Skip to main content

Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

See other formats


THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Tools of tho Trade 

Our Utilities Issue . 



Including "housekeeping" programs for tape-tt)- • • 
disk transfer, quick graphics, curing tape l/«P errors, a 
hiding your BASIC listings, color text, shorthand 
disk commands and a graphics directory! * # 



«» • 



• .4 













# Plus, frovices hliche: 
• tigfit Prografh • 
shorties, jusfr • 
f Jor^eginger§. # 

Antf # • # • 

Mlirdet at Ihe Hfctel CoCo 

More on the CoCo 3 and a 
r£^ort*bn 6s-9levef II • 






- \ 






Bouncing Boulders is a new, fast paced arcade- 
style game for your Coco. As you race your man 
around the screen you try to collect enough stars 
to open the exit to the next level. You can drop 
rocks to kill aliens that follow you around the 
screen trying to catch you. But beware of the fall- 
ing and bouncing boulders as they will crush your 
man if you get trapped under one. The many dif- 
ferent screens with lots of puzzles will keep you 
playing for hours on end. 





You've asked for it and now it's here, a wrestling 
game for your color computer. Play a single match 
or play a tag team match in this 1 to 4 player game. 
Wrestle against the computer or wrestle against 
your friend in a single or tag team match. Use pun- 
ches, kicks, body slams, back breakers and many 
other moves as you attempt to pin your opponent 
Super graphics and realistic play action make this 
a great game for all. 



m 





SB 





PI -»r.t I 



■'3 























. y ! . •* "; 




• • • • ■ . 




«• 1 • 

* 9 ■ 


■ • • 




Travel through lowns srv 4 
plore strange land 
ultimate tantasy role-playmy 
game lor the color computer. 
As you travel the land you will 
meet different characters that 
you may convince to join you In 
your quest. During your quest 
you will learn the secrets of 
magic spells and ultimately, 
your final goal. 

Enter The Gates of Delirium 
contest! The first person to 
solve the game shall be our 
grand prize winner of a Coco 3. 
There will be 5 second prizes of 
one free game from Diecom 
Products and 5 third prizes of 
one free hat from Diecom Pro- 
ducts. 

64K „ 

required $38.95 u.s. 

$52.95 can 

available on disk only 



V 



ALSO AVAILABLE 

— Paper Route, Knock Out, 
Karate, each game requiring 
64K. Tape or disk. 

$28.95 u.s. 
$38.95 can. 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT„ CANADA L9T 2X8 

We accept: 




cheque or money order 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878-8358 
personal service 9*5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax. 
C.O.D. Canada only. 
Dealer inquiries invited 
Looking for new software. 




From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 






Tandy 200 24K $649 
Tandy 600 32K $1,269 
Tandy 102 24K $395 




.,r v y 'if 




Color Computer 3 
W/128K Ext. Basic $169 




Tandy 1000 EX $56900 
Tandy 1000 SX $839.00 






BIG 5AVINC5 ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 569.00 
Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 839.00 

Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1229.00 
Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-105 80 CPS 145.00* 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel310.00 

Star LV-1210 120 CPS 199.00 

Star NX-10 120 CPS 279.00 

Star SG-15 120 CPS 410.00 

Panasonic P-1091 120 CPS 259.00 

Panasonic P-1092 180 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 292 200 CPS 529.00 

Okidata 192 \ 200 CPS 375.00 

Epson LX-80 100 CPS 275.00 

Epson FX-85 160 CPS 419.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-7 Modem 85.00 
Radio Shack DC Modem 

Program Pac 99.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 212 179.00 

Hayes 300 Baud Modem 169.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 
BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 
TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pack Interface 62.95" 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 
Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor149.00 
Goldstar Green Monitor 85.00 
Panasonic Amber Monitor w/audio99.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Major Istar 24.95 
Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 
Mark Data Graphic Adven. 24.95 
COCO Util II by Mark Data 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 
AutoTermbyPXEComputing39.95 
TelePatch II by Spectrum 
Telewriter 64 49.95 
Deft Pascal Workbench 
Deft Extra 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 
Max Fonts (72 COCO Max Fonts) 



Elite Calc 69.95 
Elite Word 69.95 
Elite File (disk only) 
DynaCalc (disk only) 
Word Pack RS by PBJ 
VIP Writer (disk only) 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 

Order any 2 software pieces listed and 
take 10% off their listed price. All Radio 
Shack software 10% off list. Send for 
complete list. "Sale prices through 
2/15/87 



27.95 
27.95 
27.95 
39.95 

79.95 
49.95 
29.95 
59.95 
99.95 
39.95 
59.95 
64.95 
69.95 
69.95 
74.50 
99.95 
99.00 
69.95 
149.95 







mm 


I I 

1 




1 




■. T-:i 






P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 Is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




26 




FEATURES 



r 



60 



Invisilist/G/en Dahlgren 

PROGRAM UTILITY Renegade hackers beware 

Murder at the Hotel CoCo/Da/e Lear 



GAME A Rainbow staff imposter is bent on mayhem! 

[^J CoCo Can Play Cupid, Too/Ernie DiZazzo 

GRAPHICS Love is in the air . . . and on the screen 

\^ CoCo Bright/Dawd C. Billen 




GRAPHICS UTILITY Text with graphics and more 

[^S Cycle-delic Pa\e\\e/ Becky F. Matthews 

COCO 3 GRAPHICS A rainbow kaleidoscope for fun 

\^ The Limousine Utility/Roger Schrag 



DISK UTILITY A tape-to-disk transfer utility 

The RAINBOWfest Reporter/Cray Augsburg 

SHOW NOTES A report from the Princeton show 

Get the P'icXure/ Chris W. Brown 

GRAPHICS A picture directory for your graphics disks 

Take Command//W/cfrae/ N. Jorgenson 



DISK UTILITY A handy disk utility for the CoCo 3 

Instant Graphics/ Courtney Powers 

GRAPHICS UTILITY Create fast, detailed Adventure graphics 

£0 CoCo ROS, Part WMDennis H. Weide 



106 




HAR DWARE PROJECT Interfacing the robotics program 

Relief for Tape-Loading Headaches/Mark Nelson 



TAPE UTILITY A quick cure for f/O Errors 



NOVICES NICHED 



Hand-Me- Downs 

David Hutchinson 
Decisions, Decisions 

Robert Rodgers 
A Public Service Message 

Ruth Golias 
Cassette Organization 

J. E. Rittenhouse 



120 Sound Off 



122 



124 



125 



Dave Lengel 
Echo 



John Stewart 
Joystick Directory 

Dale Atwater 

Planning Ahead 

Bill Bernico 



20 



26 



36 



49 



60 



73 



83 



88 



94 



106 



152 



182 



125 



126 



126 



127 



Cover illustration copyright © 1986 
by Fred Crawford 



rJfcThe cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAINBOW ON 
tape and RAINBOW ON disk. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
RAINBOW ON tape. For details, check the 

RA/NBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 

ads on pages 198 and 187. 



NEXT MONTH: Whether bullish or bearish, the March rainbow is 
sure to carry something of interest for the financial genius in your 
home. Our focus will be on business and finance, and you'll discover 
again that our CoCo is more (much more) than a "game machine." 

Get all the angles — get the March rainbow, the number one source 
for your Color Computers 1 , 2 and 3! 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Josep/7 Kolar 

Creating a review program 

Building February's Rainbow/J/Vn Reed 

Managing Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/A/f arfy Goodman _ 

Answers to your technical questions 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



101 



16 



150 



68 




New sections, new selections and Goodman's database report 

Doctor ASCW/Richard £ Esposito = 

Technical Q & A 

Education Notes/Steye Blyn 

Presidents take precedence 

Education Overview/A/f/cftae/ Plog, Ph.D 

Do teachers like computers? 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

The CoCo is music to the ears 

Wishing Well/Fred B. Scerbo . 



178 



46 



11 



12 



176 



166 



A spelling program that speaks for itself 



RAINBOWTECH 



^ Bits and Bytes of BAS\C/Richard White 

The CoCo 3 color palette from BASIC 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 

|| KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

A Level II report 

|J Pipes and Filters/Bruce N. Warner 

TUTORIAL The misunderstood features 

"Bar den's Buffer" will return next month. 

DEPARTMENTS 



200 



186 



190 



204 



Advertisers Index 

Back Issue Information 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



Letters to Rainbow 
One-Liner Contest 
Information 



208 
141 

_18 
160 

_6 



Pen Pals 

The Pipeline 

Received & Certified 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



Subscription Info 



137 Where to find Rainbow 



172 
184 
131 

_72 
154 
206 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

Product Review Contents 



.129 



The 


m\ 






February 1987 Vol. VI No. 7 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C, Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 

Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 

Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 

Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 

Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk, Jody Gilbert, 

Angela Kapfhammer, Monica Wheat 
Technical Editor Dan Downard 
Technical Assistant Cray Augsburg 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 
Consulting Editors Ed Ellers, 

Danny Humphress, Belinda C. Kirby 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 
Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Sandra Underwood, Denise Webb 



Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 
Typesetting Services 

Suzanne Benish Kurowsky, Karen Semones 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E Rodgers 



Editorial Director James E. Reed 

Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 

Creative Director Heidi Maxedon 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Customer Service Mgr. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Pam Workhoven 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
President Cindy J. Shaekleford 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 208 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect. KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAINBOwfest mdTHE rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered • trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect. 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FAlSOFT F Inc., 1986. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use Is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
the rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mall to other countries is U.S. $68, air mall U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are In print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/1 2ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



LETTERS TO THE 




Glad to Be of Service 



Editor: 

After reading rainbow for four years, I 
have to write and let you know I enjoy it very 
much. But I have never seen such a fine piece 
of workmanship as the article by Marty 
Goodman, "RTTY for the Color Computer" 
on Page 36 of the November 1986 issue. I 
use this program quite a lot. Thank you and 
I hope to see more of this kind of program- 
ming. Keep up the good work. 

Gerry Farmer 
Calgary, Alberta 



Where Are They? 

Editor: 

I was searching for one-liners in my 
November 1986 RAINBOW, but to my sur- 
prise, I could not find even one. Did you 
discontinue them? Or did I just miss them? 

Michael Jacobs 
Brooklyn, NY 

A one-liner junkie, eh! Well, never 
fear, that was just a short break. 
We get dozens of one-liners 
monthly and plan to keep publish- 
ing them indefinitely. 



BACK TALK 



Editor: 

In the November 1986 issue, Page 8, a 
reader asked about using the CoCo to 
control a model railroad layout. I suggest 
that he contact the Model Railroad^ Kalm- 
bach Publishing Co., 1027 N. Seventh 
Street, Milwaukee, WI 53233. They proba- 
bly have an article in one of their back issues.' 

Jules Stickle 
Coombs, British Columbia 



as a word processor (I use VIP Library). The 
VIP Library seems to function on the new 
machine, but I have high expectations of a 
new "super-processor" to come out in the 
near future. The purpose of this letter is to 
simply let the software companies know that 
we (the new generation of CoCo 3 users) are 
interested in new programs and program- 
ming techniques as soon as they are avail- 

a ^ C ' Randy Harrison 

Columbus, OH 



COCO 3 

Editor: 

Pm an engineering student at Ohio State 
University, and my CoCo 2 served mainly 



Didn't Have Him in Mind 



Editor: 

Finally! The CoCo 3 I had ordered in 
August was in the store waiting to be picked 
up. I got it Friday, returned it Monday. 

I have no interest in games or graphics. 
I use two CoCo 2s in my business for 
bookkeeping, billing, record-keeping and to 
automate my recording studio's audio/ 
video synchronization system. I write all my 
own programs in BASIC, and that's the catch. 

Unfortunately, the folks at Tandy didn't 
seem to have had people like me in mind 
when they developed the CoCo 3. It offers 
very little that I don't already have using a 
64K CoCo 2 and Computerware's excellent 
Screen Expander. All the extra memory and 
faster operation are not accessible from 

BASIC. 

So how about a software package that has 
Hi-Res screen with simple PRINK? (x,y) 
syntax, printing at the beginning of a line 
that doesn't wipe out the rest of the line, all 
keys repeat if held down, type-ahead buffer 
and more memory for program and variable 
storage (without toggling, banking, or 
special commands). For 512K versions: a 
RAM disk that can be used as if it were 
Drive 3, using regular Disk BASIC com- 
mands, and a print spooler. 

In short, could somebody market a pro- 
gram that would make the CoCo 3 as 
exciting for a BASIC user like me as it is for 
the rest of the CoCo Community? ■ 

Rob Edward 
Greenwich, CT 



The Primary Guide 

Editor: 

Being the new owner of a CoCo 3, 1 would 
like to make a few comments on my expe- 
riences. First, I was pleased to find a large 
number of my CoCo 1 software would run 
on CoCo 3. These included Telewriter 64, 
Spectaculator, Graf plot, Desk Mate, Ark 
Royal games, etc. One program that would 
not run was my VIP Database. Softlaw told 
me they had no plans for CoCo 3. 

I have also received no help from the local 
Radio Shack centers, who seem to be un- 
informed about CoCo 3 capabilities, soft- 
ware changes, or when OS-9 Level II will be 
available. Regarding any technical ques- 
tions, I am usually referred to Fort Worth 
Headquarters (with a toll number, of 
course). It seems to me that the advice 
available from Radio Shack centers has 
deteriorated significantly since I bought my 
first CoCo in 1981. 

Once again, we CoCo users can be very 
thankful for THE RAINBOW You are the only 
source of information we need to achieve the 
full capability of our favorite computer. The 
manual for CoCo 3 does not even mention 
how to gain use of the full I28K. The 
excellent articles that have appeared in 
rainbow since the CoCo 3 debut have 
served as the primary guide to the CoCo 3. 

Mel Siegel 
North Palm Beach, FL 

Some Tips to Pass Along 

Editor: 

I have been working with my new CoCo 
3 and would like to pass along some obser- 
vations. 

The 16K version of JDOS (Version 1.23) 
is not compatible with the CoCo 3 in the 64K 
mode (the mode at power-up). If you have 
JDOS disks, the COPY command seems to 
work, as does DSKINI, so you can copy your 
files individually from a JDOS disk to an 
RS-DOS disk. LOAD and LOADM do not 
work; neither does DOS. The reason for this 
seems to be that on the new CoCo, only the 
first 8K of the cartridge memory is reserved 
for ROM packs. The upper 8K is dedicated 
to the Super Extended BASIC. However, I 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 




I YOU COULD FALL IN LOVE WITH 

AUTOTERM ! 

IT TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 



SMARTEST 
TERMINAL 



GOOD 
LOOKIN' 



AUTOTERM shows true upper/ 
lower case in screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, or 64 characters with 
no split words. The width of 32 
has extra large letters. Scrolling is 
forward, backward, and fast. Block 
graphics pictures are displayed 
automatically and can be scrolled. 

The screen's top line shows 
operating mode, unused memory 
size, memory on/off, and caps- 
lock on/off. It also gives helpful 
prompts. 



SWEET 
TALKIN' 



KEY-BEEP can be on/off. Unac- 
ceptable keystrokes cause a lower 
pitched BOP! This ERROR- 
BEEBOP can be on/off. 

Talks to other computers with 
Full or Half Duplex; Baud Rate of 
110, 150, 300, 600, 1200; Parity as 
even, odd, mark, space, none; 7 
or 8 bit Word; any Stop Bits; all 
128 ASCII characters; true line 
Break; XON/XOFF protocol; and 
optional line-at-a-time transmis- 
sion. Able to send and receive 
text, block graphics, BASIC and 
ML programs. A 64K machine 
holds up to 44,000 characters 
(32,000 in HI-RES). 

DUAL PROCESSING lets you 
review & edit while more data is 
coming in. 

XMODEM for disk file transfer. 



Fully supports D.C. Hayes and 
other intelligent modems. 

Talks to your printer with any 
page size, margins, line spacing, 
split word avoidance. Embed your 
printer's control sequences for 
boldface, underlining, etc. Narrow 
text can be automatically spread 
out. 



You'll also use Autoterm 
for simple word processing 
and record keeping 

You can display directories, 
delete files, transmit directly from 
disk, and work with files larger 
than memory. Easily maintain a 
disk copy of an entire session. 

Compatible with TELEWRITER 
(ASCII) & other word processors. 

SMOOTH 
WALK IN' 

AUTOTERM moves smoothly 
and quickly between word proces- 
sing and intelligent terminal 
action. Create text, correct your 
typing errors; then connect to the 
other computer, upload your text, 
download information, file it, and 
sign-off; then edit the received 
data, print it in an attractive 
format, and/or save it on file. 

Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly, too! 
Any operating parameter, such as 
screen width, can be altered at 
any time. Uncompleted com- 
mands can be cancelled. 




PUTTY IN 
YOUR HANDS 



The word processor can be 
used to create, print, and/or save 
on file your personal KSMs. They 
let AUTOTERM act like you. For 
example, it can dial through your 
modem, sign-on, interact, perform 
file operations, & sign-oft; an 
entire session without your help. 
KSMs can answer the phone, 
prompt the caller, take messages, 
save them, hang-up, and wait for 
the next call. The KSM potential 
is unbelievable! 



NEW DISK VERSION 5 
IS NOW AVAILABLE 

At start-up, AUTOTERM can set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. 
Timed execution lets AUTOTERM 
work while you sleep or play. 

Print while on line, with J&M 
Parallel Printer Port, Radio Shack 
Modem Pak or RS-232 Pak. 
AUTOTERM 's buffering lets slow 
printers fall behind without losing 
data. 



NO OTHER COMPUTER IN 
THE WORLD CAN MATCH 
YOUR COCO'S AUTOMATIC 
TERMINAL CAPABILITIES! 



AVAILABLE IN CANADA 

from 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Edmonton, Alberta 



CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Please hire the mentally retarded. They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! Phyllis 



tried POKE &HFFOE, converting to the 32K 
mode, and all the JDOS commands seemed 
to work. 

When operating with JDOS, the new 
Super Extended commands will not work, 
and they will not be converted to the proper 
codes if you are writing a program under 
JDOS. If you write a program under JDOS, 
using the new commands, you can save the 
program in ASCII format under JDOS and 
then load it under RS-DOS and it will work. 

OS-9 Version 01.01.00 will not boot, but 
Version 02.00.00 will. I had hoped that the 
80-column driver would work with the new 
CoCo, but it doesn't. 

In the October 1986 issue, Marty Good- 
man stated that VIP Writer would not work 
on the CoCo 3, but I have not had any 
problems with it yet. [Some versions work; 
some don't. See Jim Reed's column in the 
January 1987 issue.] I have loaded old files, 
etc., and they work fine — that is, if you 
don't try to load while the 40- or 80-column 
screen is in effect. 

One nice feature of the new system is its 
error-trapping routine. This goes a long way 
in smoothing out the operation of a program 
since crashes can be bypassed when errors 
are encountered. However, the manual 
supplied with the computer gives only the 
codes for the BASIC errors (see Page 321), 
and did not give the codes for disk errors, 
which, to me, is where the codes really fulfill 
their purpose. By experimenting, I found 
most of the codes. I will give the numbers 
with the symbols, but will not attempt to 
explain them. 



25=UF 
26= NE 
27=BR 
28=DF 
29=OB 
30=WP 



31=FN 
32=FS 
33=AE 
34= FO 
35=SE 
37=ER 



This sequence follows the same order as 
JDOS, so I would suspect that Error 36 
should be VF, 

After setting up an error trap, it can be 
turned off later in the program by inserting 
the command ON ERR GOTO 0. This puts you 
back in the normal mode in which the 
program is aborted and the error message is 

dis P' ayed ' David Breeding 

Russell Springs, KY 



HINTS AND TIPS 



Editor: 

I've noticed from time to time, people 
writing in seeking help dumping graphics to 
the DMP-110. Put the printer into elonga- 
tion mode before initiating the dump. 

David Nicol 
Pacific, MO 

CoCo Max Compatibility 

Editor: 

I recently obtained CoCo Max for use 
with my 64K CoCo 2 and Star NX-10 
printer. The results have been fantastic. 
Initially, a problem arose with CoCo Max*s 
compatibility with the new Star NX- 10 



printer. The printer was not shown or listed 
as being su pported and Colorware could not 
offer any suggestions. I was surprised and 
somewhat dismayed that CoCo Max did not 
work by entering the other Gemini/ Star 
printers as given. I took a long shot and tried 
it with the Epson FX series (printer Line 5 
in the program) and it worked! I would like 
to pass this on to any others who might 
initially experience CoCo Max compatibil- 
ity problems with the new Star NX-10 

printer. D , .. ~ , 

v Phil Kyburz 

Amarillo, TX 



Under Separate Covers 

Editor: 

I'm a 13-year-old CoCo 2 owner and I've 
had my computer for two years. The RAIN- 
BOW ON DISK is great, but one thing bothers 
me. Why can't you send the disk with the 

magazine. Michael Dumin 

Southington, CT 

RAINBOW magazine is published 
and printed in Louisville, Ken- 
t ucky, while the disks are produced 
in another state. The magazine is 
shipped second class mail, while 
the disks are shipped by first class 
mail. 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I would like to request that readers who 
have a video digitizer please send me a 
printout of a picture made using the digit- 
izer. Please include what digitizer, printer 
and camera you used. 

Kevin Mortenson 
254 Clinton Street 
Bingham ton, NY 13905 

Educational Software Hunt 

Editor: 

I'm looking for educational software 
focusing on calculus, mechanics and ther- 
modynamics for mechanical engineering 
studies at a university. How do I locate 
information on how to purchase this type of 

software? Bill Snyder 

565 Leigh ton Avenue 
Youngstown, OH 44512 

Keeper of the Troops 

Editor: 

I'm looking for software that can run 

records for my Boy Scout troop. I can only 

find the type that will run on Apple, IBM 

or Commodore. Does anyone make it for 

the CoCo? T . ~ ^. 

Louis D. Lioccio 

2603 Jackson Avenue 

Erie, PA 16504 

Lamborghini Challenge 

Editor: 

I am looking for an artist who will take 
up the challenge to draw a Lamborghini 



Countach. For a long time I wanted to see 
my favorite computer draw my favorite car. 
If anyone wants to give it a shot, write me. 

Omri Goren 
18933 Kittridge Street, No. 64 
Reseda, CA 91335 

CoCo Version Wanted 

Editor: 

I've found just the program I'm looking 
for — it's a database program that keeps 
track of a collection of videotapes and also 
prints out labels for the tapes. It's called 
Video Tape Tracker. The problem is that it's 
available only in MS-DOS and TRS-DOS. 
I called the company, Prosoft, to see if they 
made a version for the CoCo, but no luck. 
I'd like to see something like that for the 
CoCo. Some of you software entrepreneurs 
develop such an animal. I'm sure you'd find 
a market, especially with the assured pop- 
ularity of the CoCo 3! 

Paul Whiting 
2330 Lakeland Avenue 
Madison, W 1 53704 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I have been delighted with the use of 
Harry Hardy's programs INIT36 and HI- 
DEDIR that were published on Page 46 of 
the October 1983 issue. Has anybody mod- 
ified the two programs to save the spare 
directory on a 40-track drive? If anyone can 
help in this endeavor, please write to me. 

James K. Knight 
11403 48th Drive N.E 
Marysville, WA 98270 

Lost Without a Map 

Editor: 

Is it possible to publish the complete 
memory map to the CoCo 3? I'm a techni- 
cian to the College de Granby and I want 
to introduce the advantage of the CoCo 3. 
I write many programs in machine language 
and the memory map would be helpful to 

Martin Scott 
233 Roy 
Granby, Quebec 
Canada J2G 5 R6 

We have considered publishing 
an article about the CoCo 3 mem- 
ory map, however, such an exten- 
sive report would have to be done 
over a period of several months 
and would take many pages. It is 
unlikely in the near future. We do 
ask that you watch for separate 
publications dealing with such 
subjects advertised in future issues 
of THE RAW BOW. 

For your information, we did 
publish a complete memory map 
of the Color Computer in the July, 
August, September and December 
1983 issues of rainbow. While this 
series by Bob Russell will be of 
little assistance, it will give you 
some idea of the breadth of the 
project. 



8 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



500 

POKEs, 

PEEKs, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. 50 WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKS and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ ECB/Dlsk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC. CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM. TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, REMUM, PRINT 
USIMQ, DIR, KILL. SAVE. LOAD, 
MERQE, RErlAME, DSKIMI. 
BACKUP, DSKI$. and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY. CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 

★ Generate a Repeat-key. 

★ Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

★ Speed Up your programs. 

★ Reset, MOTOR ON /OFF from 
keyboard. 

★ Recover Basic programs lost by 

nEW. 

★ Set 23 different 
QRAPMIC/SEMIQRA PrtIC modes 

★ Merge two Basic programs. 

★ AND MUCH MUCH MOREill 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECB/D1SK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2, St 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



to 



""$9.95 




200 



additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for. 

• Rompak Transler lo disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/ double sided drives with variable 
slep- rales 

• High-Speed Cessette Operation 

• Telewriter 64*>. EdtasmH-® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for OMP printers] & Text Screen Oump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS ' N EXECS Is a prerequisite 




DISK TUTORIAL 

V (2- Disk Package) 




An indispensable tutorial for serious disk 
Basic/ ML programmers Gives almost 
everything you MUST know about the disk 
system Some features: 

• Learn about track/sectors/granules 

• How the Directory is organized 

• Useful disk utilities 

• Useful ROM routines 

• How to use double sided/40/80 track drives 

• Information security on disk 

• Insight into common disk errors 

• Many Tips/ Hints/ Secrets you won't find 
elsewhere) 

• And Much Much Morel 

CoCo 1, 2 & 3 

only $36.95 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. 

drawn pictures. Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER. 
BASIC 1. 

Supports the following printers: EPSON 
RX/FX, GEMINI 10X/SG-10, NX-10, 
CMtoh 8510, DMP-1 00/1 05/400/430, 
SEIK0SHA GP-100/250, LEGEND 808 
and GORILLA BANANA. 

DISK ONLY $29.95 
PICTURE DISK#1 

This disk includes OVER 100 pre- drawn 
pictures for use with the CoCo Graphics 
Designer. 

DISK ONLY $14.95 



COLOR SCRIBE II 

THE C0C03 WORD- PROCESSOR 

This superb word processor uses the 80 
COLUMN display of the CoCo III and 
includes the following features: Justifica- 
tion, Headers, Footers, Pagination, OVER 
20 Line Editing Commands such as 
Character Insert/Delete, skip over words, 
breaking a line and more. Comes with a 
comprehensive manual. 
COCO III with Disk Drive. 

ONLY $49.95 



COCO DISK ZAPPER 




Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk It's indespensable! 

Requires minimum 32 K/64 K disk system 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $24.95 



VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
CANADA other countries $5.00). COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1 -800-654-5244 9 am - 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information, NY orders & alter-hours 1-71 6-223-1477 




CoCo Cat Art 



Editor: 

CoCo Cat behind the scenes at WPSD- 
TV, Channel 6, Paducah, Ky. Engineers 
(1-r) Joey Gill, Jim Franklin, Doug Sand- 
ers and John Bartlett (absent) use the 
CoCo as an engineering tool to do such 
things as satellite dish controller, drawing 



master video/audio diagrams and data 
basing area frequency coordination lists. 



Engineering Department 
WPSD-TV 
Paducah, KY 



Tractor-Feed Trauma 

Editor: 

I have all TRS-80 equipment which I use 
to run my computer service bureau. I use a 
DWP-210 printer to do much of my word 
processing work on, and I am pleased with 
how well it works for me. I am currently 
looking for a tractor-feed mechanism for my 
DWP-210 and am having trouble locating 
one. If any readers would happen to know 
where I could get a tractor-feed for my 
printer, I would appreciate hearing from 
them. Call me at (605) 225-9707 or write me. 

Donald J. Floodeen 
514 S. 3rd Street, Apt. 3 
Aberdeen, SD 57401 

WarGame On Disk? 

Editor: 

After looking through my old RAINBOW 
ON TAPES, I saw one of my favorite games, 
fJ'tfrGfl/ttes [November 1 983, Page 90]. Then 
I remembered why I hardly play that game 
any more — it takes so long to load from 
tape. I worked with it and almost got all of 
it to run on disk. I was wondering if anyone 
else has tried and succeeded to get WarGame 
to work on disk. Any help would be greatly 
appreciated. I'm glad to see you came out 

with RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Mike Brattain 
6004 Westhampton Drive 
Ft. Wayne, IN 46825 

Networking Troubles 

Editor: 

I am involved in Color Computer use in 
education through the Easton Catholic 
Network System. We are having some 
problems with it and I am asking if anyone 



who reads RAINBOW could help us. It would 
be most appreciated. 

Thomas J. Castronuova 
368 E. Nesquenhoning Street 
Easton, PA 18042 

Scheming for a Light 

Editor: 

I am building a light pen for my CoCo. 

Does anyone have a schematic to use a 

photo-transistor as a light pen? If so, please 

send me a copy. „ „ , 

^ J Ray Knock 

Box 551 

Lawson, MO 64062 



Friends in Need 

Editor: 

The Kadima School for Special Children, 
located in Israel, just had a catastrophe. Our 
three CoCos have died due to a faulty drive 
controller. With no available funds, and now 
without our computer, we need the help of 
the CoCo Community. 

If anyone wishes to donate a Color Com- 
puter and/or drive controller, we would 
gratefully appreciate it. We would send a 
receipt of a donation (tax deductible in the 
USA and England) for the full purchase 
price of the machine, including shipping. 
Please mark all packages "Gift," and on the 
customs form write the current resale value. 

I wish to compliment Linda and company 
at Moreton Bay Software. Not only is their 
service the best available to the CoCo 
Community, but they are also just nice 
people. Recently an order of Moreton Bay 
Products was lost by the local postal author- 
ities. Without delay, they reshipped the 
order, at no charge to me. Now that's what 
I call service. 

J. Krinsky, Executive Director 
Radin Campus, POB4177 
Netanya, Israel 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 

Letters to the editors may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo S1G, From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type Rfll to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 

Continued on Page 172 



ARTS AND LETTERS 



Jit i Box 151 




Envelope of the Month 



Valdese, NC 



10 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



UTILITIES/BOOKS 




UTILITY ROUTINES for the 
TANDY &TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

This powerful book for Basic and ML 
Programmers, includes program expla- 
nation, memory requirements and an 
annotated source listing for the utility 
routines given below. These routines if 
bought individually will cost you 
HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. 

These are 100% Position Independent 
ML Utilities and require no ML program- 
ming knowledge. 

COMMANO KEYS: Access commands with 2 keystrokes 
CURSOR STYLES: Over 65000 cursor styles 
ERROR SKIP: 'ONERR GOTO" for Basic Programs 
FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get real word error messages 
KEY CLICKER: Ensure Key input accuracy 
REPEAT KEY: Repeat ANY key 
REVERSE VIOEO (Green & Red): Eliminate eye-strain 
SPOOLER: Don't wait for those long printouts 
SUPER SCROLLER: Save/view scrolled lines 
TAPE-TO- DISK: Copy Basic and ML programs 
AND MUCH MUCH MOREIII 

For 1 6 K/32 K/64 K Cassette or Disk 
Sytstems, CoCo 1, 2&3 

BOOK $19.95 

THESE ROUTINES (READY-TO- RUN) ON 

CAS/ DISK: 

$24.95 

BOTH BOOK AND CASSETTE 
or DISK: 

$36.95 



UTILITY ROUTINES (VOLUME II) 

(Disk Only) ^fllt 

Includes 20 oft-used ulilities such as: -^F»r 

• PAINT with 65000 styles 

• Add SUPERSCRIPTS to your DMP printer 

• Design your own commands! 

• Programming Clock 

• Fast Sort lor Basic Strings 

• Create a character ssl for your DMP printer 

• Find/ Replace phrases In your Basic Program 

• Let the computer locale your errors! 

• CoCo Calculator 

• Super EDITing tor Basic Programs 

• Automatic Directory Backup 

• And much much morel 

64K DISK ONLY 

$29.95 



WE HAVE ALL THAT YOU NEED TO SUCCEED 




SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




• Disk-toDisk Copy (1-3 passes) 

• Tape-toDisk Copy 

• Tape-to Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk- ti> Tape Copy 

• Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ M L programs and DATA files. 
CoCo1,2&3 32 K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY 

$24.95 



UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best- selected utilities: 

• 40 K Olsk Basic • Disk Cataioger 

• Super Tape- to- Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 

• Disk- to-Tape Copy 

• LLIst Enhancer (with page numberlngi] 

• Graphics Typesetter (two text sizesl) 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Dump 

• X-flef lor Basic Programs 

• Hidden 32K (Use the "hidden" 32 K Irom your 64 K CoCo) 

• Basic Stepper (Super Debugger!) 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

AND MUCH. MUCH MOREIII 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 
DISK (64K Req.) ONLY $29.95 



"MUST" BOOKS 



UNRAVELLED SERIES: These 3 books 
provide a complete annotated listing of 
the BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: S 1 9 95 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0Sr9 (Book): $18.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO DS-9 (2 Disks]: $29.00 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS: Tips and tricks 
for Basic Programmers Only $14.95 
CoCo 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $16.95 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewrlter-64 (Cas) $47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 
Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64® 19.95 
Telepatch (Dsk) 19.95 
Telepafch II 29.95 

CoCo Max (Cas) 67.95 
C0C0 Max II (Dsk) 77.95 
C0C0 Max Upgrade (Dsk) 1B.95 
Autoterm (Cas) 36.95 
(Latest Version) (Dsk) 46.95 
Graphlcom II 22.95 
SPIT * N IMAGE: Makes a mirror image 
(BACKUP) of ANY disk, even protected 
ones. Will also initialize and BACKUP inone 
pass. ONLY $32.95 

COCO UTIL II (Latest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible 
computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3 ONLY $36.95 

DISK ANTI- PI HATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs. 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $59.95 

HIDE-A-BASIC 1.1: Best copy- protection 
program for Cassette Basic programs. 
CoCo 1,2 &3 ONLY $24.95 

CABLES/HARDWARE 

HAYES COMPATIBLE MODEM: $129.95 
MODEM CABLE: $19.95 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: Use your 
monochrome or color monitor with your 
CoCo (ALL CoCos). Includes audio 
connection. Easy installation - no 
soldering. ONLY $29.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 
Lowest Price Anywhere - $137.95. 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $1 B.95. 

3-P0SITI0N SWITCHER: 

Select any one of three RS232 devices 
(printers/ modems) from the serial port 
ONLYS37.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with CoCo 
Max, DS69, eta ONLY $24.95 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600). 
Comes with all cables. $39.95 



MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



To order: All ordersS50 & above shipped by 2nd day Air UPS with no extra charge. Last minute shoppers 
can benefit VISA. MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling 
(USA& CANADA, other countries $5.00) COD add$2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax Immediate shipment. Dealer inquiries invited. 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1 -800-654-5244 9 am-9 PMEST7daysa week 

Except NY. For information, technical information NY orders & after-hours 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



Promoting CoCo — 
Everyone's a Winner 




w 



e got into a lively exchange of messages on Delphi the other 
night concerning the Color Computer (what else?) and how 
we might help promote it. One of the things people were 



saying was that they sure wished we could work with sales personnel 
at Radio Shack stores to "educate" them into selling CoCos. 

It is always dangerous when someone bounces an idea off my head. 
The reason for this is simply that I tend to come up with more ideas 
and then, often, things get out of hand. In this case, though, I think 
the idea that we all seemed to come up with is a pretty good one, 
and it's one you can participate in as well. 

One of the "other" things I do is fly an airplane and, as such, I am 
a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), a 
group of people who fly light planes (as opposed to big jets) around 
in the sky. One of the interesting relationships in the aviation field 
is between air traffic controllers and light plane pilots. They very much 
(as they should) depend on one another, but sometimes they get at 
odds, too. 

AOPA came up with a good program a few years back called 
something like "Fly A Controller." Under the plan, private pilots have 
been encouraged to offer a ride to ATC personnel in an effort to give 
them a chance to "see" flying from the "other side." 

According to all reports, this has been a good program for all 
concerned. The AOPA members have gotten to know — and 
understand the problems of — ATC personnel on a personal basis. 
By the same token, controllers have had the opportunity to see what 
it is like to deal with instructions and directions from the cockpit. 

AOPA even has a small area of its monthly magazine devoted to 
reports from both controllers and pilots. I read these regularly, 
because oftentimes some of the comments are very interesting indeed. 



Printer 



Compatible with the 
new C0CO3 



erface Pack 




Seikosha SP-1000A 



Printer 



Free shipping 



Graphics 
Multiple Copies 
Variable Line Spacing 
Paper Width 

Prn and friction - 4" to 10". 
Centronics parallel. 
Impact do! matrix method, bi- 
directional in logic seeking, uni- 
directional m graphic printing. 

100 (Draft mode). 20 cps (Near 
Letter Quality) print speed, wrth 
reduced noise level 

Pin-feed or friction- feed. 
Automatic paper loading (unction. 



Metric Industries 



Model 104P 



Interface with 



Modem Switch 



3 Q 9 

$239.95 

This package includes the SP-KJC 
Printer, a l rue parallel printer, rrc 
the SP- 10 00 AS which Is a terit 
printer thai cannot operate at t 
standard Color Computer Baud 
Rate of 600. 



True descenders 

A variety of functions including 

Under line. Bold print, Double 

striking. 

A variety o< print character sets 
including Pica, Elite. Italics. Super/ 
Subscripts. Proportional. 
Elongated. Condensed, and italic 
Super ^Subscripts. 
Standard 1.5K buffer. 

Printer Is covered with a two- 
year warranty. 




The Model 101 is a serial to 
parallel interface intended for use 
with a COCO and any Centronics 
compatible parallel input printer. 
The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
baud rates (300-9600). The 101 
is only 4* x 2" x 1" and comes 
with ail cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer. 




Other Quality Items 



High Quality 5 Screw Shell C-10 
Cassette Tapes $7,50 per dozen 

Hard Plastic Stoiage Boxes for 
Cassette Tapes 52 50 per dozen 




The Mode! 102 has 3 switch 
positions that allow you to 
switch your computer's serial 
output between 3 different 
devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has 
color coded lights that indicate 
the switch position. These 
lights also act as power 
Indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with 
the 102 are color coded labels 
that can be applied to your 
accessories. The 102 has 
a heavy guage anodized 
aluminum cabinet with non-slip 
rubber feet. 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
o( a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch). 
Tlits feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 
etc.) to your computer. You may 
(hen select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5" X 2.5' X 1.25' 
and comes with all cables and 
connectors for your computer. You 
supply the serial cable for your 
modem or other serial device. 



Pin Feed Cassette Labels 
White 13.00 per 100 
Colors $3.60 per 100 (Red, 
Yellow or Tan) 



Blue, < 




Ribbons for your SP-1000 series 
Seikosha printers $8.00 



The Model 101. 102. and 104 
work with any COCO including 
COG03, any level basic and any 
memory siz'e. These products are 
covered by a 1 year warranty. 



The 101 and 104 require power in 
order 10 upfiralL' Most pririlt-r 
can supply power to your 
Interface. Stat, Radio Shack, and 
Okidata are just a few that do. 
Epson and Seikosha do not. The 
interfaces can also be powered by 
an AC adapter (Radio Shack 
Model 273-1431 plugs into 
all models). If you require a power 
supply, add a "P" to the Model 
number and $5.00 to the price 
{Model 101 P $44:95. MODEL 104P 
$56.95). 



Ordering information 



Free shipping and insurance in 
the United States (except Alaska 
and Hawaii) on a El orders over 
$50,00. Please ado 1 $2,50 far 
shipping and handling on orders 
under $50,00. 

Ohio residents add 5.5% sales 
tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use VISA. 

MASTERCARD or C.O.D. 

or send check or money order to: 



New Version 1.3 Tape transfera- 
ble to disk. Now save and 
load Labels from tape or disk. 

This fancy printing utility prints 
5 lines of Information on 
pinfeed cassette labels. "Cas- 
sette Label" Is menu driven and 
Is very easy to use. It uses the 
special features of your 
printer for standard, expanded 
or condensed characters. Each 
line of text Is automatically 
centered. Before the label 
Is printed, it Is shown on your 
CRT — enabling you to 
make changes if you like — 
then print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The 
program comes on tape and It 
Is supplied with 24 labels to 
get you started. 16K ECB 
required. 





Call for prices on 
the SP-1000A and 
other Seikosha 
inters. 



Metric Industries Inc. 

P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati. Ohio 45242 




I thought about this program as the 
discussion was continuing on Delphi. 
Then I recalled we did something very 
much like this several years ago, when 
the original Color Computer came out. 
There were a lot of people excited about 
the CoCo — and quite a number of 
them spent some time in their Radio 
Shack stores and computer centers 
infecting store personnel with that same 
excitement. 



Some of those relationships last until 
this day. A number of Color Computer 
Clubs have become strong by working 
with people in their local Radio Shack 
stores. Store personnel have directed 
new CoCo owners to users groups when 
they sold computers. A few clubs even 
have "designated salesmen" to whom 



they direct business. These salesmen are 
usually very CoCo-oriented. 

It strikes me that we can do this all 
again, and that it is very much like the 
AOPA program. As with everything, 
something like this has to be a win/ win 
situation — but there is no reason it 
should not be so. Let's look at it for a 
moment. 

Of course, we all want more people 
in the CoCo Community for so many 



reasons it would be almost silly for me 
to enumerate them. At the same time, 
a Radio Shack salesperson is interested 
in making sales — and commissions. 
Obviously, the two go together. 

May I suggest that each of you — 
individually or through your club, if 
you belong to one — take 10 to 20 



minutes out and stop by your local 
Radio Shack store (of whatever kind). 
Tell the store manager you'd like to help 
him generate some business and ask 
whom you could work with. Then help. 
M ake sure you answer any questions (or 
find someone who can). Tell them about 
your club (if you belong to one). And 
promise to direct some business to 
whomever it is that is interested. 

That's a win/win situation. And, 
point out two things to whomever you 
speak with. 

The first is that you're willing to help 
as much as you can. That is really 
important. The second is that almost no 
CoCo owner stops buying things for his 
or her computer once the computer 
itself is purchased. The additional sales 
any person in a store can make through 
the sale of just one CoCo can be con- 
siderable. So, even if the original "box" 
is not too expensive, all the things that 
will be bought for that "box" over the 
years can add up to significant commis- 
sions for the salesperson who is inter- 
ested and develops a rapport with the 
typical CoCo owner. 

Let me know how things work out. 
As I said, you can do this through a club 
or on your own. One thing is for sure, 
you'll be doing something to help the 
CoCo Community grow and you will be 
enabling more people to learn about our 
wonderful computer. I think it will 
benefit all of us. 

And let me know how it works out. 
We'll run some of your responses in our 
"Letters" column. 

— Lonnie Falk 



rr A number of Color 
Computer Clubs have 
become strong by working 
with people in their local 
Radio Shack stores." 



ORDER PHONE (416) 456-0032 

Call or Write ! For your Iree caialogue. more info or give us suggestions! 
Duck Productions. 18 Rowe Court. Brampton. Ontario. Canada L6X 2S2 
Please add $2.00 for handling Ontario residents add 7% provincial tax 
Watch our catalogue lor discounts, hints and lips and chance to win software. 

Micro • Fire the ultimate secret weapon. 

Have you beat your thumbs more than the aliens 7 This is a great 
rapid lire circuil that's easily installed on any joystick . Has no computer 
side effects. Comes with complete instructions and calibration program 
lor adjustment to taste. $19.95 ($24.95 CON.) 

Class Monitor Dual monitor driver 

The best monitor driver lor any Coco. It drives any composite, colour 
or monochrome monitors. Complete with dual audio outputs tor 
Immediate access ol either or both monitors. Simple installation 
instructions. $31.50 ($39.50 CON.) 

Laser Mazer master puzzle of reflection 

Captain. Starlleet wants Regula One protected from Intruder attack. 
A battle ol wits, pitted against six cloaked Romulan vessels lurking 
in the quadrant. Can you find and engage them in time 7 A master 
puzzle of reflection for your sensors. Identify the locations of physical 
mass in space and command your attack. Misjudgement is a deadly 
option. Adventure in Ihoughtware lor only $24.95 ($29.95 CON.) 




OURLITV 

■COMPUT6R PRODUCTS 




PlMOtCT 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Battle to D-Day The multiple player adventure 

Can you change the course ol history? General, your mission is lo 
locale and secure the Third Reich's emergency command post before 
the allied landing on Normandy. Think through obstacles, battle after 
battle to find the entrance code. Then command your assault! 8attle 
against lime! 8atlle against three opponents. Adventure in ihoughtware 
lor only $29.95 (S38 95 CON.) 



Keeping Track more than a disk manager. 

II you own more than two disks you'll love Keeping Track. A manager 
menu of nine utilities that do it all! The real highlight is "0", the 
director y/auloslari. It's a continuous access 1.0. directory that loads 
and executes any program with a single keystroke. All programs 
lully documented. $29.95 ($38.95 CON.) 

Map 'n Zap semi automatic disk repair 

The layman's step by step kit lor directory and grain table repair. 
Locales errors, maps out disk contents to screen or printer, backs 
up any flawed disk and prompts built In disk zap for repair. Complete 
with full lutorial on Coco's disk input / output access operation. 
$19.95 ($24.95 CON.) 

Code Buster machine language disassembler 

Three terrific programs to explore machine language. Screen or primer 
accurate disassembly ol binary code. Simple prompted procedure 
with some instruction to dissect and understand your ROMs Fully 
documented lor only $1 9.95 ($24.95 CON .) 



14 THE RAINBOW February 1987 




M s k. i m ^ 


-t. !—i 


CdCd ^ 




CoCo II 


$87 


CoCo III 


$169 


Drive 0 


$175 


CM-8 Monitor 


$248 


Sakata Monitor 


$185 


(composite driver 


i ncl . ) 


Deluxe Joystick 


$24 


Mouse 


$40 


Mul tiPak 


$75 


RS-232 Pack 


$27 


CCR-81 Cass.Rec. 


$42 


CCR-82 


$27 



/L- te\ 

^ MicroWonld 



CD 



A F F O R ID A B I. 



Disks(SS) 


$7 


. 50/box 


Disks(DS) 


$8 


.00/box 



DMP-105 


$110 


DMP-430 


$545 


DMP-130 


$215 


Tandy 1000 EX 


$550 


Tandy 1000 SX 


$870 


VM-4 Monitor 


$99 


CM-10 Monitor 


$360 


CM-5 Monitor 


$240 



CoCo 3 512K Upgrade 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3024) 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3124) 



$130 
$8 
$7 



Please Not* - Our ads ir« submitted 
early, so prices are subject to charva«Ml 
W« appreciate your- cooperation & .. 
understanding In this matter. 



Method of Payment: 

MC, Visa Am. Ex. - Sorry, No CltWne! 

Certified Check or Money Order. 

Personal Checks - Allow 1 week to clear! 



saasi* ass? ©JFjr 4^ul Tt^mm vlasudtoark 



* Full TANDY 

Warranty 

* 100% TANDY 

PRODUCTS 

* FREE Shipping 



==> CALL <== 

In Pa: 
215/759-7662 

In N.J. : 
201/735-6777 




m 



COMPUTER CENTER 



MicroWorld 



3 



230 Moorestown Road, Wind Gap, PA 1809 J 



Laneco Plaza, Clinton, NJ. 08809 



PRICES INCLUDE SHIPPING ! ! ! 



3_OOSfc TANDY EQUIPMENT WITH FULL 

RADIO SHACK WARRANTY 




BUILDING FEBRUARY'S RAINBOW 



a 




26-333^ 



38 %40 00 * 

25 . 1 0^ J^^^p-^-^ 



V -^,. 3000 c °* A o, we 5^ t< „ lt 



$385 



oo 



^3? 




JL ^V )>^ : <i 1^ ' ^^^J. i. 



We've come a long way, CoCo . . . 

. . . and there's a long way to go. 

T a seems that what I need is a CoCo 3 mode for my old CoCo. Now, 
I |"l could "get into"that. Yeah, I know all that stuff about it not being 
^economically feasible, but it would give me a real kick to flip a toggle 
switch on the side of my "CoCo 1 " and have it shift into a full-blown CoCo 
3 emulation. 

Hmmm, maybel could bolt a CoCo 3 on the bottom side of my computer 
desk and run a few more wires into the back end of my present CoCo. 
"What is he talking about?" you ask. Well, the truth is, I have been sort 
of dragging my heels about getting a CoCo 3. Yep, it appears that the 
managing editor of RAINBOW may be the last kid on the block to get a 
new machine. 

While two new Color Computer 3s are waiting, in the box, right outside 
my door, I still have a CoCo 2 in my office and my faithful first CoCo 
at home. Even though Cray, Dan, Jutta and even Angela and Jody latched 
onto 128K and 512K CoCo 3s here at the office like hungry hounds on 
a meat wagon, I'm still a holdout. People are beginning to talk, too. I feel 
like the last bottom-land farmer who refuses to move out to make way 
for the TVA. "Poor Jim," they must be saying, "he just won't go with the 
flow." 

Well, why should I? I mean, I didn't spend four years with my battle- 
scarred veteran just to chuck it aside and replace it with some shavetail 
rookie fresh off the boat. I feel like that guy in the Midas TV commercials 
who is still driving "OP Betsy" and still cashing in on that lifetime muffler 
guarantee. The biggest difference is that my machine (no, I haven't named 
it) has never been in the shop since I first took delivery of it in Lonnie 
Falk's basement. Yessir, my ol'* buddy, Dr. Doom, and I both got 16K 
CoCos for our birthdays and Bob Rosen himself had added 32K 
"piggyback" upgrades to each. Since that time, my CoCo's gone through 
some changes, that's for sure: lowercase board, 64K chips, new keyboard, 
you name it. And, far from slowing down with age, my CoCo's just as fast 
as it ever was, has a much better memory, does more than it ever did and 
learns new tricks every day. So, we're not ready to part company by any 
means. We go back a long way and we have the momentum to keep forging 
on, too. 

Without getting maudlin about a plastic shell full of silicon, I do have 
a soft place in my heart for my numero uno. And, while it is inevitable 
that the playful puppy of a new machine, with its own special appeal, 
eventually will find a way to my heart, too (I do like that 80-column text 
mode), I'm not going to cast my old CoCo aside any more than I'd trade 
in my loyal, gray-muzzled Newfoundland, Onyx, for some new, improved 
model of dog. 

Why am I telling you all this? Just so you'll know that we know there's 
plenty of life left in our CoCo Is and 2s and that, as attractive as that new 
model is, as long as this "oF Sarge" is M.E. of this outfit, RAINBOW'S going 
to keep marching to the same drummer who got us here and nobody's going 
to fall out of the ranks. 

So, old soldier or new recruit, if you want to get into step with the CoCo 
Community, why not ease into the rhythm with a year's subscription? It 
provides a once a month cadence that's hard to beat: CoCo 1, 2, 3, CoCo 
1, 2, 3, CoCo 1, 2, 3 . . . 

— Jim Reed 



16 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



COMPUTER AIDED INSTRUCTION 

Educational Programs for Students Grade K-12 and Adult Self Studies 

NEW PROGRAMS FOR YOUR TANDY 1000 

AND TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 



Compatible with Apple - Atari - Commodore - TRS 80 I, III, 4 - IBM PC Jr. 
J 6 New Programs now available in Basic Spanish 



• NEW! VIDEO CASSETTES FOR VHS! 



InnerAclive" 11 Video Tutorials 
Complete wit ft audio narration 

A cassettes with 8 programs in each of Ihe 
following sub|eci areas: 

* Basic Spanish Grammar Q Jj 

• Basic Algebra 

* Reading by Phonics 

• Basic Fractions 

2 programs per tape Running lime 45 minules per I ape 



per/tape 



16 Programs on 8 VHS Tapes $159 L 




syllable adjectives 
id in ■' usually just add 







CALL TOLL FREE 
FOR MORE INFORMATION 





Which has 



[ 




You m**j ta*s Able to 
reduce your taxes by 



- LncoHe 
averag iny 




-* I neons 
sp t i It Inq 

- tax shelte 



Interactive Tutorial Programs for Home or Classroom Use 

Over 1000 programs for your selection with 32 now available on disk for the Color 

Computer and 500 now available for the Tandy 1000. 



"We're Your Educational 
Software Source" 

Subject No. of Programs 

Reading Development 256 (4 on dish) 
Reading Comprehension 48 (4 on disk) 

Mathematics 128 

Algebra 16 (16 on disk) 

History 32 {A on disk) 

Spelling 16 

Government 16 

Physics 16 {4 on disk) 

16 Programs in each 
of the following: 

Children's Tales Carpentry ■ Electronics 
Health Services Office Skills - Statistics 
First Aid/Safety - Economics - Business 
Accounting - Psychology ■ MUCH MORE! 

Sunt! lor out tree catalog Of over 1 000 Do* sun SdyGfl- 
tiuruil prog rams lex Alan T8S SO. Apple, IBM PC J i 
Commotio* u, Tandy 1 000. etc 



Apple II, TRS 80 I, III, & 4, and 
Commodore 64 computers require 
respective conversion kits (plug-in board 
and stereo cassette player), $99,00, Atari 
400/600/800/1200 computers require the 
Atari cassette recorder and the Dorsett 
4001 Educational Master Cartridge, 
$9.95. For the IBM PC Jr. a cassette 
adapter cable and a good cassette 
recorder are required, The Tandy 1000 
requires the Dorsett M1001 speaker/PC 
board kit, $69.00, and a standard 
cassette recorder, A Radio Shack 
CCR-81 or CCR-82 is recommended. 

CASSETTES: $59.90 for an album con- 
taining a 16-program course (8 cassettes 
with 2 programs each); $8.80 for a 
2-program cassette. 

DISKS: $14.95 tor a one-program disk; 
$28.95 for two disks; $48.95 for four 
disks. All disks come in a vinyl album. 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



Dorsett Educational Software features: 

* Interactive Learning 
■ User Friendly 

* Multiple Choice and Typed 

* Program Advance with Correct Response 

* Full-time audio narration (Cassette 
Programs Only) 

* Self-Paced Study 

* High Resolution Graphics 

* Easy Reading Text 

For mo'tr information, or 10 order call: 

TOLL FREE 1*800-654-3871 
IN OKLAHOMA CALL (405) 288-2301 









McuterOord 




VtSA' 


, ■ 




M 




DORSETT 

Educational Systems, Inc. 

Bon 1226, Norman, OK 73070 





Jenny Grist Mill 

John Murvine 

Edensburg, Pennsylvania 

This wonderful picture was created 
with basic on one of the new CoCo 3s. 
The Jenny Grist Mill is a real mill 
located in Plymouth, Mass. John is a 
self-taught programmer and commer- 
cial artist. 



Mountain 

John Murvine 

Edensburg, Pennsylvania 

Onceagain, John enhancesthegallery 
with a scene from the Cascade Range, 
created with BASicon hisCoCo3. John 
is also the owner of Cylon Software. 






^ * t- rW.v 



1 J- 




Ma: 





5V 





Maison 
Claire Beaupre 

Montreal, Quebec 

Claire designed this winter scene to 
use as one of her Christmas cards. 
Maison was created with CoCo Max 
and Color Designer. Claire is a labora- 
tory technologist of clinical chemistry 
in a hospital. 



18 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Pete Rose 

Wally Mayes 

Hamilton, Ohio 

One of baseball's most valuable 
player/managers is depicted here in 
the gallery, and was created with 
basic. Wally is new to the CoCo Com- 
munity, and purchased his 64K CoCo 
2 a few months ago. He also noted that 
most of what he has learned has been 
from Fred Scerbo's "Wishing Well." 



Birds 

Charlie Fulp 

South Boston, Virginia 

Charlie isattending Danville Commun- 
ity College to obtain a degree in engi- 
neering and created this drawing of the 
birds with CoCo Max. 



o 



US 

B° 



N 





t 



H 
0 H 



I 



Ape 

Jeff Brown 

Findlay, Ohio 

This humorous graphic was created 
with CoCo Max and says just about 
what we all think of the rainbow. Jeff 
plans to attend Ohio State University 
and take computer graphics-related 
courses. 



"5 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! 

You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in 
upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your crea- 
tions with the CoCo Community! 

Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and 
phone number, detailing howyou created your picture (what 
programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please 
include several facts about yourself, the more the better. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this 
means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs 
or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A 
digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or 
magazine isnof an original work. 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of $15 
and a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions will also be 
given. 

Jody Doyle, Curator 




Send your entry on either tape or disk to: 

CoCo Gallery 
THE RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
Attn: Jody Doyle 

February 1987 THE RAINBOW 19 



Those renegade hackers will be 
stymied when they come up 
against . . . 



Invisi 





~'i j wti. J. ijui 



w 





m ^ % 0 IMk 

^4 ' 



Tien creating a program in 
BASIC, it is impossible to keep 
out users, or safeguard it 
from tampering and having someone 
put their own name in it. 

Load Mask was made as a counter 
measure to just that. Until the program 
is executed, the user has no way to enter 
and change it, and afterward, a BREAK 
key disable and other routines can keep 
him out completely. The program itself 
is simply a machine language loader 
that fools the computer into thinking 
that the BASIC program in memory is 
machine language. This loader also 
encrypts the BAS fC program using a very 
simple technique that stops the listing of 
the BASIC program after it is loaded. 



Glen Da hi gr en has created many pro- 
fessional games for the CoCo including 
Hall of the King, Dragon Blade and 
White Fire of Eternity. He is currently 
a student at Penn State College. His 
non-computer interests include fan- 
tasy/science fiction role playing and 
racquetball. 



The BASIC Program 

In this section I assume you have a 
disk-based system. This is different 
from the tape system because of where 
the CoCo locates the BASIC program. In 
the disk-based system, the computer 
throws the program to the end of graph- 
ics memory (SE00-S25FF on startup). 
This can be changed later by the PCLERR 
command within the BASIC program, 
but not before the program is run. This 
is because the memory (S2500-S25FA) is 
used for the ML loader and can be 
written over after the BASIC program is 
loaded and run, but not before. There- 
fore, a program that clears memory 
before the program is run using the 
PCLERR command or the various pokes 
(POKE 25 T G:NEW, etc.) cannot use this 
loader. 

Now we have established where the 
BASIC program starts, (S25FF) but not 
where it ends. The CoCo has a place in 
memory where it keeps track of the start 
and end of the BASIC program. This area 
is drawn on from the loader to configure 
it to encrypt only the part of memory 
that holds the BASIC program. You must 
also access this information, but I'll tell 
you how to do this later. 



The Amazing A-BUS 




An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

the CoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

About the A-BUS system: 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC.use INPand OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PO-123) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re-i 40: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-i 56: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card AD-142:$129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5 Vrange can be expanded to 1 00 V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-146: $139 

Tnis analog to digital converter is accurate to. 025%. Input range is — 4V to 
+4V. Resotution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 1 30ms. Ideal for thermocouple, 
straingauge. etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-156 card). 

Digital Input Card in-i 41 : $59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O DG-148:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-144: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time. Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date): built in alarm relay, led and buzzer: timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph- . 45: $79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-i 52: $1 5 

3Vfe by 4Vfe in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $1 0. 




Smart Stepper Controller sc 149: $299 

World's finest stepper controller On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10 2 inches felt". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored mttieon board memory. For each axis you can control 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, sleo type (halt, full, wave), 
Scale factor, units, holding power. e1c r Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers fMO- 1 03) Send forSC-149 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 ; $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and leach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $39 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For i wo motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-i 22: $19 

For easy conned fon of 2 motors 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board 



RE-140 




IN-141 




r Motor Driver st-1 43: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to gel familiar with them Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V H bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase). 
Spec la I Package: 2 molars (MO-1 03) + ST-14 3: PA-101: $99 

Step per Motors m 0-103; si 5 orators 39 

Pancake type. 2W" dia, } A" shaft. 7,5 e /step, 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec. 1 2V. 36 ohm. bipolar. 5 oHn torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesiser, U Sit Analog to Digital converter. 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for. 

IBM PC. XT, AT and compatibles. Uses ow shon sFqi. AR- 

Tandy 1000. 1000 EX & SX F 1 2Q0. 3Q00. Usesone sfiorlsiot. Aft- 

Apple 11.114*. Me, Uses any slot AR- 

TRS-90 Model 102. 200 Pfugs into 40 pin "svslerr bus' AR- 

Model 1 00. Uses A 0 pm socket {Socket ts dupttaf ed on adaoier). AR- 

TRS-8OMod3.4.4D.Fits50Dmbus.(VMri hard disk, use r-cabral AR- 

TftS-80 Model 4 P, Includes e*ua cable. (50 pin bus is recessed). AR- 

TRS-8Q Model 1. Plugs bnio 40 pin I/O bus on KB or Bl Aft 

Color Computers (Tandy), Fits ROM slot MuMi^k or v -cable AR 



4 Channel 



133. £69 
133. S69 



134. 
136 



S49 
S69 



U5...S69 
132..S49 
137 ,.,S62 
131...S39 
138. $4 9 



ADM42 



A-BUS Cable (3 ft, 50 COnd.) CA-f 63: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to lirst Motherboard 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb--i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards, A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (wilh connecting cable CA- 
161 : $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined lilts way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A- BUS is not a replacement tor the Mu!li-Dak 



Add S3. 00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.o. welcome 
NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D, add S3. 00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is S5 
Overseas add 1 0% 




ALPHA [Pmokm® 




Technical info: 



(203) 656-1806 



a division of Sigma Industries. Inc. 

7904- W Jamaica Avenue, Woodhaven, NY 1 1421 



£S y 800 221-0916 

New York orders: (7 1 8) 296-591 6 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What is CoCoMax? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




Go Co Max disk system, with Y- cable. 



Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with It for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
puii down menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special ef fects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max wil l instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 
The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 





iHHa 



Pull down menus 



Zoom In I 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fatbits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 1 5, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




inside the Hi-Res input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack ? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
10% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
49152 points! (256x192). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi-Res Pack. 

E I ectro n i c Ty pesett i n g . . . 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 14 built in fonts each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles ! 




Examples of printouts 



Printing Your 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers ! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80). 





The whole family will enjoy 
CoCo Max. Here are a few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80). 



Jtmscn Report 

Tun ^ t'-g Way* 



II P mflJDH H EWS TODAY 

Reporters Desperale 

'Iktf llvtll ItT «f f.«»p 

il |*M m»i :ii bin I 

<*<llt IM< Br |» if .»;. 

■ 1-114 Kill I. llJlIC 1»K|- 

i+J-Fn-rr C ir I Fckip.il> u l 
hjH hi ■.ir,|jy v 
'I f""\l> Mi L 4i4« Till M» 

■ i'^h I ? i> ■ iti i 4ijp}ipi, 
tri'abd F*ri .ii-TP T*^ti.l> 
lHhpi-dl. 4 ]| IH' tl-T 
pf >M 4|Hr. I iJ'lA. H4>l 

-i ■i'ip i»i;i:ii irr.H* 

p.'if^ ■ eii (If upr? I j' 

*Lll 1I4L ■■ ■■f!hi>ri|.l 

Oflttl --] hlBlJt.'i »l l*»< 
ll4«rM <tvmjH)L( t Mia* 

*ini' nil i) trill »i< 
«3l;i\«i *ut | cm i ibitk 
tf. •avtfcuctt .0 t( » jnbf ic.tr 
w-fruln&K 1 f *l Bf »ft ireMSIr 

fAtti Up JtaiceEt ihjvt 
hint ivsptit* /♦# cl« va- 

lulkv crip Vb<c I V«l • 
rrpejur %• t,i»ir r-..* 'hi 
KtUtE; I tl,nl Dim i iti 
irt ih» lintr' »iifi<S i-uki 
. ■ ■ ",tff r l.r,-i,n 





H NCR ICON 



CHMOID 



C0RR1 



PROFIT _J 

2* 




Pulley 




tfittWJfcWKMaiflllSlLliU.' l lli.lh'iUTrtrF.Ut 



Lili ID |fc« Jl»1 J|DI prjL ill 

111 cricMd up la &i 

f i T*p iarj.1 ,*« « it> u 
tl MB1 pilHt^F ttr\f 

III* tklt^-IFKH PT tt Pll-fcf/ll I 

T» >Kij ■ tip %ri v : 1(4 

hlF VI 5Xifl| ■■ U.I I. | puii | 
PpJ F»l f«l| P.'H IU Ftll> 

M'lH 1 'M|p1 h Kuhmi 
1 4-itipi rir ii! - .a.Ji IlM P-ik. 

L lllT Ljl VlFTI gj pjlf 

llH lHHI tRf ■"«■■ liTpr 
PPL P 1JH PT > IF F It 

i'i'iir lii'ip i: qhF PELjF |E 
hull 

I' 'ilii ■ ;i' il iT.tr ip 

■ PFi I IH Tl PI|rFF i . I P|l LpJI 

■ kll lll. f IPI* | pei;| 1 + J-ll 

■.•til -*M Li' In! Jujpf 



^rv Business graphs, charts, 
H9 diagrams. Also memos 



Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity. 



Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 






Junior's homework 
and science projects. 
Term papers too I 



COCO HBH 
Coco Hm 



CoCo Mo* 
CoCo Mat 

CoCo Max 



CoCo max 
CoCo IHax 

CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



CoCo T\a\ 
CoCo Mux 

CoCo Mm 
CoCo Max 



Video pot trait 

V (with optional digitizer). 



mm 



, >.X mo ^ 



CaCo PORT 



0d* 



^ Over 200 typestyles to 
ft) choose from I 

generate flyers. 






© 77i/s /s a cartoon. 

CcCoMctxK 




® 



A new way to express 
your Imagination. 



schematics 
and floor plans. 




CoCo Max II 



^Jj) Logos and letterheads. 



System Requirements: 

Any 64K CoCo and a standard joystick or 
mouse. (The koala pad and the track ball work, 
but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a Multi-Pak or our Y-Cable. 
CoCo Max is compatible with any Radio Shack 
DOS and ADOS. 

Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes 
almost all the features of CoCo Max II except 
Shrink, Stretch, Rotate, and Glyphics. Also, It 
has 5 fonts instead of 1 4. 
CoCo Max Is not compatible with JDOS, 
DoubleDOS, MDOS, OS-9, the X-pad, and 
Daisy Wheel Printers. 

Printers Supported: 

Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronlx, Delta 10, 10X, 15. 15X, SG- 
1 0.Okldata 82A, 92, 93, C. Itoh Pro-writer, 
Apple Image-writer, Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet, 
Radio Shack DMP 1 00, 1 05, 1 1 0, 1 20, 200, 
400, 500, Line Printer 7, Line Printer 8, TRP- 
100, CGP-220. (DMP- 130 use Line Printers), 
PMC printers, Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 1 5 



CoCo Max on tape $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max II (disk only) $79.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max to CoCo Max II 

Naw disk and manual $1 9.95 

New features of CoCo Max II: 1 4 fonts and glyphic 
font, dynamic shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive 
capability, 66 page scrapbook, point and click file 
load, color printer drivers, full error reporting. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to disk 

manuals, dlskand binder $24.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price $19.95 

Super Picture Disks #1 , #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks $29.95 




Font Editor Option 

A font is a set of characters of a 
particular style. CoCo Max includes 
1 5 fonts. You can create new fonts of 
letters, or even symbols or graphics 
with the font editor. Examples: set of 
symbols for electronics, foreign 
alphabets, etc $19.95 

Video Digitizer DS-69 

This new Low Cost Digitizer is the 
next step in sophistication for your 
CoCo Max system. With the DS-69 
you will be able to digitize and bring 
into CoCo Max a frame from any video 
source: VCR, tuner, or video camera. 
Comes complete with detailed 
manual and C-SEE software on disk. 
Multi-Pak is required. 

New Low Price Save $50 $99.95 

New: faster DS-69A $1 49.95 



Colorware Incorporated 
COLQRWARE 79-04 A Jamaica Avenue 

Woodhaven, NY 11421 



800 221-0916 

Orders only. 

NY A Info: (71 8) 298-591 6 
Hours: 9-5 Eastern time. 



Add S3. 00 per order for shipping. 
We eccept Visa. MC, checks. M. O. 
C.O.D. add S3.00 extra. 
NY and CT i add sales tax. 
Shipping to Canada is S5.0O 
Overseas, FPO, APO add 1 0% I 



The Machine Language Loader 

The loader is divided into two parts. 
The first part encrypts the BASIC pro- 
gram and is located at $2500. This is 
done simply by finding the end address 
and exchanging every other byte up to 
it. This is very easily done and requires 
no code to encrypt, but it serves its 
purpose and disables the LIST com- 
mand upon loading the program. This 
section also puts the end address of the 
BASIC program into the second part, a 
permanent part of the final product. 

The section is not used until the 
execution of the BASIC program and is 
saved along with it. Its processes include 
de-crypting the program and setting the 
BASIC pointers in memory, or telling the 
computer exactly where the program is. 
It is because of these pointers that you 
can't just save the BASIC memory as an 
ML program. 

Creating the Loader 

The loader can be made in two ways. 
If you have Disk EDTASM or some 
other compatible assembler, then you 
can enter and assemble the assembly 
language listing; otherwise, simply use 
the BASIC program that pokes the 
loader directly into memory. You can 
save it by typing 5AVEM" LOADER" , 
&H2500, &H25FA, &H2500 and press- 
ing ENTER. 

Using the Program 

First you must load a BASIC program 
into memory. Make sure you have a 
backup of the program saved in case 
something goes wrong. Then you must 



find its end address. This can be done 
by typing PRINT PEEK ( 27 ) *25G + 
PEEK (28). It is these two locations (27 
and 28) that hold the end address of the 
BASIC program in Hex. Using the equa- 
tion given, they are modified to a 
decimal number equaling the end of the 
program. Write this number down. 

Next, load in the completed ML 
loader already saved on disk. Then type 
EXEC &H2500 and press ENTER. The 
first part of the loader encrypts the 
BASIC program and returns. Then you 
must save the program as a machine 
language file. The format for this is 
S$\\IEV\"filename" , start address , end 
address, execute address. You must 
type this in as follows: SAVEM"/7/e- 
name" , &H25DB , the number obtained 
from our equation^ &H25DB. This saves 
the file as an ML program starting at 
&H25DB and ending at the end of your 
BASIC file with its execution at 
&H25DB. This is the execution location 
of the ML loader included in the saved 
file. 

You're finished! You now should have 
a newly-created machine language pro- 
gram that can be loaded and executed 
independent of any other file. Note that 
this loader does not interfere with the 
BASIC interpreter or BASIC functions 
and can be overwritten after its execu- 
tion. It simply allows the loading and 
execution of the BASIC program after 
which the memory it takes up is free. 

Modifications and Additions 

Other routines that might be of use 



to a BASIC programmer would be a reset 
and BREAK key disable. These should be 
put directly in the beginning of the 
BASIC program so as to disable these 
functions as soon as possible. 

To disable the reset button, you 
should enter POKE 113,0. It will give 
you a cold start upon pressing it. 

To disable the BREAK key on all but 
INPUT and LINEINPUT commands, you 
can use a routine taken, with permis- 
sion, from the book 500 Pokes, Peeks 
W Execs. Enter the following into your 
BASIC program: 

FOR 1=330 TO 33G : READ A:P0KEI, 
A : NEXT I : DATA 50,98,28,175, 
126,173, 165: POKE 410,12G:POKE 
411,1:P0KE412,74 

If you are familiar with machine 
language and want to modify the loader 
to disable any of these things, simply 
remember the new start and execute 
number for the completed ML/ BASIC 
file, and make sure the line in the first 
section that puts the end location in the 
second section is also modified. One can 
do this without changing the first sec- 
tion or the encryption part of the loader 
because they are separated in memory 
by approximately 200 bytes (via the ORG 
statements). Therefore, one could mod- 
ify the second section without changing 
the first. 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to Mr. Dahlgren at 21 
Edtnburg Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15235, 
412-372-5674. Please enclose an SASE 
for a reply when writing). □ 



Listing 1: LOADMASK 



p » i i i i r i i i i » i i i i i i * i t i t i ? f i i i 

J8 LOADMASK MACHINE LANGUAGE 
J8 LOADER CREATER 

P 

1J8 FOR T=&H25j3j3 TO &H2514:READ A 

$:POKET / VAL( M &H ,f +A$) : NEXTT 

2j3 FOR T=&H25DB TO &H2 5FB: READ A 

$ : POKET , VAL ( " &H"+A$ ) : NEXTT 



0 



3j3 SAVEM" LOADER" , &H25j3j3 , &H25FB, & 
H25j3j3 

4j3 DATA 9E,19,lj3,9E,lB,lj3,BF,25, 
FA, EC, 84 , IE, 89, ED, 81,BC, 25, FA, 2F 
,F5,3 9,8E,2 6,j31,lj3,BE,2 5,FA,EC,8 
4,lE,89,ED,81,BC,2 5,FA,2F,F5,lj3, 
9F , IB , 1J8 , 8E , 2 6 , J81 , ijt , 9 F , 19 , 7E , AD 
,21,j3j3,j3j3 



Listing 2: LOADER 
25j3j3 

25j3j3 9E 19 
25j32 lj39E IB 
25j35 lj3BF 25FA 



00100 ORG 

00110 NSTART LDX 

00120 LDY 

00130 STY 



$25J3J3 
$19 
$1B 
ENDAD 



START ADDRESS 
END ADDRESS 
STORE FOR LATER 



24 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



2509 


EC 


84 


00140 


START1 


LDD 


,x 




250B 


IE 


89 


00150 




EXG 


A, B 




250D 


ED 


81 


00160 




STD 


,X++ 




250F 


BC 


2 5FA 


00170 




CMPX 


ENDAD 


END 


2512 


2F 


F5 


00180 




BLE 


START1 




2514 


39 




00190 




RTS 






25DB 






00200 




ORG 


$25DB 




25DB 


8E 


2601 


00210 




LDX 


#9729 


START ADDRESS 


25DE 


10BE 


2 5FA 


00220 




LDY 


ENDAD 


GET END LOCATION 


25E2 


EC 


84 


002 30 


START 


LDD 


,x 




25E4 


IE 


89 


00240 




EXG 


A, B 




25E6 


ED 


81 


00250 




STD 


,X++ 




25E8 


BC 


2 5FA 


00260 




CMPX 


ENDAD 


END 


25EB 


2F 


F5 


00270 




BLE 


START 










00280 


♦START 


RUN PRO CEE DURE 




2 5ED 


109F 


IB 


00290 


RUN 


STY 


$1B 


PUT END LOCATION 


2 5F0 


108E 


2601 


00300 




LDY 


#9729 


GET START 


25F4 


109F 


19 


00310 




STY 


$19 


PUT START LOCATION 


25F7 


7E 


AD21 


00320 




JMP 


$AD21 


GOTO 1 RUN ' 


25FA 




0000 
0000 


00330 
00340 


ENDAD 


FDB 
END 


$0000 





00000 TOTAL ERRORS 




Co Co Cat 
NOT 



Get your own CoCo Cat button by 
writing to Falsoft, Inc., The Falsoft 
Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. Please enclose $1 .50 for ship- 
ping and handling. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 25 



One of the Rainbow staff is an 
imposter bent on murder and mayhem 




<?f FOOT ,9lT 6THE9 




hoteid eoeo 




By Dale Lear 



).elcome, detectives, to the Hotel CoCo, a parlor 
game filled with intrigue and suspense. The 
Hotel CoCo has everything you would want in 
a fine hotel — swimming pool, four-star dining room and 
much more. Unfortunately, the hotel is having a slight 
problem. One of its distinguished guests from THE 
RAINBOW magazine staff is really an imposter. Who is he 
really? Perhaps a refugee from one of the many home 
computer companies that didn't have the staying power 
of the CoCo. Perhaps some LOGO enthusiast bitter over 
the fact that the new computer language that this game 
is written in, D,L. LOGO, is only available for the color 
computer. Who knows? Whatever the motive, this 
sinister culprit is determined to "off the hotel guests one 
by one. Your mission as the hotel detective (or detectives, 
as the case may be; this game can be played by any 
number of players) is to determine just who the imposter 
is. 

The game takes place in a hotel which contains the 
following rooms: Lobby, Kitchen, Dining Room, Bar, 
Swimming Pool, Stairs, and six hotel rooms (rooms 10 1 
through 106). 

Besides the detectives (the players), there are six guests 
at the hotel, one registered in each of the six hotel rooms. 
The guests are Ms. Kapfhammer, Ms. Arnott, Ms, 
Hutchinson, Mr. Falk, Mr. Reed and Mr. Augsburg. The 
guests move freely about the hotel with the exception that 
no guest has the key to any hotel room but his own. Each 
of the guests comes to the hotel with a valuable posession. 
Whenever the guests go back to their hotel rooms they 
may decide to leave the valuable in the room or they may 
decide to take it with them. 



Dale Lear owns Dale Lear Software and makes his 
living developing programs for the Color Computer, 
He has authored games and other software such as 
Double Back, Baseball, TSEDIT, TSWORD and D.l. 
LOGO. Dale, his wife, Laurel, and their six children 
live in Petaluma, California. 

February 1987 THE RAINBOW 27 



One of the guests is really a killer in 
disguise. Whenever the killer ends up 
alone in a room with only one other 
guest and no detectives snooping about, 
he strikes! The victim is left at the scene 
of the crime and, if the victim was 
carrying his valuable at the time, the 
killer steals it and immediately stashes 
it away in his hotel room. 

Each player is a detective. Each 
detective takes his turn using the arrow 
keys to move about the playing board 
according to the spin of the wheel. All 
the detectives have passkeys and can go 
freely into all rooms of the hotel includ- 



ing the guests' rooms. When in a room, 




Listing 1: SETUP 



; SET UP PROGRAM FOR HOTEL COCO 

■ 

TO SETUP 

SETSPLIT 2 

SPLITSCREEN 

WINDOW 

HT 

PD 

PRINT 

PRINT [- SETTING UP PICTURES] 



; *** SAVE ROOM INFO 

■ 

MAKE "R 

[ [ [ROOM 101] 0 12] 
[[ROOM 102] 0 16] 
[[ROOM 103] 6 16] 
[[ROOM 104] 12 16] 
[ [ROOM 105] 18 16] 
[[ROOM 106] 18 12] 
[[LOBBY] 9 2] 
[ [BAR] 18 8] 
[[POOL] 0 6] 
[[KITCHEN] 18 4] 
[[DINING] 15 6] 
[[STAIRS] 9 10]] 
IF MEMBER? "ROOMS CATALOG 

[ERASEFILE "ROOMS] 
OPENWRITE "ROOMS 
WRITE "ROOMS :R 
CLOSEWRITE "ROOMS 

V 

I 



the names of the guests currently in the 
room are displayed. Also, a list of the 
valuables in the room is displayed. 
Whenever a room is entered, the detec- 
tive has a chance to make a guess as to 
who the killer is, or pass. 

The game begins with the prompt 
"number of players:." Next, each play- 
er's name is entered one by one. 

The screen then displays the hotel 
registration. It is advisable to make a 
copy of this list, as it can be valuable 
information in trying to locate the killer. 
At the press of a key the game begins. 

A spinner appears giving the first 
player a number between one and nine. 
This number is the number of squares 
that the player can move on this turn. 
The playing board is then displayed and 
the player makes his moves using the 
four arrow keys. The number of squares 
left to be moved is displayed in the 
lower-right corner of the screen. The 
player's name is displayed in the lower- 
left corner. 

If the player enters a room, a picture 
of the room appears and a list of the 
people and things in the room is pre- 
sented. Listen carefully at this time 
because if a murder takes place any- 



; *** DRAW AND SAVE 
ROOM PICTURES 

MAKE "RR [BOARD ROOM LOBBY BAR 

POOL KITCHEN DINING STAIRS] 
FOR "RN 1 COUNT : RR 1 
[CS 

RUN LIST ITEM :RN :RR 
SAVEPICT ITEM : RN :RR 

] 

CS 

PRINT [PICTURE SETUP COMPLETE] 
END 



■ 

; DRAW PLAYING BOARD 

t 

TO BOARD 
SETBG 12 
CS 

■ 

; *** DRAW GRID 

f 
> 

SETPC 2 
SETH 0 

FOR "I -120 120 10 
[SETXY :I -75 
FD 170] 
SETH 90 

FOR "I -75 95 10 
[SETXY -120 :I 
FD 240] 

; *** DRAW ROOMS 

h 

I 

SETPC 1 

FOR "I 1 12 1 



where in the hotel you will here a chord 
played. At this point the player either 
enters G to make a guess as to who the 
killer is, or presses the space bar to pass. 

If a correct guess is made, the player 
wins. If a wrong guess is made, the 
player is eliminated from the game. If 
the player passes, his turn is ended. 
Each player takes his turn in a similar 
fashion until either the killer is identi- 
fied or all players are eliminated by 
wrong guesses. 

To run HOTEL, first boot the OS-9 
operating system and execute d.l. 
LOGO. Then enter and save Listing 1, 
SETUP. Now, enter and save HOTEL. 
Remember to delete the comments in 
order to conserve memory. At this 
point, you can reload SETUP and exe- 
cute it. This will create several files 
required for play. After you have run 
this, you should not need to run it again. 
All you have to do now is load and 
execute HOTEL. 

Good luck, super sleuths! □ 



Editor's note: See Dan Downard's 
review of D.L. LOGO on Page 147 in the 
January 1987 issue. 



[ROOMl ITEM :I :R] 

END 



; DRAW ROOM ON PLAYING BOARD 
; ENTRY: -ROOM VARIABLE 

TO ROOMl :Z 

SETXY -108+10*ITEM 2 :Z 

-73+10*LAST :Z 
TT LAST FIRST :Z 
SETXY XCOR-10 YCOR-10 
SETH 0 
REPEAT 2 

[FD 16 RT 90 FD 54 RT 90] 

END 



; DRAW LOBBY 

TO LOBBY 
SETBG 12 
CS 

; *** DRAW FLOOR 
SETPC 2 

SETXY -128 -40 
SETH 90 
REPEAT 16 

[FD 16 RT 45 FD 50 
BK 50 LT 45] 

■ 

; *** pTJT DOTS ON THE WALL 

■ 

REPEAT 400 



28 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



[SETPC 1+ RANDOM 3 
DOT 12 8 -RANDOM 256 
9 6 -RANDOM 13 6] 

*** DRAW DOORS 



DOOR -40 -40 "\ CO 
DOOR 0-40 "CO 



*** DRAW STAR DECORATION 



SETXY 0 48 
SETPC 1 
REPEAT 18 

[FD 25 BK 25 RT 20] 

END 



DRAW BAR 
ENTRY : 
EXIT: 



TO BAR 
SETBG 12 
CS 



; *** DRAW BAR 

■ 

SETPC 2 
SETH 90 
FOR "118 1 

[SETX ITEM :I [-40 -40 -60 

-60 -60 -60 
-60 -22] 
SETY ITEM :I [-16 -6 32 

34 36 38 



40 60] 



FD 256] 
SETXY -40 -16 
SETH 0 FD 48 
SETXY -60 40 
SETH 60 
FD 42 



*** DRAW FLOOR 



SETPC 3 
SETXY -40 20 
SETH 2 70 
FD 88 



*** DRAW DOOR 



DOOR -120 20 "BAR 



*** DRAW BAR STOOLS 



FOR "X -40 80 40 
[STOOL :X 0] 

END 



DRAW POOL 
ENTRY : 
EXIT: 



TO POOL 
SETBG 12 
CS 



*** DRAW HORIZON 



SETPC 3 

SETXY -120 40 

SETH 90 



FD 240 



*** DRAW POOL 



SETPC 2 
SETXY -40 -40 
SETH 60 

FOR "X -100 20 4 
[SETXY :X -40 
FD 100] 



*** DRAW LADDERS 



LADDER -95 -35 
LADDER 80-5 
END 



DRAW LADDER 
ENTRY: -X COORDINATE 
-Y COORDINATE 



TO LADDER :X :Y 

SETPC 3 

SETXY :X :Y 

REPEAT 2 
[SETH 0 
REPEAT 18 [FD 1 RT 10] 
SETXY XCOR-3 YCOR+5 ] 

END 



DRAW KITCHEN 



TO KITCHEN 
SETBG 15 
CS 



*** DRAW COUNTER 



SETH 90 
SETPC 0 

SETXY -128 -20 
FD 256 

SETXY -128 40 
FD 256 



*** DRAW WALL 



SETXY -128 60 
REPEAT 80 

[FD 4 LT 135 FD 100 
BK 100 RT 135] 



*** DRAW CABINET DOORS 



FOR "I 14 1 
[SETH 0 
SETY -10 

SETX ITEM :l [-120 0 40 80] 
REPEAT 4 

[FD 40 RT 90] 
SETH 60 

SETXY XCOR+5 YCOR+55 
REPEAT 2 

[FD 20 RT 30 FD 40 
RT 150] ] 



*** DRAW BURNERS 



FOR "114 1 
[SETXY 

ITEM :I [-57 -A0 -27 -10] 

ITEM :I [47 53 47 53] 

OVAL 3] 



; *** DRAW FLOOR 
■ 

SETPC 1 
SETH 90 

FOR "Y -32 -90 -10 
[SETXY -128 :Y 
FD 256] 
SETH 2 25 

FOR "X -120 160 20 
[SETXY :X -20 
FD 100] 

END 



; DRAW DINING ROOM 

TO DINING 
SETBG 14 
CS 

■ 

; *** DRAW WALL LINE 

* 
t 

SETPC 0 
SETXY -120 20 
SETH 90 FD 2 40 



*** DRAW DOORS 



DOOR -100 20 CHAR 32 
DOOR -60 20 CHAR 3 2 

■ 

; *** TABLES AND CHAIRS 

■ 

SETPC 1 

TABLE CHAIRS -120 -50 
TABLE CHAIRS 0 -40 
TABLE CHAIRS 10 -100 
END 



; DRAW STAIRS 

■ 

TO STAIRS 
SETBG 15 
CS 

SETPC 2 
SETXY 80 -80 
SETH 0 



*** FOR EACH STAIR 



REPEAT 15 
[REPEAT 10 

m 

f 

; *** VERTICAL PORTION OF STAIR 

[RT 60 FD 50 BK 50 LT 60 FD 1] 
RT 60 FD 50 LT 150 

■ 

; *** BACK WALL 
■ 

SETPC 1 
REPEAT 4 

[RT 90 FD 150 BK 150 
LT 90 FD 4] 
SETPC 2 

BK 15 RT 150 BK 50 LT 150 

; *** FRONT OF STAIRCASE 
* 

REPEAT 16 

[LT 90 FD 150 BK 150 
RT 90 FD 1] 
RT 150 FD 50 LT 60 FD 10 



February 1 987 THE RAINBOW 29 



BK 10 RT 60 BK 50 LT 60] 
END 



; DRAW HOTEL ROOM 

i 

TO ROOM 
SETBG 12 
CS 

■ 

f 

; *** DRAW WALL LINES 

SETPC 1 

SETXY -40 20 

SETH 0 FD 70 BK 70 

RT 90 FD 160 BK 160 

RT 150 FD 50 

■ 

; *** DRAW BED 

BED -25 -25 

; *** DRAW CHAIR 

SETPC 1 
CHAIR 10 -70 

• 

? *** DRAW TABLE 

r 

SETPC 2 
TABLE 50 -20 

a 

; *** DRAW DOOR 

« 

DOOR 40 20 " 
END 



DRAW BED 
ENTRY: -X COORDINATE 
-Y COORDINATE 



TO RFH ■ X 








DH i. <j 








ulj 111 








JL 1 AX .A 








FD 40 T.T 


19 0 FD 4 T.T 

_L XJ L U *1 XJ X 


60 FD 


40 


uL i. C V— O 








KT o>3 r D 


"Dm -\ -\ ft 

Zo til IZy) 






SETPC 2 








FD 40 LT 


120 FD 4 LT 


60 FD 


40 


SETPC 3 








RT 90 FD 


70 RT 90 FD 


20 RT 


90 


FD 70 LT 


30 FD 36 LT 


150 FD 70 


LT 30 FD 


36 RT 120 






SETPC 2 








FOR "11 


60 2 






[RT 7 


FD 1+15/: I] 






END 









DRAW TABLE AND CHAIRS 
ENTRY: -X COORDINATE 
-Y COORDINATE 



TO TABLECHAIRS :X :Y 
CHAIR :X :Y 
CHAIR :X+20 : Y+20 
TABLE :X+40 : Y+50 
END 



DRAW CHAIR 

ENTRY: -X COORDINATE 
-Y COORDINATE 



TO CHAIR 
SETXY :X 
SETH 0 
FD 15 RT 
BK 15 LT 
BK 15 RT 
LT 100 FD 
FD 15 
END 



:X 
:Y 



:Y 



90 FD 20 RT 90 FD 15 
120 FD 15 RT 120 FD 15 
90 FD 20 RT 70 FD 20 
15 LT 80 FD 20 LT 100 



; DRAW TABLE 
; ENTRY: -X COORDINATE 
-Y COORDINATE 

TO TABLE :X :Y 
SETXY :X :Y 
OVAL 14 

SETXY XCOR+33 YCOR-15 
SETH 180 
FD 25 

SETX XCOR-15 

OVAL 6 

END 



DRAW BAR STOOL 
ENTRY: -X COORDINATE 
-Y COORDINATE 



ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 

FOR YOUR COCO 1, 2 OR 3 

THREE GREAT PROGRAMS — 

1 COCO HAPPINESS EXPERT - INCREASE YOUR HAPPINESS 

2 COCO THERAPIST - DISCUSS YOUR PROBLEMS 

3 COCO POET - ENDLESS STIMULATING POETRY 

tt£^ Al Pack I $24.95 

{SPECIFY TAPE OH QtSK) 
(AND LEARN YOUR HAPPINESS QUOTIENT) 
COMPLETE DOCUMENT A TtON tNCLUOES 
THE HISTORY OF At" 

COCO JOKESTER 

JUST TELL HIM YOUR NAME AND HE'LL TALK YOUR EAR OFF 

$26 95 {DISK ONLY) 



Now Available 

COCO EXPERT SYSTEM TOOLKIT 

BUILD YOUR OWN EXPERT SYSTEM 
USING SIMPLE MENU COMMANDS. 

— DEMOS. TUTORIAL. EXPERT SYSTEM SHELL. CLEARLY 
WRITTEN KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING MANUAL 

— CREATE YOUR OWN KNOWLEDGEBASE 

— $59.95 * DISK ONLY " 64K REQUIRED 
INCLUDED; TWO FREE EXPERT SYSTEMS 

— STOCK MARKET EXPERT 

— EXECUTIVE HEALTH EXPERT 



THINKING SOFTWARE, INC. 

46-16 65 PLACE 
WOODSIDE, N.Y. 11377 
(718) 429-4922 



'Hi * 



CALL RIGHT NOW FOR FREE CATALOG 

l aikmg version of all software available 
RS Speechpak required / Add $5.00 per disk 



GRAFPLOT 



NEW ! — 



GRAFPLOT DEMOi 
♦ 3. 00 DISK It TAPE Sin 
REFUND W/PURCHABE J"* 
"A GREAT PACKAGE ^ 
GETS EVEN BETTER" ' 
- RAINBOW 

30 DAY 

UNCONDI T I QNAL* 
MONEV-BACK 
GUARANTEE ! ! 

RAINBOW 



ST J LIST" GOT BETTER ! 

Investment ProJectioni T-Bills, FY '87 
T 1 1 1 1 



N E ! Spreadsheets & 
-Full-page Printed Graphs !! 



— <M</) 




£3 



— OO^ 1 



I 



T2 



2 

Months Since f-Bi I I I nvestwenta 

* AUTOMATICALLY LOADS DATA FROM MOST POPULAR SPREADSHEETS. 

* 29 1 GRAPHING SYMBOLS AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 

* AUTOMATICALLY SCALES AND LABELS ALL THREE OF THE AXES. 

* CALCULATES MATH FUNCTIONS, INTEGRALS AND MOVING AVERAGES. 
m FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN W/ COMPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 

* FULL-PAGE BCREENPRINTB ON ANY PRINTERi BPECIFY WITH ORDER *. 

REQUIRES 32K EXT. BASICl TAPE - 440.00 DISK - ♦43.00 



CD* 



NEW ! ! 
RR I NTER 

UN I VERBAL 

* 
* 
* 

m 



Picture Perfect ^Z^l 



SCRI 



iNPRI NT PRQBRAI 



* 



GET "PICTURE PERFECT" FULL-PAGE PRINTOUTS EVERY TIME! 
"PERFECTLY SIMPLE* TO OPERATE - "SIMPLY PERFECT - RESULTS' 
"PERFECTLY COMPATIBLE" WITH ALL DOT MATRIX PRINTERS ! 
GET "PERFECT CONTROL- DFi HEIGHT, WIDTH, POSITION, 

BAUD RATE, DOT DENSITY, NEGATIVE IMAGES, ETC. 
THE "PERFECT SOLUTION" TO YOUR GRAPHICS PRINTING NEEDS ! 
COMPATIBLE WITH GRAPHICOM AND COCO MAX PICTURES! 



ONL_ V »2= - OO ON DISK OR 



Al 



BLJ V BOTH PROGRAMS «U SAVE m 1 O _ OO 

CALL NOW FOR FREE INFORMATION <413) 347-7557, OR WRITE! 

HAWKEB RESEARCH SERVICES! S39 STANFORD AVE, OAKLAND, CA S4608 
YOUR PERSONAL CHECK IS WELCOME f SHIPMENT WITHIN 48 HOURS! 

ADD •3.00 SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS. CA . REB 1 DENTS ADD PflLEfe TAX 



30 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



TO STOOL :X :Y 


; -Y COORDINATE 


• 

p 


SETXY :X :Y 


; -TEXT ON DOOR 


; DRAW OVAL 


SETPC 1 


• 

P 


; ENTRY -SIZE 


OVAL 7 


f * \^*v ^a* ^a* aak a p • * v V 

TO DOOR : X : Y : N 


1 


SETXY XCOR+15 YCOR-8 


SETPC 3 


TO OVAL : Y 


SETH 180 


SETXY :X :Y 


SETH 40 


FD 30 


SETH 0 


REPEAT 2 


END 


REPEAT 2 


[REPEAT 5 




^ *^^J ^at aaa. ^aai ^4 a^aj a aaa. van 4% w 

[FD 60 RT 90 FD 40 RT 90] 


[FD :Y RT 18] 


« _ ^ _ ^ _ __ . __ __ _ __ 


SETXY :X+15 :Y+40 


REPEAT 5 




TT :N 


[FD :Y/5 RT 18]] 


: DRAW DOOR 


END 


END 


; ENTRY : -X COORDINATE 







Listing 2: HOTEL 



*** HOTEL COCO *** 
BY DALE LEAR 



TO HOTEL 
RANDOMIZE 
TEXTSCREEN 
CLEARTEXT 



*** GET NUMBER OF PLAYERS 



PRINT1 "NUMBER\ 0F\ PLAYERS\: 
MAKE "NP FIRST RQ 



*** GET PLAYERS NAMES 
*** SET UP PLAYER 

VARIABLES Pl-PN 
EACH OF THE FORM [f # # #] 

A A A A 

CURRENT ROOM — A A A A 

AAA 

X COORDINATE — A A ~ 

A A 

Y COORDINATE — A A 

A 

PLAYERS NAME — A 



FOR "I 1 :NP 1 
[PRINT1 "NAME\ : I I 
MAKE (WORD "P :I) 
(LIST 0 12 1 RQ) ] 



*** PRINT WELCOME 



CLEARTEXT 
PRINT [**WELCOME TO THE COCO HOTEL** ] 
PRINT 

PRINT [FIND THE KILLER 1 ] 



*** ASSIGN ROOMS 



MAKE "Z SHUFFLE [12 3 4 5 6] 

MAKE "GST 
[[MS. KAPFHAMMER] [MS. ARNOTT] 
[MS. HUTCHINSON] [MR. FALK] 
[MR. REED] [MR. AUGSBURG]] 



*** PRINT REGISTRATION 



PRINT 

PRINT [ ROOM GUEST 

FOR "116 1 

[SETCURSOR LINE 8 
PRINT ITEM :l : Z 
SETCURSOR LINE-1 16 
PRINT ITEM :I :GST] 



PRINT 

PRINT [COPY THE REGISTRATION] 
PRINT [PRESS ANY KEY] 



*** PLAY OPENING SONG 



KUSIC [T240 2LCLC 2LCLCCC 
2LCLCCE 2LCLCDF 2LCLCEG 
2LCLCFA LCLCEG LCLCDF 
2LCLCCE 2 LLB ' LLB 1 D 2LLB ' LLB ' DG 
2LLB ' LLB 1 DA 2 LLB 1 LLB f DB ' 
8LLALLAEHC# ] 



*** ASSIGN VALUABLES 



MAKE 11 VBL SE SHUFFLE 

[[GOLD RING] [MINK COAT] 

[NECLACE]] SHUFFLE 
[[FAT WALLET] [MONEY CLIP] 

[ BMW KEYS ] ] 



*** SET UP VALUABLE 

STATUS VARIABLES V1-V6 
EACH OF THE FORM [# #] 

A A 

WHO OWNS VALUABLE — A A 

A 

0-WITH OWNER , 1-IN ROOM— A 



FOR "116 1 
[MAKE (WORD n V :I) 
(LIST :I 0)] 



*** SET UP GUEST 

STATUS VARIABLES G1-G6 
EACH OF THE FORM [ # < # ] 

AAA 

REGISTERED ROOM— A A A 

A A 

0-ALIVE, 1-DEAD — A A 

A 

CURRENT ROOM A 



FOR "116 1 
[MAKE (WORD "G :I) 
' (LIST ITEM :I :Z 0 0) ] 



*** READ ROOM DATA FROM DISK 



OPENREAD "ROOMS 
MAKE U R READ "ROOMS 
CLOSEREAD "ROOMS 



*** SET UP QUICK-CHECK 
ROOM COORDINATE LIST 



MAKE "L [] 
FOR "I 1 COUNT :R 1 
[MAKE "X 
10*INT (ITEM 2 ITEM :I 
:R)/3+INT (LAST ITEM :I 



:R)/2 

MAKE "L SE :L :X :X+10] 

9 
$ 

; *** SELECT KILLER 

MAKE "K 1+RANDOM 6 

• 

i 

; *** SET UP VIDEO 
• 

MAKE "SLUFF RC 
SETSPLIT 1 
SPLITS CREEN 
WINDOW 
CS 

SETBG 12 
HT 

MAKE "C 0 

• 

; *** PLAY 

; 

WHILE "TRUE 
[FOR "PN 1 :NP 1 

t 

; *** RUN "TURN" 

FOR EACH PLAYER 

; 

[MAKE "C :C+1 
MAKE ,f PP WORD "P : PN 
MAKE :PP TURN THING :PP]] 

END 



SUBROUTINE TURN 
ENTRY: - PLAYER VARIABLE 
EXIT: - PLAYER VARIABLE 



TO TURN :PR 
CLEARTEXT 

PRINT1 "- LAST :PR "VS\ TURN 

I 

7 ALLOW PLAYER TO MOVE 
7 ACCORDING TO SPIN 
# 

OUTPUT MOVE :PR SPIN 
END 



; SUBROUTINE MOVE 

; ENTRY: - PLAYER VARIABLE 

- NUMBER OF SQUARES 
; EXIT: - PLAYER VARIABLE 

9 

TO MOVE :PL :N 
i 

; *** SHOW PLAYING BOARD 



LOADPICT "BOARD 
CLEARINPUT 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



; ** CAPTURE CURRENT X,Y 

« 

MAKE "PX ITEM 2 : PL 
MAKE "PY ITEM 3 : PL 
SETH 0 ST 



** REPEAT FOR EACH SQUARE 



DO 

[SETCURSOR 15 30 
PRINT1 : N 

** LOCATE TURTLE ON 
CURRENT SQUARE 

SETXY :PX*10-115 :PY*10-85 

■ 

; ** GET ARROW KEY 

MAKE "Z ASCII RC 

** CALCULATE NEW X,Y 

SELECT 

[:Z=9 [MAKE "PX :PX+1] 
:Z=8 [MAKE "PX :PX-1] 
:Z=12 [MAKE "PY :PY+1] 
:Z=10 [MAKE "PY :PY-1] 
"TRUE [MAKE "N :N+1]] 
SOUND 1000+RANDOM 500 20 

*** QUICK CHECK TO SEE IF 
IN ROOM 

IF MEMBER? (WORD INT 
:PX/3 INT :PY/2) :L 

★★★YES, DETERMINE ROOM 
CALL "INROOM" 
ZERO SQUARE COUNT 

[MAKE "W INT (WHERE+l)/2 
INROOM :W 
MAKE "N 0] 
ELSE 



***NO, DECREMENT SQUARE COUNT 
SET CURRENT ROOM=0 



[MAKE "N :N-1 
MAKE "W 0] 
] WHILE :N>0 
OUTPUT LIST :W : PX : PY LAST : PL 
END 



SUBROUTINE INROOM 
ENTRY: CURRENT ROOM 



TO INROOM :W 

CS 

PD 

HT 

; *** LOAD ROOM PICTURE 

■ 

LOADPICT FIRST FIRST ITEM :W :R 

■ 

*** RUN ROOM TOUCHUP PROGRAM 
RUN FIRST ITEM :W :R 
] ★ ** MOVE GUESTS/ VALUABLES 

t 

SCRAMBLE 



; ATTEMPT MURDER 

■ 

TRYKILL 

m 

; PRINT GUESTS IN ROOM 

■ 

FOR "116 1 
[IF :W=LAST THING WORD "G :I 
[IF 0=ITEM 2 THING WORD "G : 
[TPRINT ITEM Si :GST] 
ELSE 

[TPRINT SE ITEM :I 
:GST " \ ( DEAD\) ] ] ] 

*** PRINT VALUABLES IN ROOM 



MUSIC [T800 HC B B* A A' 

G » F 8EFG ' G ] 
SPLITSCREEN] 
END 



:I 



FOR "116 1 
[MAKE "V THING WORD "V 
MAKE "G THING WORD "G FIRST 
IF 0=LAST :V 
[IF :W=LAST :G 
[TPRINT ITEM :I :VBL] ] 
ELSE 
[IF :W=FIRST :G 
[TPRINT ITEM J I :VBL] ] ] 
CLEARTEXT 

PRINT1 "\"G\"\ TO\ GUESS, 
PRINT1 \ SPACE\ TO\ PASS 
CLEARINPUT 

■ 

9 

; *** ALLOW GUESS 



:V 



IF RC="G [GUESS] 
END 



SUBROUTINE GUESS 



TO GUESS 

TEXTSCREEN 

CLEARTEXT 



*** DISPLAY LIST OF GUESTS 



FOR "116 1 

[PRINT " ITEM :l :GST] 
PRINT 

PRINT [SELECT SUS PECT , PRESS ENTER] 
SETCURSOR 0 0 



*** ALLOW SELECT WITH CURSOR 



DO 

[MAKE "Z ASCII RC 
SELECT 
[:Z=12 [MAKE 
:Z=10 [MAKE 
"TRUE [MAKE 



"D -1] 
"D 1] ' 
"D 0] 



1 



IF LINE+:D>=0 
[SETCURSOR LINE+ : D COLUMN] 
] WHILE :Z<>13 

*** TEST FOR CORRECT ANSWER 



IF LINE+1=:K 

[SETCURSOR 10 0 
PRINT [GOOD GOING SLUETH] 
MUSIC [T400 LG C E G X E 4CEG] 
PRINT 

PRINT :C "TURNS 
TOPLEVEL] 
ELSE 

[SETCURSOR 10 0 
PRINT [YOU HUNG THE WRONG MAN] 



SUBROUTINE TPRINT 
PRINT ARGUMENT THEN POSITION 
TURTLE FOR NEXT PRINT 
ENTRY: - THING TO PRINT 



TO TPRINT :Z 
SOUND 4000 30 
TT : Z 

SETY YCOR-10 
END 



SUBROUTINE SCRAMBLE 

MOVE GUESTS/VALUABLES 



TO SCRAMBLE 



*** RELOCATE EACH GUEST 



FOR "116 1 
[MAKE "Z WORD "G :I 
MAKE :Z RELOC THING :Z] 



*** DROP/ PICK EACH VALUABLE 



FOR "116 1 
[MAKE "Z WORD "V :I 
MAKE :Z DROP THING :Z] 
END 



SUBROUTINE RELOC 
RELOCATE GUEST 
ENTRY: - GUEST VARIABLE 
EXIT: - GUEST VARIABLE 



TO RELOC :G 



*★★ IF GUEST IS ALIVE, 
ASSIGN NEW ROOM 



IF 0=ITEM 2 :G 
[MAKE "N 6+RANDOM 7 
IF :N=6 [MAKE "N FIRST 
OUTPUT LPUT :N BUTLAST 

ELSE 

■ 

> 

. *★★ ELSE DONT CHANGE 



:G] 
:G] 



[OUTPUT :G] 



END 



SUBROUTINE DROP 
DROP/ PICK UP VALUABLE 
ENTRY: - VALUABLE VARIABLE 
EXIT: - VALUABLE VARIABLE 



TO DROP :V 



★*★ if PLAYER WHO OWNS 
VALUABLE IS IN HIS 
REGISTERED ROOM, 
POSSIBLY DROP/PICK UP 



32 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



IF (FIRST 
THING (WORD n G FIRST :V))= 
LAST THING (WORD "G FIRST :V) 
[OUTPUT LPUT RANDOM 2 
BUTLAST : V ] 
ELSE 

■ 

■r 

; ELSE NO CHANGE 

[OUTPUT :V] 
END 



; SUBROUTINE TRYKILL 

; ATTEMPT MURDER IF ALL 

J THE ELEMENTS ARE RIGHT 
■ 

TO TRYKILL 

i 

? *** DETERMINE KILLER'S ROOM 

■ 

t 

MAKE "RK LAST THING WORD "G :K 
■ 

; *** KILLER WONT STRIKE 

; IF ANY PLAYER IN THE ROOM 

* 

FOR "I 1 :NP 1 
[IF :RK=LAST THING WORD "P :I 
[STOP] ] 

■ 

I *** SEE IF A GUEST IS ALONE 
; WITH THE KILLER 

■ 

MAKE "VICTOM 0 
FOR "116 1 
[MAKE "Z THING WORD "G :I 

■ 

i 

* *** DONT COUNT KILLER 
■ 

IF :Ko:I 

* 

■ *** IS GUEST IN KILLERS ROOM? 
[IF :RK=LAST :Z 

■ 

; *** DON 'T COUNT DEAD PEOPLE 

i 

t 

[IF 0=ITEM 2 :Z 



*** IS ANYONE ELSE HERE 



[IF :VICTOM=0 

[MAKE "VICTOM :I] 
ELSE 
[STOP]]]]] 
IF :VICTOM<>0 



■ 



; *** ALL ELEMENTS OKI STRIKE 1 

; 



[KILL : VICTOM] 



END 



? SUBROUTINE KILL 

; ENTRY: - VICTOM 
■ 

TO KILL : VICTOM 
■ 

; PLAY DIFFERENET SONG FOR EACH 
; VICTOM 

MUSIC ITEM : VICTOM 
[ [ 4 LCLE 1 LGC ] [4LCCHC] 

[4CC#DD#] [4CE I G , A] 

[4CE#G#] [4LALBCE] ] 
MAKE "G WORD »G : VICTOM 

; *** CHANGE STATUS TO DEAD 



yiY,SftV H ViVdV.V/,YpV.V#VA'fWi 

■ a a J x i bbb l ■ r ■ ■ a i r ■ ■ a a a -a a a 

I ■ ij l ■ ■ l ■ m a l l a a a a ■ ■ j- j . s .a mr a 

p ■ ■' j ■ ■ ■ l j i Liiiifriiii r j r ■ r r ■ j ■ ■ i 
M ■ ■ v a a a a a r i i ■ p ■ i i j Pxaaaraoi a arm 

'- H '■'- rJ - x -* *-*-*-* *-* *-'-3 *-*-* -*-"-*-*-'*-'■' JI -'-'-'*-f I I ^^-1 H I j-n^WT*" '." '.• •'.'.■M 

yv-.{V f W/"V.v,^V.V.V,V/,V/.v^\v^ 



f h n , r_*_ ■_ ■ ■"■ ■_*_■]_ ■_ p ■ ■ i p ■ ■ p p r, h i i 



yys. y-v 

■ .&yW4 



_ 



-/ / / / / / / / / 



/ / / / / / / • / / / > 

7 / / / / / ,- ■ / ./ ./ / ~7^7 



guess, sp/ice; 



puss 



MAKE :G LIST FIRST THING 
:G 1 LAST THING :G 

■ 

f 

; *** ASSIGN VICTOMS VALUABLES 
? TO THE KILLER 

■ 

i 

FOR "116 1 
[MAKE "V WORD "V :I 
IF (LIST : VICTOM 0)=THING :V 
[MAKE :V LIST :K 1] ] 

END 




; SUBROUTINE SPIN 

; EXIT: - NUMBER OF SQUARES 

* 

t 

TO SPIN 

; *** DRAW WHEEL 
* 

SPLITSCREEN 

CS 

PD 

HT 

SETPC 1 
SETH -90 
FOR "119 1 
[SETPC 3 -PC 

FD 80 

PU 

LT 20 BK 40 TT :I 

FD 40 RT 2 0 BK 80 RT 40 

PD] 

a 

t 

; *** SPIN TURTLE 

■ 

i 

PU 
ST 

SETXY -72 -4 
SETH 0 

REPEAT 2 7 + 5* RANDOM 1)3 
[SOUND Ij30j3 10 
FD 10 RT 8] 
OUTPUT 1+INT HEADING/ 40 
END 



; SUBROUTINE ROOM 

; TOUCH UP ROOM PICTURE 

* 

TO ROOM :z 
SETXY 5 5 60 
TT : Z 

SETXY -12 8 90 
END 



SUBROUTINE LOBBY 
TOUCH UP LOBBY PICTURE 

TO LOBBY 

SETXY -25 51 

TT PIECE 10 17 DATE 

SETXY -128 30 

END 



SUBROUTINE BAR 
TOUCH UP BAR PICTURE 

TO BAR 

SETXY -128 10 
END 



SUBROUTINE POOL 
TOUCH UP POOL PICTURE 

TO POOL 
SETXY -128 90 
END 



SUBROUTINE KITCHEN 
TOUCH UP KITCHEN 

7 

TO KITCHEN 
SETXY 0 90 
END 



; SUBROUTINE DINING 

1 TOUCH UP DINING ROOM PICTURE 

TO DINING 
SETXY 0 90 
END 



; SUBROUTINE STAIRS 

; TOUCH UP STAIRS PICTURE 

; 

TO STAIRS 
SETXY -128 90 
END 



/7S 



/ 



i 



MR. :JI ! Ai : i ; . 

