Skip to main content

Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

See other formats


The Best Money Can Buy 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 





Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (l#D 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM S99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 
Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 
(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1 .0 ... , $40. 



ADOS ROM (24 or 2B pin 



$40. 



S 9 9 - 



$79. 



.$30. 
$30. 
$20. 
$40. 



Ordering [nfarrnaiiDii . 

Use our WATS line to place your order Visa, MasterCard, or Wire Transfer. Or 
mail your payment directly to us Any non - certified funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COD orders are sflcflpie-p as well as purchasa orders from 
government agencies. Most ^Icnti nrn- shipped o\f Hiff'stiglf with the exception of hard 
drive products that are- custom tiFS qt ai^id is uu ; standard means of shipping 
unless otherwise specified. Shipping costs are available upon request. 



ADOS is a product of SpectroSystems of Miami Florida 
and is fully supported by the author. The HDS version of 
ADOS supports 2 drives, 40 track, 6ms trk-to-trk drives 
only, either Single Sided or Double Sided. 
TKBUG Monitor and DOS 1.0 

on PROM (24 or 28) $40. 

New, unique CoCo software monitor in ROM designed 
for a minimum of key strokes and fully compatible with the 
1.0 version of disk basic. Features 33 single key com- 
mands, allowing the user to quickly display and screen 
edit RAM in either hex or ASCII format. Also allows the 
user to dump screen or memory to printer, set break points, 
alter baud mis, set 64K RAM mode, and more, TKBUG 
by TOMMY KEETON 

HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 

1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



i 



r 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 1 Drive 128K 685.00 

Tandy 1000 HD 10 Meg. 256K 1539.00 

Tandy 30001 Drive 51 2K 1969.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-1 05 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 559.00 
RadioShackDWP-220 Daisy Wheel469.00 
Silver Reed EXP-500P Daisy Wheel 229.00 

StarSG-10 245.00 

StarSG-15 410.00 

Panasonic P-1091 259.00 

Panasonic P-1092 339.00 

Toshiba 1340 439.00 

Okidata 192 375.00 

Epson LX-80 275.00 

Epson FX-85 419.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-3 Modem 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-5 Modem 99.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem Pac 79.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 2212 315.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 139.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pack Interface 89.00 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 
Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Color 300 Monitor 265.00 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor 139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor 149.00 
Goldstar Amber Monitor 99.00 
Radio Shack VM-2 Green Monitor 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 FlightSimul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Slueth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Mark Data Graphic Adven. 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util by Mark Data 29.95 
COCO Max by Coiorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Coiorware 79.95 

AutoTerm by PXE Computing39.95 49.95 

TelePatch by Spectrum 19.95 

TeleWriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 89.95 

Deft Extra 39.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 59.95 

Max Edit by Derringer 19.95 

Elite Calc 69.95 69.95 

Elite Word 69.95 69.95 

Elite File (disk only) 74.50 

DynaCalc (disk only) 99.95 

Word Pack II by PBJ 134.95 

VIP Writer (tape & disk) 69.95 

VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Order any 2 software pieces listed 
and take 10% off their listed price. 
All Radio Shack software 10% off list. 
Send for complete list. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 




AMERICAN) 



r z 1 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




18 






FEATURES 



Menace of the Sandworm/Pefer Meyers 

GAME Miners on Dune fight the vile sandworms 

CoCo Fried Chips/Marty Goodman 



HARDWARE PROJECT Repair tips for burned-out controllers 

[■j] Adventure Processor/ Bill Cook 



PROGRAMMING UTILITY Take the tedium out of Adventure writing 
@ Tic Tac CoCo/ James W. Wood 



GAME Updating an old favorite with a twist 
H NymMatch/er/en Dick 



GAME Encouraging mastery of word concepts 
[si Starlord/fte/u Dash 



GAME Test your skill and daring by fighting the evil tyrant 



{=} Esch-A-Sketch/Er/c White 



GRAPHICS An easy way to create self perpetuating patterns 



H Fun and Foolery/CoCo Lovers 



GAME SHORTIES Five games to amuse plus two programming utilities 
How Does the CoCo Stack Up?/ William Barden, Jr. 



COMMENTARY Comparing the CoCo to other computers 
The Old Switcheroo/Mar/c Haverstock 



HARDWARE PROJECT Three devices on one joystick port 
The Quick Joystick Fix/ Bruce W. Goshom 



HARDWARE PROJECT Make joystick firebuttons electrically parallel 

H Eye of the Tiger/ Tim Jones 



GAME Rocky beware — CoCo is here! 
S Fortune Wheel/Arron Branigan 



GAME A challenging game for the whole family 
What's Inside a Mouse?/Sfeve Bjork 



MOUSE UTILITY Detailing the point-and-pick interface 



18 



24 



26 



36 



40 



58 



75 



79 



90 



108 



116 



122 



156 



180 



Cover Illustration copyright © 1986 
by Fred Crawford 



m The smalt cassette tape 
symbols beside features 
and regular columns indicate that 
the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's rain- 
bow on taps, ready to ctOflD and 
RUN For full details, check our 
rainbow on tape ad on Page 133. 



NEXT MONTH: Sharpen your pencils and put on the oid thinking cap 
because school days are just around the corner! Along with new shoes and 
lunch boxes, September also brings the rainbow Education issue. Keeping 
abreast of current thinking is important in today's fast-paced world and the 
rainbow is here to help. 

We'll have educational features for all ages — from preschoolers to graduate 
students and beyond. Even old pros will discover many things of interest in 
THE RAINBow's regular columns, reviews and utilities. Technology never stops 
and neither should your education. Come to the premier information source 
for the Color Computer, the rainbow, and be in the know. 



m 



- 



COLUMNS 



si BASIC Training/ Joseph Kolar 

Uncomplicating translating 

Building August's Rainbow/J/m Reed _ 

Managing Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/Marty Goodman 

Introducing a new Rainbow Column 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



Using the Co Co SIG and Marty Goodman's database report 

B Education Notes/Stei/e Blyn 

Exploring the card catalog 

Education Overview//W/cfrae/ P/og, Ph.D 

Looking at the 'hidden ' computers 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony Di Stefan o 

Timing and the SAM chip 

@ Wishing \Ne\\/Fred S. Scerbo 

Computer-paced learning 

RAINBOWTECH 



Accessible Applications/R/cftarof White 

Getting in touch with PenPal 

s] Barden's Butter/William Barden f Jr 



More interfacing tricks for assembly language and BASIC 
Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 

KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

Experimenting with RAM disks 

DEPARTMENTS 



Advertiser Index 

Back Issue Information 
CoCo Cat 



CoCo Gallery 
Corrections _ 



208 
139 
.134 
114 

_98 



One-Liner Contest 
Information 



Received & Certified 
Reviewing Reviews _ 
Scoreboard 



The Crossword Creator 
Contest 



Letters to Rainbow 
The Pipeline 



183 

__6 



Scoreboard Pointers- 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



104 



Subscription Information 
These Fine Stores 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Product Review Contents 



48 



16 



178 



174 



94 



97 



12 



101 



167 



194 



188 



186 



197 



156 
131 

.132 
_86 
88 



_66 
_56 
206 



129 



The 




August 1986 



Vol. VI No. 1 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor Tamara Renee Dunn 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Copy Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Editorial Assistants Judy Brashear, 

Wendy Falk, Jody Gilbert, 

Angela Kapfhammer, Shirley Morgan 
Technical Editor Dan Downard 
Technical Assistants Cray Augsburg, 

Chris Wehner 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, Joseph Kolar, 

Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, Fred Scerbo, 

Richard White 

Consulting Editors Ed Ellers, 
Danny Humphress, Belinda C. Kirby, 
T. Kevin Nickols 



Art Director Jerry McKiernan 

Designers Tracey Jones, Heidi Maxedon, 

Kevin Quiggins, Sandra Underwood 
Production Assistant Cynthia L. Jett 

Chief of Typography Debbie Hartley 
Typography Services Jody DoySe, 
Suzanne Benish Kurowsky 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia K Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 



Editorial Director James E, Reed 
Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 
Creative Director Jerry McKiernan 

Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Accounts Payable/A DP Lisa Rag an 

Fulfillment Services Director Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Fulfillment Services Asst. Dir. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Coordinator of Development Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

P re-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Monica Wheat, Pam Workhoven 

Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
Director Cindy J. Shackleford 
Advertising Representative Shirley Duranseau 
For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 208 



THE rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (f^' 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAINBOWfest and THE rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid p- 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40^ 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire con*- 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1986. the RAINBOW is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any r 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. Co 
® trademark of CompuServe Inc. • Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface ^ 
is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issw 
their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after rr 
refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



LETTERS TO THE 






D 

D 




Software Thieves 
(Not Pirates) ! 



Editor: 

This letter is to all the software thieves 
who are passing around a broken version of 
CBASfC VI, 01. It was discovered some time 
ago that this version of C BASIC was avail- 
able on BBSs around the country. When I 
downloaded a copy, I was quite upset. I 
spent over two years writing this program 
only to find some thieves had stolen it and 
were freely giving away copies. What gives 
you the right to take two years of my work 
and give it away or use it without my 
consent? Not only have you taken something 
that does not belong to you, you have also 
given C BASIC a bad name. The copies you 
are giving away are not even near the current 
version (VI. 12) that has a large number of 
additional commands, functions and im- 
provements. Not only that, but the stolen 
version has many commands and features 
that no longer work after it was broken. 

Some of you even have the nerve to 
demonstrate it at computer club meetings 
and discourage people who are considering 
purchasing CBASIC. Then there are those 
who have acquired the stolen version and 
have the nerve to call us up and ask us why 
something doesn't work. 

Through greed or the desire to be the 
center of attraction in the local CoCo 
Community, you have succeeded in killing 
the best Color BASIC compiler on the 
market. You have also succeeded in cutting 
our sales of CBASIC by over 50 percent. We 
can no longer afford to run our current 
advertisement since we no longer sell enough 
copies to pay for it. I have to wonder, is it 
worth it to continue to improve and enhance 
CBASIC if I can't afford to pay for the 
advertising? It also makes me realize that it 
is not worth the time or effort to even 
attempt to work on another program as 
complete or complex as CBASIC for the 
Color Computer. 

Bill Vergona 
Cer-Comp 
Las Vegas, NV 



BACK TALK 

Editor: 

May I offer some suggestions in response 
to Kyle Johnson's query in the June 1986 
issue [Page 8] regarding genealogy programs 
for a 64K Color Computer 2. 

Prickly-Pear regularly advertises a 
Family-Tree program in rainbow maga- 
zine. Another tape program I have found to 
be much more complete and usable on disk 
is Lineages, prepared and sold by Ervin A. 
Madera, P.O. Box 1746, Rohnert Park, CA 
94928-1241 for $35. 

Allen R. Streeter 
Saginaw, MI 

Incorporating Print Styles 

Editor: 

In response to the question from Jerry 
Dummer in the June 1986 issue [Page 9], he 
asked how to incorporate various styles of 
print (which his printer will print) within 
Color Scripsit. I substitute the codes for 
whatever character font I want to print in 
place of the codes Underline and Elongate 
in Option 7 on the main menu. 

I hope this will be of help; your magazine 
has certainly been a great help to me. 

Lloyd O. Billings 
Seattle, WA 

VIP Defended 

Editor: 

I take respectful difference with Richard 
White for his statement in your May 1986 
issue that VIP Writer might qualify as user 
hostile compared with other offerings. VIP 
is a powerful, elegantly programmed, and 
very intuitive and logical word processing 
package, with programmed-in and pro- 
grammable printer controls that are beyond 
belief. The kingdom of MS-DOS should 
have a package as powerful and practical! 
Neither WordStar or PC WRITE can touch 
VIP for convenience and transparency. 

I am a registered owner of Telewriter-64 



as well as VIP, and I have a lot of respeci 
for it. I don't doubt that you're right, Dar 
(May 1986, Page 217): Telewriter-64 is 
probably the most widely used word proces- 
sor for the CoCo; it's a fine package and it's 
been around a long time. But for my big 
writing projects I invariably reach for VIP. 
The recent patches for Telewriter-64 have 
added a lot to the original, but they give it 
features that VIP has as standard equip- 
ment. 

A VIP users' group was recently formed. 
Interested persons can write me at Box 194, 
01463. Hints, brief articles, letters, VIP 
database formats and CALC templates are 
gratefully received. There are no set dues, 
but contributions to defray the cost of 
copying and mailing the quarterly newsletter 
are most welcome. 

John Ogasapian 
, Pepperell, MA 

Transformation Troubles 

Editor: 

In the June 1986 issue, Marty Goodman's 
article, "The Great Transformation" [Page 
182] and associated programs are very good 
and fill a substantial need. It is indicative of 
the quality software available in the rain- 
bow. 

One problem is the interface between VIP 
Writer and several MS-DOS word proces- 
sors. Display Writer 3 and WordStar are 
two MS-DOS word processors I have used 
and both insert a carriage return at the end 
of every line. On the other hand, VIP Writer 
inserts a carriage return only at the end of 
a paragraph (a forced line feed). Thus an 
ASCII file from Display Writer 3 or Word 
Star used with VIP Writer produces a 
double-spaced output. 

The problem becomes more serious when 
sending ASCII files from VIP Writer to 
Display Writer 3 or Word Star. The MS- 
DOS software expects a carriage return after 
every line and without them treats the entire 
paragraph as one long sentence. It seems 
that these problems are eliminated if 



'E RAINBOW August 1986 




YOU COULD FALL IN LOVE WITH 

AUTOTERM! 

IT TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 



SMARTEST 
TERMINAL 



GOOD 
LOOKIN' 



AUTOTERM shows true upper/ 
lower case in screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, or 64 characters with 
no split words. The width of 32 
has extra large letters. Scrolling is 
forward, backward, and fast. Block 
graphics pictures are displayed 
automatically and can be scrolled. 

The screen's top line shows 
operating mode, unused memory 
size, memory on/off, and caps- 
lock on/off. It also gives helpful 
prompts. 



SWEET 
TALKIN' 



KEY-BEEP can be on/off. Unac- 
ceptable keystrokes cause a lower 
pitched BOP! This ERROR- 
BEEBOP can be on/off. 

Talks to other computers with 
Full or Half Duplex; Baud Rate of 
110, 150, 300, 600, 1200; Parity as 
even, odd, mark, space, none; 7 
or 8 bit Word; any Stop Bits; all 
128 ASCII characters; true line 
Break; XON/XOFF protocol; and 
optional line-at-a-time transmis- 
sion. Able to send and receive 
text, block graphics, BASIC and 
ML programs. A 64K machine 
holds up to 45,000 characters 
(33,300 in HI-RES). 

DUAL PROCESSING lets you 
review & edit while more data is 
coming in. 

XMODEM for disk file transfer. 



Fully supports D.C. Hayes and 
other intelligent modems. 

Talks to your printer with any 
page size, margins, line spacing, 
split word avoidance. Embed your 
printer's control sequences for 
boldface, underlining, etc. Narrow 
text can be automatically spread 
out. 

You'll also use Autoterm 
for simple word processing 
and record keeping 

You can display directories, 
delete files, transmit directly from 
disk, and work with files larger 
than memory. Easily maintain a 
disk copy of an entire session. 

Compatible with TELEWRITER 
(ASCII) & other word processors. 

SMOOTH 
WALK IN' 

AUTOTERM moves smoothly 
and quickly between word proces- 
sing and intelligent terminal 
action. Create text, correct your 
typing errors; then connect to the 
other computer, upload your text, 
download information, file it, and 
sign-off; then edit the received 
data, print it in an attractive 
format, and/or save it on file. 

Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly, too! 
Any operating parameter, such as 
screen width, can be altered at 
anytime. Uncompleted com- 
mands can be cancelled. 




PUTTY IN 
YOUR HANDS 



The word processor can be 
used to create, print, and/or save 
on file your personal KSMs. They 
let AUTOTERM act like you. For 
example, it can dial through your 
modem, sign-on, interact, perform 
file operations, & sign-off; an 
entire session without your help. 
KSMs can answer the phone, 
prompt the caller, take messages, 
save them, hang-up, and wait for 
the next call. The KSM potential 
is unbelievable! 

NO OTHER COMPUTER IN 
THE WORLD CAN MATCH 
YOUR COCO'S AUTOMATIC 
TERMINAL CAPABILITIES!!! 

WHAT THE 
REVIEWERS SAY 

"AUTOTERM is the Best of Class." 
Graham, RAINBOW, 6/83 

•The AUTOTERM buffer system is 
the most sophisticated — and one of 
the easiest to use. . ." 
Banta, HOT CoCo, 9/84 

"Almost a full featured word 
processor. . ." 

Ellers, RAINBOW, 11/84 

"AUTOTERM's excellent error- 
handling routines, thorough docu- 
mentation, and logical, easy-to-use 
command structure make it stand 
out." 

Parker, HOT CoCo, 5/85 



AVAILABLE IN CANADA 

from 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Edmonton, Alberta 



CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Please hire the mentally retarded. They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! Phyllis 



Telewriter-64 is used since it inserts carriage 
returns at the end of each line. 

If anyone has a simple solution to this 
problem, I'm sure it would be appreciated 
by the many VIP Writer users. 

Ronald Pettus 
St. Charles, MO 

Assessing the Assessment 

Editor: 

I must take exception to the article by 
Harry HaJIstrom entitled "Assessing the 
Market Value of Your Home," April 1986 
[Page 79]. While Mr. Hallstrom's program 
seems well-written and well-intentioned, it 
does not assess the fair market value. I can 
understand his bewilderment after talking 
with three real estate agents who were 
obviously lacking in training. Without facts 
to back up their "market value," it is no 
wonder they came up with a $20,000 range. 

On the other hand, Mr. Hallstrom's 
method neglects changes in the buying 
market, availability and type of financing, 
changes in the neighborhood, conformity 
within the neighborhood, condition, area 
amenities and more. In addition, improve- 
ments rarely increase the value as much as 
they cost. 

Your readers would be best advised to 
base their asking price on information from 
comparable sales and competitive proper- 
ties. If you live in a small town with no 
multiple listing service and only local real 
estate companies, go ahead and order a 
FNM A appraisal. The cost of the appraisal 
is small when compared to the frustration of 
an extended marketing time and false expec- 
tations. 

Roger A. Knauff 
Montgomery, AL 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

Users of "Name That Tune" (June 1986, 
Page 66) will experience problems with the 
firebuttons regardless of the computer they 
use. PEEK(G52B0) gives a number in the 
100s or 200s depending on JOYSTI<(0). To 
correct this problem, make the following 
changes in the program: 

5100 P=PEEK(G52B0) AND 3 

In lines 51 10, 5120 and 5135, substitute 2 
for 254 and 1 for 253. 

Bruce Lewis 
Maryville, MO 

The substitution will work — and 
it will work on both Co Cos regard- 
less of what set of numbers your 
firebuttons produce. However, it 
also involves one more function to 
be performed (computing the log- 
ical AND on P) in a spot where 
there is really no time to spare. 
Hence, the joysticks become a little 
less sensitive and the music moves 
a little slower. 

Marge Rutter 
Program Author 



Ring Quest Reincarnation 

Editor: 

I enjoy your magazine and the Second 
Adventures tape and would like to pass 
along a hint for the Adventures tape. In Ring 
Quest, to make it so you cannot die, make 
340 GOTO 354. This reincarnates you with 
a loss of hit points totaling the number the 
monster killed you with, but at least you get 
to finish the game. This is great for searching 
rooms. 

Mike Farmer 
El lens burg, WA 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I own a grain crop farming operation and 
would like to know what companies have 
farming business software available for the 
CoCo. Write me at RR 1, Box 301 A, 46176. 

Scott New kirk 
Shelbyville, IN 

And the Beat Goes On 

Editor: 

I am looking for a program to allow the 
CoCo to perform as a metronome. I run a 
recording studio in Nashville and would like 
to use it for my studio work. Can anyone 
help me? My address is 300 Rural Hill Ct., 
37217. 

Michael Bridges 
Nashville, TN 

Mailing List Merger 

Editor: 

Is there any way to merge a mailing list 
created by a BASIC program to Telewriter- 
641 My address is 133-01 Sanford Avenue, 
11355. 

Tho Luong 
Flushing, NY 

Data Sheet Dearth 

Editor: 

I would like to know if anyone knows 
where I can obtain the 1793 FDC data sheet 
(Floppy Disk Controller) by Western Digital 
Corporation. I need an address and tele- 
phone number please. Write to me at 834 
Third Street, G8P 1P6. 

Claude Gosselin 
Chibougamau, Quebec 

Domestic Requests 

Editor: 

Kudos to Scott Halfman for his Castle of 
Doom program (June 1986 issue, Page 26). 
This is by far one of the best basic game 
programs for the CoCo I have ever seen. 

I need help finding a couple of programs. 
First, I am looking for a program to help my 
wife lay out cross stitch patterns on all sizes 
of material. Second, I am looking for a 
program that will teach shorthand. Any help 
would be appreciated. I can be reached at 
RR 2, Box 85-A, 47882. 

Scott Lamp ton 
Sullivan, IN 



Brother, Can You Spare a Program? 

Editor: 

I am secretary of a bowling league and 
need a program that will enable me to keep 
up-to-date records of individual averages, 
etc. Does anyone know of one? Write to me 
at 195 Lynnfield Street, 01960. 

John C. Groz 
Peabody, MA 

Knitting Calculations Needed 

Editor: 

My wife has a knitting machine and I have 
a 64K Color Computer, Radio Shack disk 
drive and a printer. I would appreciate any 
information on programs available concern- 
ing knitting machine calculations. Any 
information can be sent to me at 2341 Floyd 
Drive, 53404. 

James E. Johnson 
Racine, WI 

See the Sugar Software ad on Page 
80 in the May 1986 issue. They 
have a program called CoCo Knit- 
ter. It was also reviewed in the 
same issue (Page 195). 

Diet Diagnostic 

Editor: 

Do you know of a nutrition and disease 
program for the Color Computer 64K for 
use with organic diseases, diet, vitamins, 
symptoms, dates, hours, etc. My address is 
4617 Girard Avenue No., 55412. 

Wilma Bisted 
Minneapolis, MN 

The October 1985 issue, Page 213, 
has a review of a program by 
Homesoft called Nutriguide. This 
may be what you are looking for. 

Rabbit Relations 

Editor: 

I was recently approached by several 
friends who are involved with rabbit breed- 
ing. We are looking for a program to compile 
information on rabbits for ease of record- 
keeping. It would be similar to a genealogy 
program. Has anyone seen or heard of such 
a program? I would appreciate hearing from 
anyone on this subject. I can be reached at 
P.O. Box 775, 70664-0775. 

Morgan J. Maynard 
Sulphur, LA 



DELPHI LINE 

Editor: 

OS-9, to me, means incompatability with 
all of my files that are in Extended Disk 
basic format. What would I need OS-9 for? 
Everything I ever use is in the normal 
format. Why are there only hard drive 
drivers for OS-9? It would be a great idea 
to use a hard drive in place of a floppy! Then 
I would have faster data I/O and lots more 
space. 

I could put CoCo Max Hand VIP Writer 



8 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



on it, etc. I know this would be possible if 
I could get a software driver that would drive 
a hard drive from Disk BASIC just like a 
floppy but with the plusses of a hard drive. 
More people would use hard drives because 
they wouldn't have to learn another operat- 
ing system and wouldn't have incompatabil- 
ity with their existing programs. Does 
anyone know where I can get a hard drive 
driver for Extended Disk BASIC? If so, please 
write to me at 125 Kelmar Avenue, 19355. 

Ted Matthews 
Frazer, PA 

You might check our advertisers 
such as Owl- Ware. 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

Does anyone have a device driver and a 
device descriptor for using the Radio Shack 
X-pad under OS-9, or a program to use and 
define the four special function keys on most 
CoCo replacement keyboards for use under 
OS-9, or an OS-9 sound program, or an OS- 
9 key click program? My address is P.O. Box 
506, 83221. 

Robert Parsons 
Blackfoot, ID 

Game Quest 

Editor: 

I am looking for a jet combat simulator 
for the TRS-80. There are two available for 
the Commodore 64 right now. 

Also, I would like to know where I could 
get the game P-5L My address is 3447 
Dempsey Road, 43081. 

Kevin Burton 
Westerville, OH 

You can purchase the game from 
Tom Mix Software. 

In Search of Rainboard 

Editor: 

Can you please tell me in which issues of 
rainbow the "Rainboard BBS" appeared. I 
also want to thank all the people who make 

THE RAINBOW what it is. 

Nick Barnes 
Waterbury, CT 

"Rainboard" by Lane Lester ap- 
peared on Page 44 of the No- 
vember 1984 issue. Also see "Su- 
preme SysOp and Magnificent 
Modem Master" on Page 20 of the 
November 1983 issue. 

Speechless 

Editor: 

I have purchased the Super Voice Car- 
tridge along with the Translator from 
Speech Systems. After reading instructions 
and running sample programs it works fine, 
but when I try it with other programs that 
ask if I have a speech cartridge and I say yes, 
it doesn't work. I have tried it with several 
Radio Shack programs and on Gold Runner 
from Tom Mix and it won't work with any 



of these programs. I would like to know if 
there is a program or a way to get the Super 
Voice Cartridge to work with these pro- 
grams. If anyone can help, please write me 
at P.O. Box 8522 LRS, 77711. 
Thank you for Delphi, it is: 

D elightful 
E ntertaining 
L ovable 
P owerful 
H elpful 
I nspiring 

Gene Darby 
Lumberton, TX 

The other programs you are using 
are designed for the Radio Shack 
Speech I Sound Cartridge. 

CoCo Confusion 

Editor: 

I have a 64K CoCo. I received my May 
1986 RAINBOW and looked through it. In the 
"Received & Certified" column I saw the 
Infocom games. I noticed it said the games 
were for the CoCo 2. 1 know that the CoCo 
2's POKE locations are different. Can I use 
it on my CoCo? If not, are they going to 
come out with one for the CoCo 1? 

Ryan Smith 
Placerville, CA 

The Infocom routines require the 
DOS command to boot. They 
have, however, loaded on our 
older CoCos when we used the OS- 
9 boot routine to run them. 



Take It All Off? 

Editor: 

Is it OK to turn off all the computer 
equipment at the power strip, or should I 
continue to turn off everything individually? 

RAINBOWfest at Palo Alto was great. 
Not only were there great bargains at the 
booths, the seminars we attended were good 
— especially the Steve Bjork seminar. We 
also attended Dale Puckett's OS-9 seminar 
and bought his book. Keep up the good 
work, and please come back out our way 
soon. 

Sonya J. Hurst 
Richmond, CA 

Although it is not recommended 
by Radio Shack, it has worked 
without detriment to the equip- 
ment. 

Documentation Dilemma 

Editor: 

I recently purchased a Centronics Model 
308 printer for $50. 1 knew it was used when 
I got it and expected it would not be in good 
shape, but I was wrong. The problem is I 
have no documentation on it. If anyone has 
documentation please send me a copy of it 
or tell me where I could get it. My address 
is P.O. Box 56, 67103. 

Brian Daily 
May field, KS 



Packet BBS 

Editor: 

Have any radio amateurs found or con- 
structed a packet bulletin board program or 
message recorder/ transmittal program for 
the CoCo in conjunction with two-meter 
packet radio? I have experimented with the 
Autoterm program (building keystroke 
multipliers section), but the AEA PK=80 
packet controller will not access these 
commands when a station calls my station. 
Any suggestions would be appreciated. My 
address is 19 New York Avenue, 08735. 

Harry Warren W2SAD 
Lavallette, NJ 



BOUQUETS 

Editor: 

I was pleasantly surprised to receive a 
software update disk from one of your 
advertisers, Micro Works. I had purchased 
the DS69A Digitizer and C-See software, 
and had found it to be a good product. 
Apparently Micro Works found a bug, and 
without any complaint from me, sent a new 
version of their software. Your readers 
should know that they are concerned for 
their customers. 

Terry A. Jackson 
Lombard, IL 

Editor: 

I would like to publicly thank the people 
at Frank Hogg Laboratory for the courteous 
and prompt service I received. I recently 
ordered some merchandise and am very 
pleased. The person who took my order 
explained what each piece would need to 
work properly on my system and answered 
all my questions. Half of the order arrived 
in two days. One piece had to be back 
ordered and it came in just four days. All of 
this, plus fair prices, make FHL a company 
for the CoCo Community. 

Jim Martin 
Indianapolis, IN 

Editor: 

I enjoy getting the rainbow and the main 
reason is because of your great range of 
advertisements and great departments, like 
"CoCo Gallery." It was in the rainbow that 
I came across Dayton Associates; they have 
given me good, fast service and I haven't had 
a problem yet. 

Mike Jovanovic 
Chicago, IL 

Editor: 

I would like to thank Bob Rosen of 
Spectrum Projects for his assistance in 
getting my Mark Data Products Universal 
Video Driver to work. I contacted Bob 
Rosen and explained my problem. He 
immediately resolved it. 

Bill Stephan 
Massapequa, NY 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

I feel highly honored to have a piece of 

August 1966 THE RAINBOW 9 



The Ultimate 
Color Computer 

Enhancements 

for Productivity 
from HJL Products 




To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get information 
Into and out of the system. 

This is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer. 

The Keyboard - $79.95 

The overwhelming favorite of serious 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program. 
Installs in just a few minutes with no 
soldering. 

The Numeric Keypad - $89.95 

The NumberJack is a self-contained, 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, It has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshifted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
ail necessary connectors for quick and 
easy installation without soldering. 



The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with ail 
monochrome monitors, and Is easily 
installed without clips, Jumpers or 
soldering (except in some later CoCo 2s 
with soldered-ln video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor - $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used it you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
Inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
below) 

The BASIC Utility - $25.95 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any coior computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, word wrap, global search, 



and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-legendabie 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 

Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New Yortc 1-800-462-4891 
International calls: 716-235-8358 




Ordering Information: Specify model (Original, F-version, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers Include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 tor 
shipping, 3,50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax, Dealer Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P,0. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 



my work published in "CoCo Gallery." I 
consider THE rainbow to be the finest com- 
puter magazine published today. Your 
interesting and intelligently edited magazine 
has had a lot to do with the success of our 
beloved CoCo. 

Merwyn Bly 
Vienna, VA 



Missing Address 

Editor: 

A gentleman phoned me with a question 
about my IRA Estimator (April 1986, Page 
70). I promised to send him a cassette to 
compare with his typed-in listing, but I lost 
his name and address. He is from either 
Maryland or Virginia. Please send me your 
address again. Your tape is ready. 

Bruce W. Ronald 
Dayton, OH 



How about a 'Wishing Well' 

Editor: 

I would like to see in rainbow a section 
entitled "Programs I Wish Somebody 
Would Write." Readers could write in about 
a program of their particular interest that 
might be of interest to many others with the 
same need. I personally have use for more 
business and science software rather than 
games. It would be great if someone could 
write a program for CoCo on linear pro- 
gramming or a graphics break-even analysis 
program. I would purchase these kinds of 
programs, but nowhere are they written for 
the Color Computer. 

Ron F. Pfeiffer 
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 

Where have you been? Fred B. 
Scerbo, a contributing editor, has 
been writing the "Wishing Well" 
column since March 1984. He is 
receptive to all readers* requests 
and ideas — you should drop him 
a line. 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 

Editor: 

The Pub BBS of Chandler has moved to 
Mesa and has a new telephone number: 
(602) 844-7840. The system is running 24 
hours a day under OS-9 with PBBS 4.0 
software using a 64K CoCo with multipack, 
80-column card, hardware clock and three 
80-track, double-sided drives. We support 
300 and 1200 Baud. No password is re- 
quired. There are six download subdirecto- 
ries for text, OS-9, Model 100, CoCo and 
graphics. The Pub has been running for 
nearly two years. Please stop by and see us 
sometime. 

Steve Roberson 
Mesa, AZ 

• I would like to announce the new L.A. 
Color Users Board BBS system. It is running 
the Colorama software at 300 Baud and has 
five download sections, magazine, gallery, 
message base and much more. We are up 24 



hours a day. The number is (213) 773-3024. 
To be guaranteed full access after the first 
call, send a post card to 4740 E. Florence, 
#1,90201. 

Bill Gordon 
Bell, CA 

• I am pleased to announce that the Star 
Trek BBS is online 24 hours a day, seven 
days a week. This system runs on a CoCo 
2 with two DSDD (disk) drives. The board 
has online games, downloading (XMO- 
DEM), chat with Capt. Kirk and more. 
Phone (203) 822-8176. 

Bruce Bouley 
Norwich, CT 

• I have a 64K CoCo 2 with one disk drive, 
printer and 300 Baud modem. My number 
is (315) 549-2501 or if anyone knows of a 
BBS in my area please call or write. My 
address is 5418 Rt. 89, 14541. 

Drew Hammond 
Romulus, NY 

• For the benefit of the CoCo Community, 
I have listed some local BBSs in the Yonkers 
and Bronxville area that support the Color 
Computer: 

Westchester #1, 300-1200 Baud, 24 hours 
a day, seven days a week, TBBS system. 
Phone (914) 965-2355, Bill Graspo, SysOp. 

Lexicon BBS (formerly WCHR BBS), 
300-2400 Baud, 24 hours a day, seven days 
a week, TBBS system. Phone (914) 776- 
2424. 

System 80, 300-1200 Baud, 24 hours a 
day, seven days a week. Phone (914) 793- 
5408, Steve Brundale, SysOp. 

Capraselli, 300-1200 Baud, 24 hours a 
day, seven days a week, TBBS system. 
Phone (914) 699-8186. 

M&M Public BBS, 300-1200 Baud, 24 
hours a day, seven days a week, TBBS 
system. Phone (914) 738-6857. 

TBBS of Yonkers (formerly the Undersea 
Kingdom of Golden Bridges), 300-1200 
Baud, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 
TBBS system. Phone (914) 964-8845, Mike 
Sebar, SysOp. 

I hope this encourages more CoCo nuts 
to participate in the growing world of 
telecommunications! 

S.A. Borbas 
Yonkers, NY 

• The Peninsula CoCo Board, which has 
been online since May 1984, now supports 
up/ downloads, mail section, public mes- 
sages, a D&D section, private messages and 
SIGs for Commodore, Atari, CoCo, Apple 
and MS-DOS machines. The BBS is oper- 



ated on a 64K CoCo with 1.8 megs of online 
storage program in CoBBS and supports 
300 or 1200 Baud. Parameters are 8, 1 & N 
only. Phone (804) 868-0922. Passwords are 
usually approved within 24 hours. Security 
is strict and only public domain programs 
are allowed. Runs 24 hours daily, seven days 
a week, except when SysOp is playing. 

Bill Satterwhite 
Tabb, VA 

• I would like to announce the formation 
of CoCo Beach. It runs on a Colorama BBS 
system with multilevel access, online games 
and more. Call (206) 432-2512. Jeff Gill, 
SysOp. 

Brian Wright 
Seattle, WA 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 

Letters to the editors may also be sent to 
us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: 
EDITORS. Be sure to include your complete 
name and address. 



ARTS AND LETTERS 

m J; 



t .-ju-t 5 : ^M,^Sr <r£s-v ***ZX 

r n. I V n. I. »„ 



I H * ( 

i it i a. • 



x*. ~ \ yr v*-"- "-hi v. | 

i 

F R O li T i I E if U R 8 i Z O O T 0 V 0 U - 

Sonya and Ken Hurst 
Richmond, CA 

August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 1 



LATE NIGHT RATES 
ON DELPHI 

If all goes as planned, by the time 
you read this, Delphi will have insti- 
tuted summer Late Night Rates! 

The way it works Is that, during the 
late night/early morning hours, users 
will receive one free minute for every 
10 minutes used, amounting to a 1 0% 
discount. 

The Late Night Rates are to be in 
effect during July and August and 
apply to connect time between 2 a.m. 
system time (Eastern Daylight Time) 
and 7 a.m. local node time (the time 
at your end). For Eastern U.S. users 
this is a five-hour period, but for those 
on Pacific Time, this is an eight-hour 
period since Late Night Rates apply 
from 2 a.m. syst em time to 7 a, m. local 
time. 

An added bonus to Late Night 
Rates is that many of the rainbow 
authors and editors choose to be on 
our CoCo SIG during this period 
anyway! 



A Down Home 

Invitation 



Our Anniversary Issue is history now and we've already received 
more notes, letters and cards about it than anything we've done 
in a long time. As things work through the editorial department, 
we'll print a representative number of your comments in our letters column. 

Just about everyone had nice things to say, and all I can say is "thank 
you!" We're glad you consider THE RAINBOW to be "your" magazine just 
as you consider the CoCo to be "your" computer. It makes it a whole lot 
more fun to be a part of the CoCo Community when you know everyone 
is so positive about it. 

Maybe the special section on the people who do THE RAINBOW whetted 
a few appetites, or maybe it is just because summer is coming and it's time 
to "hit the road" for vacation. Whatever the reason, we're getting a whole 
lot of requests for tours of the Falsoft Building for this summer. 

If you've already written to us about that, you know who to contact. 
But if you happen to be near Prospect and would like to stop by, you can 
arrange for a tour by writing or calling Ira Barsky, who is in charge of 
our development program. Call or write Ira at our regular address and, 
if at all possible, we'll be happy to have you. I'm sorry, but we can only 
do this Monday through Friday during regular office hours (9 a.m. - 5 p.m.). 

* * * 

Speaking of Ira, our newest employee, reminds me to talk about 
RAINBOWfest, which is also under his aegis. 

The Chicago show this year was a resounding success, but proved to 
me that I should let well enough alone. 

One of the biggest complaints we've always heard about RAINBOWfest 
is that the aisles are too small and there is not enough room to walk around 
easily. In Chicago this year we took some extra space to make the aisles 
wider. And what happened? The main response I got was that "the show 
seems smaller than last year." 

Actually, the Chicago RAINBOWfest had a slight increase in attendance 
from last year (and were there some bargains to be had!), but it did seem 
smaller because there was so much extra room. 



Don't expect that to happen again. 
After telling several hundred people 
that the show was running the same, 
attendance-wise, I decided that we'll 
forgo the bigger aisles from now on. 



And, we anticipate there will be 
another major change for RAINBOW- 
fest next year — two shows rather than 
three. We will be in Princeton, New 
Jersey, and Chicago, but the future of 



the California show, right now, is in 
doubt. 

The California show has always been 
our smallest — at least 2,000 less than 
the other two — and has always been 



the most expensive to produce. Part of 
that is because of the great distance we 
have to travel, but the other aspect is 
that hotels in the California area (north- 
ern and southern) charge far more for 



use of their facilities than anywhere else 
in the country. 

We have not made a final decision yet 
and hate not to go to the West Coast, 
but we believe we might be forced into 
dropping this one show because of a 
combination of cost and attendance. 

We are trying to find a way to cut 
costs and boost attendance in Califor- 
nia but we are not sure if those efforts 
will be successful. If not, be certain that 
the shows in Princeton and Chicago will 
be held as planned. 

* * * 

My August column is traditionally a 
pretty short one — I usually get "written 
out" for the July anniversary issue. But 
I did want to keep you up to date on 
what's going on here and will close by 
saying I hope we'll see you in Prospect 
this summer! 

— Lonnie Falk 



"We're glad you consider THE RAINBOW to be 
r your' magazine just as you consider the CoCo to 
be 'your' computer. It makes it a whole lot more 
fun to be a part of the CoCo Community when 
you know everyone is so positive about it. 99 




To make the^nnDst of your new Dragon microcomputer from Dragon-Tano, you need Dragon User 

— the international, independent magazine for Dragon owners. 



Each issue of Dragon User contains: 

• reviews of the latest software 

• programming advice for beginners 

• hardware projects 



The Dragon microcomputer was launched in the UK 
last year. Since then we has/e developed a knowledge 
and mastery of the machine's abilities. You can 
benefit from our experience by subscribing to 
Dragon User, which is expanding its coverage to include 
all US developments. 

To make sure that you receive a copy of Dragon User 
regularly, subscribe direct to us. This costs only $29.95 
for 12 issues airspeeded to you — or take advantage of 
our special offer to long-term subscribers. Individual 
copies of the magazine can be obtained from your 
Dragon dealer. 



program listings covering games and utilities 
reviews of Dragon peripherals and add-ons 
technical advisory service 
programming articles for users 






Subscription order form. Receive a free book and save money by taking out a 
lung-term subscription — a two-year subscription saves 10%, a three-year 
subscription saves 20% In addition, long-term subscribers will receive a free 
copy of either □ The Working Dragon or □ Dragon Games Master. Please send 
a check, made payable to Dragon User, with this form. 

Start my subscription from the following issue 




Name, 



Address 



Signed. 



Date. 



Subscription rates US and Canada airspeeded □ US$29.95 for 12 issues/1 year 
□ US $53.90 for 24 issues □ US$71 .90 for 36 issues Send this form to 
Dragon User, % Business Press International, 205 E. 42nd St., New "York, NY 10017 





August 1986 THE RAINBOW 13 



OWL-WARE 

WINCHESTER BASIC 



ANNOUNCING... the Development of a Major Breakthrough in 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR COMPUTER!!! 

Several months ago OWL-WARE introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer. 
No,w we are about to introduce the only RSDOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, although there are 10 
directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but if you do, all files saved from RSDOS are available to OS9. All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into, only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don't like. 

Call for further details and availability on this breakthrough product!!! 




WITH 
DRIVE 

BELOW ONLY... 



WITHOUT fK-- 
$50. DRIVE $75. 



OS-9 HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives. 

Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
Memory!!! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes... 
Software, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interface. 

°T £>o /A Systems. " Ca^iaY BG) 

$525. 5 MEG $659.10MEG 

$799.20MEG 

OWL-WARE 

is pleased to announce 




an exclusive arrangement 
to Distribute the L.R. TECH 
Hard Drive Interface and Software. DEALERS INQUIRES INVITED 




Interface & 
Software Only $99. 



NOTE: Interface is not Interrupt 
Driven Like Our Competition 

Therefore, the System Clock 
does not Lose Time During 
Hard Drive Access. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULTI-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 



CREATE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES WITH 




vers. 

2 . O 



M 
M 



M 
M 
M 
H 



convenient, on-screen Menu 
Accepts input from x-PAP. 

touch-pad: mouse or joystick 
Magnification Mode 



Drew with custom paintbrushes 
easy fftt-ntna sketching 
"Paint" coMMand 
10 colors at a tlMe 
Pictures are ready for use in 

BASIC programs 
Lettering In anu f iit 
Screen dunp to Color Inh-JrV 
or otner Tandy printers 



64K DISK 

i§pjil[ipiiiii«afinu 



$29.95 




aft? 



Hi! 



inn 



UIEW J-DIHEHSIOKAL OBJECTS FROM ANY 
ANCLE WITH 




Convenient, on-itrpcn Menu 
Supports input frow X-PflD, 

TOUCH-PfiD, MOUSE or JOYSTICK 
Built-in screen dump to Tandy 

Er inters 
lcuiates dimensions for you 
fron Just a rough sketch 
Plots or calculate* lines and 
ar c s 

On-screen sketching mode 



64K DISK 



$29.95 



OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 






TECHNICAL ADVICE 
(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 



SHhhh... Ask about the WISPER DRIVE!!! 



DRIVE 0$179.tO $239. Single 

...Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0, 1,2,3 Combos. Double 

drive 1 $99.to$145. Quad 



NOW AVAILABLE !!! 

SUPER-TROLL 




id 



OWL-WARE'S version of the 
Distro (CRC) Controller by 
Tony DiStefano.This has sockets 
for 4 ROM Chips. ...only $15.00 
additional with a Drive 0 System. 

ADD ON OPTIONS: 

CDOS $6. 

Parallel Printer Port $25. 

Real Time Clock $10. 

80 Column Card $ 49 - 

Just Controller $99. with CDOS 
to $195. with ALL options 



All drives are new and fully 
assembled. We ship 

FULL Y TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at NO ADDED CHARGE! 

CHINONand Other Brands known 
as the highest quality made. 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 



Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



We have RSDOS, JDOS, 

OWL DOS, ADOS available on 
ROM. Call about Double Sided 
or Special Needs. 



TOLL FREE 

ORDER LINE 

(800) 245-6228 

Call for 
LATEST 

PRICES!!! 



WARRANTIES 

90 day - 1 YEAR 



1 




M.C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA Res Include 6%Ta« 
PA (215) 682-6855 



OWL TIP : 

We stock Single Sided Drives, but 
at the Current Prices why not 
BUY Double Sided??? 



OWL-WARE SOFTWARE 

BUNDLE: DISK TUTORIAL 

2 UTILITIES 
2 GAMES 

DISK TUTOR 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
QUICK. PAINLESS KNOWLEDGE OF DISK 
BASIC (THIS PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN 
TUTOR IS EASILY WORTH THE BUNDLE'S 
TOTAL PRICE). 

OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
25% FASTER DISK ACCESS AND ALLOWS 
USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 

SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

2 GAMES 

2 GAMES FROM OUR STOCK. 
BOTH HAVE SOLD FOR OVER $17. EACH. 

IF SOLD SEPARATELY OVER 
$125.00 WORTH OF SOFTWARE!!! 

only $24.95!!! 
(or even better) 
$4.95 with 
DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 




BUILDING AUGUST S RAINBOW 



That plastic look . . . 

A doctor in the house . . . 

And, assorted CoCo commentary 

A grab bag of sorts. Yes, the cover of last month's anniversary issue "feels 
funny," or, as one reader says, "appears to be waterproof." Well, it was 
laminated; that is, a "photopolymer," a thin plastic coating that dries 
upon exposure to ultraviolet light, was added to give it a spiffier look. We 
figured, with our mugs on the cover, we could use all the help we could get. 

Perhaps "water resistant" would be more appropriate than "waterproof," to 
borrow terms more associated with watches and raincoats than magazines. 
Laminating a cover is much like waxing your car: it brings out the color to 
make it look prettier and it helps protect the surface, too. For instance, if you 
use a Magic Marker to draw mustaches on our caricatures, you can wipe them 
right off again. At any rate, the lamination process was an extra feature of our 
anniversary issue and, because it is quite expensive, it'll likely be a while before 
we do it again. We hope you liked it. 

Something brand new this month is "CoCo Consultations," a technical Q&A 
column by Martin H. Goodman, M.D. Marty is a hard-core hacker if ever there 
was one and, I believe, his knowledge of the CoCo and its associated hardware 
and software is unexcelled. Our challenge here at THE RAINBOW will be to keep 
Marty's voluminous replies in "CoCo Consultations" from spilling over into 
the next dozen pages. 

An added extra for rainbow readers is that Marty can be reached almost 
every evening on our CoCo SIG on Delphi. Thus, you can receive quick replies 
to your questions, even though, due to our "lead time," it may be months before 
your question is published in his (or Dan Downard's) column. 

I was recently treated to several hundred words of "clarification" from Marty 
in response to a few dozen words in a letter to the editor in July's issue. It appears 
one of our readers was somewhat overzealous in his comparison of the CoCo, 
the Amiga, the Macintosh and the Atari 520ST. 

No, the CoCo's Motorola MC6809E, most certainly, is not a 16-bit CPU, 
as was claimed, but rather an eight-bit device, albeit with 16-bit internal 
registers. Secondly, while 512K add-ons are available for the CoCo, only 64K 
is directly addressable. There were some other inaccuracies, too, but, for Marty's 
full response, youH need to check our CoCo SIG database. 

Professor Art Flexser was one of the first to chide us for not contesting the 
letter when we ran it, an editorial oversight. We've also received letters from 
several others, including George Henry of Glendale Heights, Illinois; Lake 
Smith of Mt. Juliet, Tennessee; Troy Rothwell of Battle Creek, Michigan; and 
Alan Blount of Grand Junction, Colorado. The sum and crux of everyone's 
remarks is that, yes, the CoCo is a wonderful machine, but let's keep the facts 
straight. 

Toward that end, we asked Bill Barden to do a piece on "How Does the CoCo 
Stack Up?" Bill is a recognized authority on personal computers and his 
commentary begins on Page 90. Perhaps this will make up for letting that July 
letter slip through. 

And, what else is new? Well, rainbow's technical editor, Dan Downard, is 
about ready for us to introduce the long-awaited rainbow on DISK service, 
which will include OS-9 programs, too. Stay tuned. 

Lastly, we'll soon be mailing THE rainbow in Kraft paper — the infamous 
plain brown wrapper — in order to provide extra protection during mailing. 
So, if you've been putting off subscribing because you don't like the label being 
stuck on the cover, now's your chance to join the ranks of those who save money, 
and time, by signing up for home delivery. For this month, that's "a wrap" for 
me, too. 

— Jim Reed 



500 
POKEs, 
PEEKS, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams, SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKES, FEEKs and EXECs to: 

* Autostart your basic programs 

* Disable Color Basic/ECB/Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USINQ, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MEROE, RENAME, DSKINI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

* Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Speed Up your programs. 

Reset, MOTOR ON /OFF from 
keyboard. 

* Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW. 

* Set 23 different 
QRAPHIC/SEMIQRAPHIC modes 

* Merge two Basic programs. 

* AND MUCH MUCH MOREIIl 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16K/32 K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo I and CoCo II. 

ONLY $16.95 



ORDER TODAYl VISA MC Am EX Check or MO. COD 
add $2.50. Please add $3.00 Sflr H (USA & Canada, 
foreign add $5.00). NYS residents pi. add sales tax. 
All orders shipped WITHIN 24 HOURSW 



★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 



MJF 



MICROCOM 
SOFTWARE 



P.O. Box 21 4 Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



1 6 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



UTILITIES/BOOKS 




UTILITY ROUTINES for the 
TANDY & TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

This powerful book for Basic and ML 
Programmers, includes program expla- 
nation, memory requirements and an 
annotated source listing for the utility 
routines given below. These routines if 
bought individually will cost you 
HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. 

These are 100% Position Independent 
ML Utilities and require no ML program- 
ming knowledge. 

COMMAND KEYS: Access commands with 2 
keystrokes 

CURSOR STYLES: Over 65000 cursor styles. 
ERROR SKIP: 'ONERR GOTO' for Basic 
Programs 

FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get real word 
error messages. 

KEY CLICKER: Ensure key input accuracy. 
REPEAT KEY: Repeat ANY key. 
REVERSE VIDEO (Green & Red): Eliminate 
eye-strain 

SPOOLER: Don't wait for those long printouts. 
SUPER SCROLLER: Save/view scrolled lines. 
TAPE- TO- DISK: Copy Basic and ML programs. 
AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!! 

For 16K/32K/64K Cassette or Disk 
Systems, CoCo l& CoCo II. 

BOOK $19.95 

THESE ROUTINES (READY-TO-RUN) ON 

CAS/DISK 

$24.95 

BOTH BOOK AND CASSETTE 
or DISK; 

$36.95 
OTHER MUST' BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These 3 books 
provide a complete annotated listing of 
the BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49,95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TD OS-9 (Book): $18.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TD OS-9 (2 Disks): $29.00 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS: Tips and tricks 
for Basic Programmers Only $14.95 



WE HAVE ALL THAT YOU NEED TO SUCCEED 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 

• Disk-toDisk Copy (1 -3 passes) 

• Tape-to-Disk Copy 

• Tape-toDisk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• Tape-to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ M L programs and DATA files. 
32 K Disk System 
(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY $24.95 
BEST OF 

COCO TIME 85 

(UTILITIES) 
1 8 best selected utilities from COCO- Tl ME 
1985 like: 

• In Memory Disk Drive for 64 K Cassette Users 

• CoCo Disk Zap 

• Basic Program Packer 

• Tape Encryption (Basic) 

• Disk Encryption (Basic) 

• Graphics Screen Dump for DMP Printers 

• Basic Search 

• EZ Disk Master 

• Function Keys 

• Graphics Zoom 

• Tape Index System 

• 4DK Basic (for 64 K Cassette Users) 

• Alpha Directory • Banner Creator 

• LIST/ Dl H Pause • Disk Mailing List 

• Super INPUT/LINE INPUT 

• Tape-to- Tape Copy 

Disk or Cassette Only For $26.95 

UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best- selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 

• Super Tape-to-Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• L List Enhancer (with page numbering!) 

• Graphics Typesetter (two text sizesl) 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Dump 

• X-Ref for Basic Programs 

• Hidden 32 K (Use the "hidden" 32K from your 64K CoCo) 

• Basic Stepper (Super Debugger!) 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

AND MUCH. MUCH MORE!!! 

DISK (64KReq.) ONLY $29.95 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewriter-64 (Cas) $47.95 ( Dsk) 57.95 

Telepatch(Dsk) 19.95 

CoCo Max (Cas) 67.95 

CoCo Max II (Dsk) 77.95 

CoCo Max Upgrade (Dsk) 1B.95 

Pro Color File (Dsk) 54.95 

(includes SIMON) 

Dynacalc (Dsk) 79.95 

Autoterm (Cas) 36.95 

(Latest Version) (Dsk) 46.95 

COCO UTIL II (Latest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible 
computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 
ONLY $36.95 

DISK ANTI-PIRATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs 
ONLY $59.95. 

HIDE-A- BASIC 1.1: Best copy- protection 
program for Cassette Basic programs. 
ONLY $24.95. 

( Both Disk Anth Pirate & Hide- A- Basic 1 .1 
for ONLY $79.95) 

CABLES/HARDWARE 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: Use your 
monochrome or color monitor with your 
CoCo (ALL CoCos). Includes audio 
connectioa Easy installation - no 
soldering ONLY $29.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 
Lowest Price Anywhere- $137.95. 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95. 

MICROCOM 2 POSITION SWITCHER: 

Select any one of two RS232 devices 
(printers/modems) from the serial port 
ONLY $29.95. 

MICROCOM 3 POSITION SWITCHER: 

Select any one of three RS232 devices 
(printers/ modems) from the serial port 
ONLY $34.95. 

Y CABLE: Use your Rompak with your 
Disk System ONLY $24.95. 

DISKETTES (ID): BONUS Brand SS/DD 
diskettes for the CoCa 100% Guaran- 
teed. $12/ box. 



JHJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



Our software/ books are available at all leading dealers in USA Canada and Australia To Order 
Order by phone & get a $2 refund for your phone call VISA MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 
shipping and handling (USA & CANADA other countries $5.00). COD add $2,50 extra 
NYS residents please add Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 




24-HOUR ORDER HOT LINE (7 DAYS A WEEK): (716) 223-1477 



GAME 



Mining on the Planet Dune becomes a 











t 



18 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



4K 




f the 1 




RAINBOW 









#1 



of the Sand Worm 

By Peter Meyers 




had just seen the movie Dune 
for the third time and had re- 
tired to my C0C0 to think of 
some great new program to 
work on. I eventually gave up 
that ridiculous notion and 
began playing a game of Colorpede. As I played, 
I thought about all the people with 4K CoCos 
who are missing out on the fun. So with the ideas 
of Dune still fresh in my head, I began work on 
my program, Sand Worm. 

Sand Worm is a Low-Res Centipede-type 
game in which you are an underground mining 
vehicle that must burrow through the sand, 
destroy boulders, and (most importantly) avoid 
the treacherous Sandworm. 

After the title page appears, just press ENTER 
and the game screen is produced. Use the right 
joystick to control the red mining vehicle at the 
bottom of the screen. As you move, you burrow 
a path through the sand, but you must move 
around boulders or destroy them to clear the 
way for more burrowing. The firebutton triggers 
the Ultrasonic Devastator, a sheet of sound that 
breaks rocks (for three points) and petrifies any 
portion of the Sandworm (for 10 points) turning 
it to solid stone. Your score appears in the upper 
left-hand corner, and the computer keeps track 
of both the present and high scores. 

The Sandworm also must maneuver around 
the rocks, and when it hits one, it changes 
direction, eventually moving downward to 



Peter $(ime$ Meyers is a 15-year-old sophomore 
at Tlw0a$ Jefferson High School in Rockford, 
Illinois. He enjoys experimenting with graphics 
and has owned his Co Co for six years and a 
CoCo 2 for the past two. 



5»* 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 19 







VIDEO 



A funny thing has happened in the home video 
market. As it gets easier and easier to watch what 
you want, it gets harder and harder to decide 
what that might be. 

Dozens of new tapes are released into the stores every 
week, along with hundreds of hours of programming on 
the network and cable channels. It has reached a point 
where even the most devoted videophile can use a little 
help sorting through it all. 
Now that help is available. 

