE6549 
6,0: END 

820 '**** TITLE PAGE **** 

830 HCOLOR5 , 8 : GOSUB9 10 

840 LINE INPUT AN$ 

850 HCOLOR8,8:GOSUB910 

8 60 HCOLOR5 , 8 : GOSUB104 0 

870 LINE INPUT AN $: PLAY L3$:AN=V 

AL(AN$) 

880 HCOLOR8,8:GOSUB1040 
890 HCOLORl,8 
900 RETURN 
910 XZ=8:YZ=8 

920 L3$="L25501V3 1 ; 12 ; 11 ; 10 ; 9 ; 8 ; 
7" 

930 PLAY L3 $ : PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$ 
940 HPRINT(XZ, YZ) , "S A U C E R 

DEFENSE" 
950 FOR TT=1 TO 200: NEXT TT 
960 PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$ 
970 HPRINT (XZ+7, YZ+2) , "BY" 
980 FOR TT=1 TO 200: NEXT TT 
990 PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$:P 
LAY L3$ 

1000 HPRINT (XZ, YZ+4) , "J 0 H N T 
. WELLS" 

1010 PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$ 
1020 HPRINT (XZ, YZ+6 ), "PRESS <ENT 
ER> TO START ! " 
1030 RETURN 

1040 HPRINT (XZ-5 ,YZ) /'DIFFICULTY 



118 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



1 



? 1 (EASIEST) - 4 (HARDEST) " : HPRIN 
T(XZ-5,YZ+2) , "PRESS YOUR CHOICE 
AND <ENTER>" 

1050 PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$ 
1060 RETURN 

1070 •**** SECOND SAUCER SHOOT * 

-k-k-k 

1080 REM PLAY L2$: '**** DELETE R 
EM FOR SAUCER FIRING SOUND **** 
1090 XP=SX+15:YP=SY+10:DP=X1+B+1 
8-XP:IF ABS(DP)>DI THEN XP=SX+30 
1100 HLINE(Xl+B+18,Y+9)-(XP,YP) , 
PSET : Pl=HPO INT (XP, YP+1) 
1110 HCOLORl,8 

1120 HLINE (Xl+B+18 , Y+9) - (XP, YP) , 
PRESET 

1130 IF Pl=3 THEN GOSUB690 
1140 RETURN 

1150 ■**** BONUS AND CHANGE COLO 

RS **** 

1160 HPRINT (XZ+2 , YZ+2 ) , BO : HPRINT 
(XZ+8 , YZ+2 ) , "POINTS BONUS ! " : SC=S 
C+BO 

1170 FOR SS=1 TO 10: PLAY L1$:PLA 
Y L3$:NEXT SS 

1180 IF AN=1 THEN DI=DI+.5 ELSE 
IF AN=2 THEN DI=DI+1 ELSE IF AN= 
3 THEN DI=DI+1.5 ELSE DI=DI+2 
1190 HCLS8 

1200 C0=RND ( 7 ) : C1=RND ( 7 ) : C2=RND ( 
7) :C3=RND(7) :C4=RND(7) :C5=RND(7) 
:C6=RND(7) :C7=RND(7) 
1210 RETURN 

1220 QUIT OR CONTINUE **** 

1230 HCLS4:HCOLOR 8 , 8 : FOR CO=YZ- 

8 TO YZ+2: FOR CR=XZ-6 TO XZ+24 S 

TEP 6 : HPRINT (CR, CO) ,SC: PLAY L3$: 

NEXT CR,CO 

1240 GOSUB 1280 

1250 LINE INPUT AN$ 

12 60 HCOLOR8 , 8 : GOSUB 1280 

1270 IF AN$="C" THEN SC=SC+BO:HC 

LS8:GOTO160 ELSE 810 

1280 HPRINT (XZ , YZ+4) ,SC: HPRINT (X 

Z+8,YZ+4)," POINTS i ! ! ! !" 

1290 PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$:PLAY L3$ 

1300 HPRINT (XZ,YZ+7) , "CONTINUE < 

C> OR QUIT <Q> ?":HPRINT(XZ,YZ+9 

), "PRESS <C> OR <Q> AND <ENTER>" 

1310 RETURN /R\ 



See You at 

RAINBOWfest — Chicago 

April 10-12 
Meet CoCo Cat in person. 




Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

Lait Chrlitmai we Introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Deiigner program 
(■ee review April 86 Rainbow). It hai 
been to popular that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphic! Deiigner. The 
Coco Graphica Deiigner producei 
greeting card* plui banner* and ligni. 
Thii program will further increase the 
uiefullnen and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allowi you to mix text and 
picture! in all your creation!. The 
program feature* picture, border, and 
character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built In 
libraries Plus a ipecial "grabber" utility 
ii included to capture areas of high 
reiolution icreeni for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of 32K, One Diik DHve 
(Diik Ext. BASIC 1.0/l.l.ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printers supported include: 
Epion RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8610, DMP-100/ 1.10/ 
400/ 430, Seikoiha GP-100/250, Legend 
808 and Gorilla B annana. Send a SASE 
for complete list of compatible printer*. 
#C332 Coco Graphic! Deiigner 129.96 



Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional •upplementary library 

diskette containing over one hundred 
additions! picture! ii available. 

#CSSS Picture Diik #1 1H.9R. 



Colored Paper Packs 

Now available ere packi containing 120 
iheeti of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelope! in snorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your production! unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack I19.QG 




With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer it's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 




WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Now $19.95 

Order Cat#TBRS01 
(Was $69.95) 

You can benefit from our purchaie of 
brand new WICO Trackball Controller! 
at cloeeout pricei. Thii model was 
deiigned ipeclftcaHy for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer and plugs right into the 
joyitlck port. 

WICO ii the largeit deiigner and 
manufacturer of control devices for 
commercial arcade video gamei. If 
you've ever played an arcade video 
game, chance* are you've used a WICO 
joyitick or trackball and experienced it* 

We have bargain priced trackballs for ATARI, Commodore, TI, 
and other computers. Call or write for our price list. 



luperior control, pinpoint firing 
accuracy, and exceptional durability. 

Include! one-year limited warranty. 
Phoenolic ball offer* 360-degree 
movement. Two optical encoders 
provide iplit-second reiponie. 

Quick-action fire button for smooth, two 
handed arcade reiponie and feel. Long 
5' computer connection. Heavy duty 
plastic case for long hard uie. 
Compatible with all color computer 
modeli. 



Ordering Instructions: All orders 

add 13.00 Shipping Ji Handling. UPS 
COD add 13.00. V1SA/MC Accepted. 
NY resident! add tales tax. 



Zebra Sy terns, Inc 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 119 



ORGANIZATION 



16K 
ECB 




By Richard 
Steinbrueck 



The 

Tournament 

Master 



You've got a bunch of people who 
want to get together for fun and 
fellowship at a sports tourna- 
ment, and you want every team to get 
a chance to play every other team. A 
"round robin" tournament is the way to 
do it, and RndRobin will print out the 
necessary information to get you raves 
as the tournament director. I know it 
works, because I used it to run an 11- 
team volleyball tournament last year for 
our church youth association. 

RNDROBIN is a BASIC program that 
prints, on an 80-column printer, dot 
matrix or daisy wheel, the various 
assignments for a round robin tourna- 
ment so that every team/ person plays 
every other team/ person once. It can 
handle from five to 12 teams and also 
assigns "half-courts" and starting/ 
ending times to each round. There are 
as many rounds as there are teams. Each 
round has a place to write the results of 
three individual games, so that a two 
out of three competition can be used. 

RndRobin also prints out a Win/ 
Loss Summary Sheet to allow the tour- 
nament director to keep track of the 
record of each team each round. 

The program assumes there are 
enough nets and courts, fields, dia- 



Richard Steinbrueck holds a master's 
degree in education and is a former high 
school wrestling coach. Currently he is 
a Lutheran youth minister in Valrico, 
Florida. In addition to writing pro- 
grams for the CoCo, Richard enjoys 
raising rabbits. 



monds, etc., to allow all teams to play 
at once, or in the case of an odd number 
of teams, for all but one team to play 
each round. As an example, for nine 
teams, you need four courts (see Figure 
1). When there is an odd number of 
teams, one team sits out each round. If 
there is an even number, then two teams 
rest on the second, fourth, sixth, etc., 



RndRobin is set up so you can run 
it right out of the box to see how it 
works and get an idea of how 12 teams 
would play. Examine lines 21 to 27 and 
figure out what has to bechanged. Then 
modify lines 21 to 27 with your own 
specific numbers and names. You might 
start by changing only the value for the 
number of teams in Line 22 to how 
many your tournament will have and 
printing the results. When you put in 
your own team names, put the second 
team as the first name in the DATA 
statement and then the rest of the list, 
then put the first team last. 



round. 



Half-Court 1 


Half-Court 2 


Team A 


Team I 


Half-Court 3 


Half-Court 4 


Team B 


Team H 


Half-CourtS 


Half-Court 6 


Team C 


Team G 


Half-Court 7 


Half-Court 8 


Team D 


Team F 


Team E 


(Rest Period) 



Figure 1: Nine-Team Court Setup 



120 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Those variables that can easily be 
changed are as follows (by line number): 

21 - names of the competitors, listed as 
DRTR 

22- the number of competitors/ teams 

23- the title (name) of the tournament 

24- the date of the tournament 

25- the starting time of the first round 

26- the length of time for each round 

27- the length of the break (rest period) 
between rounds 

You can also change lines 120 to 140 
for your printer's commands to allow 
double-wide, double-height printing. In 
the program now, they are only remark 
lines with my Citizen 120D codes. But 
before removing those apostrophies, 
read your printer manual. The program 
will work fine with most 80-column 
printers just as is, and putting in wrong 
codes could give some unpredictable 
results. 

A second way to enter your own 
information is to replace lines 20 to 29 
with INPUT. INPUT replaces those lines 
with a series of I NPUT statements that 
you answer each time you run the 
program. If you like to make changes, 
reentering the information can be quite 



tiresome and time consuming. That's 
why I like to have the variables as part 
of the program. I save the program with 
the variables so 1 can easily try out 
variations by changing only one aspect 
each time I run it (such as the length of 
each match). 

Lines 542 to 578 are the subroutine 
for printing the competition assignment 
sheets. The format of the sheets can be 
changed by modifying these lines. In 
particular, if a two out of three series of 
games is not used, lines 560 to 569 could 
be deleted and Line 557 could be 
changed toPRINT 8-2/'5CDRE: XXto 
XX". 

Since every printer has its differences, 
the program allows you to stop after 
printing the set of competitions for each 
round. This permits adjusting the paper 
so you can get each round to start at the 
top of a sheet. I used legal size paper (8 
Vi inches by 13 inches) to print out each 
round using double-height, double- 
wide print for my 1 1-team tournament. 

RndRobin is a printing program, not 
a record keeping program. I leave to 
another RAINBOW reader the challenge 
of writing a program that allows scores 
to be entered and then prints out the 
final results. In my own tournament I 



was out in the field, so using my CoCo 
was not advisable and records were kept 
by hand. 

The program is extensively remarked 
to allow customizing to fit your needs. 
In addition I have numbered it so that 
major routines begin at the 100s, mak- 
ing it easier to find them. Generally, I 
expect this program to be modified 
extensively as the user customizes it. 
However, I do not recommend chang- 
ing margin statements or formulas 
without careful study, since they affect 
the program in many different places. 

After writing RndRobin and prepar- 
ing it for publication, I remembered a 
gimmick used by a tournament director 
to add to the excitement of a round 
robin tournament; he rearranged the 
remaining rounds after the first few 
rounds had been played so that the 
probable better teams would be playing 
the last round. It adds a lot to have the 
deciding match for first and second 
place played during the last round. 

I would like to hear about your use 
of RndRobin and will try to answer any 
questions. You can reach me at Imman- 
uel Lutheran Church in Brandon, Flor- 
ida at (813) 681-1526. Have a happy 
tournament! □ 




566 149 25 

770 64 130 

1010 202 305 

1200 3 400 

END 132 527 



161 
124 
244 
133 
129 



Listing 1: RNDROBIN 

lj3 'title screen (1-5-87 9 AM) 

11 CLS : PRINT@1£)6 , "RNDROBIN. BAS M 

12 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) 11 BY RICHARD 
STEINBRUECK" 

13 PRINTTAB (6) "1109 LAKEMONT DRI 
VE" 

14 PRINTTAB (6 ) "VALRICO, FL 3359 
4" 

15 PRINTTAB(8) "813/681-1526" 

16 PRINT: PRINTTAB (7) "COPYRIGHT 1 
987" : PRINTTAB (5) "ALL RIGHTS RESE 
RVED" 

17 FORX=lTOW£): NEXT: CLS 

18 CLEAR2000 

19 ' 

2fl 'listing of competing teams ( 
max length of each name is 19 ch 
ar.) NOTE: starting with the se 
cond team, list all the teams in 
order and then place the first 



team's name last. 

21 DATA TEAM B , TEAM C , TEAM D, TEA 
M E , TEAM F , TEAM G, TEAM H , TEAM I, 
TEAM J, TEAM K, TEAM L , TEAM A 

22 T=12 1 number of teams (range f 
rom 5 to 12) 

23 TP$="1987 ROUND-ROBIN VOLLEYB 
ALL TOURNAMENT" 'title phrase pri 
nted at top of sheets (cannot be 

over 4p characters long) 

24 DT$="May 22, 1987" 'date 

25 H=2 :M=00 1 starting time of tou 
rnament 

26 L=15 1 length of each round in 
minutes 

27 B=5 ' length of break between m 
atches in minutes 

29 DIMTS$ (T) ,T$ (T) , A$ (T) ,N$ (T) ' T 
rounds of competition with t te 

ams 

30 'miscellaneous calculations & 
equations 

4^0 LM^ :RM=4£) 'margins set for do 
uble-wide printing 

50 TP=INT( (4£)-LEN(TP$) )/2) : DT=IN 

T( (4£)-LEN(DT$) )/2) 

60 NT=1 

10 GOT01jdj3j3 

80 ' 

100 'Citizen 120D printer codes 



April 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 21 





WE'RE BRINGING THE COCO 



RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from The 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $20 to give 
your account a positive balance. This 
will be refunded after your first free 
hour if you choose to no longer use 
the system or it will be applied to 
future connect charges. If you do not 
maintain a positive balance, you will 
be charged $3.50 each month for 
direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — 
on a regular basis. Conference 
schedules will appear in the rain- 
bow each month. Be sure to check 
online announcements for changes 
and additions. 



THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE EVEN MORE 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with Imme- 
diate CoCo Community. Check it 
out today. After all, you can sample 
it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPH I 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 



COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and THE 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge forTelenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $ 1 2 (U.S.) p er hour. 

On Telenet: The Uninet network has now merged with 
Telenet. To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 
336-0437. After you call your local access number and 
make connection, press the ENTER key twice. When the 
"TERMINAL 2 " prompt appears, press ENTER again. 
When the "@" prompt appears, type C DELPHI and press 
ENTER. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press *A\ 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
ENTER (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI; and press ENTER. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $12 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country for details on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 312561703088 through Telenet, or 
3 1 060060 1 500 through Tymnet. (You'll have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 

Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to THE rainbow, at the 
"USERNAME:" prompt, type RAINB0W5UB and press 



ENTER. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type your individ- 
ual subscription number from the mailing label of your 
latest issue of THE rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros 
at the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type RAINBOWORDER and press ENTER. 
At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type 5END5UB and press 
ENTER. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just press ENTER and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter theCoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. No time is assessed 
against your free hour of service while you answer these 
questions. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is opened, each rainbow 
subscriber will be credited with an hour of free time! 



When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into 
your own personal password. This is the password you 
will use for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



(lines 100-140) 

110 'printer code for competitio 
n schedule printing (lines 120-1 
30) 

120 'PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(12 6) 
;CHR$(49) ;CHR$(1) 'double height 
130 'PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (3 3) ; 
CHR$(40) 'emphasized double wide 
pica (40 columns) 

135 RETURN 

137 'printer code for win/loss s 
ummary sheet printing (line 140) 
140 'PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(3 3) ; 
CHR$(8)'pica (80 column) , empha si 
zed 

150 RETURN 
160 ' 

200 'Hour & Minute Subroutine 
205 IF M > 59 THEN M = M-60:H=H+ 
1 

210 IF H > 12 THEN H = H-12 
215 RETURN 

220 'start & end time of round 

225 FOR X = 1 TO T 

230 M$=STR$ (M) : IF M<10 THEN M$=" 

0"+RIGHT$ (STR$ (M) ,1) 

235 TS$(X)=STR$(H)+":"+M$ 

240 M=M+L' length of each round i 

n L minutes 

245 GOSUB 205 

250 M$=STR$ (M) : IF M<10 THEN M$=" 

0"+RIGHT$ (STR$ (M) , 1) 

255 T$(X)=STR$(H)+":"+M$ 

260 M=M+B' break between matches 

in B minutes 

265 GOSUB 205 

270 NEXT X 

275 ' 

300 'team competition assignment 
s 

305 CLS : PRINT @ 160, " DO YOU WISH 
THE PRINTER TO PAUSE AFTER I 

T PRINTS EACH ROUNDSO YOU CAN AD 

JUST THE PAPER TO GET ONE ROUND 
PER SHEET <Y/N>"; : INPUTPP$ : IFPP 

$="Y"THENPP=1' 

307 F0RA=1 TO T 'round number 

310 G=INT(T/2) '# of matches play 

ed at the same time 

315 IFGOT/2THENP=l'set P=l if o 

dd number of teams 

320 F=0:IF (A/2=INT(A/2) AND P=0 

) THENF=1:G=G-1 

325 IF A = T THEN 355 

330 U=T 

335 'reading and assigning team 
names 

340 F0RX=A+1 TO U 

345 IF DA=0 THEN READ A$ (X) ELSE 



A$ (X) =N$ (NT) : NT=NT+1 

350 NEXT X 

355 FOR X = 1 TO A 

360 IF DA=0 THEN READ A$(X) ELSE 

A$(X)=N$(NT) :NT=NT+1 
3 65 NEXT X 
370 NT=1: RESTORE 
375 ' 

400 'printing of competition sch 
edule by round 

405 GOSUB 120 'printer codes 

415 GOSUB 506 'heading subroutine 

420 FOR X= 0 TO G-l 

425 B$=A$(X+1) :C$=A$ (U-X) 

430 GOSUB 545 

435 NEXT X 

440 PRINT#-2 

445 IFPP=1THEN CLS : PRINT§160 , "PR 
OGRAM PAUSING. <ENTER> TO CO 
NTINUE PRINTING" ; : INPUTQ$ 
450 NEXT A 
455 PRINT#-2 
460 PRINT#-2 
465 GOTO1000 
470 ' 

500 'schedule sheet heading prin 
t subroutine 
503 ' 

506 CLS: PRINT "PRINTING SHEET HEA 
DING" 

509 PRINT#-2 , TAB (TP) TP$ 

510 TM$="ROUND #"+STR$(A)+" "+T 
S$ (A) +" — "+T$ (A) :TM=INT( (40-LEN 
(TM$) )/2) 

512 PRINT#-2 , TAB (TM) TM$ 
515 PRINT #-2,"" 

518 'PRINT #-2,TAB(INT( (LM+RM)/2 

) -16) STRING$ (3 2, "=") 

521 PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 4 ) STRING$ ( 3 2 , " = 

") 

524 PRINT #-2,"" 

527 IF P=1THENPRINT #-2,A$(T-G); 
" has a bye (Rest period) " ' if an 
odd number of teams compete, ea 
ch round one has a bye (rest per 
iod) 

530 IF (P=0 AND F=l) THEN PRINT 
#-2,A$(T/2) ;" & " ;A$ (T/2+1) ;" ha 
ve byes (rest period) ": F=0 ' if an 
even number of teams compete, e 
very other round two teams have 
a bye (rest period) 
533 PRINT #-2,"" 
536 RETURN 
539 ' 

542 'subroutine for printing com 
petition assignments 
545 CLS : PRINT "PRINTING ASSIGNMEN 
TS FOR ROUND"; A 



124 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



548 PRINT #-2, "Half-Court " ;2*X+ 
1; TAB (25) "Half -Court ";2*X+2 
551 PRINT #-2,B$;TAB(20) "VS" ;TAB 
(25)C$ 

554 PRINT #-2 

557 PRINT #-2, "SCORES: Game 1 .. 



it 



560 PRINT #-2 
563 PRINT #-2," 



Game 2 



it 



566 PRINT #-2 
569 PRINT #-2," 



Game 3 



* » 



it 



572 PRINT #-2 
575 PRINT #-2 
578 RETURN 
581 • 

600 'Summary sheet print routine 
610 1 

620 GOSUB 140' printer code 

630 TM=INT( (56-3 *T)/2) ' compute t 

op and bottom margin 

640 FOR X = 1 TO TM:PRINT#-2:NEX 

T X 

650 LM=24-2*T:RM=LM+32+4*T:MS=LM 
+RM 

660 TP=INT( (MS-LEN(TP$) )/2) 
670 DT=INT ( (MS-LEN ( DT$ ) ) /2 ) 
680 WL=INT( (MS-22)/2) 
690 PRINT#-2,TAB(TP)TP$ ' from lin 
e 22 

700 PRINT#-2 , TAB (DT) DT$ 
710 PRINT#-2 

720 PRINT# -2 , TAB (WL) "WIN/LOSS SU 
MMARY SHEET" 
730 GOSUB850 

740 PRINT#-2 , TAB (LM) "TEAM" ; TAB ( L 
M+16+2*T) "ROUND # " ; TAB ( LM+20+4*T 
) "TOTAL";TAB(LM+26+4*T) "PLACE" 
750 F0RY=lT0T:PRINT#-2 ,TAB(4*Y+1 
6+LM) Y ; : NEXTY : PRINT#-2 
760 GOSUB850 

770 IF DA=0 THEN FOR X=2 TO T : RE 

ADN$ (X) : NEXTX : READN$ ( 1 ) 

775 FOR X=l TO T 

780 GOSUB840 

790 A$=N$(NT) :NT=NT+1 

800 PRINT#-2 , TAB(LM) A$ ; : GOSUB840 

810 GOSUB850 

820 NEXTX 

830 GOTO860 

840 FORY=0TOT:PRINT#-2 ,TAB(4*Y+1 
9+LM) " : " ; :NEXTY:PRINT#-2 , TAB (2 5+ 
4*T+LM) " : " ;TAB(31+4*T+LM) " : " : RET 
URN 

850 PRINT#-2 , TAB (LM) STRING$ (RM-L 
M , " . " ) : RETURN 
860 GOSUB850 
870 NT=1: RESTORE 



880 FORX= 1TOTM : PRINT # - 2 : NEXTX 
885 NT=1: RESTORE 
890 ' 

1000 'main menu 

1002 CLS:PRINT@42, "RNDROBIN . BAS" 
;TAB(37)"BY RICHARD STEINBRUECK" 
; TAB (32) STRING $(32,"*") ; TAB (45)" 
MENU" 

1010 PRINT@224," <C>OMPETITION A 
SSIGNMENT SHEETS <S>CORING SUMMA 
RY SHEETS <I>NSTRUCTIONS" 
: PRINT: INPUT" WHAT IS YOUR CHOIC 
E" ;Q$:IFQ$="C"THEN225ELSEIFQ$="S 
"THEN600 

1100 'instructions 

1110 CO$="to continue, press <en 

ter>" 

1120 RU$=" INSTRUCTIONS ":RR$=" 

" : RS$=STRING$ ( 3 2 , " # " ) : R$= 
RR$+RU$+RR$+RS$ 
1130 CLS:PRINTR$ 

1140 PRINT" RNDROBIN. BAS IS A P 
RINTING PROGRAM DESIGNED TO P 
RINT OUT COMPETITION ASSIGNMEN 
TS FOR FROM5 TO 12 PARTICIPANTS 
OR TEAMS INA ROUND ROBIN TOURNA 
MENT . " 

1150 PRINT" IN A ROUND ROBIN TR 
OURNAMENT EACH OF THE PARTICIPA 
NTS OR TEAMS COMPETES AGAINS 

T EACH OF THE OTHER PARTICIP 

ANTS OR TEAMS. 

1160 PRINT@480 , CO$ ; : INPUTQ$ : CLS : 
PRINTR$ 

1170 PRINT" THE WINNER IS DETER 
MINED BY THE BEST WIN/LOSS REC 
ORD. IN THEEVENT OF A TIE, THE T 
EAM WHO WONTHE HEAD-TO-HEAD MATC 
H IS THE WINNER OF THE TIE. 
1180 PRINT" IF RNDROBIN. BAS IS 
RUN AS IS, IT WILL PRINT OUT A T 
OURNAMENT FOR 12 TEAMS. MODIFI 

Y IT FOR YOUR TOURNAMENT BY ED 
ITING LINES21-28 AND REPLACING M 

Y VALUES WITH YOUR OWN." 

1190 PRINT§480, CO$; : INPUTQ$ : CLS : 
PRINTR$ 

1200 PRINT" YOU WILL NEED TO KN 
OW THE NAMES OF THE COMPETIT 

ORS, THE TIME OF THE FIRST MAT 
CH, THE LENGTH OF THE MATCHES 
AND THE LENGTH OF THE BREAK B 
ETWEEN EACHMATCH." 

1210 PRINT" ALSO PUT IN THE NAM 
E AND DATE OF YOUR TOURNAMENT. R 
NDROBIN. BASIS DESIGNED TO PRINT 
ON AN 80 COLUMN PRINTER, EITHE 
R DAISY WHEEL OR DOT MATRIX." 
1220 PRINT@480 , CO$ ; : INPUTQ$ : CLS : 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 125 



PRINTR$ 

12 30 PRINT" RNDROBIN . BAS USES R 
EM STATE- MENTS EXTENSIVELY TO 
HELP YOU IN YOUR MODIFICATIONS 
. ALSO, LINE NUMBERS ARE ARRA 
NGED SO THAT MAJOR ROUTINES B 
EGIN AT 100, 200, 300, ETC." 

124 0 PRINT" IF YOU HAVE ANY QUE 
STIONS, FEEL FREE TO CONTACT 

ME. IF YOUWRITE, PLEASE INCLUDE 



ADDRESSED, STAMPED EN 



ENJOY YOUR T 



A SELF- 
VELOPE . " 

1250 PRINT: PRINT" 
OURNAMENT ! 11 

1260 PRINT@480,CO$; :INPUTQ$:CLS 
1210 GOTO1000 

1280 1 RNDROBIN . BAS , COPYRIGHT 19 
87 BY RICHARD STEINBRUECK, 1109 
LAKEMONT DRIVE, VALRICO, FL 335 
94, 813/681-1526 



Listing 2: INPUT 



20 'INPUT. BAS COPYRIGHT 1987 BY 
RICHARD STEINBRUECK, ALL RIGHTS 
RESERVED this routine is to be s 
ubstitued for lines 21-29 in RND 
ROBIN. BAS 

21 DA=1:YN$="IS THIS CORRECT <Y/ 
N>":CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY TEAMS IN 
THE TOURNAMENT (5-12) 11 ;T: IF(T<5 0 
R T>12)THENCLS:GOT021 

22 DIMN$(T) ,TS$(T) ,T$(T) ,A$(T) :C 
LS: PRINT" ENTER YOUR SECOND TEAM, 

CONTINUE WITH YOUR LIST, ENTERI 
NG THE FIRST TEAM LAST .": PRINT : 
PRINT "MAX LENGTH OF NAME IS 19 C 
HAR" : FORX=lTOT: PRINT "NAME OF TEA 
M";X; :INPUTN$(X) : NEXTX: PRINTYN$ ; 
: INPUTQ$ : IFQ$="N"THEN22 

23 CLS: PRINT 11 WHAT IS THE NAME OF 
YOUR TOURNA-MENT (MAX. 4j3 CHARA 

CTERS ) 11 : INPUTTP$ : PRINTYN$ ; : INPUT 
Q$: IFQ$="N"THEN23ELSEIFLEN(TP$) > 
40THENPRINT "TOO LONG-TRY AGAIN": 
FORX= 1TO1000 : NEXTX: GOT02 3 

24 CLS: PRINT "WHAT IS THE DATE OF 
THE TOURNA- MENT (IE. MAY 10, 1 



987) ":INPUTD$, Y$:PRINTYN$; : INPUT 
Q$:IFQ$="N"THEN24ELSEDT$=D$+" , " 
+Y$ 

25 CLS : INPUT"WHAT TIME DOES THE 
TOURNAMENT START (HH,MM) NOTE 
COMMA BETWEENHOUR AND MINUTES" ;H 
,M: PRINT YN$ ; :INPUTQ$: IFQ$="N"THE 
N25ELSEIF(H<1 OR H>12 OR M<0 OR 
M>59) THEN PRINT"TRY AGAIN" : FORX= 
1TO10^ : NEXTX : GOT02 5 

26 CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY MINUTES LO 
NG IS EACH ROUND" ;L:INPUT"HOW 
LONG IS EACH BREAK BETWEEN EACH 

ROUND" ;B: PRINT YN$; : INPUTQ$ : IFQ$ 
="N"THEN26 

27 CLS: PRINT "this is the informa 
tion you haveentered" : PRINT"THER 
E ARE" ;T; "TEAMS IN ";TP$;" ON "; 

DT$ ; 11 STARTING AT 11 ;M ; "MINUTES A 
FTER" ;H; " . EACH ROUND IS";L;"MI 
NUTES LONG WITH A" ; B ; "MINUTE BRE 
AK BETWEEN EACH ROUND. ": PRINTYN$ 
: INPUTQ$ : IFQ$="N"THEN2 1 

28 PRINT"THE TEAMS ARE : " : FOR X=l 
TO T : PRINTN$ ( X ) : NEXT X:PRINTYN$ 

; :INPUTQ$:IFQ$="N"THEN21 

29 ' /R\ 



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a parallel port to support a 
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printer or our hard drive, 
and an external ROM 
switch, which allows you to 
select JDOS or an optional 
RS DOS-type ROM. It 
comes in a case and in- 
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$399 



1 26 THE RAINBOW April 1 987 



DANGEROUS BOOK At what 
point does knowledge become too 
dangerous to print? This is a ques- 
tion posed by many over the grow- 
ing popularity of The Hacker's 
Handbook, a book about breaking 
into computer systems. Many peo- 
ple feel that the proliferation of this 
sort of information is dangerous 
and will encourage computer crime. 
Publisher Eben Brown of E. Arthur 
Brown Company disagrees. "The 
only threat to computer security is 
ignorance," he says. The book ap- 
pears to be doing remarkably well. 
Brown says more than 60,000 have 
been sold and he's just taken deliv- 
ery on a third press run. The 
Hacker's Handbook is available at 
many bookstores. You can also 
order it directly from the publisher. 
The price is $12.95. Contact E. 
Arthur Brown Company, 3404 
Pawnee Drive, Alexandria, MN 
56308, (612) 762-8847. 



GENERIC? The BLACK BOX 
Basic Buffer will receive data 
through either a parallel or serial 
interface at a user-selectable baud 
rate (any of 16 between 50 bps and 
38. 4K bps), then transmit that data 
to either an RS-232 serial or Cen- 
tronics parallel printer. This device, 
priced at $349, will accommodate 
four transmission modes and has 
serial or parallel input and output 
ports for compatible cables. Both 
input and output speed and com- 
munication control switches are 
adjacent to both ports, providing 



easy access for setting configura- 
tions. With a 256K storage capacity 
that enables the user to print up to 
256 copies of its contents, the Basic 
Buffer is flexible for most business 
needs. Contact BLACK BOX Cat- 
alog, P.O. Box 12800, Pittsburgh, 
PA 15241, (412) 746-5500. 

ONLINE SURPRISE While she 
was browsing through the Kuss- 
maul Encyclopedia, an electronic 
encyclopedia on Delphi, a few 
months ago, Elizabeth M. Ferrarini 
found something most unusual — in 
addition to information on such 
computer luminaries as Steve Jobs 
and Adams Osborne, she found an 
entry about herself! "I was 
stunned," says Ferrarini. "I was 
looking for biographies of people 
who fueled the growth of microcom- 
puting. And I came across my 
name." Although she doesn't have 
as much notoriety as either Jobs or 
Osborne, her formula for writing 
about online services has received its 
share of recognition. At Spring 
Comdex, the Computer Press Asso- 
ciation gave her book, Infomania: 
The Guide to Essential Electronic 
Services, (published by Houghton 
Mifflin Company) the Best 
Computer-Book-of- the- Year 
Award. Of course, Ferrarini is un- 
doubtedly flattered with even a one- 
line mention in the encyclopedia. 
She said, "I have no idea why Wes 
Kussmaul, the founder of Delphi, or 
anyone else at the service would 
even put my name in the encyclope- 
dia . . . For more information 



about Delphi and the Kussmaul 
Encyclopedia, consult Ferrarini's 
Infomania. A whole chapter is de- 
voted to the service. In fact, Russ 
Lockwood of the Louisville Times 
said, "Few people have explored the 
curves and crossroads of the data 
highways as thoroughly as Ferra- 
rini. Along the way she checks in . . . 
at attractions such as . . . Delphi." 

COST DOWNGRADE In a move 
to further strengthen its position as 
a price/ performance leader in the 
printer marketplace, Epson Amer- 
ica Inc. ? has announced a price 
reduction on some of its products. 
Prices on the Epson LQ-800 and 
LQ-1000 24-pin dot matrix printers 
and the EX-800 and LS-86 nine-pin 
dot matrix printers will be reduced. 
The LQ-800 will be reduced from 
$799 to $699 and the LQ-1000 will 
be reduced from $1095 to $995. In 
the low-end dot matrix market, the 
LX-86 will be reduced from $349 to 
$299 and the EX-800 from $749 to 
$649. At press time, information 
was unavailable as to when these 
cost reductions would take place. 
For more information, contact 
Epson America Inc., 2780 Lomita 
Blvd., Torrance, CA 90505. 



Dave Haber has informed us that 
his programs Co Co Checkbook, 
Co Co Video Tiller and VIP Writer 
Enhancer are now available exclu- 
sively from Foxy Software, 1 1684 
Ventura Boulevard, Suite #388, 
Studio City, CA 91604. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 127 



Corrections 



"Success Mansion" (January 1987, 
Page 108): Line 1310 of the listing for 
SUCCESS was "overpacked." Due to its 
length, when it was LLISTed to the 
printer, the buffer used internally by the 
CoCo's detokenizing routine could not 
hold all of the expanded line after 
detokenization. Thus, the final 0 was 
omitted. 

The last BASIC statement in the line 
should be GDTD430, whereas it now lists 
as GDTD43. To add the final zero to the 
line, enter EDIT1310. Then press X to 
get to the editor's "extend mode" and 
press 0 as the last character. Press 



ENTER and save the corrected listing. 
Also, Line 10 of the program contains 
a FILES statement that will wreak 
havoc with tape systems. If you are 
using tape and encounter this problem, 
just reenter Line 10 as follows: 

10 CLEAR 1024 



"Baseball Card File" (May 1986, 
Page 66): If you try to edit a card with 
the present version of BRSEBRLL, the 
card will disappear. To correct this, 
make the following changes: 



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Line 650 


- reverse the positions 




to N1$=N$ 


Line 680 


- reverse the positions 




to T1$=T$ 


Line 710 


- reverse the positions 




to Y1$=Y$ 


Line 740 


- reverse the positions 




to C1$=C$ 



Also, change Line 770 to read: 

IF LEFTS [ 0$, 1 ) 0"Y" THEN M1$=M 
$:GDTD790 






"Date Tracking Through the 
Ages" (January 1987, Page 46): 
Roger Bouchard has written to tell of 
some corrections to his program, 
The Last Calendar. First, Line 570 
should read: 

570 FDR ML=0TD BM-2: J=J+M 
(ML) :NEXT 

Also, in lines 160 and 660, the 
value of 40 should be changed to 3G. 
This value appears only once in each 
line. Finally, lines 100 and 1 10 con- 
tain the printer control codes neces- 
sary to enable the elongated charac- 
ter mode and disable this mode, 
repectively. Change them to suit your 
particular printer. 



"Escape From the Bug Zone" 
(January 1987, Page 58): Eugene 
Vasconi has informed us of some 
typographical errors that appeared 
in his article. These errors may be 
confusing to newcomers. Both errors 
appear on Page 59. First, the sixth 
line in column two should read: 

PLPY"T255L255;D1; 
RBCDEF;XZ$;" 

The other error is in Line 35 of 
Column three. The sentence that 
contains the error should read: 

"Your problem then becomes 
the X=X*2 statement, which maybe 
needed to be an X=X+2." 

For quicker reference, Corrections 
will be posted on Delphi as soon as 
they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. 
Just type DRTR at the CoCo SIG 
prompt and INFD at the Topic? 
prompt. 



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OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • COD. ADD $2.00 



128 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



RAINBOW REVIEW 



Art Gallery 

Display Your Pictures With Sty\e/Tothian Software, Inc 135 

Bouncing Boulders 

A Gem of a Game/Diecom Products 139 

Bowling League Secretary 

Compiles Team Sco res/ Tomela "Co 140 

CoCo III Font Bonanza 

Four-Star Utility/ Sped rum Projects, Inc 148 

CoCoSize 

Shape Up With CoCo/Kromico Software 143 

CMOS Conversion Kit 

Portable Power for the CoCo 3/CMOS Conversions 138 

Color Connection 

Telecommunications With Versatility/Computerware 134 

Educational Software 

Rules of Writing/ Yor/c 10 Software 142 

Filesafe 

Lets You Control Program Access/ Emerald Island Software 145 

FKEYS III 

More From Your CoCo Keyboard/Spectrum Projects, Inc 142 

Full Screen Editor & Varisave 

Convenience and Flexibility/ Warren <& Associates 144 

Introductory Spanish Courseware 

Help With Fundamentals/Dorset Education Software 146 

Presidential Decisions of George Washington 

Match Wits With the President/65 Software 147 

Quotes 

So-So News for Game Show Buffs/S. Erickson Software 137 

Rocky's Boots 

Creative Problem-Solving/Tfre Learning Company 132 

Super Programming Aid 

Enhances CoCo 3 Capabilities/Bangerf Software Systems 136 

The Word Search Game 

Word Puzzle Generator/ A/f/Tcaron Software 140 




RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, 
examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been issued to: 



An Algorithm That Works, a book 
that contains routines that make 
animation from BASIC look almost 
like machine language. The book 
explains the methods used and in- 
cludes listings of the routines plus 
tips on animation, programming 
techniques and a text screen clear 
subroutine. Right Brothers Soft- 
ware, 1173 Niagara Street, Denver, 
CO 80220; (303) 377-3409, $9.95 
plus $2 S/H. Accompanying disk, 
$5.90. 

BSS Disk Manager, a disk manage- 
ment utility for the CoCo 3. This 
program lets you view your disk 
directory, move, copy, print, re- 
name, transfer and kill files. Select 
a subset of names or work with the 
entire directory at one time. Bangert 
Software Systems, Box 21056, Indi- 
anapolis, IN 46221; (317)262-8865, 
$14.95 plus $2 S/H. 

Backup, a backup utility for the 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3. This program fea- 
tures an onscreen window that dis- 
plays data being backed up; error 
bypass; 35-, 36-, 40- and 80-track 
compatibility; backs up 10 tracks at 
a time. Backup ///features all of the 
above but makes use of the full 128K 
in the CoCo 3. Brainchild Software, 
Route #5, Calhoun, GA 30701; 
Backup , $8.95; Backup III $10.95, 
plus $2 S/ H. 

Bargain Disk, two-disk package 
containing classroom drill pro- 
grams. Titles include Build-A- 
Word, Guess My Word, Error Trap 
Spelling, Error Trap Number Facts, 



Guess My Number, Skip Counting, 
Robot Counting, Flash Card Drill 
and Counting Things. Thompson 
House, P.O. Box 58, Kamloops, 
B.C., Canada V2C 5K3; $22.95. 

Cave Walker, a 64K OS-9 program 
that combines the challenge of an 
Adventure with the excitement of an 
arcade game. Grab your hat and 
enter the legendary Cave of the 
Mystics. Within this underground 
palace, magical spells and treasures 
abound. Requires one disk drive 
and joystick, and features enhanced 
color graphics available under OS- 
9 Level II. Tandy Corporation, 
Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide; $24.95. 

1 r\ I H 13 >✓ ¥ W 
Champion, an arcade-type Adven- 
ture game. Take on the role of 
superhero and become a crusader 
for all that is right and good. Use 
special powers to fight the criminal 
mastermind, Mr. Bigg, and his sin- 
ister followers. This 64K game has 
Hi-Res graphics and sound effects, 
and requires a joystick. Mark Data 
Products, 24001 Alicia Parkway, 
No. 207, Mission Viejo, CA 92691; 
(714) 768-1551, Disk only, $27.95. 

Color Computer 3 Basics and 
Graphics, a guide to using the CoCo 
3. Includes descriptions of the 64 
composite and RGB colors plus 
palette suggestions, as well as re- 
views of hardware and software for 
the CoCo 3. A disk with pictures 
and programs is provided. Moreton 
Bay Software, 316 Castillo Street, 
Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 
962-3127, $19.95. 



Computer Bible Trivia, a 64K game 
requiring one disk drive. This pro- 
gram contains over 600 questions 
about the Bible. Player selects book 
of the Bible and answers questions. 
For CoCo 1 , 2 or 3. Sovereign Grace 
Software, 221 Highview Drive, Ball- 
win, MO 63011; (314) 227-3238, 
$17.50 plus $2.50 S/H. 

The SECA Coupon Filer, a 64K 

management system designed to 
help the buyer track store coupons. 
This program will handle up to 200 
coupons, and the user can add, 
delete, search for expiration dates or 
select coupons for use. For CoCo 1 
or 2. SECA, P.O. Box 3134, Gulf- 
port, MS 39505; (601 ) 832-8236, 
Disk only, $19.98 plus $3 S/H. 

Directory Viewer, a 64K program to 
transfer and catalog directories of 
other disks to one index disk. The 
program will also let the user re- 
cover a lost disk due to a directory 
crash by transferring the directory 
from the index disk back to the 
damaged file. For CoCo 1, 2 or 3. 
SECA, P.O. Box 3134, Gulf port, 
MS 39505; (601 ) 832-8236, Disk 
only, $19.98 plus $3 S/H. 

Disto Super RAM 3, a 512K mem- 
ory upgrade for the new CoCo 3. 
Includes step-by-step instructions 
for solderless installation. This 
plug-in card is compatible with OS- 
9 Level II. C.R.C. Computer, Inc., 
10802 LaJeunesse, Ste. 102, Mont- 
real, Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8; 
(514) 383-5293, $99.95. 



1 30 THE RAINBOW April 1 987 



FKEYS III Version 1.0, a function 
key utility designed for the CoCo 1, 
2 or 3, Can be programmed for 20 

different functions using the Fl and 
F2 keys. Custom versions can be 
saved to disk and loaded into RAM 
or programmed into an EPROM. 
Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 
264, Howard Beach, NY 11414; 
(718)835-1344, $24.95 plus S3 S/H. 



File Viewer, a 64K program to 
enable the user to view all files on 
a disk on the screen at one time. 
Each file is displayed with its file 
code. Using one of the single com- 
mand keys, the user can load and 
execute most BASIC or machine 
language programs. For CoCo 1, 2 
or 3. SECA, P.O. Box 3134 , Gulf- 
port, MS 39505; (601) 832-8236, 
Disk only, $19.98 plus $3 S/H. 



Fourcube, a three-dimensial exten- 
sion of tic-tac-toe. The board con- 
sists of a 4-by-4-by-4 grid of cells 
and six levels of difficulty. This 32K 
game can be played by one or two 
players using the keyboard or joy- 
sticks. For CoCo 1, 2or3. Tom Mix 
Software, 4285 Bradford NE, 
Grand Rapids, MI 49506; (616) 957- 
0444, Disk $18.95; Tape $15.95 plus 
$3 S I II . 

The SECA Fraction Review, a 64 K 
high resolution game designed to 
aid the student in learning the basic 
concepts of adding and subtracting 
fractions. The student can select 
common and non-common denom- 
inators, and single- or double-digit 
denominators. Recommended for 
students in grades five through 
eight. For CoCo 1, 2 or 3. SECA, 
P.OBox3134, Gulf port, MS 39505; 
(601) 832-8236, Disk only, $24.98 
plus $3 S/H 

Gold Finder, a 32K arcade game 
requiring one or two joysticks. 
Players advance through 69 levels 



picking up pieces of gold while 
avoiding the enemies. For CoCo 1, 

2 or 3. Tom Mix Software, 4285 
Bradford NE, Grand Rapids, MI 
49506; (616) 957-0444, $27, 

Lunchtime, a 32K game requiring 
joysticks. Your chef, Peter Pepper, is 
surrounded. Dodge pickles, hot 
dogs and eggs while building ham- 
burgers. This Hi-Res game features 
seven levels of difficulty for one or 
two players. For CoCo 1, 2 or 3. 
Tom Mix Software, 4285 Bradf ord 
NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49506; (61 6) 
957-0444, Disk $21.95; Tape $18.95 
plus $3 S/ H. 

an enhancement to CoCo 

3 Disk BASIC 1.1 operating system. 
New commands include XRUN, 
which uses the same syntax as 
LOfiDM; LCASE to input in lowercase 
mode; MDIR lists a two-column 
directory to the screen and allows 
you to load and run a program with 
a point and click of the mouse or 
joystick; MOUSE puts all characters 
on the keyboard on the top two lines 
of the screen; VOICE controls RS 
speech synthesizer; SAY lets the 
computer talk to you. Versions are 
also available for the CoCo 1 and 2. 
Hawksoft, 307 Sexauer Avenue, 
Elgin, IL 60123; (312) 742-3Q84, 
Software, $15; Customized 
EPROM, $35. 

Soundscope, a 16K program to 
make sound waves visible. The user 
can play a cassette of music or 
conversation and view the continu- 
ally changing patterns onscreen in 
one of various possible modes. 



Screens can be frozen for closer 
study or printed using any screen 
dump program. Tot hi an Software, 
Box 663, Rimer sburg f PA 1 6248; 
tape or disk, $19.95, 



Stop Burn, a machine language 
utility that darkens the text screen 
when you leave your CoCo unat- 
tended. Once installed, the program 
works automatically, Lucas Indus- 
tries 2000, 14720 Cedar Street NE, 
Alliance, OH 44601; (216)823-4221, 
$15. 



TV Blackout Bingo, plays up to 50 
bingo cards as you play your favor- 
ite TV bingo game. Supplied with 
the disk and manual is a code plug 
to be installed in the right joystick 
socket of the computer. For CoCo 
1, 2 or 3. Sunrise Software, 8901 
N W 26th Street, Sunrise, FL 33322; 
(305) 748-0775, $19.95 plus $2 S/H, 



The Word Factory's Synonyms & 
Antonyms, a 64K high resolution 
game for one or two players to aid 
in learning the concepts of synonym 
and antonym usage. The program 
package consists of four separate 
programs: the game, a program to 
create new word lists, classroom 
multiple choice test sheets, and a 
spelling checker. For CoCo 1, 2 or 
3. SECA, P.O. Box 3134, Gulf port, 
MS 39505; (601) 832-8236, Disk 
only, $19.98 plus $3 S/H. 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manuf acturers of products 
for the Tandy Color GiMputer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the fjtogazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



Software Review, 



You'll Get a Kick Out of 
Rocky 's Boots 



If memory serves, we've had Rocky / through IV, Rocky 
Road (ice cream), Rocky and Bullwinkle, and now, just in 
time for those forlorn Rocky lovers, we have Rocky s Boots\ 

Indeed, an unlikely title for a book, magazine article or 
software review. But that is exactly what Rocky 's Boots is 
— software, and very good software at that. Written and 
designed by Warren Robinett, Boots has been ported over 
to the CoCo by The Learning Company. 

Boots is an exercise in science and logic cleverly disguised 
as a game. Somehow, kids seem to have a sixth sense about 
educational software no doubt, aversion conditioning 
brought on by repeated exposure to tedious and often 
downright boring programs inflicted upon them by well- 
meaning parents. With Boots, parents may forgo any 
misgivings — Rocky answers the call! 