Wk> v* 1 — 




Most Howard Medical products are COCO 3 compatible, 
some require special patches. Please inquire when you order. 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncerU 
a company through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try it out, test it for compat 
happy with it for any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back, (less s hi 

^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^^^^MMB^^^^^^^^H 



nate the uncertainty of dealing with 

ability. If you're not 
ipping). 



COCO MAX II 

Lets the graphic capabilities of your CoCo EXPLODE 
on the screen or on paper. $78 45 

Y CABLE 

Needed to connect CoCo Max and disk drive al same 
ime. $19.45 

MAX FONTS 

Three sets include 72 different fonts for typesetting 
bulletins, brochures and announcements $61 

COLORING BOOK™ 

by Glenside Color Computer Club 

Twenty-two pictures of clip-art add the professional 

look to your pamphlet, menu or catalog sheets r 

($2 shipping lor each produrl) 



NEW FROM 



DISK 

CONTROLLER 

The DC-4 is a scaled down versionof the popular DC- 
2 without a parallel port or memory minder. It 
includes a switch with 2 ROM sockets, |DOS, manual 
and such features as gold connectors and metal box. 
It accesses double sided drives and accepts RSDOS 
11 for Radio Shack compatibility. CCC 

($2 shipping) ^Uw 






TEAC DISK 
DRIVE 



($2 shipping) 



$132 



The Teac 55B fits into the spare slots in the Radio Shack 
501 Disk Drive, This bare drive features 40 Track, double 
sided 360K potential and a six 
millisecond track 
seek rate 

The DD-2 combines the Teac 55B with our Vz height 
horizontal case and heavy duty ft A 

power supply {$2 sh i pping) $lOO 

DE-1 disk enclosure V5 height horizontal with heavy duty power 
supply. Includes all mounting hardware. <kir nn 

($2 shipping) 

DC-2 full height disk enclosure. Accepts two W height drives 
Includes power supply for 2 drives and $1Q Cft 

il) mounting hardware. ($2 shipping) «JJ«J" 



RS DOS ROM CHIP 

ROM chip fits inside disk controller, 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compatibility 



BOTEK 



Reg $40 
{$2 shipping) 



$20 



each 



Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial 
output to run a parallel printer like Star or Epson. In- 
cludes all cables. Add $10 for modem attachment 



($2 shipping) 



$6845 



WORD PACK RS 



ie hardware answer for an 80 column 
display It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A- To get started, you 
need OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, 
and a monochrome monitor 



(52 shipping) 

New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9. 



$10 



ITER 




Howard Medical has located and tested a select few 
typewriters that can connect to the Tandy Color 
Computer and we offer them here at mail order 
prices. These typewriters bridge the gap between dot 
matrix and daisy wheel printers with excellenr letter 
quality and keyboard access. Try one in your home 
for 30 days and if you do not agree that this is the best 
of both worlds return it pre-paid for a courteous 
refund. 

OLIVETTI CXM0 with built-in parallel port ^-j. 
OLYJVIPIA ORBIT XP with built-in parallel port 

$286* 

OLYMPIA CARERRA with free $75 starter kit 
Needs $75 parallel interface adapter $225* 

SMITH CORONA 6100 with spell checker 
Needs $98 parallel & serial interface adapter 



($7 shipping) 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 
C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S 




Drive 0 and 1 269 95 

One double sided drive with doubler board and new RS 
controller so you can have the equivalent of 2 drives in 
one. You can even backup from 0 to 1 . Works with all 
CoCo's. Compatible w/RS DOS. No special operating 
system needed. 




v 




2 Drives 299 95 

Both our drive 0 and 1 in one case, with cable and R.S. 
controller. The best just got better! 



EPSON® LX-80 PRINTER 



239 



95 



The logical choice for your CoCo! 80 column, 100 CPS 
in draft mode, 16 CPS in near letter quality mode, IK 
Buffer, compatible with CoCo max. 1 year warranty* 
LX-80 Tractor Feed 27.95. Serial to parallel converter 
starting at only 49.95. 

*We are authorized Epson* Sales and Service 




Drive 1 Upgrade 

Add a second l h height drive to your Radio Shack® Thin 
Line Disk Drive. Comes with 3 minute installation 
instructions, screwdriver required. Please specify either 
catalog #26-3 129 or 26-3131 when ordering. 




SUPER DRIVE SALE 

Special prices on new first quality disk drives. They even have GOLD connectors on the back . . . Some other places charge 229.00 for 
dr. 1 and 299.00 for dr. 0, not us! Drive 1 is I, Second Color Computer drive, or external mod IH, IV. Drive 1 just plugs into the extra 
connector on your Dri veO cable . Both drives are compatible with any version of the Color Computer and all versions of drives . Dri veO 
is yourfirstColorComputerdriveandcomescompletewithcable, manual, and R.S. controller. Bare full hgtSSDD drive only 79. 95. 

THE COMPUTER CENTER 

901-761-4565, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 381 19 
Add $4.90 for shipping and handling— Visa, MC & money orders accepted, No CODs 
Allow an additional 3 weeks for personal checks— Drive faceplates may vary slightly 

Prices subject to change without notice. Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 

Prices subject to change without notice. 



Love is in the air . . . and on the screen 




CoCo Can Play 

Cupid, Too 



By Ernie DiZazzo 



Move over Hallmark! Here's a program for telling 
that "certain someone"exactly how you feel, with 
colorful graphics and a sentimental love song. 
Lovecard starts with a title screen and the instruction to 
press any key to begin. Following the introductory message 
and graphics, pressing ENTER starts the music (sort of like 
high-tech strolling violinists) while the lyrics are displayed 
on the screen. After the song has concluded, a hearts-and- 
roses finale bursts on the screen, vividly declaring, "I love 
you" to the object of your affections. At the bottom of the 
screen, the name "Rainbow" appears as the recipient of this 
message, but you can edit it to display a different name. 

Lovecard is perfect for bestowing upon a loved one on 
special occasions, such as anniversaries or Valentine's Day 
— or just any oV time you want someone you care about 
to know how you feel. 

(Questions about this program may be addressed to the 
author at 10800 A Esplanade Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, 
Canada H3L 2Y6. Please enclose an SASE for a re- 
sponse.) □ 

Ernie DiZazzo lives in Montreal and is a veteran of World 
War II. Formerly a statistician with an electronics company, 
Ernie enjoys listening to music and sharpening his program- 
ming skills by reading THE RAINBOW. 




176 920 215 

.96 1050 113 

104 1160 . .165 

.27 END 47 
.42 




The Idling: LOvECRRD 
0 CLS 

10 PRINT@3 2 , H - 



20 PRINT@70,"I LOVE YOU 
30 FRINT@96, 11 



40 PRINT@134 , lr BY ERNIE. DI ZAZZ 
0. 

5J3 PRINT@197, "10800 A ESPLANADE 

AVE . " . || 

60 PRINT02 63 , "MONTREAL. H3L-2Y 
6 

70 FRINT@3 28 , "QUEBEC CANADA. 
80 PRINT@390," MUSIC RE-WRITTEN 



36 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



BY M.MARANDOLA & E.DI Z 

AZZO. 

90 PRINT@448," PRESS ANY KEY 

TO BEGIN 

100 EXEC41172 
110 CLEAR200 

120 CLS:PMODE3,1:PCLS4:SCREEN1,0 
130 DRAWBM5, 5 ;C2D28R8U28L8 ;BM35 
, 25 r D28R18U6L10U22L8 
140 DRAW"BM65,45,*BD3D22F3R15E3U2 
I 2H3L15G3BR5BD4D14F3R4E3U14H3L4G3 
150 DRAWBM95 , 65 ; D20F8R6E8U20L6D 
18G3L4H3U18L6 ; BM125 , 85 ; D29R18U6L 
10U6R8U6L8U6R10U6L18 
160 DRAWBM160, 115 ; F12D16R6U16E1 
2L8G6L2H6L6 

170 DRAW"BM190, 135 ;BD3D24F3R15E3 
U24H3L15G3BR6BD4D16F3R3E3U16H3L3 

G3 

180 DRAW M BM225, 155 ; D25F3R14E3U25 
L7D20G2L3H2U20L6 

190 PAINT(6,6) ,3,2:PAINT(38,28) , 
1,2: PAINT ( 68 , 48 ) , 2 , 2 
200 PAINT(98,68) , 1 , 2 : PAINT(128 , 8 



IT'S SO 

4 10 C$«" P4 ; L4 C ; L2 A ; L4 F ; C ; F ; A ; 03 L 

2.D?L2C;02L4C;03L2C,*L4C;C;02B-;A 
;L1D 

420 PLAY C$ 
430 CLS(4) 

440 PRINT@224,"I SIT AT THE WIND 
OW AND WATCH THE RAIN, HI-LI-LI , H 
I-LI-LI,HI-LO 

450 D$="P4 ;L4D;D;B-,*D;D;B-;D/L2C 

;L4A;L2F;L4C;C;G;C;C;G;C;L1A 
460 PLAY D$ 

470 CLS(5) 

480 PRINTS 2 2 4, "TOMORROW I'LL PRO 
BABLY LOVE AGAIN HI-LI-LI , HI-LI- 
LI, HI-LO 

490 E$="P4 ; L4D; D ; B- ; D ; D; B- ; D; L2C 
; L4A ; L2F ; L4C ; C ; G ; C ; C ; 03L2C ; 02L4A 
;L1.F 

500 PLAY E$ 
510 CLS 

520 CLS:PM0DE3 , 1: PCLS3 : SCREEN1 ,0 
530 DRAW»BM0,0,*C2R255D191L255U19 
1 ; BM60 , 173 ;R10E25R75F25R10D16L14 





5D16":PAINT(128,163) ,2 


,2 






540 


C0L0R1 : CIRCLE ( 30 , 2 5 ) , 9 . 


, , . 80 




550 


CIRCLE{38,22) , 12 , , 


.90, , 


■ 55, 1 * 




26 








2Jp , 1 : PCLrS ( 5 ) : SCREEN 1,1 


560 


CIRCLE (28, 18) ,15, , 


.75, , 


,42,1. 




15 






250 FORT=30 TO -30 STEP-1 


570 


CIRCLE (20, 23) , 10, , 


.90, , 


• 12, .9 


260 A= (2*3. 1415) *T/60 


3 








270 LINE(128,96)-(75*SIN(A)+128, 


580 


CIRCLE (28 ,28) , 13, , 


■ 65 f i 


•85, 1 ■ 


75*C0S (A) +96) ,PSET 


65 








280 LINE(128,96)-(75*SIN(A)+128, 


590 


CIRCLE (36, 28) ,12, , 


.90, . 


,95,1. 


75*C0S (A) +96) , PRESET 


35 








290 Q=60-2*T:FORY=Q TO 0 STEP-1: 


600 


CIRCLE (23 , 50) , 18, , 


. 99, . 


■ 35,1 


NEXT 


610 


CIRCLE (55, 48) , 18 , , 


.99, , 


* 3 5 , * 4 


300 NEXT: CLS 


9 








310 CLS(7) :PM0DE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1 


620 


CIRCLE (25, 50) , 12 , , 


.99, , 


,85,1. 


,1 


08:CIRCLE(38,45) , 12, , . 


99 , .25, .60 


320 PRINT@224,"A SONG OF LOVE IS 


630 


CIRCLE (128, 70) ,30, 


, .99, 


f • sjd , ■ 


A SAD SONG, HI-LI-LI, HI-LI -LI, HI 


99 








-LO 


640 


CIRCLE(80,70) ,30, , 


.99, . 


.51, .9 


330 A$="V3102T3 ;L4C; L2A; L4F;C;F? 


1 








A;03L2 . D;L2C ;02L4C; C ; A ; C; C ; A ; L4B 


650 


CIRCLE (140, 60) ,30, 


, .99, 


r • 5 8 , . 


-;02L1G 


92 








340 PLAY A$ 


660 


CIRCLE (18 8, 60) ,30, 


/ - 9 9 j 


t • ftp f • 


350 CLS (2) 


99 








360 PRINT@224, "A SONG OF LOVE IS 


670 


CIRCLE (65, 43) ,99, , 


.99 , 


,06, . 1 


A SONG OF WOE, DON'T ASK ME HOW 


5 








I KNOW 


680 


CIRCLE (12 5, 30) ,99, 


, .99 


f - 0& # ■ 


370 B$="P4 ; L4C ,* L2G ; L4E ; C ,* E ,* G ; 03 L 


15 








2D;L4C;02L2G;L4C;03L2C;L4C;L2C;0 


690 


CIRCLE (140, 55) ,90, 


, .99 


p ■ 3 8 f ■ 


2L4B-;L1A 


48 








380 PLAY B$ 


700 


DRAW " BM7 8 , 115 ; C1D1F2D1R1F2D1 




390 CLS(3) 

400 PRINT@224,"A SONG OF LOVE IS 
A SAD SONG, FOR I HAVE LOVED AND 



R1F2D1R1F2D1R1F2D1R1F2D1R1F2D1R1 
F2D1 ; BM140 , 100 ;D1F2D1R1F2D1R1F2D 
1R1F2D1R1F2D1R1F2D1R2F2D1R2E2U1R 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 37 



L 



2E2U1R2E2U1R1E2U1R2E2U1R1E2U1R1 
2U1 " ' 

710 DRAW"BM102,137,*E2U1R2E2U1R2E 

1R1 




72)3 CIRCLE(227,148) 




.80 




730 CIRCLE(233, 147) 


,12, 


, .90, 




1.26 








740 CIRCLE(224, 143) 


, 15 , 


, .75, 


.42, 


1.15 








7 mfl PTT5PT V ( O 1 £\ 1AR\ 
/ D)U W -L i\V- J_rHi lid | 




Q ffi 




.93 ' 








76^S CIRCLE(223, 153) 


,13, 


, -85, 


.85, 


1.65 








770 CIRCLE (231, 153) 


,12, 


, -90, 


.95, 


1.35 








780 CIRCLE (2 18, 175) 
1 


,18, 


, -99, 


.85, 


790 CIRCLE (250, 173) 


,18, 


, '99, 


• 35, 


.49 








800 CIRCLE(220, 175) 


,12, 


, .99, 


. 85, 


1.08 : CIRCLE (235, 170) , 12 


, , .99 


, .25 


, .60 








810 CIRCLE (30, 145) , 


9 t r • 


80 




820 CIRCLE (38, 142) , 


t t 


.90, . 


5 5 , 1 


.26 






830 CIRCLE(28,138) , 


15, , 


.75, . 


42,1 


.15 








840 CIRCLE(20,143) , 10, , 


. 90 , . 


12, . 


93 








850 CIRCLE (28, 150) , 


13, , 


.85, . 


85,1 


.65 








860 CIRCLE (36, 148) , 


12, , 


•90, . 


95,1 


.35 






870 CIRCLE (23 , 171) , 


18, , 


.99, . 


85,1 


880 CIRCLE(55,170) , 


18, , 


.99, . 


35, . 


49 








890 CIRCLE (25, 171) , 


12, , 


.99, . 


85,1 


.08: CIRCLE (38, 166) , 


12, , 


. 99, . 


25, . 


60 









900 DRAW"BM70,10;C2R8L4D14L4R8 
910 PAINT(32,28) , 2 , 1 : PAINT ( 35 , 20 
) , 2,1 : PAINT (40, 23) ,2,1 
920 PAINT (225, 147) , 2, 1: PAINT (3 5, 
30) ,4,1: PAINT (15, 24) ,2,1: PAINT (4 
4,30) ,4,1 

930 PAINT(2S,17) , 4 , 1 : PAINT(25, 20 
) ,4,1: PAINT (21, 25) ,2,1 
940 PAINT(240, 143) ,4, 1:PAINT(230 
,138) ,4,1: PAINT (233, 160) ,4,1 
950 PAINT (2 30, 155) ,2, 1:PAINT(215 
,151) ,4,1: PAINT (2 10, 150) ,2,1 
960 PAINT (218,145) ,4,1: PAINT (230 
,145) ,2,l:PAINT(231,140) ,2,1 
970 PAINT (28, 135) ,2,1: PAINT (30, 1 
47) ,2,1: PAINT (25, 140) ,4,1 
980 PAINT(30,152) , 2 , 1 : PAINT ( 35 , 1 
35) ,4,1. "PAINT (22, 148) ,4,1 

990 PAINT(45,144) ,2, 1:PAINT(38,1 
55) ,4,1 



1000 A$= ,, C4NH2NE2D2 ,, : DRAW" BM 30 , 2 
5"+A$ : DRAW"BM30 , 145"+A$ : DRAWBM2 
26,148 ,, +A$ ' ' 
1010 PAINT(128,85) ,4, 1:PAINT(170 
,85) ,2,1 

1020 PAINT (33, 50) ,2,1: PAINT (33,1 

70) ,2,1: PAINT (228, 174) ,2,1 

10 30 DRAW" BM9 5 , 55 ; C1D2 0R14U4 L9U1 

6L4 " : DRAW"BM120 , 55 ,*BD3D14F3R10E3 

U14H3L10G3BR4BD3D8F2R4E2U8H2L4G2 

1040 DRAW"BM147 , 55 ; D14F6R6E6U14L 

5D13G2L3H2U13L4 

1050 DRAW"BM174 , 55 ;NR14D20R14U4L 
10U4R6U4L6U4R10U4 

1060 DRAW "BM 30 , 70 ;C1F10R50BR65C1 
R20BR3 3R17H10R6F12G12L6E10L20BL3 
0NU4L20BL65NU4L4 8G12L6E13H13R6 
1070 PAINT(38,82) , 2 , 1 : PAINT (80 , 8 
2) , 3,1:PAINT(160,82) ,3,1: PAINT (2 
10,82) ,2,1 

1080 PAINT(98,70) , 2 , 1:PAINT(128 , 

70) ,3,1: PAINT (130 ,58) ,2,1 

1090 PAINT (160, 70) ,4,1: PAINT (150 

,70) ,2,1: PAINT (177, 74) ,4,1 

1100 DRAW"BM190, 105 ;C2D4F4ND6E4U 

4BR10BD2D10F2R6E2U10H2L6G2BR20BU 

2D12F2R6E2U12 

1110 COLORl:CIRCLE(133,173) ,28, , 
.95, .56, . 96 :C0LOR4: CIRCLE (133, 16 
9) , 22, , .90, . 54, .97 
1120 COLOR1:CIRCLE(133,170) ,18, , 
.95, . 56, .96 

1130 COLOR3:CIRCLE(13 3,168) , 12, , 
.95, .56, .96 

1140 C0L0R4: CIRCLE (131, 181) ,80, , 
.18 

1150 DRAWBM72 , 175;ND12R3BR3R3F2 
D2G2NL8F2D4 

1160 DRAW M BM90 , 177 ; D10U6NR10U4E2 
R2BR4R2F2D10 

1170 DRAW M BM108,175;R8L4D12L4R8 
1180 DRAW"BM122, 175 ;BD12U10E2R6F 
2D10 

1190 DRAW"BM139 , 175 ; D12R3BR4R3E2 
U2H2L3BL4 L3BR9E2U2H2L3BL4L2 
1200 DRAW"BM157,175;BD2D8F2R2BR3 
R2E2U8H2L2BL3L2G2 

1210 DRAW"BM175, 175 ; D9F3R1E2NU3F 
2R2E3U9 

1220 PAINT(128,172) , 1,4 

1230 PSET(128, 85, 4) : PSET ( 170 , 85 , 

2) :PSET(128, 175, 1) 

1240 PAINT(128,85) , 2 , 1 : PAINT (170 

,85) ,4,1: PAINT (128, 172) ,2,4 

1250 PRESET (128, 85) :PRESET(170, 8 

5) : PRESET (128, 175) 

1260 PSET(128,85,4) : PSET ( 170 , 85 , 
1270 GOTO1010:GOTO1220 /Rv 





38 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 





64K Disk or Tape BATTLE HYMN — The Battle of Gettysburg 

Player controls Lee's army of 1 1 divisions (39 individual) brigades including 3 cavalry 
(Stuarr) and 3 artillery (Alexander) and must capture 5 victory objectives to win 
decisively. It's all here, from Culp's Hill to Lirrle Round Top, from Pickert's charge ro 
Hood's heroic vicrory ar Devil's Den. 

Play Starrs on the second day of the bartle wirh Johnson, Early and Rodes facing an 
unreinforced Union line running from Culp's Hill down ro Cemetery Hill and enst. 
Player has early size advantage but must act quickly as Union reinforcements arc seen 
arriving; and must form the line and charge up hill over a grcai disrance. Where is 
Stuart. 7 

Brigades must be turned to march or fire. Union troops must reload after firing. 

Player may limber or unlimber cannon; must watch his fatigue factors and prevent 
troops from routing. The object is to force the flank and pin the enemy in a cross fire. 
Easier said then done. Very historic, with an Ark Royal touch. 

Hi res graphics; machine language. Game save. Play takes 3-5 houts. $29.00 



LUFTFLOTTE 

V the Battle of Britain 



i_l All 



■ ■ ■ ■ p 

■-'-.v.y 

M 

a- * a I 
■ P ■ 



■■■,»■■ 

a m > a a 

■ i p ■ ■ ■ 

m&\ 

. i p ■ ■ ■ 

■ i ■ i ■ ■ 

.■i'.'d".". 



■,\V,V 

;.v>*,\; 



1 ■ m r ■ ■ ■ 



Q4i 



P I » I * *.* i> r * a b km * I * I 4\ _", + _■_ 1 . ■ 

r.VAW>.',V* , .V, , . i iV.*. , .*. , . , .V,V,V. 

F l a | | f t LiKiJkiiiiifii ■■ ■ ■ i r t M r 4 ^ ■ n I 

i V ^\^Vi , * l i , A , i , i , i 1 A%W/iVA'- , .. , . , ..'* , i , .*i 
■ ■ ■ . V, ■■■■■■ ViiVi i.*| J . i p--.i,p 

■ ■ a mt l m ■ ip ■ k a m m k r a -i h * h ■„» ■ * P ■ +. P 

| IH I. h a ■■■ ■ ■ t a a. a a i* - ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ + r i I- 

.Ill lblilll!ltfl1'^tl>»>ii ■■■■■■■■■ ■ ■ h ri * fa 
mM ■ ■ flld lit ■ ■■■■*■■■■■*+■ ■ 
■ ■ ■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ BB-BB-rBB++l-i + -'* h" + ">-->""'P"-*P 



■ i r m n ■ P. * * ■ * * . 
■.■■■-■■Ma * i* km* -fa ■ ■■ fa 

■ ■-it* ib4i+«4ptp!"i 

1 i t, i i ■ i 4 t + I 1 f + M h 
(■■■-■■-fa-Bil + h ■- * I 



r - * 



¥ * P * P P 

.^■->;.x-:-;-:-m*s;*x-: 

i M i M i M M f b » M 
■ pamiaiilrili'lll'ki 

■ ■■■■■■■■■ ■ * »■■ ■*■ •■ 
aa>aBjaBBiBBBaifaaifal 



■ ■ ■ 



IB B- B- Bi ■ B ■". ~ 

i _L _h ± fa ■ ■ # ■ ■_■ ■ 



■ +■■ + ■", PPP-" ■-• ■■*■»■ 
. b I + I I I I * ■ ■ rf*l"JI P * _ P ¥ _ 1 
i ■ BP fa b I I * I * I 
fa**! I # ■+*"■■*■■■■■■■ 

* -^:-:*>>k-:<: 

■ ¥ P ■ PP"- "-P| -PP" pBaB«BB-BBB- 

b,Abb.hbbb bb mi bbbib+4bIb> 
BBnafar 

*■;**>:*:*:■:- :■:■>:■>:■:■:•:■ 

■* ■ B ■" * B ■ B 1 h _ ■ * ■ _ ■ *a„B-a_a - — — _ 

m b p fa r ■ h -r + fa i fa b -P-il-PF. " l _ J -_" 1 1 

B B + r p B B B ■ B B> B B riltlSlllilt+lttFlfll 

I ► W 1 ■ ¥ ■ ■ I ■ bb p b b ■ b ■ ■:. a l 4 fa ■ + l + h+.i + h_l, 
i i + ■ + fa * P 1 P I -P P BBfj.iB.aB.ft *■ i * + mt fa I ri- 

■ ■:-> : " 

H I I ¥ I »■ ■ ■■ T B B a ■ P a fa a a ■ a * m * fa I ai ".■_■ .+ B *. 

■.■.^■ + |".l B + | BBB . B + BJBBjaBaBaB+l*BBBS 

■ipaB-ralB-Blrl ' • I * -fa I » ■ * I P B - ■ ■ B a ■ » 

1 1 *BaBBBB- aBX +. + _*»+ B H. .*.'. + . A .'x* 

f I ■ ■ BBB,BBB-BB-|*I*BBB fa B ^ B j. ■ _■_ ■ J. ■ J 

- - *. |L J b J BB BBB B I B J B B ■ fadala-P+ll- flB- 

A #i- B lB--|l B J'lB- l ll B *l B --PI B BB BBB BBBB1 BB 

■ ■■bbbbb BBai-aBaifaBpBri4lri-P'PI B -fl B + 

-_BB.BB IBB BB ■ r B 1. B B B BB I I 1 1 ll M h B B 

- + " + ■ ■ ■ BBTBBB-I ■ Ml 

, -:-:-:-x-:;::::>:;::x->: ■ >>: w\< >>> 

BBB.BB,fafaa + "farih*PB-faPri faialfall--ll + 

- * BB J BB fa B . i BrB#rB-i 

■ b m. m m mm BBBB pp + pB i Bi p b b b t m m- 4 

t B J B B BB BBBB BBBB-I I- B-I fail! 1-1+4 
J. fl B. B B BB BI.BB JiBJ.BBB BBlhBBB + BB Ii 
fal lll*l|-aaB ,f|BJ.BB.BB bBBB-l I BB ■ 

■ lllllllblllltll PPl»PP B ¥-i"f¥ 
_ b b b I a I mi -fa i a I d hi*_l„l-l.l_lll.,F_l+ - + 

a B B B B B B BB faBBB BBBfal llB- fildd-lli P 

■ BBi ralfaddl-i , J iBd-P B --P B aBBBB-BBBaBBaBBBB hadl i-faPdiB 

bbb BB^-rB-iaa-ai Bd l-l-PI B -ll'l|a BB 4IH B - BB ' BBB ' BBB qaB|pB 
lap r b b i' b b b d b dl a b b- I . I ' ^ f A ' -h 4 + t A h A * ' ^ ' ' ' ' ' ^ ' m '- 

■ a ■ ■ a ■ ■ a ■ bb b i I. j rad-rdhd hi hi III h i h - *■ h J L hd 1 ' ■ - I - 
p P B b b*b'b t b BBBBBaaaaBB BBBBBal-dialditd fald-PI-PII-l-hidd-^ 

___ LB LB LBJ _pBaBBBBBBaB + rBB-aBBBB BB + faldd I ■ T ■ 

hlt + +l + i B ; l'PB'¥ald"P B BBBBBBB BBBJiiBXBBTBB-rr T 1 h - - r ^ 



32K Disk Only THE FINAL FRONTIER 

You have been chosen as rommnnder in a struggle to gain control of an unexplored 
secrion of rhe gala.\y. Your foe: an alien race called VOLSUNG. Here in the disrant 
future, when space rravel has become commonplace, on uncharred srar systems you 
hope to find rhe raw materials which are viral to your indusrry and consrruaion of a 
fleet of space crafr, 

Srarring wirh limited ships and resources, you must quickly search, locare and bring 
needed sysrems under your influence, before the aliens can gain a foothold and rhrearen 
your expansion. 

A smr system can support industry, mining, energy ot farming. You musr decide on 
how to concentrate your efforts to maintain a balance to best serve your needs for 
developing your civilization and producing new space craft. Spacecraft that you will 
surely need when you and the alien VOLSUNGS eventually collide in a titanic struggle 
for the coinirol of the Final Frontier. 

100% hi res, total machine language, disk based. $25.00 




KEYBOARD GENERAL 





Isn't it time for a newsletter/magazine that talks about the games you've been playing.' 
An in-depth resource of playing hints, strategies and tactics? Wouldn't it be nice to whip 
the computer.' 

The Keyboard General is published bi-monthly. We'll publish your letters; your game 
plays, your thoughts and idens. You'll hear from us, our program authors. You'll learn 
gaming, playing and programming hints, and perhaps discover new ways to assault that 
village or attack that flank. 

Every month we'll feature a Company Commander replay; discussion of new and old 
products, and letters from you. There will be special discounts and promotions offered 
only subscribers of the Keyboard General. 

Don't miss ouc! The Keyboard General is filling a great need in the software industry: a 
publication dedicated to discussing those programs you've been playing. Subscribe 
today, and find out how to beat the computer! $ 15.00 year subscription 



32K LUFTFLOTTE - The Battle of Britain 

Player takes the German side and tries to succeed where Goering and the entite Luft- 
waffe failed: destroy Britain's will to fight from the air. 

A mammoth game, Luftflotte has it all. Twenty-four British cities producing one nf six 
war materials: petroleum, armaments, aircraft, shipping, morale, electronics; 26 air 
bases, 18 low radar sites, 17 high radar sites all forming a complex web of inter- 
communication and defense. Can you break the web.' 

Player controls 3 Luftflottcs of over 2000 individual planes including Stuka, Junkers, 
Dornier and Heinkel bombers; Mel 10 and Mel09 fighters. Player may launch bomb 
runs, recon missions, strafing sorties or transfers: up to five flights per Luftflotte. 

Player watches as his flights head for London or Bath or Glasgow or lorad site 'j' or. 
It's up to you. There are 85 individual targets in the game. 

Hi res screen shows aerial combat, bombing and strafing missions and supplies brief 
information. Watch targets and planes explode! Semigraphic strategic map of England 
and targets. For conclusive information, view the intelligence screen to see everything. 
Unless, of course, you prefer playing EXPERT in which case you'll be (lying blind as rhe 
real Germans did not so long ago. 

Playing time: 3-fc hours. Game save. Machine language. $29.00 



ARK ROYAL GAMES 

P.O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 786-8603 




Prices include shipping io U.S.. APO's. and Canada. COD's (USA only) add $3.75. Florida resident* 
add 5% sales tax. All orders shipped within 2*i hours ProgrDms require Color Computer (Tandy 
Corp.). Dc sure to stmc system when ordering. 



Dnbiodnaino 




ORAM 



THE MEMORY TANDY LEFT OUT 



a 



mm 



HARbblSK 



For the serious OS9 user, we offer Turbo Hard Disk, a half height 10 or 20 
megabyte blazing fast hard disk with incredible storage capacity. Installed 
in an industrial quality fan cooled enclosure with oversized power supply 
with room and power for 4 half height drives (hard or floppy). 

Turbo Hard Disk comes complete ready to run. Order OS9 Level 1 or 2 on 
your COCO 1, 2, or 3. 

10 megabytes . . . $599.95 ... 20 megabytes . . . $699.95 

(C.O.D. Cash/Certified check only) 




EEC 




SPEECH SYSTEMS COMMITMENT TO THE COCO 



We are proud to offer TURBO RAM to our COCO 3 customers. However, rest assured we are 
committed to the COCO 1 and 2 as well as both the tape and disk user. We will continue to 
offer you the highest quality products. A few are under development that will knock your socks 
off. So stay tuned. 




TURB 



ram: 



$119.95 



TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3 



t> 5I2K Fast High Quality Memory. 

t> Super Easy Solderless Installation. Installs in minuies. 

t> Assembled, lesied, and burnecl-in 

t> Gold Conneciors assure ultra high reliability. 

t> High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreened PC Board. 

t> Ideal tor OS9 Level II 

j> 2 Year Warranty. 

t> Free CIME Chip Technical Specs {$10.00 without Turbo Ram). 

t> Free 512K Ram Test Program (£10.00 without Turbo Rom). 

t> Free MUSICA RAM Disk ($ 10.00 without Turbo Rani). 




t> $5 OFF TURBO RAM Disk. 

t> Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. 



$69.95 




INSTALLATION 

h you know how lo hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you cm 
install Turbo Ram in minuies. However, if you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pay the return 
postage and guarantee il lor I year. . . $15.00 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

If tor any reason you wish lo return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 15 days and be charged only a 10% reslocking charge. You 
may keep the CIME CHIP Technical Specs, 512K Ram Test program 
and MUSICA RAM DISK, a $30 value. 



TURBO RAM DISK 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning last Ram Disks to your COCO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" for fast access. Single disk system users can 



use TURBO RAM DISK lo easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 512K Turbo Charged COCO 3 . . . . $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM . . $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is ihe most comprehensive modem package for the COCO 3. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full supporl of the onto answer/auto 
dial feature tor boih Kiyes compatible and some Radio Shack moderns is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of oflemused passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE II 

This greal Word Processor can take mil advantage of the 80 column display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 20 line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and morel 

Disk $49.95 



We.KCept CASH, CHECK. COD, VISA .nul MASTER CARD orrk-fN 
Shipping and handling US ond Coiud.i S I 00 

Shipping and handling ouKide the US .md Con.id.i S1U0 
COD Choree . . S_'.O0 

Illinois residenis .idd G'/i".. s.ilcs u\ 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land oi Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest lo discover the source of 
magic in the Land of Zanlh. This intriguing adventure fealures over 2 
dozen hi-res 16 color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effecls. The lb color, 320 x 192 graphics look greal. 
Disk . . . . $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same junior you've seen in ihe Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless lillle monkey musl overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens worth) to rescue his falher, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before he finally meets 
with his big daddy The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics are superb. 
Disk . , < , . $34.95 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 



C/ P L BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

^pEECFL <^>ij^LEHl± (312) 879-6880 




TM 



of* 

Coco 



I 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



All Voice* On 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



LEGE 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



Block delete 









-lA^ 5 



\ 



LEGEND 



00110111 




I 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to- 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware 



Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels 

Transpose music to any key. 
Modify music to any tempo. 
Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose. 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 



Solo capability 
Block edits are highlighted. 
Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
\* Name of note pointed to is constantly 
displayed. 

Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece. 
Help menu makes manual virtually 
unnecessary. 

LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 
Music easily saved to tape or disk. 
Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 



LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 



$54.95 



LYRA OPTIONS 



These LYRA options are no! required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(T or D) #LC164 , $14.95 

LYRA STEREO ENHANCER 

Gives the LYRA stereo output when used with 

the STEREO PAK or ORCHESTRA 90. 

(T or D) #LS149 . . $14.95 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 
A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 ( $19.95 



WeocceplCASh. CHECK, COD, VJSA and MASTER CARD orders. 
Skipping and handling US and Canada . , . S3. 00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada SS.00 

COD Charge . ... $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/j% sales tax. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(T or D) #LS1 77 $19.95 

STEREO PAK 

Plugs into the COCO ROM cartridge slot allow- 
ing easy connection to your stereo system. 
#SP193 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Edilor 
A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 800 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a irademark of Radio Shack. 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



FILE EDIT hlDI hlSC 



^ 1 n : n 



f^l i& fo 



MIDI Instruments: 



0 
2 
4 

6 
8 
A 

C 
E 



LiiO 1 Brass 1 

006 Piano 3 

013 E Organ 5 

003 Trunpet 7 

018 Oboe 9 

021 Vibrphn B 

025 Clavier D 

043 Snaredr F 



005 
009 
014 
016 
019 
026 
032 
045 



S 1 r i 119 
Gui t ar 
P Organ 
Flute 
Clarnet 
Harpsch 
T i Rpan i 
Percusn 







Li 


t ' , j 




JH|flm\uiv\m' 





Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



^ Supports 16 Track recording and playback. 
^ Adjustable tempo 

V Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible). 

^ Record to any track. 

V Low Level track editing. 

V LYRA editing, (one voice per track). 
Playback from any number of tracks. 

^ Quantizing to Vie, V32, Yq* intervals. 



V Filter out MIDI data: ^ 

Key pressure Contro1 Chan 9e 

Program change Channel Pressure 

Pitch wheel System Message 

Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

Adjustable Key (Transposition). 

V Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing. 

V Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE 



Sequencer features. 

^ 100% machine code. 

"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

Metronome 

Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 
DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 
TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 



DX LIBRARIAN 



TM 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

•HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 




Two Years In Ihe Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice pri nts 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPERVOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 



* Dl A KJ ft/ r\tr ^ 



BLANK OISK • - 

OR TAPE > 
WITH f VERY 
ORO£R 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



-//- 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada S3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada S5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V»% sales tax 



Speech System* 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALI ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 



WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 




SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






suPtfl vmct 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Device 


SSI 263 


SC-01 


SP-256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 




- 


• 


■ 


Volume levels 










Articulation Rales 


— 


1 


I 1 


1 


Vocal Tract 
Filter Settings 


29ft 


1 


i 




Basic unit 
ol Speech 


4 AJfAllQnt MCft 


64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pilch Variations 


401* M2 Ifciotutt *MU 
•Hll 0 miifiliHii IptttM) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 



Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 





LIGATION NOTES 





Presidents Take Precedence 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This month, for a change of pace, 
we are presenting a Social Stud- 
ies program to help students 
become more familiar with our U.S. 
presidents. Our main problem in devel- 
oping this program was how to present 
the material. This was more an educa- 
tional problem than one of program- 
ming. 

We found that many junior high 
school and even some high school 
students who field-tested our ideas were 
totally unfamiliar with close to a dozen 
of our presidents. Some of our less 
popular presidents had completely 
eluded these students 1 school careers. 
We hope to remedy that deficit. 

The easiest way of presenting the 
presidents would have been to match 
their names with their order of presi- 
dency, for example, "James Monroe-5, 
Zachary Taylor- 12," and so on through 
the list. The problem with this approach 
is that only a person with both an 
excellent memory and anextreme inter- 

Steve Blyn leaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



est in the topic could possibly succeed 
in such a program. We met no such 
interested individual. 

We decided, therefore, on the ap- 
proach of asking which president came 
before the one in the question. We give 
a president's name and his years of 
presidency. The student is then asked to 
choose which of three other presidents 
immediately preceded the one in ques- 
tion. 

The three choices are randomly se- 
lected. We could have modified the 
program to select three other presidents 
who were in a close time-frame to the 
president in question, but we purposely 
did not do this. We felt this would be 
too difficult. Being randomly chosen, 
one of the three usually turns out to be 
obviously incorrect. For example, Rea- 
gan would be a silly choice for the 
president who preceded Truman. 

This feature serves to give an alert 
student an edge in figuring out the 
correct answer. He can reduce the 
possibilities often to two and sometimes 
even to one. This process of elimination 
helps reinforce the student's knowledge 
of the presidents. On the other hand, the 
student who is really lost in this game 
will not be able to benefit by even two 
obviously incorrect choices. 



The programming of this game is 
quite straightforward. There have been 
40 presidents, and this is reflected in the 
DIMENSION statement in Line 40. Lines 
50-70 read all of the presidents' names 
and years in office. These are contained 
in the DATfi lines beginning with Line 
390. 

Lines 1 20-220 select and print out the 
question and the three choices. Variable 
X keeps track of the correct answer. 
Lines 230-250 prevent any duplication 
of names. Line 290 asks forthe student's 
answer, which becomes variable A. 
Lines 310-320 check and print out the 
correct answer. Line 330 prints out the 
current scoreboard. Line 340 prints out 
the final score. Line 350 asks if you 
would like to go again. If the ENTER key 
is pressed, the game begins again. If the 
E key is pressed, the game is ended. 

We hope that those of you who use 
this program in a classroom as well as 
those who use it at home will enjoy 
playing this game. While we do not 
really expect or even hope that anyone 
will memorize all of the presidential 
information, wedo expect that each will 
learn more factual information on his 
own level about some of our presidents. 
As always, 1 enjoy hearing from readers 
about my articles and programs. □ 



46 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Only NRI teaches you to service all computers 
as you build your own fully IBM 
compatible microcomputer 



With computers firmly established in 
of fices — and more and more new 
applications being developed for every 
facet of business— the demand for 
trained computer service technicians 
surges forward. The Department of 
Labor estimates that computer service 
jobs will actually double in the next ten 
years—a faster growth rate thai for any 
other occupation. 

Total systems training 

No computer stands alone. . . 
it's part of a total system. And if 
you want to learn to service and repair 
computers, you have to understand 
computer systems. Only NRI includes a 
powerful computer system as part of 
your training, centered around the new, 
fully IBM-compatible Sanyo 880 Series 
computer. 

As part of your training, you'll build 
this highly rated, 16-bit, IBM-compatible 
computer system. You'll assemble 
Sanyo's "intelligent" keyboard, 
install the power supply and disk 
drive and interface the high- 
resolution monitor. The 880 
Computer has two operating 
speeds: standard IBM speed 
of 4.77 MHz and a remarkable 
turbo speed of 8 MHz. It's con- 
fidence-building, real-world 
experience that includes training 
in programming, circuit design 
and peripheral maintenance. 

No experience necessary— 
NRI builds it in 

Even if you've never had any previous 
training in electronics, you can succeed 
with NRI training. You'll start with the 
basics, then rapidly build on them to 
master such concepts as digital logic, 
microprocessor design, and computer 
memory. You'll build and test advanced 
electronic circuits using the exclusive 
NRI Discovery Lab®, professional digital 
multimeter, and logic probe. Like your 
computer, they're all yours to keep as 




Your NRI Lola I systems training Includes alio! 
this: NRI Discovery Lab' to design and modify circuits * 
Four t unction digital multimeter with walk -you- through instruction 
on audio tape • Digital logic probe for visual examination ol 
computer circuits • Sanyo 860 Series Computer with "intelligent" 
keyboard and 360K double-denslly, double-sided disk drive 
■ High resolution monochrome monitor • BK ROM, 256 K 
RAM ■ Bundled software Including GW BASIC, MS DOS, 
WordStar, Ca teSta r • Ret ere nee ma nua Is , schematics, M 
and bite sized lessons. M 




NRI is the only 
technical school that 
trains you on a total 

computer system. 
You'll install and 
check keyboard, 
power supply, disk 
drive, and monitor, 
following ste -by- 
step directions. 



part of your 
training- You even 
get some of the 



most popular software, including WordStar, 
CalcStar, GW Basic and MS DOS. 



Send for 100-page free catalog 

Send the coupon today for NRI's 100- 
page, f ulkolor catalog, with all the facts 
about at-home computer training. Read 
detailed descriptions of each lesson, 
each experiment you perform. See each 
piece of hands-on equipment you'll work 
with and keep. And check out NRI 
training in other high-tech fields such 
as Robotics, Data Communications, 
TV/ Audio/ Video Servicing, and more. 



SEND COUPON TODAY FOR FREE NRI CATALOG! 




SCHOOLS 



McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 
3939 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016 

We'll give you tomorrow. 



205-027 



For Career courses 
approved under Gl Bill 

□ check tor devils 



Ef CHECK ONE FREE CATALOG ONLY 

□ Computer Electronics 

□ TV/AudioA/ideo Servicing 

□ Satellite Electronics 

□ Robotics & Industrial Control 

□ Data Communications 



Name (Pioase print) 



□ Industrial Electronics 

□ Communication Electronics 
Q Electronic Design Technology 

□ Telephone Servicing 

I] Digital Electronics Servicing 

Q Basic Electronics 

□ Electricians 



□ Appliance Servicing 

□ Small Engine Repair 

□ Air Conditioning, Heating, & 
Refrigeration 

□ Locksmithing & Electronic Security 

□ Building Construction 

□ Automotive Servicing 

□ Photography 

□ Bookkeeping & Accounting 



i 



Ago 



Street 



C ly.'SMtc'Zhrj 



Accredited by tfie Manorial Homa Study Council 



The listing: PRE5DNT5 



1)3 REM 11 PRESIDENTIAL QUIZ 11 

2j3 REM 11 STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER IS LAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1987" 

3)3 Q=RND( -TIMER) 

4J25 DIM A$(4)3) ,B$(4J2S) 

5) 3 FOR T=l TO 4 j3 

6) 3 READ A$(T) ,B$(T) 
7 J25 NEXT T 

8)3 G$=STRING$(32,255) 
9j3 CLS5 

I) 3)3 PRINT@32," CORRECT = ff ;CR ff 

WRONG = ";WR 

II) 3 R=RND(38)+1 

12)3 PRINT@ 6 , ,f presidential quiz 



WHICH PRESIDENT 



13) 3 PRINT@96," 
CAME BEFORE 11 

14) 3 PRINT@16)3,G$; :PRINT@352,G$; 

15) 3 PRINT@128,A$(R) ;" ff ;B$(R) 

16) 3 X=RND(3) 

17) 3 P=RND(4)3) 

18) 3 PRINT@194," 
N PRINT A$(R-1) 

19) 3 P1=RND (4)3) 
2)3)3 PRINT @2 5 8," 



1. 11 ; :IF X=l THE 
ELSE PRINTA$(P) 



2. 



ti 



:IF X=2 THE 



N PRINTA$(R-1) ELSE PRINT A$ (PI) 

21) 3 P2=RND(4)3) 

22) 3 PRINT@322," 3 . M ; :IF X=3 THE 
N PRINTA$(R-1) ELSE PRINTA$(P2) 

23) 3 IF P=R THEN 11)3 

24) 3 IF P1=P OR P1=R THEN 11)3 

25) 3 IF P2=P1 OR P2=P OR P2=R THE 
N 11)3 

26) 3 PRINT@2 2 2,CHR$ (2)37)+CHR$ (2)37 

) ; 

27) 3 PRINT@286,CHR$ (2)37) +CHR$ (2)37 

) ; 

28) 3 PRINT@35)3,CHR$ (2)37) +CHR$ (2)37 



^JiNVShJJrv-g potato 

RGB VIDEOSoT^r 



.white: »r creen characters on a 
black screen-plus normal green 
screen-switch selectable 

.no special software 

.HI-RES GRAPHICS 

. ADD SS.00 SHIPPING & HANDLING 

INVENTIVE SOLUTIONS 

BOX 286 
STANFOUDVlLLE ,N. Y. 
( 9 ] ^ ) S 28 UUSU 1250b 



.USING THE COCO AS A DEVELOPMENT 
SYSTEM 

.HIDDEN MODEM 

. MONOCHROME VIDEO DRIVER-U'HITE 
CHARACTERS ON A BLACK SCREEN 

.COMPOSITE VIDEO DRIVER 

, PARALLEL PORTS 

.D/A A/D CONVERTERS 

.ELECTRONIC FLEA-MARKET (PARTS) 

.AND MUCH MORE 

DEAL DIRECT WITH MANUFACTURER 

SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG 
OR INFORMATION 



) ; 

29)3 PRINT@384, 11 11 ; : LINEINPUT 11 ENTE 
R A NUMBER. . . 11 ;AA$ 

3) 3)3 A=VAL ( AA$) 

31) 3 IF A=X THEN PRINT @ 4)3 4 , "CORRE 
CT" : CR=CR+1 : PLAY" L5)3CDE FGGGGGEC 11 

32) 3 IF AOX THEN PRINT@4)34 , 11 SORR 
Y,";X:SOUND 1)3)3 , 2 : SOUND 1)3)3, 2sWR 
=WR+1 

3 3)3 PRINT@32, ff CORRECT = " ;CR" 

WRONG =";WR; 
3 4)3 IF CR+WR=2)3 THEN PLAY 11 03L2)3)3 
BAGBAGGGGABGFEDC 11 :PRINT@455, "fin 
al score= ff CR*5; ff % ff ; : CR=)3 : WR=)3 

35) 3 PRINT@484, "press ENTER to co 
ntinue" ; 

36) 3 EN$=INKEY$ 

37) 3 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 9)3 ELSE 
IF EN$= !, E" THEN END ELSE 36)3 

38) 3 END 

39) 3 DATA GEORGE WASHINGTON, 17 89- 

1797 , JOHN ADAMS, 1797-18)31, THOMAS 
JEFFERSON, 18)31-18)39, JAMES MADIS 
ON, 18)39-1817, JAMES MONROE , 18 17 -1 
825, JOHN QUINCY ADAMS , 1825-1829 

4) 3)3 DATA ANDREW JACKSON, 18 2 9-183 
7, MARTIN VAN BUREN, 1837-1841 , WIL 
LIAM H. HARRISON, 1841-1841, JOHN 
TYLER, 1841-1845, JAMES POLK, 1845- 
1849, ZACHARY TAYLOR, 1849-18 5)3 , MI 
LLARD FILLMORE, 18 5)3-1853 , FRANKLI 
N PIERCE, 1853-18 5 7, JAMES BUCHANA 
N, 1857-1861 

41) 3 DATA ABRAHAM LINCOLN , 18 61-18 
65, ANDREW JOHNSON , 1865-18 69 , ULYS 
SES S. GRANT ,1869-1877, RUTHERFOR 
D B. HAYES, 18 7 7-18 81, JAMES GARFI 
ELD, 1881-1881, CHESTER A. ARTHUR, 
1881-1885 

42) 3 DATA GROVER CLEVELAND, 1885-1 
889, BENJAMIN HARRISON, 1889-1893, 
GROVER CLEVELAND, 1893-1897, WILLI 
AM MCKINLEY, 1897-19)31, THEODORE R 
OOSEVELT , 19)31-19 )39 , WILLIAM H. TA 
FT, 19)39-1913 ,WOODROW WILSON, 1913 
-1921 

43) 3 DATA WARREN G. HARDING, 19 21- 
1923, CALVIN COOLIDGE , 192 3 -19 29 , H 
ERBERT C. HOOVER, 192 9-193 3, FRANK 
LIN D. ROOSEVELT, 1933-1945, HARRY 

S. TRUMAN, 1945-1953, DWIGHT D. E 
ISENHOWER, 1953-1961 

44) 3 DATAJOHN F. KENNEDY, 1961-196 
3, LYNDON B. JOHNSON , 1963-1969 , RI 
CHARD NIXON, 19 69-1 9 7 4, GERALD FOR 
D, 1974-1977, JIMMY CARTER, 1977-19 
81, RONALD REAGAN, 1981-PRESENT ^ 



48 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



GRAPHICS UTILITY 




Colored text, lowercase letters, 
text with graphics and more! 








CoCo 

Bright 



By David C Billen 



Color Text is a machine lan- 
guage utility that gives your 
CoCo something it really needs: 
a better text display. More specifically, 
Color Text gives colored text, text with 
graphics, redefinable characters and 
lowercase characters. It requires Ex- 
tended Color, Disk BASIC. It runs on a 
16K machine, but can take advantage of 
32K and even 64K. 

To get Color Text up and running, 
enter Listing 1, which contains the 
character set. This program creates a 
file called CHARS. 

Next, you need to enter and run 
Listing 2. Don't worry about merging 
CHARS and CDLRTEXT, since Progload 
combines them for you. 

Now you have a file called CDLR 
TEXT, which is the program. 

To execute CDLRTEXT you should use 
the loader included in Listing 3. If you 
do not want to use the loader, CDLR 




David Billen lives in Nashville, Tenn. 
and is a system software designer for 
Gibson Guitar Corporation. 



TEXT can be executed on a 16K system 
by entering: 

CLEAR200 , &H34FF : LDflDFT COLRTEX 
T":EXEC 

or on a 32K system with the line: 

CLEAR200 , &H74FF : LOADM" COLRTEX 
T",&H4000:EXEC 

The loader is self-explanatory and 
accommodates loading CDLRTEXT into 
the upper RAM bank on a 64K system. 
The program is position independent, 
meaning it can be loaded anywhere in 
memory. 

Color Text is actually so compatible 
with BASIC that there is not much to 
explain. The text is on the PMDDE 4,1 
graphics screen to begin with. The text 
automatically adjusts itself to all graph- 
ics commands, including COLOR, 
SCREEN and PMODE. 

Since, in the Hi-Res modes, Color 
Text uses a 32-by-24 screen, the PRINTS 
function's range has been expanded to 
accommodate this. CL5 has also been 
modified to work with Color Text. 



You can no longer type CL5 followed 
by a number representing the color you 
want the screen to clear to, but you can 
type CLS followed by the ASCII code 
of a character you want the screen 
cleared with. So, for example, CL542 
would fill the screen with asterisks and 
home the cursor. 

There are also several control charac- 
ters that affect the display. 

A list of control characters follows: 

Character Function 

4 — Toggles scroll lock. (Scroll 
lock keeps the screen from 
scrolling up when a charac- 
ter is printed at the bottom.) 

6 — Inverts the character at the 
current cursor location, 
without updating the posi- 
tion of the cursor. 

11 — Inverts the screen. 

12 — Clears the screen. 

27 — Terminates Color Text. 

Of course, the standard characters 8 
and 13 do their thing too. 

There really is not much more to say! 
Utilizing the full versatility of Color 
Text requires an understanding of 
Extended Color Basic's graphics corn- 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 49 




Micro Smart Inc . says 

what you want to hear. 



MEGADISK PLUS 





MEGAPLEXER 



MEGADISK PLUS 

Drive a hard bargain from 5 
to 40 megabytes of reliable 
high speed systems, the new- 
est technology — hard plated 
media, automatic ECC error 
correcting, fan cooling, EMI/ 
RFI filter, gold connectors 
thoroughly burned in and 
tested just to mention a few 
standard features. Both fixed 
platter and removeable car- 
tridge systems available start- 
ing at a low 

$499.95 




MEGAPLEXER— 
NETWORK YOUR 
MEGADISK WITH UP TO 
10 TRS/80 COMPUTERS 

Attach 2 to 10 Model III/IV/4P 
computers to one megadisk 
through our easy to use me- 
gaplexer— share files, data, 
programs, and make more ef- 
ficient use of one megadisk 
with up to 10 computers. For 
a novice or expert. It will op- 
erate right out of the box. 

Four port systems 
start at a low 
$399-95 Plus Cables. 



RWBKS 1-800-343-8841 



Megadisk™ Hard Disk Drive Systems 



For the IBM/PC, Tandy 1000, TRS/80 Models I/III/4/4P, Compaq, Tava. PC Workalikes, Color Computer, Heath/Zenith, Max/80 
Complete with Hardware, Cables, Software and Quikfit Installation 



5 Megabyte Removable Cartridge Drive 
10 Megabyte Removable Cartridge Drive 
10 Meg Internal Mount IBM/Tandy 1000 
20 Meg Internal Mount IBM/Tandy 1000 
5 Mb External Cartridge System 



Starting at $399.95 

Starting at $599.95 

.... Starting at $349.95 

Starting at $449.95 

Starting at $499.95 

10 Megabyte External Cartridge System .... VPV Starting at $699 95 

10 Megabyte External System Starting at $549.95 

20 Megabyte External System Starting at $699.95 



Call for 



Floppy Disk Drives, Power Supplies and Cabinets 



Our Disk Drives are UL approved— Our Floppy Drive Cabinets and 
Power Supplies are Underwriters Laboratory Listed and have passed 
the required Federal Communications Part 15 Section B-EMI/RFI test. 
Warranty on all disk drives is one full year parts and labor. Warranty 
on floppy disk drive power supplies is five (5) years. In warranty or 
out of warranty service is 24 hour turn-a-round on all disk drives and 
power supplies. 

Half High Drives 

Dual Sided 40 tk Bare $99.95 

In Case with Power Supply $139.95 

Dual Drive in One Cabinet $239.95 

Apple/Franklin Disk Drives 

35/40 Track in Case with Cable and Software $129.95 



Call for our un advertised CoCo Specials 




Model 111/4 floppy disk 
drive upgrade kits 

Our kits, which are a snap to install, 
just need a screwdriver and about 
1 hour of 9pare time to have dual 
sided drives, just like the 4D. They 
will operate single and dual $id&d. 
Just ask us how— It's easy, even 
for the beginner. 

With one dual sided drive, floppy 
controller, heavy duty power supply 
(No lightweight stuff) all cables, In- 
structions, and our expe^i ieshjnteal 
staff to assist you. . . .£289.95 
Want a 3flC0n-o drive? 599.95 



See our Outstanding Service Promise on 

the preceding pages! 




Terms and Conditions: 

The prices quoted here are for cash. We will accept MasterCard, VISA, 
Discover and American Express. Please ask for details. 

COD's are accepted without any deposit. Purchase orders accepted based 
on prior approval, call for details. 

Our hours are from 9:30 am to 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday and until 
4:00 on Saturday. 

Our telephone number of technical service is 617-872-9090. 



Addresses: 
Wholesale/Mailorder 
200 Homer Avenue 
Ashland, MA 01721 



Retail Outlet 

271 Worcester Road 

Framingham, MA 01701 



Not responsible for typographical errors. Terms and specifications may 
change without nolice. 



Trademarks: 
IBM Corp. 
Montezuma Micro 
Tava 

Eagle Computer 

© 1987 Micro Smart, Inc. 



Keytronics Corp. 
Tandy Corp. 
Zenith Corp. 
Lotus Developmenl 
Microsoft Inc. 




Color computer 
drive kit 

Drive 0 and 1 
Our dual headed drive al- 
lows you to write on both 
sides just as though you 
had two floppy drives. Our 
special DOS 1.A will even 
lei you use Radio Shack 
DOS 1.0 and 1.1 in dual 
sided mode. 
Specially priced at 
$219.95 



Toll Free 
Ordering 

1-800-343-8841 




J 



SMART 



INC. 



200 Homer Avenue 
Ashland, MA 01721 
1-617-872-9090 



Hours: Mon.—Fri. 9:30 am to 5:30 pm (est) Sat. 4:00 pm 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



FULLY WARRANTEED 

FIFTEEN MONTHS 
PARTS AND LABOR! 



Figure 1 



PMODE 0, 2 or 4 
i £ 3 A E- 6 ? 8 



PMODE 1 or 3 
iL £ -4 -4 



r. r. 




1 







1 




















n 


r 










— ffilly 













































The letter 'A' in its 8-by-8 grid. The character 
appears just as it was designed when printed in the 
two-color modes. But bits 2, 4, 6 and 8 are doubled 
in the four-color modes. 



Figure 2 

CHARACTERS 153-255 

a r °i m b» i 

6 ♦ X C ~ □ II 
I ~ A V ► < I 

□ I E 3 H 5 E 



5 i> 



+ ♦ * + V 



^ = =U II r =n A _ 

■ ' : * rf , X . "I- • 



naSRECDE 
2 * * q 'L \ & | 



in i ;-ir- m i a n n m n 



= r s 



■ ■ ■ ■ 
• ■ ■ ■ 



[r # □ 



r 



(Most of these are not legible in the four-color modes.) 



mands. Color Text automatically ad- 
justs to the current and active page, 
mode, screen, color, etc. 

The character definer utility was 
designed to be as self-explanatory as 
possible. Notice that no matter how you 
boot Color Text, the definer reboots it 
in the I6K mode. This also means you 
don't need to boot it before running the 
definer. 

The purpose of the character definer 
is to create and modify characters to 
your own likes/ needs. The menu has an 
option to save them and an option to 
save as loader. As a rule, when you are 



working on a character set, you should 
save them. Then, to actually use the 
character set, select "save as loader." 
You are asked for the name. This file 
will actually be Color Text, both pro- 
gram and character set. If you want to 
use the boot program to load it, you will 
have to save it with the name COLR 
TEXT, or modify the boot program. 

The menu also has an option to warm 
boot and cold boot. Warm booting 
simply terminates Color Text. A cold 
boot leaves your computer in the state 
it's in when you first turn it on. 

If you select Design, you will first 



select the character to be modified. 
When selected, its image is brought up 
on a big PMODE0,1 screen. To alter it, 
move the blinkingcursor with thearrow 
keys. Press the space bar to toggle the 
color of a block. Press enter when 
finished, or CLEAR to abort. 

Here comes the trickiest thing there 
is to know about Color Text. When it 
prints the characters in a four-color 
mode, it only looks at (from left to right) 
the second, fourth, sixth and eighth bits. 
In a two-color mode it uses all of them. 
Your character set must be designed 
accordingly. □ 



180 
270 
380 
480 
580 
700 



251 
.83 
115 
182 
.14 
253 



820 23 

930 114 

1040 149 

1140 138 

END 126 



Listing 1: CHRRLORD 

1) 3 PMODE)3 , 1 : PCLEAR1 : CLEAR5)3 , &H3 8 
7F:X=&H388)3 

2) 3 READA:IFA<>999THENPOKEX,A:X=X 
4-1 : GOT02 0ELSES AVEM" CHARS " , &H3 8 8 J3 
, &H3FFF, &H35)3)3 

1)3)3 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255 
,2 55,2 55, 2)37,2)37,2)37, 2)37,2 55,2)37 
, 255, 255 



11) 3 DATA 
,255 ,255 , 
,255 

12) 3 DATA 
,239,255, 
, 187 ,255 

13) 3 DATA 
,239,255, 
255, 255 

14) 3 DATA 

, 2 5 5 , 2 5 5 , 
,255,255 

15) 3 DATA 

, 255 , 255 , 
, 255, 255 

16) 3 DATA 

, 63 , 255,2 



179, 179, 179,255,25 5., 255 
183 ,18 3,1,18 3,1,18 3,18 3 

23 9, 131, 175,131,23 5,131 
187 , 187 ,243,239,239, 155 

23 9 , 131, 175,13 5, 17 5, 131 
2)37 , 63, 255,255,2 55,255, 

243, 239, 239, 239, 239, 243 
159,239,239,239,239, 159 

255, 147 ,239, 131, 239, 147 
2 55, 239, 239, 13 1,239, 239 

255, 2 55,2 55,2 55,2)37, 14 3 
55,25 5, 255,131,255, 255, 



52 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



255 ,255 

170 DATA 255,255,255,255 



,255,255,243 
55, 255 

180 DATA 199 

,255,255,207 

,255,255 

190 DATA 131 

,255,255,13.1 

,255, 255 

200 DATA 179 

,255, 255,131 

,255,255 

210 DATA 131 

,255,255,131 

,255,255 

220 DATA 131 

,255,255,131 

,255, 255 

230 DATA 207 

,255,255,207 

,255,255 

240 DATA 243 



243 

179 
143 

243 
243 

179 
191 

191 
179 

179 
179 

207 
207 

231 



25 5, 2 55, 2 55, 131, 2 55, 131, 255, 255, 
255, 255 



231 

179 
207 

131 
227 

131 
143 

131 
243 

131 
131 

255 
255 



159 

179 
207 

191 
243 

243 
243 

179 
231 

179 
243 

207 
239 



255,207 
63 , 63 , 2 



179 
207 

179 
179 



243 
179 

179 
231 

179 
179 

207 
207 



199 
135 

131 
131 



243 
131 

131 
231 

131 
131 

255 
191 



31,207,231,243 , 



241,231,207,159 
243 ,239,239,255 



179 , 191, 179, 131 
131, 179,179,179 



250 DATA 159,207 
,255,255 , 131, 179 
,239,255 

260 DATA 131,187 
,255,255,207, 179 
,255,255 

270 DATA 7,179,135,179,179,7,255 
,2 55,199, 179,191,191, 179,199,255 
,255 

280 DATA 7,179,179,179,179,7,255 
,2 55, 3, 19 1,14 3, 191, 179, 3, 255, 255 
290 DATA 3,191,143,191,191,31,25 
5,255,131,179,191, 179 ,187,131, 25 
5, 255 

300 DATA 179,179,131,179,179,179 
,255, 255 , 199 , 239 ,2 39 , 2 39 ,2 39 , 199 
,255,255 

310 DATA 131,243,243,51,179,195, 
255, 255,51,179, 143 , 179 , 179 ,51,25 
5, 255 

320 DATA 63,191,191,191,179,3,25 
5, 255,179, 147,171, 187 , 179, 179,25 
5, 255 

330 DATA 7,179,179,179,179,179,2 
55,255,131,179,179, 179 , 179 , 131 , 2 
55,255 

340 DATA 3,179,131,191,191,31,25 
5,255,131, 179,179,179,135,251,25 
5, 255 

350 DATA 3,179,135,179,179,51,25 



5, 255, 131, 19 1,131, 251, 147, 13 1,25 
5,255 

360 DATA 3,207,207,207,207,207,2 
55,255,179,179, 179,179,179,207,2 
55,255 

370 DATA 179 
,255,255, 179 



, 179 , 


179 , 


, 179, 


179, 


, 147 , 


239 , 


,179, 


, 199, 


, 243 , 


207, 


, 191 , 


, 191, 


, 191, 


159, 


, 251, 


,251, 


,199, 


, 171, 


, 223 , 


, 191, 


,239, 


,255 , 


,131, 


,243 , 



,255,255 
3Sj5 DATA 179 
,255,255,179 
,255,255 
3 90 DATA 131 
,255,255, 131 
,255,255 
400 DATA 191 
,251,255, 131 
,255,255 
410 DATA 239 
,239,239,255 
55,255 

420 DATA 223 
,255,255,255 
,255 ,255 

430 DATA 63,191,191,131,179,131, 
25 5,255, 255,131, 179, 191, 179, 131, 



179, 199, 239 
147,171,187 



239, 147, 179 
239,239, 239 

191,179,131 
191, 191, 131 

231, 251, 251 
251, 251, 131 

239,239, 239 
1,191,223,2 

255,255,255 
131, 179, 131 



TOTHIAN SOFTHARE 



SUBTRACT I OX FROM LIST PRICES THIS MONTH I 

TESTEM I I 

New version! Make multiple choice, matching, 
true/false, completion, short answer te9ts. 
Complete randomize function. Requires printer 
with underline ability. 32K ECB. $19.95 

TEACHER PAK I I 

New version! Four programs. Weighted & regular 
grading, seating charts, alphabetizing, and 
statistics. 16K ECB. $34,95. Will Include 
Testem II tor $47.95. 

COCO GARDENER 

Computerized garden planning. 16K ECB. $19.95 

ECHO PLUS 

Both I6K & 32K versions of Graphic Echo & text 
screen dump for RS dot matrix printers. $19.95 

D I RECTORV 

Keep track of phone numbers, addresses, etc. 
Print address labels. Minimum 16K ECB. $19.95 

I NVENTORY 

Simple home data base. Minimum 16K ECB. $19.95 

Specify tape or disk. Pa. residents add 6% . 
Send check or money order - no cash - to: 

Tothlan Software, Inc. 
Box 663 
Rlmersburg, Pa. 16248 

February 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 



255, 255 

440 DATA 241,243,243,131,179,129 
,255,2 55, 255, 131, 179, 131, 191, 131 
, 255, 255 

450 DATA 15,191,143,191,191,191, 
12 7, 255, 255, 131, 179, 131, 243, 2 43, 
131,255 

460 DATA 63,191,191,131,179,179, 
255,255,207 ,25 5,207,207,207,207 , 
255, 255 

470 DATA 243,255,227,243,243,51, 
3,255,63,191, 179 , 143 , 179 , 179 , 255 
,255 

480 DATA 207,239,239,239,239,199 

,2 55, 255, 255, 147 , 171, 171, 187 , 179 
,255,255 

490 DATA 255,7,179,179,179,179,2 
55 ; 255, 2 5 5, 131, 179, 17 9, 179 ,131,2 
55, 255 

500 DATA 255,3,179,131,191,191,1 
91,255, 255, 129,177 ,13 1,243, 243, 2 
43 ,255 

510 DATA 255,3,187,191,191,191,2 
55,25 5,2 55, 131,191, 131,2 51, 131,2 
55, 255 

520 DATA 239,239,131,239,239,239 
,2 55,2 55 , 2 55 , 179 , 179 , 179 , 179 , 131 
,255 ,255 

530 DATA 255,179,179,179,199,239 
,255,255,255, 179, 179,187,171, 147 
,255,255 

540 DATA 255,179,179,199,179,179 
,25 5,2 55,255,179, 179, 131,2 4 3,243 
, 131,255 

550 DATA 255,131,243,231,207,131 
,255,2 5 5,2 31,207 ,207,207,191,207 
,207,207 

560 DATA 239,239,239,255,239,239 
,239 ,2 55 , 63 , 159 , 159 , 15 9, 2 3 9, 159 , 
159 , 159 

570 DATA 191,87,239,255,255,255, 
255,255,255,2 5 5,2 55,2 55,25 5,2 55, 
255, 255 

580 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,15,15,15,15 

590 DATA 0,0,0,0,240,240,240,240 

,0,0, 0,0, 255, 2 55, 255, 255 

600 DATA 15,15,15,15,0,0,0,0,15, 

15,15,15,15,15,15,15 

610 DATA 15,15,15,15,240,240,240 

,240,15 ,15,15,15,2 55,2 55,2 5 5,2 55 

620 DATA 240,240,240,240,0,0,0,0 

,2 40,240,240,240, 15 , 15 , 15 , 15 

630 DATA 240,240,240,240,240,240 

,240,240,240,240, 240,240, 2 55, 2 55 

, 255, 255 

640 DATA 255, 2 55, 255, 2 55,0,0,0,0 
, 255, 2 55 , 25 5, 255 , 15 , 15 , 15 , 15 



650 DATA 255,255,255,255,240,240 
,240,240,255,2 55,2 55,255, 2 55, 255 
, 255,255 

660 DATA 153,153,255,255,126,129 
,255,2 55 ,153 , 153 ,2 55,255,0, 255,2 
55,255 

670 DATA 153,153,255,255,255,129 
,12 6, 255, 255, 251, 253, 0,253, 251, 2 
55,255 

680 DATA 255,223,191,0,191,223,2 
55,255,239,19 9,171,239,239, 239,2 
39, 239 

690 DATA 239,239,239,239,239,171 
, 199,2 3 9,7,17,18,18,17,13 5, 207,3 
700 DATA 195,231,195,133,133,133 
, 133 , 19 5, 255 , 199 , 143 , 143 , 14 3 , 199 
,255,255 

710 DATA 255,231,103,1,0,231,231 
,255,2 3 9,199,131,1,131,199,2 3 9,2 
55 

720 DATA 199,199,1,1,1,239,239,2 
39, 239, 19 9, 13 1,1,1, 13 1,239, 239 
730 DATA 187,1,1,1,131,199,239,2 
55, 255, 255, 255, 255, 2 55, 255, 255, 2 
55 

740 DATA 254,253,251,199,155,139 
,131, 199, 255, 255, 195, 12 9,0, 12 9,1 
95,255 

750 DATA 126,189,219,231,231,219 
,189,12 6,0,12 7, 127, 127,127 ,12 7,0 

760 DATA 0,255,255,255,255,255,0 
,0,0, 252, 252, 252, 252, 252, 0,0 
770 DATA 115,115,115,115,115,115 
,115,115,244 ,244 ,244,244,247 ,2 40 
,240,255 

780 DATA 255,255,255,0,255,0,0,2 
55, 244, 2 44, 244, 4, 252, 0,0, 255 
790 DATA 244,244,244,244,244,244 
,244,2 4 4, 2 55, 255, 2 5 5,240,2 47, 244 
,244,244 

800 DATA 255,255,255,0,252,4,4,2 
44,231,231,0,19 5, 19 5, 18 9, 189, 60 
810 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255 

,255,0, 127,12 7,127,127, 12 7,127, 1 
27,127 

820 DATA 254,254,254,254,254,254 
, 254 ,2 54 ,0, 25 5,255 , 255 , 25 5 , 2 55 , 2 
55,255 

830 DATA 231,231,195,195,129,129 

,0,0, 0,0, 129, 129, 19 5, 195, 231, 231 

840 DATA 63,15,3,0,0,3,15,63,252 

,240,19 2,0,0, 192 ,240,25 2 

850 DATA 199,199,199,199,199,199 

, 199 ,199, 255, 255, 0,0, 0,2 55, 255, 2 

55 

860 DATA 199,191,191,199,255,255 
, 25 5,2 55, 199 , 19 9 , 109 , 171, 19 9 , 19 9 



54 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



,187,125 

870 DATA 255,251,248,121,3,131,1 
87,153,219,219,2 31,2 31,219,189,1 
89,189 

880 DATA 159,127,127,151,247,247 
,241,255,230,213,55,52,55,213,23 
0,255 

890 DATA 255,195,129,129,129,195 
,255,255,255, 195,189, 18 9, 189, 195 
,255,255 

900 DATA 3,123,123,123,123,123,3 
,255, 251, 251, 251, 251, 251, 251, 251 
,255 

910 DATA 3,251,251,3,127,127,3,2 
55, 3, 251, 251, 3, 251, 251, 3, 2 55 
920 DATA 123,123,123,3,251,251,2 
51, 255,3, 127, 127,3 ,251, 251, 3,255 
930 DATA 3,127,127,3,123,123,3,2 

55,3,251,251,251,251,251,251,255 
940 DATA 3,123,123,3,123,123,3,2 
55, 3, 12 3, 12 3, 3, 251, 251, 3, 255 
950 DATA 3,123,123,3,123,123,123 
,255, 3 , 123 , 123 , 7 , 123 , 123 , 3 , 255 
960 DATA 3,127,127,127,127,127,3 
,255,7,123 , 123 , 12 3, 123 , 123 ,7,255 
970 DATA 3,127,127,3,127,127,3,2 
55, 3 , 127 , 127 , 3 , 127 , 127 , 127 ,2 55 
980 DATA 143,239,143,191,143,255 
,255,255,23 9, 199,239,2 55,199,255 
,255,255 

990 DATA 207,207,255,3,255,207,2 
07,255,255,2 55, 159, 102 , 24 9, 25 5, 2 
55, 255 

1000 DATA 255,193,221,28,255,255 
,255,255,239 ,215 , 187 , 124, 2 55, 255 
, 255 ,255 

1010 DATA 239,207,175,96,255,255 
,255,255,12 9, 189,195, 231,2 31,219 
, 129,129 

1020 DATA 234,241,241,234,255,25 
5,255, 255,2 3 9, 195, 17 5, 175, 175, 19 
5,239,255 

1030 DATA 127,131,157,173,181,19 
5,253,255,231,219,219, 231,231,22 
7,231,225 

1040 DATA 127,191,223,235,247,23 
5,253,255,102, 189,231, 66, 66,2 31, 
189, 102 

1050 DATA 54,54,54,54,54,54,54,5 
4,0,255,85, 170,0,255, 85, 170 
1060 DATA 85,85,85,85,85,85,85,8 
5,170, 170, 170, 170, 170, 170, 170,17 

1070 DATA 102,102,102,102,102,10 
2,102, 102,85, 170,85,170,85, 170,8 
5,170 

1080 DATA 85,255,85,255,85,255,8 
5,2 5 5, 170,2 55, 170, 255, 170, 2 55, 17 
0, 255 



1090 DATA 85,0,85,0,85,0,85,0,17 

0,0,170,0,170,0,170,0 

1100 DATA 119,119,119,119,119,11 

9,119,119,187,187,187,187,187,18 

7,187,187 

1110 DATA 68,68,68,68,68,68,68,6 
8 , 13 6, 13 6 , 13 6, 13 6 , 13 6, 13 6, 13 6, 13 
6 

1120 DATA 51,204,51,204,51,204,5 
1,204,15,240, 255,255,15,240, 255, 
255 

1130 DATA 0,1,3,7,15,31,63,127,1 
29, 12 6, 12 6, 12 9, 24, 231,231, 24 
1140 DATA 203,102,60,153,217,189 

,102,203, 187, 17,187,255,2 3 8,68,2 
38,255 

1150 DATA 109,182,219,109,182,21 
9,109,182,51,51,204,204,51,51,20 
4,204 

1160 DATA 204,204,51,51,204,204, 
51,51,119,255,221,255,119,2 55,22 
1,255 

1170 DATA 159,47,15,159,249,242, 
240,249,7,119,119,96,6,23 8,2 3 8,2 
24 

1180 DATA 217,217,217,24,255,24, 
24,217,170,0,170,0,170,0,170,0 
1190 DATA 153,85,102,85,153,85,1 
02,85,0,127,9 6,96,103,103, 103,10 
3 

1200 DATA 219,245,110,220,185,11 
5,39,143 ,255, 12 9, 189, 189, 189, 189 
, 129,255 

1210 DATA 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,255,0,12 
7,127,127,127,127, 127,127,999 



180 . 
310 . 
410 . 
530 . 
END 



.46 
112 
.19 
238 
107 



Listing 2: PROGLORD 

10 PMODE0,1:PCLEAR1:CLEAR50,&H34 
FF:X=&H3500 

20 READA: IFAO999THENP0KEX, A:X=X 
+1:GOTO20 

30 LINEINPUT "PREPARE TO LOAD CH 
ARS, THEN PRESS ENTER" ;A$ 

40 LOADM "CHARS": LINEINPUT "PREP 
ARE TO SAVE";A$ 

50 SAVEM "COLRTEXT" , &H3 500, &H3FF 
F, &H3500 

100 DATA 32,7,56,128,0,0,0,0,0,1 

90,1,104,175,141,0,158 

110 DATA 190,1,107,17 5,141,1,17 8 

,13 4,126,183,1,103,183,1,106,48 

120 DATA 141,0,134,191,1,104,48, 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 55 



141,1,154,191,1, 107,190, 1, 161 
130 DATA 48,4,175,141,2,113,183, 
1,160,48,141,2,9 6,191,1,161 
140 DATA 48,141,2,128,191,1,143, 
183 , 1, 14 2, 111, 140, 18 6, 111, 140, 18 
4 

150 DATA 142,255,192,111,132,111 
,3, 111, 5, 111, 7, 111, 9, 111, 11, 13 4 
160 DATA 248,183,255,34,15,178,1 
34,3,151, 17 9,134,4,151,182,158,1 
86 

170 DATA 48,137,24,0,159,183,134 
,32,151, 18 5,4 8,141,3,2,175, 140 
180 DATA 129,48,141,0,10,166,128 
,39,31,173, 159,160,2,32,246,32 
190 DATA 12,82,65,73,78,66,79,87 
,3 9, 115,3 2,67, 111,108, 111, 114 
200 DATA 32,84,101,120,116,13,13 
,0,57 , 13, 111, 39,3,12 6, 255,255 
210 DATA 50,98,52,118,129,32,37, 
1 36,128,32,198,8,61,227,141,255 
220 DATA 65,31,2,150,178,198,85, 
61,215,181,150, 179,198,85,61,231 
230 DATA 141,255,52,141,40,141,1 
3, 23,0, 16 6, 53, 246, 51, 141, 1,23 
240 DATA 141,8,32,246,51,141,0,1 
1,150, 182,5 2,64,72,23 6,198,227 
250 DATA 225,31,5,0,52,0,67,0,52 
,0,67,0, 116,150,185, 129 
260 DATA 16,39,10,220,136,196,22 
4,141,14,19 6, 31,58,57, 2 20, 136, 19 
6 

270 DATA 240,141,4,196,15,58,57, 

131,4,0,88,73,88,73,88,73 

280 DATA 211,186,31,1,214,137,57 

, 198 , 8 , 16 6, 160, 152, 181, 167 , 132 , 4 

8 

290 DATA 136,16,90,38,244,57,198 
,8,231,141,254,202,166,160,67,13 
2 

300 DATA 85,167,141,254,191,72,1 

70, 141,254, 18 6,31,137 , 148, 181, 16 
7,141 

310 DATA 254,178,83,228,141,254, 

17 6,234,141,2 54,169,2 31, 132,48,1 
36,32 

320 DATA 106,141,254,162,38,214, 
57,198,8, 16 6,160,152,181,167,13 2 
,48 

330 DATA 136,32,90,38,244,57,4,1 

92 ,5,128,5,128,7,0,7,0 

340 DATA 158,136,48,1,159,136,51 

,140,2 37,150,182,7 2,172,198,37,2 

29 

350 DATA 236,198,208,185,130,0,2 
21,13 6,109, 141,2 54,108,38,215,15 
8,186 

360 DATA 150,185,198,8,61,49,139 
,236, 161, 23 7, 129, 16, 156, 18 3, 37, 2 



47 

370 DATA 32,7,142,4,0,159,136,15 
8, 18 6, 166, 141, 254, 74, 167 , 12 8 , 156 
380 DATA 183,37,250,57,13,111,39 
,3,12 6,255,25 5,15,112,50,98,52 
390 DATA 116,141,21,173,159,160, 
0,39,2 50,52,2,141,11,53,2,129 
400 DATA 12,38,3,141,205,79,53,2 
44,23,255,18,19 8,8,99,132,150 
410 DATA 185,48,134,90,38,247,57 
,255,255,255, 2 55,25 5, 255,255,2 55 

420 DATA 161,255,255,255,241,255 
,255,0, 64,2 55,255,255,2 55,0,84,2 
55 

430 DATA 187,0,99,255,255,255,25 
5,255,255,255,255,2 55,2 55,2 55,25 
5,255 

440 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255 
,255,2 55,255,2 5 5, 255,255,255,0,1 
30, 255 

450 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255 
,255,141,6,13 4,32,17 3,159,160,2, 
158 

460 DATA 136,140,4,0,35,4,48,31, 
159, 13 6, 57 , 220, 183 , 14 7, 18 6 , 158 
470 DATA 186,99,128,90,38,251,74 
,38,248,57,220,13 6,219,185,137 ,0 
480 DATA 167,141,253,160,150,185 
,74, 67, 16 7, 14 1,253, 153, 228, 14 1,2 
53, 149 

490 DATA 166,141,253,144,31,1,22 
,255, 11, 174, 14 1,2 54, 49, 191, 1,104 
500 DATA 174,141,255,69,191,1,10 
7,174, 141,0,2 8,48,28,191, 1, 161 
510 DATA 134,57,183,1,142,126,16 
9,40,99, 141, 253 ,108,57,5 2,17,174 
520 DATA 99,140,169,19,39,3,126, 
255,255,52,102, 150,179, 198, 85, 61 
530 DATA 231,141,253,83,166,102, 
31, 138, 38, 55, 23, 2 54, 245, 53, 102 ,5 
3 

540 DATA 17,50,98,57,52,17,174,1 
01,140,185,5,3 9,2,53,14 5,189 
550 DATA 177,198,166,159,0,166,1 

29, 64, 38, 245, 18 9, 17 9, 228, 131, 1,2 
55 

560 DATA 16,131,1,0,34,7,53,17,5 

0,98,126,165,94,198,8,32 

570 DATA 220,189,183,11,192,32,3 

7,194,134,8,61,227,141,253,3,52 

580 DATA 6,142,4,0,159,136,51,14 

1,254,108,150,182,72,17 4,198,4 8 
590 DATA 31,52,16,16,174,98,23,2 
53, 228, 23, 253, 2 00, 158, 13 6, 17 2, 22 
8 

600 DATA 36,5,23,2 54,91,32,236,1 
42,4,0,159, 13 6, 50, 100, 3 2 , 141 
610 DATA 999 



56 THE RAINBOW February 1967 



Challenges Await You In 



Thm Rainbow 



The Second Rainbow Book Of 



r 





^6 



A0 f 



Put your wits and skills to the test with 16 outstanding programs 
from the winners of our Second Simulation Contest. You'll en- 
counter explosive action as the leader of the Rainbow City Bomb 
Squad. As the Master Train Dispatcher, the pressure is intense 
to avoid accidents and keep the trains on time. When all this 
activity seems too much, who ya gonna call? Ghostget- 
ters, of course! Then it's off to CoCo's Bowling Alley for a little 
Monday night relaxation. 



ins 



Plunge into real-life action with: 



Bush Pilot — Danger lurks above the 
canopy of the dense African jungle 

Nereid Countdown — Many different 
skills are needed to launch the 
massive Ezekial into orbit 

Stock Market — Failure or fortune in 
the world of high finance 




Vacation U.S.A. — On the trail of 
adventure through the American 
heartland 
Project Theta — Alone in your fighter, 
you stand before Zygor's invasion 
fleet 

Olympic Decathlon — Qualify in 10 
grueling events 

Our award-winning authors: Curtis Boyle, Peter Brandt, Audrey DeLisle, Bill 
English, Aryeh Glaberson, Floyd Keirnan, Ray Ligocki, Brian Maiorano, Chris 
McKernan, Baron Quintana, Joel Robbins, Charles Santee, Randy Simpson, Bob 
Tyson, E.L. Vasser and Duane Wood. 

All This For Only $9.95! 

And for all the fun without the fuss — 
The Second Rainbow Simulations Tape or Disk 

Save yourself hours of typing listings. Just load these great Simulations into your 
computer and run them. What could be easier? 

The tape or disk is an adjunct and complement to the book. Even if you buy either 
the Second Rainbow Simulations Tape or Disk, you'll want and need the book 
for the introductory material and loading instructions. 

Tape Only $9.95 Disk Only $10.95 



Ptease send: □ The Second Rainbow Book Of Simulations for $9.95* 

□ The Second Rainbow Simulations Tape $9.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Simulations Disk $10.95 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed.* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Exp. Date 

Signature . _ 



Mail to: The Second Rainbow Book ol Simulations, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit cards orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

•Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S., add $4. Allow 6 to B weeks for delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% 
sates tax (or book and tape. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only please. 



Listing 3: BOOT 

10 PCLEAR4 : CLS 

20 PRINT TAB (9);"* COLOR TEXT * ,f 
30 PRINT: PRINT "SELECT LOAD TYPE 
... 11 : PRINT 
40 X=0: RESTORE 

50 READ A$:IF A$<>" . " THEN X=X+1 
: PRINT TAB(7);X;") n ?A$:GOTO 50 
60 DATA TOP OF 16K,TOP OF 32K,UP 
PER RAM, . 

100 A=VAL ( INKEY$ ) : IF A<1 OR A>X 
THEN 100 

110 ON A GOTO 200,300,400 
120 NEW 

200 CLEAR 200 , &H3 4 FF : LOADM "COLR 

TEXT 11 : EXEC : GOTO 120 

300 CLEAR 200, &H7 4 FF : LOADM "COLR 

TEXT" ,&H4000: EXEC: GOTO 120 

400 CLEAR 200,&H7F00 

405 READ A$:IF A$<>" . 11 THEN 405 

410 FOR X=&H7F00 TO &H7F19 : READ 

A$ : A=VAL ( 11 &H"+A$ ) : POKE X , A : NEXT 

420 DATA 34, 01, 1A, 50, 8E, 80, 0,10, 

8E,FF,DE, A6 , 84 , 6F, 21,A7,80 , 6F, 20 

,8C,FF,0,25,F3,35,81 

430 EXEC &H7F00:POKE &HFFDF,0 

440 LOADM "COLRTEXT" , &HAB00 : EXEC 

450 CLEAR 200,&H7FFF 

460 GOTO 120 



107 . 
520 . 
1000 
1210 
END 



221 
.62 
.71 
207 
.80 



Listing 4: DEFINE 



7 PRINTCHR$ (27) ; 11 " ; : POKE&HFFDE , 
0 :CLEAR200, &H3 4FF: LOADM 11 COLRTEXT 
n :EXEC:DIM X, A, Y, A$ , 1$ (7) : DEF FN 
C(A)=&H3 8 80+ ( (A-3 2) *8) 

8 JP$=CHR$(13)+CHR$(8)+CHR$(9)+C 
HR$ (10)+CHR$ (94)+CHR$(12) 



DOUBLE or nUTHlF 

Ve ha ve very , very 
LOV PHI CZJ5S on paper-, 
t~ 1 bbons . dishes. -and 
o t her- supplies. JSJBND 
Jttl jToj- our- F? XJZ^Z^— CZOZ^CDR 
catalog" And we will 
r-arTund a * 2 ct~qcI±-£! 




^monthly special n 

PANASONIC 1090/1/2 
3 6 12 S&H 



50 6 .00 I . 50 



S- FBCNT ST. 
CLAIR, PA 1797$ 



XOIHT OSDEB 
CKECr 



9 F$=CHR$ (254) :E$=CHR$ (255) 

10 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1,1 

20 PMODE 3,1: COLOR 0,1: CLS : COLOR 

2,0 

3(3 PRINT "* Color text - 

11 ;: COLOR 3 ,0 : PRINT 11 
* Character Define Module 11 ; 

40 PMODE 4,1 

5j3 PRINT@128 , "Select. .. " 

60 RESTORE : X=0 : PRINT 

70 READ A$:IF A$<>"." THEN X=X+1 

:PRINT TAB ( 7 ) ,*RIGHT$ (STR$ (X) ,1) ; 

") ";A$:GOTO 1(3 

8(3 DATA Design characters , Save c 
haracter set, Save as loader, Load 
character set, Exit (also CLEAR) 
,Warra boot, Cold boot , Directory , . 
1(3(3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(12) THE 
N A=5 ELSE A=VAL(A$) : IF A<1 OR A 
>X THEN 1(3(3 

1(35 IF A=6 THEN PRINT CHR$(27);: 

EXEC &HA027 ELSE IF A=7 THEN POK 

E &H71,0:EXEC &HA027 

1(37 IF A<>8 THEN 11(3 ELSE COLOR 

(3,1: CLS : SCREEN 1,0:DIR: 

1(38 IF INKEY$=" " THEN 1(38 ELSE 1 

(3 

11(3 IF A=5 THEN COLOR (3,1: CLS : EN 
D 

12 0 IF A=2 THEN GOSUB 200:SAVEM 

NM$,&H3880, &H3FFF,&H3500 

13(3 IF A=3 THEN GOSUB 200:SAVEM 

NM$,&H3500, &H3FFF, &H3500 

14(3 IF A=4 THEN GOSUB 2(3(3: LOADM 

NM$:GOTO 1(3 

15(3 GOTO 5(3(3 

199 ' 

2(3(3 'get and verify a file name 
210 ' 

22(3 PRINT@4 80, 1111 ; : LINEINPUT "FIL 
E NAME =->" ;NM$ 

225 IF NM$= ,IM THEN SOUND 200, 1:G 
OTO 22(3 

23(3 IF INSTR(NM$, "/")=0 AND INST 
R(NM$,".")=0 THEN NM$=NM$+"/BIN" 
240 FOR X=l TO LEN (NM$ ) : A=ASC (MI 
D$ (NM$,X, 1) ) :IF A>96 AND A<123 T 
HEN MID$ (NM$ ,X, 1)=CHR$ (A-32) :A=A 
-32 

250 NEXT X: RETURN 
5(3(3 ' 

510 'select a character 
520 ' 

530 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1 , 1 : COLOR 0 
,1:CLS:PRINT "Select a character 
. . . " : PRINT 

540 FOR X=32 TO 255: PRINT CHR$ (X 
) ; : NEXT 



58 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



560 PRINT@416 , "By moving the cur 
sor with the arrow keys, and t 
hen pressing ENTER. (Press CLE 
AR to return) " ; 

600 PRINT@CX+(CY+2)*3 2,CHR$(6) ; 
610 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" M THEN 610 
620 PRINT@CX+(CY+2) *32 , CHR$ (6) ; 
635 FOR Y=341 TO 344: POKE Y,255: 
NEXT 

640 X=INSTR(JP$ ,A$) : IF X=0 THEN 
600 

650 ON X GOTO 1000,660,670,680,6 
90,10 

660 CX=CX-1:IF CX<0 THEN CX=31 
665 GOTO 600 

670 CX=CX+1:IF CX=32 THEN CX=0 
675 GOTO 600 

680 CY=CY+1:IF CY>6 THEN CY=0 
685 GOTO 600 

690 CY=CY-1:IF CY<0 THEN CY=6 
695 GOTO 600 

1000 1 

1001 'define/modify a character 

1002 1 

1010 C=32+CX+(CY*32) :CA=FNC(C) 
1020 PMODE 0,1: SCREEN 1 , 1 : COLOR 
0,1:CLS236 

1030 PRINT 11 * DEFINER * "; 
1050 PRINT@3 2,"" ; :GOSUB 2000 1 ge 
t image to 1$ 

1060 COLOR 1,0: FOR X=0 TO 7 : PRIN 
T@36+(X*16) ,I$(X) ;:NEXT X 
1070 DX=0:DY=0 

1100 PRINT@36+(DY*16)+DX,CHR$(6) 
; : A$=INKEY$ : PRINT@ 3 6+ ( DY * 1 6 ) +DX , 
CHR$ ( 6 ) ; 

1105 IF A$=" 11 THEN 1200 
1110 IF A$= M " THEN 1100 
1130 X=INSTR(JP$,A$) : IF X=0 THEN 
1100 

1140 ON X GOTO 3000,1150,1160,11 
70, 1180,500 

1150 DX=DX-1:IF DX<0 THEN DX=7 
1155 GOTO 1100 

1160 DX=DX+1:IF DX=8 THEN DX=0 
1165 GOTO 1100 

1170 DY=DY+1:IF DY=8 THEN DY=0 
1175 GOTO 1100 

1180 DY=DY-1:IF DY<0 THEN DY=7 

1185 GOTO 1100 

1200 'reverse character 

1210 IF MID$(I$(DY) ,DX+1,1)=F$ T 

HEN MID$(I$ (DY) ,DX+1, 1)=E$ ELSE 

MID$(I$(DY) ,DX+1,1)=F$ 

1220 PRINT@36+(DY*16) ,I$(DY) ; : GO 



TO 1100 

2000 'Get image into I$(0-7) 
2010 FOR X=0 TO 7 : A=PEEK (CA+X) : I 

$(X)= IF A=255 THEN I$(X)=STRI 

NG$(8,E$) :NEXT X : RETURN 

2020 FOR Y=7 TO 0 STEP -1 

2030 IF (A AND 2 A Y)=0 THEN I$(X) 

=I$(X)+F$ ELSE 1$ (X)=I$ (X) +E$ 

2040 NEXT Y:PRINT@36+(X*16) ,I$(X 

) : NEXT X : RETURN 

2999 ' 

3000 'set character 

3001 1 

3010 COLOR 0,1: FOR X=0 TO 7 : PRIN 
T@36+(X*16) ,1$ (X) ; 
3020 A=0:FOR Y=7 TO 0 STEP-1 
3030 IF MID$(I$(X) ,8-Y, 1)<>F$ TH 
EN A=A+2 A Y 

3040 NEXT Y:POKE CA+X,A:NEXT X:G 
OTO 500 




^ -^Software % 




or 



KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— ONLY $24.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting Sytterrt (or home or business 1 6k 
32k. 64k User-triendly, menu-driven. Program features, balance sheet, income & 
expense statement (current & YTD'). journal, ledger, 899 accounts & 2350 entries 
on 32k & 64k (710 accounts & entries on 16k) (disk only). Version 1.2 has screen 
printouts. Rainbow Reviews 11- 9/84 ; 1.2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE'' Reg. $69.95— ONLY $19.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 
fields with 255 characters per field (4080 characters/record). Sort, match & print 
any field. User friendly menu driven. Manual included (32k/64k disk only). 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses. boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
line HELPS at all times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects 
on the screen. Can be used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. 
GRAPHICS EDITOR.Reg. $39.95— -ONLY $19.95 for disk or tape 64k ECB 
Rainbow Review 7/85. Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphic! bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. (Avail io/ov85). 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, 
total due sales, explanation spaceas long as you need detai led statements, KEEP- 
TRAK' General Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & 
more. User friendly/menu driven. Includes manual $39.95 or $49.95 General 
Ledger & Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

'COCO WINDOWS' Available 10/31/85 
With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key 
board (klicks) and 10 programmable (unction keys. Allows the user to create 
multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line 
numbering. Four (unction calculator, with memory. The above options can be 
called anytime while running or writing in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES, 
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $19.95 (disk or tape) includes manual. 

CALL TOLL FREE 




5 



1-800-942-9402 



THE OTHER GUY'S SOFTware (Add $2.50 for portage & handling) 

P.O. Box H, 55 N. Main C.O.D., Money Order, Check In U.S. Funds 

Logan, UT 64321 (601) 753-7620 (Pleaee specify If JAM controller) 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 



59 





(fyate-ctelic 
Palette 




ut&cde you* 




ycldraw demonstrates some 
of the best features of the 
new CoCo 3 — a high 
resolution screen with 16 colors and 
color text, a PRLETTE command to 
change those colors at any time (you choose 
from 64 possible colors), a BUTTON function for 
easy access of the joystick buttons, an ON BRK 
GOTO (on break) command and an ON ERR 

GOTO (on error) command. 
Cycldraw is a symmetrical drawing program. What you 
draw in one quadrant of the screen is duplicated in the 
other three screen quadrants (a kaleidoscope effect). Also 
the palette of colors is continously changing ("color 
cycling") as you draw, demonstrating a fascinating feature 

of the new CoCo. 
All you need to do is CLORD"CYCLDRRW, use the 
right joystick and follow the instructions you see on your 

screen. Happy Cycling! 
(If you have any ques- 
tions, feel free to direct 
them to B. Matthews, 
3917 Baxter Street, Nash- 
ville, TN 37216. Please 
enclose an SASE.) □ 



Becky Matthews has a 
degree in music educa- 
tion from the University 
of Mississippi. She and 
her husband, David, have 
three CoCos and two 
CoCo cats. 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 




The listing: CYCLDRflW 

10 '*** CIRCLE CYCLE DRAW *** 

20 ■*** BY BECKY MATTHEWS *** 

3f3 ON BRK GOTO 92 f3 

40 ON ERR GOTO 60 

50 POKE 65497,0 

60 1 *TITLE PAGE 

70 HSCREEN 2 

80 HCLS 8 

90 HCOLOR 4,8 

100 HPRINT (11,4)," CIRCLE CYCLE 

DRAW " 
110 'SMALL CIRCLES 
120 C=l 

130 FORX=15T0315STEP14 
140 C=C+2:IFC>15THENC=1 



150 FORY=9T0182STEP173 

160 HCIRCLE(X,Y) , 5,C 

170 HPAINT(X,Y) ,C,C 

180 NEXTY: SOUND X/ 2,1: NEXTX 

190 'MEDIUM CIRCLES 

200 C=l 

210 FORY=30TO160STEP26 
220 C=C+2 

230 FORX=10TO310STEP300 

240 HCIRCLE(X,Y) , 10, C 

250 HPAINT (X, Y) ,C,C 

2 60 NEXTX: SOUND Y/ 2,1: NEXTY 

270 'LARGE CIRCLES 

280 C=l 

290 FORY=45TO160STEP49 
300 C=C+2 

310 FORX=45TO275STEP230 

320 HCIRCLE(X,Y) , 20, C 

330 HPAINT (X, Y) ,C,C 

340 NEXTX: SOUND Y/ 2,1: NEXTY 

350 'MENU 

(10,11) 



3 60 HPRINT 
LE SIZE" 
370 HPRINT 
3 80 HPRINT 
390 HPRINT 



ii 



(14,14) 
(14,15) 
(14,16) 



II 
II 



CHOOSE CIRC 

1 - SMALL 11 

2 - MEDIUM" 
11 3 - LARGE 



it 



TRY-O-TAX 



FEDERAL SCHEDULES A - W 
FORMS 1040, 2106, 2441 



$39.99 



+ 3.00 SH 



TRY-O-BYTE 

1008 ALTON CIRCLE 
FLORENCE, S.C. 29501 
(803) 662-9500 



For maker 

dean paperwork for business 

"It will give the small or home business professional-looking 
forms and effortless, errorless totals, accounting for taxes, 
discounts, shipping and deposits" 

The rainbow, May 1986 



1 



menu driven 

customize for your company 
on screen Instructions 
creates: Invoice, quote, purchase order, 

mall order, receipt, letter 
printer customization 
and much, much more 

"You have to look good to the customer . . 
helps . . . by providing neat, well-prepared forms . . 