Inside VCR you will find clear, easy-to-read reviews 
of all the best new releases. You II find out about little- 
known videos — what they're about and where to get 
them. And in the feature articles, you'll find some very 
entertaining reading about the entertainment business. 

Now that you 've discovered VCR, you won't want to 
risk missing a single issue. You can save yourself the 
trouble of walking to the newsstand each month, and 
save yourself some money at the same time. 

Just fill out the attached card and drop it in the mail. 
Or even easier, call (502) 228-4492 and ask for Sandy. 
She'll see to it that VCR is delivered right to your door 
each and every month of the year. 



IMIIILiiiiliiiii. i,r J LiliJ^h^llHI tlllll4+bllllUilla.i L. 1 1 1 • • ||| I J I-.. 



Yes, enter my subscription for 
the next 12 issues of VCR. 

At only $15, that's 36 percent off the regular newsstand price. 



□ My check in the amount of 



State 



ZIP 

is enclosed. 



(In order to hold down costs, we do not bilL) 
Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct, Number Exp. Date 

Signature 

♦Subscriptions to VCR are $15 a year in the United States. Canadian rate is U.S. $22. Air mail rate elsewhere is 
U*5. $60. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents 
add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency on/y, please. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do hot bill. 

To order by phone {credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 

Mail to: VCR, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pirapecl, KY 40059 



lit Jin JJil|miPFM"n«i""f « ' 



lestroy your miner. If any part of the 
vorm collides with you, you are in- 
stantly smashed to pieces. The worm 
ilso possesses a natural burrowing 
seam that breaks up rocks as well as 
destroys you. When you are destroyed, 
the worm restarts at the upper left-hand 
:orner of the screen, a few more rocks 
are added to the screen and you con- 



tinue until all three of your miners are 
destroyed. 

When the game ends, the high score 
is displayed and you are asked if you 
want to play again. As long as you do 
not end the program, the high score 
remains updated throughout the games. 

The best thing about Sand Worm is it 
only uses 2.083 K of memory and will 



run on the smallest of CoCos. I have not 
included the famous speedup POKE 
because my system will not accept it, but 
those who want to should add it to give 
more excitement to the game. The game 
itself is pretty self-explanatory and you 
should have no trouble mining the rich 
soil of the desert planet with a little 
practice (and a lot of luck). □ 



The listing: SRNDWORM 

10 CLEAR10 :CLS0: PRINT© 107 , " SAND 

WORM "; :PRINT@164," BY: PETER ME 

YERS, 1985 ";:PRINT@230," FOR TH 

E TRS-80 COCO "; : PRINT® 4 20, » PRE 

SS <ANY KEY> TO PLAY " ; 

20 A$=INKEY$:IFA$= II,, THEN20 

30 LC=7 : LV=3 : B=0 : S=0 

40 CLS3:FORX=1TO60:PRINT@RND(447 

) , "o" ; :NEXT: FORX=6T013 : CP (X-5) =X 

:DM(X-5)=1:NEXTX 

50 PRINTS 1,STR$ (S)+ M ";:H=JOYSTK 

(0) :V=JOYSTK(l) 

60 A=A+1:IFA=1THENSC=464 

70 PRINT@SC,CHR$ (128) ; 

80 IFH>45THENSC=SC+1 ELSEIFH<15T 

HENSC=SC-1 

90 IFV>45THENSC=SC+32 ELSEIFV<15 
THENSC=SC-32 

100 IFSC>511THENSC=SC-32 ELSEIFS 
C<354 THENSC=SC+32 

110 IFSC>510THENSC=SC-1 ELSEIFSC 
<352THENSC=SC+1 

120 IF PEEK(SC+1024)=15 THENMU=1 
130 IFMU=1ANDH>45THENSC=SC-1 ELS 
EI FMU= 1ANDH< 1 5 THENS C=S C+ 1 
140 IFMU=lANDV>45THENSC=SC-32 EL 
S E I FMU=1ANDV< 1 5 THENS C=S C+ 3 2 
150 MU=0 

160 PRINT@SC,CHR$(183) ; 

170 P=PEEK(65280) :IFP=1260RP=254 

THENGOSUB3 3 0 

180 B=B+1:IFB>1THENNEXTX 

190 FORX=LC TOl STEP-1 

200 PRINT@CP(X) ,CHR$(128) ; 

210 CP(X)=CP(X)+DM(X) 

220 IF(CP(X)+1)/32=INT( (CP(X)+1) 

/32) THENCP(X)=CP(X)+32:DM(X)=-1 

230 IFCP(X)/32=INT(CP(X)/32) THE 

NCP (X) =CP (X) +32 : DM (X) =1 

240 IFPEEK(CP(X)+1024)=15 THENCM 

=1 

250 IFCM=1 ANDDM(X)=1 OR CM=1 AN 
DDM(X)=-1 THENDM(X)=32:CP(X)=CP( 
X)+31:CM=0 

260 IFCM=1 ANDDM(X)=32 THEN DM(X 

)=l:CP(X)=CP(X) -31 

270 IF CP(X)>448 THENTB=TB+1 : I FT 



B=l THENDM(X)=-1 

280 IFCP(X)>510 THENCP(X)=CP(X) - 
64:DM(X)=-1 

290 IF PEEK(CP(X)+1024)=183 THEN 
GOSUB450 

300 PRINT@CP(X) ,CHR$(153) ;:CM=0 
310 CL=RND(3) :IFCL=1THEN390 
320 GOTO50 

330 SOUND255,l:FORLP=SC-32 TOIST 
EP-32 

340 IFPEEK(LP+1024)=15 THENS=S+3 
:PRINT@LP,CHR$ (175) ; : SOUND100 , 1 : 
RETURN 

350 IFPEEK(LP+1024)=153 THENS=S+ 
10:PRINT§CP(LC) , "o" ; :LC=LC-1:IFL 
C=0THENFORX=6TO13 : CP (X-5 ) =X : DM ( X 
-5 ) =1 : NEXTX : LC=7 : X=7 : TB=0 : SOUND1 
, 2 : SOUND8 , 1 : RETURN : ELSESOUND1 , 2 : 
SOUND8,l:RETURN 

3 60 PRINT@LP,CHR$(207) ;:PRINT@LP 
,CHR$(128) ; :PRINT@LP,CHR$(175) ; 
370 NEXT LP 
380 RETURN 

390 IFCP(LC)>478 THEN50ELSEFORPL 

=CP ( LC) +3 2T05 10STEP3 2 

400 IFPEEK(PL+1024) =15 THENSOUND 

200,1:GOTO430 

410 IFPEEK(PL+1024)=183 THENDS=1 
:GOTO440 

420 PRINT@PL,CHR$(170) ;:NEXTPL:S 
OUND200, 1 

430 IFPL>510 THENPL=510 
440 FOREL=CP(LC)+32TOPL STEP32:P 
RINT@EL,CHR$ (175) ; : NEXTEL: IFDS=1 
THENDS=0:GOSUB450:GOTO50 ELSEGO 
TO50 

450 LV=LV-1:IFLV=0THEN4 60ELSEFOR 
Y=6T013 :PRINT@CP(Y-5) ,CHR$(175) ; 
: CP ( Y-5 ) =Y : DM (Y-5 ) =1 : NEXTY : TB=0 : 
SOUND20 , 7 : SOUND1 , 9 : FORMM=1TO20 : P 
RINT@RND(479) ,"o" ; : NEXTMM : RETURN 
460 IFS>HS THENHS=S 
470 PRINT@1,STR$ (S)+" " ;:PRINT@7 
1," HIGH SCORE :"HS 11 " ; : PRINT@2 34 
GAME OVER " ; : PRINT@42 1 , " ANOT 
HER GAME ? (Y/N) "; 
480 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN480 ELS 
EIFA$="Y"THENGOTO30 ELSEEND 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 21 



You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What isCoCo Max? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




"" " I wmm 

j^Kfcu . . .... , , 



CoCo Max disk system, with Y-cebte. 

Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love It A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 15 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success ? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
pull down menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity, CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber' 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture, 
it's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 
The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 





Putt down menus 



□ WftBi-iXKtf. . 
■■■■■ K=*WTAVAM 



Zoom In t 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fatbits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 15, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible /asso. 




Inside the HhRes Input Peck 

a Hi-Res Input Pack? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
1 0% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
49152 points! (256x192). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
d igital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi- Res Pack. 




• ■ 



ing. 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 14 built in /onfs each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles I 




1 Examples of printout* 



Your Creations 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers ! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80), 




■inlr- 1, BIS 



T\ttl with A* Bw Scoopt 



no mflJOH nEws tddry 



Reporters Desperate ' 



- th»y iit.ti fir Ho m»i 
ii lood »«», »ui httki ! 
couli loit bt tab if loot- 
llllllf tola ! h.pp.r quick!* 
E.pori.r I»rl Schaidt 11 i 
lor.d aftd unhippy am 
"1 r*tltv 4oo't c»r. ism tot 
itiekt lotbiat ivor b.,-»fti 
trcufiO H*r* ' i»ti Schawl 
Scheldt, i 11 Tt«f old o»iit« 
or ih« ciir. bit otun cea. 
to to Hit ntviptptr oTfic, 
vlthiut • itoflt tiorr Bui 
ibi> *ni i> diffmai. tc> 
ccrdisi lo Scbaidi.'l to ctm- 
tidtrtd toaaniini « <nao 
critlf lull to tr.tk th* 
dsldruai. t>ui t ni l think 
at tartkiBf Dt«>T0r1liT Km 
wouldn't ft a. in irguMf ' 

tditor Tib Jonnoa >bo«a 
litilo trsskihr for tbt un- 
tuckr tttv 'Vboa I vtt ■ 
r.rornr »t noTor h*d <bi> 
proMia 1 tbink thoto »utr» 
ort ibo loiitli bunch or bum 
! »• «v»r • rdunr lonuoci 




The whole family will enjoy 
CoCo Max. Here are a few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80|. 



Wbg it this (julg Sauling? 

Lou Sch»«ftl of IP t 6th Si 
•■i inforatd aof.^iy hoi 
ihe bod >m 110 in tbc tun 

5»«ipi'»l«j Ut file t- 



"A 



m 




Lift in the fast lane Dot all 
it's cricked up la be 

So- You ihink you v.n\ to 
(0 inio lost ttoncfou! fitld 
likt Tolcvuton or U-vjf tftrt 
You ihmk you too. .culfi 
lika lo brine in tbc bt( cuevi 
• nd rut> norrj -run ift- ■-■leb- 

rfTltl' VOll tcrgtl II RuitAIDI 

> m.itnpfr iour.li lile fun 
I kmv but otforo you io off 
holf--:o(k.ed end Elflf Tour 
»»o p.p.r or luv i t' 
notion 1'it.n i-i iht viicr of 
rmon 

I' tiki; o lot or mcf.fv 'o 
run a nonpoper lot n.myit 
ii«nin( evrn « pofff 
could ton over tH 8tW Boor 





AMERICAN 



SCHNOID 



PROFIT_J 

2 J. "9 




Pulley 




lllllllllMlilllllllillll'lillilllllllilllillliiJii'iil'Hill'lil;! 



Table 

RECO«DJMt> MASSES ellANrc 

TIMER > * BALANCE 



►ULIEY 



•9 



Business graphs, charts, 
diagrams. Also memos 




Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity. 



© 



Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 



COCO MA. 



COCO M6H 

Coco Mom 



CoCo Man CoCo Max 
CoCo Mam CoCo Max 

CoCo max 
CoCo ITIaz 




_ Junior's homework 
f*j and science projects. 
Term papers too ! 



6 



Wdeo portrait 

(with optional digitizer). 




mm 



CoCo max ste 
CoCo max 
CoCo Max 

coco Max mmMim 

Over 200 typestyles to 
f0 choose from I 
generate flyers. 




© 77?/s /s a cartoon. 

(jcCqMcolTL 




©Anew way to express 
your imagination. 



schematics 
and floor plans. 



CoCo Max II 

a/id letterheads. 



System Requirements: 

Any 64 K CoCo and a standard joystick or 
mouse. (The koala pad and the track ball work, 
but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a Muitt-Pak or our Y-Cable. 
CoCo Max is compatible with any Radio Shack 
DOS and ADOS. 

Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes 
almost all the features of CoCo Max il except 
Shrink, Stretch, Rotate, and Glyphics. Also, it 
has 5 fonts Instead of 1 4. 
CoCo Max is not compatible with JDOS, 
DoubleDOS, MDOS, OS-9, the X-pad, and 
Daisy Wheel Printers. 

Printers Supported: 

Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronix, Delta 10, 10X, 15, 15X, SG- 
10,Okidata 82A, 92, 93, 0. Itoh Pro-writer, 
Apple Image-writer, Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet, 
Radio Shack DMP 1 00, 1 05, 1 1 0, 1 20, 200, 
400, 500, Line Printer 7, Line Printer 8, TRP- 
100, CGP-220. (DMP-130 use Line Printer 8), 
PMC printers, Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 15 



Pricing 



■ « * * 



....$69.95 



CoCo Max on tape , . . .% 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max II (disk only)..,;. . $79.95 

with Hi*Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max to CoCo Max II 

New disk and manual ■ .... $1 9.95 

New features of CoCo Max II: 1 4 fonts and glyphic 
font, dynamic shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive 
capability, 68 page scrapbook, point and click file 
load, color printer drivers, full error reporting. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to disk 

manuals, disk and binder , , * $24.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price. . ......... $19.95 

Super Picture Disks #1 , #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks ....... $29.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny* 



Font Editor 

A font Is a set of characters of a 
particular style. CoCo Max includes 
1 5 fonts. You can create new fonts of 
letters, or even symbols or graphics 
with the font editor. Examples: set of 
symbols for electronics, foreign 
alphabets, etc . . $19.95 



Video Digitizer DS-69 

This new Low Cost Digitizer is the 
next step in sophistication for your 
CoCo Max system. With the DS-69 
you will be able to digitize and bring 
into CoCo Max a frame from any video 
source: VCR, tuner, or video camera. 
Comes complete with detailed 
manual and C-SEE software on disk. 
Multi-Pak is required. 

New Low Price save $50 $99,95 

New: faster DS-69A. .... $1 49.95 



Colorware Incorporated 

COLORWARE ^^^^ A ^s 

Woodhaven, NY 11421 



800 221-0916 

Orders only. 

NY & Info: (718) 296-5916 
Hours: 9-5 Eastern time. 



Add $3.00 per order tor shipping. 
We accept W*a» MC, checks, M.O. 
C. 0. £>. add $3. 00 extra. m ^ 
NY and CT S add saies tax. 
Shipping to Canada is $5.00 uithp 
Overseas, FPO, APQ odd 10% 



HARDWARE PROJECT 



A Recipe to Fix 

CoCo Fried Chips 

By Marty Goodman 



TT A is very rare that controllers just 
I ^spontaneously cease to work. In 
^nearly all cases the reason is 
because the user has plugged, un- 
plugged, or wiggled the controller in the 
computer or Multipak port socket while 
the power was on. What usually 
happens is the positive and negative 12- 
volt lines (on old CoCo Is and on 
Multipaks) contact the adjacent NMI 
and Halt line pins. Often this also burns 
out the CPU (the 6809) and/ or the 
SAM (6883, also given as 74LS783 or 
74LS785) in the computer itself. Had 
Tandy bothered, for about $1.50 worth 
of zener diodes and SCRs it could have 
fully protected the computer from such 
abuse. But in all revisions of the CoCo 
circuit board so far, it has not intro- 
duced such protective circuitry. 

Fixing the burned out disk controller 
usually entails replacing the burned out 
chips. This is facilitated by knowing 
what chips are likely to get burned out 
and by having a full set of spares. 
Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. 
Marty is the database manager of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 



Usually, on the newer controllers 
only the main disk controller chip 
(1793-002, MB8877a, or 1773), the disk 
ROM and the write precompensation 
chip (if any) is socketted. Most of the 
small scale logic chips are soldered 
directly to the board. You should be 
reasonably adept in desoldering inte- 
grated circuits. You should have on 
hand a full assortment of all chips found 
in your particular controller. A spare 
controller of the same make and model 
will give you access to the bigger sock- 
etted chips and the smaller chips are 
usually available at general IC supply 
houses. 

On most models of CoCo disk con- 
troller, the 7416 (open collector buffer) 
is quite vulnerable to damage from the 
-12-volt supply. In three CoCo 2 con- 
trollers I have fixed, both 7416s had to 
be replaced. These are U3 and U8 on the 
older type CoCo 2 controller with a 40- 
pin controller chip, and U8 and U6 on 
the newer Tandy controller that uses the 
28-pin 1773 disk controller chip. The 
74LS221 (one shot delay timer) seems 
to often burn out as well. Occasionally 
the main disk controller chip does, too. 

On the old CoCo 1 controller from 
Tandy, the 74LS02 and the 74LS04 
chips (U9 and U5 on that card) have a 
track record of blowing — sometimes 
spontaneously. Be sure to look for 
blown 7416s and 74LS221s on that 
model. You should also have the asso- 



ciated Tandy technical service manual 
and a frequency counter. The potenti- 
ometers may need adjustment so you'll 
need the frequency counter to check for 
proper setting. 

On third-party model controllers, the 
circuitry is often similar to Tandy's, and 
thus the vulnerable chips are likely to be 
the same. In the case of the old J&M 
controller, the disk controller chip is 
available only from J&M itself. 

Oddly enough, the ROM chip on 
these controllers seldom seems to be 
affected. Indeed, once in the course of 
repairing a controller I plugged in a 
ROM upside down and turned on the 
power. After realizing my blunder, I 
turned off the power, inverted the ROM 
and tried it again. Much to my amaze- 
ment, the ROM functioned just fine. 

In addition to these general tips, the 
serious trouble-shooter will want sche- 
matic diagrams of the unit to be re- 
paired. Tandy and HDS both supply 
such technical information on request 
and for a reasonable sum. J&M in the 
past was reluctant to release schematics, 
but may be changing its policies. 
DISTO agrees with the idea of releasing 
schematics of its products to the public, 
but to date has not made such informa- 
tion available. It is my impression that 
if enough customers insist on such 
information before buying any product 
from J&M or DISTO, both of these 
companies will quickly supply it. 



24 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



The Amazing A 




What will you do with it ? 





An A-BUS system with 2 Motherboards and 9 Cards. 




rmw-^o mod ' ^IMIM*< n 

A-BUS Adapters 



CoCo to A-BUS Adapter AR-1 38: $49 

Works with all CoCo's. Plugs into rom slot or Multlpak. 
Disk systems without Multipak need Y-cable ($19.95) 

A»BUSadapterfor:AAppleM,ll+,lle. AR-134...S49 

IBM PC, XT, AT and all compatibles, AR-1 33... $69 

TRS-80 Models 1 00, 200. AR-1 35..$69 

TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4D. Fits 50 pin I/O bus. AR-1 32.. .$49 

TRS-80 Model4P.lncludesextracable. AR-1 37. ..$62 

TRS-80 Model I. Plugsinto40pin I/O bus. AR-1 31. ..$39 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-120:$99 

Will accomodate five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector 
allows a second motherboard to be added to the first 
(with connecting cable CA-1 61 ...$1 2). Up to five 
motherboards can be joined this way to a single 
adapter. The motherboard is mounted on a sturdy 
aluminum frame with card guides. 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft.) CA-1 63: $29 

Connects Adapter to 1 A-BUS card or Motherboard. 
Special Cable for two A-BUS cards CA-1 62 . . .$39 

Relay Card re-140: $129 

8 industrial relays on board. Contacts are rated at 3 
amps You can control up to 64 cards (512 relays) 
using several motherboards. Jumpers are used to 
simply select the card address. The card Is easily 
controlled in BASIC with "OUT" or "POKE". For 
example, OUT 1 ,0 turns all the relays off on card #1 . 
Eight LED's show which relays are on. 

Digital Input Card in-141: $49 

It's safe and easy to connect and read switches, 
keypads, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. The eight 
inputs can monitor the presence of voltage or switch 
position. Simple INP or PEEK commands read the 
status (On or Off) of the inputs. Each input is optically 
isolated for convenience and safety. 

Analog Input Card ad-142:$i 19 

With this 8 bit, 8 channel A/D converter, your comp- 
uter can read voltages, temperatures, pressures, 
light levels, etc. Take over 1 00 readings per second 
in BASIC (several thousand with machine language). 
It's simple to use, for example: OUT 1,3 selects 
channel #3, then A~l NP(1 ) reads the voltage on that 
channel. Input range: 0 to 5.1V. Resolution: 20mV. 
Conversion time 12Qus. 

Prototyping Card pjm 52: $15 

Protocard is 3 1 /a by 4W in, and accepts up to 1 0 IC's. 



SHEILA wanted to set up a variety of experi- 
ments in her lab. With an A-BUS, the computer 
can watch the mice instead of Sheila. 
HARRY has a model railroad layout that he wished 
to automate. Now his home computer controls the engines] 
gates, signals, etc. through the A-BUS. 

BOB tests electrical fixtures as they leave the assembly line. He 
develops test equipment quickly with inexpensive, off-the-shelf, 
and easy to use A-BUS cards. 

But what's an A-BUS ? It's the easiest way to con nect a variety of 
cards that sense and control anything outside the computer. With 
the A-BUS, your CoCo becomes an incredible machine. 
What would I need? First, an A-BUS Adapter to convert your 
computer bus to the A-BUS standard. Then a Cable (with one ortwo 
slots) to connect one or two A-BUS Cards. If you need more than 
two cards, the cable will be connected instead to the A-BUS 
Motherboard, which has five slots. Up to five motherboards can be 
chained. Finally, add you choice of A-BUS Cards to fit your project. 
I'm not an engineer. Can I use the A-BUS ? If you can wire a 
switch, you can use the A-BUS. No computer hardware knowledge 
is needed I A screwdriver is ail you need for many projects. 
What about software? Simple PEEK and POKE commands con- 
trol the whole system, whether you read the time on the clock, 
switch the relays, take a temperature reading, or turn a motor. 
What if I change computers? Incredibly, this is as simple as 
replacing the inexpensive adapter card. 







*n 'T T ? f'? 




12 Bit A/D Converter an-146:$109 

This high performance analog to digital converter 
features accuracy to 0.025%, 130ms conversion 
time, sign and over range indication. The basic input 
range is -5 to +5 volts, with 1.2mV resolution, but 
the gain of the on-board amplifier can be set to 
measure microvolts. Ideal for a strain gauge, thermo- 
couple, pH meter, etc. 

Motor Controller ST-1 43:$69 

Stepper Motors are the ultimate in motion control. 
The special package (below) includes everything 
you need to get familiar with stepper motors: Each 
controller card drives two stepper motors (12V, 
bidirectional, 4 phase). 

Motor: 48 steps/ revolution, 300 steps/second, W 
shaft: MO-103...$15. Power supply: PS-126...$10 
Special Package: the controller card, two stepper 
motors, and power supply: PA-1 81 ...$99 

Clock with Alarm cl»144:$89 

It's the most powerful clock/calendar available. The 
features: # 5 second/month accuracy. • Keeps 
time, date, and alarm for 5 years (even with computer 
off). • Can time events down to 1/100 second. 

• Periodic "chime". • Full time and date alarm. 

• Four alarm outputs: Computer, LED, Buzzer, and 
Reed Relay. • Easy to use,: for example H=INP(1) 
reads the hours, Y=INP(6) reads the year, etc. 




Latest Developments 

Voice Synthesizer 

15 Bit Analog to Digital Converter 

Intelligent Stepper Motor Controller 

Digital to Analog Converter 

LCD Display (one and two line) 

Touch Tone® Decoder 

Counter Timer 

24 Line TTL Input/Output 



VS-153 
AD-155 
ST-1 54 
DA-1 47 
LD-151 
PH-145 
CT-154 
DT-148 



&V ne 800 221-0916 

Info and NY orders: (71 8) 296-591 6 
Technical Info: (203) 656-1 806 

All tines open weekdays 9 to 5 NY time. 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
We accept Visa, MC, checks, M.Q, 
CO D add $3.00 extra. 
N. Y. residents add sales tax. 
Shipping to Canada is $5.00 
Overseas, FPO, APO add 10% 



COLORWARE 



Colorware Inc 
79-04 Jamaica Ave 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 



Let Co Co take the tedium out of Adventure writing 
ind leave the creativity to you 

Processor 



Developing an Adventure game 
is not as difficult as one might 
imagine. Adventures are sim- 
ply a collection of data and a series of 
true and false tests comparing the 
player's inputs to a list of data stored in 
memory of the computer. 

The simplest way to store long lists of 
data in a computer's memory is through 
the use of arrays. Writing an Adventure 
game generally requires that informa- 
tion such as room descriptions, object 
lists, authorized user inputs and key 
responses be read into arrays so that 
they may be called upon quickly. 

Arranging the data, formatting the 
text screen and processing of standard 
commands is required in all Adven- 
tures. Some programmers accomplish it 
differently. I prefer to keep it simple and 
easy to follow, since BASIC programs 
should be a learning experience. 



Bill Cook is a manager for the Navy 
Exchange in Whidbey Island, Washing- 
ton. He is the author o/The Adventure 
Generator and wrote his first Adventure 
in 1982. He uses the Co Co extensively 
for business applications and as a 
management aide. 



About the Program 

Imagine a program that could actu- 
ally write most of the code for you, 
automatically! A program that could 
save you hours of tedious writing, 
testing and debugging — a program 
that would function error-free, and in a 
matter of minutes save you more than 
50 percent of the work in putting to- 
gether your dream program. 

AD V- PRO, or Adventure Processor, 
is a utility to save you hours of tedious 
typing of repetitive code. It simply 
writes a "shell" of an Adventure for you. 
It provides the following possibilities: 

Up to 100 rooms, 60 objects and 30 
commands. 

A separate help message for every 
location in the game. 

Individual score values for each 
object found. 

Customized responses for each object 
"examined." 

Randomized object placement, if 
desired, to make your game play differ- 
ently every time. 

Scroll-protected split screens. 

Save game in progress/ load previous 
unfinished game capability. 

Operates with memory-stretching 
PCLERR ZERO. 



By Bill Cook 



Outputs to tape or disk. 

The first step in writing an Adventure 
is mapping it out on paper. On your 
map you should indicate the major 
compass points at the top, bottom and 
sides of the sheet. N, S, E, W, Up, 
Down, should all be indicated for ease 
in laying out the Adventure. 

Each location should have a number 
as should each object you plan to place 
in the game. Have a good idea of the 
vocabulary (verbs and nouns) you want 
the program to recognize; two word 
sentences are the standard. Once you 
have completed this, jot down how 
many rooms you'll have, the number of 
objects and the number of commands 
(verbs). 

Using the Program 

ADV-PRO asks you for the number 
of items and limits you to 100 rooms, 
60 objects and 30 commands. You are 
also asked for the room number in 
which you want the game to begin and 
for a filename, You are then asked 
whether to direct the output to tape or 
disk. After answering these questions 
ADV-PRO goes to work and creates an 
Adventure "shell." 

Within a few minutes, you will be 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 27 



over half done with creating an efficient 
and versatile Adventure game. ADV- 
PRO writes to disk or tape, an ASCII 
file that is a loadable basic program. 
The pre-written coding sets up a ma- 
chine language anti-scroll routine, frees 
the maximum available memory, in- 
itializes and reserves line numbers for 
all of your room descriptions, legal 
movement directions, help messages, 
object descriptions, noun lists, object 
score values, initial locations and verb 
lists. You simply modify the program 
with your customized data. 

Here's a sample room description 
DATA line as generated: 10 DATA ROOM 
tt 1 DESCRIPTION, 0,0,0,0,0,0, 
HELP MESSAGE HERE. 

If you want room one to be described 
to the user: YOU ARE IN THE LIVING 
ROOM, simply change the line as follows: 
10 DATA IN THE LIVING ROOM 
,0,0, 0,0, 0,0, HELP MESSAGE HERE. 
Notice that the "you are" is not neces- 
sary. The program automatically pre- 
cedes each room description with "you 
are." 

Next you decide in which directions 
the player will be able to move from this 
room. Let's assume that moving north 
takes you to room three, south to room 
four, east to room six, west to room 10, 
up and down lead nowhere. These 
locations should replace the series of 
zeroes that come next in the above data 
statement. Rooms that lead nowhere 
remain at zero. The line would now read 
like this: 

10 DATA IN THE LIVING ROOM, 3, 4, 
6,10,0,0, HELP MESSAGE HERE 
Now for the help message. Assume 
that the player is in room one and he 
enters the command HELP. The re- 
mainder of the DATA statement should 
contain whatever response you would 
like the player to receive. For example, 
YOU SENSE A PRESENCE HERE. This 
phrase becomes the final part of the 

DATA statement: ■ 

10 DATA IN THE LIVING ROOM 
,3,4,6;10,0,0,YOU SENSE A PRES 
ENCE HERE 

If you would like no help to be given 
to the user, simply leave off the phrase 
with the comma preceding it. This 
causes an automatic response of NO 
HELP HERE. Here's how the line would 
look: 

10 DATA IN THE LIVING ROOM 
,3,4,6,10,0,0 

The standard format for object data 
looks like this: 

152 DATA OBJECT tt 1 DESCRIPTION, 
KEYWORD ,0,0 , RESPONSE WHEN 
EXAMINED 



As with the room descriptions, mod- 
ify the line to enter your object descrip- 
tion. Let's assume your first object is a 
small rusty knife, you want it located in 
room six, it is worth 10 points if carried 
and if the player says EXAMINE KNIFE 
you want the game to respond with IT 
HAS A PEARL HANDLE. Here's how your 
modified line should look: 

152 DATA A SMALL RUSTY KNIFE, 

KNIFE, 6, 10, IT HAS A PEARL 

HANDLE. 

If you would like an object to be 
placed in the player's inventory initially, 
use location -1. If you would like an 
object to be placed in a randomized 
location (unknown), use location -2. 
Use of randomized object locations will 
make your game play differently every 
time. 

Commands 

The first seven commands the game 
recognizes are already built in to the 
game. They are: EXAMINE, INVENTORY, 
QUIT, SCORE, HELP, SAVE and LOAD. All 
the necessary coding for these com- 
mands to function is already written 
into your program. You can, of course, 
modify the code, but it will function as 
is. The remaining commands (if you 
specified more than seven) are repre- 
sented in the program as null strings. 
The line would look like this: 

508 V$( B) = "" 
If you want the eighth command to be 
GET, simply change the line as follows: 
508 V$( B ) = "GET" 
After making the changes to include 
the entire verb list, you are finished with 
the data portion of the Adventure. 

Verb processing and conditional 
statements are the toughest parts of 
Adventure programming, and the most 
time-consuming. Let's still assume verb 
eight is GET. Processing for verb eight is 
accomplished between lines 7500 and 
7990. This is the area where you process 
the different possibilities of reactions to 
the player's use of the verb GET. This is 
where you exercise your own program- 
ming talent and creativity. Here is a 
brief sample of what could be done: 
7510 IF L0(N)=-1 THEN PRINT"Y0U 
ALREADY HAVE IT.":G0T0 60000 
7520 IF L0(N)< >L THEN PRINT"I 
DON'T SEE IT. ": GOTO 60000 
7530 IF CA=5 THEN PRINT"YOUR 
ARMS ARE FULL.": GOTO 60000 
7540 L0(N)~1:CA=CA+1:PRINT 
"OKAY. YOU HAVE IT. ": GOTO 60000 
Line 7510 checks to see if the object 
is already in the player's inventory and, 
if so, responds. Line 7520 checks to see 
if the object is in the current room and, 



if not, responds. Line 7540 places tt 
object in inventory, increments tb 
number of objects carried by one, an 
responds that you have the object. 



Significant Variables 

(In order of appearance) 



R 


Total number of rooms in 




the game 


R$(n) 


Description of room n 


D(n,nn) 


Authorized directions 




from room n 


H$(n) 


Help messages when in 




room n 


O 


Total number of objects 


0$(n,l) 


Description of object n 


0$(n,2) 


Keyword in description 




for object n 


LO(n) 


Room location of object n 


SC(n) 


Score value of object n 


0$(n,3) 


Response when object n is 




examined 


V$(n) 


Command (verb) n 


NV- 


Total number of verbs 


Vl$ 


String containing first 




four characters of each 




verb 


Nl$ 


String containing first 




four characters of each 




object 


C$(d) 


Labels for directions 


L 


Player s current location 


L5 


Temporary location stor- 




age flag 


LN 


Line counter 


z 


Temporary flag for inven- 




tory test 


P 


Test location for anti- 




scrolling 


TURNS 


Turn counter 


1$ 


User s input 


V2$ 


User s command (verb) 


N2$ 


T T 9 1 * ✓ \ 

User s object (noun) 


V$ 


Truncated verb 


N$ 


Truncated noun 


V 


Verb number 


N 


Noun number 


SC 


Score counter 


MX 


Possible score 


DV 


Device number for load- 




ing/saving -1= tape l=disk 


F$ 


Filename for saving/ load- 



ing 



With a little experimentation and 
patience, you will be writing profes- 
sional quality Adventures in no time. I 
look forward to seeing your contribu- 
tions in future issues of this magazine 
and wish you happy Adventuring, 

(You may direct questions about this 
program to Mr. Cook at 4346 Rhodo- 
dendron Drive, Oak Harbor, WA 
98277, 206-679-5220. Please enclose an 
SASE when writing.) □ 



28 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



The list 

ll 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



520 
560 
605 
720 
808 
890 



32 


1040 


220 


241 


1115 


217 


130 


1200 


. . 214 


143 


1290 


, 213 


40 


1350 


...30 


38 


END 


7 



ing: ADV-PRD 
ADV-PRO 

(C) 198 6 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
PROGRAM BY BILL COOK 
ISLAND SOFTWARE 

AN ADVENTURE PROCESSOR 

7 • 

10 GOTO63950 

20 'initialize 

100 CLEAR1500:CS$=CHR$ (142) : EL$= 
STRING$ (32,32): SG$=STRING$ (32 , 21 
7) :X=0 

110 DIMV(31) ,V$(30) :V$(1)=»EXAMI 
NE" : V$ (2) = " INVENTORY » : V$ ( 3 ) = "QUI 
T" : V$ (4 ) ="SCORE " : V$ ( 5 ) -"HELP" : V$ 
(6) ="LOAD" : V$ (7) ="SAVE" 
170 GOTO500 

172 A$=STR$(LN)+A$:PRINT#DV,A$:P 
RINT@128 , A$ : PRINTEL$ ; EL$ ; EL$ : LN= 
LN+G : RETURN 

320 'centering routine 

330 T=LEN(T$) : PRINTTAB ( INT (32-T) 

/2) ;T$: RETURN 

470 'title routine 

480 CLS:T$=" ADVENTURE PROCESSOR" 
:GOSUB330:T$=" (C) 1986 BY BILL C 
OOK" : GOSUB3 3 0 : PRINTSG$ : RETURN 
500 GOSUB480 

510 INPUT " NUMBER OF ROOMS (1-100 
)";RM:IFRM=0 OR RM>100 THEN510 
520 INPUT " NUMBER OF OBJECTS (1-6 
0) " ;NO:IFNO=0 OR NO>60 THEN 520 

530 INPUT "NUMBER OF VERBS INCLUD 
ING THE 7 BUILT-IN (1-30) ";NV: 
IFNV=0 OR NV>30 THEN 530 

531 GOSUB480:INPUT"ADVENTURE TO 
START IN WHICH ROOMNUMBER" ;L: IFL 
<1 OR L>RM THEN 531 

532 GOSUB480 : LINEINPUT" FILENAME 
(8 CHARS. MAX. ) : " ; Fl$ : IFLEN (Fl$ ) > 

8 THEN532 ELSE IFINSTR (Fl$ , » . " ) > 
0 OR INSTR(F1$, "/") >0 THEN532 

534 LINE INPUT "OUTPUT TO DISK OR 
TAPE (D/T) ?";DT$:IFDT$="D"THENDV 
=l:Fl$=Fl$+"/BAS": ELSE IFDT$="T 
"THENDV=-1 ELSE 534 

535 IFDV=-1THENLINEINPUT"PRESS 
NTER WHEN TAPE READY" ;Z$ 

536 OPEN"0",#DV,Fl$ 

540 LN=0:G=1 

541 REM process initialization 

546 A$="GOTO63950":GOSUB172 

550 A$="CLEAR600, &H7FB5 : IFPEEK (& 



E 



H7FB6) =57THEN4" :GOSUB172 

560 A$="Y=0:DX$="+CHR$ (34)+"BE01 

68AF8C0C308C0CBF01688639A78CEF39 

55550234170D6F26109E888C05E02D09 

810D270A8C05FF270535176E9CE2A68C 

E1C6203DC30400308C0934101F013416 

7EA34E0A8920E2"+CHR$ (34) :GOSUB17 
2 

570 A$="FORP=lTOLEN(DX$) STEP2:A 
$="+CHR$(34)+»&H"+CHR$(34)+"+MID 
$(DX$,P,2) :A=VAL(A$) :POKE&H7FB6+ 
Y , A : Y=Y+1 : NEXT : EXEC&H7FB6 " : GOSUB 
172 

580 A$="POKE&H7FCA,8":GOSUB172 

590 A$="DIMR$(100) ,RM(100) ,D(100 
,6) ,H$(100) ,V$(30) ,O$(60,3) ,LO(6 
0) ,SC(60) ,C$(6) ":GOSUB172 

591 A$="REM FORMAT FOR ROOM DATA 
=DESCRITION , DESTINATIONS (N , S , E , W 
,U,D),HELP RESPONSE" :GOSUB172 

592 LN=10:G=1:FORQP=1TORM:A$="DA 
TA ROOM #"+STR$ (QP) +" DESCRIPTIO 
N, 0,0, 0,0, 0,0, HELP MESSAGE HERE" 
:GOSUB172:NEXT 

595 LN=150:G=1 

600 A$="R="+STR$ (RM) +" : FORI=lTOR 
: READR$ ( I ) :FORA=lT06:READD(I,A) : 
NEXT : READH$ (I) : NEXT " : GOSUB17 2 

601 A$="REM FORMAT FOR OBJECT DA 
TA=DESCRIPTION / KEYWORD, ROOM #LOC 
ATION, POINT # VALUE, RESPONSE WHEN 

EXAMINED" : GOSUB172 

602 FORQP=lTONO:A$="DATA OBJECT 
#"+STR$ (QP) +" DESCRIPTION, KEYWOR 
D, 0,0, RESPONSE WHEN EXAMINED": GO 
SUB172 :NEXT 

605 LN=500:G=1 

610 A$="0="+STR$ (NO) +" : FORI=lTOO 
:READO$(I,l) ,0$(I,2) ,LO(I) ,SC(I) 
, 0$ ( I , 3 ) : NEXT : T=RND ( -TIMER) : FORI 
=lTOO:IFLO(I)=-2 THENLO ( I ) =RND ( O 
) : NEXT: ELSENEXT" : GOSUB172 
612 FORQP=lTONV:A$="V$ ("+STR$ (QP 
)+»)="+CHR$(34)+V$(QP)+CHR$(34) : 
GOSUB172:NEXT 
620 LN=1000:G=10 

630 A$="NV="+STR$ (NV) +" : FORI=lTO 
NV:V1$=V1$+LEFT$ (V$ (I) ,4) :NEXT": 
GOSUB172 

640 A$="FORI=lTOO : N1$=N1$+LEFT$ ( 
0$(I,2) ,4) :NEXT" :GOSUB172 
650 LN=3050 

6 60 A$ = " DATANORTH , SOUTH , EAST , WES 
T,UP,DOWN:FORDD=1T06:READC$ (DD) : 
NEXTDD" :GOSUB172 
670 LN=3100:G=10 

690 A$="L="+STR$ (L) +" : L5="+STR$ ( 
L) + " : T=0 : SG$=STRING$ (32,217): EL$ 
=STRING$ (32 , 32 ) : CLS : LN=0" : GOSUB1 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 29 






/ Max Fonts Max Edit 



New for CoCo Max 

Now you can have up to 72 fonts for creating 
dazzling type-set titles and special displays! 

3 SETS OF 24 FONTS 

WHICH ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD! 



$0/195 



each 



Written by Watty Bayer and Mike Shawaluk 



3m 



95 



©1985 Snard Enterprises 



A FONT EDITOR FOR COCO MAI 

• Edit current fonts 

• Create new fonts 

• Design symbol fonts 

• Comes with pre-defined fonts 

• CoCo Max I & II compatible 



$ 




95 



(Disk Only) 



Written by: Michael W. Shawaluk 

CoCo Max" is a registered trademark of Colorware. 



SET ONE 



SET TWO 



SET THREE 



Olgi-tal Small 

Digital Large 

Fufura 

IliiVii:! Small 

GRfD LRRGE 




m 


m 




® 



Hi 



21 



a mm 





Victory 

B«by Taath ImhII 




rim print 

Normande Small 

Normande Medium 

NORMANDE LG 

Piano 

li 



Kolon 

coataara jab 



|IMII||U|l!S)IIIKII|llE!!l|.OJIOjJ 



1 V* 



PEiqNOT SrvtAll 



PPCCROfn SITI FILL 

PKDCRBfll flSEQEUfll 



IEIE][^ [^ IMlEilE0EO 
i h-ii nn rouctoi 

Mocnofl CMa/tji 

Mocnofl JIapre 
POiEIT ©3J7 

Prinifuuir 5mnall 

PRSnTDSJT LFIRQS 




Bocklin 

I3r©aclway 

BROADWAY 

Dot. Matrix 



B j ffji n pji M| 
sG Ej u# 



ISItf IR MUNI 

STI5NCIL 






T 

Tip Top 




1 ill I 




My 



6 




PRO-COLOR-FILE 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

ENHANCED 2.0 

• 60 Data Fields for each record 

• 1020 spaces available per record if needed 

• Maximizes multiple drive operation 

• 28 equation lines (+-7) 

• IF-THEN-ELSE logic test in equations 

■ Full Screen editing on up to 4 data entry screens 

• Key click and auto key repeat 

• Stores custom designed report formats 

• Obtain totals, averages, or summaries for any field 

• Output reports to printer, screen, or disk file 

• Send data out to a DYNACALC compatible file 

• Separate label generator for up to 10 across labels 

• Pre-define up to 16 indexes for searching/reporting file 

• Sorts 750 records in under 5 minutes 

• User defined selection menus 

• Repeated tasks performed with one keystroke 

• Comes with 75 pages of documentation in a 3 ring binder 

• Supported by a national users group 

• Full time programmer support 

• Supplied on an unprotected disk 



DYNACALC 

SPREAD SHEET FLEXIBILITY 

(Includes Dynagraph, Sidewise) _ I 

Telewriter-64,. 



WORD PROCESSOR POWER 



$$95 



a coco Max ii 
ggp ~~ ^ 

' $79 95 



SIDEWISE 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Add a new "twist" to your printers capabilities! 

SIDEWISE makes your printer do something you never 
thought possible -print side ways! 

SIDEWISE will read in any ASCII text file and print it out 
side ways using a Radio Shack, Epson, Okidata, C-ltoh or 
Gemini printers having dot-graphics ability. 

SIDEWISE 0S9 is compatible with DYNACALC OS9 and 
requires BasicOB 

SIDEWISE 0S9 
(Disk only) 





SIDEWISE RS-DOS 



PRO-COLOR-FORMS 2.0 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRO-COLOR-FORMS will access data files created with 
PRO-COLOR-FILE and merge them with a letter or place them 
on pre-printed forms. 

• STORE UP TO 6 FORMATS • USER DEFINED PAGE SIZE 

• SUPPORTS SPECIAL PRINTER CONTROL CODES • RIGHT 
JUSTIFICATION • PASSWORD PROTECTION • MERGES 
WITH GRAPHICS FROM MASTER DESIGN OR 
TELEGRAPHICS • 

PRO-COLORDIR 

©1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRO-COLOR-DIR will read your directories and create a 
master data file that can be accessed by PRO-COLOR-FILE 
for sorting and reporting. 1000 + records can be stored on 
one diskette with valuable information about each program. 

You can obtain hard copies of the information and create 
labels of the filenames for placing on the diskette itself. 

• DISK ID NAME • FILENAME/EXT • TYPE OF FILE 

• DATE CREATED • DATE UPDATED • NUMBER OF 
GRANS ALLOCATED • NUMBER OF SECTORS 
ALLOCATED AND USED • MACHINE LANGUAGE 
ADDRESSES 



@ SUMMARY 

©1985 Derringer Software, Inc. 

If you use your spreadsheet program to keep track of youi 
expenses then @ SUMMARY can help you analyze those 
expenses. For example, if you indicate a "Category" for each 
expense then @ SUMMARY will produce a report that shows 
a total for each category, the highest amount, the lowest 
amount and the average amount. In addition, ©SUMMARY 
can produce a hi-res line graph or bar graph of the analysis 
and allow you to place titles on the graph. A hardcopy of the 
graph can also be generated as wed as saved to disk. 

The analysis can be saved in a "data file" which can be 
loaded into DYNACALC or read in by 6 SUMMARY for future 
additions to the analysis. If you use other Spreadsheets such 
as EUTE*CALC then you have added a graphing feature to 
your spreadsheet applications. The analysis can also be saved 
in an ASCII file which can be read by word processors for 
inclusion in a report. 

@ SUMMARY is compatible with any spreadsheet program 
that can generate an ASCII text file of worksheets. 



* RS-DOS version included FREE with DYNACALC " 

0S9 is a registered trademark of MICROWARE and MOTOROLA. 

TELEGRAPHICS 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRINT HI-RES GRAPHICS USING TELEWRITER-64! 

Use C0C0 Max, Graphicom or other graphics programs to 
create letter heads and print them while using Telewriter-64. 

Telegraphies interlaces with Radio Shack, Epson, Gemini, 
C-ltoh and Okidata printers having dot-addressable graphics. 
A simple modification to Telewriter-64 will allow you to exit 
Telewriter via the DISK I/O MENU and print out the graphic 
without affecting any of your text in the buffer. 

This is the same feature that is included in our MASTER 
DESIGN program. Since we felt you don't need to buy two 
graphics editing programs, we have made this feature available 
at a reduced price. 





Specify RS-DOS 
or 0S9* 



(disk only) 



$1995 



*0S9 version does not 
have Hi-Res graphing 
and requires Basic09. 



DYNACALC " is a registered trademark of Computer Systems Center 

ELITE*CALC is a trademark of Elite Software 

0S9 is a registered trademark of MICROWARE and MOTOROLA. 



(Available Only On Disk) 

NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLICABLE 



MASTER DESIGN 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Generates lettering in hi-res graphics that can be different 
sizes, skinny, bold, textured, drop shadowed, raise shadowed 
or tall. Also interfaces with the Telewriter-64 word processor 
for printing hi-res displays with your letters. 

Take full advantage of al I the extended BASIC hi-res graphic 
commands including boxes, circles, lines, copy displays and 
utilizeGET and PUT features. Added commands includemirror 
reflection, turn displays backwards or upside down. Squish 
displays, create dot patterns for shading or diagonal lines. 

The Letterhead Utility allows you to access hi-res graphics 
from Telewriter-64, your own BASIC programs or 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS. 

Interfaces with dot matrix printershaving dot addressable 
graphics. 



FOR BOTH 




See reviews in: 

July 84 Rainbow Oct. 84 Hot C0C0 



Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300, Florence, SC 29502-5300 

To place an order by phone, call: (803) 665-5676 

10 AM and 5 PM EDT 

Check, Money Order, VISA or MasterCard 



South Carolina residents add sales tax. 

Include $3.00 for UPS Shipping - $5.00 U.S. Mail - $9.00 Air Mail 

Canadian Distributor-Kelly Software 
Australian Distributor-Computer Hut Software 

This SUMMER SIZZLER SALE may end without notice. 



72 

700 REM process adv screen 

7 10 L1=LN : A$= " PRINT @0 , " +CHR$ (34) 

+"YOU ARE "+CHR$ (34) +"R$ (L) "+CHR 

$(34)+"."+CHR$(34) :GOSUB172 

720 A$="PRINT"+CHR$(34)+"YOU SEE 

:"+CHR$(34)+";":GOSUB172 

73J3 A$="Z=0:FORA=1TOO":GOSUB172 

740 A$="IFLO(A)=L AND POS(0)+LEN 

(0$(A,1) )>32 THENPRINT":GOSUB172 

75)3 A$="IFLO(A)=L THENPRINTO$ (A, 

1)+CHR$(44) ; :Z=l":GOSUB172 

760 A$="NEXT:PRINTCHR$(8) ;"+CHR$ 

(34)+". "+CHR$ (34)+";": GOSUB172 

770 A$="IFZ=0THENPRINTCHR$(8)+"+ 

CHR$ (34)+": NOTHING OF INTEREST." 

+CHR$(34) :GOSUB172 

780 A$=" PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" +CHR$ ( 

34)+"OBVIOUS EXITS LEAD: "+CHR$ ( 

3 4) :GOSUB172 

790 A$="F0RG=1T06 : IFD (L, G) O0THE 
NPRINTC$ (G) +CHR$ (32) ; " : G0SUB172 
800 A$="NEXT : PRINT : PRINTSG$ ; :P=P 
EEK(136) *256+PEEK(137) -1024:POKE 
&H7FCA,INT(P/32) " :GOSUB172 

802 A$="FORI=P+1024 TO 1504 STEP 
32:IFPEEK(I)=217THEN LN=I : ELSE N 
EXTI":GOSUB172 

803 A$="IFLN>0 THENFORJ=P TO LN- 
1024 STEP32:PRINT@J,EL$; :NEXTJ:L 
N=0":GOSUB172 

804 REM welcome 

805 MG$=" WELCOME TO THE WONDERFU 

L WORLD OF ADVENTURE. GOOD LUCK 
i ii 

• 

807 A$="IFTURNS=0THENPRINT@480, " 
+CHR$ (34) +MG$+CHR$ (34): GOSUB17 2 

808 REM player input 

810 L2=LN:A$="PRINT@480, ; :TURNS= 

TURNS+1:I$="+CHR$ (34)+CHR$(34)+" 

:LINEINPUT"+CHR$(34)+"WHAT NOW? 

"+CHR$ (34)+";I$":GOSUB172 

820 A$="IFI$="+CHR$ (34) +CHR$ (34) 

+ " THENPRINT " +CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + " WHAT? " +CH 

R$ (34 ) +" : GOTO"+STR$ (L2 ) : GOSUB172 

830 A$="IFI$="+CHR$(34)+"LOOK"+C 

HR$ (34) +"THEN"+STR$ (LI) :GOSUB172 

840 A$="IFLEN (1$) >1THEN"+STR$ (LN 

+40) :GOSUB172 

850 A$="L5=L":GOSUB172 

860 A$="G=INSTR("+CHR$ (34)+"NSEW 

UD"+CHR$ ( 3 4 ) +" , 1$ ) : IFG=0THENPRIN 

T"+CHR$ (34)+"I DON'T UNDERSTAND. 

"+CHR$ (34) +" : GOTO"+STR$ (L2 ) : GOSU 

B172 

870 A$="IFD(L,G) >0THEN L5=D(L,G) 
: L=L5 : GOTO"+STR$ (LI) +" : ELSEPRINT 
"+CHR$(34)+"YOU CAN'T GO THAT WA 
Y. "+CHR$(34)+":GOTO"+STR$(L2) :GO 



SUB17 2 

880 A$="I$=I$+"+CHR$(34)+" "+CHR 
$(34)+":SP=INSTR(I$,CHR$(32) ) ":G 
0SUB172 

890 A$="V2$=LEFT$ (I$,SP-1) :N2$=M 
ID$(I$,SP+1) :V$=LEFT$(V2$,4) :N$= 
LEFT$(N2$,4) : V=INSTR (Vl$ , V$) :N=I 
NSTR(N1$,N$) ":GOSUB172 
900 A $=" I FV=0 THENPRINT "+CHR$ (34) 
+"I DON'T UNDERSTAND. "+CHR$ (34)+ 
" : GOTO"+STR$ (L2 ) +" : ELSEV= (V-l ) /4 
+l":GOSUB172 

910 A$="IFN=0THENPRINT"+CHR$ (34) 

+"I DON'T UNDERSTAND. "+CHR$ (34)+ 

" : GOTO"+STR$ (L2 ) +" : ELSEN= (N-l) /4 

+l":GOSUB172 

915 REM on goto 

920 L3=LN:A$="ON V GOTO" 

930 LL=4000 

940 FORI=lTONV 

950 LL$=STR$(LL) :T=LEN(LL$) :LL$= 

RIGHT$(LL$,T-1) 

960 A$=A$+LL$+" / " 

970 V(I)=LL:LL=LL+500 

980 NEXT 

990 T=LEN(A$) :A$=LEFT$(A$ / T-1) 
992 GOSUB172:GOSUB480 
1000 FORI=lTONV 

1010 LN=V(I) :A$="REM VERB #"+STR 
$(I)+» "+V$(I) :GOSUB172 

1011 REM default each verb ! 

1012 LN=V(I)+490:A$="PRINT"+CHR$ 
(34)+"I DON'T UNDERSTAND. "+CHR$( 
34)+":GOTO"+STR$ (L2) 

1015 GOSUB172 
1020 NEXT 
1025 REM examine 
1030 LN=V(1)+10 

1040 A$="IF L0(N)<>-1 AND LO(N)< 
>L THENPRINT"+CHR$(34)+"YOU CAN' 
T EXAMINE SOMETHING YOU DO NOT H 
AVE OR CANNOT SEE. "+CHR$ (34) +" :G 
OTO"+STR$(L2) :GOSUB172 

1042 A$="IFO$ (N, 3) ="+CHR$ (34) +CH 
R$ ( 3 4 ) + " THENPRINT "+CHR$ (34) +"NOT 
HING SPECIAL. "+CHR$ (34) +" : GOTO"+ 
STR$(L2) :GOSUB172 

1043 A$="PRINTO$ (N,3) :GOTO"+STR$ 
(L2) :GOSUB172 

1045 REM inventory 
1050 LN=V(2)+10 

1060 A$="PRINT"+CHR$(34)+»YOUR I 
NVENTORY : "+CHR$ (34)+": NH=0 " : GOSU 
B172 

1070 A$="FORI=lTOO : I FLO (I) =-lTHE 
NNH=1 : PRINTO$ (1,1)": GOSUB17 2 
1080 A$="NEXT: IFNH=0THENPRINT"+C 
HR$ (34) + "NOTHING . "+CHR$ (34 ) : GOSU 
B172 



32 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



1090 A$="GOTO"+STR$ (L2 ) : GOSUB172 
1)395 REM quit 
1100 LN=V(3)+10 

1110 A$="SC=0 : PRINT"+CHR$ ( 34 ) +"G 
AME ENDS AFTER" +CHR$ (34)+" TURNS 11 
+CHR$ (34) +»TURNS . "+CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + " : FO 
RI=lTOO: IFLO(I) =-lTHENSC=SC+SC (I 
) {NEXT: ELSENEXT" :GOSUB172 
1115 A$="PRINT"+CHR$(34)+"YOU SC 
ORED"+CHR$ (34)+ " SC"+CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + "PO 
INTS . " +CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + " : POKE &H7 FCA , 0 : P 
OKE&HBA, PEEK ( &HBC) :POKE&HB7 , PEEK 
( &HBC) +6 : END" : GOSUB172 
1118 REM score 
112 0 LN=V(4)+10 

1130 A$="SC=0 : MX=0 : FORI=lTOO : IFL 
0(1) =-lTHENSC=SC+SC (I) : MX=MX+SC ( 
I ) : NEXT : ELSEMX=MX+SC (I) : NEXT" : GO 
SUB172 

1140 A$="PRINT"+CHR$ (34)+"YOU HA 
VE SCORED"+CHR$ (34 ) +"SC: PRINT"+C 
HR$(34)+"OUT OF A POSSIBLE"+CHR$ 
(34)+"MX:GOTO"+STR$(L2) :GOSUB172 
1145 REM help 
1150 LN=V(5)+10 

1160 A$="IFH$ (L) ="+CHR$ (34) +CHR$ 
( 34 ) + "THENPRINT " +CHR$ ( 3 4 ) +"N0 HE 
LP HERE . "+CHR$ ( 34)+" : GOTO"+STR$ ( 
L2)+" ELSEPRINTH$ (L) :GOTO"+STR$( 
L2) :GOSUB172 

1165 REM check for get or drop 

1170 LN=60000:A$=" IFV$="+CHR$ ( 3 
4)+"GET"+CHR$ (34) +"THEN"+STR$ (LI 
) :G0SUB172 

1180 A$=" IFV$="+CHR$ (34)+"DR0P" 
+CHR$(34)+"THEN"+STR$(L1) :G0SUB1 
72 

1190 A$=" GOTO"+STR$ (L2) :G0SUB17 
2 

1195 REM load 
1200 LN=V(6)+10 

1210 A$="LINEINPUT"+CHR$ (34)+"FI 
LENAME TO LOAD: "+CHR$ (34) +" ;F$" : 
GOSUB172 

1220 A$="IFLEN(F$) >8 THENPRINT "+C 
HR$(34)+"TOO LONG. »+CHR$ ( 34 ) +" : G 
OTO"+STR$(LN-10) :GOSUB172 
1230 A$="PRINT"+CHR$ (34)+"TAPE 0 
R DISK? (T/D) "+CHR$ (34) :GOSUB172 
1240 A$="A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="+CHR$ ( 3 
4)+CHR$ (34) +"THEN"+STR$ (LN) +" EL 
SE A=INSTR("+CHR$(34)+"TD"+CHR$( 
34)+»,A$) :IFA=0 THEN"+STR$ (LN) +" 
ELSE IFA=1 THENDV=- 1 ELSEDV=1": 
GOSUB172 

1250 A$="IFDV=-1THENPRINT"+CHR$ ( 
34)+"READY TAPE, PRESS ENTER.. "+ 
CHR$ (34)+";: LINEINPUTZ $ " : G0SUB17 



2 

12 60 A$=" PRINT"+CHR$ (34)+ "LOADIN 
G "+CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + " ; F$ : OPEN"+CHR$ (34) 
+ " I "+CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + " , DV, F$ : F0RI=1T00 : 
INPUT # DV , LO ( I ) : NEXT : INPUT # DV , L , T 
URNS,CA":GOSUB172 

1270 A$="CLOSE : GOTO60000" : G0SUB1 
72 

1275 REM save 
1280 LN=V(7)+10 

1290 A$="LINEINPUT"+CHR$ (34) +"FI 
LENAME FOR SAVING: "+CHR$ (34) +" ;F 
$":GOSUB172 

1300 A$="IFLEN (F$) >8THENPRINT"+C 

HR$ (34)+" TOO LONG . " +CHR$ (34) +" :G 

OTO"+STR$ (LN-10) :GOSUB172 

1310 A$="PRINT"+CHR$(34)+"TAPE 0 

R DISK? (T/D) ":GOSUB172 

1320 A$="A$=INKEY$:IFA$="+CHR$(3 

4)+CHR$(34)+"THEN"+STR$(LN)+" EL 

SE A=INSTR ( "+CHR$ (34) +"TD"+CHR$ ( 

34) +" , A$) : IFA=0THEN"+STR$ (LN) +" 

ELSEIFA=1THENDV=-1 ELSEDV=1" : GOS 

UB172 

1330 A$="IFDV=-1THENPRINT"+CHR$ ( 
34)+"READY TAPE, PRESS ENTER. . "+ 
CHR$ (34)+" ; : LINEINPUTZ$" : G0SUB17 
2 

1340 A$=" PRINT " +CHR$ (34)+" SAVING 
"+CHR$ ( 3 4 ) + " ; F$ : OPEN"+CHR$ (34) + 
"0"+CHR$ ( 34 ) +" , DV, F$ : F0RI=1T00 : P 
RINT # DV , LO ( I ) : NEXT : PRINT # DV , L , TU 
RNS,CA":GOSUB172 

1350 A$="CLOSE : GOTO60000" : G0SUB1 
72 

1355 REM pclear zero 

1360 LN=63950 

1370 A$="POKE&H3C0, &H5F : P0KE&H3C 
1,&H5C":G0SUB172 

1380 A$="P0KE&H3C2, &H96 : P0KE&H3C 
3,&HBC":GOSUB172 

1390 A$="POKE&H3C4, &H1F : P0KE&H3C 
5,&H02" :GOSUB172 

1400 A$="POKE&H3C6,&H7E:POKE&H3C 
7 , &H9 6 : P0KE&H3 C8 , &HA3 " : G0SUB17 2 
1410 A$="EXEC&H3C0 : GOTOl" : G0SUB1 
72 

9999 END 

63949 'pclear zero 

63950 POKE&H3C0,&H5F:POKE&H3C1,& 
H5C 

63960 POKE&H3C2,&H96:POKE&H3C3,& 
HBC 

63970 POKE&H3C4, &H1F: POKE&H3C5 , & 
H02 

63980 POKE&H3C6 , &H7E : POKE&H3C7 , & 
H9 6 : P0KE&H3 C8 , &HA3 
63990 EXEC&H3C0:GOTO20 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 33 



New Dual Mode EPSON 

The new Epson LX-80 offers printing flexibility in 
two modes: one mode allows you to print in a quick 
(100 cps) dot-matrix style for programming and 
graphics, and the Near Letter Quality mode (16 
cps) produces precise (240 dots per inch), 
beautiful type for correspondence, reports, and 
similar purposes. The LX-80 offers 160 different 
type-style combinations, including Pica, Elite, 
Enlarged, Emphasized, Condensed, Subscripts 
and Superscripts, and type-styles can be selected 
quickly from the top control panel or from program 
control. Comes standard in friction feed; tractor op- 
tion is also available. 

