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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

A Matter of Principal 



Make financial projections 

Graph business trends 

See how your stocks stack up 



Also, 

CoCo 3 tips from 
Eric White 

A typing tutor from 
Leonard Hyre 

Peter Dibble on 
OS-9 Level II 




Plus, 

Solve the Barrel Puzzle 
Play Joker Poker 



Build Game Buttons for party fun 



Our Business 

and 
Finance Issue 



0 



U254"00001 



03 




More than a dozen new hardware and software reviews, 
and five quick and easy program shorties in Novices Niche 




>c L L. 1 






9H 
I t 



H>* left : Hit 
I j hi* I yft; 1 I'd 



4 



Bouncing Boulders is a new, fast paced arcade- 
style game for your Coco. As you race your man 
around the screen you try to collect enough stars 
to open the exit to the next level. You can drop 
rocks to kill aliens that follow you around the 
screen trying to catch you. But beware of the fall- 
ing and bouncing boulders as they will crush your 
man if you get trapped under one. The many dif- 
ferent screens with lots of puzzles will keep you 
playing for hours on end. 





mm. 





You've asked for it and now it's here, a wrestling 
game for your color computer. Play a single match 
or play a tag team match in this 1 to 4 player game. 
Wrestle against the computer or wrestle against 
your friend in a single or tag team match. Use pun- 
ches, kicks, body slams, back breakers and many 
other moves as you attempt to pin your opponent. 
Super graphics and realistic play action make this 
a great game for all. 

\Hu JC \ Si iuK 
REQUIRED $28.95 U.S. 

T v- E OR DISK $3{L95can. 



Travel through towns and ex- 
plore strange lands in the 
ultimate fantasy role-playing 
game for the color computer. 
As you travel the land you will 
meet different characters that 
you may convince to join you in 
your quest. During your quest 
you will learn the secrets of 

magic spells and ultimately, 
your final goal. 

Enter The Gates of Delirium 
contest! The first person to 
solve the game shall be our 
grand prize winner of a Coco 3. 
There will be 5 second prizes of 
one free game from Diecom 
Products and 5 third prizes of 
one free hat from Diecom Pro- 
ducts. 

64K ^ 

required $38.95 u.s. 

$52.95 can. 

available on disk only 



ALSO AVAILABLE 

— Paper Route, Knock Out, 
Karate, each game requiring 
64K. Tape or disk. 

$28,95 u s. 
$38.95 can. 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 

We accept: 





cheque or money order 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878 8358 
personal service 9-5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax 
C.O.D. Canada only. 
Dealer inquiries invited 
Looking for new software. 










BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 759.00 

Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 51 2K 1229.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-105 80 CPS 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel310.00 

Star LV-1210 120 CPS 199.00 

Star NX-10 120 CPS 259.00 

Star SG-15 120 CPS 410.00 
Panasonic P-1091 i 160 CPS 299.00 

Panasonic P-1092 180 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 292 200 CPS 529.00 

Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 375.00 

Epson LX-80 100 CPS 275.00 

Epson FX-85 160 CPS 419.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-7 Modem 85.00 
Radio Shack DC Modem 

Program Pac 99.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 212 179.00 

Hayes 300 Baud Modem 169.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 
BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 
TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pack Interface 89.00 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 
Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor149.00 
Goldstar Green Monitor 85.00 
Panasonic Amber Monitor w/audio99.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Mark Data Graphic Adven. 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTermbyPXEComputing39.95 49.95 

TelePatch II by Spectrum 29.95 

Telewriter 64 1 49.95 59.95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 99.95 

Deft Extra 39.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 59.95 

Max Fonts (72 COCO Max Fonts) 64.95 

Elite Calc 69.95 69.95 

Elite Word 69.95 69.95 

Elite File (disk only) 74.50 

DynaCalc (disk only) 99.95 

Word Pack RS by PBJ 99.00 

VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Order any 2 software pieces listed and 
take 10% off their listed price. All Radio 
Shack software 10% off list. Send for 
complete list. 









I 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
TheU 




FEATURES 



Cover illustration copyright © 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's rainbow on 
tape and rainbow on DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow ON tape. For details, check the 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 

ads on pages 158 and 197. 




Check It OuX/Robert A. Green 

FINANCE Fast and easy personalized checks 

Private Accounting Wizard/ J.A. Phillips 

FINANCE Keep track of personal records 

The Thrifty CoCo/Murray Zanger 

FINANCE Make practical financial projections 

The 8088 Sounds Ott/Tobin Schuster 

TONGUE IN CHEEK An exciting computer room peripheral 

Look What They've Done/Harold L Wolff 



TUTORIAL A look at one readers personalized system 

Over a Barrel/Pat// D. Buttacavoli 

PUZZLE Find the right combination to win 



^JLife of the Party/Da/e Ft. Collins 

GAME-HARDWARE PROJECT Jeopardy-like fun for 10 at a time 

^^The Key to Success/ Leonard Hyre 




TYPING TUTOR A program to set your fingers a-flyin' 

1^1 A Matter of Principal/fla/p/? D. Miller 

FINANCE Amortize your way to financial freedom 

Charting the Ups and Downs/ Michael Sims 

ORGANIZATION Develop versatile line and bar graphs 

The Bookkeeper's Helper/Harvey Dettmann 

BUSINESS An easy way to mind your business 

Joker Poker/ Robert Brimner 

GAME Turn your Co Co into Lady Luck 

See How Your Stocks Stack Up/ Mark Evans 

FINANCE Monitor your stock performance 

Picture PeriecX/ Robert C. Montowski 



GRAPHICS UTILITY Save and load graphics under OS-9 

^3 The Budget Master's Companion/Da vid V. Haas _ 

BUSINESS A monthly budget to help you get organized 

NOVICES NICHE ,.^1 

Tricks of the Trade 



Michael B. Kromeke 
Payday Pal 



John Gallagher 
It Figures 



76 



77 



78 



Tips on the CoCo 3 

Eric White 

Seal It With a CoCo Kiss 

David M. Allen 



Keiran Kenny 



20 



26 



36 



40 



46 



52 



58 



66 



82 



86 



97 



99 



122 



156 



172 



78 



80 



NEXT MONTH: Always entertaining and efficient, the CoCo is also 
a household companion. Our April Home Help issue is packed with 
programs and tips to let your CoCo shoulder its share of tedious 
household chores and to let you have more time for important things. 
We've got the CoCo 3 crowd covered, too, with programs and tutorials 
just for the new addition to the family. 

Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home for your CoCo and 
its rainbow companion. Look to the rainbow for the best articles, 
programs and product reviews for the Color Computers 1, 2 and 3! 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Josep/7 Kolar 

Doing the program shuffle 

Building March's Rainbow/J/m ffeed_ 

Managing Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/ZWarfy Goodman 
Just what the Dr. ordered 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



108 



16 



Education Notes/Stei/e Blyn 

Making the Dewey Decimal system user-friendly 

Education Overv\evi/Michael Plog, Ph.D 

Resources for computer learning 

PRINT#-2,/Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Wishing Well/Fred 6. Scerbo 

Roboflip: Anatomy of a game 

"Turn of the Screw" will return next month 

RAINBOWTECH 



Barden's BuWer/William Barden, Jr. 

Sailing off to C 

^ Bits and Bytes of BASIC/ Richard White 

Exploring the Co Co 3 color system 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 

KISSable OS-9/Da/e L. Puckett 

Bootstrapping many systems 

OS-9 Level II/ Peter Dibble 



OS-9 PROGRAMMING Finding your way in the new system 

DEPARTMENTS 



Advertisers Index 

Back Issue Information 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



Letters to Rainbow 
One-Liner Contest 
Information 

The Pipeline 

Rainbow Info 



208 
137 
_18 
182 

_6 



Received & Certified 
Reviewing Reviews- 
Scoreboard 



Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



187 
120 

_14 



Subscription Info 
These Fine Stores 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Product Review Contents. 



.150 



92 



New sections, new selections and Goodman 's database report 

Doctor ASCW/Richard E. Esposito 164 

The question fixer 

74 



90 



12 



168 



186 



112 



184 



196 



194 



132 
131 
172 
174 

192 
177 
206 



129 



The J 




March 1987 



Vol. VI No. 8 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Copy Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Editorial Assistants Cecilia Crosby, 

Wendy Falk, Angela Kapfhammer, 

Monica Wheat 
Technical Editor Dan Downard 
Technical Assistant Cray Augsburg 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 
Consulting Editors Ed Ellers, 

Belinda C. Kirby, Joe Pierce 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 

Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Sandra Underwood, Denise Webb 

Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 
Typesetting Services 

Suzanne Benish Kurowsky, Karen Semones 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 



Editorial Director James E. Reed 

Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 

Creative Director Heidi Maxedon 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Customer Service Mgr. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief Pilot Don Higgins 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst, Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Pam Workhoven 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
President Cindy J. Shackleford 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 208 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAfNBOWfe9t and THE rainbow and RAINBOWfest logolypesare registered ® trademarksof FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage« Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
the RAINBOW are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 








jSSS * 

UP 




Bill ^fi 




Editor: 

Two of your RAlNBOWfest articles have 
mentioned an accomplishment by CoCo 
users who have made their CoCos portable. 
1 have a Model 4P and, while 1 like the 
clarity of the monitor and the built-in 
number pad, I wish it had the insides of my 
CoCo. I lack the skill and the tools to make 
the necessary changes. Is there another 
reader in the Pittsburgh area who has the 
ability and the desire to help me with the 
transplant? 

I enjoy your magazine very much, Few 
products provide a support service as good 
as yours, It is like having a user's club 
meeting in my home every month. 

John H. Mooney 
217 Terrace Avenue 
Zelienople, PA 16063 



IBM Follows the Leader 

Editor: 

Chalk up another point for the new CoCo 
3 and CM-8 monitor. In a recent issue of PC 
Weekly, (December 9, 1986) it was an- 
nounced that a new IBM PC will be intro- 
duced in 1987 that "will support an analog 
(as opposed to the standard digital) moni- 
tor." Is IBM trying to be Tandy Color 

Computer 3 compatible? ~ ~ 

r r Steve Ostrom 

Minnetonka, MN 



A Powerful Solution 

Editor: 

I do not understand why some people 
need a separate power indicator. Years ago, 
my system got to a point where T had to ask 
myself, "Now, what piece of equipment is 
on?"ln addition, the floor was covered with 
extension cords. Then I woke up. 

Since the power requirement of the nor- 
mal home computer system is very low, 
much less than the normal 15 watts of a 
household outlet, I decided to use a power 
strip to turn everything on or off at the same 
time. If I need more than the six or eight 
outlets on a power strip, I just use a second 
one either from the first or from a second 
wall outlet. I have never had any problems. 

Bobi Tweddell 
Brampton, Ontario 



Super Controller Update 

Editor: 

Owners of the Disto Super Controller 
may experience problems using it with the 
new CoCo 3. A timing problem in some of 
the older controllers can cause the computer 
to u hang up" while accessing a disk. If you 
have this problem, contact C.R.C. Comput- 
ers, Inc. at (514) 383-5293. The CoCo 3 
update costs $8 and includes return shipping 

and handling. ~ ~. 0 r 

Tony DiStejano 

C.R.C. Computers 

Montreal Quebec 



BACK TALK 



Editor: 

In the November 1986 issue [Page 10], 
E.W. Rees stated that the VIP Library is very 
hard to use and that Softlaw [now VIP 
Technologies] has terrible support. 1 must 
agree with him on the support, but disagree 
about the ease of use. I find VIP programs 
very easy to use. To me, the documentation 
is very complete and easy to understand. On 
top of all that, every program has a help 
feature. I truly enjoy using VIP software, 
and find them very user-friendly. 

Paul E. Jones 
Princeton, KY 

Still Kickin' in Spokane 

Editor: 

The membership of the MC-10 Interna- 
tional User's Group read with great resent- 
ment Mr. Scerbo's comments ["Prepare for 
Thanksgiving Cooking With Liquid Mea- 
sure," November 1986, Page 62] about the 
MC-iO computer, If his intent was to see 
how much flack he could get, or to poll 
readers to see how much interest is left i n the 
MC-10, he has succeeded. 

Tandy stopped producing the MC-10 
micro Color Computer, but it did not die. 
It is a great, affordable piece of hardware. 
This computer allowed some of us less 
fortunate to get our feet in the door of the 
computer world, and most of us have never 
set foot outside since. 

Our group was started in 1984 with the 
publishing of newsletters to inform comput- 
er users about the wonders of the MC-10. 
We grew rapidly, combining forces from six 
countries, and in 1986, each issue of our 
newsletter contained 20 pages of informa- 



tion about the MC-10 (with a couple pages 

dedicated to crosslinking information with 

CoCos). , ,» . 

Larry Haines 

East 2924 Liberty 

Spokane, WA 99207 

Fred Seer bo replies to Mr. Haines 
and other MC~10ers in his "Wish- 
ing Well" column this month. 



HINTS AND TIPS 



Editor: 

TX word processor is CoCo 3 compatible. 

Edit Line 6 and change the variable 
to G=6549?. Save TX on a new 
disk and label it "CoCo 3 Only" (the new 
value in G scrambles the screen on the older 
CoCos). TX must be used with the WIDTH 
32 screen display. 

An attempt to list Line 0 of TX will lock 

up the CoCo 3. ~ , . 

v Fred holes a r 

West field, PA 
Cassette Port Conversion 

Editor: 

Readers interested in building an adapter 
that will convert the cassette port of a CoCo 
to an RS-232 port will find construction 
plans in the December 1986 issue of Modern 
Electronics. The article includes a BASIC 
program listing that loads a machine lan- 
guage subroutine to drive a printer from a 
BASIC program, as well as patches to create 
an OS-9 printer driver. The following cor- 
rections should be made. In Figure 1, the 
polarity of D2 should be reversed. In Figure 
3, the U K" at the top end of R5 should be 
at the top end of Dl and the top end of C3 

should be labeled "t". ~ h4 n . . 

Duane M. Perkins 

Mount Gretna, PA 



Aiding the Doctor 

Editor: 

I'm pleased to see the "Doctor ASCII" 
column added to RAINBOW. I find this col- 
umn very informative and interesting. 
However, i n the November 1 986 issue [Page 
154], Scott Lane asked how the INKEYS is 
used. While the answer Mr. Esposito gave 
is correct, there is another way to use 
INKEYS. The code I use is as follows: 

100 EXEC 44539 : R$=INKEY$ 



6 THE RAINBOW March 1987 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S Q 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

NOW HI-RES 




EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 
XMODEM for machine language 
files. 128 ASCII characters, 1200 
baud, etc. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Handles files larger 
than memory. Print on line with J&M 
or RS232 Pak. Screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, 64. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! ... 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match yourCOCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



The screen dump program in the same 
issue [Page 156] would not work on my 
DMP-105 printer. Here are the changes to 
make it work. 

1000 FOR 1=1024 TO 1535 STEP 32 

1010 fl$="" 

1020 FOR J = I TO 1+31 

1030 fl=PEEK(J) 

1040 IF R>95 THEN R=R-G4 

1050 fl$=fl$+CHR$(R) 

1060 NEXT J 

1070 PRINT 0-2, R$ 

1080 NEXT I 

1090 RETURN , . , , 

Jack Jordan 

Court I and, MS 
Thumbs Up for Solitaire 

Editor: 

I've played the commercially available 
version of Solitaire and after a while it gets 
boring and predictable. 1 didn't find this to 
be true with Tudor Jones' version that 
appeared in the December 1986 issue [Page 
76]. It's much easier and doesn't always 
come up with the same starting set of cards 
as does the other version. This version also 
doesn't allow you to cheat. 

As a programmer, I found it irresistible to 
modify Mr. Jones' program slightly. It runs 
exactly the same. The only two changes I've 
made were to include Line 141 so that the 
hearts and diamonds were painted red: 

141 IF SUIT = 1 OR SUIT = 3 THEN POKE 
178,2:PRINT(XC+ll,YC+22) , ,0:PQ 
KE17B,0 



I also changed the values of S$(l) 
through 5$ ( 4 ) so that the cards would have 
the symbols instead of the letters on top 
denoting the suits, like this: 



1230 S$(1)="BR2H3UERFERFDG3":S$ 
( 2 ) = "R3HUEFU3GHEL3F3HD3EFD2U 
4RDL":5$( 3 ) = "BU3F 2E2H2G2 " : S 
$(4)="BRR2LU2L2R4UL4E2FL" 



With these minor changes, you don't have 
to look at the H, C, S and D on the card 
and try to remember which is black and 
which is red when placing cards. 

Bill Bernico 
Sheboygan, WI 



There is a minor correction to 
Solitaire appearing on Page J 82 of 
this issue. 



Clearly a Problem 



Editor: 

I'd like to point out a bug in the new 
Enhanced basic for the CoCo 3 . If you type 
CLERR 17000 : W I TH40, the computer locks 
up. If you use a slightly lower value in the 



CLERR statement, it works. Anything higher 
than about 16350 does not work. 

Raju Dash 
Downers Grove, JL 

Please read the following letter. 
Editor: 

I would like to inform all CoCo 3 owners 
about two potentially dangerous problems 
concerning programming the CoCo 3. It 
seems that if you should use the CLERR 
command to reset the value of the stack 
pointer in basic between the $2000 to 
$3FFF range when using the Hi-Res text 
screens, basic will destroy its stack clearing 
the screen. This will crash the computer. 

The second problem is using the Hi-Res 
text screens and the old ROM/ RAM page 
switch at $FFDE and SFFDF. Should you run 
a program that uses the 96K switching 
method, basic tries to switch in a page 
already in use by the Hi-Res text screen with 
the possibility of losing your work or locking 
up your machine. 

Aside from these glitches in the CoCo 3, 
I find it better than most 68000-based 
microcomputers costing much more. 

If anyone can explain how Xmodem 

protocol works, please write me. I am 

writing a terminal program and will gladly 

share credit for it. 0 

Mike Pepe 

15 Lambs Lane 

Manalapan, N J 07726 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 7 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I am looking for programs in science and 
math. Does anyone have information on 
where I can find such programs? 

Anthony J. Dee 
135 East 38th Street 
Erie, PA 1650/ 

Personnel Planner 

Editor: 

I work at a hospital that requires contin- 
uous coverage day and night. I must make 
out work schedules for three shifts per day, 
seven days a week, taking into account 
holiday time, vacation time, etc. This is done 
by hand and is incredibly time-consuming. 
If anyone has a program that would help or 
information about one, please write me. 

William Caldwell 
17 18 Great Highway 
San Francisco, CA 94122 

Out in Left Field 

Editor: 

I'm a big baseball card collectorand I am 
trying to make a listing of all my cards using 
files. Can anyone give me a hand? 

Mike Bushman 
25655 Salem 
Roseville, Ml 48066 

We suggest you see Baseball Card 
File by James W. Wood. His pro- 
gram was in the May 1986 issue on 
Page 66. 

MC-10 Transfer 

Editor: 

Is there a program available to convert 
MC-10 programs to run on the Color Com- 
puter 2 with disk? Anyone having this 

information, write me. .... ~ „ 

Ni/a D. Grose 

R.D. I, Box 17 3 A 

Manheim, PA 17545 

Hand-to-Hand Combat 

Editor: 

Does anyone know where there is a good 
hand-to-hand combat game in which you 
fight different things or people on a certain 
level and then progress to a different level 
to fight more? I am looking for one similar 
to the one in the arcades called "Gladiator." 

Mike Rebbecchi 
208 Osage Avenue 
Somerdale, NJ 08083 



erased and 1 have not been able to duplicate 
it. I would appreciate any assistance. Call 
(803) 873-8375 or write me. 

Karl Gulliford 
136- B Braly Drive 
Summerville, SC 29483 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I have the new CoCo 3 and a DMP-430 
printer and 1 am wondering if there is 
anyone who has used this printer with a 
CoCo. 1 am a member of a local duplicate 
bridge group and I print bulletins for the 
club. The printer contains IBM character 
setscontainingthecard symbols and I would 
like to be able to call them up to use. 1 had 
a short program that would allow me to do 
this but, unfortunately, it was accidentally 



Where Is It? 

Editor: 

1 own a CoCo I with64K ECB, disk drive, 

printer, modem and cassette deck. I went to 

a Radio Shack Computer Center hoping 

that they might solve my long quest for 

Flight Simulator II. They said it would be 

out in late September or early October. I was 

wondering if anyone has heard when Flight 

Simulator II will be out since it's already out 

for many other computers? ~ . n , 
J r Come Bender 

11216 S.E. 235th Place 

Kent, WA 98031 

Thinks It Re-Inks 

Editor: 

I've heard that there is a new printer 
ribbon on the market. It seems that someone 
has taken a regular ribbon cartridge and 
modified it so that it continuously re-inks 
itself. The cartridge apparently lasts longer 
than regular cartridges. Is this for real? I 
have found that costs are substantial for 
ribbon replacement. Do you know who I can 
contact to buy this new type of ribbon? 

Sharon A. Hartzog 
2546 Moonstone Drive 
San Diego, CA 92/23 

We are not aware of a regular 
ribbon cartridge that re-inks itself 
continuously. However, Comput- 
er Friends advertises an automatic 
ribbon re-inker on Page 89 in the 
January 1987 issue. They may be 
able to provide you with more 
information. 

Unsavory Characters 

Editor: 

In "Reviewing Reviews," November 1986 
[Page 131], Graham Langford of Pickering, 
Ontario complained of a problem with his 
Penpal software that I experience when 
using Ultra Telepatch with Telewriter 64. 
The problem completely spoils an otherwise 
excellent word processor. The keys A, H, 1, 
G and O, when held down even briefly, 
intermittently repeat unwanted incorrect 
characters. I'm using a 2-year-old CoCo 2 
with an FD501 controller and no other 
peripherals attached. This problem occurs 
both in the editor and the menu screens. 

I've written to the author twice since 
testing this software on CoCo 2 models in 
two different Radio Shack stores, where it 
also exhibited this problem. Mr. van der 
Poel claims this is the only complaint of this 
nature he has received and could not dupli- 
cate the problem, even with a copy of my 
working disk. [See Bob van der PoeTs letter 
in "Reviewing Reviews."] 

He suggested that 1 may have a bad PI A, 
but why did the two newer computers 1 



tested it on behave in the same manner? All 
my other software runs perfectly on this 
machine. 

Has anyoneelse in the CoCo Community 
experienced this problem and if so, what did 
you do to solve it? 1 want to continue to use 
my CoCo 2, but if I can't get the best word 
processor program to work flawlessly on it, 
1 will have to give it up. ^ 

P.O. Box 257 
Blenheim, Ontario 
Canada NOP I AO 



BOUQUETS 

Editor: 

1 want to comment about the outstanding 
quality of service from hi-tech Stationery. 
The quality of the products and the wide 
selection, coupled with the wonderful touch 
of personally signed letters from the presi- 
dent of the company (to name just a few), 
make me want to order from them more 

0flen ' R. Harp 

Dongola, IL 

Personal Service 

Editor: 

Like most of your readers 1 purchase all 
of my software through companies that 
advertise in RAINBOW. Some of these com- 
panies do their job while others go out of 
their way. 

I recently sent for a disk upgrade of my 
old Grafplot tape from Hawkes Research 
Services. After getting the disk and trying to 
get it to work with my screen print programs 
1 soon gave up. My screen print programs 
simply would not work. 

After calling Chris at Hawkes to see if he 
could help, we attempted to solve the 
problem over the phone. Without success, 
he then asked that I send my printer manual, 
screen print program and instruction sheet 
to him. In a week everything came back, 
including a modified Grafplot program that 
worked perfectly with my printer. 

Chris went out of his way to help me, and 
I want to let others know what a reputable 
and considerate software house he runs! 

Mark Perry 
Northbrook, IL 



Duck Delivers 

Editor: 

1 want to highlight a new, unsung hero in 
this not-so-perfect world. 

I have a monitor driver, three programs, 
and two rapid-fire circuits from Duck 
Productions. All materials came with excel- 
lent manuals or installation instructions. I 
have come to know when I order stuff from 
the Duck, 1 usually get more than 1 expect. 
1 sent my first order by letter and promptly 
received my goodies. What's more, I also got 
information on all the other things they 
have, a free contest entry to win software, 
a coupon and a whole page of CoCo hints 
and tips. 

My Class Monitor driver and Micro-Fire 



8 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 





NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you 'GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HJ- 
QUAL1TY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 
•* Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Baslc/ECB/Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROfT, 
PCLEAR, DLQAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USinQ, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MERGE, REM AM E, DSKINL 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key, 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only), 

Speed Up your programs. 

Reset MOTOR ON/GPF from 
keyboard. 

Recover Basic programs lost by 
MEW. ' 
Set 23 different 
GRAPHIC/ SEMIQRAPHIC modes 
Merge two Basic programs, 

AND MUCH MUCH MOREJtl 
COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1. 2, 8? 3, 

ONLY $16.95 



★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 



if 
★ 



#0 OR 

200 additional Pokes, Peeks 'n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+ # and CoCo Mar 5 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Oumpffor 0MP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS 'N EXECS is a prerequisite 

DISK TUTORIAL 

(2-Disk Package) 





An indispensable tutorial for serious disk 
Basic/ ML programmers Gives almost 
everything you MUST know about the disk 
system Some features: 

• Learn about track/sectors/granules 

• How the Directory is organized 

• Useful disk utilities 

• Useful H0M routines 

• How io use double sided/40/80 track drives 

• Information security on disk 

• Insight into common disk errors 

• Many Tips/Hints/ Secrets you won't find 
elsewhere) 

• And Much Much More! 



CoCol, 2&3 



only $36.95 





MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures, Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM QF32K ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1 
Supports the following printers: EPSON 
RX/FK GEMINI 10X/SG-10, NX-10, 
C-ltoh8510, DMM 00/1 05/400/430, 
SEIK0SHAGP-1 00/250, LEGEND 808 
and GORILLA BANANA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 

PICTURE DISK #1 

This disk includes OVER 100 pre-drawn 
pictures for use with the CoCo Graphics 
Designer 

DISKONLY$14.95 

COLOR SCRIBE ill 

THE C0C03 WORD-PROCESSOR 

This superb word processor uses the 80 
COLUMN display of the CoCo III and 
includes the following features: Justifica- 
tion, Headers, Footers, Pagination, OVER 
20 Line Editing Commands such as 
Character Insert/ Delete, skip over words, 
breaking a line and more. Comes with a 
comprehensive manual. Requires a 1 28 K 
COCO III with Disk Drive. 

ONLY $49.95 



COCO DISK ZAPPER 




5r/ 



Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk. Its indespensable! 

Requires minimum 32 K/64 K disk system 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $24.95 



VISA, MC. } Am Ex, Check MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
CANADA other countries $5.00). COD add $2,50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited 





Call Toil Free (For Orders) 1 -800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY, For inlormation, technical information, NY orders & alter- hours 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



hardware mods were simply explained and 
worked great from the time I installed them. 
Likewise, the Duck's programs Map 'n Zap, 
Micro- Fire and Keeping Track are super 
programs to tame my CoCo. 

My first order was a great deal. When I 
ordered again I forgot to send my coupon 
and they sent me a check for the discount 
with my order. Since then, I have been 
phoning them up direct. I noticed that Ian 
Millard was the guy who gave us Writer Zap 
in the September 1986 rainbow [Page 1 16]. 
What a gem! He's been very helpful, and not 
just about his own programs. Best of all, he 
honors his registered discount coupons over 
the phone. I'm looking forward to my next 
program from Duck Productions. 

Richard Leach 
Mississauga, Ontario 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

I have just returned from a three-year tour 
overseas and would like to thank all of you 
for your magazine, my one contact with the 
CoCo world. With the folding of the three 
other major Color Computer magazines, I 
was beginning to dread the fate of our 
favorite machine. But then the rainbow 
would arrive, and all was right in my world. 
Thank you rainbow from all of us who 
were, or are, far from home. 

Clell A. Harmon 
Wichita, KS 

The Number One Source 

Editor: 

I have been a CoCo owner for two years 
now, and I had worked for Radio Shack for 
almost as long. Nowhere in Tandy Corp. did 
I find the amount of information for the 
CoCo that appears each month in the pages 
of rainbow magazine. Well done rainbow; 
long may your colors fly! ^ ^ 

U. Montclair, NJ 
CoCo 3 Draws Raves 

Editor: 

Three weeks ago I replaced my 'F board 

CoCo with a CoCo 3. Wow, your rave 

reviews were certainly justified. One look at 

the demo disk on an RGB monitor made me 

forget the Atari 1040 that I had been looking 

at. The 80-column text display is my favorite 

improvement. Thanks for your entertaining 

and instructive approach to covering all 

aspects of CoCodom. n , 0 , , 

r Bob Stephens 

Courlenay, British Columbia 



CoCo Cat Controversy 

Editor: 

I am against the abuse of illegal drugs. But 
it both shocked and annoyed me when I 
discovered CoCo Cat is now on the political 
soapbox and is no longer involved with 



computers. Come off it! Must everybody get 
into the act? Just because the anti-drug 
bandwagon is rolling, must CoCo Cat jump 
aboard? 

I read CoCo Cat to find out about my 
computer and maybe have a little chuckle. 
In your January 1987 issue [Page 159], you 
have deprived me and other readers of that 
simple pleasure. Really, CoCo Cat was the 
onlycomicrelief inyour magazine, and now 
we have lost him to the world of politics. 

Will CoCo Cat now be taking positions 
on gun control, illegal immigration, the Iran 
arms deal and everything else in the realm 
of politics? Not only did you give over the 
CoCo Cat comic itself to your current 
"cause," but I was further dismayed to see 
a half page [Page 25], in full color, along the 
same lines. In the future I wish you would 
do your editorializing in your editorials. 

John Tiffany 
Washington, D. C. 



Editor: 

I would like to extend my thanks for the 
no-nonsense stance that you have adopted 
with regards to drugs. 1 know that your 
magazine is eagerly read by many young 
people and the positive educational value of 
the CoCo Cat is not to be underestimated. 
Your concern with the broader social issues 
has always been evident and is to be com- 
mended. Det D(jniel Montalvo 

Baltimore, M D 



Editor: 

I would like to let you know that the CoCo 
Cat buttons were a big hit with my Brownies. 
They loved them and they say NO to drugs! 

Jo Ann Karafja 
Wilmerding, PA 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 

• CoCo Jet BBS has been revised to run 
under my new JBBS 4.5 software. CoCo Jet 
features four subboards, an open public 
board, private mail for password users, 
downloads, a time and temperature module, 
30/1200 baud, movie reviews, information 
on CoCo clubs, added features for password 
users, four access levels and much more. 

CoCo Jet runs on a 64K CoCo 2, two 40- 
track drives and one 35-track drive, a multi- 
pack, RS-232 Deluxe Program Pak, preci- 
sion time module, WCS temperature mod- 
ule and a Bell 2 12/ A modem. The board 
runs 24 hours a day at (602) 969-8545. No 
password is needed, but more features are 
granted with a password and different access 

' Cve ^ S ' Dan Sobczak 

Mesa, AZ 



• Alitars Lair has just opened a CoCo 
message and up/downloading base. Hours 
are 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. PST. Call (916) 243- 

Sean McLeod 
6908 Dennis Court 
Redding, CA 96001 



Continued on Page 162 



THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 

Letters to the editors may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RRI to take you 
into the RainbowMagazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



arts and letters 

George Marsh jsl 

\Ld EMBERS L*HE 
W\LuAM<bBURG,\V Z5I85 




rPO. BOX 385 
PROSPECT, KY. 



Envelope of the Month 



George Marsh, III 
Williamsburg, VA 



10 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



r 



UTILITIES/BOOKS 




UTILITY ROUTINES for the 
TANDY &TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

These are 100% Position Independent 
ML Utilities and require no ML program- 
ming knowledge. 

COMMAND KEYS: Access commands with 2 keystrokes 
CURSOR STYLES: Over 65000 cursor styles 
ERROR SKIP: 'ONERR GOTO' for Basic Programs 
FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get real word error messages 
KEY CLICKER: Ensure Key input accuracy 
REPEAT KEY: Repeat ANY key 
REVERSE VIDEO (Green & Red): Eliminate eye-strain 
SPOOLER: Don't wait for those long printouts 
SUPER SCROLLER: Save/view scrolled lines 
TAPE-TO-OISK: Copy Basic and ML programs 
AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!! 

For 16 K/32K/64K Cassette or Disk Systems, 

CoCo 1, 2 & 3 BOOK $19.95 

ROUTINES ON CAS/DISK: $24.95 
BOTH BOOK AND CAS or DISK: $36.95 



UTILITY ROUTINES (VOLUME II) 

(Disk Only) 

Includes 20 oft-used utilities such as: ^Fxjjr 

• PAINT with 65000 styles ^7*^ 

• Add SUPERSCRIPTS to your DMP printer 

• Design your own commands! 

• Programming Clock 

• Fast Sort for Basic Strings 

• Create a character set for your OMP printer 

• FinaV Replace phrases in your Basic Program 

• Let the computer locate your errors! 

• CoCo Calculator 

• Super EDITing lor Basic Programs 

• Automatic Directory Backup 

• And much much morel 

64K DISK ONLY 

$29.95 

BEST OF 
COCO TIME'85 (UTILITIES) 

18 best selected utilities from COCO-TIME 1 985 
like: In Memory Disk Drive for 64 K Cassette Users, 
CoCo Disk Zap, Basic Program Packer, Tape 
Encryption (Basic), Disk Encryption (Basic), 
Graphics Screen Dump for DMP Printers, Basic 
Search, EZ Disk Master, Function Keys, Graphics 
Zoom Tape Index System 40 K Basic (for 64 K 
Cassette Users), Alpha Directory, Banner Creator, 
LIST/DIR Pause, Disk Mailing List Super INPUT/ 
LINE INPUT, and Tape-to-Tape Copy. 

Disk or Cassette, ONLY FOR $26.95 



WE HAVE ALL THAT YOU NEED TO SUCCEED 




SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1 -3 passes) 

• Tape-to- Disk Copy 

• Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk- to- Tape Copy 

• Tape-to-Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ M L programs and DATA files. 
CoCol, 2 & 3 32 K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY 

$24.95 



UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best-selected utilities: 

40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 
Super Tape-to-Oisk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 
Disk-to-Tape Copy 

LList Enhancer (with page numbering!) 
Graphics Typesetter | two text sizes!) 
LARGE DMP Graphics Dump 
X-Ref for Basic Programs 

Hidden 32 K | Use the "hidden' 32K from your 64 K CoCo) 

Basic Slepper (Super Debugger!) 

RAM Disk {for Cassettes. Disk Users] 

Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 
AND MUCH. MUCH MORE!!! 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 
DISK (64K Req.) ONLY $29.95 

"MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books 
provide a complete annotated listing of 
the BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: SI 9.95 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: S19.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: S19.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB[CoCo3] UNRAVELLED SI 9.95 
ALL 4 UNRAVELLED BOOKS S59.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 [Book]: SIB.95 
RAI NBDW GUIDE TO OS-9 (2 Disks): S29.00 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS: Tips and tricks 
for Basic Programmers Only $14.95 
CoCo 3 SECRETS REVEALED: S16.95 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewriter-64 (Cas) $47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 
Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64® 19.95 
Telepatch III 29.95 
Telepatch II 29.95 

CoCo Max (Cas) 67.95 
CoCo Max II (Dsk) 77.95 
CoCo Max Upgrade (Dsk) 18.95 
Autoterm(Cas) 29.95 
(Latest Version) (Dsk) 39.95 
Graphicom II 22.95 
SPIT 'N IMAGE: Makes a mirror image 
(BACKUP) of ANY disk, even protected 
ones. Will also initialize and BACKUPinone 
pass. ONLY $32.95 

COCO UTIL II (Latest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible 
computer. Transfer MS- DOS files to CoCo. 
CoCol, 2 & 3 ONLY $36.95 

DISK ANTI-PIRATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs. 
CoCol, 2 & 3 ONLY $59.95 

HIDE-A-BASIC 1.1: Best copy- protection 

program for Cassette Basic programs. 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $24.95 

CABLES/HARDWARE 

HAYES COMPATIBLE MODEM: $129.95 
MODEM CABLE: $19.95 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: Use your 
monochrome or color monitor with your 
CoCo (ALL CoCos). Includes audio 
connection. Easy installation - no 
soldering. ONLYS29.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 
Lowest Price Anywhere - $1 37.95. 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95. 

3-P0SITI0N SWITCHER: 

Select any one of three RS232 devices 
(printers/modems) from the serial port 
ONLY $37.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc. ONLY $24.95 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600). 
Comes with all cables. $39.95 



JkJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



Toorden All orders S50 & above shipped by 2nd day Air UPS with no extra charge. Lastminute shoppers 
can benetiL VISA MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling 
(USA& CANADA other countries$5.00) COD add$2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information technical information, NY orders & after-hours 1-71 6-223-1 477 



A Healthy CoCo for 
Years to Come 



One of the recurring themes I am seeing, both from our mail 
as well as the numerous CoCo Club newsletters which come 
to us each month, is that of wondering just where the Color 
Computer 1 and CoCo 2 are now that we have a CoCo 3. 

We've answered a lot of mail (and the newsletters keep restating 
the theme) saying the CoCo 1 and CoCo 2 are both alive and well. 
Yes, we're excited about the 3, as is most everyone else, but it would 
be foolish for us to forget that the vast number of Color Computers 
out there are Is and 2s, and will be for a long time to come. 

And, too, while there is a lot of talk and excitement about the 3 
(for very good reasons), I happen to feel the rainbow is more than 
able to support all the machines. We consider them all CoCos, and 
that is what we are here to do. 

We will certainly see lots and lots of new stuff for the CoCo 3 — 
but I think there will be more new products for the 1 and 2 as well. 
The reason is simply that activity breeds more activity. As I have 
said many times, I think we'll see a healthy and growing CoCo market 
for years to come. 

Incidentally, one of the places to see the first real evident interest 
in that market will probably be at RAINBOWfest in Chicago, April 
10-12. The Princeton show was, of course, too soon after the 
introduction of the CoCo 3 for any products to really be available. 
But, I think there will be significant things on hand at Chicago — 
and the best of what will be new for the CoCo 1 and 2 as well. I 
hope you won't miss the show. 
End of commercial. 

* * * 

One of the things I hear from a few people that, sometimes, makes 
me wonder is the complaint that there is little software yet for the 
CoCo 3; that the information is slow to come; that Tandy is dragging 
its heels on the machine. 

Well, let's put this into perspective. Even though Tandy said it 
would be four to six weeks before the CoCo 3 was available (and 
they did run into some import problems that made it a bit later) on 



Metric Industries 




their late July announcement, let's, just 
for the sake of argument, consider that 
the CoCo 3 became available on August 
I. 

If you put this into the time frame of 
the original CoCo, in terms of the 
development of the machine and 
market, I, personally, as of right now, 
had been in possession of my original 
machine for a little over a month. 

It was a 4K, non-Extended machine. 
I was "waiting" for a 16K upgrade 
(imagine that!) and Extended BASIC. 
Neither would arrive for a while yet. 

^What I am 
suggesting is that 
the CoCo 3 be 
placed in the time 
frame of the 
original CoCo." 



At that stage, too, there were virtually 
no programs available, other than some 
ROM-Paks from Tandy. The first pro- 
grams — from Computerware and The 
Micro Works — did not appear for a 
couple of months. 

What I am suggesting is that the 
CoCo 3 be placed in the time frame of 
the original CoCo. If you do that, don't 
expect more than 4K until April and 
Extended BASIC until the end of May. 
The first third-party programs will be 
available sometime in July. A disk 
drive? By December. 

See what I mean? 

Back when I was in college and took 
a course in Greek and Roman mythol- 
ogy from a Dr. Perry (a most charming 
and entertaining professor), one of the 
tales was of some goddess springing 
full-grown from Zeus' thigh. While I am 
sorry I don't recall which goddess it was 
(I don't think I remembered for the final 
exam, either) there does seem to be a 
parallel here: I think a lot of us expect 
to see all the body of programs for the 
CoCo 1 and 2 spring full-grown imme- 
diately for the CoCo 3. 

Considering the time it has been 
available, I think the initial develop- 
ment of CoCo 3 programs is really 
pretty good. And, needless to say, I 
think it will be even better as time goes 
on. I look forward to seeing all those 
marvelous creations with you. 

— Lonnie Falk 



Model 101 Interface $39.95 



The Model 101 is a serial to 
parallel interface inlended for use 
with a COCO and any Centronics 
compatible parallel input printer. 
The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
baud rates (300-9600). The 101 
is only 4" x 2" x 1 " and comes 



with all cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer. 



The Model 104 Deluxe Interface $51.95 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
of a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch). 
This feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 



etc.) to your computer. You may 
then select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5" x 2.5" X 1.25" 
and comes with all cables and 
connectors for your computer, You 
supply the serial cable for your 
modem or other serial device. 



Model 102 Switcher $35.95 



The Model 102 has 3 switch 
positions that allow you to 
switch your computer's serial 
output between 3 different 
devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has 
color coded lights that Indicate 
the switch position. These 



lights also act as power 
Indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with 
the 102 are color coded labels 
that can be applied to your 
accessories. The 102 has a heavy 
guage anodized aluminum cabinet 
with non-slip rubber feet. 




Cassette Label Package $15.95 

Organize Your Tapes, Label Your Save $8.40 when you purchase the you pay only $15.95. When 



Data Tapes, Color Code Your 
Tapes, Label Your Audio Tapes 




Cassette Label program and label 
package. You get the Cassette 
Label program, 100 WHITE labels, 
100 RED labels, 100 BLUE labels, 
100 YELLOW labels, and 100 TAN 
labels. A value worth $24.35, but 



ordering, specify the Cassette Label 
PACKAGE 



Cassette Label Program $6.95 



New Version 1.2Tape transfera- 
ble to disk. Now save and 
load Labels from tape or disk. 

This fancy printing utility prints 
5 lines of Information on 
pinfeed cassette labels. "Cas- 
sette Label" is menu driven and 
Is very easy to use. It uses the 
special features of your 
printer for standard, expanded 
or condensed characters. Each 
line of text is automatically 
centered. Before the label 
is printed, it is shown on your 



THE 101, AND 104 
REQUIRE POWER IN ORDER TO 
OPERATE. MOST PRINTERS 
CAN SUPPLY POWER TO YOUR 
INTERFACE. STAR, RADIO 
SHACK, AND OKI DATA ARE JUST 
A FEW THAT DO. EPSON DOES 
NOT. THE INTERFACES CAN 
ALSO BE POWERED BY AN AC 
ADAPTER (RADIO SHACK MODEL 
273-1431 PLUGS INTO ALL 
MODELS). IF YOU REQUIRE A 
POWER SUPPLY, ADD A "P" TO 
THE MODEL NUMBER AND $5.00 
TO THE PRICE. (MODEL 101P 
$44.95. MODEL 104P $56.95) 



CRT — enabling you to 
make changes if you like — 
then print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The 
program comes on tape and it 
Is supplied with 24 labels to 
get you started. 16K ECB 
required. 

• ~* 

CAMEI'TE i_rtl»fc-i_ 

ou8crr£ lakl miNi n« utility 



ft mn 

mm 



c 



Other Quality Items 

High Quality 5 Screw Shell C-10 
Cassette Tapes $7.50 per dozen 

Hard Plastic Storage Boxes for 
Cassette Tapes $2.50 per dozen 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00 per 100 
Colors $3.60 per 100 (Red, Blue, 
Yellow or Tan) 



ImfjaLjiui. pif 







' — : — \ 









The Model 101, 102 and 104 
will work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory size, 
These products are covered by 
a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel input 
printer including Gemini, Epson, 
Radio Shack, Okidata. C. loth and 
many others. They support 
BASIC print commands, word 
processors and graphic com- 
mands. 

We manufacture these products. 
Dealer Inquiries are invited. 



To order call our 24 hour order 
line 513-677-0796 and use 
your VISA MASTERCARD . 
request COD. or send check or 
money order to". 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Free shipping on orders over 
$50.00. Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. 

Orders under $50.00 please add 
$2.50 for shipping. 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



13 





How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program 
listings in the rainbow are formatted for 
a 32-character screen — so they show 
up just as they do on your CoCo screen. 
One easy way to check on the accuracy 
of your typing is to compare what char- 
acter "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings 
come out the same — you have a pretty 
good way of knowing that your typing is 
accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But, do read the text before you start 
typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette 
symbols on the table of contents and at 
the beginning of articles indicate that 
the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISK Or RAINBOW ON TAPE 

service. An order form for these services 
is on the insert card bound in the mag- 
azine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was 
first given to the Tandy Color Computer 
by its many fans, users and owners. 

However, when we use the term 
CoCo, we refer to both the Tandy Color 
Computer and the TDP System-100 
Computer. (While many TDP-100s are 
still in service, the TDP Electronics 
division of Tandy no longer markets the 
CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
both of the "given" names throughout 

THE RAINBOW. 

In most cases, when a specific com- 
puter is mentioned, the application is for 
that specific computer. However, since 
the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer 
in a different case, these terms are 
almost always interchangeable. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



T 



The small box accompanying a pro- 
gram listing in the rainbow is a "check 
sum" system, which is designed to help 
you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the 
rainbow. On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given. When you 



reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in 
the program and save it for later use, 
then type in the command RUN and press 
enter. Once the program has run, type 
new and press enter to remove it from 
the area where the program you're typ- 
ing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the 
rainbow, whenever you press the down 
arrow key, your CoCo gives the check 
sum based on the length and content of 
the program in memory. This is to check 
against the numbers printed in the 
rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure you 
typed in the correct basic program code. 
For more details on this helpful utility, 
refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on Page 
21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
in the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=2SG*PEEK(3S)+17B 

20 CLERR 2S,X-1 

30 X=2SG*PEEI< (3S)+17B 

40 FDR Z=X TO X+77 

50 RERD Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

G0 POKE Z , Y : NEXT 

70 IFW=?gB5THENB0EL5EPRINT 

"DRTR ERROR ": STOP 
B0 EXEC X: END 

90 DRTR 1B2, 1, 10G , 1G7, 140, G0, 134 
100 DRTR 12G, 1B3, 1, 10G, 190, 1, 10? 
110 DRTR 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DRTR 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 3B, 3B 
130 DRTR 52, 22, 79, 15B, 25, 230, 129 
140 DRTR 39, 12, 171, 12B , 171, 12B 
150 DRTR 230, 132, 3B, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
1G0 DRTR 240, 1B3, 2, 222, 4B, 140, 14 
170 DRTR 159, 1GG , 1GG, 132, 2B, 254 
1B0 DRTR 1B9, 173, 19B, 53, 22, 12G, 0 
190 DRTR 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DRTR 51, 52, 41, 0 



Using Machine Language 



Machine language programs are one 
of thefeatures of the rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these pro- 
grams into memory so you can operate 
them. ■ 

The easiest way is by using an editor/ 
assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor/assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into the CoCo and 
then have ;the editor/assembler assem- 
ble them into specific instructions that 
are understood by the 6809 chip, which 
controls your computer. 



When using an editor/assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the rainbow's 
listing into CoCo. 

Another method of getting an assem- 
bly language listing into CoCo is called 
"hand assembly." As the name implies, 
you do the assembly by hand. This can 
sometimes cause problems when you 
have to set up an ORIGIN or EQURTE 
statement. In short, you have to know 
something about assembly to hand- 
assemble some programs. 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand-assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CLERR200,&H3F00:I=&H3FB0 

20 PRINT "RDDRESS : " ;HEX$( I ) ; 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I , VRL ( "&H"+B$ ) 

50 I = I+1:GDTD 20 

This program assumes you havea 16K 
CoCo. If you have 32K, change the 
&H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 and change 
the value of I to &H7FB0. 



The Rainbow Seal 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our 
way of helping you, the consumer. The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product that carries the Seal 
has actually been seen by us, that it 
does, indeed, exist and that we have a 
sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hard- 
ware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. We 
ascertain that their products are, in 
actuality, what they purport to be and, 
upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction." The certification pro- 
cess is different from the review process. 
You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is 
right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the rainbow and 
the certification process. Certification is 
open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded 
to any commercial product, regardless 
of whether the firm advertises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of in- 
stances of violation of Seal use. 



1 4 THE RAINBOW March 1 987 



VANGUARD 



PD-1 



MORE STANDARD FEATURES IN A SMALLER PACKAGE THAN ANY OTHER OS-9 COMPUTER 









OS-9 is a very high performance operating system that brings Unix-like Multi-User, Multi-Tasking power to a Microcom- 
puter. It is a disk intensive operating system and to realize itsfull capabilities, a computer system must have a very high 
performance disk driver/disk hardware system. The Vanguard PD-1 computer from Hemphill Electronics, Inc. offers 
one of the most advanced and versatile disk operating systems available on any OS-9 based copmputer. 



STANDARD FEATURES OF THE VANGUARD PD-1 OS-9 LEVEL 1 COMPUTER 



THE MOST ADVANCED DISK DRIVE SYSTEM AVAILABLE 
OM AM OS-9 computer. 

• 4.456 Sectors Free ! 

• I Megabyte High Density Drives (IBM ■ AT Type) with twice the data 
transfer rate of Double Density Drives a nd over 2 MB of total storage 

• 8K Hardware Disk Cache 

• Reads Single or Double Sided. 35, 40 or 80 Track 

Single, Double or High Density Disks in Std. OS-9, Radio Shack, 
Mizaror Fujitsu Formats! IBM PC Format capability optional. 

• 450K Ram Disk 

• SASI/SCSI Interface 



2MHz CMOS 6809 CPU 

3 Software configurable Serial Ports with special SETBAUD Command 

Centronics Compatible Printer Port 

Built in A.C socket strip with 3 auxiliary outlets. 

Hardware Real Time Clock with On-Chip Crystal with 
± 6 seconds/month accuracy 

' Hardware Diagnostics in ROM 

Terminal Program Standard 

' XECOM XE 1203 Internal 300/1200 Baud Modem with voice, data, 
touch tone decoding and speech synthesis capabilities. 

1 Complete Line Of Matching Mass Storage Units 

All Aluminum Case is Only 1 ' higher than a Dual Half-Height Floppy 
Drive Package 



CoCo Owners, 



Thinking of upgrading your Hardware to take full advantage of the power of 
OS-9 ? Before you do, consider this. By the time you purchase an Expansion 
Bus, an 80 Column Card, a Disk Controller. Dual 80 Track Drives (you can 
not get a Controller Card to operate the High Density 1 Megabyte Drives), 
Three Hardware Serial Ports, a Parallel Printer Port, a SASI Hard Disk 
Interface, a 450K RAM Disk, a Hardware Clock and a 300/1200 Baud 
Modem you will have spent more than the cost of a Vanguard PD- 1 and you 
will have a system that will not even begin to compare to the power, 
performance and features of the PD- 1 . 

THE VANGUARD LINE OF COMPUTER HARDWARE 

A complete line of highly sophisticated, compact computer equipment, with 
GUARANTEED Hardware and Software Compatibility, bringing the full 
power of the OS-9 Multi-Tasking, Multi User operating system to the micro- 
computer user. Featuring the PD line of computers, the HD line of Hard Disk 
Drives and the HDT line of Hard Disk/Streaming Tape Drives. 



PD-1 2 1MB Floppy Drives 

PD20H 1MB Floppy, 20MB Hard Disk 

WYSE50 Terminal 



$1495.00 
$1995.00 
5 395.00 



Descriptive Brochure Available on Request 



1922 Cogswell Road, 

HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS, INC. SM ST^tJ U33 




BUILDING MARCH'S RAINBOW 





□ 



4175.°° 

COLO" 

e «M2 eg* M &c* 



2& 
26 



■30^ 



iooo 



26 
25 



cm- 



T 



360^ 



3000 



Orwe 



*i 195 

2 5 .4070 

V^i* 3000 COW sia c 



25> 

26- 

26- 



t i63 



N 



EPSON" 

<AdS. £P soN m Dow"* 




Diet Smith was right . . . 

OS-9 Users Re-Group _ 

. . . and pardon our "provinciality 



95 



I was online to RAINBOW'S Delphi CoCo SIG recently, using Greg 
Miller's great new Greg-E-Term to download Rick Adams' even 
newer Rickeyterm. I couldn't wait to get it, even though I have about 
every CoCo terminal program around. After all, Rickeyterm can send 
"super macros," a novel feature indeed. 

While I was downloading, I was also copying some old record albums 
over to tape for use on my car stereo. By habit, I also had the TV on. 
Well, with one eye on the Greg-E-Term block counter and the other on 
the tape counter, I had one ear listening for the end of the record and 
the other hearing fragments of the TV program. Candidly, I became a 
bit frazzled and began to wonder whether I was in control or technology 
was having its way with me! 

It seems as if much of my very existence is on tape or disk! I mean, 
if someone with a bulk eraser were to "sweep" my house, I'd have a 
magnetic seizure. If the office were hit, we'd probably all fall into the 
glitch and disappear. From my childhood, I recall Dick Tracy's buddy 
Diet Smith always proclaiming: "The nation that conquers magnetism 
will rule the universe!" While gravity was that cartoon prophet's 
obsession, those words have an Orwellian tone. A magnetic shield instead 
of a DEW line? ICBMs with giant bulk-eraser warheads? Hand grenades 
with "worm" programs? Well, effects of the EMP are a key concern of 
our national defense! 

Ahem. Add a big grain of salt to all of the above while I make a hard 
copy (just in case). Speaking of printed material, did I tell you that Dale 
Puckett and Peter Dibble are doing a new RAINBOW guide — all about 
using OS-9 Level II on the CoCo 3. Look for it in late spring! And, 
speaking of OS-9, Tandy's Fran McGehee assures me at press time that 
Level II will be on the store shelves by February 15. 

Also, just as we're sending this issue to the printer, Dale Puckett tells 
me that the OS-9 Users Group is making a big push "to get caught up" 
with all its activities and will soon resume publication of their MOTD 
newsletter. While President Brian Lantz has resigned for personal reasons 
due to a heavy workload as a church youth minister, Acting President 
Bill Turner has taken the reins and, Dale says, "Bill's digging in. He's 
called on the board of directors to help him and even his wife is pitching 
in." In addition to rekindling the newsletter, Bill has arranged for a 
private service to handle member mail. So, if you have pending 
correspondence, Dale suggests you might want to send a reminder to the 
new mailing address: OS-9 Users Group, Suite R-237, 1715 East Fowler 
Avenue, Tampa, FL 33612. An even quicker way to touch base and catch 
up on the latest developments is to check out OS-9 Online, RAINBOW'S 
new OS-9 Special Interest Group on Delphi. 

Briefly said, a deadline f or entering the "Free the CoCo Three" contest 
I announced in our December issue: March 1. More than a half dozen 
different correct answers have emerged in entries from most, but not all, 
states and Canadian provinces. It was just an oversight on my part that 
I did not mention provinces when I said "first f rom every state. " For that 
matter, overseas entries are, of course, being honored, too. 

Concluding our "mail call," we like to think that THE RAINBOW has 
a certain magnetism of its own, but if you want a hard copy every month, 
a yearly subscription makes a fine backup to most any CoCo configu- 
ration! 

— Jim Reed 



16 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



The Ultimate 
Color Computer 



Enhancements 

for Productivity 
from HJL Products 



A flew cdraM-^Ans, 




To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get information 
into and out of the system. 

This is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer. ^ /&w 

The Keyboard - $7B m 

The overwhelming favorite of serlow 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
Input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program, 
installs in just a few minutes with no 
soldering. ^_ /fa 



The Numeric Keypad • 

The Number Jack is a self-contained, 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshifted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
all necessary connectors for quick and 
easy installation without soldering. 




PRODUCTS j 




„,ct ■** 



» » » ! ! ! 





Now available for all 
models, including CoCo3 




The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, and is easily 
installed without clips, Jumpers or 
soldering (except in some later CoCo 2s 
with soldered in video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor - $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used it you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
above) ± ff^ 



The BASIC Utility - 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any color computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, wordwrap, global search, 



and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-iegendable 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 

Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800.482-4891 
International calls: 718-235*8358 




Ordering Information: Specify model (Original, F-version, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers Include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3.50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 




Telecoco 

Daniel Van Buskfrk 
Sand own, New Hampshire 

Our first place winner, 
Daniel, purchased his 
CoCo 3 at the October 
'86 RAIN BO Wf est in 
Princeton, New Jersey, 
and hopes to someday 
get a job in commercial 
art using computers. 
This graphic was created 
with CoCo 3 Sketch (a 
program he wrote). 




/ 




Honorable Mention 



March 



T987 



\ 




r 





The Super Computer 
Steve Baker 
Hattlesburg, Mississippi 

Steve created this graphic with 
BASIC and utilized the X-pad 
and Speech/Sound cartridge. 
Steve is married and has three 
children. He collects comic 
books and enjoys role-playing 

games. 




Honorable Mention 



Lighthouse 
Ray Larabie 
White Lake, Ontario 

Ray is 16 years old and lives 
on the lower part of the 
Madawasks River. He 
created this serene view 
with BASIC and a program 
he devised himself. 



L ne sure to se ™ * m,rnber. dew"™ ou used. 



» ' C end os »«« 



e a,e ° T^T to d«SplaV — _ ne 
,.r i and b° w ..nurse ' ho someone 

,,c '' aboul y ou '^.„, n owned oy Alrll iiied 
lew 'acts au any thing o tee ns, ^P.^-Vs 

■ Don't send .u* ame 9 £ e ate nal lhM» 

&» ^£bffi& e,3 r a Ts tn a book Of 
i.«»«W been suoi t apP ear ? 





Please «''^, ery , 
is. prospect 





Haupt's Mill Bridge 

John Murvine 
Ebensburg, Pennsylvania 

The second place winner is another 
exceptional graphic created with BASIC. 
The drawing is an autumn view of Haupt's 
Mill Bridge, which was built in 1872 in 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania. John is a 
self-taught programmer and commercial 
artist. Also, THE RAINBOW apologizes for 
misspelling Ebensburg in the last issue. 




Ol' Smokey 

C.W. Harrlman 
Bradford, Massachusetts 

Third place winner, "Harry," as he likes 
to be called, created this 1920's version 
of the Or Smokey steamroller with 
BASIC. Harry is retired from the 
Western Electric Co. and finds 
CoCoing a very exciting way of 

passing the hours. 




By Robert A. Green 



Here is a program I believe many rainbow readers 
will find useful. It provides a fast and easy printed 
personal-sized check, is simple to use, and offers a 
number of "foolproof" features. 

Check writer makes it easy to correct any mistakes in the 
date, payee's name, amount (in both the digits and the 
written form) and memo line prior to printing. If the payee 
line, written amount line or memo line are too long, 
Checkwriter rejects the entry and asks for another try that 
doesn't exceed the limitations established by the parameters 
of the check. 

Checkwriter also keeps an eye on the amount you enter, 
and rejects any entry that exceeds $99,999.99. It prompts 
for another entry that is lower than this maximum. (After 
all, who writes checks for more than that?) 

The program automatically prints the month and day 
flush-right to the "19" that's provided for the year, and then 
prints the last two digits of the year in the appropriate 
location. For protection, Checkwriter automatically inserts 
the word "only" following the written amount of the check 
if space permits, and then fills any remaining space on the 
line with asterisks. 

I wrote this program for the parameters of commonly 
used Deluxe Check Printers personal-size checks, but it can 
easily be altered to print correctly on checks by other 
printers, or on larger business checks. You can also make 
multiple copies of the same check if you want, or additional 
checks to different payees in differing amounts with the 
same date, without entering the date each time. 

After you have entered the program, put a blank sheet 
of paper in your printer, align the top edge with the top of 



the printer head, and run it. If you are not using a Gemini- 
10X printer, delete Line 330, which contains the code to 
disregard the "paper out" signal you get with small paper 
like a check. You may need to replace this code with one 
that is appropriate for your printer. 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
author at 346 Crest Drive, Whitehall, PA 18052. Please 
enclose an SA SE for a response.) □ 



..26 , 

270 .249 

410 88 

END 66 I 

The listing: CHEKRITR 

***************************** 

2j3 1 NOTE: THIS PROGRAM IS USES 
THE GEMINI-10X PRINTER CODE 
FOR DISREGARDING THE SIGNAL 
FROM THE "PAPER-OUT" DETECTOR. 
3j3 1 WHEN USING A DIFFERENT 
PRINTER YOU MAY NEED TO REMOVE 
LINE #3 3j3 OR REPLACE IT WITH 
YOUR PRINTER'S APPROPRIATE 
CODE. 

4 j3 1 **************************** 



20 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



The Amazing A-BUS\*£ 




An A- BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter In foreground 

The A-BUS system workswiththe original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 



Aboutthe A-BUS system: 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use INP and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-1 23) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re-i 40: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LEO's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad-i42:$i29 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V by adding a 
resistor, 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i 46: $1 39 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is — 4V to 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 1 30ms. Ideal for thermocouple 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card). 

Digital I nput Card in-i 41 : $59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 LineTTL I/O dg-i48:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-144: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45:$79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-i52:$is 

3'/2 by 4V2 in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




ST-143 




CL-144 




RE-140 




IN-141 




AD-142 



Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously, lncredibly.it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 1 0.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half, full, wave), 
scale factor, units, holding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (MO-1 03). Send for SC-1 4 9 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board 

Stepper Motor Driver st-i43.$79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V. bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-1 03) + ST-143: PA-181: $99 

Stepper Motors mo-i 03: $1 5or4for$39 

Pancake type, 2Va" dia, 'A" shaft, 7.5°/step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec. 1 2V. 36 ohm. bipolar. 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter, 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT. AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot 
Tandy 1 000. 1 000 EX& SX, 1 200, 3000. Uses one short slot 
Apple II, II+. He. Uses any slot. 
TRS-80 Model 1 02, 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus'" 
Model 1 00. Uses40 pin socket (Socket is duplicated on adapter) 
TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4 D Fits 50 pin bus. (Withhard disk, use Y-cable). 
TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. (50 pin bus is recessedV 
TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l. 
Color Computers (Tandy).Fits ROM slot. MuUioak. or Y-cabie 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for twp A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $12). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



AR-133...S69 
AR-133..S69 
AR-134...S49 
AR-136...S69 
AR-135...S69 
AR-132...S49 
AR-137...S62 
AR-131...S39 
AR-138...S49 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa. MC, checks, M.O. welcome, 
NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add S3. 00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Overseas add 10% 




ALPHA 



[Pi 

a division of Sigma Industries. Inc. 

242 W. Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 




Technical info: 



(203) 656-1806 



K?v y 800 221-0916 

New York orders: (7 1 8) 296-591 6 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What isCoCo Max? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




CoCo Max disk system, with Y- cable. 



Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
pull down menus, you control CoCo 
Max mruirively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 

The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 




Pull down menus Zoom In I 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fat bits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 1 5, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




Inside the Hl-Res Input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack ? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
1 0% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
49152 points! (256x192). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Packdistinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi- Res Pack. 

Electronic Typesetting... 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it,..) At a click, you can choose 
from 1 4 built in fonts each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles ! 




Printing Your Creations 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers ! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80). 





The whole family will enjoy 
CoCo Max. Here area few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80). 



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SCHNQIQ 



CORR1 



PROFIT J 




C0RP; : ; : : 
TRKES : 

;:;: : 25^. : : : : 



I 

PARTS 





Pulley" 




Table 



T TIE t. 



i-Ai*H(E 



Business graphs, charts, 
diagrams. Also memos 




Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity. 



O 



Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 



COCO MttH 
CoCo Man 



CoCo ITlax 
CoCo Ulaz 



CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



Nax 
CoCo Max 

CoCo /^tox 

CoCo Max 



CoCo max 
CoCo Ulax 

CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



Over 200 typestyles to 
ft/ choose from I 
generate flyers. 





Junior's homework 
and science projects. 
Term papers too I 



3 



Video portrait 

(with optional digitizer). 




%*} This is a cartoon. 

Steffi 

CcCofkmK 




© 



A nokv way to express 
your imagination. 



©schematics 
and f loor plans. 



CoCo Max II 

Logos and letterheads. 



System Requirements: 

Any 64K CoCo and a standard joystick or 
mouse. (The koala pad and the track ball work, 
but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a Multi-Pak or our Y-Cable. 
CoCo Max is compatible with any Radio Shack 
DOS and ADOS. 

Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes 
almost all the features of CoCo Max II except 
Shrink, Stretch, Rotate, and Glyphics. Also, it 
has 5 fonts instead of 14. 
CoCo Max is not compatible with JDOS, 
DoubleDOS, MDOS, OS-9, the X-pad, and 
Daisy Wheel Printers. 



Supported: 



Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronix, Delta 1 0, 1 0X, 1 5, 1 5 X, SG- 
10.0kidata 82A, 92, 93, C. Itoh Pro-writer, 
Apple Image-writer, Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet, 
Radio Shack DMP 100, 105, 110, 120, 200, 
400, 500, Line Printer 7, Line Printer 8, TRP- 
100, CGP-220. (DMP-1 30 use Line Printer 8), 
PMC printers, Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 15 



ing 

CoCo Max on tape $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max II (disk only) $79.95 

with Hl-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max to CoCo Max II 

New disk and manual $1 9.95 

New features of CoCo Max II: 1 4 fonts and glyphic 
font, dynamic shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive 
capability, 68 page scrapbook, point and click file 
load, color printer drivers, full error reporting. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to disk 

manuals, diskand binder . + + + „.„ $24.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price $1 9.95 

Super Picture Disks #1, #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks $29.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny* 



Font Editor Option 

A font is a set of characters of a 
particular style. CoCo Max includes 
1 5 fonts. You can create new fonts of 
letters, or even symbols or graphics 
with the font editor. Examples: set of 
symbols for electronics, foreign 
alphabets, etc $19.95 

Video Digitizer DS-69 

This new Low Cost Digitizer is the 
next step in sophistication for your 
CoCo Max system. With the DS-69 
you will be able to digitize and bring 
into CoCo Max a frame from any video 
source: VCR, tuner, or video camera. 
Comes complete with detailed 
manual and C-SEE software on disk. 
Multi-Pak is required. 

New Low Price Save $50 $99.95 

New: faster DS-69A $1 49.95 



Colorware Incorporated 

COLORWARE 79-04 A Jamaica Avenue 

Woodhaven, NY 11421 



800 221 -091 6 

Orders only. 

NY & Info: (71 8) 298-591 6 
Hours: 9-5 Eastern time. 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
We accept Visa, MC, checks, M.O 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
NY and CT : add saies tax. 
Shipping to Canada is $5.00 
Overseas, FPO. APO add 10% 



50 CLS:PRINT@13 3, "personal check 
printer 11 : PRINT@2j35 , "BY 11 : PRINT@2 
63 /'ROBERT A. GREEN 11 : PRINT@32 6 , " 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1986": FOR Z=lT02j3j3 
j3:NEXTZ 

60 CLS : PRINT@ 1 6 2 , 11 PLACE PERSONAL 
CHECK IN YOUR PRINTER AND TURN 
THE PRINTER ON . 11 : PRINT@2 9j3 , "HIT 
<ENTER> TO CONTINUE" ; : INPUTZ$ 

70 D$="MONTH AND DAY" : Y$=" YEAR" : 

A$="AMOUNT-digit s" : AW$=" AMOUNT-p 

rinted" :N$="NAME" : P$="PAY TO" :M$ 

= "MEMO" :LY$=" ONLY" : NL=j3 

80 CLS: PRINT" ENTER THE CURRENT M 

ONTH AND DAY" ; : INPUTDA$ 

90 PRINT : PRINTY$ ; : LINEINPUT" ? "; 

YR$ 

100 PRINT : PRINTP$ ;: LINEINPUT"? " 
;PA$ 

IF LEN(PA$)>35 THEN GOT044j3 
12j3 PRINT : PRINTA$ ;: INPUTAM 
13j3 IFAM>99999 . 99 THEN GOT046j3 
14 0 PRINT : PRINTAW$ ; " ? " : LINEINPUT 
"";AM$ 

15J3 IF LEN(AM$)>45 THEN GOT048j3 
16j3 PRINT : PRINTM$ ;: LINEINPUT"? " 
;MM$ 

17j3 IF LEN(MM$)>2 5 THEN GOT05j3j3 
18j3 PRINT: PRINT" IS THIS INFORMAT 
ION CORRECT?" : PRINT" <Y> YES - <N 
> NO"; 

19j3 C$=INKEY$ 

200 IF C$=""THEN GOT019j3 

210 CLS: IF C$ = "N" OR C$="n" THEN 

GOT02 2j3 ELSE GOT03 2j3 
22j3 PRINT" 1 " ;D$,DA$:PRINT"2 ";Y 
$, YR$:PRINT"3 " ; P$ , PA$ : PRINT" 4 " 
;A$ / AM:PRINT"5 " ; AW$ : PRINT AM $ : PR 
INT" 6 ";M$,MM$ 

230 PRINT :PRINT"WHICH LINE IS IN 
CORRECT" :INPUTNL: IF NL>6 THEN GO 
T02 3j3 

2 4j3 PRINT: PRINT"ENTER CORRECT" 
25j3 IF NL=1 THEN PRINTD$ ; : INPUTD 
A$ 

260 IF NL=2 THEN PRINT Y$ ;: INPUTY 
R$ 

27j3 IF NL=3 THEN PRINTN$ ; : INPUTP 
A$:IF LEN(PA$)>3 5 THEN GOT04 4j3 
28j3 IF NL=4 THEN PRINTA$ ; : INPUTA 
M:IF AM>99999.99 THEN GOT046j3 
29j3 IF NL=5 THEN PRINTAW$ ;: INPUT 
AM$:IFLEN(AM$)>4 5 THEN GOT048j3 
3 (did IF NL=6 THEN PRINTM$ ; : INPUTM 
M$:IF LEN(MM$)>2 5 THEN GOT05j3j3 
31j3 CLS:PRINTD$,DA$:PRINTY$,YR$: 
PRINTP$ , PA$ : PRINTA$ , AM : PRINTAW$ : 



PRINTAM$ : PRINTM$ , MM$ : GOTO 18 j3 
3 2 j3 CLS : PRINT@ 17 j3 , " PRINTING" : YR$ 
=RIGHT$ (YR$ , 2 ) :LL=LEN(DA$) :AD=43 
-LL 

33(3 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (27) CHR$(56) 
34j3 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , TAB (AD) DA$ 
; : PRINT#-2 ,",";: PRINT#-2 , TAB (4 6) 
YR$ 

350 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 8 ) PA$ ; 
:PRINT#-2,TAB(45) ; : PRINT#-2 ,USIN 

G"**,###.##";AM 

36(3 IF LEN(AM$)<39 THEN AM$=AM$+ 
LY$ 

37(3 ZZ=44-LEN(AM$) 
38j3 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 1 ) AM$ ; 
:PRINT#-2, (STRING$ (ZZ,CHR$ (42) ) ) 
39j3 FOR L=l TO 4 : PRINT#-2 : NEXTL: 
PRINT#-2 ,TAB(5)MM$ 

4(3(3 PRINT@16j3 , "DO YOU WANT TO PR 
INT ANOTHER COPY OF THE SAME 
CHECK?": PRINT: PRINT"HIT <Y> IF Y 
ES, <S> FOR ANOTHER CHECK, SAME 
DATE, <N> FOR A NEW DATE, OR <E> 

TO END PROGRAM. " 
41j3 X$=INKEY$ 
42j3 IF X$=""THEN GOT041j3 
43(3 IF X$ = "Y" OR X$ = "y" THEN GOT 
0 32j3 ELSE IF X$ = "S" OR X$="s" T 
HEN CLS:GOT01j3j3 ELSE IF X$ = "N" 0 
R X$="n" THEN GOT07j3 ELSE IF X$ = 
"E"OR X$="e" THEN CLS : END ELSE G 
OT041j3 

44(3 CLS:PRINT"LINE SPACE IS LIMI 
TED TO 3 5 CHARACTERS — TRY 

AGAIN . " 

45(3 IF NL=3 THEN GOT027j3 ELSE GO 
T01(3(3 

46(3 CLS: PRINT "AMOUNT OF CHECK IS 
LIMITED TO $99,999.99 IN THIS 
PROGRAM — — TRY AGAIN . " 

47j3 IF NL=4 THEN GOT028j3 ELSE GO 

T012j3 

48j3 CLS:PRINT"SPACE FOR THE WRIT 
TEN AMOUNT IS LIMITED TO 45 CHAR 
ACTERS ~ — TRY AGAIN." 
490 IF NL=5 THEN GOT029j3 ELSE GO 
T014j3 

500 CLS: PRINT" SPACE FOR THE MEMO 
IS LIMITED T02 5 CHARACTERS — T 
RY AGAIN. 11 : PRINT 

51J0 IF NL=6 THEN GOT03j3j3 ELSE GO 
T016j3 



24 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Only NRI teaches you to service all com 
as you build your own fully IBM; 
compatible microcomputer 



With computers firmly established in 
of fices— and more and more new 
applications being developed for every 
facet of business— the demand for 
trained computer service technicians 
surges forward. The Department of 
Labor estimates that computer service 
jobs will actually double in the next ten 
years— a faster growth rate then for any 
other occupation. 

Total systems training 

No computer stands alone. . . 
it's part of a total system. And if 
you want to learn to service and repair 
computers, you have to understand 
computer systems. Only NRI includes a 
powerful computer system as part of 
your training, centered around the new, 
fully IBM-compatible Sanyo 880 Series 
computer. 

As part of your training, you'll build 
this highly rated, 16-bit , IBM-compatible 
computer system. You'll assemble 
Sanyo's "intelligent" keyboard, 
install the power supply and disk 
drive and interface the high- 
resolution monitor. The 880 
Computer has two operating 
speeds: standard IBM speed 
of 4.77 MHz and a remarkable 
turbo speed of 8 MHz. It's con- 
fidence-building, real-world 
experience that includes training 
in programming, circuit design 
and peripheral maintenance. 

No experience necessary— 
NRI builds it in 

Even if you've never had any previous 
training in electronics, you can succeed 
with NRI training. You'll start with the 
basics, then rapidly build on them to 
master such concepts as digital logic, 
microprocessor design, and computer 
memory. You'll build and test advanced 
electronic circuits using the exclusive 
NRI Discovery Lab®, professional digital 
multimeter, and logic probe. Like your 
computer, they're all yours to keep as 





Your Nfli total systems 1 raining Includes all of 
this- NRI Discovery Lab - 1o design and modify circuits • 
Four-function digital multimeter with walk you through Instruction 
on audio tape • Digital logic probe for visual examination o( 
computer circuits * Sanyo 380 Series Computer with "Intelligent" 
keyboard and 360K double-density, double-sided disk drive 
* High resolution monochrome monitor » 8K ROM, 256K 
RAM * Bundled software including QW BASIC, MS DOS, 
WordStar, CalcSlar • Reference manuals, schema I Fes, 
and bite sized lessons. 





NRI is the only 
technical school that 
trains you on a total 
computersystenv 
You'll install and 
check keyboard, 
power supply, disk 
drive, ana monitor, 
following step-by- 
step directions. 



part of your 
training. You even 
get some of the 



most popular software, including WordStar, 
CalcStar, G W Basic and MS DOS. 



Send for 100-page free catalog 

Send the coupon today for NRI's 100- 
page, full-color catalog, with all the facts 
about at-home computer training. Read 
detailed descriptions of each lesson, 
each experiment you perform. See each 
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with and keep. And check out NRI 
training in other high-tech fields such 
as Robotics, Data Communications, 
TV/Audio/ Video Servicing, and more. 



SEND COUPON TODAY FOR FREE NRI CATALOG! 





SCHOOLS 

McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 

3939 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington. DC 20016 

We'll give you tomorrow. 



205-027 



For Career courses 
approved under Gl 8ill 

□ check for details 



CHECK ONE FREE CATALOG ONLY 



if 

□ Compuler Eleclronics 

□ TV/Audio/Video Servicing 

□ Satellite Electronics 

□ Robotics & Industrial Control 

□ Data Communications 



□ Industrial Electronics 

□ Communication Eleclronics 

□ Electronic Design Technology 

□ Telephone Servicing 

□ Digital Electronics Servicing 

□ Basic Electronics 

□ Electricians 



□ Appliance Seirvicing 
^ Small Engine Repair 

□ Air Conditioning, Heating, & 
Refrigeration 

□ Locksmithlng & Electronic Security 

□ Building Construction 

□ Automotive Seivicing 

□ Photography 

□ Bookkeeping & Accounling 



Name (Please print) 



Age 



Street 



C>ly. , S:.i:ii.'7ij: 



Accreted hy Ihir National HOJTie Study Courtci 



000-000 



32K 




16K 


Disk 




ECB Mod. 



categories. Using these symbols allows 
automatic net calculations at various 
points in the CoCo Accounting pro- 
gram. Categories that do not begin with 
a plus or minus sign are excluded from 
net calculations, but are included in all 
other summary tracking reports. 

Use Option 3 to add new data. This 
option is designed to be used on a 
monthly basis. Upon entry, it asks for 
the month and assumes all data entered 
thereafter is for the same month. To add 
data lor a different month, simply use 
CLEAR to return to the previous menu 
and reenter Option 3. This is where you 
create the database from which all other 
information is derived. You may enter 
a brief description and dollar amount 
for any account. 

Option 4 is used to view the database 
and to delete any entries. A deleted 
entry will appear in the database with 
DELETED as its description, but will not 
be printed to tape/ disk or printer, or 
used in any calculations. Thus, when 
saving the database to tape or disk, the 
entry is, in fact, deleted. 

If an error is made in data entry using 
Option 3, use Option 4 to delete the 
incorrect information and go back to 
Option 3 to enter the correct informa- 
tion. 

Sort Data is used to sort the database 
by month or account. This will make it 



easier for you to locate a particular 
entry. A 64K machine holds 360 entries. 
For a I6K machine, change l ine 40 to 
E=120 and Line 30 to CLERR 2000. It 
will hold approximately 120 entries. 

Option 3 giv$S the totals of any 
account over the 12 month period. 
Monthly Nets, Option 4, gives the nets 
(breach of the 12 months based on the 
way you defined your accounts (with + 
or ) at setup. 

The strength of the program is Op- 
tion 5, Print Summaries. Upon entering 
this option, you are presented with a 
menu from which you select informa- 
tion to be displayed to the screen, 
printer, or both. The options include 
Year-to-Date Account Totals, One 
Month Account Totals, Single Account 
Summary, Monthly Nets, Account 
Data (Printer), Account Names (Print- 
er) and Main Menu. The first and 
second options also give nets. All screen 
outputs can be printed by pressing P (as 
indicated at the bottom of the screens). 

The last two choices are for printer 
output only. Account Date would be 
very useful for income tax records. It 
prints out all items in the database 
assigned to a particular account so you 
can see where the year-to-dale total 
came from. Account Names, Option 6, 
prints out a handy cross reference to the 
main menu account code letters. < 



I* or Tape Systems 

To allow the CoCo Accountant to be 
used with cassette tape systems, make 
the following changes: 



205 PRINTS196, 4 'REWIND TfiPE - 
PRESS PLRY * ' 

230 OPEN * * I ' ' ,8-1 , * * ACCOUNT ' ■ 
240 INPUTB- 1 ,R1$( I ) 
250 IF EOF ( - 1 ) THEN 270 

255 INPUTtt-l,D$(N,l) 

256 INPUT8-1,D$(N,2) 

257 INPUTtt-l,D(N,l) 

258 INPUTtt-l,D(N,2) 
300 CLOSEB-1:GDTQ100 

1905 PRINT5194, 4 'REWIND TAPE - 
PRESS PLAY & RECORD' ' 
1930 OPEN 4 4 0 ' \tt-l, 4 4 ACCOUNT 1 * 
1940 PRINTB - 1 , Al$ ( I ) 

1955 PRINTtt-l,D$(N,l) 

1956 PRINTtt-l,D$(N,2) 

1957 PRINTtt-l,D(N,l) 

1958 PRINT8-1,D(N,2) 
1965 CLOSEt4-l:GOTO100 



(You may address questions about 
this program to Mr. Phillips at 12 
Wilbur Blvd.. Poughkeepsie. NY/2603. 
Please enclose an SASEfor a reply. )\3 



The listing: ACCOUNT 




1 CLS : PRINT@ 2 3 2," COCO ACCOUNTANT 
ii 

2 'J.A.PHILLIPS 

3 f 12 WILBUR BLVD. 

4 1 POUGHKEEPSIE , NY 12 603 

5 1 3/8/84 
lj3 GOTO30 

12 CLS :PRINT@2 31, "SORTING ENTRY 



# !f N: RETURN 

15 CLS : PRINT@2 3J3 , "MAX OF "E" ENT 
RIES" : FORJ=lT01j3j3j3 : NEXT 
17 GOTO10J3 
3J3 CLEAR 7J3J3J3 
4J3 E=36j3 

5J3 DIMD$(E+1,2) :DIMD(E+1,2) : DIMA 

$(26) :DIMA1$(2 6) :DIMY$(2) :DIMY(2 

) :DIMT(2 6) : DIM MT(12) 

6j3 DE$ = "== (DELETED) ==" 

70 A2$=STRING$ (8, " . ") 

75 S$=STRING$ (31, " ") 

8J3 F0RI=1T026 

82 A$ (I) =CHR$ (64+1) 

84 A1$(I)=A2$ 

8 6 NEXT 

9j3 F0RX=1T02J3J3:NEXT 

Ij3j3 CLS:PRINT@7 2, "COCO ACCOUNTAN 

rpil 

1J35 PRINT@132 , "<1> LOAD OLD DATA 
ii 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 




_ • • • 1 

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V.V. TZZiSNhli 



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#•••••••••'■■*•*• 



HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 

and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by March 
25 and we'll begin your friends' 
subscriptions with the May issue 

Of RAINBOW. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



J From: 



I 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



i 



□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp. date 

Signature 



Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. , 



110 PRINT@164, l! <2> 
CCOUNTS" 

115 PRINT@196, lf <3> 
12)3 PRINT@228, "<4> 
ATA 11 

125 PRINT@260, "<5> 
ES 11 

130 PRINT@292 , lf <6> 
135 PRINT@324, fl <7> 



DEFINE/VIEW A 

ADD NEW DATA" 
VIEW/DELETE D 

PRINT SUMMARI 

SORT DATA" 
SAVE NEW DATA 



= 11 ;D 



it 



140 PRINT@388 , "ENTER <1-7>";:INP 

UTQ 

145 IFQ>7ORQ<1THEN100 

150 ON Q GOTO200, 1300,400, 700,10 

00,1600,1900 
200 CLS:N=1 

205 PRINT@196, "INSERT DATA DISK 
NOW" 

210 PRINT@228, "PRESS <ENTER> TO 
LOAD" 

215 PRINT@260 , "OR ENTER <M>ENU 
" ; :LINEINPUTQ$ 

220 IFQ$<>" "ANDQ$<>"M" THEN 200 
225 IFQ$=""THEN2 30ELSE100 
230 OPEN "I" , #1, "ACCOUNT/DAT" 
235 FOR I=1T02 6 
240 INPUT#1, Al$ (I) 
245 NEXT 

250 IF EOF(1)THEN270 

255 INPUT#1,D$(N, 1) 

256 INPUT#1,D$(N, 2) 

257 INPUT#1, D(N, 1) 

258 INPUT#1,D(N,2) 
2 60 N=N+1:GOTO250 
270 FOR I=N TO E 

280 D$ ( I , 1) ="" : D$ ( I , 2 ) =" " : D ( I , 1) 

=0:D(I,2)=0 

2 90 NEXT 

300 CLOSE#1:GOTO100 
400 N=l 

405 IFD$(N,2)=" "THEN4 15 
410 N=N+1:GOTO405 
415 IF N>E THEN15 

420 CLS : PRINT@228 , "ENTER MONTH < 

1-12>" ; : INPUTQ 

425 IFQ<1ORQ>12THEN420 

430 M=Q 

435 D(N,1)=M 

440 A=1:GOTO1305 

445 D$(N,1)=A$(I) 

450 CLS: PRINT@68, "ACCOUNT DATA E 
NTRY #";N 

455 PRINT@129, "MONTH = ";D(N,1) 
457 PRINT@141 , "ACCOUNT = ";A1$(I 

) 

460 PRINT@193 , "DESCRIPTION. = " 
LINEINPUTQ$ 
470 IFQ$<>""THEN475 



INPUT 



472 D$(N,2)="NONE":GOTO480 
475 D$(N,2)=LEFT$(Q$,14) 
480 PRINT@193,S$ 
485 PRINT@19 3 , "DESCRIPTION 
$(N,2) 

490 PRINT @2 5 7 , "AMOUNT = "; 
Q 

500 D(N,2)=Q 

505 N=N+1:IF N>E THEN 15 
510 GOTO 43 5 
700 N=l 

705 CLS: PRINT " # MA DESCRIPT 

ION AMOUNT" 

710 F0RI=1T013 

715 IFD$ (N, 2 ) =" "THEN 770 

720 PRINT USING" ###" ;N; : PRINT TA 

B(4) ; : PRINT USING" ##" ;D(N, 1) ; : PR 

INT TAB ( 7 ) ; 

730 PRINTD$ ( N , 1 ) ; TAB ( 9 ) ; 

740 PRINT USING"% %" ; 

D$ (N,2) ; : PRINT TAB (24); 

750 PRINT USING"####.##";D(N,2) 

7 60 N=N+1 

765 NEXT 

770 PRINT@450 , "<ENTER>=SCROLL 
<999>=QUIT" 

775 PRINT@482 , " < ENTRY # >= VI EW /DEL 
ETE" ; : INPUTQ 

777 IFD$(N,2)=""THEN N=l 
780 IFQ=999THEN100 
785 IF Q>E THEN15 
790 IFQ=0THEN705 

792 CLS : PRINT@7 5 , "ENTRY #"Q 

793 PRINT@131, "DESCRIPTION: "D$ ( 
Q/2) 

794 PRINT@230, "<D>ELETE OR <V>IE 
W" 

795 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$o"D"ANDQ$o"V 
"THEN795 

796 IFQ$="D"THEN800 
798 N=Q:GOTO705 

800 D$(Q,2)=DE$:N=Q 

810 GOTO705 

1000 CLS:N=1 

1005 PRINT@73, f 

1010 PRINT@132 

T TOTALS" 

1015 PRINT@164 

UNT TOTALS" 

1017 PRINT@196 

NT SUMMARY" 

1019 PRINT@228 
ii 



1020 PRINT@260 

(PRINTER) " 
1025 PRINT@292 
S (PRINTER) " 
1027 PRINT@324 



PRINT OPTIONS" 
<1> Y-T-D ACCOUN 

<2> 1 -MONTH ACCO 

<3> SINGLE ACCOU 

<4> MONTHLY NETS 

<5> ACCOUNT DATA 



<6> ACCOUNT NAME 



<7> MAIN MENU" 



March 1987 THE RAfNBOW 29 



1,03)3 PRINT@388 , "ENTER <l-7>" ; : IN 
PUTQ 

1)335 IFQ<10RQ>7THEN1)3)3)3 

1)336 ON Q 00101)34)3,1)338 , 21)3)3, 225 

)3, 118)3, 2)3)3)3, 1)3)3 

1)338 CLS:PRINT@22 8, "ENTER MONTH 

<1-12>" ; : INPUTM1 

1)339 IF MK10RM1>12THEN1)338 

1)34)3 CLS: PRINT© 2 2 7, "CALCULATING 

ACCOUNT TOTALS" 

1)35)3 Z=)3 

1)355 FOR I = 1T026:T(I)=)3:NEXT 

1)365 IFD$ (N, 2) =" "THEN 11)3)3 

1)372 IFQ=2AND D(N,1) <> Ml THEN1 

)395 

1)373 IFD$(N,2)=DE$THEN1)395 I 
1)38)3 I=ASC(D$(N, 1) )-64 
1)39)3 T(I)=T(I)+D(N,2) 

I) 395 N=N+l:GOT01)365 

II) 3)3 CLS 

11)35 IFQ=1THENPRINT#-Z , TAB (6) ;"Y 
EAR-TO- DATE TOTALS" 

11) 38 IFQ=2THENPRINT#-Z , TAB ( 9 ) ;"M 
0NTH"M1 "TOTALS" 

111) 3 IFZ=2THENPRINT#-Z 
1115 FOR I=1T013 

112) 3 PRINT#-Z,TAB(3) ;A$(I) ;TAB(6 

) ; 

1125 PRINT#-Z,USING"######.##";T 

(i) ; 

113) 3 PRINT#-Z,TAB(17) ;A$(I+13) ;T 
AB(2)3) ; 

1135 PRINT#-Z,USING"######. ##" ;T 
(1+13) 

114) 3 NEXT 

1145 IF Z=2THENPRINT#-Z ELSE1155 

115) 3 PRINT#-Z :GOT0116)3 

1155 PRINT@483 , "<P>RINT OR <M>EN 
U OR <N>ET" ; 

116) 3 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$o"P"ANDQ$<>" 
M"ANDQ$<>"N"THEN116)3 

1165 IFQ$="M"THEN1)3)3)3 
1167 IFQ$="N"THEN125)3 

117) 3 Z=2 :GOT011)35 

118) 3 P=l:GOT013)35 

1184 CLS: PRINT© 2 2 6, "PRINTING DAT 
A FOR ACCOUNT ";A$(I) 

1185 N=l 

119) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(11) ;A$(I)"="A1 
$(I) :PRINT#-2 

119 5 PRINT#-2, "MONTH" ;TAB(8) ;"DE 
SCRIPTION" ; TAB (23) ; " TOTAL" 

12) 3)3 IFD$ (N, 2 ) = " "THEN12 3 5 
12)32 IFD$(N,2)=DE$THEN123)3 

121) 3 IFD$(N, 1)<>A$(I)THEN123)3 

1215 PRINT#-2,USING"###";D(N,1) ; 

1216 PRINT#-2,TAB(8) ; 

122) 3 PRINT#-2,USING"% 



%";D$(N,2) ; 
1221 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(23) ; 
12 2 5 PRINT#-2 ,USING"####. ##" ;D(N 
,2) 

123) 3 N=N+1: GOTO 12)3)3 
1235 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2 

124) 3 GOT0118)3 

125) 3 Z=)3:T1=)3:T2=)3:T3=)3 
1252 FOR I=1T026 

1254 IFLEFT$ (Al$ (I) , 1 ) ="-"THENT2 
=T2+T(I) 

1256 IFLEFT$ (Al$ (I) , 1 ) ="+"THENTl 
=T1+T(I) 

126) 3 NEXT 
1262 T3=T1-T2 
1264 CLS 

1266 IFZ=)3THENPRINT 

1268 IFQ=1THENPRINT#-Z , TAB ( 8 ) ;"Y 

EAR-TO-DATE NET" 

127) 3 IFQ=2THENPRINT#-Z,TAB(lj3) ;" 
M0NTH"M1"NET" 

1272 PRINT#-Z 

1274 PRINT#-Z,TAB(5) ;"INCOME";TA 
B(18) ; 

1276 PRI NT #-Z, USING" ###### . ##" ;T 
1 

1278 PRINT#-Z,TAB(5) ; "DEBITS" ;TA 
B(18) ; 

128) 3 PRINT#-Z,USING"######. ##";T 

2 

1282 PRINT#-Z,TAB(18) ;STRING$(9, 

1284 PRINT#-Z,TAB(5) ;"NET";TAB(1 
8) ; 

128 6 PRINT #-Z ,USING" ###### . ##" ;T 
3 

1288 PRINT#-Z:PRINT#-Z:IFZ=2THEN 
1294 

129) 3 PRINT@294, "<P>RINT OR <R>ET 
URN" 

1292 PRINT@353, "NOTE: YOU CAN DE 
CLARE ACCOUNTS" : PRINT@385, "AS IN 
COME/DEBITS BY PLACING A": PRINT© 
417,"+/- IN THE FIRST CHARACTER 
OF" 

1293 PRINT@449, "THE ACCOUNT NAME 
USING OPTION" :PRINT@481, "<2> OF 
THE MAIN MENU. " ; 

1294 Q$=INKEY$: IFQ$o"P"ANDQ$<>" 
R"THEN1294 

1296 IFQ$="R"THENZ=)3ELSE1298 

1297 GOT011)3)3 

1298 Z=2:GOT01266 
13)3)3 D=l 

13)35 CLS :PRINT@12, "ACCOUNTS" 
131)3 F0RI = 1T013 

1315 PRINT@ (3+1*32) ,A$ (I) " "Al$ 
(I) 



30 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



132j3 PRINT@ (17 + 1*32) ,A$ (1+13) 11 
"Al$ (1+13) 
1325 NEXT 

133j3 PRINT@48j3, "PRESS <A-Z> OR < 
CLEAR> TO QUIT"; 

1335 Q$=INKEY$: IFQ$= lf "THEN1335 
134j3 IFQ$=CHR$(12)THEN14j3j3 

1345 F0RI=1T026:IFQ$=CHR$(64+I)T 
HEN13 5j3 

1346 NEXT 

1347 GOT01335 
IFP=lTHEN13 8j3 
IFP1=1THEN1385 
IFA=lTHEN13 9j3 
PRINT@48j3,S$; 

PRINT© 4 80, "ENTER ACCOUNT NA 
; :LINEINPUTQ$ 



135j3 
1351 
1352 
1353 
1354 
ME 



it 



136j3 IFQ$ = ""THENA1$ (I) =A2$ELSE13 
70 

1365 GOT013j35 

137j3 A1$(I)=LEFT$(Q$,8) :GOT013j35 
138j3 P=j3:GOT01184 
1385 Pl=j3:GOT0211j3 
139j3 A=j3:GOT0445 
14j3j3 IFP=10RPl=lTHEN141j3 
14j35 IFD=10RA=lTHEN142j3 
P=j3 : Pl=j3 : GOT01j3j3j3 
D=j3:A=j3:GOT01j3j3 
CLS:N=1 

PRINT §1)3 6, "SORT OPTIONS" 
PRINT@166, "<1> SORT BY MONT 



141)3 
142j3 

16j35 
1607 
H" 

161) 3 
UNT" 
1615 
1617 
PUTQ 

162) 3 
1625 



PRINT@198, "<2> SORT BY ACCO 

PRINT@23j3, "<3> MAIN MENU" 
PRINT@294, "ENTER <1-3>";:IN 



I FQ<)3ANDQ> 3 THEN 1 6)3)3 
ON Q GOT0163)3, 172)3, 1)3)3 

163) 3 FOR I=1T012 
1635 GOSUB12 

164) 3 IFD$(N / 2)=""THEN1)3)3 

1645 IF D(N,1)=I THEN165)3ELSE165 
5 

165) 3 N=N+l:GOT01635 
1655 S=N 

166) 3 S=S+1 : IFD$ (5,2)=" "THEN17)3)3 
1665 IFD(S,1)<>I THEN166)3 

167) 3 Y$(1)=D$(N,1) :Y$(2)=D$(N,2) 
: Y(1)=D(N, 1) : Y(2)=D(N,2) 

1675 D$(N,1)=D$(S,1) :D$(N,2)=D$( 
S,2):D(N,1)=D(S,1) :D(N / 2)=D(S / 2) 

168) 3 D$(S,1)=Y$(1) :D$(S,2)=Y$(2) 
:D(S,1)=Y(1) :D(S / 2)=Y(2) 



Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

Last Christmas we introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Designer program 
(■ee review April 86 Rainbow). It has 
been to popular that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphici Designer. The 
Coco Graphici Designer produces 
greeting cardi plui bannen and ligni. 
This program will further increase the 
uiefullnen and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allows you to mix text and 
pictures in all your creations. The 
program feature* picture, border, and 
character font editors, eo that you can 
modify or expand the already built in 
libraries. Plus a special "grabber" utility 
is included to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library, 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of 32K, One Disk Drive 
(Disk Ext. BASIC 1.0/1. l.ADOS, or 
JD09). Printers supported include: 
Epson RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8B10, DMP-100/ 130/ 
400/ 430, Seikosha GP-100/250, Legend 
808 and Gorilla Bannana. Send a SASE 
for complete list of compatible printers. 
#C332 Coco Graphics Designer 129.95 

Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional supplementary library 
diskette containing over one hundred 
additional pictures is available. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 *U.BE. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packs containing; 120 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelopes in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your productions unforgettable, 
#C274 Paper Pack $19.96 





^ P i I i- 
CffW T IP SI 



VVKIi Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer it's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners* 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Now $19.95 

Order Cat#TBRS01 
(Was $69.95) 

You can benefit from our purchase of 
brand new WICO Trackball Controllers 
at closeout prices. This model was 
designed specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer and plugs right into the 
joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer and 
manufacturer of control devices for 
commercial arcade video games. If 
you've ever played an arcade video 
game, chances are you've used a WICO 
joystick or trackball and experienced it* 

We have bargain priced trackba 
and other computers. Call or w 



superior control:, pinpoint firini 
accuracy, and exceptional durability. 

Includes one-year limited warranty. 
Phoenolic ball offers 360-degree 
movement. Two optical encoders 
provide split-second response. 

Quick-action fire button for smooth, two 
handed arcade response and feel. Long 
6' computer connection. Heavy duty 
plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color computer 
models. 

lis for ATARI, Commodore, TI, 
rite for our price list. 



Ordering Instructions: All orders 

add $3.00 Shipping it Handling. UPS 
COD add $3.00. VISA/MC Accepted. 
NY residents add sales tax. 