The RAINBOW, May 1986 



RAINBOW 

GfnTWtCAfPO*! 

Km. 

32K ECB dlSC 

This program 




Makes learning so much fun . . . rainbow 
. . . that kids think its a gamel CI "*" T ~ 

Letter and number recognition. Ages 2 to 6 

$24 32K ecb disc or tape 

"If you are looking for a program to teach young children 
the alphabet, numbers and early vocabulary, super tutor 
may fit the bill." The RAINBOW, June 1986 

Send for more Information: 

Challenger software 

42 4th Street 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 
Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 61 



A 01 01 


II "DO TUT / 1 ^ O01\ H / TT'XTTTT'P 1 — \ 


Q Q ft rn mi c • TT7T>v/1 Q TTJTTXT T n 

oyy) 1 — lto ; if ±>4y lrl£jM 1— ± 


II 




Q 01 01 P=P-4-1 • TTTP^I R TT4TTXJ P = 1 


A 1 01 


A <1-TMVT?V^ • TTT A <i— H HTTJTXTA 1 /7( 


y ±j0 K1j 1 U KIN 


4-s)3 


A— T.7 AT / A £ \ 


O O 01 1 * i? XT r\ 

y Zyj *rjND 


A *3 01 
4 J)0 


TTT A«<1 PP A***} murVT A (A (A 

JLr iiv j. UK >\->J inxjiN 4)0)0 


Q "3 01 "DAT T7 , T"T , T7 I DPU • PT C 

yj)3 r*Aijrjllrj KvjJd • uIjo 


A A 01 
4 4)0 


1 OPm PTDPT "P PAHTTTC 


OA (A "D"D TMTM P VTT T?PP MHU H 
z?np xrr\±vi X DiL r UK JNUW • 


4 OJ0 


"O A * C 

K— A*D 


y .rU j\£j D D 4 y D / y) 


A 6 01 


■ ^TWQTPTTPTTPW Dam? 


Q £ 01 TPPPXI— 1 (A flfpn 1 CTTTP— R • CHTTMH XT 1 • 


A7 01 
'tip 


HCLS4 


XTT?VT 
INIjA 1 


A Q 01 
4o)3 


liUUljUK 0 / 4 


on ca irxTr> 

y / j0 HjM jj 


490 


HPRINT (14,2) , "INSTRUCTIONS" 
HPRINT (2 ,7), "USE THE RIGHT 


A o /K 1 /"\T1 K T"\T^ K XTm 1 OTTO 

98)3 1 * QUADRANT 1 SUB 


5J30 


y yp rlulKuijlij ( A , x; , K , C I rix J AlN 1 ( A , x ; 


JOYSTICK TO DRAW." 


/C/C 


510 


HPRINT (2,10) , "PRESS JOYSTIC 


1)3)3)3 HCIRCLE ( 3 2)3— X , Y) , K, C . HPAINT 


K BUTTON TO CLEAR SCREEN." 


( J^JJ"A / I J , U , U 


520 


HPRINT (2,11)," (RIGHT BUTTON 


1 01 1 (A UP 1 TTD P-'T T?/V 1 QO_V\ "O p • U"DA TXTT 

1)31)3 xlUlKuJ-irj ( A / 1 y ^ — x ) f K / u . flrAlW 1 


1 ON NEW JOYSTICK) " 


(X,192-Y) ,C,C 


530 


HPRINT (2,14) , "PRESS SPACEBA 


LpZp rlLlKLLfj ( J ^)3™A ; iy ^ — x ; /K/UirlJr 


R TO PAUSE DRAWING AND" 


AIM 1 ^ J^)3~A/ ±y^™x / /U/U 
±pop uUlUOJjt) 


540 


HPRINT (2, 15), "SEE FAST CYCL 


E." 




1 ^A^ 1 *P^TT ir\D AXIT O CTTti 
±)34)3 * y U AUKAJN 1 Z dUD 


550 


HPRINT (2, 18) , "PRESS SPACEBA 


tp«KP« WPTT3PT T7 /Y V\ "D P • HDA TXTT 1 ( V V 
-L )c?0 )c? IlUXKUljrj \ A , I ) f K / U • Hr / 4iJ.IN 1 ^ A / X 


R AGAIN TO RESUME." 


\ P P 

; , u, u 


560 


HPRINT (7,22) ," (PRESS ANY KE 




Y TO START ) " 


( *\0 (A— Y V N P P 
^JZ)0 A/Xy / U / U 


570 


A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN570 




580 


X=148 : Y=9 6 


A TXIP f ^ 9 (7J— Y 1Q0— P P 


590 


T=i : c=l 


irto^ WpTPPT-F^Y 1 Q9-V^ T? P»WPATMT 


600 


'SET BACKGROUND TO BLACK 


fY 1 Q9— V^ P P 


610 


PALETTE 0,0 




620 


HCLS0 


1 1 (ACS I *OTTAnPAMT ^ QTTR 

J_ ±.yjyj ^ U /lUXx/llN X O O U D 


630 


'BUTTON CHECK 


1 1 1 ft TJPTPPTTT^Y P P • T4P A TUT ^ Y V 
±±±)U IIUXKUXjJIi \ A / X ) / K/ U« ilX^riXlN X \ A / X 


640 


IF BUTTON (0)=1 THEN 620 


^ P P 

; , u, u 


650 


'SPACEBAR CHECK 


1 1 9 <71 T4PTPPT.TT ^Y 1 QO-V^ P P • WPATWT 


660 


A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(32) GOS 


/V TOO —V \ P P 


ub : 


L220 


1 Tifll TJPTPPT T? f ft — Y 1 QO- V\ P P • TJTD 


670 


'GOSUB ADVANCE PALETTE 


A TXTT / O —V 1 QO_V\ P P 


680 


GOSUB 850 


1 1 / rt WPTPPT TT ^ ^ 0 <7<— Y VN P P • WDATMT 
±±Hp nLlKLLJj \ J Z )0 A / X ) / K / U a Ilr'iiXiN X 


690 


•JOYSTICK CHECK 


^ J .4 )3™A / x / / U / U 


700 


H=JOYSTK(0) 


i n c/i r* r\rnr\ (A 
±±D)0 (jUIUDJ^ 


710 


IF H>41 THEN X=X+4 


1 1 £01 1 *PTTATYP AXTT A QTT"R 
±±0)^ "^U riJJKriiN 1 4 DUD 


720 


IF H<20 THEN X=X-4 


111ft UPTDPTTT /Y V\ "D H • UD A TXTT /V V 


730 


IF X<10 THEN X=10 


\ P P 


740 


IF X>310 THEN X=310 


Hoy) nLlKLLij (A/±y^~xy , K , C . rlr'AXM 1 


750 


V=J0YSTK(1) 


f Y 1 —V N P P 


760 


IF V>41 THEN Y=Y+4 


i i Q/i ii ft T"o pt p/iofll-v v\ *n o ■ u"n a txtt 
±±y)3 rltlKLLL ( J Zy) — J{ # x y /K/LInrAlWl 


770 


IF V<20 THEN Y=Y-4 


(32j3-X,Y) ,0,0 


780 


IF Y>182 THEN Y=182 


IZyjyJ nu±KL.ijrj ^ J Zyj ™ A , J. y Z ~ x ) ,K, l#nr 


790 


IF Y<10 THEN Y=10 


AIM 1 ^ J Zy) & , i.y *s x ) ,U,U 

±Z±jP bUlUOJJ^ 


800 


IF H<160 AND V<96 THEN 980 


810 


IF H>160 AND V<96 THEN 1040 


T O O 01 1 *PVPT "U 1 ^XTT V OTTTJ 

IZZp x LiLLL UJMIjx dUd 


1 820 


IF H<160 AND V>96 THEN 1100 


1 O*>01 T?PP P — 1 TP 1 R 
±ZJJQ r UK r 7 — • ± XU ±D 


830 


IF H>160 AND V>96 THEN 1160 


1 A ft "O 7V T TJ'TTTJ' Ti m_l T> 

124)3 PAxjUjIIIIj x J ,H"i J 


840 


GOTO 630 


12o)3 NEXT 


850 


•* AD VANCE PALETTE SUB 


i m_ m i >l a T T?T^ /I O TUTTXT T— 1 

LZoy) 1 — x + 421rl>4y lrlrjM 1—1 


860 


FOR P=l TO 15 


127)3 'SPACEBAR CHECK 


870 


PALETTE P,T+P 


1280 IF INKEY$= ,,H THEN 12 313 


880 


NEXT 


129J3 RETURN 



62 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



51 2K Memory Expansion Board 

ONLY $109.95 

• Easy to install 'Hty, 

• Complete with RAM 

• Simple instructions included 





Return of Junior's Revenge 

The best graphics you've ever seen on 
a Color Computer 3! Junior (with your 
help) has to make it through all sortsof 
obstacles to rescue his father from the 
mean zookeeper. You must get him 
through the swamp and the jungle, 
guide him up vines, and help him 
avoid the chompers and more before 
he finds his father, the King. This is a 
great arcade and adventure that 
really takes advantage of the graphic 
capabilities with 16 colors and 320 x 
192 graphics. It's superb on a compo- 
site color monitor, RGB analog moni- 
tor, or TV. Also works great with 51 2K. 

Requires 128K, CoCo3, Disk $34.95 



CoCo3Ramdisk& 
Memory Diagnostics M 

• 512K memory diagnostics includes rotating bi 
convergence, and latency text. 

• Double ramdisk creates two full featured, separate 
drive ramdisks! 

• Master copy program includes copy with verify, 
non-alphabetic and alphabetic copies. 

Requires CoCo3, 51 2K, RSDOS $1 9.95 



wm 



Color Scribe 

Take advantage of the power of your Color Computer 3 
for all of your word processing and editing needs. Have it 
your way with either a 40, 64, or 80 column display on 
either a green, amber, blue, or monochrome screen, and 
reverse video! A huge buffer of over 64K is available. No 
more guessing how much buffer space is left as a com- 
mand tells you how many bytes are available. There are 
over 20 line editing commands. You can even move a 
block of text from one file to another. Save keystrokes with 
macro commands. Includes extensive text formatting, 
pagination with headers and footers, left and right justifi- 
cation, etc. Color Scribe III is a must for anyone who is 
serious about word processing. 

Requires 1 28K, CoCo 3, Disk $49.95 



Color Connection IV 

(The power you have come to expect from your computer is 
now unleased with this great Telecommunications package. 
Use baud rates up to 1 200 directly from your computer, or up 
to 9600 with a Multi-pak. It supports all standard protocols 
^Including CompuServe's Protocol B, XMODEM, and XON/X- 
lOFR It features a 40, 64, or 80 column text display in amber, 
greea blue or monochrome modes. All of the display options 
are part of the set up file. Color Connection IV supports the 
iauto answer/auto dial features for both Hayes compotible 
and some Radio Shack modems. The buffer holds over 65K! 
'Single key macros allow you to enter often used passwords 
-;and ID'S. This program is menu driven, and comes with com- 
plete documentation to make your telecommunications as 
(easy as possible. The software also includes Color Connection 
ill for the CoCo 1 and CoCo 2. 

.Requires 128K, CoCo 3, disk S49.95 



The Magic of Zanth 

Dragons . . . Demons . . . Griffins . . . 
Centaurs . . . kind of stirs the imagina- 
tion, doesn't it? You have been sent on 
\Q quest to discover the source of the 
• magic In the Land of Zanth. Watch the 
16 colorgraphics come alive with over 
1 2 dozen hi-res animated screens. There 
I are 4 voice music and sound effects, 
land speech (when used with the 
iTandy SSC pak). The graphics look 
great on either a composite color 
I monitor, RGB analog monitor, or TV. It 
takes advantage of 512K if available. 
Excellent graphics, and an excellent 
game. 

Requires 128K, CoCo 3, Disk $3495 
I (SSC pak optional) 




Ask for our FREE CoCo Catalog! 



Call or Write to: 




Monochrome Monitor 



The 20 mhz band width, 800 line 
resolution, and 80 x 25 display 
insure a crisp picture. The non- 
glare screen and stream-lined 
style is also attractive. It also has 
audio! 

Green 12" Amber 12" $114.95 

plus $5.00 shipping 




COMPUTERWARE 1 » 619 ' 43635,2 

Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA • 92024 



Name _ 
Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



Yes! Send me your FREE catalog I 

VISA MasterCard 

Card # 

Signature 



CoCo □ 



Exp. 



Item 



Format 



Price 



Universal Video Plus 

Interfaces any Color Computer with either a color or 
monochrome composite video monitor. Arrives ready for 
installation, complete instructions, nothing else to buy. 

$34.95 



Shipping 6% Calif. Sales Tax 

Surface — $2 minimum. COD Add S5 

2% for orders over S 1 00 Shipping* 
Air or Canada — $5 minimum. TOTAL 

5% for orders over $100 
Checks are deJaye d for ba nk c lea ra nee 



Recommended Reading for Your CoCofrom . 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 




III 




k hi 


SIMULATIONS 












H K •» 1 iM 

1 m ri*^» luiK k - -j -i^iaiivn iiu 



Bf eCM IMBO* HCItf x-> 




The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

The book that demystifies the state-of-the-art operating system for 
the Tandy Color Computer. Authors Date L. Puckett and Peter Dibble 
show you how to take advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multi- 
user features, and the capability of redirecting input and output 
commands at will. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide packed with 
hints and tips, tutorials and free software in the form of program 
listings. 

Book $19.95 

Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

This sequel features 24 of the most challenging Adventure games 
ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the- Blue Meanies, find 
a hidden fortune, or win the heart of a beautiful and mysterious 
princess. Experience the thrills and chills of the most rugged 
Adventurer without ever leaving your seat. Ring Quest, Secret Agent 
Man, DarkCastte, Curse otKaros, (stand and more! 

Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 




Mil U\l\i:t»\\ in m ik 

mi \m i m i hi s 




TheRai 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 



Features 20 award-winning entries from the rainbow's first 
Simulation programming competition. You are the Commander-in- 
Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, an air traffic 
controller at one of the nation's busiest airports, the owner of your 
own software business, a civil defense coordinator in charge of 
saving Rainbow City from a raging flood, a scientist conducting 
experiments on Mars . . . Your wits are on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winning programs from our second Simulation contest. Fly through the dense African 
jungle as a bush pilot, bull your way down Wall Street, lead the Rainbow City bomb squad, 
or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



Coming Soon: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 



I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9,95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk $10.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 (book only) $19.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) $31.00 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) $ 3.50 J^f^ 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape [first) $ 3.50 j.J^T' 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13,95 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape $13,95 

Add $1 .50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 

Outside U.S., add $4.00 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 6 weeks for delivery) Total 



Name 



Address 

City 

State _ 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 





Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 




Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 365, Prospect, KY 40059. 



PWase note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf ire not aland-alone products. Thai is, they are intended lo be ah adjunct and complement to the books. Even it you buy the ta&e or dnk 
you will itilt need the appropriate book, iea registered trademark ol ihe Mfwowa/e Syaiema Corporation. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 



Do Teachers Like Computers? 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Many studies in the past have 
looked at the numbers of 
computers in schools. In this 
column, we have reported the growing 
number of machines available to stu- 
dents and teachers. With such unusual 
growth, most people now accept that 
computers have an important role to 
play in schools. The type of role, how- 
ever, will depend in large part on how 
teachers use computers and how 
teachers view the effectiveness of com- 
puters. 

There has not been much study of 
how teachers view computer use in 
schools, or of teacher attitudes about 
computers. One study, however, was 
conducted by H.J. Baker and reported 
by the U.S. Department of Education, 
Center for Educational Statistics. Bak- 
er's study was based on 2,700 question- 
naires sent to teachers in all grade levels 
throughout the country. Questionnaires 
were returned by 80 percent of the 
teachers (2, 160) — a return rate that is 
very impressive for mailed surveys. 

In addition to asking how the 
teachers use computers, eight questions 
were asked about teacher attitudes 
toward computers. The questions, 
along with the percent of each response, 
are presented in the table. 

Most teachers (82 percent either 
agreed or strongly agreed) felt that 
computers can help teachers teach more 
effectively. Thirteen percent had no 
opinion about the question. This indi- 
cates fairly strong support for educa- 

Michael Flog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



tional uses of computers by teachers, 
even by non-users. Just considering 
those who provided an opinion (elimi- 
nating the "No Opinion" group), about 
95 percent agreed or strongly agreed 
with the statement. 

Since any educational activity is 
dependent on teachers, this support is 
crucial for computer use in schools. If 
teachers do not support using machines 
for educational purposes, then any 
efforts by administrators will collapse. 

A potential positive teacher attitude 
for classroom computers may also be 
demonstrated by the second question 



about disruption to classes. Thirteen 
percent of the teachers thought having 
one or two students working on a 
computer would disrupt the rest of the 
class, while 63 percent thought it would 
not be disruptive. Nearly one-fourth (24 
percent) had no opinion about disrup- 
tion. 

One possible explanation for the 
large number of "No Opinion" re- 
sponses is the use of computer labs in 
schools. Many teachers who have stu- 
dents use computers do so in a lab 
situation; computers are not available 
in classrooms. Thus, some teachers may 



Table 1: Teacher Attitudes About Computers 

Item SA A D SD NO 

Computers can help teachers 
teach more effectively. 

Having one or two students work 
at a computer is seriously disruptive 
to the rest of my classroom activity. 

I want more training in computers. 

The software available to me 
is quite good, instructionally. 

I do not feel comfortable about 
working with computers. 

Previewing software should be done 
by teachers before purchase. 

Integrating computer time with 
other subject areas is a fairly 
simple matter. 

The hardware, or equipment, 
is difficult to use. 



28 


54 


4 


# 


13 


2 


11 


40 


23 


24 


46 


44 


3 


1 


7 


5 


30 


10 


7 


49 


8 


23 


31 


20 


18 


46 


44 


1 


* 


9 


4 


28 


25 


8 


34 


1 


7 


37 


14 


41 



SA 
A 
D 
SD 
NO 



Strongly Agree 

Agree 

Disagree 

Strongly Disagree 

No Opinion 

Less than 1 percent 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 65 



never have been in a position of having 
students work on a computer while 
something else is going on in the class- 
room. 

In one sense, the question of disrup- 
tion is not very powerful for measuring 
teacher attitudes about support for 
computer uses in schools. I used the 
term "potential positive teacher atti- 
tude, " but another factor is involved 
besides teacher acceptance of comput- 
ers — teacher style. Some teachers want 
all students in the class to be doing the 
same work at the same time. Other 
teachers encourage, even thrive, on a 
variety of activities in the same physical 
space atthe same time. It is possible that 
some of the u all the same" teachers have 
a very positive attitude toward educa- 
tional use of computers, but do not 
want a few students away from the 
lesson and working on computers. It is 
also possible that some of the "different 
activities at the same time" teachers do 
not think any disruption would occur in 
their class if a few students were work- 
ing on the machines, but do not have a 
positive attitude toward computers. 
Thus, it is difficult (maybe impossible) 
to gauge teacher attitudes by this ques- 
tion. 

An overwhelming majority of 
teachers (90 percent) said they want 
more computer training. Four percent 
said they do not want more training, 
and 7 percent had no opinion on the 
question. 

It is possible, of course, that the 4 
percent of teachers not wanting more 
training support computer use in 
schools, but feel they already know 
enough. While possible, this is unlikely. 
It is much more probable that this 4 
percent represent teachers who feel no 
need for computer use in their classes. 
One of the features of computer knowl- 
edge is that mastery is never totally 
achieved. There is always additional 
software to learn, extra "helpful hints" 
to file away, and even new machines to 
examine. 



The next survey question, about 
quality of software, does not appear to 
be a very productive item. Nearly half 
of the teachers (49 percent) did not 
express an opinion about the question. 
Of those whodid have an opinion about 
software, about twice as many (35 
percent compared to 17 percent) 
thought available software is instruc- 
tionally good. 

It seems to me that teachers can fall 
into three broad categories: those who 
have examined almost no educational 
software; those who have examined a 
little bit of software; and those who are 
familiar with a lot of software. The 
question, as stated, is somewhat inap- 
propriate for teachers with very limited 
or very great experience with software. 
Those who have very limited experience 
with software cannot really answer the 
question. Teachers who have examined 
a great deal of software have probably 
seen some very bad materials and some 
very good materials; it would be diffi- 
cult to respond to the question. 

About half of the teachers surveyed 
(51 percent) said they feel comfortable 
working with computers. Nearly one- 
third (31 percent) said they do not feel 
comfortable. It is interesting to note 
that whether teachers feel comfortable 
with computers or not, most still want 
more training. This question is proba- 
bly the single most changeable item on 
the whole survey. Teachers are contin- 
ually receiving in-service instruction on 
computers, sponsored by school dis- 
tricts, regional centers, computer con- 
sortia and state education agencies. 
Each month, a few more teachers will 
feel comfortable working with comput- 
ers. Naturally, there will always be a few 
teachers who are not comfortable with 
computers and who will have minimal 
use of the machines in classes. But, that 
number will decrease with each succes- 
sive year. 

Nearly all respondents to the survey 
felt that teachers should preview soft- 
ware before purchase. I wonder why 9 



percent of teachers had no opinion on 
this item and 1 percent disagreed. Could 
they be thinking of review by school 
people other than teachers, such as 
administrators, parents or students? 

If you want to start a spirited discus- 
sion in a teachers' lounge, make the 
comment, "Integrating computer time 
with other subject areas is a fairly simple 
matter." About one-third of the re- 
spondents to the survey (32 percent) 
agreed with the statement; about one- 
third (33 percent) disagreed; and about 
one-third (34 percent) had no opinion. 
The degree of ease or difficulty of 
integrating computers with other sub- 
jects may be related to several factors: 
particular subject matter taught, age 
and abilities of students, degree of 
knowledge and creativity of teachers, 
and quality of available software. 

About half of the teachers (51 per- 
cent) said the equipment is not difficult 
to use; only 8 percent said it is. This 
leaves 41 percent without an opinion. 
Are the "No Opinion" people those who 
have not used computers, or those who 
realize some equipment is easy to use 
and some is hard to use? 

In conclusion, it seems there are some 
generalizations from this study that 
would be worthwhile for educators to 
consider. First, in-service training about 
computers is still important for 
teachers. A small amount of that train- 
ing should be for operating equipment. 
The bulk of the training should concen- 
trate on two major topics: suggestions 
for integration of computers into sub- 
ject matter areas and selection of edu- 
cational software (possibly including 
sessions of "what makes a good soft- 
ware package"). 

For more information about this 
study, contact Janice Ancarrow at the 
Center for Educational Statistics, 555 
New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20208. If you want to communicate 
with me about the study, please send 
your thoughts to 829 Evergreen, Cha- 
tham, IL 62629. /S\ 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This one-liner will convert any positive, two-byte 
integer (0-65535) into its binary form. If the number 
entered is negative, out of range or not an integer, the 
computer will return INVALID. 

The listing: 

10 CLEAR: INPUT "DECIMAL #";Y:FORX 
=15T0J3STEP-1:IFY>=Z+INT(2 A X) THEN 
Z=Z+INT ( 2 A X) : A$=A$+"1" : NEXTX: IFY 



> 6 5 5 3 5 OR Y<> ABS ( INT ( Y ) } THENPRINT " 
INVALID" : GOTOl 0ELSEPRINTA$ : GOTOl 
j3ELSEA$=A$ + "j3" : NEXTX: IFY>655350R 
YOINT (ABS ( Y) ) THENPRINT" INVALID" 
:GOTO10ELSEPRINTA$:GOTO10 

Gregory Satir 
Fairfield, CT 



(For ihis winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both 77ie Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



66 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



GREAT COCO HI PRODUCTS 



SECRETS REVEALED 

An introduction to the 
Color Computer H !!! 
Compares differences 
between the CoCo \/\\ 
and the NEW CoCo M 

GIME chip specs 

CoCo H/CoCo m Converter 
CoCo HI Memory Map 
128K/512K RAM Test 

$16.95 






Buy 'em both for 




GRAPHICS 

It's here! A drawing 
program for the CoCo III 
using the new Enhanced 
graphic features. Requires 
28K CoCoH w/Disk 

Analog RGB monitor recommended. 

Uses 320x192 graphics 
16 of any 64 colors 
Save & Load 32K screens 
See Dec'86 review 



$19.95 



ELITE WORD-80 

The third generation CoCo Word 
Processor is here! All the power 
of EliteWord plus 40/80 column 

DISPLAY FOR THE CoCo III. AVAIL- 
ABLE only from Spectrum! $79.95 
EliteWorp-8Q & EliteSpel $99.95 

FKEYS III - Add 20 pre-defined 


51 2K UPGRADE 

It's here! The first 5 7 2 K 
Upgrade for the CoCo 111. Easy 
installation with a superior 
design & AVAILABLE NOW. Uses 
(16) PRIME 256K DRAMS - $139.95 
512K Upgrade w/o chips - $99.95 

512K RAMDISK - It's like adding 


FUNCTj 
THE CI 


[ONS TO YOUR COCO 


I I USING 


TWO (2) MORE disk drives to your 


"Lp F1 and F2 keys 


! $24.95 


CoCo III for only $24.95 


VIDEO DIGITIZER III 

25 FRAMES PER SECOND 

The fastest CoCo Video Digitizer 
ever (3 xs faster than ds-69a! ) 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR THE CoCo II J. 

Req. 128K CoCo III Disk (w/40 
pin n Y n cable or Y-Box) $149.95 


RGB ANALOG MONITOR 

Our MONITOR IS MUCH more versa- 
tile THAN THE TANDY CM-8 ! TAKES 

RGB Analog, Color composite & 
RGB TTL video. Unlike the CM-8, 

PMODE 4 ARTIFACT COLORS DON'T 

show up BLACK & WHITE (thru the 
| Color Composite input) $299.95 



CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 CoCo 111 MONOCHROME Driver $39.95* 

CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 512K CoCo III Computer $299.95 



♦ Why spend $300 Just for Hi-Res text on your CoCo III 
when you can purchase Amber monitors for under $100 ? ? ? 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

PO BOX 264 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

COCO HOT LINE 718-835-1344 



DELPHI BUREAU 




SIG Changes Include New 
Selections, New Sections 



Several changes have taken place 
on the CoCo SIG. First, the Sub- 
scriptions menu has been 
changed to "Rainbow Magazine Servi- 
ces." To enter this area, type R at the 
CoCo SIG prompt. To make things 
more logical, the "Order RAINBOW- 
fest Tickets" and "Address Change' 1 
selections have been moved from the 
Questions & Feedback section to this 
new section. The new section includes 
a selection, tA Ask The Experts," for 
sending mail to Marty Goodman, Dan 
Downard or Richard Esposito. Just 
select the person you want the technical 
question to go to and then fill in the 
blanks. You will be asked for your name 
and address and then be given plenty of 
space to ask your question. We believe 
this will help us get your questions 
answered in a timely manner. 

Another change has come about that 
has somewhat altered the SIG structure 
as we knew it before. To better handle 
the increasing interest in OS-9, we 
decided to create a new SIG directly 
pertaining to the OS-9 operating sys- 
tem. While designed for CoCo OS-9 
users, it can be used by OS-9 68K users, 
too, and even has a database topic set 
aside for such computers. This new area 
can be reached by typing 0S9 at the 
CoCo SIG prompt. Once in "OS-9 
Online," you will be greeted with the 
menu. This new SIG includes a Forum 
and a Mail section, and most impor- 



Cray Augsburg is RAINBOW'S technical 
assistant and has an associate's degree 
in electrical engineering. He and his 
wife, Ruth Ann, have two children and 
Jive in Louisville, Ky. His username on 
Delphi is RAIN BOW ma G. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow CoCo SIGop 



tantly, its own database area. This 
database area is separate from the 
normal CoCo SIG database area. This 
will make it easy for those interested in 
OS-9, since the database area will have 



16 topics corresponding to more spe- 
cific aspects of OS-9. 

Clearing Up Telenet 

Several people have said they were 



DATABASE REPORT 



To further assist us with providing 
our membership with prompt, 
expert advice, we have enlarged 
our staff complement of OS-9 experts. 
Greg Law (GREGL) now joins Dale Lear 
(dalelear) and Rick Adams (RICKA- 
»ams) as part of our Delphi OS-9 staff. 
Greg has many years of experience with 
OS-9, and is a c and 6809 assembly 
language programmer as well, Welcome, 
Greg! 

We have quite a treat in store for you 
OS-9 Level I users. Mike Dziedzic (mjd) 
has sent us a set of drivers for the 80- 
column screen of the CoCo 3, to be used 
under OS-9 Level I Version 2.0. Along 
with the addition of material from Kevin 
Darling (KDARL1NG), this should be a 
very popular set of files. These can be 
found in the OS-9 section of the CoCo 
SIG database or, if "OS-9 Online" is open 
by the time you read this, in the Drivers 
section of this new OS-9 SIG. 

We haven't forgotten all you RS-DOS 
users, though. For all CoCo RS-DOS 
users we have a treat in store: Greg Miller 
(GREGMiller) who, with Erik Gavriluk 
(ERIKGav), brought us McPaint, has 
kindly uploaded his CoCo terminal 
program Greg-E-Term. GElerm runs on 
all models of CoCo, On the CoCo 1 and 
2 it supports either the bit-banger or the 
hardware RS-232 pak. 

It offers screen display options of 32, 
51, 64, or 85 columns, or support for the 
Word-Pak II (and with soon-to-be- 
posted minor patches, support for the 
Word-Pak I and Word-Pak-RS as well) 
and the double-density, 80-column 
board. It works perfectly for Xmodem 



up- and downloading at 1200 baud 
through the bit-banger port. Of course, 
its terminal mode function in full duplex 
at 1200 baud through the bit-banger is 
less than perfect, but it is usable. 

GETerm supports the 32-, 40- and 80- 
column display of the CoCo 3 as well, 
and has special routines written explicitly 
for the CoCo 3 to use its better bit-banger 
port at 1200 baud more smoothly than 
any CoCo I or 2 program ever could. It 
also features viewing and marking of its 
buffer, and the use of both FIND and 
formatting commands for navigating in 
and printing the buffer. 

GETerm comes with a configure pro- 
gram, a help file, and two documentation 
files that total over 540K of information 
on the program. This is a major new 
"guiltware" terminal program entry into 
the CoCo world. Believe me, this is a 
must get program. It is well worth the 
time needed to download all 50K or so 
worth of material in the GETerm group. 
GETerm is to be found in the Data 
Communications section of the CoCo 
SIG. The CoCo Community owes Greg 
Miller a big thank you. 

Greg's partner, Erik, has not been 
loafing either. He has sent us a version 
of the Macintosh Picture Converter for 
the CoCo 3. This program allows you to 
download a Macintosh picture file from 
Macintosh-oriented BBS systems from a 
friend with a Mac, and then view it on 
the CoCo 3. The CoCo 3 version of the 
Mac converter displays the full horizon- 
tal width of the Mac image, though of 
course it has to scroll through the full 
vertical height of the larger Mac pictures. 



i 



68 THE RAINBOW February 1987 





SHOPPING LIST 



DC- 



SUPER CHIP -SALE- ... 

6821 Standard PIAZ ZA S: « .$6.95 

Basic RC*4 1J. Chip- ^ Q»Q5: $9.95 

6847 VDG Chip 3*^*35: $12.95 

6809E CPU Chip^K>,ft5: $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Orig SAM Chip (6883) ^,ft*r $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

68766 EPRQM - (Fits all Basic ROMS) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

New SAM Chip with heatsink (74LS785) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 6809E CPU 

and SAM Chips ^5^5: (BE PREPARED) $39.95 

EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512s ! Super 
fast programming! ~ See April '86 review .$149.95 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $3.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed $14.95 

CoCo Memory Map $16.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide $19.95 

New! New I CoCo II , Service Manual (Specify CoCo II 

Catalogue model number $24.95 

CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 

Official MICROWARE OS 9 Manual Set $49.95 

The Complete Raintow Guide to 0S9 $19.95 

Guide with Two Disk Package of demo pgms . . . $49 .95 
Color / Extended / Disk Basic Unraveled - A completely 
connented disassembly of the CoCo ROMS I Comprehen- 
sive three (3) Book Set - Save $101 $49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WICO Adapter - Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks. $19. 95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
WICO Trackball - Regularly $69.95, Now only. $24 .95 
Universal Video Drvr- All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin act Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

Computi2e "Y" Box - Better than a Y cable ..$39.95 

KAMELBON: Parallel Printer Interface $49.95 

Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3131) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 

512K COLOR COMPUTER III $299.95 



3LES AND ... 

Printer/Modem 15' Extender Cable $14.95 

Tired of unplugging devices from your RS232 port? 

Try a RS232 "Y" Cable $19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick / Mouse 10 1 Ext Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

CoCo III Analog RGB monitor cable (Specify manu- 
facturer and model number) $24.95 

15" Multi-Pak / Rom Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
ROM Paks further away $27.95 

40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

Triple RS232 Switcher - Now easily select any one 

of three RS232 peripherals $39.95 

40 Pin Triple "Y n Cable - Hook up any three (3) 

Voice/Wbrd/RS232/Digitizer PAKs $39.95 

Special I Four (4) Drive Disk Cable $49.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

C-10 tapes in any quantity 49 cents 

5 1/4 " Diskettes , any quantity 79 cents 

OS-9 Quick Reference Guide $3.95 

Ronffik w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCol $19.95 

The Magic Box - Load Mod I/III Basic program tapes 

into the CoCo $24.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs (Disk 1.0 

1.1, JDOS) in a J&M disk controller $29.95 

Qrig CoCol "D" Rev motherboard . Includes all chips 
(SAM, CPU, PIA's, VDG) except RAM and Ext Basic 1 

Fantastic source for Spare Parts I $39.95 

256K RAM Chips (Set of 8) $39.95 

HJL-57 Keyboard - CoCo III version I Comes complete 
with special FREE Function Key Software ....$59.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 RDM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a PCSCE . .$99.95 
1200 Baud Modem (Hayes compatible) Auto-dial /answer 
$139.95. Requires Modem cable (4pin DB25) ..$19.95 

Amdek Drive System with controller $239.95 

MAGNAVQX 8515 RGB Analog monitor $349.95 



All orders plus_$3.Q0 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 

1 III $2.00 extra 
sident 



COD 
NYS Resi 



s add Sales Tax 



BOX 264 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

COCO HOT LINE 
718-835-1344 



unable to log onto Delphi at eight bits, 
no parity and one stop bit. After check- 
ing into the matter, we discovered some 
features of Telenet that should help. If 
you are accessing at 300 or 1200 baud, 
when a connection is achieved, press 
ENTER, then type D and press ENTER 
again. Note that the *D' must be upper- 
case. Then proceed to log on as usual. 
If you are accessing Delphi at 2400 
baud, when a connection is made, type 
@D and press ENTER. Again, the T)' must 
be uppercase. As an aside, if you are 
using a terminal package that features 
VT-100 emulation, you can type Dl 
(uppercase 4 D') and press ENTER at the 
"Terminal" prompt. This will tell 
Telenet you want to use VT-100 emula- 
tion. 

More on Settings 

The Xmodem settings area (in the 
Settings area of your Workspace) lets 



The Macintosh Picture Converter for the 
CoCo 3 can be found either in the CoCo 
3 News section or, more likely by the time 
you read this, in the Graphics database. 

Art Flexser (artflexser) has sent us 
patches for modifying Co lor com / E to 
work on the CoCo 3. These will be found 
either in the CoCo 3 News section or in 
the Data Communications section of the 
CoCo SIG. 

Why the uncertainty on my part about 
where to find some of these files? By the 
time you read this, we will be taking apart 
our CoCo 3 News and Information topic 
area and moving most of the files in it to 
the other topic areas on the CoCo SIG 
database. As we move each file, if it is a 
CoCo 3-specific file, we will flag it with 
"(C3)" in the group name title, and will 
give it a keyword of C3, to allow you to 
scan the other databases to look for 
CoCo 3-specific files. This change is 
being implemented during December 
and January, and should be completed 
by the time you read these words. 

In the CoCo 3 News and Information 
database (or, more likely, in other ap- 
propriate databases by the time you read 
this), we have from Steve Bjork (6809ER), 
NewBoot, a program to allow owners of 
Ghana Bwana, Desert Rider and One on 
One the ability to fix CoCo 3- 
incompatibility problems in these games, 
and ma nipulate the color set. Jim Shoop 
(bazar) has provided a patch for some 
versions of VIP Writer to make it run on 
the CoCo 3. Bob Wharton (bobwhar- 
TON) sent us a color-bar utility and an X- 
MAS newsletter for the CoCo 3, and 
Kevin Darling has sent us a text file with 
yet more information on the working of 
the GIME chip, including a full pin-out 
of it. Bill Jackson (billjackson) pro- 
vided a printer spooler for the CoCo 3, 
i and Damon Hill (dwhill) has sent us an 



you set four different parameters re- 
garding how you want the system to 
handle Xmodem file transfers. They are 
"Error Check Mode," "Last Block 
Handling," "Retry Count" and "Time- 
out Period." 

Two types of Xmodem error checking 
are available on Delphi: Checksum and 
CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check). 
Checksum error checking has been 
around for a long time and is the most 
common method, so any terminal pro- 
gram that supports Xmodem will sup- 
port this method of error checking. 
Because of this, Checksum is the default 
error-checking method on Delphi. 
However, CRC error checking is con- 
siderably more accurate. If your termi- 
nal program happens to support this, by 
all means use it. In any event, the error- 
checking selection you choose only 
affects uploading. For downloading, 
Delphi automatically adjusts itself to 



interesting Microware press release. 
Frank Hogg (fhogg) of Frank Hogg Lab 
has also given us a text file telling us of 
his company's plans to support the CoCo 
3 under OS-9 Level II. Lor en Howell 
(xenos) has sent us a CGP-220 screen 
dump program. He also has given us a 
CoCo 3 drawing utility called H doodle. 
Roger Bouchard (harbie), our official 
CoCo 3 basic Bug Finder and Swatter, 
has sent us an update to his previous file 
of CoCo 3 basic bugs and fixes for them. 
Michael Fischer (M1KE88) has given us 
some "Fun Pokes" for the CoCo 3, and 
Steve Macri (dracman) has sent us his 
Kellybook program. Gene Loefer 
(GLOEFER) has given us an RGB 
palette utility. Mike Dziedzic has pres- 
ented us with a real tour de force: An ML 
program that displays all 64 RGB palette 
colors on the CoCo 3 screen at once 
(using the same sneaky trick that Rick 
Adams used in his article in rainbow). 
Doug Masten (dmasten) has sent us a 
lowercase utility. AI Gengler (AJG) has 
sent us a utility for calculating HBUFFER 
sizes. Andrew Ellinor (cropper) has sent 
us CC3 Start, containing some start-up 
pokes for the CoCo 3 basic. Derrick 
Kardos (DTG) has also sent us some 
CoCo BASIC programs. 

Finally, in this area (or in the Hard- 
ware Hacking area), I have uploaded for 
hardware hackers a fascinating file that 
contains a complete description of ex- 
actly what goes on inside the new Tandy 
PAL chip for the older multipacks. Bob 
Lentz (president of the Microworks, 
makers of Macro 80C Assembler and the 
DS-69 and DS-69A digitizer for the 
CoCo) "read" that PAL chip, and has 
provided us hackers with invaluable 
information on just what it does. 

As stated above, it is likely that all the 
material currently in the OS-9 section of 



the mode requested by your terminal 
package. 

The "Last Block Handling" option is 
of little consequence to most users. It 
lets you set how the last block of an 
Xmodem text download is handled by 
the system. In the "Normal Handling" 
mode, which is the default, the last 
block is padded with null characters to 
fill it out to a standard 128-byte Xmo- 
dem block and a CONTROL-Z is sent to 
close the file. 

Two other methods for handling the 
last block are available; "Atari Mode," 
which is obviously for users of an Atari 
microcomputer, and a "No CONTROL- 
Z" mode for users of certain Apple 
computers. 

Of more direct importance to users of 
the CoCo SIG are the "Retry Count" 
and "Timeout Period" Xmodem set- 
tings. The Retry Count is the number of 
times the system tries to recover from 



the CoCo SIG will be moved to OS9 
Online by the time you read this. So you 
may have to look around there in an 
appropriate topic section to find the 
following material. As I write this, the 
following new material has arrived in our 
OS-9 area: Kevin Darling has sent us an 
"SCF Editor Plus." Rick Adams, one of 
our staff and author of the famous MONO 
command for OS-9 on the CoCo 3, has 
gone one better and given us a COLOR 
function to change the text colors on the 
CoCo 3. Mark Sunderlin (MEGABYTE) 
has sent us a mammoth amount of mate- 
rial on his favorite error-checking/ error- 
correcting protocol, ICermit. This in- 
cludes a ICermit program for the CoCo 
under OS-9, and complete tech specs on 
the Kermit protocol. Dan Connolly 
(Connolly) has provided a grouping of 
files that includes instructions on modi- 
fying the hardware of some Word-Pak I's 
and ITs to allow them to have their ports 
moved to the same address as that of the 
Word-Pak RS, thereby making them 
compatible with the CoCo 3 Multipak. 
He also provides driver software for the 
the Word-Pak in this group. Ronald Cole 
(ronaldcole) has sent us a fix for the 
OS-9 Level 1 Version 2 clock module. 

In the Utilities section of the CoCo 
SIG, Paul K. Ward (PKW) has sent us a 
very professional review of relational 
database programs, a field he has consid- 
erable expertise in. Kenneth L. Wuelzer 
(wuelzerken) has sent us an update to 
his amazing KDISK editor, that edits RS- 
DOS, MS-DOS, and Flex disks. Chris- 
topher Rak (dunsel) has sent us a disk 
index program. Jim Zito (JIMZ) and 
Steve Fabiszak (sjfraf) have also sent 
us utilities. 

In the Graphics database, Greg Miller 
has sent us an Atari STpicture converter, 
that allows a CoCo to download and 



70 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



»»> 



MULTI-PAK CP AK 

Save ROMPAKs to your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant plugging in of ROMPAKs now by 
keeping all your PAX software on disk. Includes POXEs for "PROBLEM" ROMPAKs- including the NEW 16K PAKSI (Demon 
Attack, Dragons Lair , etc) 64X DISK $24.95 

TELE PATCH III 

AH the FE&TOES of TELEPATGH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE lowercase! Now CoCo 
III compatible) (Upgrade $15 w/proof of purchase ) $29.95 

DISK UTILITY B.I A 

A multi - featuraa tool for USER FRJEM3LY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively sort, move, rename and 
kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format , copy and backup. Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, 
plus the size, load addressae and entry points of all programs. Single ccrmvand execution of both Basic and ML programs. 
32K/64K DISK $29.95 Now also CoCo III compatible* Upgrade only $15 w/proof of purchase , (see 0ct«B4 Rainbow Review) 

SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 

Write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Tel ewri , VIP Writer, etc.) and convert them to special Highly Detailed 
character sets ! Some of the sets supported are Italics , Old English, Futuristic and Block , A character set editor is 
included to create or modify custom setsl Supports moat dot - matrix printers i DISK $29.95 (see Dec '95 Rainbow Review) 

SPECTRUM DOS 

Add 2 4 NEW Disk commands with 2 Hi-Rea screens! Supports 40 track & Double- Sided drives, 6 me stepping, auto disk 
search, error trapping fi "HPROMABLE" , 64K DISK New LOW price! J $29.95 

COCO GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

Create custom greetings for any occasion : Birthdays, Anniversaries, Holidays, etc. Also BAU3ERS & SIGNS J Includes 
"GRABBER" utility - capture Hi-Res CoCo screens for your GRAPHIC LIBRARY I Easy to use £ cotes with a set of pre -drawn 
graphics. Includes a screen £ font editor, 32K DISK $29.95 

64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 

Take advantage of an expanded 64K machine. Hake an additional 8K of RAM available by relocating the Ext Basic ROM from 
$8000 to $P80Q » Copy ROMPAKS to disk (even " protected " PAKS) and create a 32K SPOOL buffer for printing. DISK $24.95 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY 

A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy of an entire diak 
of programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to tape & prints tape & disk directories. 
TAPE/DISK $24.9$ (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 

COCO III UTILITIES 

Terrific utility support programs for the new Color Computer III I Includes a CoCo II to CoCo III converter, 32K Hi-Res 
screen saver, 40/80 column Word Processor, RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH scrolling dares. 128K DISK $21.95 

THE OS-S SOLUTION 

WOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY" environment within OS-95 The OS -9 SOLUTION replaces 19 of the old " USER 
HOSTILE " commands with single keystroke, menu driven cairoands. No more complex long pathnames or remembering complicated 
syntaxes I Set all MDE parameters at the touch of keys! :$d&*0&:New LOW pricel i 1 $24.95 (see Sept *85 Rainbow Review) 

SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the following 12 programs to 
customize your own SPECTACUIAR SOFTWARE BONANZA 1 CoCo Cheekier, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, 
Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, CoCo Calendar, Schematic 
Drafting Processor, QS-9 Solution, Basic Plus, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value ) for only $99,96111 

MIKE Y-DIAL 

When used with any Hayes compatible modem & Deluxe Program Pak, adds to Hlkeyterm 4.0 the ability to Autodial 22 numbers 
from a menu £ load a set of 3 ^CROS for each directory choice. Also EASY redial & changing of MODEM settings by command 
menu. DISK $19.95 (See Dec' 86 Review) 



Ail U.S. ordera plus $3 S/H (Other $5) 
COD add $2 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
CoCo HOT LINE 718-836-1344 



S ffT'l C W * T' HiTm i i amiffi jj^j jffTl rf 11 """^ II Cnm f ^» "f* ijCS 

po box: 264 

HOWARD BEACH NY 1141 



a bad data or timeout error before 
giving up and aborting the Xmodem 
transfer. This can be set to any number 
between one and 127. The system de- 
fault is 10 retries. 

The "Timeout Period" parameter 
dictates how long the system waits for 
you to send a block during an upload, 
or how long it waits for a reply after 
sending your computer a block during 
a download. In either case, if the time- 



out period expires before the system 
receives the appropriate response, a 
timeout error is recorded internally and 
the block is transferred again. 

The system default for timeout is 15 
seconds, but can be changed to any 
number of seconds between one and 
127. If you often experience timeout 
errors during Xmodem file transfers, 
you may want to increase this number. 
Also, Delphi users in other countries 



will probably want to select a long 
timeout period because of multiple- 
network delays. Decreasing the timeout 
period will generally result in faster 
recovery from errors during a transfer, 
but may also cause unnecessary errors 
to be generated. 

That's it for this installment of Delphi 
Bureau. We will try to devote a little 
more space to other advanced settings 
in Workspace next time. □ 



display Atari ST Degas format pictures. 
Unfortunately, this will be of limited use 
until we can get routines for "uncom- 
pressing" some of the Atari pictures 
currently on Delphi. Noel Fallon (FAL- 
LON), one of the most talented CoCo 
artists 1 have ever seen, and also SysOp 
of the Shambala BBS in Oklahoma, has 
sent us a gallery of some of the CoCo 
Max and Graphicom art he has done 
over the years. Richard P. Trasborg 
(TRAS) has sent us an RLE picture con- 
verter and several nude female images. 
Don Hutchison (DONHUTCHISON) has 
given lis a dream-girl picture. John 
Stewart (HOOP) has sent us a DMP-105 
screen dump routine, and Emery Mandel 
(emandel) has uploaded a fascinating 
animated cube demo. 

In the Music database we have some 
outstanding new uploads of classical 
material from Ray Wright (raywri) and 



Scott Milliken (IDIOT). Tim Collier 
(TIMEXTWIN) has sent us "Spring," and 
Mark Raphael (markraphael) and 
Michael Fischer havesent us other tunes. 
In the Games topic area, Darrell S. 
Dillman (MINNER) has sent us Moonbase 
One, an Adventure game. 

In the Product Reviews topic area 
Denny Skala (DENNYSKALA) has sent us 
a very professional review of the Mag- 
navox 8CM515 monitor, which is fast 
becoming the most popular third-party 
RGB A color monitor for the CoCo 3. 
In the Data Communications area, I have 
uploaded a little modifier program for 
Mikeyterm that allows you to alter the 
port address it looks at for talking to the 
RS-232 hardware, and thus allows you to 
use it with a Tandy Modem Pak, the 
alternate port on a PBJ 2SP Pak, or with 
a "CoCo-ized" Dragon computer. 

As you can see, our SIG has been very 



As you can see, our SIG has been very 
busy this last month. Those of us on the 
staff here want to thank all of you who 
have ever contributed or dropped by, for 
your help and patronage. A few days 
after I send this article to rainbow we 
will have passed the 20,000 mark in 
forum messages, and will be the first 
Delphi SIG to do so. [Michael Fischer, 
of Great River, NY, posted the 20,000th 
message on December 12.] 

I am extremely pleased with the suc- 
cess of our service, and am looking 
forward to all of the changes that are in 
progress, which will make us even belter 
able to support CoCo and OS-9 users. 
Thanks again to all of you! See you on 
the CoCo SIG! 



— Marty Goodman 
rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCI I format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should besupported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions; based on a number of 
criteria. Tnose wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Pleasedo not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



Hint . . . 



Delay Play 



I have found an interesting way to utilize the 
P0KE&HFF21,&H3C and PDKE&HFF21 , &H34. For 
those who don't know, these pokes turn the cassette 
motor relay on and off, respectively. You can use this 
to alter the way a tape sounds. Put a voice or music 
tape in your recorder and unplug all computer plugs 
from the recorder except the remote plug. Then run 
the following program: 



10 INPUT"SPEED";.A 
20 P0KE&HFF21,&H3C 
30 FDR X=l TO A: NEXTX 
40 P0KE&HFF21,&H34 
50 GOTO20 



Since the value for A is a delay factor, the larger 
is, the slower the tape will be played back. 

Jon Nash 
Tulsa, OK 



r*>.r 



72 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



16K 
Disk 




(This article first appeared in the January 1984 issue of 
THE RAINBOW. Due to its popularity and to the advent of 
our rainbow ON DISK service, we are reprinting this useful 
utility. 

While this reprinting is something of a first, it is a special 
case because the issue of the magazine in which it appeared 
is out of print and back issues are no longer available. 

This does not, by any means, signal any intention to 
"recycle" other material from previous issues.) 



The Limousine Utility 

A Tape-To-Disk 
Transfer Vehicle 



By Roger Schrag 



When lots of folks first gel a Color Computer, they 
hook up a cassette recorder to save their pro- 
grams, figuring they will get a disk drive later on. 
By the time they do get a disk drive, they have accumulated 
a large library of programs and data files on tape. 

It then becomes something of a chore to transfer all of 
those files from tape to disk. A BASIC program needs to be 
loaded from tape and saved to disk. A machine language 
program needs to be CLQflDMed from tape, analyzed so that 
the addresses may be found, and finally SfiVEMed to disk. 
Transferring data files, meanwhile, can often be a total 
nightmare. 

What 1 would like to present here is a simple tape-to-disk 
file transferring utility. The source code is shown in the 
program listing, and may be keyed in and assembled with 
most any editor/ assembler in a straightforward manner 

In short, this utility will readjust about any standard tape 
file and transfer it to disk. The disk file will have the exact 
same attributes (BASIC or machine language, ASCII or 
binary, etc.) as the tape file, and the disk file will be fully 
loadable and operational. 

Since this utility uses three undocumented routines in the 



Roger Schrag, currently studying computer science at the 
University of California at Berkeley, enjoys working with 
Co Co and writing articles for THE RA IN BOW. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 



disk ROM, it may not work on systems 
with other than Radio Shack Disk 
BASIC. It checks to see which version of 
the disk ROM you have, and then 
branches to the appropriate address. 

To transfer a file from tape to disk, 
load the assembled program and exe- 
cute it. Thescreen will clear and you will 
be prompted to prepare the cassette 
containing the file to be transferred and 
to press ENTER. Cue the tape to the 
beginning of the file and press ENTER. 
The tape's sound will be played over the 
TV's speaker to aid you in locating the 
recording on the cassette. If you cue the 
tape badly and the tape starts out in the 
middle of the file, don't worry; simply 
reposition the tape to the beginning. 
The transfer utility will sift patiently 
through the middle of a file, or even 
through garbage, until it finds what it's 
looking for. 

When the transfer utility does find the 
beginning of a file, it will stop the 
recorder and print the file's name and 
type. You will be asked if you want to 
transfer this file. If you do, press the Y 
key. Otherwise press the N key. You will 
be prompted to prepare the cassette 
again. 

As the file loads in, a block will blink 
in the upper-left corner of the screen. If 
there isn't enough memory to hold the 
whole file, or if there is an I/O Error, 
a message will be printed and the 
transfer terminated. You will then be 
invited to start the transfer utility over 
again or return to BASIC. 

BASIC programs saved in non-ASCII 
form and machine language programs 
saved with the C5AVEM command are 
organized differently on disk than on 
tape. So when the tape file is fully 



The listing: TPTDDSK 


00001 








00002 








00003 








00004 








00005 








00006 








00007 








00008 








00009 








00010 


1000 






00011 


1000 


10CE 


1000 


00012 


1004 


86 


7E 


00013 


1006 


8E 


11B2 


00014 


1009 


B7 


018E 


00015 


100C 


BF 


018F 


00016 


100F 


8E 


1460 


00017 


1012 


A6 


84 


00018 


1014 


43 




00019 


1015 


63 


84 


00020 


1017 


Al 


84 


00021 


THE RAINBOW February 1987 



loaded into memory, the transfer utility 
will automatically reformat the data as 
needed so that it will work correctly on 
disk. (BASIC programs saved in ASCII 
form, data files and machine language 
programs created by ED TA SM+ don't 
need any modifying.) 

When the tape file is finished loading 
and reformatting is complete, a message 
to this effect will appear on the screen. 
You will now be asked for the name you 
want to give to the disk file. Enter any 
filespec that is valid in BASIC but don't 
enclose it in quotes. If you don't specify 
an extension, none will be used, and if 
you don't specify a drive number, the 
default will be used. 

The transfer utility will next save the 
file onto disk. If an error occurs any- 
where along the way, a message will be 
printed and you will be prompted again 
to enter the name for the disk file. So, 
if an error occurs while saving to disk, 
you won't have to reload the tape file 
all over again. 

When the file has been successfully 
saved on disk, you will be asked if you 
would like to start the transfer utility 
anew. If you have more tape files to 
transfer, then press the Y key. Pressing 
the N key will return you to BASIC. 

At any time the transfer utility is 
waiting for keyboard input, you may 
press BREAK to cancel the transfer in 
progress. You will then be asked if you 
would like to start over again or return 

to BASIC. 

This utility will transfer any BASIC 



accurately. It may not transfer protected 
programs or automatic execute loaders, 
however. 

One interesting note: On cassette, 
there is no distinction between data files 
and BASIC programs saved in ASCII. 
That is, there is no way to tell whether 
a file was created with the command 
QPEWO" ,-l"filename" or with the 
command C5RVE "filename" What 
does this mean? If you use the utility to 
transfer a BASIC program saved in 
ASCII, you will be told that the file is 
a data file, even though it is actually a 
BASIC program. There is no harm in 
this, however, because the disk file 
created will load correctly withtheLDRD 
command, in spite of being labeled as 
a data file. 

All files created by the Color Com- 
puter start out with a 15-byte block of 
data called a "header." The header 
contains the filename, the file's type, 
whether it is in ASCII or binary, and 
whether the tape recorder must be 
turned off and back on between loading 
each block of code. This leaves four 
bytes that are usually unused. The one 
exception is in machine language pro- 
grams saved by the CSRVEM command. 
Here, the last four bytes contain the 
program's start and execute addresses. 
The transfer utility uses all of the 
information in a file's header to load it 
properly and reformat it if necessary. 
Some of this information is then trans- 
ferred into the disk directory. 



program, BASIC program saved in 
ASCII, machine language program 
created by CSRVEM, machine language 
program created by EDTASM+, or just 
about any data file to disk easily and 



(Questions about this utility may be 
addressed to the author at 2054 Man- 
ning Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90025. 
Please enclose an SASE for a re- 
sponse.) □ 



****************************** 

* TAPE TO DISK FILE TRANSFER * 
****************************** 

* 

*By : 

* Roger Schrag 

* 2054 Manning Avenue 

* Los Angeles, CA 90025 
* 

* 



START 



MLOOP 



ORG 


$1000 


Low area of memory 


LDS 


#$1000 


Set up stack 


LDA 


#$7E 


Opcode for JMP nn 


LDX 


fERROR 


Address to JMP to 


STA 


$18E 


Patch into Basic's 


STX 


$18F 


Error vector 


LDX 


#BUFFER 


Start of free memory 


LDA 


/X 


Read a byte 


COMA 




Complement register 


COM 


,x 


Complement RAM 


CMPA 


/X 


Is the RAM good? 



1019 


26 


04 


00022 




BNE 


GOTMEM 


T "P not ctnn f hp fpef 


10 IB 


63 


80 


00023 




COM 


,X+ 


Restore hvte and cro 


101D 


20 


F3 


00024 




BRA 


MLOOP 


Check more bvtes 


10 IF 


30 


89 FF00 


00025 


GOTKEM 


LEAX 


-$100 , X 

V J- A 7 A 7 / 


Toupt nm' ntpv cnmp 

JJUWCL 1 L. I_ DU11IC 


1023 


BF 


143C 


00026 




STX 


TOPMEM 


Qpf ton of mpm or v 


1026 


10CE 


1000 

f f f 


00027 


BEGIN 


LDS 


#$1000 

,r " A A 


Dpcpf efapV TiO"intPT* 

AC O C O I CI V . JV LJ V_/ ±11 l c; i_ 


102A 


86 


60 


00028 




LDA 


#$60 


Rlanle on thp cfrppn 


102C 


8E 


0400 

/ / / 


00029 




LDX 


#$400 

^ r r 


Tod of screen 


102F 


9F 


88 


00030 




STX 


$88 


Place cursor there 


1031 


A7 


80 


00031 


CLS 


STA 


, x+ 


Cl e^r thp cnrppri 


1033 


8C 


0600 

X f f 


00032 




CMPX 


#$600 

ii t a^ a^ 


One bvte at a time 


1036 


25 


F9 


00033 




BLO 


CLS 


• • • 


1038 


5F 




00034 




CLRB 




Use ROM routine to 


1039 


BD 


A99D 


00035 




JSR 


$A99D 


Activate taoe AUDIO 


103C 


8E 


1 28F 


00036 




LDX 


#TITLE 


Title messaae 

A b^bi b^k ^a* Alt ^a* a^ W ' ^ ^a* 


103F 


BD 


11F1 


0003 7 




JSR 


PRINTM 


Print the messaae 

-*» ^ at 4 «a« A> X >a » aV& 1 Vi a f aW V— -*■ * — < Sa* 


1042 


BD 


11F9 


00038 




JSR 


INPUT 


Wait for Enter 3cev 

■ W ^ m i 1 ak ^a 1 -X— a» < A a) ^a* ^ba -* W ^a* T 


1045 


7F 


0985 


00039 

/ft 




CLR 


$985 


Shut off drives so 

*-i f* A A ^a* ^La ' «A aW ak W V ^ a. ^ aW 


1048 


7F 


0986 


00040 




CLR 


$986 


Thev won't run endlesslv 

■k «W X "i * ▼ ▼ W Va^ A K W ata %A a. A > » A A aaas ^a* MaT > ^ «L T 


104B 


7F 


FF40 


00041 




CLR 


$FF40 


Durincr cassette I/O 

fca< aa aia A A ™ > r ' i * . ^a# ka* ^a* W ^a* X ^a^ 


104E 


AD 


9F A004 


00042 


GETHED 


JSR 


[$A004 ] 

L ' A A J 


Locate new recordincr 

•has ^a' ^ VA ^» > j r A « V i> ~ V Aw ^a>« ^aa' ^a' Aw \A ak A A 


1052 


8E 


1450 


00043 

f f r 




LDX 


#HEADER 


Tell ROM to read data 

aaa ^a* aaaa aaai 4» » #^ A va* ^ar aha ^a* a\ %A 


1055 


9F 


7E 


0004 4 




STX 


$7E 


Into HEADER buffer 

aV A A ^aT A A aba* A A aaf AaaJ — k X a*_< M A] A] W -1— 


1057 


AD 


9F A006 


00045 




JSR 


[ $A00 6 ] 

L ' A r J 


Read some data 


105B 


0D 


7C 


00046 




TST 


$7C 


Was it a file header? 

v * a» aaa* a^ aa * aW ^aa* a> A ^aa* w^** ^aawk ^aa^ aha ■ 


105D 


26 


EF 


00047 




BNE 


GETHED 


Try again if not 


105F 


0D 


81 


00048 




TST 


$81 


Was there an 10 error? 


1061 


26 


EB 


00049 

fir 




BNE 


GETHED 


Try aaain if so 

aw aaa W «n ^ ^HB^a ^aas aV 4b ^aa> ^a^B hr ^a^ 


1063 


BD 


11DE 


00050 

rrr r 




JSR 


MTROFF 


Shut off taDe motor 

Wjv* A A vA Vjb* W aka ak> Via* wA ha* > ^ ill ^a» W W As 


1066 


8E 


04A0 

r r 


00051 




LDX 


#$4A0 

if " * * A^ 


Set cursor position 

W W > i N^k 1 Baf >a^ aba f 1 SX a>/ ak W aaki SX A A 


1069 


9F 


88 


00052 




STX 


$88 


At mid screen 

A A Alt aa ^— ^» — aaf > ^ aaa> N_ar > r A. _ 


106B 


8E 


12E1 


00053 

rrr 




LDX 


#TNAME 


"Filename is. ♦ • " 

^B> ala aaaa ^a* A A va^ m fc* ^a» ^a kaf ▼ • V 


106E 

iAa m+ \— * AaJ 


BD 


11F1 


00054 

rrr 




JSR 


PRINTM 


Print the messaae 

a* aa ^aai at & W 1 ^a* ah A ^a" all ^a* aaa* M %n * "1 k^ 


1071 


8E 


1450 


00055 




LDX 


#HEADER 


Point to filename 

Aa W aAa A A *»* >ja< A> aAa aa A A VA A h 1 N * 


1074 


C6 


08 


00056 




LDB 


#$8 


8 characters long 


107 6 


A6 


80 


00057 


PNAME 


LDA 


,X+ 


Get character 


1078 


BD 


11E7 


00058 

AAA 




JSR 


VIDEO 


Print on screen 


107B 


5A 




00059 

AAA 




DECB 




Decrement counter 


107C 


26 


F8 


00060 

rrr r 




BNE 


PNAME 


Print whole name 


107E 


8E 


12F4 


00061 




LDX 


#TTYPE 


"It is a. . ■ " 


1081 


BD 


11F1 


00062 




JSR 


PRINTM 


Print the message 


1084 


8E 


1287 


00063 

rrr 




LDX 


#TTYPES 


Table of types 


1087 


B6 


1458 


00064 

rrr 




LDA 


HEADER+8 Get file's type 


108 A 


81 


02 


00065 

rrr 




CMPA 


#$2 


Is it legal? 


108C 


23 


02 


00066 




BLS 


OKTYPE 


Skip ahead if so 


108E 


86 


03 


00067 




LDA 


#$3 


It's "Non standard" 


1090 

r r 


48 




00068 


OKTYPE 


LSLA 




Type times two 


1091 


AE 


86 


00069 

AAA 




LDX 


A,X 


Get addr off table 


1093 


BD 


11F1 


00070 

r r r r 




JSR 


PRINTM 


Print the message 


1096 

aAa *^ >aa* 


8E 


133D 


00071 




LDX 


#XFERIT 


"Transfer it?" 


1099 


BD 


1224 


00072 




JSR 


YESNO 


Get yes or no 


109C 


26 


88 


00073 




BNE 


BEGIN 


If no, try again 


109E 


8E 


14 60 


00074 

rrr ' 




LDX 


# BUFFER 


Start of memory 


10A1 


20 

r 


05 


00075 




BRA 


SYNC 


Jump into load loop 


10A3 


7D 


145A 


00076 


TLOAD 


TST 


HEADER* 


$^A Need to resyncronize? 


10A6 


27 


0B 

r 


00077 




BEQ 


NOSYNC 


Skip routine if not 


10A8 


34 


10 


00078 


SYNC 


PSHS 


X 


Save X 


10AA 


BD 


11DE 


00079 

rrr 




JSR 


MTROFF 


Turn off tape motor 


10 AD 


AD 


9F A004 


00080 

r r r r 




JSR 


[$A004] 


Resyncronize 


10B1 

JW a—* — 


35 


10 


00081 

rrr - 1 - 




PULS 


X 


Restore X 


10B3 

-J- *a/ 


9F 


7E 

* Aaal 


00082 

rrr 


NOSYNC 


STX 


$7E 


Tell ROM where to put data 


10B5 


AD 


9F A006 


00083 




JSR 


[$A006] 


Load some data 


10B9 


C6 


01 


00084 




LDB 


#$1 


Code for I/O ERROR 


10BB 


0D 


81 


00085 




TST 


$81 


Was there an 10? 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 75 





1 £71 9 £ 


£71 £71F1 
yj yj £ a. 


00 0 8 fk 
yj yj yj o \j 




LBNE 


ERROR 

AJ A X ' A V 


Branch if so 

AW Jhm Wi A A ^W A A ^h. w 






7C 


000R7 
^u^u yj o / 




LDA 


£7C 


Check block's tvne 




o X 


FF 


00 088 

XJ XJ XJ \J \J 




CMPA 


#$FF 


End of the file? 




9 7 


yj£ 


0008 9 
rrr u - 7 




BEQ 
i_/ j_i ^ 


TAPEND 

■A» A A A> A^ * * ^ 


Skip ahead if so 


i o\nn 




000Q 0 
pyjyjyyj 




DECA 

1_ ' J_l V-* X A 




Valid data block? 




1 £71 9 ^ 


£71 0F£ 


000QT 
yjyjyjy± 




LBNE 


ERROR 


I/O ERROR if not 

-A> / N-/ AJl\A\ W A\ -A. A- * IV W 




nr 


1*1 


00092 
yjyjyj^t. 




CMPX 

w AAA* J k 


TOPMEM 

•A» >-/ A> A A AJ A A 


Out of buffer soace? 




9 5 


H9 


00093 
yjyjyj?^ 




BLO 


TLOAD 


Lood back if not 


i 01m 
±y)u± 


\- o 


FF 

r r 


yjyjyjw 




T.HB 


#£FF 
tt y r r 


Code for BUFFER FULL 

w w \JL. ^te« i. wi. Ate/ V./ X X Aj1\ X U JJJJ 


l (Tim 


7F 


1 1 R9 


0 0095 
yiyjyizju 




JMP 

W AAA. 


ERROR 

A_l V-/ A V 


Cause the error 

^ fc W A A ^ * ^ * ate ate ate 


A. yj LJ\j 


RF 

LJ X 


143E 

_L "» <■* J_i 


00096 
yjyjyj z? \j 


TAPEND 


STX 

> r vA> Jl A 


EOF 


Save the file's end 


10D9 

-L fc/ LJ «✓ 


BD 

LJ LJ 


11DE 


00097 




JSR 


MTROFF 


Shut off tape motor 




B6 

LJ \J 


1458 

J. ** *J KJ 


0 0098 

rrr • J u 




LDA 


HEADER+8 Get flle f s type 


1 01HF 


o X 


0 9 


00099 




CMPA 

# AAA. A A 


#$2 


Was it M.L. program? 


10E1 


9 


2 F 


0 0100 

A* A* rr 




BNE 

w A ~ AJ 


NOTML 


Skip ahead if not 


_L yj Lj^j 


/ LJ 


J. ** JA 


0 0101 
yjyj±yj± 




TST 


HEADER+$0A In CSAVEM form? 


J. ^LO 


9 £ 


9 A 


001 09 
yjyj±yj£ 




BNE 


NOTML 


Skip ahead if not 






00103 


*Tape files created by 


CSAVEM must be edited 








0 0104 
yjyj±yjH 


*bef ore 


they 


will load 


properly from disk 


_LJ0 £j O 


1 £71 




0 01 0 R 
yjyj±yj d 




LEAX 


$0A ; X 


Change EOF to make 




RF 




0 01 0fi 
yjyj±yjo 




STX 


EOF 


File 10 bytes longer 


i (71ph 


FT 


It JD 


001 07 
yjyj±yj / 




LDD 


HEADER+$0B Get EXEC address 


1 

A-xJ £ jJ 


FH 

Hi LJ 


OT 
O J 


0 01 08 
yjyj±yjo 




STD 




Put it at very end 




£ F 

D r 


P 9 


yj yj±yjy 




CLR 




Preceed EXEC address 




o r 


P 9 


0 0110 
^ yj ±±yj 




CLR 


#$FF 


By two zeroes 


A. yj l \j 


8 6 


FF 


0 0111 




LDA 


Preceed all that by 


A.yj £ O 


A7 


8 9 

O Zi 


00112 
yi y> a. j- c* 




STA 


/-X 


An $FF 


1 01FA 
±yj£ f\ 


r\ D 


1 A 


001 1 3 
yj yj a. a. -j 


FIX1 


LDA 


-6 ; X 


Move the entire file 


lpFC 


A7 


82 


00114 




STA 


,-x 


Over five bytes. This 


lpFE 


8C 


1465 


00115 




CMPX 


#BUFFER+5 Leaves five bytes 


1101 


22 


F7 


00116 




BHI 


FIX1 


At the very beginning 



EACH PROGRAM COMES WITH 

10 FREE DISK 



S.T.A.G. - A GRADEBOOK ■ $35.00 

A full year gradebook for up to 50 students. 

DIRECTORY VIEWER - $19.98 

Create a library of disk DIR's. Recover DIR's. 

B-FILES - $24.98 

A new super memory saving file system. 

VCR DATABASE & 

MINI TITLE SCREEN MAKER - $20.98 

File system lor tapes & title screen maker. 

FILE VIEWER - $19.98 

Single key file loading. View all disk files. 

PUZZLE MATH - S19.98 

18 Hi-Res Pictures. Game for learning simple math 

SYNONYM & ANTONYM - $19.98 

Hi-Res game. Creale lists and print test sheets 

CHECKBOOK III - $19.98 COCO III ONLY 

Hi-Res graphic entry & display. 



5% DS/DD DISK WITH SLEEVES, W P TA9S, LABELS 10/S5.50 PLUS $2.50 
S/H. ADD $.50 S/H FOR EACH 10 DISK ORDERED. 



ALL PROGRAMS FOR 64K COCO 1,2.3. 1 DISK DRIVE. ADD $3.00 S/H FOR 
PROGRAM ORDERS. ADD $1 .00 S/ H FOR EACH ADDITIONAL PROGRAM. C.O.D 
$2 EXTRA. CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR FREE CATALOG. STATE FOR WHICH 

coco. 



EXCITING OPPORTUNITY FOR NEW PROGRAMMERS TO MARKET THEIR PRO- 
GRAMS. WRITE FOR DETAILS. 



SECA - P.O. BOX 3134 
GULFP0RT, MS 39505 
(601) 832-8236 



"XPNDR2 and SuperGuide - 
an Ideal Expansion Card Set" 



— RAINBOW 2/OG 

HARDWARE REVIEW 




RAINBOW 



XPNDR2 S39.95 each or 2/S76 
This prololype card features a AO pin 
connector for projectsrequiringan on- 
line disk system or ROM paks. The 
CoCo signals are brought out to wire- 
wrap pins. Special gold plated spring 
clips provide reliable and noisefree 
disk operation plus solid support tor 
vertical mounting ol thecontroller. The 
entire 4.3* 7 inch card is drilled lor ICs. 
Assembled, tested and ready to run. 

XPNDR1 S19.95 each or 2/S36 
A rugged 4.3*6.2 inch bare breadboard 
that brings the CoCo signals out to 
labeled pads. Both XPNOR cards are 
double-sided glass/epoxy, have gold 
plated edge connectors, thru-hole 
plating and are designed with heavy 
power and ground buses. They're 
drilled for standard 0.3 and 0.6 inch 
wide dual in-line wirewrap sockets; 
with aO. 1 inch grid on the outboardend 
for connectors. 

SuperGuide S3. 95 each 
Here is a unique plastic insert that 
aligns and supports printed circuit 
cards in IheCoCocarlridge port. Don't 
forget to ORDER ONE FOR YOUR 
XPNDR CARDS. 



Included with each XPNDR card 
are 8 pages of APPLICATION 
NOTES to help you learn about 
chips and how to connect thern to 
your CoCo. 





To order or for technical informa- 
tion call: 

(206)782-6809 

weekdays 8 a.m. to noon 

We pay shipping on prepaid orders. 
For immediate shipmenl send 
check, money order or the number 
andexpiration date of yourVISA or 
MASTERCARD to: 



ROBOTIC :^r< MICROSYSTEMS 

BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 




76 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



1103 


FC 


145D 


00117 

pp -L -L. 1 




LDD 


HEADER+$0D Get START address 


1106 


ED 


83 


00118 




STD 


X 


Add it into file 


1108 


FC 


143E 


00119 
p p ii^ 




T.DD 


EOF 


Get length of file 


110B 


83 


14 6A 


00120 

r r r 




SUBD 

V./ i-J i-^ 


#BUFFER+$0A Minus 10 


110E 


ED 


83 


00121 




STD 


X 


Add this into file 


1110 


6F 


82 


00122 




CLR 

>— * oLJl\ 


,-X 


Make first byte zero 


1112 


7D 


1458 


00123 


NOTML 


TST 


HEADER* £ 


1 Is it Basic program? 

i- 


1115 


26 


ID 


00124 

p p A. 4t ~9 




BNE 


NOTBAS 


Skip ahead if not 








0012 5 

p p A- £t *J 


*Non ASCII Basic prorams 


► also must be edited 


1117 


BE 


143E 


0012 6 




LDX 


EOF 


Change end of file 


111A 


3 0 


03 


00127 




LEAX 


3 # X 


To make the file 


111C 


BF 


143E 


00128 




STX 


EOF 


Three bytes longer 


111F 


A6 


1C 


00129 


FIX2 


LDA 


•4,X 


Move entire file 


1121 


A7 


82 


00130 




STA 




Over three bytes , so 


1123 


8C 


1463 


0013 1 




CMPX 


#BUFFER+3 The three extra bytes 


1126 


2 2 


F7 
i / 


0 1 1 2 

p p -L ~J C» 




BHI 


FIX2 


Are at the beginning 


1128 


FC 


1 4 IF 

1 4 J ill 


$ 0 1 1 3 

p p J — 3 J 




LDD 


EOF 


Get length of file 


112B 


83 


14 63 


00134 

JL/ JL/ J_ «J ^ 




SUBD 


#BUFFER+3 Minus three 


112E 


ED 


R1 


00115 




STD 


x 


Add it into file 


1130 


8 6 


FF 


0013 6 




LDA 


Make very first byte 


113 2 


A7 

i i / 


82 


0 013 7 




STA 


#$52^ 


Of file an $FF 


1134 


8E 


0520 

t/ i™/ *t„fl %J 


00138 


NOTBAS 


LDX 


Set cursor position 


1137 


9F 


88 


00139 




STX 


$88 


At mid screen 


1139 


8E 


1353 


0014 0 




LDX 


#LDCOMP 


18 Load is complete 11 


113C 


BD 


11F1 


00141 
i4i 




JSR 


PRINTM 


Print the message 


11 3F 




1368 

1 J u u 


0 0142 


RETRY 


LDX 


#DNAME 


"Disk filename?" 


1142 

1 JL 4 


BD 


1 1 Fl 
iiii 


00 143 




JSR 


PRINTM 


Print the message 


1 1 A R 

114 J 


AJ u 


1 1 FQ 
ii i 7 


Pi 1 A 4 




JSR 


INPUT 


Get the filename 


1140 


nr 
jji-i 


1 4 R 

1 4 *J O 


1 4 R 

jV p 1 4 «J 




LDX 


HEADER+S 


> Get file's type 


1 1 *i u 


RF 


CI Q R 7 


CI 0 1 A 

JV p 1 4 O 




STX 


$957 


Store it 


1 1 4F 

114 SLt 


R6 
ID O 


OIQ R A 


$ 1 A 7 




LDA 


$95A 


Get default drive # 


l l «J l 


9 7 


"O o 


00148 

tv LV «L T O 




STA 


^ Cf O 


Store it 


1 i n 
ii j J 


R V 


CI Q A C 


01 All A Q 

jtJjtJ 143 




LDX 


$$94 C 


Clear out the 


1 1 R6 

1 1 w> U 


R6 

O vJ 




0i 01 1 R 0 
pp±^p 




LDA 


#$20 


Filename storage 


1 1 RR 
1 1 o 


A7 


Q « 

O JO 


01 05 1 R 1 
pp 1- 3 1 


BLANK 


STA 


,x+ 

#$957 


Area 


1 1 RA 

1 1 JA 


OP 


CIQ R7 
jo y / 


01011 R9 

p p -L +J 




CMPX 


» • « 


1 1 RH 

1 1 w> U 


2 R 


FQ 


0 0151 

ItV If 1 «^ J 




BLO 


BLANK 


ABA 


1 1 RF 


or 

O Hi 


1 4 4 CI 

14 4jW 


00 1 R 4 

p p 1 4 




LDX 


#INKEY 


Name person entered 


116 2 

1 1 L) 4 


C6 


FF 


01 01 1 R5 

p p A. —J —> 




LDB 


#$FF 


Prepare B 


1 1 £ A 


R P 




01 01 1 R^ 


GETLEN 


INCB 




Get the length of 


llo J 


o JJ 


Q R 
O D 


01 01 1 R 7 
p p ± D / 




TST 


B r X 


The person's entry 


1 1 67 

1 1 D / 


0 6 


r ij 


01 01 1 R R 

p p A. -) O 




BNE 


GETLEN 


Into B 


"1 "1 6 Q 

iioy 




1 1 / D 


01 01 1 RQ 
p p ± d 




LDU 


a BACK 


Pllf rpfn >-r\ 7\ c\ H T'P ^ ^ 

X Ut U» 1 w L» Ul i 1 CL v-1 \A J_ C O O 


l 1 6P 

llOw 


"\ A 

.3 4 


A 01 

4 p 


Oi 011 601 
p p ± o p 




PSHS 


u 


Onto stack 


1 1 6F 
1 1 D Ju 


6 F 
o r 




jyjo l o 1 




C LR 


#DFNAME 


Make space on stack 


I 1 7fl 

I I / p 




1 T7R 


01011 6 9 

p p A.\J c. 




LDU 


Use ROM routine to 


1 1 / «j 


7F 


1 26D 

J- <i \J LJ 


0 0163 

p p A. \J *J 




JMP 


USEROM 


Prepare the filename 


1176 


8 6 


4F 


00164 


BACK 


LDA 


#$4F 


ASCII 0 for Output 


1178 


C6 


0l 


00165 




LDB 


#$1 


Use device #1 (disk) 


1 1 7 A 

11/ Xi 


CF 

V-^ Aj 


1 27F 


00166 
P P j- \j \j 




LDU 


#DOPEN 


Use ROM routine to 


i i 7n 

1 1 / u 


nn 

13 U 


1 Z VJ LJ 


010! 1 6 7 
p p ± o / 




JSR 


USEROM 


Open the file 


1 1 a jfl 


O Hi 


"] A Aft 
1 4 Op 


01 01 1 ^ Q 
1 O o 




t nv 
LiJJa 


#BUFFER 


Start of memory 


1 "1 Q T 
llo J 


o a 

O D 


ft -1 

01 


0101 T Q 

>9>9 1 o y 




LDA 


#$1 


Select output device 


lloD 


Q "7 

y / 


o r 


PP 1 'P 




STA 


$6F 


# 1 (the disk file) 


1 lo / 


2k 6 


o « 

O JO 


01 ft 1 7 1 
p p ± / ± 


DWRITE 


LDA 


,x+ 


Get a byte 


1 I on 

iioy 


J 4 


1 CI 
1)5 


0! 03 1 7 7 

p p A. 1 £, 




PSHS 


X 


Save X 


1 i on 

llOD 




y r jt\pp z 


(A 01 1 7 ^ 
p p ± / o 




JSR 


[$A002] 


Write it to file 


I 1 RF 

I I o r 


1 R 


1 CI 
l^ 


p p 1 / 4 




PULS 


X 


Restore X 


I 1 Q 1 

I I y 1 


DP 

n\-> 


14 jL 


01 01 1 7 R 
p p ± / o 




CMPX 


EOF 


More to write? 


1134 


z D 


r 1 


ft 01 1 7 6 
pp ± / O 




BLO 


DWRITE 


Skip back if so 


1196 


CE 


1283 


00177 




LDU 


#DCLOSE 


Use ROM routine to 


1199 


BD 


126D 


00178 




JSR 


USEROM 


Close the disk file 


119C 


8E 


1379 


00179 




LDX 


#ALDONE 


"Transfer complete 11 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 77 



119F 


BD 


11F1 


00180 


FINISH 


JSR 


11A2 


8E 


13C4 


00181 




LDX 


11A5 


BD 


1224 


00182 




JSR 


11A8 


1027 


FE7A 


0018 3 




LBEQ 


11AC 


0F 


71 


00184 




CX-tR 


11AE 


6E 


9F FFFE 


00185 




JMP 








00186 


♦Control goes 


11B2 


34 


04 


00187 


ERROR 


PSHS 


11B4 


CE 


1283 


00188 




LDU 


11B7 


BD 


126D 


00189 




JSR 


11BA 


8D 


22 


00190 




BSR 


11BC 


E6 


E4 


00191 




LDB 


11BE 


CE 


13D9 


00192 




LDU 


11C1 


AE 


CI 


00193 


GETERR 


LDX 


11C3 


El 


C4 


00194 




CMPB 


11C5 


27 


04 


0019% 






11C7 


6D 


C0 


001$$ 




TST 


11C9 


26 


F6 


00197 




BNE 


11CB 


BD 


11F1 


00198 


GOTERR 


JSR 


11CE 


35 


04 


00199 




PULS 


11D0 


8E 


1399 


00200 




LDX 


11D3 


CI 


01 


00201 




CMPB 


11D5 


27 


C8 


00202 




BEQ 


11D7 


CI 


FF 


00203 




CMPB 


11D9 


27 


C4 


00204 




BEQ 


11DB 


7E 


113F 


00205 




JMP 


11DE 


B6 


FF21 


00206 


MTROFF 


LDA 


11E1 


84 


F7 


00207 




ANDA 


11E3 


B7 


FF21 


00208 




STA 


11E6 


39 




00209 


RETURN 


RTS 


11E7 


34 


16 


00210 


VIDEO 


PSHS 


11E9 


0Y 


6F 


00211 




T tlB? 


11EB 


AD 


9F A002 


00212 




JSR 


11EF 


35 


96 


00213 




PULS 


11F1 


A6 


80 


00214 


PRINTM 


LDA 


11F3 


27 


Fl 


0021S 




BEQ 


11F5 


8D 


F0 


0021& 




BSR 


11F7 


20 


F8 


00211 




BRA 


11F9 


8E 


144$ 


00218 


INPUT 


LDX 


11FC 


8D 


42 


00219 


INI 


BSR 


11FE 


81 


0D 


00220 




CMPA 


1200 


26 


04 


00221 




BNE 


12^2 


6F 


84 


00222 

* * 




CLR 


12J34 


20 


El 


00222 




BRA 


12$6 


81 


08 


00224 


IN2 


CMPA 


1208 


26 


0B 


00225 




BNE 


120A 


8C 


1440 


00226 




CMPX 


120D 


27 


ED 


00221 






120Y 


6F 


82 


00228 




CLR 


1211 


8D 


D4 


00229 




BSR 


1213 


20 


E7 


00230 




BRA 


1215 


81 


20 


00231 


IN3 


CMPA 


1217 


25 


E3 


00232 




BLO 


1219 


8C 


144F 


0023 3 




CMPX 


121C 


27 


DE 


00234 




BEQ 


121E 


A7 


80 


00235 




STA 


1220 


8D 


C5 


00236 




BSR 


1222 


20 


D8 


00231 




BRA 


1224 


BD 


11F1 


00238 


YESNO 


JSR 


1227 


8D 


17 


00239 


YN1 


BSR 


1229 


81 


4E 


00240 




CMPA 


122B 


26 


08 


00241 




BNE 


122D 


0 TJ* 


1438 


00242 




LDX 



PRINTM Print the message 

#AGAIN "Start program anew?" 

YESNO Get yes or no 

BEGIN Restart if yes 

$71 Make it a cold start 

[$FFFE] Reinitialize system 
to ERROR when any error occurs 

B Save error code 

#DCLOSE Use ROM routine to 

USEROM Close the disk file 

MTROFF Shut off tape motor 

f S Get error code 

#ERRS Table of error codes 

,U++ Get addr of message 

,U Compare codes 

GOTERR Skip ahead if match 

,U+ End of table? 

GETERR Skip back if not 

PRINTM Print error message 

B Restore error code 

#CANCEL "Function cancelled" 

#$1 Cancel procedure if 

FINISH Error occurred while 

#$FF Loading the tape file 

FINISH But if file loaded OK, 

RETRY Then ask aga in for filename 

$FF21 Shut off tape motor 

#$F7 Reset the bit in PIA 

$FF21 Store it in PIA 

Return 

X, D Save X and D 

$6F Device %0 (screen) 

[$A002] Print character 

D , X , PC Restore and return 

, X+ Get a byte of message 

RETURN All done if a zero 

VIDEO Otherwise print it 

PRINTM Loop back for more 

#INKEY Start of inkey buffer 

GETKEY Get a key 

#$j3D Enter key? 

IN2 Skip ahead if not 

,X Put 0 at end of data 

VIDEO Print CR and return 

#$8 Backspace? 

IN3 Skip ahead if not 

# INKEY Anything to backspace over? 

INI Ignore it if not 

, -X Erase char from buffer 

VIDEO Erase it from screen 

INI Branch back for more 

#$2,0 Non-alphanumeric? 

INI Ignore it if so 
#INKEY-h$0F Is buffer full? 

INI Ignore it if so 

, X+ Put char in buffer 

VIDEO Print it on screen 

INI Branch back for more 

PRINTM Print prompt 

GETKEY Get key 

#$4E Is it "N"? 

YN2 Skip ahead if not 

#NO "No" 



78 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Fantasy Clip Art Disk 

Gnomes ? el u^s ? dragons o.nd more- • ■ 
More than thirty clips for CocotnaK- - ■ 

ALL HEW!!! 



" p n ■■ ^ j I. 



1 ' ■ ■ . * - L r" ■ L _> J " 

"■-■■Jl -*-L- : J . 1 y ■ 



i 




.\v.v .v.r. .. V; : &-?.* \ 




Uoconio.x • * 

64K EXE: disk $14-95 



Oriental Gallery I 

Twentu new ful I -screen pictures from a 
talented graphic art i st ■ - . o.L I ready to 
print or use with Uour graphic edifor- 

rtLL HEN Ml 




M 


S 


O 


o 


R 


F 


E 


T 


T 


W 


O 


A 


N 


R 




E 


B 




A 




Y 






3 Leo.ue uou w i th 
answers'? If so? 
And Graph i cs is 



--'Did the- manual, for 
your new Color Computer 
more questions than 

Co lor Computer 3 Bos i cs 
what you need! 
This practical guide to using the 
Color Computer 3 is written by Coco 
users for Coco users. It's crammed with 
examples arid prog rams to show you how to 
use the new 6«asic commands- 
No t only that, Co I. a r Computer- 3 
B as i cs find Graph i cs comes \>) \ in a d i sk so 
you don' X have to type in the programs 
you rse I f - 

Included is an accurate description 
of the 64 composite and RGB colors plus 
palette suggestions so uou can show your 
graph i cs on ony k i nd of d i sp [ ay - Reu i ews 
of hardware and guides to some softwo.re 
for the new machine- 

Unlock the power in your Color 
Computer 3! 

A disk full of pictures and progro/ns 
plus a manual full of examples arid 
susses t i ons £19. 9S 



A SUPER COLOR PRINTER 
Tine OKIMATE 20 
AT A SUPER LITTLE PRICE! 

Prints ten characters to the inch, 
twelve characters fifteen characters to the inch, 
italics, I tal ics. I tal ics . 



Under! ine' 



P e r s c r 



o t 



Subscript 



Small. Light weight. Quiet. 
Prints up to tfO characters per second. 
Prints four color graphics. Includes 
disk software for black and white, two 
color and four color screen dumps of 
Color Computer hi res graphics. 

Okimate 20, Plug v n ' Print, 
paper, black and color ribbon, 
instructions, and software 



Parallel £240.00 
$10.00 Shipping 



The only color Okimate 
20 Screen Dump Now 
Available for the CoCo. 

(Price subject to change) 




n 



n, un rl r» i 4 rtfe 



DOUBLE DRIVER I 

The BEST monitor driver available. 
Color composite, monochrome and 
audio output. For original CoCo D. E 
and F boards. $24.95. 

MONO II 

Mono II for Color Computer 2. An 
excellent monochrome monitor driver 
that has audio output also. Specify 
model needed. 

$24.95. 




DOUBLE DRIVER II 

Finally a monitor driver for 
the Color Computer If that 
lets you use a monochrome 
and a color monitor 
simultaneously. We're proud 
of this new driver. The six 
transister circuit provides op- 
timal signal mixing and signal 
gain. Excellent monochrome 
output and better quality 
resolution in the color ouput 




than any driver we have 
seen. Audio output also. Fits 
all models of the Color Com- 
puter II. $29.95. 




THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The CoCo Switcher allows you to hook up 
three peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Con- 
nect your modem, printer and any other 
RS-232 compatible peripheral to the CoCo 
Switcher. An LED on the CoCo Switcher 
shows if your computer is on or off at a glance, 
The LED flickers when transmitting or receiv- 
ing data. 

$39.95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division oj Moreton Bay laboratory 
316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 

Ordering information 

Send $2.00 shipping and handling per order We ship 
within 1 working day on receipt of order. Blue Label 
Service available. California residenls add 6% sales tax. 




1230 


8D 


BF 


00243 




BSR 


- PRINTM 


Print the message 


1232 


8A 


FF 


00244 




ORA 


#$FF 


Reset equal flag 


1234 


39 




00245 




RTS 




Return 


1235 


81 


59 


00246 


YN2 


CMPA 


#$59 


Is it "Y"? 


1237 


26 


EE 


00247 




BNE 


YN1 


Branch back if not 


1239 


8E 


1433 


00248 




LDX 


#YES 


"Yes" 


123C 


8D 


B3 


00249 




BSR 


PRINTM 


Print the message 


123E 


4F 




00250 




CLRA 




Set equal flag 


123F 


39 




00251 




RTS 




Return 


1240 


34 


14 


00252 


GETKEY 


PSHS 


B,X 
[$88] 


Save B and X 


1242 


A6 


9F 0088 


00253 


KEY1 


LDA 


Get cursor character 


12 4 6 


8B 


10 


00254 




ADDA 


#$10 


Blink it 


1248 


8A 


8F 


00255 




ORA 


#$8F 


Make it graphic 


124A 


A7 


9F 0088 


00256 




STA 


[$88] 


Print new cursor 


124E 


8E 


0080 


00257 




LDX 


#$80 


Loop counter 


1251 


30 


IF 


00258 


KEY 2 


LEAX 


-1,X 


Decrement counter 


1253 


27 


ED 


00259 




BEQ 


KEY1 


Blink cursor if time 


1255 


AD 


9F A000 


00260 




JSR 


[ $A000 ] 


Scan keyboard 


1259 


4D 




00261 




TSTA 




Was key pressed? 


12 5 A 


27 


F5 


00262 




BEQ 


KEY2 


Branch back if not 


125C 


8E 


13BB 


00263 




LDX 


# BREAK 


"<BREAK>" 


125F 


81 


03 


00264 




CMPA 


#$3 


Was it Break key? 


1261 


1027 


FF3A 


00265 




LBEQ 


FINISH 


Break out if so 


1265 


C6 


60 


00266 




LDB 


#$60 


Blank character 


1267 


E7 


9F 0088 


00267 




STB 


[$88] 


Erase cursor 


126B 


35 


94 


00268 




PULS 


X,B,PC 


Restore and return 








00269 


^Routine below calls on a routine in the 








00270 


*Disk 


ROM. It 


accounts 


for the differences 








00271 


^between Disk 


Extended 


Color Basic 1.0 and 1.1 


126D 


34 


02 


00272 


USEROM 


PSHS 


A 


Save A 


126F 


B6 


C00 


00273 




LDA 


$C005 


Check which version ROM 


1272 


84 


01 


00274 




ANDA 


#$1 


Zero=l .0 One=l . 1 


1274 


48 




00275 




LS LA 




Zero=1.0 Two=l.l 


1275 


33 


C6 


00276 




LEAU 


A,U 


Increment U if ROM 1.1 


1277 


35 


02 


00277 




PULS 


A 


Restore A 


1279 


6E 


D4 


00278 




JMP 


[,U] 


Use ROM routine 


127B 




C8A4 


00279 


DFNAME 


FDB 


$C8A4 


1.0 Process filename 


I27D 




C952 


00280 




FDB 


$C952 


1.1 Process filename 


127F 




C468 


00281 


DOPEN 


FDB 


$C468 


1.0 Open disk file 


1281 




C48D 


00282 




FDB 


$C48D 


1.1 Open disk file 


1283 




CA3B 


00283 


DCLOSE 


FDB 


$CA3B 


1.0 Close disk file 


1285 




CAE 9 


00284 




FDB 


$CAE9 


1.1 Close disk file 








00285 


*Tape 


file types 




1287 




12FC 


00286 


TTYPES 


FDB 


TYPE1 


Basic program 


1289 




130C 


00287 




FDB 


TYPE 2 


Data file 


128B 




1318 


00288 




FDB 


TYPE3 


M.L. program 


128D 




1328 


00289 
00290 
00291 


* 
* 


FDB 


TYPE4 


Non standard 








00292 


^Messages and 


prompts 










00293 
















00294 










128F 




20 


00295 


TITLE 


FCC 


" TAPE 


TO DISK FILE TRANSFER" 


12AA 




0D 


00296 




FCB 


$0D 




12AB 




20 


00297 




FCC 






12C6 




0D0D 


00298 




FDB 


$0D0D 




12C8 




52 


00299 




FCC 


"READY 


TAPE & HIT ENTER? " 


12E0 




00 


00300 




FCB 


$0 




12E1 




54 


00301 


TNAME 


FCC 


"THE FILE IS NAMED " 


12F3 




00 


00302 




FCB 


$0 




12F4 




0D 


00303 


TTYPE 


FCB 


$0D 




12F5 




49 


00304 




FCC 


"IT IS 


if 


12FB 




00 


00305 




FCB 


$0 





L 



80 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 







la 



% 



_-■->■ „ 
[>:■.:; 



L-LLK- 



Menu oriented 
Upload/download. Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 
Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 

• Definable macro keys 

■ Works with standard serial port, RS232 
PAK, or PDJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

■ Works with standard screen. XSCREEN, or 
WORDPAK 80 column board. 



$49.95 with source $89.95 



m 



XMENU 

Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 
Create your own menus ' Worics wilh standard screen, 

$29 



XSCREEN, WORDPAK, O-PAK 
,95 with source $59.95 



: ^-i-i- lj-. .V ........ - .. ... t^-. j /■'"■■ J .V."jj^ L 



XSCREEN 

OS-9 hi-res screen 
5 1 /64/S5 chars per line ■ Eflty menu operation 

$19.95 wilh source $39.95 



m 

m 



XDIR & 


XCAL 


: :■: 


Hierarchic I directory 


OS-9 calculator 


: 


* Full sorting 


• Decimal, Hex, Binary 




- Complete partem matching 


■ +, -, *, /, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 


!"!■!■!■ 


$24.95 


with source $49.95 





1 . 1 1 1 1 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 



■ • ■ 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

■ Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

■ Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
ovcrslrike, underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

■ Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

■ Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 
$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 wilh X WORD/XMERGE some* 199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 




iiiiii 



a* 



Mai 



mm 



I 



:-:-:>" 

















SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Emry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting list. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
wilh user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/ update salesman records, and 
update the SB AP inventory. $59 95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and Lax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight lime, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, ycar-to- 
dale federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all stales 
except Oklahoma rfhd Delaware. $59.95 



I These programs ar£.*M*a &endly and menu 
idoy^^SiEn^c-tni^A^i^'f ire included; Bach 
pj cii ge featu rea-i: h i-res scred i< : Eich icquirxa 
i priii la, a minimum oT 3£i it<4 at Itui"! disk 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with the Small 
Business Accounting package. $59 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance o f vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. Trie user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report. Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used cither as a standalone A/P system or 
be integrated with the Small Business 



can 



Accounting Package 



$59.95 



. . .** . P II. I I I ! ! I II 



■ I I I P I P . I . , 1 1 1 P P !■ I ■ » I I P PI ■ I . > l IP 



1 1 I I I I I . I I I 




l.l l.l I 



K St, Paul; MN 55113 

Btebr I*qutri*r irtnled 

Aufkot'. Submuaim* met *pt*4 

QS-9 i* 1 trm$m*t*\ ^W^jrttWri 




hJL ill' 

I'i'i'iL 



Ordering Inform*! Ion 

Add SI 00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% salt.'' ux> 
Vlsi< Mastercud. COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



(612) 633-6161 



12FC 


41 


00306 


TYPE1 


FCC 


"A BASIC PROGRAM" 


130B 


00 

r r 


00307 




FCB 




130C 


41 


00308 


TYPE2 


FCC 


"A DATA FILE" 


1317 


00 


00309 




FCB 


$0 


1318 


41 


00310 


TYPE 3 


FCC 


"AN M.L. PROGRAM" 


1327 


00 


00311 




FCB 




1328 


49 


00312 

A^A^ 


TYPE4 


FCC 


"IN NON STANDARD FORM" 


133C 


00 


003 13 




FCB 


$0 


133D 


0D 


00314 


XFERIT 


FCB 


$0D 


133E 

X. «-/ »— ' Xj 


54 


00315 




FCC 


"TRANSFER THIS FILE^ " 

X X XX * X J 1 — * X XJ XX XXX -L. 1 — I X -L. J J Xj • 


1352 


00 


00316 




FCB 


$0 


1353 


54 


00317 

A^ A^ - 1 - 


LDCOMP 


FCC 


"THE LOAD IS COMPLETE" 

x. A X J— J xJVi&L^ J w >— / xxx. 1 1 1 i x. 1 i 


1367 


013 


00318 

A^ A^ 




FCB 


$0 


1368 


0D 


00319 


DNAME 


FCB 


$0D 


1369 


44 


00320 




FCC 


"DISK FILENAME? " 


1378 


00 


00321 

A* A^ 




FCB 


$0 


1379 


0D 


00322 


ALDONE 


FCB 


$0D 


137A 


54 


00323 




FCC 


"THE FILE TRANSFER IS COMPLETE" 


1397 


0D00 

A^ r r 


00324 

A 7 A* 




FDB 


S0D00 


1399 


0D 


00325 


CANCEL 


FCB 


$0D 


139A 


54 


00326 




FCC 


"THE PROCEDURE HAS BEEN CANCELLED" 


13BA 




00327 




FCB 




13BB 


3C 


00328 


BREAK 


FCC 


"<BREAK> " 

^ Aw/ X X 1 1 X X X. V r 


13C2 


0D00 


00329 

A^ A^ ~* 




FDB 


$0D00 


13C4 


53 


00330 

A* A* J J r 


AGAIN 

X * XJ X * -X_ X 1 


FCC 


i-J lAiXl Xr xx\_>\jX\XVl 1 AV1N J_i M • 


13D8 


00 


00331 

A^ A^ - 1 - 




FCB 


S0 


13D9 


13E8 

Xa^ X^ 


00332 


ERRS 


FDB 


El 

Xj _1_ 


13 DB 


38 


00333 




FCB 


S38 

y J U 


13DC 


13F8 


00334 




FDB 


E2 

Xj x^ 


13DE 


3C 


00335 

A 7 A 7 




FCB 


S3C 


13DF 


1410 


00336 

A^ A^ 




FDB 


E3 


13E1 


3E 


00337 

/a 




FCB 


$3E 

Sr w Xj 


13E2 


141D 


00338 




FDB 


E4 

XJ a 


13E4 


FF 


00339 




FCB 


$FF 


13E5 


1429 


00340 




FDB 


E5 


13E7 


00 


00341 




FCB 


$00 

"A* A* 


13E8 


44 


00342 


El 


FCC 


"DISK SPACE FUTiT." 

i-V -1— i— -» x. \ JL x* x— * Xj x VJ l i l I 


13F7 


00 


00343 




FCB 


S0 


13F8 


44 


00344 

A 7 A* J ^ ^ 


E2 


FCC 


i-/_Li_)X\ _L O rtxxXixj It xxvJ J. LjL ± H U 


140F 




00345 




FCB 


$0 


1410 


42 


00346 

A^ / 


E3 


FCC 


"BAD FTT.ENAME' 1 


141C 


00 


00347 




FCB 


$0 


141D 


42 


00348 


E4 


FCC 


"BUFFER FULL" 

l— J W X X XJXX X w XJ XJ 


1428 


r f 


00349 




FCB 


$0 

▼A* 


1429 


49 


00350 


E5 


FCC 


"I/O FRPDP" 


1432 


00 


00351 




FCB 


$0 


1433 


59 


00352 


YES 

X> X^ > / 


FCC 


MVFq " 

1 Uu 


1436 


0D00 


00353 




FDB 


$0D00 


1438 


4E 


00354 


NO 


FCC 


IN VJ 


143A 


0D00 


00355 

A 7 A* J -* -* 




FDB 








003 56 










00357 












003 5 8 


*Variables and 


noi nt pre 






00359 










003 60 








143C 


0000 


00361 


TOPMEM 


FDB 


$0 FnH n"F v ^1" ptti ' <^ mpinnTV 

t Xj! iv^i v_/x> o y o Lowiu o in in v_/ x y 


143E 


0000 

r r r r 


00362 


EOF 


FDB 


$0 End of taoe file 

T y*-^ Xj X 1 <toi V-/ X w <-X ' V— ^ X J>- -J- v_- 


1440 




00363 


INKEY 


RMB 


S10 Qns r^o f nv "1 nnn+" V\i l f f or 
v j -a' jpal-c X.VJI. XIljJLlL. JJ Li x, x, ti x. 


1450 




00364 


HEADER 


RMB 


$10 Space for tape file header 


1460 




00365 


BUFFER 


*A11 of 


the rest is for the BUFFER 




1000 


00366 




END 


START Execution begins at START 


00000 


TOTAL ERRORS 











82 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Prospect, Kentucky 



Vol.2 No. 3 



Writer: Cray Augsburg 



The RAINBOWfest Reporter 



©Falsofl, Inc. All Rights Reserved 



Color Computer 3 Is Top Dog 
at Princeton RAINBOWfest 



It was a cool evening in 
Princeton, New Jersey, when 
literally thousands descended 
upon the local Hyatt Regency 
hotel. "What's going on?" was 
heard from several passers-by 
What else?? It was the 12th 
RAINBOWfest. It was the pre- 
mier show for the new Color 
Computer 3. At 7, Friday even- 
ing, the vendors were ready and 
the doors were opened. 

There was a mad dash for the 
Radio Shack booth; everyone 
wanted to get a glimpse of the 
new machine. For many, it was 
the first look at the CoCo 3. As 
the night went on, it became a 
common sight to see people 
purchasing their CoCo 3s, tuck- 
ing them under their arms, and 
heading off to their hotel rooms 
to see what they needed to do 
to the hotel's TVs to make their 
CoCo 3 work. It was somewhat 
reminiscent of the "Cabbage 
Patch" craze. Later, after an 
hour with the new machine. 



those people would reappear in 
the exhibit hall to see what 
other things they could find. 