The program is entirely self-prompting — kids, not unlike 
their parents, hate to waste time reading the instructions. 
The program is essentially an electronic erector set, replete 
with AND, OR and NOT gates, wires, switches, timers, flip- 
flops, and the like. Rocky's world is divided into rooms, 
some containing equipment, others with sensors, targets, 
instructions and game selection menus. 

The first-time visitor is taught how to move through 
Rocky's world, and then is taken on a tour of the equipment 
areas and shown how to assemble the various components. 
After an initial exploration, the program explains concepts 
and principles involved in constructing machines utilizing 
AND, OR and NOT gates. The "inventor" (player) is then 
welcomed to the game area. Here, he is presented with a 
group of unique targets and three "sensors." Rocky's 
challenge is to construct a machine (circuit) that will cause 
Rocky's boot to kick a selected subgroup of targets off of 
the conveyer belt as they move by the various sensors. As 
each sensor is activated, the inventor observes the flow of 
electricity through his machine and immediately observes 
the result of his decisions. The rapid feedback loop to the 
inventor appears to be one of the central appeals of the game 
to young folks. As the game progresses, the inventor has 
to recognize positive and negative values, and identify and 
debug glitches in his circuit — all the while applying the 
rules of logic (Boolean, combinatorial and sequential) to the 
solution of the game. Before these principles may be 
successfully employed, the young inventor must add his own 
ideas of creative problem-solving to the game. The problem 
must first be identified. In doing this the inventor finds that 
heretofore unknown powers of abstraction and inference 
are called upon. While all of this is going on, the children 
I've observed playing Boots have had an almost deliriously 
good time! They like to think (if they don't realize that some 
folks equate thinking with work). To design and build a 
functioning, animated machine and then have the imme- 
diate opportunity to see if it, indeed, does work, is 
tremendously statisfying for kids of all ages. And if it doesn't 



work? The inventor has the immediate capability to redesign 
all or part of his creation and fire it up again. No solution 
is ever wrong, but young players soon realize that some 
solutions are more efficient than others. Given a chance, the 
youngsters I watched demonstrated insights that were 
absolutely astounding. I emphasize "given a chance," as it 
is a genuine struggle for any adult to watch the game 
progress without interjecting his own ideas and suggestions. 

There is no time pressure in Boots', each player proceeds 
at his or her own pace. With the absence of wrong answers, 
nearly all negative feedback is avoided. Rather, the entire 
structure of Rocky is aimed at immediate, positive 
feedback. The graphics are excellent, with screen designs 
that are attractive^ but not so busy as to overwhelm the 
younger players. However, the joystick routines are 
mediocre at best. This appears to be the only real shortcom- 
ing. The joysticks react very slowly to the user prompts. As 
young folks are just developing fine motor and hand-eye 
coordination skills, the sluggishjoystick response is asource 
of frustration in some cases. 

The documentation for Boots is on a level befitting the 
overall excellence of this package. Each level is fully 
explained, and suggestions and concepts are outlined for the 
benefit of interested parents and teachers. While the authors 
suggest that Boots is written for ages 9 and up, the concepts 
are sufficiently well-presented so younger children may 
thoroughly enjoy and benefit from exposure to Rocky and 
his "electrifying" world. At the other extreme, Rocky has 
the capability to expand and grow in complexity as the 
inventor gains experience. A fully featured game editor is 
provided that enables you to create totally original 
problems, and a game save feature is also provided — a 
necessary complement for the more difficult levels. Children 
of all ages have a limited attention span — and who wants 
to destroy an original creation that represents real effort and 
achievement? 

Boots is supplied on a single, unprotected disk recorded 
on both sides. Minimum system requirements are 64K with 
at least one disk drive. The use of a joystick, while optional, 
greatly enhances the quality of play. Side One supplies the 
required OS-9 Level I, Version 2.0 boot routine and game 
initialization schemes. After booting OS-9, the disk is 
reversed and the game auto-executes after pressing ENTER. 

Boots will run on the CoCo 3, but it does so in black and 
white on an RGB monitor. With an 8CM515 and CoCo 2, 
the graphics are quite satisfactory, and the artif acted colors 
are visible with the CoCo 3 in the composite input mode. 

The package jacket is liberally annointed with accolades 
from such diverse sources as Time Magazine, Popular 
Computing and The New York Times. It has received the 
"Software of the Year" award from Learning Magazine, as 
well as numerous other awards in the educational software 
arena. 

If you have a CoCo 2, and any children or a vestige of 
childlike wonder for exploration and creative thinking 
yourself, give Rocky's Boots sl try — you won't be 
disappointed! 



(The Learning Co., 545 Middlefield Rd., Suite 170, Menlo 
Park, CA 94025; 415-328-5410, $34.95. Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide) 



— Henry Holzgrefe 



132 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




Computer Island Educational Software 



PROGRAM TITLE 


GRADES 


MEMORY 


PRICE 


PRESCHOOL 








Preschool 1 - counting 


Pre-K 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Preschool II - adding 


Pre-K 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Preschool III - alphabet 


Pre-K 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Music Marvel-play songs 


Pre-K, 1 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Arrow Games-6 games 


Pre-K, 1 


32K-Ext. 


21.95 


First Games-6 games 


Pre-K, 1 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


Mr. Cocohead-facemaker 


K-3 


1 6K-Ext. 


16.95 


LANvaUAvaE An 1 o 








beyona woras 1-0 pans 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


HQ QC 

iy.yo 


beyona woras ^-o pans 


6-8 


32K-Ext. 


1 Q QC 

i y.yo 


beyona woras o-o pans 


9-12 


32K-Ext. 


1 Q QC 

iy.yo 


vocaouiary i-iuuu woras 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


1 Q QC 

i y.yo 


vooaDUiary ^- iuuu woras 


6-8 


32K-Ext. 


1Q QC. 


vocaDuiary o-iuuu woras 


9-12 


32K-Ext. 


1 Q QC. 

i y.yo 


Context Clues 


4,5,6 or 7 1 6K-Ext. 


17.95 


Reading Aids - 4 parts 


2-4 


16K-Ext. 


19.95 


King Arthur-writing tool 


2-6 


1 6/32 Ext. 


29.95 


Cocowheel of Fortune 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Context Clues 


2-3 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


CLOZE Stories 


3.4,5.6 or 7 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Locating Story Details 


2-3 or 4-5 


32K-disk 


24.95 


Drawing Conclusions 


3-4 or 5-6 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Punctuation Practice 


3-7 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 








French Baseball-200 wds. 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


French Baseball-500 wds. 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Spanish Baseball-200 wds. 


4-up 


1 6K-Ext. 


1 1 .yo 


Spanish Baseball-500 wds. 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


1Q QS 


Hebrew Alphabet 


beginners 


1 6K-Ext. 


1 1 .v7<J 


Hebrew Utility 


drawing utility 


1 6K-Ext. 


1 C. QC. 

I 0.570 


CRITICAL THINKING PROBLEMS 






Find The Math Sequence 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Stranded-graphic advent. 


4-up 


32K-disk 


24.95 


TEACHER/STUDENT AIDS 






Colorgrade-gradebook 


Adult 


32K-disk 


29.95 


Quizmaker-write quizzes 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


ETT typing tutor (CocoWarehouse) 


4-up 


1 6K-Ext. 


21.95 



Disk indicates available on disk only. 

Tape prices given. 

Add $5.00 for any program on disk. 



PROGRAM TITLE 


GRADES 


MEMORY 


PRICE 


MATH 
iviM i n 








upening a ban* Accouni 


A 7 
4~ f 


OOl/ HioL 

o^r\-aiSK 




uoiiars & oense 


O A 


IDr\-tXX. 


1 A QC 


mcooco s Menu 


Q C 

o-o 


I Dr\"tXX. 


1/1 QC 

14. yo 


ivioneypaK 


9 C 


Otr\-CXX. 




orapn i uxor 


Q 7 


o^r\-tXX. 


iy.yo 


r^ranh-lt 

VjI dpi I II 


i up 


I Oi\ Ca I. 


1/1 

IH.C70 


iviain invaUcrs 


1 O 


IDI\-CXI. 


1 7 

i / .yo 


(Via IT ILfUIZ. ™*r UJJtJI a IIUI lo 


o_c 
^ o 




1 Q 


MUUIUUll Ol OUUll dUllUI 1 


on 
^ O 




1 1 QG, 

i i .yo 


Qlrill Tiitnr Qorioc 
okiii i uiur Ociics 








LHVIblUll 1 uiur 


O / 


1 Dr\-CXX. 


i*f.yo 


Kill iltir^li/^oti^n Ti i\r\r 

iviuiLipiiuaiiuri i uiur 


O / 


I DIN CXI. 


i *+.yo 


r aGiors i uior 


O"o 


IOr\"CXI. 


1Q QC. 

i y.yo 


rraCllons 1 uxors (3 programs) 








addition, subtraction or multiplication 


A Q 


lDr\-tXI. 


19.95 ea. 


i riyonornexry 


Q in 
o- 1U 


o^r\-tXX. 


9 /I QC 


CLfUallUrib Lineal 


7-Q 


o^r\-cxx. 


1Q QC 

iy.yo 


Pnnationc OnaHratio 
^LfUaiiuiio Njcuauiauu 


O I I 


0£r\ CAl. 


1Q QC. 

I c7. C70 


Arith. Diagnostic Disk 


3-8 


32K-disk 


49.95 


Fraction Diagnostic Disk 


4-9 


32K-disk 


49.95 


Verbal Problems Series 








Distance Problems 


5-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Area & Perimeter 


5-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Pizza Game 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Sales & Bargains 


6-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Comparison Shopping 


4-7 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Binary Dice Game 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


SOCIAL STUDIES 








Know Your States 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


History Game 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


14.95 


States & Capitals 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Explorers & Settlers 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Famous American Women 


6-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Street Map Game 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


19,95 


MISCELLANEOUS 








Name That Song 1 ,2 or 3 


2-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Music Drill 


3-up 


16K-Ext. 


19.95 


Science Game 


8-up 


32K-disk 


29.95 


Computer Literacy 


6-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


5 Educational Programs 


1-2 or 






with Lightpen 


3-6 


32K-disk 


44.95 


Chemistry Tutor 


10-up 


32K-disk 


29.95 



I 



i 





RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 




V/SA 



(71 8) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add S1 .00 per order for postage. N.V. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



Software Review^ 



Every CoCo Can Make the 
Color Connection 



Many changes have been made to the latest version of 
Color Connection from Computerware. This excellent 
telecommunications package has consistently reflected a 
high level of versatility, but with the enhancements for the 
new CoCo 3, this program is an outstanding value from any 
standpoint. 

When you buy the program, you are supplied with a 
version for the earlier CoCos and the CoCo 3. Users of the 
earlier versions of Color Connection will readily recognize 
it; it has been enhanced to take advantage of the new CoCo's 
superior capabilities, rather than changed as a whole. It has 
three outstanding features that lift it head and shoulders 
above most other terminal packages for the Color Comput- 
er now on the market. 

The first of these is the capability of Color Connection 
to output 300, 600 and 1200 baud through the rear serial 
I/O port of the CoCo 3. This means that a 1200 baud Hayes- 
compatible modem can be connected directly to the CoCo 
3, and the program's command sets will drive the modem 
for auto-answer/ auto-dial. Some Radio Shack modems 
with auto-answer/auto-dial are also supported. Color 
Connection can be used with the Radio Shack Deluxe RS- 



J&R ELECTRONICS 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

"JramR" 

51 2K COCO 3 Memory Expansion Board. Upgrades stock 128K COCO 3 to full 
512K for 0S9 Level II. Similar to RS upgrade. 



COCO I & II ONLY 

Pari number Price Description 

HI 001 S39.95 Banker II bare board (with lon§ pin socket, does not include memory 

Expansion Board) 

# 1 002 S69.95 Banker II bare hoard + parts (does not include Memory Expansion 8oard} 

« 1 003 S89.95 Banker II assembled & lested (no memory) 

JM004 S129.95 Banker II (256K. upgradable 10 51 2K) assembled & lested with memory 

WI005 S169.95 Banker II (512K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1006 SI 5.00 Memory Expansion Board 

tf 1007 S29.95 Memocy Expansion Board + pans 



ALL software is configurable for 256K/512K operation 

Soltv/are shipped on disk, add $10.00 (or software on tape. (0S9 RAM DISK ool available on tape). 

ALL boards aboveare256K/512K capable, sollware & documentation included 

New SAM (74LS785) not included {use your 74LS783). 74LS785 recommended lor 2 0 MHz operation. 



COCO 3 ONLY 

d \ 0 1 0 S39.95 JramR bare hoard plus connectors and soil ware 

SI 01 ) SI 09.95 JramR kil includes all parts plus memory chips and software 

*1012 SI 39.95 JramR assembled and lested plus memory cliips and soflware 

Soltware includes — deluxe cuslomizable ramdisk & spooler, memory 
tesl. and ramdisk utility programs 



MISCELLANEOUS 

49002 S5.00 64K switch 

49004 S24.95 New SAM 74LS785 (required only lor 2.0 MHz operation) 

49005 S24.95 Power Basic (Requires RSD0S 1.0 or 1 1 and 256K or 512K Banker) 

Utilize (be extra memory ior variable storage and pass variables between 
pro§rams in diltcrent pages of memory. Split a large BASIC program into 
smaller pieces and GOTO or G0SUB a line in another page of memory 
and more features included, (disk only) 
K9006 StO 00 S/WPac upgrade. 1 XX to 2.XX 

.19007 S19.95 Software Pac lor COCO 3 includes deluxe ramdisk & spooler both highly 

customizable by user Memory tesl and ramdisk utility programs 

To place an order, write to J&R Electronics. P.D Box 2572. Columbia. M0 21045. 
OR call (301) 987-9067 - Jesse or (30 1 ) 788-0861 — Ray 

HOURS. Weekdays 7 p.m. -9 p m Sat Ncon-5 p.m EASTERN TIME, usually, if no answer try later 

Add S4.00 shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS S7 00). COO charge S3 00 Maryland residents add 
5% suite tax 

CHECKS. MONEY ORDERS OR COD's only please (personal check— 2 weeks for clearance) IMME- 
DIATE DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model « (i.e 26-3136). Disk or Tape uihen ordering 

0UANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For inlormation on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 
788-0861 COCO II 26-3IXX owners call (solderinf experience may be required) 

Software includes —deluxe customizable lamdisk & spooler, memory test, and ramdisk utility programs. 



1 34 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



232 pack, providing baud rates of 300 to 9,600 bps (bits per 
second). 

Color Connection's second outstanding feature is the new 
option 4 G' from the main menu, the video set feature. This 
allows the user of the CoCo 3 with a color composite or 
the new Analog RGB monitor to set an amber, green or 
blue screen, or the inverses of these colors in 40-, 60- or 80- 
column widths. The image is incredibly crisp and clear in 
all modes on the CM-8 RGB. The amber tends to look more 
like a lime green than a yellow, however. 

A third feature of this program is its file transfer 
protocols. Color Connection supports Xmodem, Xon/Xoff 
and CompuServe 4 B' protocol file transfer modes. This 
feature alone makes the program worth the purchase price. 
I tested the buffer dump and upload /download features of 
this program extensively and it operated flawlessly under 
all conditions. 



"This is a feature-packed 
program that can handle all 
your telecomputing needs . . ■ " 



Several more added features should be noted: Color 
Connection has a 65 K buffer. That is a full 65K of user space 
at a time. Buffer space remaining is displayed online in 
terminal mode. The CONTROL key is now used both for 
menu commands and to send control characters, instead of 
the CLEAR key. 

I only found a few minor drawbacks to the program, 
which are at the annoyance level when encountered, but the 
prospective user should be aware of them. The manual is 
well-written and understandable, but must be read to fully 
utilize the program's features. There is no online help, and 
while the program is menu-driven, there are places where 
a specific answer is required to change an option and the 
manual must be consulted to determine how to do this. 

The control codes while online were not always func- 
tional. There were times when the computer was accepting 
or transmitting data when it simply would not respond to 
a control sequence until the transmissions had stopped. 
Lastly, in the Keyboard to Buffer feature, where the user 
can input directly to the buffer from the keyboard, it is 
possible to erase all or most of a screen of data by hitting 
the CLEAR key accidentally on the CoCo 3. Also, when I 
went to input more information after viewing a buffer, what 
had been there was gone. So save that buffer first. 

Aside from these drawbacks, this is a feature-packed 
program that can handle all your telecomputing needs, most 
effectively, with class and with style. There is, of course, the 
disk-based introduction to data communications, which can 
teach the new user quite a lot about what is going on behind 
the scenes with a modem. I recommend the Color Connec- 
tion for the Color Computer 3 without reservation. 

(Computerware, P.O. Box 668, Encinitas, CA 92024; 619- 
436-3512, $49.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Jeffrey Parker 



Software Review 

Art Gallery Displays Your 
Pictures With Style 

If you are the type of computer buff who enjoys showing 
off your CoCo picture collection, Art Gallery will really ad d 
some pizazz to your show. 

Art Gallery is a graphics utility for your 32K ECB Color 
Computer 1, 2 or 3 and requires one disk drive. The BASIC 
and machine language programs are not copy-protected, so 
back-up copies for your own use are not a problem. 

Upon running GALLERY, a title page is displayed, 
prompting you to select in which PMODE you want to display 
your pictures. You can select 3 or 4, with a default of 4 when 
you press ENTER. You will then be asked which graphics 
screen you want. You can select 0 or 1, with a default of 
1 . Next, the program asks what extension is used to identify 
your pictures. You can choose PIX, PIC or whatever 
extension is used for the pictures on your disk. I should 
point out here that this program will not display CoCo Max 
or Graphicom pictures. 




The program is written to read picture files that are four 
pages, or 6,144 bytes (6K) long. Details are provided in the 
one-page instruction sheet that explains how to re-save 
pictures that are non-standard or machine language 
generated and can be made to read OS-9 based pictures 
created with Micro-Illustrator. 

After typing in the picture file extension, a second screen 
appears that allows you to choose from 1 1 special effects. 
It's nearly impossible to describe what each of these special 
effects does, so just take my word for it when I tell you that 
here is where the fun begins! 

After making your selection, you are asked if you want 
to display one or all of the pictures on your disk. You are 
also asked how long you want each picture to be displayed 
in seconds. If you select 0 for all special effects and 5 for 
display time, then a combination of all the special effects 
will be used to display the number of pictures you chose. 

I tried all of the options on several of my favorite picture 
disks and was delighted with the results. My favorites were 



the curtains, nested squares, mirror and slices. I guess I liked 
slices better than all of them. The picture appears in ever- 
widening bars, like looking through Venetian blinds as they 
gradually open. All of them are good and many reminded 
me of the special effects we see in commercial TV graphics 
productions. Several sample pictures are included on the 
disk to get you acquainted with the various features, but 
I found my own collection of digitized pictures to be the 
most interesting. 

As with most any computer program, this one is not 
without flaws. I found two design problems with Art 
Gallery. The first was that when selecting the special effects, 
the choice is not displayed. This causes some minor 
confusion, since you are never quite sure if your selection 
was actually made. The second and more serious flaw occurs 
if you select only one picture to be displayed. After this 
selection is made and the picture is displayed, you are 
returned to the same submenu to select another single 
picture. I was unable to figure out how to get back to the 
main special effects menu without breaking out of the 
program and re-running it. 

In spite of these two problems, Art Gallery is still a good 
program. On a scale of 1 to 5, I give this one a 4. 



(Tothian Software, Inc., Box 669, Rimersburg, PA 16248; 
$19.95) 

— Jerry Semones 



Formaker 

clean paperwork for business 



"It win give the small or home business professional-looking 
forms and effortless, errorlesstotals, accounting for taxes, 
discounts, shipping and deposits." 

The rainbow, May 1986 

menu driven 

customize for your company 
on screen Instructions 
creates: Invoice, quote, purchase order, rainbow 
mall order, receipt, letter CM " r ZE? THm 
printer customization &ACk 
and much, much more ^49 32K ECB disc 

"You have to look good to the customer . . . This program 
helps . . . by providing neat, well-prepared forms . . ." 

The RAINBOW, May 1986 




Makes learning so much fun ... rainbow 
. . . that kids think its a game! CEn ;™ 

Letter and number recognition. Ages 2 to 6 

$24 32K ECB disc or tape 

"If you are looking for a program to teach young children 
the alphabet, numbers and early vocabulary super tutor 
may fit the bill." The RAINBOW, June 1986 

Send for more Information: 

Challenger Software 

42 4th Street 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 
Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 135 



Software Review 

Super Programming Aid 
Enhances CoCo 3 Capabilities 

By C.L. Pilipauskas 

Here they come! The new CoCo 3 hasn't been out very 
long, but already programs are starting to show up. I had 
figured that with all the new graphics capabilities and 
increased speed, my first review for the CoCo 3 would be 
a game. To my surprise, I'm reviewing a utility — Super 
Programming Aid. 

This utility was written for the CoCo 3 and takes 
advantage of some of its new capabilities. It is designed to 
aid the BASIC programmer by adding features not found on 
the CoCo 3. The version I received (Version III) is on disk 
and contains six programs. The first is a BASIC loader 
program (SPA.BAS), which can be customized and which 
loads the actual utility (SPA. BIN). 

Also included are the default command table 
(SPATBL.BIN), a printer spooler (SPL.BIN), a command 
editing program (SPAEDIT .BAS), and a sample command 
table file (SAMPLE .BIN). This utility is not copy-protected 
and should be backed up before using. 

The program is well-documented with a 33-page manual, 
and it explains the use of the program fairly well. The only 
major omission from the documentation is examples. This 
program is complex enough to warrant some, especially for 
the beginner programmer. 

The functions of Super Programming Aid are activated 
by a series of keystrokes starting with the control key (CTRL) 
followed by another key or a shifted key. If youVe ever used 
a computer or terminal that used the CTRL key for anything, 
you know it is used like the SHIFT key — press and hold 
while hitting another key. In this utility, the CTRL key is used 
as two separate key presses. Press and release the CTRL key, 
and then press and release the other key to activate the 
function. 

Super Programming A id includes the following features: 

1) Auto Line Numbers — Automatically generates line 
numbers as you type in your BASIC program; you pick the 
starting number and the range. It has error-checking that 
prevents accidentally typing over existing lines. 

2) Screen Editing — A line editor similar to the Extended 
BASIC line editor, with some additional features such as 
insert mode, overtype mode, delete, cursor movement by 
arrow keys and line number editing. When you press the 
keys to go to the end of the line, you don't go to the last 
character in the line but to the end of the BASIC line buffer. 
If only a few characters are in the BASIC line, the cursor ends 
up several blank lines away. 

3) Keyboard Clicker Creates a noise when a key is 
pressed; can be toggled on or off. 

4) Suspend Command — Suspends (hides and protects) 
the current program in memory and al lows you to load and 
edit, run another program or append the second program 
or file. 



5) Copy Command Screen editor function that non- 
destructive^ copies a chunk of the BASIC program elsewhere 
in the same program; does extensive error-checking to 
prevent overwriting existing codes. 

6) Move Command Another screen editor function. 
This is a destructive copy (deletes the original code after the 
move) and does the same error-checking as Copy Com- 
mand . 

7) Find Command Searches for a string up to 17 
characters long i n the BASIC program in memory; allows for 
multiple search of the same string. 

8) Program Terminate - "Unhooks" itself from BASIC in 
an orderly fashion and stops execution of the utility. 

9) Scrolling Up or Down Allows for line-by-line 
viewing of the program in memory. 

10) Typ-O-Matic Toggles on or off the auto-repeat of 
a key held down for more than half a second and continues 
until released. 

I I) BASIC Program Formatting — Reformats the way the 
BASIC program is listed by breaking up long statements into 
pieces determined by the V and printing each piece indented 
on a separate line. (j 

12) Clear Key Disable — Turns the CLEAR key on or off 
to prevent accidental erasure of a line while it's being typed 
Tn. 

13) Command Keys — Allows you to define any key 
(some exceptions are listed in the manual) to represent any 
sequence of keystrokes you want. This feature is an option 
when you start the utility. If chosen, it loads in a table of 
key definitions, either the default provided by the author 
or one you generate with the Command Editor Program. 

14) Screen Print Command — Prints anything on the 
high resolution text screen (40- or 80-character) to the line 
printer. With this feature, an optional print spooler can be 
activated when you first run this program — allowing 
multitasking of the printer and BASIC. 

15) Programmable Command Key - - This is one key that 
is not defined by the utility, so you can use it for whatever 
you want. It can be defined and redefined, but it can't be 
saved like the others. 

As you can see, Super Programming Aid provides a 
wealth of features. It is available for the older CoCos and 
the manual describes a procedure for converting Command 
Tables from Versions I and II to Version III tables. 

To summarize a bit, this utility adds many features that 
could make life easier for a BASIC programmer. It provides 
outstanding error-checking to prevent you from acciden- 
tally doing anything destructive. The manual is extensive 
but might be a little confusing to the neophyte. 

1 was not able to discover any bugs or problems with this 
program while I was using it, and I tried! I feel adding key- 
repeat to the line editor and scrolling, putting more 
examples in the manual, and changing the editor to stop 
at the last character in the buffer could improve this 
program. 

If you do a lot of BASIC programming, you should find 
Super Programming Aid helpful. 

(Bangert Software Systems, P.O. Box 21056, Indianapolis, 
IN 46221; 317-262-8865, $29.95 plus $2 S/H) 



136 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Software Review! 



. . . ♦ * ■ ♦•*♦»•»*« 



Quotes: So-So News for 
Game Show Buffs 



Aha! Caught you .... There you go, sneaking off to go 
watch game shows again. Come back for a second , will you? 
I'd like to talk with you about some new Color Computer 
software. It works on a 32K CoCo 1, 2 or 3 (in CoCo 2 
mode) with a disk drive, and can really be loads of fun. 
What's that? You can't miss Wheel of Fortunel It's your 
favorite game show? Well, read on. 

Quotes by B. Erickson Software is a game for one to eight 
players based on The Wheel of Fortune. Just pop the copy- 
protected disk in the drive and type LDRDM "QUOTES". Pretty 
soon, you and your friends will be buying vowels, guessing 
letters, and trying to figure out what the famous quote, 
saying, or proverb really is. But it's the wheel you'll have 
to watch out for. It can give you up to 5,000 points for a 
correct answer, depending on where it lands, or it can 
instantly make you bankrupt. After the wheel tells you your 
fate, you can either guess at a letter, buy a vowel with $100 
of your hard-earned cash, or try to guess at the whole 
phrase. 

Just in case you need to brush up on how to play, Quotes 
is accompanied by a well-written booklet that thoroughly 
explains the program. 

Quotes has practically everything the TV show has, with 
the exception of a hostess to turn the letters. Oh, also, no 
prize boats or cars here. You do, however, have 256 quotes 
that will be randomly presented for your guessing pleasure. 
This should be enough to keep you busy for a while, but 
you may run into repeats more often as you keep playing. 
More quotes wouldn't hurt. 

But, before all you Wheel of Fortune addicts go running 
to your checkbooks, let's balance the positive and negative 
sides of Quotes. 

On the positive side, Quotes is a fun game, especially if 
you enjoy the game show. It is well thought-out, and bug- 
free. And, you can have all your friends over to gather 
'round and play for an evening. 

On the negative side, Quotes has no graphics, just text, 
and while this is formatted well, it isn't as visually enticing. 
Further, I found the game to get rather boring after playing 
for a while. Now, there are probably tons of Wheel of 
Fortune fans out there who would disagree, but I still feel 
that, while fun at first, the game gets tedious rather quickly. 

Finally, Quotes is, in my estimation, overpriced for what 
it actually does. If the game had graphics or 1,000 quotes, 
I could easily see paying $25 for it, but not as it now stands. 

Still, if you do like games such as this, I think you'll find 
Quotes a well-organized, well-written game. It really 
depends on whether this sort of thing is your cup of tea. 

(B. Erickson Software, P.O. Box 11099, Chicago, IL 60611; 
312-276-9712, $25) 

— Eric W. Tilenius 



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Back copies of many issues of the 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents 
for each additional issue for postage and 
handling if sent by United Parcel Service. 
There is a $5 charge for the first issue, 
plus a$1 charge for each additional issue 
on orders sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not 
deliver to a post office box or to another 
country. 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 
are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All others are in regular magazine 
form. VISA, MasterCard and American 
Express accepted. Kentucky residents 
please add 5 percent state sales tax. In 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
and no C.O.D. orders are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
orderthe back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To order, just fill out the form on the 
next page and mail it with your payment 
to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 137 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions,) 
(Payment must accompany back issue orders. We do not bill.) 



Hardware Review t 



NO. MONTH 

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1 AUGUST 

2 SEPTEMBER 

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6 JANUARY 

7 FEBRUARY 

8 MARCH 

9 APRIL 

10 MAY 

11 JUNE 

12 JULY 

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2 SEPTEMBER 

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4 NOVEMBER 

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8 MARCH 

9 APRIL 



□ Please send me the following back issues: 



YEAR 

'81 
'81 
'81 
'81 
'81 
'81 
'82 
82 
'82 
'82 
'82 

'83 
'83 

'83 
'83 
'83 
'83 
'84 
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"86 
'86 
'86 
'87 
'87 
'87 
'87 



VOLUME 1 

PREMIER ISSUE 

EDUCATION 
PRINTER 

HOLIDAY 



VOLUME 2 

PRINTERS 
ANNIVERSARY 

VOLUME 3 
GAMES 
EDUCATION 
GRAPHICS 
HOLIDAY 
BUSINESS 
GAMING 
PRINTER 
MUSIC 

ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 4 

GAMES 

EDUCATION 

GRAPHICS 

DATA COMM. 

HOLIDAY 

BEGINNERS 

UTILITIES 

BUSINESS 

SIMULATIONS 

PRINTER 

MUSIC 

ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUMES 

GAMES 

EDUCATION 

GRAPHICS 

DATA COMM. 

BEGINNERS 

UTILITIES 

BUSINESS 

HOME HELP 

PRINTER 

MUSIC 

ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 6 

GAMES 

EDUCATION 

GRAPHICS 

DATA COMM. 

HOLIDAY 

BEGINNERS 

UTILITIES 

BUSINESS 

HOME HELP 



PR !CE 

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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to our first three years. July 1981 
through June 1984, is printed in its entirety in our July 1984 Issue. 
Separately bound copses are also avaiiable$2 50 O 

Note: Our Fourth and Fifth Year indexes, including RAINBOW ON TAPE 
indexes, are included in the July 1985 and 1986 issues, respectively 

TOTAL 



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| To order by phone {credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309. 8 a.m. 
| to 5 p.ffv EST. Alt other inquiries call (502) 228-4492 



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C M OS Con vers ion K.iti 
he Chips Are Down 



This product consists of two 40-pin chips wrapped in 
antistatic plastic. These are H itachi HD63B2 1 P and Hitachi 
63B09EP chips, These two chips are accompanied by 
information and suggested circuitry on how to make your 
CoCo 3 "portable." 

The first page of the instructions points out how much 
less power the 63B09E uses than does the 68B09E* It 
presents quite accurate electronic specs to document this. 
It also correctly points out that the 63B2I uses about V12 
the power of a 68B21. The documentation also correctly 
points out that the GIME chip i n t he CoCo 3 is a low-power 
CMOS chip that consumes far less power than the old SAM 
VDG combination in the older model CoCos. So far so 
good. 

But then the instructions allege that if you replace your 
CoCo 3's 68B09E with their 63B09E and your 68B21 with 
their 63B21 you will have taken a significant step toward 
making your CoCo 3 portable. They provide a suggested 
circuit for running your CoCo 3 from a 1 2-volt battery pack. 

However: 

[) Both the 68B09E and the 68B21 on the CoCo 3 are 
soldered directly to the board. Removing and replacing 40- 
pin ICs without damaging the PC board is not a trivial 
matter, even if you are a skilled electronicservicetechnician. 

2) The amount of power consumption reduction afforded 
by the Conversion still amounts to only about a 20 percent 
total reduction in use by the CoCo 3. 

3) Furthermore, their suggested circuit for running the 
CoCo from that battery uses a monolithic linear regulator 
to drop 12 volts to regulated 10 volts, then allow that 10 
volts to be dropped to regulated 5 volts by the CoCo's 
inefficient on-board linear regulator circuitry. This is poor 
design in a "portable" unit, for such design throws away, 
as heat, over half of the available power in the battery pack. 
The right way to achieve portability is to use efficient 
switching power converters to produce regulated 5 volts, 
and feed that directly to the CoCo board. 

4) You still need to use a monitor with your "portable" 
computer, and you still need to hook up a disk drive, and 
power that stuff in some way as well. 

Finally, CMOS Conversions is asking S49.50 for the 
63B09E chip and S 19.50 for the 63B21 chip. I called my local 
H itachi regional office, got the name of my local distributor, 
and they informed that the single quantity price of the 
63B09E is S 12.50, and the single quantity price of the 63B21 
chip is S3. 5 1 . 

In conclusion, this product consists of misinformation on 
power supply design applications and two overpriced 
Hitachi ICs. 

(CMOS Conversions, 480 Oakrfale R«a4 NE #3, Atlanta, 
GA 30307; 404-681-0581, 43B09E chip, $49.50; *3B2i chip, 
$19.50) 

— Marty GMdman 



138 



THE RAINBOW 



April 1987 



Software Review, 



Bouncing Boulders: 
A Gem of a Game 



Bouncing Boulders is a funny, fast-paced arcade game for 
the 64K ECB Color Computer. A joystick is optional but 
highly recommended. The program is supplied on tape or 
disk and is copy-protected, but Diecomwill replace it during 
the first year if problems arise. 

After loading, the program executes automatically. A 
color test screen precedes the main title and score screen. 
Ten levels of play are incorporated, with each getting 
progressively more difficult. 




Tine Left: 88- 



The object of Bouncing Boulders is to move your man 
around the screen and collect all of the buried gems, then 
advance to the next and harder screen. When you have 
collected all of the gems on a particular screen, the screen 
flashes green and sounds a tone to signal you to go to the 
flashing exit square. If you fail to complete the screen within 
the allotted time, you lose a man and have to start over. 
Your time, men left, gems left and level of play are all 
displayed at the bottom of the screen. 

I found this game to be highly entertaining and a lot of 
fun to play. The graphics and animation are excellent, 
especially the smooth movement of the boulders and gems 
as they fall. As you move your man through the red clay, 
you have to be careful when digging under or next to the 
boulders, which can fall on top of you. Since the boulders 
are round, they can also roll sideways and drop down in 



See You at 
R A I N BOWfest-Ch icago 
April 10-12 



the open spaces that you created while digging. You can 
push the boulders out of your way by holding down the 
firebutton, but you can only push one boulder at a time. 

You also encounter various alien creatures that hinder 
your progress, but you can destroy them by leading them 
under falling boulders. If you getcaughtby one of the aliens, 
you lose a man. There are other surprises as well that make 
the game even more fun. A nice feature is the ability to pause 
and gather your wits without being penalized. If you find 
yourself blocked, you can restart the screen but you sacrifice 
a man. 

After you develop your skills enough to begin advancing 
to the harder screens, you can restart the game at the screen 
prior to the last one you completed. This is a good feature 
because it prevents the boredom of having to replay the 
easier screens each time. Disk users also get to add their 
names to the score page indicating the top 10 players. 

So for a fun, fast, colorful and challenging experience, 
I recommend Bouncing Boulders. After digging around for 
a few hours, you soon understand why diamonds and other 
precious gems are so expensive. They're awfully hard and 
dangerous to mine! 



(Diccom Products, 6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, 
Canada L9T 2X8; 416-878-8358, $28.95 plus $2 S/H) 



— David Gerald 




A unique approach 
to disc reliability 

Memory Minder from J<£M Systems is 

one of the most comprehensive disk 
drive diagnostic programs available lor 
microcomputers. It quickly and easily 
inns comprehensive testing of all vital 
operating parameters to assure data 
integrity. 

Data Integrity 

Means Data Confidence 

Memory Minder is so easy to run you 
will be inclined to test yourdisk drives on 
n regular basis and correct problems be- 
fore they ever endanger your data. This 
program provides long term confidence 
in yourdata integrity. 



Memory Minder is currently available 
for the following: 

Version 1.03 
TRS-80 Model Ul/4 

48 tpi Single Side 

48 tpi Double Side 

96 Ipi and 48 tpi Double Side 

TRS-80 Model-I 

48 tpi Single Side Single Density 

TRS-80 Color Computer and 
TDP-100 

48 tpi Single Side 
48 tpi Double Side 




Technical Knowledge 
Not Required 

Simply slip in the Memory Minder disk 
and select one or more of eight sophisti- 
cated tests. Easy to understand graphics 
on your screen display findings in a few 
moments. Now you can discover poten- 
tial misalignments and problems before 
they endanger your valuable data. 

Call or write for details and 
more information 

i//A 

J&M SYSTEMS, LTD. 

15 100- A CENTRAL SOUTHEAST 
ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87123 
505/292-4182 

We accept MasterCard and Visa 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 139 



Software Review^^^ Software Review^^^^^^^^Z 



The Word Search Game 
Supplies Tough Puzzles 

The Word Search Game from Mikaron Software is a 
hidden word puzzle generator for the 64K Color Computer 
with a disk drive. It generates random puzzles covering 
many different subjects (e.g., animals, NFL teams, automo- 
biles, etc.). 

The program comes with a single sheet of instructions, 
which adequately explain program operation. It should be 
noted that onscreen instructions are also provided. Loading 
the program brings up a high resolution screen, which 
utilizes a very nice-looking character set. This same set is 
used for all program screen displays. 

A menu for puzzle subject selection is first presented. 
Once you make a choice, the screen clears and a "wait" 
message appears while the program takes a couple of 
minutes to generate the puzzle. When the puzzle is 
displayed, the user locates the hidden word, then moves the 
cursor over each of the letters, pressing the space bar each 
time. When the word is completed on the puzzle, it is crossed 
off the master word list. Using the SHIFT-CLEAR combina- 
tion brings up a command level menu, offering options for 
(G)ame, (H)elp, (P)rint, (M)ain menu and (Q)uit. 

Up to five copies of the puzzle can be directed to a printer 
with an optional answer template. Baud rates of 600 or 1 200 
can be selected for printing. 

The only fault I can find with the program is that the 
puzzles are in a 30 by 16 grid. This makes for a very 
challenging puzzle. If the user could generate smaller 
puzzles, the program would be more suitable for younger 
family members. Of course, for more advanced puzzle 
workers, this may be considered a plus. 

One question that is becoming of more and more 
importance to CoCo owners today is compatibility. I 
encountered no problems running the program on either my 
CoCo 3 or CoCo 2. 

Overall, the program is attractive and well done. It offers 
good value for the money. If you like word search puzzles 
and want a challenge, The Word Search Game could just 
be for you. 

(Mikaron Software Company, P.O. Box 1064, Chester, CA 
96020; Disk Only, $16.95) 

— Leonard Hyre 



Bowling League Secretary 

Revisited 

In the September 1986 issue of THE RAINBOW, I reviewed 
a new software product, Bowling League Secretary by 
TOMELA*Co. This product is a specialized database that 
provides the record-keeping and calculations needed to 
maintain individual and team standings in a bowling league. 
Since that review, the author has issued an updated version 
of the program, Version 1.1. This version provides the 
capability to maintain separate bowling statistics for men 
and women in a mixed bowling league. 

Version 1.1, like its predecessor, is a well-organized, 
menu-driven program with very good documentation. The 
program is designed for a 32K Color Computer with one 
disk drive and will handle a league of up to 200 bowlers. 
A printer is almost mandatory, since the league secretary 
must prepare and post reports showing weekly scores and 
summaries of team and individual standings in the league. 

The program, which actually consists of several programs 
written in BASIC, performed as described in the documen- 
tation. As expected, it ran on my CoCo 3 without problems. 
I should mention that those with CoCo 3s can reduce the 
sort time of the program by using the high speed poke. 

The only problem I found is that there is no reporting 
capability for the preparation of an individual bowler's 
scores for the entire bowling season. TOMELA*Co noted 
in a letter published in the January 1987 issue of THE 
RAINBOW that they agreed with this comment, but that it 
was not possible to include this feature without requiring 
two disk drives. This issue is probably minor since most 
secretaries would keep the raw tally sheets from each week. 
However, TOMELA*Co is working on another version that 
would incorporate this feature. 

Bowling League Secretary is higly recommended to those 
who spend considerable time each week compiling league 
bowling scores. TOMELA*Co is to be congratulated for 
submitting updated versions of their program. 

(TOMELA*Co, P.O. Box 2162, Doylestown, PA 18901; 
$49.95) 

— Donald D. Dollberg 



CoCo 
Cat 




140 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Variety is the spice... 

MAX FONTS 1, 2, 3 or 4 Each set contains 24 fonts that are professionally 
designed and ready to use with CoCo MAX I or II. Each set includes a custom "pull 
down menu" that is used by CoCo MAX for selecting the fonts. Just "click" and use 
the same as any other font with CoCo MAX. 

Buy 2 sets and SA VE 10%, any 3 and SAVE 15%, 

all 4 and SA VE 20%! , $24.95 each (disk) 



SET 1 



SET2 



SET 3 



SET 4 



□iQtlal Small 



Digital Large 
Futura 

ll:iu~ii:l Smr.i)) 

3 HMD IL I'll RID 

u 



i 

Victory 

■ ■by Taaih Sm.II 

BABY TLLTH LC 

oeoe ©©to 

fin. rf.ni 

Normanile Small 

IVoi mande Medium 

NORMANDE LG. 

Piano 

BIMAL.+A 



&&&&& ®& 
Kolon 



lllM^UIlllJSillliKplliElllllGlllliO 



PelqwoT SmaII 

Peiqnot Larqe 
ppocpom smni.L 
PFCGFOH I1ELII1JI1 

PFDEFnn LFIFEE 



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PUTIIIt A III.il:. Mi 



I I ■ — ■ I 1 1 fi fljIJCTuI 
LlU'UlL' _• I 1 IL. 



Mocqoa Cm a . ia 



Mocnofl JIapre 

poinr out 

Prinlrcuir Snncll 

PRiriTDUT LF1RDE 



Bochlin 

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15* 



Old £nglisii 



XiKXiS MCMUM 
XiKXit LAK<ri 

HARTLAND 

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stisnch. 



Al» *3J!* AF» tSLE* «£UV 

Thin Ulan 

Tip Tnp 



Tjit-Tim i j m i ' llillliy 1 1 , J*-^L1 m M lit 

ebony 

AAAAAA 

■Ddin 



Rome Small 

(cEGDIeIrHDIP 

CfflcH] VDG 



■H- HI- [> BID ^ 



Square 



TELEWRITER-64 The word processor that has lead the 
way for over half a decade. Check out Cognitec's ad in this 
issue for all the features! Interface graphics with it using 

TELEGRAPHICS twxw/wn 

$59.95 (disk) 

TELEGRAPHICS Interface HI-RES graphic displays from 

CoCo MAX or other graphic programs with Telewriter-64. Design 

a logo or letter head and have access to it whenever you're using 

Telewriter-64! „ . „ / , , 

$2435 (disk) 

SIDE WISE makes your printer do something you never thought 
possible -print sideways! SIDE WISE will read ASCII text files 
generated by your spread sheet program and print them down 
the page instead of across. This allows you to indicate a printer 
width of up to 255 characters! No more having to hold 2 or 3 
pages together to get the entire picture of your work sheets. 
Compatible with DYIMACALC and ELITE CALC. 

$24.95 (disk) 



CoCo MAX II The most used and highly acclaimed graphic 
editing program for the Color Computer 1 or 2. Just look at 
Colorware's ad in this issue for all the features! 

$79.95 (disk) 

MAX EDIT Create your own fonts for use right in CoCo MAX 
\/\\ or load in existing FONTS for adding your own flair! Use all 
CoCo MAX options such as BOLD, ITALICS and SHADOW. 

$19.95 (disk) 



Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502-5300 
Visa/MC customers call (803) 665-5676, 
or send check or money order 

In business since 1982. 

SC residents add tax. 
Shipping: $3 UPS ground, $12 air mail (overseas) 
Canadian Distributor: Kelly Software 



Software Review ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^\ 

Communicate Effectively With 

Rules of Writing 

When we want to communicate an idea to a large number 
of people, we need to be able to write effectively. One of 
the ways we can learn how to do this is to use the self- 
development course that is available from compass 
education. This software is only available on cassette tape, 
as all of the programs contain both audio and visual 
presentations of the material. It's designed to run on your 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3. 

Volume One of Rules of Writing deals with writing 
effectively, logic in writing, developing simple and complex 
sentences, paragraphs and diction. Volume Two continues 
with parts of speech, punctuation and spelling, as well as 
writing letters, reports and papers. 

At one time or another, everyone needs to put his 
thoughts into writing. The student needs to write term 
papers or book reports. Adults might need to write reports 
about their jobs. To do this effectively, you must follow 
certain rules. These study courses show you the way to 
arrange your thoughts and ideas in a logical way. You will 
also see how to write these thoughts down. 

The other night we had a friend over who is a computer 
teacher at a local elementary school. I was telling her about 
this course of software I have been reviewing. Linda was 
very interested in seeing how it worked, so we went to CoCo, 
and put on the Rules of Writing study course. 

Linda was particularly impressed with the audio portion 
of the programs. She felt that this would indeed aid in the 
students' learning process. She felt, as I do, that the 
programs are set up in a logical and well-presented format. 
At the end of each lesson plan, you are shown a scoreboard 
that shows the number of questions asked, the number 
answered right on the first try, and the number of wrong 
answers. 

If you do a great deal of writing, or you just want to be 
able to write a good letter, then these programs should be 
useful to you. 

(York 10 Software, 9525 Vassar Avenue, Chatsworth, CA 
91311; 818-700-0330, $49.95 per two-volume set plus S/H) 



Software Review^ 



Get More From Your 
Keyboard With FKEYSIII 

FKEYS III Version 1.0 is a handy utility for all models of 
the Color Computer with at least 64K RAM. It provides 
a method to program various keys for special or repetitive 
functions. 

The program, supplied on disk, is not copy-protected, so 
back-up copies are not a problem. FKEYS III runs in the all- 
RAM mode, which is auto-loaded when first running the 
program. The program is very easy to use and is menu- 
driven. Upon running MENU, the user is presented with these 
options: Configure New FKEYS, Load Custom FKEYS, 
Accept Default FKEYS, Disable FKEYS and DOS 
Modifications. 

Configure New FKEYS, Option 1, allows you to set up 
the keys of your choice to provide whatever function you 
want. It also allows you to choose either the CONTROL key 
if you have one on your keyboard or the down arrow if you 
don't. 

Option 2, Load Custom FKEYS, allows you to load in 
the custom function keys that you have previously saved 
on the disk. Option 3, Accept Default Keys, will load in the 
default function keys. 

Keep in mind that you can change any of the functions 
using Option 1. All CoCos using the new style keyboards 
with Fi and F2 keys can have 20 functions. By using the down 
arrow as a control key on older style keyboards, the user 
can define 18 functions. 

Option 4 disables the function keys. 

DOS Modifications, Option 5, allows you to modify DOS 
for single- or double-sided drives and 35- or 40-track, and 
to change the track access speed from 6 to 30 ms. 

Another nice feature of FKEYS III is" that the entire 
modified DOS from &HC000 to S.HDFFF can be saved to disk 
and then used to burn an EPROM if you would like all of 
the special functions available at power-up. A special touch, 
I thought, was the ability to send a list of what each function 
key does to your printer. This is especially helpful if you 
have different functions programmed for different applica- 
tions. 

The menu options coupled with the ability to save custom 
versions of FKEYS III provides a lot of versatility since you 
can have many versions available for different program- 
ming or operating circumstances. 

I like FKEYS III. It provides a useful function and can 
result in significant time savings, especially in program- 
ming. You could program different keys for often repeated 
statements and commands like GDTO, GDSUB, FDR, NEXT, 
PRINT 8-2, 5RVE, LORD, etc. 

