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Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

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One, two or even three people can play Gan lelet at 
the same lime. You and your friends travel through 
the many levels In search of an qjcH to the next 
level, Avoid the Ghosts and other creatures that 
are out to stop you In your quest Collect keys to 
open doors, treasures and magic potions to aid 
you In your battle, Watch out for hidden traps as 
you frantfcaJly search for the exit to the next leve 



IKS, 
Can. 




/ I . 

SDHUS 1,15* 



Aa a paper boy, you rtde your btke 
along your route delivering papers to 
your customers. Break customers" 
windows or damage their property 
and they will can go. I tholr aubscHp- 
Uonsl Earn bonus points by damag- 
ing non-R-ubsolbers' property, A^okJ 
pedestrians, cars, and maybe even a 
mad elao In your attempt tn deliver al< 
of your psper&l DeiaMed graphite and 
-ois of surprises make ihls game a 
ma! chfllfeifle for everyone, 

1 1 hi ,H.u.,, '-I 11 

Can. 



COMING SOON: 

Mission: 
RUSH'N ASSAULT 




Move your marble around 
the mazes In your search For 
fl ie Hmsh fiiier Avoid marble 
eaters K aoid puddJes antf 
other oreatLires that Inhabit 
the mazes, EJghl different 
levels and great graptiira 
make Ihls game a mual for 
your collection* 




HIGH 
SCORE 



Fly your plane over land and water while avoiding 
enemy missiles, planes and helicopters attacking 
from the top and bottom of the screen. Use your 
radar to track objects as they approach the main 
screen. Bomb of I refineries, airports and destroy 
planes before they can take off from the airports. 
Watch out for missiles fired from hidden missile 
silos on the ground. Dozens of screensof detailed 
terrain plus increasing difficulty make this a great 
game for everyone, 

U.S. 

Can . 




TLH£ 
4*1 



f£flE 
L , I til 



KHQCK &L* t m*H -pircDTi hi* WWTS 



Fight against ffve different 
boxers In this great boxing 
gamal At first Ihe boxers 
□ra easy to knock out, but 
beware, ft gels harder as 
you move on. The boxera 
are out to atop you fn your 
quest to become 1 fihampion 
5f the World. OuislaoLttnq 
raphes make this a must 
of your rmllecfjonr 



I 



Chailerig.e the computer, or 
a Irfend to a Kerala match I 
Use various Karate punches 
and klcfcs to Knock your op- 
ponent down end earn 
points to win the maich. 
Whun chalFenglng tr»g com- 
puter, your opponent's 
Karate skifla increase a& 
on Hrin materia*, ThJa gams 
s a challenge for even the 
expert game player. 



U,S. 



Can. 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 



We accept: 





cheque or money order 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878-8358 
personal service 9-5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax. 
C.O.D. Canada only. 
Dealer inquiries invited 
Loci king for new software. 



» 



t 








BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 266K 569.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 839.00 

Tandy 3000 1 Drive 51 2K 1759.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMM05 80 CPS 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
RadioShackDWP-220DaisyWheel 359.00 

Silver Reed EXP-500PDaisy Wheel 229.00 

Star NX-10 120 CPS 279.00 

Star SG-15 120 CPS 410.00 

Panasonic P-1091 120 CPS 259.00 

Panasonic P-1092 180 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 292 200 CPS 529.00 

Okidata192160CPS 375.00 

Epson LX-80 100 CPS 275.00 

Epson FX-85 160 CPS 419.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-3 Modem 52.00 
Radio Shack DC Modem 

Program Pac 79.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 2212 315.00 

Hayes 300 Baud Modem 169.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 

Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 

64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 

Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 

HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 

COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 

Color Computer Mouse 44.00 

Multi Pack Interface 89.00 

Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 

Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 

Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor 139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor 149.00 

Goldstar Green Monitor 85.00 

Goldstar Amber Monitor 85.00 

Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 

Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Mark Data Graphic Adven. 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTerm by PXE Computing 39.95 49.95 

TelePatch by Spectrum 19.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 99.95 

Deft Extra 39.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 59.95 

Max Edit by Derringer 19.95 

Elite Calc 69.95 69.95 

Elite Word 69.95 69.95 

Elite File (disk only) 74.50 

DynaCalc (disk only) 99.95 

Word Pack RS by PBJ 99.00 

VIP Writer (tape & disk) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Order any 2 software pieces listed 
and take 10% off their listed price. 
All Radio Shack software 10% off list. 
Send for complete list. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 























P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




26 




FEATURES 



Bombs Away/ Allen Drennan 

GAME Trigger-happy combatants are headed for trouble 

The Goblins'll Getcha/ Jean and Al Duerig 



ADVENTURE A children's trick-or-treat Adventure 

dB| Power of the Palette/ft/c/c Adams and Dale Lear 

COCO 3 CAPABILITIES Graphics on the Color Computer 3 

rjfl| Transfiguration Band/Ronald T. Robson. 



58 




166 




Cover illustration copyright © 1986 
by Fred Crawford 



The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's rainbow ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, check the 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 
ads on pages 160 and 80. 



GRAPHICS UTILITY Stretch, reduce and enlarge your drawings 

2M Portraits/Ann S. Mayeux 



GRAPHICS A fun way to capture that special face 

CoCoDraw Concoctions/Dar/n Herr. 



GRAPHICS UTILITY A Hi-Res graphics editor for artists 

The RAINBOWfest Reporter/ Jeffrey Parker 

SHOW NOTES A look at the Chicago show 

Inside the CoCo 3/Marty Goodman 



COMMENTARY Some observations on the new Color Computer 

Dissecting the CoCo 3/ Cray Augsburg 

TUTORIAL A look at the internal hardware 

Don't String Me Along/Ellen and George Aftamonow — 

TUTORIAL Use this technique to find FC Errors 

Double Whammy/B/7/ Bernico 



GAME Keep your greed under control to win 

The CoCo 3/Marty Goodman 



FORUM Questions and answers about the new computer 

Graphics Quickies//?v4/A/BOtV Readers 

GRAPHICS Four fast frolics for fun 

Optimum Animation/Sfeven R. Polsz 



TUTORIAL Get better graphics while using less memory 

Odd Man OuX/Harold Schneider 



EDUCATION Learn reasoning, colors and shape discrimination 

The Shock Absorber/Marfy Goodman 



HARDWARE PROJECT A spike and surge protector for the CoCo 

The CoCo Sealer/Wayne Womack 



GRAPHICS UTILITY An easy-to-use detailer for CoCo pictures 

Picture Changer/ Jeff White 



DISK UTILITY Eliminate extension changing hassle 



18 



26 



37 



44 



49 



58 



83 



90 



94 



100 



101 



104 



108 



116 



125 



158 



166 



182 



NEXT MONTH: As the chill winds of November blow, what better time to retreat 
to your trusty CoCo and get in touch with our annual Data Communications issue. 

Online information services are the wave of the future and THE RAINBOW is here with 
answers and information for all your BBS and telecommunication questions. 

Plus, we have more games, programs for the home, educational material and 
information on the Color Computer than is available anywhere else. 

Look for November's RAINBOW! 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/ Joseph Kolar 77 

Learning how to function in BASIC 

Building October's Rainbow/ Jim Reed 16 

Managing Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/ZWarfy Goodman 180 

Just what the Dr. ordered 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 154 

Workspace commands and Goodman 's database report 

Education Uoies/Steve Blyn 152 

Back to basics with an adjective review 

Education Overview/M/cfrae/ Plog, Ph.D 164 

Sexism in the computer industry 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 12 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 161 

Hardware fixes for the VDG 

Wishing Well/Fred S. Scerbo 173 

Driller II is a thriller, too 

RAINBOWTECH 



Downloads/Dan Downard 194 

Answers to your technical questions 



g KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

Revving up for fall fun 



DEPARTMENTS 

Advertiser Index 208 

Back Issue Information 137 

CoCo Clubs 189 

CoCo Gallery 122 

Corrections 92 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

One-Liner Contest 

Information 40 

Rainbow Info 15 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

Product Review Contents. 



196 



Received & Certified 131 

Reviewing Reviews 132 

Scoreboard 96 

Scoreboard Pointers 98 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 178 

Subscription Information 24 

These Fine Stores 206 



129 



The 




October 1986 Vol. VI No. 3 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Copy Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Editorial Assistants Judy Brashear, 

Wendy Falk, Jody Gilbert, 

Angela Kapfhammer 
Technical Editor Dan Downard 
Technical Assistants Cray Augsburg, 

Chris Wehner 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, Joseph Kolar, 

Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, Fred Scerbo, 

Richard White 
Consulting Editors Ed Eilers, 

Danny Humphress, Belinda C. Kirby 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jett 
Designers Judy Colgate, Tracey Jones, 
Sandra Underwood 

Chief of Typography Debbie Hartley 
Typography Services Jody Doyle, 
Suzanne Benish Kurowsky 



Falsoft, Inc. 
President Lawrence C. Falk 

General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 



Editorial Director. James E. Reed 

Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 

Creative Director Heidi Maxedon 

Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Accounts Payable/A DP Lisa Ragan 

Fulfillment Services Director Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Fulfillment Services Asst. Dir. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Monica Wheat, Pam Workhoven 

Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
Director Cindy J. Shackleford 
Advertising Representative Shirley Duranseau 
For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Informations see Page 208 





Bill Barden and Richard White will return next month 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. THE rainbow, RAINBOWfest and THE rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 {ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1986. THE RAINBOW is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
THE rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/1 2ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



LETTERS TO THE 




Keep Those Converts 
A-Comin' 



Editor: 

Congratulations to the CoCo Community 
on the arrival of the new Color Computer 
3! 

As a current non-member of the commu- 
nity (but an interested party), I expect the 
new CoCo 3 will make quite a few converts. 
I, for one, have been hesitant to buy a CoCo, 
despite the many hardware options available 
for it, and the low cost of OS-9, because of 
its graphics limitations. But no more! With 
this latest version, the CoCo rivals the Atari 
ST in the graphics department, and moves 
well into the world of serious computers. 
And at a price of less than $220, it is easily 
affordable. 

Closely priced competitors will likely feel 
the pinch. If software developers are quick 
to react, the CoCo could enjoy fantastic 
Christmas sales. (A version of CoCo Max 
alone that takes advantage of the higher 
resolution modes would sell thousands.) 

A message for CoCo software developers: 
You have a tremendous opportunity here — 
don't let it go to waste! 

This is one non-CoCo owner who does 
not intend to stay that way any longer than 
necessary! 

Lonnie McClure 
Memphis, TN 



BACK TALK 



Editor: 

As the owner of Software Corner, a 
computer store specializing in software and 
hardware for the CoCo, I was sorry to read 
the letter in the August 1986 issue [Page 6] 
of rainbow from Bill Vergona. I really feel 
for Bill, as well as many other programmers, 
who spend endless hours programming to 
give the CoCo Community quality software 
only to have someone steal it. It is not only 
the giver, but also the receiver, who is 
breaking the law. I've heard all kinds of 
excuses from people justifying these acts and 
not one of them holds water. 

I am an independent third party dealer, 
and these pirates hurt me just as they hurt 
the programmers. One of my customers 
made the statement, "I haven't heard of any 
companies going out of business because 



their software is being pirated." Just look at 
an old issue of the rainbow and see how 
many of those advertisers are still advertis- 
ing, and how many dropped out because 
illegal copies of their software forced them 
out, and how many of the pirated programs 
were unjustly criticized because there were 
no instructions with them. 

Thank you for listening, and thanks to all 
the programmers out there who have gotten 
the CoCo this far! 

Linda Brubaker 
Software Corner 
Temple, PA 



HINTS AND TIPS 



Editor: 

Any readers who are using a JUKI 6100 
printer and are interested in adjusting word 
processing files for printing by a propor- 
tional spaced wheel, please write to me at 
P.O. Box 506, 06410. I have a working 
program I would like to share and have 
tested by users. 

Joseph P. Laronda 
Cheshire, CT 

Wireless Joystick, Part Two 

Editor: 

Here is a schematic to modify an Atari 
joystick to work with the Color Computer. 



S3. 



%1DK 
EOT T OH /IDE 



JOYSTICK 
FLU* 



- f f r lit.' 



5 
13 



LEFT 



T > 



RIGHT <^10K 



MDBS 
10 



} 



3TTJ9 



^ , -3 / 



H7^ <>H7K 

-4-4— 



FIRE 
BUTTON 



4 — • 



I took most of the information from the 
June 1985 [Page 105] article on the wireless 
joystick and made small modifications so 
the circuit can be mounted inside the joy- 
stick. I have modified one joystick and it's 
working fine. 



Is there a good program for the CoCo 2 
like the Greeting Card Designer that has 
different graphics, letter type and border 
shape on disk that can be used to fill a 
complete page? I have a Star SG-10 printer. 

Do you have a utility program to keep 
track of all the programs on a disk, add or 
modify the list and do a printout when 
needed? Send information to P.O. Box 46, 
CFS Senneterre, JOY 2C0. 

Andre Bergeron 
Nottaway, Quebec 

A correction to the referred 
article appeared on Page 224 in the 
August 1985 issue. 

Please look over the ads that 
appear in rainbow every month. 
There are several utility programs 
on the market that will do the job 
you 're looking for. 



Peeking at Function Keys 

Editor: 

For those who have purchased the HJL- 
57 keyboard and use ADOS, the function 
keys (Fl, F2, F3, F4,) do not work. If your keys 
do work, they can be used for things such 
as selecting options in menu-type programs. 

The keys are monitored by the keyboard 
rollover table, memory addresses 338-345 
(decimal) and can be used through a simple 
PEEK: 

If F! is pressed, PEEK (341) =191 
If F2 is pressed, PEEK (342) =191 
If F3 is pressed, PEEK (343) =191 
If F4 is pressed, PEEK (344) =191 

I hope someone can make use of these 
keys as I have. 

Eric Santanen 
Stanhope, NJ 

Art Gallery Tid Bits 

Editor: 

Recently one of the local Radio Shack 
stores was selling the Art Gallery ROMpack 
for $5. After opening the package and trying 
a little bit, I found a few things that some 
rainbow readers may find interesting. 

On computers with disk drives and with 



6 THE RAINBOW October 1986 

i 




YOU COULD FALL IN LOVE WITH 

AUTOTERM! 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 



< 



SMARTEST 
TERMINAL 



GOOD 
LOOKIN' 



AUTOTERM shows true upper/ 
lower case in screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, or 64 characters with 
no split words. The width of 32 
has extra large letters. Scrolling is 
forward, backward, and fast. Block 
graphics pictures are displayed 
automatically and can be scrolled. 

The screen's top line shows 
operating mode, unused memory 
size, memory on/off, and caps- 
lock on/off. It also gives helpful 
prompts. 



SWEET 
TALK IN' 



KEY-BEEP can be on/off. Unac- 
ceptable keystrokes cause a lower 
pitched BOP! This ERROR- 
BEEBOP can be on/off. 

Talks to other computers with 
Full or Half Duplex; Baud Rate of 
110, 150, 300, 600, 1200; Parity as 
even, odd, mark, space, none; 7 
or 8 bit Word; any Stop Bits; all 
128 ASCII characters; true line 
Break; XON/XOFF protocol; and 
optional line-at-a-time transmis- 
sion. Able to send and receive 
text, block graphics, BASIC and 
ML programs. A 64K machine 
holds up to 45,000 characters 
(33,300 in HI-RES). 

DUAL PROCESSING lets you 
review & edit while more data is 
coming in. 

XMODEM for disk file transfer. 



Fully supports D.C. Hayes and 
other intelligent modems. 

Talks to your printer with any 
page size, margins, line spacing, 
split word avoidance. Embed your 
printer's control sequences for 
boldface, underlining, etc. Narrow 
text can be automatically spread 
out. 

You'll also use Autoterm 
for simple word processing 
and record keeping 

You can display directories, 
delete files, transmit directly from 
disk, and work with files larger 
than memory. Easily maintain a 
disk copy of an entire session. 

Compatible with TELEWRITER 
(ASCII) & other word processors. 

SMOOTH 
WALK IN' 

AUTOTERM moves smoothly 
and quickly between word proces- 
sing and intelligent terminal 
action. Create text, correct your 
typing errors; then connect to the 
other computer, upload your text, 
download information, file it, and 
sign-off; then edit the received 
data, print it in an attractive 
format, and/or save it on file. 

Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly, too! 
Any operating parameter, such as 
screen width, can be altered at 
any time. Uncompleted com- 
mands can be cancelled. 




PUTTY IN 
YOUR HANDS 



The word processor can be 
used to create, print, and/or save 
on file your personal KSMs. They 
let AUTOTERM act like you. For 
example, it can dial through your 
modem, sign-on, interact, perform 
file operations, & sign-off; an 
entire session without your help. 
KSMs can answer the phone, 
prompt the caller, take messages, 
save them, hang-up, and wait for 
the next call. The KSM potential 
is unbelievable! 

NO OTHER COMPUTER IN 
THE WORLD CAN MATCH 
YOUR COCO'S AUTOMATIC 
TERMINAL CAPABILITIES!!! 



WHAT THE 
REVIEWERS SAY 

"AUTOTERM is the Best of Class." 
Graham, RAINBOW, 6/83 

"The AUTOTERM buffer system is 
the most sophisticated — and one of 
the easiest to use. . ." 
Banta, HOT CoCo, 9/84 

"Almost a full featured word 
processor. . 

Ellers, RAINBOW, 11/84 

"AUTOTERM's excellent error- 
handling routines, thorough docu- 
mentation, and logical, easy-to-use 
command structure make it stand 
out." 

Parker, HOT CoCo, 5/85 



AVAILABLE IN CANADA 

from 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Edmonton, Alberta 



CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Please hire the mentally retarded. They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! Phyllis 



on Page 164 particularly interest- 
ing. 



Wise Shopper 

Editor: 

I enjoyed myself at RAINBOWfest. I was 
able to make some particularly good pur- 
chases and meet the company people who 
could help me with the software I use most 
often, Dynacalc and Pro Color File. I also 
use Telewriter-64 with Telepatch and Wiz 
Font. I am a bookkeeper and a cashier, and 
am teaching my boss about computers with 
my own setup. 

I am a member of the Sacramento Color 
Computer Club (SCCC) and the Sacra- 
mento CoCo Club (SCC). I enjoy both clubs 
because they have different formats. SCCC 
plans its monthly meetings around the 
rainbow theme. The SCC is based around 
a bulletin board. 

Shelby J. Dunning 
Sacramento, CA 



Custom Adventures 

Editor: 

I am looking for an Adventure designe 
program for a cassette. If anyone know 
where I can get one, please write to me a 
266 Sheldon Road, 13068. 

Jonathan Wanage 
Freeville, N\ 

Check out "The Adventure Pro- 
cessor" on Page 27 of the August 
1986 issue. It may be just what you 
are looking for. 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I have tried using the disk expansio 
utility [June 1986, Page 92], and also the 64, 
Custom Setup [May 1986, Page 82]. Hou 
ever, they both need you to transfer th 
ROM to RAM or the all-RAM mode. Ho 1 
do you do this? 

Ian Boisvei 
Burstall, Saskatchewa 



the disk controller in the ROM port, after 
turning the computer on, try this: 

1) POKE 25,14 : POKE &HE00,0 and 
press ENTER. 

2) CLDflD and ENTER with the Art Gallery 
data tape in cassette recorder. 

3) After receiving the OK prompt, type 
PCLERR 4 and press ENTER. 

4) Write a basic line: 10 PMODE 1,1 : 
SCREEN 1,1 : GOTO 10 

5) Run this small basic line to see the 
results. 

On cassette based systems, the first step 
should be: POKE 25,6 : POKE &HG00,0 and 
press ENTER. 

With this method, you can save the Art 
Gallery on a disk. Anyone having improve- 
ments in this procedure is invited to write me 
at 1423 N. Cleveland Street, 92667. 

Ashok Basargekar 
Orange, CA 



Recognition Requested 

Editor: 

I just reread Susan Davis' April 1984 
[Page 215] article on "Women and the Color 
Computer," and I agree with the description 
of the problem, though not necessarily with 
the solution. The CoCo world seems to be 
a man's world. 

But we, the few women who are active 
CoCoists, want our share and we want 
recognition as well. That's why I'm writing 
this letter: I recently contributed to "KISS- 
able OS-9" (an excellent column) some 
programs and a patch to a Radio Shack 
screen dump. I signed my letter with my full 
name so there would be no doubt about it, 
I am a woman. Here in Curacao I am 
considered somewhat an expert on the 
CoCo. 

So, I was very disappointed when, in the 
July "KISSable OS-9" column [Page 230], 
my contributions were attributed to a man. 
It was "he" everywhere my name was men- 
tioned. 

Please, rainbow, "she." Please correct 
this error. We women in CoColand are few, 
but we want recognition, not recipe filing 
programs. I use my CoCo at work for 
technical calculations, budgeting and word 
processing. I use the one at home to write 
programs and generally explore the CoCo to 
its limits. 

As for software wishes, how about a 
version of OS-9 Dynacalc that is compatible 
with the O-Pak 85 cpl Hi-Res utility and 
doesn't eat up all available memory? 

Margo H. Guda 
Curacao, Neth. Antilles 

Our apologies! No slight in- 
tended at all; that's the way we 
received the material from the 
author, and your exotic Caribbean 
location must have diverted our 
attention momentarily. Vive la 
difference! 

Margo, you may find the article 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I am looking for a tennis Simulation 
game. Are there any for the CoCo? My 
address is 241 Stiener Avenue, 83440. 

Jeremy Hackworth 
Rexburg, ID 

Swing To the Left, Do-Si-Do 

Editor: 

I am a square dance caller and wonder if 
there is anyone who has a program that can 
be used for choreography of movements. I 
own a CoCo with two disk drives and a 
DMP 105 printer. Any help would be appre- 
ciated. Write me at 228 Kingsway, L3B 3N9. 

Terry Kallender 
We Hand, Ontario 

Hilfe, Bitte 

Editor: 

I recently purchased a Radio Shack DMP 
120 printer. This printer has the German 
alphabet, but it seems no one knows how to 
use it. I do a lot of corresponding with 
people in Germany and having access to this 
capability would help a lot. I would appre- 
ciate any assistance. My address is 431 Bass 
Avenue NE, 98568. 

Arnold D. Samuels 
Ocean Shores, WA 

Medical Madness 

Editor: 

I am knee-deep in trying to track medical 
expenses, insurance claims, reimburse- 
ments, etc. I would like to know if anyone 
has a disk program for a 64K CoCo 2 that 
could bring some organization to my med- 
ical madness? Write to me at P.O. Box 387, 
36559. 

Dave Willette 
Montrose, AL 



See "Downloads" on Page 234 of 
the August 1985 issue. Read the 
answer to Jerome P. Cigna 's ques- 
tion. 

The "Other" 32K 

Editor: 

I have an old 64K CoCo. I would like t 
know if it is possible to get 64K of RAft 
from BASIC without having to buy the OS 
9 operating system. I would appreciate an 
help you can give. 

David Ardil 
Bogota, Colombi 

The CoCo is designed to access 
only 32 K at one time for BASIC 
programs. 

Elementary Education 

Editor: 

I have a 16K Color Computer 2 and 
recorder. I am interested in obtaining edu 
cational tapes or programs to use for , 
preschooler and third grader. If anyone ha 
any information about such programs, writ 
to me at 808 Villere Street, 39576. 

Dawn Perkin 
Waveland, Ml 

Check the Computer Island Edu- 
cational Software ad on Page 154 
in the August 1986 issue. 

A Sorry State 

Editor: 

Why can't I find programs for the CoO 
that resemble Print Shop and News Room 
There are some very neat and useful pro 
grams on the market for other computers 
Yes, I have CoCo Max and others bu 
nothing that measures up to PrintShop 
which is available for almost everythinj 
except the CoCo. It's always the same ok 



8 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



story, it seems. Help! My address is 1206 Via 
Pavion, 93455. 

R.E. Newman 
Santa Maria, CA 

See "KISSable OS-9," August, 
1986, Page 201 under the heading, 
''Good News for Graphics Pro- 
grammers. " 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

1 was very pleased when 1 read "Building 
July's Rainbow." I was concerned about the 
RAINBOW supporting the present CoCo after 
the new CoCo is introduced. I am relieved 
to know you will still support the present 
CoCo. I think that the rainbow is the best! 

Christopher Romance 
Massapequa Park, NY 

Keep on Converting 

Editor: 

As soon as I got the August 1986 rain- 
bow, I started leafing through it as I usually 
do. Lo and behold I found Fortune Wheel 
[Page 156]. I jumped into my computer seat 
and started typing away. After a few hours 
I had the game ready to play. The reason for 
my excitement was that my whole family 
loves "Wheel of Fortune. u We played For- 
tune Wheel for two and a half hours and 
loved every minute of it. We decided to play 
on a regular basis. I want to publicly thank 
and congratulate Arron Branigan on a job 
well done. Mr. Branigan, maybe you can 
find the time to convert the TV game version 
of "Scrabble" to a CoCo program. I think 
it would be an excellent game just like 
Fortune Wheel. I hope you keep writing 
programs and I hope the rainbow keeps 
publishing them. 

Arie Moller 
Kensington, MD 

Missing Out 

Editor: 

Why did you make "Scoreboard" a bi- 
monthly column? I love the pointers. When 
I get stuck on an Adventure or a game, I 
have to wait two months for the next 
"Scoreboard Pointers" to look for help. I 
wish you would bring it back on a monthly 
basis. 

How about putting the one- and two- 
liners in the Table of Contents? I am always 
afraid I missed the most important one-liner 
in history because they are scattered 
throughout the magazine. Even though I go 
cover to cover, there is always the chance of 
missing one. I think an entire section de- 
voted to each month's one- and two-liners 
would be a great idea! 

Even though the rainbow is the greatest, 
I think there is always room for improve- 
ment. 

Brian Biggs 
Grove City, OH 



CoCo Cats Art 

Editor: 

This grandfather/ granddaughter pair is 
still very much enjoying learning all the 
aspects of home computering with the 
CoCo. Grandfather Jim is an engineer with 
a local television station and Beth is a 13- 
year-old student who resides in The Colony, 
Texas. Our families think we are two CoCo 
Nuts out of our palm tree but we treat them 
with the milk of human kindness. 

Jim Franklin 
Paducah, KY 




Soliciting Suggestions 

Editor: 

I would like to thank the staff at the 
rainbow for producing such a fine maga- 
zine every month. Without it, my computer 
would just be an expensive paperweight on 
my desk. 

1 am in the process of writing a farm 
accounting and inventory program and 
would appreciate hearing from farmers with 
any thoughts and suggestions. Please write 
to me at R.R. 1, Box 103, 57278. 

I would like to hear from anyone with 
information about the Laser 50 Personal 
Computer. I acquired one without any 
instructions. I want to know about getting 
or making a cassette and printer interface for 
it. I also want to know if it is still possible 
to get the 4K memory module for it. 

Mike McPeek 
Willow Lake, SD 



I Can Do It 

Editors 

If anyone would like programming done 
on the Color Computer 2, send me a letter 
and I'll return it with a questionnaire. Write 
Fewster Originals, 151 Westwood Manor I, 
1600 L 

John Fugh, Jr. 
Butler, PA 



The Book of Lists 

Editor: 

I would like to have a list of all your issues, 
their subjects and all the games and one-liner 
programs. 

Chad W. Johnson 
Orfordville, WI 

For a list of available issues and 
their subject theme see "Back Issue 
Order Form " on Page 138 of this 
issue. 

For a list of games you V have to 
refer to our indexes. They are 
available in the July 1984, 1985 
and 1986 issues. 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 

Editor: 

Please list the following California Com- 
puter Federation Bay Area Chapter BBSs: 

Presidio BBS, SysOp Dan Eckert, (415) 
567-3287. 

Redwood Gator Board, SysOp George 
Sandufer, (415) 364-6630. 

Colorboard of San Francisco, SysOp 
Brad Ryan, (415) 591-7366. 

Vallejo Colorboard, SysOp Woody Stol- 
ling, (707) 557-9221. 

Los Altos Colorboard, SysOp Bob Web- 
ster, (415) 965-7949. 

Hal 2001, SysOp Ronnie Van Scherpe, 
(415) 345-1802. 

Dan Eckert 
Presidio, CA 



• I would like to announce a BBS designed 
specifically for the Color Computer. It 
operates at 300/ 1200 Baud, 24 hours a day, 
7 bit word length, even parity and 1 stop bit. 
Call (818) 786-9052. 

Cliff Redding, SysOp 
Van Nuys, CA 

• I would like to announce the start of The 
Buck Board BBS. It runs 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week and offers CoCo support. 
Baud rates are 300/1200. Call (303) 427- 
9539. 

Lee R. Castens 
Westminster, CO 

• I would like to inform your readers of 
a new BBS in the tri-state area called The 
Angola Connection. We have a small mem- 
bership of 40 users, but are capable of 100 
downloads online at all times. Call (219) 
665-3028 anytime at 300 Baud. 

Eddie Nast 
Angola, IN 

• The Indy Color Computer Club spon- 
sors the ICCC Hotline BBS. Baud rates are 
300/1200. Call (317) 873-5808. 

Kevin S. Jessup, Sr. 
Lawrence, IN 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 9 



• I am happy to announce southeastern 
Kentucky's only BBS in the Hazard -Perry 
county area. It is called the Coalminer's 
BBS. The hours are 11:30 p.m. to 8 a.m. 
seven days a week. Settings are 300 Baud, 
full duplex, 7 bits and no parity. Call (606) 
439-4209. 

Keith W. Smith 
Hazard, KY 

• This is to announce the Exotic Zone 
BBS. It is up 24 hours a day. Call (301) 969- 
3083. 

Vallie Ingson 
Glen, MD 

• I am happy to announce the new Lin- 
Wood BBS. Call (603) 745-8811, online 9 
p.m. to 7 a.m. seven days a week. This BBS 
is free access and contains E-mail, down- 
loads, adds, scoreboard and much more. 

David Selby, SysOp 
N. Woodstock, NH 

• I would like to announce the Colour 
Kraft BBS of Rahway. It runs nonstop at 
300/ 1200 Baud, supports a comprehensive 
CoCo download section and has a large 
message base. Immediate full system access 
assured at logon. Call (201) 396-4361 any- 
time. Voice (20 f) 381-9047. 

Jay Needham , 
Rahway, NJ 

• Announcing Matthews Coloring Book 
BBS. It operates at 300 Baud N, 8, 1, 6 p.m. 
to 6 a.m., Monday through Friday and 24 
hours on the weekend. Call (704) 847-7781. 
Runs on a 64K CoCo using a Colorama 
system. 

Tim Bohnslav 
Matthews, NC 



welcome, but you must become a full 
member to access the library of programs. 
There is a section for CoCo computers. Call 
(717) 394-1357. 

Byte Bucket BBS runs on an Intel com- 
puter. There is a section for CoCo users for 
questions and suggestions. There is also a 
free library of programs for CoCo users. 
Call (717) 569-9967. 

Mike Nelson 
Lancaster, PA 

• I would like to inform you of a new BBS 
called St. Elmo's Bar. It runs on a 64K CoCo 
1 with four drives. Call (817) 244-6686. The 
BBS is up 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 
Also, I was wondering if anyone knows 
where I could find a copy of the TBBS 
programs. Write to me at P.O. Box 26689, 
76 1 26. 

Chris Young 
Benbrook, TX 

• I would like to announce the reopening 
of the Flying Fortress BBS. It's now running 
24 hours a day, seven days a week at 300/ 
1200 Baud. Call (214) 686-4796. 

Eric Hedstrom 
Garland, TX 

• The Salt Lake City CoCo Club is run- 
ning The Data Warehouse BBS. Call (801) 
487-6787 — 24 hours a day, seven days a 
week, 300 Baud, 7 bits, no parity. 

Dennis Mott 
Salt Lake City, UT 

• Announcing a new BBS in Virginia. Call 
(703) 573-2246, 300 Baud. 

Phillip Taylor 
Vienna, VA 



• Call The Utopia Network #1 BBS at 
(614) 622-0565. We are using our own 
written software. To log on use 300 Baud, 
full duplex and even parity. We have over 
200 programs available for download and 
several other features. The hours are from 
7 p.m. to 6 a.m. every evening, 

Bruce Uher 
Coshocton, OH 

• I would like to welcome all to the open- 
ing of the Toledo area Colorama BBS 
serving most of northwest Ohio. We operate 
at 300 BPS (soon to be 1200) 24 hours a day. 
Call (419) 877-0556. 

John Kendziora, SysOp 
Whitehouse, OH 

• I would like to announce the changing 
of the phone number for the Fun BBS. The 
new number is (412) 378-1323. We have 
upgraded to an RS-232c Pak and added our 
fourth disk drive to the system. There are 
many new online games, etc. We have ASCII 
up/ downloading. The system is free. Call 
today and get a password. 

Robert Chalupa, SysOp 
Aliquippa, PA 

• I would like to announce two BBSs 
which run 24 hours a day. 

LABB (Lancaster Area Bulletin Board) 
uses a TRS-80 Mod #3 computer. All are 



• I would like to announce the Madison 
Area Tandy Users BBS in the Madison area. 
The board is up 24 hours a day, seven days 
a week. There are sections for MS-DOS, 
TRS-DOS, Model 100/200, buy and sell, 
and of course, the Color Computer. There 
is also an up/ download section. The board 
is running at 8-1 -N. Call (608) 273-6922. 

Fran Selje 
Marshall, Wl 

• There is a new BBS in the Kenosha- 
Paddock Lake area called Uncle Dave's 
BBS. It runs 24 hours a day, seven days a 
week. Call (414) 843-4029. 

David Buehn, SysOp 
Paddock Lake, Wl 

• I would like everyone to know about my 
BBS. Call (800) 233-7513. Hope to see lots 
of rainbow users on it. To get on, type NEW 
at the ID prompt and NEW at the password 
prompt. 

Paul Fielding 
Red Deer, Alberta 

. • I would like to tell you about CoCo Pad, 
the only CoCo BBS in Saint John. The 
terminal settings are 300 Baud, 7 bit, even 
parity and 1 stop bit. Call (506) 652-2654. 
SysOp is Gord Peterson. 

Steven L. LeBlanc 
Saint John, New Brunswick 



• Call The Redbaron BBS at (416) 668- 
2078, 300/1200 Baud, no parity, 8 bits (or 
7 bits) and I stop bit. Runs 24 hours a day. 
The Redbaron has been up for four years. 
We have SIG sections for the CoCo. When 
you connect to the board, press enter once 
or twice to activate the board. 

Steven Cavanaugh 
Whitby, Ontario 

• Joliette has a new COBBS-BBS for 
CoCo clubs, E-mail, graphics, Xmodem, 
up/ downloading news. It runs 24 hours a 
day, seven days a week. All in French. We 
welcome all CoCo users. Call (514) 753- 
5655. 

A. Veillette 
Joliette, Quebec 

• A new BBS is now running in Riviere- 
du-Loup. Has 300 Baud, full duplex, 8 bits, 
parity none, 1 stop bit. This BBS is not only 
for posted and read messages but there is a 
big part for information. The BBS is in 
French! Call voice (418) 862-5074 or BBS 
(418) 862-9750. 

Erik Gendron 
Riviere- du- Loup, Quebec 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 

Letters to the editors may also be sent to 
us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: 
EDITORS. Be sure to include your complete 
name and address. 



ARTS AND LETTERS 




Envelope of the Month 



1 0 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 




Now! 500 new programs for the Tandy 1000! 

For Your TRS-80 Color Computer 

Apple - Atari - Commodore - TRS 80 I, III, 4 & Color ■ IBM PC Jr. - Tandy 1000 

New Educational Programs for 
Grades K-12 and Adult Self -Studies 

32 Programs Now Available on Disk 
for TRS Color Computers 




id in 



You nay be able to 
reduce your taxes by 





r 






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auerag ing 

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spl itt ing 

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One-sy I lab le adject tt>es that 
end in U usually just add fy 

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Uhleh has one syllable? 
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Interactive Tutorial Programs for Home or Classroom Use 

Over 1000 programs for your selection with 32 now available on disk for the Color 

Computer and 500 now available for the Tandy 1000. 



"We're Your Educational 
Software Source" 

Subject ' , No. of Programs 

Reading Development 256 (4 on disk) 
Reading* Comprehension 48 (4 on disk) 



Mathematics 

Algebra 

History 

Spelling 

Government 

Physics 



128 

16 (16 on disk) 
32 (4 on di&k) 
16 
16 

16 (4 on disk) 



16 Programs in each 
of the following: 

Children's Tales - Carpentry - Electronics 
Health Services - Office Skills - Statistics 
First Aid/Safety - Economics - Business 
Accounting - Psychology - MUCH MORE! 

Send for our tree catalog ot over 1000 Dorsett educa- 
tional programs tor Atari, TRS 80, Apple, IBM PC Jr., 
Commodore, Tandy 1000, etc. 



Apple II, TRS 80 I, III, & 4, and 
Commodore 64 computers require 
respective conversion kits (plug-in board 
and stereo cassette player), $99.00. Atari 
400/600/800/1200 computers require the 
Atari cassette recorder and the Dorsett 
4001 Educational Master Cartridge, 
$9.95. For the IBM PC Jr. a cassette 
adapter cable and a good cassette 
recorder are required. The Tandy 1000 
requires the Dorsett M1001 speaker/PC 
board kit, $69.00, and a standard 
cassette recorder. A Radio Shack 
CCR-81 or CCR-82 is recommended. 

CASSETTES: $59.90 for an album con- 
fining a 16-program course (8 cassettes 
with 2 programs each); $8.80. for a 
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DISKS: $14.95 for a one-program disk; 
$28.95 for two disks; $48.95 for four 
disks. All disks come in a vinyl album. 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



Dorsett Educational Software features: 

• Interactive Learning 

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For more information, or to order call: 

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IN OKLAHOMA CALL (405) 288-2301 

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DORSETT 

Educational Systems, Inc. 

Box 1226, Norman, OK 73070 





seems I've been whirling for a couple of weeks now, what 
with the new CoCo 3 announcement, getting the "special" 
issue of THE RAINBOW out and making some last minute 
changes for RAINBOWfest that will make it the place to be this fall 
First of all, a big vote of thanks from me to the people here at 
Falsoft who have been working very hard to get you all the Co Co 
3 news. Jim Reed in Editorial and Heidi Maxedon in Art marshaled 
their forces and came out with one of the most complete pieces of 
fast-paced magazine journalism I've ever seen. Sure, we'll be 
exploring the CoCo 3 for years, but I'm happy we could give everyone 
a real in-depth report on our newest baby in a minimum amount 
of time. ^ a ^> ^J^' v ' v ... -^n , 

Considering there was no real information available until the 
machine actually showed up in New York on July 30, I think the 
staff did a heck of a job getting the full report in the mail on August 
11. Had not a weekend interfered, I think it would have been a couple 
of days sooner. I hope you enjoyed our CoCo 3 coverage and look 
forward to seeing more and more of it in the months ahead. 

One place many of you got quick news was through local CoCo 
clubs. In fact, there has been a small avalanche of club newsletters 
coming in recently, all featuring the new CoCo 3 and speaking of 
it in glowing terms. 

Frankly, I wondered just where all this information was coming 
from. At least until this morning when I read the Glenside (111.) Color 
Computer Club news. Said the newsletter: "Members of RAINBOW'S 
Color Computer SIG met on Delphi tonight to discuss the new 
CoCo." Steve Bjork and Cray Augsburg hosted this exchange — and, 
for that matter, there was information on the SIG within minutes 
of the announcement. Sure is nice to have instant communications 
like that in Delphi. It was one of the service's busiest nights ever and 
one of the largest conferences ever! 

By the way, I phoned in the first bit of news to the Delphi SIG 
right from the news conference with my portable phone. Bernie 
Appel, President of Radio Shack, spotted me dictating copy and 
pointed out my activities to John Roach, Tandy CEO. We exchanged 
big smiles all around — but I didn't stop talking. UPI training will 
do that for you. 



ARK ROYALGAMES 



i t im 





BATTLE HYMN 

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG 

BATTLE HYMN The Battle of Gettysburg. Command Lee's army of 39 Divisions, 
including Stuart's cavalry brigades, and infantry division under the command of 
such famous names as Johnson, Heth, McLaws, Hood, Early and Pickett. Try to 
do what the real Confederates couldn't: destroy Mead's army at Gettysburg. Mew 
movement and turn structure; form lines, rally, limber and unlimber cannon, back- 
step, and do your best to outflank the Union line at Culp's Hill, Devil's Den or Big 
Round top. Historical, with an Ark Royal touch. Available also on the IBM PC (Tandy 
1 000). Graphics are hi res; game is machine language throughout. <jJ29 00 




^ AfrYENTUkE l$UH> 



ADVENTURE ISLAND (32K) Coco, disk only. Your plane has crashed on a deserted 
island and you must use all of your wits to stay alive. Beautiful half-screen picture 
graphics take you through jungle and beach in this fun-filled machine language 
adventure. Comes on two disks. <jJ23 00 



Disk only! SAGA-THE SORCERER'S 
CURSE 32K 100% hi-res, 100% ML 
graphic adventure. Fantastic! — $22 

Disk only! REDSTAR 32K 100% hi-res 
100% ML, Futuristic wargame involv- 
ing NATO and the WARSAW 
PACT.— $25 

BARBAROSSA 64K 100% hi-res 
100% ML game of the war in Russia 
1941-1944. "A Blockbuster, " says 
Hot Coco's Peter Paplaskas. Reviewed 
Jan. '86 Hot Coco.— $25 (Tandy 1 000) 

D-DAY Our second 64K 100% hi-res 
1 00% ML, this one dealing with the Al- 
lies invasion of France in 1944. Mas- 
sive! No review date set yet. — $25 

PHALANX 32K 100% hi-res, 100% 
ML game of Alexander the Great. No 
review date set yet. — $15 



COMPANY COMMANDER 32K ML 
routines. Tactical squad level wargame 
set in WWII. 12 scenarios, add-on ex- 
pansion modules. Dec. '85 Rain- 
bow. — $23 disk or tape 

RIVER CROSSING 32K ML routines. 
A Company Commander add-on mod- 
ule, but you no longer need C/C to play 
it.— $23 

CINCPAC BATTLE OF MIDWAY 32K 
1 00% hi-res 75% ML. The battle that 
turned the tide of war. Aug. '85 
Rainbow.— $23 

ESCAPE FROM DENNA 32K ML rou- 
tines. Semigraphic Dungeon adventure 
game. No review date set yet.— $15 



BATTLE OF THE BULGE 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. I or 2 players. Aug. 
'85 Rainbow.— $ 15 

BATTLE FOR TUNIS 32K Semigraph- 
ic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Sept. '85 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

ACROSS THE RUBICON 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. Feb. '84 
Rainbow. — $18 

WATERLOO 32K ML routines. Semi- 
graphic wargame. Mar. '84 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

KAMIKAZE 32K Hi res graphic war- 
game. Apr. '83 Rainbow. — $15 

BOMBER COMMAND 32K disk, 1 6K 
tape. Semigraphic wargame. ML rou- 
tines. Jan. '84 Rainbow.— $10 

GUADALCANAL 32K Semigraphic 
wargame. ML routines.— $15 




Prices on all programs include shipping to U.S., APO's, Canada. COD's (USA 
only) add 3.50. Florida Residents add 5%. All Orders shipped within 24 hours. 
Programs require Color Computer TM (Tandy Corp.) or TDP System 100 
Computer TM (RCA). Many programs soon to be available on MS-DOS 
systems. 



P. O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 786-8603 



Other staff 'members have worked 
very hard in setting up some special 
programs for RAINBOWfest, too. This 
should be one of our most dynamic 
shows. 

The highlight of the general program 
will be a round table discussion on the 
new CoCo 3 featuring four people you 
will probably never see again on the 
same stage. Barry Thompson, the CoCo 
line manager for Tandy, and Mark 
Siegel, who's in charge of software 
development, will be joined by two 
third-party CoCo programmers: Greg 
Zumwalt and Steve Bjork. Greg and 
Steve had stories in last month's special 
issue. 

While this is a round table, there will 
also be plenty of time for questions and 
answers. It is really going to be the 
session to attend — and we've set a 
special time so that all the exhibitors 
and people working the show will be 
able to be there, too. Plan to attend this 
one! 

Zumwalt is our speaker at the CoCo 
Community Breakfast Saturday morn- 
ing, and I think Greg's talk will be a tour 
de force you will not want to miss! I 
know few actually have a CoCo 3 in 



hand at this time, but I am certain you 
will be impressed with Greg's window- 
ing demonstration. Expect more good 
things from him (at RAINBOWfest and 
in the pages of THE RAINBOW) in the 
future*. 

Siegel and Bjork are also giving 
separate seminars, as will a host of other 
people, including our own Dale Puck- 
ett, Brian Larttz, Bill Turner and George 
Dorner from the OS-9 Users Group. 
And, well have the great Bill Barden, 
ever-popular Fred Scerbo and a bunch 
of others, too. I think it is the best 
seminar lineup we've ever had. 

Why, there's even a new T-shirt de- 
sign for the show! Be there. I know I 
will. 

Yes, there is a CoCo 3 at THE rain- 
bow. (Interesting how many people 
have asked me.) The biggest difficulty 
has been in keeping people away from 
it so we can get a few things together for 
this and subsequent issues. The more I 
see of it, the better I like it. Messrs. 
Thompson, Siegel and all have done a 
truly superb job on this machine. I find 
myself sneaking in at night just to play 
with it a little more. 

What impresses me most about the 



CoCo 3 is how much it changes so man) 
of the things we have been doing foi 
years. The addition of the 80-charactei 
screen width, the colors available foi 
characters and background, and tht 
underline and blinking attributes mear 
vastly superior displays with program 
ming ease. I've never been able to dra^ 
particularly well, but it is easy to set 
what vast potential the increased reso- 
lution and colors will have on almosl 
anything. 

And these things are available it 
plain ol* ordinary BASIC. When you gel 
into the many other things CoCo 3 car 
do, there is an almost unlimited re- 
source available to us again. 

I know most of us looked at Atari* 
and Amigas and wondered what the 
CoCo 3 would offer and when. We had 
the best computer for a long, long time. 
When you've been on top of the heap, 
you want to be there some more. It's 
nice to be better again. 



— Lonnie Fall 



Canadians! 

We are Canada's largest distributor of Color 

Computer products. 



Send for your free copy 
of our 1986 Catalog 







Ketlynews 






VOL 3 


KELLY SOFTWARE 


S£FTV»R£ 




DCSTRHJTORS 


FOR ne COLOR 




LMTED 


COWVTtB 





Kellynews-3 is now available 
and contains news, hints, 
programs and articles from 
the crew of Kelly Software. 

Please note our new 
phone number. 

Phone: (403) 236-2l6i 



We have moved to 
our new location. 




Kelly Software 
Distributors Ltd. 

P.O. Box 608, 
Station *T Calgary 
Alberta T5H 2H2 



Call now 




(403) 236-2161 

Call our orderline 
for quick delivery. 

We accept phone orders 

on your VISA or 
Master Card. No C.O.D. 



14 



THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program 
listings in the rainbow are formatted for 
a 32-character screen — so they show 
up just as they do on your CoCo screen. 
One easy way to check on the accuracy 
of your typing is to compare what char- 
acter "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings 
come out the same — you have a pretty 
good way of knowing that your typing is 
accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But, do read the text before you start 
typing. 

Finally, the little cassette symbol on 
the table of contents and at the begin- 
ning of articles indicates that the pro- 
gram is available through our rainbow 
on tape service. An order form for this 
service is on the insert card bound in the 
magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was 
first given to the Tandy Color Computer 
by its many fans, users and owners. 

However, when we use the term 
CoCo, we refer to both the Tandy Color 
Computer and the TDP System-100 
Computer. It is easier than using both of 
the "given" names throughout the rain- 
bow. 

In most cases, when a specific com- 
puter is mentioned, the application is for 
that specific computer. However, since 
the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer 
in a different case, these terms are 
almost always interchangeable. 



The Rainbow Check Plus 



T 



The small box accompanying a pro- 
gram listing in the rainbow is a "check 
sum" system, which is designed to help 
you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the 
rainbow. On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given. When you 
reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 




To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in 
the program and csflVE it for later use, 
then type in the command RUN and press 
enter. Once the program has run, type 
NEW and press enter to remove it from 
the area where the program you're typ- 
ing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the 
rainbow, whenever you press the down- 
arrow key, your CoCo gives the check 
sum based on the length and content of 
the program in memory. This is to check 
against the numbers printed in the 
rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure you 
typed in the correct basic program code. 
For more details on this helpful utility, 
refer to H, Allen Curtis' article on Page 
21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
in the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 

10 CL5:X=256*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLEAR 2S,X-1 

30 X=25G*PEE!< (35)+17B 

40 FDR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y: PRINT 2,Y;W 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THENB0ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERROR": STOP 
B0 EXEC X: END 

90 DATA 1B2, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 1B3, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA jt, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 12B 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
1G0 DATA 240, 183, 2* 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 1G6, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 1B9, 173, 19B, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



Using Machine Language 



Machine language programs are one 
of the features of the rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these pro- 
grams into memory so you can operate 
them. 

The easiest way is by using an editor/ 
assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor/assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into the CoCo and 
then have the editor/assembler assem- 
ble them into specific instructions that 
are understood by the 6809 chip, which 
controls your computer. 



When using an editor/assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the rainbow's 
listing into CoCo. 

Another method of getting an assem- 
bly language listing into CoCo is called 
"hand assembly." As the name implies, 
you do the assembly by hand. This can 
sometimes cause problems when you 
have to set up an ORIGIN statement or 
an EQUATE. In short, you have to know 
something about assembly to hand- 
assemble some programs. 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand-assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CL£AR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT ~ADDRE5S:";HEXS(I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE"; 8$ 

40 POKE I , VAL ( "&H"+B$) 

50 I=I+lsG0T0 20 

This program assumes you have a 1 6K 
CoCo. If you have 32K, change the 
&H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 and change 
the value of I to &H7FB0. 



The Rainbow Seal 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our 
way of helping you, the consumer. The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product that carries the Seal 
has been physically seen by us, that it 
does, indeed, exist and that we have a 
sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hard- 
ware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their pro- 
ducts to the rainbow for certification. 
We ascertain that their products are, in 
actuality, what they purport to be and, 
upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction." The certification pro- 
cess is different from the review process. 
You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is 
right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the rainbow and 
the certification process. Certification is 
open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded 
to any commercial product, regardless 
of whether the firm advertises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of in- 
stances of violation of Seal use. 



4 
1 





BUILDING OCTOBER'S RAINBOW 



Introducing Rainbow On Disk . . . 

. . . with a "hitch" to it! 

7 would like to remember this as the month we phased in our new 
RAINBOW ON DISK service with only one hitch. Knock on wood. 
▼ f Yes, beginning with this issue of THE RAINBOW, you can have your 
choice of RAINBOW ON TAPE or our new RAINBOW ON DISK! With the advent 
of the CoCo 3 and the new emphasis on OS-9, the time has come to offer a 
vehicle for OS-9 programs, which, of course, have been unavailable on our tape 
service. 

Enter rainbow ON disk, formatted for both Disk Extended BASIC and the 
OS-9 operating systems! Yes, both. Thanks to a "flippy," a double-sided disk 
for single-sided disk drives, we have Disk Extended BASIC on one side of the 
disk and OS-9 on the other. In fact, because one side of the disk may not always 
hold all of our Color BASIC, Extended Color BASIC and Disk Extended BASIC 
material, some months only a portion of a side will be formatted for OS-9 and 
the rest of that same side formatted to hold the spillover of other programs. 

Actually, it isn't that complex to create the disk itself, and we do have 
experience producing disk services for rainbow's sister publications, but we 
are a bit anxious as to how rainbow on DISK users will receive this newest 
offering. Therefore, we solicit your comments and suggestions. We fully expect 
rainbow on disk to undergo an evolution over the next few months as we 
get your feedback and incorporate your ideas for improving it. 

Certainly, we expect that most of you will use this new service with no 
problems; but it is almost as certain, given the many systems and configurations 
and varying levels of expertise among RAINBOW readers, that we will not have 
anticipated every contingency. For instance, did I tell you about the guy who 
found it convenient to keep disks on the outside of his filing cabinet — using 
a refrigerator magnet to hold them in place? That's a "don't" we had not even 
considered ! 

So, away we go with RAINBOW ON disk! RAINBOW Contributing Editor Fred 
Scerbo did the colorful opening graphics. Dan Do wnard decided on the "flippy" 
and the formatting arrangement. Kevin Nickols is writing the documentation. 
Newly-arrived artist Denise Webb is doing the graphic design. Cray Augsburg 
is creating each month's master disk. And Jutta Kapfhammer is pulling together 
all the pieces of the package. 

Yet, the work of producing this new product only begins there. Others, such 
as Mark Herndon and Janice Eastburn are involved in the mass-producing and 
distribution. We expect Fulfillment Services Director Bonnie Frowenfeld and 
business department staffers Sandy Apple, Monica Wheat, Beverly Bearden, 
Pat Eaton and Sharon Smith to have their hands full starting new subscriptions, 
prorating changeover fees and all. Then, there's advertising and promotion. 
Bookkeeping. Editorial. Typesetting. You get the picture; it involves just about 
the entire staff here — and, we hope it will involve you, too! 

To encourage you to become a charter subscriber to RAINBOW ON DISK, right 
off the bat we're discounting the price of a year's subscription. While the full 
nitty-gritty details are in our ad on Page 80, this means, for instance, that the 
basic U.S. rate of $99 for a year's subscription to RAINBOW ON DISK is being 
dropped to only $90 during this introductory offer period — that's only a little 
more than a tape subscription, and, during the course of a year, a savings of 
$54 over the monthly $12 single-issue price! Present tape subscribers can change 
their subscriptions over to disk service, too; details were put inside the tape 
package when the September issue was shipped. 

A final tip: For additional savings on credit card orders, call us toll free at 
(800) 847-0309 to begin receiving RAINBOW ON DISK with the very first issue. 
A yearly subscription to RAINBOW ON DISK — we believe youll enjoy signing 
up for a full 12-month "hitch." 

— Jim Reed 



500 
POKEs, 
PEEKS, 

EXECs 



FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKS and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ ECB/Dlsk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, REMUM, PRINT 
US1MQ, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MERGE, RENAME, DSKIM, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Spewed Up your programs. 

Reset, MOTOR ON /OFF from 
Keyboard. 

★ Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW. 

★ Set 23 different 
QRAPHIC/SEMIQRAPHIC modes 

★ Merge two Basic programs. 

★ AND MUCH MUCH MOREII! 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo I and CoCo II. 

ONLY $16.95 

ORDER TODAYI VISA MC Am Ex, Check or MO. COD 
add $2.50. Please add $3.00 S8f H (USA df Canada 
foreign add $5.00). NYS residents pi. add sales tax. 
All orders shipped WITHIN 24 HOURSIM 



★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 



MJF 



MICROCOM 
SOFTWARE 



P.O. Box 21 4 Fairport, N.Y. 14450| 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



1 6 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



UTILITIES/BOOKS 




UTILITY ROUTINES for the 
TANDY & TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

This powerful book for Basic and ML 
Programmers, includes program expla- 
nation, memory requirements and an 
annotated source listing for the utility 
routines given below. These routines if 
bought individually will cost you 
HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. 

These are 100% Position Independent 
ML Utilities and require no ML program- 
ming knowledge. 

COMMAND KEYS: Access commands with 2 
keystrokes. 

CURSOR STYLES: Over 65000 cursor styles. 
ERROR SKIP: 'ONERR GOTO' for Basic 
Programs. 

FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get real word 
error messages. 

KEY CLICKER: Ensure key input accuracy. 
REPEAT KEY: Repeat ANY key. 
REVERSE VIDEO (Green & Red): Eliminate 
eye- strain 

SPOOLER: Don't wait for those long printouts 
SUPER SCROLLER: Save/view scrolled lines. 
TAPE-TO-OISK: Copy Basic and ML programs. 
AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!! 

For 16K/32K/64K Cassette or Disk 
Systems, CoCo l& CoCo II. 

BOOK $19.95 

THESE ROUTINES (READY-TO- RUN) ON 

CAS/ DISK: 

$24.95 

BOTH BOOK AND CASSETTE 
or DISK: 

$36.95 
OTHER "MUST' BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These 3 books 
provide a complete annotated listing of 
the BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO DS-9 (Book): $16.95 
RAINBOW GUIOE TO OS-9 (2 Disks): $29.00 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS: Tips and tricks 
for Basic Programmers Only $14.95 



WE HAVE ALL THAT YOU NEED TO SUCCEED 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 

• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1 -3 passes) 

• Tape-to-Disk Copy 

• Tape-to-Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files. 

32 K Disk System 
. (Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY $24.95 



ONLY 



200 



$9.95 



additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER. 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double silled drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for 0 MP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS' N EXECS is a prerequisite 

UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best-selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 

• Super Tape-to-Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 

• Disk- to- Tape Copy 

• LList Enhancer (with page numbering!) 

• Graphics Typesetter (two text sizes!) 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Oump 

• X-Ref for Basic Programs 

• Hidden 32K (Use the "hidden" 32K from your 64K CoCo) 

• Basic Stepper (Super Debugger!) 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Oump 

AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!!! 

DISK (64KReq.) ONLY $29.95 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewriter-64 (Cas) $47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 

Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64® 1 9.95 

Telepatch (Dsk) 19.95 

CoCo Max (Cas) 67.95 

CoCo Max II (Dsk) 77.95 

CoCo Max Upgrade (Dsk) 18.95 

Pro Color File( Dsk) (includes SIMON) 54.95 

Dynacalc (Dsk) 79.95 

Autoterm(Cas) 36.95 

(Latest Version) (Dsk) 46.95 

COCO UTIL II (Latest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible 
computer Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 
ONLY $36.95 

DISK ANTI-PIRATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs. 
ONLYS59.95, 

HIDE-A-BASIC 1.1: Best copy- protection 
program for Cassette Basic programs. 
ONLY $24.95. 

(Both Disk Anti- Pirate & Hide- A- Basic 1.1 
for ONLY $79.95) 

CABLES/HARDWARE 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: Use your 
monochrome or color monitor with your 
CoCo (ALL CoCos). Includes audio 
connection. Easy installation - no 
soldering. ONLY $29.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 
Lowest Price Anywhere- $1 37.95. 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95. 

MICROCOM 2 POSITION SWITCHER: 

Select any one of two RS232 devices 
(printers/modems) from the serial port 
ONLY $29.95. 

MICROCOM 3 POSITION SWITCHER: 

Select any one of three RS232 devices 
(printers/ modems) from the serial port 
ONLY $34.95. 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 
CoCo Max, DS69, etc. ONLY 
$24.95. 

DISKETTES (10): BONUS Brand SS/DD 
diskettes for the CoCo. 100% Guaran- 
teed. $12/ box. 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



Our software/ books are available at all leading dealers in USA Canada and Australia To Order 
Order by phone& get a $2 refund for your phone call VISA MC, Am Ex, Check MO. Please add $3.00 
shipping and handling (USA & CANADA other countries $5.00). COD add $2.50 extra 
NYS residents please add Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 




24-HOUR ORDER HOT LINE (7 DAYS A WEEK): (716) 223-1477 



Skill and a keen intellect are needed to 
win in combat . . *■ but an over-eager 
trigger finger works against you. 




By Allen Drennan 



i Roth sides ^ e 

ICwvssiV* "» takes his 1 eli - It " ^ * e enlatl on is 

J) g$ « lhc vetoed Some e*P «™ s v oo frre. 

base <a»*vffl| A rat>S= ol «!«« „. ^ 

tip V»L*S determine he 4 an d ^ opponent sWs ^^baU 
re«§^° Teornpensa » W destroy ^ W,. The n .keep 

, ,.ced- a# tog6 i^ P v $? tame- % \ flf 19500 

f Wit "\ 

(Questions « Sonoff 



XT* 



Drennan has been programming in many 
languages for seven years. He is currently a junior at 
So nor a High School in Sonora, California. He 
programs games and software for himself 



18 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



The Ultimate < 
Color Computer 

Enhancements 

for Productivity 

from HJL Products i 




To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get information 
into and out of the system. 

This is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer, 

The Keyboard • $79.95 

The overwhelming favorite of serious 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program. 
Installs in Just a few minutes with no 
soldering. 

The Numeric Keypad » $89.95 

The NumberJack is a self-contained, 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, it has ali the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshifted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
all necessary connectors for quick and 
easy installation without soldering. 



The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, and is easily 
installed without clips, jumpers or 
soldering (except In some later CoCo 2s 
with soidered-in video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor * $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used It you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
below) 

The BASIC Utility • $25.95 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any color computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, word wrap, global search, 



and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-legendable 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad When you order. 

Call Now, Toll Froo 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1.800-462-4891 
International calls: 716-235-8358 




Ordering Information: Specify mode! (Original, F-version, or CoCo 2 Model Number)* Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers Include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3,50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



P R O D U C T S 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 . 



270 


. . . .20 


470 . . . 


...165 


620 


....22 


900 ... 


..... 1 


1090 , . 


,140 


1260 . . 


...105 


1410 


.204 


1580 


...140 


END 


...108 



T 



Till! liftti«R: BDMBRMPY 

100 » BOMBS AWAY 

110 » 

120 » ALLEN DRENNAN 

130 ' 1986 COLOR CLOUD 

140 1 1950 6 -D INDUSTRIAL DR. 

150 ' SONORA, CA. 95370 

160 ' (209) 533-3477 

170 1 

180 DIM H(139) SGOTO 1320 

190 SCREEN l r l:FOR 1=1 TO 254 ST 

EP 2:LINE(I, (H(T/2)+l) )-(1, 159) , 

PS ET: NEXT 

200 RETURN 

210 REM 

220 REM ** CREATE BASES 
230 REM 

240 CLS t PCLS : PRINT i PRINT : PRINT : P 
RINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" NUCLE 
AR BASES ACTIVE . . , " :N1=2 :FOR 1= 
1 TO 1000: NEXT I: CLS 
250 PMODE 4,1 J SCREEN 1,1:PCLS:SC 
REEN 1,1: PCLS 

260 Xl-20+FND(30) iX2=80+FND{40) : 
L f 1 ) =10+FND ( Xl-10 ) : L ( 2 ) ~X2+FN D ( 
120-X2) 

270 N=158-FND(58) : FOR 1=0 TO XI: 

H ( I } =N : NEXT i N= 1 : GOSUB 1190 

280 N=158-FND(58) ; FOR I=X2 TO 13 

9iHfI)=N:NEXT:N=2iGOSUB 1190 

290 FOR KK-1 TO 1000: NEXT KK 

3 0 0 X 3=X1+FND ( X2 -Xl-20 ) +10 : H ( X3 ) 

=50+FND ( 100 ) : N=H ( X3 ) / 2 : D1=N-H { 1 ) 

/2:D2-N-H{139)/2 

310 REM 

320 REM ** SCOREBOARD 
330 REM 

340 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" THE SCORE: 
" ;P$ (1) ? ■ PRINT" «»;S(1) :PRINT 

N ;P$(2) /: PRINT" ="tS( 

2.) - 

3 50 IF S(l)+S(2)=0 THEN 3 90 
360 REM 

3 70 REM ** CREATE ILLUSION 
380 REM 



390 A=180:R=180/(X3-X1+1) :N=H(1) 
+D1 

400 FOR I=X1+1 TO X3-l:A=A-RiH(I 
) =COS (A*, 0174533) *D1+N '■ NEXT 
410 A=0:R=1B0/(X2-X3+1) :N=H{139) 
+D2 

420 FOR I«X3+1 TO X2-1 : A=A+R: H (I 
)=COS(A*.0174 533}*D2+N:NEXT 
430 CLS i GOSUB 190 
440 REM 

450 REM ** DISPLAY WIND FACTOR 
460 REM 

470 W=FND { 100 ) -50 : PRINT j PRINT : PR 
INT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 11 WIND FA 
CTOR 11 ;:IF W<=0 THEN PRINT W+(W*- 
2};»TO THE WEST. " ELSE PRINT W;" 
TO THE EAST." 

480 FOR 1=1 TO 1500: NEXT I:CLS:G 
OSUB 1230;N=N1 
490 N=3-N:S=5*N-4 
500 REM 

510 REM ** PLAYER PROFILE 
520 REM 

530 CLS: PRINT " LAST SHOTS : B ? : FO 
R 1=0 TO 3 SPRINT A(S+4-I) ; :NEXT* 
PRINT 

540 PRINT" » ;:FOR 1=0 

TO 3;PRINT V(S+4-I) ; :NEXT IjPRI 
NT 

550 PRINT "FIRING : « ; 

550 IF N=l THEN PRINT "LEFT" ELS 

E PRINT "RIGHT" 

570 PRINT "WIND FACTOR"? 

580 IF W<=0 THEN PRINT W+(W*-2); 

"TO THE WEST." ELSE PRINT W; r, TO 

THE EAST - " 

530 ANGS=""":V$=""l PRINT P$(N)r 
600 LINE INPUT " CALL YOUR SHOT 
";YU$:IF YU$="" THEN 690 
610 FOR 1=1 TO LEN(YU$):IF MID$( 




20 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



YU$,I,1)=",» THEN 64J3 

62J3 ANG$=ANG$+(MID$(YU$,I,1) ) 

63J3 NEXT I 

640 FOR 1=1+1 TO LEN(YU$) :V$=V$+ 

(MID$(YU$,I,1) ) :NEXT I 

650 ANG=VAL(ANG$) :V=VAL(V$) :GOTO 

740 
66j3 REM 

67 fS REM ** PERFORM TOGGLE 
680 REM 

690 SCREEN 1,1 

700 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""THEN 730 

710 IF A$=CHR$(13) THEN 530 

720 GOTO 700 

730 GOTO 700 

740 CLS: SCREEN 1,1 

750 IF V<350 THEN 790 

760 PRINT: PRINT "YOUR BASE BLEW A 

PART FROM TO MUCH PRESSURE AN 

D FORCE.": FOR 1=1 TO 1500: NEXT I 

770 FOR 1=1 TO 1000: NEXT I 

780 GOTO 1120 

790 GOSUB 1220 

800 REM 

810 REM ** FIRE MISSLE 
820 REM 

830 IF N=2 THEN ANG= 180 - ANG 

840 V1=COS(ANG*.0174533) *V:V2=-S 

IN(ANG*. 0174533) *V 

850 MN=L(N) :X=L(N)*2:Y=H(MN) 

860 IF N=l THEN X=X+1 ELSE X=X-6 

870 X=X-7*(N=2) 

880 PSET(X,Y,3) :OX=0 

890 XO=X:YO=Y 

900 X=X+V1/10:V1=V1+(W-V1)/30:IF 

X<0 OR X>254 THEN 490 
910 Y=Y+V2/10:V2=V2+6 
920 IF Y<1 THEN 960 
930 IF OX THEN PSET (OX,0 , 3 ) : OX=J3 
940 PLAY"T255;01;l;l" 
950 LINE(XO,YO)-(X,Y) ,PSET:XO=X: 
YO=Y:GOTO 970 
960 OX=X 

970 IF H(X/2)-Y>2 THEN 900 
980 Y=H(X/2)+2 
990 PSET(X,Y,3) 

1000 IF ABS(X/2-L(3-N) )<3 THEN 1 
080 

1010 IF ABS(X/2-L(N) ) >3 THEN 107 
0 

1020 PRINT: PRINT " YOU DESTROYED 
YOURSELF ";P$(N):FOR 1=1 TO 150 
0:NEXT I: GOSUB 1720 
1030 GOTO 1120 
1040 REM 

1050 REM ** SOUND EFFECTS 
1060 REM 

1070 PLAY"T200 ;01 ;V31 ; 8 ; 8 ; 8 ;V25 ; 



6 ; 6 ; 6 ; V20 ; 4 ; 4 ; 4 ; V15 ; 2 ; 2 ; 2 ; V10 ; 1 ; 
1;1" : CIRCLE (X, Y) , 2 , 3 : GOTO 490 
1080 PLAY"01 ;T255 ; V10 ; 4 ; 4 ; 4 ; V15 ; 
6 ; 6 ; 6 ; V20 ; 8 ; 8 ; 8 ; V25 ; 10 ; 10 ; 10 ; V31 
; 12 ; 12 ; 12 ;V25 ; 10 ;V20 ; 8 ;V15 ; 6 ;V10 

; 4": GOSUB 1720 
1090 WIN=N 

1100 FOR KK=1 TO 1000:NEXT KK 
1110 N=3-N 

1120 S(3-N)=S(3-N)+l:IF S(3-N)+S 
(N)=GN THEN 1580 

1130 FOR 1=1 TO 10:A(I)=0:V(I)=0 
: NEXT :N1=3-N1:PCLS: GOTO 260 
1140 GOTO 1580 
1150 END 
1160 REM 

1170 REM ** DRAW BASES 1 
1180 REM 

1190 X=L(N)*2:Y=H(L(N) )-l:FOR 1= 
-2 TO 3:LINE(X+I,Y+1) -(X+I,Y-2) , 
PSET: NEXT 

1200 LINE (X-4 , Y-4 ) - (X-4 , Y-2 ) , PSE 
T : LINE (X-3 , Y-4 ) - (X-3 , Y-2 ) , PSET : L 
INE ( X , Y-4 ) - ( X , Y-2 ) , PSET : LINE ( X+ 1 
,Y-4)-(X+l,Y-2) ,PSET 
1210 LINE (X+4, Y-4 )-(X+4, Y-2) , PSE 
T : LINE (X+5 , Y-4 ) - (X+5 , Y-2 ) , PSET : R 



ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 



FOR YOUR COCO 



THREE GREAT PROGRAMS — 




1. COCO EXPERT — INCREASE YOUR HAPPINESS 

2. CoCo THERAPIST — DISCUSS YOUR PROBLEMS 

3. COCO POET — ENDLESS STIMULATING POETRY 

COMPLETE DOCUMENTATION INCLUDES 
"THE HISTORY OF AT 

ALL JUST $34.95 (SPECIFY TAPE OR DISK) 




Now Available — 

COCO EXPERT SYSTEM TOOLKIT 



BUILD YOUR OWN EXPERT SYSTEM 
USING SIMPLE MENU COMMANDS. 

— INCLUDES SHELL, TOOLKIT, DEMO 
AND TUTORIAL 

— CREATE YOUR OWN KNOWLEDGEBASE 

— $79.95 * DISK ONLY * 64K REQUIRED 



THINKING SOFTWARE, INC. 

46-16 65 PLACE 

WOODSIDE, N.Y. 11377 
(718) 429-4922 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 21 



You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What is CoCo Max? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




CoCo Max disk system, with Y-cable. 



Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
pull down menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 
The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 




JL JnLl 

BITi 



]■■■■■ 



. U!»B»XKl&.-2 



Pull down menus 



Zoom In I 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it •Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fat bits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it ail, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 1 5, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




Inside the Hi-Res Input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
10% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
491 52 points! (256x1 92). You Ipse 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi-Res Pack. 

Electronic Typesetting... 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 1 4 built in fonts each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles I 




Examples of printouts 



Printing Your Creations 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers I 



AH the CoCo Max pictures are urtretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80). 







area 





All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80fc 



Jznixoxi HUport 

Tint wilH tht tig Scoop? 



no mflJOH nEws today 



Reporters Desperate 

"th§r ileriTl »r Me ne»» 
ii t»4 ne»i out heek' I 
omM Idi« ar i»t if iobc- 
Ihmf ooein't heppen quick 1 ' 
Reporter ten S<bBi4t 11 • 
■ ooroo ■nd unbopo, a.n 
"I r«»U» Jon i tin This job 
siiakt Noihir., erer hieeoai 
.round htrt '.sty, Schawl 
SchBt4t. § ]l rm 014 n.ti.e 
of the cut. tati efien com. 
in to ihe newspaper office 
Tiihout • >tn(le itorr Bui 
rm ink li difftrtni ««- 
corelni <e Seaniei.Tre cos- 
fl4«ri4 coBQliiin| i <riao 
arieir iuii io treek me 
doleruas. but I cen'i think 
of tnythint ne»«»»rthr 
TouMn'i gti me in trouble ' 
I4iior Tib Jonuon shovi 
liiile irmp.ihy for ihe un- 
lucky cnr "Vhen I vts • 
reporter »e never ft. 4 thu 
(rotten 1 think these guyi 
ere ihe lenesi bunch of pubs 
iv» .v«r ih« • r*ier lemson 




Who is this liig Smilinfl? 

Ldii Sthverli or 917 t 6tb St 
r *i mforBed Bonder the! 
the he4 von 110 ,r, the TM99 
Sreflpiteket Set p.|e e. 




Lif i in thi fast lim not til 
it's cracked up to ba 

£o< Yau Thin* you nm 10 
go inio tome tumorous Ctrld 
hk« T*l6vaion 3f Kcvxpipiri 
You think you. loo. voul0 
like to tnng in (he Ms buck, 
and rub noier tith the -celeb- 
rtnas* Veil forcet it Running 
■ nevipaper icurnJi like fun 
I tii' i- Mil before you go off 
helf'cocked en. sierl your 

ovr, p t per or buy 9 TV 

ftenon litren t» The voice cf 

'■> lake, e lot of money (c 
run ■ ne*i(ipfr for example 
start. n| even e imell paffr 
couu :o»i ovir 111 600 Beer 




1985 



PROFIT 3 

25. 




Pulley 




INII;'I.M!!:!l:N.:i|l|i!i,||ii!| l'.| l |.:M..|,| ilhlil! 



Table 



RECORDIH* MASSES I^AHer 

TIMER p ALAnCE 



I T 1 ^ 1 



ill 




PUUEY 



Business graphs, charts, 
diagrams. Also memos 



CART 



l-IASI 




Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity. 



0 



Publish a newsle tter 
or bulletin 



COCO n«x 



COCO NfiH 
COCA Haw 



CoCo Man 
CoCo Max 



CoCo ITlax 
CoCo lHax 

Co(£o if a* 

CoCo max 
CoCo max 

^CoCo Max 
Mai 



VoVo Tlax 
CoCo Max 

CoCo /%x 
CoCo Max 



^^^^ 




Junior's homework 
r j& and science projects. 
Term papers too ! 




mm 



(Ma Mm 



ICoCo 



Ow 200 typestyles to 
choose from! 
generate flyers. 




0 



Video por trait 

(with optional digitizer). 





This is a cartoon. 





A new way to express 
f your imagination. 




Ygv schematics 
w and floor plans. 




Logos and letterheads. 



Syste m Requirements: Pricing 



Any 64 K CoCo and a standard joystick or 
mouse. (The koala pad and the track ball work, 
but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a MultKPak or our Y-Cable. 
CoCo Max is compatible with any Radio Shack 
DOS and ADOS. 

Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes 
almost all the features of CoCo Max II except 
Shrink, Stretch, Rotate, and Glyphics. Also, it 
has 5 fonts instead of 14. 
CoCo Max is not compatible with JDOS, 
DoubieDOS, MDOS, OS-9, the X-pad, and 
Daisy Wheel Printers. 

Printers Supported: 

Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronix, Delta 10, 10X, 15, 15X, SG- 
1 0.Okidata 82A, 92, 93, C. Itoh Pro-writer, 
Apple Image-writer, Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet, 
Radio Shack DMP 100, 105,1 10, 120, 200, 
400, 500, Line Printer 7, Line Printer s, TRP- 
1 00, CGP-220. (DM P-1 30 use Line Printer 8), 
PMC printers, Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 1 5 



CoCo Max on tape . . ....... $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max II (disk only). . . .... . . .$79.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max to CoCo Max 1 1 

New disk and manual , $1 9.95 

New features of CoCo Max II: 1 4 fonts and giyphic 
font, dynamic shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive 
capability, 68 page scrapbook, point and click fi te 
load, color printer drivers, full error reporting. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to disk 

manuals, disk and binder . . . . . ....... , . $24.95 

Y-Cabfe: Spec/a/ Price.. . . ..... . . $19.95 

Super Picture Disks #1 , #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks $29.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny* 



ion 

A font is a set of characters of a 
particular style. CoCo Max includes 
1 5 fonts. You can create new fonts of 
letters, or even symbols or graphics 
with the font editor. Examples: set of 
symbols for electronics, foreign 
alphabets, etc. . . .. .... ........ $19.95 



itizer DS-69 

This new Low Cost Digitizer is the 
next step in sophistication for your 
CoCo Max system. With the DS-69 
you will be able to digitize and bring 
into CoCo Max a frame from any video 
source: VCR, tuner, or video camera. 
Comes complete with detailed 
manual and C-SEE software on disk. 
Multi-Pak is required. 
New Low Price Save $50. .... . . . . $99.95 

r. faster DS-69A. .$149.95 



Colorware Incorporated 
COLORWARE 79- 04 A Jamaica Avenue 

Woodhaven, NY 11421 



800 221-0916 

Orders only. 

NY & Info: (718) 296-5916 
Hours: 9-5 Eastern time. 



Add S3, 00 per order for shipping. 
We accept Visa, MC, checks, M O. 
C. O. D. add $3.00 extra. 
NY and CT : add saies tax. 
Shipping to Canada is 35.00 
Overseas, FPO, APO add 1 




ETURN 

1220 NN=5*N:F0R J=l TO 4:K=NN-5+ 

J:A(K)=A(K+1) :V(K)=V(K+1) :NEXT:V 

( NN ) =V : A ( NN ) =ANG : RETURN 

1230 LINE(142-W,150)-(143+W,150) 

,PSET 

1240 SS=-SGN(W) 

1250 FOR 1=1 TO 5:Y=150-I:X=140+ 
W+SS*I 

1260 LINE(X,Y)-(X+1, Y) , PSET 
1270 Y=150+I:LINE(X,Y)-(X+1,Y) ,P 
SET: NEXT 
1280 RETURN 
1290 REM 

1300 REM ** MAIN DISPLAY 
1310 REM 

1320 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
";:A$="*** BOMBS AWAY *** 



ii 



1330 FOR 1=1 TO LEN (A$) : PRINT MI 
D$(A$,I,1) ; 

1340 POKE&HFF21,&H3C:POKE&HFF21, 

&H34:FOR QW=1 TO 30: NEXT QW:NEXT 

1350 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " B 

Y ALLEN DRENNAN 1 

986 COLOR CLOUD" 

1360 FOR 1=1 TO 2000: NEXT I 

1370 CLS:A$="GAME RULES ARE SIMP 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is sent second class 
mail. If you do not receive your copy by the 5th 
of the month of the publication date, send us a card 
and we will mail another. Canadian subscribers 
and foreign airmail allow two additional weeks. 

You must notify us of a new address when you 
move. Notification should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to the month in which 
you change your address. Sorry, we cannot be 
responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an "account 
number" and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



LE:":GOSUB 1540: PRINT 
1380 PRINT 

1390 A$="BLOW UP YOUR OPPONENT B 
Y FIRING AT THE RIGHT ANGLE AND 
VELOCITY, " :GOSUB 1540 
1400 PRINT 

1410 A$=" WHILE COMPENSATING FOR 
WIND AND TERRAIN. EACH GUNNER M 
UST ENTER" 

1420 A$=A$+"THE GUN ANGLE AND SH 
ELL POWER. " :GOSUB 1540 
1430 PRINT: PRINT 

1440 A$="THE ANGLE MUST BE BETWE 
EN (0-90) " :GOSUB 1540 
1450 PRINT 

1460 PRINT " PLAYERS NAMES : " 
1470 FOR P=l TO 2 

1480 PRINT "PLAYER ";P;:LINE INP 
UT", ";P$(P):IF LEN(P$(P))>10 TH 
EN CLS: PRINT "10 CHARACTERS ONLY 
!":GOTO 14 60 
1490 NEXT 

1500 DEF FND(X)=RND(X) 

1510 INPUT "HOW MANY BATTLES TO 

PLAY ";GN 

1520 IF GN<1 THEN PRINT" PLEASE , 
DONT JOKE AROUND !": GOTO 1510 
1530 GOTO 240 

1540 FOR 1=1 TO LEN (A$ ): PRINT MI 
D$ (A$,I,1) ; 

1550 POKE &HFF21, &H3C:POKE &HFF2 
1,&H34:F0R QW=1 TO 30: NEXT QW:NE 
XT 

1560 FOR 1=1 TO 700: NEXT I 
1570 RETURN 
1580 CLS 
1590 REM 

1600 REM ** GAME REPORTS 
1610 REM 

1620 PRINT "THE SCORE: ";P$(1); 

: PRINT" =" ;S (1) : PRINT P$(2);:PRI 

NT" =";S(2) 

1630 IF S(1)>S(2) THEN WI=1 
1640 IF S(1)<S(2) THEN WI=2 
1650 IF S(1)=S(2) THEN 1680 
.1660 PRINT "WINNER" 
1670 GOTO 1700 
1680 PRINT 

1690 PRINT "A TIE ! ! ! " 

1700 PRINT "BETTER LUCK NEXT TIM 

E i ! ! " 

1710 END 

1720 SCREEN 1,1: FOR RT=1 TO 15 
1730 CIRCLE(X,Y) ,RT, 3,1, .50,0 
1740 NEXT RT 

1750 FOR 1=1 TO 1500: NEXT I:RETU 



24 THE RAINBOW October 1986 




The Amazing A-BUS 



What will you do with it ? 





An A-BUS system with 2 Motherboards and 9 Cards. 



r— - 


\mr4[ 




mm 











al 



a 



ils. 



s8t Slaoua' 



SHEILA wanted to set up a variety of experi- 
ments in her lab. With an A-BUS, the computer 
can watch the mice instead of Sheiia. 
HARRY has a model railroad layout that he wished 
to automate. Now his home computer controls the engines 
gates, signals, etc. through the A-BUS. 
BOB tests electrical fixtures as they leave the assembly line, 
develops test equipment quickly with inexpensive, off-the-shelf, 
and easy to use A-BUS cards. 

But what's an A-BUS ? It's the easiest way to connect a variety of 
cards that sense and control anything outside the computer. With 
the A-BUS, your CoCo becomes an incredible machine. 
What would I need? First, an A-BUS Adapter to convert your 
computer bus to the A-BUS standard. Then a Cable (with one or two 
slots) to connect one or two A-BUS Cards. If you need more than 
two cards, the cable will be connected instead to the A-BUS 
Motherboard, which has five slots. Up to five motherboards can be 
chained. Finally, add you choice of A-BUS Cards to fit your project. 
I'm not an engineer. Can I use the A-BUS ? If you can wire a 
switch, you can use the A-BUS. No computer hardware knowledge 
is needed ! A screwdriver is all you need for many projects. 
What about software? Simple PEEK and POKE commands con- 
trol the whole system, whether you read the time on the clock, 
switch the relays, take a temperature reading, or turn a motor. 
What if I change computers? Incredibly, this is as simple as 
replacing the inexpensive adapter card. 



A-BUS Adapters 



CoCo to A-BUS Adapter AR-1 38: $49 

Works with all CoCo's. Plugs into rom slot or Multipak. 
Disk systems without Multipak need Y-cable ($19.95) 
A-BUS adapter for: AApple II, lie. AR-1 34.. .$49 
IBM PC, XT, AT and all compatibles. 
TRS-80 Models 100, 200. 
TRS-80 Mod 3,4 t 4D. Fits 50 pin I/O bus. 
TRS-80 Model 4P. Includes extra cable. 



AR-133...S69 
AR-135...S69 
AR-132...$49 
AR-1 37. ..$62 




TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus. AR-1 31 ...$39 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-1 20: $99 

Will accomodate five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector 
allows a second motherboard to be added to t he first 
{with connecting cable CA-161 ...$1 2). Up to five 
motherboards can be joined this way to a single 
adapter. The motherboard is mounted on a sturdy 
aluminum frame with card guides. 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft.) ca-163: $29 

Connects Adapter to 1 A-BUS card or Motherboard. 
Special Cable for two A-BU S cards C A-1 62 . . . $39 

Relay Card re*i 40: $1 29 

8 industrial relays on board. Contacts are rated at 3 
amps. You can control up to 64 cards (51 2 relays) 
using several motherboards. Jumpers are used to 
simply select the card address. The card is easily 
controlled in BASIC with "OUT" or "POKE'*. For 
example, OUT 1 ,0 turns all the relays off on card # 1 . 
Eight LED's show which relays are on. 

Digital Input Card IN-141:$49 

It's safe and easy to connect and read switches, 
keypads, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. The eight 
inputs can monitor the presence of voltage or switch 
position. Simple INP or PEEK commands read the 
status (On or Off) of the inputs. Each input is optically 
isolated for convenience and safety. 

Analog Input Card ad-142:$H9 

With this 8 bit, 8 channel A/D converter, your comp- 
uter can read voltages, temperatures, pressures, 
light levels, etc. Take over 1 00 readings per second 
in BASIC (several thousand with machine language). 
It's simple to use, for example: OUT 1,3 selects 
channel #3, then A=INP(1) reads the voltageon that 
channel. Input range: 0 to 5.1V. Resolution: 20mV. 
Conversion time 120us. 

Prototyping Card PR-1 52: $1 5 

Protocard is 3V2 by 4Va in. and accepts up to 1 0 IC's. 





1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-146:$109 

This high performance analog to digital converter 
features accuracy to 0.025%, 130ms conversion 
time, sign and over range indication. The basic input 
range is .—5 to +5 volts, with 1.2mV resolution, but 
the gain of the on-board amplifier can be set to 
measure microvolts. Ideal for a strain gauge, thermo- 
couple, pH meter, etc. 

Motor Controller st-143:$69 

Stepper Motors are the ultimate in motion control. 
The special package (below) includes everything 
you need to get familiar with stepper motors: Each 
controller card drives two stepper motors (12V, 
bidirectional, 4 phase). 

Motor: 48 steps/revolution, 300 steps/second, Va" 
shaft: MO-103...S15. Power supply: PS-126...$10 
Special Package: the controller card, fwo stepper 
motors, and power supply: PA-1 81 ...$99 

Clock with Alarm cl-144:$89 

It's the most powerful clock/calendar available. The 
features: • 5 second/month accuracy. • Keeps 
time, date, and alarm for 5 years (even with computer 
off). • Can time events down to 1/100 second. 

• Periodic "chime". • Full time and date alarm. 

• Four alarm outputs: Computer, LED, Buzzer, and 
Reed Relay. • Easy to use,: for example H=INP(1) 
reads the hours, Y=INP(6) reads the year, etc. 




Latest Developments 

Voice Synthesizer 

15 Bit Analog to Digital Converter 

Intelligent Stepper Motor Controller 

Digital to Analog Converter 

LCD Display (one and two line) 

Touch Tone® Decoder 

Counter Timer 

24 Line TTL Input/Output 



VS-153 
AD-155 
ST-1 54 
DA-147 
LD-151 
PH-145 
CT-154 
DT-148 



£SKJ? lne 800 221-0916 

Info and NY orders: (71 8) 296-591 6 
Technical info: (203)656-1806 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 NY time. 



Add S3.00 per order tor shipping. 
We accept Visa, MC, checks, M O. 
CO D add $3.00 extra. 
NX residents add sales tax. 
Shipping to Canada is 15.00 
Overseas, FPO, APO add 10% 



COLORWARE 



Colorware Inc 
79-04 Jamaica Ave 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 



- 





J 



J 





The GoblinsH Getcha if You 
Don't Watch Out! 

By Jean and Al Duerig 

m m ctober magic casts its spell over a suburban neighborhood in 
■ M Halloween. It is October 31 and you, dressed as a ghost, are the 
intrepid trick>or~treater determined to get your fair share of 
Halloween loot. But it won V be easy. Strange and bizarre things happen on 
the darkest night of the year. As you roam the streets, gGing from house to 
house, who knows what you may encounter? 

Halloween includes a flying saucer, haunted house, lightning, a dog that may 
or may not be vicious and an assortment of ghosts and scary sounds. 

If unsatisfactory treats are received, you are given the option of playing a 
trick, but don't be too nasty or you may land in jail. 

The game is simple for children of all ages, requiring only yes aftd no answers. 
It features 10 different graphics screens and requires 32K of memory. Points 
are accumulated by gathering desirable treats and can be lost for playing tricks 
or being a scaredy cat. Good luck! 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the Duehgs at 203 Pinecrest 
Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15237, 412-486-1888. Please endow an SASE when 
writing.) 



Jean and Al Duerig are CoCo enthusiasts who have enjoyed so many offwr 
games they decided to write their own, Jean is a foreign language teacher ami 
Al is a telephone engineer. 



26 



THE RAINBOW October 1 986 




Oclaber 19£6 THE RAINBOW 



■ ■ i'n» * 



V3 



17 107 

135 57 

540 251 

680 179 

769 101 

781 162 

792 30 

812 199 



2920 
3007 
3115 
3153 
3240 
3430 
3450 
3710 



219 
216 
40 
144 
117 
.57 
112 
.79 



3785 
4030 
4090 
4232 
5150 
5345 
END 



.87 
211 
48 
138 
.37 
251 
159 



The listing: HRLOWEEN 

1 CLS: PRINT @ 167 , "H A L L 0 W E 
E N":FOR W=l TO 1000:NEXTW 

2 PRINT: PRINT" A CHILDREN'S 
ADVENTURE BY J. AND A. 

DUERIG" : FOR W= 1 TO 1200: NEXT W 

3 DIM G(23,75) 

4 ZZ=16j30:XX=0:S=0 

5 CLS: PRINT" IT'S HALLOWEEN NIGHT 
AND TIME FOR YOU TO ROAM THE 

NEIGHBORHOODLOOKING FOR ADVENTUR 

ES, AS WELLAS TRICKS AND TREATS 
ii 

* 

6 PRINT"SO PUT ON YOUR GHOST SUI 
T AND GET READY FOR SIGHTS AND 

SOUNDS LIKE YOU'VE NEVER SEEN O 
R HEARD." 

7 PRINT "ALL QUESTIONS ARE ANSWE 
RED BY (Y) FOR YES AND (N) FOR 




<v Software <*> 




C7 



=0 



KEEP-TRAK' Genera! Ledger Reg. $69.95— ONLY $24.95 

Double- Entry' General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
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on 32k & 64k (710 accounts & entries on 16k) (disk only). Version 1.2 has screen 
printouts. Rainbow Reviews 1.1 - 9/84 ; 1.2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95— ONLY $19.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 
fields with 255 characters per field (4080 characters/record). Sort, match & print 
any field. User friendly menu driven. Manual included (32k/64k disk only). 

Rainbow Review 3/85, Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
line HELPS at all times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects 
on the screen. Can be used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. 
GRAPHICS EDITOR.Reg. $39.95— ONLY $19.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 
Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. (Avail. 10/01/85), 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, 
total due sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP- 
TRAK' General Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & 
more. User friendly/menu driven. Includes manual, $39.95 or $49.95 General 
Ledger & Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

'COCO WINDOWS' Available 10/31/85 
With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key 
board (klicks) and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create 
multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line 
numbering. Four function calculator, with memory. The above options can be 
called anytime while running or writing in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES, 
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $19.95 (disk or tape) includes manual. 

CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-942-9402 

THE OTHER GUY'S SOFTware (Add $2.50 for postage ft handling) 

P.O. Box H, 55 N. Main C.O.D., Money Order, Check In U.S. Fundi 

Logan, UT 64321 (801) 753-7620 (Pleaie specify If J&M controller) 




I 

# 
* 

I 

* 

I 



NO. TO START OVER, PRESS • 

BREAK ' AND TYPE 'RUN '": PRINT: P 

RINT" WHEN READY TO START, ENTER 
ly i ii 

8 INPUT Y$: IF Y$="Y" THEN 10 EL 
SE 5 

1)3 IF ZZ>1000 THEN 17 ELSE 12 
12 QQ=RND(12) 

14 ON QQ GOTO 17 , 17 , 17 , 17 , 3200 , 3 

990, 3100, 3100, 5000, 5000, 17 , 3500 

17 PMODE 3,1 

20 PCLS 

30 SCREEN 1,0 

35 LINE (0,140)- (255,140) , PSET 

40 LINE(70, 55) -(175,140) , PSET, B 

45 DRAW"BM64,58;E58;F58" 

50 LINE (108,105) -(132,140) , PSET 

,B 

60 LINE (84,108)-(97,130) ,PSET,B 
62 LINE(84, 119)-(97, 119) , PSET 
65 LINE (147, 108)-(161, 130) , PSET 
,B 

68 LINE(147, 119)-(161, 119) , PSET 

70 LINE(84, 70) -(97,90) , PSET, B 

73 LINE(84, 80) -(97,80) , PSET 

75 LINE(147,70)-(161,90) ,PSET,B 

78 LINE(147, 80) -(161,80) , PSET 

80 DRAW"BM83,37;U22;R14;D12 I » 

85 LINE(108, 134) -(80,190) , PSET • 

90 LINE(132, 134)-(160, 190) , PSET 

95 CIRCLE (113, 119) ,2 

110 LINE(27, 125)-(36, 140) , PSET, B 

115 LINE(15, 125) -(48,125) , PSET 

120 LINE(15,125)-(32,80) ,PSET 

122 LINE(201,140)-(214,133) ,PSET 



♦ 



I 





123 CIRCLE (207, 119) ,17, .8 

124 PAINT (207,119) ,3,4 

125 LINE(32, 80) -(48,125) , PSET 



28 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



13)3 PAINT (119 , 132) , 3 ,4 
135 PAINT(73,53) ,3,4 

140 PAINT(17,123) ,3,4 
144 PAINT (66 , 60) , 4 , 4 
149 PAINT(180,60) ,4,4 
155 CIRCLE (220, 50) ,15,2 
160 PAINT (220, 50) ,2,2 

167 LINE (113/170) -(125,172) ,PSE 
T,B 

168 CIRCLE (118, 157) ,9,2.3,2 

169 PAINT (118, 157) ,2 ,2 

17 0 CIRCLE ( 1 17 , 151) ,2 
173 CIRCLE (121, 151) ,2 

175 LINE (117, 155) -(120, 155) ,PSE 
T'W . 

176 IF ZZ>200 THEN ZZ=ZZ-200 

177 FOR W=l TO ZZ: NEXT W 

179 CLS 

180 PRINT @96,"DO YOU WANT TO RI 
NG THE DOORBELL" 

182 INPUT A$: IF A$="Y" THEN 190 

ELSE 1000 
190 PRINT @168, "TRICK OR TREAT!" 
198 SOUND170,9:SOUND 145,10 
200 FOR D=l TO 800: NEXT D 
515 PMODE 3,1 
520 PCLS 
525 SCREEN 1,0 

530 LINE (0,140)- (255 , 140) , PSET 

535 LINE(70, 55) -(175,140) ,PSET,B 

540 DRAW"BM64,58;E58;F58" 

545 LINE (108,105)-(132,140) ,PSE 

T,B 

550 LINE (84, 108) -(97, 130) , PSET, 
B 

555 LINE (84, 119) -(97, 119) , PSET 
560 LINE (147,108)-(161,130) ,PSE 
T, B 

565 LINE (147, 119) -(161, 119) ,PSET 
570 LINE(84,70)-(97,90) ,PSET,B 
575 LINE(84,80H(97, 80) , PSET 
580 LINE(147,70)-(161,90) ,PSET,B 
585 LINE(147,80)-(161,80) ,PSET 
590 DRAW"BM83 , 37 ;U22 ;R14 ;D12» 
595 LINE (108, 134) -(80, 190) ,PSET 
600 LINE (132, 134) -(160, 190) ,PSET 
610 LINE(27,125)-(36,140) ,PSET,B 
615 LINE(15,125)-(48,125) , PSET 
620 LINE (15, 125) -(32, 80) ,PSET 
625 LINE (201, 140) -(214, 133) ,PSET 
,B 

630 CIRCLE(207, 119) ,17, .8 

635 PAINT (207,119) ,3,4 

640 LINE (32, 80) -(48,125) ,PSET 

650 PAINT(73,53) ,3,4 

655 PAINT(17,123) ,3,4 

660 PAINT (66, 60) ,4,4 

665 PAINT(180,60) ,4,4 



670 CIRCLE (220, 50) ,15,2 

675 PAINT(220,50) ,2,2 

680 LINE (113,170)-(125,172) , PSE 

T,B 

685 CIRCLE (118, 157) ,9,2.3,2 

690 PAINT (118, 157) ,2,2 

695 CIRCLE (117, 151) ,2 

700 CIRCLE ( 121 , 151) , 2 

705 LINE (117,155)-(120,155) ,PSE 

T . {' ,{ V': ' ' v ' 

715 LINE(133,105)-(152,102) ,PSET 
720 LINE(152, 102) -(152, 135) , PSET 
725 LINE(152, 135)-(133, 140) , PSET 
730 PAINT (134,107) ,4,4 

735 PAINT (148, 109) ,4,4 

736 PAINT (148, 120) ,4,4 
740 CIRCLE (147, 117) ,2,2 

745 LINE(108,105)-(132,140) ,PSET 

,B 

750 CIRCLE (120, 115) ,5 

755 CIRCLE(120,124) ,7, .7 

760 LINE (117, 127) -(125, 138) , PSET 

,BF 

762 CIRCLE (90, 126) ,5 

763 PSET(90,126) 

764 PAINT (90,126) ,2,4 

765 FOR M TO Z Z : NEXT W 

768 TR$="BECAUSE OF THE INSULT R 
ECEIVED AT THIS HOUSE YOU HAVE 
THE OPTION TO TRICK. DO YO 
U WANT TO TRICK?" 

769 H$="DO YOU WANT TO TRICK OR 
TREAT AGAIN? " 

770 T=RND(12) 

773 ON T GOTO 775,777,779,781,78 
3,795,797,802,783,5350,5353,5356 

775 CLS:PRINT"YOU GOT A NICE LOL 
LIPOP WORTH 10POINTS SO YOUR SCO 
RE IS 

";S+10:S 

=S+10 

776 PRINT: PRINT H$: INPUT R$ : IF 
R$="Y" THEN GOSUB 3500 ELSE 100 

0 

777 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOU GOT A DO 
LLAR AND CAN ADD 100 POINTS TO Y 
OUR SCORE WHICH IS NOW 

ii 

;S+100:S=S+100 

778 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINTH$ : IN 
PUT R$:IF R$="Y" THEN GOTO 3180E 
LSE 1000 

779 CLS: PRINT "YOU GOT A CHOCOLAT 
E BAR WORTH 20 POINTS AND NOW HAV 
E A SCORE OF 

";S+20:S 

=S+20 

780 PRINT: PRINT: PRINTH$: INPUT A$ 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 29 



:IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 10 ELSE 100 
0 

781 CLS : PRINT" YOU GOT A COOKIE A 
ND CAN ADD 15 POINTS TO YOUR SCO 
RE. YOUR SCOREIS NOW WORTH 

" ;S+1 

5:S=S+15 

782 PRINT: PRINT :PRINTH$: INPUT A$ 
:IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 5000 ELSE 1 

783 CLS: GOTO 399)3 

784 FOR W=l TO "70 0: NEXT W 

785 Q=RND ( 5 ) 

786 ON Q GOTO 790 , 790 , 790 , 787 , 78 

8 ;\:^§w- i . 