To put it in simpler terms, the 
Color Computer 3 was the hit 
of the show. Few could speak of 
anything else. Questions and 
rumors were flying. To offset 
this, the show was attended by 
Barry Thompson, Mark Siegel, 
Fran McGehee and Srini 
Vasan. These representatives of 
Tandy Corporation did their 
best to answer all the questions 
people had. Barry Thompson 
and Mark Siegel were also 
panel members for the round- 
table discussion on the CoCo 3. 

People appeared in the ex- 
hibit hall in waves. Just as you 
started to move down an aisle, 
it would crowd up and you 
would be blocked. 

Several groups of people ga- 
thered outside the exhibit hall 
just so they could talk with each 
other. 

While excitement about the 




A round 500 Color Computer 3s fa sell-out) were taken home by the crowd 
at RAINBOWfest Princeton 1986. 



CoCo 3 was high, several "out- 
side" discussions turned to a 
more serious matter; how best 
to support the enhancements of 
the new machine. A great topic 
was the exchange of technical 
information. (As more and 
more producers of CoCo soft- 
ware get their new machines, it 
is becoming quite apparent the 
support is there. We are already 
seeing new products on the 
market designed to take full 



advantage of the CoCo 3.) 

It appears that many people 
are taking heed of CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast keynote 
speaker Dale Lear's charge that 
we move forward with CoCo 3 
and be innovative. 

We should see a great deal 
more on the CoCo 3 at the next 
RAINBOWfest which is sche- 
duled for April 10-12, 1987 in 
Chicago. 



Owl-Ware Has Everything for the CoCo Hacker 




Greg Wozricki of Owlware finalizes another sale. 



Owl- Ware was out in force 
selling everything from AC 
power centers to complete hard 
drive systems. Prices for the 
hard drive systems, which in- 



cluded Winchester BA SIC, var- 
ied from $599 for 10 Meg to 
S829 for 30 Meg. Owl-Ware was 
also selling full-height, double- 
sided drives for S89. They also 



sold two Tandy !200s with hard 
drives for S895 each. 

About the RAINBOWfest, 
Tom Roginski, owner of Owl- 
Ware, said, "These are nice, 
honest people. Very good to 
work with. Generally, I think 
everyone is enjoying the show." 

In addition to drives, Owl- 
Ware had a full line of compo- 
nents and computers. 

When the show ended Sun- 
day, Tom demonstrated a little 
hardware device Owl-Ware had 
been working on. The Super 
I/O Board is a cartridge-like 
add-on for the CoCo 2 and 
CoCo 3, which includes two 
serial ports, a parallel port and 
a real-time clock as well as 
extending the cartridge port for 
the disk controller. It is de- 
signed to work under OS-9. It 
should be a real boon for OS- 
9 hackers. 



Computer Plus — 
Great Bargains on 
Tandy Equipment 

Computer Plus occupied two 
booths at the Princeton Test. 
The hot item was the Color 
Computer 3 selling for $169. 
Computer Plus sold out of their 
CoCo 3s by noon on Saturday. 
In addition, several people took 
advantage of the opportunity to 
buy the DMP-105 for $1 10 and 
the DMP-130 for $210. 
Another hot item was the FD- 
501 disk drive system, which 
was selling for $170. Fran Pur- 
cell, owner of Computer Plus, 
said, "The crowd seems larger 
than usual. Financially this is 
the best RAINBOW/esf we've 
ever been to." 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 83 



Radio Shack — Consumer Division 
Takes Over Booth Management 



At the Radio Shack booth, 
we spoke with District Man- 
ager Hank Boyer. That is, we 
tried to speak with Hank, but 
every time the conversation 
started, he would have to run 
off to write up another sale. 
People pressed around the 
Radio Shack booth watching 
the CoCo 3 and CM -8 do their 
thing. Radio Shack was selling 
the CoCo 3 for $199 and taking 
prepaid orders for the CM-8 fur 
$259.95. Other bargains in- 
cluded the FD-50J drive system 
for $170, 64 K CoCo 2s for $85, 



1 6 K Standard CoCo 2s for $49, 
Deskmate for $59.95 and the 
Color Mouse for $29.95. When 
the Show opened Sunday, 
Radio Shack dropped the price 
of the CoCo 3 to $179 and 
shortly sold out. Hank told us, 
"The Tandy Business Products 
Division used to run the Radio 
Shack booth at the RAIN- 
BOWfests. Now, the Consumer 
Division has taken over the 
responsibility and we hope to 
be doing many new things in 
future shows. " 




RAINBOW Publisher Lonnie Folk (left) thanks CoCo Community 
Breakfast speaker Dale Lear. 




Radio Shack District Manager Hank Boyer responds to a question. 



DS-9 Users Group — 
More Popular Than Ever 

Several heavy discussions 
were started at the OS-9 Users 
Group booth. In between sign- 
ing up new members, Brian 
Lantz, president of the Users 
Group, said, "There appears to 
be a high interest in OS-9. We 
have taken twice as many mem- 
berships as we have at previous 
RAlNBOWfests." At the OS-9 
Users Group breakfast Sunday 
morning, Esther Puckett, wife 
of Dale Puckett, was unani- 
mously voted in as a lifetime 
honorary member. 



Disto's Many Marvels Include CDOS 4.0 



At the Disto booth we spoke 
with Chris Roshon, who ap- 
peared to have taken over sales 
since Tony DiStelano was al- 
ways caught up in explaining 
his u many marvels" to the ever- 
present crowd. Chris said, "We 
are enjoying the show very 
much. We especially liked the 
round-table discussion. It's 



11 



good to meet the people who 
control the CoCo's destiny in 
Fort Worth." 

On a nearby table, CoCo 
Max was running on a CoCo 2 
and people were loading full 
CoCo Max pictures in a flash. 
Tony had done it again. In a 
system running CDOS 4.0, it is 
possible to load CoCo Max 



files from the Disto RAMDisk 
instantly. 

Disto was selling the con- 
troller for $80 and the Display 
80 add-on for $ I 10. Also, 
RAMDisks were pretty inex- 
pensive, as the 256K model sold 
for$90and a full5!2Kcard was 
going for $130. 





IB 





In less formal attire, OS-9 expert 
Dale Lear goes online with Delphi. 



RAlKBOWfest Princeton was attended by some / 2,000 people. 



Delphi Gives 
Long-Distance Friends 
a Chance to Meet 

The Delphi booth was teem- 
ing with activity as Delphi 
members gathered to meet and 
see what their online friends 
looked like. While Marty 
Goodman was busy showing 
off several features of Delphi's 
system, Dick Ellisco was busy 
selling Telenetics Pony Express 
2400 baud modems for a special 
show price of $349. The mod- 
ems regularly cost $500. For 
several people, it was quite a 
thrill to see Marty accessing 
Delphi at 2400 baud . John Gib- 
ney of Delphi said, "We are 
letting people perceive the full 
value of 2400 baud operation." 



84 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Computize: Graphicom Selling Well 




Bruce Harrington of Computize discusses CoCo 3 compatibility with 
RAIN BOW jest attendees. 



At the Computize booth, 
workers were busy selling 
Graphicom and Graphicom 
Part II. The reason for high 
sales on these products is that 
CoCo Max is incompatible 
with the CoCo 3. People 
seemed to have CoCo 3 on their 
minds and wanted software 
that would work on their new, 



as well as their old machines. 

Ken Klosinski of Computize 
said, 'This is the best show so 
far for us." In addition to 
Graphicom sales, Computize 
did well selling digitizers and 'Y' 
cables. The biggest item at this 
booth was the Hardcopy print- 
er utility. 



Southwestern Digital Has Show-End Blow Out Sale 



Hot items at the Southwest- 
ern Digital booth were the 
Drive 0 for $95, and serial/ 
parallel converters. Southwest- 
ern had a show-end blowout of 
drive systems, as well, with 



Drive 0 and I combo systems 
complete with controller going 
for an unbelievably low SI 40. 
Also, complete Drive 0 systems 
were selling for $85. 



Microworld: Business Booming — Only Vendors 
to Offer CM-8 Monitors at RAINBOWfest 



The two booths occupied by 
Microworld were crammed 
with Radio Shack hardware 
and software. They completely 
sold out their 200 CoCo 3s at 
$169. Other items included the 
Radio Shack Drive 0s for $169 
and Multi-Pak Interfaces for 
$75 apiece. Microworld was 
also offering Deluxe RS-232 
Paks for a mere $25. Being an 
authorized Radio Shack Repair 
Center helped, too, as Micro- 
world is able to supply the 
required Multi-Pak fix for the 



CoCo 3. 

Perhaps one of the highest 
points in the exhibit hall came 
when Microworld was able to 
announce they had several new 
CM-8 monitors for sale. At a 
price of $275 each, they sold the 
special shipment of 10 in less 
than 15 minutes. Being first in 
line really helped at this booth. 
Richard ICromer, owner of Mi- 
croworld commented, "We've 
done a world of business this 
Saturday alone." 




CoCo 3s were a popular item at the Microworld booth. 

Diecom Plans to Support CoCo 3 

which were being sold for 
$23.95. While the programs 
were not compatible with the 
CoCo 3, David Dies assured us 
that Diecom will fully support 
the new machine. To prove this 
point, they were allowing ex- 
changes for up to three weeks 
for upgrades of their programs 
to CoCo 3 versions. David also 
told us to "look for newer 
things in the future which will 
take full advantage of the ma- 
chine's enhanced capabilities." 



While fewer software houses 
were at this RAINBOWfest 
than at previous Tests, Diecom 
was there in full force. Two new 
programs by David Dies, pres- 
ident and programmer for Die- 
com, were available. Gates of 
Delirium, a fantasy role- 
playing game was selling for 
$31.95. Also, Bouncing 
Boulders, a fast-paced, arcade- 
style game, sold at $23.95. 

Special show prices were also 
in effect for G an tele /, Wrestle 
Maniac and Marble Maze, 



Howard Medical Has a Hit With Monochrome Monitors 

Howard Medical was quite 
busy selling monochrome 
monitors from $67.50. Another 
big seller was the dual mode 
Epson LX-80 printer for $199. 
Ross Litton, manager of How- 
ard Medical, told us, "The 
CoCo 3 is definitely the high 
point of this show, but there 
seems to be some confusion 
about the CoCo 2s and CoCo 
3s and which monitors work 
with them. Once this is cleared 
up, sales will be even better." In 
any case, picking up a Comrex 
color monitor for $139 wasn't 
Howard Medical's Chris Hawks. too bad a deal, at all! 




A CoCo fan sports a "No Com- 
modores" T-shirt. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 85 




Spectrum's CC3DRAW Proves Popular 
Among New CoCo 3 Owners 



Spectrum Projects' Paul Rosen fright) wraps up a sale. 



Spectrum Projects was on 
hand with all of their CoCo 
products. They sold out of sev- 
eral, such as Telepaich 11 and 
Mi key- Dial. Spectrum's new 
CC3DRAW was a big hit at 
$19.95 as the new CoCo 3 
owners wanted to get it for their 
new machines. Asked what he 
thought the future held for the 



CoCo Community, Bob Rosen, 
owner of Spectrum Projects, 
replied, "There is definitely life 
in the CoCo market. I feel peo- 
ple have been holding back 
since the July 30 announce- 
ment. They came here to see 
and buy the CoCo 3 and now 
they want software." 




J & M's Terry Johnson. 

J ft M Systems Sees 
Future in New Machine 

J & M Systems was selling its 
JFD-EC disk controller for 
$49.95. This was a special show 
price, down from $75. In addi- 
tion, they were quite busy 
showing off a pretty, little hard 
drive. According to Terry John- 
son, "There is lots of room in 
the CoCo market for hard 
drives, especially with the up- 
coming OS-9 on the CoCo 3. 
Basically, we are impressed 
with the amount of interest in 
the CoCo 3. We are using this 
show to decide what we will be 
doing for the new machine in 
the future." 

Public Domain Software 
Makes 'test Debut 

Don Johnson of Public Do- 
main Software told us, "This is 
our first RAINBOWfest and I 
like it. The crowd enabled us to 
let people know who we are." 
PubJic Domain was selling 
disks filled with PD software 
for $5 apiece or $99 for the 
complete library of 27 disks. 
The normal rate is $10 per disk. 



Microcom: 
No Reasonable 
Offer Refused 

Several items were being sold 
at the Microcom booth. The 
Intronics EPROM program- 
mer was selling for $137, the 
new Supplement to 500 Pokes, 
Peeks and Execs was being sold 
for $9, while theoriginaledition 
wasselling for S 1 5. On Sunday, 
Microcom announced that no 
reasonable offer on their pro- 
ducts would be refused! 

HDS Does Well With 
MS-DOS, Too 

Kevin Franciotti, who was 
manning the Hard Drive Spe- 
cialists booth, feels some soft- 
ware vendors were missing out 
by not attending the Princeton 
show. In addition to their con- 
troller and CoCo disk drive 
sales, HDS sold quite a few of 
their offerings in the MS-DOS 
line. 



T ft D Software Offers Special Deals 



Tom Dykema and Marianne 
Hoving were definitely doing 
well at the T & D Subscription 
Software booth. T & D offers 
one tape or disk per month for 
one year for a price of $70. This 
means more than 120 pro- 



grams. At the RAINBOWfest, 
they were offering a special 
show deal of a one year's sub- 
scription for$60 plus four tapes 
free. Needless to say, several 
people were taking advantage 
of this offer. 




T & D's Tom and Marianne are now Mr. and Mrs. Dykema; they were 
married in November! 




Computer Island: 
Educational Market 
Is Wide Open 

Steve Blyn, a rainbow Con- 
tributing Editor, was at his 
Computer Island booth selling 
everything from blank disks to 
T-shirts. Steve says the educa- 
tional market for the CoCo is 
wide open. To prove this point, 
Computer Island promptly sold 
out of several of its educational 
software products. 



Steve Blyn of Computer Island was 
assisted by his son David. 



86 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



ADOS a Big Seller at 
Spectrosystems Booth 

Fn the Spectrosystems booth, 
owner Art Flexser was on hand 
sellingcopies of his ADOS with 
con fig utilities and documenta- 
tion for $25. He was also selling 
Peeper, a program tracer, com- 
plete with source listing for $25. 
Art said, "People here are look- 
ing for CoCo 3 stuff. While 
ADOS doesn't entirely work on 
the CoCo 3, most features do 
work and I hope to be releasing 
a version for the CoCo 3 soon." 

Mercer County CoCo Club — 
Raffle 



The Mercer County CoCo 
Club was selling RAINBOW- 
fest T-shirts as well as raffle 
tickets. The club held four raf- 
fles for 30 disks each and a 
Sunday raffle for a new CoCo 
3. Ed Whitman said, "I'm here 
to see the CoCo 3 and be in- 
volved in the excitement 
around it. It really is great to 
meet and talk with the people 
who work with the new ma- 
chines." 




A t Saturday evening 's Color 
Computer 3 round-table dis- 
cussion, the panel featured 
f/-r, above) Mark Siegel and 
Barry T hompson of T andy, 
RAINBOW'S Lonnie Folk 
and independent software 
developers Steve Bjork and 
Dale Lear. 



m 



CompuServe Offers Free Life-Time Subscriptions Computer Center Shows Off CoCo/PC 



The CompuServe booth was 
filled with people. Compu- 
Serve's Wayne Day was offer- 
ing free lifetime subscriptions 
along with $15 free credit for 



system use. Mike Ward, who 
was selling copies of his famous 
Mikeyterm, said, "It appears to 
be much more frantic than pre- 
vious RAINBOWfests!" 



CoCo 3 Undergoes Implant Surgery 




The Computer Center was 
busy selling slimline Drive I 
upgrades for $89.95 and single 
full-height drives complete with 
case and power supply for 
$74.95. However, according lo 
head technician Logan Ward, 
they were doing quite a bit of 
EPROM burning as well. They 
burned several prepurchased 
copies of ADOS into EPROMs 
for customers for only $12.95, 
which included the cost of the 
EPROM. When Logan wasn't 



wearing his "Rainbow hair"(a 
multi-hued wig), he was busy 
showing off his CoCo/ PC. The 
CoCo/ PC is a CoCo 2 with iwo 
slimline drives, disk controller 
and CoCo Max aU packed into 
an IBM PC case. To power the 
system, Logan wired in a 1 30- 
watt IBM power supply. The 
system has also been modified 
to use switchable composite 
video as well as an inboard 
audio amp and lap keyboard. 



RAINBOW and Del phi regular Martin H. Goodman, M.D., "operates" on 
a CoCo 3. 



While several onlookers 
watched with great interest, 
Marty Goodman dissected Art 
Flexser's newly purchased 
CoCo 3. The reason for the 
operation was to install asocket 
for the ROM chip internal to 
the CoCo 3. Art seemed to be 



pacing the floor, much as an 
expectant father would, as 
Marty carefully explained each 
step of the procedure. The op- 
eration was a success and Art 
became one of the first people 
to own a CoCo 3 with a sock- 
eted ROM chip. 




Falsoft General Manager Patricia Hirsch welcomes visitors to the 
RAINBOW booth. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 87 




Generate a graphic printout directory 
of your picture disks 




save the graphics directory created by 
the program. 

Then you are asked for a date (any 
format), which will also be used to label 
the finished directory. After you have 
entered the date, the program prompts 
you to put the disk to be cataloged in 
Drive 0 and press ENTER. 

Now you can sit back and watch the 
computer do its work, or go do some- 
thing else. The processing of each 
graphics image takes about one minute. 
If you have a disk full of single-screen 
images (22 is the maximum number you 
can have on oneside of a standard disk), 
it will take about 22 minute's to create 
the Graphic Graphics Directory for that 
d isk. When the last image on the picture 
disk is complete, the computer displays 
the complete directory on the screen 
and makes a pleasant beeping until you 
press any key. 

Now comes the rest of your labor; 
swapping disks. You are prompted to 
put a directory disk in Drive 0. I have 
a lot of graphics on disk and I've found 
that I prefer to segregate these graphic 
directories onto disks by themselves. 
There would be no harm in saving the 
directory on the disk cataloged, pro- 

88 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



W"W Thile amazingly efficient, those 
li/W^ eight-character filenames 
W ▼ leave a lot to be desired when 
it comes to graphic images. This is 
especially true if you are as lazy as I am 
and file seven progressive images of a 
dogwood blossom as Dl, D2, D3, etc. I 
used to find myself loading in a program 
to scan each picture on a disk, then, 
once I found the image I wanted, load- 
ing in another program to use that 
picture. Those days are over. Now I 
have GRADIR, which is my six-letter 
abbreviation for "Graphic Graphics 
Directory Image Processor and Filer 
Program." 

GRABIR is a BASIC program that can 
take a disk full of graphics images (up 
to 22 PMODE 4 screens, each 6,143 bytes 



Chris Brown lives in Siloam Springs, 
Ark., and has been a professional artist 
for 20 years. A CoCo enthusiast for five 
years, he has used his computer for 
everything from managing rental prop- 
erty to designing special logos and 
fonts. His computer art is distributed by 
Grafx. 



long) and produce, on one screen, a 
complete graphic directory of all the 
images on the disk, in a very reduced 
rendition, every picture stored on a disk 
is shown, complete with its filename, on 
one PMODE 4 screen. As small as the 
images are, they are still easily recogniz- 
able. A photographer might compare 
one of GRADiR's screens to a contact 
print of a roll of 35 mm film. It's very 
handy for selecting images and filing. 

This program is simple to use. Load 
GRABIR, then PCLERRB before you run. 
The program uses the first four PM0DE4 
pages for loading graphics from disk 
and the last four pages for assembling 
the directory. 

First, you are greeted with a request 
to stand by while the program initiates. 
The standby lasts only a couple of sec- 
onds while the alphanumeric and "long 
file"arraysareset up. During initiation, 
the grid for the directory screen is also 
set up. It's sometimes amazing how 
many things our CoCo can accomplish 
in a short time. After set up, you are 
asked for an eight-character filename 
(the program won't take a longer one). 
This is the name of the disk you are 
cataloging and will be used to label and 



GRADIR Arrays and Variables 



Arra v<5 

J \ 1 1 il T J 




DF$(30) 


Disk filenames 


GP(22,2) 


Directory screen grid 


L$(53) 


Alphanumerics for titles 


M(9B) 


Long File Image 


0(100) 


Transfer of pic 


V(20) 


Processing of pic 


String and 


real variables 


CN 


Pic Processing 


CT 


Directory count 


DE 


File divisions 


DNS 


Picture disk name 


DT$ 


Date 


E 


X position for processing 


EXT5 


Disk file extension 


F 


Y position for processing 


F 


Free grans on pic disk 


F$ 


Filename for file length check 


Fl 


Free grans on directory disk 


I 


Loop counter 


K2 


Color of lettering 


L 


Letter loop counter 


L, C, 5, X 


, P Used for computing disk file len 


LONG 


Length of disk file 


Nn$ 


Disk filename 


PQ 


Y position for lettering 


□i.i 

rW 


a position ior lettering 


OS 


Individual letter in letter routine 


S2 


Size of letters 


5E 


Disk sector 


X 


X position for processing 


Y 


Y position for processing 


Z$ 


Keyboard input 


GRADIR line breakdown 


10 


Set up arrays 


30-100 


Draw Letters routine 


110-170 


Check file length 


180 


Screen heading 


200 


Set up directory screen position gric 


210-300 


Define alphanumerics 


310-330 


Set up long file image 


340-380 


Input of pic disk name and date 


390-460 


Read disk directory 


470-500 


Check file lengths 


510-600 


Process image 


610-670 


Prepare for save 


680-720 


Save graphic directory screen 


730-790 


End of program menu 



vided enough free space is available. If 
there isn't, the program will warn you. 
In fact, it won't allow you to try to save 
the disk directory at all on a disk with 
less than three free grans, thanks to Line 
700. 

A note about the quality of the small 
images before we take a walk through 
the program's functions: It doesn't 
matter in which PMDDE the image was 
created. GRA DIR uses PMDDE 4 to allow 
the capture of the most detail. PMDDE 0 
through PMODE 3 screens require the 
same amount of time to process, but 
appear scrunched up (PMODE 0 - 
PM0DE2) or not in color (PMODE 3). You 
won't, except in very rare instances, see 
the glorious colors of your original in 
the small directory version. Remember, 
the small directory version is a "proof 
copy" only. 

Now to the workings of the program. 
A quick glance at the list of routines 
(Figure 2) and the program (Listing I) 
shows a pretty straightforward ap- 
proach, with the subroutines located at 
the beginning of the program for speed . 
The first subroutine (lines 30-100) 
draws the Hi-Res characters on the 
PM0DE4 Hi-Res screen. This subroutine 
requires five variables: color, K2 (0-8); 
size, S2 (1-63); X position, PW (0-255); 
Y position (PQ (0-192); and words, N$. 

The Check File Length subroutine is 
a bit more esoteric. Grabbing one 
record at a time from the disk file, this 
routine calculates the start and end 
addresses from the MSB and LSB 
(most-significant and least-significant 
bytes) information contained in records 
I and 2, 3 and 4, 6, 8 and 9. The result, 
the length of the file in bytes, is stored 
in the variable LDNG, which is used later 
in the program. 

Line 180 contains the heading for the 
text screen. Revise this as you will. The 
pokes to the screen only put black 
spaces after my first and last names. 

Line 200 sets up the array GP which 
positions each of the 22 possible small 
images in a discrete position on the 
screen. Reading the numbers in the 
DATA statement in pairs gives you 'X, Y 
coordinates. These coordinates, as 
determined by the processed picture 
number (CN), are used in Line 580. 

Lines 210 to 300 set the array L$( 1) 
to L$ ( 59 ) . This array contains the DRAW 
instructions used by the Draw Letters 
subroutine. This, plus the drawing 
routine, I keep as an ASCII file on one 
of my many utility disks, merging it 
when I need alphanumerics on a graph- 
ics screen. This particular version is 



special for GRADIR because the letters 
had to be small. Different versions of 
this approach have been seen here in 

THE RAINBOW. 

The heart of the program is in lines 
390 to 460, the original of which is in 
the Disk BASIC Manual from Radio 
Shack. Of special note is Line40, which 
rejects any file whose extension is not 
PIC. If your graphics are not filed as PIC 



but rather as PIX, the solution is simple. 
Make Line 410 read PIX. However, if 
you commonly use the extension BIN 
for your graphics screens, a real prob- 
lem exists. If you substitute BIN for PIC 
in Line 4 10, the program will try to load 
any and all BIN extension files, which, 
if the file is not a graphic, could cause 
the computer to go nuts and lock up. 
My suggestion is to rename your graph- 
February 1987 THE RAINBOW 89 



ics, using either PIC or PIX for the 
extension. 

Lines 510 to 600 comprise the image 
processor. The routine loads each 6, 1 43- 
byte-long image on the disk in turn, 
then processes it by taking every sixth 
byte on every sixth line and composing 
a picture in the upper left-hand corner 
of the screen. You may notice that the 
creation of the small image, because of 
the 5TEP 6, allows a dual use of the first 
screen. This small image is transferred 
with the GET and PUT in Line 580 from 
PMDDE4 Screen One (pages 1-4) to 
Screen Two (PMDDE4 pages 5-8) and 
labeled with the Draw Letters subrou- 
tine in the wink of an eye. 

Lines 490 and 540 enable this pro- 
gram to avoid graphics files longer than 
the single PMDDE 4 screen, such as the 
eight-page saves made with Derringer's 
Master Design or Colorware's Co Co 
Max. If the whole eight-page file were 
to be loaded, it would destroy the 



directory being created on PMDDE 4 
pages 5-8. To keep this from happening, 
the place marker created by Line 310 is 
used, with the proper filename, instead 
of a reduced image. 

After the directory is completed, it is 
copied from pages 5-8 to pages 1-4 by 
Line 630. The disk filename you entered 
earlier, the date and the free grans on 
the picture disk are written to the 
directory screen and then the beeping 
begins in Line 680. 

Pressing N when the program asks if 
you want to save the directory allows 
you the option of entering a new disk 
filename for the directory. If, at this 
point, you want to start over, simply 
press ENTER, which sends you to the 
end-of-programmenu. Pressing Y at the 
5RVE prompt sends the program execu- 
tion to Line 730. 

Line 730 is a standard four-page 
graphics save. Line 740 starts the end- 
of-program menu. This menu gives you 



three choices: restart, end or menu. 
Restart runs the program from scratch. 
This is what you choose when you are 
ready to catalog your next graphics 
disk. End stops the program and returns 
you to BASIC. Menu is a convenience I 
added for myself. I have several graph- 
ics design program disks. All of them 
are menu driven, and the menu program 
on each disk is named MENU.BR5. A 
switch of the disks, two key presses and 
I'm three programs away. The lazy 
artist's graphic system. 

Having cataloged all of your graphic 
disks, run each of the directories 
through a screen dump utility. Usingthe 
hard copy produced, you have a com- 
pact, concise and impressive catalog of 
all your graphics efforts, a computer 
artist's portfolio. 

I will be glad to answer any questions 
about this program. My address is P.O. 
Box 648, Siloam Springs, AR 
72761. □ 



The listing; GRRDIR 



230 . 
290 . 
380 . 
550 . 
670 . 
END 



.222 
.140 
. . .4 
.192 
.224 
.128 
.136 



10 CLEAR2000:DIML$ (59) ,M(98) ,V(2 
0) ,Q(100) ,DF$(30) ,GP(22,2) 
20 GOTO190 

20 i******* DRAW LETTERS ******. 
40 DRAW" BM 11 +STR $ (INT (PW) )+","+ST 
R$ (INT(PQ) )+ M C"+STR$ (K2 ) +"S"+STR 
$ (S2)+ M ;" 

50 FOR L=l TO LEN (N$ ) 

60 Q$=MID$ (N$,L, 1) :IF ASC(Q$)>97 

THENQ$=CHR$ (ASC (Q$) -32 ) 

10 IF ASC(Q$)-31<1 THEN RETURN 

80 IF Q$=CHR$(34) THEN DRAWL$(3) 

:GOTOlj30 

90 DRAWL$(ASC(Q$)-31) 
100 NEXTL: RETURN 
110 'check for file length 
120 OPEN"D",l,F$,l: FIELD #1,1 AS 
A$ :P=1:GOSUB150 
130 GOSUB150:L=C*256:GOSUB 150 :L 
=L+C : GOSUB150 : S=C*256 : GOSUB 150 : 
S=S+C : Y=L+S-1 : P=P+L: GOSUB150 : GOS 
UB150 : Q=C : GOSUB150 : GOSUB150 : L=C* 
256 : GOSUB150 : L=C+L 
140 CLOSE* 1: RETURN 



150 IF P>LOF(l) THEN C=l: RETURN 
160 GET # 1 , P : C=ASC (A$ ) : P=P+1 : RET 
URN 

170 RETURN 

180 CLS : PRINTCHR$ (128) ;"chris";C 
HR$ (128) ; "brown' s GRAPHICS DI 
R " ;STRING$ (3 2, 128) :POKE1036,39 
: POKE 10 3 8 , 1 2 8 : POKE 1039, 128 : RETUR 
N 

190 GOSUB180: PRINT: PRINT"PLEASE 
STAND BY WHILE THE PRO 

GRAM INITIATES. 

THANKS . " 

200 FOR I=1T022:READGP(I,1) ,GP(I 
, 2 ) : NEXTI : DATA 0,0,51,0,103,0,15 
5,0,207,0,0,38,51,38,103,3 8,155, 
38,207,38,0,76,51,76,103,7 6,155, 
76, 207,7 6,0, 114,51, 114,103 , 114,1 
55,114, 207,114,0, 152,51, 152 
210 L$ (1) ="BR7" :L$ ( 2) ="BR1RULDBU 
2U6RD6BD2BR4" :L$ (3) ="BR3BU8D2BR2 
U2BD8BR3" :L$ (4 ) ="BR1BU5U3BR2D3U1 
R1NL4BU1NL4BD7BR1" : L$ (5) ="BU8NR4 
D4R4D4L4R2D1U10D9BR5" : L$ (6) ="BU8 
R1D1L1U1R1BR3D2G4D2BR3R1U1L1D1R1 
BR3" :L$ (7)="BR7H6U2R2D2G3D3R3E2B 
D2BR3" 

220 L$ (8) ="BR1BU6U2RD2BD6BR3":L$ 
(9)="BR1H1U7E1BD9BR1" :L$(10) ="BR 
1E1U7H1BD9BR3":L$ (11) ="BR3BU3U3D 
1NR2NL2NE2NG2NF2NH2BR4D5" : L$ ( 12 ) 
="BR6U4D2L2R4BR4BD2":L$ (13 )="BR1 
U1R1D3U2 L1BR4 " 

230 L$ (14)="BR1BU3R4BD3BR1" :L$ (1 
5) ="BR1U1R1D1L1BR4 " : L$ (16) ="BR1E 



90 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



5BD5BR1" :L$ (17) ="BR1BU1U3BU1BR1R 
3BR1NG4BD1D3BD1BL1NL3 BR3 " : L$ ( 18 ) 
="BR1BU4URD5BR2 " : L$ (19) ="BU5R4DG 
3DR4BR1" :L$ (2j3) ="BU5R4G2R2D3L4BR 
7" :L$(21)="BU5D3NR5R3U3D5BR4 " :L$ 
(22 ) ="R4U3L4U2R3BD5BR3 " 
240 L$ (23)="BR1NR3U3NU2R3D3BR3" : 
L$ (24) ="BR1BU5R4D2G3BR5" :L$ (25) = 
"BR1U3NR3U2R3 D5NL3 BR1 " : L$ ( 2 6 ) =" B 
R1BU2NR4U3R4D5BR1" : L$ ( 27 ) ="BR1BU 
4BR4URDLBD3RDLUBD1BR1 " : L$ (28) ="B 
R1BU4RBD3D2ULBR3 " 

250 L$ (29) ="BR1BU5BR4G2F2BR1" : L$ 
(30 ) ="BR1BU5NR4BD2R4BD3BR1" : L$ ( 3 
1)="BR4BU4F2G2BR3" :L$ (32)="BR1BU 
2U3R4D1G2D3BR1 " : 

260 L$ (34 )="BR1U5R3D2NL3D3BR1" : L 
$ ( 3 5 ) = " BR1U5R3 D2 RNL4 D3 NL3 BR1 " : L$ 
(36) ="BR1U5NR3D5R3BR1" :L$ (37)="B 
R1U5R3BR1BD1D3 BD1BL1L3 BR5 11 : L$ ( 3 8 
)="BR1U5NR3D2NR3D3R3BR1" :L$(39)= 
"BR1U5NR3D2R3BD3BR1" : 
270 L$(40)="BR1BU1U3BU1BR1R3BD2N 
L1D3BL1L2BR3BR1" :L$ (41) ="BR1U5D2 
R3U2D5BR1 11 : L$ ( 4 2 ) ="BR3NU5BR3 " : L$ 
(43)="BR1BU3D2BD1BR1R2BR1BU1U4BD 
5BR1" :L$ (44) ="BR1U5D2R2NE2F3BR1" 



280 L$ (45)="BR1NU5R3BR1 M :L$ (46)= 
"BR1U5F2E2D5BR1" : L$ (47 ) ="BR1U5F4 
U4D5BR1" :L$ (48) ="BR1BU1U3BU1BR1N 
R2BD5R2BR1BU1U3BD4BR1" : L$ (49)="B 
R1U5R2 BR1BD1D1BD1NL2 BD2 BR1 " 
290 L$ (5j3)="BRlBUlU3BUlBRlR3BRlB 
D1D3BD1BL1L3BR2NF2BR5" :L$ (51)="B 
R1U5R3BR1BD1L1BD1BL1NL1F3BR1" :L$ 
(52)="BR1BU5BR3L3DF3DL3BR5" :L$(5 
3 ) ="BR4BU5NR3NL3D5BR5" : L$ ( 54 ) ="B 
R1BU5D4BD1BR1R2BR2 BU1U4BD5BR1" 
300 L$ (55)="BR1BU5D2F3E3U2BD5BR1 
11 : L$ ( 5 6 ) =" BR 1 BU 5 D 4 FRENU 4 FREU 4 BD 5 
BR1" :L$ (57)="BR1E5BL5F5BR1" :L$(5 
8) ="BR1BU5F2ND3E2BD5BR1 11 : L$ (59) = 
"BR1BU5R5G5R5BR1" 

310 PMODE4,l:PCLS5: LINE (1,1) -(44 
,32) , PRESET, BF:N$="LONG" :K2=5:S2 
=4:PW=lj3: PQ=13 :GOSUB4j3:N$ = "FILE" 
:PQ=23 :GOSUB4j3:LINE(6,4) -(38,28) 
, PSET, B 

320 GET(1,1) -(44 , 32) ,M,G: PCLS5 
330 PMODE4,5:PCLS5:PMODE4,l:PCLS 
3 40 'start up routine 

350 PRINT: INPUT"ENTER DISK NAME 
(8 CHAR. MAX) — >";DN$:IF LEN( 
DN$)>8 THEN3 5j3 



SUPER 

PROGRAMMING 
AID 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



"Best value of the year", see the 
review in the July Rainbow. 

The Super Programming Aid is the best in- 
tegrated software utility available for your 
COCO. Add what Tandy left out, COPY and 
MOVE statements, FIND, PRINT FORMAT- 
TER, KEY CLICKER, PROGRAMMABLE 
KEYBOARD, MULTIPLE EDIT SESSIONS, 
MERGE PROGRAMS, TYP-O-MATIC keys and 
much more, saves hours of time for BASIC 
programmers. Version II and III add many 
more features, PRINT SPOOLER, FULL 
SCREEN EDIT COMAMD, SCREEN PRIN- 
TING and more. 

VERSION I — $19.95 — for16K&32K COCO 
VERSION II — $24.95 — for 64K COCO 
VERSION III — $29.95 — for COCO 3 



Call or Write 
for Info 
Satisfaction 
Guaranteed! 



Bangert Software Systems 
P.O. Box 21056 
Indianapolis, IN 46221 
(317) 262-8865 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3127 64k color comp 
26-3131 1st disk drive 



14000 
269 95 



PRINTERS 



26-1276 DMP 105 
26-1277 DMP-430 
26-1280 DMP-130 



160.00 
580.00 
269.00 



MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1050 Tandy 1000 EX 
25-1051 Tandy 1000 SX 
25-0101 1 Plus expansion board 
25-1005 2nd drive mod 1000 

25- 1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 

26- 1070 mod 4D 64k 2dr. 



650.00 
950.00 
155.00 
145.00 
110.00 
920.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



92 



360 LINEINPUT" DATE (ANY FORMAT) " 
;DT$ 

370 PRINT: PRINT "PUT DISK IN DRIV 
E 0 AND PRESS ENTER" : INPUTQ$ : G 
OSUB180 

380 K2=4:S2=4:CT=0:CN=0:PRINT@64 

/'READING DIRECTORY" 

390 1 **READ DIRECTORY TRACK 

main loop 
400 FOR SE= 3 TO 11: DSKI$0 , 17 , SE 
,A$,B$: A$=A$+LEFT$ (B$, 114) :FOR D 
E= 0 TO 7:PT=DE*32 :NA$=MID$ (A$,P 
T+1,8) :EXT$=MID$ (A$,PT+9, 3) 
410 IF EXT$<>"PIC" THEN 450 
420 IF LEFT$ (NA$ , 1) =CHR$ (255) TH 
EN 450 

430 IF LEFT$(NA$,1)=CHR$(0) THEN 
GOTO 4 50 

440 CT=CT+1 : DF$ (CT) =NA$+"/"+EXT$ 

450 NEXTDE, SE: FR=FREE (0) 

460 IF CT=0 THENPRINT" SORRY, NO 

PICS ON THIS DISK.": GOTO750 

470 PRINT "CHECKING FILE LENGTHS" 

:FOR TT=1 TO CT: F$=DF$ (TT) : GOSUB 

120:LONG=Y-S 

480 PRINTUSING"## % % # 

####" ;TT, DF$ (TT) , LONG 

490 IF L0NO6143 THEN DF$ (TT) =DF 

$(TT)+"MAX" 

500 NEXTTT 

510 'process graphic screens 
520 PMODE4,1:SCREEN1,0:FOR 1=1 
TO CT 

530 IFDF$(I)=""THEN560 

540 IFRIGHT$(DF$(I) , 3 ) = "MAX " THEN 

N$="MAX" :DF$ (I)=LEFT$ (DF$ (I) ,8) : 

PMODE4, 1:PUT(1, 1) -(44, 3 2) ,M,PSET 

: CN=CN+1 : GOSUB580 : GOTO560 

550 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 0 : PCLS5 : LOA 

DM DF$ (I) : GOSUB 570 

560 NEXTI:GOTO630 

570 F=-1:E=0:CN=CN+1:FOR Y=0 TO 

192 STEP 6:F=F+1:E=0:FOR X=0 TO 

255 STEP 6:E=E+l:PMODE4,l:GET(X, 

Y)-(X+1,Y) ,V,G:PUT(E,F)-(E+1,F) , 

V,PSET:PUT(E,F) -(E+1,F) ,V,PSET:N 

EXTX, Y 

580 GET(2,2)-(43,30) ,Q,G:PMODE4, 
5:SCREEN1,0:PUT(GP(CN, 1) , GP(CN, 2 
) )-(GP(CN,l)+41,GP(CN,2)+2 8) ,Q,P 
SET 

590 K2=4:S2=4:PW=GP(CN,1) :PQ=GP( 
CN,2)+35:N$=LEFT$(DF$(I) ,8) : GOSU 
B40 

600 IF CN=CT THEN 630 
6lj0 RETURN 

620 'prepare for save 

630 FORI=8T05STEP-l:PCOPY I TO I 

-4 : NEXT 

THE RAINBOW February 1987 



640 N$=DN$ 

650 PMODE4 , 1: SCREEN1 , 0 : LINE ( 103 , 
158) -(255,192) , PRESET , B : S2=4 : PW= 
105 : PQ=168 : GOSUB40 
660 PW=105:PQ=178:N$=DT$:GOSUB40 
670 PW=105:PQ=188:N$="FREE GRANS 
= "+STR$ (FR) :GOSUB40 

680 Z$=INKEY$:SOUND10,2:SOUND100 
,2:IFZ$="" THEN680 

690 GOSUB180: PRINT "REMOVE PICTUR 
E DISK AND PUT GRAPHICS DIRE 

CTORY DISK IN DRIVE ZERO FO 

R save" :INPUT"PRESS ENTER TO CON 
TINUE" ;Z$ 

700 GOSUB180:F1=FREE(0) : PRINT: PR 
INT" FREE GRANS ON THIS DIRECTORY 
DISK: "Fl 

710 IF Fl<3 THENPRINT"- - not e 
nough room! - - START NEW 

DIRECTORY DISK" : INPUT"PRESS ENT 
ER WHEN READY" ; Z$ : GOTO700 
720 PRINT "SAVE THIS DIRECTORY AS 

"DN$" " ; : INPUT" (Y/N) " ; 
Z$:IF Z$="Y" THEN 730 ELSE INPUT 
"NEW FILENAME OR <ENTER> " ; DN$ : IF 

DN$=""THEN740 
730 DN$=DN$+"/PIC":SAVEM DN$,3 58 
4,9727,40999 

740 GOSUB180:IF Z $=" Y"THENPRINT" 
GRAPHIC DIRECTORY 
"DN$" SAVED!" 

750 PRINT :PRINT"r > RESTART PROG 
RAM" : PRINT"e > END PROGRAM" : PRIN 
T"m > GRAPHIC SYSTEN MENU": PRINT 
:PRINT"PRESS KEY OF CHOICE." 
760 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$=" "THEN7 60 
770 IF Z$="R" THEN RUN 
780 IF Z$="E" THENEND 
790 IF Z$="M" THEN 800 ELSE760 
800 GOSUB180: PRINT "PLACE SYSTEM 
DESIGN DISK IN DRIVE ZERO" ; : 

LINEINPUT" AND PRESS ENTER" ; Z $ : R 
UN"MENU/BAS:0" ^ 



Hint 



Customizing Color 



While disassembling Extended basic on the CoCo 
3, 1 found that the PALETTE CMP default values occupy 
memory locations from SE654 to SE663. Default 
values for PALETTE RGB are in locations SE664 to 
SE673 and the present PALETTE values are in locations 
SE678 to SE687. You can customize two color sets by 
poking respective values in the PALETTE CMP and 
PALETTE RGB ranges and then switching between them 
with one command. You can then peek the present 
PALETTE values to find out what color is in what slot. 

Jason Forbes 
Mexico, NY 




PROCOLORFILE * 

<®i984 by Oewnger StUware. Inc 

ENHANCED 2.0 

60 Data Fields for each record 
1020 spaces available per record if needed 
Maximizes multiple drive operation 
28 equation lines ( + -7) 
IF-THEN-ELSE logic test in equations 
Full Screen editing on up to 4 data entry screens 
Key click and auto key repeat 
Stores custom designed report formats 
Obtain totals, averages, or summaries for any field 
Output reports to printer, screen, or disk file 
Send data out to a DYNACALC compatible file 
Separate label generator for up to 10 across labels 
Pre-define up to 16 indexes for searching/reporting file 
Sorts 750 records in under 5 minutes 
User delined selection menus 
Repeated tasks performed with one keystroke 
Comes with 75 pages of documentation in a 3 ring binder 
SuDported by a national users group 
Full time programmer support 
Supplied on an unprotected disk 

PROCOLORFORMS 2.0 * 

£■ 1984 by Derringer Soltware Inc 

PRO-COLOR- FORMS will access data files created with 
PRO-COLOR-FILE andmergethem with aletteror place them 
on pre-printed forms. 

• STORE UP TO 6 FORMATS • USER DEFINED PAGE SIZE 

■ SUPPORTS SPECIAL PRINTER CONTROL CODES • RIGHT 
JUSTIFICATION • PASSWORD PROTECTION ■ MERGES 
WITH GRAPHICS FROM MASTER DESIGN OR 
TELEGRAPHICS ■ 

PROCOLOR-DIR * 

V1984 by Derringer Software Inc 

PRO-COLOR-DIR will read your directories and create a 
master data file that can be accessed by PRO-COLOR-FILE 
lor sorting and reporting. 1000 + records can be stored on 
one diskette with valuaole information about each program 

You can obtain hard copies of the information and create 
labels of the filenames for placing on the diskette itself. 

■ DISK ID NAME • FILENAME/EXT • TYPE OF FILE 

• DATE CREATED • DATE UPDATED ■ NUMBER OF 
GRANS ALLOCATED • NUMBER OF SECTORS 
ALLOCATED AND USED • MACHINE LANGUAGE 
ADDRESSES • . 

FOR BOTH * 



DYNACALC * 

SPREAD SHEET FLEXIBILITY 

(Includes Dynagraph, Sidewise) — I 

19* 

Telewriter-64. 



SIDEWISE * 

© 1984 by Derringer Software. Inc. 

Add a new "twist" to your printers capabilities! 

SIDEWISE makes your printer do something you never 
thought possible - print side ways! 

SIDEWISE will read in any ASCII text file and print it out 
side ways using a Radio Shack, Epson, Okidata, C-ltoh or 
Gemini printers having dot-graphics ability 

SiDEWiSE 0S9 is compatible with DYNACALC OS9 and 
requires BasicO 9 



WORD PROCESSOR POWER 



SIDEWISE 0S9 
(Disk only) 



S59 95 



coco Max 11 

GRAPHICS SUPERIOR 




SIDEWISE RS-DOS 



SJQ95 



■ion j£ 1 



@ SUMMARY * 

© 1985 Derringer Soliware. Inc. 

If you use your spreadsheet program to keep track of youi 
expenses then @ SUM MAR Yean help you analyze those 
expenses. For example Jfyoj indicate a "Categorv" for each 
expense^hen @ SUMMARY will nroducea report that shows 
a total for each categorv, the "lignesL amount, the lowest 
amount and the average amount. In addition, ©SUMMARY 
can produce a hi-res line graph or bar graph of the analysis 
and allow you to place titles on the graph, A hardcopy of the 
graph can also be generated as weff as saved to disk. 

The analysis can be saved in a "data file" which can be 
loaded into OYNACALGor read in by @ SUMMARY for future 
additions to the analysis. If you use other Spreadsheets such 
as ELITE*CALC then you have added a graphing feature to 
your spreadsheet applications. The analysis can also be saved 
in an ASCII file which can be read by word processors lor 
inclusion in a report 

©SUMMARY is compatible with any spreadsheet program 
that can generate an ASCII text file cfworksheets. 



* RS-DOS version included FREE with DYNACALC ' 

0S9is a registered irarJemaik of MICROWARE and MOTOROLA 



TELEGRAPHICS * 

« ' 1984 by Derringer Software, inc 

PRINT HI-RES GRAPHICS USING TELEWRITER-64! 

Use C0C0 Max, Graphioom or other graphics programs to 
create letter heads and print them while using Telewriter-64. 

Telegraphies interlaces with Radio Shack, Epson, Gemini, 
C-ltohandOkidataprintershavingdot-addressable graphics 
A simple modification to Telewriter-64 will allow you 10 exit 
Telewriter via the DISK I/O MENU and print out the graphic 
without affecting any of your text in the buffer. 

This is the same feature that is included in our MASTER 
DESIGN program. Since we felt you don't need to buy two 
graphics editing programs, we have made this feature available 
at a reduced price. 





Spec^RS-DOS 



or 



(disk only) 



$1995 



*0S9 version does not 
have Hi-Res graphing 
andreQuiresBasic09. 



DYNACALC* is a registered trademark of Computer Sysiems Center 

ELITE' CALC is a trademark of Elite Soliware 

OS9 is a registered trademark ol MICROWARE and MO TOROLA 

C0C0 3 Compatible 



(Available Only On Disk) 

NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLICABLE 



MASTER DESIGN * 

• 1984 by Derringer Soliware. Inc. 

Generates lettering in hi-res graohicsthat can be different 
sizes, skinny, bold, textured, drqashadowed raise shadowed 
or tall. Also interfaces with the telewriter-64 word processor 
for printing hi-res displays with your letters. 

Takefulladvantageol all the extended BASIC hi res graphic 
commands incUdinrjtjoxes, circles, lines, copy displays and 
utilize GET and PUT features. Added commands include mirror 
reflection, turn displays backwards or upside down. Squish 
displays, create dot patterns for shading or diagonal lines. 

TheLetterhead Utility allowsyouto access hi-res graphics 
from Telewriter-64. your own BASIC programs or 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS. 

Interfaces with dot matrix printersjiaving dot addressable 
graphics. 




See reviews in 

My W Rainbow. Oct S4H0lCoC0 



Derringer Software, Inc. South Carolina residents add sales tax. 

PO BOX 5300, Florence, SC 29502-5300 Include $3.00 for UPS Shipping - $5.00 U.S. Mail - $9.00 Air Mail 

To place an order by phone, call: (803) 665-5676 Canadian Distributor-Kelly Software 

10 AM Bnd 5 PM EOT Australian Dislribuior-Compuier Hut Software 

Check, Money Order, visa or MasterCard Allow 2 weeks for delivery 



A handy disk utility for the CoCo 3 



Take Command of 
CoCo 3 Drives 

By Michael N. Jorgenson 



"Whave a vast assortment of utilities for the older CoCos, 
I but only a few of them will run on the new CoCo 3. 
JLSo, 1 have written my own utility. 

Du-3 is a disk utility written in BASIC, and it contains many 
interesting features. The operating commands are Copy, 
Drive, Kill, Load, Name, Scan, Quit and Verify. An INKEYS 
control letter is given for each command, 

Upon start-up, the directory of a disk in Drive 0 is read 
and displayed in split format on the 40-column text screen 
in numerical order with extensions and granule allocations. 
The free granule space of the disk, if any, will also be shown. 

The BREAK key can be used to escape any function, or 
to read in another disk on the same working drive. Pressing 
C copies any or all files from one disk to another. The 
program prompts for the destination drive number (the 
default is Drive 0). A single-drive copy can be made on any 
workingdrive. Use the D key to change your workingdrive. 
Press D and the number of the drive you want to use (0 
to 3); the default is 0. Pressing K kills any or all files on 
the working drive disk. 

To load any file on the working drive disk, press L. Use 
N to rename any file on the working disk drive, including 
the extension. S scans the working drive disk; the program 
prompts for a starting track and sector. Use Q to exit, and 
use V to toggle Verify on and off. 



Michael Jorgenson is an electronics technician and a novice 
programmer. He lives in Lorain, Ohio, and enjoys working 
with Disk BASIC, games, utilities and telecommunications. 
He is also a published author of several short Fantasy/ 
Adventure articles and games. 



DU-3 only works on the Color Computer 3. It does not 
use a speed-up poke, but it will execute a PCLERR1. This 
is to minimize disk-swapping on single-drive systems. The 
"Insert Destination Disk" prompt that appears on single- 
drive copies is in Disk BASIC, which looks a bit crummy on 
the 40-column screen. I could not find a way to work around 
it. 

DU-3 reads and displays up to 68 files. If there are more 
than 36 files, the display scrolls upward off the screen, but 
does not affect program operation. 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
author at 749 Tower Blvd., Lorain, OH 44052, 2/6-282- 
9355- Please enclose an SASE for a reply when writing.) 



// 120 ... 


...219 


205 


.... 78 


300 


30 


380 


17 


500 


38 


END . 


... .65 


lj r 



The listing: DU-3 



1)3 

15 

25 

3,0 
35 
40 

45 



• -k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k 

1 A DISK UTILITY 
1 FOR THE COCO-3 
1 MIKE JORGENSON 

' -k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k 
l 



PCLEAR1 : CLEAR3 5 $0 

DIM FL$(68) ,XF(68) ,V(68) 



94 THE RAINBOW February 



50 CLS:ON BRK GOTO 7 5 
55 PALETTE 9, 0: PALETTE 10,2 
60 WIDTH 40: VERIFY ON 
65 V$="ON" :A$="0":GOTO75 
70 FORX=lTO DF : FL$ (X) =" " : NEXT 
75 GOSUB325:ATTR 2,0 
80 PRINT" C= COPY D= DRIV K= KI 
LL L= LOAD" : PRINT" N= NAME S 
= SCAN Q= QUIT V= "V$ 
85 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$=""THEN85 
90 Q=INSTR("CDKLNSQV",Q$)+l:ON Q 
GOT085, 10 5, 210 ,240, 565, 290 ,480, 
610,95 

95 IFV$="ON"THENV$="OFF" : VERIFY 0 
FF:GOTO100 ELSEV$="ON" : VERIFYON 
100 LOCATE 3,Y:GOTO80 
105 IF DF<1THEN100 ELSEGOSUB44 0 
110 GOSUB3 70:ATTR 2 , 0 : PRINT" COPY 

ALL OR SINGLE FILE: <A/S> ?" 
115 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$="A"THEN165 EL 
SEIFQ$="S"THEN120 ELSE115 
120 LOCATE 3 , Y : LINEINPUT" ENTER T 
HE FILE NUMBER TO COPY ? ";C$:C 
=VAL(C$):IF ODF OR C<1THEN100 
125 ATTR 3,0: IF A=B THEN140 
130 PRINT: PRINT" COPYING: "FL 
$(C)" TO "B$:COPY""+FL$ (C)+":"+A 
$TO""+FL$(C) +" : "+B$ 
13 5 SOUND100, 6:GOTO160 
140 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" COPYING: 

M FL$(C) : PRINT: PRINT" " ; 
145 COPY""+FL$(C)+":"+A$ 
150 PRINT : PRINT : SOUND100 , 6 
155 LINEINPUT" INSERT SOURCE D 
ISK, THEN <ENTER> ";Q$ 
160 GOSUB370:ATTR 2,0:GOTO80 
165 LOCATE 3 , Y: PRINT" COPY ALL, A 
RE YOU SURE: <Y/N> ? " 
170 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$=""THEN170 
175 IF Q$O"Y"THEN100 
180 ATTR 3,0: IF A=B THEN190 
185 Y=Y+2 : FORX=lTO DF: LOCATE 3,Y 
: PRINT" COPYING: "FL$(X) M TO "B$ 
:COPY""+FL$(X)+": "+A$TO""+FL$(X) 
+": "+B$:NEXT:SOUND100, 6:GOTO160 
190 CLS:FORX=lTO DF 
195 PRINT : PRINT :SOUND100, 6: LINEI 
NPUT" INSERT SOURCE DISK, THEN 

<ENTER> " ;Q$: PRINT: PRINT" " ; 
200 COPY""+FL$(X)+": "+A$ 
205 NEXT:GOTO150 
210 GOSUB470: LOCATE 3,6 
215 PRINT" CHANGE WORKING DRIVE T 
0: " ; : ATTR 2 ,0 : PRINT"<0-3> ?" 
220 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN220 
225 A=VAL(A$):IF A>3THEN220 
230 IF A<1THENA$="0" 



Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

Last Chriitma* we introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Designer program 
(■ee review April 80 Rainbow). It has 
been so populir that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphic! Designer. The 
Coco Graphics Detigner produce! 
greeting cardi plui banners and signs. 
Thie program will further increase the 
uiefullnen and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allowi you to mix text and 
pictures In alt your creationi. The 
program features picture, border, and 
character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built in 
libraries. Plui a ipecial "grabber" utility 
ii included to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of 32K, One Disk Drive 
(Dlik Ext. BASIC 1.0/1. l.ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printers lupporiad include: 
Epson RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX- 10, C-Itoh 8510, DMP-100/ 106/ 
400/ 430, Seikoiha GP- 100/250, Legend 
808 end Gorilla B ennene. Send s SASE 
for complete list of compatible printers. 
#CSS2 Coco Graphics Designer 120.06 

Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional supplementary library 

diskette containing over one hundred 
additional pictures ii available. 

#C3S3 Picture Diik #1 $14.06. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packs containing 120 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelopes in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your productions unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack 110.05 





With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer it's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Now $19.95 

Order Cat#TBRS01 
(Was $69.95) 

You can benefit from our purchase of 
brand new WICO TrackbaJl Controllers 
at closeout prices. This model was 
designed specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer and plugs right into the 
joystick port. 

WICO it the largest designer and 
manufacturer of control devices for 
commercial arcade video games. If 
you've ever played an arcade video 
game, chancei are you've used a WICO 
joystick or trackball and experienced Us 



superior control, pinpoint firing 
accuracy, and exceptional durability. 

Includes one-year limited warranty. 
Phoenolic ball offers 360-degree 
movement. Two optical encoders 
provide split-second response. 

Quick-action fire button for smooth, two 
handed arcade response and feel. Long 
S' computer connection. Heavy duty 
plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color computer 
models. 



We have bargain priced trackballs for ATARI, Commodore, TI, 
and other computers. Call or write for our price list. 



Ordering Instructions: All orders 

add 13.00 Shipping & Handling. UPS 
COD add 19.00. VISA/MC Accepted. 
NY residents add sales tax. 



Zebra Sytems, Inc 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 95 



OWL-WARE 



WINCHESTER BASIC 



ANNOUNCING... the Development of a Major Breakthrough in 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR COMPUTER!!! 

Several months ago OWL-WARE introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer. 
Now we are about to introduce the only RSDOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, although there are 10 

directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but if you do, all files saved from RSDOS are available to OS9. All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into, only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don't like. 

Call for further details and availability on this breakthrough product!!! 




$50. 




WITH 

DRIVE ONLY... %P%JVJm WITHOUT DRIVE 

BELOW OS9 HARD DRIVES FOR CoCo 1, 2. 3- 

WINCHESTER BASIC CoCo 1, 2 ONLY (CoCo 3 Version Pending) 



$75. 



OS-9 HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives. 

Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
Memory!!! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes... 
Software, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interface. 

NOTE: OS-9 and RS DOS... "This may prove to be the perfect mating of 
NEW PRICING!!! new both systems." RAINBOW (May 86) 

$599. $629. $729. $859. « softwa e r r e fa oni y $ii9 

10 MEG 15 MEG 20 MEG 30 MEG 

OWL-WARE 

is pleased to announce 
an exclusive arrangement 

to Distribute the L.R. TECH 
Hard Drive Interface and Software. DEALERS INQUIRES INVITED 



NEW COCO 3 VERSION! 

CREATE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES MITH 




m 

M 

M 
H 
M 
M 
M 
H 

M 
M 



Convert 
«cc ept 
TOUCH 
Mign i # 
Or mm m 

*liY„? 
10 col 
Plctur 

BfltlC 
L et ter 
tcrttn 

or oi 



2 . O 

lent , on-screen menu 
t Input frow X-PRD. 
-pad, nuutr. or JOYSTICK 
icat i o n ma d e 
ltn custom pelntorufhei 
ree-riAnd ikitchina 
" commend 
or s at a X lme 
t( ere reedy for uxe in 

Rr oar am* 
g in tnu f i i 
dump to Color 
ner Tandy 



Ink- Jt i 
printer 1 



64K DISK 



m 

• 9 • 

^ s * * ' s \f J f \ 




$29.95 

•//A 




UlEH 3-DIHENSI0NAL CB-iECTS FROM ANY 
ANCLE HITH 




NOTE: Interface is not Interrupt 
Driven Like Our Competition. 

Therefore, the System Clock 
does not Lose Time During 
Hard Drive Access. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULTI-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 




M p 



Convenient, on-screen menu 
Supports input /row X-PRD, 

TOUCH-PRD, MOUSE or JOYSTICK 
out it- in screen dump to Tandy 

printers 
Calculate^ dimensions for you 

sketch 
s lines and 



aicu i a i e % a i men s i < 
from just a r ougn 
lots or calculate 



ar c i 
On- sere en 



(krVching mode 



64K DISK 



$29.95 



OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 






TECHNICAL ADVICE 
(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 



SHhhh... Ask about the WISPER DRIVE!!! 



Single 



drive o$1 79. to $239. 

Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0,1,2,3 Combos. Double 

drive i$109.to$ 145. Quad 




STURDY 

Smith Corona 

FASTEXT 80 

30 CPS with 6 print spacings, 
graphics and extended character 
set* Includes serial to parallel 
printer interface. . 

ONLY... $ 1 7 9. 



All drives are new.and fully 
assembled. We ship 

FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at NO ADDED CHARGE! 

CHINON and Other Brands known 
as the highest quality made. 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 



NOW FOR CoCo 1, 2 



dm 



Special 
Bundled 

Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 

UPGRADE KIT FOR 
NEW RS SYSTEM 

Why only double capacity 
when you can triple in the same 
case. KIT INCLUDES: double sided 
drivetofitin your case, includes 
hardware and chip to run double 
sided Takes only 5 minutes 

1 YR. WARRANTY 
ONLY... 



$119. 



We have RSDOS, JDOS, 
OWL DOS, ADOS available on 
ROM. Call about Double Sided 
or Special Needs. 



TOLL FREE 

ORDER LINE 

(800) 245-6228 

Call for 
LATEST 

PRICES!!! 



WARRANTIES 

90 day - 1 YEAR 

M.C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P O Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA 
19539 

PA Res include 6 * Ta* 

PA (215) 682-6855 




OWL TIP: Version 1.1 of Disk 

Tutor now available. If you have not 
gotten yours, order today!!! 

OWL-WARE Software Bundle 

Disk Tutorial 3 Utilities 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Version 1.1 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
QUICK, PAINLESS KNOWLEDGE OF DISK 
BASIC (THIS PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN 
TUTOR IS EASILY WORTH THE BUNDLE'S 
TOTAL PRICE). 

OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
25% FASTER DISK ACCESS AND ALLOWS 
USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 
SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

VERIFY 

VERIFIES READING EACH SECTOR. BAD 
SECTORS ARE LISTED ON THE SCREEN. 

2 GAMES 

2 GAMES FROM OUR STOCK. 
BOTH HAVE SOLD FOR OVER $17. EACH. 

IF SOLD SEPARATELY OVER 
S 125.00 WORTH OF SOFTWARE!!! 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
$6.95 with 
DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 



235 DRIVE A:GOT07j3 
240 IF DF<1THEN1££ ELSEGOSUB37 0 
2 45 ATTR 2 , 0 : PRINT" KILL ALL OR S 
INGLE FILE: <A/S> ?" 
250 Q$=INKEY$: IFQ$ = "A ,, THEN27j3 EL 
SEIFQ$= ,, S M THEN255 ELSE250 
255 LOCATE 3 , Y : LINEINPUT "ENTER T 
HE FILE NUMBER TO KILL ? ";K$:K 
=VAL(K$) :IF K>DF OR K<1THEN1^ 
260 PRINT: ATTR 3,0 

265 PRINT" KILLING: "FL$(K):K 
ILL M,I +FL$ (K) :IF DF>1THEN SOUND10 
0,6:GOTO10 ELSE70 

27 j3 LOCATE 3 ; Y: PRINT 11 KILL ALL, A 
RE YOU SURE: <Y/N> ? " 
275 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$ = lf M THEN2 75 
280 IF Q$o lf Y"THENl^ 

2 85 ATTR 3 , 0 : Y=Y+2 : FORK=lTO DF:L 
OCATE 3 ,Y: PRINT "KILLING: 11 FL$ ( K 
) :KILL' f,, +FL$ (K) :NEXT:GOT07£ 
29j3 IF DF<lTHENlj3£ ELSEGOSUB37 0 
295 ATTR 2 , 0 : LINEINPUT M ENTER A F 
ILE NUMBER TO RENAME ? ";N$:N=V 
AL(N$):IF N>DF OR N<lTHENl£j3 
300 GOSUB4 7 0 : LOCATE 3,6 
305 PRINT" RENAME: M FL$ (N) 11 - TO 

WHAT ? 11 : ATTR 2 ,0 

31)3 PRINT :PRINT M <INCLUDE EXT> 
: 11 ;: ATTR 3 ,0 : LINEINPUT N$:L=LE 
N(N$) :IF L>12 OR L<1THEN16£ 
315 RENAME 11 " + FL$ (N)TO""+N$ 
320 SOUNDl£j3,6:GOT07£ 
325 FR=FREE(A) :DF=0 
330 DSKI$ A ; 17 ; 2,X$,Y$ 
335 FORX=3T09 :DSKI$ A,17,X,Y$,Z$ 
:F0RK=1T0128 STEP3 2 : GOSUB34^3 : NEX 
TK: Y$=Z$ :F0RK=1T0128 STEP32:GOSU 
B3 4 j3 : NEXTK , X : GOT03 7 0 
340 SB$=MID$ (Y$,K ; 14) :L$ = LEFT$ (S 
B$, 1) :IFL$=CHR$ (j3 ) THENRETURN ELS 
EIFL$=CHR$ (2 55) THENY=128 : RETURN 
345 IF ASC (SB$ ) >127THENRETURN 
350 DF=DF+l:XF(DF)=j3:V(DF)=£:Y=A 
SC (RIGHT$ (SB$ , 1 ) ) +1 : FL$ ( DF) =LEFT 
il $(SB$,8)+"/"+MID$ (SB$,9, 3) 

355 XF(DF)=ASC(MID$ (SB$,12,1) ) 
360 V(DF)=V(DF)+1:Z=ASC(MID$ (X$, 
Y,1)):IF Z<78THENY=Z+l:GOT036£ 

3 65 RETURN 

310 GOSUB47£:IF DF>0THEN38£ 
375 LOCATE 3,6:PRINT M NO FILES PR 
ESENT IN DISK DIRECTORY! " :SOUNDl 
00, 6 :Y=11 : LOCATE 3, Y: RETURN 
1 380 T=0:1F DF<22THENY=4 ELSEY=3 
1 385 FORX=lTO DF: IF T=0 AND Y=17T 
HENY=Y-1 : F0RK=1T06 : PRINT : NEXT 
39j3 IF T=j3THENT=l:Y=Y+l:Z=l ELSE 
T=0:Z=20 



98 THE RAINBOW February 1 987 



395 ATTR 2,0: LOCATE Z,Y 

400 IF X<lj3THENPRINTX; » 11 ; : ATTR 

3,0: PRINTFL$ (X) ;V(X) :GOT0415 

405 PRINTX ; : ATTR 3,0 

410 PRINTFL$ (X) ;V(X) 

415 NEXT: ATTR 2,0: IF T=£THENY=Y+ 

1:Z=5 ELSEZ=24 

42 0 LOCATE Z , Y : PRINT 11 Free = " ; 
425 ATTR 2,£,B:PRINT FR 
430 IF DF< 2 2 THEN Y= Y+ 3 ELSEY=Y+2 
4 3 5 LOCATE 3 , Y : RETURN 
440 GOSUB47 0 : LOCATE 3,6:PRINT M TH 
E SOURCE DRIVE IS: ";A: PRINT 
4 45 PRINT " DESTINATION DRIVE: 
11 ; : ATTR 2,0: PRINT 11 <ENTER=^J> ?" 
450 B$=INKEY$ : IFB$= M "THEN45£) 
455 B=VAL(B$) :IF B>3THEN45£ 
460 IF B<lTHENB$="j3 M 
46 5 RETURN 

410 CLS: LOCATE 7,1: ATTR 1,0, B 
475 PRINT M <« COCO-3 DISK UTIL 

>» M : ATTR 3 ,0: RETURN 
480 CLS: LOCATE 7,1: ATTR 1,0, B 
485 PRINT lf <<< COCO-3 DISK SCAN 

>»" .-LOCATE 3, 6: ATTR 3, 0: PRINT 11 
SCANNING DISK ON DRIVE: " ;A 
490 ATTR 2,0: LOCATE 3 , 9 : INPUT 11 ST 
ART AT WHICH TRACK: <0-34> ";SX 
495 IF SX>34THEN49£ 
500 LOCATE 3 , 11 : INPUT" START AT W 
HICH SECTOR: <1-18> M ;SK 
505 IF SK<1 OR SK>18THEN5£j3 
510 FOR X=SX TO 3 4 
515 FOR K=SK TO 18 
520 DSKI$ A,X,K,Y$,Z$ 
525 ATTR 3,0: PRINT : PRINT 
53 0 PRINT 1 ' lf Y$;Z$ 
535 ATTR 2 , 0 : PRINT : PRINT 
540 PRINT 11 ";X ; K 

54 5 NEXT K:SK=1:NEXT X 
550 ATTR 3 , £ , B: SOUND100 , 6 

555 PRINT: PRINT: LINEINPUT 11 PRE 

55 <ENTER> WHEN READY . lf ;Q$ 
560 GOSDB31 0 :ATTR 2,£:GOT08£ 
565 IF DF<1THEN1££ ELSEGOSUB370 
510 ATTR 2,0: LINEINPUT"ENTER A F 
ILE NUMBER TO LOAD ? 11 ;L$:L=VAL 
(L$):IF L>DF OR L<1THEN1^ 

575 ATTR 3,0: PRINT 

580 PRINT 11 LOADING: 11 FL$ ( L) 

585 F0RX=1T01^^J : NEXT: WIDTH 32 

590 IF XF(L)=2 THEN6^J^J 

595 LOAD FL$ (L) + " : lf +A$ 

600 LOADM FL$ (L) + " : lf +A$ 

6^35 POKE &HFF4£,£:EXEC 

61j3 PCLEAR4 : CLS : ATTR 3,0 

615 PALETTE CMP: END 

620 ■*** END PROGRAM *** 



The Ultimate 
Color Computer 

Enhancements 
for Productivity 
from HJL Products 

ft flow cutaM-^rv^ 





PRO D U c T * 



mm. •* 




Now available for all 
models, including CoCo3 



To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get information 
into and out of the system. 

This Is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer. £ *?mv 

The Keyboard - $7ftri 
The overwhelming favorite of serious 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program. 
Installs In just a few minutes with no 
soldering. a J;^ 

The Numeric Keypad - $8&9$J$^2? 
The Number Jack is a self-contained, 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshlfted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
all necessary connectors for quick and 
easy Installation without soldering. 



The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, and is easily 
installed without clips, jumpers or 
soldering (except in some later CoCo 2s 
with soldered-in video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor - $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used it you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
Inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
above) jl, 



The BASIC Utility • 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any color computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, word wrap, global search, 



and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-legendable 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 

Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800-482-4891 
International calls: 718-235-8358 




Ordering information: Specify model (Original, F-verslon, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3.50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 



Also from Falsoft, The RAINBOW MAKER, 




The magazine for Tandy portable and MS-DOS users 

Not only does Tandy produce our favorite CoCo, we think they produce the best and best-priced lap- 
top portable and MS-DOS computers as well. We've found that when satisfied Color Computer users 
decide to add portability or move to MS-DOS, many stick with Tandy. For these people we publish PCM, 
The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users. 

Each month in PCM, you'll find information and programs for the Tandy 100, 102, 200 and 6Q0 portable 
computers. And you'll find even more coverage for their MS-DOS machines, the 1000, 1200, 2000 and 
3000, along with the great new 1000 EX, 1000 SX and 3000 HL. 



FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from the rainbow that readers want programs to type in, so each month we bring you an 
assortment of them: games, utilities, graphics, and home and business applications. 

BAR CODE LISTINGS AND PROGRAM DISKS! 

For portable users, PCM is the only home computer publication in the world that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory like magic with the sweep of a wand! For those who don't have 
time to type in listings, we offer a companion disk service with all the programs from the magazine. 

TUTORIALS AND PRODUCT REVIEWS! 

As if all this weren't enough, we offer regular tutorials on telecommunications and hardware; assembly 
language, basic and pascal programming tips; and in-depth reviews of the new software, peripherals 
and services as they are released. Add it all up and we think you'll find PCM to be the most informative 
and fun magazine for this market today! 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries 
call 502-228-4492. 



YES! Please send me a one year (12 issues) 
subscription to PCM for only $28/ A savings of 22% 
off the newsstand price. 



Name 



Address 
City 




State 



ZIP 



In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. 
□ My check in the amount of 

Charge to my: VISA 
Acct. # 



is enclosed. 

□ MasterCard American Express 
Expiration Date 



Signature 



Canadian subscribers U.S. $35. Surface rate elsewhere $64, airmail $85. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
U.S. currency only, please. 

Mall to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 



Creating a Review Program 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The beginner who has stayed the 
course and faithfully struggled 
through these "Basic Training" 
tutorials, has reached the point where, 
after a review, he can consider himself 
a veteran. 

Today, the project is to create a 
review program. A sentence in one 
language is displayed on the screen. A 
second, translating-language sentence 
with a randomly selected, blanked-out 
word/phrase is displayed below. With- 
out any hints (except comparison with 
the first language) he is required to take 
a guess as to the missing word /phrase 
that would make the sentence whole. 
When he presses any key, the answer 
will be filled in. At this point, you may 
want to set aside this issue of THE 
RAINBOW, take up the challenge and see 
what you can come up with. If you have 
been studying these inspiring, fun-filled 
tutorials for the past year, you have the 
background to make a creditable pro- 
gram. 

Key in lines 0 to 6, 20, 21, 23, 24 and 
995 from Listing I . We will use Line 20 
for the first language and Line 2 1 for the 
translating language. Line 1 gives the 
starting locations on the text screen. It 
also chooses a random color, other than 
black or cyan, and having chosen a 
color, proceeds to Line 10. Line 10 
clears the screen and is directed to a 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veteran 
writer and programmer and specializes 
in introducing beginners to the powers 
of the Color Computer. 



selected line number of a portion of the 
program that is currently being devel- 
oped. CoCo stores (memorizes) the two 
strings, X$ and Y$ in lines 20 and 21, 
respectively, and awaits our pleasure. 

Temporarily, insert P=31:Q=P: 
GD5UB3:EXEC44539 as Line 22. P and 
0 are the variables that give the approx- 
imate number of characters/spaces in 
strings X$ and Y$, respectively. CoCo is 
told to go to Line 3, follow the instruc- 
tions and return. 

Line 3 tells CoCo to print, beginning 
at X, P number of character/spaces, 
starting from the left side of string X$, 
and to abort any trailing blank spaces 
at the end of the last row. Ditto for the 
second string. CoCo returns to Line 22 
and waits for any key to be pressed. Run 
your work. 

This is a good time to check spelling, 
punctuation and formatting. In fact, 
you will want to create Line 2000: 
P=181 : Q=P : GD5UB3 : EXEC44539 : RETURN 
and change Line 22 to GD5UB2000. Now 
run. 

In the second translating language we 
want to blank out THE CITY. List Line 
21. Directly from the^screen, we count 
to the numerical value that starts the 
blank-out area and assigns it the vari- 
able R. (Remember, 0 is the upper left- 
hand location.) 

Count the number of spaces to be 
blanked out. The first space after the 
starting quote is number 1. Count up to 
and include the space after the last letter 
to be blanked out. Assign the total a 
variable, N=ll. This system gives you a 
little leeway. For instance, in Line 23, 



your calculations can be pretty casual 
and imprecise. If A=0 then N=10 or 
N = ll; if n=l then N=9 or N=10; if A=2 
then N=8 or N=3. All these pairs will 
work equally well. 

Delete Line 22. Line23 provides both 
the A and N information that CoCo 
demands before it can zoom over to 
Line 5 and work its tail off. 

List lines 3 through 5. Allowing for 
extra-long, multiple-row sentences, 
CoCo trots up to Line 3 and prints both 
strings, X$ and Y$, in their entirety. 
Then it jumps back to Line 5. Beginning 
at Y, plus any offset (A), it will print a 
row of CHR$(143) (the same color as 
the screen background), for a total of N 
spaces. At this point, it returns to Line 
24 and waits for you-know-what! 

CoCo shoots over to Line 4, where 
the translation line is reprinted in place 
and restored to a complete sentence. 
CoCo waits for a key to be pressed, 
whereupon it clears the screen, chooses 
a random color, and returns to be 
directed to the next pair of sentences. 
Run this. 

For the heck of it, edit Line 5 so 143 
becomes 128, and run. That doesn't 
look too bad. If you prefer a black 
blank-out, your A value should begin at 
the location of the first letter to be 
hidden, and N should include from the 
first letter through the last letter of the 
blanked-out word/phrase. In this case, 
A=2:N=B. 

For the nonce, edit Line 5 so 128 is 
143 and make sure R=0:N=11 in Line 
21 . Run to make sure. 

List lines 20 to 21 . It doesn't take long 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 101 



to note that we could blank out other 
areas. 

Insert GOTO 25 as Line 22. Key in lines 
25 and 26. Insert Line 40 as a remark 
statement, to hold the spot open for the 
next pair of sentences and to avoid the 
UL Error we were getting. Now run. 

In Line 25, all we needed to do was 
select new fl and N values. Line 26 is 
identical to Line 24. This time BIG was 
washed out. Change 25 to 27 in Line 22. 
Key in lines 27 and 28. Run and see OLD 
vanish. Again, the lines were similar, 
except for new fl and N values. 

Change 27 to 29 in Line 22. Key in 
lines 29 and 30. You can see, AND got the 
treatment this time. Run. Sure 'nuff! 
Notice that since the next line will be 
Line 40, I did not put :GOTO40 at the 
end of Line 30. But, as a beginner, you 
should use it and CoCo won't holler. 
CSAVE "PflRTl". 

Best laid plans often go awry. While 
I was mulling over what we had 
wrought, it struck me that we were 
asking CoCo to do something in an 
oblique way, for which CoCo has a 
perfectly good function, MID$. Do you 
recall, veterans of past bouts with MID$, 
that it was pointed out that there were 
both a MID$ statement, which we used 
to good advantage, and a MID$ func- 
tion, which I glossed over ever so 
quickly? 

Without being aware of it, I proved 
the old adage, 'There is always more 
than one way to do anything." If you 
crack open your ECB manual, you will 
note that MID$(X$,R,N) equals re- 
placement, where X$ is the string, fl the 
position of first character to be blanked 
out and N is equal to the number of 
characters to be wiped out. Doesn't that 
sound familiar? 

Consider: X$, fl and N prepare to do 
exactly what we want to occur and yes, 
we have a replacement, STRINGS 
(N,143). Look Ma, no MID$ function! 

You are invited to try your hand at 
working out a small program to dupli- 
cate what our tutorial does, up to this 
point. Hint: Use lines 1, 10, 20, 21, 40 
and 995. Use PflRTl advisedly. In the 
next tutorial, you will be given one 
answer plus some insights on how it was 
constructed. In the meantime, let us 
continue. We have four different areas 
blanked out. Rather than get bored stiff 
displaying all four variants, wouldn't it 
be better if we picked one at random, 
displayed it and moved on to the next 
pair? 

Key in Line 22 and run it a few times. 
We shall begin the next set of sentences 



starting at the reserved Line 40. Key in 
Lines 40, 41 and 43. Change Line 10 
from 2 0 to 40, type 4 2 GO5UB2000 and 
reserve Line 60 (G0'). Run this and 
check it out. 

This time we are consolidating the 
two-line format (as in lines 23 and 24) 
and turning it into a one-liner. Insert 
Line 42: G0T045. Key in Line 45 and 
run. 



Change Line 42 to read GOTO 47 and 
key in Line 47. Now run. You can drop 
the : GDTDG0 from Line 47, if you like. 

We are only making three variants. 
Key in Line 42 from the listing and run 
a few times. In Line 10, change 40 back 
to 20 and run. 

Notice that we work methodically, 
checking each line as we add them. It 
is no sweat to isolate and correct a newly 
created mistake. Hasty, unverified work 
only guarantees a difficult debugging 
session later. 

In Line 10, change 20 to G0. Key in 
Lines 60 and 61. Reserve Line 80 (B0'). 
Insert Line 62: GO5UB2000. Now run. 
Check the format, spelling and punc- 
tuation. 

Key in lines 63 and 65 and run. Re- 
key Line 62, G0T0G5 and run. At this 
stage, we note that an integral part of 
our program is the sequence GO 
SUB5:EXEC44539:G0SUB4. This is a 
pain to key in frequently. How can we 
shorten this repetitious task? Key in 
Line 6. Sure! Create a G05UB out of the 
sequence! Key in Line 67. Change Line 
62 to GDT0G7 and run. This is good! 

We could go back and change lines 23 
through 30, 43 through 47 and 63 
through 65 to reflect this modification. 
It doesn't really matter. Long form or 
short form, both accomplish the mis- 
sion equally well. From now on, we 
shall use the condensed form. 

Re-key Line 62 from the listing and 
run. In the next pair of sentences, we 



shall reverse the languages to get 
another perspective. Here, again, are 
the steps in creating this routine. 
Change G0 to B0 in Line 10. Key in lines 
80, 81 and 83. Reserve Line 100 (100'). 
Key in B2 GO5UB2000 and run. 

Re-key B2 G0T0B5. Key in Line 85 
and run. 

Re-key B2G0T0B7. Key in Line 87. 
Run until all the variations check out. 



We switched languages to see if this 
pairing was better than the original 
presentation. Why do we do the obvious 
and check what we know will work? We 
try every variation we can think of. This 
repeated toying with the program may 
turn up a dormant bug. It may also give 
us other ideas to pursue. You never 
know what you will think up while 
doing monotonous tasks. Using the 
previous procedure, work out the next 
pair of sentences from lines 100 through 
107. 

You have become aware of how un- 
taxing it is to create this program. A 
pair of sentences is chosen, portrayed 
and checked out on the screen; various 
blank-outs are decided upon; fl and N 
values are determined; and so forth. 

The line-numbering is consistent 
throughout. In the random-selection 
lines, the ON line is easy to construct. 
Looking at it another way, using L=20 
to indicate the program line number we 
have: 



L X$ 

L+l Y$ 

L+2 (temporary line pointers) 

L+2 M=RND(x):0N M GOTO L+3, 
L + 5, L+7, etc. 

L+3 variant 1 

L+5 variant 2 

L+7 variant 3 

L+20 next x$ 



"Without being aware 
of i/., J proved the old 
adage., 'There is idivays 
more than one way to 
do anything."' 



102 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



We increment each L by +20 to allow 
for many variants in long sentences, The 
case is made to show that a simple, 
consistent procedure is lots of fun to use 
and results in rapid progress. 

Thus far, we have been fooling 
around with the second language. Who 
knows when we will have an occasion 
to blank out a portion of the first 
language? Let us prepare a routine to 
add to the armaments in our arsenal of 
GOSUB routines. 

To consult our program, list the first 
10 lines and note that Line 5 did the 
blank-outs on Y$. A similar line with 
one judicious change should do the 
trick. Key in lines 7 and 123 from the 
listing. Change 8 to 7 in Line 123 and 
run. No Good ! We get a flickering X$. 
That means it is probably OK, but 
CoCo, not given a warning to wait for 
a key press, flickers through it and goes 
on to repeat. 

List lines 5 through 7. We see in Line 
6 that after G05U85, which did the 
blanking, we had the pause that re- 
freshes (EXEC44533). Although an easy 
alternate way may come to mind, we 
shall be true to our system and key in 
Line 8. Change 7 to B in Line 123. Can 



you think of the other way that seems 
obvious? Run this, 

CoCo displayed both sentences, 
blanked out and then restored the word 
in Y$, and then blanked out and re- 
stored the definition in X$. 

Remember, we are experimenting! 
Re-key 122 G0T0125. Key in Line 125 
and run. 

This time, we add fl and N values to 
display blank-outs and restorations in 
both Y$ and X$. In Line 125. delete the 
second fl=6: and run, CoCo picked up 
the last A value and ran with it. 

List lines 120 through 123. You can 
see why no new A and N values were 
given for GQSLJBB to work with. In lines 
120 and 121, FIRST and ERSTE both 
begin at fl~6 and are N=6 spaces long. 

Change 125 to 127 in Line 122. Key 
in Line 127, Note the abbreviated Line 
1 27. Again, we do not require a second 
set of fl and N values, and the GOTO140 
was not used because it's redundant. 

Still experimenting, we try out a pair 
of sentences that require more than one 
row to display. You know the plan of 
attack. Check out this last routine on 
your own. 

After you finish this task, we meditate 



a while and think: We have chosen one 
variant at random from each pair of 
sentences and displayed it. Then we 
chose and displayed a random variant 
from the next pair, going through all the 
sentences. Line 995 returns to recycle. 

Instead of always beginning at the 
first pair at Line 20, why couldn't we 
drop down at random and begin at any 
selected pair? Re-key 10 CLSZ. Key in 
Line I I and run. 

It works, but we never change back- 
ground colors. Change 10 to 1 in Line 
995 to go to the line that chooses a new 
color. We get a hint every time a new 
color is portrayed that we ran through 
a complete set and a new one is being 
announced. 

To make X$ in the last two pairs end 
up restored, change B to 9 in lines 143 
through 149. Key in Line 9 and run, 

If we don't want the last pair of 
sentences in our program, we can alter 
Line I I to omit them. Change 7 to G 
and, if you are a perfectionist, delete 
, 140. Now run. 

You could end by keying in lines 990 
and 999, both unmasked, and masking 
Line 995. Run and CSAVE "PRO 
GRAM", But, that is not truly random. 



CE s 5th Anniversary Cataloj 

is now available? 



IF YOU OWN A TANDY COMPUTER THEBES SOMETHING FOR YOUf 



DEFT PASCAL WORKBENCH 
DEFT EXTRA 

DEFT 3D GRAPHICS SAMPLER 

WORD PROCESSING 
CHILD WRITER 
MEMO WRITER 
BUSINESS WRITER 

DATA M.4JVAGERS 
CHILD FILER 
LIST MANAGER 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

SPREADSHEETS 
CHILD CALC 
SIMPLE CALC 
BUSINESS CALC 

EAMLV LEARJV/JVG 
ABC's IN COLOR 
ALPHA MEMORY 
HAPPY COUNT 
MIX AND MATCH 
MR. BEAR COUNT 
MR. BEAR SPELLER 
MR. PIGGY 
SEE AND SPELL 
TEACHING CLOCK 



MATH SERIES 
BASIC MATH 
CRISSCROSS MATH 
CRISS CROSS PLUS 
FLASH CARD 
FRACTIONS 
FRACTION DESTROYER 
FRIEND OR FOE 
MATH BOMBER 
MATH REVIEW 
MR, BEAR FLASH CARD 
MR. BEAR MATH 
PLACE VALUES 
REDUCING FRACTIONS 
RESCUE MATH 

LEAXmJVG ACTIVITIES 

ALPHA ATTACK 

CAPITAL MATCH 

HISTORY QUIZ 

MATH QUIZ 

MEMORY MATCH 

QUUGAME 

UNITED STATES 

VOCAB BRUSH-UP 



100% 
SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEE 



LlAJVGUAGE ARTS 
ALPHABETIZE 
ANTONYM EXPRESS 
ANTONYM MATCH 
COMPUTER EASE 
CRISS CROSS SPELL 
ENGLISH REVIEW 
HOMONYMS 
NOUNS 

NOUNSREVIEW 
PLURALS 
PRONOUNS 
SAVE THE FISH 
SPELL BOMBER 
SPELLING RULES 
SUPER SPELL BOMBER 
SYNONYM EXPRESS 
SYNONYM MATCH 
TORPEDO SCRAMBLE 
VERB REVIEW 
WEEKLY SCRAMBLER 
WEEKLY SPELLER 



T 



CALL us at l~(800)-4TO4TCE or i-(30 D-963-3848 
for a FREE TCE Software catalog and the latest copy of TCE NEWS. 




February 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 03 



Unless the last pair at lines 140 and 141 
are chosen, CoCo proceeds sequen- 
tially, from its beginning, ON M, chosen 
in Line ] 1. To avoid the predictability 
of repeating a sequence of sentences, try 
this: 

Make sure Line 10 reads CL5Z. 



Change all the various GOTOs to GOTO 
1 in the following lines: 24, 26, 28; 43 
through 47; 63 through 67; 83 through 
87; 103 through 107; 123 and 125. Add 
: GDTD1 at the end of lines 30 and 127 
and run. 



That is the end of the review session. 
I hope you enjoyed plodding through 
the listing, and used some of the tricks 
you studied in the past. This program 
demonstrates how we make CoCo bend 
to our will — willingly! □ 



The listing: LRNGTRRN 



)3 ! <LISTING1> 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+l:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO 1)3 

3 PRINT@X,LEFT$ (X$,P) ;:PRINT@Y,L 
EFT$ (Y$,Q) ;: RETURN 

4 Q=181:PRINT@Y,LEFT$ (Y$, Q) ;:EXE 
C44539:CLSZ: RETURN 

5 P=18 1 : Q=P : GOSUB3 : PRINT@ Y+A , STR 
ING$ (N, 14 3) ;: RETURN 

6 GOSUB5 : EXEC4453 9 : GOSUB4 : RETURN 

7 P=181:Q=P:GOSUB3 : PRINT@X+A , STR 
ING$ (N, 143) ;: RETURN 

8 GOSUB7 :EXEC4453 9: RETURN 

9 GOSUB8 : GOSUB3 : EXEC4453 9 : RETURN 

1) 3 CLSZ:GOT02j3 

11 M=RND ( 7 ) : ON M GOTO 2)3 , 4)3 , 6)3 , 
8)3,1)3)3, 12)3,14)3 

2) 3 X$ = M DIE STADT 1ST GROSS UND 
ALT . » 

21 Y$= M THE CITY IS BIG AND OLD 

22 M=RND ( 4 ) : ON M GOTO 2 3,25,27, 
29 

2 3 A=0:N=ll:GOSUB5 

24 EXEC4453 9:GOSUB4 :GOT04)3 

25 A=13 :N=4 :GOSUB5 

2 6 EXEC4453 9:G0SUB4:G0T04J8 

27 A=2 2 :N=5:GOSUB5 

28 EXEC4453 9:GOSUB4:GOT04)3 

29 A=18 :N=4:GOSUB5 

3) 3 EXEC44539 : GOSUB4 

4) 3 X$ = M DIESER BERG 1ST HOCH. " 

41 Y$= M THIS MOUNTAIN IS HIGH. 
ii 

42 M=RND ( 3 ) : ON M GOTO 43,45,47 

43 A=)3:N=16:GOSUB5:EXEC4453 9:GOS 
UB4 :GOT06)3 

45 A=18 :N=6:GOSUB5 : EXEC4453 9 : GOS 
UB4 :GOT06)3 

47 A=7:N=9:GOSUB5:EXEC44539:GOSU 
B4 :GOT06)3 

6)3 X$= M DER ANDERE BERG 1ST NIE 
DRIG. " 

61 Y$= M THE OTHER MOUNTAIN IS L 
OW. " 

62 M=RND ( 3 ) : ON M GOTO 63,65,67 



63 A=6:N=15:GOSUB5:EXEC4453 9:GOS 
UB4 : GOT08)3 

65 A=24 :N=5:GOSUB5:EXEC4453 9:GOS 
UB4:GOT08)3 

67 A=6:N=A:GOSUB6:GOT08)3 

8)3 X$ = M HERE IS A BRIDGE. " 

81 Y$ = " HIER 1ST EINE BRUECKE . 
ii 

82 M=RND ( 3 ) : ON M GOTO 83,85,87 

83 A=)3:N=7:GOSUB6:GOT01)3)3 

85 A=11:N=14 : GOSUB6 : GOT01)3)3 

87 A=16:N=9:GOSUB6:GOT01)3£ 

1)3)3 X$ = M THERE IS ALSO A BRIDGE 
ii 

• 

101 Y$=" DORT 1ST AUCH EINE BRU 
ECKE . " 

102 M=RND ( 3 ) : ON M GOTO103 , 105 , 10 
7 

102 A=.0:N=7:GOSUB6:GOTO12J3 
105 A=11:N=5 :GOSUB6:GOT012p 
101 A=21:N= 9 :GOSUB6:GOT012j3 

120 X$=" THE FIRST HOUSE IS SMA 
LL. " 

121 Y$=" DAS ERSTE HAUS 1ST KLE 
IN. " 

122 M=RND ( 3 ) : ON M GOTO 123,125, 
127 

123 A=6:N=6:GOSUB6:GOSUB8:GOT014 
0 

125 A=6:N=ll:GOSUB6:A=6:N=12 :GOS 
UB8 : GOT014J3 

127 A=21:N=7 : GOSUB6 : GOSUB8 

1A0 X$=" I SHAVE MYSELF IN FRON 

T OF THE MIRROR. " 

141 Y$=" ICH RASIERE MICH VOR D 
EM SPIEGEL. " 

142 M=RND ( 4 ) : ON M GOTO 143,145, 
147, 149 

143 A=14 :N=5 :GOSUB6:A=l)3:N=7 :GOS 
UB8 :GOT016j3 

145 A=j3:N=14 : GOSUB6 : N=lj3 : GOSUB8 : 
GOTO 1 60 

147 A=19 : N=4 : GOSUB6 : A=17 : N=12 : GO 
SUB8:GOT016p 

149 A=23:N=17:GOSUB6:A=31:N=12:G 

OSUB8 

160 ' 

99j3 'PRINT@Y+139, " THE END ! " ; 
995 CLSZtGOTOlp 
999 'GOT0999 



104 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



The Second Rainbow Book of 




Jhm Rainbow 
Booksttetf 



Twenty-four of the most challenging Adventure games ever compiled await 
you in this Rainbow Bookshelf thriller. Journey through time, fight World War III, 
or win the heart of a beautiful and mysterious princess. Experience the titif lations 
of the most rugged Adventurer without ever leaving your seat. 

Who knows what mystical delights you will encounter in Adventures like: 

Yellow Submarine — Meet the Beatles, defeat the 
Blue Meanies and enjoy some of the Fab Four's 
great hits. 

The Wands of Raga Dune — Seek out and destroy 
the evil lord of Vogguk. 

African Transference — Avoid the cannibals to win 
the fantastic treasure. 

Pappy's Gold — Whatever happened to Pappy and 
Sarah's mine? 

Secret Agent Man — Outwit Iranian terrorists, or 
your trip to Rio is off. 

Sir Randolph Returns — Our first Adventure book 
hero is back and the action is hot. 

Curse of Karos — Find the oracle to save Barrel- 
town. 

Experience other traditional and contemporary 
challenges from these winning authors: Mark 
Fetherston, Jeff Crow, Larry Lansberry, J.C. Jack- 
son, Robert W. Mangum II, Robert Poppe, David 
Taylor, Gregory Clark, Steve Skrzyniarz, David L. 
Dawson, Curtis Boyle, Bruce K. Bell, Pat Pugliano, 
Pat and John Everest, Mike Fahy, Scott Settembre, 
Darin Anderson, Robert L. Thomas, Terrance Hale, 
Paul Hensel, Philip Courie, Michael Dennison and 
Robert Dickau. With the tape, receive three more 
adventures by Eric and Mark Riel, Carmen D. 
Michele and Jane Fisher. 

The Second Rainbow Book of 
Adventures sells for only $13.95! 

Three Bonus Programs When You Buy 
The 



The tape i s a n adjunct and complement t o the book. Even i f you buy the Second Rainbow 
Adventures Tape, you'll need the book for the introductory material and loading Instructions. 



That's right. You'll receive a total of 27 fantastic 
Adventures when you get the Second Rainbow 
Adventures tape — programs with listings too 
lengthy to include in the book. Save yourself hours 
of typing listings. Load these great Adventures into 
your computer and run them! 

The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape is 
only $13.95! 



Please send me: 
Name 



Address 
City 



□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures for $13.95* □ The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape for $13. 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed/ 

Please charge to my; 



9'e, 



*t9, 



9 



State 



ZIP 



Signature 



□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. Number Exp. Date 



Of 



e 



Mail to: The Second Rainbow Book ol Adventures, The Falsolt Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call: (800) 847-0309 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

'Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S., add $4. Allow 6-8 weeks tor delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and 
tape. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only, please. 



Create fast, detailed Adventure game graphics 



Instant Graphics and 

Hogs in Space 



By Courtney Powers 



There have been two main types of 
Adventure games seen so far in 
these pages: text Adventures and 
those combining graphics and text. Text 
Adventures do not satisfy because they 
lack what our favorite computer is so 
famous for — color. An Adventure 
game with mixed text and graphics that 
draws the characters on the graphics 
screen is the best solution. 

Doing this in BASIC, however, leaves 
us with the pictures drawn slowly in 
front of us or slowly on a graphics page 
not currently being viewed, leading to 
long, unexplained delays in the execu- 
tion of the program. A method I have 
seldom seen used is the simple expedient 
of drawing the pictures ahead of time 
and saving the graphics pages to disk as 
machine language programs. 

The instruction forsaving a machine 
language program, SAVEM, requires 
four items of information: a filename, 
and the start, end and transfer ad- 
dresses. 

Where is the start of the graphics 
screen memory? The Color Computer 
stores the number of 256-byte bounda- 
ries to the beginning of the graphics 
pages in memory location Hex BC. 
Therefore, S=PEEK(&HBC)*25G gives 

Courtney Powers is the eldest son of 
RAINBOW contributor Ron Powers, and 
is a petty officer in the U.S. Navy. His 
main interests are computers, medieval 
combat and playing rock n 'roll piano. 



106 



THE RAINBOW February 19B7 




us the address we are after. The variable 
S now contains the location in memory 
of the upper-left corner of the screen in 
Graphics Page One. 

Next, we need to know the end ad- 
dress. Again, this is quite simple. The 
graphics page takes up 6K of memory. 
To find its end address, use E = S + 
(1024*6)-1. Why the-1 in the assign- 
ment? You are starting to count at zero 
here. S+6K is one memory address past 
the end of the screen. 

Now we have a method for getting the 
entire screen saved to disk. What? I 
forgot the transfer address? Well, we 
don't want to execute this particular 
program, as graphics bytes don't make 
good ML instructions, so we'll just 
cause this particular "program" to 
execute Color BASIC. Thus, our transfer 
address is T=&HA000, which is the 
beginning of our BASIC ROM. To 
save our picture we merely write 

SRVEMy//ertarae'\s,E, t. 

Most of the Adventures we have seen 
so far do not use the entire screen for 
graphics, however. The top of the screen 
is customarily used for graphics and the 
bottom for the drawn-in text. So we 
only need to save the top half of the 
screen where we draw our pictures. 
Instead of 6K past the start address, we 
only go 3K. Here is our modified rou- 
tine to save the pictures: 

1000 S=PEEK(&HBC)*25G 
1010 SPNZY\" f ilename" iSiS 
+1024*3-1, &HA000 




February 1987 THE RAINBOW 107 



To get the picture back from disk and 
onscreen, we merely load the ML pro- 
gram. Type LQRQW'filename". 

In the demo program, I wanted a 
color similarity to Sands of Egypt (blue, 
orange, black and white), so I could 
have black space and white stars. How- 
ever, this color combination is not 
available in PMDDE 3. 

The demo program, H0G.BR5, draws 
the pictures in PMDDE 3 and displays 
them in PMDDE 4. Since both modes 
require the same amount of memory, it 
is possible to locate the picture in the 
same memory addresses in both modes 
and get the color combinations I like. 

The interesting things that happen to 
colors when you save a picture in PMDDE 
3 and reload them in PMDDE 4 are 
gratifying. You can now have four 
colors in PMDDE 4 without actually 
going to the trouble of poking each 
pixel into place! 

The manner in which the graphics 
screen changes will be familiar. You can 
make your source picture as compli- 
cated as you want, and it loads in at the 
same speed each time — much faster 
than drawing in real-time. 

Another thing we need for a graph- 
ics/text mix is a good routine for 
drawing the letters on the screen. The 
routine in the demo program does this 
nicely and can be merged into any 
program. Use RENUM and MERGE wher- 
ever you like, but the routine does work 
slightly faster if it is put at the beginning 
of a program. 

To use HDG.BR5, first load the pro- 
gram. Then put a formatted, blank disk, 
into the assigned drive. Run the pro- 
gram. You are first quizzed as to the 
color appearing on the screen. For some 
unknown reason, the CoCo randomly 
interchanges the two added colors in 
PMDDE 4 each time the computer is 
turned on and off. Therefore, we have 





108 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



to redraw the scenes for each new 
session. 

Once we have ascertained the correct 
coloring, the computer goes to work 
drawing the scenes for the game. This 
is a good time to go to the kitchen for 
a cup of coffee. To draw all the scenes 
takes a couple of minutes. A beep 
informs you when it is done with this 
task, and you are asked whether you 
need to go through the instructions or 
not. I always do, as I find them almost 
as much fun as the game. 

After you have received your instruc- 
tions, it is a simple "Hunt the Wumpus" 
type of game with a numbered search 
grid and inputting coordinates such as 
1.2 or 6.6 to go to those places on the 
grid. A game like this is really much 
better with graphics, as you can visual- 
ize where you are and what you are 
doing there. 

In the demo program, HDG.BR5, I 
have merged the drawing routine into 
the game program. You could have the 
drawing routine in a separate program, 
but this way the blue/ orange colors 
come out correc tly each time. However, 

if you are like me and 
like to chance it, once 
you have run the pro- 
gram one time and 
have the pictures on 
disk then you can 
avoid the delay of 
picture drawing. Just 
type RUN 3000 and 
start playing. If you 
are lucky, the blue/ 
orange colors will 
come out right. If 
not, you must either 
run the program, 
press RESET and 
enter RUN 3000 
again, or live with it. 
The subroutine 



that draws the letters 
on the screen is in 
lines 40 to 520. This 
subroutine can be 
isolated and merged 
into other programs. 
To use it, assign loca- 
tion coordinates LX 
(0-255) and LY (0- 
191), put the message 
to be printed in R$, 
and call the routine. 

At Line 1 we im- 
mediately jump to 
Line 630 to get past 
our character-draw- 
ing routine, and start 
by making sure our 
d isk d rive is p re- 
pared. Then we check our color in lines 
730 to 770 and assign the color variables 
C2 and C3. This is essentially the me- 
thod I have seen Fred Scerbo use in his 
"Wishing Well" articles. Then, at Line 
830 we start drawing our pictures and 
saving each one to disk as a machine 
language program. 

At Line 3000, our pictures drawn, we 
ask the player whether he wants to go 
through the instruction sequence. If the 
player chooses immediate play, we 
branch to Line 4000 and the start of the 
game. If not, we go through an instruc- 
tion sequence that consists of just 
loading in the pictures and showing the 
instructions. From Line 4030 to Line 
4370 we prepare the game by setting up 
initial conditions. 

Starting at Line 5030 (the top of the 
main loop) we draw in the picture 
appropriate to our current location, 
draw a "gravitonic detector," and fill in 
blocks to show nearby objects. At lines 
5380 and 5390 we check to see if the 
player has won or lost the game. Then 
at Line 5430 we get the player's move, 
and go back to the top of the main loop 
at Line 5670. 

The routine that prints a message 
appropriate to each location is in lines 
6010 through 6130. The "win game" 
routine is in lines 6170 to 6280, and the 
"lose game" routine is in lines 7030 to 
7140. The infamous INKEY subroutine 
is in Line 19999, ending our program. 

The main purpose of all this is to 
provide you with the tools to construct 
an Adventure game that gives you a 
professional-looking picture change, 
and to get rid of all those awful text 
Adventures. Put in some graphics that 
make us proud. Let the games begin! 

(Questions about this article can be 
addressed to the author at Rt. 1, Box 
43, Davenport, ND 58021. Please en- 
close an SASE for a response.) □ 



y 31 



170 . 
310 . 
480 . 
720 . 
940 . 
1190 
1470 
1740 
1990 
2240 
3000 



247 
234 
.85 
232 
.54 
.30 
118 
. . .4 
151 
.48 
.10 



3200 63 

3380 104 



4030 
4330 
5160 
5380 
5610 
6090 
6270 
END 



117 
228 
210 
215 
121 
227 
148 
.29 



T 



The listing: HOGSPflCE 



90 IF LKj3 THEN LI = 27 

Ipp DRAW" BM"+STR$ (LX) +", "+STR$ (L 

Y):ON LI GOSUB 130,140,150,16)3,1 

70, 180, 190,200,210,2 20,230,2 40,2 

50, 2 60, 2 70, 2 80, 2 90, 300, 310, 320, 3 

30 , 3 40 , 350 , 3 60 , 370 , 3 80 , 390 , 400 , 4 

10 



1 GOTO 630 

2 SAVE "HOG" : STOP 

10 REM************************** 

20 REM START DRAW LETTERS SUB 
30 REM************************** 
40 PLAY M T255;02":FOR LP=1 TO LEN 
(A$) :LI$=MID$(A$,LP,1) :LI=ASC(LI 
$)-64 

50 LX=LX+12:IF LX>246 THEN LX=0 : 
LY=LY+12 

60 IF LI=-19 THEN LI=28 

70 IF LI=-18 THEN LI=29 

80 IF LI>-17 AND LK-6 THEN LINE 

(LX,LY) -(LX,LY) , PRESET: GOSUB 420 



110 PLAY 1 
120 NEXT 
130 DRAW 1 
ETURN 'A 
140 DRAW 1 
8": RETURN »B 
150 DRAW 1 
■C 

160 DRAW 1 
RETURN 1 D 
170 DRAW 1 
ETURN 'E 
180 DRAW 1 
URN 'F 
190 DRAW 1 
TURN 'G 
200 DRAW 1 
TURN 'H 
210 DRAW 1 
ETURN 'I 



G" 

LP: RETURN 

BM+0 , +0 ; ND8R8D4NL8D4" : R 



BM+0 , +0 ; ND8R6D4NL6R2 D4L 
'B 

BM+0 , +0 ; NR8D8R8 " : RETURN 
BM+0 , +0 ;ND8R6F2D4G2L6" : 
BM+0 , +0 ;NR8D4NR6D4R8 11 : R 
BM+0 , +0 ; NR8D4NR6D4 " : RET 
BM+0 , +0 ; NR8D8R8U4L3 " : RE 
BM+0 , +0 ; D4ND4R8U4D8 " : RE 
BM+4 , +0 ; L2R4L2D8L2R4 11 : R 



the speech synthes lzer that leaves the others tight lipped 



TM * 




F INALLY . . . 