The price of FKEYS III is reasonable, and the documen- 
tation is sufficient to provide easy operation right out of 
the package. So, if you are looking for a quick and easy 
way to put those new Fi and F2 keys to work on your CoCo, 
then I recommend you consider FKEYS III. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344 $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 



— John H. Appel 



Hint . , . 

Hex of a Good Conversion 

Keep in mind that converting from hexadecimal 
to decimal and vice versa is simple if you let your 
CoCo do the work. To convert from Hex to 
decimal, just enter PRINT &Hxxxx where xxxx is 
any Hex number up to four digits. 

To go from decimal to Hex, enter PRINT HEX$ 
{decimal number). You must use parentheses here. 
On the CoCo 3 you can also convert an octal 
number to decimal by entering PRINT &Qxxxx]usi 
as you did for the Hex conversion above. 

H. D. Cooke 
Wilmington, VT 



— Jerry Semones 



142 THE RAINBOW ApriM987 



Software Review, 



Get in Shape With CoCoSize 



liking. I understand that the instructions in this area have 
been revised for a subsequent version of CoCoSize, so this 
may be solved. 



It's easy to start an exercise program. Just ask me; I've 
started dozens of them! Obviously, the trick is to stay on 
a program. Support groups (such as classes at a gym) are 
great. Arranging to participate in a regular program in your 
home with a friend or spouse can also help. Unfortunately, 
those options aren't right for everyone, and just plunging 
in on your own can be tough. CoCo to the rescue! 

CoCoSize from Kromico Software can be your exercise 
partner. This program, on disk with no copy protection, 
creates a graphic representation of a person who performs 
any of six different exercises while you follow along. Jane 
Fonda it ain't, but the representation is certainly accurate 
enough to portray the suggested exercise. The exercises 
available include jumping jacks, push-ups, sit-ups, chin-ups, 
toe touches and running in place. 

Upon selecting one of these from the main menu, the user 

is prompted for the number of repetitions (10-99) and the 
pace (slow, medium or fast). Following the selection, time 
is allowed for the user to get to the exercise area and assume 
the position before CoCo begins. 






The other choices from the main menu include Create 
Workout and Do Workout. The user can create and name 
a workout file, including any or all of the six exercises, in 
any order, for a chosen number of repetitions at a chosen 
pace. A quick workout, for when you're pressed for time, 
could be programmed and named 5UEQUICK. A more 
thorough workout could be programmed and named 
5UEHRRD. A workout file including all six exercises uses only 
one granule of disk space. With 28 free granules on the 
program disk, there should be plenty of space for everyone 
in the family to have several custom exercise programs. The 
Do Workout option displays a menu of all of the workout 
files. 

A minor weakness of CoCoSize is the documentation. 
There are 1 1 screens of instruction displayed by the program 
(if requested), none of which is included as hard copy. Most 
of these screens are the "press any key to continue" variety, 
but two of the screens are displayed for an interval 
determined by the program. These two screens pertain to 
"create" and "do." The instructions for "create" are a bit 
vague, and neither screen is displayed long enough for my 



"A workout file including all 
six exercises uses only one 
granule of disk space. " 



Admittedly, CoCoSize is easy to use once you figure out 
how. Unless you have a better memory than I, however, 
you'll find yourself wanting to review the instructions at 
some point. After the instructions have been viewed initially 
and the actual program is underway, the only way to return 
to the instructions is to exit to BASIC and start all over. 

When entering number of repetitions and pace for each 
exercise to create a workout, the values entered are not 
displayed. This is inconvenient when putting together a 
complicated workout and I would expect this bug to be 
remedied in subsequent versions. 

CoCoSize works well and is a real bargain. I recommend 
it to anyone wanting to use the CoCo for less sedentary 
activities. 

(Kromico Software, 708 Michigan Ave., Sheboygan, WI 
53081, $9.95) 

— Stanley Townsend 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

A DIVISION OF DATAMATCH, INC. 



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Send Card Number & Exp. Date Min. Charoe Order $20.00 




April 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



Software Review, 



Full Screen Editor & 
Varisave: Convenience and 

lexibility 



Some people may be afraid to tackle a utility with the 
complexity and flexibility of this one, but such users 
normally do not do enough of their own programming to 
need the Full Screen Editor & Varisave (FSE for short). 

What does the FSE really d o? It is primarily intended to 
provide the BASIC programmer with a word processor-like 
ability to move around the screen while correcting program- 
ming errors as they are found, rather than correcting them 
line by line. Along the way, this approach has also provided 
the ability to copy program lines, move or combine them, 
locally renumber them and perform many other editing 
functions. 

"So what?" you say, "I have the EDIT command in 
Extended Color BASIC, and I own three other screen editors 
making similar claims. I never use any of them because they 
are all inconvenient, or take too much memory, or . . . ." 
Well, this one will probably get used because it works, takes 
no memory and is user-tolerant. Furthermore, the docu- 
mentation fully explains what is being done and why. 

FSE requires 64K and Extended Color BASIC. The 
program requires 64K because it rewrites the ROM code 



ANDY C 





m m m m 1 P m Is 

i UP 1 el n 



ISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3127 64k color comp 
26-334 CoCo 3 
26-3131 1S1 disk drive 
26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 



89.95 
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(that is also how it does its job without using memory). This 
means it is intended to be EPROMed and thus loads 
normally at power-up as a self-booting portion of your 
system. I used it instead as a normal utility off disk and 
found that satisfactory. It should work also from tape 
systems. 

Vernon Nemitz's Full Screen Editor & Varisave claimed 
compatibility with all Color Computer variants. I tested it 
on an old *F Board, two CoCo 2s of different vintages, a 
CoCo 3, and two other machines. Because of the number 
of options in FSE, I never completed all options on any one 
machine, but probably tried all major options "somewhere." 

The utility was quite reliable and reasonably bug-free. 
You could, however, put one or more options temporarily 
out of business by trying them on an odd combination of 
non-standard DOS/ROM mixtures, or by trying to 
combine FSE with other software that uses undocumented 
ROM calls. 



"With all this complexity, the 
documentation and support are 
amazingly complete. " 



My experience is that FSE worked on all combinations 
tried, but that it was possible to find minor differences 
among versions. Most of these are mentioned in the 
documentation, which is excellent. Installation should take 
under an hour, including familiarization runs. 

With all this complexity, the documentation and support 
are amazingly complete. They form a tutorial on the ROM 
code in the CoCo that is worth more than the price of the 
utility itself. The disk is not copy-protected, and users are 
encouraged to make backups. I would certainly buy and use 
this convenient and helpful utility. 

Supplied with FSE, but requiring a separate loading 
operation, is the utility Varisave. Normally, a new BASIC 
program automatically re-zeroes all stored variables. With 
Varisave, you can selectively clear only part of memory, 
enabling easy transfer of variable names and their related 
string and/or numeric data. The CLERR command is 
redefined to perform this function selectively. Varisave does 
take a small amount of memory, and improper loading of 
it will crash the computer, so decide on its use before your 
session starts. (This point is well stressed and explained in 
the manual.) 

FSE also includes a redefined and improved TRDN 
command, error-trapping similar to that built into the 
CoCo 3, the ability to generate any CoCo semi-graphics 
symbol and/ or any BASIC tokenized word with only two 
keystrokes, and a new command — Into. Into allows a 
mixture of direct command and normal run modes, 
enabling the computer to perform self-editing. There are 
other options as well — but buy it and see them for yourself. 

(Warren & Associates, P.O, Box 5120, Virginia Beach, VA 
23455; 804-456-1589, $25 plus $1.50 S/H) 



— H. Larry Elman 



144 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Software Review, 



# irtfr> 



Control Program 
Access With Filesafe 



Filesafe is a program that deserves attention. It's a 
machine language program that will protect any standard 
RS-DOS disk file, including BASIC programs, word 
processor and data files. It will run on any 64K or 32K Color 
Computer, including the new CoCo 3, using Disk BASIC 1 .0 
or 1.1. 

While most of us are somewhat familiar with file 
protection schemes using passwords to encode and decode 
the files, this one has a unique feature. Your copy of Filesafe 
encodes differently from any other copy of the program. 
What this means is that even if someone else has your 
password they cannot decode your protected file unless they 
are using your copy of the program. So as long as you 
control your personal copy of the program you can control 
who has access to your files. 

Filesafe is not copy-protected. You are urged to make a 
back-up copy for your own protection. Because of the 
structure of the program, you must use only the standard 
RS-DOS BACKUP and COPY commands. The documentation 
consists of a nicely typed 10-page instruction manual in a 
clear plastic folder. I found the instructions easy to 
understand and follow. 

Running the program is simple. Just type LDRDM 
"FILESRFE" and execute. A copyright notice appears and 
a prompt is presented to select the drive you want to work 
with. Then press any key to start the program that reads 
the directory of the disk you selected. A menu page appears 
next, which provides the various program options. Up and 
down arrows are used to scroll the directory to select the 
file you want to encode or decode. You can also perform 
other functions using the following commands: 

I — File Information. Displays the name and extension 
of the file you have selected. It also tells you the file type 
such as data, BASIC, machine code, etc. The file format is 
displayed and shown as binary or ASCII. The program 
length in granules and the encryption status are displayed. 

E — Encode File. You are asked twice as to your intent 
to encode the file you have selected. Next you enter a 
password of one to 16 characters including spaces. You are 
warned to write down your password so you don't forget 
it. The file is then encrypted and the extension ENC replaces 
the original extension. 

D — Decode File. This isjust the opposite of Encode File 
with one exception. If you do not enter the correct 
password, the file will be destroyed. 



RAINBOWfest — Chica 

April 10-12 



P — Purge File. Similar to KILL in RS-DOS except all 
of the file is erased; not just the directory filename. 

R — Read Dir. Reads the disk directory in the drive 
selected. 

S — Show File. If the file has been encrypted, or is in 
machine language, you can't see anything. If the file is BASIC 
or ASCII and not encrypted, it will be displayed on the 
screen. 

Q — Quit Program. Exits Filesafe and does a cold start. 
C — Change drive. You can select which disk drive you 
are using. 

I found Filesafe to be very easy to use and user-friendly. 
I tried it on several programs and it performed as discussed 
in the instruction manual. Looking at encrypted files with 
a disk zapper or word processor resulted in only garbage 
on the screen. It has a lot of potential for those CoCo users 
who want total protection of their computer programs and 
files. While such protection is afforded by this program, you 
must exercise a great deal of caution since incorrect 
passwords not only deny entry into the program but destroy 
it as well. 

The program's author, John Gallagher, has done a nice 
job on Filesafe and its documentation. A 30-day replace- 
ment warranty is offered and the price is right for what it 
does. 

(Emerald Island Software, P.O. Box 11126, Cleveland, OH 
44111; $22 plus $2 S/H) 

— David Gerald 




A new generation of 
CoCo III software 



* J 

E 

k J 




E 


|Y| 






M 


CD 

< > 


ffi 



A user friendly, user programable function 
key utility that creates up to 20 function 
keys. Other features include DOS sods, 
DISABLE, and is EPROHable, Compatible with 
CoCo 1/11 and includes enhanced CoCo III 
version 1 Ver 1.3 - Disk only 119.95 

Hill TVL<MT± XXX 

VERSION 1.0 

An easy to use, versatile label creating 
program including many n§« CoCo III 
features. Even if you already own a label 
program, this one's a must for the III!! 

Disk $14.95 

GI MMESQFT 

4 Hallfield Ct. Add 12.51 for shipping 
Baltimore, hD 21236 Phone 301-256-7558 




April 1987 THE RAINBOW 145 



Software Revieif^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Z/TZs 

Learn the Fundamentals With 
Introductory Spanish Courses 

For years I have been reading about quick and easy ways 
to learn a foreign language, usually using a set of tapes. If 
those ads were really true, it would put me out of my job 
as a high school Spanish teacher. But there is nothing quick, 
and certainly nothing easy about learning a foreign 
language. Analogies to learning a computer language are 
only partially valid; computer languages seldom have 
exceptions, 50,000 word vocabularies, emotional content, 
or listening and speaking aspects. In light of the difficulty 
of learning a foreign language by yourself, how well does 
a new set of programs from Dorsett Educational Systems 
called Introductory Spanish Courses do? 

These programs come as eight cassette tapes, recorded on 
both sides, in a 5-by-7 inch plastic package. It is available 
only as a cassette program and will not work with anything 
plugged into the expansion port. 

A machine language "monitor" program must be loaded 
from either Tape 1 or Tape 9 before any program can be 
used. Once it is loaded, typing EXEC begins the program. 
All characters and illustrations are done on the graphics 
screen. 

Although the character size allows the same 32 letters by 
16 lines on the screen, they seem larger by virtue of their 
shape, light-on-dark presentation, and skillfully laid out 
screen arrangements. The background screen is black and 
the letters are white, with underlining and drawings in 
various colors. The screens are equally visible on a 
monochrome monitor, so equipment necessary to use this 
program is minimal. 

If you know anything about "programmed instruction" 
(no reference to computer programming here), then you 
understand the method in these tapes. After loading and 
executing the program, you leave the cassette player on 
"play." Real voice narration is supplied by the tape, playing 
through the television. 

Text and illustrations are also fed throughout the 
program by the cassette tape. The documentation suggests 
setting the monitor at a volume level of 7, which is high. 
This is good advice. Turn it high and leave it high. If, at 
any time, you can hear the machine coding through the 
speaker, it is not being loaded properly. When it happened 
to me, it was solved by turning the volume up on the cassette 
recorder. 



Explanations are given, illustrations are shown on the 
screen, then an answer is requested from the keyboard. If 
the answer is right, the narrator tells you so, and the lesson 
continues. If your answer is wrong, you hear an annoying 
tone, the screen clears, and the correct answer appears, 
sometimes with a short explanation. 

Any key returns you to the prompt screen, with your old 
answer still sitting there for you to correct. The answers are 
either multiple choice or fill in the blank. The lesson 
continues until the end of the tape, when a scoring screen 
displays the number of questions presented, the number of 
correct answers on the first try, and the number of questions 
missed. 

Having gone through all 16 sides of the eight tapes, I can 
vouch for the accuracy of the explanations and text, and 
for the quality of the pronunciation. A woman's voice offers 
the explanations. A man's voice speaks the Spanish words 
and phrases. I find it valuable to highlight the Spanish by 
presenting it in a different voice. It also offers the student 
a chance to hear Spanish from both a male and a female 
voice, since the narrator uses Spanish in her explanations. 

The lessons presented cover the basics of a first-year 
Spanish course and offer, according to the ad, a vocabulary 
of 250 words. This series is not for younger children, 
however, for two reasons. The explanations are not 
simplified. Such phrases as "in an exclamatory fashion" and 
"affirmatively" are used. And the material is presented at 
a pace that requires the attention of a serious student. 

This program addresses three of the four skills involved 
in language learning: reading, writing and listening. Except 
for some minor program bugs, I think it does so accurately 
and effectively. While this would be a very good way to begin 
independent language study or brush up on a past Spanish 
course, I immediately thought of using it on my students 
who have missed or failed to learn particular grammar 
points or specific verb conjugations. 

I found five or six problems, but none of them seriously 
hamper the program. In one case, the wrong word is 
underlined . In another, the letter 'S' appears as '9' in a word . 
The most serious bug is one spot when two lines must be 
completed for an answer. Advancing from one line to the 
next is normally done by pressing ENTER. On one screen, 
however, only pressing BREAK, then another key, would 
allow the program to continue, picking it up on the next 
screen. In spite of these flaws, I heartily recommend this 
set of tapes for anyone who wants to get a foundation in 
understanding Spanish, supplement classroom instruction 
on the first-year level, or review the fundamentals. 

The only recommendations I have for Dorsett are to 
make a companion booklet available, as well as a detailed 
list of contents for each tape. Since the tapes are linear, i.e., 
they are used straight through, there is no going back to 
find a word or verb form that was covered previously. 

A booklet that reiterates the material would be very 
helpful. A list of tape contents is needed to guide anyone 
wanting to use the tapes for review of specific items. I have 
hopes that these will soon be available, since many of the 
other programs that Dorsett offers, from math to language 
arts, do have study guides. 

(Dorsett Educational Systems, Inc., P.O. Box 1226, 
Norman, OK 73070; 800-654-3871, $99) 



POLICE OFFICERS and others 

If you are involved in the reconstruction of motor vehicle 
accidents or would like to learn, this program is a must. 
The program is extremely user friendly, It allows you to 
enter just your road measurements. The computer will 
give you the speed of each vehicle at the point of impact. 
Answers output to screen or printer. Complete in- 
structions forthe beginner. This program is written for a 
64K COCO ECB disc. It is easily adaptable to other 
RADIO SHACK computers. Order RECON today. 

Price $39.95 Plus $2.50 S&H MA Res. add 5% sales tax. 

Bytes Bits & Chips Computer Shop 
P.O. Box 42, Chicopee, MA 01014 



Dennis Church 



146 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Software Review* 



See if You Agree With The 
Presidential Decisions of 
George Washington 



It's a tough job being president, but someone's got to do 
it. Presidential Decisions of George Washington, by B5 
Software, gives you the chance to become the "Father of 
Our Country" without leaving your own home. The game 
is an educational Simulation intended for grades 7 through 
adult. It requires a Tandy Color Computer with 32K, 
Extended Color BASIC, and one disk drive. The package 
comes with one disk and a small nine-page manual. The 
instructions are also included as part of the game, so the 
manual is not really necessary. 

During the game you are presented with 10 problems that 
President Washington had to resolve during his term of 
office. You are allowed to ask the advice of other people 
who lived during the time, reflect on the past, or obtain 
information on the overall effect of the problem. You may 
do this four to six times before making your decision. You 
are then presented with four decisions and must choose one. 

The object of the Simulation is to make the same decision 
George Washington did when he was president. If your 
decision does not match President Washington's, the actual 
decision made is then displayed with an explanation as to 
why that particular decision was made. You are then asked 
if you want to continue with the remaining problems. 

When you are finished, you may request a summary and 
score to see where you stand in making presidential 



EW YORK 



APRIL 1781 



BNCr THE CONSTITUTIONAL 
ONVENT I OH OF 1 787 IT HAS-BEEN 
SSUHED BY MOST PEOPLE THtil 
EQRGE WASHINGTON, ESC . WOULD 
E THE FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE 
H I TED STATES UNDER THE NEW 
DESTITUTION. 



PRESS < 



E N 



|> TO CONTINUE 



decisions. Your answer and Mr. Washington's answer are 
both displayed for each problem presented. The answers are 
compared and rated on a scale of 0 to 50. An overall rating 
is provided along with your percent of correct decisions. 

This Simulation is intended to be used as a supplement 
to classroom work when studying this particular period of 
history. Several suggestions are provided to aid in the use 
of the game. After playing awhile you can become hooked 
on this method of supplementing classroom instructions. 

Overall, Presidential Decisions of George Washington is 
well done. It would be a good addition to your history 
lesson. 

(B5 Software Co., 1024 Bainbridge Place, Columbus, OH 
43228; 614-276-2752, $31.95) 

— Larry Birkenfeld 



Hint . . . 

A Cure for the Stutters 

If your new CoCo 3, or your older Color 
Computer, doesn't "talk" to your printer in 
anything better than a stutter at higher baud rates, 
try increasing the line delay. The memory locations 
you should use are 151 and 152. Just enter 
P0KE151 , x : P0KE152 % y where x and y aref rom the 
following table: 



X 


Y_ 


Line Delay 


64 


0 


.288 seconds 


128 


0 


.576 seconds 


255 


255 


1 . 15 seconds 



Other values should work, as well. 



Bernie Besherse 
Ketchikan, AL 



Hint . , . 



The Place for Fun 



Following are some interesting addresses on the 
CoCo 3. The addresses are the entry points to the 
indicated routines. So, boot up EDTASM and 
have some fun! 



Address 



Function 



SF636 

SE688 

SE6CF 

SE5F0 

SE545 

SE6F4 



WIDTH 
HSCREEN 

HCL5 
PALETTE 

LPOKE 
HCOLOR 



Marc Gagnon 
Cap- Madeleine, Quebec 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 147 



Software Reviewl 



CoCo III Font Bonanza 
Gets Four Stars 



After getting my CoCo 3 I was somewhat anxious to get 
software which used the features in the new machine. I am 
mostly interested initsgraphics capabilities. Forthis reason, 
I was extremely happy to see CoCo III Font Bonanza come 
in for review. While it is by no means an applications 
package, it is an excellent tool for development of CoCo 
3 products. 

The CoCo 3 allows mixed text and graphics on the new 
Hi- Res screens. The user can HPRINT text on either of the 
two new graphics screens. The font used for this text is a 
standard font, which is located in RAM. Because it is RAM- 
based, this font may be altered, saved to disk and reloaded. 
This is how the Font Bonanza works. You can use the 
modifier to alter a character set or font in memory and then 
save it to disk for future loading. The font modifier is very 
easy to use. With a few simple keystrokes, you, too, can 
create your own CoCo 3 fonts. 

CoCo III Font Bonanza also includes several different 
fonts and a demo program which illustrates how to use the 
fonts. The fonts are designed to fit both the 40-column Hi- 
Res graphics screen (320 by 1 92) and the 80-column graphics 
screen (640 by 192). All that is necessary to use a given font 
is to load it from disk, issue BASIC commands for the desired 
graphics screen and then HPRINT the text to the screen. If 
you want to change between several different fonts regularly 
throughout a program, the Font Bonanza will accommo- 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This little beauty will calculate your grade percentage 
based on number of classes, credit hours and grade 
percentage for the individual classes. Don't blame us, 
however, if you don't like the results. 

The listing: 



1 CLS: INPUT" # OF CLASSES THIS SE 
METER" ;X:FORI=lTOX:PRINT"ENTER G 
RADE & CREDIT HOURS FOR CLASS # 
" ; I ; : INPUTG , H : A=G*H : TA=TA+A : TH=T 
H+H: NEXT: PRINT "YOUR G.P.A. FOR T 
HIS SEMESTER IS " ; TA/TH 



Anthony Frerking 
Independence, MO 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



date you. Included on the disk is a program called Multplex. 
This BASIC program allows you to squeeze up to eight fonts 
into one file. Then, you can switch between the fonts 
quickly, without having to load each one from disk 
separately. 




is ioaae\ 
Type letters onto screen 
Use arrow keys to »ove cursor 
Use ALT+ < I >-< 8 > to change fofit 
Use F2 to choose 4 0 / 8 9 columns 



CoCo 3 Font Btnanza 

CoCo 3 Font Bonanza 

CdCej 3 Font Bonanza 

oCo 3 Font Bonanza 

□Co 3 Font Bonanza 

a Co 3 font Bonanza. 

Colo 3 Font Fonanza 



I must clarify one point. The RAM-based memory font 
which the Font Bonanza is used for, is only accessible from 
the new Hi-Res graphics modes of the CoCo 3. The font 
used for the Hi-Res text screens (40- or 80-column) is not 
affected by this series of programs. In other words, you can 
not type in BASIC listings while using one of the special fonts. 
This is because the Hi-Res graphics and Hi-Res text screens 
are totally separate. 

HiRes Font Modifier by P. Mishra 
C JOYSTICK] CFIRE j E SR* 1 CENTER] 




Current char: f 
Decimal: 1 0 £ 
Hex ' 5 & 



tGRROWSl CSPACE] CF1] I Veil 




All in all, I found CoCo III Font Bonanza very enjoyable 
and easy to use. The documentation is more than adequate, 
and the program does exactly what it claims to do. It is easy 
to see where we might be seeing several programs in the 
future which utilize fonts created with this package. CoCo 
III Font Bonanza gets a four-star rating. 



(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
1 1414; 718-835-1344, $28.95 plus $3 S/H) 



— Cray Augsburg 



148 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



* * * 

Clubs, Clubs, Clubs 

life compile a list quar- 
^m^m terly of Color Computer 
W W Clubs because of the 
many requests we receive. CoCo 
Clubs may wish to exchange 
newsletters, share ideas for top- 
ics of discussion at monthly 
meetings, etc. 

Please let us know if we have 
omitted any clubs and send us 
complete up-to-date addresses. 
Only those clubs that have 
signed our anti-piracy agree- 
ment form will appear in this 
listing of CoCo Clubs. Also, 
please notify us if you wish to add 
or delete any names on this list. 
Send your information to: 

CoCo Clubs 
THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

* * * 



ARIZONA 

Tucson Color Computer Club, Bill Nunn, 9631 E. 
Stella, Tucson, 85730, (602) 721-1085 

CALIFORNIA 

Color America Users Group, Mark Randall, 2227 
Canyon Road, Arcadia, 91006, (818) 355-6111 

Los Angeles-Wilshire Color Computer Users* 
Group, Norm Wolfe, P.O. Box 11151, Beverly 
Hills, 90213, (213) 838-4293 

United Computer Federation, (San Fernando Valley 
Chapler and Headquarters). Pete Ellison, 366 
West Providencia Ave., Burbank, 91506, (818) 
840-8902 

United Computer Federation, (San Francisco 
Chapter), Art Murray, P.O. Box 7007, Redwood 
City, 94063, (415) 366-4560, BBS (415) 364-2658 

United Computer Federation, (Los Angeles Chap- 
ter), Gary James, 4147 Faculty Avenue, Long 
Beach, 90808 

United Computer Federation, (Orange County 
Chapter), Fred Wright, 10112 Melody Park 
Drive, Garden Grove, 92640 

The Davis CoCoNuts, Shneor Sherman, 1818 
Haussler Dr., Davis, 95616, (916) 758-3195 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Patricia Scheffer, 
1435 W. 172nd Street, Gardena, 90247, (213) 
371-2016 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Bill Tillerson, 73 
Alamitos Ave., Suite2, Long Beach, 90802, (213) 
432-3037 

Ventura County Color Computer Club (VC4), Doug 
McLaughlin, Oxnard Public Library, 214 South 
"C" Street, Oxnard, 93030, (805) 984-4636 or 
BBS (805) 484-5491 

Citrus Color Computer Club, Jack Brinker, P.O. Box 
6991, San Bernadino, 92412, (714) 824-1866 

South Bay Color Computer Users Group, John G. 
Say, 3117 Balmoral Drive, San Jose, 95132, 
(408) 923-2967 



COLORADO 

Colorado Color Computer Club, Lloyd Carroll, 6651 
Bellaire Street, Commerce City. 80022, (303) 
288-6369 

The ESCO Computer Club, David E Schulz, 1299 
Harrison Street, Denver, 80206, (303) 388-6988 

CONNECTICUT 

The Southeast Connecticut Color Computer Users 
Group, Bill Gross, 30 Sycamore Lane, Groton, 
06340, (203) 448-1388 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd„ Dale Cily, Virginia 22193, (703) 
690-2453 

FLORIDA 

Color Computer Club of Brandon, Richard Stein- 
brueck, 2913 John Moore Road, Brandon, 
33511, (813) 681-1526 

Northwest Florida CoCo Nuts, Lee Gottcher, P.O. 
Box 1032, Fort Walton Beach, 32549, (904) 678- 
8894 

Alachua County Coior Computer Club, Robert J. 
Lake, 2929 N.E. 12th Street, Gainesville, 32609, 
(904) 378-1993 

Jacksonville Color Computer Club, William H. 
Brown 111,2411 Hirsch Ave., Jacksonville, 3221 6, 
(904) 721-0282 

CoCo Chips Color Computer Club, 715 5th Avenue 
NE, Largo, 33540, (813) 581-7779 

Broward County Color Computer Club, George 
Aloia, 2263 N.W. 65 Avenue, Margate, 33063, 
(305) 972-0975 

South Brevard Color Computer Club, Benjamin S. 
Jerome, 496 Hillside Court, Melbourne, 32935, 
(305) 259-4609 

CoCo Nuts of Central Florida, George Ellenburg, 
Box 593790, Orlando, 32859-3790, (305) 855- 
7867 

Color-6809 Users Group, Emery Mandel, 4301 11th 
Avenue North, St Petersburg, 3371 3-5207, (813) 
323-3570, BBS (813) 321-0397 

C.C. Club of Sarasota, Ernie Bontrager, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd., Sarasota, 33583. (813) 921-7510 

GEORGIA 

The Northeast Atlanta Color Computer Club, Joe 
Novosel, P.O. Box 450915, Atlanta, 30345, (404) 

921-7418 

The CoCo Cartel, Dennis M. Weldy, 4059 Acacia 
Drive, Columbus, 31904, (404) 576-5479 

Atlanta Color Computer Users Group, Terry E. 
Love, 5155 Maroney Mill Rd., Douglasville, 
30134, (404) 949-5356 

ILLINOIS 

Illinois Color Computer Club of Elgin, Tony Po- 
draza, 1 1 9 Adobe Circle, Carpentersvilie, 601 1 0, 
(312) 428-3576 

Northern Illinois CoJor Computer Club, Kenneth 
Trenchard, Sr., 6145 N. Sheridan Road 30, 
Chicago, 60660, (312) 973-5208 

Willow-Works Club, Kevin L. Adair, 5753 S. Laflin, 
Chicago, 60636, (312) 737-5716 

Peoria Color Computer Club, Harold E. Brazee, 102 
Twin Oak Court, East Peoria, 61611, (309) 694- 
4703 

Glenside Color Computer Club, Ed Hathaway, 8 W. 
Stevenson Drive, Gtendale Heights. 60139, (312) 
462-0694 

Kitchen Table Color Computer Group, Roberl Mills, 
P.O. Box 464, Hanover, 61041, (815) 591-3377 

Motorola Microcomputer Club, Steve Adler, 1301 
Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg, 60196, (312) 576- 
3044 

Chicago OS-9 Users Group, John Chasleen, 480 
Gilbert Drive, Wood Dale, 60191, (312) 860-2580 

INDIANA 

ThreeRivers Color Computer Club, R.R. 3, Box 269, 
Angola, 46703 

CoCo Program Exchange, Erik Merz, 3307 Arrow 
Wood Dr„ Fort Wayne, 46815, (219) 749-0294 



Indy Color Computer Club, Kevin S. Jessup, Sr., 
P.O. Box 26521, Indianapolis, 46236, (317) 873- 
5808 

Southern Indiana Computer Club, Route 1, Box 459, 
Mitchell, 47446 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

IOWA 

CoCo Questers, Scott Bellman, 2420 Salem Court, 
Bettendorf, 52722, (319) 359-7702 

Metro Area Color Computer Club (MACCC), David 
E. Hansen, 3147 Avenue J, Council Bluffs, 
51501, (712) 323-7867 

Mid Iowa CoCo, Terry G. Simons, 1 328 48th Street, 
Des Moines, 50311, (515) 279-2576 

Dubuque Tandy Users Group, Wesley Kullhem, 
1995 Lombard, Dubuque, 5200 1, (319) 556-4137 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson Color Computer Club, James M. Jones, 
612 Idlewild, Hutchinson, 67502, (316) 662-0718 

KC CoCo Club, Gay Crawford, P.O. Box 11192, 
Kansas City, 66111. (913) 764-9413 

Micro 80 Users Group, Kevin Cronister, 2224 Hope, 
Topeka, 66614, (913) 272-1353 

Color Computer Club of Wichita, Van Elliott, 532 
Brownthrush Lane, Wichita, 67212, (316) 722- 
7442 

KENTUCKY 

Perry County CoCo Users Group, Keith W. Smith, 
Genera! Delivery, Hardburly, 41747, (606) 439- 
4209 

LOCO-COCO. Jim Spiflman, 2405 Woodmont Dr., 
Louisville, 40220. (502) 454-5331 

LOUISIANA 

Cajun CoCo Club, Rick Herbert, P.O. Box 671, 
Crowley, 70526, (318) 788 3148 

MAINE 

Western Maine Coior Computer Club, Michael 
Wewell, Box 780, Bethel, 04217 

Tandy Computer Club, Delmer Cargill, P.O. Box 
428, Westbrook, 04092, (207) 854-2862 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Greater Boston Super Color Users Group, Robert 
Biamonte, 6 Boulder Drive, Burlington, 01803 

Massachusetts CoCo Club, Jason Rahaim, Spring 
St., Lunenberg, 01462, (617)582-6514 

CLUB 6809, Jean Salvas, 204 East Street, Spring- 
field, 01104, (413) 734-5163 

MICHIGAN 

Color C.H.I. P.S., Jack Pieron. 3175 Oakhill Place, 
Clarkston, 48016, (313) 627-4358 

CCUG (Color Computer Users Group), Rich Van 
Manen, 0-599 Lake Michigan Dr., Grand Rap- 
ids, 49504, (616) 453-8351 

Tandy Users Group of Grand Rapids, Roberl M. 
Worth, Jr., 1726 Millbank S.E., Grand Rapids, 
49508(616) 245-9324 

Greater Kalamazoo Color Computer Club. Jim Rix, 
1835 Chevy Chase Blvd., Kalamazoo, 49008, 
(616)344-7631 

Greater Lansing Coior Computer UsersGroup, P.O. 
Box 14114, Lansing, 48901 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

MISSISSIPPI 

Singing River C.C. Club, Mark Welch, 3605 Van- 
c leave Rd., # 1 1 8, Gautier, 39553, B BS (601 ) 875- 

8688 

Gulf Coast Color Computer Assoc., Ed Keels, 22 
Christy Cove, Gulfport, 39503, (601) 832-1210 

Jackson Color Computer Club, Dorothy N. Welch, 
424 Church Street, Madison, 39110, (601) 856- 
7255 

CoCo Art Club, Joel Bunyard, Rt. 16, Box 11, 
Meridian, 39301, (601) 483-0424 

MISSOURI 

North County 80 Group, Tom Vogel, 1 2 Ville Donna 
Ct., Hazelwood, 63042, (314) 739-4078 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 149 



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M/d-America Color Computer User's Group, Jerry 
Morgon, 807 Ponca Drive, Independence, 
64056, (816) 796-5813 

Coconuts, 1610 N, Marian, Springfield, 65803 

NEBRASKA 

Siouxland Color Computer Club, Alan Pedersen, 
6 1 1 D Street, South Sioux City, 68778, (402) 494- 
2284 

NEVADA 

CAT. F.U.N., Paul A. Osborne, 201 Miners Road, 
Fallon, 89406, (702) 423-5789 

NEW JERSEY 

West Orange CoCo Club, Gregg Favalora. 12 
Blackburne Terrace, W. Orange, 07052, (201) 
736-1748 (let ring 12 times) 

Loco CoCo Club, Bud Lavin, 73B Wavercrest Ave., 
Winfield Park, 07036 

Mercer County Color Computer Users Group, 
Richard C. Kelly, 1904 Country Lane, W. Tren- 
ton, 08628, (609) 883-9270 

NEW MEXICO 

Chaves County Color Computer Club, Harry Ma- 
chen, 18 Forest Drive, Roswell, 88201 

NEWYORK 

AdirondackCoCoClub(Aibany Chapter), Ron Fish, 
Box 4125, Albany, 12204, (518) 465-9793 

Adirondack CoCo Club, (Greene County Chapter), 
Pete Chast, P.O. Box 61, Athens, 12015, (518) 
945-1636 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Glens Fails Chapter), 
Richard Mitchell, 39 Center St., Fort Edwards, 
12828 

Island Color Computer Ciub, Joseph Castelli, P.O. 
Box901, Belimore, 11710, BBS (516) 783-7506 

Kings Byte CoCo Club, Morty Libowitz, 1063 East 
84th St., Brooklyn, 11236, (718) 763-4233, BBS 
(718) 837-2881 

C.C, Club of Central N.Y., Joseph Short, 248 S. 
Fourth Ave., Won, 13357, (315) 895-7730 

Rockland County Color Computer Users Group, 
Harold L. Laroff, P.O. Box 131, Monsey. 10952- 
0131, (914) 425-2274 

Olean Area CoCo Users Group, Herman L. Smith, 
P.O. Box 216, Olean, 14760, (716) 933-7488, 
BBS (716) 933-7489 

The Rochester S-80 Computer Club, Inc., Gary 
Panepinto, P.O. Box 15476, Rochester, 14615, 
(716) 392-6133 

New York Color Computer User Group, Carl Gio- 
vinsky, 15 Bolivar St., Staten Island, 10314, (718) 
761-0268 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Bull City CoCo Users Group, Todd Wall, 5319 
Durand Drive, Durham, 27703, (919) 598-1348 

Raleigh Color Computer Club, David Roper, P.O. 
Box 680, Garner, 27529 

OHIO 

Central Ohio Color Computer Club, Jim Upperman, 
5201 Wilcox Road, Amlin. 43002, (614)876-1767 

Color Computer Club, Inc.. William Wills, P.O. Box 

468, Canfield, 44406 

Dayton Color Computer Users Group, Steven E. 
Lewis, 4230 Cordell Dr., Dayton, 45439, (513) 

9QQ-3060 

Dayton Area Color Computer Users Group, David 
R. Barr, 2278 Yorkshire PI., Kettering, 45419, 
(513) 293-2228 

Greater Toledo Color Computer Club, William Paul 
Saba Sr„ 3423 Cragmoor Ave., Toledo, 43614, 
(419) 385-9004 

Tri-County Computer Users G roup, William J. 
Loeffler, 2612 Dale Avenue, Rocky River, 441 1 6, 

(216) 356-0779 

Miami Valley CoCo Club, Tim Ellis, 1805 W. Park- 
way Dr., Piqua, 45356, (513) 773-2244 

OKLAHOMA 

Central Oklahoma Computer Organization, Inc., 
MarlinSchiel, 5313 Spitz Drive, Oklahoma City, 
73135, (405) 670-6891 



Green Country Computer Association, Michael 
Keller, P.O. Box 2431, Tulsa, 74101, (918) 245- 
3456 (DATA) 

PENNSYLVANIA 

SNUG-Phila., William K, Serody, 1181 Cumberland 
Road, Abington, 19001, (215) 887-0513 

HUG-A-CoCo, George Lurie, 2012 Mill Plain Court, 
Harrisburg, 17110, (717) 657-2789 

Penn-Jersey Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 2742, 
Lehigh Valley, 18001 

Williamsport Area Color Computer Club, John M. 
Rymell, R.D. 3, Box 182, Muney, 17756, (717) 
546-2721 

The CoCo Exchange Club, Daniel Moore, 617 
Prescott Avenue, Scranton, 18510, (717) 961- 
0535 

Skyline Color Computer Club of Berks County, 
Lewis F. Brubaker, 4874 Eighth Ave,, Temple, 
19560, (215) 921-3616 

Pittsburgh Color Group, Ralph Marting, P.O. Box 
351 , West Mifflin, 1 51 22, (412) 823-7607 

RHODE ISLAND 

New England COCONUTS, P.O. Box 28106, North 
Station, Providence, 02908 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

LoCo CoCo Club, Larry Coyle, 4334 Flynn Dr., 
Charleston, 29405 } (803) 747-0802 

Midlands80ComputerClub, Frank Eargle, P.O. Box 
7594, Columbia, 29202, TBBS (803) 791-7389 

Spartanburg County CoCo Club, Lawrence Easier, 
Jr., Rt. 1 Highway 221, Spartanburg, 29302, 
(803) 578-3120 

TENNESSEE 

Tri-Cities Computer Club, Gary Collins, P.O. Box 
4506 CRS, Johnson City, 37602-4506, (615) 929- 
1862 

Foothills Micro-Computer Club, Aaron Senteli, P.O. 
Box 1541, Maryville, 37801, (615) 982-4629 

TEXAS 

Alamo Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 690256, San 
Antonio, 78269 

UTAH 

Salt City CoCo Club, Dennis Mott, 720 E. Browning 
Ave., Salt Lake City, 84105, (801) 487-6032, BBS 
(801) 487-6787 

VIRGINIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, 22193, (703) 690-2453 

Central Virginia Color Computer Club, Roger Lee, 
Rt. 2 Box 175, Madison Heights, 24572 

Color Company, Rick Blouin, 12007-C3 Greywing 
Sq., Reston, 22091, (703) 860-9297 

Richmond Area Color Computer Organization, 
William Mays, 6003 Westbourne Drive, Rich- 
mond, 23230, (804) 282-7778 

WASHINGTON 

Northwest Computer Club, Larry Haines, East 2924 
Liberty, Spokane, 99207, (509) 483-5547 

Mount Rainier Color Computer Ciub, Ron Amos, 
2450 Lenore Drive N.,Tacoma, 98406, (206) 752- 
8735 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Mil-O-Bar Computer Club, Jim LeMaster, P.O. Box 
130, Ona, 25545, (304) 743-4752 after 4 p.m. 

Blennerhassett CoCo Club, David Greathouse, 
1306 Weils Circle, Parkersburg, 26101 

WISCONSIN 

Southern Wisconsin CoCo Club, David C. Buehn, 
24607 67th Street-. Salem, 53168, (414) 843-3830 

CANADA 

ALBERTA 

Bonnyville User Group (BUG'S), Doug MacDonald, 
Box 2071, Bonnyville, T0A 0L0, (403) 826-4790 

The Calgary Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 22, 
Station M, Calgary, T2P 2G5 

Edmonton CoCo Users Group, Dexter Dombro, 
P.O. Box 4507 Sin. South, Edmonton, T6E 4T7, 
(403) 439-5245 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Vancouver Colour Computer Club, Box 76734, Stn 
S, Vancouver, V5R 5S7 

Salmon Arm CoCo, David Coldwell, RR H, Site 26 
Comp. 13, Salmon Arm, V1E 4M4 

MANITOBA 

Winnipeg Micro-80 Users Group, Robert Black, 
1 755 King Edward St., Winnipeg, R2R 0M3, (204) 
633-7196 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Campbellton 6809E Users Group, Blaine Arsenault, 
80 Deny Street, Atholville, E0K 1A0, (506) 753- 
4769 

Moncton Color Computer Users Group, Robert E. 
McLaughlin, 73 Lewis Street, Moncton, E1C 

4S5, (506) 855-3860 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Color Trading Post, Lee A. Sutton, P.O. Box 565, 
Bridgetown, BOS 1C0 

Halifax Dartmouth CoCo Users Group, Eugene 
Naugler, P.O. Box 572, Dartmouth, B2Y 3Y9 

Colour Computer Halifax User Group (CoCo Hug), 
Paul A. Power, 6354 London St., Halifax, 63 L 
1X3, (902) 455-6341 

ONTARIO 

ESSA Color Computer Club, David Morrow, 10 
Berwick Ores., Angus, L0M 1 B0, (705) 424-6985 

Kingston CoCo Club, Kenneth Bracey, 316 West- 
dale Ave., Apt. 4-C, Kingston, K7L 4S7, (613) 
544-2806 

K-W CoCo Club, P.O. Box 1291, Station C, Kitch- 
ener, N2G 4G8 

London CoCo Nuts Computer Club, Harry K. 
Boyce, 180 Concord Road, London, N6G 3H8, 
(519) 472-7706 

Niagara Regional CoCo Club, Gerry Charnberland, 
6843 Cumberland CrL, Niagara Falls, L2H 2J9, 
(416) 357-3462 

Ottawa 6809 Users Group, Norm Sholhet, 1497 
Meadowbrook Road, Ottawa, K1B 5J9, (613) 
741-1763 

Sarnia Computer Users Group, J. Verdon, P.O. Box 
1082, Sarnia, N7T 7K5, (519) 344-6985 

QUEBEC 

Club d'Ordinateur Couleurdu Quebec, Inc., Centre 
de Loisirs St-Mathteu, 7110- 8e Ave., St-Michel, 
Montreal, H2A 3C4, (514) 729-8467 

Club Micro Ordinateur de Montreal-Nord, Christian 
Champagne, 12365 Blv. Langelier #7, Montreal- 
Nord, H1G 5X6, (514) 323-5958 

Les CoCophiles, Robert Chartrand, 17 Bord-de- 
reau, Repentieny, J6A 3K2, (514) 581-1385 

Club ORCO-RS, Jacques Bedard, 33 Lisiere, St- 
Constant, J0L 1X0, (514) 632-431 1 

Le Club Couleur du Nord, Gabriel Pigeon, OP. 315, 
Barraute, JOY 1A0, (819) 734-2577 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Saskatoon Color Computer Club, L. Curtis Boyle, 
35 Bence Crescent, Saskatoon, S7L 4H9, (306) 
382-1459, BBS (306) 384-8040 



FOREIGN 

ARGENTINA 

Freecoco Club, Novoa, Miguel Angel-lng. Duarte, 
Omar, Mendez de Andes 799, Buenos Aires, 
Capital Federal 1405, phone 431-2501 

AUSTRALIA 

Blacktown City TRS-80 Colour Computer Users 
Group, Keith Gallagher, P.O. Box 264, River- 
stone, New South Wales, 2765, (02) 627-4624 

COCOPUG, Harry Murphy, 8 Lois Court, Regents- 
ville, New South Wales, 2750 

CoCoHUG (Color Computer Hobart Users Group), 
Robert Delbourgo, 15 Willowdene Avenue, 
Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania, 7005 

Sunshine Color Computer Club, Stephen Jones, 
P.O. Box 1 11, Sunshine, Victoria, 3020 



152 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



The Best Money Can Buy . . . 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering Information : 

Use our WATS line to place your order via Visa, MasterCard, or Wire Transfer Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any non - certified funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COO orders are accepted as well as purchase orders from 
government agencies. Most items are shipped off the shelf with the exception of hard 
drive products that are cusiom built. UPS ground is our standard means of shipping 
unless otherwise specifiod Shipping costs are available upon requost 



Drive 0 SS/DD $150. 

WHILE SUPPLY LASTS! 

Drive 0 Complete r $199. 

Drive 1 Complete $129. 

Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive $319. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoi! 
Houston, Texas 77059 



Australian Christian Users Group, Lieutenant 
Raymond L Isaac, 57 Wlttenoom Street, CoHie, 
Western Australia 6225, phone (097) 34-1578 

ISRAEL 

The Mid-East CoCo Club, J, Yosef Krinsky, 52/20 
Ramot Polin, Jerusalem, Israel, Phone (972} 02- 
863-354 

MEXICO 

Mexcoco Users Group, Sergio Waisser, Paseo de la 
Soledad #120, Mexico City, D.F., 53920, phone 
294-36-63 

First Color Computer Users Group of Hermosillo, 
Arluro Fernandez Diaz-Gonzalez, Javier de 
Leon No. 708, Colonia Pitic, Hermosillo, Sonora, 
phone 4-75-78 

the NETHERLANDS 

Color Computer Club Benelux, Jorgen te Giffel, 
Eikenlaan 1, 4641 GB Ossendrecht, the Nether- 
lands 

PERU 

Piura Color Computer Club, Carlos Alvarez, Box 
142, AV. Guillermo Irazola, J-6 URB. Miraflores 
Castilia, Piura, Peru, phone (074) 327182 

PUERTO RICO 

Puerto Rico Color Computer Users Club, P. A. 
Torres, Cuernavaca 1699, Venus Gardens, Rio 
Piedras. Puerto Rico 00928, Phone (137) 755- 
7598 

WEST GERMANY 

First CoCo Club Hamburg, Theis Klauberg, 2345 
Delaware Drive, Ann Arbor, Ml 48103 (tempor- 
ary address). 

The Greatest German CoCoCooks, Michael 
Herbes, Dorfstr 23, 4320 Hattinger, West Ger- 
many 



new clubs 



• The newly f ormed Southeast Connecticut 
CoCo Users Group meets the third Monday 
of every month. For inf ormation contact me 
at (203) 448-1388 or the CoConut Manor 
BBS at (203) 449- 1 792, 24 hours a day, 7 
days a week. Leave a message for SailorBill. 

Bill Gross 
30 Sycamore Lane 
Groion x CT 06340 



• The Brandon Color Computer Club 
meets the second Friday of every month, 7- 
9 p.rru Room 600, Immanuel Lutheran 
Church, 2913 S. John Moore Road, Bran- 
don. For more information contact Rich 
Steinbrueck at the church office. 