LX-P package includes an LX-80, a serial inter- 
face, a Color Computer to Epson cable, and 
Printer Tutorial that teaches you how to pro- 
gram the different type styles ($29.95 value). 

LX-P: LX-80 package $317 ($7 shpg) 
ET-1 tractor option for LX-80. $29.50. 

SF4 Single-sheet feeder for the LX-80. $143 ($7 

shpg) 



Epson 


RX-80 FT repack 


$207. 


Epson 


LX-80 New 


$249. 


Botek 


Serial to parallel converter 


$68.45 


Howard 


CoCo to Epson cable 


$25. 



DM-1 Disk mailer holds from one 




to five diskettes 


$20. 


200 lb, cardboard construction 




25 mailers/box 





MONITORS 



123 Zenith 12" Green Screen, 640 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 15 MHz band width. $114 ($7 shpg) 



123A Zenith 12" Green Screen Special, $67.50 

($7 shpg) 80 Column non glare 



122 Zenith 12° Amber Screen, 640 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 15 MHz band width. $117 (7 shpg) 

141 Roland 13" Color Monitor with speaker, 
270 dots x 200 dots resolution, 4MHz band width 
$247 ($12 shpg) 

All monitors require video controller. 

Reverse video free with monitor Order. 

MEMORY 

64K Upgrades-— 1 Year Warranty 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete instructions. Re- 
move old chips and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace cuts. $28.45 ($2 
shpg) 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering needed. Capacitor 

leads must be cut. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 
64-2 for COCO 2. Kit requires one solder point, no 

trace cuts. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 



CONTROLLERS 

New Controller from J&M: Has switch that allows 
either JDOS or RS DOS to be the disk operating 
system; eliminates software compatibility problems, 
while preserving the advantages of J&M's gold con- 
tacts and data separator. Also added to the DC-2 is 
a parallel port, which means a serial interface is no 
longer needed to make a parallel printer (like the 
Epson) work. 

DC-2 Disk Controller with JDOS. $1 28 ($2 shpg) 

RS-1: RS DOS ROM Chip. $20,00 ($2 shpg) 
DC-1 Disk Controller reads and writes to 35 and 40 
track single and double-sided drives for all models 
of the Color Computer w/ JDOS. $128 ($2 shpg) 
VC-1 Video Interface mounts inside Color Computer 
by piggy-backing IC on top of interface— no solder- 
ing, no trace cuts. All models give composite video 
& sound. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-2 for COCO 2— mono only. $26.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-3 for COCO 2— both color or monochrome 

$39.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-4 for new Color Computer (no sockets, chips are 
soldered to mother board). Attaches with spring- 
loaded clips. Color or mono, $39.45 ($2 shpg) 



DD-2 Double sided 360K disk with 




% height case & heavy 


$188. 


duty power supply 


CA-1 Disk drive cable 


$24.50 


CA-2 Two drive cable 


$29.50 


DE-1 Disk enclosure Vfe height with 




power supply 


$58. 




EPSON AND J&M 

The EJ-P Package 

The Epson LX-80 Printer teamed with our new 
J&M DC-2 Controller gives you top printing 
capabilities plus built-in switch gives JDOS or 
Radio Shack DOS so all software can run on your 
Color Computer. Package includes: Epson LX-80 
Printer with ET-1 tractor; DC-2 controller; 
parallel Color Computers to J&M cable; 
Epson Printer Tutorial ($29.95 value). 

Complete EJ-P package $425.00 ($7 shpg) 



HOWARD QUALITY STANDS 

New TS-1X Mon 
itor Stand: De 

signer-beautifu 
stand with cleai 
corner posts 
easy side access 
to ROM port, re- 
set and on/ofi 
buttons. $39.5C 
($3 shpg) 

TS-1: Standard 13" monitor stand for the original Coloi 
Computer. Specify black, ivory or clear. 15"x11"x4". 
$29.50 ($3 shpg) 

TS-2: Same as above for the COCO 2. $29.50 ($3 
shpg) 

PS-1X Printer Stand features new noise-suppressing 
foam top and cork base. 15" x11" x2 1 /2". $24.95 ($3 
shpg) 

GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to 
eflminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our 
hardware, try it out; test it for compatibility. If 
you're not happy with it for any reason, return it 
in 30 days and we'll give you your money back, 
(less shipping). 

Hours: 8:00-4:00 Mon.-Fri. 
10:00-3:00 Sat. 




Software system requirements: CoCo with 1 disk, 32K RAM, 80-cotumn printer 

Add $2 for shipping. 



r — ■ 



~. M- _ mmm — — w 



ORDERS 
(800) 
443- 
1444 



PAYROL/BAS 
39.95 

LEDGER 
free with 
PAYROL/BAS 

STATE TAX 

39.95 

941 

29.95 

CHECKS 



VIP LIBRARY 
S125 



SAP-I) 
19.95 
BPA-1 
19.95 



SOFTWARE CORNER 

Automatically calculates FED & FICA and 3 
additional user defined deductions. 
TABLES ARE ALREADY ENTERED. 
Prints checkbook with up to 30 user 
definable ledger numbers a $39/VALUE 

WITH PAYROL/BAS YOU WILL ALSO WANT 
Automatically calculates state withholding 
including graduated taxes. TABLES ALREADY ENTERED 
Prints totals by quarter per employee 
Ideal for Federal 941 and state unemployment 
500 pin-feed checks specify blue green or brown $57.25 
Softlaw's integrated package includes 
VIP Write, terminal, Database, Speller and CALC 
Stock analysis program organizes your portfolio 
and give specific sell & stop-loss points 
Chart your blood pressure from daily readings 
taken in the comfort of your home. 




The Biggest 



The Best 




The Indispensable 




:VMW. ; 




The 

THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



It's called the premier Color Computer magazine for good 
ason. THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and most 
)mprehensive publication a happy CoCo ever had! Is there any 
onder we get letters daily praising THE RAINBOW, the 
agazine one reader calls "A Pot Of Gold" for his Color 
omputer. 

THE RAINBOW features more programs, more information 
id more in-depth treatment of the Tandy Color Computer than 
iy other source, 

A monthly issue contains 260 or more pages and two dozen 
ograms, 15 regular columns and as many as 20 product 
views. And advertisements: THE RAINBOW is known as the 
edium for advertisers — which means every month it has a 
ealth of information unavailable anywhere else about new 
'oductsl Hundreds of programs are advertised in its pages 
ich month. 

But what makes THE RAINBOW is its people. Nationally 
lown people like Bill Barden, who has written 27 books on 
Dmputer topics and writes for us each month. Or, Fred Scerbo, 
ho writes special programs at the request of readers. Experts 
<e Dick White and Joseph Kplar, two of the most knowledge- 
Die writers on BASIC. Communicators like Marty Goodman and 

ray Augsburg, who stay abreast of telecommunications 
jvances. Or, Dan Downard, RAINBOW technical editor, who 
nswers our readers' toughest questions. Educators like Dr. 
lichael Plog and Steve Blyn, who show how CoCo can be used 
t home or school. Advanced programmers like Dale Puckett, 
'ho guide you through the sophisticated OS-9 operating 
/stem. Electronics experts like Tony DiStefano, who explain 
ie "insides" of the CoCo. These people, and many others, visit 
ou monthly through columns available only in THE RAINBOW. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the wide 
pectrum of interests in the Tandy Color Computer — from 
eginners' tutorials and arcade games to telecommunications 
nd business and finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
ourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to expand your 
toCo's capabilities. And, monthly reviews by independent 
eader reviewers take the guesswork out of buying new software 
nd hardware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE RAINBOW 
o be an absolute necessity for their CoCo. With all this going 
or ft, is it surprising that more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW 
subscribers renew their subscriptions? 

We're willing to bet that, a year from now, you'll be doing the 
;ame. For more information call (502) 228-4492. Or, for credit 
;artf orders only, you may call (800) 847-0309. 



O) 

c 

a 



- i 



5k cp 

Uti 8. 

c ea 3 -Q -> ea 



ZS CD CO 




«« co 



a 
o 



£ CD 

•S2 g£ 




a> 
a 
as 



CD 

W U > 
-C LU O 

** a. co 

CD jzL «— 



i 111 CO 

cd o 

Q. 



CC 
•*-> 

CO 

o 



ca 
cd 



C o 3 

o x co 
c cd « 



— (O 

CD DC .E 

15 CO 



CM 



CO 




c 

o 

o 



(0 

cc 




o 



o 
o. 

c 

o 



0) 




3 

o 




a> 
(5 



^ o 

c *- *- 

o 9> 
<d 5 w 

ca _c o> 

> o 

c »- 

o Q- 

>*£ 

O O) 

„ CO c 

CO cd CD 

C3) CO d) 

,EEr 
■5 £ = 

CO Q.£ 

o £ 

£Sg 

r-<w 
cc 



i_ ^ CO -c 

°- c ^ o 

* 5t £ 
CO § CL — 



LU K 



< ca 

co 
5 ca 



Z^ 



D) CD 

E £ 

E CD 

> CQ -O co 
2 2: CD CD 

cc -2 

'ca 
> 
ca 

a> 



.E CO 

"o — 
ca CD 
o c 

i- 'n 
o » 

CD CO 

| £ 

N ^ 

z 

CD — 

-c < 

CD LU 

CD T 

c r~ 



r— 

5 O 

§| 

>s £ 

Q- co 

<D W 

St o 

CO CD 
I C 

c 



-Q w. 
cts co 

CD 

— o 



Uj O 

co 



□ 



CD 



m 



<5 
cc o 



CD 
■*— > 

CO 

£ 



CO 

c 

ca 



X 

o 

I — 

a. 

Q. 

ca 



cn co 

O <o 

^ — -t-" 

- c -* « 

C'co O CD 

o ca i_ 

-Q ca 



ca -c 

CO _ 

ca? 
o ro 

C co 

III 

s= 

*" » s 

Z .E co 

O CO D. 
00 CD CD 

CC Q. 

CO CO 



O 
5 



UJ □ 



□ 

« # 

Cl 

E 2 
c % 

25 lA - 
55 ^ 

Uj 



a. 
N 



CO 



CO 
CO 

0 
I— 

CL 

X 

111 

c 

CO 

o 



c 



CD 

E 



CO 
CO 

0 



CO < 
CL 

£ □ 

O 

u 
o 

CO 

P co 
t ca 

co « 

i-a 

T5 
O 

CO 
O 

o 
cz 

UJ 



< 

CO 



E 

d a 

in © 

2 a 



CD 

CO 
Q 



O 

CO 



o 
cr> 
o 
i 

5 

o 
o 

£. 

CO 



.5 © 

10 B 

I § 

a 8 



o £ _ 

C CO 



ca 

CO 



ca 



£ ca 



in "D 



CL 
X 
LU 



CO 

O 



CD 

E 

>» 

CO 
CL 



□ 



CD 
£ 



CD 

n 

e 

C 
C 

o 
o 

"5 
o 

I— 

O 

c 
o 



ca T3 



co 



ca co 



O 



ceo 
— © «»- 

« "O CO 

I fi § 

co 

O C CM 
OT CD *— 
V> \£ v> 

CO — CO 
0=0) 
A * - 
CO CO 

c CO o CO 



o 

CO 

n 

3 

CO 

3 

o 



CM 



CD 

^ ^ o □ o < 



CO o 
O 



CD 
CO 

c 
CO 



cd y 
o 

CO _ 

Is 

O CL 
>> . 

. CO 
OT O 

© .'b 

T> D 
o c 

to © 
o £ 

.tr o 
£ < 

O CO 
U_ LU 



■o _ -o 

© O © 
~ TJ "t^ 
C m C 

= *=> 
© » © 

« ~ 

c o c 
— o — 
o — o 

CD ID t- 

'C 
<D O © 

ca "o 

Ml © CO 

S II 

>T3 O 

O ^ <D 

Z £ co 

Mi 

5- © 

*C -r- "O 

o i: c 
«o c — 

CO o + 



O CO 
O co 

O CO 

21 

o c 
■9 ° 

II 

ca >» 
E-d 

o ca 
c * 

T3 CO 

CO — 
o ° 

■E 

•» 

E° 

»- Z 
cn— 
o < 

°I 

o 
■a ■^ 

o c 

□_ x> 
ca 3 

CD CO 

5< 



o ca 



o 

CD 

o 
E 

CO 

ca 

O 
m 
z 

< 
cc 

LU 
X 



CD 
— 

E 
o 
O 

_o 
o 

a 

T3 
C 

ca 

<D 



LU 



CD 
-O 

a 

CO 

D 

CO 

"O 

c 
ca 
k_ 

o 
> 

ca 
o 
O 
o 

O 
l_ 

o 
>» 

c 

ca 

*CD 
CO 

O 

o 

a 

d 
o 



CD 



CD 
C 

N 

ca 

CD 



cd cd ca 

« t 

CD co . 



CD 
O 

c 

ca ^3 cd 

OB5E 

E o 



a> 

(A 

ca 

CD 



C 

o 

>. 
u 
c 

a> 
i> 
k. 

3 

O 

CO 



CD 

cn 



to 

CD 



CO 

•D 
i 

c 

o 



CO 
CO 

CD 
w 

Q. 

X 

LU 

C 
CD 
O 

"C 
CD 

E 
< 

"O 

c 

CO 

"D 
w 

CO 

O 

w 

CD 

CO 
CO 



o 



< 

cc 

LU 

X ^ 

s- -Q 
O co 
-J 



o 



co 



0 



cd = ~: ~ 



— CD 
CD £^ — 



CD 



CD 



co 



CD co 



CO 

> 

Q> 

CD 

CD 
k_ 

O) 

I2> 

CD> Q. 

C ^ CD 

is co to 

£Z <D 
CD CC 



CO 
CD 

CO t-w 

co *~ 

— ^ 

CM — 



co o: 
S □ 

CL 

CD 

E 

co uj 
co * 

Uj 

^ □ 



a. 
N 



CO 
CO 

CD 
v_ 

Cl 
X 

^ LU 

fc 5 
■2 S 

O 'C 

c E 
co co < 

CL 

E □ 
o 
o 
o 

CO 



CD 



CO 



CD 



CO -Q 
C- CD 

ECO 
ca 

CO 



CD 

co *o t: 



CD 
CO 

o 

O 

c 

UJ 

c 

CD 

E 

CO 
CL 



< 
CO 

> 

□ 



CD 
CO 



CD 
CO 

Q 

c 
o 

CO 

'5. 
x 

LU 



CO 

O 



CD 
jQ 

E 



c 

O 

o 
o 



E 
a. 
m 
o 



ca 



o 

O 
I 

oo 

o 
o 

CO 
CO 



© 
E 

3 
C 

c 
o 

52 

CD 



3 
O 

c 
o 



o 

CO 
A 
3 
CO 
k. 
3 
O 

S S 

0) T 

O CM 
■C CM 

2 3 

« _ 
$ © 

g % 

3-S> 
O Q. 

^co- 
co © 



V 



>n CA 
CO 

D S 

CO 2 

© £ 

$ o 

© 3 

JS5 c 

CD J 
© * 

© o 

si 

co t 

• CD 
CO S 

D $ 

CO 00 
— o 
CD ** • 

2l 
c o 

ca = 

-5 10 
co o 

r W J 

m « E 

"If 

o 



© 



CD 



o 

k. 

© 

CJ 



D 
CT 
C 

© 



Z] .-^ O 



CO 

c 

O) 



^ ^ O □ O < CO 



T3 = 

o CO 
LL 111 



2 5" 
« co o 

© 

"O c J 
CO CD _ 

i= 3 » 
-J O o 

CD CD t) 

.tr o 

ca * -o 
© c a> 

© ©| 

CO to 

w c c 

CD .9 * 

i- -t— o 
ca a. "o 

Ju5 
O w o 

m if 

Z « £ 

i<l 

111 2 n 

= o o 

2co g 

co D ~ 
05® 

- r (0 
O. t CO 

■Q CD "O 

,9 03 "° 

CO ■w- ca 




103 

05 



q 05 



> 

05 

05 



m 

0) 



s 0) 



m 



O 

05 
"0 

m 

O 



7v 



O 
> 

D 



q . . =n m O 

m z 2 S "0 

S H 2 w 8 

w i r- 03 52 

5 m m > J 

m 

05 



m 




> 
o 
o 

m 

05 
O) 

rn 

m 



5 DO 
8 C 

Q 0) 



05 
05 



m 

3 



m 

in 

CO 
33 

m 

13 



"0 

O 
05 

m 

o 



7v 
-< 



33 

o 





What goes well with 
the Rainbow? 




Rainbow On Tape! 



We call it the other side of THE RAINBOW and we may 
have to raise the price just to call your attention to it. With 
as many as two dozen programs every month, RAINBOW 
ON TAPE is a luxury service at a bargain basement price. 

What is it? RAINBOW ON TAPE is a monthly cassette 
tape adjunct to THE RAINBOW and it's brimming with all 
the programs (those over 20 lines long) that fill the pages 
of the magazine. All you do is pop the cassette in your tape 
recorder and they're ready to run. No more lost weekends 
— or week nights — typing, typing, typing. With RAINBOW 
ON TAPE, you can read the article in the magazine then, 
in seconds, you load it up and run it. Yes, you could type 
them in yourself, as many people do. But all of them? Every 
month? There simply isn't enough time. 

Isn't it time your CoCo became a full-time computer 
instead of a typewriter? Think how your software library 
will grow. With your first year's subscription, you'll get 
almost 250 new programs; games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications — the full spectrum of THE 
RAINBOW'S offerings without the specter of keying in 
page after page and then debugging. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE — the ' meat'' of THE RAINBOW at 
a price that's "small potatoes." Food for thought. To get 
your first heaping helping, just fill out and return the 
attached reply card. No postage necessary. 

Discover the other side of THE RAINBOW. It's not only 
a time-saver, it's the key to a whole new outlook! 





AMBER MONITOR 



59 



95 



i Drive 0 and 1 
One double sided drive with doubler board and new RS 
controller so you can have the equivalent of 2 drives in 
one. You can even backup from Oto 1. Works with all 

Sv 



,:t : 



Epson's Comrex 5650 has a 12" screen with 900 lilies. 
Resolution for 80 column text and 18 MHZ band width, 
retail price was 139.95. 13" Color Monitor (not shown), 
now only $139.95. These are new, in ■ ia^Q ry sealed 
cartons, NOT used, repacked, or refurbi^eld. Add 7,00 
s/h. Monitor Interface for any color Computer 29.95. 






195 



2 Drives 299 

Both our drive 0 and 1 in one case, with cable and R.S, 
controller. The best just got better! 



Drive 1 Upgrade 1X9 

Add a second |§ height drive to your Radio Shack* 
26-3129. Comes with 3 minute installation instructions, 
screwdriver required. Double sided version (Drive 1 and 
2) and doubler board add 79.00 



:'■»■;■ & 



■ 




Your Choice 
Silver or White 





Drive 0 



Special prices on new first quality disk drives. They even have GOLD connectors on the back . . . Some other places charge 229.00 for 
dr. land 299.00 for dr. 0,notus! Drive 1 is for modi, Second Color Computer drive, or external mod EI, IV. Drive 1 just plugs into the 
exM#nnectd^&3^r Drive 0 cable. Both drives are compatible with any version of the Color Computer and all versions of drives. 
Cn^eO is yotfr first Color Computer drive and comes complete with cable, manual, and R.S. controller . For double-sided drive and 
doubler board a^79.00 (for Drive 0 & 1 or 1 & 2) . Bare full hgt SSDD drive only 79.95. 

1 JciJSi CUlvlrU IJeJy l^lilN JLJcJv 

. ViCji V 901-761-4565, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 381 19 ^ ; a 

lllflAdd $4.90 for shipping and handling— Visa, MC & money orders accepted, No CODs 
-gf^AUow an additional 2 weeks for personal checks—Drive faceplates may vary slightly 
Prices subject to change without notice. Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 



Polar Tic Tac Toe is more than the old standby game 
with the three-by-three grid. The game is played on 
the pattern in Figure 1. 
To win this game a player must place his mark in four 
adjacent positions. These four may be in a semicircle within 
any of the four circles. Or the winning four marks can be 
in a straight line. This line of four may go through the center 
of the pattern. 

In the computer version of this game, players place red 
and green sections on the original blue grid with their 
joysticks. The program keeps track of turns, recognizes a 
winning combination and keeps track of total wins for each 
player. The loser of one game gets to go first in the following 
game. There are a total of 52 ways to win the game. But 
don't get overconfident, there are also 52 ways to lose. Good 
luck. □ 

James Wood is in his fifteenth year of teaching at Atwood 
Hammond High School in Atwood, Illinois. His subjects 
include photography, physics, chemistry, computer pro- 
gramming and math courses. He holds master's degrees in 
both instructional media and physical science education. 




Figure 1: 

Examples of Winning Combinations 



The listing: TICTRCTO 

1J3 REM JAMES W. WOOD, JAN 86 
2j3 CLS : PRINT@4j3, "POLAR TIC TAC T 
OE": PRINT: PRINT" USE JOYSTICK TO 
POSITION YOUR" : PRINT"MARKER. PR 
ESS BUTTON TO PLACE" : PRINT "MARKE 
R DOWN. FOUR IN A LINE" : PRINT "OR 



FOUR IN A SEMICIRCLE WINS.":PRI 
NT" AFTER A WIN, BOTH BUTTONS": PR 
INT"MUST BE PRESSED TO CONTI 
3j3 PRINT: INPUT "LEFT PLAYER'S NAM 
E";LP$: PRINT" YOU WILL BE RED" 
4J3 PRINT :INPUT"RIGHT PLAYER 1 S NA 
ME" ;RP$: PRINT "YOU WILL BE GREEN" 
5J3 FORT=lT08j3j3:NEXTT 



36 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



60 DIM D(32) 

70 PM0DE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1 , 0 : NP=0 

80 RESTORE : C0L0R2 , 1 

90 FOR A=30 TO 90 STEP 20 

100 CIRCLE (130, 100) , A 

110 NEXT A 

120 DRAWBM40 , 100R180L90NU90ND90 

NE63NG63F63H126" 

130 FOR A=l TO 32 :READ B,C 

140 PAINT (B,C) ,3,2:NEXT A 

150 DATA 68,48,124,16,136,16,192 

,44,204,104,180,156,84,156,48,10 

4 

160 DATA68,96,124,36,136,36,176, 
57,180,105,160,141,96,141,68,105 
170 DATA 96,72,124,57,134,57,164 
,72,160,105,13 6,132,108,126,88,1 

05 

180 DATA 108,87,124,78,136,75,14 
8,87,140,105,132,108,124,108,108 
,105 

190 IF JW=0 THEN 230 

200 NP=NP+l:IF NP=33 THEN 570 EL 

SE COLOR2,l:LINE(30,50)-(40,60) , 

PSET , BF : COLOR1 , 1 : LINE ( 2 15 , 50 ) - ( 2 

25 , 60 ) , PSET , BF : COLOR2 , 1 : LINE (215 

,50)-(225,60) ,PSET,B 

210 J0=JOYSTK(0) *4: Jl=JOYSTK(l) * 

3 : P=PPOINT ( J0 , Jl ) : PSET ( J0 , Jl , 2 ) : 

F0RT=1T02 0 : NEXTT : PSET ( J0 , Jl , P) : I 
F P<>3 THEN 210 

220 PE=PEEK(65280) : IF PE=126 OR 
PE=254 THEN PAINT ( J0 , Jl) , 1 , 2 :GOS 
UB 270 ELSE 210 

230 NP=NP+1:IF NP=33 THEN 570 EL 
SECOLOR4 , 1: LINE (30, 50) - (40 ,60) ,P 
SET , BF : COLOR2 , 1 : LINE ( 2 15 , 50 ) - ( 2 2 
5,60) ,PSET,BF 

240 J0=JOYSTK(0) : J0=JOYSTK(2) *4: 
Jl=JOYSTK(3) *3:P=PPOINT(J0,J1) :P 
SET ( J0 , Jl , 2 ) : F0RT=1T02 0 : NEXTT : PS 
ET(J0, J1,P) :IF P<>3 THEN 240 
250 PE=PEEK(65280) :IF PE=125 OR 
PE=253 THEN PAINT ( J0 , Jl) , 4 , 2 : GOS 
UB 270 ELSE 240 
260 GOTO200 

270 RESTORE: FOR A=l TO 32 

280 READ B,C:D(A)=PPOINT(B,C) :NE 

XT A 

290 1 CHECK FOR CIRCLES 
300 FOR E=0 TO 24 STEP 8 : FOR A=l 
TO 5:AL=D(A+E)+D(A+l+E)+D(A+2+E 
)+D(A+3+E) 

310 IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE I 
F AL=16 THEN 530 



320 NEXT A, E 

330 FOR E=0 TO 24 STEP 8 

340 AL=D(6+E)+D(7+E)+D(8+E)+D(1+ 

E):IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE IF 

AL=16 THEN GOTO 530 
350 AL=D(7+E)+D(8+E)+D(1+E)+D(2+ 
E):IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE IF 

AL=16 THEN GOTO 530 
3 60 AL=D(8+E)+D(1+E)+D(2+E)+D(3+ 
E):IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE IF 

AL=16 THEN GOTO 530 
370 NEXT E 

3 80 'CHECK FOR LINES 
390 FOR A=l TO 8 

400 AL=D(A)+D(A+8)+D(A+16)+D(A+2 

4): IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520ELSE IF 

AL=16 THEN GOTO530 

410 NEXT A 

420 FOR A=9 TO 12 

430 AL=D(A)+D(A+8)+D(A+16)+D(A+2 
0):IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE IF 

AL=16 THEN GOTO 530 
440 NEXT A 
450 FOR A=13 TO 16 

460 AL=D(A)+D(A+8)+D(A+16)+D(A+l 
2):IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE IF 

AL=16 THEN GOTO 530 
470 NEXT A 
480 FOR A=17 TO 20 
490 AL=D(A)+D(A+8)+D(A+12)+D(A+4 
):IF AL=4 THEN GOTO 520 ELSE IF 
AL=16 THEN GOTO 530 
500 NEXT A 
510 RETURN 

520 GOSUB580 : CLS : SCREEN0 , 0 : PRINT 

:PRINTRP$; H WINS" :RP=RP+l: JW=0:G 

OTO 540 

530 GOSUB580 : CLS : SCREEN0 , 0 : PRINT 

: PRINTLP$ ; " WINS " : LP=LP+1 : JW=1 : G 

OTO 540 

540 PRINT : PRINT"TOTAL" : PRINT : PRI 

NTLP$ , LP : PRINTRP$ , RP 

550 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <ENTER> TO 

CONTINUE" 
560 IF INKEY$=CHR$(13) THEN 70 E 
LSE 560 

570 CLS : SCREEN0 ,0 : PRINT : PRINT "NO 
WINNER" : F0RT=1T08 00 : NEXTT : GOT07 

0 

580 FOR T=1TO10:SCREEN1,1:FORTI= 

1TO20 : NEXTTI : SCREEN1 , 0 : FORTI=lTO 

20:NEXTTI,T 

590 PE=PEEK(65280) 

600 IF PE=124 OR PE=252 THEN RET 
URN ELSE 590 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 37 



Prices Change 
Every Day. 
Please Call 
1-800 343-8841 
For Lower Prices 



DEALER 



INQUIRIES 



INVITED 



I PRICE 



Sizzling Summer Specials 
Announcing MEGADISK PLUS + 

Complete Systems! for the TRS 80 Model I/III/IV/4P, Color Computer, IBM-PC & AT, Max/80 
Software Drivers: LDOS, NEWDOS/80, DOSPLUS, TRSDOS 6.x, CP/M available 




MEGADISK =■ 




Drive a 5 to 40 Megabyte Hard Bargain Starting at $399. 95 

REMOVEABLE CARTRIDGE Systems Now Available!!! 



MEGAPLEX your Megadisk — 2 to 10 Port Systems 

Prices Start at a LOW $199.95 
Models III/IV4P 



Call Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 




$259.95 

Disk Drive Upgrade Kit 

for Model 1 1 I/I V easy to install 
system — no soldering. 
Complete with controller, towers, 
power supply, 1 Half High Disk Drive, 
cables, and easy to follow instructions. 
Second Drive $89.95 



CANADIAN CUSTOMERS PLEASE CALL 514-383-5293 



TERMS and CONDITIONS 

All prices are cash discounted. However, we do 
accept MC, VISA, AMEX & DISCOVER credit cards. 
C.O.D.'s are accepted-No deposit required. 
Purchase Orders-Corporate, Government & School 
P.O.'s are accepted. Please call for details. 
Shipping Costs are calculated per order. 
Please call for total. 

Shipments of all in-stock products are made within 

24 hours. Same day service is available upon 

request — no added cost. 

Not responsible for typographical errors. 

Terms and Specifications may 

change without notice. 



Software Support Inc. 



9090 

pm (est) Sat 4:00 pm 

Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 

Dealer Inquiries 



^ilfl «f Ashland MA 01 721 
tX>°* * -6 1 7-8 72-909 

" Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 am to 5:30 pm (est) 



MicroSmart Inc. 



Service& Returns: It isourpolicyto repair all service 
returns within 24-48 hours. Normally same day turn- 
around is accomplished. It is necessary to have a 
(R)eturn (M)aterial (A)uthorization to insure 
speedy service. 

IBM, TAVA, COLUMBIA, 5151, COMPAQ, EAGLE, 
TRS/80, HEATH/ZENITH are registered trademarks 
of IBM Corp., Tava Corp, Columbia Computer Corp, 
Key Tronics Corp, Compaq Corp, Eagle Computer, 
Tandy Corp, Zenith Corp, respectively. 

1 986 Software Support, Inc. All rights reserved. 
* 1986 MicroSmart, \ncAII rights reserved. 




BREAKTHROUGH 



DEALER 



INQUIRIES 



INVITED 



Prices Change 
Every Day. 
Please Call 
1-800-343-8841 
For Lower Prices 



MEGADISK M HARD DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS 



TOLL FREE ORDERING 1-800-343-8841 



For the IBM/PC, Tandy 1000, TRS/80 Models I/III/IV/4P, Compaq, Tava, PC Workalikes. Color Computers, Heath/Zenith, Max/80 
Complete with Hardware. Cables, Software and Quikflt Installation 

6 Megabytes Internal Mount IBM/PC \AJr\iA* Starting at $239.95 

1 ] Megabytes Internal Mount IBM/Tandy 1000 ¥ *lJVyf hlC\Ai starting at 359.95 

22 Megabytes Internal Mount IBM/Tandy 1000. .. I. , " ''Cy/ / Cl\Ai r*-* starting at 469.95 

6 Megabytes External System — "'OrUrlQ-l *-^V|f HR/PlTO starting at 399.95 

10 Megabytes External System .TV '^Cl V©rtie VC w .... starting at 599.95 

20 Megabytes External System ! .V«©C| SDia/*. ■ ■ • • starting at 749.95 

Tape Backup System — Internal or External (IBM/PC) r^wQ/g. . . starting at 449.95 

nn« nr^orc IBM/Heath — DOS, 1.0, 2.0. 2.1, 3.0. 3.1 or later 

uus unvers ' TRS/80-LDOS. TRSDOS 6.x, Newdos/80, Dosplus, CP/M. COCO DOS. Max/80 LDOS. 0S9 

FULLY WARRANTEED — PARTS AND LABOR — CALL TOLL FREE - 1-800-343-8841 



FLOPPY DISK DRIVES. POWER SUPPLIES AND CABINETS 

Our Disk Drives are UL approved — Our Floppy Drive Cabinets and Power Supplies 
are Underwriters Laboratory- Listed and have passed the required Federal 
Communications Part 15 Section B-EMI/RFI tests. 

Warranty on alt disk drives is one full year parts and labor. Warranty on floppy disk 
drive power supplies is five (5) years. In warranty or out of warranty service is 24 hour 
turn-a-round on all disk drives and power supplies. 

Full Height — Tandon 

, 00 . t Single Sided 40 tk Bare $99.95 

In Case with Power Supply 1 39.95 

Dual Drives in One Cabinet 239.95 

100 -2 Dual Sided 40 tk Bare 109.95 

In Case with Power Supply , ► > . 1 49.95 

Dual Drives in One Cabinet , 259.95 

Half High Drives 

Single Sided 40 tk Bare 79.95 

In Case with Power Supplv II 4.95 

Dual Drives in One Cabinet . > 209.95 

Dual Sided 40 tk Bare 109.95 

In Case with Power Supplv 149.95 

Dual Drives in One Cabinet 259.95 

Apple/Franklin Disk Drives 

35/40 Track in Case with Cable and Software 129.95 



TURBO-M PC 

CALL 
800-343-8841 



COLOR COMPUTER DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS AND ADD IN PRODUCTS 

40 Track Single Head Drive with Case. Power Supply. Cable 

Controller. Instruction Booklet. Diskettes $199.95 

Above with Dual Drives in One Cabinet 269.95 

40 Track Dual Head with Case, Power Suply. Cable. 

Controller, Instruction Booklet. Diskettes 249.95 

Above with Dual Drives in One Cabinet 359.95 

Dual DOS Switch .... 29.95 

With Second DOS System — JDOS. RSDOS. and Booklet 69.95 



PRINTERS 



Dot Mnlri\ 

Citi/cn 

Star Micronics 



S.G. Series 



S Call 

...Marting at S2 99.95 



Daisv Wheel 

Silver Reed 440 80 Column 1 2 CPX 315.95 

550 132 Column 19 CPS 439.95 

770 132 Column 36 CPS K95.0O 

Olympin 132 Column 14 CPS WITH Form and Tractor Feed 399.95 

Printer Cables . .. , starting at 1 9,95 

Printer Paper Micropcrl' Edge 1000 Sheets 16 95 



CALL FOR MODEM SPECIALS 

Modem Special 300/1200 $199.95 















ELECTRICAL 






Surge Protectors Line Fillers 


SL Wabcr 6 Outlets with Switch . . . 


. . S 39.M5 




Unintcrruptnble Power Supplies 




399.95 



ALL IN-STOCK ITEMS SHIPPED WITHIN 24 HOURS. SAME DAY SHIPPING 
PROVIDED BY REQUEST WITHOUT ANY EXTRA HANDLING CHARGES. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
Diskettes in 10 Pack from $ 9.95 

Two print Switches from 99.95 

Disk Drive Cahlcs from ln.00 

Maintenance Cleaning Kits , 12.00 

Parallel Printer Buffers 8K 149.95 

Floppv Disk Drive Cables 

1 Drive . 1 6.00 

2 Drives IX.95 

Henth 'Zenith 2 Drive Cables Shielded 24.95 



Software Support Inc. — MicroSmart Inc. 



TERMS and CONDITIONS: 

All prices are cash discounted. However, we do 
accept MC, VISA, AM EX & DISCOVER credit cards. 
C.O.D.'s are accepted-No deposit required. 
Purchase Orders-Corporate, Government & School 
P.O.'s are accepted. Please call for details. 
Shipping Costs are calculated per order. 
Please call for total. 

Shipments of all in-stock products are made within 

24 hours. Same day service is available upon 

request — no added cost 

Not responsible for typographical errors. 

Terms and Specifications may 

change without notice. 



Kifc^K. 200 Homer Street cS&fe ' 

Se sS Ashland MA 01 721 
°pS>^ 1-617-872-9090 

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 am to 5:30 pm (est) Sat 4:00 pm * 

Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



Services Returns: It isourpolicytorepairallservice 
returns within 24-48 hours. Normally same day turn- 
a-round is accomplished. It is necessary to have a 
(R)eturn (M)aterial (A)uthonzation to insure 
speedy service. 

IBM, TAVA, COLUMBIA. 5151, COMPAQ, EAGLE. 

TRS/80. HEATH/ZENITH are registered trademarks 

of IBM Corp., Tava Corp., Columbia Computer Corp. 

Key Tronics Corp, Compaq Corp, Eagle Computer. 

Tandy Corp, Zenith Corp. respectively. 
1 986 Software Support, Inc. All rights reserved 
1 986 MicroSmart. Inc. All rights reserved 

TURBO M * of MicroSmart Inc. 



An educational game to encourage 
mastery of word concepts 



Which 







When the first CoCos arrived in 
our school I was thrilled. 
However, the software we 
ordered hadn't arrived and the class 
needed something to use. This was the 
perfect opportunity for me to learn 
BASIC. It was one of my fourth-graders, 
Jody Eason, who came up with the idea 
to make a program like the matching 
games they played in class. Nymatch 
was born. 

Matching games are popular learning 
tools. Drill and practice becomes fun. 
The cards are placed face down. Pick 
two cards and, if they match, you keep 
them and go again. The winner is the 
one with the most sets. Add the CoCo 
and you have an automatic answer 
checker. 

Nymatch can be used in any subject. 
All you need are two ideas that share a 
relationship. In history one such pair 
could be Washington and first Presi- 
dent. In math it could be 5+5 and 10. 
For my subject I chose reading. More 
specifically, Nyms. What are Nyms? I 



Brim Dick lives with his wife and three 
sons in Rensselaer, Indiana. He has a 
master's degree in education and 
teaches fourth grade. His hobbies in- 
clude writing programs for his sons and 
the classroom. 



itch? 



use Nyms as a broad category of words 
made up of synonyms, antonyms and 
homonyms. Synonyms are words that 
have the same meaning (woods/ forest). 
Antonyms are words that have the 
opposite meaning (hot/ cold). Homo- 
nyms are more confusing. Homonyms 
are broken down into two types: hom- 
ophones and homographs. Homo- 
phones are two words that sound alike 
but are spelled differently (deer/dear). 
Homographs sound differently, but are 
written the same. Read can be pro- 
nounced reed or red. 

Having a firm foundation in word 
concepts is an important link between 
reading words and understanding the 
material. Reading some articles in THE 
rainbow can be frustrating to those 
unfamiliar with the topic. Understand- 
ing what the words mean in the context 
of the article is essential. One way to 
strengthen vocabulary is to study how 
words relate to other words. That is the 
reason so much time is spent on Nyms 
in school. That is the goal of Nymatch. 

Nymatch works on 16K non- 
Extended basic. Just type it in, save 
and run it. If you own Extended BASIC 
and get an OM Error, just PCLEAR 1 
before running. 

Although the game targets grades 
three through six, it is valuable for you 
as a parent to play with your child. Your 



By Brien Dick 



Table 1 

Lines Function 

10- 220 Title and set-up 

230- 270 Game loop 

360- 530 Record keeping 

540- 630 Game subroutine 

640- 760 Examples & directions 

770-1330 Manipulate choices 

1340-1380 Fancy print routine 

1390-1430 Border & delay routines 

1440-1720 Homonym card set 

1730-2020 Antonym card set 

2030-2320 Synonym card set 



child may not be able to "sound out" 
some words. Others may be used in a 
new way. Your help early on can make 
a big difference in how fast your child 
masters the vocabulary in Nymatch. 
Many children at this level are just 
beginning to learn problem-solving 
strategies needed in locating matched 
pairs. For them, the game is reduced to 
a guessing game. Playing with a parent 
gives them examples of other strategies. 
Since this game is so versatile, you 
can add your own sets of matched pairs. 
Making changes is not hard. You need 
only modify two areas; the DATA state- 
ments and the submenu explaining the 



40 



THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



nformation. If you have 16K, there is 
tot enough room to add any games, 
fou will have to replace any set of cards 
vith your own sets. Those with more 
nemory can add to Nymatch. 

Add your game to the main menu in 
ines 550 to 590. Don't forget to adjust 
he ON/GOTO line numbers in Line 70. 
f you are adding more games, change 
Jne 620. Add one to the five for each 
idded game. 

You will need a set of 30 matched 



pairs for the DATA lines at the end of the 
program. Each DATA line holds the 
matched pair and its ID number. Re- 
member that each set of 30 pairs must 
be in the same order as in the menu. 

Final Notes 

1 hope your child enjoys Nymatch. 
Learning can and should be enjoyable 
whenever possible. Our CoCo proves 
that over and over again. Isn't that why 
most of us bought one in the first place? 



Drop me a line if you are using a 
CoCo in your school. I'd like to hear 
from you, and I'm willing to help with 
problems you have. Just send a descrip- 
tion of the problem with a listing, if you 
have a printer. 



(You may direct your questions to the 
author at 112 South Milton, Rensse- 
laer, IN 47978. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing.) □ 




The listing: NYMATCH 

10 'COPYRIGHT 1983 BY BRIEN DICK 
20 CLEAR200:CLS3:CO=185:GOSUB139 

30 DIM W(24,3) ,C$(24) ,C(24) ,P$(2 
4),P(4) ,D(24) 

40 TI$= "NYMATCH" : LO=108 : GOSUB135 

50 TI$=" CREATED BY: BRIEN DICK": 

LO=294:GOSUB 1350 

60 GOSUB1430:GOSUB360:GOTO540 

70 ON CH 0010640,670,700,730 

80 GOSUB1390:K=5 

90 A$=CHR$(143+((K-1)*16)) 

100 B$=A$+A$+A$ 

110 C$=CHR$(175) :D$=CHR$(191) 

120 E$=CHR$(128)+CHR$(128)+CHR$( 

128) 

130 FORX=lT015 

140 C1$=C1$+C$:D1$=D1$+D$:NEXTX 

150 FOR A=1T024 

160 W(A,1)=28+L+(A*4) 

170 W(A,2)=60+L+(A*4) 

180 W(A,3)=92+L+(A*4) 

190 IF A=8 OR A=16 THEN L=L+96 

200 NEXT A 

210 IFCH=1THENGOSUB1040ELSEGOSUB 
1030 

220 LO=419:GOSUB1340:INPUTX:CLS0 

230 F0RA=1T024 

240 FORB=lT03 

250 PRINT@W(A,B)-32,B$; 

260 IFB=1THENPRINT@W(A,B) -32,CHR 

$(64+A) ; 

270 NEXTB , A 

280 FORPL=lTOP 

290 R=0:GOSUB 770:GOSUB 800 

300 GOSUB450:GOSUB830:GOSUB770 



310 GOSUB800:IFR=1THEN290 

320 NEXTPL:GOTO280 

330 GOSUB500:CO=185:GOSUB 1390 

340 TI$=" ANOTHER GAME (Y/N)? " : L 

0=422 :GOSUB13 50 

350 Y$=INKEY$ : I F Y$ = " Y " THENRUNE LS 
EIFY$="N"THENCLS : ENDELSE3 50 
360 TI$="HOW MANY PLAYERS (1-4)" 
: LO=3 88 : GOSUB13 50 
370 INPUTP 

380 IF P>5THENTI$="too many play- 
ers " : LO=3 88 .* GOSUB13 50 : GOSUB 1430 
: GOTO 3 60 

390 CLS4:CO=169:GOSUB1390 

400 PRINT@96,"";:F0RH=1T0P 

410 TI$="WHO IS PLAYER #"+STR$(H 

) :LO=32*H:GOSUB1350 

420 INPUT P$(H) 

430 IFLEN(P$(H) ) >15THENPRINT"ple 
ase shorten your name" ; :GOTO420 
440 NEXTH: RETURN 

450 PRINT@398-INT(LEN(P$(PL) )/2) 
," "P$(PL)" "; 

460 PRINT @ 4 5 1 , " PRES S <SPACEBAR> 
TO PLAY"; 

470 T$="":T$=INKEY$ 

480 IFT$<>" "THEN470 

490 GOSUB770:GOSUB800: RETURN 

500 CLS3 : GOSUB1390 : TI$="scoreboa 

rd" :LO=75:GOSUB1350 

510 FORH=lTOP:LO=73+(64*H) :TI$=S 

TR$(P(H) )+" "+P$(H) :GOSUB13 50:N 

EXTH 

520 GOSUB1430: RETURN 

530 P(PL)=P(PL)+2:R=l:RETURN 

540 CO=42:CLS2:GOSUB1390 

550 TI$="WHICH GAME DO YOU WANT" 

:LO=133:GOSUB1350 

560 PRINT@ 23 4, "HOMONYM (1)",* 

570 PRINT@ 298, "ANTONYM (2)"; 

580 PRINT@ 362, "SYNONYM (3)"; 

590 PRINTQ4 2 3, "DIRECTIONS (4)"; 

600 PRINT@155,"?"; 

610 CH$=INKEY$ : C=C-1 : IFCH$=" "THE 

N610 

620 IFVAL(CH$)>0 AND VAL(CH$)<5T 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 41 



Radio Shack has the 



Computer System 
Furniture 



fifi Reg, Separate 
Items 319.80 




Spacious modular worksta- 
tion is ideal for home or of- 
fice. Features simulated oak 
finish. Easy to assemble. 

El System Desk. Twin cable 
management slots for easy 
connections. 

26-1356 119.95 

IB Storage Hutch. Mounts 
on system desk. Features 
adjustable "second shelf' 
on either side. 
26-1359 59.95 

Half-Width Hutch. (Not 
shown). 26-1374 . . . 54.95 

El Corner Section. Con- 
nects system desk and 
printer stand for a conven- 
ient "work corner" 
26-1358 39.95 

EPrinter Stand. With out- 
put paper catcher and stor- 
age shelf. 

26-1357 99.95 



Monitor Pedestal 





16 95 

Adjustable platform ro- 
tates and tilts. Holds all 
Tandy monitors. Color 
and finish match moni- 
tors. Base: llxlOWf 
(26-1369) 



Printer Supports 




Elevates printer so fan- 
fold paper can be placed 
underneath. Use with 
80-column printers. Du- 
rable crystal polystyrene. 
Easy to assemble. 
(26-1367) 



Diskette Storage 




3V2': Holds 30. 

26-1381 l 12.95 

5V4': Holds 50. 
26-1362 14.95 

8'I Holds 50. 

26-4953 24.95 



Disk Drive Head 
Cleaning Kits 



Low 
As 

795 

f Each 



Disk Size 


Cat. No. 


Each 


*3V 2 " 


26-419 


9.95 


51/A* 


26-408 


7.95 


8" 


26-4957 


8.95 



'Single sided only 



Fanfold Printer Paper 



Mailing Labels 




Computer Paper 



Computer 
Paper 

k Conipuiar Pop*" 



Computer 
Paper 



Pressure- Sensitive Fanfold 



Low As 

95 



Size 


Parts 


Design 


Vertical 


Qty. 


Cat. No 


Price 


147/8X11" 




Greenbar 


No 


500 


26-1330 


11.95 


147/BX11" 




Greenbar 


No 


1500 


72-300 


34.95 


14 7 /ax11" 




Greenbar 


No 


3500 


26-1417 


69.95 


147/8X11" 




White 


No 


1500 


72-303 


34.95 


9V2X11" 




Greenbar 


Yes 


1500 


72-304 


24.95 


9'/2X 11" 




Greenbar 


Yes 


3500 


26-1403 


49.95 


9Vz x 1 1 " 




White 


Yes 


500 


26-1423 


8.95 


9'/2x 11" 




20# White 


Yes 


500 


26-1387 


10.95 


9V2X 11" 




20# White 


Yes 


1250 


26-1427 


24.95 


9V2X11" 




20# White 


Yes 


2500 


72-311 


44.95 


9V2X 11" 


2 


White 


Yes 


750 


72-305 


34.95 



6 



i 





1-Wide. 4V2" carrier. Pkg./lOOO. 26-1328 . 6.95 

1- Wide. 4V 2 " carrier. Pkg./5000. 72-402 24.95 

2- Wide. 9V2" carrier. Pkg./2000. 72-401 15.95 

3- Wide. 9V2" carrier. Pkg./3000. 72-400 16.95 

2-Wide. Dry gum. 9 l k" carrier. Pkg./2400. 26-1456 . . . 9.95 



Items Shown With Optional Computer Components (Not included). 



best of everything 



LowCost, Compact 
Computer Workcenter 



89 



95 



Organize Your Computer System With 
This Compact, Efficient Workstation 

Beautifully Designed and Finished 
to 'Tit In" with Other Furniture 



Our beautifully styled, simulated oak finish workcenter 
features a full-width monitor shelf (41 1 /2 X 14 3 U"), space 
for computer and printer, plus plenty of workspace. This 
easy-to-assemble workcenter comes with adjustable 
glides. (26-1350) 




Perfect for Home, Office or School 



Data Communications Modem 




59 



DCM 3. 300-bps modem plugs di- 
^ rectly into modular phone outlet. 
DB25 and 4-pin DIN connectors. 
Bell 103 compatible, full duplex. 
FCC registered. (26-1178) 



Certified 
Unformatted 
Diskettes 

■ Double Density 

■ Manufactured to the 
Highest Standards 

of Excellence 

■ Buy in 10-Pack Quantiti 

Single Sided 











1 





Double Sided 



Size 


Tracks 


Quantity 


Cat. No. 


Price 


3V2" 


80 


3 


26-415 


15.95 


BO 


10 


26-416 


44.95 




40 


1 


26-305 


2.19 


5V4" 


40 


3 


26-405 


5.95 




40 


10 


26-406 


15.95 


8" 


77 


3 


26-4904 


10.95 


77 


10 


26-4906 


34.95 



Size 


Tracks 


Quantity 


Cat. No. 


Price 




40 


3 


26-411 


6.95 




40 


10 


26-412 


16.95 


5V4" 


B0 


3 


26-409 


8.95 




B0 


10 


26-410 


24.95 




80(high 
density) 


3 


26-421 


15.95 




10 


26-422 


44.95 




77 


3 


26-4961 


12.95 


8" 


77 


10 


26-4960 


39.95 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



r 

1 
1 
1 

L 



Send me an RSC-17 
Computer Catalog. 

Radio Shack 
Dept. 87-A-20 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, Texas 76102 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



1 

-I 

:■ 
i 



Phone 



J 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores and dealers. 



HEN CH=VAL(CH$)ELSE540 

630 X=RND(C) :GOTO70 

640 CLS:PRINT@70, "homophone mate 

h up"; 

650 PRINT@ 13 1 , "HOMOPHONES ARE WO 
RDS THAT SOUND THE SAME A 

ND HAVE DIFFERENT SPELLIN 

GS . " ; 

660 PRINT@2 59, "samples: SENT/CEN 
T BYE/ BY" ; 

:GOTO80 

670 CLS:PRINT@70, "antonym match 
up" ; 

680 PRINT @ 131, "ANTONYMS ARE WORD 
S WITH OPPOSITE MEANINGS 



ii . 



690 PRINT@2 59, "samples: WALK/RUN 

SAME/DIF 

FERENT"; :GOTO80 

700 CLS: PRINT© 70, "synonym match 
up" ; 

710 PRINT© 131, "SYNONYMS ARE WORD 
S WITH THE SAME MEANINGS 



ii • 



720 PRINT© 2 5 9, "samples: LEAVE/GO 

ALL/ EVER 

Y" ; :GOTO80 

730 CLS5:PRINT@75, "directions" ; 
740 PRINT@128," NYMATCH IS A W 
ORD GAME AND A MEMORY GAME 

IN ONE." 

750 PRINT@224," YOU WILL BE GI 
VEN A SET OF 24 CARDS. CHOO 

SE 2 CARDS THAT MATCH AND 

YOU EARN THOSE CARDS AN 

D MAY HAVE ANOTHER TURN." 