R*j>fflaw * N° more fumbling with MultL-Pac or Y-Connec tors 

* No vocabulary ROM or di3k needed 

* Compatible with all operating systems 

* No driver program needed 

* Appears as a printer to Co-Co 

Speak-Easy plugs into the serial 
port ot youe Co-Co, not the card 
slot, and appears as a printer 
to the Co-Co. Incorporated in 
Speak-Easy is a unique state of: 
the art two chip set which 
phonetically converts ASCI 1 text 
to speech. What this means to 
you is extreme ease o i use," 
virtually unlimited vocabuJacy,' 
and complete £lexability in a 
speech synthesizer. Just look at 
this sample BASIC program: 
10 INPUT A% 
20 PRINT A* 
30 GOTO 10 
and Imagine how you cauld 
upgrade your games and 

applications with simple printer 
statements to use Speak-Easy. It 
can say anything including 
doreign wocds. If you can spell 
it, Speak-Easy can say it. 
in RS-232C configuration with 
word length and stop bits. Choose 
08-25 connectors. I£ you have a 
let us know, we will have 






MAGAZINE FOR COLOH COMPUTER USERS. 

Spectrooj-am Magazine provides useful and interesting support 
material with a wide range of programs and articles by some of 
the best writers and programmers available. 

'TELEGRAM by Bobby Ballard: A monthly column concern- 
ing the Color Computer and its use in telecommunications. 
*DQWNTIME by Rush Caley: Little-known facts, new and 
different ideas, opinions, and an occasional criticism or two. 
*BASIC HELP by Bill Bernico: Answers to your questions 
concerning the Color Computer and the BASIC language. 
♦PASCAL P ROGRAMMING by Delmar Searls: An in-depth 
study of Pascal and how to use it effectively. 

Assembly, C, OS-9, REM statements as data storage, floating 
point math, and graphics animation are covered with an emphasis 
on understanding. Utilities, games, business and home management 
programs are a steady diet, and all the programs in Spectrogram 
are available on tape or disk. Spectrogram Magazine could become 
the most informative addition to your Color Computer system! 



PLEASE SEND ME 12 ISSUES OF SPECTROGRAM MAGAZINE 
FOR $18 [40% off the cover price). 



Name: 



CONNECTS TO THE 
SERIAL I/O PORT! 



Address: 
City: 



Also available 
selectable baud race, 
between 4 pin DIN or 
special, need or configuration, 
you talking in no time! 



(Z. 



ri.o.. • n«l«d. i 3 00 lor l4.ll U US/Canada 
^5.00 oomda Ul/Cunada 
add Sl-00 l.i COO 
,4»~it add 3't aln ioa 



539 HcDaniel 
Conyers, Ga 



Hill Rd. Visa and MasterCard 

30207 phone 404-929-1657 welcome 

—000 



State: 



Zip: 



( ) Check enclosed 

Card f 

Mail to: 



( ) Visa ( ) MasterCard 
Exp. Date: 




SPECTROGRAM MAGAZINE 
P. O. Box T38 (815)968-9600 
Rockford, IL 6TT05 



Foreign subscriptions: $26 Canada, others $34 U.S. Currency 
U.S. Croups: $15 with 5 or more subscriptions 




February 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 09 



220 DRAW" BM+0 , +0 ; BR6D8L4U2 " : RETU 
RN 'J 

2 30 DRAW" BM+0 , +0 ; D8U4R2NE4NF4 " : R 
ETURN 1 K 

240 DRAW "BM+0,+0;D 8 R8 ": RETURN 1 L 
250 DRAW'BM+0 , +0 ;ND8F4E4D8 " : RETU 
RN 'M 

260 DRAW'BM+0 ,+0 ;ND8NF8BR8D8" :RE 
TURN 'N 

270 DRAW"BM+0 , +0 ; D8R8U8L8 " : RETUR 
N '0 

280 DRAW"BM+0,+0;ND8R8D4L8" :RETU 

RN 'P 

290 DRAW"BM+0,+0;R8D8NH3NF2L8U8" 
: RETURN 1 Q 

300 DRAW'BM+0 , +0 ;R8D4L4NF4L4D4U8 
" : RETURN ' R 

310 DRAW"BM+0,+0;R8DlUlL8D4R8D4L 
8U1": RETURN «S 

320 DRAW'BM+0 , +0 ;R4ND8R4" : RETURN 
'T 

330 DRAW" BM+0 ,+0;D8R8U8": RETURN 

*U 

340 DRAW" BM+0 , +0 ; D4F4E4U4 " : RETUR 
N 'V 

350 DRAW " BM+0 , +0 ; D6F2E2NU4F2E2U6 
": RETURN 'W 

360 DRAW'BM+0 ,+0;F8BL8E8" : RETURN 
■X 

370 DRAW" BM+0 , +0 ; F4ND4E4 ": RETURN 
■Y 

380 DRAW" BM+0, +0, • R8G8R8 ": RETURN 

'Z 

390 RETURN 'SPACEBAR 

400 DRAW " BM+ 1, +4 ;R6": RETURN 'DAS 

H 

410 DRAW'BM+2 , +6 ; D2R2U2L2" : RETUR 
N ' PERIOD 

420 LI=LI+17:0N LI GOSUB 430,440 
,450,460,470,4 80,490,500,510,520 
: LI=LI-1 7 : RETURN 'THE NUMBERS 
430 DRAW'BM+0 , +0 ;R8D8L8U8R8G8" :R 
ETURN 'ZERO 

440 DRAW " BM+4 ,+0;D8N" : RETURN '1 
450 DRAW'BM+0 , +0 ;ND2R8D4L8D4R8" : 
RETURN '2 

460 DRAW " BM+0 ,+0;R8D4NL6D4L8":RE 
TURN ' 3 

470 DRAWD4R8U4D8" : RETURN '4 
480 DRAWNR6D4R6D4L6U1": RETURN ' 
5 

490 DRAWNR8D8R8U4L8" : RETURN '6 
500 DRAWBD8BR8U8L6D2" : RETURN '7 
510 DRAW"BR2R6D4L6NU4D4R6U4":RET 
URN '8 

520 DRAWBR2ND4R6D4NL6D4" : RETURN 
■9 

530 REM************************ 



540 REM END OF DRAW LETTERS SUB 
5 50 REM ************************ 

600 REM************************ 

610 REM START DRAW PROGRAM 

620 rem************************ 

630 CLS:PRINT"THIS PROGRAM WILL 
WRITE TO DISK! YOU SHOULD HAVE A 
BLANK AND FORMATTED DISKETTE 

OR A DISK YOUHAVE ALREADY RUN T 
HIS PROGRAM ONIN PLACE. DO YOU S 
TILL WANT TO CONTINUE?" 
640 GOSUB 19999 
650 IF X$o"Y" THEN END 
660 SAVE "HOG" 
670 PCLEAR4 
680 PCLS : PMODE3 , 1 
690 COLOR 3,1:SCREEN 1,0: PCLS 
700 REM************************* 
710 REM CHECK FOR CORRECT COLOR 
720 REM************************* 
"CHECK" , S , S+1024*3-l , &HA000 : PMOD 
E4 , 1 : COLOR 1, 0 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : PCLS : LOA 
DM" CHECK" : KILL" CHECK/BIN" 
740 A$="IF SCREEN IS BLUE THE 
N HIT -B- KEY. IF SCREEN IS ORAN 
GE THEN HIT -0- KEY." 

7 50 LX=-1:LY=100 
7 60 GOSUB 40 

770 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="B" THEN C2=3 
:C3=2 ELSE IF X$="0" THEN C2=2:C 
3=3 ELSE 770 

800 REM************************ 
810 REM START DRAWING PICTURES 
820 REM************************ 
830 PCLS :PMODE 3,1: SCREEN 1,0: COLO 
RC2, 1 

840 CLS: PRINT@ 9 7, "DRAWING PICTUR 
ES-WAIT PLEASE." 
850 GOSUB 900 
860 GOTO970 

870 REM************************ 
880 REM DRAW EMPTY SPACE SUB 
890 REM************************ 

900 LINE(0,0) -(256,95) ,PSET,BF 
910 LINE(25, 15) -(225,80) , PRESET, 
BF 

920 FOR X=l TO 100 : PSET ( RND ( 200 ) 
+25,RND(65)+15,0) :NEXTX 
930 RETURN 

940 REM************************* 

950 REM SAVING EMPTY SPACE 

960 REM************************* 

970 S=PEEK(&HBC) *256 

980 SAVEM" EMPTY" , S , S+1024*3-l , &H 

A000 

990 REM************************ 

1000 REM DRAW AND SAVE SUN 

1010 REM************************ 



110 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



1020 


PCLS 


1540 


CIRCLE (142,25) ,6,C3 

X^ I ma* X X^ Jammml maamml V ^A_ A m*m* W kaaa* *mmw w M W X-/ W *ama* *aaW 


1030 


GOSUB 900 


1550 


PAINT (142,25) , C2 , C3 

A A A 1 A » mAm, \ malm, A M—t M d—t *— ' J m m maa* maa* W ^mmr* **aV 


1040 


CIRCLE ( 175 , 48) ,40, 02, .8 


1560 


CIRCLE ( 116 . 35 ) .4.1 


1050 


PAINT (175 , 4 8 ) , 0 , C2 


1570 


PAINT (116,35) .0.1 

A. A A A 1 mAam \ —A- —A- \— / * «^/ *— / J J I_/ t maam 


1060 


SAVEM" SUN 1 ' ,S,S+ 10 24*3-1. &HA 


1580 


CIRCLE ( 134 . 35 ) .4,1 


000 

r 1 r 1 r 1 




1590 


PAINT(134,35) ,0,1 


1070 


REM ************************ 


1600 


SAVEM^BOSSHOG" , S , S+10 2 4 * 3 -1 


1080 


REM DRAW AND SAVE STATION 


, &HA000 


1090 


REM ************************ 


1610 


REM* ********************** 


1100 


PCLS 


1620 


REM SAVE BLANK TEXT SCRN 


1110 


GOSUB 900 


1630 


REM *********************** 


1120 


CIRCLE (125 , 50) , 20 , C3 


1640 


PCLS 4 


1130 


CIRCLE (125 , 50) , 30 , C3 


1650 


SAVEM M CLS M ,S+1024*3 ,S+1024* 


1140 


PAINT (12 5,75) , C3 , C3 


6-1, &HA000 


1150 

r 


LINE (105 # 45) - ( 145 , 55 ) # PSET, 


1660 


REM* *********************** 


BF 




1670 


REM DRAW PLANET OPENMIND 


1160 


LINE (120 ,30) -(130, 70) , PSET, 

*********** **■ * \ A - ' # **** M \ ***** <*m*r JW S 9 Jmmf J § ***■ ***** J-J -A. # 


1680 


REM ************************ 


BF 

***** m 




1690 


PCLS 


1170 


CIRCLE ( 125 , 50) ,10,C3 

X— * _i_ X X X— * A i mammal & Ad ***** § **mwf L/ J # I— ' # X— * 


1700 


GOSUB 900 


JL X O kj* 


PAINT(125, 50) ,C3,C3 


1710 


CIRCLE (100 , 47) , 30, C2, .8 


1190 


SAVEM 11 STATION" ,5,3 + 1024*3-1 


1720 


PAINT(100, 47) ,C3,C2 


, &HA000 


1730 


CIRCLE(95,40) , 10,0, .4 


1200 


REJ^* *********************** 


1740 


PAINT(95,40) ,0,0 


1210 


REM DRAW ASTEROIDS 


1750 


CIRCLE (105,57) ,10,0, .4 


1220 


REM ************************ 


1760 


PAINT (105 , 57) ,0,0 


1230 


PCLS 


1770 


SAVEM "OPENMIND" , S , S+10 24 *3 - 


1240 


GOSUB 900 


1,&HA000 


1250 


CIRCLE (3 5, 60) , 8 , C2 


1790 


REM* *********************** 


1260 


PAINT (35, 60) ,C2,C2 


1790 


REM DRAWING PLANET HIPPO 


, 1270 


CIRCLE (50 , 30) ,10,C2 


1800 


REM* *********************** 


1280 


PAINT (50, 30) ,0,C2 


1810 


PCLS 


1290 


CIRCLE (80, 50) , 4,C3 


1820 


GOSUB 900 


1300 


PAINT(80,50) ,C3,C3 


1830 


CIRCLE (150 , 50) ,40,02,-7 


1310 


CIRCLE (125, 50) ,25,C3 


1840 


PAINT(150,50) ,C2,C2 


1320 


PAINT (125, 50) ,C3,C3 


1850 


LINE (105 ,70) -(195,70) , PRESE 


1330 


CIRCLE (150, 70) ,7,C2 


T 




1340 


PAINT (150, 70) ,C2,C2 


1860 


LINE (105, 60) - (195, 60) , PRESE 


1350 


CIRCLE (200, 3 5) , 15, C2 


T 




1360 


PAINT (200, 35) ,0,C2 


1870 


LINE (105, 50) -(195, 50) , PRESE 


1370 


SAVEM" ASTEROID" ,S, S+1024*3- 


T 




1 , &HA000 


1880 


LINE(105, 40) -(195,40) , PRESE 


1380 


REM* *********************** 


T 




1390 


REM DRAW BOSS-HOG 


1890 


LINE (105, 30) - (195, 30) , PRESE 


1400 


REM* *********************** 


T 




1410 


PCLS 


1900 


PAINT(150, 29) , C3 , 1 


1420 


GOSUB 900 


1910 


PAINT(150,45) ,C3,1 


1430 


LINE ( 9 5 , 60 ) - ( 15 5 , 8 0 ) , PSET , B 


1920 


PAINT(150, 65) ,03, 1 


1440 


PAINT(126,61) ,C3 ,C2 


1930 


SAVEM"HIPPO",S / S+1024*3-1,& 


1450 


LINE ( 12 5 , 60 ) - ( 12 5 , 80 ) , PSET 


HA000 


1460 


LINE (100, 65) - (115, 70) , PRESE 


1940 


REM* *********************** 


T , BF 




1950 


REM DRAW SWEDISH PLANET 


1470 


CIRCLE (12 5, 45) , 30 ,C3 , .7 


1960 


REM* *********************** 


1480 


PAINT(125, 45) ,C2,C3 


1970 


PCLS 


1490 


CIRCLE (12 5,50) ,10,1,-8 


1980 


GOSUB 900 


1500 


CIRCLE (121, 49) , 1, 1 


1990 


CIRCLE (100, 50) ,30,C2, .8 


1510 


CIRCLE (128, 49) ,1,1 


2000 


PAINT(100,50) ,0,C2 


1520 


CIRCLE(1P6, 25) , 6,C2 


2010 


DRAW"BM8 0,55 ;U8R4D4U4R4D8 " 


1530 


PAINT (108, 25) , C3 , C2 


2020 


DRAW"BM+4 , +0,*U8R6D8L6" 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 111 



2,030 DRAW"BM+10,+0 ;U8R6D4L4R6D4" 
2040 DRAW"BM+4,+0;U8D4R6U4D4R2D4 



ii 



2050 SAVEM"SWEDISH",S,S+1024*3-1 
,&HA000 



2060 
2010 
2080 
2090 

2100 
2110 
2120 
A000 
2130 
2140 
2150 
2160 
2110 
2180 
2190 
2200 
2210 
2220 
2230 
2240 
2250 
2260 
A000 
2210 
2280 
2290 
2300 
2310 
2320 



REM* *********************** 

REM DRAWING DOG PLANET 

REM ************************ 

PCLS:GOSUB 900 
CIRCLE {90, 45) ,25,3,-8 
PAINT (90, 45) ,2,3 
SAVEM"DOGS " , S , S+102 4 * 3 -1 , &H 

REM ************************ 

REM DRAWING HOG KISS 

REM ************************ 

PCLS : GOSUB900 
CIRCLE (125, 50) ,45,C2, .6 
CIRCLE (12 5, 50) ,45,C2, .3 
PAINT (12 5, 50) ,0,C2 
CIRCLE (125, 50) ,80,0.2, .1 
PAINT(125,35) , C3 , C2 
PAINT (12 5, 65) , C3 , C2 
PAINT (60,50) ,C2,C2 
LX=90 : LY=45 : A$="KISS" 
GOSUB 40 

SAVEM"KISS" , S , S+1024*3-l , &H 



REM* ********************** 

REM DRAW GRAVE FOR DEAD 
REM *********************** 

PCLS 

LINE (0,0) -(256, 95) ,PSET,BF 
OX=0:OY=35:FOR X=l TO 256 S 
TEP 8: Y=3 5+RND(20) -10 : LINE (OX, OY 
)-(X,Y) , PRESET :OX=X:OY=Y: NEXT X: 
LINE(OX,OY)-(256,35) , PRESET 
2330 PAINT(1, 1) ,1,1 
2340 FOR X=l TO 100 : PSET (RND ( 256 
) ,RND(40) ,0) :NEXTX 
2350 PAINT(5,90) , C3 , 1 

LINE (85, 55) -(168, 80) , PRESET 



2360 
,B 

2370 
2380 
,B 

2390 
I P" 
2400 

2410 
2420 



PAINT (100, 70) ,C2 , 1 

LINE (90, 60) -(160,75) , PRESET 



LX=87 : LY=64 : DRAW'Cl" : A$="R 
GOSUB40 

DRAW" BM8 5 , 80 ; F50 ; R8 3 ; H50 " 
PAINT ( 100 , 90 ) , 1 , 1 
S=PEEK(&HBC) *256:SAVEM"DEAD 
" ,S,S+1024*3-1, &HA000 
2430 REM*********************** 
2440 REM END OF PICTURE DRAWING 
2 4 50 REM* ********************** 
3000 SOUNDl,4:CLS:PRINT"DO YOU N 
EED INSTRUCTIONS?" : GOSUB 19999:1 
F X$="Y" THEN 3040 ELSE 4000 



3010 REM*********************** 

3020 REM INSTRUCTION SEQUENCE 

3030 REM*********************** 

3040 PC LEAR 4 

3050 PCLS : PMODE4 , 1 

3060 COLOR 0,1: SCREEN 1 , 1 : PCLS 

3070 REM*********************** 

3080 REM SHOW EMPTY VIEWSCREEN 

3090 REM*********************** 

3100 LOADM" EMPTY" 

3110 LX=-1:LY=100 

3120 A$="YOU ARE BEING CALLED ON 
THE INTERSPACE TELCOMMER. . . 

HIT -ENTER- TO ANS 

WER . " 

3130 PLAY "01 ;T100 ; ABABABABABABAB 
ii 

3140 GOSUB 40 
3150 GOSUB 19999 
3160 GOSUB 3520 

3170 REM*********************** 

3180 REM BOSS HOG COMES ONSCRN 

3190 REM*********************** 

3200 LOADM" BOSSHOG" 

3210 A$="THIS IS YOUR BO 

SS-HOG. MISS HOGGY HAS BEEN HOGN 

APPED BY THE INFAMOUS HOGS IN 

SPACE... HIT -ENTER- FO 

R MORE" 

3220 GOSUB 40 

3230 GOSUB 19999 

3240 A$="YOU ARE BUT A FROG- MA 
N FROM PLANET SWAMP BUT YOU 

ARE ALL WE HAVE. YOU ARE TO 
GO TO . . . HIT -ENTER- FO 

R MORE" 

3250 GOSUB 3520 
3260 GOSUB 40 
3270 GOSUB 19999 
3280 GOSUB 3520 

3290 A$="THE COORDINATES I AM 
NOW SENDING TO YOUR NAV-COMP 
UTER. HIT -ENTER- FOR MORE" 
3 300 GOSUB 40 
3310 GOSUB 19999 
3320 GOSUB 3520 

3330 A$="YOU MOVE AROUND THE ST 
AR SYSTEM BY INPUT -TING DATA ON 
YOUR NAV-COMPUTER. FOR EXA 



MPLE- 
R MORE" 
3340 GOSUB 40 
3350 GOSUB 19999 
3360 GOSUB 3520 
3370 A$="MOVE- 3 
U TO A LOCATION 
OWN 4 FROM THE 
THE SEARCH GRID. 



HIT -ENTER- FO 



4 WOULD MOVE YO 
RIGHT 3 AND D 
UPPER LEFT OF 
THE GRID COVER 



112 THE RAINBOW February 1987 




HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . . . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of therainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 

and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by Feb. 25 
and we'll begin your friends' 
subscriptions with the April 
issue of RAINBOW. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 



i 
i 

I THE RAINBOW for: 

I 

I 



Name 



Address 



City 



.State 



ZIP 



From: 

Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 
Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard 
Acct. # 



□ American Express 
Exp. date 



Signature 



Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 




RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from The 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $20 to give 
your account a positive balance. This 
will be refunded after your first free 
hour if you choose to no longer use 
the system or it will be applied to 
future connect charges. If you do not 
maintain a positive balance, you will 
be charged $3.50 each month for 
direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — 
on a regular basis. Conference 
schedules will appear in the rain- 
bow each month. Be sure to check 
online announcements for changes 
and additions. 



THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1 200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to therainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hourof connect time. 

SAVE even more 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with Imme- 
diate CoCo Community. Check it 
out today. After all, you can sample 
it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPHI 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 



COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and the 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and onestop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $12 (U.S.) per hour. 

On Telenet: The Uninet network has now merged with 
Telenet. To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 
336-0437. After you call your local access number and 
make connection, press the ENTER key twice. When the 
U TERMINAL=" prompt appears, press ENTER again. 
When the "@" prompt appears, type C DELPHI and press 
ENTER. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press *A\ 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
ENTER (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI; and press ENTER. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $12 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country fordetails on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 312561703088 through Telenet, or 
3 10600601500 through Tymnet. (You'll have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 

Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to the rainbow, at the 
"USERNAME:" prompt, type RAINBOWSUB and press 



enter. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type your individ- 
ual subscription number from the mailing label of your 
latest issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros 
at the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type RfllNBOWORDER and press ENTER. 
At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type 5END5UB and press 
ENTER. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just press ENTER and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. No time is assessed 
against your free hour of service while you answer these 
questions. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is opened, each rainbow 
subscriber will be credited with an hour of free time! 



When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into 
your own personal password. This is the password you 
will use for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 



After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



S 0.0 TO 8.8 AND YOU START AT 4 
.4 ON IT. -ENTER-" 
3380 GOSUB 40 
3390 GOSUB 19999 
3400 GOSUB 3520 

3410 A$="THE GRAVITONIC DE 
TECTOR AT THE RIGHT OF YOUR 

SCREEN WILL FLASH WHITE TO SHO 
W NEARBY GRAVITY SOURCES . . . 

HIT -ENTER- FOR MORE" 
3420 GOSUB 40 
3430 GOSUB 19999 
3440 GOSUB 3520 

3450 A $ = " REMEMBER- MISS HOGGY IS 
DEPENDING ON YOU. GOOD LUCK-KER 
VIT. HIT -ENTER- TO ACT 
iVATE WARP ..." 
3460 GOSUB 40 
3470 GOSUB 19999 
3480 GOTO4000 

3490 REM*********************** 
3500 REM CLS SCREEN BOTTOM SUB 
3 5 10 REM* ********************** 
3520 LOADM"CLS":LX=-l:LY=100:RET 
URN 

4000 REM* *********************** 

4010 REM SET UP AND START GAME 

4020 REM************************ 

4030 PC LEAR 4 

4040 PCLS : PMODE4 , 1 

4050 COLOR 0,1: SCREEN 1,1: PCLS 

4060 DIMSP$(8,8) 

4070 SP$(4,4)="SUN" 

4080 REM************************ 

4090 REM FILL ARRAY WITH PLANETS 

4 100 REM* *********************** 

4110 FORZ-1 TO 4 
4120 X=RND(9)-1 
4130 Y=RND(9)-1 

4140 IF SP$(X,Y)<>"" THEN 4120 
4150 READ P$ 
4160 SP$(X,Y)=P$ 
4170 NEXT Z 

4180 DATA OPENMIND, HIPPO, SWEDISH 
,DOGS 

4190 REM************************ 
4200 REM FILL ARRAY W/ ASTEROIDS 
4210 REM************************ 
4220 FOR Z=l TO 8 
4230 X=RND(9)-1 
4240 Y=RND(9)-1 

4250 IF SP$(X,Y)<>"" THEN 4230 
4260 SP$(X, Y)="ASTEROID" 
4270 NEXT Z 

4280 REM************************ 
429,0 REM PUT HOGULA-1 IN ARRAY 
4300 REM************************ 

4310 X=RND(9)-1 



4320 Y=RND(9)-1 

4330 IF SP$(X,Y)<>"" THEN 4310 
4340 SP$ (X,Y) ""STATION" 
4350 FUEL«20 
4360 X=4:Y*»4 
4370 LX=-l:LY=100 

5000 REM************************ 

5010 REM TOP OF MAIN LOOP 

5020 REM* ********************** * 

5030 PCLS: IF SP$(X,Y)="" THEN LO 

ADM"EMPTY" :GOTO5050 

5040 LOADM SP$(X,Y) 'GET PIC. 

5050 A$="FUEL-"+STR$(FUEL)+" LO 

C-"+STR$(X)+" . "+STR$(Y) 

5060 LOADM "CLS" 

5070 GOSUB 40 

5075 GOSUB 6030 

5080 REM*********************** 

5090 REM DRAW LOCATOR GRID 
5100 REM* 
5110 LINE 
BF 

5120 LINE 
T,B 

5130 LINE 
T 

5140 LINE 
T 

5150 LINE 
T 

5160 LINE 
T 

5170 REM* 
5180 REM PAINT IN LOCATED ITEMS 
5190 REM*********************** 
5200 IF X=8 THEN 5220 
5210 IF SP$(X+1,Y)<>"" THEN PAIN 
T(244,46) , 1, 1 
5220 IF Y=8 THEN 5240 
5230 IF SP$(X,Y+1)<>"" THEN PAIN 
T(238,51) ,1,1 
5240 IF X=0 THEN 5260 
5250 IF SP$(X-1, Y)<>"" THEN PAIN 
T(231,46) ,1,1 
5260 IF Y=0 THEN 5280 
5270 IF SP$(X,Y-1)<>"" THEN PAIN 
T(238,41) ,1, 1 

5280 IF X=8 OR Y=8 THEN 5300 

5290 IF SP$ (X+l, Y+l)<>"" THEN PA 

INT (244, 51) , 1,1 

5300 IF X=8 OR Y=0 THEN 5320 

5310 IF SP$(X+1,Y-1)<>"" THEN PA 

INT(244,41) , 1, 1 

5320 IF X=0 OR Y=8 THEN 5340 

5330 IF SP$ (X-1,Y+1) <>"" THEN PA 

INT(231,51) ,1,1 

5340 IF X=0 OR Y=0 THEN 5360 

5350 IF SP$ (X-l, Y-l) <>"" THEN PA 



************ 

230,40) -(250 


* * * 

, 55 


****** 

) ,PSET, 


229,40) 


-(251 


, 55 


) , PRESE 


230,45) 


-(250 


,45 


) , PRESE 


230,50) 


-(250 


,50 


) , PRESE 


237,41) 


-(237 


,54 


) , PRESE 


243,41) 


-(243 


,54 


) , PRESE 


************ 


* * * 


****** 



116 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



INT(231,41) ,1,1 

5360 IF SP$(X,Y)<>"" THEN PAINT ( 
238,46) ,1,1 

5370 IF SP$(X,Y)<>"" THEN PAINT ( 
238,46) ,1,1 

5380 IF SP$ (X, Y)="STATION" THEN 
6170 

5390 IF FUEL=0 THEN 7030 

5400 REM*********************** 

5410 REM GET PLAYER MOVE 

5420 REM* ********************** 

5430 A$="ENTER MOVE-" 

5440 LX=-1:LY=180 

5450 GOSUB 40 

5460 M$="" 

5470 FOR X=l TO 3 

5480 GOSUB 19999 

5490 IF INSTR(1, ".123456780", X$) 
=0 THEN SOUND 1,5:GOTO5480 
5500 IF X<>2 AND X$=" . 11 THEN SOU 
ND 1,5:GOTO5480 

5510 IF X=2 AND X$<>" . 11 THEN SOU 

ND 1,5:GOTO5480 

5520 A$=X$ 

5530 GOSUB 40 

5540 M$=M$+X$ 

5550 NEXT X 

5560 REM*********************** 

5570 REM INTERPRET MOVE 

5580 REM*********************** 

5590 LOADM"CLS" 'CLEAR TEXT 

5600 Y=VAL (RIGHT$ (M$,l) ) 

5610 X=VAL(LEFT$(M$,1) ) 

5620 A$="WARPING OUT. . . " 

5630 LY=100:LX=-1 

5640 FUEL=FUEL-1 

5650 GOSUB 40 

5660 LX=-1:LY=100 

5670 GOTO5030 

5680 REM*********************** 
5690 REM BOTTOM OF MAIN LOOP 
5700 REM*********************** 

5710 REM 

6000 REM*********************** 

6010 REM PRINT MESSAGE ROUTINE 

6020 REM*********************** 

6030 IF SP$ (X,Y)="SUN" THEN A$=" 

YOU SEE THE HOGULA-1 SYSTEM SUN. 
ii 

6040 IF SP$ (X,Y)="ASTEROID" THEN 

A$="YOU SEE AN ASTEROID BELT." 
6050 IF SP$(X,Y)="" THEN A$="YOU 

ARE IN EMPTY SPACE." 
6060 IF SP$(X, Y)="STATION" THEN 
A$="YOU HAVE FOUND SPACE STATION 

HOGULA-ONE ! " 
6070 IF SP$ (X,Y)="OPENMIND" THEN 

A$="YOU SEE THE PLANET OF OPE 



N MINDED STEW- ARDESSES ... 11 
6080 IF SP$ (X,Y)="HIPPO" THEN A$ 
="YOU SEE THE PLANET OF HIPPO- 
BALLERINAS! -HEAVY-" 
6090 IF SP$ (X, Y)="DOGS" THEN A$= 
"YOU SEE THE DOG PLANET. TH 

EY ARE QUITE -SIRIUS- ABOUT 

IT." 

6100 IF SP$ (X, Y)="SWEDISH" THEN 
A$="YOU SEE THE PLANET OF SWED 
ISH CHEFS. THEY ARE SERVING 

FROGLEGS TODAY . . . MORK-MOR 
K-MORK ..." 
6110 LX=-1:LY=115 
6120 GOSUB 40 
6130 RETURN 

6140 REM*********************** 
6150 REM MISS HOGGY IS FOUND! 
6160 REM*********************** 
6170 LOADM"CLS" 

6180 A$="YOU HEAR A DISTRESS CA 
LL FROM THE SPACE STATION. IT I 
S MISS HOGGY. . . " 
6190 LX=-1:LY=100 
6200 GOSUB 40 

6210 FOR X=l TO 1000:NEXTX 

6220 LOADM"KISS" 

6230 FOR X=l TO 100 

6240 IF X/2=INT(X/2) THEN SCREEN 

1,1 ELSE SCREEN 1,0 
6250 PLAY"T255;05;ABC" 
6260 NEXTX 

6270 CLS : PRINT"THE GRATITUDE OF 
MISS HOGGY IS TRULY OVERWHELMIN 

G PLAY AGAIN" ; 

6280 INPUT X$:IF LEFTS (X$ , 1) ="Y" 

THEN 4030 ELSE END 
7000 REM*********************** 
7010 REM RUN OUT OF FUEL-DIE! 
7^J2^J REM* **************** ****** 
7030 LO ADM" CLS" 

7040 A$="YOU HAVE RUN OUT OF FU 
EL. . . " 

7050 LX=-l:LY=100 
7060 GOSUB 40 

7070 FOR X=l TO 1000: NEXTX 
7080 LO ADM" DEAD" 

7090 A$="ANOTHER FROG BITES TH 

E DUST. . . " 

7100 LOADM"CLS" 

7110 LX=-1:LY=100 

7120 GOSUB 40 

7130 FOR X=1TO5000: NEXTX 

7140 CLS: INPUT "WANT TO TRY AGAIN 

??";X$:IF LEFT$ (X$, 1) ="Y" THEN 4 

030 ELSE END 

19999 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="" THEN 199 
99 ELSE RETURN 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 117 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 





Educational Best-Sellers! 



* P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator letsyou fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations- 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



* Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Machine Lang uage 
Flight Manual Included 
Joysticks Re quired 
Tape $29795 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II- Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

■ Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

■ Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64KTDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDBI $42.95 Tape $39.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 

COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed abo ve PLUS. 

128K - $89.95 



Factpack-Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-/x" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System— Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 16K Ext. Basic/ 

32K for Printer Output 
Tape $39.95 Disk $42.95 

Fractions-A Three-Program Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 




# NEW RELEASE 

GOLD FINDER 

Here's the quality you have come to expect 
from TOM MIX. Another outstanding color 
computer game. This one ranks right up 
there with "Donkey Kong". Listen to this: 
69 levels for one or two players PLUS you 
can create your own levels (up to 306 on 
a disk). Endless possibilities await you in 
this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLD FINDER. . . 

32K & Joysticks Required 

Disk $27.95 

We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 




NEW RELEASE 

THE BLACK HOLE 

For anyone who enjoys solving a challeng- 
ing logical puzzle, here is a 3-dlmenslonal 
puzzle composed of 63 numbered cubes 
In a 4 by 4 by 4 array that leaves one 
BLACK HOLE. You tell the computer to sort 
the cubes and the computer tells you to put 
them in numerical order. A real brain 
bender. Outstanding color and action. 
Years of entertainment. . . 

For IBM PC & Compatibles 

$24.95 

More Tandy-IBM/PC software available. 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 
Full use of 64K RAM 
100% Machine Language 
No ROM Calls 
Selectable Drive 
Support 1-4 drives 
Menu Selected functions 
"Cold Start" exit to Basic 
Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler-the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT -Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Di sk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector— Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast 3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21 .95 

Sector Inspector- Alphabetize, backup and 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Information 

• Call us at61 6/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 

• Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

• Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

■ Authors-We pay top 
royalties! 




* CoCo 3 Compatible 




Look What's New at NO 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 




lb 



Vou mtm on fhm uId i trait of Dr* Qoigh 

orf icr y Eot* J , Qfurt) 3tor* and u al la? 

Yoo nothing 

Ghvigu* dlrtatLoni to no J 
Berth, ScxrtL 6**1,, ftttt. 

HelcoK* to Tb# Hi Id H*lti 



CoCo 3 Coj tible onl 

NEW RELEASE 

THE WILD WEST 

Get out your six shooter and polish your 
spurs! Journey into the gunslinging land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch, your 
job is to keep the peace. But the notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail 
and is on his way to Dry Gulch to recover 
his hidden fortunel 

Can you set a trap to capture Black Bart? 
Or will he getyoul You'll have to use every 
trick in the book, and be quick on the draw 
as well, as you talk to some unsavory 
characters. Decide what items you'll need 
to buy from the General Store, and lay a 
trap for your enemyl 

The Wild West is designed to be played 
exclusively on the Tandy Color Com- 
puter 3.) It has several features not seen 
in most adventures. 

•Incredible animated 320 x 192 16 color hi 

resolution graphic scenes! 
•Four voice music and sound effects. 
•Save and load games in progress. 
•A vocabulary of over 100 words. 
•Automatically SPEAKS with a Tandy 

Speech Pak. 

Requires a 128 k Coco 3 and one disk drive 
Disk $25.95 




# Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Required 

Disk $21.95 



♦ NEW RELEASE 
FOURCUBE 

Nowyou can play TIC-TAC-TOE in 3D. The 
board consists of a 4x4x4 grid of cells. Pit 
your wits against the computer with six 
levels of difficulty or against your favorite 
opponent. Sound easy? Try it and you'll 
agree with us when we say Its a "real 
challenge". 

Requires 32K 1 or 2 Player s 

T ape $15.95 Disk $18.95 




^ Moneyopoly 




Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Jo ystick Required 
Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 



♦ Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

1 6K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 



* NEW RELEASE 
LUNCHTIME 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, Is surroundedl 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hamburgers, This high res game 
features 7 difficult levels of wild entertain- 
ment. Fast paced action for either one or 
two players. Have a Burger Time. . . 
Requires 32K & Joysticks 

Ta pe $18.95 Disk $21.95 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man- Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. ♦ 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
1 60 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24,95 " 

The King-** 

32K Tape $24 . 95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian- % 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze- * 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Kater Pillar II-* 

1 6K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants- # 

16K Tape $18.95 Disk $21.95 
Buzzard Bait- $ 

32K Tape $1 9.95 D i sk $22.95 

^Equals CoCo 3 Compatible 

NOVfiSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 
■ Dealers welcome 

• Many more titles— write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/676-8172 





*CoCo 3 Compatible 




ood 




hings 




ome 



n 




hort 




rograms 



The new Color Computer owner buys his/her versatile 
machine for its graphics and music capabilities, organization 
of their home and office, educational purposes — both in the 
home and school and to acquire programming knowledge — and 
some, simply for pure fun and entertainment. 

As far as the CoCo is concerned, the more you learn, the more 
you realize how little you actually know. That is why every session 
at the keyboard is an adventure in learning. 

THE RAIN BO W is a teaching environment and we realize that 
the majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" will contain shorter 
BA SIC program listings that will entertain and help the new user 



5 



un 





ames 



gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer; graphics, music, 
games, utilities, education, programming, etc. ■ 

Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. 
We like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at 
one sitting and will be useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice 
programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the 
software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we do not have the time to key in program listings. All programs 
should be supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how 
the program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, 
the payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 

— Jutta Kapfhammer 
Submissions Editor 




C^and-tMe-® 



owns 



By David Hutchinson 



Hand Off is a simple, but challenging game. The object is 
to pass a ball from one block to another as the blocks move 
vertically in opposite directions across the screen. The ball 
starts in the block in the top row and the block moves rapidly 
across the screen in one direction while the block in the row 
underneath moves across the screen in the other direction. 

To pass a ball down, press any key at the exact moment 
the blocks meet. To accomplish a win, the ball must be passed 
all the way to the block at the bottom. The faster the ball 
is moved to the bottom, the better the score. 



The listing: HAND OFF 

10 CLEAR 1000,15871:DIMI(15) 

20 FORC=15872 TO 15916 : READD : POK 

EC,D:NEXTC 

30 DATA 16,142,0,31,142,4,96,230 

,128,166,132,167,31,48,1,49,63,3 

8,246,231,31,48,136,31,16,142,0, 

31,230,132,48,31,166,132,167,1,4 

8,31, 49, 63 , 38,2 4 6, 231,1,57 

40 DEFUSR0=15872:POKE15877,4:POK 

E15878 , 0 : U=4 : V=0 : W=0 : SC=2 500 : Q=0 

:TIMER=0:CLS(0) 

50 FORX=0TO14:Y=RND(31) :P=(X*32) 
+Y: I (X) =Y: PRINT® P , " " ; : NEXTX : PRI 
NT@I(0) ," ."; 

60 A=USR0 (0 ) : I (W) =1 (W) -1 : IFI (W) < 
0THENI (W)=31 

70 I(W+1)=I (W+l) +1:IFI (W+l) >31TH 



120 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



nothing beats a Tandy printer. 







1 










Tandy printers make fine print quality, 
graphics and high performance affordable* 



delivers superior correspondence char- 
acters. Plus, in the draft mode, the DMP 
430 delivers a fast 180 cps. 

Low-cost, triple-mode 

personal printer 

The DMP 130 (26-1280, $349.95) 
lets you choose from word processing, 
data processing and dot-addressable 
graphics with four character styles. 

Letter-quality daisy wheels 

Daisy wheel printers give you that 
crisp "electric typewriter" look. Our 
DWP 520 (26-2800, $995.00) prints 
up to 500 wpm. Or try the DWP 230 
(26-2812, $399.95) for economical 
letter-quality and up to 200 wpm. 

See the complete selection of print- 
ers and accessories at a Radio Shack or 
Radio Shack Computer Center today. 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



r 



Send me 
an RSC-17 
Computer Catalog. 

Mail To: Radio Shack 

Depl. 87-A-713 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 



1 



A match for your machine 

For your best value and selection in 
top-quality printers, shop your local 
Radio Shack Computer Center. We've 
got the printer that you need. 

Dot-matrix power for business 

The DMP 2200 (26-1279, $1695.00) 
gives you efficient, fast printing at 380 
cps. It supports elongated, double 
high, bold, underline, super/subscripts, 
italics and double strike, plus bit- 
image graphics. 

The DMP 2110 (26-2810, $1295.00) 
prints at 240 cps. Use the Font Editing 
Packages (sold separately) to load dif- 
ferent type styles for print quality that 
rivals a daisy-wheel printer! 

The DMP 430 (26-1277, $899) is a 
132-column dot-matrix printer that 

Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and at participating stores and dealers. All printers shown are IBM® compatible. The DMP 430 requires special 

order at some locations. IBM/Registered TM International Business Machines Corp. 



Name. 



Company. 



Address. 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone. 



ENI (W+1)=0 

80 A$=INKEY$:IFA$O""THEN90 ELSE 
60 

90 Q=Q+1:X=(2*I(W) ) :Y=(2*(W+1) ) : 
IFPOINT(X, Y)=-l THEN 120 ELSE IF 
X<=0 THEN 60 ELSE IF POINT (X-l, 
Y)=-l THEN 120 

100 IF X>=62 THEN 60 ELSE IF POI 
NT(X+2,Y)=-1 THEN 120 
110 GOTO 60 

120 V=V+32:IFV>224 THEN V=0:U=U+ 

l:IFU>5 THEN 120 

130 POKE 15877 ,U: POKE15878 , V 



140 0=W*32+I(W) :PRINT@0, " ";:W=W 

+1:0=W*32+I(W) : PRINT@0 ,".";: I FW= 

14 THEN 150 ELSE 60 

150 I(W)=I(W)-1:IFI(W)<0 THEN 16 

0 ELSE A=USR0 (0) :GOTO150 

160 SC=SC-TIMER:SC=SC-(8*Q) :IFSC 

>TS THENTS=SC 

170 PRINT@483 , "SCORE = ";SC;" TO 
P = ";TS; :A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN1 
80 ELSE40 

180 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN180 ELS 
E 40 




3 ecisions, decisions 

By Robert Rogers 



Although mostly for fun, the following program may help 
you make a decision, if it's not too serious. It is designed to 
help you determine which of a large number of alternatives 
is most desirable. 

Upon running, the program asks you to input alternatives. 
Let's say, for example, you can't decide which video game 
to buy and you have narrowed your selections down to the 
following: The King, Astro Blast, Berserk, Colorpede. Lunar 
Rover Patrol, Ghost Gobbler and Sea Dragon. Input the 
selections and when the last alternative has been entered, 
press ENTER. 

At this point, you are given the opportunity to make 
changes and/ or add any new items; then the decision-making 
process begins. All items are compared to the others without 
repetition. Simply press I or 2, depending on which item you 
prefer. When all the alternatives are matched and you have 
made your decisions, the results are displayed. The alterna- 
tives are listed from the choices you made, ranked in order 
of the number of times you selected them. Ties are identified 
and ranked the same. 

The listing: DECISION 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



• **************************** 



• * 
> * 
i * 
< * 

• * 



MICRO-DECISION 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1984 BY 
ROBERT ROGERS & RTR*SOFT 

VERSION 1.0 JUNE 1984 
FOR 4K COLOR BASIC COCOS 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



6 

7 1 **************************** 
10 CLEAR10000:CLS 

30 DIMA$(21) ,B(21) ,P(21) ,P$(21) , 
T(21) 

50 CLS : PRINTTAB ( 9 ) "MICRO DECISIO 
N" : PRINT" ENTER THE ALTERNATIVES 
THAT ARE UNDER CONSIDERATION. <E 



NTER> WILL TERMINATE ENTRY OF 
ITEMS. ":PRINTSTRING$( 3 2, 143+32) 
; :SOUND200, 1 
60 C=0 
70 C=C+1 

80 PRINT "ALTERNATIVE "C ; : INPUTA$ ( 
C ) : I FA $ ( C ) = " " THENC=C- 1:GOTO100 
90 SOUND225, 1:GOTO70 
100 CLS:Z=0:FORT=1TO C:Z=Z+1:PRI 
NTA$(T) :IFZ>12 OR T=C THENINPUT" 
INCORRECT ITEM " ; Z$ : IFZ$=" "THENZ 
=0 : CLS : GOTO 110 : ELSE INPUT" CORRECT 
ED: ";ZZ$:FORY=lTOC:IFZ$=A$ (Y) TH 
ENA$ ( Y) =ZZ$ : Z=0 : CLS : GOTO100 : ELSE 
NEXTY : SOUND1 , 3 : GOTO100 
110 NEXTT 

130 CLS: PRINT" TESTING OF PR 

EFERENCES 

150 FORI=2TOC 

160 FORJ=lTOI-l 

180 PRINT"WHICH ALTERNATIVE DO Y 
OU PREFER:" 

190 PRINTSTRING$ ( 3 2 , CHR$ (143+96) 
) 

200 PRINT@192,"<1> "A$(I) 

2 10 PRINTTAB ( 5 ) " OR " 

220 PRINT"<2> "A$(J) 

230 PRINT: INPUT "TYPE CHOICE: ";W: 

I FWO 1ANDW< > 2 THENCLS : GOTO 18 0 : ELS 

ESOUND2 00 , 1 : CLS 

240 IFW=1THENT(I)=T(I)+1 

250 IFW=2THENT(J)=T(J)+1 

260 NEXT J, I 

280 FORN=lTOC:T(N)=T(N)+l:NEXTN 
290 FORF=lTOC 
300 L=0:V=0 
310 FORN=lTOC 

320 IFT(N)>V THEN L=N:V=T(N) 
330 NEXTN 

340 P(F)=L:H(P(F) )=T(L) 
350 T(L)=0 
360 NEXTF 

370 CLS: PRINT" HERE ARE THE ALTRN 
ATIVES RANKED ON THE BASIS OF YO 



122 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Radio Shack has the ♦ ♦ ♦ 






..♦best of everything! 



Unleash the true potential of your 
Color Computer with accessories 
from Radio Shack. 

Add a pair of joysticks (A, 26-3008, 
Pair/$19.95) for fast 360° movement 
or our Deluxe Joystick (B, 26-3012, 
$29.95) that adjusts to your touch, al- 
lowing "fine tuning". For maximum 
control of games and graphics, simply 
"roll" the Color Mouse (C, 26-3025, 
$49.95) across a tabletop to accu- 
rately position the cursor 

Maximize your Color Computer's 
power with the Multi-Pak Interface 
(D, 26-3124, $99.95). You can change 
programs instantly using the selector 
switch, or under program control. 
And you can connect disk drives or 
other accessories, too. 



Here are two more great-sounding 
accessories! The Sound/Speech Car- 
tridge (E, 26-3144, $79.95) adds 
three-voice sound and text to speech. 
The Orchestra-90 CC (F, 26-3143, 
$79.95), lets you create electronic 
music and sound effects. 

The 300-baud DC Modem Pro- 
gram Pak (G, 26-2228, $89.95) makes 
it possible to join the telecommuni- 
cations wave. Since the modem and 
software are built in, you can access 
information services by phone. Need 
more memory? Hard disk storage is 
yours with the Hard Disk Interface 
(H, 26-3145, $129.95)*. 

Come in today for the accessories 
that make your Color Computer even 
more of a high performer! 



Radio /hack 



The Technology Store 



TM 



A (DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



r 



Send me an RSC-17 
Computer Catalog. 

Mall lo: Radio Shack, Depi. 87-A-712 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth. TX 76102 

Name 



■I 



Address 

City 



State 
Zlp_ 



Phone 



'Requires 64K, Mulii-Pak Interface, floppy disk with controller and 
0S-9 (2.0 or later). Prices apply ai participating Radio Shack Com- 
puter Centers and participating Radio Shack stores and dealers. 
0rchestra-9(VTM Software Affair. 0S-9fTM Microware Corp. 



II 



UR CHOICES. 

380 PRINTSTRING$ (32, 143+112) 
390 PRINT "RANK ALTERNATIVE 
400 F=0:R=0:FORN=1TOC:F=F+1 
410 IFF=12 AND C>12 THENPRINT"<E 
NTER> TO CONTINUE" : EXEC 44 5 3 9 : F=0 
420 IFH(P(N) ) =H (P (N-l) ) THENPRINT 



R; "TIE" ; :ELSER=R+1 : PRINTR; 
425 PRINTTAB(9) ;A$ (P(N) ) 
430 NEXTN 

440 PRINT" <ENTER> WHEN READY": EX 

EC44539 

450 RUN 








ublic 
ervice Message 



By Ruth Go lias 



The following program could be a real lifesaver if the 
suggestion is taken seriously. The statistics prove it! 



The listing: MESSAGE 



***************************** 

SILENT RADIO 
BY 

RUTH GOLIAS 
282 6 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY 
TORRANCE, CALIF. 90505 

1986 

***************************** 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 CLS0 : PRINT@170 , "silent" ; : PRIN 

T@176,CHR$(128) ; : PRINT@177 , "radi 
o"; 

20 PRINT@239,"by"; 

30 PRINT@298,"ruth"; :PRINT@302,C 
HR$(128) ; :PRINT@302,CHR$(12 8) ; : P 

RINT@304, "golias"; 

40 FOR B=0 TO 31 : PRINT@B, CHR$ (11 
1) ; :NEXT B 

50 FOR B=31 TO 479 STEP32 ; PRINT@ 

B, CHR$ (111) ; :NEXT B 

60 FOR B=0 TO 448 STEP32 : PRINT@B 

,CHR$(111) ; :NEXT B 

70 FOR B=1504 TO 1535: POKE B,15: 

NEXT B:SCREEN0,1 

80 FOR D=l TO 3000: NEXT D 

90 CLS0 

100 FOR B=163 TO 190 STEP 2:PRIN 



T@B, CHR$ ( 180 ) ; :NEXT B 'TOP OF R 
ADIO-RED 

110 FOR B=227 TO 253 STEP 2 : PRIN 
T@B,CHR$ (177) ;: NEXT B 'BOTTOM OF 



LEFT 
RIGH 



T@B,CHR$(177) 

RADIO-RED 
120 PRINT@195,CHR$(181) ; 

SIDE OF RADIO-RED 
130 PRINT@221,CHR$ (181) ; 
T SIDE OF RADIO-RED 
140 FOR B=291 TO 3 17 : PRINT@B , CHR 
$(220);: NEXT B 'TOP COUNTER ROW 
-BLUE 

150 FOR B=322 TO 350 : PRINT@B, CHR 
$(220);: NEXT B 'MIDDLE COUNTER 
ROW-BLUE 

160 FOR B=353 TO 383 : PRINT@B, CHR 
$ ( 2 20 ) ; : NEXT B ' BOTTOM COUNTER 
ROW-BLUE 

170 FOR B=385 TO 479 STEP 8 : PRIN 
T@B, CHR$ (218) ; : NEXT B ' COUNTER 
POSTS-BLUE 

180 FOR B=415 TO 479 STEP 32:PRI 
NT@B, CHR$ (213 ) ; :NEXT B 'RIGHT 
COUNTER POST-BLUE 

190 FOR B=1505 TO 1535 STEP2 : POK 
E B, 169: NEXT B 'FLOOR-BLUE 
200 FOR B=1506 TO 1534 STEP2 : POK 
E B, 185: NEXT B 'FLOOR-RED 



CREEN0 , 1 
211 ' WALKING LETTERS 
220 A$=" FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT 

IT'S THE LAW " 

230 S=300 

240 FOR B=196 TO 220 
250 FOR X=l TO S:NEXT X 
260 B=B+1 

270 IF B=220 THEN 240 

280 PRINT @ B, LEFT$ (A$,221-B) ; 

290 PRINT@197,RIGHT$(A$,B-197) ; 

300 SCREEN0,1 

310 GOTO250 



THE RAINBOW 



tilities 






assette Organization 



By J. E. Rittenhouse 

Tape Menu is a simple utility for cassette organization. It 
allows you to list all the programs filed on a cassette, assign 
each a program number and automatically CLOflD a specific 
program by simply pressing a key. 

To set up Tape Menu, enter the program names in the DATA 
statements in lines 40, 50 and 60. This can be done by retyping 
the lines and replacing PROGRAM NAME with the actual name 
of the program. Be sure to separate multiple listings in each 
line with commas. If you need more room on the screen to 
display your listings together, delete Line 250 (type DEL 250). 

The program is designed for six program listings. However, 
you can change the amount by editing lines 7 and 10 to fit 
your needs: 

7 DIM P$ [insert number of programs) 
10 FOR X=l TO insert number of programs 

To do this, type EDIT 7 and press ENTER. The original 
program line will appear. Press the space bar eight times (to 
reach the point you want to change) and the following will 
be displayed: 

7 DIM P$ ( 

Type D (represents delete a character) and then type I 
(represents insert a character), followed by the number of 
programs you want to use in the menu and press ENTER. For 
example, if you want to change the number of programs to 
eight, Line 7 will then look like this: 

7 DIM P$ (B) 

You can also change a line by retyping the entire line. Line 
10 should be changed in the same manner as Line 7. Refer 



to your user's manual for more information on editing 
functions. 

CSAVE"TAPEMENU" at the start of each cassette you want 
to organize. Then C5AVE each of the programs in numerical 
order as they are listed in lines 40, 50 and 60. Note: Instead 
of assigning each program a code name, use the listing 
number. For example, use CSAVE"1", CSAVE"2", CSAVE"3", 
etc. Again, you can add new programs to the list by changing 
lines 7 and 10, and add new DATA statements for the 
additional programs. When saving Tape Menu, be sure to 
leave a short blank space following it on the tape in case you 
need the space to add additional DATA statements later. 

Using Tape Menu may seem a bit bothersome to set up 
initially, but once you have organized all of your tapes in this 
manner, all you will need to do is load and run Tape Menu, 
and input a selection; the program will automatically be 
loaded. 

The listing: TAPEMENU 

1 REM* TAPE MENU 

3 REM BY J. E. RITTENHOUSE 

5 CLS 

7 DIM P$(6) 

lj3 FOR X=l TO 6 

15 READ P$ 

17 IF EOF(P) THEN 25j3 
2jS PRINT X;"- 11 ;P$ 
3)3 NEXT X 

4j3 DATA PROGRAM NAME, PROGRAM NAM 
E 

5j3 DATA PROGRAM NAME, PROGRAM NAM 
E 

6j3 DATA PROGRAM NAME, PROGRAM NAM 
E 

25j3 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

26)3 PRINT "ENTER THE NUMBER OF TH 

E" 

27j3 I N PU T " PROGRAM YOU WISH TO US 
28 jS CLOAD A$ 





ound lyjff 



By Dave Lengel 



The following utility uses the CoCo's single-bit sound 
capability to create a click sound when any key is pressed 
on the keyboard. 

Upon running Key Beep, you are asked to input an address 
where the machine language is to reside. (Use &H0FFF as 
an example.) The ML portion of the program is then poked 
into memory and executed. 



The listing: KEY BEEP 

1) 3 INPUT" INPUT START ADDRESS" ;S 

2) 3 FORI=S TOS+76 

3) 3 READA : POKEI , A 

4) 3 NEXT 
50 EXECS 

I) 3)3 DATA 182,255,35,132,243,183, 
255,35,182,255,34 

II) 3 DATA 138,2,183,255,34,182,25 
5,35, 138,4,183 

12) 3 DATA 255,35,19)3,1,1)37,175,14 
1,0,38,49,141 

13) 3 DATA )3, 4, 16, 191, 1,1)37, 52, 6,1 
98,10,134 

February 1987 THE RAINBOW 125 



140 DATA 2,186,255,34,183,255,34 
,141,18,134,253 

150 DATA 180,255,34,183,255,34,1 



41,8,90,38, 233 
160 DATA 53,6,126,0,0,134,100,74 
,38,253,57 





cho 



By John Stewart 

Echo allows you to get a hard copy of your session on the 
CoCo. The program gets its name from its ability to echo 
any character printed on the screen to your printer. To do 
this the program intercepts your CoCo's output routine using 
a RAM hook at Memory Location 360. It checks to see if 
a character is being sent to the screen and then sends the 
character to the printer and then back to the screen. 

If you have Extended Color BASIC, after running, you can 
start Echo working by typing A=U5R0(0) and pressing 
ENTER. The printer will start printing everything that is on 
the screen. To stop the echo function, type A=U5R1(0) and 
press ENTER. 

If you do not have Extended Color BASIC, you must use 
the EXEC command to get Echo to work. First, delete lines 
80 and 90. Then, to start Echo, type EXEC 512 and press 
ENTER. To stop Echo, type EXEC 537 and press ENTER. 

Note: Be sure your printer is turned on and the baud rate 
(600 baud: POKE150,B7; 1200 baud: 150,41; 2400 baud: 
POKE 150, IB; 4800 baud: POKE 150,7; 9600 baud: 



POKE150 , 1) is set before you run Echo or your computer will 
lock up. 

The listing: ECHO 

5 1 ECHO 

10 ' SENDS SCREEN OUTPUT 

20 ' TO PRINTER 

30 ' BY JOHN STEWART, MAY 1986 
40 FORX=&H200 TO &H241 
50 READ A$ 

60 POKE X,VAL("&H"+A$) 

70 NEXT X 

80 DEFUSR0=&H200 

90 DEFUSR1=&H219 

100 CLS:PRINT"TO SEND OUTPUT TO 
PRINTER TYPE A=USR0(0) AND PRES 
S ENTER": PRINT: PRINT "TO STOP OUT 
PUT TO PRINTER TYPE A=USR1(0) A 
ND PRESS ENTER" 

110 DATA A6,8D,0,3D,26,12,6C,8D, 
0,37,BE,1,68,AF,8D,0,2E,30,8D,0, 
10, BF, 1, 68,39,AE,8D,0,22,BF,1,68 
, 6F,8D,0, ID, 39,34,2,96, 6F, 2 6, E, 8 
6,FE,97,6F,3 5,2,3 4,2,AD, 9F,A0,2, 
F,6F,35,2,6E,9D,0,0,0,0,0 



^Joystick LQ irectory 

By Dale Atwater 




Joystick Directory will organize your disk directory in two 
columns, keep your directory from scrolling off the screen, 
and automatically load and execute any program selected 
using the right joystick. 

Upon loading the program, enter a selected disk in the drive 
and choose either to display another directory or execute a 
program. 

The listing: DIRECTRY 

10 CLEAR 1000 

20 DIMI$(58) ,F$(2) 

30 N=0 

50 FOR 1=1 TO 9 

60 DSKI$0,17,2+I,F$(1) ,F$(2) 

70 FOR F=l TO 2 

80 FOR J=l TO 97 STEP 32 

90 IF MID$(F$(F) , J,1)=CHR$(255) 

THEN GOTO170 ELSE IF MID$(F$(F) 

J,1)=CHR$(32) THEN GOTO 140 

100 Q$=MID$(F$(F) ,J+8,3) 

110 C$=MID$(F$(F) , J,8)+"/"+Q$ 
120 N=N+1 



130 I$(N)=C$ 
140 NEXT J 
150 NEXT F 
160 NEXT I 
170 CLS:PA=0 
175 I$(24)="" 
180 FOR 1=1 TO N 

190 IF I>30 AND PA=0 THEN PRINT@ 
480, "press in for more, c to choo 
se"; :GOSUB250:PA=-480:CLS 

200 PRINT@PA+2+(I-l)*16,I$(I) ; 
210 NEXT I 

220 PRINT 04 80, "enter to repeat - 

c to choose" ; 
230 GOSUB250 
240 RUN 

250 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 250 
ELSE IF I$="M" OR I$=CHR$(13) TH 
EN RETURN ELSE IF I$<>"C" THEN 2 
50 

260 J=JOYSTK(0) : JJ=JOYSTK(l) 

270 IF J=0 THEN T=0 ELSE IF J=63 

THEN T=16 
280 PRINT@PO," "; :A=INT(JJ/4.3) * 
3 2 : PO=A+T : PRINT @PO, CHR$ (127 +RND ( 
8) *16) ; 

290 IF PEEK(65280)=126 OR PEEK(6 
5280) =254 THEN FOR X=1024+PO+2 T 



126 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



0 1024+PO+14:A$=A$+CHR$(PEEK(X) ) 
:NEXT X:GOSUB310:GOSUB 335 
300 GOTO 260 

3 1) 3 FOR X=l TO LEN (A$ ) 

32) 3 IF MID$(A$,X,1)=CHR$(96) THE 

N MID$(A$,X,1)=" 11 
330 NEXT X: RETURN 

335 FOR X=l TO LEN(A$):IF MID$ (A 
$,X,l)="o" THEN MID$(A$,X,1)="/" 
:NEXT X ELSE NEXT X 
340 IFRIGHT$(A$,4)="BIN "THENCLS 
: PRINT" — >"A$: LINE INPUT "ARE ANY 
COMMANDS REQUIRED PRIOR TO LOADI 
NG ?";B$:IFB$="Y"OR B$="YES" THE 
NLINE INPUT"HAVE YOU DONE THESE 
COMMANDS (Y/N) " ;B$ : IF B$="YES 
" OR B$="Y" THEN LOADM A$:EXEC E 
LSE 370 ELSE 380 



350 IF RIGHT$(A$,4)="BAS " THEN 
LOAD LEFT$ (A$,8) ,R 

3 60 CLS:PRINTA$:PRINT"I DO NOT K 
NOW THIS EXTENSION ("RIGHT$(A 
$,3)") "/'SHOULD I LOADm OR 10AD" 
; :GOTO400 

370 PRINT" PLEASE DO THESE COMMAN 
DS THEN TYPE • CONT '": STOP : LOAD 
M A$ 

380 CLS : PRINT @ 2 2 4 + 1 6 - ( LEN ( " LOADI 

NG "+A$)/2) , "LOADING "+A$ 

390 LOADM LEFT$ (A$ , 8 ) : EXEC 

400 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 400 

410 IF I$="M" THEN LOADM LEFT$ (A 

$,8) :EXEC 

420 IF I$="L" THEN LOAD LEFT$ (A$ 
,8) ,R 

430 GOTO 400 




I? lanning head 

By Bill Bernico 

Everyone is saving for one thing or another. Maybe it's an 
official Donny and Marie pup tent or perhaps a Davey 
Crockett coonskin cap. Or maybe it's something practical, 
like the new CoCo 3. In any case, you'll want to know how 
long you have to save before you can actually buy. Savin/or 
will tell you exactly that, down to the week, or any part 
thereof. 

Simply follow the prompts. When inputting money 
amounts, don't use the dollar sign ($). If you are entering 
amounts under a dollar, like 37 cents for example, input . 37. 
After you input the amount earned f romyour allowance and/ 
or job, you are asked how much you want to keep each week 
for spending. Obviously, the amount you want to keep can't 
be larger than the amount you earn. If you try to do this, 
a message will appear telling you just that — which proves 
you can't spend more than you have . . . unless, of course, 
you have a charge card. 

The listing: 5RVINF0R 

J3 'SAVINFOR by BILL BERNICO 

1 CLS 3: PRINT" WHAT IS YOUR NAME"; 
:PRINT@32, ""; :INPUTN$: CLS: PRINT" 
WELL, "N$: PRINT "WHAT ITEM ARE YO 
U SAVING FOR?":FORX=102 9TO(1030+ 
LEN(N$) ) :POKEX,PEEK(X) -64:NEXTX: 
LINEINPUTA$ : PRINTSTRING$ (32,175) 
;:PRINT"WHAT DOES 11 ;A$ : INPUT 11 COS 
T IN DOLLARS ";B 

2 PRINTSTRING$(3 2, 191) ;:PRINT@2 6 
1,"IS YOUR INCOME FROM :": PRINT : F 
ORX=12 8 5TO 1 30 4 : POKEX , PEEK ( X ) - 6 4 : 
NEXTX: PRINT" 1.) ALLOWANCE": 
PRINT" 2.) JOB": PRINT" 3 
.) BOTH": PRINT: PRINT" ENTER 
(1-3) 11 ; :INPUTC:ON C GOSUB6,7,8 



3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" YOUR TOTAL 
WEEKLY INCOME IS" : F=D+E : PRINT: PR 
INT : PRINT" " ; : PRINTU 
SING"$### . ##" ; F : PRINT : PRINT : PRIN 
T" HOW MUCH OF THAT DO YOU WANT 

TO KEEP EACH WEEK FOR SPENDIN 
G": PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 11 ; : INP 

UTG 

4 IF G>F THENPRINT@354 , 11 YOU CAN' 
T KEEP MORE THAN YOU MADE. T 
RY AGAIN " : FORX= 1 TO 1 500 : NEXTX : GOT 
03ELSE H=F-G:CLS:PRINTSTRING$(64 
,128) ; : PRINT"THIS LEAVES " ;N$ : W= 
B/H : PRINTUS ING" $###.##"; H ; : PRINT 
" PER WEEK":PRINTSTRING$(96,12 8) 

• 

t 

5 PR I NT "AT THIS RATE YOU WILL HA 
VE ENOUGH MONEY TO BUY 

11 ;A$: PRINT" IN" ; :PRINTUSI 
NG"###.#";W; :PRINT" WEEKS TIME" 
: PRINTSTRING$ (12 8,128) ; : GOT09 

6 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "HOW MUCH DOES 
";N$: PRINT "GET FOR A WEEKLY ALLO 

WANCE" : PRINT: PRINT" examples 

:":PRINT" 75 CENTS = .75":P 

RINT" 1 DOLLAR = 1.00": PRINT 

» $3.50 = 3.50":PRINT:PRI 

NT : PRINT ; : INPUTD : RETURN 

7 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" HOW MUCH D 
0 YOU MAKE ON YOUR JOB P 
ER WEEK" : PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" $ 
11 ; : INPUTE : RETURN 

8 GOSUB6:GOSUB7:GOT03 

9 PRINT@484, "aNOTHER RUN eND" ; 
: EXEC4 3 3 4 5: FORX=1TO100 : NEXTX : IN$ 
=INKEY$ : PRINT@484 , "ANOTHER RUN 

END" ; : EXEC4 3345: FORX=1TO10 0 : NEX 
TX:IFIN$=""THEN9ELSEIFIN$="A"THE 
NRUNELSEIFIN$="E"THENCLS : ENDELSE 
9 /R\ 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 127 



STAR NX-10 COMPLETE SYSTEM 




Easy-to-use and ready for the heavy workloads 
from your TRS-80 Color Computer I, 2, 3 or PC 
compatible. Control pilch, margins, NLQ, Italics 
and more from the Front Control Panel. Stuff the 
5K data buffer with your own unique character set 
or use one of the I I built in character sets. I 
Year limited warranty serviceable nationwide. 
Deluxe Users manuaJ. System includes the NX-10 
Dot Matrix printer with BLUE STREAK II serial- 
to-parallel interface and our Software Trio (see 
below). 



_ 



SPECS: I20cps Draft. 30cpa NLQ. Italics Sub & Superscripts. 
Emphasized, Doublesliike. Proportional. International, Down Loadabto 
Char,, Left, Right, or Center Justification. Underline. Vertically Enlarged 
2XMX, 5, 6. 8.5. 10. 12, 4 17 CPI. Graphics 480-1920 dots/lino. Hon. & 
Vert, Tabs, Forward or Reverse n/216' Line Foeds. Hex Dump. Friction 
& PushTraclor, 5K Data Buffer. 



$28995 



+S10 Shipping 
and Insurance 



COMPLETE 



SEIKOSHA SP-1000AS COMPLETE SYSTE 



Triple Mode Dot Matrix printer with serial 
interface* cable and our Software Trio (see 
below). Ready to run single sheet or 4" to 10" 
tractor paper from your TRS-80 Color Computer 
1, 2, or 3. Compatible with your programs that 
let you control >our baud rate, like CoCoMax, 
VIP, Basic and OS-9 etc. 24 month limited 
warranty. 76 page users manual. 



SPECS: tOOcps Drall, 20 cps NLQ. Italics. Sub & Suporscripis. &3B. 
Ooublesiriko, Proportional, International, Underline 5. 6. 8 5. 10. 12. & 
17 CPI, Graphics 480-1920 doisJlmo. Horizontal and Vortical Tabs. 
n/2i6" Line Feeds, Hex Dump, Friction andTractor Paper Feed 



$21995 



+S10 Shipping 
and Insurance 



COMPLETE 





CITIZEN 120D COMPLETE SYSTEM 



Triple Mode, High performance Dot Matrix 
printer with serial interface, cable, and our 
Software Trio (see below). Ready to run with 
your TRS-80 Color Computer 1, 2, or 3. Load 
single sheets with one button ease or use the 
adjustable tractor with rear or bottom feed. Fill 
the 4K buffer with text and graphics from your 
favorite programs such as CoCoMax, VIP and 
Basic at rates up to 9600 baud. 12 month limited 
warranty. Deluxe users manual. 



SPECS: 120 cps Draft. 25 cps NLQ. Italics. Sub & Supersets, 
Emphasizod, Doublostnke. Proportional. International. User Delmod 
Characters. Leli. Right, Centor or FulUustilication. Undrhne. Ovorsoora. 
Roverse Print. Vertically Enlarged 2X. 5. 6. 8 5. 10. 12. 17. & 20 CPI. 
Graphics 480 1020 dots/line. Hon. and Verl. Relative & Absoluio Tabs, 
n/2 16" Lino Feeds. Hox Dump. Friction and Tractor, 4K Butlor. 



$229 95 



+S10 S flipping 
and Jasurancc 



COMPLETE 



Serial to Parallel 



BLUE STREAK II interface 



Transfer your data from CoCo 1, 2, 3 to your 
parallel printer with a fury. The Blue Streak can 
increase your data transmission 4 fold over 
conventional-compatible interfacing and increase 
printer tliroughput. An additional serial I/O port 
permits port sharing with another serial device 
without recabling. 



SPECS 300 600 1200. 2*00. ^00. 9600 Swilhabte Baud Bal*s, 
Pow^ Supply ??s U31A ul Listed 1 mat Wairariy, Jnpui A Pin Serial. 
Ouipui 36 Pin Parallel art 4 Pm Scnai. Torai Cable Langm 54 incnas. 



$49^ without power^J 
$54^ with power 



+%2 Shipping 
rcurirtcc 



S2 Shipping 



SOFTWARE TRIO 



I.. . 1 






J)txxypnlt 
WORD PROCESSOR Z.Z 

TAPE OR DISK VERSION 

A feature packed program that turns your CoCo 
into an office machine. Create and save letters 
and documents with the Word processor tailored 
for your printer. 




A FULL 8 M XH" SCREEN DUMP PROGRAM 

A well-written and documented program written 
in machine language position independent code. 
Features include user definable color shading and 
printing in all 5 Pmodes. Tape transferable to 
disk. Requires 16K extended color basic. 



TYPE SELECTION 
TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

Menu driven program for the CoCo. Teaches 
and shows the new user the numerous features of 
their printer. (Specify printer when ordering) 



ALL THREE 
PROGRAMS 



$1995 



of W.R. 
HA! I . 



INC 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES 

DUN & BRADSTREET LISTED 

7201 CLAIRCREST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6 % SALES TAX • COD. ADD $2.00 

TK.S HO Vfik* <"iMi>|HiU'r««Tjiuly C»»qi . (\»CuM,u0rt Color*. we Inc.. VlPi".' Sulibw Ci*p. All tljta *ul>pvl io dun^c williotil unlive 



RAINBOW RE VIE 




CoCo III Secrets Revealed 

Informative Reading/ Spectrum Projects, Inc 140 

CoCo Guru 

Al With a Mind of Its Own/Thinking Software 134 

Computer Hammer 

Lets You Pound Your Troubles Away/The LyterSide 141 

DDAY 

The Invasion of NormandyAArfr Royal Games 138 

Dual DOS Switcher 

Simple and Inexpensive/CflC Inc 138 

Gantelet 

Provides a Thrill and a Challenge/D/ecom Products 135 

The Guidebook for Winning Adventures 

Clues to Six Infocom Adventures/fiaer? Enterprises 146 

The Lottery Player 

Helps You Be a Winner/Suzanne Spencer Software 143 

Mini DO S9 

OS-9 Program for the SC68008 Coprocessor Card/C/r Pak Ltd 149 

Music Libraries 400, 500, 600, 700 and 800 

For Your Listening Pleasure/Speech Systems 137 

Physics/Science Study Course 

Educational Software/Ko/7c 10 Software 140 

Puzzle Math 

Gives the Total Picture/S£C>4 145 

Studies in the Parables 

Framework for Bible Study/Soyere/gn Grace Software 142 

UNDERWARE Ribbons and Color Pens 

Iron-On Transfers From CoCo/Diversions, Inc 136 

Ultra Label Maker 

Create Labels of All Kinds/C/WD Micro Computer Services 144 

VIP Writer Enhancer 

A Useful Addition to a Popular Program/Spectrum Projects, Inc 148 



RAINBOWfest is the only computer show 
dedicated exclusively to your Tandy 
Color Computer. Nowhere else will you 
see as many CoCo-related products or be able to 
attend free seminars conducted by the top Color 
Computer experts. It's like receiving the latest 
issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for com- 
mercial programmers to show off new and inno- 
vative products for the first time. Chicago is the 
show to get information on capabilities for the 
new CoCo 3. In exhibit after exhibit, there will be 
demonstrations, opportunities to experiment 
with software and hardware, and special RAIN- 
BOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits 
and attending the valuable, free seminars on all 
aspects of your CoCo — from improving basic 
skills to working with the sophisticated OS-9 op- 
erating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in a 
fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

To make it easier for you to participate, we 
schedule RAINBOWfests in different parts of the 
country. If you missed the fun in Princeton, why 
don't you make plans now to join us in Chicago? 
For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, RAINBOWfest is located in an 
area with many other attractions. 

As a new feature for RAINBOWfest, we are 
planning an Educational Sandbox. This will fea- 
ture child-oriented workshops to give hands-on 
experience to an age group often neglected. 
There will be a session for the kindergarten to 
third grade set and another for fourth through 
seventh graders. RAINBOWfest has something 
for everyone in the family. 

The Hyatt Regency Woodfield offers special 
rates for RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday 
evening with a session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's 
a daytime show Saturday — the CoCo Commun- 
ity Breakfast (separate tickets required) is at 8 
a.m., then the exhibit hall opens promptly at 10 
a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, the exhibit 
hall opens at 11 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained di- 
rectly from the rainbow. We'll also send you a 
reservation form so you can get your special 
room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment manyof ourexhibitors enjoy, call POSH 
at (502) 893-3311. All POSH services are available 
at no charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 

CoCo Community Breakfast 

Greg Zumwalt — CoCo 3 Programmer i 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo 
Community Breakfast is Greg Zumwalt, one 
of the early CoCo specialists. An independent 
programmer and computer designer, Greg is 
one of the select few writing Tandy software 
for the new Color Computer 3. He owns ZCT 
Software, of Tulsa, Okla., and also writes 
software for various business applications. 




77? £ following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, 
examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been issued to: 



The Amazirf Maze Game, contains 60 
data files from which you can choose 
different mazes. All places in each maze 
are accessible so that the player can 
move about and pick up points. The 
object is to escape from the maze. This 
game requires 64K ECB and one disk 
drive. Mikaron Software Company, 
P.O. Box 1064, Chester, CA 96020; 
$9.95 plus $.50 S/M. 



Art Gallery, a 32K Extended BASiC 
graphics display program. Show off 
your CoCo art collection with machine 
language special effects. Program in- 
cludes nine sample pictures, as well as 
instructions for viewing your own crea- 
tions. Toihian Software, Box 663, 
Rimer sburg PA 16248; $19.95, 



Bouncing Boulders, a 64K game. The 
object is to move around the screen 
collecting the required number of gems 
to activate the Exit square. Joystick is 
optional. Diecom Products, 6715 Fifth 
Line, Mi/ton, Ontario, Canada L9T 
2X8; (416) 878-8353, $28.95; $38.95 
Cnd. 



Color Scribe II, a 128K CoCo 3 word 
processing program. This program 
allows a choice of 40-, 64- or 80-column 
display in either amber, green, blue or 
monochrome. Buffer gives over 64K 
bytes, and acommand is provided to tell 
how many bytes are available. Text 
formatting capabilities include justifica- 
tion, headers, footers, pagination and 
more. Macro commands are supported 



to save time and keystrokes. Computer- 
ware, Box 668, 4403 Manchester 
Avenue U102, Encinitas, CA 92024; 
(619) 436-3512, $49.95. 

Color Connection IV, a 128K CoCo 3 
telecommunication package. Use baud 
rates up to ]200 baud directly from the 
back of the computer, or up to 9600 
with the use of a Multi-pak. Features 
40-, 64- or 80-column text display in 
amber, green, blue or monochrome 
modes. This program also supports the 
auto-answer/ auto-dial features for 
Hayes compatible and some Radio 
Shack printers. Computerware, Box 
668, 4403 Manchester Avenue $102, 
Encinitas, CA 92024; (619) 436-3512, 
$49.95. 



CMOS Hitachi 63B0SE and 63B21, 
replacement chips for the Color Com- 
puter CPU and PIA, CMOS Conver- 
sions, 480 Oakdale Road NE f Suite 3 } 
Atlanta, GA 30307; (404) 681-0581, 
CPU $49.50; PI A $19.50. 



Super Programming Aid Version III, a 
CoCo 3 utility program to integrate 
most used functions and save disk 
space. The Version III print spooler has 
been updated to use the memory map- 
ping unit available in the CoCo 3 and 
to use 12K of the memory which is not 
used by basic as a print spool area. A 
new screen print command has been 
added to allow you to print the contents 
of the 40- and 80~character screen to the 
printer. Banger t Software Systems, 
P.O. Box 21056, Indianapolis, IN 
46221; (317)262-8865, $29.95. 



The Word Search Game, a 64K ECB 
game requiring one disk drive. The disk 
contains 51 data files from which you 
can choose a list of words. All of the 
words are then placed in a randomly 
designed puzzle for you to find. This 
game can be used as an educational tool 
for children in the fourth grade and up. 
Mikaron Software Company, P.O. Box 
1064, Chester, CA 96020; $16.95 plus 
$.50 SI H. 



Wrestle Maniac, a 64K game requiring 
one joystick, Pin your opponent for the 
3 count and win the match. You control 
your wrestler and can move anywhere 
within the ring. Wrestling moves and 
actions are controlled by the joystick, 
and up to four players may participate 
in the same match. Diecom Products, 
67 15 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, Can- 
ada L9T 2X8; (416) 878-8358, $28.95; 
$38.95 Cnd, 



The Seal of Certification program is 
open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, 
regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine 
certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a 
sample copy — but this does not 
constitute any guarantee of 
satisfaction. As soon as possible, these 
hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers 

for evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



February 1 987 THE RAINBOW 131 



NEW 

DISK 
DRIVES 

STARTING AT 

89. 

WITH CASE & 
POWER SUPPLY 

$12995 



New Low Price 



■ r: i v - ■ -■ ~ ■ _-■ * 

"iTV!^^ ill |1 r *^ mftm V 



40Tks 6Ms 
' Double Sided 



Double Density 

40 or 80 Tracks 
1/2 Hght.Teoc/Ponosomc 



TANDON MPI TEAC 

Speed 6 ms tk to tk and up 
Copocity 250k unformatted 
Trocks 40 

Worronty now 1 YEAR 



CALL FOR 
SALE 
PRICES 



We carry only the finest quality disk drives ^no seconds - no surplus 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! all drives fully tested&warranteed 

Complete Disk Drive with Power Supply&Case r? a ? $129.95 

Two Drives in Dual Case& Power Supply .. jeac £2r7&95 CALL 

1/2 ht double sided double density Disk Drives .(Panasonic/Teac)§ $119-95 

1/2 ht double sided double density Disk Drive with ps &case, ... .^99:95 CALL 
ow to use your new drive system on audio cassette 

Single ps& case $44.95 Dual 1/2 ht ps&case ... .$54-95 Dual ps& case ... Call 

Color Computer Controller (J&Ml 

DRIVE 0 FOR RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 

TANDON, MPI OR TEAC DRIVE ( SINGLE SIDED 40 TRACKS SPEED 5 MS TRK TO TRK& UP) 



$129.95 



POWER SUPPLY and CASE, TWO DRIVE CABLE WITH ALL GOLD CONNECTORS , 
.c^J&M CONTROLLER, MANUAL and DOCUMENTATION %^Q^> $ S A L E ! 



H ^ ,v DRIVE 0 FOR RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 

^ -v^ PANASONIC 1/2 HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED DOUBLE DENSITY DRIVE 500K unformatted 



*\> POWER SUPPLYand CASE, 2 DRIVE CABLE WITH ALL GOLD CONNECTORS 



t LABLt YY I I n ALL uULU LUNNtLIUHb CAW P A I T I 

J&M CONTROLLER. MANUAL and DOCUMENTATION $£7£H^f SALE! 

TAKE ADDED SAVINGS ON TWO DRIVE SYSTEMS ^^^^^ 

DISKETTES with free library case :r. S\7^5 

Unadvertised Specials I I fl $Call 



Drives c leaned ,aligned & tested 

TECHNICAL STAFF ON DUTY, PLEASE CALL FOR ASSISTANCE 



$29.95 



ft 

CALL US TODAY!! 
i ORDER TOLL FREE 



617 278 6555 

1-800-635-0300 



* DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. 

617-278-6555 

1 TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 



9 SOUTH MAIN ST 
UXBRIDGE, MASS. 01569 

617-278-6555 



We welcome 



HOURS MON -SAT 9-6 (EST) 



• Visa/Master Charge 

• Checks (al low 2 weeks for clearing ) 

« CO.D. Add $2.00 



New Hard Drives 



IBM XT 



COMPLETE SYSTEM 



JUST PLUG IN 



Call For 
BEST PRICE 



COMPATIBLE 





Warranty - One Full Year 



call for low price 



5 to 20 Megabyte, ready to run on the TRS 
80 Model I/III/IV/4P, color computer, 

SCREEN DUMP PROGRA 

64K UPGRADES $19.95 The best screen dump program for the Epson & Gemin 



VIDEO DRIVER 

ENABLES YOUR COCO TO OPERATE WITH A 
VIDEO MONITOR INSTEAD OF A TELEVISION! 



$24.95 



Panasonic 1091 Printer 

1091 Printer & SP3 & Screen Dump 



239.95 
299.95 



printers ever!! Have the option of standard images 
reverse w/regular or double sized pictures S "JQ 95 

sp-3 interface for color computer 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem / printer switch — no need for 
Y-cables or plugging/unplugging cables 




PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
Call for current pricing 



Only: 

$54.95 



™ PRINTERS 






now 

with 

screen 

dump 



$219 




TR UE DATA PR O DUCTS 

9 SOUTH MAIN ST. 
jj UXBRIDGE, MASS. 01569 




COMPLETE SYSTEM 
Nothing more to buy! 

Dealer inquiries invired 



CALL US TODAY!! 617" 278" 6555 
£ ORDER TOLL FREE 1-800-635-0300 



Software Review, 



The CoCo Guru Has 
a Mind of Its Own 



My Webster's Dictionary defines a Guru as one's personal 
spiritual adviser or teacher. It also says he is a leader, highly 
regarded by a group of followers and that sometimes the 
term is used derisively. CoCo Guru applies only to the latter 
part of that definition. 

The machine language program is supplied on disk and 
requires the Radio Shack Speech/ Sound Pak. No documen- 
tatioD is provided nor is it needed to run the program. The 
disk is copy-protected, and works on the CoCo 3. 

Most of us think of a Guru as a wise man; a philospher 
with deep religious roots. This Guru however, is nothing 
more than a dirty old man who rambles endlessly about 
nothing in general and sex in particular. If bad taste is your 
bag, read on. 

Theonly input you, the user, have is typing in your name. 
From then on the Guru asks and answers all the questions 
that are directed to you. 

Often when a question is asked, you might want to answer 
differently than the program allows, and that is a big flaw 
in the program. You find yourself only an observer to a 



conversation that leaves you speechless. The questions and 
answers are totally irrelevant to anything and are sometimes 
humorous. The program is structured to create random 
sentences, which I suppose is why the thing is so darned 
nutty. I found myself unwillingly glued to my CoCo in utter 
disbelief at how really awful it was. It's like watching a Pee 
Wee Herman movie; you just can't figure out how he can 
make money being so downright corny. Maybe that's what 
the authors of CoCo Guru had in mind when they released 
it for sale. They may sell a few, but it will never be a hot 
item for the CoCo as far as I am concerned. It's definitely 
not for youngsters, either; in fact, it deserves an 'R' rating 
for its many sexual innuendos and suggestive talk. On a 
scale of 1 to 5 it rates no better than a 1, and that's being 
generous because I like programs that use speech synthesis. 

The authors of CoCo Guru would do us all a favor if they 
would channel their talents toward a more meaningful 
speech synthesis program. Or maybe they could rewrite this 
program so that the user could type in direct responses to 
the many silly questions. Maybe then I'd feel like I had some 
control over what is being discussed. Maybe then it would 
rate a 2. 



(ThinkingSoftwarc, 46-16 6Sth Place, Woodside, NY 1 1377; 
718-429-4922, S34.9S) 



— Jerry Semones 



SELECTED SOFTWARE ★★★★★★) 



* LOW PRICES ★ FAST SERVICE * FREE SHIPPING * 



SOLDERLESS UPGRADE KITS 

With easy-to-follow instructions 

512K FOR COCO 3 $129,95 

512K RAMDISK FOR COCO 3 $19.95 

64K FOR E BOARD $39.95 

64K FOR F BOARD $29.95 

64K FOR COC02* (ALL MODELS) . . , $29.95 

'All Korean models require one solder joint. 

Please specify model # with order. 

NOTE: ALL fCs used in our kits are first quality 150 NS 
prime chips and carry one lull year warranty. 



BASIC ROMs DISASSEMBLY 

COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED $17.95 

EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED $17.95 

DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED $17.95 

ALL 3 BOOKS ONLY $39.95 

ULTRA 80C DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER $29.95 

BUG OUT & THE ORACLE (Ml. Monitor) $14.95 

ALL 5 ITEMS ONLY $59.95 

500 POKES. PEEKS. 'N EXECS $16.95 

200 POKES. PEEKS. l N EXECS $9.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES (VOLUME 1) $19.95 

WITH ROUTINES ON TAPE OR DISK $36.95 

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 

(TEPCO) $16.95 

ALL 10 ITEMS ONLY $119.95 



UTILITIES & APPLICATIONS 

TAPE 

DYNACALC 

TELEWRITER 64 $39.95 

TELEPATCH ii 

PRO-COLOR-FILE 2.0 

TOM MIX MAS ASSEMBLER 

AUTOTERM $31.95 

PEN PAL 2.1 

ADOS 

THE PEPPER W/SOURCE $24.95 

DISK UTILITY 2.1 

SUPER BACKUP UTILITY 

GRAPHICOM 

UTILITY ROUTINES VOL. 1 

UTILITY ROUTINGS VOL. 2 

SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 

DISK TUTORIAL (2 DISKS) 



DISK 
$69.95 
$49.95 
$24.95 
$49.95 
$67.95 
$39.95 
$74.95 
$27.95 
$26.95 
$19.95 
$44.95 
$21.95 
$21,95 
$27,95 
$21.95 
$34.95 



COCO MAX WITH TAPE $64.95 

COCO MAX II WITH DISK $74.95 

Y-CABLE 24,95 

DS-69A DIGISECTOR $139.95 

HJL-57 KEYBOARD $69.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER $139.95 

DATARASE $39.95 

ROMPACK P.C. BOARD W/CASE $9.95 

VIDEO PLUS IIU $34.95 



GAMES 

TAPE DISK 

WRESTLE MANIAC $26.95 $26.95 

BOUNCING BOULDERS $26.95 $26.95 

THE GATES OF DELIRIUM $35.95 $35.95 

GANTELET $26.95 $26.95 

MISSION F-1 6 ASSAULT $26.95 $26.95 

PAPER ROUTE $26.95 $26.95 

P51 MUSTANG $26.95 $29.95 

WORLDS OF FLIGHT $26.95 $29.95 

WIZARD S CASTLE $21.95 

DRAGON BLADE (PRICKLY-PEAR) $26.95 

PACKAGE SPECIALS 
SELECTED SOFTWARE PAC: Galagon. Cubix Froggie. 
Lancer & Lunar Rover Patrol (All 32K M.L.) 
$34.95 TAPE OR DISK 

SPACE PAC: 10 M.L. Space Games (Mostly 16K) 
$21.95 TAPE OR DISK 

ADVENTURE PAC: 5 Adventure Games (Mostly 32K) 

$19.95 TAPE OR DISK 

EDUCATIONAL PAC: 6 Educational Games 

(16K + 32K) 

$19.95 TAPE OR DISK 

TREASURY PAC: A collection of 30 games (4K - 32K) 
$29.95 TAPE OR DISK 

WEBCOR MODEM':* AUTOTERM" 
$64.95 (DISK ADD $5.00) 
COCO CABLE $12.95 

'300 Baud Dlract Connect. Power Adapter Included. 
"Latest Version. 



WE PAY SHIPPING in the United States, Canada & Mexico. 
Overseas please add 1 0%. (MN Residents add 6% sales tax.) 
We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or money order. U.S. 
funds only for foreign orders. C.O.D. please add $2.00. 



Send to: 



SELECTED SOFTWARE 



P.O. Box 32228, Fridley, MN 55432 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 6 1 2-7 57-2439 
INFORMATION 612-757-1026 (11 A.M.-5 P.M. C.S.T.) 

24 HOUR SHIPPING 



134 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Software Review! 



Discover the Magical Maze 

of Gantelet 



Shades of Dungeons and Dragons. Gantelet, by Diecom 
Products, is one of those maze-type games filled with 
creatures, treasures, door keys and magic objects, including 
the famous magic potion. The game requires a 64K CoCo 
and is available on tape or disk. It can be played with one 
to three players. Joysticks are required to play with more 
than one player. One player uses the arrow keys to move 
around the maze and the space bar to fire in the direction 
you are facing. The other two players use the joysticks and 
fire buttons. 

The game consists of a multiple-level maze. The exact 
number of levels is unknown. The object is to find treasures 
and advance from level to level, scoring as many points as 
possible before your character dies. No mention is ever 
made of escaping the maze. Each player begins with 600 
"health" points. You may increase health points by finding 
food scattered around the various levels of the maze, 
otherwise they decrease as time goes on. When the health 
points reach zero, the player is dead. Thegame is over when 
all players have died. 




Creatures move around the levels searching for players 
to attack. An attack by a creature reduces a player's health 
points. A special creature, Death, can d rain your health very 
quickly. You must avoid him at all costs. Creatures may be 
shot, or ail creatures and creature generators on the screen 
may be destroyed by using a magic potion if you happen 
to nave found one. Other objects have magical qualities for 
the players to discover, 



If you find a key you may walk over it to pick it up. It 
may then be used to open a door which consists of a series 
of blue squares. I never have much luck with artifact colors 
so my doors were always green. Entering an "exit 1 * square 
moves a player to the next level, while entering a "telepor- 
ter" moves the player to another place on the screen on the 
same level. If more than one player participates, all players 
must be in the exit before anyone is placed on the next level. 

The game is well-done and provides quite a challenge, 
especially on the higher levels where more creatures exist. 
The characters respond a little sluggishly to the joysticks 
and may take some getting used to, but this was not a serious 
drawback. All players must remain visible on the screen at 
all times. This means two players cannot go in opposite 
d irections in the maze because the screen cannot scroll two 
directions at the same time. The screen appears to lock up 
until both players proceed in the same direction. This also 
takes some getting used to, as well as player cooperation. 

For a gamester, Gantelet provides a thrill and a challenge. 
It would make a good addition to anyone's maze collection. 



(Diecom Products, 6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, 
Canada L9T 2X8; 416-878-8358, $28.95; $38.95 Cnd.) 



— Larry Birkenfeld 




A unique approach 
to disc reliability 

Memory Minder from J&M Systems is 
one of the most comprehensive disk 
drive diagnostic programs available for 
microcomputers. It quickly and easily 
runs comprehensive testing of all vital 
operating parameters to assure data 
integrity. 

Data Integrity 

Means Data Confidence 

Memory Minder j.s so easy to run you 
will be inclined to test your disk drives on 
a regular basis and correct problems be- 
fore they ever endanger your data. This 
program provides long term confidence 
in your data integrity. 



Memory Minder is currently available 
for the following: 

Version 1 .03 
TRS-80 Model 10/4 

48 tpi Single Side 

48 tpi Double Side 

56 tpi and 48 Ipi Double Side 

TRS-80 ModeM 

48 tpi Single Side Single Density 

TRS-80 Color Computer and 
TDP-iOO 

48 tpi Single Side 
48 tpi Double Side, 



Technical Knowledge 

Not Required 

Simply slip in the Memory Minder disk 
and select one or more of eight sophisti- 
cated tests. Easy to understand graphics 
on your screen display findings in a few 
moments. Now you can discover poten- 
tial misalignments and problems before 
they endanger your valuable data. 

Call or write for details and 
more Information 




J&M SYSTEMS, LTD. 

15 1 00- A CENTRAL SOUTHEAST 
ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87123 
505/292-4182 

We accept MasterCard and Visa 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



The CoCo Bookkeeper 

A Complex Bookkeeping PockOQQ fot The Color Compute/ 

EE ATI IDCC- 
rCAIUKCiJ). 

* HK*««$OtyT>O«0*SflAy-A5l!c2l hHes screen w«fh hve upCXX 
cose characters 

* OftiEtTID • AJi pcouur ledgers and |ounr*atj ate included (device 
emry oene(oikx*noi ©ervMoi ledge*, AP vote i. purchases camwceiprsA 
dlifcosomenls. Income & e upends sfotamen!. Wof Dotance. ban* reeon- 
Clitotton. yeor-er»a ciofngs 4 opening* 

* USH-HHCNDiY - the program is driven Dy pocnip mertui Trorufe* from any one 
toOQiW | CX^noi fO any ome* U C>CCarr\i>Mihed w«n (XX) Of W *eySft<*Oi 

•roWl»Wt-Usotnojtt>eoprkx^o<nofmolOf "M«QaooA cjoe/o<»on Meaodoi 
prcMoes cm Initial 2ixi grorvjioi or" storage on o specially icxmofied di^en© 
(included wtm the program) and 6 mWliocond op&ratJonol speed Ibis 
progfom is designed la lecogNiedisk storage space as memory - H vAii wrffe 
ana read flies up to 252 gfanows (S80k ) long 

* U MJUOIY-AJi postings Of© InttoHy mode la the oenera* Journal Postings loor 
gfher journals and leao© 4 * Including prepovoHon a* o tool bo'orvre and n*<e 
rtaiemenf of income and expense Is a M)y automatic, men u-c on rubied 
function 

* RINCTHDN - The uae* con ofrtoin o Hardcopy of any vorv p*oaucedbv 
tne piogfom Cnanges of ooud role CJOO-WO) ore accomplished o 
jUngse keystroke 

* 0OOUMINTATK>N • Complete and comprehensive documentafioncovenng 
every aspec) erf operation is supp4»ed in simple, non-iechrucai lecms Actua 
"keyabte" examples are given fhioughoul 

The CoCo Bookkeeper operates acceding t» goc^aiiy accepted 
occounlk^Q procedures, ft wfli take o business from opening day to the 
final balance sheet and pro/it and toss statement at income fax rime, 
men open tne books for me following year. 

32K and one disk drive required Supports multi-driv© system* 
CoCo 2, 3 Compatible 



^HflHRHf STIR 9 Hi iflflC—Jflw HMMfr B dK***JBflb 

w 5 w B fl wy^^y fif Hp H fl^^^ 

Si Hf H H ^flkaaMr BS BBS n VkaMlflp 

W ttfl KW 99 49 ^Mjy MB Hb TQg^fr 

©f 0'iB'"i"i" i fcWy 



fjg$ W% 1\jf9 In OQs© c# 

magic arsd r^ratt^n you 
9* lott In t**$ tot5*dd#n 
woods »v^q ip out- 

Wsk $24.95 



i// 



Adventure In 

Mythology 

By ScoH Cabit 

An onimoio*-' g;or,n:rs ocventure 
Borne monsre-s ona discover fxeasu/es 
as yau assume ihe personalities of 
various neroes n"- oncien} Greek myth- 
ic^y 1 vbu goai is ,o ^r. fne hond ot the 
Deaufiful Atalonto. the swrtf-running 
hunrress Bur bew.'Oieot ihe perils and 
obsiacres fhOJ stond tn you* woyas you 
KXirney through oncieni Greece', four- 
voice music and sound eMoc/v oulo- 
malic speech when usmg o londy SSC 
speech pak Load and Save «eoiure. 
over 250 local ions mk Mochme ion- 
guage 

T ope $21.95 Dltk $24.95 

The Andrea CoCo 

By Art Martin 

Another great animafed graphics 
advenrure! AJ> yau carty® down to the 
Yacht Club for was fo get o annk ona 
maybe ploy o Irrne pc*e/ Heck, 
nobody would ever g^>ess thai the 
closest thing you owned fc a real yacht 
was the one over your firepi'oce if was 
in the bar that you heard rumors of 
earth-shotiermg even is ooou» io fake 
place You stop our onio me wharf lo 
ge' O little o» when you' noiufai 
curiosity and sense or adventure siar 
?o worv.Con you save ine worid^ 
Superb graphics, save $. icoo leafure 
one d^sk drive required 

Disk $24.95 



an i tfcif off a * 

For Only 

tAO 95 

DSDO - $3.00 5 & H (Box 10) and Many more 



Saauaro «« 

^Tfc^^A Tucson. A2 65712 

SOftWare <*02) 881-6786 



22S^^B£2S^^^Qc.O.D. Order Add $3.00 
Afrzona Residents Add 7% fox • Deafer inquires Invited 

Call Or Write For Free Catalog! 
Authors* We're Seeking Good Software Now! 




Accessory Re vie 

Iron-On Transfers With 
UNDERWARE Ribbons and 

Color Pens 

Diversions, Inc., is marketing a line of products cleverly 
entitled UNDERWARE. At the heart of this product line is 
the UNDERWARE printer ribbon. Anything printed on plain 
paper with this ribbon becomes an iron-on transfer ready 
to adorn your favorite article of clothing. UNDERWARE 
ribbons are available in black for the following printers: 
Imagewriter 1 & II, Oki/Gemini Spool, Epson FX-70/80/ 
100, Epson LQ-1500, Star Radix 10, IBM ProPrinter, 
Toshiba P-J350, TI 850 & 855, and Mannesmann Tally MT- 
80. Prices for these ribbons range from $14.95 to $21.95. 

Ribbons are available in red, blue, green, yellow, brown 
and purple for the Imagewriter I & II, Oki/Gemini Spool, 
and Epson FX-70/80 for $16.95. 

Multi-color ribbons are available for Imagewriter II 
($29.95) and Epson JX-80 ($34.95) color printers. 

If your printer is not on the list, don't despair; Diversions 
has specially formulated carbon paper that works to create 
transfers with any impact printer that accepts sheet fed 
paper. 

The use of a graphics software package enhances this 
product. Remember, though, the image printed on paper 
must be the mirror image of the desired finished product. 
The UNDERWARE documentation indicates that many 
graphics packages include such a "flip" feature. If yours 
does not, Robert C. Montowski's FLIP-L2R utility which 
appeared in the July '86 RAINBOW may be the ticket. 

You may want to spruce up the designs you create with 
UNDERWARE ColorPens. A set of these includes red, blue, 
green, orange and yellow. Whether used to decorate images 
created with UNDERWARE ribbons or to create free-hand 
works of art, anything drawn or written on paper with a 
ColorPen becomes an iron-on transfer. 

The fabric to be decorated should be at least 50 percent 
polyester for best results. The documentation suggests that 
your iron be set to its hottest setting. Be careful here — 
experiment on an old shirt or something. The hottest setting 
on my iron scorched and nearly melted the fabric within 
seconds and created very unsatisfactory results. The 
"permanent press" setting turned out right for me. 

Both the printed images and those created with Col- 
orPens transferred well. My advice regarding printed 
images is the bolder the better. ColorPen creations look 
much better after transferred to cloth than they do on paper. 
Pen lines in filled in areas seem to disappear to uniform 
color when transferred. My daughter Emily was in charge 
of pens and created quite a creature from outer space! 

I have a couple of questions for Diversions, Inc. Why no 
ribbons for Radio Shack printers? Why no mention in the 
documentation of Tandy computers and graphics software 
for them? 

(Diversions, Inc., 505 W. Olive Ave. #520, Sunnyvale, CA 
94(186; 408-245-7575, ribbons from $1494 fo $21.95; pens, 
$14.95) 

— Stanley Townsend 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Software Review, 



Music Libraries for Your 
Listening Pleasure 



Speech Systems is well-known in the CoCo Community 
for its popular music programs, voice synthesizers and 
E.A.R.S. To complement these fine pieces of software, what 
else would a company sell? Why not sell examples of the 
output of these programs. Hence, Music Libraries 400, 500, 
600, 700 and 800. These packages are in addition to the 
Music Libraries 100, 200 and 300. 



THEME FRO* : 
DAVE 

E E-TOMITE 

C HL STREET 

1 D V N « S T Y 

E J 0 H M N Y 

F FOOTBALL 

G 28-c'8 

H P H P R D 0 L 3 

I S L V R S P H S 

J LAURAS T 

K j S A C R 0 U D 

L H iJ TEL 

M D IJ K E S OF 

N JEFFRSHS 

0 R I P L E Y S 



ST ELSEWHERE 

G R IJ S I H 

0 DALLAS 
R ELS WHERE 
S SOLI D 0 L D 

T FACTS OF 

IJ MSTPPEEO 
V N E U H h R T 




Each Music Library contains five or six disks with over 
100 four-voice music selections. The entire library is the 
work of two music lovers. Volumes 1 00 to 400 and 600 were 
transcribed and arranged by C. Clark Rulaford , and 
volumes 500, 700 and 800 were compiled by Speech Systems 
vice-president, Randy Spector. As a serious user of Music a f 
Musica //and Lyra, I am well aware of the time and work 
involved in compiling such libraries. A tip of the hat to both 
these gentlemen for their fine job. 

While each volume is available on both tape and disk, 
I received the disk version. You are instructed to run a 
program called JUKEBOXD. After doing so, you are greeted 
with a two-column menu of all the selections available on 
the disk. From there, you may choose to listen to a single 
selection or all selections on the disk. ( Musica is not 
required for listening to the music in the music libraries.) 



See You at 
KAI N HU Wi est-Chicago 

pril 10-12 



In addition, the JUKEBOXD program supports output to the 
Speech Systems Stereo Pak as well as to the TV, It also 
supports high-speed playing. The Stereo Pak output works 
very well and, at high speed, you can sit back and imagine 
you are sitting in a concert hall. 

An obvious attempt has been made by Speech Systems 
to ensure a variety of music styles in each volume. For 
example, Volume 700 contains TV Themes, Beethoven, 
Broadway, Blues, Kenny Rogers, The Beatles and Country 
Classics Parts I and 2. With such a wide variety of music, 
it is somewhat difficult to pick your favorites. Personally, 
I never liked the "Moonlight Sonata" by Beethoven until 
I heard some of the special effects introduced by the 
arranger. I have listened to these five libraries in their 
entirety four different times. There are very few mistakes 
in transcription. I am even considering running an output 
from my computer room to the stereo in the family room 
just so we can listen to selections. Or, better yet, I may just 
buy a newCoCo and set it by the stereo. With all these music 
packages from Speech Systems, the CoCo is quickly 
becoming an integral part of the stereo system. 

The Speech Systems Music Libraries are packages that 
you can really sit back and enjoy. ! definitely rate these 
packages a 97 out of 100. And, no single Library is better 
than any other. They are all worth getting. 