787 S=S-1J3 : PRINT : PRINT" YOU ' RE LU 
CKY THAT THE DOG IS FRIENDLY 
AND ONLY WANTS ONE OF YOUR COOK 
IES. THAT COSTS YOU 10 POINTS AN 
D YOUR SCORE IS NOW 

";S:GOTO 789 

788 S=S+150: PRINT: PRINT" IT'S A V 
ERY FRIENDLY STRAY DOG AND WANT 
S TO GO HOME WITH YOU . HE 1 S WOR 
TH 150 POINTS, SO YOUR SCORE IS 

NOW 



it 



;s 



789 FOR W=l TO 1000-.UEXT W: PRINT 
: PRINT H$: INPUT R$:IF R$="Y" THE 
N 10 ELSE 1000 

790 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" THE D 
OG BIT YOU. ":FOR W=l TO 1000: 
NEXT W: PRINT: PRINT" 0 
UCH! ! ":G0T0 799 

792 PRINT: PRINT :PRINTH$: INPUT R$ 
:IF R$="Y" THEN 10 ELSE 1000 

795 CLS:PRINT"YOU GOT AN APPLE H 
ERE ADD 20 POINTS TO YOUR SCO 
RE. YOUR SCOREIS NOW 

"JS+20 

:S=S+2J3 

796 PRINT: PRINT :PRINTH$: INPUT A$ 
:IF A$="Y" THEN 5000 ELSE 1000 



797 CLS : S=S - 2 0\ PRINT: PRINT "YOU G 
OT AN APPLE AND CAN ADD - UGH!, 
YOU JUST FOUND A WORM IN THE A 
PPLE SO SUBTRACT 20 POINTS. YOUR 
SCORE IS NOW 
ii ;S 

799 FOR W=l TO 8j3j3:NEXT W: PRINT: 
PRINTTR$ : INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 

GOSUB 2900 ELSE 10 

800 PRINTH$ : INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" T 
HEN 10 ELSE 1000 

802 PMODE 0, 1 : PCLS : S CREEN 1 , 1 
802 FOR X-l TO 4 

804 PCLS 1 

805 FOR W=l TO 200: NEXT W 

806 PCLS 2 

807 FOR W=l TO 150: NEXT W 

808 NEXT X 
810 SOUND 1,20 

812 CLS: PRINT "THAT WAS LIGHTNING 
AND YOU'D BETTER GO HOME TIL 
L THIS STORM PASSES OVER. YOU 
ALSO LOSE 15 POINTS . ":S=S-15 : PR 
INT: PRINT "YOUR NEW SCORE IS ";S 

815 FOR W=l TO 1500: NEXT W 

816 PRINT I 360, "TRICK OR TREAT? 



ii 



817 INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 198 
ELSE 1000 

1000 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 
GOODNIGHT" 

1001 PRINT: PRINT" YOUR FINAL S 
CORE IS:";S 

1002 END 

2900 CLS 

2901 RESTORE I 

2902 PRINT @ 70, "TRICKS YOU CAN' 

DO" rv. 

2904 PRINT: PRINT 

2906 DATA DUMP GARBAGE, SOAP WIND 
OWS, CHASE CAT, MAKE FACES , DYNAMIT 
E HOUSE 

2908 FOR M=l TO 5 



ORDER PHONE (416) 456-0032 

To order or tor further information or program suggestions please write: 
Duck Productions, 18 Rowe Court, Brampton, Ontario, Canada L6X 2S2 
WATCH FOR MACHINE GENESIS, a three program utility and tutorial for 
beginner exploration of machine language progamming. COMING SOON! 

KEEWNGTRAO? 

NINE PROGRAMS, to easy they're almost uier independent! More 
than the average diskette management tysyem, ITS A BOOT UTILITY! 

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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 




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The laymans kit lor disk repair. Step by step procedure to repair 
directories and grain tables. Locates errors, maps out disk contents 
with printer or screen output, will backup any flawed disk, and prompts 
built in disk zap for repair. Complete with documented tutorial on disk 
input/output operation, access. $19.95, ($24.95 CDN) 



MICRO • FIR€ 

Have you beat your thumbs more than the aliens? 
You need a secret weapon! This automatic rapid fire 
circuitry package can be added to any joystick. It 
has on/off control and does not affect computer 
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Custom component has adjustable rate of fire and comes with a full 
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CODE BUSTER disassembler 

Explore machine language programming with an easy, accurate 
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procedure will answer questions in your study. Fully documented 
instructions. $19.95, (S24.95CDN) 



30 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



II 



II 



PR 



fe91j3 READ T$ 
2912 PRINT M;: PRINT 
INT T$' 
2914 NEXT M 

2916 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT "CHOOSE A 
TRICK BY NUMBER" 

2918 INPUT T 

2919 FOR W«l TO 1500: NEXT W 

2920 ON T GOTO 3000,3003,2934,29 
32,4200 

2930 GOTO 2900 

2932 CLS: S=S - 2 0 : PRI NT .'PRINT" GHOS 
TS CAN'T MAKE FACES SO YOU LOSE 

20 POINTS FOR BEING SILLY. YOUR 

SCORE IS NOW 

" ; S : GOTO 2945 
2934 CLS: PRINT: PRINT 11 THE CAT WEN 
T UP A TREE SO NO CHANGE IN T 
HE SCORE." 
2945 RETURN 

3000 X=RND(3) 

3001 ON X GOTO 3002,3004,3004 

3002 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
"YOU LOST YOUR NERVE SO THERE IS 

NO CHANGE IN YOUR SCORE. YOUR 
SCORE REMAINS ";S: RETURN 

3003 CLS : PRINT : PRINT "YOU GOT AWA 
Y WITH SOAPING THE WINDOW SO Y 
OU MAY ADD 25 POINTS TO YOUR SCO 
RE WHICH IS NOW 



/ 



S+2 5 : S-S+2 5 : RETURN 

3004 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOU GOT CAU 
GHT DUMPING GARBAGE CANS AND HA 
VE BEEN ARRESTED. IT'S ALL 0 
VER FOR YOU TONIGHT AND YOUR S 
CORE IS ZERO.":FF=0 

3005 FOR BB=1 TO 1500: NEXT BB 

3006 PMODE 3,1: PCLS: SCREEN 1,0 

3007 CIRCLE (125, 95) ,20,2.3,2 
3009 PAINT(125,95) ,2,2 

3012 CIRCLE (118, 83) ,2,4 
3015 CIRCLE (131, 83) ,2,4 



3017 CIRCLE (125, 92) , 6 , 4 , . 75 , . 5 , . 
99 

3019 LINE (110,130) -(140/ 132) , PS 
ET , BF 

3022 LINE (40,30)^(210,133) , PSET 
,B 

3025 FOR X=40 TO 210 STEP 17 

3030 LINE (X,30)-(X,133) , PSET 

3031 NEXT X 

3032 Z$="BU8 ;R8 ;G8 ;R8 ;BR4" 

3033 0$="U8 ; R8 ; D8 ; L8 ; BR12 " 

3036 IF FF=1 THEN 3037 ELSE 3038 

3037 DRAW"BM110,150"+Z$+O$+O$ 

3038 FOR W=l TO 3500: NEXT W 
,3039 Sp0 ■ 
3040 U=RND ( 2 ) 

3045 ON U GOTO 10,1000 

3100 PMODE 1 , 3 : PCLS : SCREEN 1,1 

3105 CIRCLE (50, 50) ,15 

3106 PAINT (143, 80), 3, 4 

3107 LINE(100,185)-(180,125) ,PSE 
T,B 

3110 LINE- ( 140 , 85 ) , PSET ' ROOF 
3112 LINE- (100, 125) , PSET 
3115 LINE(110,160)-(125,130) , PSE 
T, BF 

3117 LINE (155, 160) -(170, 130) , PSE 
T, BF 

3120 LINE (130, 130) -(149, 185) , PS 
ET,B 

3122 CIRCLE (134, 157) ,2 

3125 LINE (160, 105) - (160 , 90) , PSET 



3127 
3128 
3129 
3130 
3131 
3132 
3134 
3135 
313 6 
3137 



LINE - (175,90) , PSET 
LINE- ( 175,115) , PSET 
Y=185 

FOR X= 1 TO 250 STEP 3 
G=RND (12) : COLOR 2 , 4 
LINE (X, Y) - (X, Y-G) ,PSET 
NEXT X 
X=167:Y=89 
SP=0:EP=0 

FOR R=l TO 20 STEP 



UPGRADE YOUR COCO WITH THE SUPERC0MP68 008 BOARD FROM CIR-PAK LTD 
IMPROVE YOUR DISPLAY WITH THE HIGH RESOLUTION GRAPHIC DISPLAY BOARD 

THE SC68008 BOARD FEATURES • NEW SOFTWARE FOR THE SC68008 HI RES GRAPHIC DISPLAY FEATURES. 



8/16/32 BIT INTERNAL PROCESSING 
8K EPROM MONITOR ( SPARE USER SPACE ) 
1 CENTRONIC PARALLEL PRINTER PORT 
256K DYN. RAM (UP TO 51EK WITH JUMPER) 
1 8-BIT I/O SPARE PORT 
DMA OPERATION WITH COCO BUS 
COPROCESSING MODE 
MC6800B ONLY MODE 

SIMPLY PLUG THE SCBB00B BOARD INTO 
THE EXPANSION PORT OF YOUR COCO AND 
PLUG THE DISK CONTROLLER INTO THE 
SC68Q08 BOARD. NO MODIFICATION TO 
YOUR SYSTEM IS REQUIRED. 

PCB ONLY WITH EPROM MONITOR 99* US 

ASSEMBLED & TESTED WITH 256K DRAM 339* US 

STEEL CASING FOR THE SC68008 BD 39* US 

INFORMATION PACKAGE 2* US 



RSDOS - 2S6K RAMDISK 39* US 

0S9 - 256K RAMDISK 59* US 

OS9 - DRIVER FOR THE SCBB00B 29* US 

0S9 - CODE TRANSLATOR 49* US 
TO GENERATE A 68000 SOURCE 
FROM A 6809 CODE WITH LABELS, 
VARIABLES TABLE. AND DISASSEMBLES 
6809 CODES FOR COMMENTS. 

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NEC7220 GRAPHIC DISPLAY CONTROLLER 

RESOLUTION i 640 X 220 STD 

SOFTWARE DRIVER - MACHINE LANGUAGE 

HI QUALITY PCB WITH GOLD PLATED CONTACTS 

28 SOCKETED I.CS. - HIGH SPEED 

75 OHM COMPOSITE VIDEO OUT. 

MANUAL WITH COMPLETE CIRCUIT DIAGRAM 

32K ON BOARD DRAM 

EASILY ADAPTABLE TO NON STANDARD WIDE 
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J0L 2P0 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 31 



3140 EP=EP+.02:IF EP>.5 THEN EP= 
0 

3143 CIRCLE (X+R,Y-R) ,R,4,1,SP,EP 

3145 NEXT R 

3146 FOR W-l TO 600:NEXT W 

3147 CLS: PRINT "AN ECCENTRIC OLD 
MAN LIVES HERE AND HAS A FIRE IN 

HIS FIREPLACE. THE SMOKE LOOKS 
LIKE A GHOST . " 

3148 PRINT: PRINT "DO YOU DARE TO 
TRICK OR TREAT HERE?" 

315)3 INPUT A$ : IF A$="Y" THEN 31 
53 ELSE 3157 

3153 X=RND(2):ON X GOTO 3155,315 
6 

3155 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "THE OLD MAN 
IS REALLY AN ESCAPEDCONVICT AND 
HE TOOK AWAY ALL YOUR GOODIE 

S.YOUR SCORE IS ZERO" : S=0 : PRINT: 
GOTO 3158 

3156 CLS:PRINT"HE IS REALLY A NI 
CE FRIENDLY FELLOW SO YOU GET 

25 POINTS FOR BEING BRAVE AND 1 
J3 EXTRA POINTS FOR SHARING YOUR 
CANDY WITH HIM" : S=S+35 : PRINT : PRI 
NT" YOUR SCORE IS NOW "; S: PRINT :G 
OTO 3158 

3157 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOU LOST YO 
UR NERVE SO YOU LOSE 25 POINTS F 
OR BEING A SCAIRDY CAT " : S=S- 
25: PRINT "YOUR SCORE IS NOW ";S: 
GOTO 3158 

3158 FOR W=l TO 700: NEXT W: PRINT 
:PRINTH$: INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 

10 ELSE 1000 
3180 D=RND ( 3 ) 
3182 CLS 

3185 ON D GOTO 17,3200,3200 
3200 IF XX=2 THEN 10 
3202 PMODE 3,1:PCLS 
3205 SCREEN 1,0 
3210 SS=190 

3230 CIRCLE (20, 150) ,12, ,4, .4, .1 
3240 LINE (1J3,174)-(30,174) ,PSET 
3250 PAINT (20, 150), 2, 4 
3260 DRAW "BM155 , 180 ;E30 ;U70 ;E3 ; 
U30 ;H20 ?H5 ; L15 ; H5 ; L15 ; H5 ; L2 0 " 
3270 DRAW"BM255 , 180 ;H30 ;U70 ;H3 ;U 

30;E20;U5;E10" 

3280 CIRCLE (24, 130) ,2 

3290 CIRCLE (18, 130) ,2 

3300 LINE (18,135) -(22,135) ,PSET 

3310 FOR X=l TO 255 STEP 3 

3320 Y=RND(10) 

3330 COLOR 4,3 

3340 LINE (X, 180) - (X, 180-Y) ,PSET 
3350 NEXT X 

3370 GET (9,175)-(32,100) ,G,G 
3380 FOR T=l TO 11 



3390 X=RND(140) 
3400 Y=RND(150) 

3410 PUT(X,Y)-(X+23,Y+75) ,G,PSET 
3415 SOUND SS,3:SS=SS+2 
3420 NEXT T 

3423 FOR W=l TO 1200:NEXT W 

3424 CLS 

3425 PRINT: PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE 
WOODS AND GHOSTS ARE POPPING UP 
EVERYWHERE BUT YOU MUST CROSS. 
" : PRINT 

3426 FOR W=l TO 2000:NEXT W 

3427 X=RND(4) 

3430 ON X GOTO 3431,3433,3432,34 
41 

3431 PRINT "YOU FAINTED AND CANNO 
T CONTINUE. ALL SCORE IS LOST AND 

YOU MUST GO HOME .": S=0 : GOTO 34 
45 

3432 PRINT"THE GHOSTS WERE ABOUT 
TO GET YOUBUT A FLYING SAUCER S 

UDDENLY LANDED AND SCARED THE 
M AWAY " : FOR W-l TO 2673:NEXT W:G 
OTO 3500 

3433 PRINT" YOU SCREAMED A LOT BU 
T HAVE STAGGERED OUT OF THE 
WOODS. NEXT TIME BE MORE BRAVE BU 
T YOU GET 25 POINTS FOR THE EFF 
ORT": S=S+25: PRINT" YOUR SCORE IS 

";S 

3435 FOR V=l TO 3 

3436 SOUND 211,15 

3437 FOR Z=l TO 180: NEXT Z 

3438 NEXT V 

3439 GOTO 3445 

3440 FOR V=l TO 3 

3441 PRINT "YOU ARE VERY BRAVE AN 
D MADE IT TO THE OTHER SIDE WIT 
H 50 EXTRA POINTS" : S=S+50 : PRINT" 
YOUR SCORE IS ";S: GOTO 3445 

3442 FOR Z=l TO 200:NEXT Z 

3443 NEXT V 

3445 FOR W=l TO 2400: NEXT W 

3448 XX=XX+1 

3450 GOTO 10 

3500 PMODE 1,3 

3510 PCLS 

3520 SCREEN 1,1 

3530 CIRCLE (120, 150) ,40, ,3.5,0.5 
,.75 

3540 CIRCLE (120, 150) ,40, ,3.5, .75 
,0 

3 550 DRAW"BM80 , 150 ; R2 6 ;U30 ; R26 ; D 
30;R26;L56" 

3560 CIRCLE(110,134) ,2 
3570 CIRCLE (97, 90) ,5 
3580 CIRCLE (112, 90) ,5 
3590 CIRCLE (127 ,90) ,5 
3600 CIRCLE (142, 90) ,5 



32 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 



r 



3610 PAINT (125, 140) ,7,8 

3620 LINE (149 , 58) - (181, 31) ,PSET 

3630 LINE (93, 58) -(64,31) ,PSET . 

3640 DRAW"BM158,38;E15;F15;G15;H 

15;E8;F15" 

3 650 DRAW"BM8 6,36; H15 ; G15 ; F15 ; El 
5;H8;G15" 

3 660 DRAW "BM120 , 15 ;U12 ;NR12 ;NL1 
2 ;ND12 ;NE12 ;NF12 ;NG12 ;NH12" 




3670 CIRCLE (120, 140) ,95, ,0.45 ,. 
83, .68 

3680 PAINT(125,110) ,6,8 

3690 FOR T=l TO 10 

3700 PAINT (97,90) ,8, 8: PAINT (112 

,90), 8, 8 

3710 PAINT (127, 90) ,8, 8: PAINT (142 
,90), 8, 8 

3730 PRESET (97, 90 ): PRESET (112, 90 
) 

3740 PRESET (12 7, 90) 

3750 PRESET (142 , 90) : PRESET (110 , 

134) 

3754 SOUND 100,4 

3760 FOR W=l TO 100: NEXT W 

3770 NEXT T 

3772 Z$="D2G1BE1BU2BR12" 

3773 0$="U8R6D8L6BR12" 

3778 CLS:PRINT"THIS IS A FLYING 
SAUCER WHICH HAS LANDED ON YOU 
R STREET. DO YOU WANT TO TRICK 

OR TREAT HERE?" 

3779 INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 378 
2 ELSE 10 

3780 GOTO 3780 

3782 X=RND(3): ON X GOTO 3783,37 
85,3787 

3783 PRINT "YOU FOUND THEM FRIEND 
LY AND THEYGAVE YOU A MARS BAR P 
LUS 30 POINTS": S=S+30: PRIN 
T"YOUR SCORE IS ";S: PRINT 



3784 FOR W=l TO 1500:NEXT W:PRIN 
T H$: INPUT A$:IF A$=»Y" THEN 10 
ELSE 1000 

3785 PRINT"THIS IS A TRICK ON YO 
U TO CAPTURE A HUMAN SPEC I 
MEN FOR THEMARTIAN ZOO SO THE G 
AME IS OVER FOR YOU": FOR W=l 

TO 1500 :NEXTW:FF=1: GOTO 3006 

3787 PRINT" THEY TRIED TO CAPTURE 
YOU BUT YOU WERE TOO SMART FO 

R THEM AND ESCAPED. YOU GET 40 
POINTS FOR YOUR CLEVERNESS .": S=S 
+10: PRINT "YOUR SCORE IS ";S 

3788 FOR W=l TO 1500: NEXT W.PRIN 
T:PRINTH$: INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THE 
N 10 ELSE 1000 

3990 CLS: PRINT 0133, "BEWARE OF T 
HE DOG! ! !" 

3992 FOR W=l TO 1100: NEXT W 

4000 PMODE 0,1 

4001 JJ=0 

4002 PCLS 

4004 SCREEN 1,0 

4006 LINE(10,50)-(60,58) , PSET 

4008 LINE-(75,30) ,PSET 

4010 LINE- (85 , 55) , PSET 

4012 LINE- (120, 75) , PSET 

4014 LINE- (165, 75) , PSET 

4016 LINE- (2 10, 80 ), PSET 

4018 LINE- (240, 69) , PSET 

4020 LINE- (225, 55) , PSET 

4022 LINE- (250, 73) , PSET 

4024 LINE- (225, 100) , PSET 

4026 LINE- (220, 160) , PSET 

4028 LINE- (210, 160) , PSET 

4030 LINE- (200, 120) , PSET 

4032 LINE(10,50)-(10,57) ,PSET 

4034 LINE- (55, 80) , PSET 

4036 LINE- (20, 95) , PSET 

4038 CIRCLE (77, 70) ,4 

4040 LINE- (20, 100) , PSET 

4042 LINE- (60, 95) , PSET 

4044 LINE- (90, 110) , PSET 

4046 LINE- (85, 160) , PSET 

4048 LINE- (105, 160) , PSET 

4050 LINE- (110, 117 ), PSET 

4052 LINE(106,158)-(120,157) ,PSE 

T 

4054 LINE- (127, 120) , PSET 

4056 LINE- (167, 125) , PSET 

4058 LINE- (187, 120) ,P£ET 

4060 LINE- (197, 158) , PSET 

4062 LINE- (209, 158) , PSET 

4064 PMODE 0,2: PCLS 

4066 LINE (10,80)-(60,58) , PSET 

4068 LINE- (75, 30) , PSET 

4070 LINE- (85,55), PSET 

4072 LINE- (120, 75) , PSET 

4074 LINE- (165, 75 ), PSET 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 33 




Howard Medical Computers 

We have Rainbowfest prices year 'round! 




SMITH 



CORONA 




Smith Corona offers the latest and best in typewriter 
technology including a built-in 50,000 word dictionary and 
spelling checker that beeps as a spelling error is made, 
a full line lift off correction feature! 



($7 shipping) 



$286 



Special interface plug unit transforms the Smith Corona 
typewriter into a wordprocessing printer for your color 
computer. Includes both serial and parallel output. 




NEW FROM 
J&M 

The DC-4 is a stripped down version of the very popular 
DC-2 and includes all the same features such as 
memory minder automatic format recognition, gold cir- 
cuits, metal box, and software selectable tract seek rate 
except for ROM switch and parallel port. 



($2 shipping) 





The Teac 55B fits into ihe spare slots in the Radio Shack 
501 Disk Drive. This bare drive features 40 Track, double 
sided 360K potential and a six 



millisecond track 
seek rate. 



($2 shipping) 



$132 



The DD-2 combines the Teac 55B with our V2 height 

horizontal case and heavy duty 

power supply. .„ 

($2 shipping) 



$188 



IANTEI 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of deal- 
ing with a company through the mall Once you receive our hardware, try It out; 
test it for compatability. If you're not happy with It for any reason, return It In 30 
days and well give you your money back, (less shipping). 



RS DOS ROM CHIP 





ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&l 
and RS controller Release 1.1. 

Reg. $40 

BOTEK ($2 shipping) 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial 
output to run a parallel printer like Star or Epson. In- 
cludes all cables. Add $10 for modem attachment. 



$20 



eacl 




($2 shipping) 



$6845 



his ROM jiack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display. It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A. To get started, you 
need OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, 
and a monochrome monitor. aQA 

($2 shipping) ^0%f 

New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9. 



$10 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 

PAYR0L/BAS" 

Written in nonprotected basic for the color computer. 
This easy-to-use package of programs will simplify and 
decrease the time spent doing payroll. Rainbow May 
1986 review says, "Elegant and professional." State and 
federal tables are already included Send $1 for 11 page 
reports guide. 

VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package includes VIP writer ter- 
minal, data base, call and disk zap which can fix a 
diskette that is giving I/O errors. e**%m 

5 125 




SAP-II 

Stock analysis program 
organizes your portfolio 
and gives specific sell 
and stop-loss points. 

$1995 



BPA-1 

Chart your blood pres- 
sure from daily readings 
taken in the comfort nl 
your home. 



$2 shipping on software 




Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 6062 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 4:00 Mon. - Frl. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 
C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S 



ORDER RAINBOW 

ON DISK NOW 

AND SAVE! 

As a special introductory 
offer, you can subscribe to 
RAINBOW ON DISK be- 
fore January 1, 1987, for 
only $90 — $9 off the reg- 
ular subscription price. 
Don't miss out — order 
today! 




It's called the premier Color Computer magazine for good 
reason. THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and most 
comprehensive publication a happy CoCo ever had! Is there any 
wonder we get letters daily praising THE RAINBOW, the 
magazine one reader calls "A Pot Of Gold" for his Color 
Computer. 

THE RAINBOW features more programs, more information 
and more in-depth treatment of the Tandy Color Computer than 
any other source. 

A monthly issue contains more than 200 pages and up to two 
dozen programs, 14 regular columns and as many as 20 product 
reviews. And advertisements: THE RAINBOW is known as the 
medium for advertisers — which means every month it has a 
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products! Hundreds of programs are advertised in its pages 
each month. 

But what makes THE RAINBOW is its people. Nationally 
known people like Bill Barden, who has written 27 books on 
computer topics and writes for us each month. Or, Fred Scerbo, 
who writes special programs at the request of readers. Experts 
like Dick White and Joseph Kolar, two of the most knowledge- 
able writers on BASIC. Communicators like Marty Goodman and 
Cray Augsburg, who stay abreast of telecommunications 
advances. Or, Dan Downard, RAINBOW technical editor, who 
answers our readers' toughest questions. Educators like Dr. 
Michael Plog and Steve Blyn, who show how CoCo can be used 
at home or school. Advanced programmers like Dale Puckett, 
who guide you through the sophisticated OS-9 operating 
system. Electronics experts like Tony DiStefano, who explain 
the "insides" of the CoCo. These people, and many others, visit 
you monthly through columns available only in THE RAINBOW. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the wide 
spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color Computer — from 
beginners' tutorials and arcade games to telecommunications 
and business and finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to expand your 
CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly reviews by independent 
reader reviewers take the guesswork out of buying new software 
and hardware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE RAINBOW 
to be an absolute necessity for their CoCo. With all this going 
for it, is it surprising that more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW 
subscribers renew their subscriptions? 

We're willing to bet that* a year from now, you'll be doing the 
same. For more information call (502) 228-4492. For credit card 
orders only, you may call (800) 847-0309. 



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Two great ways to bring 
the Rainbow into your life 




Rainbow on Tape 
& Rainbow On Disk! 



For more than four years now, tens of thousands of 
RAINBOW readers have enjoyed the luxury of RAINBOW 
ON TAPE. Each month our tape service subscribers receive 
all the great programs from the pages of THE RAINBOW 
(those over 20 lines long), without the trouble of having to 
type them in. 

Now, in addition to RAINBOW ON TAPE, there is 
RAINBOW ON DISK — another great way to bring THE 
RAINBOW into your life. 

Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your cassette 
player or the disk into your drive. No more lost weekends 
typing, typing, typing. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and run. 
No work. No wait. 

Yes, you could type the programs in yourself, as many 
people do. But all of them? Every month? There simply isn't 
enough time. 

Just think how your software library will grow. With your 
first year's subscription, you'll get almost 250 new pro- 
grams: games, utilities, business programs, home applica- 
tions — the full spectrum of THE RAINBOW'S offerings 
without the specter of keying in page after page of listings 
and then debugging. And, with RAINBOW ON DISK, you'll 
also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — as 
we've said before, they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at 
a price that's "small potatoes." And now you even have a 
choice about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and return 
the attached reply card. No postage necessary. 



■'>■-■■■■;■;.'. :•.:.:» 




I ltiq km iuh H II mm « 



^•iJ-Ti lf .- 




Drive 0 and 1 



conttoller so you can have the equivalent of 2 drives in 
one. You can even backup from 0 to 1 . Works with all 
CoCo'P 



Epson's Comrex 5650 has a 12" screen with 900 jiiies. 
Resolution for 80 column text and 18 MHZ band width, 
retail price was 139.95. 13" Color Monitor (hot shown), 
now only $139.95, These are new, in factory sealed 
cartons, NOT used, repacked, or refurbished. Add 7.00 
s/h. Monitor Interface for any color Computer 29.95. 



••5 *<" 



i&V (><■■■ Hi 








m : : 





: iSiilt:' ^IllPves 299 95 
Both our drive 0 and 1 in one case, with cable and R^S. 
controller. The best just got better! 



Drive 1 

Add a second l h height drive to your Radio Shack' 
26-3129. Comes with 3 minute installation instructions 
screwdriver required I Double sided version (Drive 1 and 
2) and doubler board add 79.00 



5 1 



"■•.'.■■■■;:":•:<.•..'■<•• 



■■ 



— 







J 

WMMHMMMHMiaMipMlilMII 



... .... 



its' :"" 



- >• 



':« W$i 



3? = .-.■■ i V, 



Ik 



if:*;- 



i'i. • ..--!";.. ' -.?*S* ■ ... !■ 



t^S p ' 



125 





Your Choice 




'v. : >: : yv-':';fv<V 



Special prices on new first quality disk drives. They even have GOLD connectors on the back . . . Some other places charge 229.00 tor 
isfej||i«i299.00 for dr. 0> not us! Drive 1 is for mc)dl, Second Color Computer dri 

extra connector on your Drive 0 cable. Both drives are compatible with any version of the Color Computer and all versions of drives. 
Drive 0 is your first Color Computer drive and comes complete with cable, manual, and R,S . controller. For double-sided drive and 
"ttlil^ 1 or 1 & 2). Bare full hgt SSDD drive only 79.95. 

THE COMPUTER CENTER 
901-761-4565, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 381 19 
Add $4.90 for shipping and handling— Visa, MC& money orders accepted, No CCBp 
;|dlow an additional 2 weeks for personal checks— Drive faceplates may vary slighi|pf 
Prices subject to change without notice. Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 





4)376 LINE-(210,80) , PSET 

4,078 LINE- (230, 69) , PSET 

4080 LINE- (255, 55) ,PSET 

4082 LINE- (250, 73 ), PSET 

4084 LINE- (225, 100) , PSET 

4086 LINE- (220, 160) , PSET 

4088 LINE- (210, 160) , PSET 

4090 LINE (10, 81) -(15, 89) , PSET 

4092 LINE -(65,96) , PSET 

4094 LINE- (90 , 110) , PSET 

4096 LINE- (85, 160) , PSET 

4098 LINE -(105,160) , PSET 

4100 LINE- (110, 117) , PSET 

4102 LINE(106,158)-(120,157) ,PSE 

T 

4104 LINE- (127, 120) , PSET 

4106 LINE- (167, 125) , PSET 

4108 LINE- (187, 120) , PSET 

4110 LINE- ( 197 , 158 ) , PSET 

4112 LINE- (209, 158) , PSET 

4114 LINE- (197, 120) , PSET 

4116 CIRCLE (77, 70) ,4 

4118 LINE (17, 85) -(42, 81) , PSET 

4120 FOR P«l TO 2 

4122 PMODE 0,P 

4124 SCREEN 1,0 

4126 FOR W=l TO 200: NEXT W 

4128 NEXT P 

4129 JJ=JJ+1 

4130 IF JJ<>7 THEN 4120 
4150 GOTO 784 

4200 PMODE 4,1 
4202 PCLS 
4204 SCREEN 1,1 
4226 CLS 

4230 PRINT@237, "BOOM" 

4232 SOUND 1,30 

4234 PMODE 4,1 

4236 SCREEN 1,0 

4238 FOR 1=2 TO 200 STEP 2 

4240 CIRCLE (128, 96), I 

4242 NEXT I 

4258 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "SETTING OFF 
DYNAMITE IS A BIT MUCH. YOU A 
RE GOING TO JAIL AND YOUR SCORE 
IS ZERO":FF=0:S=0 
4260 GOTO 3005 
5000 PMODE 3,1 
5010 PCLS 
5020 SCREEN 1,0 

5030 LINE(0, 170) -(255, 170) , PSET 

5040 LINE(5,170)-(75,35) ,PSET, B 

5050 CIRCLE (65, 100) ,4 

5060 LINE (20, 50) -(30, 65) , PSET, B 

5070 LINE(105,144)-(245,41) ,PSET 

,B 

5080 PAINT (45, 65), 3,4 

5090 LINE(110,140)-(240,45) ,PSET 

,B 



5100 CIRCLE (175, 115) ,27 

5110 PAINT (175, 50), 2, 4 

5120 CIRCLE (165, 107) ,5 

5130 CIRCLE (185, 107), 5 

5140 DRAWBM172 , 116 ;E3 ;F3 ; L4" 

5150 CIRCLE(174, 126) ,8, ,0.5,0,0. 

5 

5160 CIRCLE (174, 125) ,8,, 0.5, 0,0. 
5 

5170 LINE (175, 91) - (180 , 75) ,PSET 
5180 LINE(176,91)-(181,75) ,PSET 
5190 LINE (174, 91) -(179, 75) , PSET 
5200 CIRCLE (220, 45) ,25, ,2, .25, .5 
5210 LINE(220, 95)-(210, 140) , PSET 
5220 LINE(220,95)-(240,90) ,PSET 
5230 CIRCLE (130, 45) ,25, ,2,0, .25 
5240 LINE (128,90)-(140,138) ,PSE 
T 

5250 LINE(128,90)-(112,87) , PSET 
5260 FOR X=l TO 10 
5270 PAINT (165, 107) ,4, 4: PAINT (18 
5, 107) ,4,4 

5280 PRESET(164, 107) : PRESET (185 

5290 PRESET (16 3, 107 ): PRESET (185, 
107) 

5300 PRESET (164, 108) : PRESET (185, 
108) 

5310 PRESET (164, 106) : PRESET (185, 
106) 

5320 FOR W=l TO 300: NEXT W 
5330 NEXT X 

5340 CLS '.PRINT @96 , "DO YOU WANT 

TO RING THE DOORBELL?" 
5342 INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 534 
4ELSE 1000 

5344 SOUND 170, 9: SOUND 145,10 ' 

5345 GOTO 770 

5350 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOU GOT A P 
OPSICLE BUT IT MELTEDAND MESSED 
UP ALL THE OTHER GOODTHINGS" 

5351 PRINT: PRINT "YOU LOSE 30 POI 
NTS" : S=S-30 : PRINT : PRINT" YOUR SCO 
RE IS ";S:FOR W=l TO 1500: NEXT W 
: PRINT H$ 

5352 INPUT A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 10 
ELSE 1000 

5353 S=S+3 5: CLS: PRINT: PRINT" YOU 
GOT A POPCORN BALL WORTH 35 POIN 
TS SO YOUR SCORE IS NOW 

";S:FOR W=l TO 1500: NEXT W 
: PRINT: PRINT H$ 

5354 GOTO 5352 

5356 S=S+45: CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOU 
GOT A BAG OF CANDY CORN WORT 
H 45 POINTS SO YOUR SCORE IS 

";S:FOR W=l TO 1400: NEXT 
W: PRINT: PRINT H$ 

5357 GOTO 5352 



36 THE RAINBOW October 1966 



The Power of the 
Palette: Graphics on 
the Color Computer 3 



By Rick Adams and Dale Lear 



We're all excited that the in- 
creased resolution and 
number of colors of the Color 
Computer 3 graphics display produces 
more spectacular and colorful graphics. 
But there are other implications to the 
method of graphics support provided 
by the new Graphics Interrupt Memory 
Enhancer (GIME) chip that are even 
more astounding. 

With the previous SAM/VDG chips 
in the Color Computer 1 and 2, a 
maximum of four colors was available, 
chosen from one of two available sets 
of four specific colors — no exchanges 
or substitutions allowed. With the 
GIME chip, all the rules of color selec- 
tion for graphics display have changed. 
You may display up to 16 colors out of 
a palette that contains your own color 
set chosen from a total of 64 possible 
colors. 

Thus, Color Computer 3 software 
utilizes more high resolution displays 
with many more colors than we've seen 



Rick Adams is a systems programmer 
for a company that develops 68000- 
based systems software. In addition to 
writing games, he likes science fiction 
and is the author of Radio Shack f s 
Temple of ROM. Rick lives in Rohnert 
Park, California. 

Dale Lear owns Dale Lear Software 
and makes his living developing pro- 
grams for the Color Computer He has 
authored games and other software 
such as Double Back, Baseball, 
TSEDIT, TSWORD and D.L. LOGO. 
Dale, his wife Laurel and their six 
children live in Petaluma, California. 



previously. The edges of objects on the 
screen are smoother, too. The ability to 
choose your own color set leads to a less 
cartoon-like representation of objects 
on the display, with less dependence on 
hacker tricks like color "aliasing" (arti- 
facting) to generate more appropriate 
colors. 

Less obvious, but very important to 
note, is the fact that this palette scheme 
of specifying color sets enables us to use 
a completely new form of computer 
animation. Presently, there are two 
major methods of animating Color 
Computer graphics: the screen-flip 
technique and the draw-redraw tech- 
nique. Screen-flip involves keeping two 
copies of the screen, drawing one of 
them while the other is being displayed, 
then reversing the process. Draw- 
redraw simply means that you use one 
screen which is displayed all the time; 
your spaceship (or whatever) is erased 
at its previous position, and redrawn at 
its new position. But now we also may 
use a third method, called the palette- 
switching method: Display the entire 
screen, including objects drawn in 
various colors, and then change the 
values of the colors set in the palette 
after they are drawn. 

If you change the red in your palette 
to blue, then all of the objects previously 
displayed in red will instantaneously 
change to blue — just like magic! With 
a little trickery, this technique can be 
used to make portions of the screen 
flash, or pulse on and off in various 
colors. Objects may be instantly 
changed to the background color (mak- 
ing them disappear), or changed from 
the background color to a visible color, 



making them seem to appear out of 
nowhere. A bird could be made to flap 
its wings by making the up position of 
the wings visible, then making the up 
position disappear and making the 
down position of the wings visible. So 
here is another major new graphics 
animation technique available to the 
Color Computer 3 user. No longer are 
we held to merely four colors. We're 
only limited to 16 colors at a time . . . 
or are we? 

Another new piece of hardware in the 
CoCo 3, the programmable interrupt 
timer, enables us to use yet another new 
technique to provide up to 64 colors on 
the screen at a time! Using this tech- 
nique, the programmable interrupt 
timer is set to interrupt the computer 
four times during every screen redraw. 
At the top of the screen, the interrupt 
routine sets the palette with 16 colors. 
One-quarter of the way down the 
screen, the timer interrupts again. 
Sixteen other colors are put into the 
palette, and so on. In effect, one 16- 
color palette is active for the first one- 
quarter of the screen, another palette is 
active for the next quarter screen, and 
so on. 

Sure, it's one of those nasty hacker 
tricks, and the normal BASIC user isn't 
going to want to bother with it. But 
software developers just love this kind 
of thing, and you can expect them to use 
it to their advantage. 

So, if you see some software come out 
that uses 64 colors at once, don't scratch 
your head and say "that's impossible." 
You'll be able to say, "Hey, I know how 
they did that; I read about it in THE 
rainbow!" 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 37 



Rainbow Tunnel 

The Rainbow Tunnel is a short BASIC 
program that demonstrates the range of 
colors available on the Color Computer 
3, while at the same time showing an 
interesting use of the PRLETTE com- 
mand to provide animation. 

Lines 90 through 140 set the high 
speed mode, and tell basic to go to the 
end of the program at Line 640 if the 
break key is pressed. The high-speed 
POKE is guaranteed to work on the 
Color Computer 3. And the new ON BRK 
command is a welcome addition. 

Lines 160 through 250 load the 
graphics' palette with a set of colors that 
closely approximate the spectrum from 
red to purple — a rainbow, in other 
words. The color codes used appear in 
the DRTfl statement at Line 200. Lines 
270 through 360 create, and then paint, 
a series of concentric circles. The circles 
are painted with the colors of the rain- 
bow. In lines 380 through 440, the 
concentric circles that formed the 
borders for the PRINT command are 
drawn again in colors that match the 
painted regions near them, rather than 
in colors that were appropriate to use 
for a paint border. 

So far, we have a brilliant, multicol- 
ored display on the screen, but where is 
the animation? Have patience. When 
the program gets down to Line 490, the 



magic begins. The loop at Line 490 
looks pretty simple, so check the sub- 
routine at lines 520 through 580. The 
palette colors are changed in such a way 
that each concentric circle appears to 
move one position outward, thus giving 
the illusion that you are traveling down 
a brightly-colored "rainbow tunnel." 
But actually, nothing is moving at all! 
The color assignments, specified by the 
palette values, are moving, not the 
actual display data. This effect would be 
even more spectacular from assembly 
language, in which a considerable delay 
would have to be put in the loop so that 
the display would not look like a blur! 

Finally, we come to the end routine 
at lines 600 through 650. The PRLETTE 
RGB command sets the colors back to 
their defaults. Otherwise, when we press 
break, the screen might be in a color 
set so weird we couldn't read it. 

When we watched this program run 
for the first time, there was a long 
silence, followed by this conversation: 

Dale: "You couldn't do that before on 
a Color Computer!" 

Rick: "You couldn't even do it 
badlyr 

Who's Waggin' the Wheel? 

Wagon Wheel is a short basic pro- 
gram that demonstrates a new anima- 



tion technique that was unavailable tc 
the color computer world until th< 
CoCo 3. 

Lines 120 through 150 perform a fev 
set-up calls, including some new fea- 
tures. 

Lines 200 through 350 draw a whee 
with spokes. The spokes, however, an 
drawn in a very special way. Fourteer 
groups of equally spaced spokes an 
each assigned a different color (oi 
palette register). 

As you watch the spokes beinj 
drawn, they look colorful. However 
they look a little close together, and the} 
certainly don't appear to be moving! 

Now the magic begins. Lines 42C 
through 440 set the 14 palette registers 
assigned to the spokes, all to white (the 
background color). What happens? All 
the spokes disappear. 

Now we get to lines 510 through 560. 
By setting only one of the 14 palette 
registers assigned to the spokes to black, 
every 14th spoke appears. By constantly 
cycling through the 14 registers setting 
only one at a time to black, the wheel 
now appears to turn. 

Of course, nothing is really moving. 
No drawing is being done at all. The 
palette values are changing, causing the 
illusion of animation. □ 



Listing 1: TUNNEL 


250 


GOSUB 560 








260 


i 




10 • 


*************************** 


270 


• *************** 




20 ' 


* "RAINBOW TUNNEL" * 


280 


' PAINT CIRCLES 




30 ' 


* DEMO TO SHOW USE * 


290 


■ *************** 




40 • 


*, OF PALETTE REGISTERS * 


300 


FOR 1=0 TO 19 




50 ' 


* TO SIMULATE MOTION * 


310 


R=8+I*8 




60 ' 


*BY RICK ADAMS & DALE LEAR* 


320 


C=I AND 15 




70 ' 


*************************** 


330 


HCIRCLE(160,96) ,R,1 




80 • 




340 


HPAINT (156+R,96) ,C, 


1 


90 « 


*************** 


350 


HPAINT (164-R,96) ,C, 


1 


100 


• SET HIGH SPEED 


360 


NEXT I 




110 


• *************** 


370 


i 




120 


POKE &HFFD9 , 0 


380 


* **************** 




130 


DIM CC(32) 


390 


• PAINT THE LINES 




140 


ONBREAK GOTO 640 


400 


1 BETWEEN CIRCLES 




150 


i 


410 


• **************** 




160 


• * * ************* 


420 


FOR 1=0 TO 19 




170 


' SET UP COLORS 


430 


HCIRCLE (160, 96) ,8+1*8,1 AND 


180 


• *************** 


15 






190 


HSCREEN 2 


440 


NEXT I 




200 


DATA 49 , 50 , 51,52 ,53,22,23,24 


450 


i 




,55, 
210 


56,57,58,59,60,61,62 
FOR 1=0 TO 15 


460 


' *************** 




470 


• LOOP 




220 


READ CC(I) 


480 


• *************** 




230 


CC(I+16)=CC(I) 


490 


GOSUB 560 




240 


NEXT I 


500 


GOTO 490 





38 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



COMPUTERIZE YOUR BUSINESS 

with COMPUTERWARE® 
Affordable Business Software 




Computerware is proud to present affordable business applications that are easy to use for your CoCo! 
We are able to offer our powerful business software without requiring any additional software. All you 
need is 64K and two disk drives! 

Computerware's business applications have been in use for over 5 years, so you know they are proven and well- 
tested. They are not tutorials, though, and do assume you know and use sound accounting principals. However, 
these menu-driven systems are truly user-friendly and are. accompanied by comprehensive manuals. 



GENERAL LEDGER $125 

This is a comprehensive double-entry accounting system 
with complete audit trails, closing procedures, and full reporting. 
The chart of accounts is flexible and the system easy to use. 
Reports include the General Ledger, Trial Balance, Balance 
Sheet, Income Statement, and Transaction Register, Your 
financial information is at your fingertips! 

CHECK LEDGER $125 

This is a single-entry bookkeeping system which allows the 
users to define a chart of income and expense accounts. Year* 
to-date totals are maintained for each account as weil as com* 
plete checking account history. By just entering your checking 
account information, you can have always-current visibility 
over your income and expense ledgers. Financial statements 
and taxes are a snap! 

PAYROLL $175 

This is the most comprehensive payroll you'll find on a 
micro-computer. Besides collecting key employee information, 
it allows entry of pay rates for standard hours, overtime, and 
salary. Hourly, salary, and commissioned employees may be 
paid weekly, bi-weekly, semi-monthly, and monthly. Two types 
of special monthly deductions are also accommodated. Year- 
to-date, quarterly, monthly and current totals are maintained. 
All federal reporting is done automatically and your state com- 
putations are also included. 



INVENTORY CONTROL $125 

This system is designed to help the retailer, distributor, or 
businessman to keep control of this important factor. It stores 
your cost and quantity information, updates it immediately, 
and offers you key management reports with useful summaries 
at any time. With four costs, four locations, selling history, and 
vendor information for each item, you will always have the facts! 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE $125 

This system can give you the tools to plan your business' 
growth by controlling expenditures and forecasting cash require- 
ments. It helps a small business manage and track its cash 
liabilities by collecting vendor invoice information and report- 
ing the business' cash commitments and payment history. 
Along with standard payables reports, it also includes a check 
writer and payment forecast reports. 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE $125 

All businesses need to know who owes them money! This 
system provides reliable and timely information regarding the 
status of all customer accounts. You can know instantly which 
accounts are past due, forecast how much money to expect 
to receive for cash flow planning, and keep on top of your cus- 
tomers' credit positions. Customer name, address, credit limit, 
invoice, and payment information is recorded and reports of 
all information including customer statements are available 
upon your request. 




OMPUTERWARE ® 



P.O. Box 668 • Encinitas, CA 92024 • (619) 436-3512 



Computerware is a federally registered trademark of Computerware. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 



510 




580 


RETURN 


52,0 


> *************** 


590 




53/3 


• SUBROUTINE TO 


600 


• * ************** 


540 


• CHANGE PALETTE 


610 


1 RESET PALETTE 


550 


• *************** 


620 


' ON BREAK 


560 


FOR 1=0 TO 15: PALETTE I,CC(I 


630 


• *************** 


+K) : 


NEXT I 


640 


PALETTE RGB 


570 


K=(K-1)AND 15 


650 


STOP 



Listing 2: WHEEL 



10 
20 

30 
40 

50 
60 
70 
80 
90 
100 

110 
120 
130 
140 
150 



*************************** 

* "WAGON WHEEL" * 

* DEMO TO SHOW USE * 

* OF PALETTE REGISTERS * 

* IN ANIMATATION * 

*BY RICK ADAMS & DALE LEAR* 
*************************** 

************** 

* SET UP 

* ************** 

POKE &HFFD9,0 
HSCREEN 2 
HCLS(l) 
PALETTE 0,24 





THE RAINBOW'S 

One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 



Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 




160 • 

170 *********************** 

180 1 DRAW OUTSIDE OF WHEEL 
190 1 * * * * * * **************** 

200 HCIRCLE (160 , 96) , 90 , 0 
210 HPAINT (0,0) ,0,0 
220 ' 

230 *********************** 

240 1 DRAW SPOKES 
250 K=14*8 

260 *********************** 

270 FOR 1=0 TO K-I 

280 X=90*SIN (1*3 . 14/K) 

290 Y=90*COS(I*3.12/K) 

300 HCOLOR 2+14* (I/14-INT (1/14 ) ) 

,1 

310 HLINE (160+X, 96+Y) - (160-X, 96 
-Y) ,PSET 
320 NEXT I 
330 FOR. 1=1 TO 30 
340 HCIRCLE (160,96) ,1,0 
350 NEXT I 
360 

* * * * * * ****** ***** ***** 

SET ALL PALETTE 

COLORS TO WHITE 

EXCEPT ONE 
********************** 

FOR 1=1 TO 15 
PALETTE 1,255 
440 NEXT I 
450 

************************ 

ROTATE WHEEL BY SETTING 

ONE PALETTE REGISTER 

AT A TIME T BLACK 
************************ 

K=2 

KK=K+ 1 
530 IF KK=16 THEN KK=2 
540 PALETTE K, 255 : PALETTE KK,0 
550 K=KK 
560 GOTO 520 
570 ' 

580 ************************** 

590 'RESTORE PALETTE ON BREAK 
600 ************************* 

610 PALETTE RGB 
620 STOP 



370 
380 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 



460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 



40 THE RAINBOW October 1986 




They're here! 
All NEW 

Products for the 
CoCo 3! 



Color Connection IV 

by BJ Charnbless 

New features Include 80 columns, higher baud rates, and 
more! This is the most comprehensive modem package for 
the CoCo 3. All standard protocols are supported including 
CompuServe's Protocol B, XMODEM protocol, and 
XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto dial feature 
for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems 
is provided, Single key macros allow easy entry of often-used 
passwords and ID'S with a single key stroke. 

Requires 1 28K, CoCo 3, Disk $49.95 

Color Scribe II 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 80 
column display of the CoCo 3. Justification, Headers, 
Footers, and Pagination make it perfect for letters and 
documents as well as programming in BASIC PASCAL, n C" 
and Assembly Language. (A special option allows you to 
disengage the formatter, allowing more free memory for 
program editing.) Over 20 line editing commands Include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, 
breaking a line, and more! A complete, easy-to-understand 
manual accompanies your disk. 

Requires 128K, CoCo 3, Disk $49.95 



The Magic of Zanth 

by Scott Cablt 

In the Land of Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, 
Griffins, Centaurs and Demons abound. You are sent on a 
quest to discover the source of magic in the land of Zanth. 
This intriguing adventure features over 2 dozen hl-res 16 
color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effects, and speech (when used with the Tandy SSC pak). 
The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics look great on either a 
composite color monitor, an analog RGB monitor, or a 
television. 

Requires 128K, CoCo 3, Disk, (SSC pak optional) $34.95 

Return of Junior's Revenge 

by BJ Charnbless 

This is the same Junior you've seen in the Kong arcade 
series, but with new CoCo 3 graphics. This tireless little 
monkey must overcome all sorts of obstacles (4 screens 
worth) to rescue his father, The King, from the mean 
zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb 
vines, avoid chompers and birds, open locks and more 
before he finally meets with his big daddy. The 16 color, 320 
x 192 graphics are superb on either a composite color 
monitor, an analog RGB monitor, or a television. 

Requires 128K, CoCo 3, Disk $34.95 



all or write for our NEW fall/winter cataU 

It's filled with special prices and coupons for extra savings 



By the time you read this ad . . . 

. . . even more products will be 
available for the new CoCo 3. 

. . . many OS-9 products will be 
available to run on OS-9 Level 2. 

Order your FREE catalog today!!! 



Introductory Special 
$3.00 off any order for CoCo 3 Software 
offer expires October 311 986 



Call or Write to: 




'QQMPUTERWARE ® i«f|«M»tf 

Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA • 92024 



Name - 
Address 
City 



State 



Yesl Send me your FREE catalog I CoCo □ 

VISA MasterCard 

Card # Exp. 

Signature 



.Zip 



Item 



Format 



Price 



Shipping 6% Calif. Sales Tax 

Surface — 52 minimum. COD Add $5 

2% for orders over SI 00 Shipping* 
Air or Canada — $5 minimum. TOTAL 

5% for orders over SI 00 
I Checks are delaved for bank clearance^ 



WE'RE BRINGING THE COC 



RAINBOWS 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from The 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $20 to give 
your account a positive balance. This 
will be refunded after your first free 
hour if you choose to no longer use 
the system or it will be applied to 
future connect charges. If you do not 
maintain a positive balance, you will 
be charged $3.50 each month for 
direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — 
on a regular basis. Conference 
schedules will appear in the rain- 
bow each month. Be sure to check 
online announcements for changes 
and additions. 



THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1 200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE EVEN MORE 

Want to sjive even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with Imme- 
diate CoCo Community. Check it 
out today. After all, you can sample 
it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPH I 



TYPE: 

GROUP CDC0 





COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and the 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Uninet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Uninet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $12 (U.S.) per hour. 

On Uninet: Call (800) 821-5340 to get the Uninet number 
for your area. After you call the appropriate number for 
your own area and make connection, you'll see a prompt 
of "L?" Press enter, the period key (.) and enter again. 
At the "service:" prompt, type GVC (for General Videotex 
Corporation) and enter. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press *A\ 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
ENTER (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 310G, 
DELPHI ; and press enter. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $12 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Uninet or Tymnet. 
Check with the telephone authorities in your country for 
details on how to sign up for this service. When you have 
an account set up, you can reach Delphi with a "host code" 
of 312561703088 through Uninet, or 310600601500 
through Tymnet. (Youll have to pay the toll charges for 
this connection.) 

Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to THE RAINBOW, at the 
"USERNAME:" prompt, type RfllNBOUSUB and press 



enter. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type your individ- 
ual subscription number from the mailing label of your 
latest issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros 
at the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you dont already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type RRINBDWQRDER and press ENTER. 
At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type SEND5UB and press 
enter. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because youll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just press ENTER and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. Well 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP CDCD 

After you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and youll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. Youll also 
be assigned a temporary password. No time is assessed 
against your free hour of service while you answer these 
questions. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is opened, each rainbow 
subscriber will be credited with an hour of free time! 



When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into 
your own personal password. This is the password you 
will use for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 



After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 




Stretch, reduce and enlarge your drawing creations 



The 
Shifting, 

Reducing, 

Stretching, 

Enlarging 



Transfiguration 



For those of you who love 
playing with graphics, 
here's a simple, short and 
almost infinitely versatile 
program. 

Using Zoom-Stretch you can change 
a small image to a larger image or vice 
versa. But you can also stretch or 
squeeze the image like Silly Putty. Does 
that sound like what you've been wait- 
ing for? Well, start typing. 

Listing 1 shows the main program in 
a simple menu format. It is self prompt- 
ing and uses eight graphics pages. The 
original rectangle will be taken from the 
image in PMODE 4 , 1 and OR-ed with the 
image in PMODE 4 , S (within the rectan- 
gle specified). 

First, draw or load the original image 



Ron Ropson lives in Green Bay, Wis- 
consin and is a fabrication manager for 
a plastics shop. He has independently 
studied machine language and hopes to 
make a career of programming and I or 
photography. 




to PMODE 4,1. Determine what part of 
that image you would like to transfer to 
the destination screen using the top left 
(X1,Y1) and bottom right (X2,Y2) 
coordinates (they must be entered in 
that order). Next, determine where and 
what size the end result will be on the 
destination screen in the same manner 
(X3,Y3) (X4,Y4). 

Load and run Zoom-Stretch. When 
the menu appears, you may want to 
clear the destination screen (unless you 
are adding to what's already there). 
Next enter Zoom-Stretch Mode 1. The 
computer asks for the origin and desti- 
nation coordinates. Enter them as 
instructed and watch the CoCo do its 
work. Press any key to return to the 
menu. It's as simple as that. 

To help you understand how it works 
and to show some examples of the 
variety of possibilities of this program, 
I have included three modifications 
which use Zoom-Stretch to create inter- 
esting graphics effects. 

Listing 2 is a modification which 
draws a flower on the origin screen 



By Ronald T. Ropson 



(PMODE 4 , 1) and deposits 12 flowers of 
various sizes onto the destination screen 
(PMODE 4,5) to produce a pretty flow- 
ered pattern on the screen. Add these 
lines to the original program as shown. 
When run, this starts producing the 
flower pattern, then returns to the 
menu. Enter, save, then run it and see 
it do its stuff. 

Listing 3 is another modification to 
Listing L This one draws five-pointed 
stars of decreasing size on the destina- 
tion screen from one star drawn on the 
origin screen. 

Listing 4, another modification, 
draws the word "RAINBOW" on the 
origin screen and stretches and squeezes 
the letters onto the destination screen. 
This illustrates the Silly Putty effect. 

If you like to work with machine 
language, run Zoom-Stretch and save 
the machine language to shorten the 
program. The ML routine is fully po- 
sition independent. The value of PC and 
the cleared memory area must be 
changed to accommodate the new po- 
sition. 



44 



THE RAINBOW Oetoter 1986 



Run the program and enter CSfiVEM 
"ZOOM/flL " , PC+1G , PC+1BG , PC+26. 
Delete the data statements and change 
Line 15 to read 15 CL0ADM"Z00fVML". 
If you have a disk system, change 
CSfiVEM to SflVEM and CLOfiDM to LOflDM. 
If you don't understand machine lan- 



guage, don't worry. Just type in the 
program as it is and don't change 
anything. 

Does this give you ideas or new 
possibilities? Maybe you can load the 
latest drawings of your friends and 
stretch them a bit. How about wall- 



paper patterns with more variety? You 
are limited only by your imagination 
and 49,152 pixels. Have fun! 

(Questions may be directed to the 
author at 1223 Michaline Drive, Green 
Bay, WI 54304, 414-499-2195, Please 
enclose an SASE when writing.) □ 




......... , j s» .><{., S, 

.V.'f -. •'•■.■••.'> iv'^<»~:'-B 

1 tTvV ■ -a - r. ? >'S t f 



- - . . 




Figure 1: Origin Screen 



Figure 2: Destination Screen 



ROPS 
&H7F 



Listing 1: Z00M1 

0 ' ZOOM/ STRETCH , 1985 BY RON 
ON '"" '- :; "y ] 
5 PCLEAR8 : PMODE4 , 5 : CLEAR20 0 , 
00 \ ":. "• - ' !w >;;' 

10 PC=&H7F01 
15 FORA=PC+16 TO PC+186 : READB$ : P 
OKEA,VAL("&H"+B$) : NEXTA 
2/3 DATA 8j0 , 4 0 ,20 , 10 ,8 ,4/2 ,% 0,0, 



200 CLS : INPUT"ORIGINAL RECTANGLE 

: X1,Y1,X2,Y2";X1,Y1,X2, Y2 

210 IFX1>2550RY1>1910RX2>2550RY2 

>191THEN200 

220 INPUT" DESTINATION RECTANGLE: 

X1,Y1,X2,Y2" ;X3,Y3,X4,Y4 
230 IFX3 >2 5 50RY3 >19 10RX4 >2 550RY4 
>191THEN220 

240 RH=(X4-X3)/(X2-X1) :H2=(RH-IN 
T(RH) ) *256:RV=(Y4-Y3)/(Y2-Y1) :V2 
=(RV-INT(RV) ) *256 

250 POKE PC , XI : POKEPC+1 , X2 : POKEPC 
+2 , Yl : POKEPC+3 , Y2 : POKEPC+4 , RH : PO 
KEPC+5 , H2 : POKEPC+6 , RV: POKEPC+7 ,V 
2 : POKEPC+12 , X3 : POKEPC+1 3 , X4 : POKE 
PC+14 , Y3 : POKEPC+15 , Y4 
2 60 PMODE4 , 5 : SCREEN 1, 1 : EXEC (PC+2 
6) : RETURN 

300 PMODE4 , 5 : SCREEN!, 1 : PCLS0 :RET 
URN 

A /If /TC t^\% tt A ■ a ^^fl»T ■ ■ a ix fT^ TP x Ti ■ 



DC , A6 , 30, IF , 89, 44, 44,4 

. , .... ,. , A5 , E 4 , 8 6 , 2 7 , F , A6 , 3C,1F 

, 89 ,44, 4 4 , 4 4 , C4 , 7,E6 , A5 , EA , C6, E7 

,C6,39 

45 GOTO 100 

50 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN50ELSERE 
TURN 

100 CLS: PRINT@13 , "MENUE" , "<1> ZO 
OM/STRETCH" ,"<2> CLEAR DEST. SCR 
EEN" , " < 3 > VIEW ORIGIN SCREEN" , " < 
4> VIEW DESTINATION SCREEN", "<5> 
TRANSFER DEST TO ORIG" : INPUTA: 0 
NA GOSUB200, 300,400, 500, 600 
110 GOSUB50 : GOTO 100 



URN y> 

400 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : RETURN 
500 PMODE4 ,55 SCREEN! , 1: RETURN 
60 0 PMO DE 4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : FORA= " ' 
:PCOPY (A+4) TO (A) : NEXTA: GO 

a 



=1T04 
GOTO40 



Listing 2: Z00M2 

45 GOSUB2000:GOTO100 
2000 GOSUB400:PCLS0 
2005 'DRAW FLOWER 

2010 CIRCLE ( 100 , 70) , 36 , , . 75 : PAIN 
T( 100, 70), 1,1 

2020 FORT= . 15T06.29STEP. 628 3 : X=5 
0*SIN (T) +100 : Y=37 . 5*COS (T) +70 : CI 
RCLE (X, Y) , 16 , , . 75 :NEXTT 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 45 



OWL-WARE 

WINCHESTER BASIC 



ANNOUNCING... the Development of a Major Breakthrough in ■ 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR COMPUTER!!! 

Several months ago OWL-WARE introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer. 
Now we are about to introduce the only RSDOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, although there are 10 
directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but if you do, all files saved from RSDOS are available to OS9. All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into, only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don't like. 

Call for further details and availability on this breakthrough product!!! 




WITH 
DRIVE 

BELOW ONLY... 



WITHOUT 
$50. DRIVE $75. 



OS-9 HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives. 

Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
Memory!!! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes... 
Software, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interface. 

NOTE: OS-9 and RS DOS... "This may prove to be the perfect mating of 

both systems." RAINBOW (May 86) 

$525. 5 meg $659.10MEG ,nte 

OWL-WARE $799. 20MEG ^ ^$ 
is pleased to announce 




an exclusive arrangement 
to Distribute the L.R. TECH 




Software Only $11 9 

NOTE: Interface is not interrupt 
Driven Like Our Competition. 

Therefore, the System Clock 
does not Lose Time During 
Hard Drive Access. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULTI-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 



Hard Drive Interface and Software. DEALERS INQUIRES INVITED 



UtCH 3-0IHCHSI0KAL OBJECTS FROM ANY 
ANCLE MI TH 




Convenient, on-screen menu 
Supports input fron X-PPD, 

TOUCH-PAD, nOUSE or JQYS1ICK 
suilt-in screen dump to Tandy 

Er i n % e r s 
lculates dimension* for ux>u 
from Just a rough sketch 
Plots or calculates lines and 
ar c % 

lln-screen sketching node 



64K DISK 



$29.95 



OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 





J 




i 




TECHNICAL ADVICE 
(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 



SHhhh... Ask about the WISPER DRIVE!!! 



'Wrive o $ 1 79. to $239. 

...Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0, 1,2,3 Combos. Double 

drive 1 $99.to$145. Quad 



NOW AVAILABLE !!! 

SUPER-TROLL 




lb 



OWL-WARE'S version of the 

Distro (CRC) Controller by 

Tony DiStefano.This has sockets 

for 4 ROM Chips. ...only $15.00 

NOTE: Each option, only available 
with option listed above it. 

ADO ON OPTIONS: 

COOS 

Parallel Printer Port 

Real Time Clock 
80 Column Card 

Just Controller $99. with CDOS 
to $195. with ALL options 



$6. 
$25. 
$10. 
$65. 



All drives are new and fully 
assembled. We ship 

FULL Y TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at NO ADDED CHARGE! 

CHINON and Other Brands known 
as the highest quality made. 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 



Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



We have RSDOS, JDOS, 
OWL DOS, ADOS available on 
ROM. Call about Double Sided 
or Special Needs. 



TOLL FREE 

ORDER LINE 

(800) 245-6228 

Call for 
LATEST 

PRICES!!! 



WARRANTIES 

90 day - 1 YEAR 




M.C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA Res Include 6% Ta* 

PA (215) 682-6855 



OWL TIP : 

If you compare price to value, 

OWL-WARE always has the best 
price!!! 

OWL-WARE SOFTWARE 

BUNDLE: DISK TUTORIAL 

2 UTILITIES 
2 GAMES 

DISK TUTOR 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
QUICK, PAINLESS KNOWLEDGE OF DISK 
BASIC (THIS PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN 
TUTOR IS EASILY WORTH THE BUNDLE'S 
TOTAL PRICE). 

OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
25% FASTER DISK ACCESS AND ALLOWS 
USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 
SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

2 GAMES 

2 GAMES FROM OUR STOCK. 
BOTH HAVE SOLD FOR OVER $17. EACH. 

IF SOLD SEPARATELY OVER 
$125.00 WORTH OF SOFTWARE!!! 

only $24.95!!! 
(or even better) 
$4.95 with 
DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 



.75, .75 



•75/ • 5 i 
.75,0, . 
.75, .88 
38 



2030 CIRCLE (110, 128)., 66 , 
,.2 

2040 CIRCLE (215, 128) ,40, 
.7 

2050 CIRCLE (160, 101) ,40, 
2 

2060 CIRCLE (13 2, 150) ,30, 
,.08 

2070 CIRCLE (177, 145) ,30, , .75, 
, .58 

2090 ' COPY FLOWERS TO SCREEN 
2100 GOSUB300:FORA=1TO12:X1=0:Y1 
=0 : X2=2 55 : Y2=19 1 : READX3 , Y3 , X4 , Y4 
: GOSUB2 40 : NEXT A : GOSUB50 : RETURN 
2110 DATA0, 0,48, 36, 32, 12, 132, 87, 
118 ,0,198, 60, 208 ,16 , 255 ,52,12,64 
, 72 ,112 , 144 , 48 , 255 , 140 , 112 ,56,16 
0,92,64,80,144,152,16,132,64,168 
,132,116,212,176,208,144,255,180 
,84,156,132,191 



3020 IFC=1THENC=.39ELSEC=1 
3030 LINE (A, B) - (X, Y) ,PSET:NEXTT 
3040 GOSUB300:FORA=0TO100STEP25: 
X1=0 : Y1=0 : X2=255 : ¥2=191 : X3=A: Y3= 
A* . 75 : X4=255-X3 : Y4-191-Y3 : GOSUB2 
40 : NEXTA: GOSUB50 : RETURN 



Listing 3: Z0DM3 

45 GOSUB3000:GOTO100 

3000 GOSUB400 : PCLS0 ' 5STAR 

30 10 C=l : X=12 8 : Y=5 : FORT=0TO6 . 3 ST 

EP.6283 :A=X:B=Y:X=128-SIN(T) *121 

*C: Y=96-COS (T) *91*C 



Listing 4: ZDDM4 

45 GOSUB4000:GOTO100 
4000 GOSUB400:PCLS0' RAINBOW 
4010 DRAW"BM32,106U20R10D10L10F1 
0BR12U20R10D10NL10D10BR12R5NR5U2 
0L5R10BR12ND20F20U20BR12ND20R10D 
8G2L8R8F2D8L10" 
4020 CIRCLE (162, 96) ,11 
4030 LINE(182,86)-(192,106) ,PSET 
: LINE- (202,86), PSET : LINE- ( 2 12 , 10 
6) ,PSET:LINE-(222,86) ,PSET 
4040 GOSUB300:FORA=1TO11:X1=16:Y 
1=85 : X2=2 40 : Y2=107 : READX3 , Y3 , X4 , 
Y4 : GOSUB24 0 : NEXTA : GOSUB50 : RETURN 
4 050 DATA0 , 10 , 255 , 18 ,0 , 30,255 , 90 
,0,100,128,120/128,100,255,120,0 
,130,85,160,85,130,160,160,160 ,1 
30 , 255 ,160 , 0 ,170 , 64 , 180 , 64 , 170 , 1 
28 , 180 ,128, 170 , 192 , 180 , 192 , 170 , 2 
55,180 




TCE's 5th Anniversary Catalog 

is now available? 



PROGRAMMING TOOLS 
DEFT PASCAL WORKBENCH 
DEFT EXTRA 

DEFT 3D GRAPHICS SAMPLER 

WORD PROCESSING 
CHILD WRITER 
MEMO WRITER 
BUSINESS WRITER 

DATA MANAGERS 
CHILD FILER 
LIST MANAGER 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

SPREADSHEETS 
CHILD CALC 
SIMPLE CALC 
BUSINESS CALC 

EARL Y LEARNING 
ABC s IN COLOR 
ALPHA MEMORY 
HAPPY COUNT 
MIX AND MATCH 
MR. BEAR COUNT 
MR. BEAR SPELLER 
MR. PIGGY 
SEE AND SPELL 
TEACHING CLOCK 



MATH SERIES 
BASIC MATH 
CRISS CROSS MATH 
CRISS CROSS PLUS 
FLASH CARD 
FRACTIONS 
FRACTION DESTROYER 
FRIEND OR FOE 
MATH BOMBER 
MATH REVIEW 
MR. BEAR FLASH CARD 
MR. BEAR MATH 
PLACE VALUES 
REDUCING FRACTIONS 
RESCUE MATH 

LEARNING ACTIVITIES 

ALPHA ATTACK 

CAPITAL MATCH 

HISTORY QUIZ 

MATH QUIZ 

MEMORY MATCH 

QUIZ GAME 

UNITED STATES 

VOCAB BRUSH-UP 



LANGUAGE ARTS 
ALPHABETIZE 
ANTONYM EXPRESS 
ANTONYM MATCH 
COMPUTER EASE 
CRISS CROSS SPELL 
ENGLISH REVIEW 
HOMONYMS 
NOUNS 

NOUNS REVIEW 
PLURALS 
PRONOUNS 
SAVE THE FISH 
SPELL BOMBER 
SPELLING RULES 
SUPER SPELL BOMBER 
SYNONYM EXPRESS 
SYNONYM MATCH 
TORPEDO SCRAMBLE 
VERB REVIEW 
WEEKLY SCRAMBLER 
WEEKLY SPELLER 



100* 
SATISFACTION 
GUARANTEE 




CALL us at 1 -(800)-4TC-4TCE or l-(301)-963-3848 
for a FREE TCE Software catalog and the latest copy of TCE NEWS 



48 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



Portraits 
by BASIC 



By 

Ann B. 
Mayeux 



jitin Mayeux takes time from the computer to cure 
for her iwo small boys and husband* She has a degree 
in psychology and (aught herself programming from 
the CoCo manual and THE rainbow. Ann writes 
Adventure games and programs for her sons. 

n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^n^nv 



Whose face will you draw? With Draw 
Face, you can draw your friends, a 
clown, a vampire, a baby and any other 
face you can imagine. It's easy. 

Using single-key selections, choose face 
shape, ears, hairstyle, eyes, eyebrows, mouth, 
nose, accessories and other features such as 
beard, glasses, or vampire cape. To make a 
selection, press the letter for the option 
wanted. 

To help you, a box in the upper right-hand 
corner tells which feature you need to choose, 
If you cannot remember the options, pressing 
the slash (/) brings up a list of the letters tp 
use and a brief description (see Figure). 



Menu Options 



Shape 


B - 


Baby 


C - 


Cadaverous 


L - 


Long 


0 - 


Oval 


R - 


Round 


S - 


Square 


Ears 




B - 


Big 


E - 


Normal ears 


L - 


Little 


N - 


No ears 


S - 


Pointy 


Hair 




A - 


Afro 


B - 


Boy's 


C - 


Curly 


D - 


Dutch boy 


H - 


Hair 


1 - 


Curly infant 


L - 


Long 


M - 


Middle part 


N - 


No hair 


0 - 


Old fringe 


P - 


Pony tail 


R - 


Red fringe 


S - 


Girl's short 


W - 


Widow's peak 


Eyes 




B - 


Big 


C - 


Closed 


E - 


Open eyes 


1 - 


Little 


L - 


Eyes with 




lashes 


M - 


Mad 


0 - 


Sleepy open 


s - 


Surprised 


T - 


Tired 



Eyebrows 

A - Arched 

B - Bushy 

C - Clown 

I - Infant 

M - Mad 

N - None 

Q - Quizzical 

S - Surprised' 

T - Tilted 

Mouth 

B - Big 

C - Clown 

H - Happy 

I - Infant rosebud 

L - Lipstick 

M - Straight mouth 

0 - Open 
S - Sad 
T - Teeth 

V - Vampire 

Nose 

C - Clown 

1 - Infant 
N - Narrow 
P - Pug 

S - Straight 

W - Wide 

Accessories 

B - Beard 

C - Cheeks 

E - Earrings 

F - Frown 

G - Glasses 

H - Hat 

M - Mustache 

N - Neckline 

R - Hair bow 

S - Shirt 

T - Bow tie 

V - Vampire's cape 



October 1986 



THE RAINBOW 49 



Next to your Tandy* or 





nothing beats a 



High-quality printers — at 
hard-to-beat prices! 

Now that you have the 
home or office computer you 
wanted, get the printer you 
need. A Tandy printer! 

Tandy printers are designed 
to give you exceptional print 
quality graphics and high 
performance — all at afford- 
able prices. Your nearby Radio 
Shack Computer Center has a 
complete line of printers, from 
high-speed dot matrix to 
letter-quality daisy wheels. 
There's sure to be one that 
will suit your particular print- 
ing requirements — and 
budget — to a tee. 



Budget-priced high 
performer 

The DMP 105 (26-1276, 
$199.95) is the low-cost solu- 
tion for data-processing and 
general-purpose use. The 
DMP 105 features a bidirec- 
tional head that prints 80 
characters per line at 43 lines 
per minute (10 cpi). Elon- 
gated and condensed modes 
are also available. Prints up to 
80 characters per second. Par- 
allel and Color Computer- 
compatible serial interfaces. 

Triple -mode "personal 
printer" 

The low-cost, versatile 
DMP 130 (26-1280, $349.95) 



features word-processing and 
data-processing, as well as 
dot-addressable graphics 
modes. You can choose from 
four character styles: standard 
or italic cursive, in draft or 
correspondence modes. The 
DMP 130 supports super/ 
subscripts, double-width, 
bold, double-strike and micro- 
fonts. The bidirectional, logic- 
seeking print head prints 
original, plus two copies on 4" 
to 10" fanfold paper or single 
sheets. Prints up to 100 char- 
acters per second. Built-in 
tractor. Parallel and Color 
Computer-compatible serial 
interfaces. IBM® PC 
compatible. 



POcompatible computer, 




Tandy printer* 



Low-cost business printer 

The DMP 430 (26-1277, 
$699.00) is a dot-matrix 
printer with an 1 8- wire print 
head that delivers superior 
correspondence fonts in a sin- 
gle pass. Prints 10, 12, or 16.7 
cpi, plus elongated, standard, 
elite and condensed. You can 
also get micro, italic and 
double-high fonts. Prints origi- 
nal, plus two copies at 180 
characters per second. IBM 
PC compatible. 

Power for business 

Get high speed and high 
performance with our finest 
printer, the DMP 2200 
(26-1279, $1695.00). Efficient, 



fast printing means no long 
and costly delays for reports. 
Supports elongated, double- 
high, bold, underline, super/ 
subscripts, italics and 
double-strike modes, plus bit- 
image graphics. Prints up to 
380 characters per second. 
Features a true pin-driven 
tractor — not sprocket. Prints 
original, plus up to six copies. 
Parallel interface only. IBM 
PC compatible. 

In Business . . . 
for Business 

For the best value and se- 
lection in printers, shop Radio 
Shack. We've got the right 
match for your machine! 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store' 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



I 
I 



Send me an RSC-17 Computer Catalog. 

Mail to: Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-704 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth .Texas 76102 



I 



Name 



Company 



I 



Address 
City 



State 
ZIP. 



Phone 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and at participating 
stores and dealers. The DMP 430 may require special order 
IBM/Registered TM international Business Machines Corp. 



After your picture is the way you 
want it, press the *@' key and type in a 
name across the bottom of the screen. 
If the name is five or six characters long, 
it will be centered. Push the left-arrow 
key to allow for more letters. A tone 
sounds when the left margin is reached. 
Pressing the *@' key erases the name. 

You can clear the screen at any time, 



and once ears are selected, the features 
can be changed by pushing the up- 
arrow. Repeatedly pressing the up- 
arrow erases previous features in turn, 
except the face shape. Accessories 
cannot be erased, but if you have started 
accessories and decide you want to 
change a feature, the up-arrow takes 
you back through. After typing the 



name, the up-arrow takes you back to 
accessories, although the box in the 
corner does not reappear. 

After enjoying your picture, clear the 
screen and begin again. 

(Questions may be directed to the 
author at 874 Maine Road, Key West, 
FL 33040, 305-296-6019. Please enclose 
an SASE when writing.) □ 



150 


161 


1640 


153 


260 


. 169 


1810 


, 94 


420 


. 49 


1960 


.162 


560 


189 


2120 


213 


770 


64 


2260 


105 


930 


154 


2460 


227 


1040 


103 


2570 


142 


1130 


122 


2690 


. 30 


1340 


213 


2770 


194 


1450 . 


191 


END 


....14 



The listing: DRflWFACE 

10 1 DRAW A FACE 

20 1 BY ANN B. MAYEUX 

30 • KEY WEST, FL 

40 Z$=" ":U$=" < A > TO CH 

ANGE ":Y$=" <CLEAR> TO CLEAR 
SCREEN" 
50 ' *SHAPE 

60 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1 , 1 : MG$=" 
BM5,0R245D190L245U190R200D40R45" 
: DRAWMG$ 

70 DRAW"BM20,20U10R5F2D6G2L5BR13 
U10R6F2DG2L6R5F3D2BR6U6E4F4DNL8D 
5BR7NU10E4NUF4NU10BR20U6E4F4DNL8 
D5BR20U10NR7D5NR5D5BR13U6E4F4DNL 
8D5BR15BU2G2L4H2U6E2R4NF2BR9NR7D 
5NR5D5R7":GOTO90 

80 LINE (209,3)-(248,38) , PRESET, B 
F : RETURN 

90 DRAW"BM210,9R3U3L3U3R3 ;BR4D6U 
3R4U3D6;BR4U4E2F2DNL4D3 ;BR4U6R4D 
3L4D3 ;BR8U6R3BD3L3D3R3" : CIRCLE (2 
26,20) ,10, , .8, .41, .1:DRAW"BM218, 
24F3D4F3R5E3U4E2U" 

100 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN100 ELS 
E LINE(10, 10) -(200, 30) , PRESET, BF 
110 IFA$="C"THENF=1:GOTO230 
120 IFA$="O"THENF=2:GOTO270 
130 IFA$="L"THENF=3 :GOTO240 
140 IFA$="R"THENF=4 :GOTO250 
150 IFA$="S"THENF«5:GOTO260 
160 IFA$="B"THENF=6:GOTO220 
170 IFA$="/"THEN200 
180 GOTO100 

190 ON F GOTO230,270,240,250,260 



,220 

200 CLS:SCREEN0,0:PRINT@74, "SHAP 
E" : PRINT : PRINTZ$+"<B> BABY" : PRIN 
TZ $+ " <C> CADAVEROUS " : PRINTZ $+ " <L 
> LONG" : PRINTZ $+"<0> OVAL" : PRINT 
Z$+"<R> ROUND": PRINT Z$+"<S> SQUA 
RE" 

210 IFINKEY$=""THEN210 ELSESCREE 
Nl,l:GOTO100 

220 CIRCLE(121,73) ,49, , .8, .42, .1 
: CIRCLE (96, 106) , 21, , 1, . 32 , . 61: CI 
RCLE(146,106) ,21, ,1, .89, .2:CIRCL 
E (121, 123) ,19, ,1, .13, .37:DRAW"BM 
90 , 124M110 , 135BR22M153 , 123" :GOTO 
290 

230 CIRCLE (120, 76) ,47, ,1, .4, .12: 
DRAW"BM87,102D20F20R28E20U20":GO 
TO290 

240 CIRCLE (120, 85) ,43, ,1.5, .95, . 
6: CIRCLE (120, 67) ,41, ,1, .5,0: GOTO 
290 

250 CIRCLE (120, 82) ,51, ,1, .3, .2:C 
IRCLE(122,119) ,20, ,1, .1, .41: GOTO 
290 

260 CIRCLE (120, 60) ,47, , .65, .48, . 
02: CIRCLE (120, 120) ,35,,.6,0,.5:D 
RAW"BM167 , 62M154 , 120BL68M74 , 62 " : 
GOTO 2 90 

270 CIRCLE (120, 80) ,48, ,1.1, .45, . 
05: CIRCLE (120, 119) ,30,,.9,.1,.4: 
DRAW"BM167 , 94M143 , 13 6BL45M74 , 94 " 
280 1 *EARS 

290 GOSUB80:DRAW"C8BM215,17U6R4B 
D3L4D3R4 ; BR4U6R3D3NL3D3 ;BR4U6R4D 
3L4RF3 ;BR4R3U3L3U3R3BM232 , 27E2RF 
2D3G2LH2BL11G2LH2U3E2RF2" 
300 R$="R2E2R3F2D14G4L3H4" : L$="G 
4L3H4U14E2R3F2R2" : B$="R2E3R4F5D1 
4G4L7H6U2" : I$="D2G6L7H4U14E5R5F3 
R2 " 

310 S$="R5E10D25G8L4H8":P$="G8L4 

H8U25F10R5":RB$="RE3R4F3D8G3L4H3 

":LB$="LH3L4G3D8F3R4E3" 

320 IFQ=1THENIFE=0THEN630ELSE ON 

E GOTO440,530,580,490 
330 Q=0:A$=INKEY$ 
340 IFA$="E"THENE=1:GOTO440 
350 IFA$="S"THENE=2:GOTO530 



52 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



360 IFA$="B"THENE=3:GOTO580 

370 IFA$="L"THENE=4:GOTO490 

380 IFA$="N"THEN630 

390 IFA$=CHR$(12)THENRUN 

400 IFA$="/"THEN420 

410 GOTO 3 30 

420 CLS:SCREEN0,0: PRINT @74, "EARS 
" : PRINT : PRINTZ$+"<B> BIG" : PRINTZ 
$+"<E> NORMAL": PRINTZ $+"<L> LITT 
LE " : PRINTZ $+ "<N> NONE" : PRINTZ $+ " 
<S> POINTY SPOCK":PRINT§448,Y$ 
430 IFINKEY$=" "THEN4 3 0 ELSESCREE 
N1,1:GOTO330 

440 IFF=10RF=6THENDRAW"BM164,83X 
R$;BL83XL$;" 

450 IFF=2THENDRAW"BM166,84XR$;BL 
87XL$;" 

460 IFF=30RF=5THENDRAW"BM161,85X 

R$;BL77XL$;" 

470 IFF=4THENDRAW" BM1 6 9 , 82XR$ ; BL 
93XL$;" 

480 IFQ=2THEN290ELSE630 

490 IFF=10RF=20RF=6THENDRAW"BM78 

, 87XLB$ ; BM163 , 87XRB$ ; " 

500 IFF=3ORF=5THENDRAW"BM81,90XL 

B$;BM159,90XRB$;" 

510 IFF=4THENDRAW" BM75 , 90XLB$ ;BM 

165,90XRB$;" 

520 IFQ=2THEN290ELSE630 

530 IFF=10RF=5THENDRAW"BM162,86X 

S$;BL73XP$;" ' 

540 IFF=20RF=6THENDRAW"BM165,84X 

S$;BL79XP$;" 

550 IFF=3THENDRAW"BM162 , 83XS$ ; BL 
73XP$ ; " 

560 IFF=4THENDRAW"BM169 , 80XS$ ; BL 
87XP$ ; 11 

57^ IFQ=2THEN290ELSE630 

580 IFF=10RF=6THENDRAW"BM164,83X 

B$;BL80XI$;" 

590 IFF=2THENDRAW"BM166,85XB$;BL 
86X1$;" 

600 IFF=30RF=5THENDRAW"BM161,87X 
B$;BL75XI$;" 

610 I FF=4 THENDRAW " BM1 6 9 , 82XB$ ;BL 
90X1$;" 

620 IFQ=2THEN2 90 

630 IFF=4THEN640ELSEDRAW"BM149,1 

27D20F20BL97E20U20":GOTO650 

640 DRAWBM150, 121D15F20BL100E20 

U15" 

650 GOSUB80:DRAW"BM216,16U6D3R4U 

3D6BR4U6R4D3NL4D3BR4NU6BR4U6R4D3 

L4RF3 ;BM218,30U6E3R12F3D6L2U2H2L 

10G2D2L2" 

660 ' *HAIR 

670 A$=INKEY$ 

680 IFA$="A"THEN1020 

69J3 IFA$="B"THEN940 



700 IFA$=»"C"THEN1080 

710 IFA$="D"THEN1130 

720 IFA$="H"THEN1060 

730 IFA$="I"THEN980 

740 IFA$="L"THEN1040 

750 IFA$="M"THEN1010 

760 IFA$="N"THENB=1:GOTO1150 

770 IFA$="O"THEN1110 

780 IFA$="P"THEN920 

790 IFA$="R"THEN1120 

800 IFA$="S"THEN990 

81p IFA$="W"THEN970 

820 IFA$="/"THEN860 

830 IFA$=CHR$(12)THENRUN 

840 IFA$=CHR$ (94) THEN890 

850 GOTO670 




860 CLS:SCREEN0,0:PRINT@74, "HAIR 
": PRINT: PRINT "<A> AFRO <L 

> LONG <B> BOYS <M 

> MIDDLE PART <C> CURLY <N 

> NONE <D> DUTCH BOY <0 

> OLD FRINGE <H> STRAIGHT <P 

> PONY TAIL" 

870 PRINT" <I> INFANT <R> RE 

D FRINGE <S> SHORT GIRLS <W> WI 
DOW'S PEAK" :PRINT@ 416, U$+" EARS": 
PRINTY$ 

880 IFINKEY$=" "THEN8 80ELSESCREEN 
1,1:GOTO670 

890 DRAW"C5M+0,0":Q=2:ON E G0TO4 

40,530,580,490 

900 GOTO330 

910 IFINKEY$=""THEN910 ELSESCREE 
N1,1:GOTO670 

920 P$="E9R12F9D20F3E5D10G6L7H7U 
13H4L8" :O$="H9L12G9D20G3H5D10F6R 
7E7U13E4R8" 

930 IFF=3ORF=5THENDRAW"BM160, 74X 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 53 



P$ ;BL85BU10XO$ ; "ELSEDRAW"BM165 , 7 

0XP$;BL95BU10XO$;" 

940 CIRCLE(96,6) ,68, ,1, .15, .25:D 

RAWBM163 , 83L6U6H5L3H10U8BD20BL4 

5L6G3D6L6" 

950 IFF=20RF=4THENDRAW"BM169,83L 

9BL80L9" 

960 GOTO1150 

970 DRAW"BM163 , 83L5U13H12L11G15H 

15L11G12D13L5" :GOTO950 

980 HR$="R8F4D4G3R8E4U5H3":DRAW" 

BM75 , 8 6F3R7E2U4GL3H3U3E7R3XHR$ ; X 

HR$;XHR$;R9F5D10G2L3H2D4F3R5E6": 

GOTO950 

990 CIRCLE (90, 94) ,10, ,2, .2, .65:C 
IRCLE(150,94) ,10, ,2, .85, .4:DRAW" 
BM70,108E9BR80F9" 

1000 CIRCLE (80, 108) ,13, , .9,0, .55 
: CIRCLE (160, 108) , 13 , , . 9 , . 95 , . 5 : G 
OTO940 

1010 CIRCLE(92,34) ,33, ,1, .1, .35: 
CIRCLE (145, 32) ,33, ,1, .15, .4:G0T0 
1150 

1020 B=l:FORH=98T0146STEP6:CIRCL 
E(H,41) ,8:CIRCLE(H,36) ,8:NEXTH:F 
ORH=108TO132STEP6:CIRCLE(H,50) ,8 
: NEXTH 

1030 CIRCLE (88, 43) , 8 : CIRCLE (152 , 
43) ,8:CIRCLE(85,48) , 8 : CIRCLE (156 
, 48) , 8 : FORV=53TO70STEP5 : CIRCLE (8 
0 , V) , 8 : CIRCLE ( 162 , V) , 8 : NEXTV : GOT 
01150 :REMCIRCLE( 8 1,58) ,8:CIRCLE( 
161,58) ,8 :GOTO760 

1040 CIRCLE (40, 139) ,22, ,1.2,0, .3 
: CIRCLE (200, 139) , 22 , , 1 . 2 , . 2 , . 5 
1050 CIRCLE (120, 105) ,66, ,1.4, .45 
, .07 : DRAW"BM206 , 162G5L30BL99L30H 
5":GOTO940 

1060 CIRCLE (122, 112) ,70, , .5, .65, 
. 85 : I FF= 1THEN DRAW " BM 166 , 84L6" 
1070 GOTO950 

1080 B=l:FORH=91T0152STEP8:FORV= 
37T054STEP8 : CIRCLE (H,V) , 11: NEXTV 
: NEXTH :FORH=100TO140STEP8: CIRCLE 
(H,30) ,11, ,1, .5,0:NEXTH 
1090 CIRCLE (88 , 62 ) , 11 : CIRCLE ( 151 
,62) ,11: CIRCLE (96, 62) ,8:CIRCLE(1 
43,62) ,8 

1100 FORV=50TO105STEP8: CIRCLE (79 
,V) , 11: CIRCLE ( 160, V) , 10: NEXTV :F0 
RV=69T099STEP8 : CIRCLE (72 , V) , 12 : C 
IRCLE(169,V) ,12: NEXTV: GOTO1150 
1110 B=1:DRAW"BM164,85L9H4U4E4R9 
BL85R9F4D4G4L9":GOTO1150 
1120 B=1:FORH=73TO90STEP5:FORV=7 
0TO75STEP3 : CIRCLE (H, V) , 7 : CIRCLE ( 
2 40 -H , V) , 7 : NEXTV : NEXTH : CIRCLE ( 8 0 
,65) ,7:CIRCLE(160,65) ,7:GOTO1150 
1130 IFF=4THENDRAW"BM74 , 73F5R79E 



9"ELSEDRAW"BM77 / 73F5R73E9" 
1140 • *EYES 

1150 GOSUB80:DRAW"BM215,16U6R3BD 

3L3D3R3BR8U3NH3E3BR4D6R3BU3L3U3R 

3BR7L3D3R3D3L3 ;BM216, 29E3R3F3BR6 

E3R3F3BL4C6UBL13DC8" 

1160 A$=INKEY$ 

1170 IFA$="B"THEN1400 

1180 IFA$="C"THEN1390 

1190 IFA$="E"THEN1370 

1200 IFA$="I"THEN1380 

1210 IFA$="L"THEN1360 

1220 IFA$="M"THEN1340 

1230 IFAS="O"THEN1410 

1240 IFA$="S"THEN1420 

1250 IFA$="T"THEN1350 

12 60 IFA$=CHR$ ( 12 ) THENRUN 
1270 IFA$=»/"THEN1300 

1280 IFA$=CHR$(94)THEN13 30 
1290 GOTO1160 

1300 CLS : SCREEN0 , 0 : PRINT@42 , "EYE 
S" : PRINT: PRINTZ$+"<B> BIG" : PRINT 
Z$+»<C> CLOSED" :PRINTZ$+"<E> OPE 
N" : PRINTZ$+"<I> LITTLE" : PRINTZ$+ 
"<L> EYES WITH LASHES" :PRINTZ$+" 
<M> MAD":PRINTZ$+"<0> SLEEPY OPE 
N" :PRINTZ$+"<S> SURPRISED" : PRINT 
Z$+"<T> TIRED" 

1310 PRINT@416,U$+"HAIR":PRINTY$ 

1320 IFINKEY$=""THEN1320 ELSESCR 

EEN1,1:GOTO1160 

1330 PCLS:DRAWMG$:Q=l:GOTO190 

1340 DRAW"BM97,89R7C6D6U6C8F6BR2 

0E6C6D6U6C8R7" :GOTO1450 

1350 V$="FR9EBG3NL6BE3":DRAW"C6B 

M99,95XV$;BR21XV$;C8»:GOTO1410 

1360 DRAW"BM96,88F3E2R2H3F3R5H3B 

R32G3R5E2G3R3F2E2" 

1370 E$="E4R3C6D5U5C8R3F5" : DRAW" 

BM98 , 92XE$ ;BR15XE$ ; " : GOTO1450 

1380 E$="E3R2C6D5HU2R2D2LU4R3C8F 

3G2L6H2" : DRAWBM98 , 93XE$ ;BR30XE$ 

;":GOTO1450 

1390 CIRCLE (102, 89) , 13 , , . 7 , . 1, . 4 
: CIRCLE (138, 89) , 13 , , . 7 , . 1, . 4 : GOT 
01450 

1400 B$="H3U5E3R3F3D5G3L3C6U2H1U 
2E1R2F1D2G1L2C8D2" : DRAW"BM102 , 97 
XB$ ; BR34XB$ ; " : GOTO1450 
1410 CIRCLE (104, 91) , 5 : CIRCLE ( 136 
, 9 1 ) , 5 : CIRCLE ( 10 4 , 9 1 ) , 3 , 6 : CIRCLE 
(136,91) ,3, 6: CIRCLE (104, 97) ,13, , 
.8, .6, .9 :CIRCLE( 136,97) , 13 , , .8, . 
6, .9:GOTO1450 

1420 CIRCLE (104, 91) ,5, 6: CIRCLE (1 
36,91) ,5, 6: CIRCLE (104, 91) ,2,7:CI 
RCLE(136,91) ,2,7 

1430 CIRCLE (104, 92) ,9, ,1, .5,0:CI 
RCLE(136,92) ,9, ,1, .5,0 



54 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



14 40 «*EYEBROWS 

1450 GOSUB80:DRAW"C8BM213,19U8R2 

F2G2NLF2G2L2BR8U8R3FD2GL3RF3DBR4 

U8R4D8L4BR8BU8D6F2E2NU3F2E2U6BM2 

18 , 2 9E2R3 FBR6ER3 F2 " 

1460 Q=0:DRAW"C8":A$=INKEY$ 

1470 IFA$=CHR$ ( 12 ) THENRUN 



1480 IFA$= 
1490 IFA$= 
1500 IFA$= 
1510 IFA$= 
1520 IFA$= 
1530 IFA$= 
1540 IFA$= 
1550 IFA$= 
1560 IFA$= 



'B"THENY=1 
'S"THENY=2 
'I"THENY=8 
«M"THENY=3 
'N"THENY=9 
■Q"THENY=4 
'A"THENY=5 
'T"THENY=6 



GOTO1700 
GOTO1660 
GOTO1670 
GOTO1690 
GOTO1730 
GOTO1710 
GOTO1680 
GOTO1640 
GOTO1650 



"C"THENY=7 
1570 IFA$=CHR$(94)THEN1630 
1580 IFA$="/"THEN1600 
1590 GOTO1460 

1600 CLS:SCREEN0,0:PRINT@42 , "EYE 
BROWS" : PRINT : PRINT Z$+»<A> ARCHED 
" : PRINTZ $+ " <B> BUSHY " : PRINTZ $+ " < 
C> CLOWN" :PRINTZ$+"<I> INFANT" :P 
RINTZ$+"<M> MAD" : PRINTZ$+"<N> NO 
NE" : PRINTZ$+"<Q> QUIZZICAL" : PRIN 
TZ$+"<S> SURPRISED" : PRINTZ$+"<T> 
TILTED" 

1610 PRINT@4 16 , U$+"EYES " : PRINTY$ 





1620 IFINKEY$=" "THEN1620ELSESCRE 
EN1,1:GOTO1460 

1630 LINE (88 , 84)-( 150/99) , PRESET 
,BF:GOTO1150 

1640 DRAW"BM90,90E8R5BR33R5F8" :G 
OTO1730 

1650 DRAW"C7BM94 / 89E9ND5F9BR17E9 
ND5F9C8" :GOTO1730 

1660 CIRCLE (102 ,90) , 12 , , 1 . 1 , . 6, . 
9: CIRCLE (138, 90) ,12,,1.1,.6,.9:G 
OTO1730 

1670 DRAW"BM98, 85R11BR20R11" :GOT 
01730 

1680 DRAW"BM94,90E7R8F3BR17E3R8F 



7":GOTO1730 

1690 DRAW"BM100,81R7F9BR9E9R7":G 
OTO1730 

1700 DRAW"BM94,87E4R17FL18GR17BR 

12R17HL18ER17F4":GOTO1730 

1710 DRAW"BM94,82E4R11F3BD5BR17E 

3R13F4":GOTO1730 

1720 '*MOUTH 

1730 IFQ=2THEN1450ELSEGOSUB80:DR 

AW"BM209 , 17U6F2E2D6BR4U6R4D6L4BR 

8NU6R4U6BR4R4L2D6BR6U6D3R4U3D6;B 

M2 2 3 , 2 8 F3NR6FR4E4 " 

1740 A$=INKEY$ 

1750 IFA$="B"THEN2000 

1760 IFA$="C"THEN1960 

1770 IFA$="H"THEN1970 

1780 IFA$="I"THEN1980 

1790 IFA$="L"THEN2030 

1800 IFA$="M"THEN1950 

1810 IFA$="O"THEN2010 

1820 IFA$="S"THEN1990 

1830 IFA$="T"THEN2020 

1840 IFA$="V"THEN1940 

1850 IFA$=CHR$ ( 12 ) THENRUN 

1860 IFA$="/"THEN1890 

1870 IFA$=CHR$ (94)THEN1920 

1880 GOTO1740 

1890 CLS:SCREEN0,0:PRINT@42, "MOU 
TH" : PRINT : PRINT Z$+"<B> BIG" : PRIN 
TZ$+"<C> CLOWN": PRINTZ $+"<H> HAP 
PY" : PRINTZ$+"<I>' INFANT" : PRINTZ $ 
+"<L> LIPSTICK" :PRINTZ$+"<M> STR 
AIGHT" 

1900 PRINTZ$+"<0> OPEN": PRINTZ $+ 

"<S> SAD/MAD" : PRINTZ $+"<T> TEETH 

11 : PRINT Z$+"<V> VAMPIRE" :PRINT@41 

6,U$+"EYEBR0WS" : PRINTY$ 

1910 IFINKEY$=" "THEN1910ELSESCRE 

EN1,1:GOTO1740 

1920 Q=2 :DRAW"C5" :0N Y GOTO1700, 
1660,1690,1710,1680,1640,1930,16 
70,1450 

1930 IFY=7THENDRAW"BM94 , 89E9ND5F 
9BR17E9ND5F9":GOTO1450ELSEGOTO14 
50 

1940 DRAW"C7BM107,120R26L5D7H2U5 

L12D5G2U7C8":GOTO2060 

1950 DRAW"C7BM110, 118R20BG3L12C8 

":GOTO2060 

1960 CIRCLE (120, 114) ,24,7, .7, .01 
, .49: CIRCLE (120 ,113) ,9,7, .7, .05, 
. 45 : DRAW"C7BM96 , 115U3E4R9F5BR14E 
4R9F4D3C8": PAINT (120, 129) ,8,7 
1970 CIRCLE (120, 115) ,16,7, .5, .05 
, .45:GOTO2060 

1980 DRAW"C7BM112 / 121RE3UERF2E2R 
FDF3NRG3L8H3BR6R3C8" :GOTO2060 
1990 CIRCLE (120, 120) ,13,7, .3, .5, 
.99:GOTO2060 . 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 55 



2000 DRAW"C7BM107,120E5R16F5G4L1 

8H4R26C8" :GOTO2060 

2010 CIRCLE (120, 119) ,8,7: GOTO206 

2020 DRAW"C7BM105,118F9R12E9L30R 
10C8D4R5U4D4R5U4":GOTO2060 
2030 CIRCLE (121, 119) ,11,7, .5, ,08 
, .47: CIRCLE (121, 119) ,13,7, .7, .08 
, .47 

2040 DRAW"C7BM108,119R10F2E2R10L 

2H3L4G3H3L4G3L2C8" 

2050 '*N0SE 

2060 GOSUB80:DRAW"BM213,15U6F6U6 

BR4R4D6L4U6BR12L4D3R4D3L4BR8U6R3 

BD3L3D3R3BM227,27D4G2R6H2U4" 

2070 A$=INKEY$ 

2080 IFA$=CHR$(12)THENRUN 

2090 IFA$="S"THEN2210 

2100 IFA$="W"THEN2200 





2110 IFA$="C"THEN2230 

2120 IFA$="I"THEN PSET ( 117 , 109) : 

PSET(123,109) :GOTO2260 

2130 IFA$="N"THEN2240 

2140 IFA$="P"THEN2220 

2150 IFA$="/"THEN2180 

2160 IFA$=CHR$(94)THENPAINT(120, 

125) ,5, 5: LINE (105, 110) -(135, 127) 

, PRESET , BF : G0T017 3 0 

2170 GOTO2070 

2180 CLS : S CREEN0 , 0 : PRINT @ 7 4 , » NOS 
E" : PRINT : PRINTZ$+"<C> CLOWN" : PRI 
NTZ$+"<I> INFANT" :PRINTZ$+"<N> N 
ARROW" : PRINTZ $+" <P> PUG" : PRINTZ $ 
+"<S> STRAIGHT" : PRINTZ $+"<W> WID 
E" : PRINT§416 ,U$+ "MOUTH" : PRINTY$ 
2190 IFINKEY$=""THEN2190 ELSESCR 
EEN1,1:GOTO2070 

2200 DRAW"BM112,110U2E2R2FNU4BE2 



R5BF2NU4ER2F2D2BL5LBL7L":GOT0226 
0 

2210 DRAW"BM120,95D12BF3R2BL8L2" 
:GOTO22 60 

2220 DRAW"BM124 , 107F3BL4LBL4LBL3 
E3" SGOTO2260 

2230 CIRCLE ( 120, 104 ) ,8, 7: PAINT (1 

20,105) ,7,7:GOTO2260 

2240 DRAW"BM118,95D10G2D4E1R1F1R 

2E1R1F1U4H2U10" 

2250 '*ETC. 