Zebra Sytems, Inc 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



1685 N=N+l:G0SUB12 

1690 IF Q=2 THEN1765 

1695 GOTO1660 

1700 NEXT 

1720 FOR I=1T026 

1725 GOSUB12 

1730 IFD$(N,2)= IMI THEN100 

1735 IFD$(N,1)=A$(I)THEN1740 ELS 

E1745 

1740 N=N+1: GOT01725 
1745 S=N 

1750 S=S+l: IFD$ (3,2)=" M THEN17 70 
1755 IFD$(S,1)OA$(I)THEN1750 
1760 GOTO1670 
1765 GOTO1750 
1770 NEXT 
1900 CLS:N=1 

1905 PRINT@194, "INSERT DATA DISK 
NOW" 

1910 PRINT@22 6, "PRESS <ENTER> TO 
SAVE OR" 

1915 PRINT@258, "ENTER <M>ENU '» ; 
:LINEINPUTQ$ 

1920 IFQ$<>" "ANDQ$O"M"THEN1900 
1925 IFQ$=""THEN1930ELSE100 
1930 OPEN "0",#1, "ACCOUNT/DAT" 
1935 FOR I=1T026 
1940 PRINT#l f A1$(I) 
1945 NEXT 

1950 IF D$(N,2)=""THEN1965 
1952 IF D$(N,2)=DE$THEN1960 

1955 PRINT # 1 , D$ ( N , 1 ) 

1956 PRINT#1,D$(N,2) 

1957 PRINT#1, D(N, 1) 

1958 PRINT#1 , D (N , 2 ) 
I960 N=N+1:GOTO1950 
1965 CLOSE#1:GOTO100 

2000 CLS :PRINT@22 9, "PRINTING ACC 
OUNT NAMES" 

2003 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(11) ; " 
ACCOUNTS" 

2004 PRINT#-2 

2005 FOR I=1T013 

2010 PRINT#-2,TAB(3) ;A$(I) " = "A1$ 
(I) ; TAB (17) ;A$(I+13) "=" Al$ ( 1+13 ) 
2015 NEXT 

2020 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 

2025 GOTO1000 

2100 N=1:Z=0 

2105 P1=1:GOTO1305 

2110 CLS :PRINT@227, "CALCULATING 

ACCOUNT TOTALS" 

2115 F0RX=1T012 : MT (X) =0 : NEXT 

2120 IFD$(N, 2)=""THEN2145 

2125 IFD$(N, 1) <>A$ (I)THEN2140 

2130 IFD$ (N,2)=DE$THEN2140 

2135 MT(D(N,1) )=MT(D(N,1) )+D(N,2 

) 



2140 N=N+1: GOTO 2120 
2145 CLS 

2150 PRINT#-Z,TAB(12) ;A1$(I) :IFZ 
=2THENPRINT#-Z 

2155 PRINT#-Z / TAB(8) ; "MONTH" ;TAB 
(19) ; "TOTAL" 
2160 F0RX=1T012 

2165 PRINT#-Z,TAB(6) ;:PRINT#-Z,U 
SING"#####";X; 

2170 PRINT#-Z,TAB(15) ; :PRINT#-Z , 

USING"######.##";MT(X) 

2175 NEXT 

2180 PRINT#-Z 

2183 IFMN=1THEN2310 

2185 IFZ=0THEN2195 

2190 PRINT#-Z:GOTO2200 

2195 PRINT@483, "<P>RINT OR <N>EX 

T ACCOUNT" l 

2200 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$<>"P" ANDQ$<>" 
N"THEN2200 

2205 IFQ$="N"THEN2100 
2210 Z=2:GOTO2150 

2 2 50 CLS :PRINT@228 / "CALCULATING 
MONTHLY NETS" 
2255 N=1:Z=0 

2260 F0RX=1T012 : MT (X) =0 : NEXT 

2265 IFD$(N / 2)=" "THEN2 29 5 

2270 IFD$(N,2)=DE$THEN2290 

2275 I=ASC(D$(N,1) )-64 

2 2 80 IFLEFT$(A1$(I) , 1) ="-"THENMT 

(D(N,1) )=MT(D(N,1) )-D(N,2) 

2285 IFLEFT$ (Al$ (I) , 1) ="+"THENMT 

(D(N, 1) )=MT(D(N, 1) )+D(N, 2) 
2290 N=N+l:GOT022 65 
2295 CLS 

2297 PRINT#-Z , TAB ( 11) ;"NET INCOM 
E" 

2300 IFZ=2THENPRINT#-Z 
2305 MN=l:GOT02155 

2310 MN=0: IFZ=0THEN2312 

2311 PRINT#-Z:GOT02313 

2312 PRINT@487, "<P>RINT OR <M>EN 
U"; 

2313 Q$ = INKEY$: IFQ$o"P"ANDQ$<>" 
M"THEN2313 

2315 IFQ$="M"THEN1000 

2320 Z=2:GOT02297 ^ 



See You at 
RAIN BO Wf est — Chicago 

April 10-12 



32 THE RAINBOW March 1987 

T 



d 





-t. !-> ge? 


^ MicroWorld 


) = 


-f 


CdCd ^ s 


I- 


FORDAB L_ EI . _ 






CoCo II 
CoCo III 
Drive 0 


$87 

$169 

$235 




Disks (SS) 
Disks (DS) 


$7.50/box 
$8.00/box 


CM-8 Monitor 


$248 




DMP-430 
DMP-130 


$545 
$265 




Deluxe Joystick 

Mouse 

MultiPak 


$24 
$40 
$62 




Tandy 1 000 EX 
Tandy 1000 SX 


$495 
$790 




Speech Cartridge 
CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 
Joysticks (pair) 


$35 
$35 
$9 




VM-4 Monitor 
CM-10 Monitor 
CM-5 Monitor 


$99 

$360 

$240 





CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 


$130 


MultiPak Upgrade (26-3024) 


$8 


MultiPak Upgrade (26-3124) 


$7 



Please Note - Our ads ir« submitted 
early, so prices art subject to change!!! 
We appreciate your cooperation & 
understanding in this matter. 



Method of Payment: 

MC, Visa, Am. Ex. - Sorry. No Citiline! 
Certified Check or Money Order. 
Personal Checks - Allow 1 week to cli 



Minimum order 15.00 



imJEK IPIRH®E BLUmr A^AttlL&IBaJt 

ass« ®ifif &jul v&Bmir m^m^s^jsL 



Full TANDY 

Warranty 
10 OS TANDY 

PRODUCTS 
FREE Shipping 



==> CALL <= 
In Pa: 

21 5/759-7794 
In N. J. : 

201/735-9560 




COMPUTER CENTER 



MicroWorld 



) 



230 Moorestown Road, Wind Gap, PA 18091 



Laneco Plaza, Clinton, N.J. 08809 



ALL PR I C 



INCLUDE SHIPPING ! ! ! 



1005fe TANDY EQUIPMENT WITH FULL 

RADIO SHACK WARRANTY 




Most Howard Medical products are COCO 3 compatible, 
some require special patches. Please inquire when you order. 

GUARANTEE — Ho ward Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with 
a company through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try it out, test it for compatability. If you're not 
happy with it for any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back, (less shippin; 



COCO MAX II 

Lets the graphic capabilities of your CoCo EXPLODE 
on the screen or on paper, $yg ^5 

Y CABLE 

Needed to connect CoCo Max and disk drive at same 
time. ^5 

MAX FONTS 

Ihree sets include 72 different fonts for typesetting 
bulletins, brochures and announcements 

COLORING BOOK™ 

by Glenside Color Computer Club 

Twenty-two pictures of clip-art add the professional 

look to your pamphlet, menu or catalog sheets J^c 

($2 shipping (or eatti product J 





NEW FROM 



CONTROLLER 

The DC-4 is a scaled down versionof the popular DC- 
2 without a parallel port or memory minder. It 
includes a switch with 2 ROM sockets, JDOS, manual 
and such features as gold connectors and metal box. 
h accesses double sided drives and accepts RSDOS 
1.1 for Radio Shack compatibility. 

($2 shipping) 




ling) $65 



TEAC DISK 
55B DRIVE 



The Teac 55B fits into the spare slots in the Radio Shack 

501 Disk Drive. This bare drive features 40 Track, double 

sided 360K potential and a six £4 44 

millisecond track ,„ . . . v y l ^lX 

seek rate ($2 sh.ppmg) v IUC 

The DD-2 combines the Teac 55B with our V2 height 
horizontal case and heavy duty #^4 44 

powe, supply (S2 shipping) $IOO 

DE-1 disk enclosure Vt height horizontal with heavy duly power 
supply. Includes all mounting hardware. 

1 



($2 shipping) '^35*00 

DE-2 full height disk enclosure. Accepts two ji heigh 1 drives* 
Includes power supply for 2 drives and $39 50 



all mounting hardwan 



($2 shipping) 



RS DOS ROM CHIP 



ROM chip fits inside disk controller 24 pin tits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compaiibiiiiy 

Reg. $40 COH 

each 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial 
output to run a parallel printer like Star or Epson. In- 
cludes all cables. Add $10 for modem attachment. 



($2 shipping) 



$68*5 




WORD PACK RS 

is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display. It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A. To get started, you 
need OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, 
and a monochrome monitor 



($2 shipping) 

New basic dnver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9. 



$10 



ITE 



Howard Medical has located and tested a select few 
typewriters that can connect to the Tandy Color 
Computer and we offer them here at mail order 
prices. These typewriters bridge the gap between dot 
matrix and daisy wheel printers with excellent letter 
quality and keyboard access. Try one in your home 
for 30 days and if you do not agree that this is the best 
of both worlds return it pre-paid for a courteous 
refund. 

OLIVETTI CX880 with built-in parallel port jrjCJ^* 
OLYMPIA ORBIT XP with built-in parallel port 

$286* 

OLYMPIA CAR ERR A with free $75 starter kit 
Needs $75 parallel interface adapter $223* 

SMITH CORONA 6100 with spell checker 
Needs $9ti parallel & serial interface adapter 

$315* 

*($7 shipping) 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 
C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S 



ORDER RAINBOW 
ON DISK NO W 
AND SAVE! 

As a special introductory 
offer, you can subscribe to 
RAINBOW ON DISK be- 
fore March 15, 1987, for 
only $90 — $9 off the reg- 
ular subscription price. 
Don't miss out — order 
today! 




It's called the premier Color Computer magazine for good 
reason. THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and most 
comprehensive publication a happy CoCo ever had ! Is there any 
wonder we get letters daily praising THE RAINBOW, the 
magazine one reader calls "A Pot Of Gold" for his Color 
Computer. 

THE RAINBOW features more programs, more information 
and more in-depth treatment of the Tandy Color Computer than 
any other source. 

A monthly issue contains more than 200 pages and up to two 
dozen programs, 14 regular columns and as many as 20 product 
reviews. And advertisements: THE RAINBOW is known as the 
medium for advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else about new 
products! Hundreds of programs are advertised in its pages 
each month. 

But what makes THE RAINBOW is its people. Nationally 
known people like Bill Barden, who has written 27 books on 
computertopicsand writes for us each month. Or, Fred Scerbo, 
who writes special programs at the request of readers. Experts 
like Dick White and Joseph Kolar, two of the most knowledge- 
able writers on BASIC. Communicators like Marty Goodman and 
Cray Augsburg, who stay abreast of telecommunications 
advances. Or, Dan Downard, RAINBOW technical editor, who 
answers our readers' toughest questions. Educators like Dr. 
Michael Plog and Steve Blyn, who show how CoCo can be used 
at home or school. Advanced programmers like Dale Puckett, 
who guide you through the sophisticated OS-9 operating 
system. Electronics experts like Tony DiStefano, who explain 
the "insides" of the CoCo. These people, and many others, visit 
you monthly through columns available only in THE RAINBOW. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the wide 
spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color Computer — from 
beginners' tutorials and arcade games to telecommunications 
and business and finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to expand your 
CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly reviews by independent 
reader reviewers take the guesswork out of buying new software 
and hardware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE RAINBOW 
to be an absolute necessity for their CoCo. With all this going 
forit, is itsurprising that morethan90percentof THE RAINBOW 
subscribers renew their subscriptions? 

We're willing to bet that, a year from now, you'll be doing the 
same. For more information call (502) 228-4492. For credit card 
orders only, you may call (800) 647-0309. 



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Two great ways to bring 
the Rainbow into your life 




THE COLOR 



New Ct»w Ctipntw 3 

CoCo 





Our 



Rainbow on Tape 
& Rainbow On Disk! 



For more than four years now, tens of thousands of 
RAINBOW readers have enjoyed the luxury of RAINBOW 
ON TAPE. Each month ourtape service subscribers receive 
all the great programs from the pages of THE RAINBOW 

(those over 20 lines long), without the trouble of having to 
type them in. 

Now, in addition to RAINBOW ON TAPE, there is 
RAINBOW ON DISK — another great way to bring THE 
RAINBOW into your life. 

Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your cassette 
player or the disk into your drive. No more lost weekends 
typing, typing, typing. Assoon asyou read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and run. 
No work. No wait. 

Yes, you could type the programs in yourself, as many 
peopledo. But all of them? Every month? Theresimply isn't 
enough time. 

Just think how your software library will grow. With your 
first year's subscription, you'll get almost 250 new pro- 
grams: games, utilities, business programs, home applica- 
tions — the full spectrum of THE RAINBOW'S offerings 
without the specter of keying in page after page of listings 
and then debugging. And, with RAINBOW ON DISK, you'll 
also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — as 
we've said before, they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at 
a price that's "small potatoes." And now you even have a 
choice about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and return 
the attached reply card. No postage necessary. 



EPSON® LX-80 PRINTER 239 



Drive 0 and 1 269 95 

One double sided drive with doubler board and new RS 
controller so you can have the equivalent of 2 drives in 
one. You can even backup from 0 to 1 . Works with all 
CoCo's. Compatible w/RS DOS. No special operating 
system needed. 



The logical choice for your CoCo! 80 column, 100 CPS 
in draft mode, 16 CPS in near letter quality mode, IK 
Buffer, compatible with CoCo max. 1 year warranty* 
LX-80 Tractor Feed 27.95. Serial to parallel converter 
starting at only 49.95. 

*We are authorized Epson* Sales and Service 




Both our drive 0 and 1 in one case, with cable and R.S. instructions, screwdriver required. Please specify either 

controller. The best just got better! catalog #26-3129 or 26-3131 when ordering. 



8 




SUPER DRIVE SALE 

Special prices on new first quality disk drives. They evenhaveGOLD connectors on the back . . . Some other places charge 229.00 for 
dr. 1 and 299.00 for dr. 0, not us! Drive 1 is I, Second Color Computer drive, orexternalmodHI, IV. Drive 1 just plugs in to the extra 
connectoron your DriveO cable. Both drives are compatible with any version of the Color Computer and all versions of drives. DriveO 
is your first Color Computerdriveandcomescomplete with cable, manual, and R.S. controller. Bareftill hgtSSDD drive only 79.95. 

THE COMPUTER CENTER 

901-761-4565, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN38119 
Add $4.90 for shipping and handling— Visa, MC & money orders accepted, No CODs 
Allow an additional 3 weeks for personal checks— Drive faceplates may vary slightly 

Prices subject to change without notice. Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 

Prices subject to change without notice. 



A program that lets you make 
practical financial projections 

Thrifty CoCo Handles 
What -If Calculations 



By Murray Zanger 



Frequently throughout the year, I 
find I have to carry out some 
"what if" calculations either for 
myself or for others. In my program 
library I have several financial pro- 
grams which, for example, give me a 
complete printout of a mortgage amor- 
tization schedule. Usually, I don't really 
want that extensive a result. What I 
would rather do is try out several sets 
of input data and quickly get a result for 
comparative purposes. 

Financial Planner does just that. 
After thinking about the typical finan- 
cial calculations most people might like 
to carry out, and after asking various 
friends for input, I determined that 
there are six (well, actually seven) 
common "what if" calculations that are 
most frequently wanted. 

The first is Compound Interest, 
which lets you know how rapidly your 
savings are growing. If you choose this 
option, you are led to a submenu that 
permits you to compound as often as 
daily, or as infrequently as annually. 
You can quickly and easily check how 
much more you will get if your money 
is compounded more frequently. (Not as 
much as you might think.) 

A popular option is number 2, Mort- 
gage/Loan Payments. Before you go 
seek that mortgage or loan, check out 
what your monthly payments will be 
first. Also, the program will tell you 
what your sum total payments will be. 
Very depressing! 

Option 3, Years to Reach Desired 
Amount, is for dreamers and planners. 



You have x dollars; you ultimately want 
to have y dollars for some project or 
trip. At a given interest rate, how many 
years will it take for your initial invest- 
ment to grow to your goal? 

Being a cynic (or a realist), I like 
Option 4, Yield Calculator. You see an 
ad in the paper, "Invest $1,000 with us 
today and receive $5,000 in just 20 
years," or some similar nonsense. Is this 
really a good deal? Option 4 calculates 
the actual annual yield on your invest- 
ment. 

For frugal CoCo Nuts, Option 5 is 
really two programs in one: an IRA 
calculator that lets you see how your 
annual contributions will grow until 
retirement, and a similar program that 
keeps track of the growth of your 
monthly savings contributions. You 
must assume some typical or average 
interest rate, but otherwise the calcula- 
tions are accurate. 

The last option, What Mortgage Can 
I Afford?, is for young professionals or 
couples who want to buy a home but 
don't know how large a mortgage they 
can afford. Pick the monthly payment 



Murray Zanger is a professor of organic 
chemistry at the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy and Science. He has been a 
CoCo owner for about four years and 
has found it invaluable for his work. He 
has developed several chemical applica- 
tions that utilize the text and graphics 
capabilities of the CoCo. 



you can afford, and this option will 
calculate the size of the mortgage you 
can get. 

All of the calculations have a print 
option that gives you a hard copy of the 
results. Typical printouts are shown in 
Figure 1. The options are adaptable to 
many combinations and variations that 
you may find useful. For example, 
suppose you already have a mortgage at 
some high rate. What if you re-financed 
it several points lower? What would 
your new monthly payments be? How 
much less money would you pay over 
the life of the mortgage? 

Or suppose you have been in an IRA 
for a number of years. You know what 
you have contributed and you know 
what it is worth. What average rate has 



your money been growing at? For this 
you can use Option 5 with a twist. Plug 
in your annual contributions and the 
number of years you've contributed, 
and then try different interest rates until 
you find the one that gives you the 
amount you actually have accrued. For 
the answer to these and other fascinat- 
ing money questions, give Financial 
Planner a try. 

The program itself is fairly simple in 
organization, The only difficult part 
was working out the actual equations 
needed. 

If anyone makes any improvements 
or additions to the program, I'd appre- 
ciate hearing from you. For me at least, 
this program is worth a million! 



Lines 

20-999 
1000-1900 

2000-2570 

3000-3560 

4000-4550 
5000-5270 

6000-6210 



Function 

Menu 

Compound Interest Cal- 
culation 

Mortgage/ Loan Calcula- 
tion 

Years to Reach Desired 
Amount 
Yield Calculator 
IRA/Savings Calcula- 
tions 

What Mortgage Can I 
Afford? 



(You can write to Mr. Zanger at 512 
Devon Road, Havertown, PA 19083. 
Please enclose an SASE for a re- 
sponse.) □ 



The listing: FNRNPLRN 



W 1020 



1230 
2000 
2530 
3500 



53 


4080 


165 


. 94 


5020 


173 


227 


5140 


109 


199 


6000 


154 


236 


END 


...161 



T 



20 CLS : PRINT"FINANCIAL PLANNER - 

M. ZANGER" 
22 PRINT" FEB. 12, 1986" 

25 PRINT 

30 PRINT" ************ MENU *** 
3 5 PRINT 

4)3 PRINT"1. compound interest 11 
50 PRINT"2. mortgage/loan paymen 
ts" 

60 PRINT" 3. 
ed amt . " 
70 PRINT "4. 
75 PRINT"5. 
tions" 
77 PRINT "6. 
afford" 

8J3 PRINT" ENTER YOUR CHOICE (1-6 
)" 

90 A$ = INKEY$ : IFA$ = " "THEN9)3 ELSE1 
100 A=VAL(A$) 

110 ON A GO SUB 1000 , 2000 , 3000 , 4 
000 , bfi ft ft , 6000 

1000 CLS : PRINT"compound interest 

calculation" 
1010 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "=") ; 

1012 INPUT"PRINCIPAL " ;M 

1)314 INPUT "RATE " ;R 

1016 INPUT" YEARS ";Y 



years to reach desir 

yield calculator" 
ir a/ savings contribu 

what mortgage can i 



1020 PRINT"+++++++ how compound 

ed ++++++++"; 

1030 PRINT" 1. Annually" 

1040 PRINT"2. Semi-Annually" 

1050 PRINT"3 . Daily" 

1055 PRINT"4. Monthly" 

1060 PRINT"enter your choice (1- 

4) " 

1010 A$=INKEY$: IFA$ = n "THEN1)37)3 E 

LSE 108)3 

10S0 A=VAL(A$) 

1)385 IF A=1THENC$ = " annually "ELSE 
IFA=2THENC$= "semi-annually" ELS 
EIFA=3THENC$=" daily "ELSEIFA=4THE 
NC$="monthly" 

1090 ON A GOTO 11)3)3,111)3,112)3,11 
30 

1100 T=l : P=Y :RR=R/ 10 )3:GOT01 150 
1110 T=2:P=Y*2:RR=R/2)3)3:GOT0115)3 
1120 T=3 60: P=Y * 3 6)25 : RR=R/ 3 6000 : GO 
T0115)3 

1130 T=12 :P=Y*12 : RR=R/ 12)3)3 : GOTOl 
150 

1150 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "%") ; 
1200 TV = M*(1+RR) A P 
1210 PRINT"AFTER ";Y;" 
1220 PRINT"YOUR $";M;" 
1230 PRINT" INVESTED AT 
CENT" 

1235 PRINT" (Compounded 
124)3 PRINT"WILL BE WORTH 
1 2 50 PRINTUS ING "$$###,###.##"; TV 
1260 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "$") ; 
1300 PRINT "DO YOU WANT A HARD CO 
PY (Y/N)" 

1310 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 1310 
ELSE 1320 

1320 IF A$="N" THEN 1900 ELSE 13 



YEARS" 
DOLLARS" 
";R;" PER 

";C$;") " 
ii . 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 37 



30 

133)3 IF A$<" Y" ORA$>"Y" THEN 131 
)3 ELSE GOT015)3)3 

15)3)3 PRINT#-2,STRING$(55,"-") 

151) 2) PRINT#-2 , "AFTER " ; Y ; " YEARS 

it 

152) 3 PRINT#-2 , "YOUR $";M;" DOLLA 
RS" 

153) 2) PRINT#-2 , "INVESTED AT ";R;" 
PERCENT (COMPOUNDED ";C$;")" 

154) 2) PRINT#-2 , "WILL BE WORTH "; 

155) 2) PRINT#-2, USING" $###, ###.##" 

;TV 

156) 2) PRINT#-2 , STRING$ (55, "-") 

157) 2) PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (1)3) 

19)3)3 PRINT"another calculation?" 

191) 3 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$ = " "THEN19 l^EL 
SE192)3 

192) 3 IFA$ = "N"THEN END ELSE 193)3 

193) 3 IFA$-"Y" THEN 2)3 ELSE IF A$ 
<"Y"ORA$>"Y" THEN 19)3)3 

2)3)3)3 CLS: PRINT" mortgage paymen 
t calculation" : PRINT 

2)31)3 INPUT"principal ";P 

2)32)3 INPUT" rate. . (%) ";R 

2)33)3 INPUT"years ";Y:YY= 

-(12*Y) 

2)34)3 R =R/ 12)3)3 
2)35)3 PRINTSTRING$ (32, "%") ; 
2)352 Z = 1-(1+R) A YY:X=Z/R 
2)36)3 MR = P/X 

2)37)3 PRINT"your monthly payment 
is "; 

2)38)3 PRINTUSING" $$# # # . ##" ;MR 
2)383 PRINT"total repayment"; 
2)385 PRINTUSING" $$###, ### . ##";MR 
*12*Y 

2) 39)3 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "%") ; 

22)3)3 PRINT" DO YOU WANT A HARD CO 
PY (Y/N)" 

221) 3 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN2 21)3EL 
SE222)3 

222) 3 IF A$-"N" THEN 19)3)3 ELSE 22 

3) 3 

228)3 IFA$<"Y"ORA$>"Y" THEN 22)3)3 
ELSE 25)3)3 

25)3)3 PRINT#-2,STRING$ (45, " = ") 

2 51)3 PRINT #-2 , "AMT. OF LOAN $" ; P 

252) 3 PRINT#-2 , "BORROWED AT %";R* 
12)3)3 

253) 3 PRINT#-2 , "FOR A PERIOD OF" ; 
Y;" YEARS" 

254) 3 PRINT#-2 , "YOUR MONTHLY PAYM 
ENT WILL BE"; 

255) 3 PRINT#-2 ,USING"$### . ##" ;MR 
2552 PRINT#-2, "YOUR TOTAL PAYMEN 
TS WILL BE"; 

2555 PRINT #-2 , USING" $$### ,###.## 



" ;MR*12*Y 

256) 3 PRINT#-2 ,STRING$ (45, " = ") 

257) 3 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (1)3) :GOT019)3)3 
3)3)3)2) CLS :PRINT"years to reach ma 
turity calcn . " 

3)31)3 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "#") ; 

3)32)3 INPUT"initial investment... 

. " ; IV 

3)33)3 INPUT"final value 

. " ; FV 

3)34)3 INPUT"interest rate 

. " ;R:R=R/1)3)3 

3)35)3 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "%") ; 

3)36)3 Y=(2 . 3)33*LOG(FV/IV) ) / (2 . 3)33 

*LOG(l+R) ) 

3)37)3 PRINT"years to reach final 
value" ; 

3) 38)3 PRINTUSING" ###.##"; Y 

3 3)3)3 PRINT" DO YOU WANT A HARD CO 
PY (Y/N)" 

331) 3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""THEN3 3 1)3 
ELSE 332)3 

332) 3 IF A$="N"THEN19)3)3 ELSE 333)3 

333) 3 IFA$>"Y"ORA$<"Y"THEN 33)3)3 E 
LSE 3 5)3)3 

35)3)3 PRINT#-2 , STRING$ (32 , " = ") : PR 
INT#-2,"IF YOU INVEST $";IV 

351) 3 PRINT#-2,"AT A RATE OF " ;R* 
1)3)3;" PERCENT" 

352) 3 PRINT#-2 , "AND WANT TO RECEI 
VE "; 

353) 3 PRINT#-2 ,USING"$# ##,##. ##" ; 
FV 

354) 3 PRINT#-2,"IT WILL TAKE "; 
3545 PRINT#-2,USING"###.##";Y; :P 
RINT#-2 , " YEARS" 

355) 3 PRINT#-2 ,STRING$ (32, " = ") 

356) 3 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (1)3) :GOT019)3)3 

4) 3)3)3 CLS: PRINT" yield cal 
culation" 

4)3)35 PRINTSTRING$ (32,"*") ; 

4)31)3 INPUT"initial investment. . $ 

" ; IV 

4^2)3 INPUT" value at maturity... $ 
" ; FV 

4)33)3 INPUT"years to maturity.... 
ii . y 

4^4)3 PRINTS TRING$ (32,"%") ; 
4)35)3 R= ( FV/IV) A ( 1/ Y) -1 : R=R* 1)3)3 
4)37)3 PRINT"your rate of interest 
is"; 

4)38)3 PRINTUSING"##. ##" ;R; :PRINT" 

% 11 

4 3)3)3 PRINT "DO YOU WANT A HARD CO 
PY (Y/N) " 

431) 3 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$ = " "THEN4 3 1)3 EL 
SE432)3 

432) 3 IFA$ = "N"THEN19)3)3ELSE433)3 



38 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



4 3 3j3 IFA$<"Y"ORA$>"Y"THEN4 3j3j3ELS 
E45j3j3 

45j3j3 PRINT#-2,STRING$ (41, "=") 
451j3 PRINT#-2,"IF YOU INVEST $" ; 
IV 

452j3 PRINT#-2 , "FOR A PERIOD OF " 
;Y;" YEARS" 

453j3 PRINT#-2 , "AND AT MATURITY W 
ILL GET $";FV 

454 p PRINT # -2 , "YOUR RATE OF RETU 
RN WILL BE "; 

4545 PRINT#-2 ,USING"## . ##" ;R; : PR 
INT#-2," PERCENT" 

455j3 PRINT#-2 ,STRING$ (41, " = ") : PR 

INT#-2 ,CHR$ (1JZJ) :GOT019j3j3 

46)3)3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) 

5j3j3j3 CLEARlj3j3j3 : CLS : PRINT"ira/sav 

ings contributions" 

5j3j32 PRINT : PRINT : PRINTSTRING$ ( 3 2 
»*») 

5j3j34 PRINT" IRA or MONTHLY SAVING 

5 (I/M)" 

5j3j36 Q$ = INKEY$:IFQ$=""THEN5j3j36 

5j3j38 IFQ$ = "M"THEN5j322 

5j31j3 INPUT"annual contribution"; 

P 

5j32j3 INPUT"annual interest rate" 
;I:GOT05j33j3 

5j322 INPUT"monthly contribution" 
;P 

5j324 INPUT" interest rate" ; 1 : 1=1/ 
12 

5j33j3 R = 1 + I/Ij3j3 

5j34j3 INPUT"number of years" ;Y 

5j345 T=Y:IF Q$ = "M"THEN T=Y*12 

5j36j3 SUM=j3 

5j37j3 FOR N = 1 TO T 

5j38j3 SI= P*R^N 

5j39j3 SUM = SUM+SI 

510j3 NEXT: CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

51j35 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "*") ; 

51j37 IFQ$ = "M"THEN5115 

51 1)3 PRINT"WITH AN ANNUAL contri 

but ion OF $";P;"@ AN interest 

rate OF ";" %";I;" AFTER- 

" ;Y; "years" ; :GOT0512j3 

5115 PRINT"WITH A MONTHLY contri 
bution OF $";P;"@ AN intere 

st rate OF ";" %";I*12;" 

AFTER" ; Y; "years" 
512 j3 PRINT" YOUR total value W 
ILL BE": 

513j3 PRINT" "; 

514j3 PRINTUSING"$$# ##";SU 

M 

515j3 PRINTSTRING$ (3 2, " * " ) ; 

516j3 PRINT "DO YOU WANT A HARD CO 

PY (Y/N)" 



517j3 A$ = INKEY$ : IFA$ = " "THEN517j3EL 
SE518j3 

518j3 IFA$ = "N"THEN19j3j3ELSE519j3 
519j3 IFA$<"Y"ORA$>"Y"THEN516j3ELS 
E52j3j3 

52j3j3 PRINT#-2,STRING$(5j3,"$") 
52j32 IF Q$ = "M"THEN 5232 
521j3 PRINT#-2 , "With an annual in 
vestment of $";P 

522j3 PRINT#-2,"At a rate of " ; I ; 
" PERCENT" 

523j3 PRINT#-2 , "For a total of "; 
Y;" Years" :GOT0524j3 
5232 PRINT#-2 , "With a monthly in 
vestment of $";P 

5234 PRINT#-2,"At a rate of ";I* 
12;" PERCENT" 

5236 PRINT#-2 , "For a total of "; 
Y;" Years" 

524j3 PRINT#-2 , "You will have a g 
rand total of "; 

525j3 PRINT#-2, USING"$$ ## 
" ; SUM 

526j3 PRINT#-2,STRING$(5j3, "$") 
5265 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (10) 
527j3 GOT019j3j3 

6j3j3j3 CLS: PRINT"WHAT MORTGAGE CA 
N YOU AFFORD?" : PRINT 
6j3j35 PRINTSTRING$ (32,"$") ; 
6j31j3 INPUT"monthly payment" ;MR 

6j32j3 INPUT"rate. . . % ";R 

6j33j3 INPUT"years " ; Y : YY 

= 12*Y:R=R/12j3j3 

6j35j3 Z=1-(1+R)*-YY:X=Z/R 
6j36j3 P=MR*X 

6j37j3 PRINT"maximum mortgage is"; 
6j38j3 PRINTUSING" $$###,###.##" ;P 
6j39j3 PRINTSTRING$ (32,"$") ; 
61j3j3 PRINT" DO YOU WANT A HARD CO 
PY (Y/N)" 

6110 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$ = " "THEN611j3 

612j3 IFA$ = "N"THENl9j3j3ELSE613j3 

613j3 PRINT#-2 ,STRING$ (5j3, " = ") 

6135 PRINT#-2,"IF MAXIMUM MONTHL 

Y PAYMENT CAN BE " ; 

615j3 PRINT#-2 , USING" $$## ,###.##»' 

;MR 

616j3 PRINT#-2,"@ A RATE OF 

%";R*12j3j3 

617j3 PRINT#-2 , "FOR " ;Y; 

" YEARS" 

618j3 PRINT#-2 , "YOUR MORTGAGE CAN 

BE "; 

619j3 PRINT#-2, USING"$$# ## 
ii • p 

62j3j3 PRINT#-2,STRING$(5j3," = ") ; 

621j3 PRINT#-2, CHR$ (lj3) :GOT019j3j3 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 39 



TONGUE IN CHEEK 



An exciting sound-generating 
peripheral for ■ computer room 




B jjmjs ^ wHfe mh Mm mm 

lit? Car %# Car Car 



By Tobin 



asting around to discover an application [quite 
possibly the best] for the 8088 microprocessor, I hit 
upon a unique system that I hope will be of interest 
to hackers everywhere. I have devised a solar-powered, 
microprocessor-controlled wind chime. I call this system the 
SPMCWC. It is a suitable sound-generating peripheral for any 
computer room, or can be used as a high-tech designer 
element wherever needed. 

As shown by the schematic, the ceramic 8088 is well-suited 
for the intended environment, and provides adequate support 
for the rest of the circuit. The circuit consists of the 
supporting 8088 microprocessor and six COM20 17 UARTs 
(universal asynchronous receiver transmitter). 

The operation of the SPMCWC is very simple. The operator 



mm ^jflttftte ^mt ^mt 

jg/6S^%hn 8889 SSS ftflt-aBtei. ^joQOOOouJooBfl jBSSSSOtt . flflg tHBl rf^h ri^h 

JBBP 'Vat, 9 mBB^tBSBk JttKF^&tBX W m «B Wm ^|^F ^|^F 

JZQT «S5 a SSS BOOy am J000T tOOQC Bflfc^ * *** BBS mm §.f gr.-f 

Qui SOS 2 BBs aS fflS 99 WOMwu*. m fflflf 'Til *x 



Schuster 



(you) must hang the system on a suitable hook. The SPMCWC 
is automatically activated when the operator releases it. Easy 
enough! 

Little Theory 

The theory behind the SPMCWC is also quite simple. The 
sun warms the Earth's surface; the heat rising from the surface 
causes air currents. The UARTs are struck by these air 
currents and begin to move around. As they move, they bump 
into other UARTs. This bumping action causes the UARTs 
to begin vibrating. This vibration, transmitted into the air, 
is perceived by us as sound. 

I hope you find the SPMCWC system as educational and 
entertaining as I have! □ 




Support Hook 



COM2017 



COM2017 



COM2017 



13 



8088 



19 



20 



140 



: 2 1 



\ 39 



31 



25 



COM2017 



J 1 



COM2017 



COM2017 



ijj M 

1 1 1 n n n 
I i 

JLJLJUU 




8088 Microprocessor 



Wire Length 
6 inches 



(6) COM2017 UART 



Notes; All components must be ce- 
ramic package. 

Keep all IC pins cut short to 
eliminate picking up signals 
from adjacent ICs. 

Position device in ade- 
quately lighted area to show 
off its unique design. 

Designed for wind velocities 
not to exceed 15 MPH. 



40 THE RAINBOW March 1987 




mm 



RAM 



TM $J*9as 

$1 1 9.95 



* ^TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3 " ° 






W 512K Fast High Quality Memory. 

W Super Easy Solclerless Installation. Installs in minutes. 

Assembled, tested, and burnecl-in. 
W Gold Connectors assure ultra high reliability. 

High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreened PC Board. 
W Ideal lor OS9 Level | 
W 2 Year Warranty. 

W Free GIME Chip Technical Specs ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
W Free 5I2K Ram Test Program (S 10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
Free MUSICA RAM Disk (S 10.00 without Turbo Ram). 




W $5 OFF TURBO RAM Disk. 

Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. 



$69.95 




INSTALLATION 

It' you know how to hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you can 
install Turbo Ram in minutes. However, if you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pay the return 
postage and guarantee it tor I year , . $15.00 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

If for any reason you wish to return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 15 clays and be charged only a 10% restocking charge. You 
may keep the GIME CHIP Technical Specs, 5 1 2 K Ram Test program 
and MUSICA RAM DISK, a S30 value. 



TURBO RAM DISK 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning fast Ram Disks to your COCO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" for last access. Single disk system users can 



use TURBO RAM DISK to easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 512K Turbo Charged COCO 3 $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is the most comprehensive modem package for the COCO 3. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto 
dial feature for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk ......... . . . . , . . ... . . . . , . ... $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE II 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 80 column-display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 20 line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and morel 

Disk $49.95 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land ot'Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest to discover the source of 
magic in the Land of Zanth. This intriguing adventure features over 2 
dozen hi-res 16 color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effects. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics look great. 
Disk $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same Junior you've seen in the Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless little monkey must overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens worth) to rescue his father, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before he finally meets 
with his big daddy. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics are superb. 
Disk $34.95 



We accept CASH. CHECK. COD. VISA and -MASTER CARD orders 
Shipping and handling US nnd CoiLidii SJ.QO 
Shipping and handling outside the US ,ind C.in.ida S5.00 
COD Charge S2.00 
Illinois residents ,idd ft'-i",, soles ia\ 




38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 




TM 



FILE EDIT HIDI H1SC 



ALL Voices Dn 
T ine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 
II Reset block 





IF YOU 



FILE EDIT HIDI HISC 



Block delete 



Block copy 



LEGEND 




I 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA tor musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo tor $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CMI47). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint 1 ) 

Super Simple Editing Supports| 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware 



t> Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

f Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels 

Transpose music to any key. 
Modify music to any tempo. 
Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose. 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
^ Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 

LYRA OPTIONS 



Solo capability 
j> Block edits are highlighted. 

Tie notes together for musical continuity 
Name of note pointed to is constantly 
displayed. 

Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece. 
Help menu makes manual virtually 
unnecessary. 

LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 
Music easily saved to tape or disk. 
Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 



LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 



$54.95 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided tor those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 tiles to LYRA 
tiles. 

(T or D) #LC164 . . , $14.95 

LYRA STEREO ENHANCER 

Gives the LYRA stereo output when used with 

the STEREO PAK or ORCHESTRA 90. 

(T or D) #LS149 ...... $14.95 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $19.95 

We accepi CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders 

Shipping and handling US and Canada . . . , , S3. 00 

Shipping and handling ouiside the US and Canada . . S3. 00 

COD Charge $2 .00 

Illinois residents add h'U% sales tax 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 0 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Tor D) #LS177 ... $19.95 

STEREO PAK 

Plugs into the COCO ROM cartridge slot allow- 
ing easy connection to your stereo system. 
#SP193 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CMI47 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 000 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark ol Radio Shack 




38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 




FILE EDIT HIDI HISC 



(Zi \T) \~\ 



HIDI Instrunents: 



8 



Q]01 Brass 1 

006 Piano 3 

013 E Drgau 5 

003 Trunpet 7 

018 Dboe 9 

021 Vibrphn B 

025 Clavier D 

043 Snaredr F 



005 Strii»9 

009 Guitar 

014 P Organ 

016 Flute 

019 Clarnet 

026 Harpsch 

032 Tinpani 

045 Percusn 



0^° 




III I r t I f i i , * 





mm MM 



I • I I , . ■; l d», 



Silk- »t +1 .. 
M F, a ~k. 



^i#f(|f|[|||||||||||jy^| 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSlCA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



Supports 16Track recording and playback 
v* Adjustable lempo. 

Over 45 Kbyles available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible). 

Record to any track. 
*> Low Level track editing. 

LYRA editing, (one voice per track) 
^ Playback from any number of tracks 
\* Quantizing to Vie. V32, Vba intervals. 



^ Filter out MIDI data: 

Key pressure Conlro1 Chan 9 e 

Program change Channel Pressure 

Pitch wheel s V stem Message 

1^ Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in bolh 
record and playback mode. 

Adjustable Key (Transposition). 

f Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing 

*> Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE 



^ Sequencer features 

*> 100% machine code. 

"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

*> Metronome 

\* Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K C0C0, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 



DX LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plentyof music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 




EARS 



CM 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



■ . . 



V'." iai Intel UaencA 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

•HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

• HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 

^% 

flWNX DISK <^ 

OH TAH > 
WIFH EVEAY 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'//' 



entd 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada h S3. 00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6Vi% sales tax 



Speech Sydti 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 





9 



T.M . 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 



WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 




SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






SUPf R VOICE. 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Device 


SSI 263 


SC-01 


SP 256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 




t 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 


10 


• 


t 


Articulation Rates 


a 


t 


1 


1 


Vocal Trad 
Filler Settings 




1 


\ 


1 


Basic unit 
of Speech 


M phortomrt 
t Qu'itlons e»ich 


64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 


1096 (3? «btolu<« l»v«H 

•Mh 6 infliction ipeoot) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 



Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 






^ BLANK OISK 
OR TAPE 
WITH CVCRY 
ORDER 



visa 9 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'/A 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V*% sales tax 



Speech Si4$t 



em$ 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 




Look What They've Done to 

My CoCos 



By Harold L. Wolff 



Our first printer was a dot-matrix 
Radio Shack D MP- 1 00 and it 
has served us very well. But we 
had a problem with it (created by me) 
which resulted in its being out of service 
for two weeks. Since my wife, Sandi, 
uses our computer system every day, 
sometimes for as much as four to six 
hours at a time, this two-week down 
time was unacceptable. 

This incident led to the development 
of the system we now have. It is this 
system that I will attempt to describe in 
my article. 

We own three CoCo 2s, and I recently 
purchased a Smith Corona L-1000 
daisy wheel printer. We have retired the 
DMP-100 to backupstatus. The L-1000 
is a marvelous printer at a good price. 
It has 16 Baud rates and parallel input. 

As you may have guessed, a major 
factor in the development of my "cheap 
and dirty" system was Sandi's substan- 
tial use of it. A 100 percent backup had 
become a major requirement. 

Back in the beginning, I installed a 
400-watt inverter to power only the 
CoCos in order to prevent data loss. 
The CoCo only consumes about 24 
watts, so a 60-watt inverter would have 



Harold Wolff is an electrical engineer 
employed by a pipeline firm in Hous- 
ton, Texas. His wife, Sandi, is a licensed 
ordained minister. She used their 
CoCos for all seminary work, including 
preparation of her thesis. 



done. I "overbought" because of the 
occasional hurricane in our area. 

The inverter has a square wave out- 
put rather than a sine wave. A square 
wave inverter is relatively cheap and 
easy to make. The 120 VAC feeds the 
power transformer which feeds the 
bridge rectifier. The CoCo works on +5 
VDC and -5 VDC regulated, so the 
square wave ultimately has no notice- 
able effect on the CoCo. The inverter is 
powered by a 1 2 VDC car battery which 
is on continuous float charge. 

Since then, I have developed a battery 
backup for the CoCo for the cost of six 
D cells and two diodes. 

I spent a long time searching for a 
CoCo diagram with no success. Finally, 
I tried Radio Shack. Within a week I 
had a complete service manual. Radio 
Shack to the rescue. 

Our CoCos are almost exclusively 
used for word processing with the Color 
Scripsit program packs, and the compu- 
ters are never turned off. In our part of 
town we average a power dip once every 
four weeks, so the battery backup 
system is a necessity, not a luxury. 

There are several ways to accomplish 
battery backup. I used a minimum 
number of parts to do it the cheapest 
and most reliable way. Since the +DC 
output of the bridge is about +9.50 VDC 
to ground, I chose to tie in the 9 VDC 
battery backup output isolated with 
diodes (see Figure I). No current will 
flow from the battery pack into the 
CoCo unless the magnitude of the 



46 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1987 



-10.79 VDC/GND 




+9.50 VDC/GND 
4 



T 

i 

T 



Figure l:Battery Backup Connections 




Added 



Add 



Jumper 



i i 



Add 
Jumper 



Figure 2: Off/ On Switch Defeat 



CoCo supply becomes less than that of 
the battery pack. The diodes inhibit the 
CoCo power supply from feeding the 
battery pack, which could possibly 
overload the power supply. I chose to 
use alkaline non-rechargeable cells. 

I tied in the positive where the cath- 
odes of D3 and D4 tie together. D3 and 
D4 are larger than D 1 and D2 since they 
supply more current to the +5 VDC 
supply than Dl and D2 supply to the 
-5 VDC supply. The -5 VDC is only 
used for the RS-232C output drivers. I 
tied the negative to the black lead of the 
secondary of the power transformer. 

You can verify that you are at the 
right diodes by checking with your 
voltmeter that there are about +9.5 volts 



from there to ground. Don't be fooled; 
the two fuses look almost like diodes. 

I also defeated the off/ on switch so 
it could not be left in the off position 
causing the battery pack to be drained 
(see Figure 2). 

I paralled two 3-amp diodes to give 
me plenty of current capacity and to 
lower the drop across the diodes on the 
battery backup system. Some people 
call this overkill, but diodes are cheap 
and I'm buying some insurance for 
pennies. 

Test the battery backup once a month 
and replace the batteries each year. To 
test the backup, have some data in 
memory you don't mind losing. Unplug 
the cord from the outlet and leave it 



unplugged for 10 seconds. Plug it back 
in. If the screen went blank or there was 
some data loss, replace the battery pack. 

The purpose of this battery backup is 
to ride through power dips. An ex- 
tended electrical outage would result in 
the battery pack being drained. A 
switch could be added so that the 120 
VAC power and the 9 VDC battery 
would be turned off simultaneously. 

For $9.95 each, I ordered upgrade 
kits for the CoCos. The kits each in- 
cluded eight 4164N/20 chips and an 
instruction sheet. There are eight plug- 
in chips to change and one solder-in 
jumper to add. This gives me 32K of 
RAM accessible in each CoCo now. The 
upgrades are not a true 64K upgrade 
since I did not install the plug-in ROM 
and did not do the necessary changes 
required to allow disk operation. I did 
a cheap and dirty upgrade which in- 
creased my RAM memory for word 
processing from 16K to 32K per CoCo. 

Now I would like to describe how two 
of our CoCos are hooked together. 



CoCo #1 



Data In 




Data Out 



GND 




CoCo #2 




Data Out 



Input 



600 MW 

Ai 
Ami 



Output 



udio ] 
pfifier \ 



GND 




RS 

CCR-81 



6 6 VU 

Meter 



Note: All cables use ground shields. All shields are tied together. 
Figure 3: Cassette Deck and VU Meter Connections 



AC PWR 



Battery 
Charger 



I 



12-Volt 
Battery 



400- 




Watt 




Inverter 





V- Cassette 
Input 



CoCo 
#1 



i 



Seriat 
Out 



Casse 
Out \ 

nr 



CL 

o 
< 



Cassette 
Outu, 



CoCo 
#2 



te 



Cassette 
Input 



Serial 



4 



600 
MW 
AMP 



Cas. 
Deck 







4PDT 

Printer 

Switch 













Printer 
L-1000 
S.C. 



Printer 
DMP-10( 

as. 



Figure 4: System One Line Configuration 



I tied the cassette output of each 
CoCo to the cassette input of the other 
one. I can send data from one CoCo to 
the other. To accomplish this I had to 
use a smal j audio amplifier to bring the 
level of the CoCo output up to the 
required input level of the other one (see 
Figure 3). 

I simply key in LORD FROM TRPE on 
the receiving CoCo and then type SRVE 
ON TRPE on the sending CoCo and, 
bingo, a cheap and dirty transfer of 
data. 

I have a cassette deck connected so I 
can record from either CoCo and play 
back to either CoCo. This two-CoCo 
system is very handy for testing a new 
recording before erasing all the data 
that has been entered. This assures we 
have a good recording before we erase. 
Wealways make two recordings and test 
them both before erasing RAM. 

In the course of my experimentation, 
I have concluded that it's best to use a 
high quality cassette recorder and com- 
puter cassette tapes. You will reduce 
your aspirin intake considerably. RERD 
ERROR becomes the norm when you use 
audio tapes and a cheap recorder. 

I also put a VU meter on my system. 
The VU meter monitors the signal level 
of what's going into the receiving CoCo. 



The CoCo is somewhat sensitive to the 
level of its input. The VU meter is used 
when transferring data between CoCos 
and when playing a tape back into the 
CoCo (see figures 3 and 4). 

A good level is about -4 on my VU 
meter. All VU meters are not created 
equal. You just need to try and see what 
works with your system. 



I have both the L-1000 and DMP-100 
printers connected so that CoCo one 
can print to the L-1000 while CoCo two 
is printing to the DMP-100. I have a 
4PDT switch wired so I can swap, by 
flipping a switch, which CoCo sends 
data to which printer (see figures 4 and 

5). 

I have a very versatile system with 
64K usable RAM with the Color Scrip- 
sits, a cassette deck, transfer capability, 
two printers and one very happy wife. 

Notes and Trivia 

32K RAM equates to about 20 pages 
of double-spaced text. We try not to 
exceed 16K blocks for our tape file. Of 
course, this is optional, but I feel that 
the longer the file, the more apt you are 
to have a RERD problem. 

I have also found that where you 
locate your cassette recorder in relation 
to the CoCo, TV and printer sometimes 
makes a difference when trying to SAVE 
and LORD from tape. I located our 
cassette about J2 inches below all of our 
other equipment on a special shelf. 

The amplifier must be off while the 
cassette deck is in use. The cassette deck 
must be off (not in use and not in pause) 
when data transfer is being used. 

We do not use the automatic cassette 
start/ stop feature of the CoCo, but I 
suppose you could just parallel the two 
isolated contacts out of each CoCo to 
start and stop the cassette. 

I hope youVe enjoyed this brief tour 
of our system. Maybe this will give you 
ideas for designing your own. □ 




CoCo #1 



DMP-100 
Input 



CoCo «2 



Printer 
Swtich 
4PDT 




L-1000 
Input 



Figure 5: Printer Switch Wiring 



THE RAINBOW 



March 19B7 



More than a book . . . 



A MILESTONE 



Cum I 





AINBdwGUIDE TC 



readable code to build complex programs. The 
OS-9 operating system and the high level 
languages it brings you make the job easy. 



OS-9 has so n 
need a gu 
as The Con 
show you how 
potential < 
implemen 
philosoph 



Co-autho 



Dibble 



The 



demystifie 
gives the Co 
flexibility than 
on the ma 



confiden 



With The C 



you will b 
the multite 



standard 
For only 



[t that you 
thorough 



the 



Also Available! 

I he Rainbow Guide To OS-9 Disk. An adjunc 
the book for the tutorials, and the pack 
lonathv proarams. Two-Disk Packaae 




Coming soon also by Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble: 
A complete Rainbow guide to using OS-9 Level II on the Color Computer 3. 



□ Please send me The Complete 
Rainbow Guide To OS-9 for $19.95. 



□ Please send me The Rainbow Guide 
To OS-9 Disk (a package of two 
disks) for $31.* Does not include 
book. 




Name 



Signature 



Address 



City 



□ My check in the amount of 



State 



ZIP. 



is enclosed. 



□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 





_Card Expiration Date 



Mail to: The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 per book shipping and handling in U.S. Outside U.S. add $4 per book. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. KY residents 
add 5% sales tax. \n order to hold down costs, we do not bill. ALL ORDERS IN U.S. FUNDS. 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation. 



Ask for our 
FREE CoCo Catalogs 




XOMPUTERWARE 



Nuke the Love Boat! 



by Steve Hartford 

Master terrorist Abdul Mullah has sent a suicide squad 
of fanatics to destroy the last symbol of the American way. 
Their mission: 

Nuke the Love Boat! 

They are bent on detonating their stolen nuclear device 
onboard but you stumbled upon it first. With the help of 
Doc, Julie, Gopher, the rest of the crew and an assortmenf 
of guest stars, you must form a commando army to keep 
the bomb out of terrorist hands. 

Your forces hold the bow. The terrorists are attacking 
from the stern. They have a modern arsenal. Your only 
weapons are the ones your ingenuity can create. Fire 
hoses against firearms, the battle wages from deck to 
deck. 

This strategy simulation is much more than a sitcom. It's 
a race against time and all the odds. The fate of prime 
time America rests in your hands. Can you and the crew 
stop Abdul Mullah before he: Nukes the Love Boat? 

This simulation is fully mouse/joystick driven with pull 
down menus and wi ndows. It takes full advantage of the 
CoCo 3's graphics. If your CoCo has 51 2K, it will be used as 
a fast Ramdisk. This is an adventure in strategy and an 
in-depth exploration of the CoCo 3's real capabilities. 

Requires CoCo 3, mouse or joystick, Disk only $34.95 




Return of Junior's Revenge 

The best graphics you've ever seen on 
a Color Computer 31 Junior (with your 
help) has to make it through all sorts of 
obstacles to rescue his father from the 
mean zookeeper. You must get him 
through the swamp and the jungle, 
guide him up vines, and help him 
avoid the chompers and more before 
he finds his father, the King. This is a 
great arcade and adventure that 
really takes advantage of the graphic 
capabilities with 16 colors and 320 x 
192 graphics. It's superb on a compo- 
site color monitor, RGB analog moni- 
tor, or TV. Also works great with 51 2K. 

Requires CoCo 3 t Disk $34.95 



The Magic of Zanth 

Dragons . . . Demons . . . Griffins . . . 
Centaurs . . . kind of stirs the imagina- 
tion, doesn't it? You have been sent on 
a quest to discover the source of the 
magic in the Land of Zanth. Watch the 
16 color graphics come alive with over 
2 dozen hi-res animated screens. There 
are A voice music and sound effects, 
and speech (when used with the 
Tandy SSC pak). The graphics look 
great on either a composite color 
monitor, RGB analog monitor, or TV. It 
takes advantage of 512K if available. 
Excellent graphics, and an excellent 
game. 

Requires 128K, CoCo 3, Disk $34 95 
(SSC pak optional) 




Call or Write to: 




COMPUTERWARE < 619 > 

Box 668 • Encfnltas, CA • 92024 



Name _ 

Address 
Cny 



Siaie 



Zip 



Yes! Send me your FREE catalogl CoCo □ 

VISA MasterCard 

Card Exj 

Signal ure 



Hem 



Price 



Shipping 

Surface — $? minimum 

2% for orders over SI 00 
Air cr Canada — $5 minimum 

5% for orders over SI 00 
Checks are delayed for bank c\ea r ance 



6% C3hf Sales Tax 
COD Acid $5 
Shipping' 
lOML 



51 2K Memory Expansion Board 

ONLY $109.95 

• Easy to install 

• Complete with RAM 

• Simple instructions included 




CoCo 3 Ramdisk & 
Memory Diagnostics 

• 512K memory diagnostics includes rotating bit 
convergence, and latency text. 

• Double ramdisk creates two full featured separate 
drive ramdisksl 

• Master copy program includes copy with verify, 
non-aiphabetic and alphabetic copies. 

Requires CoCo3, 51 2K, RSDOS $19.95 



celebrates the CoCo 3! ! ! 




by Scott Cabit 

This is the screen editor everyone has 
been waiting for! Screen Star is clearly the 
most powerful editing product ever avail- 
able on the Color Computer. 

WordStar Implementation 

What makes it so powerful? Screen Star 
implements the popular WordStar editing 
capabilities. If you know or use WordStar 
on any other computer, you already know 
how to use Screen Star on your CoCo! 
Plus, what you learn with Screen Star you 
can use on nearly any other computer 
you use later. 

Edit Files Larger than Memory 

Since Screen Star uses the disk as an 
extension of memory, it will edit files larger 
than memory. You are not confined to 
small text or program files! 

Block Commands 

With a keystroke you can mark the start 
and end of a block, then move copy, or 
delete the block with another keystroke. 

Cursor Movement 

An array of powerful cursor commands 
help you to move left or right one charac- 
ter, or one word, or one line; scroll forward 
or back one line, one screen, one block; 
jump to the start or end of the line or the 
screen, block, or file. 



Find & Find/Replace Commands 

Full implementation of find and find/ 
replace commands make mass changes 
and searches a snap. This is so time saving 
when programming or word processing! 

Parameter Commands 

Personalize your editing environment 
using the parameter commands. Set 
tabs, toggle the video, access the OS-9 
Shell, and choose wordwrap. CoCo 3 
users can define up to 10 functions keys 
for fast, repetitive functions. 

Smart Speller Included 

Smart Speller is included in the pack- 
age too! This is a revolutionary new idea in 
spelling checker programs. Unlike most 
spelling checkers which require a huge 
dictionary file containing every word you 
ever wish to use, Smart Speller utilizes a 
relatively small dictionary which contains 
the most common English misspellings 
and their correct spellings. This makes 
Smart Speller much easier to use, since it 
will not stop at every word and requires 
much less space. 

Smart Speller will also recognize any 
abbreviations you commonly use and 
replace them with their full spellings 
automatically! This feature alone can 
save you countless hours of typing time. 



Pop-Up Help Menus 

Help is as close as a keystroke. At any 
time you can bring up a concise list of 
commands and functions to help you use 
Screen Star's full capabilities. 

Closing Commands 

Not only can you exit the editor with or 
without save, but you can import or 
export files whenever you need them. 

Use with Text Formatter 

Screen Star works especially well with 
Computerware's OS-9 Text Formatter to 
provide a full word processing team. You 
simply imbed the Text Formatter com- 
mands in your Screen Star file. It will then 
be printed in style with headers, footers, 
pagination, justification, etc. We offer a 
special package price for this powerful 
duo! 

Level 1 for CoCo 1 & CoCo 2 

Screen Star uses OS-9. The original 
CoCo and CoCo 2 are supported under 
Level 1. A special 51 x 24 screen driver is 
provided (and required) to make avail- 
able the added screen capabilities. 

Level 2 and CoCo 3 

CoCo 3 users can run Screen Star with 
either Level 1 or Level 2 OS-9 and have 
the added advantage of the ALT and 
function keys. The Level 2 screen driver 
provided (and required) offers extended 
capabilities for scrolling and display fea- 
tures on an 80 x 24 screen. 

All versions included 

All versions are included in the Screen 
Star package, so you can enjoy its power 
on any CoCo you use! 

Requires 64K Disk $49.95 
With Text Formatter $74.95 
(Save $10!) 



Ask for our FREE CoCo Catalog! 




At last, an easy way to get beautiful 
documents and letters with OS-9 1 You 
need not buy and learn another editor. 
This Text Formatter interfaces with any edi- 
tor that produces standord ASCII text files 
including Computerware's Advanced 
Editor, Radio Shack's TS Edit, and Compu- 
terware's new Screen Star. You simply 
imbed any of the dozens of print com- 
mands in your text file and let the Text 
Formatter print your beautifully formatted 
text for you. 



OS-9 Text Formatter 



Page and Line Directives: 

Text Formatter includes commands for 
left and right justification, page breaks, 
special spacing, automatic pagination 
for your given number of lines per page 
and the width of the lines, automatic 
page numbering, and more. 

Centering, Tabs, and Special Printing: 

There are many ways to format your text 
with centering, indenting, tabs, and 
underlining. Also included is the ability to 
send escape and control codes to your 
printer to utilize its special features. 



Headers and Footers: 

You can direct the Text Formatter to put 
a constant heading or footing with date, 
page number, or your special phrase on 
the left, right, or in the middle of the top or 
bottom of the page. 

Special Features 

Other important features include 
macros for often used sequences and 
formatting, relative arguments for setting 
spacing directives, upper and lower case 
modes, non printable remarks, and more! 

The Text Formatter makes changing the 
whole look and format of your document 
as easy as a few keystrokes. You have no 
excuse for not having the most profes- 
sional looking documents! 

Requires 64K, OS-9 $3495 



CuCo $ 

Disk 



SOT 



7 




The Barret Puzzle is a -single-unit puzzle that 
contains a tola I of 23 movable colored balls, There 
are two rings, each holding 10 balls, and a plunger 
that moves 15 of the balls up and down through l he rings 
The balls arc arranged in six colors, lour each ol five 
colors, and three gray 

While there are fewer possible combinations with this 
puzzle than with the Rubik's cube, this one is much more 
difficult to solve because of the number ol moves 
necessary lo make a simple change, 

Instructions for using the program are in the listing, 
so just type it in and run, The colors have been chosen 
lor an RGB monitor, The program saves to disk as listed; 
to save to cassette, just change all tils to U Is. 

i in joy yourself and good luck; you'll need it! □ 

Paul liuttaeavoli fives in Alameda, California, and works 
at the Ciarvmotu Country Cluh. lie has been programming 
/// e ( \) C \ f ft >r s i.x vears t ami t tsex fits Cotv ' u> riU} ^ lt ' 
"(< mu k C fan 1 1 ei H BS . 



140 , , . 
510 
-1010 . . 
3070 . , 



. .178 6010 187 

. 206 20020 ,..172 

. .228 20190 . 223 

. ..97 END ..... .71 



The listing: BARREL 

i)3 f *> BARREL PUZZLE<* 

*>BY PAUL D. BUTTACAVOLK* 
*>NOV. 1986<* 

11 PALETTE RGB: ON BRK GOTO IppfSfl 

12 WIDTH 4j3:CLS:LOCATEli,il:ATTR 
jS f 1,B: PRINT "*> BARREL 'FUZZLE<*''; 

13 ATTR0, 1 

14 LOCATE 11,23:PRINT"WANT INSTR 
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Look What's New at NOVASOFT! 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 




nun t 

?ov ar« od *b* HAi& itr|*t of Dr$r 
sc* a Saloon. * Bult tu 9u 
of f ic«. Hotel. Hunl Star* ud u 

Horth, Sovtk Eaii Pitt, 
tft looxf to Ttw HiVd Wtftl 



CoCo 3 Compatible only 

NEW RELEASE 

THE WILD WEST 

Get out your six shooter and polish your 
spursl Journey into the gunslinging land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch, your 
job is to keep the peace. But the notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail 
and is on his way to Dry Gulch to recover 
his hidden fortune! 

Can you set a trap to capture Black Bart? 
Or will he get you! You'll have to use every 
trick In the book, and be quick on the draw 
as well, as you talk to some unsavory 
characters. Decide what items you'll need 
to buy from the General Store, and lay a 
trap for your enemy! 

The Wild West Is designed to be played 
exclusively on the Tandy Color Com- 
puter 3.) It has several features not seen 
fn most adventures. 

•Incredible animated 320 x 192 16 color hi 

resolution graphic scenes! 
•Four voice music and sound effects. 
•Save and load games in progress. 
•A vocabulary of over 100 words. 
•Automatically SPEAKS with a Tandy 

Speech Pak. 

Req uires a 128k Coco 3 and one disk drive 
Disk S25.95 




# Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Required 

Disk $21.95 



* NEW RELEASE 

FOURCUBE 

Now you can play TIC-T AC-TOE in 3D. The 
board consists of a 4x4x4 grid of cells. Pit 
your wits against the computer with six 
levels of difficulty or against your favorite 
opponent. Sound easy? Try it and you'll 
agree with us when we say its a "real 
challenge". 

Requires 32K 1 or 2 Player s 

Tape $15.95 Disk $18.95 





^ Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required 
Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 



CREM1S 





tains 

m & ffrruRji ha note 



♦ Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in ail! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

1 6K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 



* NEW RELEASE 

LUNCHTIME 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surrounded! 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hamburgers. This high res game 
features 7 difficult levels of wild entertain- 
ment. Fast paced action for either one or 
two players, Have a Burger Time. . . 
Requires 32K & Joysticks 

Taps $18.95 Disk $21.95 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man-Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. $ 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

^Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 

The King- # 

32K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian— $ 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze-* 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Kater Pillar II- * 

16K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants- if 

16K Tape $18.95 Disk $21 .95 
Buzzard Bait- $ 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 

^Equals CoCo 3 Compatible 

NOVASOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 

• Dealers welcome 

• Many more titles-write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/676-8172 





*CoCo 3 Compatible 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 




Educational Best-Sellers! 



^ P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations- 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manua l Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Joysticks Required 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II— Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new featuresf 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32K TDBI $42.95 Ta pe $39.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 
COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed above PLUS. 

Requires 128K - $89.95 



Factpack- Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-/x" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System -Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Re quires 16K Ext. Basic/ 
32K for Printer Output 
Tape $39.95 Disk $42.95 

Fractions—A Three-Program Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30,95 Diskl>35.95 




# NEW RELEASE 

GOLD FINDER 

Here's the quality you have come to expect 
from TOM MIX. Another outstanding color 
computer game. This one ranks right up 
there with "Donkey Kong". Listen to this: 
69 levels for one or two players PLUS you 
can create your own levels (up to 306 on 
a disk). Endless possibilities await you in 
this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLD FINDER. . . 

32K & Joysticks Required 

Disk $27.95 

We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 




NEW RELEASE 

THE BLACK HOLE 

For anyone who enjoys solving a challeng- 
ing logical puzzle, here is a 3-dlmensional 
puzzle composed of 63 numbered cubes 
in a 4 by 4 by 4 array that leaves one 
BLACK HOLE. You tell the computer to sort 
the cubes and the computer tells you to put 
them in numerical order. A real brain 
bender. Outstanding color and action. 
Years of entertainment. . . 

For IBM PC & Com patibles 

$24.95 

More Tandy-IBM/PC software available. 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 

• Full use of 64K RAM 

• 100% Machine Language 

• No ROM Calls 

• Selectable Drive 

• Support 1-4 drives 

• Menu Selected functions 

• "Cold Start" exit to Basic 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler-the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT- Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Disk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector-Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21.95 

Sector Inspector -Alphabetize, backup and 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Infor mation 

• Call us at 61 6/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 

• Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

• Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

• Authors-We pay top 
royalties! 





VISA 



* CoCo 3 Compatible 



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Buy the PRO-COLOR- 
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PRO-COLOR-DIR This utility will read the directory of all 
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*lf renewing, please include the mailing label from your latest issue 
of The Rainbow. 

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PO Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502-5300 
(803) 665-5676 




Foj software: 

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$37 overseas surface 
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MR-HARDWARE PROJECT 








IVfost computer games a e 
fine entertainment when vou have a 
friend over. But when you fire up your 
CoCo in a crowd, onl> a leu get to play and 
the rest just look on. My friends and family 
don't like to be left on the sidelines so I stopped 
putting my CoCo on the guest list at parties. G- 
Party, a trivia game similar to TV's Jeopardy but large 
enough to include up to 10 contestants, has again put the 

CoCo on the social registe . 
All of the fun roles are kept for the humans. The CoCo docs 
the things we don't enjoy, such as keeping score, displaying 

questions and deciding who answered first. 
The game may be played using the standard keyboard for contestant 
bidding. However, it takes on a much more realistic feel when the players 
can leave the keyboard to the M.C. and use then own game buttons. 
These are inexpensive and can be built by following the accompanying 
instructions. 




Dale Collins lives in Moorestown, New Jersey. He is a senior 
district software specialist with Motorola Computer Systems 
where he programs in C in a UNIX environment. 



■ 





58 THE RAINBOW March 1987 





March 



1987 THE RAINBOW 59 



By Dale R. Collins 



Playing the Game 

Run the BASIC program G-Party. You 
must indicate whether you want the 
contestants to share the keyboard with 
the M.C. or use separate game buttons. 
Indicate whether you will be using 
question and picture files from the tape 
or disk. 

Use Option 4 to identify the contest- 
ants. The M.C. enters the name, then 
that player must press his game button 
or a key 0 to 9 or A to Z. When there 
are no more contestants to be identified, 
press ENTER to display the player list. 
Pressing ENTER again gives the menu. 
Before each level of G- Party you must 
load your question file using Option 5. 

Single and Double G-Party 

In these rounds, the categories are 



displayed with the question values in a 
column-row grid. The name of the 
current player is displayed in the lower- 
left corner of the screen. 

The player announces his choice, 
suchas"SewIt Isfor200,"and the M.C. 
keys in the column and row numbers. 
If this question is a daily or video 
double, the selecting player must specify 
the amount he wants to wager before he 
sees the question. 

However, if this is a normal question, 
the CoCo displays the question and 
begins timing for a player to press his 
button. The first person to press his 
button is named on the screen and has 
a few seconds to answer. The M.C. must 
know the questions and answers in 
advance to be judge. Correct answers 
are logged with the right arrow, and 



incorrect answers with the left arrow. If 
no answer is logged before that player's 
time expires, or he is logged as incor- 
rect, his score is debited and the ques- 
tion is once again fair game for any 
others who want to try. If no one has 
answered correctly and no one else 
wants to try, the answer is displayed 
until the M.C. presses ENTER. 

The round continues until all ques- 
tions are used. The M.C. then returns 
to the menu using an M to load the next 
question file and start the next round. 
During a round the M.C. may also use 
A to show the last answer, T to display 
the current total score or C to correct 
a player's score. 

Final G-Party 

Only those players with a score 



Behind the Scenes: Building the Game Buttons 



By Dale R. Collins 



VJl/^fc l° ve t0 walcn TV game shows, 
▼ Y C imagining ourselves standing 
with the game button under our sweaty 
hand, believing we would leave the other 
contestants in the dust. 

Until now, our attempts to mimic TV 
competition games have been limited by 
hardware. Two contestants can make do 
with the buttons on the joysticks, but for 
a greater number, they must all crowd 
around the keyboard and screen. At best, 
only three or four have a chance at active 
play. Contestants cannot become ab- 
sorbed in the game because they must 
constantly shift to see the screen and 
press "their" key. 

I will show you how to make a set of 
10 individual game buttons that will set 



the contestants free to concentrate on the 
game. This is an excellent hardware 
project for a beginner for several reasons. 
First, the electronic components you will 
be working with are very inexpensive 
(less than $14) and readily available. 
Second, the components are all sturdy 
and not likely to be damaged by inexpe- 
rience. Third, this hardware will only be 
connected to the computer when you 
have finished construction and are ready 
to use it. There is never a phase of 
construction during which your comput- 
er is "down." Fourth, you will not need 
to open your CoCo thereby voiding the 
warranty. 

The operation of these buttons is a very 
simple thing. The joystick port is actually 




3P 



Photo of 10 game buttons and hub (center). 



a device called an analog-to-digital 
converter. Normally it monitors very 
low-voltage values determined by posi- 
tions of the joystick, and then estimates 
it on an integer scale from 0 to 63 through 
the function JOYSTI<(0). We are replac- 
ing the joystick with the set of game 
buttons which return unique voltages for 
each button pressed. Each button will 
always put out the same voltage, which 
is always expressed as the same integer 
1 to 63. Thus, our basic program only 
needs to test the value in JOYSTI<(0). If 
it has a non-zero value, we can tell which 
button is pressed. 

There is one caution to note. Because 
the voltages are so low and we are intro- 
ducing many solder joints and lengths of 
wire, the values may waver a bit for each 
button. 1 recommend that when you test 
a button that normally yields a value of 
47, you accept a range of 46 to 48 as a 
true value for that button. 

Let's get down to the business of 
assembling the game buttons. 

Drill the switch-mounting holes in the 
bottom of 10 margarine tubs and a hole 
for the wire in the side, close to the lip. 
The eleventh tub is to be the central 
location of the circuit. You will need to 
drill 10 holes for the wires to the switches 
and two more for the wires to the DIN 
plug. Drill them equally spaced around 
the side. 

Cut the wire into 12 equal pieces and 
strip the ends back X A inch. Split one 
length into two single conductors. 

Push a wire through the hole in the side 
of each button tub. Tie a knot in the wire 
so that when the wire is pulled from the 
outside of the tub there will be a little 
slack when the switch is mounted. Solder 
a conductor to each post of the 
switches. Mount the switches in the holes 
and put the lids on the tubs. 

Slide the hood of the plug a few inches 
back onto the remaining pair and one 



60 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



greater than zero are allowed to play the 
final question. The current scores are 
displayed until the M.C. presses ENTER. 
The category is displayed and each 
player should write down how much of 
his score he will be risking. After all 
players are committed, the M.C. presses 
ENTER to display the question. He 
should allow the players about 30 
seconds to write their answers before 
pressing ENTER. The players are asked 



their answers, which should be logged 
as correct with the right arrow or 
incorrect with the left arrow, and their 
wager. CoCo announces the winner. 

Entering Question Files 

You may create new sets of questions 
using Option 7. You will be prompted 
to first enter the category. Each question 
has three parts. First is the "special" 
field which is blank for most questions. 



If you want this question to be a daily 
double, put a 'D' in this field. To make 
it a video daily double, enter the name 
of the binary picture file to be loaded. 
The question and answer may each 
contain 60 characters. After you have 
entered a full set of questions, you may 
edit them individually using Option 8. 
Remember to save them using Option 
6. You may print a list of a question set 
currently in memory using Option 9. □ 




46 .... 


246 


4039 


91 


2026 


176 


4080 


149 


2095 


67 


4250 


192 


2135 


102 


4540 


253 


2212 


100 


5005 


227 


2390 


110 


5175 


26 


2545 


161 


6030 


7 


2940 


113 


END 


...103 



T 



The listing: GPARTY 

1 REM G-PARTY 1.J3 J39/29/86 
BY DALE R. COLLINS 

2 PCLEAR4 : CLEAR6j3j3j3 
5 GOT099j3j3 

2J3 REM PLAYER BID 

21 PRINT@48j3, n 

11 ; :IFPA<1THEN7J3 
2 2 IFPB$= fl K"THEN31 



23 C=44j3:REM GAME-BUTTON INPUT 

24 J=JOYSTK(J3) :C=C-l:IFC<lTHEN7j3 

25 IFJ<4THEN24 

26 PL=99 :FORI=J3TONP-l 

2 7 IFJ<PA ( I ) +2 ANDJ>PA ( I ) -2THENPL 

=1 : PA ( I ) =J3 : PA=PA-1 

28 NEXT I : IFPL=9 9THEN2 4 

2 9 GOT03 8 

31 C=440:REM KEYBOARD INPUT 

32 A$=INKEY$:C=C-1:IFC<1THEN7J3 

33 IFA$= lf 11 THEN 3 2 

34 PL=999 :FORI=j3TONP-l 

35 IFASC(A$) =PA ( I ) THENPL=I :PA(I) 
= / 0:PA=PA-l 

3 6 NEXTI : IFPL=9 9 9THEN3 2 

38 PRINT@48J3,P$ (PL) ;" - PLAYER"; 

40 REM CHECK ANSWER 

41 C=4j3j3 

42 A$=INKEY$:C=C-1:IFC<1THEN6J3 

43 IFA$=""THEN4 2 



1 QTY 


Description 


Radio Shack # 


100 feet 


22 gauge speaker wire 


278-1385 


1 


component perfboard 


276-149 


1 


6-pin DIN plug 


274-020 


1 10 


switches norm open 


275-1547 


9 


10K ohm !4-watt res. 


271-1335 


1 


22K ohm !4-watt res. 


271-1339 


I 


220K ohm !4-watt res. 


271-1350 


11 


soft margarine tubs with lids 






Figure 1: Parts List 





single wire (3 conductors). Solder the 
single wire to Pin 1 and the double to pins 
2 and 5. Solder a jumper wire connecting 
pins 2 and 3. Assemble the plug and lock 
the hood in place. 

Push the second end of all button wires 
and plug wires into the eleventh tub. Tie 
knots in each so when pulled from the 
outside of the tub they will reach about 
1 inch beyond the opposite lip. 

Place all of the resistors on the board 
to construct the circuit in Figure 2. Place 
a totally stripped wire long enough to 
connect 1 1 holes on the board starting at 
the end of R 1 1. Solder all connections on 
the board. 

Solder one of the conductors of every 
button pair to a resistor junction starting 
at the free end of Rl up to the junction 
between R9 and R10. Solder the other 



conductor in each pair onto the totally 
stripped wire on the board. Solder the 
single wire from the DIN plug Pin 1 to 
the totally stripped wire. Solder the 
conductor from Pin 5 to Rl and from Pin 
2 to the junction between R 10 and Rl 1. 

Check your connection with Figure 2. 
If they match, put the lid on this tub. 

The set of 10 game buttons should be 
connected to the right joystick port. Test 
each button by running the following 
BASIC program. 

10 PRINT JOY5TI<(0) : GOTO 10 

The value shown on the screen when 
no button is pushed should be 0. Press 
one button at a time, noting the number 
for each. They should all be unique. If 
there are any problems check your con- 
nections against Figure 2. □ 



ji 



pin 1 



pin Z 



sun 

SW2 



SUI4 




SIU7 



SW8 



s in to 



Rl 

R2 
R3 
R4 
R5 
R6 
R7 

R8 
R9 
RIO 



R11 



pin 3 



pin 5 



Figure 2 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 61 



45 IFA$=CHR$(8)THEN60 

46 IFA$<>CHR$ ( 9 ) THEN42 

50 REM GOOD ANSWER 

51 PRINTS 4 9 8, "GOOD GOOD"; 

52 P2 (PL)=P2 (PL)-hB(CO,RO) : B ( CO , R 
0) =0 : TU=PL 

53 FORI=1TO20: NEXTI 

54 GOTO2500 

60 PRINT@498, 11 BAD BAD" ; 

61 P2 (PL) =P2 ( PL) -B ( CO , RO ) 

62 FORI=1TO20 : NEXTI 
64 IFDD=1THEN2 0 

70 REM TIME LIMIT 

72 B(CO,RO)=0 

73 PRINT<§384 , "answer " : PRINT" 
";Q1$(C0,R0) ; :GOSUB502 



74 GOTO2500 

502 A$=INKEY$ 

503 RETURN 
2000 REM MENU 
2005 CLS 
2010 PRINT" 
2012 PRINT"--' 



IFA$=""THEN502 



g-party n 



2014 
2016 
2018 
2020 
2022 
2024 
2026 
2028 
2030 
2040 



PRINT"1. 
PRINT"2 . 
PRINT"3 * 
PRINT "4 . 
PRINT"5 . 
PRINT" 6 • 
PRINT"7 . 
PRINT "8 . 
PRINT "9 . 

PRINT" — 
ff 



PLAY ROUND 1" 
PLAY ROUND 2" 
PLAY FINAL" 
IDENTIFY PLAYERS" 
LOAD QUESTIONS" 
SAVE QUESTIONS" 
ENTER QUESTIONS" 
MODIFY QUESTIONS" 
PRINT Q&A SHEET" 



g-party 



it 



double g-part 



2042 PRINT" ENTER OPTION " ; : 

2044 INPUTOP 

2050 ONOP GOTO2060, 2070, 4500, 209 
0,2110,2 200,4 300, 4200, 6000 
2054 GOTO2042 

2060 REM ROUND 1 

2061 A2$=" 
2063 MX=B(0,5) 
2,064 CO=99 
2068 GOTO2500 

2070 REM ROUND 2 

2071 A2$=" 

■y II 

2072 FORCO=0TO4 : FORRO=0TO5 : B ( CO , 
RO ) =B ( CO , RO ) * 2 : NEXTRO : NEXTCO 

2073 MX=B(0, 5) 

2074 CO=99 
2078 GOTO2500 

2090 NP=0:REM I DENT PLAYERS 

2091 CLS : PRINT"ENTER PLAYER 1 S NA 
ME " ; :INPUTP$ (NP) : IFP$ (NP) = M!, THE 
N2101 

2092 IFPB$="K"THEN2098 

2093 PRINT: PRINT"PRESS YOUR BUTT 
ON TO REGISTER" ; 



2094 PI (NP) =JOYSTK(0) : IFP1 (NP) <4 
THEN2094 

2095 K=JOYSTK(0) : IFK>P1 ( NP ) THENP 
1(NP)=K 

2096 NP=NP+1:GOTO2091 

2098 PRINT"PRESS YOUR KEY TO REG 
ISTER" ; 

2099 GOSUB502 

2100 P1(NP)=ASC(A$) :NP=NP+1:G0T0 

2091 

2101 GOSUB2300 

2102 GOSUB502 

2103 TU=RND (NP) -1 : GOTO2000 
2110 REM LOAD Q f S 

2120 FORI=0TO4 

2121 B(I,0)=50 

2122 B(I,1)=100 

2123 B(I,2)=200 

2124 B(I,3)=300 

2125 B(I,4)=400 

2126 B (I , 5) =500 
2129 NEXTI 

213 1 CLS : PRINT "load questions fr 
om " ; :IFMD$="D"THEN2140 

2132 PRINT"tape" : PRINT : PRINT"REA 
DY TAPE - PRESS PLAY ": PRINT : PRIN 
T" ENTER FILENAME " ; : INPUTB$ 

2133 OPEN"I", #-1, B$ 

2134 FORI=0TO4 : FORJ=0TO5 

2135 INPUT#-1,H$(I,J) ,Q2$(I,J) ,Q 

$(I, J) , Ql$ ( I , J) 

213 6 NEXT J: NEXTI 

2137 CL0SE#-1 

2139 GOTO2000 

2140 PRINT ff disk" : PRINT 

214 2 PRINT" ENTER FILENAME " ; : INP 
UTB$: B$ = B$-b"/DAT" 

2144 OPEN"D" , #1,B$, 133 

2146 FIELD #1,5 AS Cl$,8 AS C2$, 

60 AS C3$, 60 AS C4$ 

2148 K=0 

2150 FORI=0TO4 : FORJ=0TO5 

2152 K=K+1: GET#1,K 

2154 H$ (I, J) =C1$ :Q2$ (I, J) =C2$ : Q$ 

(I,J)=C3$:Q1$(I, J)=C4$ 

2156 NEXTJ: NEXTI 

2160 CL0SE#1 

2199 GOTO2000 

2 200 REM SAVE QUESTIONS 

2201 CLS: PRINT"save questions to 
" ; : IFMD$="D"THEN2210 

2202 PRINT"tape" : PRINT: PRINT"REA 
DY TAPE - PRESS PLAY & RECORD » : 
PRINT" ENTER FILENAME ";:INPUTB$ 

2203 0PEN"0",#-1,B$ 

2204 FORI=0TO4 : FORJ=0TO5 

2205 PRINT #-l,H$ (I, J) , Q2$ (I , J) ,Q 
$(I, J) ,Q1$ (I, J) 

2 206 NEXTJ: NEXTI 
2207 CL0SE#-1 



62 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



2 209 GOTO2000 


2542 


GOTO2500 


2 210 PRINT"disk" : PRINT 


2545 


IFA$ = "A ,f THENGOSUB2 700 : GOT02 


2212 PRINT"ENTER FILENAME " ; : INP 


500 


UTB$ : B$=B$+"/DAT" 


256)3 


IFA$<"1"THEN2520 


2214 OPEN' 1 D ,f , #1,B$, 133 


2562 


IFA$>"5"THEN2520 


2216 FIELD#1 , 5 AS Cl$,8 AS C2$, 6 


2564 


CO=VAL(A$)-l 


0 AS C3$, 60 AS C4$ 


257)3 


GOSUB502 


2218 K=0 


2572 


IFA$<"1"THEN2520 


222)3 FORI=0TO4 :FORJ=0TO5 


2574 


IFA$>"6"THEN2520 


2224 LSETC1$=H$ (I , J) :LSETC2$=Q2$ 


2576 


RO=VAL(A$) -1 


(I, J) : LSETC3 $=Q$ ( I , J) : LSETC4$=Q1 


2578 


IFB(CO,RO) =0THEN2500 


$(I/J) 


258)3 


GOTO5000 


2225 K=K+1: PUT#1,K 


27)3)3 


REM SHOW ANSWER 


22 26 NEXTJ : NEXTI 


271)3 


IFCO=99THENRETURN 


2240 CLOSE#l 


272)3 


CLS 


2290 GOTO2000 


273)3 


PRINT"question: " : PRINT" " 


2 300 REM DISPLAY PLAYERS 


;Q$ (CO,RO) : PRINT : PRINT 


23 lj3 CLS: PRINT" total players 11 : 


274)3 


PRINT"answer : " : PRINT" " ;Q 


PRINT 


1$ (CO,RO) 


2 311 FORPA=0TONP- 1 : PA ( PA ) =PA : NEX 


278)3 


GOSUB502 


TPA 


279)3 


RETURN 


2314 FORI=lTONP-l:FORJ=lTONP-l 


29)3)3 


REM CORRECT A PLAYER ? S SCOR 


2316 IFP2 (PA(J) ) >P2 (PA (J-l) ) THEN 


E 




K=PA(J-1) :PA(J-1)=PA(J) :PA(J)=K 


291)3 


GOSUB2300 


2 318 NEXTJ: NEXTI 


292)3 


PRINT@448, "PLAYER TO CORREC 


2320 FORI=0TONP-1 


T: PLEASE IDENT"; 


2322 PRINTUSING"+##### % 


2925 


IFPB$= 1f K"THEN2950 


% ###" ;P2 (PA(I) ) f P$ (PA 


2 93)3 


J=JOYSTK(0) :IFINKEY$<> ! '"THE 


(I) ) ,P1(PA(I) ) 


N2990 


2324 NEXTI 


2932 


IFJ<4THEN2930 


2 3 90 RETURN 


294)3 


PL=99 :FORI=0TONP-1 


2 400 REM GENERAL BOARD 


2942 


IFJ<P1(I) +2ANDJ>P1 (I) -2THEN 


2 410 CLS:PRINTA2$ 


PL=I 




2420 FORJ=0TO5 : FORT=0TO4 


2944 


NEXTI 


2422 PRINT" . ";: PRINTUSING"% %" 


2946 


IFPL=99THEN2930 


;H$ (I , J) ; 


2948 


GOTO2960 


2424 NEXTI : PRINT' 1 . 11 


295)3 


GOSUB502 


2426 NEXTJ 


2952 


PL=999 : FORI=0TONP~1 


245)3 PRINT" 1 2 3 


2954 


IFASC(A$) =P1(I)THENPL=I 


-4 5 — » 


2956 


NEXTI: IFPL=999THEN2950 


24 6)3 FORJ=0TO5 


296)3 


PRINT@4 4 8," ENTER CORRECTION 


24 61 FORI= / 0TO4 


AMT 


FOR " ;P$ (PL) ; » ! S SCORE"; : IN 


2462 PRINT" ! " ; : IFB ( I , J ) =0THENPRI 


PUTK 




NT" " ;ELSEPRINTUSING"#### "; 


297)3 


P2(PL)=P2(PL)+K 


3(1, J) ; 


2 9 8)3 


GOSUB2300 


2463 NEXTI : PRINTUSING" # " ; J+l 


2982 


FORJ>1TO1000 : NEXTI 


2464 NEXTJ 


299)3 


GOSUB2500 


2 470 PRINT" 


3)3)3)3 


REM INPUT INTO A$ 




3)31)3 




2480 PRINTP$ (TU) ; " - select";: PR 


3)315 


PRINT@A9,"? ";A$;CHR$(255) ; 


INT@504 , "T A C M M ; 


n ii • 




2 490 RETURN 


3)32)3 


Z$ = INKEY$: IFZ$- !! "THEN3020 


2500 REM NORMAL PLAY 


3)33)3 


IFZ$=CHR$ (13) THENRETURN 


251)3 GOSUB2400 


3)340 


IFZ$OCHR$ (8) THENA=A+1:A$=A 


252)3 GOSUB502 


$fZ$ 


:GOTO3015 


253)3 IFA$="M"THEN2000 


3050 


A= A -1:1 FA< 1THEN 3010 


2535 IFA$= ,f C"THEN2900 


3060 


A$=LEFT$ ( A$ t A) :GOTO3015 


2539 IFA$<> f, T !, THEN2545 


4020 


REM DISPLAY CATAORY 


2 54)3 GO8UB2 300 


4030 


PRINT© 3 2 , "catagory " ;CO+l 


2541 GOSUB502 


4032 


PRINT@0 64," > <"; 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 63 



% 



% 



% 



4J035 FORJ=)3T05: Jl=j39 6+J*32: PRINT 
@J1, USING" % % »;H$(CO # J) 
; : NEXT J 

4)339 PRINTS 28 8, 11 > <" ; 

4)34)3 RETURN 

4)345 REM INPUT CATAGORY 

4J35J3 F0RJ=)3T05 

4j352 J1=J396+(J*32) :A9=Jl:GOSUB3j3 
P)3 

4)353 IFLEN (A$ ) >5THENA$=LEFT$ (A$ , 
5) 

4)354 IFA$<> n ,f THENH$ ( CO , J ) =A$ 
4)356 PRINT@J1 , USING" 
";H$(CO,J) ; 
4)358 NEXTJ 
4)359 RETURN 
4)37)3 REM INPUT Q & A 
4)371 PRINT@32,0, USING" 

% # % % % %" ; "question 

",RO+l, "type" ,Q2$ (CO.RO) ; 
4)372 PRINT@352,USING"%% % 

%";"q",Q$(CO, 

RO) ; 

4)374 PRINT@416,USING"%% % 

%";"a",Ql$(CO 

,RO) ; 

4^578 A9 = 34)3 : G0SUB3)3)3)3 : IFLEN (A$) > 
8THENA$=LEFT$ (A$ , 8 ) 
4)38)3 IFA$<>" "THENQ2 $ (CO , RO) =A$ 
4)382 PRINT@34)3, USING" % % 

" ;Q2$(CO,ro) ; 
4)384 a9=3 53 : g0sub3)3)3)3 : iflen (a$ ) > 

6j0 THENA$~LE FT $ (A$,6)3) 

4)386 IFA$<>" M THENQ$ (CO, RO) =A$ 

4)388 PRINT@353 .USING" % 

%" ;Q$ (CO,RO) ; 
4)39)3 A9=4 17 : GOSUB3)3)3)3 : IFLEN (A$) > 

6 y 0THENA$=LEFT$ (A$, 6J3) 

4)392 IFA$<>" ,, THENQl$(CO,RO)=A$ 

4)394 PRINT (§4 17, USING" % 



4)398 
4^)3)3 
4 21)3 
RINT 

422) 3 

;a$ 

4222 

423) 3 

;co 

4232 
4234 
4236 
4238 



%";Ql$(CO / RO) 

RETURN 
REM MODIFY 

CLS : PRINT" modify screen" : P 

INPUT" qUESTION OR cATAGORY" 

IFA$0"Q"ANDA$0"C"THEN2)3)3)3 
INPUT"WHICH CATAGORY (1-5)" 

IFC0<1THEN2)3)3)3 
IFCO>5THEN2)3)3j0 
CO=CO-l 

IFA$= M Q"THEN42 6)3 



modify 



enter n 



final g 



424)3 CLS: PRINT" modify 
catagory" : GOSUB4£2)3 
4244 GOSUB4)345 :GOT02)3)3)3 
4 2 5)3 GOT02)3)3j3 

4 2 6)3 INPUT M WHICH ROW (l-6) n ;RO 
4262 I FR0<1THEN 2)3)3)3 
4264 IFRO>6THEN2)3)3)3 
42 66 RO=RO-l 
4 2 8)3 CLS: PRINT" 
question" :GOSUB4£2)3 
4282 GOSUB4j37)3 
429)3 

43)3)3 REM COMPLETE ENTER 
4310 CLS: PRINT" 
ew board" 
4 32,0 FORCO=0 T04 
4322 GOSUB4)32)3 
4326 GOSUB4)345 
433)3 FORRO=)3T05 
4332 G0SUB4)37)3 
4 3 4)3 NEXTRO 
435)3 NEXTCO 
439)3 GOT02)3)3)3 
45)3)3 REM FINAL 
45)35 GOSUB23)3)3 
45)37 GOSUB5)32 

451) 3 CLS: PRINT" 
-party" : PRINT@123 , "catagory: " 

452) 3 PRINT@16j3,H$ ()3,)3) ;H$(0,1) ;H 
$03,2) ;H$(0,3) ;H$(j3,4) ;H$(J3,5) ; 

453) 3 GOSUB5)32 

454) 3 PRINT@256, "Question: " 

455) 3 PRINT@291,Q$ ()3,)3) ; 

456) 3 GOSUB5)32 

4 5 7 5 PA«J3 : FORI=^TONP-l : IFP2 ( PA ( I 
) ) >J8THENPA=PA+1ELSEPS ( PA ( I ) } =J3 
458)3 NEXTI 

4 6)3)3 PB=PA: F0RI=PB-1T0)3STEP-1 : PB 
(PB-1-I)=PA(I) : NEXTI 

461) 3 FORA9=)3TOPB~l 

462) 3 GOSUB23)3)3 

4622 PRINT@448 , P$ (PB(A9) ) 7 
4625 GOSUB5)32 

4 62 6 IFA$=CHR$ ( 8 ) THENDD=-1 : GOT04 

63)3 

4 6 27 IFA$=CHR$ ( 9 ) THENDD=1 : GOT04 6 

3)3 

4628 GOT04625 

463) 3 PRINT" ' S WAGER " ; : INPUTK 

464) 3 P2 (PB(A9) ) =P2 (PB(A9) )+K*DD 

465) 3 NEXTA9 
466$ GOSUB23)3)3 

467) 3 PRINT@448, "congradulations 
H ;P$ (PA()3) ) ; 

468) 3 GOSUB5)32 
469$ GOT02)3)3)3 

5,0)30 REM DISPLAY QUESTION 
5)3)32 DD=1 

5)3)33 A$= S INKEY$ : IFAS<>" f 'THENPRINT 



64 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



@ 448 , "someone has their key push 

ed M ; :goto5j3j33 

5j3j34 IFPB$= lf K lf THEN5j3j36 

5j3j35 J=JOYSTK(j3) : IFJ>1THENPRINT@ 

448 , "someone has their button pu 

shed" ; :GOT05j3j35 

5j3j36 IFQ2$(C0,R0) >" "THEN 
510 J3 

5J3J37 F0RPA=j3T0NP-l:PA(PA)=Pl(?A) 
:NEXTPA 

5j31j3 CLS: PRINT" question" 

5)35)3 PRINT@131,Q$(C0,R0) 

5J39J3 GOT02j3 

51j3j3 REM DAILY DOUBLE 

51j35 PL=TU:DD=2 

511j3 CLS: PRINTS 12 8,"*** DAI 
L Y ***":PRINT@16j3," D 

O U B L E" 
512)3 IFQ2$(C0,R0)O"A "AND 
Q2$ (CO,RO) <>"D "THENPRINTQ 
J396, " v i d i o" 

513j3 IFQ2$(C0,R0)="A "THEN 
PRINT@j396 ," audio" 
514j3 PRINT@224, "player - ";P$(PL 

); 

515J3 PRINT@256, "total - ";P2(PL 

) ; 

516)3 K=P2 (PL) :IFK<MX THEN K=5j3j3 
5165 PRINT @ 3 2 "limit - ";K 
517J3 PRINT@3 3 6,"" ; :INPUT"WAGER " 
;B(CO,RO) :IFB(CO,RO) >K THEN517j3 
5175 CLS: PRINT" question": 
PRINT@131,Q$(C0,R0) ; 

5177 IFQ2$(C0,R0)="D "THEN 
5198 

5178 IFQ2$(C0,R0)="A "THEN 
5190 

518J3 IFMD$="D"THENQ2 $ (CO ,R0) =Q2$ 

( CO , RO) +"/BIN" : L0ADMQ2 $ ( CO , RO ) E 

LSE CLOADMQ2 $ ( CO , RO ) 

5182 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : FORI=lTO 

10J3 : NEXT I : GOT05198 

519J3 AUDIOON:MOTORON 

5191 GOSUB5J32 

5192 AUDIOOFF :MOTOROFF 
5198 GOT04J3 

6j3j3j3 REM PRINT Q & A LIST 

6J310 PRINT#-2," LIST OF Q & 

A FOR FILE ";B$ 

6J312 PRINT#-2 

6J32J3 FORCO=j3T04 

6J322 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, "*** "; 

6J324 FORJ=j3T05: PRINT#-2 , H$ (CO, J) 

;" ";:NEXTJ:PRINT#-2, " " 

6J32 6 FORRO=j3T05 

6J328 PRINT#-2,USING"# # %% % 

% % 

%" ;CO+l,RO+l,"Q" ,Q$(CO,RO) ,Q2$( 
CO,RO) 



6)33)3 PRINT#-2, USING" 



o o 



% 



%";"A",Q1$ 

(CO,RO) 

6j332 PRINT#-2 
6j334 NEXTRO 
6J336 NEXTCO 
6J39J3 GOT02j3pj3 
99j3j3 REM SETUP 

991j3 DIMB(5,6) ,Pl(lj3) ,P2(1J3) ,PA( 
1ft) ,PB(10) 

992j3 DIMP$(lj3) ,Q$(5,6) ,Q1$(5,6) , 
Q2$(5,6) ,H$(5,6) 

993)3 CLS: PRINT" WELCOME TO CO-CO 

g-party ! " 

9932 PRINT@128 , "WILL YOU USE (G) 
AME-BUTTONS OR (K) EYBOARD FOR P 
LAYER BIDDING" ; : INPUTPB$ : IFPB$<> 
"G" ANDPB$<>"K" THEN9 9 3 2 
9938 IFPEEK(&HC0j3j3)<>&H4 4 THEN M 
D$="T" :GOT0999j3 

994J3 PRINT@256 , "WILL YOU USE (D) 
ISK OR (T) APE FOR FILE STORAGE 
" ; :INPUTMD$:IFMD$o"D"ANDMD$o"T 
"THEN9 94j3 
999J3 GOT02j3j3j3 



i 





<v Software > 



C7 



=0 



'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— ONLY $24.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting Syitem for home or business: 16k. 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement (current & YTD ), journal, ledger, 699accounts & 2350 entries 
on 32k & 64k (710 accounts & entries on 16k) (disk only). Version 1.2 has screen 
printouts. Rainbow Reviews 1.1 - 9/64 : 1.2-4/65 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95— ONLY $19.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 
fields with 255 characters per field (4060 characters/record). Sort, match & print 
any field. User friendly menu driven. Manual included (32k/64k disk only). 