Brandon CoCo Club 
2913 S John Moore Road 
Brandon, FL33511 



• The CoCo Nuts of Central Florida meets 

on the first Wednesday of every month at 

7:30 p.m. If interested, write me or call (305) 

855-7867. ^ Xjf m , 

George M. Ellenburg 

5455 Hansel Avenue (L-7) 

Edgewood, FL 32809 



• Announcing the Central Illinois CoCo 
Club. We meet the first Sunday of each 
month in the conference room at the Bank 
of Pontiac, in Pontiac from 7-10 p.m. 

Tom Golladay 
406 North Clay Street 
Fairbury, IL 61739 



• I would like to announce the forming of 
the Kids Only CoConut Club. The purpose 
of the club is to exchange hints about games, 
POKES and PEEKS, programming tips and 
public domain software. Anybody under the 
age of 16 is invited to join. The fee is SI a 
year. Write to me f or information. 

Konnie Siewierski 
1010 N. Plum Grove Road, Apt. 202 
Schaumburg, IL 60173 



• The Hutchinson Color Computer Club 
meets at the Taco Hut, 600 East 30th, 
Hutchinson. Call (316) 662-0718 for infor- 
mation. 7 7 

James Jones 

612 Idlewild 
Hutchinson, KS 



• CCOG would like to invite CoCo users or 
would-be users to join us. We meet on the 
third Tuesday ofeach month from 7-1 0 p.m. 
at DSL Computer Products, Inc., 4950 
Schaefer, Dearborn. We generally have 
some presentation and much informal 
exchange of information. Anyone interested 
can call me evenings at (313) 334-3934, 

Charles S. Van Ark 
Bloomfield Hill, MI 



• The Hollidaysburg Area Color Computer 
Club will be having meetings at the Holli- 
daysburg Public Library every other Tues- 
day from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. For information 
call (814) 695-3522 or write to me. 

Shawn Senne 
RD 1, Box 77 
Hollidaysburg, PA 16648 

• I would like to announce the birth of the 
newest Color Computer club — The CoCo 
Exchange Club, The club offers a monthly 
newsletter, reviews, useful programs and 
hints, Write f or more inf ormation. 

Daniel Moore 
617 Pre scot t Avenue 
Scranton, PA 18510 

• Announcing the Memphis Color 
Computer Users Group. For information 
call (90 i ) 685-0009 or write me. 

The Computer Center 
c/o Logan Ward 
5512 Poplar A venue 
Memphis, TN 38119 



• I wish to announce the reorganization of 

the San Antonio CoCo Club. Thenewname 

is the Alamo CoCo Club and meets monthly 

with membership open to anyone. For 

additional information, call me at (512) 699- 

6027 or write. » rs 

Harvey Dapeer 

P.O. Box 690256 

San Antonio, TX 78269 

• Announcing a club f or M C- 1 0 users. The 
MC-10 International Users Group meets on 
a regular basis and has a newsletter. For 
more information write to us. 

Larry Haines 
East 2924 Liberty 
Spokane, WA 99207 

• I am starting a club called Discover 80. 
We tradepublicdomainsoftware and PEEKS 
and POKES. If interested, write me. 

Derek Schooley 
73 Keeneland Drive 
Huntington, WV 25705 

• We would like to inform your readers of 
the presence of a Milwaukee based comput- 
er group. The CoCo-Mug(Color Computer- 
Milwaukee Users Group) is a club solely for 
the enjoyment and enhancement of the 
Tandy Color Computer. Meetings are on the 
first Monday of every month. For more 

information, contact me. r n, • 

John Davis 

4105 N. 79 Street 

Milwaukee, WI 53222 

• C'mon, CoCoists, the Poor Man's CoCo 

Club needs members, If you want to get the 

most out of your CoCo, please write or call 

me at (608) 562-3260. ' * . , 

v ' M arc Andreessen 

Rl 2 t Box 103W 

New Lisbon, W 1 53950 



• I would like to announce the formation 
of a new club called The Master Key Mu- 
tants. A club for all CoCo users. We feature 
a monthly newsletter that contains reviews 
of the newest CoCo software, hardware 
ideas, and a soon-to-be bulletin board. To 
join, write me or call (403) 276-2726. 

Jim Kung 
132-43 Avenue N.W. 
Calgary, Alberta 
Canada T2K0H6 



• The CoCoKnights Color Computer Club 

is now about to enter its third year. The 

members are all rainbow addicts. For 

further information please write. The BBS 

numbers are Rain Board 382-9080, nightly 

8- J 1 p.m. (CoCo system) or Com Line, 727- 

0352, (Tandy 1000 system). . ~ . 

i v J J ' A, Ooievaar 

221 Edward Sir, 

Victoria, British Columbia 

Canada V9A 3E4 



154 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



• I am pleased to announce the formation 
of a new CoCo club — Moncton Color 
Computer User's Group, The club is open 
to world wide membership. These members 
will be known as associate members and will 
receive the club newsletter and membership 
cards. The membership fee of $8 is to cover 
the cost of postage and handling. All inquir- 
ies are to be mailed to me. 

Robert McLaughlin 
73 Lewis Street 
Moncton, New Brunswick 
Canada El C 4S5 

• The Trafasas Computer Clu b has recently 

changed its address to: CoCo Co-op, Box 

565, Brid getown, Nova Scotia, BOS ICO. We 

trade public domain software and publish a 

monthly newsletter that reviews programs 

and also has contests, etc. T n 

Lee Sutton 

Box 565 

Bridgetown, Nova Scotia 
Canada BOS 1 CO 

• The Essa Color Computer Club meets at 
Saint Mary's School in Barrie twice monthly 
on Monday nights. For more information, 



call Eld on Doucet at (705)424-1354 or Dave 

at (705) 424-6985, n X4 

Dave Morrow 

10 Berwick Cres,, Box 844 

Angus, Ontario 

Canada LOM 1 BO 



• Announcing a new computer club in 

Stirling. We wil! be meeting in the village 

council chambers on the second Thursday of 

each month. Formore information call (613) 

395-2320 or write me, r ~ r . 

James R. Dean 

RR83 

Stirling, Ontario 

Canada KOK 3E0 



• The Burlington Color Computer Users 
Group holds monthly meetings on the 
second Tuesday of the month between 
September and June. Meetings are held in 
the cafeteria of Burlington Central High 
School in Burlington. Visitors are welcome. 
The club serves members from Ancaster, 
Dundas, Hamilton and Oakville. Wepublish 
a newsletter to keep our members up to date 
on club events as well as programming tips, 



and the latest information for the CoCo 
community. We have a good selection of 
programs available in the club library. Dues 
are $30 per year which are used to keep our 
hardware/ software library up to date and to 
publish the newsletter. ^ Coffey 

33 Drakes Drive 
Stoney Creek, Ontario 
Canada L8E4G4 



• The First Color Computer Club of Israel 
has changed its name and location. We are 
now The Mid-East CoCo Club serving the 
entire Mid-East region with our ever grow- 
ing library of public domain software. For 
membership information call (972) 02-863- 
354 (local time 8-1 1 p.m., Sunday through 
Thursday) or write to me. 

J. Yosef Krinsky 
50/52 Ramot Polin 
Jerusalem, Israel 





0*^ 





THE RAINBOW S 

One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines, This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have ''really 
neat 1 ' programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packedsotightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 



Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 





& : : ig^^ 






J m WtM0 ^rfr %m0 



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Switch mstani/y between watching 'BQuia' program output and Peeper s trace of 
registers and stack on screen or printer inspect memory m any of 26 display mooes 
Execution speed can be vaned 'rom lull speed to :n e barest crawl or halted entirely, 
as programs fLn S-ngie-sicppmg breakpoints memory or register examine'changc 
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Tito Magnavox 8CM515 and 8CM505 monitors, containing RG8A, RGBS, and audio 
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April 19B7 THE RAINBOW 155 



COCO 3 CAPABILITIES 



CoCo 3 
RGB monitor 




The 

Write 
Stuff 



By Bill Cook 



Recently I purchased a CoCo 3, and not owning a 
word processor that can take advantage of the new 
text screens and colors, I decided to write one. It's 
rather simple, yet sophisticated enough for most uses. I call 
the program Write III 

The program needs practically no user documentation. 
It is fully menu-driven and prompts the user through the 
major steps required. When selecting a line to edit, the text 
color changes to highlight that line. You may then move the 
cursor left or right with the arrow keys. To delete a 
character, position the cursor under the character you want 
to delete and press SHIFT and the left arrow. To open up 
space within a line for inserting a character or word, 
position the cursor where you want the text to break and 
press SHIFT and the right arrow. Change characters in this 
mode by simply typing over the old text. To exit the line 
editing mode press ENTER, 

During normal text entering, you can move the cursor 
right or left with auto-repeat by pressing SHIFT and the 
appropriate arrow key. 

From the menu, simply select the appropriate option for 
starting a new document, loading in a file, saving a file, 
viewing the directory, killing files from the disk, or printing 
a document. 

All printing has the following defaults: 

Left margin^JO 
Right margin^ 10 
Printed lines per page=55 
Single spacing 

These values and a few more can be changed by embed- 
ding printer commands into your document. Embedding 
commands is simple. A semicolon (;) as the first character 
in a line tells the program that printer commands are to 
follow. Here's a sample command line: 

;LM=6 RM=6 5P=2 BF=1 

This line sets the left margin at six spaces from the left 
of the page, the right margin at six spaces from the right 
of the page, single spacing and boldface (emphasized) 
printing. The command line is an unprinted line, so be sure 
not to mix text or other information with this line. The main 
rule to remember is that the semicolon must be the first 
character of the line. 

Another helpful command is ;N on a line by itself. This 
command forces a new page. 

Readers with programming experience will find it fairly 
easy to add their own customized printer commands. I have 
added REM statements to show where printer commands 
are located. Underlining, for instance, would be a nice 
additon! 

Other than the few rules noted above, there is nothing 
else to remember. It's almost too easy. Try it, I think you 
will like it. Remember, a CoCo 3, disk drive and RGB 
monitor are required. The boldface printer codes are for 
Epson printers. □ 



156 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



23 


9 


4173 


200 


54 


23 


4190 


88 


150 


170 


5400 


13 


3000 


254 


5530 


113 


4040 


250 


END 


134 


4143 


140 







The listing: 3 WRITER 

0 'WRITE III - COCO III WORD PRO 
CESSOR (C) 1986 BY BILL COOK 11/ 
19/8 6 

1 PCLEAR1:CLEAR12000:DIML$(200) 
5 POKE&HFFD9,0:ON BRK GOTO 9000: 
ON ERR GOTO10000 

10 CR=8p:FG=3 : BG=1 : WIDTHCR: PALET 
TE RGB: PALETTE 1,0:CLS 2:ATTR7,1 
: XL=20 0 : FORX=lT04 : X ( X ) =X+3 4 0 : NEX 
T:XX=247 

11 PR$=STRING$ (CR, ) : BL$=STRIN 
G$ (CR-1 , 32 ) : DF$= M :0": DF=0 

12 DATAStart New File, Load Old F 
ile,Save Current File , Edit/Revie 
w F^le, Print Current File, Resume 

Document , Kill File, View Directo 
ry,Exit to BASIC 

13 FORI=lT09 :READM$ (I) : NEXT: GOTO 
100 

16 GOSUB3 3 : IFH=CR-4THEN2 8 

17 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$= M "THEN17 

18 A=ASC(A$) : RETURN 

19 AN$= M!f 

20 GOSUB16 : IFA=13THEN2 5ELSEIFA=3 
4THEN2 i 0ELSEIFA=2 1THEN5 i 0ELSEIFA=9 
3THEN54ELSEIFA=95THEN2 i 0ELSEIFA=9 
1THEN20 

21 IFA=12THENL$(N)=AN$: RETURN 

2 2 IFA<>8THENAN$=AN$+A$ :PRINTA$ ; 
:GOTO20 

23 IFLEN ( AN$ ) = i 0THEN19ELSEAN$=LEF 
T$ ( AN$ , LEN ( AN$ ) -1) :PRINTCHR$ (8) ; 
:GOT02j3 

25 IFA=13THENL$(N)=AN$+CHR$(126) 
:N=N+1:IF N=>XL THEN80 

26 PRINTCHR$ (12 6) : AN$ = M " : GOSUB3 3 
:GOT02p 

28 IFMID$ (AN$,H, 1) <> M "THENH^H-l 
:GOT028 

29 L$ (N)=LEFT$ (AN$,H) :LOCATEH,V: 
PRINTSTRING$ (CR-2-H, 32) :N=N+1:IF 

N=>XL THEN8£I 

30 AN$=MID$ (AN$,H+1) :PRINTAN$;:G 
OSUB3 3 

31 GOT02^ 

33 HSTATX$,X,H, V: RETURN 

37 LOCATEH , V : RETURN 

39 ZZ=INT(CR/2)-INT(LEN(Z$)/2) :L 



OCATE ZZ,V:ATTR7,1:PRINTZ$:ATTR3 
, 1 : RETURN 

46 RP= i 0:FORX=lTO4:IFPEEK(X(X) )=X 

X THENRP=1: POKEX (X) , 2 55 : NEXT : ELS 

ENEXT 

48 RETURN 

50 GOSUB4 6:IFRP=1ANDLEN(AN$)>0TH 
ENAN$=LEFT$ (AN$ , LEN ( AN$ ) -1) : PRIN 
TCHR$(8) ; : H=H+ (H-1>-1) : LOCATEH, V 
:GOT05^ ELSE2^0 

54 G0SUB4 6:IFRP=1ANDLEN(AN$)<76T 
HEN AN $ = AN $ 4- ,f " : PRINT" M ;:H=H-(H+ 
KCR-4) : LOCATEH, V:GOT054 ELSE20 
10 IFF$ = MM THEN1^ 

71 IFINSTR(1,F$, M / M )= i 0 AND INSTR 
( 1 , F$ , " . " ) =0 THENF$=F$+ M . DAT" 

72 OPEN M D M , l,F$,l:LO=LOF(l) :IFLO 
=0 THENPRINT : PRINT M File not foun 
d . 11 : CLOSE : KILLF$ : FORTD=lT01£J£J£J :N 
EXT :UN=l: RETURN ELSE CLOSE : RETUR 
N 

100 CLS : H=0 : V=0 : LOCATEH , V : Z$= M Wr 

ite III CoCo III Word Proces 

sor" :GOSUB3 9:V=V+l: Z$= M By Bill C 
ook" : GOSUB3 9 : PRINTPR$ ; : ATTR3 , 1 
110 FORI=lT09: LOCATECR/2-12, 1+5: 
PRINTI;CHR$ (8) ;". M ;M$(I) : NEXT 

115 LOCATECR/2-12 , 16 : PRINT" File 
in memory : " ; F$ 

116 LOCATECR/2-12 , 17: PRINT M No. L 
ines : M ;N 

117 LOCATECR/2-12 , 18 : PRINT "Space 
Remaining : " ; 20 p-N 

120 LOCATE CR/2-16,21:ATTR 7,1,B 
:PRINT M Select the option of your 
choice. " ; :ATTR FG,BG 
130 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$ = M M THEN 1 3 ^0 ELSE 
A=VAL(A$) 

140 IFA<10RA>9THENSOUNDl^, 1 : GOT 
O130ELSECLS:ON A GOTO1000 , 2000 , 3 
000 ,4000 ,5000 ,6000 ,7000 ,8000 ,900 

150 SOUNDl^, l:GOT014p 
200 GOTO 200 

1000 'START NEW DOCUMENT 

1010 F$= M 11 : }i=0 : V—0 : POKE2 82 ,0 : LOC 

ATEH , V : Z $ =M $ ( 1 ) + 11 . .Press <CLEAR> 

for MENU M :GOSUB3 9:PRINTPR$; 
1020 FORI=j3TOXL:L$ ( I ) = " ,f : NEXT : N= 
0:GOSUB19 :POKE282 , 2 55 : CLS : GOTO10 

P 

1030 FORI= > 0TON-1:PRINTL$(I) :NEXT 
:PRINTL$ (N) ; :GOSUB3 3 : FORI=NTOXL: 
L$ ( I ) =" " : NEXT : GOSUB1 9 : POKE2 8 2,25 
5:GOTO100 

2000 'LOAD DOCUMENT 

2005 POKE&HFFD8,0 ^=0^=0 

2,01,0 CLS:Z$=M$ (2) : GOSUB3 9 : PRINTP 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 157 



R$; 

2020 PRINT ,f Enter Filename/Ext: ,f ; 
: LINEINPUTF$ : GOSUB7)3 : IFUN=1THENU 
N=j3 : GOTO2)310 

2)33)3 ATTR7 , 1 : PRINT : PRINT l? Loading 

?i +F$ : ATTR1 , 1 : AN$ = " " 
2040 OPEN' 1 1' 1 , 1 , F$ : X=0 
2)35)3 IF E0F(1)=-1THEN21)3)3 
2060 INPUT#1,L$(X) :X=X+1 

2) 37)3 GOTO205)3 

21)3)3 CLOSE : N=X: POKE&HFFD9 f 0 : GOTO 
1)3)3 

3) 3)3)3 'SAVE DOCUMENT 

3)3)35 POKE&HFFD8,)3:H=p:V=)3 

3) 31)3 CLS : Z$=M$ (3) : GOSUB3 9 : PRINTP 
R$ 7 

3020 PRINT ,f Enter Filename/Ext : 11 ; 

: LINEINPUTF$ : GOSUB7J3 

3040 ATTR7 , 1 : PRINT : PRINT "Saving 

"+F$ 

3050 OPEN"0" , l,F$:FORI=)3TON:PRIN 
T#l , CHR$ (34) L$ (I) CHR$ (34) : NEXT 
3060 CLOSE : POKE&HFFD9 , 0 : GOT01)3)3 

4000 'EDIT DISPLAY 

4001 M1$= H <F>orward <B>ack 
<I>nsert line <D>elete line <E 
>dit line <M>enu " : M2 $=="<F>or 
ward <B>ack <I>nsert 1 
ine" :M3$="<D>elete line <E>dit 1 
i n e **c 1^1 ^ ^£ in \i 

4010 CLS:V=)3:Z$=M$ (4) :GOSUB39:PR 
INTPR$; 

4) 315 PP=0:SC=l:LP=18:LV=j3 

4)22)3 LOCATE )2 , 2 : POKE 2 8 2,255: A$=IN 
KEY$: FORX=LP*PP TO LP*PP+LP : PRIN 
T fl "+L$(X) :NEXT:V=2 2:LOCATEj3,21: 
PRINTPR$; : IFCR=8)3THENZ$=M1$:G0SU 
B39 

4021 IFCR=4)3 THENLOCATE)3 , 2 2 : PRIN 
TM2$;M3$; 

4025 IFLV> j 0THENH=)3 : V=LV: GOSUB3 7 : 
GOT04)34)3 

4)33)3 H=)3: V=2 :GOSUB37 

4)34)3 A$ = INKE Y$ : IFA$=" !f THEN4j34j3 E 

LSE A=INSTR(CHR$(94)+CHR$(10)+CH 

R$(8)+CHR$(9)+"IDMEFB" , A$ ) : ON A 

GOT04 120, 4 120, 4120, 4120, 4140, 415 

0, 4160, 417)3,418)3, 4190 

4050 SOUND1J30, 1:GOTO4J340 

4120 IFPEEK(341) =247 ANDV>2 THEN 

POKE341, 255 : V=V-1 : GOSUB3 7 : FORTD= 

1T04)3:NEXT 

4130 IFPEEK(342)=247 AND(V<LP+2 
AND NO<N-l)THENPOKE34 2, 255: V=V+1 
:GOSUB37 : F0RTD=1T04 0 : NEXT 

4131 IFPEEK(344)=247 ANDH<CR-3TH 
ENPOKE344, 255: H=H+l:GOSUB37 : GOTO 
4200 

4132 IFPEEK(343 )=247 ANDH> )3THENP 



OKE34 3 , 25 5 :H=H-l:GOSUB3 7 :GOT042j3 

4135 NO=LP*PP+V-2 :GOTO4040 

4140 NO=LP * PP+V -2:1 FN+ 1>20 )3THENL 
OCATEj3, 22 : PRINT" Only 200 lines a 

llowed " :S0UND1)3)3, 5:F0RTD=1T 

02000 : NEXT : GOTO 1)3)3 

4141 IFN=)3THENS0UND1)3)2, l:GOT04j84 

4142 LOCATE)3,22:PRINTTAB(10) ,f Mak 

ing room for insert ":FORIl= 

N TO NO STEP-1 : FORI2=j3T03 : IF 12 = 
1THEN4146 

4143 I3=PEEK(VARPTR(L$ (II) )+I2) 

4144 POKE(VARPTR(L$ (11+1) )+I2) ,1 
3 

4146 NEXT I2,I1:L$(N0)=CHR$(32) : 
N=N+ 1 : LV=V : GOT04 0 20 

4150 NO=LP*PP+V-2 : IFN— 0THENSOUND 
100, 5 :GOT04)34)3 

4151 LOCATE)3, 22 : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) "Del 
eting line n : FORIl=NO+l TO N 

4152 FORI2=)3T03 

4153 IFI2=1 THEN4157 

4154 I3=PEEK(VARPTR(L$ (II) ) +12) 

4155 POKE(VARPTR(L$ (11-1) )+I2) , I 
3 

4157 NEXTI2, Il:N=N-l:LV=V:GOT04j3 

2 0 

4160 GOT01J3J3 

4170 NO=LP*PP+V-2:LOCATE)3,22:ATT 
R7, l:PRINT n Line Edit Mode: Press 

<ENTER> to Exit" :LOCATE)3, 23 :PRI 
NTBL$ ; : POKE2 82 ,0 : IFN=j3THENSOUNDl 
)3)3,5:GOT04j31)3 

4171 A$=L$(NO) :Z1$= !I !#$%&" ()*=1 
23 456789)3 : -8+ ; ?/> . < , ABCDEFGHIJKL 
MNOPQRSTUWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqr 
stuvwxyz" : LOCATE 1,V:ATTR1, 1 : PRIN 
TA$ ; : IFH-)3THENH=1 : GOSUB37 ELSEGO 
SUB37 

4172 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$ = fl !f THEN4 172 E 
LSEIFPEEK(3 43 ) =2 4 7 THENPOKE 3 4 3, 25 
5:H=H-1 ELSEIFPEEK(344)=247THENP 
OKE344, 255:H=H+1 

4173 IFH<=1THENH=1 ELSEIFH>=LEN ( 
A$)+l THENH=LEN (A$) 4-1 

4174 IFZ$=CHR$ (13) THENLOCATE1 , V : 
ATTR3 , 1 : PRINTA$ ; : L$ (NO) =A$ : POKE2 
82,255: LOCATEp , V : G0SUB3 3 : SOUNDl)3 
0,1: LOCATEJ0 ,22: 1 FCR= 8 0 THENPRINTM 
1$: LOCATE)3,V :GOTO4040 ELSEPRINTM 
2 $ ; M3 $ ; : LOCATE)3 , V : GOT04 04 0 

4175 IFZ $=CHR$ (21) ANDLEN ( A$ ) >1TH 
ENGOSUB33 : Z$-INKEY$: PRINTMID$ (A$ 
,H+1) ; ,f " ;:GOSUB37:A$=LEFT$(A$,H 
-1)+MID$(A$ / H+1) :GOT04172 ELSE IF 
Z$-CHR$ ( 2 1) ANDLEN (A$) =1THENG0SUB 
33:PRINTMID$(A$,H+1) ;" ,f ;:GOSUB3 



158 THERAINBOW April 1987 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-lOO 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



HALL OF THE KING (Rainbow Review 6/86) 

This program combines all the things you look for in a great 
two disk graphics adventure program. The Hi-Res graphics 
are superbly done. The text portion of the screen and the 
graphics change quickly as you move through the HALL OF 
THE KING. You can move freely from one portion of the 
adventure to another. Call up your inventory at any time. You 
can even save or load a game at ANY time. HALL OF THE 
KING will challenge even the most seasoned adventurer. 

HALL OF THE KING requires 64K EB and one disk drive. This 
exciting two disk adventure comes packaged in a vinyl case. 
$39.95. 

HALL OF THE KING II (Rainbow Review 9/86) 

Continue your quest for the Earthstone in The Inner 
Chambers of the HALL OF THE KING. Outstanding graphics 
help show the way to success in your search to help restore 
the legendary power of the Earthstone to the dwarven race. 
The deeper you travel into the inner chambers, the more dif- 
ficult your progress becomes. HALL OF THE KING II has all 
the fine features of the first adventure. It is designed to 
follow the original HALL OF THE KING but may be played as 
a stand-alone adventure. The adventure fills two disks and 
comes packaged in a handsome vinyl folder. It requires one 
disk drive and 64K. $39.95 

WARP FACTOR X (Rainbow Review 2/86) 

If you have been waiting for a game for your color computer 
that has everything, your wait is over. WARP FACTOR X is 
here. This all graphics simulation game requires strategy, 
fast thinking, an eye for detail, and -above all experience in 
knowing the capabilities of your stai jhip and its computer. 
(See review in Feb. 85 issue of Rainbow.) It requires 32K one 
disk drive and comes packaged in a vinyl library case. $34.95 

DARKMOOR HOLD (Rainbow Review 8/86) 

You and your comrades will explore the levels of Darkmoor 
Hold in an effort to gain great riches and defeat the dark 
wizard. The Wizard will soon realize the threat you pose and 
the many monsters you meet and battle will become stonger 
and more powerful as you move through the 10 levels of 
Darkmoor. A keen eye will help you find weapons and armor 
to aid your battle along with treasures for you to keep. Your 
party consists of a Dwarf, an Elf, and you, the Human, each 
with their own special attributes. The weapons, armor and 
treasure are placed randomly in each level to provide a new 
challenge each time you play. You may also save the game 
you are playing since defeating the evil Wizard is not an easy 
task. It has great graphics and an impressive text screen to 
give you more fun than a barrel of elves. Requires 64KEB and 
1 disk drive. $29.95 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — all of our software 
can be backed up using standard backup procedures. 

Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include $1.50 
shipping for each order. TX residents add 5 1/8% sales tax. 
Orders shipped within two days. 

Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. Canadian 
dealers should contact Kelly Software Distributors, Ltd. 608, 
STNT, Calgary, Alberta T5H 2H2, (403) 236-2161 




DRAGON BLADE (Rainbow Review 11/86) 
Animated Graphics Adventure 

This 100% hi-res graphics adventure features many animated 
screens which will delight the avid adventurer. You search for 
the magic Blade which is the only way to rid your homeland of 
the fearsome dragon which has risen from a long rest to ter- 
rorize your village. Fill your screen with super graphics as you 
try to solve the difficult challenge the village leaders have set 
before you. Dragon Blade requires 64K EB and 1 disk drive. 
$29.95 

DOLLAR WISE 



# 



In todays world of high finance, variable interest rates, 
balloon payments, and lease options there is a program that 
can help you sort out the details and make sense of the small 
print. DOLLAR WISE is an extremely flexible program that 
will allow you to find the best loan by substituting values for 
all the different variables that make up the loan. Find the 
future value and interest paid for either single or multiple 
deposit savings accounts. Determine mortgage interest paid 
during a tax year— very good for estimating tax savings on 
credit purchases also. Should you rent or buy. DOLLAR WISE 
gives you all the options. It will even provide a loan amortiza- 
tion table print out with Tax Year summaries either by month 
or year. Requires 32K Tape -$24.95 Disk - $27.95 



FONTFILE — (New for the COCO III) 



FONTFILE replaces the standard Hi-Res COCO III font with a 
character set you select. Choose from a menu of 26 or create 
your own and save it to disk for future use. Use the fontf ile in 
your own basic programs or livenup an old program with a Hi- 
Res font screen. FONTFILE will work on all versions of the 
COCO but is especially written to take advantage of the 
special capabilities of the new COCO III. Requires 64K and 
one disk drive. $24.95 



COMING SOON! 
Hall Of The King III 



Send for our free catalog 

Call (915) 584-7784 or 

Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

213 La Mirada 
El Paso, Texas 79932 





7:A$=MID$ (A$,H+1) :GOT04172 

4176 IFZ$=CHR$ (93) ANDLEN ( A$ ) <CR- 
1 2THENGOSUB33 :Z$=INKEY$: PRINT" "; 

MID$ (A$,H) ; :GOSUB37:A$=LEFT$ (A$, 
H-l)+" "+MID$ (A$,H) :GOT04172 

4177 IFINSTR(Z1$,Z$)=,0THEN4179 

4178 IF(H>1 ANDH<CR-2)THENA$=LEF 
T$ (A$,H-1)+Z$+MID$ (A$,H+1) :H=H+1 
: LOCATE 1 , V: PRINTA$ ; ELSE IF(H=1A 
NDH<CR-2) THENA$=Z$+MID$ (A$,H+1) : 
H=H+1 : LOCATE1 , V : PRINTA$ ; 

4179 GOSUB37:GOT04172 

4180 IF(PP+1) *LP<N THENPP=PP+1:G 
OT04£)2£) ELSES0UND1^,5:G0T04£4£J 
419J3 IFPP*LP>J3 THENPP=PP-l:GOT04 
j32^ ELSE SOUND1J30,5:GOTO4£4£ 
t±2$$ GOTO4040 

5j5f5j5 ' PRINT 

5(5(51 CLS:PRINT"Is printer on (Y/ 
N) ? " ; : LINEINPUTY$ : IFLEFT$ ( Y$ , 1 ) = 
M Y" OR LEFT$(Y$ / l)="y"THENPR=l E 
LSEPR=,0 

5pp2 PRINT"How many copies" ; : INP 
UTNC:FORQ=lTO NC : CLS : Z$=M$ (5) : GO 
SUB3 9:PRINTPR$; 

5j3^4 LM=1£J:RM=1£) : LG=8£J-LM-RM: LP= 
55 : PG=j5 : Ll=j3 : SP=1 : BF=j5 : B$ = " " 
: 5(51(5 FORI=£TON: IFI=N THENLF=1 
5020 A$=B$+L$(I) :B$="":IFLEFT$(A 
$ , 1) =" ; "THEN 55^ 'PRINTER COMMA 
ND 

; 5030 LL=LEN(A$) 

! 5032 IFLL>LG THEN 5£J4J3 

5033 X=INSTR(A$,CHR$ (126) ) :IFX>0 
THENMID$ (A$,X, 1) =CHR$ (32) :B$="" 

5034 GOT05j355 

5j34£ B$=MID$(A$,LG+1) : A$=LEFT$ (A 
$,LG) 

5041 IFRIGHT$(A$,1)<>" "THENB$=R 
IGHT$ (A$ , 1 ) +B$ : A$=LEFT$ ( A$ , LEN (A 
$) -1) :GOT05£41 
5j555 GOSUB54p£J 

5056 X=INSTR(B$,CHR$ (126) ) : IFX>0 
THENA$=B$ : B$=" " : GOTO5J330 
5j36£ NEXTI , Q 
5399 GOTOl^P 

54j3j3 GOSUB3 3 : LOCATELM, V: POKE&HFF 
D8,J3:PRINTA$ 

541j3 L1=L1+SP: IFSP=2THENPRINT EL 
1 SE IFSP=3THENPRINT: PRINT 

5411 IFPR=j3THEN549j3 ELSEPRINT#-2 
, TAB (LM) ;A$ 

5415 IFSP=2THENPRINT#-2 :ELSEIFSP 

=3THENPRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 

542^ IF(L1=>LP OR LF=1) THEN PRIN 

T#-2 :L1=L1+1:IFL1=6J3 THENPRINT#- 

2, TAB (3 5) ;"-" ;PG+1;"-" :PRINT#-2, 

CHR$ (12) :Ll=l:PG=PG+l:LF= i 0:ELSE5 

42j3 



5430 IFBFO i 0THENPRINT#-2 / CHR$(27 
);"E"; 'EMPHASIZED FOR EPSON MX- 

ON 

5431 IFBF=,0THENPRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) 
;"F"; 'EMPHASIZED FOR EPSON MX- 

OFF 

5490 POKE&HFFD9 ,fi : RETURN 

55pp 'PRINTER COMMANDS 

5510 X=INSTR(A$ , "LM=") : IFX>0 THE 

NLM=VAL(MID$ (A$,X+3 ,2) ) :IFLM>2£T 

HENLM=2 i 0 

5520 X=INSTR(A$, "RM=") :IFX>0 THE 
NRM=VAL(MID$(A$,X+3,2) ) :IFRM>2£T 
HENRM=2 i 0 

5530 X=INSTR(A$ , "LP=") : IFX>0THEN 
LP=VAL(MID$(A$,X+3,2) ) :IFLP>66 T 
HENLP=66 

5540 X=INSTR(A$ , "PG=") :IFX>0THEN 

PG=VAL (MID$ ( A$ , X+3 , 2 ) ) 

5550 X=INSTR(A$,"SP= n ) :IFX>0THEN 

SP=VAL(MID$(A$,X+3,2) ) :IFSP>3THE " 

NSP=3 

5560 X=INSTR(A$, "BF=") :IFX>0THEN 

BF=VAL (MID$ ( A$ , X+3 ,2)) 

557 j5 X=INSTR(A$ , " ;N") : IFX>0THENL 

F=l ELSE LF=0 

5575 LG=80-LM-RM 

5580 GOTO5060 

6000 'RESUME 

6010 CLS:H=0:V=0:Z$=M$(6) :GOSUB3 
9 : PRINTPR$ ; 

6020 FORI=0TON-1:PRINTL$ (I) :NEXT 
:PRINTL$(N) ; : POKE2 82 ,0 : GOSUB3 3 : G 
OSUB20 : POKE282 , 255 : GOTO100 
7000 'KILL 
7005 POKE&HFFD8 ,0 

7010 CLS:Z$=M$(7) : GOSUB3 9 : PRINTP 
R$; :DIR: PRINT 

7020 PRINT"Enter Filename/Ext:"; 
: LINEINPUTF$ : GOSUB70 : IFUN=1THENU 
N=0:GOTO7010 

7030 ATTR1, 1: PRINT: PRINT"Are you 
sure? (Y/N) ?" ; : INPUTS$ : IFLEFT$ ( 
S$,l) <>"Y"THEN70010 
7040 ATTR7 , 1 : PRINT"Killing "+F$ : 
KILL F$:POKE&HFFD9,0:GOTO100 
8000 'DIR 

8010 CLS:POKE&HFFD8,0:Z$=M$ (8) :G 
OSUB3 9 : PRINTPR$ ; : DIR : PRINT 
8020 ATTR7 , 1 : PRINT"Press any key 
to return to MENU" : EXEC4 4539 : PO 
KE&HFFD9 , 0 : GOTO100 

9000 POKE&HFFD8 , 0 : POKE2 82 , 2 55 : ST 
OP 

10000 PRINT "ERROR #";ERNO;"IN LI 
NE" ;ERLIN:GOTO9000 



160 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



» 



DOCTOR ASCII 




Command Causes CoCo 3 

System Crashes 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



I If I execute the following com- 
mands, either in direct mode or as 
part of a program, my CoCo 3 
crashes. This seems to be a design 
problem with the machine, since I have 
experienced the same problem with a 
number of machines. 

CLERR 17000: NIDTH 40 

A similar problem arises if I run a 
program that constantly increases the 
size of the stack: 

10 WIDTH 40 
20 GDSUB 30 
30 PRINT MEM : GOTO 20 

On the CoCo 3, the system crashes, 
whereas on my CoCo 2, I get an OM 
Error. The net result is that programs 
that use a lot of string space and j or 
space for machine language segments 
will not run with the WIDTH 40 state- 
ment added. I would appreciate it if you 
could suggest possible solutions. 

Terry A. Jackson 
Associate Professor 
Midwest College of Engineering 

13 The designers of the CoCo 3, in 
/C an attempt to maintain as much 
compatibility as possible with the CoCo 
Is and 2s while abiding with the licens- 
ing agreements from Microsoft, could 
neither modify nor rewrite the ROM 
code of Color BASIC, Extended BASIC, 
or Disk BASIC. It had to be a patch job 
and the 8K had to come from an area 

Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 




in the range $0000-$7FFF Due to these 
design limitations, they chose Super 
Extended BASIC to usethe address space 
$2000-$3FFF (16384-24575) as a swap 
area to permit the CoCo's 6809E to 
address the Hi-Res text screen from its 
normal 64K address space. 

This design can cause problems if 
your program expects to find something 
in the swap space at the time it is 
swapped out. The solution is to keep the 
stack out of this area. Instead of clear- 
ing a lot of memory above S3FFF for 
machine language programs, use the 
PCLERR command to clear space below 
and place your CoCo 3 machine lan- 
guage programs in memory starting at 
$600 (for cassette) or $E00 (for disk). If 
you have huge character string require- 
ments, save the strings in a random 
access file. If file I/O is too slow, J&R's 
JramR 5I2K upgrade includes RAM 
disk software. The software is also 
available separately and is compatible 



with other 512K CoCo 3 upgrades. 
Keep in mind that the CoCo 3 is prima- 
rily an OS-9 machine and when running 
with it, none of these problems arise. 

MC-10 Software Available 

[% In your December '86 column, 

*j — 

^ Nicholas Petroff asked if there was 
;J a way to make his MC-10 more like 
the CoCo. As a matter of fact, all the 
things he asked for (and more) are 
available for the MC-10 through the 
MC-10 users group. My MC-10 has 
Extended BASIC fEXT.BRS by Gary 
Furr), RAM disk (MCDOS by Gra- 
hame Pollock), Assembler (Ass-6803), 
MCOS (by MJB), Conversion pro- 
grams (CoToPo and PoToCo by Bob 
Schecter), Word Processor (TvlcWord 
by Bob Schecter) and various disas- 
semblers, utilities and programs. These 
programs are available both as listings 
in the MCLJG newsletter and on tape. 
There is also a 64K upgrade available 
from Helen Francisco that gives 44 K 
RA M for BASIC and ML programs and 
ROM 1.4 (on tape) which uses this extra 
memory. Anyone wanting more infor- 
mation should send $1 and a #10 SASE 
to: MC-10 Users Group, Box 103, 
Owensville, IN 47665 for a sample copy 
of our 20-page newsletter. 

Larry Allen 

ID Face it, Larry. The MC-10, 
^ though it has lots of company 
(PC Jr., TI-994A, VIC-20, Sinclair- 
1000, etc.), is an orphan machine. I 
would still advise an MC-10 owner to 
cut his losses and go with a CoCo 3. The 
TV and cassette recorder with cable for 
the MC-10 will work with the CoCo 3, 
but that's about it. 

April 1987 THE RAINBOW 161 



CoCo 3 Keyboard 

Where can I get a Co Co 3 keyboard 
for my Co Co 2? 

John Witt man 
Greens Fork, IN 



T) Order part number AXX-0245 
/L from Radio Shack National Parts 
via your local Radio Shack dealer. The 
cost is $19.90. 

Upgrading the New CoCo 



How do you upgrade a CoCo 3 to 
512K? Is soldering necessary? 

Virginia Niewoehner 
Chicago, IL 



X? Soldering is not necessary. You 
A jL unplug the four 41464 64K by 4 
RAM chips, cut out the disk capacitor 
C65 and then plug in the satellite mem- 
ory board. Various satellite memory 
boards are marketed by J&R Electron- 
ics, Radio Shack National Parts (Part 
No. AXX-7117) and others. 

Scrambled Downloads 

II own a CoCo 2 with one drive and 
a DCM-3. My friend owns a TRS- 
80 Model I (old silver Z-80 model, 
not a CoCo) with two drives and a 
DCM-1 modem. When we try down- 
loads, they always become scrambled 
on my end. 

Jimmy Munroe 
Sussex, New Brunswick 

First, one modem must be set to 
"Answer," the other to "Origi- 
nate." Second, both computers must be 
running smart terminal programs with 
identical protocol settings (i.e., word 
length, parity, stop bits, etc.). Third, 
since the machines are not software- 
compatible, only ASCII-formatted files 
or ASCII-saved BASIC programs can be 
transferred. 





Memory Poke for Disk 

II have a converted 64 K CoCo with 
two disk drives. When typing in the 
memory poke, POKE 25,G:NEU, / 
find that I cannot load anything from 
a disk. The disk starts to load but then 
quits in the middle of the load and 
continues to run with no further load- 
ing. I have to shut down the machine to 
do anything else. Why? Is there a fix? 

Raymond R. L. Hoem 
(MONT KID) 
Billings, MT 




Apparently, what you are trying 
to do is simulate a PCLERR0. Disk 
BASIC uses the area between &H600 and 
&HDFF, but by executing your poke, 
you let BASIC overwrite this area, raising 
havoc with Disk BASIC. If you want to 
use as much memory as possible with 
Disk BASIC, use POKE 25,14:PDKE 
&HE00,0:NEU. 

Non-compatible Apple Drives 

II just acquired two TEAC drives. 
They were used in the past on an 
Apple (Acorn) computer. I tried to 
use them with my CoCo but all I got 
were 1/ O Errors. I have one TEA C 
drive, the same kind, a slim-line, sort of 
like the new Radio Shack drives turned 
on their sides. I was wondering if I could 
configure these drives for a 64 K CoCo. 
Will I need any different configuration 
with the new CoCo 3? 

Erol Senakis 
(EROL) 
Elmhurst, NY 

Apple-compatible disk drives use 
a non-standard interface. CoCo 
drives use the IBM standard. Drives 
that work with the CoCo 1 or 2 will also 
work with the CoCo 3. 

9600 Baud on CoCo 3 

II used to be able to poke a 1 into 
Location 150 for my printer speed on 
my old gray CoCo /, I have a CoCo 
3 now and it doesn't seem to recognize 
anything faster than an 18 or 2400 baud 
in POKE 150. I have a Model 101 Metric 
Ind. serial-to-parallel converter and it 
ran my Okidata 192 fine at 9600 baud. 
Any suggestions? 

Ronald C. Bruellisauer 

(RONBWY) 

Cheyenne, WY 

Try poking a 4 into Location 150 

for 4800 baud. For 9600 baud you 

will have to adjust your Model 101. 

ATTR Is a Pain 

1/5 there any way to permanently 
disable the permissions feature for 
files in Level I OS-9? Having to 
remember to set RTTR every time I want 
to do something even though I have a 
single-user system is a pain. 

Clell Harmon 

(NAVY MAN) 

Wichita, KA 



I use OS-9 all the time and hardly 
ever need to mess with the RTTR 




command. The permissions feature is 
meant as a safeguard so that you can 
protect files from accidental erasure or 
modification. The only program I have 
found that requires me to go back and 
reset the permissions is StyFix, the 
configuration program for the word 
processor Stylograph, and it is only 
used once when setting up a new printer. 

Boot Query 

I en joy learning BASIC by examining 
and modifying other programs. I 
have a very fine boot program for 
disk system, but for the life of me cannot 
figure it out. This is the listing: 



10 CL5 

20 fl = PEEK(&HlB)*25G+PEEI< 
(&H1C)G 

30 PRINT"<1RUTD BDOT>B":PRINT 

40 PRINT"up GO UP" 

50 PRINT"down GO DOWN" 

60 PRINT"enter EXECUTE"" 

70 PRINT"brsak RBDRT" 

B0 EXEC R 

90 END 





It seems as though the only two lines 
that do anything are 10 and 80, yet if 
I type only these two lines and run, it 
will not work. If I load and run off my 
disk however, it works. Why is this? 

David Johnson 
(DA VIDJOHNSON) 

Leicester, NC 

Apparently, the BASIC program 
you load from disk has an em- 
bedded machine language program 
attached to it. After loading the pro- 
gram, examine the address calculated 
from PEEK(27)*25G+PEEK(2B). You 
will find it is well past the end of your 
BASIC program allowing room for the 
ML. 

New Keyboard for an 'E' Board 

II need to fit an 'E' board with a 
newer keyboard. Would it be easier 
to buy an adapter for the newer 
keyboards, or build one myself? 

Keith Wayne Smith 

(UGLY) 

Hardburly, KY 

You can purchase a keyboard 
adapter for a nominal fee. Also, 
if you purchase a new keyboard up- 
grade from Tandy, it is included if you 
tell them that it is for an old CoCo I. 




162 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Fantasy Clip Art Disk 

&TtQTfo$Sj eLues* dromons and fnof&- ■ ■ 
More than t-h irtLj dips for Cqgomo ■ - ■ 

■ ALL fiEM ! I ! 



_ — - _ bi _ ■ ■ l i 1 m 



fry > y» r 



"Hi. 



■ - . „h k .<• i -■ ,r ■■ ■ - 




Yoy Must 
Coco mo x ■ 

EftB disk ?H- $5 



Oriental Gallery I 

T w en t '-i fi e w f u L [-scree r"i p i ct ur e s f r o ru o. 
to. I. en fed yro.ph ic art i st • • -al L readu to 
print or use with Uour Qraphic editor- 

ALL NEW ! ! ! 




M 

O 
R 
E 
T 
O 
N 



BETTER GRAPHICS ON 
YOUR COCO 3 

Use the graphic power 
of your Coco 3 J More 
good information and 
examples of high res 
graphics on the Coco 3 . 
Create better static 
illustrations. Learn 
more about Basic 
animation, screen 
scrolling, tips on 
HPUT and HGET, how to 
use HDRAW and much more 



4? 



BETTER 
GRAPH ICS 
0M VOUR 

COCO 3 



Bette r Graphics on your Coco 



3 plus two disks of programs and pictures. $24.95 



OKIMATE 20 WITH PLUG ' N ' PRINT 

Small, quiet and colorful! Eight vivid colors. 
Excellent print quality. Italics, super and sub 
scripts. Ten, twelve or fifteen characters to the 
inch. The perfect second printer for your Coco. 

Printer, Plug 'n 'Print , paper, black and color ribbons, 
instruction and software. $240 plus $10 shipping. 



GRAPHIC SCREEN DUMP FOR THE OKIMATE 20 

Dump PMODE 3 and PMODE 4 graphics from your Color 
Computer to the Okimate 20 printer. Select 2 color, 4 
color or black and white screen dumps. $29.95 




E 



A GUIDE TO COCO 3 BASIC AND GRAPHICS 

Do you want to learn more about your 
Color Computer 3? If so, A Guide to Coco 
3 Basic and Graphics is what you need! 

This practical guide to the Coco 3 is 
written by Linda Nielsen, a long time 
Coco user. It has more than 50 pages of 
examples, explanations, and programs 
especially for the Coco 3. 

Not only that, the Guide includes a 
disk of programs and pictures. Translate 
low res graphics onto the high resolution 
screen. Draw on the 320 by 192, 16 color 
or the 640 by 192, 4 color screens. 
Learn how to display 256 artifacted 
colors on a television or composite 
monitor . 

Unlock the power in your Color Computer 
3, order your GUIDE today! 
Price effective March 1 $21.95 



DOUBLE DRIVER II 

Finally a monitor driver for 
the Color Computer II that 
lets you use a monochrome 
and a color monitor 
simultaneously. We're proud 
of this new driver. The six 
transister circuit provides op- 
timal signal mixing and signal 
gain. Excellent monochrome 
output and better quality 
resolution in the color ouput 




than any driver we have 
seen. Audio output also. Fits 
all models of the Color Com- 
puter 11. $29.95. 




THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The CoCo Switcher allows you to hook up 
three peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Con- 
nect your modem, printer and any other 
RS-232 compatible peripheral to the CoCo 
Switcher An LED on the CoCo Switcher 
shows if your computer is on or off at a glance. 
The LED flickers when transmitting or receiv- 
ing data. 

$39,95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 



DOUBLE DRIVER I 

The BEST monitor driver available. 
Color composite, monochrome and 
audio output. For original CoCo D. E 
and F boards. $24.95. 

MONO II 

Mono II for Color Computer 2. An 
excellent monochrome monitor driver 
that has audio output also Specify 
model needed. 

$24,95. 




MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division of Moreton Bay laboratory 
316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 

Ordering information 

Send $2 00 shipping and handling per order We ship 
within 1 working day on receipt of order. Blue Label 
Service available. California residents add 6% sales tax. 




What's the Address? 