2260 GOSUB80:DRAW"BM218,20U6R4BD 
3L4D3R4BR6U6L2R4BR4NR4D6R4BR4RUL 



ii 



2270 A$=INKEY$ 

2280 IFA$="B"THEN2500 

2290 IFA$="C"THEN2480 

2300 IFA$="E"THEN2580 

2310 IFA$="H"THEN2490 

2320 IFA$="S"THEN2520 

2330 IFA$="R"THEN2530 

2340 IFA$="G"THEN2540 

2350 IFA$="M"THEN2550 

2360 IFA$="N"THEN2560 

2370 IFA$="F"THEN2590 

2380 IFA$="T"THEN2600 

2390 IFA$="V"THEN2610 

2400 IFA$=CHR$(12)THENRUN 

2410 IFA$="@"THEN2620 

2420 IFA$="/"THEN2450 

2430 IFA$=CHR$ (94) THENLINE (110,1 

12) -(130, 95) , PRESET, BF:GOTO2060 

2440 GOTO2270 

2450 CLS :SCREEN0,0: PRINT § 10, "ACC 
ESSORIES" : PRINT: PRINT" <B> BEARD 

<M> MUSTACHE <C> CHEEK 

S <N> NECKLINE <E> EARRI 

NGS <R> HAIR BOW <F> FROWN 

<S> SHIRT <G> GLASS 

ES <T> TIE <H> HAT 

<V> VAMPIRE CAPE" 
2460 PRINT§384,U$+"NOSE" :PRINT"< 
@> STOP DRAWING AND ENTER NAME " 
+Y$ 

2470 IFINKEY$=""THEN2470 ELSE SC 
REEN1 , 1 : G0T02 2 7 0 

2480 DRAW"BM96, 105U3E3R3F3D3G3L3 
H3BR41U3E3R3F3D3G3L3H3" : PAINT (99 
,105) ,8, 8: PAINT (145, 105) ,8, 8: GOT 
02270 

2490 B=l: CIRCLE (120, 55) ,70,7, .26 
, .8, .7:CIRCLE(120,45) ,40,7,1, .45 
, .05: PAINT (120, 50) , 7 , 7 : GOTO2270 
2500 BD$="BM86,76D33F22R24E22U33 
R9D45G30L25H30U45R9" :IFB=1THEN25 
10ELSEPAINT(124,54) ,8,8:REM 



56 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



* BEARD* 

2510 DRAW" C7 XBD$ ;C8 " : PAINT (120,1 
40) ,8 ,7: DRAWBD$ : G0T02 270 
2520 DRAW"BM90,138F30D10U10E30D1 
5G20H10G10H20U15" :GOTO2270 
2530 B=1:DRAW"C6BM116,40H8L10G2D 
18F2R10E8R6F8R10E2U18H2L10G8L6C8 
" : PAINT (116,43) ,6,6: G0T02 270 
2540 CIRCLE (102, 91) , 14 , 7 , . 7 : CIRC 
LE(138,91) ,14,7, . 7 : DRAW"C7BM79 , 8 
0F10BR27R10BR27E10C8":GOTO2270 
2550 DRAW"BM98 , 118E6R32F6H6L4G1L 
18H1" :GOTO2270:REM**MUSTACHE** 
2560 IFF=4THENCIRCLE(120,120) ,40 
, , . 7 , . 1 , .4ELSECIRCLE(120,130) ,40 

: 2570'gOTO2270 

2580 CIRCLE (75, 105) ,5, 6:CIRCLE(1 

69,105) ,5,6:GOTO2270 

2590 DRAW"BM118,82D5BR5U5" :G0T02 

270 

2600 DRAW"BM108,156C6RF7E2R4F2E7 
RD16LH7G2L4H2G7LU16C8 •» : PAINT ( 120 
,163) ,6,6:GOTO2270 
2610 DRAW"C7BM47,167E25H15R30M97 
, 152G15L35BR149H25E15L30M144 , 152 
F15R35C8" : PAINT (82 , 157 ) , 7 , 7 : PAIN 
T ( 148 , 152 ) , 7 , 7 : FORH=99T014 5STEP7 
: CIRCLE (H, 152) , 4 :NEXTH:GOTO2270 
2620 LINE (200,1) -(249, 50) , PRESET 
,BF:LINE(6,185)-(245,170) , PRESET 
,BF 

2630 DRAW»C5BM0 , 185BR85C6" : L=85 
2640 IFL<10THENL=10:SOUND15, l:DR 
AW" BM10 ,185 "ELSEIFL>2 4 0THENSOUND 
l,l:GOTO2820 

2650 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN2650 

2660 IFA$="@"THEN2620 

2670 IFA$=" A "THENDRAW"C8":GOT022 

\U ; 'r 70 ' -.. . 

2680 IFA$=*"A"THENDRAW"M+0 ,0U10E4 
F4D3NL8D7BR9 ll ELSEIFA$="B"THENDRA 
W"M+0,0U14R5F2D2G2L5R6F2D4G2L5BR 
16" 

2690 IFA$="C"THENDRAW"BM+3 ,0H3U8 
E3R2F3BD8G3L2BR13"ELSEIFA$="D"TH 
ENDRAW'M+0 , 0U14R5F3D8G3L5BR17 » 

2700 IFA$="E"THENDRAW"M+0 ,0U14R8 
BD7BL2L6D7R8BR8 "ELSEIFA$="Y" THEN 
DRAW" BM+4 , 0U7H4U3 BR8 D3 G4 D7 BR12 " 
2710 IFA$=»V"THENDRAW»BM+0,-14Dl 
0F4E4U10BD14BR8"ELSEIFA$=»I"THEN 
DRAW"M+0,0R2U14L2R4BD14L2BR9" :L= 
L-4 



2720 IFA$="M"THENDRAW"M+0,0U14F5 

E 5 Dl 4 BR8 " : L=L+ 2 E LS E I F A $= " 0 " THEND 

RAW"BM+3,0H3U8E3R2F3D8G3L2BR13" 

2730 IFA$="L"THENDRAW"NU14R8BR8" 

ELSEIFA$="N"THENDRAW"U14M+8 , 14NU 

14BR6"ELSEIFA$="R"THENDRAW"M+0,0 

U14R6F2D3G2NL6F2D5BR8 " 

2740 IFA$="Z"THENDRAW"M+0,0BU14R 

8D3G8D3R8BR8"ELSEIFA$="T"THENDRA 

W"BM+4,0U14L4R8BD14BR8"ELSEIFA$= 

" H " THENDRAW "M+0,0U14D7R8U7D14 BR8 

27 50 I FA$= " F " THENDRAW" M+0 , 0U1 4 R8 
BD7 BL2 L6 D7BR1 6 " ELSE IFA$=." G" THEND 
RAW"BM+2,0H2U10E2R4F2BD6NL3D4G2L 
4BR14" 

2760 IFA$="J"THENDRAW"BM+3 ,0NH3R 
2E3U11BD14BR8 "ELSEIFA$="K"THENDR 
AW"M+0,0U14BR8G8E4F4D6BR8"ELSEIF 
A$="P»THENDRAW"M+0,0U14R4F3D3G3L 
4D5BR16" 

2770 IFA$="Q"THENDRAW"BM+3 ,0H3U8 
E3R3F3D8G3L3R2BU4F4BR8"ELSEIFA$= 
"S "THENDRAW" BM+0 , -3F3R2E3U2H3L2H 
2U2E2R3F3BD11BR8" 

2780 IFA$="U"THENDRAW"BM+0 , -14D1 
1F3R3E3U11BD14BR8"ELSEIFA$="W"TH 
ENL=L+2 : DRAW" BM+0 , -14D14E5F5NU14 
BR8 " ELS EI FA $= " X " THENDRAW" M+ 8 , - 1 4 
BL8M+8,14BR8" 

2790 IFA$=CHR$ ( 8 ) THENDRAW" BM+0 , 0 
BL17" : L=L-32ELSEIFA$=CHR$ (32) THE 
NDRAW" BM+0 , 0BR17 "ELSEIFA$=CHR$ ( 1 
2 ) THENRUN 

2800 IFA$=". " THENDRAW" BM-2,0RULD 

BR8"ELSEIFA$="/"THEN2860 

2810 L=L+16:GOTO2640 

2820 A$=INKEY$ 

2830 IFA$="@"THEN2620 

2840 IFA$=CHR$( 12) THENRUN 

2850 GOTO2820 

2860 CLS : SCREEN0 ,0 : PRINT@42 , "ENT 
ER NAME": PRINT: PRINT" IF THE NAM 
E IS 4 OR 5 LETTERS LONG, JUST 
TYPE IT IN. IF IT ISLONGER, HIT 
LEFT ARROW ONCE FOR EACH TWO LE 
TTERS MORE THAN 5." 
2870 PRINT: PRINT "<S PACE BAR> WIL 
L ENTER A SPACE. ": PRINT" < A > WIL 
L TAKE YOU BACK TO ACCESSOR 
IES.":PRINTY$ 

2880 IFINKEY$= S ""THEN2880ELSESCRE 
EN1,1:GOTO2650 ^ 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 57 



GRAPHICS 







7 




By Darin Herr 

58 THE RAINBOW October 19B6 



Use this high resolution graphics 

editor and let your imagination run wild! 



Co Co Draw is a user-friendly, 
high resolution (PMDDE 4) 
graphics editor. It has the 
usual LINE, CIRCLE, BOX, etc., func- 
tions, plus a full character set (for 
adding text to pictures), an UNDO 
command and even a Magnify mode for 
detailed editing. Co Co Draw requires 
32K, Extended BASIC and one joystick 
(a mouse or touchpad should also 
work). As listed, it requires a disk drive, 
but it also works with a cassette system 
using the modifications listed at the end 
of this article. A printer is optional. 

Type in both listings (CoCoDraw and 
MenuGen) exactly as they appear and 
save them to disk. (Do not add any 
extra spaces to CoCoDraw, as it hardly 
fits in the available memory as it is!) 
Lines 10000 and 12000 to 12080 are the 
same in both programs, so you do not 
have to type them in twice. 

Run MenuGen first. This program 
generates a file (MENUS.SYS) which is 
loaded and used every time CoCoDraw 
is run. Make sure that each disk with 
CoCoDraw on it also contains MEN- 
US.SYS. Now run CoCoDraw, and you 
are ready to start. 

When CoCoDraw is run, it initializes 
itself and asks if you want to use the 
speed up POKE (POKE 65495,0). Move 
the joystick left or right to select "yes" 
or "no" and press the button on the 
joystick when the one wanted is under- 
lined > 

The main menu is on the top quarter 
of the screen. The rest of the screen is 
the editing area. A little pointer should 
be blinking somewhere on the screen. In 
the upper-left section of the menu are 
14 boxes, each containing an icon (a 
little picture symbolizing what it does). 



Darin Herr is a sophomore at Lancaster 
Mennonite High School in Ephrata, 
Pennsylvania and a self-taught pro- 
grammer. Besides computing, he enjoys 
tennis, biking and stamp collecting. 



These are called tools and are what you 
use to create the picture. 

To the right of the tools are two larger 
boxes labeled "Color" and "Back- 
ground." These show the current fore- 
ground and background colors (or 
patterns). Below the tools and colors are 
four words: File, Size, Misc and Undo. 
Each of these (except Undo) triggers a 
pull-down menu that allows you to do 
things like save, load and print pictures. 

The pointer can be moved aroun<f the 
screen using the right joystick. How- 
ever, because the joystick's resolution is 
smaller than the screen's, the pointer 
can only be positioned to the nearest 
four dots horizontally and three dots 
vertically. To compensate for this, the 
arrow keys can be used to move the 
pointer as many as three dots to the 
right of the joystick position and two 
dots below it. This is limited, but with 
some practice you should be able to 
place the pointer on any dot on the 
screen. When part of the pointer is off 
the right side of the screen, it becomes 
distorted. When this happens, the 
upper-left corner of the distortion is the 
current point. 

To select a command from the main 
menu, simply position the tip of the 
pointer over the desired option and 
press the joystick button. 

The Tools 

When a tool is selected, its icon 
changes colors to let you know what 
you are working with. Here is how to 
use each tool: 

Draw (pencil with point down) — 
Leaves a line after the pointer when the 
button is held down. 

Erase (pencil with eraser down) — 
When this is selected, the pointer 
changes to a block eight by eight dots 
in size. Whenever the button is pressed, 
the area behind the block changes to the 
background color. The eraser can be 
made smaller using the Size pull-down 
menu. More on that later. 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 59 




s Battle the 

st of Disk Drives 



New Lower Price 

Un-DISK Drives $4&95? 

$34.95 

You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



Un-DISK uses your computer's extra 
memory like a fast disk drive. 

Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs. 

Un-DISK is INVISIBLE. Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VDOS. 

Un-DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

Un-DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all.., 

Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

Un-DISK should be in the library of every 
serious CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J. Esser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 



OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited, the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if yoCTaTready own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk. 

EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . 
Additional Power For $14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK! 

• VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5, 10, 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DISKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• 

• VDUMP can allow you to save a whole lot 
of rainbow on tape in a SINGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK. 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally! Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $34.95 

The Preble VDUMP $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U.S. and Canada $1.50 

or $5.00 to other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 
Canadians may order from Kelly Software 



Box (the empty square) — Move the 
pointer to one corner of the box, then 
press and hold the button down while 
moving the opposite corner of the box. 
When you like it, release the button. 

Circle — Position the pointer where 
you want the center of the circle to be, 
then hold, the button down while adjust- 
ing the radius. To adjust the radius, put 
the joystick in the center vertically and 
move it left or right to roughly get the 
radius. Now, keeping the joystick at the 







□ 


o 




T 


\ 




■ 


GET 


PUT 




File Size 



Co Lor 




Background 



M i sc 



Undo 



MRIN MENU RREfl 




EDITING RREfl 



Figure 1: Main Menu 



same place horizontally, move it up or 
down to make fine adjustments. Release 
the button when you have the desired 
radius. 

Paint (a paint can pouring paint) — 
Move the pointer to where you want to 
pour the paint and click the button. You 
can fill in either black or green areas. 

Text (a capital T') — Move the 
pointer to where you want the first 
character to be and click the button. A 
blinking cursor appears and you may 
type any letter (upper- or lowercase), 
number or symbol on the keyboard. 
Press ENTER to exit this mode. The 
foreground color should be a solid color 
(not a pattern) while typing because 
anything else will be unreadable. 

Line — Move the pointer to one end 
of the line, then hold the button down 
while moving the other end. Release the 
button when you like it. 

Ray (several lines coming from the 
same point) — Move the pointer to the 
center point and click the button (do not 
hold it down). Move the end of the first 
ray to where you want it and click again. 
Do the same for as many rays as you 
want, but when doing the last one, hold 
the button down until you hear beeping 
(about two seconds). Now you can start 
another set of rays or select another 
option. 

Solid Box (the solid square) — This 



works the same as Box, but when done, 
the box becomes solid. 

Get — This is used to get an area of 
the screen (up to 64 by 64 dots) to be 
used later with PUT. Move the pointer 
to the upper-left corner of the area to 
be gotten, then press and hold the 
button down. Now move the bottom- 
right corner until you have the size you 
want, and release the button. 

Put — This puts what you got using 
GET. Move the block that you got 

around the screen, and 
whenever you press the 
button it will be put there. 
You can hold the button 
down while moving the 
joystick for some interest- 
ing Tesults. There are five 
PUT modes to choose from: 
Set, Reset, And, Or and 
Not. Set puts it exactly as 
it was gotten; Reset re- 
verses the original colors; 
And puts it without erasing 
what is already there; Or 
puts it, showing what was 
gotten only where there is 
something under it. (And 
and Or are reversed when 
using green or buff on black.) Not 
reverses the colors in an area the same 
size as the area that was gotten. What 
was in the area that was gotten has no 
effect on this mode. How to change the 
PUT Mode will be described later. 

Magnify (a magnifying glass) — 
When this option is selected, a 16-by-16 
dot box appears, replacing the pointer. 
Move this box over the area you want 
magnified, then click the 
button. A new screen ap- 
pears showing the area se- 
lected magnified eight 
times. To make changes to 
the original, move the 
pointer over the magnified 
dot you want to change 
and click the button. Its 
color will be inversed, as 
well as the corresponding 
dot in the Now box, to see 
how the change looks in 
actual size. If you make 
some changes, but then 
decide you liked the origi- 
nal better, move the point- 
er over the box marked 
Cancel, click, and the screen will be 
changed back to the original. When 
satisfied with your changes, move the 
pointer over the box marked Done and 
click. This will take you back to the 
main menu with the change, made. 



Up Arrow — Actually, the editing 
area you see is just 75 percent of the 
entire picture. By clicking the Up Arrow 
you see the top 75 percent of the picture. 

Down Arrow — Shows the bottom 
75 percent of the picture. 

Color — In the Color box is a block 
showing the current color, as well a little 
design to show how it will look when 
used on diagonal lines. To change color, 
move the pointer anywhere in the Color 
box and click. A new screen appears 
with a selection of 256 colors and 
patterns. To select a color, move the 
flashing box over the color wanted and 
click. If you would rather leave the color 
the way it was, press the space bar (even 
while the screen is being drawn) and you 
will return to the main menu. 

Background — Works the same as 
Color, but changes the background 
color, which is used when erasing and 
when clearing the screen. 

Pull-Down Menus 

To use the pull-down menus, move 
the pointer over the word File, Size, or 
Misc and hold the button down. 
Another menu appears below it. Move 
the joystick up and down until the 
selection you want is highlighted, then 
let the button up. 
The File menu includes the following: 
Disk Load / Save — You are asked for 
a filename, and then asked if it is OK. 
If not, you return to the main menu. No 
error trapping is used in the disk I/O, 
so if you get some type of error, just type 
GOTO 700 and press ENTER to return to 
the main menu. 



MAGNIFY 




Before 




Now 



Done 



Cance L 



Figure 2: Magnify Option 



Disk Dir — You are asked for the 
drive number, and the directory of the 
disk in that drive is shown. Press the 
shift and '@* keys together to pause 
the display, and click the joystick but- 
ton to return to the main menu. 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 61 



Prices Change 
Every Day. 
Please Call 
1-800-343-8841 
For Lower Prices 



DEALER 



INQUIRIES 



INVITED 



I PRICE 



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Announcing MEGADISK PLUS + 

Complete Systems! for the TRS 80 Model I/III/IV/4P, Color Computer, IBM-PC & AT, Max/80 
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Drive a 5 to 40 Megabyte Hard Bargain Starting at $399* 95 

REMOVEABLE CARTRIDGE Systems Now Available!!! 



MEGAPLEX your Megadisk — 2 to 10 Port Systems 

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Disk Drive Upgrade Kit for 
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system— no soldering. 
Complete with controller, 
towers, power supply, 1 
Half High Disk Drive, ca- 
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structions. Second Drive 
$89.95 




High Quality Low- 
est Price Drive 0, 1, 
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at $189.95. 



CANADIAN CUSTOMERS PLEASE CALL 514-383-5293 



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TERMS and CONDITIONS: ■ - W ■ \J ■ - % M%0 M Cprvi™»A Returns II isniirnnlirAilnrPrwi 



TERMS and CONDITIONS 

All prices are cash discounted. However, we do 
accept MC. VISA. AMEX & DISCOVER credit cards 
CO D s are accepted-No deposit required. 
Purchase Orders-Corporate. Government & School 
P O. s are accepted. Please call for details. 
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Not responsible for typographical errors. 

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^ ow - 1-617-878-9090 

r Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 am to 5:30 pm (est) Sat 4:00 pm 



Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



Service & Returns: It is our policy to repair all service 
returns within 24-48 hours. Normally same day turn- 
around is accomplished. It is necessary to have a 
(R)eturn (M)aterial (A)uthorization to insure 
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TRS/80, HEATH/ZENITH are registered trademarks 

of IBM Corp.. Tava Corp., Columbia Computer Corp. 

Key Tronics Corp, Compaq Corp. Eagle Computer. 

Tandy Corp. Zenith Corp, respectively. 
1 986 Software Support, Inc. All rights reserved 
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TURBO M " of MicroSmart Inc. 



— 



Tape Load/ Save — Same as disk. 
When saving, make sure the tape re- 
corder is set to Record before saving 
because recording starts right away. 

Screen Dump — I have included a 
routine that does a double-size screen 
dump to the Epson RX-80. Make sure 
the printer is online and the proper 
Baud rate has been set before saying the 
printer is ready. 



The Size menu is used to change the 
eraser size. Just select the size you want 
(8 by 8, 4 by 4, or 1 by 1) and click. 

The Misc menu includes: 
* Clear Screen — Clears the screen, but 
only the editing area being seen. To 
clear the whole picture, you must clear 
the top 75 percent, click the Down 
Arrow, and clear the bottom 75 percent. 

Show Picture — This shows the 



whole picture at one time. Click again 
to get back to the main menu. 

Color Set — Toggles the color set 
between green/ black and buff/ black. 
Use buff to get artifact colors. Green is 
the default. 

Put Modes — Used to change the PUT 
mode. 

Undo has no menu, it simply undoes 
the last operation. 



Initialization 



TABLE 1: Line Description of CoCoDraw 

Data for Character Set (in ASCII Order) 



1-3 


Clear eight graphics pages; print title screen; (the ap- 


12000 


•space' to 
V to 4 9' 




parently unnecessary GOTOs here are to get around the 


12010 




PCLEftR bug in older versions of Extended BASIC) 


12020 


V to •<§>' 


5 


Dimensions and defines variables (see variables list) 


12030 


'A' to *M' 


8 


Reads data for the screen dump routine 


12040 


'N' to '2' 


10 


Sets graphics mode; clears screen 


12050 


ASCII 91 to ASCII 96 


20 


Loads screen containing the menus 


12060 


V to 4 k' 


600 


Gets the menus into arrays 


12070 
12080 


T to 'w' 
V to 'z' 


Check for Selection Front Main Menu 


13000 


Data for screen dump routine 



700 Copies picture to editing area 

710 Puts Main Menu; switches to graphics screen 

720 Asks if you want to use the speed-up POKE 

730-780 Read joystick; check which option was selected 
from main menu and branch to that routine 

Pull-Down Menu Routines 

1000-1900 File Menu routines 

(1700-1710 Screen dump routine) 
2000-20 10 Size Menu routine 
2500-2560 Misc Menu routine 
3000 Undo routine 



Variables 

Numeric 



CS 

FC 

BC 

ES 

PM 

P 



LE = 



Color set 
Foreground color 
Background color 
Eraser size 1 
PUT Mode 
Used to copy 
pages, POKE value, 
etc. 

Max length of 



Color and Background 


input 


3500 


Draws color selection screen 


PN = Page number 


35 10-3530 Select color/ pattern using joystick 


FB * Firebutton status 






X,Y,XX,YY,Xl,Yl=scrn. loc. 


Tools 




S = Menu selection 


4000 


Draw 


A * Misc. variable 


4200 


Erase 


N = Number of op- 


4400 


Box and Box Fill 


tions in pull-down 


4600 


Circle 


menu 1 


4800 


Paint 




5000 


Text 




5200 


Up Arrow 


String 


5400 


Line 


S$ = String to be printed in print routine (10000) 


5600 


Ray 


SP$ = 'Y* if speed-up poke is allowed and 4 N' if not 


5800 


GET 


EX$ * Used as an extension to print routine (see article) 


6000 


PUT 


1$ * InkeyS 


6200 


Magnify 


INS = String that was typed in input routine ( 1 1000) 


6400 


Down Arrow 


FI$ = Filename 



Subroutines 

8000 Copies from picture to editing area 

8200 Copies from editing area to picture 

8500 Puts main menu and fills in colors in main menu 

8800 Selects item from pull-down menus 

9000 Draws pointer and waits for you to press the button 

9200 Like 9400 unless you're in the main menu (see article) 

9400 Reads joystick and returns 

9500 Checks which arrow key was pressed 

9800 Selects Yes or No using the joystick 

10000 Prints a text string on the graphics screen 

1 1000 Inputs a text string from the keyboard 



Arrays 

ME = Main Menu (GP) (GP = GET/PUT array) 

FI = File Menu (GP) 

SI = Size Menu (GP) 

MI * Misc Menu (GP) 

GP * GET and PUT (GP) 

AR = Pointer (GP) 

A = Misc. Array (GP) (Used mainly in joystick input 
routine) 

CHS = Draws strings for character set 

D - Used in screen dump routine 



64 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



Use IHe Brains Your Tandy 

Wasn't born with. 



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Mind-tingling action) 

THE SECOND RAINBOW BOOK OF 




Twenty-four of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
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Order The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and among the 24 program 
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Yellow Submarine — Meet the Beatles and attempt to 
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Ring Quest — Regain possession of a magical ring and 
save a kindom. 

Time Tripper — Lost in another dimension. 



Chief Inspector — Who killed B.L Brown? 

Sir Randolf Returns — The sequel to a favorite from our 

first Adventure book. 

Silverton House — Where's the money been stashed? 
Ice Princess — Just one glance at this beauty will steal 
your heart. 




Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mark Fetherston, Jeff Crow, Larry Lansberry, 
J.C. Jackson, Robert W. Mangum II, Robert Poppe, David Taylor, Gregory Clark, Steve Skrzyniarz, David L. Dawson, Curtis Boyle, 
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The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures sells for only $13.95! 

THREE BONUS PROGRAMS 

WHEN YOU BUY THE SECOND RAINBOW ADVENTURES TAPE! 

That's right. You'll receive a total of 27 fantastic Adventures when you get the Second Rainbow 
Adventures tape. The three bonus games are Castle Thuudo, by Carmen D. Michele; Halls of 
Dungeon Death, by Eric and Mark Riel; and Caves of Kalakh, by Jane Fisher — programs with 
listings too lengthy to include in the book. Save yourself hours of typing listings. Load these great 
Adventures into your computer and run them! 

The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape is only $13.95. 

The tape is an adjunct and complement to the book. Even if you buy the Second Rainbow 
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Keep your Rainbow Bookshelf up-to-date! 
See Page 1 17 for additional Rainbow Bookshelf offerings. 





□ Please send me 
The Second Rainbow 
Book Of Adventures 
for $13.95* 



□ Please send me 
The Second Rainbow 
Adventures Tape 
for $13.95 




The Rainbow Bookshelf™ 



Name 



Address 



City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed.* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number Exp. Date _ 



Signature 



Mail to: The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures, 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S., add $4. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill! 
U.S. currency only, please. 



f It Doesn't Work 

If parts of the main menu or pull- 
lown menus are messed up, the prob- 
em is probably in the MenuGen pro- 
gram. Try proofreading the part of 
MenuGen corresponding to the menu 
vhere the problem is. 

Any other problems are most likely 
n CoCoDraw. Look up the section that 
ioesn't work in the line-by-line descrip- 
ion and proofread those lines. 

How it works 

CoCoDraw uses all eight graphics 
Dages. Pages one to four hold the actual 
Dicture, Page five is the main menu, and 
pages six to eigfyt are the editing area. 
When CoCoDraw is run, it first initial- 
zes itself by defining the variables, 
oading the screen containing main 
menu and the pull-down menus {MEN- 
US. SYS) and getting them into arrays. 
Then it PCOPYs from the picture to the 
editing area, puts the main menu on the 
screen, and goes to a subroutine starting 
at Line 9000 which allows you to move 
the pointer around using the joystick 
until you click the button. 

Next, in lines 740 to 780 it checks to 
see if you were in the menu area when 
you clicked, and if so, it branches to the 
routine selected. That routine then 
takes control until another option is 
selected from the main menu. The 
program is very structured, so it should 
not be too difficult to follow. Here is a 
list of the major subroutines and how 



they are used: 

8000 — Copies pages one to three to 
the editing area if PN=1 or pages two 
to four to the editing area if PN=2. Used 
in Undo and in most of the tools, such 
as in Line to erase the line you are 
making as you move it around. Also 
used to erase a pull-down menu and 
several other places as well. 



8200 — Copies the editing area to 
pages one to three if PN=1 or to pages 
two to four if PN=2. Opposite of 8000. 

8500 — Puts the main menu on the 
screen and fills in the Color and Back- 
ground boxes. 

8800 — This is the routine that allows 
you to select an option from a pull- 
down menu. Returns when you click the 
button. You must give it 'N' (the number 



of items in the menu minus one) and 
4 XX' (the 'X' value of where you want 
the menu to be). It gives you 'S' (the 
number of the item selected, with one 
being at the top). 

9000 — Allows you to move the 
pointer around the screen using the 
joystick. Returns when you click the 
button. Gives you 'X' and fc Y\ the screen 



location of the pointer when the button 
was clicked. It gets 'X' using 
JOYSTK(0)*4+XO. (XO is used to 
allow more detailed movement using 
the arrow keys on the keyboard.) 
Y=JOYSTK(l)*3YO. 

9200 — Checks the location of the 
joystick and the status of the button and 
returns immediately only if the position 
is in the editing area. If the position is 
in the main menu, it draws the pointer 
until you press the button or move into 
the editing area. If you press the button, 
it goes to Line 740 which checks what 
was selected and branches to it. If you 
move into the editing area, it returns. 

9400 — Checks the location of the 
joystick and the status of the button. 
Returns immediately. Gives you 'X' and 
4 Y' (the screen location of the joystick), 
and TB\ which equals 254 (&HFE) if 
the button is pressed. 

9500 — Used by 9400. Checks which 
arrow key is pressed and changes XO 
(X-offset) and YO (Y-offset) accord- 
ingly. Returns immediately. 

9800 — Prints Yes and No on the 
screen starting at location 'X,Y' and lets 
you use the joystick to select one. 
Returns when button is pressed. If A<32 
then the answer is yes. 

10000 — Draws S$ starting at the 
current DRfiUi location, where S$ equals 
any string of text you want printed on 
the graphics screen. It can also use the 
variable EX$. EX$ equals any DRfiW 
string you want inserted between each 





4? 


□ 


o 




T 


\ 




■ 


CET 


PUT 


qJ 


File S i ze 



® 



Co Lor 




M i so 



Undo 



Disk Load 
Disk Save 
Disk Dir 
Tape I 
Tape : 
Screei 



ed by those attending 
est Princeton, 1984 



Disk Save 




F i L ename : 


DEMO 


O.K.? Ves 


No 



ft 



B&U TV 




or 



Figure 3: File Menu 



A dually, the editing area you 
see is just 75 percent of the 
entire picture. By clicking the 
Up Arrow you see the top 75 
percent of the picture. " 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 67 



Modifications 

To make this program work on a non- 
disk system: 

A. Change Line 1000 to: 

1000 GOSUBB200:PUT(0,4B)-(79,1 
23 ) , F I : XX=0 : N=G : GO5UBBB00 : PO 
KE65494 ,0:1 F5=7THEN1900EL5EIF 
5<4THEN700 

B. Change Line 1100 to: 

1100 C5RVEMFI$, 1536,7679,44539 

C. Delete Line 20 

D. Take lines 40 to 520 from MenuGen 
and insert them into CoCoDraw. 
(You can do this because you have 
about 2K more memory than disk 
systems.) 

E. To use, just CLORD and run. 

If you do not have a printer, add GOTO 
700:REM.to Line 1690. If you want to 



use another screen dump routine, delel 
lines 8, 1700, 1710 and 13000, and pi 
your routine in lines 1700 to 1 89S 
Remember to add a GOTO 700 at the en 
of the routine so the program will retur 
to the main menu when the printing i 
done. Check back issues of THE RAW 
BOW for screen dump programs fo 
other printers. 

Special thanks to Daryl Hoover, wh< 
let me use his printer (an Epson RX-80 
to write the screen dump routine in 
eluded with this program. 

If you have any questions or com 
ments about CoCoDraw, I would lib 
to here from you at Rt. #2, Box 223 
Ephrata, PA 17522. Please include ai 
SASE if you want a return reply. C 



character. It is used in this program as 
BL1 to put less space between each 
character. Under normal use, EX$ 
equals the null string (" "). 

11000 — This is the input routine 
used in entering the filename for saving 
and loading and for adding text to your 
picture. You give it 'X' and 4 Y\ the 
screen location to start at; LE, the 
maximum length of the string to be 
input; and KE$, which limits which keys 
will be accepted. If you want all keys to 
be accepted, make KE$ equal to "ALL." 
If you want just 'Y* and *N' allowed, 
make KE$ equal to "YyNn." It gives 
you INS, the string that was input. 
Returns when ENTER is pressed. 

See Table 1 for a line-by-line descrip- 
tion and a variable list. 



^\/7 130 236 

yff 400 ......130 

10000.... 189 

12030.... 226 

| END ... »v.87 

Listing 1 : MENUGEN ^■■■■■^■■■■■■■■■rf 

% 1 MENUGEN , BY DARIN HERR 

1 1 FOR USE WITH COCODRAW VI. 1 

2 GOTO 8 

5 PCLEAR8 : DIMCH$ ( 9J3 ) : FORA=j3TO90 : 
READCH$ (A) : NEXT : GOTO10 
8 PCLEAR8:GOT05 

Ijd PMODE4 , 5 : COLORS , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 
1,J3 ' • M^'W>>' 
4j3 1 ** THE POINTER ** 
5J2) DRAW»BM0,124R3G3U3F4" 
9J3 ' ** THE MAIN MENU ** 

LINE(0,j3)-(255,46) ,PSET,B:FO 
RX=j3TO 1 12 STEP1 6 : LINE (X,j3)-(X,32) 
, PSET : NEXT : LINE ( 1 15 , 1 1 ) - ( 14 7 , 2 9 ) 
, PSET , B : LINE (187., 12) -(251,28) ,PS 
ET, B: LINE (184 , j3) - (184 , 32 ) ,PSET:L 
INE (J3 , 16 ) - ( 112 ,16) , PSET : LINE (J3/3 
2)-(255,32) ,PSET 



At tast - The book exclusively for you and your CoCo !! 
You've learned BASIC and are now ready to learn assembly 
language programming. This hands-on guide begins with 
the basics and progresses to the expert level; 
revealing programming conventions and techniques and 
al I the internal capabilities of the TDP-100, CoCo 1 
and 2. At every step of the way are illustrations, 
sample programs, and plain English explanations. All 
sample programs are shown as assembled with Radio 
Shack's EDTASH+ cartridge. Plus, a complete chapter 
explains how to use all EDTASM+ capabilities. This book 
describes how to write subroutines, interrupt handlers, 
programs that control the graphics display modes, 
cassette, disk, keyboard, sound, joysticks, serial I/O, 
interrupts, and use of ROM resident subroutines. Also 
covered are the MC6809E microprocessor, the video 
display generator (VDG), peripheral interface adapters 



110 DRAW'BMll, 2G8D3LUR2UDRE8HL2D 
R2DL2 ;BM2p , 13E8U3RDL2DULG8FR2UL2 
UR2 ; BM35 , 3R10D10L10U10 ; BM54 , 4R3F 
3D3G3L3H3U3E3;BM71,4G5F4E5RD4FU6 
LULDLH2D2U5 7 BM8 3 , 5U2R9D2HL3D8FL3 
EU8L4 ;BM104 , 3G5R3D5R4U5R3H5" 
120 DRAW "BM3 , 19F10 ;BM24 ,24 ;M2^|l 
9 ; BM24 , 24 ; F5H5 ;M22 , 3p ; BM24 , 24 ;M1 
9,28; BM2 4, 2 4 ; M19 , 2 1 ; BM5 3 , 2 1L2 D6R 
2 U 2 BU4 BR4 L2 D3 R2 L2 D 3 R2 BR3 U 6 LR2 ; BM 
67 , 2 4R2 U3 L2 D6BR4 BU6D6R2U6 BR2 R2 LD 
6 ;BM85 , 18R3F3D3GDF3DH4GL3H3U3E2R 
4F2D3G2L3H2U3E1 ; BM102 , 19D5L3F5E5 
L3U5L3" 

13j3 LINE (35, 19) -(45,29) ,PSET,BF 

140 DRAW"BM3 , 36" : S$="File ,, : GOSUB 

10000 : DRAWBM67 , 36" : S$="Size" : GO 

SUB10000 : DRAW"BM131, 36" : S$="Misc 

" : GOSUB10000 : DRAWBM195 , 36" : S$=" 

Undo" : GOSUB10000 

190 • ** THE COLOR BOXES ** 

200 DRAW"BM115,2 " : S$="Color" : GOS 

UB10000 : DRAWBM187 , 2" :EX$="BL1" : 

S$="Background" : GOSUB10000 

290 1 ** THE FILE MENU ** 

i 



(PIA>, SAM, memory, and how they all work together. 
Suitable as a high school or college textbook. 
CHAPTERS ; The Binary Number System Memory and Data 
Representation - Introduction MC6809E Microprocessor * 
Addressing Modes of the MC6809E - MC6809E Instruction 
Set - Assembly Language Programming with EDTASM+ - 
Assembly Language Programming - Assembly Language and 
Extended Color BASIC ■ Internal Control and Graphics - 
Technical Details. 

289 pages TRS-80 & EDTASM+ 

soft cover trademarks of Tandy Corp 

$16.00 U.S. plus $1 .50 shipping. Check or money order, 
RI residents please add 6% sales tax. Inquire about 
volume discounts. 

Published and TEPCO 
sold by 30 Water Street 

Portsmouth, RI 02871 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING for the TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 



68 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



300 LINE (0,48) -( 78, 122 ) , PSET >. B i L 
INE (2, 123) -(79,123) , PSET: LINE- (7 
9, 50), PSET 

310 EX$="BL1" : DRAWBM5 , 52 " : S$="D 
isk Load" :GOSUB10000 : DRAWBM5 , 62 
" : S$="Disk Save" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW 
"BM5 , 72 " : S$="Disk Dir" : GOSUB1000 
0: DRAW"BM5 , 82" : s$="Tape Load" : GO 

SUB 10000 : DRAWBM5 ,92" : S$="Tape S 

ave»:GOSUBl0000 

320 DRAW"BM5,102":S$="Screen Dum 

p" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW"BM5 , 112 " : EX$= 

l 'BLl":S$="Quit/BASIC":GOSUB10000 

390 i ** THE SIZE MENU ** 

400 LINE (80, 48) - (158 , 92 ) , PS ET , B : 

LINE (82, 93 )- (159 ,93) , PSET : LINE- ( 

159, 50), PSET 

410 DRAW"BM85,52":S$="Eraser Siz 
e" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW"BM85 , 62" :S$=" 
1 X 1" : GOSUB10000 : DRAWBM85 , 72 
":S$=" 4 X 4":GOSUB10000:DRAW"B 
M85,82":S$="> 8 X 8" :GOSUB10000 
490 & ** THE MISC MENU ** 
500 LINE (160,48) -(238, 142) ,PSET, 
B:LINE(162,143)-(239,143) ,PSET:L 
INE-(239.50) ,PSET 

510 DRAW"BM165 , 52" :S$="Clear Scr 
een" :GOSUB10000 :DRAW"BM165 , 62": S 
$="Show Picture" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW 
"BM165, 72 ":S$=" Color Set":GOSUBl 
0000 : DRAWBM165 , 8 2" : S$="PUT Mode 
" :GOSUB10000 : DRAWBM165 , 92 " : S$=" 
> Set":GOSUB10000:DRAW"BM165,102 

":S$=" Reset" :GOSUB10000 

520 DRAW"BM165,112":S$=" And" : G 

OSUB10000 : DRAW"BM165 , 122" : S$=" 

Or" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW"BM165 , 132" : S 

$=» Not":GOSUB10000:EX$="" 

600 EXEC44539:INPUT"PRESS [ENTER 

] WHEN READY TO SAVE" ; A$ : SAVEM"M 

ENUS . SYS" , 9728 , 14333/44539 

610 END 

9990 ' ** HI -RES PRINT ROUTINE * 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Hit the white balloons with your arrows, but don't 
waste arrows because each shot creates a dangerous 
black balloon which you must avoid. Use the right 
joystick and firebutton. 

The listing: 

0 IFA=0THENCLS : PRINT "SCORE :"S:F 
ORI=1TO50 : PRINT§RND ( 30 ) +RND (9 ) *3 
2 , "0" ; : NEXT : A=l : G0T0ELSEPRINT@4 4 
8,TAB(JOYSTK(0) *.47) "< A > 

" ; : IF (PEEK (652 
80)AND1)=0 THENPRINT@RND(224)+31 
,"0"; :GOTO1ELSE0 



* 

10000 F0RA=1T0LEN(S$) :DRAWCH$(AS 
C(MID$(S$,A, 1) ) -32) +EX$ : NEXT : RET 
URN 

11990 ' ** CHARACTER DATA ** 
12000 DATA BR7, BR2D4BD2D0BU6BR5, 
BRDBR2UBR4 , BD2R4HD4EL4FU4BUBR6 , B 
R4BDL4D2R4D2L4R2DU6BR5 , DRUBR3DG4 
DBR 3 URDBU 6 BR 3 , BRRFG3DFRE2BD2H4UB 
UBR7 , BRDRUBR5 , BR3G2D2F2BU6BR4 , BR 
F2D2G2BU6BR6 , BD3R4BD2H4BD4E4BUBR 
3 , BD3R4BG2U4BUBR5 , BD6BR2 GBU7 BR 6 , 
BD3R4BU3BR3 

12010 DATA BD6BR2R0BU6BR5 , BD6UE4 
UBR3 , BDD4FR2EU4HL2BD3BRR0BE3BR2 , 
BR2D6RL2BU5EBR5 , BDER2FDG4R4BU6BR 
3 , BDER2 FDGL2R2 FDGL2HBE5BR2 , D3R4L 
D3U6BR4 , R4L4D3R4D3L4BE6BR, BDD4FR 
2EUHL2BU3R2FBEBR2 , DUR4D2G3DBE6 , B 
DDFR2 FDGL2 HUER2 EUHL2 BR6 , BRR2FD4G 
L2HBU4DFR3BE3 

12020 DATA BD3BR2D0BD3U0BU6BR5 , B 
D3BR2D0BD3GBU7BR6 , BR3G3F3BU6BR4 , 
BD2R4BD2L4BE4BR3 , BRF3G3BE6 , BD2UE 
R2FD2L2DBD2U0BU6BR5,R4D4L2U2R2BD 
4L4U6BR7 

12030 DATA BDD5U2R4D2U5HL2BR6 , D6 
R3 EUHL2 R2 EUHL2 BR 6 , BDD4FR2EBU4HL2 
BR6, D6R2E2U2H2LBR6 , D3R3 L3D3R4BU6 
L4BR7 , D6U3R3L3U3R4BR3 , BDD4FR2EU2 
L2R2BU2HL2BR6,D6U3R4D3U6BR3,R4L2 
D6L2R4BU6BR3 , BD4DFR2EU5BR3 , D6U3R 
F3H3E3BR3 , D6R4BU6BR3 , D6U5RFDUERD 
5U6BR3 

12040 DATA D6U5RFD2F2U6BR3 , BDD4F 
R2 EU4HL2 BR 6 , D6U3R3 EUHL2 BR 6 , 3DD4 F 
REHF2HEU3HL2BR6 , D6U4F4H3R2EUHL2B 
R6 , BDDFR2 FDGL2 HBE4 HL2 BR 6 , R2D6U6R 
2BR3 , D6R4U6BR3 , D3 FDFEUEU3 BR3 , D5F 
EUDFEU5BR3 , DF4DBL4UE4UBR3 , DFDFD2 
U2EUEUBR3 , R4DG4DR4BU6BR3 
12050 DATA BRR2L2D6R2BU6BR4 , BD8L 
R6BU8BR2 , BRR2D6L2BE6 , BD2E2D6U6F2 



1 FORI=417+INT(PEEK(346) *.47)T03 
2STEP-32 :IFPEEK(1024+I)=79THENPR 
INT@I , "X" ; : PRINT@I+3 2 , " » ; : PLAY" 
T99AB" : S=S+10 : PRINT@8 , S : IFINT (S/ 
300) =S/300THENA=0 : GOTOELSE0ELSEI 
FPEEK ( 1024+1 )=15THENPLAY"T2BAG"E 
LSEPRINT@I , " A " ; : PRINT§I+32 , " " ; : 
NEXT:PRINT@I+32 , " ";:G0T0 

Vick Mishra 
Newington, CT 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 69 



BU2BR3,BL7,BR7 

12060 DATA BD2R3FD3L3HER3BU4BR3 , 
D6R3EU2HL2BU2BR6 , BD3D2FR2EBU2HL2 
BU2BR6, BD3D2FR3U4L3R3U2BR3 ,BD3DR 
4UHL2GD2 FR3 BU6 BR3 > BD3R3L2D3U5ERF 
BEBR2 , BD3 D2 FR3 DGL3 BR4 BUU5L3 R3 BU2 
BR3 ,D6U4R3FD3BU6BR3 , BDBR2D0BD2D3 
BU6BR5 , BD7FR2EU4BU2U0BUBR3 , D6U3F 
3H2E2BU2BR4 

12070 DATA BR2D6RBU6BR4 , BD2D4U4R 



730 


, 33 


5200 


97 


9520 


8 


1030 . . 


• .»'■;* 1 59 


6000 


»,: . '» V .* 1 50 


11020 


....128 


1900 .. 


■ . . • 79 


6240 


• . . « .1 37 


12010 


..... 86 


3000 . . 


...224 


6290 


.-..'246 


12050 


...170 


4230 , 


,,,116 


8830 


. • * « .119 


END 


....181 



Listing 2: COCODRAW 

0 • COCODRAW VI . 1 BY DARIN HERR 

1 GOTO 3 

2 CLS : PRINT@108 , "COCODRAW" : PRINT 
@142 , "VI . 1" : PRINT @ 20 7 , "BY" : PRINT 
@235, "DARIN HERR" : PRINT@270 , "198 
6":PRINT§449, "INITIALIZING-ONE M 
OMENT PLEASE" :GOT05 

3 PCLEAR8 : GOT02 

5 DIM A (102) ,AR(1) , ME (3)37) , FI(15 
1) ,SI(92) , MI (191) ,GP(102) ,CH$(90 
) : FORA=0TO90 : READCH$ (A) :NEXT:BC= 
3:ES=7:PN=1:PM=1:LE=40 

8 DIMD(15) :FORA=0TO15:READD(A) :N 

, EXT ■ ■ 

10 PMODE4 ,5 : COLOR0 , 1 :PCLS 
20 LO ADM" MENUS . SYS" 
600 GET(0,124)-(4,128) , AR , G : GET ( 
0 , 0 ) - (255 , 47 ) , ME : GET ( j3 , 48 ) - ( 79 , 1 
23) ,FI: GET ( 80 , 48 ) - (159 , 93) , SI :GE 
T(16j3,48)-(239,143) yMI 
1PP GOSU&Sppp 
:71J0 GOSUB85j3j3 : SCREEN 1 , CS 
720 IFSP$=" "THENLINE (56,84 ) - ( 197 
,117) , PRESET, BF: LINE (57, 85) -(196 
,116) ,PSET,B:DRAW"BM64,88":S$="D 
o you want to use" :GOSUB1000j3 : DR 
AW"BM64,97":S$="the Speed-Up POK 
E?" : GOSUB10000 : X=1J31 : Y=106 : GOSUB 
980j3:IFA<32THENSP$="Y":GOTOlll)3E 
LSESP$="N" : GOSUB8000 
73J3 GOSUB 9ppp 

74j3 PLAY"03T16C":IFY>47THEN73j3 
75j3 IFY>32THENS=INT (X/64) +1 : ONS 
GOTO 10 0 J3 , 2 pp 0 , 2 5 0 J3 , 3 j3 00 
7 60 I FX> 1 1 1THENS=X : GOTO 3 50 0 
770 X=INT(X/16) *16:Y=INT(Y/16) *1 
6 : S= (X/16+1) +7*Y/16 : IFS=70RS=14T 
HEN780ELSEPUT (X+l , Y+l) - (X+15 , Y+l 
5) ,A,NOT 



2D4U4RFD3BU6BR3 , BD2D4U4R3FD3BU6B 
R3 , BD3D2FR2EU2HL2BU2BR6 , BD2D6U2R 
3EU2HL2BU2BR6,BD3D2FR3D2U6L3BU2B 
R6 , BD2 D4U2 E2 R2 BU2 BR3 , BD 3 FR2 FGL3B 
E4L3BU2BR6 ,BD2R2LU2D5FEBU5BR4 , BD 
2 D3FR2EU3 BU2 BR3 , BD2 DFDFEUEUBU2 BR 
3 , BD2D3FEUDFEU3BU2BR3 
12080 DATA BD2F4H2G2E4BU2BR3 , BD2 
DFDFG2E 3UEUBU2 BR3 , BD2R4G4R4BU6BR 
3 



780 ONS GOTO4000,4200, 4400, 4600, 
4800,5000,5200,5400,5600,4400,58 

00. 6000.6200.6400 

1000 GOSUB8200:PUT(0, 48) -(79,123 
) , FI : XX=0 : N=6 : GOSUB8800 : POKE6549 
4,0:IFS=7THEN1900ELSEIFS=3THENGO 
SUB8000 : CLS : INPUT "DRIVE #" ; P : IFP 
>3THEN700ELSEDIRP : FORA=1TO2STEP0 
:IF(PEEK(&HFF00)OR&H80)O&HFE TH 
ENNEXTELSE700 

1010 POKE178,0:POKE179,3:LINE(36 
1 84 ) «- (217 ,117 ) , PRESET , BF : LINE (37 
,85) -(216, 116) ,PSET,B:IFS=6THEN1 
690ELSEIFS<3THENS$="Disk"ELSES$= 
"Tape" 

1020 IFS=10RS=4THENS$=S$+" Load" 
ELSES$=S$+" Save" 

1030 DRAW" BM4 0,88": GOSUB 10000 : DR 

AWBM40, 97" :S$="Filename: ": GOSUB 

10000 : IFS<3THENLE=14ELSELE=8 
1040 X=110 : Y=97 : KE$="ALL" : GOSUB1 
1000:FI$=IN$ 

1050 DRAW"BM40,106":S$="O.K.?":G 
OSUB100 0 0 : X=8 2 : Y=10 6 JGOSUB9 800 : 1 
FA>31THEN1110 
1060 IFS>3THEN1090 

10 70 I FS= 1THENLOADMF I $E LSES AVEMF 
I$,3584, 9727, 44539 
1080 GOTO1110 

1090 IF S=4 THEN PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN 

1, CS : CLOADMFI $ : PM0DE4 , 5 : SCREEN 1 , 
CS:GOTO1110 

1100 CSAVEMFI$ , 3584 , 9727 ,44539 
1 1 10 GOSUB8000 : IFSP$= " Y " THENPOKE 
65495,0 
1120 GOTO730 

1690 S$="Screen Dump" : DRAW"BM87 , 
88" :GOSUB10000:S$="Is printer re 
ady?" : DRAW "BM 6 7 , 97" :GOSUB10000 : X 
=99:Y=106:GOSUB9800:IFA>31THEN11 

1700 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (27) "@"CHR$ (27 
) "A"CHR$(8) 5S$=CHR$(27)+"K"+CHR$ 
(128)+CHR$(1) :FORA=1536T01567:FO 
RX=1T02 : PRINT#-2 , S$ ; : FORB=191TO0 
STEP-l:P=NOT(PEEK(A+32*B) ) : IFX=1 
THENC=(P AND240)/16ELSEC=P AND 15 



70 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



wmmmmmm 









• Menu oriented 

• Upload/download. Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 

• Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 

• Definable macro keys 

• Works with standard serial port, RS232 
PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

• Works with standard screen. X SCREEN, or 
WORDPAK 80 column board. 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



XMENU 

Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 
. Create your own menus ' ^orkswith sttndard I screen, 

J XSCREEN, WORDPAK. O-PAK 

$29.95 with source$59.95 



XSCREEN 

OS-9 hi-res screen 
• 5 1 /64/85 chars per line ■ Easy menu operation 

$19.95 with source $39.95 



XDIR & XCAL 

Hierarchial directory OS-9 calculator 

• Full sorting ■ Decimal, Hex, Binary 

• Complete pattern matching "+,-»*»/. AND.OR, XOR, NOT 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overs trike, underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $1 24.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source$49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with XWORD/XMERGE sourc$1 99.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 







SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting List. $79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
with user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter / update salesman records, and 
update the SB AP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and tax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay periods totals 
for straight time, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, year-to- 
date federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all stales 
except Oklahoma and Delaware. $59.95 



These proems a^ -iuser friendly : and menu 
driven. Sample ti^nsactiohs are included. Bach 



a Juries screeai 
a printer, a minimum of 32k and at least 1 disk 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with the Small 
B usiness Accounting package. $ 5 9 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $59 95 





i i ii 1906 Jerrold AVenue 
f St^ 

Dtaltr Inquiries .;jm^td-^^y:^ 
Author Submissions oct*pt*i 
OS-9 is a trademark of Microwatt 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



(612) 633-6161 



1710 PRINT#-2,CHR$(D(C) ) ;CHR$(D( 
C)) ; :NEXTB: PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (0) :NEXT 
X,A:GOTO700 

1900 GOSUB8000 : CLS : PRINT "TYPE 'C 
ONT [ENTER] ' TO RESTART PROGRAM 

PRINT : STOP : GOTO700 
2000 GOSUB8200:PUT(64,48)-(143,9 
3 ) , SI : XX=64 : N=3 : GOSUB8800 : IFS=1T 
HENGOSUB8 000 : GOT07 3 0 
2010 POKE 178 ,0 : POKE 17 3 ,3 : LINE ( 69 
,6 2 ) - (74,89), PRESET , BF : DRAW " BM6 9 
, "+STR$ (S*10+42) +CH$ (30) : GET (64 , 
4 8 ) - ( 143, 9 3 ) , SI : S=S-2 : ES=S *4-SGN 
(S) :GOTO700 

2 500 GOSUB8 2 00 : PUT ( 1 2 8 , 4 8 ) - ( 20 7 , 
143) ,MI : XX=128 : N=8 : GOSUB8800: IFS 
< 5THENONS GOT02 510 ,2520,2540,255 
0ELSE2560 

2510 GOSU38000 : LINE (0,48)- (255 , 1 

91) , PRESET, BF:GOT07 30 

2520 GOSUB8000 : PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 

GS 

2530 GOSUB9400:IFFBO&HFE THEN25 

30ELSEPMODE4 , 5 : GOTO70 0 

2540 CS=ABS(CS-1) : SGREEN1 , CS : GOS 

UB8000:GOTO730 

2550 GOSUB8000:GOTO730 

2560 POKE178 ,0 : POKE179 , 3 : LINE ( 13 

3, 92) - ( 138 , 139 ) , PRESET , BF : DRAW'B 

M13 3 , "+STR$ ( S* 10+4 2 ) +CH$ ( 30 ) : PM= 

S-4: GET (128, 48) -(207, 143) , MI: GOS 

UB8000:GOTO700 

3000 GOSUB8 00 0 : GOT07 3 0 

3500 GOSUB8200 : PCLS X FORY=3T0191S 

TEP12 : FORX=3T0256STEP16 : A= ( Y-3 ) / 

12*16+ (X-3 ) /16 : POKE178 , A: LINE (X, 

Y) - (X+7 , Y+6 ) , PSET , BF : IFINKEY$<>" 

" THEN7 00ELSENEXTX , Y : IFBC=0THENPO 

KE178 , 3ELSEPOKE17 8 , 0 

3510 X=INT(JOYSTK(0)/4) *16+2 :Y=I 

NT ( JOYSTK(l) /4) *12+2 : LINE (X, Y) - ( 

X+9 , Y+8) , PSET, B: LINE (X, Y) - (X+9 , Y 

+8 ) , PRESET , B : FB=PEEK ( &HFF00 ) OR&H 

80 : I$=INKEY$ : IFFBO&HFE ANDI$=" " 

THEN3510 

3520 A=(Y-2)/12*16+(X-2)/16:IFI$ 
<> " THEN700ELSEI FS< 1 8 4THENFC=A E 
LSEBC=A 
3530 GOTO700 

4000 GOSUB9000:IFY<48THENGOSUB85 
0 0 : GOTO 7 40 ELS EGOSUB 8 2 00 : LI NE ( X , Y 
)-(X,Y) , PRESET 

4010 GOSUB9400:LINE-(X,Y) , PSET: I 

FFB=&HFE THEN4010ELSE4000 

4200 GOSUB 8200:IFBC=0THENPOKE17 

8,3ELSEPOKE178,0 

4210 GOSUB9200 : IFX>255-ES THENX= 
255-ES 

4220 IFY>191-ES THENY=191-ES 



4230 GET (X, Y) -(X+ES,Y+ES) ,A,G:LI 
NE ( X , Y ) - ( X+ES , Y+ES ) , PSET , BF : LINE 
(X,Y) -(X+ES,Y+ES) , PRESET , BF : IFFB 
<>&HFE THENPUT(X,Y) -(X+ES, Y+ES) , 
A, PSET 

4240 GOTO4210 

4400 GOSUB9 000 : XX=X : Y Y= Y : I F Y< 4 8 T 
HENGOSUB8 500 : GOT07 40ELSEGOSUB8 2 0 

4410 GOSUB9400 : LINE (XX, YY) - (X, Y) 
, PRESET , B: LINE- (XX, YY) , PSET , B : IF 
FB=&HFE THENGOSUB8000:GOTO4410EL 
SEIFS>7THENLINE (XX, YY) -(X,Y) , PSE 
T, BF 

4420 GOTO4400 

4600 GOSUB9000:XX=X:YY=Y:IFY<48T 
HENGOSUB8500:GOTO740ELSEGOSUB820 

4610 GOSUB9400:CIRCLE(XX,YY) ,ABS 
(X+Y/12-8) :IFFB=&HFE THENGOSUB80 
00:GOTO4610ELSE4600 
4800 GOSUB9000:IFY<48THENGOSUB85 
00 : GOTO740ELSEIFPPOINT (X, Y) =0THE 
NC=1ELSEC=0 

4810 GOSUB8 200: PAINT (X,Y) , ,C:GOT 
04800 

5000 KE$="ALL":LE=36 

5010 GOSUB9000:IFY<48THENPUT(81, 

1) -(95,15) ,A,NOT:GOTO740ELSEIFX= 

0THENX=1 

5020 GOSUB8200 : GOSUB11000 : GOTO50 
10 

5200 IFPN=1THEN730ELSEPUT(97, 1) - 
(111 , 15) , A , NOT : PUT (97, 17) - (111, 3 
1) , A, NOT : GOSUB8200 «. PN=1 : GOSUB800 
0:GOTO730 

5400 GOSUB9000 : IFY<48THENGOSUB85 
00 : GOTO740ELSEGOSUB8200 : XX=X : YY= 
Y 

5410 GOSUB8000:GOSUB9400: LINE (XX 
,YY)-(X,Y) , PSET: IFFB=&HFE THEN 5 4 
10ELSE5400 

5 600 G0SUB9 000 : IF Y < 4 8 THENG0SUB8 5 
00 : G0T07 4 0ELSEXX=X : Y Y=Y : G0SUB8 20 
0 

5610 GOSUB9400:LINE(XX,YY) -(X,Y) 

, PSET: IFFB=&HFE THENA=0 : GOTO5620 

ELSEGOSUB8000:GOTO5610 

5620 A=A+1 :GOSUB9400 : IFFB=&HFE A 

NDA<10THEN5 620ELSEIFA< 10THENGOSU 

B8200:GOTO5610ELSE5630 

5630 PLAY " C": GOSUB 9 4 00 : 1 FFB= & HFE 

THEN5630ELSE5600 
5800 GOSUB9000 : 1 F Y< 4 8 THENPUT (49 , 
17 ) - ( 63 , 31 ) , A, NOT : GOTO740ELSEGOS 
UB8200:XX=X:YY=Y 

5810 X=JOYSTK(0) :Y=J0YSTK(1) :IFX 

X+X>2 5 5THENX=2 5 5 -XX 

5820 IFYY+Y>191THENY=191-YY 



72 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



5830 LINE (XX,YY)- (XX+X, YY+Y) ,PRE 
SET, B: LINE- (XX, YY) , PSET, B: FB=PEE 
K(&HFF0j3) OR&H8J3 : GOSUB8J300 : IFFB=& 
HFE THEN581J3ELSEGET (XX, YY) - (XX+X 
, YY+Y) , GP, G: F0RA=1T04 : PUT (XX, YY) 
- (XX+X, YY+Y) , GP , NOT : NEXT : PUT ( 4 9 , 
17 ) - ( 63,31) ,A , NOT : GX=X: G Y=Y : GOTO 
730 • ; ' c '- ! " '■" v;; - 

6j300 GOSUB820J3 

Splp GOSUB92J30 : IFX+GX>255THENX=2 
55-GX 

6J32J3 GET(X,Y)-(X+GX, Y+GY) , A, G:ON 
PM GOSUB6J34J3 , 6J35J3 , 6J360 , 6J37J3 , 6080 
: IFFBO&HFE THENPUT (X, Y) - (X+GX, Y 
+GY),A,PSET 
6j33j3 GOTO601J3 

6J340 PUT (X, Y) - (X+GX, Y+GY) , GP, PSE 
T: RETURN 

6J35J2 PUT ( X,Y) -(X+GX, Y+GY) , GP, PRE 
SET: RETURN 

6J36J3 PUT (X, Y| - (X+GX, Y+GY) , GP, AND 
: RETURN 

6J37J3 PUT (X,Y) - (X+GX, Y+GY) ,GP,OR: 
RETURN 

6J38J3 PUT (X, Y) - (X+GX, Y+GY) ,GP,NOT 
: RETURN 

620j3 POKE178,j3:POKE179,3 

6210 GOSUB92J30 : IFX>2 4 0THENX=2 4 J3 



622j3 IFY>176THENY=176 
6230 GET(X, Y) - (X+15, Y+15) , A, Gi LI 
NE(X,Y) -(X+15, Y+15) , PRESET, B: LIN 
E(X,Y) -(X+15, Y+15) , PSET, B: PUT (X, 
Y) - (X+15 , Y+15 ) , A, PSET : IFFBO&HFE 
THEN62 10ELSEGOSUB8 200 : X1=X : Y1=Y 
6240 SCREEN, 0 : PCLS : LINE (12 ,12)- ( 

146,146), PSET, B : LINE (11,11) - (14 7 
, 147 ) , PSET, B: LINE ( 16 ,160) - (72 , 17 
6) , PSET, B: LINE (.88 , 160) - (144 , 176) 
, PSET, B: LINE (190, 30) -(209, 49) , PS 
ET,B: LINE (190, 94) -(209,113) , PSET 
, B : LINE ( 0 ,0 ) -(255, 191 ) , PSET, B: LI 
NE (1,1) -(254, 190) ,PSET,B 
6250 DRAWBM57 , 3 " : S$="MAGNIFY" : G 
OSUB10000 : DRAWBM3 1, 165" : S$= M Don 
e" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW"BM96 , 165" : S$= 
"Cancel" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW"BM181 , 5 
6" :S$='» Before" : GOSUB10000 : DRAW'B 
M191, 120" : S$="Now" : GOSUB10000 
62 60 PUT (192,32)- (207 , 47 ) , A, PSET 
: PUT (192, 96) -(207,111) ,A,PSET:FO 
RY=32T047 : YY= ( Y-32 ) *8+16 : F0RX=19 
2 TO 20 7 : XX= (X-192)*8+16: IFPPO INT ( 
X , Y ) =0THENLINE ( XX , YY ) - ( XX+ 6 , YY+6 
) ,PSET,BF ELSELINE(XX,YY)-(XX+6, 
YY+6) , PRESET, BF 
6270 NEXTX, Y 



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ALL DISKS CONE WITH TYVEK SLEEVES, LABELS, N.P.TABS 

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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 73 



628,0 GOSUB9)3)3)3:IFX>1420RX<160RY< 
160RY>176THEN628)3ELSEIFY<144THEN 
X=INT( (X-16)/8) :Y=INT( (Y-16) /8) : 
XX=X*8+16 : YY=Y*8+16 : PUT (XX, YY) - ( 
XX+ 6 , YY+6) , A, NOT : PUT ( X+ 1 9 2 , Y+ 9 6 ) 
-(X+192,Y+96) ,A,NOT:GOT0628)3 
6290 IFY<16)30RY>1760R(X>93ANDX<8 

8) THEN628J3ELSEIFX>87THENGET ( 192 , 
32) -(2)37, 47) , A, G: PUT (192 , 96) -(2)3 
7,111) ,A,PSET:GOT0626)3ELSEGET(19 
2,96) - (2J37, 111) ,A,G:GOSUB85j3j3:GO 
SUB8)3)3)3:PUT(X1,Y1)-(X1+15,Y1+15) 
,A,PSET:X=8)3:Y=16:GOT077)3 

6400 IFPN=2THEN730ELSEPUT(97,1) - 
(111,15) , A, NOT: PUT (97, 17) -(111, 3 
1) , A, NOT : GOSUB8 2)3)3 ; PN=2 : GOSUB8)3j3 
)3:GOT073)3 

8/9)9)3 FORP=PN TOPN+2 : PCOPYP TOP+6 
-PN: NEXT: RETURN 

82)3)3 FORP=6T08 : PCOPYP TOP-6+PN:N 
EXT : RETURN 

85)3)3 PUT()3,)3)-(255>47) ,ME:P0KE17 
8,FC:POKE179,BC:LINE(116,12)-(14 
6 , 2 8 ) , PSET , BF : DRAW" BM17 8 , 4NL2 4NG 
17ND24M157 , 13M178 , 4M169 , 26" : LINE 
(188, 13) -(25)3,27) , PRESET, BF : IFPN 
=1THENPUT(97, 1) -(111, 15) ,A,NOT:R 
ETURNELSEPUT (97, 17) -(111,31) ,A,N 
OT: RETURN 

88)3)9 GOSUB94)3j3:S=INT(Y/3/(63/N) ) 
:GOT0883)3 

881J3 GOSUB940)3:S=INT(Y/3/ (63/N) ) 
: IFFBO&HFE THENS =S + 1 : PUT (XX+2 , P 
* 1)3+ 5 1 ) -( XX+ 7 6 , P* 10+ 6)3 ) , A , NOT : RE 
TURNELSEIFS=P THEN881)3 

882) 3 PUT (XX+2, P*1)3+51) -(XX+76,P* 
10+60) ,A,NOT 

883) 3 PUT (XX+2, S*lj9+51 ) -(XX+76,S* 
10+60) ,A,NOT:P=S:GOT0881)3 

9) 3)3)3 G0SUB9 4)30 :GOT09)3 2)3 

9)31)3 G0SUB9 4)3)3: PUT (XX, YY) - (XX+4 , 
YY+4 ) , A, PSET : IFFB=&HFE THENRETUR 
N 

9)32)3 GET(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4) ,A,G:IFPP 
OINT(X,Y) >J3THENPUT(X,Y) -(X+4,Y+4 
),AR,PSET ELSEPUT(X,Y) -(X+4,Y+4) 
,AR, PRESET 

9)3 30 XX=X:YY=Y:GOT09)3ip 

9200 GOSUB940)3:IFY>47THENRETURNE 

LSE922)3 

9 2 10 GOSUB 9 400 : PUT ( XX , Y Y ) - ( XX+ 4 , 
YY+4) , A, PSET: IFY>47THENRETURN 
9220 GET(X,Y) -(X+4,Y+4) ,A,G:IFPP 
OINT (X, Y) >0THENPUT (X , Y) - (X+4 , Y+4 
),AR,PSET ELSE PUT (X, Y) - (X+4 , Y+4 
) ,AR, PRESET 

9230 IFFB=&HFE THENPUT (X, Y) - (X+4 
, Y+4 ) , A , PSET : G0SUB8 500 : GOT07 4)3EL 
SEXX=X : YY=Y : GOTO 92 10 



9400 IFPEEK ( &H155 ) +PEEK ( &H156) +P 
EEK(&H157)+PEEK(&H158)<&H3F8 THE 
NG0SUB9 5)3)3 

9410 X=JOYSTK(j3) *4+X0: Y=JOYSTK(l 
) *3+Y0 : FB=PEEK ( &EFF00) OR&H8J3 : RET 
URN 

9500 IF(PEEK(3 41)=2470RPEEK(341) 

=246) ANDYO>)3THENYO=YO-l 

9510 IF(PEEK(342)=2470RPEEK(342) 

=246) ANDY0<2THENY0=Y0+1 

9520 IF(PEEK(343)=2470RPEEK(343) 

=246) ANDXO>0THENXO=XO-1 

9530 IF ( PEEK ( 3 4 4 ) =2 4 70RPEEK (344) 

= 2 4 6 ) AN DXO <3THENXO=XO+l 

954^J FB=PEEK(&HFF)3)3)OR&H8j3:IFFB= 

&HFE THENP=254ELSEP=255 

9550 FORA=&H155 TO&H158 : POKEA, P: 

NEXT : RETURN 

9800 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ (Y 
):S$="Yes No" :GOSUB 10)3)30 
9810 A=J0YSTK()3) : IFAO2THENP0KE1 
78,0: POKE179 , 3ELSEPOKE178 , 3 : POKE 
179, 0 

9820 LINE (X-l, Y+8) -(X+20,Y+8) , PS 
ET:LINE(X+4)3, Y+8) -(X+55,Y+8) , PRE 
SET : IF ( PEEK ( &KFF00 ) OR&H8 0 ) =&HFE 
THENPOKE 1 7 8, FC : POKE 1 7 9 , BC : RETURN 
ELSE981)3 

10000 FORA=lTOLEN(S$) :DRAWCH$(AS 
C (MI D$ ( S $ , A , 1 ) ) -32 ) +EX$ : NEXT : RET 
URN 

11000 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ ( 
Y)+"LD8RU8RD8RU8RD8RU8RD8U8L5":G 
ET(X-l,Y)-(X+5,Y+8) , A,G: IN$=INKE 
Y$ 

11010 IN$=INKEY$: IFIN$=" "ANDC0<1 
)3THENCO=CO+l : GOTO11010ELSEIFIN$= 
""THENPUT (X-l, Y) -(X+5, Y+8) ,A,NOT 
;CO=0:GOTO11010 

11020 IFIN$=CHR$ (8) THENIFLEN (DE$ 
) =J3THEN11)31)3ELSEPUT (X-l , Y) - (X+5 , 
Y+8) , A, PRESET :X=X-7:DE$=LEFT$ (DE 
$ , LEN (DE$) -1) : DRAWBL7 " : PUT ( X-l , 
Y)- (X+5, Y+8) ,A,PSET:GOTO11010 
11030 IFIN$=CHR$( 13) THENPUT (X-l, 
Y) - (X+5 , Y+8) , A, PRESET : IN$=DE$ : DE 
$=" ": RETURN 

11040 IFASC(IN$) <310RLEN(DE$)=LE 
ORIN$=CHR$(95)ORX>242 THEN11010 
11050 IFKE$<>"ALL"THENIFINSTR (KE 
$,IN$)=0THENSOUND1, 1:GOTO11010 
11060 PUT (X-l , Y) - (X+5 , Y+8 ) , A, PRE 
SET: DRAWCH$ (ASC (IN$ ) -3 2 ) : DE$=DE$ 
+IN$ : X=X+7 : PUT (X-l , Y) - (X+5 , Y+8 ) , 
A,PSET:GOTO11010 

12000 DATA BR7 , BR2D4BD2D)3BU6BR5 , 
BRDBR2UBR4 , BD2R4HD4EL4FU4BUBR6 , B 
R4BDL4D2R4D2L4R2DU6BR5 , DRUBR3DG4 
DBR3 URDBU 6 BR3 , BRRFG3DFRE2BD2H4UB 



74 THE RAINBOW October 1986 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-lOO 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



HALL OF THE KING (Rainbow Review 6/86) 

This program combines all the things you look for in a great 
two disk graphics adventure program. The Hi-Res graphics 
are superbly done. The text portion of the screen and the 
graphics change quickly as you move through the HALL OF 
THE KING. You can move freely from one portion of the 
adventure to another. Call up your inventory at any time. You 
can even save or load a game at ANY time. HALL OF THE 
KING will challenge even the most seasoned adventurer. * 

HALL OF THE KING requires 64K EB and one disk drive. This 
exciting two disk adventure comes packaged in a vinyl case. 
$39.95. 

HALL OF THE KING II - THE INNER CHAMBER 

Continue your quest for the Earthstone in The Inner 
Chambers of the HALL OF THE KING. Outstanding graphics 
help show the way to success in your search to help restore 
the legendary power of the Earthstone to the dwarven race. 
The deeper you travel into the inner chambers, the more dif- 
ficult your progress becomes. HALL OF THE KING II has all 
the fine features of the first adventure. It is designed to 
follow the original HALL OF THE KING but may be played as 
a stand-alone adventure. The adventure fills two disks and 
comes packaged in a handsome vinyl folder. It requires one 
disk drive and 64 K. $39.95 

WARP FACTOR X (Rainbow Review 2/86) 

If you have been waiting for a game for your color computer 
that has everything, your wait is over. WARP FACTOR X is 
here. This all graphics simulation game requires strategy, 
fast thinking, an eye for detail, and above all experience in 
knowing the capabilities of your starship and its computer. 
(See review in Feb. 85 issue of Rainbow.) It requires 32K one 
disk drive and comes packaged in a vinyl library case. $34.95 

DARKMOOR HOLD (Rainbow Review 8/86) 

You and your comrades will explore the levels of Darkmoor 
Hold in an effort to gain great riches and defeat the dark 
wizard. The Wizard will soon realize the threat you pose and 
the many monsters you meet and battle will become stonger 
and more powerful as you move through the 10 levels of 
Darkmoor. A keen eye will help you find weapons and armor 
to aid your battle along with treasures for you to keep. Your 
party consists of a Dwarf, an Elf, and you, the Human, each 
with their own special attributes. The weapons, armor and 
treasure are placed randomly in each level to provide a new 
challenge each time you play. You may also save the game 
you are playing since defeating the evil Wizard is not an easy 
task. It has great graphics and an impressive text screen to 
give you more fun than a barrel of elves. Requires 64KEB and 
1 disk drive. $29.95 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — all of our software 
can be backed up using standard backup procedures. 

Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include $1.50 
shipping for each order. TX residents add 5 1/8% sales tax. 
Orders shipped within two days. 

Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. Canadian 
dealers should contact Kelly Software Distributors, Ltd. 608, 
STNT, Calgary, Alberta T5H 2H2, (403) 236-2161 




DRAGON BLADE 

Animated Graphics Adventure 

This 100% hi-res graphics adventure features many animated 
screens which will delight the avid adventurer. You search for 
the magic Blade which is the only way to rid your homeland of 
the fearsome dragon which has risen from a long rest to ter- 
rorize your village. Fill your screen with super graphics as you 
try to solve the difficult challenge the village leaders have set 
before you. Dragon Blade requires 64 K EB and 1 disk drive. 
$29.95 

UTILITIES 

RTD Trio — Take advantage of this special offer. This 
package of three utility programs includes our new DISK TO 
TAPE, TAPE TO DISK (version 2.0), and ROMFREE (version 
2.0). TAPE TO DISK moves BASIC, ML and DATA files from 
tape to disk automatically — one program or an entire tape. 
It even fixes those programs that load at hex 600 so they 
work on a disk system. ROMFREE moves ROM packs to tape 
or disk easily, and fixes them so you just load and EXEC. 
ROMFREE now accomodates the larger 16K ROM packs. 
You won't believe how easy it is to protect your software 
library! These programs are shipped on tape. Requires 16K. 
$49.95 ($24.95 each if purchased separately) 

Prickly Pear Mallllst — Ver. 2.0 — You won't find a mailing 
list program anywhere that will out-perform this one. Req. 
32K and one disk drive. Only $29.95 

STATISTICS 

Lizpac — Absolutely the most complete statistics package 
we have seen for ANY computer anywhere. Lizpack is 850,000 
Bytes of programming filing 7 disks with an eighth disk con- 
taining data files to be used in the examples. The 200 page 
manual completely explains all that Lizpac has to offer. It is 
user friendly. Send for more information. Req. 32K disk only. 
$195.00 

Send for our free catalog 

Call (915) 584-7784 or 

Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

213 La Mirada 

El Paso, Texas 79932 





UBR7 , BRDRUBR5 , BR3G2D2F2BU6BR4 , BR 
F2D2G2BU6BR6 , BD3R4BD2H4BD4E4BUBR 
3 , BD3R4BG2U4BUBR5 , BD6BR2GBU7BR6 , 
BD3R4BU3BR3 

12010 DATA BD6BR2R i 0BU6BR5 , BD6UE4 
UBR3 , BDD4FR2EU4HL2BD3BRRJ3BE3BR2 , 
BR2 D6RL2 BU5EBR5 , BDER2 FDG4R4 BU6BR 
3 > BDER2FDGL2R2FDGL2HBE5BR2 , D3R4L 
D3U6BR4 , R4L4D3R4D3L4BE6BR, BDD4FR 
2EUHL2BU3R2FBEBR2 , DUR4D2G3DBE6 , B 
DDFR2 FDGL2HUER2 EUHL2 BR6 , BRR2FD4G 
L2HBU4DFR3 BE 3 

12020 DATA BD3BR2Dj3BD3Uj3BU6BR5 , B 
D3BR2DJ3BD3GBU7BR6 , BR3G3F3BU6BR4 , 
BD2R4BD2L4BE4BR3 , BRF3G3BE6 , BD2UE 
R2FD2L2DBD2UJ3BU6BR5 ,R4D4L2U2R2BD 
4L4U6BR7 

12030 DATA BDD5U2R4D2U5HL2 BR6 , D6 
R3EUHL2R2EUHL2BR6 , BDD4FR2EBU4HL2 
BR 6 , D6R2E2U2H2LBR6 , D3R3L3D3R4BU6 
L4BR7 , D6U3R3L3U3R4BR3 , BDD4FR2EU2 
L2R2BU2HL2BR6 , D6U3R4D3U6BR3 , R4L2 
D6L2R4BU6BR3 , BD4DFR2EU5BR3 , D6U3R 
F3H3E3BR3 , D6R4BU6BR3 , D6U5RFDUERD 
5U6BR3 

12040 DATA D6U5RFD2F2U6BR3 , BDD4F 
R2EU4HL2BR6 , D6U3R3EUHL2 BR6 , BDD4F 
REHF2HEU3HL2 BR6 , D6U4F4H3R2EUHL2B 



R6 , BDDFR2FDGL2HBE4HL2BR6 , R2D6U6R 
2BR3 , D6R4U6BR3 , D3FDFEUEU3BR3 , D5F 
EUDFEU5BR3 , DF4DBL4UE4UBR3 , DFDFD2 
U2EUEUBR3 ,R4DG4DR4BU6BR3 
12050 DATA BRR2L2D6R2BU6BR4 , BD8L 
R6BU8BR2 , BRR2D6L2BE6 , BD2E2D6U6F2 
BU2 BR 3 , BL7 , BR7 

12060 DATA BD2R3FD3L3HER3BU4BR3 , 
D6R3EU2HL2BU2 BR6 , BD3D2FR2EBU2HL2 
BU2BR6 , BD3D2FR3U4L3R3U2BR3 , BD3DR 
4 UHL2 GD2FR3BU6 BR3 , BD3R3L2D3U5ERF 
BEBR2 , BD3D2FR3DGL3BR4BUU5L3R3BU2 
BR3 , D6U4R3FD3BU6BR3 , BDBR2DJ3BD2D3 
BU6BR5 , BD7FR2EU4BU2U0BUBR3 , D6U3F 
3H2E2BU2BR4 

12070 DATA BR2D6RBU6BR4 , BD2D4U4R 
2D4U4RFD3BU6BR3 , BD2D4U4R3FD3BU6B 
R3 ) BD3D2FR2EU2HL2BU2BR6, BD2D6U2R 
3EU2HL2BU2BR6,BD3D2FR3D2U6L3BU2B 
R6 , BD2D4U2E2R2BU2BR3 , BD3FR2FGL3B 
E4L3BU2BR6 , BD2R2LU2D5FEBU5BR4 , BD 
2D3FR2EU3BU2BR3 , BD2DFDFEUEUBU2BR 
3 , BD2 D3 FEUDFEU3 BU2 BR3 
120B0 DATA BD2F4H2G2E4BU2BR3 , BD2 
DFDFG2E3UEUBU2BR3 , BD2R4G4R4BU6BR 
3 

13000 DATA0, 3 ,12, 15,48,51,60,63, 
192,195,204,207,240,243,252,255 



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SOLDERLESS UPGRADE KITS 

With easy-to-follow instructions 



64K FOR E BOARD 

64K FOR F BOARD 

64K FOR COC02* (ALL MODELS) 

EXTENDED BASIC CHIP 

*AM Korean models require one solder joint 
Please specify mode! # with order 



$39.95 
$29.95 
$29.95 
$34.95 



I 



NOTE: All ICs used in our kits are first quality 150 I\IS 
prime chips and carry one full year warranty. 



BASIC ROMs DISASSEMBLY 



COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED 
ALL 3 BOOKS 

ULTRA 80C DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 
BUG OUT 8. THE ORACLE (M.L. Monitor) 
ALL 5 ITEMS 

500 POKES, PEEKS, 'N EXECS 
UTILITY ROUTINE (VOLUME 1) 
WITH ROUTINES ON TAPE OR DISK 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 
ALL 9 ITEMS 



$17.95 
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(tepco) $16.95 
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COCO MAX II disk only $74.95 

Y-BRANCHING CABLE $27.95 

DS-69A DIGISECTOR & C-SEE III SOFTWARE .... $149.95 

HJL-57 KEYBOARD $69.95 

THE INTRONICS EPROM Programmer 

Program Up to 84K x 8 Eprom .••••••••« $139.95 

DATARASE (Eprom Eraser) $39.95 

2764 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $5.95 

27128 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $7.95 

ROM PACK P.C. BOARD with cue (or 27m $9.95 

TEAC 55B or Fujitsu M2551A 

DS/DD 'A Height Drive $109.95 

2 DRIVE with Case and Power Supply •••••••• $269.00 

JFD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS 1.2 $129.00 



10 DS/DD DISKETTE w/eleeve & label $9.95 

Diskette Carousel •••••••••••••••• $24.95 

300 Baud Modem Direct Connect* ••••••••• $49.95 

•With Autoterm on tape (Disk add $5.00) $64.95 

1200 Baud Modem Auto Answer/Dial** $119.95 

"With Autoterm on tape {Disk add $5.00) ...... $149.95 

Modem Cable $12.95 

VIDEO PLUS IIC $34.95 

VIDEO PLUS IIU $34.95 

REAL TALKER I 

With 3 talking games $49.95 

REAL TALKER II 

With 3 talking games • $54.95 

NUMBER JACK THE HJL Numeric Key Pad $79.95 



WIZARD'S CASTLE 

64 K Graphic Adventure 
By Spectral Associates 
Disk only $19.95 



Telewriter 64 
Telepatch II 
$74.95 (Disk Version) 



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76 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 



Learning How To 
Function in Basic 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last month, we used the MIDS and 
LEN functions on the inverse, 
black screen, but we didn't hurt 
ourselves explaining them in detail. 

To make amends, we shall repair this 
neglect and work with LEN, LEFTS and 
RIGHTS. We are going to use the MIDS 
that complements LEFTS and RIGHTS. 
Keep in mind that there is another form 
of MIDS (a statement as opposed to a 
function). 

We'll toy around with the regular 
green screen and create some interesting 
effects that may be of use in your 
programming future. 

The first order of business is to give 
an overview of LEN, LEFTS, RIGHTS and 
MIDS. Look at Listing 1. Key in lines 10, 
20 and 100. The meat is in Line 20. We 
plan to display a title on the text screen 
— a centered name and address head- 
ing. 

The entire text was enclosed, within 
quote marks, in one long string of 
letters, numerals and blank spaces. The 
strung-out line was assigned a name, 
string variable A$. The three lines of the 
title were scrambled and blank spaces 

Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer and special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of Co Co. 



separating the lines were omitted by 
personal choice. 

Key in Line 30. L is the variable 
assigned to LEN ( fi$ ) , the length or 
number of characters/ spaces in the 
string A$. 

It was chosen to display this value to 
achieve a dual purpose. First, to locate 
it in the center of the screen as a cen- 
tering guide. The two-digit value begins 
on the 15th space. (Remember the first 
line is 0, not 1.) Secondly, I was curious 
to know how many characters/ spaces 
there were in A$. 

The top line of desired text is buried 
in the middle of string A$, so we may 
as well fetch it, using MIDS as our 
appropriate tool. 

Key in Line 40. Picking a location on 
the second row, I unimaginatively chose 
32 at the left margin. Later, it would be 
centered. MIDS, the target text, was the 
first of three values to be enclosed 
within parentheses. Counting from the 
first character in the string until reach- 
ing J (the beginning of the segment of 
text to be plucked out of A$), gave the 
second value to be added to A$, and 
separated from it by a comma. Next, 
counting from the first letter J, the 
number of characters/spaces to be 
included (totaling 12), became the third 
value, again separated from the second 



value by a comma. Don't forget to tack 
on the closing parenthesis. 

Now run it. Notice that it lines up 
along the left margin. 

The address is next and, since it is at 
the right end of string A$, it is a can- 
didate for RIGHTS. Key in Line 50. The 
locating value, 64, was chosen, although 
any reasonable value near the left 
margin would have been fine, say from 
64 through 70. RIGHTS contains two 
items enclosed within parentheses. The 
first is the target string, A$. Since all of 
the characters / spaces at the right end of 
the string would be utilized to create the 
second line of text, the total number of 
characters /spaces making up the sec-| 
ond entry would be found by counting 
backwards, beginning with T, up to and 
including one. If you prefer, count from 
one to T, but it would be best to work 
from right to left. The value is separated 
by a comma from A$. In other words, 
the last 21 characters /spaces will be 
displayed on the row. Run this. 

Now, since the balance of our text 
appears at the beginning of Line 20, the 
LEFTS was called upon for help. Key in 
Line 60. A value of 96 was chosen as the 
trial location of the third row. LEFTS is 
used about the same as RIGHTS, except 
it works from the left end, or beginning, 
of A$. The number of letters to be 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 77 



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The Model 101 is a serial to 
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The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
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with all cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer 



The Model 104 Deluxe Interface $51.95 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
of a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch). 
This feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 



etc.) to your computer. You may 
then select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5* X 2.5" X 1.25* 
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The Model 102 has 3 switch 
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The Model 101, 102 and 104 
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These products are covered by 
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The Model 101 and 104 work 
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included in this row were tallied, from 
I through zero and this total, 19, be- 
came the other value included in LEFTS. 
If you look at the number of characters/ 
spaces used in the last items in M IDS and 
RIGHTS, and subtract the total from L, 
you can see that every character/ space 
in A$ was accounted for. This doesn't 
always follow if you have unnecessary 
spaces or unused characters in the 
string. Again, run your work. 

Take a few minutes and adjust the 
lines to center them. Take a moment to 
change the 52-33 in Line 60 to 19, since 
the point has been made. 

Key in lines 70 and 80. Line 70 waits 
for any key to be pressed and then Line 
80 zaps the top row and in the process 
says goodbye to 52. 

Ordinarily, having no further use for 
Line 30, it could be deleted — but then 
there goes the tutorial! Of course, Line 
30 could be masked with a REM marker, 
but that too alters the listing. 

Look at lines 40 through 60. Are your 
PRINTS values 46, 69, 102, respec- 
tively? They need not be exactly the 
same. So long as the title appears 
reasonably well-centered to you, that is 
what counts. 

Who wants to practice? Using MIDS, 
how would you put on lines 50 and 60? 
Better still, put your name and address 
into a single long string and make a 
nicely centered heading to demonstrate 
your grasp of the functions. 

If you plan to use the material in 
string A$ more than once, you could 
assign a variable to the substrings in 
lines 40, 50 and 60. They will be ready 
for instant use elsewhere in your pro- 
gram. Insert and run the following: 

35 Rl$=MID$(fi$,20,12):R2$=RIGHT 
$ ( AS , 21 ) : R3$=LEFT$ ( fl$ , 19 ) 

90 PRINT@170,f=ll$:PRINT@197,G2 
$:PRINT@230,P3$ 

Naturally, you could then substitute 
the three variables, Al$, A2$ and A3$ 
for the function statements they repre- 
sent in lines 40, 50 and 60, respectively. 
At that point, A$ becomes a dinosaur. 

Key in Listing 2 and run it to get an 
overview. You will note that the text was 
printed one complete word at a time, 
repeated monotonously to the screen. 
The original objective was to afford you 
practice using LEFTS, RIGHTS and 
MIDS, the idea being to figure out many 
different ways to accomplish the mis- 
sion. Seven examples were sufficient to 
create the text panel to keep the tutorial 
short and succinct. No doubt, you will 



78 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



z able to find other techniques to get 
le job done. I can think of about 20 
ariations on this theme. The acid test 
■ your ability to display what you 
itended in the manner intended by 
rawing upon CoCo's versatility. 
List lines 5 to 50. A word about the 
LEAR 500. If you masked it with a REM, 
ou would have quickly determined 
lat the program works OK. Masked or 
ot, CoCo already cleared 500 memory 
Dcations. Change Line 5 to CLEAR0 and 
un it. Again, change Line 5 to CLEAR1 
nd run. Repeat this through CLERR4. 
Vn OS Error (out of string space) in 
Jne 30 message appears, because there 
.re five letters in each string of D$ used. 
Change Line 5 to CLERR5. The program 
s in good shape because, coinciden- 
ally, every string is composed of five 
etters. 

Restore Line 5 to CLEfiR 500, if you 
ike. On power up, CoCo automatically 
eserves 200 string spaces. 

Whenever working with strings, it is 
jood practice to CLEfiR 500. If you 
vork with many strings or lengthy 
itrings up to about 255 characters/ 
>paces, CoCo may have no places allo- 
tted to store them. It cries for guidance 
bvith an OS message. Don't panic! 
Increase the CLEfiR 500 to CLEfiR G00 
and run. If it still isn't enough space, try 
a larger figure, until CoCo has enough 
memory reserved to handle the load you 
thrust upon it. You will see an example 
of this in the third tutorial of this series. 

Now, let us return to lines 5 through 
50. In Line 30, we decided to print 
BETTY using LEFTS to pick out of string 
D$ the first five letters and print them 
beginning at location eight. Since I am 
lazy, I used the old reliable semicolon 
ploy to allow me to butt up the next 
segment without taxing my brain figur- 
ing out PR I NT@ locations. A small pause 
fetched from a G05UB routine allows 
time to digest the display momentarily. 
Then, using MIDS, from the same string, 
beginning with the sixth character/ 
space and going up to and including the 
10th character/ space, ANN was ap- 
pended to BETTY, followed by a semi- 
colon and another pause. Finally, uti- 
lizing RIGHTS, the balance of the letters 
were put on to complete the name 
followed by a pause of longer duration. 

You could have broken up D$ to use 
the first six characters/ spaces in Line 30 
and four characters/ spaces in Line 40 
and still maintain the integrity of the 
three segment plan of attack. Only one 
problem. If you left Line 5 at CLEAR5, 
you got the OS message because there 



are six characters/ spaces in Line 30. 
OK. Make sure Line 5 reads CLEAR 500. 
Now run. Can you pick up the error? 
Failure to change the starting letter in 
Line 40 from six to seven generated the 
problem. 

Can you break up D$ into some other 
groups without destroying the presenta- 
tion, using the same functions? Now is 
a good time to work something out and 
become more familiar with the three 
functions. 

Your fertile mind tells you that this is 
a lot of work to put three equal seg- 
ments on the screen. True, true. 

List lines 70 to 100. To save all the 
fuss of counting and using LEFTS, etc., 
in Line 70, we prefabricated the three 
building blocks and assigned them to 
separate string variables. Still being 
naturally lazy, to locate the starting 
position of the second row of text, it was 
simple to add 32 to the PRINT!? location 
usurped from Line 30. In lines 80 to 100, 
each name was placed exactly as in lines 
30 through 50, but with less effort. List 
Line 100 to compare. Run this. If you 
were a glutton for punishment, you 
could revise the strings in Line 70 
without altering the presentation in this 
part of the tutorial. Be careful: The 
following presentations may get thrown 
out of kilter. 

List lines 120 to 150. Here PRINTTAB 
was used to get the same results. Note 
the necessity of the semicolon. If you 
don't know what will happen when you 
run without it, pull out the semicolon 
and run it. 

1 can't stand that last line at the 
bottom of the panel. Find the correct 
program line and edit to center it! 

List lines 160 to 180. To place the text 
in the correct spaces on the next row, 
without the semicolon ploy, each string 
must be located individually. OK, now 
run. Too much calculating! Better that 
CoCo does the work as in the previous 
presentation. 

In order to return to the subject at 
hand and clown around with LEFTS, 
etc., list lines 200 to 220 and see how 
only MIDS was used to work out the 
same arrangement. List lines 240 to 300 
to see LEFTS and then RIGHTS carry the 
entire load to put on all three segments. 
Run your work. 

Since each of the groups has five 
characters/ spaces, you could use MIDS, 
RIGHTS and/ or LEFTS interchangeably 
(not their contents) and get the same 
results. It is no big deal to use the entire 
contents of a string when all are the 
same length. 



For practice, in Line 70, add a space 
to A$, strip off both spaces from B$ and 
add a leading space to C$. Run. 

CoCo is upset! Help CoCo straighten 
out this mess. First off, compare the 
distorted lines with the program lines 
concerned and point out and explain 
the whys and wherefores of the resultant 
boo-boos to yourself. Then make the 
required corrections. 



. . ideas began 
to perk in my 
noodle . . 



Look how valuable those GDSUB 
routines are. The short one was used 14 
times and the longer one was used seven 
times. 

List lines 320 on. In the third tutorial, 
we will work on presenting text, using 
LEFTS, and who knows what else, a 
letter at a time, in a very attractive, 
readable manner. Lines 320 and 330 
were just plopped onto the screen. 
Patience — you'll like it! 

You may wonder, what value is all 
this nonsense to me? It is important for 
a newcomer to become familiar with all 
the functions, statements and so forth. 
Knowing all the nuances of CoCo's 
features allows you a broad option of 
possibilities when composing a pro- 
gram. The more ways you know to do 
a job, the more alternatives are availa- 
ble for your creations. 

The educational language program 
you learned how to create and use 
recently would have been impossible to 
create without knowing what CoCo 
could do with LEFTS, MIDS and 
RIGHTS. Knowing what is possible 
affords you the choice of following 
many pathways to a fruitful conclusion. 

In fact, in fooling around with these 
tutorials, ideas began to perk in my 
noodle and aided me to move from dead 
center to further enlarge and modify 
that program. 

Notice how in lines 320 and 330 we 
continue to employ the invisible vertical 
line gambit to format our text. The 
point to be emphasized is that what you 
learn in these tutorials becomes a part 
of your computing skills and can herein- 
after! be called forth on demand to 
create some goodie that is near and dear 
to your heart. □ 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 79 



Listing 1: STRINES1 

fl ' <LISTING1> 
10 CLS 

20 A$= 11 INVERNESS, FL, 3 2 650 JOSEPH 

KOLAR1709 DICKINSON STREET" 
30 L=LEN(A$) : PRINT@14 , L; 
40 PRINT@32,MID$(A$,20,12) 
50 PRINT@64,RIGHT$ (A$,21) 
60 PRINT@96,LEFT$(A$, 52-33) 
70 EXEC44539 
80 PRINT§0,"" 
100 GOTO100 

#^ h 

220 117 

END 73 



I 



Listing 2: STRINGS2 



240 PRINT§8+160,RIGHT$(A$,5) :GOS 
UB50J3 

250 PRINT@13+160,RIGHT$(B$,5) :GO 
SUB500 

260 PRINT@18+16J3,RIGHT$(C$,5) :GO 

SUB600 

270 '*** 

280 PRINT@8+192 / LEFT$(A$,5) ; :GOS 
UB500 

290 PRINT@13+192,LEFT$(B$,5) ; :GO 
SUB500 

300 PRINT@18+192,LEFT$(C$,5) :GOS 
UB600 ' 

320 PRINT: PRINT" USING THE THRE 
E VARIABLES, A$;B$;C$; YOU CAN C 
ENTER THE NAME, WITH PREGNANT PA 
USES BETWEEN VARIABLES, USING 

A VARIETY OF TECHNIQUES. 
330 PRINT: PRINT" SOME ARE A WAS 
TE OF TIME!" 
340 GOTO 340 

500 FOR Z=1TO200: NEXT: RETURN 
600 FORZ=1TO500: NEXT: RETURN 



0 '<LISTING2> 
5 CLEAR 500 
10 CLS 

20 D$=" BETTY ANN WHITE" 
30 PRINT@8,LEFT$(D$,5) ; :GOSUB500 
40 PRINT MID$(D$,6,5) ; :GOSUB500 
50 PRINTRIGHT$(D$,5) :GOSUB600 
60 ■*** 

70 A$="BETTY":B$=" ANN ":C$="WHI 
TE" 

80 PRINT@8+32,A$; :GOSUB500 
90 PRINT B$;:GOSUB500 
100 PRINT C$:GOSUB600 
110 '*** 

120 PRINTTAB ( 8 ) A$ ; : GOSUB5 0 0 

130 PRINTTAB ( 13 ) B$ ; :GOSUB500 

140 PRINTTAB ( 17 )C$:GOSUB600 
150 i*** 

160 PRINT@8+96,A$:GOSUB500 

170 PRINT@13+96,B$:GOSUB500 

180 PRINT@18+96,C$:GOSUB600 
19^ »*** 

200 PRINT§8+128,MID$(A$,1,5) ; :GO 
SUB500 

210 PRINT@13+128,MID$(B$ / 1,5) ; :G 
OSUB500 

220 PRINT@18+128,MID$(C$,1,5) :GO 

SUB600 

230 '*** 



"XPNDR2 and SuperGuide - 
an Ideal Expansion Card Set" 



RAINBOW 2/86 
HARDWARE REVIEW 




XPNDR2 $39.95 each or 2/$76 
This prototype card features a 40 pin 
connector for projects requiring an on- 
line disk system or ROM paks. The 
CoCo signals are brought out to wire- 
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disk operation plus solid support for 
vertical mounting of the controller. The 
entire 4.3*7 inch card is drilled forfCs. 
Assembled, tested and ready to run. 

XPNDR1 $19.95 each or 2/$36 
A rugged 4.3*6.2 inch bare breadboard 
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SuperGuide $3.95 each 
Here is a unique plastic insert that 
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cards in the CoCo cartridge port. Don't 
forget to ORDER ONE FOR YOUR 
XPNDR CARDS. 



Included with each XPNDR card 
are 8 pages of APPLICATION 
NOTES to help you learn about 
chips and how to connect them to 
your CoCo. 




To order or for technical informa- 
tion call: 

(206) 782-6809 

weekdays 8 a.m. to noon 

We pay shipping on prepaid orders. 
For immediate shipment send 
check, money order or the number 
and expiration date of your VISA or 
MASTERCARD to: 



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MICROS/STEMS 



BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 81 



Computer Island Educational Software 

FIRST GAMES 32K Ext. $24.95 tape $29.95 disk 

First Games contains 6 menu driven programs to delight and teach your early 
learners (ages 3-6). These games enrich the learning of colors, numbers, lower case 
letters, shapes, memory, visual discrimination and counting. 



ARROW GAMES 32 K Ext $21.95 tape $26.95 disk 

Six menu driven games for young children (ages 3-6) to teach directions. All games 
involve using the arrow keys ONLY, Games include; LADYBUG, BUTTERFLY, AR- 
ROW MATCH, KALEIDOSCOPE, RABBIT, and DOODLE. Colorful graphics. 




5V wars** 




MATH INVADERS 32K Ext $17.95 tape $22.95 disk 

A multi-level "Space Invaders" type game to reinforce the 4 basic math opera- 
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ficult as you progress. Hi-res graphics. Joystick required. 

COCO WHEEL OF FORTUNE 32K Ext. $tE3.9S t?pe . &2-1.95 disk 

Hi-res graphics and screen in this version of the popular TV show. One tpgsix: 
players. Spin the wheel for points and guess a letter to solve the puzzle. Over 200 
puzzles. Have tun wtiile slrfjnglhening tenguage arte skills. 



DOLLARS & SENSE 16K Ext. $14.95 tape $19.95 disk 

Learn to make purchases. Graphic displays of items Kids love. Player buys items 
using dollars and coins to practice using money correctly. Solutions given. 