Rainbow Review 3/65, Hot CoCo 1 0/65 

BOBS MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses. boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
line HELPS at all times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects 
on the screen. Can be used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. 
GRAPHICS EDITOR. Reg. $38.85— ONLY $18.85 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 
Rainbow Review 7/65, Hot CoCo 9/65 "The grephlct bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. (Avail. io/oi/65). 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, 
total due sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements. 'KEEP- 
TRAK' General Ledger tie In, account number checking, credit limit checking & 
more. User friendly/menu driven. Includes manual. $38.85 or $48.85 General 
Ledger & Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

'COCO WINDOWS' Available 10/31/85 
With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key 
board (klicks) and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create 
multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line 
numbering. Four function calculator, with memory. The above options can be 
called anytime while running or writing in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. 
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $18.85 (disk or tape) includes manual. 

CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-942-9402 



THE OTHER GUY'S SOFTware (Add $2.50 for postage & handling) 

P.O. Box H, 66 N. Main C.O.D., Monty Order, Check in U.S. Fund* 

Logan, UT 84321 (801) 753-7620 (Please epeclfy It JAM controller) 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 65 




TYPING TUTOR 



CoCo 3 
R GB Monitor 




Here's a program that's just your "type" 



The Key to Success 



By Leonard Hyre 



This program, CoCoType lll y is a 
typing tutor for your Color Com- 
puter 3. It lets would-be typists 
learn proper typing techniques, and 
may also be used by those of us whose 
typing skills are a bit rusty. To utilize 
CoCoType HI, you must have a Color 
Computer 3 and a compatible 80- 
column RGB display, such as the Tandy 
CM-8 monitor. 

After the title screen is presented, the 
program goes right to work, allowing 
the user to select from four different 
options. The first option, Beginner 



Exercises, is ideal for first-timers. Just 
place your fingers on the highlighted 
home keys and type in the displayed 
exercise. Starting with the most easily 
mastered keys, this option allows the 
beginner to get comfortable with the 
idea of typing without looking at the 
keyboard. After an exercise is correctly 
typed four times, a new one appears. 

The second option on the main menu 
is Advanced Exercises. These are sim- 
ilar in style to Option 1 , but take in the 
"tough" keys, such as the numbers. 
Option 3 presents complete words for 



the user to enter. It is suggested that this 
exercise be repeated until real profi- 
ciency is attained. 

The fourth option is Phrase and 
Sentence Exercises. As suggested by the 
title, the idea is to type in complete 
sentences. If typed correctly, a new one 
appears. If not, the same exercise is 
repeated. Completing 24 sentences 
correctly here will send the program off 
to the graduation routine. 

A few pointers concerning learning to 
type are in order here. Always rest your 
fingers on the highlighted home keys, all 
other keys being reached from this 
location. Resist looking at the keyboard 
as much as possible. You will find it very 
natural to press the proper key without 
looking after only a few short sessions. 
Remember, you will not master typing 
in a few minutes. Short practice sessions 
over a period of a few weeks will be 
required before you begin to type con- 
fidently. Lastly, don't worry about 
speed! Speed will come automatically as 
you learn to instinctively press the 
correct keys. 

Program flow is relatively straight- 
forward, with no mind-boggling tech- 
niques to ponder. As such, it may serve 
well as an introduction to program- 
ming, or as a bit of a tutorial for those 
of you new to the CoCo 3. The use of 
the high resolution screens presents 
some new concepts to those of us who 
have been banging on the CoCo 1 and 
CoCo 2 keys for years. 

When typing in the program, I make 
one strong suggestion. Line 130, which 
enables high-speed operation, also 
creates problems when trying to load or 
save files. You may wish to defer typing 
in this line until after the rest of the 




Leonard Hyre is the author of Federal Hill Software's Handicapper series and 
a number of articles for RAINBOW, He also published several articles in rainbow's 
sister publication, SOFT SECTOR, and is the author of Sanyopoly, a new Sanyo 
game from Michigan Software. 



66 



THE RAINBOW March 1 987 





• SECRETS REVEALED 

An introduction to the Color Computer III that compares the 
differences between the CoCo I/ll and the NEW CoCo III. Includes: 
GIME chip specs, CoCo II to CoCo III converter, CoCo III memory 
map and a 128K/512K RAM test. "Offers some very good information 
to programmers . " - Raixibow Review Feb '87 $19.95 

• C III GRAPHICS 

A drawing program for the CoCo III using the new Enhanced graphic 
features: 320x192 graphics, 16 of any 64 colors, plus the ability 
to Save and Load 32K screens. "Paint pretty pictures on the 
€0003." - Rainbow Review Dec '86 $19.95 

• ROLLER CONTROLLER 

Meet the challenge of super fast arcade action using the brilliant colors of the CoCo III. Six completely dif- 
ferent maddening mazes with progressive skill levels. 12SK DISK $29.95 

• FONT BONANZA 

Replace the "PLAIN" CoCo III characters from a menu of INCREDIBLE fonts or create your own * 128K DISK $29.95 

• ELITEWORD-80 

The third generation CoCo Itford Processor is here I All the powerful features, advantages and benefits of 





• FKEYS III 

A productivity enhancement that gives you the capability to add twenty (20) pre-defined functions to the CoCo 
III by using the CTL, Fl and F2 keys! $24.95 *" ~ ~ *' "™~ "~ 

• 512K UPGRADE (NOW $99,951 

Easy installation with a superior design for a reliable upgrade, processing efficiency and AVAILABLE NOW for 
the CoCo III! $99.95* A 51 2K upgrade without RAM chips $49.95* (see March '87 Rainbow Review) *-The lowest 
upgrade prices in Rainbow magazine, perioii 

• 512K RAMDISK 

Expand your processing power at a fraction of hardware costs* This fantastic feature is like adding two (2) 
more very fast / high speed disk drives to your CoCo III for only $24.95 

• VIDEO DIGITIZER III 

Take pictures with speed I The fastest CoCo Video Digitizer ever! Twenty-five (25) frames a second (3 Xs faster 
than the DS-69A1 ) Now available for the CoCo III. $149.95 Req. 128K CoCo III with a 40 pin 'Y» cable or Y-Box. 

• RGB ANALOG MONITOR 

Our monitor is much more versatile than the Tandy CM-8! Takes a variety of video inputs, including : RGB 
Analog , Color Composite and RGB TTL. Unlike the CM-8,HPMD0E 4 artifact colors don't show up BLACK and WHITE 
(when processed through the Color Composite input) $299.95 



• PAL SWITCHER 



Have the best of both worlds by being able to switch between CoCo II and CoCo III modes when using a Multi-Pak 
Interface. Req. OLDER PAL chip and MEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multi-Pak Interface $29.95 



CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 
CoCo III Monochrome driver $39.95 



CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 
512K CoCo III Computer $299.95 



All orders plus $3-00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 

SPECTRUIVI PROJECTS 

K. M 0™% % Jh # IF 8 ! jf™! CT #%, fiT*® 8 — H 9%. £ #| «^ ^% 

WW ffl H B to M m jggp ^v^m^ Hbbbbbk Sfi SB bb^b u uiiii m ^v^m^ 83 PWM n r wT 52 D B^_^k B B^^^L 

■ B BaaaaaiB ySaSa *w« ABA iw nnnnnn w* WtuuuuujdW B^^^H nffi ABA m^^Jm m n B vfl SB fl ^^^PB B ^^^BP 

B B 'BBF Tflflflfli OTfflf AT mt HI MWBBBBBpy BB> mRmmmR AT ynttttttttP B B H fflff SS B B B B 

WMMMfln' ^^tMhMW" ^ W ayHHHMBH y ^^^^^^^^^^ 4Mi I VinnnnM oWt floor ^Bp ^™ J MnMn ™™n rflp™ •iff "W™™ """* "W™" """" 1 HoHUW ^HHHAH* W 'HBHUW Wflff 



1 

program is typed in and working. Alter- 
natively, you could enter 130, 170 and 
1840 as your first lines. Then, pressing 
the BREAK key will restore the machine 
to slow speed and allow saving and 
loading files automatically. This, by the 
way, is an ideal example of the value of 
the new ON BRK command in CoCo 3 

BASIC. ■ 

The first subroutine to be called by 
the program is the title routine (lines 
1630 through 1800). Please forgive me 
for the length of this routine, but I was 
so excited with the new color and 
graphics I couldn't help myself. After 
drawing the typewriter and scrolling up 
the title, a return is made to the main 
program. 

Next, we need to read in all the data 
needed to define the var|)us exercises. 
This is handled by the routine contained 
in lines 1440 through 1510. Nothing 
fancy here, but be especially careful 
typing them in, as an error in the data 
could give very misleading errors at run 
time. 

At last, ready to start to work, the 
program draws a representation of the 
full CoCo 3 keyboard on the screen. 
This serves to help users keep their eyes 
on screen and not on the actual key- 
board. Note that the home keys are 
highlighted in a different color from the 



68 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



■ 

regular keys. The keyboard drawing 
(subroutine in Line 1 140) remains on 
the screen regardless of which exercise 
is being used. , 

Selections l and 2 from the main 
menu are controlled from a loop found 
in lines 750 through 920. When called, 
the routine first clears the upper work 
area (using HPUT to put a black mask 
over the . old text), then presents the 
exercise to be typed and awaits user 
input. 

Because text uses the HPRINT rather 
than PRINT command to put text on the 
Hi-Res screen, the INPUT statement that 
would otherwise be used in this type of 
Situation is not usable. As a substitute, 
the program creates and checks strings 
made up of a number of INKEYS com- 
mands. For example, if the exercise is 
"S FAD," the INKEYS will loop a 
number of times equal to the length of 
the exercise. 

Starting with a string of " " (noth- 
ing), the loop adds the INKEYS input to 
the start string on each pass. After the 
first pass, the string will be 'S\ after the 
second, "SF," etc. When the end is 
reached, this string is compared to the 
exercise presented to check for correct- 
ness, and appropriate action is taken. 

Incorrect answers result in a flash of 
the screen (using PALETTE) and presen- 



tation of the same exercise. Correct 
answers update the "Number Correct" 
and continue the exercise loop. Several 
error traps are built in and the option 
to exit to the menu at any prompt is 
always available. The user just presses 
the question mark key and the program 
goes back to the main menu. 

Menu options 3 and 4 basically work 
the same way, with minor variations in 
display and error-handling. Note that 
with Option 4, Phrase Practice, the user 
can abort entry of a sentence by pressing 
ENTER-? at any time. 

Throughout the program listing, you 
will find numerous uses of PALETTE, 
HPRINT, HCQLOR, HBUFF, HPUT, HGET 
and other new CoCo 3 commands. By 
noting the use in the listing and compar- 
ing it with actions on screen, you may 
be able to get a few useful tips for your 
own programming. 

Should you encounter difficulty in 
entering the program, feel free to con- 
tact me, either by mail at P.O. Box 403, 
Cambridge MD 21613, or by phone at 
(301) 228-0064 (after 5 p.m. EST). You 
may also leave me messages on the 
Delphi network in the CoCo SIG (my 
username is MUNCH). I hope you find 
CoCoType III a useful addition to your 
library of software for the new and 
powerful Color Computer 3. □ 




The listing: COCOTYPE 



1)3 ***************************** 
* * * * * * ************** 

The COCO III TYP 
* 



2J0 ' * 
ING TUTOR 
3)3 ■* 



4) 3 ■* 
yre 

5) 3 '* 



by Leonard H 



6J3 1 * REQUIRES COCO III WITH RG 
B 8)3 COL. DISPLAY * 
7)3 ■* 

* 

8 j3 ' **************************** 
******************** 



85 ' 

1) 3)3 DIM A$(36) ,B$(36) ,C$(18) ,D$( 
12) 

11) 3 ' 

12) 3 HBUFF 1,64)3)3 

13) 3 POKE 65497,)3:REM *** IT IS R 
ECOMMENDED THAT THIS LINE BE TYP 
ED IN LAST *** 

14J3 ' 

15) 8 '** ON BRK Allows Restoratio 
n To Normal Operation If Break P 
ressed 

16) 3 ' 

17) 3 ON BRK GOTO 18 4)8 

18) 3 ' 

19) 3 GOSUB 163)3:'** This is the T 
ITLE screen 

2) 3)3 GOSUB 144)3:'** This READS in 
the DATA statements 

21) 3 GOSUB 114)3:'** This draws th 
e KEYBOARD display 

22) 3 1 



A 





SHOPPING LIST 



□ C 



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Basic ROM 1,1 Chip^9rQ5: $9.95 

6847 VDG Chip^i^aS: $12.95 

6809E CPU Chip^^G5: $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Orig SAM Chip (6883) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

68766 EPROM - (Fits all Basic ROMS) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

New SAM Chip with heatsink (74LS785) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA ! s, 6809E CPU 

and SAM Chips ^5^03: (BE PREPARED) $39.95 

EPROM Programmer ~ uses 2716s up to 27512 s! Super 
fast programming! - See April f 86 review .$149.95 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $3.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Progranniing Tricks Revealed $14.95 

CoCo Memory Map $16.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks f N Execs $16.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS $19.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide $19.95 

New! New! CoCo II Service Manual (Specify CoCo II 

Catalogue model number) $29.95 

CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9 $19.95 

Guide with Two Disk Package of demo pgms ...$49.95 
Color/Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled - A completely 

commented disassembly of the CoCo ROMS ! Comprehen- 
sive three (3) Book Set - Save $10! $49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WICO Adapter- Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks. $19. 95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
WICO Trackball - Regularly $69.95 , Now only. $24. 95 
Universal Video Drvr - All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin Ext Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

Computize " Y" Box - Better than a Y cable ..$39.95 

KAMELBON Parallel Printer Interface $49.95 

Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3131) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 

DOUBLE SIDED DRIVE 0 $239.95 

512K COLOR COMPUTER III $299.95 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
COD add $2.00 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



COCO CABLES AND ... 

Printer / Modem 15 1 Extender Cable $14.95 

Tired of i^i^lucj^ino, devices from your RS232 port? 

Try a RS232 "Y" Cable $19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick / Mouse 10 1 E>ct Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

CoCo III An a 1 og RGB monitor cable (Specify manu- 
facturer and model number) $24.95 

15" Mult i-Pak / Rcm Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
ROM Paks further away $27.95 

40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

Triple RS232 Switcher - Now easily select any one 

of three RS232 peripherals $39.95 

12 EilL Triple "Y" Cable - Hook up any three (3) 

Voice/Word/RS232/Digitizer PAKs $39.95 

Special! Four (4) Drive Disk Cable $49.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

C-10 tapes in any quantity 59 cents 

5 1/4 " Diskettes , any quantity 79 cents 

0S-9 Quick Reference Guide $3.95 

RoiTipak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCo I $19.95 

The Magic Box - Load Mod I/III Basic program tapes 

into the CoCo $24.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs (Disk 1.0 

1.1, JDOS) in a J&M disk controller $29.95 

Qrig CoCol "D" Rev motherboard . Includes all chips 
(SAM, CPU, PIA's, VDG) except RAM and Ext Basic ! 

Fantastic source for Spare Parts! $39.95 

256K RAM Chips (Set of 8) $39.95 

H.3L-57 Keyboard - CoCo III version! Comes complete 
with special FREE Function Key Software ....$59.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE . .$99.95 
1200 Baud Mod em (Hayes compatible) Auto-dial/answer 
$139.95. Req's Modem cable ( 4pin or DB25 ) ..$19.95 

Amdek Drive System with controller $239.95 

GEMINI Printer - 120cps, NLQ mode $249.95 

MAGNA VOX 8515 RGB Analog monitor $349.95 



BOX 264 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 



HOT LINE 

835-1344 



718- 



230 '** Menu Display Created Her 
e 

240 » 

250 PALETTE 1 , 255 : PALETTE 2,54:H 
COLOR 1, 0: HPRINT (20, 1) , "The MENU 

11 :HPRINT(28 , 2) , 11 1> Beginners 

Exercises 11 :HPRINT (28 , 3) , fl 2> Adv 
anced Exercises 11 : HPRINT ( 28 , 4 ) ,"3 
> Word Exercises 

260 HPRINT(28,5) , fl 4> Phrase Prac 
tice" 

270 CH$=INKEY$ : IF CH$ = lfll THEN 270 
280 IF VAL(CH$)<1 OR VAL(CH$)>4 
THEN 2 70 

290 HPUT(140,5) -(400,56) , 1,PSET 
300 ON VAL(CH$) GOTO 7 50 , 7 50 , 340 
,570 
310 1 

320 ! *** ROUTINE FOR SELECTION 3 
* * * 

330 ' 

340 PALETTE 2 , 50 : PALETTE 3,38 
350 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT ( 1 , 1 ), "Word P 

ractice ": HCOLOR 3: HPRINT (5 6 

, 1 ) , " 1 ? 1 at prompt=MENU" : HCOLOR 

360 HPRINT (63 , 3) , "DON'T WORRY" :H 
PRINT (63, 4) , "ABOUT SPEED" 
370 HCOLOR 2:HLINE(500,20)-(594, 
42) ,PSET,B 

380 HCOLOR 1: HPRINT (14 , 6) , "Repea 
t These Exercises Until You Can 
Type Them Smoothly" 

390 FOR E=l TO 18 

400 HPRINT (20 , 2 ), "Here is your w 

ord " : HPRINT (42,2) , C$ (E) 

410 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT (34 ,3) , "Type, 
. . . ": HCOLOR 1 
420 AN$="" 

430 FOR LX=1 TO LEN(C$(E)) 
440 TP$=INKEY$:IF TP$=""THEN 440 
ELSE IF TP$="?"THEN GOSUB 1560: 
GOTO 250 ELSE 450 
450 AN$=AN$+TP$ 
460 HPRINT (42,3) , AN $ 
470 NEXT LX 

480 IF AN$=C$(E) THEN PLAY"T130V 

1503E04E05EP3 203E04E05E" 

490 IF AN$OC$(E) THEN PALETTE 0 

, 53 : PLAY"01T64CG" : PALETTE 0 , 0 : E= 

E-l 

500 HCOLOR 0 : HPRINT (42,2) ,C$(E) : 
HPRINT (42,3) , AN$ : HCOLOR 1 
510 NEXT E 
520 GOTO 390 
530 GOTO 530 
! 540 ! 

550 ' *** ROUTINE FOR PHRASE EXE 
RCISES 



70 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



560 1 

570 PALETTE 2, 27: PALETTE 3,4 6 
580 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT ( 1 , 1 ), "Words 
and Sentence Accuracy. ..." :HCOLO 
R 3: HPRINT (60,1) , " '? 1 at prompt=M 
ENU": HCOLOR 1:TC=0 
590 HPRINT(14 , 6) , "24 Correct Req 
uired! " :HCOLOR 2 :HPRINT(50 ,6) , "C 
orrect=" : HPRINT (59,6) , TC : HPRINT ( 
60 , 2 ) , "<RET>=ABORT" 
600 FOR E=l TO 12 

610 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT ( 1 , 2) , "Your P 
hrase Is ....": HCOLOR 1: HPRINT (20 
,2) ,D$(E) 

620 HCOLOR 3 : HPRINT ( 14 , 3 ) , "Type- 
>": HCOLOR 1 
630 AN$="" 

640 FOR LX=1 TO LEN (D$ (E) ) 

650 TP$=INKEY$:IF TP$=""THEN 650 

ELSE IF TP$="?"THEN GOSUB 1560: 
GOTO 2 50 ELSE IF TP$=CHR$(13) TH 
EN 690 ELSE 660 
660 AN$=AN$+TP$ 
670 HPRINT (20, 3) ,AN$: NEXT LX 
680 IF AN$=D$(E) THEN PLAY"T130V 
1503E04E05EP3 203E04E05E" : HCOLOR 
0 : HPRINT (59,6) , TC : TC=TC+1 : HCOLOR 

2 :HPRINT(59 , 6) ,TC:HCOLOR 1:IF T 
C=24 THEN 1050 

690 IF AN$OD$(E) THEN PALETTE 0 
, 53 : PLAY"01T64CG" : PALETTE 0 , 0 : E= 
E-l 

700 HCOLOR 0 : HPRINT ( 20 , 2 ) ,D$(E) : 
HPRINT (20,3) , AN$ : HCOLOR 1 
710 NEXT E 
720 ? 

730 '*** ROUTINES FOR SELECTIONS 

1 AND 2 
740 ' 

750 PALETTE 2, 53: PALETTE 3 , 3 6 : FO 
R E=l TO 36:TI=0:IF VAL(CH$)=1 T 
HEN HPRINT (1, 1) , "Beginners Exerc 
ises" ELSE HPRINT ( 1 , 1) , "Advanced 

Exercises" 
760 HCOLOR 3 : HPRINT ( 60 , 1 ) , " 1 ? 1 at 

prompt=MENU" 
770 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT ( 1 , 2 ) , "Here i 
s the Exercise. ..." 
780 HCOLOR 1 : HPRINT (23 , 6 ), "Type 
Each Exercise Correctly 4 Times" 
790 IF VAL(CH$)=1 THEN HPRINT (26 
,2),A$(E) ELSE HPRINT (26,2) , B$ (E 

) 

800 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT (61,2) , "Times 

Perfect= lf : HPRINT (75 , 2 ) , TI 
810 HCOLOR 1:HPRINT(24,3) , "->" 
820 AN$ = " lf 
830 FOR LX=1 TO 4 

840 TP$=INKEY$ : IF TP$=""THEN 840 



««< COLORFUL UTILITIES »»> 

MULTI-PAK CRAK 

Save RQMPAKs to your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant plugging in of ROMPAKs now by 
keeping all your PAK software on disk . Includes POKEs for " PROBLEM " ROMPAKs- including the NEW 16K PAKSI (Demon 
Attack, Dragons Lair, etc) 64K DISK $24.95 

All the FEATURES of TKTiKPATCH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE lowercase! Now CoCo 
III compatible! (Upgrade $15 w/ proof of purchase ) $29.95 

DISK UTILITY S.1A 



A multi - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 



sort, move, rename and 



kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format , copy and backup. Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, 
plus the size, load addresses and entry points of all programs. Single command execution of both Basic and ML programs. 
32K/64K DISK $29.95 Now also CoCo III compatible! Upgrade only $15 w/ prpof of purchase , (see Oct* 84 Rainbow Review) 

SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 

Write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter-64 , VIP Writer, etc.) and convert them to special Highly Detailed 
character sets I Some of the sets supported are Italics , Old English ^ Futuristic and Block . A character set editor is 
included to create or modify custom setsl Supports most dot - matrix printers! DISK $29.95 (see Dec '85 Rainbow Review) 

SPECTRUM DOS 

Add 24 NEW Disk commands with 2 Hi-Res screens! Supports 40 track & Double -Sided drives, 6 ms stepping, auto disk 
search, error trapping & " EPROMABLE ". 64K DISK^d^aHNew LOW price! ! $29.95 

COCO GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

Create custom greetings for any occasion: Birthdays, Anniversaries, Holidays, etc. Also BANNERS & SIGNS ! Includes 
" GRABBER " utility - capture Hi-Res CoCo screens for your GRAPHIC LIBRARY! Easy to use & comes with a set of pre "drawn 
graphics. Includes a screen & font editor. 32K DISK $29.95 

64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 

Take adva ntage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an additional 8K of RAM available by relocating the Ext Basic ROM from 
$8000 to $D800. Copy ROMPAKS to disk (even "protected" 1 PAKS) and create a 32K SPOOL buffer for printing. DISK $24.95 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY 

A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy of an entire disk 
of programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to tape & prints tape & disk directories. 
TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 

COCO III UTILITIES 

Terrific utility support programs for the new Color CnmputKj: III ! Includes a CoCo II to CoCo III converter, 32K Hi-Res 
screen saver, 40/80 column Word Processor, RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH scrolling demos. 128K DISK $24.95 

THE OS-S SOLUTION 

NOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY " environment within OS-9! The OS-9 SOLUTION replaces 19 of the old " USER 
HOSTILE " commands with single keystroke, menu driven commands. No more complex long pathnames or remembering complicated 
syntaxes! Set all XMODE parameters at the touch of keys! $39.95 New LOW price I ! ! $24.95 ( OS-9 Level II compatible!!!) 

SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the following 12 programs to 
customize your own SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA! CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, 
Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, CoCo Calendar, Schematic 
Drafting Processor, OS-9 Solution, Basic Plus, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value) for only $99.95!!! 

MIKEY-DIAL 

When used with any Hayes contpatible modem & Deluxe Program. Pak , adds to Kikeyterm 4_.0 the ability to Autodial 22 numbers 
from a menu & load a set of 3 MACROS for each directory choice. Also EASY redial £ changing of MODEM settings by ccmmand 
menu. DISK $19.95 " Mikeydial is an excellent program that increases the power of Mikeyterm ." -Dec' 86 Rainbow 



Afl U.S. orders plus $3 S/H (Other $5) 
COD add $2 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
CoCo HOT LINE 718-835-1344 



HOWARD 



ELSE IF TP$=" ? " THEN GOSUB 156j3: 
GOTO 25jd 
85j25 AN$=AN$+TP$ 

860 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT ( 2 6 , 3 ) ,AN$ 
87j3 NEXT 

88J3 IF AN$=A$1E) OR AN$=B$(E) TH 
EN PLAY"T25505CDEFG" : HCOLOR 0 : HP 
RINT(75,2) ,TI :HCOLOR 2 : TI=TI+1 : H 
PRINT (75 , 2 ) ,TI : HCOLOR 1 
89J3 IF CH$="1"AND AN$oA$ (E) OR 
CH$= ff 2" AND AN$OB$(E) THEN PALE 
TTE 0 , 53 : PLAY"01T64CEG" : FOR DL=1 

TO 10: NEXT: PALETTE 0,0 
900 HCOLOR £5: HPRINT (2 6, 3) , AN$ 
91J2J IF CH$="1" AND TI = 4 THEN HCO 
LOR 0 : HPRINT (26, 2) , A$ (E) : HCOLOR 
1:NEXT ELSE IF CH$ = ff l ff THEN GOTO 

8 2j3 

92)3 IF CH$="2" AND TI = 4 THEN HCO 
LOR £5: HPRINT (26,2) ,B$(E) : HCOLOR 
1:NEXT ELSE GOTO 82j3 
93j3 ? 

94j25 1 ** This is the GRADUATION C 
ertif icate 
95j25 1 

96j25 PALETTE RGB: WIDTH 40 : HSCREEN 

2:HCLS 8 
97j25 HCOLOR 1 

98j25 HLINE (J3 ,J3) -(319 , 191) ,PSET,B 

99j25 HDRAW M BM24j2, 5j3;ClU2j3E2j3R3j3F2 

0D20G20~L30H20" 

1000 HPAINT(26j3, 4j3) , 1, 1 

1010 HCOLOR 3 : HPRINT (3 2,4) , "GOLD 

- n ;HPRINT(32 ,5) , "MEDAL" : HLINE ( 2 4 

8,27)-(3j2j3,52) ,PSET,B 

1020 HCOLOR 2 : HPRINT (34,2) , " * " : H 

PRINT (3 4, 7) , "*" 

1030 HCOLOR 5 : HPRINT (5,5) , " GRADU 
ATION CERTIFICATE" 

1040 HCOLOR 7 : HLINE ( 2 4 , 32) - (230, 
52) ,PSET, B: HCOLOR 0 : HLINE ( 22 , 30) 
-(232, 54) , PSET,B 

1050 HCOLOR 4 : HPRINT (2 , 12) , "You 
are hereby awarded a certificate 
": HPRINT (3 , 14) , "for the f CC-3 TY 
PING TUTOR COURSE 1 " 
1060 HCOLOR 3:HLINE(1J3,82)-(31J3, 
126) ,PSET,B 

1070 HCOLOR 5 : HPRINT (1,16) , STRIN 
G$(38, '■*") 

1080 HCOLOR 3 : HPRINT (1, 18) , STRIN 
G$(38, "*") 

1090 HCOLOR 1 : HPRINT (1, 2 0 ), STRIN 
G$(38, »■*") 

1100 AK$=INKEY$: IF AK$=" "THEN 11 
00 ELSE 184j3 
1110 1 

1120 f ** Here is where the KEYBO 
ARD is created 



114,0 PALETTE RGB: WIDTH 80 

1150 PALETTE 0,0: PALETTE 3,8 

1160 PALETTE 1 , 2 5 5 : PALETTE 2,54 

1170 HSCREEN 4: HCOLOR 1,0 

1180 HCLS j2:HGET(14j3, 5) -(4J3J8,56) 

,1 

1190 HLINE(2j3,lj3j3)-(6Pj3,19j3) ,PSE 
T,B: HLINE (5, 70) -(615,195) ,PSET,B 
1200 HPRINT (3 , 14) , " 1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

0 ; — esc" 

121J3 HPRINT (2 , 16) , " alt Q 
W E R T Y U I 

O P @ clr Alf 
1220 HPRINT ( 3 , 18) , " ctr A 
S D F G H J K 

L ; ent If rt" 
123j3 HPRINT ( 4, 20) , " shft Z 
X C V B N M , 

/ shft dwn" 
1240 HPRINT(64,22) , " Fl F2" 
125j3 HLINE(32 , lj38) -(5j35, 122) , PSE 
T, B: HLINE (55j3, 108) -(590, 122) , PSE 
T,B 

126j2 FOR L=72 TO 505 STEP 4j2:HLI 
NE(L, 1J38)-(L / 122) ,PSET:NEXT L 
127J3 HLINE (26, 124 )- (585, 138) , PSE 
T,B 

1280 FOR L=66 TO 560 STEP 4j2:HLI 
NE(L,124) -(L,138) ,PSET:NEXT L 
129J3 HLINE (32 , 140) - (590, 154) , PSE 
T,B 

1300 FOR L=72 TO 590 STEP 40:HL1 
NE (L,14j3)-(L,154) ,PSET: NEXT L 
131J8 HLINE(45,156)-(585,17j3) , PSE 
T,B 

1320 FOR L=88 TO 560 STEP 4j2:HLI 
NE(L,156) - (L, 170) ,PSET:NEXT L 
133j3 HLINE (95, 172 )- (485 , 186) , PSE 
T, B: HLINE (51J3, 17 2) - (586 , 186) , PSE 
T, B: HLINE (548 , 172 ) - (54 8 , 18 6) , PSE 
T 

134j2 HPAINT(lj3, 85) , 1, 1 

1350 HCOLOR 3 , 1 : HLINE ( 80 , 87 ) - ( 50 

0,96) ,PSET,BF 

1360 HCOLOR 1 , 4 : HPRINT ( 18 , 11 ) , "C 
OCO III Typing Tutor. . . .by L. Hy 
re" 

1370 HCOLOR 2 , 1 

1380 HLINE (j3,^)-(619,6j3), PSET , B : 
HLINE (4,2)-(616,58), PSET, B:HCOLO 

R 1,0 

1390 HPAINT(9j3,142) , 3 , 1 : HPAINT ( 1 
40,142) , 3 , 1: HPAINT (180, 142) ,3,1: 
HPAINT ( 2 20, 142) , 3 , 1 : HPAINT (340 , 1 
42) , 3,1: HPAINT (3 80 , 14 2) ,3,1:HPAI 
NT (4 20 , 142) , 3 , 1 : HPAINT (4 60 , 142) , 
3,1: HPAINT (56J8,12J8) ,3,1 



72 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



14) 3)3 RETURN 

141) 3 1 

142) 3 f *** DATA FOR EXERCISES REA 
D IN FROM HERE *** 

143) 3 1 

144) 3 FOR X=l TO 3 6 : READ A$(X):NE 
XT:FOR X=l TO 3 6 : READ B$(X):NEXT 
:FOR X=l TO 18: READ C$(X):NEXT:F 
OR X= 1 TO 12 : READ D$(X):NEXT 

145) 3 DATA SFAD , FADS , KJL; , J ; LK, GH 
TU , UGHT , WEVN , VEWQ , INOP , PINO , ZXTR 
, BRNY , CLOS , SEKP , TYUI , REOP , MVWH , D 
ALK , VBNC , Z XCV , DEKI , AI AI , SUE A , QWO 

1 , KSDJ , FDSA , JKLO , QWTR , OICN , NOQZ , 
HG ; A , SLKD , YTOW , QOEI , ERLM , PSTR 

146) 3 DATA A1S2 , D3F5 , T4 Y5 , 7K8 6 , PO 
QW, D3L)3,J5K1,)3932, DJ312 , PCB4 , CR4 5 
,USA)3, Z)321,M03D,L)309 , DR13 , PR3V, Z 
PR6 , NHU8 , H)3DX , XYP3 , )3 ICE , NL9 )3 , SL)3 

2, P)33C,X)39E,MOT5, 93 71, C)3Z3 , FH)33 , 
DX34 , NL9)3 , HNLZ , ZN3 7 , CDE3 , LKN8 

147) 3 DATA DOWNTOWN , EVERYDAY , ANTI 
CIPATE , MERI DI AN , MAXIMUM , IMITATE , 
ZESTFUL , UNDERSTAND , OVERCOME 

148) 3 DATA MEANINGFUL, XYLOPHONE , S 
CHOOLING , PHOTOGRAPH , EXONERATE , IN 
TERFACE , COMPUTER , GREATEST , MAGAZ I 
NE 

149) 3 DATA NOW IS THE TIME FOR AL 
L GOOD MEN, EVERY GOOD BOY WILL H 
AVE HIS DAY, THERE IS NOTHING STO 
PPING ME NOW, ROSES ARE RED-VIOLE 
TS ARE VIOLET, MANY A GOOD MAN HA 
S GONE ASTRAY, I LOVE TO TYPE WIT 
H MY OWN TANDY, THE SLY FOX WILL 
GET THE CHICKEN 

15) 3)3 DATA COMPUTERS ARE NOT ACTU 
ALLY SMART, HE LIKES TO WRITE HIS 

OWN STORIES, OSTRICHES ARE VERY 
STRANGE BIRDS, PLUTO AND CHARON A 
RE FAR DISTANT, DANCING AND SINGI 
NG CELEBRATIONS 

151) 3 RETURN 

152) 3 ' 

153) 3 f ** This CLEARS the MENU an 
d WORK Areas 

154) 3 1 

155) 3 PLAY lf Tl)3N$=A$ (E) OR AN$ = B$ ( 
E) THEN HPRINT ( 4,77: PRINT TI;:P 
LAY"05C n 

156) 3 E=1:HPUT(8 , 5) - (268, 56) , 1,PS 
ET 

157) 3 HPUT(355, 5) -(615,56) ,1,PSET 

158) 3 HPUT (14)3, 5) -(4)3)3,56) ,1,PSET 

159) 3 RETURN 

16) 3)3 1 

161) 3 '** The TITLE ROUTINE is he 
re 

162) 3 1 



163) 3 PALETTE RGB: WIDTH 4)3:HSCREE 
N 2:HCLS 3 

164) 3 HCOLOR 1 : HLINE ( 5)3 , 1)3 ) - ( 2 8)3 , 
3)3) ,PSET,BF:HCOLOR 14 : HPRINT ( 9 , 2 
),"The CC-III TYPING TUTOR 11 :HCOL 
OR 2:HLINE(52, 13) -(278,27) ,PSET, 
B 

165) 3 HCOLOR 14 : HLINE ( 5)3 , 12)3 )-( 27 
)3, 17)3) , PSET, B: HLINE (52 , 122 ) - (268 
, 168) , PSET,B 

166) 3 HPAINT(55, 13)3) ,4,14: KEY$ = M U 
4R9D4R2U4R9D4R2U4R9D4R2U4R9D4R2U 
4R9D4R2 11 

167) 3 KEY$=KEY$ + KEY$+KEY$ : HDRAW'B 
M7)3 , 16)3 ; C14 ; XKEY$ ;U4R9D4 ; 11 

168) 3 HDRAW I! BM7)3, 153 ; C14 ; XKEY $ ; U4 
R9D4 ; " : HDRAW 11 BM7)3 , 14 6;C14 ;XKEY$; 
U4R9D4 ; ■'■ : HDRAW 11 BM7)3 , 139 ;C14; XKEY 
$;U4R9D4;" 

169) 3 HCOLOR 4 :HLINE (42 , 118 ) - (28)3 
, 1)3)3) , PSET, B: HCOLOR 2 : HPAINT (5)3 , 
1)35 ) ,2,4 

17) 2)3 HCOLOR 14 : HLINE ( 32 , 9 5 ) - ( 4 1 , 
125) ,PSET,BF 

171)3 HLINE (29)3 , 95) - (281, 125) , PSE 
T , BF 

17 2)3 HLINE (68 , 165) - (24 8, 13)3) , PSE 
T,B 

173) 3 HDRAW 1 ' BM1 2 )3 , 129;C14 ;E8R62F8 
ii 

174) 3 HCOLOR 4 : HLINE ( 9)3 , 112 ) - ( 2 2 8 
,1)32) ,PSET,BF 

175) 3 HCOLOR 14 : Tl$= lf COCO III":FO 
R X=l TO LEN(T1$) : HPRINT ( 16 , 13 ) , 
LEFT$(T1$,X) : PLAY M T3201CP3 2E n : NE 
XT:HCOLOR 4 :HLINE (9)3, 1)32) - (228 , 9 
2 ) , PSET, BF : PLAY"05E04E05P3)3E" : HP 
RINT(16 , 13) ,T1$ 

176) 3 HCOLOR 14 : HPRINT ( 16 , 1 2 ) , Tl$ 

177) 3 T2$="Typing Tutor 11 : FOR X=l 
TO LEN (T2 $ ) : HPRINT (14,13) , LEFT$ ( 
T2$,X) : PLAY M T3 2 01DCP3 2E lf : NEXT 

178) 3 HCOLOR 4 :HLINE (9)3 , 92) - (228 , 
82) , PSET, BF: PLAY "05E04EP3 205E" :H 
PRINT(16,12) , Tl$: HPRINT ( 14 , 13) ,T 
2$:HCOLOR 14 : HPRINT ( 16 , 11) , Tl$ : H 
PRINT(14 , 12) ,T2$ 

179) 3 T3$="by L. Hyre l! :FOR X=l TO 
LEN (T3$) : HPRINT ( 15 , 13) ,LEFT$(T3 

$,X) :PLAY n T3201DCP32E" :NEXT 

18) 3)3 FOR TM=1 TO 1 2)3)3 : NEXT : RETUR 
N 

181) 3 1 

182) 3 f ** ON BRK comes here to cl 
ean up the act! 

183) 3 ? 

184) 3 WIDTH 32: SCREEN p:CLS:POKE 
654 9 6, )3: PRINT "NORMAL SPEED RESTO 
RED 11 : PRINT M PROGRAM STOPPED 11 : END 



March 19B7 THE RAINBOW 73 



Making the Dewey Decimal 
System User-Friendly 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This article will help familiarize 
students with one important 
aspect of the library — The 
Dewey Decimal System. This system is 
used with non-fiction books only. When 
students begin to do reports in social 
studies or science, sometime near the 
end of their elementary school career, 
the use of non-fiction material will 
become essential. Knowing how to 
utilize what the library has to offer will 
be of great benefit. 

The overwhelming majority of our 
libraries have numbers and letters 
marked on the spines of all non-fiction 
books. Some large libraries use Library 
of Congress numbers to organize their 
books. There are also a small number 
of libraries that use computers to organ- 
ize and locate their books. Someday, 
computers may altogether replace the 
need for numbering systems. When 
computerized, the books can merely go 
in alphabetical or any other order and 
be easily located on a video monitor. 

At the moment, however, the over- 
whelming majority of libraries in our 
country use the Dewey Decimal Sys- 
tem. A man named Melvil Dewey 
created this system, which arranges all 
non-fiction books into 10 subject areas. 
Dewey's system uses a decimal point. 
This allows the continuous addition of 
numbers for any new books acquired. 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won * wards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



Thumbnail Sketch of the Dewey 
Decimal System 

000-099 General Works — Includes 
many types of reference books includ- 
ing encyclopedias and almanacs. 

100-199 Philosophy — Includes dif- 
ferent ways of thinking through the ages 
as well as psychological topics. 

200-299 Religion — Includes reli- 
gions past and present and Bible stories. 

300-399 Social Sciences — Includes 
how people live together, costumes, 
holidays, etiquette, folk tales and fairy 
tales. 

400-499 Language — Includes var- 
ious dictionaries of all languages, in- 
cluding English. 

500-599 Pure Science — Includes 
physics, biology, astronomy, chemistry, 
botany, animals and many other topics 
from nature. 

600-699 Applied Science — Includes 
ways that science helps us, such as 
computers, rockets, television, farm 
animals and pets. 

700-799 Fine Arts — Includes art, 
music, puppets and other amusements. 

800-899 Literature — Includes Eng- 
lish and American plays and poetry, as 
well as literature from other countries. 

900-999 History and Travel — In- 
cludes geography, travel, biographies 
and histories of ancient and modern 
times. 

This program asks the student in 
which section of the library can we learn 
more about various subjects. We hope 
that the program will make the Dewey 
Decimal System less frightening and 



more understandable to students. The 
system is often quite intimidating to 
beginners. 

Line 50 reads the DATA statements for 
the Dewey Decimal System. Line 90 
prints out this information in the form 
of a chart. This chart is to be referred 
to by the student throughout the pro- 
gram. 

Line 60 reads the DATA statements for 
the questions and answers. Lines 1 10- 
130 ask where we can find information 
about one of the 21 randomly selected 
questions included in this program. 
Line 140 asks the student for an answer 
and lines 160 and 170 tell if the answer 
was correct or incorrect. The correct 
answer will be displayed if the student 
gave an incorrect response. 

Twenty-one questions and answers 
have been included in this program. 
These are represented by D$ and E$. 
They are the DATA statements in lines 
300-360. You may change these DATA 
statements or add more of your own. If 
you want to add any, be certain to 
adjust the DIM statement in Line 40, the 
T variable in Line 60 and the R variable 
in Line 120. 

Line 80 has the counter for this 
program. After 10 questions, the score 
is displayed by lines 210-230. The stu- 
dent may at that time press the E key 
to end the program or the G key to go 
again. 

We hope this program will help famil- 
iarize your child or students with the 
Dewey Decimal System. Although 
computers may someday truly cancel 
out the need for this system, that day is 
quite some time in the future. □ 



74 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



The listing; DEWEY 

1J3 REM" DEWEY DECIMAL SYSTEM" 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 

D , STATEN ISLAND, NY , 19 8 7 

30 PR$=STRING$ (32 , 25 5) 

4J3 DIM A$ ( 10 ) , B$ ( 10 ) , C$ ( 10 ) , D$ ( 2 

1) ,E$(21) 

5j3 FOR T=l TO 10 : READ A$(T),B$(T 
) ,C$ (T) : NEXT T 

60 FOR T=l TO 2 1 : READ D$(T),E$(T 
) : NEXT T 
10 CLS5 

8J3 N=N+1:IF N>1J2 THEN 210 
9J3 FOR T=l TO 1J3 : PRINTTAB (J3 ) A$ (T 
) ; " . "TAB (3) B$ (T) TAB (13 ) C$ (T) : NEX 
T T 

100 PRINT@3 2j3 , PR$ ; 

lip PRINT8352," WHERE CAN WE LE 
ARN MORE ABOUT" 
120 R=RND(21) 

130 PRINT@3 84 , D$ (R) 

140 PRINI§412,"? "; :LINEINPUT AN 

$ 

, „„„„„ »_ . _ _ - . ..„ „ i- 

150 PRINT@448,PR$; 

16) 3 IF AN$-E$(R) THEN PRINT@425, 
"CORRECT" ; : CR=CR+1 

17) 3 IF AN$OE$(R) THEN PRINT@421 
, "SORRY, "E$ (R) " IS CORRECT" ; 

8)3 PRINT§484 , "press enter to go 
on" ; 

190 EN$=INKEY$ 

200 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 7)3 ELSE 
190 

21) 3 CLS: PRINT" DEWEY DECIMAL 
SYSTEM" 

22) 3 PRINT: PRINT" YOUR SCORE WAS " 
CR*lj3"% THIS TIME. 11 

23) 3 PRINT: PRINT" 
O GO AGAIN 



PRESS G T 
OR E TO EN 



D THE GAME . " 

24)3 EN$=INKEY$ 
250 CR=0:N-0 
260 IF EN$="G" 



THEN RUN ELSE IF 



EN$«"E" THEN END ELSE 240 



1 



RGB VIDEOSolV.'^ 

.WHITE OR GKEEN CHARACTERS ON A 
BLACK SCREEN-PLUS NORMAL GREEN 
SCREEN-SWITCH SELECTABLE 



.NO SPECIAL SOFTWARE 
, Hi -RES GRAPHICS 

, ADD $5.00 SHIPPING & HANDLING 

INVENTIVE SOLUTIONS 

BOX 286 
STANFURDVI LLE ,N.Y. 



.USING THE COCO AS A DEVELOPMENT 
SYSTEM 

. HI1DEN MODEM 

. MONOCHROME VIDEO DRIVE R- WHITE 
CHARACTERS ON A BLACK SCREEN 

.COMPOSITE VIIEO DRIVER 

.PARALLEL PORTS 

.•/A A/1 CONVERTERS 

.ELECTRONIC FLEA-- MARKET (PARTS) 

,AND MUCH «ORE 

DEAL DIRECT WITH MANUFACTURER 

SEND OK CALL FOR FREE CATALOG 
OR INFORMATION 



2 7)3 DATA A , 000 -9 9 9 , GENERAL WORKS 
,B, 1)3)3-19 9 , PHILOSOPHY, C, 2)3)3-2 9 9 , 
RELIGION, D, 3)3)3-39 9 , SOCIAL SCIENC 
ES 

28) 3 DATA E , 4)3)3- 4 9 9 , LANGUAGE , F , 5)3 
J3~~599,PURE SCIENCE, G, 6)3)3-699 , APP 
LIED SCIENCE, H, 7)2)2-7 9 9, FINE ARTS 

29) 2 DATA 1 , 8)3)3-899 , LITERATURE, J , 
9)3)3-999, HISTORY AND TRAVEL 

3)3)3 DATA THE FRENCH LANGUAGE , E , B 
ONGO DRUMS, H, THE STORY OF THE U. 
S ■ FLAG , J 

31) 3 DATA WAYS OF THINKING , B, ALMA 
NACS , A, BIBLE STORIES, C 

32) 3 DATA STORIES ABOUT GODDESSES 
, C, WASHINGTON'S LIFE STORY , J , TUR 

TLES AND TORTISES,F 

33) 3 DATA POETRY OF THE 18)3)3 1 S, I, 
SENDING SOMEONE TO THE MOON , G , AT 
OMIC ENERGY, G 

3 40 DATA BRAZIL 1 S HISTORY , J, TORN 
ADOES,F,HOW TO MAKE PUPPETS, H 

3 5)3 DATA HISTORY OF ANCIENT ROME 
,J,THE CARE OF PETS , G, CHEMISTRY 
EXPERIMENTS, F 

360 DATA FAMOUS FAIRY TALES, D, RE 
FERENCE BOOKS, A, HISTORY OF TELEV 
ISION,G 



A new generation of 
CoCo III software 



Bills EE GO 



II user friendly! user prograiable function 
key utility that creates up to 20 function 

keys. Other features include DOS iods f 

DISABLE, and is EPROftable. Disk only. 

Ver 1.0 - all CoCo's .... $14.95 

Ver 1.3 - CoCo III only , . . $19.95 



r 



nULTlL^BEL 1X1 

VERSION 1.0 




An easy to use, versatile label creating 
prograi designed specifically for the CoCo 
III. Includes lany new CoCo III features. 

Disk . . . 114.95 

61HHES0FT 

4 Hallfield Ct. 

Baltiiore, MD 21236 Phone (301) -256-7558 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 75 



ive 



asy 



leces 



The new Color Computer owner buys his/ her 
versatile machine for its graphics and music 
capabilities, organization of their home and office, 
educational purposes — both in the home and school and 
to acquire programming knowledge — and some, simply 
for pure fun and entertainment. 

As far as the Co Co is concerned, the more you learn, 
the more you realize how little you actually know. That 
is why every session at the keyboard is an adventure in 
learning. 

the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize 
that the majority of our readers will always be beginners. 
In our continuing effort to always keep the new user in 
mind and in addition to the many beginner feature articles 
and programs published in every issue, f Novices Niche" 
contains shorter basic program listings that entertain and 
help the new user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color 




Computer: graphics, music, games, utilities, education, 
programming, etc. 

Contributions to "Novices Niche'* are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of short programs that 
can be typed in at one sitting and will be useful, educa- 
tional and fun. Keep in mind, although the short programs 
are limited in scope, many novice programmers find it 
enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software 
written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're 
sorry, but we do not have the time to key in program 
listings. All programs should be supported by some 
editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. 
If your submission is accepted for publication, the 
payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior 
to publication. 

— Jutta Kapfhammer 
Submissions Editor 



ame 




Tricks ®f The Trade 

By Michael B. Kromeke 



Switch is a puzzle-type game that can be solved by moving 
the four blue blocks on the left to the right side of the screen 
and the four red blocks on the right to the left side of the 
screen. 

Blocks can only be moved forward one space at a time 
and only the blocks of opposite color can be jumped over. 
Blue blocks can only be moved to the right and red blocks 
only to the left; the program will prevent you from making 
illegal moves. 

If you get stuck and cannot make another move, just press 
X to start the game again. 

The listing: SNITCH 

1) 3 REM MICHAEL B. KROMEKE 

2) 3 DIM A,A$,B,B$,X,P(9) : CLSJ3 

3) 3 FOR X=l)357 TO 1)386 :POKE X,14)3 



: POKEX+64 ,131: POKEX+16)3 , 14)3 : POKE 
X+288, 131:NEXTX 

4) 3 PRINT@7," CORRECT SOLUTION '■ ; 
:FOR X=)3 TO 9 STEP 3 : PRINT@68+X , 
CHR$ (191) ; :PRINT@8 3+X,CHR$ (17 5) ; 
: NEXT X' 

5) 3 FOR X=l)356 TO 112)3 STEP 32:PO 
KE X,143:POKE X+3 1 , 143 : NEXT X : FO 
R X=1216 TO 1344 STEP 32:POKE X, 
143:POKE X+31 , 143 : NEXT X 

6) 3 B$=CHR$(128) :B$=B$+B$ 

7) 3 PRINT@291, 1111 ;: FOR X =1 TO 9: P 
RINT X; : NEXT X 

8) 3 FOR X=1T04:P(X)=1:P(X+5)=2:NE 
XT X 

9) 3 PRINT @ 3 9)3 , "PRESS # 1-9 TO MOV 
E 11 ; :PRINT@3 8 4,CHR$ (17 5) ; : PRINT@ 
386, "=> 11 ; :PRINT@411, 11 <=" ;:PRIN 
T@415,CHR$(191) ; 

I) 3)3 PRINT@459 , "PRESS 1 X 1 11 ; : PRINT 
@489,"TO TRY AGAIN ";:GOT02 6)3 

II) 3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$ = IMI THEN 11)3 

12) 3 IF A$ = lf X M THEN RUN 2)3 

13) 3 A=VAL(A$) :IF A<1 OR A>9 THEN 
GOTO 2 5)3 



7 6 THE RAINBOW March 1 987 



140 IF P(A)=1THEN 210 

150 IF P(A)=0 THEN 250 

160 IF A-1=0 THEN 250 

170 IF P(A-1)=0 THEN P(A-1)=P(A) 

:P(A)=0:GOTO 2 60 

180 IF A-2=0 THEN 250 

190 IF P(A-2)=0 THEN P(A-2)=P(A) 

:P(A)=0:GOTO 2 60 

200 GOTO 250 

210 IF A+l=10 THEN 250 

220 IF P(A+1)=0 THEN P(A+1)=P(A) 

:P(A)=0:GOTO 260 

230 IF A+2=10 THEN 2 50 

240 IF P(A+2)=0 THEN P(A+2)=P(A) 

:P(A)=0:GOTO 260 

250 SOUND1 , 3 : GOTO 110 

260 PRINT©228,"";:FOR X=l TO 9 

270 IF P(X)=1 THEN PRINT (CHR$ ( 17 



5) ) ;B$; 

280 IF P(X)=0 THEN PRINT B$+CHR$ 
(128) ; 

290 IF P('X)=2 THEN PRINT CHR$(19 

1)B$; 

300 NEXT X: SOUND 9 9, 2: SOUND 140, 
1:IF B=l THEN PRINT @1 70 , "CHANGE 
places" ;: B=0 : ELSE IF B=0 THEN PR 
INT©170 , "change PLACES" ;: B=l 

310 FOR X=1T04:IF P(X)<>2 THEN 1 

10 ELSE NEXT 

320 IF P(5)<>0 THEN 110 

330 FOR X=l TO 255 STEP 3:SOUNDX 

,2:POKE 65314, X:NEXT X 

340 CLS3:FOR X=l TO 20 

350 PRINT©RND(500) , " YOU DID IT 

";:SOUND RND(255) ,4:NEXT X:END 



D 
D 



usiness 




alculations 






ayday Ira I 



By John Gallagher 



Have you ever wondered how much an hourly wage 
increase would affect your daily, weekly, monthly or yearly 
earnings? By entering either the percentage of the increase 
or the hourly rate you wish to examine, Wage Calc will do 
just that. (If you only wish to examine the increased wage 
rate per hour, you must enter 0 to bypass the percentage 
input.) 

The program will also display the difference between your 
old and new rate of pay in hourly, daily, weekly, monthly 
and yearly totals. (See Figure I.) 

The listing: WAGECALC 



% INCREASE : .03 




wage groups current 


new 


HOURLY : 4.3 5 


4 .4805 


DAILY : 3 4.8 


35. 844 


WEEKLY : 174 


179.22 


MONTHLY : 696 


716.88 


YEARLY : 904 8 


9319 . 44 


wage rate d 


if f erences 


HOURLY DIFFERENCE 


: .1305 


DAILY DIFFERENCE 


: 1.044 


WEEKLY DIFFERENCE 


: 5.21999997 


MONTHLY DIFFERENCE 


: 20.8799999 


YEARLY DIFFERENCE 


: 271.439999 


AGAIN ? y/n 




Figure 1 : Sample printout 


of Wage Calc 



1 CLS 


11 


PRINT@8 3,B1 


2 POKE65495,0 


12 


D=B*8 : D1=B1*8 


3 INPUT"ENTER AMOUNT OF INCREASE 


13 


PRINT© 100, "DAILY :"D 


IN DECIMAL FORM : %";A 


14 


PRINT@115,D1 


4 INPUT"ENTER YOUR PRESENT HOURL 


15 


C=D*5 : C1=D1*5 


Y WAGE XXX. XX : S";B 


16 


PRINT© 131, "WEEKLY :"C 


5 FOR J = 1 TO 1000: NEXT J 


17 


PRINT@147,C1 


6 CLS 


18 


M=C*4 : M1=C1*4 


7 PRINT@0,"% INCREASE : "A 


19 


PRINT@162 , "MONTHLY : "M 


8 PRINT©3 2 , "wage groups current 


20 


PRINT@179,M1 


new" 


21 


Y=D*260 : Y1=D1*260 


9 PRINT© 6 7, "HOURLY : "B 


22 


PRINT© 19 5 , "YEARLY : "Y 


10 I=B*A : B1=I+B 


23 


PRINT@213, Yl 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 77 



24 PRINT@2 64, "wage rate differen 
ces" 

25 X=B1-B 

26 PRINT@2 8 8 , "HOURLY DIFFERENCE 

27 S=D1-D 

28 PRINT© 3 2)3, "DAILY DIFFERENCE 

29 T=C1-C 

3j3 PRINT@352, "WEEKLY DIFFERENCE 

:"T 
31 Q=M1-M 



32 PRINT@ 3 8 4 , "MONTHLY DIFFERENCE 

:"Q 

33 K=Y1-Y 

34 PRINT@416 , "YEARLY DIFFERENCE 
:"K 

35 PRINT@448, "AGAIN ? y/n" 

36 A$=INKEY$ : IF A$=CHR$(89) TK 
EN 1 ELSE 37 

37 IF A$=CHR$(78) THEN 38 ELSE 2 
6 

38 POKE 65494, j3:CLS:END 




t [figures 

By Keiran Kenny 



Total will add a long list of numbers and then check for 
accuracy. The length of entries is restricted to nine 
characters. Up to 216 numbers can be entered; if more are 
needed, change the value of 216 in lines 70 and 210 to the 
desired number. 

The listing: TOTAL 

10 CLS : PRINT@4j3 , "<<<TOT-ALL>>>" 
20 PRINT@96 , "BY KEIRAN KENNY, TH 
E HAGUE, 1986" 

30 FORX=16j3T0191:PRINT@X, " + " :NEX 
T 

40 PRINT@2 2 4, "INPUT THE NUMBERS 
TO BE ADDED (MAX. 9 CHARACTERS 

INCLUDING DECIMAL POINT) . YO 
U WILL HAVE A RUNNING TOTAL AND, 

AFTER EACH 13 ROWS, A SUB-TOT 
AL AT THE TOP OF EACH COLUMN. TO 

SUBTRACT ENTER A MINUS NUMB 

ER. " ; 

50 PRINT : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) " PRESS 
ANY KEY . " ; : EXEC4 453 9 : CLS 



60 PRINT: PRINT 

10 DIM A(216) ,SM(216) 

80 P=8j3 

90 N=N+1 : PRINT@j3 , CHR$ (31): PRINT@ 

0, ;: INPUT" INPUT A NUMBER" ;A$ : A=V 

AL ( A$ ) : PRINT@j3 , CHR$ (31) 

10 IFLEN (STR$ (A) ) >lj3 THENN=N-1 : 

GOT09j3 

lift A(N)=A:SM(N)=SM(N-1) +A(N) 
120 LA=LEN (STR$ ( INT (A (N) ) ) ) :LS=L 
EN (STR$ ( INT (SM (N) ) ) ) : LT=LEN (STR$ 
(INT(SM(N-1) ) ) ) 

130 IFA(N) >^0ANDA(N) <1THENLA=1 
140 IFSM(N) >j3ANDSM(N) <1THENLS = 1 
150 IFA(N) <j3ANDA(N) >-lTHENLA=l 
160 IFSM(N) <j3ANDSM(N) >-lTHENLS=l 
170 IFSM(N-l) <j3ANDSM(N-l) >-lTHEN 
LT=1 

180 IFN/13<>INT(N/13)THENPRINT@P 

-16,CHR$(31) :PRINT@P-LA,A(N) : PRI 

NT@P+26-LS , "TOTAL : "SM (N) ; 

190 IFN/13=INT (N/13 ) THENCLS : PRIN 

T@4j3-LT, "SUB-TOT: "SM(N-l) :P=8j3:P 

RINT@P-LA, A (N) : PRINT@P+26-LS , "TO 

TAL: "SM(N) ; 

200 P=P+32 

210 IFN=216THEN230 

220 GOTO90 

230 PRINT@P+29, "END" ; 




tilities 





ips ®n The 

By Eric White 






78 



A few secrets have^been discovered regarding the CoCo 
3 that are not mentioned in Tandy's Color Computer 3 
Extended BASIC manual. 

To detect whether the following keys are being pressed, 
you can use these statements in your programs: 

IF PEEK ( 341 ) = 191 THEN key ALT is pressed 

IF PEEK (342) = 191 THEN key CTRL is pressed 

IF PEEK (343) = 191 THEN key Fl is pressed 

IF PEEK (344) = 191 THEN key F2 is pressed 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Fantasy Clip Art Disk 

G r»o rn ©St & i t/^jS j dr a 9 ons 0. n d more- . . 
[lore t han thirty c I i ps for Co com ax- • ■ 

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/■ • ■ • iJ, 



■ I a t r — a 




64K QsB disk - .$14 - 95 



M 
O 



Oriental Gallery I 

Tuien t lp new f u L L - scr een p i c t ur* e s f r* om 0. 
talented graphic art i st - « « al L read'-i to 
print or use with Uour qraphTc editor- 

RLL NEU ! ! ! 






BETTER 
GRAPHICS 
ON VOUR 
COCO 3 




I,, 1 1 1 r i I 1 *! < I 




BETTER GRAPHICS ON 
YOUR COCO 3 

Use the graphic power 
of your Coco 3 ! More 
good information and 
examples of high res 
graphics on the Coco 3 
Create better static 
illustrations. Learn 
more about Basic 
animation, screen 
scrolling, tips on 
HPUT and HGET , how to 
use HDRAW and much more. Better Graphics on your Coc o 
3 plus two disks of programs and pictures. $24 .95. 



OKIMATE 2 0 WITH PLUG 'N 'PRINT 

Small, quiet and colorful I Eight vivid colors. 
Excellent print quality. Italics, super and sub 
scripts. Ten, twelve or fifteen characters to the 
inch. The perfect second printer for your Coco. 

Printer, Plug 'n 'Print , paper, black and color ribbons, 
instruction and software. $240 plus $10 shipping. 



GRAPHIC SCREEN DUMP FOR THE OKIMATE 20 

Dump PMODE 3 and PMODE 4 graphics from your Color 
Computer to the Okimate 20 printer. Select 2 color, 4 
color or black and white screen dumps. $29.95 



S 

o 



R 


F 


E 


T 


T 
O 


W 

A 


N 


R 




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B 

A 




Y 






A GUIDE TO COCO 3 BASIC AND GRAPHICS 

Do you want to learn more about your 
Color Computer 3? If so, A Guide to Coco 
2 Basic and Graphics is what you need' 

This practical guide to the Coco 3 is 
written by Linda Nielsen, a long time 
Coco user. Tt has more than 50 pages of 
examples, explanations, and programs 
especially for the Coco 3. 

Not only that, the Guide includes a 
disk of programs and pictures. Translate 
low res graphics onto the high resolution 
screen. Draw on the 320 by 192, 16 color 
or the 640 by 192, 4 color screens. 
Learn how to display 256 artifacted 
colors on a television or composite 
monitor . 

Unlock the power in your Color Computer 
3, order your GUIDE today! 
Price effective March 1 $21.95 



DOUBLE DRIVER I] 

Finally a monitor driver for 
the Color Computer II that 
lets you use a monochrome 
and a color monitor 
simultaneously. We're proud 
of this new driver. The six 
transister circuit provides op- 
timal signal mixing and signal 
gain. Excellent monochrome 
output and better quality 
resolution in the color ouput 




than any driver we have 
seen. Audio output also. Fits 
all models of the Color Com- 
puter II. $29.95. 




THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The CoCo Switcher allows you to hook up 
three peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Con- 
nect your modem, printer and any other 
RS-232 compatible peripheral to the CoCo 
Switcher. An LED on the CoCo Switcher 
shows if your computer is on or off at a glance, 
The LED flickers when transmitting or receiv- 
ing data 

$39.95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 



DOUBLE DRIVER I 

The BEST monitor driver available. 
Color composite, monochrome and 
audio output For original CoCo D. E 
and F boards. $24.95. 

MONO II 

Mono 11 for Color Computer 2. An 
excellent monochrome monitor driver 
that has audio output also Specify 
model needed. 

$24 95 





MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

L ^ A Division oj Moreton Bay laboratory 
316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 

Ordering information 

Send $2.00 shipping and handling per order. We ship 
within 1 working day on receipt of order. Blue Label 
Service available. California residents add 6% sales tax. 



and, to detect if the computer being used is a CoCo 3, use: 

IF PEEK (33021) =50 THEN computer is a CoCo 3 

Also, on Page 295 of the manual, the color definitions 
for the CoCo 3's 64-color palette are not included. The 
following program, Color Check, will display the color and 
its palette number (0-63). To change the foreground color, 
press the Fl key. To change the background color, press the 
F2 key. 

Thanks to John Wagner for his help in finding these clues 
and for sharing his new CoCo 3. 

The listing: CDLRCHEK 

]_ j3 ' **************************** 

2) 3 f * PALETTE COLOR CHECKER * 

3) 3 f * FOR USE WITH THE COCOIII * 

4) 3 f * VERSION: 1. J3 8611. )34 * 



5jj ***************************** 

6) 3 f * (C) 1986 BY ERIC WHITE * 

7) 3 1 **************************** 

8) 3 FG=)3:BG=18:ON BRK GOTO 15)3 

9) 3 CLS:FORX=32 TO 127: PRINT CHR$ 
(X) ; :NEXT:PRINT@39)3, "PALETTE COL 
OR CHECKER" : PRINT@422 , "VERSION: 
1.1 8611. J31" 

1)3)3 IF PEEK (3 43) =191 THEN FG=FG+ 
1 AND 63 

llj3 IF PEEK(344)=191 THEN BG=BG+ 
1 AND 63 

12) 3 PALETTE 12 , FG : PRINT@2 3)3 , "Fl 
FOR FOREGROUND^ 1 FG 

13) 3 PALETTE 13 , BG : PRINT@294 , "F2 
FOR BACKGROUND^ 1 BG 

1.4)3 GOT01)3)3 

15)3 PALETTE 12 , J3 : PALETTE 13,18 



eal Ut 






By David M. Allen 



The following program prints self -addressed envelopes 
for business or pleasure. Be sure to set the baud rate on your 
printer before running. 

A sample printout is shown in Figure 2. A few strips of 
tape should be adequate to seal the envelope securely. 



The listing: ENVELOPE 



1 

2 
3 
4 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



•kick 
kkk 
k k k 
kkk 



ENVELOP5 *** 
DAVID M. ALLEN *** 
P. 0. BOX 531 *** 
BREWSTER, WA. 98812 



1) 3 REM: THIS PROGRAM PRINTS A SE 
LF ADDRESSED ENVELOPE 

2) 3 CLS : PRINT"SENDER ADDRESS" : INP 
UT "NAME ";L1$: INPUT "COMPANY" 
;C1$: INPUT "STREET " ; L2 $ : LINEINP 
UT "CTY,ST,ZIP ";L3$ 

3) 3 PRINT "RECEIVER ADDRESS " : INP 
UT "NAME ";L4$: INPUT "COMPANY" 
;C2$: INPUT "STREET "; L5$ : LINEINP 
UT "CTY,ST,ZIP ";L6$ 

4) 3 F0RI=1T04 : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 6 ) ; " . " 
; TAB ( 69 ) ; " . " : NEXT : F0RI=1T07 4 : PRI 
NT#-2 , " . " ; : NEXT : F0RI=1T02 : PRINT# 
-2,TAB(6) ;".";TAB(69) ; " . " : NEXT 

5) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(6) ;"." ;TAB(9) ;L1 
$;TAB(69) ;". " 

6) 3 IF Cl$="" THEN GOTO 8)3 

7j3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(6) ; " . " ;TAB(9) ;C1 









inV.we cur. " . u 'i d 

. t\t<. f .1 Xwy, 41 








Figure 2: Sample printout of Envelope 



II II 



II II 



;TAB(9) ;L2 



II 



" ;TAB(9) ;L3 



II 



$;TAB(69) 

8j3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(6) 
$;TAB(69) ;"." 
9j3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(6) 
$;TAB(69) ;"." 

ipfS FORI=lT06:PRINT#-2 ,TAB(6) 
" ;TAB(69) ; " . " : NEXT 

11$ PRINT #-2 / TAB(6) ; " . " ; TAB ( 3j3 ) 
;L4$;TAB(69) ;"." 
12J3 IF C2$ = "" THEN GOTO 14 JJ 
13J8 PRINT#-2,TAB(6) 
C2$;TAB(69) ;". " 

14) 3 PRINT#-2 / TAB(6) 
L5$;TAB(69) ;"." 

15) 3 PRINT#-2 / TAB(6) 
L6$;TAB(69) ;"." 

16) 3 F0RI=1T07 : PRINT#-2 ,TAB(6) 
" ; TAB (69) ; " . " : NEXT : FORI= 1T07 4 : PR 
INT#-2 ,".";: NEXT : F0RI=1T02 1 : PRIN 
T#-2,TAB(6) ;".";TAB(69) ; " . " : NEXT 

17) 3 FOR I=lT074:PRINT#-2 / "."; :NE 
XT: END /S\ 



ii ii 



ii ii 



ii ii 



;TAB(3)3) 
;TAB(3)3) 
;TAB(3)3) 



• ii 



80 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1987 



■ 



mmmm 



mm. 




mmm 






Mmmm 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 



• Menu oriented 

• Upload/download. Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 

■ Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



Definable macro keys 
Works with standard serial port, RS232 
PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 
Works with standard screen. X SCREEN, or 
WORDPAK 80 column board. 



XMENU 

Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 
Create your own menus * Wo * s wiUl slandard scrc£n - 

$29 



XSCREEN, WORDPAK, O-PAK 
.95 with source$59.95 



XSCREEN 

OS-9 hi-res screen 
51/64/85 chars per line • Easy menu operation 

$19.95 with source $39.95 



mm 




■ • ' ■ ■ 1 



XDIR & XCAL 

Hierarchial directory OS-9 calculator 

■ Full sorting • Decimal, Hex, Binary 

• Complete pattern matching • +, -, *, /, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 



kMiiiiiiiiilliiiiMit 



mm 



§ 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

Works with slandard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 
True character oriented full screen editing 
Full block commands 
Find and Replace commands 
Execute OS-9 commands from within 

Proportional spacing supported i 
Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overstrike, underline, super/sub-scripts - 1 

10 header/footers 

Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source$49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
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XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 



!W! OTU^U!Vr ■ ■ ■ WW^WWV,,,,,,!-]-!.!.!.! •.v.-!'!v?-?-*'T'"-"- , -'- , "f 












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* a « 



V. r - r - r -".". 

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SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chait of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry , Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting List. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
wilh user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman records, and 
update the SB AP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and Lax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight time, overtime and bonua pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, year-to- 
datc federal and/or state Lax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all states 
except Oklahoma rfhd Delaware. $59 95 



These pjogjams. are user. friendly and menu 
driven, S ample crarisaciiisoi are includ ed, Each 
package features a hi-res screctt. Each requires 
ii i mirismum <02Jc a^ iileiii 1 disk 

driv&: 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit rails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with the Small 
Business Accounting package. $ 5 9 95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. . The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $59 95 



in , 




1906 Jerrold Avenue 
m SL Pant, MN 551 J? 





Ordering Information 

Add S3 ,00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% saics m. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2 50), persantl checks. 



Author Stfbmitriont nvc*pi*4 



(612) 633-6161 



A 

MATTER 
OF 

PRINCIPAL 



JL ,E * 



1 

3 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
H 
12 
13 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
2 0 

21 
22 
23 
24 



***** 



its** 

lis*** 

lii't* 



i*> 

***** 
!*u 

$1.67 



Hi** 

B 
fir* 

fell 



By Ralph D. Miller 



While in the process of purchasing a home recently, 
I had various financing schemes to consider. In 
order to evaluate each properly, I needed an 
amortization program. As always, CoCo to the rescue! 

A mortize is small, residing in only 1 ,982 bytes of memory. 
It does require Extended BASIC. The printer baud rate is 
set in Line 2. If you are using the default baud rate of the 
CoCo (600), just delete Line 2. Printer codes are found in 
lines 17, 19, 22 and 43. On my IDS-460 (as well as all other 
printers I've encountered), CHR$(13) is a carriage return, 
and CHR$(12) is a form feed. 

Amortize is simple to use. Upon running it, you will be 
asked for the annual interest rate in percent, number of 
interest periods annually (if your interest is compounded 
daily, this would be 365; for interest compounded monthly, 



Ralph Miller is a broadcast engineer on the systems staff 
at John H. Phipps Broadcasting. He lives in Tallahassee, 
Florida. 



enter 12, etc.), number of payments per year, the amount 
of the loan in dollars, and the term of the loan in years. 
You need enter digits only, no %, $, etc. are needed. 

The program then checks to be sure your printer is online 
and notifies you if it is not. Upon finding the printer online, 
Amortize prints a header describing the loan and the 
computed installment amount, then details each payment 
by the amount of the payment applied to interest, the 
amount applied to principal, and the amount of debt 
outstanding. These tables really come in handy when you 
decide to prepay principal payments in order to save 
interest. After printing the last payment, Amortize goes to 
the data input prompts to run another table. 

A word of caution, which I learned through experience: 
If you let it be known that you can run amortization tables, 
you'd better shop around for a good price on a couple of 
boxes of printer paper. 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 13322, Tallahassee, FL 32317; 904-386- 
3618. Please enclose an SASE for a reply when writ- 
ing.) □ 



82 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



The listing: RMDRTIZE 



I REM (C) 1986 RALPH D. MILLER 
I 2 POKE149,)3:POKE15)3,17 

3 CLS 

4 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER THE ANNUAL I 
NTEREST" : INPUT "RATE, IN PERCENT: 

";JU 

5 M=JU/ 1)3)3 

6 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER THE NUMBER 0 
F INTEREST" :INPUT"PERIODS PER YE 
AR: ";Q 

7 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER THE NUMBER 0 
F PAYMENTS" : INPUT "PER YEAR: ";S 

8 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER THE LOAN AMO 
UNT":INPUT"IN DOLLARS: " ;A 

9 PRINT :PRINT"ENTER THE PERIOD O 
F THE LOAN":INPUT"IN YEARS: ";E 
1)3 D=(l+M/Q) A (Q/S)-1 

II F=( (1- (1+D) A (-S*B) ) A -l) *D*A 

12 C1=F:G0SUB52:F$=C1$ 

13 Cl=A:GOSUB52 : A$=C1$ 

14 SP=PEEK ( 65 314 ) AND1 

15 IF SP>)3 THEN GOSUB58 

16 CLS : PRINT @ 2)3)3 , "printing table 
ii 

17 PRINT#-2, "THE AMORTIZATION TA 
BLE FOLLOWS FOR A $";A"LOAN AT "J 
U" PERCENT ANNUALLY , " : PRINT # - 2 , " I 
NTEREST COMPOUNDED"Q"TIMES ANNUA 
LLY AND PAYMENTS MADE" S" TIMES AN 
NUALLY"CHR$ (13) " FOR" B" YEARS ("S* 
B" PAYMENTS ): "CHR$ ( 13 ) CHR$ (13) 

18 GOSUB62 

19 PRINT#- 2, "INSTALLMENT AMOUNT: 
" ; F$ ; CHR$ ( 13 ) CHR$ (13 ) 

2j3 PRINT#-2 , "PAYMENT" , "INTEREST" 
, "PAYMENT" , "OUTSTANDING" 

21 PRINT #-2, "NUMBER", "ON DEBT", 
"ON PRINC", " DEBT" 

22 PRINT#-2," "," " 

, » " , " "CHR$ (13) 

CHR$ (13) 

23 DC=A:WY=j3 

24 FOR Y=(WY+1) TO (WY+10) 

25 HM=DC*D 

26 Cl=HM:GOSUB52 :HM$=C1$ 

27 RT=F-HM 

28 Cl=RT:GOSUB52 :RT$=C1$ 

29 LF=DC-RT 

3j3 Cl=LF:GOSUB52 : LF$=C1$ 

31 GOSUB64 

32 Cl=Y:GOSUB56:PRINT#-2 ,C1$,HM$ 
,RT$,LF$ 



33 IF LF>=F THEN 4 5 

34 Y=Y+1 : HM=LF*D 

35 Cl=HM:GOSUB52 :HM$=C1$ 

36 RT=LF-HM 

37 Cl=Y:GOSUB56:PRINT#-2,Cl$, 

38 Cl=HM:GOSUB52:GOSUB69:PRINT#- 
2,C1$, 

39 Cl=LF:GOSUB52 :GOSUB69 :PRINT#- 
2 Cl$ 

4J3 PRINT#-2 , "NIL" 

41 Cl=HM+LF:GOSUB52 

42 IF F$OCl$ THEN PRINT#-2 , "LAS 
T PAY 1 T : " ;C1$ 

43 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (12) CHR$ (12 ) 

44 GOTO 3 

45 DC=LF 

46 NEXT Y 

47 IF (S*B)>Y THEN 49 
4 8 GOTO 51 

49 WY=WY+lj3 
5J3 GOTO 2 4 

51 RETURN 

52 C2=INT(lj3j3*Cl+.5)/lj3j3 

53 C1$="$"+MID$(STR$(C2) ,2) 

54 IF C2=INT(C2) THEN C1$=C1$+". 
j3j3" 

55 RETURN 

56 C1$=MID$ (STR$ (CI) , 2) 

57 RETURN 

58 CLS : PRINT@198 , "printer off li 
ne" 

59 SP=PEEK( 65314) AND 1 
6J3 IF SPOJ3 THEN 59 

61 RETURN 

62 JF$=RIGHT$ (F$ , 3 ) : IG$=LEFT$ ( JF 
$,1):IF IG$<>"." THEN F$=F$+"j3" 

63 RETURN 

64 GOSUB69 

65 JF$=RIGHT$ (HM$ , 3) : IG$=LEFT$ (J 
F$,1):IF IG$<>"." THEN HM$=HM$+" 

66 JF$=RIGHT$(RT$,3) :IG$=LEFT$(J 
F$,1):IF IG$<>"." THEN RT$=RT$+" 
j3» 

67 JF$=RIGHT$ (LF$ , 3 ) : IG$=LEFT$ (J 
F$,1):IF IG$<>"." THEN LF$=LF$+" 
j3" 

68 RETURN 

69 JF$=RIGHT$ (Cl$ , 3) : IG$=LEFT$ (J 
F$,1):IF IG$<>"." THEN C1$=C1$+" 
j3» 

70 RETURN 



■ 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 83 



OWL- WARE 





rf DAOI 




NEW COCO 3 VERSION! 

CREATE 3EAUTIFUL PICTURES WITH 

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Develop versatile line anil bar graphs 



Charting 



By Michael Sims 




Originally, I wrote Graphit to 
keep track of my school grades, 
but I have since adapted it for 
various uses. 

Graphit is an all-purpose graphics 
program in which you enter values and 
it develops a line or bar graph. You can 
then save, load, print out or add more 
data. There is also room on the graph 



Michael Sims is a junior at North 
Richland high school in New York, and 
is a self-taught programmer and Co Co 
fanatic. He plans to pursue a career in 
systems analysis. 



for a title and labels for the 'X' and 'Y' 
axes. 

This program is user friendly and 
menu driven; there shouldn't be any 
problem with it. 

The menu options include: 



Add Data — Thisis where you enter the 
numbers to be graphed. To leave this 
mode, press ENTER. 

Save Data — Saves data to disk. 

Load Data — Loads data f rom disk. 

Graph Data — Makes a line or bar 
graph from the data provided. If no 
name is specified for the graph, you 



are sent back to the menu to pick one 

at Option 5. 
Name Graph — Where you specify 

name, horizontal and vertical labels. 
Print Data — Prints data to printer or 

screen. Baud rate is set to 1200. To 

change, edit Line 10000. 
New Memory — Clears the memory. I 

recommend this always be done 

before loading a new file or starting 

a new graph. 

If there are any questions about this 
program, don't hesitate to write me at 
5 Skinner Court, Tomkins Cove, NY 
10986. Please enclose an SASE. □ 



THIS IS AN EXAMPLE GRAPH 





86 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 




The listing: GRRPHIT 



GRAF IT 



By Michael G. 
5 Skinner Ct. 
Tomkins Cove, 



Sims 



NY 10986 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

6 GOSUB 10000 

10 DIM TEST(255) , L$ (97) : FOR LE=4 
8T057 : L=L+1 : READL$ ( LE ) : NEXT : FORL 
E=65TO90 : L=L+1 : READL$ (LE ) : NEXT 
20 RNUM=0 

30 IF TIMER<50 THEN 40 ELSE GOSU 
B8020 

40 CLS : PRINT@0 , "GRAFIT" : PRINT@8 , 
»FN="FILE$ : PRINT@20 , "NF="RNUM: PR 
INT@3 2,STRING$ (32 , 204) ; 
50 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 7 ) ; "MENU : 11 
60 PRINTTAB (7 ); 11 <1> ADD DATA 11 
PRINTTAB (7 ) ;"<2> SAVE DATA 11 

lf <3> LOAD DATA 11 



70 
80 
90 



PRINTTAB ( 7 ) 
PRINTTAB (7) ; 11 <4> GRAPH DATA 11 



100 PRINTTAB ( 7) ; "< 5 > NAME GRAPH 11 

105 PRINTTAB (7) ; lf <6> PRINT DATA 11 

106 PRINTTAB ( 7) ;"<N> NEW MEMORY 11 
110 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN110 

120 IF A$= n N lf THEN TIMER=0 : RUN 
130 A=VAL(A$) :IFA<1 OR A>6 THEN 
GOSUB 6080:FORDL=1TO1000:NEXTDL: 
GOTO40 

140 ON A GOTO 1000,2000,3000,400 
0, 5000, 9000 
1000 1 

1010 CLS : PRINT@0 , "ADD DATA 11 : PRIN 

T@ 32, STRING$ (3 2,204) 

1020 FOR X=RNUM+1 TO 255 

1030 PRINT 11 ITEM 11 X 11 : 11 ; : LINEINPUTT 

EST$ 

1040 IF TEST$ = lffl THEN RNUM=X-1:G 
OTO40 

1050 IF ASC(TEST$) >57 THEN GOSUB 

6070:GOTO1030 
1060 IF LEN(TEST$)>9 THEN GOSUB 
6020:GOTO 1030 
1070 TEST(X) =VAL(TEST$) 
1080 IF TEST(X)<0 THEN GOSUB6000 
:GOTO 1030 



1090 NEXT X 

1100 GOSUB 6010:GOTO 40 

2000 IFRNUM=0THENGOSUB6060 :GOT04 

0 ELSE CLS : PRINT@0 , "SAVE DATA" : P 

RINT@32 ,STRING$(32 ,204) ; 

2010 PRINT 

2020 PRINT "FILENAME : " ; : LINEINPUT 
FILE$ 

2030 IF FILE$ = "" THEN 40 ELSE IF 
LEN(FILE$)>8 THEN GOSUB 6040: GO 
TO2020 

2040 OPEN"D", #l,FILE$+"/GPH",33 
2050 FOR RUM=1 TO RNUM 
2060 PRINT #1, TEST ( RUM) :PUT#1, RUM 
2070 NEXT RUM 

2080 PRINT#1,NAME$:PUT#1:PRINT#1 

, BOT$ : PUT # 1 : PRINT# 1 , SIDE $ : PUT# 1 

2090 CLOSE#1:GOTO40 

3000 CLS : PRINT@0 , "LOAD DATA" : PRI 

NT@32,STRING$(32,204) ; 

3010 PRINT 

3020 PRINT "FILENAME : " ; : LINEINPUT 
FILE$ 

3030 IF FILE$="" THEN 40 ELSE IF 
LEN(FILE$)>8 THEN GOSUB6040 : GOT 
02020 

3040 OPEN"D", #l,FILE$+"/GPH",33 
3050 FOR RNUM=1 TO L0F(l)-3 
3060 GET#1:INPUT#1, TEST (RNUM) 
3070 NEXT RNUM 

3080 GET#1:INPUT#1,NAME$:GET#1: I 
NPUT#1, BOT$:GET#l: INPUT#1, SIDE$ 
3090 CLOSE#1:GOTO40 
4000 POKE178,3:IF RNUM=0 THEN GO 
SUB 6060IGOTO40 ELSE IF NAME$=" " 
THEN F1=1:G0SUB 6050 : GOTO5000 

4005 PRINT: PRINT"LINE OR BAR? (L 
/B)" 

4006 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN4006 E 
LSE IF A$="L" THEN PRINT ELSE IF 

A$="B" THEN PRINT ELSE GOSUB 60 
80:GOTO4006 

4010 R5=0:X=0:PMODE4, 1:PCLS:SCRE 
EN1, 1 

4020 X=123-( (7*LEN(NA$) )/2) : FORM 
=1T0LEN (NA$) : X=X+7 : DRAW"BM"+STR$ 
( INT (X) ) +" , 10 ; "+L$ (ASC (MID$ (NA$, 
M, 1) ) ) : NEXT 

4030 Y=97-( (10*LEN(SI$) ) /2 ) : FORM 
=1T0LEN ( S I $ ) : Y=Y+9 : DRAW" BM2 f " +ST 
R$ ( INT ( Y) ) +" ; "+L$ (ASC (MID$ (SI$ ,M 
, 1) ) ) : NEXT 

4040 X=123-( (7*LEN(B0$) )/2) : FORM 
=1T0LEN ( B0$) : X=X+7 : DRAW " BM " + S TR $ 
(INT(X) ) +" , 18 9 ; "+L$ (ASC (MID$ (B0$ 
,M, 1) ) ) : NEXT 

4050 LINE (0, 15) - (255 , 15) , PSET 
4060 FOR Y=191 TO 20 STEP -5 
4070 LINE(9,Y)-(12,Y) , PSET 



I 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 87 



4j38j3 NEXTY 

4j39j3 FORX=j3T0255STEP5: LINE (X, 179 

)-(X / 176) ,PSET:NEXTX 

41j3j3 T=j3 

411)3 S = 2 55/RNUM 

412j3 ZZ=TEST(1) : F0RZQ=1T0RNUM : IF 
TEST(ZQ)>ZZ THEN ZZ=TE(ZQ) 
413j3 NEXT ZQ 
414j3 N=151/ZZ 

415j3 LINE(15,171-(TE(1) *N) ) -(15, 
171-(TE(1) *N) ) ,PSET 
4155 IF A$="B" THEN POKE178,2 
416j3 IF A$="L" THEN FOR X=15 TO 
255 STEP S ELSE FOR X=15 TO 25j3 
STEP S 

417j3 R5=R5+1 

4175 IF R5=RNUM THEN 4 2j3j3 

418j3 IF A$="L" THEN LINE- (X, 171- 

(TE (R5 ) *N) ) , PSET ELSE LINE(X,17j3 

)-(X+(S-5) , 171-(TE(R5) *N) ) ,PSET, 

BF 

419j3 NEXT X 

42j3j3 IFINKEY$ = lf "THEN4 2j3j3ELSEGOTO 
4j3 

5j3j3j3 CLS :PRINT"NAME GRAPH 11 : PRINT 
@32 ,STRING$ (32 , 2 j3 4 ) 
5J31J3 PRINT 

5j32j3 PRINT 11 ENTER TITLE OF GRAPH: 



it 



5j33j3 LINEINPUT">" ;NAME$ 
5j34j3 IF NAME $ = 11 11 THEN NA$=" 11 : GO 
T04j3 ELSE IF LEN (NAME$ ) >3 2 THEN 
GOSUB6j34 JZJ : GOT05 j33 f5 

5j35j3 PRINT 11 BOTTOM LABEL: 11 : LINEIN 

PUT">" ; BOT$ : IFBOT$= lf "THENBO$=" 11 

:GOT04j3 ELSE IF LEN(BOT$)>32 THE 

NGOSUB6j34j3 :GOT05j35j3 

5j36j3 PRINT I! SIDE LABEL: 11 : LINEINPU 

T M > I! ;SIDE$:IFSIDE$= ,fM THENSI$= 11 " 

:GOT04j3 ELSE IF LEN ( SIDE$) >15 TH 

EN GOSUB 6j34j3:GOTO 5j36j3 

5j37j3 IF Fl=l THEN F1=J3 : GOT04j3j3j3 

ELSE GOT04j3 

5j38j3 GOT05j38j3 

6j3j3j3 PRINT "error: NUMBER TOO SMAL 



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L M : SOUND 2 JZJ JZJ , 3 : RETURN 
6J2J1J2J PRINT"error : FILE TOO LARGE" 
: S0UND2 JZJ JZJ , 3 : F0RDL= 1T0 1 J2J J2J J2J : NEXTDL 
: RETURN 

6J2J2J2J PRINT"error: NUMBER TOO LARG 

E" :S0UND2J2JJ2J , 3 : RETURN 

6J2J3J2J PRINT"error : NAME TOO SHORT 11 

: S0UND2 J2J J2J , 3 : RETURN 

6J2J4J2J PRINT" error: NAME TOO LONG": 

S0UND2 J2J J2J , 3 : RETURN 

6J2J5J2J PRINT 11 error : NO TITLE" : SOUND 
2J2JJ2J , 3 : F0RDL=1T01J2JJ2JJ2J : NEXTDL: RETUR 
N 

6J2J6J2J PRINT" error: MEMORY EMPTY" :S 
OUND2J2JJ2J , 3 : F0RDL=1T01J2)J2JJ2J : NEXTDL: R 
ETURN 

6J2J7J2J PRINT" error: NO ALPHA DATA A 
LLOWED" : SOUND 2J2JJ2J , 3 : RETURN 
6J2J8J2J PRINT"error:SO SUCH CHOICE" 
: S0UND2 JZJ J2J , 3 : RETURN 
7J2JJ2JJ2J 1 

7J2J1J2J DATABRHU4 ERFD4 GNLBR2 

7J2J2J2J D AT AR2 U6NGD6R2 

7J2J3J2J DATABU5ER2FDGL2GD2R4 

7J2J4J2J DATABU5ER2FDGNLFDGL2NHBR3 

7J2J5J2J DATABR3U6G3R4BD3 

7J2J6J2J DATABUFR2EU2HL3U2R4BD6 

7J2J7J2J DATABU3R3FDGL2HU4ER2BD6BR 

7J2J8J2J DATABU6R4 DG3 D2 BR3 

7J2J9J2J DATABRHUER2 EUHL2 GDFR2 FDGNL2 

BR 

71J2JJ2J DATABRR2EU4HL2GDFR3BD3 

711J2J DATAU5ER2FD2NL4D3 

712J2J DATARU 6NLR2 FDGNL2 FDGNL3 BR 

713J3 DATABR4 BU5HL2 GD4 FR2 EBD 

714J3 DATARU6NLR2FD4GNL2BR 

715J3 DATAU6NR4D3NR3D3R4 

716J3 DATAU3NR3U3R4BD6 

717J3 DATABUU4ER3BD4NLD2L3NHR3 

718J3 DATAU3NU3R4NU3D3 

719J3 DATAR2U6NL2NR2 D6R2 

7 2 JZJ JZJ DATABUNUFR2 ENU5BD 

721J2J DATAU3NU3RNE3F3 

72 2J2J DATANU6R4 

723J2J DATAU6F2DUE2D6 

724J2J DATAU6F4NU4D2 

7 2 5J3 DATABRHU4 ER2 FD4GNL2 BR 

726J3 DATAU6R3FDGL3D3BR4 

72 7J3 DATABRHU4ER2FD4GNL2BUHF2 

728J3 DATAU6R3FDGL3RF3 

729J3 DATABUFR2EUHL2HUER2FBD5 

73J3J3 DATABU 6 R4 L2 D 6 BR2 

7 31J3 DATABUNU5FR2ENU5BD 

732J3 DATABU6D4F2E2U4BD6 

7 3 3J3 DATANU6E2UDF2NU6 

734J3 DATAUE4NUG2H2NUF4D 

735J3 DATABU 6 DF 2 E 2 NUG2 D 3 BR2 

736J3 DATABU 6R4DG4DR4 



88 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



8ppp PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 
8010 RE AD A $ : X=X+5 : DRAW 11 BM " + S TR $ ( 
X)+",120 ; fS +A$:GOTO8 / 01j3 
8p2p F5=l:PM0DE 4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 
, 1 : POKE178 , 2 : FORX=0TQ2J2STEP2 : LIN 
E(X, S3) - (X, 191) ,PSET:LINE(25 6-X, j3 
) -(2 56-X, 191) , PSET: LINE (0 , X) - (25 
5,X) , PSET: LINE (0, 19 1-X) -(255,191 
-X) , PSET : NEXTX: POKE17 8 , 3 

8021 G$(1)= II BM+1,+ / 0;R4E1UL3 ;BM-3 
,+0;DU4ER4F n 

8022 G$ (2) = ,f U2R5FDUHEUH2L4D4":G$ 
( 3 ) - ,f U2R6D2U4H2L2G2D2 lf : G$ ( 4 ) = "U2 
R4L4U4R6" : G$ ( 5 ) ="R6 L3U6R3 L6 " : G$ ( 
6)= n BM+3 , +0 ;U6R3 L6 11 

8023 X=90 : F0RG=1T06 : X=X+10 : DRAW" 
BM H +STR$ ( X ) + 11 , 40 ; » +G$ ( G ) : NEXTG : L 
INE(85,47)-(170,27) ,PSET,B 

8030 A$(1)="A GENERAL PURPOSE GR 
APH H :A$ (2)=" PROGRAM FOR THE TAND 
Y" : A$ ( 3 ) ="COLOR COMPUTER" : Y=50 : A 
$(4)=" ":A$(5)=" ":A$(6)="BY":A$ 
( 7 ) = H MICHAEL SIMS" 
8040 FOR A=l TO 7 
8050 X=j3 

8060 X=123-( (LEN(A$(A) ) *7)/2) 
8070 Y=Y+15 

8080 FOR M=l TO LEN (A$ (A) ) 
8100 X=X+7 

8110 DRAW"BM"+STR$ ( INT(X) ) +" , "+S 
TR$ ( Y) +" ; »+L$ (ASC (MID$ (A$ (A) , M, 1 

))) 

8115 PLAY"L255" 
8120 NEXT M , A 

8140 FOR Z=1TO130 0 l IFINKEY$ = " 11 TH 
ENNEXT ELSE 40 
8150 GOTO 40 

9000 IFRNUM=0THENGQSUB6060:GOTO4 
0 ELSE CLS:PRINT"PRINT DATA" : PRI 
NT@32,STRING$(32, 204) ; 
9010 PRINT: PRINT "PRINTER OR SCRE 
EN (P/S) 11 

9020 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN9020 E 
LSE IF A$="P" THEN B=-2 ELSE IF 
A$="S" THEN B=0 ELSE IF A$-CHR$ ( 
13) THEN 40 ELSE GOSUB 6080: GOTO 
9020 

9030 IF B=-2 THEN PRINT "READY PR 

INTER & HIT <ENTER>" 

9040 IFB=-2 THEN IFINKEY$=CHR$ (1 

3) THEN 9050 ELSE 9040 

9050 PRINT# B , NAME $ : PRINT# B , S TRIN 

GS ( LEN (NA$ ) , "-■') : FORX=lTORNUM: PR 

INTTEST (X) , : NEXTX 

9060 IF INKEY$ = lfff THEN9060 

9070 GOTO 40 

10000 POKE150,40 f set br to 1200 
10010 RETURN 





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March 1987 THE RAINBOW 



89 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 




Finding Resources for 
Computer Learning 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Recently I received a little news- 
letter in the mail called Adven- 
tures in Learning. This publica- 
tion used to be called DragonSmoke, 
and is edited by two people who used 
to write for the RAINBOW, Bob Albrect 
and Don Inman. Both continue to 
produce material and software for the 
Color Computer. 

The newsletter claims to have no 
carefully and precisely defined au- 
dience. It is supposed to be a newsletter 
for all enthusiasts of the Color Comput- 
er. As the name implies, however, the 
emphasis is on learning — about the 
Color Computer and about things to do 
with computers. 

The name, by the way, is very apt. 
The newsletter presents learning as an 
adventure. I have a personal attachment 
to dragons, and thus have some feeling 
of loss for the name Dragonsmoke. 
However, the new name fits the period- 
ica] better than the old one. 

There are many small (and a few 
large) classroom activities listed in the 
newsletter. A creative teacher could 
easily take material from this newsletter 



Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



and implement it directly into a lesson. 
The material is easily adapted to other 
activities the teacher wants. 

There are entire lessons within the 
publication, as well as pieces on how to 
teach bits, bytes, and numbering sys- 
tems: binary, hexadecimal, and de- 
cimal. Also, they have a section on 
simulations for use in schools. The 
simulations are presented and consid- 
ered as learning activities, not simply 
games. 

There is a challenging word-learning 
activity called Wordsworth; each letter 
gets a number value, and each word is 
the sum of the values of its letters. This 
activity can prove difficult even for your 
brightest students. (Can you find a word 
whose sum is 30?) There are also book 
and software reviews, and my favorite, 
BASIC Challenges (puzzles) for students 
to solve. 

I am not making a self-serving plug 
for this particular periodical. No com- 
mission for subscription will ever come 
my way. I do, however, think educators 
should examine a sample copy of the 
newsletter, but only to determine for 
themselves if the information is valua- 
ble for their individual classrooms. 
Some teachers willnot find the material 
worthwhile; my guess is that most will 
find some utility in Adventures in 
Learning. 

The major reason for bringing this 
publication to your attention is that it 
is the only one I have seen that consists 
entirely of support materials for educa- 
tors. The rainbow has a lot of good 



information for teachers: programs; 
suggestions for class activities; reviews 
of software and books; and naturally, 
learning exercises. The RAINBOW is a 
multi-purpose (perhaps full-purpose is 
a better term) publication. Contained 
within these pages is something for 
everyone with a Color Computer, in- 
cluding the electronic hobbyists, folks 
running a business, people interested in 
playing games — everyone. Adventures 
in Learning, on the other hand, is 
limited to learning-type activities. 

It seems to me that educators need 
support materials. Teachers in class- 
rooms need to have more than just a few 
places to share information, learn new 
techniques, and build a file of activities 
for students. Some teachers get support 
materials from their local school district 
through a computer consultant. Some 
teachers have access to a consortium 
that provides support materials for 
classroom experiences with computers. 
Many teachers, unfortunately, are on 
their own, or share ideas with just a few 
close colleagues. 

Every teacher has a few good ideas. 
Even the worst teacher in your school 
can come up with a good idea for 
students in classrooms now and then. 
Most teachers have many good ideas to 
implement in their classrooms. A very 
few teachers have a large number of 
good ideas. It is rare for any teacher, no 
matter how good, to fill a school year 
just with self-generated ideas. Teachers, 
like all other professionals, need to have 
stimulation from others, and the type of 



90 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



"Build up 
enough of these 
techniques, and 
you soon find 
you have an 
entire set of 
valuable 
educational 
experiences for 
your classes. " 



support materials contained in the 
newsletter helps provide this. 

One overworked word these days is 
"network." Despite the overuse of the 
term, teachers do need a network sys- 
tem (or systems) to learn from each 
other. The key to a network is sharing. 
Teachers need to share ideas with each 
other, and select for use those that fit 
with their style and classrooms. 

A network system should thus in- 
volve software development, classroom 
tips, learning exercises, entire units of 
instruction, and almost anything else 
that teachers want to share with each 
other. The RAINBOW magazine is not 
structured as a learning network, but 
does provide some networking capabil- 
ities for readers. The RAINBOWfests 
held around the country are excellent 
networking devices for teachers as well 
as for other types of Color Computer 
users. Something like Adventures in 
Learning is an excellent complement to 
a network system for educators using 
computers in classrooms. 