I am now using a CoCo 3 and some- 
times want to' transfer a machine 
language file from disk to tape to try 



it as a file on a tape-only system. Could 
you tell me at what memory addresses 
I could find the Start, End and Execute 
addresses of the most recently loaded 
from disk ML file? 

Steven G. Schnautz 

(WOODSMITH) 

Ft. Myers, FL 

D The addresses from disk machine 
/L language files cannot be peeked 
out of memory like they can with one 
that is loaded from tape. A program is 
needed to get this information. One 
such program that will give you this 
information is Jeff Francis' Disk Utility 
2.1 A, $29.95 from Spectrum Projects. 

Corrosion Confusion 

/ have a 64K CoCo I, a 26-3024 
Multi-Pak, the older disk controller 
and an RS-232 pack. I have been 
having intermittent problems with my 
disk drives. The motors randomly 
turned on and sometimes the disk was 
written on, effectively destroying the 
format and data. The problem seemed 
to be connected with the RS-232 pack 
in Slot I of my Multi-Pak. It seemed as 
though I could fix the problem tempo- 
rarily by applying slight pressure to the 
controller pack. I removed the pack, 
took it apart and noted some corrosion 
on the ground tabs on the connector. I 
cleaned the connector and put the 
system back together and have not had 
the problem return. My question — was 
this a coincidence? If this could not have 
been the problem, what could the prob- 
lem be? 

Harold M. Wilson 

(HA L2356 ) 

Austin, TX 

The problem was in the connec- 
tors on your controller. Fre- 
quently, with controllers that do not 
have gold-plated connectors, oxidation 
causes corrosion to build up on the 
surfaces that mate with your CoCo. 
Using a pencil eraser to clean the con- 
nectors on your controller removes the 
oxidation from the surfaces and makes 
it as good as new. 

Can't Save to Disk 



/ am using a direct connect modem 
pack with a multipack. I have been 
told there is a poke that would allow 



me to save to disk. For the life of me 
I can't find a soul who knows it. Can 
you help? 

Vince Falcone 

(IYAVIN) 

Minden, NV 

T} As with the RS-232 pack, the 
/L software in the ROM of your 
modem pack is tape-oriented. With a 
disk, it is useless unless you are using 
OS-9 Version 2.0 or later. 

OS-9 Level 1 Patches 

I have a CoCo 3 and cannot boot my 
OS-9 Level I, Version 1. 00. Is there 
an easy way to get it to run? I asked 
a local Radio Shack dealer if he knew 
of any upcoming patches, but he just 
recommended that I purchase Level II. 

John C. Henneberger 

(AMX) 

Tucson, AZ 

D The patches are now in the down- 
load section of rainbow's new 
OS-9 Online SIG on Delphi. 

Compatibility With the CoCo 3 

Now that the CoCo 3 has become 
widely available, I have a few ques- 
tions. First, am I able to use my old, 
silver TEC drive on a new CoCo 3? The 
salesman at my local Radio Shack store 
has no clue as to whether it would be 
possible or not. Secondly, will my old 
software ("VIP Desktop, CoCo Max II, 
etc.) work on the CoCo 3? 

Fredrik J. Ahlberg 
(FREDALBERG) 

Kingston, NH 

Your old controller requires 12 
/C volts. You can get the required 12 
volts from a CoCo 3 adapted multipack, 
or you can get the 12 volts by running 
a wire from the 12-volt source on your 
disk drive's power supply (this requires 
some hardware experience). Patches for 
CoCo Max are now on Delphi. Hints 
as to how to fix various versions of VIP 
software are there too. 



Disk Controller Can't Be Shared 

/ would like to hook up my CoCo 
2 and CoCo 3 to work with one disk 
£jl controller and one TV, but have run 
into a few problems. I have found a Y 
cable that I think will work for the 



controller, but haven't found a way to 
connect the TV yet. Can you help? 

Edward A. Wolf 
(LSPC) 
Queens, NY 

IJ Thanks to Marty Goodman for 
/L the following reply: You can 
make up a switch box that can switch 
the video input of the TV between a 
CoCo 2 and 3. Or you can buy such 
boxes from Radio Shack or other con- 
sumer electronic suppliers. They are 
inexpensive and widely available. It is 
impossible to electrically switch a disk 
controller between CoCos in any simple 
or effective fashion. A Y cable will not 
work in this situation, and may well 
destroy both CoCos and /or the disk 
controller if you try to use it in the 
manner you seem to be describing. You 
must power down your entire system 
and physically move the disk controller 
from one CoCo to the other to "share" 
the disk controller. 



Multi-Pak Extension Cord 



/ am trying to make an extension 
^ cord to free my CoCo from my 
Multi-Pak. What I need to know is 
if there is a limit to the length between 
the two. Also I would like to know what 
the limit is for extending the cable 
between the keyboard and mother- 
board. 

Eric A. Canha 

(MARKTWAIN) 

Fairhaven, MA 



Any type of extension cable for 
your multipack will lead to 

unreliable disk operation due to liming 

problems. Don't do it! 

As for the keyboard cable, some 

hackers report using cables 6 to 10 feet 

in length with no problems. 



For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submitted 
through rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine 
Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW > prompt, type R5K for "Ask 
the Experts" to arrive at the EX- 
PERT^ prompt, where you can 
select the "Doctor ASCII" online 
form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



164 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




ar. 



flware 



NO EXTRA 



CALLIGRAPHER 



CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Turn your CoCo and dot- 
matrix printer into a calligrapher's quill. 
Make beautiful invitations, flyers, 
certificates, greeting ca.rds, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are x k 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okiclata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $24.05. 

OSO Calligrapher - (C) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calligra- 
pher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints ail the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to IrojJ on UNIX (tin) 
systems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old En- 
glish and Cartoon fonts. Additiona-1 fonts 
are available (see below). Disk only; OS9; 
$24.05. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.05 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduce-d-reversed versions of 
Ga.y Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) •Id Style and Broa.d- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #• - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 20.05: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (2G fonts) on 
one disk. 

UTILITIES 

Auto Run II - (Hybrid BASIC /ML) Util- 
ity to allow your own tape-based BASIC or 
ML programs to display a graphics title 
screen and then self-start after loading. In- 
cludes a graphics editor to create profes- 
sional looking title screens. Tape onlv; 16K 
ECB; $10.05. 

Piratector - (100% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk- based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non- executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo I, 
II, III (except Semigraf); $30.05.* 



A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Semigrar Graphics Editor - (100% ML) 
Use 8 colors and standard text characters 
to draw graphics pictures and screens in 
high resolution semigraphics mode. In- 
cludes sample pictures. Tape/Disk; 16K 
CB; $10.05. 

Super Screen Machine - (100% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters, many other features. 
Tape/Disk; 32K CB; CoCo I, II, III (except 
S4K mode); $10.05. 

Color Disk Manager - (100% ML) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo I, II, III (except for 64K 
mode); $2-1.05. 

Color Tape Manager - (100% NIL) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into BASIC DATA 
statements, append ML to BASIC, load, 
display/modify and save tape file, handles 
missing EOF and filename blocks, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 1GK ECB; CoCo I, II, 
III (except for 64K mode); $10.05. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or 
disk, fast and simple general data base 
program. Create files of records that can 
be quickly sorted, searched, deleted a.nd 
updated. Powerful printer formatting. Up 
to 8 user fields, sort on up to 3 fields. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape 
or Disk based mailing list management 
program. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2'/* to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Util- 
ity companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail 
to allow multi-term search [AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $11.05 (see 
combo pkg below). 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.05. 



SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $10.05 each. 



price 



S!U 



EDUCATIONAL 



RAINBOW 

C£Rl»FlCAriOW 
SEAL 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 
5 and up. Story creation game; output to 
screen or printer; includes 2 stories or 
create your own. Tape/Disk; $10.05 or 
disk with 62 stories for $20,05. Sets of 10 
stories on tape/disk for $-1.05: Fairy 
Tales, Current Events, X-Raled, Sing- 
Along. Adventure. Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Ages 4 and up. A simple 
graphics aa venture- game for young chil- 
dren and their families. Old testament. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

The Presidents of the USA - (100% 

ML) Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games., 
user modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 a.nd up. Shar- 
pen your knowledge of the 50 stnte.s. Cap- 
itals, nicknames, abbreviations, flowers, 
trees, birds. Trivia! Tape /Disk; 16K ECB; 
$10.05. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 1GK ECB; $10.05. 

PrcReacIer - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 
3-5 (leve! I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great 
graphics and music. Level 1: matching 
colors, shapes, letters and numbers; Level 
2: association of letters and consonant 
blends with their sounds. Tape/Disk; Joys- 
tick; $10.05. 

Sbatgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Enter up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
>rint graph with screen print program 
not supplied); much more! Tape/Disk; 
.10.05. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This proaram may be tax 
deductible. Disk only: $20.05. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $10.'05. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from babv to man. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

Flying Tigers - [10%% ML) Fast De- 
fenders style arcade game. 5 levels of 
difficulty; Great graphics a-ncl sound 
effects. Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10.05. 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
'(305) 981-1241 



Alt programs ran on the CoCo I, //and III, 32K 
Extended Baric, unices otherwise noted. Add 
Si .50 per tape or disk for postage and 'handling. 
Florida residents add 5% sales tax. COD »rdt;rs 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. 




By John 




idsmath is designed to help children enjoy learning 
math skills. Only positive rewards are given, to en- 
f I courage the child and make learning more fun. 

The problems are drawn onscreen, with a flashing box 
designating where the correct answer should go. This helps 
the child learn the proper location of digits for problems 
whose answer is more than 9. 

After the problem is drawn on the screen, the child may 
enter his answer. If two incorrect responses are given, a 
visual help is displayed on the bottom of the screen. I found 
my own two girls progressed beyond the helps after a while. 

A big star is drawn on the screen when a correct response 
is given, regardless of how many wrong guesses the child 
may have made. After every five correct answers there is 
a five-star salute to the player, then play resumes. 

To have a version of Kidsmath for subtraction problems, 
make the following changes: 

Insert 1B5 IF D-T<0 THEN 180 

6B5 FDR FF=1 TO 300: NEXT FF 
Change 230 LINE ( 10 , 105 ) - ( 170 , 110 ) , P5ET , BF : 
LINE (40,70)-(65,75) ,P5ET,BF 
240 TT=0-T:D$=5TR$(TT) 
660 U=7 

6B0 CIRCLE (U, I) ,6,1:PPINT(U,I) ,1,1 
Delete lines 210 and 650. □ 



John Collicott is employed by Radio Shack in Hutchinson, 
Kansas. He belongs to a recently formed Color Computer 
club and his hobbies include programming his Co Co 2. 



166 



THE RAINBOW 







9D& 



^Ijr 41 181 420 230 

I 62 64 730 237 

93 106 1210 93 

150 177 END 165 

I * 

The listing: ADDITION 

I GOTO 1100 

5 'KIDSMATH BY JOHN COLLI COTT 
10 CIRCLE (X,Y-1) ,24,3, l:LINE(X-2 
2 , Y-3 ) - (X-22 , Y+3 ) , PSET : LINE ( X+2 2 
,Y-2) -(X+22, Y+2) , PSET: LINE (X-2, Y 
-23) -(X+2 , Y-23) , PSET: LINE ( X-2 ,Y+ 
21) -(X+2, Y+21) ,PSET 

II CIRCLE (X,Y-1) , 16, 3 

12 PRESET(X, Y+22) :PRESET(X, Y+23) 
: LINE ( X-3 , Y-2 4 ) - ( X+3 , Y-2 4 ) , PRESE 
T: PRESET (X,Y-2 5) : PRESET (X-2 4 , Y-l 
) :PRESET(X+24,Y-1) : PRESET (X-24 , Y 
-2) : PRESET (X+24, Y-2) 

13 PAINT (X-17, Y-l) ,3,3 
15 RETURN 

20 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X-15 ) + " , "+STR$ ( 
Y+20) +" ;BR7R20U5L5U3 8L10G8F5E5D3 
0L8D5" 

21 PAINT(X, Y-15) ,3,3 
25 RETURN 

30 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X-20) +" , "+STR$ ( 
Y+15)+" ;D5R40U5L30" 

31 LINE(X-20,Y+15) -(X+11,Y-10) ,P 
SET: LINE (X-10,Y+15) - (X+21, Y-8) , P 
SET: LINE (X-18, Y-15) - (X-ll, Y-12) , 
PSET 

32 CIRCLE (X,Y-5) ,20,3,1, .6, .98:P 
RESET(X,Y-25) : PRESET ( X , Y-2 4 ) : LIN 
E(X+20,Y-9)-(X+20,Y-3) , PRESET 

33 CIRCLE(X, Y-5) ,15,3,1, .6, .96 
3 4 PAINT (X-10, Y+17) , 3 , 3 
3 5 RETURN 

40 CIRCLE (X, Y-5) ,15,3,1, .6, .98 

41 CIRCLE (X,Y+3) , 15, 3 , 1, .03 , .4 

42 LINE (X+13, Y+2) -(X+6, Y-l) , PSET 
: LINE - (X+13, Y-6) , PSET 

43 CIRCLE(X, Y-5) ,20,3,1, .6, .99:C 
IRCLE(X,Y+3) ,20,3,1, .02, .4:PRESE 
T(X,Y-25) : PRESET (X, Y-2 4) :PRESET( 
X,Y+23) : PRESET (X, Y+22) 

44 LINE (X+19, Y-5) -(X+15,Y-1) ,PSE 
T:LINE- (X+19, Y+4) ,PSET 

45 LINE (X-18, Y-15) -(X-ll, Y-12) ,P 
SET:LINE(X-16,Y+15) -(X-10,Y+10) , 
PSET 

46 PAINT (X,Y-22) ,3,3 

47 RETURN 

50 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X+15)+'» , "+STR$ ( 
Y+20)+";U15R4U5L4U23L6D23L20U23L 



5D28R25D15R6" 

51 PAINT(X+13 , Y+15) , 3 , 3 

52 RETURN 

60 CIRCLE (X-2, Y+2) ,20,3,1, .65, .4 
: PRESET ( X-2 , Y+2 2 ) : PRESET ( X-2 , Y+2 
1) : PRESET ( X-2 ,Y-18) : PRESET (X-2 , Y 
-17) : PRESET (X+18, Y+2) 

61 LINE(X-16, Y+16) -(X-ll, Y+12) ,P 
SET 

62 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X-13 )+", "+STR$ ( 
Y-4)+";L7U20R3 5D5L30D9" 

63 CIRCLE (X-2 , Y+2) , 15, 3 , 1, .6 ,. 37 

64 PAINT (X+15, Y+2) ,3,3 

65 RETURN 

70 CIRCLE (X-2 , Y+3) ,18,3,1, .65, .4 
7 : PRESET (X-2 , Y-15) : PRESET (X-2 , Y- 
14) : PRESET (X+16, Y+3) : PRESET (X-2, 
Y+21) : PRESET ( X-2, Y+20) 

71 CIRCLE (X-2 ,Y-10) ,18,3,1, .55, . 
9 : PRESET ( X-2 , Y-2 8 ) : PRESET ( X-2 , Y- 
27) 

72 CIRCLE (X-2, Y+3) , 13, 3: CIRCLE (X 
-2,Y-10) ,13,3,1, .55, .88 

73 LINE(X-18, Y+5)-(X-18,Y-14) , PS 
ET 

74 LINE(X+4, Y-18)-(X+8, Y-19) , PSE 
T 

75 PAINT (X-15, Y+2) ,3,3 

76 RETURN 

80 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X+20 ) +" , "+STR$ ( 
Y-25)+" ;L40D5R35" 

81 LINE (X+20, Y-25)-(X+5, Y+20) , PS 
ET: LINE- (X-2 , Y+20) , PSET : LINE- (X+ 
13 , Y-20) ,PSET 

82 PAINT(X-15, Y-23) ,3,3 

83 RETURN 

90 CIRCLE (X,Y-9) , 10, 3: PRESET (X,Y 
+1) : PRESET (X, Y) 

91 CIRCLE (X,Y+7) , 10, 3 : PRESET (X,Y 
-3) : PRESET (X, Y-2) 

92 CIRCLE(X, Y-5) ,20,3,1, .54, .97: 
CIRCLE (X, Y+3) , 20,3 , 1, .03, .47: PRE 
SET(X,Y-25) :PRESET(X,Y-24) :PRESE 
T(X-20,Y-5) :PRESET(X,Y+23) : PRESE 
T(X, Y+22) 

93 LINE (X+19, Y-6)- (X+14, Y-l) , PSE 
T: LINE- (X+19, Y+4) , PSET 

94 LINE (X-18 , Y-6) - (X-14 , Y-l) , PSE 
T : LINE- ( X-18 , Y+4 ) , PSET 

97 PAINT(X-15, Y-5) ,3,3 

98 RETURN 

100 CIRCLE (X, Y-10) , 18, 3 , 1, . 15, .9 
9:PRESET(X, Y-28) : PRESET ( X , Y-27 ) : 
PRESET (X,Y+8) : PRESET (X, Y+7 ) : PRES 
ET(X-18, Y-10) 

101 CIRCLE(X, Y+3) ,18,3,1, .02, .4: 
PRESET (X, Y+21) : PRESET (X, Y+20) 

102 CIRCLE (X, Y-10) , 13 , 3 , 1 : CIRCLE 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 167 






* ^2dft **2* ^ * dtwe. 0\ «* 



-* i tot u * ' 




* raws! : cuf«rw w*ssk«* c ° 



ft* u 



see 



10 01 a art**" 




(X,Y+3) ,13,3,1,0, .4 



LINE(X+16,Y+5)-(X+16,Y-14) ,P 
LINE(X-10,Y+13) -(X-7, Y+9) , PS 



103 
SET 
104 
ET 

lj35 PAINT (X,Y+4) ,3,3 
1J36 RETURN 

139 •*** THE ROUTINE FOR SELECTI 
NG RANDOM NUMBERS 

140 PMODE 3,1: SCREEN 1,0:PCLS:CO 
LOR 3 

150 BL=RND ( -TIMER) :0=RND(GN) 
160 Y=30:X=100:SW=0 

170 ON 0 GOSUB 20,30,40,50,60,70 

,80,90,100,10 

180 T=RND(GN) 

190 Y=80:N=l:CC=0 

200 ON T GOSUB 20,30,40,50,60,70 
,80,90,100,10 

210 IF 0+T>9 THEN X=60 ELSE X=10 
0 

220 Y=140 

230 LINE(10, 105) -(170,110) ,PSET, 

BF: LINE (50, 60) -(5 5,85) ,PSET,BF:L 

INE (40, 70) -(65,75) ,PSET,BF 

240 TT=0+T:0$=STR$ (TT) 

250 PLAY "05 L2 00 ABAB AB AB AB ABC C C " 

299 '*** KEYBOARD CHECK FOR THE 



ANSWER 
300 A$=INKEY$ 

310 SW=SW+1:IF SW=1000 THEN 1 
3 20 COLOR C 

330 LINE(X-25, Y-25 ) - (X+25 , Y+25) , 
PSET,B 

340 C=C+1:IF C>4 THEN C=2 
3 50 IF A$="" THEN 300 ELSE 3 60 
360 COLOR l:LINE(X-25,Y-25) -(X+2 
5, Y+2 5) ,PSET,B 

3 70 COLOR 3 

380 IF MID$(0$,N+1,1)=A$ THEN 40 
0 ELSE 390 

390 CC=CC+1:IF CC=2 THEN 600 ELS 
E 300 

400 A=INSTR("0123456789",A$) 

410 ON A GOSUB 10,20,30,40,50,60 

,70,80,90,100 

420 C$=C$+A$ 

4 30 IF VAL(C$)=VAL(0$) THEN 500 
ELSE 440 

440 X=X+40:N=N+1 
450 GOTO 300 

500 O$= ,I,I :A$ = ,MI :C$="":TT=0 

510 FOR E=l TO 200: NEXT E 
520 GOSUB 800 

530 ANS=ANS+1:IF ANS=5 THEN 1300 
ELSE 150 



SELECTED SOFTWARE ★★★★★★] 



★ LOW PRICES * FAST SERVICE * FREE SHIPPING ★ 



SOLPERLESS UPGRADE KITS 

With easy-to-follow instructions 

512K FOR COCO 3 $99.95 

512K SOCKETED BOARD W/0 RAM $44.95 

512K RAMDISK FOR COCO 3 .., $19.95 

64K FOR E BOARD ..$39.95 

64K FOR F BOARD , $29.95 

64K FOR C0C02* (ALL MODELS) $29.95 

*AII Korean models require one solder joint 
Please specify model # with order 

NOTE: ALL ICs used in our kits are first quality 150NS 
prime c/tfps and carry one lull year warranty. 

BASIC ROMs DISASSEMBLY 

COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED $17.95 

EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED „ $17.95 

DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED $17.95 

ALL 3 BOOKS ONLY $39.95 

ULTRA 80C DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER $29.95 

BUG OUT & THE ORACLE (M.L Monitor) $14.95 

ALL 5 ITEMS ONLY $59.95 

500 POKES. PEEKS. "N EXECS $16.95 

200 POKES. PEEKS, "N EXECS $9.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES (VOLUME 1) $19.95 

WITH ROUTINES ON TAPE OR DISK $36.95 

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 

(TEPCO) $16.95 

ALL 10 ITEMS ONLY $119.95 



UTILITIES & APPLICATIONS 

TAPE 

D YN A C A l_C r r r , , r r 

TELEWRITER 64 M $39.95 

ULTRA TELEPATCH II 

TOM MIX MAS ASSEMBLER 

AUTOTERM „.., 

PEN PAI 9 1 
ADDS 

THE PEEPER W/SOURCE 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A „ 

GRAPHICOM 

UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 . 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL. 2 
SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 
DISK TUTORIAL (2 DISKS) ..„., 



$29.95 



$24.95 



$21.95 



imm t I I I I ► | 



DISK 

$69.95 
$49.95 
$19.95 
$49.95 
$39.95 
$74.95 
$27.95 
$26.95 
$14.95 
$21.95 
$21.95 
$27.95 
$21.95 
$34.95 



COCO MAX WITH TAPE 
COCO MAX II WITH DISK .... 

Y-PARI F 

DS-69A DIGISECTOR 

HJL-57 KEYBOARD .., .„..> 

EPROM ERASER r ... 

ROMPACK P C. BOARD W/CASE 

VIDEO PLUS IIU 

REAL TALKER II 

W/3 TALKING GAMES 

8-BALL POOLTABLE GAME 



$64.95 
$74.95 
$24.95 

$139.95 
$59.95 
$39.95 

.., $9.95 
$34.95 

$54.95 
..$1 4.95 



GAMES 

TAPE DISK 

WRESTLE MANIAC $26.95 $26.95 

BOUNCING BOULDERS $26.95 $26.95 

THE GATES OF DELIRIUM $35.95 $35.95 

GANTELET.. ■. $26.95 $26.95 

MISSION F-16 ASSAULT $26.95 $26.95 

PAPER ROUTE m , .,, .$26.95 $26.95 

KARATE . .$26.95 $26.95 

KNOCKOUT $26.95 $26.95 

P51 MUSTANG $26.95 $29.95 

WORLDS OF FLIGHT.,.,. $26.95 $29.95 

WIZARD'S CASTLE $21.95 

ROLLER CONTROLLER 

(COC03) $24.95 $24.95 

PACKAGE SPECIALS 

SELECTED SOFTWARE PAC: Galagon, Cubix Froggie. 
Lancer & Lunar Rover Patrol (All 32K M.L.) 
$34.95 TAPE OR DISK 

ADVENTURE PAC: 5 Adventure Games (Mostly 32K) 

$19.95 TAPE OR DISK 

EDUCATIONAL PAC: 6 Educational Games 

(16K + 32K) $19.95 TAPE OR DISK 

TREASURY PAC: A collection of 30 games (4K -32K) 

$29.95 TAPE OR DISK 

NEW BOOKS FOR COCO 3 

Color and Extended Basic Unravelled $29.95 

Super Extended Basic Unravelled $19.95 

Both (or only $44.95 



WE PAY SHIPPING in the United States, Canada & Mexico. 
Overseas please add 1 0%. (MN Residents add 6% sales tax.) 
We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or money order. U.S. 
funds only for foreign orders. C.O.D. please add $2.00. 



Send to: 



SELECTED SOFTWARE 



P.O. Box 32228, Fridley, MN 55432 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 61 2-757-2439 
INFORMATION 612-757-1026 (11 A.M.-5 P.M. C.S.T.) 

24 HOUR SHIPPING 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 169 



599 '*** THE HELP SCREEN 
6£)j3 U=7 : 1=185: FOR W=l TO 0 
61J3 COLOR 2 

620 CIRCLE (U, I) , 6 : PAINT (U, I ) ,2,2 
63 $ U=U+13 
640 NEXT W 

650 LINE(U-4,I) -(U+4,I) ,PSET:LIN 

E(U,I-4)-(U,I+4) ,PSET 

660 U=U+13 

670 FOR W=l TO T 

680 CIRCLE (U, I) , 6 : PAINT (U, I) ,2,2 
690 U=U+13 
700 NEXT W 
710 CC=0 
720 COLOR 3 
730 GOTO 300 
; 799 •*** THE STAR 

800 H=215:V=35 
810 COLOR C 

820 LINE(H-9,V-13) -(H,V-35) ,PSET 
:LINE-(H+9,V-13) ,PSET 
830 LINE(H+9,V-13) -(H+35,V-13) ,P 
i SET:LINE-(H+15,V+10) , PSET 

840 LlNE(H+15,V+10)-(H+25,V+35) , 

PSET : LINE- (H,V+17 ), PSET 

850 LINE(H,V+17) -(H-25,V+35) ,PSE 

T: LINE- (H-15,V+5) , PSET 

860 LINE(H-15, V+5) -(H-35,V-13) ,P 

SET: LINE- (H-9,V-13) ,PSET 

870 PAINT (H, V-32 ) ,C,C 

880 IF FLAG=1 THEN RETURN 

890 COLOR 3 

900 PLAY " 05L2 5 5AABBCBBAEDD ABCAAB 
BCB" 

910 FOR WT=1 TO 1000: NEXT WT 
920 PCLS: RETURN 
1000 'RERUN GAME 
1010 PCLS 

1020 N=l : CC=0 :A$=" " :0$="" : TT=0 : A 
NS=0 

1030 GOTO 150 
1100 'TITLE SCREEN 
1110 CLEAR:CLS(3) 
1120 FOR TL=1 TO 2 
1130 PRINT @TS,""; 
1140 FOR TN=1 TO 8 
1150 PRINT TN;"+"; 
1160 NEXT TN 
1170 TS=448 
1180 NEXT TL 

1190 PRINT @105," KIDSMATH " 

m 

120 0 PRINT @137," BY " 

1210 PRINT @169,"JOHN COLLICOTT" 

t 

1220 PRINT @201," INMAN, KANSAS " 



1230 PRINT @233," JAN. 17,1986 " 

f 

1240 PLAY"T404L4DDL8DC03B-GL2FB- 

04L4CCL8DC03B-04L8DL2 . C03L8FE-DF 

B-04C03L4B-L8B-AGAB-GL4F04L8DC03 

L8 B- AB- GAF AO 4 CO 3 LI B - " 

1250 FOR X=l TO 1£J^:NEXT X 

1260 CLS 

1270 GN=9 

1280 GOTO 140 

1299 '*** FIVE STAR SCREEN 

1300 PCLS 
1310 FLAG=1 

1320 C=2 : H=3 5: V=3 5 

1330 GOSUB 810 

1340 C=3:H=215:V=35 

1350 GOSUB 81^0 

1360 C=4:H=3 5:V=155 

1370 GOSUB 810 

1380 C=2:H=215:V=155 

1390 GOSUB 810 

1400 C=2:H=125:V=95 

1410 GOSUB 810 

1420 FLAG=£ 

1430 PLAY"T403L4AL8AAL4ABAF#L2DL 
4AL8AAL4AF#L4DDEF#04DL8DDL4DED03 
BL2G04L4DL8DDL4C#03BL2AL4ABL2AL4 
AGL2F#L4F#EL1D M 

1440 FOR WAT=1 TO 1^0: NEXT WAT 
1450 COLOR 3 
1460 GOTO 1000 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Try this vacation planning helper before your next 
road trip. Just answer the prompts and let your CoCo 
give you the answers. 

The listing: 

0 CLS£:INPUT"ROUND TRIP MILES" ;D 
: INPUT 11 AV . MPH" ; S : INPUT" AV . MPG" ; F 
: INPUT"EST . $/GAL . " ; C : INPUT" # NIG 
HTS" ;Y: PRINT" $/night" :INPUT"LODG 
ING" ; L: INPUT" FOOD" ; E : INPUT"MISC" 
;M:PRINTD/S"HRS. DRIVING - TOTAL 
COST" : PRINTUS ING "$$###.##"; D/ ( F* 
C) + (L+E+M) *Y: 'VISIT ALBERTA 

Barry Wiedman 
Edmonton, Alberta 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



170 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 




VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™. 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. ^z 7 ©!^/}^^ 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



im 1 1 c v rin v 


1 £\L 
10 IV 






ECB 





Refresh your Roman 
numeral skills by . . . 

Counting 

With 

Caesar 

By Thomas Hood 



For formality, decoration and distinctiveness, 
nothing beats Roman numerals. Romans pro- 
vides an opportunity to develop and refresh skill 
in using them. It converts the numerals from Arabic to 
Roman and vice versa, and also has a drill option. 

The standard short form is assumed in the program. 
For example, 40 must be represented by XL and not by 

xxxx. 

The level of difficulty in the drill option may be 
controlled by altering the value of the number in Line 
630. A beginner might be best served by a low value, say 
17, which can be increased as the numerals are mastered, 
but this number cannot exceed 3,999. 



Tom Hood likes to use the Color Computer in his 
avocation of cryptanalysis. He lives in Dover, North 
Carolina and designs programs for his niece and nephew. 



If the CLEAR key is pressed by mistake, press enter 
to recover the prompt. 



The listing: RDMPNS 




10 REM romans xv march mcmlxxxvi 
20 DATA1,I,5,V,10,X,50,L, 100, C, 5 
00, D, 1000, M 

30 FORI=0TO6:READV(I) ,D$(I) : NEXT 
40 GOTO800 'menu 

50 PRINT" (ENTER AN @ FOR MAIN 



1 72 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



MENU) " : PRINT : RETURN 

60 REM arabic — >roman 

70 CLS : PRINTTAB ( 8 ) ll MAXIMUM=3999" 
80 PRINT : GOSUB5j3 

90 LINE INPUT "ARABIC NUMERAL: » ;N 

$ : IFN$=" 11 THEN SOUND 1,0,0 , 1 : GOT09J3 

100 IFN$=" ©"THENRETURN 

110 F=l : LL=LEN (N$ ) 

120 FORI=lTO LL: J$=MID$ (N$, I, 1) 

13j3 IFJ$<"j3"OR J$>"9"THENF=j3:I=L 

L 

14j3 NEXT : IFF=j3 THENPRINT" DIGITS 
ONLY, PLEASE . 11 : SOUNDlj3j3 , 1 : GOT09j3 
150 N=VAL(N$) :IFN<1 OR N>3999 TH 
ENPRINT"OUT OF RANGE .": SOUNDlj3j3 , 
l:GOT09j3 

160 GOSUBl9j3 'get-r$ 

170 PRINTR$:GOT09j3 

18j3 1 make-roman 

190 R$= IMI 

200 B=lj3j3j3:0=6 

210 IFN>=B THENN=N-B:R$=R$+D$ (O) 
:GOT021j3 

220 I FN= 0 THENRETURN 

230 B=B/ 10 : 0=0-2 : IFB>N GOT02 3j3 

240 C=0 

250 IFN>=B THENN=N-B:C=C+1:G0T02 
50 

260 IFC=9THENR$=R$+D$ (0) +D$ (0+2) 

:GOT029j3ELSEIFC>=5THENR$=R$+D$(0 

+ 1) :C=C-5:IFC=j3THEN29j3 

210 IFC=4THENR$=R$+D$ (0) +D$ (0+1) 

:GOT029j3 

28j3 R$=R$+STRING$ (C,D$ (0) ) 
290 IFN>j3THEN2 3j3 
300 RETURN 

31j3 REM roman — >arabic 

3 2 0 CLS : PRINTTAB ( 7 ) 11 MAXIMUM=MMMC 
MXCIX" : PRINT 
33j3 GOSUB50 

340 LINE INPUT "ROMAN NUMERAL: 11 ;R 
N$ 

350 IFRN$=""THENSOUNDlj3j3,l:GOT03 
40 

3 60 IFRN$="© "THENRETURN 

370 F=l:GOSUB42j3:IFF=j3THEN34j3 'e 

val-rn$ 

380 GOSUB55j3:IFF=j3THEN3 4j3 'valid 
ate-rn$ 

39j3 PRINTRN 
400 GOT034J3 

41j3 1 eval-rn$ 

42j3 RN=j3:Vl=j3 

43j3 FORI=LEN (RN$ ) TO 1 STEP-1 

44j3 C$=MID$(RN$,I,1) 

450 FORC=j3T06 

460 IFC$=D$(C)THENV2=V(C) :GOT05j3 
0 



470 NEXTC 

48j3 PRINT"' 11 ;C$ ;"•»;" IS NOT A R 
OMAN NUMERAL . " : F=0 : RETURN 
49j3 'eval-chars 

500 IFV2<V1 THENRN=RN-V2 ELSERN= 

RN+V2 

51j3 V1=V2 

520 NEXT I 

530 RETURN 

540 ' validate-rn$ 

550 IFRN<1 OR RN>3999 THENG0SUB5 
8 0 : RETURN 

560 N=RN : G0SUB19 0 : IFRN$<>R$THEN : 
GOSUB58 0 : RETURN 
570 RETURN 

580 SOUNDlj3j3,l:PRINT"THIS IS NOT 

STANDARD FORM . " : 7=0 : RETURN 
590 REM DRILL 

600 CLS :PRINT@12, "DRILL" : PRINT :G 
OSUB5J3 

610 N=RND( -TIMER) 
62 0 A=0 

630 ANS=RND (3999) : REM ans range 

640 A=(A=j3) : IFA=ja THEN7 2j3 

650 N=ANS:GOSUB19j3 

660 PRINT "ROMAN FOR" ANS"?" 

67 0 LINEINPUTRN$ 

68j3 IFRN$="@ "THENRETURN 

69j3 IFR$ORN$ THENSOUNDlj3j3 , 1 : GOT 

0660 

700 PLAY"V15T1203 L2CL4CCL2DL4GG 

04L2C" 

71j3 GOT06 3j3 

7 2j3 N=ANS:GOSUB19j3 

73j3 PRINT" ARABIC FOR "R$"?" 

74j3 LINEINPUTRN$ 

750 IFRN $= " @ " THENRETURN 

76j3 N=VAL(RN$) : IFNOANS THENSOUN 

Dlj3j3,l:GOT07 3j3 

770 PLAY"V15T803 L4D+FL2F+FD+" 
780 GOT063j3 

79j3 'menu 

8 00 CLS j3 : PRINT @ 4 1 , " ROMAN NUMERAL 
S" ; 

810 PRINT@32*5, "1. ARABIC TO ROM 
AN" ; 

82j3 PRINT§32*7 , "2 . ROMAN TO ARAB 
IC" ; 

83j3 PRINT© 3 2*9 , "3 . DRILL"; 

84j3 PRINT§32*11, "4 . END"; 

850 PRINT §32*15 , "PRESS A NUMBER" 

• 

860 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN86j3 
87j3 ONVAL(K$) GOSUB7j3, 32j3, 600, 880 
:GOT08j3j3 

88j3 CLS :PRINT§3 2*8+6, "ROMAN NUME 
RALS ENDED" : PRINT© 3 2*13, "" :END:R 
ETURN /R\ 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 173 



Spreadsheets 
have never been 
so simple 



Plottin* and Plannin' 



By BUI Reed 



When I first saw a BASIC spread- 
sheet program and put it on 
my computer, I really liked 
it, but there were a lot of features I 
wanted in a spreadsheet program that 
this one didn't have. The program was 
written in a way that made changes 
difficult, if not impossible, so I decided 
to write my own spreadsheet program. 

Cheap Spread is written in a modular 
style, so that the program is broken 
down into small, manageable blocks 
which can be easily changed. When I 
first wrote it, I wrote "program stubs" 
for the parts not yet written. In this way 
I could check out the program as I wrote 
new subroutines. This also makes it easy 
to replace subroutines or add new ones. 

There are messages throughout this 
program to inform you of an error in 
the command name operands, and even 
to tell you of errors in setting up func- 
tions. But not all messages are for 
errors. Some are for requesting more 
information, such as how many rows 
and columns of the spreadsheet to print. 
These messages help the program to be 
user-friendly. 

I wrote an INKEY$ subroutine to 
control data input for at least two 
reasons. First, this prevents you from 



Bill Reed is a systems analyst for a large 
manufacturing firm in Lavergne, Ten- 
nessee. His hobbies include camping 
and other outdoor activities. 



entering too much data in cells; you are 
limited to only nine characters. If you 
enter more than that, it is written over 
by the next cell or wraps around to the 
next line. Second, it prevents a line feed 
after you press ENTER, which you get 
with the INPUT command in BASIC. This 
can be especially annoying on the last 
line of a screen when it causes the entire 
screen to scroll up a line. You may use 
any key to enter data. Backspace works 
as normal, SHlFT-backspace backs up to 
the beginning of a field, and the right 
arrow works the same as pressing the 
space bar. The INKEYS routine controls 
cursor movement so that you do not 
enter more data than is allowed, and it 
prevents backspacing past the begin- 
ning of a field. 

Statements preceding the GDSUB to 
the INKEYS subroutine set the length of 
thefield (LN), whether you can enter any 
key or numeric keys only (TY$), and the 
start position for entering data (59). 
The INKEYS subroutine calculates the 
end position, and checks it to make sure 
that you do not enter data past it. The 
statement after the GOSUB moves the 
temporary variable C9$ to the actual 
value you want to save. For a numeric 
field, the variable C9 is used. 

Sometimes the program seems to be 
hung up when it does not respond to a 
keypress, but it is only stopping to clear 
more space for strings. This is known as 
"garbage collection." This occurs more 
frequently using a large spreadsheet, 
but not so often as to be a problem. 



174 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Starting Out 

When you firststart the program, you 
are asked if you want to create or load 
a spreadsheet. If you create a spread- 
sheet, you are then asked to enter the 
number of rows and columns. Pressing 
enter at these points gives the defaults 
of 40 rows and 14 columns. This is 
about the maximum number of cells 
that you can use. I set the default to 14 
columns so you can have a column for 
titles, 12 months of data and a totals 
column. I frequently use this spread- 
sheet program for doing my monthly 
budget and it works out very well. 



# m 



"Expressions . 

HM C CJ Wmimmm*%5mM MMM 

an mi ^ JLjaJ 3t ^ w n, 
,flf lff.qrtlffiijm Hiiif *%J*MM 0 

If you load a spreadsheet you are 
asked the name of the spreadsheet file. 
If you do not enter an extension on the 
filename, the program automatically 
adds 'DPT to the filename. 

Cells are referred to by the row 
number, followed by a comma or a 
dash, then the column number. Func- 
tions entered for a cell are evaluated in 
algebraic notation. That is, exponenti- 
ation is done first, followed by multipli- 
cation and division, then addition and 
subtraction. Parentheses may be used to 
change the order of operations. This 
function evaluation routine works in 
the same way as many higher-level 
language compilers running on main- 
frame computers. 

In evaluating functions, mathemati- 
cal expressions go through a conversion 
process so that they are evaluated in 
algebraic notation. This process uses a 
variable array (VS), and a stack for the 
mathematical operators (5i<$). The 
stack is used as a holding place for the 
operators while the proper sequence is 
established for them. Then they are 
transferred to the variable array. After 
the entire function is scanned, the 
calculations are done. For example, an 
expression entered as: 

[5,3]+[5,5]*[6,5] 
is converted before calculations to: 

[5,3] [5,5] [6,5] * + 
This format is known as postfix nota- 



tion. Hewlett-Packard calculators use 
this notation. 

The program has room to accommo- 
date up to 10 variables and 10 operators 
per function, as determined by the 
dimension of the array V$. The length 
of the function entered is limited to 30 
characters, but if you need more than 
that, change the length (LN) in the first 
line of the Enter Function subroutine. 

The commands in Cheap Spread 
include the following: 

DAT r,c — Enter the row and column 
for entering data in a cell. 

F r,c — Enter function for a row and 
column. Functions can be entered in 
many formats. The first and easiest is 
Rnl,n2 or Cnl,n2 which specifies row 
or column summation. 4 R' takes the 
sum of rows nl through n2. 'C sums 
columns nl through n2. Calculations 
involving cells are referred to by sur- 
rounding the row and column numbers 
by brackets. The left bracket is gener- 
ated using the SHIFT-down arrow, and 
the right bracket by the SH^rr-right 
arrow. You can use any combination of 
cells and constants in functions. For 
example: R2,3; C3-6; [5,3]+[5,4]/[5,5]; 
[5,3]/[5,4]+l;[5,5]; and 3+2*5. 

V r,c — View function at row and 
column specified. It is not necessary for 
the cell to be on the screen. 

VF — View all the functions defined 
on the screen, Instead of data being 
displayed, functions are displayed. 

I r,c — Increment a cell. You are 
asked to enter the amount that you want 
to add to the value already in the cell. 

D r,c — Decrement a cell. You are 
asked to enter the amount that you want 
to subtract from the value already in the 
cell. 

CC cl-c2 — Copy column of data 
from c 1 to c2. The first column must be 
on the screen, but the second column 
specified need not be on the screen. 

CR rl-r2 — Copy rows of data from 
rl to r2. The first row must be on the 
screen, but the second row need not be 
on the screen. 

H — Displays a help screen. Pressing 
any key returns you to the same point 
in the spreadsheet. 

P — Sends the spreadsheet to the 
printer. If you select standard size print, 
the maximum number of columns you 
may specify is eight. The maximum 
number of columns is not checked for 
narrow print, but if you use the default 
size spreadsheet, you should not have 
any problem. 



SPREAD r,c — Takes the value in a 
cell and spreads it to one or more 
columns. You may enter a whole 
number between 1 and the maximum 
number of columns. The starting cell 
will be divided by this number, and the 
result will be put into the number of 
cells specified. You may also enter a 
number between .001 and 1, and this 
will divide the value in the cell by the 
fractional amount and put the result in 
just that one cell. You can use this to 
double the value in a cell by entering .5 
as the number of columns to spread. 

U — Updates the spreadsheet. Up- 
dating is done a column at a time, 
starting at the first column on the left. 
If you have formulas that depend on a 
value in a higher numbered row in the 
same column, you may need to update 
the spreadsheet more than once to 
obtain correct results. 

ERASE — Clears all data and func- 
tions. You are asked what row and 
column on which to start erasing. This 
is done so you can leave your row and 
column headings on the spreadsheet. 

CLRD — Clears all data from the 
spreadsheet, leaving all the functions 
intact. 

J r,c — Jump to specified row and 
column. This puts the specified row and 
column in the upper left corner of your 
screen. This is especially useful for 
jumping to the first column to see what 
the title for a particular row is, and then 
jumping back. 

S — Save spreadsheet. You are asked 
if you want to replace the existing 
spreadsheet or save a new one. When 
saving a new spreadsheet, if you leave 
off the file extension, the program will 
automatically add /DPT to the file 
name. Data is saved in the following 
manner: First, the number of rows and 
columns are written to the file. Then, all 
the data in the cells are written out one 
column at a time, starting with the first 
column. Finally, all the functions are 
written out one column at a time, 
starting with the first column. 

The printer options in Cheap Spread 
are for an Okidata printer. If you have 
a different printer, you may need to 
refer to your printer manual for correct 
control codes for standard and narrow 
print. The variable that has the control 
code for printing is 5Z$. The baud rate 
for printing is set for 1 200 baud. If your 
printer baud rate is different, either 
delete or change the POKE 150, 41 in 
the initialization subroutine. □ 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 175 



yff 521 



200 71 

520 66 6530 211 12520 ... 138 

770 245 7090 236 13650.... 190 

1590 201 7660 212 14540 • • • 217 

2110 173 8170 190 15530.... 151 

3040 55 9040 238 1 6060 .... 1 63 

4525 33 10590 29 END 173 



The listing: SPRERD 

1J3 CLEAR 7j3j3j3 

2j3 PMODEJ8 , 1 : PCLEAR 1 

3j3 GOSUB 5j3j3: ' INITIALIZE 

4j3 GOSUB 8j3j3j3 : 1 HELP SCREEN 

5j3 GOSUB Ij3j3j3j3: 'DISPLAY SCREEN 

6j3 GOSUB Ij3j3j3 : 1 ENTER DATA 

7j3 GOSUB 2j3j3j3 : 1 CHECK COMMAND 

8j3 IF ER$O nn THEN GOSUB 95j3j3:GO 

TO 6j3: 'ERROR 

9j3 IF CN>9 THEN 160 

1J3J3 GOSUB 25j3j3 : 'VALID ROW AND DE 

LIMITER? 

11J3 IF ER$<>" M THEN GOSUB 95j3j3:G 
OTO 6j3: 'ERROR 

12) 3 GOSUB 3)3)3)3: 'VALID COLUMN? 

13) 3 IF ER$<>"" THEN GOSUB 95)3)3 :G 



OTO 6)3 : 1 ERROR 

14) 3 IF CN<6 OR CN=8 OR CN=9 THEN 
GOSUB 35)3)3: 'IS CELL ON SCREEN? 

15) 3 IF ER$<>"" THEN GOSUB 95)3)3 :G 
OTO 6)3: 'ERROR 

16) 3 IF CN=1 THEN GOSUB 4)3)3)3: 1 ENT 
ER DATA 

17) 3 IF CN=2 THEN GOSUB 45)3)3 :GOSU 
B 1)3)3)3)3: 'ENTER FUNCTION 

18) 3 IF CN=3 THEN GOSUB 12 5)3)3 : GOS 
UB 1)3)3)3)3 : 'INCREMENT CELL 

19) 3 IF CN=4 THEN GOSUB 13)3)3)3: GOS 
UB 1)3)3)3)3 : 'DECREMENT CELL 

2) 3)3 IF CN=5 THEN GOSUB 9)3)3)3 : GOSU 
B 1)3)3)3)3: 'SPREAD FIGURES 

21) 3 IF CN=6 THEN GOSUB 5)3)3)3: 'VIE 
W FUNCTION 

22) 3 IF CN=7 THEN GOSUB 11)3)3)3: GOS 
UB 1)3)3)3)3: 'MOVE WINDOW 

23) 3 IF CN=8 THEN GOSUB 5 5)3)3: GOSU 
B 1)3)3)3)3: 'COPY ROWS 

24) 3 IF CN=9 THEN GOSUB 6)3)3)3: GOSU 
B 1)3)3)3)3: 'COPY COLUMNS 

25) 3 IF CN=1)3 THEN GOSUB 65)3)3: 'PR 
INT SPREADSHEET 

26) 3 IF CN=11 THEN GOSUB 75)3)3: ' SA 
VE SPREADSHEET 

27) 3 IF CN=12 THEN GOSUB 8)3)3)3: GOS 
UB 1)3)3)3)3: 'HELP SCREEN 

28) 3 IF CN=13 OR CN=14 THEN GOSUB 
85)3)3:GOSUB 1)3)3)3)3 : 1 CLR DATA/ALL 

29) 3 IF CN=15 THEN GOSUB 115)3)3: GO 
SUB 1)3)3)3)3: 'UPDATE SPREADSHEET 

3) 3)3 IF CN=16 THEN GOSUB 165)3)3: 'V 
IEW FUNCTIONS ON SCREEN 

31) 3 IF CN<>17 THEN 6)3 

32) 3 PRINT@32, "QUIT. ARE YOU SURE 
(Y/N) " ; : INPUT YN$:IF YN$o"Y" TH 
EN 6)3 

33) 3 END 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This Two-Liner creates cassette index cards on your 
printer. Just type it in, run it and answer the prompt 
for the number of cards you desire. Then just fold the 
printout on the dotted lines and fill it in. 