McCOCO'S MENU 16K Ext. $14.95 tape $19.95 disk 

America's favorite pastime - going out to, eat. Learn to buy and add up your pur- 
chases from atypical fast food restaurant menu. Gain skill in using money. Different 
prices each time. 




o Jiest 



AREA & PERIMETER 32K Ext. $19.95 tape $24.95 disk 

Triangles, rectangles, and circles are covered in this Hi-res t$$) and graphics 
program. c i; 

SALES & BARGAINS 32K Ext. $19.95 tape $24.95 disk 

see us at II PRINCETON Learn to find the discounted price. Hi-res text and beautiful graphics. 

DISTANCE PROBLEMS 32 K Ext. $19.95 tape $24.95 disk 

Moving graphics and text combined on a Hi-res screen. Rate x Time equals Distance 
in all its forms. 




OPENING A BANK ACCT 32K Ext. $24.95 disk only 

A set of programs designed to introduce and provide practice in the skills of filling 
out bank applications, deposit and withdrawal slips, and computing bank account 
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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 




(718) 948-2748 

Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 1 
Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1.00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. 






Prospect, Kentucky, October 1986 



Vol.2 No.2 



Writer: Jeffrey Parker 



The RAINBOWfest Reporter 



© Falsoft, Inc. All Rights Reserved 



CoCo fans find bargains at Chicago RAINBOWfest 




Our fourth Chicago RAINBOWfest (our 11th show) was once again at the Hyatt-Regency Woodfield, May 23- 
25. Our next show is in Princeton, New Jersey, Oct, 17-19, and promises to be a coming-out party for the new 
CoCo3. 



RAINBOW publisher 
speaks of loyalty, 
bright future 



rainbow's Lonnie Falk spoke 
to a full crowd of excited CoCo 
and rainbow fans about the se- 
riousness of the Color Computer, 
the strength of the machine be- 
cause of its huge user base, and 
the tremendous loyalty from 
third-party manufacturers. Falk, 
who built Falsoft, Inc. and the 
rainbow around his initial love 
for the Color Computer, ex- 
pressed optimism about a bright 
future for CoCo owners. "Radio 
Shack is a smart company. They 
know they've got a strong prod- 
uct and equally strong support in 
the CoCo." 

Falk said the rainbow would 
go on serving the CoCo commu- 
nity without fail. "This machine 
has a bright future," said Falk, 
"and we will be a part of that 
future." 




Cecil "Jejf"Houk, a music programmer for Speech Systems, appears ready 
to direct a CoCo symphony. 

Speech Systems music, music, music 



If you weren't at the Speech 
Systems booth, you might never 
believe what our powerful little 
CoCo can really do. Amid the din 
of fully synthesized orchestras 
conducted by the MIDI interface, 
people trying the piano keyboard 
for the CoCo, the Stereopack, 
Musica II and Supervoice. Rich 
Parry, owner of Speech Systems 



and developer of the highly ac- 
claimed EARS Speech Recogni- 
tion interface, ran back and forth 
as quickly as he could answering 
questions and helping customers. 
"I can't believe the turnout," said 
Parry, quite out of breath. "With 
the discount prices, we may be 
sold out of everything by Satur- 
day night!" 



Braving the heat and sun of 
Memorial Day weekend, thou- 
sands of eager CoCophiles 
swarmed into the Hyatt-Regency 
Woodfield, just outside of Chi- 
cago, for the eleventh RAIN- 
BOWfest. 

There were bargains .galore. 
Radio Shack led the way with 
items like their CGP-1 15 printers 
for only $150 and new FD-500 
slimline Drive 0 packages for the 
incredibly low price of $149. 

All manner of manufacturers 
and celebrities were there, with 
news of new CoCo products and 
interesting, informative seminars 
to answer questions. Of course, 
there was the CoCo Community 
Breakfast, all the news on the 
rapidly growing OS-9 Users 
Group, and above all else, bar- 
gains, bargains, bargains. 

The tone of this RAINBOW- 
fest was one of exuberant sup- 
port. Although there were more 
attendees than at the previous 
show, the exhibition hall was 
larger, so many people thought 
fewer people had attended. Said 
Lonnie Falk, publisher of THE 
rainbow, "We're going back to a 
smaller room next year. I thought 
a bigger room was what every- 
body wanted, but we got it and 
now people are complaining 
more. Next year well go back to 
the original size." 

Excitement ran high about the 
new CoCo. Unfortunately, no 
detailed information was availa- 
ble. Special CoCo Community 
Breakfast guest speaker Steve 
Bjork said that, because he was 
under non-disclosure agreements 
with Tandy, he could really only 
talk about what he would like to 
see in such a new machine. Bjork 
also spoke about the power of the 
OS-9 operating system, and 
about the surfacing industry 
based around CDI (Compact 
Disk Interface) ROM technol- 
ogy. 

[Editor's Note: Steve will be 
joining independent programmer 
GregZumwalt and Tandy's Barry 
Thompson and Mark Siegel, 
both key figures in the CoCo 3*s 
development, in a special round- 
table discussion of the Color 
Computer 3 at our Princeton 
RAINBOWfest, October 18.] 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 83 



Free seminars draw hundreds 



The Speech Systems Experi- 
mental Traveling Synthesized 
Band, with Rich Parry, was by far 
the most popular free seminar of 
the Chicago RAINBOWfest. 
Over 300 eager fans tried to cram 
into the seminar room, but little 
more than half of that number 
were able to fit inside. 

Author Dale Puckett, former 
OS-9 Users Group President and 
well-known OS-9 speaker, gave 
two well-attended seminars, one 
an introduction to OS-9 and the 
other an introduction to BASIC09. 

Other seminars included Dick 
White's Spreadsheet Applica- 
tions, Tim Jenison of Colorware 
speaking on the Secrets of CoCo 
Max, and Dan Downard in two 
seminars for beginners. Jim 



Reed, the rainbow's managing 
editor, and Danny Humphress, 
managing editor of PCM, held a 
seminar on writing programs and 
articles for publication in maga- 
zines. PCM is another Falsoft 
publication for Tandy's portable 
and MS-DOS computers. 

There were also seminars on 
buying a machine to fit your 
needs, user interfaces and file 
transfers between the CoCo and 
MS-DOS machines. 

All of the seminars were inter- 
esting and well-received, giving 
those in attendance a chance to 
meet many of the CoCo com- 
munity celebrities and to have 
their questions answered on a 
more personal basis. 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest Princeton 
October 17-19 





Breakfast speaker Steve Bjork, president of SRB Software (right), tells a 
fish story to Brian Lantz, president of the OS-9 Users Group, 

CompuServe 
online from 
RAINBOWfest 

CompuServe's CoCo Special 
Interest Group manager Wayne 
Day gave a comprehensive dem- 
onstration of the SIG's online 
database for Tandy users. In 
addition, free time was being 
raffled off hourly during the 
entire show. Mike Ward, author 
of the Mikeyterm communica- 
tions program for the CoCo, was 
on hand, too. 

Radio Shack wheels and deals 




THE RAINBO W's Dr. Michael Plog 
is soon to release his new CoCo 
statistics book. 



Occupying a large exhibit 
space at the show, Tandy/ Radio 
Shack dealers were selling every- 
thing they had at unbelievably 
low prices. The 64K Color Com- 
puter 2 was being sold for $99 and 
FD-500 Drive 0s for $149. Model 
100 portable computers were 
going for only $250, with some 
lucky people buying several at a 
time for an astounding $150 



apiece. CCR-81s went for $29.95 
and the list goes on and on. In 
addition, hundreds of popular 
software items were sold at more 
than 60 percent off. The most 
popular item there, according to 
a Radio Shack dealer, was the 
CGP-115 color ink-jet printer. It 
sold out within minutes of the 
show's opening on Friday eve- 
ning at a low $150. 




T h 




Mike Ward (left) goes through the motions of getting a CoCo online. 
84 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



Saturday is always the busiest day at our RAINBO Wfests. In Chicago, 
the Radio Shack booth offered huge discounts. 



Disto is in 
control with 
super controller 



Tony "Turn of the Screw" Di- 
Stefano, a rainbow contributing 
editor, was manning the Disto 
booth with its fascinating and 
ingenious new four-DOS con- 
troller with internal expansion 
port. Also on display at Disto 
were the 80-column card with 
real-time clock and parallel print- 
er port, the MPROM pro- 
grammer for EPROMS, and the 
Super RAMDisk 256/512K. 
They also offered their C-DOS 
operating system, which substan- 
tially upgrades Extended Color 
basic and adds drivers for Disto 's 
display, printer and controller 
devices. 




MiCROCOM SOFTWARE 



awards h 

CQUhTIMt ?** 




Microcoms Kishore Santwani (left) and Gary Jes answered questions 
about their books and utility software. 



A bang-up time with DynaCalc 



Dennis Derringer, well-known 
author of the Pro-Color Series, 
was on hand to demonstrate his 
line of products. Attendees at 
RAINBOWfest also saw the in- 
troduction of two new products 
from Derringer Software: Sum- 
mary, for summarizing spread- 
sheets, and Max Edit, a program 
to design and edit Co Co Max 
fonts. "It's a little bit of a di- 
lemma, 11 said Dennis. "I am also 



selling a three-disk set of fonts for 
Co Co Max, and they are doing 
very well. They appeal to people 
who want more text fonts, but 
don't have time to design them." 
Dennis was offering a substantial 
discount on all his products, and 
business was booming. 

Sharing the booth with Derrin- 
ger Software was Joe Turner 
from Computer Systems Center, 
producers of Dynacalc. While 




Joe could not sell the products 
himself, Radio Shack was offer- 
ing them at discounted prices. "1 
can only promote them," said 
Joe. "I can't sell them. But 1 can 
send you right over to Radio 
Shack' and they'll take care of 
you." Because of the strong inter- 
est in OS-9 at this RAINBOW- 
fest, the OS-9 version of Dyna- 
calc was doing very well. 



Special packages 
from T&D Software 

T&D Subscription Software 
was on hand with nearly 50 tape 
and disk packages from its 
monthly subscription software 
service. Not only were they offer- 
ing reduced prices on their 
monthly program disks, but they 
had also put together special 
packages at discounted prices. 



Hot new <ja 
graphics, uj 
and more 



es, 
ades 



Many other products were 
either introduced or displayed at 
the Chicago RAINBOWfest. A1J 
of them are top-quality items, 
and all were offered at special 
show rates. 

From Diecom products of 
Canada came several new pro- 
ducts: Gantelet, F- 16 Assault and 
Karate. Along with several other 
titles, these products have out- 
standing graphics and action. 
And imagine, the author is only 
19 years old! 

Four Star Software offered 
Pen Pal 2.0, with some nice new 
features, at a special show price, 
along with several games and new 
OS-9 utilities packages. 

Michtron came out in full force 
with a range of products and the 
introduction of a new game, BYO 
Pinball, which rivals the MS- 
DOS version of the program in 
detail and action. Along with this 
piece of new software were other 
hits from Michtron, such as 
Speed Racer, Rommel 3-D and 
more. 

Howard Medical impressed 
the RAINBOWfest crowd with 
their 80-column, dot-addressable 
graphics printer, the Howard 80. 



Saguaro Software 
introduces 
new Adventures 

Saguaro Software was on hand 
with special prices and several 
new products, including the An- 
drea Co Co graphics Adventure, a 
new Adventure from Scott Cablt 
called Adventure in Mythology, 
and a sneak preview of a graph- 
ics Adventure called White Fire 
of Eternity that is scheduled to be 
released soon. Along with these 
pieces, Saguaro was selling the 
new Bob van der Poel Telewriter- 
64 Character Set Editor 



RAINBOW's development coordinator IraBarsky makes notes for future 
shows. 



Free pictures for CoCo MAX II 



Tim Jenison of Colorware was 
selling CoCo Max //for a special 
price of only $69. With each 
purchase he was including a free 
disk full of CoCo Max images. 
The new CoCo Max II has 14 



fonts, dynamic two-dimensional 
shrink and stretch, supports mul- 
tiple drives, and is, on the whole, 
incredible to behold. Upgrades 
from CoCo Max I were available 
for $20. 




RAINBOW reviewer A. Buddy Hogan (left) makes a purchase from John 
Ross. 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 85 




^ First-time exhibitor 
Synercon displays 

powerful options . 



Synercon, Inc., a new exhibitor 
at RAINBOWfest, was offering a 
256K external plug-in memory 
expansion board, as well as a 1- 
megabyte board that the OS-9 
people were thrilled to see. They 
were also offering a five-meg hard 
drive, a 20-meg drive, and their 
new operating system, SDOS, 
along with the SD BASIC Com- 
piler^ a true basic compiler. 
Bundled with the compiler was a 
two-pass assembler, 6809 de- 
bugger and text editor. 



Synercon's Richard Gros goes 
over a printout with pharmacist 
David Bialka and Mrs. Bialka. 





Dennis Derringer of Derringer Software (seated) demonstrates his popular 
3Pro-Color-File. 



Ross Litton of Howard Medical 
fields a question. 



OS-9 Users Group a star attraction Sof CO S 



Brian Lantz, president of the 
OS-9 Users Group, together with 
Bruce N. Warner, editor of the 
MOTD newsletter, and several 
well-known OS-9 Users Group 
personalities, were very pleased 
with the turnout and said that 
many OS-9 enthusiasts had 
joined the group. The OS-9 Users 



Group offered membership, but- 
tons, T-shirts and raffle tickets for 
software. Tickets for the OS-9 
Users Group Breakfast on Sun- 
day morning were available, too. 
Keynote speaker Dr. James W. 
Moore, Jr., of Micro ware, spoke 
on current issues and trends with 
the OS-9 operating system. 



Delphi surges ahead 



John Gibney, national sales 
director for Delphi, was very 
enthusiastic about signing people 
up right from RAINBOWfest to 
join in the already large and fast- 
growing family of users on Del- 
phi. 

rainbow Magazine runs the 
CoCo SIG on Delphi, providing 
the community with instant com- 
munication, online shopping ser- 
vices and a host of other valuable 
features. "When people become 
aware of the capabilities of a 

86 



service like Delphi, and the low 
cost, it's like discovering a whole 
new world," said Gibney. 

One of the best features of 
Delphi is the instant communica- 
tions capabilities it gives users, 
whether participating in forums, 
buying software, or just getting a 
question answered by an author 
or editor from rainbow. The 
CoCo SIG is just one aspect of 
Delphi, and John encourages 
users to discover Delphi's full 
potential. 



hardware 

priced 

right 



Sofco Computer Supply Com- 
pany, of Downer's Grove, Illi- 
nois, had quite a few show spe- 
cials to offer, including DEC dual 
drives at special RAINBOWfest 
prices. Among their other offer- 
ings were labels, cases, binders, 
drive-cleaning kits, hardware 
tool kits, and Samsung color and 
monochrome monitors. Accord- 
ing to Charles W Schneider, who 
ran the booth at the show, sales 
were brisk and he was dropping 
prices on equipment about once 
an hour to give show goers the 
best bargains possible. 



Great discounts 
from Prickly-Pear 

Prickly-Pear Software, sharing 
the booth with Saguaro, featured 
several excellent utilities, as well 
as the highly acclaimed To Pre- 
serve Quandic and its new Hall of 
the King, a two-disk graphics 
Adventure. 




If you're tall enough to reach the 
arrow keys, it's game time! 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 




David Dies of Diecom Products was one of the Canadian exhibitors. 



J&M's 

Albuquerque 
express 

J & M Systems, Ltd., of New 
Mexico, are always regulars at 
every RAINBOWfest. At the 
Chicago show, they had great 
deals on many of their products, 
including their original JFD disk 
controller, "slightly defective" 
drive controllers, their famous 
Memory Minder drive alignment 
and testing program, and hard 
drives, 



Alpha Products comes to C0C0 Tom Mix Software 



New to the Color Computer 
market is Alpha Products of 
Woodhaven, New York. Alpha 
Products has long been a manu- 
facturer of peripheral products 
for the other Radio Shack TRS- 
80 computers. Alpha's main pro- 
duct is the Amazing A-Bus, an 
expansion chassis and mother- 



board assembly which allows the 
interfacing of many different 
cards, or even additional mother- 
boards, to the Color Computer. 
Some of the devices supported 
and supplied by Alpha are the 
digital and analog input cards, a 
motor controller, clock with 
alarm and voice synthesizer. 



brings on the games 




Zytek's Jim O'Keef (right) appears dressed for Adventure as he 
discusses Plateau of the Past with two R A JNBOWj esters. 

Zytek shows unique map 
window programming 

Zytek, of Blue Island, Illinois, 
was on hand displaying their new 
Adventure, Plateau of the Past. It 
uses the unique map window 
programming and is a thrilling 
new entry into the Adventure 



market for the Co Co. Driven by 
a special price and a special three- 
free-disk incentive to the first 50 
customers, this program, too, 
was among those that sold out 
before the end of the show. 



Tom Mix Software was on 
hand with some real greats, like 
its P51-D Mustang Attack flight 
Simulation, Approach Con- 
troller Simulation, and several 
new releases, such as Martian 



Crypt and the Misadventures of 
Eddie. Especially popular was the 
new joystick-controlled, ani- 
mated graphics Adventure, Maui 
Vice, which sold out by the end 
of the show. 




Tom and Gisele Mix find a moment's respite from duty in the exhibit hall 

October 1986 THE RAINBOW 87 



Derringer Software. 



Max Fonts 

New lor CoCo Max 

Now you can have up to 72 fonts for creating 
dazzling type-set titles and special displays! 

3 SETS OF 24 FONTS 

WHICH ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD! 



$ 



24 



95 



each 



3m 



95 



Written by Waily Bayer and Mike Shawaluk 



Max Edit 



© 1985 Snard Enterprises 



A FONT EDITOR FOR 
COCO MAX 

• Edit current fonts 

• Create new fonts 

• Design symbol fonts 

• Comes with pre-defined fonts 

• CoCo Max I & II compatible 



CoCo's Best 
& Fastest 
Spreadsheet 

RS-DOS 
VERSION 



FOR 64K 
DISK SYSTEMS 






(Disk Only) 



• 51 x 24 

Display with 

Lower Case 

Super-fast Smart 
Screen Refresh 

• Auto-Repeat 
Keyboard Driver 

• 

* Fast 16-Digit Arithmetic 
with Scientific Functions 

• Two-way communications 
with PRO-COLOR-FILE 

★ Enhanced* 



Written by: Michael W. Shawaluk 

CoCo Max" is a registered trademark of Colorware. 



Serving the Color 
Computer for 4 Years. 



PRO-COLORFILE 

&.1984 by Derringer Software. Inc. 

ENHANCED 2.0 

60 Data Fields for each record 
1020 spaces available per record if needed 
Maximizes multiple drive operation 
28 equation lines (+-7) 
IF-THEN-ELSE logic test in equations 
Full Screen editing on up to 4 data entry screens 
Key click and auto key repeat 
Stores custom designed report formats 
Obtain totals, averages, or summaries for any field 
Output reports to printer, screen, or disk file 
Send data out to a DYNACALC compatible file 
Separate label generator for up to 10 across labels 
Pre-define up to 16 indexes for searching/reporting file 
Sorts 750 records in under 5 minutes 
User defined selection menus 
Repeated tasks performed with one keystroke 
Comes with 75 pages of documentation in a 3 ring binder 
Supported by a national users group 
Full time programmer support 
Supplied on an unprotected disk 



$ 59 



95 



PRO COLOR FORMS 2.0 

£ 1984 by Derringer Software. Inc. 

PRO-COLOR-FORMS will access data files created with 
PRO-COLOR-FILE and merge them with a letter or place them 
on pre-printed forms. 

• STORE UP TO 6 FORMATS • USER DEFINED PAGE SIZE 

• SUPPORTS SPECIAL PRINTER CONTROL CODES • RIGHT 
JUSTIFICATION • PASSWORD PROTECTION • MERGES 
WITH GRAPHICS FROM MASTER DESIGN OR 
TELEGRAPHICS • 

PROCOLOR-DIR 

c 1984 by Derringer Software, inc. 

PRO-COLOR-DIR will read your directories and create a 
master data file that can be accessed by PRO-COLOR-FILE 
for sorting and reporting. 1000 + records can be stored on 
one diskette with valuable information about each program. 

You can obtain hard copies of the information and create 
labels of the filenames for placing on the diskette itself. 

• DISK ID NAME • FILENAME/EXT • TYPE OF FILE 

• DATE CREATED • DATE UPDATED ■ NUMBER OF 
GRANS ALLOCATED • NUMBER OF SECTORS 
ALLOCATED AND USED • MACHINE LANGUAGE 
ADDRESSES • 



$ 29 



95 



DYNACALC* 

SPREAD SHEET FLEXIBILITY 

(Includes Dynagraph, Sidewise) 

$jg95 

Telewriter-64 

WORD PROCESSOR POWER 

$59 95 

coco Max II 

GRAPHICS SUPERIOR 

$JQ95 



TM 



@ SUMMARY 

€> 1985 Derringer Software, inc. 

if you use your spreadsheet program to keep track of your 
expenses then ©SUMMARY can help you analyze those 
expenses. For example, if you indicate a "Category" for each 
expense then @ SUMMARY will produce a report that shows 
a total for each category, the highest amount, the lowest 
amount and the average amount. In addition, ©SUMMARY 
can produce a hi-res line graph or bar graph of the analysis 
and allow you to place titles on the graph. A hardcopy of the 
graph can also be generated as well as saved to disk. 

The analysis can be saved in a "data file" which can be 
loaded into DYNACALC or read in by @ SUMMARY for future 
additions to the analysis. If you use other Spreadsheets such 
as ELITE*CALC then you have added a graphing feature to 
your spreadsheet applications. The analysis can also be saved 
in an ASCII file which can be read by word processors for 
inclusion in a report. 

@ SUMMARY is compatible with any spreadsheet program 
that can generate an ASCII text file of worksheets. 



Specify RS-DOS 
orOS9* 



(disk only) 



$1995 



*0S9 version does not 
have Hi-Res graphing 
and requires Basic09. 



DYNACALC ' is a registered trademark of Computer Systems Center 

ELITE*CALC is a trademark of Elite Software 

0S9 is a registered trademark of MICRO WARE and MOTOROLA. 



SIDEWISE 

© 1984 by Derringer Software. Inc. 

Add a new "twist" to your printer's capabilities! 

SIDEWISE makes your printer do something you never 
thought possible -print side ways! 

SIDEWISE will read in any ASCII text file and print it out 
side ways using a Radio Shack, Epson, Okidata, C-ltoh or 
Gemini printers having dot-graphics ability. 

SIDEWISE 0S9 is compatible with DYNACALC 0S9 and 
requires Basic09 



SIDEWISE 0S9 
(Disk only) 



SIDEWISE RS-DOS 



$3995 
$2495* 



* RS-DOS version included FREE with DYNACALC R 

0597s a registered trademark of MICROWARE and MOTOROLA. 

TELEGRAPHICS 

© 1984 by Derringer Software. Inc. 

PRINT HI-RES GRAPHICS USING TELEWRITER-64! 

Use C0C0 Max, Graphicom or other graphics programs to 
create letter heads and print them while using Telewriter-64. 

Telegraphies interfaces with Radio Shack, Epson, Gemini, 
C-ltoh and Okidata printers having dot-addressable graphics. 
A simple modification to Telewriter-64 will allow you to exit 
Telewriter via the DISK I/O MENU and print out the graphic 
without affecting any of your text in the buffer. 

This is the same feature that is included in our MASTER 
DESIGN program. Since we felt you don't need to buy two 
graphics editing programs, we have made this feature available 
at a reduced price. 



$2495 



(Available Only On Disk) 

NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLICABLE' 



MASTER DESIGN 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Generates lettering in hi-res graphics that can be different 
sizes, skinny, bold, textured, drop shadowed, raise shadowed 
or tall. Also interfaces with the Telewriter-64 word processor 
for printing hi-res displays with your letters. 

take full advantageof all the extended BASIC hi-res graphic 
commands including boxes, circles, lines, copy displays and 
utilize GET and PUT features. Added commands include mirror 
reflection, turn displays backwards or upside down. Squish 
displays, create dot patterns for shading or diagonal lines. 

The Letterhead Utility allows you to access hi-res graphics 
from Telewriter-64, your own BASIC programs or 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS. 

Interfaces with dot matrix printers having dot addressable 
graphics. 



FOR BOTH 



$2995 



See reviews in: 

July 84 Rainbow. Oct. 84HotCoCo 



Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300, Florence, SC 29502-5300 

To place an order by phone, call: (803) 665-5676 

10 AM and 5 PM EDT 

Check, Money Order, VISA or MasterCard 



South Carolina residents add sales tax. 
Include $3.00 for UPS Shipping - $5.00 U.S. Mail - $9.00 Air Mail 

Canadian Distributor-Kelly Software 
Australian Distributor-Computer Hut Software 



COMMENTARY 



Inside the CoCo 3 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



rhis is a collection of observations 
made after examining the insides 
of a Color Computer 3 and com- 
paring its ROM to that of a CoCo 2. 

ROM Addressing 

The CoCo 3 has a 32K by 8-bit ROM. 
The lower 16K of this ROM contain 
code that is nearly the same as that in 
the 16K of Color BASIC and Extended 
Color BASIC, with the following 
changes: 

The copyright message in the Ex- 
tended BASIC part of the ROM is 
altered, as is the version number in 
the Color BASIC ROM. 

The part of Extended BASIC that 
formerly contained code for the 
DLORD command is now completely 
different. 

The startup sequence in Color 
BASIC, including the RAM chip se- 
lector and memory size checker, as 
well as the warm/ cold start reset 
sequence code, is all rewritten. 

The keyboard routine in Color 
BASIC has been rewritten (possibly to 
allow use of the keyboard interrupt, 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. 
Marty is the database manager of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 



which would considerably speed the 
execution of Color BASIC). 

The vectors set at the end of the 
Color BASIC ROM are now all point- 
ing in different places. 

Apart from these relatively minor 
changes, there exists a complete image 
of the Color BASIC and Extended BASIC 
ROMs in the lower part of the 32K by 
8-bit ROM. 

The GIME chip supports three 
modes for addressing ROM in the 
CoCo 3. In one of these modes, only the 
lower 16K of ROM is addressed inter- 
nally, and the remaining 16K of 
addressable ROM is looked for on the 
cartridge port. In this mode, the ROM 
in the CoCo 3 should be able to be made 
to closely emulate the appearance of the 
ROMs in a CoCo 2. In fact, even pro- 
grams that use undocumented calls to 
the ROM should not be compromised 
on the CoCo. The two low-order bits of 
SFF90 control the mapping of the 
available CoCo 3 ROM memory. Note 
that the CoCo 3 can, via those bits, be 
made to address a full 32K of ROM on 
a ROM pack, allowing it to support up 
to 64K total of ROM in the system. 

RAM Upgrades 

The CoCo 3 is delivered as a 128K 
machine, with expansion to 512K of 
memory via a plug-in board. The 128K 
unit has four 18-pin, 4-bit wide by 64K 
4464-type DRAM chips. The 512K add- 
on board is inserted after removing the 
four 4464 chips, and that board has on 
it sixteen 1-bit by 256K 41256 DRAMs. 
Presently the add-on board is the only 



option lor expanding the addressable 
memory of the CoCo 3. 

The board is easy to duplicate, and it 
is likely that third-party suppliers will 
soon be carrying versions of it, probably 
priced somewhat below Tandy's $150 
price. In theory, a sensible way to 
upgrade the CoCo 3 would be to replace 
the four 4464 DRAMs with four 4-bit 
wide by 256K 1-megabit DRAMs. But 
that sort of chip is barely on the drawing 
board, and its production and sale at 
less than astronomical prices is not 
likely to occur soon. 

Such a 4-bit wide by 256K chip is 
quite different from the 1-bit wide by 1- 
megabit chips that are already being 
sold in the $50 per chip price range. The 
1-bit wide by 1-megabit chips should 
soon be an economic reality. But a 4-bit 
wide by 1-megabit chip will, as I stated, 
be a long time coming. 

The RAM is arranged so a 16-bit 
wide data bus is available to the video 
circuitry. This allows data to be put on 
the screen much faster than on the old 
CoCo 2, providing for higher resolution 
and more colors in the CoCo 3 display. 

RAM Addressing 

The GIME chip supports a complex 
and powerful memory manager far 
more sophisticated than the crude bank 
switching arrangements used in CoCo 2 
RAM upgrades such as Thunder RAM 
and the J&R Banker. The memory 
manager allows you to take any group 
of eight 8K segments in the full 512K 
address space and map them into the 
64K of available memory directly ad- 
dressable by the 6809. The old CoCo 2 



90 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



memory upgrades could move memory 
around only in clumsy 32 or 64K blocks 
and were far more limited in how they 
could shuffle such blocks. The control 
addresses for the memory manager are 
in the $FFA0 to SFFAF address range. 

This sophisticated memory manage- 
ment is what allows the CoCo 3 to run 
OS-9 Level II. Writers of dedicated 
applications for the CoCo 3 also find 
this powerful memory manager allows 
them to easily and quickly address the 
half-megabyte of the CoCo 3 without 
disrupting programs running in part of 
the 6809's address space. The CoCo 3 
could become an attractive machine for 
scientific and industrial tasks because of 
its low price and high performance. 

When it boots up, the CoCo 3 re- 
serves memory at $FE00 through 
SFEFF for special system functions, 
including interrupt handling. The 
GIME hardware is set up to hold the top 
256 bytes of addressable RAM (located 
just below the control I/O ports of 
SFFOO through $FFFF) constant 
through all memory manager address 
changes. This hardware feature is neces- 
sary to implement OS-9 Level II. 

But the need to keep memory in this 
area constant will be the single most 
common cause of incompatibilities 
between CoCo 2 Disk BASIC software 
and the CoCo 3. It may be possible, 
using a switch at Bit 3 of $FF90, to turn 
off that reservation of those top 256 
bytes and, via other manipulations, to 
more closely emulate the old CoCo 2 
environment. Alternatively, it may 
prove easier for many software makers 
to do the minor rewrite needed to leave 
that address area alone. In many cases, 
this may be all the change needed to 
make "incompatible" CoCo 2 software 
run on the CoCo 3. 

Emulation of Old SAM Functions 

VDG related functions — Addresses 
$FFC0 through $FFD3 function on the 
GIME in exactly the same way they did 
on the old SAM, providing for total 
emulation of all documented old SAM/ 
VDG functions. 

» 

Memory related functions — Addresses 
$FFD4 and $FFD5 (the page switcher) 
are supported on the GIME chip. The 
RAM/ ROM switcher at SFFDE and 
SFFDF that switches 32K of ROM with 
32K of RAM is supported too. Thus, 
many Disk BASIC programs that run in 
a "96K" environment on the CoCo 2 
will still work on the CoCo 3. 



Both Graphicom and WEFAX ap- 
pear to work properly on the CoCo 3. 
These are examples of Disk BASIC 96K 
programs that use only documented 
calls to ROM vectors and do not mess 
with the top 256 bytes of available 
RAM. 



"The GIME chip 
supports three 
modes for 
addressing ROM 
in the CoCo 3. " 



Not surprisingly, $FFDA through 
SFFDD ports on the old SAM set up 
for4K, 16K or 64K of memory using the 
old CoCo and CoCo 2 chip arrange- 
ment, are not supported on the GIME 
chip. No great loss here, except to 
insiders who used the SHIFT/ BREAK/ 
Reset technique to make RAM snap- 
shots. 

Clock control — The CoCo 3 uses a 
primary crystal that works at twice the 
speed of that used in the CoCo 2. This 
is an 8X colorburst crystal: 28.63636 
MHz. The old speed up POKE at $FFD6 
and SFFD7 that would make the CPU 
address the ROM at twice normal speed 
(but still address RAM at its normal 
speed) is not supported on the CoCo 3. 

But before you get alarmed, rest 
assured that when Tandy took that 
away, they gave us something much 
better: The port at $FFD8 and $FFD9 
on the old CoCo caused the ROM and 
RAM to be addressed at double speed, 
but terminated RAM refresh and com- 
pletely destroyed the old CoCo and 
CoCo 2's video display. However, on 
the CoCo 3, this "super high speed" 
POKE is now fully supported, the RAM 
memory is refreshed and the video 
display is unaffected. This means you 
can properly run your Disk BASIC 
programs at full double speed on the 
CoCo 3, though you may have to drop 
back to normal speed during such 
functions as cassette and disk I/O and 
sound generation. 

Video Display of Text 

I have experimented with displaying 



the CoCo 3's video on quality amber 
monochrome monitors. Initially, at 
power up, the display had the ugly 
vertical stripe distortion that is typical 
when you put a color signal on a mono- 
chrome monitor. 

Although the GIME supports turn- 
ing off the color signal via a port (Bit 
4 of $FF98), poking under BASIC to this 
port was of limited value because the 
port is reset each time a new BASIC print 
statement is executed. Later on, we may 
find an easy way to properly shut off the 
color when in BASIC. 

But, for now, by properly altering the 
foreground and background colors 
using the sophisticated palette control 
of the CoCo 3, we can make the CoCo 
3 produce a credible image on a mono- 
chrome monitor. Even in the 80-column 
display mode, the image is quite read- 
able. Somewhat to my disappointment, 
although the 80-column set was not all 
that bad, I found its sharpness and 
crispness somewhat inferior to that of 
my PBJ Word Pak I 80-column card, 
and far inferior to that of my IBM PC 
clone. But part of this may have been 
due to a badly adjusted monitor, and 
part to my not having sufficient time to 
play with the color set. Both black 
letters on light background and light 
letters on black background can easily 
be produced. Underlining is supported. 
The character font is the same as that 
of theTl VDG chip. 

Buying a composite video mono- 
chrome monitor (in the $60 to $120 
price range) allows you to take advan- 
tage of the 80-column display of the 
CoCo 3. A color composite monitor will 
not support the 80-column display. If 
you want both 80-column display of 
text and full color capability, your only 
option is an RGB analog monitor. 
Tandy wants $300 for its CM-8. This is 
something of a bargain, actually, since 
Magnavox and Sony, who also make 
CoCo 3-compatible RGB analog mon- 
itors, want at least $70 more, though 
their products are more flexible and 
support other signal protocols as well). 

Via the GIME video hardware, one 
can generate 32-, 40-, 64- and 80- 
column text screens, although, on a 
color TV, only the 32-column works 
well at all. The 40-column display will 
often be cut off by the overscan found 
on most commercial color TVs. 

Add-on Hardware Addressing 

The GIME uses lots of address space 
not used before by the SAM chip. It 
does leave open address ports between 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 91 



SFF60 through $FF7F for use by Radio 
Shack and third-party developers. 

Of these, $FF7F is used by the Mul- 
tipak, $FF68 through SFF6F are typi- 
cally used by the RS-232 Pak card and 
the Tandy Modem card (or PBJ 2SP 
card). $FF7D and $FF7E are used by 
the Tandy Speech Sound pak if they are 
in the system. Other devices addressed 
in this legal range are Ears, third-party 
voice packs and the Stereo Pak from 
Speech Sound. All of these should work 
just fine on the CoCo 3. 

But woe to the manufacturer who did 
not heed the warnings given by Tandy 
to not use addresses outside of that 
range! Sadly, CoCo Max is one such; 
it will not work on the CoCo 3 in its 
present form. Hopefully, new CoCo 
Max hardware will be made that fixes 
this problem. 

Among those pieces of hardware that 
will mess up the GIME chip and are 
therefore somewhat incompatible with 
the CoCo 3 is Radio Shack's Multipak 
Interface. Yes, there is a bug in the PAL 
chip in both the old and new Multipak 
interface that lets the port at SFF7F 
ghost to $FF9F. This conflicts with a 
"Horizontal Offset Register" in the 



CoCo 3's GIME. I have been told by an 
informed source that the problem only 
occurs in 512K CoCo 3s, and that a fix 
in the form of a new PAL chip will be 
provided by Tandy. 

It has been rumored that this fix for 
the Multipak will cost $6, regardless of 
whether you have an old or new Mul- 
tipak. This is a reasonable price for such 
a fix. This fix is not yet available at your 
service centers or at National Parts, but 
should be ready by the time 51 2K CoCo 
3s reach your stores. 

Compatibility 

In some preliminary testing, I found 
that Telepatched Telewriter and Mikey- 
term, two popular applications, both 
crash when booted on the CoCo 3. At 
present I am not sure of the exact reason 
or how to fix these. But fixes for both 
should be forthcoming. It certainly is 
true that many popular CoCo 3 Disk 
BASIC standbys will not work on the 
CoCo 3. But it is equally clear that 
Tandy bent over backward to try to 
preserve compatibility for both their 
own and for third-party software. Un- 
fortunately, in many cases, their best 
efforts were not good enough. But the 



CoCo 3 is so nearly CoCo 2 compatiblt 
that it should not be very hard to fi> 
existing CoCo 2 favorites to run on th< 
CoCo 3. My one major criticism o: 
Tandy in this regard is that they shoulc 
have warned us long ago to stay out o: 
the SFEOO through $FEFF region 
much as they did clearly warn us not tc 
use undocumented vectors. 

Conclusion 

Hopefully there will soon be new 
software taking advantage of the CoCc 
3's vastly improved video display, RS- 
232 and memory capability, which will 
make the issue of CoCo 2 incompatibil- 
ity under Disk BASIC less of a concern. 

Special Note of Thanks: 

I would like to give special thanks to 
Tandy Corporation for giving permis- 
sion to developers who had CoCo 3s to 
allow me to examine them and their 
documentation after the CoCo 3 was 
officially released. Without the kind 
cooperation of Tandy Corp, Steve 
Bjork and Dale Lear, it would be im- 
possible for me to get this information 
out to the CoCo Community as early as 
this. i S3\ 



CORRECTIONS I 

"A Recipe to Fix CoCo Fried Chips" (August 1986, 
Page 24): Marty Goodman has written to clarify and 
update some statements he made in that article. Marty 
had implied that J&M Systems might be reluctant to 
provide schematics for its disk controllers. This was 
based on Marty's past experience. However, more 
recently Marty has been informed by Richard Allen of 
J&M Systems that schematics for both of their disk 
controllers are available for $5 each from J&M* Marty 
extends his apologies for implying otherwise. 

"Which Nym is Witch?" (August 1986, Page 40): Brien 
Dick tells us we need to insert the following line into his 
Nymatch program: 

1475 DATA BUY, 5, BYE, 5 



"The Old Switcheroo" (August 1986, Page 108): In 

Figure 4 on Page 112, there is an extra reference to Pin 
5. Please disregard the reference to Pin 5 that appears 
to the left of Jl ? J2 and J3 in the middle of the figure. 



"What's Inside a Mouse?" (August 1986, Page 180): 

Due to a paste-up error, the lines in Listing 2 are not in 
order. Lines 10100-15000 from the second column on 
Page 184 should be placed just after Line 10000 in the 
first column. We apologize for any inconvenience this has 
caused. 



"Wishing Well: Achieving Arcade Game Speed in 
BASIC" (July 1986, Page 98): Joel De Young has found 
if you make a high score it is not recognized until another 
game has been played. His solution is to change the 
following lines: 

56 IF NS>TS THEN TS=NS 

57 PRINT@71,"HIGH SCORE"; TS :PRIN 
10135 , "YOUR SCORE " ; NS 

This should solve the problem. It is the same as 
switching lines 56 and 57 around. 



"Outfox Those Narrow Printers With Rotate" (May 
1986, Page 120): The filename in Line 250 of Listing 3 
on Page 126 should be changed from RSDWS to 
RSIDWS. 

i i ... - vi in' ; y,'u<';u V \ : '[" ii.'. iii,.n l iq ! .iMiii.....i ' 

"Who Will Survive the Castle of Doom?" (June 1986, 
Page 26): Scott Half man writes to tell of some corrections 
that need to be made to his Castle program. The 
dimension statement in Line 10 needs to be changed to 
DIMG(6,2). Also, insert the following at the beginning 
of Line 15: 

SC$="0": 



For quicker service, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DfiTfi at 
the CoCo SIG prompt and INFO at the Topic? prompt. 



92 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



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TUTORIAL 



A look at the internal hardware 



Dissecting the CoCo 3 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Assistant 



The following is a list and brief description 
of the major components and areas on the 
Color Computer 3 circuit board. 

A) Transformer Assembly — This trans- 
former has the same specifications as the one 
used in the CoCo 2. As in previous designs, the 
Color Computer 3 draws power from the wall 
as long as it is connected to an outlet. The 
amount of power it draws, however, is small 
when the machine is not turned on. 

B) Power Switch — When turned on, allows 
current to flow to the Color Computer 3's logic 
circuitry. 

C and D) Left and Right Joystick Connec- 
tors — Close examination reveals that the sixth 
pin, which was unused in previous designs, is 
now connected. This, along with the enhanced 
software, allows the Color Computer 3 to 
recognize both buttons on a Deluxe Joystick. 

E) Serial I/O Connector — This four-pin 
jack accepts Radio Shack's de facto standard 
for RS-232 devices. Enhancements elsewhere 
in the machine allow more reliable operation 
at much higher speeds than on previous 
CoCos. 

F) Cassette Port — This five-pin connector 
allows you to hook a cassette recorder to the 
Color Computer 3. 

G) RF Modulator — This unit changes the 
video signal so the Color Computer 3 can drive 
a television display. This circuit was present on 
all older CoCos and most CoCo 2s. 

H) RF Channel Select — For selecting 
whether the TV display receives the Color 
Computer's output on VHF channel 3 or 4. 

I) Composite Video Output — This RCA 
phono jack supplies a composite signal for 
driving a composite color monitor. The Color 
Computer 3 is not set up to drive a mono- 
chrome monitor when you take it out of the 
box. 

J) Audio Output — This RCA phono jack 
supplies a line-level audio output. It may be 
connected to the monitor's audio-in jack or to 
an external amplifier. It will operate even if you 
are using a TV or an RGB monitor for the 
display device. 

Cray Augsburg is RAINBOW'S technical 
assistant and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, Ruth 
Ann, have two children and live in Louisville, 
Kentucky. His username on Delphi is RAIN- 
BOW MAG. 



K) Reset — As always, this switch does not 
destroy memory contents, but causes the 
computer to stop execution of a currently 
running program. However, if you have used 
POKEs or machine-language routines to alter 
the basic routines, they will be changed back 
to normal by the use of the Reset button. 

L) RAM Area — The Color Computer 3 
(128K version) contains four 41464 RAM 
chips. These chips are 64K by 4-bit, dynamic 
RAM chips. These chips are removed when the 
machine is upgraded to its limit of 5 12K RAM. 

M) Microprocessor — The Color Comput- 
er 3 uses the Motorola 68B09E microprocessor. 
This 40-pin MPU is designed for reliable 
operation up to 2 MHz and, as with previous 
CoCos, gets its clock signal from an external 
source. 

N) ROM Port — This 40-pin cartridge/ 
expansion port accepts existing ROM Paks or 
the MultiPak Interface. If you intend to use a 
MultiPak Interface with the new machine, you 
need to get the MPI fixed at your Radio Shack 
Service Center first. Apparently, there was a 
bug in the PAL chip on the MPI. The fix is 
expected to cost $6 plus installation charges. 

O) Memory Expansion Connectors — These 
three 12-pin header connectors are designed to 
receive the 512K RAM upgrade board. The 
512K upgrade consists of a satellite board 
containing 16 256K by 1-bit dynamic RAM 
chips. 

P) Keyboard Connector — The Color Com- 
puter 3 uses the same clear Mylar cable for its 
keyboard connection as the *F board and later 
CoCos used. 

Q) Power Supply Circuitry — This is where 
the incoming power, after being stepped down 
by the transformer, is rectified, regulated and 
filtered. This section supplies +/-5 volts 
regulated, and an unregulated 12 volts. 

R) 68B21 PIA — Used to drive portions of 
the video as well as the cassette and sound 
circuitry of the Color Computer 3. 

S) 68B22 PIA — This open-collector device 
drives the Color Computer 3's keyboard. 

T) Clock Crystal — Unlike its predecessors, 
which used a clock crystal of frequency 
14.31818 MHz, the Color Computer 3 uses a 
crystal with a frequency of 28.63636 MHz. 
This, combined with the new circuitry in the 
machine, allows much faster operation. 

U) The GIME — This flat-pack is a revo- 
lutionary design from Tandy. The GIME (for 



Graphics, Interrupt, Memory Enhancement) 
combines the functions of the 6847 (VDG) and 
the 6883 (SAM) from previous CoCos. In 
addition to supplying bipolar RAM for faster 
video action, the GIME manages the extended 
memory of the Color Computer 3 despite the 
fact that the 68B09E can directly address only 
64K of memory. The GIME can be looked at 
as the "hardware handler" of the Color Com- 
puter 3 as the 68B09E is looked at as the 
"software handler." It is the coolest-running 
chip in the Color Computer 3. 

V) ROM — This 32K by 8-bit ROM con- 
tains Microsoft Extended basic and the over- 
lay enhancements produced by Microware for 
Tandy. All Color Computer 3s come with this 
Enhanced Extended BASIC. 
** Not shown in these pictures is the RGB 
monitor connector on the bottom of the new 
Color Computer. It is a 10-pin header connec- 
tor unlike the DB9 connectors used by other 
manufacturers. However, only nine slots on 
the monitor connector are used and one pin is 
blocked to eliminate the possibility of plugging 
the monitor in backwards. For more informa- 
tion about the differences between color 
composite and RGB, refer to Ed Ellers' article 
on Page 27 of the September 1986 issue. 

Some Observations 

Many people have expressed concern about 
whether the Color Computer 3 supports 
artifact colors. The new machine does support 
artifact colors when used with a television or 
color composite monitor (an RGB monitor 
will produce the image, but only in black and 
white). However, in the past the color set 
chosen by the computer has been random and 
was selected by repeatedly pressing Reset. This 
was not a very reliable method. The Color 
Computer 3 powers up in the same configura- 
tion every time it is turned on. To change to 
the alternate set, hold down the Fl key and 
press Reset one time. The computer will switch 
to the alternate set. To switch back, just press 
Reset one time. 

The Color Computer 3 is designed to operate 
at 0.894 or 1.788 MHz. When turned on, the 
machine is set to run at 0.894 MHz. However, 
since the new machine is always operating from 
RAM (contents of ROM are copied and 
overlayed in RAM on power-up), the RAM 
speed-up POKE will work. Just POKE 65497,0 
to use the 1.788 MHz clock speed. Type POKE 
65496,0 to go back to 0.894 MHz. □ 



94 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 





Above: A view of the Color Computer 3's 
circuit board as seen when looking from the 
front of the computer. The keyboard has been 
removed and the RGB monitor jack is mounted 
beneath the board on the right-hand side. 

Left: A view of the Color Computer 3's key- 
board. The two function keys are on the 
bottom-right, while the control and alt keys 
are on the left side. 



Right: The back of the Color Computer 3. All 
letter designations coincide with those in the circuit 
board view as well as those in the text. 




October 1986 THE RAINBOW 95 




us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world 
your high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAtNBQW's 
u S^0reboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed 
tegfbly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, y^ur high 
scons. ' It^llf fil^ ii mit^^.'tttrBe sco re e ntrtes per mont^ Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE 
rainbow. The '-Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our new 
Delphi CoCo SIG From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



... r-i- tip 

'•y,X -...v.: 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 

1.800 *Chrts Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 



4,254 
3,970 
3.851 
3,478 
3,299 



★Todd Wirt*, Midland, Ml 
Steven Bullard, Allen, OK 
Michael Wolcheski, Meriden, CT 
Rick Busse, Granite City, IL 
Neil Edge, Williston, FL 



AN DRONE {Radio Shack) 



58,200 
57,300 
54,300 
53,500 



40,585 



★Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 
Mitch Hart, Seattle, WA 
Daphnie Phillips, Evansville, Wl 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Theresa Juetten, Pelkie, Ml 
AREX (Adventure International) 

25,640 ★Don Lyman, Seattle, WA 
BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

96-0 ★•Eddie Roginski, Mertztowh, PA 
BEAM RIDER (Spectral Associates) 
6,004.000 *James Oakley, Nashville, TN 
3,042,470 Evelyn Thompson, Nederland, TX 
747,200 Robert Eering, Swift Current, 
Saskatchewan 
BOXING (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 

480 ★Tattb Khan, Bronx, NY 
BREWMASTER (NOVASOFT) 



46,713 
33,676 
30,720 
21,221 
19,986 
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814-1 
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256-4 
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386,600 
279,600 
216.350 

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161.725 



★Martha St.John, Highland Falls, NY 
Steven Byrne, Gibsonia, PA 
Alan Drazen, Longwood. FL 
Jean-Francois Morin. Loretteville, 
Quebec 

Scott Purrone, Roselte Park, NJ 
Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 



89 
89 
90 
91 
92 



BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 



75,100 
30.850 
26,900 
25,700 
22.600 



★Rachael Richards, Blakeslee. PA 
Daniel Cecil, Bardstown, KY 
Derek Leidig, Clinton, NY 
Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ 
Brian McGuire, Golden, CO 



BUSTOUT (Radio Shack) 



37,900 
21.850 



★Gordon Rock, Davenport, IA 
Charles Eggtesfietd, Sault Ste Marie, 

Ontario 
Tanya Maestas, Denver, CO 
Mike McCafferty, Idaho Fails, ID 
Chris Zepka, North Adams. MA 
Andy Walker, York. PA 
BUZZARD BAIT (7dm Mix) 
4,455,150 ★Paul Rumrill, Gales Ferry, CT 

Blossom Mayor, East Greenbush, NY 
Rupert Young, Sheffield. MA 
Fruber Malcom, Culpeper, VA 
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Mark Herpst, San Diego, CA 



21,630 
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3,091,700 
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CALIXTO ISLAND (Mark Data) 



113 
115 
166 

CANDY CO 

141,403 
103,306 



★Jeff Hillison, Blacksburg, VA 
Luis Mejico, Cordoba, Argentina 
Chad Gott, Evangeline, LA 
(Intracolor) 
★Luis Mejico, Cordoba, Argentina 
Kirk Nedrebeg, Liverpool, OH 



CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 



9,988,000 
9,129,100 
1,763,399 
1,428.600 
1,347,800 
79,400 
29,800 



★Brannon Baxley, Live Oak. FL 
Gary Mohnsen, Tucson, AZ 
Billy Gavin, Bossier City, LA 
Chad McCieilan, Rushville, IN 
Lucy Dorego, Leamington, Ontario 
Jared Hunter, Rochester, NY 
Jennie Driscoli, Wellesley, MA 



CASTLE (THE RAINBOW, 6/86) 

10.216 ★Kirby Smith, York, PA 
CHOPPER STRIKE (MichTron) . 

46,800 ★Christopher Conley, North Attieboro, 
MA 

THE COCO ZONE (THE RAINBOW. 4/86) 

146 ★W.E. Veenschoten, Birmingham, AL 
173 Lori & Jeff Morrish, New Market, 
Ontario 

COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

999-0 ★•Erik Munson, Tucson, AZ 

Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
•John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
•Chislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 
Quebec 

•Skipper Taday, East Lyme, CT 

Ellsworth Summers, Jacksonville, FL 
•John Hubbard, Cambridge, MO 
•Steven Bullard, Allen, OK 
•Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
•Andy Walker, York, PA 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

1 10,454 ★Scott Enman, Belle-Mead, NJ 
107,864 David Entenmann, Monroe, NY 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

87 ★Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
John Semonin, Akron, OH 
David & Shirley Johnson, 
Leicester, NC 
DEATH TRAP (Soft Sector) 

86,748 ★Douglas Pardon, Brigham City, UT 
40,674 David Entenmann, Monroe, NY 
DECATHALON (Spectrel Associates) 

10,304 ★Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
9,646 Matthew Sunderland. Christchurch. 
New Zealand 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

244.110 ^Gregory Day, Holstein, Ontario 
Lisa Nebel, Phoenix, AZ 
Jon Ruhnow, Duncanville, TX 
Tracy Salzman, LaSalle, CO 
Mike Watson, Northville. NY 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

68,872 ★Janine Freamon, Citrus Heights, CA 
Skip Freamon, Citrus Heights, CA 
Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
Michael Lizardy, Oregon, OH 
Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
DONPAN (Radio Shack) 

48,900 ★Brett Kurtin, Roanoke, VA 
20,000 Rodrigo Maldonado, Whlttier, CA: 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 
2,586,300 *Eugene Roosa, Stone Ridge, NY 
Diane Guernon. Montreal, Quebec 
Michael Brennan, Calgary, Alberta 
Joel MacNeil, Needham, MA 
Joel DeYoung, Manson, Manitoba 
Jennie Driscoli, Wellesley, MA 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

68,142 ★Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 
British Columbia 
Theresa Juetten, Pelkie, Ml 
Chuck Morey. Bakersfield, CA 
Christian Keyes, Stroud, Ontario 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Luis Mejico, Cordoba, Argentina 



19,554 
18,461 
17,463 
15,707 



78,010 
64,195 
57,655 
45,775 



65.215 
62,329 
51,519 
50,268 



1.618.400 
450.600 
52,840 
48,670 
16.060 



46,804 
45,291 
44.340 
42,450 

18,036 



DRAGON BLADE (Prickly-Pear) 

175 ★Eric Crichlow, Las Vegas, NV 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

123,120 ★Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
Gilles Gagne, Sillery, Quebec 
Nathanael Heller, Kenner, LA 
Brian Matherne, Gretna, LA 
Jerrnaine Jackson, Tallutah, LA 
Owen Edson, Sherman Oaks, CA 
James Nahas, New London, CT 
Ed Emelett, Nanticoke, PA 
DRAGON SLAYER {Tom Mix) 

75,900 ★Christian Keyes, Stroud; Ontario 
ENCHANTER (Intocom) 

185/186 *David Tarleton, Williamsburg, VA 
185/183 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs. GA 
80/1 15 Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 
EVICTOR (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 

7,500 ★Rachael Richards, Blakeslee, PA 
4,570 Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
FALCON'S LAIR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 
30,522 ★Kirby Smith, York, PA 
Talib Khan, Bronx. NY 
Joyce Smith, Butler, PA 
Michael Scott, Johnstown, NY 
Daniel Cecil, Bardstown, KY 
FIRE COPTER (Adventure International) 

43,260 ★Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
FROGGIE (Spectral Associates) 

48,000 ★Jennie Driscoli, Wellesley, MA 

Curtis Taylor, Scarborough, Ontario 
Carlton Taylor, Scarborough, Ontario 
Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Mariano Frausto, Blue island, IL 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

98,900 ★Erik Munson, Tucson. AZ 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Scott Maestas, Denver, CO 
Allisont larosis, Owego, NY 
Oren Bergman. Herzlia, Israel 
Mark Herpst, San Diego, CA 
GALLOPING GAMBLERS (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 
$193,527.18 *Steven Bullard, Allen, OK 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 

243,810 *Jay Graddick, Cocoa, FL 
73,460 John Straiton, Merritt Island, FL 
GHANA BWANA ( Radio Shack) 

693,830 *Steve Wright. Fredericton. 
New Brunswick 
Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
Gene Wells, Silsbee, TX 
Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
James Ginn, Laurel, IN 
Steve Dale, Lakeland, FL 
Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
Ben Hoft, Huntsville, AL 
James Doty, Washougal, WA 
GHOST GOBBLER (Spectral Associates) 
102,540 ★Greg Erickson, Lowell, MA 

Olga Pichard, Lausanne, Switzerland 
Ghislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 

Quebec 
Pierre Pichard, Lausanne, 

Switzerland 
Sylvain Castonguay, Chicoutimj. 

Quebec 
Mark Herpst, San Diego, CA 
HYPERZONE ( Computerware) 

802 ★Harry Hull, Martinsville, IN 



24,360 
22,940 
17,980 
11,250 



54,300 

51.300 
33,930 
30,870 
21,350 



510.160 
459,930 
325,900 
253,960 
229,550 
190,140 
47,980 
38,490 



80,550 
76,900 

7&900 

72,960 

47,200 



★★★★*★★★★★*★★★★***★★★*★**★★** 



96 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 




KARATE (Diecom Products) 

10,900 ★Jim Doyle, Barrackville, WV 
9,900 Scott Enman, Belle-Mead, NJ 
4,200 Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 
KEYS OF THE WIZARD (Spectral Associates) 

662 ★John Fulton. Boydton, VA 
THE KING {Tom Mix) 
4,092,600 ★Fruber Malcom, Culpeper, VA 
2.134,600 Tim Rueb, Stevensville, Ml 
1,670,900 Yolanda Farr, Sayre, PA 
1,500,800 Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
158,100 Jeff Maxwell, Lincoln, NE 
106,200 Mark Herpst, San Diego, CA 
KLENDATHU {Radio Shack) 
1 ,347.020 ★Paul Shoemaker, Quartz Hill, CA 
1,177,550 Dan Franzen, Westlake. OH 
412,809 Jay Pribble, Davenport, IA 
322,852 James Doty. Washougal, WA 
266,362 Brian Ennis, Wilmington, NC 
KNOCK OUT (Diecom Products) 

181,085 ★Rush Caley, Port Orchard, WA 
168.385 John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
149,190 Daniel Lesage, Laval, Quebec 
137,900 John Rogers, Rye, NH 
132,465 Kirk Nedrebeg, Liverpool, OH 
131.575 Jason Sullivan, Seymour, IN 
KUNG FU FIGHTER (THE RAINBOW, 3/86} 
870 ★Brian Matherne, Gretna, LA 
LANDER (T&D Software) 

3.250 ★Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 
142,600 * Jerry Rossano, Manassas, VA 
MADNESS AND THE MINOTAUR (Radio Shack) 

240 ★John Fulton, Boydton, VA 
MARBLE MAZE {Diecom Products) 
36,354.780 ★Melvin Sharp Jr., Baltimore, MD 
106,950 Dan Bouges, Niantic, CT 
104,130 Jeff Maxwell. Lincoln, NE 
103,560 Stephane Ouzilleau, Lauzon, Quebec 
34,330 Brian Biggs, Galloway, OH 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

20,941 ★Shelby Dunning, Sacramento; CA 
18.874 Tim Rueb, Stevensville, Ml 
17,250 Keith Queen, Marietta. GA 
1 4,861 Michael Clerico, Seaford, NY 
14,785 Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
5,612 Luis Mejico, Cordoba, Argentina 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

617.950 ★Michael & David Garozzo, 

Morrisville, PA 
161,920 John Guptill, Columbia, MO 
92,610 Andy Walker, York, PA 
17,900 Hiram Esparza, Blue Island, IL 
MINIGOLF (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

27 ★Brian DePlonty. Saginaw, Ml 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
29,600 ★Jeanine Mason, Spencer, MA 
14,900 Paul Mason, Spencer, MA 
MODULE MAN (Spectral Associates) 

14.100 ★Damon Sunderland, Christchurch, 
New Zealand 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

206,780 ★Wanda Jones, Brantford, Ontario 
109,200 Joel MacNeil, Needham, MA 
93.890 Rupert Young, Sheffield. MA 
60,120 Steve Thomas, Ogdensburg. NY 
43,610 Tim Cragg. Kahoka. MO 
MOON HOPPER (Computerware) 

376,350 *Rene Ringuette, Riviere-du-Loup. 
Quebec 



ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1 ,006-57 ★Elliot Alfred & Ian Hanson, Houston. 
TX 

994-28 Chad Johnson, Little Rock, AR 
986-22 Toby Jacobs, Bellefontaine, OH 
970-32 : Wes Hill, Vashon, WA 
969-0 •Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 
PANIC BUTTON (Radio Shack) 

1,590 *Eric Sessions, Stateline, NV 
1,340 Chris Tripp, Goldsboro, NC 
1,120 Nathanael Heller, Kenner, LA 
PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 

337,550 ★Lawrence Elman, Smithtown, NY 
249,000 Jami Foster. Maryville, TN 
98,200 Jeanine Mason, Spencer, MA 
20,650 Moe Tindell, Sebring, FL 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
250,200 *Leon Kornbluth, Richfield, NJ 
63,890 Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
50,200 Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
PHANTOM SLAYER (Med Systems) 

398 *Marc Gagnon, Cap-de-la-Madeleine, 
Quebec 

244 Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

84.650 ★Erick Newman, Willseyviile, NY 
PITFALL il (Activision) 

194,000 ★Michael Wallace, Bronx, NY 
1 73,884 Brian Biggs, Grove City, OH 
170,248 Donald Williams, Prince George, 

British Columbia 
142,152 Don Lyman, Seattle. WA 
125,836 Moe Tindell, Sebring, FL 
19,335 Chad Johnson, Little Rock; AR 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ★James Doty, Washougal, WA 
15 Randy Heckman, La Mirada, CA 
9 Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
9 Jeff Maxwell, Lincoln, NE 
POLARIS (Radio Shack) 

55,278 *Moe Tindell, Sebring. FL 
33,770 Gene Murphy, Ft Worth, TX 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

7,430 ★Myriam Ferland, Trois-Rivieres, 
Quebec 

6.000 Billy Fairfull, Charleston, SC 
4,840 Steve Thomas, Ogdensburg, NY 
4,825 Jeff Gdrney, Glen Lyon, PA 
4,065 Joseph Tokarz Jr., Blossburg, PA 
POOYANf/Dafasoft; 

97,500,000 *Rich Fiore, Clemson, SC 
3,785,000 Ben Collins, Clemson, SC 
1 ,987,000 Jon Sowle, Sanford, FL 
1,546,000 Jason Maxwell, Manchester; TN 
1 ,253,200 Thomas Mayor, Brooklyn, NY 
197,300 Theresa Juetten, Pelkie, Ml 
107,850 Matthew Sunderland, Christchurch. 
New Zealand 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

165,180 *Matt Heinemann, Richmond, VA 
116,630 Keith Aschemeier, Napoleon, OH 
57,680 Melita Boudreault, Port-Cartier! 
Quebec 

56,500 Bruce Johnson, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
50,210 Scott Swedis, Spencer, MA 
39,890 Elliot Alfred, Houston, TX 
21,380 Stacie Heifers, Sparta, IL 
PRO GOLF (Computerware) 

68 ★Steven Byrne, Gibsonia, PA 



1 ,301 ,350 Brian Matherne, Gretna, LA 
1 ,060,250 Pat Mulhern, Newark, CA 
973,990 Philippe Gosselin, Montreal, Quebec 
956,100 David Thomas, Parkersburg, WV 
758,850 James Thomas, LeSage, WV 
528,000 Harold Matherne Jr., Gretna, LA 
REACTOIDS (Radio Shack) 

76,085 ★Joel DeYoung, Manson, Manitoba 
5,230 Chris Tripp, Goldsboro, NC 
RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderVision) 

1 82,661 ★ Andrew Wootten York, Aiken, SC 
ROBOTTACK (Intracolor) 
1,020,800 *lan MacLachlan, Bethany, Ontario 
975,850 Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 
931,250 Keith Smith, Bethany, Ontario 
637,600 Chad McClellan, Rushville, IN 
' 599,150 Douglas Hauk, Peoria, IL 
ROMMEL 3-D (MichTron) 

499,400 ★Stephen Charchuk. Yarmouth. 

Nova Scotia 
84,000 Todd Hooge, Comox, 

British Columbia 
68,200 Marc Gagnon, Cap-de-la-Madeleine, 
Quebec 

62,700 Paul Seng, East Lansing, Ml 
55,300 George Mealer, Riverdale; GA 
RUN FOR YOUR LIFE (THE RAINBOW, 4/85) 
121,000 ★Kirby Smith, York, PA 
80,000 Brian Jensen, Drayton Valley, 
Alberta 

50,000 Karen Goddard, Oshawa, Ontario 
20,000 David Craft, Roanoke, VA 
20,000 Ryan Devlin, Louisville. KY 
20,000 Brian Voges, Jasper, IN 
10,000 Luis Mejico, Cordoba, Argentina 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

997,300 *John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
983,300 Gabriel Assel, Cameron, MO 
879,100 Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 
741,100 Bryan Jenner, Calgary, Alberta 
587,600 Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
399,900 Rich Fiore, Clemson, SC 
367,800 Paul Mason, Spencer, MA 
347,900 Matthew Sunderland, Christchurch. 

New Zealand 
342,200 Damon Sunderland, Christchurch, 

New Zealand 
208,700 Don Lyman, Seattle, WA 
SAM SLEUTH P.I. (Computerware) 

10 ★John Fulton, Boydton, VA 
SEA DRAGON (Adventure International) 
51,610 ★ Jason Barney, Renton, WA 
23.300 Scott Enman, Belle-Mead, NJ 
21,200 George Frausto, Blue Island, IL 
19,630 Jorge De Albertis, Lima, Peru 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

190,280 ★Damon Sunderland. Christchurch, 

New Zealand 
27,510 Craig Schindler, Cambridge, Ontario 
24,000 Frank Pruet, San Diego, CA 
17,300 Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
16,805 Arne Peterson, Lake City, FL, 
SHENANIGANS (Mark Data) 

90 ★Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

90 *Jeff Hillison, Blacksburg, VA 

90 ★Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 

British Columbia 
95 David Kay, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
99 Ed Emelett, Nanticoke, PA 
SHOCK TROOPER (Mark Data) 



103.940 


Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 


69 


David Esarey, Shelbyville, IN 


214,203 


★ Fruber Malcom, Culpeper, VA 




British Columbia 


PROJECT NEBULA fflaoVo Shack) 


150,490 


Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 


102,940 


Krista Cassell, Eastern Passage, 


3,815 


★Christopher Romance, 


100,040 


Rodney Mullineaux, Gig Harbor, WA 




Nova Scotia 




Massapequa Park, NY 


69,328 


Gordon Alvarnaz, Taunton, MA 


100,410 


Craig Cornell, Greentown, IN 


345 


Ian Hanson & Elliot Alfred* Houston, 


49,438 


Alex Seliger, Lachine, Quebec 


80,470 


Brett Bias, Enterprise, AL 




TX 


40,699 


Martin Parada. Arcadia, CA 


MUDPIES (MichTron) 


150 


Mariano Frausto, Blue Island, IL 


SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 


246,600 


★Terry Kreller. Winnipeg, Manitoba 


QU IX (Tom Mix) 


228,610 


★Michael Clerico, Seaford, NY 


127,200 


Lisa Kohn, Canton. OH 


999,999 


★Wilbur James, Charleston, WV 


227,840 


Cliff Farmer, McGregor, TX 


108,800 


Eddie Roginski, Mertztown, PA 


49,000 


Richard Curran, Fredericton, 


35,000 


Bruce Johnson, Vavenby, 


77,900 


Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 




New Brunswick 




British Columbia 


68,600 


Edward McGoldrick, Brooklyn|lNY 


38,014 


Christopher Con ley, North Attleboro, 


26,610 


Jeff Gorney, Glen Lyon, PA 


65,400 


Anthony Farina, Brooklyn, NY-£ ::: 




MA 


18,500 


Ken Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 


NINJA WARRIOR (Programmer's Guild) 


22,454 


Mariano Frausto, Blue Island, IL 


SKIING (Radio Shack) 


753.000 


★ Rich Fiore, Clemson, SC 


16,270 


Mark Motel, Blue island, IL 


0:56 


★Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ 


268,200 


Vivian Buterin, St. John, MO 


RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 


0:56 


★ Leslie Sherman, Shallowater, TX 


181,200 


Robert Merc redi, Winnipeg, Manitoba 


4,510,740 


★Les Dorn, Eau Claire, Wl 


0:59 


Tim North, Emporia, KS 


164,400 


Terry Kreller, Winnipeg, Manitoba 


1,945,110 


Dominic Deguire, St. Basile, Quebec 


1:00 


Scott Clevenger, Fairmount, IN 


108,000 


Eric Gladstone, Ocala, FL 


1,330,500 


Sara Grace, Baltimore, MD 


1:00 


Billy Fairfull, Charleston, SC 



★**★★*★*★*★★★★***★*********** 



* 

* 
* 

★ 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 97 



★ ****★★★******★****★**★★★*★*★ 



1:10 Kevin Gallagher, Santa Monica, CA 
1:13 Anthony Perez, Westminster, CA 
1:13 Chris Wright, Fredericton, 
New Brunswick 
SLAY THE NERIUS (Radio Shack) 

480,671 *Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ 
294,808 Joyce Walcott, Mt. Clemens, Ml 
217,195 Christian Keyes, Stroud, Ontario 
57.764 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
SPACE SHUTTLE SIMULATOR (Tom Mix) 
560 *Robert Heifers, Sparta. IL 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

145,400 ★Brian King, Orlando, FL 
142,720 Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 
142,310 Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
142,100 Chris Harrison, Brooks, KY 
139,210 Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 
92.360 Eddie Lawrence. Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
86,880 Steve Nudelman, Brooklyn, HT 
SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

1,740 ★Joel De Young, Manson, Manitoba 
1,730 Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ : ; 
1,540 Blake Cadmus, Reading. PA- • 
STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

8,750 *Jon Larson, Seligman, AZ 
8,750 *Kent Pirkle, Cumming, GA 
8,400 John Guptill, Columbia. MO 
8,200 Chris Coleman, Mertden, CT 



8,100 Curtis Frazier Jr., Enterprise, AL 
7,300 Chris Tripp. Goldsboro. NC 
6,500 Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ 
5,400 Mark Herpst, San Diego; CA 
STARLORD (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 

46,440 ★Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 
STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

347,420 *Steven Smith. Matthews, NC 
78,600 Don Johnson, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
58,580 Stefan Mecay, Austin, TX 
37,550 Michelle Wyner, Bloomfield, Ml 
29,500 Shane Thompson, Cape Girardeau, MO 
STORM (Computerware) 

4,305 ★Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

7,360 *Robert Shymanski, Superior, MT 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

1,422,400 ★Timothy Bishop, Jacksonville, FL 
959,400 Sonya Hurst, Richmond. CA 
938,800 Christopher Romance, 

Massapequa Park, NY 
219,300 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
207,800 Jeanine Mason, Spencer, MA 
130,700 Paul Mason, Spencer, MA 
109,700 Eddy Learnard. Williston Park, NY 
10-METER PLATFORM DIVING (THE RAINBOW, 9/85) 

262 ★Brian Matherne, Gretna. LA 
TO PRESERVE QUANDIC (Prickly-Pear) 

67 *Jeff Hillison, Blacksburg, VA 



TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

142 ★Joshua Henderson, Amherst, OH 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

1,850 ★Michael Batalon, Ninole, HI 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) 

80 ★Bernard Fritz, Diamond Springs, CA 
WILDCATTING (Radio Shack) 

300,741 *Jason Munson, Tucson, AZ 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061,000 ★Byron Afford, Raytown, MO 
1.300,500 Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
253,400 Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
159,500 Thomas Mayor, Brooklyn, NY 
1 32,300 Roy Geeo, Hot Springs, AR 
108,200 Tracy Nahas, New London. CT 
97,500 Christopher Conley, North Attleboro, 
MA 

85,400 Douglas Shymanski. Priest River, ID 
82,600 Tina Heifers, Sparta, IL 
62,500 Walter Hearne, Pensacola. FL 
47,200 David Anderson. Midlothian, VA* 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) 

21,100 *Phillip Johnson, Scottsville, VA 
14,300 Dale Taylor. Chattanooga, TN 
13,600 Michael Etchason, Sauk Rapids, MN 
6.600 Roy Geeo, Hot Springs. AR 
6,300 Jeffry Long, Butler, PA 
5,300 Jason Maxwell, Manchester, TN 



— Debbie Hartley 




CORE 






In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we. offer this column of 
pointers for our game-playing readers > benefit. If you have some interest- 
ing hints and tips, we encourage you to share them by sending them to 
the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



FEEDBACK 

Scoreboard: 

In response to Eric Crichlow's letter 
(August 1986) regarding Trekboer, there is 
no second spider. If you don't do away with 
the first spider, it will regain consciousness 
and you won't get a second chance to do 
away with it. To get rid of it for good, FEED 
5PID, CAPS, E, S, N. W, GET SPID, E, 5, GO 
DOOR, P SPID, G PLAN, GO DOOR and PRES 
RED. YouU have to take it from there. 

Can anyone help me? Fm stuck in the 
game Raiders^ by Prism Software. What 
do you say to the lady in the airport to 
make her give you the canteen? I hope 
someone out there will be able to help me! 
Write to the "Scoreboard,** 

Bette A. Hatcher 
Nor walk, CA 

Scoreboard: 

In response to Mr. Cotton's letter (Au- 
gust 1986), concerning Trekboer, when 
you're at the bridge on Alton, go east and 
tie the rope to the tree. Then go back to 
the bridge (make sure you have the capsule 
and the amulet) and cross it. When you're 
on the bridge, go north. You'll figure it out 
from there. 

Wilfred Arndt 
Ambler, PA 

Scoreboard: 

In response to A me Peterson's letter 
(August 1986) and my own (July 1986) 
about Dallas Quest , to get the cannibals to 



let you pass at the cave entrance, you must 
do something with the ring. 

I need help with Pitfall If. Send any help 
to the "Scoreboard." 

Rodrigo Maldonado 
Whittier, CA 



CORRECTION 



Scoreboard: 

I had a letter published in the "Score- 
board Pointers" section (July 1986) en- 
titled "Fighting Keys." The keys were 
misprinted. The c 2' key should be the 'Z' 
key and the * 1 ' should be the 7* (slash key). 

John Licata 
Richton Park, ft 

Editor's Note: Thank you, John, for 
pointing out the errors in your letter. 
Once again, we must impress the 
importance of printing legibly (or 
perhaps eyen typing) when submit- 
ting scores, and especially pointers. 



STAYIN' ALIVE 



Scoreboard: 

1 have a few hints for the game Robot- 
tack. First of all, it is much better if you 



play using two people; one controlling the 
movement, the other controlling the firing. 

Secondly, 1 found that it is best to move 
out of the way of the robots, then, holding 
down the button for rapid fire, blow a path 
through the robots so that you may save 
a few humans. This method may not score 
as many points (due to the fact that you 
usually don't have time to get all the 
humans before the screen clears and you 
go to the next level), but I have found you 
stay alive longer. Using this method with 
a friend, we successfully made it up to 
Level 89! 

Scott Enman 
Belle- Mead, NJ 



KEEP MOVING 



Scoreboard: 

I have a few tips for the game Lunar- 
Rover Patrol. When being bombarded 
from the air, keep moving, slow down and 
speed up. If you are about to be hit with 
a diagonal shot from the upper-left of the 
screen, speed up and jump — it may miss 
you. Shoot the ones that drop straight 
down on you and dodge the others. 

In the boulder section, keep firing and 
slow down gradually. Keep the joystick to 
the left, jumping over or shooting the small 
boulders and shooting the big ones. 

Jerry Rossano 
Manassas, VA 



***************************** 



98 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★a-*** 



HIT 'EM FROM BEHIND 

coreboard: 

I have a tip for Shock trooper players, 
efore you leave, the first stage, wait for the 
Dbots at the -top of the screen behind 
'here they appear. When they appear, 
loot left and when they turn around grab 
ourself 500 points! I have gotten up to 
2,000 points by doing this. 

Bernard Florence 
Croydon, Australia 



RIGHT COMBINATION 

Scoreboard: 

Many people seem to have trouble with 
dadness and the Minotaur > including me. 
cannot find the solution to the Scorpion, 
herefore I haven't been able to beat it after 
lmost three years. However, I feel qual- 
ified to give a few tips,, 

Most important, be sure to save the 
ame on tape before making the first move, 
nd again every time you make progress. 
Tie game changes each time you start over 
rom the beginning. 

Believe the instruction manual. All 256 
ooms are accessible and the first spell 
eally is automatic when you get the right 
ombination of objects (i.e., Food and 
Mushroom). 

Kill the Sprite ASAP to stop it from 



moving things around where you can't find 
them anymore. 

Drop unneeded items for landmarks 
when exploring the maze. 

John W. Meredith 
Enterprise \ AL 



VINES SUBLIME 

Scoreboard: 

I have some advice for beginning Raaka- 
Tu players. To get the gold coin, the guards 
have to go left. To make them march left, 
go to the vines and climb them. You should 
fall and the guards will kill you. Now, when 
you start again, go west, south and west. 
Then, get the coin and go north to the 
vines* climb them. You should fall through 
the roof and land in the temple. 

If you fall from the vines, don't worry. 
The guards will always go left when you 
are killed at the north wall. 

Dawn Daniels 
San Antonio, TX 



PRAY FOR HELP 



Scoreboard: 

Here are some tips for Zork L In the 
loud room, type ECHO. 



Pray at the Altar — this will help more 
than you expect. 

You should put all your treasures in the 
trophy case. 

If you have trouble turning the bolt on 
the dam, try pressing some of the buttons 
in the maintenance room. 

Does anybody know what to do with the 
magic gunk? 

Frank Heezen 
Poquoson, VA 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our new Delphi CoCo SIG. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
MAIL, then type SEND and address to: 
EDITORS. Be sure to include your complete 
name and address. 

— Debbie Hartley 



PRINTERS!!! 

NEW! Star Micronics NX-10 5 29S 

Okidata 192 (Parallel) 5 370 

Okidata 192 (Serial) s 425 

Okidata 182 s 240 

Silver Reed 550 (Daisy Wheel) J 395 

Silver Reed 400 (Daisy Wheel)(Par. or Serial) $ 200 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo and IBM upon request, 
*I5 off interface with purchase of printer. » 
Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it!!! 

SP-2 INTERFACE for EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ( J 5°° extra) frees parallel port 
for use with other computers 

■ $ 49 95 (plus *3°° shipping) 

SP-3 INTERFACE for MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem /printer switch — no need for Y-cables or 
plugging/unplugging cables 

■ $ 64 9S (plus *3°° shipping) 

Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS 

ALL 'A HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) $ 235 

Drive 0,1 (addressed as 4 drives!) $ 350 

All above complete with HDS controller, cable, & drive 

in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives $ I09 

Dual Vi Height Case w/ Power Supply $ 49 

Double Sided Adapter $ 25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions $ 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes $ 32 & $ 3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: s 5/drive or power supply, $ I0 max. 

Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft. — J I0. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft — $20. 
Other cables on request. (Add *3 00 shipping) 

CP.O. Box 293 
— - Raritan, NJ 08869 

(201) 722-1055 

R ENGINEERING 




October 1986 THE RAINBOW 99 



TUTORIAI, 



16K 
ECB 



| 

Use this technique to track down FC Errors 





Don't 
String 

Along 

ay 



By Ellen and 
George Aftamonow 



Most computers don't hesitate 
to tell us where we went 
wrong and what sort of mis- 
take we made this time. We are all too 
familiar with SN Error in 100, TM 
Error in 250, etc. In each case, one 
simply looks at the given line number 
and corrects it; 

However, this is not necessarily the 
case with the FC (function call) Error. 
All too often an examination of FC 
Error shows that the given line number 
has no error in it at all. Many people 
then sit down and pen a letter to the 
author or the magazine to proclaim that 
the program does not work. But, before 
we're so quick to blame the program, we 
should do a little detective work. 



The Aftamonows are self-taught pro- 
grammers living in Milford, Connecti- 
cut. Ellen holds a degree in math and 
concentrates on the structure of the 
program, while George creates and 
designs graphics. 



When you get an FC Error message, 
first check the given line. If the line is 
correct, then the most likely suspect is 
a previously defined string. For in- 
stance; 



100 I$(l)»"UeBR3R2N[>9R2 

110 W$="BR5L2NU5L2HU7BR6D7GBR4" 

12,0 0$ = ,, U8R4D8NL4BR2 " 

130 R$= ,, U8R4FD2GL2F4BR2" 

140 K$~ H U8BD4NE4F4BR2 " 

150 S $ = " BRNHR4 EU2HL4 HU2ER4 BR4 BD8 



ti 



160 PL$="T200L100O4AAABBBCCC" 
170 PMODE3 f 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS 
180 DRAW"BM70, 100S8XI$(1) ;BR8XW$ 
; XO$ ; XR$ ; XK$ ; XS $ ; " iPLAYPL$ 
190 FORX=1TO5000:NEXTX 

In this example, if the CoCo greets us 
with an FC Error in 180 and Line 180 
lists correctly, we should backtrack to 
lines 100 through 160, where we first 
defined the various strings. All Line 180 
does is execute the strings that appear 
in lines 100 through 160. So it stands to 
reason that if a string was defined 
wrong, Line 180 cannot be executed, 
thus the FC Error. 

The easiest way to pick out the culprit 
is to insert a quote and REM (" ') after 
a suspect string, using the edit mode. 
Thus, Line 180 becomes: 

180 DRAW r, BM70 / 100S8XI$(l) ;» f BR8X 
W$;XO$ ;XR$ ;XK$ ; XS $ ; « : PIAYPL$ 

If the program reaches Line 190, then 
the error was not in j$ ( 1 ) in Line 100. 
So delete the " and insert them after 
the next string. 

180 DRAW" BM 70 , 100S8XI$ (1 ) ; BR8XW$ 
; " ♦ XO$ ; XR$;XK$;XS$ ? « ; PLAYPL$ 

Continue in this manner until you get 
the FC Error. You will then know which 
string has the error and you can look for 
an error in the line where the string is 
defined. Often times it is the letter T 
which should have been number one, 
the letter 'O' which should have been 
number zero, or the letter 'IT which 
should have been number eight. So 
when you see an FC Error, don't let it 
string you along. 

( Questions about this technique may 
be directed to the authors at 46 Howe 
Street, Milford, CT 06460, 203-878- 
3602. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing.) 



100 




THE RAINBOW October 1986 




A Greedy Man's 
Comeuppance 

is the 



By Bill Bernico 



itf. 



ATI . 



*2 



-"V. 



1 



I would like Li) Sihare. my first game 
with i Ik rest of the readers, li's 
called WaJMffljJ, and it*s based on 
the old dice game* Skunk. 

The object of Whummy is to acquire 
a preset n urn her of points before your 
opponent does. Each player take$ turns 
rolling the dice, You may roll as many 
Limes as you like, provided you don't 
roll a one, which in ill is game k repre- 
sented by & A W\[Ibr l^^f}, 

Willi each roll, you accumulate the 
number of points made on Lb at roll. If 
you choose not to roll again, you keep 
the points accumulated during thai 
turn. Roll a one (W) and you lo&C all Lhe 
points from that turn and the dice are 
passed to the next player. If you roll two 
ones (Ws), it's el double wham my and 
you ]ose alJ the points you have earned 
throughout the game. That'* especially 
aggravating near the end when you have 
more to lose. 

There's some skill required to know 
When to slop and pass the turn to 
someone else, but ihis game ha* the one 
element that is essential to a good game 
greed. The temptation to roll just one 
more time when you're behind makes 
lor s^me excitement during the game. 

One last note- on the screen pre.se nta- 
tion used. It contains the statement 
POKE 35'3,60;5CRE1£N 0,1 to turn the 
screen a shade of orange when a 
wham my h hit. Simply follow the nexi 
direction on the screen £tnd press ENTER 
Lu continue. The screen will return to 
normal. If you should press the BR.EAK 
key while the screen h OfatigC, Lhe 
program WfU hang up. Just press trie 
Reset button, type POKE 359,126 and 
press enter. It won't show up on the 
screen, bul the fix frill be made and 
you'll see the green screen with the DK 
prompt onee again, 

f 'Questions about ihis program may 
he directed to Mr. Bemko at 708 Mich- 
igan Avenue, Sheboygan, WI 5308L 
4!4-4>9-735iL Ptetise enclose an SASH 
when writing.) □ 



BUI Bzrnka is a seff-htughf tomputerist 
who enjoys goif* mmic and program- 
ming, tie ha tint turner wUharoek hand 
and Hves in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 101 



150 100 600 163 

280 218 700 174 

480 121 END 59 



The listing: WHflMMY 

10 ' THE GAME OF WHAMMY 

20 • BY BILL BERNICO 

30 ' 708 MICHIGAN AVE. 

40 • SHEBOYGAN, WI 53081 

50 ' (414) 459-7350 

60 ' 

70 D=0 : E=0 : F=0 : G=0 : H-0 : 1=0 : J=0 : K 

=0:L=0:Z=43345 

80 C$=CHR$(170) :D$=CHR$(165) :E$= 
CHR$(172) :F$=CHR$(163) :Y$=CHR$(1 
59) :R$=CHR$(191) :L$=CHR$(175) 
90 CLS : PRINT© 13 6 , " THE GAME OF wh 

ammy 

100 PRINT@201,"BY BILL BERNICO 
110 PRINT@0,STRING$ (32,223) ; : PRI 
NT@480,STRING$(31,223) ; :POKE1535 
,223: FORX=3 2T04 4 8 STEP3 2 : PRINT@X , 
CHR$(223) ; tNEXT 

120 FOR X=31 T0479STEP32:PRINT@X 
,CHR$(223) ; : NEXT: PRINT @ 3 3, STRING 
$ (30 ,207) ; : PRINT@449 , STRING$ ( 30 , 
207) ; 

130 FORX=65T0417STEP32:PRINT@X,C 
HR$(207) ; :NEXT:FORX=94 TO 478 ST 
EP32:PRINT@X,CHR$(207) ;:NEXT 
140 PRINT@66,STRING$(28,239) ; :PR 
INT@418,STRING$(28,239) ; :FORX=98 
T0386STEP32:PRINT@X,CHR$(239) ; :N 
EXT 

150 FORX=125T0413STEP32 :PRINT@X, 
CHR$(239) ; :NEXTX:SOUND89,3:SOUND 
109 , 3 : SOUND125 , 3 : SOUND109 , 3 : FORX 
=1T01 2 0 i NEXT : SOUND12 5,3: SOUND8 9 , 
3 : FORX=lT02 0 0 : NEXT : SOUND175 , 2 
160 PRINT@358,"HIT ANY KEY TO BE 
GIN"; :EXEC44539 

170 CLS: PRINT "NUMBER OF PLAYERS 

(1-4)";: FOR X=1024 TO 1046 : POKE 

X, PEEK (X) -64 : PLAY"O5T60B" : EXEC Z 

:NEXT X: INPUT F 

180 IF F<1 OR F>4 THEN 170 

190 PRINT© 3 2 , STRING$ (32 , 150) ; 

200 FOR G=l TO F 

210 PRINT :PLAY"O5T60B": EXEC Z:PL 
AY"04B":EXEC Z : PLAY"05B" : EXEC Z: 
PLAY"04B 

220 PRINT " PLAYER #»; G ;: INPUT A$ ( 
G) :NEXT G 
230 H=RND(F) 

240 PRINT§384, "POINTS NEEDED TO 
WIN";:FOR X=1408 TO 1427:POKEX,P 
EEK (X) -64 : PLAY"O5T60B" : EXEC Z : NE 



XT: INPUT L 

250 CLS:GOSUB 790 

260 IF F>2 THEN PRINT@64 , STRING$ 
(32,191) ; 

270 IF F<3 THEN PRINT© 3 2 , STRING $ 
(64,191); 

280 PRINT@96,R$;R$;A$ (H) " 'S TURN 

";STRING$(28,191) } 
290 PRINT@118, "goal"L; 
300 PRINT@128,STRING$(32,191) ; 
310 I=RND(6) : J=RND(6) :K=I+J 

320 PRINT@160, STRING$ (96, 175) ; 

330 PRINT§194, "your roll";: PRINT 

@205 , I ; : PRINT@211 , J; : PRINT@219 , K 
; : POKE1222 , 32 : POKE12 3 3,43: POKE12 
39,61 

340 PRINT© 17 2 , C$ ; F$ ; F$ ; F$ ; D$ ; 

350 PRINT@204,C$;L$; :PRINT@207,L 

$;D$; 

3 60 PRINT@2 3 6 , C$ ; E$ ; E$ ; E$ ; D$ ; 
3 70 PRINT@17 8 , C$ ; F$ ; F$ ; F$ ; D$ ; 

380 PRINT@210,C$;L$; :PRINT@213,L 

$ ; D$ ; 

390 PRINT@242 , C$ ; E$ ; E$ ; E$ ; D$ ; 

400 PRINT@185,STRING$(7,175) ; 
410 PRINT@249,STRING$(7,175) ; 
420 PRINT@256,STRING$(32,255) ; 
430 PRINT@288,STRING$(32,159) ; 
440 PRINT@352,STRING$(32,159) ; 
450 PRINT@416,STRING$(32,159) ;ST 
RING$(32,255) ; 

460 IF PEEK(1230)=113 THEN POKE 
1230,23 

470 IF PEEK(1236)=113 THEN POKE 
1236,23 

480 IF 1=1 AND J=l THEN PRINT@28 
8,STRING$(160,159) ;: SOUND 1,14:S 
OUND 34,4:SOUND 44, 2: FOR X=l TO 
340: NEXT X: SOUND 1,9:GOTO600 
490 IF 1=1 OR J=l THEN PRINT@288 
,STRING$(160,159) ; :FOR X=l TO 50 
:PLAY"O1T60":EXEC Z:NEXT X:GOT06 
10 

500 E=E+K:D(H)=D(H)+K 
510 IF D(H) =>L THEN 710 

520 PRINT© 320 , E ; "points" ; Y$ ; "thi 
s " ; Y $ ; " t urn " ; S TRI NG $ ( 1 6 , 1 5 9 ) ; : PO 

KE1344, 159 : IF PEEK ( 1 3 4 6 ) =9 6THEN 

POKE1346,159 

530 GOSUB 790 

540 PRINT@384,D(H) ; "total" ;Y$"po 
ints";STRING$(20,159) ; :POKE1408, 
159: IF PEEK(1410)=9 6THEN POKE 14 
10,159 

550 PRINT@487, "ROLL AGAIN (Y/N)? 
";:FOR X=1510 TO 1528: POKE X,PEE 
K{X) -64 : PLAY"O3T60F" : EXEC Z : NEXT 
550 B$=INKEY$:IF B$=" "THEN 560 
570 IF B$="Y"THEN 250 



102 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



58j3 IF B$= S "N"THEN 62J3 
59j3 GOT056j3 

6J30 PRINT@32j3,STRING$(8,159) ; "do 

uble" ; Y$ ; "whammy" ; STRING$ ( 3 p , 159 

) ;:PRINT@384,STRING$(4,159) ; "you 

" ; Y$ ; "lose" ; Y$ ; "all" ; Y$ ; "your" ; Y 
$;"points , !;STRING$(2j3,159) ; :D(H) 
=J3:G0T0 620 

61J3 PRINT@288,STRING$(44,159) ; :P 
RINT@332, "whammy" ;STRING$ (47 , 159 
) ; :PRINT@385,"you";Y$;"lose";Y$; 
"all" ; Y$; "points"; Y$ ; "this" ; Y$"t 

urn" ; STRING $ (34,159); STRING $ (32, 

255) ; :D(H)=D(H) -E 

62j3 H=H+l:E=j3 

63)3 IF H>F THEN H=l 

640 GOSUB 65J3:G0T0 25J3 

650 PRINT@485, "HIT <ENTER> TO CO; 

NTINUE";:FOR X=1504 TO 1535: POKE 

X / PEEK(X)-64:EXEC43345:NEXT X 
66 ji IF 1=1 AND J=l THEN GOSUB 84 

670 IF 1=1 OR J=l THEN GOSUB 850 
680 IF INKEY$OCHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 680 
690 POKE 359,12 6 
700 RETURN 

71)3 PRINT@320,STRING$(32 / 159) ;A$ 



(H) ; Y$ ; "wins" ;Y$; "with" ;Y$;D(H) ; 
Y$; "points" ;STRING$ (63 , 159) ; 

720 PLAY " T 6 J3 0 1 C DE FG ABO 2CDEFGAB03 

GDEFGAB04CDEFGAB05CDEFGAB 

730 GOSUB 790 

740 PRINT@487, "PLAY AGAIN (Y/N) ? 
";:FOR X=1510 TO 1528: POKE X,PEE 
K(X) -64 : PLAY"O5T60B" : EXEC Z : NEXT 
750 C$=INKEY$:IF C$=""THEN 750 
760 IF C$="N"THEN CLS : LIST-50 : EN 
D 

770 IF C$="Y"THEN RUN 

780 GOTO 750 

790 PRINT@0,A$(1) ;D(1) 

800 IF F=>2 THEN PRINT@16 , A$ (2 ) ; 

D(2) 

810 IF F=>3 THEN PRINT@32 , A$ (3) ; 
D(3) 

820 IF F=>4 THEN PRINT@48,A$ (4) ; 
D(4) 

830 RETURN 

840 FORX=1T05 :POKE359 , 60 : SCREEN0 
, 1 : PLAY"O4T60F" : FORY=1TO100 : NEXT 
Y : POKE359 , 12 6 : SCREEN0 ,0 : PLAY"03T 
60F" : FORY=1TO100 : NEXTY : NEXTX : RET 
URN 

850 POKE 359 / 60:SCREEN0 / l:RETURN 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Now $19.95 




(Was $69.95) 



You can benefit from our recent purchase of brand new 
WICO Trackball Controllers at closeout prices. This model 
was designed specifically for the Radio Shack Color Computer 
and plugs right into the joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer and manufacturer of control 
devices for the commercial arcade video games. If you've 
ever played an arcade video game, chances are you've used a 
WICO joystick or trackball. You've experienced the superior 
control. The pinpont firing accuracy. The exceptional 
durability. 

Includes one-year limited warranty. Phoenolic ball offers 
360-dcgree movement. Two optical encoders provide 
split-second response. Quick-action fire button for smooth, 
two handed arcade response and feel. Long 5' computer 
connection. Heavy duty plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color computer models. 

ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: Specifiy CAT# C331. 
Include $19.95 per trackball plus $3.00 for S&H. UPS COD 
Add $3.00, VISA/MC Accepted. NY Residents add sales tax. 

ORDER NOW! 
QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED. 

Zebra Systems, Inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 




The Coco Greeting Card Designer 

the Coco Greeting Card Designer can be used to design 
and print custom Greeting Cards for all occasions 
including: Valentine's Day, Birthdays, Mother's Day and 
more. 

It's easy to use and includes a library of predrawn Hi-Res 
Graphic Pictures! You can write custom messages on the 
cover and inside your cards in a selection of character 
fonts and sizes. An easy to use editor allows you to pick 
your type style, font size, and more. Two fonts and a 
selection of custom border patterns are included, and the 
easy to use editors allow you to create many more! 
The Coco Greeting Card Designer requires a Coco or 
Coco II with a minimum of 32k, One Disk Drive (Disk Ext. 
BASIC 1 .0/1.1 , ADOS, or JODS). Some of the printers that 
the Greeting Card Designer supports are: EPSON RX/FX, 
GEMINI 10X orSG-10, C-ITOH 8510, DMP-1 00/1 05/400/ 
430, SEIKOSHA GP-100/250, LEGEND 808 and GORILLA 
BANANA. Send an SASE for current list of other compat- 
ible printers. See Review in April 86 Rainbow . . . 

Only: $24.95 



RAINBOW 




Plus $3.00 Shipping & Handling 
NY Residents add Sales Tax. 
UPS COD ADD $3.00 
VISA/MC Accepted 

ZEBRA SYSTEMS, 
INC. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, New York 11421 
(718) 296-2385 
Dealer Inquiries Invited 



• ; ; >V 1. 

_ MS* rl'f 

. .. . 



Colored Paper Packs — Now available are packs of 40 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 16 matching envelopes 
in bright RED, GREEN and BLUE. Perfect for making your 
card unforgettable! Prjce $19 95 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 03 



Getting to the Details 
of the CoCo 3 



By Marty Goodman 



Q. I hear the new Co Co 3 will have 
an RGB output. Does this mean I 
can use the same RGB monitor I now 
use on my IBM PC? 

A. No. The new CoCo 3 does have 
an RGB output, but it is an RGB 
analog output, not the RGBI-type 
signal protocol used for most stand- 
ard IBM PC color displays. The 
RGBI used by the IBM systems is 
characterized by its signals at TTL 
levels (five volts or zero volts — 
nothing in between). It allows for a 
maximum of 14 colors plus black. 
RGB analog allows for a great many 
more colors and, as such, is a super- 
ior protocol. It may be possible to 
modify many RGBI-type monitors 
to accept RGB analog signals by 
merely removing a chip or two inside 
the monitor and properly biasing the 
bases of the R, G, B and synch input 
transistors. But apart from such 
hacker manipulations, to fully ap- 
preciate the impressive color graph- 
ics capability of the CoCo 3 you will 
have to either buy the $300 CM-8 
monitor from Tandy, or use one of 
the few other RGB analog capable 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a phy- 
, sician trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and 
outspoken commentator — sort of 
the Howard Cosell of the CoCo 
world. Marty is the database man- 
ager of rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi His non-computer passions 
include running, mountaineering 
and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 



monitors. Both Magnavox and Sony 
make a few monitors that are RGB 
analog capable. There are two minor 
variants of RGB analog. One is the 
kind used by the CoCo 3, where the 
R, G and B signals are separate and 
there are separate synch signals. The 
other is the protocol used by the 
Amiga computer, where the synch 
signal information is tacked on to the 
Green luminance line. 



Q. I know the CoCo 3 features 
much improved graphics resolution. 
But the CoCo 3's joystick inputs are 
of the same zero-to-63 low resolution 
as those of the old CoCo 2. How can 
I achieve smooth positioning of a 
cursor or character on the CoCo 3 
screen using the joystick? Will the 
CoCo Max Hi-Res joystick help? 

A. Currently, the only way to get 
Hi- Res joystick control on a CoCo 3 
involves one of several programming 
tricks: for instance, using a fine 
control box (like that used by Graph- 
icom) or using the analog joy- 
stick as a time-controlled, four- 
switch joystick via a software emu- 
lation of such an Atari-type joystick. 
CoCo Max's Hi-Res joystick hard- 
ware (and the program itself) will not 
work on the CoCo 3 due to the 
hardware using a port address that 
conflicts with assigned addresses 
used by the GIME chip in the CoCo 
3. But it has been rumored that a low- 
cost adaptor will soon be available. 
It will plug in between the joystick 
ports and computer (on both the 
CoCo 2 and 3) and will greatly in- 
crease the available resolution of the 



joysticks. Keep an eye on new pro- 
ducts from Tandy; help is on the way. 



I am told by Tandy that all of 
their hardware for the CoCo 2 will 
be compatible with the CoCo 5. Is 
this so? What about hardware and 
software from non-Tandy sources? 

A. To the best of my knowledge, all 
Tandy hardware for the CoCo (Mul- 
tipak, Disk controller, RS-232 Pak, 
Hard Disk Controller, Speech 
Sound Pak, and such) is fully com- 
patible with the CoCo 3. Similarly, 
all third party disk controllers (those 
from J&M systems, HDS and Disto) 
should also work fine with the CoCo 
3. But in order for them to work with 
the CoCo 3, they need to have an 
unmodified version of Disk BASIC 
1.1. The PBJ 2SP pack is also fully 
compatible with the CoCo 3, as is the 
Disto RAM disk card. The 80- 
column card from PBJ will probably 
not work on the CoCo 3, although 
it is not needed due to the 80-column 
capability of the CoCo 3. 

CoCo Max will not work in its 
current form on the CoCo 3, in part 
because of hardware conflicts. But it 
will very likely be re-released in a 
CoCo 3 compatible version. 

Due to differences in the handling 
of memory on the CoCo 3, much 
other well-known CoCo 2 software 
{Telewriter, VIP Writer, Mikeyterm, 
Graphicom, Color Com E, etc.) will 
not work in their original forms on 
the CoCo 3. However, patches for 
these and other popular CoCo 2 
programs will most likely appear 
soon. 



104 THE RAINBOW October 1986 







□ 

OOQQQOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQOOQ 
SUPER RAM - I 

The first 256K/512K memory board for the CoCo II ! 256K/512K of memory resides 

IN THIS STURDY, LOW NOISE METAL CASE AND ALL THE SUPPORT CIRCUITRY TO ACCESS IT 
AS A HIGH SPEED RAMP I SK ! CoMPATIBI F WITH Al I CoOo IT'S . EVEN THE 26-3127B AND 

26-3134A/B . (see June '86 Rainbow Review) Requires a RS Multi-Pak. 

25iK Board - $129.95 Board (Recommended for QSrl users) - $169.95 

OS- 9 Driver - $24.95 



NOW add 68QQ8 CPU processing power to the CoCo ! Simply elug the 68K board into 

THE ROMPAK PORT OF YOUR CoCo AND ATTACH YOUR DlSK CONTROLLER INTO THE 68K BOARD. 