Conducting a network system by 
newsletter is not as satisfying as face-to- 
face communication, but a newsletter is 
naturally much better than nothing. 
The essence of the value of the newslet- 



ter, or any networking system, is for 
teachers to discover what they might try 
in classrooms. Much of what you dis- 
cover from any network will have to be 
filtered through your unique needs and 
capabilities (those of your students as 
well as yourself). After that filtering 
process, you should have a set of new 
techniques to try in the classroom. Build 
up enough of these techniques, and you 
soon find you have an entire set of 
valuable educational experiences for 
your classes. 

In the ideal situation, teachers will 
have several networks for idea genera- 
tion and sharing. In addition to things 
like newsletters and the RAINBOW, it 
would be valuable for teachers to have 
access to resources such as consortia 
and computer experts within a school. 
If your situation is less than ideal 
(whose isn't?), you might want to add 
one more resource to your list. 

For those interested in learning more 
about the newsletter Adventures in 
Learning, write to P.O. Box 7627, 
Menlo Park, CA 94062. Perhaps there 
are other network systems that I haven't 
heard about. If you know of one, please 
let me know at 829 Evergreen, Cha- 
tham, IL 62629. _ 



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March 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



DELPHIBUREAU 



Changes Make Delphi 
Even Easier to Use 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Assistant 



has spent considerable time working on A new version of the Forum software 
specific items in the software which was installed in late December. At the 
controls the Forum section of the SIG. Forum prompt, entering an R brings up 



DATABASE REPORT 



The OS-9 SIG, which is reachable 
from the CoCo SIG menu, was 
officially opened January 6, 
1987. This SIG is designed to meet the 
needs of the ever-increasing population 
of OS-9 users. Several people have 
already stopped in and said hello in the 
OS-9 Online SIG Forum. Several other 
changes have also taken place on Del- 
phi. These changes will affect users of 
both SIGs. First, the WHO and SEND 
commands now work across node 
boundaries, just as they do in Confer- 
ence. Some of you will remember that, 
not too long ago, we couldn't even "see" 
people who were accessing Delphi via a 
different node. It's good to know that 
we can easily communicate with these 
people now. The WHO command also 
shows the number of people in Confer- 
ence, if anyone, and indicates these 
people by placing parentheses around 
their usernames. The SEND command 
has been altered such that it doesn't 
truncate your message to 1 28 characters 
if you make it issue the message prompt 
by entering just SEND or SEND user- 
name. Finally, in addition to being a 
little quicker to start up, the Conference 
"head count" is displayed upon entry to 
the SIG. 

In addition to these changes, Delphi 



Cray Augsburg is RAIN BOW 's technical 
assistant and has an associates degree 
in electrical engineering. He and his 
wife, Ruth Ann, have two children and 
live in Louisville, Ky. His username on 
Delphi is RAIN BOW MAG. 



The big news is the opening of 
rainbow's OS-9 Online Special 
Interest Group. Dale Lear, Rick 
Adams, Greg Law, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed and I have been working on this 
project for the last month. We've moved 
all of the OS-9 files that were formerly 
lumped together in the one OS-9 Topic 
Area on the CoCo SIG, and sorted them 
out in the OS-9 Online database in a 
more organized fashion. We also expect 
very soon to start uploading those long- 
promised five megabytes of OS-9 Users 
Group material to a special and separate 
topic area on the OS-9 Online SIG. We 
have already posted there a complete 
listing of the files that will soon be 
arriving. 

We welcome all to OS-9 Online. Dale 
Lear is our SysOp. You can get there 
either from the CoCo SIG by typing 05, 
or from the Groups menu of Delphi. 
Note that if you enter OS-9 Online via the 
CoCo SIG, you will return to the CoCo 
SIG when you exit it. Note also that the 
Conference areas of OS-9 Online and of 
the CoCo SIG are merged, so that 
anyone in the Conference Area of OS-9 
Online can "see" everyone on both the 
CoCo and the OS-9 Online SIGs if they 
type WHO (or 'WHO if they are actually in 
a particular group). You can also conven- 
iently page or send to anyone in either 
group from Conference of either group. 

I want to give special thanks to two of 
our staff: Don Hutchison, who both 



helped us set up OS-9 Online directly, 
and whose tireless work on the CoCo 
SIG database gave me and others time to 
work on constructing OS-9 Online. I also 
want to thank Greg Law, one of our most 
knowledgeable OS-9 "gurus." Greg has 
been exceedingly active on the CoCo SIG 
answering questions about OS-9, and I 
look forward to seeing him being equally 
active in his "new home" on OS-9 Online. 

Note: If you plan on submitting new 
OS-9 material to us, please submit it to 
the OS-9 Online database. Of course, as 
usual, free time for uploading is availa- 
ble. Just go to the help menu and fill out 
the form for "request for free upload 
time." The original CoCo SIG will re- 
main the place for those using Disk 
Extended basic programs, and for most 
of those with CoCo hardware questions 
or suggestions. It will continue to support 
CoCo owners who are not using OS-9, 
and also provide some OS-9 coverage for 
a while longer. Those primarily using OS- 
9 are encouraged to "hang out" at OS- 
9 Online. 

New Submissions 

The following new programs are on 
OS-9 Online: Duane M. Perkins (DPER- 
kins) sent us TEST ASM, a tutorial file that 
illustrates use of the MMU in a 128K 
CoCo 3. His ACTDDC.B09 is an aid to 
design of DC power supplies. Kevin 
Darling (KDARLING) has submitted an 
enhanced SCF editor, which upgrades 



92 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



the reply prompt for a reply to the 
current message. In earlier versions, 
there was some system confusion be- 
tween RERD and REPLY since both begin 
with 4 R\ There is no need to enter RERD 
since a message number alone will 
accomplish the same thing. If you want 
to enter the RERD command, you will 
have to type it out. Also, issuing a 
REPLY, or R, after an attempt at FDLLDW 
fails will no longer send a reply to some 
other message. Using NEXT after you 
start following a thread interrupts the 
FDLLDW. Use ENTER to continue follow- 
ing. A NEXT will cause you to read the 
next unread message whether it is in the 
thread or not. 

How about following a thread back- 
wards? You can do this by entering BACK 
when you wish to see previous messages 
in the thread. Just as with FDLLDW, use 
enter to see the next previous message. 
A NEXT will abort the process and take 
you to the next unread message. Please 
note that the FDLLDW command is 
disabled while reading backwards since 
it could cause the system to go awry. 

Another new feature of our Forum 
software is TAG (you can abbreviate this 
command by entering T). This com- 



mand causes Forum to remember a 
message you may want to reread again 
before leaving Forum. This is handy if 
you want to read all the messages in the 
Forum before replying to any of them. 
If you try to exit the Forum without 
reread ing your tagged message, you will 
be prompted to RERD TRG. Rereading a 
tagged message untags it, but DIR TRG 
does not. 

The HIGH command has been altered 
so that you can change your current 
high message without having to see the 
secondary prompt. Just enter HIGH 
xxx x, where xxxx is the message 
number you want as your highest mes- 
sage. You can also use HIGH 0. The HIGH 
command normally clears which new 
messages you have read, but if you press 
ENTER at the prompt for a new high 
message number, the Forum software 
assumes you just wanted to see your 
current high message number. It does 
not forget which new messages you have 
already read. Along with these changes 
in Forum, the new software has been 
designed to be much more lenient about 
what punctuation is allowed in com- 
mands involving ranges of message 
numbers. For instance, each of the 



following command lines performs the 
same task: 

DIR 123:150 
DIR 123,150 
DIR 123-150 
DIR 123;150 
DIR 123/150 

You can also enter something like 
RERD 0500 instead of RERD 500. If you 
want to read a range of messages non- 
stop, you can accomplish this by enter- 
ing RERD 123:150 NS. Before, you had 
to enter the NS before the range 
numbers. Please note that some other 
commands are still sensitive to order. 
One example of this is REPLY 150 / 
EDIT. 

The /EDIT must be after the message 
number. In any event, these changes 
should make life a little easier for those 
people who are used to other systems 
and bulletin board systems. 

Last is a change which allows you to 
type ahead one command when enter- 
ing Forum. For instance, at the CoCo 
SIG or OS9 prompt, you could enter 
FORUM RERD NEW to enter Forum and 
read your new messages. □ 



the simple command line editor of OS- 
9. Jay Truesdale (jaytruesdale) has 
given us a very simple database utility 
written in 6809 assembly f or compactness 
and speed. Vincent Figundio (vinfig) 
has sent us 5RD.REB, a text rebuttal to 
a member's account of his problems 
getting OS-9 running. Roger Smith 
(SMUDGER) has sent us UNLORD.B03, a 
utility that unlinks modules loaded into 
memory more than once. It saves typing 
UNLINK over and over. 
MikeyTerm 4.3 

Just in case you Disk Extended basic 
users thought we had forgotten you, I 
have a major new announcement: Mikey- 
Term 4.3 is now released and is available 
in the Data Communications section of 
the CoCo SIG. This revision of the classic 
terminal program by Mike Ward (mike- 
WARD)includes support f or the CoCo 3 in 
80-column mode. The full program, 
accessory files and documentation are 
available in the Data Communications 
section. Now CoCo 3 users have a choice 
in 80-column Disk Extended basic free- 
ware programs: the new MikeyTerm 4.3 
or Greg-E-Term (the latter was an- 
nounced last month). 

Both are in our Data Communications 
topic area, and I recommend you down- 
load both of them. I want to give special 
thanks to Mike Ward for sharing with 
our membership on Delphi his latest 
revision of what is by f ar the most f amous 
CoCo terminal emulator program. 



Another highlight of this past month 
on the CoCo SIG was the uploading of 
three new graphics image converter 
programs. Erik Gavriluk (erikgav) has 
provided a Commodore 64-to-CoCo 3 
picture converter. 

Inspired by an earlier and cruder 
project for the CoCo 2 that he and I had 
worked on together, Erik has written an 
all-machine language utility that can now 
display Commodore 64 pictures on a 
CoCo 3 screen, preserving their full 
original colors and displaying the entire 
picture on the screen without need of 
scrolling. Erik has also written and 
uploaded a Macintosh picture converter 
for the CoCo 3, allowing Macintosh 
pictures to be viewed on the CoCo 3's 
screen. His partner, Greg Miller (greg- 
miller), has uploaded a CoCo 3 
converter program for uncompressed 
Atari ST Degas format pictures. 

All three of these converter programs 
are to be found in the Graphics topic 
area, along with some sample images 
from these three "alien" machines. The 
group names to look for are 
C64PIX.BIN, Macintosh Pix Converter, 
and Atari ST Converter. 

Erik has also uploaded some alterna- 
tive printer dump routines for both his 
CoCo 2 and CoCo 3 Macintosh convert- 
er programs. The potential for cross- 
pollination of artistic ideas due to the 
availability of such converters is im- 
mense. I even heard a rumor that more 



impressive graphics programs are on the 
way from these two talented CoCo pro- 
grammers, who may soon be releasing 
their first major commercial product. 

NOTE: Uploaders and downloaders 
should please remember that from now 
on all files in the database that support 
the CoCo 3 will be flagged in two ways. 
They will have the expression "(C3)" in 
the group name title, and will all have as 
one of their key words "C3." This will 
hopefully aid CoCo 3 owners who are 
searching the database for new material 
for their machines. 

I also want to call special attention to 
an important new contribution from 
Greg Geary (GJG). This is a group called 
PMODE to HIRES Converter. This machine 
language utility converts PMODE 4 old- 
style CoCo graphics screens into CoCo 
3 HSCREEN 2 images, an extremely useful 
trick! John Snyder (mythrandir) has 
added a sort of basic Driver as a "front 
end" to Greg's utility, to make it even 
easier to use. J ohn's contribution is listed 
as HCOPY. 

Michael Fischer (MIKE88), (the winner 
of our "who will bag Forum msg # 20,000 
contest) has sent us a stunning CoCo 3 
graphics demo called Bouncing Ball. 
There have been many such Amiga-like 
bouncing ball demos for the Coco 3, but 
this one sent to us by Mike is by far the 
most precise rendition of the Amiga 
graphics demo classic. The version we 
currently have posted has benefitted 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 



from two modifications of the original 
upload, and now works properly on both 
128K and 512K CoCo 3s, and supports 
either a composite video or an RGB color 
monitor. 

Also in the Graphics database we have 
had a great number of new files. Tom 
Rawlinson (tomino) has sent us a graph- 
ics demo, and Carmen Izzi Jr. (cizzijr) 
has provided a palette display. Both are 
for the CoCo 3. Raymond Lueders 
(moonshine) has sent us quite a lot of 
material, including dreamgirl pictures, 
pix of Bruce Lee and Karen Allen, and 
several stunning nudes. 

Don Hutchison (the backbone of our 
database submissions processing on the 
CoCo SIG) has contributed a digitized 
picture of Mike Ward. Billy Hambric 
(SNOOPYDOG) has sent us a Snoopy Dog 
Calendar. Derrik Kardos (DTG) has 
provided a James Bond image. 

Ira Goldwyn (irag) has sent us more 
digitized images, including one of Joan 
Rivers. Bob Montowski (GRAPHICSPUB) 
has sent a viewer utility for looking at Hi- 
Res DS-69 images. Greg Geary has 
provided a DMP-220 screen dump for 
the CoCo 3 Hi-Res screen. Fred McDon- 
ald (FREDMCD) has sent us Viper. Pix. 
Last but not least, Michael Schneider 
(mschneider) has sent us a very intrigu- 
ing basic version of a bouncing ball 



demo B0UNCE2 . BRS for the CoCo 3, 
which shows the impressive power of the 
CoCo 3's basic graphics commands. 

In the Music database Robert Heil 
(LURKER) has sent us two new composi- 
tions, and Ray Wright (raywri) has 
uploaded over 16 new tunes, including 
both classical and popular material. Ray 
has been one of our most prolific music 
uploaders. Mike Fischer has sent us a 
version of "Ghostbusters." All of these 
are in the Musica II PLRY format. 

In the Utility database, Keith Smith 
(UGLY) has provided a CoCo 3 joystick 
utility. Ted Christensen (TEDCHRISTEN) 
has sent us a budget utility, David Wendt 
(dwendt) has sent us a disk file compar- 
ison utility, and Don Hutchison has 
provided a tape inventory program. 
Chris W. Brown (crispwilliam) has 
sent us a patch for TelePatch to allow it 
to run on the CoCo 3, and we have a 
budget program from Jim Manning 
( JIMBM). Roger Smith has uploaded a file 
that may help make some versions of VIP 
Writer run on the CoCo 3. 

In the Games topic area, Steve Macri 
(dracman) has sent us Kelly Checkers. 
Loren Howell (XENOS) has sent us Proto 
7. Don Hutchison has provided a version 
of The Game of Life that had previously 
disappeared from our database. Don has 
also sent us two other files, Astro Mines 



and the famous Ultimate Adventure 
game. I am sure Adventure game folks 
will find that last one quite amusing. 
David Ferreira (skeeve) has sent us a 
BIO.BAS, and Fred McDonald has pro- 
vided Thunder Cat Game. 

In the General topic area, Carmen Izzi 
Jr. has sent information on disk error 
codes to aid CoCo 2 and 3 programmers. 
I've also uploaded a couple of articles I 
wrote, including some thoughts on the 
512K upgrade for the CoCo 3 and some 
observations of mistakes made in rain- 
bow articles. 

The Product Review topic area now 
contains a comparative review I wrote 
after evaluating both the PBJ 512K 
memory upgrade and a prototype of the 
Disto CRC 512K memory upgrade for 
the CoCo 3. 

As you can see, there is a lot of new 
material in the Delphi rainbow CoCo 
SIG database well worth downloading. 
And we now have another entire special 
interest group, OS-9 Online, to serve 
CoCo and other OS-9 6809 machine 
users (we even plan on some degree of 
support f or68000 OS-9). Do drop by and 
check all of this out! See you on the CoCo 
SIG and on OS-9 Online. 

— Marty Goodman 
Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 



From the Princeton RAINBOWfest . . . 

The CoCo 3 Round-Table Tape! 



the rainbow recorded the main event 
of RAINBOWfest Princeton, the Satur- 
day evening (Oct. 18) round-table 
discussion: 

"The Design, Development 
and Marketing of the CoCo 3." 

Speakers included Tandy's Barry 
Thompson and Mark Siegel, as 
well as independent CoCo 3 pro- 
grammers Steve Bjork and Dale Lear 
(filling in for Greg Zumwalt). 

This was a lively and informative ses- 
sion and, therefore, we want as many 
people as possible to hear what these 
RAINBOWfest guests had to say. 



YES, Please send me 



copies of the "CoCo 



3 Round-Table Tape" at $5 per copy plus $1.50 

S/H for a total of . 

(U.S. Currency only, please.) 



Name (please print) 



Address 



City 



State 



Telephone 
Company- 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



Exp. Date 
Signature 



Make checks payable to The Rainbow. Mail to CoCo 3 
Round-Table Tape, The Rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. To place credit card orders, call our toll- 
free number: (800) 847-0309. 



94 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1987 



H 

m 



> 



DELPHI 



This abbreviated, modified version of Delphi's command card has been 
created to help our readers who use Tandy® Color Computers get started 
quickly on Rainbow's new COCO SIG. It is being reproduced here for 
your convenience and can be removed, if you wish, and kept near your 
computer for easy reference. 



WELCOME TO DELPHI 

Most Delphi commands are self-explanatory. This card will serve as 
a handy backup reference. 

In the following command reference, use ENTER in place of 
RETURN. 

Signing onto Delphi Directly 

1. Dial 617-576-0862. 

2. When you have carrier, press RETURN once or twice. 

3. At USERNAME type your menibeniaine and press RETURN. 

4. At PASSWORD type your password and press RETURN. 

How To Sign On Using Telenet 

1. Dial your local Telenet number. 

2. Press RETURN twice. 

3. When TERMINAL= appears, press RETURN. 

4. When Q appears, type C DELPHI and press RETURN. 

5. Then type your USERNAME and PASSWORD as outlined 
above. 

How To Sign On Using Tymnet 

1. Dial your local Tymnet number. 

2. When PLEASE TYPE YOUR TERMINAL IDENTIFIER or 
a string of x's appears, type A without a RETURN. 

3. When PLEASE LOG IN appears, type DELPHI and press 
RETURN. 

4. Then type your USERNAME and PASSWORD as outlined 
above. 

How To Sign On Using DataPac (Canada) 

1. Dial your local DataPac number. 

2. Type . for 300 bps or .. for 1200 bps and press RETURN. 

3. Type PROF 1 and press RETURN to permit use of 
Xmodem. 

^ 4. Type SET 2:1 and press RETURN to allow echo of next 
Da command. 

§. 5. Type P 1 3106.DELPHI and press RETURN to use 
-j. Tymnet. 

co 6. Or type P 1 311061703088 and press RETURN to use 



Telenet. 

7. Then type your USERNAME and PASSWORD as outlined 
above. 



30 Your computer has a key marked either RETURN, NEW 



LINE, XMIT or ENTER. When you see the word RETURN 
09 here, press the corresponding key. 

O You can obtain your local access number by calling Te- 

* lenet at 1-800-336-0437 or Tymnet at 1-800-336-0149. If you 

have any difficulty, call DELPHI toll-free at 1-800-544-4005 (in 
(O Massachusetts, 1-617-491-3393). 

cn 



1 



MAIN MENU OF DELPHI 

Starting point for getting the most out of DELPHI. 

BUSINESS & FINANCE - Financial and business news and 
analysis, brokerages services, stock and commodities quota- 
tions and more. 

CONFERENCE - Real time communication with one person or 
a group. 

DELPHI MAIL - Electronic mail, Batch Mailthru and Telex to 
users of other online services. 

ENTERTAINMENT - Gaines, trivia, polls, horoscopes, Collab- 
orative Novel and more. 

GROUPS II CLUBS - Online meeting places - both clubhouse 
and clearing-house - for people with personal computers, 
hobbies and other special interests in common. 

HELP - Explanation of Main Menu commands and other fea- 
tures of DELPHI. 

LIBRARY - Healthnet, Online Gourmet, CAIN, encyclopedia 
and other business and consumer databases. 

MAGAZINES & BOOKS - Talk back to your favorite publica- 
tions and subscribe. 

MERCHANTS' ROW - Interactive shopping service. 

NEWS-WEATHER-SPORTS - Continually updated news and 
sports, weather forecasts, movie reviews, etc. 

PEOPLE ON DELPHI - Member directory and Chatter Board. 

TRAVEL - Plan your trip and make reservations. 

WORKSPACE - Create, edit, upload and download files. 

USING DELPHI - Rates and other information about DELPHI 
and your use of DELPHI. 

DELPHI MAIL 

Primary Mail Menu: 

BATCH MAILTHRU - Send electronic mail to users of other 

online services.* 
CATALOG - List your Mail files. 

GLOBALINK TRANSLATION - A professional translation 
service.* 

MAIL - DELPHI'S electronic mail; receive and send messages. 
TELEX - Send messages via Western Union's Telex.* 
WORKSPACE - Create, edit, upload, download and maintain 

files of text. 
SETMAIL - Set your Mail message counter. 

U se these comman ds for DELPHI Mail: 

RETURN - Press RETURN upon entering Mail to read new 
messages, if any. Pressing RETURN then presents the sub- 
sequent message or more of tlte current message. 

BACK - Display message that precedes that currently dis- 
played. 

DELETE - Delete just-read message. Or follow DELETE 
with a number to designate the number of the message you 
wish to delete. 

DIRECTORY - List summary of your Mail messages. 

DIRECTORY folder name - List summary of messages in 
specified folder. 

DIR/FOLDER - Display all folders in your mail box. 

DIR/NEW - List your new messages. 

DIR/SINCE= 4-JUL-86 - List messages received since speci- 
fied date. 
EXIT - Return to previous menu. 

EXTRACT filename - Save displayed message in specified file. 

FILE folder name - Add displayed message to specified folder. 

FORWARD username - Send displayed message to others. 

NEXT - Display subsequent message (same as pressing RETURN). 

2 



READ - Display your Mail messages. 
READ/NEW - Display newly arrived Mail. 
REPLY - Send instant response to sender of displayed mes- 
sage. 

SEARCH string - Search Mail file for specified character 
string. 

SELECT - Pick messages for deletion, extracting or searching. 
SELECT folder name - Choose folder that contains desired 

messages. 
SEND - Transmit message. 
SEND filename - Send specified file. 
SEND/EDIT - Call editor to edit a new message. 
SEND/LAST - Send just-sent message to someone else. 

GROUPS AND CLUBS 

Program libraries, discussions, conferences, newsletters and 
polls for users of Atari, Apj'le, Commodore f Texas I nstru- 
ments, Tandy, Wang and IBM- compatible computers as well 
as for those interested in science fiction, theology, computer 
art, music, model building and more. 

Entering a group for the first time gives you its nonmember 
menu and lets you JOIN the group as a member. If you se- 
lect the JOIN option, you are asked to provide your real name, 
rather than your DELPHI membername, and to agree to the 
group's rules. There is no extra cost to becoming a group mem- 
ber. 

Use commands for Conference and Workspace when using 
those functions in Groups and Clubs. 

Database 

Programs and other files organized into groups of related items. 

DIRECTORY - Display a directory of all groups in the topic. 

READ - Read description of a group. You must read the de- 
scription before downloading the file(s) contained in the 
group. 

SEARCH - Search a topic by keyword. 

SET TOPIC - Switch from one topic to another without leav- 
ing the database section. 

SUBMIT - Submit one or more files for inclusion in a topic. 
You upload file(s) to your workspace and then use the 
SUBMIT command to send them to the group manager 
for inclusion in the database. 

WORKSPACE - Enter your workspace area. 

To access a file, first READ it. Then use these commands: 

DESCRIPTION - Display description of file again. 

DISPLAY - Display/list the file on your screen. 

DOWNLOAD - Use with buffer-capture downloading method. 

LIST - Like display, list a file unformatted. 

NEXT - Advance to next group or file. Pressing ENTER or 
RETURN does the same thing. 

XMODEM - Download file using Xmodem protocol. 

KERMIT - Download file using Kennit protocol. Download- 
ing commands that apply to one file of a multiple group 
require specifying the number of the file within the group. 

Forum 

Leave a message or read a message left bv another. 

ADD - Start new message thread with a different subject and 
categorize it according to Topics established by group man- 
ager. Type ? to see designated Topics. 

DELETE - Remove a message written by you or addressed to you. 

3 



DIRECTORY - Display directory of messages. 

EDIT - Edit current message written by you. 

FILE - Place copy of message in your workspace. 

FOLLOW - Follow message thread. Rend only those messages 

of designated thread. 
FORWARD - S end copy of message via DELPHI Mail. 
HIGH - Set/show high message number. 

MAIL - Enter DELPHI Mail while keeping your place in Fo- 
rum. 

MENU - Show complete menu of commands. 

NEXT - Read next message. Pressing ENTER or RETURN 
does the same thing. 

READ - Read message (follow READ with message number 
to display designated message). 

READ WAITING - Read messages only to you. 

READ NEW - Read all new messages. 

READ NEW NS - Read messages nonstop (use with com- 
puter buffer on). 

READ NS 2000 - Read nonstop all messages with numbers 
greater than 2000. 

REPLY - Respond to message. 

RETURN - Read next message in thread (used after FOL- 
LOW) or read next new message. 
TOPIC - Set/show message topic. 

CONFERENCE 

'Talk' online with other DELPHI members. 

Use these commands before joining a group J 
EXIT - Return to previous menu. 

JOIN groupname - Join existing group or start new one. 

NAME name - Change your name or 'handle. 1 

PAGE membername - Page another DELPHI member to join 

you in Conference. 
WHO - List members online and Conference groups. 

Immediate Commands to use while in Conference 

/CANCEL - Terminate a page to another member. 
/EXIT - Leave a gTOup. 
/GNAME name - Change group name. 
/JOIN groupname - Join an existing group. 
/MAIL - Enter Mail, but retain your place in Conference. 
/NAME - Change your name or 'handle.' 
/PAGE - Invite another member into your group. 
/REJECT - A pleasant 'No, thank you' to a pager. 
/REPEAT - Control viewing of your own Conference com- 
ments. 

/SEND membername - Send private message to another mem- 
ber. 

/SQUELCH membername - Ignore messages from a member. 
/WHO - List all current members and Conference groups. 
/WHOIS membername - Display profile. 

PEOPLE ON DELPHI 

Enter information about yourself; find out about others. 

I-AM - Add, change information about yourself. 
ADD - Add information about yourself. 
CHANGE - Alter your existing profile. 
DELETE - Remove all or part of your profile. 
DISPLAY - Show your profile. 

WHO-IS membername - Display profile, if available. 
LIST-KEYWORDS - Display keywords used in profiles. 
BROWSE - Read member profiles. 

4 



SEARCH - Search for certain information, using keywords. 
CHATTER BOARD - Bulletin Board for general messages. 

Chatter Board menu: 

ADD - Post a message on the Chatter Board. 

READ - Read posted messages. 

HELP - Explanation of Chatter Board commands. 

WORKSPACE 

You store files and messages here. Upload a file here before 
submitting it to a database, file forum messages for later re- 
trieval and store mail messages. 

CATALOG - Show those files you have created. 
CREATE - Create text file and store in your workspace. 
DELETE - Remove file you no longer need. 
DIRECTORY - Same as Catalog, show the files you have cre- 
ated. 

DOWNLOAD - Download text file from DELPHI to disk. 
EDIT - Create and edit your own text files. 
LIST - List contents of any text file in your workspace. 
PURGE - Delete all but current version of duplicate files. 
RENAME - Change name of any file in your workspace. 
UPLOAD - Upload text file to DELPHI from your computer. 
XDOWNLOAD - Download text or non-text file via Xmodem 
protocol. 

XUPLOAD - Upload text or non-text file via Xmodem proto- 
col. 

KDOWNLOAD - Download text or non-text file via Kermit 
protocol. 

KUPLOAD - Upload text or non-text file via Kermit proto- 
col. 



USING DELPHI 

Your source for information about DELPHI. 
ADVICE FROM DELPHI - Replies to frequently asked ques- 
tions 

CREDIT POLICY - Explanation of policy. 

DELPHI ADVANTAGE - Explanation of special membership 

plan and application for membership in plan. 
FEEDBACK - Send ideas to DELPHI Product Development 

Group. 

GUIDED TOUR - Brief version of tour you took at sign-on. 
INDEX - Quickly locate information on DELPHI. 
MAIL TO SERVICE - Send your comments, questions to 
DELPHI. 

MANUALS - Information for obtaining DELPHI and Dialog 
documentation. 

MEMBER SERVICES - Hours for DELPHI Member Services. 
MEMBERSHIP AGREEMENT - Your contract for using 
DELPHI. 

NETWORK INFO - Phone numbers and log-on procedures 
for Tymnet. Telenet and DataPac. 

PREMIUM SERVICES - Rates, information on extra-cost 
services. 

WHAT'S NEW ON DELPHI - Online newsletter. 

RATES AND PRICES - Line-time rates, with a comparison 

to DELPHI Advantage rates. 
TELEX CODES - Needed to send Telex messages. 
REVIEW BILLS/INVOICES - Vjew your DELPHI account. 
USAGE HISTORY - View to-date DELPHI activities. 
SETTINGS (PROFILE) - Using the followmg options, tailor 

response of DELPHI to your unique requirements. 

5 



Select from, the Settings Menu to alter your interaction with 
DELPHI. Most settings also may be changed at any time with 
the appropriate ' slash 1 (/) command. Type /HELP FULL for a 
complete list. 

BUSY-Mode - Turn off or turn on pages from Conference or 

alerts to new Mail messages. 
DEFAULT-Menu - Bypass the Main Menu by choosing the 

menu you wish to greet you at sign-on. 
DOWNLOAD-Line-Terminator - Adjust text-line termination 

to your computer type. 
ECHO-Mode - Control how characters are 'echoed' to you as 

you type. 

EDITOR - Select the editor you need for Workspace or Mail. 
KERM IT-SETTINGS - Change options affecting the way you 

do Kermit file transfers. 
LENGTH (Lines/page) - Adapt DELPHI output to your com- 
puter screen's length. 
NETWORK-PARAMETERS - Select settings to suit your 

terminal configuration and establish solid communication 

with your terminal software. 
PASSWORD (Change) - Guard your password by changing it. 

from time to time or if you feel its confidentiality may have 

been compromised. 
PROMPT-Mode - Select the prompt level that suits you: 

BRIEF provides only a keyword, VERBOSE gives you a 

keyword and a prompt message, MENU provides all your 
options at that level. 

SLASH-Term-settings - Specify terminal settings to be main- 
tained each time you log on to DELPHI. 

TERMIN AL-Type - Indicate type of terminal you operate. 

TIMEOUT - Indicate number of minutes DELPHI awaits 
your input before logging you off. 

UTILITIES - Advanced operations on your profile settings. 

WIDTH (Columns) - Adjust DELPHI output to the width of 
your computer screen. 

XMODEM-SETTINGS - Alter the way DELPHI executes 

Xmodem file transfers. 

DELPHI TERMINAL CONFIGURATION GUIDE 

8-bit ASCII, I stop bit, no parity, asynchronous, full-duplex, 
no auto-linefeed, XON-XOFF, or handshaking, enabled. 

DELPHI CONTROL CHARACTERS 

Control-Z - End input or exit to previous menu. 

Control-S - Suspend sending. 

Control-Q - Resume sending. 

Control-0 - Skip to end of file or message. 

Control-U - Cancel input for current line. 

Control- R - Redisplay current line. 

Control-X - Cancel everything typed ahead but unsent. 

Control-C - Cancel current activity and start over. 

Modified Command Card for Rainbow Readers 

DELPHI I " 

Delphi is a © trademark of General Videotex Corporation. 

RAINBOW is a © trademark of Falsoft, Inc. 

Tandy is a © trademark of Tandy Corporation. 

Tymnet is a © trademark of Tymshare, Inc. 

Telenet is a © trademark of Telenet Communications Corp. 



6 



BUSINESS 





An easy way to mind your business 



The Bookkeeper's 



Helper 

By Harvey Dettmann 




T 



he following program will be beneficial to the 
bookkeepers of small businesses. Payroll figures the 
gross and net amounts on weekly employee checks 



Harvey Dettmann, a retired senior citizen on disability, has 
enjoyed the Color Computer for three and a half years. He 
says it has given his life a new direction. 



based on the number of regular and overtime hours worked, 
the hourly wage, and F.I.C.A., state and federal tax 
deductions. These deductions can be obtained from the 
tables supplied by your state and federal government. 

Payroll will print to the screen or an LP VII or compatible 
printer. It can also be used to confirm the accuracy of your 
own payroll check. □ 



DATE: JAN. 09, 1987 



Sample printout 



NAME 



JOE X. AMPLE 



GROSS 

$ 169.69 
REG HOURS 



SS/WH 



FED/WH 



ST/WH 



NET WAGES 



$ 6.28 $ 10.94 $ 3.14 $ 149.33 

40.00 O T HOURS 3.50 RATE- $ 3.75 



The listing: PRYROLL 



1J3 

4J3 
5J3 
6J3 
70 



SALARY (SCREEN OR PRINTER) 
******************* 

* HARVEY DETTMANN * 

* SILVERLEAF DR * 

* SUSSEX, WIS. * 

* 53089 * 
******************* 



8J3 ? VERSION 2.J3 

9J3 CLS 

1J3J3 PRINT@1J38, "SALARIES 11 

llj3 PRINT: PRINT 11 BY HARVEY 

DETTMANN" 
12J3 PRINT: PRINT 
13)8 LINEINPUT" MMM. DD, YYYY 

" ; D$ 

14 0 PRINT 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 97 



15/3 INPUT 11 NAME 11 ;N$ 

16/3 PRINT: PRINT 

17/3 PRINT 11 TO CONTINUE PRESS AN 
Y KEY 11 

18/3 C$=INKEY$:IF C$= IMI THEN 18)3 

19/21 CLS 

2/3/3 PRINT© 5, ; 

21/3 INPUT "REG. HOURS WORKED 11 ;H 

2 2/3 INPUT 11 O.T. HOURS WORKED 11 

;o 

23/3 PRINT 11 

?! 

24/3 INPUT 11 WAGES/ PER/HOUR 11 ; 

S 

25/3 PRINT 11 

ff 

2 6/3 PRINTUSING 11 REG SALARY IS 

$####. ##";H*s 

27/3 PRINTUSING" 0 T SALARY IS 

$####. ##";0*S*1.5/3 

28/3 X=H*S 

29j3 Z=0*S*1.5/3 

3/3/3 W=X+Z 

31/3 PRINT 11 

fi 

3 2/3 PRINTUSING"GROSS WAGES ARE: 

$####. ##";w 

33/3 INPUT 11 F.I.C.A. ";SS 

34/3 INPUT 11 FEDERAL TAX"; FT 

35/3 INPUT 11 STATE TAX"; ST 

3 6/3 PRINT 11 

37/3 PRINTUSING 11 NET WAGES ARE > 

$####. ##";W-SS-FT-ST 

39/3 INPUT 11 PRINTER OR SCREEN (P/ 

S) I! ;T$ 

4/3/3 IF T$<> "S" AND T$<> lf P l! THE 
N 39/3 

41/3 IF T$= "S" THEN 19/3 
42/3 IF T$= "P" THEN 43/3 

4 3/3 1 PRINTER ROUTINE 

44/3 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (31) ;TAB(14) ; 11 
WEEKLY WAGES 11 

45/3 PRINT# -2 , CHR$ ( 3/3 ) ; 11 DATE : 11 ; D 
$ 

46/3 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2,STRING$ (8/3 

47/3 PRINT#-2 / lf NAME 

GROSS SS/WH 
FED/WH ST/WH NET WAGES" 
48/3 PRINT#-2 
49/3 NET=W-SS-FT-ST 
5/3/3 PRINT#-2,TAB(2) ;N$; 
51/3 PRINT#-2,TAB(22) ; 
52/3 PRINT#-2, USING" $#,###.##"; 
W; 

53/3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(3 9) ; 



54/3 PRINT#-2,USING"$###. ##" ;SS; 

55/3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(51) ; 

56/3 PRINT#-2 / USiNG'"$f ## . ##" ; FT ; 

57/3 PRINT#-2 / TAB(6/3) ; 

58/3 PRINT#-2 / USING"$###. ##" ;ST; 

59/3 PRINT#-2 / TAB(68) ; 

6/3/3 PRINT#-2 / USING" $#,###.##"; 

NET 

61/3 PRINT#-2 / TAB(2/3) ; 

62/3 PRINT#-2 , USING" REG HOURS 

- ##.##";H; 

63/3 PRINT#-2, USING" 0 T HOURS # 
#.##";0; 

64/3 PRINT#-2 .USING" RATE- $##.# 
#";S 

65/3 cls : input"print another (y/n 
) " ;k$ 

66/3 if k$<>"y" and k$<>"n" then6 

5/3 

67/3 IF K$="Y" THEN 69/3 

68/3 IF K$ = "N" THEN 91/3 

69/3 CLS : PRINT: INPUT"NAME" ;N$ 

7/3/3 PRINT: PRINT"TO CONTINUE PRES 

S ANY KEY" 

71/3 C$=INKEY$:IF C$="" THEN 71/3 
72/3 CLS:PRINT@5, ; 
73/3 INPUT"REG. HOURS WORKED" ;H 
74/3 INPUT" 0 T HOURS WORKED" 

;o 



WAGES/PER/HOUR " ; 



75/3 PRINT" 

76/3 INPUT" 
S 

77/3 PRINT" 

if 

78/3 PRINTUSING" REG SALARY IS $ 
####.##";H*S 

79/3 PRINTUSING" 0 T SALARY IS $ 

####-##";0*S*1.5/3 

8/3/3 X=H*S 

81/3 Z=0*S*1.5/3 

82/3 W=X+Z 

8 3/3 PRINT 

8 4/3 PRINTUSING "GROSS WAGES ARE: 

$####. ##";w 

85/3 INPUT" F.I.C.A. ";SS 

86/3 INPUT" FEDERAL TAX"; FT 

87/3 INPUT" STATE TAX";ST 

88/3 PRINT" 

89/3 PRINTUSING" NET WAGES ARE > 

$####.##"; W-S S -FT-S T : PRINT# - 2 
9/3/3 PRINT" (PRINTING NEXT DATA 
) ":GOTO 49/3 

91/3 CLS : PRI NT @ 2/3/3, "THE END-THANK 
S ! ! " 

92/3 GOTO 92/3 _ 



98 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



CoCo 3 
Disk 



A game of poker you can play without 
gullible buddies or beer nuts 



JOKER 



TOKER 





Tft "ROBERT TONER 



eel like turning CoCo into Lady Luck, 
cracking open a fresh deck of onscreen 
cards, and settling down to some extrava- 
gant betting? Presenting Joker Poker, a colorful 
version of Five Card Draw that allows you to place bets 
and accumulate (or lose) money depending on the cards 
CoCo deals you. 

Don't worry if you're a little unsure of poker terminology. 
This game provides onscreen definitions of the various 
hands (a "flush" is five in the same suit, etc.), and lists the 
returns you can expect for each hand — for instance, if you 
bet $2 and draw a royal flush, you win $200 (but if you bet 
$20, you win $2,000!) 

jfi*-^ Pressing the R key brings up 
I , I the rules, which incJ ude a 1 ist of 

hat keys to use to place bets. 
Pressing S shows the score, E 
ends the game, and the space bar 
repeats your last bet. 
After you have entered your 
bet, a graphic representation of five 
playing cards appears across the 



Robert Brimner has a degree in electri- 
cal engineering and worked 30 years as a 
manager for Bell of Pennsylvania. Now 
retired, he enjoys music, tennis, bowling and 

writing useful or enter- 
taining programs for 
the CoCo. 



67 THE RAINBOW 99 



top of the screen. You're prompted to discard any or all of 
these cards by pressing keys 1 through 5 (if you want to get 
rid of the first card, press 1, for the second, press 2, etc.). 
When you press the space bar, CoCo deals your new cards; 
your winnings (or losses) are calculated according to the 
hand you end up with after the "draw." 

If you're in the mood to throw around some money, take 



some chances, and see what kind of dealer your CoCo can 
be, try a few hands of Joker Poker — and let the chips fall 
where they may! 

(Questions about this game may be addressed to the 
author at 5427 Pocusset Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15217, 412- 
421-0126. Please enclose an SASE for a reply when 
writing.) □ 



22 .. 
31 .. 
301 . 
480 . 
1099 
1200 
2002 



150 2067 93 

.28 5145 49 

217 5203 241 

164 5500 12 

179 5999 234 

.21 6090 0 

239 END 148 



T 



The listing: POKER 

1 CLS : POKE &HFFD9 , 0 '. PALETTERGB : PA 
LETTER , 0 : PALETTE 2 , 11 : PALETTE 14 , 3 
: HSCREEN2: CLS 1' POKER GAME BY R. 
L. BRIMNER 

2 ONBRKGOT05999:ONERRGOT05999 

3 POKE278 , PEEK ( 274 ) :POKE281, PEEK 
(275) 

5 DIMC(4,15) ,H$(5) ,H(5) ,N$(11) ,S 
$(10) :C(1,15)=8:C(2,15)=8:C(3 / 15 
)=8 

8 F$= H SCORES" 

10 HBUFF1, 1155: HBUFF2, 6560: HBUFF 
3,8:HGET(0,0) -(160,80) , 2:H$(1)=" 
4E" :H$ (2) ="4D" :H$ (3) ="4C" :H$ (4) = 
"4B" : H$ ( 5 ) ="4A" : GOSUB5914 

13 GOSUB7000 : POKE&HFFD8 , 0 : OPEN"I 
" , #1 , F$ : FORQ=lT09 : INPUT # 1,N$ (Q) , 
S$ (Q) : NEXT : CLOSE# 1 : POKE&HFFD9 , 0 : 
IFS $ ( 9 ) =" 11 THENX$=" 20 " ELSEX$=S $ ( 9 

) 

14 HCOLOR3 : HPRINT ( 10 , 0 ) , "FIVE CA 




Try Again! 
Place your bet 
Joker is I H 

RHurns on f&: 

Ruga! Flush 
° o $ I . Flush 



You have Si 



of a Ki 
u i 1 Hou* 
1 ush 

Pitr 



I kind I 

si m 



RD DRAW POKER" :HLINE(76, 10) -(244 

,10) ,PSET / B:X$="Can you top $"+X 

$+"?" :HCOLORl: HPRINT (12 , 10) ,X$:S 
OUND50 , 1 : SOUND1 , 3 : GOSUB5700 : FORQ 
=1TO4000 :NEXT:GOSUB5602 : Z=108 :PA 
LETTE0 , 1 : CLS 1 

15 HB$= TM=l:SW=l:AB=l:H9=-l:N 

$=" ":HH=20:D=20 

2 0 IFGB=0THENGOSUB560 1 : HCOLOR3 : H 

PRINT (10, 10 ), "Press <R> for rule 
s! 

2 2 GOSUB52 00 : D$= " " : RM=2 : GOSUB5 4 0 
0:GOSUB5260:GOSUB1000:GOSUB1200 
23 'BET LOOP 

2 4 B$=INKE Y $ : IFB$= " " THENI FD>0THE 

NPR$="Place your bet" :GOTO5210EL 
SE24ELSESOUND100 , 1 : GOSUB5270 : IFB 
$="R"THENH9=H9*-1 : GOSUB110J3 : GOTO 
24ELSEIFB$="S"THENH9=H9*-1 : GOSUB 
2000:GOTO24ELSEIFB$="E"THENH9=l: 
GOSUB2000:GOTO24 

25 IFB$=" "THENB$=HB$ELSEHB$=B$ 

26 IFB$="A"THENB=D ELSEIFB$="H"T 
HENB=INT ( D/ 2 ) ELSEIFB$= " Q " THENB=I 
NT (D/4 ) ELSEIFB$="T"THENB=INT (D*3 
/4 ) ELSE B=VAL ( B$ ) : I FB$ < " 0 " ORB $ > " 9 
"THENELSEIFB=0THENB=10 

27 IFB=0ORB>D THENB$=" " : GOT024 

28 AB=B:BT$=STR$ (B) :L=LEN(BT$) +1 
: BT$=RIGHT$ ( BT$ , L-2 ) : D=D-B : PR$=" 
YOU bet $"+BT$:GOSUB5212:GOSUB52 
00 : IFB=>INT ( D/4 ) THENRM=1 : GOSUB54 

00 



Can you top $29? 

JD K E P 

PDKEP 

- f*' I Br i mo** i , LI Bt 



100 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



29 IFGB=0THENGOSUB5918ELSEGOSUB5 
602 

30 FORZ=1TO5:GOSUB5890:NEXT:GOSU 
B59 14 : QT=0 : QS=1 : H9=-l : GOSUB1000 

31 GOTO100 

97 1 DRAW LOOP 

98 QT=0:IFH(1)+H(2)+H(3)+H(4)+H( 
5) =-5THENQS=lELSEQS=0 

100 B$=INKEY$ : IFQT=150ANDQS=0THE 
N5990ELSEIFB$=" "THENQT=QT+1 : GOTO 
5220 

102 GOSUB5270:IFB$=CHR$(3 2)ORB$= 
CHR$ (13) ORB$ =,, N"THEN200ELSEIFB$= 
"S ,, THENH9=H9*-1:GOSUB2000:GOTO10 
0ELSEIFB$="R"THENH9=H9 *-l : GOSUB1 
300 : GOTO100ELSEIFB$="E H THENH9=1 : 
GOSUB2000 : GOTO100ELSEIFB$="A"THE 
NQS= 0 : GOSUB5 60 2 : GOTO 9 8 ELS E Z = VAL ( 
B$) :IFZ<10RZ>5THEN98 
104 SOUND80, 1:H(Z)=H(Z) *-l:Y=14: 
X=24+(Z-1) *56 

106 QS=0:IFH(Z)=1THENGOSUB5160:G 
OT098ELSEGOSUB514 0 : GOT098 
200 GOSUB5601:FORZ=1TO5:IFH(Z)=1 
THENY=14 : X=2 4+ ( Z - 1 ) *56 : H ( Z ) =0 : GO 
SUB5300 : C (S , R) =8 : C (0 , R) =C (0 , R) -1 
:C(S,1)=C(S,14) :C(0,1)=C(0,14) :I 
FR<15THENC ( S , 0 ) =C ( S , 0 ) -1ELSEELSE 
210 

205 GOSUB5890:GOSUB5140 

210 NEXT:IFGB=0THENGB=l:GOSUB560 

1 

299 'DETERMINE THE RETURN 

300 P=0:JK=C(0, 15) :AC=C(0, 14) :ST 

=0 : HJ=JK : FL=0 : K3=0 : K2 =0 : W=0 : FORS 

=1TO4:IFC(S,0)>4-JK THENFL=1:S=4 

301 NEXT : IFFL=0THEN3 10ELSEFL=0 



ND JK= 1THENELS E 3 40 
335 P=2 3:GOTO480 

340 IFD>0THENHCOLOR4 : HPRINT (0,11 

) ,"Try Again!" :SOUND80,1:SOUND1, 

4:GOTO480ELSE480 
470 P=18 

480 IFP>0THENHCOLOR5:GOSUB1004:F 
0RQ=1T013 : K=RND ( 50 ) : SOUNDK , 1 : NEX 
T : SOUND 1,5:D=D+W:I FHH< D THENHH=D 

ELSEELSE495 
490 GOSUB5200 

495 GOSUB5700: IFD>0THENRM=3 : GOSU 
B5400 : AB=1 : GOT024ELSEGM=l : Q=0 : H9 
=1 : SOUND 80 , 1 : SOUND1 , 4 : B$=" : GOTO 
2000 

999 'SHOW THE RETURNS 

1000 X=0:GOSUB5250:GOSUB1099:FOR 
P=15T02 3 : GOSUB1004 : NEXT : RETURN 
1004 X$=" ":ONP-14GOSUB1010, 1020 

,1030,1040,1050,1060,1070,1080,1 
090: RETURN 

10 10 X$= " $ " : W=100 *AB : L=LEN ( S TR$ ( 

W) ) : PR$="Royal Flush" :GOTO1093 
1020 W=40*AB:PR$="St. Flush": GOT 

01093 

1030 W=20*AB:PR$="4 of a Kind":G 

OTO1093 



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DISCOUNTS 

COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-31 27 64k color comp 89.95 

26-334 CoCo 3 170.00 

26-3131 1st disk drive 269.95 

26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 259.95 

PRINTERS 

26-1276 DMP 105 160.00 

26-1277 DMP-430 580.00 

26-1280 DMP-130 269.00 

MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 

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25-1 051 Tandy 1000 SX 850.00 

25-01011 Plus expansion board 155.00 

25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 249.95 

25- 1 020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 1 1 0.00 

26- 1070 mod 4D 64k 2dr. 920.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



302 FORR=10TO1STEP-1:GOSUB5500 

304 IFFL=1THENIFR>9THENP=15 : GOTO 

480ELSEP=16:GOTO480 

306 NEXT:P=19:GOTO480 

310 FORR=14TO2STEP-1:IFC(0,R)>1T 

HENST=1 

313 IFC(0,R)=>4-HJ THENP=17 :GOTO 
480 

314 IFC(0,R)=3-HJ THENK3=1 : HJ=0 : 
IFK2 >0THEN47 0ELSE 324 

317 IFC(0,R)=2THENIFK2=1THENK2=2 
: GOT03 3 0ELSEK2=1 : IFK3=1THEN470 
320 IFST=0THENIFR<11THENGOSUB550 
0:IFFL=1THEN326 

324 NEXT:IFST=0THENGOSUB5500 

325 I FFL< > 1THEN 330 

326 P=20:GOTO480 

330 IFK3=1THENP=21:GOTO480 
332 IFK2=2THENP=2 2:GOTO480 
334 IFAC=2ANDK2=1THENELSEIFAC=1A 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 101 



1040 W=10*AB:PR$="Full House": GO 
TO1093 

1050 W»5*AB:PR$="Flush":GOTO1093 
1060 W=4*AB: PR$="Straight" : GOTOl 
09 3 

1070 W=3*AB:PR$="3 of a Kind" : GO 
TO1093 

1080 W=2*AB:PR$="2 Pair" : GOTO109 
3 

1090 W=AB:PR$="2 Aces 
1093 PN=L-LEN ( STR$ (W) ) : PR$=X$+RI 
GHT$(STR$(W) ,LEN(STR$(W) )-l)+" " 
+PR$ : HPRINT ( PN , P) , PR$ : RETURN 

1099 HCOLOR2:X$=" Returns on $"+R 

IGHT$(STR$(AB) ,LEN(STR$(AB) )-l)+ 
" : " : HPRINT (0 , 14 ) , X$ : RETURN 

1100 IFH9=1THENX=160:GOSUB5250:H 
COLOR7 : HPRINT (21,14), "<Keys> for 

betting: "ELSEGOSUB1200:GOTO24 1 

SHOW BET RULES 

1105 HPRINT(21, 15) ,"<l-9,0> = $1 
-$9,$10 

1110 HPRINT (21, 16) ,"<Q>=l/4 of $ 
": HPRINT (32, 16) ,D 

1115 HPRINT (21, 17) , "<H>=2/4 of $ 
": HPRINT (32, 17) , D 

1120 HPRINT (21, 18) , "<T>=3/4 of $ 
": HPRINT (32, 18) ,D 

1125 HPRINT (21, 19) ,"<A>=4/4 of $ 
":HPRINT(32,19) ,D 

1130 HPRINT(21,20) , "<Spacebar> w 
ill re-" : HPRINT (22, 21) , "peat you 
r last bet" 

1135 HPRINT(21,22) , "<S> to see s 
cores" : HPRINT (21, 23) ,"<E> to end 
game 

1199 RETURN 

1200 X=160:GOSUB5250:HCOLOR2:HPR 
INT (21,14)," Definitions : " : HPRINT 
(21,15) ,"(AKQJ10 Of a suit) 'SHO 
W DEFINITIONS 

1210 HPRINT (21, 16) ," (Run of 5 in 

suit) 

1220 HPRINT(21, 18) , " (3 of kind & 

pair) 

1230 HPRINT (21, 19) ," (All of same 
suit) 

1240 HPRINT (2 1,20) , " (Run of 5 an 
y suit) 
1250 RETURN 

1300 IFH9=1THENX=160:GOSUB5250:H 
C0L0R6: HPRINT (21, 14) , "<Keys> for 
drawing : "ELSEG0SUB12 00 : GOTO 100 

'SHOW DRAW RULES 

1305 HPRINT (21, 16) , "<l-5> will d 
iscard, 

1310 HPRINT (22, 17) , "or will reca 



11 , an" : HPRINT (22,18)," erroneous 
discard. 

1315 HPRINT (21, 19 ), "<A> Discards 
all 51 

1320 HPRINT(21,21) , "<Spacebar> w 
ill re-" : HPRINT (22,22) , "place ca 
rds and/or" : HPRINT (22,23) , " conti 
nue the game . " 

1399 RETURN 

1999 'SHOW SCORES 

2000 IFH9=-1THENX=160 : GOSUB5250 : 
GOSUB1200 :RETURNELSEGOSUB2002 : IF 
B$="S"THENRETURNELSEIFB$="E"THEN 
2100ELSE2050 

2002 X=160:GOSUB5250:HCOLOR9:IFN 
$>" "THEN FORQ= 9T01STEP-1:I FHH> V AL 
(S$ (Q) ) THENS $ (Q+l) =S$ (Q) :S$ (Q)=S 
TR$(HH) :N$(Q+1)=N$(Q) :N$(Q)=N$EL 
SEQ=1ELSE2005 

2003 NEXT 

2005 HPRINT (21, 14) , "Nine high sc 
ores: 

2010 F0RQ=1T09:Q$=RIGHT$ (STR$ (Q) 
,2)+LEFT$(" "+N$(Q)+" ",9 
)+S$(Q) : HPRINT ( 20, 14+Q) ,Q$:NEXT 

2011 RETURN 

2050 IFHH>VAL(S$ (9) ) ANDHH>20THEN 
ELSE2067 

2052 SOUND80, 1 : L=0 : HC0L0R1 : GOSUB 
5204:HPRINT(21,12) , "Your name?" 

2055 HLINE(257,103)-(263,103) , PS 
ET,B:HGET(257,103)-(263,103) ,3 
2060 M$=INKEY$ : IFM$=" "THENHPUT ( 2 
57+L*8, 103) -(2 63+L*8,103) , 3 , PSET 
:GOTO2060ELSEHPUT(257+L*8, 103) -( 
2 63+L*8 , 103 ) , 2 , PSET : IFM$=CHR$ ( 8 ) 
THEN2068ELSEIFM$>CHR$(31)ANDL<8T 
HENHPRINT (32+L,12),M$: N$=N$+M$ : L 
=LEN(N$) :GOTO2070 

2065 POKE282,255:IFM$OCHR$(13)T 
HENN $="":GOTO2050ELSEIFN$>""THEN 
GOSUB2002:GOTO2120 

2067 GOSUB5204 : IFB$="E"THEN2 142E 
LSE2140 

2068 HPUT(249+L*8,96)-(263+L*8,l 
03) , 2 , PSET: L=L-1 : IFL<1THENN$=" " : 
GOTO205 0ELSEN$=LEFT$ (N$ , L) : G0T02 
060 

2070 IFL=1THENPOKE282,0:GOTO2060 
ELSE2060 

2100 SOUND80,1:HPRINT(5,11) , "DO 
you want to END GAME (Y/N) ?" 
2110 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN2110EL 
SEIFA$=" Y"THEN2050ELSEGOSUB527 0 : 
G0SUB5 200 : RETURN 

2120 GOSUB5270 : HPRINT ( 13 , 11) ,"Sa 

ving scores!" 



102 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



2125 POKE & HFFD8 ,j3: OPEN" 0" , #1 , F$ 
213J3 F0RQ=1T09:WRITE#1,N$(Q) ,S$( 
Q) : NEXT : CLOSE# 1 : IFH9=j3THENCLS : PR 
INT H SCORES file established/clea 

red i 11 : ST0PELSEP0KE&HFFD9 , j3 : G0T02 
140 

214j3 SOUND8j3,l:GOSUB527j3:HPRINT( 

6,11) , "Press <ENTER> to play aga 
in" 

2141 A$=INKEY$:IFA$OCHR$(13)THE 
N2141 

2142 GOSUB527j3:GOSUB56j32 :Z=lj38:G 
0T015 

5j3j3j3 'SUB ROUTINES 
514J3 IFH9=j3THENHCOLOR14 : HLINE (X, 
Y) - (X+4j3 , Y+54 ) , PSET , B : HC0L0R4 : HL 
INE(X+1,Y+1) -(X+39, Y+53) ,PSET,BF 
:HGET(X,Y) -(X+4J3, Y+54) , 1:G0T0515 

J3 

5145 HPUT(X,Y) - (X+4J3 , Y+54) ,1,PSE 
T 

515J3 GOSUB53J3J3 : 1 FR= 1 5 THENHDRAW " S 
4C14 " : HX=X+1 : HY=Y+8 : GOSUB6j3j3j3 : GO 
SUB6 j3 lj3 : RETURN ELSEHDRAW " S 8 C 1 4 " : 
HX=X+3:HY=Y+15:GOSUB5152 :IFS>2TH 
ENHC0L0R3 E LS EHC0L0R2 

5151 HX=HX+l:GOSUB5152:HY=HY+l:G 
0SUB5 152: G0T05 155 

5152 GOSUB6j32j3:ONR-l GOSUB6j325,6 
03j3, 6)335, 6j34j3,6j345, 6j35j3, 6j355, 6j36 
j3 , 6065 , 6f58f5 , 61jJjJ , 6J385, 6j37j3 :RETUR 
N 

5155 HX=X+8:HY=Y+35:GOSUB6j320:ON 
S GOSUB612j3, 6125, 611j3, 6115 :RETUR 
N 

516j3 HPUT(X,Y)-(X+4j3,Y+54) ,2,PSE 
T:H(Z)=1:RETURN 



52j3j3 HCOLOR4:GOSUB52j34:IFD>j3THEN 
D$=STR$(D) :PR$="You have $"+RIG 

HT$ ( D$ , LEN ( D$ ) -1) ELSEPR$="You ar 

e broke ! " 

52j32 HPRINT(21,12) ,PR$:H$=STR$(H 
H):X$="Your high $"+RIGHT$ (H$ , LE 
N(H$)-1) :HPUT(16j3,lj34)-(32j3,lll) 
, 2 , PSET : I FHH> 2 J3 THENHPRINT (21,13) 
v$ 

52 0 3 RETURN 

52J34 HPUT(16J3,96)-(32J3,103) , 2 , PS 
ET : RETURN 

521J3 HPUT(j3, 96) -(112,103) , 2 , PSET 
:TM=TM*-1 : IFTM=1THENELSEHC0L0R4 : 
HPRINT (J3, 12) ,PR$:FORQ=lT036j3:NEX 
T 

5211 GOT024 

5212 HPUT(j3,96)-(112,103) , 2 , PSET 
: HC0L0R4 : HPRINT (0,12), PR$ : RETURN 

5220 IFQS=1THENHPUT(0,88)-(112,9 
5) , 2 , PSET : TM=TM*-1 : IFTM=1THENELS 
EHC0L0R4 : HPRINT ( 0 , 1 1 ) , " Draw? " : FO 
RQ=1TO3 60:NEXT 

5221 GOTO100 

5250 HPUT(X,112) -(X+160,192) ,2,P 
SET : RETURN 

5260 HPUT(0,Z+4)-(320,Z+44) ,2, PS 
ET:HPUT(0, Z+45) -(320,Z+85) ,2,PSE 
T: RETURN 

5270 HPUT(0,88) -(320,95) ,2, PSET: 
RETURN 

5300 S=VAL("&H"+LEFT$(H$(Z) ,1) ) : 
R=VAL("&H"+RIGHT$ (H$ (Z) , 1) ) :RETU 
RN 

5400 HC0L0R4:IFRND(RM)=1THENC(4, 
15 )=0:X$=" Joker is IN"ELSEC (4 , 15 
)=8:X$="Joker is OUT" 



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Upgrade your Color Computer by adding our JFD-CP disk controller, JDOS with Memory Minder in ROM and one or two half-height floppy drive(s) with case and power supply. . 
Drive 0 System with one double sided drive $279 Drive 0, 1 System with two double sided drives J3^9 



March 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 03 



5401 HPUT(72,104)-(95,111) ,2,PSE 
T: HPRINT (0 , 13 ) , X$ : RETURN 

5500 IFC(0,R)+C(0,R+l)+C(0,R+2)+ 
C(0,R+3)+C(0,R+4)+C(0, 15) >4THENF 
L=l 

5501 RETURN 

5601 HPUT(32,80)-(288,87) , 2 , PSET 
: RETURN 

5602 Y=14:Z=0:FORX=24TO264STEP56 
: Z=Z+1 : G0SUB5 160 : NEXT : RETURN 
5700 C(0, 15)=0:FORR=0TO14:FORS=0 
T04 : C(S , R) =0 : NEXT : NEXT : RETURN 
5890 S=RND(4) : R=RND ( 14) +1 : IFC (S , 
R) >0THEN5890 

5895 C(S,R)=9:C(0,R)=C(0,R)+1:H$ 
(Z)=HEX$(S)+HEX$(R) :C(S,1)=C(S,1 
4) :C(0,1)=C(0,14) :IFR<15THENC(S, 
0) =C (S , 0 ) +1 : RETURNELSERETURN 
5914 Y=14:Z=l:Q=l:FORX=2 4T0264ST 
EP56 : GOSUB514 0 : SOUNDQ , 1 : Q=Q+20 : H 
( Z ) =-1 : Z=Z+1 : NEXT : RETURN 
5918 HCOLOR2 : HPRINT ( 4 , 9 ) ,"<1> 
<2> <3> <4> <5>":RETUR 

N 

5990 SOUND100 , 2 : QS=1 : GOSUB5601 :H 
COLOR3 : HPRINT (4, 10) , "Press <SPAC 
EBAR> for new cards! " :QT=0:GOTO1 

00 

5999 POKE282,255:PALETTERGB:WIDT 
H40 : POKE &HFFD8 , 0 : CLS 1 : PRINT " ERNO 
" ; ERNO ; "ERLIN"ERLIN: IFERLIN=13TH 
ENLOCATE0,1: PRINT "Did you enter, 

•F$="CHR$(34) "SCORES "CHR$ (34) ": 

GOTO 2125', to establish SCORES? 
" : STOPELSESTOP 

6000 GOSUB6020:GOSUB6080:GOTO600 
8 'SUB ROUTINES FOR HDRAW 

6005 GOSUB6020:GOSUB6095 
6008 GOSUB6090:GOSUB6085:GOSUB60 
7 5 : GOSUB6 10 5 : RETURN 
60 10 DRAW " S 4 " : HX=X+ 1 4 : H Y=Y+2 3 : GO 
SUB602 0 : GOSUB6115 : HX=X+2 6 : HY=Y+3 
2:GOSUB6020:GOSUB6120:HX=X+14:HY 
=Y+41 : GOSUB6020 : GOSUB6110 : HX=X+3 
: HY=Y+ 3 2 : GOSUB 6020:GOSUB6125: RET 
URN 

6020 X$="BM"+STR$ (HX) +" , "+STR$ (H 
Y) : HDRAWX$ : RETURN 

6025 HDRAWBU4UER3FDGLG3R5BR4 " : R 
ETURN 1 2 

6030 HDRAW"BU5ER3 FDGNL2 FDGL3HBDB 
R9 " : RETURN « 3 

6035 HDRAW"BR4U6G4R5BD2BR4":RETU 
RN'4 

i 6040 HDRAW" BUFR3EUHL4U3R5BR4BD6" 



: RETURN 1 5 

6045 HDRAW" BUU4ER3NFBD3NL3FDGL3N 
HBR8 " : RETURN • 6 

6050 HDRAW " E 5UL5 BR9 BD 6 " : RETURN 1 7 
6055 HDRAW" BRHUEHUER3 FDGNL3 FDGL3 
BR 8 " : RETURN • 8 

6060 HDRAW" BUFR3EU4HL3GDFR3 BR5BD 
3" : RETURN '9 

6065 HDRAW"R3LU6LGBR5BD5BUU4ER2F 

D4GL2NHBR9 " : RETURN • 10 

6070 HDRAW "U4E2F2D2 NL4 D2 BR4 " : RET 

URN 

6075 HDRAW"U3NR3U3R5BD6L5BR9" :RE 
TURN 1 E 

6080 HDRAW "BU2DFR3EU5BD6BR2 " : RET 
URN' J 

6085 HDRAW " U 6 D 3 RNE 3 F 3 BR4 " : RETURN 
1 K 

6090 HDRAW"U6R5D6L5BR9" : RETURN ' 0 
60 9 5 HDRAW " U6 R4 FDGL4 BD3 BR9 " : RETU 
RN'P 

6100 HDRAW" BR2LHU4ER2FD3G2BU2F2B 
R4 " : RETURN • Q 

6105 HDRAW"U6R4FDGL3F3BR5" :RETUR 
N'R 

6110 C=14 : HDRAW"C14E6F6G6H6" : HCO 
LOR3:GOTO6130 

6115 C=14 :HDRAW"C14U2EURUR2DRDFE 
URUR2DRDFD2G6H6" :HCOLOR3 :GOT0613 

0 

6120 C=14:HDRAW"C14E6F6D2G2L4D2U 

2L4H2U2" :HCOLOR2 :GOTO6130 

6125 C=14:HDRAW"C14E2RU2E2R2F2D2 

RF2D2G2L4D2U2L4H2U2 " : HCOLOR2 : GOT 

06130 

6130 HPAINT(PEEK(199) *256+PEEK(2 
00)+8,PEEK(201) *256+PEEK(202) ) , , 
C : RETURN 

6999 'SUB ROUTINE FOR THE TITLE 

7000 Z=108:U=3 5:V=172:FORY=1TO3: 
HC0L0R3 : 1 F Y=2 THENHC0L0R4 ELS E I F Y= 
3 THENHC0L0R2 

7005 HDRAW"S8" :HX=3 5 : HY=Z+20 : GOS 
UB6000 :HY=HY+1 : GOSUB6000 : HX=3 6 : G 
OSUB6000 : HLINE (125,HY-2)-(285,HY 
) ,PSET,BF 

7010 HDRAW" S2 4 " : F0RX=1T03 : HX=U : U 
=U+ 1 : H Y= V : V=V+ 1 : GOSUB 600 5 : NEXT 
7015 HDRAW" S 4 " : HY=Z+8 3 : HLINE (35, 
HY-2) -(116, HY) , PSET, BF: HPRINT (16 
,23),"R. L. Brimner, 11/86":NEXT 
: RETURN 



104 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Also from Falsoft, The RAINBOW MAKER, 




The magazine for Tandy portable and MS-DOS users 

Not only does Tandy produce our favorite CoCo, we think they produce the best and best-priced lap- 
top portable and MS-DOS computers as well. We've found that when satisfied Color Computer users 
decide to add portability or move to MS-DOS, many stick with Tandy. For these people we publish PCM, 
The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users. 

Each month in PCM, you'll find information and programs for the Tandy 100, 102, 200 and 600 portable 
computers. And you'll find even more coverage for their MS-DOS machines, the 1000, 1200, 2000 and 
3000, along with the great new 1000 EX, 1000 SX and 3000 HL. 

FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from the rainbow that readers want programs to type in, so each month we bring you an 
assortment of them: games, utilities, graphics, and home and business applications. 

BAR CODE LISTINGS AND PROGRAM DISKS! 

For portable users, PCM is the only home computer publication in the world that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory like magic with the sweep of a wand! For those who don't have 
time to type in listings, we offer a companion disk service with all the programs from the magazine. 

TUTORIALS AND PRODUCT REVIEWS! 

As if all this weren't enough, we offer regular tutorials on telecommunications and hardware; assembly 
language, basic and pascal programming tips; and in-depth reviews of the new software, peripherals 
and services as they are released. Add it all up and we think you'll find PCM to be the most informative 
and fun magazine for this market today! 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries 
call 502-228-4492. 



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Mall to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 



April 10-12 




v / 



v 








Feel the energy of the city. Freeh, provocative. 
This spring, there's another glittering fight to 
the Chicago skyline — RAINBOWfest! 

Explore stimulating new ideas and broaden your 
horizons at RAINBOWfest, the only computer 
show dedicated exclusively to your Tandy Color 
Computer. The CoCo Community congregates 
April 10 to 12 at the Hyatt Regency Woodfield and 
we want you to join us. 

This is where commercial distributors gather to 
show off new and innovative product a for the first 
time. Where RAINBOW authors and CoCo experts 
come to share their expertise in seminars and one- 
to-one chats. Where hardware and software self 
for low RAINBO Wfesi prices 

Set your own pace for visiting exhibits and at- 
tending the many free seminars on all aspects of 
your CoCo. You'll see demonstrations, have op- 
portunities to experiment with software and hard- 
ware, and meet with some of the most creative and 
forward-thinking people in the industry today. 
RAINBOW publisher and editor Lonnie P a[k will 
be there along with many of tin:- Falsuff .tan, 
ready to answer your questions and give you the 
"inside scoop" on the CoCo. 

Only 15 minutes from O'Hare International Air- 
port, RAINBOWfest provides a perfect get-away 
weekend not only for the computer fanatic, but for 
the whole family. We're right across the street 
from the world's largest mal} and just 30 minutes 
from downtown Chicago. 

The show begins Friday evening with the exhibit 
hall open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday's action 
is nonstop beginning with the 8 a.m. CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast {separate tickets required). Our 
featured speaker is Greg Zumwait, president of 
ZCT software. Exhibits and seminars will be in full 
swing from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 1 1 a.m. to 4 
p.m. on Sunday. That will be hardly urujuf (h time 
to see and do everything you'll want to, between 
scheduled events and our new Educational Sand- 
box for the kids — plus a special appearance by 
CoCo Cat, too! 

You can get RAINBOWfest tickets directly from 
THE RAINBOW. We ll include a reservation form 
so you can take advantage of the Hyatt Regency's 
special room rates of $60 for single or double oc- 
cupancy. 

For the same POSH treatment many of our ex- 
hibitors enjoy, have your travel arrangements and 
hotel reservations handled through RAINBOW af- 
filiate POSH Travel Assistance of Louisville. Call 
POSH at {502) 893-331 1, All POSH services are 
available at no charge to RAINBOWfest patrons. 



CoCo Community Breakfast 

Greg Zumwalt — CoCo 3 Prog rammer 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Greg Zumwalt, 
one of the early CoCo specialists who has created everything from flight simulators 
to computer games. An independent programmer and computer designer, Greg is 
one of the few people Tandy has selected to write software for the new Color 
Computer 3. He owns ZCT Software, of Tulsa, Okla., and also writes software for 
business applications in such areas as aviation, the oil industry and the medical field. 



A A A A A 



ftAlNBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: April 10-12, 1987 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $60 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: April 3, 1987 



RAINBOWfest * Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: October 9-1 1, 1987 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $86 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: October 2, 1987 

FREE T-Shirt to first live ticket orders received from each state. 

Firsl 500 ticket orders received gel the First Rainbow Book of Adventures. 



Kevin Darling 
Carl Krelder 

INDEPENDENT PROGRAMMERS 

OS-9 Internals 



Peter Dibble 

PROGRAMMER AND AUTHOR 

OS-9 Level II 
Art Flexser 

PRESIDENT, SPECTRO SYSTEMS 

Add in Q Features to 
the BASIC ROMS 

John Ross 

ROSS COMPUTER SERVICES 

Telecommunications 

Mark Slegel 

TANDY PRODUCT MANAGER 

Selling Programs to Tandy 



A SPECIAL EVENT! 



We are pleased to announce The Educational Sandbox, a Joint Tandy/ 
RAINBOW effort. This Is a computer workshop for RAINBOWfest kids. 
There will be two sessions on both Saturday and Sunday. One workshop 
will be for the kindergarten through third-grade set, and the other for fourth 
through seventh graders. Each workshop will last between 45 minutes and 
one hour, and will give the children and their parents hands-on experience 
In using Tandy computers and software. 



Free Seminars 

Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW TECHNICAL ASSISTANT 
Intro to our Delphi CoCo SJG 

Dick White 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Spreadsheets for the CoCo 

Jim Reed 

RAINBOW MANAGING EDITOR 

Writing for Publication 

Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Beginners Overview of BASIC09 and Be- 
ginners Overview of OS-9 

Dr. Michael Plog 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Statistics and the CoCo 
Educational Uses of the Machine 



A. Buddy Hogan 

INDEPENDENT PROGRAMMER 

Integrating CoCo 3 Into 
Organizational Work 

Eric Gavriluk 
Greg Miller 

THE MILULUK PARTNERSHIP 

CoCo 3 Graphics 

Dan Downard 

RAINBOW TECHNICAL EDITOR 

Hardware Projects 

William Barden, Jr. 

RAINBOW CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

05-9 Languages 

Bill Bernico 

INDEPENDENT PROGRAMMER 

Writing in BASIC 



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tickets require advance reservations. 



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Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt Re- 
gency Woodfield ($60, single or double room). 

Advance ticket deadline: April 3, 1987. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will also 
be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
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Doing the Program Shuffle 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



X i is time to put MID$ function 
I | under the microscope. Last 
l month, you were asked to save 
PRRT1, the first part of PROGRRM. 

In that portion of the program, you 
blanked out a portion of a sample 
sentence and then supplied the missing 
text. The MID$ function can handle this 
problem effectively. To your credit, 
you managed to invoke an alternate 
method. 

Look at the PRRT1 listing. It may be 
a bit different from your copy in some 
minor aspects. I extracted my version 
from the completed PROGRRM. This is a 
good programming technique — ex- 
tract pertinent parts of an existing 
program to save time and effort in 
recreating that which is extant. 

Load PRRT1 or, if you desire, key in 
the listing for PRRT1 in this issue. Drop 
GOTD20 from Line 10. It serves no 
purpose. Delete GOTO40 from lines 24, 
26 and 28. If you followed instructions 
implicitly, the four truncated lines end 
in a colon. 

CoCo ignores a final colon because, 
finding no instructions after it, it goes 
on to the next statement. Ending a 
program line with a dangling colon 
looks so amateurish, especially in a 
finished product. 

A final colon is a hint. It cries out that 
you may want to add some G0T0/G0SUB 
routine here to present a new problem 
or condition. It also hollers, "Here I am! 
Here is where a routine could be 
added!" 

The reserved Line 40 is harmless, and 
is a constant reminder that the next 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer and special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



segment has a home waiting for it. The 
real reason for these particular changes 
is to cycle through all the variations in 
succession in a perpetual loop. 

MID$ function allows CoCo to re- 
place a designated portion of a string, 
5$, beginning at the Rth character/ 
space, for a length of N characters/ 
spaces and replace same with an ap- 
propriate replacement string. 

Our specific problem is to operate on 
Line 21 and make various modifica- 
tions. It is one thing to know what a 
statement or function does. It is another 
to put it to good use. 

List Line 5. Lines 3 and 5 did the 
work. We know that we must have a 
complete sentence, X$. Rekey 5 
PRINTBX, X$ ; : RETURN and run. You 
can see that it prints out X$ just fine. Do 
not be deceived or overconfident, how- 
ever. We don't know precisely where we 
will wind up. Rekey Line 5, 
P=181:PRINT@X,LEFT$(X$,P) ; : RETURN, 
and run. This is our expanded state- 
ment. 

In order to portray the second, trans- 
lating sentence, type EDIT 5 to delete, 
press return and add our MID$ func- 
tion, :MID$(Y$,R,N)=STRING$(N,143): 
PRINT@Y,Y$; : RETURN. Now run. FC 
Error in 5! FC means there is an illegal 
function error in the line called or some 
line executed previously by CoCo. Press 
BREAK. If typing PRINT Y$ and pressing 
ENTER prints string Y$ OK, we can 
eliminate Line S as the culprit. Line 23 
was the last line CoCo ran through 
before it pooped out. Let's check the R 
and N values. Uh-Oh! In MID$ function, 
R must be at least 1 . Under our previous 
method, R was the screen location. 
Now, it is the numerical value of the first 
character/ space that we pinpoint to be 
blanked out. 

Edit Line 23, changing 0 to 1, and 



run. We have a partially blanked-out 
sentence. At the end of Line 24, add 
GOTO10 and run. How are we going to 
fill in the balance of the sentence to 
make it whole? 

List Line 24. GOSUB 4 doesn't do it! 
Let's change 4 to 3 in Line 24 and see 
if GOSUB 3 handles it. No! Why? 

Think about it for a few minutes. 
Press BREAK, type PRINT Y$ and press 
ENTER. We get the blank-out sentence 
that is equal to string Y$. We changed 
Y$ from its original form (Line 21). We 
must recapture the original Y$. 

One way to have our cake and eat it, 
too, is to create a new string variable, 
5$, which is equal, yet distinct, from Y$. 
Doing so allows us to work on S$ and 
change its contents without losing the 
original Y$. Can you alter Line 5 to do 
this? 

Edit Line 5 and insert S$=Y$ : at the 
beginning. Change both Y$s to 5$s and 
run. We see a flicker, so we know that 
we did it! Change Line 24, drop off 
GOTO10 and run. The second variation 
is not quite with it. It should be appar- 
ent that R must be augmented by +1. 
Make the change in Line 25 and run. 
You now have an equivalent of listing 
RLT. Save RLT after you make an ap- 
propriate change in Line 0. 

Last month, when we created our 
PROGRRM, I wasn't sure what additional 
havoc we might wreak on the paired 
sentences, so I automatically added all 
those LEFTS statements requiring P and 
0 values to make them operational 

Continuing, we look over our work 
to tighten it up. Look at listing RLT1. 
Make modifications to RLT that should 
still be in CoCo's memory. 

Now that I have made a big deal out 
of the LEFTS routines, let us assume that 
our ultimate program will stay within 
the confines of our basic idea. 



108 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



In Line 5, substitute the short, one- 
purpose PRINT@X,X$; for P=1B1: 
PRINT@X,LEFT$(X$,P) ; and run. In 
Line 4, substitute for Q = 1B1:PRINT 
EY,LEFT$( Y$,Q j ;, the equivalent, 
PRINT@Y,Y$; and run. 

List Line 5. In the MID$ function part 
of Line 5, the length, N, of the portion 
of 5$ that is to be replaced, may be 
omitted if the entire replacement string 
will be used. In our program, the re- 
placement string, STRING£(N,143), 
contains the length, N. Edit Line 5 
further by deleting ,N in the MID$ 
function and run it. 

Now list. Observe that G05U85 is 
followed by EXEC44533:GDSUB4 in a 
following program line in all four 
variants. 

This calls for GOSUBing the GDSUB, a 
favorite ploy. We choose a program line, 
2, so we don't have to overtax our 
mental resources. Key in Line 2, 
GDSUB 5 :EXEC4 4533 : G05UB4 : RETURN. 

In Lines 23, 25, 27 and 29, change 5 
to 2. Delete the four unrequired lines 24, 
26, 28 and 30. Now run this. The result 
should be listing ALT, which you should 
save. 

A few asides on GDSUB. With a little 
ingenuity, you might have worked out 
one long GD5UB5 by dropping RETURN 
and including the EXEC44539 from Line 
2 and the scoop in Line 4. Naturally, 
you would delete lines 2 through 4 and 
change 2 to 5 in lines 23 through 29, 
Run your work. See listing RLT2. 

The self-imposed limitations are that 
you can't use the hot scoop in G05UB4 
by itself, much less the scoop in the 
original GD5UB5. (See ALU.) We have 
cut down on our options. 

A long multi-statement program line 
isdifficult for a newcomer to work with. 
A case in point: Using either flLTl or 
RLT2 as a guide, modify our program 
so that in string Y$ ? both BIG and OLD 
are blanked out together. That's a good 
problem. Which listing would you 
rather use? 

Big deal me! I started to tinker with 
Line 5 in RLT2 and quickly became 
confused and got lost. I wound up using 
RLT1. Now, I could use Line 5 as a 
model or guide. It didn't take long 
before one solution was discovered. 
Look over listing PROBLEM. Can you 
follow my thinking? 

The basic plan ran thusly: To blank 
out one area, we required two forms of 
the second, translating sentence, Y$, the 
completesentence,and 5$ 3 the modified 
sentence with one blank-out. 

It would not serve our purpose to 



have T $ = V $ to develop our second 
blank-out, I may be wrong, but we 
would get either the first or second 
blank-out, never both. If T$=S$, (one 
blank-out), we could modify 5$ to make 
the second blank-out. Thus, T$ should 
print both blank-outs so T$ would 
provide the desired effect. 



"One mf the secrets 
of using TRON 
effectively is to 
isolate the suspect 
portion of a 
program." 



Key in PROGRRM and run. Now list 
Line 23. I n Line 23, we determined the 
R and N values to hide BIG and used 
GD5UB5 to print it, We did not need to 
print it. We could h ave deleted 
:PRINT@V,5$;. Delete it and run. As 
soon as GD5UB5 executed it and re- 
turned, we knew (using Line 5 as a 
model) that the next order of business 
would be to extract what information 
we need to display the additional blank- 
out and modify it so it wouldn't conflict 
with Line 5, 

Compare Line 6 to Line 5. We had to 
make T$=5$. Having already printed 
the top sentence, X$, we skipped over it. 
We used MID$ function for the second 
time. We played it safe and changed our 
variables, B equivalent to R and M 
equivalent to N, both working on T$, 
not 5$! 

Now, we printed our T$ sentence that 
contains the pair of blank-outs. We 
paused for a key to be pressed and 
returned to continue. 

Look at Line 23! Our two values to 
zap OLD were B=22 and M=5, followed 
by GD5UBG (sic). We headed for GD5UB4 
and over-printed T$ with V$, the com- 
pleted sentence. We paused for a key 
press, chose a different color and re- 
turned to attack the next variant. 

We combined GD5UB6 and GD5UB4 
into a single G05UB7, merely as a sim- 
plification in programming. 

Note the B and M values in Line 23 can 
easily be distinguished as the values 
necessary to produce the second blank- 



out. It also announces in a program line 
that two blank-outs exist. 

As you will agree, it is better to have 
many short GOSUBs as opposed to a few 
long ones. In this last program, we used 
GOSUBS in both the single and double 
blank-out routines. 

I love to work with G05UB routines. 
CoCo doesn't mind, and hops back and 
forth dutifully in a flash. 

Did you note how one creative pro- 
gram solved a problem, suggested a new 
problem — and away we went! From 
PRRT1 to RLT to RLT1 to RLT2 to 
PROBLEM. We could go on and make 
other modifications, but we have gotten 
sufficient practice with MID$ function. 

TRON and its sister command TROFF, 
are a pair of debugging goodies that are 
all too often ignored or misunderstood 
by the newcomer. 

TRON is the command that is entered 
into CoCo, allowing CoCo to list, in 
square brackets, the numbers of the 
lines that are being executed sequen- 
tially. The newcomer becomes disen- 
chanted when he activates TRON, only to 
see CoCo go berserk in a runaway state. 
It fast becomes confusing, disillusion- 
ing, and finally, hopeless. TROFF is 
quickly invoked to return to a normal 
state of chaos. Sound familiar? 

One of the secrets of using TRON 
effectively is to isolate the suspect 
portion of a program. The good part is 
that you can generally run a program, 
beginning with any line number you 
designate. For example, RUN40 or 
RUN200 starts executing the program at 
lines 40 and 200, respectively. 

The bad part is that it will run 
through to the end of the program 
unless it is tied up waiting for an input, 
passing beyond the error, and effec- 
tively shielding it from detection. Dis- 
appointingly, it will pass through a lot 
of program lines without listing them on 
the screen. 

Type CL0RD"RLT1" TRON, press 
ENTER and run. The display we see has 
20; 2; 23; 2; 5; in brackets at the top 
of the screen and sentences XS and V$ 
displayed. 

List Line 20. You can see that lines 0, 
1 and 10 precede the lines in the first 
display. Now run. What happened to 
them and how do you know CoCo 
passed through them? 

A general rule is that if CoCo does 
something to alter the visible screen, it 
will be indicated in brackets — general, 
but not universal. 

Edit Line 10 to insert STOP at the 
beginning, and run. Now you can see 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 109 



that CoCo noticed the REM line, 0. It 
read and stored a couple of variables, 
a formula and some instructions in Line 
1, then went as directed to Line 10 and 
stopped. Type CONT and press ENTER. 

CoCo cleared the screen at 10, obli- 
terating 0, 1 and 10. 

Rekey Line 10 CL5Z: and run. CoCo 
read and committed to memory lines 20 
and 21; read and absorbed the value of 
variables R and N, 23; and jumped to 2. 
There it was told to print X$ and 5$, at 
which point, returning to the next part 
of Line 2, it waited with bated breath 
for instructions. 

List Line 23. What do you expect to 
happen? Run and see. CoCo is still 
entwined in Line 2. Since a key was 
pressed, granting CoCo permission to 
continue, it executed Line 4 and dis- 
played Y$, and at the end of the newly 
displayed line, A. Again, it awaits your 
pleasure. It goes to the next variation, 
Line 25, and does its thing as requested. 
Go through the rest of the variations. 

Another way to look at it is to con- 
sider each set of brackets as a stepping 
stone in a path that wends its way 
through a routine. Since it spells out the 
progression through the routine only, it 



is advisable to have a hard copy or the 
listing for comparison, to avoid switch- 
ing back and forth between the listing 
and the display. 

Type NEW CL0RD"PRRT1". Keep in 
mind, if you don't TROFF before you 
load in the new listing, you will remain 
in TRDN mode. Now run. 

Notice where 24 appears on the 
display. The GDSUB routines are some- 
what different. See if you can follow 
this! The last thing that happened was 
the alteration of Y$ by creating the 
blank area, followed by 24, impinging 
on the text. CoCo pauses for permission 
to continue. 

For a better perspective, delete the 
final GOTOs in lines 10, 24, 26 and 28, 
and run through the whole routine. 
Observe each stepping stone. CoCo is so 
sophisticated! Note that after lines 28 
and 30 are executed, the next step is 
Line 4 in both instances. Where was 4 
after 24 or 26? 

I can only guess that the ending in the 
last two variations of Y$ were blanked 
out, causing CoCo to invoke Line 4 to 
change the last segments of the display. 
Thus, the last change was a highlighted 
stepping stone, Line 4. 



Right or wrong, the point is that some 
stepping stones are omitted. It all 
depends on the individual display since 
all four variant routines, lines 23 
through 30, tell it to perform similar 
operations. 

That is what makes TRDN of limited 
value to a newcomer. It becomes more 
and more useful as you gain confidence 
and experience. 

In my judgment, a newcomer should 
call on TRDN, especially when checking 
out small routines. If the stepping 
stones seem incomprehensible, TROFF, 
and resort to a more familiar technique 
such as trial and error, intuitive 
changes, or studying the listing. 

In other instances, as in PROBLEM, a 
stepping stone will overprint previous 
stepping stones and give you an appar- 
ent erroneous sequence. For example, 
the first variation ends in ~?\ 6. Then 
after a key press, 4 is printed over ?. 
But, it looks like 4; G, due to 6 remain- 
ing on the screen. 

TRON is a fun tool that is helpful in 
understanding what CoCo is doing, and 
when. It will give you a new perspective, 
and increase your respect for CoCo's 
amazing versatility. □ 



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right if the note is too sharp and left if it is too flat. You can adjust 
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Listing 1: PfiRT 1 
JZJ ! <PART1> 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO 1JZJ 

3 PRINT@X,LEFT$(X$,P) ; :PRINT@Y,L 
EFT$ (Y$,Q) ; : RETURN 

4 Q=181:PRINT@Y,LEFT$(Y$,Q) ; : EXE 
C4453 9 : CLSZ : RETURN 

5 P=181:Q=P:GOSUB3 :PRINT@Y+A,STR 
ING$ ( N , 14 3 ) ; : RETURN 

1J3 CLSZ:GOT02j3 

2j3 X$= ff DIE STADT 1ST GROSS UND 
ALT . 11 

21 Y$ = fl THE CITY IS BIG AND OLD 



ii 



23 A=j8:N=ll:GOSUB5 

24 EXEC44539:GOSUB4:GOT04j3 

25 A=13:N=4:GOSUB5 

26 EXEC44539:GOSUB4:GOT04j3 

27 A=2 2 :N=5:GOSUB5 

28 EXEC44539:GOSUB4 :GOT04j3 

29 A=18:N=4:GOSUB5 
3j3 EXEC44539 : GOSUB4 
4j3 1 

995 CLSZ:GOT01j3 
Listing 2: RLT 

J3 1 <ALT>ERNATE 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO 1J3 



110 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



4 Q=181:PRINT@Y,LEFT$(Y$,Q) ;:EXE 
C4 4539 : CLSZ : RETURN 

5 S$=Y$:P=181:PRINT@X,LEFT$ (X$,P 
) ; :MID$(S$,A,N) =STRING$ (N, 143) :P 
RINT@Y , S$ ; : RETURN 

lj3 CLSZ 

2J3 X$ = " DIE STADT 1ST GROSS UND 
ALT . 11 

21 Y$=" THE CITY IS BIG AND OLD 
ii 

• 

23 A=l:N=ll:GOSUB5 

24 EXEC44539 : GOSUB4 

25 A=14:N=4:GOSUB5 

26 EXEC44539 :GOSUB4 

27 A=2 2:N=5:GOSUB5: 

28 EXEC44539 :GOSUB4 

29 A=18:N=4 :GOSUB5 
3j3 EXEC44539 :GOSUB4 
4j3 1 

995 CLSZ: GOTO lj3 
Listing 3: fiLTl 
j3 1 <ALT1> 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO lj3 

2 GOSUB5 : EXEC4 45 39: GOSUB4 : RETURN 

4 PRINT@Y, Y$; : EXEC44539 : CLSZ :RET 
URN 

5 S$=Y$:PRINT@X,X$; :MID$ (S$ , A) =S 
TRING$ (N, 143) :PRINT@Y,S$; : RETURN 
lj3 CLSZ: 

2j3 X$ = " DIE STADT 1ST GROSS UND 
ALT. 11 

21 Y$ = " THE CITY IS BIG AND OLD 

23 A=l:N=ll:GOSUB2 
25 A=14:N=4 :GOSUB2 
27 A=22 :N=5:GOSUB2 
29 A=18:N=4 :GOSUB2 
4j3 ' 

995 CLSZ:GOT01j3 
Listing 4: ALT2 

j3 ! <ALT2> ■ 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 

OTOl ELSE GOTO lj3 

5 S$=Y$:PRINT@X / X$; :MID$ (S$ , A) =S 
TRING$ (N, 143 ) : PRINT@Y , S$ ; : EXEC4 4 
539 :PRINT@Y, Y$; : EXEC4 4 5 39 : CLSZ :R 
ETURN 
lj3 CLSZ 
2j3 X$=" 
ALT . 11 
21 Y$ = " 



DIE STADT 1ST GROSS UND 



THE CITY IS BIG AND OLD 



it 



23 A=l:N=ll:GOSUB5 

25 A=14 :N=4 :GOSUB5 

27 A=2 2:N=5:GOSUB5 

29 A=18:N=4 :GOSUB5 



4j3 1 

995 CLSZ :GOT01j3 

Listing 5: PROBLEM 
j3 1 <PROBLEM> 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO lj3 

2 GOSUB5 : EXEC44539 : GOSUB4 : RETURN 

4 PRINT@Y, Y$ ; : EXEC44539 : CLSZ : RET 
URN 

5 S$=Y$:PRINT@X,X$; :MID$(S$ / A) =S 
TRING$ (N, 14 3) : PRINT@Y , S$ ; : RETURN 

6 T$=S$:MID$(T$,B)=STRING$(M,143 
) :PRINT@Y,T$ ; : EXEC44539 : RETURN 

7 GOSUB6:GOSUB4 : RETURN 
lj3 CLSZ: 

20 X$= ff DIE STADT 1ST GROSS UND 
ALT . 11 

21 Y$= fl THE CITY IS BIG AND OLD 
ii 

• 

23 A=14:N=4:GOSUB5:B=2 2:M=5:GOSU 
B7 

25 A=l:N=ll:GOSUB2 

27 A=6:N=5:GOSUB5:B=18:M=4 :GOSUB 

7 

29 A=ll:N=3 : GOSUB2 
4j3 1 

995 CLSZ:GOT01j3 ^ 



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March 1987 THE RAINBOW 111 




CoCo3 




BITS AND BYTES OF BASIC 



Exploring the CoCo 3 

Color System 

By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Using last month's program, you 
can display any grouping of up 
to 16 CoCo 3 colors and see 
their numbers. Why Color 38 should be 
orange or Color 9 bright blue is elusive. 

The situation is further muddied 
since TV and composite video color 
monitors display colors differently than 
the CM-8 analog RGB monitor does. 
This led Ed Ellers to suggest that the 
CM-8 monitor was added after the TV 
interface was complete (January 1987, 
Page 24). It turns out that the color 
numbering arrangement is coldly logi- 
cal, at least to the CoCo 3 and the CM- 
8. It's the TV system that's out of phase. 

The key to tlie way both TV and RGB 
analog monitors work is called "addi- 
tive color mixture" by my college phys- 
ics text (I looked it up). Now my book 
is a bit old, predating color television, 
but it has the principles right. We'll 
update the example using the color 
cathode ray tube instead of projectors 
with colored lenses. 

Each dot on the screen is really three 
dots, one green emitter, one blue emitter 
and one red emitter. There are three 
electron guns: one to shoot at red dots, 
one to shoot at green dots and one to 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the coauthor of the TIMS database 
management program. 

112 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



illuminate the blue dots. How bright 
each dot is depends on the strength of 
the electron beam aimed at it. 

The eye cannot detect the compo- 
nents in any color mixture. In this 
respect, the eye differs from the ear. 
Those who have one of the multi-voice 
music synthesizers for the CoCo will 
attest that they can hear the separate 
notes in a chord. The listener does not 
hear a single middle pitch between the 
tones being sounded. The ear is analyt- 
ical while the eye is not. So, if the red 
dot and the green dot of a pixel are 
illuminated the observer sees a yellow 
dot. If the red dot is strongly illumi- 
nated while the green dot is weakly 
illuminated, the result is orange. 

Sixty-four colors are available in the 
CoCo 3 system. The Jow-order six bits 
in a byte define the color for the palette. 
Because composite video and TV work 
differently from the CM-8 monitor, it is 
not unreasonable to expect some differ- 
ences in color display. 

In composite video systems the two 
highest-order bits carry intensity infor- 
mation, so there can be four intensities 
for each basic color. You might say there 
are five intensities since, if both bits are 
off, black results. That leaves the four 
lower-order bits to specify the color. 
The result is four intensities of 16 basic 
colors. According to Rick Adams and 
Dale Lear, these bits control color 
phase in the signal (January 1987, Page 
20). As we will see, this system is more 
restrictive and less subject to logical 



analysis than the analog monitor sys- 
tem. 

When using the analog monitor, the 
CoCo 3 controls three separate color 
signals that are sent to the monitor. 
There are separate wires in the cable for 
red, green and blue. Each of the signals 
may be off, or be at low, medium or high 
intensity levels. Each directly controls 
its dot in a pixel. There is no phase 
shifting and decoding. You can directly 
decode a color number to determine the 
illumination state of each of the color 
dots in a pixel. 

A byte is usually represented as a 
series of eight bits. The left-most bit is 
the high-order bit, while the right-most 
bit is the lowest-order bit. This bit is 
designated 4 0' while the eighth bit is 
designated 4 7\ For example: 

Bit Number 7 6 5 4 3 2 10 
Bit Value 0 1 10 10 10 

A bit with a value of 1 is on, while 
a value of 0 indicates the bit is off. Each 
of the six bits the palette deals with to 
determine color in the analog RGB 
system has a specific meaning: 

Bit Number 7 6 5 4 3 2 10 
BitMeaningX X Rl Gl Bl R0 GO B0 

4 R\ 'G' and 'B' refer to red, green and 
blue. The 4 0' and the M' pertain to color 
intensity. If Bit 0 only is on, blue will be 
turned on at low intensity. The color 
number is 1. If Bit 3, corresponding to 



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WE'RE BRINGING THE COCO 



RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from The 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $20 to give 
your account a positive balance. This 
will be refunded after your first free 
hour if you choose to no longer use 
the system or it will be applied to 
future connect charges. If you do not 
maintain a positive balance, you will 
be charged $3.50 each month for 
direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — 
on a regular basis. Conference 
schedules will appear in the rain- 
bow each month. Be sure to check 
online announcements for changes 
and additions. 



THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

if you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE even more 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29,95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with Imme- 
diate CoCo Community. Check it 
out today. After all, you can sample 
it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPH I 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 



COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and THE 
rainbow's CoCo S IG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $12 (U.S.) per hour. 

On Telenet: The Uninet network has now merged with 
Telenet. Toget the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 
336-0437. After you call your local access number and 
make connection, press the ENTER key twice. When the 
"TERMINAL=" prompt appears, press ENTER again. 
When the "@" prompt appears, type C DELPHI and press 
ENTER. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press 'A'. 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 
ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
enter (use two periods if you Ye using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI; and press ENTER. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $12 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country fordetails on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 312561703088 through Telenet, or 
3 10600601 500 through Tymnet. (You'll have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 

Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to the rainbow, at the 
"USERNAME:" prompt, type RRINBOWSUB and press 



ENTER. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type your individ- 
ual subscription number from the mailing label of your 
latest issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros 
at the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type RRINBOWORDER and press ENTER. 
At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type 5END5UB and press 
ENTER. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just press ENTER and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. No time is assessed 
against your free hour of service while you answer these 
questions. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is opened, each rainbow 
subscriber will be credited with an hour of free time! 