(Speech Systems, 38W 255 Deerpath Road, Batavia, IL 
60510; 312-879-6880, $29.95 per Library) 



— Cray Augsburg 




THE RAINBOW'S 

"One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 



Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 



Jig 




February 1987 THE RAINBOW 137 



Hardware Review^ 



Dual DOS Switcher: 
Simple and Inexpensive 



Have you ever thought about making your own custom- 
ized DOS but put of f the project because you couldn't think 
of a neat and clean way to add it to your CoCo? I like to 
build project boards, but I like them to plug in. I don't like 
the idea of hacking away at the innards of my computer. 

Well, I have some good news for you. Now there is a 
simple and inexpensive way to add another DOS to your 
computer — it's called the Dual DOS Switcher. It's designed 
to be used inside your J&M Disk Controller. After you have 
completed the installation, you will be able to manually 
switch between a 24-pin ROM and a 28-pin EPROM or two 
28-pin EPROMs. 

Oddly enough, I found I could not install both the J-DOS 
and the RS-DOS at the same time. Both of these are 24 pin 
in my machine and this is one configuration the switch does 
not handle. 

While the installation itself is simple enough and requires 
about 30 minutes to complete, the instructions may be 
inadequate for those who have never attempted any 
electronic modifications before. 

All in all, the product works fine, and for the price it sure 
beats trying to come up with your own form of "kludge" 
to the system. 

(CRC Inc., 10802 Lajeunesse, Montreal, Quebec, Canada 
H3L2E8; 514-383-5293, $14.95) 

— Phil Speed 



Software Review^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^/7?\ 

DDAY: The Invasion 
of Normandy 

DDA Y from Ark Royal Games is an excellent historical 
program that provides hours of fun. This Simulation 
requires strategy and advance planning as you control the 
Allies in their fight against the Nazis. 

The game is simple to load and execute, and is not copy- 
protected so backups can be made. After each turn is 
completed, you may play on or save the setup. This is a plus 
for war buffs who want to try to work different combina- 
tions of forces. 

DDA Y begins with the design of your invasion force. The 
seven pages of documentation that come with the program 
include an example run of the order of battle that is very 
helpful. 

The one restriction of the game is that you are only 
allowed three fighter bomber squadrons. The Nazi forces 
are controlled by the CoCo and, in order to get control of 
the air, you must destroy at least four of the German 
airfields. If this is not done quickly, your navy and troops 
suffer. 

DDA Y is for the more advanced player; novices may have 
some difficulty getting started. Some knowledge of the 
Invasion of Normandy is needed. This game rates an 8 on 
my scale of J to 10. Now all I need to know is where to 
put General Patton and the tanks! 

(Ark Royal Games, P.O. Box 14806, Jacksonville, FL 
32238; 904-786-8603, tape $23; disk $25) 

- Keith Smith 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Run the one-liner on your disk system. When asked 
for the track number, enter an appropriate response 
and this routine will print the information contained 
on every sector of that track to your screen. 

The listing: 

1 CLE AR5 j3 $ : CLS 3 : PRINT § 4 2 , " TRACK 
READER" ; :PRINT@423 / " (C) 1985 E.D. 
WILKES" ; : PRINT @ 4 6j3, "MACON ,GA" ; :P 
RINT §19 6," ENTER TRACK # (j3 TO 34 
) " ; : INPUTT : FORS=lT018 : DSKI$jZ( , T , S 
, A$ , B$ : PRINT "TRACK# "T, " SECTOR# " S 
, A$ ; B$ : FORA= 1T01 5 J3 J3 : NEXT : NEXTS : F 
ORA=lT02 j3 j3 0 : NEXT : GOTOl 

Ernest Wilkes 
Macon, GA 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Minimon is a miniature monitor that will give you 
the locations at which your BASIC program and its 
associated commands are stored. Just type it in and 
save it to tape or disk in ASCII format. Then merge 
it in when your program is in memory. To merge 
Minimon from tape use the following line: 
□PEN"I " , 1 , "MINIMON" : PDKE111 , 255 : EXEC4415G 
and press ENTER. 

The listing: 

Ij2(j3j3j3 CLS:FORX=PEEK(25) *256+PEEK 
(26)TOPEEK(27) *256+PEEK ( 28) -140: 
T=T+ 1 : PRINTT AB ( 7 ) n LOC"X;PEEK(X) " 
"CHR$(PEEK(X) ) :IFT/15=INT(T/15) 
THENPRINT@4 89, "PRESS ANY KEY.";: 
EXEC44 539: CLS : NEXTELSENEXT 

Keiran Kenny 
The Hague, Holland 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape) 



138 THE RAINBOW February 1987 




New interactive CoCo software^ 



© 



THE MAGIC OF SPELLING 

Grades 4 to 8 



makes learning easy, 
fun. Kids love it! 



NEW LOW PRICE - 16 lessons for the price 
of 8! Educational Software for kids frorz 
6 fo 18. 



Parents are depending more and more on 
supplemental education for their children. Edu- 
cators know lhal the most effective teaching is 
done one-to-one. Through individual attention 
and self-paced progress, students learn more 
and retain more. 

BETTER THAN A PRIVATE TUTOR 

The Compass Education Software LOOK/ 
LISTEN/LEARN approach is the next best 
thing to a private tutor. Unlike other educational 
software the Compass Library also talks to the 
student — not in synthesized speech, but in a 
real human voice. With on-screen textual infor- 
mation and attention-gelting graphics, stu- 
dents of all ages actually enjoy learning! 

SELF-PACED FOR BETTER RETENTION 

The lessons advance only after the stu- 
dent has correctly answered the questions 
throughout the programs assuring that the 
material has been thoroughly absorbed. 

SIMPLE EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 

All you need is the TRS-80* Color Com- 
puter (any model), computer cassette recorder 
and TV set. Once the cassette is loaded you 
need only enter two simple commands . and 
then press any key to slart the lesson. 

Of course you can stop the lesson at any 
point to study information on the screen. Just 
push the pause button on the cassette player. 
Push it again and lesson resumes. 

To answer queslions throughout the les- 
son simply press the appropriate number on 
the computer keyboard, type in the correct 
answer, or follow other easy instructions. And 
to go back and review, just rewind the cassette. 
It's that simple. 

CHOOSE FROM 9 SUBJECTS 

There is not sufficient space in this adver- 
tisement to list all lesson titles, but here is a 
sample: 

MATHEMATICS 

In today's advanced, HiTech world, under- 
standing and working with numbers is essen- 
tial. Compass has developed three compre- 
hensive series of math programs. From basic 
numerals for the very young, to algebra and 
higher mathematics for the older child. In 
between, there are programs for everything 
from addition and subtraction to practical 
everyday percentage problems. 

•TRS-80 Is a registered trademark of The Tandy Corporation. 



V 




MS 1 — Plurals: branches, rodeos, valleys 
MS 2 — Plurals: houses, brushes, candies 
MS 3 — Plurals: babies, pianos, leaves 
.MS 4 — Suffixes: boxed, referred, writing 
*MS 5 — Suffixes: paid, quickly, extremely 
MS 6 — Suffixes: said, confusion, school's 
MS 7 — Homonyms: two, too, to; their, there 
MS 8 — Homonyms: our, are, hour; ate, eight 
MS 9 — Homonyms: weight, wait; who's, whose 
MS 10- Homonyms: scent, cent; sell, cell 
MS 1 1 -Homonyms: dew, due; course, coarse 
MS 12 -Homonyms: cite, site, sight; by, buy 
MS 13- Homonyms: blue, blew, creek, creak 
MS 14 -Homonyms: sale, sail; steel, steal 
MS 15 -Spelling by Syllables: leller, color 
MS 16 -Doubling Consonanl Lellers: hollow 



o 



MATH/FRACTIONS 

Grades 4 to 8 



MF 1 — Numerator, denominator, bar 
MF 2 — Multiplication of fractions 
MF 3 — Factors and prime numbers 
MF 4 — Reducing fractions, reciprocals 
MF 5 — Reducing fractions, lowest terms 
MF 6 — Proper fractions, mixed numbers 
MF 7 — Multiplication-division of fractions 
MF 8 — Addition-subtraction of fractions 
MF 9 — Addition of mixed numbers 
MF 10 — Changing fractions to decimals 
MF 11 — Converting decimal numbers 
MF 12 — Word problems using percents 
MF 13 — Additional problems using percents 
MF 14 — Word problems using percents 
MF 15 — Finding circle area using pi 
MF 16 — Using a ruler to measure fractions 

MATH/BASIC ALGEBRA 
HH For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: MBA-1 to 16 



o 



MATH/NUMBERS 

For grades 1 to 6 
Sixteen lessons: MN-1 to 16 

SELF DEVELOPMENT 

Writing effectively means communica- 
tiong effectively. Through the writing series of 
lesson students of all ages will develop basic 
skills needed to turn thoughts and ideas into 
expressive words and phrases. 



o 



RULES OF WRITING 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: RW-1 to 16 



LANGUAGE ARTS 

A practical education begins with good 
reading skills and is continued with increased 
vocabulary comprehension and, of course, 
spelling. Your child will learn that reading is fun 
while they are also learning when to use "to," 
"too," and "two," and how to spell when build- 
ing a vocabulary. 



© 



VOCABULARY COMPREHENSION 

Grades 3 to 5 
Sixteen lessons: VC-1 to 16 



o 



READING COMPREHENSION 

For all grades 

Sixleen lessons: DRC-1 to 16 



© 



SCIENCE 
SCIENCE/PHYSICS 

For all grades 
Sixteen lessons: SP-1 to 16 




HISTORY 
AMERICAN HISTORY 

For grades 4 to 12 
Sixteen lessons: AH-1 to 16 

So there it is . . . no-nonsense subject 
matter presented in a way that maximizes 
understanding and retention. 

SPECIAL PRICING 
YORK 10 is now offering, for a limited time, 
a complete set in any subject, 1 6 cassettes, 
one lesson on each cassette, for only 
$49.95. We originally offered only 8 cassettes 
for the same amount so now it's twice the 
value. The same 16 cassettes are sold else- 
where for over $150. 

To order, send your check or money order 
for $49.95 (CA residents add sales tax) for 
each subject you wish, plus $3.50 shipping and 
handling (any quantity). For immediate ship- 
ment, call collect the number below and 
charge your VISA or MASTERCARD. 



EHna 



9525 VASSAR AVENUE 
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311 

1 818/700-0330 — 



Book Rev/ew^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SV^N 

CoCo III Secrets Revealed 
Offers Good Information 

The Color Computer 3 market is presently in somewhat 
of a waiting state. Color Computer software/ hardware 
vendors are busy trying to get new products for the CoCo 
3 while most owners of the new machine are waiting 
(impatiently) for those new products. When the new 
products are finally released, 1 imagine there will be quite 
a rush of CoCo 3 sales. However, what do we do while we 
are waiting? The daring, technically-minded people who 
dabble in programming will want to pick up CoCo III 
Secrets Revealed, a 34-page information manual for the 
CoCo 3. 

The manual contains six chapters that discuss features of 
the new machine, and gives a modest memory map. Chapter 
1 covers the basics of the Memory Management Unit 
(MMU)aswellasexplaininghowthe palette registers work. 
It includes a subjective chart of what values give what colors 
in the palette registers. Chapter 2 lists and briefly describes 
the new commands in the CoCo 3. This really is useless, 
as anyone who owns a CoCo 3 already has the manual, and 
this chapter doesn't give enough specifics to help anyone 
who doesn't have the new machine. Chapter 3 goes back 
to discuss some of the finer aspects of altering the palettes. 
This chapter also includes several "you type 'em" examples 
of how to access some fancy features. Chapter 4 is a tidbits 
chapter. It covers smooth scrolling of graphics, a memory 
test program for 128K and 512K versions of the CoCo 3, 
and several peeks and pokes to control the video output. 
Chapter 5 is devoted to an eight-page memory map. This 
map does not fill the need for a good disassembly of the 
machine. However, it does provide a great deal of informa- 
tion regarding operational "modes" of the CoCo 3 and 
where to go to control I/O on the new machine. Those 
technically-oriented people will be able to discern a good 
deal of useful information from this chapter. Finally, 
Chapter 6 is a brief summary. The last page of CoCo Iff 
Secrets Revealed gives the pinouts for the RGB jack located 
on the bottom of the CoCo 3 and also for the Gl ME chip. 
These diagrams are rough, hand-drawn pictures which 
might indicate they were thrown in at the last minute. 

All in all, CoCo fff Secrets Revealed offers some very 
good information which will be helpful to advanced as well 
as intermediate programmers. 1 do feel, however, the 
manual could have been reduced to about 10 pages and still 
contain the same amount of useful information. The price 
is not too high, especially since we are all waiting for CoCo 
3 products. 



(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $16.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Cray Augsburg 



Software Review^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^f^ 

Physics: The Study of Motion, 
Matter and Energy 

The software library from York 10 Software consists of 
five main courses which cover standard school curriculum. 
Each study course consists of two volumes of material with 
eight cassette tapes in each volume, for a total of 144 
individual lesson plans. 

This library is only available on cassette tape because it 
contains both audio and visual presentations. The first 
cassette in each volume contains the loader used to run all 
of the lessons in that volume. As the loader is written in 
machine language, you need to follow this procedure when 
using these programs. First, insert the first cassette in the 
cassette player and rewind it. Then turn on your CoCo and 
monitor, and type CLOflDM : EXEC and press ENTER. When 
the program is loaded and running, just follow the prompts 
on the screen. 

While you are using these lesson plans, you can stop the 
program at any time by pressing the pause key on your 
cassette player. If you don't have a pause key, just stop the 
recorder. You can also rewind or fast forward the tape so 
that you can review or skip any section of the lesson plan. 

Physics is defined as the study of motion, matter and 
energy, and their interactions. Everything in our universe 
is governed by these laws. Are you curious about physics? 
What are light and sound waves? How does electricity work? 
For the answer to these and other questions, you can use 
one of the lesson plans contained in the Physics/ Science 
study course. 

Volume One takes you through the study of motion, 
matter, sound, light and optics, and wave motions. Volume 
Two takes you through the study of electrons, AC voltage, 
solid-state electronics, the elements, atomic and nuclear 
physics, and the theory of relativity. 

Although the instruction book states that these lesson 
plans are made so that students of all ages can explore these 
concepts, each lesson plan starts out by telling you that the 
study of physics is a hard subject and that you should go 
back and review any previous lessons until you have a firm 
grasp of the concepts discussed. 1 fully agree with this 
disclaimer. 

My son Eddie, who is 8 years old and in the third grade, 
was curious about this software. One night, he sat down in 
front of our CoCo and went through the Sound and the 
Light and Optics lessons. Although he finished both lessons, 
1 don't think he really comprehended the concepts that were 
being explained. 1 would, therefore, suggest that these 
lessons be used by students who are older. 

1 tried the courses on AC voltage and solid-state 
electronics. 1 was impressed. These courses are set up in such 
a way as to explain the subject matter in a concise and 
entertaining way. 

If you are curious about physics and the laws that govern 
our universe, then these programs will be very useful to you. 

(York 10 Software, 9525 Vassar Avenue, Chatsworth, CA 
9131 1; 818-700-0330, $49.95 per volume plus $3 S/H) 

— John H. Appel 



140 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Accessory Review* 



Pound Your 
Troubles Away With 
Computer Hammer 

Have you ever felt like your computer really needed a 
good beating? Well, now you can take out your frustrations 
from syntax errors and the like on your machine without 
actually damaging your valuable investment. 

What TV bricks did for television, the Computer 
Hammer does for computers. Go ahead, pound your 
computer's brains out! You'll feel much better when you Ye 
through, and your machine will still be intact. 

All thanks to the Computer Hammer, a mallet-shaped 
piece of foam rubber. No frustrated computer user should 
be without one! 



THE ORIGINAL 



COMPUTER HAMMER™ 



SOFTWARE FOR YOUR HARDWARE' 




ttfiti ft Mu*r far m»i if. 



Emptier raiittdl t 
miliaria 



Cantata r abate it food n>, 
taa MadfM of ncvftirolltd 
ftrtOftt nd toaJrivg hu bm 
■mm fe r«H«va apsralor 
Um%u atioa tar weak* M a tiiaa 




" Hi — lft# jwr/«i 

M I ftad affaeUt* wh rit u irt fti 

*<f*d«*, far aatl mulit fare* 
CiiiiiRj(« r Htmnifr within e# mf 
chcI Hhimrir Gamatrtar n 

»**r TAJ-* 1 f iiif .\p( % - 



(The Lyler Side, 511 Cottonwood, Canon City, CO 812)2; 
303-275-1640, $8.95) 

— Angela Smith 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MDNTHLV MAGAZINE 





Back copies of many issues of the 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents 
for each additional issue for postage and 
handling if sent by United Parcel Service. 
There is a $5 charge for the first issue, 
plus a $1 charge for each additional issue 
on orders sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not 
deliver to a post office box or to another 
country. 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 
are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All others are in regular magazine 
form. VISA, MasterCard and American 
Express accepted. Kentucky residents 
please add 5 percent state sales tax. In 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
and no C.O.D. orders are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To order, just fill out the form on the 
next page and mail it with your payment 
to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




February 1987 THE RAINBOW 141 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 
(Payment must accompany back issue orders. We do not bill.) 



□ Please send me the following back issues: 





MONTH 


YEAR 


VOLUME 1 


PHIGE 




NO. 












l 


JULY 


81 


PREMIER ISSUE 


w.uu 


i — i 
l_l 


2 


AUGUST 


81 




$2.UU 


i — i 
LI 


3 


SEPTEMBER 


81 


EDUCATION 


$2.00 


i — i 
l_l 


4 


OCTOBER 


81 


n n i a i t~ f~ r*\ 

PRINTER 




i — i 
U 


5 


NOVEMBER 


81 




(T n nn 

$2.00 


i — i 

u 


6 


DECEMBER 


81 


1 1 ^"™\ ■ | 1 — \ A \ / 

HOLIDAY 


$2.00 


1 — 1 

u 


7 


JANUARY 


82 




$2.00 


1 — 1 

u 


8 


FEBRUARY 


82 




$2.00 


f — 1 


9 


MARCH 


82 




$2.50 


1 — 1 

u 


10 


APRIL 


82 




(TO C A 

$2.50 


1 — 1 

u 


12 


JUNE 


82 




$2.50 


1 — 1 

u 








VOLUME 2 






1 1 


JUNE 


1 DO 


PRI NTERS 


$2.95 


1 — 1 

l_l 


12 


JULY 


■ oo 
OJ 


A A 1 A 1 1 V J 1 — O A P*\ \ / 

ANNIVERSARY 


$2.95 


1 — 1 

u 








VOLUME J 






1 


All 1 1 O T - 

AUGUST 


■ oo 


GAMES 


$2.95 


1 — 1 

u 


2 


SEPTEMBER 


i no 

83 


i~ r"\ i i a t~ i a i 

EDUCATION 


$2.95 


1 — 1 


3 


OCTOBER 


83 


/"* n a n i i ■ /"> o 

GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

u 


5 


DECEMBER 


83 


1 1 /~\ ■ 1 Ok A W 

HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

u 


8 


ft. J A 1 — 1 * 1 | 

MARCH 


84 


n i ion iroo 

BUSINESS 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

l_l 


9 


a n ^\ i ■ 

APRIL 


' O A 

84 


/""» A a a 1 a 1 /"» 

GAMING 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

u 


10 


MAY 


84 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

u 


1 1 


JUNE 


84 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


1 — 1 


12 


i i i ■ \ / 

JULY 


84 


A A 1 A 1 1 1 J I - O A I - \ \ / 

ANNIVERSARY 


$3.95 


1 — 1 








t i i iinr A 

VOLUME 4 






1 


All 1 1 O T" 

AUGUST 


84 


GAMES 


$3.95 


1 — 1 


2 


it* r~ r™n~ r~ 1 jnr n 

SEPTEMBER 


r Q /I 

84 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

u 


3 


OCTOBER 


'0 A 

84 


GRAPHICS 


(TO AC 

$3.95 


1 — 1 

u 


4 


NOVEMBER 


84 


f->« ATA i 11 j 

DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

(_J 


5 


DECEMBER 


84 


i i /~\ i i r~\ a \ / 

HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

□ 


6 


1 A A 1 1 1 A I - \ \ / 

JANUARY 


85 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 


7 


FEBRUARY 


85 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


8 


MARCH 


85 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

□ 


9 


A 1 — » I — 1 | | 

APRIL 


85 


Olfc.41 II A *1~ i /™\ A 1 O 

SIMULATIONS 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

□ 


10 


MAY 


85 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


1 1 


ii it ir 

JUNE 


85 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


1 2 


J 1 II w 

JULY 


85 


ANNIVERSARY 


$3.95 


1 — 1 








VOLUME 5 






1 


All 1 1 T~ 

AUGUST 


85 


GAMES 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


2 


SEPTEMBER 


85 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


3 


OCTOBER 


85 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

□ 


4 


NOVEMBER 


1 oc 

85 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


1 — 1 

□ 


6 


j a a 1 1 i a r*\ \ / 

JANUARY 


'OC 

86 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


7 


f - r~ n i~ \ i i a n \ / 

FEBRUARY 


' o c 

86 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


1 1 

□ 


8 


M AHL/H 


8b 


ni i o i a i r~ o o 

BUolNEbo 


$3.95 


1 — 1 


y 




OO 


unuc LJCI D 
MUMb HbLr 1 


$j.y5 


1 — 1 

u 


10 


MAY 


'86 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


□ 


11 


JUNE 


'86 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ 


12 


JULY 


'86 


ANNIVERSARY 


$3.95 


□ 








VOLUME 6 






1 


AUGUST 


'86 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 


2 


SEPTEMBER 


'86 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


□ 


3 


OCTOBER 


'86 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


□ 


4 


NOVEMBER 


'86 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


5 


DECEMBER 


'86 


HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


□ 


6 


JANUARY 


'87 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 


7 


FEBRUARY 


'87 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


□ 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index lo our first three years, July 1981 
through June 1984. is printed in its entirety in our July 1984 issue. 
Separately bound copies are also available$2.50 □ 

Note: Our Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes, including RAINBOW ON TAPE 
indexes, are included in the July 1985 and 1986 issues, respectively. 



TOTAL 

KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

U.S. MAIL CHARGE 

SHIPPING & HANDLING 

U.P.S. CHARGE 

TOTAL AMOUNT 

ENCLOSED 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed, or charge to my: 

□ visa □ mc Dae 

CARD # 

EXPIRATION DATE PHONE » 

SIGNATURE 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309. 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Software Review t ^^^^^^^^^^^^S^^/^\ 

Studies in the Parables 
Provides the Framework 
for Bible Study 

Studies in the Parables is a welcome addition to the 
growing selection of Bible-based programs, and another 
fine offering from the Rev. Mark S. Camp and Sovereign 
Grace Software. 

Like other Sovereign Grace programs, Studies in the 
Parables consists of disk text files along with a printing 
utility. The text files may be printed out on any word 
processor or by using the built-in text processor. 

There are a lot of big words one can use when talking 
about the study of the Holy Scripture, but Mark Camp 
doesn't use them and I don't either. 

I will make no attempt to judge or comment on the 
theology of these studies. I only want to evaluate their use 
in a general way. They are good solid outlines written by 
a man who knows the subject matter. 

Speaking of that aspect, the Studies in the Parables are 
simple, straightforward theology, written in a clear and 
concise style. 

This program is of great value to Bible teachers, students 
and to people who may be interested in the study of 
scripture. The material on the disk could be used for a series 
of expository sermons on the Parables, or simply used as 
the framework for further study. 

Mark Camp says he hopes we will use the disk as a 
"skeleton, on which (we) can hang (our) own meat." I can 
see that as a very good use. Mark has essentially prepared 
a good study around which we can build a commentary. The 
folks at my storefront church will be having a series based 
on Mark's outline. I suppose that is why he took all the time 
to prepare the study — to send it into the world to teach. 

(Sovereign Grace Software, 221 Highview Drive, Ballwin, 
MO 63011; 314-227-3238, $9.95) 

— Howard Lee Ball 



Hint . . , 

Attractive Solution 

After finding out the price of a bulk tape eraser, I 
decided there must be another way to accomplish 
complete erasure of tapes. A quick look in the junk 
box yielded just the right tool — a magnetic mount 
for a CB antenna. Any large magnet should do. Just 
rub the magnet in a circular motionseveral times over 
the tape on both sides. You can then use the tape to 
record sound or data. Though 1 haven't tried it yet, 
this should also work with VCR recording tape. Be 
sure to store and use the magnet far away from your 
tape collection so that you don't inadvertently erase 
other tapes, too. 

Jack Demaree 
Versailles, IN 



142 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Software R e vie rr^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_77TN 

Pick a Winner With 
The Lottery Player 

Jf you are like millions of other people, you may have 
spent a buck or two on a lottery. Twenty-two states and the 
District of Columbia, along with Canada and Australia, are 
currently operating lotteries. Their popularity and increased 
revenue are attracting more and more states to consider 
them as ways to supplement declining tax bases. 

Suzanne Spencer Software now offers for your 64K Color 
Computer The Lottery Player, which claims to increase the 
chances of winning lotteries. The program is available on 
either tape or disk and is not copy-protected, so backup 
copies are no problem. The purchaser should specify what 
state or national lottery version is wanted when the order 
is placed. 

Most people who play lotteries select numbers based on 
some scheme like their birthday, social security number, 
address or other combination of numbers. Sometimes you 
might get lucky, but the odds of winning using such picks 
are very slim. Dave Gentry, the author of The Lottery 
Player, has done some serious studying in the area of 
mathematical probabilities and has developed a unique 
computerized approach to selecting lottery picks. The 
methods that Dave discusses in the 10-page set of instruc- 
tions require that you utilize the method of Wheeling 
Numbers. This method, along with the purchasing of 
multiple Lotto tickets each week, will help you become a 
winner. The author is wise to point out that while there is 
no guaranteed return for the money you invest, you will see 
an improvement in your winnings that can be verified before 
any money is spent by keeping track of the winning numbers 
for a period of time. 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Hexdump is a short program that will present a 
hexadecimal output to your screen of the contents of 
a given block of memory. Just enter the start and end 
addresses of the block of memory you wish to see. 

The listing: 

1J3 INPUT " S TART ADDRESS: ";X:INPU 
T 11 END ADDRESS: 11 ;Y:FOR Z=X TO Y 
STEP 8 : PRINT HEX$ ( Z ) ;" : " ; : FOR W 
=Z TO Z+7:M$=HEX$(PEEK(W) ) :IF LE 
N(M$) =lTHENM$="j3 l, +M$ : PRINT M$ ; 11 
11 ;: NEXT W: PRINT: NEXT Z : GOTO10 : EL 
SE PRINT M$; n " ;:NEXT W: PRINT :NE 
XT Z:GOT01j3 

John Wells 
Herndon, VA 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



The program requires that the user enter the winning 
lottery numbers each week in the program's data state- 
ments. In this way the computer is able to determine the 
most frequently called numbers, which forms the basis of 
the Wheeling system. 

Wheeling systems take a set of numbers and thencombine 
them into various combinations of six numbers each. All 
of the possible combinations are not used because most of 
us could not afford the cost of the thousands of tickets 
needed. There are normally 38 to42sets of six numberseach 
that are derived, and the program produces a sufficient 
number of combinations to give an increased chance of 
winning. Since the odds of winning first place are slim, the 
best this program can do is improve those odds and increase 
your chances of winning second, third and fourth place 
money. You may not win the big one but the small stuff adds 
up, too! 

The Lottery Player uses the abbreviated Wheeling system 
so the average player can afford the cost of the weekly 
lottery tickets. The program allows you to select 12, 14, 16 
or 18 numbers that will be Wheeled into 38, 40 or 42 
combinations of six numbers each. Three methods of 
number selection are used and shown in the five main menu 
options. 

In Option 1, you are prompted to pick up to 18 numbers 
and the numbers are Wheeled. 

Option 2 allows you to select the last 10-week period that 
you have winning Lotto ticket numbers for. Since it utilizes 
only the last 60 numbers that have been drawn, it is often 
considered the best way to select the "hot" numbers. This 
option analyzes the winning numbers from the last 10 weeks 
and selects only those numbers which have appeared more 
than twice in that period. Ticket combinations are presented 
on the screen and to the printer if you want. 

In Option 3, the computer generates the most frequent 
numbers that have appeared between a beginning and 
ending period. These numbers are then compared to the 
amount of numbers you chose for Wheeling purposes and 
all of the other numbers are discarded. The various ticket 
combinations are displayed on the screen or to the printer. 

Selecting Option 4 lets CoCo analyze any of the three 
methods chosen using data from the previous weeks of 
winning numbers. You can see the number of tickets 
Wheeled and the cost of those tickets. 

The final option sends a chart to your printer and shows, 
graphically, the frequency that each number in your lottery 
appeared in the previous weeks. 

This program does a lot with lottery information. It 
utilizes the CoCo and an optional printer to take full 
advantage of the Wheeling Number System. I urge any of 
you who play lotteries on a regular basis to use this program 
to improve your chances of winning. With this software, a 
CoCo and weekly purchases of lottery tickets, you may 
become the first millionaire on your block! 



(Suzanne Spencer Software, 4176 47th Ave. NE, Salem, OR 
97305; 503-390-6664, tape $21 .95; disk $24.95) 4 

— David Gerald 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 43 



Software R e vie wa^Z^^^^^^^^^^^^^TV^N 

Create Labels With 
Ultra Label Maker 

I like to think of myself as an organized and precise 
individual. However, when it comes to labeling disks in my 
rather large disk library or addressing a quick envelope to 
rainbow magazine, I always seem to be just barely able to 
scribble it down with my trusty, felt-tipped pen. Well, look 
out world, now that I'm armed with Ultra Label Maker 
from Bob van der Poel Software, no more fooling around 
with handwritten scribbles. I can now, with very little effort, 
create the neatest labels you have ever seen. (Last I heard, 
my wife and kids were drafting a letter of thanks to Bob.) 

Ultra Label Maker comes in either a cassette or disk 
version, requires 32K Extended BASIC and is not copy- 
protected. One of its most important features is its 
compatiblity with any and all printers. Owning a DMP-120, 
I usually suffer heavily when purchasing any printer-related 
software. This program is one of the few exceptions. The 
software allows this compatibility by letting you create your 
own printer driver. However, unlike some programs with 
the same option, you do not have to be a programmer or 
hacker to generate the driver. The Ultra Label Maker disk 
also contains a program called Fontedit which takes you 
step by step through the creation of your own printer driver. 
Fontedit lets you set up from one to nine control code 



BACK TO COMPUTING! 


Name Brand 

DISKS 
$1.00 

DS DDw/Tyvek Sleeves 
Buy 5 gel FREE Case 
Buy 10 -Color Case 

C-10 Cosseftes 59c 


Dot Matrix/Graphics 

PRINTER 
$239 

Panasonic 10801 

109tionly 
S279 


SOFTWARE 

CLEARANCE 

Games up to 50% 
Books/Others20% 
CoCo Maxll w/Y 
Cable S95 


Composite 

MONITORS 

star! at 
$79 

12" HiRES Amber 

13" REB Analog .Call 

14" Color/Sound .S159 


5V« 40-Track Slim 

DISK DRIVES 

$90 

Teac FD 55 BV 
W/Case/Pwr $139 


Smart Auto 

MODEM 

$189 

300/1200 Baud 
Hayes Comp 
Free $30 Cable! 


SYSTEMS 

IBM XT 
Compatible 

$499 

256K Kit/1 35W PS/ 
Bnh Keybd/Color/ 
FlipCase/360K Drive 


MISCELLANEOUS 

Keyboards from S25 
Disk Cases/60 S16 
Printer Intf S40 
Video Driver S29 
Power Slrip S16 
Swivel Base S 16 
Catolog Free 


PARTS 

•EPROMS -ROMS 

•CONTROLLERS 
• MEMORY DRAMS 
•CABLES -KITS -ICS 
•PAPER -LABELS 
•RIBBONS 
•DAISY WHEELS 


POLYGON COMPUTERS 

1316 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 206 
Los Angeles, CA 9001 7 

(21 3) 483-4406 Shipping Charges: 
Catlt. res. add 6'/?% fax 2% or $3.00 mln. 
All prices subject Monitors/Printers 
to change/stock avail. Hardware extra 



144 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



sequences for printer functions such as Italics, NLQ, Elite, 
Condensed and others. What's more, when you run the 
actual Label program it allows you to mix and match any 
of the fonts for each and every line. It even takes into 
account the different type sizes, such as "expanded" and 
adjusts the number of characters allowed on the line. 

The program also lets you set the size of the labels, 
allowing for any size mailing label or other label on the 
market. I have some rather large 5-by- 1 .5-inch labels and 
it handled them perfectly. As with the font styles above, the 
number of characters prompted for on each line changes 
with the size of the label. Also, the data entered may be 
automatically centered, left or right justified or left as is at 
your discretion. Of course, each label can be saved for 
reprinting or modifications at a later date. 

At this point, I have described what is possibly one of 
the most user-friendly and practical label-making programs 
on the market today. However, Mr. van der Poel didn't stop 
there, but added two more options to further enhance the 
program. One option is called Merge File Print, which sets 
up a label "mask" using the features I described earlier and 
has the program read an ASCII file of names and addresses, 
and generate a label for each. Each blank line in the mask 
is replaced by a line from the ASCII file. This means you 
could put fixed information in the mask to appear on every 
label and input the remaining variable information from the 
file. The file is easily created with any word processor 
capable of ASCII output. 

The other option allows each label to be printed with a 
sequential number for raffle, event or hat-check tickets. The 
starting number and increments are user-definable to the 
point of allowing a negative increment and the placing of 
the number anywhere within the label. 

By now, you may have guessed that I was impressed by 
this program. For those of you who have TelePatch, also 
by Mr. van der Poel, you already know the forethought and 
precise planning that goes into his products. Being a 
professional programmer myself, I really appreciate a 
quality piece of software when I find it. Also included with 
the program is an extremly clear and well-written manual 
ranking among the best documentation I have seen in a long 
time. If you need to create labels of any kind, you couldn't 
possibly go wrong with Ultra Label Maker. 

(CMD Micro Computer Services, 10447 124th Street, 
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5N 1R7; 403-488-7109, 
$14.95) 

— Ken Boyle 

Hint ... 

Great Racks, CoCo Stacks 

Several department stores carry small metal grid 
racks that fit onto 1 your cupboard or closet shelves. 
They are intended to hold such things as plates, towels 
or just about anything. With that in mind, I decided 
to use one to hold my CoCo equipment. It works 
' perfectly! Just place it right over your CoCo (many 
of them even work well if you have a Multi-Pak 
Interface) and set your monitor and/ or disk drives on 
them. Buy two and use one for your printer. These 
racks are great and, best of all, they are very inexpen- 
sive! 

Stephen A. Haughey, M.D. 
Whitefish Bay, Wl 



Software Review. 



Get the Total Picture 
With Puzzle Math 



Only a generation ago one of the major ways of drilling 
math facts was the use of the flash card. The problem was 
written on one side of the card and the answer was on the 
other. The student used the cards individually or the teacher 
used them in class, many times in the form of a game. With 
the advent of the microcomputer, software authors began 
writing drill-type software that mimicked the flash card. 
Numerous programs have been written that provide drill of 
math facts. These are available either commercially or in 
past issues of THE RAINBOW. Certainly, one could easily 
argue that we don't need any more math drill programs. 
However, for those who might be looking for a program 
that would also make the process of reviewing math facts 
interesting and fun for the child, consider Puzzle Math by 
SECA. 

Puzzle Math, which requires 64K with Disk Extended 
Color BASIC and one disk drive, does everything that the 
old flash cards did and more. Each time the student answers 
the problem correctly, a piece of a picture (puzzle) is 
displayed. Thus, there is an incentive to keep answering the 
questions in order to see the complete picture. The program 
disk comes with 18 pictures that the computer randomly 
selects at the beginning of the program. 

Puzzle Math starts out with a menu of the four math 
functions — addition, subtraction, multiplication and 
division. Having selected one of these functions, the next 
menu prompts for the range of difficulty. There are four 
ranges of difficulty, approximately corresponding with 
grades two through five. The third and final menu prompts 
for the number of puzzle pieces (problems), 8, 12, 16, 24 
or 48. 





After answering all of the prompts, a graphics screen 
appears and presents five possible answers from which to 
choose the correct one. If the correct answer is entered, the 
screen reveals another puzzle piece; if an incorrect answer 



is entered , you are given a second chance to enter the correct 
answer. The program continues in this manner until all 
pieces have been revealed. Then, a score card is shown that 
gives the total problems attempted, number of problems 
answered correctly and the number of problems answered 
incorrectly. 

Now you are probably thinking all this sounds great, but 
what happens when the child gets tired of the 18 pictures 
provided with the program? No problem! Simply use any 
picture that is drawn in either PNODE 3 or PMODE 4 by any 
of the popular graphics editors. Simply rename the picture 
as PICT7V.BIN, where N is a number between one and 18, 
and copy it to the program disk. Details for this procedure 
are provided in the manual. 

Puzzle Math is a very good piece of software that does 
exactly what is claimed. The 18 pictures are very detailed 
drawings that are of interest to children. One aspect that 
I did not like was with the 3rd and 4th levels of difficulty 
for both multiplication and division. Too many of the 
problems were of the form N x 1, N/ 1, and N/N. In my 
opinion, such problems are much too easy for a fourth or 
fifth grader. Otherwise, Puzzle Math is a very good program 
that 1 would recommend for young children. I should also 
note that SECA includes a free box of 10 DS/DD disks 
with the purchase of Puzzle Math. 

(SECA, Southeastern Computer Arts, P.O. Box 3134, 
Gulfport, MS 39505; 601-832-8236, $24.95) 

— Donald Dollberg 



ADOS 



ENHANCED, EPROM-ABLE 
DISK BASIC 



now you can supercharge Basic wiin an impressive array ol extra leaiures 
WITHOUT sacnliCing compatibility' ADOS is compatible wiin viriually 10X3% ol 
commercial soliwaie Customizing utilities arc provided to allow user-aetinea 
commana abbreviations, baud raie. step rate, tracks per disk (35 or d0). support ol 
double Sided drives and more Alte' customizing ADOS, you can nave it burned into 
an EPROm inat plugs mio me Oisv Basic ROM socket, or just use it m RAM as a 6<ik 
OiSK uiilify (EPROM ■» bummg will cost about 520-we provide mlormanon 
concerning now you can nave this done) Feaiures include - * repeat and edit of tne 
last ri;reci moO€ command • 26 definable control key abbreviations • automatic line 
number prompts • DOS command 'lowercase command entry (a tine complement io 
a Lowe/Kii r u P8J WordPak) • COPY (liienamc> 10 (drive number) • AE error override 
ophon ■ RAM command (64KI ■ HUNM command • text echoing 10 printer • ML 
monitor • to.xt Me scan • ennanced directory • cr-or trapping • rvrcs text utility 
included (42. Si. or 64 cnaraciers per imcj 

COULONOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THA T WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS " 

THE RAIN80W. December 1984 
-I LOVE ADOSI . . . A GENUINELY FIRST RATE PRODUCT." 

Color Micro Journal. February 1985 
WON'T PART WITH mY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING ... NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS." 

Hoi CoCo.May 1985 

Oiak 127. 9S 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 



Monitor maenme language programs AS 7h£y ARE Running 1 Peeper actually 
nmesnares with tne larget program, giving FULL CONTROL as ML programs run 
Switcn instantly between waicnmg regular program output and Poeper's trace o' 
registers and stack on screen or printer. Inspect memory m any ol 26dispiay mooes 
Execution speed can be varied irom tuli speed to tne barest crawl, or na'ted emireiy. 
as Programs run Smgie siepping oreakpoims memory or register exammercnange 
Relocatable, supports 6<iK usw t t6K required) See February 8S review 
Olsk S23.9S Tape 12V9S Assombtor source listing Add 3.00 

NEW FOR COC03 

CUSTOM CABLE FOR MAGNA VOX RGB MONITORS 

f ho Mognavox BCM515 and 8CM50S monitors, containing RGBA. RGBi. and audio 
inputs, sell at prices comparable to Tandy's CM-8. and represent a tar better buy 
forCoCo3uaers. Composite Input, which CM-8lacks. is required lor seeing PMODE 
4 displays in color. RGBI allows iho Magnavox. unlike the CM-B. to be used with 
PC-Compatibles — a big resale consideration ...Cable 19.95 




. , ...... . ,, . 11111 N Kendall Drive. 

SPECTROSYSTEMSy — U^r Suite A108 

w — ->1- / — Miami. Florida 33176 

No tiolFay on personal checks (305) 274-3699 '.^ly o« 

Please add £200 shipping Sorry no credit cards or CODz ' vr J 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 45 



Book RevieWi 



Clue Yourself in With 
The Guidebook for 
Winning A dventures 

By Eric Tilenius 

On the front cover of The Guidebook for Winning 
Adventures by David and Sandy Small is a message written 
in small white type: "If you haven't discovered Adventure 
games, you don't know what you're missing. If you have, 
you need help!" And help is just what this bookTs about. 

In the past, lone computer Adventurers have had two 
choices when baffled by some puzzling situation — scream 
and try to work it out on their own, which could indeed 
take months; or madly call a friend at 2 a.m. and ask for 
help. Somehow, I always got stuck doing the former, as 
calling friends at two in the morning provoked rather 
unfriendly remarks. The matter was made worse when 
Infocom entered the CoCo Adventure scene. Infocom's 
games were just so wonderfully addictive, I often ended up 
agonizing over mysteries for days on end. But, just as 
matters seemed to get worse, they suddenly improved. 

Enter 7he Guidebook for Winning Adventures. It gives 
hints, clues, maps and outright solutions to some of 
Infocom's fabulous games. These games (all available for 
the Color Computer from either Radio Shack or Infocom) 
are Enchanter, Infidel, Planetfall, and Zork I, II and ///. 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

A DIVISION OF BATAMATCH, INC. 



PROGRAMMERS 
D I SK 




UJOUJ ! 



± 12* FOR 
512* FOR 
± 12*0 FOR 

W/SLEEVES, LABELS, N.P. TABS 
HADE JN USA! CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. 
5 YEAR WARRANTY 



DISKS 



10/$8.95 



6/S28.00 
4/S22.00 

DOZ/S22.00 
4/S10.00 

DOZ/S22.00 

6/S34.00 
4/S25.00 



FACTORY PUNCHED - USE BOTH SIDES 
PRINTER RIBBONS 

EPSON MX/RX/FX 70/80 $5.00 Ea. 

RED, GREEN, BROWN, BLUE $6.00 Ea. 

GEMINI tOMOX/SGtO $2.00 Ea 

GEM/OK I COLORS $3.00 Ea. 

OKI DATA 80/82/92/93 $2.00 Ea. 
C.ITOH.NEC 8023, APPLE 

DMP/IMAGEWRITER $6.00 Ea. 

RED. GREEN, BROWN, BLUE $6.50 Ea. 

ALL ITEMS 100% GUARANTEED 

Add $2.50S/Hin U.SA - Canada Add $3.50 + $1. 00/ L B 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

23552 PLYMOUTH, REDFORD, HI 48239 

(313) 255-9B50 

Send Card Number & Exp. Date Min. Charae Order $20.00 





Both the authors and I suggest not looking at the outright 
solutions until you have completed the Adventure, as being 
handed the solution takes all the fun out of an Adventure. 
The book also offers tips on Adventures in general and 
includes a brief section on how Adventure games are 
written. These sections are not very detailed, but provide 
a background in Adventures for those not familiar with 
them. 

The main bulk of this book — 299 pages, to be exact — 
is devoted to giving clues to the six Adventures mentioned 
above. These sections are similar to the InvisiClues booklets 
marketed by Infocom. There are, however, two chief 
differences between The Guidebook and Infocom's In- 
visiClues: One works to this book's advantage, and the other 
to its detriment. The first difference is cost. InvisiClues 
provides hints to just one Infocom game and costs $7.95, 
while for $9.95, The Guidebook gives hints and maps to six 
games. 

The publisher, however, had a problem with The 
Guidebook: Namely, how to hide the clues so that a reader 
didn't ruin his game by looking down a page and seeing all 
the answers to all the puzzles. The InvisiClues, as its name 
suggests, accomplishes this by putting clue answers in 
invisible ink and providing a decoding pen. This technique, 
however, would be far too costly in a 300-plus page book. 
Instead, the authors provided scrambled answers to clue 
questions. Thus, if you are stuck in a certain part of an 
Adventure, you need only find the appropriate question in 
the clue book that describes the situation and unscramble 
(by means of the given key) the answer to this question. 

For instance, if you were playing Planetfall and wanted 
to find out how to fix the broken coolant system, you would 
simply turn to the chapter on Planetfall, find the section 
on The Tower Core Area (which is where the coolant system 
is located), then look for the question, "How can 1 fix the 
coolant system?" Unscramble the scrambled clue, and voila! 

After using The Guidebook for a while, I soon became 
quite weary of unscrambling clues by hand. That's when I 
wrote the program enclosed with this review. Simply RUN 
this program and type in the scrambled sentence. In the 
blink of an eye, the plain Englishclue appears on your CoCo 
screen. I also found that using this program forced me to 
try a situation before turning to the book for help, since 
I had to save my position in the Adventure and QUIT before 
1 could run my decoder. The program is a real relief if you 
buy this book — give it a try. 



J2> 
1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 

lj3 



* REQUIRES EXTENDED BASIC * 
THIS PROGRAM WILL TRANSLATE 
THE ENCODED HINTS IN THE 
BOOK "THE GUIDEBOOK FOR 
WINNING ADVENTURES" BY 
DAVID AND SANDY SMALL. WITH 
THIS PROGRAM, YOU CAN DE- 
CODE THE CLUES ON YOUR COCO 
AND SAVE LOTS OF TIME & 
EFFORT. >BY ERIC TILENIUS 
CLEAR 12j30 



15 CLS 

2j3 FOR C=65 TO 9fS 
3j3 A$=A$+CHR$(C) 
4j3 NEXT C 
5j3 LINE INPUT "TRANS LATE >" ;B$ 



146 THE RAINBOW February 1987 




60 PRINT 

7j3 FOR C=l TO LEN (B$) 
8j3 M$=MID$(B$,C,1) 

9j3 IF INSTR{1,A$,M$)>0 THEN M$=C 
HR$(ASC(M$)-1) :IF ASC(M$)=64 THE 
N M$= l, Z tl 

95 MID$(B$,C,1)=M$ 

10 NEXT C 

lip PRINT"* " ;B$ 

120 PRINT: PRINT "HIT ANY KEY TO R 
ESTART" ; 

130 IF INKEY$=" "THEN 13£ ELSE RU 
N 

One thing I like about The Guidebook is that it has 
different levels of clues foreach question. The first clue gives 
a gentle nudge in the right direction, the second a big push, 
and the third clue usually tells you the answer straight out. 
This way, you get only the clues needed. Sometimes the first 
clue is a bit sarcastic. For instance, upon de-scrambling the 
first clue to the question, "What is the chemical dispenser 
used for?" one is greeted with the very helpful clue, 
"dispensing chemicals"! 

In addition to the clues, The Guidebook offers a list oi 
all the objects used in the Adventure and their purposes, 
a section containing maps of each Adventure, and an "Ordei 
of Play," which gives the complete step-by-step solution to 
each Adventure. 

With the aid of a couple of friends, I tested a major 
portion of the hints given by this book and found the book 
to be quite comprehensive as far as providing the answers 
to any possible question a player might have. I checked the 
maps in the book against those I had drawn up and found 
that those, too, seemed complete and accurate. 

I did come across a few errors in the step-by-step solution 
section, though. For instance, under the section for 
Planet/all, you are told to get out of the safety webbing after 
the pod lands under water. If you wait this long while 
playing the game, though, you'll never make it to the 
surface. You must get out when the pod first starts to sink. 
In another case, you aretold to put the flask in the machine 
shop, and then later told to pick it up while in the "Corridor 
Junction." Boy, that flask moves fast! However, with a few 
minor exceptions such as these, the step-by-step solutions 
worked and even gave the correct number of points you 
obtained for each puzzle. 

Despite the annoyance of having to unscramble clues 
(made easier by the program below), and the few minor 
inaccuracies this book contains, I would recommend it to 
anyone who has, or is planning on buying, any two or more 
of these games. If you only have one of these games and 
aren't planning to buy more, Infocom's InvisiCIues is 
cheaper and easier to use. However, this book is a great 
companion to any Adventure game lover, and, unlike the 
InvisiCIues, can be passed on to a friend who is having 
troubles with other games. 




51 X 24 
Display with 

Lower Case 



Two-way communications 
with PRO-COLOR-FILE 
• Enhanced ' 



(David and Sandy Small, Baen Enterprises, 8 West 36 
Street, New York, NY 10018; 212-947-8244, $9.95) 



Derringer Software, Inc 

P.O. Box 5300 
Florence, SC 29502-5300 



To place an order by phone, 
Call: (803) 665-5676 



Check. Money Order. VISA or Master Card 
Souih Carolina residents add sales tax 



Include $3.00 for UPS Shipping — 
$5.00 U.S. Mail — $9.00 Air Mail 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 147 



Software Review! 



VIP Writer Enhancer 
Provides Helpful Additions 



If you use VIP Writer, this BASIC utility from Foxx 
Software will interest you. It allows you to use text files 
created by VIP Writer in another context, such as uploading 
them to a BBS. Or if you prefer, you can download files 
from another word processor or BBS and modify them for 
use with VIP Writer. 

VIP Writer Enhancer reads any text file from disk and 
then modifies it as specified and creates a new corrected file 
while leaving the original intact. 

The program is very easy to use. After running it, you 
are greeted with the Main Menu. A full complement of 
options is available to allow you to perform other useful 
disk functions without exiting to BASIC. 

The first option allows you to Convert VIPio ASCII files. 
Since VIP Writer does not add a carriage return at the end 
of a line, problems are likely to occur when trying to upload 
to a BBS or read a K/P file on another word processor. Since 
each paragraph is saved as one long continous line, you'll 
get a rather cluttered text file on any other word processor. 
This option adds carriage returns at the line length specified 
at the prompt and also enables word wrap. 

The next option is converting ASCII to VIP files. It 
removes carriage returns so when reading a file into VIP 
Writer it will be readable again. Without this option, re- 
formatting the VIP file would be a real chore. 

A handy option allows you to convert to mixed-case that 
modifing a file written in all uppercase and changing it to 
lowercase, leaving only the beginnings of sentences 
capitalized. It can't recognize proper names, though, but 
you can easily correct that in your word processor. This is 
nice in those cases where you downloaded a file from a BBS 
that doesn't use lowercase. The next two options allow you 
to convert to all upper- or lowercase. You might want to 
use these options for uploading to a BBS that requires all 
uppercase or all lowercase. 

Remove Control Characters comes in handy when mixing 
files from various word processors where control codes are 
likely to be different. It's also handy for fixing downloaded 
files from BBS's. 

The Rename File option is like basic, but easier to use. 
Just follow the prompts. The Kill File option is also like 
BASIC, but prompts help prevent accidental killing of files. 

View File displays any file on the screen. Uses the space 
bar to start and stop and the up/ down arrows to go forward 
or backward one screen at a time. Count File displays the 
character count of any file. Drive # selects what drive your 
files are in, and Exit To Writer restarts VIP Writer if a copy 
of VIP Writer is on the enhancer disk, or if VIP Writer is 
in Drive 0. 

A feature I liked was the default file extension automat- 
ically added by the program. This results in a quick and 
accurate way to determine which files have been modified. 
When you select any of the options you will be prompted 
with FILENAME ? After the program reads in the filename, 



it asks you NEN NRME 9 For example, if you had a VIP file 
on your disk named TEST. VIP and you selected option I, 
you would answer the FILENAME 7 prompt with TEST. The 
file TEST .VIP would be read in and then you would be asked 
NEHNAME 7 By simply typing TEST, the program adds the 
extension A5C to TEST so that the new file is called 
TEST . A5C. 

VIP URITER ENHANCER 
BY DAVE HABER 

<C) 1588 FOKX SOFTWARE 

1> CONVERT VIP TO ASCII FILE 
K2> CONVERT ASCII TO VIP FILE 

CONVERT TO MIXED CASE 
k4> CONVERT TO ALL UPPER CASE 
CONVERT TO ALL LOU ER C ASE 
REMOVE CONTROL CHARACTERS 



< R > E N A M E FILE 
^KHLL FILE 
KVMEM FILE 
C OUNT FILE 



<EMTER> JIR 
<D>RIVE ft 
<E>XIT TO WRITER 
<Q>UIT TO BASIC 



The automatic extensions are .A5C (convert VIP to 
ASCII file), .VIP (convert ASCII to VIP file), .MXC 
(convert to mixed case), .AUC (convert to all uppercase), 
.ALC (convert to all lowercase), . RCC (remove control 
characters) and .NEW (rename). 

A six-page, spiral-bound notebook provides complete 
and easy to understand documentation. Instructions are 
provided to allow the user to customize the program. You 
can change the default extensions, characters per line, 
highest valid drive and display options. 

This program is a nice addition to VIP Writer. It provides 
some helpful additions to an already popular program. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc, P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $19.95 plus $3 S/H) 

—Jerry Semones 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest-Chicago 

April 10-12 



148 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 




Software Rrviny 

Getting the Max 

From MiniDOS9 

In this day and age when many utility programs claim 
to do everything from whitening your teeth to picking up 
the kids after school, it is very refreshing to see a program 
developed that claims little but does everything it states — 
perfectly. This program is Cir-Pak Limited 's MiniDOS9. 
MiniDOS9 is a utility package that allows Cir-Pak Limited's 
SC68008 coprocessor card to communicate with OS-9. You 
must have both the coprocessor card and OS-9 to have any 
benefit from this package. 

MiniDOS9 can best be described as a "mini" monitor that 
allows one to communicate directly with the SC68008 card. 
The monitor contains what I consider to be the core routines 
that are necessary to debug software and gain an insight into 
the internal workings of a microprocessor-based system. 
There are essentially three types of commands that 
MiniDOS9 allows you to perform: memory display and 
alteration, program loading and execution, and software 
debugging. Ail commands are one keystroke in length and 
are entered from the main menu. 

The memory commands allow for the displaying and 
changing of single bytes, the copying of blocks of memory 
from one place to another and the dumping of 80 contiguous 
memory locations to the screen. Typically, one tells the 
monitor which memory location he would like to work with 
and then is allowed to either display the contents of that 
location (or locations), change its value or bump the 
memory location pointer. The program loading and 
execution commands are quite simple, but necessary. One 
can load data from the CoCo's memory to the SC68008 and 
from the SC68008 back into the CoCo. Program execution 
is also made possible. 



The software debugging commands are what I found the 
most useful. They allow the user to trace a program's 
execution and stop at any point in the program, or to step 
through each instruction one at a time. The user is allowed 
to place up to five breakpoints in the code that is to be 
debugged. Whenever one of the breakpoints is encountered 
by the program, it halts and gives control back to the 
monitor. The user can then either check the status of the 
program by dumping the registers or he can manipulate the 
program or address space. The program can then be 
resumed with a single keystroke. If one finds that he wants 
to check a particular area of the code but doesn't like the 
idea of constantly setting and resetting breakpoints, he can 
cause the program to go into single step mode. From here, 
each instruction is executed singly and then control is given 
back to the monitor. These are essential commands if one 
wants to debug machine language programs. 

In addition to the three types of commands, there are 
provisions to execute any of the normal OS-9 commands 
from the monitor. This is done by invoking the shell from 
inside the monitor. Two of the normal OS-9 commands, chx 
and chd, are provided directly from the monitor so that a 
shell invocation does not have to take place. 

To those who own an SC68008, MiniDOS9 is one of those 
few basic necessities that one should not be caught without. 
I had no problems with the documentation, since there was 
very little printed materia! (none was really needed). I had 
no problems with the software itself and found everything 
to be exactly as I had expected. 

MiniDOS9 does not claim to do everything, but what it 
does do, it does very well. It is casually elegant. 

(Cir-Pak Ltd., P.O. Box 410, Varennes, Quebec, Canada 
JOL 2P0. Also available from Orbit Electronics, P.O. Box 
613, Derby Line, VT 05830; 819-876-2926. Coprocessor 
card, assembled and tested with 256K DRAM, $399 U.S.; 
MiniDOS9, $59 U.S. plus $4 S/H) 

— J. Kleinwaechter 



PRINTERS! 

NE W! Okidata 192+ (Par. or Ser.) ..... s 370 

NE Wl Okidata 193 (Parallel) ............ s 540 

NEW! Okidata 193+ (Serial) ............. s 6 10 

Okimate 20 Color Printer. s 1 35 

Fujitsu 2100 (80 col.) MlO 

Fujitsu 2200(132 col.) S S20 

Toshiba 321 (Par. or Ser) $ 5!0 

Qume Lecterpro 20 (Letcer Qual.) ..... M45 

Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) s 240 

Silver Reed 600 (Daisy Wheel) s 575 

(Add *10 Shipping for Primers) 



ACCESSORIES! 

Taxan 1 2" Green Monitor $ 125 

Taxan I 2" Amber Monitor s 1 35 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot (80 coi.) *30 

Tabic Top Printer Stand 

w/Siot (132 col.) x 45 

Stand w/Diskette Storage (80 col.) s 47 

Stand w/Diskette Storage (1 32 col.) $ 57 

Other Primers. Monicors. and Accessories for CoCo 
and IBM upon request. 

4 15 off interface with purchase of printer. 

j Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it!!! 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL to HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) s 235 

Drive 0, 1 (addressed as A drives!) *350 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives 1 1 09 

Dual '/a Height Case w/ Power Supply s 49 

Double Sided Adapter l 2S 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions s 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes $ 32 & *3 s/h 

WeusetheHDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs; s 5/dhve or power supply, MO max. 
Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft — MO. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft — *20. 
Other cables on request. (Add ^3*° shipping) 



SP-2 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19.200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ( s 5 00 extra) frees parallel 
port for use with other computers 

■ S 49 9S (plus *3°° shipping) 



SP-3 INTERFACE for 
MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19.200 BAUD rates 

« External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ 8uilt in modem/ printer switch— no need forY-cables or 
plugging/ unplugging cables 

■ s 64 n (plus s 3°° shipping) 



Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 



c 




^^^^ ^^^ 



P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201) 722-1055 

NtxINEEKINtji 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 149 







y Marty troodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



• / find my Word Pak produces an 
image on my screen that "waves" 
slowly, but is otherwise sharp. Can this 
be fixed? 

Bill Jackson 

(BILL J A CKSON) 

Sacramento, CA 

I have seen the same problem on all 
models of Word Pak. There are two 
ways to approach the fix. If you are 
comfortable with modifying ML soft- 
ware under RS-DOS and modifying 
drivers under OS-9, you can alter the 
fine vertical timing constants in the 
initialization program for the Pak. 

Alternately, and probably a simpler 
approach, you can solder a trimmer 
capacitor onto one or the other side of 
the crystal of the Word Pak, going 
between the lead from the crystal and 
ground. Typically, one in the 5- to 25- 
picofarad range will do the job. Then 
adjust this cap until the waviness on the 
screen goes away. (Bill Jackson gave me 
this follow-up on Delphi a few days 
later: "A 20 pF cap worked. My screen 
now looks fine.") 



CoCo 2 Upgrade 



• I'm having trouble upgrading a Co Co 
2 A, How do I upgrade it to 64 K? I 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the Co Co world. 
Marty is the database manager of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 



already have the two needed 4464 RA M 
chips. How do I add Extended BASIC? 

Gary Mc Million 
Battle Creek, MI 

To the left of the 6821 chip in the front 
of the circuit board is a single pair of 
pads labeled J6, 64K and RAM size. 
You must solder a wire between those 
two pads on the board . Then rep lace the 
two socketted 4416 chips with the two 
4464 chips you bought. This will com- 
plete the 64K upgrade of that board. 

To upgrade to Extended BASIC, you 
must first buy the Extended BASIC chip 
and manual (price is about $40 from 
Tandy). You must specify exactly what 
catalog number CoCo you have for 
them to order the right chip. Clip the 
soldered jumpers J I, J2, J3, J4 and J5 
from their current 64 K position setting 
and solder in new jumpers in the 128K 
postion. J2 through J5 are located 
together side by side, and Jl is located 
a little farther away All are near the 24- 
pin ROM chip that is sitting in a 28-pin 
socket. Remove the old ROM chip and 
replace it with the 28-pin ROM you 
bought. This completes the upgrade to 
Extended BASIC. Note that the U 64K" 
and "128K" on Jl through J5 refer to 
the number of bits in the ROM chip, 
and do not refer to any 128K memory 
upgrade for the CoCo 21 



Multi-Pak Extension Cord 

• / just bought a Multi-Pak, and find 
it does not quite fit on my desk with my 
CoCo. Where can I get an extension 
cable so I can position it on a shelf 
above my computer? 

Tom King 

(CAPNCRUNCH) 

Winter Haven, FL 



I strongly urge you not to use such an 
extension cable. Though they are made 
and sold, using one can decrease the 
reliability of the operation of your 
computer. The unbuffered bus of the 
CoCo was not designed to have its 
signals sent down several feet of ribbon 
cable. Note that some CoCo systems 
will appear to function fine with such an 
extension cable, but I would not trust 
such an arrangement. 



Double-Sided, 80-Track Drives 

• / am using OS-9 Profile on a 64 K 
CoCo 2 With it I have a Tandy FD-500 
single-sided, 4$-track drive. I'm inter- 
ested in installing double-sided, 80- 
track drives. Where can I get one, and 
what software will I need? 

Reuben Pressor 
San Antonio, TX 

OS-9 is well-suited for using a variety 
of disk drives, including the 80-track, 
double-sided variety. These are sold 
from many different venders, including 
True Data Products, who advertise in 
rainbow. You will need to install disk 
device drivers and descriptors appro- 
priate for 80-track drives. These can be 
purchased from D.P. Johnson, 7655 
S.W. Cedarcrest St., Portland, OR 
97223; (503) 244-8152. Ask for their 
SDISK package. 



Hot-Running SAM Chips 

• I'm interested in what you can tell me 
about the old SAM chips that run hot. 
I will be making some heat measure- 
ments on mine soon. 

Damon Hill 
(DWHILL) 
Atlanta, GA 



150 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



I am told that Motorola made a 
number of changes in the mask of the 
SAM chip over the years. The early 
ones seemed to run much hotter than 
the later ones, and certainly were more 
likely to cause subtle crashes on the 
CoCo, particularly during disk I/O due 
to less than perfect internal timing. 
SAM chips made after January 1984 
were of a significantly superior mask 
than their predecessors. The new SAM 
chip used in 'A 1 and 4 B' model CoCo 2s 
(the 74LS785) is significantly better 
than the old 6883 (74LS783), and it is 
usable in the older units. But, of course, 
if your CoCo 1 or 2 is working fine right 
now, I do not advise changing the SAM 
chip. 



Looking at RGB Monitors 

• For my CoCo club, J am evaluating 
different brands of RGB analog mon- 
itors for possible use with the CoCo 3. 
What should I look for? Stripe width, 
bandwidth, or what? 

Joe Register 

(MAGVSU) 

Naperville, JL 

With color monitors, stripe width (or 
in the case of super-fine monitors, dot 
pitch) in millimeters correlates in some 
degree to the sharpness of the image. 
The CM-8 has a dot pitch of .52 mm. 
The Magnavox 8CM5 15 (professional) 
monitor that is becoming popular with 
Color Computer 3 users offers a dot 
pitch of .42 mm. The Magnavox 
8CM643 has a stripe width of .39 mm. 
The Teknika MJ305 offers a stripe 
width of .41. The Magnavox 8CM505 
model offers a dot pitch of .65 mm. 

There are many other factors in- 
volved in determining what the image of 
a monitor looks like. These include anti- 
glare properties, number of video input 
signal connections, flatness of focus 
from edge to edge, and linearity. If the 
stripe widths are similar, there is no way 
to be sure which monitor looks better 
unless you look at the display on them 
yourself. 

The Magnavox and Teknika units 
mentioned all offer compatibility with 
CoCo Is and 2s, VCRs, and IBM PCs 
(they possess RGB I, RGB A and com- 
posite video input capability). The CM- 
8 can be used only with a CoCo 3, and 



cannot show artifact colors on CoCo 1 
and 2 software. The Magnavox 
8CM515 also offers excellent anti-glare 
coating. 

Bandwidth is a figure that relates to 
the ability of the electronics at the input 
of the monitor to respond to a rapidly 
changing signal. Typically the band- 
width of the monitor will be more than 
adequate for it to display an image to 
the full capability of the resolution of its 
picture tube, as measured in stripe 
width or dot pitch. 

A rule of thumb suggested to me by 
Ed Ellers: Monitors with stripe widths 
greater than .50 mm are really not 
suitable for resolving 80-column text. 
The 8CM505, with a stripe width of .65 
mm, turns out to be unusable in most 
ofthe CoCo 3 80-column modes. Itdoes 
resolve 320-by-200 graphics quite 
nicely. 



Hooking Up 3 { /i-lnch Drives 

• Is it possible to hook a 3 i /}-inch drive 
to the Color Computer? If so, what 
steps are necessary? 

George Ellenburg 

(ELLEN BURG) 

Edgewood, FL 

The 3 ! /2-inch disk drives are the exact 
electronic equivalent of 554-inch, 80- 
track, double-sided drives. Both have 
720K data storage capacity. The signals 
on all of the lines of the 3'^-inch drive 
are identical to those of the 5 l / A -'mch 
drive, so the two are electronically 
interchangeable. The only electrical 
problem is that 3!/? -inch drives use a 
dual-row header connector (two rows of 
17 pins in parallel) instead ofthe 34 land 
edge card connector that is standard on 
5 ! /i-inch drives. Thus, you will have to 
make up or modify a cable on your own. 
The connector you need is a female 34- 
pin, dual-row header IDC-type connec- 
tor; Radio Shack sells it as part number 
276-1525. There are usual considera- 
tions of setting the drive to respond as 
the drive number you want it to be, and 
of resistive termination of the drive 
cable, as with 5 -inch drives. I recom- 
mend using 314-inch drives under OS- 
9 with disk modules designed to use all 
80 tracks and both sides. Be sure you 
have one 40-track (preferably double- 
sided) 5 '/4- inch drive in the system to 
allow you lo read disks other CoCo 
users and producers are still using. The 
3 '/r inch drives are fast becoming the 



industry standard for replaceable media 
drive systems. 

Use of the full capacity of 80-track, 
double-sided drives via RS-DOS is 
rather difficult. You can use such drives 
as single-sided, 35-track drives under 
RS-DOS, with no modifications to 
either the operating system or the drives 
(you'd merely be using the first 35 tracks 
on Side 0, and ignoring the remaining 
80 percent ofthe drive's capacity). With 
minor modifications to RS-DOS (such 
as an ADOS EPROM), you can also 
use them as 35- or 40-track, double- 
sided drives. 



J&M Controller Fix 

• My J&M J FB-CoCo does not work 
with my CoCo 3. Can you tell me how 
to fix it? 

Gil Winograd 

(demonn) 
Glen Ellyn, IL 

You need to de-solder U I 1 (the 
74LS04 chip) from the board and re- 
place it with a 7404. The problem is that 
the gate on it used to supply the SCS 
line to the controller chip (pins 1 and 2 
of the 7404) offers just ashade too much 
delay, and this causes problems. For 
those of you who are not hackers 
equipped to de-solder and replace chips, 
J&M generously offers to make this 
repair f or $5 plus the cost of two-way 
shipping of your controller. Contact 
them f or details. J&M has been very 
conscientious in both working hard to 
find this problem and offering a fix to 
the public at a nominal cost. I applaud 
their efforts. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 

THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only- 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the RAINBGW> 
prompt, type RSK (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations" 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 51 



■gggggtt ■ nil WS mm A {■■& B H n Aft 

SSSSSf fflWffirffftffft ^iSS}^. ^dQBBk WBBBftffffflBfrr i ^dOBBk mBBbIi MM .daBBBfc. . rfflflfflfflRfti BE mm .jflflMBlftL djBStoSSSM mram-aflB jdflflBBiU. doPdo^jaSBBL-ddESfei jJOdTOftA juuuubdflBBOl jQOPO&jfflTO 8 juuuubdflBBOl gAWfl™ ^jjJJJJjv wmHig -aS8 jdgttfca jdaflBBBftf. ,<jflflaaaatx, juuuuLdflOBBBL 

oas fflftfflti ^ ww ww m BEE .flwBBO jflflflflflBk 9 55b i WBBBB a I ■ bbb flaaaaaflMBi wuim^ .wffi^K 52 jhRSSSShSL jbbbB jdp JUUUUUUUUUUL BE B66a JUUUUUUUUUUL X lisiPslISS »P$fii WS$$/3M&$ S3 a BBB BB a n SJ JJUUUUUUUU Ub JmmaaBama. ■ Wa JBBas 

nmmmf flW^ TWTT Ibhimb ODSflWfiB MBWMm fln^HB ^RVb| ^W^H ABBBBf'Wfia juwwwjj w? WBlBBg T www *ww j666BpW@Kg flMOOM nP JOOPOcTCOOw fflBWMMfflTOO JOOOOtr'wBBW BBy*uffl 'IBbOO ^ tOpIBC MMP WBBBBn bBBB 9 fflffl^ Wff BOBBBB T WWWffW JBBBBB " WBBB flaS BB MmPTflflm B Ba* BB l 

ffifiu TmT BBS BBS BSE QZS BBS BBS BEE BBj Bffl ™» 555*. ZEES' mm? BBS BBZ BB1 ™" UUW ~™MBBh 8998 99999 ~ZJSSSSu BBB COW BB COOOOf BBS wwT Bm "TTJfflfflO BBBBS VBBS BBj BB fiDQQS MB 

©llss ill® slsl ilSllsSiil HHtfttMW tf BBB 3SSSSL BBS BBB BBS BBS SB BBB HBa "fflHHHHHHfar. s iMMMIU ' mm BBS BBt fi ' 1 55? jxbubXBj » pi§ JBBBBb S bbb Mm 5m 66668 jjQBsBS Si BB 8 Jf 

BBB llis illi bhFwbb M, b BBS BBB BBB BBB SOOOK BBB B BBB B ^" "ffffftftftftftfl l&l® SittS BBS son B WWl SKal J6BB Sgm egpi mfm J6BBB ISs! RB BBS SScll Isll Pstl& isis; bbjwbm 03 B6666I jBBBK |gg§| BB 9 glgM sfiig |||g| 

In BBB Ha tsSMsSi ■ mm BBBLfflum BMHuuwm 8888U888u H 1 SS^BbT wSaJSS sbb BB WSLMB BBg -' BBg mm Wad&m mm mm Wm Wmmm mff mm mmtmm mm mff mm ■ ISSySS BBB ran vB&^BB mm«mm BBj BBS Bffl DB&asJ 

n Ms am ^BS&? 555EES ■ SB BE ^BflF ~*ttmt p >bb$ MB BBS ^SSWa BSi BS SB mi Bffl SB ^PSs Bffl] BB BB n ^BJr BB am WB ^BBBr BB Bfl BB WB 



■How that you've built and tested the 
■HCoCo ROS hardware, it's time to 
HyJI show you how to interface it to the 
Robotix R-2000 robot kit and present 
the program that allows you to use it. 
With the ROS program, you'll be able 
to write ROS macros to activate 
robotic-type toys, electric train layouts 
or even your own robot if you decide to 
build one. 

The ROS System 

The ROS program is actually two 
separate programs. The first is a BASIC 
program (Listing I) that allows you to 
load the machine language program, 
and to load and save ROS macro files 
to cassette. It also allows you to clear 
the ROS file buffer. It's menu-driven 
and self-explanatory. To use the ROS 
program, type CLDfiD "ROBOT" and 
press ENTER. The program loads and 
executes the machine language program 
for you. 

The second program (Listing 2) is the 
machine language program which was 
originally written in PASCAL. This pro- 
gram is also menu-driven. It allows you 
to write, edit, test and execute the ROS 
macro files. 

Let's take a look at each command 
listed on the ROS program menu. 

Append — adds lines to an existing 
ROS macro file. Enter X at the instruc- 
tion prompt to exit the Append mode. 

Delete — deletes lines from an exist- 



Dennis Weide is a communications 
technician for A T& T communications 
in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he 
programs AT&T and IBM PCs. He 
enjoys making toys and teaching com- 
puter programming. 

152 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



BBBh tiffin Bt flflgro SljnSB Bt M 

BBhB. I JuH SB MQi "^ yuv JyyE yyv Bl aBB ■ ^UuL BbThB BMHMflf BQf W" BJ Jflj flflfl Byp Wff 

BuBh Bun WtSm BLsbe Bfl Dm I suB H n » «B BB BLsbe Bl BUR Bun 

ing ROS macro file. To terminate the 
delete mode, enter zero (0) for the line 
number when prompted. 

Edit — changes an existing command 
in an existing ROS macro file. This is 
not a true editor. Because of the simplic- 
ity of the ROS program, you must 
retype the entire macro line. Enter a 
zero for the line number to exit the Edit 
mode. 

Insert — inserts lines in an existing 
ROS macro file. Enter a zero for the line 
number to exit the Insert mode. 

List — lists ROS macros resident in 
memory to the screen. 

Print — lists ROS macros resident in 
memory to the printer. 

Quit — returns to BASIC. You must 
load and save ROS macro files from the 
BASIC program. 

Run — executes an ROS macro file. 

Test — use this command to test an 
ROS macro file. Press the space bar for 
each command in the file. This steps the 
macro through each command so you 
can observe its effect. 

Write — writes a new ROS macro 
file. It starts at the beginning of the ROS 
buffer. Any macro lines in the buffer 
will be overwritten when the Write 
command is executed. 

ROS Macro File Structure 

The ROS macro file is stored in 
graphics addresses 1 536 to 7679. Each 
ROS macro line requires five bytes of 
memory. The ROS program encodes 
macro instructions and stores them in 
five bytes during the Write function, 
and decodes and executes them during 
the Test and Run functions. You can 
create ROS macros with more than 
1,200 commands per file. If you PCLEAR 
8 before loading the BASIC program, 



you can create macros twice as large. 

The five bytes per macro line are used 
as follows: Instructions are stored in 
bytes I and 2 as an address. The device 
is stored in Byte 3 as a power of 2, and 
the duration is stored in bytes 4 and 5 
as a decimal value from 0 to 16383. 

ROS Commands 

There are only five commands avail- 
able for use in ROS macros. Because the 
ROSSP is powered from the CoCo, 
power requirements must be kept to a 
minimum. Therefore, only one move- 
ment can be executed at a time. How- 
ever, the five commands allow some 
versatility. The basic command syntax 
is instruction, device number, duration. 
The ROS command Forward is used to 
turn on the specified motor in the 
forward direction. For example FOR- 
WARD 2 10 turns on Motor 2 for an 
internal count of 10. Reverse is used to 
turn on the specified motor in the 
reverse direction. It is similar in struc- 
ture to the Forward command. Halt 
causes macro execution to stop for the 
specified duration. The device number 
is not used in this command. Until 
executes thecommand following it until 
the specified device (input) goes low. 
Example: 

UNTIL 3 
FORWARD 5 

This example causes Motor 5 to turn 
forward until Input 3 goes low. Notice 
that the duration is not used in either 
of the two commands and, finally, the 
command Wait stops macro execution 
until the specified device (input) goes 
low. This allows the ROS macro to be 
synchronized with mechanical equip- 
ment. 



HOT HARDWARE AND SUPER SOFTWARE 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER 

IT'S THE BEST!!! Great Price! Only $29.95 



Carefully engineered to 
work with ALL Color 
Computer models 
including the newest 
COCO II. Enables your 
COCO to operate with a 
video monitor instead of 
television. 



Works with monochrome 
monitors! 
Works with color 
monitors! 

Audio Connection 
included! 

Easy installation — 
no soldering! 



64K 
Disc Only 



TANDY 1000 UPGRADES 



640K upgrade board with real time clock $1 89.95 

Serial Interface Board 49,95 

Parallel Interface Board 29.95 

Hayes compatible 300/ 1 200 Baud deluxe modem 1 89.95 



MONITORS, PRINTERS, ETC 



$109,95 



Magnavox BM-7622 Amber Screen - high quality, low price 

Order a quality monitor from us and get a Universal 
Video Driver for only $24.95 — Save $5.00. 

Star NX-10 Printer, New model for '06 279.95 

Star LV1 210, Replaces popular SG-10 model 219.95 

GRAFX SCREEN - versatile screen dump software. Print horizontal or 
vertical, image magnification, positive or negative and more - 5 ] A" disc. 

ONLY $14.95 FREE with your printer order. 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 

300 to 9600 baud. Complete with 
all cables and connectors. 





Only $49.95 



DISC DRIVES 



Teac 55B DSDD Drive $1 19.95 Drive one upgrade for new Tandy 

J&M JFD-CP Controller dual horizontal cabinet ..11 9.95 
with DOS 129.95 Disc drive cable 24.95 

Dual cabinet, power supply holds Radio Shack DOS Rom 1.1 
2 horizontal 1/2 height drives. . . 79.95 w/manual 29.95 

Accounting System - very popular ledger 
system for small businesses $99.95 disk 

Order Entry - an excellent companion 
lo the accounting system $99.95 disk 

Easy File - get organized with this 
user friendly data management system $59.95 disk 

Super Screen - Best screen enhancement program available. 
Cassetle $29.95 Disk $32.95 



FOR THE SERIOUS COCO USER 



DISCS • CASSETTES • ROMS • CHIPS 



5 l /i" discs, double density reinforced hub w/sleeve, guaranteed. 
$1 2.95 for 10 discs in an atlractive storage box. 

C- 10 Cassettes w/labels 10 for $5.50 

Cassette storage box 10 for $2.00 

Basic 1.2 ROM $39.95 

Extended 1.1 ROM w/Manual $49.95 

DISC STORAGE CASE - Attractive, heavy 

duty acrylic case with lock. Holds and SUPER BARGAIN 

protects 50 5 W discs. ONLY $9.95 

Purchase this attractive storage case including 10 discs for $21.95. 

64K Memory Expansion Kit. 

All parts and complete instructions (for 'E' and 'F' boards and COCO II) 

NOW ONLY $19.95 



32K required 

Other Super 
■Arcade Games: 

Tut's Tomb 
Time Fighter 



NEW FOR THE HOLIDAYS 

A unique new arcade/adventure game!!! Take 
on the role of SUPERHERO and become a 
crusader for all that is right and good! Use 
your special powers to fight the criminal 
mastermind, Mr. Bigg and his sinister follow- 
ers. Combat is hot and heavy and requires 
fast thinking and a quick joystick. Colorful 
hi-res graphics and great sound effects. 



0GM WDtGOT 

Intelligence has intercepted a coded message 
revealing a plan to conquer Earth. Four of your 
Shocktroopers must infiltrate the heavily defended 
underground enemy base and steal all of the secret 
TRC-5 attack saucer sub-assemblies. 




©KMvth l (.n l l -.ii]^. 



Tired of flying 
wimpy airplanes??? 



At 




SECT 



Want to try 
something macho 



Li;iiLiaa 



I for a change?? 





CYBERTANK is a real-time tank simulation that will get 

your adrenalin flowing! 

Your survival depends upon lightening-fast tactical decisions. Penetrate 
deep into enemy territory with powerful intelligence gathering devices 
and sophisticated armaments. Cannons, heat seeking missiles, llame 
throwers, pill boxes, battle tanks ... 64K Disk only. $27.95 



ADVENTURES 



The top-selling Mark Data 
Adventure Series. 

Hi-res color graphics! Great story lines! 

Calixto Island • Black Sanctum 
Sea Search • Shenanigans • Trekboer • Vortex Factor 

All adventures require 32 K. 



COCO UTIL II - NEW VERSION 



Transfer Coco disc files to your IBM compatible computer. 
You may also transfer MS-DOS files to a Color 
Computer disc. Save hours of retyping. 
Coco Uril has been so popular we decided to 
make it even more powerful and versatile... 
extended directories, taster, improved menu 
selection system and more! $39.95 

Coco Uiil users upgrade lo lhe new version for only $12.95 including shipping and handling. 





FREE — Send for our free flier 



Mark Data Products 



24001 Alicia Parkway, No. 207, Mission Viejo, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 



SHIPPING: All order-, under "slOO |jlV.T»e ndd 42 reKulnr, S.S .)ir. All orders over $100 plt^e t idd t% 
regular, U%air. Giliiuinu r^sidt-nK pleJsr .((Id (>% s,)l( j s Mx. Orders < lulsif f( j lhe i oniinenlol U.S., check 



wt\\\ lk for s1ii|*r)rnjt jrwmfir i>l*M>t- nmm U.S. l'und 1 ^ Wrw;y*> juEMnrs — roni.iti v$ ior e*c<nn£ 



Writing an ROS Macro 

When writing an ROS macro, you're prompted for all the 
inputs. Let's enter a sample macro to see the structure. 



You see: 

INSTRUCTION 
DEVICE NUMBER 
DURRTIDN 
INSTRUCTION 
DEVICE NUMBER 
DURRTION 
INSTRUCTION 
DEVICE NUMBER 
INSTRUCTION 
DEVICE NUMBER 
INSTRUCTION 



You enter: 

FORWARD 
3 

12 

FDRWARD 

10 

22 

UNTIL 
1 

FORWARD 
3 



X 

This example shows the macro lines you might enter to 
program a robot to do some simple task. The first three lines 
tell the ROS to activate Motor 3 in the forward direction for 
a count of 12. The next three lines tell it to activate motor 
10 in the reverse direction for a count of 22. The next four 
lines tell it to activate Motor 3 in the forward direction until 
Input I goes low. The last line tells the ROS to exit the write 
or append mode. The ROS macro is now in memory and can 
be tested or saved to cassette. 

Testing the Macro 

After writing an ROS macro, test it to check its accuracy. 
Select the T option from the ROS menu and press ENTER. 
When you Ye ready to execute the macro, press the space bar. 
The first macro line will be displayed on the screen and 
executed. Press ENTER to display and execute each line of the 
macro. The macro will continue to loop through itself until 
you press N to end the test mode. Use the Edit, Delete and 
Insert modes to make necessary macro corrections. 

Executing the Macro 

Execute the macro by selecting R from the ROS menu and 
pressing ENTER. This mode automatically executes each 



p _»i_ 

Pa; 



21 



pap ir 



Figure 1: Motor Switch Wiring 



•C 1 Ml»m 

uotoi i-a 



Mir 



• »v 



i? 



war 



"if 



Jill 



u i r 



KIF 



]-'-/ 



P(id 



CO 



1 '-5 



ic & rus?<4 

nr. I. H'JC UMVLH 
UUIOH IS 



m !i 



pmo it 



IS 



16 



urn 



MIX 



I — *JtoD- -/ 



per 



IC 7 ML42<4 
OCiii Dt>» > Ifi 

wur i- a 



pca^ u 



PC 4 



PC I 



PCO 



7 



Wrtllf 



IN6 



"<a 



SI 



13 



UlCBOSwl TCH 



-crro 



rh 



14 




SCO 



TYPICAL NWTOn SWITCH v/iniNG 



/77 



154 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Figure 2: Robotix Switch Circuit Board 

3 



□ 



7 f 



M5 



/ 

o 



U4 



W3 



cv - 
2 O 




ntv 




BLACK 



5V 



-t ev. 



lit 

WHITE 5 X 
to 3 

o 



RED 



J 



ROBOTIX SWITCH CIRCUIT BOARD 



Figure 3: Lead Designations 


Lead Name 


Definition 


AO - A2 


Address lines 0 to 2 


CS 


Chip select lead 


DO - D7 


Data lines 0 to 7 (8 bits) 


E 


Processor E clock lead 


INI - IN 1 6 


ROS inputs 1 to 16 


MIF- MI6F 


Motor forward leads 1 to 16 


MIR - M16R 


Motor reverse leads 1 to 16 


PAO - PA7 


Port A bits 0 to 7 (output) 


PBO - PB7 


Port B bits 0 to 7 (output) 


PCO - PC7 


Port C Bits 0 to 7 (input) 


RD 


Read enable lead 


R/D 


Processor read /write lead 


SCS 


Processor chip select lead 


WR 


Write enable lead 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of THE RAINBOW is sent second class 
mail. If you do not receive your copy by the 5th 
of the month of the publication date, send us a card 
and we will mail another. Canadian subscribers 
and foreign airmail allow two additional weeks. 

You must notify us of a new address when you 
move. Notification should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to the month in which 
you change your address. Sorry, we cannot be 
responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an "account 
number 7 ' and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



Figure 4: Component Designations 


Pi p <; i o n ii t i n n 

L/C 31gl 1 « 11 Ul 1 


D pfinitiftn 
Uclllll 11UII 


in - inn 

I V_> I I v_> ] VJ 


inicgrdicu v^ii cuii ^cnipy i iu iu 


K 1 F - K 1 
i\ i r rv i u I 


rorwdra comroi relay i 10 id 


KIR - K16R 


Reverse control relay 1 to 16 


01 F - 016F 


Forward control transistor 1 to 1 6 

1 V_J 1 tt CI 1 VJ 1111 VJ I LI CI 1 1 J 1 O L VJ 1 | L V_y I \_/ 


Q1R - Q16R 


Reverse control transistor 1 to 16 


R1F - R16F 


Forward control resistor 1 to 16 


Rl R - R16R 


Reverse control resistor 1 to 16 


SI - S16 


Input switch 1 t o 1 6 



Figure 5: Connecting Relay With Low Coil Resistance 



<V1 ] 

p*! 



KAJL 



P>0 



IK 

A/W 

RIF 




OIF 



CJ 

<r> 



fJJ_ 
>0Q 



IC* "l-W«« 

■•OTOH rl 



w 



an a 



IK 

AyVV 




Kffl 

oin 



*c» i * 



"SI. 



rn 



iC r r«i mm 

INPUT I I 



rn 



O I 



_»ea 



L-icooi-ircii 



-crro- 



HO 



rrPiC.U. ^I0R SWITCH wiHiNi} 



/77 



macro instruction without any other input from you. It also 
loops through the macro until N or the firebutton on either 
joystick is pressed. 

Interfacing the ROS 

I connected my ROSSP to a small robot arm I created 
using the Robotix R-2000 kit from Milton Bradley. Figure 
1 shows the schematic representation of the Robotix switch 
circuit board and how it's wired to the ROSSP. Figure 2 
shows the actual circuit board. This board switches between 
+3 volts and -3 volts to activate forward and reverse 
movement. Leads M I through M5 are the battery leads going 
to the motors. Leads Gl through G5 are the ground leads 
to the motors. The red lead on the right side of the schematic 
is the reverse direction lead and the black lead is the forward 
direction lead. The white lead is ground. 

Using a short piece of cable and a connector, wire the M I 
through M5 battery and ground leads to the ROSSP relays 
as shown in figures 3 and 4. Notice that the switch side (S I) 
of the motor is connected to both the forward relay (KlF) 
and the reverse relay (KIR). The connector must be 
unplugged when the ROSSP is inserted in the ROM port and 
power is applied. Otherwise, the +3 volts and -3 volts will 
beshorted together. The ROS program will instruct you when 
to plug in the switch circuit. Figures 3 and 4 explain all the 
lead and component designations. 

Because of the inaccuracy of the motors supplied with the 
kit, I cut cams of thin plastic and mounted them on the motor 




THE CENTRAL SOURCE FOR COCO SUPPORT 



For Coco . . . 

in the Midwest 

Now in our 5th year! 



Fast Delivery. . .Friendly Service 




New Low Prices . . . 

SEIKOSHA 

SP-1000A 



100 cps draft 
20cps NLQ 
Friction and tractor 
Front panel Controls 
Graphics 
1.5 K buffer 
2 yr. Warranty 



RAINBOW 



r ;,l 


■exTTj 







REVIEWED IN 
OCTOBER 86 RAINBOW 




Parallel printer 

with Metric Industries 
Model 104 interface . . 



New 



With pbh-64 interface with 64K BUFFER! 



$209. 00 
$249. 00 
$299. 00 




toco Man =r 



TheCompiete 




i 



includes 

Dflvjxf Joystick 
nd Y-cablf 1 » 



eft 



COCOMOH II 

with Y-cable 
with Joystick 



t 119.95 



79.95 
99.95 
99.93 



■HMNMNHMRRKSvU 



LATEST VERSION 
FEATURES . . . 

•14 fonts 
•Shrink. Stretch 

Rotate 
•Multiple drives 
•Pattern Save 

UPGRADES AVAILABLE 

Disk I to II 20. 00 
Tape I to Disk II 

25. 00 

Max Edit 19.95 
Picture disks 29.95 
set of 3 



%mA DELUXE JOYSTICK 



FOR COLOR COMPUTER 

• Open gimbal design 

• Self-centering or free-floating operation 

• Mechanical trim on both axes 

• Eight foot cable 

DEALER INQUIRES INVITED 

REVIEWED IN A UGUS T 86 RAINBOW 




$27.50 each 
$49.95/ pair 



CHOOSE FROM OUR LARGE 
SELECTION OF COCO PRODUCTS 

B5 ... Colorware ... Derringer ... Diecom ... Dynacaic ... Elite ... 
HJL ... J & M ... Mark Data ... Metric Industries ... 

Michtron .. Microcom ... Microworks ... Tom Mix ... PBJ ... 

PXE ... Spectrum Projects ... Speech Systems ... Sugar ... 
TCE ... VIP ... Zebra ... and more' 

Yes/ We have COCO GRAPHICS DESIGNER! 



• Call • 

513-396SOFT 



• Shop by Modem • 

513-396SHOP 



• Write ♦ 

2235 Losantiville. Cincinnati, OH 45237 

SHIPPING will b* c*««9f0 at out ACTUAL COST 
Ohio fttidtntt mo IS". %»tf\ Tti COO J<3d 2 00 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 55 




Figure 6: Alternate Input/Output Interfacing Methods 



la 



tril-5 



■ J 



J 



o 

i 

I— 

VI 
in 



IJ 



•> 



0- 



7 



> it 




A. LED OUTPUT DRIVER 



■ ■ 



■ i 



• ■ r. 1 

\'r— £ 



> 



■[> : 



i> 



■I 



IK 

A/'WV 



11, 



■> 



M i V 1 



3- 




OUTPUT 



n} 1 | 



J. L 



1— 
U. 



•a 
u 



B. OUTPUT RELAY DRIVER 



-- I 



<]• 



1 1 



in 



'3_. 



'(J >Y 




C. RELAY INPUT 



t*H 0.1 




AAA/V — 

330 



IK 

AA/W 



INPUT 



/77 



D TRANSISTOR INPUT 



shafts. These cams were used to operate microswitches 
connected to scan buffer inputs (see Figure 3). Using the Until 
command, the microswitches provided fairly accurate arm 
positioning. I was able to move a small plastic box back and 
forth from one spot to another automatically for several 
hours. 

More Options 

The ROSSP circuit can be used in other applications by 
modifying the circuit. Figure 5 shows an alternative method 
of connecting relays with a low coil resistance. If you use that 
type, you will need an external power supply. The transistors 
Q1F and Q1R act as low current switches. A logic high 
applied to the base of the transistors causes them to conduct. 
This places ground at the bottom of the relay winding and 
the relay operates. Resistors RJF and R1R are current 
limiting resistors. 

Figure 6 shows alternate methods of interfacing inputs and 
outputs to the ROSSP. With some experimentation, you can 
connect almost any type of peripheral device you can think 
of. Figure 7 shows the motor assignments for the 8255 PPI 
chips, the instruction, addresses and values used to write the 
ROS program. Using that information, you can write your 

156 THE RAINBOW February 1987 







Figure 7 








Motor assignments for motors 






1 to 8 and inputs 1 to 8 






IC 82SS Chip 1 Address equals SFF43 








Value equals 137 








Motor 




8255 


AHHr 

r\ (J (J I . 


I AO/I 


Number 


Instruction 


Addr. 


Vdlup 

V dlUL 


PAD 


1 


FORWARD 


SFF40 




PA I 


2 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


9 

Z 


PA? 


3 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


A 


PA1 


4 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


Q 
O 


PA4 

I 


5 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


I U 


PAS 


6 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


jZ 




7 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


f\d 
04 


PA7 


8 


FORWARD 


SFF40 


J ?R 

1 ZO 


PRO 


1 


REVERSE 


$FF4l 




PR 1 


2 


REVERSE 


SFF4I 




PR? 


3 


REVERSE 


SFF4I 


A 


PR1 


4 


REVERSE 


SFF4I 


Q 
O 


PR4 


5 


REVERSE 


SFF4I 




PRS 


6 


REVERSE 


$FF4 1 




PR6 


7 


KcvcK jc 


<r 1717/1 i 


64 


PR7 


8 


REVERSE 


SFF4I 


1 ?8 
1 zo 


pro 

I V_,VJ 


1 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF42 


1 

1 


PC 1 

I Vw 1 


2 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF42 


9 
z 


PC? 


3 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF42 


A 


PCI 


4 


WAIT/ UNTIL 


SFF42 


0 
O 


PC4 


5 


WAIT/ UNTIL 


SFF42 


J f\ 
\ u 


PC5 


6 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF42 


32 


PC6 


7 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF42 


64 


rL / 


8 


WAIT/ UNTIL 


SFF42 


1 zo 




Motor assignments for motors 






9 to 16 and inputs 9 to 16 






IC 82S5 Chip 2 Address equals SFF47 








Value equals 137 






OiJJ 


Motor 




8255 


A HHr 


I pari 


Number 


Instruction 


Addr. 




PAD 

I rWJ 


9 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


1 
1 


PAI 


10 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


2 


PA2 


1 1 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


4 


PA 3 


12 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


8 


PA4 


13 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


16 


PA5 


14 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


32 


PA6 


15 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


64 


PA7 


16 


FORWARD 


SFF44 


128 


PBO 


9 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


1 


PBI 


10 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


2 


PB2 


1 1 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


4 


PB3 


12 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


8 


PB4 


13 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


16 


PB5 


14 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


32 


PB6 


15 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


64 


PB7 


16 


REVERSE 


SFF45 


128 


PCO 


9 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


1 


PCI 


10 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


2 


PC2 


1 1 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


4 


PC3 


12 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


8 


PC4 


13 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


16 


PC5 


14 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


32 


PC6 


15 


WAIT/ UNTIL 


SFF46 


64 


PC7 


16 


WAIT/UNTIL 


SFF46 


128 




tware 



COLOR DISK 
MANAGER 

Color Disk Manager will do selective initializations, verifies, 
backups, repairs and much more! 

• will initialize single tracks, a range ol tracks, or the entire disk to 
more than 35 tracks 

• allows you to make a backup of the directory out of reach ol basic 
and put it back if a directory crash occurs; has a recover file command 
which will load entire files off the disk if the directory crashes and the 
allocation table is good; will repair or salvage crashed disk several 
ways 

• is 64K compatible allowing a 64K backup: does backups by track, 
a range of tracks, or the whole disk (will do more than 35 tracks) 

• gives an allocation table map with granules x-referenced to tracks 
and sectors, and showing which granules are used; displays a file 
granule map showing which granules, tracks, and sectors the file 
uses, and the length 

• will do a directory displaying file names in two columns, the num- 
ber of free granules, and the free bytes if below 65535; has a kill file 
command 

• loads and saves, sectors, tracks or files; loads files two ways, as 
done by basic, or with header bytes left in, which helps in studying how 
files are saved on disk; has an append sector command 

• verifies iracks or the entire disk showing the track and sector if an 
error occurs, with the option of continue or stop 

• is multiple drive compatible 

• allows you to save a block of memory to disk; transfers programs 
from tape to disk 

• has a rapid scan feature which allows you to scan the disk by 
tracks and sectors using the arrow keys 

• will dump memory to the screen in ascii, good for listing basic 
programs or source files; has a move memory block command, and a 
transfer control command 

• converts decimal to hex or hex lo decimal 

• allows you to examine memory using the arrow keys with displays 
in hex (or decimal) and ascii 

• will load and execute rompac s saved on disk; has a move rom lo 
ram command 

• allows you to change origin (start addr.) of ML programs; displays 
the start, end, and execute addresses of ML programs 

• 32K - 64K ECB $34.95 Disk 



RAINBOW 
SCREEN MACHINE 

• Add these features to your computer/program: ML extension of 
Basic loads on top of 1 6, 32, or 64K machines to enable easy mixture 
of hl-res graphics and text in your programs. Dense text or large 
lettering for children, visually impaired or VCR title screens with no 
programming! 

• User definable 224 character set featuring lower case de- 
scenders, Greek, cars, tank, planes, etc., completely interfaced with 
all keys, commands, and PMODES. 12 sizes (mosLcolored) from 16 
x 8 to 64 x 24. PRINT fa, TAB and comma fields are fully sup- 
ported. 

• 2 distinct character sets automatically switch for sharpest lettering 
featuring underline, subscript, superscript, reverse video, top 
and bottom scroll protect, double width, colored characters in 
PMODE 4, and help screen. 

• Simple 2-letter abbreviated commands inside your program or 
control key entry from keyboard, even during program execution! 

• Includes demo program, character generator program and man- 
ual. 1 6K Basic required — 32K recommended. $29.95 Tape; $32.95 
Disk. 



COLOR TAPE 
MANAGER 

• merges multiple basic programs into one; appends multiple ma- 
chine language programs into one; appends machine language to 
basic (example included) 

• converts numbers from hex to decimal or decimal to hex; allows 
input in hex or decimal 

• rapidly scans memory using the arrow keys with auto-key repeat 

• displays memory in hex (or decimal) and ascii; allows the changing 
of memory in decimal or hex 

• deals with missing end of file blocks; loads and saves data with or 
without a filename block 

• handles programs with varying block lengths 

• displays the start, end. and execute addresses of ML programs; 
displays the buffer start, end and top addresses 

• converts ML programs into basic data statements which can be 
loaded as. or merged with, a basic program 

• turns the audio and cassette motor on and off with one key com- 
mands; has inverted displays which lessen eye fatigue 

• finds the end of programs on tape even trom within a program with 
a skip file command: allows the transferring of control to other pro- 
grams with a go command 

• moves blocks of memory from start through end address to new 
start address: allows the changing of the origin (start adds) or ML 
programs 

• has an 8.380 byte loading buffer with 16K systems and 24.760 
byte loading buffer with 32K systems 

• 16K ECB mimimum $19.95 Tape $22.95 Disk 



SUPER 

SCREEN MACHINE 

All of the features of Screen Machine and more: 

• Variable SMOOTH Scroll for professional displays, listings, busi- 
ness use. 

• Variable volume KEY Click (tactile feedback). 

• EDTASM + command for instant compatibility with cartridge 
EDTASM. 

• Superpatch + command for instant compatibility with the 
Superpatch-f Editor- Assembler. 

• True Break key disable and recognition. 

• 10 User Definable commands used to activate your special drivers 
or subroutine. 

• Dynamic Screen Dump command for use with Custom Software, 
Engineering's Graphic Screen Print program for simple printer "Snap- 
shots" of your screen even during program execution! 

• Super Screen Machine - $44.95 Tape; $47.95 Disk. 



Screen Machine can be used in games, word processors, utilities, etc. 
In addition, the custom graphics characters can be used to develop 
easy, effective hi-res character-graphics programs. The potential is 
truly unlimited. 

Screen Machine is fully interfaced with all keys and commands. 
Although some Basic programming knowledge is recommended just 
a few minutes spent studying and referencing your computer's Basic 
manuals will turn you on to the power of computing with Screen 
Machine. 

Screen Machine can be used to directly create video recorder title 
screens or large lettering for children or the visually impaired simply by 
typing 



Dealer and author Inquijies are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 11938, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
481-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS only. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Add $1.50 per program for postage and 
handling. Florida residents add 5%sales 
tax COD orders are welcome. CIS 
orders EMAIL to 70405, 1374. No 
refunds or exchanges. 



VFSA 



own ROS program. By using a combination of inverting and 
non-inverting buffers for inputs and outputs, you can turn 
on or off any electrical device using digital signals. 

OptoeJectric devices such as infrared detectors and source- 
detector LEDs could replace microswitches as position 
detectors. If signal polarity is a problem on the scan buffer 
inputs, replace the 74LS244s with 74LS240s to invert the 
input signal. Likewise, by replacing the 74LS240s on the 
distributor outputs with 74LS244s, the motors would operate 
until the bit for that motor was set high. Be careful not to 
operate the forward and reverse relays at the same time if 
they are used as shown in the schematic. That would short 
the +3 volts to the -3 volts and could lead to disaster. 



Listing h ROBOT 

100 1 ROBOT BASIC PROGRAM 

200 1 BY DENNIS H. WEIDE 

300 1 (C) 1986 

400 ' 
500 1 

600 POKE&HFF43 , 137 : POKE&HFF47 , 13 
7 

100 POKE&HFF4 0,0: POKE&HFF41 , 0 : PO 

KE&HFF4 4 , 0 : POKE&HFF4 5 , 0 

800 FOR X=l TO 1000: NEXT 

900 CLS : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 3 ) " ACTIVA 

TE ROBOT CONTROL NOW" 

1000 PCLEAR4 : PCLS : CLEAR200 , 19999 

: CLOADM 

1100 CLS 

1200 PRINT: PRINT: PRINTTAB (7) "ROB 
OT PROGRAM MENU" 
1300 PRINT 

1400 PRINTTAB (5 ) "1. ACCESS ROBOT 
PROGRAM" 

1500 PRINTTAB ( 5 ) "2 . LOAD ROBOT F 
ILE" 

1600 PRINTTAB (5) "3 . SAVE ROBOT F 



Listing 2: R8T22SRC 

(** ROBOT2 2/SRC **) 

(** ROBOTICS PROGRAM **) 

(** BY DENNIS H. WEIDE **) 

(** A ROBOT PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE **) 

PROGRAM ROBOT (INPUT, OUTPUT) ; 



I hope this information has been of interest to you. It's only 
a starting point for those really interested in experimenting 
with computers. The CoCo offers such easy interfacing to 
peripheral equipment it's a shame more people aren't taking 
advantage of it. Using a circuit similar to the ROSSP, we Ve 
used the CoCo for everything from a simple robot CPU to 
a complex industrial security system. Why not try your 
engineering ability at designing CoCo projects for interfac- 
ing? 

As always, if you have any questions or comments, feel free 
to write to me at 14201 Marquette N.E., Albuquerque, NM 
871 23. Please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope if 
you would like a reply. □ 



ILE" 

1100 PRINTTAB (5) "4 . CLEAR ROBOT 
MEMORY" 

1800 PRINTTAB (5) "5. END PROGRAM 
SESSION" 

1900 PRINT: INPUT" ENTER ONE OF 
THE ABOVE >" ;OA 

2000 IF 0A<1 OR OA>5 THEN SOUND 
100,10:GOTO1100 

2100 ON OA GOSUB 2200 , 2 400 , 21 00 , 

2100,2200 

2200 GOTO 1100 

2300 EXEC: RETURN 

2400 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: INPUT" FILEN 

AME>" ;P$ 

2500 CLOADM P$ 

2 600 RETURN 

2 100 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : INPUT"FILEN 
AME>" ;P$ 

2800 PRINT: INPUT" PREPARE CASSETT 
E TO SAVE" ;L 

2900 CSAVEM P$, 1536,7679,20000 

3000 RETURN 

2100 PCLS: RETURN 

2200 CLS : END 



VAR 

CHOICE , KEY , OFFSET , LOFFSET , LINENUMBER, LISTADDR, WRITEADDR, VALUE, LVALUE, LDU 
RATION, DURATION, LISTNUM,MOTORNUM, POINTER: INTEGER; 

LASTCHAR , DIRECTION : CHAR ? 