760 GOSUB1390:LO=453:GOSUB1340:I 
NPUTX:GOTO540 
770 FORX=0TO4 

780 PRINT@352+(X*32) , Cl$ ;CHR$ (12 

8); 

790 NEXTX: RETURN 
800 FOR X=0TO4 

810 PRINT@352+16+(X*32) ,D1$; 

820 NEXTX: RETURN 

8 30 T$="":T$=INKEY$ 



CoCo Trend 



Name brand software 
jrft at least 20% off 

suggested retail. 



15001 Glory Dr. Huntsville, AL 35803 
(205) 880-COCO (2626) 
Call or write for free catalog. 



840 PRINT@421, "1ST CARD"; 

850 IFT$=""THEN830 

860 IFASC (T$) <650RASC (T$) >88THEN 

830 

870 GOSUB980 

880 IFW(ASC(T$)-64,1)=0THEN830 

890 GOSUB770:GOSUB1120:GOSUB1090 

900 T1$="":T1$=INKEY$ 

910 PRINT@437 , "2ND CARD"; 

920 IFT1$=""THEN900 

930 IFASC (Tl$) <650RASC (Tl$) >88TH 

EN900 

940 IFASC (T$) =ASC (Tl$) THEN900 

950 IFW(ASC(T1$) -64 , 1) =0THEN900 

960 GOSUB1160:GOSUB800 

970 GOSUB990 : GOSUB1200 : RETURN 

980 T=ASC(T$) -64: RETURN 

990 T1=ASC(T1$)-64:GOSUB1100 

1000 IFC(T)=C(T1)THENGOSUB530 

1010 IFC(T)=C(T1)THENGOSUB1270 

1020 RETURN 

1030 FORX=1TO30*(CH-1) :READZ$,Z, 
Y$,Y: NEXTX 

1040 J=RND(18) :IFJ=1THEN1050ELSE 
FORX=lTOJ*4 :READJ$ : NEXTX 
1050 F0RF=1T024 
1060 J=RND(24) 

1070 IFD(J)=1THEN1060ELSED(J)=1 
1080 READC5 (J) :READ C(J):NEXT:RE 
TURN 

1090 PRINT@388,C$(T) ;: RETURN 
1100 PRINT@388+16,C$(T1) ; 
1110 GOSUB1430: RETURN 
1120 FORB=lT03 

1130 PRINT@W(ASC(T$)-64,B)-32,C$ 
+C$+C$; 

1140 IFB=1THENPRINT@W(ASC(T$) -64 
, 1) -32 T$ ; 

1150 SOUND60*B,l:NEXTB:RETURN 
1160 FORB=lT03 

1170 PRINT@W(ASC(T1$)-64,B)-32,D 
$+D$+D$; 

1180 IFB=lTHENPRINT@W(ASC(Tl$)-6 
4,1) -32 , Tl$ ; 

1190 SOUND60*B,1:NEXTB: RETURN 
1200 IFW(ASC(T$)-64,1)=0THENRETU 
RN 

1210 FORB=lT03 

1220 PRINT@W(ASC(T$)-64,B)-32,B$ 

• 

1230 IFB=1THENPRINT@W(ASC(T$) -64 
■ 1) —32 , T$ ; 

1240 PRINT@W(ASC(T1$)-64,B)-32,B 

$ ; 

1250 IFB=1THENPRINT@W(ASC(T1$) -6 

4,B)-32,T1$; 

1260 NEXTB: RETURN 

1270 FORB=lT03 

1280 SOUND INT(50/B),1 



44 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



12 90 PRINT@W(T,B)-32,E$; 

1300 PRINT@W(T1,B)-32,E$; 

1310 W(T,B)=0:W(T1,B)=0:NEXTB 

1320 X1=X1+1:IFX1=12THEN3 30 

133/3 G0SUB14 3 0 : RETURN 

1340 TI$=" PRESS <ENTER> TO PLAY" 

1350 FORX=lTOLEN(TI$) 

136)3 PRINT@LO,LEFT$(TI$,X) ; 

1370 SOUND100+(X*2) ,1 

1380 NEXT: RETURN 

1390 FORX=1024TO1055:POKEX,CO:NE 
XT 

1400 FORX=1024TO1504STEP32:POKE 
X, CO: NEXT 

1410 FORX=1504TO1535:POKEX,CO:NE 
XT 

1420 FORX=1055TO1535STEP32:POKEX 
, CO : NEXT : RETURN 

1430 FORD=1TO1400: NEXT: RETURN 
1440 DATA FOUR, 1, FOR, 1 
1450 DATA ATE, 2, EIGHT, 2 
1460 DATA EYE ,3,1,3 
1470 DATA BARE, 4, BEAR, 4 
1480 DATA DEAR, 6, DEER, 6 
1490 DATA DAYS , 7 , DAZE , 7 
1500 DATA CITE, 8, SITE, 8 
1510 DATA CHORD , 9 , CORD , 9 
1520 DATA CENT, 10, SENT, 10 
1530 DATA AUNT, 11, ANT, 11 
1540 DATA BLEW, 12, BLUE, 12 
1550 DATA AIR, 13, HEIR, 13 
1560 DATA DEW, 14, DO, 14 
1570 DATA DOE, 15, DOUGH, 15 
1580 DATA HAIR, 16, HARE, 16 
1590 DATA GRATE, 17, GREAT, 17 
1600 DATA HAIL, 18, HALE, 18 
1610 DATA NEW, 19, KNEW, 19 
1620 DATA HAY, 20, HEY, 20 
1630 DATA CREEK, 21, CREAK, 21 
1640 DATA KNIGHT, 22, NIGHT, 22 
1650 DATA KNOT, 2 3, NOT, 2 3 
1660 DATA SON, 24, SUN, 24 
1670 DATA STEAK, 25, STAKE, 25 
1680 DATA SEW, 26, SOW, 26 
1690 DATA SHOOT, 2 7, CHUTE, 2 7 
1700 DATA SCENE, 28, SEEN, 28 
1710 DATA RIGHT, 29, WRITE, 29 
1720 DATA ROTE, 30, WROTE ,30 
1730 DATA POOR,l,RICH,l 
1740 DATA RARE, 2, COMMON, 2 
1750 DATA QUIT , 3 , CONTINUE , 3 
1760 DATA PROPER, 4, IMPROPER, 4 
1770 DATA SAME, 5, DIFFERENT, 5 
1780 DATA SAFE , 6 , DANGEROUS , 6 



1790 DATA ILL, 7, HEALTHY, 7 
1800 DATA POWERFUL , 8 , WEAK , 8 
1810 DATA PROUD, 9, ASHAMED, 9 
1820 DATA FILL, 10, EMPTY, 10 
1830 DATA UNITE, 11, DIVIDE, 11 
1840 DATA GATHER, 12, SCATTER, 12 
1850 DATA CRUEL, 13, KIND, 13 
1860 DATA EVIL, 14, GOOD, 14 
1870 DATA ASLEEP, 15, AWAKE, 15 
1880 DATA REPAIR, 16, DESTROY, 16 
1890 DATA RAPID, 17, SLOW, 17 
1900 DATA POLITE, 18, RUDE, 18 
1910 DATA QUESTION, 19, ANSWER, 19 
1920 DATA NONE, 20, SOME, 20 
1930 DATA YOUTHFUL, 21, OLD, 21 
1940 DATA BALD, 22, HAIRY, 22 
1950 DATA AVERAGE, 2 3, UNUSUAL, 2 3 
1960 DATA CHEAP, 2 4, EXPENSIVE, 2 4 
1970 DATA BEFORE, 2 5, AFTER, 25 
1980 DATA BRIEF, 26, LONG, 26 
1990 DATA FALSE, 27, TRUE, 27 
2000 DATA DOUBT, 2 8, BELIEVE, 2 8 
2010 DATA DIRTY, 2 9, CLEAN, 29 
2020 DATA LIGHT , 30 , DARK, 30 
2030 DATA KILL, 1, MURDER, 1 
2040 DATA LIKE, 2 , ENJOY, 2 
2050 DATA LITTLE , 3 , TINY , 3 
2060 DATA MEAN , 4 , UNKIND, 4 
2070 DATA NEAR, 5 , CLOSE , 5 
2080 DATA MIX , 6 , BLEND, 6 
2090 DATA SLEEP, 7 , DOZE , 7 
2100 DATA RE AL , 8 , TRUE , 8 
2110 DATA SECRET, 9, HIDDEN, 9 
2120 DATA SICK, 10, ILL, 10 
2130 DATA EXCITED, 11, THRILLED, 11 
2140 DATA ZERO, 12, NONE, 12 
2150 DATA TOTAL, 13, WHOLE, 13 
2160 DATA TOUGH, 14, HARD, 14 
2170 DATA USUAL, 15, REGULAR, 15 
2180 DATA COUCH, 16, SOFA, 16 
2190 DATA HAPPY, 17, GLAD, 17 
2200 DATA HEAL, 18 , CURE , 18 
2210 DATA DEPART, 19, LEAVE, 19 
2220 DATA DAMAGE , 20 , RUIN , 20 
2230 DATA FAKE, 21, FALSE, 21 
2240 DATA EASY, 22 , SIMPLE , 22 
2250 DATA ADORE , 2 3 , LOVE , 23 
22 60 DATA CLOSE , 24 , SHUT , 24 
2270 DATA BATTLE , 25 , FIGHT, 25 
2280 DATA HARD, 26 , ROUGH, 26 
2290 DATA FAST, 27 , SWIFT, 27 
2 300 DATA DRAG ,28, PULL ,28 
2 310 DATA CONFESS, 2 9, ADMIT, 29 
2320 DATA FIX, 30 , REPAIR, 30 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 45 




X'S MINI-CATALOG 



Educational Best-Sellers! 




P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situation s- 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 





fODOoll 



HEAD 



CLH 



'stall' JjltI^brice 

■ lata k 



ft 



Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Joysticks Required 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II— Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

■ Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32K TDBI $42.95 Tape $39.95 

Fractions— A Three-Program Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence * 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 



Factpack -Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/+/X" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System -Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 1 6K Ext. Basic/ 

32K for Printer Output 
Tape $39.95 Disk $42.95 

Math Duel-A challenging math game that 
pits you against the computer in a game 
of wits. Use your knowledge of factors, 
multiples and prime numbers to gather 
points against your CoCo. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 




I.IK 4 I 

£L* IB 

rcr sn 
ii inf.- 

Hi. £5 



Approach Control Simulation 
From Betasoft Systems. 

"Caught in a blinding snowstorm, two jet 
airliners are on a collision course. The 
pilots are unaware of the imminent danger. 
Hundreds of lives are at stake. A high-speed 
disaster is inevitable unless you act fast..." 
This and many other exciting scenarios 
await you as an Air Traffic Controller, The 
thrills, challenges and frustrations you'll 
experience with this authentic, real-time 
simulation will give you countless hours of 
discovery and adventure. 

32K Machine Language 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34795 

We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 



New! Tandy 1000/1200/3000 -IBM/PC-Compatable Software 



Inventory Mate -General purpose 
inventory program suitable for a variety 
of applications. Inventory turnover and 
transactions are kept on permanent 
record. Has automatic item count 
adjustment when shipping or receiving. 
Also generates reports suitable for 
many uses! $79.95 

Postal Express -Lightning-fast general 
purpose mail program for home, small 
business. Each file stores up to 500 
entries; in-memory storage for quick 
operation; automatic selective printing 
options using global search and cate- 
gorizing features; Zip Code ordering, 



alphabetizing, accepts 9-digit and 
foreign Zips as well! $49.95 
Special Delivery -Comprehensive mall 
list program for businesses, featuring 
versatility found only in much more 
expensive packages! Up to 2000 entries 
held in each file; additional address line 
can be placed anywhere in the 
individual mailing label; categorize and 
print entries according to custom 
needs; Zip Code ordering, alpha- 
betizing, uses 9-digit and foreign Zips, 
too! $79.95 

More Tandy-IBM/PC software available. 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 

• Full use of 64K RAM 

• 1 00% Machine Language 

• No ROM Calls 

• Selectable Drive 

• Support 1-4 drives 

• Menu Selected functions 

• "Cold Start" exit to Basic 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler— the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT— Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Disk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector -Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast 3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21.95 

Sector Inspector-Alphabetize, backupand 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 Bradford N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

616/957-0444 

Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/957-0444 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors— We pay top 
royalties! 




Look What's New at NOVnSOFT! 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 




Ok, 



, Direotions:<Hest«North-> 
? YOU dl* i V j 

<f.-:\ your sports-, da'i*^; 




CCX3F Bf—^ H28 CI i ok to stop 

|~New Release I 
Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Required 

Disk $21 .95 




is a doa.a necklace het»e» 



The Misadventures of Eddie 

Another great Novasoft adventure. The or 
man in the mines' rebellious son, Eddie, is 
roaming through time, creating havoc-and 
you must bring him home in order to return 
to your own time! Over 140 locations, 50+ 
commands, in hi-res graphics. Experienced 
adventurers will love this one! 

Requires 64K 
Disk $21.95 




Goldrunner 

Travel the maze in your never-ending search 
for gold-but beware of trap doors, burly 
guards and other hazards! 33 screens. 

64K Joystick or Keyboard 
Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 



■ 



I ll 

I II ' 



h D n r ■# ei p 

□ □UEJ fc'J-Elh 

Hfl pin. i bei i] 



,-J I :pn v , I. T. 1 Ei POUR. TMRfl 



'uU MRPT T(3 
Uirxr print: 




nr 



li: 




Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required 
Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 



CREDITS 



cftV 3 



COINS 



OAR 



mm 

t; • : -Mi i 



m 



CQIMS 

IH 0 RETURN HftHDLE 



[FAYS ONLY ON LIT LINES] 

Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

16K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 



Other Best Sellers 

Martian Crypt- Life once existed on Mars! 
Find the hidden Martian crypt. Animated 
hi-res graphic adventure with sound effects. 

32K Tape $1 8.95 Disk $21 .95 

Skyway— Manuever your craft along the 
skyway avoiding enemy craft, mines, sky 
bugs and holes! 32K and Joystick. 

Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 

Blackbeard's Island -Find Blackbeard's 
treasure but be ever mindful of the hazards 
along the way. Graphic adventure. 

32K Disk $19.95 

Brewmaster— Move along the end of the 

bars, serving beer to your thirsty customers. 
Fast-paced action. 32K & Joystick. 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 

CoCo Crosswords- Master set has 27 
puzzles, four levels of difficulty. Pull down 
menu. Additional sets have 30+ puzzles 
each. 

32K Master Set Disk $24.95 
Sets #2, #3, #4 just $12.95 ea. on Disk 

Color Car- Fast moving racing lets you 
"bump & jump" other racers through the 
course. 

64K & Joystick. Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 



Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man -Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 

The King— 

32K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian— 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze— 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Kater Pillar II- 

1 6K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants— 

1 6K Tape $1 8.95 Disk $21 .95 
Buzzard Bait— 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 

NOVFISOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

4285 Bradford N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 
■ Dealers welcome 

• Many more titles -write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/957-0444 



TAKING BASIC TRAINING 



16K 
ECB 



Part two of the translation demonstration 



Uncomplicating Translating 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Before we dive in and immerse 
ourselves in the nitty-gritty of the 
second part of our translation 
demo, I would like to make a few 
observations. 

We have gone from the germination 
of an idea and, step by step, added to 
it to broaden its scope. As a newcomer 
to CoColand, you have helped con- 
struct a program that is well within your 
capabilities. There was no earth- 
shattering concept to grasp. But, don't 
expect to produce a viable program in 
a day or two. You will find gremlins 
lurking around and thwarting your 
efforts every step of the way. No matter. 
If you attend to the problem at hand 
and solve it at every stage of the process, 
you will have a usable, if not useful, 
program. 

Did you notice that as you created 
this program, you had fun working out 
each segment? In spite of yourself, you 
began to associate the Romanian words 
with their English mates. Not only were 
you brushing up on your typing and 
programming skills, but you were be- 
coming familiar with the subject matter. 

Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer and special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of Co Co. 



This should hint at the potential for 
educational applications you are begin- 
ning to unleash. If you are familiar with 
a Romance or Germanic language, you 
may have spotted some cognates. The 
perceptive programmer might wonder if 
"raft" meaning "shelf," figuratively a 
plank, is not related to "raft," a plat- 
form for swimming, not to mention a 
roofing rafter. 

Did you save your work on tape? 
CLOflD it. If not, copy Listing 1 from last 
month's tutorial. Check out Line 10 to 
make sure it is GOTD20. 

Did you notice that, at times, we had 
no operating lines 22 and 32? Delete 
lines 22 and 32, then run. Again, we 
have three sets of X$ and Y$ strings and 
only one operating line, Line 42. CoCo 
always chooses the last X$ or Y$ sen- 
tence to operate on. Press break, then 
restore lines 22 and 32. This observation 
may be helpful in solving another reoc- 
curring problem. 

Key in, from this month's Listing 1, 
lines 8, 50, 51 and 52. Line 8 prints both 
sentences without an intervening pause. 
List lines 50 through 52. Line 51 is a 
word-by-word literal translation of 
Line 50. Note, for the first time in our 
demo, that the sentence in Line 51 
extended to the second text line. The 
invisible-vertical-line gambit is alive 



and well. Line 52 depicts the usual 
English translation. 

Edit Line 10 at the end to GOTO50. 
Add at end of Line 5 : G0SUB5 and run. 
We allow the student/ viewer to look 
over the sentence to be translated. Press 

BREAK. 

Add at end of Line 51 :G05UBB and 
run. We display both the foreign sent- 
ence and word-by-word translation 
merely for informational purposes. 
Unfortunately, it is a tortured English 
rendition. Press BREAK. 

Add at end of Line 52 :G05UB3 and 
run. This displays the two sentences we 
intend to dissect. 

You can devise your own system. This 
segment is included to give some ideas 
as to how to approach problems of this 
nature. You might revise G0SUB3 so 
both languages are put on simultane- 
ously to display lines 50 and 52. You can 
also deep-six GDSUBs you do not intend 
to use. 

List lines 50 and 52. We decide to 
break them into two parts. The most 
practical break is after "George." Count 
directly from the screen to get the 'P 1 
and 'Q' values. Key in 53 P=12:Q=9: 
Do not press enter yet. Recall that if 
the next to last segment of a divided 
sentence is put on using G05UB2, you 
can use G05UB4 instead. Type GDSUB4 



48 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



nd press ENTER. Run the program then 
ress BREAK. 

Change Line 10 to 10 CLSZrGOTOGG. 
Ley in lines 60 and 61. Press BREAK and 
st Line 60. Note that each succeeding 
jxt line begins under the opening quote 
lark. You may also divide a word if 
ecessary. The lines look odd because in 
ine 60 there are no spaces between 
/ords. This is because the words end at 
he right margin, and the left margin of 
he next row follows immediately, List 
Jne 6 1 . You can easily spot the invisible 
vertical line. This is because blank 
paces were used to fill in the empty 
pace up to the right margin so that the 
lext words would start a new row at the 
eft margin. 

Key in 63 G0SUB3. This is a tempor- 
ary use of GDSUB3 to display lines 60 and 

61 in their entirety. It is good practice 
to double-check long strings for correct 
spelling and formatting before proceed- 
ing. Run the program. The strings X$ 
and Y$ abut. It doesn't look good. One 
solution is to drop Y$ two rows or 64 
characters/ spaces at the beginning of 
the operating line, Line 62. We want to 
move *Y* location down by 64 spaces. 
Insert Y=Y+64 : at the beginning. Run, 
then press BREAK then CLEAR. List lines 
60 and 61. 

Our first part will end with the space 
after and V respectively. Count 
directly from the screen to determine 
the first set of values, P=24 and Q=27. 

Rekey Line 62 to read 62 Y=Y+64: 
P=24:Q=27:G0SUB2:. Press ENTER. 
Run and press BREAK, then CLEAR. List 
lines 60 and 61. Edit Line 62 and enter 
X. 

The next part will end with "urc@" 
at space 31 and "ascended" at space 38. 
Add P=31:Q=38:G0SUB2:. Press 
ENTER. Run and press BREAK, then 
CLEAR. List lines 60 and 61. Edit Line 

62 and enter X. 

The next part, "pe tronul" ends at 41 
and "the throne" at 52. You can pick up 
the count either beginning at 32, a 
known signpost at the start of text row 
two, or pick up the last T' or 'Q' value. 
You know that "ascended" ended at 
Q=38. By looking at Line 62, start 
tapping away with "TO — T=39, 
O=40, space=41, etc., to the next divi- 
sion. Enter P=41:Q=52:GD5UB2:. 
Press ENTER and run it. Press BREAK, 
then CLEAR. Edit Line 62 and enter X. 

The next portion ends at the space 
after "romaneshti." Pick up the last T* 
value from Line 62 and count off. 'P' 
will equal 57. The value ends after 
"wallachia." 



Look at Line 61. Note that "walla- 
chia" extends across the invisible verti- 
cal line. We know that *C is at number 
64, so pick up the count from that point. 
It ends at 68. Enter P=57:Q=68: 
G05UB2 : . Press ENTER and run it. Press 
BREAK and CLEAR. List lines 60 and 61. 
Edit line 62 and enter X. 

The next part ends in both X$ and Y$ 
after "1436." You can begin calculating 
*P' from number 64 and you can pick 
up the 'Q' starting number from the last 
'Q' value, 68. Determine the values. 

Enter P=71:Q=B5:G0SUB2:. Press 
ENTER and run it. Press BREAK and 



"This mistake may ~ 




dormant while you 
are creating the 
program, hut after 
you finalize it, it pops 
up to haunt you." 




CLEAR. List lines 60 and 61. Edit Line 
62 and enter X. 

The next T' section ends after "ul- 
cere®." Pick up the count from the last 
*P' value in Line 62 (71) and count. The 
next 'Q' value is the last word of the text 
line "and tried." We know the next line 
begins with number 96, so we subtract 
one to get to the right margin of the 
previous line to get 'Q\ 

Enter P=B2:Q=95:G05UB2:. Press 
ENTER and run it. Press BREAK and 
CLEAR. List lines 60 and 61. Edit Line 
62 and press ENTER. This time we won't 
'X' to the end. This would cause Line 
60 to scroll up and off the screen, losing 
our place. First, we will determine our 
next break, which ends after "scape," 
picking up the count from Line 62. 
Now, we can type X and P=91 : . Do not 
press enter! The English equivalent is 
"to free." We pick up the count by 
counting down from the opening quote, 
0, 32, 64, 96 and start counting. Add 
Q=103:GO5U82:. Press ENTER and run 
it. Press BREAK and CLEAR. List lines 60 
and 61. Edit Line 62 and press ENTER. 
We have one more break to do. Be on 
the alert because, after we get our next 
'P' and 'Q' values, we add G0SUB4 
instead of GDSU82, then well be fin- 
ished. 

The last break is "tsara," which ends 



Educational Programs 



\ Questions 7 ? 
• • • 

Questions — a powerful, easy to use, 
authoring program! Questions has as 

many uses as its owners have creativity. 
Teachers have used Questions to develop 
pre and post tests, to make copies of the 
same test with questions in a different 
order, and to review and reinforce difficult 
lessons with their students. But Questions 
is not limited to school uses. Enterprising 
people have found other uses for it. Party- 
givers have used it to personalize games 
For baby and wedding showers, and for 
creating their own trivia games. Adminis- 
trators nave used it for inservice training. 
Children have written their own riddles 
with it. If you own Questions, you'll find a 
way to use it. You will also be pleased with 
its many fine features: 

* Word processing commands that al- 
low you to make changes as you type 

* Screen commands so you do not have 
to constantly refer to the manual 

* Options to take the quiz on the com- 
puter or to print a hard copy of it 

* Sequential or random presentation of 
questions 

* The ability to print the same test with 
questions in a different order 

* The printing of an answer key 

* The option to use expanded printer 
lettering to create large print tests. 

* The ability to save quizzes to cassette 
or disk 

* A review feature which permits stu- 
dents to study questions that have 
oeen missed 

* A record keeping system 

* Multiple choice, true/false, or fill 
in the blank formats. 

Questions is truly a professional authoring 
program that meets the needs of all of its 
users. 

16K ECB - Cass. $19.95 
32K ECB - Cass. $24.95 
32K Disk - $26 M 

***************************** 

Reading Comprehension Series 
Grades 2 - 4 

B5's Reading Comprehension Series is a 

set of data files to be used with the Ques- 
tions program described above. Each file 
contains over 100 questions, organized 
into 6 to 8 sequential lessons. Lessons 
build from simple to complex. This series 
emphasizes the thinking aspect of reading. 
Simple sentence structure allows the stu- 
dent to concentrate on thinking skills. 



Main Idea * 
Fact & Opinion * 



Sequencing 
Cause & Effect 



Each Title: Cassette - $10.95 
Disk $12.95 
Complete Series of 4 Titles: 
Cass. - $39.95; Disk - $41.95 

Most B5 programs are available 
(CF through Radio Shack® Express 
Order. 

A trademark of Tandy Corp; 



B-5 Software Co. 

1024 Balnbrldge Place 
Columbus, Ohio 43228 
Phone (614) 276-2752 




August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 49 





Show Schedule: 

Friday evening 

- Exhibits open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m 
Saturday 

— CoCo Community Breakfast at 8 a.m. 

- Exhibits open at 1 0 a.m. and ciose at 6 p 
Sunday 

— Exhibits open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 





rincdon 



RAINBOWfest is the 
only computer show 
exclusively dedi- 
cated to your Tandy Color 
Computer. Nowhere else 
will you see as many pro- 
ducts, have access to the 
top experts, or be able to 
attend free seminars. It's 
the next best thing to re- 
ceiving the latest issue of 



the rainbow in your mail- 
box! 

Every RAINBOWfest 
features many delightful 
surprises. It's a great op- 
portunity for commercial 
programmers to show off 
new and innovative pro- 
ducts for the first time. You 
get the jump on new capa- 
bilities for your CoCo. In 



exhibit after exhibit, there 
are demonstrations, op- 
portunities to experiment 
with software and hard- 
ware, and special RAIN- 
BOWfest prices. 

You can set your own 
pace between visiting ex- 
hibits and attending the 
valuable, free seminars on 
all aspects of your CoCo — 



s 

V 



/ 




AAA A~A 



from improving basic 
skills to working with the 
sophisticated OS-9 oper- 
ating system, 

Many of the people who 
write for the rainbow — 
as well as those who are 
written about — are there 
to meet you and answer 
your questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people, 
just like you, who share 
your interest in the Color 
Computer. It's a person- 
to-person event, as well as 
a tremendous learning ex- 
perience, in a fun and re- 
axed atmosphere. 

To make it easier for you 



to participate, we schedule 
RAINBOWfests in differ- 
ent parts of the country. If 
you missed the fun in Chi- 
cago, Illinois, why don't 
you make plans nowto join 
us in Princeton? For 
members of the family who 
don't share your affinity for 
CoCo, you'll be comforta- 
ble knowing that RAIN- 
BOWfest is located in an 
area with many other at- 
tractions. 

The Hyatt Regency- 
Princeton offers special 
rates ($79, single or double 
room) for RAINBOWfest. 
The show opens Friday 



evening with a session 
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's 
a daytime-only show Sat- 
urday — the CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast (sepa- 
rate tickets required) is at 
8 a.m., then the exhibit hall 
opens promptly at 10 a.m. 
and runs until 6 p.m. Sun- 
day, the exhibit hall opens 
at 11 a.m. and closes at 4 
p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOW- 
fest may be obtained di- 
rectly from THE RAINBOW. 

We'll also send you a spe- 
cial reservation form so 
you can get your special 
room rate. 



Come to RAINBOWfest! 



RAINBOWfest 

Princeton, New Jersey 

Dates: Oct. 17-19, 1986 

Hotel: Hyatt Regency-Princeton 

Rooms: $79 per night, 

single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: 

Oct. 10, 1986 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders received from each state. 



The POSH way to go. 

You may wish to have your travel arrangements handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assistance, Inc., of 
Louisville. The people at POSH are very familiar with both 
RAINBOWfest and the area in which it is being held So, for the 
same POSH treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, cafl POSH 
at (502) 893-3311. All POSH services are available at no charge 
to RAINBOWfest attendees. 



YES, I'm coming to Princeton! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance sale price. 
Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: ? 
Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 
Saturday CoCo Breakfast at $12 each total 

Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt 
Regency-Princeton ($79, single or double room). 



$1.00 



Name (please print) 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



Telephone 

Company 

□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Exp. Date 

Signature 



Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky call (800) 847-0309. 

Advance ticket deadline: Oct. 10,1986. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will 
also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full 
price. 



just before our invisible vertical line and 
therefore must be 95. Type X and P=95 : . 
The last mate is "the country" and we 
pick up 'Q' from Line 62 and count. 
Type 0=115 :GD5UB4, press ENTER and 
run. Whew! 

It is suggested that you advance from 
division to division until you feel com- 
fortable with this system. Once you get 
it under your belt, you can figure out the 
operating line completely before you 
check it out. 

Did you notice the need to use CLEAR 
when working on a long text line? 

Let's consider the case of differing 
word order between languages. 

Type 10 CLSZ:GDTOB0. Key in lines 
7, 70 and 71. List lines 70 and 71. "Om" 
means "man" and "crud" means "cruel." 
If we choose to break after "om," we 
find the word "man" is further in the 
sentence and we have a new problem: 
to pluck out "man" without "the cruel." 
We must use a new stratagem to pro- 
duce parallel definitions. 

We could chicken out and make the 
break end after "crud" and "man" 
respectively, but we won't. 

Look at Line 7. This GOSUB allows us 
to display X$ as usual. We use MID$ to 
pull out the word we want and display 



it first. MI D$ ( Y$ , Q , R ) tells us that from 
a specified point, *Q\ in the body, M I D$, 
of sentence Y$, we want to display 'R' 
characters/ spaces. 

First, recall that we pushed down 
Line 61 64 spaces to Y+64. Since we are 
returning to a normal line, we must 
return 'Y' to its usual value. We must 
begin Line 72 with either Y=Y-64 or 
Y=22S. Otherwise, as we add numerous 
program segments, some of which will 
be overly long text lines, Y$ will be 
displayed lower and lower and eventu- 
ally drift completely off the screen, due 
to a cumulative error. 

This mistake may lie dormant while 
you are creating the program, but after 
you finalize it, it pops up to haunt you. 

Back to work! We determine the 
value of T\ 5. Type 72 Y=225:P=5:. 
Do not press ENTER yet. Note the 
following procedure carefully: The 
word we want to appear first is "man" 
with its leading and following blank 
spaces (for aesthetic reasons). Since it is 
in the body of the sentence we must 
determine the values of MI D$ ( Y$ , Q , R ) . 

We count on the screen from the 
invisible vertical line, the number of 
spaces up to and including the last letter 
of the word in front of the word we are 



targeting. It is the *L' in "cruel," 11 
spaces. This is our offset 'Y* value, 
Y=Y+il. Add Y=Y+11:. *Q' is always 
one number higher than the offset 11. 
Add 0=12 :.To figure out 'R\ count, 
starting at 4 Q', the number of spaces to 
be displayed (six)/ Add R=6:. To acti- 
vate MID$( Y$, 12,6), we tack on 
G0SUB7 : and press ENTER. Run it, press 
BREAK and list lines 70 and 71 . Edit Line 
72 and enter X. 

We must return to the beginning of 
Y$ to display "the cruel." We reduce *T 
by the amount of the offset, 11. Add 
Y-Y-ll:. We are ready to work up the 
next word(s). The break in X$ is the 
space after "crud," whose T' value is 1 1. 
There are a variety of ways to pick up 
'Q\ To be safe, count from the starting 
quote up to and including the space 
after "cruel" (even though this last space 
is already displayed), Q=I2. Type 
P=11:Q=12:G0SUB2:. Press ENTER 
and run. 

The next division is after "ishi" and 
"himself." Press BREAK and list lines 70 
and 71. Edit Line 72 and enter X. Type 
P=15 : 0=26 : G0SUB2 : and press ENTER. 
Run it and press BREAK. List lines 70 
and 71. Edit Line 72 and enter X. 

Next, we will break after "ucise" and 



Personal Stationery 
for Personal Computers 

Now, a unique quality stationery for the 
personal computer user. 

Perfect for letters, thank you notes and 
correspondence of all types. 

Give your computer correspondence the 
personal touch. 

• Designed, continuous feed, Classic® Laid 
and Linen stationery. 

• Dozens of pre-printed designs available. 

• The perfect gift for all personal computer 
users, family, friends, business associates 

and children. 

Write Today for Free Sample and Brochure 

hi-tech Stationery 
5901 Warner Ave. Suite 270-B 
Huntington Beach, CA 92649 




) — \ 



h i - tech 




Quality Stationery for Personal Computers 



Listing 1: LRNGTUT1 

0 'LISTING1 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO10 

2 PRINT@X, LEFT$ (X$ , P) ;:EXEC44539 
: PRINT@Y , LEFT$ (Y$,Q) ; : EXEC44539 : 
RETURN 

3 P=159:Q=159:PRINT@X,LEFT$ (X$,P 
) ; :EXEC44539:PRINT@Y,LEFT$ (Y$,Q) 
; : Z=RND ( 7 ) +1 : EXEC4 453 9 : CLSZ : RETU 
RN 

4 GOSUB2 : GOSUB3 : RETURN 

5 P=159:PRINT@X,LEFT$ (X$,P) ;:EXE 
C4 4 5 3 9 : CLS Z : RETURN 

7 PRINT@X, LEFT$ (X$ , P) ;:EXEC44539 
:PRINT@Y,MID$(Y$,Q,R) ; :EXEC44539 
: RETURN 

8 P=159:Q=P:PRINT@X,LEFT$ (X$,P) ; 
: PRINT@Y, LEFT$ ( Y$ , Q) ; : EXEC44539 : 
CLSZ: RETURN 

10 CLSZ:GOTO20 

20 X$=" CEI CARE ASCULT@ 1 NVA A @ 
ii 

21 Y$=" THOSE WHO LISTEN LEARN, 
it 

22 GOSUB3 

30 X$=" PUN O CARTE PE UN RAFT. 
ii 



52 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



CO 



te rware 




s Products 

dial 



C.E.O. 

The Complete 
Electronic Organizer 

by Warren Ulrich lit 

With the C.E.O. desktop software, your CoCo 
becomes your own personal administrative 
assistant. Screens show in an easy to read hires 
display with upper and lowercase. The icons (pic- 
tures for commands! make it simple and fun to 
use. 

Using the Date Book, you can keep track of 
special occasions, memos, and hourly notes that 
can be printed or displayed as a daily schedule, or 
for a whole week. The Calculator allows you to 
do quick computations. Let the accurate real-time 
Clock help keep you on time. It beeps every 
hour, and also has a convenient alarm that you 
can set to remind you of those important 
appointments. The Phone Directory can keep 
up to 194 entries of names and phone numbers. 
Instead of jotting down notes on small pieces of 
paper than can get lost, use the Freeform File 
Drawer to write messages. Your notes will be 
neatly organized and saved for instant retrieval. 

You can display or print any of your entries upon 
request. C.E.O.'s mini-formatter prints everything 
in an easy-to-read style. $49.95 

Requires 64K, at least one disk drive. 
Supports dual drives when available. 





Pro Golf 

by John Sandberg 



Tee off with this great simulation of America's 
most played sport. Pro Golf offers practice ses- 
sions on the Putting Green and the Driving Range 
before you go to play either the front or back nine. 
You'll face real situations like wind factor, lies in 
the rough or out-of-bounds, trees, water traps, 
and morel Pro Golf provides an entertaining 
challenge to the beginner as well as the pro, with 
36 holes to practice on. $29.95 

Requires 32K, Disk, Extended Bask 




Monitors 



NAP Monochrome Monitors 



The 20 mhz band width. 800 line resolution, and 
80 x 25 display insure a crisp picture. The non- 
glare screen and streamlined style is also attrac- 
tive. Plus— it has audio input. 
Green 12" Amber 12" $105.00 

plus $5 shipping 

SAKATA Color Monitor 

Beautiful 13" color display with 280 x 300 line 
resolution. Includes composite video color and 
audio. 

$175 plus $15 shipping 



Universal Video Plus 

composite video interface 
for all Color Computersl 

we would like you to look at our Universal 
Video Plus and would dare you to compare it 
with any other video interface, we feel confident 
that you will see that it is the best product and 
the best buy in CoCo monitor drivers ever! 

• The Universal Video Plus works with every 
CoCo. Easy-to-follow, clear Instructions 

are included. 

• All cables (audio & video} are included. No 
need to buy extenders or extra cables as 
required by other drivers. 

• Heavy duty construction, evidenced by 
sturdy leads and connectors. 

• Shielded audio & video cables insure that 
no extra RF interference is introduced from the 
Universal Video Plus, unlike other interfaces. 

• The adjustment pot on the Universal Video 
Plus makes it easy to optimize the video sig- 
nal for each computer. You don't have to mod- 
ify your computer to get good display! 

• Our advanced design gives the highest 
quality display. 

• Installation Is easy. There is no soldering 
and no dismantling of the RF shield. 





Treasure of the Aztecs 

by Scott Cabit 



You take a small force to search the jungles in 
hopes of finding the missing Treasure of the 
Aztecs. While following a faint trail, your team is 
ambushed by Aztec warriors. You awaken after 
the battle, alone and disoriented. Can you, a lone 
soldier, survive the perils of the jungle. . .and 
rediscover the Treasure of the Aztecs? 

This unique graphics adventure features special 
sound effects and four voice music. There are over 
50 hires graphic screens, and it allows use of the 
Radio Shack SSC Speech Cartridgel 

Requires 64K 

Cassette S24.95 Disk $27.95 




Escape : 2012 

by BJ Cham bless 



In the great tradition of outer space adventure, we 
present Escape: 2012. While on a mission for 
the United Earth Forces, you've been captured 
behind enemy lines. As a prisoner of war, you 
must escapel In this graphics adventure there are 
over 35 objects to deal with, 137 rooms arranged 
in a 3 dimensional maze of 4 levels to traverse, 
and at least 2 arcade sequences to master before 
you can proceed. The graphics and action are 
superbl Cassette $24.95 



Requires 64K 



Disk $27.95 



Universal Video Plus 



$34.95 



Computerware is a federally registered trademark of f rrqii ww.k 
Canadian distribution by Kelly Software, 
Box 11932, Edmonton, Alberta, T5J 3L1 



it* 



• pages of hardware 
• over 50 software products 
• informative articles & product reviews 



£#1 

T * • monitors, disk drives, modems, printers, joysticks, & more. 
• business applications, OS-9 software, personal productivity tools, 
games, & more 

send for our free catalog & get $3 off with this coupon. 




Call or Write to: 




COMPUTERWARE ® i*«h»-m« 

Box 668 • Encinltas, CA • 92024 



Name - 
Address 
City _ 



State 



Yesl Send me your FREE catalog! CoCo □ 

VISA MasterCard 

Card # _ — m Exp. 

Signature , ; _ 



Item 



Format 



Price 



Shipping 6% Calif. Sales Tax 

Surface — 52 minimum. COD Add $5 

2% for orders Over Si 00 Shipping* 
Air or Canada — S5 minimum. TOTAL 

5% for orders over $100 

Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



From Listing 2, list lines 70 and 71. 
Key in the lines as lines 80 and 81. Now 
list 80 and 81. Aside from the fact that 
the word order is different, the equiva- 
lent of "om" is "the man," not "man." 
This is a split-section. This creates a new 
problem that occurs frequently in Ger- 
man verbs. Note the sentence "Ich 
mache das fenster zu" where "zuma- 
chen," meaning "to shut," is split — 
"mache — zu." 

The definite article is separated from 
the noun in Line 81. Rather than work 
out both the inverted word order and 
the split-section at the same time, we 
solved one problem, and now well try 
both. 

Key in Line 9. This GD5UB displays 
X$ up to the break; Y$, to the first break 
at 'Q'; then it skips to a second location 
(Y+A+l) and pulls the balance out of 
the body of the sentence. 

G05UB9 handles the split-section in 
the second language. If you need it for 
the first language, your project is to 
modify this line. If you can't dream up 
a demo sentence to check it out, then 
make the contents of Line 80 Y$ and X$ 
in Line 8 1 . 

The T' value of "om" is five. The 'Q' 
value of "the" is six. Count to the last 



letter of the last word in front of the 
target "man," 11, which is 'A'. 4 B' is 
always the next space. B=12 and 'R' is 
the number of spaces to be displayed, 
six. 

Type 82 P=5:Q=G:fi=ll:B=12: 
R=6:G0SUBS, press ENTER. Run it and 
press BREAK. 

Figure out the next break, "crud"- 
"cruel," P=ll and Q=12. Edit Line 82, 
press X and ENTER, then type P=ll: 
0=12:. Since we already displayed the 
various parts in the last segment (lines 
70 through 72) let's cut the agony and 
finish. Type G0SUB4 and run it. 

As usual, there is an easier version of 
G05UB9, but it is not consistent with our 
rigid demo format. Lines 100 through 
142 contain a few more sentences. They 
are a bonus for the dedicated pro- 
grammer to study or work through for 
practice. 

You can delete lines 20 through 142 
and use this program as a core to 
translate sentences in some other lan- 
guage. This program is great for self- 
study. Crack open a conversational 
grammar and sharpen your program- 
ming skills while painlessly absorbing a 
foreign vocabulary. □ 



"killed." Type P=21:Q=34:GOSUB2:. 
Note that we pick up *Q' at number 32, 
the invisible vertical line. We won't run 
this one. 

We decide to put on "dushmanii" and 
"the enemy" next. The phrase, "f@r@ 
mil@" and "without pity" will be put on 
as a unit. That being our plan, we are 
alert to the fact that we are calculating 
the next to Jast T' and 'Q' values. We 
know that "dushmanii" is the last word 
on the row, so we use the right margin 
number, 31, or P=31. We pick up our 
count from the last 'Q' value in Line 72 
and count it out, 44. Type P=31 : 0=44 : 
G05UB4. Press ENTER and run. 

Checking out our handiwork, I see 
that we could have placed parentheses 
around "himself" because we don't 
usually use the reflexive pronoun in this 
context. You may want to alter Line 71 
to do so. Be warned, some of your 'Q' 
values will have to be revised. In fact, 
you should be eager to work it out. 
Refer to Listing 2, lines 71 and 72 to see 
if you got the same answer. It is not 
necessary to copy this listing. 

That was the good news. Now, here 
is the bad news. Lines 70 through 72 
present another problem that I neatly 
side-stepped. 

31 Y$= M I PUT A BOOK ON A SHELF 

r. 

32 GOSUB3 

40/ X$~" NE VOM DUCE M'INE DIMIN 
EA A @ • » 

41 Y$« ,f WE SHALL GO TOMORROW MO 
RNING." 

42 P=5 : Q=P : GOSUB2 : P=9 : Q=ll ; GOSUB 
2 : P=14 : Q=*P: GOSUB2 : P=20 : Q-23 : GOSU 

50 X$=» PE GEORGE 'L DOARE CAPU 
Ii. ":GOSUB5 

51 Y$= fl AS FOR GEORGE , HE HURTS 
THE HEAD . 1 • : GOSUB8 

52 Y$=" GEORGE (HE) HAS A HEADA 
CHE. 11 : GOSUB3 

-53i P=12:Q=9:GOSUB4 

60 X$=" DOMNITORUL VLAD A EPE$ S 
E URC@PE TRONUL A ARII ROM'NE$TI 
»N AN-UL 1436 $1 »NCERC@ S@ SCAP 
E A ARADE TURCI. " 

61 Y$=*» THE RULER, VLAD TSEPESH 
r AS- CENDED TO THE THRONE OF WA 
LLA- CHIA IN THE YEAR 1436 AND 
TRIED TO FREE THE COUNTRY FROM T 
HE TURKS. " 

62 Y=Y+64 : P=24 : Q=27 : GOSUB2 : P=31 : 
Q=38 : GOSUB2 : P«4 1 : Q=52 : GOSUB2 : P=5 
7 : Q=68:GOSUB2: P=7 1 : Q=8 5 : GOSUB2 : P 
=82: Q=95 : GOSUB2 : P=9 1 : Q=103 : GOSUB 



2 : P=95 : Q=115 : GOSUB4 

70 X$=" OM CRUD, f $I UCISE DU$M 
ANII F@R@ MIL§. 11 

71 Y$=" THE CRUEL MAN, HIMSELF, 

KILL-ED THE ENEMY WITHOUT PITY. 
ii 

72 Y=225:P=5 : Y=Y+11 : Q=12 : R=6 : GOS 
UB7 : Y=Y-11 : P=ll : Q=12 : GOSUB2 : P=15 
: Q=2 6 : GOSUB2 : P=2 1 : Q=3 4 : GOSUB2 : P= 
31:Q=44:GOSUB4 

990 ! GOTO990 

999 CLSZ:PRINT@10," REPEATING.. 
" ; : FOR S=l TO 10 00 : NEXT : GOTO 2 j3 

Listing 2: LPNGTUT2 

0 'LISTINGS 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO10 

2 PRINT@X r LEFT$ (X$ , P) ; :EXEC44539 
: PRINT@Y, LEFT$ (Y$ , Q) ; : EXEC44539 : 
RETURN 

3 P=159:Q=159:PRINT@X,LEFT$(X$,P 
) ; : EXEC44539 : PRINT @ Y , LEFT $ (Y$ , Q) 
; : Z=RND(7)+1:EXEC44539 : CLSZ :RETU 
RN 

4 GOSUB2:GOSUB3: RETURN 

5 P=159 : PRINT @ X , LE FT $ ( X $ , P) ; : EXE 
C44539 : CLSZ .-RETURN 

7 PRINT@X,LEFT$(X$,P) ; :EXEC44539 



54 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



:PRINT@Y,MID$ (Y$,Q,R) ; :EXEC44539 
: RETURN 

8 P=159:Q=P:PRINT@X,LEFT$ (X$,P) ; 
: PRINTS Y,LEFT$ (Y$,Q) ; :EXEC44539: 
CLSZ: RETURN 

9 PRINT§X,LEFT$(X$,P) ; :EXEC44539 
:PRINT@Y,LEFT$ (Y$,Q) ; :PRINT@Y+A, 
MID$ (Y$, B,R) ,* : EXEC44539: RETURN 

10 CLSZ:G0T02J3 

2^f X$=" CEI CARE ASCULT@ 1 NVA A @ 
ii 

21 Y$=" THOSE WHO LISTEN LEARN, 
if 

22 GOSUB3 

3j3 X$=" PUN 0 CARTE PE UN RAFT. 
ii 

31 Y$=" I PUT A BOOK ON A SHELF 
ii 

. 

32 GOSUB3 

4j3 X$=" NE VOM DUCE M'INE DIMIN 
EA A @ . " 

41 Y$=" WE SHALL GO TOMORROW MO 
RNING." 

42 P=5:Q=P:GOSUB2:P=9:Q=ll:GOSUB 
2 : P=14 : Q=P : GOSUB2 : P=2 J3 : Q=2 3 : GOSU 
B4 

5j3 X$=" PE GEORGE 'L DOARE CAPU 
L. ":GOSUB5 

51 Y$=" AS FOR GEORGE, HE HURTS 



THE HEAD . " : GOSUB8 

52 Y$=" GEORGE (HE) HAS A HEADA 
CHE. " : GOSUB3 

53 P=12 :Q=9:GOSUB4 

6J3 X$=" DOMNITORUL VLAD A EPE$ S 
E URC@PE TRONUL A ARII ROM ' NE$TI 
'N AN-UL 143 6 $1 'NCERC@ S@ SCAP 
E A ARADE TURCI . " 

61 Y$=" THE RULER, VLAD TSEPESH 
, AS- CENDED TO THE THRONE OF WA 
LLA- CHIA IN THE YEAR 143 6 AND 
TRIED TO FREE THE COUNTRY FROM T 
HE TURKS . " 

62 Y=Y+64:P=24:Q=27:GOSUB2:P=31: 
Q=3 8 : GOSUB2 : P=4 1 : Q=52 : GOSUB2 : P=5 
7 : Q=68 : GOSUB2 : P=71 : Q=85 : GOSUB2 : P 
=8 2 : Q=9 5 : GOSUB2 : P=91: Q=lj33 : GOSUB 
2 : P=95 : Q=115 : GOSUB4 

7J3 X$=" OM CRUD, • $1 UCISE DU$M 
ANII F@R@ MIL@. " 

71 Y$=" THE CRUEL MAN, (HIMSELF 
) , KILLED THE ENEMY WITHOUT P 
ITY. " 

72 Y=225:P=5:Y=Y+ll:Q=12:R=6:GOS 
UB7 : Y=Y-11 : P=ll : Q=12 : GOSUB2 : P=15 
: Q=2 8 : GOSUB2 : P=2 1 : Q=3 8 : GOSUB2 : P= 
31:Q=48:GOSUB4 

8j3 X$=" OM CRUD, »$I UCISE DU$M 
ANII F@R@ MIL@. " 




Authorized Star Micronics Service Center * Cafl for return authorization number. 

THE WAITING IS OVER! 

THE SUPER COSMOS CONNECTION 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTER WITH BUFFER! 

YOU JUST CANT BUY A BETTER 
SERIAL/PARALLEL CONVERTER! 

ORDER YOURS TODAY 
- 8K SUPER COSMOS CONNECTION 

ONLY $129.95 



8K RAM CHIP SOLD SEPARATELY - $15.95 each 

3 FOR $42.95 

16K VERSION -$144.95 
24K VERSION -$154.95 
32K VERSION -$169.95 




• SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERSION 

• 1 10 TO 19,200 BAUD, 7 OR 8 BIT 

• 8K BYTES STANDARD BUFFER 
(USER EXPANDABLE TO 32K IN 8K STEPS) 

• COPY/CLEAR, LED PUSH BUTTON (MULTIPLE COPIES) 

• MODEM SWITCH AND ALL CABLES 

• COMPLETE WITH POWER PAK AND SIMPLE INSTRUCTIONS 

• WORKS WITH ANY PARALLEL PRINTER OR YOUR MONEY BACK 

• HIGHEST QUALITY CONSTRUCTION, TWO-YEAR WARRANTY 

IF YOU'D RATHER BE USING YOUR COMPUTER THAN WAITING 



TEST RESULTS: (19,056 BYTE PROGRAM 

LISTING AT 9600 BAUD.) 



32K SUPER COS-CON 

36.8 Seconds 



OTHER INTERFACE 

4 min. 59.8 sec. 




NO SURCHARGE FOR 
CREDIT CARDS 



m 






m 


Cuds y 



8K SUPER COSMOS CONNECTION 
AND STAR SG-10 PRINTER 

$379.00 Package S&H Included! 



Reviewed in Dec. 1985 Rainbow 
Shipping Included! 



Dealer Inquiries on Company Letterhead invited. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 55 



81 Y$=" THE CRUEL MAN, (HIMSELF 
) , KILLED THE ENEMY WITHOUT P 
ITY. " 

82 P=5:Q=6:A=ll:B=12:R=6:GOSUB9: 

P=ll:Q=12:GOSUB4 

100 PRINT @ 5 , "THE REST OF THE ST 
ORY "; 

101 X$=" PE MUL A I 'I A RASE 'N A 
EAP@ . " 

102 Y$=" MOST OF THEM, (THEM) H 
E IM- PALED. w 

103 P=ll:Q=16:GOSUB2:P=14:Q=23:G 

OSUB4 

110 X$=" DE ACEEA FU PORECLIT V 
LAD A EPE$ SAU VLAD DRACUL. " 

111 Y$=" BECAUSE OF THIS HE WAS 
NICK- NAMED VLAD THE IMPALER OR 
VLAD THE DEVIL. " 

112 P=ll : Q=18 : GOSUB2 : P=14 : Q=25 : G 
OSUB2 : P=2 3 : Q=3 7 : GOSUB2 : P=3 7 : Q=54 
:GOSUB4 

120 X$=" MAI T'RZIU, 'N SECOLUL 
XIX, UN SCRIITOR BRITANIC BRAM 
STOKERSCRISE ROMANUL DRACULA CA 

RE SE PETRECEA 'N TRANS ILVANIA. 



ii 



121 Y$ 
H CEN- 

RAM 



-ii 



MUCH LATER, IN THE 19T 
TURY, A BRITISH WRITER, B 
STOKER, WROTE THE NOVEL, 



'DRA- CULA 1 , WHICH TOOK PLACE I 
N TRAN-SYLVANIA. " 
122 Y=Y+64:P=14:Q=P:GOSUB2:P=31: 
Q=3 7 : GOSUB2 : P=4 3 : Q=3 9 : A=4 6 : B=47 : 

R=9 : GOSUB9 : P=52 : Q=47 : GOSUB2 : P=63 

: Q=71 : GOSUB2 : P=70 : Q=77 : GOSUB2 : P= 

86 : Q=102 : GOSUB2 : P=91 : Q=108 : GOSUB 
2 : P=104 : Q=119 : GOSUB4 

130 X$=" ACEST SCRIITOR C@L@TOR 
I 'N TRAN S I LVAN I A $1 AUZI DE V 
LAD DRACUL. " 

131 Y$=" THIS WRITER TRAVELED I 
N TRAN-SYLVANIA AND HEARD ABOUT 
VLAD THE DEVIL. " 

132 Y=225:P=17:Q=14:GOSUB2:P=26: 

Q=2 3 : GOSUB2 : P=4 4 : Q=4 0 : GOSUB2 : P=5 
5:Q=56:GOSUB4 

140 X$=" DUP@ AL C§RUI NUME ALE 
SE TITLUL ROMANULUI S@U. » 

141 Y$=" ACCORDING TO WHOSE NAM 
E HE CHOSE AS THE TITLE OF HIS 

NOVEL . " 

142 P=7:Q=15:GOSUB2:P=16:Q=21:GO 
SUB2 : P=2 1 : Q=2 6 : GOSUB2 : P=3 1 : Q=3 7 : 
G0SUB2 : P=3 8 : Q=50 : GOSUB2 : P=48 : Q=5 
3 : A=5 6 : B=57 : R=7 : GOSUB9 : GOSUB3 
990 'GOTO990 

999 CLSZ: PRINT 11 REPEATING.. 
";:FOR S=l TO l^ffi: NEXT: GOTO 20 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is sent second class 
mail. If you do not receive your copy by the 5th 
of the month of the publication date, send us a card 
and we will mail another. Canadian subscribers 
and foreign airmail allow two additional weeks. 

You must notify us of a new address when you 
move. Notification should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to the month in which 
you change your address. Sorry, we cannot be 
responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an "account 
number" and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 





0 




THE RAINBOW'S 

One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
^^■pr means a new dimension and new 
^^^^^ opportunity for those who have "really 
J^^neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 

Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 






56 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



. . . of everything. 



Accessories can make the differ- 
ence between just a computer and 
an efficient computer system. That's 
why Radio Shack offers a wide se- 
lection of accessories that make the 
most of your Color Computer. 

Save valuable time with the 
Multi-Pak Interface (A, $99.95). It 
connects up to four Program Pak™ 
cartridges so you can change pro- 
grams quickly and easily. You can 
change between slots with the 
built-in selector switch, or under 
program control. 

If you like being a winner, then 
this is the fast-action joystick for 
you! With 360° movement and 
single-shot control, these joysticks 
give you the advantage every time 
(B, Fair-$ 19.95). 



With our FD-501 Thinline Disk 
Kit (C, $299.95) you can turn your 
Color Computer with Extended 
BASIC into a full-fledged disk sys- 
tem. Because the Kit comes com- 
plete and ready to run — all you 
have to do is plug it in and you'll 
have 156,672 characters of user 
storage per 5 1 U ff diskette. 

Need the ultimate in storage ca- 
pabilities? Then the Hard Disk 
Interface (not shown, $129.95) can 
give you just that. 

Want quick and accurate control? 
Let our Color Mouse (D, $49.95) 
scurry across your tabletop to accu- 
rately position the computer's cur- 
sor movement. 

Radio Shack has the right acces- 
sories for your Color Computer! 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 





1 

s 

1 



Send me an RSC-17 Computer Catalog. 



Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-22 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



I 
■ 

I 

■ 

I 

-1 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating 
Radio Shack stores and dealers. Components pictured with 
accessories not included. 



GAME 



32K 
ECB 



Is your skill and courage enough to 
save the Earth from . . . 



Can he 
for IfiK ECU 



The Evil Tyrant 



5tar Lord 



\ Jou are the last hope 

people. Ever since s hose <Jfe#tfe4 

I aliens aifivtittj they have Ca^ie^ ; 
nothing but destruction. Ybii to^ 
uommand of the last surface laser 'i$$r 
non, You must use this powerful 
pon to destroy the merciless attackers. 
If you fail, the tyrant Star Lord will 
enslave your people, It's up to you! 