When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into 
your own personal password. This is the password you 
will use for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 



After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



B] is on, blue will be on at medium 
intensity. The color number corre- 
sponding to Bit 3 on and all others off 
is 8. Both bits 1 and 4 may be on at the 
same time, in which case a high- 
intensity signal is sent to the monitor 
and the color number is 9. 

We can now accurately predict the 
color of blue from its color number. 
Color 1 is dark blue, Color 8 is medium 
blue and Color 9 is bright blue. 

An identical analysis can be made for 
green. Only Bit 1 on means dark green, 
whose color number is 2. Bit 4 on means 
medium green, whose color number is 
16. Bright green results when both bits 
1 and 4 are on and its number is 2 + 16, 
or 18. Red uses bits 2 and 5. Dark red 
is Color 4, medium red is Color 32, 
while bright red is Color 36. Thus the 
intensities of the pure colors, red, green 
and blue are defined. Color 0 is black 
(all colors off). 

Of course any bits can be on at any 
time. The 64 colors encompass all 
possible combinations of bits on and 
off. At this point, readers with CM-8 
monitors may want to type in the BASIC 
program at the end of the article. It is 
a CoCo 3 version of the lab experiment 
described in my physics book. But, 
instead of having projectors show inter- 
secting circles of colored light on a 
screen, we will let the CoCo 3 generate 
the same experiment on the monitor. 
Again, this only works right on the CM- 
8 monitor. On a composite video mon- 
itor or TV there is no logic associated 
with the colors. 

When you run the program, the 
display shown in Figure 1 is drawn on 
the screen with three intersecting pri- 
mary color ovals with all three intensi- 
ties set at high. To the left, the color 
numbers are displayed. To the lower 
left, intensities are displayed with an 
arrow pointing to an intensity number 
adjacent to one of the primary color 
names. Move the arrow by pressing any 
key except the numbers 0 to 3. The 
arrow steps down and then goes back 
to the top color. You can also press a 
num ber 0 to 3 to set the intensity for the 
primary color the arrow is pointing to. 
Zero turns the color off while 1, 2 and 
3 correspond to dark, medium and 
bright. 

Moving on to color mixing, let's start 
with mixing bright colors. Bright red 
and bright green produce yellow. Bright 
red, green, blue and yellow comprise the 
first PMODE 1 and 3 color set used in 
previous CoCos. The alternate color set 
is buff, cyan, magenta and orange. Buff 



H D r IT L V£ 
1 til OP 
fUXTURES 



COLO 

N U*6: 



COLOR [NT 



GREEN 
fcLUC 



is a mixture of bright red, bright green 
and bright blue. It is essentially white 
when the brightness of the TV or mon- 
itor is on full. Cyan is a mixture of 
bright green and bright blue with red 
off. Magenta is a mixture of bright blue 
and bright red. Thus, yellow, buff, cyan 
and magenta are the four colors result- 
ing from mixing equal brightness pairs 
of primary colors and, with orange 
substituted for yellow, constitute the 
second set of PMODE 3. You can see these 
colors in the areas where 
the three ovals in Figure 
1 intersect. Now the logic 
behind CoCo half-color 
selections is apparent. It 
only took me six years to 
discover it. 

On a cold start, the 
CMP versions of these 
colors are stored in slots 
0 to 7 of the palette. Black 
is in Slot 8. Those with 
CM-8 monitors should 
execute PRLETTE RGB or 
include the command in 
their program if they 
want to have correct 
color graphics. 

Mixing medium and 
dark primary colors pro- 
duce medium and dark 
versions of the bright 
color mixtures. For ex- 
ample, buff goes to me- 
dium and dark gray. The 
dark mixtures would pro- 
duce some nice dungeon 
or cave illustrations. Fig- 
ure 2 illustrates the low- 
intensity primary colors 
and some of their mix- 
tures. Figure 3 illustrates 
the generation of orange 
in the CoCo half-color set 
by mixing high-intensity 
red and low-intensity 
green. 

This covers the simpler 
color mixtures. We 
discovered that there are 
three intensities for each 
of three primary colors 
resulting in nine separate 
colors. Each of these can 
make nine different two- 
color mixtures, produc- 
ing a total of 27 two-color 
mixtures. Twenty-seven 
three-color mixtures are 
available and, adding 
black, all'64 possible col- 
ors are accounted for. 



The program is divided into seven 
sections: lines 5 to 160 initialize and 
d raw the screen, lines 200 to 240 get and 
process an input character, lines 300 to 
390 process a red intensity change, lines 
400 to 490 process a green intensity 
change, lines 500 to 590 process a blue 
intensity change, lines 600 to 690 update 
thecolor number display, and Line 1010 
contains color number data for the 
various primary color intensity levels. 
This is read into the IN(X,Y) array. 




ENTER NEU 



Figure 1: High-intensity primary colors red, green and 
blue and their mixtures. 




Figure 2: Low-intensity primary colors and their 
mixtures. 




Figure 3: Mixing high-intensity red and low-intensity 
green produces orange. Blue is off. 



116 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligraphcr - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Turn your CoCo and dot- 
matrix printer into a cailigrapher's quill. 
Make beautiful invitations, flyers, 
certificates, greeting cards, labels and 
more, Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nijiefies, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are Vi 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okiclata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $2-1.95. 

OSO Calligrapher - (C) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calligra- 
pher, the OSO Calligrapher prints all the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to troff on UNIX (tin) 
systems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old En- 
glish and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts 
are available (see below). Disk only; OSO; 
$22.05. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OSO version; $14.05 
each. Set #1 - (0 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #(i - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OSO; 20.05: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
one disk. 

UTILITIES 

Auto Run fti - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Util- 
ity to. a llow your own tape-based BASIC or 
ML programs to display a graphics title 
screen and then self-start after loading. In- 
cludes a graphics editor to create profes- 
sional looking title screens. Tape only; 16K 
ECB; $10.05. 

Piratector - (100% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk-based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non- executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo I, 
II, III (except Semigraf); $39.95. 



A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is av liable. 



Semigraf Graphics Editor - (100% ML) 
Use 8 colors and standard text characters 
to draw graphics pictures and screens in 
high resolution semi-graphics mode. In- 
cludes sample pictures. Tape/Disk; 1GK 
CB; $10.05. 

Super Screen Machine - (100% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters, many other features. 
Tape/Disk; 32 K CB; CoCo I, II, III (except 
G4K mode); $10.05. 

Color Disk Manager - (100% ML) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo I, II, III (except for 64K 
mode); $24.05. 

Color Tape Manager - (100% ML) Ta.pe 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into BASIC DATA 
statements, append ML to BASIC, load, 
display/modify and save tape file, handles 
missing EOF and filename blocks, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 1GK ECB; CoCo I, II, 
III (except for 6<lK mode); $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or 
disk, fast and simple general data base 
program. Create files of records that can 
be quickly sorted, searched, deleted and 
updated. Powerful printer formatting. Up 
to 8 user fields, sort on up to 3 fields. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05' (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape 
or Disk based mailing list management 
program. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2Vz to 4 inches wide. 
Ta|>e/Disk; $19.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Util- 
ity companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail 
to allow multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $1-1.95 (see 
combo pkg below). 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.05. 

SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $10.05 each. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SI AC 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



S!!l 



EDUCATIONAL 

Silly Syntax - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 
5 and up. Story creation game; output to 
screen or printer; includes 2 stories or 
create your own. Tape/Disk; $10.05 or 
disk with 62 stories for $20.05, Sets of 10 
stories on tape/disk for $4.0 5: Fairy 
Tales, Current Events, X-Rated, Sing- 
Along, Adventure, Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ ML) Ages 4 and up. A simple 
graphics adventure game for young chil- 
dren and their families. Old testament. 
Ta.pe/Disk; $19.05. 

The Presidents of the USA - (100% 
ML) Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, 
user modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 1GK ECB; $10.05. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Shar- 
pen your knowledge of the 50 states. Cap- 
itals, nicknames, abbreviations, Bowers, 
trees, birds. Trivia! Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; 
$10.05. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

PreReader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 
3-5 (level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2j; Great 
graphics and music. Level 1: matching 
colors, shapes, letters and numbers; Level 
2: association of letters and consonant 
blends with their sounds. Tape/Disk; Joys- 
tick; $10.05. 

StatgraP - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Enter up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
print graph with screen print program 
[not supplied); much more! Tape/Disk; 
$10.05. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This pr$gram may be tax 
deductible. Disk only; $20.05. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to man. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

Flying Tigers - (100% ML) Fast De- 
fenders style arcade game. 5 levels of 
difficulty; Great graphics and sound 
effects. Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10.05. 



All program* run on the CoCo I, 11 and III, 32K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
Si .50 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add b% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. 



In Line 5, a two-dimension array for 
the data from Line J 010 is created; the 
high-speed poke is made and the pri- 
mary color intensity variables RD, GN 
and BL are initialized. 

In Line 10, the RGB palette is estab- 
lished. The screen display includes three 
ovals that intersect in a way that pro- 
duces seven specific areas. The outer 
portions of the ovals contain only the 
primary colors red, green and blue. 
Their colors are specified by the varia- 
bles RR for red, GG for green and BB for 
blue. The values initially assigned, 3G, 
IB and 9, correspond to maximum 
intensity of all three colors. 

The intersecting ovals define three 
sectors where two of the primary colors 
mix. The variables defining the colors 
in these sectors are RG for red and green, 
for green plus blue and BR for blue 
ci ad red. The initial color numbers are 
i4, 45 and 27. These numbers are 
obtained simply by adding the color 
numbers of the two primary colors 
involved. Finally, there is the center 
sector where all three primary colors 
mix. lis variable is fll_ with the value G3, 
initially. 

In Line 20, HCDLOR 11, B defines the 
palette slots to be used for the fore- 
ground and background colors while 
H5CREEN 2 displays the 320-by-192, 16- 
color graphics screen. In lines 30 and 40, 
two buffers are defined and filled with 
the current black screen color. When 
numbers printed on the screen are 
updated later, the program will retrieve 
black from these buffers to erase the 
previous numbers. 

The three circles are drawn in Line 50. 



The numbers within the parentheses 
define the centers, the B0 sets the diame- 
ter as 80 dots while the .75 defines the 
aspect ratio, causing the resulting figure 
to be an oval rather than a circle. I did 
this to maximize the size of each figure 
while leaving room for text on the 
screen. The circle color is not specified 
and defaults to the foreground color. 

I noted before that the default palette 
contains the high-intensity three pri- 
mary colors and their mixes. To paint 
the circle sectors we need only to specify 
the palette slot containing the desired 
color and specify Slot 11, which is the 
color of the sector outline where paint- 
ing is to stop. The palette slot assign- 
ments are now fixed and color changes 
to a particular sector are made by 
changing the color assigned to its 
palette slot. 

In Line 90, the color numbers relating 
lo the various primary color intensities 
are read into the IN (XV) array. Lines 
100 to 160 write the needed text onto the 
screen. About midway down the screen 
on the left side is a block of numbers 
displaying the current color numbers in 
each of the sectors. Since this needs 
updating each time colors ai'e changed, 
it was put in a subroutine starting in 
Line 600. 

The HPUT statement in Line 600 
erases the currently displayed numbers 
and the HPRINT statements rewrite 
using the most current color numbers. 

With the basic display complete, the 
program goes to Line 200 and looks for 
a keystroke. At this point, there is a left 
arrow pointing toward "red" in Line 20 
near the bottom of the page. The cur- 



rent line of the arrow is held in variable 
CL. If a key other than the numbers 0 
to 3 is pressed, 1$ is assigned a space 
that is detected in Line 210. Using th| 
variable CL to establish arrow location, 
the HPUT statement in Line 210 erases 
the arrow. Then if the arrow was not ojji 
Line 22, it is moved down one line. If 
the arrow had been on Line 22, it would 
have been printed on Line 20. CL is 
updated accordingly. 

When a number in the range 0 to 3 
is entered, changes to the displayed 
colors are called for. The program uses 
flP=CL-19 to get a 1, 2 or 3 in RP and 
moves to Line 230 to select the appro- 
priate color change subroutine. An 
alternate to the IF-THEN statements in 
Line 230 is ON flP GOSUB 300,400,500. 
□ N-GOSUB can be much faster and 
clearer when many options are in- 
volved. 

The subroutine starting in Line 300 
changes colors as the red intensity 
changes. Subroutines starting with lines 
400 and 500 are nearly identical except 
that they are tailored to handle green 
and blue intensity changes. First the 
intensity number is recovered from 1%. 
Next, the previous intensity shown kt 
the bottom of the screen is erased and 
the new intensity printed. Then the 
color number for the new intensity is 
obtained from the array IN(1,RD}. 
Finally the new colors for the mixed- 
color sectors involved are calculated 
and palette slots changed accordingly. A 
call is made to GOSUB G00 to update the 
color numbers on the screen and the 
program returns for the next key- 
stroke, [j 



The listing: C03CDL0R 

5 DIM IN(3,3) :POKE65497,0:RD=3:G 
N=3 : BL=3 

10 PALETTE RGB : RR=3 6 : RG=54 : GG= 18 
: BR=45 : AL=63 : GB=2 7 : BB=9 
20 HCOLOR11, 8:HSCREEN2 

30 HBUFF1,908:HGET(0,184)-(200,1 
92) ,1 

40 HBUFF2,98:HGET(0,0)-(20,8) ,2: 
HBUFF3,1025 : HGET (0 , 72 ) - (80, 96 
),3 

50 HCIRCLE (159,6)3) , 80, , .75:HCIRC 
LE(23 9,60) , 80, , . 7 5 : HCIRCLE ( 199 , 1 
20) ,80, , .75 

60 HPAINT(120,60) , 3 , 11 : HPAINT (20 
0,40) ,1, 11:HPAINT(260,60) ,0,11 
70 HPAINT(160, 100) , 6 , 11:HPAINT(2 
00, 100) ,4,11:HPAINT(2 40, 100) ,5,1 
1 



80 HPAINT(200, 120) , 2 , 11 

90 FORX=lT03 : FORY=0TO3 : READIN (X, 

Y) : NEXT Y,X 

100 HPRINT (0,0) , "ADDITIVE" : HPRIN 
T(0,1) , "COLOR" : HPRINT (0,2) , "MIXT 
URES" 

110 HPRINT (1, 6) , "COLOR" : HPRINT 

(1, 7) , "NUMBERS" : GOSUB600 
120 HPRINT (0, 18) , "COLOR INTENSI 
TY" 

130 HPRINT (0, 20) , "RED ":HPRI 
NT (6,20) , RD 

140 HPRINT (0,21) , "GREEN" : HPRINT ( 
6,21) ,GN: HPRINT (0,22) , "BLUE" : HPR 
INT (6, 22) , BL 

150 CL=20:LA$=CHR$ (95) : HPRINT (9, 
CL) ,LA$ 

160 HPRINT (9 , 23) , "ENTER NEW INTE 
NSITY 0 TO 3" 
198 ■ 



118 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



199 1 

200 I$=INKEY$: IFI$ = Mfl THEN2j3j3 ELS 
E IF ASC(I$)<48 OR ASC(I$) >51 T 
HEN I$= M » 

210 IF I$= M 11 THEN HPUT(7^,CL*8- 
l)-(9,0,CL*8+7) ,2,PSET:IF CL<22 T 
HEN CL=CL+1 : HPRINT (9, CL) , LA$ : GO 
TO200 ELSE CL=2 0 : HPRINT ( 9 , CL) , L 
A$:GOTO 200 
220 AP=CL-19 

230 IF AP=1 GOSUB 30jZI ELSE IF AP 
=2 GOSUB 4j3j3 ELSEGOSUB 500 
24j3 GOT02j3j3 

298 1 

299 1 

3)30 RD=VAL(I$) :HPUT(5j3,CL*8-l)-( 
7j3,CL*8 + 7) , 2 , PSET : HPRINT (6,20) , R 
D 

310 RR=IN(1,RD) : RG^RR+GG : BR= 

RR+BB : AL=RR+GG+BB 

3 20 PALETTE 3, RR: PALETTE 1 , RG : PA 

LETTE 6, BR: PALETTE 4,AL 
33)3 GOSUB 6,0,0 
3 9j3 RETURN 

398 f 

399 1 

400 GN=VAL ( I $ ) :HPUT(5j3, CL*8-1) - ( 
7j3, CL*8 + 7) , 2 , PSET t HPRINT (6,21) , G 
N 

410 GG=IN(2,GN) : RG=RR+GG : GB= 

GG+BB : AL=RR+ GG+ B B 

42j3 PALETTE J3 , GG : PALETTE 1 , RG 



: PALETTE 5 , GB 
4 3J3 GOSUB 60,0 
RETURN 



PALETTE 4,AL 



49j3 
498 

499 1 

500 BL=VAL(I$) :HPUT(5j3, CL*8-1) - ( 
7 / 0,CL*8 + 7) , 2 ,PSET:HPRINT (6 , 22 ) ,B 
L 

510 BB=IN(3,BL) : BR=BB+RR : GB= 

GG+BB : AL=RR+GG+BB 

520 PALETTE 2 , BB : PALETTE 6 , BR 

: PALETTE 5,GB : PALETTE 4,AL 

530 GOSUB 600 

590 RETURN 

598 1 

599 1 

600 HPUT(j3,72)-(8j3,9 6) , 3 , PSET 
610 HPRINT (J3,9),RR : HPRINT (3, 
9) , RG : HPRINT (6,9) , GG 

62J2J HPRINT (0,10), BR : HPRINT (3 
,10), AL : HPRINT (6,10),GB 
63j3 HPRINT (3, 11) , BB 
69,0 RETURN 
1000 1 

ljZSl^l DATAjZi ,4, 32, 36, .0,2, 16, 18, J3,l 
,8,9 /K\ 




CoCo's Best 

& Fastest 

Spreadsheet 

RS-DOS 

eric 1 f \ ki 
t™ Kol U III 

JMMWWM » Sea ^BHB^ B ^■■^ ™ 



FOR 64K 
DISK SYSTEMS 




March 1987 THE RAINBOW 119 



HACKER'S DREAM Omnitronix, 
Inc. is now offering a self-contained, 
stand-alone, 8031-based microcon- 
troller package for applications devel- 
opment. The MSC-8031 Controller 
features two bi-directional serial ports 
that are independently selectable for up 
to 19,200 baud. The front panel of the 
controller has two on/ off switches and 
two LED indicators that are under the 
processor's control. The board supports 
one 2764 EPROM and one 8K SRAM. 
An internal expansion header permits 
additional memory or I/O interfacing. 
A programmer's development package 
is offered that includes the MSC-803 I 
Controller, 8K SRAM, UL approved 
AC adapter, schematics and program- 
ming examples. The kit cost is $249. 
Contact Omnitronix, Inc., 760 Harri- 
son Street, Seattle, WA 98109, (206) 
624-4985. 



STATIC BATTLE Ohm/ Electronics 
has provided an economical solution to 
the static problems that plague users of 
electronic equipment. With the intro- 
duction of the Scooter Model STPIO 
Anti-Static Touch Pad, both user and 
equipment are protected. The pad, 
which measures 2 3 /g by 3% by % inch, 
mounts to any equipment or work 
surface with a pressure sensitive back- 
ing. The fully conductive front surface 
connects to 10 feet of cord that termi- 
nates with a banana plug and / or alliga- 
tor clip for easy connection to any 



adjacent ground. The user simply 
touches the conductive pad before 
equipment operation for positive 
grounding between user and equip- 
ment. Scooter Anti-Static Touch Pads 
carry a suggested retail price of $12.95. 
Contact Scooter Products, Ohm/ Elec- 
tronics, Inc., 746 Vermont Street, Pal- 
atine, IL 60067, (800)323-2727; Illinois, 
call (312) 359-6040. 



LOW PRICES Accutest Instruments, 
Inc.'s new 20-page electronic test equip- 
ment catalog and price list features 
thousands of off-the-shelf items, both 
new and reconditioned, at up to 70 
percent off original list prices. All 
custom-reconditioned equipment is 
thoroughly checked and precision cal- 
ibrated by Accutest's technicians. The 
line of equipment offered by Accutest 
includes power supplies, X-Y plotters, 
oscilloscopes, counters and DVMs. For 
a free copy of Accutest's catalog and 
price list, contact Accutest Instruments, 
Inc., P.O. Box 130, Route 526, Clarks- 
burg, NJ 08510, (609 ) 259-0460 or call 
toll-free (800) 524-0747. 



SALES UP Tandy Corporation has 
announced consolidated sales and oper- 
ating revenues for the month of No- 
vember were $336,135,000, an increase 
of 14 percent over the November 1985 



sales and operating revenues of 
$294,737,000. Tandy's U.S. retail oper- 
ations recorded a 17 percent gain in 
sales and operating revenues to 
$296,841,000 in November 1986, from 
$254,132,000 in November 1985. Sales 
and operating revenues of U.S. retail 
stores in existence more than one year 
increased 14 percent in November 1986. 



DRIVE FOR THE BLUES J&M Sys- 
tems, Ltd. of Albuquerque, N.M., has 
announced a new 3.5-inch floppy drive 
to upgrade existing 5.25-inch systems to 
the new industry standard at an afford- 
able price. The system is designed for all 
IBM products and Compatibles. It is 
available as either an internal or exter- 
nal unit that is installed quickly and 
easily without special knowledge or 
tools. Internal units utilize the standard 
IBM floppy drive controller. External 
drives can be connected to any system 
that has a 37-pin connector. All drives 
include a copy of ARC, the acclaimed 
file compression and backup utility. The 
new J&M drives may be of interest to 
anyone wanting to upgrade a system, 
gain the increased storage available 
with a 3.5-inch disk or exchange infor- 
mation with other systems and porta- 
bles. Full information and prices are 
available from J&M Systems, Ltd., 
15 100- A Central S.E., Albuquerque, 
NM 87123, (505) 292-4182. 



120 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



DeskMate 7*in-l software 
makes your Color Computer 

better than ever. 



Now our popular DeskMate® 
software is available for disk-based 
Color Computers! DeskMate 
(26-3259, $99.95) features seven 
popular personal-productivity 
programs — all on one disk! A 
general-purpose TEXT entry and 
editing program is ideal for writing 
correction-free letters, memos and 
short reports. LEDGER, a simple 
spreadsheet program, helps you do 
budgeting, sales forecasting, profit- 

and-loss projec- 
tions and other 
"What if . . . ?" 
calculations. Us- 
ing the four- 

color PAINT 

CALENDAR picture editor, 




LEDGER 



■■■■■BHHHILUL 






m 


UILKIIII! ■ 
• i mimi.i 

ItlMMIttIM 








■ 




iq 







am am cam you can create 

colorful charts, 
graphs, designs 
and "doodles" 
I on your screen. 
Print a copy on 
a dot-matrix or 
ink-jet printer. 
The INDEX CARDS personal filing 
system lets you enter and edit data 
and perform simple sorts and search- 
es. It's ideal for keeping track of 

names and ad- 
dresses. TELE- 
COM gives you 
access to na- 
tional informa- 
tion services, 
TELECOM plus transmits 



If I ' 1 1 1 'iI^^^^^B 



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Ml. \§4 f »|latta* 

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«■•• <«.l ■» 

(••i ■■ 





^^^^J 'fit W' H J I I f 1 i'^^^^^M ^ m 



Data Di recto rv 

^ g m 

Filsl (5 Datafile Budget 

m r »! 

April S5 Friends Bulletin 

li*J □ EH 

Kidstuf f Resumes Yea r 13B5 

M Si 00 

Com pus rv Dow Jones Pioturel 

Ha/BS Recipei Entrpriz 






INDEX CARDS 



and receives 
files from other 
computers by 
phone (requires 
modem). A sim- 
ple monthly cal- 
endar program 
displays "to 
do's" for any date. CALENDAR is 
an easy way to organize your day. 
A four-function CALCULATOR is 
available within the operations of 

any application. 

Don't have a 
disk drive? You 
can add one for 
just $299.95. 
(26-3131). 
TEXT EDITOR Come in today! 

Radio Shaelt 

The Technology Store' 




r 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 

L 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



Send me an RSC-18 
Software Reference Guide. 

Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-715 
300 One Tandy Center, Fori Worth, TX 76102 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



1 
I 
I 
I 

I 

J 



Prices apply at Radio Shack ComputerCenters and par- 
ticipating stores and dealers. DeskM ate/Registered TM 

Tandy Corp. 




ee How Your Stocks 

Stack Up 



lock Tracker was developed to 
help me monitor the stock 
market. 1 1 allows the user t o track 
the daily price of stocks. The user can 
print averages, highs and lows as well 
as stock prices. In addition, the accom- 
panying Graph program (which uses the 



same data files as Stock Tracker) dis- 
plays a graph of the 30-day moving 
average, stock prices and the year-to- 
date average. 

Each file can track up to five stocks 
(mutual funds, indexes, etc.) for up to 
130 days. Stock Tracker also allows the 




This graph depicts a certain stock's 30-day moving value (jagged line) along with its year- 
to-date average (dotted line). This helps the user get an overall picture of how well the 
stock is performing. 

Mark Evans is a sophomore at Memphis State University where he is majoring 
in business and is a member of the Student Activities Council. He works with 
the youth group at Farmington Presbyterian Church and writes computer 
programs in his spare time. 



user to back up data. This is usef ul when 
starting a new tape after the first 130 
days are up to preserve recent highs, 
lows and averages. 

Programming techniques that may be 
of interest are found at various points 
in the programs. In Stock Tracker^ lines 
of interest include: 



36-42 
69-77 
92-94 
107-124 



Calculate the stock price 
highs, lows and average 
Scroll the daily prices on 
the screen 

Contain the routine to 

back up data 

Contain a variable map 



Of interest in the Graph program are 
lines 1 0 to 12, where the program graphs 
the stock price, calculates the most 
recent 30-day average and graphs this 
average. Graph adjusts the scales to 
ensure full use of the graphics page. 

When keying in this program, espe- 
cially on a 16K CoCo, it is important 
to type the lines just as they appear in 
the listing. Both Stock Tracker and 
Graph use all of the available memory 
on the 16K CoCo. Therefore, unneces- 
sary spaces and lines can cause an Out 
of Memory Error. Note that lines 34 and 
42 in Stock Tracker and lines 3, 6, 25 
and 26 in Graph contain the high speed 
poke (65495,0). Delete this if it does 
not work on your computer. 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 2184 C oath- 
bridge Drive, Germantown, TN 38138. 
Please enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 



122 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Uncompromisin g performance at an incredible price. 



Files Folder OlsK 



7 t v e> 



More colors, superb graphics, 
greater power for only $ 219 95 




The Tandy 9 
Color Computer 3 



f . r r r r i r r f .. f 

I I I J . f . I . I I I I | i 

I .1 .» . * J J J J I I I I " V 

t I I I 1 I I i i r " 








Our most powerful 
Color Computer 

Finally, the ideal computer for 
your family: our most advanced 
Color Computer ever. The Color 
Computer 3 is great for small 
business and home applications. 
You get the advantages of a high- 
priced computer — without the 
high price! 

A rainbow at your 
fingertips 

The Color Computer 3 fea- 
tures 128K memory (expandable 
to 512K), giving you greater 
programming power. With the 
CM-8 High-Resolution Monitor 
(26-3215), you can create razor- 
sharp graphics using 64 colors. 



The Color Computer 3's Ex- 
tended BASIC features 21 new 
commands that allow you to al- 
ternate screens, colors, and 
backgrounds — all at a higher 
resolution and with a greater va- 
riety of colors than any previous 
Color Computer. 

Compatible and 
expandable 

Best of all, the new Color 
Computer 3 is compatible with 
software and accessories de- 
signed for the Color Computer 
2, including a wide selection of 
educational, personal-manage- 
ment and game programs. Ex- 
pand with a modem or printer, 
or add a disk drive to create a 



sophisticated disk system and 
open the door to a library of ad- 
vanced disk software. 

The Color Computer 3 
(26-3334) is your affordable alter- 
native. See it today at Radio Shack. 



r. 



Send me an RSC-17B Computer Catalog. 

Mail to: Radio Shack. Dept. 87-A 714 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 

Name 




Address 
City 



State 
Zip_ 





Radio /hack 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



Price applies at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores and dealers. 
Monitor and accessories sold separately. 




ft CLSp : PRINT@138 , "STOCK TRACKER" 
: PRINT@138+32 , "BY MARK EVANS";: 
PRINT@136+96, "COPYRIGHT (C) 198 
6" ; : FORX=1TO2000 : NEXT : CLS : PRINT© 
96, "THIS PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO 
AID IN THE TRACKING OF STOCK PRI 
CES.IT IS not CLAIMED AS A METHO 
D" 

1 PRINT"OF INVESTING IN STOCKS. 
FURTHER, THE AUTHOR IS not RES PON 
SIBLE FOR THE OUTCOME FROM ERR 
ONEOUS CALCULATIONS RESULTING F 
ROM THISPROGRAM. " : FORX=lTO 10000 : 
NEXT 



STOCK TRACKER 



COPYRIGHT (C) 19 8 6, MARK EVANS 



2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 ' 

11 • 

12 PCLEAR1 : CLEAR1400 : DIMS (5, 130) 
,D$(130) 

13 CLS 3 : PRINT" 1 . DAILY ENTER SEQ 
UENCE":PRINT"2. SAVE DATA" : PRINT 
"3. PRINT OPTIONS" :PRINT"4. CREA 
TE FILES" :PRINT"5. LOAD DATA": PR 
INT"6. END PROGRAM" 

14 PRINT "ENTER SELECTION..."; 

15 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=" 1"THEN17ELSEI 
FR$=" 2 " THEN7 9 ELS E I FR$= " 3 " THEN 3 4E 
LSEIFR$="4"THEN8 5ELSEIFR$="5"THE 
NGOTO 1 8 ELS E I FR$ = " 6 " THENCLS0 : EN D 

16 GOT015 

17 PT$="DAILY ENTER SEQUENCE..." 
:GOSUB19:GOT025 

18 PT$="LOAD DATA. . . " : GOSUB19 : GO 
T013 




CoCo Cat 

(Dtugd -file, 
NOT 



Get your own CoCo Cat button by 
riting to Falsoft, Inc., The Falsoft 
uilding, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. Please enclose $1.50 for ship- 
ping and handling. 



1 24 THE RAINBOW March 1 987 



19 CLSj3:PRINTPT$; : PRINT© 64 ,»'»';: I 
NPUT 11 ENTER NAME OF STOCK DATA FI 
LE 11 ; DN$ : PRINT@12 8 , "PRESS PLAY 0 
N TAPE RECORDER. . . PRESS <SPACE 
BAR> WHEN READY. . . 11 ; 
2j3 R$=INKEY$:IFR$= f! "THEN21ELSE2 

21 1 LOAD DATA 

22 OPEN f! I f! / -l / DN$ 

23 INPUT#-1,NE:F0RQ=1T05:INPUT#- 
1, S$ (Q) : NEXT: FORW=lTONE : INPUT#-1 
,D$(W) ,S(1,W) ,S(2,W) ,S(3,W) ,S(4, 
W) ,S(5,W) :NEXT: CLOSE (-1) 

2 4 RETURN 

25 'DATA ENTRY 

2 6 CLS :NE=NE+1 : INPUT 11 DATE (MM/DD/ 
YY) 11 ;D$ (NE) :GOSUB95 : CLS : PRINT@j3 , 
D$(NE):FOR S=1T05 : PRINT@32 * (S+l) 

,USING"% ■ % ff ;S$(S) / 

: PRINT"PRICE" ; : INPUTS (S,NE) : NEXT 

27 PRINT@32*12 : PRINT f! ANY CORRECT 
IONS (Y/N) ?" ; 

28 R$=INKEY$: IFR$= f! Y f! THENPRINT : I 
NPUT f! WHICH NUMBER (1-5) 11 ; N : PRINTS 
$(N) , : PRINT 11 PRICE 11 ; : INPUTS (N, NE) 

: CLSj3 : PRINTD$ (NE) : F0RS=1T05 : PRIN 
TS$ (S) ,S(S,NE) :NEXT:GOT027 

29 IFR$=" 11 THEN2 8 

3j3 CLSj3:PRINT"REWIND DATA TAPE.. 

PRESS RECORD AND P 
LAY... PRESS ENTER WHEN R 

EADY ... 11 

31 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENGO 
SUB8j3ELSE31 

3 2 CLSj3: PRINT" DATA HAS BEEN SAVE 
D. . . PRESS ANY KEY TO R 
ETURN TO MENU. ALL DAILY ENTRY FU 
NCTIONS ARE COMPLETE. 11 

33 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$= f! "THEN33ELSE13 

34 IF TT=9187 THEN 43 ELSE TT=91 
87 : POKE65495, J3 : F0RW=1T05 : T (W) =J3 : 
NEXT 

35 CLSj3 : PRINT f! PLEASE STANDBY ... 11 

36 ZA=j3:FORQ=lT05:HP(Q)=j3:LP(Q) = 
5j3j3j3 : FORW=lTONE : ZA=ZA+1 

37 T(Q)=T(Q)+S(Q,W) 

38 PRINT@25 / USING f! ###### f! ; 5*NE-Z 
A 

39 IF S (Q, W) >HP (Q) THEN HP(Q)=S(Q 
,W) 

4j3 IF S(Q,W)<LP(Q)THEN LP(Q)=S(Q 
,W) 

41 NEXT: NEXT 

42 F0RQ=1T05:AP(Q)=T(Q)/NE:NEXT: 
POKE 6,5494 ,j3 

43 CLSj3 : PRINT 11 1 . GENERAL INFORMA 
TION 2. DAILY PRICES 

3. RETURN TO MENU 11 

44 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$= f! 3 11 THEN 13 ELS EI 



FR$= f! l f! THEN4 5ELSEIFR$= !! 2 f! THEN5 8E 
LSE44 

45 CLSj3: INPUT "PRINT TO:l. SCREEN 

2 . PRINTE 

R 11 ;EW: IFEW=1THEN4 6E 

LSEIFEW=2THEN5 3ELSE45 
4 6 WQ=1 

47 CLSj3:PRINT@j3,USING"% 

% CURRENT PR 

ICE: $####.## DATE: % 

% 

YEAR AVERA 

GE: $####.## YEAR HIGH: 

$####. ##";S$(WQ) ,S(WQ,NE) ,D$(NE 
) ,AP(WQ) ,HP(WQ) 

48 PRINTUS I NG 11 YEAR LOW: $####.# 

#" ;LP(WQ) :PRINT f! 

ii . 

4 9 PRINT 11 PRESS < A > TO ADVANCE AN 

D <DOWN ARROW> TO REVIEW. 

PRESS <ENTER> TO END SE 

QUENCE . 11 

5j3 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$ = l!Af »THENWQ=WQ+l 
ELSEIFR$=CHR$ (1)8) THENWQ=WQ-1ELSE 
IFR$=CHR$ (13 ) THEN 3 4 ELSE 5 j3 

51 IF WQ>5THENWQ=5: SOUND 2j3j3,2 E 
LSE IF WQ<1THENWQ=1:S0UND1 / 1 

52 GOT04 7 

53 CLSj3: PRINT 11 TURN PRINTER ON AN 
D POSITION PAPER. . . PRESS <E 
NTER> ... 11 

54 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=CHR$ (13) THEN55 
ELSE54 

55 PRINT#-2,TAB(35) ; "STOCK DATA" 
:PRINT#-2 ,STRING$ (8JZJ, f! - f! ) :PRINT# 
-2, "STOCK 11 ;TAB(2j3) ; "DATE" ;TAB(3j3 
) ; " CUR . PRI CE " ; TAB (45) ; " YEAR ME A 
N" ; TAB (6J3) ; "YEAR HIGH / LOW" : PR 
INT#-2,STRING$ (8j3, "-") 

56 FOR QQ=1 TO 5 : PRINT #-2,USING 
"% % % % 

$####.## $####.## $## 

##.## $####. ##";S$(QQ) ,D$(NE) , 
S(QQ,NE) ,AP(QQ) ,HP(QQ) ,LP(QQ) :NE 
XT 

57 PRINT#-2,STRING$ (8j3, "-") : GOTO 
34 

58 CLSj3:PRINTUSING"l. % 

% " 2 . % 

% 3 . % 

% 4 . % 

5, 5 . % 

%";S$(1) f S$(2) f S$(3) f S$(4 

).S$(5) 

59 PRINT@3 2*6, "MAKE SELECTION AS 
TO WHICH YOU WANT DAILY PRICES 
ON. PRESS <ENTER> TO RETURN 
TO MENU . " 

6j3 WQ$ = INKEY$ : IFWQ$=CHR$ (13) THEN 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 125 



34ELSEIFVAL(WQ$) >=1AND VAL(WQ$)< 
=5 THEN 61 ELSE 6)3 

61 CLS)3 : KK=VAL (WQ$) : PRINT" WHERE 
DO YOU WANT DATA PRINTED. 

1. SCREEN OR 

2 . PRINTER 11 

62 RR$=INKEY$:IFRR$="1"THEN D=J3 
ELSE IF RR$="2 "THEND=-2 ELSE 62 

63 CLS)3 : PRINT 11 PRESS ENTER WHEN R 
EADY TO PRINT DATA. " 

64 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=CHR$(13)THEN66 
ELSE64 

65 S (KK,)3) =S (KK, 1) 

66 IF D=-2 THEN PRINT#-2 , CHR$ ( 15 

) 

67 IFD=-2THENPRINT#-2,USING"DAIL 
Y STOCK QUOTES FOR % % 
" ;S$(KK) : PRINT#-2,CHR$ (14) : PRINT 
# - 2 , " DATE 11 ; TAB (18) ; 11 PRI CE " : PRINT 
#-2 / STRING$ (4)3, "-") : FORPP=lTONE : 
H=S (KK,PP) -S(KK,PP-1) :PRINT#-2,U 
SING»% % $####.### + 
####.###" ;D$(PP) ,S(KK,PP) ,H 

68 IF D=-2THENNEXT : GOT03 4 

69 FOR A=1T0 NE STEP14 

7) 3 CLS 

71 IF NE-A>14THEN QQ=A+14 ELSE Q 
Q=NE 

72 FORAA=A TO QQ : PRINTUSING"% 

% $####.### +####. ###";D$(A 
A) , S ( KK , A A ) , S ( KK , AA ) -S ( KK , AA- 1 ) :, 
NEXT 

73 PRINT@32*15, "PRESS <SPACEBAR> 
TO CONTINUE."; 

74 R$=INKEY$: IFR$=" "THEN75ELSE7 

4 

75 NEXTA 

76 PRINT@32*15, "PRESS A KEY TO R 
ETURN TO MENU . " ; 

77 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=" "THEN77ELSE34 

78 GOT078 

79 CLS)3:INPUT"REWIND DATA TAPE.. 

PRESS RECORD AND P 
LAY... PRESS ENTER WHEN R 

EADY. . . " ;EE$:GOSUB8)3:GOTO 

13 

8) 3 MOTORON: F0RX=1T025)3)3 : NEXT: OPE 
N"0",-1,DN$ 

81 PRINT #-l,NE 

82 F0RQ=1T05:PRINT#-1,S$(Q) : NEXT 
:FORW=lTONE: PRINT #-l,D$ (W) ,S (1,W 
) / S (2 , W) , S ( 3 ,W ) , S ( 4 , W) f S ( 5 f W ) :NE 
XT 

83 CLOSE (-1) 

84 RETURN 

85 CLS:PRINT"1 CREATE NEW FILE": 
PRINT"2 BACKUP FILE" : PRINT"3 RET 
URN TO MAIN MENU" 

86 R$=INKEY$: IFR$="1"THEN87ELSEI 



FR$="2"THEN9 2ELSEIFR$="3"THEN13E 
LSE86 

87 INPUT"ENTER FILENAME" ; DN$ : CLS 

88 PRINT"ENTER THE NAMES OF 5 ST 
OCKS TO BE TRACKED:" 

89 PRINT@64 , " " ; : F0RX=1T05 : PRINTU 
SING"STOCK #";X; :INPUTS$(X) : NEXT 
9J3 CLSj3:FORX=lT05:PRINTS$ (X) : NEX 
T: PRINT@32*11 , "ARE THESE CORRECT 
(Y/N)?"; 

91 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=" "THEN9 1ELSEIF 
R$="N"THEN8 5ELSEIFR$=" Y"THEN7 9 

92 CLS: INPUT"HOW MANY DAYS BACK 
DO YOU WANT TO SAVE";BD:IF BD>N 
E OR BD<1 OR BDOINT(BD) THEN 92 
ELSECLSjZ) : INPUT "FILE NAME" ; DN$ : DN 
$=MID$ ( DN$ / 1 / 8 ) 

93 PRINT@96, ""; :PRINT"PRESS PLAY 
AND RECORD. PRESS <ENTER>" ; : 

LINEINPUTR$ : MOTORON : F0RX=1T02 5j3j3 

; NEXT : MOTOROFF : OPEN"0" , -1 , DN$ : PR 
INT#-1 , BD: F0RX=1T05 : PRINT#-1 , S $ ( 
X) : NEXT : FORQ=BD T01STEP-1 : NB=1+N 
E-Q:PRINT#-1 / D$(NB) f S(l f NB) ,S(2, 
NB) ^(S.NB) ,S(4,NB) ^(S.NB) 

94 NEXT: CLOSE :GOT013 

95 IF LEN(D$ (NE) ) <>8THENlj35 

96 F0RQ=1T08:E$(Q)=MID$(D$(NE) ,Q 
,1) : NEXT 

97 IF E$ (3)="/"ANDE$(6)="/"THEN9 
8ELSE1J35 

98 IF E$(l)="l"ORE$(l)="j3"THEN99 
ELSE1J35 

99 E=ASC(E$ (2) ) : IFE>=48AND E<=57 

THENlj3j3ELSElp5 

1J3J3 FORW=4T05:E=ASC(E$(W) ) : IFE>= 
48ANDE<=57THENlj31ELSElj35 

1)31 NEXT 

1)32 IF E$ (7) ="8"ORE$ (7) ="9"THEN1 
j33ELSElj35 

1)33 E=ASC(E$(8) ) : IFE>=4 8ANDE<=57 

THEN 1)34 ELSE 1)35 
1)34 RETURN 

1)35 PRINT "ENTER DATE IN FORMAT 
MM/DD/ YY . " : INPUTD$ (NE) :GOT095 



1)36 
1)37 

1)38 

I) 39 

II) 3 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 



VARIABLES : 
D$ (X) =DATE R$=INKEY$ 
S(X,Y)=STOCK PRICE FOR 
STOCK X, DATE Y 
S$(X)=STOCK NAME 
DN$=DATA FILE NAME 
NE=NUMBER OF ENTERIES 
HP(X)=HIGH PRICE FOR 
LP(X)=LOW PRICE STOCK X 
T(X)=TOTAL OF STOCK 

PRICES FOR STOCK X 
AP (X) =AVERAGE PRICE FOR 

STOCK X 



126 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1987 



119 


1 LINES 


5j3j3-68j3:D=PRINT 


12/3 1 




DEVICE 


121 




KK=STOCK # 




DIN— if 


at? T7 1 M T 1 TT 1 "D TT7C TXTiCIT TO 


123 


1 BE 


USED IN DATA BACKUP 



Listing 2: GRRPH 

J3 1 STOCK TRACKER GRAPH PROGRAM 

1 1 COPYRIGHT (C) , 1986 MARK EVANS 

2 PCLEAR4 : PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : CLEAR12 J3 
J3:DIMS(5,13J3) ,D$(13j3) : CLSj3 : INPUT 
"ENTER FILENAME" ;DN$ : PRINT@9 6 , "P 
RESS PLAY AND <ENTER> TO LOAD D 
ATA FROM TAPE • " : LINEINPUTR$ : R$=" 
":DN$=MID$(DN$ / l / 8) 

3 OPEN"I" , -1 , DN$ : INPUT#-1 , NE : FOR 
Q=1T05:INPUT#-1,S$ (Q) :NEXT:FORW= 
1T0NE:INPUT#-1,D$(W) , S(1,W) ,8(2, 
W) ,S (3,W) ,S (4 ,W) , S (5,W) :NEXT:CLO 
SE (-1) : POKE65495 , J3 : F0RW=1T05 : T (W 
)=j3:NEXT:PRINT@4 4 8, "PLEASE STAND 
BY" 

4 F0RQ=1T05 : HP (,Q) =j3 : LP ( Q) =5j3j3j3 : F 
ORW=lTONE:T(Q)=T(Q)+S (Q,W) : IFS (Q 

,W)>HP(Q) THENHP (Q) =S (Q,W) 

5 IFS(Q,W)<LP(Q)THENLP(Q)=S(Q,W) 

6 NEXT: AP (Q) =T (Q) /NE : NEXT: POKE 6 5 
494, j3 

7 MA=j3:MT=j3:CLSj3:PRINT"ENTER NUM 
BER TO BE GRAPHED" :F0RQ=1T05:PRI 
NTUSING"# ";Q; : PRINTS $ (Q) : NEXT 

8 R$=INKEY$:S=VAL(R$) :IFS>j3ANDS< 
6THEN9ELSE8 

i 9 SC=18j3/(HP(S)-LP(S) ) :MP(S) = (HP 
i (S)+LP(S) )/2 :DS=2 5 6/NE: SCREEN1, 1 
:LINE-(j3,96+(MP(S) -S (S , 1) ) *SC) ,P 
RESET 

1J3 FORD=lTONE : IFD<=3 j3THENMT=MT+S 
(S f D) :MA=MT/D 

11 IFD>3j3THENMT=MT+S(S / D)-S(S / D- 
3)3) :MA=MT/3j3 

12 PSET (DS*D, 96+ (MP (S) -MA) *SC) :L 
INE- (DS*D, 9 6+ (MP (S ) -S ( S , D) ) *SC) , 
PSET: PSET (DS*D, 192) :PSET(DS*D, 19 
1) :NEXT 

13 SCREEN1 1 1 : R$=INKEY$ : IF R$=" f, T 
HEN 13 

14 CLS : PRINT"ENTER SELECTION :": P 
RINT"1 DAY GRID":PRINTUSING"2 AV 
ERAGE PRICE ($####.###)" ;AP (S) : P 
RINT"3 HIGHLIGHT A DAY":PRINT"4 
CLEAR SCREEN": PRINT" 5 GRAPH ANOT 
HER STOCK" : PRINT" 6 VIEW GRAPH" :P 
RINT"7 HORIZONTAL PRICE LINES" :P 
RINT"8 END PROGRAM" 

15 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=" 4 "THENPCLS : GO 



T013ELSEIFR$="6"THEN13ELSEIFR$=" 
2 "THEN2 5ELSEIFR$ = "5 "THENGOT07ELS 
EIFR$="1"THEN21ELSEIFR$="3"THEN1 
6ELSEIFR$=" 8 "THENENDELSEIFR$=" 7 " 
AND(HP(S) -LP(S) ) >1THENG0T02 3ELSE 
IFR$=" 7 " THENPRINT " INTERVAL TOO S 
MALL" : GOT015ELSEGOT015 

16 CLS :PRINT"USE THE UP AND DOWN 
ARROW TO SCROLL THROUGH THE 

DATES, PRESS ENTER TO HIGHLIGHT 

THE DATE BEING VIEWED, ": QW=1 

17 R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=CHR$ ( 10 ) THENQW 
=QW- 1ELS E I FR $= " A " THENQW=QW+ 1 

18 IF QW<1THENS0UND1 / 1:QW=1ELSEI 
F QW>NE THENSOUND2 5 5,1: QW=NE 

19 IFR$=CHR$ (13)THENLINE(DS*QW / j3 
) - (DS*QW, 196) , PSET:GOT013 

2j3 PRINT@164 / USING"% %";D 
$ (QW) :GOT017 

21 CLSj3: INPUT"ENTER INVERVAL FOR 
GRIDS, ENTER <1> FOR A GRID FOR 
EACH DAY";GI:IF GI>NE THENPRINT 

"INTERVAL TOO GREAT, ENTER AGAIN 
" ;ELSEIF GK1THENPRINT" INTERVAL 
MUST BE GREATER THEN j3":FORWQ=lT 
03j3j3j3 : NEXT : GOTO 21 

22 FORX=lTO NE*DS STEP GI*DS:LIN 
E(X / j3)-(X / 255) / PSET: NEXT :GOT013 

23 I=INT( (HP(S) -LP(S) )/2j3) :GOSUB 
24: CLS: PRINTUSING"$## . # INCREMENT 
S " ; I : FORXY=INT ( LP ( S ) +1 ) TOINT ( HP ( 
S) ) STEPI: LINE 03,96+ (MP (S) -XY) *SC 
) -(255 / 9 6+(MP(S) -XY) *SC) ,PSET:NE 
XT:GOT013 

24 IFK1THENI = 1 : RETURNELSERETURN 

25 POKE65495, j3 : YP=96+ (MP (S ) -AP ( S 
) ) *SC: F0RP=J3T02 55: IFPPOINT (P, YP) 
=5THENC=j3ELSEC=5 

26 PSET(P, YP,C) :NEXT:POKE65494,j3 
:GOT013 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest — Chicago 

April 10-12 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



127 



STAR "NX-10 COMPLETE SYSTEM 




Easy-to-use and ready for the heavy workloads 
from your TRS-80 Color Computer 1, 2, 3 or PC 
compatible. Control pitch, margins, NLQ, Italics 
and more from the Front Control Panel. Stuff the 
5K data buffer with your own unique character set 
•r use one of the 1 I built in character sets. 1 
Year limited warranty serviceable nationwide. 
Deluxe Users manual. System includes the NX- 10 
Dot Matrix printer with BLUE STREAK II serial- 
to-parallel interface and our Software Trio (see 
below). 



SPECS. 120cps Dratl, 30cps NLQ. liaJcs Sub & Suporsaipts. 
Emphasized, Doublesirike. Proportional, International, Down Loadable 
Char.. Lett, Righl, or Center Justification. Underline. Vertically Enlarged 
2X/4X, 5. 6, 8.5. 10. 12. & 17 CPI. Graphics 480-1920 dots/lino, Horj. & 
Vert Tabs, Forward or Reverse n/216* Line Feeds, Hex Dump, Friction 
& Push Tractor. 5K DaiaBulfer 



$28995 



+S10 Shipping 
and Insurance 



COMPLETE 



SEIKOSHA SP-1000AS COMPLETE SYSTE 



Triple Mode Dot Matrix printer with serial 
interface, cable and our Software Trio (see 
below). Ready to run single sheet or 4" to 10" 
tractor paper from your TRS-80 Color Computer 
1, 2, or 3. Compatible with your programs that 
let you control your baud rate, like CoCoMax, 
VIP, Basic and OS-9 etc. 24 month limited 
warranty. 76 page users manual. 



SPECS. lOOcps Draft. 20 cps NLQ, Italics, Sub & Suporscnpts. Bold, 
Doublesirike. Proportional, International, Underline 5, 6, 8 5. 10. 12. & 
17 CPI, Graphics 480-1920 dots/line, Horizontal and Verlical Tabs. 
n/2 1 6* Line Feeds, Hex Dump, Friclion and Tractor Paper Feed 



$219 95 



+SI0 Shipping 
and Insurance 



COMPLETE 





CITIZEN 120D COMPLETE SYSTEM 



HT TT1? CTDTTAIT TT serial io 
t>LUt J> 1 KE AK 11 interface 



Triple Mode, High performance Dot Matrix 
printer with serial interface, cable, and our 
Software Trio (see below). Ready to run with 
your TRS-80 Color Computer 1, 2, or 3. Load 
single sheets with one button ease or use the 
adjustable tractor with rear or bottom feed. Fill 
the 4K buffer with text and graphics from your 
favorite programs such as CoCoMax, VIP and 
Basic at rates up to 9600 baud. 12 month limited 
warranty. Deluxe users manual. 



Serial to Parallel 



SPECS: 120 cps Draft 25 cps NLQ, Italics, Sub & Superscript, 
Emphasizod, Doublestriko, Proportional. International. User Defined 
Charactors, Left. Right, Cenlor or Full Justification. Undrlme, Ovorscoro. 
Revorse Print, Vertically Enlarged 2X. 5. 6, 85. 10. 12, 17, & 20 CPI, 
Graphics 480-1920 dots/line, Horz and Vert Relative & Absolulo Tabs. 
n/2l6"Lino Foods, Hex Dump, Friction and Tractor. 4KBulfor 



$22995 



+S10 Shipping 
and Insurance 



COMPLETE 



Transfer your data from CoCo 1, 2, 3 to your 
parallel printer with a fury. The Blue Streak can 
increase your data transmission 4 fold over 
conventional-compatible interfacing and increase 
printer throughput. An additional serial I/O port 
permits port sharing with another serial device 
without recabling. 



SPECS: 300. 600, 1200, 2-100. -1000, 9600 Swhhable Baud Rales, 
Power Supply 276-1 431 A UL Listed. 1 Year Warranty, Inpul 4 Pin Serial. 
Output 36 Pin Parallel and 4 Pin Serial, Total Cable Longth 54 Inches, 
Sox 4"x2"xr 

$49^ without power tlnS^ce 



$5495 with power 



+S2 Shipping 
and Insurance 



SOFTWARE TRIO 





WORD PROCESSOR 2.2 

TAPE OR DISK VERSION 

A feature packed program that turns your CoCo 
into an office machine. Create and save letters 
and documents with the Word processor tailored Features include user definable color shading and 
for your printer. printing in all 5 Pmodes. Tape transferable to 

disk. Requires 16K extended color basic. 



A FULL 8"Xir SCREEN DUMP PROGRAM 

A well-written and documented program written 
in machine language position independent code. 



TYPE SELECTION 
TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

Menu driven program for the CoCo. Teaches 
and shows the new user the numerous features of 
their printer. (Specify printer when ordering) 



ALL THREE 
PROGRAMS 



$1995 



INC 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES "I, INC 

DUN & BRADSTREET LISTED 

7201 CLA IRC REST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6 % SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.(K) 

TRS HO Color Com|HUcr00 Tandy Coip., CoCoMaxQG Colorwarc Inc., VIPW Soft law Coq>. All ilaU Mihjctl lo change wjiluHil nutica 




RAINBC 




E 



EW 



Citizen 120-D Printer 

Sleek, Efficient and Easy to Use/Dayton Associates 147 

CoCo III 512K Upgrade 

Memory Modification/Specfrum Projects 145 

CoCo Hymnal 

Inspirational Mus'\c/Sovereign Grace Software 143 

Educational Software 

Helps Develop Language Arts Skills/ Vo/7c 10 Software 146 

Elite*Word/80 

Word Processor for the CoCo 3/Spectrum Projects 134 

Interbank Incident 

A Rendezvous With Adventure//nfocoA77 139 

Kamelion 

Interface Operating System/D. J. Leffler 141 

Keeping Track 

Control Disk Pile-Up/Duc/c Productions 142 

Magic of Zanth 

Graphics Adventure for the CoCo 3/Computerware 140 

RAMDisk 

OS-9 Program for a 68008 Coprocessor Card/ Cir-Pak Ltd 137 

River Crossing 

A Simulation for the Armchair GeneralA4/7c Royal Games 135 

Softreader 

Puts "Hams" in Touch With the World/CoCo Enterprises 144 

A Synopsis of the Books of the Holy Bible 

Study of the Scriptures/Cot/nfry Software 143 

Teacher Pak Plus 

Lightens the Classroom Load/Tothian Software 138 

The Word Factory's Word Meaning 

Build a Better Vocabulary/S£C>4 136 



\ 



*0f 



Challenges Await You In 



Jhm Rainbow 
Bookshttf 



The Second Rainbow Book Of 






**** ^E*^^ 




Put your wits and skills to the test with 16 outstanding programs 
from the winners of our Second Simulation Contest. You'll en- 
counter explosive action as the leader of the Rainbow City Bomb 
Squad. As the Master Train Dispatcher, the pressure is intense 
to avoid accidents and keep the trains on time. When all this 
activity seems too much, who ya gonna call? Ghostget- 
ters, of course! Then it's off to CoCo's Bowling Alley for a little 
Monday night relaxation. 

Plunge into real-life action with: 



Bush Pilot — Danger lurks above the 
canopy of the dense African jungle 

Nereid Countdown — Many different 
skills are needed to launch the 
massive Ezekial into orbit 

Stock Market — Failure or fortune in 
the world of high finance 



Vacation U.S.A. — On the trail of 
adventure through the American 
heartland 

Project Theta — Alone in your fighter, 
you stand before Zygor's invasion 
fleet 

Olympic Decathlon — Qualify in 10 
grueling events 



Our award-winning authors: Curtis Boyle, Peter Brandt, Audrey DeLisle, Bill 
English, Aryeh Glaberson, Floyd Keirnan, Ray Ligocki, Brian Maiorano, Chris 
McKernan, Baron Quintana, Joel Robbins, Charles Santee, Randy Simpson, Bob 
Tyson, E.L Vasser and Duane Wood. 

All This For Only $9.95! 

And for all the fun without the fuss — 

The Second Rainbow Simulations Tape or Disk 

Save yourself hours of typing listings. Just load these great Simulations into your 
computer and run them. What could be easier? 

The tape or disk isan adjunctand complement to the book. Even if you buy either 
the Second Rainbow Simulations Tape or Disk, you'll want and need the book 
for the introductory material and loading instructions. 

Tape Only $9.95 Disk Only $10.95 



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Please send: □ The Second Rainbow Book Of Simulations for $9.95* 

□ The Second Rainbow Simulations Tape $9.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Simulations Disk $10.95 

Name 




Address 
City 



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□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed.* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Exp. Date 

Signature . 

Mail to: The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit cards orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

*Add $150 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S., add $4. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% 
sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only please. 



REVIEWING 




Wall Street 

Editor: 

I would like to thank Patricia Arring- 
ton for her review of Wall Street (Oc- 
tober 1986, Page 137). The review was 
excellent, except for one omission. The 
instructions to the program did not 
mention that Wall Street is also avail- 
able on disk; however, a disk version is 
available for $6. 

Andre Need ham 
Drayon Software 



Bob van der Poel Software 

Editor: 

In the November '86 issue of THE 
RAINBOW two of my products were 
reviewed; 1 would like to make a couple 
of additional comments. 

Ultra Telepatch (Page 138) is com- 
pletely compatible with the CoCo 3. 
Also, it is mentioned that the copy 
reviewed was Version 3.0. This was a 
misprint in the documentation — the 
copy reviewed was 1.0; we're now ship- 
ping release 2.0. 

The review of Lister (Page 139) men- 
tions some problems with baud rates: 

. . the program assumes you are using 
. . . 600 baud." Actually, it uses the 
standard outputs provided by BASIC, 
and the user can set these to any rate he 
wants (POKE 150, .vxjust like you do 
with any other program). Since this 
program was submitted for review, I 
have received my CoCo 3. Because of 
the method used by Micro ware to add 
the new tokens to BASIC, I found that 
Lister would not handle these tokens 
properly. A new version is now being 
shipped that handles the CoCo 3's 
tokens (it works with the CoCo 1 and 
2 as well). 

In the same issue you had a letter 
from Graham Langford in which he 
complained about a problem with Pen- 
pal. I am not associated in any way with 
Four Star Software; but the complaint 
Mr. Langford had is similar to one I 



received from one of my Ultra Tele- 
patch customers — that of intermittent 
extra characters appearing, usually @'s 
and h's [see the letter from Paul Cundle, 
Page 8]. I have been unable to duplicate 
the problem. I've tried the "defective" 
version on at least 10 other computers 
and found it to work fine on every one. 
My guess is that my customer and Mr. 
Langford both have a hardware prob- 
lem with their computers. I suspect a 
slow or flaky PIA. If any other users 
have experienced similar problems with 
Ultra Telepatch, or any other program, 
and have come up with a fix, I'd really 
like to hear from them. 

Bob van der Poel 
Edmonton, Alberta 



Lyra 

Editor: 

It was with some interest that I read 
the review of Lyra by Speech Systems 
in the December RAINBOW. After exten- 
sive use of the Lyra demo, I feel obliged 
to comment on the problems with Lyra 
that the reviewer passed off with, "I am 
told that we can expect the works on 
this package as well." Unfortunately, 
this just isn't the case! 

I have been a choir director, soloist 
and composer for 20 years in the U.S. 
and Europe and have found some short- 
comings with Lyra which preclude 
really serious work with it. 

First, when successive notes have the 
same pitch, they sound as one long note, 
and the only way to break them up is 
to shorten the notes and add rests. In 
part singing and accompaniment this is 
unacceptable, and I can't imagine com- 
posing this way. 

Secondly, a new or additional voice 
(a fifth note in a chord, for example) can 
be added to the music only if it is 
preceded from the beginning of the 
music with rests in every measure until 
it is sounded. Thus, if a fuller chord is 
desired in Measure 27, rests must be 
added as place holders for this voice in 
measures 1-26. 

Yes, there are eight voices, but for 



normal composition where varied 
chord size is more the rule than the 
exception, trying to use them is ex- 
tremely unwieldy. And the inability to 
change volume or tempo within Lyra 
relegates it to a position below Musica 
in my opinion. 

I contacted Speech Systems concern- 
ing these problems and was informed 
that Lyra was intentionally written the 
way it is now, and no correction to my 
two major objections will be forthcom- 
ing. I hope the attitude of Speech 
Systems wasn't truly represented by the 
young man I talked to on the phone. 
Their products are good and fill a need 
in the CoCo software market. 

Lawrence A. Reed 
Peoria, AZ 



Editor's Note: 

The review of Lyra was done by 
our technical editor, Cray Augs- 
burg, who also has a background 
in music. We asked him to read 
your letter and would like to share 
his comments with you. 

"The reason the notes sound as 
one long note when short notes of 
the same pitch are tied together is 
because Lyra does not support 
any form of envelope control. 
This is true of all Speech Systems' 
music programs except Sym- 
phony 12. To get around this, you 
must enter a note of shorter dura- 
tion and fill the space with a rest. 
This is not a major fault, rather an 
inconvenience. 

"The Color Computer does 
have a slow clock speed by today 's 
standards. It is also relatively 
small in the memory department. 
Because of this, and because of the 
complex nature o/Lyra, rests are 
required to precede voices that do 
not appear until later. Again, this 
is an inconvenience I can live with. 

"Musica and Musica 2 went 
through several revisions, so let s 
give Speech Systems a chance to 
feature-pack Lyra. " 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 

The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, 
examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been issued to: 



Blackout Bingo Game, a program to 
assist the player in winning TV 
Bingo. Let CoCo play over 100 
cards while you watch the game on 
television. CoCo 3 compatible. R. E. 
Powell, 309 Foster Street, Greens- 
burg, PA 15601; tape only, $19.95 
plus $2 S/ H. 

Datapack II Plus, a 32K terminal 
program requiring one disk drive. 
This program allows you to com- 
municate with other computers and 
computer information services at 
rates varying from 300 to 9600 baud. 
Features include Hi-Res screen and 
80-column displays, built-in buffer 
editor, programmable key buffers 
and Auto-Log files, and supports 
RS-232 hardware. Cer-COMP, 
5566 Ricochet Avenue, Las Vegas, 
NV89110; (702) 452-0632, $59.95. 

Dragon's Castle, a 32K Adventure 
game. The fire-breathing dragon 
has attacked the castle of your king. 
He has kiJled_everybody except the 
beautiful princess. Your mission is 
to save the princess and destroy the 
dragon using weapons and magic 
spells you find along the way. CoCo 
3 compatible. Mitchell Software, 
P.O. Box 194, Tomahawk, Wl 
54487; (715) 453-4204, $14.95 plus 
$1.50 S/H. 



Elite*Word/80, Color Computer 3 
word processing program. Includes 
40/80-column display, onscreen 
command line, wide range of con- 
trol keys for text editing and file 
manipulation. Spectrum Projects, 
Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, 
NY 11414; (718) 835-1344, $79.95 
plus $3 S/H. 

Lockout, a I6K Disk ECB utility. 
Create your own passwords to pro- 
tect your disks. Compatible with 
CoCo 3. Custom Software, Box 42, 



Long Lane, MO 65590; (417) 345- 
8163, $15 plus $1.25 S/H. 

Mega Sound, a software/ hardware 
device designed to assist in record- 
ing actual voice, music or any other 
sound you want into your comput- 
er's memory. Requires standard 
audio source and one disk drive. 
Lucas Industries 2000, 14720 Cedar 
Street NE, Alliance, OH 44601; 
(216) 823-4221, $49 plus $2.50 S/ H 

Stgmaword, word processor de- 
signed for a 32K disk system. Fea- 
tures include onscreen line and 
character counters, full-screen edit- 
ing, justified display and printing, 
disk I/O, and is menu-driven. The 
program can also be customized, 
Sigma Software, 14024 152nd 
Avenue SE> Rent on, WA 98056; 

$9M mm all 

State the Facts Game, a 64 K educa- 
tional program that requires one 
disk drive. This geography game 
helps players learn the states and 
capitals, and provides interesting 
facts about individual states. Mi- 
karon Software Company, P.O. 
Box 1064, Chester, CA 96020; 
$22.95 plus $.50 S/H 

Survey Programs, 32K ECB pro- 
grams for surveyors. Package in- 
cludes three "traverse" routines. 
Field Traverse accepts field data. 
Bearings, included/ excluded angles 
and deflection angles are processed, 
and distances can be corrected for 
slope and temperature. Map Check 
accepts bearings and distances only, 
and the distances cannot be cor- 
rected. The third routine is included 
with the Coordinate Geometry pro- 
grams. It accepts bearings and dis- 
tances only, and no adjustments are 
available. TP Jones, 2338 Ryder 
Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 
K1H 6X6; $119; $159 Cnd. 



Title, a 32K disk utility. Ch'oose 
background and character colors, 
and print large titles on the screen. 
This program also lets you create 
subroutines that can be merged into 
BASIC programs. B, Erickson Soft- 
ware, P.O. Box 11099, Chicago, IL 
60611; (312)276-9712, $30. 

Ultra Editor, a 128K CoCo 3, full- 
screen line editor. Features include 
Find, Change and Jump com- 
mands, block transfers and macros. 
The program has two buffers: a 
50K-plus main buffer and a 16K 
secondary buffer. Both disk and 
cassette I/O are supported. CMD 
Micro Computer Services Ltd., 
10477 124th Street, Edmonton, 
Alberta, Canada T6M I El; $19.95 
plus $2 S/H. 

Wild West, a 128K CoCo 3 Adven- 
ture that requires one disk drive. Get 
out your six-shooter and polish 
your spurs! Journey into the land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch 
your job is to keep the peace, but 
Black Bart has escaped from jail and 
is on his way to recover his hidden 
fortune. Can you set a trap to cap- 
ture Black Bart? Or will he get you? 
Tom Mix Software, P.O. Box 201, 
Ada, MI 49301; (616) 676-8172, 
$25.95. 



The Seal of Certification program is 
open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, 
regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine 
certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a 
sample copy — but this does not 
constitute any guarantee of 
satisfaction. As soon as possible, these 
hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to THE rainbow reviewers 

for evaluation. 
— Judi Hutchinson 



132 THE RAINBOW March 1987 




The DS-69A is the best video digitizer available for your COCO at any price. This new, turbocharged version of our 
original DS-69 Digisector allows your 64K COCO to see clearly into the world of any television picture. 



SPEED! 

PRECISION! 

RESOLUTION! 

Compabitibility 

Compactness 

Convenience 

Ease of Use 



The fastest — 8 images per second! 

The highest — 64 levels of true grey scale! 

The finest — 256 x 256 picture elements! 

Use with a black and white or color camera, a VCR or tuner. 

Self contained in a plug in Rompack. 

Use with a Y-cable, Multi-Pak, PBJ Bus or plug directly into the cartridge slot. 
Software on disk will get you up and running fast! 



POWERFUL C-SEE ™ SOFTWARE 

C-SEE is the menu driven software package included with your DS-69A. Available on disk or cassette, it provides 
lightning fast 5 level digitizing to the screen, high precision 16 level digitizing for superb hard copy printout and 
simple keyboard or joystick control of brightness and contrast. Or call our driver routines from your own Basic 
program for easy 64 level random access digitizing. Pictures taken by the DS— 69A may be saved on disk or 
cassette by C-SEE and then edited with COCO MAX, MAGIGRAPH or GRAPHICOM for special effects. Any of the 
popular printers may be used to obtain printouts of images digitized by the DS-69A. 

ONE YEAR WARRANTY 

DS-69A Digisector & C-SEE III Software 

OR your DS-69 & 
MAGIGRAPH Graphics Editor on disk 



$149.95 
$ 59.95 
$ 39.95 



DS-69 DIGISECTOR " 
THERE'S ONLY ONE BETTER VIDEO DIGITIZER . _ 

And that's the DS-69A. The DS-69 is The Micro Works' original video digitizer, tried and true since 1984. It provides 
almost all the features of the DS-69A and is now available at a new low price. The DS69 features; 

SLUGGISHNESS 2 images per second. Quick enough to freeze all but the fastest moving pictures. 
INCOMPATIBILITY Brightly colored scenes may be striped when using a color camera. 
INCONVENIENCE Will not work with a Y cable. 

Otherwise, it's a DS-69A. Precision, resolution, compactness, ease of use, software and warranty. 
Except one last thing. 

DS-69 Digisector & C-SEE III Software $ 99.95 

Superb image quality produced by both Digisectors. 





Screen 




Screen 



\ 1 



Printout 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new DS-69A or DS-69 
you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full refund of the purchase price. 
We'll even pay the return shipping. If you can get any of our competitors to give you 
the same guarantee, buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



Software Review^^^^SESSSI^^^^^Z/*\ 

Elite*Word/80 Offers 
Superior Word Processing 

for CoCo 3 

Elite* Word/ 80 is a third-generation word processing 
program for the Color Computer 3. This third revision 
builds on the many popular features of the previous versions 
and provides both 40- and 80-column text displays. This 
program will not work on either the CoCo 1 or 2; only the 
CoCo 3. Furthermore, the 80-column text display can only 
be appreciated on an RGB or monochrome composite 
monitor. I used it on my Tandy CM-8 RGB monitor, as well 
as on an NAP monochrome composite monitor and an 
Amdek color composite monitor. The 80-column text 
display was beautiful on the RGB and monochrome 
monitors but horrible on the color composite monitor. In 
the 40-column mode, the text was fine on all three monitors. 

The program is supplied on disk and contains a BASIC 
driver in addition to the main machine language program. 
A test file is also provided on the disk and is used as a 
tutorial on how the commands work. This gives you the 
chance to actually try the various commands and functions 



Imrt S*tt Lt*J Mnl Id** Hun Hut Htt Cfc»* Till * 


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pifUr defer to section ? of the lUtuil). 




Tit 'EJECT* *n the atari Um till cms* i eattf feed 
U Ut tl fori before this setleote is printed. Tie 
tillt belt* nil be ovUuticilLf centered. 




PEST TUT 








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right on the screen. Also included on the disk is a program 
called Setup. This BASIC program can be used to start the 
program with default values of your choice, such as screen 
width, disk drive number, upper- and lowercase, printer 
fonts and baud rate, etc. The disk is not copy-protected, so 
a backup for your own use is recommended. 

1 found Elite* Word/ 80 to be very user-friendly. I'm an 
old Telewriter-64 fan, but 1 can tell you that Elite* Word 
is easier to learn and use. 1 was impressed with its overall 
speed and smoothness of operation. My one dislike is that 
the program does not feature audible key-clicks. I've grown 
to like this feature on my many-patched version of 



Telewriter. Somehow, the sound and rhythm of the "clicks" 
seem to make me a better typist. What the heck, this 
program has so many great features, what's wrong with a 
simple little key-click option? 

The start-up screen on the RGB monitor is black with 
white letters. The command line at the top of the screen can 
be changed by pressing ENTER to advance to the next set 
of commands. You never have to leave the text screen to 
execute commands from the main menu. 

One of the main menu options, the Insert (1) mode, 
displays current status information consisting of Insert, K 
Free, Column Location and U/L Case. 

" . . destined to become a new 
standard in word processing for 
the Color Computer 3. " 

Insert reminds you that you are in the typing or editing 
mode. K Free indicates the space free in the text buffer in 
thousands. (This was 48K on my 128K CoCo 3.) Column 
Location is a counter starting at I , which increments on each 
keystroke to either 40 or 80 depending on your column 
width selection. U/L Case indicates either upper- or 
lowercase, and is toggled with SHIFT-O just like in BASIC. 

You will also find thatthe F2 key functions as a backspace 
delete key while in the Insert mode. Automatic key repeat 
is also invoked and repeats any key held down after about 
a one-second delay. You can exit the Insert mode at any time 
by pressing the BREAK/ ESCAPE key. 

The Print command invokes a format menu with 
impressive options that can be changed by the user. 

Space simply does not permit me to explain each and 
every detail of Elite* Word /80\ however, suffice it to say 
there is also a whole range of control keys available for text 
editing and file manipulation. These commands are used in 
conjunction with the CLEAR or CONTROL keys. CLEAR-E, for 
example, inserts an "Eject" control code in the text file that 
causes your printer to do a form feed to the top of the next 
page. You can also define headers and footers to be printed 
at the top and bottom of each page. And one I especially 
liked was the auto-centering command CLEAR-C. CLEAR-w 
toggles between 40- and 80-column text modes. 

One other important point is that error codes and sounds 
are used throughout the program to tell you if you are doing 
something wrong. If you do encounter an error, you will 
be returned to the main command mode and will not lose 
your text. 

In summary, 1 was impressed with the overall ease of this 
program's operation. The documentation is detailed and 
complete in every way. There are 38 pages of easy-to-read, 
understandable instructions provided, with examples. I 
believe that Elite* Word /80 is destined to become a new 
standard in word processing for the Color Computer 3. If 
you have not yet purchased a word processor for your new 
computer, 1 urge you to consider this latest development 
from Elite Software. I think you will be glad you did. 

(Spectrum Projects, P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $79.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



134 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Software Review t 



River Crossing for the 
Armchair General 



Tired of "shoot-'em-up" games? Are your joysticks 
smoldering from trying to shoot all those space nasties? 
Then it's time to sit back, give the old wrist a chance to relax 
and get those brain cells working with River Crossing. 

In the past, armchair generals have simulated famous 
battles in history using the typical implements of the board 
game — counters, dice and a map of the battle. Such games 
often have a board the size of the average kitchen table and 
literally hundreds of counters which designate the various 
military/ naval units in the battle. On top of this is the rule 
book, which not only gives the instructions for play but also 
the decision logic needed to determine who won when 
opposing units meet in battle. The rule book is usually 25 
pages or more and takes considerable time to digest. When 
you are finally ready to play, you then have to find someone 
who has also gone through the same process. If you are 
successful at all this and manage to get a game going, 
Murphy's Law (if anything can go wrong, it will) surfaces 
about half-way through the game, e.g., the family cat jumps 
on the board and sends those hundreds of counters all over 
the place. At this point, enter Ark Royal with River 
Crossing and, of course, your friendly CoCo. 

River Crossing is a tactical computer wargame that 
simulates "small-scale" battles. In other words, it does not 
attempt to simulate large-scale battles such as DDay or 
Battle of the Bulge (also products of Ark Royal). The game 
requires a 32K Color Computer and is written in BASIC with 
machine language subroutines. Essentially, the program 
does two things: It provides all of the implements needed 
to simulate the battle; and it provides the opponent, i.e., 
you don't have to find someone who has read the rules — 
CoCo knows them all. 

River Crossing displays the battle map using semi- 
graphics (text graphics) with letters representing your 
military units and various color blocks representing the 
river, roads, forest, etc. Now, before all you "must-have- 
Hi-Res" people get bent out of shape, I actually like this 
approach. I can sit back and enjoy the game without 
eyestrain. 

Provided with River Crossing are 12 scenarios, so you 
really have 12 games in one. For each one of the 1 2 scenarios, 
you can choose one of five skill levels. Upon loading the 
game, which is available on tape or disk, you select the 
scenario, skill level and if you want to use the high-speed 
poke. 

The objective is to eliminate the prescribed number of 
enemy units and secure a defined area of the map with a 
designated troop strength, In some of the scenarios, you 
must marshal your forces, cross the river and secure the 
designated area. In others, you already occupy the area and 
must defend against the enemy. The objective is accom- 
plished by moving your forces and engaging in battle with 
the enemy using weapons available in that scenario. 

River Crossing contains a number of features that 
attempt to make the Simulation as realistic as possible, For 



example, a unit cannot fire on an enemy unless it can see 
the enemy, i.e., the terrain does not block the "line of site;" 
air strikes cannot be called by a unit unless it has a radio; 
unit movement, which is based on an assigned movement 
factor, i.e. the maximum number of squares which a unit 
may move in its turn, is a function of the terrain — roads 
are full movement whereas the forest reduces a unit's 
movement and river crossing takes essentially one square 
per turn. Other factors such as the late arrival of additional 
troops and the surprise enemy attacks from behind the trees 
leave the impression of a realistic battle. 

During the review of River Crossing, my son Chris and 
I played approximately 25 separate games and found no 
bugs in the game. Once you get the hang of it, the game 
is very interesting and challenging. Unfortunately, like so 
many software packages, the documentation is not partic- 
ularly good. While all of the information needed to play the 
game is there, it is not clearly organized and presented in 
a fashion that the newcomer can pick up easily. If you have 
played war game Simulations, you will have little problem 
learning River Crossing', if you haven't, it will take some 
time and study, but I can assure you that it is worth it. 

Ark Royal specializes in wargaming and has put a lot of 
effort in this area as one can easily see from their bimonthly 
newsletter, The Keyboard General, available for a nominal 
yearly subscription. 

(Ark Royal Games, P.O. Box 14806, Jacksonville, FL 
32238; 904-786-8603, $23) 

— Donald Doiiberg 




jMHif HHHi TililHBHllllh: MM 



We arc Canada's largest 
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Computer 



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Kellynews is now available and contains news, 
hints, programs and articles from the crew at Kelly 

Software. We are Canada's largest national 
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stock all the latest games, utilities, simulations and 
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Colour Computer owners and Dealers to send for 

our FREE catalog. 







Kelly Software Distributors Ltd, 

P.O. Box 808, Station T Calgary, Ma. T2H 2H2 

Tel: (403) 236-2161 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



Software Re^/ew^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Build a Better Vocabulary 
With The Word Factory's 
Word Meaning 

The Word Factory's Word Meaning consists of three 
educational programs, Game, List Maker and Printer. The 
programs are designed to build a child's vocabulary by 
fitting the right word to a sentence. The program also allows 
a parent to input new words and sentences, and a teacher 
to prepare written tests. 

Theprogramis writtenfor a CoCo with 64K, and requires 
a disk drive and a printer if tests are desired. I ran the 
program on my CoCo 3, with RS-DOS and disk drive, and 
an Epson MX-80 printer. Everything worked well, but I had 
to experiment to find the right baud rate for my printer. 

The manual recommends a backup disk and asks that the 
copyright be protected. Upon running the program, you are 
treated to a high resolution graphics title page followed by 
a menu allowing selection of any of the three programs. The 
first program, Game, tests a child's vocabulary. It presents 
a phrase or sentence and eight blocks containing single 
words. The program rotates from word to word until the 
player selects the word most pertinent to the phrase and 
presses the space bar. There are two boxes shown for "right" 
and "wrong" where scores are kept. At the outset of the 
program, the player selects the game list to be played from 
a menu shown. If a list has been created in the List Maker 



program, it appears here. The player then selects the number 
of questions to be presented (from 10 to 50) and the speed 
of play (four speeds). 

The game allows rotation through the array of words 
three times before declaring the player wrong. Players get 
a second chance to answer wrong words at the end of the 
specified number of questions. Scoring is based upon the 
speed selected (the faster the speed the higher the score), 
the quickness of the answer (higher score bonus for answer 
on first rotation) and, of course, correctness of answer. 
Scores may be saved to disk providing they are higher than 
those already stored. The highest possible score is obtained 
by using the maximum number of questions at the highest 
rate of speed. 




[ CHOOSE Q 


CHEF I 








HOME Y 


YOU HftUE IN YOUR POCKET 




U 1 






11 


RIGHT 


JJfcOHG 1 



List Maker provides the means for creating original sets 
of words and phrases. The program uses a code name 
supplied by the user to identify and store lists created. This 
is a particularly useful part of the program package because 
it provides the capability to create an endless series of lists 
that can be tailored to a child's particular vocabulary needs. 
The lists can be stored on the program disk or on a separate 
disk, allowing greater storage capacity. A menu option 
allows previously created lists to be added to, providing you 
stay within the 143 maximum word limit. An option is also 
provided to correct existing lists. 

The third program, Printer, produces test sheets for 
classroom use. The tests are of the multiple-choice type with 
four choices. The program also produces an answer sheet 
for each test generated. Three menu choices are available 
for test preparation. The first selects a list at random, the 
second uses a list of the user's choice. The third option 
allows the user to select words as the program scans lists. 

A bonus program called Dir is included in the package. 
This program loads into the unused 8K of memory located 
above Disk basic RAM. Dir allows viewing of all the files 
on a disk at one time. 

The Word Factory's Word Meaning comes with a 
concise, clear manual and is user-friendly. This is a good 
educational package to aid in the development of a child's 
vocabulary and is a fun game to play. I think it is a good 
value for the price, particularly with the offer of 20 free disks 
with each program sold. 

(SECA, P.O. Box 3134, Gulf port, MS 39505; 601-832-8236, 
$24.98) 



SUPER H^vA/eB 
PROGRAMMING jcss^^&. 
AID flrSft 

RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

"Best value of the year", see the 
review in the July Rainbow. 

The Super Programming Aid is the best in- 
tegrated software utility available for your 
COCO. Add what Tandy left out, COPY and 
MOVE statements, FIND, PRINT FORMAT- 
TER, KEY CLICKER, PROGRAMMABLE 
KEYBOARD, MULTIPLE EDIT SESSIONS, 
MERGE PROGRAMS, TYP-O-MATIC keys and 
much more, saves hours of time for BASIC 
programmers. Version II and III add many 
more features, PRINT SPOOLER, FULL 
SCREEN EDIT COMAND, SCREEN PRIN- 
TING and more. 

VERSION I — $19.95 — for16K&32K COCO 
VERSION II — $24.95 — for 64K COCO 
VERSION III — $29.95 — for COCO 3 

Call or Write Bangert Software Systems 

for Info P.O. Box 21056 

Satisfaction Indianapolis, IN 46221 

G uaranteed ! (31 7) 262-8865 



— Mel Siegel 



136 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Software/ Hardware Review, 



What Else, But a RAM Disk 
— The SC68008 RAMdisk 

When I first heard that Cir-Pak had designed a 68008 
coprocessor card that would work with the CoCo, I 
dreamed of the unlimited possibilities that were now within 
reach. Quite honestly, though, using this powerful device 
as a RAM disk was not one of them. While at first skeptical, 
I soon became an ardent fan of Cir-Pak Limited's SC68008 
OS9-RAMdisk. 

It should be made clear that this software package does 
require Cir-Pak's SC68008 coprocessor card and the OS- 
9 operating system; without both you cannot utilize this 
package. 

Since the SC68008 allows for 256K of memory, Cir-Pak 
wrote an OS-9 device descriptor and a device driver that 
allows this memory to be used as a RAM disk. For those 
not familiar with the concept, a RAM disk is a block of 
memory that appears to the operating system as another 
disk drive. The big advantage to this, in addition to adding 
another disk drive to your system, is that RAM disks 
typically run 10 to 50 times faster than a normal disk drive. 
This RAMdisk is given the name /rd and can be used 
anywhere that /d0 and /d 1 are normally used. Cir-Pak also 
provides a batch file that transfers all of the OS-9 system 
commands to the RAMdisk so that the access and loading 
of these commands is much faster. Believe me, once you are 
used to the speed of a RAM disk, floppies become painful. 

What does give the SC68008 RAMdisk an edge over all 
of the other OS-9 RAM disks is that most of the code 
associated with making this RAMdisk work resides on the 
coprocessor card, not within the CoCo's precious memory 
space (as all other RAM disks do). In the OS-9 environ- 
ment, quite often the name of the game is to save as much 
memory as possible. The less that is tied up with hardware 
drivers and system overhead, the better. Of course, the cost 
is that you must own an SC68008 card. 

THe [documentation for this product consisted of two 
pages, but none was really needed. There is just enough 
documentation to install the software perfectly every time. 

If you already own, or are planning to purchase an 
SC68008 coprocessor card to use with the OS-9 operating 
system, don't even hesitate — buy the SC68008 RAMdisk. 
You will not be disappointed. 

(Cir-Pak, Ltd., P.O. Box 410, Varennes, Quebec, Canada 
J0L 2P0; Distributed in U.S. by Orbit Electronics, P.O. Box 
613, Derby Line, VT 05830; 819-876-2926, RAMdisk, $59; 
SC68008 Board with 256K DRAM, $339 U.S.) 

— J. Kleinwaechter 



See You at 
RAIN BO Wf est — Chicago 

April 10-12 




Back copies of many issues of the 
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March 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 37 



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through June 1984, is prinled in its entirety in our July 1984 issue. 
Separately bound copies are also available$2.50 □ 

Note: Our Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes, including RAINBOW ON TAPE 
indexes, are included in the July 1985 and 1986 issues, respectively. 



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j to 5 p.m. EST. Ali other inquiries call (502) 228-4492, 



Software p ^ t#, ^ ,j/ B____^/^ 

Teacher Pak Plus Lightens 
the Classroom Load 

Teacher Pak Plus consists of a set of four 16K programs 
that have been revised and improved. They are specifically 
intended for teachers as an aid to grading and managing 
classes. An additional program, Co Co Tesiem //, is sold 
separately to prepare tests. 

These days with the variety of hardware types and mods 
available, it is important to define the hardware required 
for a program. These programs are written for the CoCo, 
cassette or disk drive, 16K of RAM capacity, and a Radio 
Shack printer, I used my new CoCo 3, RS-DOS with disk 
drive and my Epson MX-80 printer, with complete success. 
The instructions provide some simple changes that can be 
made f or non-Radio Shack printers for underlining. 

The first program, Dister2, performs statistical analyses 
of a series of numbers. It provides averages, sample and 
population standard deviations, and variances. Though 
intended for class grades, it can be used for any series of 
numbers. This program produces both printed and onscreen 
presentations, and data can be saved on tape or disk, it 
would be a valuable tool for a teacher to establish test 
scoring distributions and averages, and to provide direction 
in scoring by the curve. 

Grader2 is designed to calculate end-of-term or mid-term 
grades for individual students. This program also provides 
printouts and onscreen presentations, with input titles 
including class description and student names. Data can be 
saved to tape or disk. 

The third program, Alpher2, alphabetizes input class 
names. Output can be saved to tape and disk, and may be 
used with Grader2 and Seater2, 

The last program, Seater2, utilizes input names to prepare 
classroom seating charts. Remember how Professor 
Kingsfield used a class chart to call on his law students in 
Paper Chase? This program not only prepares the chart, but 
allows the teacher to move students on the chart as the 
occasion arises. 

The extra program, not included in the Teacher Pak Plus 
package, is CoCo Tesiem 1L This program helps the teacher 
in preparing tests. It will take multiple choice, completion, 
short answer, true/false or matching questions. Again, data 
may be saved on tape or disk and revised or reused. 

Though the instructions provided are on two pages and 
are therefore brief, the programs are user-friendly and do 
not require a great deal of familiarization. The menus are 
self-explanatory and allow review and modification of data, 
as well as subsequent addition or deletion of information. 
I did not run into any glitches in operating these programs, 
which is somewhat unusual in unfamiliar program opera- 
tion. 

Teacher Pak Plus and CoCo Tesiem //should be valuable 
aids to a teacher with a CoCo. The ability to score individual 
tests and track grading through a semester, as well as to 
prepare tests, will make any teacher's life easier 

(Tothian Software Inc., Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 1 6248; 
Teacher Pak Plus, $47,95; CoCo Tesiem II, $19.95) 

— Mel Siegel 



138 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Software Review, 



Interbank Incident: A 
Rendezvous With Adventure 



Who but a secret agent gets a private jet and a large 
expense account, while getting more than a fair share of 
excitement? You can become an agent for The Agency in 
the Interbank Incident from Tandy, and set out to recover 
a code book that controls a top secret satellite capable of 
destroying a city. Your search for this elusive book takes you 
around the world. From a small bookstore in Seattle to the 
Louvre in Paris to a huge casino in Rio de Janeiro, clues 
are scattered in every corner of the world. 




3£ P B t:r ? 



-.'<e.=j:: : 




There are three things that make this Adventure espe- 
cially interesting. The first, and most important, is that 
instead of typing in your commands, you can use a joystick 
or a mouse to select from a panel of eight icons to carry 
out your task. For example, instead of typing EXfiMINE THE 
PRINTING, all you have to do is point to the icon of the 
eye or the magnifying glass and then to the painting. By 
combining the various icons, you can do just about 
everything you've ever wanted to do in an Adventure game 
(except swear at it, of course). For those of us who have 
never been very good typists, this feature is a boon. 

Another thing that makes this game great is the highly 
developed graphics. The details are very good, and it doesn't 
add objects that it does not recognize. The many screens 
of detailed graphics keep you interested, even though you 
have touwait for them, but I'll explain that later. 

The final thing that makes this game fun is that every time 
you play it, it is different. The first thing you do in each 
Adventure is choose which secret agent you want to play. 
Each of the eight agents has strong and weak points. From 
an ex-marine to a Nobel Prize winner, there is an agent made 
for you. All the agents get different responses from the 
people they meet and each handles situations differently. 
Also, the clues are scrambled and no object is in the same 
place twice. 

Unfortunately, this program is not quite problem-free. 
There are a couple of flaws that keep this Adventure from 
being the best it could be. Tandy seems to have forgotten 
the ones who made the CoCo successful originally. They 
make the owners of CoCo Is type in a special program to 
boot it up. Although it is nice that they set it up so that 
it boots with CoCo 2's DOS command, it really bothers me 
that Tandy seems to think now that old CoCos are not 




y @ tj 



important. Also, this game is really slow. On many 
commands, especially movement, you have to wait while the 
program accesses the disk to find out the results. It becomes 
even worse when you select the wrong thing and have to 
wait such a long time to correct yourself. But as I said above, 
the great graphics do help pass the time because they are 
so interesting. 

I would heartily recommend this game to everyone but 
the most impatient CoCo users. In my opinion, the benefits 
of this spectacular game outweigh the few disadvantages. 

(Infocom, Inc., 125 Cambridge Park Drive, Cambridge, MA 
02140; 617-492-6000, $29.95. Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide.) 

— Karl Lowenstein 



BACK TO COMPUTING! 


Name Brand 

DISKS 
$1.00 

DS DD w/ Tyvek Sleeves 
Buy 5 get FREE Case 
Buy 10-Color Case 

C-10 Cassettes 59c 


Dot Matrix/Graphics 

, PRINTER 
$239 

Panasonic 10801 

10911 only 
$279 


SOFTWARE 

CLEARANCE 

Games up to50% 
Books/Others20% 
CoCo Maxll w/Y 
Cable $95 


Composite 

MONITORS 

start at 
$79 

12"HiRES Amber 
13"RE8 Analog . .Call 
14" Color/Sound .S159 


5% 40-Track Slim 

DISK DRIVES 

$90 

Teac FD 55 BV 
W/Case/Pwr $ 1 39 


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MODEM 

$189 

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SYSTEMS 

IBM XT 
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$499 

256K Kit/1 35W PS/ 
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Flip Case/360K Drive 


MISCELLANEOUS 

Keyboards from S25 
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Printer Intl $40 
Video Driver . S29 
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Catalog . Free 


PARTS 

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I E3 POLYGON COMPUTERS KH 

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(213) 483-4406 Shipping Charges: 
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All prices subject Monitors/Printers 
to change/stock avail. Hardware extra 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



139 



Software Review* 



Mystical Mayhem in 
The Magic ofZanth 



The Magic of Zanth is a new graphics Adventure game 
for a 128K or 512K Color Computer 3. It features over two 
dozen high resolution, 16-color, animated graphics scenes. 
The Adventure also features four-voice music, and when 
used with a Multi-Pak interface and a Tandy Sound/ Speech 
Program Pak, even talks. This Adventure has it all! 




You have d 
Rrotfrey wo: 
Th*r# 1* a 



a xsco 
uorkin 
a ny* 



iacouaradt the Good Ha 
rkina in him lahoraxo 
itpmfarioum pool hara 



aaician 



pu aaai ^nothing mpaoial 
hMiotra direction* to go 
o&tf 




The program is supplied on a copy-protected disk, but 
a generous replacement offer is available should you 
experience loading problems. Its best colors and resolution 
are obtained on an RGB monitor such as the Tandy CM- 
8. During the loading process, you may select a composite 
monitor. I tried an Amdek Color-1 Plus, but the colors and 
detail were not nearly as good as on the CM-8. You should 
also plan on having a blank RS-DOS formatted disk handy 
to be used as a "game save" disk. Believe me, you will want 
to use the Save option frequently! 



This Adventure centers around the land of Zanth where 
magic abounds. It takes a very active imagination and a lot 
of patience to solve this Adventure. You will come face to 
face with dragons, griffins, centaurs and demons. Your 
mission is to discover the source of all magic in Zanth. You 
must enlist the aid of the good magician, Humfrey, to assist 
you in your Adventure and this in itself is quite a task. 

The use of the voice pack, while novel and cute, is by no 
means a necessary addition. In fact, you can toggle the 
speech on and off with the command Voice at any prompt. 
After listening to the slow, monotone computer voice tor 
5 or 6 moves I had heard enough and turned it off. I could 
read the text a lot faster and be ready for the next move 
before the darned thing quit talking! This is not to condemn 
the use of the voice pack, however. On the contrary, I'm 
sure it will benefit younger children by helping them read 
the text. I believe the program's author, Scott Cabit, was 
wise to include the use of the voice pack as an option. If 
you don't plug in a voice pack, it can't talk anyway and the 
Voice command will be ignored. 

As is customary in Adventure games, directions of travel 
such as North, South, East and West are invoked by typing 
GO NORTH or by using the arrow keys. The clustered location 
of the four arrow keys on the CoCo 3 make them the easiest 
and fastest way to enter directions. You can also Get, Drop 
and Examine things. Questionable or dangerous situations 
can be dealt with by using Info or Help and, by all means, 
Save. You can only carry a limited number of objects and 
typing INV supplies you with your current inventory. 
Another valuable command in Zanth is Talk, which can be 
used to interact with characters as you encounter them. You 
will find this to be important during your Adventure. 

I found The Magic of Zanth to be a real challenge. I enjoy 
graphics Adventures and have solved many, but as of this 
writing, this one eludes me . . . though I'm getting close. 
This is a fine program, with excellent loading and operating 
instructions and it is nicely packaged. It does a nice job of 
capitalizing on the new features of the Color Computer 3, 
and I recommend it for challenging enjoyment. 



(Computerware, 4403 Manchester Ave., Suite 102-Box 668, 
Encinitas, CA 92024; 619-436-3512, $34.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



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140 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Software Review^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S?ZS 

Kamelion — The Interface 
Operating systems of a 
Different Color 

Whenever new hardware is brought onto the market, 
there is often a substantial wait until the proper accompany- 
ing software is developed. More often than not there are 
tools designed to help make this delay as short as possible. 
Cir-Pak's SC68008 coprocessor card is that hardware and 
Kamelion by D.J. Leffler is that tool. Kamelion is self-titled 
as an Interface Operating System (IOS). It was designed to 
provide future software developers with a psuedo-operating 
system for the SC68008. If you do not own an SC68008, 
this software is of no value to you. This IOS is an extension 
to the Monitor provided by Cir-Pak. All features available 
to Monitor are directly accessible by Kamelion. 

Kamelion provides four basic types of commands: Disk 
Basic, Monitor, 68008 Direct and Complex routines. 
Monitor commands are just duplicates of those commands 
already provided by Cir-Pak's Monitor, as stated earlier. 
Disk BASIC commands are a few of the commands provided 
by RS-DOS or JDOS. Among those available are DIR, 
DRIVE, EXEC, FREE, KILL, LOflDM, RENAME, SRVEM, UNLOAD 
and CL5 for both RS-DOS and JDOS users and RATE for 
JDOS users only. While both the Monitor and Disk BASIC 
commands are handy, they are simply extensions to 
previously available software. All of the uniquesoftware lies 
in the 68008 Direct and Complex routines. 

There are five 68008 Direct commands: Load, Save, Go, 
Do and Bas. Load and Save are equivalent to the RS-DOS 
compliments in that they load and save data from memory 
to disk or vice-versa. They differ in that they work with the 
68008's memory area rather than the CoCo's. The Go 
command is equivalent to RS-DOS's EXEC. It allows for the 
execution of 68008 user mode programs. Do performs the 
same function except that it executes 68008 system mode 
programs, and Bas allows the user to return to the CoCo's 
warm start state (BASIC). 

There are two Complex commands: Configure and Lbug. 
Configure is used as a multiple-program loader. Its function 
is to load the files listed in the file CONFIGUR.BAS into the 
68008's memory. CONFIGUR.BAS is a simple ASCII file that 
has a 68008 filename on each line. I am not sure of the great 
advantage of this command or why it is considered 
"complex." It is left for the user to discover its value. Lbug, 
on the other hand, is a usef ul little program that can be used 
to debug 6809 programs. It is an interrupt-driven debugger. 
Its function is similar to Monitor's except that it works with 
6809 code only and has a few sparse commands. These 
commands include the ability to breakpoint, alter the 
CoCo's memory, single step and dump 10 bytes of memory. 
Each command is executed by a single keystroke. 