The listing: 

1 CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY CARDS" ;D:FO 

RA=lTOD : Z$=" 

":PRINT#-2,Z 

$:PRINT#-2,":SIDE 1; 

: SIDE 2 ; " : FORX=lT014 : PRINT#-2 , " : 

• 

: " : NEXTX : PRINT # -2 , Z $ : PRINT 

#-2 , " : TITLE ; " : PRlNT#-2 

2 PRINT#-2,Z$:PRINT#-2, " : NOTES;" 
:FOR X=lT04:PRINT#-2,": 

. ii . 

NEXTX: PRINT#-2 , Z$ : NEXTA 

Keith S el bee 
Akron, OH 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and itscompanion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



See You at 

RAIN BO Wf est — Chicago 

April 10-12 



1 76 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



500 ' *****INITIALIZATI0NS***** 
510 CUR$=CHR$ (17 5) : POKE 150,41 
520 BD$=CHR$ (150) 
530 DC=1:DR=1 

540 NM$="0123456789. " :OP$=" A */-+ 
()" 

550 Vl$="0123456789. A */+-[] () " 
560 FOR 1=1 TO 6 
570 READ PI (I) ,P2 (I) 
580 NEXT I 

590 DATA 3,4,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,1,0,4 
600 NC=17:DIM VC$ (NC) ,V$ (20) 
610 FOR 1=1 TO NC 
620 READ VC$(I) 
630 NEXT I 

640 DATA DAT,F, I , D, SPREAD, V, J,CR 
, CC , P , S , H , ERASE , CLRD , U , VF , Q 
650 CLS4 

660 BN$=BD$+STRING$ (22,32) +BD$ 
670 PRINT@32+4,STRING$ (24, 150) ; 
680 PRINT@2*3 2+4,BD$+" , CHEAP 

SPREAD "+BD$; 
690 PRINT@3*32+4,BD$+"A 
EET PROGRAM "+BD$; 
700 PRINT@4*3 2+4,BN$; 
710 PRINT@5*32+4,BD$+" 
LL REED "+BD$; 

740 PRINT@6*32+4,STRING$ (24, 150) 



SPREADSH 



BY BI 



750 PRINT@ll*32+4, "LOAD OR CREAT 
E (L/C) " ;: INPUT LC$ 
760 IF LC$="L" THEN GOSUB 7000 :G 
OSUB 10000: GOTO 810 
770 IF LC$<>"C" THEN 750 
780 PRINT@13*32+4, "# OF ROWS(DEF 
AULT=40) 11 ; : INPUT MR: IF MR=0 THEN 
MR=40 

790 PRINT@14*32+4, "# OF COLS(DEF 
AULT=14 ) " ; : INPUT MC : IF MC=0 THEN 
MC=14 

800 DIM C$ (MR,MC) , FC$ (MR,MC) 
810 RETURN 

1000 "*****ENTER COMMAND******* 
10 10 PRINT@0 , STRING$ (64,32) ; 
1020 PRINT @0, ">"; 



1030 S9=2 :LN=30: GOSUB 1500:IP$=C 
9$: ' INKEY$ INPUT 
1040 RETURN 

1500 '**INKEY$ INPUT ROUTINE*** 
1510 PS=S9:E9=S9+LN:C9$="" 
1520 PRINT@PS,CUR$; 
1530 C8$=INKEY$:IF C8$="" THEN 1 
530 ELSE C8=ASC(C8$) 
1540 IF C8=8 OR C8=9 OR C8=13 OR 
C8=21 OR C8>31 THEN 1550 ELSE 1 
530 

1550 IF C8<>13 THEN 1570 

1560 PRINT@PS," 11 ; :C9=VAL(C9$) :R 

ETURN 

1570 IF C8<>8 THEN 1612 

1580 IF PS=S9 THEN 1530 

1590 IF LEN(C9$)>1 THEN C9$=LEFT 

$(C9$,LEN(C9$) -1) ELSE C9$="" 

1600 PRINT@PS," " ;:PS=PS-1 

1610 GOTO 1520 

1612 IF C8<>21 THEN 1620 

1614 IF PS=S9 THEN 1530 

1616 C9$="":PRINT@S9,STRING$ (LN+ 

1,32) ; :PS=S9: GOTO 1520 

1620 IF C8<>9 THEN 1670 

1630 IF PS=E9 THEN 1530 

1640 PRINT@PS," ";:PS=PS+1 

1650 C9$=C9$+" " 

1660 GOTO 1520 

1670 IF PS=E9 THEN 1530 

1680 IF TY$="N" AND INSTR( "01234 

56789. +-",C8$)=0 THEN 1530 

1690 C9$=C9$+C8$ 

1700 PRINT@PS,C8$; :PS=PS+1 

1710 GOTO 1520 

2000 "******FIND COMMAND******* 
2010 CM$="" 

2020 'REMOVE BLANKS IN COMMAND 
2030 FOR 1=1 TO LEN(IP$) 
2040 IF INSTR(NM$,MID$(IP$,I,1) ) 
>0 THEN 2070 

2050 IF MID$ (IP$,I,1) <>" " THEN 
CM$=CM$+MID$ ( IP$ ,1,1) 
2060 NEXT I 
2070 11=1 



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April 10-12 

and meet CoCo Cat 
in person 




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ApriM987 THE RAINBOW 177 



2080 FOR 1=1 TO NC 

2090 IF CM$=VC$(I) THEN 2110 

2100 NEXT I 

2110 IF I>NC THEN ER$=CM$+" COMM 
AND NOT FOUND" 
2120 CN=I 
2130 RETURN 

2500 '**VALID ROW & DELIMITER?* 
2510 01$="" 

2520 FOR 1=11 TO LEN(IP$) 

2530 IF INSTR(NM$,MID$(IP$,I,1) ) 

>0 THEN 01$=01$+MID$(IP$,I,1) EL 

SE 2550 

2540 NEXT I 

2550 II=I+1:01=VAL(01$) 

2560 IF LEN(O1$)=0 THEN ER$="OPE 

RAND 1 INVALID OR MISSING" : GOTO 

2600 

2570 IF CN<9 AND 01>MR THEN ER$= 
"MAX. NO. OF ROWS IS"+STR$(MR) 
2580 IF CN=9 AND 01>MC THEN ER$= 
"MAX. NO. OF COLS IS"+STR$(MC) 
2590 IF MID$(IP$,I,1)<>"-" AND M 
ID$(IP$,I,1)<>"," THEN ER$="DELI 
MITER MUST BE '-' OR ' B r " 
2600 RETURN 

3000 '******CHECK COLUMN****** 
3010 02$="" 

3020 FOR 1=11 TO LEN(IP$) 

3030 IF INSTR(NM$,MID$(IP$,I,1) ) 

>0 THEN 02$=02$+MID$ (IP$,I,1) EL 

SE 3050 

3040 NEXT I 

3050 II=I:02=VAL(02$) 

3060 IF LEN(O2$)=0 THEN ER$="OPE 

RAND 2 INVALID OR MISSING" : GOTO 

3090 

3070 IF CN<>8 AND 02>MC THEN ER$ 
="MAX. NO. OF COLS IS"+STR$ (MC) 
3080 IF CN=8 AND 02>MR THEN ER$= 
"MAX. NO. OF ROWS IS"+STR$ (MR) 
3090 RETURN 

3500 '***IS CELL ON SCREEN?**** 
3510 IF CN<9 AND (01>DR+13-1 OR 
OKDR) THEN 3550 

3520 IF CN=9 AND (01>DC+3-l OR 0 
KDC) THEN 3550 

3530 IF CN<6 AND (02>DC+3-l OR 0 
2<DC) THEN 3550 
3540 GOTO 3560 

3550 ER$="CELL(S) NOT ON SCREEN" 
3560 RETURN 

4000 «***ENTER DATA IN CELL**** 
4010 S9=96+ (01-DR+l) *2+(01-DR) *3 
0+ (02-DC) *10 :LN=9 :GOSUB 1500 :C$( 
01,02)=C9$ 

4020 IF S9=502 THEN GOSUB 10000: 
'REDISPLAY IF SCREEN SCROLLS 



4030 RETURN 

4500 •*****ENTER FUNCTION***** 

4510 S9=32:LN=30: GOSUB 1500:FC$( 

01,02)=C9$:IP$=C9$ 

4520 IF IP$="" THEN 4540 

4525 IF LEFT$ (IP$ , 1) ="-" THEN FC 

$ (01,02) ="":ER$="ENTER NEG. NO. 

AS 0-NUMBER" : GOSUB 9500: GOTO 454 

P 

4530 IF LEFT$ (IP$ , 1) ="C" OR LEFT 
$(IP$,1)="R" THEN GOSUB 13500 EL 
SE GOSUB 14000 
4540 RETURN 

5000 '*****VIEW FUNCTION****** 
5010 IF FC$ (01,02) <>"" THEN PRIN 
T@32 ,FC$ (01,02) ELSE PRINT@32,"N 
0 FUNCTION DEFINED"; 
5020 GOSUB 12000: 'PRESS ANY KEY 
5030 RETURN 

5 500 ******** COP Y ROWS ******** 
5510 FOR 1=1 TO MC 
5520 C$(02,I)=C$(01,I) 
5530 NEXT I 
5540 RETURN 

6000 '******COPY COLUMNS****** 
6010 FOR 1=1 TO MR 
6020 C$ (I,02)=C$ (1,01) 
6030 NEXT I 
6040 RETURN 

6500 '****PRINT SPREADSHEET**** 

6510 PRINT® 32 , "STD PRINT OR NARR 

OW(s/N) ";: INPUT SZ$ 

6520 IF SZ$="N" THEN SZ$=CHR$(29 

) ELSE SZ$=CHR$(30) 

6530 PRINT© 32, STRING$ (30,3 2) ; 

6540 PRINT© 3 2 , "ENTER START, END R 

OW" ; : INPUT Rl , R2 

6550 PRINT@3 2,STRING$ (30,32) ; 

6560 PRINT© 3 2, "ENTER START, END C 

OL"; : INPUT C1,C2 

6570 IF SZ$=CHR$(30) AND C2-C1>8 
THEN ER$="CAN ONLY PRINT 8 COLS 
STD SIZE": GOSUB 9500:GOTO 6660 

6580 ER$="READY PRINTER AND PRES 

S ANY KEY":GOSUB 9500 

6590 PRINT#-2,SZ$ 

6600 FOR I=R1 TO R2 

6610 FOR J=C1 TO C2 



6620 PRINT#-2 ,USING"% %";C 

$(i,J) ; 

6630 NEXT J 

6640 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (13) ; 
6650 NEXT I 

6660 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (30) 
6670 RETURN 

7000 '****LOAD SPREADSHEET**** 
7010 PRINT@13*32+4, "FILENAME: "; 
: INPUT F$ 



178 THE RAINBOW April 1987 






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7020 IF INSTR(F$, "/")=0 AND INST 

R(F$, ". ")=0 THEN F$=F$+"/DAT" 

7030 0PEN"I",#1,F$ 

7040 INPUT#1,MR,MC 

7050 DIM C$(MR,MC) ,FC$(MR,MC) 

7060 FOR 1 = 1 TO MR 

7070 FOR J=l TO MC 

7080 INPUT#1,C$(I,J) 

7090 NEXT J, I 

7100 FOR 1=1 TO MR 

7110 FOR J=l TO MC 

7120 INPUT# 1 , FC$ ( I , J ) 

7130 NEXT J, I 

7140 CLOSE #1 

7150 RETURN 

7500 '****SAVE SPREADSHEET**** 
7510 PRINT@32, "NEW FILE/REPL EXI 
STING (N/R) " ; : INPUT NR$ 
7520 IF NR$="N" THEN PRINT@32, ST 
RING$ (30, 3 2) ; :PRINT@32 , 1111 ; : INPUT 
"FILENAME: " ; F$ ELSE IF NR$<>"R" 

THEN 7510 
7530 IF INSTR(F$, "/")=0 AND INST 
R(F$,".")=0 THEN F$=F$+"/DAT" 
7540 IF NR$="R" THEN KILL F$ 
755)3 OPEN"0", #1,F$ 
7560 WRITE # 1 , MR , MC 
7570 FOR 1=1 TO MR 
7580 FOR J=l TO MC 
7590 WRITE#1, C$ (I, J) 
7600 NEXT J, I 
7610 FOR 1=1 TO MR 
7620 FOR J=l TO MC 
7630 WRITE # 1 , FC$ ( I , J ) 
7640 NEXT J, I 
7650 CLOSE#l 
7660 RETURN 

8000 "******HELP SCREEN******* 
8020 CLS: PRINTS 10, "CHEAP SPREAD" 

8J33J3 PRINT@2*32+2, "DATx,y- ENTER 

DATA IN CELL"; 
8j34j3 PRINT@3*32+2, "SPREADx, y-SPR 
EAD AMT TO COLS"; 

8j35j3 PRINT@4*32+2, "Fx,y - ENTER 

FUNCTION IN CELL"; 
8J36J3 PRINT§5*32+2 , "Vx,y OR VF - 
VIEW FUNC"; 

8j37j3 PRINT@6*32+2 , "CCx.y - COPY 
COLUMN" ; 

8J38J3 PRINT@7*32+2/ l CRx / y - COPY 
ROW"! 

8J39J3 PRINT@8*32+2, »Ix,y - INCR 

Dx ; y - DECR fl ; 
81j3j3 PRINT@9*32+2, "Jx,y - JUMP 
TO ROW, COL"; 

8110 PRINT@ 10*3 2+2 , "ERASE - CLEA 
R EVERYTHING"; 



812j3 PRINT@ll*32 + 2 , "CLRD - CLEA 
R DATA ONLY"; 

813J3 PRINT@12*32 + 2 / "H - HELP 

Q - QUIT" 
814J3 PRINT@13*32+2 , "U - UPDATE 

S - SAVE"; 

815J3 PRINT@14*32 + 2 / "P - PRINT 
it • 

8160 PRINT@15*32+9 , "PRESS ANY KE 

yll . 

8170 GOSUB 12000 
8180 RETURN 

8500 «***CLEAR DATA/ FUNCTION*** 

8510 IF CN=13 THEN PRINT@3 2 , " CLE 

AR EVERYTHING (Y/N) "; 

8520 IF CN=14 THEN PRINT© 3 2 , "CLE 

AR ALL DATA (Y/N) " ; 

8530 INPUT YN$:IF YN$<>"Y» THEN 

HZ PRINTQ32 , "ENTER START ROW T 
0 CLEAR"; : INPUT S2 

8550 PRINT@32, "ENTER START COL T 
0 CLEAR" ;: INPUT S3 
8560 FOR I=S2 TO MR 
8570 FOR J=S3 TO MC 
8580 C$(I,J)="" 

8 590 IF CN=13 THEN FC$(I,J)="" 
8600 NEXT J 

8610 NEXT I 
8620 RETURN 

9000 '*****SPREAD FIGURES***** 
9010 PRINT@32 , "HOW MANY COLUMNS" 
; : INPUT CL 

9020 IF CL>MC-02+l THEN ER$="MAX 
NO. OF COLUMNS IS"+STR$ (MC-02+1 
): GOSUB 9500:GOTO 9070 
9030 03=(VAL(C$(01,02) ) )/CL:03=I 
NT(O3*100+. 5) /100 

9040 FOR J=02 TO INT (02+CL+ . 999) 
-1 

9050 C$(01, J)=STR$(03) 
9060 NEXT J 
9070 RETURN 

9500 '***PRINT ERROR MESSAGES** 

9510 PRINTS 32, ER$; 

9520 ER$="" 

9530 GOSUB 12000 

9 540 RETURN 

10000 ' *****DISPLAY SCREEN***** 

10010 GOSUB 10500 

10020 FOR 1=1 TO 13 

10030 FOR J=l TO 3 

10040 IF J+DC-1>MC THEN 10080 

10050 IF I+DR-1>MR THEN 10090 

10060 PRINT@96+(I-1) *30+I*2+(J-l 

) *10,C$(I+DR-1, J+DC-1) ; 

10070 NEXT J 

10080 NEXT I 



180 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



10090 RETURN 

10500 '***ROW & COL HEADERS*** 
10510 CLS 

10520 FOR 1=1 TO 3 

10530 PRINT@66+(I-1) *10,DC+I-1; 

10540 NEXT I 

10550 FOR 1=1088 TO 1119 

10560 IF PEEK(I)>63 THEN POKE I, 

PEEK (I) -64 

10570 NEXT I 

10580 FOR 1=1 TO 13 

10590 PRINT@64+ (1*32) ,RIGHT$ (STR 

$(I+DR-1) ,2) ; 

10600 NEXT I 

10610 FOR 1=1120 TO 1504 STEP 32 
10620 IF PEEK(I)>63 THEN POKE I, 
PEEK(I) -64 

10630 IF PEEK(I+1)>63 THEN POKE 
I+1,PEEK(I+1) -64 
10640 NEXT I 
10650 RETURN 

11000 •*****MOVE WINDOW****** 

11010 DR=01 : DC=02 : RETURN 

11500 '***UPDATE SPREADSHEET*** 

11510 PRINT@32 , "UPDATING. . . " ; 

11520 FOR Cl=l TO MC 

11530 FOR Rl=l TO MR 

11540 IF FC$ (R1,C1)="" THEN 1156 

0 

11550 IP$=FC$(R1,C1) :01=R1:02=C1 
tGOSUB 4530 
11560 NEXT R1,C1 
11570 RETURN 

12000 '*****PRESS ANY KEY****** 

12010 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 12 
010 

12020 RETURN 

12500 ****** INCREMENT CELL***** 
12510 PRINT© 32 , "ENTER INCREMENT" 
; : INPUT IX 

12520 03=VAL(C$ (01,02) )+IX 
12530 C$ (01,02) =STR$ (03) 
12 540 RETURN 

13000 1 *****DECREMENT CELL***** 
13010 PRINT© 32 , "ENTER DECREMENT" 
; : INPUT DX 

13020 03=VAL(C$ (01,02) ) -DX 
13030 C$ (01,02) =STR$ (03) 
13040 RETURN 

13500 '**SUM ROWS OR COLUMNS** 

13510 03=01:04=02 

13520 II=2:G0SUB 2500 

13530 IF LEFT$ (IP$ , 1) ="C" AND 01 

>MC THEN ER$="MAX. NO. OF COLS I 

S";STR$(MC) ELSE ER$="" 

13540 IF ER$<>"" THEN GOSUB 9500 

:GOTO 13700 



13550 GOSUB 3000 

13560 IF LEFT$ (IP$ , 1) ="R" AND 02 

>MR THEN ER$="MAX. NO. OF ROWS I 

S";STR$(MR) ELSE ER$="" 

13570 IF ER$<>"" THEN GOSUB 9500 

:GOTO 13700 

13580 VL=0 

13590 IF LEFT$ (IP$,1)="C" THEN 1 

3600 ELSE 13650 

13600 '*****SUM COLUMNS***** 

13610 FOR 1=01 TO 02 

13620 VL=VL+VAL(C$ (03 ,1) ) 

13630 NEXT I 

13640 GOTO 13690 

13650 '*****SUM ROWS******** 

13660 FOR 1=01 TO 02 

13670 VL=VL+VAL(C$ (1,04) ) 

13680 NEXT I 

13690 C$ (03, 04) =STR$ (VL) 
13700 RETURN 

14000 ' * * BREAK DOWN FUNCTION*** 

14010 VN=0:TS=0:SK$="" 

14020 FOR 1=1 TO LEN(IP$) 

14030 I9$=MID$(IP$,I,1) 

14040 IF I9$="[" THEN GOSUB 1450 



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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 181 



0:GOTO 14070 

14050 IF INSTR(NM$,I9$) >0 THEN G 
OSUB 15000: GOTO 14070 
14060 IF INSTR(OP$,I9$)>0 THEN G 
OSUB 15500 

14J37J3 IF ER$<>"" THEN GOSUB 9500 
:GOTO 14120 

14j38j3 IF INSTR(V1$,I9$)=0 THEN E 
R$=" INVALID CHARACTER" : GOSUB 950 
0:GOTO 1412)3 

1409) 3 NEXT I 

1410) 3 IF TS>0 THEN GOSUB 15500 
14110 GOSUB 16000:'EVAL FUNCT 
14120 RETURN 

1450)3 1 * * * * *EVALUATE CELL****** 
14510 03$ = IIM :04$= IIM 
14520 1=1+1 

14530 IF I>LEN(IP$) THEN 14610 
14540 I9$=MID$ (IP$,I, 1) 

14550 IF INSTR(NM$,I9$) >0 THEN 0 
3$=03$+I9$:I=I+l:G0T0 14530 
14560 IF I9$<>"-" AND I9$<>"," T 
HEN ER$=" DELIMITER MUST BE '-' 0 
R 1 , 1 " :GOTO 14 6 60 
14570 1=1+1 

14580 IF I>LEN(IP$) THEN 14610 

14590 I9$=MID$ (IP$,I, 1) 

14 600 IF INSTR(NM$,I9$) >0 THEN 0 

4$=04$+I9$:I=I+l:GOTO 14580 

14610 IF I9$<> 11 ] 11 THEN ER$="MISS 

ING RIGHT BRACKET" : GOTO 14 6 60 

14620 03-VAL(03$) :04=VAL(04$) 

14 630 IF 03>MR THEN ER$="MAX. NO 

. OF ROWS IS"+STR$(MR) 

14640 IF 04>MC THEN ER$="MAX. NO 

. OF COLS IS"+STR$(MC) 

14650 IF ER$="" THEN VN=VN+1:V$( 

VN)=C$(03,04) :IF V$(VN)="" THEN 

V$(VN)=" " 

14 660 RETURN 

15000 ' ****EVALUATE CONSTANT*** 
15010 N9$="" 

15020 IF I>LEN(IP$) THEN 15050 
15030 I9$=MID$ (IP$, I, 1) 
15040 IF INSTR(NM$,I9$) >0 THEN N 
9$=N9$+I9$: 1=1+1: GOTO 15020 
15050 VN=VN+l:V$(VN)=N9$: 1=1-1 
15060 RETURN 

15500 '**PUSH/POP OPER STACK*** 
15510 IF 19$=")" THEN 15520 ELSE 
15610 

15520 IF TS=0 THEN ER$="MISSING 
LEFT PARENTHESIS" : GOTO 15680 
15530 TM$=MID$(SK$,TS, 1) 
15540 IF TM$="(" THEN 15550 ELSE 
15570 

15550 TS=TS-1:IF TS=0 THEN SK$=" 
" ELSE SK$=LEFT$ (SK$,TS) 



15560 GOTO 15680 

15570 VN=VN+1:V$ (VN)=TM$ 

15580 TS=TS-1:IF TS=0 THEN SK$=" 

" ELSE SK$=LEFT$ (SK$,TS) :GOT0155 

20 

15600 '***PUT ON STACK?******* 

15610 IF TS=0 THEN 15670 

15620 TM$=MID$ (SK$,TS, 1) 

15630 IF PI (INSTR(OP$,TM$) ) <P2 (I 

NSTR(OP$,I9$) ) THEN 15670 

15640 VN=VN+1:V$ (VN) =TM$ 

15650 TS=TS-1:IF TS=0 THEN SK$=" 

" ELSE SK$=LEFT$ (SK$ ,TS) 

15660 GOTO 15610 

15670 TS=TS+1:SK$=SK$+I9$ 

15680 RETURN 

16000 '****EVAL IN POSTFIX**** 
16010 1=1 

16020 IF VN=1 THEN 16170 

16030 TM$=LEFT$ (V$ (I) , 1) 

16040 IF INSTR(OP$,TM$)=0 THEN I 

=I+l:GOTO 16030 

16050 IF VAL(V$(I))<>0 THEN 1=1+ 

l:GOTO 16030 : 'NUMBER 

16060 IF TM$=" A " THEN V$(I-2)=ST 

R$ (VAL(V$ (1-2) ) A VAL(V$ (1-1) ) ) 

16070 IF TM$="*" THEN V$(I-2)=ST 

R$ (VAL(V$ (1-2) ) *VAL(V$ (1-1) ) ) 

16080 IF TM$="/" THEN IF VAL(V$( 

I-1))<>0 THEN V$(I-2)=STR$(VAL(V 

$ (1-2) )/VAL(V$(I-l) ) ) ELSE V$(I- 
2 ) =»0» 

16090 IF TM$="+" THEN V$(I-2)=ST 
R$ (VAL(V$ (1-2) )+VAL(V$(I-l) ) ) 
16100 IF TM$="-" THEN V$(I-2)=ST 
R$ (VAL(V$ (1-2) ) -VAL(V$ (1-1) ) ) 
16110 IF I+1>VN THEN 16170 
16120 FOR J=I+1 TO VN 
16130 V$(J-2)=V$(J) 
16140 NEXT J 
16150 VN=VN-2 
16160 GOTO 16010 

16170 IF LEN(V$(1))>9 THEN V$(l) 

=LEFT$ (V$ (1) , 9) 

16180 C$(01,02)=V$(1) 

16190 RETURN 

16500 '**VIEW SCREEN OF FUNC*** 

16510 GOSUB 10500 

16520 FOR 1=1 TO 13 

16530 FOR J=l TO 3 

16540 IF I+DR-1>MR THEN 16580 

16550 XX$=FC$ (I+DR-1, J+DC-1) : IF 

LEN(XX$)>9 THEN XX$=LEFT$ (XX$ , 9 ) 

16560 PRINT@96+(I-1) *30+I*2+(J-l 

) *10,XX$; 

16570 NEXT J 

16580 NEXT I 

16590 RETURN „ 



182 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



***************************** 




BOARD POINT 




r 



In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
V^we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



FEEDBACK 

Scoreboard: 

Attention Erick Molnar: Yes, there are 
other exits from Bedlaml If the dog doesn't 
die, SERRCH each room until you find one 
with a painted door or a secret door. If the 
door is painted, OPEN PRINTED DOOR, If it's 
a secret door, bring Napoleon into the 
room (NRPOLEON FOLLOW ME) then have 
NRPOLEON OPEN SECRET 000R. 

To help Dale Lampe in Pyramid 2000: 
After you GET DIRMQNDS, go North, West 
and GET COINS. 

Bene A . Hatcher 
Apple Valley, CA 

Fill It to the Rim 

Scoreboard: 

Here is some information for Mark 
Bourdeaux about the stick in Hall of 
Kings. First you need to get the bucket and 
candle stub. Put the candle in the bucket; 
this stops up the hole in the bucket. Then 
go to the kitchen and fill the bucket with 
the water. After that, go to the pool and 
fill it with the water. 

Arie Moller 
Kensington, MD 

Underground Trick 

Scoreboard: 

For Joseph J. McElheny: Enlist the aid 
of the camel in Sands of Egypt, he knows 
just where to go. You don't enter the 
pyramid in the obvious way; an under- 
ground tunnel would be just the trick. 

James K, Knight 
Marysvxlle, WA 

Cross Over the Bridge 

Scoreboard: 

Here are Trekboer tips for David Mer- 
kel. Tie the rope west of the bridge, then 
cross the bridge. Carry only three light 
objects, or you will die. Don't worry if the 
bridge collapses after you cross it. Hint: 
Spiders don't survive when in antimatter 
chambers. 

How can I find a way to drink water in 
Sands of Egypfl 

Luis Torres 
Lima, Peru 



Polarized 

Scoreboard: 

In answer to Sherry Moore's question 
about Pyramid 2000, you have to go North 
and South a lot in the maze. At a certain 
time (most likely after going North) go 
East — you will be at the brink of a pit. 
Go East and then Northwest. (The chest 
will not be there if the mummy has not 
taken two of your treasures.) The block 
cannot be moved, but is simply an obsta- 
cle. 

James Pede 

VORTEX FACTOR 

Scoreboard: 

In Vortex Factor, how do you get past 
Cairo Moon 2? What's behind the book- 
case? How do you get through north 
doors? 

Tom Rawlinson 
Toronto, Ontario 

Darkest Cairo 

Scoreboard: 

In Vortex Factor, when I go to Cairo, 
it says it is too dark to see. If I try to move 
it says I fall and hit my head, which ends 
the game. 

Chris Sparks 
Nicoma Park, OK 

Scoreboard: 

How do you open the door that seems 
impossible and get past the gate in the 
basement of the castle in Vortex Factorl 
Steve Adler and Bobby Limoges 

Montreal, Quebec 



Scoreboard: 

In The Vortex Factor, I have figured out 
you need to make a candle to move around 
on Cairo, but when I go into the dungeon 
to get the string the door slams shut and 
I can't get back out. 

A hint for Calixto Island: Be sure to take 
the air pump with you when you go to the 
island. 

John Riddle 
Linthicum, MD 



Scoreboard: 

How do you open the bank in Vonex 
Factorl 

Eric Tabor 
Chicago, IL 

CRYSTAL CASTLES 

Scoreboard: 

On the CoCo 1 or 2, if you die once then 
go into the door on the first screen on 
Crystal Castles, you will be transported to 
a high level and get 140,000 points. On the 
CoCo 3, doing the same (no need to die 
once) you will get 490,000 points and be 
transported to an even higher level. 

In Dallas Quest, how do you get past the 
snake on the path? 

M arc Reiter 
Cincinnati, OH 

Scoreboard: 

On the first screen of Crystal Castles, go 
into the door and jump. You will warp to 
a high level. Every time you use up all your 
bears, start a new game and go into the 
door and jump. You will be on the level 
right before the one you died on. 

Jared Brookes 
Calgary, Alberta 



D UNGEONS OF DA GGORA TH 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, on the first 
level, put everything on the ground (with 
the exception of the leather shield), wait 
for a spider to come up, and let it sit there 
(two or three hours works best.) When you 
come back, all the monsters should be 
backed up waiting in line for you (it is 
much easier to kill all of the monsters this 
way). 

Billy Foster 
Fayetteville, NC 

Ring and Run! 

Scoreboard: 

To destroy the image of the wizard in 
Dungeons of Daggorath, you must set 
down one of almost everything (sword, 
flask, shield, etc.). When it comes, attack 
it with a ring and run all the way down the 
corridor. 



***************************** 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 183 



***************************** 



On the second board of Zaxxon, put 
your ship so it shoots into the corner. Then 
put it at the third height on your altitude 
meter. This will get you 1000 point bonus 
every time. 

In Raaku-Tu, after you've killed the 
serpent at the blood-stained altar, get the 
golden idol. It will give you five points. 

Frank Morrison 
Mercer Island, WA 

Smiling Blobs? 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get past the smiling blobs 
in Dungeons of Daggorath besides enter- 
ing MOVE? How do you kill the blobs? 

Chris Ravenell 
Queens, NY 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, when you 
kill the Wizard image, can you get the 
scroll he lays? 

Lurry Lockwood 
u Pine Bluff, A R 

BED LA M 

Scoreboard: 

Here is a Bedlam hint: If a doctor ever 
gives you a shot, type PLUGH — then you 
will be better and better. 

Danny Buchanan 
Tucson, AZ 

Scoreboard: 

In Bedlam, I cannot open the cabinet or 
the red doors. 

In Pirate's Adventures, the keys are 
under the nailed rug and the parrot kills 
the snakes. 

Jason Jones 
St. Pauls, NC 

Scoreboard: 

I need specific instructions on how to get 
the keys from the cabinet and the room 
with the nurse in it, in Bedlam. 

Scott Nagle 
Danbury, CT 

DALLAS QUEST 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, I have been on the plane 
and seen the monkey. I haven't been able 
to get out of the jungle, 

Gregg Thompson 
Chesterfield, VA 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get past the cannibals and 
into the cave in Dallas Quest! 

Jason Mulig 
Ragle y, LA 



On An Egg Hunt 

Scoreboard: 

I can't figure out a way to get past the 
spider because I can't find the eggs in 
Dallas Quest. 

Also, in Sands of Egypt, 1 can't find the 
scepter everybody keeps talking about. 

Chris O 'Neal 
Terre Haute, IN 

Scoreboard: 

The command that must be used at the 
cave entrance in Dallas Quest is the com- 
mand used to make Roger the elephant 
cooperate at Dumbo's nest. 

In Sands of Egypt, where is the con- 
tainer? Is the snake oil useful? 

Rodrigo Maldonado 
Whillier, CA 

GOLD RUNNER GUIDANCE 

Scoreboard: 

A helpful tip for the game Gold Runner: 
When too many "men" are too close to 
you, put a hole in the bricks just before a 
ladder. The men will be forced to go up or 
down, which gives you a chance to run. Is 
there any way to start at a different level 
besides Level I in Gold Runner! 

Tony For lino 
Tacoma, WA 

Scoreboard: 

Level (9 of Gold Runner has me 
stumped. How do yougetthe lastgold bar 
and manage to escape the blue level in 
order to be free to reach the ladder at the 
top of the screen? 

Barbara Williams 
Fort Madison, I A 

SIFTING THROUGH _ 
THE SA NDS OF EGYPT 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I have the scepter 
(needed to open the pool drain) but I don't 
know what to type for it to open. 

Omri Goren 
Reseda, CA 



Scoreboard: 

In The Sands of Egypt, I am in the inner 
chamber underground. I translated the 
hieroglyphics and returned the scepter 
before I went underground again. I can't 
find any treasure. Also, how do you get out 
of the boat and up through the hole in the 
roof? 

In Pyramid, I get the coins but the 
mummy always takes them before I get to 
the maze. I can't get past the serpent. 

Phil Derksen 
Hendersonville, NC 



Go to Restroom? 

Scoreboard: 

What do you do at the oasis, other than 
drink, in Sands of Egypt! What items am 
I supposed to have (especially at the start 
of the game before the cliff)? 

Jeff Haase 
Timmins, Ontario 

Scoreboard: 

When Sands of Egypt first starts out, go 
North until you get to the cliff. Go West 
twice, get shovel. Go North twice, kill the 
snake. 




Curtis Schaaf 
Moro, IL 



Snake Oil, Anyone? 

Scoreboard: 

Some assorted tips: In Sands of Egypt, 
get the snake oil into the canteen and 
return to the pool. 

In Bedlam, to get the keys you will need 
to use the window hook. 

In Pyramid 2000, to get past the serpent, 
THROW the statue at it. 

In Raaku-Tu, how do you get past the 
gargoyle? 

Philip Manwarren 
Harrington, ME 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I can get to the 
treasure room and get the ladder; what 
next? 

Also, in Dragon Blade, 1 cannot figure 
out how to open the stone door. 

David Boyd 
Kenosha, WI 

Scoreboard: 

In Dragon Blade, % if you fall into the 
mine, do you need to get something? If so, 
how do you get it? How do you get out of 
the mine? 

David Hunt 
Gaithersburg, MD 



PYRAMID PARTICULARS 

Scoreboard: 

I n Pyramid 2000 1 need to know how to 
get to the vending machine. In Sands of 
Egypt I need to know how to drain the 
pool, where the oil is to free the scepter, 
and how to enter the pyramid. 

John Wood 
■ Maroa, IL 

Scoreboard: 

Here are a couple of Pyramid hints: 
When you get to the chamber that has steps 
leading up a dome, go South. You will 



***************************** 



184 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



******** ********************^ 



enter a room with some gold. Get the gold 
and go North, then West to the Bottomless 
pit. 

Danny Flores 
Louisville, KY 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, I can't get past the 
serpent in the pharaoh's room. I get the 
gold, scepter, food, water, statue box and 
lamp. 

A tip for Bedlam: To get the green key, 
stay at the end of the hallway. Type GET 
GREEN KEY WITH HOOK. 

Frank Morrison 
Mercer Island, WA 

Scoreboard: 

In response to various recent cries for 
help . . . Pyramid: With the mummy, 
there's nothing you can do, except retrieve 
the treasures from the maze. 

Zork I: The Slide Room's wall isn't 
granite. The only granite walls in the game 
are in the Temple and Treasure room. 

Sands of Egypt: RIDE CAMEL three times 
to get to the pyramid. (However, you 
cannot get inside.) 

Stephen Berry 
Lake Jackson, TX 

POTPOURRI 

Scoreboard: 

In Zork I 1 can't unlock the grating in 
the forest or get rid of the granite wall in 
the slide room or the temple. Is there any 
way to open the wooden door in the living 
room of the house? 

Joseph Branciforte 
Cromwell, CT 

You Get a Line, 
111 Get a Pole 

Scoreboard: 

In Blackbeard, to fish you need the 
string and a branch you cut from the 
coconut tree. 

In Martian Crypt, where do you get the 
red gem? 

Serge Grenier 
Boucherville, Canada 

Roll Over in the Clover 

Scoreboard: 

Some tips for Black Sanctum: Give the 
old man the jug of wine. When in the organ 
room, type PLAY BACH if you have the 
parchment. 

In Shenanigans, where do you find the 
Shamrock to get past the snake? 

Bill Hoban 
Green Bay, WI 



Scoreboard: 

I can't get past the robot in the second 
room in Escape 2012. In Black Sanctum, 
how do you BUILD the altar? I can find 
everything else except some wood and 
nails. 

Jerry Honigman 
Waggoner, IL 

What's for Supper, Grandpa? 

Scoreboard: 

In Gantelet, on Screen 7, go to the 
upper-right and get a food. Go a little 
higher up and get a potion. 

Scott Jamison 
Billerica, MA 

Scoreboard: 

In Syzygy, I can get the spacemit (either 
of two), blanket (any of several), sword, 
string and fuzzy space creature. But then 
what? 

In Enrak, can anyone tell me how to 
light the lantern? 

In Escape 2012, how do you get past the 
guard just outside your cell? 

I have a fragmentary program called 
M&M Shee. Does anyone know where the 
complete program can be obtained? 

John Tiffany 
Washington, D. C. 

Scoreboard: 

With Trekboer, I get to the planet Alton, 
but I cannot get past the force field or the 
grate. 

Edward Swatek 
Chicago, IL 

Most Take American Express 

Scoreboard: 

In Calixto Island, we can get on the 
island and find the crown and pottery, but 
we don't know what to do next. If we go 
back to the natives a second time, they 
won't take anything and our boat is de- 
flated. 

Dean Muller and Joel De Young 
Elkhorn, Manitoba 

Scoreboard: 

A few hints for Robot Odessy 1: You 
need the white robot for the maze at the 
end of the sewer. If you lose one robot 
anywhere and can't recover it, you might 
as well start all over; you need all of them 
later in the game. 

In Dallas Quest, how do you get the 
monkey to stop chewing the tobacco so 
you can bribe him to take the mask off the 
so-called head hunter chief? 

Andy Thornton 
Kalamazoo, MI 



Double Speed 

Scoreboard: 

On Slay the Nerius and Microbes, you 
can achieve double speed. Before typing in 
your name, press the SHIFT key and while 
holding it down, press the @ key and let 
go. It may work on other games where you 
input your name in the text screen. Worth 
a try . . . game play is twice as fast. 

Minesh Patel 
Benton, AR 

. 

Scoreboard: 

In Hall of the King, I get the crowbar, 
but I can't bend the bars on the gate. It 
always says, "I am not strong enough, 
now . „ . ." 

Damon McGaughey 
Ashland, KY 

Caught in a Loop 

Scoreboard: 

I go into a continuous loop in Wizard's 
Castle: well-traveled road, to barn, to 
forest, to river — and then die from a 
cyclops or other enemy. 

Alex Abraham 
Atlanta, GA 

Scoreboard: 

In Raaku-Tu, after you have the first 25 
points (which you don't need .to go over 
any rugs to get) try pushing the altar 
around a little bit If that doesn't help, try 
GO DOWN. 

Brent Dingle 
Norwalk, I A 

Scoreboard: 

Can anyone out there give aid with 
Raaka-Tu (I escape a lot only to die) or 
Shamusl 

John Beck 
Suitland, MD 

To respond to other readers 9 inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCoSlG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



★★★★*****★★★★★★★★★★★★★*★★★★★★ 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 185 



COCO CONSULTATIONS 



Tricking BASIC Into Printing 

Special Characters 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



How can I get my CoCo to print a 
quotation mark to the screen under 
Microsoft BASIC? 

Raymond Lueders 

(MOONSHINE) 

Hanover Park, IL 

Because the quotation mark is used 
as a delimiter in the PRINT statement, 
you need to "trick" BASIC into seeing it. 
This is done using the CHR$ statement 
to create a quotation mark, putting it 
inside of a string, and then printing that 
string. For example, if you want the 
computer to print the characters This 
is a "quote" printed to screen, try 
this: 

10 Q$=CHR$(34) 

20 P$="THIS IS R " 

30 B$="QUOTE" 

40 C$ = " PRINTED TO SCREEN." 

50 PRINT A$+Q$+B$+Q$+C$ 

Line 10 generates a quotation mark. 
Lines 20 to 40 create the text strings, 
and then Line 50 prints it all. 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., is a long- 
time electronics tinkerer and lives in 
San Pablo, California. Marty is a RAIN- 
BOW contributing editor and writes the 
"CoCo Consultations'* column. He is 
also the database manager of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG on Delphi. 



Note that the same technique can be 
used to generate all sorts of other 
characters for printing to screen or to 
printer. 



Using a Sony RGB Monitor 

How do you hook up the CoCo 3's 
RGB output to a Sony RGB monitor? 
The monitor has a 34-pin connector 
with inputs for R, G and B, and a single 
input for combined down-going sync. 
The CoCo 3 puts out separate and up- 
going sync signals. 

Barbara Winnett 
San Bruno, CA 
Kenneth Conklin 
Alpena, Ml 

You need to feed both the H and V 
sync into the inputs of a NOR gate (use 
a 74LS02 chip). You may install this 
chip either inside your CoCo 3 (and run 
it out through Pin 10 of the cable after 
disconnecting Pin 10 inside the CoCo 
from the PIA to which it normally 
goes), or install it inside the Sony 
monitor, and provide for separate and 
up-going sync inputs on two of the 
many unused pins on that 34-pin dual- 
row header male connector that many 
Sony brand monitors use for their RGB 



A input. Then make up your cable 
accordingly. Be sure to tie high any 
unused inputs on that 74LS02. Note 
that a 74S02, 74F02 or 74ALS02 will 
work fine too. 

Some Sony monitors lack the 34-pin 
connector and instead use only an odd, 
rectangular, 8-pin video connector. If 
yours is like that, you may want to 
install the 74LS02 chip inside the CoCo 
3. One good way to do so simply and 
quickly would be to piggyback it on top 
of IC 15 (the 74LS04 chip in the CoCo 
3), where the H and V sync signals are 
readily available. 

Please note that the advice I gave on 
this matter in a previous "CoCo Con- 
sultations" column was slightly flawed. 
I suggested using separate inverter gates 
and then combining the outputs. This 
will not work. You could have used a 
single inverter gate and combined the H 
and V sync inputs using diodes and a 
"wire OR" circuit, but what I have 
recommended this month is a superior 
solution. 



The Atari Connection 

How can I hook up my Atari SCI 2 24 
RGB color monitor to my CoCo 3? 

Kerry Bankston 
Evadale, TX 



186 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



TANDY 

. t,„,l RflV 



Atari uses an odd 13-pin DIN con- 
nector for its video input, arranged as 
follows: 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 
13 

(looking at the female connector o n the 
back of the Atari SCI 223). Connectors 
for it can be ordered from Alpha Prod- 
ucts, P.O. Box 4306, Thousand Oaks, 
CA 91360, (818) 899-9304. On this 
connector, pins 6, 7 and 10 are red, 
green and blue respectively. Pins 8 and 
13 are ground, and pins 9 and 12 are 
horizontal and vertical sync, respec- 
tively. Pin 5 may be audio. Ostensibly 
the RGB analog levels and polarity of 
the Atari are similar to that of the 
CoCo's output. 

When I hooked up my CoCo 3 to the 
Atari by merely hooking up the corres- 
ponding R,G,B and the H and V sync 
and ground lines, I got a sharp image. 
Unfortunately, the image was shifted by 
about a quarter of the screen up and to 
the left. There was not enough latitude 
on the H and V position adjustments of 
the monitor to get the image properly 
centered. There were some other prob- 
lems as well, involving failure to display 
properly the ALT-CTRL-RESET "Three 
Mugateers" picture, and some weird 
behavior with some programs. 

There appear to be some subtle dif- 
ferences in timing and/ or expected 
signal levels. It is possible that several 
hours spent with an oscilloscope look- 
ing at the signals from the Atari ST 
color video and comparing them to 
those of the CoCo 3 would yield the 
answer. Possibly some delay circuits on 
the sync and/ or repositioning of the 
magnets on the SCI 224 monitor's pic- 
ture tube would solve all of the prob- 
lems. 

The chief engineer at one company 
which sells RGB analog monitors con- 
fided that he was having a devil of a time 
getting his company's monitors to work 
properly with the Atari ST's video 
output, further implying some (proba- 
bly intentional) weirdness about the 
RGB protocol used by Atari. It appears 
that the CoCo 3 uses a more standard 
sort of RGB than does the Atari ST, 
though in the world of RGB, there 
really is very little that can be consid- 
ered a standard. 



ROM Call Locations 

Can you tell me the different ROM 
call locations needed to convert pro- 
grams that ran under Disk Extended 
BASIC 1.0 to run under Disk Extended 

BASIC 1.1? 

Ralph Coleman 



Although Disk Extended BASIC 1.1 is 
nearly identical to Version 1.0 in terms 
of the code for its routines, almost every 
call is in a d ifferent place. I can't provide 
you with a complete list of such differ- 
ences — it would take me far too long. 
But you can get all the information you 
need from looking at Disk Extended 
Basic Unravelled, a complete disassem- 
bly of both versions. This is published 
by Spectral Associates, and can be 
purchased from Spectrum Projects. I 
have been told that Spectral Associates 
will likely have released a disassembly 
for the ROM and patched RAM images 
of the CoCo 3 by the time you read this. 



Changing RTTY Transmit Rates 

How can I change the shift of the 
RTTY program to transmit at 850 for 
60 wpm operation that we use on the Air 
Force MARS net? 

Earl Kleeberger 
Springfield, OH 



A complete copy of the assembly 
language source code for the RTTY 
program is posted in the Data Com- 
munications section of the Delphi RAIN- 
BOW CoCo SIG. You may alter it at your 
own risk, but I warn you this is an 
extremely delicate and sophisticated 
code, and only a master 6809 pro- 
grammer will be able to modify it and 
make it work as desired; the RTTY 
program is full of very precise real-time 
loops. The timing is an integral part of 
the way the code was written and cannot 
be altered in any simple fashion. Sorry. 





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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 87 



CoCo 3 Questions 

How can I make my CoCo 3 have a 
readable display with a monochrome 
monitor? How can I make my CoCo 3 
work in 80-column mode with the RS- 
232 Pak? Where can I get a TI 6847 Tl 
VDG chip? No Texas Instruments dis- 
tributor has heard of it. 

Dick Buescher 
Madison, WI 



Set the palette so that you have white 
(palette color 63) on black (palette color 
0) for the text display. The text will then 
look fine on a monochrome monitor. In 
32-column mode this involves setting 
PRLETTE 12,0:PRLETTE 13,63 0. In 
40- or 80-column mode you must play 
with palettes 0 and 8 (PRLETTE 
0,63: PRLETTE B,63). This, of course, 
is for BASIC programs. Other programs 
hopefully will offer the option of choos- 
ing a white on black display. 

The program in the ROM of the RS- 
232 Pak is worthless, so don't worry 
about it not working in 80-column 
mode of the CoCo 3. But, with a mul- 
tipack, you can use any of many excel- 
lent programs for the CoCo 3 and RS- 
232 Pak that support 80 columns. Com- 
mercial products that support the RS- 
232 Pak and CoCo 3 in 80-column mode 
include Color Connection from Com- 
puterware and Data Pak II Plus from 
Cer Comp. Data Pak II Plus provides 
good support for VT100 terminal em- 
ulation. 

The 6847T1 VDG is not made by 
Texas Instruments. Instead, it is made 
by Motorola. Or rather, it was made by 
Motorola. In Volume 8, No. I of Mo- 
torola's Semiconductor Data Update 
flyer, they announce that as of March 
31, 1987, they are discontinuing the 
6847T1 VDG chip. This is not suprising, 
for the CoCo 2 has been out of produc- 
tion for nearly a year, and there were 
few other applications for that ill-fated 
chip. No one is interested in a 32- 
column lowercase-capable video gener- 
ator when far more flexible video dis- 
play chips are available. 