You must position the laser turret and 
try to hit the attacking alien ship, If the 
alien ship hits you with one of its bullets, 
you lose one shield. At the beginning of 
Star lord you have three shields. An 
indicator in the top right-hand corner of 
the screen displays the last three shields 
you have, (It is possible to ititiM. 
than three shields, but only the last tH^I 
are indicated.) 

The Hat land on which yow turret 
moves ("the yellow strip of land) protects 
you from incoming bullets. However, 
alien ships slowly destroy tft^(%pt^i 
below as they descend toward th£ |>0t^ 
torn of the screen. If you collide with 
one of the aliens, you lose a shield. 



Raju Dash is a senior at Downers Grove 

North High School in $Uinois> fie 
started programming irt BASIC OH <t 4K 
Color Computer five years age ptitf Hw 
progressed to progromm ing in assembly 
language on a 64 K Co Co 2. 



By Raju Dash 



order to advance to the next skill level, 
you must destroy one full squadron (16 
ships). You are rewarded with a shield. 

The screen clears and a new, flicker- 
ing type of ship starts descending to- 
ward the ground, ft is important that it 
be shot before it reaches the ground, If 
it lands, you will not advance to the next 
skill level: rather you will have to fight 
another squadron from the same skill 
level. The number of ships and the^pced 
of the game increases as the skilf level 
increases, 

When you lose all of your shields, the 
program displays the title screen. At the 
lop of the screen, the high score is 
displayed, and at the bottom right, the 
most recent score is shown. At the 
bottom left is the current skill level, 
Unless the Reset button is pressed, you 
continue playing from the skill level on 
which you died. This way you do not 
have to repeat the screens you com- 
pleted before. While the program run5 T 
you may pause execution by pressing 
the BREAK key, To restart press ENTER. 

The program allows either joystick or 
keyboard input, Simply press T or S K' 
from Hie title screen to make a selection. 
If you choose the joystick option, use 
the right joystick to move and the 
button to fire. For the keyboard option t 
use the left- and right-arrow keys to 
'•nl4$t an ^ the space bar to fire. 




THE RAINBOW August 1906 



Radio Shack's Color Computer T 

Si«/EON 
OUR BEST ! 



64K Memory! Extended BASIC! 
Cut $ 40...new low price $ 159.95 



The Color Computer 2 is an af- 
fordable computer that allows you 
to write programs tailored to your 
personal and household needs. It's 
ideal for small-business and pro- 
fessional uses alike. With the 
built-in Extended BASIC lan- 
guage, you can access 32,000 
characters of memory. To access 
the full 64K memory, simply add a 



disk drive and the optional OS-9 
disk operating system. 

The powerful Color Computer 2 
(26-3127, was 199.95 in Cat. RSC- 
16) creates detailed color graphics 
from simple, one-line commands, 
and is ideal for drawings, designs, 
charts, engineering diagrams and 
even animation! 



P L 1 



CHAMBER 0 




9. 09 



Ready-to-run software can help 
you set up personal and house- 
hold budgets, create a household 
inventory, keep track of your in- 
vestments, write letters and re- 
ports and record recipes. 

With a wide range of educa- 
tional software available, your 
children can use the Color Com- 
puter 2 to help strengthen their 
math, spelling and reading skills. 
The family can even play exciting 
computer games. The system 
attaches to any TV and is easily 
expanded. 

Get the Color Computer 2 and 
your family will immediately start 
to enjoy the advantages of home 
computing . . . together! 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store' 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



501 



135 






I 



Send me a new 
RSC-17 Computer Catalog 

Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-22A | 
300 One Tandy Cemer, Fort Worth, Texas 76102 



Name 



Company , 
Address „ 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Telephone 



I 

1 

: ■ 
■ 

J 



TV not included. Price applies at Radio Shack Computer 
Centers and at participating Radio Shack stores and dealers. 
0S-9/TM Microware and Motorola. 



Alter typing in the BASIC loader for 
Starlord, save it to disk or tape. Then 
perform a cold start on your computer. 
Type in POKE 25, 57; POKE 14592, 
0 : NEN to reserve room for the as- 
t sembled program. Now CLORD the 
BASIC loader back into the computer. If 
you want w save the program as a 
binary filc T delete Line 50. Run the 
program. In approximately 30 seconds 
the program will execute. If you deleted 
Line 50, the computer simply prints OK 
when it is finished poking the data into 
memory. Now you can save it. Type CSR 
VEfTSTFlRLDRD", 18240, 14430, 121 
74 to save the program as a binary file. 



Now all you have to do is CLDRDM and 
EXECute to run the program. The pro- 
gram runs on any Color Computer with 
32K memory. Since the assembled ver- 
sion will run on a 16K system, the 
easiest way to load the program would 
be to make a binary file of it on a 32K 
system and then load the machine 
language code on the I6K system. (The 
BASIC loader takes up a little over 16K.) 
Another, more tedious method, would 
be to break the loader up into several 
short BASIC loaders, each loading a part 
of the total program. Then, once the 
entire program has been poked into 
memory, it can be saved as a binary file. 



This process is tricky, so be cautious. 

Stariord is a very exciting game 
particulary at the higher skill levels 
Here's a tip: A bullet takes longer to hi 
a ship that is higher up so you must fin 
in advance of the ship in order to hit it 
Hitting ships becomes easier at th< 
higher skill levels because the entire 
game executes faster. I will be happy t< 
answer any questions that may arise 
Have fun! 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to Mr. Dash at 1490 Golden 
BellCL, Downers Grove, IL605I5.312- 
960-0428. Please enclose an SA SE whert 
writing.) □ 



■'.SI* 




.•■■V V. \ 



180 r . 


1 1 . » 34 


1650 .. 


* * . . 76 


2830 . 


.,162 


4340 , 


...44 


370 . . 


.. 153 


1760 , 


.198 


2980 . . 


... * . 5 


4490 , . 


...169 


560 . . 


...161 


1850 .. 


...161 


3130 . . 


...213 


4700 .... 


. . . . .1 


740 .. 


. •■ » .. . 55 


1950 


*'«,#•». .0 


3280 . . 


. . . 63 


4870 . . 


..122 


870 ..i 


...134 


2060 7. 


...236 


3430 


...126 


5020 . . 


• 254 


1080 . 


, , , 67 


2160 .. 


...126 


3590 .. 


...216 


5170 .. 


...165 


1210 . 


*••«"•'•#•' .33 


2260 . . 


...144 


3740 . . 


... .48 


END . . 


. . 149 


1330 .. 


...167 


2360 . . 


,152 


3890 . . 


.,154 






1430 , . 


.,*197 


2530 . . 


...■119 


4040 . . 


...115 






1530 . 


; .234 


2680 .. 


...222 


4190 -U 


. ' . '•»-: . 1. 7 







The listing: STBRL0R0 .. 

i ' . ,"V ., • • : ' 



5 ^^basic loader for StarLord 
7 1 be sure to POKE 2 5 ,57 before 

i 




10 FOR 1= 10240 TO 144 30 

20 READ X 

30 POKE I,Xl«P i: ' 

40 NEXT I 

50 EXEC 12174 

60 DATA 32,33,35,37,39,41,43,45 
70 DATA 46,48,50,51,53,54,55,57 
80 DATA 58,59,60,60,61,62,62,63 
DATA 63,63,63,63,63,63,62,62 



1 100 


DATA 


61, 


60, 


,60, 


,59, 


,58, 


,57, 


,56, 


,55 


110 


DATA 


54, 


53, 


,51, 


,50, 


,49, 


,48, 


,46, 


,45 


120 


DATA 


44 , 


43, 


,41, 


,40, 


,39, 


,38, 


,37, 


,35 


130 


DATA 


34, 


33, 


,32, 


,32, 


,31, 


-30, 


,29, 


,29 


1 14^3 


DATA 


28, 


28, 


,28, 


,27, 


,27, 


,27, 


,27, 


,27 


150 




27 , 


,27, 


,28, 


,28, 


,28, 


,29, 


,29, 


,30 


160 


DATA 


30, 


,31, 


,32, 


,32, 


,33, 


,34, 


,35, 


,36 


170 




36, 


,37, 


,38 , 


,39, 


,39, 


,40, 


,41, 


,42 


180 


DATA 


42, 


,43, 


,43, 


,44, 


'44, 


,45, 


,45, 


, 45 


190 


DATA 


45, 


,45, 


,45, 


,45, 


,45, 


r45, 


,45, 


,45 


200 DATA 44, 


,44, 


,43 i 


,43, 


,42, 


,41, 


,41, 


,40 


210 


DATA 


39, 


38, 


,37, 


,36, 


,35, 


,35, 


,34, 


,33 


220 


DATA 


32, 


,30, 


,29, 


,28, 


,28, 


,27, 


,26, 


,25 


230 


DATA 24, 


23, 


,22 , 


,22, 


.21, 


-20, 


-20, 


,19 


240' 


DATA 


19, 


, 18 , 


,18, 


1. 18 ^ 


,18, 


,18, 


,18, 


,18 


1 K'- '"'W 


DATA 


X8 f 






,18, 


,19, 


,19, 


-20, 


,20 



260 
270 


DATA 21,21,22 
DATA 27,27,28 


,23 ,24, 
,29,30, 


2 4 , 25 
31 , 3 1 


, 2 6 
,32 


280 
290 
300 


DATA 33,33,34 
DATA 36,36,36 
DATA 35,34,34 
DATA 29,28,26 


,34, 35, 
,36,36, 
,33,32, 


35,35 
36,35 
31 , 3 1 


,36 
,35 
,30 


310 
320 
330 


DATA 19,18,17 
DATA 9,8,7,6, 


, 25,24, 
,15,14, 
5 1 4 f 3 j 3 


23,22 
13,12 

. ■ ' ■ 


,20 
,10 


340 
350 
360 


DATA 2,1,1,0, 
DATA 0,0,1,1, 
DATA 5,6,8,9, 


P, 0,0,0 
2,3 / 3 f At 

1^3 f 12 / 1 


3,15 






60 



THE RAINBOW August 1 9B6 



**4 V"V **** 

370 


DATA 


17/ 


mm 4% 

18 j 


jffek jW 

r 20 , 


22, 


,24, 


26 


,28, 


,30 


960 


DATA 


1,^,^,0,0,0,0,0 






380 


M^ M, BM M. 

DATA 


A jm 

32 , 


3 4 j 


A MM 

r 37, 


JjJk M. 

39, 


,42, 


44 


,46, 


,48 


mmm MM Mjt 

97p 


DATA 0,0/0/1,1,1, 


1,2 






390 


*m. mmm «» 

DATA 


mm W 


M jM. 

52 j 


MS Jl 

r 54, 


56, 


,57, 


59 


,60, 


,61 


Mmm, mmm) 

980 


DATA 


2,3,3,4,4,5, 


5,6 






4 rt mi 

400 


W •* MM «ft 

DATA 


62, 


4* Mv 

62 / 


p 63 , 


63, 


, 63 , 


63 


, 63, 


,62 


990 


DATA 


7,7,8,9,10,11,12,13 




M mm mmd 

410 


DATA 


62 , 


61, 


r 60 , 


59, 


,58, 


57 


,56, 


,55 


1000 


DATA 


14,15,16,17 


, lo , 19 


,20 


,2 


420 


V»j. «* *mmn *m 

DATA 


54, 


52 i 


r51, 


50, 


,48, 


47 


,46, 


,44 


1 










430 


DATA 


43, 


42 , 


r41, 


40, 


,39, 


38 


,38, 


, 37 


1010 


i^ri X tm 


OO 0*5 *5>l 


, 2 7., 28 


,29 


,3 


440 


m. mmm pmm «» 

DATA 


36, 


Jk .M 

36, 


j*Jl -mm> 

-36, 


35, 


, 35> 


35 


, 3 5 , 


.35 














Jl JIM W 

45)3 


DATA 


35, 


35, 


,35, 


35, 


35, 


35 


,35, 


,36 


1020 


UjH.1 jfi 


32/32/33,34 


/35/35 


,36 


,3 


j ^ w 
460 


DATA 


36, 


36, 


r 36, 


36, 


,36, 


37 


, 37, 


, 37 


7 












«J JMB. — » 

470 


DATA 


37, 


37; 


,37, 


37, 


. 37, 


37 


, 3 6 , 


,36 


1030 

;3^ : "V 


Utm ± jM 


*5Q <3D «J'ft >l /5( 

j o , «j o , j y , *kjo 


, 41,41 


,42 


,4 


480 


Mk mm (mm Mj 

DATA 


a ' m mm 

36, 


36, 


. 36, 


36, 


.36, 


35 


- mmmm. 

, 35, 


,35 










490 


DATA 


35, 


35, 


,35, 


34 1 


34/ 


34 


,34, 


,34 


1040 


HATA 


A A. A A AK AC 


,46,47 


,48 


,4 


W jW 

500 


V"Ja. M. mmj mi 

DATA 


A Jl 

34, 


A ji 

34, 


JO* Jl 

.34, 


34, 


34, 


34 


, 34, 


, 34 


8 












510 


DATA 


34, 


34, 


, 34, 


34, 


,34, 


34 


, 34, 


,34 


1050 


DATA 

UjM X x\ 


*tm7 f OjO , O JO O X 


, O J. , D#£ 


, 3 J 


,5 


JIM M* Mlmt 

520 


DATA 


34, 


34, 


, 34 f 


34, 


34, 


34 


,34, 


34 


; 3l,v 








mmm -+m <W 

530 


m^k. mm mmwrnm «m 

DATA 


33, 


33 , 


Ma, a' 

, 33 , 


jk A 

33 , 


33., 


32 


t 3 2 , 


32 


1060 


DATA 

UilX A 


K/ ca RR 


,30/00 


, 3 / 


,5 


540 


DATA 


32, 


31, 


■ 31/ 


31, 


mmm mmm* 

,30, 


- — ' 

30 


,30, 


30 


7 












550 


DATA 


30, 


29, 


,29, 


29, 


29/ 


29 


,29, 


29 


1070 


DATA 


KQ RQ RQ CO 
JO , 3D ; 3 7/3 7 


f Dzf f O jO 


, OJ0 


,6 


MM MI Jht 

560 


DATA 


29, 


29, 


,29, 


29, 


29, 


29, 


1 29 , 


29 


0 








570 


DATA 


29, 


29, 


,29, 


29, 


29, 


29 


,29, 


29 


1080 


DATA 

UCm Jm 41 


fil fil fil 

ox, ox, ox, ox 


f Omm , 0«2 




,6 


580 


DATA 


29, 


29, 


,29, 


29, 


,29, 


29 


,28, 


,28 


2 












590 


DATA 


28, 


28, 


,28, 


28, 


, 2 7/ 


27 


,27, 


,27 


1090 


DATA 


fio fi'i #sa 

O jC , O J , DJ / OJ 


6 3 63 
, O J , oo ' 


63 

f O J 


,6 


600 


DATA 


2 7 , 


27, 


,27, 


26, 


,26, 


2 6 


,26, 


,26 


3 












610 


DATA 


26, 


26, 


26, 


26, 


27/ 


27 


,27, 


27 


1100 


DATA 

mJt\ Jm £m 


f.*K f.*\ fi^ fi^ 


63 63 
I o o , o o 


63 
^ OJ 


,6 


620 


DATA 


27, 


27, 


,28, 


28, 


28, 


28 


,28, 


28 


3 












630 


DATA 


28, 


28, 


,28, 


28, 


28, 


28 


,27, 


27 


1110 


DATA 


0«3 , P 4 / O Z , 0 *s 


, O jC , OX 


A 1 
f o X 


,6 


640 


DATA 


27, 


26, 


,25, 


25, 


24, 


23 


,22, 


21 


1 












650 


DATA 


20, 


19, 


, 17, 


16, 


15, 


13 


,12, 


,11 


1120 


HATA 


ox., o^c/, \j)u i \jyj 


, J? , 3 


f 3 -7 


,5 


_ — — « 

660 


DATA 


9,8 


,7, 


,6,5 


1,4, 


3 ,2 


J 






8 












670 


DATA 


1/1,0, 


0/0,0, 


0,3 








1130 


DATA 


58 57 57 56 


. 56 55 

/ V. W p- mm* mj 


55 

1 mm* mm* 


,5 


680 


DATA 


1,2 


,3, 


,4,6 


',7, 


? ,3 


.1 






4 












69JZS 


DATA 


13, 


15, 


,17, 


19, 


,21/ 


24 


,26, 


,29 


1140 


DATA 

i— 'i* X Cm 


KA K'l KO 


51 51 

, 3 X , 3 X 


f 3J0 


, 5 


700 


DATA 


32, 


33, 


,34, 


35, 


36/ 


37 


,39, 


,40 


0 












710 


DATA 


41, 


42, 


43/ 


44, 


,45/ 


46 


,47, 


,48 


1150 


DATA 

UCm X i7\ 


A Q AO AO A 7 


A6 A 6 


A5 


t 4 


72^ 


DATA 


49, 


50, 


,51, 


52, 


53/ 


54 


,55, 


,56 


4 












73^ 


DATA 


56, 


57, 


,58, 


58, 


,59, 


59 


,60, 


,60 


1160 


DATA 




Al A0 
, ft x. , ft/; 


3Q 


,3 


740 


DATA 


61, 


61, 


, 62 , 


62, 


, 62 , 


62 


,63, 


,63 


8 












750 


DATA 


63, 


63, 


,63, 


63, 


, 63, 


63 


,63, 


,63 


1170 


DATA 

LJCm X J?* 


3 8 37 36 35 


35 . 3A 


33 

W mj %J 


,3 


760 


DATA 


62, 


62, 


,62, 


62, 


,61, 


61 


,61, 


, 60 


2 












11$ 


DATA 


60, 


59, 


,59, 


58, 


,58, 


57 


,57, 


,56 


1180 


DATA 

tm*mVm X 47* 


32 31 30.29 

•a/ J-< f mj m\m , *^ X/ f mm mV 


,28.28 

, mm \m* f mm \J 


. 27 

f Am I 


,2 


18$ 


DATA 


56, 


55, 


,54, 


54, 


,53, 


52 


,52, 


,51 


6 












19$ 


DATA 


50, 


50, 


,49, 


48, 


,48, 


47 


,46, 


,46 


1190 


DATA 

JL/A A X JTJt 


25 .25 24.23 


. 22 22 

, mm Ct f *m & 


. 21 
/ 


, 2 


800 


DATA 


45, 


44, 


r44, 


43, 


,42, 


42 


,41, 


,41 


<M* 

P 










• 


810 


DATA 


40, 


39, 


r 39, 


38, 


,38, 


37 


,37, 


,37 


mm — mmt -mm* 


DATA 

km* Cm mm JTJ> 


1 q no 1 A 1 7 

X «7 , X -7 , X O , X / 


17 16 


1 5 

/ -*-3 


,1 


820 


DATA 


36, 


36, 


,35, 


35 , 


,35, 


34 


,34, 


,3 4 






.... . ,■ '.'i;, 








830 


DATA 


33, 


33, 


r 33, 


33, 


,33> 


32 


,32, 


,32 


121j3 


DATA 

x jti 


1 A 1 3 13 12 


12 1 1 

, 14 /XX 


1 0 


,1 


84/3 


DATA 


32, 


32 , 


,32, 


32, 


,32, 


32 


, 32, 


,31 


mjV 












850 


DATA 


31, 


31, 


r 3 1 , 


31, 


,31, 


31 


,31, 


,31 


1220 


DATA 

LJ£m X A 


Q Q O Q 7 7 


6 6 
, o , o 






860 


DATA 


32, 


32 , 


, 32 , 


32, 


, 3 2, 


32 


, 32 , 


,32 


1230 


HATA 


5 , 5 , 4 , 4 ,4,3 


3 3 






81$ 


DATA 


32, 


32 , 


,31, 


31, 


,31, 


31 


,31, 


,31 


1240 


DATA 

LJ£m X J7J> 


2 2 2 2 11 

jC , jC , j£ , jC , X. , _L 


1 1 






88$ 


DATA 


31, 


31 , 


r 31/ 


31, 


-30, 


30 


,30, 


r30 


1250 


DATA 

kJCm X JTA 


1.0.0.0.0.0 


.0.0 






89$ 


DATA 


30, 


29, 


r 29, 


29, 


,28, 


,28 


,28, 


,27 


M MX -mm M>t 

1260 


DATA 


0,0,0,0,0,0 


,P,$ 






9$$ 


DATA 


27, 


26, 


,26/ 


26, 


,25, 


25 


,24, 


,24 


127j3 


DATA 

m/ m A «JU m jV 


1,1,1,1,1,2 


,2,2 






91$ 


DATA 


23, 


22, 


,22, 


21, 


,21, 


,20 


,19, 


r 19 


M - — — « 

128J3 


DATA 


2 / 3, 3 /3 / 4 ,4 


,4/5 






92$ 


DATA 


18, 


17, 


rl7, 


16, 


rl5, 


,15 


, 14, 


,13 


mm — — - - 

1290 


DATA 


5,6,6,7,7,8 
9,10, 10 , 11 , 


,8/9 






92$ 


DATA 


13, 


12, 


,11, 


11, 




9, 


9,8 




M Jk Mjf ^jf 

1300 


DATA 


12/12, 


13/ 


M M* 

13 


940 


DATA 

mm* Em X JTj> 


7 / 7 


r /6 


,6,S 


>,5, 




L 

f 






1310 


DATA 


14,15,15,16 


,17,17 


,18 


, 1 
/ 


95$ 


DATA 


3,3 


,2, 


,2,2 


1,1, 


rl/] 


i' 






9 













August 1986 THE RAINBOW 61 



132)3 DATA 
5 

13 30 DATA 
1 

134) 3 DATA 
55 

135) 3 DATA 
5 

136) 3 DATA 

137) 3 DATA 
16,237 

138) 3 DATA 
,76,237 

139) 3 DATA 
,238,14)3 
14)3)3 DATA 
55,6 

141) 3 DATA 
,1)3)3 

142) 3 DATA 
4)3,192 

143) 3 DATA 
237 

144) 3 DATA 
89,79 
1450 DATA 
,167,237 
146)3 DATA 
,142,0 



19,2)3,21,22,22,23,24,2 

25,26,27,28,28,29,3)3,3 

)3, 255,0, 255,75, 255, )3, 2 

0,255,0,255,0,255,0,25 

0,255,0,255,0,255,0,52 
112,48,141,251,227,31, 

140,222,76,237,140,223 

140, 224,76,237,140,225 

228,134,63,183,255,35, 

16, 131,255,255, 16, 39,0 

237,140, 192 ,55,6,237,1 

55,6,237, 140,192,55,6, 

140,192,55,2, 167,140,1 

95, 237,140,165,237,140 

140 ,169 , 237 , 140 , 171 , 16 



1470 DATA 
,171,152 
1480 DATA 
5,183 
1490 DATA 

,1 

1500 DATA 
11 

1510 DATA 
16,227 
1520 DATA 
3,39 

1530 DATA 
17,38 
1540 DATA 
4,250 
1550 DATA 
1560 DATA 
1570 DATA 
1580 DATA 
1590 DATA 
1600 DATA 
1610 DATA 
1620 DATA 
1,250 
1630 DATA 
13 

1640 DATA 
210 



107,48,140,148,166,148 
5, 171, 152,10 , 171 , 152 , 1 
255,32,23 6,1,227,3,237 
23 6,6,227,8,237,6,236, 
227 , M , 2 3l> 11,236,136, 
136,18,237 ,136,16,49,6 
2, 32 , 2j36, 1J36, 141,255,1 
19 6,22,255,146,53,240, 

P,j3,j3,j3,4,25j3,l,6 

0,j3,0,j3,j3,6,j3,l 
255,255,112,0,0,0,0,0 

112,0,1,3,0,3,0,4 

0,3,0,2,255,255,3,0 

8,0,8,0,3,0,2,8 

0, 10,0,10,0,8,0,3 

255,255,9,121,10,210,1 

13, 63,16, 10 , 32, 11, 112 , 

4 8 , 13, 128, 16,9,121,10, 




WE'VE CHOSEN THE BEST OF OVER 450 PROGRAMS AND 
PACKAGED THEM FOR YOU! 10 TO 12 PROGRAMS EACH PACK- 
AGE. COLOR COMPUTER ONLY. 

#1 Home Management I #2 Home Management II #3 Education 



Budget 

Checkbook Balancer 
Cost ol Living 
Tinycalc 

Electronic Datebook 
Account Manager 
Stock Market 
Word Processor 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Database 
Coco Terminal 
Bartender 

#4 Adventures 




Treasures of Barsoom 

Killer Mansion 

College Adventure 

Coco-Terrestnal 

Escape 

Zector 

Skid Row 

Quest 

Naughide 

Haunted House 



Video Cassette Organizer 
Home Product Evaluation 
Electric, Gas & Water Cost 
Baseball Manager 
Car Manager 
Ham Radio Log 
Home Inventory 
Personal Directory 
Recipe Machine 
Disk Labeler 
Password Scrambler 
Disk Directory Print 

#5 Games 

Trek 

Galactic Conquest 

Warlords 

The Power Sword 

Steps 

Robot Bomber 
Force Field 
Rat Attack 
Caterpillar Cave 
Meteor 



Flash Card 
Spanish Lessons 
Typing Tutor 
Creativity Test 
Arithmetic Football 
Cost of Living 
Math Tutors 1,2 
Trigonometry Tutor 
TypingGame 
Word Tests 
Talking Alphabet 
Clown Dunk Math 

#6 Utilities 



Some of these programs above 
can sell for $29.95 each 



DiskDirProt 
Dir. Pack& Sort 
DiskZapper 
Roll Out 
Doss Boss 
Disk Backup 
51 '24 Editor 
51 '24 Screen 
Autocopy 
Fastsort 
1 0 Error tgnorer 
Text Screen Prinl 



VISA 



RAINBOW 

CEflTlflCATION 
UAL 



$29 



95 



each 



TAPE OR DISK 

SPECIAL 
BUY 2 PACKAGES AND 
GET THIRD ONE FREE 



THE GREATEST SOFTWARE 
DEAL ON EARTH! 



GET 12 DISKS OR TAPES A YEAR CONTAINING OVER 120 QUALITY PRO- 
GRAMS. A SUBSCRIPTION TO T & D SOFTWARE CONSISTS OF 1 0 READY- 
TO-LOAD PROGRAMS DELIVERED BY FIRST CLASS MAIL EVERY MONTH. 

NO, WE ARE NOT THE SAME AS THE RAINBOW ON TAPE. IN FACT, MANY 
SUBSCRIBERS HAVE WRITTEN IN AND SAID THAT WE ARE MUCH BETTER 
THAN RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




PRICES 



TAPE OR DISK 

1 YEAR (12 issues) 70.00 
6 MO. (6 issues) 40.00 
1 ISSUE 9.00 

Michigan Residents Add 4% 
Overseas Add $10 to Subscription Price 
Personal Checks Welcome! 



★ 16k-64k Color Computer 

★ Over 3B00 Satisfied Customers 

★ Back Issues Available From 

★ July '82 {Over 450 Programs) 



★ THIS MONTH ONLY ★ 



SUBSCRIBE FOR A YEAR AND 
RECEIVE A FREE PACKAGE OF 
YOUR CHOICE INDICATE WHICH ONE 

1 . Home Man I 4. Adventures 

2. Home Man II 5. Games 

3. Education 6. Utilities 



OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

1. INCOME PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

2. BILL BOARD 2 

3. MOUNTAIN BATTLE 

4. THE TEN ROUND FIGHT 

5. COCO - KEENO 

6. HIGH RESOLUTION HOCKEY 

8. ON SCREEN SCALE RAINBOW 

9. LIBERTY SHIP 
10. SINGLE STEP RUN 



GET ISSUE 
#45 ABOVE FOR 
ONLY *3.00 



[MasterCard] 



T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, P.O. BOX 256C, HOLLAND, Ml 49423 (61 6) 396-7577 



62 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



165J3 DATA 
8 

1660 DATA 
5,255 
167J3 DATA 
5,175,175 
168J3 DATA 
5,175,175 
169j3 DATA 
5,175,175 
170 J3 DATA 
5,175,175 
171J3 DATA 
0,189,188 
1720 DATA 
8,190,189 
1730 DATA 
9,188,190 
1740 DATA 
0,189,175 
1750 DATA 
7,183,179 
1760 DATA 
9,187,183 
1770 DATA 
3,179,187 
1780 DATA 
7,183,175 
1790 DATA 



11,250,13,63,16,7,250, 



240, 


,9,121,10,210,16, 


,25 


175, 


1 »7C 

r l/D t 


r 175 , 


r I/O i 


t I/O t 


,17 


175, 


- I/O i 


r I/O i 


r I/O i 


t l/o i 


,17 


175, 


i l/D , 


r 175 j 


r I/O ^ 


f I/O j 


,17 


175, 


1 *7 K 

t ± / O i 






i 1 / o i 


rl7 


175, 


TOO 

- loo i 


r lyp i 


TOO 

r 189 i 


loo 

t 188 j 


,19 


190, 


TOO 

t 189 i 


TOO 

f loo , 


f 19)3 j 


TOO 

t 189 j 


,18 


188, 


t ±9)0 t 


TOO 

p 189 j 


TOO 

t 188 i 




,18 


189, 


TOO 

r lOO j 


f ±9)0 i 


TOO 

t 189 | 


T Q Q 

- loo j 


,19 


175, 




r lO / i 


1 Q "5 
> lu J j 


1 *7Q 


,18 


187, 


lOJ j 




r ±0 / i 


i lO J | 


,17 


179, 


187, 


,183, 


,179, 


,187, 


,18 


183, 


179, 


,187, 


,183, 


, 179, 


,18 


175, 


128, 


, 186, 


, 181, 


,128, 


,18 



6,181,128 
1800 DATA 

8,186,181 
1810 DATA 
1,128,186 
1820 DATA 
6,181,175 
1830 DATA 
0,189,188 
1840 DATA 
8,190,189 
1850 DATA 
9,188,190 
1860 DATA 
0,189,175 
1870 DATA 
7,183,179 
1880 DATA 
9,187,183 
1890 DATA 
3,179,187 
1900 DATA 
7,183,175 
1910 DATA 
6,181,128 
1920 DATA 
7,207,207 
1930 DATA 
7,128,186 



186,181,128,186,181,12 
128,186,181,128,186,18 
181,128,186,181,128,18 
175,188,190,189,188,19 
190,189,188,190,189,18 
188,190,189,188,190,18 
189,188,190,189,188,19 
175,179,187,183,179,18 
187,183,179,187,183,17 
179,187,183,179,187,18 
183,179,187,183,179,18 
175,128,186,181,128,18 
186,181,207,207,207,20 
207,207,207,207,207,20 



The Coco Greeting Card Designer 

The Coco Greeting Card Designer can be used to design 
and print custom Greeting Cards for all occasions 
including: Valentine's Day, Birthdays, Mother's Day and 
more. 

It's easy to use and includes a library of predrawn Hi-Res 
Graphic Pictures! You can write custom messages on the 
cover and inside your cards in a selection of character 
fonts and sizes. An easy to use editor allows you to pick 
your type style, font size, and more. Two fonts and a 
selection of custom border patterns are included, and the 
easy to use editors allow you to create many more! 
The Coco Greeting Card Designer requires a Coco or 
Coco II with a minimum of 32k, One Disk Drive (Disk Ext. 
BASIC 1 .0/1 .1 , ADOS, or JODS) . Some of the printers that 
the Greeting Card Designer supports are: EPSON RX/FX, 
GEMINI 10X or SG-10, C-ITOH 8510, DMP-1 00/1 05/400/ 
430, SEIKOSHA GP-1 00/250, LEGEND 808 and GORILLA 
BANANA. Send an SASE for current list of other compat- 
ible printers. See Review in April 86 Rainbow . . . 

Only: $24.95 

Plus $3.00 Shipping & Handling 
NY Residents add Sales Tax. 
UPS COD ADD $3.00 
VISA/MC Accepted 

ZEBRA SYSTEMS, 
INC. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, New York 11421 
(718) 296-2385 
Dealer inquiries Invited 

Colored Paper Packs — Now available are packs of 40 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 16 matching envelopes 
in bright RED, GREEN and BLUE. Perfect for making your 
card unforgettable! Price $-,9 95 



RAINBOW 

MM 




I of 




WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Now $19.95 




(Was $69.95) 



You can benefit from our recent purchase of brand new 
WICO Trackball Controllers at closeout prices. This model 
was designed specifically for the Radio Shack Color Computer 
and plugs right into the joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer and manufacturer of control 
devices for the commercial arcade video games. If you've 
ever played an arcade video game, chances are you've used a 
WICO joystick or trackball. You've experienced the superior 
control. The pinpont firing accuracy. The exceptional 
durability. 

Includes one-year limited warranty. Phoenolic ball offers 
360-degree movement. Two optical encoders provide 
split-second response. Quick-action fire button for smooth, 
two handed arcade response and feel. Long 5* computer 
connection. Heav\ duty plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color computer models. 

ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: Specifiy CAT# C331. 
Include $19.95 per trackball plus $3.00 for S&H. UPS COD 
Add $3.00* VISA/MC Accepted. NY Residents add sales tax. 

ORDER NOW! 
QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED. 




Zebra Systems, Inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 63 



1940 DATA 181,128,186,181,128,18 
6,181,175 

1950 DATA 175,188,190,189,188,19 
0,189,188 

1960 DATA 190,189,207,19,20,1,18 
,32 

1970 DATA 3 2,12,15,18,4,207,188, 
190 

1980 DATA 189,188,190,189,188,19 
0,189,175 

1990 DATA 175,179,187,183,179,18 
7,183,179 

2000 DATA 187,183,207,207,207,20 
7,207,207 

2010 DATA 207,207,207,207,207,20 
7,179,187 

2020 DATA 183 , 179 , 187 , 183 , 179 , 18 
7,183,175 

2030 DATA 175,128, 186, 181, 128,18 
6,104,67 

2040 DATA 105, 113 ,121, 120, 118, 96 
,66,89 

2050 DATA 96 ,82 ,110 , 67 , 110 , 68 , 65 
83 

2060 DATA 72,96,186,181,128,186, 
181,175 

2070 DATA 175,188,190,189,188,19 
0,189,188 

2080 DATA 190,189,188,190,189,18 
8,190,189 

2090 DATA 188,190,189,188,190,18 
9,188,190 

2100 DATA 189,188,190,189,188,19 
0,189,175 

2110 DATA 175 , 179 , 187 , 183 , 179 , 18 
7,183,179 

2120 DATA 187,183,179,187,74,15, 
25,19 

2130 DATA 20,9,3,11,187,183,179, 
187 

2140 DATA 183,179,187,183,179,18 
7, 183 , 175 

2150 DATA 175,128,186,181,128,18 
6,181,128 

2160 DATA 186,181,128,186,181,12 
8,186,15 

2170 DATA 18,186,181,128,186,181 
,128,186 

2180 DATA 181,128,186,181,128,18 
6,181,175 

2190 DATA 175,188,190,189,188,19 
0,189,188 

2200 DATA 190,189,188,190,75,5,2 
5,2 

2210 DATA 15 , 1 , 18 , 4 , 190 , 189 , 188 , 
190 

2220 DATA 189 , 188 , 190 , 189 , 188 , 19 
0,189,175 

2230 DATA 175,179,187,183,179,18 



7,183,179 

2240 DATA 187,183,179,187,183,17 
9,187,183 

2250 DATA 179,187,183,179,187,18 
3,179,187 

2260 DATA 183,179,187,183,179,18 
7,183,175 

2270 DATA 175,175,175,175,175,17 
5,175,175 

2280 DATA 175,175,175,175,175,17 
5,175,175 

2290 DATA 175,175,175,175,175,17 
5,175,175 

2300 DATA 175,175,175,175,175,17 
5,175,175 

2310 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2320 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2330 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2340 DATA 255/0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2350 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2360 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2370 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 
0 

2380 DATA 255,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
2390 DATA 0,0,3,0,255,2,255,0 
2400 DATA 255,0,255,0,255,255,24 
3,48 

2410 DATA 192,204,12,63,243,51,3 
,192 

2420 DATA 252,240,192,48,204,207 
,192,192 

2430 DATA 48,12,15,195,51,255,12 
,12 

2440 DATA 204,76,252,170,170,170 
,170,170 

2450 DATA 170,170,170,0,255,0,25 
5,0 

2460 DATA 255,0,255,0,0,0,255,0 
2470 DATA 63,207,243,252,3,0,23, 
8 

2480 DATA 152,142,56,44,159,114, 
142,53 

2490 DATA 37,191,1,13,182,255,3, 
138 

2500 DATA 1,183,255,3,23,3,182,1 
27 

2510 DATA 47,65,127,47,66,127,47 
,67 

2520 DATA 127,47,68,127,47,73,20 
4,44 

2530 DATA 226,253,44,21,23,252,8 
8,23 

2540 DATA 252,85,23,252,82,23,25 



64 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



ISTD 



SUPER CONTROLLER 



n A I N BO'fr 



4* 



; 



□NLV S99.9J 



□NLV $99.95 US 



rz* 



^•3 



^ CPA 



01 





worr/35-PH 

00-02 8S22 



- 



FEATURES! J0K 
■ Gold contacts on all connectors. 
- Shielded metal box for low RF noise. 

• 4 28-pin sockets for software expandabilit 
•Uses 2764 or 27128 EPROMS. 

• EPROMS are software selectable. ^\ 

• Internal Mini-Expansion Bus interface for; 

- 80 Columns # 

- Real Time Clonk and/or 



- Parallel Printer or 

- EPHQM Programmer 

- User Projects. 



connectors. P es S. cl 

for low RF noise. SSIK 

software expandability. simple E 

EPROMS. ^[ ^^^Jsthepj 

m selectable. , Snltomrt 

iion Bus interface for; MpRDM 

program 

ck compatibility. * ^> Contrail! 
adjustments needed. 



X 



Is a R 



eal Time Clock. This is a clock chip that will 



The second Is a Real Time Clock. This is a clock chip that will 
^ ^ keep the proper time, date and year. A small battery keeps the 
1 time when the Computer is of!, retreive and set the time by using 
simple Basic POKES . Also available with the Real Time Clack 
is I he optional Centronics Compatible Parallel Printer adapter. 
Software to set the c lock and prints r dri ver included . 



w 

• Com pf etc Radio Shack compatibility. 

• New i^ hnoiagy, no adjustments needed. 

• Very Accurate 1Gmhz High Speed Master Clock. 

• Needs i 5 volts only, works on all COCOs or COCO Ms. 

EXPANSION ADD-ONS: jT\ a 

There are currently four add-ons available from DISTO ft 
thiyplfeller; 

PPRINT ^ ^Jr'^ ^jPk 



3m DIST 



Ofor ^\ 

K3n V a 



The third is a Mini EPROM Programmer. Yes, a low cost 
programmer that attaches to the disk controller. A must for the 
OtSTO Super Coniroller Program those often used utilities 
into EPROM and plug them directly into your controller Will 
program 2764 s or 27128's, a perfect mate lor the DPSTO Super 
GoriNfler. \ ^ 



■w m-« r-i i -t-r i m -w ■ - 

DlSPLMfflrV iiT^ J 

The fourth is a real knock-out. This is a three in one card. It s 
major function is to add an 80* 24 display to your computer.V 
A feature packed package also includes RTIME and PPRINT. 
AN in one neat package that fits inside the controller. \ 
0S9 software available. Call for more information. * <f 

CREDITS: ^\ ^\ 3^ \^^\ 

The DISTO 5 ripe* Controller, add-ons and all its documentation are conceived 
and iksirini^r by Tony Distefano. The 0IST0 Super Controller and add-ons are 
manutatturEfl and riisln'bulBd by; C.R.C COMPUTER INC. 
id 902 Lajeunessc. Montreal. Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8 1-514-383-5293 



The first is a Centronics Compatible Parallel Printer adapter, 
This adauter will allow you to connect a Centronix compatible 



X 



This adapter will allow you to connect a Centronix compatible manuiattureri ^nd disinbuiEfi by; c.r.c. computer inc. 

printer directly to your Controller, leaving IhB Serial port Ot your lOBOZ Lapuimessc . Mantreaf, Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8 1-514-383-5293 

Computer tree foryour modem. Printer driver software included. , D|ST0 and CRC computers are registered trade marks. The DISTO Super 

^^r' Controller and add-ons are copywrited by DISTO. ^^^W '"1 



X 



2,79 

2550 DATA 
3,255,2 
256J3 DATA 
134 

2570 DATA 
0,132 
2580 DATA 
3 

2590 DATA 
1 

2600 DATA 
192 

2610 DATA 
54 

2 620 DJiTA 
182 

2630 DATA 
4 

2640 DATA 
125 

2650 DATA 
,47 

2660 DATA 
36 

2670 DATA 
7 

2680 DATA 
1,90 



189 , 161 , 193 , 134 , 251, 18 
182,255,0, 132,2,39,14, 
247,183,255,2,182,255, 
2,38,232,32,3,115,47,7 
134,3,183,47,74,23,3,1 
134,64,183,47,48,23,5, 
127,47,76,204,5,4,253, 
213,23,3,231,22,4,218, 
47,75,142,4,76,72,76,6 
48,134,140,0,0,46,249, 
47,140,16,38,0,141,125 
73,39,27,182,255,0,68, 
5,127,47,76,32,3,115,4 
76,173,159,160,10,182, 



2690 DATA 
,161 

2700 DATA 
9,5 

2710 DATA 
76 

2720 DATA 
129 

2730 DATA 
,48 

2740 DATA 
7, 123 
2750 DATA 
7,48 

2760 DATA 
82 

2770 DATA 
05,204 
2780 DATA 
,206 

2790 DATA 
4,203 
2800 DATA 
48 

2810 DATA 
,123 

2820 DATA 
,48 

2830 DATA 



129,32,37,89,32,31,189 

193,252,1,88,193,247,3 

127,47,76,32,3,115,47, 

129,247,39,9,182,1,87, 

247,39,58,3 2,26,182,47 

129,120,39,19,16,142,4 

198,172,23,5,103,182,4 

76,183,47,48,23,5,65,1 

47,48,198,172,253,54,2 

170,184,253,56,9,198,4 

47,105,247,56,11,255,5 

23,6,246,32,22,182,47, 

129,2,39,219,16,142,47 

198,172,23,5,47,182,47 

74,32,198,182,47,44,38 



■ 

I 
I 

* 

I 

I 

# 

I 

* 

I 

* 

I 
I 

I 

* 

I 
I 

* 

I 
I 

* 

I 

* 

I 
I 

i 

i 

* 

L 




*v Software <fr 




KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— ONLY $24.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k. 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement (current & 'YTD'), journal, ledger, 899accounts & 2350 entries 
on 32k & 64k (710 accounts & entries on 16k) (disk only). Version 1.2 has screen 
printouts. Rainbow Reviews 1.1 - 9/84 ; 1.2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95— ONLY $19.95 

Filing data base, File any information with Omega File, Records can have up to 16 
fields with 255 characters per field (4080 characters/record). Sort, match & print 
any field. User friendly menu driven. Manual included (32k/64k disk only). 

Rainbow Review 3/85, Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses. boxes, linesand ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
line HELPS at all times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects 
on the screen. Can be used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. 
GRAPHICS EDITOR. Reg. $39.«5-ONLY $19.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 
Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. (Avail. 10/01/85). 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, 
total due sates, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP- 
TRAK' General Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & 
more. User friendly/menu driven. Includes manual. $39.95 or $49.95 General 
Ledger & Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

'COCO WINDOWS' Available 10/31/85 
With hi-res character display and window generator, Features an enhanced key 
board (klicks) and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create 
multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line 
numbering. Four function calculator, with memory. The above options can be 
called anytime while running or writing in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES, 
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $19.95 (disk or tape) includes manual. 

CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-942-9402 




THE OTHER GUY'S SOFTware (Add $2.50 lor postage A handling) 

P.O. Box H, 55 N. Main C.O.O., Money Order, Check In U.S. Funds 

Logan. UT 84321 Jtftl > 753-7820 (Ptuu ip*n j v If JAM Cunlrallar} 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE rainbow are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works, Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Tnose wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



66 



THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



298/3 DATA 186,255 ,44,21, 22,25/3,2 
299j3 DATA 47 , 14j3 , 16 , 3 8 , j|§f§t| 1 2 9 



2840 DATA 182,47,76,16,39,1,53,2 
2850 DATA 44,166,255,44,21,23,25 
DATA 127 ,47,76, 115 , 47 , 44 , 18 

2,47 

287J3 DATA 48,139,2,198,171,253,4 
7,46 

2880 DATA 16,142,47,44,23,5,22,2 
52 

289/3 DATA 47 , 46 , 193 , 34 , 35 , 19 , 9/3 , 
247 

29/3J3 DATA 47,47,23,4,166,182,47, 

45 SI 

2910 DATA 164,132,167,132,48,136 
, 32/ 32 

292,0 DATA 12,127,47,44,127,47, 
29 3/3 DATA 47,47,23,4,142,198,17/3 

ipi tumsiii 

132, 22, /3, 232, 99, 132, 11 



•...*■ ^ v 



f.i:.; 



2 9 5J3 DATA 182,47,77, 19 8|34 r 2 3 7 ,2 

2960 DATA 54 , 2J35 , 2J34 ,67,18,253,5 

297^ DATA 247 ,56, 11, 23 , 6, 107 ,206 
, 44 



*"■ v : . J^'f 



wis 



3W DATA 34,13,129,2,37,9,193,3 
3010 DATA 37,9,193,17/3,34,5,57,9 

, »■ l\r. '\' >i\ •■ • " - V; ^.• P - ; ; ; V..; : ,: i : . 

3020 DATA 196,32,243, 96, 65,57, 12 
3/33/3 DATA 14/3,38,9,16,142,47,115 



,236 



3/34/3 DATA 2 , 23 , 4 , 128 , 2/34 , 5, 5, 253 
1/35/3 DATA 47,78,182,47,48,198,17 

, «j 4/ 

306J3 DATA 47,82,236,2,253,47,80, 

3^7/3 DATA 4,2,43,75,252,47,46,25 
3 

3/38/3 DATA 47,82,23,3,247,43,30,2 

36 wmw>' : 

3090 DATA 2,125,47,14/3,38,56,235 

,65 ^w&:>:'<'* : ' " 

31/3/3 DATA 171,196,237,2,253,54,2 
05 ,204 ^1 i'i 

3 lip DATA 168,184,253,56,9,198,4 

, ft ' 

3120 DATA 56,11,22,5,244,127,47, 
4 4 



□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 

□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 




COLOR COMPUTERS 



price price TANDY COMPUTERS 



OUR 



LIST OUR 
PRICE PRICE 



26-3136 16K Standard Color Computer 2 
26-3127 64K Extended Color Computer 2 
26-3131 Disk Drive 0 for Color Computer 

26-3130 Disk Drive 1 for Drive 0 

26-3008 Joystick 

26-3012 Deluxe Joystick (EACH) 

26-3018 Extended Basic Kit 

26-1208 CCR-81 Tape Recorder 

26-1173 DCM-3 Direct Connect Modem . 



$119.95 
199.95 
299.95 
199.95 
19.95 
29.95 
39.95 
59.95 
59.95 



$ 99.00 
169.00 
240.00 
169.00 
16.95 
25.00 
36.00 
50.00 
50.00 



SOFTWARE 


30001210 Telewriter 64 Tape 


$ 49.95 


$ 42.00 


30001 220 Telewriter 64 Disk 


59.95 


49.00 


30001110 VIP Writer 


69.95 


59.00 


30001140 VIP Database 


59.95 


49.00 


30001150 VIP Terminal Disk 


49.95 


45.00 


30001170 VIP Integrated Software , , 


149.95 


139.00 


30001130 SS/DD 10 Pack Diskettes 


21.00 


14.00 


PRINTERS AND ACCESSORIES 



26-1276 DMP-1 05 80 cps Dot Matrix $199.95 

26-1280 DMP-130 Dot Matrix 349.95 

20001025 EPSON LX-80 Printer 369.95 

20001515 EPSON LX-80 Tractor Feed 29.95 

20021070 OK I DATA 182 Printer 299.00 

20041020 STAR SG-10 Printer 299.00 

300091 10 BOTEK Serial to Parallel Interlace 



$169.00 
285.00 
225.00 

25.00 
245.00 
250.00 

59.00 



26-1 070 Model 4D Desktop 64K 2 FD& Deskmate$1 1 99.00 
25-1000 Model 1000 1 FD 128K & Deskmate 999.00 
25-1001 Model 1000 1 FD& 10 Meg HD256K 1999.00 
25-3000 Model 1200 1 FD & 10 Meg HD256K 2499.00 

25-3001 Model 1200 Two FD 256K 1499.00 

25-4000 Model 3000 One FD 51 2K 2599.00 

25- 401 0 Model 3000 1 FD & 20 Meg HD 51 2K 3599.00 

26- 3901 Model 600 Port Comp 32K 1 3 1 / 2 Disk 1 599.00 

25-1021 CM4 Color Monitor 299.95 

25-1022 CM10 Color Monitor 459.95 

25- 3010 VM-3 Monochrome Monitor 219.00 

26- 5111 VM-1 Monochrome Monitor 199.95 

26-5112 CM-1 Color Monitor 599.00 

25-3043 Graphics Adaptor T-1200, T-3000 . 299.00 
25-3047 Deluxe Graphics Adapt T-1 200, T-3000 499.95 
25-3130 MS-DOS 2.11 /Basic Tandy 1200 . 89.95 
25-41 04 MS-DOS 3.1 /Basic/Deskmate Tandy 3000 99.95 



$ 895.00 
705.00 
1 475.00 
1 525.00 
1200.00 
1900.00 
2600.00 
1195.00 
225.00 
380.00 
185.00 
1 65.00 
510.00 
185.00 
395.00 
75.00 
85.00 



CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-248-3823 

For Technical Questions and Information on our complete line of 
computer accessories and current prices: 

CALL 1-517-625-4161 

Mon.-Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Advertised prices are 
cash prices. C.O.D. accepted ($10.00 charge per carton on C.O.D. Call for further 
C.O.D. information.) M.C., Visa, add 2%. A.X., add 3%. All non-defective items re- 
turned will be subject to 10% restocking fee. Defective items require return merchan- 
dise authorization. Call for R.M.A. Number before returning. Delivery is subject to 
product availability. 

PERRY COMPUTERS • 124 SOUTH MAIN STREET • PERRY, Ml 48872 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 



67 





PROGRAMS • PERIPHERALS • SUPPLIES • SERVICE 



For Coco . . . 

in the Midwest 



Now in our 4th year! 




New Catalog Now Available 

CALL OR WRITE 



Introducing . . . 



SEIKOSHA 

SP-1000A 



• 100 cps draft 

• 20 cps NLQ 

• Friction and tractor 

• Front panel Controls 

• 1.5 K buffer 

• 2 yr. Warranty 




00 



Parallel printer $225. 

with Metric Industries Model 104 interface 

$2 6 9.oo 

"The New Leader in Price-Performance!" 



ir"*""""" 11 



Coco Man 



The complete 




includes 



u/[ D*1ux* Joystick 
rV I »nd Y-cablt ! ! 



COCOMOH II 

with y-cabie 
with Joystick 



System 



f 119.95 



79.95 
99,95 
99.95 



LATEST VERSION 
FEATURES . . . 



□ 



mil \\\m®xmr. 

!IIIIIM=»MS8£vN 



•14 fonts 
•Shrink, Stretch 

Rotate 
•Multiple drives 
• Pattern Save 
UPGRADES AVAILABLE 

\ Disk I to II 20. 00 
Tape I to Disk II 

25 00 

Max Edit 19.95 
Picture disks 
available 



UpA DELUXE JOYSTICK 



EXCELLENT FOR COLOR COMPUTER 
USE IT FOR GRAPHICS, GAMES. ETC. 

CoCo owners will appreciate this high quality, 
durable joystick. Open gimbal design ... self- 
centering or free-floating operation. Mechanical 
trims on both axes ... eight foot cable ... firing 
button has lifetime 5,000,000 presses. A two- 
button version of the Deluxe Joystick is available 
for the Tandy 1000. DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 




$27. SO each 
$49.95/ 'pair 



CHOOSE FROM OUR LARGE 
SELECTION OF COCO PRODUCTS 

B5 ... Colorware ... Derringer ... Diecom ... Dynacaic ... 

Elite ... Four Star ... HJL ... J & M ... Mark Data ... 
Metric Industries ... Michtron ... Microcom ... Microworks ... 
Tom Mix ... PBJ ... PXE ... Speech Systems ... Sugar ... 
TCE ... VIP ... Zebra ... and more! 

Yes/ We have PENPAL! 



313J3 DATA 127 , 47 , 46 , 127 , 47 , 47,99 
/ 1 

3140 DATA 182,47,75,76,198,225,6 

1,23 ].4'&'l\-> >V^&(% • 

3150 DATA 31^17,236,2,23,255,96, 

122 ' y/ Z^M^¥^$fiiW'.^ 

3160 DATA 47, 133, 16, 39, 2, 100, 57, 

23 1^£&W$$&&>&%' ' 

3170 DATA 1, 51 ,32 , 217, 125, 47, 14j3 

j 38 

3180 DATAl*2:4'5#lSi2,^4f ,48, 160 ,2, 42 

,\ >-:::^^ 

3190 DATA 64,129,10,35,1,57,16,1 

42 Hl^-^^^^^^f^^^^hnZ 
3 200 DATA 47,24,49,36,16,140,47, 
44 : " ' 

32 10 DATA 39,17,166,164,3 8, 244,9 
9,164 *v ;h ' '^h'i } 
3220 DATA 2 , 13^,, 2 , 203 , 4 , UM t 

34 Vv V. i V:V''.:- V V ■ ' 

32 3 0 DATA 2 3 ,4,2 , 57 ,125,47,132,1 

6 " T - ; ##" Vi r jKs ^ : :|;4.&'«'4',>*. : - > ■ ' ' 

3240 DATA 38,2 , 9.3^14 2 , 4 7 -0f3®01 4 

7; ' : , • :< ~/\\ ' ' ■ ^\.y^-><-^ > ; * •• t "> , 

3250 DATA 75,129,3,35,2,134,3,13 

9 . '"^^O •■ ' ^ ... 

3260 DATA 1,177,47,133,35,6,182, 

:4;?7 . 1 ' : " ..7 

3270 DATA 133,183,47 , 141, 183,47, 

131. f 16»'<<.;K-r ; ^';,:-/>i' : 7 — 

3280 : DATA 132 ,38 , 60 , 125 , 47 , 141,3 

8,97 ' ' v :'.;v- ,^;'/> i • 

3290 DATA 182,-47 , 84 , 139/1, 132 ,3, 

183 £ } ^yJ;MM;m^ ¥ : . 

3300 DATA 47 , 84 , 167 , 136 , 43 , 198 , 5 

,6i m !: ^W$m>fB^X : 

3 3 10 DATA 52,16 , 206,47, 8 5 , 51,197 
,255 ' ' . -' ' .?~V-/ . 

3320 DATA 54,203,23,254,207,53,1 

6,166 ^'K^fi^/^H^ 

3330 DATA 2,177,47,48,37,7,134,2 

3340 DATA 167,13 6, 41,32,5,134,1, 

167 -■■■'■":<;'■;; *';.:>■ ■/ Vi € f 5; tr;:i; ' 

3350 DATA 136,41 , 134,1 , 1 6 7,13 6,4 

2,51 ■ ij0;M-:y 

3360 DATA 136,41,236,2,23,254,20 

8,166 . ... 