In addition to the BASIC commands provided by Kamel- 
ion, some BASIC interface service routines are provided that 
the user can call from any of his programs. These are an 
assortment of various routines that allow for the fetching 
of user input and the moving of data from memory to disk 
and to the screen in various combinations. Kamelion 



performs exactly what it claims to do. However, as is the 
case with all software, there is much more to consider in 
a proper evaluation, namely the human interface. I feel very 
stongly that the designer must have forgotten about the 
person sitting in front of the keyboard. This can first be 
evidenced by the fact that Kamelion requires the CoCo to 
be in 64K "all-RAM" mode — the designer assumes the user 
has such a program at his disposal, rather than providing 
one. His choice of how the screen is displayed is also lacking. 
He chooses to display data in both normal text and inverse 
video, which can sometimes be effective, but not in the 
manner he chose. It makes the screen very difficult to read, 
at best. Also annoying is the fact that Lbug does not 
remember where it was last working, except in the single 
step command. For instance, if you want to change several 
contiguous memory locations, you must enter a new 
command and address for each byte. This alone is unac- 
ceptable. 

Also lacking in performance was the Kamelion owner's 
manual. There isn't a subject in the manual that shouldn't 
have been elaborated upon more than it is. A whole section 
is dedicated to what is termed "Vocabulary." This section 
is meant for those who also own a companion program 
called LFAST. This is fine, except that the exact same section 
is repeated in the LFAST manual. Not only is it unneccessary, 
it is very confusing. The order in which topics are handled 
makes very little sense. One-half of the manual is an 
appendix. This would be OK, but why are the Lbug 
directions in the appendix, when "Vocabulary" is not? The 
sense of organization conveys little to the user. I know that 
organization can be a very personal thing, so I decided to 
ask several other, knowledgable CoCo users to read through 
the manual. Not suprisingly, I received the same criticisms. 

In viewing the package as a whole, I find Kamelion has 
some very good possiblities. I think, however, that it needs 
some major revisions. Since there is no other package to 
compete with it, these criticisms may be unimportant to 
those who need what this package has to offer. 

(D.J. Leffler, 955 Trinidad Road, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931; 
305-783-2713, $78.50.) 

— J. Kleinwaechter 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Just run Writer and then type away. Your messages 
will be sent to your printer. 

The listing: 

1) 3 CLS 3: PRINT© 3 2 /'MAGIC PRINTER 
WRITER>" ; : PRINT@128 , ; : A$=INKEY 
$:IF A$= M " THEN 10 ELSE IE A$=CH 
R$(13) THEN PRINT#-2," " 

2) 3 PRINT #-2,A$;:GOTO lj3 

Jonathan Bent ley 
Alta Loma, CA 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies ol 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and vis companion The Seumtl 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 141 



Software R e vie ir^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SV^N 

Control Disk Pile-Up With 

Keeping Track 

Presently, many, if not most, Color Computer users own 
disk drives for their CoCos. As these people use their disk 
drives, a strange phenomenon occurs; the diskettes pile-up. 
We get so many disks involved to perform relatively few 
tasks that we become confused about what is where and how 
to get to it. Keeping Track from Duck Productions was 
designed to help us in our time of need. 

Keeping Track is actually a compilation of several useful 
routines and utilities for disk drive owners. The first 
program on the disk is named D. This BASIC utility, when 
run, presents a directory of the disk in the drive on the 
screen. Information regarding disk name, number and 
backup notation is also presented on this screen. 

This information is created using a different utility so it 
won't necessarily appear the first time you run D. From the 
"screen directory," you can use the arrow keys to point to 
a given file and press ENTER to run the file. This can be quite 
handy, as D only occupies one granule of disk space and 
can be copied to every disk in your library. 

The other program on the disk, the Keeping Track 
program itself, is a menu for several smaller utilities. These 
include Dos Boot Creator, Alpha Directory, Disk File 
Address, Disk Comparison, Directory Print, Directory 
Saver, True Drive Test and Parameter Reset. 

Dos Boot Creator writes the D binary file and installs it 
on any formatted disk. It embeds your disk number and 
name, which you enter, into the binary code of the D 
program. While running Dos Boot Creator, you are also 
given the opportunity to begin creating an identical set of 
backups of the disks in your library. 

Alpha Directory is a utility designed to alphabetically sort 
the directory of any disk you select. As a bonus, it sorts the 
disk as usual, but. if it finds the D program, it will 
automatically place it at the beginning of the directory. This 
makes it easier when you want to run the D program. 

Disk File Address will print the start, ending and execute 
addresses of any machine language file on the disk, as well 
as the length of the file. You have the option of printing this 
information to the screen or a printer. You may also have 
the program print this information for every M L file on the 
disk or just specific files. This particular utility, while very 
useful, appeared to be quite slow in operation. 

Disk Comparison is designed to keep your backup disks 
current. It compares one disk to another, say, a backup to 
a working copy, and reports all programs that do not have 
duplicates on the other disk. You then have the option of 
copying the unduplicated files in bulk or singly by entering 
the filenames. The copying procedure uses "verify on" 
which, while more time-consuming, ensures accurate copies 
of the files in question. 

Directory Print, a general-purpose directory printing 
utility, will send a copy of a disk's directory to your printer 
so you can have a hard copy. This program prints the disk 
directory in two columns on a standard page. My gripe with 
this utility is that it seems to bomb out. When selecting this 
option from the Keeping Track menu, the disk drive kicks 



on to load the routine and then the user gets a Syntax Error 
in Line 1 1 . 

The program is list-protected, so you cannot even find 
out for sure what is happening. It appears the program tries 
to perform a PCLERR0. Simply entering RUN at this point 
will cause the program to continue normally, but this is a 
hassle. Personally, I prefer a simple PQKE111 ,254:DIR. It 
may only print in one column, but it works every time. 

The Directory Saver utility is rather useful. It allows the 
user to protect up to 56 files on a disk by saving directory 
information to a place higher up in the directory track. Note 
that this does not take up any of the normally available 
space on the disk. It is then a simple matter to replace a 
damaged directory if the occasion arises. 

The True Drive Test routine gives the user the ability to 
see how fast his/ her disk drive is operating. This can be quite 
an important diagnostic tool when you begin having trouble 
with I/O Errors. It can also be quite useful if you take pride 
in maintaining your disk drives, though most technical types 
would be using much more sophisticated programs to 
maintain their disk drives. 

The last selection on the Keeping Track menu is Parame- 
ter Reset. This routine is designed for the user to enter 
specific information about his system, such as the number 
of disk drives and printer baud rate. This selection should 
be the first one the new user picks. 1 was somewhat dismayed 
that the printer baud selection did not allow baud rates 
above 2400 baud. 

Overall, Keeping Track is not a bad system. It combines 
several of the most desired utilities into one package. 
However, I don't think it is up to par with some of Duck 
Productions other offerings. I have seen what I consider to 
be far more useful disk utility programs at lower prices. 1 
give Keeping Track a two-star rating on my four-star scale. 

(Duck Productions, 18 Rowe Court, Brampton, Ontario, 
Canada L6X 252; 416-456-0032, $29.95) 

— Cray Augsburg 



Hint . . . 

Banishing Burn-In 

There are many times when I want to leave my 
computer system on while I am doing something else. 
The problem with this is that there is a chance the 
image coming from the computer will "burn in" on 
my display. To avoid this problem, I issue the 
following line: 

0 CL50:GDTD0 

Now, when I am away, the screen will be black and 
no image can get burned in on my monitor. This line 
also works well from within a BASIC program, 
especially if used with some form of time delay. 

Thomas J. Strike, Jr. 

Snugas, CA 



142 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Software Revien^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S /7Z\ 

A Synopsis of the Books of the 

Holy Bible 

Eddie Davis has used the power of BASIC to write a very 
simple program that provides the user with a short synopsis 
of the 66 books of the Bible. 

Each synopsis contains the name of the book, the number 
of verses, the number of words and a brief outline of the 
material covered in the chapter. 

The program would be an excellent addition to the 
collection of a beginning Bible student, a Sunday School 
teacher or a pastor. The material is quite simple, so it would 
also be useful for children, almost from the age of literacy. 

The program loads by typing BIBLEBK5. You get a 
welcoming billboard, a few beeps and a message to press 
any key. You are then asked to select the book you want 
to see. You press any key and then type in the name of the 
book of the Bible. The synopsis appears on the screen and 
you are asked if you want a printout. If you say yes, the 
printer comes to life and zips out a neat little synopsis. I 
always print at 9600 baud, but my POKE 150, 1 had little 
effect on the speed of the program, which is quite slow. 
There is not too much to print in the first place, so I suppose 
speed is not that important. 

The manner in which the synopsis printing is accom- 
plished caused my DMP-200 to deliver a couple of lines of 
symbols, which meant it did not understand a CHR$ string 
being sent to it. It did not interfere with the working of the 
program, but it got my attention. 

All in all, this is a very interesting program about a very 
interesting subject. It is on a beginner's level, so far as the 
study of the scriptures, and could be a very good teaching 
tool. 

(Country Software, Route 1, Box 590, Taylorsville, MS 
39168; 601-782-4633, $5 plus $1 S/H) 



Software Review^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Sf?\ 

That Old Time Religion With 

CoCo Hymnal 

Have your parents ever wondered just what it is you spend 
so much time doing on the old CoCo? Why not give them 
a treat by playing a few hymns, in four voices, upon your 
CoCo organ ! CoCo Hymnal is a collection of 40 hymns on 
disk. It is full of many of your (and your parents') favorite 
gospel hymns, and is quite well done. 

The arranger of these tunes, Mark Camp, states in the 
concise documentation that "they are by no means fancy 
arrangements, but should be considered in light of their 
meaning," but 1 disagree. In light of their meaning there 
really is no need to get too fancy, yet he has used a variety 
of voice tones and tempos so they don't all come out 
sounding the same. The words to many of the verses are 
included so you can sing along, or at least "make a joyful 
noise," and the option of playing each song separately or 
in groups is included. You are limited to choosing from eight 
at a time, but this is little inconvenience. 

I must admit that although I am an ordained pastor, I 
only recognized about half of the hymns. However, my wife, 
who plays the organ, picked out almost every one. So, when 
you get tired of programming and need a little inspiration, 
CoCo Hymnal should be just the ticket. 

(Sovereign Grace Software, 221 Highview Drive, Ball win, 
MO 63011; 314-227-3238, $9.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Rev. Jefferson L. Hatch 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This program will print out a bill of sale to your 
printer. Just run it and let it work. 

The listing: 

1$ CLS:PRINT#-2,TAB(34) ; "BILL OF 
SALE" : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#- 
2:PRINT#-2, "I 

-do hereby sell and convey owner 
ship of ":PRI 

NT#-2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "to 

on this date 

for the sum of $ . 

2J3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, "SERIAL NO. 

: " : PRlNT#-2 : PRINT#- 

2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "SELLER: 

WITNE 

SS: " :PRINT#- 

2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "BUYER: 

WITNE 

SS: " 

Eddie David 
Taylorsville, MS 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



— Howard Lee Ball 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Here is a program that converts U.S. dollars to 
Canadian dollars or Mexican pesos, or vice versa. You 
will need to find the present exchange rate and edit it 
into the listing where you see the question marks. 

The listing: 

1 PRINT"$1CAN.=$???U.S. : " :INPUTC 

:PRINT"1 PESO=$???U.S. : " : INPUTP: 

PRINT "HOW MANY?" : INPUTX: PRINT "$" 
X"U.S=$"X/C"CAN" , "$"X U U.S=="X/P" 
MEXICAN PESOS " : PRINT " $ " X " CAN= $ " X 
*C"U.S"," "X"MEXICAN PESOS=$"X*P 
"U.S." 

Gerald Carroll 
Kirk land, Quebec 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



Software/Hardware Revien^^^^^^^^^Sf^ 

In Touch With the World: 

Softreader 

If you are one of the many CoCo users who also own 
a short-wave receiver and would like to get added utility 
from your computer, Softreader from CoCo Enterprises 
will be of interest to you. If you are not into short-wave, 
you may want to be after you hear what this program can 
do. 

Softreader is an RTTY (Radio Teletype) program 
designed to work with all versions of the Color Computer, 
including the new CoCo 3. It requires at least 16K and can 
be ordered for either tape or disk systems. The software is 
not copy-protected, so backup copies can be made for your 
own use and protection. The copy supplied for review was 
on disk so keep that in mind as you read this. 

No interfacing is required. All you have to do is connect 
the black cassette plug that normally plugs into the cassette 
earphone jack to the loudspeaker or phone jack of your 
short-wave receiver. A simple audio filter that runs off two 
9-volt transistor radio batteries is available at extra cost and 
improves RTTY reception quality. This filter simply 
connects between the loudspeaker or jack and the black 
cassette plug. 

Documentation is detailed and complete. Nine pages are 
contained in a plastic report cover and provide all of the 
information needed to get the program up and running in 
a very short period of time. A 20-minute demo cassette is 
provided that contains typical RTTY signals and can be 
used immediately to see the program actually work. 

Upon running the program a main menu is presented with 
the following options: Manual, Automatic, Options, Print 
Buffer, Save Buffer and Quit. 

In the Manual mode, you must select the received signal's 
baud rate, shift, and either normal or reverse. In the 
Automatic mode all this is done for you except for normal/ 
reverse which you must select. If Options is selected, you 
will be sent to another menu where you can set such things 
as your printer's baud rate and automatic buffer dump to 
disk. You can turn on the auto buffer in the Options menu 
and send everything in the buffer to disk. An empty disk 
holds about 16 full buffers of about 9.6K each, which means 
you can get about 150K of text on each disk. After you have 
listened to the demo tape, you will begin to recognize what 
RTTY signals sound like. Then you can tune your short- 
wave receiver to the many international frequencies that are 
used for RTTY transmissions. There is a handy list included 
in the documentation that shows what frequencies to listen 

to as well as the time of day and the baud rate and shift 
of the transmitting stations. All kinds of information is 
transmitted via RTTY, ranging from news and weather to 
military traffic and ham radio. 

"Tuning in" RTTY signals can be tricky without some 
sort of tuning indicator, but the authors of this program 
have made it simple. A built-in tuning indicator appears on 
the screen when you go to either the Automatic or Manual 
mode. As you slowly tune your receiver through the signal, 
a cursor appears over the three available "shifts" that the 
program will copy. These shifts are 850Hz, 425Hz, and 
I70Hz, which represent the majority of RTTY transmis- 



sions. The program can copy baud rates ranging from 45 
to 100. A handy "noise gauge," which ranges from poor to 
good, is also shown on the screen. If the signal you aretrying 
to tune in registers in the poor range of the gauge, then 
chances are pretty slim that you will be able to get reliable 
copy. 

This is where the optional audio filter comes in handy 
since it helps filter out unwanted noise from the signal you 
are trying to copy. During actual RTTY reception, the top 
line of your screen d isplays the status of the various program 
parameters. A1J of the parameters can be changed instantly 
with a single keystroke. This makes it easy to change the 
baud rate, shift, and normal/ reverse while listening to the 
signal and trying to tune it in. With the Automatic mode, 
a lot of the guesswork is taken out of these parameter 
changes, but it can take a minute or two for the program 
to detect the baud rate and shift. By that time you can 
usually set the baud rate and shift manually with a minimum 
of trouble. Once you get the hang of it, it's pretty simple 
to use. 

One last point about the short-wave receiver. You don't 
need the latest state-of-the-art digital $300 wonder, but you 
do need a receiver that is fairly stable and does not drift 
excessively. It should also have a BFO (Beat Frequency 
Oscillator) like that used to copy CW or Morse Code 
transmissions. If the receiver can copy CW or Upper/ Lower 
Side Band, it has a BFO. In order to copy international 
RTTY transmissions the receiver should tune frequencies 
from 2 to 27 MHz. You can find good used receivers at 
"Hamfests," flea markets and military surplus outlets. 

I found Softreader to be an exciting entry into the Color 
Computer market. It's a lot of fun to use and provides a 
unique application for our favorite computer that could put 
you on the leading edge of world events. 

(CoCo Enterprises, P.O. Box 5211, Laurel MD 20707; 301- 
498-1110, Softreader, $37.50; Audio Filter, $43.95; Both, 
$63.45) 

— Jerry Semones 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 



Just insert this subroutine in a program in which you 
want to copy the text screen to the printer. Then insert 
a G05UB 500 when the screen is ready. 

The listing: 

5j3j3 FORT=lj324T01535STEP32 :FORX=j3 
T031: A=PEEK(T+X) :IF A<64 THEN A= 
A+96 ELSE IF A>95 THEN A=A-64 
5j31 PRINT#-2,CHR$(A) ; : NEXTX : PRIN 
T#-2 : NEXTT : RETURN 

George Quellhorst 
Painesville, OH 

(For [his winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



144 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Hardware Review* 



CoCo III 512K Upgrade: 
Money-Saving Modification 



For those of you who are not afraid to tinker with the 
insides of your CoCo 3, here is a quick and simple 51 2K 
plug-in upgrade that you may want to consider. 

The upgrade is made by PB J Inc., and is a nicely designed 
and well-constructed plug-in circuit board. It consists of a 
double-sided glass-epoxy circuit board with 16 socketed 
41256 120-ns DRAMS. 

The overall size of the L-shaped board is 4 ! /2 by 2% inches. 
Two rows of header pins extend from the bottom of the 
board and plug into matching sockets on the CoCo 3 board. 

Installation is quick and simple. A four-page booklet is 
included that guides you through a step-by-step process. 
The instructions are well done and pictorial diagrams are 
used to help you find the various components that are 
affected during the installation. A 128K/512K RAM test 
is also included with the documentation. 

After unplugging your CoCo 3 and removing six (the 
instructions say five) screws, the top of the computer is lifted 
off and set aside. At this point, you must make sure your 
body does not contain static electricity. You can touch a 
nearby cold water pipe or other grounded metal object to 
discharge yourself. The four 64K by 4 RAM chips (41464) 
that make up the present 128K RAM are removed and set 
aside. I recommend you place these chips in conductive 
foam and store them in a safe place so that you can go back 
to 128K RAM if the need ever arises. 

Before you plug in the new 512K board, you must clip 
the leads on two small capacitors on the CoCo 3 board. 
They are identified as C65 and C66 in the diagram, and are 
easy to find and remove. The 512K board is then plugged 
into the two white sockets on the CoCo 3 board. I did have 
to slightly bend the long, narrow metal shield near the rear 
of the CoCo 3 board to allow the upgrade board to push 
down into the sockets. This shield is located just behind the 
joystick, cassette and serial sockets. 

I noticed one other area of caution: While the instructions 
do not point this out, I strongly recommend that you place 
a small piece of thin cardboard over the upright, 10-mFd., 
25-volt electrolytic capacitor desiginated as C82 on the 
CoCo 3 board. This capacitor is orange on my CoCo and 
sits just to the right of C66, which is one of the capacitors 
that must be removed prior to installing the 512K board. 

The reason for this precaution is quite simple: The PBJ 
512K board mounts all components on the top of the board, 
which is desirable from a heat dissipation standpoint. 
However, this then allows the cut ends of the various 
component connections to face down and possibly touch 
othercomponents underneath. After examining this closely, 
the only vulnerable point was at C82. The vinyl covering 
on the capacitor does not completely cover the top and 
could be contacted by the cut ends of components protrud- 
ing from the bottom of the 5 12K board. I should point out 
that in my case no contact was made, but if C82 were taller 
or soldered higher on the board, contact could be made. 
Just keep this in mind when you install this upgrade 



It's interesting to note that Tandy gets around this 
problem not only by mounting the chips upside down, but 
also by using three nylon spacers that snap into the upgrade 
board and the CoCo 3 board, preventing the board from 
being pushed down too far in the sockets. The disadvantage 
to the Tandy approach, however, is poor air circulation. 

Tandy also uses a ground plane or RF shield on the 
bottom of their board, which serves to cover the connection 
points. I was not able to determine if the ground plane made 
a difference, but I could not "hear" any RF interference on 
my short wave equipment nor could I "see" any additional 
interference while hooked up to a TV set. 

Total installation time is about 20 minutes, not including 
the time it takes to type in the memory test program. It 
worked perfectly on power-up. 1 reassembled the case 
making sure I put the short screws in the keyboard end of 
the case. I was impressed with the quality of the PBJ 
upgrade. It also comes with a one-year warranty. 

The best part is that you can upgrade it yourself and save 
money. So if you're ready to expand your CoCo 3's memory 
to its capacity, I recommend the PBJ 512K Upgrade. Now 
that we have the memory, all we need are some programs 
to use it all! 



(Spectrum Projects, Inc., Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $139.95 with chips; $99.95 without 
chips, plus $3 S/H) 



— Jerry Semones 





^jp(S<sk :&^l FOR $149.00 

TM 



the speech synthesizer that leaves the others tight lipped 



F IN ALLY . . . 



* 
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No more Humbling with Multl-Pac or Y -Connect ors 
No vocabulary ROM or disk needed 
Compatible with all operating systems 
No driver program needed 
Appears as a printer to Co-Co 



Speak-Easy plugs into the serial 
port of your Co-Co, not the card 
slot, and appears as a printer 
to the Co-Co. Incorporated in 
Speak-Easy is a unique state of 
the art two chip set which 
phonetically converts ASCII text 
to speech. What this means to 
you is extreme ease of use 
virtually unlimited vocabulary, 
and complete flexability in a 
speech synthesizer. Just look at 
this sample BASIC program: 
10 INF'UT A* 
20 PRINT A$ 
30 GOTO' 10 
and imagine how you 
upgrade your games 




Harvey says, Finally, I con 
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CONNECTS TO THE 
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March 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 45 



Software Review 

Language Arts Software for 
Readi^^and Spelling Skills 

For the past two months, I've been reviewing study 
courses comprising an educational series available from 
Compass Education. This month, I will review the Lan- 
guage Arts study course. 

The Language Arts curriculum is divided into three sub- 
categories. In Lesson Plan 1, volumes I and II both contain 
short stories that are used to help the student develop 
essential reading ability and comprehension. In Lesson Plan 
2, the student is introduced to spelling. The student will 
learn about pluralizing words, adding suffixes, spelling by 
syllables, and how to distinguish between homonyms like 
"scent" and "cent." 

In Lesson Plan 3, the student will be helped to develop 
comprehension in definitions, spelling and synonyms in 
everyday vocabulary. 

As I have stated in previous articles, these lesson plans 
are very well thought out, organized and presented. 1 
especially enjoy the fact that there is an audio portion. This 



helps by explaining each new word and giving examples of 
how that word is used. 

My son Eddie (he is usually my "tester" for any software 
I receive) and I sat down to check out these study courses. 
First we went through the reading comprehension series. 
Each lesson plan is actually a story that was read to Eddie 
while he followed the printed words that were displayed on 
the screen. Every couple of paragraphs or so, Eddie would 
be asked a few questions about material that had been 
previously presented. I think this way of teaching really 
develops comprehension, as Eddie wasn't just reading the 
words, he was really understanding what he had read. 

At the end of each lesson plan you are shown a score- 
board, which shows you the total number of questions 
asked, the number answered correctly on the first try and 
the number of wrong responses. The two other sections, The 
Magic of Spelling and Vocabulary Comprehension, were 
both as enjoyable and challenging as the Reading Compre- 
hension lesson plan. 

I would recommend these study courses for anyone who 
enjoys language arts, or anyone who would like to review 
the rules of spelling. 

(York Software, 9525 Vassar Avenue, Chatsworth, CA 
91311; 818-700-0330, $49.95 per two-volume set, plus 
$3S/H) 

— John H. Appel 



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146 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Hardware R e vie ft^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^V^N 

Citizen 120-D System: Sleek, 
Efficient and Easy to Use 

Citizen America Corporation understands that the 
average computer user wants not only a good, versatile 
printer, but also one that can add pizazz to graphics and 
text on demand. To this end, they have given us the 120- 
D, an attractive, affordable dot matrix printer. 




It offers a wide range of type styles including pica, elite, 
compressed, expanded, compressed expanded, italic, 
proportional, emphasized, double strike and correspon- 
dence quality. It also supports underlining, overscoring, 
reverse print, superscript, subscript and vertically enlarged 
print. Combining modes gives even greater flexibility — 
elite expanded emphasized italic, for example. For greater 
convenience, common combinations can be selected using 
the Master Print mode. Correspondence quality is available 
in all 14 character widths and heights, but not in reverse 
print. The control panel on the front allows the user to select 
various fonts. 

The 120-D also has 1 1 international character sets, math 
and graphic symbols and even Greek letters available. The 
international characters (U.S., France, Germany, England, 
Denmark I, Sweden, Italy, Spain, Japan, Norway and 
Denmark II) can be used with any of the 120-D's other 
features including correspondence quality and italics. 

Formatting your printout is easy. The 120-D has left and 
right justification, and auto-centering, along with tab 
printing, variable line spacing and variable line feeds. 

Of course, it also does graphics. There are eight densities 
available: single-density, 60 dots per inch (dpi); double- 
density, 120 dpi; high-speed double-density, 120 dpi; 
quadruple-density, 240 dpi; CRT screen, 80 dpi; one-to-one, 
72 dpi; Hi-Res CRT, 90 dpi; and two-to-one, 144 dpi. 

For those who are just not satisified with the amazing 
array of characters and styles available, the 120-D allows 
the user to design his own characters. This feature is useful 
not only for adding a little flair to your printing, but also 



for special applications such as business, science or a foreign 
language not already included. 

It is important to note that this package from Dayton 
Associates is a complete printer system. The printer includes 
a built-in serial interface with a cable to attach it to the 
CoCo. With this interface, the CoCo can send data to the 
printer at baud rates from 300 to 9600. 

This system is not only ready to plug-and-go, it also 
includes a software package that contains a word processor 
to take advantage of the features of the printer; a program 
that allows you to set special features of the printer and test 
those functions; and SUPERPRT for producing screen 
dumps. The software is available on tape or disk, and 
normally sells for $19.95. 

This printer is sleek, efficient and easy to use. At 9600 
baud it prints fast enough to keep all but the most fanatical 
speed demons happy. The only drawback I could discover 
is the sound level. It tends to be a bit louder than other 
printers I have heard. But this is only a minor problem and 
detracts not at all from its fine performance. 

The manual is very well-written and logically put 
together. The control codes are summarized in an appendix 
and there is a handy tear-out quick reference card. 

With all its features, special characters and graphics, the 
Citizen 120-D System, including software and cable, is a 
good package at a good price. 

(Dayton Associates, 7201 Claircrest Drive, Dayton, OH 
45424; 513-236-1454, $229.95) 

— Jo Anna Arnott 



EACH PROGRAM COMES WITH 

** 10 FREE DISK ** 



S.T.A.G. - A GRADEB00K - $35.00 

Not a semester, but a full year gradebook. Up to 50 students. 

B-FILES - $24.98 

New super file system. Save over 13,000 bytes of program memory. 

FILE VIEWER - $19.98 

Single key program loading. View all disk files at one time. 

MINI TITLE SCREEN MAKER - $20.98 

Catalog your VCR tapes. Create title screens. Print records. 

CHECKBOOK III - S19.98 COCO 3 ONLY 

Keeps track of checks and expenses. Print out records 

DIRECTORY VIEWER - $19.98 

If you have a large library of disks, then you'll need Directory Viewer Copy 
all your disk directories to one index disk. List the directories to the screen 
or list the files of each directory. If one of your disks should suffer a crashed 
directory, then use the Directory Viewer index disk to copy the crashed direc- 
tory back to the disk. This is the best insurance you 'II ever have against loos- 
ing a program disk due to a crashed directory. 

ALL PROGRAMS FOR 64K COCO 1,2,3, 1 DISK DRIVE. ADD S3 S/H ADD 
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Uncovering ROM 





M 



y Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Why is it that when I run a ROM RAM 
program ("Downloads" August 1985) on my 
Co Co 3, I find that programs which would 
not previously run on my CoCo 3 now run 
correctly? 

Bruce E, Ondersma 

(BED) 

Grand Rapids, MI 

When the CoCo 3 wakes up after power 
up or cold starts it has copied its ROMs into 
RAM, and then heavily patched them for 
the CoCo 3 f s extra BASIC commands. You 
are operating in "all-RAM" mode. But, 
although you are using a heavily patched 
and modified version of the ROMs, a pretty 
near exact image of the old CoCo 2 ROMs 
is lurking within. When you runthe ROM- 
RAM program, you are actually loading 
into RAM a nearly exact (and unpatched) 
image of the old CoCo 2 ROMs. 



Support for the RS-232 

During a recent sale I bought a RS-232 
pack for $30 and a Multi-Pak Interface for 
$70, Will I be able to use them with Auto- 
term? Is it true I need these items to operate 
at 1200 baud? Where can I get a cable to 
connect a CoCo 2 to the Multi- Pak to make 
my system fit better on my desk? 

David Johnson 

(DAVJDJOHNSON) 

Leicester, NC 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physician 
trained in anesthesiology, is a longtime 
electronics t inker er and outspoken com- 
mentator — sort of the Howard Cosell of the 
CoCo world. Many is the database manager 
of rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. His 
non-computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photography, 
Marty lives in San Pablo, California, 

150 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



rainbow's Jim Reed tells me that the new 
Disk Version 5 of Autoterm supports the 
RS-232 pack and Xmodem, too. He says an 
added advantage of the RS-232 pack is that 
you can toggle the printer while online. 
MikeyTerm and Greg-E-Term among 
"shareware" programs, Color Connection 
IV from Computerware and Data Pak 11+ 
from Cer-Comp also provide support for the 
RS-232 pack from Radio Shack. When 
using it with these programs, you do need 
the Multi-Pak if you are using a disk-based 
system. 

The RS-232 pack is needed if you want 
completely smooth and professional opera- 
tion at 1200 baud or higher. Although it is 
interesting to note that Autoterm, Greg-E- 
Term and Colorcomj E all allow some 
degree of operation at 1 200 baud via the "bit 
banger" (built-in 4-pin DIN serial) port, 
such operation is flawed by sluggish screen 
response and failure of proper full duplex 
operation at times, though Xmodem works 
fine at 1200 baud in such programs (due to 
the fact that Xmodem is an intrinsically half 
duplex protocol). 

1 urge you to not use a cable to connect 
the Multi-Pak to the CoCo, This will result 
(in most cases) in unreliable operation and 
occasional crashes during disk operation. 
The Multi-Pak must be plugged directly into 
the CoCo. The only reasonable way to clear 
up the mess caused by a CoCo system 
sprawling on your desk is to make a remote 
keyboard, and put the main CoCo system 
below, above, or to one side of your desk. 



Drive Addition 

/ have a Radio Shack FD 500 disk drive 
unit and want to add a second drive to it. 
Should I get a single- or a double-sided 
drive? What is involved in adding the drive? 

John D. Oravecz 

(JORA VECI) 

Warren, OH 



The drive you have iis the unit is a single- 
sided drive. Radio Shack *s Disk Extended 
BASIC is geared to work only with single- 
sided drives. OS-9 supports double-sided 
drives, but if you have one single- and one 
double-sided drive you will not be able to 
conveniently make backups of material on 
the double-sided drive.; I recommend that if 
you are using only Radio Shack's Disk 
Extended BASIC system you add only a 
single-sided drive. BuU if you are going to 
use OS-9, you would do well to get a double- 
sided drive, realizing that soon you'll need 
to get rid of the existing single-sided drive 
in the FD-500 unit and replace it with a 
double-sided drive. 

Adding a drive is not ; hard; the details vary 
considerably from brand to brand. You must 
hook up the drive to a source of power* and 
hook up the 34-pin edge card connector to 
the cable inside the cabinet. Sometimes you 
will have to redo the cable if the edge card 
connector of one brand of drive does not 
exactly line up with that of the existing drive. 

You will have to "configure" the new drive 
to make it think it is a given drive number. 
This consists of setting a jumper or switch 
on the drive. Typically such jumpers are 
labeled u DS0, DS1, DS2, DS3, HM, HS, 
MX." You should set the DS1 jumper to 
make the drive think it is Drive I . Note that 
on some drives, the drive select jumpers are 
numbered DS1, DS2, DS3 and DS4. On 
these drives you would set the DS2 jumper 
for the drive to think it is a Drive L Also 
set the HM jumper, if it is present. 

Finally, be sure that only one of the drives 
in the system has a "terminator resistor 
pack" in place. This is usually a gizmo that 
looks like an integrated circuit with 14 or 16 
pins, and i s plugged into a socket o n the disk 
drive. There must be only one of these to a 
system. If the drive you are adding has a 
terminator pack plugged in when you get it, 
remove that pack because the existing drive 
in the FD-500 already has such a terminator. 



Ghosting Memory Addresses 

Vve heard that some programs will work 
on a I28K CoCo 3 but not on a 512K CoCo 
3. Is this so? If so, why? 

James Mc Daniel 
(NEW KID) 
Brooklyn, NY 

The problem you refer to occurs only 
under Radio Shack's Disk Extended BASIC, 
and not under OS-9. The problem only 
affects a small number of software offerings 
that were written by programmers who did 
not understand the workings of the CoCo 3's 
memory management unit. 

The M MU on the CoCo 3 causes memory 
addresses to ghost in 64K blocks on a 128K 
CoCo 3. That is, if you write to address 
$00000, what you put there will be readable 
at $60000 also. Thus, some programmers 
carelessly wrote data into memory at one 
address, then later looked for it at another 
address modulo 64K. Because the two 
different addresses were matched by ghost- 
ing on the 128K CoCo 3, the program 
worked. But, when a 512K CoCo was used, 
the program was in the position of storing 
data in one place and then later looking for 
it in another. 



True Break on the RS-232 

How do I program the RS-232 pack to 
send a "true break'? I've looked at the 
information that comes with it, and I am still 

confused. 

Rick Adams 

(RICK ADAMS) 

Rhonert Park, CA 

I am not surprised you are confused by the 
information that accompanies the pack. 
Radio Shack included most of the technical 
information on the 6551 D ART chip, but 
left out critical material on just what bit does 
what in some of the registers. The informa- 
tion you want is present on Page 15 of the 
RS-232 pack manual. The register you need 
to deal with is called the Command Register 
and is mapped to $FF6A on the Multi-Pak, 
Bits 3 and 2 concern themselves with sending 
a true break signal. Those bits affect the 
pack as follows: 



Bit Transmitter 

3 2 Interrupt 

0 0 disabled 

0 1 enabled 

1 0 disabled 
1 1 disabled 



*RTS Transmitter 
Level status 
high off 
low on 
low on 

low transmit Break 



Thus, to send a true break, you merely 
need to store a $0C (bits 2 and 3 set) into 
$FF6A. Remember to f irststore the original 
contents of $FF6A, pause for the break t# 
be sent, then restore the original contents 
into $FF6A. 

Note that Bit 4 of the Command Register 
sets echo mode, Bit 0 sets DTR and Receiver 
interrupts, and Bit 1 sets the *IRQ interrupt. 



from Bit 3 of the Status Register. Also note 
that in the table on Page 14 of the RS-232 
pack manual regarding the Status Register, 
Radio Shack forgot to print the bit numbers. 
The items in that table relate to bits 0 
through 7, with Bit 0 being the top item 
(Parity Error Bit) and Bit 7 being the bottom 
item (IRQ status). On Page 16, the table of 
Control Register functions also lacks needed 
information on what bit does what. The 
baud rate is set by bits 3, 2, 1 and 0 (these 
are represented respectively left to right in 
the table at the bottom of Page 1 6). The 
Receiver Clock Source is set by Bit 4, and 
the number of stop bits is set by Bit 7 of the 
control register. 



The RS-232 to Modem Connection 

I'm trying to get my RS-232 pack to talk 
to my Radio Shack modem. Vm using a 
cable from Radio Shack that has a 4-pin 
DIN connector at one end and a DB25 
connector at the other. The DB25 isplugged 
into the RS-232 pack and the DIN connec- 
tor is plugged into the modem. Yet, I can V 
get the modem to work. Can you help me? 

George McCashin 
(GMCC) 
Chattanooga, TN 

Several others on Delphi have had this 
problem. You are using the wrong cable. 
Instead, try using a 25-wire DB 25 to DB 25 
connector to hook your pack to your 
modem. Radio Shack sells such a cable 
(Catalog No. 26-1408) for about $17, or you 
can make one for about $6 in parts if you 
shop discount catalogs. Nearly all modems 
will work fine with the RS-232 pack with 
such a "straight-through, 25-wire cable", 
provided their switches are set correctly. 
Note that you were using the DIN to RS- 
232 cable backwards; that cable was in- 
tended to have the DIN connector plug go 
to the CoCo and the DB25 connector go to 
the modem. Your problem stemmed from 
not tying high the needed hand shake pins 
on the RS-232 pack. But the best thing to 
do is to use the 25-wire cable, 



CoCo-ised Dragon 

/ want to add a disk drive /# my Dragon 
64 computer, and want to make it Color 
Computer compatible. 

Raymond E. Heath 
Renton, WA 

It is possible to make a Dragon 64 nearly 
98 percent CoCo compatible. What is in- 
volved is replacing one EPROM with a 
slightly modified version of the code that is 
in the CoCo ROMs, rewiring the keyboard 
just a little, and rewiring the 40-pin bus so 
that + and - 12 volts are in the correct places. 
For a while some companies (such as Super 
Choc in Canada) sold CoCo ROMs modi- 
fied for the Dragon, and the Los Angeles 
Users Group had a number of members 



running Dragons with modified CoCo 
EPROMs in them. These modifications 
resulted in a Dragon that thought it was a 
CoCo, would print out through the parallel 
port, but could access the serial port via a 
PRINT tt-3. Because the Dragon was now 
pretty nearly a CoCo from both hardware 
and software points of view, it could even 
work fine with a normal CoCo disk con- 
troller plugged in. 

The problem would be finding someone 
with a copy of the code for the "CoCo-ized 
Dragon" ROMs, who also had an EPROM 
programmer and could burn a version into 
a 27128 EPROM. For most, I would not 
recommend using a Dragon because it is an 
unsupported machine in this country. 
Rather, get a CoCo, a Multi-Pak and, if you 
need it, you can buy cards from RAINBOW 
advertisers that add a parallel port to the 
Multi-Pak. 



Null Modem Cable 



How do I make a null modem cable to 
connect the "bit banger " (4-pin DIN serial) 
ports from my CoCo 2 to my CoCo 3? 

Richard Trasborg 

(TRAS) 

Stat en Island, NY 

To make the null modem you ask about, 
get. two 4-pin DIN connectors (Catalog No. 
274-007 at Radio Shack) and a three (or 
more) wire cable. Connect the pins as 

follows: 



1 Plug 2 Signal Connection 



Pin 3 Pin 3 ground to ground 

Pin 2 Pin 4 RS-232 out to RS-232 in 

Pin 4 Pin 2 RS-232 in to RS-232 out 

This should work. It is possible that some 
CoCo software might demand a carrier 
detect line to be pulled up. This wouJd 
require suppling some voltage (9 volts from 
a transistor radio battery would work) to 
Pin i of the serial connector on one or both 
of the CoCos. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations^ 

THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the R AINBOW> 
prompt, type R5K (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXP£RTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations** 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



151 




Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world 
your high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your besteffort on record in THE RAINBOW'S 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed 
— legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high 
score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE 
RAINBOW. The "Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 



3,960 

3.800 
2.600 
2.300 
1.800 



★Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek. 
British Columbia 
Shaw Muniz, Los Angeles, CA 
John Fredericks. Kalkaska. Ml 
Blain Jamieson. Kingston. Ontario 
Chris Goodman, Baltimore. MD 



ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 



CHOPPER STRIKE (MichTron) 

131,500 ★Christopher Conley, 
North Attleboro, MA 
THE COCO ZONE (THE RAINBOW, 4/86) 
98 ★Chris Dunne, Pittslield. NH 



COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 



10.938 


★Chad Lung. Lake Lenore, 


999-0 


★•Erik Munson. Tucson, AZ 




Saskatchewan 


866-1 


Ghislain Chillis. Trois-Rivieres. 


6,851 


Myriam Ferland. Trois-Rivieres, 




Quebec 




Quebec 


814-1 


Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn. NY 


4,656 


Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 


814-0 


•John Licata, Richton Park, IL 




British Columbia 


653-0 


•Danny Perkins. Clifton Forge, VA 


4.254 


Todd Wirtz. Midland. Ml 


549-0 


•Skipper Taday, East Lyme, CT 


4.058 


Johnny Garrison. Tuscaloosa, AL 


169-0 


•David Flynn. Socorro, NM 


AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 


108-0 


•Michael Albert. Long Beach, NY 


71.035 


★Quinn Grantor, Bismark. ND 


DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 


63.600 


Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 


87 


★Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 




British Columbia 


87 


★Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 


58,200 


Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 


88 


David & Shirley Johnson, 


57.300 


Mitch Hart. Seattle, WA 




Leicester, NC 


54.300 


Daphnie Phillips, Evansville. Wl 


89 


Milan Parekh. Fullerton, CA 


40.585 


Theresa Juetten, Pelkie, Ml 


89 


Andrew Urquhart. Metairie, LA 


AREX (Adventure International) 


89 


Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 


69,500 


★Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 


90 


Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 




Quebec 


91 


John Semonin, Akron, OH 


BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 


DEMON ATTACK (tmagic) 


861-0 


★•David Morgan, Rome, NY 


244.110 


★Gregory Day, Holstein, Ontario 


BEAM RIDER (Spectral Associates) 


125,520 


Mike Watson. Norlhville. NY 


6.871.020 


★Lise Lapointe. La Tuque, Quebec 


81 .635 


Tim Glenn, Havertown, PA 


6.004,000 


James Oakley, Nashville, TN 


78.010 


Lisa Nebel. Phoenix, AZ 


3.286.700 


Paul Bivens, Washington, PA 


64.195 


Jon Ruhnow, Duncanvllle, TX 


3.042,470 


Evelyn Thompson. Nederland, TX 


55.676 


Chris Brokaw, Monticello, IA 


747.200 


Robert Eering, Swift Current, 


50,120 


Brian Abeling, Monticello, IA 




Saskatchewan 


DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 


BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 


2,586.300 


★Eugene Roosa. Stone Ridge, NY 


3.101 


★Vincent Knight, Harvey. IL 


1,618.400 


Diane Guernon, Montreal. Quebec 


391 


Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 


450,600 


Michael Brennan, Calgary, Alberta 


BLACK SANCTUM (Mark Data) 


159.610 


Blake Cadmus. Reading, PA 


160 


★Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 


112.890 


MaryAnn Powers. Carmichael, CA 


BOXING {THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 


64.100 


Geoffrey Hall, Casselbury, FL 


995 


★Jonathan Wanagel, Freeville, NY 


52,840 


Joel MacNeil, Needham, MA 


775 


Quinn Granfor, Bismark, ND 


50,040 


Brad Larkin, Sterling Hts., Ml 


720 


Konnie Siewlerski, Schaumburg, IL 


45,470 


Thomas Hulit, Sweet Grass, MT 


620 


John Dunne Jr., Pittsfleld, NH * 


DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 


480 


Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 


98,985 


★Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 


395 


Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 


89,490 


Neil Edge, Williston, FL 


BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 


77,254 


Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 


75,100 


★Rachael Richards, Blakeslee, PA 


73,346 


Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 


43.150 


Shirley Kirk. Elgin. OR 




Quebec 


37.957 


Odene Kirk, Elgin, OR 


70,142 


Chris Goodman, Baltimore. MD 


36.400 


Jeff Miller. Bronson, Ml 


68.142 


Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 


30.850 


Daniel Cecil, Bardstown. KY 




British Columbia 


CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 


62.442 


Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 


150.200 


★Brian Lewis. Baltimore, MD 




Newfoundland 


68,300 


Art Pancoast, North Huntingdon. PA 


55.300 


Patrico Gonzalez. Buenos Aires. 


60,000 


Debbie Wilcock, Mt. Carmel. PA 




Argentina 


CASTLE (THE RAINBOW, 6/86) 


49.500 


Danny Perkins. Clifton Forge, VA 


202.659 


★ Brendan Powell. La Grande. OR 


39.243 


Joseph Ratcliff, Jackson, Ml 


116.606 


Darryn Bearisto, New Carlisle. 


11.126 


Carolyn Coleman, Meriden, CT 




Quebec 


DRACONIAN (Torn Mix) 


93.672 


Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 


760.549 


★Conan Davis, London, Ontario 




British Columbia 


279,160 


Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 


55.239 


John Broussard Jr., Alexandria, LA 




British Columbia 


38.217 


John Fredericks, Kalkaska, Ml 


157.310 


Mark Bourgeault, Mississauga, 


11,802 


Todd Masek, Wickliffe, OH 




Ontario 



DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

123,120 ★Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
Gilles Gagne, Sillery, Quebec 
Nathanael Heller, Kenner, LA 
Meg Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
Brian Matherne. Gretna, LA 
Chris Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
ENCHANTER (Infocom) 

400/212 ★Charly Rushing, Santa Rosa, CA 
400/621 Brad Wilson. Lithia Springs, GA 
185/186 David Tarleton, Williamsburg, VA 
80/115 Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 



46,713 
33,676 
32,340 
30,720 
23.960 



★★*★★★*★**★*★******★★**★★★**★* 



7,500 
4,880 
4,570 



26.880 
19.554 
18.461 
17,463 



EVICTOR (THE RAINBOW. 7/86) 

9,230 ★Raymond MacGarvey, Dawson Creek. 
British Columbia 
Rachael Richards, Blakeslee, PA 
Shaw Muniz, Los Angeles, CA 
Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
FALCON'S LAIR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 
30.522 *Kirby Smith, York, PA 

Jimmy Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 
Joyce Smith, Butler, PA 
Michael Scott, Johnstown, NY 
FLIPPY (T&D Software) 

27,470 ★Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 
GAL AGON (Spectral Associates) 

169.410 *Danny Dunne. Pittsfield, NH 
104,870 Chris Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
73,520 Neil Edge, Williston, FL 
71,220 Debora Edwards, Wembley, Alberta 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
2,01 1 ,200 ★Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
Robert Fox, Dover, OH 
Michael Wallace, Bronx, NY 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
Brian Hunter. South Berwick. ME 
Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
GHANA B W ANA (Radio Shack) 
1,243.870 ★Gene Wells, Silsbee, TX 
Steve Wright, Fredericton, 

New Brunswick 
Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
Mike Dyer, Lompoc, CA 
Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
GHOST GOBBLER (Spectral Associates) 
102,540 *Greg Erickson, Lowell, MA 
Pierre Pichard, Lausanne, 

Switzerland 
Olga Pichard, Lausanne, Switzerland 
Ghislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 
Quebec 

Sylvaln Castonguay, Chicoutimi, 

Quebec 
Mark Herpst, San Diego, CA 
GIN CHAMPION (Radio Shack) 

1,078-0 ★•Jeff Abeling, Monticello, IA 
HALL OF THE KING (Prickly-Pear) 

134 ★Paul Maxwell. Vancouver. 
British Columbia 
HEIST (THE RAINBOW, 5/84) 

21 ,000 ★David Morgan, Rome. NY 
THE INTERPLANETARY FRUIT FLY (THE RAINBOW. 1/85) 
49,500 ★David Morgan, Rome NY 



1,108,750 
1,081.530 
1 ,025,900 
932,660 
787,780 
685,840 



693,830 

510,160 
359,080 
325,900 



86,070 

80,550 
76.900 

72.960 

47,200 



152 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



******************************' 




32 

MISSION: F- 

468,750 
127,550 
38,305 

34,670 
29,600 



KAMAKAZIE KAR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 

83.85 *Dan Dawson. Fort Wayne, IN 
75.75 Tim Glenn. Havertown, PA 
KNOCK OUT (Diacom Products) 

181,085 *Rush Caley, Port Orchard, WA 
168,385 John Licata, Richton Park. IL 
149,190 Daniel Lasage, Laval, Quebec 
1 38,150 Nick Pettibone, St. Louis, MO 
137,900 John Rogers, Rye, NH 
LEMANS (Spectral Associates) 

0:53 *Robert Eering, Swift Current. 

Saskatchewan 
0:66 Tom Maccarone, Swampscott, MA 
0:93 Stephen Mills, Swift Current, 
Saskatchewan 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

20,941 *Shelby Dunning, Sacramento, CA 
18,874 Tim Rueb, Stevensville, Ml 
17,250 Keith Queen, Marietta, GA 
15,675 Brian Lewis, Baltimore, MD 
14,861 Michael Clerico, Seaford, NY 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

77,700 ★Brian Abellng, Monticello, IA 
MINIGOLF (THE RAINBOW. 5/86) 

23 *Wilfrid Sloan. Newport-on-Tay. 
Scotland 

Chris Banas. North West Territories. 
Canada 

■16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
*Karen Jessen. Cleveland. OH 
Michael Heitz, Chicago. IL 
Richard Nieves, Mayaguez, 

Puerto Rico 
Chris Foster, Texarkana, TX 
Jeanine Mason, Spencer, MA 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

207,800 *Kenneth Kirby, Murphy, NC 
44,625 Jeff Abeling, Monticello, IA 
NUKE AVENGER (T&D Software) 

47,550 *Carolyn Coleman, Meriden, CT 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1 .078-2 *Toby Jacobs, Bellefontaine, OH 
1,006-57 Elliot Alfred & Ian Hanson, 
Houston, TX 
994-24 Mark Berry, Durham, Ontario 
994-28 Chad Johnson. Little Rock, AR 
970-32 Wes Hill, Vashon, WA 
969-0 «Erik Huffman, 

Rochester Hills, Ml 
PAPER ROUTE (Diacom Products) 

720,560 *Konnie Siewlerski, Schaumburg, IL 
531,600 Larry Shelton, Marlon. IL 
511.000 David Kauffman. South Haven, Ml 
337.550 Lawrence Elman, Smlthtown, NY 
249,000 Jaml Foster. Maryville, TN 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
250,200 *Leon Kornbluth, Richfield, NJ 
187.300 Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
109,800 Mike Dyer. Lompoc, CA 
69,720 Chris Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
63,890 Milan Parekh. Fullerton, CA 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

85,100 *J. Yosefkrlnsky, Jerusalem, Israel 
PITFALL II (Activislon) 

199,000 *Pat Leathrum. Newark, DE 
199,000 *Kirk Lockhart, Waco, TX 
199,000 *Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
198,800 David Kardos, Colonla, NJ 
198.252 Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
194,000 Michael Wallace, Bronx, NY 
187,900 Thomas Audas II, Fremont, CA 
175,852 Chris Brokaw, Monticello. I A 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ^Christopher Conley, 

North Attleboro. MA 
54 *Tom Maccarone. Swampscott. MA 
54 *James Doty. Washougal, WA 
54 *Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge. VA 



45 Doug Sterner. New Albany, PA 

15 Randy Heckman, La Mirada. CA 

9 Walter Hearne. Pensacola, FL 

9 Jeff Maxwell. Lincoln. NE 



POOYAN (Datasoft) 

97.500,000 *Rich Fiore, Clemson, SC 
3,785,000 Ben Collins, Clemson, SC 
1,987,000 Jon Sowle. Sanlord, FL 
1,546,000 Jason Maxwell, Manchester, TN 
1,253,200 Thomas Mayor, Brooklyn, NY 
271 ,350 Wade Glenn, Castle Rock, WA 
162,740 Patrlco Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 

100.050 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
QUE BIT (Mike Ro Products) 

77.800 ^Jennifer Hotaling. Duanesburg, NY 
QU\X (Tom Mix) 

1.404.000 *Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
1.003,104 Elisa Goodson. Sao Paulo, Brazil 
205,335 John Hotaling. Duanesburg. NY 
104,034 Christopher Conley. 

North Attleboro. MA 
RACER (THE RAINBOW. 3/85) 

14.4 ★Fallon Yager. Bellevue, ID 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 

6.330,350 *Myriam Ferland. Trols-Rivieres, 
Quebec 

4,510,740 Les Dorn, Eau Claire. Wl 
1,945,110 Dominic Deguire, St. Basile, 
Quebec 

1.388.330 Benoit Filion. Ste-Therese, 
Quebec 

1,330,500 Sara Grace, Baltimore, MD 
ROBOTTACK (Intracolor) 
2.122,150 *Ghislain Chillis & Michel Lessard, 

Trois-Rlvleres. Quebec 
1,020,800 Ian MacLachlan. Bethany. Ontario 
975.850 Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 
931,250 Keith Smith, Bethany. Ontario 
637,600 Chad McClellan, Rushville, IN 
378,950 David Yerger. New Tripoli. PA 
SAILOR MAN ( Tom Mix) 

997,300 *John Licata, Richton Park. IL 
983.300 Gabriel Assel. Cameron. MO 
910.200 Mike McGeoch. Havertown, PA 
879,100 Alan Drazen. Longwood, FL 
741.100 Bryan Jenner. Calgary, Alberta 
471,700 Nicole Hubler, Swanwlck. IL 
140,900 Patrlco Gonzalez. Buenos Aires. 
Argentina 

SEA DRAGON (Adventure International) 

76,110 * Jean-Francois Morin. Loretteville, 
Quebec 

SEA SEARCH (Mark Data) 

100 *David Flynn. Socorro. NM 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

44,090 *Carolyn Coleman. Meriden, CT 
SIR EGGBERT JUMPER (THE RAINBOW. 8/85) 
1 .660 *John Austin, Clifton. TX 
568 Odene Kirk, Elgin, OR 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

145.400 *Brian King. Orlando. FL 
142.720 Erik Huffman. Rochester Hills. Ml 
142,310 Kevin Cornell. Greentown, IN 
142,100 Chris Harrison. Brooks, KY 
139,210 Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 
102.230 Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 
Newfoundland 
SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

3,820 *Eddie Lawrence. Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
2,550 Charles Marlow, Briarwood. NY 
2,000 Mike Watson. Northville, NY 
1,740 Joel DeYoung, Manson, Manitoba 
1 ,730 Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ 



1,234,125 
452.880 
406.875 
213.180 



299.030 

78,600 
58.580 
49.900 
23.750 



STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

9.350 *Michael Shahan, Bloomington, IN 
8,750 J. Yosefkrlnsky, Jerusalem, Israel 
8,750 Jon Larson, Seligman, AZ 
8,750 Kent Pirkle. Cumming, GA 
8,400 John Guptill, Columbia. MO 
8,200 Chris Coleman. Meriden. CT 
8,150 Brian Abellng, Monticello. IA 

STARLORD (THE RAINBOW. 8/86) 
2,747,355 ^Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, 
Nova Scotia 
John Herbert, New Baltimore, Ml 
Brad Bansner, Wyomissing, PA 
Mark Glover. Derby, NY 
David Bartmess, Fayelteville, PA 
STELLAR LfFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

427.210 *Steven Smith. Matthews. NC 
William Novobilsky. 

Lanoka Harbor. NJ 
Don Johnson, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
Stefan Mecay, Austin. TX 
Craig Fricke. Jacksonville, IL 
Roger Ranee. Charleston, SC 
STORM ARROWS (Spectral Associates) 

94.850 *Chris Banas. North West Territories, 
Canada 

TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

1,422,400 *Timothy Bishop, Jacksonville. FL 
J. Yosefkrinsky, Jerusalem, Israel 
Sonya Hurst. Richmond. CA 
Christopher Romance. 

Massapequa Park, NY 
Thomas Audas II, Fremont, CA 
Tom Dunne. Pittsfield. NH 
TREASURE QUEST (THE RAINBOW. 11/86) 

18,295 *Shaw Muniz. Los Angeles. CA 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

142 *Paul Maxwell. Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
TUBE FRENZY (Aardvark) 

181.930 *Sheryl Chapnick. Winnipeg. Manitoba 
121.740 Chris Banas. North West Territories. 
Canada 

VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW. 7/86) 

10,489 *Karl Gullilord, Summerville. SC 
Pat O'Neill. Nepean. Ontario 
Brad Bansner. Wyomissing. PA 
Jeff Brudereck, Wyomissing. PA 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) 

100/100 ★Tommy Crouser. Dunbar, WV 
Rick & Brenda Stump, 

Laureldale, PA 
Paul Maxwell, Vancouver. 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 

2,725,500 *Donald Porter, Summerville, SC 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061,000 *Byron Alford. Raytown. MO 
Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
Andrew Urquhart. Metairie. LA 
Blake Cadmus. Reading. PA 
Bob Dewitt. Blue Island, IL 
Jeff Miller, Bronson, Ml 
Tom Maccarone. Swampscott. MA 



960.000 
959,400 
938,800 

250.600 
230.460 



6,294 
2.626 
2,512 
1,201 



100/483 



210 



1,300.500 
1.100,600 
256,400 
253,400 
111.400 
72,800 



— Jody Doyle 



****** ★★**★**★★**★*★*★★★★★*★★ 



* 
* 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



153 



I 



★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★a-** 





n 

in 





RO P 




In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



FEEDBACK 

Scoreboard: 

In response to Danny Perkin's and Andy 
Wolstromer's letter (December '86), about 
Dungeons of Daggorath, there are four 
key points to solving the game: 

1) Save all equipment and drop in front 
of you. 

2) When fighting the wizard's image, 
attack him with both fire and ice rings. 

3) When the wizard's image dies you 
only have lef t what you are carrying, so put 
a ring and sword in your hands. 

4) To kill the wizard you must use the 
energy ring and elvish sword, and keep 
moving. 

Maurice MacGarvey 
Dawson Creek, British Columbia 

Scoreboard: 

Here are some hints in response to letters 
from David Beyer and Michael Heitz in the 
December '86 issue of rainbow. 

In Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, 
you must keep the robot so busy it willnot 
have time to clean up the fish. Try putting 
the satchel in front of the panel and the 
mail from your house on top of it. 

In Trekboer, if you look at the panel in 
the wrecked ship, you will see one way it 
can be opened. Go north of the wrecked 
ship and you will find the material you 
need. On a different planet, there is a 
cenotaph, and if you look at it, you should 
be able to figure out the coordinates you 
need. Also, be sure to climb the cenotaph 
to get something you will need later. 

Can anyone tell me how to get to the 
cave in El Diablerol I have tried to dream 
to get there, but keep getting told that "His 
power is too strong," so any help would be 
appreciated. 

Richard King 
Plymouth, IN 

Scoreboard: 

To help Sam Waldrop get the red and 
green keys in Bedlam: 

To get the red key you must use the 
window hook. 

To get the green key, go to the room but 
don't go in, then type GET GREEN KEY. 

Michael Leturgez 
Bloomington, IN 



Scoreboard: 

In reference to Joel De Young's letter 
about The CoCo Zone, you do not need 
the flashlight to get out of the casket. Try 
DIG SHOVEL or DIG WELL. You will find the 
flashlight, which you will need later on, 
after you get out of the casket. Good luck. 

R. Sinisi 
Saranac Lake, NY 

Scoreboard: 

In response to Mark Bourdeaux's ques- 
tion in the December '86 issue of THE 
rainbow. For Hall of the King: to find the 
stick you must go to the pool; it's up to you 
to see how to fill it. You'll find the match 
in the library (somewhere) and light a fire 
before you light your stick. Last but not 
least, you have to be powerful to bend the 
bars. To do that you need a key piece! 

Paul Maxwell 
Vancouver, British Columbia 

OFF THE WALL 

Scoreboard: 

I have a few tips on Downland. When 
you are on Level 5, you must get the key 
off the wall by having your head slightly 
lower than it and jumping off the rope. 

To get off the wall, hold the joystick 
toward the wall and press your button. You 
will bounce off the wall and catch the rope. 

Af ter moving f rom Chamber 0 to 1 , stay 
in Chamber 1 until the timer is under 2000. 
Then go back to Chamber 6. The timer will 
be back to 4000, so you are not pressed f or 
time. 

I have trouble with Level 8 because I 
can't get from the horizontal to the second 
vertical rope. If anyone can help, please 
write to the "Scoreboard." 

Quinn G ran/or 
Bismark, ND 

WISE MOVES 

Scoreboard: 

Here are some assorted tips. 

For Vortex Factor: To get into Cairo 
Moon you need a candle; try this. Take the 
statue of the bird to London 1200, then 
find the string there (somewhere). Go back 
to the cylinder and before going in, type 



MELT BIRD, then simply MAKE CRNDLE. It 
is a wise move to find everything in Lon- 
don before lighting the candle and moving 
on. Also, try pulling a torch or two! 

For Draconian: Unless you are a crack 
shot, you must sacrifice a man on levels 5 
on up. What may be helpful is to blast all 
the modules except for one on your first 
pass (i.e., sacrificial jet), then, on the 
second pass, pick up all of the men. 

Paul Maxwell 
Vancouver, British Columbia 

VORTEX VERSE 

Scoreboard: 

I've finally solved the Vortex Factor! 
Here's a poem I wrote for those of you who 
are still counting the fish. 

Turn a torch that opens a wall, 
Go on in — there's no need to stall. 
Pick the lock with the pin, 
Get the treasure and come out again. 
Melt the bird while you have the string, 
Make the candle and get into the ma- 
chine. 

Press the button and get the ring, 
As you prepare to see the king. 
Give him the object and follow him, 
(Better hurry, your candle's gettin' dim.) 
Pull the lever that opens a hole, 
Go on down — you don't need a pole. 
Get the final treasure and win the game, 
Write to the rainbow and enjoy the 
fame! 



Hopefully, it will help. The whole solu- 
tion can be obtained by calling the 2 1st 
Century Connection BBS (304) 768-7191, 
going to the CoCo SIG, and pressing M 
for the Color Computer Magazine. 

Tommy Crouser 
Dunbar, WV 



DONT ROCK THE BOAT 

Scoreboard: 

I have some hints for ZORK I. Always 
bring the scepter in the boat with you. 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ ★★★★ 



1 54 THE RAINBOW March 1 987 



***★********★*★★★★*★★★★★★★*★★ 



Also, drop all sharp things before boarding 
the boat, then get them afterwards. How 
do you kill the thief? I've tried, but I'm 
always unsuccessful. 

Ronnie Scott 
Ridge field, WA 

| FINDING THE KEY 

Scoreboard: 

I have a few tips for Bedlam. Examine 
every room to find the secret door. Have 
Napoleon open the secret door. Or, get the 
pill, put it into the meat, then feed it to the 
dogs. Or, lead Picasso to the room where 
you started, then open the painted door. To 
get the red key, go to the dispensary and 
GET RED KEY WITH HOOK, To get the green 
key, stand outside the electro' room and 
type GET GREEN KEY WITH HOOK. 

In Raaka-Tu y the rug is just a decoy to 
distract the player. EXRMINE every wall to 
find the gem. 

In Madness & the Minotaur, I have 
gotten the flute, parchment and rope, 
played the flute at the music at the maze, 
exposed the ledge, but where does it reveal? 
Giving the sapphire to the packrat does 
nothing. Would someone please answer 
these questions so I can get the other 20 
points? 

John Riddle 
H Lint hi cum, MD U 



FREEZE WARNING 

Scoreboard: 

Here are some hints for Enchanter: 
The adventurer goes where gnome man 

has gone before. 

For defeating lances, find an armored 

foe: by the sea, from the sea, with speed, 

we go. 

A warning about Raaka-tu — typing in 
an unknown word or phrase while running 



on me CoCo 3 causes the program to 
freeze. 

Charly Rushing 
Santa Rosa, CA 

ESSENTIAL AMULET 

Scoreboard: 

I have a few helpful hints for Trekboer 
and Planet/all. On Trekboer — yes, you do 
need the amulet. It's on top of the cenotaph 
on the frozen planet. If you get as far as 
the garden planet, and have tied the rope 
to the tree, you need to carry only the 
amulet, another beaker-full of acid (gotten 
from the desert planet) and the yellow 
capsule. Cross the bridge; don't press the 
button before you go into the room — 
you'll get zapped. Go in the room; get the 
plant, and you are on your own. One last 
hint: You need to have the plant in your 
possession when you teleport to Earth. 

On Planet/all — don't mind the demer- 
its, always go by the port. Once the explo- 
sions begin, go to the escape pod and 
always go in the safety netting. 

I am having problems solving the Vortex 
Factor by Mark Data. I keep dying on 
Cairo. Is there a light? How do you get the 
Bable fish on the Hitchhiker's Guide to the 
Galaxy? Help! 

Eric Jones 
Gautier, MI 



THE THINGS THAT GET AWAY 

Scoreboard: 

I have a tip for Protectors: If you put the 
opposite joystick just about in the center 
of the "lasers" it will go over to the other 
side of the screen as well as the right side. 
This will help destroy the things that get 
away. 

Keith Waller 
Belvidere, IL 



MADNESS TIDBITS 

Scoreboard: 

Here are some tidbits for Madness & the 
Minotaur players: 

Never carry more than three objects and 
two treasures; the floor can easily cave in, 
reducing your strength, and it puts you in 
a bad situation. 

If you have the scroll in hand, type OPEN 
SCROLL to summon the troglodyte to you. 
But only after something has already 
attacked you will that work. A spell with 
an 4 0' in it helps with "a pile of rocks." A 
spell with an 'M' in it, plus the rope helps 
with the thing that the oracle never men- 
tions. 

Can anyone tell me what "the score on 
the parchment" means? Please send aid to 
"Scoreboard." 

Dale Lampe 
Sacramento, CA 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section ofour Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 



This program lets you quickly and easily find the 
average value of a group of numbers. Just follow the 
screen prompts. 



1 CLS : C=C+1: IN PUT "NUMBER-" ;N:T=T 
+N:IFC=Q THEN A=T/Q : PRINT "AVER AG 
E OF NUMBERS ="; A, "NUMBERS ADDED 
=";T ELSE GOTOl 



The listing: 

P CLS : PRINTTAB ( 3 ) ; "AVERAGER BY M 
ICHAEL CRESS 11 : PRINTSTRING$ (32,"- 
") ; :INPUT"HOW MANY NUMBERS TO BE 
AVERAGED" ;Q 



Michael Cress 
Bridgetown, Nova Scotia 

i 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book oj 'Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 155 




Picture Perfect 
Graphics Commands 



By Robert C. Montowski 



I have written two commands to use 
under OS-9 versions 1.00, 1.01, or 
2.00 so that OS-9 users will have a 
quick and easy way to save and load 
graphics under OS-9. The commands 
are called gload and gsawe. The com- 
mands act like the LOflDM and SflV/EM 
commands under RS Disk BASIC. No 
memory addresses are needed and you 
don't need to know the size or location 
of the graphics screen in memory. The 
commands do it all for you. 

While I have supplied several differ- 
ent format pictures on the disk, I realize 
RAINBOW has no way to pass these 
pictures on to their readers. So I have 
written a procedure file called makepix 
that will not only draw a picture of some 
lines/circles; it will also show how the 
gsawe/gload commands work. You 
can list the file to see how it works and 
also to be sure that you have all the 
correct commands in your /d0/CMDS 
directory for this procedure file to work. 

The gsawe command writes picture 
files out to disk in two possible formats. 
One is S180A bytes long and the other 
is $1800 bytes long. The $1800 size file 



Bob Montowski works at Norristown 
State Hospitalin Pennsylvania. He runs 
an OS-9 BBS called the Graphics Pub 
and is presently learning assembly 
language and C under OS-9. His Delphi 
user name is GRAPHICSPUB. 



is suitable for use under OS-9 with 
either the gload command, the BAS1C09 
graphics modules, OS-9 Deskmate, or 
OS-9 Micro Illustrator. The $180A size 
picture file can be copied to a Radio 
Shack CoCo format disk with either O- 
Pak's Xcopyox the COPY command. The 
picture file can also be Xmodem-ed 
across to any CoCo BBS and it will 
already be in the correct format to be 
loaded into memory under Disk BASIC. 

The gload command can load pic- 
tures of several different formats. It can 
load in a Disk BASIC format picture that 
is $180A bytes long, a BAS1C09 picture 
that is $ 1 800 bytes long, an OS-9 Desk- 
mate picture that is $1640 bytes long or 
an OS-9 Micro Illustrator picture that 
is $1800 bytes long. For picture formats 
shorter than $1800 bytes {Deskmate) 
you will see a blank space at the bottom 
of the screen. If a picture file is shorter 
than $1640 bytes, the gload command 
will terminate with an error. 

The gsawe command has two forms: 

gsawe /d0/ Saves picture in 

picture OS-9 format 

gsawe + /d0/ Saves picture in 

picture Disk BASIC format 

with extra header 
and footer bytes 

The gload command has two for- 
mats: 



gload - /d0/ 
picture 



BASIC09, OS-9, 
Deskmate or 
Micro Illustrator 
Loads in any Disk 
BASIC picture and 
ignores the extra 
bytes in the file 



gload /d0/ 
picture 



Loads in any OS-9 
picture from 



When 1 say the picture is in Disk 
BASIC format I mean that it is a picture 
file with a length of $180 A bytes — not 
that the picture is on an RS format disk! 
Pictures made under RS-DOS must be 
copied to an OS-9 format disk with 
either O-Pak's XCopy or Basic's COPY 
command or the file/ picture must be 
downloaded with an OS-9 terminal 
program and then saved to an OS-9 
Disk. 

Very simple animation can be done 
under OS-9 by gloading several pic- 
tures one after another. If you are using 
O-Pak's Hi-Res screen or Xscreen's Hi- 
Res screen you can load pictures and use 
the text of those Hi-Res drivers for 
doing Hi-Res tutorials. The only limits 
to these commands are the user's imag- 
ination. 

1 can be reached by phone or on my 
OS-9 BBS (The Graphics Pub) at (215) 
277-6951. The BBS hours are 7 p.m. to 
7 a.m. EST. 

(Questions about this article may be 
directed to Mr. Montowski at 1151 
Sterigere Street, Apt. B-18, Norristown, 
PA 19403. Please enclose an SASE for 
a reply when writing.) □ 



156 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



DataPack 1 1 Plus V4.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOPJLOTaiid AUTO-LOS Command Processors 
X-MODEM DISK FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
VT-100 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

* No lost dala using Hi-Pts Display, Even at 1 200 Baud on the Serial port. 

* Q Mi-Res Displays, 2d to 2SScoiumr»s by 2i lines L true Upper/Lower case. 

* ASY. Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display and Oisk . 

* ASCII It BINARY disk fit* transfer support via XMODEM. 

* Osrectly record receive data to a disk file while online. 

* VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

* VT-tOO/52 cursor keys L position, insert/delete, PF & AH. Kbd. keys. 

* Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates 300 to 0600. 

* Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

* Send full 128 character set from Keyboard with control codas. 

* Complete Editor Insert, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 

* 0 Variable lengthy Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

* Programmable Printer rales from M 0 to OoQO Baud. 

* Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Key Buffers or Disk. 

* Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

* Freese Display & Review information On line with no loss of data. 

* Built in Command Menu {Help) Display. 

* And much much more. 

Supports: Word-Pak I, fl, R.S. and Double Density 80 Column Cards 
Disto Controller w/80 column card & parallel printer 
PBJ ParaHel Printer Card and Dual Serial Port (2SP-Pak) 
R. S. Modem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 52K & Disk, Only $59.95 



Hl-RES 11 Screen Commander 

Tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on your 
CoCo? Wish you could see more lines and characters? Then HI-RES II 
is the answer, it can give you the big screen display you've always 
wanted. It will display 2A I ines of 32, 42, 51, 64 and even 85 true 
upper and lower case characters per line without extra hardware. 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package available 
for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is compietefy 
Compatible and transparent to Basic, Once the program is loaded, 
everything works the same as before, only you have a much better 
display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed text and 
Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate Uxl and 
graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key repeat 
f eature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the screen, 

HI-RES II f eatures over 30 special control code functions that allow 
you to change characters par line, protect display lines, change 
background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse video, 
underline* double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works on 
all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 6AK and provides automatic 
reset control so Hl-RES II wont disappear when you press reset. 

Only 24.95 on Tape or $29.95 on Disk 



"The Source" 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine language 
programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
Source Code. And "The Source" has all the features and functions you 
are looking for in a Disassembler. 

* Automatic Label generation and allows specifying fCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Disassembles programs directly from Oisk or ROM, 

* Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk, or a printed listing, 

* Generated source files ere in standard ASCII format. 

* Built in Hex/ASCil dump/display to locate FCB, fCC and FOB areas 

* Built in Oisk Directory and Kill file commands. 

* Menu display with single key commands (or smooth, Easy operation. 

* Written in fast machine language, one oi the easiest to use Disassemblers 

Requires 32K Disk $34.95 



The CBA5IC Editor/Compiler VI. 1.2 

Do you want to write fast machine language programs but you 
don't want to spend the next few years trying to learn how ??? 

Well with CBASIC, you could be writing them right now! 
CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and program 
editing system available for the Col*r Computer. It will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available in your color 
Computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit and 
convert programs f rom a language you are already f amiliar with 
Extended Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We added advanced f eatures like a full 
blown program editor, Hi-Res text Displays and BO column hardware 
support for editing, compiling and your compiled programs. Plus we 
made it exceptionally easy to use, CBASIC is the friendliest and 
easiest compiler available for the Color Computer. 

"T he most complete Editor /Compiler ! have seen for the CoCo.. " 

—The RJtNBQW, March tOB6 

CBASIC is fl powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs 
without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory 
allocation and so on, because CBASIC will do it f or you automatically. 
Or, CBASIC will lei you control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC features well over 100 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. CBASIC supports ALL the High and Low 
Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in 
Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET, PUT, PLAY and DRAW, 
all with 99.98 syntax compatibility. CBASIC also supports the built 
in Serial I/O port with separate printer h. serial I/O baud rates. You 
can send and receive data with PRINT. INPUT and INKEY commands. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 
which allows you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. 
It is a full featured editor designed specifically for writing and editing 
Basic programs. It has block move & copy, program renumbering, 

automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control and more, 
"The Editor is a very good one andcouldbe the subject for review 
all by itself... " -The RAINBOW, March IQS6 

"Comparing ECB's edit mode to CBASIC* text editor is like comparing a 
World War II jeep to a modern sedan Both get you to your destinaiion f 
but what a difference in the ride '--Hot CoCo, F eburary I Q$b 

The documentation f or CBASIC is an 8 1/2 * M Spiral Bound book 
which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. 

"CBASIC s manual is easy to read and written with a minimum of 
technicatese. " - -Hot CoCo February, I OS 6 

The price of CBASIC is $ 1 49.00. It is the most expensive Color 
Bask Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. 
Compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar for dollar. CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 64K & Disk, not JDOS compatible. 

"The price tjtp if carries sfr/n&d a bit steep for smnteger compiler <w first 
glance, but whenyou add hi-res drivers, and fullscreen editing, CBASIC 
begins to look wore likes bargain.. ' -- Not CoCo February, 1 086 
"A Complete Editor/Compiler Weil Wortht is Price ' - -ftAINBOW March I $86 



TEXTPRO III 
"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

* Q Hi-P.es Displays from 26 to 255 columns by 24 lines & Upper/Lower Case 

* Three Programmable Header lines thai can be re-defined at anytime. 

* Programmable Footer line V Automatic Footnote System. 

* 10 Programmable lab stops & 7 Powerfull Tab Function Commands. 
8 Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left and right, 

* On screen display of underline and Double size characters. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc, parameters anytime in the text. 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a full disk. 

* Easily imbed any number of format and control codes, 

* Automatic Memory sense 16-fHK with up to 4dK of memory workspace. 

* Fully supports the use of 60 column hardware cards. 

TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better off 
with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what your 
looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally diff erent way than most 
word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character abbreviations 
of words or phrases for commands and formatting information that 
you imbed directly in your text, There are over 50 different 
formating commands you can use without ever leaving the text your 
working on. There ire no time comsuming, and often furstrating 
menu chases, you are in total control at all times. The formatted 
output can be displayed directly on the' screen, showing you exactly 
what your printed document will look like' before § single word is ever 
printed. This includes margins, headers! footers, page numbers, page 
breaks, underlining, column formating and full justification. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49.95 



EDT / ASM 64D 
64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ ASM 64D i s a Disk based co-resident Tex t Editor h Assembler, 
it has a Hi-Resolution 51. 64 or 85 column by 24 line display, so you 
see your program listings easily and it supports Column cards. The 
disk also contains a f ree standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

This is the most powerf ult, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/ Assembler package for the Color Computer. It even has 
automatic line number generation f or easy entry of program material. 

* local and&lobal string search and/or replace, 

* Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 

* Easy lo use Single keystroke editing commands, 

* Load &Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

* Hove or Copy single & multiple text lines. 

* Create and Edit disk fileslarger than memory. 

* Hi-Res Text Display 28 to 6S columns by 24 lines. 

* Supports Word-Pak I ( H. & R.S. and Dislo 80 column display cards. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D f eatures include: 

* Supports the full 6 SCO instruction set. 
» Supports conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly 

* Supports Disk Library files (include), 

* Supports standard motorola assembler directives 

* Allows multiple values for FDB L FCB directives. 

* Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 

* Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADM formal. 

* Supports up to 0 open disk files during assembly, 

* Allows assembly from editor buffer. Disk or both 

Requi res 52K Q\sk $59.95 




J ■■■■ % x j 



CoCo-3 512K upgrade $149.95, curd wihout Rim $49.95 
Two Drive RAM-DISK program for 512K CoCe-3 $19.95 



To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below 
To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COO call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89 1 10 

702-152-0632 






Those Great RAINBOW Programs 

Without All the Fuss! 
Subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE! 



Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 




Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbowon tape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $105 for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 
bill. 




DISK USERS: RAINBOW ON DISK 

IS NOW AVAILABLE! 

All the programs from the rainbow — includ- 
ing OS-9 — are now available on disk. For 
more information, see Page 197 of this issue. 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, RAINBOW ON TAPE can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of THE RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past March issues are 
also available for immediate download in the RAINBOW ON 
TAPE Database area in THE RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG 
on Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



RAINBOW ON TAPE is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOWON TAPE, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, (credit card orders only) call 
(800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call (502) 228-4492 



Programs From Our Past Business Issues: 

March 1986 — Receipt File, prints receipts and saves to disk 
for tax purposes; CoCoflow, a modified version of an icon- 
driven program to aid in drawing flow chart diagrams; Rule 
of 78s, determines early pay-off amounts on installment 
loans; Cash vs. Financing, a program that shows which way 
is the most economical for you; Home Budget Analysis, a 
program that assists in budgeting and forecasting personal 
finances; Analyzer, examines disk file structure; Varlist, a 
utility that lists program variables; Marquee, a utility that adds 
pizazz to title and menu screens; Expense Tracking and 
Management System, three programs that provide budgetary 
analysis for accounts; and Mortgage Planner, demonstrates 
how paying off a mortgage early is an advantage. Plus eight 
additional programs. 

March 1985 — EOQ Calc, helps find the ultimate bargain for 
economic management; Lurkley Manor, a graphics Adven- 
ture game; Payroll, part one of a complete small business 
payroll package; Home Financial Statement, keeps track of 
home finances; Landlord's Helper, part one of a two-part 
series on managing rental property; CFRR, a finance program 
that analyzes prospects for good investments; PERT, an aid 
to project and estimate the efficient use of time; T-Bill 
Computation, computes the worth of treasury bills; Convert, 
figures foreign exchange rates; Stock Index, gauges stock 
market performance; Joystick, a tutorial on incorporating 
joysticks into programs; Demon's Defiance II, a mini arcade 
game; Education Notes, a lesson on how to formulate math 
solutions; and Personable Pascal, a tutorial on compiling a 
program in several smaller pieces. 

Plus 17 programs from the March 1984 issue of THE 
RAINBOW. 



Listing 1: gsave 



Pmode 4 

a 6144 byte 



**************************************** 

* GSAVE 
* 

★ 
★ 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
# 
* 
* 
★ 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

★ 

* 

* 

* 
* 

* 
* 

* 
* 

************* *************************** 

* To get rid of the Hi-Res screen under OS-9 

* all you need to do ist 

* 0S9:display 12 

* I 

* From Basic09 you can get rid of the Hi-Res 

* screen with: ' 

* RUN GFX ("quit") 

**************^ ************ ************** 

* NOTE 



An OS-9 command for saving a 
Hi-Res screen out to disk as 
file. 

Before this command can be used you MUST 
use the display command from OS-9 to 
invoke the Hi-Res screen. 
You can do this like this: 
0S9: DISPLAY 0F pi 0F 

If doing this from Basic09 then you must 
call the Hi-Res screen with the line 
RUN GFX ( "MODE" ,1,15) . . . If there is 
no Hi-Res sceen present Gsave will exit 
with an error. 



Gsave can save pictures out to disk in 
2 formats: 

I f the picture is to be used again with 
Basic09, Micro-Illustrator, or Deskmate 
than you save the picture out to disk with 
this line: 

0S9: Gsave /dp/picture , name 

If the picture is to be used under RS Disk 
Basic and you are going to Xmodera it to a 
BBS or use OPAk's XCOPY to get this file 
onto a RS Dos disk than you save the picture 
to disk like this: 
0S9 : Gsave + /dp/picture. name 
This will save the picture to disk with an 
additional 10 bytes added to the file that 
are needed under RS Disk Basic to know where 
to load the picture into memory. 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



Gsave will only save out a standard size 
Pmode 4 picture screen. It will not save 
out a double screen that is considered 
standard under CoCo MAX, 



*************************************** 



* 
* 
* 

* 
* 



Bob Montowski 
Apt. B-18 1151 
Norristown, Pa 
215-277-5951 
CIS : 71615 ,531 



Sterigere St, 
19403 



*************************************** 





ifpl 






use 


/h0/def s/os9def s 




endc 




type 


set 


prgrm+objet 


rev 


set 


reent+3 




mod 


glend , glnam, type, rev, glen t , gl 


glnam 


f cs 


"GSAVE" 


edition 


fcb 


6 




org 


0 


gpath 


rmb 


1 


temp 


rmb 


2 


gscreen 


rmb 


2 


flag 


rmb 


1 


stack 


rmb 


200 


glsize 


equ 


» 


er 


fee 


/GRAPHICS NOT KICKED IN YET.. 




fcb 


1)3,13 


erl 


fee 


/FILE COULD NOT BE OPENED/ 




fcb 


1)3,13 


ar3 


fee 


/ERROR WHILE WRITING TO FILE/ 




fcb 


10,13 


ghead 


fcb 


$00,$18,$00,$0E,$00 


c? i" Ail 


fcb 


SFF, $00,$j30,$A0,$27 




stx 


temp, u 




ldb 


#0 




stb 


f lag,u 




ldx 


$00 




Ida 


#1 




ldb 


#$12 




os9 


i$getstt 




bes 


error 



■/ 



loop 



loop2 



stx 
ldx 
Ida 
cmpa 
beq 
cmpa 
bne 
ldb 
stb 
bra 
leax 
ldb 
Ida 
os9 
bes 
sta 
ldb 
cmpb 



gscreen, u 
temp , u 
$ x+ 
#32 

lOOD 

# » + 

jL 

loop 

~l,x 

#3 
#2 

i$create 
errorl 

J»* V*l. ■4"* 4* 

&*? £*t w * 4 f %JL 

t lag,u 
#1 



* The picture being saved is a RS Disk Basic 

* picture, Write 5 header bytes out to disk 



* first 



OS9pix 



gpath , u 



os9pix 



* 

* 
* 
* 



bne 
Ida 

ldy #5 
leax ghead, per 

C^'l ^2 

bes error3 

ldx gscreen ,u 

Ida gpath , u 

ldy 16144 

os9 i$write 

bes error3 

ldb flag f u 

cmpb #1 
Picture is a Rs Disk Basic picture 
and need these last 5 bytes added 
for Disk basic to know where to place 
picture in memory 



finish 



bne 


finish 


ldy 


#5 


leax 


gtail f per 


os9 


i$write 


bes 


error3 


Ida 


gpath, u 


os9 


i$close 


clrb 




os9 


f Sexit 


leax 


er ( per 


bra 


out 


leax 


erl f per 


bra 


out 


leax 


er3 , per 



error 
errorl 

error3 

* 

ALL ERROR MESSAGES ARE WRITTEN TO 
STANDARD ERROR OUTPUT. . . >> SO YOU 
CAU REDIRECT THIS OUTPUT (PATH 2) TO 
A PRINTER OR DISK FILE AJNED NOT INTERFERE 
WITH THE HI-RES SCREEN 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

out 



glend 



Ida 

ldy 

os9 

os9 

emod 

equ 

end 



#200 

i$writln 
tsexit 



Listing 2: gload 



An OS~9 Command for loading in a Pmode 
4 Hi-Res screen into memory . Before 
this command can be used . . . You MUST. . . 
use the display command from OS^ to 
invoke the Hi-Res screen . 
You can do this like this: 
OS9: DISPLAY 0F 01 0F 

If doing this from Basic09 then you must 
call the Hi-Res screen with the line 
RUN GFX ( "MODE ",1,15) . . .If there is 
no Hi-Res sceen present Gload will exit 
with an error. 

Gload can load in two types of Pmode 4 
pictures . If the pictures was created 
with Micro- Illust rat or or OS-9 Deskmate or Basic09 
than you can load those pictures 1 ike 
K ¥ S9:Gload /d0/picture 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 159 



* 
* 



If the picture is a binary picture in 
Radio ShacJc format and you have down- 
loaded it with an OS-9 Terminal program 
than there are extra bytes in the file 
that are not needed. To get this pix 
into memroy call Gload like this: 
0S9:Gload - /dp/picture 



**************************************** 



* 
★ 
* 
* 
* 
★ 
* 
* 



NOTE 

Gload will only load pix made with 
either OS-9 Basic09, OS-9 Deskmate, 
OS-9 Micro Illustrator, or a PMODE 4 
pix that has been download via XMODEM 
to an OS-9 Disk. It will not load 
double size pix made by CoCo MAX « . . 



X************************************** 

* Bob Montowski 

Apt. B-18 1151 Sterigere St. 
Norristown, Pa. 19403 
215-277-5951 
cis:7l6l5,531 
*************************************** 





ifpl 








use 


/d0/def s/os9def s 




endc 






type 


set 


prgrm+obj ct 


rev 


set 


reent+3 




mod 


glend, glnam, type , rev , glent , g 


glnan 


f cs 


"GLOAD" 


edition 


fcb 


4 






orq 


0 




qpath 


rmb 


1 




temp 


rmb 


2 




gscreen 


rmb 


2 




\- q Tr\ y~\ 0 

Lc mp c 


> — m V-i 
L IllU 






L lay 


VTN h 






c 4~ a \r 


i. ill J— ' 






Cf 1 c: i 7 o 

M X J _L C 








er 


fee 


/GRAPHICS NOT KICKED IN YET. 




fcb 


10i 13 


erl 


fee 


/FILE COULD NOT BE OPENED/ 




fcb 


1^,13 


er3 


fee 


/FILE IS NOT A PICTURE FILE/ 




fcb 


10,13 


glent 


stx 


temp , u 




ldb 


&0 






stb 


flag , u 




ldx 








Ida 


n 






ldb 


#512 




os9 


i$getstt 




bes 


error 




stx 


gscreen , u 




ldx 


temp , u 


loop 


Ida 


,x+ 






cmpa 


#32 






beq 


loop 




cmpa 








bne 


loop2 




ldb 








stb 


f lag , u 




bra 


loop 


loop2 


leax 


-l,x 




Ida 


n 






os9 


i$open 




bes 


errorl 




sta 


gpath , u 




ldb 


flag , u 




cmpb 


n 






bne 


os9pix 




Ida 


gpath, u 


* Read in 


the first 5 


bytes of the file... These 



./ 



* are not part of the actual picture 



os9pix 



ldy 


#5 


leax 


temp2 , u 


os9 


i$read 


bes 


error3 


ldx 


gscreen , u 


Ida 


gpath, u 


ldy 


#6144 


os9 


i$read 


cmpy 


US 1640 



* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 



A normal picture is $1800 bytes long and a 
Deskmate picture is $164j3 bytes long, 
if the read pulls in less than $164j3 bytes 
than the file is >>NOT« a picture file I i ! 
and an error is generated by Gload 
bit error] 
IF THE FILE YOU ARE ATTEMPTING TO READ 
IN IS A DESKMATE .PIC FILE THE I $READ WILL 



* GENERATE A EOF ERROR AS THE DESKMATE .PIC 

* FILE IS SHORTER THAN 6144 BYTES LONG ... BUT 

* THIS IS STILL OK... ALL THAT WILL HAPPEN IS 

* THE BOTTOM OF THE HI-RES SCREEN WILL REMAIN 

* EMPTY .... 





Ida 


gpath , u 




os9 


inclose 




clrb 






os9 


f $exit 


error 


leax 


er , per 




bra 


out 


errorl 


leax 


erl , per 




bra 


out 


error3 


leax 


er3 , per 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

out 



ALL ERROR MESSAGES ARE WRITTEN TO 
STANDARD ERROR OUTPUT... >> SO YOU 
CAN REDIRECT THIS OUTPUT (PATH 2) TO 
A PRINTER OR DISK FILE AND NOT INTERFERE 
WITH THE HI-RES SCREEN 



glend 



Ida 

ldy 

os9 

os9 

emod 

equ 

end 



U 

n 200 

i$writln 
f $exit 



Listing 3: 


makepix 




LOAD GLOAD GSAVE 




LOAD ECHO DISPLAY SLEEP 




DISPLAY 


0F 01 


£F 




DISPLAY 


14 






DISPLAY 


16 24 


24 




DISPLAY 


1A 0A 






DISPLAY 


16 3 2 


32 




DISPLAY 


1A j3A 






DISPLAY 


16 50 


5j3 




DISPLAY 


1A 






DISPLAY 


16 70 


70 




DISPLAY 


1A 0A 






GSAVE /DJ3/CIRCLES 




DISPLAY 


12 






DISPLAY 


0C 






ECHO WE 


SAVED 


A PICTURE TO DISK 




ECHO AND WE WILL NOW LOAD IT BACK 




ECHO IN 


TO PROVE THE GSAVE AND GLOAD 




ECHO COMMANDS 


WORK 




ECHO FIRST WE 


1 LL SLEEP ABOUT 5 SECS . 




SLEEP 500 






DISPLAY 


JUT 01 


0F 




GLOAD /DP/CIRCLES 




SLEEP 500 






DISPLAY 


12 






ECHO IT 


WORKS 


• • • 





Hint 



Pointed Statements 



Here are some more CoCo 3 tips! To find the 
current line number that is pointed to by the ON ERR 
statement, enter the following line: 

PRINT PEEK(&HFE0E)*256+PEEK(&HFE0F) 

To find the line number currently pointed to by the 
DN BRK statement, enter this line: 

PRINT PEEK ( &HFE0C ) *25G+PEEI< ( &HFE0D ) 

Bob Rosen 
Howard Beach, N Y 



160 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Variety is the spice... 

MAX FONTS 1, 2, 3 or 4 Each set contains 24 fonts that are professionally 
designed and ready to use with CoCo MAX I or II. Each set includes a custom "pull 
down menu" that is used by CoCo MAX for selecting the fonts. Just "click" and use 
the same as any other font with CoCo MAX. Send a SASE for samples of all 
the fonts! 

Buy 2 sets and SA VE 10%, any 3 and SA VE 15%, 

all 4 and SA VE 20%! $24. 95 each (disk) 



SET1 



SET 2 



SET 3 



SET 4 



DlQl-»«l Small 

Digital fflaidiLjm 

Digital Largs, 
Futura 

HH1FH 



n 



MIK 



victory 

■ >bg Tmmth ImiII 

SABY TILTH LC 

eoeo ©ceo 




Cartwhiil 

Normande Small 

IMormande Medium 

NORMANDE LG. 

Piano 

SINAL«A 



cHci'rLow 

Kolon 



iMlnuuirisiiiiiKiiliiBpliiGjiiijQiii 



PeiqwoT Larqe 
pnoopnm snmLL 
PFDCFRfl flEOtlLfl 

PFDEFnm LHFEE 



d3(Sg][i]|^][i3p]!©] 

I I • — f I III - 1 i~ i~t I.I »~ T 

Mocno/i Cms.h 

Mocnofl 7Iapre 
SIBI1 

POinT OUT 

Prini/uui; fiiuicll 

PRinTDUT LF1REE 



Bochlin 

■roadway 

lx it Ma !• i • i. : 



Old £ngLisll 

URBaM 

Xt&XV M*MUM 
ceLttc 

HARTLAND 

stiencil 



<yp> ae, Al> sV> «flf> sV> sV> 

Thin Han 

Tip Top 




ebonii 

AAAAAA 

METHL 

"Ddin 



Roma Small 

c-ii ||hir ii i!p:::c i ; 

•'iJI'll ■mill I ■ii'lU.cr'W 1 

Clrq.ua 

COTIEIRGBIP 

Cfflcffl V0G 



■H- hi- O 



5quam 



^traffic 



TELEWRITER-64 The word processor that has lead the 
way for over half a decade. Checkout Cognitec's ad in this 
issue for all the features! Interface graphics with it using 
TELEGRAPHICS — included FREE! sgm m 

TELEGRAPHICS Interface HI-RES graphic displays from 

CoCo MAX or other graphic programs with Telewriter-64. Design 

a logo or letter head and have access to it whenever you're using 

Telewriter-64! «„, n,- 

$24.95 (disk) 

SIDE WISE makes your printer do something you never thought 
possible -print sideways! SIDE WISE will read ASCII text files 
generated by your spread sheet program and print them down 
the page instead of across. This allows you to indicate a printer 
width of up to 255 characters! No more having to hold 2 or 3 
pages together to get the entire picture of your work sheets. 
Compatible with DYNACALC and ELITE CALC. Included FREE 
with DYNACALC 1 Not compatible with Spectaculator. 

$2435 (disk) 



CoCo MAX II The most used and highly acclaimed graphic 
editing program for the Color Computer 1 or 2. Just look at 
Colorware's ad in this issue for all the features! 

$79.95 (disk) 

MAX EDIT Create your own fonts for use right i n CoCo MAX 
l/ll or load in existing FONTS for adding your own flair! Use all 
CoCo MAX options such as BOLD, ITALICS and SHADOW. 

$19.95 (disk) 



Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502-5300 
Visa/MC customers call (803) 665-5676, 
or send check or money order. 

In business since 1982. 

SC residents add tax. 
Shipping: $3 UPS ground, $ 12 air mail (overseas) 
Canadian Distributor: Kelly Software 



Continued from Page 10 

• 1 would like to bring to the attention of 
all RAINBOW readers the following list of 
BBSs. All are affiliated with the California 
Computer Federation, but are open to use 
of everyone. All boards operate 24 hours a 
day. 

Presidio BBS, San Francisco 

(415) 567-3287 
Redwood Gatorboard, Redwood City 

(415) 364-6630 
Colorboard of San Francisco 

(415) 591-7366 
Valleio Colorboard, Vallejo 

(415) 557-9221 
Los Altos Colorboard, Los Altos 

(415) 965-7949 
Hal 2001, San Mateo, (415) 345-1802 
East Bay CoCo Hangout, Oakland 

(415) 530-2444 
San Bruno CoCo BBS, San Bruno 

(415) 877-8141 
Colornet, Burbank, (818) 840-8903 
L.A. Color Users Board, Los Angeles 

(213) 773-3024 

If you have questions concerning these 

California Computer Federation BBSs, 

contact Dan Eckert (4 1 5) 567-3287 ( Presidio 

BBS). _ r . 

Dan Eckert 

San Francisco, CA 

• I have a CoCo modem and would like to 

communicate with someone in the Denver 

area. Call (303) 650-6035. _ , c , . , 

Fred Schmidt 

3966 Shaw 

Westminster, CO 80030 

• The Village CoBBS is online in Cromwell. 

We support 300/ 1 200 baud, 24 hours a day. 

Call (203) 635-1401. D . D c , , 

Bartleit B. S hat tuck 

46 R. Geer Street 

Cromwell; CT064I6 

• I would like to announce the White House 
Colorama V.300 BBS. It has downloads, 
boards and more; 300 baud. Call (305) 799- 

Lance Easley 
Cocoa Beach, FL 

• The Dreamland Express BBS is up and 
running at (904) 686-0094 featuring original 
software, four message boards, plus one 
board dedicated to the CoCo. Also featuring 
a full CoCo download menu and text files. 
It's worth a long distance call from any- 

W ^ ere " Charles Op per man, SysOp 

4497 Crescent Road 
Spring Hill, FL 33526 

• I would like to announce one of the 
newest BBSs in the central Indiana area 
called The Gator Board at (317) 482-1079, 
online from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m., seven days a 
week, operating at 300/ 1 200 baud. It offers 
one club and six public SIGs, up/download- 
ing, a voting booth, nine news files and the 
usual private and public message bases. One 
main attraction is the music SIG containing 
top ten lists for all kinds of musical tastes, 
concert updates (for our area) along with 
album, CD. and stereo equipment reviews. 

Derk Gates, SysOp 
307 N. Grant Street 
Lebanon, IN 46052 

162 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



• The Duke's Shelbyville Colorama has 

been online for over one year. It runs 24 

hours a day, seven days a week, and its 

features include: message base, online 

program and games, downloading, screen 

pause and other well-known Colorama 

features. The communications protocol is 

300 baud, 7 bit, even parity, I stop bit. Call 

(3(7) 392-2769. n , 

v Duke N orris 

P.O. Box 241 

Shelbyville, IN 46 1 76 

• 1 would like to announce the M&M 

Electronics BBS in Winnfield. New users are 

welcome. Call (318) 628-2087 after 7 p.m. 

(Central time), Monday through Friday. 

Voice (318) 628-6434. ' . . _ ... 

v ' Keith Guilloite 

P.O. Box 194 

Joyce, LA 71440 

• Experience the Launching Pad BBS in 
Baltimore, Now operating at 300/1200 
baud, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 
Featuring plenty of CoCo downloads and 
several message bases. Call (30 !) 661-1826. 

Tom Di Marco, Jr. 
9502 Perry Hall Blvd. 
Baltimore, MD 21236 



• The Graveyard BBS is a multi-purpose 
system that includes: online games, X- 
modem downloads, multiple message bases 
and E-mail, It runs on a 64 K CoCo with 
three disk drives and a Hayes 1200 baud 
modem. The BBS operates 24 hours a day 
at 300/ 1 200 baud. Call (6 1 7) 792-038 1 . 

Glenn May 
192 Oak Street 
Shrewsberry, MA 01545 

• The GOSUBTRS-80Computer Club has 
a BBS that operates 24 hours a day at 300/ 
1200 baud. Call (617) 756-1442. 