Don't waste your time with the 
6847T1 . If you need one as a replace- 
ment part for your old CoCo IIB com- 
puter, the chip is available from Tandy 
National Parts. 



Bad Boots on the CoCo 3 

/ have DL LOGO and am unable to get 
it to boot on the CoCo 3. Can you help? 

Kenny Pikulski 

(PIKULSKI) 
Monumet Beach, MA 

I'm unable to get Trivia Fever to boot 
on the CoCo 3. Can you help? 

David Rehm 
Fort Myers, FL 

The reason both DL LOGO and Trivia 
Fever won't boot on the CoCo 3 is that 
they both boot up under OS-9 Level I, 
Version 1.0 or Version LI, and those 
versions of OS-9's boot process violate 
rules for the CoCo 3 and cause a crash. 
Fortunately there is a simple way to get 
around this. Merely boot up under OS- 
9 Level I, Version 2.0, then put the 
Trivia Fever or the DL LOGO disk in 
your drive and press the reset button 
once. OS-9 will reboot, but will bypass 
the very earliest stage of the boot 
process, and it was this stage that caused 
the crash. Using this technique, you can 
also boot up OS-9 Level I Version 1.0 
on the CoCo 3. 

I have examined the boot code that 
lies on Track 34 and have determined 
that the problem is an attempt to write 
over memory at SFE00 and up, where 
the CoCo 3 puts its interrupts. Indeed, 
I have been able to make a very minor 
modification to the boot code there that 
allows OS-9 Level 1 , Version 1 .0 to boot 
properly on the CoCo 3. Look for an 
article on the needed patch to be pub- 
lished in RAINBOW in the next month or 
so. Such a patch would make it unnec- 
essary for you to get OS-9 Level 1, 
Version 2.0 by merely properly patching 
the boot routine of Version 1.0, DL 
LOGO, Trivia Fever and other early OS- 
9 Tandy products that currently suffer 
from the same problem. 



PAL Switcher 

You spoke of a PAL switcher in your 
article on the CoCo 3 fix for the CoCo 
Multi-Pak. Will such a gizmo be avail- 
able as a commercial product? 

Paul K. Ward 

( PK W) 

Arlington, VA 

Yes, I believe that Spectrum Projects 
will be carrying a PAL switcher for the 
Catalog No. 26-3024 Multi-Pak. This 



device is of interest to (hose who own 
one multipack but want to use it some 
of the time with their CoCo 2 and at 
other times with their CoCo 3. It allows 
you to have both the old and new PAL 
chips installed and to switch between 
them. It is expected to retail for $29.95, 
but may be sold for a bit more with a 
special varient upgrade PAL included 
that allows running the CoCo Max 
hardware and software on the Coco 3. 



Not Truly Random 

/ use the RND function, but every time 
I start up a program using it I get the 
exact same "random" number se- 
quence. How can this be fixed? 

Genaro Hernandez 
San Luis Potosi, Mexico 

The RND function generates a pseudo 
random number sequence that actually 
repeats after many values, on the basis 
of an equation. To get it to start up at 
a different part of that sequence, all you 
need to do is to "seed" the RND function 
with the particular value of the timer. 
This is done using the statement: 

10 X=RND ( -TI MER ) 

If you include this statement at the 
start of your programs, they will start 
at totally different values of the random 
number sequence each time, for the 
start point will be set with the value of 
the timer, which in turn will be ran- 
domly selected depending on the exact 
instant at which you typed RUN com- 
mand. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the R A1NB0W> 
prompt, type R5K (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations" 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



188 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



DOWNLOADS 

Sounds Like 
A Bad Connection 

By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



• When I try to use my RS-232 printer 
port, the computer just seems to hang 
up. I've tested the printer on other 
Co Cos, and it works fine. Also, I've 
found that pressing down on the PC 
board of my Co Co will initiate printing. 

Dan Grampsas 
San Francisco, CA 

It sounds as if you have a bad con- 
nection from the serial I/O connector to 
the circuit board, Dan. Pin 4 on the 
serial connector must be held high in 
order to output data when using the 
port for a printer. This is called a 
handshake signal and normally sent 
from the printer to your CoCo to indi- 
cate that the printer buffer is not full 
and, therefore, ready to accept data. In 
your case, since you have a bad connec- 
tion, Pin 4 is not high and data is not 
being sent to the printer. 

Repair will consist of removing the 
circuit board and re-soldering the con- 
nection. If you don't feel comfortable 
with doing this, take your computer to 
a Radio Shack Service Center. My 
experience has been that Radio Shack's 
service organization is good. 



A PASCAL Bonanza 

• / was wondering if you knew of a 
company that made a PASCAL program 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago and he has built several 
68XX systems. 



similar to Turbo PASCAL that is CoCo 
3 compatible. I think DEFT PASCAL 
might be, but I haven't seen it advertised 
for a long time and I don't know how 
to get in touch with them. 

Craig Fischer 
Renton, WA 



Craig, I am aware of at least two 
PASCAL packages for the CoCo other 
than those that you mentioned. First of 
all Radio Shack has a PASCAL package 
for OS-9 that was introduced by Mi- 
croware. You must first have OS-9 
Level I Version 2.0 or Level [I to use this 
package on your CoCo 3. 

The second PASCAL editor and com- 
piler I am aware of also requires OS-9. 
It is called Dynasoft PASCAL, and is 
distributed by Frank Hogg Labs. 

I am no PASCAL expert, but I have 
seen both packages and can only com- 
ment that the documentation for the 
Radio Shack version is better. As far as 
the features, you will have to investi- 
gate. 



Running a BBS 

• / own a 64 K CoCo 2 with J DOS and 
two drives (SSSD), a modem I B and a 
Deluxe RS-232 Program Pak. My goal 
is to run my own BBS by modifying the 
modem as described in the November 
1984 issue and writing my own BBS 
software. I would like to be able to use 
both the RS-232 and the drive for this. 
Although the AC I A is not mapped into 
the same place as the drive controller, 



(AC I A: $HFF68 - $HFF6B, drive con- 
troller: $HFF40 - $HFF43), is it still 
possible to have them both on the 
busses without any problems? Can it be 
done with a Y cable? Can it be done with 
a Multi-Pak? Would you recommend 
OS-9 for this application? How well 
does J DOS work with OS-9? 

Rob Wedlock 
Casper, WY 



There is no hardware incompatibility 
between the ACIA in the RS-232 Pak 
and your disk drive, Rob. The problem 
is the ROM in the RS-232 Pak. It's at 
the same address as your disk ROM. 

You have two alternatives to solve 
this problem. First, use a Multi-Pak 
interface. This prevents the ROM con- 
flict and al lows both your disk drive and 
RS-232 Pak to be used simultaneously. 

You can indeed use a Y cable if you 
disable the ROM in the RS-232 Pak. At 
the same time, I do not recommend Y 
cables due to the problems they create 
adding extra capacitance to an already 
unbuffered bus. 

Regarding your concern of using 
JDOS with OS-9, after the initial boot- 
ing process, OS-9 is a 64K RAM oper- 
ating system and does not use JDOS. 
You must be careful though! There are 
address conflicts between J&M disk 
hardware and reserved memory in the 
CoCo 3. I see no advantage in using 
either RS-DOS or OS-9 for a bulletin 
board, other than the fact that with OS- 
9 you can have a multi-user BBS. I 
would recommend OS-9 Level II if 
you're considering OS-9. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 189 



Graphics Memory 

• / own a 64 K Co Co 2 with a cassette 
player. I have been working on a draw- 
ing program, but I ran into a snag. Tm 
having trouble saving the graphics 
screen. When I try CSflVEN Nfl$, 
1536, 3072, 3B0 it saves perfectly but 
when I reload the picture, only the top 
half of it is there. Why is this? What is 
the correct statement? 

Rick Normandeau 
Wetaskiwin, Alberta 

Rick, the solution to your problem 
requires an understanding of the mem- 
ory map of your CoCo and of how 
memory is allocated based on the dif- 
ferent graphics commands. Two com- 
mands have a lot to do with how your 
memory is organized, PCLEflR and 
PMDDE. 

PCLEflR reserves a number of gra- 
phics pages (up to eight) for use as 
graphics screens. Each page occupies 
1.5K of memory. When your computer 
is turned on, Extended BASIC reserves 
four pages, or 6K, of memory for graph- 
ics. This is the equivalent of a PCLEAR4 
command. This memory starts imme- 
diately above your text screen memory, 
which happens to be at $400 to $5FF. 
Keep in mind that the stands for 
hexadecimal notation. If you want to 
convert this to decimal, use the follow- 
ing BASIC direct statement: ?&H600. 
You should get 1536 as an answer. That 
just happens to be the starting address 
you mentioned in your letter. If you add 
$600 (the start of your graphics screens) 
and $600 (1.5K of graphics memory on 
startup) you get $1E00. Therefore, your 
BASIC program will start at $1E00, if 

you haven't changed the graphics mem- 
ory allocated by use of the PCLEflR 
command. Otherwise, your graphics 
memory always starts at $600 and ends 
depending on the graphics memory 
allocated by the PCLEflR command. 

Even though you allocate memory 
space by the use of the PCLEflR com- 
mand, the actual amount you use de- 
pends on the PMDDE command. The 
following chart will help you under- 
stand. 



Command Resolution Pages 

PMODE0 , X 1 28 by 96-2 Color I 

PM0DE1 , X 1 28 by 96-4 Color 2 

PMQDE3,X 128 by 192-2 Color 2 

PM0DE4,X 128 by 192^ Color 4 

PMDDE5,X 256 by 192-2 Color 4 



As you can see, PMDDE0 requires one 
page, or 1 .5K, per screen. You can select 
the screen used by the X, or second 
argument, of the PMDDE command. To 
further our understanding, upon start- 
up you have the choice of four PNDDE0 
screens, since each requires one page. 
Keep in mind that 1K=$400, or 1024, 
and that 1 page=1.5K=$600, or 1532. 

Hopefully, from this discussion you 
can figure out what the starting and 
ending addresses are for your graphics 
screens. In your case, Rick, it sounds as 
if you are not executing the proper 
PMDDE command for the graphics you 
have saved or maybe only saving half of 
the graphics screen in the first place. 



High Speed Disk I/O 

• I've read that you cannot save or load 
anything from or to your disk drive 
under the high speed poke. I wish 
someone would tell this to my Color 
Computer. I just got my disk drive this 
year, and I have Disk Extended BASIC 
1. 1. I found out by mistake that I can 
save programs to disk under the high 
speed poke 65495 , 0. Will this hurt my 
system in any way? 

If I use a J/M Controller on my disk 
drive, will I be able to use all 40 tracks? 

Mike Zweitel 
Sturtevant, Wl 

Mike, storing data to your disks has 
little to do with the speed of your CoCo. 
All of the data transfer is handled by the 
Western Digital WD 1 793 chip inside the 
disk controller. Interrupts are used to 
transfer data between the disk con- 
troller and the microprocessor inside 
your CoCo. Maybe you are comparing 
disk I/O to tape I/O, where software 
timing is used. 



Suspect Chips 

• / have a 64K computer with Disk 
Extended BASIC 1.1, and I have a key- 
board problem with my gray CoCo. I 
originally had the old Chiclet-type 
keyboard, and neither the G nor the O 



key would function unless you pressed 
the keys very slowly, and that only 
worked about 10 percent of the time. 
The problem only existed when the high 
speed poke was present. But when I had 
the new CoCo 2 keyboard installed, it 
didn't even work in the normal speed. 
The only way I can make an O or G is 
to push the SHIFT at the same time I 
push O or G. But this presents a prob- 
lem when using a program that uses 
upper- and lowercase. In some machine 
language programs, the O and the G 
work fine. 

Mike Roush 
Ottawa, KS 

Mike, from the sound of your prob- 
lem, I would be more suspect of either 
the 6809E microprocessor or the 6821 
PIA than the keyboard contacts. I guess 
the fact that it won't work at high speeds 
is the key. Try replacing these chips and 
see if that cures your problem. 



Old Drives for the CoCo 2 

• / have a TRS-80 Model I disk drive, 
(Catalog No. 26-1164). It uses 5 l /4-inch 
disks, 40 tracks, single-sided. I want to 
redesign it for my CoCo 2 64K. What 
do I do to make the change? 

Richard West 
West Jordan, UT 

Richard, all that you need to use your 
old disk drive is a Color Computer Disk 
Interface (Catalog No. 26-3022) and the 
cable connecting the controller to your 
drive. I assume that the drive is in a case 
and has a power supply. Along with the 
hardware you get Disk BASIC. For your 
information the interface cable between 
the controller and drive uses a 34-pin 
flat cable connector. 



Learning Machine Language 

• / have a 64 K Color Computer with a 
disk drive and modem. I would like to 
learn machine language. I am looking 
for a program that has a machine 
language monitor, assembler and disas- 
sembler, like Disector for the Commo- 
dore 64. Is there one available for the 
CoCo 2? Also, is there a good memory 
map available? 

Mike Keahl 
Lakeland, FL 



190 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Mike, have you tried EDTASM+ 
from Radio Shack? I still use it for all 
of my machine language programming. 
It has an editor, assembler and a mon- 
itor/debug program named ZBUG. 
There have been several patches in THE 
rainbow for converting the original 
ROM Pak to d isk I/O, but Radio Shack 
has since introduced Disk EDTASM+. 

We published a memory map in THE 
RAINBOW several years ago, but I would 
recommend the BASIC Unravelled 
series by Spectral Associates, available 
from Spectrum Projects. 



Uncovering the DOS Command 

• / have three questions. The first deals 
with a command J accidentally found in 
the RS-DOS operating system called 
DD5. When you type the command, the 
drive comes on and the computer loads 
a bunch of garbage. It isn *t documented 
in my owners' manual. 1 thought it 
might be a boot for OS-9, but I don't 
have a copy to try it on, 



My second question deals with put- 
ting the computer in the Extended 
BASIC only mode without disconnecting 
the drive controller. I read a review in 
the February 1986 issue on a DOS 
Switcher from Spectrum Projects which 
led me to believe it would be possible 
to put a switch on the disk ROM enable, 
Then, by switching it out and rebooting 
ECB, the disk ROM would be com- 
pletely transparent to programs like my 
old cassette version Telewriter, Do you 
know i f this would be dangerous to the 
computer or if it would even work? 

Finally, J would like to know about 
Y cables versus multipacks. How do Y 
cables work? Must the cartridge be 
designed to be used with a Y cable or 
will all cartridges work? Again, would 
use of the Y cable make unplugging the 
drive controller unnecessary, especially 
for things like the speech synthesizer 
cartridge? 

Larry Ullom 
Wheeling, WV 

The DOS command is indeed a boot 
program for OS-9 that was added to 
Disk BASIC in Version 1.1 and later. It 
has other custom uses depending on 



your imagination. All that it does is 
transfer d ata from Track 34 of the d isk 
and execute the program in memory. 

As far as your question on the ROM 
switcher, I would recommend it for 
what you are trying to accomplish. You 
can use it by omitting one on the ROMs. 

I do not recommend Y cables due to 
possible hardware timing problems 
associated with extra bus capacitance. 
At the same time the only real problem 
is that not all hardware add-ons use 
unique addressing. A Multi-Pak will 
solve most of these problems and still 
offer reliable bus operation. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
RAlNBtw, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through the MAIL section of our 
Delphi CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine Services, 
then, at the RAINBO W> prompt, type LET 
to arrive at the LETTERS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Downloads" online form 
which has complete instructions. 



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For the smart shopper Keep track of coupons. Print shopping lists, 

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18 pictures, up to 48 pieces. Great way to practice simple math- 



Stale 



ZIP 



0 My check in the amount of 



is enclosed' 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Accl. No. , Exp. Dale 



Signature 

Mali to: The Third Rainbow 8ook of Adventures, The Falsoft Building, 

P.O. Box 385 r Prospect, KY 40059 
To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
EST. For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

"Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S. add $4. Allow 6 to 
8 weeks lor delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape, in 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only please. 



ALL PRIGRAMS FOR 64K COCO 1,2,3, 1 DISK MIN. ADD $3 S/H. + $1 S/H 
PER EACH ADDITIONAL PROGRAM ORDERED. CO D, $2 EXTRA. MS RES, 
ADD 6% SALES TAX. CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG. MAKE FUNDS 

PAYABLE TO SECA. 



EXCITING OPPORTUNITY FOR NEW PROGRAMMERS TO MARKET THEIR PRO- 
GRAMS. WRITE FOR DETAILS. DEALERS WELCOMED 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



SECA - P.O. BOX 3134 
GULFP0RT, MS 39505 
(601) 832-8236 




April 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 91 



[p) /A 
LPliZ/uL 





A Cr O I tilt I 



Under standing How 

Manages Memory 

By Peter Dibble 



et's start by reviewing some 
terms from last month's article. 
The 6809 uses logical addresses 
to access memory. These logical ad- 
dresses are intercepted by the DAT 
(Dynamic Address Translation unit) 
which translates them into physical 
addresses. All the logical addresses that 
a process can use (there may be up to 
64K valid logical addresses) make up its 
logical address space. The physical 
addresses they translate to make up its 
physical address space. On the CoCo 3, 
the DAT translates addresses in 8K 
segments called blocks. 

OS-9 Level II uses memory manage- 
ment hardware to give each process up 
to 64K, to protect processes from one 
another, and to make memory fragmen- 
tation irrelevant. 

The normal use of OS-9 Level II is to 
use much more than 64K of memory to 
run many processes at the same time 
(maybe as many as 57 on the CoCo 3), 



Peter Dibble has a bachelor's degree in 
chemistry and is currently a graduate 
student in computer science. He has 
worked as an applications programmer, 
systems programmer and as the user 
services assistant director for the Uni- 
versity of Rochester Computing Center. 
With Dale Puckett, he is the coauthor 
of The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9. 



and to isolate them from each other. 
There is a small increase in the memory 
available to a process (up to almost 
64K) because most of OS-9 is hidden, 
but programs bigger than 64K are not 
directly supported by OS-9. 

Large programs are one of my main 
interests and a feature of this series. 
Maybe I convinced you last month that 
OS-9 needs to support them. Why 
doesn't it? 

There are at least two good reasons 
for OS-9 Level II to ignore the possibil- 
ity that a single program could use more 
than 64K, Microware was always 
strongly committed to keeping all ver- 
sions of OS-9 as compatible as possible. 
The changes required to make it much 
easier to use extended memory from 
within a program would have driven 
Level II far from Level I. 

It probably wasn't worth the effort to 
make it easy to use extended memory. 
Limited memory is seldom a serious 
problem, and there are pleasing ways to 
circumvent the limit. 

Processes and Address Spaces 

Under OS-9 Level I, a process gets a 
program module, a data area with the 
stack growing toward the bottom of it, 
at least three I/O path numbers and an 
occasional slice of CPU time. Under 
Level II a process gets all that plus an 
address space. That's the main advan- 
tage and the main fault of Level II. 



OS-9 allocates two regions of mem- 
ory to each process. One is for the 
program module and any other mod- 
ules the process brings in; the other 
region is for data. Since each allocation 
is for at least 8K, a single process uses 
at least 16K. If you assume that OS-9 
uses 48K for itself and uses the J6K 
minimum per process, you find that the 
CoCo has memory for 29 processes. I 
got 57 processes by assuming that they 
all share common code and so get by 
with only 8K of memory per process. 

OS-9 manages the DAT so a program 
has to make a special effort to access 
memory in another program's address 
space. If you run a buggy program, it 
is difficult for it to corrupt another 
program's memory. This is a particu- 
larly big advantage if you have several 
users on your system. It is a particularly 
dreadful problem if your program 
wants to use data that OS-9 associates 
with another process. 

Using data associated with another 
process sounds pretty arcane. Processes 
usually don't even know that they share 
the processor. Why should they care 
that they can't access one another's 
variables? If you follow good OS-9 
programming practice the separation 
will be no problem. If you don't, the big 
pitfall is that the OS-9 operating system 
has its own address space. You can't get 
at OS-9's data structures. 

Hardware and software interrupts 




192 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



are a problem for OS-9. The 6809 insists 
on using interrupt vectors in the top few 
bytes of memory. The processor doesn't 
know about the DAT, so those vectors 
have to be at the top of every logical 
address space. Does every program 
have to include the interrupt vectors 
and service routines? 

The problem is solved with a bit of 
a kludge. There is a 256-byte piece of 
OS-9 in every address space. It catches 
interrupts, sets up a few things, switches 
the task register to select OS-9's address 
space, and jumps into the main part of 
OS-9. 

Fragmentation 

There is no such thing as memory 
fragmentation under Level II. OS-9 
builds an address space by getting up a 
DAT image (a copy of the values it will 
store in the DAT registers for that 
address space). It plunks block numbers 
into the DAT image any way it likes. 
They don't need to be sequential or even 
in order. OS-9 Level I requires that 
allocations of memory be contiguous. 
Memory management lets Level II 
escape that requirement and the frag- 
mentation problem with it. 

Building an address space for a pro- 
cess proceeds in two steps. One step is 
to find the program module for the 
process. The memory containing the 
module is put at (or near) the high end 
of the DAT image. The other step is to 
find enough free blocks for the data 
space the program wants. These blocks 
are put at the bottom of the DAT image. 

Here's an example in more detail. The 



object is to create an address space for 
the imaginary program Tester. 

a) Put the blocks containing Tester 
near the top of the image. OS-9 
searches for the Tester module, 
finds it in blocks 20 and 21 and 
puts them in the image: 

(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 20,21) 

b) Find enough free blocks to satisfy 
Tester's requirements (20K). OS-9 
searches these for three blocks, 
and finds them at 30, 35 and 50: 

(30, 35, 50, 0, 0, 0, 20, 21) 

c) Fill the remaining slots in the DAT 
image with a junk block number. 
Some block number must be desig- 
nated as junk for this purpose. If 
it's 62, the final DAT image will be: 

(30, 35, 50, 62, 62, 62, 20, 21) 

The top 512 bytes of each address 
space are reserved for OS-9 and the 
memory-mapped area. If a module 
would overlap that memory, OS-9 
doesn't use the top block for it. The only 
way OS-9 can fail to find the memory 
for a program is if there are not enough 
free blocks anywhere in memory. 

A Pitfall 

When you load modules, OS-9 makes 
a special address space for them. This 
gets interesting when you load a file 
containing several modules which OS- 
9 neatly packs into an address space. 
This saves lots of memory, but when 
you use any one of the modules, OS-9 
brings the entire module address space 
with it. 



If you like to include utility programs 
in your 059Boot file, be warned. You 
get everything in the bootstrap with any 
utility program. If you have 32K of 
modules in your bootstrap including 
GoToXY, you will have mysterious prob- 
lems. A program that wants to use 
GoToXY will link to the module. OS-9 
will map the address space containing 
GoToXY into the program's address 
space — all 32K of it. When the pro- 
gram runs out of memory you will be 
surprised. After all, GoToXY is only 200 
bytes or so. 

That's a mighty fast treatment of 
modules. I'll come back to them, but I 
wanted to make sure this little pitfall 
was exposed early. 

OS-9 puts each process in a separate 
address space. This means that pro- 
cesses can't easily access one another's 
memory. The best assumption is that 
your program can only use data that it 
has allocated. It can't use OS-9's vari- 
ables. It also means that one program's 
stray pointer won't crash another pro- 
gram. 

Since the DAT can assemble an ad- 
dress space from blocks of physical 
memory in any order, memory frag- 
mentation is not an issue for OS-9 Level 
II. 

Merging modules into files is a good 
idea under Level II. It is commonly used 
for utility programs that you load from 
a file at start-up time. Collections of 
more than 8K of modules are not so 
good. Including modules that aren't 
part of OS-9 in 059Boot is a bad 
idea. ^ 



mm 



w 





OS-9 ™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



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or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
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drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
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L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities Including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
languaae p disassembler, disk sector edit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

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PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
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CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
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driver and test software included. $199.00 

All disk prices are for CoCo OS-9 format; for other formats, specify 
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(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 is a trademark of Mlcroware and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS Is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 193 




BITS AND BYTES OF BASIC 



Making the Most 
of CoCo 3 Features — 

i 

Without Overdoing It 

By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



After last month's physics and 
programming lessons, it is time 
for lighter fare. A few trips to 
rainbow's Delphi CoCo SIG recently, 
has opened my eyes — and my pocket 
too — to things going on in the CoCo 
world th U I had not kept up with. There 
are some really fine software packages 
for all CoCos just waiting to be down- 
loaded. Most of the CoCo 1 and 2 items 
run on the CoCo 3 as well. 

One of the finest programs under RS- 
DOS is KDSK by Kenneth L. Wuelzer, 
1 13 Arrowhead Dr., Montgomery, AL 
36117. Talk about a disk utility pack- 
age, this one does it all and runs on all 
CoCos. It will format a target disk and 
back it up with a disk in another drive 
in 1 10 seconds. It takes RS-DOS nearly 
as long just to DSKINI a disk. We 
control our CoCo users group public 
domain library by copying disks for 
later sale at $2 or $3 at the meetings. You 
can imagine what a boon KDSK has been 
to the librarian. 

By the way, our library includes only 
public domain and shareware software. 
Some of the material on the Delphi 
CoCo database is in it. Software pub- 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in basic pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the coauthor of the TIMS database 
management program. 



lished in RAINBOW is not in the library, 
in keeping with RAINBOW'S policy. Nor 
is there commercial software in the 
library, even for people to "try out." 
KDSK, which is shareware, is in the 
library. Shareware should be copied and 
distributed, since the first objective is to 
get it into the machines of as many 
people as possible as quickly as possi- 
ble. Cash return to the author correlates 
directly with the number of "free" 
copies distributed. Get a copy of KDSK 
and give one to each of your friends. 
Those who like and use the program are 
requested to send Kenneth Wuelzer $15 
for a registered disk with complete 
documentation files. That is little 
enough to ask for software of this 
quality. 

With KDSKyou can format individual 
sectors or tracks. Every time it works on 
a disk, it backs up the granule allocation 
table and disk directory sectors 1 to 9 
on Track 17 to the unused sectors 10 to 
1 8 on the same track. No w if the demon 
strikes Sector 2 and wipes out your 
granule allocation table, there is a 
chance for recovery. Find out which 
sectors are wiped out (generally only 
one or two), and use KDSK to reinitialize 
only those sectors. Then have KDSK 
move the hidden directory back to 
sectors 0 to 9. 

Want to copy only certain programs 
off RAINBOW ON DISK to your working 
disk? KDSK prints a lettered directory 



and asks you to type only the letters 
corresponding to the files you want 
copied. When you press ENTER it goes 
off and copies all indicated files — fast. 
Kill works the same way. Want to 
format a disk as double-sided, 40-track 
using RS-DOS, perhaps to use with 
JDOS or ADOS? KDSK can do it. In 
fact, it can make a double-sided 40 with 
MS-DOS format. 

Another capability is to make a 
master file of all your disk files and print 
a sorted list complete with disk number 
and other data. And of course it has the 
basic utilities to work on individual disk 
sectors for dumps, changes and the like. 
My KDSK registratio n number is #0001 7 
and the disk goes into my Hall of Fame 
alongside my Serial #121 Telewriter 
cassette. Next time you are on RAIN- 
BOW'S Delphi CoCo SIG, download 
KDSK from the Database Utilities sec- 
tion. 

There is a large amount of graphics 
material on Delphi. Much of it is stored 
in the MAXCMP format developed by 
Art Flexser and Mike Ward. A PMODE 
4 picture is compressed and stored in 
DflTfi statements in a BASIC program 
that decodes the data and re-displays 
the graphic when run on your computer, 
fne program has subroutines to save 
the graphic to disk as a standard binary 
dump. The software can handle double- 
screen Graphicom and Colormax pic- 
tures. Though generated on CoCo Is 



194 THE RAINBOW ApriM987 



and 2s, all pictures I have downloaded 
run fine on my CoCo 3. 

There is a considerable number of 
digitized pictures and the software to 
print them using Epson or Epson- 
compatible printers. This did me little 
good, as I have Radio Shack printers. 
However, recent additions to the SIG 
include software to display converted 
digitized pictures using the CoCo 3 640- 
by-192 screen. For those into digitized 
pictures, this is a big step forward. 

Even more spectacular are Apple 
Macintosh pictures that can be loaded 
and viewed on a CoCo. Macintosh 
pictures are 512 pixels wide and a 
number of times longer than 192 lines, 
so only a portion can be viewed at a 
time. On a CoCo 3 in the 640~by-192 
mode, viewing is far more satisfactory. 
Files and software are in the Graphics 
portion of the Delphi CoCo SIG data- 
base. 

Here is a hint that can save lots of 
money if you are new to the CoCo SIG. 
Open your terminal package buffer and 
read through program descriptions as 
fast as possible. When the buffer nears 
full, save it to a file on disk, clear the 
buffer and continue reading. If you are 



using GETerm, the buffer holds about 
39,500 characters, so you can get a good 
quantity at a time. Still, it took me five 
full buffers to do most of the Graphics 
section. 

Next, use a program like Lister (in- 
cluded here) to print the files on your 
printer. Now you can read the descrip- 
tions at your leisure without running up 
Delphi charges. To access a particular 
program, enter the Database section 
and type R and the first few characters 
of the description's name. Where the 
name is not unique, find one before the 
one you want that is unique and read 
back from there until you reach your 
target. 

Here is another money-saver. If you 
plan to do explorations of what is on 
Delphi, buy a 1200 baud modem before 
you start. Since the charge is the same 
whether you use 300 or 1200 baud, you 
download much more material per buck 
at 1200 baud. You can easily save the 
price of the modem in the first month. 

BASIC programs specifically for the 
CoCo 3 are starting to show up. Some 
are good and some are not. Some are 
reworks of CoCo 1 and 2 BASIC pro- 
grams and try to use CoCo 3 features. 



Frankly, it only took me five minutes to 
get quite tired of a flashing menu line. 
The words are hard to read. It's one 
thing to have neat new features, but it 
is quite another to use them to maxi- 
mum advantage. 

And we have color troubles in CoCo 
City, A program written for TV or color 
composite video can be unusable with 
the CM-8 monitor. I worked a while 
with a disk indexing program that 
changed foreground and background 
colors for each new screen. The 80- 
column buff characters on a light blue 
background cannot be read. I can't 
believe the author saw this screen in 
these colors. I have not tested the 
program on a composite monitor, but 
I think the problem involves differences 
in ways composite video and the CM- 
8 display certain color numbers. 

We never had these problems before. 
CoCo 1 and 2 colors were so few, I stuck 
with an amber monitor and did not 
bother with software that used colors 
that looked the same on the monitor. 
Artifact colors left me cold as well. I felt 
if something could not be done right, 
then let's not bother with it at all. Now 
with so many colors available and two 




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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 195 



different display systems and a natural 
tendency to use it all, we have problems. 

First, authors must resist the ten- 
dency to get too cute in software they 
want others to use. Character-oriented 
software should be legible first. Then 
some careful dressing up can be tried. 
Stick with basic colors and assure good 
contrast in both composite and analog 
systems. I think it is definitely OK for 
the software to ask if CMP or RGB 
display is being used and set the palette 
accordingly. RGB, CMP or TV versions 
of a program may be an answer. In the 
case of TV, 80-column characters are 
not legible and the left two or three are 
chopped off by the TV. 

So the author is left with the dilemma 
of whether to write the program for 
everyone, for one or the other monitor 
systems or for monitors as a group 
without TV compatibility. 

Greg Miller went so far as to provide 
for nine different display choices with 
his Greg-E-Term terminal program. 
Three of these options are for the CoCo 
3 while the rest support CoCo 1 s and 2s. 
In the CoCo 3 mode, GETerm lets the 
user choose foreground, background 
and border colors. In addition, the user 
can configure many other parameters to 
tailor GETerm to a specific communi- 
cations system. The configured pro- 
gram is then saved to disk and is all 
ready to go when next loaded. 

In a lot of other ways, GETerm turns 
out to be one of the nicest terminal 
packages I have used. It supports a solid 
Xmodem protocol that works well with 
Delphi, even when Delphi takes an 
extended break to service other users. 
Fortunately, this happens infrequently, 



but when it does GETerm patiently 
waits till Delphi returns. Otherwise, the 
error rate has been extremely small 
working 1200 baud through CoCo 3's 
serial port. GETerm can be downloaded 
using Xmodem from the Communica- 
tions section of the Delphi CoCo SIG 
database. 

Whatever the display system choice, 
that choice should be stated and the 
software must be tested to assure that 
it works as advertised. 



^Fragmentation 
within the CoCo 
System is hardly- 
unique in the 
computer world. 



If you can get into trouble with color 
in character-oriented work, think of the 
can of worms the graphics world faces. 
The Tandy CoCo 3 demo is a case in 
point. Certain sequences just do not 
work on CMP and TV. Red grass 
doesn't cut it. Of course the demo exists 
to showcase the CoCo 3 and the CM- 
8 and it does the advertised quite well. 

RATNBOW has categorized programs 
foryears, using amount of memory, and 
whether disk or tape are used, as the 
parameters. The CoCo 3 requires at 



least a display parameter. I propose All, 
TV&CMP, CMP and RGB. Of course 
such descriptors should appear on 
information services such as Delphi, as 
well. 

I am calling for categorization of 
CoCo 3 software, since I do not feel a 
multi-mode monitor stands a chance. 
Sure, they are out there and can be 
made to work, even as a TV to watch 
those wonderful artifacted colors in 
PMDDE 4. And a small percentage of 
CoCo 3 owners will choose that route, 
although no one in my group of CoCo 
3 owners has shown the slightest inter- 
est. And I am not about to spend the 
bucks or put up with the hassle. I don't 
think many others are, either — at least 
not right now. 

Fragmentation within the CoCo Sys- 
tem is hardly unique in the computer 
world. The MS-DOS community had a 
nice standardized system for a number 
of years. That is coming apart with 
multiple graphics systems and new 
machines that are incompatible with 
earlier ones. There's been an explosion 
of choices and it is hard to tell which are 
important to consider and which are 
inconsequential, much less deal with the 
important questions. 

Well, we had a nice standardized 
machine and have fussed for something 
better for years. Now we have it and we 
need to do some work to make the most 
of our new options without overdoing 
to the point that things become cute. 
My worst fear is that color will be used 
for its own sake and functionality will 
be compromised. Things like that will 
turn off current and potential users 
fast. n 



The listing: LISTER 

1 'LISTER- A PROGRAM TO LIST AN 
ASCII FILE TO SCREEN OR PRINTER 
10 PRINT "LISTER IS SET UP NOW FO 
R 9 6)3)3 BAUD RATE TO THE PRINTE 
R. IF YOUR PRINTER RUNS AT 6)3 
0 BAUD, DELETE THE POKE 15)8,1 I 
N LINE 20. IF YOU PRINT AT SOM 
E OTHER BAUD, CHANGE THE POKE, 
DELETE LINE 1)8 AND RES AVE THE 

PROGRAM . 
20 CLEAR 800:POKE150,1 
30 LINE INPUT "FILE NAME? (PRESS 
<ENTER> FOR DIRECTORY) "; F$ : I FF$= 



"? "ORF$=" "THENGOSUB12 )3 

4) 3 PRINT "SCREEN OR PRINTER? (S/P 
) " ; :GOSUBll)3:DV$=B$:IFDV$="S"TH 
ENDV=0ELSEDV=-2 

5) 3 CLS:IFDV=-2THENPRINT: PRINT: PR 
INT"printing " 

6) 3 OPEN "I",#1,F$ 

7) 3 LINE INPUT #1, A$ 

8) 3 PRINT#DV,A$ 

90 IF EOF(l)=-l THEN PRINT"end o 
f file"; :CLOSE#l: END 

I) 3)3 GOTO 7)3 

II) 3 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="" THEN 11)3 
ELSE RETURN 

12)3 PRINT"DRIVE#? " ; : GOSUBll)3 : IF 
VAL(B$) >3THEN12)3ELSEDIR VAL(B$) : 
GOTO30 , 



196 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



— 7/ VSST 




OS-') 



/ 



^£7 



ICISSfibl© OS-9 



■ C si in ri #i I si Lr c 

AluCXJIJIJL JSLfl^r JL ClJCm^ Vy O 1LJ 



Back to the Beginnin 

By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 





ack in October of 1983 we bor- 
rowed the title for this column 
from that famous acronym, 
KISS, short for Keep It Simple Stupid. 
Our Intention was to write acolumn full 
of tips that would indeed make OS-9 
simple to operate. Yet, on many occa- 
sions our enthusiasm for new and excit- 
ing tools got in the way and we did 
everything but keep it simple. 

This month a letter from Michael H. 
Rambo inspired us to get back ontrack. 
Mr. Rambo wanted true lowercase 
characters on his Color Computer 
screen. He owned the *B' version with 
the new 6847T1 VDG. With ADOS he 
was able to make it happen. By the time 
he had switched to OS-9 he was spoiled. 
He wanted to keep his lowercase char- 
acters. 

With ADOS he switched modes by 
storing Hex 55 at SFF22. Not to be 
fooled, he jumped right in and wrote a 
Hexdump program in BASlCOf. Then, he 
searched for and hand disassembled any 
code in the OS-9 memory modules that 
made reference to SFF22. Let me tell 
you, Michael has a lot more patience 
than I do. His hand disassembly looked 
accurate. He even got it to work — 
partially. By changing a byte at $3D5 in 
the CCIO module that comes with 
Version 2.00.00, he was able to get OS- 
9 to boot up from his modified ADOS 
with the lowercase and inverse video 
screen he wanted. However, every time 

Bale L. Puckett, who is author oj The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and 
coauthor, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association, Bale 
works as a U. S. Coast Guard lieutenant 
and lives on Governors Island in New 
York Harbor. 



he did a warm reboot by pressing the 
reset button he would lose his lowercase 
screen. He wrote us looking for a 100 
percent reliable method of patching OS- 
9. 

The secret is not to patch. OS-9 
Version 2.00.00 gives you a utility 
named tmode which is tailor-made for 
the job. You use this tool to tell OS-9 
what your hardware looks like. For 
example: 

□59: tmode upc -pause 

This command line tells OS-9 you 
want the terminal on the standard 
output path to print only uppercase 
letters and you do not want it to stop 
and wait for you to give it a go-ahead 
at the end of a screen page. The follow- 
ing command will do just the opposite. 

□59: tmode -upc pause 

After giving this command, OS-9 
pauses and lets you catch up on your 
reading after it fills your screen. And, 
it prints lowercase letters on your screen 
as lowercase — true lowercase if you 
have one of the newer machines and use 
the trick we are about to show you. 

The solution to Rambo's problem 
rests with tmode's type parameter 
which is used to tell OS-9 how to 
initialize the ACI A chip in the Radio 
Shack RS-232 program pack and how 
to set up your Color Computer screen. 
This month, we'll stick to the screen. 

The information that defines your 
screen isstored inbitsOand I inthetype 
byte. If Bit 0 is off, OS-9 will not know 
that your machine has true lowercase 
capability. If Bit 0 is on, OS-9 recognizes 
that your machine has a chip that can 
generate true lowercase characters and 
will govern itself accordingly. 

Bit I of the type byte tells OS-9 the 
width of your screen. If Bit I is clear (or 



zero) OS-9 knows that your screen is 32 
characters wide. That is the case when 
you are using the true lowercase capa- 
bility of the VDG chip. If you are using 
one of the hardware program packs that 
generate an 80-co!umn screen you will 
want to set Bit 1. Let's look at a couple 
of examples. 

□53: tmode type=0 

After you type this line, the path 
descriptor on the standard output path 
will be set up for a 32-column screen 
that does not have true lowercase cap- 
ability, i.e., an older VDG chip. 

OSS: tmode type=l 

This command tells OS-9 that your 
machine has the proper VDG to gener- 
ate true lowercase characters. 

059: tmode type=3 

If you type this command, OS-9 
thinks your screen can generate true 
lowercase characters and is 80 charac- 
ters wide. This condition would be true 
if you were using a hardware program 
pack that outputs 80 columns. But, 
there's a gotcha! If you just type tmode 
type-1 alone, OS-9 will not automat- 
ically switch you into the true lowercase 
mode. To make this happen you must 
issue two commands. Do it like this: 

□59: tmode type^l 
□ 59: disp 1 ay e 

Or, like this: 

059: tmode type=l ; display e 

The moral of our story — don*t use 
a sledge hammer to kill a flea. Take the 
time to study the documentation. A 
small investment here can often save 



April T987 THE RAINBOW 197 



you much time. I must confess I was 
unable to find the fact that I needed to 
type display e to make the switch 
anywhere in the documentation that 
came with the Version 2.00.00 upgrade. 
J found it by trial and error. 

Turning off /DO 

Last month we showed you how to set 
up a system disk for your hard disk 
based OS-9 computer that will operate 
without the floppy disk device descrip- 
tors and device driver, ccdisk. By 
removing these and other unused mod- 
ules from your []S9Boot file you can 
really trim your system and make more 
memory available for your programs. 

You can still boot up from a floppy 
startup disk because the boot module 
stored on Track 34 of your Rad io Shack 
system disk, contains the code you need 
to talk to the disk drive mounted in slot 
/d0. There is one small detail that you 
will want to take care of, however. For 
long-term operation in this mode, you 



need a way to turn off the floppy drive 
in the slot normally named /d0. 

Since you have removed the /d0 
floppy device descriptor module from 
your DS9Boot file and are using the 
name /d0 for your hard disk descriptor, 
you don't have a way to talk to the 
floppy disk drive to tell it to shut off. 
But, think again! Where there's a will, 
there's a way! 

The quick and dirty way to turn off 
the motor on the floppy disk drive is to 
use the OS-9 debug utility. Try this: 

□59: debug 

Interactive Debugger 
DB: -SPACEBAR ff40 ENTER 

FF40 FF 
DB: =00 ENTER 
ERROR B010 

FF40 FF 
DB: q ENTER 

Shortly after you type =00 you'll 
notice the red LED go out on your drive 



and hear the motor stop running. That's 
easy enough. In fact, you could even run 
debug from within your startup file 
using a script containing the debug 
commands we typed manually above. 
However, it wouldn't look very elegant 
— and most important, it would steal 
several seconds of your precious com- 
puting time from you every time you 
boot your system. 

Wouldn't you rather have a short 
machine language program you could 
run automatically from your startup 
file? Let's go for it. Besides, it gives us 
a chance to give many of you an intro- 
ductory look at the OS-9 assembler, 
asm. 

Getting Started With Asm 

When you start a programming pro- 
ject you enter a do loop. Regardless of 
the language, whether it is low-level like 
6809 assembly or high-level like 
BASIC09, PASCAL and C, there are at least 
three steps you will find yourself repeat- 



Listing 1: driveof f 

ifpl 

use /d#/def s/os9def s 
endc 

mod length , name , prgrm+obj ct , reent+ 1 , start , data size 

rmb 20$ reserve for stack 

datasize equ . 
name fcs /D#Off/ 



fcb 1 Edition Number 

fee /From KISSable OS-9, April 1987/ 

start clra 
sta $ff40 
clrb Clear Error 
os9 f$exit Return to Shell 

emod 

length equ * 
end 



Listing 2: dr iveof f . 1 is ting 



D 

PPP16 W 

00019 
00020 
00021 
00022 
00023 



0000 87CD003C 
00C8 

000D 44304F66 

0012 01 

0013 46726F6D 

0031 4F 

0032 B7FF40 

0035 5F 

0036 103F06 

0039 5F6D14 
003C 



ifpl 
endc 

mod 

rmb 

datasize equ 

name fcs 

fcb 
fee 

start clra 

sta 
clrb 
os9 

emod 

length equ 

end 



length, name , prgrm+obj ct , reent+1 , start , dat 



200 



reserve for stack 



/Djaof f/ 

1 Edition Number 

/From KISSable OS-9, April 1987/ 



$f f40 
f$exit 



Clear Error 
Return to Shell 



ppppp error(s) 
ppppl warning (s) 

$PP3C ppp6p program bytes generated 
$PPC8 pp2pp data bytes allocated 
$18A3 p63j37 bytes used for symbols 



198 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



ing many times. In a pseudo-language 
it might look like this: 

While Your program doesn't run 
properly Do 

Enter or Edit the Source 
Code file 

Assemble or compile into 
object code 

Debug the object code using 
your system debugger 
EndWhile 

When the loop above gets to this 
point your program most likely runs 
properly and it is time for you to write 
the documentation so everyone can use 
it. 

Most common OS-9 asm command 
lines look something like this: 

□59: asm ttlBK drweof f □ 

If you type this command, OS-9 will 
load in your assembler from your cur- 
rent execution directory — /D0/CHD5. 
It reserves 18,432 bytes or 18K of 
memory for the assembler to use for 
data storage. It assembles a file named 
driv/eof f which it assumes you have 
stored in your current data directory. 
When it is finished, it will have created 
a file in your current execution direc- 
tory, /D0/CMD5. That file will contain 
an OS-9 module which you can load 
and run from the OS-9 prompt. 

Why did you need to ask for more 
memory on the command line? That's 



a good question. Unfortunately, the 
OS-9 asm command only asks for 4,096 
bytes of data memory when it comes 
alive. Because you usually need to 
assemble the 059Def s file each time you 
assemble a program, 4,096 bytes isn't 
enough. You need at least 16K of mem- 
ory f or all but the shortest of programs. 

Incidentally, you can permanently 
change the amount of memory asm 
requests by changing the 12th and 13th 
byte in the asm file with a utility like 
Patch from Computerware. For exam- 
ple, if you change the two Hex bytes, 10 
and 00, which are stored there now to 
3F FF, asm will automatically request 
16K of memory when it starts up. 

If you don't own Patch, you can 
accomplish the same thing with debug. 
First, load asm into memory. Then run 
debug and link to asm with the 1 
command. Then change the two bytes 
and exit the debugger. When you see the 
OS-9 prompt again, save the asm mod- 
ule in memory into a temporary file and 
verify it to update the CRC. 



□59: save /dO'cmds/ temp 

asm ENTER 

□S9: veri f y </d0/cmds/ temp> 

/d0/cmds/New.flsm u ENTER 

0S9: del /dO/cmds'asm ENTER 

□S9: rename /d0/cmds/new 

. asm asm 



But we said we would keep it simple 
this month! Let's get back on track by 
playing what-if. What if you don't want 
your executable file stored in your 
current execution directory. Rather, 
you want it in a special directory you 
have set up for your hard disk project. 
Let's call that directory HDPRDJECT. 

Notice how we always type the name 
of our directories with all capital letters 
when we create them. This lets us tell the 
difference between a standard file and 
a directory file with a quick glance at the 
screen. Also, let's assume that you want 
a hard copy listing of your assembled 
source code to help you spot any logic 
errors. Do it this way. 

□59: asm 818K driv/eof f L o='d0 
/hdproj ect'dOof f >'p 

The next time you run asm, you 
change your mind. You want to save the 
listing of your assembled source code in 
a file. You'll find time to look at it later, 
maybe. Besides, you don't need an 
object code file this time. You didn't 
really want to run the program, you just 
wanted to study the technique. 

□59: asm 818K driveof f L> 
dri veof f . 1 is ting 

Notice that we typed an uppercase L 



Listing 3: IOMan. patch 



* 
* 



Either do the following manually, 
to make your new IOMan: 



or use it as a shell procedure file 



* Save the old ioman, and change it's name in memory: 

save /dp/ioman* old ioman 

debug 

L ioman 

. . +D 

= 41 

* Load an ioman so we have extra space to play with: 



$load /dj3/ioman. old 
L ioman 
. .+3 
=1D 

L ioman 
• .+8 
=E2 



* Fix known ioman bug: 



L ioman 
, .+6BB 
=12 
=E1 



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April 1987 THE RAINBOW 199 



so you couldn't confuse it with the 
number 1. Feel free to type a lowercase 
T on your own command line if you 
would like. Remember these points and 
you should get along with the OS-9 asm 
command. Always ask for at least 16K 
of memory when you run the assembler 
unless you are not assembling the 05- 
3Def s file with your program. Always 
put the □ for object code parameter on 
your command line if you want a file 
you can run later. And finally, always 
put the 1 for listing on the command 
line if you want asm to generate a listing 
you can study. 