3370 DATA 66,198,5, 61, 16, 142,47, 

85 ' ■■'i^iM^J^ ' "'" 

3 380 DATA 49,165,16,191,54,203,5 

2,1S£ : /M ,M^W^&y:^ ""~ 

3390 DATA 23 ,254 ,219, 53,16,52,16 

,'23::x?#;v ; ' 7^: : 

3400 DATA 255,74,53,16,122,47,13 
1,39 

3410 DATA 4,48,4,32,146 ,142,47, 2 
8 



• Call • • Shop by Modem • 

513-396-SOFT 513-396-SHOP 

i 1 



WW 

5ms 



—J 

• Write* 

2235 Losantiville, Cincinnati, OH 45237 

SHIPPING will be charged al our ACTUAL COST 
Ohio residents add S S\ Sales Ta» COD add 2 00 



68 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



342J3 DATA 
,231 

3430 DATA 
344J0 DATA 

1 ' 

345J3 DATA 
,48,136 
34 6J3 DATA 
71, 35 
3470 DATA 
136,224 
3480 DATA 
32,231 
3490 DATA 
44 

3500 DATA 
39 

3510 DATA 
,23 

3520 DATA 
3530 DATA 
7,140 
3540 DATA 
83 

3550 DATA 
7,74 

3560 DATA 
4,21 

3570 DATA 



166,132,39,55,23 6,2,92 

3, 52,16,23 ,3 , 19,53 , 32 
193,1,39 ,23 , 19 3 ,3 ,39,1 

166,33, 164 , 132 , 167, 13 2 

224,32,13,230,35,193,1 

2 39,141,66,111,164,48, 

230,33 , 202 ,85 ,83,234,1 



, 48,4,140,47, 
,142,47,8,166,1, 
13,16 , 142,47,115,2 36 , 2 



■ f ..■ 



3 , 2, 111, 132,111, 1,48,4 
140 ,47 ,24 , 38,232, 122 , 4 



43 , 3 , 22 , 253,34 ,134,3,1 
47 ,140,22, 253 ,26, 122, 4 
3 9 , 50, 206, 44, 206 ,255,4 
23,249,28,206,16, 31,19 



8,85 

3580 DATA 
31,17 
3590 DATA 
9,4 

3600 DATA 
55 

3610 DATA 
1,196 
3620 DATA 

7,0 

3630 DATA 
8,198 
3640 DATA 
,188 

3650 DATA 
47 

3660 DATA 
,32 

3670 DATA 
37 

3680 DATA 
191 

3690 DATA 
255 

3700 DATA 
5,202,183 
3710 DATA 
3,255,208 



231,196 ,51,200,32,17,1 

159,37,245,182,47,74,3 

129 , 3 , 37,2 , 134 , 3 , 198 , 2 

206,16,31,51,200,96,23 

74,38,248,57,16,206,12 

16,142,47,123,182,47,4 

172,23,2,160,190,47,65 

47,69,37,30,39,11,191, 

69, 190 , 47, 67 , 191,47 , 71 

17,190, 47,67, 188,47,71 

9 , 191, 47,71,190,47,65, 

47,69,22,4,211,79,183, 

198,183,255,201,183,25 

255,204,183,255,206,18 



Canadians! 

We are Canada's largest distributor of Color 

Computer products. 



Send for your free copy 
of our 1986 Catalog 







Kdtynews 






V01 3 














KEHir SOFTVWRE 


SCFTVWRt 




DSTRei/TORS 


FOftT>«COU» 




LMTED 







Kellynews-3 is now available 
and contains news, hints, 
programs and articles from 
the crew of Kelly Software. 

Please note our new 
phone number. 

Phone: (403) 236-2161 



Wc have moved to 
our new location. 




o- 

\ 




Kelly Software 
Distributors Ltd. 

P.O. Box 608, 
Station 'T Calgary 
Alberta T5H 2H2 



Call now 




(403) 236-2161 

Call our orderline 
for quick delivery. 

We accept phone orders 

on your VISA or 
Master Card. No C.O.D. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 69 



372/3 DATA 183,255,210,183,255,19 
2,183,255 

3730 DATA 194,183,255,196,183,25 
5,34,142 

3740 DATA 45,8,16,142,4,0,236,12 
9 

3750 DATA 237,161,16,140,6,0,37, 
246 

3760 DATA 190,47,69,191,54,12,19 
0/47 

3770 DATA 71,191,54,14,23,2,221, 
142 

3780 DATA 4,20,141,40,190,47,65, 

191: 

3790 DATA 54,12,190,47,67,191,54 
,14 

3800 DATA 23,2,201,142,5,249,141 
, 20 

3810 DATA 142,0,0,191,54,12,134, 
3820 DATA 246,47,75,253,54,14,23 

,2 jm. 

3830 DATA 179,142,5,238,206,54,8 
,198 

3840 DATA 3,166 ,197,132 , 15 , 139,4 
8,167 

3850 DATA 1 3 0 ,166,197,68,68,68,6 
8,139 

3860 DATA 48,167,130,90,43,2,32, 
233 

3 8 70 DATA 26,16 ,57,79,183 ,255,19 
8,183 

3880 DATA 255,200,183,255,202,18 
3,255,205 

3890 DATA 183,255,206,183,255,20 
8 183 255 

3 900 DATA 2 10 ,183,255 ,192,183,25 
5,195,183 

3910 DATA 255,197,182,47,75,132, 
3,198 

3920 DATA 8,61,203,224,247,255,3 
4,28 ; 

3930 DATA 175,57,142,20,64,204,1 
70,170 

3940 DATA 237,129, 140 ,37,96,37,2 
49,16 

3950 DATA 206,127,0,134,1,183,47 
,24 

3960 DATA 183,47,132,182,47,74,7 
6,183 

3970 DATA 47,74,23,254,190,127,4 
7,25 

3980 DATA 182,47,77,183,47,26,13 
4,34 

3990 DATA 183,47,27,134,4,183,47 
,135 

4000 DATA 16,142,47,115,252,47,2 
6,23 



4010 DATA 1,122,252,47,26,253,47 
,80 

4020 DATA 252,47,46,253,47/82,20 
4,5 

4030 DATA 5/253,47,78, 23,0, 253,4 
3 

4040 DATA 88,125,47,140,38,54,18 
2,47 

4050 DATA 26,187,47,24,183,47,26 
,129 

4060 DATA 121,37,11,112,47,24,12 
4,47 

4070 DATA 27 , 124 , 47,27 ,32, 18, 129 
,1 

4080 DATA 34,14,112,47,24,124,47 
,27 

4090 DATA 124,47,27,134,4,183,47 
,135 

4100 DATA 246,47,27,193, 170,3 6,5 
8,122 

4110 DATA 47,135,39,236,206,47,1 
10,255 

4120 DATA 54 , 203, 252,47,26,253,5 
4,205 

4130 DATA 204 , 168 , 18 4,253,56,9,1 
98,4 

4140 DATA 247,56,11,23,2,195,22, 
254 

4150 DATA 20,124,47,75,182,47,75 
72 

4160 DATA 72,72,198,255,61,23,0, 
131 

4170 DATA 127,47,44,127,47,46,12 
7,47 

4180 DATA 47,198,16,247,47,133,1 
27,47 

4 190 DATA 141 , 127 , 47, 84,127,47,8 
,127 

4200 DATA 47,12,127,47,16,127,47 
,20 

4210 DATA 127,47,9,127,47,13,127 
,47 

4220 DATA 17,127,47,21,127,47,13 
2,127 

4230 DATA 47,28,127,47,32,127,47 
,36 

4240 DATA 127,47,40,127,47,44,16 
,206 

4250 DATA 127,0,134,3,183,47,140 
,23 

4260 DATA 254,201,22,250,226,182 
,255,3 

4270 DATA 43,1,59,182,255,2,182, 
47 

4280 DATA 77,139,7,129,120,34,16 
,183 

4290 DATA 47,77,134,251,183,255, 
2,182 



70 THE RAINBOW August 1986 






Menu oriented 
Upload/download. Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 
Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 

• Definable macro keys 

• Works with standard serial port, RS232 
PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

• Works with standard screen. X SCREEN, or 
WORDPAK 80 column board. 



$49.95 with source $89.95 



XMENU 

Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 

- Create your own menus ' Yf^^S SSl'lS'S ™ v 

' XSCREEN, WORDPAK, O-PAK 

$29.95 with source$S9.95 



XSCREEN 

OS-9 hi-res screen 
5 1/64/85 chars per line - Easy menu operation 

$19.95 with source $39.95 



XDIR & 


XCAL 


Hierarchial directory 


OS-9 calculator 


• Full sorting 


• Decimal, Hex, Binary 


• Complete pattern matching 


- +, /, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 


$24.95 


with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 
$34.95 with source $54.95 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

■ Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overs trikc, underline, super/sub- scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source$49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with XWORD/XMERGE sourc* 199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 







SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting list $79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
with user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman records, and 
update the SBAP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and tax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight time, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, year-to- 
date federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all states 
except Oklahoma and Delaware. $5 9.95 



driven. Sample transactions are included. Bach 
package featured a hi-res screen. Each requires 
a printer, * minimum of 32k arid at least 1 disk 
drive. 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with the Small 
Business Accounting package. $59 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $59 95 




MICROTECH 

CONSULTANTS 



Jeirold Avenue 
I N VS - St. Paul, MN 55112 

■Author SnbmuMipn* ■ M^^^i^^^^ 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



OS'9 is a tradtmark of Aliti 



(612) 633-6161 



43j3j3 


DATA 


28 




4310 


DATA 


#134. 
432J3 


254 


DATA 


2. 64 




4330 


DATA 


3 , 47 




4340 


DATA 






4350 


DATA 


,241 




4360 


DATA 


34 




4370 


DATA 


,37 




4380 


DATA 


55 




4390 


DATA 


,68 




4400 


DATA 


43,54 


4410 


DATA 


1,1 




442$ 


DATA 


72,72 


4430 


DATA 



255,0,132,64,39,5,59,1 
118,32,2 36,189,161,193 
183,255,2,182,255,0,13 
38,244,59,243,47,67,25 
67,252,47,65,201,0,137 
253,47,65,57,252,47,80 
47,83,34,21,177,47,82, 
16,243,47/78,241,47,83 
8,177,47,82,37,3,134,2 
57,79, 57,183,47,134,68 
183,54,221,134,32,61,2 
22 3,251,54,221,137,0,3 
57,141,232,182,54,221, 
17 6,47, 134, 64, 23J3, 132, 



T err hi an s: of^rwA /?e 



TIME MASTER Calendars, biorhythms, human 
compatibility, more. Fun at parties, Printer 
optional. Reviewed 12/85. 16K ECB. $19,95 

PERPETULIFE Challenging board game based on 
Life. Play a friend or play (lose to) CoCo. 
Reviewed 4/86. 16K ECB/ML . $19.95 

GRAPHIC ECHO New! Versatile graphic screen 
dump for RS dot matrix printers. Regular or 
enlarged images. Positive or negative images. 
Adjustable margin or auto-centering. Works in 
all 5 PMODEs. 16K/32K ML. $14.95 

TEACHER PAK PLUS The works for teachers. $47.95 

HOME WARE New! Give your CoCo real power at 
home. Printer preferred. Works with tape or 
disk. Five 1GK ECB/ML modules: 

CALENDAR - Draw calendars for any date. 
Various formats. Add appointments, memos. 
SAVINGS/LOANS - Work out a personal savings 
plan. Decide it you can afford that loan. 
DIRECTORY - Keep track of phone numbers, 
addresses, etc. Print address labels. 
INVENTORY - For home insurance records, 
hobbies, small business. Very flexible. 
HOME-WRITER - ML word processing powerful 
enough for home use but easy enough to be 
totally mastered in one short sitting. 
Single modules: $19.95 Whole set: $49.95 

All programs sold on tape. Send check or money 
order, no cash CPa. residents add 67.) to: 



RAINBOW 



Tothian Software, Inc. 
Box 663 
Pimersburg, Pa. 16248 



RAINBOW 



All of these programs carry the Rainbow Seal. 



74,43 




4440 


DATA 


7 




445)3 


DATA 


,47,123 


4460 


DATA 


6,32, 


237 


4470 


DATA 


,236, 


136 


4480 


DATA 


1,179 


4490 


DATA 


1,237 


,136 


4500 


DATA 


236,164 


4510 


DATA 


156, 182 


4520 


DATA 


4,64 




4530 


DATA 


,33,228 


4540 


DATA 


5,0 




4550 


DATA 






4560 


DATA 


4570 


DATA 


4580 


DATA 


4590 


DATA 


4600 


DATA 


4610 


DATA 


4620 


DATA 


4630 


DATA 


4640 


DATA 


4650 


DATA 


4660 


DATA 


4670 


DATA 


4680 


DATA 


,50 




4690 


DATA 


54,12 


4700 


DATA 


54 




4710 


DATA 


,166 




4720 


DATA 


,50 




4730 


DATA 


248 




4740 


DATA 


4,255 


4750 


DATA 


18 




4760 


DATA 


2,54 




4770 


DATA 


54 




4780 


DATA 



4, 84, 84, 32, 249:, 196 , 3 , 5 
198 > 172 , 141 ,207 ,16,142 
2 3 6,13 2 , 2 37 ,1 61,236,13 
161,236, 136, :64, 237, 161 
96,237, 164 , 57 ,52, 16, 14 
2 36 , 161 ,237,132,236,16 

32 ,236, 161,237,136,64, 

2 37 $ 13 6 ,9 6,53,144,141, 

54,221,72 ,7 2,176,47,13 

206, 47, 136, 230, 198 , 231 

13 2, 2 3 1,132 ,57,41,0,25 

255,0,255,0,255,0,255, 

0,0,0,1,0,0,0,2 

0,0,0,4,0,0,0,8 

0,0,0,22,0,0,0,50 

0,0,0,100,0,0,1,40 

0,0,2,86,0,0,5,18 

0,0,16,36,0,0,32,72 

0,0,64,150,0,0,129,146 

0,1,99,132,0,3,39,104 

0,6, 85,54 ,0 , 19, 16 , 114 

0,38,3 3,68,0,82,66,136 

1,4, 133 ,118 ,2,9, 113 , 82 

4,25,67,4,8,56,134,8 

22, 119 , 114 , 22 , 51, 85 , 68 

103 ,16, 13 6 , 100 , 16 ,142 , 

127 ,54, 8 , 127, 54,9, 127 , 

10 , 127 , 54 ,11, 142,54 , 16 

130, 198, 9,140, 54, 11,39 

90,39,244,49,36,68,36, 

238 , 164 ,255 ,54, 4, 238,3 

54,6, 52,118 ,141,4, 53, 1 

32 ,230,206, 54 , 12 , 16 ,14 

12,142,54,8,198,4,28,2 

166 , 130 , 169 ,162 , 25,167 



72 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



,194,90 
4790 DATA 
4800 DATA 
4810 DATA 
4820 DATA 
36 

4830 DATA 
34,32 
4840 DATA 
16 ,137 
4850 DATA 
8,16 

486)3 DATA 
68 , 17 
4870 DATA 
39 

4880 DATA 
38, 62 
4890 DATA 
23,0 

4900 DATA 
,134 

491)3 DATA 
,104 

4920 DATA 
3,38 

4930 DATA 
5,34 

4940 DATA 
61/2 31 
4950 DATA 
4,38 

4960 DATA 
8,61 

4970 DATA 
0,230 
4980 DATA 
4,167 
4990 DATA 
6, 48 

5000 DATA 
6,134 
5010 DATA 
,141 

5020 DATA 
5030 DATA 
7,167 
5040 DATA 
8,17 

5050 DATA 
,4,237 
5060 DATA 
6,105 
5070 DATA 
3,38 

5080 DATA 
,32 

5090 DATA 



38,246,57,0 ,255 ,0,0,0 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,16 

0 , 0 , 0 , 49, 141,255,230,2 

164 ,68, 68, 167 , 168 ,16,1 

61, 227,168, 18 , 235, 168, 

0,237, 34, 237 , 36, 166, 16 

72,72,160 ,164, 64, 167, 1 

128 ,4, 64,167, 42, 76,167 



111 , 3 8 ,236, 40 , 2 3 7 ,4 3 , 2 



57,141,200,166,168,17, 
93 , 231 , 47 ,166, 184 ,2,61 
4,237,45, 104 , 46, 105, 38 
46,105,38,106,45,106,4 
34 ,174,34, 48, 136,32,17 
175 ,36 ,230 , 132 ,166 ,47, 
46,23 6,39, 237,42,106,4 

■ •' . '' *V-' i /- 

10,166,45,141,41,166, 3 

231,196,57, 109,45,38,1 

38 ,231,192, 11 1,38,134, 

45, 106,42, 38 , 190 , 174 , 3 

1, 166,132,175,36,167,4 

4, 167,42,22 ,255,173 ,48 

0,3,230,134,57,1,4,16 
64 , 23 ,255, 87 , 166,168,1 

39,166,40 ,132,3,171,16 

167, 168 ,21,166, 192 , 198 

46,104,46,105,38,104,4 

38 , 10 6 , 4 7, 106,42 , 106,4 

7> 166, 168, 21,167,45,32 

109,42, 38,22,230,39,20 



3,4 

5100 DATA 
11,38 
5110 DATA 
,4 

5120 DATA 
2,195 
5130 DATA 
61,231 
5140 DATA 
4,48 

5150 DATA 
30,40 
5160 DATA 
2,166 
5170 DATA 
8,210 
5180 DATA 
166 

5190 DATA 
67,168 
5200 DATA 
4,133 
5210 DATA 
9,133 
5220 DATA 
,63,15 
5230 DATA 
75 

5240 DATA 

5250 DATA 
0,20, 192 
5260 DATA 
,129,140 
5270 DATA 
,237 

5280 DATA 
,250 

5290 DATA 
55 



231,45,141,61, 11 1, 39,1 
174,36,48,1,175,36,134 
167 ,42 , 109 , 47, 38,203 , 3 
166,42,141,162,166,38, 
38 , 141,30, 111,38,174 , 3 
136,32,175, 34 , 175,36, 2 
134,4,160,168,17,237,4 
168,17,167,39, 106,44,3 
57,48,141,0 ,28, 230,45, 
38,165,184,4,164,133,1 
20,166,184,4,99,133, 16 
170 ,168 , 20 , 167 , 184 ,4,9 
57,255,192,240,252,255 
3,141,10 ,57 ,18,127,47, 
141,3,22 ,247, 92 , 142, 16 
204,119,220,237,129, 14 
37,249,204,170,170,237 
37,96,37, 249 , 204 ,85,85 
129,140,40,0,37,249,23 



162,57 ,0,255,0, 255 ,0,2 

/Si 



CHECKING ACCOUNT INFORMATION SYSTEM 

Let your CoCo ease the task of nanaging your checking 
accounts with CftlS. Record deposits, checks, ATn 
transactions, interest, service charges and other 
debit/credit transactions. Reconcile and balance your 
accounts in ainutes. Search and edit capabilities. 

Requires 32K and 1 disk drive (ain). Printer optional. 

To order, send check or HO for 24.75 plus 2.50 S/H to: 
(SC res. add 51 sales tax) 



After Five Software 
P.O. Box 210975 
Colutbii, J.C. 29221-0975 

(Reviewed in RAINBOW April '86 issue, pg. 1B5) C ™* T,0N 



RAINBOW 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 73 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 



MORE GOOD SOFTWARE 

GRAPH1COM 

3 disk package $29.95 

64K EXB disk 
SAM DIAMOND 

graphic adventure .... $29.95 

32K EXB disk 
HOT SLOT 

casino simulation .... $24.95 

32K EXB disk or tape 
ECLIPSE 

excellent pixel editor. . $19.95 

64K EXB disk 



THE MOTION PICTURE 

Animation tool 

64K Disk Only 

FANTASY CLIP ART 
Cocomax or Graphicom 
64 K Disk 

BJORK BLOCKS 
Graphics with Animation 
32K EXB Tape 



GOOD SOFTWARE 

FILE CABINET 
. . $39.95 Data Base for tape 

16K EXB Tape 



$14.95 



$34.95 



$29.9 



COCO WRITER TWO 

Tape Version 

16K EXB Tape 

Disk Version 

32K Disk 

Business Software Call Us 



$34.9 
$44.9 



A SUPER COLOR PRINTER 
The OK I MATE 2 O 
AT A SUPER LITTLE PRICE! 

Prints ten characters to the inch, 
twelve characters fifteen characters to the inch. 
Italics. Italics. I tal ics . 



Under 1 ine 



S-jperscriot 



Subscript 



Small. Light weight. Quiet. 
Prints up to 80 characters per second. 
Prints four color graphics. Includes 
disk software for black and white, two 
color and four color screen dumps of 



Color Computer hi res graphics. 

Okimate 20, Plug v n ' Print, 
paper, black and color ribbon, 
instructions, software and cabl 



e for 



Parallel $220.00 
$10.00 Shipping 



The only color Okimate 
20 Screen Dump Now 
Available for the CoCo. 




n a % s ■» on Santa Baroara founded \ * as 




Guaranteed Pretested 



64K UPGRADES 

E Board (solderless - 

pictured) $39.95 

F Board $26.95 

CoCo 2 (except 26-3134A&B and 

26-3136A&B) $26.95 

CoCo 2 (models 26-3134A&B and 
26-3136A&B $39.95 

Having trouble with your CoCo? We 
have the chips you need. Call us. 
(805) 962-3127 



SELECTED REPLACEMENT CHIPS FOR THE COCO 

The "COCO CORRECTION" 
Chips for Ull and U29 

Presoldered assembly for E boards upgrades. $12.95 

SN74LS785N (The SAM chip) $28.95 

6809E (Microprocessor) $19.95 

6822P (PIA) $13.95 

6821P (PIA) $ 8.95 

1372 (Color Mixing Chip) $10.95 
Extended basic (EXCEPT models 26-3127B, 

26-3134A/B and 26-3136A/B $29.29 



DOUBLE DRIVER I 

The BEST monitor driver available. 
Color composite, monochrome and 
audio output. For original CoCo D, E 
and F boards. $24.95. 

MONO II 

Mono II for Color Computer 2. An 
excellent monochrome monitor driver 
that has audio output also. Specify 
model needed. 

$24.95. 




DOUBLE DRIVER II 

Finally a monitor driver for 
the Color Computer II that 
lets you use a monochrome 
and a color monitor 
simultaneously. We're proud 
of this new driver. The six 
transister circuit provides op- 
timal signal mixing and signal 
gain. Excellent monochrome 
output and better quality 
resolution in the color ouput 




than any driver we have 
seen. Audio output also. Fits 
all models of the Color Com- 
puter II. $29.95. 




THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The CoCo Switcher allows you to hook u 
three peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Cor 
nect your modem, printer and any othc 
RS-232 compatible peripheral to the CoC 
Switcher. An LED on the CoCo Switch* 
shows if your computer is on or off at a glance 
The LED flickers when transmitting or recek 
ing data. 

$39.95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division of Moreton Bay laboratory 
316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 

Ordering information 

Send $2.00 shipping and handling per order. We ship 
within 1 working day on receipt of order. Blue Label 
Service available. California residents add 6% sales tax. 





RAPHICS 



16K 
Disk 




the 
RAI NBOW 




I 



Use this program to design 
Escher-type graphics 



Esch-A-Sketch 

By Eric White 



"No one can draw a line that is not 
a boundary line; every line splits a 
singularity into a plurality. Every closed 
contour, no matter what its shape, 
whether a perfect circle or an irregular 
random form, evokes in addition the 
notions of 'inside' and 'outside* and the 
suggestion of 'near' and far away', of 
'object' and 'background'." 

— M. C. Escher 



Ihave always been a great fan of 
M.C. Escher and his self- 
perpetuating patterns. Escher had 
the unique ability to blend shape and 
form with perfect balance. From his 
drawings, one feels a sense of complete 
unity and purpose of form. 

In a search for techniques to create 
Escher-type designs I tried many stand- 
ard graphic techniques such as tracing 
paper and pencil, but had little success. 
When drawing a self-perpetuating pat- 
tern, each line creates both an "inside" 
and "outside" border simultaneously. 
This can get quite frustrating as you try 
to keep the subject recognizable. Need- 
less to say this technique was time 
consuming and tedious. 

The main challenge is to draw both 
sides of the subject at the same time. The 
computer is the perfect medium to 
attempt to solve this problem. Listing 1 



is a short version of Escher. bas and 
accepts X-Pad, Joystick or Hi-Res pak 
for input. Type in the program and save 
it before trying to use it. 

You need to edit Line 440 with the 
appropriate device number. This value 
is stored in the variable DV. For the X- 
Pad use a value of 1 (this is the default). 



If you want to use a Hi-Res pak, use a 
value of 2. Those using the standard 
joystick port input need to set DV equal 
to 3. Edit in the appropriate value 



before running the program in Listing 
I. 

Listing 2 is a DMP-200 graphics print 
program for use with pictures created 
with Escher. bas. This program prints a 
full 8-by-10.5 inch swatch of your 
patterns. 

I have learned a lot in experimenting 



with Escher's world. I can't help but 
wonder what he would have done next 
if he had the use of todays microcom- 
puters to continue his work. □ 



_i 












>«• «W :*» -| 






ESCHER KEYBOARD INPUTS 


m wr a "»i 

a 

« . 
* 

m 
m 


■+ — 

it 
«. 

+ — • 


c 
w 


— k— 

■ , P 
_ + 

— 4— 


;clear screen to white 
white pen color 


* destroys picture buf. 
! changes pen color 




'■»-' ' 

4— • 


B 




black pen color 


| 2 changes pen color 


: 


*■ 


1-3 


— f ~ 
m 


pen size 

— _. r .. r .__. — , — ^^.i.w 


s lxl, 2x2, 3x3 square 


m 
m 


M 


u 

s 


mirror effect on/ off 




■t. 


'■it 
;. » 


S 


If 
i 

— v — 


save Hi-Res picture 


!:• saves to tape/disk 


« 


* 
• 

H 


X 


9 

1 


X-Pad input device 


s change drawing device 


h 

■ 


ft 

m 

. m 

-IP 
* 


J 
P 

it n 


a 
* 

::. j( ... 
» 

«MM 

■ 
ft 


joystick input device 
Hi-Res pak input dev. 
update whole picture 


change drawing device 
: change drawing device 
i press spacebar 


■t 
« 

■i ; :.y-« ■ 
■ »■ 















August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 75 



Y' 18 



80 . 
360 . 
END 



• » » • 



113 
.91 
.78 



T 



Listing 1: ESCHER 

10 ON DV GOTO 30,40,50 

20 GOTO430* & SET UP VARIBLES 

30 X=PEEK(65376) : Y=PEEK ( 65377 ) :S 

=PEEK(65378) : GOTO 60 » X PAD 

40 Y=PEEK(65433)/1. 15 : X=PEEK ( 654 

34) : S=PEEK( 6542 4 ) +3 : GOTO 60 ' HIRES 

50 X=JOYSTK(0) : Y=JOYSTK(l) :S=(PE 

EK(65280)ANDl)+3 ' JOYSTICK 

60 PUT(X, Y) -(X+K, Y+K) ,C,NOT 

70 IF S=3 THEN 90 ELSE PUT(X,Y)- 

( X+K, Y+K) ,C,NOT 

80 A$=INKEY$:IF A$<>"" THEN 180 
ELSE 10 

90 COLORC:LINE(X,Y) -(X+K, Y+K) , PS 
ET, BF 

100 XR=INT(X/ ( (R+l) *2) ) * ( (R+l) *2 
) 

110 X=X-XR 

120 IF M THEN LINE (R-X+XR+R+1 , Y) 
- (R-X+XR+K+R+1 , Y+K) , PSET , BF 
130 Y=Y-INT(Y/( (R+l) *2) ) *( (R+l) * 
2) 

140 IF Y>R THEN Y=Y-R-1 : X=X-R-1 : 
IF X<0 THEN X=(R+1)*2+X 
150 COLORC:LINE(X+W,Y+W)-(X+K+W, 
Y+K+W) ,PSET,BF 

160 IF M THEN LINE (R+ (R-X) +W+1 , Y 
+W) - (R+ (R-X) +K+W+1 , Y+K+W) , PSET, B 
F 

170 GOTO 10 

180 IF A$="C" THEN 400 1 CLEARPIC 
190 IF A$="W" THEN C=l 1 WHITE 
200 IF A$="B" THEN C=0 1 BLACK 
210 IF A$="l" THEN K=0 ' PENSIZE1 
220 IF A$="2" THEN K=l ' PENSIZE2 
230 IF A$="3" THEN K=2 • PENSIZE3 
2 40 IF A$="X" THEN DV=1'X-PAD 
250 IF A$="P" THEN DV=2 1 HIRESPAK 
260 IF A$="J" THEN DV=3 1 JOYSTICK 
270 IF A$="M" THEN IF M THEN M=0 

ELSE M=l' MIRROR ON/OFF 
280 IF A$="S" THEN CLS : PRINT"NAM 

E TO SAVE AS ( /"ET$")" :P 

RINT§16 , " ( " ; : LINEINPUT A$ : PRINT§ 
17,A$:PRINT@25, "/"ET$") 11 :IF A$=" 
" THEN450 ELSE IF PEEK (188) =6 TH 
EN CSAVEM LEFT$(A$,8) ,&H600,&H1D 
FF,R+1 ELSE SAVEM LEFT$ ( A$ , 8 ) +"/ 
"+ET$ , &HE00 , &H25FF , R+l : GO 



r 

1 



1 1.—' . 




*9 «4-^l^»rfr"-" 





290 IF A$<>" " THEN 10*UPDATE PI 
CTURE 

300 SCREEN1 ,0 1 : POKE65495 , 0 1 SPEED 
POKE 

310 GET(W,W) -(R+W,R+W) ,A 

320 GET(W+R+1,W) - (W+R+R+l , R+W) ,B 

330 F=0 

340 FOR X=0 TO 255 STEP R+l 
3 50 FOR Y=0 TO 191 STEP R+l 
360 IF F THEN PUT (X, Y) - (X+R, Y+R) 

,B,PSET:F=0 ELSE PUT (X, Y) - (X+R, Y 
+R) ,A,PSET:F=1 

370 NEXTY: IF F=0 THEN F=l ELSE F 
=0 

380 NEXTX ' : POKE65494 , 0 1 SLOW POKE 

3 90 SCREEN1 , 1 : GOTO10 

400 CLS : INPUT "ARE YOU SURE YOU W 

ANT TO CLEAR THE SCREEN ( Y/N) 11 ; 

A$ 

410 IF A$<>"Y" THEN SCREENl,l:GO 
TO10 

420 PCLS1 : COLOR0 : SCREEN1 , 1 : GOT04 
50 

f.a> ; K t ' ' % '* : /.*€> v iv* '"'%•■/:& ti-'V 






76 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



DIM A(R) ,B(R) ,C(9) :K=1:DV=1 

PM0DE4 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : GOTO 10 

************************* 

* A STUDY OF REGULAR * 

* DIVISION OF THE PLANE * 
************************* 

* COPYRIGHT 198 6 BY * 

* ERIC M. WHITE * 

* ALL RIGHTS RESERVED * 
************************* 

* VERSION: 1.0 8604.20 * 
************************* 



140 . 
END 



.74 
246 



T 



Listing 2: PRINT200 

10 CLEAR4000:ET$="ESH" : DIM PR$(6 
4) 

20 GN$=CHR$ (18) ' GRAPHICS ON 
30 GF$=CHR$ (30) ' GRAPHICS OFF 
40 CLS: PRINT "NAME TO LOAD IS (.. 
/"ET$") " 

50 PRINT §1 6, "(";: LINE INPUT A$ : PR 
INT§17,A$ 

60 PRINTQ25, »/"ETS") " :IF A$= ,MI T 
HEN RUN ELSE IF PEEK (188) =6 THEN 
CLOADM LEFT$(A$,8) ELSE LOADM L 
EFT$(A$,8)+"/"+ET$ 
70 PMODE4:SCREENl,l 
80 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27)CHR$(23) ' CO 
MPRESS ON 

90 FORYl=l TO 63 STEP7 
100 FORX1=0 TO 63 
110 FORY2=0 TO 6 

120 IF PPOINT(X1,Y1+Y2)=0 THEN N 
B=NB+INT(2 A Y2) 



130 NEXT Y2 

140 PR$ (Y1)=PR$ (Y1)+CHR$ (NB+128) 
:NB=0 

150 NEXT Xl:PRINT#-2,GN$; 

160 F0RL=1T09 : PRINT#-2 , PR$ (Yl) ; : 

NEXT 

170 PRINT#-2 : NEXT Yl 

180 FOR X=0 TO 10 

190 FOR Yl=l TO 63 STEP 7 

200 FOR L=1T09:PRINT#-2,PR$(Y1) ; 

: NEXTL 

210 PRINT#-2 : NEXT Y1,X 

PRINT#-2,GF$CHR$ (12) ;:RUN 
************************** 

* ESCHER DMP-200 GRAPHIC * 

* PATTERN PRINTOUT PROG. * 
************************** 

* COPYRIGHT 1986 BY * 

* ERIC M. WHITE * 

* ALL RIGHTS RESERVED * 
************************** 

* VERSION: 1.0 8604.26 * 

************************** 



220 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
560 
570 
580 
590 





MAGAZINE FOR COLOR COMPUTER USERS. 



for business, home 
self-improvement. 



Color Computer 



* Programs 
management, 
games, utilities 

* Reviews of 
products 

* Tutorials on programming 
Assembly, C, Pascal, and Basic 

* Contests 

GROUP RATES: $15 with orders 
of 5 or ■ore subscriptions! 



in 




SPECIAL OFFER 

As an introductory offer, 
you can order the first year 
of SPECTROGRAM Magazine 
at 40% off the cover price. 
For $18, you wilt receive 
1 2 issues of the magazine 
that could become the most 
informative addition to 
your Color Computer system. 

We want to establish a 
line of two-way commu- 
nication between our staff 
and our readers as an aid 
in serving your needs. Please 
enclose any comments or 
special requests with your 
subscription form. 



PLEASE SEND ME 12 ISSUES OF SPECTROGRAM 
MAGAZINE FOR $18 (40% OFF THE COVER PRICE). 

Name: 



Address: 

City: 

State: 



Zip: 



( ) Check enclosed 

Card « 

Mail to 



( ) Visa ( ) Mastercard 
Exp. Date 



SPECTROGRAM Magazine 
P.O. Box 138 
Rockford, IL 61105 
(815) 968-9600 



i 

I 




August 1986 THE RAINBOW 77 





Orders 
800-628-2828 
Ext. 850 



Information 

301-521-4886 




Handicappers! 



The Pros 



Tired of wrestling with Sunday point 
spreads? Let your Color Computer 
do it for you! Pigskin Predictions, the 
best-selling NFL handicapper, is 
ready for 1 985. Spend a few minutes 
typing in scores each week, and 
here's what it will do: 

■ Menu-driven selection of 
schedules, ratings, division races, 
predictions or results by team or 
week. Seven different reports avail- 
able. 

■ Easy once-a-week entry of 
scores-no complex, meaningless 
stats. 

■ Predicts scores of all games for remainder of sea- 
son each week! 

■ Calculates projected won-lost records for all 
weeks. 

■ Maintains home field advantage and power rat- 
ings for all teams. 

■ 1985 schedule data file included free. 

■ 32/64K enhanced version features dazzling Rain- 
bow Writer Screen display. Seeing is believing! Stan- 
dard 16K version included, too. 

■ You'll be amazed at the power of this program. 
16/32K ECB required (32K for disk). Only $39.95 on 
tape or disk. 1985 Data tape or disk for previous own- 
ers, just $13,95. 





College 



After two years of searching, we've 
finally found a college football handi- 
capper! We think it's a winner! The 
Lockmaster® maintains stats on 
105 major college teams, analyzes 
the local point-spread, and rates the 
game as a betting proposition. Why 
waste your efforts on games with 
marginal chances of success, when 
you can get your Color Computer to 
pick the games that are most likely 
to make you a winner? 

To use the program, all you need 
are the College Football ratings that 
appear each week in USA Today. You can run individual 
games (including bowl games), update team stats and 
customize each game's rating with critical information 
such as coaching and quarterback changes and injuries 
to key players. 

Using the weekly stats and our mathematical formu- 
la (which includes schedule difficulty, power ratings, of- 
fense and defense), The Lockmaster rates each game 
against the current point spread and tells you how sure 
the bet is. 

The Lockmaster is easy to use and menu driven. It in- 
cludes complete instructions and data file for 105 major 
college teams. 32K/64K Disk only. Just $39.95. 



Thoroughbred, Harness, Greyhound 




-HORSE RACK" 




HARNESS RACE! 




DOG RACES- 



Use your Color Computer to improve your performance 
at the track! These 16K programs for Thoroughbred, Har- 
ness and Greyhound racing rank the horses or dogs in 
each race quickly and easily, even if you've never handi- 
capped before. All the information you need is readily avail- 
able from the Racing form, harness or dog track program. 
We even provide diagrams showing you where to find each 
item! 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, past 
performance, weight, class, jockey's record, beaten favor- 
ite and post position. Harness factors include speed, post 
position, driver's record, breaking tendencies, class, park- 



ed-out signs and beaten favorite. Greyhound factors in- 
clude speed, past performance, maneuvering ability, favor- 
ite box, class, kennel record, beaten favorite and breaking 
ability. 

We include complete instructions and a wagering guide 
that tells you which races to bet and hwich to avoid — one 
of the real secrets of good handicapping. You can buy a 
more expensive handicapper, but we don't think you can 
buy a better one! Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound 
Handicapper, $39.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for 
$59.95 or all three for $74.95. 




Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore, Md. 21208 



Mcii Cord , 



I 
\ 




mm 



and 
Foolery 







ARCADE 


16K 
ECB 





Mastering the Gates 

By Keiran Kenny 

This short game called Gates is not intended for sizzling 
zappers of cosmic creeps, but for those who lack the speed 
and dexterity needed to qualify as the fastest laser in the 
western galaxy. 

The screen shows five equally spaced fences. You are 
the yellow spot at the bottom center of the screen and 




must pass through the gates in all five fences in order to 
reach home. The gates open and close at random and you 
never know when a gate will open, or stay open long 
enough to pass through. 

When a gate opens in a fence, press the left- or right- 
arrow key to move in the required direction, then press 
the up-arrow key before the gate disappears and you will 
pass through and gain 20 points. If the gate slams shut, 
you bounce back and lose 10 points. Gates begins with an 
initial bonus score of 500, which should be enough to 
keep the score at a positive value. 

The listing: GATES 

0 'GATES: BY KEIRAN KENNY, 1985 

lj3 CLSj3:X=RND( -TIMER) :OK=5j3j3 

20 PRINTS, "*************GATES** 

3j3 FORX-jjTOeStSETXX^S^S) *SST(X f l 
j3,8) :SET(X,15,8) :SET(X,2j3,8) :SET 
(X,25,8) :NEXT 
40 PRINT046, "home" ; 
50 H=3 2 :V=28 

60 P=RND(6J3) : IFP/2=INT (P/2) THEN6 
0 

10 N=RND(5) :L=N*5:K$=INKEY$ 

8)3 F=25+RND(55) :TIMER=j3 

90 RESET (P, L) : RESET (P+1,L) : RESET 

(P+2,L) 

Ipp SET (H, V, 2 ) 

11)3 IFL=V-3THENK$=INKEY$ELSEGOTO 
280 

120 IFP+1>H THENS=2:GOT017j3 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 79 



i 

i 



130 IFP+KH THENS=-2 :GOTO150 

140 IFP+1=H THEN190 

150 IFK$OCHR$(8)THEN110 

160 IFK$=CHR$ (8) THENFORX=H TO P+ 

1STEPS:SET(X,V,2) : RESET (X+2 , V) :G 

OSUB290 : H=X: NEXT : RESET (H+2 , V) : GO 

TO280 

170 IFK$OCHR$ (9) THEN110 

180 IFK$=CHR$ ( 9 ) THENFORX=H TO P+ 

1STEPS:SET(X,V,2) :RESET(X-2,V) :G 

OSUB2 9 0 : H=X : NEXT : RESET (H-2 , V) : GO 

TO280 

190 IFK$OCHR$(94)THEN110 
200 IFK$=CHR$(94)THENFORX=L+3 TO 
L-2STEP-1:SET(H,X,2) :RESET(H,X+ 
1) : GOSUB290 : IFPOINT (H, X-l) =8THEN 
RESET (H,X) : RESET (H,X+1) :V=X+2:SE 
T(H,V,2) :SOUND128,1:Z=Z+10:B$=" 
(DOWN 1)3) ":GOTO220ELSEV=X:NEXT:O 
K=OK+20:B$=" (UP 20) ":IFV>5THEN2 

20 

21)3 IFV<5THENPRINT@46,CHR$ (128)+ 
CHR$(128)+CHR$(128)+CHR$(128) ; :P 
RINT@0,CHR$ (31) "HOME! SCORE ="OK 
-Z; :GOTO2 30ELSE280 

220 PRINT@0,CHR$(31) :PRINT@7,"SC 
ORE"+B$+" ="OK-Z:GOTO280 
230 PRINT": ANOTHER? Y/N" ; 

24) 3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN24)3 

25) 3 IFK$="Y"THENCLS:Z=)3:GOT01)3 

26) 3 IFK$="N"THENCLS : END 

27) 3 GOT024)3 

28) 3 GOSUB29)3: IFPOINT (P+1,L) =8 TH 
EN6)3ELSE11)3 

29) 3 IFTIMER>F THENSET (P, L, 8 ) : SET 
(P+1,L,8) :SET(P+2,L,8) : RETURNELS 
ERETURN 




SIMULATION 



16K 
ECB 



r 



Laying Down the Chips 

By Bill Bernico 

At one time or another, most everyone has played 
bingo. It's one person's job to pick the little bingo chips 
from a revolving drum and call out the numbers. In the 
professional version, a plexiglass tank with 75 blowing 
ping pong balls is used. One ball at a time randomly pops 
up to the top as the next bingo number to be called. The 
following program, Automatic Bingo Caller, simulates 
this machine. It's not a bingo game but it randomly calls 
all of the 75 bingo numbers one at a time without duplica- 
tion. 

Upon running the program two lines are displayed at 
the top of the screen. The first line displays the numbers 
already called. The second line tells you how many 



numbers have not been called. Pressing 'C picks the next 
number; 'B' and the game pauses so a player's card may 
be checked for a correct bingo; and 'N' starts a new game. 
If it turns out that a player did not have a bingo, pressing 
'R' resumes that particular game. That's all there is to it! 

The listing: BINGO 



1)3 
20 
3)3 
40 
50 



ABC-AUTOMATIC BINGO CALLER 
BY BILL BERNICO 
708 MICHIGAN AVE. 
SHEBOYGAN, WI 53081 
(414) 459-7350 



60 

70 DIM B(15) ,C(5,15) 

80 DATA 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11, 

12,13,14,15 

90 FOR X=l TO 15: READ B(X):NEXT 

X 

100 Y=9 6:CLS:FOR F=l TO 5 : FOR V= 
1 TO 15 

110 C(F,V)=(F-1) *15+V 

120 NEXT V:NEXT F 

130 FOR X=l TO 75 

140 F=RND ( 5 ) : V=RND ( 15 ) 

150 IF C(F,V)=0 THEN 140 

160 C(F,V)=0 

170 PRINT @0, "NUMBERS CALLED ="X 
180 PRINT @ 3 2, "NUMBERS LEFT ="7 
5-X 

190 PRINT@64,STRING$ (32, 131) ; 



200 
210 
15; 
220 
30; 
230 
45 



IF F=l THEN PRINTS Y, " 
IF F=2 THEN PRINT§Y, 



IF F=3 THEN PRINT© Y, 
IF F=4 THEN PRINTS Y, 



b"B(V) ; 
•i"B(V) + 



•n"B(V) + 
•g"B(V) + 
•o"B(V) + 



240 IF F=5 THEN PRINTS Y, 

60; 

250 IF X=75 THEN 310 

2 60 Y=Y+4:PLAY"L2505V5C" 

270 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 270 

280 IF I$="C"THEN NEXT X 

290 IF I$="B"THEN 310 

300 GOTO 270 

310 FOR F=l TO 3 

320 PRINTS25, "BINGO": EXEC 43345 
330 FOR D=l TO 150: NEXT D 
340 PRINTS25, "bingo": EXEC 43345 
350 FOR D=l TO 150: NEXT D : NEXT F 
360 PRINTS483, "rESUME THIS GAME 

nEW GAME"; 
370 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 370 
380 IF I$="R"AND X=75 THEN RUN 
390 IF I$="R"AND X<75 THEN PRINT 
@483,STRING$(27,143) ; : GOTO 280 
400 IF I$="N"THEN RUN 
410 GOTO 370 



80 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



Fly Off the Handle 

By Archor Wright 

The following program, Simple Flight Simulator dem- 
Dnstrates the basics of flight. It takes a while to be able to 
totally control the jet. The vertical movement of the right 
joystick controls the right half of the horizon and hori- 
zontal movement controls the left half of the horizon. 

You can practice forever because the CoCo jet never 
runs out of fuel! 




Calling to Mind 

By David Huang 

Repeat It is a game that requires a good memory. Four 
squares, along with the title and score, appear on the 
screen. Press any key to start the game and a square lights 
up with a short "beep." You must then press the number 
(1-4) corresponding to that square. If the computer's se- 
quence is repeated correctly, the score increments by one 
and another square is added to the sequence. The se- 
quence will be replayed by pressing the 'R' key. If a key is 
pressed that does not correspond to the square in se- 
quence, the game ends. 

The object of the game is to repeat as many sequences 
as possible to obtain a high score. Exceeding a score of 10 
without replaying any sequence indicates great memoriza- 
tion. 

Enjoy! 



The listing: FLIGHT 




REPEAT II 
1 £ 3 4 






■■■HI 






1 




13- 







0 POKE 6 5 4 9 5 , 0 : CLS : PRINT© 1 , " sIMPL 
E f LIGHT SIMULATOR" ; : PRINT© 64 , "C 
REATED BY: ARCHOR WRIGHT" ;: PLAY" 
PI" :PMODE4 , 1 : POKE 17 9 , 1 : PCLS : SCRE 
EN1,1 

1 H=JOYSTK(0) :V=JOYSTK(l) 

2 IFH<20THENA=A+1 

3 IFV<20THENB=B-1 

4 I FH> 4 0THENA=A- 1 

5 IFV>40THENB=B+1 

6 I FA<0THENA=A+ 1 

7 IFB<0THENB=B+1 

8 IFA>191THENA=A-1 

9 IFB>191THENB=B-1 

10 POKE178,1:LINE(0,1+A)- (255,1+ 
B) ,PSET:POKE178,2:LINE(0,A) -(2 55 
,B) ,PSET:DRAW"BM128,96C1R9L18UR1 
8L18R9U6RD6L2U6D6LU3D3R4U3 " : GOTO 
1 



The listing: REPEAT IT 

10 DIMP(100) ,BE(50) : Z=l 

2 0 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCRE EN 1 , 1 

30 F0RI=J3T09:READN$(I) :NEXTI 

40 DATA U5R4D5L4,BR2R2LU5G,NR5E4 

HL2G, R5U3NL3U2L5 , BR3U5G3R4 , R4EUH 

L3U2R4 , R5U2L4ND2U3R4 , BR4U3EUL4D , 

R5U5L5D2NR4D3 , R5U5L5D2R4 

50 DRAWBM96 , 40 ; ND7R4 FDGNL4 FFD2 B 

R3BU7NR5D3NR4D4R5BR3BU7ND7R4FD2G 

L4BD3BR8BU7NR5D3NR4D4R5BR3BU7BDD 

6U4NR5U2 ER3 FD6BR3 BU7R4 L2 D7BR10BU 

7R4L2 D7 L2R4 BR4 BU7R4 L2 D7 " 

60 DRAW"BM96/ 130 ; BR3U6NL2R2BR2R3 

LD6NLRBR3U6F2E2D6BR3U6NR3D3NR3D3 

R3 BR3 R3U3 L3U3R3 BR3 D2 BD2 D2 " 

70 X=135:F0RI=1T03:DRAW"BM"+STR$ 

(X)+", 130;"+N$ (0) :X=X+8:NEXTI 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 81 



80 DRAW"BM88,80;D20R20U2J3NL20R20 
D2 0NL2 0R2 j3U2 0NL2 0R2 0 D2 ft L2 0 " 
90 X=95 : F0RI=1T04 : DRAW"BM"+STR$ ( 
X)+",70;"+N$(I) :X=X+20:NEXTI 
1ft ft A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN100 
lift C=RND(4) 

12ft P (Z) =C: F0RT=1T0Z : PAINT (69+ (P 

(T) *20) ,85) , ,5:SOUND1,10:PUT(69+ 

(P(T)*20) ,81)-(69+(P(T)*20+18) ,9 

9 ) , BE , PSET : NEXTT : B=l 

130 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN130 

14 ft S0UND255,1 

15ft IF A$=»R" THEN 120 

160 IF VAL(A$)=P(B) THEN 170 ELSE 

190 

17 ft B=B+l:IF B>Z THEN180ELSE130 

18j3 TI$=STR$(Z) :X=151:F0RS=1T03: 

J$=LEFT$(RIGHT$(TI$ / S) ,1) :PUT(X, 

122)-(X+5,130) ,BE / PSET:DRAW ,I BM"+ 

STR$(X)+",130;"+N$(VAL(J$) ) :X=X- 

8 : NEXTS : Z=Z+1 : GOTO110 

19ft FORI=1TO10:SOUND1,1:NEXTT:DR 

AW"BM97 , 150 ;U6R4D2BD2NLD2NL4BR3U 

6R4D3NL3D3BR3U6F2NDE2D6BR3NR4U3N 

R3U3R4BR8ND6R4D6NL4BR3BU6D4F2E2U 

4BR3BD6NR4U3NR3U3R4BR3BD6U6R4D3L 

4R2F2D" 

200 GOTO 200 





16K 
ECB 
MOD. 




PROGRAMMING UTILITY 




32K 
ECB 





Break Key Disable 

By Eric Harrison 

The following program should be particularly useful in 
games and educational programs written for small chil- 
dren. It first disables the break key, then places a ma- 
chine language keyboard routine in memory. To call the 
program use a GOSUB 50000 and then copy the variable 
ZZ$ to whatever variable you want to use. This can be 
done with a simple assignment statement. To allow entry 
of a numeric variable, use VAL(ZZS) and assign this to 
the appropriate variable. 

Note that the BREAK key will work until Line 2 is exe- 
cuted. Also, the break key is not disabled while in the di- 
rect command entry mode. This is to allow for editing of 
programs. 

As written, the program requires 32K Extended Color 
BASIC but can be altered to run on a 16K ECB system as 
follows: 

1) In Line 3 change the FOR loop values from &H7F00 
to &H3F00 and &H7F0C to &H3F0C. 

2) Change the CLEAR statement in Line 1 to CLEAR 
G00,&H3EFF. 

3) In Line 3 change the DEFUSR statement to DEFUS 
RO=&H3F00. 



The lisitng: BREAKDI5 



1 CLEAR 600,&H7EFF » MEM FROM 
&H7F00 AND UP FOR M/L 

2 READ X$, Y$:IFX$="0"THEN3 ELSE 
X$=" &H"+X$ : Y$=" &H"+Y$ : X=VAL (X$) : 
Y=VAL(Y$) :POKE X, Y : GOT02 : DATA F8 
,32,F9, 62,FA,1C,FB,AF / FC,7E,FD,A 
D,FE,A5,19A,39,19B,0,19C,F8, 19 A, 
IE, ft, ft ' NOW THE break KEY IS D 
ISABLED SORT OF. 

3 FOR X=&H7F00 TO &H7F0C:READ A$ 
: V=VAL ( 11 &H"+A$ ) : POKEX , V : NEXTX : DE 
FUSR0=&H7F00 : DATAAD , 9F , Aft , ft ft , 27 , 
FA, IF, 89 , 4F, BD, B4 , F4 , 39 ■ ADD 
M/L KEYREAD FOR PROGRAM AT LINE 
5 ft ft ft ft - 

9 REM *** THE FOLLOWING (LINES 1 
fl-5ft) IS A DEMO OF HOW TO USE TH 
IS PROGRAM... TRY TO break IT AT 

ANY* TIME ! ! ! 

10 CLS: PRINT "PLEASE ENTER A STR 
ING . . . " ; 

20 GOSUB 5ftftftft 

3 ft PRINT: PRINT "THE LINE YOU ENT 
ERED IS: " ;ZZ$ 

35 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"PRESS ANY K 
EY WHEN READY. . . " : ZZ=USRj3 (J3) • C 
ALL KEYREAD ROUTINE JUST FOR DEL 
AY. . . 

Aft FOR X=l TO 5J3J3: PRINT X:NEXT 
5J3 END 

1J3J300 GOTO Iftftftft 
5pftpfi ZZ$="" 
5J301J3 PRINT CHR$(128); 
5j3j32j3 WZ=USRj3(j3) 
5J3J33J3 WZ$=CHR$(WZ) 
5J304J3 PRINT CHR$(8); 
5J3050 IFWZ=8 THEN IF LEN(ZZ$)<=j3 
THEN 50110 ELSE ZZ$=LEFT$ ( ZZ$ , L 
EN(ZZ$) -1) :PRINTCHR$(8) ; :GOTO500 
10 

50060 IF WZ=13 THEN PRINT: RETURN 
50070 IF WZ=21 THEN IF LEN(ZZ$)> 
1 THEN FOR CC=LEN(ZZ$) TO 1 STEP 
-l:PRINTCHR$ (8) ; : NEXT : G0TO5 0000 
50080 IF WZ>31 AND WZ<123 THEN 5 
0090 ELSE 50010 

50090 IF LEN(ZZ$)=>240 THEN SOUN 
D 100,1: IF LEN(ZZ$)>254 THEN SOU 
ND 100, 2: GOTO 50010 
50100 ZZ$=ZZ$+WZ$:PRINTWZ$; 
50110 GOTO 50010 



82 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



LOGIC 



16K 
ECB 



Masonry Madness 

By Andy Blount 

Bricks is a Lo-Res puzzle-type game in which you must 
move a stack of bricks from one side to another. All of the 
bricks are different sizes and are represented by Xs. Only 
one brick can be moved at a time and large bricks can't be 
stacked on smaller ones. 

To play the game use the left- and right-arrow keys to 
move the 'G' and *P' across the top of the screen. The 'G' 
represents getting a brick and the 'P' represents placing a 
brick. To get or place a brick press ENTER and it disap- 
pears or appears, if the move is not illegal. The score is 
tallied by how many moves have been made; the lower the 
better. 



ftftlcks 

BY; ftfttW Ei-OUHT 
''Mi 41 



IFP=2THEN80 ELSE50 
40 GOTO30 

50 IFLEN (X$ (PL) ) =0 THEN30 
60 P=2 : P$="p" : N$=RIGHT$ (XJ? (PL) , 1 
) :M=VAL(N$) :M$=L$ (M) : PRINT@107 , M 
$:PR$=LEFT$ (X$ (PL) , 1) :PRINT@450+ 
(PL-1) *9-( (LEN(X$ (PL) ) -1) *32) , RP 
$; :MID$(X$ (PL) ,LEN(X$(PL) ) ,1)=" 
":Y$=X$ (PL) :X$(PL)=LEFT$(Y$,LEN( 
X$(PL))-1) 

70 PRINT@162+(PL-1) *9,P$:GOTO100 
80 IFLEN (X$ (PL) ) =0 THENX$ (PL) =MI 
D$ (STR$ (M) , 2 , 1) ELSEN$=RIGHT$ (X$ 
(PL) ,1) :IFM>VAL(N$) THEN100 ELSE 
Y$=MID$ (STR$ (M) ,2,1) :X$(PL)=X$(P 
L) +Y$:M$="" :M=0 

90 PRINT§107 , RP$ : P=l : P$="g" : PR$ = 
RIGHT$(X$(PL) ,1) :PRINT@450+(PL-1 
) *9-( (LEN(X$ (PL) ) -1) *32) ,L$ (VAL( 
PR$) ) ; :PRINT§162+(PL-1) *9,P$ 
100 SC=SC+1:PRINT@80,SC: IFLEN (X$ 
(1))=8 ORLEN(X$ (3) ) =8 THEN110ELS 
E GOTO30 

110 PLAY"04Llj3CDEFGAB" :CLS: PRINT 
"CONGRADULATIONS , YOU SOLVED THE 
PUZZLE IN" ;SC; "MOVES. ■•: END 




PROGRAMMING UTILITY 



Settle a Score 

By Tio Babich 

Joyscore is a utility designed for use in game program- 
ming. It allows players to enter first, second and third 
place high scores using the right joystick. 