Ed Donovan, SysOp 
357 June Street 
Worcester, MA 01602 

• We are pleased to announce the Instant 
CoCo BBS. Hours are 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. 
weekdays and 10 p.m. Friday to 7 a.m. 
Sunday. We are 300/ 1 200 baud, 7 bit, even 
or 8 bit, none and 1 stop bit. The board is 
FIDO running on a Tandy 1000. We have 
several download sections and a reading 
room. There are message sections for 
general and technical help. Call (614) 870- 
6544 

Robert E. DeBolt 
9667 Taylor Court 
Pickerington, OH 43147 

• The Toledo area Colorama BBS serves 
most of northeast Ohio. We operate at 300 
BPS (soon to be 1 200)24 hours adav. Phone 
(419) 877-0694 or BBS (419) 877-5556. 

John Kendzrara 
6016 Kathy Drive 
Whitehouse, OH 43571 

• I am disappointed I have not found a BBS 
around the Oklahoma City area yet. If 
anyone has a BBS please put down the baud 
rate and parity and the number and send it 

t0 me * Patrick Warn h off 

1024 Big Oak Drive 
Midwest City, OK 73110 



• The Hideaway BBS runs 24 hours a day, 

seven days a week, 300 baud, 7-n-l. Call 

(405) 598-61 13. We feature a message base, 

online games, downloads, an advertising 

section, plus a whole lot more. . „ . ... 
v Jeff Cahill 

Route I, Box 1 10 

Tecum seh, OK 74873 



• The ASC11-80 BBS is online 24 hours a 
day for telecommunication callers. Call 
(215) 252-1608. Nevin Keller 

136 S. 1 5th Street 
Easton, PA 18042 

• I am running an OS-9 PBBS system with 
PBBS software 4,2 at (215) 277-6951. The 
BBS runs from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. EST. It runs 
at 300/1200 baud, has four message bases, 
nine download areas and over 1 0 megabytes 
of hard disk storage space. The BBS runs 
under a256K RAM disk and is very fast. All 
those interested in graphics or OS-9 or just 
looking for a friendly place to talk with other 
CoCoites. Call the Graphics Pub. 

Bob Montowski 
B~ 18 1 151 Sterigere Street 
Norristown, PA 19403 

• I am pleased to announce the CoCo SIG 
on Dragnet BBS in Harrisville. It runs 24 
hours a day at (40 1 ) 568-2343. 

Eric G. Robichaud 
10 Stoneham Drive 
Woonsocket, R 1 02895 

• This is to announce a new BBS in the 
Greenville-Spartanburg area. The Board- 
walk BBS runs at 300/1200 baud, 24 hours 
a day, 7 bit word, even parity, 1 stop bit. 
Features CoCo downloads, text files, mes- 
sage base and online games. Supports the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Being a computer market- 
ing representative with the Radio Shack 
Computer Center in Greenville. I have lots 
of advance notice about CoCo goings on. 
Call (803) 27 1 -9243, everyone is welcome to 
call 

C. W. Gordon, SysOp 
Greenville, SC 

• CoCo Palace BBS now operates under 4.0 
Colorama. I have added another 180K of 
storage and have multiple downloads and 
security levels, as well as special user input 
files that are ongoing. It also features a 
voting section that has a new topic each 
month. Call (615) 581-9752. 

Another new BBS in Morristown is the 

Great White North. Phone (615) 587-0051. 

The SysOp is McPhail Hunt. w 

Marty CUne 

936 Hall Drive 

Morristown, TN 37815 

• Announcing the Computech-80 BBS, 
running 300 baud, 24 hours a day Monday 
through Sunday, 7- or 8-bit words, all access 
is free. Multiple computer forums available, 
and lots of downloads for CoCo. Call (703) 

365-201 8 or write. n . , « 

Ricky Suiphm 

Route 1, Box 20 
Henry, VA 24102 

• The CoCo Beach BBS has been running 
for a year. Colorama software, 1200 baud, 
7 bits, even parity, one stop bit, 15 meg- 
abytes disk storage half-filled with public 



When You're Running Hot, 
It's Time for a Change 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



/ have a Co Co 2 with Extended 
BASIC, but only 16 K of memory. Ii 
has reached the point where I must 
upgrade my Co Co to at least 64 K. I also 
have a problem in that after about 30 
minutes of computer operation with 
either Scripsit or just in the command 
mode, the components below the slot- 
ted air intake on the top left get very hot. 
When this happens, the words on the 
screen start misspelling themselves. I 
need to know the easiest and possibly 
cheapest way to cure both of these 
problems. 

Ken Bang hart 
Red lands, CA 



\\j Ken, upgrade techniques depend 
/* upon the model of the machine. 
In his "Earth to Ed" column in the 
March and April 1985 RAINBOWS, Ed 
Ellers covers how to upgrade Korean- 
manufactured CoCo 2s. If yours is one 
of the earlier, American-made CoCo 2s, 
refer to his "RAM / ROM Upgrade 
Roundup" in the May 1984 issue. But, 
with your overheating problem com- 
pounding the situation, 1 think you 
would be better off cutting your losses 
and buying a new CoCo 3. 

Changeable Character Set 



Is there any software available that 
would allow me to change the char- 
acter set on my 64 K Co Co 2? 

Kevin Callis 
Alberta, VA 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. lie holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

164 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



R 




I 



Computerware, Box 668, Encin- 
A X itas, CA 92024, (6 19) 436-3512, 
sells a machine language program called 
Screen Expander, Kevin. It uses the 
high resolution display screen to gener- 
ate a new character set. 

A New Keyboard for CoCo 

I'm considering purchasing a key- 
board for my old gray ' E' board 
CoCo I. I am quite satisfied with 
CoCo's original keyboard layout and 
have no need for special function keys. 
Could I purchase Tandy's replacement 
keyboard kit (Catalog No. 26-3016, 
$39.95 )and install it myself? 

David Turk 
Richland Center, WI 



Installing a keyboard is simple 
/C enough, David, but be sure that 
they supply you with an adapter, be- 
cause the old gray Color Computers 



(those with 4 C\ 'D' and 4 E' boards) used 
a wire cable instead of the mylar one 
which is used on the newer machines. 

Bugged by ZBUG 

I'm 15 years old and am trying to 
learn assembly language after two 
years of experience with BASIC. I 
purchased the EDTASM+ program and 
have been having some problems exe- 
cuting programs in ZBUG. One prob- 
lem that I have had is that when I try 
to execute a program in ZBUG, // hangs 
up and resets the program. Is this a 
problem with the program or with the 
editor? Is there a program for ED- 
TASM+ which turns object code into 
the editor's source code? 

Wayne Facer 
Chiloquin, OR 

I? The problem is with your pro- 
gram, Wayne. When you pro- 
gram in BASIC, you are using a built-in 
interpreter; the interpreter systemati- 
cally scans each line for errors and, if 
it is correct, translates the line into 
machine language which it then exe- 
cutes. If the line is incorrect, the pro- 
gram halts and an appropriate error 
message is displayed. When you pro- 
gram in assembler or machine language, 
no such error checking is done, so if you 
make a logic error in your code, the 
odds are that the machine will lock up 
or do a reset. Unfortunately, the only 
thing you can do is to save the source 
code before assembling so that you can 
make corrections and try again. ZBUG 
allows you to disassemble small por- 
tions of code and there are more sophis- 
ticated disassemblers available from 
advertisers in the magazine. The most 
difficult part of the disassembly process 



domain software. Firsriog on restricted, 
mail privileges, no download restriction. 

Jim McCracken 
1208 Montana Court 
Virginia Beach, VA 23456 

• The Bellingham BBS is up and running. 
Call (206) 734-5806 between 21:00-07:00 
Monday through Sunday. 

Roger Alexander 
Bellingham, WA 

• Eskimo North is a BBS for CoCo enthu- 
siasts and users of other Tandy machines. 
Supports Xmodem file transfers, and can 
have four users online at a time. It runs on 
a Tandy Model 16B with the XENIX oper- 
ating system. Open 24 hours a day at 300/ 
1200 baud. Call (206) 367-3837. 

Brian Wright 
Seattle, WA 

• Announcing the existence of the B.U.G. 
Board BBS. This is a club board (Bonnyville 
User Group) and it is necessary to become 
a member for full access to this board. It is 
a Colorama board and runs on a 64K CoCo 
with two single-sided disk drives, 24 hours 
a day. Call Data (403) 826-6266 or Voice 
(403) 826-4790. ^ 

Bonnyville, Alberta 

• I would like to announce the Public BBS 
System of Shaughnessy. The number is (403) 
381-3417. The system is running 24 hours a 
day under OS-9 with PBBS 4.2 software 
using a 64K CoCo 2 with multipack, hard- 
ware clock, parallel printer port, deluxe RS- 



232 Program Pak, D.P. Johnson's 512 Ram 

Card, and three 80-track double-sided 

drives. The BBS supports 300/1200 baud. 

There are six download directories for basic 

programs, OS-9 programs, OS-9 assembly 

programs, OS-9 patches, text files and 

merchandise. No password is required. 

Please log on and see. ~. ~ n 

° Dieter G. Rossmann 

P.O. Box 24 

Shaughnessy, Alberta 

Canada TO K 2 AO 

* The Micro Ads BBS has a new number 
(604)765-1578, Monday through Friday, 10 
p.m. to 8 a.m. PST, 300 baud, 8 data, I stop, 
no parity. I am developing a new section for 
automatic weather information and, at 
present, only have the light detector work- 
ing. I would like to ask anyone who is in the 
know, to contact me in regards to adding a 
windspeed/direction, temperature, rain 
indicator and perhaps a more reliable clock 
circuit to the joystick ports for data acqui- 

Sltl0n ' David Coldwell 

RR 2, Suite 14 A, Com p. 13 
Kelowna, British Columbia 
Canada V1Y7RI 

• I would like to inform everyone in the 
southern Ontario region that the Essa Color 
Computer Club of Barrie is now operating 
a BBS at (705) 728-2765. The system is run 
on a CoCo 2 with a 15-Meg hard drive and 
includes such things as messages, up/down- 
loads and mail. Also the Essa Color Com- 
puter Club welcomes all new members. We 



meet twice monthly at St. Mary's School in 

Barrie. For more information call (705) 726- 

28 14 or write to me. ~ Iy 

Doug Morrow 

2-60 Burton Avenue 

Barrie, Ontario 

Canada UN 2R6 

• The Information Station BBS supports 
300/ 1200/2400 baud, 8 bit, X-Modem, no 
parity, auto-halt, up/downloads, online 
games, stock market simulation, casino, 
dedicated CoCo message base, private mail 
and general message bases. Applications to 
the system can be made on your first log on 
and are usually approved within 24 hours. 
Call (519) 455-0187 

Wayne Morrison 
1089 Chippewa Drive 
London, Ontario 
Canada N5V2T8 

• This is to announce our French BBS, the 

Le Babillard du Club CoCo La Tuque Inc. 

Call (819) 523-4329; when you get the link, 

press ENTER. It is open 24 hours a day, 7 days 

a week, speed 300 baud. To become a 

member, leave a message to PMP, on the 

BBS, or write to me. n . , 

Pierre Lome 

C. P. 458 

La Tuque, Quebec 

Canada G9X 3P4 

• I'd like to announce a new BBS called 
CoCo Line. Call (514) 669-3031. Open 24 
hours a day, 7 days a week. The BBS is a 
French board. 

Daniel Lesage, SysOp 
Montreal, Quebec 



ADOS 



ENHANCED, EPROM-ABLE 
DISK BASIC 



Ncnv you can supercharge Basic wilh an impressive array oi exlra leatures 
WITHOUT sacificing compai ibihiy 1 ADOS is compaliDIC wiln virtually l00 c o ol 
commercial sollware Customizing utilities are provided lo allow user dehnerj 
command abbreviations baud rate step rate tracks pet disk i3f> or dOi suppott of 
double sided dnves. and more After customizing ADOS you can have .t burned mlo 
ai< EPROM mat plugs mto the Disk Bas«c ROM socket or iusi use M m RAM as a 6<tK 
disk utility (£PROM * burning will cost dbOul S20- we provide mtormahon 
concerning how you can have (Ins done ) Fealur.Cs include • repeat and edit ol ine 
last direcl mode command * 26uetmaDle control key a»b'e'. ;ations • automahc line- 
number prompis • DOS command • lowercase command entry (a line complement 10 
a Lowerkii ^r PBJ WordPak) » COPy (lilenamci to (drive number ) • AE error override 
option « RAM command 164K) • RUNM command • lexl ecnomg to printer • ML 
monitor • text die scan • enhanced direoorv • error trapping ■ hi res text utility 
included U2. 5t. or 6a characters per imei 

7 COULD NOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THAT WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS." 

THE RAINBOW December 1984 
'•/ LOVE ADOSf . . . A GENUINEL Y FIRST RATE PRODUCT " 

Cotor Micro Journal. February 1985 
"I WON'T PART WITH MY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING . . . NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS." 

Hot CoCo.May 1985 

Oisk $27.95 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 



Monitor machine language programs AS THEY ARE RUNNING' Peeper actually 
iimeshates with the target program, giving Full CONTROL as ML programs run 
Swnch instantly oetween watching regular program output ana Peeper s trace ol 
registers and stack on screen oi printer inspect memory ,n any ol 26 display mopes 
Execution speed can be varied from full speed lo ma barest crawl or halted entnely 
as programs run Single stepping breakpoints, memory or reojslei Cxammercnange 
Relocatable, supports 6jK use H6K reouired) See February '85 review 
Disk S23.95 Assomblor source listing Add 3.00 

NEW FOR COC03 

CUSTOM CABLE FOR MAGNAVOX RGB MONITORS 

The Magnavox 8CM5l5and8CM505 monitors, containing RGBa, RGBI. and audio 
inputs, sell at prices comparable to Tandy's CM-8, and represent a far better buy 
tor CoCo 3 users. Composhe input, which CM-0 lacks, is required (or seeing PMODE 
4 displays in color RG8J allows lhe Magnavox. unlike the CM-8. lo be used wrth 
PC-Compatibles — a big resale consideration Cable 19 95 



t^THE COCO-PC IS HERE! 




Wouldn't il be great lo use an IBM PC, XT, AT or 
compatible to run CoCo OS-9 and FLEX software. 

Well, now you can with our PI-6809 processo r ea rd. PT-6809 
fits neatly into a full size expansion slot in the PC. 1 1 
features ONE MEGABYTE RAM, 128K EPROM and a full 
RS-232 interface. 

Our software runs FLEX and boots CoCo OS-9 from disk 
yet gives you FULL ACCESS to PC facili ties including hard 
disk, printer, network . . . and file transfer between FLEX. 
OS-9 and PC/MS-DOS formats. 

NO RISK TRIAL — Buy the PI-6809 now and we give you 
a money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. DON'T 
DELAY — ORDER TODAY! 

Special Introductory Price — $495.00 
Sh ipping and Insurance — S 19.50 

COMPUSENSE LIMITED, PO BOX 169, 
PALMERS GREEN, LONDON, ENGLAND 
N 13 5XA Phone 01 -882 0681 /6936 

Cheques, Money Orders, VISA 
and MASTERCHARGE accepted 
Dealer Knquiries Welcome 



March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



163 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 




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(305) 274-3699 or 



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HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 



HARD DRIVE SPECfAUST 
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Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
witti the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM .... $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering Information : 

Use Our WATS line to place your order via Visa, MasterCard, or Wire Transfer. Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any non - certified funds will be held until proper 
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is distinguishing between code and 
tables or data. 



Double-Precision Arithmetic 

/ would like to be able to use double- 
precision arithmetic on my CoCo 
32 K with Extended Color BASIC 1. I, 
RS-DOS LI. Do you know of any 
machine language programs available 
that would give me this capability? I 
have heard that VIP Calc has such 
capability. Using EDTASM+ (tape) I 
think I could find the section related to 
double precision arithmetic, but I 
would need a printout o/VIP Calc. Do 
you have a patch to make this printout 
possible? My goal is to obtain as exact 
solutions as possible and I would gladly 
sacrifice operating time for the in- 
creased accuracy. 

Willard Conner 
Chadds Ford, PA 



X? VIP Calc does not come with 
7^-source code. This means that you 
would have to use a dissassembler, 
which is not an easy task. You would 
have to have some machine language 
savvy, and would have to use the dis- 
assembler to try to find the code that 
performs the calculations desired. Even 
distinguishing between code and data is 
a difficult task at times. A better way to 
obtain the accuracy that you desire, 
Willard, would be to write the code 
using the C language. In order for you 
to use C, though, you will need to 
operate under OS-9. Another way for 
you to obtain accurate solutions would 
be to write the code using X BASIC, under 
FLEX. Both of these environments 
require at least 64K of memory. You 
said that you had 32K, but if you have 
an 'F' board, you may really have 64K. 



DOS Determination 

How can I tell what DOS my Color 
\Computer is using? I have a DM P- 
105 printer and a couple of my 
friends have DM P-IIO printers. Do you 
know of any screen dump one-liners 
that we can use with our printers? 

Paul Dumin 
Southington, CT 

166 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



TJ" To date, Paul, Radio Shack has 
/C supplied only DOS versions 1.0 
and 1.1. The version that is loaded into 
your machine will appear on your 
screen when you turn on your comput- 
er. If you have a CoCo 3, the version will 
either appear as DOS 2.0 or DOS 2.1, 
even though they are the same as 1 .0 and 
1.1. The only significant difference 
between DOS l.Oand 1.1 is the addition 
of the DOS command. This command 
enables the Color Computer to load 
OS-9. It would be relatively simple to 
write a one-liner that would dump the 
screen to either of the mentioned print- 
ers, but it would be dreadfully slow. A 
fast machine language screen dump 
program that should work with your 
printers is called Versadump, which 
appeared in "Printer Answers," HOT 
CoCo, March 1985, Page 24. 



Travel Keyboard Connector 

p / have a CoCo 1 4 D* board 32 K, 
^ upgraded to an 'E' board, two disk 
^ drives and a Gemini 10 X printer. I 
have two problems that have been 
driving me crazy. I have a CoCo 1 
keyboard (pin and cable connection) 
and an excellent full travel keyboard 
that a friend gave me. It has a flat ribbon 
that slides into a connector, not the 
plug I pin like my old keyboard. I have 
not been able to find an adapter that 
would allow me to connect the new 
keyboard to my CoCo L I've tried 
placing the ribbon on top of the pins 
and clamping them together, which 
gives me about 90 percent of the keys, 
but if the keyboard moves even a na- 
nometer I have to reclamp it and start 
all over. Radio Shack has not been able 
to help me in my search for the adapter, 
can you? I also have the Radio Shack 
graphics software. What can I buy that 
would allow me to print out the pie, bar 
and scatter charts on my Gemini print- 
er? Is this soft ware only com patible with 
Radio Shack printers? I bought a screen 
dump program, but it doesn't seem to 
work with the Radio Shack graphics. 

Larry Pis tell i 
Fountain Valley, CA 



For the adapter that you require, 
**}L Larry, contact Spectrum Pro- 
jects, P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
1 1414, (7 18) 835-1344. Explain that you 
need an adapter that connects a new- 



type keyboard to the older CoCo 1 
machine. These adapters are a Tandy 
product that were distributed for key- 
board upgrades when the CoCo 2 was 
introduced. For the screen dump 'de- 
sired to print the pie, bar and scatter 
charts, see the Versadump program 
mentioned in the previous answer. . 1 



The Software Needs an IBM 

In reply to my question in the No- 

gvember 1986 issue of RAINBOW con- 
cerning the use of IBM software on 
my CoCo, your answer said, "The 
program that allows you to do this is the 
CoCo U til II, by Mark Data. "I bought 
the program only to find that it must be 
run on an IBM (or Compaq) which I do 
not have. I called Mark Data to inquire 
about this and they told me that i / 
cannot transfer the data on anything 
other than an IBM or Compaq, and ip 
add insult to injury, I couldn 7 even g%t 
a refund! I feel that you should let your 
readers know that CoCo Util 11 will n&t 
do the job, before others buy the pro- 
gram and discover the same thing. 

A. Obner 
Hendersonville, NC 



Vc^ / In answering your question, I 
/£- assumed that you either had an 
IBM-compatible machine or had access 
to one. Otherwise, why would you have 
IBM software? The advertisement for 
the CoCo Util II program in this mag- 
azine (see Spectrum Projects, Inc.) 
states "Requires 128K MS-DOS Com- 
puter W/2 Disk Drives." CoCo Util II 
is designed for the person who has 
access to an IBM-compatible machine, 
IBM software is usually written and 
read on both sides of a disk, 40 tracks 
per side, nine sectors per track and 512 
bytes per sector, whereas the CoCo can 
normally only access one side of a disk 
containing 35 tracks, 18 sectors per 
track and 256 bytes per sector. 

When using the CoCo Util II pro- 
gram, you would first need to format a 
CoCo disk, then insert the formatted 
CoCo disk into the IBM-compatible 
machine and copy an ASCII file to the 
CoCo disk. You could then edit the file 
on your CoCo, and later transfer the file 
back to the IBM-compatible machine in 
a similar fashion. 

Be alerted that only high-level source 
code saved in ASCII can be transferred. 
Neither the CoCo Util II program ndr 



I 



any other is designed for the person who 
wants to buy IBM software and use it 
on the CoCo unless, of course, the 
source code is supplied, but this situa- 
tion is quite rare. It is designed for the 
person who, perhaps, uses an IBM- 
compatible machine at work and wants 
to edit the same files at home, then take 
them back to work. 

Any IBM-compatible machine can 
transfer the disks using the CoCo Util 
//program. If you want to transfer IBM 
PC programs written in BASIC and 
saved in ASCII to your CoCo you can 
use one of several methods. D.P John- 
son, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest Street, Por- 
tland, OR, markets PC/XFER Utilities, 
$45. rc/XFER also requires SDisk, 
$29.95, marketed by the same company. 
To use rCjXFER Utilities, you pipe the 
standard input/output to/ f rom the 
single-sided PC/MS-DOS disk. You 
can also refer to Marty Goodman's 
"Transfer CoCo Text Files to MS-DOS 
Disks" in the June and July 1985 issues 

of THE RAINBOW. 

Bar Code Reader 

W\ Is there a bar code reader wand with 
corresponding hardware and soft- 
ware that would allow me to read 
data in, and print bar codes with a 
DM P- 1 05 andj or DMP-500 Radio 
Shack printers, under CoCo 2 control? 

Jose Pedro A Iherti 
Argentina 

Radio Shack markets the wands, 
7^ bar code drivers and read/ write 
software only for the model 100/102/ 



200s. In order to use these wands on 
your Color Computer, you would have 
to design your own hardware adapters 
and write your own software to convert 
the Model 100 system to your CoCo. 

JDOS-CoCo 3 Incompatibility 

/ am a longtime CoCo 'F' board user 
who recently acquired one of the first 
CoCo 3s at the RA IN BO Wfest. So 
far, I've found that the machine has 
great potential, but it's giving me some 
initial heartburn. I have two disk con- 
trollers, J&M and HDS, each with two 
ROM chips, giving me J DOS L2, RS- 
DOS L0 and RS-DOS LI. When run- 
ning with disk, all of the CoCo 3 com- 
mands seem to disappear. For example, 
the WIDTH command gives a Syntax 
Error. What do I have to do to achieve 
su ccessful CoCo 3 disk operation? 
What can I do to achieve successful 
CoCo 2 emulation running a CoCo 3 as 
a disk system? Also, How do you get 
Telewriter-64 to work on the CoCo 3? 

Col. H.L, Elman 
Port Jefferson Station, NY 

\\j J DOS is not compatible with the 
CoCo 3. If you want an alternate 
DOS with additional capabilities, be on 
the lookout for ADOS3, by Spectro- 
systems, 11111 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 
AI08, Miami, FL 33176, (305) 274- 
3899. It might already be on the market 
by the time you read this. 

As far as CoCo 2 emulation is con- 
cerned, if you mean you want the CoCo 
3 to boot up and indicate Disk Basic 1 .x 
instead of 2.x, then type P0KE& 



HFFDE , 0 : POKE&H71.0: EXEC&H 
A027. 

If your Telewriter-64 does not work, 
I assume that you have an older version, 
which has problems with improper 
response to the keyboard. I n your disk 
version of Telewriter-64, add the fol- 
lowing lines to the program U/BAS and 
replace its Line 200 with the line below 

200 LDADM "TWG4" , OF : GOSUB 500 
:P0KE3B6,57: IF(SW) GD5UB 330 

500 P1=PEEK[&HA000) :P2=PEEK(&Hfl 
001} 

501 PDKEDF+7931 , PI : PDKEDF 

+7932, P2 
502PDKEDF+B210,P1: PDKEDF 

+B211,P2 
503PDKEDF+9B45,P1: PQKEDF 

+9B46,P2 

504 PDKEDF+137B3, PI : PDKEDF 
+137B4,P2 

505 POKEDF + 14774 , PI : PDKEDF 
+14775, P2 

506 PDKEDF + 15241 , PI: PDKEDF 
+15242, P2 

507 IF PEEK(&HC004)"215 THEN 
PDKEF+B929,202:PDKEB930a03 

50B RETURN 



For a quicker response, your questions 
may also be submitted through RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG on Delphi. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOWS prompt, type ASK for "Ask the 
Experts" to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Doc- 
tor ASCII" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



PRINTERS! 

N EWI Okidata 192+ (Par. or Sen) , , s 370 

N gW! Okidata 193 (Parallel) $ 540 

MEW! Okidata [93+ (Serial) $ 6 1 0 

Okimate 20 Coior Printer $ I35 

Fujitsu 2100 (80 col) , $ 4 1 0 

Fujitsu 2200(132 col.) .... $ 520 

Toshiba 32 1 (Par, or Ser.) s 5 10 

Qume Letterpro 20 (Letter Qua!,) . . . . s 445 
Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) . . s 240 
Silver Reed 600 (Daisy Wheel) s 575 

s'Add s 1 0 Shipping for Printers) 


ACCESSORIES! 

Taxan 12" Green Monitor , i \75 

Tax an 12" Amber Monitor $ I35 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot (80 col.) J 30 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot(l32col.) s 45 

Stand w/ Diskette Storage (80 col.) s 47 

Stand w/ Diskette Storage (132 col.) s 57 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo 
and IBM upon request. 

MS off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and well beat it!!! 


DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL Vi HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) *235 

Drive 0, 1 (addressed as 4 drives!) > '350 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive ir> case with power supply 

Double Sided Adapter . . , . , S 2S 

H DS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions , s 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes , $ 32 & *3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROH's. 
Shipping Costs: *5 /drive or power supply, M0 max, 
Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft.~M0. Co CojRS-232 Cables 1 5 f t.-*20. 
Other cables on request, (Add s 3°° shipping) 


SP-2 INTERFACE for SP-3 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

a 300- 19,200 BAUD rates ■ 300-19,200 BAU D rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs ■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ( s 5 00 extra) frees parallel ■ Built in modem /primer switch— no need for Y-cables or 
port for use with other computers p' u gg in g /un PNi in g cables 

■ *49 9S (plus 53oo shipping) ■ s 64 9s (plus *3« "shipping) 

Both a'so available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 


|P P.O. Box 293 

lyi Raritan, NJ 08869 
N (201) 722-1055 

mm ^Hft MC* fo_B jj^ft g fo_B MP* MEHi* B BElH 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 167 



Roboflip: 
Anatomy of a Game 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
(he " Wishing Well, " submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 7 forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Since a number of people are very 
excited about the game and 
graphics possibilities of the new 
CoCo 3, this month we will review the 
basics of game-making by presenting a 
brand new Color BASIC game inspired 
by the letters and phone calls of a 
number of readers. In the following 
paragraphs I will unfold the story that 
led to the creation of this month's 
program; Roboflip. 

Wishes? What Wishes? 

During the last year and a half, the 
wishes submitted by many readers have 
been darn near impossible to grant. The 
original intention behind the "Wishing 
Well" was to have rainbow readers 
bounce ideas off me that could possibly 
be turned into working BASIC pro- 
grams. Unfortunately, some readers 
have either requested programs that 
only one or two people in the entire 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 

168 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



world could use, or projects that could 
not be done in BASIC, even with 128K! 

A number of readers have been re- 
questing more games. Others have 
insisted that programs be made to work 
on the MC-IO as well. One such reader, 
Mr. Larry Haines, editor of the MC-IO 
International User's Group in Spokane, 
Wash., blasted me for suggesting that 
the MC-IO was dead. (Sorry, I only said 
I felt not many people were using it. I 
never said it was deadX) 

Anyway, I felt this would be a good 
time to come up with a program that 
would still work on the MC-IO (with 
20K). Prompted by Mr. Haines' request 
that I not abandon the MC-IO, I started 
scratching my head to come up with 
something new. 

At that point, I got on the phone to 
Tony Morris, co-owner of a new com- 
puter supply outlet in western Massa- 
chusetts, called Computer Food. I 
needed some repair work done on my 
line printer, so we got into a short 
conversation. Tony commented that his 
nieces were now using the 64K disk 
system he gave them and used a heavy 
dose of "Wishing Well" programs, such 
as Math Driller and Color Change 
Quiz. He also asked when some new 
games would be coming down the line. 

"This is getting tough lately, Tony. No 
one has suggested any workable ideas 
for games lately. Everyone wants games, 
but I'm at a loss of what to come up 
with. Writing a new program each 
month for several years has taken its 
toll!" 



"Oh, come on now," he answered. 
"There are a lot of things you could 
make for games. It doesn't have to be 
elaborate!" 

"Oh yeah?" I replied. "What would 
you suggest?" 

"What a about a game of Flip?" 

"Flip?" 

"Yeah, you remember playing Flip 
with baseball cards when you were a 
kid. Why not make a computer ver- 
sion?" 

A computer game of Flip? I reflected 
that Flip was not such an old game, 
after all. It seems that every day I have 
to break up a game of Flip somewhere 
in the school building. (The only prob- 
lem here is that most of the high school 
students I catch are playing Flip with 
dollar bills, with real money as the prize. 
This is forbidden in school!) 

Now seemed like a good time to 
introduce a computer game of Flip. 
Maybe I could come up with an attrac- 
tive game that would satisfy my stu- 
dents' desire to play the game, without 
involving any money, and also satisfy 
those who wanted a new CoCo game 
(including the MC-IO fans). 

The result is Roboflip, a Lo-Res 
graphics version of the game I played as 
a kid on the grammar school play- 
ground. However, getting the game to 
work correctly was a much tougher task 
than I expected. 

Writing the Game 

What, you might ask, is so difficult 
about writing a game of chance? Just 



"The computer 
has a very 
predictable way 
of generating 
random 
numbers." 



use the RNO command, right? Not so 
simple, my friends. Those of you famil- 
iar with how a computer works will 
know that a computer does not generate 
true random numbers. Try this little 
test. 

Turn on your computer, type the 
following and press ENTER. 

FORI=1TD10:PRINT RND ( 10 } : NEXT 

The screen will print out a string of 



random numbers. Copy them down. 
Now turn the computer off and on 
again. Repeat the same command again 
and compare the numbers on the screen 
with the numbers you wrote down. 
They are the same, aren't they! 

The point is, the computer has a very 
predictable way of generating random 
numbers. Most users of the Color 
Computer will be familiar with the way 
to overcome this. Making a variable 
equal to the negative value of the TI MER 
resets the random number generator. 

fl=RNO ( -TIMER ) 

This is even more effective if placed 
inside a loop using the INKEYS com- 
mand, which keeps resetting the value 
until the user responds to the keyboard. 

This was not the major obstacle, 
however. The big problem was making 
the game "win able" or "loseable." If you 
flip a coin one hundred times, odds say 
you should get a 50/50 split nearly all 
the time. If] made each player's values 
too large, the game would eventually 
reach an equal point where neither one 
would win or lose. One player's losses 
would later be offset by the other's. 

I got around this by giving each 
player only 10 cards. This number lets 



the game be completed within a reason- 
able amount of time. (No one wants to 
play Flip for half an hour!) 

Once I got the program lines work- 
able, I created a graphic to go along 
with the game. This type of game could 
be written with just text, but it would 
be a complete drag. Therefore, [ de- 
signed two colorful robots who play the 
game. One is the player, the other is the 
computer. U sing a number of FOR -NEXT 
statements and the SET, RESET and 
PRINTS commands, I was able to put 
together a simple animation that shows 
each robot shaking a set of colorful 
cards and then flipping them, thumbs 
up, into the air. The cards then gently 
flutter to the ground. 

Sure, this could have been a Hi-Res 
game, but then it wouldn't work on 
Color BASIC CoCos or on the MC-10. 
I hope none of you are too spoiled by 
Hi-Res to ignore the many uses of the 
SET command and character strings. 
When working with very young chil- 
dren, a game like this in Lo-Res is much 
more effective and will hold the young- 
ster's attention. 

Playing the Game 

On running the game, you will notice 
a slight variation on our "Wishing Well" 




THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

A DIVISION OF DATAMATCH, INC. 



r>s/r>r> 

PROGRAMMERS 



lfZ> FOR * 
SlZI FOR 
± G>& FOR 

W/SLEEVES, LABELS, W.P. TABS 
HADE IN USA! CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. 
5 YEAR WARRANTY 

R"l I F*F* Y DISKS 10/*8.95 

FACTORY PUNCHED - USE BOTH SIDES 
PRINTER RIBBONS 

EPSON MX/RX/FX 70/80 
RED, GREEN, BROWN, BLUE 
GEMINI 10/10X/SG10 
GEM/OKI COLORS 
OKIDATA 80/82/92/93 
C.ITOH.NEC 8023, APPLE 
DMP/IMAGEWRITER $6.00 Ea. 

RED, GREEN, BROWN, BLUE $6.50 Ea. 

ALL ITEMS 100% GUARANTEED 



$5.00 Ea. 
$6.00 Ea. 
$2.00 Ea. 
$3.00 Ea. 
$2.00 Ea. 



6/$28.00 
4/$22.00 

0OZ/$22.00 
4/$1 0.00 

DOZ/$22.00 

6/$34.00 
4/$25.00 



Add $2.50 S/H in U.S.A. - Canada Add $3.50 + $1.00/LB 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

^jfffi 23552 PLYMOUTH, REDFORD, MI 48239 

■™l (313) 255-9850 

Send Card Number & Exd. Date Min. Charae Order 





A unique approach 
to disc reliability 

Memory Minder from J&M Systems is 

one of the most comprehensive disk 
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microcomputers. It quickly and easily 
runs comprehensive testing of all vital 
operating parameters to assure data 
integrity. 

Data Integrity 

Means Data Confidence 

Memory Minder is s« easy to run y«u 
will be inclined to test your disk drives on 
a regularbasis and correct problems be- 
fore they ever endanger your data. This 
program provides long term confidence 
in your data integrity. 



Memory Minder is currently available 
for the following: 

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TRS-80 M»del III/4 

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March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



169 



title. I have only a few DATA lines that 
are used more than once with the RE- 
STORE statement. This repeats our 
Roboflip title without duplicating lines. 
Pressing ENTER starts the game f rom the 
title page. 

The screen creates two robots. The 
one on the left is you, and has a green 
head. The one on the right with the red 
head is the computer. At random, one 
of you will have the first "flip." If the 
computer goes first, he will just shake 
his hand and flip. If you go first, the 
screen will wait until you press the space 
bar to flip. Don't worry, the screen 
prompts you with directions as the 
game is played. 

If the two cards are both green, like 
your robot, you win both cards. (You 
start with 10 cards apiece.) If both cards 
turn up red, the computer wins. If they 
split, the cards stay in the pot and you 
both flip again, in reverse order. The 
screen shows a number dead center, 
which is the number of cards in the pot. 
The next one to win a hand collects the 
whole pot. The number of cards is 
displayed above each player's head. If 
a player hits zero while there is a split, 
both players split the pot and continue 
until one player hits zero on a loss. 

Sound simple? You will be surprised 



how frustrating the flipping can be 
when thingsare notgoingyour way. The 
game can be interesting, especially for 
the very young who never played Flip 
with baseball cards. 

Typing in the Game 

For those of you who are new to the 
"Wishing Well," I will repeat a few 
standard points. Be sure to type in the 
DATA lines exactly as you see them, The 
commas are not a mistake. Also, if you 
see any lowercase letters in the listing, 
you must use SHfFT-0 to get into and out 
of the lowercase mode. The letters 
appear as a reversed black block on the 
screen, which looks very attractive once 
you get down to playing the game. 

MC-10 

There is only one change that is 
required when you type in this listing, 
The MC-10 doesn't have a TIMER func- 
tion, so you should replace the com- 
mand TIMER with some large number, 
say 9999, instead. This will give you a 
random appearance when in the INKEY 
mode. Make this change anywhere in 
the listing where you see -TIMER. 

New Challenges 

As this year progresses, I would really 



like to develop some elaborate games, 
preferably with an educational applica- 
tion. When it comes to Adventures, I 
don't usually have a good idea to start 
with. Therefore, I am going to issue a 
challenge. 

If you have a theme you would like 
to see used for a game, drop me a line 
with your idea. Be as specific as possi- 
ble. If you can think of a way to have 
it include an educational task, suggest 
that too. If your idea is good, I will even 
include your name or names in the title 
card, which I haven't done in the past. 
Get these in the mail to me c/o THE 
RAINBOW or to my home address (60 
Harding Avenue, N. Adams, MA 
0 1 247). Please don't expect a written 
response — I don't have the time for 
computer pen pals, as much as I would 
like to. 

Conclusion 

This program was short and simple, 
but for those of you just starting out or 
with young children, it will be a good 
way to get your feet wet. I hope you 
enjoy the game. In return, I hope to 
receive an avalanche of valuable sugges- 
tions. Either way, you will be the 
winners. □ 



w 125 



» * • » # s 



. .38 
.208 



290 

End 



240 
.47 



30 DATA, 26, ,26,16,2 6, ,21, ,21, , ,2 
6,, 26,, 21, ,,42, 36, ,,37, ,37, 32, 42 

35 DATA28,24, , 28 , 28 , 28 , 28 , 28 , , 28 
, 28, 28, 24 ,,28, 28, 28,, 44, 44,,,, 44 
,44,44 , 36 ,44, 36,44 , , 
4j3 PR1NT@454," BY FRED B.SCERBO 



2 REM 

3 REM 

4 REM 

5 REM 

6 REM 



* 



* 



The listing: ROBOFLIP 

1 REM ************************ 

ROBOFLIP 
BY FRED B.SCERBO 
60 HARDING AVE. 
NORTH ADAMS, MA ,01247 
COPYRIGHT (C) 19 8 6 
7 REM ************************ 

10 CLS0 : F0RI = 1T03 2 : PRINTCHR$ (25 2 
) ; : NEXT 

15 FORY=128T0192STEP32 :RESTORE: F 
ORI=lT012 8 : READA : PRINTCHR$ ( A+Y) ; 
:NEXTI, Y:F0RI=1T0 3 2 : PRINTCHR$ ( 2 5 
2) ; : NEXT 

20 DATA28,3 / 0, 28, 29 , , 3^,28,29, 28, 
29, 28, 28 , 30, 28, 3,0,28,29 , 16 ,44, 46 
, 44, 44, 42 , 45, 4j3 ,, 36, 46, 36, 46, 44, 
45 

25 DATA, 27, 19, 23, 16, 26, ,21, ,21,1 
9, 19, 26,, 26,, 21,,, 43, 39, 32, 4j3, 37 
19 t i 42 , ,43,35,39 



ii 



45 PRINTQ486, " COPYRIGHT (C) 198 
6 " ; 

5J3 IFINKEY$OCHR$(13)THEN5^ 
5 5 CL>S0 

60 R$=CHR$(128) 

65 FORI=3T07 : SET (1,5,2) : SET (1+53 
,5,2) : NEXT 

70 FORI=2T08: SET (1,6,6) : SET (1+53 
,6,4) : NEXT 

75 FORI=lT09 : FOR¥=7T01# : SET ( I , Y, 
6) :SET(I+53,Y,4) :NEXTY,I 
80 FORI=2T08:SET(I,ll,6) :SET(I+5 
3 , 11,4) : NEXT 

85 FORI= i 0TOl j 0 : FORY=12T018 : SET (I , 
Y,8) : SET (1+53, Y,3) :NEXTY,I 
90 FORI=2T07 : FORY=2 / 0TO24STEP2 : SE 
T(I,Y,3) : SET ( 1+53 , Y, 6) :NEXTY,I 
95 F0RI=1T08:SET(I,26,7) :SET(I+5 
3,26,2) : NEXT 

100 PRINT@2 2 7, CHR$ (236) CHR$ (235) 
CHR$ (227) CHR$ (227) CHR$ (232); 



1 70 THE RAINBOW March 1 987 



1) 35 PRINT@2 4 8,CHR$ (196) CHR$ (195) 
CHR$ (195) CHR$ (199 )CHR$ (2)34) ; 

11) 3 PRINT@131,CHR$ (2)36) ;:PRINT@1 
33 / CHR$ (194) ; 

115 PRINT@154,CHR$ (19 3) ; :PRINT@1 
56 / CHR$ (2)35) ; 

12) 3 GOT0135 

125 FORI=175T0399STEP32 : PRINT@I , 
CHR$ (15 3) ; : S0UND2 , 1 : PRINT@I , CHR$ 
(12 8) ; :PRINT@I+3 2,CHR$ (15)3) ; : SOU 

ND2 , 1 :PRINT@I+32 , CHR$ (128) ; : NEXT 

13) 3 RETURN 

135 REM START GAME 

14) 3 PRINT@44 9, "you" ; : PRINT@472, " 
computer" ; 

145 PP=RND(1J3) :IFPP=>6THENCC=1:G 
OT0155 

15) 3 CC=j3 

155 YU=1)3:CP=1)3:TT=RND(2) 

16) 3 GOSUB165 : F0RI=1T01)3)3)3 : NEXT : G 
OT017)3 

165 PRINT@34 f "" ; : PRINTUSING" ##" ; 
YU ; : PRINT @ 6 j3 , " " ; : PR INTUS I NG " # # " ; 
CP; : RETURN 

170 IF TT=lTHENGOSUB2 4)3:GOSUB2 8)3 
:TT=2:GOT018)3 

175 IF TT=2THENGOSUB28)3:GOSUB24)3 
:TT=1: GOTO 18)3 

18) 3 BP=BP+2:IF KK=LL THEN2J3J3 

185 PRINT@5,R$R$R$ "neither "R$ "on 
e"R$"wins"R$R$R$ ; 

19) 3 PRINT@11)3, BP; 
195 GOT021)3 

2) 3)3 IFKK=2 2 3 THENPRINT@ 5 , R$R$ "you 
"R$"win"R$"this"R$"time"R$R$R$; : 
PRINT@11)3 , R$R$R$R$ ; : YU=YU+BP : BP= 
)3:GOT021)3 

2 )35 IFKK=191THENPRINT@5 , R$R$ "the 
"R$"computer"R$"wins"R$R$R$ ; : PRI 
NT@11)3 , R$R$R$R$ ; : CP=CP+BP : BP=)3 

21) 3 IF YU=)3THEN32)3 
215 IF CP=)3THEN32)3 

22) 3 GOSUB165 

225 F0RI=1T015)3)3:NEXT:PRINT@461 / 
R$R$R$R$R$; 

23) 3 GOT017)3 
235 GOT0235 

24) 3 PRINT@5, "press"R$"spacebar"R 
$"to"R$"flip"; 

245 X$=INKEY$:F0RI=1T03)3:NEXT:PR 
INT@231 / CHR$ (191) ; : AK=RND ( -TIMER 
) : F0RI=1T03 )3 : NEXT : PRINT@ 2 3 1 , CHR$ 
(223) ; : IFX$<>CHR$ (32) THEN245 

25) 3 PRINT@2)3)3,R$; : YU=YU-1 : GOSUB1 
65 

255 ZZ=12:FORI=14T09STEP-l:ZZ=ZZ 
+3 : SET ( ZZ , 1 , 5 ) : F0RKY=1T03 )3 : NEXTK 
Y:RESET(ZZ,I) : NEXTI : GOSUB12 5 



26) 3 KK=RND(5)3) : IFKK=>2 6THENKK=2 2 
3 

265 IFKK<=25THENKK=191 

27) 3 PRI NT @ 4 6 1 , CHR$ ( KK ) ; 

2 75 RETURN 

28) 3 PRINT@5, "the"R$ "computer "R$" 
flips"R$"now" ; 

285 CP=CP-l:GOSUB165 

29) 3 F0RI = 1T01)3 :A=RND( -TIMER) : PRI 
NT@248 / CHR$ (191) ; : F0RII=1T03 )3 : NE 
XTII :PRINT@248 f CHR$ (223) ; :FORII= 
1T03)3 : NEXTI I : NEXTI 

295 ZZ=51:FORI=14T09STEP-l: ZZ=ZZ 

-3 : SET ( Z Z , 1 , 5 ) : F0RKY=1T03)3 : NEXTK 
Y:RESET(ZZ,I) : NEXTI : GOSUB12 5 
3)3)3 LL=RND ( 5)3 ) : IFLL=>2 6THENLL=19 
1 

3)35 IFLL<=25THENLL=223 
31)3 PRINT@465, CHR$ (LL) ; 
315 RETURN 

3 2)3 IF KKOLL THEN BP=BP/2 : YU=YU 
+BP : CP=CP+BP : BP=)3 : F0RI=1T01)3)3)3 : N 
EXTI : PRINT@5 , R$"you"R$"both"R$ " s 
plit"R$"them"R$R$; 

325 IF KKOLL THENPRINT@11)3 , R$R$ 
R$R$ ; : PRINT© 4 61, R$R$R$R$R$ ; : FORI 
=1T01)8J3J8 : NEXT: GOTO 2 2)3 

33) 3 IF YU=)3 THEN PRINT@5 , "you"R$ 
"have"R$"lost"R$"the"R$"game" ; :G 
OSUB165 

335 IF CP=)3 THEN PRINT@5 , R$" the" 
R$"computer"R$"has"R$"lost"R$; :G 
OSUB165 

34) 3 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$ (13) THEN 

34) 3 

345 PRINT@11)3 / R$R$R$R$; 

35) 3 PRINT@461,R$R$R$R$R$ ; 
355 GOT0135 



Hint . . . 

Sound Advice 

When I hooked my Color Computer up to a 
monitor, 1 knew something was missing. I had built 
my own video driver, but had not made accommoda- 
tions for the audio. I started looking for an easy way 
to obtain sound from the Color Computer without 
having to build a special circuit. It was then that 1 
stumbled across the cassette port. 1 just used an 
adapter to change the /g-inch phone plug on the 
cassette cable to an RC A-type phono plug I could plug 
into my monitor. The adapter is readily available at 
your local Radio Shack. Although it doesn't work for 
some programs, it is an effective and very inexpensive 
way to get sound from the CoCo. 

Frank Mattia 
Brooklyn, NY 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 171 




USINESS 




he Budget Master's 
Compan ion 



By David V Haas 




his is a monthly budget for use 
on a tape-based system. It will 
store up to nine fixed monthly 
expenses, plus nine other bills. You may 
enter as many as five paychecks. 

Budget will keep a current balance of 
all checks minus any bills. When a bill 
is deducted, it is locked out with a PAID 
flag. These flags are stored with your 
other data on tape to indicate all pre- 
viously paid bills. 

After reviewing paid bills, reset the 
flags and you're ready for the current 
week's deductions. I recommend that 
you save your data after each session 
and, at the end of each month, save the 
past month's data so it may be referred 
to if necessary. 

Included is a print function that 
prints the beginning balance and the 
balance after each deduction. This is 
handy for checking off each payment as 
you mail it. 

The paycheck entry section holds a 
maximum of five entries and each one 
is added to the current balance as it is 
entered. Paychecks load in sequence 
automatically. The date of the entry is 
also displayed. 

When loading miscellaneous bills, 
you are prompted to clear all bills, keep 
previous entries, or return to the main 
menu. The number of currently loaded 
bills is displayed below the menu as a 
reminder. When loading miscellaneous 

Dave Haas is a staff sergeant in the U.S. 
Air Force stationed at Eg! in Air Force 
Base in Florida, and is a maintenance 
technician for fire control avionics on 
F-16 aircraft. He is married, has three 
children, and enjoys Color Computer 
programming in his spare time. 



bills, no entry names longer than eight 
characters are allowed. 

Load fixed expenses by editing Line 
130 to contain up to nine expenses. 
Then edit Line 1 10 to load the dollar 
amounts for the entries made in Line 
130. All loaded bills are displayed when 
deducting fixed or miscellaneous ex- 
penses. The current balance (total of all 
checks minus deducted expenses) is also 
displayed. You are prompted for De- 
duct Bill or Main Menu. After deduct- 
ing a bill, it is locked out with a PR ID 
flag. Any time you select a bill higher 
than those displayed, or one that is 
locked out, an error tone sounds. 

Use the Skipf/Set Gap Option to 
skipf your user copy of Budget and to 
set a blank gap after it before you save 
new data to tape. 

The printer output is formatted for 
the CGP-220. The finished printout is 
color-coded orange for deduction, and 
green for balances after expenses are 
subtracted. The control codes are easily 
changed for other printers. When 
choosing this option, you are prompted 
for the amount of pay for the week you 
are in and the current day of the month. 
Then you are given the option of print- 
ing each expense. Each is printed and 
subtracted from the paycheck listed. 
Then the balance is printed and the next 
expense is listed. 

Use the last option, Quit/ Reset Flags, 
to reset all lockout flags after reviewing 
paid bills. When you are finished, 
simply choose Quit, and you are 
through for the day. 

(You may contact the author at 126 
A Oak Drive, Eglin A FB, FL 32542, 
904-651-2913. Please enclose an SASE 
fmr a reply when writing.) □ 



172 THE RAINBOW March 1987 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-lOO 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



HALL OF THE KING (Rainbow Review 6/86) 

This program combines all the things you look for in a great 
two disk graphics adventure program. The Hi-Res graphics 
are superbly done. The text portion of the screen and the 
graphics change quickly as you move through the HALL OF 
THE KING. You can move freely from one portion of the 
adventure to another. Call up your inventory at any time. You 
can even save or load a game at ANY time. HALL OF THE 
KING will challenge even the most seasoned adventurer. 

HALL OF THE KING requires 64K EB and one disk drive. This 
exciting two disk adventure comes packaged in a vinyl case. 
$39.95. 

HALL OF THE KING II (Rainbow Review 9/86) 

Continue your quest for the Earthstone in The Inner 
Chambers of the HALL OF THE KING. Outstanding graphics 
help show the way to success in your search to help restore 
the legendary power of the Earthstone to the dwarven race. 
The deeper you travel into the inner chambers, the more dif- 
ficult your progress becomes. HALL OF THE KING II has all 
the fine features of the first adventure. It is designed to 
follow the original HALL OF THE KING but may be played as 
a stand-alone adventure. The adventure fills two disks and 
comes packaged in a handsome vinyl folder. It requires one 
disk drive and 64K. $39.95 

WARP FACTOR X (Rainbow Review 2/86) 

If you have been waiting for a game for your color computer 
that has everything, your wait is over. WARP FACTOR X is 
here. This all graphics simulation game requires strategy, 
fast thinking, an eye for detail, and-above all experience in 
knowing the capabilities of your star jhip and its computer. 
(See review in Feb. 85 issue of Rainbow.) It requires 32K one 
disk drive and comes packaged in a vinyl library case. $34.95 

DARKMOOR HOLD (Rainbow Review 8/86) 

You and your comrades will explore the levels of Darkmoor 
Hold in an effort to gain great riches and defeat the dark 
wizard. The Wizard will soon realize the threat you pose and 
the many monsters you meet and battle will become stonger 
and more powerful as you move through the 10 levels of 
Darkmoor. A keen eye will help you find weapons and armor 
to aid your battle along with treasures for you to keep. Your 
party consists of a Dwarf, an Elf, and you, the Human, each 
with their own special attributes. The weapons, armor and 
treasure are placed randomly in each level to provide a new 
challenge each time you play. You may also save the game 
you are playing since defeating the evil Wizard is not an easy 
task. It has great graphics and an impressive text screen to 
give you more fun than a barrel of elves. Requires 64KEB and 
1 disk drive. $29.95 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — all of our software 
can be backed up using standard backup procedures. 

Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include $1.50 
shipping for each order. TX residents add 5 1/8% sales tax. 
Orders shipped within two days. 

Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. Canadian 
dealers should contact Kelly Software Distributors, Ltd. 608, 
STNT, Calgary, Alberta T5H 2H2, (403) 236-2161 




DRAGON BLADE (Rainbow Review 11/86) 
Animated Graphics Adventure 

This 100% hi-res graphics adventure features many animated 
screens which will delight the avid adventurer. You search for 
the magic Blade which is the only way to rid your homeland of 
the fearsome dragon which has risen from a long rest to ter- 
rorize your village. Fill your screen with super graphics as you 
try to solve the difficult challenge the village leaders have set 
before you. Dragon Blade requires 64K EB and 1 disk drive. 
$29.95 



DOLLAR WISE 



^8^ 



In todays world of high finance, variable interest rates, 
balloon payments, and lease options there is a program that 
can help you sort out the details and make sense of the small 
print. DOLLAR WISE is an extremely flexible program that 
will allow you to find the best loan by substituting values for 
all the different variables that make up the loan. Find the 
future value and interest paid for either single or multiple 
deposit savings accounts. Determine mortgage interest paid 
during a tax year— very good for estimating tax savings on 
credit purchases also. Should you rent or buy. DOLLAR WISE 
gives you all the options. It will even provide a loan amortiza- 
tion table print out with Tax Year summaries either by month 
or year. Requires 32K Tape -$24.95 Disk - $27.95 



FONTFILE — (New for the COCO III) 



FONTFILE replaces the standard Hi-Res COCO III font with a 
character set you select. Choose from a menu of 26 or create 
your own and save it to disk for future use. Use the fontf ile in 
your own basic programs or livenup an old program with a Hi- 
Res font screen. FONTFILE will work on all versions of the 
COCO but is especially written to take advantage of the 
special capabilities of the new COCO III. Requires 64K and 
one disk drive. $24.95 



COMING SOON! 
Hall Of The King III 



Send for our free catalog 

Call (915) 584-7784 or 

Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

213 La Mirada 
El Paso, Texas 79932 






The listing: BUDGET 

10 B$="3 2 621CAF7EADA5" : Y=&HF8 

20 F0RR=1T0LEN ( B$ ) STEP2 

30 C$="&H"+MID$ (B$ / R / 2) 

40 V=VAL ( C $ ) : POKEY , V : Y=Y+ 1 : NEXTR 

50 POKE&H19A, &H39 :POKE&H19B,0 :PO 

KE&H19C, &HF8 : POKE&H19A, &H7E 

60 CLS3 

70 FORT=1TO500:NEXT 
80 CLEAR5000 

90 DIMFD(9) , PA(5) , PD(5) , FD$(9) , M 
D$(9) ,MD(9) ,NA$(23) , PF(9) , PM(9) 
100 Q=100 : F0RX=1T09 : READFD (X) :NE 
XT 

110 DATA111. 11,222. 22,333. 33, 444 
.44,555.55,666.66,7 77.77,88 8.88, 
999.99 

120 F0RX=1T09 :READFD$ (X) :NEXTX 
130 DATALOAN#l , LOAN #2 , LOAN #3 , LOA 
N#4 , LOAN#5 , LOAN#6 , LOAN#7 , LOAN#8 , 
LOAN #9 

140 F0RDA=1T023 :READNA$ (DA) :NEXT 
DA 

150 DATA W,R,I,T,T,E,N, ,B,Y, ,D 

,A,V,I,D, ,V., ,H,A,A,S 

160 CLS3:FORT=1024TO1055:POKET,3 

6:EXEC4 3 3 59 : NEXTT : FORT=1504TO153 

5 : POKET ,36: EXEC4 3359: NEXTT 

170 F0RDA=1T02 3:PRINT@Q+1,NA$ (DA 

) ; :EXEC43 359:IFDA=8 THENGOSUB2 10 

:Q=Q+l:NEXTDA:POKE6 5494,0 ELSEQ= 

Q+l : NEXTDA 

180 CT=1:PRINT@2 2 6, " 1- START 

NEW MONTH 11 ; 

190 PRINT@2 58," 2- LOAD CURRE 

NT DATA "; 
200 GOTO2 20 

210 PRINT@361, "JUNE 15, 1986" ;:S 
OUND2 50 , 1 : FORT=1TO500 : NEXT : RETUR 
N 

220 W$=INKEY$:IFW$="" THEN220 EL 
SEIFW$="1" THEN230 ELSEIFW$="2" 
THEN1840 ELSE220 
230 CLS 



240 S9=1:PRINTTAB(225) :PRINT"ENT 
ER 1ST 3 LETTERS OF 
CURRENT MONTH" :PRINTTAB(2) : INPUT 
CM$:GOSUB2 3 90 

250 IFCM$=""THENCLS:GOTO240 ELSE 
IFLEN(CM$)<>3 THEN260 ELSE270 
260 CLS 3 : PRINT@2 30 , "PLEASE USE 3 
LETTERS ! ! " ; : FORT=1TO1000 : NEXT : C 
LS:GOTO240 
270 CLS 

280 FORX=0TO31:PRINT@X, CHR$ (143) 
: NEXT 

290 A$="$$ FILE'S BUDGET $$ " 
300 FORC=32T063 :PRINT@C, CHR$ (175 
) ; :NEXTC 

310 IFS9 = 1 THENPRINT ff THIS IS A M 
ONTHLY BUDGET FOR USEON A TAPE B 
ASED SYSTEM. IT WILL STORE UP TO 

NINE FIXED MONTHLY BILLS AND A 
LSO UP TO NINE OTHER BILLS. YOU 
CAN ENTER UP TO FIVE PAYCHECKS 
320 IFS9 = 1 THENPRINT@2 3 4 , "AND IT 

KEEPS A CURRENTBALANCE OF ALL 
PAYCHECKS MINUS ANY BILLS THAT Y 
OU f VE DEDUCTED. WHEN A BILL IS D 
EDUCTED, IT IS LOCKED OUT WITH 
A <-paid! FLAG. 

(PRESS A 

NY KEY) " 

330 IFS9=2 THENPRINT "THESE FLAGS 
WILL BE STORED ALONGWITH ALL OT 
HER DATA ON YOUR DATATAPE TO IND 
ICATE ALL PREVIOUSLY PAID BILLS 
NEXT TIME. AFTER YOU REVIEW PAID 
BILLS, RESET FLAGS AND YOU ARE 
READY FOR CURRENT WEEK'S DEDU 
CTIONS. " 

340 IFS9 = 2 THENPRINT@2 7 5 , " SAVE N 
EW DATATO TAPE EACH TIME IT'S UP 
DATED. SAVE ALL DATA TO A SEPARA 
TE TAPEAT THE END OF EACH MONTH 
SO YOU CAN REFER BACK TO ANY PAS 
T MONTHIF NECESSARY. 

(PRESS ANY KEY) " 
350 IFS9=3 THENPRINT "THIS PROGRA 
M ALSO HAS A PRINT FUNCTION TH 
AT PRINTS OUT THE AMOUNT OF Y 
OUR PAY BEFORE AND AFTER EACH 
BILL IS DEDUCTED FOR THE CURRENT 
WEEK. YOU CAN CHECK OFF EACH BI 
LL AS YOU MAIL IT! (PRE 
SS ANY KEY) " 

360 FORI=1TO30:SO$=LEFT$ (A$ , I) :P 
RINT@31-I,SO$:Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$=""T 
HEN370 ELSE3 90 

370 FORT=1TO100 : NEXTT : NEXT I : FORI 
=20TO0STEP-l:SO$=RIGHT$ (SO$ , I ) :P 



174 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



RINTSl, S0$ :Z$=INKEY$ : IFZ$= M "THEN 
380 ELSE39j3 

38j3 FORT=lT01j3j3 : NEXTT: NEXTI : GOTO 
3 6j3 

39j3 S9=S9 + 1: IFS9 = 4 THENCLS : GOT04 
j3j3 ELSE27j3 

4J30 PRINT@4 , "PRESS NUMBER OF SEL 
ECTION" 

4 1)3 FORX=32T063:PRINT@X,CHR$(175 
) :NEXTX 

42J25 PRINT@68,"1. ENTER NEW PAYCH 
ECKS" 

43j3 PRINT@l£Jj2, 
NSES" 

440 PRINT@132, 
XPENSES" 

450 PRINT@164, "4 . DEDUCT MISC EX 
PENSES" 

460 PRINTS 19 6 , 
APE" 

470 PRINT@228, 

X JTXXT IZt 

480 PRINT@260, 
SET GAP" 
490 PRINT@292, 
TER" 



'2. LOAD MISC EXPE 
'3 . DEDUCT FIXED E 



'5. SAVE DATA TO T 

'6. LOAD DATA FROM 

'7. SKIPF PROGRAM/ 

'8. OUTPUT TO PRIN 

'9 . QUIT / RESET p 



aid FLAGS" 
510 FORX=352T0383:PRINT@X,CHR$(l 
75) :NEXTX 

520 PRINT@388 , "CURRENT MONTH: 
"CX$" 

530 PRINT@450, "PRESENT BALANCE: 
":PRINT@46 8,USING"$ ####.##" ;CB 

540 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN540 
, 550 IFVAL(Z$)<1 THEN540 ELSE IFV 
■ AL(Z$)>9 THEN540 

: 560 ON VAL(Z$) GOTO570 , 1140 , 800 , 

1360, 1640, 18 40,2160, 2510, 2050 
! 570 CLS 

. 580 PRINT@0, "CHECK #1.. " : PRINT§ 



ORDER PHONE (416) 456-0032 

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Please add $2.00 lor handling, Oniario residents add 7% provincial tax 
itch o ur catalogue for discounts, hints and tips and chance to win software. 

M icro • Ff re the ultimate secret weapon. 
Have you beat your thumbs more than the aliens? This is a great 
rapid fire circuit that's easily installed on any joystick. Has no computer 
side eltects. Comes wilh complete instructions and calibration program 
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Class Monitor Dual monitor driver 

The best monitor driver for a^y Coco. It drives any composite, colour 
or monochrome monitors. Complete with dual audio outputs for 
immediate access ol either or both monilsrs, Simple installation 
instructions. $31.50 ($39.50 CON.) 

Lazer Mazer master puzzle of reflection 
The supreme game of suspense. Yours is the strategic battle of time and 
space. $24.95 ($29.95 CON.) 

Battle to D-Day the multiple player adventure 

The master game of strategy. Battle against time, battle against the 
Third Reich. Up to four joystick players. Adventure in tnoughlware. 

$29.95 {$38.95 CDN.J 



" : PRINT 



" : PRINT 



11, USING" $ ###.##"; PA ( 1) :PRINT@2 
4, ,I -"CM$PD(1) 
59j3 PRINT@3 2, "CHECK #2., 
@43 , USING "$ ###.##"; PA (2) : PRINT© 
56, "-"CM$PD(2) 
6j3j2J PRINT@64, "CHECK #3.. 
§75,USING"$ ###.##"; PA (3) : PRINT© 
88, "-"CM$PD(3) 

61j3 PRINT@96, "CHECK #4.. ": PRINT 
§1/37, USING "$ ###.##" ;PA( 4) : PRINT 
@12j3, "-"CM$PD(4) 

62J3 PRINT@128, "CHECK #5.. " : PRIN 
T@13 9 ,USING f, $ ###.##" ;PA (5) : PRIN 
T@152, "- ff CM$PD(5) 
63J3 PRINT 

64j3 PRINT" <E>NTER PAYCHECK <M>A 
IN MENU" 

65$ FORX=384T0415:PRINT§X, "*":NE 
XTX 

66j3 PRINT@422 , "PAYCHECK f S WILL L 
OAD IN SEQUENCE (1 TO 

5) " 

Z$=INKEY$ I IFZ $=» "THEN67j2J 
IF Z$="M" THENCLS : GOT04j3j3 
IFZ$= H E" THEN7j3j3 ELSE67j3 
PRINT @ 2 9 5 , " ARE YOU SURE (Y/N 



67,0 
68J2 
69J2 
7j2)j3 

)" 

71/3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$="" THEN7 1/3 EL 

SEIFZ$="Y" THEN72/3 ELSE57/2) 

72/2) CLS : PRINT@7 , "paycheck entry 

mode" 

73/3 FORX=3 2T063 :PRINT@X, "X" : NEXT 
X 

74/3 IFPA(l)=/3 THENINPUT" ENTER AM 
OUNT" ;PA(1) : INPUT" DAY OF MONTH" 
;PD(1) :CB=CB+PA(1) :GOT057/3 
75$ IFPA(2)==0 THENIN PUT" ENTER AM 
OUNT" ; PA (2) : INPUT" DAY OF MONTH"; 

PD(2) :CB=CB+PA(2) :GOT057/3 

76/3 IFPA(3)=^ THENINPUT" ENTER AM 

OUNT" ; PA (3) : INPUT" DAY OF MONTH" ; 




^QUALITY 

\COMPUT€R PR 

luorii 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Machine GenisiS assembly tutor...plus 

is a clean and simple approach to learning binary pfogramming. The 
package includes tuN beginners instruction in plain language, an editor 
assembler, a debugger, a disassembler and utilities for advanced study 
and application. Fantastic value at only $34.95 ($49.95 CON.) 

Buy Quality and Value! 



Keeping Track more than a disk manager. 

I? you own more than two disks you'll love Keeping Track. A manager 
menu ol nina utilities that do it all 1 . The real highlight is "I", the 
directory/autostart, it's a continuous access I.D. directory that loads 
and executes any program wilh a single keystroke. All programs 
fully documented. $29 35 ($38 95 CON.) Reviewed March 87 

Map ! n Zap semi automatic disk repair 

The layman's step by step kit for directory and grain table repair, 
Locates errors, maps out disk contents to screen or printer, backs 
up any flawed disk and prompts buiri in disk zap for repair. Complete 
with full tutorial on Coco's disk input / output access operation. 
$19.95 C$24.95 CON.) Reviewed January 87 

Code Buster machine language disassembler 

Three terrific programs to expfore machine Fanguage, Screen or printer 
accurate disassembly of binary code. Simple prompted procedure 
with some Instruction to dissect and understand your ROMs Fully 
documented for only $19.95 ($24.95 CDN.) 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 75 



PD(3) :CB=CB+PA(3) : GOT057)3 
77 ft IFPA(4)=)3 THEN INPUT" ENTER AH 
OUNT" ; PA ( 4 ) : INPUT" DAY OF MONTH" ; 
PD(4) : CB=CB+PA(4) :GOT057)3 

78) 3 IFPA(5)=)3 THENINPUT" ENTER AM 
OUNT " ; PA ( 5 ) : I NPUT " DAY OF MONTH" ; 
PD(5) : CB=CB+PA(5) :GOT057)3 

79) 3 PRINT@134 , "all paychecks loa 
ded " : F0RT=1T02 )3)3)3 : NEXTT : GOT057)3 

8) 3)3 CLS: POKE65495, ft 

81) 3 PRINT@6 , "$$ FIXED DEDUCTIONS 

$$" 

82) 3 DC$="<-paidi " 

83) 3 FORX=32T063 : PRINT@X,CHR$ (175 
) : NEXTX 

84) 3 PRINT§64, n l. " FD$ ( 1 ) : PRINT@7 
8, USING" $ ###.##" ;FD(1) :IFCK(1) = 

I THENPRINT@88,DC$ 

85J3 PRINT@96,"2. "FD$ ( 2 ) : PRINTgl 

1) 3 r USING" $ ###.##" ;FD (2) :IFCK(2) 
=1 THENPRINT@12)3, DC$ 
86)3 PRINI§128,"3. "FD$(3 
142,USING"$ ###. ## !! ;FD(3 
)=1 THENPRINT@152,DC$ 

8 7)3 PRINT@16)8, "4 . H FD$(4 
174,USING"$ ###.##";FD(4 
)=1 THENPRINT@184,DC$ 

88) 3 PRINT@192, "5 . "FD$(5 

2) 36,USING"$ ###.##»;FD(5 
) =1 THENPRINT@216 , DC$ 

89) 3 PRINT@224, "6. "FD$(6 
238,USING"$ ###.##";FD(6 
)=1 THENPRINT@248,DC$ 

9) 3)3 PRINT@256 , "7 . "FD$(7 
27)3,USING"$ ###. ##";FD(7 
)=1 THENPRINT@2 8)3,DC$ 
910 PRINT@288,"8. "FD$(8 

3) 32,USING"$ ###.##";FD(8 
)=1 THENPRINT@312 , DC$ 
92)3 PRINT@32)3,"9. "FD$(9 
334,USING"$ ###.##";FD(9 
)=1 THENPRINT@344 , DC$ 

9 3)3 PRINT? 3 8 4," CURRENT CASH BALA 
NCE : " : PRINT§4)37 , USING " $ ####.##» 
;CB 

94)3 PRINT : F0RX=1T09 : P=P+CK (X) : NE 

XTX:IFP=9 THEN97J3 ELSEP=)3 

9 5)3 PRINT(§45)3, " <D>EDUCT BILL < 

M>AIN MENU" 

96)3 GOT098J3 

97 ft PRINT" <M>AIN MENU 

II :GOT01j3j3j3 

98) 3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN98)3 

99) 3 IFZ$ = "D" THEN1J31)3 ELSEIFZ$ = " 
M lf THENPOKE65494 , ft : CLS : GOT04 ft ft E 
LSE98J3 



: PRINT© 
: IFCK(3 

: PRINTS 
: IFCK(4 

: PRINT© 
: IFCK(5 

: PRINT© 
: IFCK(6 

: PRINT© 
: IFCK(7 

: PRINT© 
: IFCK(8 

: PRINTS 
: IFCK(9 



1)3)3)3 IF INKE Y$ = "M" THENPOKE 6 5 4 9 4 

,)3: CLS: GOTO 4)3)3 ELSE1)3)3)3 

1)31)3 PRINT"WHICH BILL TO DEDUCT 

(1-9)" 

1)320 Z$ = INKEY$:IFZ$-""THEN1 J 020 
Ij33j3 IF Z$=" / 0" THEN1)32)3 
1)34)3 IFZ$=" 1"THENIFCK ( 1 ) - 0 THENC 
B=CB-FD(1) : CK(1) =1 : GOT08j3j3ELSE S 
OUND1, 3 :GOT08)3)3 

Xj35j3 IFZ$ = "2"THENIFCK(2)=)3 THENC 
B=CB-FD (2) : CK(2) = l:GOT08)3)3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :GOT08)3)3 

1)36)3 IFZ$="3"THENIFCK(3)=)3 THENC 
B=CB-FD(3) : CK(3 ) =1 : GOT08)3)3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :GOT08)3)3 

107)3 IFZ $="4 "THENIFCK ( 4 ) =)3 THENC 
B=CB-FD(4) : CK(4) =l:GOT08j3j3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :GOT08)3)3 

1)38)3 IFZ$ = "5"THENIFCK(5) =)3 THENC 
B=CB-FD(5) :CK(5)=l:GOT08)3)3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :GOT08)3)3 

1) 39)3 IFZ $=" 6 "THENIFCK ( 6 ) =)3 THENC 
B=CB-FD(6) :CK(6)=l:GOT08j3j3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :GOTO8j3,0 

11) 3)3 IFZ $="7 "THENIFCK ( 7 ) =J3 THENC 
B=CB-FD(7) :CK(7)=1:G0T08J3)3 ELSES 
OUND1.3 : GOTO 8)3)3 

111J3 IFZ$-"8"THENIFCK(8) =ft THENC 
B=CB-FD(8) :CK(8)=1:G0T08J3)3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :GOT08j3j3 

112) 3 IFZ $=" 9 "THENIFCK ( 9 ) =)3 THENC 
B=CB-FD(9) :CK(9)=l:G0T08)3)3 ELSES 
OUND1, 3 :G0T08J3)3 

113) 3 CLS :GOT04)3)3 

114) 3 CLS3:PRINT@66, "1. CLEAR ALL 
MISC BILLS 11 ; 

115) 3 PRINT@98, "2 . KEEP PREVIOUS 
MISC BILLS" ; :PRINT@13)3, "3 . RETUR 
N TO MENU " ; 

116) 3 PRXNT@194,NB" BILLS CURRENT 
LY LOADED " ; 

117) 3 IFNB=9 THENPRINT@2 6 5 , "MISC 
IS FULL!"; 

118) 3 Z$=INKEY$; IFZ$ = "1" THEN1190 
ELSEIFZ$="2 " THENCT=NB+1 : GOT012 

2) 3 ELSEIFZ$="3"THENCLS : GOT04)3)3 E 
LS E 1 1 8 )3 

119) 3 F0RX=1T09 : MD$ (X) =" " : MD (X) =0 
: NEXTX :CT=l:NB=j3 

12) 3)3 GOT0122)3 

121) 3 CLS3 : PRINT© 2 3 5 , "MISC FULL" ; 
: FORT=lT02)3j3)3 : NEXT : CLS : GOT04)3)3 

122) 3 IFNB=9 THEN121)3 ELSE CLS3:P 
RINT" HOW MANY NEW BILLS TO ADD? 

I! 

12 30 Z$=INKEY$MFZ$=""THEN12 3)3 



176 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



124j3 IFZ$ = "j3 lf THENCLS : GOT04j3j3 EL 
SEIFNB+VAL(Z$) >9 THEN12 5j3 ELSENB 
==NB+VAL(Z$) :GOT0127j3 
125j3 CLS3 : PRINT@22 6, "MISC ONLY H 

OLDS 9 ENTRIES! ! 11 ; : FORT=lT015j2j3 : 
NEXT: CLS :GOT0122j3 

126j3 CLS:PRINT@7, 11 $$ MISC LOADI 
NG $$'» :FORX=32T063 : PRINT@X , CHR$ ( 
175) :NEXT:GOT012 9j3 

127J3 CLS:FORY=l TO VAL (Z$) : PRINT 
§7," $$ MISC LOADING $$" 
128j3 FORX=3 2T063 : PRINT@X,CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXTX 

129j3 PRINTCT 11 . 11 : INPUT "NAME OF B 
ILL 11 ;MD$ (CT) :IFMD$ (CT) = IMI THEN129 

13j3j3 IFLEN(MD$ (CT) ) >8 THEN13 2j3 
131)3 IFLEN(MD$ (CT) ) <8 THENMD$ (CT 
)=MD$ (CT) +CHR$ (32) :GOT0131j3 ELSE 
133j3 

132j3 CLS3 :PRINT@228 / "EIGHT (8) L 
ETTERS MAX! " ; : FORT=lT015j3j3 : NEXT : 
CLS:GOT012 6j3 

133j3 : INPUT "AMOUNT OF BILL";MD(C 
T) 

134j3 CLS:CT=CT+1:NEXTY 
135j3 CLS:GOT04j3j3 

136j3 DC$="<-paid! " : CLS : POKE65495 

137j3 PRINT@5," $$ MISC DEDUCTION 
S $$ " 

138j3 FORX=32T063:PRINT@X,CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXTX 

139j3 IFMD$(1)<>"" THENPRINT@64 , " 

1. "MD$(1) : PRINT@78 , USING" $ ###. 
##";MD(1) :IFCL(1)=1 THENPRINT@88 
,DC$ 

14j3j3 IFMD$(2)<>"" THENPRINT@9 6 , " 

2. "MD$ (2) : PRINT @ 110 , USING 11 $ ### 
• ##" ;MD(2) : IFCL(2) =1 THENPRINT@1 
2j3,DC$ 

141)3 IFMD$(3)<>"" THENPRINT@128, 
"3, "MD$(3) : PRINT@142 , USING" $ ## 
#.##";MD(3) :IFCL(3)=1 THENPRINT@ 
152, DC$ 

142j3 IFMD$(4)<>"" THENPRINT@16j3 , 
"4. "MD$(4) : PRINT@174 , USING" $ ## 
#. ##" ;MD(4) : IFCL(4)=1 THENPRINT@ 
184, DC$ 

143)3 IFMD$(5)<>"" THENPRINT@192 , 
"5. "MD$(5) : PRINT@2j36 , USING 11 $ ## 
#. ##" ;MD(5) :IFCL(5)=1 THENPRINT@ 
216, DC$ 

144J3 IFMD$(6)<>"" THENPRINT@224 , 
"6. "MD$(6) : PRINT@238 , USING" $ ## 
#. ##" ;MD(6) :IFCL(6)=1 THENPRINT@ 



248 , DC$ 

145)3 IFMD$(7)<>"" THENPRINT@2 5 6 , 
"7. "MD$ (7) : PRINT@27j3 ,USING'»$ ## 
#. ##" ;MD(7) : IFCL(7) =1 THENPRINT@ 
28)3, DC$ 

146j3 IFMD$(8)<>"" THENPRINT@288, 
"8. "MD$ (8 ) : PRINT@3 (52 , USING "$ ## 
#. ##" ;MD(8) :IFCL(8)=1 THENPRINT@ 
312, DC$ 

147p IFMD$(9)<>"" THENPRINT@32)3, 
"9. "MD$(9) : PRINT@334 , USING" $ ## 
#. ##" ;MD(9) :IFCL(9)=1 THENPRINT@ 
344, DC$ 

148) 3 PRINT@384 , "CURRENT CASH BAL 
ANCE : " : PRINT @ 4)37 , USING" $ ####.## 
" ; CB 

149) 3 PRINT@45)3," <D>EDUCT BILL 
<M>AIN MENU" 

15)3)3 Z$ = INKEY$ :IFZ$ = ""THEN15)3)3 

151) 3 IFZ$ = "D" THEN152)3 ELSEIFZ$= 
"M" THENPOKE 65 494 , )3 : CLS : GOT04)3)3 
ELSE15)3)3 

152) 3 PRINT" WHICH BILL TO DEDUCT 
(1-9)" 

153) 3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN153)3 

154) 3 IFZ$ = " 1"THENIFCL (1) =)3ANDMD ( 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
tokeyin programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 177 



1) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD ( 1 ) :CL(1)=1:G0 
T0136J3 ELSE S0UND1 , 3 : GOT013 6j3 
155J3 IFZ $ = l! 2 "THENIFCL ( 2 ) =J3ANDMD ( 

2) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD (2) :CL(2)=1: GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :G0T0136J3 
156j3 IFZ$= lf 3" THENIFCL ( 3 ) =J3ANDMD ( 

3) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD(3) : CL( 3 ) =1 : GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :G0T013 6J3 
157JZ IFZ $ = ,f 4 "THENIFCL ( 4 ) =J3ANDMD ( 

4) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD ( 4 ) : CL ( 4 ) =1 : GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :G0T013 6J3 

158) 3 IFZ $ = "5 "THENIFCL (5) =J3ANDMD( 

5) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD ( 5 ) :CL(5)=l:GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :G0T013 6J3 

159) 3 I FZ$ = 11 6 "THENIFCL (6) =)3ANDMD ( 

6) >)3 THENCB=CB-MD ( 6 ) : CL ( 6 ) =1 : GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :GOT013 6)3 

16) 3)3 IFZ$ = "7"THENIFCL (7) =)3ANDMD ( 

7 ) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD ( 7 ) : CL ( 7 } =1 : GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :GOT0136)3 

161) 3 IFZ$="8"THENIFCL(8) =)3ANDMD ( 

8) >)3 THENCB=CB-MD(8) :CL(8)=l:GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUND1, 3 :GOT013 6)3 

162) 3 IFZ $ = " 9 " THENIFCL ( 9 ) =)3ANDMD ( 

9 ) >J3 THENCB=CB-MD ( 9 ) : CL ( 9 ) =1 : GOT 
0136)3 ELSESOUNDl,3:GOT013 6)3 

163) 3 CLS:GOT04)3)3 

164 J3 CLS : PRINT "PREPARE RECORDER. 
.PRESS ANY KEY" 

165) 3 FORX=32T063 : PRINT@X, CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXTX 

166) 3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$ = ""THEN166)3 

167) 3 FORX=)3T031:PRINT@X, CHR$ (175 
) :NEXTX:PRINT@74 , "SAVING DATA" 

168) 3 FORX=96T0127:PRINT@X,CHR$(l 
75) :NEXTX 

169) 3 OPEN "0", #-l,"DATA" 

17) 3)3 F0RQ8=1T09 : PRINT #-l,CK(Q8) 
:NEXTQ8 

171) 3 F0RQ9=1T09: PRINT #-l,CL(Q9) 
:NEXTQ9 

172) 3 PRINT #-l,CB: PRINT #-l,CM$ 

173) 3 PRINT #-l,CX$: PRINT #-l,NB 

174) 3 F0RX=1T05: PRINT #-l,PA(X):N 
EXTX 

175) 3 F0RX2=1T05: PRINT #-l,PD(X2) 
:NEXTX2 

176) 3 F0RX3=1T09 : PRINT #-l,FD$(X3 
) :NEXTX3 

177) 3 F0RX4=1T09 : PRINT #-l,FD(X4) 
:NEXTX4 

178) 3 F0RX5=1T09 : PRINT #-l,MD$(X5 
) :NEXTX5 

179) 3 F0RX6=1T09: PRINT #-l,MD(X6) 
:NEXTX6 

18) 3)3 CLOSE #-1 



181) 3 CLS 3 

182) 3 PRINT@2 9 9, "DATA SAVED"; 

183) 3 F0RX=1T02)3)3)3 : NEXT : CLS : G0T04 

184) 3 CLS :PRINT@)3, "PREPARE RECORD 
ER. .PRESS ANY KEY" 

185) 3 FORX=32T063 :PRINT@X, CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXTX 

186) 3 Z$ = INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN186)3 

187) 3 FORX=)3T06? : PRINT@X , CHR$ ( 175 
) :NEXTX 

188) 3 PRINT@ 74 , "LOADING DATA" 

189) 3 FORX=96T0127:PRINT@X,CHR$(l 
75) :NEXTX 

19)3)3 OPEN "I", #-l,"DATA" 

191) 3 F0RQ8 = 1T09 : INPUT #-l,CK(Q8) 
:NEXTQ8 

192) 3 F0RQ9 = 1T09 : INPUT #-l,CL(Q9) 
:NEXTQ9 

193) 3 INPUT #-l,CB: INPUT #-l,CM$ 

194) 3 INPUT #-l,CX$: INPUT #-l,NB 

195) 3 F0RX=1T05: INPUT #-l,PA(X):N 
EXTX 

196) 3 F0RX2=1T05: INPUT #-l,PD(X2) 
:NEXTX2 

197) 3 F0RX3 = 1T09 : INPUT #-l,FD$(X3 
) :NEXTX3 

198) 3 F0RX4 = 1T09 : INPUT #-l,FD(X4) 
:NEXTX4 

199) 3 F0RX5=1T09: INPUT #-l,MD$(X5 
) :NEXTX5 

2)3)3)3 F0RX6=1T09 : INPUT #-l,MD(X6) 
:IF EOF (-1) THEN2)31J3 ELSENEXTX6 
NEXTX6 

2)31)3 CLOSE #-1 
2)32)3 CLS 3 

2)33)3 PRINT@2 99 , "DATA LOADED"; 
2)34)3 F0RS=1T02)3)3)3 : NEXT : CLS : W$ = " " 
:GOT04)3)3 

2)35)3 CLS3:PRINT@)3, "<Q>UIT 

<R>ESET FLAGS" 

2)36)3 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$ = "" THEN2)36)3 
2)37)3 IFZ$="Q" THEN212)3 ELSEIFZ$= 
"R" THEN2J38J3 ELSE2)36)3 
2)38)3 CLS3 : PRINT@2 33 , "CLEARING FL 
AGS " ; 

2)39)3 F0RX=1T09:CK(X)=£:NEXTX 
21)3)3 F0RY=1T09:CL(Y)=)3:NEXTY 
211)3 F0RT=1T01)3)3)3 : NEXT : CLS : G0T04 

212(3 CLS 3 : PRINT@224 , "DID YOU SAV 
E UPDATED DATA (Y/N)?"; 

213) 3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$="" THEN213J3 

214) 3 IFZ$ = "N" THENCLS : GOT04)3)3 EL 
SE215)3 

215) 3 CLS:POKE3 59 , 6)3:PRINT"THANK 



178 THE RAINBOW March 1987 




■ 3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

■ True lower case characters 

■ User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

■ Right justification 

■ Easy hyphenation 

■ Drives any printer 

■ Embedded format and 
control codes 

■ Runs in 16K ? 32K, or 64K 

■ Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

■ No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply slated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads, 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
Tl, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, It makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 





, .one oj the best programs for the Color 
Computer / have seen. , . 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 


1982 


TELEWRITERS 



Bui now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64, For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewnter~64 text buffer grows accordingly, In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 5 i x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exac? layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
f if rie. Compare this wilh cumbersome 
''windows*' that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVU/VIll, DMP-100/2K), Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet , etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access io 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable fonl and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font 'Typewriter" feature send?, typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from she keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use wilh MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line herders and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer, Chain prim any number of files from cassette 



or disk 




RAINBOW 

Cl':n*tCAT:OM 
SMI 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sire saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: prim directory with free 
space to screen or primer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scroUing, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end Hue, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

insert or delete text anywhere «n the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the .screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 




. . , truly a slate of the art word processor. , , 
outstanding m every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49,95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation, (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store, If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1 258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 

Radio/hack stores 

via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple tt is a trademark of Apple Composer, Inc.; Atari is a trademark 
of Atari, trie: TRS-80 i* a trademark of Tandy Corp. MX-80 is 2 
trademark of Epson America. Inc. 



YOU FOR USING MY BUDGET 111 11 : POKE 
359,126:END 

216J3 CLS:PRINT@5, 11 <S>KIPF < 

G>AP" :FORT=32T063 :PRINT@T,CHR$ (1 
75) :NEXTT 

217j3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN217j3 

218j3 IFZ$ = ff S ff THEN219j3 ELSEIFZ$ = 

"G" THEN2 32j3 ELSE217j3 

219j3 CLS : PRINT@j3 , "PREPARE RECORD 

ER. . PRESS ANY KEY 11 ; 

22j3j3 FORT=3 2T063 :PRINT@T, CHR$ (17 

5) :NEXTT 

221j3 Z$ = INKEY$ : IFZ$= lf "THEN2 21j3 
222j3 CLS : PRINT@8 , "SKIPPING PROGR 
AM" 

223j3 FORX=3 2T063 :PRINT@X,CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXT 
224j3 SKIPF 

2 2 5 j3 CLS : PRINT @ 8 , " PROGRAM SKI PPE 
D 1 " 

226j3 FORX=32T063 : PRINT@X, CHR$(17 
5) :NEXT 

2 2 7j3 FORX=lT015j3j3: NEXT: CLS 

228j3 PRINT@2," <S>ET GAP <M 

>AIN MENU" 

229j3 FORX=32T063 :PRINT@X, CHR$ (17 
5) : NEXT 



GRAFPLOT 



NEW ! 



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TAPE 5 in 



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43.00 DISK * 
REFUND W/PURCHA8E ^ 
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- RAINBOW 



^ £ \ Spreadsheets 
-Full-page Printed 



V* 



30 DAY 
UNCONDITIONAL^ 
MONEY— BACK 
GUARANT 



RAINBOW 



oo 



Projection: T-Bills, FY 
T 1 T 



'87 



& 



0 




u 
> 
<viv> 



4 6 
Months Since T-Bill 



8 10 12 

I nvestments 



L. 



* 



AUTOMATICALLY LOADS DATA FROM MOST POPULAR SPREADSHEETS. 
2*5»1 GRAPHING BYMBOLB AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 
AUTOMATICALLY SCALES AND LABELS ALL THREE OF THE AXES. 
CALCULATES MATH FUNCTIONS, INTEGRALS AND MOVING AVERAGES. 
FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN W/ COMPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 



* FULL-PAGE 8CREENPR INTS ON ANY PRINTERi 5FEC :FY WITH ORDER . 
REUUIRE8 32K EXT. BABICi TAPE - «40.0O DISK - «43. 00 



NEW ! ! 
F=-R I NTI 
UN I VI 



: Picture ^Perfect 



:r 
:re 



BCRI 



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NEW ■ ! 
LJ T" II — I T V 
PROGRAM 



GET "PICTURE PERFECT" FULL-PAGE PRINTOUTS EVERY TIME! 
"PERFECTLY SIMPLE" TO OPERATE - "SIMPLY PERFECT" RESULTS! 
"PERFECTLY COMPATIBLE" WITH ALL DOT MATRIX PRINTERS! 

GET "PERFECT CONTROL" OFi HEIGHT, WIDTH, POSITION, 
BAUD RATE, DOT DENSITY, NEGATIVE IMAGES, ETC. 

THE "PERFECT B0LUTI0N" TO YOUR GRAPHICS PRINTING NEEDS! 

COMPATIBLE WITH GRAPH ICOM AND COCO MAX PICTURES! 



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YOUR PERSONAL CHECK IS WELCOME! SHIPMENT WITHIN 4B HOURS! 

ADD «3.00 SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS. CA. RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 



23j3j3 Z$=INKEY$ : IFZ$ = " "THEN2 3j3j3 
231j3 IFZ$="M" THENCLS : GOT04j3j3 EL 
SEIFZ$ = fl S fl THEN2 32 j3 ELSE231j3 
232j3 CLS : PRINT@j3 , "PREPARE RECORD 
ER. . PRESS ANY KEY 11 

233j3 FORX=32T063 :PRINT@X,CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXTX 

234j3 Z$ = INKEY$: IFZ$ = ""THEN234j3 
2 3 5j3 M0T0R0N : CLS : PRINT@j3 , "MOTOR 
IS ON.. TAP ANY KEY TO STOP" 
236j3 FORX=32T063 :PRINT@X, CHR$ (17 
5) :NEXTX 

237j3 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$ = ""THEN237j3 
238j3 MOTOROFF:CLS:GOT04j3j3 
239j3 IFCM$ = "JAN" THENCX $ = " JANUAR 
Y" : RETURN 

24j3j3 IFCM$="FEB" THENCX$ = " FEBRUA 
RY": RETURN 

241j3 IFCM$ = "MAR" THENCX$ = " MARCH" 
: RETURN 

242j3 IFCM$ = "APR" THENCX$="APRIL" 
: RETURN 

243j3 IFCM$ = "MAY" THENCX$=CM$ : RET 
URN 

244j3 IFCM$ = "JUN" THENCX$ = " JUNE" : 
RETURN 

245j3 IFCM$="JUL" THENCX$ = " JULY" : 
RETURN 

246j3 IFCM$ = "AUG" THENCX$ = " AUGUST 
" : RETURN 

247j3 IFCM$ = "SEP" THENCX$ = "SEPTEM 
BER" : RETURN 

248j3 IFCM$ = "0CT" THENCX$ = "0CT0BE 
R" : RETURN 

249j3 IFCM$="N0V" THENCX$ = "NOVEMB 
ER" : RETURN 

25j3j3 IFCM$="DEC" THENCX$ = " DECEMB 
ER": RETURN ELSECM$=" ": RETURN 
251j3 CLS3 : PRINT@8 , "OUTPUT TO PRI 
NTER" ; 

252J3 PRINT@2 31 , "ARE YOU SURE (Y/ 
N)"; 

253j3 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$='»" THEN2 53 j3 
254j3 IFZ$ = "N" THENCLS : GOT04j3j3 
255j3 IFZ$ = "Y" THENCLS : G0T02 5 6j3 E 
LSE2530 

256j3 CLS3 : INPUT"DAY OF MONTH" ;DM 
:INPUT"AMOUNT OF PAY THIS WEEK"; 
AP:CLS3 : PRINT" *VERIFY PRINTER IS 

ON AND READY*"; 
257j3 PRINT@234 , "PRESS ANY KEY" ; 
258j3 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$="" THEN2 58j3 
2590 CLS3:PRINT@2 3 3, "STARTING BU 
DGET" ; 

26j3j3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ; 
CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (84) ;CHR$ (48) ;TAB(2 
3);"=> BUDGET < = " ; CHR$ ( lj3 ) ; CHR$ ( 



180 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 





Toll Free 

Orders Only 
800-628-2828 
EXT 850 



Information 
301-521-4886 




If You Pay Taxes 

Need Coco-Accountant 

All our software is CoCo 3 Compatible 






' 'It s the most useful piece of soft- 
ware I own. " 

That's what we hear again and 
again from folks who buy Coco-Ac- 
countant II. This 32/64K single-entry 
accounting system for the home and 
small business is all you need to 
manage your finances and give you 
the information you need at tax time. 

We wrote the original version for 
ourselves two years ago because 
we wanted to know three things: 
Where did the money come from, where did it go, and 
what can we deduct from our taxes? 

As it turned out, we liked it better than anything else 
on the market, so we decided to sell it. And we've been 
improving it ever since. 

People say they like it because it's easy to use. Just 
spend a few minutes each month entering your data: 
checks, cash outlays, credit card expenses or income. 
In any order. CoCo-Accountant takes the whole mess 
and makes sense out of it. Here's what it does: 

♦ Lists and totals entries by month, offsetting in- 
come against expenses. 

♦ Lists and totals entries by account, for a month or 
the whole year. 

♦ Lists and totals entries by payee or income 
source, for a month or the whole year. 




TAX 
DEDUCTIBLE 




♦ Provides a year-to-date summary 
by account. 

♦ Prints a spreadsheet showing 
activity by account and month for 
the whole year (seeing this one is 
believing). 

♦ Flags deductible expenses. 

♦ Flags expenses subject to 
sales tax and figures out how much 
sales tax you paid! 

♦ Lets you define up to 48 ac- 
counts (in 64K version). 

♦ Takes 900 entries in 64K version, 500 in 32K disk 
and 450 in 32K tape. 

♦ Sorts entries by date. 

♦ Stores your data to tape or disk. 

You can use CoCo Accountant as a simple check- 
book register or make it into a comprehensive home ac- 
counting package. Our customers tell us they use it in 
the home, at school, for their clubs, churches and small 
businesses. In fact, they use it in ways we never 
dreamed of! 

CoCo-Accountant (I is so easy to use and flexible 
that you'll be delighted. So stop shoving all those re- 
cords in a shoe box and join the computer age! 

The price of Coco-Accountant II is $34.95. Please be 
sure to tell us your memory requirements and whether 
you want tape or disk. 




Harness, Greyhound 



•HORSE RACES 




•HARNESS RACES- 




DOG RACES- 



Use your Color Computer to improve your performance 
at the track! These 16K programs for Thoroughbred, Har- 
ness and Greyhound racing rank the horses or dogs in 
each race quickly and easily, even if you've never handi- 
capped before. All the information you need is readily avail- 
able from the Racing form, harness or dog track program. 
We even provide diagrams showing you where to find each 
item! 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, past 
performance, weight, class, jockey's record, beaten favor- 
ite and post position. Harness factors include speed, post 
position, driver's record, breaking tendencies, class, park- 



ed-out signs and beaten favorite. Greyhound factors in- 
clude speed, past performance, maneuvering ability, favor- 
ite box, class, kennel record, beaten favorite and breaking 
ability. 

We include complete instruction and a wagering guide 
that tells you which races to bet and which to avoid — one 
of the real secrets of good handicapping. You can buy a 
more expensive handicapper, but we don't think you can 
buy a better one! Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound 
Handicapper, $34.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for 
$54.95 or all three for $74.95. 



Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore. Md. 21208 





13) 

261j3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(17) ;CX$;DM" , 1 
986" ;TAB(128) ;CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (84) ; 
CHR$ (49) ; 11 (CHECK) 11 
262)3 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(84) ; 
CHR$(54) ;CHR$(28) ;CHR$(45) "*";C 
HR$ ( lj3 ) ;CHR$ (13) 

263j3 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (2 7) ;CHR$(84) ; 
CHR$ (5j3) 

264j3 PRINT#-2,TAB(15) ; "PAYCHECK 
$ ";AP 

265j3 PRINT#-2, CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(84) ; 
CHR$ (48) 

266j3 FORX=lT09:CLS3:PRINT@4j3, "FI 
XED DEDUCTIONS"; 

267)3 PRINT@233 ,FD$(X) 11 M FD (X) ; 
2 68j3 PRINT@294 , "PRINT THIS BILL 
(Y/N) ; 

269)3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$= IMI THEN269j3 
2 7)3^ IFZ$= lf N lf THENNEXTX ELSEIFZ$ 
= n Y " THEN272j3 ELSE269j3 

271) 3 GOT0273)3 

272) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(15) ;CHR$(27) ;C 
HR$(84) ;CHR$(49) ;»- ";FD(X); M "; 
FD$(X); fl <F> () 11 ;CHR$ (27) ;CHR 
$(84) ;CHR$(5)3) ;CHR$(1)3) ;CHR$(13) 



:AP=AP-FD(X) : PRINT#-2 , TAB (15) ; »- 

ii :PRiNT#-2,TAB(15) 

: PRINT#-2 , USING 11 $ ###.##" ;AP: PRI 
NT#-2, "BALANCE 11 : NEXTX 

273) 3 F0RX=1T09 : CLS3 : PRINT@4)3 , "MI 
SC DEDUCTIONS" ;: IFMD$ (X) ="" THEN 
279)3 ELSEPRINT@233 ,MD$ (X) " "MD( 

X) ; 

274) 3 PRINT@294 , "PRINT THIS BILL 
(Y/N)"; 

275) 3 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$ = flfl THEN275)3 

276) 3 IFZ$="N" THENNEXTX ELSEIFZ$ 
= "Y" THEN278)3 ELSE275)3 

277) 3 GOT0279)3 

278) 3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(15) ;CHR$(27) ;C 
HR$(84) ;CHR$(49) ;"- ";MD(X);" " 
;MD$ (X) ; "<M> () " ;CHR$ (27) ;CHR 
$(84) ;CHR$(5)3) ;CHR$(1)3) ;CHR$(13) 
:AP=AP-MD(X) : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 15) ;»- 
":PRINT#-2,TAB(15) 

: PRINT # - 2 , USING " $ ###.##"; AP : PRI 
NT#-2, "BALANCE" : NEXTX 

279) 3 CLS:PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ; CHR$ ( 
84) ;CHR$ (54) ;CHR$ (28) ;CHR$ (45) "* 
":F0RX=1T03:PRINT#-2,CHR$ (1)3) ;CH 
R$ ( 13 ) : NEXTX : GOT04)3)3 



Corrections 



"GIME That Lowercase" (Hint, January 1987, Page 
146): Due to a production error, one of the addresses 
in the POKE statement is incorrect. The address &HFF33 
should be changed to &HFF22. 