Features 8/16/32 bit internal processing, parallel port, and fast DMA operation. 
25iK Board - $349.95 (Metal case $39.95) 25K RAMP I SK Driver - $59.95 

OS-9 Driver - $29.95 

SUPER CONTROLLER - 

The most AMAZING CoCo Disk Controi i fr ever ! Switch up to four DOS's (up to 16K) 
via a single software POKE. Choose between R/S 1.0/1.1, Spectrum DOS, ADOS, JDOS 
Stearman DOS - $99.95 ( Spfctrum DOS $29.95 or ADOS $39.95 with purchase of the 
Super Controller - Buy 'em both for $59) 

Fnhancfd Display 80 - Add an 80X24 display. Real Time Clock and Centronics 

PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE TO YOUR SUPER CONTROLLER ! INCLUDES SMOOTH SCROLLING, 

Switchable Video Input - $149.95 (NEW QS-9 Drivfr for Display 80 - $24.95) 
EPROM Programmer for the Super Controller - $69.95 (Uses 2764's ($4.95) or 
27128's ($6.95) EPROMS) 

COMM-4 - 

Enhance the MULT I -TASKING & MULT I -USER features of OS- 9 by providing (4) serial 
independent devices via DB-25 plugs on a plug-in cartridge. Allows 

YOU TO HOOK UP ANY COMBINATION OF UP TO (4) TERMINALS, MODEMS OR PRINTERS. A 

must for Bun. ft i m Board Sysqps ! (Call 504-340-7609 COMM-4 BBS to see a demo - 
300 /1200 Baud, 8 Bits, No Parity) $99.95. Requires a RS Multi-Pak. 

COCO MAX II - 

Feature packed hardwarf & softwarf Graphics System ! Includes: Phi i -Down Menus, 
Icon processing, multiple Font styles, full graphic editing plus a special Input 
Module for 25iX152 joystick input. 64K DISK $79.95 - with a 'Y' Cable $99.95 
CoCo Max I-II Disk Upgrade $19.95 - MaxFdit $19.95 - MaxFonts (Set of 3) $64.95 



OOOQQOQOOOOQQQQQQQOQOOQQQOQQQQQOQQQQQQOQQO 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 



COD ORDER HOT LINE 718-835-1344 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

COLORFUL COMPUTING 





COMMUNICATION 



[ 

C0L0RC0M/E - A complete smart 
termi na 1 package! Upload, 
Download, Hi-Res (51X24) 
screen, 300/1200 Baud, Offline 
Printing. 32/64K Disk * - $39.95 
*- Now with DELPHI & Compuserve 
XM ODEM support! Download ML! 
COMPUSERVE Starter Kit $14.95 




I 




MODEMS 




^J HIIIIIIIHIIIIIIlllllllllHlllllllllllllllllllllip 



1 200 BAUD 
$129.95 



* * 



Hayes compatible! Super for the 
DELPHI & Compuserve CoCo Sig! 
300/1200 Baud, Auto -dial / answer 
** Requires Modem cable .$19.95 




KEYBOARDS 




SEIKOSHA 

SP-1000A 

• 100 cps draft 

• 20 cps NLQ 

• Friction and tractor 

• Front panel Controls 

• 1.5 K buffer 

$219.95 




WORD PROCESSING 




TELE WRITER-64 - Three Hi-Res 
screens, true lowercase char's 
right justify, full screen 
editor. Tape $49.95 Disk $59.95 
TELEPATCH - A TW-64 enhancer ! ! ! 
True b lock move, O verstrike & 
TSPOOL mode, Type Ahead Buffer 
FASTER Disk I/O 64K Disk $19.95 



PRINTERS 





GEMINI NX-10 - 120 cps, tract- 
frict feed, NLQ mode, 5K buffer 
Front Panel Controls! - $249.95 
KAMELEON -Low cost Parallel Ptr 
Interface! 600/9600 Baud $49.95 
PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Ptr 
interface & 64K Print Buffer ! 
COMPUTE while you PRINT $149.95 



miiiiimi' inmiiiiimrmnra 

MONITORS 





RS 26-3016 Low Profile CoCo 
Keybd. Fits all CoColTs, "F" & 
TDP-100's WAS $39.95 NOW $14.95 
Adapter for D/E CoCoI's - $9.95 




$10 






Monitor Stand $24.95 



m 



I 




MONOCHROME 
MONITORS 

80x24 Hi-Res screens! $79.95 
Uni versal Video Driver - Works 
w/all monitors & CoCos!- $29.95 
1 3 TT ~C0L0R Monitors $169.95 




1 



OFF COLORCOM/E WITH A HAYES MODEM 

OFF TELEWRITER-64 WITH ANY PRINTER, 
KEYBOARD OR MONITOR 



$10 



m 



SPEEDY COD ORDER HOT LINE - CALL 718-835-1344 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

COLORFUL COMPUTING 



SPREADSHEET 




or] [DYNAGALCI 




Screen 32X16 51X24 

Precision 9 digits 16 digits 
Hi-Res Graphics NO YES 
Visicalc cmd format NO YES 
New low price! 64K Disk $69.95 
Side Wise -Print DYfilACALC files 
up to 255 ch a rs -s i deway s ! $24* 95 




**** at 



BUY 'EM 
BOTH FOR 

< DYWACALC h PCF 3.0 

$99.95 



ONLY) 



DATA BASE MANAGER 













PRO-COLOR FILE 
Fids, 8 Report 
Fmts, 1020 bytes 
Fields, Global ! 
Sort, Create Fi 
w/DYNACALC! - Di 
Pro Color Dir a 
Buy 'em both for 


2.0 - 60 Data 
Fmts, 4 Screen 
/record. Sort 3 
Search, FAST ML 
les Compatible 
sk $49.95 
nd PCF Forms - 
only $29.95 




Til 


iiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiniiii 


iimuhiiiiiii 


ln= 



DISK DRIVES 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DRIVE 0 

$239.95 

Disk Drive - 1,2 or 3 - $119.95 
Top Drive for FD-501 - $119.95 

i 





TANDY 1000 



Want to u pgrade your $699/ $999 
Tandy 1000 ? (See below ! ! i) 
640K Upgrade - Take your 128K 
Tandy 1000 up to 640K and SAVE 
(Why pay up to $520 ?*) $169.95 
Tandy 1000 2nd Drive - Add 360K 
of storage & SAVE MORE- $149.95 
Buy 'em BOTH for only - $299.95 




-Cost of RS Memory PLUS 
Expansion Board (25-1011) & 
256K RAM kit (26-6019) 
1986 Computer Catalogue - P.94 








'You judge' 



GAME CONTROLLERS 




TRACKBALL 
$19.95* 

Wi cp Command Adapter - Now you 
can hookup 2 Atari type joystks 
to your CoCo for only $19.95! 
* Reg. $69.95 (See 9/86 review) 




mit iiniiiiHiiniiiumiiminnnTimi 



COCO II UPGRADES 



Want to upgrade your new $69/ 
$88 CoCo II? (See below !!) 
4464 DRAMs - two chip 64K 
upgrade for 26-31 3 4A and 26- 
3134B Korean CoCo I I 1 ! ..$39.95 
Extended BASIC - 28 pin ROM for 
26-3134 A7BToCo II' s ...$34.95 
Buy 'em BOTH for only - $69.95 




SPECTRUM PROJECTS, Inc. 

PO BOX 264 
HOWARD BEACH, NY 11414 



CoCo Club/Dealer 
inquiries invited I 
Software/Hardware 
submissions welcomed I 



is 




All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 






By Helene LaBonville 



The Great Talking Pumpkin is a graphics display of a 
large jack-o -lantern that will assist in greeting trick of 
treaters on Halloween night. 

A small audio amplifier (such as RS #277-1008A), a 
microphone (With a 3.5mm miniature phone plug) and a 
joystick are needed to make the jack-o'-lantern appear to 
talk. The black plug from the computer's cassette cable must 
be connected to the output jack of the amplifier and the 
mike connected to the input jack. With the computer on, 
start with the amplifier volume turned all the way down and 
the TV or monitor volume turned up about midway. Next, 
enter FiUDIQON and adjust the volume setting on the 
amplifier slowly, until your voice is heard on the TV speaker. 
Then, run The Great Talking Pumpkin and speak while 
pressing the joystick button. The Great Pumpkin lives! 





The listing: PUMPKIN 



J3 • TALKING PUMPKIN BY HM LaBONV 
ILLE 

1 1 ADAPTATION OF DAVE HOOPER'S 

2 • DRAWING FROM THE RAINBOW 




3 ' OCTOBER 1982 (PAGE 104) 

4 • AND MIKE KELLER'S ARTICLE 

5 ' FROM 8J3-MICRO (OCT82 PAGE104 

) 

6 GOT08 

7 GOTO 9 

8 PCLEAR8 : PMODE4 : PCLS : GOT07 

9 PMODE3 , 1 

lj3 ' DRAW PUMPKIN 

11 ' LINES 1J0-8J3 ARE IDENTICAL T 
0 HOOPER'S LINES 10-85 
15 CIRCLE(128,96) ,9j3,7 
20 PAINT(128,96) ,7,7 



108 THE RAINBOW October 1986 




SHOPPING LIST 



SUMMER CHIP -SALE- ... 

RF Shield for D/E CoCo I's $3.95 

6821 Standard PIA Jf§s3S: $4.95 

Basic ROM 1.1 Chip $&f95L $7.95 

Orig SAM Chip (6883) J$J#r9T $9.95 

6847 VDG Chip $9.95 

6809E CPU Chipi$»r$5r $9.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) ...$19.95 
68769 (Fits all Basic ROMS) EPROM $19.95 
Disk ROM 1.1 (New DOS Command ) ...$29.95 
New SAM Chip w/heatsink (74LS785) $29.95 
Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 
CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 

6809E CPU & SAM Chips SSSrSS' $29.95 

EPROM Eraser - 3 min erasure time $49.95 
EPROM Prgmr - 2716* s up to 27512 ! Super 
fast programming-See 4/86 review $149.95 

COCO LIBRARY... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 .$3.95 
New! 200 MORE Pokes. Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 
CoCo Memory Map ..................$14.95 

Basic Programmi ng Tricks Revealed. $14. 95 

500 Pokes. Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide ...$19.95 

Assembly Language Programmi ng ....$19.95 

Color Basic Unraveled $19.95 

Extended Basic Unraveled $19.95 

Disk Basic (1.0/1.1) Unraveled ...$19.95 

New! CoCo II Service Manual* $24.95 

CoCo III Service Manual ..........$39.95 

Official 0S9 Manual Set $39.95 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9.$19.95 
W/Two Disk Package of demo pgms ..$49.95 
Color / Extended / Disk Basic Unraveled - 
Complete disassembly of the CoCo ROMS ! 
Complete 3 Book Set - Save $10! ..$49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF... 

CoCo Light Pen - ^2*r8S: Save $5!. .$19.95 
Cpmp,ut.i.ze "Y" Box - More positive 

connections than a "Y" Cable $29.95 

PBJ WORDPAK-RS - Newest version ! HiRes 
80x24 display. Comes w/0S-9 drivr $99.95 
Micro Works DS-69A Digitizer ....$149.95 

CoCo III 51 2K Upgrade COMING SOON 

* - Specify CoCo II Catalogue Number 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
COD add $2.00 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 




COCO CABLES AND... 

Pri nter/Modem 15' Extender Cable .$14.95 
Tired of unpl uggi ng devices from your 
RS232 port? Try a RS232 "Y" Cable . $19. 95 
Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pinF.$19.95 
Modem~CabTe^ "67t (DB25-DB25) ....$19.95 

Joystick7Mouse 10* Ext Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) ..$24.95 
Null Modem Cable - 4 pin to DB25 .$24.95 
T5"~ Multi-Pak/Rom Pak Extender - Move 
your Multi/ROM Paks further away .$27. 95 
40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk 
w/Voice, Word Pak, CoCo Max , etc ..$29.95 
Triple RS232 Switcher - Now select one 
of any three RS232 peripherals ...$39.95 
40 Pin Triple "Y" Cable - Hook up any 3- 
Voice7Word/RS232/Digitizer PAKs ..$39.95 
Special! 4 Drive Disk Cable $49.95 

ID STUFF... 

C— 10 tapes in any quantity .....49 cents 
5 1/4 " Diskettes , any quantity .79 cents 

OS-9 Quick Reference Guide $3.95 

Rompak w/Blank PC Brd-27xx series .$9.95 
Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV 
interference created by CoCo! ....$19.95 
The Magic Box - Load Mod I/III Basic 

program tapes into the CoCo $24.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs 
(Disk 1.0 1.1, JD0S) in J&M ctlr .$24.95 
Orig CoCo I "D" Rev motherboard . Includes 
all chips (SAM, CPU, PIA's, VDG) except 
RAM and Ext Basic ! Spare Parts ! $29.95 

RAM Chips (Set of 8) $39.95 

Model 100 8K Upgrade $39. 95 

HJL-57 Keyboard - Save $7.00!!! ..$72.95 

Specify Model /Revision Board 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM $79.95 

Amdek Twin 3" Drive System $139.95 

Amdek Drive System w/controller .$239.95 



HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 



HOT LINE 
1344 



s 

p 

E 
C 
I 

A 
L 

6 

4 
K 

R 
A 
M 

C 
H 
I 

P 

S 

$ 
1 
9 

■ 

9 
5 



718-835- 



COLORFUL UTILITIES 



Something possibly wrong with your CoCo? ?? CoCo CHECKER is the answer! ! Will test your ROMs, 
RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, Printer* Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, PIAs, VDG, Internal 
Clock Speed, Multi-Pak Interface and more!! 16K TAPE/DISK $19-95 (see Jan ! 85 Rainbow Review) 



MULTI-PA K CRAK 



Save RO^ PAKs to your 64 K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant 
p logging in of ROMPAKs now by keeping all your PAK software on disk . Includes POKEs for 
"PROBLEM" ROMPAKs- including the NEW 16K PAKS! (Demon Attack,Dragons Lair,etc) 64K DISK $24.95 





■ 



r AI! the FEATURES of TELEPAT CH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD 
($19,95J font w/TRUE lowercase descenders! Get BOTH & SUPERCHARGE your TW-64 for only $29-95 



SPIT N IMAGE 



A super upgrade from Disk Omni Clone! Back everything up! This amazing program handles non 
standard " disks with ease. We haven't found any disk yet that it can't handle. Don't ever be caught 
without a backup again! Lowest price too! Beats most " copy protection " programs! 32K DISK $29.95 



COCO SCREEN DUMP 



The best screen dump program for the Panasonic, Epson & Gemini printers ever! Have the option of 
standard or reverse images w/regular or double sized proportional pictures* 600-9600 Baud too! A 
must for Gra phi c orn and CoCo Calendar users. 16K TAPE/DISK $19.95 (see Nov "84 Rainbow Review) 



DISK UTILITY 2.1 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively 
sort, move, rename and kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy and backup. 
Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, plus the size, load addresses and entry points of all 
programs. Single command execution of both Basic and ML programs. 32K/64K DISK $24.95 " Disk 
Utility has proven itself very quickly at my house" - Ed Ellers Oct '84 Rainbow Review pg. 220 



SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 



Now you can write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter-64, VIP Writer, etc.) and convert 
them to special Highly Detailed character sets ! Some of the character sets supported are Italics , 
Old Engl ish , Futuristic and Block . A character set ed itor is included to create custom sets or 
modify existing ones! Supports most dot-matrix printers! DISK $29.95 (see Dec f 85 Rainbow Revi&w) 



Add 24 NEW Disk commands with 2 Hi -Res screens! Supports 40 track & Double -Sided drives, 6 ms 
stepping, auto disk search, error trapping & "EPROMABLE". 64K DISK 3$3*9*85l New LOW price!! $24.95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR 



Save time and design pro looking diagrams using a 480X540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows. 
Over 30 electronic symbols w/10 definable symbols . (Even Logic gates & Multipin chips!) Print hard 
copy and save to disk. 64K DISK ;$49a©5: New LOW price!!! $29.95 (see Jan '84 Rainbow Review) 



THE MEMORY MANAGER 



Now you can use the SECOND 32K memory bank of your 64K CoCo as a SUPERFAST Ramdisk! Also 
CHAIN a long Basic program from the first bank into the second or LOAD Basic programs into both 
32K banks and RUN from either bank! USER FRIENDLY & completely MENU DRIVEN. 64K DISK $29-95 





coco c 



Use your CoCo to keep track of your checking and savings accounts! Printout individual personal 
checks! 32K/64K TAPE $19.95 DISK $29*95 (see April'85 pg. 210 & Oct'85 pg. 197 Rainbow Reviews) 



THE ULTIMATE GRAPHIC ADVENTURE 



Wizard's Castle is a graphic adventure game with deadly creatures , magic spells and traps of all 



types which are RANDOMIZED at the beginning of each session so that no 2. adventures will be the 
same! REAL TIME ACTION keeps the game's characters interacting even though you may be waiting to 
make a move. Includes three skill levels, 60 Hi-Res screens & Game Save Feature. 64K DISK $24.95 



Li j 



ANY 5 PROGRAMS 
ET A DOUBLE SIDED 
DRIVE f FOR $199.05 
OTHER DISCOUNTS CAN BE APPLIED 



*NOW AVAILABLE BY EXPRESS ORDER AT 



YOUR LOCAL RADIO SHACK STORE!!! 

ASK TO SEE THE RADIO SHACK 
DEMO DISKS - FC#0249 & F 



JiT:Tf: 






.ORFUL UTILITIES <N»<» 



^ BRE ETING CARD PB 



^Create custom greetings for any occasion: Birthdays, Anniversaries, Holidays, etc. The program can 
be used to make custom Thank-You, Invitations, Get -Well cards and Announcements! Easy to use and 
includes a library of pre- drawn Hi -Res graphics. Includes a screen & font editor. 32K DISK $24.95 



COCO VIDEO TITLE 



Start your VCR tapes #lth dazzling title frames followed by professional countdown to black fade- 
outs! Use a title page editor with several sizes of text & background colors ! 32K TAPE $19.95 



PENPAL 



lt*s here! CoCo's answer to 1-2-3 ! PENPAL combines Word Processing, Communications, Graphics, 
Data Base & Spread-sheet into a single mteflratetf software package! 64K DISK INTRO PRICE $69.95 



B4K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 



Take advantage of an expanded 84 K machine. Make an additional 8K of RAM available by relocating 
the Ext Basic ROM from $8000 to SDQOQ , Copy ROMPAKS to disk (even " protected " PAKS) and create 
a 32K SPOOL buffer for printing. DISK % 34.95 (see July '83 Rainbow Review) 



TAPE/DISK UTILITY 




A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic 
copy of an enlire disk of programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to, disk- Also copies tape to 
tape & prints tape & disk directories. TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 



SUPER DUPER UTILITIES 



inaliy! At last! A "SUPER DUPER" utility software package all rolled up into ONEllI Includes such 
great utilities as: CoCo Disk Zap, Disk Encryption, Disk Mailing List, EZ Disk Master, Graphics 
ZOOM, Banner Creator, Function KEYS, Super INPUT/LINEINPUT, Basic Program PACKER, Alpha 
Directory, Basic SEARCH and much, much more!!! 32K DISK $29.95 ( see June '86 Rainbow Review) 



COCO CALENDAR 



Get organized for '86 TODAY with the Co Co Calendar! Designed for recording Che entire year's 
oceassipns and daily appointments so you can plan ahead. You can store HUNDREDS of entries and 
our GRAPHIC Calendar will show all MEMOS! 32K DISK $19.95 (see Mar f 86 Hair bow Review) 



THE OS-9 SOLUTION 



NOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY " environment within OS-9I The OS-9 SOLUTION 
replaces 19 of the old "USER HOSTILE " commands with single keystroke, menu driven commands. No 
more typing in complex long pathnames or remembering complicated syntaxes! Set all XMQDE 
parameters at the touch of keyslJSSMSr N&w LOW price!!! $24.95 (see Sept f 85 Rainbow Review) 



COCO-UTIL 



Now you can have the power to easily transfer Radio Shack Color Computer disk files to your MS- 
DOS machine - including the Tandy 1000 & IBM PC!!! You can also transfer MS-DOS files to your 
CoCq disk, even format CoCo disks! CoCo-Util will save you countless hours of retyping ! No need to 
move your computer or printer anymore! Requires 128K MS-DOS computer w/2 disk drives - $29-95 






BONANZA PACKAGE 



■eate an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the 
following 12 programs to customize your own SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA! CoCo Checker, 
Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, 
Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, CoCo Calendar, Schematic Drafting Processor, OS-9 
Solution, Graphicom, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value) for only $99.95!!! 



FRANK HOGGS O-PAK 



A H > -Res Screen & Utilities package for QS-9 users! Use one of the available Hi -Res character sets 
(42X24, 64X19, 85X24, etc.) or create your own* Mix graphics withy text on a screen with unlimited 
flexibility. Copy files between OS-9 and Radio Shack DOS. 64K DISK $39.95 



Ml orders plus $3 S/H (Foreign $5) SPECTRUM PROJECTS INC 

COD add $2 extra p-*^^ n 

NYS Residents add Sales Tax PO BOX 264 

COD ORDER LINE 718-835-1344 HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 



25 CIRCLE(128,96) ,45, 1,2 
30 CIRCLE(128, 96) ,30,1,3 
35 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,58,1,1.6 
40 CIRCLE(128, 96) ,80,1,1.1 
45 CIRCLE(128,96) ,10,1,9 
50 ' EYES -NOSE 

55 DRAW"C8;BM68,68E16F16L32" 

60 PAINT (84, 64) ,0,8 

65 DRAWC8 ; BM156 , 68E16F16L32 " 

70 PAINT(172,64) ,8,8 

75 DRAW"C8;BM112,92E16F16L32" 

80 PAINT (128 ,88) ,8,8 

85 ' COPY BODY, EYES AND MOUTH T 

0 PAGES 5 TO 8 

90 PCOPY1T05 : PCOPY2T06 : PCOPY3T07 

: PC0PY4T08 

95 1 CLOSED MOUTH 

100 CIRCLE (128, 96) , 52 ,8, 1,0,-. 5 

105 CIRCLE (128,59) ,77,8,1, .160, . 

35 

110 PAINT (128, 142) ,8,8 

115 DRAW"C7;BM92,122D8R8U5" 

120 PAINT (96, 126) ,7,7 

125 DRAW"C3;BM124, 6U4R8D4L8" 

130 PAINT ( 128,4) ,3,3 

135 DRAW"C7 ;BM165, 120D10L8U7" 

140 PAINT(161,128) ,7,7 

145 DRAW"C7 ;BM120, 148U8R16D9L16U 

1" 

150 PAINT (128, 144 ) , 7 ,7 
155 PMODE3 , 5 

160 ' OPEN MOUTH 

161 • LINES 165-215 ARE IDENTICA 
L TO HOOPER'S LINES 90-135 

165 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,52,8,1,0, .5 
170 CIRCLE(128, 21) ,91,8,1, .160, . 
35 

175 PAINT (126, 124) , 8,8 

180 DRAW"C7;BM88, 100D8R8U5" 

185 PAINT (92, 104) ,7,7 

190 DRAW"C3 ;BM124, 6U4R8D4L8" 

195 PAINT (128, 4) ,3,3 

200 DRAW"C7/BM164,100D10L8U7" 

205 PAINT(160,104) ,7,7 

210 DRAW"C7;BM120,148U8R16D9L16U 

1" 

215 PAINT (12 8, 144) ,7,7 
220 AUDIOON 

225 1 DISPLAY CLOSED-MOUTHED PUM 
PKIN 

230 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

235 FORX=1TO50:NEXT 

240 1 OPEN MOUTH IF JOYSTICK BUT 

TON PRESSED 

245 IF PEEK(339)=255THEN245 
250 PM0DE4,5:SCREEN1,1 
255 FORX=1TO100:NEXT 
260 GOTO230 



Colors of the Spectruir 



By Bill Bernico 



You've probably seen ROY G. BIV mentioned before i 
THE RAINBOW. For those of you who do not know, RO 1 
G. BIV represents the six primary and secondary colors o 
the spectrum that make up a rainbow: Red, Orange, Yellow 
Green, Blue, Indigo and Violet. 

The following program demonstrates the combining o 
any two of the primary colors (red, yellow, blue) to mato 
a secondary color (green, orange, violet). Just answer th 
computer's prompts. 



The listing: SPECTRUM 




10 
20 

30 
40 

50 

60 

70 

80 



SPECTRUM 

BY BILL BERNICO 

708 MICHIGAN AVE. 

SHEBOYGAN, WI 53081 

(414) 459-7350 

IDEA BY DAVID POLONSKY 



R$=CHR$(191) :Y$=CHR$(159) : B$= 
CHR$ (175) : BL$=CHR$ (128) 
90 CLS0 : PRINT@71 , "RED" } : PRINT@76 
, "YELLOW" ; : PRINT© 8 4 , "BLUE" ; 
100 PRINT@102,STRING$(5,191) ?STR 
ING$ ( 8,159) 7 STRING$ ( 6 , 175 ) ; 
110 PRINT© 165, "CHOOSE ANY two OF 
THESE";: PRINT© 197, "COLORS TO SE 
E WHAT COLOR";: PRINT© 2 2 9, "THEY M 
ARE WHEN COMBINED."; 
120 PRINT© 3 2 3, "CHOICE 1 (R,Y,B): 
" ; : INPUT C$ (1) : SOUND191, 1 

130 PRINT@387 , "CHOICE 2 (R,Y,B) : 

";:INPUT C$(2) :SOUND150,1 

140 IF C$(1)=C$(2)THEN 90 

150 IF C$(1)="R"AND C$(2)="B"THE 

N C$ ( 3 ) =CHR$ ( 239 ) : GOTO 2 10 

160 IF C$(1)="R"AND C$(2)="Y"THE 

N C$(3)=CHR$(255) :GOTO210 

170 IF C$(1)-"Y"AND C$(2)="R"THE 

N C$(3)=CHR$(255) :GOTO210 

180 IF C$(1)="Y"AND C$(2)="B"THE 

N C$(3)=CHR$(143) :GOTO210 

190 IF C$(1)="B"AND C$(2)="R"THE 

N C$(3)=CHR$(239) :GOTO210 

200 IF C$(1)="B"AND C$(2)="Y"THE 

N C$(3)=CHR$(143) :GOTO210 

210 PRINT@344,BL$+BL$+BL$+C$(3)+ 

C$(3)+C$(3)+C$(3)+C$(3) ; :PRINT@3 



112 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



77 , "="+BL$+C$ ( 3 ) +C$ (3 ) +C$ ( 3 ) +C$ ( 
3 ) +C$ ( 3) ;: PRINT@408 , BL$+BL$+BL$+ 
C$(3)+C$(3)+C$(3)+C$(3)+C$(3) ; 
220 GOSUB 2 30: GOTO 90 
230 PRINT@484,"HIT ANY KEY TO CO 
NTINUE" ; : EXEC4 4539 : RETURN 



28/3 DATA 42,124,1,1,125,5,53,53, 

53 , 53 ,5 , 125,1 , 1, 124 ,999 

290 DATA 0,127,64,67,69,74,85,90 

, 85, 9J3, 85, 90, 85,74,69,67,64,64,6 

5,65,65,65,65,89,89,89,88,88,67, 

69,74,85,90,85,90,85,90,85,74,69 

,67,64,127,999 



rhe Boogie Box 

iy Michael Berenz 



♦*»•"»} 

j ;<M**t**» iwfrtitw ■!'•»;'!*« 

wm ® w 



This program prints a very small version of a jam box 
n any Radio Shack dot-matrix printer; 



delisting: RADIO 



4K 



10 REM ****************** 
20 REM * RADIO * 

25 REM * BY MIKE BERENZ * 
30 REM ****************** 

40 PRINT#-2,CHR$(18) 

50 PRINT#-2,CHR$(128) ;CHR$(224) ; 

CHR$(184) ; 

60 FOR A=l TO 38 

70 PRINT*.- 2 , CHR$ ( 168 ) ; 

80 NEXT A 

90 PRINT#-2,CHR$(184) ;CHR$(224) 

100 READ B: IF B=999 THEN PRINT # - 

2,»»: GOTO 130 

110 PRINT#-2,CHR$(128+B) ; 

120 GOTO 100 

130 PRINT#-2,CHR$(128) ;CHR$(255) 
;CHR$(128) ;CHR$(252) ; 
140 FOR C=l TO 5 

150 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (170) ; CHR$ (2 13) 



160 NEXT C 

170 READ D:IF D=99 

180 PRINT#-2,CHR$( 

190 GOTO 170 

200 FOR E=l TO 5 

210 PRINT#-2,CHR$(170) ;CHR$(213) 



9 THEN 200 
128+D) ; 



220 NEXT E 
230 PRINT* 
;CHR$ (12 8) 
240 READ F 
2,CHR$(30) 
250 PRINT* 
260 GOTO 2 
270 DATA 0 
3,79,73,77 
7,73,79,73 
1,79,64,64 
,127,999 



-2,CHR$( 

;CHR$ (25 
: IF F=99 
:END 

-2,CHR$ (F+128) ; 
40 

,127,0,4 
,75,13,9 

,77,75,7 
/ 70, 79, 7 



170) ;CHR$(252) 
5) 

9 THEN PRINT* - 



8,48,0,79,77,7 
,15,73,77,75,7 
7,73,79,9,13,1 
9,70,0,48,48,0 



Space Attack 

By Patrick J. Benway 




This short program uses the BASIC commands of CIRCLE, 
LINE and PSET-PRESET to demonstrate a space city raid. 

The listing: RAID 

10 CLS:PRINT§196, " SPACE-CITY 

(RAID! ) " :F0RJ=1T0255STEP3 : SOU 

NDJ,1:NEXT 

20 PMODE4 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 : F0RJ=1T 
0300 :PSET(RND (255) ,RND( 191) ) :NEX 
T 

30 F0RJ=1T07 : CIRCLE ( 12 , 185) , J, , 1 




5:CIRCLE(28,187) , J, ,10 : CIRCLE (45 
,195) , J, ,8 .'CIRCLE (62, 225) , J, ,12: 
CIRCLE (238, 187) ,J, ,13 : NEXT: SOUND 
255,50 

40 F0RJ=1T025: CIRCLE (180, 20) ,J, , 
. 200 : NEXT : S 0UND1 , 50 : S0UND1 5 0 , 8 : S 
OUND50 , 1 : LINE ( 180 ,20 )- ( 30 , 120 ) , P 

SET:LINE(180, 20) -(30,120) , PRESET 
: S0UND1 , 50 : SOUND150 , 8 : SOUND50 , 1 : 
LINE(180, 20) -(245,150) ,PSET:LINE 
( 180 ,20 ) - ( 245 ,150 ) , PRESET : S0UND1 
, 50 

50 SOUND200 , 20 : LINE (10 , 100 ) - (170 
,20) ,PSET:LINE(10,100) -(170,20) ,• 
PRESET 

60 FORJ=1TO100:A=RND(255) :B=RND( 
191) : LINE (170,20) -(A,B) ,PSET:NEX 
T /R\ 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 113 



RAINBOWfest is the only computer show . 
dedicated exclusively to your Tandy 
Color Computer. Nowhere else will you 
see as many CoCo-related products or be able to 
. attend free seminars conducted by the top Color 
Computer experts. It's the next best thing to re- 
ceiving the latest issue of the rainbow in your 
mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for com- 
mercial programmers to show off new and inno- 
vative products for the first time. Princeton is the 
show to get the jump on new capabilities for the 
new CoCo 3. In exhibit after exhibit, there will be 
demonstrations, opportunities to experiment 
with software and hardware, and special RAIN- 
BOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits 
and attending the valuable, free seminars on all 
aspects of your CoCo — from improving basic 
skills to working with the sophisticated OS-9 op- 
erating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in a 
fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

To make it easier for you to participate, we 
schedule RAINBOWfests in different parts of the 
country. If you missed the fun in Chicago, why 
don't you make plans now to join us in Prin- 
ceton? For members of the family who don't 
share your affinity for CoCo, RAINBOWfest is lo- 
cated in an area with many other attractions. 

The Hyatt Regency Princeton offers special 
rates ($79, single or double room) for RAIN- 
BOWfest. The show opens Friday evening with a 
session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a daytime 
show Saturday — the CoCo Community Break- 
fast (separate tickets required) is at 8 a.m., then 
the exhibit hall opens promptly at 10 a.m. and 
runs until 6 p.m. A special Saturday evening 
round table examining the new CoCo 3 (6:30 
p.m.) is sure to be a highlight. On Sunday, the 
exhibit hall opens at 1 1 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained di- 
rectly from the rainbow. We'll also send you a 
reservation form so you can get your special 
room rate. 

The POSH way to go. Have your travel arrange- 
ments and hotel reservations handled through * 
rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assistance, Inc., 
of Louisville. For the same POSH treatment 
many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at (502) 
893-3311. All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 

Show Schedule: 

Friday evening 

— Exhibits open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Saturday 

— CoCo Community Breakfast at 8a.m. 

— Exhibits open at 10 a.m. and close 
at 6 p.m. 

— Special round table at 6:30 p.m. 

Sunday 

— Exhibits open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



Free Seminars 

Mark Siegel 

Product Manager, Software Engi- 
neering, Tandy/Radio Shack 

An Insider's View 
of the New CoCo 3 

Jim Reed 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 

Writing for Publication 

Jeffrey Parker 

Independent Programmer 
and Author 

Getting Your CoCo To 
Talk To Your MS-DOS 

Fred Scerbo 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 

Using Computers in 
Education 



Bill Barden 

Independent Programmer 
and Author 

Beginning Assembly 
Language 

Brian Lantz 

President, National OS-9 
Users Group 

OS-9 Overview 

George Dorner 

OS-9 Veteran Programmer 

The OS-9 Environment: 
Tools and Pipes 

Dan Downard 

rainbow Technical Editor 

A Look at Peripherals 



Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 

Beginners' Guide To OS-9 
and BASIC09 

Leonard Hyre 

Freelance Author and Programmer 

Introduction to BASIC 

Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Assistant 

Intro to our Delphi 
CoCo SIG 

Bruce Warner 

MOTD Editor 

OS-9 From a User's 
Standpoint 



A A A A A 

Steve Biork 

President of SRB Software 

Getting the Most from 
Your CoCo 3 

John Gibney 

Delphi National Sales Director 

National Information 
Services vs. Local 
Bulletin Boards 

Bill Turner 

Vice President National 
OS-9 Users Group 

Business Applications 
of OS-9 

Paul Hoffman 

Graphic Artist and Programmer 

Inside CoCo Graphics 



CoCo Community Breakfast 

Greg Zumwalt — CoCo 3 Programmer 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Greg Zumwalt, 
one of the early CoCo specialists who has created everything from flight simulators 
to computer games. An independent programmer and computer designer, Greg is 
one of the select few writing Tandy software for the new Color Computer 3. He owns 
ZCT Software, of Tulsa, Okla., and also writes software for business applications in 
such areas as aviation, the oil industry and the medical field. 



A SPECIAL EVENT! 



Saturday Evening Round-Table Discussion at 6:30 p.m. 

The Design, Development and Marketing of the Color Computer 3 

Exclusive: Listen to the key people in the design and development of 
the Color Computer 3! Featured Speakers: Barry Thompson, Buyer, 
Computer Merchandising, Tandy/Radio Shack; Mark Siegel, Product 
Manager, Software Engineering, Tandy/Radio Shack; Steve Bjork, 
President, SRB Software; and Greg Zumwalt, President, ZCT Software. 



RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: Oct. 17-19, 1986 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $79 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: Oct. 10, 1986 

Join us at a future RAINBOWfest! 

RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: Early April 1987 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $60 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: March 25, 1987 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders received from each state. 

▲ A A A A A A 



1 



YES, I'm coming to Princeton! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance sale price. 
Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 



Three-day tickets at $9 each 
One-day tickets at $7 each 



total 



total 



Name (please print) 

Address 

City 



State 



Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 

Saturday CoCo Breakfast at $12 each total 

Handling Charge $1 



Telephone 
Company 



ZIP 



TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt 
Regency Princeton ($79, single or double room). 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Exp. Date 

Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: Oct. 10,1986. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will also 
be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky call (800) 847-0309. 



TUTORIAL 




Get 

better 
graphics 

while using 
less memory 



Optimum 
Animation 



By Steven R. Polsz 



Have you ever designed a pro- 
gram using animation graphics 
only to find, after long hours of 
work, that the graphics were too elab- 
orate and they ate up so much memory 
there wasn't enough room for the entire 
program? Have you had to settle for 
spaceships that look like little crosses 
rather than the beautiful graphics dis- 
play you wanted? Perhaps your explo- 
sions had to be a series of blinking 
colors instead of the real thing? If you 
have tried any extensive animation or 
game design, this or some similar diffi- 
culty has probably clouded your efforts. 
But there is a solution to this problem 
— a solution that frees at least 95 
percent of the memory previously re- 
served for graphics storage. 

Let us first consider the process of 
creating the animation scenes: the GET 
statement. The usual syntax of this 
statement is GET (XI, Y1)-(X2, Y2) ,R 



Steve Polsz lives in Philadelphia and is 
a free-lance programmer, writer and 
artist. The discovery of optimum ani- 
mation is due to his impatient 3-year- 
old, Adam, and an undiscovered typo. 



where X1,Y1 are the upper-left corner 
coordinates and X2,Y2 are the lower- 
right corner coordinates of the graphics 
scene to be stored. The variable 'A' is 
the target array where the scene is 
stored. This array is dimensioned to 
match graphics scene point to array 
member, in a one-to-one correspon- 
dence. 

Thus, the number of members in the 
target array is the same as the number 
of points in the animation scene. If we 
create two animation scenes that are 8 
by 16 points in size, we need two 8-by- 
16 arrays to store them. Each of these 
arrays contains 128 members, and each 
array member consists of five bytes — 
a total of 1280 bytes. This is slightly less 
than 300 bytes short of one graphics 
page. 

• Yet if we use PMODE 0, the entire 
graphics screen (128 by 96 points) is 
stored on this very same page. By using 
the GET statement, the equivalent of two 
rows of the video screen is stored in the 
identical space utilized by the computer 
to store the entire screen. It seems that 
the GET statement is very inefficient. 
Then again, is it? 

Our next step is to examine the actual 
contents of the array 'A' after the 



116 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



graphics scene has been stored in it. The 
following short program does just that: 



10 PMDDE1 , 1 : SCREENING: COLORS 
4,3:P CLS 

30 DRAW "SB CI BM 2,6 UER3F ; 

2DRUHR 2ER3FD BM4 , 4 C4 R3FBR3ER3 * 

50 DIM R(15,5J:GET(0,0)-(30,10), 

fi:PUT(32,32)-(62,42)^fl 

70 GOSUB210 ' 'K 

90 FORJ=0TO5 

110 FORI=0TD15 

130 PRINTI;J;fl(I,J) 

150 NEXT I 

170 GOSUB210 

190 NEXT J 

210 R$=*"* 

230 fl$=INKEY$ 

250 IFR$="" THEN 230 ELSE RETURN 



Lines 10 through 50 create the space- 
ship graphics scene shown in the Figure, 
then reproduces it elsewhere on the 
screen by use of the PUT statement. This 
scene is 16 by six, therefore the asso- 
ciated array consists of 480 bytes — 
slightly more than one-fourth of one 
graphics page. 

By pressing any key, the contents of 
the array 'A' are displayed, one screen- 
ful at a time. To view the next screenful, 
push any key. 

The first two numbers are the indices 
of the array member, the third, its value. 
As you can see, the great majority of 



these values is zero. The non-zero 
members are as follows: 

A(0,0) -2.932031 E+12 
A(1,0) -1.88127596 E-36 
A(2,0) -9.12340439 E-35 
A(3,0) -1.14532461 E+10 
A(4,0) -2.93203083 E+12 

How should we interpret this? The 
first five members of 'A' are non-zero 
and distinct, while the remaining cells of 
'A' are empty. 

According to the Extended BASIC 
manual, the GET statement transfers the 
animation scene pointwise in a one-to- 
one mapping into the array 'A'. There- 
fore, we should expect, for example, the 
point (0,0) to be coded into A(0,0), the 
point (2,0) into A(1,0), and so forth 
until point (30,10) is mapped into 
A(15,5). Obviously this cannot be the 
case. If it were, A(0,0) through A(4,0) 
would be identical and none of the 
members of 'A' would have a zero value. 

The logical assumption is that the 
entire graphics scene is coded into the 
first five members of 4 A'. Let us add the 
following lines to our program: 

60 DIM B(4) : GET(0,0)-(30,10) , 
B: PUT (64,32 )-( 94,42 ),B 

Replace lines 90 through 130 with: 

90 FOR 1= 0 TO 4 

110 PRINT fl(I,0); B(I) 

Delete Line 190 and run the program. 

The original spaceship appears in the 
upper-left corner along with two dupli- 
cates. Examine the two closely; you will 
find them to be identical. Push any key 
and the screen displays the values of 
A(0,0) through A(4,0) with its counter- 



part from the array 'B' next to it. As you 
see, these too are identical. 

So the two-dimensional array sup- 
posedly required for the GET/ PUT state- 
ment pair can be replaced by a one- 
dimensional array of considerably 
shorter length. But how can we deter- 
mine the minimum size of this array? 

This answer may be deduced from the 
information found in the BASIC manual 
Getting Started with Color BASIC. 
Pages 264 to 266 detail the computer's 
method of storing graphics information 
(see Table 1). 



Table! 

Graphics 2R is the same as PMODE 0 
Graphics 3C is the same as PMODE 1 
Graphics 3R is the same as PMODE 2 
Graphics 6C is the same as PMODE 3 
Graphics 6R is the same as PMODE 4 

As we can see from the table, there 
are eight points of graphics display per 
byte for even-numbered PMODES, and 
four points per byte for odd-numbered 
PMODES. 

Taking all this into consideration, the 
96 points of the spaceship graphics in 
PMODE 1 can be contained in 24 bytes 
of information. Since each member of 
an array contains five bytes, this scene 
can be fitted into an array of length five. 

The GET parameters define exactly 
how the scene is fitted into the target 
array. If either more of less than five 
bytes are used in any row of the graphics 
scene, there will be a "wrap around" so 
that each member of the target array 
will be filled before the next one is 
written into. 

The PUT statement reverses this pro- 
cess, translating the scene within the 
confines of its parameters. Any trailing 
members of the information array have 
a zero value and are ignored. 

Therefore, to most efficiently use the 
GET/ PUT statement pair, count the 
number of graphics points used in the 
scene and divide this number by 20, if 
in an odd PMODE, or 40, if in an even 
PMODE, then subtract one. 

The result is the necessary length of 
a one-dimensional array needed to store 
the scene. As you see, by use of this 
method, the array space is drastically 
reduced — a total of at least 95 percent 
over the usual method. 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 6739 Regent 
Street, Philadelphia, PA 19142, 215- 
72 7- 7562. Please en close an SA SE when 
writing.) ^ 




October 1986 THE RAINBOW 117 




TM 



Ok 

doao 



J\/[ax 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



All Voices Dn 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



Block delete 



j Block copy 





if YOU 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



(Dam 



JJUJJJl. 




I 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 
Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 
Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



i> Output ail 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 

12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 

drum machines. 
^ Output any voice on any of the 16 MIDI 

channels. 
^ Transpose music to any key. 
\* Modify music to any tempo. 

Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose. 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
* Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

j> Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 

- LYRA OPTIONS - 



^ Solo capability 

^ Block edits are highlighted. 

^ Tie notes together for musical continuity. 

Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 
\* Jump to any point in the score 

instantaneously. 
\* Memory remaining clearly displayed, 

however you will have plenty of memory 

even for the most demanding piece. 

Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary. 
\* LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 

hardware unless you want more power. 

Music easily saved to tape or disk. 
\* Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 
LYRA (Disk Only) #LY122 $54.95 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 
A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(T or D) #LC164 $14.95 

LYRA STEREO ENHANCER 
Gives the LYRA stereo output when used with 
the STEREO PAK or ORCHESTRA 90. 
(T or D) #LS149 $14.95 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 
A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $14.95 

We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada .... ' $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD Charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/4% sales tax. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 
Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(T or D) #LS1 77 $19.95 

STEREO PAK 
Plugs into the COCO ROM cartridge slot allow- 
ing easy connection to your stereo system. 
#SP193 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 
A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 
play all 8 voices in stereo. 
(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 
A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 
A collection of over 800 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 

COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorwave. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack. 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 



CV P C, ,/ , , BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

<f5p££,arL ^UltSmi (312) 879-6880 



TM 



J2 



COCO MIDI 



SEQUENCER/EDITOR 



Jow your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. Whether 
ou have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it doesn't 
natter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our entry level 



MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our Professional 
COCO MIDI SYSTEM. 



i Supports up to 16 tracks. 

> Up to 8000 events per track. 

> May be used as a sequencer. 

> User friendly graphicsdisplay. 

> Menu driven. 

» Metronome available. 

> Real time recording. 

) Save your masterpiece to disk. 



r.v.v.v.v.w,^ 



} m -JJK ~ mm 
■ • 


mm j " mm j m mm * m 1 m U | • •' \ 


^^^^ 






nimumi 



Playback any or all tracks at any tempo. 

Tracks may be deleted, copied, transposed, or mixed. 

Filter out unwanted channel or type of MIDI data. 



• Tempo may be modified. 

• Quantizing to 32nd or 64th. 

• Simple music editing. 

• Requires 64K disk system. 

• Transposition. 

Comes complete with Rom Pak 
Hardware interface, cables, 
manual, and software. Requires 
Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
Disk only. #CM147 , . . $149.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
/our MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
vtUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Includes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
Tape or Disk. #CM126 $39.95 



DX-7 LIBRARIAN 



TM 



RAM cartridges for the Yamaha DX-7 aren't cheap and don't hold 
all the sounds you would like. The DX-7 LIBRARIAN is a program 
that when used with COCO MIDI, lets you save and load any 



number of sounds. Save sounds individually or as a group letting 
you load the DX-7 in seconds. 

Disk only. #DX143 $29.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you heed. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

#MK167 $29.95 



MUSICA TO COCO MIDI 



This program is for COCO MIDI users that wish to convert MUSICA 
files so they can be played by COCO MIDI. It opens your MIDI 



synths to our MUSIC LIBRARY and much public domain music. 
Disk only. #MC193 $29.95 



MUSIC LIBRARY 



TM 



The MUSIC LIBRARY series consists of 8 volumes: 100 through 
800 each sold separately. Each contains over 100 four voice music 
selections with a playing time of over 3 hours each. The disk 
version is shipped on 5 full disks. When coupled with STEREO 
PAK, the music is reproduced with unsurpassed realism, 

A JUKEBOX program is included to allow you to select specific 
songs or automatically play each. These songs are ready to go, 
you don't need MUSICA 2 or a knowledge of music. MUSICA 2 
users may customize each song. Each volume sold separately, 

specify tape or disk. #MLXXX $29.95 

List of 800 songs #LS800 $3.00 



MUSIC LIBRARY 100 
Stage, Screen, & TV 
Music of the 70's 
Music of the 60's 
Music of the 50's 
Old Time Favorites 
MUSIC LIBRARY 200 
MUSIC LIBRARY 300 
MUSIC LIBRARY 400 
MUSIC LIBRARY 500 
MUSIC LIBRARY 600 
MUSIC LIBRARY 700 
MUSIC LIBRARY 800 



Classical 

Christmas (popular) 

Christmas (traditional) 

Patriotic 

Polka Party 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 



Entire Library 
30 Hours of 
Music! 
40 disks 

or 
25 tapes 




FILE EDIT HIDI HISC 



LEGEND 
B2 



fa 



.•» 



f-#— 3 



00110(1)0© 



TM 



SYMPHONY 12 



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IT I ? I I I I ? I I 

rri; r r r rrj i » r^r 
> t ,r i r r j jm i r i 
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jST?*6KST?J JtTSl.TS?^ 




If you want to compose music, experiment, or 
just listen to music, LYRA is the tool you need. 
LYRA represents the new state-of-the-art super 
user friendly software. Pull down menus and 
icons make composing music as easy as pointing 
with a joystick or mouse and clicking. LYRA is 
capable of 8 individually controlled voices. You 
may take advantage of the 8 voice power of 
LYRA using external MIDI synthesizers or SYM- 
PHONY 12. We believe that LYRA and SYM- 
PHONY 12 was a match made in heaven. For a 
limited time, when you purchase both, we will 
include free the LYRA SYMPHONY 12 CONNEC- 
TION, a $19.95 value. 



STEREO AND MONO. By connecting SYM- 
PHONY 12 to your home stereo system, music is 
produced in stereo, 6 voices from each channel. 
However, you don't need to have a stereo system, 
all 12 voices also come out of your TV or monitor. 

SOUND EFFECTS. SYMPHONY 12 is a sophisti- 
cated sound generator. 12 voices and 4 noise 
generators give you incredible sound effect capa- 
bility. We have included gun shot, explosion, rac- 
ing car and more. 

SYMPHONY 12. You get over a dozen music and 
sound effect selections and complete documenta- 
tion. Software is shipped on Tape or Disk. 



PIANO KEYBOARD. For those wishing to turn 
SYMPHONY 12 into a real polyphonic synthe- 
sizer we offer a full size 61 note piano 
keyboard. 

Tape users using both SYMPHONY 12 and the 
PIANO KEYBOARD will require a Y-CABLE. 
Disk systems require a Triple Y-CABLE or 
MULTI-PAK. 

SYMPHONY 12 (T or D) #SY149 . . $69.95 
LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

#LS1 77 $19.95 

PIANO KEYBOARD #PK185 $169.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 



GUITAR CHORD BOOK 



This program, written by a guitar instructor of 17 years, displays in high 
resolution graphrcs the exact fingering for over 100,000 chord combina- 
tions. You may even tune your guitar to the computer and play along. 



Whether you are a beginning guitar student or an advanced player, you 

will find this quick reference to guitar chords invaluable. 

32K Disk only #GC153 ■ $29.95 



MUSIC THEORY 



COURSE 1 J 

This course covers all the basics from music notation & duration, key 
signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the keyboard. This is an entry 
level course recommended as a prerequisite for Course 2. 
32K Disk only. #MT101 $49.95 



COURSE 2 

A more advanced course that deals with: Major and Harmonic Minor 
scales, interval spelling, Triad (Chord) theory, Inversions, Dominant 7th 
chords, and ear training of the intervals. 

32K Disk only #MT102 $49.95 



EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



t~! 133 to fo^* 




• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you wouM normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 



FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



s. 



peec 



It Syst 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V«% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 





Co Covilla 

Edwin Hathaway 

From his home in Glendale Heights, 
Illinois, Edwin created this vibrant 
European community with the use of 

CoCo Max. 




R 

i 

2 





® 



5 

I 

z 



Spaceship Earth 

Steve Warrick 

Steve, who lives in Peru, Illinois, opens 
the gallery with this graphic rendition 
of Spaceship Earth, which dominates 
the entrance to Epcot Center. Steve 
used CoCo Max for his work of art. 





P 
R 
I 

Z 
E 



Serpent 

Charlie Fulp 

Sailing within the coils of a sea snake, 
Charlie, who lives in South Boston, 
Virginia, used CoCo Max to create this 
viperous pictorial. 



1 22 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



Halloween 

George Aloia 

George, of Margate, Florida, used 
CoCo Max to bewitch the gallery with 

a Halloween treat. 




Center 

John Bayko 

John, who lives in Regina, Saskatche- 
wan, teaches a twelfth grade computer 
class and created this graphic illustra- 
tion of the Saskatchewan Center of the 

Arts with the use of basic. 




It 



E 




I 1 

| 




u 

n 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! 

You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in 
upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your crea- 
tions with the CoCo Community! 

Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and 
phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what 
programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please 
include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this 
means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs 
or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A 
digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or 
magazine is not an original work. 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of $15 
and a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions will also be 
given. 

Jody Doyle, Curator 



Scorpion 

Tim Cummings 

With the latter part of October being 
under the horoscope sign of Scorpio, 
Tim used CoCo Max to create this 
lethal arachnid. Tim lives in Micilani, 
Hawaii. 




Send your entry on either tape or disk to; 

CoCo Gallery 
THE RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
Attn: Jody Doyle 



October 1986 



THE RAINBOW 



123 



Now from Falsoft, The RAINBOW MAKER, comes . . . 




The magazine for Tandy portable and MS-DOS users 



Not only does Tandy produce our favorite CoCo, we think they produce the best and best-priced lap- 
top portable and MS-DOS computers as well. We've found that when satisfied Color Computer users 
decide to add portability or move to MS-DOS, many stick with Tandy. For these people we publish PCM, 
The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users, 

Each month in PCM, you'll find information and programs for the Tandy 100, 102, 200 and 600 portable 
computers. And you'll find even more coverage for their MS-DOS machines, the 1000, 1200, 2000 and 
3000, along with the great new 1000 EX, 1000 SX and 3000 HL. 

FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from the rainbow that readers want programs to type in, so each month we bring you an 
assortment of them: games, utilities, graphics, and home and business applications. 



BAR CODE LISTINGS AND PROGRAM DISKS! 

For portable users, PCM is the only home computer publication in the world that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory like magic with the sweep of a wand! For those who don't have 
time to type in listings, we offer a companion disk service with all the programs from the magazine. 

TUTORIALS AND PRODUCT REVIEWS! 

As if all this weren't enough, we offer regular tutorials on telecommunications and hardware; assembly 
language, basic and pascal programming tips; and in-depth reviews of the new software, peripherals 
and services as they are released. Add it all up and we think you'll find PCM to be the most informative 
and fun magazine for this market today! 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries 
call 502-228-4492. 



YES! Please send me a one year (12 issues) 
subscription to PCM for only $28.* A savings of 22% 
off the newsstand price. 



Name 



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*Canadian subscribers U.S. $35. Surface rate elsewhere $64, airmail $85. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
U.S. currency only, please. 

Mail to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 



The challenge in this game is to pick . . . 



1% /I wrdaughter, who is almost 

j^f W three years old, is fasci- 
%/ nated by the computer. 
Whenever she sees me or her sisters 
using it, she demands a chance to type 
at the keyboard or use the joysticks. 
Since this enthusiasm should certainly 
be encouraged, I have tried to write 
some games for her to play and become 
accustomed to using a computer. 

Like most other children her age, my 
daughter loves to watch "Sesame 
Street." The game song "One of These 
Things Is Not Like the Others" gave me 
the idea for this program. 

In the program NotLike, the child 
must choose which of four items is 
different from the other three. When the 
program is run, four geometric figures 
are drawn on the screen. Three are 
identical, but the fourth (which can be 
in any of the four corners of the screen) 
is different. It may be a different color, 
a different shape, or a different size 
from the others. 

After the figures have been drawn 
and the song has been played, a box 
appears around the figure in the upper 
left corner. After a few seconds, the box 
moves to the next figure, and so on. The 
child must either press a key or joystick 
button (from either joystick) while the 
box is around the different figure. 

If the child answers correctly, the box 
flashes through different colors and a 
beeping tone is played. Then the screen 
is erased and new figures are drawn. If 
the child answers incorrectly, a low note 
is sounded but nothing else happens. 
The box continues to move to the 
different figures and the child must try 
again. 

The game continues until the BREAK 
key is pressed. There is no scoring since 
a score would be meaningless to the 
preschooler. 

The program is well-commented. 
When it is run, arrays and variables are 



Dr. Harold Schneider is a professor of 
mathematical sciences at Roosevelt 
University in Chicago where he teaches 
mathematics, computer science and 
actuarial science. 



The 
Odd 

Man 
Out 

By Harold Schneider 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 25 



initialized. The PLftY strings for the 
song, which appear in DfiTfi lines 1010 
through 1020, are read into array PL$. 
The DRAW strings for the figures are read 
from DRTR lines 1510 through 1650 into 
array S$. The array P$ holds the four 
possible starting positions for each 
figure. The arrays 'X' and 'Y' hold 
coordinates. For I = 1 to 4, these are the 
center PAINT positions. For I = 5 to 8, 
*X' and 4 Y' hold the coordinates of the 
upper left-hand corner, and for I = 9 to 
12, they hold the coordinates of the 
lower right corner. 

Lines 100 to 170 control the choosing 
and drawing of the figures. A random 
color (CI) and figure (SI) are chosen 
and the size is fixed at five. The position 
for the different figure (D) is selected. 
Still another random choice decides 
whether to vary the color, shape or size. 

The subroutines to choose a different 
color, shape and size start at lines 500, 
600 and 700. If size is chosen, the 
different figure can either be larger or 
smaller than the others. 

Lines 200 to 230 draw the box and 



check whether a key or joystick button 
is pressed. This should work with all 
versions of BASIC. If a correct answer is 
given, the program branches to Line 
300, but an incorrect answer branches 
to Line 350. 

Several easy changes are built into the 
program. The variable DL, assigned to 
1 10 in Line 20, is the delay constant. It 
determines how long the box remains 
around each figure before moving to the 
next one. Currently, the pause is about 
3.5 seconds. You may change DL to 
make the delay longer or shorter. 

The variable V in Line 20 determines 
the number of things thai can vary to 
make one figure different. When this is 
three, as it is set in the program, the 
different figure can vary in color, shape 
or size from the others. If V equals two, 
then only color and shape may vary. 
This makes the program much easier, 
since size differences are the hardest for 
a child to discern. If V equals one, then 
only color changes can occur. Do not 
use any values for V other than one, two 
or three. 



Variable NS in Line 20 is the number 
of different shapes available. It is eight 
for the original program. You can add 
extra shapes by putting DRAW strings foi 
them in DATA statements at the end ol 
the program and increasing the value ol 
NS accordingly. Use only DRAW state- 
ments. Each figure should start from the 
center position and be restricted to a 
square of about 70 pixels on each side. 
Use only relative moves, not absolute 
coordinates of points. Your figure must 
be drawn so that a PAINT statement 
starting in the center will color the entire 
figure. 

NotLike teaches the preschooler 
important skills in reasoning, color 
recognition and shape discrimination. 
In addition, it gives experience in using 
a computer and is fun to play. 1 hope 
your toddler enjoys playing it as much 
as mine does. 

(You may direct questions about this 
program to the author at 430 S. Mich- 
igan Ave,, Chicago, IL 60605, 312-747- 
5432, Please enclose an SASE when 
writing,) □ 



70 .. 
220 . 
710 . 
1520 
END 



164 

.70 
.50 
184 
.72 



The listing: NOTLIKE 



0 'NOTLIKE BY HAROLD SCHNEIDER 

10 PCLEAR 4:I=RND(-TIMER) 

20 DL=110:NS=8:V=3: 'DL IS DELAY 

CONSTANT :'NS IS THE NUMBER OF SH 

APES IN THE DATA STATEMENTS AT T 

HE END: 'SET V=2 TO EXCLUDE SIZE 

DIFFERENCES AND V=l TO ALSO EXCL 

UDE SHAPE DIFFERENCES 

30 DIM X(12) ,Y(12) ,P$(4) ,PL$(8) , 

C(4) ,Z(4) ,S$(NS) 

40 FOR 1=1 TO 8 '.READ PL$(I) :NEXT 
I 

50 X(1)=64:X(2)=192:X(3)=64:X(4) 
=192:Y(1)=48:Y(2)=48:Y(3)=144:Y( 

A V,=»1 A A 



4)=144 

60 X(5)=0:X(6)=128:X(7)=0:X(8) = 
28:X(9)=127:X(10)=255:X(11)=127 
X(12)=255:Y(5)=0:Y(6)=0:Y(7)=96: 
Y(8)=96:Y(9)=95:Y(10)=95:Y(11)=1 
91:Y(12)=191 

70 P$ (1) ="BM64 , 48" : P$ (2 ) ="BM192 , 



=1 



48 " : PS ( 3) ="BM64 , 144 " : P$ ( 4 ) ="BM19 
2,144" 

80 FOR 1=1 TO NS : READ S$(I):NEXT 
I 

100 'DRAW SHAPES 

110 PMODE 4,1: COLOR 0,1:PCLS:SCR 
EEN 1,1: PMODE 3,1 

120 C1=RND(3) :S1=RND(NS) :D=RND(4 
) 

130 FOR 1=1 TO 4:C(I)=C1:S(I)=S1 
:Z (I) =5: NEXT I 

140 ON RND(V) GOSUB 510,610,710 
150 FOR 1=1 TO 4: PLAY PL$ (2*1-1) 
: PLAY PL$ (2*1) : DRAW P$(I):DRAW " 
C=C ( I ) }S— Z(I) j" 

160 DRAW S$(S(I) ) : PAINT (X (I) ,Y(I 
)),C(I),C(I) 

170 NEXT I: COLOR 1,0 :A$=INKEY$ 

200 'DRAW BOX AROUND SHAPE 

210 FOR 1=1 TO 4:LINE(X(4+I) ,Y(4 

+1) ) -(X(8+I) ,Y(8+I) ) ,PSET,B:FOR 

J=l TO DL: A$=INKEY$ 

220 IF A$="" AND ( (PEEK( 65280) A 

ND 127) =127) THEN 230 ELSE IF D= 

I THEN 310 ELSE SOUND 20,5 

230 NEXT J:LINE(X(4+I) ,Y(4+I) )-( 

X(8+I) ,Y(8+I) ), PRESET , B : NEXT I:G 

OTO 210 

300 'CORRECT ANSWER 
310 C=2:FOR J=l TO 20: COLOR C,0: 
LINE(X(4+I) ,Y(4+I) ) -(X(8+I) ,Y(8+ 
I) ) ,PSET,B:C=C+1:IF C>3 THEN C=l 



126 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



35J3 ' INCORRECT ANSWER 

360 SOUND 12J3,2:NEXT J:GOTO 110 

5j3j3 'DIFFERENT COLOR 

51)3 C2=RND(3):IF C2=C1 THEN 51J3 

520 C(D)=C2: RETURN 

600 'DIFFERENT SHAPE 

610 S2=RND(NS) :IF S2=S1 THEN 610 

620 S(D)=S2: RETURN 

700 'DIFFERENT SIZE 

710 IF RND(4)>3 THEN 720 ELSE Z( 

D) =3: RETURN 

720 FOR 1=1 TO 4:Z(I)=3:NEXT I:Z 
(D) =5: RETURN 
1000 'SONG 

1010 DATA T302L8.BP64L16BP6403L4 
EP64GP64BP64 , FP64L8 . FP64L16GP64L 
8AP64L4.FP64,02L8.BP64L16BP6403L 
4DP64FP64BP64 , L8GP64L4GP64L8FP64 
L4EP64 

1020 DATA L8.BP64L16BP6402L4BP64 
03EP64GP64BP64 , FP64L8 . FP64L16GP6 
4L8 . AP64L16FP64 , L8 . FP64L16FP64L4 
BP64BP6402L8 . BP6403L16CP64L4DP64 
EP64,P64 
1500 'CIRCLE 

1510 DATA "BM+0/ -22L5GL3DL3DL2DL 
DL2DL2G3DG2DG2DGD2GD2GD4GDFD5FD2 



FD2 FDFFDFDF4RFRF2RFR2 FR2 DR4 FR2ER 
4UR2ER2ERE2 RERE 4 UEUE 2UEU2 EU 2 EU 5 E 
UHU4HU2HU2HU2HUH2UH3L2UL2ULUL2UL 
3UL3UL6" 
1520 'SQUARE 

1530 DATA "BM-26 / -26R52D52L52U52 
it 

1540 'EQUILATERAL TRIANGLE 

1550 DATA "BM+0, -30;M-30, +49 ;M+6 

0,+0;M-30,-49" 

1560 'WIDE RECTANGLE 

1570 DATA "BM-36,-15R72D30L72U30 
ii 

1580 'TALL TRIANGLE 

1590 DATA "BM+0 ,-35;M+15 ,+60;M-3 

0, +0;M+15, -60" 

1600 'SHORT TRIANGLE 

1610 DATA "BM+0,-10;M+36,+18}M-7 

1, +0;M+35,-18" 
1620 'HEXAGON 

1630 DATA "BM+16 / -20L28GDG2G2DDG 

2 DG2 DG2 DG2 DG2 DG2F2DF2 DF2 DF2 DF2 DF 

2DF2DF2DR29UE2UE2UE2UE2UE2UE2UE2 

UE2H2UH2UH2UH2UH2UH2UH2U2H2U" 

1640 'TALL RECTANGLE 

1650 DATA "BM-14 / -33R28D66L28U66 



SPECIAL DEAL ON 
500 PROGRAMS! 



GET 50 DISKS OR 50 CASSETTE TAPES FULL OF OVER 
500 PROGRAMS. HERE IS WHAT YOU'LL RECEIVE: 

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★ Over 200 exciting games including Warlords, Star Trek, 
Super Vaders, Solar Conquest, Horse Races, Football, 
Baseball, Frog Jump, Invader, Plus Much More! (Many 
machine language games) 

★ Over 30 adventures including The College Adventure, Dun- 
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Experiment. Plus 32K Graphic Adventures. 

EACH INDIVIDUAL ISSUE SOLD FOR *9. 00 
EACH OR M50 FOR ALL 50 ISSUES. WE 
SLASHED THE PRICE TO ONLY 150. 00 . 



REG. $ 450 



$ 150 



00 



★★THIS MONTH ONLY** 



VISA 



Buy this package of 500 programs and 
receive a free 6 month subscription. 
(A s 35 value) 



RAINBOW 

CtHTtFICATKM 
UAL 



THE GREATEST SOFTWARE DEAL 
ON EARTH JUST GOT BETTER! 



THAT'S RIGHT! THIS MONTH WE'VE DROPPED OUR YEARLY 
SUBSCRIPTION RATE AN UNBELIEVABLE »1 0. 00 TO ENTICE YOU 
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TION TO T & D SOFTWARE CONSISTS OF 10 READY-TO-LOAD 
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NO WE ARE NOT THE SAME AS THE RAINBOW ON TAPE. IN 
FACT, MANY SUBSCRIBERS HAVE WRITTEN IN AND SAID THAT 
WE ARE MUCH BETTER THAN RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




PRICES- 
tape 

OR DISK 

1 YEAR(12Imum) JWKT 
0 MO. (6 i mum) A&Xrf 
1 1SSUE 



THIS 
MONTH ONLY 
60.00 
35.00 
8.00 

Michigan Residents Add 4% 
Overseas Add $10 to Subscription Price 
Personal Checks Welcome! 



* 1 6K-64K Color Computer OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

* Over 4000 Satisfied Customers 1 . Computer I.O.U. 6. Haunted Staircase 

* Back Issues Available From 2. Disk Disassembler 7. Canyon Bombers 

* July '82 (Over 500 Programs) 3. Bak Chokers 8. Dragon Adventure 
j^S^^ 4. Pachinko 9. Graphic Scroll 

ffjf*^\ 5 - Stock Charting 1 0. Auto Border 

RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 




T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, P.O. BOX 256C, HOLLAND, Ml 49423 (61 6) 396-7577 



October 1 966 THE RAINBOW 1 27 



THE NEW GENERATION 




COMPLETE NX-10 

PRINTER SYSTEM 



"Logon** 

WORD PROCESSOR Z.Z 

TAPE OR DISK VERSION 

A feature packed program that turns your CoCo into an of- 
fice machine. Create and save letters and documents with the 
Word processor tailored for the NX-10. 



5K BUFFER • IMPROVED NLQ • QUAD HIGH & 
WIDE PRINTING • EXTENDED CHARACTER 
SETS • 10 INTERNATIONAL FONTS • IN-THE- 
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CPS (LQ) • FONT CONTROL & MARGIN CON- 
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RIGHT HAND JUSTIFYING • SINGLE 
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COMPLETE SYSTEM 

NX-10 • BLUE STREAK II • SUPER GEMPRINT 
TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL • WORD PROCESSOR 2.2 



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+ $10 Shipping 
and Insurance 



BLUE STREAK II 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 



• RUN COCO I or II to PARALLEL PRINTER 

• HIGH QUALITY TOGGLE SWITCH ELIMINATES CABLE SWITCHING 

• 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 SWITCHABLE BAUD RATES 

• AC POWER OPTIONALNOT NEEDED WITH NX-10 PRINTER 

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• THRU-PUT EQUIVALENT TO ^ IffiiWWIPPINn I 
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• 1 YEAR WARRANTY rainbow PAID! 



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NEW 
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p OR NX-10 



SUPER GEMPRINT 

CUSTOM SOFTWARE 



Overall, Super Gemprint is very well-written and documented " 

—Rainbow December 84 review. 

SONUS! TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

FREE WITH SUPER GEMPRINT 

Menu driven program for the CoCo. Teaches and shows the new 
user the numerous features of the NX-10. 



SUPER GEMPRINT AND 

TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 



A / and Handling 




DAYTON ASS 



ofW.R. 
KALI 



INC. 




DUN & BRADSTREET LISTED 

720 1 CLAIRCREST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



RAINBOW REVIEW 




4 

C Compiler 

Economy with Versatility/fiad/o Shack , 

Car Dealer Assistant 

A Big Help on the Lot/Sylvester Software . 

CoCo Diskzap Utility 

Modify or Repair Prog rams/SuperCom Associates . 
Colorchestra 

Lets the Music F\ov//Horizon Software 

Disk BASIC Unraveled 

Valuable Library Addition/Specfrum Projects Inc 

Graphic Echo 

Screen Dump for All Seasons/7otf7/ar) Software - 
Max Fonts 

Co Co Max Add-on/ Derringer Software , tf , 

The Memory Game 

Develop Concentration/M/7caron Software Company 

Memory Manager 

Move Into Control/Dynam/c Electronics, Inc 

MicroeFire 

Speeds Up the Joystick Action/Duc/c Productions 

Mission: F-16 Assault 

Action for Serious Game Players/D/ecom Products 

Pumpman 

Good Graphics, Rapid Action/Saguaro Software 

Seikosha SP-1000A Printer 

Power for the Little Guy/Cinsoft 

Unkill 

Help for Lost Programs/ Proper Programs « ., 

Wall Street 

Keeps the Interest Flowing/Drayon Software 
WordPak-RS 

Widen Your Video Horizons/Specfrum Projects Inc 



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rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — over 250 
pages loaded with as many as 24 
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currency only, please. Ail subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
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RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



THE FOLLOWING PRODUCTS have 
recently been received by the rainbow, examined by our 
magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of Certification, 
your assurance that we have seen the product and have ascertained 
that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been issued to: 



Artificial Intelligence Package, consists 
)f three programs. The Happiness 
Expert calculates your happiness quo- 
ient and offers advice based on re- 
ponses; Poet composes endless reams 
)f poetry on screen or printer; and 
Therapist asks about your problems, 
hen engages you in conversation. 
Thinking Software, 46-16 65th Place, 
Woodside, NY 11377, $34.95. 

CoCo-Util, a powerful and flexible 
utility program that allows you to 
transfer Tandy Color Computer disk 
files to your MS-DOS machine. You 
can also transfer MS-DOS files to a 
Color Computer disk. Migrate applica- 
tion data files from one system to 
another and save countless hours of 
retyping. Mark Data Products, 24001 
Alicia Parkway #207, Mission Viejo, 
CA 92691, $39.95 plus $2 S/H. 

DCM — RS232c, two-position mo- 
dem/ printer selector. This device allows 
connections of any two serial devices to 
CoCo's serial port at one time. Derby 
City Software, 3025 Kozy Kreek Drive, 
Louisville, KY 40220, $34.95. 

Disk Anti-Pirate, for 16K/32K/64K 
CoCo disk systems. This program copy 
protects BASIC and ML programs on 
disk using a variety of protection 
schemes. Autostart programs, encrypt 
them with your own password and use 
optional key/ commands and functions 
to disable. Microcom Software, P.O. 
Box 2t47 FairporU NY 14450, $59.95. 

Disk BASIC Unraveled, a book contain- 
ing detailed and documented disas- 
sembled listings of Disk BASIC Versions 
1.0 and 1.1. Readers need knowledge of 
6809 assembly language programming. 
Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 
21272, Woodhaven, NY 11421, $19.95 
plus $3 S/H. 



Dragons Temple, a 64K ECB Adven- 
ture game. Join King Art's court on a 
quest for the unknown treasures ru- 
mored to be in the dreaded home of 
Smokey, the fire-breathing dragon. 
Begin your journey into the dragon's 
temple armed with a lamp and plenty of label on Hi-Res screen displaying label 
oil, for once the lamp goes out, you see just as it will be printed with spaces, 



Quest for Reality, a 32K ECB Adven- 
ture game requiring one joystick. The 
scenario places you in The Weird Zone, 
a dream-like fantasy world. The object 
is to find the Orb of Reality and be set 
free. Features animated graphics 
screens and special MAP command. 
Steve Britton, Route 2, Box 1015, 
Friendsville, TN 37737, $21.95 plus 
$1.50 S/H. 

Ultra Label Maker, lets user compose 



only the monster's glowing eyes and the 
gleaming treasure. JADE, RFD #2, 
Box 2740, Clinton, ME 04927, $13.95. 



italics and underlining. A companion 
program, Fontedit, is included for 
producing custom drivers for any print- 
er. Labels can also be numbered. CMD 
Micro, 17435 5 7th Avenue, Edmonton, 
Alberta, Canada T6M 1E1, $14.95 plus 
GRX-DMP II, a graphics screen print $2 S/H. 
utility for bit-image printers such as the 

D MP- 105. This enhanced version Universal Monitor Drive, available in 
prints from PMODE 4, 3 or 1.7, is three configurations for the CoCo. 
shorter, runs faster and works on disk V.D.I is designed to drive a color or 
and cassette bases. Sigma Software, monochrome monitor with sound ca- 



14024 152nd Avenue, Renton, WA 
98056, cassette $7.95; disk $8.95. 



pability. The V.D.2 can be used for 
monitors without sound, and the V.D.3 
drives both color and monochrome 
monitors simultaneously. No soldering 
required. Derby City Software, 3025 
Kozy Kreek Drive, Louisville, KY 



Phalanx, a 32K machine language game 
of Alexander the Great. The scenario 40220, $28.95 each. 
places you in the year 334 B.C. when a 

young Macedonian King named Alex- WordPak-RS, an 80-column video 
ander led a small but well-trained army board for the CoCo. This board is 
into the ancient land of Persia. You, as designed for OS-9 Version 2.0 and 
Alexander, control 16 units against an allows use of screen control codes, 
army of Persians in a Simulation of Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 
tactical combat. Ark Royal Games, 21272, Woodhaven, NY 11421, $99.95 
P.O. Box 14806, Jacksonville, FL plus $3 S/ H. 
32238, tape $20; disk $22. 



The Seal of Certification program 
is open to all manufacturers of products for the 
Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Sea/, the magazine certifies the product does 
exist — that we have examined it and have a sample copy — 
but this does not constitute any guarantee of satisfaction. 
As soon as possible, these hardware or software items 
will be forwarded to the rainbow's reviewers for evaluation. 

— Judl Hutchinson 



BBS 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 131 



REVIEWING PEWQEM 



OS-9 Version 2.00 

Editor: 

In the July 1986 [Page 166] review of 
Radio Shack's OS-9 Version 2.00, Mr. 
Goldwasser tells of a problem with the 
Config utility. His problem was a mirror- 
image of my own: disks that would not boot 
up from Disk basic. 

I learned that the problem stems from not 
setting the execution directory to /DO/ 
CMDS after inserting the boot/ config disk. 
You need to enter CHX /DO/CMDS before you 
enter CONFIG. The documentation was not 
too specific about this step. 

Keep up the good work rainbow! 

Paul Kapaldo 
N. Olmstead, OH 



The Enhancer 

Editor: 

I was very pleased with Jerry Semones' 
review of The Enhancer [May 1986, Page 
207]. However, I think the EVAL command 
explanation was slightly confusing. To 
illustrate the power of EVAL: When you 
enter PRINT VflL("5+7") the computer 
displays 5. 

On the other hand, PRINT EVAL ( "5+7") 
produces a result of 12. EVAL can evaluate 
any legal formula; VflL can evaluate only 
actual numbers. 

I hope this clears up the confusion, and 
demonstates the power of EVAL. Once 
again, 1 thank Mr. Semones for his excellent 
review. 

David Skoll 
H.D.R. Software 



Homeware 

Editor: 

I would like to comment on the review of 
our Homeware home management package 
[July 1986, Page 169]. While the review is 
largely accurate for five of the six modules 
that comprise Homeware, I think there may 
be some misunderstanding with the descrip- 
tion of the word processor module, Horn- 
write. 

It is stated that Homwrite contains "both 
typewriter mode and insert modes." As I 
understand typewriter mode, it is a mode in 
which a word processor prints on paper 
immediately, line by line as you type, rather 
than waiting until you have typed the entire 
document. Homwrite is set up so that 
printouts are done after the entire document 
is typed on screen. There is a mode in which 
you can type over anything that already may 
be on screen at the cursor's position, and 
there is another mode in which your typing 
is inserted in front of anything that already 
may be at the cursor's position. 

The review states that "the printout is 
single spaced." As explained on page three 
of the instructions, the spacing can be 
changed easily by using the Spacing option 
that appears on one of the Homwrite menu 
screens. 

Finally, since 1 regularly use Homwrite to 
do my own correspondence-type word 
processing, I am puzzled by the statement 
that Homwrite is "not on a par with the 
other modules." While it lacks features 
commonly found in more complex word 
processors, I find the program perfectly 
adequate for letter-writing and similar small 
household jobs for which it is intended. 

Jim Toth 
Tothian Software, Inc. 



The Best Epson Screen 
Dump Utility 

Editor: 

Mr. van der Poel announces himsel 
puzzled over a problem I experienced whil 
reviewing The Best Epson Screen Dum^ 
Utility [February 1986, Page 216]. Thi 
problem is screens printed at an offset of . 
few bytes from their correct starting address 

Users should be grateful for the additions 
clarification Mr. van der Poel's letter afford 
[August 1986, Page 132], 

R. W. Odin 
Sedro-Woolley, W/ 



CGP-220 Screen Dump Package 

Editor: 

The recent review of my program CGP 
220 Screen Dump Package illustrates hov 
easy it is for a programmer to forget that no 
everyone using a computer is an expert. Mj 
omission of examples showing how to use 
the clear statement to reserve memory foi 
various programs in the package is a case ir. 
point. 

The documentation now contains exam- 
ples showing how to use the CLEAR state- 
ment. My thanks to your reviewer, Cra} 
Augsburg, for bringing this oversight to m} 
attention. 

Bob van der Poe t 
CMD Micro Computer Services, Ltd. 

We welcome letters to "Reviewing Re- 
views" and remind you that they may also 
be sent to us through the MAIL section 
of our new Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



132 THE RAINBOW October 1986 




■ 3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

■ True lower case characters 

■ User -friendly full -screen 
editor 

■ Right justification 

■ Easy hyphenation 

■ Drives any printer 

■ Embedded format and 
control codes 

■ Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

■ Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

■ No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 5 1 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 X 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 5 1 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on (he screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVII/VIII, DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 



or disk. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell *n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su r e saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 




...truly a state of the art word processor... 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /haek stores 

via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a trademark 
of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp; MX-80 is e 
trademark of Epson America, Inc. 




Software Review* 



PROGRAMS • PERIPHERALS • SUPPLIES • SERVICE 



For Coco . . . 

in the Midwest 

Now in our 4th year! 



New Catalog Now Available 

CALL OR WRITE 




RAINBOW 



Wl 



Introducing . . . 

SEIKOSHA 

SP-1000A 

100 cps draft 
20 cps NLQ 
Friction and tractor 
Front panel Controls 
Graphics 
1.5 K buffer 

2 yr. Warranty . *Q(\Q fifl 

Parallel printer $£UCl.UU 

th Metric Industries Model 104 interface $249.00 

"The New Leader in Price-Performance!" 








m 


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Mu 
£> 


■y 

H 


K 


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P 


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Coco Man 



The Complete 



Is/- 



I 




includes 



fTl C>eluxe Joystick 



COCONttM M f 79.99 

witn Y-cable 99.93 

With Joystick 99.93 



□ 



\\mmxmr. 



LATEST VERSION 
FEATURES . . . 

•14 fonts 
•Shrink, Stretch 

Rotate 
•Multiple drives 
•Pattern Save 
UPGRADES AVAILABLE 

Disk I to II 20. 00 
Tape I to Disk II 

25 00 

Max Edit 19.95 
Picture disks 
available 



%m>! DELUXE JOYSTICK 



EXCELLENT FOR COLOR COMPUTER 
USE IT FOR GRAPHICS. GAMES. ETC. 

CoCo owners will appreciate this high quality, 
durable joystick. Open gimbal design ... self- 
centering or free-floating operation. Mechanical 
trims on both axes ... eight loot cable ... firing 
button has lifetime 5,000,000 presses. A two- 
button version of the Deluxe Joystick is available 
for the Tandy 1000. DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 




$27.SO each 
$49. 95/ pair 



CHOOSE FROM OUR LARGE 
SELECTION OF COCO PRODUCTS 

B5 ... Colorware ... Derringer ... Diecom ... Dynacaic ... Elite .. 
Four Star ... HJL ... J & M ... Mark Data ... Metric Industries .. 
Michtron ... Microcom ... Microworks ... Tom Mix ... PBJ ... 
PXE ... Spectrum Projects ... Speech Systems ... Sugar ... 
TCE ... VIP ... Zebra ... and more! 
Yes! We have PENPAL! 



Rapid Action, Good Graphics 
Highlight Pump Man 



Man the joysticks! Aliens are attacking underground ai 
it is your job, as Pump Man, to stop them. 

PumpMan is Saguaro Software's version of the arca( 
game Dig Dug. In it, you must dig tunnels under the grour 
in an attempt to trap and blow up aliens using a hi£ 
pressure air pump. Or, lead the aliens up a tunnel and drc 
a rock on them. But beware, these aliens can transpo 
themselves through solid rock, and pop into one of yoi 
tunnels. Watch your step near the fire-breathing dragon! 

Quite honestly, I'll confess to being an arcade Dig Di 
addict. It offers a wonderful diversion from shoot-'em-U] 
and provides a delightful challenge. This is why, when 
received PumpMan to review, I immediately pounced o 
my joystick and got ready for hours of fun. 

Is PumpMan fun? It sure is. But, 1 must admit to havir 
mixed feelings about the game. While the game wt 
certainly welcome and well-used around my house, 
couldn't help but feel that it could have been better. 

PumpMan comes on a copy-protected disk, or 
available on cassette. While I generally dislike cop? 
protection schemes, I can't fuss too much about the one use 
for disk, since it does let you make a non-executable backu 
of the program. If something happens to the original, simpi 
back up the copy (which won't work by itself) onto th 
original disk and it should work. Loading the game is £ 
easy as typing LDfiDM "PUMPMAN". 

The game is played with one joystick to move Pump Ma 
in one of four directions. The firebutton activates the pumj. 
I sometimes had trouble turning right or left with the okk 
joysticks. It was a frustration to me that the firebutton di 
not autofire. Holding down the button does not keep th 
pump activated; you must constantly press it, and even the 
it sometimes doesn't register. 

The graphics are good, and the action rapid. Th 
animation, however, is often flickery which, while no 
affecting the game play, can be mildly annoying. On the plu 
side, PumpMan keeps your interest, has a game paus 
feature and comes with 15 board variations. The game' 
sound effects are adequate, but I do miss the catch 
background music found in the arcade version. Most all th 
other features of the arcade game are included, though. 

The two-page documentation covers all the necessar 
features of PumpMan. 

On a rating scale of one to five, I'd rate PumpMan a 
follows: playability, three; keeps interest, four; documen 
tation, three; graphics, three; sound, two and price vs. value 
three. 

PumpMan is a fun game, and it is evident that Dave Dies 
the author, has a great deal of talent. As it is, it's very good 
but a few more weeks of work could have made this garni 
outstanding. 

(Saguaro Software, P.O. Box 1864, Telluride, CO 81435, 
$24.95 tape, $29.95 disk; $1 S/H. Requires 32K and joystick) 



— Eric W. Tileniu! 



• Call • 

513-396 S0FT 



• Shop by Modem • 

513-396 SH0P 





• Write • 

2235 Losantiville, Cincinnati, OH 45237 

SHIPPING will be chirgefl al our ACTUAL COST 
Ohio«riid>nts add 5 5\ Sue i Ta« COD add 2 00 



1 34 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



ardware ReviewSS^^^^^SSSSSSS^/^\ 

Colorchestra Lets 
the Music Flow 

Since 1 am in a country rock band, write my own music, 
nd own a computer and a synthesizer, I was thrilled when 

received Colorchestra, a MIDI sequencer for the Color 
Computer. There are many MIDI sequencers for other 
omputers but not for the Color Computer. Now those of 
.s who own CoCos and synthesizers won't be tempted to 
>uy another computer to use with our musical instruments, 
before 1 review Colorchestra though, I had better give a 
ittle history and explain what MIDI equipment is supposed 
o do. 

MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a 
iniversal language adopted by most musical instrument 
nanufacturers so that MlDI-equipped instruments can 
:ommunicate and control each other, regardless of which 
:ompany makes the instrument. 

When electronic music was first being developed it was 
possible to interconnect or interface to monophonic 
;ynthesizers by using simple voltage signals. But as 
computerized polyphonic synthesizers became the norm, 
he old techniques of interfacing became too cumbersome. 
So MIDls were developed. They use eight-bit signals to 
serially transmit all kinds of information from one 
nstrument to another. 

Colorchestra is a very attractive product. There is even 
a ROM pack made of walnut! The documentation is 
packaged in a sturdy binder and there is a cassette version 
as well as two disk versions. The software is not copy 
protected, so make and use copies. You must have the 
hardware and the software to make it work. 

The many features include: works with any MIDI- 
equipped synthesizer or rhythm machine; 16 polyphonic 
multifunction tracks; 8,000 note storage not dedicated to 
any specific track; user friendly Hi-Res graphics interface; 
real time write mode; solo capability on any track; varying 
tempo range from 30 to 250 beats per minute; audible and 
visual metronome; programmable measure locator; se- 
quencer records from any MIDI channel (1-16); each track 
can output to any MIDI channel (1-16); records full 
spectrum of MIDI data including program changes, pitch 
bends and all 128 available MIDI controllers; accepts or 
transmits MIDI synchronization for rhythm or drum 
machines; and programmable time signature plus many 
others. 

To use Colorchestra you need a 64K Color Computer and 
any MIDI-equipped device. With disk drive you also need 
a Y Cable or a multipack. It does not matter what version 
of DOS you have because the program makes no ROM 
calls. 

Colorchestra is the beginning of a series of programs from 
Horizon that allows you to work with the CoCo and a 
MIDI. 

It is not a problem to boot up Colorchestra in either 
cassette or disk format. In the main menu you will see a 
well-designed screen of icons giving eight choices. They are 
Multitrack Recording, Track Editing, Toolbox Menu, 
Control Panel Menu, Help, Disk I/O, Cassette I/O and 
System Trash. To choose any of the options is simply a 
matter of using the arrows to move and pressing ENTER. 



Multitrack recording is the heart of the program. Here 
you can record in any or all of the 16 tracks after selecting 
recording or playback options. Your options include 
Recording Resolution (used to clean up timing errors), Time 
Signature, Tempo, Metronome Mode (to control timing 
and sychronization with other machines) and Track 
Selection. When ENTER is pressed, recording begins after 
one measure. To end recording, press BREAK, which returns 
you to the main menu. 

Track editing and the Tool kit give you the ability to 
change what you have recorded. You can change individual 
notes or completely transpose your composition from one 
key to another. 

The control panel is used to change Colorchestra's 
general options: MIDI echo controls, velocity controls, 
sequence title, real time filter settings, MIDI in channel 
selection and MIDI out channel controls . 

The options for Help, Disk I/O, Cassette I/O and System 
Trash are all self-explanatory and easy to use. Each option 
uses icons and the arrow keys for selection. In the Disk 
I/O menu you can Load, Save, Kill, Rename and get a 
directory. In the Cassette I/O you can Save, Load and 
Verify. 

If you have MIDI equipment and a CoCo, now there is 
a product to let the creative juices flow. Colorchestra is the 
beginning of a new world for CoCo musicians. 

(Horizon Software Corporation, P.O. Box 289, Opelousas, 
LA 70570, 64K required, $149.95) 

— Thomas E. Nedreberg 



J&R ELECTRONICS 

Complete 256K and 51 2K Memory Expansion Systems 
(Hardware, Software and documentation included) 
User friendly software, programmer not required 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

★ We have eliminated the necessity to piggyback for 512K versions! ★ 
RAMDISK — Fast disk I/O, 35/40 track (two RAM drives with 51 2K) 

PC0PYM0R — More than 30 PM0DE 4 screens in memory at once! PC0PY command modified to accept 
PC0PY 1 to 128. More than 70 P MODE 4 screens and PC0PY 1 to 302 with 51 2K versions (or 30 PM0DE 
4 screens with one RAM DISK). 

SPOOLER — HUGE printer buffer for offline storage inside your computer while the printer's busy. Custom- 
izable from 30K to over 200K (500 K with 51 2K versions). Buffer can be turned off /on copied using simple 
PRINT CHR$ commands. 

0S9 Rimdlsk — Fast OS-9 disk I/O! 35/40 track single sided or 40 track double sided (512K) Ramdisk 
under 0S9! GOOD'S 0S9 Ramdisk (Rainbow Feb '86) with fully commented source code and install files 
added by J SR. (Requires 0S9 operating system) 
ALL software above is configurable for 256K/512K operation. 

Software shipped on disk, add $10.00 for software on tape. (0S9 RAMDISK not available on tape). 

ALL boards below are 256K/512K capable, software & documentation included. 

New SAM (74LS785) not included (use your 74LS783), 74LS785 recommended for 2.0 MHz operation 

Pirt number Pries Description 

#1001 $39.95 Banker II bare board (with long pin socket, does not include memory 

Expansion Board) 

01002 $69.95 Banker II bare board + parts (does not include Memory Expansion Board) 

#1003 $89.95 Banker II assembled & tested (no memory) 

#1004 $129.95 Banker II (256K, upgradable to 51 2K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1005 $169.95 Banker II (51 2K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1006 $15.00 Memory Expansion Board 

#1007 $29.95 Memory Expansion Board + parts 

#9000 $89.95 Down Under Controller. Ram Pack size controller with BDOS Gold 

plated, high reliability edge connectors, jumpers for 24/28 pin ROM. 
Compatible with COCO I and COCO II. 

#9001 $35.00 BDOS (Enhanced DOS on 27128 EPROM) 

#9002 $5.00 64K switch 

#9004 $24.95 New SAM 74LS785 (required only for 2.0 MHz operation) 

#9005 $24.95 *New!* PowerBasic — Introductory Price. (Requires RSD0S 1.0 or 

1.1 and 256K or 51 2K Banker) Utilize the extra memory for variable 
storage and pass variables between programs in different pages of 
memory. Split a large BASIC program into smaller pieces and GOTO or 
G0SUB a line in another page of memory. . . and more features included, 
(disk only) 

#9006 $10.00 S/WPac upgrade. 1. XX to 2.XX 

To place an order, write to J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia. MD 21045. 
OR call (301 ) 987-9067 — Jesse or (301 ) 788-0861 — Ray. 
HOURS: Weekdays 7 p.m.-9 p.m.; Sat. Noon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME. 

Add $4.00 shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS $7.00), COD charge $3.00. Maryland residents add 
5% state tax. 

CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS OR COD's only please (personal check — 2 weeks for clearance). IMME- 
DIATE DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model # (i.e. 26-3136), Disk or Tape when ordering. 
QUANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For information on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 
788-0861 . COCQ II 26-31 XX owners call (soldering experience may be required). 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



Software ReviewSSSSSS^SSSSS^^SfZS 

Mission: F- 16 Assault: A Must 
for Serious Game Players 

You're flying over enemy terrain at about Mach 2. 
Suddenly you see the first target, a group of unprotected 
buildings. You speed up as you drop bombs to destroy this 
target. But before the bombs hit the ground, a blip appears 
on the radar. You know what that means, so you get ready 
for combat. An enemy helicopter glides onto the screen and 
you fire furiously at the craft for a few seconds before 
destroying it. You wipe your brow and continue with the 
mission. 

No, you haven't joined the Air Force, you're playing 
Mission: F-16 Assault, one of Diecom's newest 64K arrivals. 
Of all of the games I've played on my CoCo, this new release 
from Diecom has to be one of the best. Its graphics and 
animation are the best I have seen in an action game, and 
it has down-to-earth logic. 

The scenario is as follows: You are in control of a white 
jet fighter. The ground scrolls beneath the plane. You have 
full control of the jet's movement around the screen. Your 
missiles fire forward and the bombs are dropped to the 
ground. 

The entire playing field is situated over enemy territory 
which is dotted with different types of defenses. There are 
several tactical areas, including refineries, airports and 
other vital locations. Points are awarded for destroying 



these targets. Not only are these land sites targets, but som 
also serve the enemy. Airports, for example are used U 
launch airplanes, and once destroyed, aircraft may n< 
longer take off from that site. There are other sites whicl 
are unique in this way, such as missile silos and helicopte 
pads. 

The enemy uses several kinds of defense against you 
aircraft. These include missiles, jet aircraft, helicopters 
boats and tanks. They may all be destroyed except for the 
surface-to-air missiles and the enemy's missiles which fin 
from the jet aircraft and helicopters. 

All flying aircraft take off from a ground site such as ar 
airport or helicopter pad. Therefore, these craft may be 
destroyed both on the ground and in the air. To destro> 
anything on the ground, you must drop a bomb. To destroy 
an enemy in the air, you must use missiles which fire forward 
from your aircraft. 

Radar is on the right side of the screen and indicates most 
enemy craft positions. There is one special enemy aircraft 
which can be used to jam your radar. This aircraft must be 
destroyed before your radar is destroyed. 

Some other features in this game are: a bonus aircraft for 
every 10,000 points, a pause and restart feature, and a high 
score board. 

I love this game, and give it a full five-star rating. Mission: 

F-16 Assault is a must for all serious CoCo game players. 

i 

(Diecom Products, 6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, 
Canada L9T 2X8. Tape or disk $28.95 U.S., $38.95 Can.) 

— Pat Downard 



□ □□□□ 
□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 
□□□□□ 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



price price TANDY COMPUTERS 



LIST OUR 
PRICE PRICE 



26-3136 16K Standard Color Computer 2 . . $119.95 $ 99.00 

26-3127 64K Extended Color Computer 2 . 199.95 169.00 

26-3131 Disk Drive 0 for Color Computer . . 299.95 240.00 

26-3130 Disk Drive 1 for Drive 0 199.95 169.00 

26-3008 Joystick ..• 19.95 16.95 

26-3012 Deluxe Joystick (EACH) 29.95 25.00 

26-3018 Extended Basic Kit 39.95 36.00 

26-1208 CCR-81 Tape Recorder 59.95 50.00 

26-1173 DCM-3 Direct Connect Modem . . . 59.95 50.00 

SOFTWARE 



30001210 Telewriter 64 Tape 


$ 49.95 


$ 42.00 


30001 220 Telewriter 64 Disk 


59.95 


49.00 


30001110 VIP Writer 


69.95 


59.00 


30001140 VIP Database 


59.95 


49.00 


30001150 VIP Terminal Disk 


49.95 


45.00 


30001170 VIP Integrated Software 


149.95 


139.00 


30001130 SS/DD 10 Pack Diskettes 


21 .00 


14.00 



26-1 070 Model 4D Desktop 64K 2 FD& Deskmate$1 1 99.00 

25-1 000 Model 1 000 1 FD 1 28K & Deskmate 999.00 

25-1 001 Model 1 000 1 FD & 1 0 Meg HD 256K 1 999.00 

25-3000 Model 1 200 1 FD & 1 0 Meg HD 256K 2499.00 

25-3001 Model 1200 Two FD 256K 1499.00 

25-4000 Model 3000 One FD 51 2K 2599.00 

25- 401 0 Model 3000 1 FD & 20 Meg HD 51 2K 3599.00 

26- 3901 Model 600 Port Comp 32K 1 3 1 / 2 Disk 1 599.00 

25-1021 CM4 Color Monitor 299.95 

25-1022 CM10 Color Monitor 459.95 

25- 3010 VM-3 Monochrome Monitor 219.00 

26- 5111 VM-1 Monochrome Monitor 199.95 

26-5112 CM-1 Color Monitor 599.00 

25-3043 Graphics Adaptor T-1 200, T-3000 . 299.00 

25-3047 Deluxe Graphics Adapt T-1 200, T-3000 499.95 

25-3130 MS-DOS 2.1 1/Basic Tandy 1200 . 89.95 

25-41 04 MS-DOS 3.1 /Basic/Deskmate Tandy 3000 99.95 



$ 895.00 
705.00 
1 475.00 
1 525.00 
1 200.00 
1900.00 
2600.00 
1195.00 
225.00 
380.00 
185.00 
1 65.00 
510.00 
185.00 
395.00 
75.00 
85.00 



PRINTERS AND ACCESSORIES 



26-1276 DMP-105 80 cps Dot Matrix $199.95 

26-1280 DMP-1 30 Dot Matrix 349.95 

20001025 EPSON LX-80 Printer 369.95 

20001515 EPSON LX-80 Tractor Feed 29.95 

20021070 OK I DATA 182 Printer 299.00 

20041020 STAR SG-10 Printer 299.00 

300091 1 0 BOTEK Serial to Parallel Interface 



$169.00 
285.00 
225.00 

25.00 
245.00 
250.00 

59.00 



CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-248-3823 

For Technical Questions and Information on our complete line of 
computer accessories and current prices: 

CALL 1-517-625-4161 

Mon.-Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Advertised prices are 
cash prices. C.O.D. accepted ($10.00 charge per carton on C.O.D. Call for further 
C.O.D. information.) M.C., Visa, add 2%. A.X., add 3%. All non-defective items re- 
turned will be subject to 10% restocking fee. Defective items require return merchan- 
dise authorization. Call for R.M.A. Number before returning. Delivery is subject to 
product availability. 

PERRY COMPUTERS • 124 SOUTH MAIN STREET • PERRY, Ml 48872 



136 



THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



ftware Review 



Wall Street Keeps 
the Interest Flowing 

Wall Street is a game which can be played by one to eight 
ople, and the strategy involved does not change with the 
mber of participants. Each player begins the game with 
,000 in cash, and tries, through the purchase and sale of 
mpany shares, to increase his or her holdings to a winning 
lount which can be set at any number between $2,000 and 
99,999,999. Wall Street can even be played noncompet- 
vely, i.e., by setting the winning amount of money at a 
fficiently high level, the players can enjoy refining their 
:tics and mastering the idiosyncrasies of the program for 
veral hours without even coming close to a victory. 
There are eight American companies to choose from 
lose high, average and low stock prices are correlated with 
stock indicator somewhat analogous to the famous Dow 
mes Average. The object is to maximize profits by buying 
w and selling high as in real stock exchanges. At first I 
ought this was a Simulation of the stock market and 
iticipated some realistic market action. However, this 
ogram is a game, and its departures from realism make 
e proceedings swifter, more exciting, and for those who 
m't get too greedy, more profitable. There is an old saying 
the stock market, "The Bulls make money, even the Bears 
ake money, but the pigs . . . they don't make any money!" 
For example, there was never a stockholders' meeting like 
te ones in this game where you go in with X shares of a 
)mpany's stock and emerge with 2X, 3X or 4X and usually 
tore shares. This is an exhilarating way to live the good 
fe if you can resist the urge to hold the stock in the hope 
lat it will double and triple some more, and instead, 
invert your shares to cash before the broker's fee is 
ssessed at $10 per share! 

We never did discover the relationship between the 
mulated rolls of the dice and the ups and downs of the 
ame. We guessed that perhaps the makers of the program 
rst created it on a physical board with squares to determine 
ne's fate for each turn. 

As we continued to play we became increasingly con- 
inced that Wall Street is to the stock market what 
Monopoly is to real estate. Wall Street is written in BASIC 
nd comes on an unprotected tape which is easily loaded 
nd converted to disk. The documentation is adequate, 
lthough it's hard to understand the game until you play 
:. The game would be improved by writing the current 
»layer's name on every screen; we occasionally had some 
ontroversy over whose turn it was. Also, some folks wished 
he program would allow them to liquidate their shares 
vhile automatically computing scores before reaching the 
lesignated winning amount. 

We are happy to recommend this program. Unlike most 
;ames, it has held our interest through several playings, and 
it a cost of $6 per tape, you'll still have money left over 
or investing in the real thing. 

(Drayon Software, P.O. Box 2516, Renton, WA 98056. 
Requires 16K ECB, $6.) 