PRTFILE : TEXT ; 

PROCEDURE WRITEPROG1; 
BEGIN 

WRITE ( 1 INSTRUCTION > 1 ) ; 
READLN ( DIRECTION ) ; 
CASE DIRECTION OF 



158 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 





: OFFSET: 


:=8 


t p t , 


: OFFSET: 


: =0 




: OFFSET: 


: =1 


8 U ? l 


i OFFSET : 


:=9 




: OFFSET: 


:=2 


f X f : 


:EXIT 





ELSE WRITE LN ( • INSTRUCTION ERROR ' ) 
END; 

IF DIRECTIONo ' H ' THEN BEGIN 

WRITE ( • DEVICE NUMBER> 1 ) ; 

RE ADLN ( MOTORNUM ) ; 
END 

ELSE VALUE :=0; 
IF MOTORNUM< 9 THEN BEGIN 

WRITEADDR: =$FF4 0 ; 
END; 

IF MOTORNUM>8 THEN BEGIN 

WRITEADDR :=$FF4 4 ; 
END; 

CASE MOTORNUM OF 

1,9: VALUE : =1 ; 

2, 10: VALUE: =2; 

3 , 11: VALUE: =4 ; 

4,12: VALUE : =8 ; 

5, 13: VALUE: =16; 

6, 14: VALUE: =3 2 ; 

7, 15: VALUE: =64; 

8, 16: VALUE: =12 8 
END; 

IF (DIRECTION< 'U' ) AND ( LASTCHARO 1 U 1 ) THEN BEGIN 

WRITE ( ■ DURATION> ' ) ; 

RE ADLN ( DURATION) ; 

IF DURATION>163 8 3 THEN BEGIN 
WRITE ( • DURATION ERROR • ) 

END; 
END 

ELSE DURATION :=0; 
LASTCHAR : =DIRECTION ; 

WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER] : =WRITEADDR+OFFSET ; 
BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+2 ] : = VALUE ; 
WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+3 ] : = DURATION ; 
END; 

PROCEDURE LISTPROGl; 
VAR FORREV: STRING; 
BEGIN 

LISTADDR : =WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER] ; 
LVALUE : =BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+2 ] ; 
LDURATION : =WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+3 ] ; 
LOFFSET:=0 ; 

IF LISTADDR>$FF4 2 THEN LOFFSET:=8; 
IF LISTADDR=$FF4 9 THEN LOFFSET:=0; 
CASE LISTADDR OF 

$FF4 0 , $FF44 : FORREV : = • FORWARD ' ; 

$FF4 1 , $FF4 5 : FORREV : = • REVERSE ' ; 

$FF42 , $FF4 6: FORREV :=• WAIT ' ; 

$FF4 8, $FF4C: FORREV :=' HALT' ; 

$FF4 9 , $FF4 D : FORREV : = ' UNTI L 1 
END; 





February 1987 THE RAINBOW 159 



CASE LVALUE OF 

0:LISTNUM:=-8; 

1:LISTNUM:=1; 

2:LISTNUM:=2; 

4:LISTNUM:=3; 

8:LISTNUM:=4; 

16:LISTNUM:=5; 

32:LISTNUM:=6; 

64:LISTNUM:=7; 

12 8:LISTNUM:=8 
END; 

LISTNUM: =LISTNUM+LOFFSET ; 
IF LISTADDR=0 THEN BEGIN 

FORREV:='END' ; 

LISTNUM :=0; 

LDURATION:=0 
END; 

WRITELN ( PRTFILE , LINENUMBER : 4 , 1 
END; 

PROCEDURE WRITE PROGRAM ; 
BEGIN 
PAGE ; 
WRITELN; 
DIRECTION: = 1 A 1 ; 
LINENUMBER: =5; 

WRITELN ( 1 POINTER = 1 , POINTER: 5) ; 
WHILE DIRECTION< 'X' DO BEGIN 

WRITEPROG1 ; 
WORD [POINTER] : =LINENUMBER; 
LINENUMBER: =LINENUMBER+5 ; 




1 , FORREV : 8 , LISTNUM : 2 , LDURATION : 6 ) ; 



Corrections 

"Graphically Speaking: The Artistic BBS" (No- 
vember 1986, Page 108): Eric Bailey has written us to 
correct the error-trapping routine for the load function 
in LiVRSEDIT. Lines 430, 460 and 470 need to be changed 
as below. 

43 j3 GOSUB 73j3:PRINT@j3, 1111 ; : FF$=F$ 
:IF FF$= IMI THEN GOT034j3 
46j3 FF$=FF$+"/DAT M 

47j3 OPEN "D", #l,FF$:E=LOF(l) : CLO 
SE#l:IF E=j3 THEN PRINT M FILE NOT 
FOUND 11 :CLOSE#l: KILL FF$ : FOR T=l 
TO Ij3j3j3 : NEXTT : GOSUB 780 : GOTO430 



"Pretty Pictures on the CoCo 3 With CC3 Draw" 
(Review, December 1986, Page 148): In the review of 
CC3 Draw, we incorrectly reported Spectrum Projects 
as being in Florida. Spectrum is located in the state of 
New York. 



does not offer a free upgrade of the Multi-Pak Interface, 
regardless of date of purchase or whether the warranty 
is still in effect. There is a charge for this service. 



Festive CoCo: Ready to PAINT the Town" (July 
1986, Page 46), "PUT Speedy GETzales to Work" 
(November 1986, Page 158): H. Allen Curtis has written 
to describe a problem with running his programs from 
RAINBOW ON TAPE. It appears that, in the process of 
compiling RAIN BOW ON TAPE, two extra bytes are added 
to the end of the files. This interferes with the embedded 
machine language Mr. Curtis uses in some of his 
programs. To correct the problem, merely load each 
program, replace POKE 337, 2G in Line 2 with POKE 
337,24 and resave the program. 



"A PAL for Your CoCo 3" (January 1987, Page 98): 

Contrary to speculation in the article, Radio Shack 



For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DPTP at 
the CoCo SIG prompt and INFO at the Topic? prompt. 



160 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



he Best Money Can Buy . . . 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 



•»»# ■ III ua»< 



AMflO OflJV£ SPECIALIST 

COLO* COUrUTlH CCHTHOILLH 
V. 





Recfuce your I/O errors with the Hard DHve Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controHer allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering Information ; 

Use our WATS line to place your order via Visa, MasterCard, or Wire Transfer. Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any noh -certified funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COO. orders are accepted as well as purchase orders from 
government agencies. Most items are shipped off the shelf with the exception pi hard 
drive products that are custom built. UPS ground is our standard means of shipping 
unless otherwise specified. Shipping costs are available upori request 



Drive 0 SS/DD $150. 

WHILE SUPPLY LASTS! 

Drive 0 Complete v $199. 

Drive 1 Complete $129. 

Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive $319. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



END; 
END; 



PROCEDURE LISTPROGRAM; 
BEGIN 
PAGE ; 

CASE DIRECTION OF 

1 P 1 : REWRITE ( PRTFILE , 1 : -2 1 ) ; 

1 L 1 : REWRITE (PRTFILE, 1 : -3 ' ) 
END; 

LINENUMBER : =5 ; 
LISTADDR:=1; 
WRITELN ; 
REPEAT 

LISTPROG1; 

LINENUMBER : =LINENUMBER+ 5 ; 
UNTIL LISTADDR=0; 
WRITELN; 

REWRITE (PRTFILE , 1 : -3 1 ) ; 

WRITE ( 1 PRESS <ENTER> TO CONTINUE 1 ) ; 
REPEAT KEY :=CALL( 41419 , 0) UNTIL KEYoO ; 
END; 






PROCEDURE RUNPROGRAM; 
BEGIN 
PAGE ; 

WHILE TRUE DO BEGIN 
LINENUMBER: =5; 
FOR KEY:=1 TO 2 000 DO BEGIN 

VALUE :=0; 
END? 
RE PEAT 

IF DIRECTION= 1 T 1 THEN BEGIN 

REPEAT KEY:=CALL(41419,0) UNTIL KEYoO 
END; 

CHOICE :=BYTE [6528 0] ; 
CASE CHOICE OF 

125 / 126,253 / 254:EXIT 
END; 

MOTORNUM : =WORD [ POI NTER+ LINENUMBER ] ; 

VALUE: =BYTE [POINTER+LINENUMBERH-2 ] ; 

DURATION : =WORD [POINTER+LINENUMBER+3 ] ; 

LISTPROG1; 

CASE MOTORNUM OF 

$FF4 0 , $FF4 1 , $FF4 4 , $FF4 5 : BEGIN 

BYTE [ MOTORNUM ] : =VALUE ; 

REPEAT 

FOR KEY:=1 TO 1000 DO BEGIN 

CHOICE :=0 ; 
END; 

DURATION: =PRED (DURATION) ; 
UNTIL DURATIONS- 
END; 

$FF42 ; $FF46: BEGIN 
REPEAT 

DURATION : =BYTE [ MOTORNUM ] AND VALUE ; 







162 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



UNTIL DURATI 0N= VALUE; 
END; 

$FF48 , $FF4C : BEGIN 
REPEAT 

FOR KEY:=1 TO 1000 DO BEGIN 

CHOICE :=0 ; 
END; 

DURATION : =PRED ( DURATION) ; 
UNTIL DURATIONS- 
END; 

$FF49, $FF4D: BEGIN 

WRITEADDR: =MOTORNUM-7 ; 
OFFSET : =VALUE ; 
LINENUMBER: =LINENUMBER+5 ; 
LISTPROGl; 

MOTORNUM : =WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER] ; 
VALUE : =BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+2 ] ; 
BYTE [ MOTORNUM ] : = VALUE ; 
REPEAT 

DURATION :=BYTE [WRITEADDR] AND OFFSET; 
UNTIL DURATION=OFFSET; 
BYTE [MOTORNUM] :=0 ; 
END 
END; 

BYTE [MOTORNUM] : =0 ; 
LINENUMBER: =LINENUMBER+5 ; 
UNTIL MOTORNUM=0; 
END; 





We are Canada's 
largest Software Distributors 
for the Color Computer 



*0. 3 




COCO-3 
OK MEMORY 
UPGRADE 
BOARDS 

$74.95 

Add $5.00 Shipping 



COCO-3 
512K MEMORY 
BOARDS 

$164.95 



Add $5.00 Shipping 



Kelly Software Distributors Ltd. 

P.O. Box 608, Station T Calgary, Alberta T2H 2H2 

TEL: 1-403-236 2161 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 163 




END; 

PROCEDURE EDITLINE; 
BEGIN 
PAGE ; 

WHILE TRUE DO BEGIN 
WRITELN ; 

WRITE ( 1 ENTER LINE NUMBER TO EDIT > ' ) ; 
READLN ( LINENUMBER ) ; 
IF LINENUMBER=0 THEN EXIT; 
IF LINENUMBER MOD 5=0 THEN BEGIN 

REWRITE (PRTFILE, ' : -3 1 ) ; 

LISTPROG1; 

WRITELN ; 

WRITEPROG1 
END 

ELSE WRITELN (• INVALID LINE NUMBER'); 

END; 
END; 

PROCEDURE DELETELINE; 
BEGIN 
PAGE ; 

WHILE TRUE DO BEGIN 
WRITELN ; 

WRITE ( 1 ENTER LINE NUMBER TO DELETE > ' ) ; 

READLN (LINENUMBER) ; 

IF LINENUMBER=0 THEN EXIT; 

IF LINENUMBER MOD 5=0 THEN BEGIN 

WORD [ POINTER] : =WORD [ POINTER] -5 ; 

REWRITE (PRTFILE, 1 : -3 1 ) ; 

LISTPROGl; 

REPEAT 

WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER] : =WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+5 ] 
BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+2 ] : =BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+ 
WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+3 ] : =WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+ 
LINENUMBER: =LINENUMBER+5 ; 
UNTIL WORD [POINTER+LINENUMBER] =0 ; 
END; 
END; 
END; 



7] 
8] 



PROCEDURE APPENDPROGRAM ; 
BEGIN 

LINENUMBER :=WORD[ POINTER] ; 
PAGE ; 

DIRECTION :=' A" ; 
WHILE DIRECTION<'X' DO BEGIN 
WRITEPROG1 ; 

WORD [POINTER] : =LINENUMBER; 
LINENUMBER: =LINENUMBER+5 ; 
END; 
END; 




PROCEDURE INSERTLINE; 
VAR NEWLINE: INTEGER; 
BEGIN 



764 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



PAGE; 

LINENUMBER : =WORD [ POINTER ] 
WORD [POINTER] : =LINENUMBER4-5 ; 
WRITELN ; 

WRITE ('ENTER LINE TO INSERT >'); 
READLN ( NEWLINE ) ; 

IF NEWLINE>LINENUMBER THEN EXIT; 
IF NEWLINE MOD 5=0 THEN BEGIN 
REPEAT 

WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER] : =WORD [ POINTER+LINENUMBER-5 ] ; 
BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER+2 ] : =BYTE [ POINTER+LINENUMBER- 3 ] ; 
WORD[POINTER+LINENUMBER+3 ] : =WORD[ POINTER+LINENUMBER- 2 ] ; 
LINENUMBER : =LINENUMBER-5 ; 
UNTIL LINENUMBER=NEWLINE ; 

WRITEPROG1; 
END; 
END; 



BEGIN 
PAGE ; 

BYTE [150] :=1; 
DIRECTION : = ' A 1 ; 
POINTER :=WORD[ 186] +1 ; 
WRITELN ( 1 POINTER= 1 , POINTER: 5) 
WRITELN ; 

REWRITE (PRTFILE, 1 : -3 1 ) ; 
LINENUMBER : =5; 




WHILE TRUE 
PAGE ; 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN; 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ; 
WRITE ( 1 



DO BEGIN 



ROBOTICS PROGRAM'); 

A - APPEND MACRO LINES 1 ) 
D - DELETE MACRO LINE ' ) ; 
E - EDIT MACRO LINE 1 ) ; 
I - INSERT MACRO LINES ' ) 
L - LIST ROBOT MACRO 1 ) ; 
P - PRINT ROBOT MACRO ' ) ; 
Q - QUIT TO BASIC ) ; 
R - RUN ROBOT MACRO 1 ) ; 
T - TEST ROBOT MACRO 1 ) ; 
W - WRITE ROBOT MACRO 1 ) ; 

ENTER CHOICE > f ) ; 



READLN ( DIRECTION ) 
CASE DIRECTION OF 



f A 1 
1 D f 
'E f 
1 1 1 
■L f 



APPENDPROGRAM; 
DELETELINE; 
EDITLINE; 
INSERTLINE; 

, 1 p f : listprogram; 

»Q f tEXIT; 

1 R 1 , 1 T 1 : RUNPROGRAM; 
'W 1 : WRITEPROGRAM 
ELSE WRITE ( 1 
END; 

END; 

END. 




INVALID SELECTION') 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 165 



A Spelling Program Tha 



Speaks for Itself 



By Fred B. Seerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the " Wishing Well, " submit it to Fred 
cjo THE rainbow. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 't for get that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 



Approximately two years ago, 
Tandy introduced the Speech/ 
Sound Pak for its Color Com- 
puter line. While several other models 
were already on the market, some at a 
considerably lower price, Tandy re- 
leased this little wonder that was ca- 
pable of working as a free-standing add- 
on. No machine language driver needed 
to be loaded into this ROM pack, as 
some other models required. The voice 
was clear and realistic sounding and it 
only took a few lines to incorporate the 
synthesizer into your BASIC programs. 



Fred Seer bo is a special needs instructor 
for the North A dams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master s in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



The Speech/Sound Pak still remains 
part of the Tandy catalog, while some 
other earlier, independent models are 
now hard to find. One void still remains, 
however. Owners of this Pak still do not 
have enough software to meet their 
needs or appetites. Therefore, at the 
suggestion of Mr. Don Andreatta of 
Houston, Texas, this month's "Wishing 
Well" returns to the field of artificial 
voice synthesis by introducing a new 
program, Hear It and Spell It. 

Why a Talking Speller? 

When 1 began learning BASIC pro- 
gramming after buying my first CoCo, 
a number of programs were provided as 
standard introductions to the world of 
programming. One was, u Let's design a 
program that simulates the rolling of 
dice!" Another hot ticket was a simple 
"yes/ no" or "true/false" format for 
tests. The third biggest item covered in 
training books was usually some kind of 
spelling test. I combed through these 
books trying to find anything I could 
use in my classroom, especially a decent 
spelling program. 

There was usually one problem with 
all of these simple BASIC programs: 
None of them was really very effective 
for drilling or quizzing in spelling. The 
main reason for this shortcoming is the 



fact that there is no effective or realistic 
way to portray the word to be spelled 
without actually displaying it on the 
screen. There have been many noble 
attempts, however. 

Some programmers have written 
variations on the TV game shows, 
Password or Wheel of Fortune. There 
have been other efforts such as Hang- 
man or Tri- Planetary Hangmenoids 
(from an earlier "Wishing Well"), which 
involve a hit or miss approach to guess- 
ing what word has been selected by the 
computer. Since in spelling we are 
trying to arrive at the correct letter-for- 
letter version of a word, a hit or miss 
approach is not the best idea. 

There is really only one way to cor- 
rectly teach, drill and quizspelling. That 
technique is to have the word pro- 
nounced to the person trying to spell it. 
That is the way teachers have done it for 
centuries. The advent of microcomput- 
ers is no reason to abandon a successful 
method. Instead, the improvement of 
artificial speech in home microcomput- 
ers has given us a better reason to adapt 
this new technology to the old tech- 
nique, rather than vice versa. 

That brings us to this month's talking 
program: Hear It and Spell It. Designed 
with these thoughts in mind, H&SPELL 
(its 8 asic filename) offers home users a 



16S THERAINBOW February 1987 



"Your CoCo 
greets you 
with each new 
word and 
recites it twice 
before asking 
you how to 
spell it." 



catchy update of the old spelling bee. 
Granted, many users may have already 
come up with their own talking spellers 
upon purchasing the Tandy synthesizer. 
However, I have attempted to make the 
program as classy and simple as possi- 
ble, while still retaining the flavor and 
feel of our usual "Wishing Well" offer- 
ings. 

The Program 

H&5PELL will fit in a standard 16K 
CoCo with Extended Color BASIC. (It 
may also work on a I6K Color BASIC 
machine, but I no longer have one to try 
it on. All my machines were upgraded 
long ago. Sorry, all you MC-10 users!) 
As you start to type in the listing, you 
will notice that between lines 9 and 10 
there appears to be a strange space 
without a line number. To get this effect, 
when typing in Line 9, simply advance 
the space bar until the line appears 
exactly as shown on the 32-column 
listing in the magazine. You may then 
type in the string of '*'s for our border. 

The title card is made from our 
Titlemaker from several issues ago. 



Every month 1 get letters from readers 
who say they get an OD Error when 
running one of these listings they have 
typed in. Once again, let me remind you 
that the DATR statements at the begin- 
ning of the listing must be typed in 
exactly as you see them. Leaving out so 
much as a comma will cause the pro- 
gram to choke. Therefore, please be 
precise when typing in the program. 

One of the first subroutines in the 
program consists of the actual lines 
suggested by the instruction manual 
that comes with the Speech/ Sound Pak, 
with a few minor changes. Many of the 
instructions needed to run the program 
will also be spoken by your CoCo as the 
program begins. Remarks such as, 
"Press ENTER to continue" are actually 
spoken. Anytime a phrase needs to be 
spoken, it is given the value of A$ and 
sent to the subroutine that activates the 
SPEECH (GD5UB 105). 

One thing you will notice is that all 
my speech strings (A$) are written out 
phonetically. For example, my last 
name, Scerbo, is written as Skerbo. 
While the Pak is usually very accurate 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Here are two related one-liners from the same 
gentleman. Asclist (Listing I) lists an ASCII file from 
disk to your screen. Hexlist (Listing 2) performs the 
same task, except that output will be in hexadecimal 
form. A simple edit here and there will cause the 
output to go to your printer. 

Listing 1: 

1 LINEINPUT"FILENAME: " ; R$ : OPEN"I 
» , # 1 , R$ : CLOSE : OPEN" D" , # 1 , R$ , 1 : FI 
ELD# 1 , IAS A$ : FORX=lTOLOF ( 1 ) : GET# 
1 : PRINTA$ ; : NEXTX : CLOSE : END 

Listing 2: 

1 LINEINPUT" FILENAME : " ; R$ : OPEN "I 
" / # 1 , R$ : CLOSE : OPEN" D 11 , # 1 , R$ , 1 : FI 
ELD#1, IAS A$:FORX=lTOLOF(l) :B$=" 
[ ] " :GET#l:MID$ (B$,2)=HEX$ (ASC( 
A$ ) ) : PRINTB$ ; : NEXTX : CLOSE : END 



Byron Walton 
Calgary, Alberta 



(For ihcse winning one-liner coniest entries, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 




Wouldn't it be great lo use an IBM PC, XT, AT in- 
compatible to run CoCo OS-9 and FLEX software. 

Well, now you can with our PI-6009 processor card. PI-6809 
fits neatly into a full si/.e expansion slot in the PC. It 
features ONE MEGABYTE RAM, 128K EPROM and a full 
RS-232 interface. 

Our software runs FLEX and boo Is CoCo OS-9 from disk 
yet gives you FULL ACCESS to PC facilities including harrl 
disk, printer, network . . . and file transfer between FLEX, 
OS-9 and PC/MS-DOS formats. 

NO RISK TRIAL — Buy the PI-6009 now and we give you 
a money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. DON'T 
DELAY — ORDER TODAY! 

Special Introductory Price — S495.00 
Shipping and Insurance — $ 19.50 

COMPUSENSE LIMITED, PO BOX 169, 
PALMERS GREEN, LONDON, ENGLAND 
N13 5XA Phone 01-882 0681/6936 

Ch eques, Money Orders, VISA 
and MASTERCH ARGE accepted 
Dealer Enquiries Welcome 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 167 



in pronouncing a string you give it, 
there are just some combinations it 
cannot get. That is why for each word 
we want to have spoken and then 
spelled, we must supply the correct 
spelling first, followed by the correct 
pronunciation. 

The words we want to try in our 
spelling d rill will be included starting in 
Line 1000. The correct entry for putting 
in your own words is: 

1000 DRTR SPELLING, 
PRONUNCIATION 

with the last line being: 

5000 DRTR END , END 

The program is designed to handle 40 
spelling words (41 counting the END 
statement that is our flagto stop reading 
data). If you want to increase the 
number of words, increase the value of 
5N in Line 70 to be one more than the 
number you want. (If you want 100, 
then 5W=101.) 

Be sure to save the program before 
trying to run it. A mistake in the POKE 
statements at the front of the listing 
could lock up the machine and cause 
you to lose your whole program. There- 
fore, save it first. 

Running the Program 

I am not going to take the fun out of 
running the program by printing out 
everything the program says when you 
run it. You will be able to tell either 
when you type in the listing or when you 
run it for the first time, You can advance 
from the titlecard by pressing ENTER. 

Your CoCo greets you with each new 
word and recites it twice before asking 
you how to spell it. A set of l *'s corre- 
sponding to the number of letters in the 
word appears. You will also notice that 
the set of color borders on the screen 
changes with each new word. An arrow 
flashes below the letter to be attempted. 

If at any time you want to hear the 
word again, just press the space bar to 
have it pronounced again. As you select 
each letter to try, your CoCo will say the 
letter. If you are not correct, it will say, 



"No, not J" or whatever letter it is you 
pressed. Be sure not to type the letters 
in too quickly, or you may get ahead of 
the program. There is sometimes some 
delay when calling the sound subrou- 
tine, so typing too fast can mess you up 
if you make a mistake. 

Once the word is correctly spelled, it 
is repeated and the program spells the 
word out loud while flashing each letter. 
This serves as a good reinforcer of the 
actual spelling becausethe user sees and 
hears the words spelled right on the 
screen. 

As with all my programs, pressing @ 
gives you the score card. You may press 
Y to rerun, N to stop or C to continue 
with the word you were working on. 
Any error in the spelling of a word will 
count the whole word as wrong. (Sorry, 
but that's the way it is with real spelling 
tests, too.) 

The order of the words will be differ- 
ent each time you run the program. 
Remember, putting in too many words 
will make the program an absolute 
torture for any child to use. (Would you 
want to sit and spell 100 words on the 
computer? Keep it simple.) 

Try Some Other Words 

You will notice I only included 10 
words in the sample listing. Here are a 
few more suggestions you can try in 
place of the ones in the listing. Be sure 
to type DEL1000"4Sgg and press ENTER 
to delete the words in this listing if you 
already have the program saved with 
these words. 

While some words may be listed 
twice, since the spelling and pronunci- 
ation are usually the same, here is a 
short list of some that do require pho- 
netic changes: 

1000 DRTR CHILDREN, CHILL OREN 
1010 DRTR TOMORROW s TO MORRON 
1020 DRTR NINETEEN, NI NTEEN 
1030 DRTR BRERKFR5T , BREKFR5T 
1040 DRTR FE8RURRY ,FE8URRY 
1050 DRTR NERTHER, NETHER 
1060 DRTR 0NI0N5,UNYUN5 
1070 DRTR 5NERTER, 5NETTER 
1080 DRTR HERLTH t HELTH 
1030 DRTR RMERICR,RHMEHRIi<R 
5000 DRTR END, END 



You can get the proper rhythm in the 
pronunciation by adding spaces as 
needed in the spelling. If you would like 
to see some good examples of the need 
to use phonics in the pronunciation, try 
the spelling words for these stales: 

1000 DRTR MINNE50TR,MIN EH 
50 TR 

1010 DRTR ILLINOIS, ILLINOI 

1020 DRTR PENN5YLVRNIR, 

PENN5YLVRNE E RH 

1030 DRTR CONNECTICUT, 

CONNETTICUT 

1040 DRTR HRNRII ,HR NHYEE 
1050 DRTR IDRHO, I DRHO 
10G0 DRTR MISSISSIPPI, 
MI55I55IPPEE 
1070 DRTR GEDRGIR,GORBIR 
1080 DRTR 0HI0,0 HI □ 
1030 DRTR UTRH,U TRHN 
5000 DRTR END, END 

Some of the states actually work out 
OK, but these can be a real pain. If you 
need tocheck the correct pronunciation 
of a word as you are typing in the list, 
run the program with some words in it 
and press BREAK. Take the spelling you 
would like to use for pronunciation and 
make it equal to fi$, such as: 

R$="BRHLONEY" 

Press ENTER and then type in: 

GO5UB105 

Then press ENTER again. If you didn't 
quite hear it, then GO5UB105 again. You 
can repeat this process until you get the 
sound right. Then type it into the DRTR 
line as needed. Remember, always put 
thecorrectspellingfirstand the pronun- 
ciation second. Last of all, always 
remember to include Line 5000 DRTR 
END, END to make the program work. 

Conclusion 

Next month, we will try another new 
approach to your ideas, maybe even 
with artificial sound again. Let me 
know how well this program works for 
you, and keep your suggestions com- 
ing. □ 



135 . 
235 . 
335 . 
410 . 
END 



.145 
.225 
.210 

.178 
. .79 
..99 



The Listing: H&5PELL 



1 REM************************** 

2 REM* HEAR IT AND SPELL IT * 

3 REM* BY FRED B.SCERBO * 

4 REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 198 6 * 

5 REM* 60 HARDING AV. N .ADAMS , MA* 

6 REM************************** 



168 THB RAINBOW February 1 98 7 




) 



The DS-69A is the best video digitizer available for your COCO at any price. This new, turbocharged version of our 
original DS-69 Digisector allows your 64K COCO to see clearly into the world of any television picture. 



SPEED! 

PRECISION! 

RESOLUTION! 

Compabitibility 

Compactness 

Convenience 

Ease of Use 



The fastest — 8 images per second! 

The highest — 64 levels of true grey scale! 

The finest — 256 x 256 picture elements! 

Use with a black and white or color camera, a VCR or tuner. 

Self contained in a plug in Rompack. 

Use with a Y-cable, Multi-Pak, PBJ Bus or plug directly into the cartridge slot. 
Software on disk will get you up and running fast! 



POWERFUL C-SEE™ SOFTWARE 



C-SEE is the menu driven software package included with your DS-69A. Available on disk or cassette, it provides 
lightning fast 5 level digitizing to the screen, high precision 16 level digitizing for superb hard copy printout and 
simple keyboard or joystick control of brightness and contrast. Or call our driver routines from your own Basic 
program for easy 64 level random access digitizing. Pictures taken by the DS — 69A may be saved on disk or 
cassette by C-SEE and then edited with COCO MAX, MAGIGRAPH or GRAPHICOM for special effects. Any of the 
popular printers may be used to obtain printouts of images digitized by the DS-69A. 

ONE YEAR WARRANTY 

DS-69A Digisector & C-SEE III Software 

OR your DS-69 & 
MAGIGRAPH Graphics Editor on disk 



$149.95 
$ 59.95 
$ 39.95 



vo9 



SO 



0^ 



DS-69 DIGISECTOR 
THERE'S ONLY ONE BETTER 



3 



VIDEO DIGITIZER 



And that's the DS-69A. The DS-69 is The Micro Works' original video digitizer, tried and true since 1984. It provides 
almost all the features of the DS-69A and is now available at a new low price. The D&69 features; 

SLUGGISHNESS 2 images per second. Quick enough to freeze all but the fastest moving pictures. 
INCOMPATIBILITY Brightly colored scenes may be striped when using a color camera 
INCONVENIENCE Will not work with a Y cable. 

Otherwise, it's a DS-69A. Precision, resolution, compactness, ease of use, software and warranty. 
Except one last thing. 

DS-69 Digisector & C-SEE III Software $ 99.95 

Superb image quality produced by both Digisectors. 



* .1 





Screen 




Screen 



Printout 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new DS-69A or DS-69 
you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full refund of the purchase price. 
We'll even pay the return shipping. If you can get any of our competitors to give you 
the same guarantee, buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. ^7©[^[J^5 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



7 REM* THIS PROGRAM WILL NOT * 

8 REM* WORK WITHOUT A SPEECH * 

9 REM*SOUND-PAK BY RADIO SHACK* 
REM* ************************* 

10 CLSft : CLEAR2 ,0,0,0 : PRINTSTRING$ (3 
2,25 2) ; :F0RI=1T032J3:READA:PRINTC 
HR$ (A+12 8) ; : NEXT 

15 DATA6J3, 58, 48, 62 ,56,61,60,60,5 
8,53,60,60,58,52,62,60,60,58, ,84 
,94,85,92,93,92,93,80,16,19,27,1 

8, 

20 DATA, 59, 51, 58, ,53,51,50,48,53 
,51,51,58, ,59,51,51,58, ,80,90, , , 
85, ,,,17,27, 19,19, 

25 DATA, 58, ,58, ,53, , ,48,53, , ,58, 
,58,53,50, , ,80,90, , ,85, ,21,16, 
16, 16, 

30 DATA51,58,,59,50,55,51,51,58, 
55,,, 59, 49, 58,, 61, 51, 48, 81, 91,,, 
87,82, , , 20 , 28 , 29 , 28 , 24 
35 DATA99,99,99,99,98,99,99,99,9 
9, 98, 99, 99, 99, 99, 99, 98, 99, 98,,, 9 
9, 98,,, 35, 34, 35,35, 35, 35, 35, 34 
40 DATA106, , ,96,104, 101, ,,, 106, 1 
01,96, ,, ,104,101, ,, ,101, ,, ,37, ,4 
0 , , 37 , , , 40 

45 DATA106, , , , ,101, , , ,106,101, , , 

/ / / 1 / f i i IP 1 1 r r r 3 7 t t t t 37 t t r 

50 DATA108, 108 ,108,108,106,101,1 
08,108,108,104,101,108,108,108,1 
04, ,101, , , ,101, , , ,37, , , ,37, , , 
55 DATA, ,, ,106,101, ,,, ,101, ,,,, , 
101, , ,98, 101,96, ,98,37, ,, ,37, , , 
60 DATA107,99,99,99,106,103, , , , , 
103,99,99,99,99,106,103,99,99,10 
6,103,99,99, 106,39,34, , ,39,34, , 
65 PRINTSTRING$ (32,243) ; 
70 T=80 : K=l : SW=4 1 : MU=RND ( -TIMER) 
75 DIM B$ (SW) ,W$ (SW) ,P$ (SW) ,P(SW 
) ,Q(41) ,C(7) 

80 F0RI=1T07 :C (I) = (1*16) +14 3.-NEX 



85 XX=&HFF00 : YY=&HFF7E 

90 POKEXX+1, 52 : POKEXX+3 , 63 

95 POKEXX+35,60 

100 GOTO140 

105 FORII=lTOLEN(A$) 

110 IF PEEK(YY) AND 128=0 THEN110 

115 POKEYY,ASC(MID$(A$,II,l) ) 

120 NEXTII 

125 IFPEEK(YY) AND12 8=0THEN125 
130 POKEYY,13 

135 FORHH=1TO70:NEXTHH: RETURN 
140 A$="HEAR IT AND SPELL IT. BY 
FRED B SKERBO. .COPPEERIGHT NI H 
N TEEN EIGHTY SIX" : GOSUB105 
145 PRINT@422," BY FRED B.SCERB 
0 " ; 

150 PRINT@454," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 

86 "; 

155 FORI=1TO20:READW$ (I) ,P$ (I) 
160 IFW$ (I)="END"THEN170 
165 NEXTI 

170 A$="PRESS ENTER TO BE GIN":G 

OSUB105 

175 LN=I-1 

180 FORI=lTOLN 

185 P(I)=RND(LN) :IF Q(P(I))=1THE 
N185 

190 Q(P(I) )=1:NEXTI 

195 IFINKEY$<>CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN195 

200 FOR PY=1T0 LN:C=PY 

205 G=RND ( 7 ) 

210 FT=0:NT=0 

215 CLS0:PRINT@0,STRING$ (64,C(G) 
) :PRINT@96," O.K. LET'S TRY TH 
IS ONE !" 

220 A$="0 K LETS TRY. THIS ONE":G 
OSUB105 

225 PRINT @ 12 8," HOW WOULD YOU S 

PELL ?": PRINT :PRINTSTRING$ ( 

64 ,C(G) ) ; :A$="HOW WOOD YOU SPELL 



Canyon County Deuices 

P..0. BokC 
Saugus, Ca. 91 350 




Voice: (31 8] 304-133S 

Data: (805) 253-0221 
300/1200 8-N-1 

Precision™ 

Mfg. by Xidex/Dysan 
High Qual i ty at 1 ow 
cost DSDD 5i" Disks 
10 per box. $9.90bx 
3-9 10 up 

$9.20 $8.40 



Generic DSDD 5i" Disks. * cr nn per box 
68* each 30 for $18 ^JQ^of 100. 



FOR ORDERS LESS THAN $20.00 ADD $1.50 
FOR ALL C.O.D. ORDERS ADD $1.50 ALSO. 
PRINTER RIBBONS 



Catalog! 


Description 




[5-11 


12 


101-1505 


C.Itoh Prowriter IMI Ceylon) 


It 5.05 


$ 4.65 


£ 4.35 


101-2240 


Epson LX80 (N^lonL. 


S 5.95 


I 5.45 


4 5.15 


101-22SC 


Epson Mx/*X/RX 70/80 


[Nylon 




1 4.95 


S 4.55 


S 4.30 




Gemini 10/10X/15/15X 


[Nylon 1 




$ 2.20 


S 2.00 


s 1.9a 




OkidataCMicroline} 80 / 82 / 83 / 92 / 93 (Ny) 


$ 2.20 


$ 2.30 


$ 1.90 


101-4515 


Ok i foU(M i c rolTnel "ML 84 £Nj> ton) 


S 5.15 


% 4.70 


$ 4.45 


101-4?00 


Panasonic KX-P 1 090/91/92 [Nylon} 


M 1 . 1 5 


T10".45 


£10.10 



NOW MORE COLORS IN MORE TYPES OF RIBBONS ARE 
NEW COLOR SETS AVAILABLE. IRON ON TRANSFER RI 
USE YOUR MODEM ON THE DATA LIKE AND SAVE 10% 
NEXT ORDER. YOU'LL FIND OUR COMPLETE CATALOG. 
IONS, AND LATE BREAKING SPECIALS. 

GET 10% DISCOUNT ON YOUR NEXT 
BY ORDERING ON THE DATA LINE. 



AVAILABLE . 
BBONS ALSO. 
ON YOUR 
NEW ADDIT- 

ORDER 



170 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



" :GOSUB105 
2 30 FORDL=1TO1400 : NEXTDL: PRINT 
235 C$=W$ (P(C) ) :A$=P$ (P(C) ) :GOSU 
B105:PRINT 

240 P=LEN(C$) : PRINT @2 9 9, STRING $ ( 
P, "*") : PRINT 
245 GOSUB105 

250 PRINTSTRING$(64,C(G) ) ; 

255 FORDL=1TO900: NEXTDL 

260 F0RI=1T0P:B$(I)=MID$(C$,I,1) 

:NEXTI 

2 65 PRINT@448," PRESS <SPACEBAR> 

TO SAY WORD. " ; 
270 FORI=lTOP 
275 PRINT@3 30+I, " A " ; 
280 X$=INKEY$ 
285 IFX$=" "THENGOSUB105 
290 IFX$="@ "THEN 400 
295 PRINT@3 30+I, " 11 ; 
300 IFX$<"A"THEN275 
305 IFX$>"Z"THEN275 
310 PRINT@3 30+I," " 
275 

315 PRINT@298+I,X$; : A$=X$ : GOSUB1 

05 : IFX$=B$ ( I ) THEN 3 40 

320 F0RY=1T05 : NEXTY 

325 NT=NT+l:A$="NO NOT "+X$:GOSU 

B105 

330 FORDL=1TO500:NEXTDL:A$=P$ (P( 
C)) 

335 PRINT@298+I, "*" ; :GOT0275 

340 A$=P$ (P(C) ) :NEXTI 

345 A$="VERY GOOD. " : GOSUB105 

350 A$=P$ (P(C) )+" IS SPELLED. ":G 

OSUB105 

355 FORDL=1TO2 600:NEXTDL 

360 FORI=lTO P: A$=B$ ( I ) : GOSUB105 

:V=ASC(B$(I) ) 

365 F0RG=1T06:PRINT@2 9 8+I, CHR$ (V 
+3 2) ; :F0RDL=1T02 5: NEXTDL :PRINT@2 
98+1, B$ (I) ; : F0RDL=1T02 5 : NEXTDL: N 



: IFX$=""THEN 



EXTG:NEXTI 

370 FORDL=1TO200 : NEXTDL: A$=P$ (P( 

C) ) : GOSUB105 : GOSUB105 

375 IF NT=>1THEN NW=NW+1 ELSE NC 

=NC+1 

3 80 PRINT© 4 4 8, 11 PRESS <ENTER> 
TO CONTUNUE . 11 ; 

385 FORDL=1TO900 : NEXTDL :A$="PRES 
S ENTER TO CON TIN U":GOSUB105 
390 IFINKEY$OCHR$ ( 13 ) THEN3 90 
39 5 NEXTPY 

400 CLS : PRINT § 101, "YOU TRIED"NC+ 
NW'WORDS AND" :PRINT@165, "SPELLED 
"NC" CORRECTLY" 

405 PRINT@2 2 9 , "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 
ONG. " 

410 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

415 MS=INT(NC/NQ*100) 

420 PRINT@2 9 3 , "YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 

%." 

425 PRINT@357, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 
C) ?"; 

430 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 
435 IFX$= ,I N"THENCLS:END 
440 IFX$="C"THEN205 
445 GOTO430 

1000 DATA ALLEGIANCE, AH LEEJENTS 

1010 DATA MIXTURE, MIXTURE 

1020 DATA ENCYCLOPEDIA, EN SI CLO 

PE DEEAH 
1030 DATA ME CHAN I C , MEHKAHNIK 
1040 DATA INDUSTRIAL, INDUHSTREE 
AHL 

1050 DATA ALCOHOL, AL COHALL 
1060 DATA ELECTRI CITY , E LEK TRIS 
SITY 

1070 DATA SOLUTION, SO LU SHUN 
1080 DATA INVENTORY , INNVVIN TORY 
1090 DATA SUPERMARKET, S 00 PPER M 
AR KET 

5000 DATA END, END /s\ 




- .<?> -p\> > o5> jvS^ ^ 



A. 



6 




$18.00 U.S. 
$1.50 shipping. 



v<p p # _<o v 



U.S. check or money 
order. RI residents 
please add 6% sales tax. 



6^ ^ 



> <^ <^ # ^ 3? 



TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 171 



Continued from Page JO 



BRICKBATS 

Editor: 

I have a few complaints about Four Star 
Software and Penpal. I purchased Penpal 
early this year and had only one problem at 
first, and that is the same one that Graham 
Langford wrote about in the November 
issue. 

Occassionally when you press the A it 
instantly prints a@a , @a@, or ihihih when 
the I is pressed. I wrote to Four Star about 
this, but got no response. 

The next problem I had was when I tried 
the Sort routine in the database module. It 
does not use the computer's memory at all 
to sort and does all the sorting by accessing 
the disk intermittently. A sort of 120 items 
took 15 minutes. I did another sort and 
about halfway through, the drive crashed 
and I got a File Structure Error. 

The next problem was when I bought a 
new Dual TEAC drive. When I tried to load 
a file from one of the modules I kept getting 
a Drive Not Ready error. I found out that 
if I quickly pressed the load function imme- 
diately after getting the error that the file 
would load. As long as the drive was still on 
from the first try, it would work. Needless 
to say, it was very difficult to type in a file 
name the second time before the drive shut 
off. It seems that the program simply does 
not give the drive enough time to come up 
to speed, even though it seems to almost 

instantly. ~ n 

Dan Page 

Churchill, Mmnitob* 



PEN PALS 



• I am looking for some pen pals. I have a 
64K CoCo 2, disk drive, tape, modem, 
DMP-1 10 printer, and speech and sound 

pakl Steve Poates 

2056 South Mc Vay Drive 
Mobile, A L 36605 

• I am 35 years old and would like to 

correspond with CoCo users, especially in 

the northwest Arkansas four-state area. I 

have a 64K CoCo with disk, cassette and a 

DM P- 105 printer. „ . , „ . , 

r David Knight 

305 N. Main 

Bentonville, A R 72712 

• I am 15 years old and have a CoCo 2, a 
Modem I, two disk drives and a D MP- 1 00 
printer. I would like to hear from people 
from all over the worjd. If you have a 
modem or just want to talk about some- 
thing, call me at (805) 398-1029. Do not call 
after 10 p.m. (Pacific time) on weekdays. 

Don Lawson 
4309 Eakins Court 
Bakers field, CA 93311 



• I would like some pen pals in the CoCo 

Community. _ , , ... , . 

Todd Weakley 

643 E. Hawthorne Street 

Ontario, CA 9/764 

• I am looking for some pen pals from the 

Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania or New 

Jersey areas. 0 . 

Steve Slack 

6 Saddle Circle 

Newark, DE 1971 1 

• I would like some pen pals in the Clay- 
mont/ Wilmington area. I have a CoCo 2, 
disk drive, cassette, TRP-I00 printer and 
direct connect modem. 

James E. McDowell 
4C Rector Court 
Wilmington, DE 19810 

• I am looking for pen pals. I have a 64K 
CoCo, one drive and one printer modem. 

Lance Easley 
141 E. Gadsden Lane 
Cocoa Beach, FL 32931 

• I am 16 years old and looking for a pen 

pal. I have a 64K CoCo, one disk drive and 

a 300 baud Modem II. I have lots of games, 

Adventures, etc., so someone send me a 

letter. _ 

Steve Sizemore 

25250 SW 145 Avenue 

Homestead, FL 33032 

• I am 1 3 years old and looking for pen pals 
who are game nuts. It can be 8AS1C, binary, 
graphics, Adventures, etc. I love all games. 

Chris Weiss 
10106 S. W. 22 Terrace 
Miami, FL 33165 

• I am 1 5 years old and I have been to Japan 
twice for a total of four months and speak 
fluent Japanese. I have been programming 
in basic for five years. 1 have a CoCo 3 with 
four drives, a modem, printer, multipack 
and Speech/ Sound Pak. I'm looking for a 
pen pal, preferably one who has the same 
interests and speaks (or is) Japanese. 

Nimisi Malle 
1245 Thrush Avenue 
Miami Springs, FL 33166 

• I am 1 5 years old and would like pen pals 
aged 15-21 years, preferably from England, 
France, Germany, Scotland or from any 
other foreign country. pm)a ^ 

3 71 9 Casaba Loop 
Vairico, FL 33594 

• I would like to be a pen pal with anybody. 
I am 13 years old and have a CoCo 2, disk 
drive and a sound and speech cartridge. 

Alex Abraham 
555 Wyncourtney Drive 
A tlanta, GA 30328 

• 1 am 15 years old and in search of other 

teenage CoCo nuts. I have a 64K CoCo 2, 

CGP-220, two TEAC DSDD drives and a 

modem. ~ n , , , . 

tony Belehradek 

3514 So. E/mwood 

Berwyn, IL 60402 



• I have a CoCo 2, disk drive and modem, 
and I'm into all types of games, Simulations, 
Adventures and war games. If anyone has 
the same interests please contact me. 

Raymond Lueders 
1341 Sea Biscuit Lane 
Hanover Park, IL 60103 

• I am 16 years old and have a CoCo 2, 
DMP-105 printer, disk drive and cassette 
player. Anyone with at least a tape player 
can write me. I will answer all letters (SASE 
required). Dane Kramer 

802 N. DeQumcy 
Indianapolis, IN 46201 

• I am 15 years old and own a 64K CoCo, 

cassette recorder and disk drive. I'd like to 

have other CoCo pen pals from anywhere 

around the world. n n 

Scott Stevens 

1810 Peachtree Drive 

, Valparaiso, IN 46383 



• I am 17 years old and looking for a CoCo 
pen pal. My present system co nsists of a 64K 
CoCo 2, cassette recorder, FD-500 disk 
drive and a DMP-105 printer. I plan to 
purchase the new CoCo 3. 

Andrew Urquhart 
6813 Arthur Street 
Metairie, LA 70003 

• I am a 22-year-old looking for pen pals. 

1 have a CoCo 2 and 3, four d isk drives and 
cassettes. Will answer all replies. 

Bill Morse 
2 Ford Street 
Haverhill, MA 01830 

• I have both the CoCo 2 and 3, one disk 

drive and Gemini I0X printer. I would like 

to write to someone who has worked with 

EDSTA M VIP Writer/ Database and 

Musica 2. I teach at a multi-grade Christian 

school and would like to hear from other 

teachers. .... . 

Mike Lowe 

200 N. High 

Charlotte, Ml 48813 

• I am 32 years old and have a 64K CoCo 

2 with double disk and cassette. I would 

enjoy corresponding with adults of similar 

interests. ~ , . 

Dennis Lytle 

1920 Burnham 

Saginaw, Ml 48602 

• I am looking for pen pals. I have an older 

64K CoCo with a drive, DMP-105 and 

CGT-220 printers and Flatbed Plotter 215. 

Also a 32K Model 100 computer. 1 would 

like to hear from anyone interested in any 

of these. r , . . ~ 

Shirley lowns 

Box 3573 
Bozeman, MT 59772 

• Are you interested in having CoCo Com- 
puter pen pals from all over the world? I 
write dozens of letters each week to pen pals 
and I know that many of them would like 
to hear from other CoCo users. If anybody 



172 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-lOO 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



HALL OF THE KING (Rainbow Review 6/86) 

This program combines all the things you look for in a great 
two disk graphics adventure program. The Hi-Res graphics 
are superbly done. The text portion of the screen and the 
graphics change quickly as you move through the HALL OF 
THE KING. You can move freely from one portion of the 
adventure to another. Call up your inventory at any time. You 
can even save or load a game at ANY time. HALL OF THE 
KING will challenge even the most seasoned adventurer. 

HALL OF THE KING requires 64K EB and one disk drive. This 
exciting two disk adventure comes packaged in a vinyl case. 
$39.95. 

HALL OF THE KING II (Rainbow Review 9/86) 

Continue your quest for the Earthstone in The inner 
Chambers of the HALL OF THE KING. Outstanding graphics 
help show the way to success in your search to help restore 
the legendary power of the Earthstone to the dwarven race. 
The deeper you travel into the inner chambers, the more dif- 
ficult your progress becomes. HALL OF THE KING II has all 
the fine features of the first adventure. It is designed to 
follow the original HALL OF THE KING but may be played as 
a stand-alone adventure. The adventure fills two disks and 
comes packaged in a handsome vinyl folder. It requires one 
disk drive and 64K. $39.95 

WARP FACTOR X (Rainbow Review 2/86) 

If you have been waiting for a game for your color computer 
that has everything, your wait is over. WARP FACTOR X is 
here. This all graphics simulation game requires strategy, 
fast thinking, an eye for detail, and -above all experience in 
knowing the capabilities of your staiohip and its computer. 
(See review in Feb. 85 issue of Rainbow.) It requires 32K one 
disk drive and comes packaged in a vinyl library case. $34.95 

DARKMOOR HOLD (Rainbow Review 8/86) 

You and your comrades will explore the levels of Darkmoor 
Hold in an effort to gain great riches and defeat the dark 
wizard. The Wizard will soon realize the threat you pose and 
the many monsters you meet and battle will become stonger 
and more powerful as you move through the 10 levels of 
Darkmoor. A keen eye will help you find weapons and armor 
to aid your battle along with treasures for you to keep. Your 
party consists of a Dwarf, an Elf, and you, the Human, each 
with their own special attributes. The weapons, armor and 
treasure are placed randomly in each level to provide a new 
challenge each time you play. You may also save the game 
you are playing since defeating the evil Wizard is not an easy 
task. It has great graphics and an impressive text screen to 
give you more fun than a barrel of elves. Requires 64KEB and 
1 disk drive. $29.95 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — all of our software 
can be backed up using standard backup procedures. 

Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include $1.50 
shipping for each order. TX residents add 5 1/8% sales tax. 
Orders shipped within two days. 

Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. Canadian 
dealers should contact Kelly Software Distributors, Ltd. 608, 
STNT, Calgary, Alberta T5H 2H2, (403) 236-2161 




DRAGON BLADE (Rainbow Review 11/86) 
Animated Graphics Adventure 

This 100% hi-res graphics adventure features many animated 
screens which will delight the avid adventurer. You search for 
the magic Blade which is the only way to rid your homeland of 
the fearsome dragon which has risen from a long rest to ter- 
rorize your village. Fill your screen with super graphics as you 
try to solve the difficult challenge the village leaders have set 
before you. Dragon Blade requires 64K EB and 1 disk drive. 
$29.95 



DOLLAR WISE 



# 



In todays world of high finance, variable interest rates, 
balloon payments, and lease options there is a program that 
can help you sort out the details and make sense of the small 
print. DOLLAR WISE is an extremely flexible program that 
will allow you to find the best loan by subsl il ullng values for 
all the different variables that make up the loan. Find the 
future value and interest paid for either single or multiple 
deposit savings accounts. Determine mortgage interest paid 
during a tax year — very good for estimating tax savings on 
credit purchases also. Should you rent or buy. DOLLAR WISE 
gives you all the options. It will even provide a loan amortiza- 
tion table print out with Tax Year summaries either by month 
or year. Requires 32K Tape -$24.95 Disk - $27.95 



FONTFILE — (New for the COCO III) 



FONTFILE replaces the standard Hi-Res COCO III font with a 
character set you select. Choose from a menu of 26 or create 
your own and save It to disk for future use. Use the fontflle In 
your own basic programs or livenup an old program with a Hi- 
Res font screen. FONTFILE will work on all versions of the 
COCO but Is especially written to take advantage of the 
special capabilities of the new COCO III. Requires 64K and 
one disk drive. $24.95 



COMING SOON! 
Hall Of The King III 



Send for our free catalog 

Call (915) 584-7784 or 

Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

213 La Mirada 
El Paso, Texas 79932 





is interested, please send me a letter telling 

me what kind of system setup you have and 

111 try to match you up as close as possible 

wiih other CoCoZoids, n . , ... 

Erick Molnar 

65 A Park Street 

Reno, N V 89502 

• I have a 64K Extended Color Basic CoCo 
2 with one disk drive. Pm a loyal rainbow 
reader and would like a pen pal 

Chipper Pulitzer 
Box X - Palmer Hill Road 
Au Sable Forks, NY 12912 

• I am nine years old and have a CoCo 2 

with 64K and a cassette recorder I also like 

Adventure games. . . ... . 

& Jonathan Wan age I 

266 Sheldon Road 

Freeville, N Y 13068 



• I am (ooking for a technically minded pen 

pal to share programming and hard ware 

ideas wiih. I have a 64K CoCo and one disk 

drive. . ~ . 

Jason torbes 

RD 2, Box 380 

Hurlbui Road 

Mexico, NY 13114 

• I am 14 years old and looking for a pen 
pal. ! have a 64 K CoCo 2 with one disk drive. 

David Morgan 
621 Chatham Street 
Rome, N Y 13440 



• I would like a pen pal, I have a 64K CoCo 
2, disk drive, cassette recorder and TP- II 
and DMP-lll printers. 

Michael J, Clerico 
2648 Riverside A venue 
Seaford, NY II 783 

• I am looking for a pen pal. 

John Whita 
4141 Hamilton-EMton Road 
Hamilton, OH 450 1 1 



• I am looking for anyone who can write 
me and tell me what they know about 
computers. All letters will receive a reply. 

Lisa Brabh 
419 Believue 
Springfield, O H 45503 

• 1 am 15 years old and would like to get 
in Vouch wiih aU CoCo users in Oklahoma. 
1 own a 64K CoCo, two disk drives, an 
Epson RX-81 printer and cassette player. 

Brandon Knight 
RT. 2 

Sulphur, OK 73086 

• I am looking for a pen pal outside of the 
U.S. I am 17 years old and have a 64K CoCo 
1 and a 1 28 K CoCo 3, two disk drives, a Line 
Primer Vll and a cassette player. 

Scatty Huishof 
35468 Riverside 'Drive S W 
Albany, OR 97321 



• I am 13 years old and looking for a pen 

pal. I have a I6K ECB CoCo (soon to be 

upgraded to 64K), DMP-105 printer and a 

CCR -81 cassette recorder. . , w , 

John Mahan 

P.O. Box 1043 

Cave Junction, OR 9 7523 

• The International (80) Pen Pal Club is 
being started. Any CoCo owner can join. 
You must have a disk or cassette player. 

Nevin Keller 
136 S> 15th Street 
Easton, PA 18042 

• I am looking for a pen pal who likes to 
program in basic with assembly language 
subroutines. I have a 64 K CoCo 2 cassette 

system. Brian Lipscomb 

5/06 Whitby Avenue 
Philadelphia, PA 19143 



• I am looking for some CoCo pen pals in 
the tiniontown area. Write or call me at 
(412) 437-6215. Chuck Mills 

222 Evans Street 
Uniontown, PA 15401 

• I am 15 years old and am looking for a 
few pen pals from anywhere. I have two disk 
drives, printer, 64K and soon, a CoCo 3. 
Anyone with similar setup who is interested 
in games and programming, write me. 

Brad Bansner 
2006 A pple Place 
Wyomissing, PA 196/0 



• I would liketoknowifthereareanyhigh 
school girls who like to program and want 
a pen pal. 1 am a junior at Greenwood High 
School. My setup is a CoCo with RAM disk, 
one disk drive, printer and Multi-Pak. 

Patrick M alone 
4 Harper Lane 
Greenwood, SC 29646 

• I would like to have some pen pals. I own 
a CoCo 3 and IYn interested in hearing from 
other people with the new computer. 

Dave Bell 
116'hS. 300 East 
Smithfieid, UT84335 



• { would like to correspond with other 
CoCo readers. 1 have a 64K CoCo 2, a 
DMP-105 printer and a tape recorder. 

Richard L. West 
3946 Tuscaloosa Way 
West Jordan, UT 84084 

• I am interested in gelling a CoCo pen pal. 
I operate a BBS at (703) 365-2018 in Virgin- 
ia. I have a CoCo 2, two disk drives, m odem, 
cassette, DMP-105 printer and a Real 
T"a I k e r 

Ricky Sutphin 
Route I, Box 20 
Henry, VA 24/02 



• Anyone interested in a pen pal please 
contact me. I will do my best to answer all 
letters. I have lots of good public domain 
software. If anyone is interested, send an 
SASE or call me on a weekend afternoon at 
(703) 361-5244. 

Jerry Rossano 
10153 Parkview Drive, No. 8 
Manassas, VA 22 UO 



* 1 would enjoy having a pen pal. Pm 14 
years old and own a TR.S-80 computer. 

Tosha Reetz 
1/02 Oak Street 
Bloomer, W 154724 



• I am looking for pen pals of any age. I 

am 27 years old and own a 64 K CoCo 2 with 

a disk drive. , . Y 

John Lentz 

5 100 W. 1342 1 Loomis Drive 

Muskego, W 1 53/50 



• Once again Pm looking for pen pals who 
would like to co-author some programs with 
me. If you are interested or if you only have 
the idea for a program, contact me. 

Biff Bernico 
708 Michigan A venue 
Sheboygan, WI 5308/ 



• I am 17 years old and a proud owner of 
a CoCo 2 and CCR-82 recorder. When I 
moved from Holt, Missouri, to Cheyenne, 
I found aim ost no support for the CoCo, 1 
am looking for a pen pal and/ or club in the 

Wyoming area. _ „ , 

J G Doug Humphrey 

514 Melton, Apt. A 
Cheyenne, WY 82009 



• I have been corresponding with several 
people who have written to rainbow asking 
for pen pals. I would enjoy corresponding 
with mature, but still fun, CoCo w s e r 5 , 
especially any who play Dungeons and 
Dragons. I have a 64K ECB CoCo 1 with 
disk drive, printer, tape and modem. 

Paul "Stalker " Ingraham 
2948 Kiilarney Drive 
Prince George, British Columbia 

Canada, V2K2B1 



• Pm currently looking for a pen pal with 

an Amiga !000. Does anyone have an Amiga 

and a CoCo? If so, drop me a line. I find it 

very interesting to take my ofd issues of 

rainbow and convert the programs to the 

Amiga. I have some deruos that you would 

not believe. r , n , 

Leonard M acEachern 

RR I, Port Hastings 

Inverness County, Nova Scotia 

Canada BO E 2 TO 



1 74- THE RAINBOW February 1987 



• 1 am interested in acquiring pen pals from 

anywhere in the world. If interested, please 

contact me. D . , Xjf * . A 

Rick Mc Inly re 

50 Haggert y Road 

Newbury, Ontario 

Canada NOL 120 

• I am 16 years old and have a gray CoCo 
upgraded to 64K equipped with a DCM-3 
modem and a TP-JO printer. Searching for 
someone particularly in Canada. 

Derek Boucher 
Box 341 
Bonaventure, Quebec 
Canada GOC I EO 

• I would like pen pals 10 exchange hints 
and tips, ideas, discoveries, etc. I am I7years 
old and own a 64K CoCo > Epson LX-8G 
printer, a graphics tablet and a tape re- 
corder. 1 love making programs for myself 
and other people. No matter how old you 
are, or where you live, write to me. 

Jean-Francois Darmezin 
217 Brock Street 
Cowansviiie, Quebec 
Canada J2K2H6 

• I'm 1 3 years old and own a i 6K TRS-80 

CoCo extended. n , . D , 

Roberta Book 

P.O. Box 774 

Assiniboia, Saskatchewan 

Canada SO HO BO 



• I live in a small town called San Rafael 
and 1 am a new rainbow reader. 1 own a 64K 
CoCo 2 with a CCR-8 1 cassette recorder. I 
am 14 years old and looking for CoCo (or 
compatible) owners anywhere. If anyone is 
interested in having a pen pal in Argentina, 
please write me. CflWoj £ fgrnandez 

Maza 176 
San Rafael, Mendoza 5600 

Argentina 

• I would like to hear from pen pals around 
the world and of any age. I have a 64K ECB 
with one disk drive and a tape system. 

R. Makrievski 
4 Delaware Drive 
Si. Albans, Victoria 3021 

Australia 

• Are you interested in having a CoCo pen 

pal? If yes, then write to me. I'm 1 6 years 

old and have a 64K CoCo 2 with cassette 

recorder. r . , . ~ , 

Dereham Stephen 

Peltzer Avenue, 4 

4800 Verviers 

Belgium 

• Pm Brazilian and would like to have pen 
pals from all over the world. 

Ricardo Jorge Lopes da Cruz 
Rua Santos Moreira, 138 
Cordeiro, Recife, PE 50000 

Brazil 



• Vm looking for pen pals all over the 
world. I speak German, Spanish, Portugese 
and, of course, English, 

Daniel Sireidt 
8 Hassan Sabry Street, c/o GTZ 

Zamalek. Cairo 



• I would be very interested in correspond- 
ing with any Color Computer users in the 
Scandinavian or European countries. I have 
a 64K ECB system with DMP-105 printer 
and cassette storage. My main interests are 
in basic and assembly language program- 
ming, electronics and flying (I am a licensed 
pilot). I do have flight planning programs, 
which I developed, if anyone is interested, 

Larry L, Bernard 
Aim tor get 2 A 
S-2I457 Mai mo 
Sweden 

• I would like to get in contact with German 

CoCo users and, of course, CoCo users from 

every country. My system is a 64 K CoCo I, 

two double-sided drives, also DMP-iOO and 

GCO-1 15 printers. I am using my CoCo in 

machine language, basic, forth, logo. 

Pv\ *s o i»* ^ Hid c* » ry j o / . • 

Hans-Joerg Sebastian 

Kalkumerstr. 96 

4000 Duesseldorf 30 

West Germany 

t7& 



# COLOR BANKBOOK 

• BUSINESS BANKBOOK 

SVSTEM ONE 

FOR ONE OlSK DRIUE 

SVSTEM TWO 

FOR TWO OISK DRIDES 

If! UCK FILE 

If! SUPERBISK UTILITY 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY '&& 
RAINBOW PAGE 191 

RADIOLOG 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY '8£ 
RAINBOW PAGE £03» 

CODE PRACTICE 

ORDERS OR INFORMATION 

CALL 1-800-628-282B 
EXTENSION 552 

ALL PROGRAMS INCLUDE MANUALS 
REQUIRE 32K AND 1 DISK DRIVE. 
ADD f£.00 SHIPPING £ HANDLING 
FLORIDA RES. ADD S7. SALES TAX 



SOFjTimOR'E 



$19.95 



$49.95 



$49.95 



$19.95 



$ 9.95 



$ 9.95 



$ 9.95 



RAINBOW 

Ctltlf-CtfrQH 
StM 



8901 Nil 26 ST DEFT R 
SUNRISE, FL 33322 



J .irtrtrtrtiL uvvvvvvvvvv^i i^^^^^^^n Wtttttt ^MWh. ^^^^^^^^w tfvvvvvvvvvv^i ji^^Aa i^^v ^ganui jdflflfififififififc. 

fflfH D"V ^^^^m met ^^^^m jm^^to. mmroroo ^^^^m jMWi i UMfc t ssSaSk Sat sat ^^^^^k aiiy M , mih 

jWBafl PP ^L^f ^K^^ 3BS ^^^^ vrb ^L^Af SB fflmffi mat Ww. 

M 3BBr Mm S££ ^R_^^_ a ffi ^R_^^_ ^Wft. JWff ww I thhhL miffflKr DO VttsB SB * WB - ■ MMf «Hh-3B? 

'flSaBOTwft. n IB ^^^w^ B fl flH fl P ^^^nm ^mmm^ HE n n , MmuaM r si ^I»B TOO ^vunr - m—MMM '" 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

"JramR" 

512K COCO 3 Memory Expansion Boari Upgrades stock 128K COCO 3 to fut 
51 2 K for 0S9 Level II. Similar to RS upgrade. 

COCO I & li ONLY 



Perl oumbsr 


Pries 


DassflpUofl 


#1001 


$39.95 


Banker II bare board (with long pm socket, does not include merMry 






Expansion Board) 


A1002 


S69 95 


Banker li bare board + pans (does not include Memory Expansion Board) 


if 1003 


$89.95 


Banker ll assembled 8. tesied (no memory) 


ft 1004 


$12995 


Banker II (256K. upgradable to 512K) assembled & tested with memory 


If 1005 


$169.95 


Banker II (512K) assembled & tested with memory 


If 1005 


StS.OQ 


Memory Expansion Board 


^100? 


$29.95 


Memory Expansion Board + pans 



ALL sofiware is coniigurabie tor 258K/512K opeiaiton. 

Software shipped on disk, add $10.00 for sofiware on tape. {0S9 RAMOiSK not available on tape). 

ALL boards below are 256K/5T 2K capable, soliwate & documenialion include d 

New SAM (?4LS?85) not included (use your 74LS783). 74LS785 recommended far 2.0 UHt operation. 

COCO 3 ONLY 

IMG10 S39 95 Jramfl bare board plus conneclofs 

#101 ! SI 09.95 Jramfi kil includes alt parts plus memory chips 

#1012 SI 39.95 Jramft assembled and tested plus memory chips 



#9000 



*900l 

*3S04 
#9305 



#9005 



$89 95 



$35.00 
$5 00 
S24 95 
S24.9S 



S10.00 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Down Under Coniroller. ftam Pack size conuolier wilh BOOS Gold 
plated, high ieliability edge conneciors, jumpers lor 24/28 pin ROM. 
Co/npatible with COCO ! and COCO IF a COCO 3. 
8D0S (Enhanced OOSon 27128 EPftOM) 
64K switch 

New SAM ?4lS785 (required only for 2.0 MMi operation) 

Power Basic (Requires RS00S 1 0 or i.l and 256K or 512K Banker) 

utilize the extra memory for variable slorage and pass variables between 

programs in different pages of memory. Split a large BASIC program into 

smaller pieces and GOTO or G0SU8 a line in another page of memory. , . 

and more features included (disk only) 

S/W Pac upgrade. i.XX to 2 XX 



To place an order, write to jifl Electronics. P.O. Box 2572. Columbia, M0 21045, 
OR call (301) 987-9067— Jesse or (Ml) 788 0861 — flay 

HOURS Weekdays 7p m -9p m.; Sat Noon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME, usually, if no answer Iry later. 

Add $4.00 shipping & handling {FOREIGN ORDERS S7.00), COD charge 53,00. Maryland residents add 
5% slate tax 

CHECKS. MONEY ORDERS OR COO'S only please (personal check —2 weeks tor clearance) IMME- 
DIATE DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model # (i.e. 26-3136), Disk or Tape when ordering. 

QUANTITY DISCOUN T AVAILABL E For iniormaiitm en shipping or prevfous/y p/acstf orders caff (30f) 
788-0861 COCO II 26- 31 XX owners call (soldering experience may be required). 



February 198? THE RAINBOW 1 75 





S 1 fx U § 1 C 




1 T? 1 
.lie Hi 



JL O 



By lony Uihtelano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



A long time ago, I did an article on an analog-to-digital 

/% converter. I explained that you can take a varying 
X JlLsignal and convert it into a digital value from 0 to 
255. This time I'll do the opposite. 

This month's project is called a D-to-A converter, where 
a digital value from 0 to 255 is converted into an analog 
voltage. But that is just part of it. I'll show you how to make 
two of these things. With two of these and some software, 
we will be able to make music in stereo. Our scenario starts 
by making two D-to-A converters. Then, with a couple of 
preamps, some connectors, a stereo system and some 
software you'll be playing computer music. Well start today 
with the D-to-A converters and finish up next month with 
the preamp and some music software. 

You can buy a complete, two-channel D-to-A converter 
chip, but they are a little expensive and most require three 
voltages. This is a problem with the one-voltage CoCo 2 and 
3. Besides, it's more fun building your own. Now, let's get 
into some theory on D-to-A converters. 

Remember that a digital value from 0 to 255 is made up 
of eight binary bits. Each of these bits has a value of 0 
(ground) or ! (5 volts). If you use every combination of eight 
bits, you come up with 255. 

Let's introduce another component: a resistor, Yes, the 
good oV resistor, if you put a voltage between the two points 
of a resistor, you could measure the voltage across it. If you 
put two resistors in series (Figure I) and measured the voltage 
across both resistors, you would get the voltage that you put 
in. For instance, in Figure I, if you put 5 volts across both 
resistors, you would measure 5 volts. If you measured across 
just one resistor, you would get a value somewhat less than 
5 volts. If you measured the voltage across thesecond resistor 
and added that value to the value of the first, you would get 
5 volts. The voltage is divided between the two resistors. If 
you had three resistors, the sum of the voltages of the three 
would add up to the total voltage applied. It is a simple 
mathematical equation and it depends on the resistance value 



of the resistor. In a resistor circuit, the higher the resistor 
value, the higher the voltage across it. 

If we had 255 different resistors hooked up to a voltage 
and were able to control which resistor had the voltage on 
it, we would have an acceptable D-lo-A converter. But I'm 
sure you don't want to hook 255 resistors to some circuit. 
Well, you don't have to. All you need is nine resistors: eight 
for the eight data bits and one used as a voltage reference 
or source. It is used as a divider. This is commonly known 
as a resistor ladder. 

If we use that theory, plus a bit of computer theory, we 
can convert a digital binary value of eight 0- and 5-volt levels 
to an analog level. A computer's data bus is continually 
changing as the computer does its thing. In order to isolate 
an eight-bit value, a latch is needed. The easiest place to add 
a latch is on the cartridge port. So, get out the tools and let's 
get started. 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early specialist in computer 
hardware projects* He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



Figure 1 



R1 



5V 



R2 



Voltage across R1 plus voltage across R2 equals 
5 volts. 



176 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



Figure 2 



Computer 
Cartridge 
Slot 



E 


6 


6 


scs 


36 


5 






4 


RAW 


18 


3 


Al 


20 


2 


AO 


19 


t j 


5 volts 


9 § 




GNO 
DO 


33 

JL 

10 - 


3 


Dl 


1 1 


4 


D2 


02 


7 


D3 


13 


8 


D4 


14 


13 


D5 


15 


14 


D6 


56 J7 


D7 


17 


18 







16 



7 
4 
L 
S 
1 

3 
8 



"37 



12 



13 



14 



Fourth D to A 

Third D to A 
Second D to A 



15 



1 1 



R9 = 47K 



7 
4 
L 
S 

? 
7 
3 



12 



15 



16 



19" 



?l00pF 



You will need all the usual things for a project. A 
protoboard, sockets, wire and a few parts. The first two parts 
are not that hard to find. A good electronics hobby shop will 
have them. They are a 74 LSI 38 and a 74LS273. 

You will see the circuit and how to hook it up to the CoCo 
bus in Figure 2. If you want stereo or two channels, you will 
need another 74LS273 and another nine resistors and 
capacitor. In fact, this circuit can have as many as four 
channels of D-to-A. All are identical to the one in this 
diagram except where Pin 1 1 connects to the 74LSI 38. Also, 
nine resistors are connected to each 74LS273. The diagram 
shows how to connect the other three circuits. The output 
of this D-to-A converter is about . I volts on the low end and 
about 4.9 volts on the high end. The capacitor is used for 
high-frequency roll-off and to dampen switching noise. 

So far, there haven't been any problems, but notice that 
1 haven't given any resistor values. This is where the tricky 
part comes. The resistor value for R9 is simple: 47K ohms, 
half-watt or quarter-watt. But the other resistors are a 
different story. In theory, the value for each resistor is double 
the previous value. For example, if the first resistor value is 
IK ohms, the next value must be 2K and so on. Using this 
method, the values are: 



Rl = IK ohms 
R2 = 2K ohms 
R3 = 4K ohms 
R4 = 8K ohms 



R5 = I6K ohms 
R6 = 32K ohms 
R7 = 64K ohms 
R8 = I28K ohms 



That is fine in theory, but try to find these values in any 
store! It is next to impossible, but don't despair; you can get 
these values by using more than one resistor for each value. 
For instance, a 4K resistor does not exist (unless you want 
to custom-order it in quantities of 10,000). But, if you put 
two 2K resistors in series with each other, you get 4K. You 
see, resistors in series add up in value. A 10K resistor in series 
with a 22K resistor gives you 32K. Now, the trick is to find 
the right combination of resistors, to match the values above. 
Some may require only one or two resistors, but other values 
wiJJ require as many as four or five resistors to add up to 



the right value. It all depends on what value resistors your 
dealer carries. 

To make matters worse, the precision of the resistors has 
to be high. The ideal resistor must have a (oJerance of .1 
percent. Again, these are expensive and rare. If you are like 
me, you have a resistor bin. I went through the bin with an 
ohmmeter and measured the values and took the closest 
value. If you are not sure how to read the value of a resistor, 
Figure 3 shows a resistor color code chart and how to read 
it. The first and second colors are the numeric value and the 
third is a multiplier. For example, if you have a resistor that 
has a color code of red, violet and orange, its value is 27,000 
ohms or 27K. Some resistor values are just not made. Here 
is a table of resistors that 1 found and used for my D-to-A 
circuit. 



Rl = IK R5 

R2 = 2K R6 

R3 = 2K + 2K R7 

R4 = 6.8K + I.2K R8 



I5K + IK 
22K + I0K 
27K + 27K + I0K 
I00K + 27K + IK 



Again, it is important to have the right values. If you don't 
have the right values, keep adding more resistors until you 
do; they aren't expensive. Even after you get the right 
theoretical values, use a precise ohmmeter to fine-tune these 
resistors. Remember, the closer the values you use, the better 
the sound it will make. If your resistors are not perfect, at 
best, you will get a little harmonic distortion; at worst, you 
will get a bad sound. 



Figure 3: Standard Resistor Color Code 



i 



■ 



i 



m 




Tolerance band 
Number ol 2eros (multiplier) 
Second S'gnilicant figure 
First significant figure 



Color 


Significant 
figure 


Multiplying 
value 


Black 


0 


1 


Brown 


i 


10 


Re# 


2 


100 


Orange 


3 


1.000 


Yellow 


4 


10.000 


Green 


5 


1 00.000 


Blue 


6 


1 .000.000 


Violei 


7 


10.000.000 


Gray 


8 


100,000.000 


White 


9 


1,000.000,000 


Gold 


j_ 5% tolerance 




Silver 


^_ 10% tolerance 




No color 


^20% tolerance 




Re* 


j_ 2% lolerance 





As far as the parts are concerned, you can get the 
protoboard and the ICs from CRC Inc., 10802 Lajeunesse, 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8. The resistors you will 
have to dig up yourself. 

See you next month. 



February 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 77 



DOCTOR ASCII 




That Same OP Boring 

Black and Green 



By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



Can I get text colors other than 
green I black or black/ green in the 
32-by-l6 text mode on my CoCo 3? 

Julie Malkemus 
Cleveland, OH 



D The text and background colors 
/C are controlled by the registers at 
&HFFBC and &HFFBD. The follow- 
ing program, COLDRPIK . BflS allows 
you to select a color combination. Note 
that there are 4,096 color combinations 
to choose from. Of the 4,096, there are 
64 where the text and background are 
the same color, allowing you to write to 
the screen invisibly before revealing the 
text by changing the values of one of the 
registers. The program allows you to 
change text colors with the up and down 
arrows, and background colors with the 
left and right arrows. Use BREAK to exit 
the program. 

10 DEF FNM(X) = X-INT(X/64)*64 

20 WIDTH32 

30 F=1:B=1:CLS 

32 PRINT@0, "rainbow color poke" 
40 POKE&HFFBC , F 

50 PRINT@32,"$FFBC POKE VALUE IS 
";F 

60 POKE&HFFBD, B 

70 PRINT@64 , "$FFBD POKE VALUE IS 
" ;B 

80 A$ = INKEY$:IF A$=" h THEN 80 
90 IF A$=CHR$(94) THEN F=FNM(F-l-l 
) ELSE IF A$=CHR$(10] THEN F=FNM 
(F-l) ELSE IF A$=CHR$(9) THEN B= 
FNM (B+l) ELSE IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN 

B=FNM(B-1) 
100 GOTO 40 




Richard Esposito is a project engineer 
for TR W's Federal Systems Group. He 
holds bachelor's, masters and docto- 
rate degrees from Polytechnic Institute 
of Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 




Using Tapejix With a Disk 

/ am writing in regard to a program, 
~]Tapefix, which appeared in your 
r June 1986 column in 80Micro. What 
changes are required to use this pro- 
gram on my 64 K Co Co 2 with Disk 
Extended BASIC L0 or LI? I have had 
problems getting it to work properly. 

Robert McClure 
Vernon, CT 



T) There was a typo in the program: 
/C The that should have pre- 
ceded the 4 H' was inadvertently dropped 
from Line 280. Tapefix is only needed 
for programs that start below &H600 
and are to be used on a disk system. It 
will not work if the program has copy 
protection, an auto-loader or is larger 
than 1 6K. 



Step-by-step Error Tracing 

Is there an easy way to trace an 
error, step-bystep, for a novice? 

Rudolph Querard 
Levi i town, NY 

You can use James Provost's 
J\£ 5VNC.BR5 to send a continuous 
log of your screen display to your 
printer. This program originally ap- 
peared in the August 1984 issue of 

RAINBOW 

10 'sync' BY JAMES PROVOST, RAIN 
BOW, 8/84, PG 149 
20 FOR X=1000 TO 1007: READ A: PO 
KEX, A: NEXT 

30 POKE 360,3: POKE 361,232 

40 DATA 52,84,189,162,191,53,84, 

57 



CoCo 2 to 3 Upgrade 

Can a CoCo 2 be upgraded to a 
CoCo 3> 

Basil V. Fuze 
Abbolsford, British Columbia 



13 Since, hardware-wise, the CoCo 
^/C 3 is a brand new machine that 
shares few circuits with the CoCo 2, 
such an upgrade would involve replac- 
ing the entire printed circuit board. If 
Tandy did this and modified the case for 
the additional ports (RGB and compos- 
ite video outputs), with a nominal 
charge for labor, it would probably cost 
more than the current price for the 
CoCo 3. You may, however, see some 
third-party vendors with a CoCo 3 
compatible memory upgrade, but as for 
ihe new display options, it would not be 
cost-effective. 

How to Save Memory 

Does it save memory if I squeeze as 
many commands as possible into one 
line using colons, and j or by taking 



1 78 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



COMPUTERS 

INTRODUCES 

DISTO 



DISTO SUPER RAMS 



• 512K Memory upgrade 

• Easy to install 

• Solder less 

• Plug-in card 

• Fully compatible with 0S.9 Level II 

►State of the art 

fast 120ns Dynamic Ram 



SUPER 

RAM 




RAM FOR 



ONLY 



THE 




SEND FOR 
FREE CATALOGUE 




^ C.R.C. 
* COMPUTERS 

10802 Lajeunesse 

Montreal, Quebec 

Canada H3L 2E8 



1-51 4-383-5293 



I DEALER INQUIRIES 
INVITED 


WE ACCEPT 
PHONE ORDERS 




C.O.D. 

IN CANADA 

ONLY 






out spaces that do not introduce syntax 
errors? I like saving memory, but still 
would like to preserve readability. 

Ricky Sulphin 
Henry, VA 

You save four bytes for every line 
number eliminated, and one byte 
for each space eliminated. There is a 
commercial product, Packer^ by Bob 
van der Poel Software, which you may 
be interested in. It was reviewed in the 
December 1986 issue, Page 139, You can 
always keep two versions of your pro- 
grams: a readable copy for documenta- 
tion and a packed version for execution 
— then you'll have the best of both 
worlds. 

Model I — CoCo File Transfer 

A local business recently gave me a 
Model I system, the expansion unit 
and disk drives 0 and /. / also have 
a 64K Extended Co Co with cassette, 1 
have written programs that will run on 
either. Is there a method or device thai 
will enable me to transfer data and 
programs between the two? 

Brian T, Sprouse 
Forest, VA 

13 You can t r a n s f e r ASCII files 
between the two using smart 
terminal programs with both comput- 
ers' RS-232 ports joined with a null- 
modem cable. One way to read Model 
I tapes into your CoCo is by using the 
Magic Box, a cable/software package 
marketed by Spectrum Projects. Brian, 
you might also consider using the drives 
with your CoCo and abandoning that 
"orphan" machine. All you'd need is a 
two-drive cable and a disk controller 

Dumping Printer Control Codes 

Can your text-dump program be 
modified so characters that control 
printer modes can be stripped away? 

Edward R. Spa don i 
Dedham, MA 

The following program, CHRR - 
SET.BRS, illustrates the problem 
by* poking the values 0 to 255 to screen 

memory. 




FORI=0 TO 255 
20 POKE 10 2 4+1 , I 
30 NEXTI 
40 GOTO40 

Since every one of these values cor- 
responds to a character on the screen, 
but most printers use some of the codes 
below 32 for special effects, a character 
translation table must be constructed to 
convert these characters' memory 
values to their corresponding ASCII 



codes, which are understood by BASIC'S 
CHR$ function. This table was incorpo- 
rated into the DUMP. BRS program which 
follows: 

10 DIM T(127) 
20 T(0)=32 

30 FOR 1=1 TO 265 T ( I ) =1+9 6 t NEXT 
40 FOR 1=27 TO 31: T ( I ) —1+6 4 : NEX 

T 

50 FOR 1=3 2 TO 63:T(I}=I:T(I+64 ) 
~li NEXT 

60 FORI = 64 TO 9 5 : T ( I ) =1 : NEXT 
70 FORI=102 4 TO 1504 STEP 3 2 
80 A$*»" 

90 FOR J=I TO 1 + 31 

100 X=PEEK(J) 

110 IF X>127 THEN X=3 2 

120 A$=A$+CHR$(T(X) ) 

130 NEXT J 

140 PRINT*-2,A$ 

150 NEXTI 

160 RETURN 

The program corresponding to 
CHRRSET . BRS for the 40- and 80- 
column modes on the CoCo 3 is 
HCHRRSET _BRS, which appears in List- 
ing 3 (note the CoCo 3 has no text 
graphics characters): 

10 WIDTH40:CLS 
20 POKE&HFFA2 , &H76 
30 FORI=0 TO 255 
40 POKE16384+I*2 f I 
50 NEXTI 
60 GOTO60 

The next program, HDUMP.BRS is a 
subroutine that must appear at the 
beginning of your program and must 
wholly reside below the 16384 address 
in memory. When your program GD- 
SUBs to Line 20, the normal ASCII text 
characters are dumped to the screen. If 
you also want to dump the extended 
characters, a table such as that in the 
DUMP. BRS program must be con- 
structed and customized for your print- 
er. 

10 GOTO140 

20 P0KE&HFFA2 , &H76 

30 FORI=16384 TO 20124 STEP 160 

40 A$ = ,,5! 

50 FOR J=I TO 1+159 STEP 2 
60 X=*PEEK(J) 

70 IF X>127 THEN X=X-128 

80 IF X<32 THEN X=3 2 

90 A$=A$+CHR$(X) 

100 NEXT J 

110 PRINT8-2, A$ 

120 NEXTI 

130 POKE &HFFA2,&7A 

140 REM REST OF PROGRAM FOLLOWS 



INKEYS Versus INPUT 

Please explain in detail the differ- 
ence between INKEYS and INPUT. 

Merl Miller 
Albuquerque, NM 



T% The program INPUT. BRS is the 
logical equivalent of this pro- 
gram; 

10 INPUT RS 
20 PRINT RS 

The additional code complexity 
would be necessary for most data inputs 
if BASIC lacked the INPUT statement. 
INKEYS only polls the keyboard for an 
instant and if a key happens to be down 
at that instant, its value is passed on to 
the variable that INKEYS is assigned to, 
If a number was being input, the follow- 
ing program would also have to convert 
the string in RS into the corresponding 
value using the VRL( ) function, 



10 A$^ H " 
20 PRINT"? 
30 B$ = INKEY$:IF B$ = ,M, THEN30 
40 PRINTB$; 



50 IF ASC (B$) 
60 A$=A$+B$ 
70 GOTO 30 
80 PRINT AS 



= 13 THEN 80 



CoCo 2 Mode Boot Up 

How can I put my CoCo 3 into 
CoCo 2 mode? 

Jeff Williams 
Huntsvilie, A L 



D If what you mean by that is to 
have it boot up with the Disk 
BASIC \.x banner instead of 2.x, then 
type: 

POKE&HFFDE,0: POKE&H71,0: 
EXEC&HR027 

However, this won't make your 
CoCo 3 compatible with all of your 
CoCo 2 software. What most people 
mean when they say CoCo 2 mode is 
that you are using the 32-column screen 
format. 

Disk Interference 

/ have a CoCo 2 and a CGP-220 
printer. I have copies of the CODUMP 
and BWDUMP programs, which are 
written for a 16 K machine. I put up with 
the J6K, but now that J have a disk, they 
don't work at all. Can you help? 

Dan Redding 
Gibson City, 1L 

I do not have copies of the pro- 
grams you mention, but in the 
earlier version of Radio Shack's screen 
dump, you had to change a JMPS8273 
to JMPSCBSA for DOS 1 .0 or to JMP 
SCC1C for DOS 1,1. Perhaps they 
repeated that mistake in your version. 
The routines you mention are supposed 
to be position-independent, and if they 




180 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



are, you can load them with an offset 
of 16384 in a 32K or 64 K machine. 

Small Disks Less Than Great 

|U I'm looking for an Amdek 3 -inch 
2 dual disk drive for my CoCo 2. I have 
W written directly to Amdek, but have 
received no response. Are there any 
other suppliers of small drives for the 
CoCo? 

Daniel Moore 
Br oo ma 11, PA 

Regarding the Amdek drives, 
even if I could find you a supplier, 
my advice would be don't buy it. If you 
really want small drives, get the IBM- 
compatible, 720K, 3'/2-inch double- 
sided drives, but with these you will also 
need one 35- or 40-track, 5'/i-inch drive 
so that you can use it to transfer soft- 
ware from standard media to your 
smaller disks. The big hoopla about 
these smaller drives is a myth. The 
smaller drives do not hold more data 
than it is possible to store on the similar 
5!/i-inch drives. 

The truth is that IBM chose not to 
market 80-track, double-sided drives 
for the PC. If you want to talk about 



storage density, Konica Technology 
(Sunnyvale, Calif., 408-773-9551) has a 
new 5!/4-inch drive, model KT-510 with 
a formatted storage capacity of 10.9 
megabytes. This drive can also read 
normal 360K disks. These drives sell for 
$400 each in OEM quantities and the 
special 5 J /4-inch media for $20 each. 

Detecting New CoCo 3 Keys 

How can I access the Fl and F2 keys 
on the CoCo 3 from BASIC? 

John Chitty 
(JMC) 
Destrehan, LA 

The new keys, ALT, CTRL, Fl and 
F2, fill in what were the missing 
positions in the keyboard rollover table 
on the CoCo 2. You can detect these 
keys by polling addresses 341, 342, 343 
and 344 ? respectively, for a change in 
value from 255 to 191. 



Corrections 

December, 1986: The $199 text- 
scanner is called Omnireader, marketed 
by G.A.S. International, Inc., P.O. Box 
1282, Euless, TX 76040, (800) 523-4898. 
It attaches through the RS-232 interface 



and comes with software for an IBM PC 
Compatible or Macintosh. It reads 
Courier 10, Courier 12, Letter Gothic, 
and Prestige Elite. No CoCo software is 
available. 

November, 1986: A typo appeared in 
Line 100 of my reply to Scott Lane 
regarding the INKEYS function. The 
"< >" should be a c =\ Thanks to Allen 
E. Weatherford, Morgantown, N.C., 
for pointing this out. 

November, 1986: A typo appeared in 
Line 130 of my response to Helga Craig. 
Drop the "I+" and the 4 ;\ See the answer 
to Edward Spadoni, this issue, for a 
much improved version that strips off 
non-printable ASCII characters that 
play havoc with many printers, and a 
new version for the CoCo 3. 

For a quicker response, your questions 
may also be submitted through rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK for "Ask the 
Experts" to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Doc- 
tor ASCII" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



From the Princeton RAINBOWfest . . . 

The CoCo 3 Round-Table Tape! 



THE rainbow recorded the main event 
of RAINBOWfest Princeton, the Satur- 
day evening (Oct. 18) round-table 
discussion: 

"The Design, Development 
and Marketing of the CoCo 3." 

Speakers included Tandy's Barry 
Thompson and Mark Siegel, as 
well as independent CoCo 3 pro- 
grammers Steve Bjork and Dale Lear 
(filling in for Greg Zumwalt). 

This was a lively and informative ses- 
sion and, therefore, we want as many 
people as possible to hear what these 
RAINBOWfest guests had to say. 



YES, Please send me 



copies of the "CoCo 



3 Round-Table Tape" at $5 per copy plus $1.50 

S/H for a total of . 

(U.S. Currency only, please.) 



Name (please print) 



Address 



City 



State 



Telephone 
Company., 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Exp. Date 

Signature 



Make checks payable to The Rainbow. Mail to CoCo 3 
Round-Table Tape, The Rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. To place credit card orders, call our toll- 
free number: (800) 847-0309. 



February I987 THE RAINBOW 181 



A quick cure for I/O Errors 



Fast Relief for 
Tape-Loading Headaches 

By Mark Nelson 



rhere are always a few built-in 
frustrations that go along with the 
use of any computer system. One 
of my greatest frustrations with the 
CoCo, and I'm sure many of you feel the 
same way, is the tape recorder and those 
darn I/O Errors. Things get quite a bit 
better when you get a disk drive, but 
there are still many times when using the 
old cassette recorder is the only way to 
go. For instance, you may subscribe to 
RAINBOW ON TAPE, and some of the 
programs you bought before you got a 
disk drive won't transfer to disk (some 
don't work with the controller plugged 
in, anyway). 

Let's face it, the tape recorder is an 
important part of our computer system 
and we'd better learn to live with it. 
That's why I wrote Tape Doctor. It 
makes iteasierto get along with the tape 
recorder by changing the CoCo's meth- 
od of loading programs and files. 
Specifically, it modifies the way I/O 
Errors are handled. 

The familiar method of handling 
these errors is to put the infamous 
I/O ERROR message on the screen and 
then stop everything. With Tape Doc- 
tor, on the other hand, CoCo informs 
you of any errors and then continues to 
load the tape. This way, all good por- 
tions of the program or file are still 
loaded when, otherwise, they would be 
lost. 



Mark Nelson is a computer science 
student at Brigham Young University 
and author of the Second RAINBOW 
Adventure Contest winner, Head of the 
Beast. 



The program listing is quite short, so 
even you "two-finger" typists out there 
can handle this one. Be sure to save the 
program before you run it, because it 
erases itself after it runs. Tape Doctor 
requires 64K ECB, and yes, it will work 
with the disk controller plugged in. I've 
used it to help me transfer a few hard- 
to-load tapes to disk. 

When you have the program on tape 
or disk, run it. After a second or two, 
the "OK" prompt will appear and you're 
ready to load tape programs and files in 
the usual way withthe BASIC commands 
CLORD, CLORDM, INPUTB, etc. When a 
tape is loading, you'll see a white block 
appear on the screen after a successful 
block load (a block is 255 bytes). If an 
I/O Error occurred during the last 
block, a black block will appear instead, 
but the program or file will continue to 
be loaded. Obviously, if there are some 
black blocks that come up during the 
load, there was some faulty data loaded 
and it will need to be fixed. If it's a BASIC 
program, you may just want to run it 
and see where the syntax errors are, fix 
them and save the program again. 
Machine language programs are a lot 
harder to fix unless you're the author, 
and even then it's no picnic. But, many 
load errors do not have any great effect 
on the program's execution. A game 
might not give you bonus points be- 
tween rounds anymore, or some other 
trivial thing might be wrong, but it still 
may be fun to play. 

If you have a program that uses tape 
I/O, you can use Tape Doctor in con- 
junction with that software by simply 
running Tape Doctor and then your 
other software. If you have a file you 



can't load with Telewriter-64, you can 
use Tape Doctor to help by following 
these instructions. CLORD " TELE64 ", 
then when the "OK" prompt appears, 
type 25 GOTO 100 and press ENTER. 
Next, type RUN and press ENTER. Now, 
from the Telewriter main menu type B 
for BASIC. Load and run the Tape 
Doctor. Type EXEC 7720 and press 
ENTER to return to Telewriter. You'll be 
missing about 3.5K of the text buffer. 

To disable Tape Doctor, press the 
reset button on the back of the comput- 
er, or type POKE S.HFFDE , 1 and press 
ENTER. To re-enable, type POKE 
S.HFFDF , 1 and press ENTER. 

I have had pretty good success using 
Tape Doctor to load otherwise unload- 
able programs and files. I hope you get 
as much use out of Tape Doctor as I 
have. Now, here are some suggestions 
on how to avoid I/O Errors in the first 
place. 

The Tape Doctor is a last resort 
method of loading a bad tape. If a tape 
can be loaded without any errors, that's 
much preferred. A dirty tape head often 
causes I/O Errors. You can buy an 
automatic cleaner that you just put in 
and "play" like a tape. This is a simple 
way of cleaning that is better than 
nothing. However, you can do a better 
job cleaning by hand. Ask a salesman 
at any electronics store to show you how 
to clean the heads with cotton swabs 
and cleaning solution. A bottle costs 
less than two dollars and will last you 
many years. The heads shou\d be 
cleaned every two weeks or so. A good 
cleaning will take you less than five 
minutes, even on the dirtiest machine. 

If you still get I/O Errors, try to load 



182 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



at severai different volume settings. 
Usually, a slightly lower volume should 
be tried. If you're using batteries in your 
recorder, buy an inexpensive battery 
tester and test them once a month or 
more often if you use your computer a 
lot. The recorder runs at a slightly 
slower speed when the batteries are 
weak. If you do save a program or data 
onto a tape using weak batteries and 
you can't load it after you change 
batteries, try putting the old batteries 
back into the recorder and loading it 
then. If it loads, save it again after 
changing to the fresh batteries. 

Probably the most common reason 
for I/O Errors is misalignment of the 
tape head. Aligning the head is a simple 
procedure that takes about two minutes 



to perform. You will need a small, 
jeweler's-type, flat head screwdriver. 
First, unplug the recorder from the 
computer. Now put the program tape 
that's giving you trouble into the re- 
corder and press the play button. Lo- 
cate the alignment hole, a small hole 
through the plastic case, right above the 
tape head (NOTE: Some recorders have 
no alignment hole and have to be taken 
apart to align). Now, insert the screw- 
driver into the hold and down into the 
alignment screw directly below. Turn 
the screw slowly back and forth while 
listening to the sound of the program. 
You may want to turn the volume down 
a little since it sounds terrible. You will 
hear the sound get clearer, brighter, and 
higher in pitch, and then as you con- 



tinue turning, it becomes muffled. The 
correct setting is where the sound is the 
brightest and highest pitched. Turn the 
screw until you're satisfied that you 
have the clearest sound possible and 
you're finished with the alignment. 

One final tip. If you've loaded a 
machine language program and you 
want to resave it, type C5RVEM 
" f i 1 ename" , PEEK ( &H1E7 ) *255+PEEK 
(&H1EB),PEEK(&H7E)*255 + PEEI< 
( &H7F ) + 255 , PEEK ( &H9D) *255+PEEI< 
[&H9E) and then press ENTER. Good 
luck in your battle with I/O Errors! 

(Questions about this article may be 
addressed to Mark at 2A-44 S. Wy- 
mount Terrace, Provo, UT 84604. 
Please enclose an SASE for a re- 
sponse.) □ 



The listing: TRPE DOC 

5 1 tape doctor 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 
BY MARK NELSON 
9 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 11 

tape doctor " : PRINT : PRINT" 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1985" : PRINT" 
BY MARK NELSON" 
1J3 CLEAR 999 

2j3 DATA 26,8j3,19j3,128,j3, 183, 255, 

222,16 6, 128, 183, 255,22 3 , 167 ,31,1 

4j3, 224 ,j3, 37,241, 57 

4j3 FOR 1=1 TO 2 1 : READ A:A$=A$+CH 

R$(A) : NEXT I 

5j3 P=VARPTR(A$) + 1 

6j3 POKE P,12 6 

7j3 EXEC P 

75 FOR X=j3 TO 9 : POKE &H9Dj3j3+X , PE 
EK(&HA7E9+X) : NEXTX : 'relocate mot 
or off routine 

8j3 POKE &HA7E9, &H7E : POKE&HA7EA , & 
H9D: POKE&HA7EB, &H0j3 : 'branch to r 
eset counter on motor off 
82 DATA 9F,76,9E,F3,8 6,9F,A7,8j3, 
9F,F3,9E,76,39:FORX=j3 TO 12 : READ 
R$:POKE&H9Fj3j3+X, ( VAL ( " &H"+R$ ) ) : 

e 



85 POKE &H9Ej3j3,&H9F:POKE &H9Ej31, 
&H7 6:POKE &H9Ej32, &H9E:POKE &H9EJ3 
3,&HF3:POKE &H9Ej3 4 , &H8 6 : POKE &H9 
Ej35,&H8j3:POKE &H9EJ3 6 , &HA7 : POKE & 
H9Ej37, &H8j3:POKE &H9Ej38 , &H9F : POKE 
&H9Ej39,&HF3:POKE &H9Ej3A , &H9E : PO 
KE &H9Ej3B, &H76:POKE &H9Ej3C , &H3 9 : 
'black 

8 6 POKE &HA74j3,4:POKE &HA745,&H7 
E: POKE&HA74 6 , &H9F : POKE&HA747 , j3 : P 
OKE&HA741 , &H7E : POKE&HA742 , &H9E : P 
OKE&HA743, j3: ' branch to routines 

to put square 
88 POKE &H9Dj3A,&H8E:POKE&H9Dj3B,& 
Hj3 4 : POKE &H9Dj3 C , &HCj3 : POKE &H9 Dj3D, & 
H9F:POKE &H9Dj3E , &HF3 : POKE &H9D0F 
, &H39 : 1 routine to reset counter 
on motor off 

9j3 POKE &HF3, &Hj34:POKE &HF4 , &HQ3 
:POKE &HA531,&H12:POKE &HA532,&H 
12 : POKE&HA4E3 , &H12 : POKE&HA434 , &H 
12 

Ippp PRINT: PRINT" THE DOCT 

OR IS in" 
lplp NEW 

102j3 1 tape doctor 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 

BY MARK NELSON & 



Hint . . . 



'Uncram' Crowded Tapes 



Many people cram several programs on one tape 
with very little space between each program. If you 
do this, you may want to follow the steps below when 
trying to load a program that has been saved later on 
the tape. It will prevent a lot of headaches. 

1. Count the number of programs saved before the 



program you want to load. Good record-keeping will 
help in this step. 

2. At the beginning of the tape, type MD- 
TDRDN :RUDIDDN and press ENTER. 

3. Start counting the number of programs by 
listening for silent spots and, at the same time, type 
in CLDRD, but do not press ENTER. 

4. At the end of the program just before the 
program you are trying to load, press ENTER. 

Donald E. Deich, Sr. 
Dubuque, I A 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 183 



GOING TO THE DOGS New from 
The Softtech Group is the Enhanced 
Greyhound Handicapping package. 
This two-program set, which includes 
both the Enhanced Greyhound Handi- 
capping system and the Wager Return 
Analysis programs, includes features 
for professionals, but is designed with 
the novice in mind. Suggested retail 
price for the package is $49.99 plus $2 
shipping and handling. Contact Soft- 
tech Group, Inc., P.O. Box 582, Keego 
Harbor, MI 48033, (313)851-4925. 



PAIRING UP The Pro Writer C-210 
XP and wide-carriage C-215 XP, which 
offer dual emulation of the IBM Pro- 
Printer and Epson FX-80+, have been 
introduced by C. Itoh Digital Products, 
Inc. Both printers are designed for 
business applications and are capable of 
speeds of up to 216 characters per 
second (cps) in draft mode and 45 cps 
in near-letter-quality modes. Both the 
80-column C-210 XP and the 136- 
column C-215 XP include automatic 
vertical and horizontal tabbing, right 
and left justification and true super- and 
subscripts. Other features include front 
panel selection of NLQ and short paper 
tear-off capability. Centronics-type 
parallel interface and a 10K buffer are 
standard, as are both friction and 
tractor-feed. Graphics resolution is up 
to 240-by-2 16 dpi. Suggested retail price 
for the C-210 XP is $529 and $679 for 
the C-215 XP. Contact C. Itoh Digital 
Products, Inc., 19750 South Vermont 
Avenue, Suite 220, Torrance, CA 
90502, (213)327-2110. 



HAYES ACROSS AMERICA A 

feature-enhanced version of the Smart- 
modem 2400 became available early in 
the fourth quarter of 1986 from Hayes 
Microcomputer Products, Inc. The new 
features are designed to provide easy 
access to modem configuration settings 
and to increase stored phone number 
capacity. The modem is also now cap- 
able of Hayes AutoSync communica- 
tions mode. The new features include 
the ability to view active and stored 
profiles and telephone numbers, storage 
for two configuration profiles in EE- 
PROM, storage capacity for four phone 
numbers and 36-character capacity for 
stored phone numbers. Since two uni- 
que configuration profiles can be stored 
in the modem's EEPROM, users can 
save their two most widely used settings 
for fast, simple access to selected remote 
systems. The new features are imple- 
mented using new commands that ex- 
pand the Hayes Standard AT command 
set. Estimated retail price for the Smart- 
modem 2400 is $899. Contact Hayes 
Microcomputer Products, Inc., P.O. 
Box 105203, Atlanta, GA 30348, (404) 
449-8791. 



REDUCED RATE FOR 2400 Compu- 
Serve Incorporated has announced a 
cost reduction, making its 2400 baud, 
dial-up access rate for subscribers the 
same as the 1200 baud access rate. The 
prime or daytime rate for 2400 baud 
access has been cut from $22.50 per 
connect hour to $15 per connect hour. 
The standard or evening/ weekend rate 
for 2400 baud access has been cut from 
$19 per connect hour to $ 1 2.50 per hour. 
CompuServe can be accessed during 
standard or prime service hours. Stand- 



ard service hours are from 6 p.m. to 5 
a.m. weekdays, and all day Saturday, 
Sunday and announced CompuServe 
holidays. Prime service hours are from 
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays. Rates for 300 
baud remain at $6 per hour for standard 
service and $12.50 per hour for prime 
service time. Costs for 1200 baud access 
remain at $12.50 per hour for standard 
service and $15 per hour for prime 
service hours. Communications sur- 
charges also apply. CompuServe is an 
H&R Block company. Contact Compu- 
Serve, 5000 Arlington Centre Boule- 
vard, P.O. Box 20212, Columbus, OH 
43220, (614)457-8600. 

FINE PRINT Networx, a supplier of 
computer and electronic accessories, 
has introduced a Dot Matrix Cleaning 
Kit recommended for use on a wide 
assortment of printers, plotters and 
typewriters. Normal operation of such 
equipment leads to buildup of ink, dust, 
lint and machine-generated debris on 
print heads. Without regular cleaning, 
these deposits can cause character 
blurring and/or unit failure. The kit 
contains carefully selected and tested 
materials, safe for use on sensitive 
electronic and data processing equip- 
ment. Each kit includes a l-ounce 
printer / pi otter / typewriter cleaning 
agent and one 9-by-36 inch print ele- 
ment cleaning material, used to to clean 
print heads; one 4-ounce spray can of 
"Air Clear"forcleaning rollers, tractors 
and ribbon assemblies; and six office 
equipment cleaning pads and ink clean- 
ing pads for equipment exteriors and 
hands. Suggested retail price for the 
Dot Matrix Cleaning Kit is $29.95. 
Contact Networx, 203 Harrison Place, 
Brooklyn, NY 11237, (718)821-7555. 



184 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



DataPack 1 1 Plus V4.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOPILOTind AUTO-L06 Command Proctssors 
X-MODEM DISK FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
VT-lOO & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

Ha ioit data using Hi-ftei Display, Even at 1 200 Baud on the Serial port. 
Q Wl-ftai Display!, 26 to 255 columns by 74 Hnaa k true Upper/Lower case. 
4SK Texl Buffer *hzn using the Hi-fta* Text Display and Disk . 
ASCII k BINARY disk file transfer aupport vie XHODftrl, 
Directly record receive data i© a disk fil# while onlm«> 
VT-100 terminal emulation for VAK t UNIX and other systems. 
VT- 100/52 cursor keys k position, inaert/deleU, PF k AH Kbd. keys. 
Programmable Word Ungth, Parity, Slop Bits and bsud rales 30(3 to Q&QO, 
Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 
Sand full 128 character sal from Keyboard with control codas. 
Complete Editor Insert, Delete, Change or Add to But ler. 

* ft Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

* Programmable Printer rates from MO to 0600 Baud, 
Send file* diracity from the Buffer, Macro Key ftuf f srs or Disk. 
Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 
Freeie Display k ftsview information Qn line with no Iota of data. 
Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 
And much, much more. 

Supports; word-Pak I, II, ft.S. and Double Density SO Column Card a 
Oisto Controller w/SQ column card L parallel printer 
PBJ Parallel Pnnlar Card and Ouai Serial Port (2SP-Pak) 
ft. S. Modem-Pak ft. Deluxe RS-232Pak f even with Disk. 

Requires 32K & Disk. Only $59.95 



HI-RES II Screen Commander 

Tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on your 
CoCo? Wish you could see more Unesand characUrs? Then HI-RES II 
is the answer, it can give you the big screen display you've always 
wanted. It will display 7A lines of 32, 42, 51. 64 and even 85 true 
upper and lower case characters per line without extra hardware. 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package available 
for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive, It is completely 
compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program is loaded, 
everything works the same as bef ore. only you have a much better 
display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed text and 
Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate text and 
graphics screens. It also has an adjusl-able automatic key repeat 
f eature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the screen. 