E 



The listing: BRICKS 

10 RP$=STRING$ ( 8 , " " ) : F0RX=1T08 : 
L$=L$+ " X" : L (X) =X : L$ ( X) =L$ : NEXT : X 
$(2)="87654321" 

20 CLS : PRINT@13 , "BRICKS" : PRINT@4 
1,"BY ANDY BLOUNT": PRINT© 7 4, "SCO 
RE: 0" :FORX=j3T07:A$=MID$(X$ (2) ,X 
+1,1) :PRINT@459-X*32,L$(VAL(A$) ) 

: NEXT : P=l : P$="g" : PRINT@162 , P$ ; : P 
L=l 

30 IN$=INKEY$:IFIN$="" THEN 30 EL 
SEIFIN$=CHR$ (9) ANDPL<>3 THENPRI 
NT@162+(PL-1) *9, " "; :PL=PL+1:PRI 
NT@162+(PL-1) *9,P$ ELSEIFIN$=CHR 
$(8) ANDPLOl THENPRINT§162+(PL- 
1) *9, " " ; :PL=PL-1:PRINT@162+ (PL- 
1)*9,P$; ELSEIFIN$=CHR$ (13) THEN 




August 1986 THE RAINBOW 83 



The listing: JOYSCORE 



10 CLS3 

2j3 PRINT" USE THIS UTILITY IN YO 
UR NEXT GAME. USE A GOSUB Ij3j3j3 
j3 AND SET YS EQUAL TO THE VA 

RIABLE HOLDING THE PLAYERS SC 
ORE. DELETE LINES 0-9999 AN 

D 10010. FOR A DEMONSTRATION" 

31 PRINT" PRESS A KEY." 

32 PRINT"NOTE: THE SIGN ENDS 
INPUT . " ; 

50 EXEC 44539 

8999 GOSUB10000 

9000 STOP 

10000 REM** USE YS AS THE PERSO- 
NS SCORE AND USE THIS SUBROUTE 
WITH A GOSUB 10000 ROUTINE. 

10005 IF YS<HS AND S<MS AND S<LS 
THEN GOTO 10270 

10006 A=0:J=O:I=O 
10010 YS=1000 
10020 PLAY"L255" 
10030 CLS0 

10040 A$="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUV 
WXYZ ._&" 
10050 Y=10 
10060 R$="" 

10070 Q$=STRING$(32, 196) 

10080 PRINT" SELECT LETTERS WITH 

JOYSTICK. " 

10090 PRINT 

10100 PRINT@128,A$ 

10110 J=JOYSTK(0) 

10115 IF J>59 THEN J=59 

10120 K=INT(J/2) 

10130 SET(J,Y,2) :PLAY"V5;ABC;V15 
" :RESET(J,Y) 

10135 IF PEEK(65280)=254 AND K=2 
9 THEN GOTO 10210 



10140 IF PEEK(65280)=254 OR PEEK 
(65280) =126 THEN PLAY"ABCDEFG" :G 
OSUB10160:A=A+1:IF A>11THEN10210 

ELSEPRINT@204 / R$ 
10150 GOTO10110 

10160 IF K=26 THEN R$=R$+" " : RET 

URN 

10170 IF K=27 THEN R$=R$+" . " : RET 
URN 

10180 IF K=28 THEN R$=R$+CHR$ (8 ) 
:A=A- 2: RETURN 

10200 R$=R$+CHR$ (K+65) :RETURN 

10210 CLS 

10220 T$="":T$=R$ 

10230 IF YS>HS THEN L$=M$:LS=MS: 
M$=H$ : MS=HS : HS=YS : H$=T$ : GOTO102 6 

0 

10240 IF YS>MS THEN L$=M$:LS=MS: 
MS=YS : M$=T$ : GOTO 10 2 60 
10250 IF YS>LS THEN LS=YS:L$=T$ 
10260 CLS 

10270 PRINTQ$: PRINT" h 

igh scores" 

10280 PRINTQ$ ; : PRINT" 

1ST PLACE" :PRINTQ$; 

10290 PRINTH$ , HS : PRINTQ$ ; 

10300 PRINT " 2ND 

PLACE" :PRINTQ$; 

10310 PRINTM$ , MS 

10320 PRINTQ$ ; : PRINT" 

3RD PLACE" :PRINTQ$; 

10330 PRINTL$,LS 

10334 FOR T=l TO 10 

10 3 40 PLAY " L2 2 5 ; V3 ; ABC ; V6 ; ABC ; V9 

; ABC ; VI 2 ; ABC ; VI 5 ; ABC ; V18 ; ABC ; V2 l 
; ABC ; V2 4 ; ABC ; V2 7 ; ABC ; V3 0 ; ABC ; V3 1 
;A;V15;L255" 

10345 NEXTT 
103 50 RETURN 



CANYON COUNTY BIEVICES 

P. 0. BOX C 
SAUGUS. CA. 913 SO 



PRINTER 



All GiraraiKeed 





10% DISCOUNT 




5UM ittlUKtU 

DISSS 

DISKS IN PACKAGES OF 10 
PER PACK 3 PACKS 



101-2240 



SSDD $ 7.95 
DSDD $ B.95 



$22.50 
$25.50 



WITH HUB RINGS, SLEEVES, 
LABELS, & WRITE PR0T .TABS 
100% ERROR FREE WARRANTY 



COLORS AVAILABLE. ALSO 3.5 in. 
MICRO 0ISKS AT SIMILAR SAVINGS 
CALL OR WRITE FOR PRICES. 



SPECIAL THIS MONTH 
Order before the end 
of August and take a 
10% DISCOUNT off of 
order total . 



No handling charge on orders 
of $20 or more. 
ADD $1.50 handling on orders 
of less than $20. COD orders 
add $1.50 COD charge. 
Calif, sales add 6.5% tax. 



101-2250 



101-2270 



101-2900 



101-4316 



101-4505 



101-4515 



101-4525 



101-4470 



101-4970 



101-5545 



Epson LX80 Spectrum(ny1on^ 



Epson MX/FX/RX70/80jriyTorT 



Epson MX/FX/RX 100 (nyTon 



IBM Select ricIK Cor rectbl 

I ' J ■ ' J. 1 _ _ 1 J. » » ■ i — "■' ■ ^^^^ 



NEC 5500/7700 Spinwriter 



Okidata ML80/82/83/92/9T 



Okidata ML84 (nylon)' 



Okidata Micro! ine!82/192 



RadioShack TRS-80 LP VI 1 



Gorilla Banana (nylon) 



Tally/Mannes. Spirit 80 



$ 5.95 



$ 4.95 



$ 6.85 



$1.95 



$ 7.40 



5 2.15 



$ 4.85 



$ 8.90 



$ 7.40 



$ 7.40 



$ 6.95 



$ 32.65 



I 27.25 



S 37.60 



5 10.90 



$ 40.60 



S 11.90 



$ 26.75 



$ 49.00 



$ 40.60 



S 40.60 



38.10 



S 31.65 



S 26.40 



S 36.50 



S 10.55 



S 39.35 



$ 11.50 



$ 25.90 



$ 47.50 



S 39.35 



S 39.35 



S 36.95 



Ribbons for most printers available. Send us your name, address, 
& discretion of printer for Quote & Catalog. 
Quantity Discount Prices available 1n larger quantities. OK to 
mix ribbons (minimum 1 box per type) for Discounts. 
Colors available in some popular typ*s. SEND FOR CATALOG. 



84 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



WE'VE OUTDONE OURSELVES! 



TM 



IS-69A DIGISECTOR 

rHE VIDEO DIGITIZER NOBODY CAN BEAT 

he DS-69A is the best video digitizer available for your COCO at any price. This new, turbocharged version of our 
riginal DS-69 Digisector allows your 64K COCO to see clearly into the world of any television picture. 

PEED! The fastest — 8 images per second! 

RECISION! The highest — 64 levels of true grey scale! 

ESOLUTION! The finest — 256 x 256 picture elements! 

ompabitibility Use with a black and white or color camera, a VCR or tuner. 

Compactness Self contained in a plug in Rompack. 

convenience Use with a Y-cable, Multi-Pak, PBJ Bus or plug directly into the cartridge slot. 

ase of Use Software on disk will get you up and running fast! 

OWERFUL C-SEE ™ SOFTWARE 

J-SEE is the menu driven software package included with your DS-69A. Available on disk or cassette, it provides 
ightning fast 5 level digitizing to the screen, high precision 16 level digitizing for superb hard copy printout and 
iimple keyboard or joystick control of brightness and contrast. Or call our driver routines from your own Basic 
urogram for easy 64 level random access digitizing. Pictures taken by the DS— 69A may be saved on disk or 
:assette by C-SEE and then edited with COCO MAX, MAGIGRAPH or GRAPHICOM for special effects. Any of the 
)opular printers may be used to obtain printouts of images digitized by the DS-69A. 

)NE YEAR WARRANTY 

)S-69A Digisector & C-SEE III Software $149.95 

OR your DS-69 & $ 59.95 

MAGIGRAPH Graphics Editor on disk $ 39.95 



3S-69 DIGISECTOR " 

THERE'S ONLY ONE BETTER VIDEO DIGITIZER . . . 

^nd that's the DS-69A. The DS-69 is The Micro Works' original video digitizer, tried and true since 1984. It provides 
almost all the features of the DS-69A and is now available at a new low price. The D&69 features; 

SLUGGISHNESS 2 images per second. Quick enough to freeze all but the fastest moving pictures. 
INCOMPATIBILITY Brightly colored scenes may be striped when using a color camera. 
NCONVENIENCE Will not work with a Y cable. 

Otherwise, it's a DS-69A. Precision, resolution, compactness, ease of use, software and warranty. 
Except one last thing. 

DS-69 Digisector & C-SEE III Software $ 99.95 

Superb image quality produced by both Digisectors. 





Screen 




Screen 



Printout 



NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new DS-69A or DS-69 
you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full refund of the purchase price. 
We'll even pay the return shipping. If you can get any of our competitors to give you 
the same guarantee, buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977, 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



* 
* 



**************************** 




Gwe us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoGoists in showing the Color Computer world 
^ouKhigh score at your favorite micro-diversion* We want to put your best effort on record in THE rainbow's 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed 
— legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high 
score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE 
RAtiiiillH^Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our hew 
Delphi CoCo SIG, From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL* then type send and address to; editors, 

: S 



mimmmimitim 



★ Current Record Holder 



3,851 
3,478 
3,299 
3,056 
1,578 



57,300 
54,300 
53,500 

27,950 



4,400 
3,050 
3,000 
2,500 



3,042,470 
747,200 

310,420 



ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 
4,254 ★Todd Wirtz, Midland, Ml 

Michael Wotcheski, Merlden , CT 
Rick Busse, Granite City, IL 
Neil Edge, WHIiston, FL 
Matthew Nelson, Endwell, NY 
Roy Geeo, Hot Springs, AR 
AMPHIBIA (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 

11,200 ★Daniel Bisbee, Chesterfield, MA 
6,665 David Salvatore, New Kensington, PA 
AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 

58,200 ★Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 
Mitch Hart, Seattle. WA 
Daphnie Phillips, Evansville, Wl 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Mike Tindall, Manitowoc, W| 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Data) 

101 ,989 ★David Salvatore, New Kensington, PA 
63,125 Edward Vogel Sr., Pittsburgh, PA 
53,950 Bill Fritsch, Whitehall, PA 
BATS AND BUGS (THE RAINBOW, 7/84) 

24,600 ★Michael Rosenberg, Prestonburg, KY 
Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
Jay Lose, Gulfport, MS 
Michael Scott, Johnstown, NY 
Steven Bullard, Allen, OK 
BEAM RIDER (Spectral Associates) 
4,969,060 ★James Oakley, Nashville, TN 

Evelyn Thompson, Nederland, TX 
Robert Eering, Swift Current, 

Saskatchewan 
Trevor Nagel, Swift Current, 
Saskatchewan 
BLACKBEARD'S ISLAND (NOVASOFT) 

65 ★Jeff Hillison, Blacksburg, VA 

78 Roy D. Grant, Toledo, OH 

79 Jeff Roberg, Winfield, KS 
BLACK SANCTUM (Mark Data) 

106 *Jeff Hillison, Blacksburg, VA 
BREWMASTER (NOVASOFT) 

451,650 ★Martha St. John, Highland Falls, NY 
Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 
Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 
Quebec 

Scott Purrone, Roselle Park, NJ 
Chris Cope, Central, SC 
BROTAN THE BLUE (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 
2,534 ★Robert Obringer, Wayne, NJ 
BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 
26,900 ★Derek Leidtg, Clinton, NY 

Daniel Cecil, Bardstown, KY 
Brian McGuire, Golden, CO 
Vincent Neauit, Biddeford, ME 
Tandy Carter Jr., Atwater, CA 
BUSTOUT (Radio Shack) 

37,900 ★Gordon Rock, Davenport, IA 

Charles Egglesfield, Sauit Ste Marie, 

Ontario 
Tanya Maestas, Denver, CO 
Mike McCafferty, Idaho Falls, ID 
Chris Zepka, North Adams, MA 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 
4,455,150 ★Paul Rurnrill, Gales Ferry, CT 

Blossom Mayor, East Greenbush, NY 
Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
Fruber Malcom, Culpeper, VA 
Gordon ROck, Davenport, IA 
Marc Gagnon, Cap-de-ia-Madeleine, 
Quebec 

CALIXTO ISLAND (Mark Data) 

166 ★Chad Qott, Evangeline, LA 



279,600 
216,350 

166,175 
98,875 



24,400 
22,600 
21,100 
14,881 



21,850 

21,630 
21 ,236 
18,403 



3,091,700 
1,133,850 
980,500 
847,400 
152,450 



Shutout 



9,129,100 
1,428,600 
1,347,800 
1,004,000 



31,260 
30.050 
27,530 
24,920 



60,690 
57,070 
45,460 
40,610 



707-0 

549-0 
256-4 
243-0 
93-1 



CANDY CO. (Intracolor) 

103,306 ★Kirk Nedrebeg, Liverpool, OH 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
9,988,000 ★Brannon Baxley, Live Oak, FL 
Gary Mohnsen, Tucson, AZ 
Chad McClelian, Rushville, IN 
Lucy Dorego, Leamington, Ontario 
Brett Fancher, Hooksett, NH 
CASHMAN (MichTron) 

$45,900 *Gordon Rock, Davenport, IA 
Fred Naumann, Hailey, ID 
Keith Miller, Houston. TX 
Sally Naumann, Hailey, ID 
Edwin Prather, Oxnard, CA 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 
352,020 ★Faye Keefer, Augusta, GA 
Mary Largent, Madison, MS 
Paul Walcott, Mt. Clemens, Ml 
Joyce Walcott, Mt. Clemens, Ml 
Stephanie Kosara, Monroe, NY 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

814-1 ★Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
•Chislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 
Quebec 

•Skipper Taday, Eaat Lyme, CT 

Ellsworth Summers, Jacksonville, FL'. 
•Steve Mutton, Shrewsbury, MA 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
COLOR BLACKJACK (THE RAINBOW, 10/83) 
$15,670 *Wayne Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
7,340 Helen Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

107,864 ★David Entenmann, Monroe, NY 
COLOROUT (Colorfui Software) 

34,085 *Tim Rueb, Stevensville, Ml 
COLORPEDE (Intracolor) 
3,107,194 ★John Ray, Goodlettsville, TN 
Keith Queen, Marietta, GA 
Gait Queen, Marietta, GA 
Mariano Frausto, Blue Island, IL 
Kevin Radwan, Blue Island, IL 
COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW, 4/83) 

3,241,600 ★Earl La Jesse Foster, Lynchburg, VA 
CRYSTLE CASTLES (ThunderVision) 

850,156 ★Michael Brennan, Calgary, Alberta 
Dan Mitenko, Calgary, Alberta 
Edwin Prather, Oxnard, CA 
Jeff Dinger, Edgewood, MD 
Jay Roberg, Winfield, KS 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

87 ★Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
John Semonin, Akron, OH 
David & Shirley Johnson, 

Leicester, NC 
Tommy McClure, Doyline, LA 
Robert Sunderland, Sacramento, CA 
DEATH TRAP (Soft Sector) 

40,674 ★David Entenmann, Monroe, NY 
DEFENSE (Spectral Associates) 

365.400 ★Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 

104,900 ★Michael Davidson, Cartersville, GA 
Scott Lewis, Glide, OR 
Hillel Morris, Chicago, IL 
Keith Tysinger, Asheboro, NC 
Skipper Taday, East Lyme, CT 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

64,195 *Jon Ruhnow, Duncanville, TX 
57,655 Tracy Salzman, LaSalfe, CO 
45,775 Mike Watson, Northville, NY 



65,215 
51,519 
37,912 
37,550 



1,618,400 
450,600 
32,380 
27,000 



45,291 
38.014 

37.990 
33,450 
31.138 



46,713 
33,676 
21,221 
19,986 



1,066,000 
1,006,000 
133,036 
59,529 



800,060 
689,751 
559,380 
545,000 



90 
91 
92 



93 
93 



100,900 
97,600 
93,500 
88,800 



34,990 Skip Freamon, Citrus Heights, CA 
32,190 Roger Dingledine, Chapel Hill, NC 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

68,872 ★Janine Freamon, Citrus Heights, CA 
Skip Freamon, Citrus Heights, CA 
Michael Lizardy, Oregon, OH 
Kenneth Merkel, Houston, TX 
Keith Miller, Houston, TX 
DONPAN (Radio Shack) 

20,000 ★Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
DOODLEBUG (Computerware) 
2,070,460 ★Robert Heifers, Sparta, IL 
30,330 Ken Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 
2,586,300 ★Eugene Roosa, Stone Ridge, NY 
Diane Guernon, Montreal, Quebec 
Michael Brennan, Calgary, Alberta 
Lorrie Trout, Johnstown, CO 
Roy Geeo, Hot Springs, AR 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

68,142 ★Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 
3ritish Columbia 
Chuck Morey, Bakersfield, CA 
James Pede, Rosedale, 

British Columbia 
John Siler, Dayton, OH 
Mike Tindall, Manitowoc, Wl 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

123,120 ★Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
Gilles Gagne, Sillery, Quebec 
Nathanael Heller, Kenner, LA 
Jermaine Jackson, Tallulah, LA 
Owen Edson, Sherman Oaks, CA 
DUNGEON QUEST (Computerware) 

16,985 ★Albert Seliger, Lachine, Quebec 
DUNKEY-MUNKEY (tntellectronics) 

276,900 *Jon Schmidt, Buffalo, MN 
Mark Aberdeen, Delisle, 

Saskatchewan 
Pat Leathrum, Newark, DE 
Michael Drouin, Reeds Spring, MO 
Esther Cassell, Eastern Passage, 
Nova Scotia 
ELECTRON (Tom Mix) 

45,890 ★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
40,650 Brad Gaucher, Hinton, Alberta 
32,625 John Morris, Rustburg, VA ". 
28,760 Craig Cornell, Greentown, IN 
ENCHANTER (Infocom) 

185/186 ★David Tarleton, Williamsburg, VA 
80/115 Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 
FALCON'S LAIR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 
18,461 *Joyce Smith, Butler, PA 

Michael Scott, Johnstown, NY 
Daniel Cecil, Bardstown, KY 
Alexander Taday, East Lyme, CT 
Dick Teeter, Hawley, PA 
Roy Geeo, Hot Springs, AR 
FIGHTER PILOT (Saguaro) 

350,450 *Steven Arvay, St. Louis, MO 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 
125,960 *John Gruz, Peabody, MA 
4,220 Bobby Shotko, Easton, PA 
2,080 Brook Whiffen, Jackson, MS 
1,600 Rick Busse, Granite City, IL 
FROGGIE (Spectral Associates) 

24,360 ★Curtis Taylor, Scarborough, Ontario 
22,940 Carlton Taylor, Scarborough, Ontario 
11,250 Mariano Frausto, Blue Island, IL 
7,270 Christopher Taylor, Scarborough, Ontario 



216,400 

198,000 
66,900 
47,300 



17,463 
15,707 
14,627 
12,497 
9,984 



★**★****★★**★★★*********★★★* 



1 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 




51,300 
33,930 
30,870 
19,410 



520,700 
352,000 
126,590 
49,220 



325,900 
259,960 

253,960 
248,540 
43,180 



80,550 
76,900 

76,900 

72,960 



760,600 
394,550 

350,450 
274,300 



5,200 Hiram Esparza, Blue island, IL 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

54,300 ★Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 
British Columbia 
Scott Maestas, Denver, CO 
Allisont larosis, Owego, NY 
Oren Bergman, Herzlia, Israel 
Ron Volans, Ogdensburg, NY 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 
1 ,306,640 ★Jackie Maddox, Iron Station, NC 
Keith Queen, Marietta, GA 
Gail Queen, Marietta, GA 
Shawn Corway, College Point, NY 
Atice Wasneuski, College Point, NY 
GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 

26,800 * Jorge De Albertis, Lima, Peru 
GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 

459,930 ★Gene Wells, Silsbee, TX 

Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
Steve Wright, Frederictbh, 

New Brunswick 
James Ginn, Laurel, IN 
Byron Alford, Raytowri, NO 
Arne Peterson, Lake City, FL 
GHOST GOBBLER (Spectral Associates) 
102,540 ★Greg Erickson, Lowell, MA 

Olga Plchard, Lausanne/Switzerland 
Ghislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 

Quebec 
Pierre Pichard, Lausanne, 

Switzerland 
Sylvain Castonguay, Chicoutimi, 
Quebec 

GOLD RUNNER (NOVASOFT) 

855,250 ★Jesse Sanders, Chimney Rock, CO 
Carmen Izzi Jr., Naugatuck, CT 
Marilyn dePierre, Mascouche Hts., 

Quebec 
Steven Arvay, St. Louis, MO 
Andrew Reeves, Woodinville, WA 
THE INTERPLANETARY FRUIT FLY (THE RAINBOW, 1/65) 
37,000 ★Scott Perkins, Port Orange, FL 
26,500 Jon Jegglie, Bend, OR 
22,000 Steven Bullard, Allen, OK 
16,500 Michael Scott, Johnstown, NY 
INVASION OF THE FLYING (THE RAINBOW, 3/66) 
SAUCER PEOPLE 

920 *Michael Clerico, Seaford, NY 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE ( Computer ware) 
1,100,000 ★Mike McCafferty, Idaho Fails, ID 
Brett Bias, Enterprise, AL 
Matthew Ramsay, Detroit, Ml 
Craig Cornell, Greentown, IN 
Mike Wochek, Bethel, CT 
JUNKFOOO (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

1,504,930 ★Larry Thomson, Menominee, Ml 
KARATE (Diacom Products) 

10,900 ★Jim Doyle, Barrackville, WV 
4,200 Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 
KEYS OF THE WIZARD (Spectral Associates) 

662 *John Fulton, Boydton, VA 
THE KING (Tom Mix) 
4,092.600 ★Fruber Malcom, Culpeper, VA ; 
Tim Rueb, Stevensville, Ml 
Yolanda Farr, Sayre, PA 
Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
Kevin Radwan, Blue Island, IL 
KLENDATHU (Radio Shack) 
1 ,347,020 *Paul Shoemaker, Quartz Hill, CA 
Dan Franzen, Westlake, OH 
Jay Pribble, Davenport, IA 
Brian Ennis, Wilmington, NC 
Gordon Atvarnaz, Taunton, MA 
KNOCK OUT (Diecom Products) 

168,383 ★John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
Rush Caley, Port Orchard, WA 
Daniel Lesage, Laval, Quebec 
John Rogers, Rye, NH 
Kirk Nedrebefl, Liverpool, OH 
LANCER (Spectral Associates) 

209,200 ★Gordon Alvarnaz, Taunton, MA 
LEMANS (Spectral Associates) 

0:57 ★Robert Eering, Swift Current, 
Saskatchewan 
Trevor Nagel, Swift Current, 

Saskatchewan 
Chris Wright, Fredericton, 
New Brunswick 
MADNESS AND THE MINOTAUR (Radio Shack) 



106,950 
103,560 
34,330 
33,410 



17,250 
14,861 
14,785 
14,241 
12,101 
8,314 



478 
365 



93,890 
60,120 
43,610 
34,140 



102,940 

100,410 
80,470 
80.050 



1,090,000 
1,072,600 
969,590 
376,000 



2,134,600 
1,670,900 
1,500,800 
79,340 



1,177,550 
412,809 
266,362 
209,825 



156,875 
149,190 
137,900 
132,465 



0:7|ft 



220 ★John Fulton, Boydton, VA 
MARBLE MAZE (Diecom Products) 
38,354,780 ★Melvin Sharp Jr., Baltimore, MD 
Dan Bouges, Niantic, CT 
Stephane Ouzilleau, Lauzon, Quebec 
Brian Biggs, Galloway, OH 
Brett Bias, Enterprise, AL 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

18,874 ★Tim Rueb, Stevensville, Ml 
Keith Queen, Marietta, GA 
Michael Clerico, Seaford, NY 
Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
Scott Swedis, Spencer, MA 
Scott Maestas, Denver, CO 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Greek, 
British Columbia 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

617,950 ★Michael & David Garozzo, 

Morrisville, PA 
161,920 John Guptili, Columbia, MO 
17,900 Hiram Esparza, Blue Island, IL 
MONKEY KONG (Med Systems) 

622 ★Krista Cassell, Eastern Passage, 
Nova Scotia 
Glen Bilodeau, Otterburn Park, 
Quebec 

Mark Ferris, Deep River, Ontario 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

206,780 *Wanda Jones, Brentford, Ontario 
Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
Steve Thomas, Ogdensburg, NY 
Tim Cragg, Kahoka, MO 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 
British Columbia 
MOON HOPPER (Computerware) 

376,350 *Rene Ringuette, Riviere-du-Loup, 
Quebec 

Krista Cassell, Eastern Passage, 

Nova Scotia 
Craig Cornell, Greentown, INI 
Brett Bias, Enterprise, AL 
Matt Yentes, Urbana, IN 
MR. DIG (Computerware) 
8,967,000 ★Brannon Baxley, Live Oak, FL 
6,787,000 Jeff Roberg, Winfield, KS 
3,533,650 Paula James, Lumberton, TX 
2,261,900 Stephane Ouzilleau, Lauzon, Quebec 
MS. MAZE (Tom Mix) 

12,560 ★George Frausto, Blue island, IL 
MUDPIES (MichTron) 

77,900 *Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 
66,700 Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
NINJA WARRIOR (Programmer's Guild) 
108,000 ★Eric Gladstone, Ocala, FL 

Spencer Reeves, Baton Rouge, LA 
Larry Strome, Humboldt, 

Saskatchewan 
Scott Enman, Belle Mead, NJ 
Mike McCafferty, Idaho Fails, ID 
Vivian Buterin, St. John, MO 
NUKE AVENGER (T&D Software) 

128,1 25 ★Chris Coleman, Meriden, CT 
OFFENDER (American Business Computers) 
171,900 *Jorge De Albertis, Lima, Peru 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

986-22 ★Toby Jacobs, Beltefontaine, OH 
Wes Hill, Vashon, WA 
Todd Amodeo, Winthrop, MA 
Michael Lizardy, Oregon, OH 
•Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 

Mark Lang, Downieviile, CA 
•David Jones, Frostburg, MD 
Kurt Rising, Westfield, MA 
OPERATION FREEDOM (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 
73,529 *Kirby Smith, York, PA 

Ed Westberg, Jensen Beach, FL 
Mary Edwards, imperial, MO 
Paul Walcott, ML Clemens, Ml 
Alexander Taday, East Lyme, CT 
PANIC BUTTON (Radio Shack) 

1,120 ★Nathanael HeJIer, Kenner, LA 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 

50,260 *Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
PENGUIN (THE RAINBOW, 2/85) 

48,250 ★Paul Wagorn, Carp, Ontario 
44,550 Kevin Gallagher, Santa Monica, CA 
20,780 George Bodiroga, Eureka, CA 
8,470 Joseph Tokarz Sr., Blossburg, PA 
1,660 Robert Nicosia, Gloversville, NY 



106,300 
68,100 

60,300 
53,200 
23,320 



970-32 

916-34 

910-58 

890-0 

690-41 

434-0 

434-8 



23,347 
19,814 
18,882 
12,673 



126,550 
87,700 
58,650 

39,350 



6,000 
4,840 
4,065 
3,440 



1.987,000 
1,253,200 
266,300 
250,050 



116,630 
57,680 

56,500 

50,210 
26,760 
14,700 



PHANTOM SLAYER (Med Systems) 

398 ★Marc Gagnon, Cap-de-ia-Madeleine, 
Quebec 

PLANET INVASION ( Spectral Associates) 

155,000 ★Jimmy Doyle, Barrackville, WV 
• Thomas Mayor, Brooklyn, NY 
Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 
Ghislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 

Quebec 
Paul Hotz, Herzlia, Israel 
POLARIS (Radio Shack) 

33,770 ★Gene Murphy, Ft. Worth, Tt 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

7,430 ★Myriam Ferland, Trois-Rivieres, 
j: Quebec 

Billy Fairfull, Charleston, SC 
Steve Thomas, Ogdensburg, NY 
Joseph Tokarz Jr., Blossburg, PA 
Bart Springer, Oskaloosa, IA 
POOYAN (Datasoft) 
3,785,000 *Ben Collins, Clemson, SC 
Jon Sowle, Sanford, FL 
Thomas Mayor, Brooklyn, NY 
Pat Leathrum, Newark, DE 
Andrew Reeves, Bothel, WA 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

165,180 ★Matt Heinemann, Richmond, VA 
Keith Aschemeier, Napoleon, OH 
Melita Boudreault, Port-Cartier, 

Quebec 
Bruce Johnson, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Scott Swedis, Spencer, MA 
Lorrie Trout, Johnstown, CO 
Shelly Tumbleson, Johnstown, CO 
PRO GOLF (Computerware) 

69 *David Esarey, Shelbyville, IN 
PROJECT NEBULA (Radio Shack) 

3,815 ★Christopher Romance, 
Massapequa Park, NY 
150 Mariano Frausto, Blue Island, IL 
QUE BIT ( Mike Ro Products) 

53,150 ★Neil Edge, WIMiston, FL 
QUIXrTom Mix) 

999,999 *Wilbur James, Charleston, WV 
22,454 Mariano Frausto, Slue Island, IL 
16,270 Mark Motel, Blue Island, IL 
RACER (THE RAINBOW, 3/85) 

301.9 ★Kirby Smith, York, PA 

Jennifer Woland, Silverdale, PA 
Neil Edge, Wtlliston, FL 
Craig Cornell, Greentown, IN 
Robert Nicosia, Gloversville, NY 
RADIO BALL ( Radio Shack) 
4,510,740 ★Les Dorn, Eau Claire, Wl 

Dominic Deguire, St. Basile, Quebec 
Sara Grace, Baltimore, MD 
Brian Matherne, Gretna, LA 
Pat Mulhern, Newark, CA 
ROBOTTACK (Intracolor) 
1 ,020,800 *lan MacLachlan, Bethany, Ontario 
Keith Smith, Bethany, Ontario 
Chad McClellan, Rushville, IN 
Douglas Hauk, Peoria, IL 
Stephane Ouzilleau & Daniel Cloutier, 
Lauzon, Quebec 
ROMMEL 3-D (MichTron) 

130,300 ^Stephen Charchuk, YBfrnouth, 
Nova Scotia 
Todd Hooge, Comox, 

British Columbia 
Marc Gagnon, Cap-de-la-Madeleine, 

Quebec 
Paul Seng, East Lansing, Ml 
Alex Seliger. Lachine, Quebec 
RUN FOR YOUR LIFE (THE RAINBOW, 4/85) 
80,000 ★Brian Jensen, Drayton Valley, 
Alberta 

Karen Goddard, Oshawa, Ontario 
David Craft, Roanoke, VA 
Ryan Devlin, Louisville, KY 
Brian Voges, Jasper, IN 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

879,100 *Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 

Bryan Jenner, Calgary, Alberta 
Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
Jon Sowle, Sanford, FL 
Brannon Baxley, Live Oak. FL 



283.4 
17.6 
15.0 
12.9 



1,945,110 
1,330,500 
1,301,350 
1,060,250 



931,250 
637,600 
599,150 
547,800 



84,000 

68,200 

82,700 
52,700 



50,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 



741,100 
587,600 
567,900 
378,300 



SAM SLEUTH P.I. ( Computer ware) 



******** ******************** 



* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 87 



***★********★*******★★★★*★★★★ 



10 ★John Fulton, Boydton, VA 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

77 ★Jeff Hillison, Biacksburg.VA 
SEA DRAGON (Adventure International ) 

21,200 ★George Frausto, Blue Island, IL 
19,630 Jorge De Albertis, Lima, Peru 
SEA SEARCH (Mark Data) 

94 ★Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, fl_ 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

17,300 *Rodrigo Maldonado, Whittier, CA 
16,805 Arne Peterson, Lake City, FL 
SHENANIGANS (Mark Data) 

90 ★Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

95 Jeff Hillison, Blacksburg, VA 
95 David Kay, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
99 Ed Emelett, Nanticoke, PA 

SHOCK TROOPER (Mark Data) 

214,203 ★Fruber Malcom, Culpeper, VA 
150,490 Erik Huffman, Rochester Hills, Ml 
100,040 Rodney Mullineaux, Gig Harbor, WA 
69,328 Gordon Alvarnaz, Taunton, MA 
49,438 Alex Seliger, Lachine, Quebec 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

228,610 ★Michael Clerico, Seaford, NY 
227,840 Cliff Farmer, McGregor, TX 
35,000 Bruce Johnson, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
18,500 Ken Dewitt, Blue Island, |L : 
9,950 Hiram Esparza, Blue island, tL 
SKIING (Radio Shack) 

0:59 ★Tim North, Emporia, KS 
1:00 Scott Clevenger, Fairmount, IN 
1:00 Billy Fairfull, Charleston, SC 
1:10 Kevin Gallagher, Santa Monica, CA 
1:13 Anthony Perez, Westminster, CA 
1:13 Chris Wright, Fredericton, 
New Brunswick 
SKRAMBLE (Tom Mix) 

109,280 ★Gilles Gagne, Sillery, Quebec 
SLAY THE NERIUS (Radio Shack) 

294,808 ★Joyce Walcott, Mt Clemens, Ml 
57,764 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
SPACE AMBUSH (Computerware) 

398,300 ★Alice Wasneuski, College Point, NY 



116,820 Shawn Corway, College Point, NY 
29,480 Frank Canepa III, Santurce, 
Puerto Rico 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

248,720 *Larry Lockwood, Benton, AR 
232,120 Jim Tucker, Commerce, TX 
200,300 Scott Swedis, Spencer, MA 
24,430 Michael Drouin, Reeds Spring, MO 
23,560 George Frausto, Blue Island, IL 
SPACE SHUTTLE SIMULATOR (Tom Mix) 
555 ★Robert Heifers, Sparta, IL 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

145,400 ★Brian King, Orlando, FL 
142,310 Kevin Cornell, Greentown, IN 
142,100 Chris Harrison, Brooks, KY 
139,210 Alan Drazen, Longwood, FL 
129,950 Jeff Dinger, Edgewood, MD 
SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

1,540 ★Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

8,400 ★John Guptill, Columbia, MO 
8,200 Chris Coleman, Meriden, CT 
8,100 Curtis Frazier Jr., Enterprise, AL 
7,050 Andreas Thaler, Coaticook, Quebec 
6,950 Scott lachetta, Rochester, NY 
STARSHIP CHAMELEON (Computerware) 

46,600 ★Glen Bilodeau, Otterburn Park, 
Quebec 

STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

78,600 *Don Johnson, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
56,580 Stefan Mecay, Austin, TX 
37,550 Michelle Wyner, Bloomfield, Ml 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

1 ,422,400 ★Timothy Bishop, Jacksonville, FL 
959,400 Sonya Hurst, Richmond, CA 
938,800 Christopher Romance, 

Massapequa Park, NY 
219,300 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
158,400 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
TIME BANDIT ( Mich Tron) 
1 ,025,210 *Terry Moora, St. Catherines, 
Ontario 

747,460 Steven Coiadonato, Roslyn, PA 
619,270 Kristopher Staller, Ft. Wayne, IN 



215,810 Mark Olson, Whttecourt, Alberta 
106,390 Sylvain Castonguay, Chicoutimi, 
Quebec 

TUBE FRENZY (Aardvark) 

125,800 ★Shawn Corway, College Point, NY 
87,750 Alice Wasneuski, College Point, NY 
TUT'S TOMB (Mark Data) 

247,800 *Jerry Austin, Baraboo, Wl 
225,1 60 Robert Wright, North Queensland, 
Australia 

189,960 Nicole Pouliot Coors, Mobile, AL 
189,940 Mike McCafferty, Idaho Falls, ID 
121,740 Ed Martinson, Newton, NC 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 
12,838,864 ★Gordon Alvarnaz, Taunton, MA 
WHIRLEYBIRD RUN (Spectral Associates) 
1 1 7.000 *Jeff Ray, N. Charleston, SC 
105,400 Sylvain Castonguay, Chicoutimi, 
Quebec 

54,500 Jay Aust, Marlborough, CT 
47,050 Michel LeBrun, Anjou, Quebec 
43,850 Glen Bilodeau. Otterburn Park, 
Ontario 

WILLY'S WAREHOUSE (Intracolor) 

654,800 ★Marilyn dePierre, Mascouche Hts,, 
Quebec 

ZAKSUND (Elite) 

70,600 ★Mike Atwood, Cedar Rapids, IA 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061,000 ★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
1,300,500 Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
253,400 Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
159,500 Thomas Mayor, Brooklyn, NY 
132,300 Roy Geeo, Hot Springs, AR 
94,500 Brian McGuire, Golden, CO 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) 

21,100 ★Phillip Johnson, Scottsville, VA 
14,300 Dale Taylor, Chattanooga, TN 
13,600 Michael Etchason, Sauk Rapids, MN 
6,600 Roy Geeo, Hot Springs, AR 
6,300 Jeffry Long, Butler, PA 



~» Debbie Hartley 




In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column of 
pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some interest- 
ing hints and tips, we encourage you to share them by sending them to 
y the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. j J 



FEEDBACK 

Scoreboard: 

In response to Donald Dare's letter 
(May 1986) concerning Dungeons of Dag- 
gorath, there are five levels. The wizard is 
on Level 5. 1 have killed him (and won the 
game) several times. 

You need the Joule and Rime rings plus 
a certain sword and shield, Those two rings 
must be 4t incanted" into their magic forms, 
though. A dictionary is most helpful! 

When you kill the "real" wizard, get his 
ring, then "incant" it. 

Also, iri Pyramid from Radio Shack, I 
can only get a few treasures and have found 
10 or so rooms. I always get lost in the 
maze. I found the vending machine, but 
ended up lost r— then dead. Send any help 
to the "Scoreboard:'* 

Dale Lampe 
Sacramento, CA 



Scoreboard: 

In response to Michael Fischer's letter 
(May 1986) concerning Hitchhiker's Guide 
to the Galaxy \ you also take the tooth- 
brush from Earth. Although you don't 
always need it, you're better safe than 
sorry! 

You cannot get past the screening door 
until you're near the end of the game. You 
should be very persistent in going to the 
Engine Room. Bring the plotter, generator 
and the Advanced Tea Substitute to the 
bridge. PUT BIT IN ATS, PUT SMALL PLUG 
IN SMALL RECEPTACLE, TURN ON DRIVE 
and off you go. If you want the improb- 
ability generator to work on the whole 
ship, then put the large plug in the large 
receptacle. 

Billy Harris 
Beaumont, TX 

Scoreboard: 

Concerning Peter Thorpe's letter (May 



1986), I have some advice. First, jump in 
the back of the jeep and go north. To get 
out of the mine, go N, E, N, E, S, E and E. 
I assume you know about the translator in 
the logging camp. 

I did get across the river, but only once. 

There are some things I was wondering. 
How do you get the children home? How 
do you cross the river? And finally, what 
do you need to complete Chapter One? 
Send any responses to the "Scoreboard." 

Dean Wagner 
Avon Lake, OH 



AUTOPILOT MODE 

Scoreboard: 

I have a few tips to pass along to anyone 
who uses Flight Simulator I by Radio 
Shack. The simulator will land itself in 



***************************** 



88 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



***************************** 



autopilot mode if you set the altitude for 
zero feet. It will also take off in autopilot 
if you let the plane reach takeoff speed 
(160-200), then engage the autopilot. 

John L. Whitaker 
Hamilton* OH 



KEEP YOUR GUARD UP 

Scoreboard: 

For those who have Knock Out by 
Diecom and are having trouble getting to 
the champ, this might help. 

When starting out with Canvas Kid, put 
your guard up and wait for him to move 
slightly, then punch left. You should be 
able to hit the first guy four times, then 
wait until he moves again and let him have 
it four more times with a left punch. You 
should do this to all boxers except the 
champ. Remember, though, the higher the 
rank of the boxer, the less number of times 
you can hit him. 

Phil Levesque 
Lewiston, ME 



ADVICE FROM THE DEAD 

Scoreboard: 

In three days I have solved Dragon 
Blade and would like to offer some tips. 
Although typing "help" in most places only 
gets you a meaningless response, in two 
places (both concerning water) it can be 
very helpful. 

To get past the first door you have to 
follow the advice of the dead man and get 
your hands dirty. Type REST when you 
reach a restful place. 

Throwing a rock at the right place keeps 
you from getting killed. 

In order to get past the stone door, you 
have to search one other room very care- 
fully. 

I do need help on two other Adventures. 
First, how do you get past the second 
spider in Trekboerl Second, in my To 
Preserve Quandic hint sheet, it tells me to 
call Kendall when I'm trapped in the room 
with the keys. But, when I call him he tells 
me that I'm not in a desperate situation and 
he won't help. How do I get past this? 

Eric Crichlow 
Las Vegas, NV 




POTPOURRI 

Scoreboard: 

I am a new reader of this magazine and 
I want to give some hints. 

In Offender, always "look" at the top 
little section instead of the big principal 
section. By looking at the small section, the 
game is easier and you will make hundreds 
of points. 

In Pooyan (rounds two and four), don't 
wait for the wolves to come up, or the 
"thing" on top of you to fall on your head 
when there are too many wolves on the 
tree. Instead, start shooting at the coming 
balloons (with no wolves). Doing this gets 
you more points. 

In Flight Simulator /, if you go north 
from Airport 0, you will find the Tandy 
Corp. logo picture and by flying north 
from Airport 2 you will find an 'N' and an 
arrow showing where the north is. Later, 
you can find words saying "Flightsim L" 
By flying east from Airport 0 you will also 
find the words "Flightsim I" and by flying 
east from Airport 2 you will find Airport 
4 and an 4 N* with an arrow telling where 
north is. Just before you run out of fuel, 
you will find two mountains with a lake 
and a river between them. 

In Cashman, when there are no cats, go 
up and get all the bombs that are being 
thrown. 

1 need help with Section 41 of Cashman 
and Section 3 in Poltergeist. 

I also need help with Adventure in 
Wonderland, Dungeons of Daggorath and 
Sands of Egypt. Send any help to the 
"Scoreboard." 

Jorge De Albertis 
Lima, Peru 



HOT STUFF 



Scoreboard: 

I need help with the Adventure game 
Trekboer. It is the first graphics Adventure 
I've bought and 1 can't seem to get past the 
stream of lava to get to the grating on the 
other side. If anyone can help me please 
write to the "Scoreboard." 

Alvin Cotton Jr. 
Fayetteville, NC 




TIMELY TIP 

Scoreboard: 

Many thanks to David Rodriguez's 
letter (May 1986) about Dallas Quest. I 
had the same problem Jon Olson had. Now 
that I've gotten through that, I need help 
getting past the cannibals and into the 
cave. How do I do this? Any help will be 
appreciated. 

Arne Peterson 
Lake City, FL 



TRAPPED IN THE COCO ZONE 

Scoreboard: 

Can anyone help me with Bruce Bell's 
CoCo Zone? (Appeared in RAINBOW, April 
1986.) I can't seem to get past the spider 
and web. 

Kim O'Brien 
Crest view, FL 



Editor's Note: To escape the tangled 
web she weaves, a shiny piece of 
jewelry is what you should leave. 
Before you arrive though, you'd 
better take heed, something else 
shiny, you will also need. 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our new Delphi CoCo SIG. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
MAIL, then type SEND and address to: 
EDI TORS. Be sure to include your complete 
name and address. 




★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 89 



How 

Does 
the 
CoCo 
Stack 



Up* 



By William Harden, Jr. 



you plunked down $69.95 
/^and bought a Color Com- 
J<-J VJputer on sale and now 
you're wondering what you've gotten 
into, eh? Or maybe you've had a Color 
Computer for a while and you're won- 
dering how the Color Computer stacks 
up against other computers in the news. 
Whether you're a new CoCo owner or 
an old hand, every once in a while I 
think it's a good idea that we stand back 
and assess ourselves and our equip- 
ment. Just how does the CoCo compare 
to systems like the Commodore 64, 
IBM PCjr, Macintosh, Atari ST and 
others? This is not a task for the average 
CoCo freak — he's simply too chauv- 
inistic, too enthralled with the system 
for which he spent hard-earned money. 
I'm also biased, but I think I can separ- 
ate my bias from the facts. I've been in 
all types of computing since 1965 — 
everything from mainframes to micros. 
Currently I have a Radio Shack TRS- 
80 Model I, TRS-80 Model II, TRS-80 
Model 4, two Color Computers, a 
Tandy 1000, a Tandy 2000, an IBM PC, 
an IBM PCjr, a Commodore 64 and 
assorted other smaller computers, like 
the little-known Timex 2068. Want a 
perspective about your machine? I think 
I can do an unbiased job. 

Eight Bits, Sixteen Bits, and More 

Computer science students love to 
beat each other over the head with their 
computer systems the same way they do 
with automobiles. "My Chevy can take 
your Ford!" has turned into "My Mac 
can run rings around your CoCo!" and 
other insults. When I'm asked what 
system I have at home, I tell them a Cray 
X-MP. Since this is a ten million dollar 
supercomputer, it shuts them up for a 
while. 

Whether you have a CoCo or Cray, 
though, one of the ways computers are 
compared is by the size of data pro- 
cessed by the microprocessor inside the 

Bill Barden has written 27 books and 
over 100 magazine articles on various 
computer topics. His 20 years expe- 
rience in the industry covers a wide 
background: programming, systems 
analyzing and managing projects rang- 
ing from mainframes to microcompu- 
ters. 



90 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



machine. Our Color Computers have a 
6809 microprocessor, which handles 
data in 8-bit chunks. (A bit, or binary 
digit, can hold one piece of information, 
a yes/ no or 0/ 1 piece of data.) 

The 8088 microprocessor used in the 
IBM PC, PCjr, and Tandy 1000, among 
others, is widely touted as a 16-bit 
microprocessor, but is really an 8-bitter 
like the 6809. Both the 6809 and 8088 
can perform some 16-bit operations, 
but move data between memory and 
central processing unit eight bits at a 
time. The microprocessor used in the 
Tandy 3000 and IBM AT is a true 16- 
bit microprocessor, an 80286. 

Many other microcomputers use 
older microprocessors than the 6809 — 
the Apple II series and Commodore 
VIC-20 or 64, for example, use a 6502 
microprocessor, decidedly an 8-bitter. 
The Apple Macintosh uses a newer 16- 
bit microprocessor, a 68000, as does the 
Atari ST line and the Amiga. 

So that puts the Color Computer on 
a par with the microprocessor used in 
the Tandy 1000, IBM PC and PCjr — 
about midrange in today's market. The 
question is, is a 16-bit microprocessor 
twice as good as an 8-bitter? The answer 
is not at all. Given a choice between a 
16-bitter and an 8-bitter, I'd take the 16- 
bitter, but I wouldn't expect it to do the 
job twice as fast. If you've ever seen 
some of the early Macintosh word 
processing applications, you'd wonder 
how such a fast microprocessor can 
operate so slowly. More important than 
the microprocessor size is how the 
system is put together as an entire 
package — hardware design, software 
design, operating system and so forth. 

To sum it all up, let's give the Color 
Computer a seven out of a possible 10 
for the microprocessor. 

The More Memory the Better? 

The Color Computer has a maximum 
memory limit of 65,536 bytes, each byte 
capable of holding one character of 
data, or about one basic keyword. Not 
all of this memory is available for user 
program storage, though. Normally, 
about half of the memory holds the 
BASIC interpreter. The remaining 32,768 
bytes is an enormous amount of mem- 
ory compared to minicomputer systems 
of the 1960s, many of which used only 



8,192 bytes to run their programs. 
However, the 32K (K standing for 
1,024) bytes does pale in comparison to 
the 640 K bytes available on the Tandy 
1000, IBM PC, and PCjr, and the 
millions of bytes available on more 
recent systems such as the IBM AT and 
Tandy 3000. How much memory is 
really needed? 

It really depends upon the task, but 
generally, the more memory, the better. 
Part of the reason people clamor so 
much for additional memory is that 
applications software packages like 
Lotus 1-2-3 are memory hogs — they 
require hundreds of thousands of bytes 
to run. However, there are many other 
packages that do not require such huge 
amounts of memory. Perhaps 90 percent 
of all software programs will run in a 
32K byte system. 

Systems like the Commodore 64 and 
Apple II series have about the same 
amounts of memory as the Color Com- 
puter. However, there's no question that 
this is one area in which the Color 



"More important than the 
microprocessor size is how the system 
is put together as an entire package — 
hardware design, software design, 
operating system and so forth/' 



Computer could stand some beefing up. 
If a new Color Computer is released, 
we'll certainly see additional memory as 
an option, perhaps as much as 512K. In 
the meantime, the Color Computer can 
run virtually any application, due to the 
large amounts of software packages 
available from Radio Shack and out- 
side vendors. 

Because the Color Computer could 
use more memory, we'll give the CoCo 
a three out of a possible 10 on memory. 

Good Graphics 

One of the nicest things about the 
Color Computer is its graphics — a 
maximum of 256 pixels, or dots, per 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 91 



horizontal row by 1 92 pixels per vertical 
column, making a total of 49,152 sepa- 
rate dots on the screen, each of which 
can be one of two colors. Another mode 
allows 128 by 192 dots in four colors. 
How does this compare to other sys- 
tems? At the top of the line is the 
Commodore Amiga, which has a max- 
imum of 640 by 400 pixels in 16 colors. 
Next is the Tandy 2000 with 640 by 400 
pixels in eight colors. The Atari ST is 
in this 640 by 400 range. The Enhanced 
Graphics Adapter of the IBM PC al- 
lows 640 by 350 pixels in 16 colors. The 
Apple II series allows 560 by 192 pixels 
in 16 colors. The standard IBM PCjr is 
next. The PCjr graphics is virtually 
identical to the Tandy 1000 — 640 by 
200 pixels in four colors. The Apple 
Macintosh has 512 by 342 pixels, but 
only in black and white. At the bottom 
of the range are machines like the Atari 
1200 series with 320 by 193 pixels and 
older machines with even less resolu- 
tion. The Color Computer is in this last 
category. 

You can see that the Color Computer 
is marginal as far as graphics goes — 
newer machines are tending towards 
better and better graphics. Of course, to 
get the better graphics, you need an 
expensive color monitor at perhaps 
$400 extra over the cost of the system. 
Then there's the fact that 640 by 400 
pixels in 16 colors requires a meg- 
abyte(!) of memory and a great deal of 



time to process. The result is a very slow 
screen update. With 128 by 192 four- 
color and 256 by 1 92 two color graphics, 
Color Computer screen updates can be 
done rapidly, and you don't need huge 
amounts of memory to store additional 
screen pages. 

Again, though, I'd have to say that 
the more screen resolution, the better, 
even if the full capability of the system 
isn't realized. Let's give the Color 
Computer four out of 10 on graphics. 



Languages 

Most computers have a built-in BASIC 
language capability — the IBM PC and 
PCjr do, as does the Color Computer. 
The interesting thing about BASIC is that 
most versions of it have been pro- 
grammed by Microsoft, a software 
company in Bellevue, Washington that 
got in on the ground floor of microcom- 
puters and has remained a major 
market force. As a result, Color Com- 
puter BASIC (including Extended BASIC) 
is remarkably like the PC and PCjr 
BASIC in many respects. The LINE, 
CIRCLE, and other graphics commands 
are virtually identical to those used on 
the IBM PC/ PCjr. Color Computer 
BASIC is therefore a strong BASIC that 
is much more of a standard than BASICS 
such as Applesoft BASIC or Commodore 

BASIC. 

Currently, the most popular compu- 
ter languages are basic, pascal, c, 
FORTRAN, COBOL and assembly lan- 
guage. All of these are available on the 
Color Computer via the OS-9 Operat- 
ing system. OS-9, of course, doesn't 
come with the system. It's a fairly 
inexpensive option, however, and you 
can pick the language or languages you 
require. The IBM PC and PCjr also 
have all languages available for them, 
but many of the other systems, espe- 
cially the newer ones, may not have 
certain languages. Assembly language is 
generally available on all systems — I've 



mentioned the EDTASM+ product — 
and other assembler programs are 
available for the Color Computer as 
well. Assembly language is a difficult 
language in which to program, but it 
produces extremely fast programs. 

As far as languages, therefore, I'd 
have to give the Color Computer a nine 
on a scale of 10; just about everything 
you'd want is available, although you 
do have to use the OS-9 operating 
system in some cases. 



Operating Systems 

An operating system controls system 
resources such as printers and disk 
drives and it acts as an overseer to 
control all system operations. Although 
Disk BASIC is called Disk BASIC, there 
are many functions in BASIC that would 
properly belong in the operating system 
realm; commands like DIR, KILL and 
LDADM. The intent of Radio Shack was 
to make a simple operating system, and 
they succeeded very well — the Disk 
BASIC operating system commands 
include most of the common things 
you'd want to do with any operating 
system. 

In addition to Disk BASIC there's the 
sophistication of OS-9. OS-9 is a Color 
Computer form of the Unix operating 
system, an operating system developed 
by Bell Telephone Labs and touted as 
one of the best around. Personally, I'm 
less enthusiastic than most about OS-9 
and Unix. It's sophisticated and versa- 
tile, to be sure, but it's not very friendly 
and hard for the beginner to use. How- 
ever, I would rank OS-9 above such 
operating systems as the MS-DOS used 
on the IBM series and Tandy 1000, 
1200, 200 and 3000. 

Without OS-9, I'd have to give the 
Color Computer four out of a possible 
10; with OS-9, it gets an eight — one 
point is taken off because of OS-9's 
complexity. 

The CoCo User Base 

It's funny how you can have an ex- 
citing computer, but if the system 
doesn't take off, nobody develops soft- 
ware for it, potential buyers lament the 
lack of software and delay their pur- 
chase or buy another system, and the 
product may fail. This was the case for 
many computers over the last ten years 
or so — computers such as the Timex 
2068 and Coleco Adam. One current 
product for which this may be happen- 
ing is the Commodore Amiga, which 
seems a little expensive for the impres- 
sive graphics possible on the system. 

The base of users for the system, then 
is very important. It takes sales of 
hundreds of thousands of systems be- 
fore the snowball effect works the other 
way, inducing more and more people to 
develop software for the system, design 
system add-ons and produce other 
related products. Current estimates of 
sales for the Color Computer are about 
1.5 million units! That's not a bad 
figure, to say the least. For contrast, the 
IBM PC is one of the best selling 
computers of all time, certainly in the 
millions of units. The Commodore 64 



"One-and-a-half million users can't be 
too far wrong — let's give the Color 
Computer a nine out of 10 for the user 
base." 



92 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



ind VIC-20 have also sold millions. The 
\pple Macintosh has probably sold in 
he high hundreds of thousands. The 
BM PCjr has sold in the low hundreds 
)f thousands. Systems such as the 
Zoleco Adam or Timex 2068 have sold 
)nly tens of thousands. The Color 
Computer, then, is toward the high end 
}f sales compared to other systems, but 
s not the all-time best selling small 
computer. 

With 1.5 million units, however, the 
CoCo has a plethora of hardware and 
software products. IH just mention a 
few that have blown my socks off. 
There's CoCoMax, a terrific color 
graphics/ mouse program which rivals 
the Macintosh MacDraw, but in color! 
There's EDTASM+, one of the best 
assemblers on the market today in terms 
of interaction with the user and inte- 
grating editing, assembling, and debug- 
ging facilities. There's OS-9, the profes- 
sional Operating System for the Color 
Computer which enables several tasks 
to be run concurrently on the CoCo and 
provides more than enough power for 
even a jaded mainframe user. However, 
there are a lot of small products too, 
ranging from the Y cables sold by 
Spectrum Projects to the neat games of 
MichTron. The point is, there's a huge 
user base and a full spectrum of pro- 
ducts to support the computer, which 
you certainly will not find in systems 
which haven't made the grade. 

One-and-a-half million users can't be 
too far wrong — let's give the Color 
Computer a nine out of 10 for the user 
base. 