— Patricia Arrington 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 




Back copies of many issues of the 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents 
for each additional issue for postage and 
handling if sent by United Parcel Service. 
There is a $5 charge for the first issue, 
plus a $1 charge for each additional issue 
on orders sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not 
deliver to a post office box or to another 
country. 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 
are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All others are in regular magazine 
form. VISA, MasterCard and American 
Express accepted. Kentucky residents 
please add 5 percent state sales tax. In 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
and no C.O.D. orders are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To order, just fill out the form on the 
next page and mail it with your payment 
to: 



THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




October 1986 THE RAINBOW 137 



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: 
■ 

: 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 
(Payment must accompany back issue orders. We do not bill.) 

□ Please send me the following back issues: 





MONTH 


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YEAR 




PRICE 


1 


JULY '81 


PREMIER ISSUE 


$2.00 


□ 


2 


AUG. '81 




$2.00 


□ 


3 


SEPT. '81 


EDUCATION 


$2.00 


□ 


4 


OCT. '81 


PRINTER 


$2.00 


□ 


5 


NOV. '81 




$2.00 


□ 


6 


DEC. '81 


HOLIDAY 


$2.00 


□ 


7 


JAN. '82 




$2.00 


□ 


8 


FEB. '82 


♦ 


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9 


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APR. '82 




$2.50 


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VOLUME 3 


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GAMES 


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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to our first three years, July 1981 
through June 1984, is printed in its entirety in our July 1984 issue. 
Separately bound copies are also available. $2.50 □ 

Note: Our Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes, including RAINBOW ON TAPE 
indexes, are included in the July 1985 and 1986 issues, respectively. 

TOTAL 



KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

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to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Software RevieWi 



Y, 



s 



Graphic Echo — A Screei 
Dump for All Seasons 

I recently upgraded my computer and purchased a do 
matrix printer, so I was really excited when I receive 
Graphic Echo to review. Not only can I type letters an 
reviews, but with this program, I can also send any graphi< 
screen I have to my printer. 

The program is written in machine code, and tb 
directions I received explained how to load the progran 
There are also two programs; one is for 16K users and tfc 
other is for 32K users. The instructions were short, bi 
adequate. 

To use Graphic Echo, load the graphics to be printed int 
the computer. Run the graphics and press the BREAK ke; 
This stores the graphics into the computer's memor 
CLDRDM the machine language program. Before executin 
this program, make sure your printer is set to the graphic 
mode. Your printer instruction book explains this. Whe 
the printer is set, type EXEC. That's it! 

The program only takes a few moments for a regular siz 
image to be printed. But wait, there's more! You have 
choice, using pokes, of setting one or more of the followin, 
options: print enlarged image, print regular image, prin 
negative image, print positive image, set a left margin o 
automatically center the image. 

I experimented with these options, and I was impresse< 
with all of them. I tried different graphics screens and ha< 
no problem with any of them. If, during the printing of ai 
image, you want to stop, just press the BREAK key. This stop; 
the printing. 

This program will work with all PMODEs, but it is onl] 
designed to work with Radio Shack printers. 

For the price, Graphic Echo is a very useful utility foi 
the CoCo. 

(Tothian Software, Inc., Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248, 
$14.95) 

— John H. Appe! 



See You at 
R AI N BO Wf est-Princeton 
October 17-19 



InirtnniiHHMiiiMniiMtHtuiHHHainuHiiuiifMHiM 

138 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



Software Review 

Move Into Control With 
Memory Manager 

So, you have a64K Color Computer but you're not using 
OS-9? Telewriter 64 tells you it has more than 22K of buffer 
space, but how do you get to it for your own BASIC 
programs? Is there any way to make use of memory above 
the ROMs? 

Here is a two-program set designed to help you make use 
of that memory, either with your old programs or with 
program development. Memory Manager allows the use of 
the second 32 K of RAM in several ways. RAMdisk is a 
separate program that uses the 32K of RAM exclusively for 
storage of programs, both BASIC and machine language. 

The programs are available on either disk or tape. A 
CLOflDM followed by EXEC installs either program. Memory 
Manager allows using BASIC in both 32K banks of memory, 
or gaining some RAM by transferring the ROM data to 
upper RAM and transferring the data as- a block to an area 
above the ROMs. Memory Manager also allows you to 
undo any of these procedures. 

Running BASIC in both banks introduces a menu that will 
copy or exchange banks. This makes it possible to keep a 
copy of a program under development in memory while 
debugging. EXEC accesses Memory Manager again to 
exchange banks or copy either bank if your program 
crashes. 

The all-RAM mode allows approximately 8K of RAM 
for storage of a short program or data. To store data you 
must know the beginning and ending locations of the data 
and where you want them placed. Transferring a program 
is much easier. 

The RAMdisk is used exclusively to store programs in 
memory while any single program may be run in the lower 
32K of memory. The RAMdisk menu contains Display 
Programs, Save a Program, Delete a Program, Clear All 
Programs, Return to Last Program and Load a Program. 
Each of these options pertains to the programs in the upper 
memory, except Return to Last Program, which begins 
running the program in lower memory The menu always 
shows the programs already in memory, their length and 
the memory left. Both BASIC and ML programs may be 
saved, but the beginning, ending and execution addresses 
must be known for ML programs. 

Even though RAMdisk and Memory Manager are 
separate programs, they each contain ML subroutines that 
can be executed without executing the programs as a whole. 
Using these subroutines, you can copy ML subroutines into 
the second memory bank, exchange the data in the two 
banks, copy to either bank, move data to either bank, 
change BASIC program vectors and condition memory for 
the all-RAM mode. The utility of these subroutines is that 
your BASIC program can access them directly. You can, for 
instance, store data in upper RAM automatically. 

The documentation is 10 pages of error-free, clearly 
reproduced pages. It explains the programs in general and 
goes through each menu choice. There are few examples. 

Using RAMdisk at first proved to be difficult. My first 
attempts nearly all met with a hung-up machine. The 
problems begin when programs of any complexity start to 
run in lower RAM. After the running, even if broken early, 



re-entering RAMdisk or Memory Manager with an EXEC 



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Call or write for free catalog. 



was an adventure. I had some success when I modified the 
programs I was saving and running by adding the line 0 
INPUT R. This would keep it from doing anything before 
I decided my next step. 

When you return to the last program from either the 
Memory Manager or RAMdisk menu, the program in lower 
RAM is automatically run. I would suggest to Dynamic 
Electronics that they modify their programs to not 
automatically run. You are supposed to BREAK the program 
if you don't want it to run, but it may have already locked 
the BREAK key out or poked the machine into conflict with 
the memory programs. I would think that using these 
programs for developing your own BASIC programs would 
be a major inconvenience when your partially developed, 
fully buggy program starts running every time you return 
from saving a copy of it or a subroutine. 

My efforts at using RAMdisk have been successful only 
in saving and running the simplest of programs. Using 
Memory Manager has met with better success. The two 
main purposes here are to use memory, either in two equal 
banks or an 8 K block of memory for data or program 
storage. Although I had some strange things happen when 
installing Memory Manager, when it worked, it worked. I 
could copy a program to the second bank, then modify the 
program. If it crashed, I could bring the original back from 
the second bank. Or, after development, I could copy it to 
the upper bank and continue developing. 

My advice is to make your program-under-development 
saves to disk. Tape-only users may save time with the 
Memory Manager programs but at a trade-off. The machine 
may lock up, although there have been times when a reset 
and EXEC have gained successful re-entry to RAMdisk and 
Memory Manager, with upper bank data intact. 

I envision two markets for these programs. The first are 
BASlC-only programmers wanting quick and easy RAM 
storage while they develop their programs. I advise against 
Memory Manager for them. The other potential market 
consists of those familiar with machine language program- 
ming and the CoCo memory. They would be able to take 
advantage of subroutines in Memory Manager or perhaps 
diagnose the quirks in the program to use it to real 
advantage. 

(Dynamic Electronics Inc., P.O. Box 896, Hartselle, AL 
35640, tape $27.95, disk $29.95) 

— Dennis Church 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 139 



HI-RES II SCREEN COMMANDER 

Are you tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on 
your CoCo? Do you wish you could see more lines and characters? 
Then HNRES II is the answer, it can give you the big screen display 
you've always wanted. It will display 24 lines of 32, 42, 5 1 , 64 and 
even 85 true upper and lower case characters per line without any 
hardware modifications. 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package 
available for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is 
completely compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program 
is loaded, everything works the same as before, only you have a 
much better display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed 
text and Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate 
text and graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key 
repeat feature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the 
screen. HI-RES II features over 30 special control code functions 
that allow you to change characters per line, protect display lines, 
change background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse 
video, underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works 
on all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides 
automatic reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you 
press reset. 

Only $24.95 for Tape and $29.95 for Disk 

EDT/ASM 64D 

64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER w I DEBUG 

EDT/ASM 64D is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & 
Assembler. It has a Hi-Resolution 5 1 , 64 or 85 column by 24 line 
display, so you see your program listings easily. It also supports the 
PBJ 80 Column Word-Pak cards. The disk also contains a free 
standing Machine Language Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

The Editor in EDT/ASM 64D is the most powerfull, easy to use 
Text Editor available in any Editor/ Assembler package for the Color 
Computer. It even has automatic line number generation for easy 
entry of program material. Some of it's features include: 

jr> Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

<r> Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 

<r> Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

Ct* Load & Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

<r> Move or Copy single & multiple text lines. 

<r> Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

<r> Hi-Res Text Display 28 to 85 columns by 24 lines. 

<r> Supports the PBJ 80 Column cards Word-Pak I & 11. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D is the part that creates 
the Machine Language program. It processes the source file(s) 
created or edited by the text editor and creates a LOADM or 
CLO ADM binary file on either Disk or Tape. Using library files you 
can assemble an unlimited size file, using several different disk 
drives. 

Supports conditional 1F/THEN/ELSE assembly. 
Ct* Supports Disk Library files (include). 

Supports standard motorola assembler directives 
<r> Allows multiple values for FDB & FCB directives. 
Ct* Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 
<t? Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADM format. 
Ct* Supports up to 9 open disk files during assembly. 
Ct* Allows assembly from editor buffer. Disk or both. 
<r> Full description text error messages. 

DEBUG is a free standing program debugger which provides all 
the functions supported by most system monitors. Some of them 
include: 

O- Examine and change the contents of memory. 
c?» Set and display up to 10 breakpoints in memory. 
<r> Remove single or multiple breakpoints, 
c?* Display/Change processor register contents. 

Dump Memory in Hex and ASCII format. 
<r> Fill Memory range with a specified data pattern. 
<r> Move a block of memory. 
<r> Search memory range for data pattern. 
<r> Disassemble memory into op-code format. 

luires 32K and Disk $59.00 



"The Source" 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine lan- 
guage programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assemb- 
ler Source Code for a fraction of the cost of other Disassembler/ 
Source generator programs. And, the Source has all the features 
your looking for in a Disassembler. 

(C^ Automatic Label generation. 
%y Allows specifying FCB, FCC and FDB areas. 
%y Save, Load and Edit FCB, FCC, and FDB map on Disk. 
& Disassembles programs directly from Disk 
(r> Output complete Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, 
Screen or both. 

<& Generates Assembler compatible source files directly to disk. 

<r> Generated source files are in standard ASCII format. 

(r> Built in Hex/ASCII dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FDB 

areas in a program. 
<& Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 
& Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy, 

almost foolproof operation. 
v> Written in fast machine language, one of the quickest and 

easiest to use Disassemblers available. 

Requires 32K and Disk $34.95 

TEXTPRO III 



Reqi 



The Advanced Word Processing System 

&> 9 Hi-Resolution Display Formats from 28 to 255 columns by 24 
lines. 

t> True Upper and Lower Case display format. 
C/* Three Different Programmable Header lines, re-definable at 
anytime. 

t> Programmable Footer line & Automatic Footnote System. 
& 10 Programmable Tab stops & 7 Tab Function Commands. 
Automatic Line Justification, Centering, Flush left and Flush 
right. 

O On screen display of underlining and Double size characters. 
& Change indents, margins, line length, etc. at anytime in a 
document. 

Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a 
full disk. 

& Easily imbed any number of format and control codes for 
printers. 

&• Automatic Memory sense 16-64K with up to 48K of 
workspace. 

<r> Typist Friendly line and Command format entry w/ auto key 
repeat. 

c5* Fully supports the use of 80 column hardware cards. 
TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed 
for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not 
like most of the other word processing programs available for the 
Color Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to 
write letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be 
better off with one of the other word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processing program with extensive document 
formatting features to handle large documents, term papers, man- 
uals, complex formating problems and letter writing, then TEX- 
TPRO is what your looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally 
different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and 
formatting information that you imbed directly in your text. There 
are over 50 different formating commands you can use without ever 
leaving the text your working on. There are no time comsuming, 
and often furstrating menu chases, you are in total control at all 
times. The formatted output can be displayed directly on the screen, 
showing you exactly what your printed document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed. This includes margins, head- 
ers, footers, page numbers, page breaks, underlining, column 
formating and full justification. 

Disk $59.95 Tape $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 

To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or C.O.D. call us at the 
number listed below (Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 

; tiM\ Act n*?i «p» 



D&tflPack tl Pint V4.0 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
With AUTOPILOT Executive Command Processor and A UTO- LOG Language Processor 

X-MQDEM DISK FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
YT- 1 00 & YT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 



No lost data when using Hi-Res Display , Even at 1200 Baud. 
9 Hi-Res Display formats, 28 to 255 columns by 2A lines. 
True Upper and Lower Case Displays. 
45K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Display and Disk . 
Kill the Hi-Res Display Option for an Extra 6K of buffer space. 
ASCII 9k BINARY disk file transfer via XMODEM. 
Directly record receive data to a disk file while online. 
VT-IOO terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 
VT- 100/52 cursor keys & position, insert/delete, tabs & more. 
Automatic File Capture. 

Programmable Word Length, Parity and Stop Bits. 
Programmable Baud Rates from 300 to 19200 Baud. 
Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, no garbled data. 
Send full 128 character set from Keyboard with control codes. 



Complete Editor, Insert, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 
Automatic Key Repeat for Buffer Editing. 
9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers can store 
entire programs. Only limited by the size of available memory. 
Programmable Control Character Trapping. 
Programmable Prompt Character or Delay to send next line. 
Programmable Printer rates from 1 10 to 9600 Baud. 
Send Files directly from the Buffer or Disk. 
Supports True Line Break Transmission- 
Save and Load Text Buffer and Program Key to Tape or Disk. 
Disk Commands include: Load, Save, Kill and Directory. 
Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Bufferr. 
Automatic Memory Sense 16-64K (32K required for Hi-Res ). 
Program and Memory Status Displays. 
Built in Command Menu (Help) Display, 



* Freeze Display & Review Information On line with no data loss. 
Auto-Log: is a communications programming language that will enable you to automatically have DPH+ Dial the phone, wait for and respond 
to a log-on prompt, send commands to a remote system, or even to send an entire program automatically. 

AUTOPILOT: is a executive command processor that will automatically process a command file containing a sequence of DPII+ commands 
including Auto-Log commands. 

SUPPORTS: PBJ Word-Pak I, II, R.S. and Double Density 80 Column Cards Not Compatible vith JDOS 

Disto Super Controller w/80 column card & parallel printer Requires 32 K & Disk 

PBJ Parallel Printer Card and Dual Serial Port (2SP-Pak) 
Radio Shack tlodem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak. even with Disk 



Only $59.00 



Do you want to write fast efficient machine language programs but you don't want to spend 
the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly language? 
Well with CBASIC. vou could be writing them right now! 

C8AS1C is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and program 
editing system available for the Color Computer. It will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available in your color 
computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit and 
convert programs from a language you are already familiar with 
Extended Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We spent over 2 years writing and 
refining CBASIC to make it the Best Color Basic compiler available 
for the Color Computer. We added advanced features like a full 
blown program editor. Hi-Res text Displays and 80 column hardware 
support for editing, compiling and even for your compiled programs. 
Plus we made it exceptionally easy to use, CBASIC is the friendliest 
and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer. 

The most complete E tfi tor/Compiler I ha ye seen for the CoCo... " 

--The RAINBOW, March 1966 

CBASIC is for BEGINNER & ADVANCED USERS 



CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the 
Advanced Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write 
programs without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, 
memory allocation and so on, because CBASIC will handle it for you 
automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC will let you control 
every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC adds many features not found in Color Basic, like 
Interrupt, Reset and On Error handling, and much more. 

Commands and Extensive Hardware Support 

CBASIC features well over 100 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. CBASIC supports ALL the High and 
Low Resolution 6raphics. Sound, Play and String Operations available 
in Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET. PUT. PLAY and 
DRAW, all with 99.9S syntax compatibility. CBASIC also supports 
the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable printer & 
serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to 
use PRINT. INPUT and INKEY commands. 

CBASIC is the only Color Basic Compiler that includes it's own 
Hi-Res 5 1 , 64 or 85 by 24 line display. It also supports the PBJ 
"Word-Pak" I. 11 and R.S. versions as well as the Disto and Double 
Density 60 column displays. All as part of the standard CBASIC 
package. You can even include them in your compiled programs by 
using a single CBASIC command. 

CBASIC makes full use of the power and flexibility of the 6883 
SAM in the Color Computer. It will fully utilize the 96K of address 
space available in the CoCo during program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. There is a single CBASIC command for automatic 64K 
RAM control, to allow use of the upper 32K of RAM automatically. 
When used in compiled programs it will automatically switch the 
ROMs and RAM in and out when needed. Plus there are two other 
commands to control of the upper 32K of RAM manually in a 
program. 



CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 
which allows you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. 
It is a full featured editor designed specifically for writing and 
editing Basic programs, most likely you'll find you want to use it for 
writing all your Basic programs. It has block move & copy, program 
renumbering, automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control 
and much more. 

"The Editor is a very good one and could be the subject for review 
alt by itself ■ ' - -The RAINBOW, March I $86 

"Comparing ECB's edit mode to CBASiC's text editor is like comparing a 
World War II jeep to a modern sedan. Both get you to your destination, 
but what a difference in the ride. — Hot CoCo, Feburory 1 986 

The documentation provided with CBASIC is an 8 1/2* \ ! Spiral 
Bound book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real 
information. We went to great lengths to provide a manual that is 
not only easy to use and understand, but complete and comprehensive 
enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

"CBASiC's manual is easy to read and written with a minimum of 
technicalese. " —Hot CoCo February , I G86 

The price of CBASIC is $ 149.00. It is the most expensive Color 
Basic Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. 
Compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar for dollar. CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 64K & Disk, not JDOS compatible . 

"The price tag it carries seemed a bit steep for an integer compiler on first 
glance, but when you add 64K, hi -res drivers, and full -screen editing, CBASIC 
begins to look more like a bargain. " —Hot CoCo February, 1 966 
"A Complete Editor/Compiler Well Worth its Price "--RAmOW March 1966 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED 

I/O COMMANDS . CLOSE, CLOADM, CSAVEM, DRIVE, DSKIS, DSK0$, FIELD, FILES, GET, 
INPUT, LINE INPUT, KILL, LSET, LOADM, OPEN, PRINT, PRINT®, PUT, RENAME, RSET, SAVEM, 
WRITE 

CONTROL STATEMENTS : CALL, CHAIN, END, EXEC, FOP., NEXT, STEP, GOTO, GOSUB, 
RETURN, IF, THEN, ELSE, STOP, END, RUN, ON/GOTO, 0N/G0SUB.0N ERROR GOTO, ON NMI 
GOTO, ON IRQ GOTO, ON SWI GOTO, ON FIRO GOTO, ON RESET GOTO, IRQ ON, IRQ OFF, 
RAM ON, RAM OFF, RAM64K, IRO, FIRO, NMI, SWI, STACK, RET I 

COMPILER DIRECTIVES: BASE, ORG, DIM, HIRES, DPSET, GEN, PCLEAR, TRACE ON, TRACE 
OFF, MODULE 

GRP AH ICS /SOUND STATEMENTS: PLAY, SOUND, COLOR, CIS, CIRCLE, DRAW, LINE, PAINT, 
PCLS, PCOPY, PMODE, PRESET, PSET, RESET, SET, SCREEN, POINT, PPOINT, GET, PUT 
NUMERIC FUNCTIONS: ABS, POS, RND, PEEK, DPEEK, TAB, ASC, LEN, INSTR, VAL, ERR, ERL, 
EOF, SWAP, LOF, LOC. FREE, CVN, VARPTR, JOYSTK, SGN, TIMER, OVEREM, DSEARCH, 
SWITCH, POS*, INKEY 

STRING FUNCTIONS: CHRt, LEFTJ, RIGHT1, MIDt, STR1, TRMt, STRINGJ, MKNl,lNKEYt, BUFt, 
SWAPS, SWITCHJ, HEX$ 

QTHER/SPFCIAL COMMANDS: AUDIO ON/OFF, DATA, DIM, MOTOR ON/OFF, POKE, DPOKE, 
READ, RESTORE, CBLINK, UNLINK, BRATE, PRATE, MID|=, STACK, VERIFY ON/OFF 

To urder b y mail, send check or money order for Ihe amount of the program plus 
13.00 for shipping and handling to the address listed below. 

To order by VIAS, MASTERCARD or COD call us at: (702) 452-0632 (Monday thru 
Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas. NV 89 I 10 
<702)~452-0632 



Software Review ^^SSEESSESSSSSSt?^ 

Car Dealer Assistant — A Big 
Help Down on the Lot 

Car Dealer Assistant is designed for the small to medium 
sized auto dealer using a CoCo with one drive and a printer. 
Each disk holds the system program and up to 200 accounts. 

Car Dealer Assistant helps the salesman negotiate a price, 
figure a payment schedule and write up contracts. It also 
keeps track of payments and customer data for the office. 

The package consists of two laminated three-ring binders, 
one unprotected master disk and the documentation. One 
binder holds the master disk and documentation. The other 
is provided for handy storage. The user is encouraged to 
make backup copies of the master for day-to-day use, and 
you're reminded to protect yourself with multiple copies of 
each disk after you've entered data. 

The program consists of a machine language loader and 
several subprograms in BASIC. The line numbers are 
provided for you to customize so billings and printouts will 
have your heading, and the computer will contain your local 
options and taxes. You can do more customizing if you're 
familiar with BASIC. The author is available by mail with 
prompt answers. 

The program helps you negotiate a price by giving three 
"what if" computation subroutines: Purchase, Amortiza- 
tion and Roll Back. 



BACK TO COMPUTING! 


Name Brand 

DISKS 
$1.00 

DS DD w/ Tyvek Sleeves 
Buy 5 get FREE Case 
Buy 10— Color Case 

C-10 Cassettes 5°c 


Dot Matrix/Graphics 

PRINTER 
$199 

Citzen 120D/NLQ 

Silver Reed DW 
$289 . 


SOFTWARE 

over 1 80 titles 
discounted 
Games up to 50% 
Books/Others20% 
CoCoMaxll w7Y 
Cable $95 


Composite 

MONITORS 

start at 
$79 

12" Samsung amber 
12 "Sakata HIRES . .$99 
13 "Color/Sound .$159 


5 1 /4 40-Track Slim 

DISK DRIVES 

$90 

DSDD Hi-Tech (U.S.) 
W/Case/PwrS139 
TeacDS . . .$109 


Smart Auto 

MODEMS 

$189 

300/1200 Baud 
Hayes Comp 
Free Cable! 


SYSTEMS 

IBM Compatible 
$499 

256K Kit/1 35W PS/ 
Enh Keybd/Color/ 
Rip Case/360K Drive 


MISCELLANEOUS 

Keyboards from $25 
Disk Cases/60 . .$16 

Printer Intf $40 

Video Driver . . .$24 

Power Strip $16 

Swivel Base. . . .$16 
Catalog Free 


PARTS 

•EPROMS »ROMS 

•CONTROLLERS 
•MEMORY DRAMS 
•CABLES •KITS »ICS 
•PAPER "LABELS 
•RIBBONS 
•DAISY WHEELS 



The Purchase Computation section lets your custornei 
look at the final cost based on price, down payment, trade- 
in and other variables that can be changed and recalculated 
instantly. Amortization lets your customer see monthh 
payment schedules based on various time frames, percen- 
tage rates and/ or amount to be financed. The "Roll Back' 
routine helps when the customer makes a counter offer. You 
can enter trade-in, down payment, financing and your own 
out-the-door costs to see whether you can make the deal 
and still meet your own profit margin. 

All the numbers are held in memory, so it's very easy to 
change any one figure and see how that affects everything 
else. You also have a print option you can show your 
customer or keep for reference. The program automatically 
moves the final figures to the Customer Data and Contract 
routines. 

Car Dealer Assistant also prints contracts. The program 
is already programmed to print out on either Motor Vehicle 
and Security Agreement (Form 522 Rev 5/85) or the Motor 
Vehicle Purchase Order and Disclosures required by federal 
law (Form 702 Rev 5/85). Different formats would require 
some knowledge of BASIC to make changes. Printouts are 
also available for billings, customer payments, vehicle sales 
and tax reports. 

The Customer Data routine is where you'll keep names 
and addresses, contract information and vehicle data. Each 
record has a seven character alphanumeric account number. 
Up to 200 records are stored on the disk in the order 
recorded (not by account number). 

The program can be used to send statements and update 
customer payment records if you are doing the financing. 
It allows up to four payments per month. 

The documentation is thorough. Each step is flow charted 
and explained. The system requires a simple password; the 
rest is menu driven. You simply choose from options shown 
on the screen and follow instructions and prompts. 

Don't be put off by the small price. This isn't a small 
package. But there had to be some trade-offs to get such 
a major application on a microcomputer. It's written for a 
minimal system with one drive — there's no provision for 
system vs. data disks and it does no sorting. 

Access to customer records is by account number only, 
but all statements have that number and you can print a 
cross reference list showing the name on each account. 
There is no error trapping, so a comma in a dollar amount 
($12,000) would tell you Extra Ignored and compute only 
the amount to the left of the comma. But these are 
insignificant in light of the power of the total package. 

(Sylvester Software Services, 3640 Lightner Court, Waldorf, 
MD 20601, $29.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Bob Dooman 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest-Princeton 
October 17-19 




PI POLYGON COMPUTERS 

1316 Witshire Blvd., Suite 206 
Los Angeles, CA 90017 

(21 3) 483-8388 Shipping Charges: 

Calif, res. add 6Yi% tax 2% or $3.00 mln. 

All prices subject Monitors/Printers 

to change/stock avail. Hardware extra 



142 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



Software ReviewJ^SSSS^SS^^^S^S^^\ 

C Compiler: All the Features at 

Half the Price 

The C Compiler program may be used to compile C 
language source code programs into executable machine 
language OS-9 modules. The C Compiler reads C language 
source files from one or more disk files, compiles them into 
assembly language source files, optimizes the assembly 
language source code for speed and compactness, assembles 
the output into relocatable object code modules, and links 
the object modules to the library functions and other 
compiled object code modules to produce executable 
machine language OS-9 modules. 

The Radio Shack C Compiler comes on two 35-track OS- 
9 disks. A light blue, spiral-bound manual of more than 100 
pages accompanies the disks. 

One disk contains the programs needed to compile a C 
source program to an executable assembly language 
program. The second disk contains the compiled library 
functions, definition files, three c source program examples 
and some assembly source programs. 

The first disk contains files for the following: two-pass 
compiler executive program, macro p re-processor program, 
compiler pass 1 program, compiler pass 2 program, 
relocating assembler program, assembly code output 
optimizer program and assembly code output linker 
program. 

The second disk contains directories for: source header 
files containing definitions for various applications, the 
compiled c library functions, three sample c source code 
programs and a subdirectory of various assembly source 
listings. 

System calls are provided which perform functions such 
as open or close a file, change execution or data directory, 
create a new file and so on. These are provided to extend 
the portability of the language and to save the user from 
writing the functions. They are needed because these 
functions deal with the hardware of the system. With these 
calls, you won't have to know assembly language code to 
write programs to perform these functions. In fact, there's 
a system call ( _os9() ), that lets a c programmer access any 



OS-9 system call by passing the function code and a pointer 
to a register structure as an argument. 

The pre-processor directive, #ASM, is supported for 
applications where you must have the speed of embedded 
assembly language. 1 found no stacking order of function 
arguments, so we'll have to experiment if we need this 
capability. 

The optimizer can be suppressed via an option at compile 
time. This speeds up the compilation. The optimizer 
shortens the code about 1 1 percent with a comparable 
increase in speed, according to Microware. I compared the 
output of the line.c program with and without the optimizer 
and found that it replaced long branches with short ones 
where possible (saving one byte each time) and rearranged 
some code to tighten up things (saving a few more bytes). 
Of course, a good assembly language programmer could 
have done the same or better, but for long programs or 
inexperienced assembly language programmers it's a real 
boon! 

A profiler program is included that keeps track of how 
many times each function is executed while the program is 
running. If your program appears to be slow, the profiler 
can help you find the most-used functions that might require 
extra effort to speed up the execution time. If it's a memory 
hog, then the profiler could be used to find functions that 
are not used and can be omitted. 

Something else I really like is the option to output c 
source code on the assembly output listing. This assists in 
debugging and / or massaging areas of code that need special 
assembly language attention to speed up the execution. It 
helps locate bugs or idiosyncrasies of the compiler, too. 

The company that wrote the marvelous, modular OS-9 
operating system hard coded the drive number for the 
library drive in two of the passes! Dl is coded into CC1 
at offset $EE5 and in C.PREP at offset S135C (Microware, 
how could you?). If you have a RAM disk or a hard disk 
and want to speed up the compiler, you'll need to patch the 
descriptor name into these locations. 

A good source-level debugger would have been great; 
maybe we'll get one when enough CoCos have 5I2K of 
RAM! We need powerful tools so we can produce good 
software in less time. 

A c source code library for the system calls and library 
functions would be helpful to beginners and software 
developers. 

This is Version 1.00.00; the last revision was done in 1983. 
Either they did it right the first time, or nobody's spoken 
loudly enough to make them update. I do suspect though, 
that this version was adapted from a version supporting one 
of the earlier OS-9 systems in existence before CoCo OS- 
9 was born. How about a new version that doesn't hard code 
the library drive? Throw in bit fields, too, while you're at 
it. 

The C Compiler is a good value at $99.95. I recommend 
it for anyone wanting to learn the C language, and for those 
who know C and don't want to program OS-9 application 
programs in assembly language. The features included are 
comparable to c compilers costing twice as much on other 
computers. 

(Tandy Corp; available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 
Cat. No. 26-3038, $99.95) 



One-Liner Contest Winner 

Learn how pi is calculated. Just enter the number 
of times you desire and see how close you can get. 

The listing: 

CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY TIMES" ;N: S~ 
1 : FOR 1=2 TO N STEP 2:X=I/(I-1): 
Y=I/ ( 1+1 ) : S=S *X* Y : PRINT© 6 4 , "PI : 
" ;S*2 , 1 :NEXT 1 1 END 

Richard Goodman 
College Station, TX 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



Jesse W. Jackson 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 43 



Software Review ^SH^ZSSSZT/^ 



Unkill: Help for Lost Programs 



Sooner or later it will happen. You get that long-awaited 
disk drive and are thrilled with the power and speed it offers. 
You'll get so carried away that sooner or later you'll 
accidentally kill a file you didn't mean to. Some of the more 
expensive utilities in use today have an unkill feature 
coupled with a lot of other commands. Now a dedicated 
program called simply Unkill can be used if you make that 
dreaded mistake. 

In order to put this program through its paces, I killed 
a program on one of my disks and then ran UnkilL Prompts 
guide the user through a series of steps to recover the lost 
program as long as it has not been overwritten in the 
meantime. When a file is killed, all that really happens is 
that the first character of the filename is deleted from the 
directory on Track 17. The rest of the file is still on the disk, 
but it's no longer retrievable. 

This program requires two disk drives and a printer. The 
printer is used to read the remaining portion of the filename, 
as well as the file format, program length in bytes and 
starting granule. The program examines the entire disk for 
other killed files. All 67 granules are examined and 
information displayed as to their use. Using the information 
displayed on the screen and printer you can make some 
decisions, with the aid of the program prompts, to recover 
the lost program. 

It is not foolproof, however. The user needs to have some 
working knowledge of the disk file allocation table and how 
files are written to the disk. Remember, when a file is killed, 
the file allocation table is reset. 

I was impressed with UnkilFs ease of use. It's easy on the 
wallet, too. It may be worth its weight in gold if it saves 
even one favorite program. 

■ 

(Proper Programs, P.O. Box 681, Garner, NC 27529, $9.95 
plus $2 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



Software Review SSSI^S^^SSS^SSf? 

Max Fonts: 
Valuable Add-On 

Derringer Software has produced a useful add-on for 
Co Co Max called Max Fonts. The existing Co Co Max and 
CoCo Max II provide 14 fonts. With Max Fonts you can 
add up to 72 more. There are three disks, each with 24 fonts. 
You can buy one, two or all three. 

Each of the fonts can be modified using the Style pull- 
down menu. For those who are not familiar with CoCo 
Max, the Style menu allows you to alter the default printing 
of the fonts by making them bold, outlined, shadowed or 
italicized. You can also use any of the styles in combination 
with each other. 

Max Fonts comes with five half-pages of documentation 
printed in very small type. Two pages are all it takes to 
explain how to use the product. The remaining three pages 
are used for showing samples of all the fonts. The instruc- 
tions are clear and easy to follow. 

The only drawback I could find is the disk handling 
required to use Max Fonts. After starting CoCo Max you 
must remove the system disk and replace it with the font 
disk you want to use. The Load Page command on the file 
menu is used to load the fonts. Due to the limitation of the 
size of the pull-down menu, only half (12) of the fonts are 
accessible at a time. 

Should you want to use the original fonts provided by 
CoCo Max, Derringer Software has provided them on each 
of the three Max Fonts disks. This prevents having to 
remove a Max Fonts disk and replace the system disk. 

Max Fonts is compatible with the original CoCo Max 
as well as the new CoCo Max IL I tested the fonts on both 
systems and had absolutely no problems. Max Fonts is easy 
to use, well-documented and performs the job as designed 
and advertised. I recommend this software as a valuable 
add-on for the CoCo Max system user. 

(Derringer Software Inc., P.O. Box 5300, Florence, SC 
29502-5300, $24.95 each, all three for $64.95) 

— Rick L. Earsley 



ORDER BY PHONE 
C.O.D. 24 Hrs. 

Vo 
Da 
300 



■OR ORDER BY \Ak\im 




45<£ea. 

IN BOX 
OF 100 



5 i" DISKS 51(fcea 

SSDD or DSDD r^DAri 

All Guaranteed. 
SPECIAL PRICE Uh iU 
LIMITED STOCK 



All with lables,sleeves,& tabs. 
This price is limited to stock on 
hand. So, HURRY, don't miss out. 

We're sorry, but at these already discounted 
prices, no other discount may be applied to 
these Disk Prices. 



rarYan 

T^QLflTY 

devices 

P. 0. Box C 
Saugus, Ca. 91350 

Add $1.50 for handling on 
orders less than $20. COD 
orders, add $1.50. Calif, 
sales, add 6.5% Sales Tax. 



Ribbons for most printers available. 
& discription of printer for Quote & 
Quantity Discount Prices available i 
mix ribbons (minimum 1 box per type) 
Colors available in some popular typ 



Cataloa* 


All Guaranteed 
Discription 


Per 

Ribbon 


Box 

of 6 


S50-S150 
per order 


101-1090 


Brother HR 15/25 (nylon) 


$6.60 


$ 36.15 


$ 35.05 


101-1410 


Centronics 150/152-2/159 


$ 6.15 


$ 33.65 


$ 32.65 


101-1505 


C.Itoh Prowriter I & 1 1 


$5.05 


$ 27.75 


$ 26.85 


101-2240 


Epson LX80 Spectrum{ nylon) 


$ 5.95 


$ 32.65 


$ 31.65 1 


101-2250 


Epson MX/FX/RX70/80(nylon) 


$ 4.95 


$ 27.25 


$ 26.40 


101-2270 


Epson MX/FX/RX 100 (nylon) 


$ 6.65 


$ 37.60 


$ 36.50 1 


101-2900 


IBM SelectricII(Correctbl) 


S 1.95 


$ 10.90 


$ 10.55 


101-4315 


NEC 5500/7700 Spinwriter 


$ 7.40 


$ 40.60 


S 39.35 ! 


101-4505 


Okidata ML80/82/83/92/93 


$ 2.15 


$ 11.90 


$ 11.50 


101-4515 


Okidata ML04 (nylon) 


$ 4.85 


$ 26.75 


S 25.90 


101-4525 


Okidata Microl ine!82/192 


$ 8.90 


$ 49.00 


$ 47.50 


101-4970 


RadioShack TRS-B0 LP VI 1 


$ 7.40 


$ 40.60 


$ 39.35 ! 


101-4970 


Gorilla Banana (nylon) 


$7.40 


$ 40.60 


$ 39.35 • 


101-5545 


Tally/Mannes. Spirit 80 


$ 6.95 


S 38.10 


$ 36.95 * 



Send us your name, address, 
Catalog. 

n larger quantities. OK to 
for Discounts, 
es. SEND FOR CATALOG. 



144 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 




Do you want your reports 

to1^fc^^l^ l4lr*> tTli^ You can do it all 
IfJOU lJJVi: LI115* . wjth T | MS .$24.95 



Disk compatible 

Fast Machine Language sort routine 

• sort on 3 fields simultaneously 
With our ML search routines you can 

- search on a selected field 

• search for a specific item 

- search for records within range 

Phrase substitution editor - fast ML delete routines 
Up to 8 user-definable fields per record 

- up to 230 characters per field 

- variable field length 

- variable record length 

(memory allocated is the actual length of the record) 
Upper and lower case 
User-selected report formats 

- report headings 

- full margin control 

- select which records to print 

- select field to print 

- select order in which fields are printed 

- multiple fields per line 

Send TIMS file to either tape, disk or printer — allows you to 
use the extensive editing capability available with a word 
processor to add to or combine other data with a TIMS 
report 

Save, load, append and verify routines 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 
1710 North 50th Avenue 
Hollywood, Florida 33021 
(305)981-1241 



Add 81.50 per program for posture 
und bundling- IHoridu residents udd 
5% sulcs tux. 

COD orders ure welcome. CIS orders 
EMAIL If i7(>40R. K*74. No refunds or 
exehunifes. 

VISA 



SUGAR SOFTWARE PRODUCTS 
NOVEMBER 1, 1983 


SORTED BY AUTHOR 


TINS 
PAGE 1 


DENNIS ZAEBST 
ST A TOR AF 

32K 


TAPE 


EDUCATIONAL 

•24 . 95 


GRADE 10 AND UP 


G.T. BARR1CK 
THE GREAT USA 
16K 


TAPE 


EDUCATIONAL 

•19.93 


GRADE 4 AND UP 


GARY DAVIS 
AUTO RUN 
16K 


TAPE 


UTILITY 

•19.95 


PROGRAMMER 




SUGAR SOFTWARE 
NOVEMBER t. 198 


PRODUCTS 


SORTED BY TITLE 


T IMS 
PAGE I 


PIRATECTOh 


• 99. 95 


GARY DAVIS 

PROGRAMMER 


UTILITY 


PRERE.ADEP 

t afe :r> 


♦19. 95 


S.DAVIS *. S.COSTANZO 

3-6 


EDUCAT IONAL 


SILLY SYNTAX 
TAPE 16K 


* 1 9 . 95 


GARY DAVIS 

GRADE 5 AND UP 


E DUCAT IONAL 



or this? 



SUGAR SOFTWARE PRODUCTS - SORTED 
NOVEMBER 1. 19B5 


BY 


TOPIC 






TIMS 
PAGE 1 


EDUCAT IONAL 
DENNIS ?AE8ST 


GRADE 10 AND UP 
STATGRAF 


3» 


TAPE 


• 24. 


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EDUCATIONAL 
G. T . fciARR I Ct 1 


GRADE 4 AND UP 
THE GREAT USA 




TAPE 


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EDUCAT IONAL 
GARY DAVIS 


GRADE 5 AND UP 
SILLY SYNTAX 


16* 


TAPE 


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database 
management 
system 





TIMSMAIL 

$19.95 

32K ECB recommended 
Disk compatible 



o 



The ultimate m#n9»* 
onager ^eCoCo 

send your mailing «st to P^er. 
tape or *sk 



^rrrTcoiumn printer 
Designed tor 8U c 
User selected labe 

^faSelsS 

2.5, 2.75, 3, 3.5 and 4 
inch labels 
Select fields to print 
ISlct records to print 



TIMS UTILITY 



TIMS UTILITY features: 

Multi-Term Search - Search your database using a search criterion 
based on up to 5 keywords. You can use either "AND LOGIC" or "OR 
LOGIC". 

Global Change ■ This is the "automatic" version of the modify mode. It 
can be used when there is a unique set of features in a specified field. 
For example, we could change all references to Rainbow to RB. 



$4.95 - Tape 



Record Change - Add or delete fields to your records. The maximum 
number of fields per record is still 8. 

Split File Mode - Use "AND" logic (all articles published in Rainbow 
and written by Davis) "OR" logic (all customers in Ohio or Maryland), 
or Range Search to split your large file into 2 or more smaller files. You 
can save your new file to tape or disk. 



Global Delete - Automatically deletes every record in the database TIMS UTILITY comes on tape and is disk compatible. It requires 32K, 
which meets the search criteria. and a file created with either TIMS or TIMSMAIL. 



Software RevieWi 



Book Review! 



Develop Concentration 
With The Memory Game 



Disk BASIC Unraveled Is a 
Valuable Library Addition 



As you probably know, it is hard to find a good software 
package these days that has some educational value in it. 
Well, I believe that the people at Mikaron Software have 
finally bridged the gap between fun and education. 

The Memory Game is a 64K, Extended Color BASIC 
program requiring disk drive. The program comes with The 
Memory Game, Puzzle Disk One (stored on the same disk 
as The Memory Game) and a small instruction card. 
Although the card is small, it contains some very good 
information and an example of game play. Loading 
instructions for the game are on the disk. 

The Memory Game is played like a game of Concentra- 
tion. For those of you who are not familiar with it, I will 
explain. The screen is divided into 30 boxes numbered one 
through 30. Behind each box is a point value, which remains 
constant throughout the game. Each turn, you pick two 
boxes, revealing their point values. If they match, you gain 
the points, and the boxes they occupied are filled with parts 
of the main puzzle. If they don't match, the boxes are 
replaced and the next turn begins. 

The main puzzle is a collection of symbols, objects and 
letters that represent a phrase or saying when put together. 
The disk has 10 puzzles on it, so you should have fun for 
awhile. Mikaron Software says they will have more puzzle 
disks soon. 

I found The Memory Game to be very enjoyable and fun 
to play, but I do have one complaint: The speed of the game 
is extremely slow. Even though I don't look at this as a plus 
for the game, some people might. The longer there is 
between turns, the longer you have to remember the 
positions of the point values, thereby increasing the ef- 
fectiveness of this program. 

The game keeps a running high score, so you can see how 
well you have been playing. If you would like to play against 
a friend, the game has a two-player mode for added fun and 
competition. 

Overall, The Memory Game is a great value for its price. 
If you want a game that is fun as well as educational, then 
The Memory Game is right up your alley. 

(Mikaron Software Company, P.O. Box 1064, Chester, CA 
96020-1064, $9.95) 

— Sean McDonough 



CHECKING ACCOUNT INFORMATION SYSTEM 

Let your CoCo ease the task of aanagino your checking 
accounts with CAIS. Record deposits, checks, ATn 
transactions, interest, service charges and other 
debit/credit transactions. Reconcile and balance your 
accounts in linutes. Search and edit capabilities. 

Requires 32K and 1 disk drive tain). Printer optional. 

To order, send check or HO for 24.95 plus 2.50 S/H to: 
(SC res. add 51 sales tax) 

After Five Software 

M. Sox 210975 
CoJuikia, S.C. 29221-0975 

(Reviewed in RAINBOW April '86 issue, pg. 185) 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Here's a book you software hackers out there can reall> 
sink your teeth into. Disk BASIC Unraveled is a fully 
detailed and documented disassembled listing of Disk BASIC 
Versions 1.0 and 1.1. The book is not a tutorial or a how- 
to manual on machine language, but rather a detailed look 
at the assembly listings. 

The reader needs to have beginning knowledge of 6809 
assembly language programming to be able to take full 
advantage of the opportunities this book offers. It is also 
assumed that the reader is familiar with the contents of the 
disk system owner's manual which contains a general 
description of the overall operation of Disk BASIC and other 
useful information concerning the physical and logical 
format of the tracks and sectors. 

Properly studied and used, Disk BASIC Unraveled 
should help the serious reader understand the theory behind 
Color DOS, and to modify it for his own purposes or add 
extra commands or functions. 

The book is nicely bound, magazine size and 154 pages 
long. It's full of useful information for the serious CoCo 
hacker. There is even a nice section that deals with the 1793 
Floppy Disk Controller, which I found to be very useful. 
If you are inclined toward machine language programming, 
you will benefit from this publication. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 21272, Woodhaven, NY 
11421, $19.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



LOOSE STRINGS / by Tron 




146 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



iftwareRe vie Wbmhi^^^^m/^\ 

•peedy CoCo Diskzap Utility 

Does the Trick 

The CoCo Diskzap Utility program comes from a team 
f programmers, Paul Kudla and Andy Geist, located in 
Ontario, Canada working under the name of SuperCom 
.ssociates. 

One purpose of a disk zap program is to allow the user 
) modify or repair parts of a program. The means to this 
nd differentiate the various zap programs on the market. 

Diskzap Utility approaches the task by allowing the 
ser to modify or repair portions of a specific sector of a 
isk or by calling up an individual file by its specific name. 

The program, shipped on a protected disk, is written in 
lachine language (except for a single line BASIC loader) and 
; totally memory resident, which provides the very fast 
taction time to any command in the package; this speed 
; the reason the authors felt it was necessary to put a 
/arning in the introduction. The program loads and 
utomatically executes using either the BASIC loader line as 
rovided for the purchaser who has the 1.0 Disk ROM or, 
or those with Version 1.1, just typing in DOS and pressing 
NTER does the job. 

There are several key features of this software package 
hat set it apart from the run-of-the-mill zap programs. It 
an be configured to work on disks at 34 tracks or 40 tracks; 
t can be configured to work with double-sided or single- 
ided disks; the step rate may be set from six to 30 
nilliseconds; configuration patterns can be saved; automat- 
cally recognizes data address marks in a sector; has 
electable sector offsets; needs as little as 16K; handles up 
o four drives on line; has an automatic repeat key; can be 
lsed to verify any sector(s) of the disk or the total disk; reads 
ind displays a CoCo disk directory from within the 
>rogram; has a fast format function; allows the user to fill 
my sector(s) with zero (Hex 00); copies specific sectors or 
he total disk to another disk or another area of the same 
iisk; and produces a hardcopy of the information in specific 
jector(s) or the total disk both in ASCII and Hex, allowing 
'or the selection of Baud rate for the printer. 

The options can be called up from the main menu by 
iimply using the arrow keys. Display and File Zap are the 
:rue work horses of the program. 

The Display option allows individual sectors to be 
presented on the screen, and just by pressing the CLEAR key 
the screen will toggle between Hex or ASCII characters. 
When the user arrives at the changes, the 'NT key is pressed. 
This invokes a subsidiary routine to take over and the nibble 
under consideration appears in inverse video to alert the 
user to the location where the action will take place. The 
arrow keys move the highlighted area any place on the 
screen. When the program is operating under this modifi- 
cation option, it is a very critical time because of the speed 
at which changes are made. An error now might blow your 
disk in a wink. 

Changes can be made in either ASCII or Hex notations 
from the keyboard. The program does only what the user 
requests, so the user is totally responsible for what happens 
to the disk under operation. For example, in the Hex mode, 



pressfai^th^'Z!-piits zeroes from the current cursor position 
to the end of the page. Pressing the BREAK key aborts the 
action but pressing ENTER transfers the changes to disk. 
Needless to say, only those who know what they want to 
accomplish should attempt to use this very fast option. 

The File Zap option is just as fast and powerful, and the 
same precautions should be followed. The file to be searched 
for or worked on is called up by name. It does not matter 
if the file was saved in BASIC, ASCII, or machine language, 
the program can read and display it on the screen. As in 
the Display option, changes to any nibble may be made 
from the keyboard. 

Because the disk is copy protected, SuperCom Associates 
offers to replace for one year a program disk that does not 
work. After one year, replacements will be issued for the 
cost of the disk plus shipping and handling. The copy 
protection system used on the program disk may be part 
of a problem encountered with Version 1 .0 of the program. 
Version 1.0 would not always load into CoCo with the 1.0 
Disk ROM but would with units having the 1 . 1 Disk ROM; 
Version 2.0 has corrected the problem. Once loaded, both 
versions of the program worked as advertised on either 
CoCo. 

Version 2.0 allows the user to select in what notation 
mode the user wishes to operate. Entries may be made in 
either hexadecimal or decimal notations, making the 
program easier to use for those whose native tongue is not 
Hex. 

SuperCom Associates provides the program in a Radio 
Shack TRS-80 three-ring binder with an eight-page manual 
The manual is produced on a daisy wheel printer and is very 
readable. Actually, the manual understates the program's 
abilities. CoCo Diskzap Utility has a "Hex" of lot to offer. 

(SuperCom Associates, 449 Rougemount Drive, Pickering, 
Ontario, Canada L1W 2B8, disk $39.95 U.S.) 

— Robert E. Foiles 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This one will create some nifty changing designs. It 
looks good on a Color Computer 3, as well. 

The listing: 



1 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS : FORQ=lT099999 : SC 
REEN1 , RND ( 2 ) -1 : X~RND ( 25 6 ) -1 : Y-RN 
D ( 19 2 ) - 1 : H=RND (2 56)KL : V-RND (192) 
-1 : COLOR (RND ( 7 ) ) +1 , 1 : LINE (H,V)-( 
X,Y) , PSET , BF : IF PEEK ( 345 ) =2 4 7 THEN 
RUN : ELSENEXT 



Robert Rogers 
West Palm Beach, FL 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the -author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 147 



Hardware Revie "'^^^™* ~^st\ 

Power for the Little Guy: 
Seikosha SP-1000A Printer 

In these times of fancy laserjet printers and super plotters 
capable of producing large and detailed blueprints, it is nice 
to know that someone is still thinking of us little guys. Most 
of us either cannot afford or have no need for such an item; 
however, we do need some method of getting text on paper. 
The Seikosha SP-1000A is a versatile printer which packs 
a lot of features at a more than reasonable price. 

When I opened the box and had my first look at this 
printer, I was immediately reminded of the DMP-130 sold 
by Radio Shack. This was because of the SP-lOOOA's solid 
construction, paper-loading tray and front panel controls. 
The front panel controls give the user the ability to select 
or de-select near-letter-quality printing as well as set the left 
and right margins. However, the true test of any printer 
comes when you turn it on. 

The SP-1000A is capable of printing pica, elite, 
condensed, proportional and italic fonts in several styles. 
These styles include bold, double-strike and double-width. 
The SP-1000A also fully supports subscript and superscript 
character modes. All standard margin, tab and printhead 
settings are controlled via control codes, as are underlining 
and unidirectional printing. The printer codes are what 
most people would call Epson compatible. For instance, one 
would issue a PRINT8-2,CHR$(27) ; "SO" to select the 
double-width style. 



The SP-1000A also allows the user to select from 
foreign language fonts for printing. This is done either I 
changing the DIP switches or by issuing the appropria 
control codes. Can your present printer print a tilde ov 
an 'n' without your having to program it to backspace fin 

More important is the SP-lOOOA's ability to be pr 
grammed with your own character set. You can store speci 
characters in the 1.5K RAM of the printer and then u 
them to print characters specific to your own needs. The 
characters, called download characters, let technical peop 
print reports without having to pen in those stranj 
characters by hand. 

The user's manual is well-written. The control codes a 
summarized at the end of the manual and you may ref 
to specific pages to find more information on a specific cod 
This is the closest thing to an index. Along with eac 
control-code explanation the manual includes a progran 
ming example. Although these examples were written ft 
the IBM computers, most users should be able to conve 
them for the Color Computer quite easily. 

The SP-1000A has a standard Centronics parall 
interface. Although it doesn't have a serial interface, it 
a simple matter to purchase and install a serial-to-parall 
converter. Cinsoft, who distributes this printer in the U.S 
also carries such a converter and is offering a package dej 
for the printer and interface. 

All in all, the Seikosha SP-1000A is an excellent buy. 
will more than meet the needs of almost every user. Wit 
its low price tag, the SP-1000A would make a good additio 
to nearly any computer system. This one gets four stars i 
my little black book. 




1007. Tandy 
Equipment with 
Full Warranty. 



Microujorid 
Microiuorld it 



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Wind Gap, PA 
18091 
215-759-7662 



Lanoco Plaza 
Clinton, NJ 08809 
201-735-6777 



Call For Prico Ust 



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NEW TANDY 1000 
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(Distributed by Cinsoft, 2235 Losantiville Ave, Cincinnati, 
OH 45237, $209; $249 with interface) 

— Cray Augsburj 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 



This program draws a rainbow to help you get 
through those rainy days. 

The listing: 



1 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1 , 1 : FOR R= 
60TO110STEP10 : CIRCLE (128 , 192) ,R, 
, . 75: NEXTR : CIRCLE (2J2) 8, 4J3) ,2J3: FOR 
M=1T03 : READ X, C : DATA114 , 3 , 127 , 2 
, 14J3 , 4 : PAINT (208 , 40) , 2 , 4 : PAINT (1 
28, X) ,C,4:NEXTM:FOR X=0TO1STEPJ3 : 
NEXT 

James Butterworth III 
Del Rio, TX 



(For this winning one-Hner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape,) 



148 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



fiden Your Video Horizons 
With WordPak-RS 

3ne of the longstanding complaints about the Color 
mputer has been its lack of an 80-column video display. 
The WordPak-RS is a cartridge designed to plug into the 
alti-Pak expansion interface (MPI) to give the user 80- 
lumn video on a monochrome monitor. The cartridge has 
RCA-type phono jack for the standard video output. It 
juires a 64K Color Computer and OS-9 Version 2.0. 
The WordPak-RS features an 80-column by 24-line video 
.play with a full upper- and lowercase character set that 
s true lowercase descenders. It also features self- 
ntained video RAM and a programmable display format 
d cursor. 

Installation of the WordPak-RS is relatively simple. The 
-column driver and descriptor on a backup of your OS- 
Zonfig disk must be replaced with the driver/ descriptor 
ir included with the WordPak. Then, use the Config utility 
create an OS-9 system disk with these files stored in the 
ot file. When you plug the WordPak in and boot OS-9, 
u will have an 80-column display. 
This display works very well with OS-9. The upgrade to 
rsion 2.0 includes several changes that support 80-column 
leo. The DIRectory. and LIST commands, as well as 
veral other utilities, have been altered to support the 
dened screen. 

The WordPak-RS allows programmable display and 
rsor control. To accomplish such things as clearing the 
reen, inversing the video and complete cursor-movement 
•ntrol, one need only use the OS-9 display command along 
ith the codes supplied in the WordPak-RS manual. 
The manual includes a wealth of information. In addition 
explaining some OS-9 theory and giving complete 
stallation instructions, the manual offers a great deal of 
chnical information dealing with the theory behind the 
r ordPak-RS. This information, while not going overboard, 
ves an intermediate programmer enough background to 
rite his own character set. This can then be burned into 
standard 2716 EPROM and plugged into the WordPak. 
I feel the WordPak-RS is an excellent product and would 
) a welcome addition to any OS-9 user's Color Computer 
stem. While the price is a bit on the steep side, the 
ipabilities of the WordPak-RS really shine and allow one 
• get down to serious business. Once you have one, you 
on't know how you ever got along without it! 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 21272, Woodhaven, NY 
11421, $99.95 plus $3 S/H) 

» 

— Vic Roberts 



See You at 
R Al N BO Wf est-Princeton 
October 17-19 



Hardware Review£S^SSSSSSSSS^^ST/7?\ 

Speed Up the Action With 

Micro*Fire 

Micro*Fire, a new device from Duck Productions, is a 
small circuit board that fits inside your joystick. Its purpose 
is to give you rapid-fire control of the firebutton. 

The circuit board is small and holds a switch, a multi- 
turn potentiometer and an 8-pin IC, as well as a few support 
components. Installation is fairly easy. First, the board must 
be mounted in the joystick case. This is done by securing 
the switch through a hole you must drill in the case. Then 
make three or four quick soldering connections, put the 
joystick back together and enjoy the new capabilities of your 
joystick. I cannot think of any joystick for the Color 
Computer that this device would not work in. Mine was 
installed in a Radio Shack Deluxe joystick. 

The installation manual is well-written and includes a 
listing for calibrating the rate of fire. The manual describes 
how to hook up the Micro^Fire to allow single-shot and 
rapid-fire techniques to be used in the same game without 
turning the Micro^Fire off. 

As for action, Micro^Fire holds up to its promises. With 
an adjustable firing rate from 25 shots per minute to 900 
shots per minute (most CoCo software will only recognize 
up to about 340 shots per minute) you shouldn't have to 
worry about the aliens again. Along with several other 
games (mostly space shoot-'em-ups), I tried the Micro^Fire 
with Pegasus from Radio Shack. Boy, it sure saved me from 
coming down with "joystick thumb." 

Although Micro^Fire won't affect the fire rate on games 
that control the number of shots per time period via 
software, I think it is a worthy investment for any serious 
gamer. 

(Duck Productions, 18 Rowe Court, Brampton, Ontario, 
Canada L6X 2S2, $19.95, $24.95 Cnd.) 

— Ruth Graham 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Ribbon will generate some interesting designs. Give 
this one a RUN. 

The listing: 

ft PCLS : PMODE3 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : PMODE4 
$ Z«3 4 : Y=j3 : FORX=j3T0144j3STEP7 . 5 : D= 
X/57 . 295 : S-COS (D) *57 . 295+Z : LINE ( 
S , Y+35) -(S/Y) ,PSET: Y==Y+1: Z=Z+1 : N 
EXTrGOTOp 

Charles P. Maulick 
Staien Island, NY 

-■ :■!..' ife^^^M-, ^f : *v 

(For this winning one-liner sorueht entry, ilic author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 49 




[DCS MINI-CATALOG 




Educational Best-Sellers! 



P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations- 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 





*y — ^-^^ 




-;^^»^^K:':UaL5jLj--: [*•>:■'-:-: 
:rMPMK : :::; ???:= *fc : : : 


i on i> f}>'^>».'{.;-:--'; J .: ! , in fit r$x 

— , — - : , - ■ " ' " - , a^.** 



Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Machine Language 
Right Manual Included 
Joysticks Required 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II -Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32K TDBI $42.95 Tape $39.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 

COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed above PLUS. 

Requires 128K - $89.95 



Factpack— Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-*7x" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System— Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 1 6K Ext. Basic/ 

32K for Printer Output 
Tape $39.95 Disk $42.95 

Fractions -A Three-Program Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 




NEW RELEASE 

GOLD FINDER 

Here's the quality you have come to expect 
from TOM MIX. Another outstanding color 
computer game. This one ranks right up 
there with "Donkey Kong". Listen to this: 
69 levels for one or two players PLUS you 
can create your own levels (up to 306 on 
a disk). Endless possibilities await you in 
this exciting new creation. Move over 
Gold runner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLD FINDER. . . 

32K & Joysticks Required 

Disk $27.95 

We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 




NEW RELEASE 

THE BLACK HOLE 

For anyone who enjoys solving a challeng- 
ing logical puzzle, here is a 3-dimensional 
puzzle composed of 63 numbered cubes 
in a 4 by 4 by 4 array that leaves one 
BLACK HOLE. You tell the computer to sort 
the cubes and the computer tells you to put 
them in numerical order. A real brain 
bender. Outstanding color and action. 
Years of entertainment. . . 

For IBM PC & Compatibles 

$24.95 

More Tandy-IBM/PC software available. 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 

• Full use of 64K RAM 

• 100% Machine Language 

• No ROM Calls 

• Selectable Drive 

• Support 1 -4 drives 

• Menu Selected functions 

• "Cold Start" exit to Basic 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler -the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT- Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Disk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector-Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast 3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21.95 

Sector Inspector- Alphabetize, backup and 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/957-0444 

Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/957-0444 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors- We pay top 
royalties! 




Look What's New at NOVflSOFT! 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 





NEW RELEASE 

DONUT DILEMMA 

Angry Angelo has raided Antonio's Donut 
Factory sending the entire complex amuckl 
Donuts have come alive and all the 
machines are out of control. You must 
reach floor 10, past the Fat Spurters, 
Cream Blasters and Berserk Bucket to 
name a few, and deactivate the power 
generator to restore law and order. But 
hurry! Time is running out! 

Requires 32K 

T ape $21 .95 Disk $24.95 




Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Required 
* Tape $18.95 Disk $21.95 

Other Best Sellers 

The Misadventures of Eddie— Eddie is 
roaming through time creating havoc-and 
you must bring him home! Over 140 loca- 
tions, 50+ commands, hi-res grapic 
adventure. 64K Disk $21 .95 
Brewmaster- Move along the end of the 
bars, serving beer to your thirsty customers. 
Fast-paced action. 32K & Joystick. 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 

Martian Crypt- Life once existed on Mars! 
Find the hidden Martian crypt. Animated 
hi-res graphic adventure with sound effects. 

32K Tape $1 8.95 Disk $21 .95 



NEW RELEASE 

FOURCUBE 

Now you can play TIC-TAC-TOE in 3D. The 
board consists of a 4x4x4 grid of cells. Pit 
your wits against the computer with six 
levels of difficulty or against your favorite 
opponent. Sound easy? Try it and you'll 
agree with us when we say its a "real 
challenge". 

Requires 32K 1 or 2 Player s 

Tape $15.95 Disk $18.95 




Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required 
Tape $19.95 Disk$2Z95 



CREDITS 



PlfiV 



COINS 




COINS 

Ifl 0 RETURN HANDLE 



Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

16K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 



NEW RELEASE 

LUNCHTIME 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surroundedl 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hamburgers. This high res game 
features 7 difficult levels of wild entertain- 
ment. Fast paced action for either one or 
two players. Have a Burger Time, . . 
Requires 32 K & Joysticks 

Tape $18.95 Disk $21.95 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man-Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

Dragon Slayer-Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 

The King- 

32K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian— 

32KTape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze- 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Kater Pillar II- 

1 6K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants - 

1 6K Tape $1 8.95 Disk $21 .95 
Buzzard Bait— 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 

NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

61 6/957-0444 

Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 

• Dealers welcome 

• Many more titles— write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/957-0444 





It's Back to Basics 

With an Adjective Review 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This month's article presents a 
grammar review program. It is 
suitable for a review of any part 
of speech within a sentence. We have 
chosen to illustrate with a review of 
adjectives. 

Grammar is making a comeback in 
education. For many years, in the not 
too distant past, it was felt that by 
stressing grammar, student creativity 
would be stifled. Grammar was put on 
the back burner. Therefore, many stu- 
dents were educated with very weak 
skills in grammar. This deficiency came 
back to haunt them later in life. Col- 
leges, especially, complained of poor 
basic writing skills of many entering 
freshmen. 

The back-to-basics movement we 
have witnessed in the past few years 
includes and even stresses grammar. 
Correct grammatical usage is again part 
of most school systems' curricula. Our 
program helps to review parts of speech. 

We chose adjectives as an example of 
the way to use this program. A sentence 
appears on the screen. An arrow ap- 
pears underneath the first letter of the 
first word in this sentence. The student 
uses the right-arrow key to move the 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York, 



arrow underneath the first letter in the 
word which is the adjective. 

Pressing the ENTER key indicates 
whether this is indeed the sentence's 
adjective. If correct, the child proceeds 
to the next sentence. If incorrect, the 
child repeats the same sentence until he 
guesses correctly. 

There are 10 sentences in this pro- 
gram. You may have as many as you 
want. The number of sentences is indi- 
cated in Line 30 as variable 'N\ Line 60 
chooses one of the sentences randomly 
and Line 1 10 prints it on the screen. 

Lines 130 to 180 contain the routine 
to move the arrow. The arrow is dis- 
played by using CHR$45. Line 150 erases 
the arrow and moves it to the right 
whenever the right-arrow key is pressed. 
Line 160 does the same to the left. When 
CHR$ 13 (the ENTER key) is pressed, the 
program jumps down to Line 190. 

Lines 190 to 210 check the student's 
current positioning of the underline 
arrow. This indicates whether the stu- 
dent has selected the adjective in this 
sentence. If the student is correct, he 
may press the ENTER key to get the next 
sentence or the 'E' key to end the 
program. If incorrect, he is instructed to 
press the ENTER key to try again. 

Lines 280 to the end of the program 
contain the DRTfl statements. Each 
contains two parts. The first is the 
sentence. We limited our sentences to 
under 32 characters to allow them to fit 
on one line. You do not have to stick to 
this idea. It does, however, make for a 
neater screen display. The second part 



of the DflTR line is the number of char- 
acters counted until the place where the 
first letter of the adjective occurs in the 
sentence. 

This program is easily modifiable for 
nouns, verbs, pronouns, adverbs or any 
part of speech you want to test. We even 
tried a version with scrambling the 
words of a sentence and asking the 
students to move the arrow to the 
correct first word of the scrambled 
sentence. 

We encourage you to use your crea- 
tivity to find additional uses for this 
program. Many times it happens that 
you are looking for a program to cover 
particular subject areas or skills. You 
find that what you need has just not 
been written commercially. The reason 
for this is most often a marketing 
decision. It is not worth the time, effort 
and cost to a software company to 
produce a program that has limited 
appeal. The programs appearing in 
these monthly columns are meant to be 
modified to fit particular needs. They 
are written so that some simple modi- 
fications can be performed by those 
who do not know how to program. 

You could work on this Adjective 
Review and turn it into a Noun, Verb, 
Adverb, Etc., Review, save each ver- 
sion, and eventually cover all parts of 
speech. Modifications are meant to be 
done on many of the programs that 
appear in this column. We encourage 
you to do so. You can develop a per- 
sonal library of educational programs 
that focus on skills for your needs. □ 



152 



THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



The listing: ADJECT IV 

10 REM" GRAMMAR REVIEW-ADJECTIVES 
ii 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 
D , STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1986" 
30 N=1J3 

4J3 DIM A$(N) ,A(N) 

50 FOR T=l TO N : READ A$(T),A(T): 

NEXT T 
60 R=RND(N) 
10 CLS 

80 PRINT@4j3, "adjective review"; 

90 PRINT§72,STRING$ (16,255) ; 
100 H=224 

11J3 PRINT@192,A$(R) ; 
12j3 PRINT@H,CHR$(45) 7 
13J3 EN$=INKEY$ 

140 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 190 
150 IF EN$=CHR$(9) THEN PRINT@H, 
CHR$(143) ; :PRINT@H+1,CHR$(45) ; :H 
=H+1 

160 IF EN$=CHR$(8) THEN PRINT§H, 
CHR$(143) ; :PRINT@H-1,CHR$(45) ; :H 
=H-1 

170 PRINT§192,A$(R) ; 
18J3 GOTO 130 
19j3 G=H-223 

200 IF G=A(R) THEN 22j3 
21j3 IF GOA(R) THEN 250 



22j3 PRINT@3 64, "CORRECT" ; :PLAY"04 
L1J3J3CDEFGECCCC" :PRINT@422 , "PRESS 

ENTER TO GO ON"; 
230 EN$=INKEY$ 

24J3 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN ELS 
E IF EN$="E" THEN END ELSE 230 
250 PLAY"02L2J3BB" :PRINT@355, "PRE 
SS ENTER TO TRY AGAIN"; 
2 6J3 EN$=INKEY$ 

270 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 70 ELSE 
260 

280 DATA SHE IS A BIG GIRL.,1J3 
290 DATA HE WENT TO THE GROCERY 
STORE. ,16 

300 DATA DAVID ATE A CHOCOLATE C 
OOKIE.,13 

310 DATA THE FAT CAT SAT DOWN SL 
OWLY . , 5 

32j3 DATA MY FRIENDLY DOG'S NAME 
IS SPOT. ,4 

33,0 DATA WE WENT TO SEE A SCARY 
MOVIE., 18 

340 DATA I ATE THE SWEET PEACH Q 
UICKLY. ,11 

350 DATA CAN YOU DRAW A PRETTY P 
ICTURE?,16 

360 DATA WHERE IS MY BIG BOOK NO 
W?,13 

370 DATA THE HEAVY DOOR CREAKED 
NOISILY., 5 fl 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This one-liner will flip any previously loaded or 
drawn PMODE 3 or 4 picture upside-down. This is one 
of those programs that is good to study for technique. 

The listing: 



10 DIMA(lj3) ,B(lj3) :PMODE4,l: SCREE 
Nl,l: FORY=j3TO 9 5 : GET (0,Y)-(255,Y) 
, A , G : GET (0 , 191-Y) - (255 , 191-Y) , B, 
G: PUT (0,Y)-(255,Y),B,PSET: PUT ( 0 , 
191-Y) -(255, 191-Y) , A , PSET : NEXTY : 
F0RD=1T099999 :NEXT 



Mike Hall 
Hartland, WI 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
Of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations an4 its companion 77k? Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) I 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This program displays designs created by the 
rotation of a line about a fixed point on the line while 
the point undergoes simple harmoiiic translation in a 
horizontal direction. 

(Editor's Note: After a mouthful like that, the least 
you can do is give it a try!) 

The listing: 

1 PMODE 4 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS : P=RND ( 10 
) /10 :T=RND (36j3)/57.3: R=RND ( 8 )/4: 
FORN=lT06p:V=128+47*SIN(N/9.55) : 
T=T+R/9 . 55 :W=V-8j3*(l-P) *COS (T) :X 
=96-8j3*(l-P) *SIN(T) :Y=V+8jZS*P*COS 
(T) :Z=96+8$*P*SIN (T) : LINE (W>X) - ( 
Y , Z) , PSET: NEXT : #RI=lT02j2j3j3:NEXT 
j GOTO! 

I ; -\ ; Steve Halko 
Corrales, NM 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both 77?e Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 153 



DELPHI BUREAU 



Command Options 
in the Workspace 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow's CoCo SIGop 
Username: RAINBOWMAG 



Last month we discussed some of 
the commands in the workspace 
area. We also covered the proper 
method for uploading files to Delphi. 
This month we'll continue our discus- 
sion of the remaining workspace com- 
mands. Take a look at the table of 
commands. These are the commands 
available in your Delphi workspace. 

Submitting Files 

We've already discussed the proce- 
dure for uploading files, but how do you 
go about giving them to the system so 
other users can download them? This is 
accomplished with the SUBMIT com- 
mand. Once you have uploaded your 
file, type SUBMIT and press ENTER. 
Delphi asks if the file to be submitted 
is in your workspace and if you want to 
continue. Enter Y for yes. Then you are 
asked how many files you want to 
submit. It is best to use only the number 
of files you want to put together in one 
group. If you answer with more than 
one, Delphi asks if the files are to be put 
together as a group. 

Next, you are prompted for the file 
type. Options include program, article, 



Cray Augsburg is RAINBOW'S technical 
assistant and has an associate's degree 
in electrical engineering. He and his 
wife, Ruth Ann, have two children and 
live in Louisville, Kentucky. His user- 
name on Delphi is RAINBOWMAG. 



documentation, data and miscellaneous 
text. Delphi then asks to which data- 
base you want to submit the file(s). 
Enter the first three characters of the 
appropriate topic. 

If you are submitting more than one 
file at a time, Delphi asks you to enter 
how you want the group named in the 
public database. You can use up to 32 
characters and use of this many is 
advisable, as it helps clarify your group. 

Next, enter a description of the file(s). 
Please include all pertinent information 
in this description. We would like to see 
addresses with machine language files, 
required POKES with BASIC files, system 
requirements for all programs and 
loading information for graphics and 
music. This is to help others as they try 
to download and enjoy your creations. 

Once the complete description is 
entered, press CONTROL 'Z' to escape to 
the keyword prompt. If you enter a 
question mark here you will see what 
the required primary keyword choices 
are. Pick the most appropriate and then 
add others of your choice. After enter- 
ing the keywords, you are asked for the 
workspace filename. Then you have the 
option of entering a special filename if 
the file absolutely requires one once it 
has been downloaded (i.e., another file 
in the group needs to refer to or call the 
file in question). 

Then you are asked for the display 
name. If only submitting one file, the 
display name is also the name the public 



154 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



ses to find the file and, therefore, it 
Hows up to 32 characters. Finally, 
)elphi asks if the submitted file(s) are 
o be deleted from your workspace. 



and press ENTER. This merges TEST.2 
onto the tail end of TEST.l, thereby 
altering TEST.l. TESX2 remains un- 
changed in your workspace. 



rf . . . the Common area is a 
place for individual users to 
offer things to other users. n 



That's all there is to it. You have just 
submitted a file for CoCo SIG members 
to download, use and enjoy. From here, 
the file goes to the preview area where 
it will be downloaded and checked for 
errors by one of the database elves. If 
all goes well, we'll send a mail message 
to let you know your file has been 
accepted for the public database. 

Now, just to confuse things, look at 
the table again. There is a command 
called PUBLISH. Sounds like it might do 
the same thing as SUBMIT, huh? Well, it 
does. You can use SUBMIT and PUBLISH 
interchangeably. Try these commands. 
We are more than happy to have sub- 
missions from all CoCo SIG members. 



On to Other Commands 

Let's try a little experiment. Use 
CRERTE to build two separate short text 
files online. Call one of them TEST.l 
and the other TEST.2. Now, type: 

RPPEND TE;ST.2 TEST.l 



CRTRLDG is another useful command. 
Try it. Does the result look familiar? It 
should, as the CRTRLDG command func- 
tions identically to the DIRECTORY 
command. Use whichever one you feel 
most comfortable with. You can use 
RENAME to change the filenames in your 
workspace area. This sure is a handy 
command to have around when you 
need it. 

The SETTINGS command allows a 
user to change default settings as well 
as important technical information 
about how files will be transmitted. This 
command alleviates the need to go all 
the way back to the main menu to set 
your password or terminal width. 

Now we come to the UNPROTECT 
command. It is advisable not to exper- 
iment with this command. All mail and 
user default files are stored in your 
workspace. They are in a protected 
form. This means you cannot inadvert- 
ently delete these specific files when 
playing around in workspace. However, 
if you UNPROTECT a file, it is fair game 
to any typing errors. Please be careful 
with this command. If you need to 
delete mail, the best way to do it is to 
go to Mail and delete your messages 
there. Be forwarned about UNPROTECT. 

The EXIT command takes you out of 
workspace and returns you to the pre- 
vious prompt. It accomplishes the same 
thing as control *Z\ 

The Common Area 

As its name implies, the Common 
area is a place for individual users to 
offer things to other users. It can be used 
to transfer a text file to a friend or for 
just about anything. To get to the 
Common area just enter COMMON at the 
workspace prompt. You are then told 



Table of Commands 



RPPEND 


PUBLISH 


CRTRLOG 


PURGE 


COMMON 


RENRME 


COPY 


SETTINGS 


CRERTE 


SUBMIT 


DELETE 


UNPROTECT 


DOWNLOAD 


UPLORD 


EDIT 


XUPLORD 


EXIT 


XDOWNLORD 


HELP 


KUPLORD 


HOME 


KDOWNLORD 


LIST 


KERMIT 



When You Own A 

COLORCHESTRA ™ 
MIDI SEQUENCER 

All Of A Sudden, 
Synthesized Music Production 
Becomes Very, Very Simple. 

COLORCHESTRA. (from the author of 
CoCo MIDI), links together your Tandy 64 K 
Color Computer and MIDI equipped 
keyboard synthesizer or rhythm drum 
machine and makes it simple to create 
masterpieces of music. 

By incorporating menus and graphic icons, 
all there is to recording in real time is 
pushing a few keys. 

Once the track is entered, auto correction, 
transposing, and filtering may be implemented 
And COLORCHESTRA™ works with you to 
record up to 8,000 notes utilizing as many 
as 16 tracks... awesome. 

But it doesn't stop here - COLORCHESTRA" 1 
is crammed with a myriad of other outstanding 
professional features... 

y/ Solo capabilities on any track 
v Tempo range from 30-250 beats per 
minute. 

V Audible and visual metronome 
y/ Programmable measure locator 

Sequencer will record from any MIDI 
Channel (1-16) 
v Each track can output to any MIDI 

Channel (1-16) 
>/ Records full spectrum of MIDI data , 
including program changes, pitch bends, 
all 128 MIDI controllers (modulation 
wheel, breath controller, sustain 
pedal, etc.) 
y/ Will sync to drum machines 
v MIDI thru on input 
v Programmable' time signature 

Real time velocity modification 
s/ All 16 tracks can be titled 
y/ Software filter removes specific MIDI 
parameters from recorded music such 
as pitch bend, program, change, 
velocity data, modulation wheel, MIDI 
controller 

y/ Transposition of notes up or down any 
number of octaves in half steps 

v/ Auto correct feature for timing errors 
Stores composed music on tape or 
diskette 

Works with any disk operating system 
(Radio Shack, JDOS, ADOS, etc.) 

COLORCHESTRA 1 " system complete - 
$149.95. Call any day (ex. Sun.) to order. 
We ship same day. We accept check, COD, 
Visa, Master Card. Shipping add $3.00, 
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COLORCHESTRA Copyright 1985 C.W. Lanusse tU. 







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SOFTWARE 


CORPORATION 



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Opelousas, Louisiana 70570 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 155 



The Universal 
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are here 

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Now one Universal Cartridge 
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Maclnker (US) re-inks all spools. We 
have Maclnker(s) dedicated to 
specialized cartridges, zip pack, har- 
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supported. Use your Maclnker to re- 
ink your dry, fabric cartridges (for 
less than 5 cents in ink) and watch the 
improvement in print-out quality. Our 
new, residue-less, lubricated, dot 
matrix ink yields a darker print than 
most new ribbons. Or get any of our 
basic ink colors; brown, blue, red, 
green, yellow, purple and use 
Maclnker to create and/or Re-ink 
your own colored cartridges. We 
have uninked or colored cartridges 
for the popular printers and ribbon 
re-loads for any printer. Operation is 
extremely simple & automatic with 
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supports CW and CCW rotating car- 
tridges. A good quality fabric ribbon 
of average length can be re-inked 
almost indefinitely. In our tests one re- 
inked Epson* 80 ribbon has outlived 
the estimated life of the print-head!! 
We receive consistent & similar feed- 
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August 85 we have over 40,000 MAC 
INKER(s) in the field, in. 5 continents 
(220 V motors available). Maclnker 

SO is $60.00. Cartridge drivers are 
1.50/ea. We still have our first 
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Maclnker has been reviewed, ap- 
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*EPSON is a trademark of EPSON CORP. 



you are entering the Common area. To 
get back to your individual workspace, 
just enter HOME and you'll be there. 

To copy a file from the Common area 
to your own workspace for later pe- 
rusal, use the COPY command. An 
example would be: 

COPY fileto.get HOMErnewfile 

To copy a file from your workspace to 
the common area, enter: 

COPY HOME: file to. go newf ile 



Notice the use of HOME : in the above 
examples. It is used to transfer files 
between your workspace and the Com- 
mon area. The first filename is always 
the file to transfer and the second name 
corresponds to what the filename will be 
once the file is transferred. 

COPY can also be used within your 
individual workspace to create multiple 
copies of a file. This comes in handy 
when you're altering or editing a file, 
but also want to keep a copy of the 
original. 



Aside from the Kermit-specific coir 
mands, we have covered about ever) 
thing you will meet in workspace. W 
won't devote any time to Kermit, as i 
is not yet supported on the CoCo. W 
might, however, see something in th 
not too distant future. Who knows 
Maybe you'll be the one to implemen 
it on the Color Computer. The specifi 
cations files are in the database. 

Conference 

As you can imagine, things have beei 

buzzing on our CoCo SIG since th« 

announcement of the Color Compute 

3 on July 30. That evening, severa 

people joined in a conference led b; 

Steve Bjork (6809ER) to discuss th! 

new machine. There were over 30 peo 

pie in attendance. We heard the Unine 

and Tymnet V3035 ports were all full 

It was taking people forever to ge 

online. We're sorry if you missed th< 

conference, but you can find out mon 

information now by staying tuned to th< 

CoCo SIG. 
Unfortunately, one of the people whe 

was unable to attend the conference wa* 

Jim Reed (JIM REED), our CoCo SIC 

Manager. I say "unfortunately" — Jirr 



DATABASE REPORT 



By Marty Goodman 

The biggest news in the Delphi data- 
base is the arrival of Dale Lear (DALE- 
LEAR) as our new OS-9 database section 
leader. Dale replaces Steve Bjork, who 
will still be checking in regularly. Dale is 
known to CoCo users as the author of the 
Baseball and Doubleback ROM packs, 
and as the author of DL LOGO, a full 
and powerful LOGO implementation 
under OS-9 (considerably more elabo- 
rate than the Radio Shack disk or Pro- 
gram Pak versions released three years 
ago). Dale has been using OS-9 since its 
release for the Color Computer, and was 
among the first developers of Tandy OS- 
9-based CoCo software. He also does 
consulting work relating to UNIX sys- 
tems. Dale is quite knowledgeable about 
the details of the CoCo 3. We warmly 
welcome him to the Delphi family. Look 
for him on the SIG! 

The next biggest news here is the 
explosion of our Music database. All of 
these are Musica 2 files, which can be 
downloaded using Xmodem and made to 
play using the Play utility available in the 
Music data library. Richard P. Trasborg 
(TRAS) started us off with Kool, and 
Cray Augsburg (RAINBOWMAG) con- 
tributed the Scott Lampton Transcrip- 



tions. Then Ned Smith (NEDSM) con- 
tributed Axel Foley, Tom King 
(CAPNCRUNCH) gave us no fewer than 
25 tunes, and George McCashin 
(GMCC) gave us BACH 184 MVS. 
Allan H. Smith (LUTHER) gave us two 
popular tunes ( Wake Me Before You Go 
and Sa y You*re Wrong) and Stephen 
Scherock (SFSCHEROCK) then gave us 
a dozen more titles. Scott Milliken 
(IDIOT) recently gave us Idiosyncrasies, 
and is soon to send us quite a number 
more. One member just spoke to me 
about uploading a library of Grateful 
Dead transcriptions. We seek more files 
to speed this rapidly growing database on 
its way. 

In the General topic area, Cray Augs- 
burg has given us a quick introduction to 
the new commands under Disk Extended 
Color basic 2.1 available on the CoCo 
3. I will soon be adding material to the 
General and Hardware Hacking sections 
providing new information on our new 
machine. In the Utilities section Robert 
Pierce (RPIERCE) has given us a mem- 
ory editor to view and alter CoCo mem- 
ory locations. Mike Lucash (MIKELU- 
CASH) has provided a utility to convert 
ML programs to data statements to 
facilitate easy inclusion into basic pro- 
grams. He has also given us a disk zap 
program. Mark O'Pella (MDODEL- 



1 56 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



was in New York covering the an- 
nouncement. While he was busy phon- 
ing in news reports to us, it was all we 
could do to stand still, eagerly awaiting 
his arrival back here so we could look 
at the many pictures he took. The lucky 
guy got to see the thing before we did! 

The conference was a smashing suc- 
cess. Most people who had questions 
got them answered, while others sat 
back and digested all the information. 
There were very few hitches and all went 
smoothly. Soon, you will see here a 
guideline on holding scheduled confer- 
ences. 

If you haven't already done so, check 
out the many new files in the database 
covering the Color Computer 3. The 
files are very informative and will give 
you some insight into the powerful 
capabilities of the new machine. Also, 
check elsewhere in this issue for some 
example programs by our very own 
Dale Lear (DALELEAR). Dale is our 
OS-9 database section-leader and is also 
a programmer who has been working 
with the Color Computer 3. We are very 
fortunate to have him with us and we 
look forward to many more great things 
from him. □ 




PHI) has given us a disk directory sort 
program and Rodger Alexander (SAL- 
ZARD) has given us TEST MAK- 
ER, PBJ, a utility to facilitate the creation 
of Y/N, matching and essay question 
tests, written to support the full 80- 
column display capability of the PBJ 
Wordpak. It is likely that minor modifi- 
cations of it will run in the 80-column 
mode on the CoCo 3. Stephen Macri 
(DRACMAN) uploaded OSCAR.BAS 
(to calculate the orbit of several Ham 
radio OSCAR satellites). He has also 
given us Dates and Calendar, calendar 
utilities. These use Steve Bjork's mouse 
software. Loren J. Howell (XENOS) 
gives us a recipe program, and from Eric 
Tilenius (TILENIUS) comes a logarithm 
table creator, and an envelope addresser. 

In the Games topic area, we have 
received Miner from Mike Lucash, and 
a nuclear plan simulator from Robert 
Matthews (BOBMATTHEWS). 

Our Data Communications topic area 
has been enhanced by Disk Fone Send 
from Mike Lucash, a utility to send an 
entire disk over the telephone via 
modem. Greg Miller (GREGMILLER, 
co-author of McPaint) has also provided 
his disk-to-disk terminal transfer utility, 
which supports sending disk at up to 1 200 
Baud via the "bit-banger" port from one 
CoCo to another. Stephen Scherock has 
sent us a Mikeyterm utility, MTSTART Y 
to set up Mikeyterm for different logons. 
He has also contributed Teleterm Version 
1.32. Jim Lalone (TERMITE) has given 
a dialer utility. 

In the Graphics section, I am starting 
to put up issues of the "CoCo Gallery" 
for you to download and enjoy. We have 
received a font editor from Ken Schunk 
(KENSCHUNK), an%a Dolly Par ton 



Picture from Richard Trasborg. Mark 
O'Pella uploaded a random art genera- 
tor, and Ira Goldwyn (IRAG) has shared 
a few more of his pictures. Loren J, 
Howell has sent an animated fire picture, 
and Steve Dale (MARINER 1) contrib- 
uted a rock video image. Ken Bragg 
(KILRCOCO) has sent LEG END. DRV 
and Derrik M. Kardos (DTG) has given 
an image of the starship enterprise. 

In the OS-9 Database, where Dale 
Lear will soon be assuming his duties, 
Steve Bjork has provided several versions 
of his bouncing ball demos. Robert 
Wuest (WUEST) has uploaded a system 
utility for sending memory modules to 
standard output, and a calendar pro- 
gram, the rainbow's "KISSable OS-9" 
material is now available for download 
in the OS-9 database (at a, $3.50 sur- 
charge for the group as a whole). 

With the arrival of the CoCo 3, look 
for definitive coverage on its hardware 
and software aspects here on the Delphi 
CoCo SIG. Soon, I hope to have com- 
pleted an exhaustive file describing the 
reasons for some CoCo 2/ CoCo 3 soft- 
ware incompatibilities, and how to over- 
come them, as well as a discussion of the 
GIME chip. I also expect to be posting 
some interfaceless RTTY software for 
the Color Computer. This was written by 
the authors of Graphkom and WEFA X. 
This last will appear in the Data Com- 
munications section. As OS-9 supporl 
for the CoCo 2 and CoCo 3 grows, we 
expect to greatly expand our OS-9 sec- 
tion. Stay tuned. 

See you on Delphi! 

— Marty 
(MARTYGOODMAN) 
Delphi CoCo SIG Database Manager 




n 




< 




PSYCHO 1 
of B basic 
as classic 
laboratory 
for fun. 
friendly , 



is an integrated package 
programs In hi-res. used 
exercices for use in a 

of psychology or Just 
These programs are user 

menu driven and in 



French, English and Spanish. 



Explore the caverns aboard a tank 
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mutants CThe LE05D . Arms and fuel 
are available but you must leave 
your vehicule tc get them... Those 
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Programs ; 
REACTION, 
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ILLUSION, 
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A B4K graphics adventure game on 
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Bring them back to your girlfriend 
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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 57 



HARDWARE PROJECT 




Protect your valuable equipment 
from power spikes with . . . 



« 



The Shock Absorber 

* 

By Marty Goodman 



Power line surge and spike protec- 
tors come in all types and prices. 
Few people who buy them are 
aware of the considerable differences in 
quality among the various products. 
Some consist merely of a few capacitors 
across the power line. Some have a 
single metal oxide varistor (MOV) 
across the incoming AC line. Slightly 
better ones have three MOVs running 
across the two main incoming AC lines 
and go from each of those lines to 
ground. Some even add a fuse. 

But the best surge and spike protec- 
tors use dual zener diodes in addition to 
MOVs and fuses. Such high-quality 
spike protectors often sell for $50 to 
$100. If you are interested in buying a 
spike protector for your computer or 
other sensitive electronic device, be sure 
to ask the seller if it uses dual zener 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cose 11 of the Co Co world. 
Marty is the database manager of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 



diodes. If it does not, or if the seller is 
in the least bit unsure, do not waste your 
money on the item. 

MOVs and dual zener diodes func- 
tion in a similar fashion. Both are 
devices that behave as insulators until 
the voltage across them exceeds a cer- 
tain preset value. After that, both of 
them become conductors. Thus, both 
are used across power lines where a 
potential short may occur. MOVs differ 
from zeners in that they are about 10 
times slower to respond to a voltage 
surge, and when they get overloaded 
they burn out to an open circuit condi- 
tion (thereby ceasing to provide any 
protection). Zener diodes respond far 
more rapidly than MOVs, but when 
they are overloaded they often fuse to 
a closed circuit (shorted) condition. 
Zener diodes clip ultra-fast voltage 
spikes down to size. MOVs are nice to 
have because they kick in later and 
relieve the stress on the zener. Fuses 
should always be in series with any dual 
zener diodes you use, so that if the 
voltage spike persists, causing the zener 
to short out permanently, the fuse then 
blows, preventing a fire hazard. There 
you have the three elements of a quality 
spike and surge protector: a fuse, a dual 
zener diode and MOVs. 

I've built a number of spike protec- 
tors for my equipment at home. I start 



158 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



SPST 
Switch 




AC Hot 



— OvX) 



Circuit Breaker 
or 

Fuse MOV 110V 



Ground 



AC Neutral 



Grounded 
AC Plug 



220 Volt 
Dual Zener 




To AC Outlets 
>. On the Power 
Strip 



MOV 110V 



DPDT 



AC Hot 



Ground 



MOVs 



AC Neutral 




To AC Outlets 



Dual 

Zener 

Diodes 



Symbol for 
Dual Zener 



Symbol 
for MOV 



This circuit adds extra safety via a DPDT 
switch and common mode zener diodes. 
Be sure to fuse both AC hot and neutral 
if you use this. 





with a commercial power strip. A local 
hardware store sells six-outlet power 
strips for $12 each. I select one that is 
either screwed or snap-fitted together, 
avoiding those riveted together. I open 
the strip and add three MOVs and one 
dual zener to its circuit. 

The power strip typically contains a 
switch, a breaker and a neon light in 
addition to the grounded AC power 
cord and the six outlets. I buy the MOVs 
at Radio Shack (Cat No. 276-568, 
$1.69). You need a 220V rated dual 
zener diode. This part is not available 
at Radio Shack, but you can find it at 
electronic supply houses. The cost 
should be under $3. If you can't find a 
dual one, two back-to-back regular 10- 
watt zeners will work fine. 

I've included a schematic diagram for 
the surge protector. If you shop around 
very carefully, you may be able to build 
one for under $20 in parts in about one 
hour. Be very careful to fully insulate 
everything you wire in. Cloth electrical 
tape will come in very handy. 

(Questions about this project may be 
directed to the author at 1633 Bayo 
Vista Ave., San Pablo, CA 94806. 
Please enclose an SASE when writ- 
ing.) IS* 



TOTHIAN SO FT HARE 



COCO TESTEM 

Make multiple choice, matching, true/false, 
completion, snort answer tests. Complete 
randomizing function. Requires printer with 
underline ability. Works with tape or disk. 
32K ECB tape, $19.95 

TEACHER PAK 

Both weighted and regular grading, seating 
charts, alphabetizing, statistical analysis. 
Works with tape or disk. 16K ECB tape. $34.95 

BOTH COCO TESTEM AND TEACHER PAK - $47.95 

D I SKMAN 

Backup, reorganize, and alphabetize RS disk 
directories. Examine & change sectors. Catalog 
disk tiles. Printouts. 32K disk. $21.95 

HOMEWARE 

Versatile home management package. Use with 
tape or disk. Five 16K ECB/ML modules on tape: 

CALENDAR - Draw calendars. Various formats. 

SAVINGS/LOANS - Personal finance calculators. 

DIRECTORY - Keep track of phone numbers, 

addresses, etc. Print address labels. 

INVENTORY - For home records, hobbies, etc. 

HOME-WRITER - Simple ML word processing. 

Single modules: $19.95 Whole set: $49.95 



ADOS 



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Now. you can supercharge Basic with an impressive array of extra features 
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commercial software, Customizing utilities are provided to allow user-defined 
command abbreviations, baud rate, step rate, tracks per disk (35 or 40), support of 
double-sided drives, and more. After customizing ADOS, you can have it burned into 
an EPROM that plugs into the Disk Basic ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a 64K 
disk utility, {EPROM + burning will cost about S20--we provide information 
concerning how you can have this done.) Features include: • repeat and edit of the 
last direct-mode command • 26 definable control-key abbreviations • automatic line- 
number prompts • DOS command • lowercase command entry (a fine complement to 
a Lowerkit or PBJ WordPak) • COPY (filename) to (drive number) • AE error override 
option • RAM command (64K) • RUNM command • text echoing to printer • ML 
monitor • taxt file scan • enhanced directory • error trapping • hi-res text utility 
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"/ COULD NOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THAT WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS." 

THE RAINBOW. December 1984 
"/ LOVE ADOSl ...A GENUINELY FIRST RATE PRODUCT." 

Color Micro Journal, February 19B5 
"I WON'T PART WITH MY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING ...NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS." 

Hot CoCo.May 19B5 

Disk.. S27.95 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 



Monitor machine-language programs AS THEY ARE RUNNING! Peeper actually 
limeshares with the target program, giving FULL CONTROL as ML programs run. 
Switch instantly between watching regular program output and Peeper's trace of 
registers and stack on screen or printer. Inspect memory ir> any of 26 display modes. 
Execution speed can be varied from full speed to the barest crawl, or halted entirely, 
as programs run. Single-stepping, breakpoints, memory or register examine/change. 
Relocatable, supports 64K use (16K required) See February '85 review. 
Disk $23.95 Tape $21.95 Assembler source listing . Add 3.00 

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Fastape allows cassette I/O at 3000 baud-TWICE NORMAL SPEED. It uses the high- 
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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 159 



1 



'lil 



5ft 



Those Great RAINBOW Programs 

Without All The Fuss! 
Subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 



Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $105 for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 
bill. 



DISK USERS: RAINBOW ON DISK 

IS NOW AVAILABLE! 

All the programs from the rainbow — includ- 
ing OS-9 — are now available on disk. For 
more information, see page 80 of this issue. 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, rainbow on tape can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of the rainbow's Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past October issues are 
also available for immediate download in the rainbow on 
tape Database area in THE rainbow's Color Computer SIG 
on Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



RAINBOW ON TAPE is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOW ON TAPE, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, (credit card orders only) call 
800-847-0309, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call 502-228-4492. 




Programs From Our Past 
Graphics Issues: 

October 1985 — Graphics Quickies, seven short graphics 
programs; Elevator, an educational program that teaches the 
fundamentals of up and down; Bytecoder, a basic program 
designed to allow the examination and change of memory 
locations; No-niner, a game that tests your thinking ability; 
Punctuation Quiz, reviews the uses of punctuation marks; 
Color Cartoons, a graphics program that creates animation; 
Zonx, an ML arcade game with fast action and sound effects; 
Puzzle Maker, a game that teaches logic skills; Digital 
Aquarium, a graphics program that displays a realistic, 
animated aquarium; Sound Story, a demo on sound produc- 
tion with the SOUND, PLflY and EXEC commands; CoCocad, aids 
in drawing detailed schematics; Heart Quiz, a graphics 
display and quiz on the parts of the heart; and Number 
Bumper, an arcade game that teaches number skills and 
keyboard reaction. 

October 1984 — 8-COLOR, a utility to get eight colors on the 
PMDDE 4 screen; The CoCo School Marm Part II, a spelling 
practice and examination system; Developing a Database 
Manager Part IV, a tutorial on using direct access disk files; 
Follow, a tutorial that teaches the importance of reading 
directions; BLOWUP, a graphics utility for pmode 4 screen 
enlargements; Tarot, a Simulation of the popular card game; 
Sketch, a color graphics editor; Pair 8, two line printer 
programs for streamlining, pairing and bracketing of tourna- 
ment competitions; Little E, an upgraded utility to add cursor 
controlled editing functions to the MC-10 and CoCo; Convert, 
a graphics modification to Radio Shack's Art Gallery; 
Presidents, a game of trivia; Hurricane, an electronic 
hurricane tracking chart; and SCANDAL, a beginner's 
assembly language tutorial. 



URN OF THE SCREW 




Some Hardware Fixes 

for the Video 
Display Generator 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last month, I described in detail 
the innards of the new CoCo B 
series computer. One difference 
nside this computer is a new version of 
he VDG (Video Display Generator). I 
lescribed it as being an improved ver- 
;ion of the old faithful VDG that has 
>een in the CoCo since the beginning. 

To make the new VDG compatible 
with the old one, the new functions of 
:his VDG are not readily accessible. For 
instance, this VDG has a built-in low- 
ercase character set. But press the old 
5H1FT/0 and nothing happens. You still 
get that crummy inverse video lower- 
case character. So what gives? 

Well, in order to get it to work, you 
may have to add in a little hardware. 
This is where I come in. Get out the old 
soldering iron and dig in as I lead you 
through the modifications to get the 
most out of your new 4 B* series comput- 
er. Note: The letter 'B' must appear on 
the model number of the computer and 
not inside on the PCB. For instance, the 
one I have is model number 21-3 134B. 



Tony DiStefano is well-known as an 
early specialist in computer hardware 
projects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Que- 
bec. 



Let's start with the basics. The old 
VDG chip number is Motorola 
MC6847. The new part is another Mo- 
torola part numbered MC6847T1, 
though in some computers, the part 
number might be XC80652P. 

The first and most important change 
is the lowercase capability. Normally it 
is disabled, meaning you will not see the 
lowercase characters when using the 
shift/ 0 on the keyboard. Instead, you 
get the normal inversed character set. 
You can change it in software. The pin 
that controls which mode you are in is 
connected to the PIA, which is memory 
mapped at SFF20 to SFF23, or 65312 
to 65315 in decimal. It is connected to 
PB4 or Bit 4 of address location $FF22 
or 65314. This bit is normally a zero. 
Changing this to a one gives you real 
lowercase characters. The only problem 
is the routine in Extended BASIC will 
change it back to a zero every time you 
print something. If you want to do it in 
BASIC, add this line every time you want 
to change the screen to true lowercase: 

10 POKE &HFF22 , (PEEK (&HFF22) 
OR 16) 

What this line does is change Bit 4 to 
logical level one. But remember, each 
time you print on the screen or change 



from graphics to text, Extended BASIC 
changes this back. You may want to' 
make this line into a subroutine. Better 
yet, why don't you do it in hardware? 
It's more permanent. 

There are many ways of doing this 
change in hardware. Use the one that 
suits you best, but the first way I present 
is the simplest. Remove the chip from 
the socket. Bend Pin 30 (GMO) out so 
that it does not plug back into the 
socket. Solder a short piece of wire from 
Pin 30 to Pin 17. Pin 17 is the 5-volt 
supply. This action permanently 
changes the level of the pin to logical 
level one, giving lowercase all the time. 

If the VDG is soldered into the board 
without a socket, then just cut Pin 30 
at the base and pry it up. Use slim-line 
cutters or a razor blade. Be careful not 
to cut anything else. 

The second way to make the hard- 
ware change requires an SPDT switch. 
Figure 1 shows two ways of wiring the 
switch to this circuit. Using Figure la 
as a guide, pull Pin 30 out as described 
before. Solder a wire from Pin 30 to the 
center of the switch. Solder another 
wire from one side of the switch to Pin 
17 of the VDG. Solder a third wire to 
the other side of the switch and to Pin 
1 of the VDG. 

When the switch is toward Pin 17, the 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 161 



a. 



Pin 17 



Pin 17 



Pin 30 



Pin 1 



SPDT 



J 



Pin 30 



Hole 30 



b. 



s 

SPDT 

J 



Figure 1: Lowercase Switching 



display will always show lowercase 
characters. When it is the other way, it 
will always display inverse characters. 
Figure lb shows basically the same way 
as before, but instead of connecting the 
third wire to Pin 1, connect it to the 
empty pinhole created when you pulled 
Pin 30. This way, when the switch is 
toward Pin 17, you always get lowercase 
characters. When the switch is the other 
way, you get whatever display Bit 4 of 
the PIA is set to. This is the most 
versatile way of connecting this pin. 