HI-RES II f aatures over 30 special control code functions thai allow 
you to change characters per line, protect display lines, change 
background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse video, 
underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works oo 
all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides automatic 
reset control so Hi-RES II won't disappear when you press reset. 

Only 24.95 on Tape or $29.95 on Disk 



"The Source" 8 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine language 
programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
Source Coda. And "The Source" has all the features and functions you 
are looking for in a Disassembler. 

* Automatic Label generation end allows specifying FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Disassembles programs directly from Disk or ROM. 

* Output Disassembled Mating with labels to the Printer, Screen or both 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk, or a printed listing. 

* Generated source files are in standard ASCII format. 

* Built in He*/ ASCII dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 

M Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

* WnUen in fast machine language, one of the easiest to use Disassemblers 

Requires 32K Disk $34.95 

T EXT PRO ill 
"The Advanced Word Processing System " 

* 0 Hi-Res Displays from 2d to 255 columns by 7A lines k Upper/Lower Case 

* Three Programmable Header lines that can be re-defmed at anytime. 
« Programmable Footer line k Automatic Footnote System. 

* 10 Programmable lab stops k ? Powerful! Tab Function Commands. 

* Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left and right. 

* On screen display of underline and Oouble size characters. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc. parameters anytime In the text. 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the sisre of a full disk. 

* Easily imbed any number of format and control codes. 

* Automatic Memory sense I6-64K with up to 48K of memory workspace. 

* Fully supports the use of 40 column hardware cards. 

TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed for 
spaed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better off 
with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what your 
looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally different way than most 
word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character abbreviations 
of words or phrases for commands and formatting Information that 
you imbed directly in your text. There are over 50 diff erent 
formating commands you can use without ever leaving the text your 
working on. There are no time comsuming, and often f urslrating 
menu chases, you are In total control at ail times. The formatted 
output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing you exactly 
what your printed document will fooklike'bef ore a single word is ever 
printed. This includes margins, headers^ footers, page numbers; page 
breaks, underlining, column formating and full Justification. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49.95 



The CBASIC Editor/Compiler VI. 1.2 

Do you want to write fast machine language programs but you 
don't want to spend the next few years trying lo learn how ??? 
Well with CBASIC, you could be writing them right now! 

CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic Compear and program 
editing system available f or the Color Computer. It will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available In your color 
computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit and 
convert programs f rom a language you are already familiar with 
Extended Disk Color Basic, into f ast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We added advanced features like a f ull 
blown program ediljor. Hi-Res text Displays and 80 column hardware 
support for editing, compiling and your compiled programs. Plus we 
made it exceptionally easy to use, CBASIC is the f riendliest and 
easiest compiler available f or the Color Computer. 

'The most complete f dii or/Compiler / have seen for the CoCo... " 

- - Th* GAIN BOW, Hsrch / QS6 

CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs 
without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory 
allocation and so on, because CBASIC will do it for you automatically. 
Or, CBASIC will let you control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC features well over 100 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that f ully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. CBASIC supports ALL the High and tow 
Resolution Graphics, Sound, Piay and String Operations available in 
Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET, PUT, PtAY and DRAW, 
all with 99.935 syntax compatibility. CBASIC also supports the built 
in Serial !/0 port with separate printer &. serial I/O baud rates. You 
can send and receive data with PRINT, INPUT and INKEY commands. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 
which allows you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. 
It is a full featured editor designed specifically f or writing and editing 
Basic programs. It has block move & copy, program renumbering, 
automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control and more. 
"The Editor is a very good one and could be the subject for review 
off by itseff.. * - - The J? A tNBOW, fiarch I 036 

"Comparing fCB's edit mode to CBASIC s text editor is tike comparing a 

World War ft jeep lo s modern Sedan. Both get you to /our destination 
but what a difference in the ride. -- Not CoL o, Feburary I 930 

The documonLation for CBASIC is an 8 1/2 86 11 Spiral Bound book 

which contains approximatly 120 pages of rea! information. 

-CBAStC's manuaJis easy to read and written with a minimum of 
technic atese. " - -No t CoCo F ebruary , IQS6 

The price of CBASIC is $149.00. It is the most expensive Color 
Basic Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment 
Compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color 8asic 
compiler. Dollar for dollar, CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 6AK & Disk, not JDOS compatible, 

'The price tag it carries se&m*d a bit steep for an integer compiler on first 
glance, but when you add 6-IK, hi-res drivers, and full- server) editing, CBASIC 
beoins to took more tike a bargain.. " - - Hot CcCo February, 1 036 
"A Complete Cdi tor /Compiler Weft Worth its Price" —fcAlNBOW March IQ36 



EDT/ASM 64D 
64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM 640 Is a Oisk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler, 
it has a Hi-Resolution 51. 64 or 85 column by 24 line display, so you 
sbb your program listings easily and it supports Column cards. The 
disk also contains a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

This is the most powerfull, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/ Assembler package f or the Color Computer. It evan has 
automatic tine number generation for easy entry of program material. 

* Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

* Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 

* Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

* Load & Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

* Move or Copy single k multiple text lines. 

* Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

* Hi-Res Text Display 26 to 65 columns by 21 lines. 

* Supports Word-Pak 1 ,11. k U.S. and Oisto 60 column display cards. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D f eatures include; 

* Support j the full 6800 instruction sal. 

* Supports conditional IF /THEN/ELSE assembly. 

* Supports Disk Library files (include). 

* Supports standard motorola assembler directives 

* Allows multiple values for fDB L PCS directives, 

* Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 

* Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOAOM format. 

* Supports up to 0 open disk files during assembly. 

* Allows assembly from editor buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 32K Dlsfc 159,95 



Amp mmmb rm?®mmm®m 



CoCo-3 512K upgrade 1149.95. cird wihoul Ram |4 
Two Drive RAM-DISK progrim fur 512K CoCo-5 f 1 



15 



To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus 13.00 for shipping L handling lo the address below. 
To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (70.5) 452-0632 
[Monday thru Saturday, 6am to 5pm PST J. 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Los Vegas, Nevada 891 10 

702-152-G632 



DOWNLOADS 



Hold Those Variables 



• Is there a method for the CoCo to run 
one program, then load a new one while 
holding all variables at values set by the 
first program (similar to the CHAIN 
command of other computers)? 

Warren Cole 
Nashville, TN 

Not while using Disk BASIC, Warren. 
You can pass parameters using OS-9, 
but you didn't mention if you were using 
OS-9. About the only thing I can sug- 
gest is storing all of your variables in a 
short random disk file before running 
your new program. Then you can load 
the variables back into memory and 
continue. 



Using DSKCON With 128K 

• / have a Co Co 3, with 128K. I want 
to use DSKCON with the upper memory 
locations. Because DSKCON only allows 
the I/O buffer to be in the range of 
memory locations 0 to 65535, I can 7 put 
anything in the 128K range. My ques- 
tion is, how do / use DSKCON, or any 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago and he has built several 
68XX systems. 



routine using a buffer, with the 128K 
memory range? 

Dave Bell 
Smith field, UT 

One of the funny things about the 
new CoCo 3, Dave, is even though there 
is plenty of space for graphics in lower 
memory banks, there is no way of 
saving or loading the screens. Notice, 1 
said lower memory banks. When initial- 
ized, the normal 64K occupies from 
$70000 to S7FFFF All other memory 
is at $00000 to S6FFFF 

There are several programs appear- 
ing on bulletin boards for saving and 
loading this information. Various meth- 
ods can be used, such as swapping 
memory banks using the DAT (Dy- 
namic Address Translator), or by use of 
a machine language program that will 
access the extra memory. 

The only documented way to use the 
extended memory is by using the LPEEK 
and LPOKE functions to copy data from 
regular to extended memory. I'm sure 
we will run an article on how to save and 
load extended memory screens in the 
very near future. 



Crashed Disk Directories 

• / own a 64 K CoCo 2 with Extended 
BASIC, disk drive with Disk BASIC 1. 1, 
and a D MP- 105 printer. I have a big 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



problem with ''crashed" disk directo- 
ries. When I try to write over an existing 
program with the same name, I don 7 get 
an AE Error. Disk BASIC writes over the 
program, but doesn 7 seem to fix the file 
allocation table. Any programs that 
appear after this file are lost. When I try 
to load these programs I get an FS 
Error. Please help. 

Randy Adams 
Memphis, TN 

Randy, 1 used to have the same 
problem. Instead of overwriting a file, 
1 cured the problem by first killing the 
old file before rewriting it. I have had 
no further problems. If anyone knows 
what the exact bug is, please write and 
we'll try to explain why this happens. 



Color on CM-8 

• / own a CoCo 3, single drive, DMP- 
105 printer and a CM-8 monitor. With 
the CM-8 hooked up to the CoCo 3 as 
per instructions, most of my programs 
run in black and white, not color. Radio 
Shack cannot give me a reason, other 
than my software is CoCo 2 compatible, 
and not for CoCo 3. All the programs 
run in color on a TV monitor, but not 
the CM-8. 

Greg Kazian 
Greer, SC 

Greg, with the good comes the bad. 



1 86 THE RAINBOW February 1 987 



The CM-8 is an RGB analog monitor. 
Previously, CoCo 2s produced compos- 
ite video using an adaptor. You cannot 
obtain the same resolution with a com- 
posite monitor as you can with an RGB 
monitor. In this context, you have 
purchased a superior monitor. At the 
same time, different signals are used for 
RGB from the computer to the monitor. 
Using the CoCo 2 and a composite 
monitor, quite a few of the more recent 
graphics programs used artifact colors, 
which relied on composite video's color- 
burst signal. The CM-8 monitor is not 
capable of displaying artifact colors. 

A big argument is brewing on 
whether the CM-8 is the proper monitor 
for the CoCo 3. I think the main con- 
tention is that it is not compatible with 
a great deal of existing software, as in 
your case. Many other RGB monitors 
have a composite video mode and will 
display artifact colors. As soon as some 
of these monitors are submitted for 
evaluation, we will give you our opin- 
ion. In the meantime, there is nothing 
wrong with your CM-8. I'm sure you'll 
be satisfied with your CM-8 when more 
software is available that uses its capa- 
bilities. 

By the way, for those readers with 
composite monitors, try the following 
to get a readable 80-column screen: 

WIDTHB0 : PALETTES, 255: PALETTE0 , 0 



Novice Upgrade 

• / have a 16K Korean CoCo 2 ECB 
and I went to Radio Shack to ask about 
having ii upgraded to 64 K. They told 
me il would cost about $70 with parts 
and labor, and I would be better off 
buying a 64 K CoCo 2 ECB on sale for 
$99 (at the lime). While thinking this 
over, I purchased my first copy of THE 
RAINBOW. I noticed several ads for 
upgrade kits for about $30. Although 
the ads say that all instructions and 
parts are included, the problem is that 
I have practically no experience in 
computer or electronic technology. Is it 
feasible for a novice to attempt such an 
upgrade on his own? I have gathered 
from the ads thai one solder joint is 
required in upgrading my model, but I 
am otherwise in the dark as to how 
difficult the procedure would be. 

J.S. Grossman 
Lubbock, TX 

In the case of the Korean CoCo, 
upgrading will consist of replacing a few 



chips, in sockets, by the way, and 
connecting two pads by soldering a 
jumper between them. The instructions 
I have seen are more than adequate. I'd 
try it myself, even if I were a novice. 



CoCo 3 Drive Compatibility 

• Presently 1 am using an original gray- 
case CoCo (E board) with drives 0 and 
I and would like to know if these drives 
(Part No. 26-3022) and controller (Part 
No. 26-3022) are compatible with the 
CoCo 3. And, if not, what do I have to 
do to make them compatible? 

Kenneth Stark 
St. Ann, MO 

Ken, you need 12 volts for your 
particular controller. Experience has 
been that it doesn't have to be well 
regulated. Find 12 volts in the power 
supply of your CoCo 3 and run a jumper 
to Pin 2 on the cartridge connector. 
Make sure Pin 2 is not grounded. This 
may require cutting a trace on the 
circuit board. 

If you don't want to experiment, buy 
a Multi-Pak. It has the 12 volts neces- 
sary on the bus for the older disk 
controllers. 



Disk Controller Necessity 

• Is there any way you can use a disk 
drive through the I/O port without 
having to use the special adapter that 
fits into the cartridge port? 

Michael S. Novak 
Virginia Beach, V A 

Michael, the special adapter you are 
referring to is the disk controller. It 
allows the computer to communicate 
with the disk drives, in addition to 
containing the Disk BASIC software. 
You need a controller to use your disk 
drives. I wouldn't recommend building 
your own. 

There are alternate disk controllers 
on the market. Alternate disk drives are 
also available. The only drawback is 
that the software used by non-standard 
controllers is also, for the most part, 
non-standard. I'm not saying you must 
use a standard controller, but be sure 
you are aware of the consequences if 
you do not. Maybe you could obtain a 
non-standard controller with standard 
software. It's possible if you order your 



ROM from Radio Shack. Make sure 
the controller will accept it. 



BASIC Program Merging 

• / have seen numerous procedures for 
merging BASIC programs on the CoCo 
and they all appear to be essentially the 
same. For instance, after loading the 
first program, let X1=PEEI<[25), X2= 
PEEK (26) , X3=PEEI<(27] , X4=PEEI< (28]. 
Providing that X4 is not 0 or I, 
PDKE25,X3:PDKE2B,X4-2 and load 
the second program. Renumber, if 
necessary, so that the line numbers 
don't overlap, then P0KE25,X1: 
P0KE26,X2. 

More often than not, I find that this 
process restores the first program, but 
loses the second, both on my 32 K CoCo 
and my 64 K, The results are the same 
regardless of whether my disk drive is 
connected and wherever in memory 
PMDDE or PCLEAR commands force the 
program to reside. 

Harry M. Stern 
Miami, FL 

You have to rearrange the procedure 
you are using, Harry. Renumber the 
second program before you load it. 
Make sure the line numbers do not 
overlap with the first program. Then, 
you should be in good shape. 

After loading the first program, 
memory locations 25 and 26 contain the 
beginning address of your program. 
Locations 27 and 28 contain the ending 
address. You essentially tell the comput- 
er to start loading the second program 
at the end of the first by P0KE25, 
X3:PDKE26,X4-2. The -2 overwrites 
the end of file. Load your second pro- 
gram, put the original addresses back in 
memory locations 25 and 26, and save 
the combined programs. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK to arrive at the 
EXPERTS> prompt, where you can select 
the "Downloads" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



1 88 THE RAINBOW February 1 987 





Toll Free 

Orders Only 
800-628-2828 
EXT 850 



Information 
301-521-4886 




i 



If You Pay Taxes 

. Need Coco-Accountant 

All our software is CoCo 3 Compatible 




TAX 

^ DEDUCTIBLE 



"It's the most useful piece of soft- 
ware I own. " 

That's what we hear again and 
again from folks who buy Coco-Ac- 
countant II. This 32/64K single-entry 
accounting system for the home and 
small business is all you need to 
manage your finances and give you 
the information you need at tax time. 

We wrote the original version for 
ourselves two years ago because 
we wanted to know three things: 
Where did the money come from, where did it go, and 
what can we deduct from our taxes? 

As it turned out, we liked it better than anything else 
on the market, so we decided to sell it. And we've been 
improving it ever since. 

People say they like it because it's easy to use. Just 
spend a few minutes each month entering your data: 
checks, cash outlays, credit card expenses or income. 
In any order. CoCo-Accountant takes the whole mess 
and makes sense out of it. Here's what it does: 

♦ Lists and totals entries by month, offsetting in- 
come against expenses. 

♦ Lists and totals entries by account, for a month or 
the whole year. 

♦ Lists and totals entries by payee or income 
source, for a month or the whole year. 



♦ Provides a year-to-date summary 
by account. 

♦ Prints a spreadsheet showing 
activity by account and month for 
the whole year (seeing this one is 
believing). 

♦ Flags deductible expenses. 

♦ Flags expenses subject to 
sales tax and figures out how much 
sales tax you paid! 

♦ Lets you define up to 48 ac- 
counts (in 64K version). 

♦ Takes 900 entries in 64K version, 500 in 32K disk 
and 450 in 32K tape. 

♦ Sorts entries by date. 

♦ Stores your data to tape or disk. 

You can use CoCo Accountant as a simple check- 
book register or make it into a comprehensive home ac- 
counting package. Our customers tell us they use it in 
the home, at school, for their clubs, churches and small 
businesses. In fact, they use it in ways we never 
dreamed of! 

CoCo-Accountant II is so easy to use and flexible 
that you'll be delighted. So stop shoving all those re- 
cords in a shoe box and join the computer age! 

The price of Coco-Accountant II is $34.95. Please be 
sure to tell us your memory requirements and whether 
you want tape or disk. 



Thoroughbred, Harness, Greyhound 




HORSE RACES' 





•HARNE55 RACES- 



■DOG RACES- 



Use your Color Computer to improve your performance 
at the track! These 1 6K programs for Thoroughbred, Har- 
ness and Greyhound racing rank the horses or dogs in 
each race quickly and easily, even if you've never handi- 
capped before. All the information you need is readily avail- 
able from the Racing form, harness or dog track program. 
We even provide diagrams showing you where to find each 
item! 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, past 
performance, weight, class, jockey's record, beaten favor- 
ite and post position. Harness factors include speed, post 
position, driver's record, breaking tendencies, class, park- 



ed-out signs and beaten favorite. Greyhound factors in- 
clude speed, past performance, maneuvering ability, favor- 
ite box, class, kennel record, beaten favorite and breaking 
ability. 

We include complete instruction and a wagering guide 
that tells you which races to bet and which to avoid — one 
of the real secrets of good handicapping. You can buy a 
more expensive handicapper, but we don't think you can 
buy a better one! Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound 
Handicapper, $34.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for 
$54.95 or all three for $74.95. 




Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore. Md. 21208 



3 



KISSable OS-9 



Frank Hogg Sees the Light 
and a Level II Report 

By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The speaker is Barry Thompson, 
the man who buys and sells 
Color Computers in the Tandy 
Towers at Fort Worth. 

"If youVe looking for opportunity, 
look no further. The potential installed 
base is in the millions. In fact, the 
installed base of the CoCo 2 is already 
in the millions." 

As he should be, he is enthusiastic 
about the future of the new Color 
Computer 3 as he talks to members of 
the CoCo Community Breakfast during 
RAINBOWfest Princeton. Yet, Thomp- 
son isn't the only one bullish about 
CoCo 3 prospects. At the OS-9 Com- 
munity Buffet the next morning, Frank 
Hogg of FHL in Syracuse, N.Y., picked 
up the CoCo 3 ball and ran with it. 

"You have inside information!" Hogg 
said. "With your knowledge of OS-9, 
you can seize an opportunity." 

Hogg thinks the CoCo 3 has a very 
bright future and he's putting his money 
and marketing skills where his mouth is. 

"You can grab the brass ring, make 
merry and have fun like we have," Hogg 
said. "Or, you can sit on the merry-go- 
round and watch the world go by. The 
choice is yours." 

FHL plans to sell Sculptor y a fourth- 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and 
coauthor, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale 
works as a U.S. Coast Guard chief 
warrant officer and lives on Governors 
Island in New York Harbor. 



generation database application that 
will run on 40 different microcomput- 
ers, to CoCo 3 owners soon. Hogg 
believes that half of the people who own 
Color Computers today will buy a 
CoCo 3. 

"Then they'll be looking for things to 
buy!" Hogg said. "The CoCo 3 can be 
the opportunity of a lifetime for you. 
Fill a void! Find a need! Fill it! But 
remember — more than anything else 

— it is very important that you be first 
with your application." 

Hogg told the three dozen OS-9 Users 
Group members present that most 
software developers haven't been get- 
ting the message that they must use OS- 
9 to capture the capabilities of the CoCo 
3. He also told the developers that when 
they write OS-9 software for the CoCo 
3, they will also be writing for the future, 
noting that any software written with 
6809 OS-9 development tools can easily 
be carried into the 68K world. 

"Software written in C, BASIC09 or 
PASCAL on the Color Computer is 
directly compatible with OS-9 68K," 
Hogg said. "Applications written with 
our Sculptor development system can 
be carried directly to more than 40 
different computers, including most of 
the IBM clones." 

Hogg was so enthusiastic about the 
CoCo 3 and OS-9 Level II opportunities 
that we asked him to do an exclusive 
interview for "KISSable OS-9" readers. 
Some of his answers may surprise you 

— especially if you read his now infa- 
mous blast at the Color Computer and 
OS-9 two years ago. 

More Powerful Than a GIMIX III 

Dale: How does the CoCo 3 compare 
to other 6809 OS-9 computers you have 
used? 



Frank: It knocks their socks off! The 
CoCo 3 with OS-9 Level II and win- 
dows is probably one of the most pow- 
erful computers around. It is far more 
powerful than the G1M1X ill [ paid 
$12,000 for four years ago. And, the 
CoCo 3 only costs a few hundred dol- 
lars. As a single-user computer, the 
CoCo 3 can do just as much work for 
you as the GIMIX ill. We ran our office 
with software developed under Sculptor 
on the GIMIX 111 for several years. Yet, 
with a CoCo 3, OS-9 Level II and 
windows, we could do a better job — 
faster than with the GIMIX ill! 

Dale: That's hard to believe. 

Frank: Yes, I know it seems unbeliev- 
able, since the CoCo 3 runs at 1.8 MHz 
and the GIMIX III runs at 2 MHz. But, 
the GIMIX Ut must share time between 
several users on different terminals. 
Having the CoCo with windows is like 
having several terminals on the same 
screen. 

For example, when we create an 
invoice, we need to jump from one 
screen to another. With the CoCo 3 we 
can use a different window with the flick 
of a key! Put in the customer informa- 
tion, press a key and instantly we can 
enter the invoice. Press the key again 
and we can write a letter. If the phone 
rings, we press the key again and we're 
back in the invoice program. When the 
phone call ends, we press it again and 
like magic we're back at work with our 
letter. 

When we installed our office system 
in 1982 we paid almost $1,000 for the 
terminals alone. Now we can get the 
complete CoCo 3 with drives and every- 
thing for half that. 

Dale: So do you think the CoCo 3 will 
be a good business computer? 

Frank: It's good for anything and 



190 



THE RAINBOW February 19B7 



everything. For business, it's perfect. 
For home use, it's perfect too — both 
inexpensive and powerful. Of course, 
the key to all of the CoCo 3's power 
comes from OS-9, its new windows and 
the software that runs them. 

Dale: What kind of software will 
FHL offer for the CoCo 3? 

Frank: We plan to release a signifi- 
cant number of applications. As you 
know, we have had software running on 
OS-9 Level II for several years that we 
couldn't offer to the CoCo 2 community 
because of the lack of available memory. 
The new CoCo 3 with OS-9 Level 11 and 
512K lets all that software work — and 
very well, I might add. 

The first and most important product 
we have for the CoCo 3 is a specially 
priced version of Sculptor Plus. CoCo 
3 owners will be able to buy it for half 
the price of other Level H system 
owners. 

Dale: That would make the price 
about $495. Isn't that too steep for the 
CoCo market? 

Frank: Well, the very same product 
compiled from the same source running 
on a VAX minicomputer sells for close 
to $15,000! At $495, the CoCo version 
is a real bargain. I can't begin to de- 
scribe here what Sculptor is or what it 
can do. However, to help your readers 
discover the power and capabilities of 
Sculptor, we will be releasing a demo 
disk at a very low price, $5 or so, and 
it will be copyable. This means they will 
be able to see how it works for them- 
selves. We'll also be selling the Sculptor 
run-time package for $99. To make that 
a bargain, we plan to sell a large number 
of application programs written in 
Sculptor for $10 to $50. For that price 
you'll receive both the source and 
object. This means you will be able to 
run the application right away. Later, if 
you decide to pick up the full Sculptor 
package, you'll be able to modify those 
programs so they will be a perfect match 
for your business. 

Dale: Why do you think Sculptor will 
be so important to the CoCo 3 owner? 

Frank: It is the most powerful devel- 
opment system I have ever seen on any 
computer. There are versions of Sculp- 
tor running on more than 40 different 
computers and the programs written in 
it are compatible between the different 
machines. 

You could develop Sculptor pro- 
grams on your $200 CoCo 3 at home, 
carry the program to a million dollar 
VAX at work and run it without any 
modifications! No other development 



system can do that. Plus, the develop- 
ment time is incredibly short. You can 
develop applications using Sculptor in 
about one tenth the time it would take 
with most other languages. 



Dale: What kind of applications can 
you develop with Sculptor! 

Frank: Most people use Sculptor 
when they need an application that can 
access a large amount of data from 
several different databases very quickly. 
We have packages written in Sculptor 
that can manage a dental office, a real 
estate office or manage property. We use 
other Sculptor programs to maintain 
general ledgers, record accounts receiv- 
ables, and manage accounts payable. 
We also have clients using Sculptor for 
church management and mailing list 
management. All of these programs run 
on Sculptor and are very fast. They can 
access over 22 million records. And, any 
one of these records can be retrieved 
from a hard disk in less than a second. 

Dale: Ho w will Sculptor on the CoCo 
3 differ from Sculptor on the GIMIX III? 

Frank: Actually, Sculptor will appear 
to run faster on the CoCo 3 because of 
the windows. Keep in mind that the 
GIMIX III runs at almost the same clock 
speed as the CoCo 3 but doesn't have 
windows. To match the CoCo 3, the 
GIMIX would need to have several ter- 
minals hooked to it. 

Dale: How will you use the CoCo 3 
windows with Sculptor! 

Frank: Imagine you run a mail order 
business and need to do a lot of typing 
and other standard office chores. For 
starters, you will want a hard disk to 
keep your business records. Even 
though you can keep many records on 
a floppy disk, business people need to 
have enough storage on line to hold all 
of their information and they need to 
get at it fast. With a hard disk and 
Sculptor you have this ability. 

When you first bring the system up, 
you may start an invoice program in the 
first window. Then, open another win- 
dow and start the word processor. Then, 
you may create another window to run 
a few maintenance programs. At any 



timeyou can pressone keyand instantly 
move to another window! You can 
bounce back and forth from one to the 
other at will, doing whatever is neces- 
sary along the way. 



Dale: Why is it important that Sculp- 
lor is compatible with other computers? 

Frank: Look at aJI the people who 
have written their software in BASIC. If 
they need to switch to another comput- 
er, like an IBM PC, they will have a 
major rewrite on their hands. With 
Sculptor running under 40 different 
computers — and the list is growing 
daily — that problem just doesn't exist. 
No businessman knows what his com- 
puter needs will be three years from now 
and Sculptor gives him the flexibility to 
move his applications to another ma- 
chine at any time. Of course, it is the 
logical choice for developers for the 
same reason. 

Dale: What do you think of the future 
of the CoCo 3? 

Frank: It will be long and good. Most 
people don't realize the CoCo 3's poten- 
tial at this time and it will take several 
years before it starts to reach its limit. 
The future looks very, very good in- 
deed. 

Dale: How important is OS-9 to the 
CoCo 3's success? 

Frank: Vital! Absolutely vital! With- 
out OS-9 you lose the windows, the 
multitasking and the programs like 
Sculptor. BASIC is only good for small 
jobs and has a very limited future. OS- 
9 is definitely the only way to fly. 

Dale: What else will FHL be selling 
for the CoCo 3? 

Frank: We are working on a Word- 
Star clone for both OS-9/ 6809 and OS- 
9/68000. Because WordStar is so pop- 
ular and has so many books and train- 
ing programs available to support it, we 
think it will make a nice product. 

Many people believe that OS-9 will 
never be popular because it is not 
compatible with the IBM PC. We don't 
agree! Instead of trying to run IBM 
software, we are going to market OS- 
9 software that operates like IBM 
software. However, because of OS-9's 



February 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 91 



^Many people believe that 
OS -9 will never be popular 
because it is not 
compatible with the IBM 
PC. We don't agree!" 



superiority, the program will do many 
things that IBM versions will never be 
able to do. 

Dale: How do you rate the CoCo 3 
against the PC? 

Frank: The CoCo 3 runs circles 
around the IBM PC. But, it is unfair to 
compare a silk purse to a sow's ear. The 
CoCo 3, with its windows, OS-9 Level 
II, and our QT CoCo hard disk — if you 
will is powerful enough to run a good 
sized business. 

"The thing that 
excites me about 
Multi-View is the 
fact that it creates 
conventions for 
data interchange 
that developers 
would be fools not 
to use." 

Dale: What is the QT CoCo? 

Frank: It is a hard disk and floppy 
disk system for the CoCo 3 or CoCo 2 
that is based on our QT. 

Dale: I don't get it, why the QT? 

Frank: The QT without the computer 
board is probably the smallest disk 
drive enclosure with a solid power 
supply and provisions for both a hard 
disk and a floppy you can buy. It can 
also be upgraded to a full 68000-based 
QT computer system at any time. 

Dale: What do you get when you buy 
aQTCoCo? 

Frank: You get everything that is in 
a QT except the computer board. You 
get the case, a double-sided floppy 
drive, a 20-megabyte hard drive, a 
controller, a power supply, cables, etc. 
These are the exact same parts that are 
used in the QT. They go through the 
same testing and quality control. We 
just leave out the parts that are only 
needed for the QT. This means nothing 
is wasted later if you want to upgrade 
to the QT. The system is fan cooled and 
has a power supply much more power- 
ful than even the QT needs. In fact, the 
power supply alone costs more than a 
CoCo 2 costs today. 

Dale: Why would you want to buy a 
QT CoCo instead of another hard disk 
drive? 

Frank: There are several reasons. 
First, there's the size. The QT CoCo is 
very small — less than half a cubic foot. 



Besides the CoCo 3, it's all you'll need 
on the desktop. One of the things that 
has always bothered me about the 
CoCo is all the little boxes and wires 
that you need to make a complete 
system. With the QT CoCo, you reduce 
the number of boxes and that creates a 
more professional appearance and 
takes up less desk space. Another rea- 
son is reliability — the QT has been out 
for two years now and it has proven to 
be a very reliable computer. Using this 
same technology in a hard disk system 
brings that reliability to the CoCo. Of 
course, the QT CoCo is the only hard 
disk system that can be upgraded to a 
full 68000-based computer later and 
that should be important to you if you 
think you will ever want to move up to 
a bigger system. 

Dale: What do you lose when you 
upgrade to a QT? 

Frank: I didn't mean to imply that 
everything is used. Only the parts in the 
QTcase itselfcanbeused. You also need 
a controller for the hard drive and a 
floppy disk controller if you don't 
already have one. We are selling the 
Disto controller and SASI interface 
because they both fit in a case the size 
of a Radio Shack disk controller. This 
means that you don't need to install a 
multipack to use the system. The Disto 
hard disk interface also gives you a 
serial interface that you can use with a 
printer or terminal at full speed without 
losing characters. All in all, Tony has 
built a great system. If you upgrade later 
you can still use the Disto floppy con- 
troller. You will only lose the use of the 
SASI interface card. 

Dale: If you do upgrade to a QT, how 
do you convert the files on the hard disk 
to the QT? 

Frank: You don't need to! The 68000 
OS-9 file format is the same as the 6809, 
so the QT can read the hard disk with- 
out any reformatting. 

Dale: What does it cost? 

Frank: The price isn't firm yet. But, 
it will be less than the price Tandy 
charges for their 15-Meg hard disk. You 
will be able to get a floppy and a 20-Meg 
hard disk, plus controller, plus the 
potential for upgrade to a QT later for 
less money than you would pay Tandy 
for their 15-Meg hard disk! 

Dale: How else will you be support- 
ing the CoCo 3? 

Frank: On the hardware side, we are 
already selling 5I2K upgrade boards, 
disk controllers and complete disk drive 
systems. On the software side we will be 
marketing FBU, a high performance 



hard disk backup utility; QCom, a 
communication program that uses the 
Xmodem protocol and two additional 
utilities, ULD and DLD, which let you 
upload and download files quickly. 

Dale: What is FBU1 

Frank: FBU is designed to back up 
a hard disk to a number of floppy disks. 
It is optimized for speed and uses a 
minimum number of floppies because it 
compresses your files before it saves 
them. FBU comes with a utility named 
FRS which restores your files to the 
hard disk, creates directories, and sets 
all the attributes, owner IDs and dates. 

Dale: What about your communica- 
tions programs? 

Frank: QCom lets you send or receive 
straight ASCII text files. It also lets you 
upload or download any file using the 
Xmodem protocol or simply chat on 
line. DLD and ULD give you a way to 
transfer programs to or from your 
CoCo 3 when you are communicating 
with another computer. They also use 
the Xmodem protocol. 



My First Look at Level II 

"OS-9 Level II has to be the software 
bargain of the decade," said Tandy's 
Mark Siegel as Bruce Warner and I 
followed him into a private room at the 
Hyatt in Princeton. "Where else can you 
buy all this power for $79.95?" 

After seeing Level II, Warner and I 
both decided that Siegel's remark had 
to be the biggest understatement of the 
year. We only got to watch the CoCo 3's 
new operating system perform for 
about 30 minutes, but we liked what we 
saw. 

Siegel created a few windows with 
short command lines from the OS-9 
prompt. After he had filled the screen 
with windows he started a new shell in 
the largest window. The command 
sequence looked something like this: 

□59 : mon type m 
□59 : iniz 

□59: ex shell i=/W 

At this point, approximately 48K of 
memory remained free in the 128K 
machine we were using. Siegel re- 
marked that he had created up to 14 
windows with shells and applications 
running in them in a 512K machine. 

While we watched, Siegel started 
shells in each of the three windows he 
had opened and ran a different utility 
in each — concurrently. He toggled 



192 THE RAINBOW February 1987 




/ 



Computer Island Educational Software 



BEYOND WORDS 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
These Language Arts programs cover 
common misspellings, and synonyns/ 
antonyms on each level. Additionally, 
Level 1 tests contractions and abbre- 
viations, Level 2 tests homonyms, 
and Level 3 tests analogies. Each 
program has three parts and con- 
tains over 400 questions and uses 
over 800 words. All tests are grade 
appropriate. User modifiable (direc- 
tions included). Printer option. Speci- 
fy Level. 

Level 1 Grades 3-5 

Level 2 Grades 6-8 

Level 3 Grades 9-1.2 




VOCABULARY BUILDER 

32K. Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
200 Vocabulary questions on appro- 
priate grade levels in a 4 part multiple 
choice format. 1000 words used. Ex- 
tensive research has provided chal- 
lenging words on all levels. When 
mastered, the words may be changed 
by the user (full directions included). 
Printer option. Specify Level. 

Level 1 Grades 3-5 

Level 2 Grades 6-8 

Level 3 Grades 9-12 



CONTEXT CLUES - 4, 5, 6, 7 

16K Ext. - $17.95 tape/ $22.95 disk 
Each reading program contains 
about 50 situational paragraphs with 
one key word missing. Child uses 
context clues to find correct answer 
in multiple choice format. Random 
selection of readings each round. 
Specify 4th, 5th, 6th, or 7th grade. 

CONTEXT CLUES - 2-3 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
A reading program wherein the child 
uses the context to choose the cor- 
rect answer. Multiple choice format, 
hi-res screen. Grades 2-3. 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
A step by step tutorial for learning to 
compute the sides and angles of right 
triangles. All examples have graphic 
representation. Help commands and 
cursor aids assist throughout. 




OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT 

32K Ext. - $24.95 disk only 
A set of programs designed to intro- 
duce and provide practice in the skills 
of filling out bank applications, deposit 
and withdrawal slips, and computing 
bank account balances. Loaded with 
graphic presentations. Grades 3-6. 



EQUATIONS TUTOR 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Elementary-Intermediate algebra. 
Step by step tutorials. Multi-level. 
SPECIFY Linear or Quadratic. 




AREA & PERIMETER 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Triangles, rectangles, and circles 
and covered in this Hi-res text and 
graphic program. 

COCO WHEEL OF FORTUNE 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Hi-res graphics and screen in this 
version of the popular TV show. One 
to six players. Spin the wheel for 
points and guess a letter to solve the 
puzzle. Over 200 puzzles. Have fun 
while strengthening language arts 
skills. 

MATH INVADERS 

32K Ext. - $17.95 tape/$22.95 disk 
A multi-level "Space Invaders" type 
game to reinforce the 4 basic math 
operations (addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division). Prob- 
lems become more difficult as your 
progress. Hi-res graphics. Joystick 
required. 





RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



Computennsland 



SEAL 




(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 



Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 
Please add S1 .00 per order 1or postage. N.Y, residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including lull directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



between the windows by striking a 
single key on the new CoCo 3 keyboard. 
We were impressed. 

Siegel told us that with the new Level 
II OS-9 software, contiguous memory 
would not be needed for programs. 
However, it is needed for windows. We 
also learned that OS-9 Level 1 1 looks for 
a file named fiutoex and that we would 
probably be running out of memory for 
process descriptors before we run out of 
memory for our programs. Yet, he said 
at one time he had run 28 individual 
processes before he ran out of memory. 

We also learned that we would no 
longer be able to load drivers for new 
devices and then run them. We would 
need to use DSBGen to put them in a new 
□SBBoot file. Level II OS-9 has a mouse 
driver built in. But, if you don't like 
mice, you can use the keyboard as a 
pseudo-mouse. A special joystick 
adapter that plugs into the joystick port 
and sells for $9.95 lets you point your 
mouse at any one of the 640 individual 
pixels in a line when you are running 
your CoCo 3 at its highest resolution. 

Even though the OS-9 Debug utility 
will no longer come with the basic OS- 
9 release, you will still be able to patch 



modules in memory using a special 
utility named ModPatch. It will update 
the CRC for you automatically and 
eliminate the need for the separate 
verify step. Debug will now be part of 
the development package. By the way, 
you'll still be able to do plenty of 
reading when you move up to OS-9 
Level II. The new manuals promise to 
be about 700 pages long — would you 
believe they started out at 900 pages? 

One of the most exciting things about 
OS-9 Level II and the CoCo 3 is the part 
we didn't get to see. Siegel didn't get to 
show us Multi-View at Princeton be- 
cause there weren't any 512K machines 
around to use for a demo. 

Multi-View is an enhanced window- 
ing environment designed specifically 
for the CoCo 3. It gives a common, 
graphics-based environment to run 
your application programs in. Title 
bars, menu bars, pull-down menus and 
dialog are all built into the system. This 
graphics shell lets you select picture- 
oriented commands (most people call 
them icons) to run your programs. A 
number of desktop utilities, or tools, are 
a keystroke away. An alarm clock, 
calculator, calendar/memo book, con- 



trol panel and clipboard support are all 
built in. Two other accessories let you 
configure your printer or call for help 
at any time. 

The thing that excites me about 
Multi-View is the fact that it creates 
conventions for data interchange that 
developers would be fools not to use. 
This means that the OS-9 programs of 
the future will have a central look or feel 
because they will use the same method- 
ology. You, the end user, will be the real 
victor because you will only need to 
learn how to save data with an OS-9 
application onetime. Why? Because, all 
OS-9 software will carry out similar 
functions in a similar way. In a nutshell, 
you will save your data in your spread- 
sheet the same way you save your data 
in your word processor, etc. Other 
standard operations will also be done 
the same way across the spectrum of 
application software. 

Yet, Microware and Tandy have 
designed the OS-9 Level II system on 
the CoCo 3 so that they can be flexible 
in the future. If the industry standard 
"user interface" changes in a few years, 
they will be able to write a new one. The 
internals of the operating system will 



Listing 1: files ize 

ifpl 

use . . . ./def s/os9def s 
endc 

type set sbrtn+objct 
revs set reent+1 

mod length, name, type, 
art , mem 

org p 
stack rmb 250 
mem equ . 

name fcs /filesize/ 
pcount equ 2 
pathaddr equ 4 
hiaddr equ 8 
loaddr equ 12 
start ldd pcount, s 

cmpb #3 

beq L01 

ldb #56 
error coma 

rts 

L01 ldd [pathaddr, s] 

tsta 

beq L02 

tfr a,b 
LJ32 tfr b,a 

ldb #2 



revs, st 



os9 I$getstt 
bcs error 
stx [hiaddr, s] 
stu [loaddr,s] 
clrb 
rts 
emod 
length equ * 
end 

Listing 2: f ilepir 

ifpl 

use . . . ./def s/os9def s 
endc 

type set sbrtn-fobjct 
revs set reent+1 

mod length, name, type, 
art , mem 

org J3 
stack rmb 250 
mem equ . 

name fcs /fileptr/ 
pcount equ 2 
pathaddr equ 4 
hiaddr equ 8 
loaddr equ 12 
start ldd pcount, s 
cmpb # 3 



revs, st 



194 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



stay the same and won't need to be 
changed. 

The Race Is On! 

The race has already started among 
CoCo 3 third-party hardware vendors. 
Three vendors have announced 512K 
upgrade boards for the CoCo 3. 

Bob Rosen at Spectrum Projects is 
selling his for $139.95. It uses 16 prime 
256K DRAMs. You can buy it without 
the RAM chips for $99.95. 

Tony DiStefano, who designs hard- 
ware for CRC, Inc., has released his 
5I2K board also. It sells for $129.95. 

And finally, Frank Hogg at FHL is 
selling the PBJ 512K upgrade for the 
CoCo 3 at $129.95. FHL sells the bare 
PBJ board without the memory chips 
for $49.95. 

Another Utilipak 

Steve Goldberg continues to improve 
his Ulilipak software. Now, new 
customers can buy Ulilipak, Sr. for $20. 
What a bargain! For the price you get 
40 utilities. And Goldberg hasn't forgot- 
ten Ulilipak veterans. They can upgrade 
their package by sending a blank disk, 
a postage paid mailer and $7 to Gold- 



berg at 695 Plainview Road, Bethpage, 
NY 1 1714. 

Goldberg no longer sends a printed 
manual with his bargain basement 
utilities. Rather, he puts it on your disk 
and gives you a proced ure file which will 
print it automatically. Ulilipak, Sr. is a 
combination of Ulilipak and Ulilipak 
Too. It supercedes both by replacing a 
number of existing programs, adding 
better error handling and enhancements 
to others. Many of the original utilities 
run much faster. Especially notable are 
improvements to Grep, Pk, Unpk, 
Crypt, Head and Tail. 

Skala Discovered 

Back in July we mentioned some 
256K RAM disk drivers for The 
Banker. They were written by Dennis 
Skala and are available in the OS-9 
database on rainbow's Color Comput- 
er S1G on Delphi. Since then we have 
received several dozen requests for 
Dennis* address. Here it is: 5423 West 
Sebago Drive, Fairview, PA 16415. Be 
sure to say thanks! 

CoCo 3 Programs Appearing Online 

CoCo 3 OS-9 programs are starting 



to show up in the online databases. For 
example in the OS-9 database on our 
Delphi CoCo SIG, you can now find a 
CoCo 3 driver for your Word-Pak II. 
It was written by an OS-9 user named 
Connolly. 

Connolly has also contributed a 
number of other utilities that may cause 
you to join the fun on the CoCo SIG. 
Included in the latest index compiled by 
OS-9 database manager Dale Lear are 
a file directory utility, an archive/ 
restore utility set and Make, a UNIX- 
like development utility. He has also 
uploaded a Make script file that shows 
you how to patch a module. More than 
three dozen fileshave appeared since we 
first reported the increased activity last 
month. Join the fun. 

On the CompuServe OS-9 SIG you 
can also find a number of new CoCo 3 
programs in the database. The two most 
important this month are CO380, an 80- 
by-24 screen driver. It runs under OS- 
9 Level I, Version 2.00.00 and was 
written by Mike Dziedzic, 134 Drift- 
wood Drive, Grand Island, NY 14072. 
It supports all OS-9 Level I, Version 
2.00.00 control codes and some OS-9 
Level II control codes — letting devel- 



beq LJ31 
ldb #56 
error coma 
rts 

LJ31 ldd [pathaddr,s] 

tsta 

beq Lj32 

tfr a,b 
Lf32 tfr b,a 

ldb #5 

os9 i$getstt 
bcs error 
stx [hiaddr,s] 
stu [loaddr,s] 
clrb 
rts 
emod 
length equ * 
end 

Listing 3: demo tes t 

PROCEDURE FileSizeText 
DIM filename$: STRING 
DIM path: INTEGER 
DIM hi , lo : INTEGER 

INPUT "Please give me a filename 
: M ,filename$ 



OPEN #path, filename$:READ 
PRINT path, f ilename$ 

RUN files ize (path , hi , lo) 

fs=hi*65536.+lo 

RUN fileptr (path, hi, lo) 

fp=hi*65536.+lo 

PRINT "The file size is " , f s 
PRINT "The file pointer is at 

fp 
END 



Listing 4: unload 



* * 

* UNLOAD * 
* * 

* Repetitive Unlink Command * 
* * 

* (C) Copyright 19 8 6 * 

* by Fred Sawtelle * 

* 31j33 Montgomery Road * 

* Huntsville, TX 7734j3 * 

* April 1, 1986 * 
* * 



nam Unload 

ttl Repetitive Unlink Command 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 195 



opers get a head start before Level II is 
released, Jt also supports the OPak Hi- 
Res control codes so that you can run 
some of the older software, such as 
DynaStar, on your CoCo 2. 

Another interesting CoCo 3 file is 
CC3Fix, a utility that lets you create an 
OS-9 Level I, Version J. 00.00 or Version 
1.01.00 disk that will run on the CoCo 
3. You boot the system normally, run 
CC3fix and then do a cobbler to a 
freshly formatted blank disk. This new 
system disk will boot directly on the 
CoCo 3 without the memory conflicts 
that previously caused Version 1.00.00 
and Version 1 .0 1 .00 of OS-9 to crash. It 
was written by Kent D. Meyers. 

Unload, SysGo for Version 2.00.00 
and a BASIC09 Procedure 

Mark Roseman of 736 Queenston 



Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 
sent us a note with an assembly lan- 
guage program that you can use with 
B AS l COO to find the size of a file, or your 
current position within a file — a 
BAS1C09 equivalent of LDP and LOC in 
Microsoft BASIC. To do the job, you use 
an OS-9 ISGetstt call. To call his 
routines, use a BAS1C09 statement like 
this. 



run f i 1 esize ( pa th , hi , Id) 
fs := hi * 65536 + Id 



Path, hi and io are all integer var- 
iables, or parameters, and fs is a real 
variable which holds the file size. A call 



to fileptr would be written in a 
similar fashion. For his program, see 
listings I, 2 and 3. 

This demo program asks you for a 
filename, then prints the size of your file 
and tells you where the file pointer is 
currently pointing. In the example it 
will still be pointing to the beginning of 
the file, or zero. 

Both SysGo for Version 2.00.00 and 
UnLoad were contributed by Fred 
Sawtelle of 3103 Montgomery Road, 
Huntsville, TX 77340. Sawtelle is the 
author of several other utilities we 
published during 1986. 

By the time I sit down to work on the 
March edition, I should have had some 
hands-on experience with OS-9 Level II 
on the new CoCo 3. We'll cross our 
fingers! Till then, enjoy! □ 



ifpl 

use /d$/defs/os9def s 
endc 

* CONDITION: use /d0/def s/os9def 
s 

* MODULE SPECS 



TYP set prgrm+objct 
REV set reent+1 

mod ZZ,MN,TYP,REV,GO,EDAT 
MN fcs "Unload" 

fcb 1 

fee " (C) 1986FredSawtelle" 
★ DATA SPECS 

TOP rmb 2 
BOTTOM rmb 2 
LEN rmb 2 
TIMES rmb 1 

rmb 2j30 
ED AT equ . 

ERMSG fee "ERROR: can't find " 
ERMEND equ * 

ERMSG 2 fee "ERROR: didn't unload 



ERM2END equ * 
CGRTN fdb $070d 



* EXECUTABLE CODE 



GO stx TOP 



os9 f$prsnam 
bes OUT 
clra 
std LEN 
sty BOTTOM 
os9 f$link 
bec GOTMOD 

ERPRINT leax ERMSG, per 

ldy #ERMEND-ERMSG 

bra EP2 
EP1 leax ERMSG2,pcr 

ldy #ERM2END-ERMSG2 
EP2 Ida #2 

os9 i$write 

bes OUT 

ldx TOP 

ldy LEN 

Ida #1 

os9 i$write 

bes OUT 

leax CGRTN, per 
ldy #2 

os9 i$writln 
bes OUT 
bra CKNEXT 

GOTMOD Ida #$10 

sta TIMES 
UNLINK os9 f$unlink 

bes OUT 
dec TIMES 
bne UNLINK 
clra 
ldx TOP 
os9 f$link 
bec EP1 




1 96 THE RAINBOW February 1 987 



Telewriter-64 , 

the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lowercase characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
Tl, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On lop of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk . 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I hove seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Te\e\writer. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— I6K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. \\ 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
gel about 40K of memory to store text . So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 5) x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect fov showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
lime. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPV11/V111, DMP- 100/200, Epson, Okidaia, 
Centronics. NEC, C. lioh, Smilh-Corona, 
Terminet, e(c). 

Embedded conirol codei give full dynamic access to 
intelligent primer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and typesi2e, doi- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per pa&e, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable jusiification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line hepders and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su r e saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in. save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



... truly a state of the art word processor, 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability f or serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs 549.95 on cassette, 559.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your Jocal software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755- J 258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Appk- [[ is a trademark of Apple Computer. Inc.; Aiari is a trademark 
of Atari. Inc.: TRS-80 ii a trademark of Tandy Corp: MX-80 ij a 
trademark of Epson America, Inc. 






inbow Programs 

Without All The Fuss! 
Subscribe to rainbow on tape! 



Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 



Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbowon tape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $1 05 for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 
bill. 




DISK USERS: RAINBOW ON DISK 

IS NOW AVAILABLE! 

All the programs from the rainbow — includ- 
ing OS-9 — are now available on disk. For 
more information, see page 187 of this issue. 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, rainbow on tape can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Inlormation Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of THE rainbow's Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past February issues are 
also available for immediate download in the RAINBOW ON 
tape Database area in the rainbow's Color Computer SIG 
on Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



rainbow on tape is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOW ON TAPE, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, (credit card orders only) call 
800-847-0309, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call 502-228-4492. 



Programs from Our Past Utilities Issues: 

February 1986 — Valprint and Valname, graphics utilities to 
help you send an original and personalized valentine; 
PixFiles, a graphics utility to get picture formats together; 
Crashproof, a disk utility that provides a menu in which you 
can move the arrows over the program you want and press 
ENTER; Debug, an ML utility that can display 30 bytes and 
their corresponding characters on the screen at any address 
and prints out in listing form; Mendump and Crun, two utilities 
to auto-execute tape programs; Memory Diagnostic, a 
confidence check for the RAM-SAM portion of your Color 
Computer; Quick Restore, a programming utility that allows 
you to restore to a specified line number; SuperCLS, a 
machine language subroutine that completely replaces the 
CLS command and adds several options to its standard 
features; and Sound Story 2, produces sounds without the 
plrv or SOUND commands. Plus twelve additional programs. 

February 1985 — WEFAX, a communications utility that 
processes facsimile weather pictures into graphics; Space 
Race, an educational game for calculating your way through 
the solar system by solving math equations; Buffer Stuffer, 
an ML utility that enhances keyboard input capabilities; 
Autoboot, a loading utility that makes ML programs self-ExEC; 
Simplify and Sharpen Displays, a basic tutorial on the ease 
of writing programs involving displays; CoCopadd, a utility 
that turns your keyboard into a numeric keypad; CoCo Merge, 
a uti lity to merge cassette-based prog rams; CoComon Junior, 
speeds up the process of finding, typing and executing ML 
programs; Disk Merge, merges the contents of one disk to 
another without erasing the contents of the destination disk; 
and Talking Micro Math Lab, an educational program to 
strengthen addition and subtraction skills. Plus eight 
additional programs. 



CKNEXT ldx BOTTOM 
Ida , x+ 
cmpa #$0d 
bne GO 
clrb 

OUT os9 f$exit 

emod 
ZZ equ * 

end 



Listing 5: sysgo 



* * 

* SYSGO System Module * 

* Revised by Fred Sawtelle * 

* May 28, 1986 * 
* * 

nam SysGo 

ttl Refined System Module 
ifpl 

use /dp/def s/os9def s 
endc 

* CONDITION: use /dp/def s/os9def 
s 

★ MODULE SPECS 

TYP set systm+objct 
REV set reent+1 

mod ZZ ,KN,TYP,REV,GO,EDAT 
MN fcs "SysGo" 

fcb $pd rrevision 

* DATA SPECS 

rmb 2pp 
EDAT equ . 

* STRINGS AND DATA 



REBOOT fcb $55,p,$74 
nop 

clr $ffp3 

nop 

nop 

sta $ffdf 
jmp $efpe 
RBEND equ * 

* * 

* EXECUTION ENTRY * 

* SIGNAL TRAP 

GO leax RTI,pcr 
os9 f$icpt 

* RESET VECTOR 

leax REBOOT, per 
ldu #$71 

ldb #RBEND-REBOOT 
GETBOOT Ida ,x+ 
sta , u+ 
decb 

bne GETBOOT 

★ SET DIRECTORIES 

leax XDIR,pcr 
Ida #4 

os9 i$chgdir 
leax DDIR,pcr 
Ida #3 

os9 i$chgdir 

SETPRIOR os9 f$id 
ldb #$8p 
os9 f$sprior 

* RUN STARTUP 

leau START, per 
ldy #$15 
bra NS1 



DDIR fee "/dl" 

fcb $pd 
XDIR fee "CMDS" 

fcb $j3d 

SHELL fee "SHELL" 
fcb $pd 

START fee "/<W startup 
fcb $pd 



* NOTE: IF YOUR STARTUP FILE IS 

* IN YOUR EXECUTION DIRECTORY, 

* CHANGE PREVIOUS STRING TO: 

* START fee "startup -p" 



NEWSHELL ldy #p 
NS1 leax SHELL, per 

ldd #$lpp 

os9 f$fork 

bes SHELLERR 

os9 f$wait 

bee NEWSHELL 

SHELLERR bra SHELLERR 

RTI rti 

emod 
ZZ equ * 
end 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 199 



BITS AND BYTES OF BASIC 



The CoCo 3 Color Palette 

From a BASIC Program 

By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



With 64 colors to choose from, 
things can get confusing fast. 
The Sample 23 program in 
the manual displays all available colors, 
eight at a time. This will get you started, 
but the next question is, how does one 
color look next to a similar one on a 
different screen? The answer is to write 
a program in BASIC. This kills two birds 
with one stone. It meets my needs and 
also serves as a tutorial on how the 
palette works and how some of the new 
BASIC commands that deal with high 
resolution screens work. 

We will work in the 16-color, 320-by- 
J92 graphics mode. The idea is to draw 
1 6 boxes in buff on a black background . 
Each box is to be filled, in order, from 
the palette so that each color in the 
palette is shown. Since we can print 
characters to this screen, we will 
number each box with the palette slot 
it is referencing and print the number of 
the color displayed in each slot. 

The program starts with a little 
housekeeping. The DIM CC( 15) in Line 
5 establishes a numeric array that will 
keep the number of the color in each 
palette slot. The array numbers relate 
directly to the palette slot numbers. 
POKE 65497,0 sets the microprocessor 
speed to 1.8 MHz. POKE 65496,0 will 
reset the clock to .9 MHz. 

There are two different default 
palette color selections based on the fact 
that televisions and composite video 
monitorsdisplay colors differently from 
the CM-8 Analog RGB Color Monitor. 
Line 8 prints the question about an 
RGB monitor and the INKEY5 state- 

Ri chard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the coauthor of the TIMS database 
management program. 



ment in Line 10 looks for a Y or N 
answer. Note that Line 10 is written so 
that only a Y or an N are accepted and 
that any other letter, including all 
lowercase entries, sends the program 
back to the start of Line 10. 

Users with anything other than a 
CM-8 monitorshould enter an N. When 
N is pressed, the program does a RE- 
STORE to assure that the data pointer is 
reset and then enters a FOR-TO-NEXT 
loop to read A 16 times. The data in lines 
2000 and 2010 are the default color 
numbers for the RGB monitor in Line 
2000 and for TV or composite video in 
Line 2010. When RERD A has been done 
16 times, the data pointer is positioned 
to the first data item in Line 2010. Then 
the PALETTE CMP command sets the 
palette to the composite video default. 

If Y is chosen, the program restores 
the data pointer and does a PALETTE 
RGB, which loads the RGB default 
palette colors. 

Well, this almost works. There is a 
small bug. It is not apparent if one 
simply switches from the CMP to the 
RGB color set, since Slot 15 is filled 
with Color 38 in both instances. If Slot 
15 is loaded with some other color, the 
commands PALETTE RGB and PALETTE 
CMPdo not reset Slot 15 toColor38, but 
leave it unchanged. Once you have this 
program running, change the color in 
Slot !5, break and rerun the program. 
You will see all the default colors except 
in Slot 15 which remains the color you 
previously set. 

If, however, you use the reset button 
to break the program, you will find 
Color 38 in Slot 15 when you rerun the 
program. The reset button resets the 
machine to the CMP default colors 
including Slot 15, which will contain 
Color 38. 

Add 20 HC0L0R4,B:H5CREEN2. 

An H5CREEN command is used to 



both clear and display a CoCo 3 high 
resolution graphics screen. You have 
five choices: 



H5CREEN0 
H5CREEN1 
H5CREEN2 
H5CREEN3 
H5CREEN4 



Low resolution 
320 X 192, 4-color 
320 X 192, 16-color 
640 X 192, 2-color 
640 X 192, 4-color 



The HCOLOR C1,C2 command sets a 
foreground color, CI, and a back- 
ground color, C2. Color numbers range 
from 0 to 15 and refer directly to the 
palette slot numbers. The default uses 
Slot 1 for the foreground and Slot 0 for 
the background. I felt the colors would 
show up better against a black back- 
ground (Slot 8), and used buff for the 
foreground, Slot 4. So, in Line 20, 
HCOLOR 4,8 picks my choices and 
H5CREEN2 puts us in the graphics envi- 
ronment. Note that these color choices 
hold only as long as buff and black 
remain selected for slots 4 and 8. 

H5CREEN0 appears to be the way for 
the program to break out of graphics to 
get back to a text screen. Since HSCREEN 
clears the screen with the then-current 
background color each time it is used, 
there is no way for BASIC to draw a 
hidden graphic and then display it like 
you can using PMODE and SCREEN com- 
mands in the CoCo 2 mode. The CoCo 
3 way to do this is to set all the palette 
slots to the same number, issue an 
HSCREEN command and then follow 
with the code to generate the graphics. 
Use HCOLOR C1,C2 to set new fore- 
ground and background colors for 
PSET and RESET when used with HLINE, 
HPUT, H5ET and HRESET. Next, use FOR 
X = 1 to 15 : PALETTE X,C2 : NEXT 
to set all palette slots to the same co\ot. 
Now, where a color number is used in 
a command, use any palette number in 
the 0 to 15 range. Since all the colors 



200 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



in the palette are the same, the screen 
will remain clear. When it comes time 
to display the graphic, load the desired 
color numbers into their palette slots 
and the picture instantly appears. 

A variation on this strategy is to load 
colors into the palette in such a way as 
to make the picture grow and change on 
the screen. The dragon sequence in 
Radio Shack's CoCo 3 demo is an 
outstanding example of this technique, 
where the room comes slowly into being 
and wall colors lighten as torches along 
the walls are lighted. The torch light is 
made to flicker and dancejust by chang- 
ing palette slot color assignments. The 
changes are subtle, increasing their 
effectiveness. Although the demo is a 
machine language program, the types of 
changes used in this sequence are slow 
enough that BASIC will easily handle 
them. This sequence also illustrates the 
fact that the 64-color selection and the 
16 colors available at a time will meet 
all but the most exacting needs. Scenes 
tend to be bright or drab or pastel, but 
not all these things at the same time. 
One color set works well in a dungeon 
while an entirely separate set is needed 
for an outdoor scene. 

Line 30 uses HLINE to draw horizon- 



tal lines in the upper, center and lower 
parts of the screen. In the first paren- 
theses is the X,Y location of the start of 
the line. The 0,0 position is the top-left 
corner of the screen. The X dimension 
is horizontal and ranges from 0 to 319, 
increasing to the right. The Y dimension 
is vertical and ranges from 0 to 191 
increasing from top to bottom. PSET 
draws in the pre-selected foreground 
color slot. RESET draws in the pre- 
selected background slot. A slot 
number (0 to 15) may be used in place 
of PSET or RESET. 

HLINE also may be used to draw a 
box by using 4 ET parameter. The syntax 
is HLINE (xl,yl)-(x2,y2) ,PSET,B. 
You can also fill the box with the color 
of the outline using HLINE (xl,yl)- 
(x2,y2) ,PSET,BF. Of course, all of 
this is the same as CoCo 2 Extended 
BASIC. 

Line 40 draws vertical lines to gener- 
ate 1 6 boxes. Line 50 first paints the top 
row of boxes with colors from slots 0 
to 7 and then does the same to the 
bottom boxes using colors 8 to 15. This 
is accomplished using HPRINT (x,y), 
C1,C2. Of course X,Y defines the pixel 
where painting is to start. The color to 
use is put into the CI location. Color C2 



is border color where painting is to stop. 
Remember colors C I and C2 really refer 
to palette slots. At the same time the 
color number for each color is read into 
the array CC(X). 

Cheers are in order CoCo 3 Ex- 
tended BASIC lets us printtextanywhere 
on a graphics screen. In the 320-by-]92 
mode the 40-column character set is 
used while the 80-column set is used in 
the 640-by-J92 mode. 

Enough celebration — how does it 
work? HPRINT ( X , Y ] prints text starting 
at X column and Y row. Note that it uses 
columns and rows and not pixel posi- 
tions. This is consistent with the way the 
LOCATE command works when 

moving the cursor on a text screen. In 
Line 60, HPRINT(8,0) , "CURRENT 
PALETTE COLORS " prints the string 
starting at Column 8 in Row 1. 

The string may be defined in an 
HPRINT statement or be held in a string 
variable. In Line 70, text is assigned to 
string variables 5T$ and SB$, which are 
then printed by the HPRINT statements 
in Line 80. The function here is to print 
50 through 57 above the top row of 
boxes and 58 through 515 beneath the 
bottom row to identify palette slot 
numbers. 



500 PROGRAMS! 



GET 50 DISKS OR 50 CASSETTE TAPES FULL OF OVER 
500 PROGRAMS. HERE IS WHAT YOU'LL RECEIVE: 

★ Over 250 Utility/Home Application Programs including a 
Word Processor, DataBase, Spreadsheet, Account Man- 
ager, 2 Basic Compilers, Terminal Programs, ROM Copies, 
Mail List, Machine Language Tutorials, Plus Much More! 

★ Over 200 exciting games including Warlords, Star Trek, 
Super Vaders, Solar Conquest, Horse Races, Football, 
Baseball, Frog Jump, Invader, Plus Much More! (Many 
machine language games) 

★ Over 30 adventures including The College Adventure, Dun- 
geon Master, Space Lab, Ice World, Ship Wreck, Zigma 
Experiment. Plus 32 K Graphic Adventures. 

EACH INDIVIDUAL ISSUE SOLD FOR $ 9. 00 
EACH OR H50 FOR ALL 50 ISSUES. WE 
SLASHED THE PRICE TO ONLY 150. 00 . 



SPECIAL DEAL ON the greatest software deal 



ON EARTH JUST GOT BETTER! 



THAT'S RIGHT! THIS MONTH WE'VE DROPPED OUR YEARLY 
SUBSCRIPTION RATE AN UNBELIEVABLE $ 10.°° TO ENTICE YOU 
INTO SUBSCRIBING WITH US. GET 12 DISKS OR TAPES A YEAR 
CONTAINING OVER 120 QUALITY PROGRAMS. A SUBSCRIP- 
TION TOT & D SOFTWARE CONSISTS OF 10 READY-TO-LOAD 
PROGRAMS DELIVERED BY FIRST CLASS MAIL EVERY MONTH. 

NO WE ARE NOT THE SAME AS THE RAINBOW ON TAPE. IN 
FACT, MANY SUBSCRIBERS HAVE WRITTEN IN AND SAID THAT 
WE ARE MUCH BETTER THAN RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




1 YEAR(12ltsu@s) 

6MO.(6(8BU6S) 

1 1SSUE 



PRfGES- 

TAPE 
ORDiSK 



THIS 
MONTH ONLY 
60.00 
35.00 
8.00 



Michigan Residents Add 4% 
Overseas Add $10 to Subscription Price 
Personal Checks Welcome! 



REG. $ 450 



OV\R $ 150 



00 



★ ★THIS MONTH ONLY** 



VISA 



Buy this package of 500 programs and 
receive a free 6 month subscription. 
(A $ 35 value) 




* 1 6K-64K ColorComputer OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

* Over 4000 Satisfied Customers 1 . Computer LO.U. 6. Haunted Staircase 

* Back Issues Available From 2. Disk Disassembler 7. Canyon Bombers 

* July '82 (Over 500 Programs) 3. Bak Chekers 8. Dragon Adventure 

4. Pachinko 9. Graphic Scroll 

5. Stock Charting 10. Auto Border f 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
S£Al 



RAINBOW 

C*BTir»CAY*0« 



CoCo 3 Compatible 




T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, P.O. BOX 256C, HOLLAND, Ml 49423 (61 6) 396-7577 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 201 



The next task is to print the color 
number directly above or beJow the slot 
number. Since we are starting with a 
default color set, I was able to put the 
color numbers for the default colors 
into DATA statements, which were sub- 
sequently loaded into the numeric 
array, CC(X). To generate a string 
containing a color number, the expres- 
sion CCS = "C"+5TR$(CC(X) ) is used 
and the result will have the form "C ZZ" 
since 5TR$( ) adds a leading space 
when converting positive numbers. The 
top row of color numbers is printed 
using the FDR-TD-NEXT loop in Line 90 
while the bottom colors are printed in 
Row 22 using the code in Line 100. 
Since the loop in Line 90 starts with 0, 
the "C ZZ" strings will start in Column 
0 and be printed at five column spaces. 
In Line 100, the FDR-TD-NEXT index 
starts at 8, so 8 must be subtracted from 
X in the HPRINT statement. This is why 
there are separate lines to print the top 
and bottom rows. 



"dheers are in order. 
CoCo. 3 Extended 
It iSH: lets us print 
text anywhere on a 
graphics screen.** 



The high resolution graphics use 
HGET and HPUT in the same way GET and 
PUT are used in CoCo 2 Extended 
BASIC. A nearly 8K memory space is 
allocated in the 64K memory block that 
contains the high resolution screen 
memory. HBUFF buffer,size allocates a 
portion of the 8K block to a buffer 
where buffer is a number, and size is the 
number of bytes. Determining the 
number of bytes required is the confus- 
ing part. 

The manual approaches the question 
by defining the number ofdots or pixels 
a byte of memory can define. Read and 
digest that approach, then read the 
following where I will try a bit different 
tack. 

Lefs start with bits. A bit may be on 
or off. This is a two-state system. In a 
two-color graphics mode, the fore- 
ground and background colors are 
preset. It is then sufficient to know that 
a dot should be on or off. If the dot is 
to be on, it is set to the foreground color. 
If it is to be off, it is set to the back- 
ground color. HSCREEN 1 sets a two- 
color, 320-by- 192 mode where the de- 



fault foreground is set for Slot 1 and the 
default background is set to Slot 0. You 
can change this with HCDLDR C1,C2 
discussed earlier. HSCREEN 2 used in the 
program is a 16-color mode that re- 
quires four bits to relate any of the 16 
palette locations to the dot. 

Now let's look at the HGET statement 
in Line 190 which says HGET (0,0)- 
(20,5) ,2. The 0,0 to 20, B area en- 
compasses eight rows of 20 dots each. 
In a two-color mode where each dot 
needs only one byte of data, each row 
of dots would need only two and a half 
bytes. However, since it is necessary to 
move even bytes, this rounds up to three 
bytes. But, the row might not start on 
a byte boundary. It might start at the 
end of one byte, bridge two other bytes 
and end in a fourth byte. So in a worst- 
case situation, four bytes might be 
required. With eight rows, a simple 
multiplication of 4 times 8 yields 32 
bytes. The manual says add Itotherow 
number and then do the multiplication 
and weget 36 bytes. The manual further 
states the size is I less than the calcu- 
lated size, so the buffer allocation 
statement would be HBUFF 1,35. 

The method in the manual tries to 
sort out the cases where the row ofdots 
only bridges three bytes and allows a 
reduced buffer allocation. 

Multiple color modes need more of 
each byte to store their color informa- 
tion. A four-color mode needs to store 
four states, which can be done with two 
bits, so each byte defines four dots. The 
16-color, 320-by- 1 92 mode needs to 
store 16 states, which requires four bits. 
Each byte only defines two dots. 

In the HSCREEN 2, 16-color mode, at 
least 10 bytes are needed to save a row 
of 20 dots. If the row had run from I 
to 21, II bytes would actually have been 
involved. Following the book, eight 
rows plus one yields a multiplier of 9 
and a block size of 99. In Line 190, I 
properly used a size of 99 minus 1, or 
98. Unfortunately, there is evidence that 
buffer sizes calculated by the book do 
not always work. A friend defined three 
98-byte buffers in three successive lines 
of code. His machine hung up. He 
changed the first line to HBUFF 1,99 and 
the program ran, even though the fol- 
lowing two lines used HBUFF 2,98 and 
HBUFF 3,9B, and the HPUT statement 
was identical in all three cases. 

I originally made a mistake and 
defined the buffer in Line 1 10 as HBUFF 
2,807 when the correct code is HBUFF 
2,903 and the program ran fine on my 
machine. I have no assurance that it will 
run on someoneelse's machine. It seems 



irrational, but that's what the data I 
have now says. How about some of you 
CoCo 3 owners experimenting with 
this? Write if you find enlightenment. 

Obviously, things are flaky with 
HBUFF. If you have trouble, first make 
sure you have properly calculated the 
buffer size. If you have, add I to that 
size. In fact, if you share your programs 
perhaps the prudent course is not to 
subtract that last 1 from the buffer size. 
Two error modes have been docu- 
mented at this time. First, the machine 
may hang up and require use of the reset 
switch. If the buffer size given is too 
small, an FC Error results, providing 
BASIC chooses not to accept the defini- 
tion — and basic seems to be doing 
some funny choosing these days. 

Lines 200 through 215 simply use 
INKEYS to get the number of the slot 
where you want to change a color. The 
single-digit or two-digit number is kept 
in variable 5L$ as a string. VRL ( 5L$ ) is 
used to put that number into a numeric 
variable 5L, which is tested to assure 
that it is within the 0 to 15 range. 

When we did the HGET to fill Buffer 
I, we got a buffer full of background 
color referencing Slot 8 in the palette. 
Now we use HPUT ( 0 , 1 54 )-( 200 , 
192) ,1,P5ET to blank the slot number 
question-and-answer text. When you 
HPRINT to a graphic, BASIC draws each 
character using the foreground color 
active at the time. Only those dots 
actually defining the character are 
written. HPRINTing a string of spaces 
changes no dots which may already be 
on the screen. So, it is necessary to 
actually HPUT background color over 
characters to erase them. Next, we 
HPRINT the slot number chosen and ask 
for a color number. It is held in CCS and 
CC and is tested to assure it is within the 

0 to 63 range. 

In Line 250 the color in Palette Slot 
SL is changed to CC. The rest of the line 
is housekeeping to erase the text on the 
bottom line of the screen. Lines 255 and 
260 are used to erase the old color 
number and write the new one at the 
changed slot display. The program then 
returns to get another change. 

1000 GOTO 1000 is a programming 
aid. It locked up the program so I could 
see the results of each piece of code as 

1 wrote it. Of course, pressing BREAK 
returns to the text screen for changes or 
more programming. If you type in the 
program, put Line 1000 in first and then 
simply type RUN from time to time to see 
if things are working right. 

At this point, 1 am very favorably 
impressed with the CoCo 3, its graphics 



202 THE RAINBOW February 1987 



and the CM-8 monitor. Colors on a 
color TV before the monitor arrived 
were neat. Colors on the monitor are 
awesome for a system of its cost. It runs 
rings around the Tandy 1000. Thanks to 
Mike Dziedzic, 134 Driftwood Dr., 



Grand Island, NY 14072 and his 
TERM 380 and CO380 driver and device 
descriptors under OS-9 Version 2.0, I 
am writing this using DynaStar running 
with the 1.8-MHz clock on an 80- 
character screen, black on light blue. 



Sorry Mike, but I don't like buff on 
dark blue. The character set is much 
better than the one I saw on a Tandy 
1000 a few hours ago. I think I may 
change my start-up file so I have a buff 
background. □ 



The listing: BfiSICPAL 

5 DIMCC(15) :POKE65497,j3 

8 PRINT"ARE YOU USING AN RGB MON 

ITOR? " ; 

10 ANS$=INKEY$:IFANS$ = ""THEN 10 
ELSEIFANS$="N"THEN RESTORE : FORX= 
J3T015 : READA : NEXT : PALETTECMPELSE 
IFANS$="Y" THENRESTORE : PALETTERG 
B ELSE 1J3 

2J3 HCOLOR4,8:HSCREEN2 : CLS 

3J3 HLINE(j3,2 6)-(32j3,26) ,PSET:HLI 

NE(0,96)-(32j3,96) , PSET : HLINE (j3 , 1 

66)-(320,166) ,PSET 

4j3 FOR X=0TO32j3STEP4j3: HLINE (X, 27 

)-(X,165) , PSET: NEXT 

5j3 FORX=0TO7 rREADCC (X) :HPAINT(2j3 

+X*4j3 , 27 ) , X, 4 : NEXT : FORX=8T015 : RE 

ADCC(X) :HPAINT(2j3+(X-8) *4j3 , 97) ,X 

, 4 : NEXT 

6j3 HPRINT (8,0) , " CURRENT PALETTE 
COLORS" 

7j3 ST$="SJ3 SI S2 S3 S4 

S5 S6 S7»:SB$="S8 S9 SI 
j3 Sll S12 S13 S14 S15 
80 HPRINT (0, 2) ,ST$:HPRINT (0,21) , 
SB$ 

90 FORX=0TO7 : CC$="C"+STR$ (CC (X) ) 
:HPRINT(5*X, 1) ,CC$:NEXT 
100 FORX=8T015 : CC$= M C"+STR$ (CC (X 
) ) : HPRINT (5* (X-8) ,22) ,CC$:NEXT 
110 HBUFFl,908:HGET(0,184)-(200, 
192) ,1 

190 HBUFF2,98:HGET(0,0)-(20,8) ,2 
200 HPRINT (0, 23 ), "SLOT NUMBER TO 
CHANGE?' 1 

205 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=" n THEN205ELSE 



HPRINT(24,23) ,I$:SL$=I$ 

210 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=" M THEN210 ELS 

E IFI$<>CHR$ (13) THENSL$=SL$+I$ 

215 SL=VAL(SL$) :IFSL<0 OR SL>15T 

HENHPUT ( 0 , 184) -(200,192) ,1,PSET: 

GOTO200 

220 HPUT(0, 184)-(200, 192) ,1, PSET 
:HPRINT (0,23 ), "SLOT "+SL$+" NEW 

COLOR NUMBER?" 
230 I$=INKEY$ : IFI $=""THEN2 30ELSE 
HPRINT (2 6,2 3) ,I$:CC$=I$ 
240 I$=INKEY$ : IFI $=" "THEN240ELSE 
IFI$OCHR$ (13) THENHPRINT(27,23) , 
I$:CC$=CC$+I$ 

245 CC=VAL(CC$) :IFCC<0 OR CC>63 
THEN220 

250 PALETTESL,CC:HPUT (0,184) -(20 
0,19 2) , 1,PSET:HPUT (100, 184) - (300 
,19 2) ,1,PSET 

255 IFSL<8 THENHPUT(16+SL*40,8) - 
(3 5 + SLM0 , 15 ) , 2 , PSETELSEHPUT ( 16 + 
(SL-8) *40,17 6) -(3 5+ (SL-8) *40,18 3 
) ,2, PSET 

260 IFSL<8THENHPRINT(1+5*SL,1) ,S 
TR$ (CC) +" "ELSEHPRINT(l+5* (SL-8) 
,22) ,STR$ (CC)+" » 
270 GOTO200 
1000 GOTO1000 

2000 DATA18 , 54 , 9 , 36 , 63 ,2 7,45,38 , 

0,18,0,63,0,18,0,38 

2010 DATA18,3 6,11,7,63,31,9,3 8,0 

,18,0,63,0,18,0,38 

10000 POKE654 9 6,0:MOTORON:FORX=1 
TO9000 : NEXT : FORX=lT03 : CSAVE"CNGP 
ALET" : MOTORON : FORY=1TO600 : NEXTY , 
X: MOTOROFF 



LOWEST CONTROLLER PRICE EVER! The New JFD-EC, Only $75 

NOW COCO 3 Compatible* 



JFD-EC DISK CONTROLLER 

The JFD-EConomical controller combines the best features of 

the original JFD-COCO 
with the two switchable 
ROM sockets, fully buf- 
fered data lines, and Mem- 
ory Minder in ROM. The 
JFD-EC replaces the JFD- 
COCO in our product line 
at an even lower price. 
The controller includes 
JDOS. Memory Minder in 









"l 

m 


■ 

1 

i 




0" 
0 


■ 

i 


<//A 



ROM. and the JDOS manual 



JFD-EC Disk Controller with JDOS 
JFD-EC Disk Controller with RSDOS1.1 
For both add $20 additional 



$75 
$75 



NEW TERMS 

One-year warranty on parts & labor: 30-day 
money back guarantee (except .shipping) if not 
totally satisfied. Items must be returned in like new 
condition. 

Free shipping via UPS in continental United Suites 
for payment by VISA. MasterCard, or cashiers 
check. COi requires 10% prepayment by bank 
card plus 3% shipping. Blue Label and foreign 
shipping extra 

JAM SYSTEMS, LTD. 

I5100-A CENTRAL SOUTHEAST 
ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87123 
505/292-4182 



JFD-CP DISK CONTROLLER 

Our new JFD-CP. compatible with both the original COCO and 

the COCO 2. features a 
^J^, parallel port to support a 
Centronics compatible 
printer or our hard drive, 
and an external ROM 
switch, which allows you 
to select JDOS or an op- 
tional RS DOS-type ROM. 
It comes in a case and in- 
cludes JDOS 1.2 and man- 
ual. JDOS implements all RS DOS commands, plus many more, 
including auto line numbering, error trapping, baud rate selec- 
tion. OS/9 boot from floppy or hard drive, and Memory Minder, 
our disk drive analysis program (Precision Alignment Disk not 
included). 

JFD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS $ 1 39 

JFD-CP Disk Controller with RSDOS 1 . ] $ 139 

For both add $20 additional 




We accept MasterCard and Visa 

"JFD-EC The JFi-EC. our newest controller, exhibits no compatibility problems with the COCO 3. Using RS130S 1.1 in the JFD-EC ustrs will have complete access lo the new capabilities of the COCO 3 

•JFD-CP The JFD-CP controller is compatible with the COCO 3. however the parallel port will not function with the COCO 3. Users »f the JFU-CP and COCO 3 should not connect anything to the parallel 
printer port. 

'The JDOS disk operating system will yield unpredictable results when used «n a COCO 3. It is recommended that JDOS not be used on the COCO 3. Radio Shack DOS (vers. 1.0 or I.J) will work in all 
)&M Controllers. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 203 





TUTORIAL 



Pipes and Filters for the Masses 



By Bruce I\. Warner 



The OS-9 operating system is a very versatile environ- 
ment. Perhaps most noticeable is that OS-9 gives you 
a multitasking and a true multiuser environment. 
There is a powerful feature in OS-9 that is often overlooked, 
a feature often misunderstood. OS-9 can handle pipes and 
filters! 

"What are pipes and filters?" you ask. 

Filters are programs that affect the output of another 
program. They may be used to sort the output, delete portions 
of the output, or add to the output. A pipe is the part of the 
operating system that connects the filter to the parent or 
master program. 

Pipes and filters are tied to OS-9's ability to perform multi- 
tasking. They are essential for running two programs at the 
same time and converting the output from one program to 
the input for another. 

The easiest way of getting a set of filters is by using what 
is called a toolbox. The toolbox consists of a number of 
programs that add flexibility to your OS-9 svstem. While 
most of the programs do very little on their own, they provide 
extra power for the overall system. There are any number 
of different OS-9 toolbox kits available. My preference is 
Computerware's Textools. Others are available from Frank 
Hogg Laboratory, Microware and D.P. Johnson. 

Thesimplest example oftheuse of pipes and filters is piping 
something through a sort. This may come in handy when you 
are working with a large directory (such as a 5- or 10-Meg 
hard disk) or you have a large list in a file. We'll use the 
example of a directory. First, look what happens when you 
type dir. On my system it looks like this: 

Directory of /hd 10:15:05 

□sgBoDt cnds sys 

startup CDBDI PR0GRRM5 

STY SPELL prlnt_sty 

DEMOS hd. driver hd .descriptor 

DEF5 

TEST MORE 
WRITINGS CONTACTS 
hrdsk . 1 is ting 
5TD_DRIVES 
K.Dos .f Lxed 
kdos.flx SRC 



rssembly_source: 

CMQDEM 
KS.RUN 

holdl 
R5_DRIV/E5 
lnsta 1 1 
l<dos3 . 1 



Bruce Warner holds a bachelor's degree in computer 
programming, is president of the Northern Virginia 
Color Computer Club, and owns Soft War, a docu- 
mentation company. He is also an enlisted journalist 
in the US. Navy. 



This is a fairly large directory, so it's difficult to see if a 
program or directory is there. You can find it, but with the 
breaks in the lines, you'll probably get confused. What do 
you do? For starters, you can use a program called Is (or a 
similar name under one of the other toolboxes) to get a 
directory that displays each of the files on its own line. It 
makes my directory look like this: 



OS^Boot 
CMD5 SYS 
s ta r tup 

COBOL-PROGRAMS 

STY 

SPELL 

prlnt_s ty 

DEMOS 

hd. dr i ver 

hd. descriptor 

R5SEMBLY_50URCE 

DEFS 

CMODEM 

TEST 

MORE 

ICS . RUN 

WRITINGS 

CONTACTS 

holdl 

hrdsk . listing 

R5_DRIV/E5 

5TDJDRIV/ES 

insta 1 1 

l< .Dos. Fixed 

l<dos3.1 

kdos .fix 

SRC 



This makes your directory a little more readable, but it still 
lacks a sense of order, which may be required for quick 
reference. Since most toolboxes come with a Sort routine, 
we can now take Is and "pipe" its output through a "filter" 
called qsort to give us a sorted version of the directory. The 
pipe command is represented by an exclamation point (!). 

The command line looks like this: 
Is /hd ! qsort>/p 

You can replace the /hd with any device name. 



THE RAINBOW February 1987 



This runs the program /susing a hard disk drive as the input 
directory, pipes the output through the program qsort and 
redirects the output to the printer. Now the listing looks like 
this: 

ASSEMBLY—SOURCE 

CMDS 

CMQDEM 

COBOL-PROGRAMS 

CONTACTS 

DEFS 

DEMOS 

K.Oas.Fl xed 

KS.RUN 

MORE 

059Boot 

RS_DRIVES 

SPELL 

SRC 

STD_DRIVES 

STY 

SYS 

TEST 

WRITINGS 
hd. descriptor 
hd. driver 
hoidl 

hrdsk. I isting 
insta 1 1 
!<dos .fix 
Udos3. 1 
pr in t_s ty 
s tar tup 

Notice that the order of the listing has changed. This is 
because the output from the Is program has become the input 
for the program called qsort, which put the listing in ASCII 
order. This looks better, but it still isn't an alphabetical listing 
of the directory, since the capital letters ( A-Z) all come before 
the lowercase letters (a-z) when sorting in ASCII format (Z 
is before a). If you've filed your directories using the 
conventions recommended by experienced OS-9 users, this 
could be used to tell you that the first section of the Is output 
contains directories and the second section contains single 
files (provided you have properly named your files). The 
problem is that some files contain both upper- and lowercase 
characters. So what good will the filter do? 

Your next option is to use another filter to change the 
listing to either all small or all capital letters. This will put 



the entire directory in alphabetical order. You will lose the 
identification of files and directories, but you'll know 
everything in any directory. Just type! 

is /hd ! lower ! qsort >/p 

Again, the /hd can be replaced with your device. This 
executes the program Is to give a listing of all the filenames 
on the hard disk. The output will be piped through a program 
called lower, which converts all of the characters to 
lowercase. The output from lower is then piped through the 
program qsort. The qsort output is an alphabetical listing of 
the directory. The final output is then redirected to the printer. 
The new output looks like this: 

assemb ly_source 

cmds 

cmodem 

cobo l_programs 
con tac ts 
def s 
demos 

hd - descr iptor 
hd .driver 
hoidl 

hrdsk . 1 1 s t i ng 

insta 1 1 

l< .dos . fixed 

Udos .fix 

l<dos3 . 1 

ks . run 

more 

osBboo t 

pr in t_s ty 

rs_dr i ves 

spe 1 1 

src 

s tar tup 

s td_dr i ves 

sty 

sys 

tes t 

wr i tings 

Now that you have an understanding of pipes and filters, 
take some time and see what you can come up with to increase 
the power of the OS-9 operating system. Try something like 
piping dsave through a shell. 

( Questions may be directed to Mr. Warner at 14503 
Fuller ton Road, Dale City, VA 221 93, 703-670-4962. Please 
enclose an SASEfor a reply when writing.) ^ 



OS-9™ SOFTWAREIHARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full useof 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sectoredit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO— Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboards and mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOSTM diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. OS-9 
driver and test software included. $199.00 

All disk prices are forCoCo OS-9 format; for other formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid. or COD, VISA/MC accepted, 
add $1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added 
for COD. 



D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS la a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 205 



THESE FINE STORES 
CARRY THE RAINBOW 

The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have 
other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you 
patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Biewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix 
Sierra Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayertevllle 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
HalfMoon Boy 
Hollywood 
Lompoc 
Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

COLORADO 

Weslmlnster 

DELAWARE 

Mlddletown 

Mllford 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Cocoo 

Davte 

Deltona 

Ft Lauderddle 

Jacksonville 



North Miami 

Beach 
Orlando 
Panoma City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
Sarasota 
Slarke 

Tallahassee 
Tampa 

Tltusville 

GEORGIA 

Bremen 

Cummtngs 

Jesup 

Marietta 

Toccoo 

IDAHO 

Moscow 

ILLINOIS 
Aurora 
Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson NewsCo. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 

Electronic World 

TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Books Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electranlcs/Radlo Shack 
Anderson News Co. 

Soflware Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Strawf lower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
L&H Electronics Emporium 
E.D.C. Industries 
Polygon Co. 
Tower Magazine 
Sawyer's News. Inc. 
Computer Literacy 

Soflware City 

Delmar Co. 

Mllford News Stand 

Normar. Inc.— The Smoke Shop 

Software. Software, Inc. 
The Open Door 
Software Plus More 
-Wilson Assoc: dba Ra dio Shack 
Electronics Engineers 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
The Book Nook 
Book Town 
Deano's IV 

AJmar Bookstore 

§opk Mania 

8oyd-Ebert Corp. 

Anderson News Co. 

Wolf's Newsstand 

Family Computers 

Record Junction. Inc. 

Radio Shack Dealer 

Anderson News Co. 

Fine Print Bookstore 

Sound Trader & Computer Center 

Computrac 

Bremen Electronlcs/Radlo Shack 

Kent Radio Shack 

RadioShack 

Act One Video 

Martin Music Radio Shack 

Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's & Brentana's 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. Dalton Booksellers 

N Wabash St. 

West Jackson St. 
Bob's in Newtown 
Bob's News Emporium 
Bob's Rogers Paik 



Chlllicothe 

Danville 

Decatur 



East Mallne 

Evanstan 

Geneseo 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 

Oak Brook 

Oak Park 

Paris 

Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokle 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 
Columbus 
Garrett 
Greenwood 
Indianapolis 



Jasper 
Madison 
Martinsville 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenporl 

KANSAS 

Topeka 

Wichita 



KENTUCKY 

Georgetown 

Hazard 

Hopklnsvllle 

Louisville 

Paducah 

Plkevllle 

LOUISIANA 

Crowley 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Waterboro 



Book Maiket 

East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Drversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's & Brentano's 

South Wabash 

West Jackson 

516 N. Michigan 

836 N. Michigan 
Parkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sandmeyer's Bookstore 
Univ. of Chicago Bookstore 
Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Videomat, Inc. 
Book Emporium 
Book Market 
Book Empoiium 

K-Mart Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's IV Radio Shack 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & &entano's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridon Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Maiket 
Illinois Newsservice 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Ploce 
North Shore Distributors 



D & D Electronics 
Radio Shock 
White Cottage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems. Inc 
Finn News Agency, tnc. 
The Computer Experience 
Bookland. Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

Area Office Supplies 
Radio Shock 
Mitting's Electronics 



Interstate Book Store 



Palmer News, Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka. Inc. 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 
Lloyd's Rodlo 

Goodwin Electronics 
Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
The Computer Store 
Radio Shack 
Gus-Stan Enterprises 

Acadlana Newsstand 
The Book Rack 

Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 



MARYLAND 

Silver Spring 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Fitchburg 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Dearborn 

Durand 

Harrison 

Lowell 

Mt. Clemens 

Muskegon 

Owasso 

Perry 

Rasevllle 

Royal Oak 

Sterling 

Heights 
Trenton 
Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 
Willmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Jefferson City 
Klrksvllle 
Moberly 
St. Louis 



MONTANA 

Whlteflsh 



Layhill Newsstand 

Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Corners Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Go. 

Book Nook. Inc. 
DSL Computer Products 
Robblns Electronics 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Curl's Sound & Hame Arcade Center 
Michigan Radio 
The Eight Bit Comer 
C/C Computer Systems 
Perry Computers 
New Horizons 
Soflware City 

Sterling Book Center 
Trenton Book Store 
Geriy's Book Ca. 

Read-More News 
The Photo Shap 



Ray's IV & Radio Shack 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Front Page News 



Consumer Electronics of Whiteflsh 



NEBRASKA 




Lincoln 


Hobby Town 


NEVADA 




Las Vegas 


Hurley Electronics 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knalls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Montvale 

Pennsvllle 

River Edge 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

AJamogordo 
Albuquerque 



NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Johnson City 
New Vork 



Verham News Corp. 

Village Computer & Software 

Micro World II 

Outpost Radio Shack 

Software City 

Dave's Etect. Radio Shack 

Software City 

Soflware Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Dislributors 
Page One Newsstand 



Lltt Brtdge Book Shop. Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co.. Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

GA West & Co. 

Unicom Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station. Track 37 

200 Park Ave. (Pan Am #1) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center *2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
jonil Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 





206 THE RAINBOW February 1987 




N. White Plains 

Pawling 

Rochester 

Woodhaven 



State News 

Usercom Systems. Inc. 

Walden Books 

World Wide Media Services 

Software City 

Universal Computer Service 
village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Aberdeen 



Cory 
Charlolte 

Havlock 

Hickory 

Marion 

OHIO 

Blonchester 

Conton 

Chordon 

Cincinnati 

Columbiana 

Coshocton 

Dayton 

Faliborn 

Girard 

Kent 

Kenton 

Lakewood 

Umo 

MIomisburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Xenio 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allison Pork 

Altoona 

Brookville 

Malvern 

Philadelphia 

Phoenixville 
Pittsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Wind Gop 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 



King Electronics 
Rodb Shack 

News Center in Cory Village 
Newsstand Infl 
Papers & Paperbock 
Computer Plus 
C? Books & Comics 
Boomers Rhythm Centef 

JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Clnsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

Utopia Software 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wllke News 

News-Readers 

Girard Book & News 

The News Shop 

T.W. Hogan & Associates 

Lakewood International News 

Brunner News Agency 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

M ount Orab Radio Shock 
Programs Unlimited 
Leo's Book & Wine Shop 
Fine Print Books 



Merit Mlcf o Software 

Thomas Sales. Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Fifth Ave. News 

Software City 
Newborn Enterprises 
Larry's Stereo Shop 
Personal Software 
City Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Radio Shack 
All-Pro Souvenlers 
Pitt Computer & Software 
Software Comer 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Software Connection 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. Software Haus. Inc. 

Gaffney Book Store 
Palmetto News Co. 
Softwore City 
Fleming's Electronics 



Gaffney 
Greenville 
Sparfanburg 
Union 



TENNESSEE 

Chattonooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllle 

Memphis 



Nashville 
Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 

Brenham 
Elgin 
Orange 
San Antonio 

UTAH 

Murray 

VIRGINIA 

Gatton 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Ladysmlth 
Milwaukee 



Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
First Byte Computer Co. 
Computer Center 
Software. Inc. 



WYOMING 

Casper 

ARGENTINA 

Cordobo 

AUSTRALIA: 

Klngsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blalrmore 

Bonnyvllle 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 
Folrview 
Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
Innlsfall 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydmlnster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Strathmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetasklwin 



Mosko's Book Store 

Delker Electronics 

Cox Electronics Radio Shack 

Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 
Northway Books & News 
CoCo Nuts 

Deseret Book 

Electronics Markeling 
l-O Computers 
Software City 

Adams News Co.. Inc. 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News & Hobby 

Electronics. Etc. 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid II 

Harvey Schwartz Bookshop 

Unlv, of Wisconsin Bookshop 

The Computer Store 



Informotlco Y Tetecomunlcaciones 



Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" AS.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shock Associated Stores 
Langard Etectronics 
CMD Micro 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Radio Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Rodio Shock. ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Welter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westtock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Rumnbv 


Comoulit 

1 l|— .villi 


Ri irTK 1 nl/A 

UVJII ID LUr\U 


VT Video Works 


Campbell 




River 


TRS Electronics 


Chllliwock 


Charles Paiker 


Cooclenav 


Rick's Music & Stereo 


Dawson Creek 


Belt Radio & TV 


Golden 


Taks Home Furnishings 


Kelowno 


Telesoft Marketing 


Langley 


Lang(ey Radio Shack 


N. Vancouver 


MicFOwesf Distributors 


Nelson 


Olivers Books 


Parksvllle 


Parksvllle TV 


Pentlcton 


D.J.'s 


Salmon Arm 


Four Comer Grocery 


Matrix Computing 


OIUI Iwf 


SliflnAv FlAr'lTonir*^ 

ray LIDWIIUI 1IL.O 


Smlthers 


Wall's Home Furni ture 


100 Mile 




House 


Tip Top Radio 8t TV 


MANITOBA 




Altona 


LA Wlebf Ltd. 


Lundar 


Goconson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodls Sight «. Sound 


Selkirk 


N^.L- LI II IO L1uV-ri 


Virden 


Archer Enterprises 


Winnipeg 


d &<i Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeffnes Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewitt Elec. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Coibonear 


Slade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Halifax 


Atlantic News 


ONTARIO 




Aurora 


Comou Vision 


Concord 


Ingram Softwore 


Exceter 


J. Macleane & Sons 


Hanover 


Modern Appliance Centre 


Huntsvllle 


Hunjsvllle Elec. 


Kenora 


Donny W B" 


Kingston 


T.M. Computers 


Llstowel 


Modem Appliance Centre 


South River 


Max TV 




Dennis TV 


QUEBEC 




LoSolie 


Messogerfes de Press© Benjamin Enr. 


rUI 11. KUUyt? 


DCAjiique Bruno iaroc n e 


SASKATCHEWAN 




Assinlboia 


Telstar News 


Estevan 


Kotyk Electronics 


Moose Jaw 


D&S Computer Ptoce 


Nlpiwan 


Cornerstone Sound 


Reglna 


Regina CoCo Club 




Software Supermarket 


Saskatoon 


FveryboaVs Software Library 


Shellbrooke 


Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 


Tisdale 


Paul's Service 


Unity 


Grant's House of Sound 


YUKON 




Whltehorse 


H & O Holdings 


JAPAN 




Tokyo 


America Ado. Inc. 


PUERTO RICO 




San Juan 


Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



February 1987 THE RAINBOW 207 



A D VER TISER INDEX 

We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning THE RAINBOW when 



you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Ark Royal Games 39 

Bangert 91 

Canyon County Devices 170 

Cer-Comp 185 

Challenger 61 

Cinsoft 155 

CNR Engineering 149 

Cognitec 197 

Colorware 22, 23 

Compusense 167 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island 193 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 63 

CoCo Cat Anti durg 25 

D.P. Johnson 205 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Delphi 114, 115 

Derringer Software 93, 147 

Diecom IFC 

Disto/CRC 179, BC 

Dorsett 17 

Duck Productions 14 

Fazer Electronics 109 

Federal Hill Software 1 89 

Hard Drive Specialists 161 

Hawkes Research Services 30 

HJL div. of Touchstone 



Technology, Inc 99 

Howard Medical 34, 210 

Inventive Solutions 48 

J & M Systems 135, 203 

J & R Electronics 175 

Kelly Software Distributors .... 163 

Mark Data Products 153 

Marty's Rubber Stamp Shop 58 

Metric Industries 13 

Micro Smart 50, 51 

Micro Works, The 1 69 

Microcom Software 9, 11 

Microtech Consultants Inc 81 

MicroWorld 15 

Moreton Bay 79 

NRI Schools 47 

Novasoft 119 

Other Guys Software, The 59 

Owl-Ware 96, 97 

PCM 100 

Perry Computers 16 

Polygon 1 44 

Preble's Programs, Dr IBC 

Prickly-Pear Software 173 

PXE Computing 7 

Radio Shack 121, 123 

Rainbow Adventure Book II ....105 

Rainbow Binder 209 

Rainbow Bookshelf 64 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 113 



Rainbow On Disk 187 

Rainbow On Tape 198 

Rainbow Simulation Book II 57 

RAINBOWfest 130 

RAINBOWfest Tape 167 

Robotic Microsystems 76 

Saguaro 136 

Seca 76 

Selected Software 134 

Software House, The 146 

Spectrogram Magazine 109 

Spectrosystems 145 

Spectrum Projects Inc. . . .67, 69, 71 
Speech Systems 

40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 

Sugar Software 1 57 

Sunrise Software 175 

T & D Software 201 

TCE 103 

Tepco 171 

Thinking Software, Inc 30 

Tom Mix Software 118 

Tothian Software Inc 53 

True Data Products 132, 133 

Try-O-Byte 61 

Woodstown Electronics 91 

York 139 

Zebra Systems 95 




Call: 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Marian Nolan Carpenter 

Advertising Representative 

12110 Meridian South, Suite 5 

P.O. Box 73-578 

Puyallup, WA 98373-0578 

(206) 848-7766 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Faisoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hlngham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



Protect and highlight 
your important 
magazine collection 

with sturdy 
RAINBOW binders 




Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of therainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide com- 
plete protection. 

These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we re offering a special discount on past issues 

of the magazine. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat Index 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES. Please send me 



set(s) of RAINBOW binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 

enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1 . (Regular price $2.50.) 

(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number _ _ . „ Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per Iwo-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



- 



Most Howard Medical products are COCO 3 compatible, 
some require special patches. Please inquire when you order. 



(800) 443-1444 



ORDERS 



(312) 278-1440 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 




RINTERS 




NEW 

Dual Mode 

EPSON LX-80 



a IK inpul buffer (Of niut h 
Jes the LXflO. a Bofok serial 



HBP IUIL'M<»1 



01*T ($7 shipping) 
O I I Acid 529.50 for tractor ET-1 



STAR 

NX-10 



c\ printers arnl olW 
novemonl ol paper pt 
Hies NX-P package includes the NX 10, ; 
the Howard Pnntar Tutorial 





MONITORS 

123A 12" 

Thrs 12" green scroen high resolution mon- 
itor offers 80 column capability, Zenith quad 
|y and a 30 day warranty valid at any of 
Zenith's 1200 locations OCtt Ar|/ 

n £ .ia-i$Mn$gy50 REPACK 



Our price 



(S7 shipping) 



I 



122A Zenith 12" Amber Screen ot- 
ters the same 640 dots k ^00 dots 
resorption at iSMH* as the 12.1A 
and a 90 day warranty valid at our 
1200 locations $QQ 
(S7 shipping) O O 

Magnavox. BCM 515 with analog 
RGB and TTL RGB and composite 
video, Buitt-in speaker. 640 x iOU 
rjOfS iev>lution in KtjB mod« 
I de a I for C0C0 3 C - ~| g\ •> 

{$14 thippinB) 

Magridvox CM B652 color compo- 
site with 2 yeai wanantee iV 
screen 240 % 200 dm ruinluiion 
\KitU buitl-in speaker, a- aa 

l iH shipping) 



TURNIH luins your COrnpOSitC 
monitor inif * a 82 ctianin'l 



r.V.sei. 



4) J trapping) 



1 



All monitors require en amplifier 
circuit to drtve the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer 
They attach with spring connectors, 
with two wires extending qui ot the 
computet one lor audio end one tor 
video 

VA-1 lor monochrome 
in Iters only, 111* all 
if computers 

h $0445 

4 tor monochrome 
color, fits all coin j 
puters 




u( n i docs not require video i 




shpgj 



$ 39 



45 




DISK CONTROLLERS 



C-3 
ADD-ON 



DC-38 It 

|y, parai 
und dll 



B0 column capao- 
er, real time clock 



S138 



OC-256 25rJK HAM Board includes 
sollware to access all RAM Si 25 

DC-3P Mini EPROM Programmer 

includes all software iu 

program 2764 or 27128 *55 

OC512 512K HAM Board §165 



Includes controller and 
C-DOS ROM chip. 

$ 98 (S2 shipping! 



BOARDS 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and paral- 
lei printer port 

DD-2 Double sided 360 k disk drive 
wilh Vj height ta*G *hqq 
and power supply 5 loo 



CA-1 Cable lo connec 
one drive 



introtfer to 

C-OOS 3.3 2B PIN ROM makes 
Disto DC -4 work 
rl CoCol 



MEMORY 



64-E1 tor E Boards with complete 
instructions, Remove old chips and 
replace with p reassembled pack- 
age-no soldering 
nr trace cuts ($2 shpg) *^0.^ 
64-F1 for F Boards. No sotder+ng 

iifmliMl i .ipacttnr 
loads rnusi by cut 




$2445 

($2 shipping) 



64-2 tor COCO 2. Kit requires one 
sokierpCHnt.no e^i***; 
trace cuts, (S2 shipping) s 24 45 
64-22 Two Chip set lor 26-3 1 34 A 
and B 26-3136A and B Koren Col- 
or Compu lers require --0^ 
Isolde/ point ^ 

($2 shipping) 




SOFTWARE SPECIALS 

PAYROL/BAS™ 

Written m nonprotected baste for the color computer This easy-to-use package 
of programs will simplify and decrease Ihe time spent doing payroll ftamoow 
May 1986 review says, "Elegant and professional" Slate and federal tables 
are already included Send for FREE 11 page reports guide S~7Q 9 5 

VIP LIBRARY 

Soltlaw's integrated package includes VIP writer terminal, data base call and 
disk zap which can flit a diskette thai Is giving I/O errors g ^ j» 

SAP-II BPA-1 

Slock analysis program organizes Chart your blood pi&ssurs horn daily 

your portfolio and gives specific readings taken rn the comtort of 




$ 19 95 



GUARANTEE 



oward Medical's 30 day guarantee is meant to eliminate II 
dealing with a company through tho mad Once you receive our hardware, ir*y 
il oui; lesi it lor cumpalabilily tf you ro no! happy with 11 lor any reason, return 
it in 30 days and we ll give you your monoy back, (less shipping) 




Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL PO/S 



Help Ijs Battle the 

lost of Disk Drives 




New Lower Price 

Un-DISK Drives $43*85? 

34.95 

You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



Un-DISK uses your computer's extra 
memory like a fast disk drive. 

Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs. 

Un-DISK is INVISIBLE. Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VDOS. 

Un-DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

Un-DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all . 

Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

Un-DISK should be in the library of every 
serious CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J. Esser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 



OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited, the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if you already own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk. 

EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . 
Additional Power For S14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK! 

• VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5, 10. 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DISKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• VDUMPcan allow you to save a whole lot 
of rainbow o n tape in a SINGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally' Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $34.95 

The Preble VDUMP $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U S. and Canada $1.50 

or $5.00 lo other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 
Canaoians may order from Kelly Software 






We* 



33^ ^5 on att ■ 



e A v \t use© ^qu w 



r o\d c«°"£ 



xa \ too* 




ted 



n«* -L, 



or** 



seP aT 



aieW