"Fortune Wheel on Tape"(December 1986, Page 50): 

Line 580 of the tape patch should be as follows: 

5B0 FOR RD=1 TD RD 

The variable name RD was listed incorrectly in that 
issue. 



appearing too often as the top card in Column 7. To 
fix this, change the value of 51 in the second FOR- NEXT 
loop of Line 230 to 52. 



"Turn Of The Screw: Taking a Look at How 
Monitors Work" (January 1987, Page 94): The CoCo 
3's RGB output uses positive-going sync pulses — not 
"negative or composite," as stated in this article. The 
preferred monitors are those that have separate 
horizontal and vertical sync input lines and accept 
positive sync. The Sony monitor mentioned by Tony 
DiStefano (or others in the Prof eel, XBR and 11CR 
series with analog RGB inputs) can be used as well, but 
a specially made monitor cable is needed. 



"The Solitary Endeavor" (December 1986, Page 76): 

Tudor Jones has written to tell of a problem with the 
shuffle routine in 5DLTRIRE. Apparently, the cards are 
not fully shuffled, resulting in the king of spades 



For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DPTfl at 
the CoCo SIG prompt and INFO at the Topic? prompt. 



182 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Computer Island Educational Software 



ETT ELECT. TYPING TEACHER 

32K Ext. - $21.95 tape/$26.95 disk 
Visual clues guide you while you learn 
to type without watching you r fingers! 
ETT shows your accuracy, response 
time, and word per minute. You quick- 
ly see how you improve with practice. 
Over 1000 sentence variations using 
every letter of the alphabet, or create 
your own practice sets. 1 0 page study 
guide included. Makes learning to 
type fun. From CoCo Warehouse. 




3 




PRESCHOOL PACK 1 

16K Ext. - $11.95 tape/ $16.95 disk 
Clown and Fish-Num: Two programs 
to help your child recognize and 
count the words and numbers 1-10. 
Hi-res graphics and lively songs help 
to attract and keep attention. 

PRESCHOOL PACK 2 

16K Ext. - $1 1.95 tape/$16.95 disk 

Count Kids and Add Penny: Two pro- 
grams to help your child count and 
add up to 10. Beautiful hkes graphics. 



KING AUTHOR'S TALES 

32K Ext. - $29.94 disk only 

This innovative program allows child- 
ren in grades 2 to 6 to write composi- 
tions, book reports, or short stories 
and save them to files. The material 
can be reviewed, corrected, rewritten, 
saved and reloaded at any time. 
Teachers may create reading com- 
prehension material for their classes. 



COMPARISON SHOPPING 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Learn to be a smart shopper. Player 
compares prices at 3 stores and cal- 
culates savings. Hi-res screen. 
Scoring. 

DISTANCE PROBLEMS 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 

Moving graphics and text combined 
on a Hi-res screen. Rate x Time 
equals Distance in all its forms. 

SALES & BARGAINS 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Learn to find the discounted price. 
Hi-res text and beautiful graphics. 




THE HISTORY GAME 

32K Ext. - $14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 
"Jeopardy" type game. 5 categories 
and 5 questions in each category. 
One or two player game checks your 
knowledge of American History. Dif- 
ferent questions each round. Hi-res 
graphics. 




GRAPH TUTOR 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/ $24.95 disk 
Line, bar, pie and pictographs are de- 
monstrated. Learn to read and use 
these graphs. Create your own 
graphs. Test mode. Hi-res graphics 
throughout. 

EXPLORERS & SETTLERS 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Hi-res screen. Multiple choice quiz on 
explorers and settlers of the new 
world. 

FAMOUS AMERICAN WOMEN 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/ $24.95 disk 
A who-am-l game of over 50 multiple 
choice questions on a Hi-res screen. 




KNOW YOUR STATES 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape only 
Hi-res graphics portray each state for 
you to identify. If you can't, try the 
"HELP" command where you can 
see the state's position within the 
entire United States. Choose the 
number of states you want to try and 
see your score at the end. 



/ 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



ComputenNsland 



VISA 



(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add S1.00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds 




DOWNLOADS 



You Just Have To 

Stay Cool 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



• Is there a way to mount a fan inside of a 
CoCo 2 without another power supply? My 
computer always overheats and destroys 
whatever I am doing. 

Chris Inacio 
York, PA 

Chris, 1 have seen several versions of fans 
for the CoCo, from muffin fans, to a little 
device that I call a "hummingbird." 1 looked 
through the ads and couldn't find any for 
sale. Fans are quite common for serious 
CoCo users. I would recommend a "hum- 
mingbird," my term for a small vibrating, 
rather than oscillating, fan. 

Before you try a fan though, I would 
suggest a heat sink (to draw off heat and 
dissipate it) on your PIA chip. Just take a 
small piece of aluminum (not foil) stock and 
glue it to your PIA chip using heat conduc- 
tive cement. Be sure to avoid any contact 
between the metal and any of the pins on the 
chip. Good luck, and stay cool! 



Level I on CoCo 3 



• / can't get OS-9 Level I to boot on my 
CoCo 3. Do I have to wait for Level II or 
do I have a problem with my software or 
hardware? 

Dennis Alvarez 
Euclid, OH 

Dennis, you don't need OS-9 Level 11 to 
run OS-9 on the CoCo 3. You need Version 
02.00.00 of Level 1. If you have Version 

Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago and he has built several 
68XX systems. 



01.00.00, or 01.01.00, we understand that 
you can exchange it at your local Radio 
Shack store for an upgrade. There will be a 
charge, of course. 

While we are on the subject, those of you 
with CoCo 3s who are interested in 80-by- 
24 text using OS-9 Level I should check the 
OS-9 Database on Delphi. There is a pro- 
gram called CO380 that replaces CCJO with 
either an 80-by-24, or an 80-by-25 full-color 
driver. The driver uses screen memory 
outside your Level 1 workspace, and sup- 
ports several O-PAK and Level 11 screen 
commands. You can use most existing Level 
I software, including most versions of 
Dynastar. 

Hopefully, by the time you read this OS- 
9 Level 1 1 should be in the stores. Should you 
buy Level II? If you are in doubt, try the 
Level I driver. When you get Level 11, the 
programs will be the same, you'll just have 
more memory, and a windowing environ- 
ment. 



Auto-Modem Appeal 



• / am in need of a modem with auto- 
answer/ auto-dial capability. I don't have the 
RS-232 pack. Could you please suggest one? 
Also, where can I get a copy of super- 
patched EDTASM+? 

Jason McCampbell 
St. Johns, MI 

You do not need the RS-232 pack to use 
a modem, Jason. I use a Hayes Smartmo- 
dem connected to the serial I/O port on the 
rear of my CoCo. You will need an RS-232 
pack if you buy a modem that is 1200 baud, 
or above. Reliable communications through 
the serial I/O port can only be obtained at 
300 baud. 

As far as modems are concerned, 1 would 



recommend any brand as long as it's Hayes 
compatible. That means it uses standard 
Hayes control codes for auto-dial and auto- 
answer. 

As far as obtaining a copy of Super 
Patched EDTASM+, the article originally 
appeared in the September 1983 issue of the 
rainbow. You must have the original ROM 
pack to use the patch. Try it, you'll like it! 



Delphi Saving 

• / have a 64 K CoCo 2 with both disk and 
cassette. I am currently using a Tandy direct 
connect modem with a Multi-Pak Interface. 
I would love to save to disk and am told it 
can be done, but no one seems to know how. 
Can you help? 

Vince Falcone 
Minden, NY 

The problem you are having is typical, 
Vince. I assume you are using an RS-232 
pack. I guess you could be using the Modem 
pack, but that's a different story. You need 
to use another terminal package instead of 
the one in the RS-232 pack. You can disable 
the ROM in the RS-232 pack by cutting the 
CE pin. It would probably be better to 
remove the entire ROM. This prevents a 
conflict between the disk ROM and the RS- 
232 pack ROM. 

Several programs are available for using 
the RS-232 pack as a terminal driver. 
Autolerm from PXE Computing, and Da- 
tapack II Plus, from Cer-Comp both sup- 
port the RS-232 pack. Two popular public 
domain programs are MikeyTerm and 
GETerm. I'm using GETerm on a CoCo 3, 
and I think it's great. 



164 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1987 



Assembly Language Answer Corrected 

• In your January 1987 column, Craig 
Leininger asked you about the up and left 
arrows in the listing from the assembly 
language book. 

The up arrow should have been a down 
arrow which, when shifted on the CoCo, 
produces the left bracket, and the left arrow 
should have been listed as the right arrow 
which, when shifted, produces the right 
bracket on the CoCo, 

Hope this information will help. 

Carmen M. Izzi, Jr. 
Naugatuck, CT 

Thanks for the help, Carmen, I stand 
corrected. It's clear in the text thai these 
codes stand for the left and right brackets 
respectively, or indirect addressing in assem- 
bly language, I should have known better 
than to question Radio Shack's proofread- 
ers. 



Downloading Doldrums 

• Dan, Ym having no luck at all with the 
downloads on Delphi. I've downloaded at 
least six programs and none of them will 
run. I have no trouble with the downloads 
on any other BBS, including CompuServe, 
so I'm wondering if Delphi's downloads 
work differently from the others. Any 
advice? Thanks. 

Joseph R. Laval lee 
Carroll ton, TX 

Joe, I haven't noticed a difference between 
Delphi and any other bulletin boards. I 
would suggest using the Xmodem protocol 
for best results. You didn't mention your 
terminal software, or protocol. As I men- 
tioned in a previous letter, I have used 
MikeyTerm and GETerm for downloads 
with no problems whatsoever. After reading 
the summary of the program you want to 
download, just type XM, enable your termi- 
nal software, and you should be on your 
way, 



CoCo 2 to CoCo 3 Upgrade 

• / have a 64K Color Computer I. My 
model number is 26-3002 A. Is this an 'F' 
board? I want to upgrade my CoCo to a 
Color Computer 3. How can I do this? What 
VDG chip does the Color Computer 3 have? 
How can I upgrade my CoCo to red-green- 
blue analog color (RGB) for use with the 
CMS? I understand it is difficult, but I want 
it done. From what chip does the CoCo 3 
get its 640-by- 192 graphics? How can I get 
128 K to 5 1 2K? I sits VDG like the CoCo 2? 
How many BASIC chips are there? In mine 
I have two BASIC chips (BASIC ROM Li and 
Extended BASIC LO). Would I have to add 
another ''ROM plug" to adapt the CoCo 3 s 
2.0 BASIC? From what chip does it get the 
S0-by-24 column display? In CoCo 2 mode 
are you able to get H0-by-24 display with (he 
CMS? In what chip does the CoCo 3 hide 
its 64 colors? How does it switch between 
ROMs? Where do I gel these chips and 
hardware? This information is very impor- 
tant lo me. Thanks a "byte. " 

Dan Trust 
Charleston, ME 



Dan, you get this year's award for the 
most questions in the shortest space. You 
indeed have an T\ sometimes called a "285" 
board. 

In my opinion, it would be a waste of time 
to convert your present board lo be equiva- 
lent, if not impossible. The last time 1 
inquired, the price of 128K CoCo 3s was 
somewhere around $171, The CoCo 3 al- 
ready has an RGB output, plus the memory 
you want. 

Now, as Paul Harvey says, you get l he rest 
of the story. The CoCo 3 does not use a 
VDG, but instead uses a GIME chip both 
for memory management and graphics, 
including the 80-column screen. The 64 
colors are hidden in memory pointers called 
palette registers. Physically, the GIME is a 
very small chip with a multitude of pins, not 
well suited for breadboarding, to say the 
least. It would be nearly impossible to 
duplicate a CoCo 3 without a GIME chip. 

One RfcM is used that contains both 



BASIC and Extended basic, pi us some 
patches by Microware to add commands to 
Extended BASIC. The only place to get it is 
fro m Radio Shack. The CoCo 2 mode 
supports only 256-by- f 92 graphics, the same 
as you now have. You cannot get good 81- 
column graphics in the CoCo 2 mode at 
present, even with an RGB monitor It's 
better, but still not good. 

1 have an excellent idea. Why don't you 
buy a CoCo 3, take the guts out, put it in 
your CoCo 1 enclosure, and see what every- 
one says? 



Moving Into High Memory 

• Please tell me how to load the Tandy Hi- 
Res Screen Print Utilities cassette program. 
Catalog No. 26-3121, into high memory. 
This program loads: 14848, 16127, 14848 
and there are instructions to relocate it at 
12288. I have a 32 K CoCo and would like 
to load into higher memory. I've made 
several attempts without success, 

H.G, Williamson 
Myrtle Beach, SC 

H.G., all you have to do is add 16383 to 
each address you mention. It will work fine 
and allow you to use your extra I6K of 
memory, 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O, Box 385, Prospect, K Y 
40059, We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity, Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo S1G> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOWS prompt, type RSK to arrive at the 
EXPERTS> prompt, where you can select 
the "Downloads" online form which has 
complete instructions. 




<5> 




q5 ^ N#\A + $1.50 shipping. 



$18.00 U.S. 



A, tfyT v 

v c/ 6> w rr , V JS Sh' J2T <y O . V v s? r$° V 'V 3 c, ' xty ^ js, S 

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A ff O N c3° % V 0 O .O . -> ^ 



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U.S. check or money 
;: order- RI residents 

please add 6% sales tax. 

TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 185 



BAR DEN'S BUFFER 



Sailing Off to C 

By William Barden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



When the C language first became popular on 
microcomputers, I was given a strong sales pitch 
by one of my friends, a software developer who had 
done a lot of work for Radio Shack. 

"Oh, we're doing all of our work in C now. It's almost as 
fast as assembly language!" 

"How fast is it?" I queried, doing my best Johnny Carson 
impression, "About a third as fast as assembly language?" 

"Oh, no. Much faster than that — maybe only 10 or 15 
percent slower than assembly language," he replied. "You can 
do everything you can do in assembly language, but much 
easier; all systems programmers are going to use it!" 

Is C really that good? Should you use it on the CoCo 1, 
2 or 3? We'll help you answer those questions in this column 
and the next. Among the neater things possible with C on 
the CoCo is embedded assembly language within the C 
compiler itself! Our ultimate goal will be to use C with short 
assembly language code for critical processing that must be 
as fast as possible. 

OS-9 Rears Its Ugly Head 

Radio Shack's C Compiler (26-3038, $99.95) runs on the 
CoCo with no problem, but only under OS-9. This means, 
of course, that you must plunk down the $69.95 for OS-9 and 
suffer through learning OS-9 before being able to program 
in C. You'll also need two disk drives. 

Lei me say at the outset that learning any new system is 
usually excruciating agony. OS-9 is no exception. I can't tell 
you with a straight face that I didn't spend hours wondering 
why 1 was getting compilation errors when I used uppercase 
only, hours puzzling over the the fact that edi t in OS-9 may 
process less than the total file in its buffer, hours over the 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analyzing and managing projects ranging from 
mainframes to microcomputers. 



OS-9 system generation program. I'll leave that to pro- 
grammers who smugly say, "Well, of course OS-9 works that 
way." They aren't telling you about the hours they spent 
puzzling over some minor problem that was obvious once 
they had found the answer. In this column I'll try to give you 
hints and steps to help alleviate that first painful encounter 
with OS-9 and C. 

Steps to Running Your First C Program 

The steps in running a C program for the first time are as 
follows: 

1) Prepare a system disk with the C compiler on it in some 
reasonable, workable configuration. 

2) Use the OS-9 bui Id command, the OS-9 edi t utility, or 
some other editor to produce a C source program in ASCII 
(text) format. 

3) List that program and do a fair amount of desk checking. 

4) Compile the program with the C compiler to produce an 
object program that will run "stand-alone." 

5) Run the compiled object program and verify that it runs 
the way you expected it to. 

6) Go back to steps 2 through 6 to correct errors and retry 
the program until you have a perfect copy. 

We'll take these steps one at a time. By the end of this column 
we will have compiled two small c programs. In the next 
column we'll work on a larger program and assembly 
language. ■ 

Preparing the System Disk 

The C compiler for OS-9 comes on two disks. The first bit 
of advice I'd give, of course, is to back up those disks and 
then lock them away. I normally make one backup containing 
an exact copy of the original disks. This backup is then used 
to generate working disks. 

To back up the two C disks, you'll have to load OS-9, 
format two disks, and back up the originals. I'll assume thai 
you've never used OS-9 before. 



186 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Booting Up OS-9 
Turn on the system. You'll see the familiar: 

DISK EXTENDED COLOR BRSIC 1.0 
COPYRIGHT (c) 1981 BY TANDY 
UNDER LICENSE FROM MICROSOFT 
OK 



Backups 

Backing up a disk is about as simple. Put a formatted disk 
in Drive 1 . After the OS-9: prompt, type backup. The backup 
command assumes a two-drive copy from Drive 0 to Drive 
I if the command is entered this way, You'll now see: 

RERDY TO BRCKUP FROM /Q0 TO '01 



Put the OS-9 Boot disk into Drive 0, type RUN "*" and press 
ENTER. You'll see this display on the screen: 

05-9 UTILITY DISK VER 01.00.00 



B BOOT 05-9 
T TEST DISK DRIVE 



COPYRIGHT 1983 TRNDY CORP 
RLL RIGHTS RESERVED 

Type B, but don't press ENTER. You'll now seethe message: 

INSERT 059 DISKETTE 

INTO DRIVE 0 RND PRESS R KEY 

Place the OS-9 System disk into Drive 0 and press a key. If 
you have Disk BASIC LI, just put the OS-9 System Master 
in Drive 0 and enter DOS, The screen will clear and the 
message 05-9 BOOT appears. After the boot message, OS-9 
will be loaded and youll see: 

OS-9 LEVEL ONE VR„ 02.00.00 
COPR. 19B0 BY M0T0R0LR INC. RND 
MICROWRRE SYSTEMS CORP. 
LICENSED TO TRNDY CORP, 
RLL RIGHTS RESERVED 
YY/MM/DD HH:MM:55 
TIME? 

Enter the current date and time and press ENTER. The screen 
will display SHELL and 0S9:. 

You Ye now ready to format two disks. Insert the first disk 
to be formatted in Drive 1 (/d !). Type format 'ril. You'll 
see: 

COLOR COMPUTER FORMRTTER 
FORMRTTING DRIVE '01 
Y (YES) OR N (NO) 
RERDY'? 

Press Y. The formatting will begin. After about 10 seconds, 
the message DISK NRME: will appear. Enter any legal OS-9 
name. 

The formatter will now do a verify pass to check the disk. 
If all is OK. vou'll see: 

000 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 

It 

Kb 

020 021 022 

NUMBER OF GOOD SECTORS: $000276 
05-9: 

Repeat the formatting process for as many disks as you'll 
need, in this case Pd recommend four; two to hold the copies 
of the original C disks and two working disks. 



At this point remove the system disk from Drive 0 and put 
in the C disk to be copied. Press Y, and you'll see: 

R 

IS BEING SCRRTCHED 

0!< ?: 

Press Y. The backup will now take place, When it's finished, 
you'll see: 

SECTORS COPIED: $0276 
VERIFY PRSS 

SECTORS VERIFIED: $027G 
059: 

Repeat the process for the second C disk. 

C and OS-9 Modules 

At this point you're standing around with a silly grin and 
two copies of the original C disks. The goal now is to merge 
the data on those C disks into two usable disks that contain 
an editor, the c compiler and associated modules, and a BASIC 
subset of the OS-9 system. This is a real problem. With only 




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March 1987 THE RAINBOW 187 



single-sided disk drives, there is no way to have an entire OS- 
9 system and a C compiler on two disks — there simply isn't 
enough room. Some of the capability of the system will have 
to be discarded — things like format and backup, which can 
be maintained on another disk. 

To see what's on the C compiler disk, put the disk into Drive 
1 and the OS-9 system disk in Drive 0 and type: 

chd 'dl 
d i r 

You'll see: 

DIRECTORY OF . 10:36:00 
CMDS 

The chd command changes the current data directory to 
be the main directory on Drive 1. That main directory 
contained a subdirectory (another directory ) called CMDS. 
CMDS is the main OS-9 directory that contains the modules 
necessary to implement OS-9 commands and other com- 
mands. OS-9 uses directories in a type of tree structure shown 
in Figure 1. The dir command lists the contents of the 
current directory. 



Drive 0 




Directories 



/CMOS 



/SOURCES 



/dir 



/edlt/progl.c 



/teste 



/test 



/INVEN 



/masterl 



/master2 



/master3 



Figure 1: OS-9 Tree Directory Structure 



To see the modules in CMDS, type: 

chd /dl'cmds 
dir 

You'll see: 
DIRECTORY OF . 10:37:00 



ecl 

c . pass2 
c . 1 ink 
dir 



c .prep 
c . op t 
copy 
echo 



c : passl 
c . asm 
del 
list 



Many of these program modules are obviously connected 
with the C compiler; c. passl and c.pass2 control the two 
compiler passes, c.asm assembles the compiled code and 
clink links the object modules with library and user 
modules. Anything with a C prefix is a C-related program 
module. The copy, del, dir, echo and list modules, 



however, are all OS-9 modules that can be found on the 
master OS-9 disk. They are redundant if an OS-9 disk is 
available on the system. 

If you perform the same process on the C library disk, you'll 
see three sets of modules — LIB, DEFS and SOURCES. The 
LIB directory contains ciib.r and cstart.r. The file 
c 1 i b . r is the main set of library routines for handling day- 
by-day processing for compiled C programs. Links are made 
to these routines during the link process. The DEFS directory 
contains other modules necessary for the operation of the C 
compiler. 

The SOURCES subdirectory contains source code modules 
for compilation. You can' put your source code modules in 
this directory or establish your own directory. We'll assume 
in this article that you'll be putting your source code in this 
directory. 

Getting a Usable C Disk 

The best way to get a master c disk is to use the Version 
02.00.00 upgrade for OS-9 (26-3030). This upgrade is not 
Level II OS-9. It is an upgrade to Level I OS-9 which is 
necessary for the CoCo 3. It also supports 80-column screen 
displays for the CoCo 3 and provides other niceties. Among 
the benefits is a program called Conf ig. 

Conf ig automatically configures an OS-9 system disk by 
a question and answer procedure; the result is a tailored disk 
which is efficient in terms of storage as unnecessary modules 
are not included. Conf ig comes on the boot disk for Version 
02.00.00. To use it, load OS-9, put the Boot disk in Drive 
0 and type chx /d0/cmds. 

This changes the execution directory to the CMDS directory 
of the boot disk. The execution directory is used by the system 
to find programs to be executed. Often the execution 
directory is set to D0/CMDS. Now, execute the Config 
program by typing Config. The Config program will now 
load from Drive 0 and display: 

CONFIG 

RS VERSION 01.00.00 



HOW MRNY DRIVES DO YOU HRVE: 

1 - ONE DRIVE ONLY 

2 - TWO OR MORE DRIVES 
SELECTION [1,2] 

Press 2 for two drives. You'll see: 

BUILDING DESCRIPTOR LIST 
. . . . PLERSE WRIT 

You'll see a menu of items: 

->TERM32 X 
TERMB0 
D0 
Dl 
D2 
D3 

H0 15 
HI 15 
H0 35 
HI 35 

By using the S and arrow keys, you can put an 'X' opposite 
the appropriate module you want included in the system. 



188 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



These modules are "drivers" for the I/O devices — TERM32 
is a 32-character display driver, TERMB0 an 80-character 
display driver, D0 through D4 are disk drives, and H0 or HI 
are hard disks. Pressing the right arrow displays the second 
set of devices: 

Tl 

T2 

T3 

Ml 

M2 

NIL 

SSC 

PIPE 

P is printer, T is a terminal port, M is a modem and SSC is 
a Speech/ Sound cartridge. 

In the example here, I selected TERM32, D0, Dl and P. 
Pressing D then brings up the query ARE YOU SURE ( Y'N ) ? : . 
Pressing Y brings you into the next part of Con Fig, the 
I/O subroutine select: 

CD32 
CDB0 
GRFD 

The selections are for either a 32- or 80-column display, or 
a graphics module. In the example here I chose CD32 with 
the S key and arrow keys and then pressed D for done. After 
answering another ARE YOU SURE ( Y'N) ?, you'll see: 

BUILDING BOOT LIST 
. . . . PLEASE WAIT 

You'll see a clock module selection: 

NHAT CLOCK MODULE IS NEEDED 

1 - 60 HZ (AMERICAN PONER) 

2 - 50 HZ (EUROPEAN PONER) 
SELECTION 1,2 

Press 1, of course. 

You'll now see the message: 

PLACE A FORMATTED DISK 

IN DRIVE NUMBER 1 
HIT ANY KEY TO CONTINUE 



Put a formatted disk in Drive 1 and press a key. There will 
be a great deal of disk activity, but you'll finally see: 



DO YOU WISH TO ADD 
[N]D COMMANDS, STOP NON 
[B] ASIC COMMAND SET 
[INDIVIDUALLY SELECT 
[7] RECEIVE HELP 
SELECTION [N,B,F,I,?] 



We want a minimum disk, therefore press B. The message: 

PLACE YOUR SYSTEM DISK 
IN DRIVE 0 

HIT ANY KEY TO CONTINUE 

appears on the screen. 

Put the original OS-9 disk in Drive 0 and press a key. 
Again, there will be much disk activity — the Config 
program is copying system modules from Drive 0 to Drive 
1. The program ends with the OS-9 prompt. 

The disk you have generated is bootable from your CoCo 
3 or newer versions of the CoCo 2 by entering dos. Since 
a minimum system configuration was requested, it is a "bare- 
bones" disk, with as few CMD5 modules as possible. Still, the 
free command reveals only 423 free sectors out of 630. 

The C compiler disk uses 521 sectors to store its modules. 
However, copy, del, dir, echo and list are found on the 
compiler disk and are redundant; they take up 14 sectors, so 
we're left with a space of about 507 sectors that must be 
found. 

Remove the Boot disk and store. Now put the disk you 
just generated into Drive 0 and the original OS-9 system disk 
in Drive 1. 

At this point, it's merely a question of deleting enough 
modules on the disk we just configured. Use the dBl 
command and this sequence to delete from the disk just 
configured. 

chd /D0/CMDS (points to CMOS directory) 
DEL format (delete module) 



OS-9™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full use of 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sector edit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO— Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboardsand mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOStm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. OS-9 
driver and test software included. $199.00 

All disk prices are for CoCo OS-9 format; for other formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, 
add $1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added 
for COD. 



D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Mlcroware and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 189 



I used del to delete the following modules: 



/D0/SYS/ERRNSS 

ATTR 

BACKUP 

DELDIR 

DISPLAY 

FORMAT 

INIZ 

LOAD 

MAKDIR 

nDIR 

MFREE 

PRINTERR 

PR0C5 

UNLINK 

XMODE 



error messages in SYS directory 

file security 

backup for disks 

deletes a directory 

sends Hex characters 

formats a disk 

initializes devices 

loads module into memory 

creates a directory 

displays current module names 

displays memory areas used 

prints error messages 

displays list of processes 

deallocates module in memory 

changes device parameters 



Then, typedeldir /d0/sys. The modules on the compiler 
disk are now transferred to the minimum system disk by a 
copy command. The data directory is first set to /dl'CMDS. 
Theexecution directory points to /d0/CMDS so that the copy 
will be recognized: 

CHD /Dl/CMDS 

COPY CC1 /D0/CMDS/CC1 

COPY C. PREP /D0/CMDS/C.PREP 

COPY C.PflSSl /D0/CMDS/C.PASS1 

COPY C.PASS2 /D0/CMDS/C.PASS2 

COPY COPT /D0/CMDS/CQPT 

COPY C.flSM /D0/CMDS/CASM 

COPY CLINK /D0/CMDS/C.LINK 

Typing free /d0 now reveals 12 free sectors on the 
minimum system disk. This disk will be a read-only disk 
during C compilations. If the data directory is set to 'd0, the 
compiler will attempt to write temporary files and run out 
of space quickly. The data directory should always be set to 
the second disk, the library disk, by using chd 'dl'sources. 

You now have a minimum C compiler disk with OS-9. Set 
the new disk aside temporarily and load the original OS-9 
disk into Drive 0. 

Now turn to the library disk. This disk had 199 free sectors 
available. It can be used as is with one minor addition. The 
edit module can be added to the disk so that you'll have 
the ability to generate source files. To do this, back up the 
library disk and load the working copy into Drive 1. Now 
transfer the edit module from the original system disk by 
using copy /dQ/cmds'edi t /dlVedit. 

You now have two disks for compiling C programs. The 
modules on each are shown in Figure 2. 



Getting the Source Code 

During the following, the minimum C system disk will 
always be in Drive 0 and the library disk will always be in 
Drive 1. The data directory will always point to /dl' 
SOURCES by using chd /dl'SOURCES, and the execution 
directory will always point to /d0/CMOS by using chx /d0/ 
CMOS. 

Should you start getting strange errors, reboot and 
initialize the system with those conditions. 

The compiler works from a pure ASCII source file. We'll 
always store that file in 'dl'SOURCES as a program name 
of your choice, but with a C suffix. For example, you might 
call the program progl . c, myprog . c, or a . c. 



C Compifer 



/DO 



/OS9BOOT 



/CMOS 



/STARTUP 



cel. c.prep, c.passi, 
c.pass2. c.opt. c.asm, 
c.i'ink, 

Build, Copy, Oale. Dai, 
Dir. Echo. Free, List, 
Rename. Setime, Shell, 
Tmode 



C LIBRARY 



/UB 



cstart.r 



/SOURCES 



/D6FS 



/eon 



|Your 
programs- 
source 

and 
object) 



ctype.h. a'ir8ci.h, 
errno.h, modes. h, 
module. h. os$.h. 
osSdefs.a. sefjmp.h, 
sgsiat.h, signal. h, 
sidio.n, ume.h 



Figure 2: C Disk Content 



One clue before continuing: the C language is geared to 
lowercase. Always use lowercase (small letters) for c 
programs except for necessary text strings. If this is not done, 
you'll probably get unsatisfied references during the linking 
process as link.c looks for a library routine with an 
uppercase name (such as PRINTF) instead of lowercase 
(printf). To set lowercase, use tmode -upc. 

Pressing CLEAR followed by 0 will now switch from 
uppercase to lowercase. Lowercase is denoted on the screen 
by inverse video. To get back to uppercase once more, repeat 
CLEAR-0. You can toggle the case at any time. 

The simplest way to build a text file is to use build. Here's 
the sequence with a short program: 

chd 'dl'sources 
build progl.c 
' * c test program 1 */ 
ma in ( ) 

{ 

printf ( "This is rather simple" ) ; 

1 

press ENTER 

This sequence builds a source program as 'dl'SOURCES/ 
pragl.c. The right and left brackets are produced by 
pressing CTRL followed by left or right parentheses. 

Compiling the Source 

Believe it or not, you're now ready to compile the source. 
This is the sequence: 

chd /di/sources (this should be unnecessary) 
chx /d0/cmds (this should be unnecessary) 

ecl progl.c - f-'dl/sources/pragl 



190 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



This sequence tells the compiler to compile source program 
progl.c in /dl'SDURCES and produce an executable object 
file called 'dl'SDURCES'progl. 

The compilation is slow — about five minutes. You should 
see this sequence if everything is going normally: 



CC1 VERSION R5 01.00.00 

COPYRIGHT 19B3 MICROWRRE 

REPRODUCED UNDER LICENSE 

TO TRNDY 

' progl . c ' 

c .prep : 

c . passl : 

c . pass2: 

c . op t : 

c . asm: 

c . 1 ink : 

0S9: 

The last OS-9 prompt indicates that everything went to the 
end successfully and that progl now resides in /dl'SDURCES 
ready to be executed. 

Executing the Compiled Program 

To execute progl, enter 'dl'sources/progl. This 
bypasses the execution directory (still at /dO'CMDS) and 
executes the program. The program output here is not too 
impressive. However, for a first try, this is not bad! (I won't 
tell you how long it took me to get to this point.) 

A Second Program Using Edit 

Build is fine for editing short programs. However, most 
programs won't run the first time and must be modified. C 
is no exception. For this process, an editor that can read in 
an existing file and easily modify code is required. Edit is 
that type of editor. 

We've stored edit on the library disk and can execute it 
without changing the execution directory by using /dl'ed i t 
progl .c prog2 . c. 

In this sequence the program to be edited is progl.c and 
the edited output program is prog2.c. To write a program 
from scratch, use the form /dl'edi t progl . c. 

Edit will load any old program, or at least a part of the 
program if the program is large. After edi t loads, you will 
see no heading, only the E prompt. 

Edit operates with many commands. Examples of the 
most common are: 



<* 
-5 
+5 
d 

R* 



L*— 

L — 
L5— 

Q - 



move to the end of the text in 
the buffer (not necessarily the 
entire text) 

move to the start of text 

move 5 lines back 

move 5 lines forward 

delete current line 

read in remainder of the text 

(for larger files) 

list all text (press ENTER after 

each screen) 

list current line 

list next five lines 

quit editor, return to OS-9 



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191 



To insert lines, type in the line after a blank. The line will 
be inserted before the current line: 

/* this is the current line */ 
E : tempi = temp2; 
E: -1 

tempi = temp2 ; 
E:12 

tempi = temp2; 

/* this is the current line */ 
E: 

A second program that adds the numbers from 1 to 100 
and prints the result is shown in Listing i. Try your hand 
at entering this with edit, compiling it, and then executing 

it. 

On to Assembly Language 

A final program is shown in Listing 2, It prints the prime 
numbers from 1 through 90 and uses many of the features 
of C in doing so. We'll discuss this program, C structures and 
assembly language interfacing in the next "Barden's 
Buffer." □ 

Listing 1: ADDNUM 

/* c program 2 */ 
main () 

{ 

int n, sum; 
n = i • 

sum = $ ; 

while ( n != 101 ) 
( 

sum - sum + n; 
n = n + 1; 

} 

printf ( "THE SUM=%ci \n" f sum ) ; 
} 

Listing 2: PRIMENUM 

/* PRIME NUMBER GENERATOR PROGRAM */ 

/* function to initialize array of numbers */ 

clear_array ( a t size ) 

int a[ 11 ] , size ; 

{ 

int i; 

for ( i • jS) i <« size - 1; ++i ) 

a[ i ] » 2)347 ; 

} 

/* function to reset bit */ 
reset_bit ( a, i, j ) 
xnt c&|[ 11 "\ f jl f "} % 

( 

int k, mask, ptwo, tempi, temp 2 ? 

mask » 9 - ( ( i * j ) % lp ) ; 

k =» mask; 

ptwo - 1 f 

while ( k I- p ) 

( 

ptwo = ptwo * 2 ? 
k * k - 1 ? 

} 

mask ■ ptwo ? 

tempi - a [ ( i * j ) / If ] ; 
temp2 » tempi / ( 2 * mask ) ; 
a[ ( i * j ) / 1J3 ] - tempi - mask; 
i£(a[(i*j)/10]/(2* mask ) J - temp2 } 
a[ ( i * j ) / lp ] = tempi; 

I 



/* function to print results */ 
print_res ( a, n ) 

int n , a [ 11 ] ,* 

{ 

int i, j, ptwo, mask, tempi, temp 2; 
for ( i «■ l ; i <- n - 1; ++i ) 

{ 

ptwo ™ 1 ; 

mask = 9 - ( i % 10 ) ; 

j = mask; 

while ( j $ ) 

{ 

ptwo - ptwo * 2 ; 

j - j - i; 

) 

mask ~ ptwo; 

tempi = a [ i / lp ] ; 

temp 2 « tempi / ( 2 * mask ) ; 

a[ i / 10 ] - tempi - mask? 

if ( a[ i / 10 J / ( 2 * mask ) 1= temp2 ) 

a[ i / 10 ] = tempi; 
else 

printf ( "%d \n", i ) ; 

} 

} 

/* driver */ 

main ( ) 
{ 

int numbers [ 11 ], i, j; 

printf ( "PRIME NUMBER S\n" ) ; 
clear_array ( numbers, 11 ) ; 
for ( i = 2 ; i 4 5 ? ++i ) 

{ 

for ( j - 2 ; j <« ( 90 / i ) ; ++ j ) 
reset_bit ( numbers , i, j ) ? 

) 

print_res ( numbers , 90 ) ; 



I 



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192 THE RAINBOW March 1987 






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OS-9 PROGRAMMING 



Finding Your Way 

With OS-9 Level II 

By Peter Dibble 



This article is to help you get 
started with the extended mem- 
ory available on the CoCo 3 
under OS-9 Level II. 

On OS-9 Level II systems the 6809 
CPU is insulated from memory by a 
device called a Dynamic Address Trans- 
lation unit. Each byte in a computer has 
an address that the processor uses when 
it wants to read from or write to that 
memory. A 6809 can generate 64K 
(that's 65,535) different addresses. This 
seems to place a limit on the amount of 
memory a computer built around the 
6809 can use. There is no point in having 
memory your computer can't address, 
so 6809s have no use for more than 64K 
of memory. Right? 

When the 6809 was designed, 64K 
was a lot of memory. Even today it 
sounds like a big number if you think 
of it byte by byte, but it goes frighten- 
ingly fast. The 64K limit is probably the 
6809 's biggest problem. 

The 6809 isn't the only processor with 
this kind of problem. For a long time 
mainframe computers were limited to 
16 megabytes (that's 16,777,215 bytes) 



Peter Dibble has a bachelor's degree in 
chemistry and is currently a graduate 
student in computer science. He has 
worked as an applications programmer, 
systems programmer and as the user 
services assistant director for the Uni- 
versity of Rochester Computing Center. 
With Dale Puckett, he is the coauthor 
of The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9. 



of memory. That limitation turned out 
to be a terrible problem for them. No 
joke! The massively popular PC uses an 
Intel 8088 microprocessor that has its 
own kind of 64 K limitation. It's not easy 
to use more than 64K on a PC, but it's 
possible, and now almost everyone does 
it. 

We need to escape from the 64K 
barrier. Let's look more carefully at the 
problem. The 6809 can generate 64K 
different addresses. That means that it 
can directly address (or, if you like, 
name) 65,535 bytes of memory. We'll 
just make the addressing (in a sense) 
indirect and the barrier will lower. 

Everytime the 6809 wants to access 
memory, we take the address it asks for 
(which is called a logical address) and 
feed it to a special device. The special 
device is called a Dynamic Address 
Translation unit, or a DAT On the 6809 
side the DAT takes an address range of 
64K. On the memory side it generates 
whatever range it is designed for; in the 
case of the CoCo, that's 512K. 

The addresses coming out of the 6809 
are usually called logical addresses and 
the addresses that go to memory are 
called physical addresses. The actual 
memory that the 6809 can address at 
any moment is called its address space. 
The trick is to change the 16-bit ad- 
dresses coming out of the 6809 into the 
19-bit addresses required to address the 
512K of memory in the machine. In 
jargon, the DAT maps logical addresses 
to physical addresses and defines the 
current address space. 

Let's start with a very simple DAT, 
and do it in decimal instead of binary. 



An easy way to simplify the DAT is to 
decrease the amount of input it has. If 
the address range of some imaginary 
decimal computer were 0 to 999, we 
could build a DAT that only translated 
the digit in the hundreds place. That's 
a big simplification. Instead of having 
to know how to translate 1 ,000 different 
addresses, the DAT only needs to deal 
with 10 of them. Let's say that the range 
of physical addresses is 0 to 4999. The 
DAT (which is only looking at the 
hundreds digit), will need to take a 
number between zero and nine and 
translate it to a number between zero 
and 49. The tens and ones digits from 
the logical address can go directly to 
memory. 

A simple DAT is just a table. For the 
computer we are working on, it has 10 
possible inputs. You make an array with 
10 entries and in each position you put 
the address to which the DAT should 
translate that input. If the DAT con- 
tained 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, it would 
translate addresses into themselves. The 
number at Index 0 in the table is 0, 
Position 1 holds 1, and so forth. If the 
DAT contained 49, 48, 47, 46, 45, 44, 43, 
42, 41, 40, it would translate address to 
the top 10 blocks of the physical address 
space — in reverse order. 

Let's try it again on the 6809. Ad- 
dresses on the 6809 are 16-bit binary 
numbers; that is, the range 0 to 65535 
decimal is the same as the range 0 to 
1111111111111111 binary. 

Say the DAT takes the top bit in a 
logical address and replaces it with four 
bits. The 6809 will produce 16-bit 
logical addresses, and the DAT will 



194 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



rr Any delay in 
the DA T has to 
be made up by 
using faster 
memory in the 
rest of the 
system, or by 
slowing down 
the 6809. m 



convert them into 19-bit physical ad- 
dresses. Physical memory will be di- 
vided into 16 blocks of 32K each, and 
a program can pick any two of them for 
its address space. If each program needs 
64K, you can run eight of them. More 
interesting, if all programs share 32K of 
common memory and have 32K of their 
own, you can run 15 of them. 

A block is the smallest piece of mem- 
ory a program can have. Doling out 
memory in 32K chunks isn't very effi- 
cient when many programs use only a 
few hundred bytes. Most Level II sys- 
tems use 4K blocks, and sizes as small 
as 512 bytes have been tried. Tandy 
chose to use 8K blocks on the CoCo 3. 

If you are designing a DAT, you can 
pick any power of 2 you like as a block 
size. Large blocks lead to wasted mem- 
ory, but small blocks have costs too — 
hardware and software. The simple 
DAT with 32K blocks only needed to 
store two four-bit physical block 
numbers to describe an address space. 
If it had used 8K blocks (like the Color 
Computer), it would have had to store 
eight 6-bit numbers. That's a hardware 
cost. Whenever you want to change to 
another address space, you have to 



change the numbers in the DAT. The 
more bits in the DAT, the more time it 
takes to change them. That's a software 
cost. 

The cost of memory to store eight 
6-bit numbers sounds too small to 
consider. It isn't. The memory used to 
store the DAT registers has to be so fast 
that the DAT can read a value out of 
them and put it on the physical address 
lines with no noticeable delay. Any 
delay in the DAT has to be made up by 
using faster memory in the rest of the 
system, or by slowing down the 6809. 

The most frequent change to the DAT 
registers is made when the system 
switches between a user address space 
and the system address space. It 
happens every time an interrupt 
happens or a program calls OS-9. This 
is important enough that the DAT in the 
Color Computer has a special switch 
called the task register which accelerates 
it. The DAT actually stores two sets of 
translation registers, and the task reg- 
ister switches between them. When a 
program does an OS-9 call or a piece of 
hardware causes an interrupt, someone 
switches the task register and OS-9's 
address space becomes current. 




1 i t\ \ 

FOH COLOfl COMPUTER USERS. 



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March 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



195 



^/A\! 





SSflSL m dtfflfo 1B™& H ff H %>fth BLjB 

IllOOaOiu U3"3 




ooisirappi 





11 y 




y o i i 1 1 o 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




e're going to show you a 
handy way to build new sys- 
tem disks — especially if you 
are fortunate enough to be using a hard 
disk-based system. But first we'll take a 
look at conf ig — an excellent alterna- 
tive for the beginner that comes with 
OS-9 Level I, Version 2.00.00. 

Conf ig gives you a menu and lets you 
select the device descriptors you want to 
have available on your new system disk. 
The program is stored in a directory 
named CMOS. The files that hold the 
modules containing all the required OS- 
9 device descriptors, device drivers, file 
managers, etc., are stored in a directory 
named MODULES. 

Start by booting your system using a 



Dale L, Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and 
coauthor, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale 
works as a U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant 
and lives on Governors Island in New 
York Harbor. 



backup copy of the Tandy OS-9 System 
Disk. After you see the "OS9:" prompt, 
you must take out the system disk and 
insert the disk containing conf ig. Type 
chx /d0/cmds, press ENTER and type 
chd /d0. 

Now, type config and follow the 
directions on the menu. You move from 
row to row on the menu using the up 
and down arrows. Select a device by 
pressing the S. If you want more infor- 
mation about a device, you can get it by 
pressing H. 

When you have finished selecting 
device descriptors for all the devices you 
will be using, config creates a new 
□SSBoot file and asks if you would like 
a disk with no commands, a basic 
command set, a full command set, or a 
set of individually selected commands. 

After you have spent a few weeks — 
or is it months — waiting for your 
computer to copy all of your files onto 
a new system disk, you will come to the 
realization that you really don't need to 
have all your files on each and every 
system disk you own. It is much easier 
to boot with one disk which contains 
only the files you need to start the 
system, e.g., setime. 

As soon as the system is running you 
can remove that disk and insert the disk 



that contains the files you use all the 
time. As we have mentioned in earlier 
editions of this column, you may want 
to load one disk with the files you need 
when writing, another with files needed 
while you are programming with assem- 
bly language or C. When you move up 
to a hard disk, you won't even need to 
swap disks. 

Configure a System Disk Using a Pipe 
Once you know your way around OS- 
9, you'll discover there are a lot of ways 
to skin a cat. For example, using an 
unformatted directory list utility like d 
or Is, and a pipeline to OSSGen, you can 
configure new system disks quickly. 

First, format a new disk to hold your 
module library. Then, create a directory 
with a name that describes the config- 
uration you want on your new system 
disk. For example, I use directory 
names like 5DI5KB0, HDDNLYB0, HDDN- 
LYR5 and D 1 5TDB0R5D0. The first 
directory contains modules to make a 
system disk that uses Dan Johnson's 
SDisk drivers and the Disto 80-column 
card. 

The second directory does not con- 
tain any floppy disk drivers and uses the 
Disto 80-column card. The third uses 
the original Radio Shack screen drivers 



196 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 






an 



c^ 1 , 



HO 1 " 



art 



o9 ! 



MOP 



VO 



*1 



\0*< 



^^-""'^^ «d ***** 




a* 1 



to 



'.it 



Listing 1: binary 



/* 



OS-9 utility 



binary 



★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 

V 



by Dennis J. Duke 
Bessemer, Al . 
£6 November 86 

This utility v/ill accept a decimal number as input and print 
a binary number. 



# include <stdio.h> 



int 



n; 



main (argc, argv) 
int argc; 
char *argv[ ] ; 

( 

int i ; 

/* Check to make sure the utility was called properly */ 
if (argc != 2) { 

fprintf (stderr, "usage: %s number\n H , argv[£]); 

exit (J3) ; 

I 

/* Convert input char to int */ 
n = atoi (argv [ 1] ) ; 



for (i = 15; i >= i- 
if ( (n & (1 « i) ) 
putchar ( ' ) ; 

else 

putchar ( '!') ; 



-) { 

== 0) 



/* Add a space after each 4 digits */ 
if (i % 4 == 0) 
putchar ( ' ' ) ; 

) 

putchar ( ' \n ' ) ; 



I 



Listing 2: spl i t 



/* 
* 

* 

* 
♦ 

V 



OS-9 utility 

by Dennis J. Duke 
Bessemer, Al . 
23 November 86 



split 



This utility will split a file into smaller files. This is especially 
useful when you wish to use an editor such as 'TS/EDIT' on a file too 
large for it's buffer. The syntax is "split [ -n ] infile [ outfile ]" 
where 'n' is the number of lines wanted in the new files (default 50) . 
If 'outfile* is specified, the output files will be given that name 
with a-z appended to the name. If 'outfile' is not specified, the 
output files will be named xa-xz . 



# include 



<stdio. h> 



FILE 



*fopen(), *fpin, *fpout; 



char suffix [2] ; 
char outfile [29] ; 

int sent = 97; /* Initialize at decimal value of 'a' */ 

main (argc, argv) 
int argc ; 
char *argv[]; 
( 

int c ; 

char inf ile[30] ; 

int nolines = 5$ ; /* Set default to 5$ */ 
int linecnt = 0; 

/* Check to make sure the utility was called properly */ 



and runs on a hard disk drive without 
any floppy drivers. And the final exam- 
ple directory contains modules that let 
me use the Disto 80-column card on a 
system with a hard disk drive named dO. 
The floppy disk drives on that system 
are named dl and 62. 



There are 



many ways to 
get the right 
modules in your 
directories." 



You can use the makdir utility com- 
mand to make your new directories. 
But, how do you get the modules into 
those directories? I started by saving the 
standard modules I would need in each 
and every boot file, regardless of the 
hardware configuration in a file called 
StdBoot. I used a command line like 
this: 

save StdBoot IOMan RBF 5CF 
Pipeman Piper Pipe Sysgo 

I used a similar command line to save 
the modules used by the standard Tandy 
32-column screens in a file called Tan- 
dyScreen. 

If you forget which modules are in a 
file a few months after you have created 
your directory, you can always use the 
OS-9 ident command to find out what 
you did (ident -s StdBoot). 



11 Sci 

24 SD1 
10 SD1 
4 SD1 
2 SE1 
BP SF1 

12 SCI 



S5E46DE 
S157744 
$815287 



IOMan 

RBF 

SCF 



S1A9CC4 , PipeMan 
S5B2B56 . Piper 



SCC06AF 
SDE6D76 



Pipe 
SysGo 



Let's look at the rest of the modules 
in my customized directory (dir 
tandy). 



Sgg You <it 

RAINBOWfest — Chicago 

April 10-12 



198 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1987 



Directory of tandy 00 : 3 5 : 13 



StdBoot 

cwccdisk.dr 

cwdl . dd 

KDBoot 

RSClock 

NilDrv 

R0 



parallel 
cwdp . dd 
KShell 
TandyScreen 
Nil 
P 

RamPak 



Parallel contains the device driver 
that runs the Centronics parallel port on 
my Disto 80-coiumn card. It is used by 
the device descriptor P. R0 is the device 
descriptor for my 512K Disto RAM 
Disk. It uses the device driver named 
RamPak. Ni 1 is a device descriptor that 
gives you a way to throw the output 
from a program into that bit bucket in 
the sky. It uses the driver, Ni lDrv. 

HDBoot is a file that contains both the 
device descriptor and device driver for 
my Disto hard disk interface. KShell, 
is Brian Lantz's KShel 1 that comes with 
Computerware's Advanced Utilities 
package. And finally, cwccdisk.dr is 
the CCDisk replacement driver sold by 
Computerware. Notice that I named the 
file cwccdisk.dr instead of ccdisk 
.dr so I could tell the difference be- 
tween it and the standard Tandy driver 
by glancing at the filename. The same 
holds true for the device descriptor, 
wd0.dd. 

There are many ways to get the right 
modules in your directories. For exam- 
ple, if you own the modbus ter utility 
from Dan Johnson or have access to the 
public domain 5pl i tMod utility in disk 
zero of the OS-9 Users Group library 
you can follow these steps. 

Create an empty directory to hold 
your new modules. Type makdir con- 
f igi tmyway and press ENTER. Then, 
make the new directory your working 
data directory. Type chd con f igi tmy- 
way and press ENTER. Now, use mod- 
buster like this: modbus ter /dl' 
□59Boot. 

When the command finishes, you'll 
wind up with a directory containing a 
file for each module in the D59Boot file 
on the disk you had mounted in Drive 
I. You can now use the OS-9 del utility 
command to delete all of the files that 
you do not want in your new system 
disk. After you have finished deleting 
the unwanted files, use the OS-9 copy 
command to copy any additional mod- 
ule files you may need in the OSSBoat 
file into this directory. 

You are now ready to perform pipe- 
line magic with OS-9. Insert a freshly 
formatted disk in Drive 1 and type chd 
con f i g i tmyway and press ENTER. 
Then type Is ! os9gen /dl. 

If you don't believe in magic and want 
to confirm that the proper modules are 
in your D59Boot file, type ident -s / 
dl/os9Boot. 



if (argc < 2) 

usage (argv[£] ) ; 

/* Check for syntax and '-n' option and set up file names */ 
if (argv[l] [j3] =- ■-■) { 
if (argc < 3) 

usage (argv[£] ) ; 

/* Extract the number of lines from a rgv [ 1 ] */ 
nolines = atoi (argv[l] + 1) ; 

/* Get the input file name */ 
strcpy (infile, argv [ 2 ] ) ; 
/* Get the output file name */ 
if (argc >3) 

strcpy (out file , argv [ 3 ] ) ; 

else 

strcpy (outfile, "x") ; 

} 

else { 

/* Get the input file name */ 
strcpy (infile, argv [ 1 ] ) ; 
/* Get the output file name */ 
if (argc >2) 

strcpy (outfile; argv[ 2 ] ) ; 

else 



} 



strcpy (outfile, "x" ); 



/* Make sure the input file exists */ 

if {(fpin = fopen (infile, "r")) == NULL) ( 

fprintf (stderr, "%s: can't open %s\n" , argv[$], infile); 

exit(0) ; 

) 

/* Set up output file */ 
output (argv [0 ] ) ; 

/* Main loop to do splitting */ 
while ( (c « getc (fpin)) 1= EOF) 
if ( C == .\ n «) ( 

putc (c, fpout) ; 
linecnt+-f ; 

if (linecnt == nolines) 
linecnt = 0; 
f close ( fpout) ; 

/* get next output file */ 
output (argv[£] ) ; 



else 



/* Write to output file */ 
putc (c, fpout) ; 



) 

cleanup () ; 



usage (fileid) 
char *fileid; 

{ 

fprintf (stderr, "usage: %s [ 
exit (0) ; 



•n ] infile [ outfile ] \n" , fileid); 



output (fileid) 
char *f ileid [ ] ; 

{ 

char newfile [30 ] ; 

/* Convert ' sent 1 int to char string */ 
sprintf (suffix, !l %c", sent); 

/* Don't allow a suffix past 'z' */ 

if (scnt++ > 122) { /* 122 is decimal for f z' */ 

fprintf (stderr, "%s; can't create output files beyond ...z\n", fileid); 
cleanup ( ) ; 

} 

/* Build output file name */ 
strcpy (newfile, outfile) ; 
strcat (newfile, suffix) ; 

/* Make sure the output file can be created */ 

if ((fpout = fopen (newfile, "w") ) == NULL) ( 

fprintf (stderr, "%s: can't create %s\n", fileid, newfile); 
cleanup ( ) ; 

) 



cleanup ( ) 
{ 

/* Close files and exit */ 
fclose (fpin) ; 
fclose (fpout) ; 
exit (0) ; 

} 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 199 



Listing 3: col 

************************************** 
* 

* COL - (C) 1986 STEPHEN B. GOLDBERG 
* 

* Displays files, sorted lists etc. in 2 to 5 columns 
* 

* use: col [-number] [filename] [ . . . ] 

* default - 2 columns (no number option) 

* 2 to 5 columns (with 1 -number' option) 
* 

* Omit filename(s) for standard input path for use 

* with input redirection or in a pipeline 
* 

* Examples: 
* 

* 

* 

* 



col filename <ENTER> 

col -3 filel file2 <ENTER> 

list filel file2! sort! col -5 >/p <ENTER> 



ifpl 

use 

endc 



/d^/def s/os9def s 



mod len, name , prgrm+obj ct , reent+1 , entry , dsiz 



pointer rmb 
path rmb 



maxcol 
maxlen 
count 
buffer 



dsiz 
* 

name 



rmb 
rmb 
rmb 
rmb 
rmb 
rmb 
equ 

f cs 
fcb 
fee 



2 parameter pointer 

1 input path number 

1 number of columns 

1 width of column 

1 column counter 

77 input/output buffer 

2pp stack 

2pp parameters 



f c o 1 f 

1 edition number 
/(c) S .B.Goldberg/ 



fdb $$228, $031a f $0414 ,$0510 



* 

table 
* 

****************************** 
* 

* INITIALIZE & FIND FILENAME 
* 



entry 



clr 
stx 
ldd 
cmpa 
bne 



path standard input path 
pointer save param* address 
,x get first param. 



# 



minus sign? 



default no, use default 
subb #$32 yes, make binary 
bmi default not val id, use default 
cmpb #3 val id count? 
bhi default no , use default 
aslb double 

leay <table,pcr table address 
ldd b , y get constants 
leax 2 , x skip count param 
set save constants 
#$02 2 8 two columns 
maxcol save constants 
count set counter 
, x+ get next character 
cmpa #$20 space? 
beq f ileloop yes, keep looking 
cmpa #$0d filename? 
beq read no , use standard input 
leax -l,x yes, reset pointer 
****************************** 
* 

* OPEN FILE FOR LISTING 
* 

open Ida #read* read mode 



bra 

default ldd 
set std 
sta 

fileloop Ida 



Once you have created a directory 
containing the modules needed in the 
□S9Boot file on your first customized 
system disk you are almost home free. 
From here on out you can create new 
directories and copy module files back 
and forth. Each directory will hold the 
module files you use with a specific type 
of hardware configuration, When 
you're done, make sure to save the disk 
with these directories so you can use it 
in the future. 

The dircopy command from the 
Computerware Disk Fix and utilities 
package is a handy tool for this kind of 
work. And speaking of that utility, 
here's a reminder that may save you 
some work. A typical dircopy com- 
mand line might look like this: 

dircopy /dl/mods /h0/boo tmods 
/hardisk/ tandysc reens 

Who wants to type all that? Try this 
instead. "Make that long pathlist your 
working data directory Then, use OS- 
9*s anonymous directories: 



chd /h0/boo tmods/hardisk 

/ tandyscreens 

DS9 : dircopy /dl/mods . 

The period in the second line above 
means use the current data directory. 
Anonymous directories become even 
more useful if you are only copying a 
select handful of files from a directory 
buried deep in OS-9's hierarchical file 
structure. For example, if there were a 
file named Co32 in the preceding direc- 
tory you would only need to type: 

copy „/Co32 /dl/Screens/Co32 



/HO as /DO? 

If you want to start a debate, suggest 
something unconventional or different. 
During the past few years there have 
been several hard disk drives introduced 
for OS-9 based computers. Almost all 
of them have used /hO as the name for 
the hard disk. 

On the surface this seems very logical. 
It makes it very easy to tell which device 
is the hard drive and which device is the 
floppy drive. But, it creates problems 
with a number of programs that look 
for specific files in directories on device 
/dO. OS-9 68000 solves the problem by 
creating a default device named /dd and 
telling all software developers to use 
that device name as a standard. 



200 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



rr They really 
sail on a 
hard disk. " 



We reported several months ago that 
Carl Kreider had found the obvious 
solution several years ago — rename the 
module containing your hard disk 
device descriptor. Call it /dO. I wanted 
to experiment with Kreider's idea and 
when I received my hard disk 1 did just 
that. It's fantastic; Deskmate and the 
many other Tandy programs that are 
hard coded to look for special files on 
device /dO will never notice the differ- 
ence. They really sail on a hard disk. 

To do the conversion, follow these 
steps. Use the OS-9 debug utility to 
patch your device descriptor dl mod- 
ule. Change theTto a'2\ Save this new 
module into a file named temp. Then, 
verify it and update the CRC. 

sav/e temp D2 ENTER 

veri Fy <temp>DlasD2 - dd ENTER 

del temp 

Now, do the same for the module 
containing the device descriptor for 
/dO. Call it dl and save it in a verified 
file with updated CRC named 
DOasDl.dd. 

Finally, patch the h0 device descrip- 
tor module in the same manner. Change 
the h in h0 to d and save it in a verified 
file named H0asD0 . dd. M ake sure that 
you have updated the CRC with the 
veri fy command's V option. 

You can now put the files containing 
the patched device descriptor modules 
in a directory with all other modules 
you need in your new D59Boot file — 
1 used a directory named DistoB0asD0 
— and use the procedure above to 
create a new system disk. Afteryou boot 
with that system disk, you will be 
running with a working data directory 
named /dO and a working execution 
directory named /dO/CMDS. This new 
/dO will have several megabytes of 
storage. 



os9 i$open open file 

bcs out exit with error 

sta path save path number 

stx pointer save param. pointer 



'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k 
* 

* GET ENTRY AND PRINT COLUMN 
read 



loop 



setlen 
newline 

count it 



endline 



skip 



leax 
Ida 
ldy 
os9 
bcs 
clrb 
Ida 
cmpa 
beq 
incb 
cmpb 
bne 
clra 
tfr 
leax 
dec 
beq 
subb 
bpl 
bsr 
leax 
clra 
negb 
tfr 
bsr 
bra 
Ida 
sta 
cmpb 
bhs 
bsr 
bra 
pshs 
bsr 
puis 
bra 



buffer, u buffer address 
path input path 
#77 maximum length 
i$readln get entry 
error branch on error 

clear length counter 
, x+ get character 
$$pd end character? 
setlen yes, set entry length 
no, count character 
#77 maximum length? 
loop no, count some more 

yes, clear msb of length 
d,y length to 1 Y 1 register 
buffer, u buffer address 



count 
endline 
maxlen 
countit 
print2 
space , per 



last column? 

yes, print with carriage return 
longer than column? 

yes, take another column 
no, print entry 

address of fill spaces 



clear msb 
make lsb positive 
d,y number of spaces to fill column 
print2 fill entire column 
read get next entry 

new column count 
save it 
longer than column? 
yes, skip column 

no, print it 
get next entry 
y save length 

carrtn carriage rtn. to next line 
d retrieve length 

newline print in first column of next line 



maxcol 

count 

maxlen 

skip 

printl 

read 



'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k 
* 

ERROR CHECK AND EXIT 



error 



cmpb 
bne 
Ida 
beq 
os9 
ldx 
Ida 
cmpa 
bne 
bsr 
clrb 
os9 



#e$eof end of file? 
out no, quit with error 
path input path number 
endit standard input, quit 
i$close close file 
pointer param. pointer 
,x get param. char. 
%$pd end of command? 
open no, get next file 
carrtr^ yes, print car. rtn. 

clear error 
f$exit quit 



endit 
out 

'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k 
* 

* PRINT ENTRY SUBROUTINE 



carrtn 
printl 
print2 



cr 

space 
len 



leax 

ldy 

Ida 

os9 

bcs 

rts 

feb 
fee 
emod 
equ 



<cr,pcr car, rtn. 

#77 maximum line length 

#1 standard output path 

i$writln write to screen 

out exit with error 

return 

$£d 
/ 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 201 



Listing 4: prompt 



*********************** * ************************** 
* 

* PROMPT - COPYRIGHT (c) 1986 S. B. GOLDBERG 
* 

* Changes shell prompt for Level I CoCo OS-9 

* Works with Ver. 1 and Ver. 2 CoCo OS-9 
* 

* Use: prompt [new_prompt ] 

* characters past 4 will be omitted 
* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



If new_prompt parameter is not entered on 
you will be asked for a new prompt. Type 
press <ENTER> . You MUST use this mode if 
command characters (<>!&#) in the prompt, 
a change, make no entry and press <ENTER> 



the command line, 
in the prompt and 
you want any shell 
If you don't want 
to exit. 





ifpl 






use 


/d0/defs/os9def s 


* 


endc 




* 


mod 


len, name, prgrm+ob jet , reent+ 


newpmpt 


rmb 


5 prompt buffer 




rmb 


200 stack 




rmb 


50 parameter 


dsiz 
* 


equ 


■ 


name 


f cs 


/prompt/ 




fcb 


1 edition number 




fee 


/(c) 1986 S.B.Goldberg/ 


ask 


fcb 


7 bell 




fee 


/New Prompt: / 


shell 


fee 


/shell / module name 



****************************** 

* 



* INITIALIZE 
* 



& GET NEW PROMPT 



entry 



loop 



getpmpt 



ldd 

std 

std 

pshs 

Ida 

cmpa 

beq 

ldb 

Ida 

cmpa 

beq 

sta 

decb 

bne 

bra 

leax 

Ida 

ldy 

os9 

bes 

deca 

ldy 

tfr 



#0 

/U 

2 , u 
u 

#$0d 



clear new 

prompt buffer 
save buffer address 
parameter character 
parameter? 



getpmpt no, ask for prompt 
#4 character counter 
,x+ get param. char. 
#$0d end? 

find yes, find shell 
,u+ no, save it 

done? 
loop no, get more 
find yes, find shell 
<ask,pcr new_prompt prompt 
#1 standard output path 
#13 length of prompt 
i$write prompt to screen 
out exit with error 

standard input path 
#5 maximum prompt length 
u # x buffer address 



os9 i$readln get new prompt 

bes out exit with error 

cmpy #1 new prompt? 

beq noerr no, quit 

tfr y,d yes, length to 'b' 

decb less carriage return 

clr b,x clear carriage return 

****************************** 

* 

* LOCATE SHELL AND PATCH 
* 

find leax <shell,pcr module name 

clra any type or language 

os9 f$link link for address 



of shell 



Sometimes you will want to strip 
your DS9Boot file down to the bare 
minimum so that you will have the 
maximum amount of memory available 
for your application program. Desk- 
mate, for example, needs more than 150 
pages to run. 



"The CoCo 3 
shell has a new 
parameter that 
lets you set up 
windows 
easily. " 



One way to do this is to remove the 
floppy disk driver and device descrip- 
tors from your system, leaving the 
driver and device descriptor f orthe new 
hard disk named /d0 in place. We tried 
this with our system and it works quite 
well. We simply copied the modules 
from the directory DISTDB0RSD0 into a 
new directory named HDDNLYB0 and 
deleted the floppy driver and descrip- 
tors and several other modules. 

Practice with these techniques and 
before long you'll be able to configure 
your OS-9 system the way you like it. 
If you have a number of start-up disks, 
you can pick the one that matches the 
job you need to get done. 

Exploring the CoCo 3 Shell 

The CoCo 3 shell has a new parame- 
ter that lets you set up windows easily. 
For example, to start a shell in device 
/w3 — one of seven predefined CoCo 
3 windows, you need only type shell 
-i='ui3&. 

This command initializes input, out- 
put and error path for the shell running 
in the window named 'w3. You can kill 
the /Term device by starting a shell on 
another device without including the 
concurrent process operator '&'. For 
example, shell -i='tl. 

There is also a shorthand notation. 
Redirect some data with ">/ 1" and the 
output will go to the standard output 
path. If you use "»>" you will redirect 
both the standard output and standard 
error paths. A "<»" will redirect the 
standard input and standard output 
paths. 



202 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Recommended Reading for Your CoCo from . . . 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 



■ ICI II klMiflU i.ihiih in 



supinations 





i in n \|\|m \\\ itin>h 
III \lni m i ill 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

The book that demystifies the state-of-the-art operating system for 
the Tandy Color Computer. Authors Dale L Puckettand Peter Dibble 
show you how to take advantage of 0S-9's multitasking and multi- 
user features, and the capability of redirecting input and output 
commands at will. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide packed with 
hints and tips, tutorials and free software in the form of program 
listings. 

Book $19.95 

Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

This sequel features 24 of the most challenging Adventure games 
ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies find 
a hidden fortune, or win the heart of a beautiful and mysterious 
princess. Experience the thrills and chi lis of the most rugged 
Adventurer without ever leaving your seat. Ring Quest, Secret Agent 
Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos, Island and more! 

Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



TheRai 




0u \ Sale* 



RAIN! 



Close «---' theB(5 tto^ i 



bed. 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

Features 20 award- winning entries from the rainbow's first 
Simulation programming competition. You are the Commander-in- 
Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, an air traffic 
controller at one of the nation's busiest airports, the owner of your 
own software business, a civil defense coordinator in charge of 
saving Rainbow City from a raging flood, a scientist conducting 
experiments on Mars . . . Your wits are on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winning programs from our second Simulation contest. Fly through the dense African 
jungle as a bush pilot, bull your way down Wall Street, lead the Rainbow City bomb squad, 
or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



Coming Soon: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 



I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 . 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk $10.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 (book only) $19.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) $31 .00 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) $ 3.50 JH^& 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) $ 3.50 Jfc 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13.95 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape $13.95 

Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 

Outside U.S., add $4.00 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



Name 



Address 

City 

State _ 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 



" 1 J 





Account Number 



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Signature 




Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 



Please note: The tapes and disks ottered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, they are intended to be art adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or disk, 
you will still need the appropriate book. QS-fle is « registered trademark of tho Mic/oware Systems Corporation. 

To order by phone {credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 



bcs out exit with error 

os9 f$unlink unlink shell 

bcs out exit with error 

puis x retrieve buffer address 

ldd ,x++ first new prompt chars 

std $36 ,u patch shell 

ldd ,x last new prompt chars 

std $38, u patch shell 
****************************** 

* 

* ADJUST CRC FOR NEW PROMPT 
* 





tfr 


u,x shell address 




ldd 


2 , u get length of shell 




subd 


#3 less CRC bytes 




tfr 


— mm *m ■ ■ • t 1 m f 

d,y update length to ' Y ' 




leau 


d,x address of CRC accumulator 




ldd 


#$ffff initialize the 




std 


, u shell module 




sta 


2 , u CRC accumulator 




os9 


f$crc do count 




bcs 


out exit with error 




com 


, u+ complement 




com 


; u+ the CRC 




com 


, u bytes 


noerr 


clrb 


clear error 


out 
* 


os9 


f$exit quit 




emod 




len 


equ 


* 




end 





Listing 5: modcrc 



/* copyright (c) 1986 by Gregory A. Law */ 

/★ Used to update the module CRC of a module in memory 

/* the module to disk, all work done in memory */ 

/* use: modcrc module <raodule> <...> */ 

main(argc / argv) 
int argc ; 
char *argv[ ] ; 

{ 

int i ; 

unsigned Address ; 

unsigned *Length; 

char *Module; 

char *ModCrc; 



No need to save */ 



/* temporary counter variable 
/* module address */ 
/* pointer to module size */ 
/* pointer to the module */ 

/* pointer to the CRC values of the module */ 



for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) ( /*■ do for all modules on command line */ 

Module = modlink(argv[i] , p, p) ; /* get the module address via Link */ 

Address = Module; /* pass the address from the pointer */ 

if (Address == -1) /* if the module is not found */ 

exit (2 34) ; /* return module not found error */ 



/* get module size */ 
/* get address of CRC bytes */ 
= pxFF; /* initialize all to $FF */ 



Length = Address + 2 ; 
ModCrc = Module + (*Length) - 3; 
ModCrc [P] = ModCrc [1] « ModCrc[2] 
crc( Module, *Length - 3, ModCrc) ; 
ModCrc (P] - -ModCrc [0] ; /* complement the CRC */ 

ModCrcfl] « -ModCrc [1 ] ; 
ModCrc [2] « -ModCrc[2]; 



Listing 6: da te 

/* prints the date, day of week, time, and julian date */ 
/* copyright (c) 1986 by Gregory A. Law */ 

^include <stdio.h> 
^include <ctype.h> 
^include <time.h> 
^include <macros.h> 



fldefine MO p 
#define DAY 1 
fldefine YR 2 

jldefine BAD_DIGIT -1 

jldefine BAD_MONTH -1 

jldefine BAD_DAY -1 

#define BAD_YEAR -1 

main ( ) 
( 

struct sgtbuf time; 
char day [40] ; 
int julian; 
char *s; 



/* Month flag */ 
/* Day flag */ 
/* Year flag */ 

/* error flags */ 



/* structure for holding the date & time */ 

/* array for day name */ 

/* variable for julian date */ 

/* pointer to char */ 



Third-party developers are in hot 
pursuit of CoCo 3 tools. For example, 
Computerware will soon release a 
CoCo 3 KSheil. It will support the 
operators above and up to nine function 
keys. It will include a data module 
named shel ldef that will hold a set of 
shell parameters thatyou cangrab when 
you need them. 



"Third-party 
developers are 
in hot pursuit of 
CoCo 3 tools." 



March Listings 

Our mailbox was full of educational 
and useful programs for "KISSable OS- 
9" readers this month. We feature the 
work of Dennis J. Duke of Bessemer, 
Alabama; Stephen B. Goldberg of 
Bethpage, New York and Greg Law of 
Columbus, Georgia, and Delphi CoCo 
SIG fame. 

Dennis sent us a number of utilities 
and it was hard to make a choice for the 
first offering. We decided to list two of 
his C programs, Binary and Split. Bi- 
nary gives you a quick way to find the 
binary value of a number. You type in 
a decimal number, it prints the equiva- 
lent binary number. It will print all 
numbers between 1 and 65,535. 

If you write many long stories with 
TSEdit or the Deskmate editor, you will 
find Split a very useful tool. It gives you 
a way to split a large file into two or 
more smaller files. You can tell Split 
how many lines you want in each file. 
If you don't, you get 50 lines each in as 
many files as it takes to hold your 
original — up to 26. You can name your 
output files or let Split name them for 
you. If you opt for the latter, your 
filenames will read xa through xz. 

Dennis is a staff analyst and lives in 
a UNIX world at Bell South Services. 
However, he does no C programming at 
work. "That's why I welcome the oppor- 



204 THE RAINBOW March 1987 



tunity to play with the CoCo," he said. 
He asked if there was a relatively simple 
way to modify Level 1 OS-9 to give an 
80-column display with the new CoCo 
3. The answer may be found in a public 
domain 80-column CoCo 3 device 
driver on Compuserve's OS-9 SIG as 
well as Delphi's OS 9 Online SIG. 

Stephen Goldberg can't seem to stop 
writing excellent CoCo-based OS-9 
programs. "It's always bugged me when 
I list or sort a file with small entries and 
the output marches down the left side 
of the screen displaying only 24 entries 
at a time — wasting the rest of the 
screen," he said. "Co/ is my solution. 

"To use the program, type col fol- 
lowed by a minus sign and the number 
of columns you want, followed by the 
file or files you want to list in column 
form," he said. "You may display your 
file in two to five columns." 

If you do not type a filename, Col will 
take its input from the standard input 
path. Its output goes to your standard 
output path. This means that both the 
input and output to Col can be redi- 
rected to a file or printer. 

Goldberg also sent along a f un utility 
command that shows you how you can 
patch your shell command file to 
install a new prompt. We showed you 
how to do the same thing using debug 
and a shell script sometimeago. It's just 
one more way to prove that there are 
many ways to solve the same problem 
when you have a powerful operating 
system like OS-9 at your fingertips. 

How many times have you run 
through the "debug, save, verify -u, 
os9gen" procedure — just to patch a 
module? Greg Law wrote a utility 
named ModCRC to make life simpler. 
His program updates the module CRC 
of a module while it is still in memory. 
Your new sequence becomes "debug, 
modcrc, cobbler." 

If you get tired of having your CoCo 
give you the military time, rejoice. Law 
has come to the rescue of those who 
yearn for a less militant clock. In fact, 
his Date utility also gives you the Julian 
date — just in case you work in a 
military procurement center. The out- 
put from Law's program look like this: 

Thursday, November 13, 1986 11:35:45 PM 
Julian 86255 

Enjoy this month's listings. We'll add 
a few more next month if the April 
Fool's pranksters don't strike too hard. 
If you have an OS-9 programming tip 
or utility you would like to share with 
"KISSable OS-9" readers, let us hear 
from you. Keep on hacking! □ 



static char *raonth[ ] - { 
"None" , 
"January" , 
"February" , 
"March" , 
"April" , 
"May" , 
"June" , 
"July" , 
"August" , 
"September" , 
"October" , 
"November " , 
" December" 

}? 

getime(Stime) ; /* get the date and process into julian */ 

Julian - jul (time. tjnonth k 0xf f , time . t_day & 0xff, time . t_year & 0xff ) ; 

/* now process the day of week */ 

zeller (time . t_month & 0xf f , time . t_day & 0xff, time. t_year & 0xf f ) ; 

print f("%s %02d, %04d ", month [ t ime . t_month ] , time,t_day, 
time.t_year + 19)30) ; 

if (time . t_hour »«■ 0 ) 

printf ("12: %02d:%02d AM" » time. t_minute, time. t_second) ; 

else if (time, tjiour > 0 && time.t_hour < 12) 

printf ("%d:%02d: %02d AM", t ime . t_hour , time . t_minute , 
time. t_second) ; 

else if (time . t_hour == 12) 

printf ("12 : %02d:%02d PM" , time. t_minute, time . t_second) ; 

else if (time. tjhour > 12 ) 

printf ("%d:%02d: %02d PM" , time. t_hour - 12, time , t_minute , 
time, t__second) ; 

printf ("\nJulian %02d%03d\n" , time. t_year, julian) ; 

) 

jul (month, day , year) 

int month; 

int day ; 

int year; 

{ 

static int days[13] =» {0, 31, 28, 31, 30 , 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31) ; 

int n = 0; 

int mdy[3]; 
unsigned int retjul; 

days[21 = 28,* 

mdy[DAY] = mdy [MO ] = mdy[YR] ^ 0? 

mdy [KO] ■ month ? / * set in the month, day, and year */ 

mdy [ DAY ] - day; 
mdy [ YR] 38 year; 

if (mdytMO) < 1 || mdy (MO] > 12) /* invalid month? */ 
return ( BAD_MONTK ) ? 

if (mdy[YR] < 100) ( 

if (mdy [ YR] < 80) /* year < 80 then 2l'st century */ 

mdyCYR] +« 2000; 
else /* else 20 ' th century */ 

mdy[YR] +■ 1900? 

} 

/* check to see if it is a leap year */ 

if (mdy(YR) % 4 0 && mdy[YR] % 100 1-0 || mdy [YR] % 400 == 0) 
days [2] = 29? 

/* check for invalid day of month */ 
if (mdy { DAY ] < 1 [j mdy [DAY] > days (mdy [MO] ] ) 
return (BAD__DAY) ; 

/* the blunt work routine, add up all days in previous months */ 
retjul = mdy [ DAY ] ,* 
for (n - 1? n < mdy [MO] ? n++) 
retjul += days[n}? 

return (ret jul) ; 

} 

/* this routine returns a pointer to a string indicating the day of week */ 
int zeller (months, days, yer) 
int months ? 
int days; 
int yer? 

{ 

int n - 0? 
int month ? 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 205 



I 



THESE FINE STORES 
CARRY THE RAINBOW 

The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have 
other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you 
patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewfon 

Florence 

Greenville 

Modlson 

Montgomery 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix 
Sieiro Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Citrus Heights 
Gross Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywood 
Lompoc 
Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

COLORADO 

Westminster 

DELAWARE 

Mlddletown 

Mllford 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Cocoa 

Davie 

Deltona 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Jacksonville 



North Mlomi 

Beach 
Orlondo 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
Sarasota 
Starke 

Tallahassee 
Tampa 

Titusville 

GEORGIA 

Athens 

Bremen 

Cummlngs 

Jesup 

Morletta 

Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Lewlston 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Auroro 
Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 

Electronic World 

TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Books Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Software Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
L&H Electronics Emporium 
E.D.C. Industries 
Polygon Co. 
Tower Magazine 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Computer Literacy 

Software City 

Delmar Co. 

Mllford News Stand 

Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 

Software, Software, Inc. 

The Open Door 

Software Plus More 

Wilson Assoc. dba Radio Shack 

Electronics Englneeis 

Mike's Electronics Distributor 

The Book Nook 

Book Town 

Deono's TV 

Almar Bookstore 

Book Mania 

Boyd-Eberl Corp. 

Anderson News Co. 

Wolfs Newsstand 

Family Computers 

Record Junction. Inc. 

Radio Shack Dealer 

Anderson News Co. 

Fine Print Bookstore 

Sound Trader & Computer Center 

Computrac 

The Academic Resource Center. Inc. 

Bremen Electronlcs/Rodlo Shack 

Kent Radio Shack 

Radio Shack 

Act One Video 

Mortln Music Radio Shack 

Books, Etc. 

Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's & Brentano's 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. Dalton Booksellers 

N.Wabash St. 

West Jackson St, 
Bob's In Newtown 
Bob's News Emporium 



Chilllcothe 

Danville 

Decatur 



East Moline 

Evanston 

Geneseo 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 

Oak Brook 

Oak Park 

Paris 

Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokie 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Columbus 

Gairett 

Greenwood 

Indianapolis 



Jasper 
Madison 
Martinsville 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 

KANSAS 

Topeka 

Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Georgetown 

Hazard 

Hopklnsvllle 

Louisville 

Paducah 

Plkevllle 



LOUISIANA 

Crowley 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Waterboro 



Bob's Rogers Park 
Book Market 

East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Diversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's & Brentano's 

South Wabash 

West Jackson 

516 N. Michigan 

835 N. Michigan 
Porkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sandmeyer's Bookstore 
Univ. of Chicago Bookstore 
Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Videomat. Inc. 
Book Emporium 
Book Market 
Book Emporium 

K-Mart Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Market 
Illinois News Service 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Clr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Ploce 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cottage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 
Finn NewsAgency, Inc. 
The Computer Experience 
Bookland. Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

Arco Office Supplies 
Radio Shock 
Mitting's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 

Palmer News, Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka. Inc. 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 
Lloyd's Rodlo 

Goodwin Electronics 
Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
The Computer Store 
Radio Shock 
Gus-Ston Enterprises 



Acadlana Newsstand 
The Book Rack 

Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 



MARYLAND 

Silver Spring 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Fltchburg 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Dearborn 

Durand 

Harrison 

Lowell 

Mt. Clemens 

Muskegon 

Owosso 

Peny 

Roseville 

Royal Oak 

Sterling 

Heights 
Trenton 
Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 
Willmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Jefferson City 
Klrksville 
Moberly 
St. Louis 



MONTANA 

Butle 
Whlteflsh 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Montvale 

Pennsvllle 

River Edge 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 



NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Elmlra Heights 
Fredonla 
Hudson Falls 
Johnson City 
New York 



Layhill Newsstand 

Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Corners Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 

Book Nook. Inc. 

DSL Computer Products 

Robbins Electronics 

Horn'son Radio Shack 

Curfs Sound & Home Arcade Center 

Michigan Radio 

The Eight Bit Corner 

C/C Computer Systems 

Perry Computers 

New Horizons 

Software City 

Sterling Book Center 
Trenton Book Store 
Gerry's Book Co. 

Read-More News 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Front Page News 

Plaza Book Store 

Consumer Electronics of Whitefish 

Hobby Town 

Hurley Electronics 

Verham News Corp. 

Village Computer & Software 

Micro World II 

Outpost Radio Shack 

Software City 

Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 

Softwore City 

Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Page One Newsstand 



Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G.A West & Co 

Unicorn Electronics 

Bornes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station. Track 37 

200 Park Ave.. (Pan Am #1) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center *2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
Stote News 



206 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



N. White Plains 
Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Aberdeen 
Cay 

Charlotte 

Havlock 
Hickory 
Marlon 

OHIO 

Blanchester 
Canton 
Chardon 
Cincinnati 
Columbiana 
Coshocton 
Dayton 

Fakborn 
Glrard 
Kent 
Kenton 
Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamisburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Xenia 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulso 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allison Park 
Altoona 
Brookvllle 
Malvern 
Phlladelph la 

Phoenixville 
Pittsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Wind Gop 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Goffney 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 
Union 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 

Nashville 
Smyrna 
Union City 



Usercom Systems. Inc 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Software City 

Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
Worldwide News 
Spectrum Projects 

King Electronics 
Radio Shack 

News Center in Caiv Village 
Newsstand Int'l 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Boomers Rhythm Center 

JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Clnsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

Utopia Software 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wilke News 

News-Readers 

Glrard Book & News 

The News Shop 

T.W. Hogan & Associates 

Lakewood International News 

Brunner News Agency 

Edu-Caterers 

Wllke News 

Mount Orab Radio Shack 
Programs Unlimited 
Leo's Book & Wine Shop 
Fine Print Books 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Fifth Ave. News 

Software City 
Newborn Enterprises 
Larry's Stereo Shop 
Personal Software 
City Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Radio Shack 
All-Pro Souvenlers 
Pitt Computer & Software 
Software Corner 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 

Softwore Connection 

Software Haus. Inc. 
Goffney Book Store 
Palmetto News Co 
Software City 
Fleming's ElectTonics 

Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
First Byte Computer Co. 
Computer Center 
Software. Inc. 
Mosko's Book Store 
Delker Electronics 
Cox Electronics Radio Shack 



TEXAS 

Brenham 
Elgin 
Orange 
San Antonio 

UTAH 

MurTay 

VIRGINIA 

Gafton 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Ladysmlth 
Milwaukee 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



WYOMING 

Casper 



ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA: 

Klngsford 



CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blalrmore 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 
Falrview 
Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
Innlsfail 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydmlnster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Strath more 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetasklwln 



Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 
Northway Books & News 
CoCo Nuts 

Deseret Book 

Electronics Marketing 
l-O Computers 
Software City 

Adams News Co.. Inc. 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications. LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News& Hobby 

Electronics, Etc. 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid II 

Harvey Schwortz Bookshop 

Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 

The Computer Store 



Informatico Y Telecomunicaciones 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Spoils & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Radio Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
A.S.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack. ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's ElectTonics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



Burnaby 


Compulit 


Burns Lake 


VT. Video Works 


Campbell 




River 


TRS Electronics 


Chilliwack 


Charles Parker 


Coortenay 


1 — \ III ft A n f> i 

Rick s Music & Stereo 


Dawson Creek 


Bell Radio & TV 


Golden 


Taks Home Furnishings 


Koiowna 


i olfcJbun ivivjiKoiing 


Langley 


Langley Radio Shack 


N. Vancouver 


Microwest Distributors 


Nelson 


Oliver's Books 


Parksville 


Parksville TV 


Penticton 


D.J.'s 




Four Corner Grocery 


Salmon Arm 


Matrix Computing 


Sidney 


Sidney Electronics 


Smithers 


Wall's Home Furniture 


inn Miio 

IUVJ IVIIItJ 




House 


Tip Top Radio & TV 


MANITOBA 

111* » f » ■ 1 mawr « 




Altona 


LA Wiebr Ltd. 


Lundar 


Goranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodi's Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L. Enns Elec. 


viraen 


Mrcner enterprises 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeffries Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewitt Elec 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Carbonear 


Slade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Halifax 


Atlantic News 


ONTARIO 




Aurora 


Compu Vision 


Concord 


Ingrom Software 


Exceter 


J. Macleane & Sons 


Hanover 


Modern Appliance Centre 


Huntsville 


Huntsville Elec. 


Kenora 


Donny "B" 


Kingston 


T.M. Computers 


Ustowel 


Modern Appliance Centre 


South River 


Max TV 




Dennis TV 



QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assinibola 

Estevan 

MooseJaw 

Nipiwan 

Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Messagerles de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Ploce 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCoClub 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Gronfs House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado. inc 



Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



I 



March 1987 THE RAINBOW 207 



AD VERTISER INDEX 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when 
you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Bangert 136 

Brainbank Software 88 

Canyon County Devices 140 

Cer-Comp 157 

Challenger 187 

Cinsoft 89 

CNR Engineering 167 

CoCo Cat Anti-Drug ad 124 

Cognitec 179 

Colorware 22, 23 

Compusense 163 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island 183 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 50, 51 

D.P. Johnson 189 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Delphi 114, 115 

Derringer Software 57, 119, 161 

Diecom IFC 

Disto/CRC 193, BC 

Dorsett 113 

Duck Productions 175 

Fazer Electronics 145 

Federal HU) Software 181 

Gimmesoft 75 



Hard Drive Specialists 165 

Hawkes Research Services 1 80 

Hemphill Electronics 15 

HJL div. of Touchstone 

Technology, Inc 17 

Howard Medical 34, 210 

Inventive Solutions .75 

J & M Systems 103, 169 

J & R Electronics 195 

Kelly Software Distributors 135 

Metric Industries 13 

Micro Works, The 133 

Microcom Software 9, 11 

Microtech Consultants Inc 81 

MicroWorld 33 

Moreton Bay 79 

Novasoft 54 

NRI Schools 25 

Other Guys Software, The 65 

Owl-Ware 84, 85 

PCM 105 

Perry Computers 16 

Polygon 139 

Preble's Programs, Dr IBC 

Prickly-Pear Software 173 

PXE Computing 7 

Radio Shack 121, 123 

Rainbow Guide to OS-9 49 



Rainbow Binder 209 

Rainbow Bookshelf 203 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 28 

Rainbow On Disk 197 

Rainbow On Tape 158 

Rainbow Simulation Book II. ...130 

RAINBOWfest 106, 107 

RAINBOWfest Tape 94 

Real-Time Specialties, Inc 110 

Saguaro 191 

Seca 147 

Selected Software 146 

Software House, The 169 

Spectrogram Magazine 195 

Spectrosystems 163 

Spectrum Projects Inc. . . .67, 69, 71 
Speech Systems 

41, 42, 43, 44, 45 

Sugar Software 117 

Sunrise Software 111 

T & D Software 91 

Tepco 1 85 

Tom Mix Software 55 

True Data Products 148, 149 

Woodstown Electronics 101 

Zebra Systems 31 




Call: 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Marian Nolan Carpenter 

Advertising Representative 

12110 Meridian South, Suite 5 

P.O. Box 73-578 

Puyallup, WA 98373-0578 

(206) 848-7766 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Fateoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502)22*4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hlngham, MA 02043 

(617) 74^-5852 



208 



THE RAINBOW March 1987 



Protect and highlight 
your important 
magazine collection 

with sturdy 
RAINBOW binders 




Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide com- 
plete protection. 

These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 

of the magazine. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat Index 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES Please send me 



set(s) of RAINBOW binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 
enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1. (Regular price $2.50.) 



(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 

Charge to: □ VISA 

Account Number 

Signature 



is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

□ MasterCard □ American Express 

Expiration Date 



Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 




Most Howard Medical products are COCO 3 compatible, 
some require special patches. Please inquire when you order. 



(800) 443-1444 



ORDERS 



(312) 278-1440 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 




RINTER 




Dual Mode 

EPSON LX-80 



The LX-80 offers draft or near telle? quality plus a IK input buller tor muct 
taster graphics printing speed LX-P package includes Irn? t.X-80 a Boiflk serra 
to paiallel converter, and a Howard Pnniei Tutorial 




^317 (i7 shippifig) 



Add $29.50 for tractor ET-1 




STAR 
NX-10 



ie NX- to is the latest generation ot printers and otters built- >n hack tractor 
teed giving forward and backward movement ol paper plus exceptional graphics 
printing capabilities NX-P package includes the NX-10, a Botek serial to parallel 
converter and the Howard Printer Tutorial 



*299 



($7 shipping) 



ONI 



123A 12" 

This 12" green screen nigh resolution mon- 
itor offers 80 column capability, Zentlh quali* 
ty and a 30 dav warranty valid ai any ot 
Zenith's 1200 locatron3 

Retail $149 $0750 REPACK 



Our price 



(S7 ahipping) 



122A Zenith I2 M Amber Screen Ot- 
ters the same 640 dots * 200 dots 
resolution at 15MHz as the 123A 
and a 90 day warranty valid at our 
1 200 locatla ne $ Q Q 

($7 shipping) 0 O 

Magruvo* BCM 515 wiih analog 
RGB and TTL KGB and composite 
video. Built-in speaker 640 x 200 
duis resolution in RGB mode. 
Idejt lor CoCo 3 C^fcrtO 

or randy iooo *A jO 

($14 shipping) 

Magnavox CM H6S 2 color compo- 
site with 2 ye«ir warrantee 13" 
screen 240 x 200 dot resolution 
with built-in speaker $*|CJ|^ 

(St A ^hrppmgj 

>Co 3 does not require video amplifii 



lURNfK turns your composih* 
monitor into a B2 channel 



T.V. ice. 



l« ^tipping) 



All monitors require in amplifier 
circuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer 
They attach with spring connectors, 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one lor audio and one lor 
video 

VA-l loi monochrome 
^ Mors uiily, liti- all 

rolor computers 

$2445 



1 h i 



2 shpgj 

C-4 for monochrome 
01 CO for UCS all color 
computers 

«S2 Shpg, $ 45045 





DISK CONTROLLERS 




DC-3 
ADD-ON 



DC-38 includes 00 column capaci* 
ly, parallel printer, real lime clock, 
and all software $138 

c 

s 

r 



Includes controller and 
t-DOS ROM chip. 

s 98 (52 shipping) 

BOARDS 



DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM S "J 2 5 

DC-3P Mini EPROM Programmer 
indudus all sollware to 
program 2764 or 2712a s 55 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and paral- 
lel printer port u jy 

DD-2 Double sided 360K disk drive 
with V* height ca:;e 
and power supply 



*188 



OC512 512K RAM Board $165 



CA-1 Cable lo connect controller to 
one drive $24 50 

C-D05 3.3 PIN ROM makes 
DfstO DC-3 work 
with CoCo J. 



MEMOR 



64 -El for E Boards with complete 
instructions Remove old chips and 
place with p reassembled pack- 
ge — no soldering ac 
r trace cuts. ($2 shpg) *28* 45 
64-F1 lor F Boards. No soldering 
needed Capacitor $2^45 



0 



leads rnusi be cut 



(S2 shipping) 



64-2 for COCO 2. KM requires one 
solder point, no ft 4 _ 

trace culs ($2 shipplng)^24^ 
64-22 Two chip set tor 2&-3134A 
and B, 26-3 13€A and B. Koren Col- 
or Computers require CrtrtvIC 
1 solder point *Z8 

($2 shipping) 




SOFTWARE SPECIALS 




PAYROL/BAS™ 

Written in nonprotected basic tor the color computer This easy*to*use package 
of piograms will simplify and decrease the time spent doing payroll Rambow 
May 19B6 review says, ''Elegant and professional '' Slate and federal tables 
are already included Send for fRit 11 page reports guide $"71195 



$ 79 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's Integrated package includes VIP writer terminal, data base, call and 
disk 2ap which can fix a diskette thai is giving I/O errors <jj 

sap- 1 1 



125 



Stock analysis pragiam organizes 
your portfolio and gives specific 
sell and 3iop* 
loss points, 



$1995 



BPA-1 

Chan your blood pressure Irom daily 
readings taken in the comfort ot 
your home 



$-|g95 



GUARANTEE 




Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of 
dealing with a company through the mail Once you receive our hardware, fry 
11 out. test (I lor compatibility II you're not happy with II for any reason, return 
ii in 30 days and we ll give you your money back, (less shipping) 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 



Dr. Preble's Programs 
Striking A Blow For 




" . p Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better . . . 

— Albert Camus 



that 



*** Mental Freedom 

for CoCo 1, 2 and 3! 



A Thought-Controlled Video Challenge 

We call it The Preble Thoughtware. 

DOES GREEN BLOOD flow in your veins like Mr. Spock? Is your mind well 
ordered? Or is your mind a mass of conflicting emotions like most 
humans? 

THOUGHTWARE may answer these questions and more. 

IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your very 
thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-con trolled 
graphics: levitation and materialization! 

PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS - 
now! The Radio Shack Color Computer has many ad- 
vanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's 
Programs combines the advanced technology of the CoCo 
with the amazing Radio Shack BIOFEEDBACK MONITOR 
to bring you "Preble Thoughtware." 

THOUGHT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any 
video game you have ever played, Thoughtware tests your 
ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse 
circumstances. 

LIGHTNING FAST reflexes will do you no good here, unless you 

first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. 
DO YOU HAVE SELF-CONTROL? Many people can keep a 

"Poker Face" even when they are worried so that others 

may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Thoughtware 

will find out! 

AND ITTALKS! Did you know that theCoCocan produce incredibly realistic 
digital speech without a special speech synthesizer? And I mean really 
high quality speechl Forget the mechanical robot voice. This voice 
quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no extra 
hardware is needed for speech. None. The CoCo produces this amazing 
digital speech all by itself (with a wee bit of programming by Dr. Preble). 

THOUGHTWARE — Next time your friends ask what your computer can do, 
show them the Preble Thoughtware! 

Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor Catalogue #63-675 

The Preble Thoughtware — TAPE $27.95 + s/h, on DISK $29.95 + s/h 





*** Basic Freedom *** 

for The Color Computer 3 
(with versions for CoCo 1 & 2) 

A Full Screen Editor for BASIC Programming 

We call it EDITOR 3. Chris Babcock wrote a pure, efficient Machine Language 
program to open a new dimension of ease and power for anyone typing in 
a BASIC program. 

Here are your BASIC Freedoms! 

FULL CURSOR MOVEMENT — Use the arrow keys to move anywhere on a 
screen. If you are using a Color Computer 3, then even the 40 or 80 
column screen is supported! 

INSERT, CHANGE or DELETE CHARACTERS anywhere on the 
screen. Simply move to what you wish to change, change 
it and continue working! 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS are OK! EDITOR 3 lets you type in 
lowercase any time or all the time. Lowercase command 
words are automatically translated to uppercase for BASIC. 
Of course, lowercase text within quotes stays lowercase. 
This is great when typing wiht the CoCo 3's 40 or 80 column 
mode with true lowercase! 
MERGE LINES within a program with just a few keystrokes! 
AUTO KEY REPEAT — Hold down any key and it will repeat. 
INVISIBLE — Once EDITOR 3 has been loaded in, it is activated 
^ith a single keystroke! It hides itself out of the way of other programs 
and can be turned off any any time. Pressing RESET will not hurt 
EDITOR 3! 

EASY TO USE — Installation takes seconds! Well-written goof-proof manual 
included. 

COCO 1 & 2 — Yes, even though this program was conceived for the powers 
of the new CoCo 3, we still support the previous Color Computers. They 
too, need their BASIC Freedom! 

EDITOR 3 — So easy and handy, you'll never want to run your CoCo without 
it! 

Available on DISK only for CoCo 3 @ $29.95 + s/h 

CoCo 1/2 version can not support 40 or 80 column screens. CoCo 1/2 version 
is available on TAPE for $27.95 + s/h or DISK for $29.95 + s/h. 



Also Available for CoCo 1 & 2 only: 

VDOS, the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in memoryl Works with or without a disk 
drive. TAPE $27.95 + s/h, DISK $29.95 + s/h 

VDUMP, for the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in a single file! $14.95 + s/h on tape. 
VPRINT, for the UnDISK: Printout UnDISK Directory! $9.95 + s/h on tape. 



Order From 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 



Check, Money Order, MasterCard, VISA or COD accepted. For Shipping to USA and 
Canada add $1 .50, to other countries add $5.00. 



Technical questions answered 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 





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