The next change has to do with the 
border. In the normal text mode you see 
a big green square with black letters. 
This border is always black in the text 
mode. Now there is another alternative. 
How about a green border? There is a 
way of doing this in software. The pin 
that controls which mode you are in is 
connected to the PIA which is memory 
mapped at SFF20 to $FF23 or 65312 to 
65315 in decimal. It is connected to PB6 
or Bit 6 of address location SFF22 or 
65314. This bit is normally a zero. 
Changing this to a one gives a green 
border. The only problem is that the 
same routine in Extended basic that 
changes the lowercase pin every time 
you print something also changes this 
pin. If you want to do it in BASIC, add 
this line: 

4 

10 POKE &HFF22 , (PEEK (&HFF22) 
OR 64) 

What this line does is change Bit 6 to 
logical level one. If you want to change 
both the lowercase and the green 
border, change the last value to 80 (16 
+ 64). The new line to change both the 
lowercase and green border would look 
like this: 

10 POKE &HFF22 , (PEEK (&HFF22) 
OR B0) 

But remember, every time you print 
on the screen or change from graphics 
to text, Extended BASIC changes this 



back, so again, you may want to make 
this line into a subroutine. And again, 
this can be done in hardware. 

One way to do this is to remove the 
chip from the socket. Bend Pin 27 out 
so that it does not plug back into the 
socket. Solder a short piece of wire from 
Pin 27 to Pin 17. This action perma- 
nently changes the pin to logical level 
one, giving a green screen all the time. 

If the VDG is soldered into the board 
without a socket, cut Pin 27 at the base 
and pry it up. 

The second way requires an SPDT 
switch. Figure 2 shows two ways of 
wiring the switch to this circuit. Pull Pin 
27 out as described previously (see 
Figure 2a). Solder a wire from Pin 27 
to the center of the switch. Solder 
another wire from one side of the switch 
to Pin 17 of the VDG. Solder a third 
wire to the other side of the switch and 
to Pin 1 of the VDG. 

When the switch is toward Pin 17, the 
display will always have a green border; 
when it's the other way, it will always 
have a black border. Figure 2b is bas- 
ically the same way as before, but 
instead of connecting the third wire to 
Pin 1, connect it to the empty pinhole 
created when Pin 27 was pulled. This 
way, when the switch is toward Pin 17, 
you always get a green border and when 
the switch is the other way, you get 
whatever display Bit 6 of the PIA is set 
]to. This is also the most versatile way 
of connecting this pin. 



a. 

Pin 17 



Pin 27; 
Pin 1 




The third modification is The famoi 
inverse video screen. You no long* 
need to add a gate to do inverse vide< 
The procedure is basically the same i 
the others, but with different values an 
different pin numbers. You can chang 
it in software. The pin that control 
which mode you are in is connected t 
PBS or Bit 5 of address location $FF2 
or 65314. This bit is normally a zerc 
Changing it to a one gives you a. 
inverse video screen. But remembei 
Extended BASIC will change it back. I 
you want to do it in BASIC, add this lin 
every time you want to change to ai 
inverse screen: 

10 POKE &HFF22 , (PEEK (&HFF22 
□R 32) 

This line changes Bit 5 to logical ieve 
one. To change both the lowercase ant 
the inverse video, change the last valu< 
to 48 (32 + 16). The new line to changi 
both the lowercase and inverse vide< 
looks like this: 

10 POKE &HFF22 , (PEEK (&HFF22; 
□R4B) 

Since Extended BASIC will change 
this back, again you may want to make 
this line into a subroutine. Don't bothei 
to add the green border value when 
using the inverse video — it has a lower 
priority and shuts off anyway. Again, 
you can do it in hardware. 

To make the change in hardware, 
remove the chip from the socket and 
bend Pin 29 out. Solde* a short piece of 
wire from Pin 29 to Pin 17. This per- 
manently changes the pin to logical level 
one, giving inversed video all the time. 
(Pin 17 is the 5-volt supply.) 

If the VDG is soldered into the board 
without a socket, then just cut Pin 29 
at the base and pry it up. 

The second way uses an SPDT 
switch. Figure 3 shows two ways of 




SPDT 



Figure 2: Green Border Switching 



1 62 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



wiring the switch to this circuit. To use 
the first method (Figure 3a), pull Pin 29 
out. Solder a wire from Pin 29 to the 
center of the switch. Solder another 
wire from one side of the switch to Pin 
17 of the VDG. Solder a third wire to 
the other side of the switch and to Pin 
1 of the VDG. 

When the switch is toward Pin 17, the 
display will always have an inverse 
video; when it's the other way, it will 
always have a normal screen. The sec- 
ond method (Figure 3b) is much the 
same as the first. Instead of connecting 



a. 




the third wire to Pin 1, connect it to the 
empty pinhole. When the switch is 
toward Pin 17, you always get inverted 
video; when the switch is the other way, 
you get whatever display Bit 5 of the 
PIA is set to. 

These three changes to the new VDG 
add to the versatility of the CoCo's 
display. However, I suggest you wire the 
three pins using the SPDT switches and 
the empty hole left by each pin because, 
when in any graphics mode, these three 
pins are also used by the VDG to 
control which graphics mode you are in. 




SPDT 



Hole 29 



"You no longer need 
to add a gate to do 
inverse video." 



If you hard wire the pins into a partic- 
ular mode, you will loose certain graph- 
ics modes, depending on which pin you 
hard wired. If you use the most versatile 
way for each switch, all you have to do 
to return to the normal or default mode 
when you need a certain graphics mode 
is to throw a few switches. 

Next month, I'll get into a step-by- 
step description of how to integrate the 
new MC6847T1 chip into your older 
non-'B' CoCos. I wonder just how many 
original CoCos are still out there? I 
would like to thank James R. Igou of 
Newark, Delaware for supplying me 
with the manual and an MC6847T1 
chip to work with. I would also like to 
thank Bill Warnica of Barrie, Ontario, 
for his assistance with this and the next 
article on the new VDG chip. ^\ 



Figure 3: Inverse Video Switching 



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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 163 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 





A Discussion About Sexism 
in the Computer Industry 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



"W" computer education sexist? It is 
I CJtrue that more boys than girls 
-M.lijare computer hackers, own 
home computers and take computer 
classes in school. Ever since computer 
education began in this country, educa- 
tors have noted that computer use 
seems to be associated with gender, and 
have tried to provide some explanations 
for it. One explanation deals with child 
rearing practices. Boys are thought to 
be trained to enjoy more violent activ- 
ities, such as the "shoot- 'em-up" arcade 
games. 

Another explanation involves aca- 
demic performance. Boys tend to score 
higher on group achievement tests in 
mathematics than girls. Since program- 
ming a computer is somewhat math 
oriented, it makes sense that more boys 
than girls might become proficient in 
this activity. 

Some explanations center on biolog- 



Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



ical differences between boys and girls. 
Some recent medical research indicates 
that the brains of males and females are 
indeed different. The differences, how- 
ever, are very small, and at present there 
is no way to determine what effects 
these chemical differences may have on 
behavior. 

No single explanation can account 
for the fact that a higher proportion of 
boys is interested in computers. How- 
ever, the real issue is whether any girl, 
if she wants, can successfully achieve 
her potential and express herself 
through computers. The answer is 
obviously affirmative. Women have 
provided excellent programs for com- 
puters, and contributed to the progress 
of the computer industry. As an exam- 
ple, let's have a short history lesson. 

All right, all you programmers — 
who was the first programmer? Based 
on the preceding paragraph, you may 
correctly assume a woman has that 
honor. The right answer, as you may 
know, is Lady Augusta Ada Lovelace. 
Yes indeed, Lady Ada was the first 
programmer, working with Charles 
Babbage's Analytical Engine. Babbage 
created a mechanical computing device 
during the first half of the 1800s, and 



Ada programmed it. 

Lady Ada lived from 1816 to 1852. 
Her father was the poet Lord Byron, 
familiar to anyone who has taken a high 
school English literature course. Lady 
Ada was a poet in her own fashion — 
not with words, like her father, but with 
the Analytical Engine. She developed 
the concepts of subroutines and loops 
while programming Babbage's ma- 
chine. You may have heard of the 
programming language developed by 
the Defense Department called ADA, 
honoring Lady Ada Lovelace. 

The Analytical Engine, however, was 
not an electronic device, but a mechan- 
ical one. Wheels, gears and cams did the 
work instead of switches, wires and 
relays. The machine was not a true 
computer. 

Let's go to the second programmer, 
or the first electronic programmer. 
Sorry guys, but the person holding this 
honor is also a woman, Grace Murray 
Hopper. Grace Hopper was a math 
teacher at Vassar and Barnard, and a 
lieutenant in the Navy during World 
War II. She wrote the complex instruc- 
tions that made the Mark I, or Auto- 
matic Sequence Controlled Calculator, 
work in 1943. 



164 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



To her, the solution to making the 
computer work was obvious. "Why 
start from scratch with every single 
program you write? Develop one that 
would do a lot of the basic work over 
and over again for you." 

Grace Hopper designed a computer 
language called FLOW-MATIC. She is 
often credited with inventing the COBOL 
language, although a committee actu- 
ally designed it, based on her earlier 
work. While working for the Depart- 
ment of Defense, she was responsible 
for developing a compiler that would 
make COBOL run on almost any 
computer. 

Grace worked with the company that 
built the Univac I, and stayed on until 
she retired in 1971. She has won nearly 
every award in the computer industry, 
is a captain in the Naval Reserve, travels 
worldwide giving speeches and hopes to 
celebrate New Year's Eve in 1999, when 
she will be 94 years old. 

There are, of course, many talented 
women in the computer field. Some 
write programs; some manage software 
firms; some provide instruction about 
computers. In general, however, fe- 
males are less represented in the indus- 



try than males. This situation will 
probably change during the next few 
years. Girls in school are being required 
to take computer courses, just as boys 
are. Women are entering the profes- 
sional job markets and finding that 



provide encouragement for any student 
interested in computers. It may be that 
because of cultural and historical for- 
ces, different types of encouragement 
are needed for female students. If they 
need role models, there are none better 



"No single explanation can 
account for the fact that a 
higher proportion of boys is 
interested in computers. " 



computers represent an area of employ- 
ment. Women are beginning to appear 
in computer clubs (only a few, but still 
more than just a few years ago) and on 
bulletin boards. 

Perhaps our role as educators is to 



than Lady Ada Lovelace and Grace 
Murray Hopper. Who knows — per- 
haps the first programmer of the optical 
computer (using light as opposed to 
electric impulses) will also be a 
woman. ^ 



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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 165 




An easy-to-use detailer for Co Co drawings 



The 

CoCo 

Scaler 



COCOSCALER 
£ 1 0 1 S 



20 



By Wayne Womack 



rhe Co Co Scaler can be used to 
get more detail in your drawings. 
While you draw on a low reso- 
lution screen, your drawing is displayed 
in high resolution in the upper-right 
corner of the screen. The commands 
available in CoCo Scaler are Move, 
End, Set and Reset. 

Each section of the high resolution 
screen can be worked on, one section at 
a time, in the low resolution section. 
First, load an old drawing or create a 
new one. If you want an old drawing, 
it will be loaded and will show up in the 
high resolution grid. Press 'M' to move 
a section of the picture to the editing 
grid. Use the arrows to move the block 
marker to the correct section. Then 
press 'S' or 'R* and that section is moved 
to the editing grid. 

Once the section is in place, use the 
joystick to move to the correct square. 
Pressing the firebutton fills the square 
with white (if you press 'R*) or black (if 
you press 'S'). You can toggle between 
4 R' and 'S' as needed. As you edit in the 
low resolution grid, the picture in the 

Wayne Womack has been a commercial 
artist for 15 years and lives in Bridge ton, 
Missouri. In the evenings he teaches 
BASIC programming at a local high 
school 




high resolution grid is also changed. 
When finished with one section, press 
4 M' to get another section. When you 
are finished changing the picture, press 
'E' and give your drawing a name. It will 



be saved with the extension /DRW. 

(You may direct questions about this 
program to the author at 12738 Gist 
Road, Bridgeton, MO 63044. Please 
enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 



Line 

> ■ 

10-30 
40-50 
60-320 

h 

233-610 
620-630 

1640-1130 
1140 
1150 

1160-1200 



1210-1220 



J 1230-1250 
1260 

1270-1330 

& •. * * ' 

(1340-1490 



Function 

•"■*A" i'* A.' •>> .'.'A vV/ : ' ■ • .**"* 

Remark statements. 
Initialize program. 
Create each letter of the 
alphabet. 

Create the numbers. 
More program initializa- 
tion. 

Draw the Title Screens. 

Timing Loop. 

Clears the screen. 

Let you choose an old 

drawing or start a new 

drawing. 

Draw frame for the high 
resolution screen in the 
upper right corner of the 
screen. 

More program initializa- 



Writes CoCo Scaler at 
top of screen. 
Draw the grid used for 
the low resolution screen. 
Draw numbers and let- 
ters on the screen. 



*!.r!'V, 



Line 

1500- 1520 
1530-1710 
1720-1780 
1790-1920 

1930-2100 



Function 



2110 



2110 

2130-2200 
2210-2280 
2290-2310 



Draw the move screen 
grid. 

Joystick and Command 

processing lines. 

Draw X and Y position 

on the screen. 

Show you where you are 

on the high resolution 

screen. 

Scan the high resolution 
area and transfer it to the 
low resolution side for 
editing. 

Clears everything off 
screen except the draw- 
ing area for saving the 
picture to disk. 
Timing loop. 
Save the drawing to disk 
Load a drawing. 
This is a temporary block 
to show you where you 
are while in moving 
Mode. 



1 66 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



< 

180 11 1620 133 

360 126 1700 22 

580 82 1860 136 

840 232 2000 73 

1030 196 2170 173 

1240 174 END 22 

1480 176 

i — 



The listirtg: SCALER 

4 
* 

10 'THE COCO SCALER 

20 'BY VW SOFTWARE 

30 '10/21/84 

40 CLEAR1500:PCLS 

50 DIM NO$(25) ,A(25) ,SC(25) 

60 ' ***LETTERS*** 

70 LA$="BM+1,0U4E2F2D2BL4R4D2BR3 

H 

80 LB$="BM+1,0U6R3F1D1G1BL3R3F1D 
1G1BL3R3BR4" 

90 LC$="BM+1,0BR3E1BU4H1L2G1D4F1 
R2BR4" 

100 LD$="BM+1,0BR3E1U4H1L3D6R3BR 
4" 

110 LE$="BM+1,0BR5BU6L5D3R3BL3D3 
R5BR3 " 

120 LF$="BM+1,0BR5BU6L5D3R3BL3D3 
BR 6" 

130 LG$="BM+1,0BR5E1U2L2BR2BU2H1 
L2G1D4F1R2BR4" 

140 LH$="BM+1,0U6BD3R4BU3D6BR4" 
150 LI$="BM+1,0BU6R4BL2D6BL2R4BR 
3" 

160 LJ$="BM+1,0BU1F1R2E1U5BD6BR4 
ii 

170 LK$="BM+1,0U6BD3R2E2U1BL2BD3 
F2D1BR3" 

180 LL$="BM+1,0U6BD6R5BR3" 

190 LM$="BM+1,0U6R1F2D1U1E2R1D6B 

R3 " 

200 LN$="BM+1,0U6F5BU5D6BR3" 

210 LO$="BM+1,0BR3L2H1U4E1R2F1D4 

G1BR4" 

220 LP$="BM+1,0U6R3F1D1G1L3D3BR7 
ii 

230 LQ$="BM+1,0BR3L2H1U4E1R2F1D4 
G1BH1F2BU1BR3 " 

240 LR$="BM+1,0U6R3F1D1G1BL3R3F1 
D2BR3 " 

250 LS$="BM+1,0BU1F1R2E1U1H1L2H1 
U1E1R2F1BD5BR3" 

260 LT$="BM+1,0BR6BU6L6BR3D6BR5" 
270 LU$="BM+1,0BU6D5F1R3E1U5BD6B 
R3» 



280 LV$="BM+1,0BU6D4F2E2U4BD6BR3 
ii 

290 LW$="BM+1,0BU6D6R1E2U2D2F2R1 
BU6D6BR3 " 

300 LX$="BM+1,0U1E4U1BL4D1F4D1BR 
3" 

310 LY$="BM+1,0BU6D2F2E2U2BL2BD4 
D2BR5" 

320 LZ$= M BM+1,0BU6R4D1G4D1R4BR3" 

330 '***NUMBERS*** 

340 NO$ (0)="BM+1,0BR1R2E1U4H1L2G 

1D4F1BH1E4BD5BR3 " 

350 NO$ (1)="BM+1,0BU4E2D6BR3 M 

360 NO$ (2)="BM+1,0BU5E1R2F1D1G4R 

4BR3" 

370 NO$ (3)="BM+1,0BU5E1R2F1D1G1L 
1BR1F1D1G1L2H1BF1BR6 " 
380 NO$ (4)="BM+1,0BU2E4D6BL4BU2R 
6BD2BR3 " 

390 NO$ (5)="BM+1,0BR4BU6L4D3R3F1 
D1G1BL3 BU1F 1R2 BR3 " 

400 NO$ (6)="BM+1,0BR5BU5H1L2G1D4 

F1R2E1U1H1L3BD3BR6" 

410 NO$ (7)="BM+1,0BR3U2E3U1L5BD6 

BR8" 

420 NO$(8)="BM+1,0BR3L2H1U1E1H1U 

1E1R2F1D1G1L2BR2F1D1G1BR4" 

430 NO$(9)="BM+1,0BU1F1R2E1U4H1L 

2G1D1F1R3BD3BR4 " 

440 NO$ (0)="BM+6, -1U4H1L2G1D4F1R 
2E1G1BR4" 



450 


NO$ (10) 


=NO$ 1 


'1) 


1 +NO$ 1 


(0) 


460 


NO$(ll) 


=NO$l 


'1] 


+NO$i 


(1) 


470 


NO$(12) 


=NO$ I 


[1] 


+NO$l 


(2) 


480 


NO$ (13) 


=NO$l 




1 +NO$ l 


[3) 


490 


NO$ (14) 


=NO$l 




l +NO$ I 


'4) 


500 


NO$ (15) 


1 =NO$ 1 


[i] 


1 +NO$ 1 


[5) 


510 


NO$ (16] 


1 =NO$ 1 


[i] 


+NO$ 


(6) 


520 


NO$ (17! 


l=NO$ 


(i] 


l+NO$ 


(7) 


530 


NO$ (18) 


=NO$ 


[i; 


l+NO$ 


(8) 


540 


NO$ (19) 


l=NO$ 




l+NO$ 


(9) 


550 


NO$ (20) 


l=NO$ 


(2) 


l+NO$ 


(0) 


560 


NO$ (21) 


|=NO$ 


[2; 


l+NO$ 


(1) 


570 


NO$ (22] 


|=NO$ 




l+NO$ 


(2) 


580 


NO$ (23) 


l=NO$ 


[2; 


l+NO$ 


(3) 


590 


NO$ (24) 


l =NO$ 


[2; 


|+NO$ 


(4) 


600 


NO$ (25; 


l=NO$ 


[2; 


|+NO$ 


(5) 



610 MI$= l, BM+2 / -3R3BD3BR2" 
620 A=5:B=20 

630 PMODE 4,1: PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
640 DRAW "BM81, 177;XLV$;" : DRAW 
"BM80,177;XLV$;": DRAW "BM90,177 
;XLW$;": DRAW "BM91, 177 ;XLW$ ; " 
650 DRAW "BM105,177;XLS$;XLO$;XL 

F$ ; XLT$ ; XLW$ ; XLA$ ; XLR$ ; XLE$ ; " 

660 PMODE 4,1 

670 LINE(4,4)-(250,166) ,PSET,B 
680 LINE(4,182)-(250,182) , PSET 
690 LINE(4, 185)-(250, 185) , PSET 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 167 



700 XX=254:YY=166 
710 NT$= ,I L25504V3T255;4;4;" 
720 FORX=4TO250 STEP5 
730 XX=XX-5 

740 LINE(X,4)~(XX,YY) ,PSET 
750 PLAY NT$ 
760 NEXT 

770 F0RY=8T0166 STEP5 
780 YY=YY-5 

790 LINE(4,YY)-(250,Y) , PSET 
800 PLAY NT$ 
810 NEXT 

820 FORI=1TO1000:NEXTI 
830 LINE (4, 4) -(250,165) , PRESET, B 
F [ 
840 LINE(6 / 167)-(250, 181) , PRESET 
,BF 

850 NT$="L200O2;1;2;3;4;" 

860 VN$="V1T15" 

870 DRAW "BM95,177;XLP$;XLR$;XLE 
$ ; XLS $ ; XLE $ ; XLN $ ; XLT $ ; XLS $ ; " 
880 X=4 
890 PLAY VN$ 
900 F0RY=5T052 STEP4 : X=X+6 
910 LINE(X / Y)-(X*2.75 / Y*2.75) ,PS 
ET,B 

920 F0RI=1T02 | 
930 PLAY "V+T+ ,, +NT$ 
940 NEXT I 

950 LINE(X+1,Y*2.75)-(X*2.75,Y*2 
.75), PRESET 1 

960 LINE(X*2.75,Y+1)-(X*2.75,Y*2 
.75) , PRESET 

970 NEXTY j 

980 LINE(82 / 52)-(82*2.75,52*2.75 

) f PSET, B 

990 FORI =1 TO 2 : PLAY "V+T+"+NT$ : NE 

XTI | 

1000 LINE(6,167)-(250,181) , PRESE 
T,BF 

1010 DRAWBM95 , 95 ; S16 ; XLC$ ; XLO$ ; 
XLC$ ; XLO$ ; » : DRAW" BM9 6,94; XLC$ ; XL 

0$ ; XLC$ ; XLO$ ; S12 ; " 

1020 DRAW" BM102, 119 
1030 DRAW"BM119 , 119 
1040 DRAW"BM135,119 
1050 DRAW"BM152,119 
1060 DRAW" BM17 1,119 
1070 DRAW"BM190,119 
1080 DRAW"BM+0,0;S4 
1090 LINE(4, 163)-(250, 163) , PSET 
1100 DRAW "BM50,177;XLC$;XLO$;XL 

P$ ; XLY$ ; XLR$ ; XLI $ ; XLG$ ; XLH$ ; XLT$ 



XLS$ 

XLC$ 

XLA$ 

XLL$ 

XLE$ 

XLR$ 
•i 



ii 
it 
i 
i 
i 
i 



ii 



1110 DRAW "BM135,177;XNO$(l) ;XNO 

$(0) ;XMI$;XN0$(2) ;XN0$(1) ;XMI$;X 
N0$(8) ;XN0$(4) ;» , 
1120 PLAY "T404" 

1130 PLAY "V2L8CFA0+CP80-AL4.0+C 



P4P80-" 

1140 FORI=1TO1000:NEXTI 
1150 PCLS 

1160 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

» NEW OR OLD SCREEN" .-PRINT 

: PRINT" PICK N OR 0" 

1170 X$=INKEY$ 

1180 IF X$="O"THEN2210 

1190 IF X$="N"THEN1220 

1200 GOTO1170 

1210 »***SMALL DRAWING BOARD*** 
1220 LINE(155, 15)-(239, 119) , PSET 
,BF 

1230 «***INIT PROGRAM*** 

1240 PMODE 4,1:SCREEN1, 1:RS=0:X1 

=1:Y1=1:X2=15:Y2=3 3:X3=160: Y3=12 

6:X4=157:Y4=17 

1250 DIM M(21,26) 

12 60 DRAW "BM27, 12;XLC$;XL0$;XLC 
$ ; XLO$ ; XBK$ ; XLS $ ; XLC$ ; XLA$ ; XLL$ ; 
XLE$;XLR$;" 

1270 ' ***LARGE GRID*** . 
1280 F0RX=12 TO 132 STEP6 
1290 LINE(X, 28)-(X, 180) , PSET 
1300 NEXT X 

1310 FORY=30 TO 180 STEP6 
1320 LINE(12,Y)-(135,Y) ,PSET 
1330 NEXT Y 

1340 •***NUMER LARGE GRID*** 
1350 DRAW "BM 11, 27 ;XNO$ (1) ; " 
1360 DRAW "BM 36 , 27 ;XNO$ (5) ; " 
1370 DRAW "BM 59 , 26 ;XNO$ (1) /* 11 : DR 
AW "BM 65,27;XNO$(0) ;" 
1380 DRAW "BM 89 , 26 ;XNO$ (1) ; " : DR 
AW "BM 96,27;XNO$ (5) ;" 
1390 DRAW "BM 119 , 26 ;XNO$ (2 ) ; " : D 
RAW "BM 125,27;XNO$(0) ;" 
1400 DRAW "BM 4 , 103 ;XLY$ ; " 
1410 DRAW "BM 64 , 188 ;XLX$ ; " 
1420 DRAW "BM 136 , 36 ;XNO$ ( 1) ; " 
1430 DRAW "BM 136 , 60 ;XNO$ ( 5) ; " 
1440 DRAW "BM 136 , 90 ;XNO$ (10) ; " 
1450 DRAW "BM 136 , 120 ;XNO$ (15) ; " 
1460 DRAW "BM 136 , 150 ;XNO$ (20) ; 
1470 DRAW "BM 136 , 180 ;XNO$ (25) ; " 
1480 DRAW "BM 203 , 135 ;XLX$ ; " : LIN 
E (212, 135) -(231,135) ,PSET 
1490 DRAW "BM 203 , 145 ;XLY$ ; " : LIN 
E(212,145)-(231,145) , PSET 
1500 »***MOVE GRID*** 
1510 FORY=122 TO 154 STEP 8: LIN 
E(156,Y) -(188,Y) , PSET: NEXTY 
1520 FOR X=156 TO 188 STEP 8: LIN 
E(X,122) -(X,154) , PSET : NEXTX : PAIN 
T(X3,Y3) :GOSUB1730:GOSUB1760:DRA 
W "BM 175,166;XBK$;XLS$;XLE$;XLT 

dN « ii 



• II 

/ 



1530 ' ***COMMANDS*** 
1540 X$=INKEY$ ' 



168 THE RAINBOW October 1986 






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1550 J=JOYSTK(0) :K=JOYSTK(l) :P=P 
EEK(65280) 

1560 IF J=0 THEN X1=X1-1: X2=X2- 
6: IF X1<=1 THEN Xl=l: X2=15 
1570 IF J=63 THEN X1=X1+1: X2=X2 
+6: IF Xl=>20 THEN Xl=20: X2=129 
1580 IF J=0 OR J=63 THEN GOSUB17 
30 

1590 IF K=0 THEN Y1=Y1-1: Y2=Y2- 
6: IF Y1<=1 THEN Yl-1: Y2=33 
1600 IF K=63 THEN Y1=Y1+1: Y2=Y2 
+6: IF Yl=>25 THEN Yl=25: Y2=177 
1610 IF K=0 OR K=63 THEN GOSUB17 
60 

1620 IF PPOINT(X2-2,Y2-2)=0 THEN 
PSET(X2,Y2) :PSET(X2-1,Y2) : PSET ( 
X2+1,Y2) :PSET(X2,Y2+1) :PSET(X2,Y 



PRESET (X2-1,Y 
PRESET (X2,Y2+ 
GOTO 1640 
PRESET(X2-1,Y 
PRESET (X2,Y2+ 
PSET(X2,Y2) :P 



2-1) : PRESET (X2,Y2) 
2) : PRESET (X2+1,Y2) 

1) : PRESET (X2,Y2-1) 
1630 PRESET (X2,Y2) 

2) : PRESET (X2+1,Y2) 
1) : PRESET (X2,Y2-1) 
SET(X2-1,Y2) :PSET(X2+1,Y2) :PSET( 
X2,Y2-1) :PSET(X2,Y2+1) 

1640 IF P=126 AND RS=0 OR P=254 
AND RS=0 THEN PRESET (X1+X4 , Y1+Y4 
) : PAINT (X2,Y2) :GOTO1540 
1650 IF P=12 6 AND RS=1 OR P=254 
AND RS=1 THEN PSET (X1+X4 , Y1+Y4 ) : 
LINE(X2-2,Y2-2) -(X2+2,Y2+2) , PRE 
SET,BF:GOTO1540 
1660 IFX$=""THEN1540 
1670 IFX$="E"THEN LINE ( 174 , 156) - 
(230,166) , PRESET, BF: DRAW" BM175 , 1 
6 6 ; XBK$ ; XLE$ ; XLN$ ; XLD$ ; " : GOT02 11 

0 

1680 IFX$="R"THEN S0UND1 , 1 : RS-1 : 
LINE (174 , 156) - (230 , 166) , PRESET, B 
F: DRAW 11 BM 175,166;XLR$;XLE$;XLS 
$ ; XLE$ ; XLT$ ; " : GOTO 15 40 
1690 IFX$="S"THEN SOUND1 , 1 : RS=0 : 
LINE (174, 156) -(230, 166) , PRESET, B 
F: DRAW "BM 175,166;XBK$;XLS$;XLE 
$;XLT$;":GOTO1540 

1700 IF X$="M"THEN SOUND1 , 1 : LINE 

(174,156) -(230,166) , PRESET , BF : DR 

AW " BM1 7 5 , 1 6 6 7 XLM$ ; XLO $ ; XLV $ ; XLE $ 

; " : GOSUB1800 : GOTO1540 

1710 GOTO1540 

1720 '***POS. NUMBERS*** 

1730 LINE(209,123)-(234,134) , PRE 

SET, BF 

1740 DRAW "BM213, 133 ;XNO$ (XI) ;" 
1750 RETURN 

1760 LINE(209,136)-(234,144) , PRE 



170 



THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



SET, BF 

1770 DRAW »BM213,143;XN0$(Y1) ;" 
1780 RETURN 

1790 ***LOC ON MOVE SCREEN*** 
1800 GOSUB2290 

1810 X$=INKEY$: IF X$=""GOTO 181 
0 

1820 IF X$OCHR$(10) AND X$OCHR 
$(9) AND X$OCHR$(8) AND X$OCHR 
$(94) AND X$<>"S" AND X$<>"R" TH 
EN 181J3 

1830 LINE(X3-3,Y3-3)-(X3+3,Y3+3) 
, PRESET, BF 

1840 IF X$=CHR$(10) THEN SOUND1, 
i? GOSUB 2290: Y4=Y4+25: Y3=Y3+8 
: IF Y4>92THEN Y4=92: Y3=150: SO 
UND1J3 , 5 

1850 IF X$=CHR$(9) THEN SOUNDl,l 
: GOSUB 2290: X4=X4+20: X3=X3+8: 
IF X4>217THEN X4=217: X3=184: S 
OUND10 , 5 

1860 IF X$=CHR$(8) THEN SOUNDl,l 
: GOSUB 22 90: X4=X4-20: X3=X3-8: 
IF X4<157THEN X4=157 : X3=160:SO 
UND10,5 

1870 IF X$=CHR$(94) THEN SOUND1, 
1: GOSUB 2290:Y4=Y4-25: Y3=Y3-8: 
IF Y4<17THEN Y4=17: Y3=12 6:SOUN 
D10,l 

1880 PAINT (X3,Y3) 

1890 IF X$="S" THEN SOUNDl,!: GO 
SUB2290: RS=0: LINE ( 174 , 156 )- (2 3 
0,166) , PRESET, BF : GOSUB1940 : DRAW 
"BM175 , 166 ; XBK$ ; XLS$ ; XLE$ ; XLT$ ; " 
: RETURN 

1900 IF X$="R"THENSOUNDl,l: GOSU 

B2290: RS=1:LINE(174,156)-(230,1 

66) , PRESET, BF:GOSUB1940: DRAW "BM 

175, 166 ;XLR$ ;XLE$ ;XLS$ ;XLE$ ;XLT$ 

; 11 : RETURN 

1910 GOSUB2290 

1920 GOTO1810 

1930 '***SCAN SCREEN*** 

1940 LINE(209,123)-(234,134) ,PRE 

SET, BF 

1950 POKE 65495,0 
1960 XS=9 : YS=27 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest-Princeton 

October 17-19 



1970 F0RI=1T025:SY=I+Y4 :YS=YS+6 
1980 LINE(209,136)-(234,144) , PRE 
SET, BF 

1990 DRAW "BM213,143;XNO$(I) ;" 
2000 FORN=1TO20:SX=N+X4 
2010 XS=XS+6 

2020 LINE(209, 123) -(234,134) , PRE 
SET, BF 

2030 DRAW "BM213, 133 ;XNO$ (N) ;" 
2040 A(N)=PPOINT(SX,SY) 
2050 IF A(N)=0 THEN PAINT (XS,YS) 
ELSE LINE(XS-2,YS-2)-(XS+2,YS+2 
), PRESET, BF 
2060 NEXTN:XS=9:NEXTI 
2070 LINE(209, 136) -(234,144) , PRE 
SET, BF: DRAW "BM213 , 143 ;XNO$ (Yl) ; 



ii 



2080 LINE(209,123)-(234,134) , PRE 
SET, BF: DRAW "BM213 , 134 ;XNO$ (XI) ; 



2090 POKE 65494,0 
2100 RETURN 

2110 LINE(1, l)-(256, 14) , PRESET, B 

F : LINE (1, 15) -(154, 120) , PRESET, BF 

: LINE (1,120) -(256,192) , PRESET, BF 

2120 FORI=1TO2000:NEXTI 

2130 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

11 SAVE GRAPHICS" 

2140 PRINT" ============= 



ii 



2150 PRINT" 
ii 



DRAWINGS NAME 



UP TO": PR 
8 CHARACTERS" 



2160 PRINT" 
INT" 

2170 PRINT: PRINT" 

--/DRW" ; 

2180 PRINT@294," " ; : INPUTNA$ 

2190 IF NA$="" THEN2150 

2200 SAVEM NA$+"/DRW" , 3584 , 9727 , 

3584:END 

2 2 10 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

» LOAD GRAPHICS" 

2220 PRINT" ============= 

ii 

2230 PRINT" DRAWINGS NAME 

ii 

2240 PRINT" UP TO": PR 

INT" 8 CHARACTERS" 

2250 PRINT: PRINT" 

— /DRW" ; 

2260 PRINT@294," " ; : INPUTNA$ 

2270 IF NA$=""THEN2230 

2280 LOADM NA$+"/DRW" : SCREEN1 , 1 : 

GOTO1240 

2290 GET(X4+1, Y4+1) - (X4+20 , Y4+25 
) /M, G 

2300 PUT(X4+1,Y4+1) -(X4+20, Y4+25 
) ,M,NOT 
2310 RETURN 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 171 




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» 



rhe Challenge Returns: 
Driller II I s a Thriller, Too 

s 

By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



ditor's Note: If you have an idea for 
te "Wishing Well" submit it to Fred 
f o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
our ideas specific, and don f t forget that 
lis is BASIC. All programs resulting 
om your wishes are for your use but 
imain the property of the author. 



Let's face it. Sequels are a major 
part of our everyday life. We've 
had Rocky VI, Psycho III and 
Poltergeist II. If something works, we 
re tempted to try for a repeat of the 
access story. The "Wishing Well" is no 
xception. Some of the best programs 
1 these pages have often been the 
ispiration for newer and better ver- 
ions, or better yet, sequels. This 
lonth's "Wishing Well" offers a newly 
written sequel to a program that first 
ppeared in these pages over three years 
go: Multi Math Driller. So, here it is! 
lie wait is over! You asked for it! The 
aga continues . . . Multi Math Driller 
I. 



7 red Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
or the North Adams Public Schools in 
forth Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
master's in education and has pub- 
\shed some of the first software avail- 
ble for the Color Computer through 
lis software firm, Illustrated Memory 
lanks. 



The Wish 

The prime motivating force behind 
Driller I was a desire to counter the 
effects of the math software glut which 
had the "let's see how many aliens you 
can kill" approach. As a teacher, I have 
a bit of a problem with the idea that 
zapping, blasting and killing are the best 
ways to teach our youngsters. Not only 
that, but the novelty of zapping soon 
wears off and actually serves as a block 
to our learning efforts. As a student 
progresses, the game aspect of such 
software only slows down further pro- 
gress. 

Driller I took a different approach. 
Instead of a spaceship, we have a large 
oil rig ready to drill into the ground. 
Sitting above the drill was a multipica- 
tion problem. Running in an under- 
ground stream below the drill was a 
river of moving answers which, of 
course, included the correct response. 
When the correct answer ran under the 
drill, pressing the spacebar or the fire- 
button on the right joystick caused the 
drill bit to sink into the ground and 
detect the correct answer below it. 

Sound different? It was, and I re- 
ceived very favorable responses from 
parents and teachers who found the 
program a welcome alternative to the 
violent software their youngsters were 
too often confronted with. To be per- 



fectly honest, this sequel is a bit 
overdue. However, that is one of the 
problems that a column like this runs 
into trying to grant so many wishes. To 
my patient readers I offer my apologies. 
Better than that, however, Driller II is 
now a reality. 

The Program 

Driller His designed to fit into a 16K 
Color BASIC CoCo and the MC-10 with 
the 20K expansion unit. To use the 
program in a 16K Extended CoCo, you 
will need to clear the graphics memory. 
You may do this in two ways: PCLERR1 
or P0KE25,6:NEUI. 

Do not use this POKE if you are using 
a disk drive. Use the PCLEAR1 method 
instead. If you have 32K or 64K, you 
already have all the memory you need. 

Driller II, like its companion pro- 
gram, uses CHR$ graphics to give us an 
attractive nine-color screen. Since we . 
do not need to use the Hi-Res graphics, 
using CHR$ colors gives a much more 
dramatic effect. It also gives a much 
larger image since the largest number 
we will be working with is a two digit 
number. 

The program contains a large number 
of DATA statements at the end of the 
listing. These must be keyed in exactly, 
since they form the basis for our en- 
larged letters and numbers displayed in 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 73 



colon Notice that several lines have only 
a string of commas. Be sure to key these 
in just as you see them. 

Several parts of the listing also use 
lowercase letters. Be sure to use the 
SHlFT/'O'to type these into your CoCo. 
They will appear as inversed letters on 



your screen. The inverse video charac- 
ters give us a nice effect. Use the SHIFT/ 
4 0' to return to normal again. 

While the listing is similar to Driller 
I, the line arrangements are a bit differ- 
ent, so it is not likely that you could just 
alter that listing to create this one. I 



have made the corrections for the joy 
stick problem that some newer CoC< 
owners run into, so this program shouk 
work on all models. (The MC-10 ver 
sion does not have the joystick option. 

Naturally, I have designed this vei 
sion to operate in much the same fash 



485 



109 


600 ... 


191 


242 


685 ... 


193 


104 


775 ... 


79 


69 


850 ... 


202 


209 


END . . 


70 


175 







The listing: DRILLER2 



3 REM* 

4 REM* 

5 REM* 

6 REM* 



* 



1 REM*************************** 

2 REM* MULT I MATH DRILLER 2 * 

BY FRED B.SCERBO 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1986 
60 HARDING AVENUE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 
7 REM*************************** 
10 CLS0 
15 CLEAR500 
20 FOR ZZ=1T09 6:BB$=BB$+CHR$ (128 
) :NEXTZZ 
25 BR=30:YS=20 
30 REM IF MC-10 THEN MC=15360 
35 MC=0 : 
40 DIM A(45,9) ,B(4,12) 
45 F0RI=2T011:F0RY=1T09:READ A (I 
,Y) :NEXTY,I 

50 F0RI=19T044:F0RY=1T09 
55 READ A(I,Y) 
60 NEXTY , I 
65 FORI=lT04 : F0RY=lTO12 : READ B(I 
, Y) : NEXTY, I 

70 FOR ZZ=0TO31:PRINT@ZZ,CHR$(18 
8);:NEXT ZZ:FOR ZZ=320TO351:PRIN 
T@ZZ,CHR$(179) ; :NEXT ZZ:FORI=0TO 
21:SET(0,I,4) :SET(63,I,4) : NEXT 
7 5 W$= M MULTI " : C=3 2 : L=3 8 : GOSUB5 4 5 
: W$="MATH" : C=16 : L=13 6 : GOSUB54 5 : W 
$=" DRILLER" : C=64 : L=2 25 : GOSUB545 
80 FORI=57T061:SET(I,14,5) :SET(I 
,18,5) : NEXT : FORI=15T017 : SET (58 , I 
,5) : SET (60, I, 5) : NEXT 
85 REM <SHIFT><0> FOR LOWERCASE 
90 R$=CHR$(128) : PRINT@417 , "by"+R 
$+" f red" +R$+ 11 scerbo "+R$+R$+ " copy 
right" ; 

95 POKE1467+MC,49:POKE1468+MC,57 
.-POKE1469+MC, 56 : POKE1470+MC, 54 
100 GOSUB685 : FORI=417TO480 : PRINT 
@I,CHR$ (128) ; :NEXTI 



105 PRINT@353 , "select"R$"speed"R 
$"from"R$"fast"R$"to"R$"slow" ; :G 
OSUB115 
110 GOTO120 

115 W$="l TO 9" :C=112 :L=422 :GOSU 
B545: RETURN 

120 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN120 

125 X=ASC(X$) :IFX<49THEN120 

130 IFX>57THEN120 

135 K=VAL(X$) :DL=K*8 

140 CLS0 : W$="SELECT" : C=32 : L=4 : GO 

SUB545 : W$="DESIRED" : C=48 : L=98 : GO 

SUB545 

145 W$=" LEVELS" : C=16 : L=19 6 : GOSUB 
545 :W$="FROM" : C=64 : L=296 : GOSUB54 
5:GOSUB115 

150 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN150 
155 X=ASC(X$) :IFX<49THEN150 
160 IFX>57THEN150 

165 K=VAL(X$) 

170 CLS0:W$="DO YOU":C=80:L=5:GO 
SUB545 : W$="WANT THE" : C=112 : L=96 : 
G0SUB545 : W$="LEVELS» : L=196 : C=64 : 
GOSUB545 

175 W$="ASSORTED" :C=32 :L=288:GOS 
UB545:W$="Y ":C=16:L=386:GOSUB54 
5:W$="OR ":C=0:GOSUB545:W$="N ": 

C=16:GOSUB545 

180 PRINT@L+1,CHR$(190) ;CHR$(188 

)CHR$(191) ; :PRINT@L+3 3,CHR$(128) 

CHR$(188)CHR$(188) ; : SET (54 , 28 , 4) 

185 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN200 

190 IFX$="N"THEN205 

195 GOT0185 

200 AJ=1:GOTO205 

205 CLS0:GOSUB215 

210 GOTO220 

215 W$="WHAT IS":C=16:L=3:GOSUB5 
4 5 : RETURN 

220 FOR ZZ=416T0447:PRINT@ZZ,CHR 
$(188) ; :NEXT ZZ:FOR ZZ=480TO510: 
PRINT@ZZ,CHR$ (179) ;: NEXT ZZ 
225 POKE1535+MC,179 
230 E=29:F=34:FORG=10TO24STEP2 
235 FORI=E TO F : SET (I , G, 5) :NEXTI 
240 SET(E-1,G+1,6) : SET (F+l , G+l , 6 
) 

245 E=E-1:F=F+1:NEXTG 

250 FORI=12T026:SET(31,I, 3) :SET( 

32,1,3) :NEXTI 

255 PRINT@108, "divided"R$"by"; :F 



174 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 



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ion that the first one did. I have de- 
signed it so that the division problems 
have whole number answers. 

Running The Program 

On running Driller II, a title card not 
unlike the original comes up on the 
screen. Pressing the spacebar moves us 
to our choices. First, you must select the 
speed at which the answers run below 
the drill. One is the fastest while nine is 
the slowest. 

Then you select the level of difficulty 
from one to nine. The number of the 
level corresponds to the division table 
presented. Next, you decide whether or 
not you want the levels assorted. An 
assortment at level nine will give prob- 
lems all the way down to level one. This 
helps review previous levels. 

Unlike other "Wishing Well" pro- 
grams, Driller I and // both have a set 
number of problems that must be com- 
pleted. In this case, the number of 
problems is 20 and is signified by the 
value YS in Line 25. The value of BR 
is the total number of tries at problems 



until you get through the 20. You may 
alter these values in the the listing. Just 
be sure that BR is larger than YS. 

When a problem appears, press the 
spacebar or right joystick firebutton the 
moment the problem is under the drill. 
If it goes past the drill, you may be 
marked wrong, so adjust the speed at 
the beginning to fit your needs. If the 
answer is wrong, you will be told to try 
again. If you take too long, the screen 
reminds you to think. 

If your answer is correct, the screen 
displays a multi-colored CORRECT and 
reprints the problem and answer. Press- 
ing the spacebar or joystick button 
advances you to the next problem. 

If you get all the problems right, the 
6il well explodes in a colorful display. 
1 think you'll like the effect. Users of 
priller I would often try harder to get 
all the answers correct. It's a nice 
incentive. 



MC-10 Modifications 

Only two lines need to be changed to 



make this program work on the MC-10. 
Change the value of MC from zero to 
15360 in Line 35. Also, delete Line 345 
since the joystick routine is not needed. 
Be sure to save the program before 
running it, since an error in one of the 
POKE values could crash the program 
and lock up your machine if you make 
a typo. That goes for CoCo users as 
well. 



Conclusion 

I hope that Driller II proves as val- 
uable to you as Driller I was. In fact, 
if any of you have suggestions as to 
other "Wishing Well" programs which 
you would like to see expanded or 
revised or continued as this one was, 
drop me a line with your ideas. Those 
of you who haven't seen Driller I may 
want to request a back issue of Sep- 
tember 1983. Who knows? Maybe 
someday I might put out a "Best of the 
Wishing Well" with some of those oldies 
all in one place. Let me know what you 
think. □ 



OR TP=1T0 YS:NP=)3:IF TR=>BR THEN 
49)3 

26) 3 F=RND(9):IF F=LN THEN260 
2 65 IF AJ=j3 THEN E=K | 

27) 3 IF AJ=1 THEN E=RND(K) 

275 FORLL=132T0196STEP32:PRINT@L 
L,R$R$R$R$R$R$R$; : NEXTLL 

28) 3 E=E*F:F=E/F:E2=E 
285 IFE<lj3THEN3)3)3 

29) 3 EE$=STR$(E) :E1=VAL(MID$(EE$ / 
2,1) ) :E2=VAL(RIGHT$(EE$,1) ) 

295 I=El+2:L=132:C=112:GOSUB635 
3)3)3 LN=F:I=E2+2:L=13 6:C=112:GOSU 
B635 : I=F+2 : L=151 : GOSUB635 
3)35 AN=E/F : F$=STR$ (AN) 

31) 3 F0RI=1T06:G=RND(9) :H=RND(9) : 
H$=STR$ (G*H) : F$=F$+" »+H$ : NEX 
TI 

315 J$=LEFT$(F$,32) 

32) 3 PRINT@448, J$; 
325 L$=RIGHT$(J$ / 31) :M$=LEFT$(J$ 
,1) :J$=L$+M$ 

33) 3 FORP=lTO DL: NEXTP : IFTR=>BR T 
HEN49)3 | 

335 IFINKEY$=CHR$(32)THEN37)3 

34) 3 REM IF MC-1)3 DELETE LINE345 
345 POKE339 / 255:IFPEEK(339)=254T 
HEN370 j 

35) 3 NP=NP+1:IFNP=15J8THEN360 
355 GOT032)3 

36) 3 PRINTS, BB$; : W$= ,, THINK" ; C=64 
: L=6 : GOSUB545 : SOUND1 , 2 : SOUND1 , 2 : 
SOUND1 , 2 I 



365 GOT032)3 

37) 3 TR=TR+1:PRINT@431,CHR$(186)C 
HR$(181) ; :PRINT@463,CHR$(138)CHR 
$ (133) ; 

375 IF AN=VAL(MID$(J$ / 15 / 4) ) THEN 
385 

38) 3 GOT0425 

385 PRINT@)3,BB$; 

39) 3 FORC=16T0112STEP32 :W$="CORRE 
CT M : L=3 : GOSUB54 5 : SOUNDC+1 , 1 : NEXT 
C 

395 L=)3:PRINT@)3 / BB$; :IFE<lj3THEN4 
)35 

4)3)3 I=El+2:L=)3:C=48:GOSUB635 
4)35 L=4:I=E2+2:C=48:GOSUB635:L=L 
+4 : FORI=15T022 : SET (1,2,6): NEXT : S 
ET(18 / )3 / 6) :SET(18,4,6) :I=F+2:C=4 
8:GOSUB635 

41) 3 W$=" IS":C=16:GOSUB545:W$=ST 
R$ (AN) :C=32:GOSUB545 

415 GOSUB685:PRINT@)3 / BB$; :GOSUB2 
15:CR=CR+1:NEXT TP 

42) 3 GOT0445 

425 PRINT@j3,BB$; : W$="WRONG" : C=64 
: L=6 : GOSUB54 5 : SOUND20 , 1 : SOUND2 , 1 
: SOUND2 )3 , 1 : SOUND2 , 1 

43) 3 WR=Wft+l:PRINT@)3 / BB$7 :W$="TRY 
11 : C=32 : L=l)3 : GOSUB545 : F0RI=1T03)3)3 
: NEXT : PRINT@)3 , BB$ ; : W$="AGAIN ,f 
435 C=96:L=6:G0SUB545:F0RI=1T03)3 
)3 : NEXT : PRINT@)3 , BB$ ; : GOSUB2 15 : IF 
NP>1)3)3THEN NP=)3 

44) 3 GOT032)3 



1 76 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



445 IFTROYS THEN49J3 

45)3 PRINT @ J3, BB$ ;: FOR JJ=448T0479 

: PRINT© J J , CHR$ ( 159 ) ; : NEXTJJ 

455 FORI=28T01J3STEP-1:SET(31,I,2 

) :SET(32,I,2) :SOUND2 3J3,l:NEXTI:F 

0RI=1T07 : SET (30-1*2 , 10-1 , 2 ) 

46j3 SET(33+I*2, Ij3-I,2) :SOUND230, 

l.'NEXTI: SET (30-1*2, 11-1,2) :SET(3 

3+1*2,11-1,2) 

465 F0RI=1T012:SET(13-I,2+I*2,2) 
: SET (50+1, 2+1*2, 2) :SOUND230,1:NE 
XTI : FORI=1TO20 : SOUNDRND (230) , 1:N 
EXT 

470 CLS0:W$="YOU HIT" : C=32 : L=2 : 
G0SUB545:W$="PAYDIRT" : C=64 : L=98 : 
G0SUB545 

475 W$="WITH A":C=48:L=196:GOSUB 
545 : W$="PERFECT" : C=16 : L=290 : GOSU 
B545 

480 W$="SCORE" : C=112 : L=390 : GOSUB 
545 

485 GOSUB685 

49)3 CLSj3:W$="0UT OF" : C=16 : L=6 : GO 
SUB545 :W$=STR$ (TR) +" TRIES" : C=48 
:L=96:GOSUB545:W$="YOU HAD" 
495 C=32:L=196:GOSUB545:W$=STR$( 
WR) :C=64:L=307-(LEN(W$) *3) : GOSUB 
545 

500 W$="MISSES":IF WR=1 THEN W$= 
" MISS" 

505 C=112:L=388:GOSUB545 
510 IFINKEY$=CHR$(13)THEN520 
515 GOTO510 

520 PRINT@483 , "press"R$"enter"R$ 
"for"R$"another"R$"try" ; 

525 FORI=1TO1000:NEXT 

530 IFINKEY$=CHR$(13)THEN540 

535 GOTO530 

540 RUN 

545 P=LEN(W$) :F0RZ=1T0P:I=ASC(MI 
D$(W$,Z,1) )-46 
550 IFI=31THEN585 
555 IFI=32THEN595 



560 IFI=41THEN605 

565 IFI=42THEN615 

570 IFI=-14THEN625 

575 GOSUB635 

580 GOTO630 

585 I=l:GOSUB660 

590 GOTO630 

595 I=2:GOSUB660 

600 GOTO630 

605 I=3:GOSUB660 

610 GOTO630 

615 I=4:GOSUB660 

620 GOTO630 

625 L=L+2 

630 NEXT .-RETURN 

635 PRINT@0+L,CHR$(A(I,1)+C)CHR$ 

(A(I,2)+C)CHR$(A(I,3)+C) ; 

640 PRINT@32+L,CHR$(A(I,4)+C)CHR 

$(A(I,5)+C)CHR$(A(I,6)+C) ; 

645 PRINT@64+L,CHR$(A(I,7)+C)CHR 

$(A(I,8)+C)CHR$(A(I,9)+C) ; 

650 L=L+4: RETURN 

655 GOT0655 

660 PRINT@0+L,CHR$(B(I,1)+C)CHR$ 
(B(I,2)+C)CHR$(B(I,3)+C)CHR$(B(I 
,4)+C) ; 

665 PRINT@32+L,CHR$(B(I,5)+C)CHR 
$(B(I,6)+C)CHR$(B(I,7)+C)CHR$(B( 
I,8)+C) ; 

670 PRINT @ 6 4+L , CHR$ (B (1 , 9) +C) CHR 

$(B(I,10)+C)CHR$(B(I,11)+C)CHR$( 

B (I , 12 ) +C) ; : L=L+5 : RETURN 

675 PRINT@Q,CHR$(154) ;:PRINT@Q+3 

0,CHR$(145)CHR$(128)CHR$(154)CHR 

$(145) ; 

680 PRINT@Q+63,CHR$(153)CHR$(155 
)CHR$(152) ; :PRINT@Q+96,CHR$(152) 
; : RETURN 

685 FORI=1TO1500:TU=RND(9999) 
690 REM MC-10 DELETE LINE 69 5 
695 IFPEEK(339)=254THEN705 
700 IFINKEY$=" "THENNEXT 
705 RETURN 



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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 77 



710 DATA135, 14)3,139, 143, 128 ,143, 
132,140,136 

715 DATA129,143,128,128,143,128, 
132,140,136 

720 DATA142, 140, 139, 13 1,140, 129, 
140,140,140 

725 DATA140,140,139,140,140,143, 
140,140,136 

730 DATA143,133,138,140,141,142, 
128,132,136 

735 DATA143,140,140,140,140,143, 
140,140,140 

740 DATA143,140,140,143,140,143, 
140,140,140 

745 DATA142,140,143,128,135,136, 
132,136,128 

750 DATA143,140,143,143,140,143, 
140,140,140 

755 DATA143,140,143,140,140,143, 
140,140,140 

760 DATA135 , 140, 139 , 143 , 140, 143 , 
140,128,140 

765 DATA143,140,139,143,140,139, 

140,140,136 1 

770 DATA143,140,140,143,128,128, 

140,140,140 

775 DATA143,140,139,143,128,143, 
140,140,136 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCd owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining now the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



780 DATA143 


,140, 


,140 


,143 


,140,140, 

* m 9 # 9 


140,140,140 










785 DATA143 


1 140, 

f m \ 


,140 


,143 


,140,140, 

9 9 9 mm 


140,128,128 










790 DATA143 


»140, 

f r i 


,140 


,143 


,132,143, 

r w w 


140,140,140 










795 DATA143 


,128, 


,143 


,143 


,140,143, 

r / w w 


140,128,140 










800 DATA132 


,143, 


,136 


,128 


,143,128, 

f 9 9 


132,140,136 










805 DATA 140 


,141, 


,142 


,128 


,133,138, 

www 


140,140,136 










810 DATA143 


,129, 


,142 


,143 


,141,130, 

¥ ¥ f ¥ 


140,128,140 










815 DATA143 


,128, 


,128 


,143 


,128,128, 

9*9 


140, 140,140 










820 DATA, , , 


9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 

3,14)3,14 


9 9 9 9 


1 t 


825 DATA 14: 


3,14 


3,128,143 

9 9 


,140,140,140 








830 DATA143 

*m mm mam A «■ mm m* A «b * *m 


, 140 


,143 


, 143 


,140,140, 


140,128,128 

^mm IV mm m ^mm m ^mm wmm ^m 










835 DATA143 

^m *m *m mm* m, A mm mt A mmm m *m 


, 140 


,143 


,143 


,129,143, 

f r w 


140 , 140 , 142 

mmm * A/ I mm* m A/ I mm* * 










840 DATA143 

^m A */ mf4 A m mt A mm* * 


. 140 


, 143 


,143 


,141, 130, 

W W / W 


140, 128 , 140 










845 DATA143 


/140, 


,140 


,140 

9 # 


,140,143, 

9g9 9 


140,140,140 










850 DATA 140 


,143, 


,140 


,128 


, 143 , 128, 


128, 140, 128 










855 DATA143, 


,128, 


143, 


, 143, 


r 128, 143 , 


140,140,140 










860 DATA139 , 


,128, 


135, 


,141, 


,131,142, 

' ¥ W 


128,140,128 










865 DATA, , , , 


t i i i i 


i i i i 


f / / / J 

r w W 


f , 


870 DATA13 9 1 


,128, 


135, 


,132, 


,143,136, 

'WW 


128,140,128 










875 DATA140 , 


r!40, 


143 


,131, 


,140,128, 

f / 1 w 


140, 140, 140 










880 DATA14 3 , 


rl30, 


129, 


, 143, 


,143, 132, 


136,143,140, 


,128, 


128, 


, 140 




885 DATA143 1 


,139, 


128, 


,143, 


, 143 , 132, 


139,143,140, 


,128, 


132, 


, 140 




890 DATA143 , 


,128, 


128, 


,143, 


,143,134, 


137,143,132, 


,136, 


132, 


,136 




895 DATA141 , 


,130, 


129, 


,142, 


,129,134, 


137,130,140, 


,128, 


128, 


,140 






1 78 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



/ 



Metric Industries fine. 



Printer-Interface Package 

239.95 



with 



*Free shipping 

Seikosha SP-1000A 
Printer 



Metric Industries 
Model 104 Interface 
with Modem Switch 




Features of SP-1000A 

• Centronics parallel. 

• Impact dot matrix method, bi- 
directional in logic seeking, uni- 
directional in graphic printing. 

• 100 (Draft mode), 20 cps (Near 
Letter Quality) print speed, with 
reduced noise level. 

• Pin-feed or friction-feed. 

• Automatic paper loading function. 

• A variety of functions including 
Under line, Bold print, Double 
striking. 

• A variety of print character sets 




The Model 104 is a serial to parallel 
interface with the added feature of a 
serial port (sometimes referred to as a 
modem switch). This feature allows the 
connection of a parallel printer and 
any serial device (modem, serial printer 
etc.) to your computer. You may then 
select either output, serial or parallel, 
with the flip of a switch. The 104 is 
only 4.5" X 2.5" X 1.25" and comes 
with all cables and connectors for your 
computer. You supply the serial cable 
for your modem or other serial device. 

Interface is covered with a one-year 
warranty. 



Ordering Information 

*Free shipping and insurance in the 
United States except Alaska and 
Hawaii. 

Ohio residents add 5.5% sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use VISA, 

MASTERCARD or C.O.D. 

or send check or money order to: 

Metric Industries Inc. 

P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



Printout Sample 

789! ; <»>?«ABCDEF 
<=>?OABCDEFGH I JKLM , 
789: ; <=>?<9ABCDEFGHI 
/ei23456789:;<*>?*ABCDEFGHI 
789 ! J <*> 7&&BCDEF 
<=>?®ABCDEFGHIJKLM 
789: ; <=>?9ABCDEFGHI 
HFGH I JT ICL, 

EFQHI JKLHNOPQ 

789 7 ;<->7Mtco 

Graphics 

6 kinds of horizontal graphic density 
(480/ 576/640/720/960/1,920 dots/line) 
Multiple copies 
Original plus 2 copies 
Line spacing 

1/6, 1/8, 7/72, n/144, n/216 (n = 0-255) 
inches 
Line space feed 

6.7 lines/sec (6 lines/inch). 
10 lines/sec (9 lines/inch). 

Paper width 

Pin and friction *(4" to 10"), 
Dimensions 

390W X 119H X 278D(mm) with tractor 
(15.4W X 4JH X 10.9D inches) 
Weight 

4.9kg (10, 9 lbs) 



including Pica, Elite, Italics, 
Super/Subscripts, Proportional, 
Elongated, Condensed, and Italic 
Super/Subscripts, 
• Standard 1.5K buffer. 

Printer is covered with a two-year 
warranty. 




Call for prices on the 
SP-1000A and other 
Seikosha printers. 



Better to Leave EPROMs 
to Those in the Know 



By Marty Goodma 



• / have been considering the Disto Super 
Controller and its associated EPROM 
Programmer. I do not know much about 
EPROMs or their applications. Can I put 
my existing software into EPROM? How do 
I install such EPROMs? I 

Ricky Heavner 
Miami, FL 

In most cases EPROMs and EPROM 
programmers can only be fully used by folks 
who are familiar with the specifics of the 
Color Computer hardware and ROM soft- 
ware. It is possible to put commerical 
programs into EPROM, but a little tricky, 
and in most cases you gain little by doing 
so. 

For more information, check the essay on 
EPROMs in the Hardware Hacking section 
of the CoCo SIG on Delphi. 



• The letters I, O, H, J, K, L, N and M have 
ceased to work on my old 64K 'F' board 
Co Co. Can you help me? 

Paul Grover 
Plover, WI 

These keys are all wired to Row 2 of the 
keyboard matrix layout. The most likely 


Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cose 11 of the CoCo world. 
Marty is the database manager of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy, Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 



1 80 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



cause of your problem is a broken trace on 
the plastic keyboard connector. Unfortu- 
nately, this is very difficult to repair; a 
replacement keyboard is needed in this case. 
It is also possible, though less likely, that the 
connection is broken on the motherboard, 
either where the keyboard connector socket 
is soldered in or somewhere between that 
and its connection to the 6822 keyboard 
PIA. 



• When my computer is turned on it reads 
EXTENDED COLOR BASIC 1.1. But when I 
type EXEC 41175, I get back COLOR BASIC 
1 - 2. Which version do I have? 

I am considering purchasing a Tandy 
Disk Drive 0 Package with one drive in it. 
Can Hater add another drive acquired from 
a source other than Radio Shack? Are there 
any makes or models of drives you would 
recommend? 

Robert H. Ruggley 
Heyworth, IL 

Color Computers have their BASIC oper- 
ating system installed in three separate 
pieces: The Color basic ROM, the Ex- 
tended Color BASIC ROM, and the Disk 
BASIC ROM. When turned on, the computer 
displays the copyright and sign-on message 
associated with the highest level ROM 
(Color BASIC is the lowest, and Disk BASIC 
is the highest). Thus, your computer has 
Version 1.1 of the Extended basic ROM. 
When you type EXEC 41175 the computer 
shows the copyright and sign-on message in 
the Color BASIC ROM, a different part of the 
code. Thus, your computer's Color basic 
ROM is Version 1.2. 

If you are referring to the current model 
Radio Shack Drive 0 package that has a one- 
half height drive in a full-height horizontal 
cabinet, then the answer is yes, you can add 



any of a wide variety of makes of bare di 
drives as a second drive, and have them bo 
fit in the cabinet and work just fine as Dri 
1. Depending on the exact brand of dri 
you buy, you may encounter minor pro 
lems configuring the drive to make it thii 
it is Drive 1 , or making the 34-pin connect 
reach to the circuit board of some mod 
disk drives. Both of these problems are easi 
solved. 

Nearly any 40-track capable, 5Vi ini 
single- or double-sided drive should woi 
fine. Brands I have had good experieno 
with are TEAC model 54A single-sided ar 
model 55B or 55BV double-sided, TE 
model 501 single-sided and model 5C 
double-sided, and double-sided Shugar 
Matshusita and Panasonic model 455. 

Single-sided disk drives are no long* 
being made and will soon be unavailable. 



• My 16K Extended Color basic responc 
with 8487 when I type PRINT MEM. Why , 
this? How can I get the use of the full 16K 

Harold Harmo 
Riverside, Cj 

Although there is 16K of RAM in you 
computer, the basic operating system mus 
use a considerable portion of it in order 1 
function. This is why when you type PRIN 
MEM you are told that roughly half of tha 
amount of memory is available for basi< 
programs and data use. You can get mor 
memory by typing PCLEflR 1, and still mor 
by typing POKE 25,6:P0KE &G00,0:NEN. 



• Is there a POKE on the Color Computer ti 
inverse the screen? 

Jesus Padillt 
San Luis Potosi, Mexicc 



No. There is no simple way to generate 
/erse video with a software POKE. But 
ire are software utilities available to do so. 



How can I run my CoCo 2 off a 12 VDC 
>wer pack like one used for a VCR? How 
n I get a service manual for my Co Co 2? 
ie local Radio Shack was unhelpful. 

Francis Crosby 
Romulus, NY 

A comprehensive service manual is avail- 
>le for all models of CoCo 2. All Radio 
tiack stores should be able to order one for 
>u. The CoCo 2 service manual is also 
/ailable directly from Radio Shack Na- 
onal Parts. You can call them and ask for 
, giving them the catalog number of your 
)mputer. 

All models of CoCo 2 use pretty nearly the 
ime power supply. They generate an unreg- 
lated +10 volts at about 1.2 amps, and an 
nregulated -10 volts at about .2 amps, 
hese voltages are fed both to the SALT 
hip and the heat sunk pass transistor, and 
jgulated to +5 volts using the regulation 
ircuitry in the SALT chip. The -10 volts is 
sed only inside the SALT chip and is 
squired for the cassette port and relay to 
/ork and for the bit banger RS-232 port to 
/ork. Everything else works off just 5 volts 



only. You can get the needed negative 
voltage using a small battery. A 9-volt 
alkaline battery should do. A more elabo- 
rate approach would be to get -10 volts out 
of the +12-volt battery using a switching DC 
to DC voltage inverter. You can get 1 0 volts 
by running the 12-volt battery through three 
or four diodes in series. Each diode produces 
a .5 to .6 volt drop. 



CORRECTION 

In the August "CoCo Consultations" 
column, I wrote some slightly misleading 
material regarding the PCLEflR 0 statement. 
While the expression PCLEflR 0 is not legal 
in BASIC, in Extended BASIC you can ac- 
complish, in effect, a PCLEflR 0 (clearing all 
graphics pages from memory, freeing a 
maximum amount of RAM for BASIC pro- 
grams) by typing; 

POKE 25,6 
POKE &H600,0 
NEW 

I implied that only a PCLEflR 1 was 
possible under Disk Extended BASIC, This 
was careless of me. For, as Art Flexser 



immediately pointed out to me on Delphi, 
a PCLEflR 0 under Disk basic can easily be 
accomplished by typing: 

POKE 25,14 
POKE &HE00,0 
NEW 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

For quicker response time, your questions 
may also be posted in the FORUM section 
of rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. In 
FORUM, type ADD and address your ques- 
tions to the username MARTYGOOD- 
MAN. Marty is on most every evening to 
respond to FORUM messages. Other CoCo 
SIG members may also reply to questions 
posted in this public message area. Please be 
sure to leave your name and address in any 
FORUM questions, since those of wide 
interest will be selected for publication in 
this column. 



S.T.A.Q. 
A QRADEBOOK 

A full year gradebook. Track 
students not just for a 
semester, but for a full school 
year. Includes all the features 
you normally expect of a 
gradebook; weighted averag- 
ing of tests, homework scores, 
semester tests; correct, 
change or delete any student 
record; statistical analysis of 
scores; plus many more 
features not found In any other 
gradebook program. Included 
Is a complete report writer for 
your printer. Frankly, we 
believe S.T.A.G. to be the best 
full year gradebook program 
on the market today. Write for 
details. 

64k»Dlsk $35.00 
SECA 

TEACHER TESTED 

P.O. BOX 3134 
GULFPORT, MS 39505 
(601) 632-8236 

Ms. res. add 6% sales tax. In- 
clude $3 shipping/handling. 
Make checks payable to SECA. 
Dealers and authors inquiries 
welcome. No refunds or 
exchanges. 

10 Free disk given for 
each program ordered. 



THE WORD FACTORY'S 
WORD MEANINGS 

Captivating Graphic Game 
New Word List Maker 
Test Sheet Printer 
1144 Words & Meanings 
An aid for learning new words 
and their meanings. Create ad- 
ditional lists for game use or 
classroom printed tests. New 
lists created can be for any age 
grou-. 

Grade 2-Adult. 64k-Dlak 
$24.98 

PUZZLE MATH 

Hi-Res graphic game for rein- 
forcing addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division. 
Four levels of difficulty. Comes 
with 16 graphic pictures to 
start with. Add more if you 
wish. Each picture can be us- 
ed as an 8 to 48 piece puzzle. 
A favorite with kids. 
Grade 2-5. 64k- Disk $24.96 
THE WORD FACTORY'S 
SYNONYMS AND ANTONYMS 
Hi-Res Graphic Game 
New World List Maker 
Test Sheet Printer 
5760 Comb. Word List 
An aid for learning synonyms 
& antonyms. Create additional 
word lists for game use or 
classroom printed tests. 
Grade 2-Adult. 64k-Dlsk 
$24.96 




Forms 



P.O. Box 1061 
Wilkes-Barre, PA. 18792 

Introduces 

8>§£abel master go 

We are pleased to announce the addition of the 
LABELMASTER to our line. 

The LABELMASTER is compatible with ANY 
printer that can print text!!! 

With LABELMASTER you can: 

* Make customized diskette jackets! By using your favorite 
dump program, you may add your own personalized graphics 
design! 

* Print jackets with the disk's directory, on the front cover! 

* Print professional looking labels for your disks! 

* Print Blank, or personally customized Cassette labels! 

* Prepare and Maintain Mailing Labels! You may print an un- 
limited number of every label on the disk in one operation f 

* Save Money!!! LABELMASTER'S DISK-TWIN will allow you 
to easily double the storage capacity of each diskette! 

ORDER NOW! 

Only $19.95 



ALSO, 

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^CREDIT CARD ORDERS, CALL (717) 821-2946 



^QsterCor<^ 



PLEASE ADD S2.00 S&H. PA ORDERS ADD 6% SALES TAX 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 81 



This program makes it easy to use 
several different graphics programs 
without all the extension changing hassle 



Picture File Extension 

Changer 



By Jeff White 



"W" recent years many new graph- 
■ "WT|ics programs have come on 
JLJI-ithe market for the Color 
Computer, each with its own unique 
qualities. I find myself going from one 
to another quite often: using one pro- 
gram for drawing the basic outline of 



Jeff White is a self-taught programmer 
and has had a Co Co for three years. He 
is president of the Carrollwood Co Co 
Club and owner of Merlin's Software. 
Jeff lives in Tampa, Florida. 



the picture, another to paint it and yet 
another to edit my mistakes. 

The problem with this is that they all 
use different extensions to load and save 
the files. It is a hassle to rename the file 
each time you go from one to another, 
particularly when you have a whole disk 
of files and each one must be renamed. 
I went to work to solve this problem and 
Picture File Extension Changer was the 
result. 

This program changes individual file 
extensions or it can do an entire disk at 
once. It is menu driven and easy to use. 



The first thing that appears when rur 
ning the program is the title screen, 
used Maxcmp to convert the file t 
ASCII so I could merge the file with th 
title. You are asked if you need instruc 
tions. 

The main menu appears next an» 
there are seven options to choose from 
The most popular extensions are use< 
for options one through six. Optioi 
seven allows you to enter whateve 
extension you want. After selecting on 
of the choices, you are asked whethe 
you want to rename all of the files o 



260 . 
420 . 
600 . 
840 . 
1070 



192 
203 
137 
24 
178 



1260 
1360 
1520 
1640 
1730 
1820 



.136 
.133 
.213 
...3 
.203 
.195 



1910 
1990 
2080 
2170 
2260 
END 



.81 
197 
189 
134 
182 
126 



T 



The listing: EXTCHNGR 



Editor's Note: The following listing 
must be entered exactly as it appears in 
the magazine. To generate the under- 
score^) use SHiFT-up arrow. To gener- 
ate the backslash (\) use SHIFT-CLEAR. 



10 1 

2)3 1 

30 1 

40 1 

50 

60 

70 

80 

90 

100 

110 
120 
130 



PICTURE FILE 
EXTENTION CHANGER 
BY JEFF WHITE 
(C) 1986 



MERLIN'S SOFTWARE 

1304 FOUR SEASONS BLVD 

TAMPA, FLA. 33613 

(813) 971-4451 

B=3:CLS(B) 

PMODE4 , 1 

POKE179,l 

PCLS 



1 82 THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



rename individual files. If you choose 
files, every file with that extension 
11 be changed. Be careful when in this 
Dde; if you are changing files with BIN 
tensions, all files with BIN extensions 
11 be changed, not just picture files. 
Next, you are asked to enter the drive 
imber of the disk you want to rename. 



If you chose to rename all files earlier, 
it renames all selected extensions to the 
new extension. If you chose to rename 
individual files, a menu of all the files 
appears. Just enter the number next to 
the file you want to rename and it does 
it. When finished, press 'Q' to quit. 
After quitting, you are asked if you 



want to do another disk. If so, it returns 
to the main menu. If not, the program 
ends. 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to Mr. White at 1304 Four 
Seasons Blvd., Tampa, FL 33613. 
Please enclose an SASE when writ- 
ing.) □ 



140 SCREEN1, 1 

150 GOSUB1510 

160 FORT=1TO900:NEXTT 

170 PM0DE4,1:SCREEN1,1 

18J3 FORI=l TO 152: LINE (0,1) -(256 

,1) , PRESET: NEXT 

190 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 190 
200 FORI=192 TO 152 STEP-1:LINE( 
0,I)-(256,I) , PRESET: NEXT 
210 IF A$="Y" THEN 1240 • 
220 CLEAR2000 
230 B=3 

240 DIM C$(ll) / PIC$(68) 
250 CLS(B) 

260 PRINT" picture file extentio 
n changer" 

270 POKE1024,32:POKE1032,32:POKE 
1037 , 32 :POKE1047 , 32 : POKE1055 , 32 
280 PRINT@96,"1. RENAME <BIN> TO 
<MAX> " 

290 PRINT"2. RENAME <MAX> TO <BI 
N>" 

300 PRINT"3. RENAME <BIN> TO <PI 
C>" 

310 PRINT"4. RENAME <PIC> TO <BI 
N>" 

320 PRINT"5. RENAME <BIN> TO <PI 
X>" 

330 PRINT"6. RENAME <PIX> TO <BI 
N>" 

340 PRINT" 7. RENAME < ANOTHER <EX 
T>" 

350 PRINTQ185, "pick a";:PRINT@21 
7 /'number" 

360 POKE1213,32 

370 0$=INKEY$:IF 0$="" THEN 370 
380 IF 0$="1" THEN OE$="BIN" : NE$ 
="MAX" 

390 IF 0$="2" THEN 0E$="MAX" : NE$ 
=»BIN" 

400 IF 0$="3" THEN 0E$="BIN" : NE$ 
="PIC" 

410 IF 0$="4" THEN 0E$="PIC" : NE$ 
="BIN" 

420 IF 0$="5" THEN 0E$="BIN" : NE$ 
="PIX" 

430 IF 0$="6" THEN 0E$="PIX" : NE$ 
=»BIN" 

440 IF 0$="7" THEN PRINT© 3 52 , " " ; 
: INPUT"0LD EXTENT I ON" ;0E$ : PRINT@ 



352," ":PRIN 
T@352 , "" ; : INPUT"NEW EXTENT I ON" ;N 
E$ 

450 0=VAL(0$) 

460 IF 0<1 OR 0>7 THEN 370 

470 PRINT© 3 5 2, "RENAME ( 1 ) ALL OR 

(2) INDIVIDUAL?"; 

480 R$=INKEY$:IF R$="" THEN480 

490 IF R$="l" THEN A=1:GOTO520 

500 IF R$="2" THEN A=2:GOTO520 

510 GOTO480 

520 PRINT@448," (ENTER 
)= 0" 

530 P0KE1471,95 

540 PRINT@416,"";: INPUT "ENTER DR 

IVE NUMBER (0 , 1 , 2 , 3 ) " ;K 

550 IF K<0 OR K>3 THEN 530 

560 DRIVE K 

570 CLS(B) 

580 GOSUB800 

590 "RENAME INDIVIDUAL FILES 

600 PRINTQ392 , "enter the number" 



610 PRINT@425," 
620 POKE1425,32 
630 POKE1448,32 
1455,32:POKE146 
640 PRINT@456," 
650 POKE1482,32 
1493,62 

660 POKE1494,32 
670 PRINT@488," 



of the picture" ; 
:POKE1421,32 
:POKE1451,32:POKE 
3,32 

to be renamed" ; 

:P0KE1485, 32 : POKE 

:POKE1495,32 
type (q) to quit" 



680 POKE1516,32:POKE1517,60:POKE 
1519 , 62 : POKE1520 , 32 : POKE1523 , 32 
690 PRINT© 4 70, "" ; :LINE INPUT" ";F 

$ 

700 FORT=1496TO1503 : POKE T,62:NE 
XT 

710 IF F$="Q" THEN 1140 
720 F=VAL(F$) 

730 IF F<1 OR F>C THEN 660 
740 CLS(B) 

750 PRINT@192," " ; PIC$ (F) ; " IS 

NOW BEING RENAMED" 

760 P$=PIC$(F)+"/"+NE$ 

770 RENAME PIC$ (F) +"/"+0E$ TO P$ 

780 GOSUB800 

790 GOTO600 

800 'GET FILE NAMES 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 183 



81J3 FOR X = 3 TO 11 

820 DSKI$ K,17,X,A$,B$ 

830 IF (LEFT$(A$ / 1)=CHR$(&HFF) ) 

THEN 85)3 | 

840 C$ (X)=A$+LEFT$(B$, 127) : NEXT 
X 

850 X=X+1:C=1 

860 FOR Y = 3 TO X:FOR Z=0 TO 7 
870 IF MID$(C$(Y) ,Z*32+9,3)<> OE 
$ THEN 920 I 

880 PIC$(C)=MID$(C$(Y) ,Z*32+1,8) 

890 L$=LEFT$(PIC$(C) ,1) 

900 IF (L$=CHR$(0) OR L$=CHR$(&H 

FF)) THEN 920 

910 C=C+1 

920 NEXT ZtNEXT Y 

930 IF A=l THEN GOSUB1030 

940 C=C-1 

950 IF C=0 THEN 1470 
960 MID=INT(C/2)+l 
970 CLS(B) :TAB=1 
980 FOR D = 1 TO C 

990 PRINT@TAB, USING" ##";D; : PRINT 

". — > " ;PIC$(D) ; 

1000 TAB=TAB+32:IF D=MID THEN TA 
B=16 

1010 NEXT D 
1020 RETURN 

1030 1 RENAME ALL FILES 

1040 FORD=l TO C-l 

1050 IF C=l THEN 1470 

1060 PRINT@224, ,, < l, +OE$+"> FILES 

NOW BEING RENAMED TO<"+NE$+"> FI 

LES . " | 

1070 P$=PIC$(D)+»/"+NE$ 

1080 RENAME PIC$ (D) +"/"+OE$ TO P 

$ 

1090 NEXTD 
1100 CLS 
1110 DIR 

1120 PRINT© 3 8 4, "ALL <"+OE$+"> FI 
LES HAVE NOW BEEN RENAMED TO < 
"+NE$+"> FILES." 
1130 GOTO1160 
1140 CLS: DIR 

1150 PRINT@384 , "ALL SELECTED <"+ 

OE$+"> FILES HAVE NOW BEEN CHA 

NGED TO <"+NE$+"> FILES." 

1160 PRINT@448,"DO YOU WISH TO D 

0 ANOTHER DISK? (yes 

/NO) "j; 

1170 FORT=1TO300:NEXT 

1180 PRINT@448,"DO YOU WISH TO D 

0 ANOTHER DISK? 1 (YES 

/no) " 

1190 FORT=1TO300 S NEXT 

1200 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN1160 

1210 IF A$="Y" THEN 220 



1220 IF A$="N" THEN 1230 ELSE 12 
00 

1230 POKE113,0:EXEC40999. 
1240 'INSTRUCTIONS 
1250 CLS(B) 

1260 PRINT" INSTRUCTION 
S " * 

1270 PRINT" MANY NEW GRAPHIC PRO 
GRAMS HAVE COME ON THE MARKET RE 
CENTLY THATUSE EXTENTIONS OTHER 
THAN THE STANDARD <BIN>. THERE 

MAY BE "; 
1280 PRINT"TIMES WHEN YOU WOULD 
LIKE TO USEA FILE FROM ONE BUT I 
T HAS TO BERENAMED BECAUSE OF TH 
E EXTENTION"; 

1290 PRINT"DIFFERENCE. MANY TIME 
S YOU MAY WISH TO WORK ON A FUL 
L DISK OF FILES BUT YOU WOULD H 
AVE TO GO "; 

1300 PRINT "AND RENAME EVERYONE. 
WELL THIS PROGRAM WILL HELP YOU 

OUT . " ; 

1310 PRINT@448," PRESS SPACEBA 
R TO CONTINUE " ; 
1320 EXEC44539 
1330 CLS(B) 

1340 PRINT" PICTURE FILE EXTENTI 
ON CHANGER WILL CHANGE THOSE EXT 
ENTIONS FORYOU. THE PROGRAM IS M 
ENU DRIVEN AND VERY EASY TO USE. 

YOU HAVE A"; 
1350 PRINT"CHOICE OF RENAMING AL 
L OF THE FILES OR SOME OF THE 
FILES . " 

13 60 PRINT" IF YOU CHOOSE TO REN 
AME ALL THEFILES IT WILL CHANGE 
EVERY <BIN>FILE ON THE DISK SO C 
HECK TO MAKE SURE ALL THE FIL 
ES ON THE DISK ARE PICTURES." 
1370 PRINT: PRINT 

1380 PRINT@448," PRESS SPACEBA 
R TO CONTINUE " 
1390 EXEC44539 
1400 CLS(B) 

1410 PRINT" IF YOU CHOOSE INDIVI 
DUAL YOU CAN PICK WHICH ONES Y 
OU WANT TO CHANGE. BASIC FILES A 
RE IGNORED IN BOTH CASES." 
1420 PRINT" THAT IS ABOUT ALL YO 
U NEED TO KNOW. I HOPE THIS PRO 
GRAM IS AS HANDY TO YOU HAS IT H 
AS BEEN FORME." 

1430 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRI 
NT 

1440 PRINT@448," PRESS SPACEBA 
R TO CONTINUE " 
1450 EXEC44539 



184 THE RAINBOW October 1986 




[ 

( 



I 






Orders 
800-628-2828 
Ext. 850 



Information 

301-521-4886 



Handicappers! 



The Pros 




Tired of wrestling with Sunday point 
spreads? Let your Color Computer 
do it for you! Pigskin Predictions, the 
best-selling NFL handicapper, is 
ready for 1985. Spend a few minutes 
typing in scores each week, and 
here's what it will do: 

■ Menu-driven selection of 
schedules, ratings, division races, 
predictions or results by team or 
week. Seven different reports avail- 
able. 

■ Easy once-a-week entry of 
scores-no complex, meaningless 
stats. 

■ Predicts scores of ail games for remainder of sea- 
son each week! 

■ Calculates projected won-lost records for all 
weeks. 

■ Maintains home field advantage and power rat- 
ings for all teams. 

■ 1985 schedule data file included free. 

■ 32/64K enhanced version features dazzling Rain- 
bow Writer Screen display. Seeing is believing! Stan- 
dard 16K version included, too. 

■ You II be amazed at the power of this program. 
16/32K LCB required <32K for disk). Only $39.95 on 
tape or disk. 1985 Data tape or disk for previous own- 
ers, just $13.95. 




College 



After two years of searching, we've 
finally found a college football handi- 
capper! We think it's a winner! The 
Lockmaster® maintains stats on 
105 major college teams, analyzes 
the local point-spread, and rates the 
game as a betting proposition. Why 
waste your efforts on games with 
marginal chances of success, when 
you can get your Color Computer to 
pick the games that are most likely 
to make you a winner? 

To use the program, all you need 
are the College Football ratings that 
appear each week in USA Today. You can run individual 
games (including bowl games), update team stats and 
customize each game's rating with critical information 
such as coaching and quarterback changes and injuries 
to key players. 

Using the weekly stats and our mathematical formu- 
la (which includes schedule difficulty, power ratings, of- 
fense and defense), The Lockmaster rates each game 
against the current point spread and tells you how sure 
the bet is. 

The Lockmaster is easy to use and menu driven. It in- 
cludes complete instructions and data file for 105 major 
college teams. 32K/64K Disk only. Just $39.95. 



Thoroughbred, Harness, Greyhound 




•HORSE RACES- 





Use your Color Computer to improve your performance 
at the track! These 16K programs for Thoroughbred, Har- 
ness and Greyhound racing rank the horses or dogs in 
each race quickly and easily, even if you've never handi- 
capped before. All the information you need is readily avail- 
able from the Racing form, harness or dog track program. 
We even provide diagrams showing you where to find each 
item! 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, past 
performance, weight, class, jockey's record, beaten favor- 
ite and post position. Harness factors include speed, post 
position, driver's record, breaking tendencies, class, oark- 



DOG RACES- 



ed-out signs and beaten favorite. Greyhound factors in- 
clude speed, past performance, maneuvering ability, favor- 
ite box, class, kennel record, beaten favorite and breaking 
ability. 

We include complete instructions and a wagering guide 
that tells you which races to bet and hwich to avoid — one 
of the real secrets of good handicapping. You can buy a 
more expensive handicapper, but we don't think you can 
buy a better one! Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound 
Handicapper, $39.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for 
$59.95 or all three for $74.95. 



Y L LmJ Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore. Md. 21208 




< 



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186 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 



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October 1986 THE RAINBOW 187 



Recommended Reading for Your CoCo from . . . /^fftfe 

The Rainbow Bookshelf 





I Ml u\i\u<»\\ in m ik 
til AllVKYCI HI'S 




The Complete Rainbow Guide To OS-9 

The book that demystifies the state-oMhe-art operating system 
for the Tandy Color Computer, Authors Dale L. Puckett and Peter 
Dibbie show you how to take advantage of OS-9's multi-tasking 
and multi-user features, and the capability of redirecting input 
and output commands at will. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide 
packed with hints and tips, tutorials and free software in the form 
of program listings. 

Book $19.95, Disk $31.00 (2 disks, book not included) 

The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

Features 20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
Simulation programming competition. You are the Commander- 
in-Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, an air 
traffic controller at one of the nation's busiest airports, the owner 
of your own software business, a civil defense coordinator in 
charge of saving Rainbow City from a raging flood, a scientist 
conducting experiments on Mars . , . Your wits are on the line. 
Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



s/ 

The Rainbow Book of Adventures 

A collector's item containing 14 winning programs from the 
rainbow's very first Adventure contest. Includes such favorites 
as Sir Randolf of the Moors, Search for the Ruby Chalice, Deed 
of the York, Horror House, One Room, The Door and Dr. A valoe. 
Plus, hints and tips on solving Adventures, 
Book $7.95, Tape $7.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Our newest arrival features 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
games ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue 
Meanies, find a hidden fortune, or win the heart of a beautiful 
and mysterious princess. Experience the thrills and chills of the 
most rugged Adventurer without ever leaving your seat. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos> Island 
and more! 

Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



Coming soon 
The Rainbow Guide to Introductory Statistics 
The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 



I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

(book only) $ 1 9.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) $31 .00 



Name 




□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 



$ 7.95 
$ 7.95 



□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13.95 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape $13.95 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4.00 per book 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



Address 

City 

State — 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 




Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Fatsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, they are intended to be an 
adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. 
OS-9® is a registered trademark of thfc Microware Systems Corporation. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 



* * * 

D0C0 Community 



FLORIDA 

Northwest Florida CoCo Nuts, Lee Gottcher, P.O. 
Box 1032, Fort Walton Beach, 32549, (904) 678- 
8894 



KENTUCKY 

Perry County CoCo Users Group, Keith W. Smith, 
General Delivery, Hardburly, 41747, (606) 439- 
4209 

LOCO-COCO, Jim Spillman, 2405 Woodmont Dr., 
Louisville, 40220, (502) 454-5331 

LOUISIANA 

Cajun CoCo Club, Rick Herbert, P.O. Box 671, 
Crowley, 70526, (318) 788-3148 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Greater Boston Super Color Users Group, Robert 
Biamonte, 6 Boulder Drive, Burlington, 01803 

Massachusetts CoCo Club, Jason Rahaim, Spring 
St., Lunenberg, 01462, (617) 582-6514 

CLUB 6809, Jean Salvas, 204 East Street, Spring- 
field, 01104, (413) 734-5163 

MICHIGAN 

Color C.H.I. P.S., Jack Pieron, 3175 Oakhill Place, 
Clarkston, 48016, (313) 627-4358 

CCUG (Color Computer Users Group), Rich Van 
Manen, 0-599 Lake Michigan Dr., Grand Rap- 
ids, 49504, (616) 453-8351 

Grand Rapids Area Tandy Users Group, Robert M. 
Worth, Jr., 1726 Millbank S.E., Grand Rapids, 
49508 (616) 245-9324 

Greater Kalamazoo Color Computer Club, Jim Rix, 
1835 Chevy Chase Blvd., Kalamazoo, 49008, 
(616) 344-7631 

Greater Lansing Color Computer Users Group, P.O. 
Box 14114. Lansing, 48901 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

MISSISSIPPI 

Singing River C.C. Club, Mark Welch, 3605 Van- 
cleave Rd., #118, Gautier, 39553, BBS (601 ) 875- 
8688 

Gulf Coast Color Computer Assoc., Ed Keels, 22 
Christy Cove, Gulfport, 39503, (601) 832-1210 

CoCo Art Club, Joel Bunyard, Rt. 16, Box 11, 
Meridian, 39301, (601) 483-0424 

MISSOURI 

North County 80 Group, Tom Vogel, 12 Ville Donna 
Ct. Hazelwood, 63042, (314) 739-4078 

Mid-America Color Computer User's Group, Jerry 
Morgon, 807 Ponca Drive, Independence, 
64056, (816) 796-5813 

Coconuts, 1610 N. Marian, Springfield, 65803 
NEBRASKA 

Siouxland Color Computer Club, Alan Pedersen, 
61 1 D Street, South Sioux City, 68776, (402) 494- 
2284 

NEVADA 

CAT. F.U.N., Paul A. Osborne, 201 Miners Road, 
Fallon, 89406, (702) 423-5789 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CoCo Nuts, Matthew Pietrusewicz, R.F.D. #1, Box 
548, Pelham, 03076, (603) 635-7098 

NEW JERSEY 

West Orange CoCo Club, Gregg Favalora, 12 
Blackburne Terrace, W. Orange, 07052, (201) 
736-1748 (let ring 12 times) 

Loco CoCo Club, Bud Lavin, 73B Wavercrest Ave., 
Winfield Park, 07036 

NEW MEXICO 

Chaves County Color Computer Club, Lee Mitchell, 
1102 Melrose Drive, Roswell, 88201, (505) 623- 
0789 

NEW YORK 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Albany Chapter), Ron Fish, 
Box 4125, Albany, 12204, (518) 465-9793 

Adirondack CoCo Club, (Greene County Chapter), 
Pete Chast, P.O. Box 61, Athens, 12015, (518) 
945-1636 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Glens Falls Chapter), 
Richard Mitchell, 39 Center St., Fort Edwards, 
12828 



I At ehavecompiledalistof 
WW Color Computer Clubs 
W W because of the many re- 
quests we have received. CoCo 
"lubs may wish to exchange 
newsletters, share ideas for top- 
es of discussion at monthly 
meetings, etc. 

Please let us know if we have 
emitted any clubs and send us 
complete up-to-date addresses. 
Only those clubs that have 
signed our "agreement form" will 
appear in this listing of CoCo 
Clubs. Also, please notify us if you 
wish to add or delete any names 
on this list. Send your information 
to: 

CoCo Clubs 
THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

"^^t 

RIZONA 

ucson Color Computer Club, Bill Nunn, 9631 E. 
Stella, Tucson, 85730, (602) 721-1085 

CALIFORNIA 

;olor America Users Group, Mark Randall, 2227 
Canyon Road, Arcadia, 91006, (818) 355-6111 

os Angeles-Wilshire Color Computer Users' 
Group, Norm Wolfe, P.O. Box 11151, Beverly 
Hills, 90213, (213) 838-4293 

California Computer Federation, (San Fernando 
Valley Chapter), Pete Ellison, 366 West Provi- 
dencia Ave., Burbank, 91506, (818) 840-8902 

California Computer Federation, (San Francisco 
Chapter), Art Murray, P.O. Box 7007, Redwood 
City, 94063, (415) 366-4560, BBS (415) 364-2658 

The Davis CoCoNuts, Shneor Sherman, 1818 
Haussler Dr., Davis, 95616, (916) 758-3195 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Patricia Scheffer, 
1435 W. 172nd Street, Gardena, 90247, (213) 
371-2016 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Bill Tillerson, 73 
Alamitos Ave., Suite 2, Long Beach, 90802, (213) 
432-3037 

Ventura County Color Computer Club (VC4), Doug 
McLaughlin, Oxnard Public Library, 214 South 
"C" Street, Oxnard, 93030, (805) 984-4636 or 
BBS (805) 484-5491 

Citrus Color Computer Club, Jack Brinker, P.O. Box 
6991, San Bernadino, 92412, (714) 824-1866 

South Bay Color Computer Users Group, John G. 
Say. 3117 Balmoral Drive, San Jose, 95132, 
(408) 923-2967 

COLORADO 

The ESCO Computer Club, David E. Schulz, 1299 
Harrison Street, Denver, 80206, (303) 388-6988 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, Virginia 22193, (703) 
690-2453 



Jacksonville Color Computer Club, William H. 
Brown III, 241 1 Hirsch Ave., Jacksonville, 32216, 
(904) 721-0282 

CoCo Chips Color Computer Club, 715 5th Avenue 
NE, Largo, 33540, (813) 581-7779 

Broward County Color Computer Club, George 
Aloia, 2263 N.W. 65 Avenue, Margate, 33063, 
(305) 972-0975 

South Brevard Color Computer Club, Benjamin S. 
Jerome, 496 Hillside Court, Melbourne, 32935, 
(305) 259-4609 

Color-6809 Users Group, Emery Mandel.4301 11th 
Avenue North, St. Petersburg, 33713-5207, (813) 
323-3570, BBS (813) 321-0397 

C.C. Club of Sarasota, Ernie Bontrager, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd., Sarasota, 33583. (813) 921-7510 

GEORGIA 

The Northeast Atlanta Color Computer Club, Joe 
Novosel, P.O. Box 450915, Atlanta, 30345, (404) 
921-7418 

Atlanta Color Computer Users Group, Terry E. 
Love, 5155 Maroney Mill Rd., Douglasville, GA 
30134, (404)949-5356 

ILLINOIS 

Illinois Color Computer Club of Elgin, Tony Po- 
draza, 1 19 Adobe Circle, Carpentersville, 60110, 
(312) 428-3576 

Northern Illinois Color Computer Club, Kenneth 
Trenchard, Sr., 6145 N. Sheridan Road 30, 
Chicago, 60660, (312) 973-5208 

Willow-Works Club, Kevin L Adair, 5753 S. Laflin, 
Chicago, 60636, (312) 737-5716 

Peoria Color Computer Club, Harold E. Brazee, 102 
Twin Oak Court, East Peoria, 61611, (309) 694- 
4703 

Glenside Color Computer Club, Ed Hathaway, 8 W. 
Stevenson Drive, Glendale Heights, 60139, (312) 
462-0694 

Kitchen Table Color Computer Group, Robert Mills, 
P.O. Box 464, Hanover, 61041, (815) 591-3377 

Motorola Microcomputer Club, Steve Adler, 1301 
Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg, 60196, (312) 576- 
3044 

Chicago OS-9 Users Group, John Chasteen, 480 
Gilbert Drive, Wood Dale, 60191, (312) 860-2580 

INDIANA 

Three Rivers Color Computer Club, R.R. 3, Box 269, 
Angola, 46703 

CoCo Program Exchange, Erik Merz, 3307 Arrow 
Wood Dr., Fort Wayne, 46815, (219) 749-0294 

Indy Color Computer Club, Kevin S. Jessup, Sr., 
P.O. Box 26521, Indianapolis, 46236, (317) 873- 
5808 

Southern Indiana Computer Club, Route 1 , Box 459, 
Mitchell, 47446 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

IOWA 

CoCo Questers, Scott Bellman, 2420 Salem Court, 
Bettendorf, 52722, (319) 359-7702 

Metro Area Color Computer Club (MACCC), David 
E. Hansen, 3147 Avenue J, Council Bluffs, 
51501, (712) 323-7867 

Dubuque Tandy Users Group, Wesley Kullhem, 
1995 Lombard, Dubuque, 52001, (319) 556-4137 

KANSAS 

KC CoCo Club, Gay Crawford, P.O. Box 11192, 
Kansas City, 66111, (913) 764-9413 

Micro 80 Users Group, Kevin Cronister, 2224 Hope, 
Topeka, 66614, (913) 272-1353 

Color Computer Club of Wichita, William Wales, 220 
East Harry St., Lloyd Electronics, Wichita, 
67220, (316) 685-9587, BBS (316) 685-8752 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 189 



UTAH 

Salt City CoCo Club, Dennis Mott, 720 E. Browning 
Ave., Salt Lake City, 84105, (801 ) 487-6032, BBS 
(801)487-6787 " 

VIRGINIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, 22193, (703) 690-2453 

Central Virginia Color Computer Club, Roger Lee, 
Rt. 2 Box 175, Madison Heights, 24572 

WASHINGTON 

Northwest Computer Club, Larry Haines, East 2924 
Liberty, Spokane, 99207, (509) 483-5547 

Mount Rainier Color Computer Club, Ron Amos, 
2450 Lenore Drive N., Tacoma, 98406, (206) 752- 
8735 



Group, Keith Gallagher, P.O. Box 264, Rh 
stone, New South Wales, 2765, (02) 627-462 

COCOPUG, Harry Murphy, 8 Lois Court, Regef 
ville, New South Wales, 2750 

CoCoHUG (Color Computer Hobart Users Grot 
Robert Delbourgo, 15 Willowdene Aven 
Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania, 7005 

ISRAEL 

The First Color Computer Club of Israel, J. Yo 
Krinsky, Data Processing Division, 1 Rat 
Street, Netanya, Israel, (053) 52277 

MEXICO 

Mexcoco Users Group, Sergio Waisser, Paseode 
Soledad #120, Mexico City, D.F., 53920, pho 
294-36-63 



Island Color Computer Club, Joseph Castelli, P.O. 
Box 901, Bellmore, 11710, BBS (516) 783-7506 

Kings Byte CoCo Club, Morty Libowitz, 1063 East 
84th St., Brooklyn, 11236, (718) 763-4233, BBS 
(718) 837-2881 

C.C, Club of Central N.Y., Joseph Short, 248 S. 
Fourth Ave., Won, 13357, (315) 895-7730 

Rockland County Color Computer Users Group, 
Harold L. Laroff, P.O. Box 131, Monsey, 10952- 
0131,(914) 425-2274 

Olean Area CoCo Users Group, Herman L. Smith, 
P.O. Box 216, Olean, 14760, (716) 933-7488, 
BBS (716) 933-7489 

The Rochester S-80 Computer Club, Inc., Gary 
Panepinto, P.O. Box 15476, Rochester, 14615, 
(716) 392-6133 

New York Color Computer User Group, Carl Glo- 
vinsky, 15 Bolivar St., Staten Island, 10314, (718) 
761-0268 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Bull City CoCo Users Group, Todd Wall, 5319 
Durand Drive, Durham, 27703, (919) 598-1348 

Raleigh Color Computer Club, David Roper, P.O. 
Box 680, Garner, 27529 

OHIO 

Central Ohio Color Computer Club, Jim Upperman, 
5201 Wilcox Road, Amlin, 43002, (614) 876-1767 

Color Computer Club, Inc., William Wills, P.O. Box 
468, Canfield, 44406 

Dayton Color Computer Users Group, Steven E. 
Lewis, 4230 Cordell Dr., Dayton, 45439, (513) 
299-3060 

Dayton Area Color Computer Users Group, David 
R. Barr, 2278 Yorkshire PI., Kettering, 45419, 
(513) 293-2228 

Greater Toledo Color Computer Club, William Paul 
Saba Sr., 3423 Cragmoor Ave., Toledo, 43614, 
(419) 385-9004 

Tri-County Computer Users Group, William J. 
Loeffler, 2612 Dale Avenue, Rocky River, 44116, 
(216) 356-0779 

Miami Valley CoCo Club, Tim Ellis, 1805 W. Park- 
way Dr., Piqua, 45356, (513) 773-2244 

OKLAHOMA 

Green Country Computer Association, Michael 
Keller, P.O. Box 2431, Tulsa, 74101, (918) 245- 
3456 (DATA) 

PENNSYLVANIA 

HUG-A-CoCo, George Lurie, 2012 Mill Plain Court, 
Harrisburg, 17110, (717) 657-2789 

Penn-Jersey Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 2742, 
Lehigh Valley, 18001 

Skyline Color Computer Club of Berks County, 
Lewis F. Brubaker, 4874 Eighth Ave., Temple, 
19560, (215) 921-3616 

Pittsburgh Color Group, Ralph Marting, P.O. Box 
351, West Mifflin, 15122, (412) 823-7607 

RHODE ISLAND 

New England COCONUTS, P.O. Box 28106, North 
Station, Providence, 02908 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

LoCo CoCo Club, Larry Coyle, 4334 Flynn Dr., 
Charleston, 29405, (803) 747-0802 

Midlands 80 Computer Club, Frank Eargle, P.O. Box 
7594, Columbia, 29202, TBBS (803) 791-7389 

Spartanburg County CoCo Club, Lawrence Easier, 
Jr., Rt. 1 Highway 221, Spartanburg, 29302, 
(803) 578-3120 

TENNESSEE 

Tri-Cities Computer Club, Gary Collins, P.O. Box 
4506 CRS, Johnson City, 37602-4506, (615) 929- 
1862 

Foothills Micro-Computer Club, Aaron Sentell, P.O. 
Box 1541, Maryville, 37801, (615) 982-4629 

TEXAS 

The San Antonio Color Computer Club, James 
Leatherman, 2430 Rawhide Lane, San Antonio, 
78227 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Mil-O-Bar Computer Club, Jim LeMaster, P.O. Box 
130, Ona, 25545, (304) 743-4752 after 4 p.m. 