Looking Inside 

Now that you know how to call asm 
from the OS-9 command line, let's look 



* Insert lbra to patch: 

L ioman 
a .4-4BE 
= 17 
=£2 
= 4F 

* Now add the patch: 

L ioman 

. .+710 

= 3D 

= B7 

=FF 

=D8 

=AD 

=8B 

=B7 

=FF 

=D9 

= 39 

* Plus new crc: 



inside a short sample program. Since we 
still need a program to turn off drive 
/d0 in a system without a device des- 
criptor by that name we'll tackle that 
problem. 

Listing 1, driveof f, is a simple OS- 
9 assembly language program. In fact, 
this program only does one thing. It 
writes a zero to the location $FF40 in 
your Color Computer. This is the ad- 
dress of the multipack interface where 
you plug in your disk controller. 

We picked this very short program so 
you would have a model or "shell" you 
can use to build your own programs. 
You will need all of the parts we have 
included in our listing in every OS-9 
assembly language program you write. 
Since our program was designed to give 
you a model we have used generic 
names that you can use in any program. 
Listing 2 is how our program looked 
after we ran it through asm. 

The first column of numbers you see 
in the assembled listing are merely line 
numbers. These line numbers are used 
in error messages and can help you spot 
a syntactical problem in your code. The 
next column shows the offset of the 
code generated by each line in your 
program within the actual module 
generated by the assembler. For exam- 
ple, if you use the dump utility to dump 
the object code file you generated, you 
would find the d in d0of f represented 
as 44 Hex, exactly 13 or D in Hex 
— bytes from the start of your file. If 
you loaded the file driveof f and used 
debug to examine the module d0of f in 
memory you would also find the D at 
the same offset. 

The next column of Hex code dis- 
played in the assembled listing shows 
the actual 6809 object code, in Hex, that 



asm generated for you. Moving to the 
right, youH experience deja vu. This 
column contains the labels you typed in 
the very first column of your original 
source code. Next, you see a column 
containing the operators or pseudo- 
operators you typed followed by a 
column containing the operands you 
entered. Asm has put your comments in 
another neat column. 

We'll switch our orientation now 
from columns to rows. Notice the dif- 
ference between the first three rows of 
our source code listing and the first two 
lines of the assembled listing. The 
assembler has left out the line use /d0/ 
def s/os9def s. It did this because the 
first line in the file DSSDefs contains 
□pt -1 which turns off the listing. It 
isn't turned on again until after the 
entire 059Defs file is assembled. For 
this reason you may want to insert a 
comment line in your own source code 
to remind yourself what you wrote 
there. 

The conditional statement i fpl or "if 
pass one" lets the assembler read the 
□59Defs file on its first pass but causes 
it to skip it on the second pass. Once the 
assembler has recorded the information 
in the DSSDefs file in its symbol table, 
it doesn't need to see it again. Note here 
that if you are using asm you must 
always have the DEF5 directory availa- 
ble on drive /d0. And, the file 059Def s 
must be stored in that directory. 

The next line of our program is the 
one that creates the standard OS-9 
module header. You will see this same 
line, or something very similar, in 
almost every OS-9 assembly language 
program. 

If you use the OS-9 dump utility to 
look at the object code in d0of f after 



= 7£J 

-DF 
= FF 

save /d0/ioman . tmp ioman 

* Now ident ioman to see if it is a good module. 

* If so skip the verify step and os9gen a new boot file. 

verify u </d < 0/ioman . tmp >/d£J/ ioman . new 
del /d^/ ioman . tmp 
attr ioman. new e pe 

* Now os9gen a new boot file using ioman. new in place of the original. 

* Reboot and try some disk I/O fuctions. If every thing is working fine then 

* you are running at 2 MHz except for direct driver calls. IRQ driver code 

* stays at 2MHz in this version. 



200 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



you assemble it, you will quickly see 
what the mod statement does for you. 

The first two bytes in your object 
code file will be 87 CD Hex. In fact, you 
will find that they are the first two bytes 
of every OS-9 memory module. The mod 
operator puts them in each module for 
you. 

The next two bytes are 003C. Now 
look at the offset in the second column 
of your assembled listing. That's inter- 
esting! The offset at the label named 
1 eng th is 003C also. Now look at name. 
The listing says it is at an offset of 000D. 
What value do you see in the listing you 
"dumped" on your screen? I'll bet it's 
000D. The same pattern should hold 
true for the labels named start and 
datasize. 

Asm finds the value of prgrm, obj ct 
and reent in the D59Defs file you 



called in with the use statement in the 
second line of your source code. If you 
look at the dump of d0of f , you will see 
that prgrm + objct is 11 Hex and 
reent+1 is 81 Hex. This means that 
prgrm has a value of 10 Hex and obj ct 
has a value of 01 Hex. Likewise, reent 
must have a value of 80 hex. List out 
the D59Defs file and see if this is true. 
You see, there really is a very logical 
design behind OS-9. That's why it's so 
effective. 

Notice that on every OS-9 assembly 
language program you write you will 
need to reserve at least 200 bytes of 
memory for use by the stack. This is in 
addition to the memory you need for 
your own program. The program 
driveoff did not require any data 
memory. While you're looking at that 
part of the listing however, note that the 



assembler has printed a D adjacent to 
the part of the listing that applies to data 
storage. 

The W flag you see in that same 
column was put there to warn you that 
you directly addressed a fixed point in 
memory in that line of the code. This 
practice is taboo in OS-9 programming. 
However, we got away with it here 
because we are writing to a fixed hard- 
ware memory location that never 
changes. 

The f cs operator generates a string 
of characters in memory. The last byte 
of that string has its eighth bit set. It is 
standard practice to put the edition 
number immediately following the 
name. The character string generated by 
the fee operator doesn't do anything 
other than identify the source of the 
program in the object code file. 



Listing 4: terminal -asm 
nam Terminal 

ttl Dumb terminal program 
ifpl 

use /h0/def s/def sf ile 
endc 

mod Size, Name , Prgrm+Objct, Reent+1 , Start , MemSize 

***************************************** 
* 

* A very fast dumb terminal capable of 

* running 2 400 baud rather effeciently 

* under OS-9 vr. 02.00.00 on AciaPak. 

* Some trickery was needed in order to 

* acheive this high speed, such as 

* having AciaPak send a signal on every 

* character sent, reading and writing 

* an entire buffer at once, and the 

* super high speed poke. This may not 

* work on all CoCo ' s but it works great 

* on my F board, mainly because we are 

* constantly accessing memory which 

* keeps it refreshed. If any sleep were 

* performed the contents of memory 

* would be lost. Designed mainly for the 

* newer CoCo 3 which is highly capable 

* of running in the high speed mode but 

* may also work on others but there is 

* no guarantee made. Use control Z to 

* exit. The command line should look 

* like 'Terminal /T2 ' . . . 
* 

Name fes /Terminal/ 
feb 1 



CommPath rmb 1 
ParamPtr rmo 2 
Buffer rmb 256 
CommOpt rmb 32 



Path number for the 
Parameter pointer 
Temporary buffer 
Modem options 



modem 



CommSave rmb 32 Saved copy 
TermOpt rmb 32 Terminal options 
TermSave rmb 3 2 Saved copy 
Stack rmb 10*1024 A HUGE stack just 
MemSize equ . 



in case 



Trap bsr ChekComm Check modem for data 
rti 



Start sta $ffd9 Set super high speed 
stx ParamPtr Store parameter pointer 

Ida #%00000011 * — wr 

os9 I$Open 
lbcs ErrExit 

sta CommPath Store path for /t2 

leax Trap, per Get address of intercept routine 

os9 F$Icppt Set it in OS9's tables 

Ida CommPath 

ldb #SS.Opt 

leax CommOpt, u 
os9 I$GetStt 
leax CommSave, u 
os9 I$GetStt 
Ida #1 

leax TermOpt, u 
os9 I$GetStt 
leax TermSave, u 
os9 I$GetStt 
lbsr Setup 
Ida CommPath 

**************************************** 
* 

* Tell AciaPak to send us a signal to 

* let us know when data is ready for 

* us to pick up with the Read call. 
* 

ldb #SS.SSig 

ldx #$0010 

os9 I$SetStt 

**************************************** 
* 

* Main loop: Poll the keyboard and 

* the modem. We do this in spite of the 

* intercept routine also polling the 

* modem to obtain our quick speed and 

* there appears to be occassions when 

* AciaPak does not send the signal. We 

* use this routine to again tell AciaPak 

* that we need the signal, keeping 

* everything in sync. 
* 

Loop bsr ChekTerm 
bsr ChekComm 
bra Loop 

***************************************** 
* 

* Poll the keyboard and write any data found 

* to the modem. 
* 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 201 



When you run the program d0of f, 
OS-9 executes the code beginning at the 
label start. The emod operator tells 
asm that it has reached the end of an 
OS-9 module. The next line of code 
generates the length of the module for 
use by the mod operator above. 

Let OS-9 Do It for You 

The beauty of programming in as- 
sembly language using a powerful op- 
eratingsystem like OS-9comes from the 
fact that the operating system itself 
gives you a rich assortment of system 
calls that do all the nasty little program- 
ming jobs for you. All you have to do 
is set up the registers and use the OS- 
9 pseudo-operator to tell asm to let the 
system do it. 

For example, we could use the follow- 
ing sequence of code to print the KISS- 



able 05-9 string in our program. First, 
we would need to put a label in front 
of the string, like this: 

string fee /From KISSable 05-9, 
April 1997/ 

Then, we could generate the following 
code. 

Idy H30 
Ida ttl 
os9 I$ur i te 
bes error 

We have loaded the 6809's Y register 
with the length of our string, loaded the 
A register with the number of OS-9's 
standard output path and called the 
I$uri te I/O system call. 



Don't Mix Systems 

A letter from Bill Burchell of Mis- 
sion, British Columbia, encouraged me 
to remind you of a warning we had 
published earlier in the year. Do not mix 
different versions of your OS-9 system 
disk and the utilities that come with 
them. You can wind up causing strange 
problems that will leave you scratching 
your head until you're bald. 

Burchell suggested that you can run 
OS-9 Version 1.00.00 on the CoCo 3 by 
booting first with Deskmate, exiting to 
the OS-9 shell and then changing disks. 
You can hobble along doing this if your 
local Radio Shack doesn't have the 
Version 2.00.00 upgrade in stock, but I 
wouldn't run that way too long. There 
are hundreds of subtle changes under 
the surface waiting to jump out at you 
in the form of weird errors that you'll 



ChekTerm clra 


leax Buffer, u 


ldb #SS. Ready 


os9 I$Write 


os9 ISGetStt 


rts 


bes TermRts 




ldv a i 


Setup leax CommOpt,u 


1 pay Rll"F"P^T~ 11 

XCu A D Ul LCI / \JL 


clr 4,x 




clr 5,x 


Ida Rn ffoy 


clr 6,x 


ctc\ na H 1 a 

UUl^Ja |f y JL CI 


clr 11, x 


1 hon Pyi t" 
XJJfclLJ LAIL 


clr 12, x 


her Wri t-PoTrnn 

Uul VM L X w 111 111 


clr 13.x 


1 CL 111 A La L V»a 


clr 14,x 




clr 15 , x 


**************************************** 


clr 1 6 , x 


•ft 


clr 17 . x 


•k Tho f i •v-cf +"Viinrf Tiio H <*■» is +* o rol 1 A /— • t ^ 

" 1 lie LXL.au L.I1XI lV-j WCJ UU IS UVJ L, CJ JL JL rt v— X CL 


elf 18 x 


" not. uO scilU Ullti oXvjndX UU A.ccp UULocIL 


Ida CommPath 

lUu linn ^ u uii 


* trom wrapping in nere trom tne mtercepc 


ldb £SS Oot 


* routine to pick up the same data and 


os9 I$SetStt 


* preventing the havoc from wreaking. 


leax TermOpt,u 


* Next, we check to see how many characters 


clr 4,x 


* are waiting in the buffer. We then read 


clr 5,x 


* the entire buffer in one fell swoop, 


clr 6,x 


* put the whole mess out to the terminal 


clr 11, x 


* (/term) and then tell Acia to turn on 


clr 12, x 


* the signalling once more. 


clr 13, x 


* 


clr 14, x 


ChekComm Ida CommPath 


clr 15, x 


ldb #SS.Relea Turn off signalling 


clr 16, x 


os9 I$SetStt 


clr 17 ,x 


Ida CommPath 


clr 18,x 


ldb #SS. Ready How many characters waiting? 


Ida #1 


os9 I$GetStt 


ldb #SS.Opt 


bes CommRts None, so return 


os9 I$SetStt 


clra Clear out the high bit 


rts 


tfr d,y Put waiting buffer length in Y 




Ida CommPath 


Exit clrb Clear error 


leax Buffer, u 


ErrExit pshs b,cc Save error status 


os9 I$Read Read the ENTIRE buffer 


leax CommSave,u Restore modem options 


bsr WritTerm Go write the whole mess 


Ida CommPath 


Ida CommPath 


ldb #SS.Opt 


ldb #SS.SSig Turn signalling back on 


os9 I$SetStt 


ldx #$J3J31J3 


leax TermSave,u Restore /term options 


os9 I$SetStt 


clra 


CommRts rts Return to whence we came 


ldb #SS.Opt 




os9 I$SetStt 


WritTerm Ida #1 Stdout 


sta $ffd8 Back to normal speed 


leax Buffer, u 


puis b,cc Restore error status 


os9 I$Write 


os9 F$Exit Back to OS-9 


rts 






emod 


WritComm Ida CommPath 


Size equ * 


Idy #1 


end 



202 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



New Low Price!! 



i SAVE 
I $500.00!! 

Now includes 
the 'C compiler! 





The QT Plus 



Save $500 on the QT Plus and get the 'C 
compiler too! Now only $2995.00 

The famous QT Plus is now more affordable 
than ever. Move up to the Professional version 
of OS9/6800 with the new QT Plus . 

The QT Plus includes a 10 Mhz 68000 with 
512K RAM, a 20 megabyte hard disk with a 
720K floppy, 4 serial ports and 2 parallel ports. 
The QT Plus is expandable to 1024K RAM, 8 
serial ports and 3 parallel ports within the 
cabinet. The software is the NEW Professional 
Version of OS9/68K with more powerful 
utilities, the uMacs screen editor and the 
languages Basic09 and the 'C compiler. In 
addition the NEW UniStar word processor 
(WordStar compatible) and the famous 
DYNACALC spreadsheet, QCom communi- 
cations and 'fbu' floppy backup packages are 
also included in the remarkably low price. 



a full 68000 based QT Plus. The best part is 
that there is no loss when you do so. Contact us 
for more detailed information and watch next 
month for our ad for The QT CoCo. 

The QT 20x 

The QT 20x is our latest Super Microcomputer 
based on a 12.5 Mhz 68020 32 bit processor 
with 1/2 to 14 1/2 megabytes of RAM and 2 to 
30 serial ports/users. Other features include 
DMA, calendar clock with battery, full SCSI 
interface and much more. The software is the 
same as the QT Plus with the addition of 
Networking included! 

The QT 20x with 512K RAM 2 serial ports a 20 
meg hard drive and 720K floppy is only 
$3695.00. 2 Meg/4 serial port expansion 
boards are only $800 each when ordered with the 
system. Call for other options and full specs. 



The QT CoCo 



HOT News for CoCo Users 

The QT CoCo is a QT Plus without the 68000 
computer insides. This way you can use the QTs 
hard and floppy drive as a drive subsystem for 
your CoCo 1/2 or 3 until you want to upgrade to 



Software List 

Sculptor OS9/68K 995.00 

Sculptor CoCo LevII 595.00 
*QT owners only 



Our Price 

695.00* 
495.00 




FRANK HOGG 
LABORATORY 



Est. 
1976 



770 James St., Syracuse, NY 13203 Telex 646740 

315/474-7856 



Listing 5: md i r . c 



/* prints an extended module directory in plain english */ 
/* copyright (c) 1986 by Gregory A. Law */ 
# include <stdio.h> 
# include <ctype.h> 
^include <time.h> 



main() 
( 



unsigned *mod_ptr = 0x0026; 


/* 


pointer to module directory 


V 


unsigned *mod_end = 0x0028; 


/* 


pointer to last module entry 


V 


struct { 


/* 


module directory pointer 


*/ 


unsigned mod_addr ; 


/* 


module address 


V 


char link; 


/* 


module link count 


V 


char dummy; 


/* 


this byte apparantly unused 


*/ 


) *mod_dir - *mod_ptr; 








struct sgtbuf time; 








getime ( &time) ; 


/* 


Get the system date and time 


V 



printf (" Module directory at %02d : %02d : %02d\n\n" , 

time.t_hour/ time . t_minute, time. t_second) ; 
printf ("Addr Size Owner Type Language Revs Ed # Link Module na 



while(mod_dir .mod_addr < *mod_end) ( 
if (mod dir->mod addr !« 0) ( 



/* Range for module dir */ 
/* Is module stil there? */ 



printf ("%4X mod_dir->mod_addr) ; /* module address 
get_inf o (mod_dir->mod_addr, mod_dir->mod_addr, 
mod_dir->link, mod_dir->dummy) ; 



J 

mod dir++; 



/* Increment pointer to structure */ 



J 

/* This routine does the blunt of the work. It uses the pointers created 
/* the main routine to pull out the information in the module header. It 
/* then calculates the physical address of the module name and passes it 
/* to another routine for fetching. 



get_info (module, address, link, ed_num) 
unsigned *module; 
unsigned address ; 
char link; 
char ed_num ; 

( 



/* Pointer to the module header 

/* Address of the module header 

/* Value of the link count 

/* Value of the unused byte 



unsigned attr, revs ; 

unsigned type, lang; 

int dummy ; 

unsigned offset; 

dummy = *module++ ; 

printf ("%4X %5d ", *module++, ed_num) ; /* mod size & owner 



offset = *module++; 

type = "module & jbtf. 000 ? 

lang = "module & 0x0 f 00; 

attr = "module & 0x00 f0; 
attr /= 0x10; 

revs = "module & 0x00,0 f; 

switch (type) { 



/* Get the offset to the name 

/* Get the module type code 

/* Get the language code 

/* Get the attributes byte 

/* Make the attributes $0P - $0f 

/* Now get the revision count 



/* Figure out the module type 



case 


0x1000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 

i 


"Program") ; 




case 


0x2000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 


"Subroutine") ; 




case 


0x3000: 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 


"Multi-module") 


• 


case 


0x4000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 


"Data module" ) ; 




case 


0XC000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 


"System module" 


) ; 


case 


0xd000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 


"File manager") 


• 


case 


0xe000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


14s 


ii 


"Device driver" 


); 


case 


0xf000 : 


printf ("%- 
break; 


>14s 


ii 


"Descriptor") ; 




default: 


printf ("%- 


■14s 


ii 


"User defined' 1 , 


type) ; 



} 



switch (lang) ( 



case 


0x0000 : 


printf ("% 
break; 


-lis 


ii 


"Data") ; 


case 


0X0100 : 


printf ("% 
break; 


-lis 


ii 


"6809 Object") 


case 


0x0200 : 


printf ("% 
break ; 


-lis 


ii 


"Basic09") ; 


case 


0x0300 : 


printf ("% 
break; 


-lis 


ii 


"Pascal") ; 


case 


0x0400 : 


printf ("% 
break; 


-lis 


ii 


"C I-code") ; 



/* Figure out what language 



V 
*/ 
*/ 
V 

*/ 
V 

*/ 
*/ 



*/ 

V 

*/ 

V 
V 

*/ 
*/ 



seldom be able to duplicate and never 
be able to explain in great enough detail 
to get help. 

Everyone Loves OS-9 

ARK, Inc., 6-2, Hyakunincho 2- 
Chome, Silver Plaza Okubo DAI2 
#303, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo 160 Japan, 
sent me a Christmas card again this 
year. The address is new, as is the slick 
stick-on label they sent us. 




Ark, Inc., has another sticker that 
says "I Love OS-9 68000 ®." Maybe 
we'll see that one on a CoCo someday! 

Rich Perry at Speech Systems, 38 
West 255 Deerpath Road, Batavia, IL 
60501, phone 312-879-6880, must be 
thinking about OS-9 now. We received 
an advertising flyer from him last week 
that featured a Turbo H ard Disk f or the 
serious OS-9 user. A half-height 10- 
megabyte unit is $599.95. You can have 
20 megabytes for $699.95. The flyer said 
to order OS-9 Level I or II for your 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Perry also featured a 
Turbo RAM for the CoCo 3. "Ideal for 
OS-9 Level II," it reads. Good things are 
on the horizon. 

April Listings 

We have a gold mine for you this 

month. Listings in Assembly Language, 

BASIC09 and C plus a special CoCo 3 

procedure file take the spotlight. They 

come from Steve Croom, Dennis Duke 

and Greg Law 

Here's a patch from Steve Croom 

that will let you modify the IDMan 
module in OS-9 Level I, Version 2.00.00 
for use on the CoCo 3. When you use 
it, your Color Computer and multipack 
interface will run smoothly at 2 MHz. 
When one of your programs makes an 
I/O call, this patch will cause OS-9 to 
slow down your system clock to .89 
MHz. As soon as the call is completed, 
it will switch back to 1.8 MHz. 

Terminal is a dumb terminal that 
can run up to 2400 baud effectively. It 
is designed mainly for the CoCo 3 and 
will work only with Version 2.00.00 and 
the AciaPak. The ACIA driver must 
support the SS.SSig Set Status Call. It 
works great with an 80-column card but 



204 THE RAINBOW April 1987 



may cause some garbage to be printed 
on your screen if you run it with C032 
on a CoCo 1 or 2. 

We also have mdir, a utility you can 
read in English. And, its output is 
pleasing to the eye. Tip your hat to Greg 
Law for this C listing. 

How many times have you down- 
loaded a file with the Deskmate, or 
other terminal program, only to wind 
up with an extra line feed at the begin- 
ning of every line. Worry no more! 
Strip. c will remove them for you. You 
can edit them out by hand with your 
editor, but it's a whole lot easier this 
way. 

OS-9 Users Group President Resigns 

We have learned that OS-9 Users 
Group President Brian Lantz has re- 
signed for personal reasons. Lantz is a 
youth minister at his church and has 
been putting in upwards of 60 hours a 
week there each week. It is easy to 
understand why he couldn't keep up 
with a tough schedule like that and 
manage a national users group too. 

Because of the long hours and hard 
work performed by the likes of Brian 
Capouch, George Dorner, Dave Ka- 
leita, Carl Kreider, Bruce Warner, Joe 
Debuc and Steve Odneall — to name 
just a few — as well as a strong personal 
involvement with the growth of the 
group during ijiy two years as president, 
I am sorry to report that many mail and 
other problems have created havoc for 
the OS-9 Users Group during the past 
seven or eight months. Vice President 
Bill Turner is digging in. He has a plan. 
The board of directors has been called 
to help for the first time in a year. 
Progress has been made on several 
fronts. Hopefully, recovery will be 
forthcoming soon. I have been investi- 
gating the problems for several weeks 
and have offered my help and several 
suggestions to Turner. I am studying his 
plan and will have further details next 
month. 

Next Month 

We've accumulated a number of ex- 
cellent tips from several sources for next 
month's column. Frank Malaney, the 
author of PrintForm, has offered some 
tips to help you use his shareware 
program we published in 1986 and we 
hope to have some Level II information 
for you by then. We'll cross our fingers 
again. In the meantime we have a few 
more utility programs from our readers 
to share with you. Keep 'em coming! 
Until May, enjoy. □ 



) 



case 0x0500: printf ("%-lls "Cobol") ; 

break; 

case 0x0600: printf ("%-lls », "Fortran") ; 

break; 

default: printf ("%-lls » # "Reserved" , lang) ; 



/ 



) 



printf("%4d %4d %4X » , revs, attr, link); */ 

address -*-= offset; /* Use the module address and */ 

get_name (revs , attr, link, address); /* calculate the physical address */ 



get_name ( revs , attr, link, name_ptr) 
char revs, attr, link; 
char *name_ptr; 

( 

char name [ 30 ] ; 
int i - 0 ; 
char c ; 

do { 

name[i++] = c = *name_ptr++; 
} while (isprint(c) ) ; 
attr = *name_ptr; 
name( — i) - narae[i] & 0x7 t ; 
name['+i] = 1 \0 1 ; 
printf("%4d %4d %4d " 

printf ( "%s\n" , name); 



/* Copy the char into storage 
/* Repeat until > $7F (high bit) 
/* Get edition byte 
/* Strip off the high bit 
/* Append NULL to the end 
revs, attr, link) ; 



V 

*/ 

V 
V 

V 



Listing 6: strip.c 



char modid[] = " @ (£) strip . c 



/* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

V 



OS-9 utility 



1.2" ; 

strio 



by Dennis J. Duke 
Bessemer, Al. 
04 November 8 6 

Strip off unnecessary leading characters (new lines) created by the 
Desk-Mate terminal program when downloading a file. 



# include 



<stdio . h> 



FILE 



*fopen(), *fpin, *fpout; 



main (argc, argv) 
int argc; 
char *argv[ ] ; 

( 

int c ; 

/* Check to make sure the utility was called properly */ 

if (argc != 3) ( 

fprintf (stderr, "usage: %s infile outfile\n", argv[0]); 
exit (0) ; 

) 

/* Make sure the input file exists */ 

if ((fpin = fopen (argv[l] , "r")) == NULL) { 

fprintf (stderr, "%s: can't open input %s\n", argv[0], argv[l]); 
exit(0) ; 

} 

/* Make sure the output file can be created */ 

if ((fpout = fopen (argv[2], "w")) == NULL) { 

fprintf (stderr, "%s: can't open output %s\n", argv[0] , argv[2]); 
exit(0) ; 

) 

/* Read the input file */ 

while ((c = getc(fpin)) != EOF) { 

/* If the character is a "new line", skip it */ 
if (c == 10) 
continue ; 



/* Otherwise, output it */ 
putc (c, fpout) ; 



) 



/* Close the input and output files */ 

f close ( fpin) ; 
fclose (fpout) ; 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 205 




■HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHI MMM tUlrJT . *¥¥¥■ 

JOMMMgOOOOOOOOf emmmm fffffft 30000 

■ I INI 

s&ff ™» ffis •si U jB H jB 'ifc «r 88} B 88 

iL ^ j=% ■« im i 1 r i 






Ra m 



RES 




The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have 
other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you 
patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 
Birmingham 
Brewton 
Florence 
Greenvle 
Madison 
Montgomery 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix 
Sierra Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Rsyefteville 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywood 

Lompoc 
Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

COLORADO 

Westminster 

DELAWARE 

Middietown 

MMord 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 
Boca Raton 
Cocoa 
Davie 
Deltona 
Ft. Lauderdale 

Jacksonville 



North Miomi 

Beach 
Orlando 
Panama City 
PensacoSa 
Pinellas Park 
Sarasota 
Starke 

Tallahassee 

Tampa 

Tltusvllle 

GEOROlA 

Athens 

Bremen 

Jesup 

Marietta 

Toccoa 

IDAHO 

lewiston 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Auroro 
Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electrodes 
Madison Books 
Trade W Books 

Electronic World 

TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Books Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Software Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Stxawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
L&H Electronics Emporium 
E.D.C. Industries 
Polygon Co 
Tower Magazine 
Sawyers News, Inc. 
Computer Literacy 

Software City 

Delmar Co. 

Milford News Stand 

Normar, Inc. —The Smoke Shop 

Software, Software, Inc. 

The Open Door 

Software Pius More 

Wilson Assoc. dba Radio Shack 

Electronics Engineers 

Mike's Electronics Distributor 

The Book Nook 

Book Town 

Deano's TV 

Almar Bookstore 
Book Mania 
Boyd-Ebert Corp. 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 
Family Computers 
Record Junction, Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Anderson News Co. 
Rne Print Bookstore 
Computrac 

The Academic Resource Center. Inc. 

Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 

Radio Shack 

Act One Video 

Mail in Music Radio Shack 

Books, Etc. 

Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's & Brentono's 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. Daiton Booksellers 

N. Wabash St. 

West Jackson St, 



Chllllcothe 

Danville 

Decatur 



East Mollne 

Evanston 

Genesee 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 

Oak Brook 

Oak Park 

Paris 

Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokie 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 



Bob's In Newtown 
Bob's News Emporium 
Bob's Rogers Park 
Book Market 

East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Dlversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's & Brentono's 

Sotit h Wabash 

West Jackson 

516 N. Michigan 

835 N. Michigan 
Parkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sand mover's Bookstore 
Univ. of Chicago Bookstore 
Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Vldeomat, Inc. 
Sock Emporium 
Book Market 
Book Emporium 

K-Mart Raza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Kroch's & Brentana's 
Kroch's & Brentono's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan 'village 

Westiake Shopping Center 
Book Market 
Illinois News Service 
Kroch's & Brentono's 
Kroch's & Brentono's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town &. Country Shopping Or. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 



INDIANA 




Angola 


D& D Electronics 




Rodio Shack 


Berne 


White Cottage Electronics 


Columbus 


Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 


Garrett 


Finn News Agency, Inc. 


Greenwood 


The Computer Experience 


Indianapolis 


Bookland. Inc. 




Delmar News 




Indiana News 


Jasper 


Etex Mart 


Madison 


A/co Office Supplies 


Martinsville 


Radio Shack 


Wabash 


Mlttlng's Electronics 


IOWA 




Davenport 


Interstate Book Store 


OHumwa 


Southside Drug 


KANSAS 




Topeka 


Palmer News, Inc. 


Town Crier of Topeka. Inc. 


Wichita 


Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 




Lloyd's Radio 



KENTUCKY 

Georgetown 

Hazard 

Hopkinsvilte 

Louisville 

Paducah 

Pikevlife 



Goodwin Electronics 
Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
The Computer Store 
Radio Shack 

Ray's Furniture/ Radio Shack Dealer 



LOUISIANA 

Crowley 

Monroe 

MAINE 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Waterboro 

MARYLAND 

Silver Spring 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Fitch burg 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 
Allen Park 
Dearborn 
Durand 

Harrison 

Howell 

Lowell 

Mt. Clemens 
Muskegon 
Owosso 
Perry 

Royal Oak 
Sterling 

Heights 
Trenton 
Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 
WHlmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 

Jefferson City 
Kltksvllle 
Maberiy 
St. Louis 



MONTANA 

Butte 
Whltefish 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 

NEVADA 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Montvale 

Pennsville 

River Edge 

Rcwkaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Aiamogordo 
Albuquerque 

NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredania 
Hudson Falls 



Acadiana Newsstand 
The Book Rack 

Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 

Layhill Newsstand 



Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Comers Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 
DSL Computer Products 
Robblns Electronics 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curt's Sound & Home Arcade Center 

Michigan Radio 

The Eight Bit Comer 

C/C Computer Systems 

Perry Computers 

Software City 

Sterling Book Center 
Trentan Book Store 
Gerry's Book Co. 

Read-More News 
The Photo Shap 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Cowfey Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Front Page News 

plaza Book Store 

Consumer Electronics ofWhitefish 

Hobby Town 

Hurley Electronics 

Verham News Corp, 

Village Computer & Softwore 

Micro World 51 

Outpost Radio Shack 

Software City 

Dave's Elect, Radio Shack 

Software City 

Software Station 



New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Page One Newsstand 

Lift Bridge Book Shop. Inc. 

Cromland, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co.. Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G A West & Co. 



1 



206 THE RAINBOW April 1987 




Johnson City 
New York 



Unicorn Electronics 

Barnes 8c Nobte— Sales Annex 

CoJIseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 
Grand Central Slattoo. Track 37 
200 Park Ave. (Pan Am #1 ) 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonil Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Usercom Systems, Inc. 
Waiden Books 
World Wide Media Services 



N, White Plains 


Software City 


Pawling 


Universal Computer Service 


Rochester 


Village Green 




World Wide News 


Woodhaven 


Spectrum Projects 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Aberdeen 


King Electronics 




Radio Shock 


Cory 


News Center In Cary Village 


Charlotte 


Newsstand Inn 




Papers & Paperback 


HoMock 


Computer Plus 


Hickory 


(7 Books & Comics 


Morion 


' Boomers Rhythm Center 


OHIO 




Blanches! er 


JR Computer Control 


Canton 


Little Professor Book Center 


Chardon 


Thrasher Radio & TV 


Cincinnati 


Onsoft 


Cofombiano 


Fidelity Sound & Electronics 


Coshocton 


Utopia Software 


Dayton 


Huber Heights took & Card 




Witke News 


Falrborn 


News-Readers 


Kent 


The News Shop 


Kenton 


T W. Hogon & Associates 


Lakewood 


Lakewood International News 


Lima 


B runner News Agency 




Edu-Coterers 


Mlamlsburg 


Wilke News 


Mount Orab 


Mount Orab Radio Shock 


Rocky River 


Programs Unlimited 


Toledo 


Leo's Book fk Wine Shop 


Xenlo 


Fine Print Books 



TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllle 

Memphis 

Nashville 
Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 
Brenham 
Elgin 
Orange 

UTAH 

Murray 

VIRGINIA 

Gate 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacomo 



WEST VIRGINIA 
Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Ladysmith 
Milwaukee 



WYOMING 

Casper 



ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA; 

Kfngsford 



Anderson News Co, 
Gulid Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
First Byte Computer Co, 
Computer Center 
Software, Inc. 
Mosko's Book Store 
Deiker Electronics 
Cox Electronics Radio Shack 

Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 
Northway Books & News 

Deseret Book 

Electronics Morketlng 
i-O Computers 
Software City 

Adams News Co.. inc. 
B & ! Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News & Hobby 

Electronics, Etc. 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid ft 

Harvey Schwortz Bookshop 

Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 

The Computer Store 



Inkxmatlca Y Telecomunlcaclones 



Paris Radio Electronics 



Stettler Stettler Radio Shack 

Stralhmore Wheatland Electronics 

Taber Pynewood Sight & Sound 

Westlock West lock Stereo 

Welaskiwin Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



OKLAHOMA 




CANADA: 




Oklahoma 




ALBERTA 




City 


Merit Micro Software 


Banff 


Banff Radio Shack 


Taklequah 


Thames Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 


Blalrmore 


L & K Sports & Music 


Tulsa 


Steve's Book Store 


Bonnyvllle 


Poul Tercler 


OREGON 

Portlond 


Fifth Ave, News 


Brooks 
Calgary 


Double "0" AS.C. Radio Shock 
Billy's News 


Claresholm 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


PENNSYLVANIA 




Drayton Valley 


Langard Electronics 


Allison Park 


Software City 


Edmonton 


CMD Micro 


Altoona 


Newborn Enterprises 




Kelly Software Distributors 


Brookville 


Larry's Stereo Shop 


Edson 


Radio Shack 


Malvern 


Personal Software 


Folrvlew 


D.N.R. Furniture & TV 


Philadelphia 


City Software Center 
Newsy 


Fox Creek 


Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Radio Shack 


Phoenixville 


Stevens Radio Shack 


Ft. Saskatche- 




Pittsburgh 


Ail-Pro Souveniers 


wan 


Ft. Moll Radio Shack, ABC 


Pleasant Hills 


Pitt Computer & Software 


Grande 




Temple 


Software Corner 


Cache 


The Stereo Hut 


Wind Gap 


Micro World 


Grande 




York 


The Computer Center of York 


Centre 


The Book Nook 


RHODE ISLAND 
Warwick 


Software 'Connection 


Hinton 

Innlsfail 

Leduc 


Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Lelhbrldge 


Datatron 


Charleston Hts. 


Software Hous, Ire 


Lloydminster 


Lloyd Radio Shack 


Gaffney 


Gaffney Book Store 


Okotoks 


Okotoks Radio Shack 


Greenvtlie 


Palmetto News Co. 


Peace River 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Spartanburg 


Software CPy 




Tavener Software 


Union 


Fleming's Electronics 


St. Paul 


Walter's Electronics 



Burnaby 
Bums Lake 
Campbeli 

River 
Chilllwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langiey 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Porksville 
Penficlon 

Salmon Arm 
Sidney 
Smlihers 
Squamish 
100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 
Lundar 
Morden 
The Pos 
Selkirk 



Compurif 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langiey Radio Shack 
Mlaowest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
ParksvilleTV 
0J.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Matrix Computing 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LA Wiebr Ltd. 
Goranson Elec 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd, 



NEW BRUNSWICK 

Mono ton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carfoonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsvllle 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Asslnlbola 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nlplwan 
Reglna 

Saskatoon 
SheSfbroake 
Tisdafe 
Unity 

YUKON 
Whltehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec. 



Seaport ESec. 
Slade Realties 



Atlantic News 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Huntsvllle Elec. 

Oonny "8" 

T.M. Computers 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telsfar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Piace 
Cornerstone Sound 
Reglna CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



April 1987 THE RAINBOW 207 



A D VER TISER INDEX 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when 
you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Bytes Bits & Chips 146 

Canyon County Devices 89 

Cer-Comp 39 

Challenger 135 

Cinsoft 33 

CNR Engineering 85 

Cognitec 61 

Colorware 22, 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Friends 16 

Computer Island 133 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 50, 51 

C. R.C. Computers 179, BC 

D. P. Johnson 193 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Derringer Software. . .65, 93, 141 

Diecom IFC 

Delphi 122, 123 

Duck Productions 87 

F.M. Technology 199 

Fazer Electronics 33 

Federal Hill Software 31 

Floppy Source, The 104 

Gimmesoft 1 45 

Hard Drive Specialists 153 



Hawkes Research Services . . .58 



Hemphill Electronics 15 

HJL div. of Touchstone 

Technology, Inc 25 

Hogg, Frank Laboratories . . . 203 

Howard Medical 34, 210 

Inventive Solutions 177 

J & M Systems 126, 139 

J & R Electronics 134 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 181 

Metric Industries 13 

Micro Works, The 171 

Microcom Software 9, 11 

Microtech Consultants 

Inc 81 

MicroWorld 103 

Moreton Bay 163 

Novasoft 55 

NRI Schools , 77 

Other Guys Software, The 57 

Owl-Ware 96, 97 

Perry Computers 187 

Preble's Programs, Dr IBC 

Prickly-Pear Software 159 

PXE Computing 7 

Radio Shack 113, 115 

Rainbow Adventure 

Book III 191 

Rainbow Bookshelf 209 



Rainbow Gift Subscription ... 17 
Rainbow Guide To OS-9 ....100 



Rainbow On Disk 168 

Rainbow On Tape 110 

R AINBO Wfest 106, 107 

RAINBOWfest Tape 48 

Saguaro 111 

Seca 191 

Selected Software 169 

Software House, The 143 

Soft Sector 49 

Spectogram 195 

Spectrosystems 155 

Spectrum Projects 

Inc 67, 69, 70 

Speech Systems 

41, 42, 43, 44, 45 

Sugar Software 165 

Sunrise Software 195 

T & D Software 63 

Tepco 92 

Tom Mix Software 54 

True Data Products 150, 151 

Woodstown Electronics 144 

Zebra Systems 119 




Call: 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Marian Nolan Carpenter 

Advertising Representative 

P.O. Box 725 

516-189th St Court East 

Spanaway, WA 98387 

(206) 847-9901 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



208 



THE RAINBOW April 1987 



Recommended Reading for Your CoCofrom . . . 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 






llll II MM.uW in m iK 
• i| \|>\ I \TI III s 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

The book that demystifies the state-of-the-art operating system for 
the Tandy Color Computer. Authors Dale L. Puckett and PeterDibble 
show you how to take advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multi- 
user features, and the capability of redirecting input and output 
commands at will. An easy-to-read ( step-by-step guide packed with 
hints and tips, tutorials and free software in the form of program 
listings. 

Book $19.95 

Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

This sequel features 24 of the most challenging Adventure games 
ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find 
a hidden fortune, or win the heart of a beautiful and mysterious 
princess. Experience the thrills and chills of the most rugged 
Adventurer without ever leaving yourseat.fi/ng Quest, Secret Agent 
Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos, island and more! 

Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 




The Rainbow Book of Simulations 



Features 20 award-winning entries from the rainbow's first 
Simulation programming competition. You are the Commander-in- 
Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, an air traffic 
controller at one of the nation's busiest airports, the owner of your 
own software business, a civil defense coordinator in charge of 
saving Rainbow City from a raging flood, a scientist conducting 
experiments on Mars . . . Your wits are on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winning programsfromoursecond Simulation contest. Fly through the dense African 
jungle as a bush pilot, bull your way down Wall Street, lead the Rainbow City bomb squad, 
or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



Coming Soon: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 



I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk $10.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 (iwoitoniy) $19.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Oisk Package (2disks) $31 .00 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) $ 3.50 Ji^&> 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) $ 3,50 j 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13.95 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape $13.95 

Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 

Oulside U.S., add $4.00 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 




VISA 



1 



Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Please noie: The tapes and disks ottered by The Rainbow Bookshelf ire noi stand-alone product*. That it. they are intended to be ah adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or tf is* 
you will Mill need the appropriate book. OS-9» is a registered tiademort of iho Mlc/oware Systems Co/poraUon. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 



Save $100 on Magnavox Monitor: 
Magnavox CM8505 RGB Analog only $198!! 



MONITORS 




122A Zenith 12" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 dots resolu- 
tion at 15MHz as the 123A and a 90-day 
warranty valid at 1200 locations. 

(«7 shipping) $88 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list $499 

SAVE 
$100 

$298 

+ $14 Shipping 
CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
$29.95 w/o monitor. 



123A 12" 

This 12" green screen high resolution 
monitor offers 80 column capability, 
Zenith quality and a 30-day warranty 
valid at any of Zenith's 1200 locations. 

Retail $149 50 
Our price W ■ ■ 

($7 shipping) REPACK 

All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits all color computers 



$24.45 



( s 2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome o r color, fits all 
color computers 

($2 shipping) 



$39. 45 




MAGNAVOX 

CM 8505 has analog 

RGB and TTL RGB and composite 
color input. Built in speaker. 13" 
screen with 390 dots x 240 
resolution in RGB mode. Plus 1 
year parts & labor warranty. 



reg. list $299 

SAVE 
$100 



$198 

+ $14 Shipping 




0 +. Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for onlv 



$178*5 

(*5 shipping) 
Add S34 for a Disto DC-3. 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K 




GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility, if you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 states. 
APO and Canada order slightly higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 



p|S*> 



includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. 

$98 

$2 shipping on all DiSTO products 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM$^ 25 

DC512 512K RAM Board with 
software $165 

DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port $40 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips 



2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

Hb^Hfi $85 ° "<* 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Dlsto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol / BAS™ 

# (82 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
state and federal calculation 

• Custom code for every state 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



Payrol / BAS™ 
30 Day Trial 

$79.95 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP writer terminal, data 
base, call and disk zap which can 
fix a diskette that is giving I/O 



errors 



$125 

(*2 shipping) 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots in- 
side the computer and can be 
populated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$49.50 

PC Memory board with 256K*99 
PC Memory board with 512K $118 

Software spooler and RAM disk 
for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 

$1 9.45 

(S2 shipping on Memory 
products) 



64-2 for CoCo 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no trace cuts. 

(^2 shipping) $24.45 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions. Remove old chips 
and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace 
cuts. 

(*2 shipping) 28.45 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor leads must be 
cut. 

(*2 shipping) $24.45 

64-22 Two chip set for 26-3134A 
and B, 26-3136A and B. Koren Col- 
or Computers require 1 solder 
point. 

($2 shipping) 28.45 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 

ORDERS INQUIRIES ANO ORDER STATUS 

=(800) 443-1444 =(312) 278-1440 = 




Showroom Houn; 
8:00 - > 00 Mon. - fri. 
70:00 - 3:00 SjI. 



WE ACCEPT; VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

CO D OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 



Dr. Preble's Programs 

Striking A Blow For 




". - , Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better . . . 

— Albert Camus 



91 



*** Mental Freedom 

for CoCo 1, 2 and 3! 



A Thought-Controlled Video Challenge 

We call it The Preble Thoughtware. 

DOES GREEN BLOOD flow in your veins like Mr. Spock? Is your mind well 
ordered? Or is your mind a mass of conflicting emotions like most 
humans? 

THOUGHTWARE may answer these questions and more. 

IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your very 
thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled 
graphics: levitation and materialization! 

PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — 
now! The Radio Shack Color Computer has many ad- 
vanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's 
Programs combines the advanced technology of the CoCo 
with the amazing Radio Shack BIOFEEDBACK MONITOR 
to bring you "Preble Thoughtware." 

THOUGHT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any 
video game you have ever played, Thoughtware tests your 
ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse 
circumstances. 

LIGHTNING FAST reflexes will do you no good here, unless you 

first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. 
DO YOU HAVE SELF-CONTROL? Many people can keep a 

"Poker Face" even when they are worried so that others 

may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Thoughtware 

will find out! 

AND IT TALKS. 1 Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic 
digital speech without a special speech synthesizer? And I mean really 
high quality speech! Forget the mechanical robot voice. This voice 
quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no extra 
hardware is needed for speech. None. The CoCo produces this amazing 
digital speech all by itself (with a wee bit of programming by Dr. Preble). 

THOUGHTWARE — Next time your friends ask what your computer can do, 
show them the Preble Thoughtwargj 

Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor Catalogue #63-675 

The Preble Thoughtware — TAPE $27.95 + s/h, on DISK $29.95 + s/h 





*** Basic Freedom *** 

for The Color Computer 3 
(with versions for CoCo 1 & 2) 

A Full Screen Editor for BASIC Programming 

Wecall it EDITOR 3. Chris Babcock wrote a pure, efficient Machine Language 
program to open a new dimension of ease and power for anyone typing in 
a BASIC program. 

Here are your BASIC Freedoms! 

FULL CURSOR MOVEMENT — Use the arrow keys to move anywhere on a 
screen. If you are using a Color Computer 3, then even the 40 or 80 
column screen is supported! 

INSERT, CHANGE or DELETE CHARACTERS anywhere on the 
\P screen. Simply move to what you wish to change, change 

it and continue working! 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS are OK! EDITOR 3 lets you type in 
lowercase any time or all the time. Lowercase command 
words are automatically translated to uppercase for BASIC. 
Of course, lowercase text within quotes stays lowercase. 
This is great when typing wiht the CoCo 3's 40 or 80 column 
mode with true lowercase! 
MERGE LINES within a program with just a few keystrokes! 
AUTO KEY REPEAT — Hold down any key and it will repeat. 
INVISIBLE — Once EDITOR 3 has been loaded in, it is activated 
with a single keystroke! It hides itself out of the way of other programs 
and can be turned off any any time. Pressing RESET will not hurt 
EDITOR 3! 

EASY TO USE — Installation takes seconds! Well-written goof-proof manual 
included. 

COCO 1 & 2 — Yes, even though this program was conceived for the powers 
of the new CoCo 3, we still support the previous Color Computers. They 
too, need their BASIC Freedom! 

EDITOR 3 — So easy and handy, you'll never want to run your CoCo without 
it! 

Available on DISK only for CoCo 3 @ $29.95 + s/h 

CoCo 1/2version can not support 40 or 80 column screens. CoCo 1/2 version 
is available on TAPE for $27.95 + s/h or DISK for $29.95 + s/h. 



Also Available for CoCo 1 & 2 only: 

VDOS, the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in memory! Works with or without a disk 
drive. TAPE $27.95 + s/h, DISK $29.95 + s/h 

VDUMP, for the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in a single file! $14.95 + s/h on tape. 
VPRINT, for the UnDISK: Printout UnDISK Directory! $9.95 + s/h on tape. 



Order From 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 



Check, Money Order, MasterCard, VISA or COD accepted. For Shipping to USA and 
Canada add $1.50, to other countries add $5.00. 



Technical questions answered 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 




*£JSb Po^t s *9* 



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