Blennerhassett CoCo Club, David Greathouse, 
1306 Wells Circle, Parkersburg, 26101 

WISCONSIN 

Southern Wisconsin CoCo Club, David C. Buehn, 
24607 67th Street, Salem, 53168, (414) 843-3830 

CANADA 

ALBERTA 

Calgary Color Computer Club, Don Towson, 832 
Cannell Rd. S.W., Calgary, T2W 1T4, (403) 281- 
2855 

Edmonton CoCo Users Group, Dexter Dombro, 
P.O. Box 4507 Stn. South, Edmonton, T6E 4T7, 
(403) 439-5245 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Salmon Arm CoCo, David Coldwell, RR #4, Site 26 

Comp. 13, Salmon Arm, V1E 4M4 
MANITOBA 

Winnipeg Micro-80 Users Group, Robert Black, 
1 755 King Edward St., Winnipeg, R2R 0M3, (204) 
633-7196 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax Dartmouth CoCo Users Group, Eugene 
Naugler, P.O. Box 572, Dartmouth, B2Y 3Y9 

Colour Computer Halifax User Group (CoCo Hug), 
Paul A. Power, 6354 London St., Halifax, B3L 
1X3, (902) 455-6341 

ONTARIO 

ESSA Color Computer Club, Albert L. Ley, 40 Perry 
Street, Barrie, L4N 2G3, (705) 728-9481 

Kingston CoCo Club, Kenneth Bracey, 316 West- 
date Ave., Apt. 4-C, Kingston, K7L 4S7, (613) 
544-2806 

K-W CoCo Club, P.O. Box 1291, Station C, Kitch- 
ener, N2G 4G8 

London CoCo Nuts Computer Club, Harry K. 
Boyce, 180 Concord Road, London, N6G 3H8, 
(519) 472-7706 

Niagara Regional CoCo Club, Gerry Chamberland, 
6843 Cumberland Crt., Niagara Falls, L2H 2J9, 
(416) 357-3462 

Ottawa 6809 Users Group, Norm Shoihet, 1497 
Meadowbrook Road, Ottawa, K1B 5J9, (613) 
741-1763 

Sarnia Computer Users Group, J. Verdon, P.O. Box 

1082, Sarnia, N7T 7K5, (519) 344-6985 
QUEBEC 

Club d'Ordinateur Couleur du Quebec, Inc., Centre 
de Loisirs St-Mathieu, 7110- 8e Ave., St-Michel, 
Montreal, H2A 3C4, (514) 270-7507 

Club ORCO-RS, Jacques Bedard, 33 Lisiere, St- 
Constant, P.Q., J0L 1X0, (514) 632-4311 

Le Club Couleur du Nord, Gabriel Pigeon, CP. 315, 

Barraute, P.Q., JOY tAO, (819) 734-2577 
SASKATCHEWAN 

Saskatoon Color Computer Club, L. Curtis Boyle, 
35 Bence Crescent, Saskatoon, S7L 4H9, (306) 
382-1459, BBS (306) 384-8040 

FOREIGN 

AUSTRALIA 

Blacktown City TRS-80 Colour Computer Users 



the NETHERLANDS 

Color Computer Club Benelux, Jorgen te Giff 
Eikenlaan 1, 4641 GB Ossendrecht, the Nethi 
lands 

PERU 

Piura Color Computer Club, Carlos Alvarez, Bi 
142, AV. Guillermo Irazola, J-6 URB. Miraflor 
Castilla, Piura, Peru, phone (074) 327182 

WEST GERMANY 

First CoCo Club Hamburg, Theis Klauberg, Krie 
kamp 27A, Hamburg 65, West Germany 200 
FRG, phone (040) 536-36-76 



new clubs 



Editor, 

CoCo clubs desiring to exchange publi 
domain software with the Color Americ 
Users Group can contact Jack Eizenga, Dis 
Librarian, 3811 N. Foster Avenue, 9170( 
Call (818) 960-8010. At the present time w 
have 25 disks full of public domain software 
We believe this to be one of the larges 
collections anywhere. 

Jack W. Eizengt 
Baldwin Park, C/ 

• I would like to announce the beginning o 
the Fresno Color Computer Clul 
(F.C.C.C.). For information, write to 607 E 
Magili, 93710. 

Mike Cycof 
Fresno, C/. 

• Is there anyone who lives in my area whe 
would like to start a CoCo club? Write mt 
at 8250 Dorothy Street, 91770. 

Tony Kwar 
Rosemead, CA 

• I would like to announce a new CoCc 
club called the South Bay Color Computet 
Users Group. TBBS is running 1 1 various 
CoCo sub-boards with four separate up/ 
download software bases. Members will 
receive a monthly newsletter which contains 
a BBS list, pokes page, news section with the 
latest happenings from CompuServe, Del- 
phi and other branches of the CoCo world. 
We will be holding monthly meetings where 
members can access our program library. 
For more information call (408) 867-2823, 
Allan Schaffer; (408) 923-2967, John Say; or 
call our TBBS at (408) 253-6293. 

John Say 
San Jose, CA 



1 90 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



I would like to announce the existence of 
le CoCo Cartel, a Color Computer users 
roup. For more information, write to 4059 
cacia Drive, 31904. 

Dennis Weldy 
Columbus, GA 

Does anybody out there want to start a 
ublic domain software club? The club 
ould include a directory of current public 
omain software that the club already has. 
'his could be in the form of a newsletter. Its 
lembers could give and receive public 
omain software. The list could grow larger 
nd larger with every contribution. This 
/ould really get the public domain software 
ut in the open. Send suggestions to 1821 
rfalibu Drive, 83401. 

David Harris 
Idaho Falls, ID 

> Announcing the formation of the Willow- 
Vbrks Club. If you're interested in joining, 
here is a $10 entry fee. For more informa- 
ion, write to 5753 S. Laflin, 60636. 

Kevin L. Adair 
Chicago, IL 

> The Indy Color Computer Club meets the 
irst and third Tuesdays of each month, 7 
),m., Cropsey Auditorium, Central Library, 
St. Clair at Pennsylvania, Indianapolis. 
Membership information may be obtained 
:>y calling Paul Chastain at (317) 545-2125, 
;he I.C.C.C. Hotline BBS at (317) 873-5808 
or by writing to I.C.C.C, P.O. Box 26521, 
Lawrence, IN 46226. 

Kevin S. Jessup, Sr. 
Lawrence, IN 

• The Color Computer Club of Wichita 
meets on the last Thursday of the month at 
7 p.m., District 70 I.A.M. Lodge, 235 
By Pass and Meridian. Write me at 220 East 
Harry Street, 67220 or call (316) 685-9587. 

William Wales 
Wichita, KS 



mailing the quarterly newsletter are most 
welcome. 

John Ogasapian 
Pepperell, MA 

• Announcing the formation of a new 
CoCo club called the Williamsport Area 
Color Computer Club. Meets every third 
Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. in the 
James V. Brown Library. If you have any 
questions contact me at (717) 322-9715 or 
send a message in the SIG on Delphi. 

Christian Ross 
(CGR) 
Williamsport, PA 

• The New England COCONUTS meets at 
the Warwick Public Library at 600 Sandy 
Lane, usually on the fourth Thursday of the 
month from 7 to 9 p.m. The address is Box 
28 106, North Station, 02908. We ask that all 
inquiries include an SASE for a response. 

Robert J. Sullivan, Jr. 
Providence, RI 

• A few of my friends and I have decided 
to organize a CoCo club in Chattanooga. 
Write to me at 13809 Lillard Road, 37379 
if you are interested. 

Bill Kroulek 
Soddy, TN 

• I would like to announce the formation 
of the Virginia CoCo Club (VACC). We meet 
once a month in the Fairfax County Library. 
We have many benefits to offer such as a 
newsletter, a public domain software library 
and we are currently working on obtaining 
discounts from major manufacturers in the 
CoCo community. For more information, 
contact me by calling (703) 347-4022 or 
writing to Rt. 3, Box 203F, 22186. 1 can also 
be reached on the Handy Tandy BBS, which 
has a private section and features for club 
members only at (703) 573-7282. 

Michael Saint 
Warrenton, VA 



reviews. A newsletter full of contests, ideas, 
hints to games, everything brought by the 
readers. Will exchange newsletters with 
other clubs. For more information, write to 
me at P.O. Box 427, BOS 1C0. 

Michael Cress 
Bridgetown, Nova Scotia 

• The Sarnia Computer Users Group meets 
on the last Tuesday of the month at Alex- 
ander Mackenzie School. We have club 
disks and offer a newsletter. Anyone in the 
Sarnia area with a computer is invited to 
join. For more information, write me at 
254!/ 2 Confederation Street, N7T 2A1. 

Norm Lamoureux 
Sarnia, Ontario 

• The Durham 80C Computer Club meet- 
ings are held at Durham College in Oshawa, 
Room B 305, 7 p.m., first Wednesday of each 
month. We've been in operation for four 
years. Write to P.O. Box 95, Whitby, On- 
tario, LIN 5R7 for more information. 

Durham 80 C Computer Club 
Whitby, Ontario 

• The Club Micro-Ordinateur De 
Montreal-Nbrd has been in existence for six 
months. We teach BASIC language, assem- 
bly language and give many explanations on 
utilities programs. We meet every Saturday 
at Polyvalente Henri-Bourassa Local 101 
from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, write 
12365 Boulevard Langelier #7, H1G 5X6 or 
call (514) 323-5958. 

Gardy Neptune 
Montreal- Nord, Quebec 

• I am pleased to announce the promotion 
of the Advance Color Club of Rio De 
Janeiro. Our club library can boast the 
ownership of over 700 CoCo programs and 
we are growing daily due to new submis- 
sions. At present we have 102 members. We 
welcome correspondence from other exist- 
ing CoCo groups. Anyone wishing to find 
out what owning a CoCo is all about can 
send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: 

Pedro Napolitano Filho 
Advance Color Club 
Rau Humaita 104 Ap. 103 Botafogo 
Rio De Janeiro, RJ CEP 22261, Brazil 

• Announcing the existence of the Piura 
Color Computer Club in Peru. For informa- 
tion call (074) 327182 or write to me at: 

Carlos Alvarez 
Piura Color Computer Club 
Av. Guillermo Irazola 
J-6 URB. Miraflores Castillo 

Box #142 
Piura, Peru 

• Anyone interested in joining the Puerto 
Rico CoCo Club can write me at: 

Jose E. Colon 
312 Tapia 
Santuree, Puerto Rico 00912 



• The Red Stick CoCo Club is in operation. 
For information, write me at 3527 Hickory- 
wood Avenue, 70807. 

Justin Young 
Baton Rouge, LA 

• We would like to announce the existence 
of the Tandy Computer Club located in the 
Portland area. For more information, please 
call (207) 854-2862, or write P.O. Box 428, 
04092. 

Del Cargill 
Westbrook, ME 

• A VIP users group (for owners of VIP 
products), was recently formed. Interested 
persons can write me at Box 194, 01463. 
Hints, brief articles, letters, VIP database 
formats and CALC templates are gratefully 
received. There are no set dues, but contri- 
butions to defray the cost of copying and 



• I am writing to let everyone know the new 
mailing address for the Vancouver Colour 
Computer Club is P.O. Box 76734, Postal 
Stn S, V5R 5S7. 

Don MacDonald 
Vancouver, British Columbia 

• The 6809E Users Group was recently 
started with a goal of fellowship and the 
sharing of experience and knowledge in the 
use of the Color Computer.. A big part of the 
club is the information and programs from 
RAINBOW magazine. For information, write 
to 136 Lansdowne Street, E3N 2M7. 

Vance G. Anderson 
Campbellton, New Brunswick 

• I would like to announce to all CoCo 
users of Nova Scotia that the CoCo Co-Op 
is just starting out and wants to hear from 
you. We have games, hints, scores, clubs and 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 191 



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No Time Like the Present 



By Dan Downan 
Rainbow Technical Edito 



• / have a 64K *E* Board CoCo and am 
planning to upgrade to 51 2 K. Can I run OS- 
9 Level 2 on this upgraded system? Also, is 
it true that Motorola recently introduced a 
new VDG chip with the same pinouts as 
CoCo's present chip that performs all of the 
same functions but adds true lowercase and 
the rest of the ASCII character set? 

John Farrar 
Lebanon, TN 

John, you couldn't have picked a better 
time to be interested in OS-9 Level II and 
512K. We have a cure for your concern for 
the new VDG chip, too. 

As you probably noticed in last month's 
RAINBOW, the new CoCo 3 has been re- 
leased. It features 1 28K expandable to 51 2K; 
enhanced Extended Color basic; OS-9 
Level II (additional cost); a new combina- 
tion VDG and SAM chip (called a GIME); 
upper- and lowercase 32, 40 or 80 column 
text; 640 X 192 four-color graphics; 320 X 
192 sixteen-color graphics; composite, RF 
and analog RGB outputs; a new keyboard; 
plus it's compatible with most of the soft- 
ware and hardware you now own. 

I don't recommend any modifications to 
your existing CoCo because at $219.95, it's 
more economical to just purchase a new 
CoCo. 

I am not aware of software available for 
any of the current memory upgrades that 
will allow you to run OS-9 Level II. Even 
though a new VDG with lowercase is avail- 
able, it is not pin-for-pin compatible with the 
old VDGs. 



CoCo Compatible? 

• / have just acquired a Commodore 1902 
Video Monitor. It has three switches: Com- 
posite, RGB and SEP. If I buy the Universal 

Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago and he has built several 
68 XX systems. 



Video Driver and change the monitor switch 
to Composite, will this monitor work for the 
CoCo 2? 

David Lindberg 
Cooperstown, NY 

Your Commodore 1902 will work fine 
with a CoCo 2, David. You will need a video 
driver for the CoCo; the one you mentioned 
should work fine. You are also correct in 
setting the switch to composite. 

Ed Ellers informed me that the SEP 
position on the switch is for use with Com- 
modore computers. They use a separate 
composite signal for the color information, 
so SEP stands for separate color signal. 



No Dice 

• I have an old 16K Extended BASIC Color 
Computer. Decimal memory locations 
16384 through 32767 (hexadecimal 4000 
through 7FFF) are described as "not used. " 
Is there any way I can use this wasted space 
for program and variable storage? I would 
like to know this because it sure would 
prevent a substantial amount of OM Errors. 
Thank you very much. 

Charles M. Murphy 
New Hartford, NY 

Sorry, Charlie! With only 16K of RAM 
you can't use memory locations above 16383 
($3FFF). With a 64K upgrade the addresses 
you mentioned will be at your disposal. 



• / have a 64K CoCo with two drives and 
a Gemini 10 X printer. A friend of mine 
purchased a second-hand MC-10. He asked 
me to type in the program you wrote for the 
October 1983 rainbow. This was to convert 
the CoCo's programs to MC-10 BASIC 

This program is for OS-9, which I do not 
have. Is there any program lean get that will 
convert CoCo's programs to work on his 
MC-10? 

When I type this MC10CONV program 
I get SN Errors, since I do not have OS-9. 



Evidently this machine was not popular ar. 
does not have its own software source. 

Donice Cheroi 
Pittsburgh, P. 

You don't need OS-9 to assemble tr 
program you mentioned, Donice. It just s 
happened that we used the Microwai 
assembler in the Motorola compatible moc 
to generate the object code for this progran 
It seemed like the thing to do since OS-9 ha 
just been released for the CoCo. I hope 
didn't confuse too many people. 

If you don't want to fool around with a 
assembler, let me suggest buying a copy c 

RAINBOW ON TAPE. 



Don't Sweat It 

• / have formatted the other side of single 
sided disks. My local computer store man 
ager tells me that when I run my disks o) 
the other side, they are internally rotating U 
the opposite direction than was intended 
and in doing so I am redispersing any dus 
captured by the felt cloth and possibl) 
damaging my disk drives. Is this correct o, 
is it safe to continue with the process? 

Armando Marin Ariai 
San Juan, PI 

Armando, it sounds as if your local 
supplier is a true purist. He is correct; the 
disks do rotate in the opposite direction. I 
wouldn't worry about it, though. You can 
actually buy commercial diskettes that 
already have the write protect notches and 
timing holes for dual-sided operation, so 
evidently the disk manufacturers feel that it's 
OK. 



Cursory Inspection 

• Is there a CHRS or POKE to turn the cursor 
off and on in my CoCo? 

I used to be able to do this on a TRS-80 
Model II by using PRINT CHRS [2) for off 
and PRINT CHR$(1) for on. Those same 
statements don 't seem to work on my CoCo. 

Dorothy Witt 
Indianapolis, IN 



OS-9 Not Needed 




There are no routines to turn the cursor 
n or off in Extended BASIC, Dorothy. If you 
ave 64K, and first run a program such as 
IOMRA A/ to get to the 64K mode, you can 
isable the cursor with P0KE&HA199, &H39 
or P0KE413S9,57). To restore the cursor, 
ype P0KE&HR199 , &HR (or P0KE413G9 , 10). 



Printer Problems 

> 7 have a Gemini 10 printer (not the I OX), 
'have connected it to Co Co with a BOTEK 
Serial interface and do a lot of word process- 
ng using Telewriter 64. The system works 
Ine except that if I try to print out a long 
ext the printer is excruciatingly slow, 
r nstead of 100 characters per second, it 
yrints at a rate of only two lines every 14 
seconds or about 10 characters per second. 
This rate continues until the last 40 or so 
'ines of text are reached after which the 
printer prints rapidly and continuously until 
the end of the text. 

The Gemini 10 has a built-in 2.3 K buffer 
which may be causing this problem. I like 
all the good features of my system and do 
not want to buy a new printer. Is there any 



way I can fix this problem and get the true 
100 character per second print rate from my 
printer? 

Melvin A. Halpern 
Charlotte, NC 

The only thing I would suggest, Melvin, 
is that you set the BOTEK interface at 9600 
Baud and POKE150,1. This fills up the 
buffer as fast as possible. It appears you 
can't print and fill the buffer at the same 
time. If this is the case, you may try disabling 
your buffer. If anyone has suggestions, 
please write. 



Who's In Control? 

• Does it matter what operating system you 
have before you run OS-9? I would like to 
get Cooking With CoCo on an EPROM, so 
when the computer is turned on, it automat- 
ically runs the BASIC file called AUTO- 
EXEC.BAS which in turn would boot OS- 
9 by running *,BAS. Is this possible or 
would that EPROM interfere with OS-9? 

Is it possible to put another Multipak on 
the system by plugging another one into the 
already existing one with a ribbon cable? 

Anyone out there interested in a "rear 
remote keyboard with infrared transmitter 



and receiver, write me. My address is 10153 
Parkview Dr. #8, 22110. Thank you. 

Jerry Rossano 
Manassas, VA 

Jerry, when using OS-9 the ROMs, or 
EPROMs in your case, are disabled and you 
are in the 64K mode. When first turning on 
your computer some kind of operating 
system has to be there, or the microproces- 
sor won't know what to do. You also need 
some type of boot program to tell the 
computer to jump to OS-9. A basic pro- 
gram that does this is included in the OS- 
9 package. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through the MAIL section of our new 
Delphi CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick DELPHI MAIL, then type 
SEND and address TO: DANDOWNARD. 
Be sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



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October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 95 



KISSABLE OS-9 



Getting Revved Up 
For Fall Fun 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Stand by for excitement! Sources 
confirm that the new Color Com- 
puter runs OS-9 Level II. 
Another OS-9 user who has seen the 
machine reported that its graphics 
capability is somewhere between the 
Atari ST-512 and the Commodore 
Amiga. Graphics programs running on 
both of these machines look super, so 
we are in for a real treat. I can hardly 
wait for all the details. While we're 
waiting, 111 give a review of OS-9 
memory management schemes. 

Much of the power of the new Color 
Computer will be made possible by 
Microware's OS-9 6809 Level II Oper- 
ating System. On the surface, the casual 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale 
works as a U.S. Coast Guard chief 
warrant officer and lives in Alexandria, 
Virginia. 



user who only runs commercial pro- 
grams probably won't notice much 
difference between OS-9 Level I and 
OS-9 Level II. Users who must deal with 
large data files in memory or pro- 
grammers who want to run two or three 
tasks at a time through an OS-9 pipeline 
will notice a tremendous improvement. 

Most of the problems we have run 
into with OS-9 on the original Color 
Computer are caused by the limited 
amount of memory available in the 64K 
of memory addressed directly by the 
6809 microprocessor. While it's true 
that OS-9 based computers exist that 
use only 4K of ROM and 2K of RAM, 
these small computers are really con- 
trollers. Essentially, they run the same 
small machine code program forever, 
monitoring external real world condi- 
tions in real time, opening and closing 
the valves and switches that keep a 
manufacturing process on track. 

If you write all of your OS-9 pro- 
grams in assembly language, you can 
get by with as little as 24K of workspace. 
Higher level languages like BASIC09 
require at least 40K. Essentially, OS-9 
Level I was designed for use on comput- 
ers being used by one person. Most 
Level I machines contain 4K of ROM 
and 60K of RAM. The Color Computer 



uses 64K of RAM. It gets the informa- 
tion that is normally stored in ROM 
from Track 34 of an OS-9 boot disk. 
Level I machines can only address 64K 
of memory. 

OS-9 Level II computers use memory 
management hardware that allows the 
6809 microprocessor to address more 
than 64K of memory. Most of them use 
a chip called a DAT (Dynamic Address 
Translator). This chip moves memory 
in and out of the 64K address space used 
by the 6809. Most DAT chips switch 4K 
blocks of memory in and out of the 
6809's workspace. In the past several 
years however, several large scale inte- 
gration (LSI) chips have been released. 
These chips often switch the memory in 
and out of the 6809's 64K block in 2K 
increments. 

The random access memory in your 
Color Computer can hold either data or 
programs. If you could peek into your 
computer's memory while it is running, 
you would see the names of a number 
of modules at the top of the 6809's 64K 
workspace. At the bottom of the work- 
space you would see a lot of temporary 
data being used by the programs stored 
in those modules. In the middle, you 
would find a bit of free memory to run 
additional programs. 



196 



THE RAINBOW October 1 986 



When you load a new OS-9 program 
lodule it is placed at the top of the 
vailable memory space. When you run 
lat program, it will use the first mem- 
ry at the bottom of the available 
lemory space. The amount of memory 
squired by each program is stored in 
tie program's module header. 

If you have worked with computers 
or a while, you have probably come to 
ealize that you can never have too 
nuch memory. OS-9 designers knew 
his and threw in a lot of features to help 
nanage this important resource. OS-9 
equires that all programs be reentrant. 
V program that is reentrant can be used 
>y more than one person or process at 
he same time. 

For example, two users may want to 
un a BASIC09 program at the same time. 
Vfany older operating systems would 
•equire that two copies of BASIC09 be 
oaded into memory to make it possible. 
But, since BASIC09 is reentrant, both 
isers can use the same copy of it. In this 
example, we have saved more than 22K 
Df memory — a large chunk in a 64K 
:omputer. 

Despite OS-9's built-in memory sav- 
ing features, we have all run into a 
problem called memory fragmentation. 



On an OS-9 Level I computer, fragmen- 
tation can be a serious problem. On 
Level II computers the problem goes 
away — almost. 

Memory fragmentation becomes a 
problem when the available free mem- 
ory is broken up into so many little 
pieces that OS-9 can't find enough 
memory in one contiguous block to 
load another program module or assign 
data memory to a running process. A 
process, by the way, is a program that 
is running. 

An operating system that permits 
more than one program to run at the 
same time needs a way to divide the 
system's memory between programs. 
Earlier operating systems like CP/M, 
FLEX and PC-DOS didn't bother to 
manage their memory; they didn't allow 
more than one program to run at a time. 

OS-9 Level I uses a first-fit allocation 
scheme to manage its memory. This 
means that when you attempt to load a 
program module or run a program, OS- 
9 assigns the first block of memory big 
enough to hold your module or meet the 
data requirement of your program. It 
assigns as much of this first free block 
of memory as the module needs and 
remembers that the rest of the block is 



available as a smaller block. The main 
disadvantage of this approach is it uses 
big blocks of memory and leaves a lot 
of small blocks that can only be used to 
hold small program modules or satisfy 
small memory requests. 

If you want to watch OS-9's memory 
allocation in action on your Color 
Computer you can use the Mdir, Mfree 
and Sleep utilities to study the process. 
Start by experimenting with the exam- 
ple given on pages 302 to 306 of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9. 

The only way to de-fragment memory 
is to kill some of the processes running 
so they release the memory they are 
using. After killing them, you can 
restart them. When they are restarted, 
they will be assigned memory at both 
ends of the available memory space, 
leaving a larger chunk of memory free 
in the middle. 

Memory fragmentation becomes a 
problem when the available free mem- 
ory is broken up into so many little 
pieces that OS-9 can't find enough 
memory in one contiguous block to 
load another program mod ule or assign 
data memory to a running process. A 
process, by the way, is a program that 
is running. 



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October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 97 



Fragmentation can take place in the 
data storage area at the bottom of 
available memory or in the module 
storage area at the top of memory. You 
will most often run into fragmentation 
in the data memory area when starting 
a lot of processes. This happens because 
each process has been assigned some 



ff Memory 
fragmentation is 
caused by changing 
memory demands." 



space for data. If you terminate a 
medium-aged process first you will 
wind up with a small chunk of available 
memory in between the data memory 
used by the oldest and youngest running 
processes. 

As you will see when you experience 
the long-awaited new Color Computer, 
life is much easier with OS-9 Level II. 
And the most important advantage 
revolves around the way Level II sys- 
tems manage their memory. Level II 
systems use Dynamic Address Transla- 
tion hardware that gives the system a 
way to use lots of memory — even 
though the 6809 microprocessor can 
only address 64K. 

OS-9 Level II lets each process run in 
its own 64K memory address space, 
isolated from all other processes that 
may be running on the system. This 
means that if you want to run a 4K sort 
program, you could request up to 60K 
of data memory for that process. In 
other words, the program module and 
the data area it uses must fit in a 64K 
space. The OS-9 system code which 
includes all device descriptors and 
drivers, file managers, etc., is running in 
its own 64K space independent of the 
workspace you are using. The end result 
for the average user is that OS-9 Level 
II will appear to be much easier to use. 

A Gold Mine of Helpful Tips 

We all seem to run into these same 
problems at one point or other in our 
OS-9 career. For example, Fred Swa- 
telle of Huntsville, Texas recently sent 
us a number of interesting observations 
and some tips that are a real gold mine 
for beginners. We featured his sound- 
generating programs last April. 

Swatelle wanted to save space on the 
System disk he uses with the OS-9 
assembler so he used his editor to trim 



down the files in the Defs directory. 
Remember, if you try these tricks you 
should work only with a copy of the 
original system disk. 

Before Swatelle edited the files on his 
disk, he listed the files to the printer so 
he would have a hard copy to work 
from. To do this he had to delete the 
OPT -L directives in the files. Addition- 
ally, he had to add the following lines 
at the beginning of the Rbfdefs and 
Scfdefs files. 

if pi 

use /d0/def s/os9def s 
endc 

After you have followed the example, 
assemble the three files and redirect the 
listing to your printer. 

□59: asm/d0/defs/os9defs 
L >/p <CR> 

Then, using the printed listing and a 
good editor, you can remove all com- 
ments from the code, as well as any 
unnecessary assembler directives. For 
example, Pag directives and blank lines 
may both be deleted. A text editor 
which displays the carriage returns is 
the best tool for the job because it makes 
it easy to delete strings of blank spaces. 
After you have finished, keep these bare 
bones files in your Defs directory and 
keep the hard copy listing as a reference 
manual. And if you have a few moments 
of spare time, use it to study the 
OS9Defs files. You will really be sur- 
prised at the information in these files. 

Here's an example of one man's 
improvement being another man's ob- 
stacle. Swatelle tried out the new OS- 
9 Version 2.00.00 Dump utility and 
decided he didn't like it. The new ver- 
sion automatically configures the for- 
mat of its output to the column width 
stored in the device descriptor being 
used. For example, if you type: 

□59: dump >/p <CR> 

OS-9 checks the device descriptor, /p, 
and learns that your printer is 80 co- 
lumns wide. It then formats its output 
accordingly. However, if you redirect 
the output of the Dump utility to a file, 
you will find it stored on your disk in 
the old 32-column format. 

Swatelle wanted to be able to use the 
manual width control parameters avail- 
able in the original Dump, so he deleted 
the new Dump and copied the old 
version from his Version 1 .01 disk to his 
system disk. 



If you own DeskMate but have no 
yet purchased your copy of OS-9 Ver 
sion 2.00.00, you can use the module 
in the DeskMate system disk with th< 
OS9Gen utility command from you: 
original Version 1.01 system disks t( 
make new system disks that use tht 
Version 2.00.00 kernel. This will giv< 
you some of the new features likt 
repeating keys, etc. 

If you do have your copy of OS-5 
Version 2.00, here's another tip frorr 
Swatelle. He says that after he modified 
the modules that came with Versior 
2.00.00 to match his hardware, he saved 
them in place of the original copy in the 
Modules directory of his backup cop> 
of the Config disk. For example, aftei 
using Xmode and TunePort on the 
device descriptor for the printer device 
descriptor, /p, Swatelle deleted the 
copy on his working Config disk and 
saved the new version in a file named 
p.dd. 

Again, remember you must only 
make these changes on a working copy 
of your Config disk. In fact, you should 
always make a working copy of all your 
OS-9 software immediately and store 
the original, unmodified disks in a safe 
place — just in case something happens 
to your working copy. 

If you just moved to OS-9 and have 
not yet purchased an OS-9 disas- 
sembler, never fear. If you have been 
using Disk BASIC for a while and own 
Roger Schrag's Super-Patched ED- 
TASM, you can use it to disassemble 
OS-9 code too. First, boot OS-9 and 
load the modules you want to disassem- 
ble. Then, run the Mdir e utility to find 
where they are stored in memory Fi- 
nally, without turning off your Color 
Computer, run SPEDTASM. 

You will need to do some translation 
manually, since this Disk BASIC based 
disassembler won't recognize that an 
SWI2 interrupt is an OS-9 system call. 
You'll also need to look up the value of 
the byte following each SWI2 in the OS- 
9 technical information manual to find 
out which system call it is. 

If you have swapped system disks or 
changed execution directories since you 
first booted OS-9 and you want to 
return to the original system disk 
booted from, just use the CLEAR/ 
BREAK keys to terminate the current 
Shell. When you do this, SysGo starts 
a new Shell that uses the original exe- 
cution and data directories. 

Parallel Driver Patch for Disto 

If you are using one of the earlier 
versions of the parallel driver for Tony 



198 THE RAINBOW October 1386 



DiStefano's fantastic Disto PPrint 
hardware and have an older printer, you 
may be wondering about the Device 
Not Ready Error that keeps popping 
up. The delay loop that waits for the 
printer to signal it is ready to accept 
more characters did not allow enough 
time for some of the slower hardwares. 

To solve the problem, run the OS-9 
Debug utility and execute the following 
steps: 

LParallel 

-<5PRCEBRR>.+4C 

=20 

0 

The original value at an offset of 4C 
Hex from the beginning of the Parallel 
module is 26, the Hex code for Branch 
If Not Equal (BNE). This patch changes 
it to a 20, the code for Branch Always 
(BRA). This causes the driver to skip 
the Device Not Ready trap. Be cau- 
tioned however, that it will cause your 
system to wait for the printer forever if 
it happens to be offline. After you make 
the patch above you can save the mod- 
ule Parallel into a temporary disk file 
and then verify if into a permanent file 
using the Verify utility's update CRC 
parameter. 

DS9: save temp . Paral lei 

Paral lei 
□S9: veri fy <temp.Para 

llel>Fixed. Paral lei u 

After making the patch and executing 
the two command lines you will be able 
to load the new drivers. You could also 
OS9Gen the Fixed. Parallel driver into 
your OS-9 boot file if you want to take 
the time. 

And, from what I see, DiStefano is 
still at it — designing better hardware 



for our Color Computers. The latest 
idea is the queue, a keyboard adapter 
that will convert the standard CoCo 
keyboard into parallel ASCII. The 
device will be buffered and interrupt 
driven, and will support auto-repeat. 

Multi-Tasking in Action 

If you use a computer at work that 
lets you use desk accessories, you'll 
enjoy this tip from Pete Lyall. He runs 
DynaStar concurrently with the 
XCom9 terminal program available 
from the OS-9 Users Group Software 
Library, or its author Greg Morse. 

"Because of X Corn's size — 5K for 
program, 2K for data — I am able to 
use DynaStar to edit a file while still 
online with XCom9. Try that with 
CoCo DOS!" Lyall said. "XCom9 is a 
simple, no fancy stuff, freeware termi- 
nal. If accustomed to a terminal pro- 
gram that 'takes over' your system and 
gives you menu control, it may seem a 
little sparse at first. But once you get 
used to it, you will appreciate the fact 
that it is designed not to interfere with 
other programs running concurrently. It 
allows file capture and transmission as 
well as Xmodem file transfer." 

Jonathan Cluts, a former Tandy 
employee, added that he had run Sled, 
a full-screen editor in memory with 
XCom9, "I have also downloaded a file, 
called up a new Shell, started that file 
printing and then gone on to download 
another file," Cluts said. 



Congratulations 

Congratulations are in order for 
Wayne Day, president of Golden Trian- 
gle Corporation and fellow rainbow 
author. Day recently formed the Tandy 
Users Network (TandyNet) to serve the 
full line of Tandy microcomputers. He 



has operated The Color SIG on Com- 
puServe since its beginning in 1982. The 
new network takes the place of four 
existing Tandy SIGs that had been 
operated by individual managers scat- 
tered across the nation. TandyNet will 
allow the individual SIGs to share 
information, improving the support for 
Tandy computer users. 

"Over the years, the forums have 
become a gigantic users group that 
holds meetings 24 hours a day," he said. 
"We have taken the idea one step further 
and created a blanket group — the 
Tandy Users Network." 

A Tip of the Hat to Tim Harris 

Tim Harris, who has contributed 
several programs to this column and 
The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9, was published in the May issue 
of Dr. Dobb's Journal. Harris took an 
earlier article in that publication to task. 

"One of the most novel features 
added in Version 2 of MS-DOS is the 
concept of 'installable device drivers," 
the article said. Color Computer owners 
have been using this "new concept" for 
at least three or four years! But, let's 
quote Harris: 

"I would like to say that this concept 
may be new and novel for Microsoft 
and MS-DOS but it is certainly not a 
new and novel concept for other oper- 
ating systems. The initial 6809 OS-9 
Level I released in 1978 sported this 
feature," Harris told Dr. Dobb*s Jour- 
nal readers. Good job Tim. That's the 
kind of evangelism we need. If we tell 
them often enough, they are bound to 
stop and pay attention. 



Speaking of Evangelism 

You can become an OS-9 evangelist 
by writing letters like the one Tim 



OS-9 ™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



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OS-9 is a trademark of Mlcroware and Motorola Inc. 
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October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 99 



Listing Is gotoxy 

nam gotoxy. adm3 

ttl DynaStar editor XY routine for Disto 80 Column Card 



Allan 6. Jost January 10, 198 2 



use /Hj3/DEFS/Defsfile 

ttl DynaStar XY routine for CoCo 
opt g 
org 0 

EndMem equ . no data space for a subroutine 
Vers equ 2 version number 

mod EndMod , Name , Sbrtn+Obj ct , Reent+Vers , Entry, EndMem 
Name fcs "gotoxy" 

fcb Vers 
Entry bra Go 

fcb 24 number of lines on terminal 

fcb 80 number of characters per line 

fcb 1 This terminal scrolls 

fcb 1 length of Clear Line Sequence 

fcb 4 byte that clears line 

fcb 0 no initialization sequence 



on entry X contains X-coordinate: 1 . . 80 
B contains Y-coordinate: 1 .. 24 



Go equ * actual entry point 
leas -3,S make working space 
addb #31 change Y to cursor control char 
stb 2,S and put into work space 
tfr X,D get the X coordinate 
addb #31 and change it also 
stb 1,S 

ldb #2 xy-cursorcode 
stb 0,S finish building work space 
Ida #1 standard output path 
leax 0,S the escape sequence 
ldy #3 and its length 
os9 i$write put it out to console 
leas 3,S restore stack by releasing work space 
rts back to caller now, folks 
emod 

EndMod equ * this is the end, folks. 

Listing 2: HGraphx 

/* 

HGRAPH - Horizontal Bar Graph Program 
by Milt Webb 

This program demonstrates the use of structures 
and sequential disk files containing mixed types. 
Create a bar graph with up to 16 bars by entering 
the title, subtitle, scale (range) of the graph 
and the label and value of each bar. The program 
is menu driven and the graph files are read/saved 
in the current data directory. This program is written 
for B0 column displays. The #defines may be altered 
accordingly for hi-res displays. 

*/ 

#include <stdio.h> 
# include <ctype.h> 
#define TRUE 1 
#define FALSE 0 

#define TERMWID 80 /* width of terminal screen */ 
#define MAXITEMS 16 /* size array of items to graph */ 
#define TITLEN 41 /* length of title, subtitle string +1 */ 

/* length of label strings +1 */ 
/* length of filename */ 
/* empty string */ 

/* clear screen, home cursor for wordpak */ 



#define LBLEN 19 
#define NAMLEN 12 
# define STOP »»' 
#define CLEARS 2 



Char hl[] - "HORIZONTAL BAR GRAPH vl.l"; 

char h2[] « "by Milt Webb"; 

long i, count, j, points; 

long GWIDTH m (TERMWID - LBLEN - 1) ; 



struct param { 

char title [TITLEN] ; 
char subtitl e [TITLEN ] ; 
long upper; 
long lower; 
long count; 
} header; 

struct data { 

char label [LBLEN] ; 

long value; 

} bar [MAXITEMS ] ; 



Harris sent to Dr. Dobb's Journal Bui 
even if you are writing letters like this 
and telling all your friends about OS- 
9, please don't forget to cover anothei 
very important audience — those peo- 
ple already using OS-9. 

Are we covering this base? I don't 
think so because we don't have every- 
thing we need. If OS-9 is to succeed in 
the consumer marketplace it must have 
a reason for being. There must be 
hundreds of application programs to do 
the jobs that people buy computers to 
do. 

To make this happen we must encour- 
age the programmers already within our 
ranks. We must salute them when they 
move the state of the art forward. We 
must encourage them to make bold 
steps forward with innovative tech- 
niques, rather than discourage them 
with our criticism. 

I say these things after reading the 
mail on both CompuServe's OS-9 SIG 
and on RAINBOW'S Delphi CoCo SIG. 
There are a lot of helpful people using 
both of these electronic bulletin boards, 
but there is also too much criticism. 
This criticism, especially when com- 
bined with low sales and minimal profit, 
discourages programmers from writing 
new programs. As a result, we all suffer. 

For example, people criticize Tandy 
for making a business decision when 
they designed their OS-9 implementa- 
tion. Then, they criticize Microware for 
delivering the product the customer 
ordered. They don't stop to realize one 
important basic of the business world — 
the customer is always right. 

Frankly, Tandy had a good reason for 
every feature they put in Color Comput- 
er OS-9. We may or may not agree with 
the selection made by Tandy's de- 
signers, but we must realize that these 
business decisions were not made 
lightly. And to be quite honest, we must 
also realize that if Microware hadn't 
been willing to deliver the product 
Tandy wanted, Tandy probably would 
have picked another operating system 
for the Color Computer. Then where 
would we be? 

Everyone deserves a pat on the back 
once in awhile — especially when he is 
not getting rich in a market he is sup- 
porting out of pure love. If this positive 
attitude theory seems like a lot of 
hogwash to you, I challenge you to look 
around the business world. I think 
you'll find that companies that project 
a positive, can-do attitude to the public 
and to their own employees are the ones 
getting ahead. Organizations run by 



200 THE RAINBOW October 1986 



nanagers who try to think of reasons 
lot to do something are falling like flies. 

The bottom line: If you know a better 
vay to do something, do it. If it's 
;omething everyone can use, sell it. If 
t's not, share it. But, do it. And, please 
ion't put the other guy down just 
because his approach is a little different. 

Sell Your Program in Japan 

Ark Corporation is interested in good 
applications to market in Japan. They 
report that the Fujitsu FM-1 1, an OS- 
? Level II machine, is the most popular 
in Japan. The company is also introduc- 
ing three types of plug-in OS-9 68 K 
boards for the leading personal comput- 
ers in Japan. 

"The biggest and most well-known 
disadvantage of OS-9 when compared 
to other systems is its lack of application 
programs," says Ark's Vice-President 
Hirokazu Sugawara. "Thus, we are 
looking for good OS-9 programs to 
introduce in Japan while developing 
our own. We need good programs for 
business, communications, database 
management, entertainment, home 
accounting, programming and word 
processing." 

If they like your program, Ark will 
grant you an exclusive distribution 
license in the Japanese market, prepare 
a Japanese operating manual and make 
any modifications needed to make it fit 
the Japanese market. They pay 10 to 20 
percent of the program's retail value in 
royalties. Their FAX number is 03-350- 
8383. Their phone number is 03-350- 
5171. If you have a good program, go 
for it! 

Bob Rosen called my attention to the 
fact that OS-9 has made Byte magazine 
again — this time in a brief report from 
Comdex. Byte reported that Micro- 
trends of Schaumburg, 111., has intro- 
duced versions of OS-9 for the Amiga, 
Atari ST and Macintosh, The report 
also mentioned compact disk interac- 
tive and noted that OS-9 "is similar to 
UNIX but smaller and less complex." 

An Assembly Language Tip 

John Bowden, a Navy cryptologic 
technician stationed in Adak, Alaska, 
wrote us recently and asked how to run 
another OS-9 command from within an 
assembly language program. 

"My quest started with the simple 
desire to clear my text screen in OS-9 
without typing the cumbersome Dis- 
play C," Bowden said. "At first I used 
a simple procedure file that ran the 
command line Display C when I typed 
CLS. That was fine but it took a lot of 



{ 

int k F n 

ptfltnitj) i /* need this to print long integers V 
waH-bCI) /* nake nanu repeat until <J is Hit +/ 

' 1 , 

putcha r [ CLEARS ) : /* el Bar display and house curaar */ 

print r ( i! \n\n * ) r 
canter {hi) r 
center (h2> f 
printf ("Xn") t 
printbordsr^ ) ? 
print if ["vivivw) t 

£4ttt*r prvpo 'L 1 to LOAD graph file-. 11 ); 
print f (f\tt") f 

canter| '"Type 'G 1 to CHEkTE a nsV graph. ■) ; 
print f ("Mi") i 

center ("Type 'Q 1 to QUIT prograa. *'") J 
fcriiikf (*\a\ft\,n w ) t 
printbordlarfj j 

print f ( « So Lection : 11 ) ? 
k-toupper ( getchar {)) ; 

Hvitch(k) 

{ 

case P L" : 

if ( r * {readgra.f[) D TRUE) } dografO r 
print! ( "TlTftflfo ENTER to return to nenuJ r ) ; 
k^fttGharO I 
bra-afci 

aakinfoQ ; 
aakitejift{ j j 
do-grafif) J 

if ( r - (aavgrafO m THUE> ) 

( 

print f '"Press efter to return to m*nu T |P H 
k-gstchar ( ) ; 

S 

hraak; 

caaa 1 Q k : 

■ScitMf 
break? 

default i 

braakr 

) '/+ end switch */ 
) /* end white */ 
) /+ And vain */ 



aakinfoC) 

got titla H subtitle & range of graph */ 

\ 

while ^etcharO ! - 1 \n T ] t /* purgo Input buffer */ 
print f (^fitle for graph; ") f 
gets (ftaadar L title) ; 
printf ("SubtitlSi 
gets (header .subtitLftJ I 

printf ("Enter the upper range Cor thia graphs ")/ 

bc a nf C 11 *ld ,T * * header . upper) ; 
printf {"Enter the Lowtr rang* for thl* graph t *)i 

acanf ( h *ld'* , fi header . lover) t 

While (^fetcftarU !- '\n')? /* purge input buffer */ 

} 



askitems f > 

/* Gat labels an.a data values for graph */ 
putCharfCLEAHS> ; 

printff "Enter up to *d itaoua for thia graph. \n* * HAXITEMSJ J 
printf f'WaximuB label Length is Vfl charaotera . \n lp ,L31iE?J-l) ; 
printf {"Frees <ENTEH> at a label prcmpt when f iniahed. \n"} 
printbordar ( ) j 
printf { 1h \n 11 ) p 

header. count ■ 0? 

/* gat thinga started */ 

printf ("Enter label for itoffl * r header , count-1) r 

while ( head»r + count < milk iTEtts 

i-5 3trcaip(getB [bar [tirade count] . label) F STOP) 2 ™ £ ) 

prtntf ^ rt Now h the data for > %s± " H bar [header. count] ►AaboL )t 
BCanK^^X* 1 r SbarChoad*r h count++] . value) ; 
print* ("sn"! r 

WtliLo C3«atcnar(J J» 'Xn' ) J /* ptirg* Input buf fer */ 
printf f"Entar label for ito'm fclds " r header . count-l) r 

I 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 201 



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me because of the extensive disk I/O. 
/hat I really would like to do is imple- 
lent the Display C command in assem- 
ly language." 

There are two ways to clear the Color 
Computer screen from within an OS-9 
ssembly language program. A short 
ssembly language program that sends 
He clear screen character, 12 decimal or 
OC Hex, to the standard output would 
>e the most direct route. We'll show you 
he code to do that first, and then list 
. short segment of code to run your 
>rogram from within another program. 
Ve'll finish with a piece of code to let 
ou execute the display command with 
he character 12 decimal as a parameter. 

t This program will clear the screen on 

your Color Computer 
fc Syntax: els <ENTER> 

nam els 

* Use standard OS-9 Defsfiles 
if pi 

use /Dp/DEFS/defsfile 
endc 

opt L 

ttl Clear Screen Utility 

* Use standard OS-9 module header 

mod clssiz , clsnam, type, revs, start , size 
clsnamfcs /els/ 
typeset PRGRM+OBJCT 
revsset REENT+1 

*• Data Memory Area Defined here 
clrchrrmb 1 

* Reserve room for stack 
rmb 25jS 

sizeequ . 

* Actual code starts here 

startlda #$0Cclear screen character 

sta clrchr store it in data area 

leax clrchr, upoint to character 

ldy #lwe want to send one character 

Ida #lto the standard output path 

os9 i$wrltego send it 

clrbclear carry 

os9 f$exitand exit 

emodmark the end of the module 

clssizegu * 

end 

This short assembly lanaguage pro- 
gram sends the character 12 decimal to 
OS-9's standard output path. On a 
Color Computer this character clears 
the screen. In fact, most printers use the 
same character for a form feed, so you 
can redirect the output of the new 
command to start a new page on the 
printer. 

□S9: cls>/p 

To run your Cls program from within 
another assembly language program 
you can insert the following code in 
your other program. 

* Execute cls utility command 

* First define the strings 

shlstrfcs /shell/ 
emdstrfee /cls/ 



tfograft) 

/* display the graph */ 

{ 

putc-JiaxfCLEIWLS ) ? 

£ e nt ar ( header . t it la ] t 

center (header, subtitle.) j 

prlr.tf ( 3.01d*3.01d lp , header . lower t header .upper) j 
printborder f J ; 

for [ i-p ; i<foaader. count || 
C 

printf ( l * % - 13 a | " , tar [ i ] . label) ; 

point* - t(ber[i] -valu* -header a ov*r) * gwidth) 
/ (header. Upper -header. lower) j 

if ( bar [i] .valued header. lower ) 
putchar ('<»); 

else if ( points < I j 

points * 1; /f need at least one point */ 

else if ( points > CffSDTS ) 
points « G WIDTH; 

for ( j-0 ; j<points > j++ ) 
putchar ( 1 * 1 ) ; 

if (barti] .value > h*aa*ri upper) 

put char ( *>•); 
else printf ("\n") ; 

) 

printborder() ; 

} 

readgraf ( ) . 

/* read data from graph file - current data directory */ 
int c ; 

Int err f lg«TRUE ; 

FILE *filptr; . 

char f il ename [ NAMLEN] ; 

while {geCCharf) 1= ' \n 1 ] ; /» purge buffer */ 
print f ("Enter filename for graph to vleui ; 
■gets (filename) ; 

:l3fe ( (fiiptr-ffipen< filename , ■■r") ) ItULL ) 

printf {"Sorry, cannot op+r. - \^ [r t filenare) ? 
arrflg-FALSE? 

} 

else 

( 

f r ead { -5 header P aizeaf (header) F l,f tlptr] t 
freed ( £bar[£] r alzeof {Jaar} 1 1 r f ilptr} j 
f close (f tiptryp 
} /* end else |g§ 

return errf Ig ; 
j /* end func V 

savgraf ( ) 

/* save graph aata:^ current data 4ir#ctory */ 
{ 

int c; 

int errflg»TRUE? 

FILE *filptr; 

char filename [NAMLEK] ; 

printf ( "Enter filename for tfciia graph: n ) ; 
gets (filename} ; 

if ( ffilptr^fopantfilana^a^iw! 1 ) ) WILL) 

printf ("Sorry, cannot open * a. \n H , f ilenaae) j 
errflg-FALSE; 

else 

I 

fwrita ( Sheader „ s i z eOf ( header ) , 1 , lilp tr ) ; 
f write ( sbar ] , aiEeof fbar) r l,filptr> : 
fclose(filptr) ; 
} /* end else */ 

return err fig; 
) /* end func */ 

center (string) 
char * string; 

/* print argument centered on display */ 
{ 

int spaces, num; 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 203 



mmm 



ipio»« * (TERMWID - strlan (string) ) / 2i 
for (num «* 1 ; nura <- spaces ? num-H-) 

- . . ' : ' :v: 'j)utchar ( ' 1 ) ; 
fcrintf ("%s\n" , string) ; 



>order 

/S print a border row of signs * 



:,'fe nua? 

* ( num«0 ? num<TERMWID ; num++, >) 
putcharC'* 1 ) ; 



PROCEDURE els 
: ;blM hp : BVTE 
•'DIM name : STRING [3] 

name:«Vhi" 

OPEN #hp, name ? WRlti 1 ?^ ' 
PRINT #hp,CHR$(12) ; K$. 



Listing 4: printat 



': •• : 'fi> 
■I. 



"a.:"'^*. v'.'. I?S : ^ ' 



if 



PROCEDURE printat 
PASAK col t row ; INTEGER 
DIM hp J BYTE 
DIM name:STRING[3] 
name:» w /hi" 
open #hp , name t write 

PRINT #hp,CHR$(2) ; CHR$ (col+32) ; CHR$ (row+32) / 
CLOSE Jhp 



• ; - 1 '<< t»^.y :'- , ' ; v •-. r 't'.. ■; , v v'. -v " s 



Listing 5: toggle 



PROCEDURE toggle 

DIM name ! STRING [ 3 3 
DIM hp: BYTE 

namet-Vhi" 
OPEN #hp , name : write 
PRINT #hp, CHR$ (2p ) 
CLOSE #hp 



.,!s: 



*1 



.^•.fjSTg* >»< :R : > 



Listing 6: Aojc 

PROCEDURE box 

(* calling syntax Is : *) 

(* RUN BOX (hst art, vstart t hend / vend) *) 

PARAM hstart , vstart,hend , vend ? INTEGER 

RUN gfx ( 0 line n , hstart , vstart f hend f vstart ) 

RUN gf x ( n I ine" ^ hstart , vstart , hstart , vend) 

RUN gfx("l ine" , hend, vstart, hend , vend) 

RUN gfx( M 1 ine 1 ' , bend , vend , hstart , vend) 

END 



Listing 7: Jitlhox 



• ••■•r>'i l ui.uj><\i<<'0 •■•••1,1 .. W " , ^;''v;".> 



PROCEDURE f illbox 

param hstart , vstart , hend , vend : INTEGER 
DIM 1 inecount , counter : INTEGER 
linecount : -vend-vstart 
FOR counter i»p TO linecount-1 
RUN gf x ( "line" , hstart , vstart+counter, hend, vstart+counter) 
NEXT counter 



S 5 ,;f -: v ■:■ .A = J<' ',v' >.' .'\;:(- \: ■ „'{ : 



t* ^>;>^ ii-v:,.;..:;.-;.;,..* 

vft^.-f % ' v^i 1,.;! 

. •< «t .n„:>*j>: . , :i,-.-:» i v!. " 



>' '. >. ko; / 



*» ..." ■ ^Sfffs** 'V-.^f 



vvT-J'-j. /SIS: 

• ''■S-rsJ.'x'.f 

>v::.->- "f. «"li{' , S 5>'? 



•V ,y- • • • 



i :: f. A ». ^^»';« 



,..V 



next counter ■ " 

END 



Listing 8: pixsaver 

•'.•-PROCEDURE pixsaver 
4>IM vdisplay , numbers INTEGER 
DIM titles STRING [ip] 




204 



fcb 13<RETURN> character 

leax shlstr,pcrpoint to "shell" 

ldy #4size of parameter string 

leau cmdstr , pcrpoint U-register to "els" 

Ida #lit»s 6809 object code 

clrboptional data area size 

os9 f$forkgo start the els as a process 

bes error 

os9 f$waitand wait for it to finish 

* resume other program execution 

You could modify this code to run tht 
OS-9 Display utility command like this 

* Execute display utility command 

* With 11 C" as a parameter 

* Define the strings 

shlstrfcs /shell/ 
emdstrfee /display c/ 
fcb 13<RETURN> character 

leax shlstr, pcrpoint to "shell" 

ldy #l£size of parameter string 

leau cmdstr, pcrpoint U-register to "els" 

Ida #lit«s 68^9 object code 

clrboptional data area size 

os9 f$forkgo start the els as a process 

bes error 

os9 f $waitand wait for it to finish 

* resume other program execution 

Study the differences between the twe 
code segments and you'll quickly pick 
up the idea. If you put code like this in 
your assembly language programs, it is 
up to you to insure that the programs 
running from within those programs arc 
actually loaded in memory or available 
in the current execution directory. Have 
fun! 



RS-232 Tip 

For something that is supposed to be 
simple, serial communication between 
two computers is often quite confusing. 
We get a lot of letters from people trying 
to use their Color Computers with other 
computers. In fact, I had trouble when 
I tried to fire up my RS-232 Pak the first 
time. 

I could get my terminal programs to 
run perfectly when I plugged the RS- 
232 Pak into a modem. But every time 
I tried to communicate with another 
computer I was stopped at the pass. I 
could send, but I couldn't receive — 
even though I had made the connection 
through a null modem cable. 

The problem revolves around the fact 
that the RS-232 Pak wants to see a 
carrier signal from the modem before it 
works properly. My solution was to 
short Pin 20, the data terminal ready 
signal from the RS-232 Pak to Pin 8, the 
carrier detect line. I made this connec- 
tion on the end of the cable that plugged 
into the RS-232 Pak. By cheating like 
this I was essentially telling the RS-232 
Pak that there was always a carrier. 

Other people cheat their connections 
to the RS-232 Pak in a similar manner. 
For example, one programmer I know 
always creates a false carrier by jumper- 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 



rig pins 6, 8 and 20 on both ends of his 
able. 

To make your second computer look 
ike a modem you also need to connect 
'in 2 on one end of your cable to Pin 
i on the other and vice versa. Addition- 
Lily you must short Pin 4 to Pin 5 on 
>oth ends of the cable and make sure 
hat Pin 7 is passed through from one 
>nd of the cable to the other. The only 
iisadvantage to shorting these control 
)ins is your terminal will not be able to 
end a hardwired signal to your Color 
Computer to tell it to stop sending if it 
lap pens to get behind. 

This Month's Listings 

We've received several notes from 
3eople who have upgraded their hard- 
ware and don't have the proper GoTo- 
KY routine to work with DynaStar and 
DynaSpelL Our first listing this month 
will let you use your Disto 80-column 
:ard with these programs. You can 
modify the listing to work with the 
standard Color Computer screen in 
Version 2.00.00 by simply changing the 
size definitions. 

Our next listing is a C program named 
HGraphx from Milt Webb. HGraph.c 
creates horizontal bar graphs on an 80- 
column screen, demonstrates how to 
use a menu within a C program and 
shows you how to save and read sequen- 
tial files containing mixed data types. It 
is Webb's first program. 

Our final listings were contributed by 
Robert B. Stephens. He uses BASIC09 
with the Xscreen package from Micro- 
tech Consultants, Inc. He displays all 
his text on the Xscreen device, /hi. If 
you are using a different screen, you can 
use similar code by just changing the 
name of the device. I tried both Cls and 
Printat with the standard Tandy 32- 
column display and they worked just 
fine. 

"I wrote a short procedure called 
Pixsaver to save graphics screens," 
Stephens said. "Picture files are stored 
in a directory named PIX. To view the 
pictures you use a procedure named 
Pixshow. Another procedure named 
Toggle lets you inverse letters with 
Xscreen. The latter may be used to 
highlight single words or inverse the 
entire display." 

That's it for October. Hopefully, by 
the time I sit down to write the No- 
vember column we will have at least 
seen the new OS-9 Level II Color Com- 
puter. In any case well be attempting to 
round up more tips for all OS-9 
users. □ 



DIM pixpath, pixbyte,hp:BYTE 

DIM' name : STRING [ 3 ] 

name:=*"/hi" 

OPEN # hp, name: WRITE 

RUN printat (0,0) 

INPUT "Picture title?" , title 

CREATE #pixpath, "/ D0/pix/"4-title: WRITE 

RUN gfx("Gloc" / vdisplay) 

RUN printat 

PRINT #hp," » 

FOR number:^ TO 6143 

pixbyte : =PEEK (vdisplay+number) 

PUT #pixpah, pixbite 

NEXT number 

CLOSE tfpixpah 

CLOSE #hp 

END 



Listing 9: pixshow 

PROCEDURE pixshow 

(* If you are not using a hi-res display, you *) 

(* must add gfx("mode") statement to this procedure. *) 

DIM pixbite, hp: BYTE 

DIM px: BYTE 

DIM name:STRING[3] 

DIM vdisplay, number: INTEGER 

name:«"/hi" 

OPEN # hp, name: WRITE 

PRINT #hp,CHR$(12) 

RUN printat (0,0) 

PRINT #hp USING "a 64*", "Pixshow : See Pix directory for file names." 
PRINT #hp USING »s64*", "Filename"; 
RUN gfx( , 'Gloc",vdisplay) 
RUN printat (28, 13) 
INPUT file$ 

OPEN #px , "/d^/pix/ H +f ile$ : READ 
SEEK #px,0 

FOR number: ~0 TO 6143 

GET #px, pixbite 

POKE vdisplay+number, pixbite 

NEXT number 

CLOSE #hp 

CLOSE #px 

END 



Listing 10: calc 

PROCEDURE calc 

DIM a, b,c,d, e,f ,g,h,i, j , k, 1 ,m, n:REAL 

DIM o,p,q,r,s,t,u,v,w,x,y,z:REAIi 

DIM pp : BYTE 

DIM sp : BYTE 

DIM name:STRING[2] 

name:-"/p" 

PRINT CHR$(12) 

' PRINT "CALCULATOR ... All Basic Math Functions work!" 
PRINT "Variables are letters a-z — assign with let a=xxx" 
PRINT "The printer path is #pp — Send text or variables there at will." 
PRINT "If you want anything hardcopy — don't forget to turn on your printer." 
INPUT " ... Printer on? (y/n) ",yesno$ 
IF yesno$«"y" THEN OPEN #pp , name : WRITE 
ELSE PRINT 
ENDIF 

INPUT "Do you want to save some of this stuff? (y/n) " / query$ 
IF query$="y" THEN 

PRINT "File name is Scratchpad: Send data there at will." 
PRINT "Syntax is PRINT #sp, <text>, <mathfunction (variable) >" 
OPEN #sp, "ScrtchPad" : UPDATE 
ELSE PRINT 
ENDIF 

PRINT "Type <cont> <ENTER> to close paths." 
PAUSE 

IF yesno$»"y" THEN 

PRINT "Printner path closed." 

CLOSE #pp 

ENDIF 

IF query$="y" THEN 

PRINT "Scratch Pad closed." 

CLOSE #sp 

ENDIF 

END 



Listing 11: makescratchpad 



PROCEDURE Make_ScratchPad 
DIM Scratchpad: BYTE 

CREATE #Scratch_Pad, "Scratchpad" : UPDATE 

PRINT "The Scratchpad file for Calculator has been created." 

CLOSE # Scratchpad 

END 



October 1 986 THE RAINBOW 205 



THESE FINE STORES 
CARRY THE RAINBOW 

The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have 
other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you 
patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 
Brewton 
Hc-ier-ee 
Graenvfle 
Mod Hon 

ALASKA 

ARIZONA 

Priced 
Siena Vlsf-i 
lompe 

AMWkSAS 

ftjyflN(wfl|fl 

CAiLFQPiiA 

Cilnis Mi. ylna 
Grass Votlny 
Hr*f Mcofl Bpy 
HolrflyCfld 

LOmooc 
Its Anqaio* 

Sac*omenio 
Santa Rosa 
funnytfate 

CCHO&ADO 

WestmlrrfJer 

MLAWAK 

MldEJlB*iwn 

Mlllord 

Wilmington 

fLOHlDA 

Boca Norton 

Cocoa 

Davie 

Ff. LaudaracJe 
_ack&ojwiilB 



MetbOL/ne 

North rViomi 

Booth 
O-ICrtdO 

:i ii y-i : C.r\ 
^iir^ari;!:! 
■^inullGG PQik 

fernse/io 

tdlOhSBSi# 

Tamps 
Titusvifle 

Bremen 
Cumrrtngss 
Jemp 
Marietta 

Toocoa 

IPAHQ 

MaKCw 

ILUHOI5- 

A.Unrn 



L^S£jrn|iQ'^n 



JBtfeiSOn Net\V3 

McDawett zSach dph j 
Anderson Newa Co 
M & a clectmnld 
Mcdisof 3ooki 
Tie>Jc± "N" Bceki 

Eleclfonlc World 

mi-EEK ComputeiL 
L^ngilon't Books 
BOOKS DC. 
Compute Library 
Andfiison Ng<ys Co. 



Vaughn, BWfWletf Radii* Shqck; 
Ahdejison N?w$ Ca 

ViiHrtis Pius 
Ajdvtf'CS Rpdlr>. hie 
SlrwfJrTmiF' EJoClronlos 
Lotflty P^rnblihjfa 
Vtaaid Bodi & r*wu Oj 
LfllH Eodrorka Emoonum 
E&C industries 
FoMaon^Cd, 
lower Magazine 
£ow^^ New*. Inc. 
Computer literacy 

Software City 

DBlmcrCti 

M ltofdN™S* and 

Nc-rmar, Inc — The Smoke 3nop 

Software. Software, inc. 
The Open door 
Software Pita Was 
Elechcnlcfi Engna&rv 
Mike's Ltechnnlca Delfibutor 
ihe Book Nook 
Bom town 
Deano'atV 
Gty ^a-^lana 

Aimai Eootaiorf 

rVici/ r/fcirln 
Brjvr-nberi C^rp 
Vderson MflNH On 

Famlfv Campulort 

5unn/5 Sum**, inc 

AndBrson New; G& 

Rt€< Print Etofcih™ 

Sound "3 roofer i Computer GarHar 

Compytrac 

□uman Ei^lrw'iC^Rudio Shack 

Kent Radio Shack 

nraaio Snack 

Acr Dob yfldeo 

Martin Murjc mania Shack 

Johnson \'\bws I>gB r *zy 

bach"! ik Breatano- J s 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. DcJlon flaal«se<le't 

N Wc&ash Sa. 

Wbs? Jackson S. 

Botfs in NcrwltfWn 

bah s i n I**?. i mpctfum 



ChUlcolhe 

ll^COtlJl 



Gwnsicn 
Ggnawo 

Ur4fl 
^wlcrn 
Oak Brook 
Oak Port 
farts 
ffeona 



SchQUf^lKrg 

Skokle 

SFHTign&td 



SuhhylrJrtd, 
wssi Franker 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Beire 

CukincCHji 

GameTI 

GretftTwood 

■rvitpnaoolE 



Wpt1TrT4viU*j 
W^in?h 

IOWA 

QnvrH '-prill 

Tapeka 
Wtehlta 

r^a'peio-wn 

HPaacnd 

l-fcatXlnPMllkj 

LOtHSVllD 

Poducah 
Pahlwirift 

Pi.^la- 

LQUfSIWtt 

Ciciwtfly 
Monroe 

Maine 

bockton 
Caribou 
i^ratefDoco 



iio^^Rag^tflPaik 

$nck MaikOl 

Norlh-ClccfO 

^■asr PK[.i5,ty 
E.ft Gato"a ft ASwr^al^t 
KFQCh'i A Brenlano's 

South Wtroosh 

WulI jackson 

516 N. rAcTJoar- 

BJ5 N. IVr^f lean. 
cttrtiMjay Of ucb 
-n'kwiHt fsoaia 
Sapdrr^^ 3tsqi*i=la't: 
Univ. of Chlcr^a Bcc4cska* 

U'irJ i HsBc*farHDifl 

Videcmal. ri& 
Etook limpotlu^' 
took r^art<el 
Boo« Lmpoflu'Tv 

KrWaft PLcno 

NorthcjoT&S^all 
Book dmpaj|um 
Chicago-Moln H&m 
G-Bc J Supply 
Pt>iA ITrhpalum 
r>iii*Nt<A 
WI'slVRficllnEhflrl; 

K?ach'&* LVunlan&'i 
Kcoch't & Uranldno'E 
Book Erripatlum 
Book Emporium 

JaTeflaan Viibae 

W&stako Shocplnp C&ntoi 
took Market 
ItJnos News Serves 
KrocrVB & Btentano's 
Kioch's A. BfBrctano's 
Book Emporium 

SonDOJTion. Csnhai Noth 

Town a Counlry Shopp*rig Or, 
Book Empoiiuni 

PqporPI&cfi 

Nu II * 5l>oiu ptilnbuitH^ 

WHl'B CoHarjft6|&cN0fiJo.T 
Micro Compulof Sysronw, Inc; 
ftrrt News .Aaehov, Inc- 
Iho'Compuler Fjgirananoe 
Boo^tand. Inc 
Delmar Nbms 
Indiana News 
PIbjc Marl 

Aeco OiTlofi SuppllBE, 
naalo Shock 
M^ s lriu r s PkKtronlci 

Intaitf a|e Back -SrarE- 
l^lmurNfArtrlriC: 
Town C^kH ^ iCpnkn, Inc. 
AmatBur Eqjpmvn* Co- 
I LriULi s Bodln 

Soocr^in Boc*roolc5 
Den*]* tk^no Q\M Marl 
Mat? by ShGp 
Th^rcxnpvJli-'r liegp 
Rn4li3 S?>::L:k 
R-Kqr dr^cliCfllCa 
C5u|: ^ti"i nis'H'iyiHJL 
rVHIuf niotlwif ilea 

Acodkma Newstand 
The Book Rack 

Voyaaer Boaktfnie 
Pncko Shack 

TifOQii?SlKKk 



MAfrVLAND 

iHvnl Sprr>3 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BlCOklCft 
Csiir'r.viilrji i 

Fllcn&jra 
Ipswch 
LlHk^toh 
Lynn 

MIOHDCfAN 
Allen Pcfk 
DearPcm 
fJaian-d 

I IQ'I ?^ r ! 

La-^fill 

M< Cfanfterm 
Qwowo 



Nosevlle 
koyal Oak 
£s1. Johns 
STer-ng 

Heights 
gaming 

MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 
WllbPYsr 

WISSQUfit 

Fnnnlnffton 
kjrk^vilk? 
Mdb^ilv 
Sr Lours 

■JnlVerHtyCN 

MONTANA 

WNisfish 

Lroaln 
Omaha 

fiEVACA 

LasVecas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

^fest Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls- 

enmon 

Lqi^ence'vnie 

Lktwccd 

Marmora 

Mojitvala 

Psinnwlle 

l:ker Edge 

Rockaway 

NEW MEiflCC 

AiLuqueraoe 

NEW YORK 

niuc:kpOri 
Clmha I 4ekjl>^ 

Redo nip 
I Ijii-jn rcJi 
li;hnfion City 
New fork 



Layhll Newifitahd 

Voyaga Bookstaro 
Col OT Town News 
Corners Book Shop 

IflswicSTt NCvs-S 

Osmpulw Plui 
NcpHi Shore Co, 

rn tf-Ji. Nook, she 

DJil Cafrtputer FVcddcls- 

l^ooalh^ Bt^.Horn^ 

Harrison Ratto Shack; 

Cuti Sound & Homo- Arcades Qenier 

fev Bock. Shop 

Mjcnigan ftacTra 

rha Eight Bit Comer 

C/C CompJter Svitema 

P-tairy Corrrput&i 

PelTV Cll a Gas 
No^f Hcnifons 
SdhvCK? CltV 
Clhlo^. Rli.filKinkii, 

Ste*1lna Bogfe C^Jhlnr 
■Sarn/i Back CD. 

liead:- More rMewa 
me i^hoJo Shop 

f^aya T\' flc t^acw Shack 
\M* L eetronkzs, 

AttdiottJt 
BiaOk ElYipCfium 
CariputrM KcfH3Trao 

Bnal Benton 

■D=raum* Peeti&nies or v^itteflsi i 
Hobb^Tcwn 

Ccfnputw 4 Com pa h«rls 

Hurley Bft£tionit5 

Vefhown ntews Corp- 

VllLaaB Compute * Sofrwarn 
^ora Work* II 

K'- do Con Sot' *o re Corner 
iionwae Ctty 
Oarpast riaaio Shack 
SortwareCltv 
Dave's E>ect Rodro Shock 
ScfrwaraCrty 
Lonvare barton 

NtY*r Hod suns Co^nputer SVstems 
Desert Moon DlslnCutots 
Paps OnB Ne^storid 



I n R:l^n RcM;k Shop, |rtc 

!iCU1l'enr-vT|ef NftwrCft, inC 

On UriB: COiflpulftJ ArurKS Curiam 

ga 'west a. Co 

Unicom Electronic 

LTorn&! Be "liable — So fts Anne* 

Co^sea/ft flaqto 

nojtem rre/iysstai id 

Giand Denlral Starion, Ti&ck 31 

SflDPaik A^e., (Par. Am *1) 

55 Water Sireet 

Wo*ld Trade Centet #3 
firsr S?cp News 
lalB Hours Bookslon 
intern all oca I Smoke Erop 



t 



206 THE RAINBOW October i&fifi 



Usercom System^ irte£ v 
;'WaldenBo1>k&- • 
World Wide Media Services 
N. White PldirM Software CHy 
Rochester village Green 

World Wide Newll:? 
: . Woodhdyeh ; Spectrum Projects 

Afrerdeerl King Electronics 

Radio Shack 
Cd^; ; ; News Center in Cary village 

Charlotte Newsstand infl 

Papers & Paperback 
Wdvlock : Computer Plus 
Hickory V Comics 
Marion Boomers Rhythm Center 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Fargo 

OHIO 

Bfanchester 
Cdhton 
Charaori 
Cincinnati 
Columbians 
Coshocton 
,;Pdytdh; . 

ISairbom 
Glrard 

Kenton 

Lakewood 

t)rjnd 

Miamlsburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Xenla 

OKLAHOMA ; 

Oklahoma., 

City 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allison Park 

Aitoona 

Brookville 

Malvern 

Philadelphia 

Phoenixville 
Pittsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Wind Gap 
York; 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 



Computer Associates 

• . v < \ r >; & i v*- i^; '■' v * 'y ■ 

tcVs£* i-'-ol^v t,-" C 

JR Computer Control 
Utile Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
Utopia Software 
Huber Heights Book & Card 
Wilke News 
News-Readers 
Glrard Book & News 
The News Shop 
T.W. Hogan & Associates 
Lakewood international News 
Brunner News Agency 
Edu-Caterers 
Wilke News 

Mount Orab Radio Shack 
Programs Unlimited 
Leo's Book & Wine Shop 
Fine Print Books 



Merit Micro Software 
Steve's Book Store 

• SK * " •"" ■ V \i"£ . ■Vv . 

.. 1 «. * ." »■«. ■* of > '"0 ■ ■ j 

i £ . ■. .•;•■.* -\e .■• <: ; ■ 

Rfth Ave. News 



i2S is? 



Software City 
Newborn Enterprises 
Larry's Stereo Shop 
Personal Software 
City Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Radio Shack 
All-Pro Souveniers 
Pitt Computer & Software 
Software Comer 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 

~'.'*V'".^ ;* ')!/'■' ' . ■'■''iV «.'- c *;" , i ■ •,*>'' 

Software Connection 



Knoxviiie 

Memphis f 

Nashville 
'Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 

Elgin 
Ft. Worth 
Orange 
San Antonio 

UTAH 

Murray 

VIRGINIA 

vGafton 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
;! Pdrkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Ladysmith 
Milwaukee 



Anderson News Co. 

First Byte Computer Co. 

Computer Center 

Software, Inc. 

Mosko's Book Store 

Delker Electronics 

Cox Electronics Radio Shack 



The Homing Pigeon 
Software Terminal 
Northway Books & News 
CoCo 



WYOMING 

Casper 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 



DeseretBook 

Electronics Marketing 
i-0 Computers 
Software City 

Adams News Co., Inc. 
B & i Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News & Hobby 

Electronics, Etc, 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid II 

Harvey Schwartz Bookshop 

Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 

The Computer Store 



Informatlca Y Telecomunlcaciones 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. Software Haus, Inc. 
Gaffney Gaffney Book Store 

Greenville Palmetto News Co. 
Spartanburg Software City 
Union Remlng's Electronics 

JENNESSEE > 

C^attancoga - - Anderson News Co, 

JGuitd Books & Periodicals 
Dickson Highland Electronics 



AUSTRALIA: 




Klngsford 


Paris Radio Electronics 


CANADA: 




ALBERTA 




Banff 


Banff Radio Shack 


Blatrmore 


L&K Sports & Music 


Bonnyvilie 


Paul Tercier 


Brooks 


Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 


Calgary 


Billy's News 


Claresholm 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


. Drayton Valley 


Langard Electronics 


Edmonton 


CMD Micro 




Kelly Software Distributors 


Edson 


Radio Shack 


Fairview 


D.N.R, Furniture & TV 


Fox Creek 


Fox City Color & Sound 




A.S.C. Radio Shack 


Ft. Saskatoon 


Ft. Mall Radio Shack 


Grande 




Cache 


The Stereo Hut 


Grande 




Centre 


The Book Nook 


Hlnton 


Jim Cooper 


innisfaii 


L&S Stereo 


Leduc 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Lethbridge 


Datatron 


Uoydminster 


Lloyd Radio Shack 


Okotoks 


Okotoks Radio Shack 


Peace River 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 




tavener Software 


St. Paul 


Walter's Electronics 


Stetfler 


Stetfler Radio Shack 



Strath more 
Taber 
Westlock 
Wetaskiwin 



Wheatland Electronics 
pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Burns Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilliwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson 
Golden 
Langley 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksville 
Pentlcton 

Salmon Arm 



Compulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
BellRadb&TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Langley Radio Shack 
Microwest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksville IV 
DJ/s 

Four Corner Grocery 



LAWiebrLtd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodl's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics 



Matrix Computing ' 
Sidney Sidney Electronics 

Smtthers Wall's Home Furniture 
100 Mile 

House'. Tip Top Radio & IV 

MANITOBA 

Altona 
Lundar 
Morden 
The Pas 
Selkirk 
vlrden 
Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton Jeffries Enterprises 
Sussex Dewitt Elec. 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood Seaport Elec. 

Carbonear Slade Realties 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Aurora 
Concord 
Exceter 
Hamilton 
Hanover 
Huntsville 
Kenora 
Kingston 
Ustowel 
South River 



QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Asslnibob 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nlplwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 

Shellbrooke 

Tlsdale 



YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Atlantic News 

Compu vision 
Ingram Software 
J. Macleane & Sons 
Dataman 

Modern Appliance Centre 
Huntsville Elec. 
Donny"B" 
T.M. Computers 
Modern Appliance Centre 
Max TV 
Dennis TV 

Messageries de Presse Benja min Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Race 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket ; 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee, Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Granf s House of Sound 

H&O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 
Software City 



available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professorlifd^ & Brentano's, and Community 

NewscSWliisS 



October 1986 THE RAINBOW 207 



A D VER TISER 'S IND EX 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when 
you contact these firms,. 



After Five Software . * . . . . . 146 

Ark Royal Games . . . . . v**>13 

Canyon County Devices ♦ * 144 

Cer-Comp v . . . 1 40, 141 

ChallenQer. . . . • • • * * * ■* • • ■ •?* 1 95 
Cinsoft '('i.iff, ; .»' ■ ■ ■ ■ ■•• ■ ■ ■ ■ .»• » ■ ■ ■ . 1 34 
CirPak ..7... ... v., ......... 31 

CNR Engineering . , .99 

Co Co Trend • r r r ...... r »>..♦♦ .139 

Cog n i tec . . • • ♦ •> •:• • . * ■ »• «... . 1 33 

Colorware ..... . . ........ 22, 23, 25 

CompuServe v . »^\*»% * - * - -65 
Computer Center . . .«,.»,.. ^ * .35 

Computer Friends . . . .156 

Computer Island . . . .,. . . .... ... . ♦ .82 

Computer Plus ... . . . . . . . . . > + , 3 

Computerware , ... .39, 41 

Computize, Inc. . . . . .• . . .> , . 163, 209 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

^5 e I p h i • . * . # . . » . ....... . . . ... . 42 , 43 

Derringer Software . ... . ; w . . .88, 89 

Diecom ... .IFC 

D isto. . . . . • . • .. . . . . . . . . «* . . . . . l El C/ 

Dorsett • l » > . •> . . ... « • » « • . » . » » » . 1 1. 

Duck Productions .30 

Electronic Motion Control . . > 177 

Federal Hill Software ♦ . . . . . 185 

Hard Drive Specialists . . .[. . 169 



Hawkes Research Services 73 

HJL div. of Touchstone 

Technology, Inc.. ♦ * . , <#* * * , . . 19 

Hogg, Frank Laboratories . 197 

Horizon . . . • * . . * . . • .« .» . . ■■• « . ... . 1 55 
Howard Medical . . . . . . . . . 34, 210 

J & M Systems BC 

J & R Electronics .135 

Johnson, D.P. ..... 1 99 

Kelly Software Distributors. . . , . .14 
L o m ig .••...».••«..•..•««.... .157 

Mark Data Products . > .• . . « ..^.^ 175 
Metric Industries. ........ . .78, 179 

Micro Works, The . .> . .... . . . , . 1 72 

Microcom Software .16, 17 

Microtech Consultants Inc 71 

MicroWorld .-148 

Mix, Tom Software . . . .150, 151 

Moreton Bay ...... . ; . . . . . , . 93 

Other Guys Software, The ....... 28 

Owl-Ware ... .... .46, 47 

PCM 124 

Perry Computers 136 

Plan-Net Forms .... . 181 

Polygon ...... • . . . . .. . ..... 142 

Preble's Programs, Dr. 60 

Prickly-Pear Software . , ..... ... . . .75 

PXE Computing . . . . . . 7 

Radio Shack 50, 51 



Rainbow Adventure Book II 6 

Rainbow Binder . * ... ..... v*>. ♦ .20 

Rainbow Bookshelf ... . . . . . . .18 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 13 

Rainbow On Disk . . . . . ...r. - . 8 

Rainbow On Tape ^ ♦ ► , . . , . . 16 

RAINBOWfest .114, 11 

Robotic Microsystems . .8 

Saguaro Software ... . ♦ .• . it 

S EC/^^ . »*.«.«. .... ...... ....18 

Selected Software * ... . . . * .w. . . .7 

Software House, The . , ..<..« J 

Software Support, Inc.. . . . . . .62, 6 

Spect rosy stems .... ....... * . . . .15 

S pectrum Projects I nc> 

....105, 106, 107, 109, 110, 11 
Speech Systems 

.,.118, 1 1 9, ...-1.20* 1 «? 

Sugar Software . , . I . , 14i 

Sunrise Software . , 191 

T & D Software . . . * . . < . . * . . . k . . 12" 

I E f » a a ... a . . a a a . . J » . ." . '• . - f . . . . . 4| 

Tepco - f 61 

Thinking Software, inc. ... . ^ . 

Tothian Software Inc.. . . > + + 15S 

True Data Products ,192, 19^ 

Woodstown Electronics . . + + + . . . 16f 
Zebra Systems . . . . ..... . r , ... .10c 



Mi Caffc 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Shirley Duranseau 

Advertising Representative 

12110 Meridian South, Suite 5 

P.O. Box 73-578 

Puyallup, WA 983734)578 

(206)848-7766 I 




Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



208 



THE RAINBOW October 1986 



ALL SOFTWARE 
COMPATIBLE 
WITH 
COCO I & COCO II 
COMPUTERS 



SUPER BACK-UP 
UTILITY © 



.WITH S.B.U. FROM COMPUTIZE — 

)U'LL NEVER NEED ANOTHER BACK- 

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)PER BACK-UP UTILITY WILL PER- 

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TAPE TO TAPE (Regardless of most protec- 
tion schemes!) 

TAPE TO DISK (Move Cassette programs to 
Disk!) 

AUTO RELOCATE (For those Cassette pro- 
grams that conflict with Disk operating 
systems.) 

DISK TO TAPE (Place Disk programs onto 
Cassette) 

DISK TO DISK (Our powerful SpHt-N-Image 
Program, Copies regardless of most protec- 
tion schemes!) 
MENU DRIVEN 

REQUIRES 32K EXTENDED COCO 
REQUIRES 1 OR 2 DRIVES 
ALL MACHINE LANGUAGE!!! 
DMPARE WITH OTHER INDIVIDUAL 
ROGRAMS COSTING IN EXCESS OF 
00.00 

ISK $49.95 Cat. No. 107CD 

SPIT-N -IMAGE© 

M/L Disk Back-Up Utility 

here is no need to suffer the heartbreak of 
ashed disks any longer. Spit-N-lmage will 
eate a mirror image of your valuable disk pro- 
•ams which do not respond to normal back-up 
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ass. Data processing experts always insist on 
aving a back-up — it's good practice. 

REQUIRES 32K CC 
IISK $34.95 Cat. No. 101CD 



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ransfer contents of disk to tape ■ Transfer con- 
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REQUIRES 32K CC EXT. 
)lsk $24.95 Cat. No. 105CD 



'Y BOX 




f you have ever owned a 4, Y" Cable you know 
ow easy it is to 'bump* or dislodge the cable 
rom the computer. With the positive mechanical 
onnection of the "Y Box" chances are greatly 
educed of the "Y" coming dislodged. 

)ne of the most common causes of a shorted 
lata bus in the CoCo is a misaligned or loose 
'Y M Cable. Don't let your computer be the next 
'ictim of a M Y" Cable, order the "Y Box'* from 
TOMPUT1ZE. 

» NOISE FREE "GOLD CONTACT" TO 
YOUR COMPUTER 

» POSITIVE MECHANICAL AND ELEC- 
TRICAL CONNECTION 

» Catalog No. I62CH Only $29.95 



MASTER KEY II 

New Improved Version! A hardware product that 
takes control of any program regardless of protec- 
tion. Now use with RS Multi-pak, "Y" cable or 
optional extender cable. Captures register contants 
as they were when Master Key II was engaged. 
Complete disassembler, memory save, and much 
more. Requires some familiarity with Assembly 
Language. 

ROM PAK Cat. No. 160HR $ 99.95 

Cat. No. 161HR With Ext. Cable $109.95 






(215) 946-7260 P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 
y/SA ■ I MasterCard] 

Check or M.O. • Add $3.00 shipping • PA residents add 6% sales tax 
******* THE LATEST IN COCO NEWS!!! ★ 



• Supports 4 Hi-Res display modes 

• 4 page animation mode 

• Color Palette with over 15 color patterns for use 
with Hi-Res artifact 

• Send /Receive pictures over modem 

• Supplied utility allows capturing Hi-Res screens 
from most COCO arcade games 

• Multiple Hi-Res character fonts (user re- 
definable) 

• Supplied utility for transferring Graphicom* 
screens to Basic or other M/L programs. 

• Supplied utility for loading screens from Basic 
or other sources 

• Built in Hi-Res SCREEN PRINT (compatible 
with EPSON, C-ITOH, GEMINI-10, OKI, plus 
Radio Shack's LP-VII, LP-VIII, DMP-100, 
DMP-200, and GCP-115 printers) from 110 to 
9600 baud 

• SEND/RECEIVE slow -scan television 

• Many additional features, operating hints, hard- 
ware mod's and suggestions, etc. 

REQUIRES 64K COCO, 1 DISK DRIVE, AND 2 
ANALOG JOYSTICKS 



QUICK BACKUP 
UTILITY $19.95 
Catalog No 185CD 

Deluxe backup utility for the Radio Shack Color 
Computer. 

• Backup a disk in as few as 32 seconds (in three 
passes) 

• Format and backup a full disk in one minute 

• Full error correcting features (retry, skip, in- 
finite retry) 

Displays the current track that is being processed, 
works with all ROM versions. Supports I or 2 disk 
drive. A great disk production tool. 



GRAPHICOM $24.95 

Catalog No 111GD 

Simply stated - One of the finest graphic programs 
written for the Color Computer! 

FEATURES: 

• S-U-P-E-R U-S-E-R F-R-I-E-N-D-L-Y ! 




Announcing Colorscan, new software for the CGP-220. This program is a must for 
anyone who owns a Radio Shack Ink Jet Printer, and enjoys creating graphics with 
Graphicom, Graphicom Part II, CoCo MAX, or any program that produces a standard 
6K biannary picture file. 

This program contains some of the popular features found in "HARDCOPY" Such as 
lxl, 2x2 and posters; but color scan produse full color prinytouts of your favorite 6K 
graphics files. You can also create colorful banners up to 27' in length, or dump a disk's 
entire graphic contents to paper. 

Colorscan will print program listings in blazing color, make remarks in red, line numbers 
green, search for strings and print in blue, etc. All these features and more. 
Colorscan catalog number 184WD $29.95 



GRAPHICOM PART 



II 



• ••••• 



$24.95 



GRAPHICOM PART II DOES NOT RE- 
QUIRE GRAPHICOM TO RUN! 




Uil.G 



Graphicom Part II is a video processing 
package (hat provides many functions 
that are missing in Graphicom. Here are 
just a few of the features provided by 
Graphicom Part II: 

ENLARGE/REDUCE/ROTATE 
Enlarge or reduce any portion of a graphic 
screen, just like a photographic enlarger! 
Rotate by any degree or fraction of a 
degree around any point on the screen. 



PAINT 

Paint or "fill-in" any irregular area on the 
screen! More than 50 different colored 
patterns available. Additional paint pat- 
terns may be user-defined. 

PAN & ZOOM 

"Zoom in" x2, x4, or x8 on any portion 
of the screen to do fine pixel work. Allows 
editing of Graphicom character sets with 
ease! 

TYPESETTER & FONT EDITOR 

Add text in 16 different sizes, also sup- 
ports user definable foreground & 
background colors. Design & Edit 
characters for use in the typesetter. 

PIXEL BLASTER 

Allows the user to easily substitute or 
remove colors. Widen lines, swap BLUE 
& RED without effecting BLACK & 
WHITE, etc. 

Graphicom Part U requires a 64K extend- 
ed disk basic system, and supports 1 to 4 
disk drives, keyboard or joystick (analog 
or switch type) input. It will load and save 
both Standard BIN files and Graphicom 
screens. Ali functions support color or Hi- 
Res operation, as wen as the 4 screen 
display modes. 



OUR 
GRAPHICOM 
DIGITIZER 
JUST GOT BETTER 
SEE PAGE 163 



ARE YOU LOOKING 

FOR A HI-RES GRAPHIC 
SCREEN PRINT 
PROGRAM? 




THE ULTIMATE PRINTER UTILITY 




©1984 W MIXES III ITH Usl.0 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



HARDCOPY - Hardcopy is more 
than just a screen print utility, compare 
these features with any other graphic 
dump program on the market; 

• Full GRAPHICOM/GRAPHICOM 
PART 11 compatibility! Loads STAN- 
DARD 6K images, GRAPHICOM 
pictures, and COCO MAX pictures 
too! 

• BLACK & WHITE or GREY SCALE 
printing. In GREY SCALE printing, 
colors are printed as user definable 
patterns. Supports hi-res in all 4 
GRAPHICOM display modes! 

• lx, 2x, 3x PRINTOUTS - Three menu 
options are reserved for the most fre- 
quently used printout sizes; lx 
(quarter page), 2x (half page), and 3x 
(full page). 

• GRAPHIC LABELS - The label prin- 
ting option allows the user to create 
custom mailing or disk labels with 
professional looking results. 

• GREETING CARDS - The greeting 
card option allows the user to custom 
design greeting cards using both text 
and graphics. 

• GIANT POSTERS - The poster op- 
tion provides the user with a means of 
reproducing a hi-res graphic to a 
multi-sheet poster. 

• SPECIAL EFFECTS - The special ef- 
fects option allows the user to directly 
control the printing directives; ROTA- 
TION, X/Y SIZE, X/Y FLIP, X/Y 
GRID, X/Y FILL, TAB, WINDOW, 
POS/NEG IMAGE, and more! 

• USER CALL - Have an application 
that HARDCOPY doesn't quite 
match? HARDCOPY routines can be 
added to EXTENDED BASIC 
through the USR command! 

HARDCOPY* requires a 64K Color 
Computer or Color Computer II, and at 
least one disk drive. It supports I to 4 disk 
drives, keyboard or joystick input. Please 
specify printer and cat. number when 
ordering. 

• Due to hardware differences, some 
features may function differently on cer- 
tain printers. 

IDS 480/560-G Cat. No. 170WD 

Oki 82A (Okigraph) Cat. No. I79WD 

Okidata92 Cat. No. 171 WD 

Gemini 10X Cat. No. 174WD 

Gemini SG-10/15 Cat, No. 178WD 

DMP-105 Cat. No. 183WD 

Epson LX-80 Cat. No. 1 73 WD 

Epson MX-80 Cat. No. 172WD 

Epson RX-80 Cat. No. 173WD 

Epson FX-80 Cat. No. 173WD 

Riteman PLUS Cat. No. I77WD 

DMP-110 Cat. No. 180WD 

DMP-120 Cat. No. 176WD 

DMP-130 Cat. No. 182WD 

DMP-200 Cat. No. 175WD 

CGP-220 Cat. No. 181WD 

HARDCOPY PRINT 
UTILITY $29.95 




Howard Medical Computers 



(800) 443-1444 



RINTERS 



ORDERS 




NEW 

Dual Mode 

EPSON LX-80 

h 



The LX-80 offers draft or near letter quality plus a 1K Input buffer for muc 
faster graphics printing speed. LX-P package includes the LX-80, a Botek serial 
to parallel converter, and a Howard Printer Tutorial. 



< $7 shipping) 



Add $29.50 for tractor ET- 



AT 



a . 1 



STAR 
NX-10 



The NX-10 is the latest generation of printers and offers built-in back tractor 
feed giving forward and backward movement of paper plus exceptional graphics 
printing capabilities. NX-P package includes the NX-10, a Botek serial to parallel 
converter and the Howard Printer Tutorial. <j*^q^ 



($7 shipping) 



NIK 



123A 12" 



This 12" green screen high resolution mon- 
itor offers 80 column capability, Zenith quali- 
ty and a 30 day warranty valid at any of 
Zenith's 1200 locations. 



Retail $149 
Our price 



$«7so 



($7 shipping) 



122A Zenith 12" Amber Screen of- 
fers the same 640 dots x 200 dots 
resolution at 15MHz as the 123A 
and a 90 day warranty valid at our 
1200 locations. <£ O 

($7 shipping) O O 

Clo8eout Specials — only 14 in 
stock. We have a limited number of 
lesser known color monitors that 
have been discontinued but are 
brand new in their ej 4 a 
original boxes | 4 ^ 

($14 shipping) 

141 Roland 13" Color Monitor with 
speaker, 270 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 4 MHz CO 4 "7 
bandwidth ^| ( 

($14 shipping) 



131 Zenith 13" Color Monitor has 
medium resolution with speaker 
and RGB jack. §4 f\ 

($14 shipping) lOO 

All monitors require an amplifier 
circuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors, 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. 

VA-1 for monochrome 
monitors only, fits all 
color computers 



$2445 



($2 shpg) 

VC-4 for monochrome 
>r color, fits all color 
:omputers 

s 

($2 shpg)^ 



39«s 



(312) 278-1440 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 



DISK CONTROLLERS 

□ISTD 



■iff 



DC-3 

Includes controller and 
DOS ROM Chip 

$ 98 ($2 shipping) 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capaci- 
ty, parallel printer, real time clock, 
and all software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $-J25 

DC-3P Mini EPROM Programmer 
includes all software to 

program 2764 or 27128 

DC512 512K RAM Board S"|glJ 



RS-1 Radio Shack's 1-1 ROM 
based operating system $20 

DD-2 Double sided 360K disk drive 

with V2 height case 

and power supply '188 

CA-1 Cable to connect controller to 
one drive $2450 

CA-2 Two drive cable 



$2950 



MEMORY 



64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions^ Remove old chips and 
replace with preassembfed pack- 
age— no soldering; AX 
or trace cuts.(8fcahpg)*2B.* D 
64-Ff for F Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor $24 4 *> 



leads must be cut 



lipping) 



64-2 for COCO 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no e 
trace cuts. ($2 shipping) 5 24 45 
64-22 Two chip set tdr 26-3134A 
and B, 26-3136A and B. Keren Col- 
or Computers require +nt%AC 
1 solder point *28 45 

($2 shipping) 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 




PAYROL/BAS™ 

Written in nonprotected basic for the color computer. This easy-to-use package 
of programs will simplify and decrease the time spent doing payroll. Rainbow 
May 1986 review says, "Elegant and professional." State and federal tables 
are already included. Send $1 for 11 page reports guide, $"7Q95 

VIP LIBRARY ' ^ 

Softlaw's integrated package includes VIP writer terminal, data base, call and 
disk zap which can fix a diskette that is giving I/O errors. $ 1 O C 

SAP-II BPA-1 " 

Stock analysis program organizes Chart your blood pressure from daily 

your portfolio and gives specific readings taken in the comfort of 

S'poinlT $1995 *° urh °™ $1Q95 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of 
dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out; test it for compatability. If you're not happy with it for any reason, return 
it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back, (less shipping) 




Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 6062: 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
6:00-4:00 MonrFri. 

10:00-3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S 




ilCjJ 







!•'•*■ .1- ■zV*"'T -3 >v-v >•.-*; .,-•.>' 



I 



lifted 



0* 



SUP* 3 





HEAT UP YOUR COCO ! 





HARD DRIVES 



Besides the obvious advantage of increased disk access 
speeds and a vast amount of storage, our COCO hard 
drives boast many innovative features. For instance, 

you may boot OS/9 

directly from 
JDOS - no 
intermediate 
boot floppy is 
required. Our 
software can 
Tun with virtually 
any Winchester with a 
ST412 type interface. Our drives have capacities of 5, 
10, or 20 MBytes (formatted), and may be either 
partitioned into up to 7 logical units or left as one 
large logical unit. Our COCO hard drive systems are 
complete with case, power supply, cables, OS/9 
drivers, and instructions. Prerequisite: OS/9, JFD-CP 
controller. 

5 V 4 " 5 MByte full site $495 
5W 10 MByte Vi size $650 
2>Vi" 20 MByte (shown above) $795 

JFD-CP DISK CONTROLLER 

Our new JFD-CP, compatible with both the original 
COCO and the COCO 2, features a parallel port to 

support a 
Centronics 
compatible 
printer or our 
hard drive, 
and an 

external ROM 
switch, which 
Hj allows you to 
select JDOS or 
an optional RS 
lOS'type ROM. It comes in 
a case and includes JDOS 1.2 and manual. JDOS 
implements all RS DOS commands, plus many 
more, including auto line numbering, error 
trapping, baud rate selection, OS/9* boot from 
floppy or hard drive, and Memory Minder**, our 
disk drive analysis^ program (Precision Alignment 
Disk not included). 

JFD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS $ 139 

COCO-CLASSIC 

Our old JFD-COCO controller remains a strong 
seller. Some people just like old "classics" best! So 
we have brought it back at the lowest price ever! 

JFD-COCO Disk Controller with JDOS $99 




terms 

One-year warranty on parts & labor; 30-day money 
back guarantee (except shipping) if not totally 
satisfied. Items must be returned in like new 
condition. 

Free shipping via UPS in continental United States 
for payment by VISA, MasterCard, or cashiers check. 
COD requires 10% prepayment by bank card plus 
3% shipping. Blue Label and foreign shipping extra. 




DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Upgrade your Color Computer by adding our new 
JFD-CP disk controller, supercharged with JDOS 1*2 

operating 
system, and a 
^^^^^ top quality 

drive with case 
^ ' ' and power 

. \ ' ' ' * supply. Comes 

complete with 
cable and JDOS 
manual. 



Drive 0 System with one single side drive $279 

Drive 0 System with one double side drive $349 

Drive 0, 1 System with two single side drives $389 

Drive 0,1 System with two double side drives $489 



MEMORY MINDER** 

Memory Minder 

is a disk drive 
test program now 
included in 
JDOS. Used 
with a 
Precision 
Alignment 
Disk, 
Memory 
Minder allows 
you to check 
your drives for speed, 
alignment, sensitivity, hysteresis, 
and more! You can actually align or adjust the drives 
while viewing the graphics on the screen. No special 
equipment needed! 

PRECISION ALIGNMENT DISKS (From Dysan) 
PAD-40X 1 : Tests single side disk drives $26 
P AD-40X2: Tests double /single disk drives $33 

Memory Minder is available on diskette for those 
who don't own a JFD-CP controller with JDOS. 
Includes Precision Alignment disk. 






Memory Minder: single side package 
Memory Minder: single /double side package 

*OS/9 is a registered trademark of Microware, Inc. 

** Memory Minder is a registered trade ma rd at J&M Systems, Ltd. 



i//A 

J&M SYSTEMS, LTD. 

151 00- A CENTRAL SE 
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 87123 
505/292-4182 



$59 
$75