Cost 

This is a subject dear to everyone's 
heart and probably is the biggest single 
factor in a small computer purchase. At 
the RAINBOWfest in Palo Alto earlier 
this year I saw 16K Extended BASIC 
Color Computers going for $59.95! 
Those types of prices make the Color 
Computer a tough system to beat. 
Another decided plus in favor of the 
Color Computer is that the system is 
modular — you can start off with the 
basic box and then add disk drives and 
other equipment as you require. 

Figuring an Extended Color Compu- 
ter with a single disk drive, 64K of 
memory, and color television monitor, 
the best current price would be about 
$600. The Atari ST with monitor is 
about $700. A Tandy 1000, an excellent 
buy, can be purchased for about $1000 
with color monitor. The Commodore 
Amiga with monitor is about $1400. An 



IBM PC with a single drive and color 
monitor is about $1800. The Color 
Computer, then, is not as dramatically 
different as you might expect when it 
comes to price, but it sure is an easy 
system on which to start off inexpen- 
sively, and one that will grow with you. 

However, there's another factor in 
price. Lotus 1-2-3 for the IBM PC costs 



Other people run only Lotus 1-2-3 and 
would like huge amounts of memory for 
their spreadsheets. Still other owners 
are into languages such as C and assem- 
bly language and want a system that 
runs their favorite compiler in a friendly 
environment. Other users want a system 
with good, inexpensive graphics games 
for their kids. I'll leave it up to you to 



"Do I like the Color Computer? 
Somehow it exudes a user friendliness 
my IBM PC just can't compete with." 



$300. The Microsoft C compiler for the 
PC costs $250. Contrast this with the 
$29.95 for Radio Shack's "Spectacula- 
tor" and $99.95 for the OS-9 C compiler 
on the Color Computer. Just walk 
through the aisles of any RAINBOW- 
fest to see how inexpensive hardware 
and software for the Color Computer is. 

Let's give the Color Computer a 
seven out of 10 on the basis of its 
bargain prices for an overall system and 
inexpensive hardware and software 
add-ons. 

To Sum It All Up 

At this point we can tabulate the 
different categories we discussed above. 
A lot of this, I admit, is somewhat 
subjective, but I've tried to be unbiased. 
Here's the scorecard: 



Microprocessor 

Memory 

Graphics 

Languages 

Operating System 

User Base 

Cost 



7 out of 10 

3 out of 10 

4 out of 10 
9 out of 10 

8 out of 10 

9 out of 10 
7 out of 10 



Obviously simply adding up these 
counts won't give you an absolute figure 
on how the Color Computer stacks up 
against the competition. The biggest 
reason for this is that the criteria above 
must be "weighted." With some users, 
cost is a very important factor, with 
others, the difference between a $3000 
Tandy 3000 system and an $600 Color 
Computer system is no problem at all. 



determine your own needs and how 
much weight you'd like to give each 
factor. 

From the comparisons above, 
though, I think it's fair to draw the 
following conclusions: the Color Com- 
puter is an inexpensive system with 
inexpensive software and hardware 
add-ons. The system uses a fairly recent 
microprocessor that provides adequate 
computing power. Memory is limited, 
but large enough to run most applica- 
tions. While the graphics don't match 
the graphics of newer systems, they are 
adequate for most applications and 
games. The Color Computer has a wide 
range of languages, a good basic oper- 
ating system, and a harder-to-use, but 
powerful, advanced operating system. 
It's user base guarantees good support 
from the manufacturer and developers 
of hardware and software products. 

And now for my personal, strictly 
biased opinion: Do I like the Color 
Computer? Somehow it exudes a user 
friendliness my IBM PC just can't 
compete with. I like the classic lines of 
the instruction set of the 6809 micro- 
processor. I even, believe it or not, like 
the feel of the keyboard. When I see the 
graphics on such programs as Sands of 
Egypt or Co Co Max, I forget that the 
resolution isn't quite as good as a Tandy 
1000. I especially like wandering down 
those aisles at RAINBOWfests, picking 
up fantastic bargains on hardware and 
software. The CoCo will be around for 
a while in my computing room and I 
hope in yours as well. 

August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 93 




EDUCATION NOTES 



16K 
ECB 




Exploring the Card Catalog 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



"W* ^ is never too early to begin build- 
I good library skills. Many 

~M» ^public libraries have story hours 
for children, beginning with the pre- 
school set. There are many skills needed 
to be able to use libraries to their fullest 
extent. Children in the elementary 
grades need continued instruction and 
guidance in the use of their classroom 
and school library facilities. 

The school librarian or classroom 
teacher usually helps individuals and 
groups to select books or to find books 
related to a particular topic or problem. 
She sets aside periods in which she tells 
a story, introduces children to new 
books and acquaints them with the 
library setup. She also explains and 
demonstrates the use of the card cat- 
alog. 

By the end of the fifth or sixth grade, 
most students are thoroughly familiar 
with the organization of the school 
library. They understand classification 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



of books and library arrangement, use 
of encyclopedia or reference book letter 
keys, reference guides, card catalogs 
and the use of a variety of reference 
books. These reference books include 
encyclopedias, atlases, almanacs, year- 
books, telephone directories and news- 
papers. The students often collect and 
organize materials for class assignments 
or their own class library. 

One skill we feel dominates library 
use is the card catalog. The ability to 
properly use it often determines if one 
can locate the proper material one 
needs. Some libraries are now using 
methods other than the traditional card 
catalog. The newer methods usually are 
less expensive to the library. Whatever 
the system, the material it contains is 
similar. 

This month's program will help fa- 
miliarize students with the information 
contained on cards from a typical card 
catalog. An illustration of a typical card 
is shown. The student is asked to locate 
the author's last name, the title, the 
publisher and the number of pages. 

Lines 30 and 40 set the dimensions for 
the number of cards. Lines 50 through 
70 read the cards' information from the 
DATA lines. Lines 80 through 300 ask the 



questions about the four pieces of 
information we are looking for. If the 
answer is correct, a pleasant tune is 
heard. If incorrect, the correct answer 
is inserted in the proper place. 

The DATA lines contain the cards' 
contents. They are entered in the follow- 
ing manner: author's last name, au- 
thor's first name, title of book, illustra- 
tor, publisher, copyright date and 
number of pages. 

Please note there is no comma at the 
end of the number of pages which is the 
end of the DATA line. Placing a comma 
here is a common mistake that alters the 
results desired. 

There are currently only five cards in 
our catalog. You may add an almost 
endless number of cards if you desire. 
Merely follow the DATA line pattern 
started by the program and shown 
above. Enter your DATA on lines that 
you create following Line 420. Be sure 
to adjust the value of 'N' on Line 30 to 
the new total amount of cards. 

We, at Computer Island, hope that 
you will use and modify this program 
for your children's needs. It would be a 
nice experience for the children to assist 
you in selecting more books to include 
and in entering the new DATA lines. □ 



94 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



4^ 

Sj/ 200 34 

330 208 

END 40 



T 




The listing: CARD LOG 

10 REM "CARD CATALOG" 
20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 
D SOFTWARE , STATEN IS LAND, NY, 1986 
30 N=5 

4j3 DIM A$(N) ,B$(N) ,C$(N) ,D$(N) ,E 
$(N) ,F$(N) ,G$(N) 
50 FOR T= 1 TO N 

60 READ A$ (T) , B$(T) ,C$(T) ,D$(T) , 
E$(T) ,F$(T) ,G$(T) 
70 NEXT T 

8J3 CLS5 : PRINT@7 , "THE CARD CATALO 
G"; 

90 PRINT§32,STRING$(32,2)34) ; 
100 FOR T=1T05 : PRINT : NEXT T 
110 R=RND(N) 

120 PRINT@64,A$ (R) ", "B$ (R) 
130 PRINT§lp4,C$(R) 
140 PRINT@136,D$(R) " , ILLUS . 11 
150 PRINT@168,E$ (R) 

160 PRINT@180,",C.";F$(R) 

170 PRINT@200,G$(R) P., ILLUS." 

180 PRINTSTRING$(32,195) ; 

190 PRINT@2 56 /'AUTHOR'S LAST NAM 

E";: INPUT L$ 

200 IF L$=A$(R) THEN GOSUB 350 :G 
OTO 220 

210 IF L$OA$(R) THEN GOSUB 360: 
PRINT@274, "-";A$ (R) 
220 PRINT@320, "TITLE" ;: INPUT T$ 
230 IF T$=C$(R) THEN GOSUB 350 :G 
OTO 250 

240 IF T$OC$(R) THEN GOSUB 360: 
PRINT@325, "-"C$ (R) 

250 PRINT© 3 8 4, "PUBLISHER" ; : INPUT 
P$ 

260 IF P$=E$(R) THEN GOSUB 350 :G 
OTO 280 

270 IF P$OE$(R) THEN GOSUB 360: 
PRINT@393, "-"E$ (R) 

280 PRINT@448, "HOW MANY PAGES";: 
INPUT M$ 

290 IF M$=G$(R) THEN GOSUB 350 :G 
OTO 310 

300 IF M$OG$(R) THEN GOSUB 3 60: 
PRINT@462, "-" ;G$ (R) 



310 PRINT@482, "enter TO GO ON OR 

e TO END"; 
320 EN$=INKEY$ 

330 IF EN$="E" THEN CLS ELSE IF 
EN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN ELSE 320 
340 END 

350 PLAY " L50O4 CEGEEEGC ": RETURN 
360 PLAY"O2L100CCC" : RETURN 
370 DATA SPEARING, JUDITH, GHOSTS, 
MARVIN GLASS, SCHOLASTIC, 1972, 160 
3 80 DATA HENTOFF, NAT, JAZZ COUNTR 
Y, CHARLES MINGUS , DELL, 1970 , 143 
390 DATA DECK, JOHN, BEYOND TOMORR 
OW, RICHARD SANDERS,NOBLE,1970,15 
8 

400 DATA GRAVES, CHARLES, JOHN KEN 
NEDY , PAUL FRAME,DELL,1966,80 
410 DATA DAVISON, MICKIE, GEORGE W 
ASHINGTON, SEYMOUR FLEISHMAN , SCHO 
LASTIC,1957,71 

420 REM" YOU MAY ADD MORE DATA LI 
NES HERE FOR MORE BOOKS. BE SURE 
TO KEEP THE VALUE ON 'N' ON LIN 
E 15 CURRENT." 



m 

'Mnilw Cqii1 



PiT LRSTi \ \ 

ARE YOU TIRED OF PLUGGING 
AND UNPLUGGING PERIPHERALS? 

WOULD YOU RATHER F10T SPEND 
$50.00 ON A SWITCHING BOX? 

PLAN-NET FORMS now offers complete 
plans (assembly instructions, diagrams, 
and parts lists by vendor) for RS-232 port 
switching boxes. 

All parts are available almost everywhere 
locally at a small fraction of the cost of 
most commercially offered boxes. 

Only $ 5.00 PER SET!!! 

UarN©t Forms 



:*assn 



VISA 



P.O. Box 1061 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-1061 
717-821-2946 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 95 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 

I JL 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full -screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 









...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 


TELEWRITER-64 







Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
•'windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

{Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVII/VIII, DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable /disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line hepders and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su p e saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page hack ward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



6R\ 

RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



...truly a state of the art word processor... 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to; 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Calif ornians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple 11 is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a trademark 
of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp; MX-80 is a 
trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 



The ^Hidden' Computers 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The education industry is com- 
prised of much more than 
teachers and students. Many 
people work for education, but never 
see a classroom, or even a school. Yet, 
their work is important, and helps to 
make teachers' jobs more productive. 
Computers play a role for these people 
too, and assist in getting an educational 
product developed and delivered. 

One example of such an educational 
effort is the production of educational 
television tapes for schools and general 
public. Preparation of a videotape can 
be a very simple affair, providing you 
do not mind a low-quality final product 
with an amateurish appearance. With a 
video cassette recorder and a video 
camera, anyone can take home movies 
and show them in classrooms. Produc- 
tion of a high-quality tape, however, is 
an entirely different matter. 

Before videotape, preparation of an 
educational film could also have been a 
simple affair. Many people owned home 
movie cameras and took movies. An 
amateur could even edit the film by 
looking at each frame of the film, 
cutting and splicing until the edited 
version was more acceptable to the 
audience. With videotape, editing can- 
not be done with a sharp blade and glue. 
You cannot simply cut a piece of video- 



Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in a central office of a 
school district and currently is em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



tape and attach another piece to it. 
Electronic editing is required. 

Another problem of video editing is 
school students (and members of the 
public such as school board members, 
parents, etc.) have a more sophisticated 
attitude toward educational video 
materials than in the past. The quality 
of the message is often measured by the 
quality of the medium. We have been 
spoiled by slick network production, 
not to mention Sesame Street and other 
professional material now available for 
educational use. 

Editing a videotape has some similar- 
ities to editing celluloid film. A video- 
tape has frames, much like a film has 
frames. On celluloid film, a single frame 
is one picture, one exposure of light 
onto the film. One frame of a videotape 
is a sweep of the cathode ray gun down 
the video screen. There are thirty such 
complete sweeps every second, there- 
fore a video frame is 1/30 of a second. 
To edit a tape, you need to record the 
frames wanted onto a new tape. A blank 
tape is used to receive the images from 
other tapes. The final recording has to 
be in the proper sequence, even if that 
means going backwards on one of the 
raw tapes. 

Every videotape contains the image 
plus other information. Each frame has 
room for 80 bits of audio information. 
Some of that information is used as a 
time code track. Each frame of video 
tape has a code that tells the hours, 
minutes, seconds and frame number. A 
technician can call up the exact frame 
of a piece of tape that is two minutes, 
14 seconds, and 29 frames from the 
beginning. 



Now we see how to edit videotape. 
The director can indicate the final tape 
should begin with the shot happening 
four minutes, two seconds, three frames 
after the start of the raw tape, go for 20 
frames, then insert the shot that is one 
hour, eight minutes, five seconds and 
three frames. This process continues for 
the entire length of the finished product. 
This type of editing is much more 
difficult than cutting a strip of celluloid 
and physically inserting it at the right 
place. 

There are companies that provide the 
equipment necessary for such editing. 
One machine is required to record the 
final product and, generally, more than 
one machine is used to provide the 
incoming source tape, since most people 
will have more than one reel of tape 
containing the original information. 

Recently, I observed such an opera- 
tion at the television section of the 
Illinois State Board of Education. One 
recording machine was connected to six 
source tape players. Two other input 
devices were used to control screen 
graphics. The editing process was 
handled by a computer, as you might 
well imagine. The impressive part of this 
educational television facility is that a 
Radio Shack Color Computer is the 
machine controlling this massive array 
of complex electronic video equipment. 
That's right — the little white box from 
Tandy, almost unnoticed among dials, 
knobs, blinking lights and huge ma- 
chines, was the brains of this operation. 

The Color Computer has several jobs 
in this facility. It must first touch and 
read each of the incoming tape ma- 
chines and the recording machine. The 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 97 



computer has to determine if the tape 
machine is on with a tape correctly 
inserted and ready to play. The compu- 
ter provides commands to each of the 
machines to stop, get ready, play, and 
most crucial of all, to determine the 
frame position called for by the director. 

The creator of this system, Mitch 
Hopper, loads up to six tapes, then sits 
at the keyboard of the Color Computer. 
He types in a command to record from 
one of the input machines, beginning at 
a specified location, for the required 
length of time. There are hundreds of 
such commands necessary for one final 
tape. Each command is also listed to a 
printer for later verification and track- 
ing of the finished tape. 

The computer then goes to the spe- 
cified input machine, reads the time 
code, determines how far away (and in 
which direction) the requested time 
code is, moves the tape back and forth 
until it has found the correct beginning 
spot. The exact frame of the input tape 
is then noted. To further complicate 
matters, the electronic devices have a 
delayed reaction time. A tape machine 
cannot simply begin playing, it first has 
to get up to speed then start showing the 



signals for that frame. Each input 
machine has a different delay time, 
meaning the Color Computer has to 
keep these times straight for every 
machine. 

Finally, the Color Computer must 
start the machine providing the incom- 
ing signal, as well as the recording 
machine, at exactly the correct time, so 
the specified frame — not one frame 
ahead or behind — is recorded on the 
final product. With thirty frames per 
second, the job requires the combina- 
tion of high quality in computer, soft- 
ware and operator. 

I was amazed when I found the Color 
Computer performing this task. I was 
even more amazed when the man who 
developed this system said he had 
written the entire program in BASIC. 
Machine language would have been 
faster than BASIC, but would not greatly 
increase actual speed, because of the 
time required for a human to change 
tapes on the machines. 

The total material investment in this 
system was one Color Computer, a tape 
player for the computer (no need to use 
disk; the program stays in the machine), 
and about $250 for a Programmable 



Peripheral Interface box. The- PP 
contains extra memory and the addi 
tional ports necessary for "talking" witl 
the tape machines. No monitor wa 
necessary, there were plenty just laying 
around. After all, this is a facilit] 
devoted to video. Mr. Hopper spent sij 
weeks programming the Color Compu 
ter and building the interface device. 

It is possible to purchase hardwan 
and software specially developed fo: 
this type of operation. Such a system tc 
perform the tasks currently done by th< 
Color Computer would cost abou 
$30,000. Of course, that does not in- 
clude the time necessary to learn how tc 
operate the equipment. 

So, the next time you show a class i 
videotape, or watch something on edu- 
cational television, think of the people 
behind the production. One of themjusi 
might be an extremely creative persor 
named Mitch sitting in front of a littk 
white computer from Radio Shack. 

That's all for now. If you have i 
comment or question about this article 
or any matter related to education anc 
the Color Computer, please contact me 
at 829 Evergreen, Chatham, Illinois 
62629. fZ\ 



CORRECTIONS 







"Wishing Well: Achieving Arcade Game Speed in 
BASIC" (July 1986, Page 98): Due to a printing error, 
some lines in the Trench listing may be difficult to read. 
Line 15 should read as follows: 



"The Old-Time Banner Printer" (May 1986, Page 150): 

Credit should have been given to Francis S, Kalinowski 
for portions of the program concept and some of the 
operating routines that were derived from his original 
work. We regret this omission. 



15 PMODE3 , 1 : R$="U24C2F2E4F2G4C4N 
H3F20L24":DRAW ,, C4S4BM0,47"+R$ :R$ 
-"U24L4C2H2G2F4C4NE3G2 0R28" : DRAW 
» BM2 55,47 ,r +R$ : PAINT ( 3 ,41) ,4, 4 : PA 
INT ( 2 5 3 , 4 1 ) , 4 , 4 : PMODE 4,1: RETURN 



Line 17 should read: 



"Juggle Bills, Juggle Bills, Juggle All the Way!" 
(March 1986, Page 76): Glen Dufur has written to point 
out that, although the keybox for the article indicates 
otherwise, Homebdgt is cassette-based and does not 
support disk. 



17 LINE- ( 180,20) ,PSET : LINE- (256, 
40) , PSET : LINE (7 6,20 )-(0,0) , PSET : 
LINE(180,20)-(256,0) , PSET: PAINT ( 
10 1 2) ,2, 2: PAINT (10 ,20) , 4 , 2: PAINT 
(246,20) , 4 ,2 : PMODE 4 , 1 : LINE (0,144 
) - (256 , 192) ,PSET,BF:F0RI=1T065:P 
SET (RND (256 ) , RND (66) +30) : NEXT 



For quicker service, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DAT R at 
the CoCo SIG prompt and INFO at the Topic? prompt. 



98 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 




s Battle the 

st of Disk Drives 



^Jew Lower Price 

Jn-DISK Drives $40*35? 

$34.95 

You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



Un-DISK uses your computer's extra 
memory like a fast disk drive. 

Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs. 

Un-DISK is INVISIBLE. Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VDOS. 

Un-DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

Un-DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all . . . 

Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

Un-DISK should be in the library of every 
serious CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J. Esser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 




OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited, the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if you already own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk. 

EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . 
Additional Power For $14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK! 

• VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5, 10, 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DISKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• VDUMP can allow you to save a whole lot 
of rainbow on tape in a SINGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK. 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally! Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $34.95 

The Preble VDUMP $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U.S. and Canada $1.50 

or $5.00 to other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 
Canadians may order from Kelly Software 



Mind-tingling action] 

THE SECOND RAINBOW BOOK OF 




Twenty-four of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled await you in this latest offering from The Rainbow 
Bookshelf. Journey through time, fight World War III, win 
the heart of a beautiful and mysterious princess. Experience 
the titillations of the most rugged Adventurer without ever 
leaving your seat. 

Order The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and among the 24 program 
listings you'll receive are: 



Yellow Submarine — Meet the Beatles and attempt to 
outlast the Blue Meanies while enjoying some of the 
Fab Four's all-time musical hits. 
Ring Quest — Regain possession of a magical ring and 
save a kindom. 

Time Tripper — Lost in another dimension. 




Chief Inspector — Who killed B.L. Brown? 
Sir Randolf Returns — The sequel to a favorite from our 
first Adventure book. 

Silverton House — Where's the money been stashed? 
Ice Princess — Just one glance at this beauty will steal 
your heart. 




Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mark Fetherston, Jeff Crow, Larry Lansberry, 
J.C. Jackson, Robert W. Mangum II, Robert Poppe, David Taylor, Gregory Clark, Steve Skrzyniarz, David L. Dawson, Curtis Boyle, 
Bruce K. Bell, Pat Pugliano, Pat and John Everest, Mike Fahy, Scott Settembre, Darin Anderson, Robert L. Thomas, Terrance Hale, Paul 
Hensel, Philip Courie, Michael Dennison and Robert Dickau. 

The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures sells for only $13.95! 

THREE BONUS PROGRAMS 

WHEN YOU BUY THE SECOND RAINBOW ADVENTURES TAPE! 

That's right. You'll receive a total of 27 fantastic Adventures when you get the Second Rainbow 
Adventures tape. The three bonus games are Castle Thuudo, by Carmen D. Michele; Halls of 
Dungeon Death, by Eric and Mark Riel; and Caves of Kalakh, by Jane Fisher — programs with 
listings too lengthy to include in the book. Save yourself hours of typing listings. Load these great 
Adventures into your computer and run them! 

The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape is only $13.95. 

The tape is an adjunct and complement to the book. Even if you buy the Second Rainbow 
Adventures Tape, you'll need the book for the introductory material and loading instructions. 

Keep your Rainbow Bookshelf up-to-date! 
See Page 117 for additional Rainbow Bookshelf offerings. 





□ Please send me 
The Second Rainbow 
Book Of Adventures 
for $13.95* 



□ Please send me 
The Second Rainbow 
Adventures Tape 
for $13.95 




The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed.* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number Exp. Date _ 



Signature 



Mail to: The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures, 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S., add $4. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
U.S. currency only, please. 




URN OF THE SCREW 



Timing and the SAM Chip 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



A we all know, the CPU in our 
/% CJCoCo is the MC6809E. It is 
L .m. j^the heart of the computer. It 
squires RAM and ROM and I/O and 
r ideo and so on to help support it. All 
hese devices must be memory mapped, 
'hey must appear somewhere in the 
4K bytes of memory the CPU can 
.ccess. The proper timing and sequenc- 
tig must be within the specifications of 
he CPU. Normally, a handful of TTL 
74 series) logic chips take care of this, 
n the CoCo one big chip takes care of 
ill of this and more. The chip is the 
VIC6883, sometimes known as the 
^4LS783N. The name of this chip is a 
Synchronous Address Multiplexer or 
5AM for short. This is a 40-pin chip 
;hat mates the MC6809E and the 
MC6847 (the video chip). This chip also 
does all of the dynamic memory refresh 
Liming and memory mapping of all the 
other major chips of the CoCo. As you 
san see, this thing is a real workhorse 
of a chip. By the time I am finished de- 
scribing this chip, everyone will have as 
much respect for it as I do. 

Tony DiStefano is well-known as an 
early specialist in computer hardware 
projects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Que- 
bec, 



The first part of this article is a pinout 
of this chip. Figure 1 shows the pinout 
of the SAM chip. The following is a pin- 
by-pin description of the Motorola chip 
number MC6883. 

Pin 1 to 4 — All to A8. Address lines 
All to A8 respectively from the 
MC6809E. These are four of the 16 
address lines the SAM requires to fully 
control the memory mapping of the 
CPU. 

Pins 5 and 6 — OSCin and OSCout. 

These are the crystal oscillator inputs. 
A crystal and supporting components 
supply the SAM a master frequency of 
14.31818 MHz. This is the highest 
frequency available in the CoCo. 
Pin 7 — VClk. The first function of this 
pin is to generate an output of 3.579545 
MHz. This supplies the color carrier for 
the VDG (Video Dispay Generator) Clk 
pin. The second function resets the 
SAM when this pin is pulled to a logic 
level of 0, acting as an input. In the 
CoCo, this pin is part of the reset 
circuitry. 

Pin 8 — D AO (Display Address 0). The 

function of this pin as described in the 
Motorola manual is the least significant 
bit of a 16-bit video display address. The 
more significant 15-bits are outputs 
from an internal 15-bit counter which is 
clocked by DAO. The second function, 



A11 cz 


1 




40 


=3 VCC 


A10CZ 


2 




39 


ZD A12 


A9 CZ 


3 




38 


ZJ A13 


A8 CZ 


4 


M 


37 


ZJ A14 


OSCIN CZ 


5 


C 


36 


Z3 A15 


oscout cz 


6 


6 


35 


ZI 27 


VCLK CZ 


7 


8 


34 


Z] 26 


DAOCZ 


8 


8 

3 


33 


Z3 25 


HSCZ 


9 




32 


Z124 


WE CZ 


10 




31 


Z3 23 


CASCZ 


11 




30 


ZI 22 


RASOCZ 


12 




29 


ZI21 


QC 


w 




28 


ZD 20 


E CZ 


14 




27 


ZISO 


R/WC 


15 




26 


Z3S1 


AO CZ 


16 




25 


Z3S2 


A1 CZ 


17 




24 


ZDA7 


A2CZ 


18 




23 


ZJA6 


A3 CZ 


19 




22 


ZDA5 


CNDEZ 


20 




21 


□ A4 



SAM Pinout 
Figure 1 



not used by the CoCo, is to indirectly 
enter the logic level of the VDG FS 
(field synchronization pulse) for vertical 
video ad dres s updating. 
Pin 9 — HS. This input, connected to 
the HS output of the VDG, detects the 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 101 



falling edge of the pulse in order to 
initiate eight dynamic RAM refresh 



Column Address Strobe. It strobes the 
most significant 6, 7 or 8 address bits 



»w>' — 



SAM Control Registers 



iiS ; *'->. •5 J! »j»" 



- 



FFk DF 



FF DE 



FF DD 



FF DC- 



FF ;r DB 



FF D7 



: FF?;: D6 



'FF'-.; '.05. 



FF D* 



FF 03 



'•FF*; D2 



FF 01 



FF DO 



-:FF^ CB 



FF CD 



W CC 



FF CB 



FF CA 



FF C9 



FF C« 



FF C7 



FF C« 



FF C5 



FF C4 



FF C3 



FF C2 



FF CI 



FF rCfl 



— 



s 



s 



s 



tUirn 



s 



s 



s 



TY 



Ml 



MO 



Rl 



MP 



RO 



F6 



F4 



F3 



F2 



F1 



FO 



m 



map 
typo 



memory 



tlze 



CPU 
rale 



f*V 

page § 



display 
offset 

v? 4 . 



VDG 
MODE 



Oascrlptlont 



RAM 



0 = ROM/RAM 



00«4K Ot*1«K U-WM. 11=atatlcRAM 



# ^ro# / H)1 « dual «p6«d 11 • rj*i 



SET * PAGE #1 CLEAR = PAGE #0 



S«<f*. 



"A 



alert of display 
address and 512 byte offset 



a 
z 

> 



0 . 



O 



5 ft 

O H 



L 





1 


1 


1 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 




0 


0 


1 


•1 


0 


0 


1 


0 


1 


0 


1 


0 


..\ ■ 


a 



— 



S * aatv 



C = clear 



cycles. It also resets four least signifi- 
cant bits of the internal video address 
counter. 

Pin 10 — WE. This output is the write 
enable pulse that enables the CPU to 
write into d ynam ic RAM. 
Pin 11 — CAS. This output is the 



into dyn amic RA Ms. 
Pin 12 — RASO. This output is the Row 
Address Strobe 0. It strobes the least 
significant 6, 7 or 8 address bits into 
dyamic RAMs in Bank 0. 
Pin 13 — Q. This output is the Quad- 
rature clock used by the CPU that leads 



the 'E' clock by about 90 degrees. 
Pin 14 — E. This output 'E' clock, beti 
known as the Enable clock, is used 
the CPU. It is the main CPU timing ai 
is also used by most peripherial devict 
This clock determines the speed 
which the CPU operates. 
Pin 15 — R/W/This input is fed fro 
the CPU's R/W line. It tells SA. 
whether the CPU is reading or writii 
data to memory, writing to the SA! 
registers or device 0. 
Pins 16 to 19 — AO to A3. Address lin 
AO to A3 respectively from tl 
MC6809E. These are the next four < 
the 16 address lines the SAM requir 
to fully control the memory mapping i 
the CPU. 

Pin 20 — GND. Return ground for ti 
five volts. Signal ground to which s 
signals are referenced. 
Pins 21 to 24 — A4 to A7. Address lin< 
A4 to A7 respectively from th 
MC6809E. These are the next four < 
the 16 address lines the SAM requin 
to fully control the memory mapping c 
the CPU. 

Pins 25 to 27 — S2 to SO. S2 is the mo 

significant bit of the three device sele< 
bits. The binary value of these three pir 
selects one of eight chunks of CP1 
memory map, device 0 to 7. Varying i 
length, these chunks provide chip s< 
lects for three ROMS, RAM, three I 
O areas and boot area; the boot area i 
not used in the CoCo. 



Chunk 
Niiitie 

SO 



si 



£2 



S3 



Mapped 
Area 

S00OO to J7FFF 
0 to 32767 



S800D to I9FFF 
32768 to 40959 



SA000 lo SBFFF 
40960 to 49151 



SC000 to SFEFF 
49! 52 to 65279 



34 



SFF00 to $FFI F 

65280 to 6531 I 



Description 

This area in a 64 K ma- 
chine is 32K of user 
RAM, 

This area is occupied 
by the 8K Extended 

BASIC ROM chip, 

This area is occupied 
by the 8 K Color BASIC 
ROM chip. 

Normally this area is 
occupied by the 
Disk ROM chip, but 
this area can access up 
to I6K. 

This area is 32 bytes 
long. Four bytes are 
used for a PI A to 
which the keyboard 
H$, VS and audio se- 
lect arc connected. 



Chunk 
Name 



Mapped 
Area 



Description 



S5 



SFF20 to $FF3F 
653 1 2 to 65343 



JFF40 to SFF5F 
65344 to 65375 



S7 



SFF60 to SFFDF 
65276 to 65503 



This area is also 32 
bytes long and again 
only four bytes are 
used for a PIA to 
which the VDG con- 
trol^ P/A, cassette 
motor, RS-232 and in- 
terrupts are con- 
nected. 

This 3 2 -byte area is 
used with a disk con- 
troller to control 
things like drive select, 
FDC control and 
drive motors. 

This is not used except 
for the SAM control 
registers. 



Table 2 



1 02 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



■ 



ns 28 to 35 — ZO to Z7. These are the 
ght multiplexed address lines needed 
access 64K dynamic RAM. With 16K 
'namic RAM, only ZO to Z6 are used 
id Z7 is RAS1 for a second bank of 
>K chips. With 4K dynamic RAM, Z6 
not used. These lines are also used to 
:nerate the video address refresh on 
e alternate 'E' cycle, 
ins 36 to 39 — A15 to A12. Address 
les A15 to A12 respectively from the 
[C6809E. These are the last four of the 
3 address lines the SAM requires to 
illy control the memory mapping of 
le CPU. 

in 40 — Vcc. This pin requires +5 
alts. It powers all the functions in this 
lip. 

As you can see from these descrip- 
ons, the SAM chip and VDG chip are 
iOsely linked. The SAM chip generates 
ata from its RAM and delivers it to the 

DG. That is one of the functions of the 
AM. It works closely with the VDG 
lonitoring the horizontal and vertical 
yncs in order to give it the proper data 
lat the VDG later converts to a video 
ignal. The SAM has many modes in 
/hich it delivers video data to the VDG. 
Tiese modes are selected by a set of 
egisters in the SAM's memory map. 
Jut since the SAM chip has no data 
ines going to it, the registers are ac- 
essed by writing to odd address loca- 
ions to set the register and writing to 
ven address locations to clear the 
egister. The data written to these 
ocations is irrelevant. Table 1 shows all 
he SAM control registers and their 
unctions. Most of the registers shown 
ire used with the VDG. 

Pins SO to S2 are used to decode 
chunks of memory. These so-called 
chunks of memory are what memory 
maps the CoCo into what we know it 
to be. For instance, BASIC is one chunk 
that is 8K long. Disk Extended BASIC 



is another chunk that takes up 16K. 
These eight chunks are decoded from 
the three pins by using a 74LS138. You 
might remember this from a past article, 
but if you don't, a '138 is a three-input 
to eight-output decoder; just what the 
doctor ordered. Each one of these eight 
outputs controls one chunk of memory. 
Table 2 shows all eight chunks and 
describes where in the memory map 
they appear and what use each has in 
the CoCo. 

In Table 2, notice that part of S7 are 
the SAM control registers. Table 1 
describes the SAM control registers. 
The SAM control registers are divided 
into six areas. The following is a de- 
scription of each of these areas. 

The first area is the map type. When 
cleared, the SAM is in the map type 0. 
This is the mode that BASIC sets it up 
to be. The ROMs are active and a 
maximum of 32K RAM is accessible. 
When set, the SAM is in the map type 
1 . This mode is better known as the 64K 
mode or the RAM mode. In this mode 
none of the ROMs are active but all 64K 
RAM is accessible. The OS-9 operating 
system uses this mode. 

The next mode is the memory size. 
The SAM can use three types of dy- 
namic memory, 4K, 16K and 64K. 
When your CoCo is first turned on, a 
routine in the BASIC ROM checks to see 
what kind of RAM is installed and sets 
the SAM chip accordingly. 

The third mode is CPU rate. The 
SAM has some control as to the speed 
at which the CPU can operate. It has 
three choices; the first is called slow. In 
this mode the CPU runs at .894 MHz. 
The next is the dual speed mode. De- 
pending on where the CPU is accessing 
memory, it can access it at .894 MHz or 
at the faster 1.78 MHz. At the dual 
speed, SO and S4 are accessed at the 
slower speed, all other accesses are at 



the higher speed. The third speed is the 
fast speed. This is where all accesses are 
done at the high speed, but at that 
speed, the SAM chip does not have the 
time to do video. The video screen 
displays garbage. 

The fourth mode is the page mode. 
When the SAM is in map type 0 and is 
using 64K memory chips, only half, 
32K, of memory is used. The other half 
is just sitting unaccessible. Setting this 
register switches in the other half of 
memory and switches out the first half. 

The fifth mode area is a big one in 
that it takes up a lot of room. This is 
the display offset. This offset tells the 
SAM chip where in memory to start the 
video scanning. Since the smallest 
memory area the SAM can scan is 512 
bytes, all offsets are 512 bytes apart. The 
display offset is a binary address to the 
start of the video display. 

The sixth area is the VDG mode. 
Since graphics pages take up more 
memory than text, the SAM has to scan 
more memory. The amount of memory 
scanned depends on the graphics reso- 
lution mode required. Basically there 
are three amounts of graphics memory. 
The first is 1.5K memory, the second is 
3K and the highest is 6K. These modes 
of graphics must match the graphics 
mode the VDG is set to. You will find 
more detail on these modes in the BASIC 
manual supplied by Radio Shack. 

The last mode is reserved for future 
use. Who knows what Motorola has in 
store for these unused registers. 

The SAM chip is a very complex 
chip, indeed. I have just described only 
the major parts of this chip. Complete 
details on this chip are available from 
your Motorola dealer. The details I have 
given are taken from that manual and 
the TRS-80 Color Computer Technical 
Reference Manual, available at your 
local Radio Shack store. 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING for the TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 



At last ^ The book exclusively for you and your CoCo !! 
You've le^rrted BASIC and are now ready to learn assembly 
language programming. This hands-on guide begins with 
the basics and progresses to the expert level; 
revealing programming conventions and techniques and 
all the internal capabilities of the TDP-100, CoCo 1 
and 2. At every step ofi the way are illustrations, 
sample programs, and plain English explanations. All 
sample programs are shown as assembled with Radio 
Shack's |p|ASM+ cartridge. Plus, a complete chapter 
explains how to use all ED TASM+ capabilities. This book 
describes how to write subroutines, interrupt handlers, 
programs that control the graphics display modes, 
cassette, disk; keyboard, sound, joysticks, serial I/O, 
interrupts, and use of ROM resident subroutines. Also 
covered are the MC6809E microprocessor, the video 
display generator (VDG), peripheral interface adapters 



(PIA), SAM, memory, and how they all work together. 
Suitable as a high school or college textbook. 
CHAPTERS : The Binary Number System - Memory and Data 
Representation - Introduction MC6809E Microprocessor - 
Addressing Modes of the MC6809E - MC6809E Instruction 
Set - Assembly Language Programming with EOT ASM* * 
Assembly Language Programming - Assembly Language and 
Extended Color BASIC - Internal Control and Graphics - 
Technical Detai Is. 

289 pages TRS-80 & EDTASM+ are 

soft cover trademarks of Tandy Corp 

$16.00 U.S. plus $1.50 shipping. Check or money order. 
RI residents please add 6% sales tax. Inquire about 
volume discounts. 

Published and 

sold by 



TEPCp 

30 Water 



Portsmouth, RI 02871 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 103 





LOCK IT TIGHT Technalock is a low- 
cost way to secure movable equipment 
from theft. Pressure-sensitive adhesive 
bonds the securing plates to the equip- 
ment while a vinyl-coated steel cable 
and lock completes the system. The kit 
can be used for applications other than 
computer equipment; stereos, tool- 
boxes, outboard motors and many 
other items can be protected as well. 
The master system sells for $24.95 and 
expansion kits are available. Contact 
Business Security Systems, 512 South 
Hanley, St Louis, MO 63105, (314) 
962-4446. 

POWER PLAY Ohm/ Electronics re- 
cently introduced the Scooter(R) 
Model SP5G Guard-It™ Control Cen- 
ter for personal computers. The SP5G 
provides five protected and switched 
outlets. LED indicators show the status 
of the main power, computer and mon- 
itor outlets. The unit protects against 
noise, voltage surges and spikes. A 
resettable circuit breaker completes the 
front panel. The thin, modern cabinet, 
which emulates the look of the IBM PC 
and clones, features an attached swivel 
base. Suggested retail price is $98.95. 
Contact Ohm/ Electronics, 746 Ver- 
mont Street, Palatine, IL 60067, (800) 
323-2727. In Illinois, call (312) 359- 
6040. 

PICKS FOR YOUR POCKET Spe- 
cialized Systems Consultants Inc. has 
announced its latest edition to its line of 
pocket references. The Text Processing 
Reference is a guide to UNIX word 
processing tools and includes coverage 
of the mm macros and the tbl, eqn, nroff 
and troff commands. The 32-page guide 
sells for $6. Other pocket references 
offered by SSC are UNIX Command 
Summary, C Library Reference for 
Standard System V, MS-DOS Com- 
mand Reference, FORTRAN 77 Refer- 
ence and the VI Reference. Contact 
Specialized Systems Consultants Inc., 
P.O. Box 55549, Seattle, WA 98155, 
(206) 367-UNIX. 



IMPROVEMENTS Tandy Corpora- 
tion has announced that consolidated 
sales and operating revenues for the 
month of May were $245,108,000. This 
is an increase of 12 percent over the May 
1985 revenues of $219,074,000. Tandy's 
U.S. retail operations recorded a 10 
percent May gain over that same period 
in 1985. In May 1986, recorded sales 
and revenues for U.S. retail operations 
were $195,414,000 while May 1985 sales 
were reported to be $177,112,000. Rev- 
enues from U.S. stores in existence 
more than one year increased slightly in 
May 1986. Keep it up Tandy! 

ADDITIONS Black Box Corporation 
has issued the second edition of its 
personal Black Box(R) Catalog. The 
new catalog offers 20 percent more 
items than the previous issue. New 
product lines include data acquisition 
products, software to serve as manage- 
ment tools and several reference books 
on the personal computing field. Also 
included in the 88-page, full-color 
catalog are cables, switches, test equip- 
ment, tools, modems, spoolers, pro- 
tocol converters and terminal emula- 
tion boards. Subscription to the catalog 
is available at no charge by writing: 
Personal Black Box(R) Catalog, P.O. 
Box 12800, Pittsburgh, PA 15241, or by 
calling (412) 746-5500. 



NO MORE STICKY DISKS Weber & 
Sons Inc. has found a method of label- 
ing diskettes. The NoLabelSystem(c) is 
a permanent label way to organize and 
identify floppy disks. Instead of peeling 
off old labels and affixing new ones, you 
affix a clear plastic pocket to the disk 
and slide in an insert card with the 
appropriate information on it. To re- 
name the disk, just slide in a new card. 
Included in the NoLabelSystem(c) are: 
100 plastic pockets, 100 white and 100 
color insert cards. The tabs on the insert 
cards stick out of the pockets for easy 
removal. Sizes are available for 3|/i- 



inch, 5!4-inch and 8-inch diskettes. TI 
kit is $19.45 plus $3 shipping. Catalc 
numbers are: NLS-3.5-100, NLS-5.2! 
100 and NLS-8-100. A test packag 
containing 25 samples of each item : 
also available for $6. Contact Weber < 
Sons Inc., NLS Dept., 3468-2 Hwy I 
Freehold, NJ 07728, (800) 225-0044. 



WANT TO GO OUT? Internatiom 
Resource Development Inc. has give 
us some insight into the future of datinj 
The firm is predicting that by 199 
singles bars around the world will b 
equipped with computerized card reac 
ers to help their customers meet "coir 
patible" companions. According t 
Matthijs Moes, who led the study effor 
customers will carry special identifies 
tion cards — about the same size a 
credit cards — and the terminal/ reader 
in the bars will read the informatio 
into a small computer. The compute 
will compare personal attributes an< 
indicate to the customer who else in th 
bar might have compatible interests 
The customer will have to take it fron 
there. The cards will give a whole ne\ 
meaning to the term "personal" compu 
ter, says Moes. 

On a related note, IRD says medica 
cards, similar to the dating cards, wil 
be introduced first. These cards wil 
contain all-important medical historiei 
of the carrier. This information will helf 
in processing insurance claims and 
more importantly, speed necessar) 
attention to the ill. Blue Cross/ Blue 
Shield of Maryland announced lastyeai 
that it had given Canon a contract foi 
$40 million to produce some 60,OOC 
reader/ writer terminals over a five-yeai 
period. 

EXPERIMENTER'S DELIGHT OWI 

Inc. has expanded its Movit family of 
educational robot kits to include the 
WAO. This robot is designed to teach 
the fundamentals of computer pro- 
gramming (e.g. flowcharts), perform 
graphics and develop an awareness to 
robotics. WAO has an internal micro- 
computer chip. The system stores a 
program in ROM (2K) and will store a 
user program in RAM (128 x 4 bits). 
With its built-in RS-232 interface, the 
WAO is ready to communicate with 
most personal computers. WAO is sold 
in kit form and requires assembly. The 
electronics, however, come pre- 
assembled and tested. Suggested retail 
for WAO is $99.95. Contact OWI Inc., 
1160 Mahalo Place, Compton, CA 
90220, (213) 638-4732. 



104 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



2S6K 




HOME RUN! 



256K Bd - $129.95 
512K Bd - $169.95* 

(Requires RS Multi-Pak) 



OS-9 
DRIVER 
$24.95 



The first 256K/512K memory bd for the 
CoCo II ! Inside this low noise metal 
case lives 256K/512K of memory and all 
the circuitry to access it as a RAMDISK ! 
Compatible w/all CoCo H's even 26-31 27B & 

B (see June '86 Rainbow Review) 




ecommended for OS-9 users ! 



256 K 




256K 



STRIKE 1 - RAM ! 

(NOT available for CoCo H's) f^Q_Q 

********* ^° ° 

Thunder Dupe 2 - Format & Jt nDI\/CD 

vC Backup a FULL diskette (68^ UTaI V E.ri 

grans) in ONE PASS! Up to j*, ^ 

. 4 Disk Drives?!! $24.95 ^ <SlOA QR 

5>^h»o 

The first 256K memory Bd for the CoCo! 
Load four 32K pgms at once, emulate a 
40trk RAMDISK, 60K Print Spooler, FAST 
access, 30+ Hi-Res screens in memory!! 
$99.95 (see Sept '85 Rainbow Review) 

DOUBLE RAM - Upgrades a THUNDER RAM from 256K to 
512K giving TWO independent RAM Disks! $79.95 



veSom coco make 



; : .-. ,f!i|Bl|R;:;:. : :..:-:-.' 

VERSION 



STRIKE 3 - A KIT! 

Feature packed hardware & software 
Graphics System! Includes: Pull-Down 
Menus, Icon processing, multiple Font 
styles, full graphic editing plus a special 
Input Module for 256x192 joystick input. 
64K DISK $79.95 w/Y-Cable $99.95 
Requires Multi-Pak or Y-Cable ($29.95) 
CoCo Max I - II Disk Upgrade - $19.95 
CoCo Max (TAPE) $69.95 Mouse Pad $14.95 



■»*— SUPER DISK '»m, 

GRAND SLAM ! 

Tony Di Stefano (Turn of the Screw Guru) 
has done it again ! ! ! Coming soon is 
SUPER DISK - a HARD DRIVE adapter that 
will fit inside the Super Controller or Super 
Ram. It will be able to access one or two 
FIVE, TEN or TWENTY MEGABYTE Hard 
Disk Drives. Write for more exciting details ! 

COMING... SUPER COPY!!! 




STRIKE 2 - DOS! 



EPROM Programmer 
| $59.95 1 



Uses 2764 ($6.95) 
or 27128 ($14.95) 

EPROMS ! (Requires Super Controller) 

The most AMAZING CoCo Disk Controller 
ever! Switch up to 4 DOS's (up to 16K) 
via a single software POKE! Choose 
between R/S 1.0/1.1, Spectrum DOS, 
ADOS, JDOS, Stearman DOS - $99.95 

Spectrum DOS $29.95 and/or ADOS $39.95 w/purchase 
of Super Controller (Buy 'em both for $59) 

Enhanced Display 80 - Add an 80x24 
display, Real Time Clock & Centronics 
Parallel Printer interface to your Super 
Controller ! Includes SMOOTH SCROLLING 
& Switchable Video Input !! $129.95 
NEW! OS-9 Driver for Display 80 $24.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS, INC. 

PO BOX 21272 
WOODHAVEN NY 11421 

Mail or Phone 

Shipping $3.00 (Foreign $5,001 
COD $2 extra - NY Res add tax 
COD Order Line 718-835-1344 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

COLORFUL COMPUTING 



COMMUNICATION 




C0L0RC0M/E - A complete smart 
terminal" package! Upload, 

Download, Hi-Res (51X24) 

screen, 300/1200 Baud, Offline 

Printing. 32/64K Disk * - $39.95 

*- Now with DELPHI & Compuserve 

XMODEM support! Download ML! 

COMPUSERVE 5hr Start Kit $19.95 




MODEMS 




WORD PROCESSING 





1 200 BAUD 
$129.95 



** 



Hayes compatible! Super for the 
DELPHJ & C ompuserv e CoCo Sig! 
30671200 Baud, Auto-dial/ answer 
** Requires Modem cable .$19.95 




KEYBOARDS 



TELEWR I JER r 64 - Three Hi-Res 
screens, true lowercase char's 
right justify, full screen 
editor. Tape $49.95 Disk $59.95 
TELEPATCH - A TW-64 enhancer! ! ! 
True block move, Overstr i ke & 
TSPOOL mode, Type Ahead Buffer 
FASTER Disk I/O 64K Disk $19.95 

lllilllllllllHIllllllllllllimilllllllllllllll 



PRINTERS 

— ■ 



GEMINI N X-1Q - 120 cps, tract- 
frict feed, NLQ mode, 5K buffer 
Front Panel Controls! - $249.95 
KAMELEON -Low cost Parallel Ptr 
Interface! 600/9600 Baud $49.95 
BriteFace -The first INTELLIGEN T 
Ptr Interface! A1J Baud rates 
with NO switches to turn $59.95 





MONITORS 



aiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHia 





I 'l ' i \^\\ 



RS 26-3CH6 Low Profile CoCo 
Keybd. Fits a/M CoColTs, "F" & 
TDP-100's WAS $39.95 NOW $14.95 
Adapter for D/E CoCoI f s - $9.95 




i 



E 




Monitor Stand $24.95 



pnilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHI 



MONOCHROME Monitors - CRISP 
80x24 Hi-Res screens! $79.95 
Uni versa! Video Driver - Works 
w7a11 monitors & CoCos!- $29.95 

Anti -Glare Screen $24.95 

TT^COLOR Monitors $169.95 

TAXAN Tuner-Receive TV channels 



on any composite m onitor $99.95 




SAVE $10 



OFF COLORCOM/E WITH A HAYES MODEM 

OFF TELEWRITER-64 WITH ANY PRINTER, 
KEYBOARD OR MONITOR 



SAVE $10 



SPEEDY COD ORDER HOT LINE - CALL 718-835-1344 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

COLORFUL COMPUTING 



SPREADSHEET 



a u i in i» i m ii nm m m m n i ■»! ■ mi 

3 ICoPipet it i.rl lUYNACALC 



UVNACALC 



i— 




Screen 32X16 51X24 

Precision 9 digits 16 digits 
Hi-Res Graphics NO YES 
Visicalc cmd format NO YES 
New low price! 64K Disk $69.95 
Side Wise -Print DYMACALC files 
up to 255 cha^s -sideways 1 $24,95 



Bimnim miiiiiiiiiiiiniHiiiBiiiin 



DISK DRIVES 

amiiiiiiiiiiiima imnmniMBniWB j 




ATA BASE MANAGER 





PRO-COLOR FILE 2,0 - 60 Data 
Fids, 8 Report Fmts, 4 Screen 
Fmts, 1020 bytes/record. Sort 3 
Fields, Global Search, FAST ML 
Sort, Create Files Compati ble 
w/DYNACALC! - Disk $49.95 
Pro Color Pi r and PCF Forms - 
r em both for only $29.95 



Buy 



fn 



silllllllUIHIHINHIUIMIIOIHlllllB 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DRIVE 0 

$239.95* 

Disk Drive - 1,2 or 3 - $119.95 
* Super Control ler -Manual - Cable 




ii 



GAME CONTROLLERS 



g nniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




Wjco Com mand Adapter - Now you 
can hookup 2 Atari type joystks 
to your CoCo for only $19. 95 ! ^ 
Wico Trackball -Rapid fire & 36Cr 
action! Reg. $69.95 - Now $19.95 
DELUXE Joystick - 360 Degree 
control with center return or 
analog positioning - $27.50 




fenn mum in iniTnmmtniTr 



DISK SOFTWARE 



* * 



Hu iHiim—iiiiiiimi iiiiiiimninnnmmi 



1. Fast Dupe II $14.95 

2. CoCo Keybd Software ..$14.95 

3. Wizard (TW-64) $19.95 

4. EZ Base (Database) ....$24.95 

5. Graphicom $24.95 

6. Blackjack Royale $24.95 

7. Color Forth ...$24.95 

8. Spect'm Adv Generator $29.95 






COCO II UPGRADES 



gjiniiiiiuiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiimiimiiii 



Want to up grad e your new $69/ 
$88 CoCo II? TSee below ! !) 
4464 DRAMs - two chip 64K 
upgrade for 26-31 3 4A and 26- 
3134B Korean CoCo 1 1 1 ! ..$39.95 
Extended BASIC - 28 pin ROM for 
26-3134 A7B~CoCo II's ...$34.95 
Buy ! em BOTH for only - $69.95 



Buy em buih tor oniy - >o^.yo 

^iiiiiiimiwiiiiiiiiiiininwiiiiiniil 



♦ *~ SAVE $100! ! 1 
Buy the ABOVE 8 
programs for only 
$79.95 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS, Inc. 

PO BOX 21272 
WOODHAVEN NY 11421 



FREE - Send for our 
CoCo catalog flier 111 
Dealer inquiries invited 1 
Software submissions 
welcomed ! 



All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



HARDWARE PROJECT 



With this handy joystick port 
switchbox, CoCo can pull off . . . 




By Mark Haverstock 



The Color Computer owner has a 
multitude of control devices to 
choose from. Several varieties of 
joysticks, trackballs, touchpads and 
mice are available to help us draw, play 
and create. However, the Color Com- 
puter can only accommodate one device 
at a time in each of its joystick ports. 
Likewise, the hardware component of 
the popular graphics program Co Co 
Max only offers a single plug-in socket. 

If you've ever had to reach behind the 
computer to plug and unplug joysticks, 
or have wanted to change drawing 
devices in Co Co Max, youll appreciate 
the Stick Switcher. Armed with a few 
parts and tools, you can build this 
convenient switchbox for selecting up 
to three different devices on one joystick 
port. An off positon is also included. It 
allows all the control devices to be 
disconnected from the joystick port. 



Mark Haverstock is an English and 
reading teacher for the Boardman 
Schools in Youngstown, Ohio, and is 
involved in computer and media pro- 
jects at the middle school level His 
hobbies include computing, photo- 
graphy and amateur radio. 



Figure 1: Layout for Drilling Box (to scale) 




Back 



V 2 " 



1 s /a 



it 



Front 



7 /o" 



■1 5 /a" 



Cover 



108 THE RAINBOW August 1986 




A 



SHOPPING 




UMMER CHIP -SALE- ... 

821 Standard PIA J$9r9£. $4.95 

8T4416 16K Chips - 5 volts $4.95 

asic ROM 1.1 Chip $7.95 

rig SAM Chip (6883) .£t9?95L $9.95 

847 VDG Chip £t§?95^ $9.95 

809E CPU Chip jf»?95; $9.95 

822 Industrial PIA $t*f9£ $9.95 

asic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) ...$19.95 
8769 (Fits all Basic ROMS) EPROM $19.95 
isk ROM 1.1 (New DOS Command ) ...$29.95 
lew SAM Chip w/heatsink (74LS785) $29.95 
xt Bisic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 
:oCo First Aid Kit - includes 2 PIAs, 

809E CPU & SAM Chips $59795! $29.95 

prom Eraser - 3 min erasure time $49.95 
iprom Prgmr (2ms speed/2K-16K) ..$149.95 
andylOOO 51 2K Upgrade-SAVE $350 $169.95 

SOCO LIBRARY... 

\ History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 .$3.95 

^oCo Memory Map $14.95 

teste Programming Tricks Revealed. $14. 95 

500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

jasic 09 Tour Guide $19.95 

Assembly Language Programming ....$19.95 

Color Basic Unraveled $19.95 

Extended Basic Unraveled $19.95 

Disk BasicTTTO/1.1) Unraveled ...$19.95 

New! CoCo II Service Manual* $24.95 

SECOND Book & Tape of Adventures .$29.95 

0fficiaT~ 0"59 Manual Set $39.95 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9.$19.95 
W/Two Disk Package of demo pgms ..$49.95 
Color/ Extended / Disk Basic Unraveled - 
Complete disassembly of the CoCo ROMS ! 
Complete 3 Book Set - Save $10! ..$49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF... 

CoCo Light Pen -324*&£Save $5!.. $19. 95 
Coinp u t i z e -1 ^ " Box - More positive 

connections than a "Y" Cable $29.95 

PBJ WORDPAK-RS - Newest version ! Hi Res 
80x24 display. Comes w/OS-9 drivr $99.95 

Micro Works DS-69A Digitizer $149.95 

Tandy 1000 2nd Drive (SAVE $40) .$159.95 
* - Specify CoCo II Catalogue Number 
All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $6.00) 
COD add $2.00 extra 
NY8 Resident a add Sales Tax 



COCO CABLES AND... 

Printer/Modem 15' Extender Cable .$14.95 
Tired of unpl uggi ng devices from your 
RS232 port? Try a RS232 n Y' r ~Cable.$19.95 
Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) .$19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

JoystictTMouse 10' Ext Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) ..$24.95 
Null Modem Cable - 4 pin to DB25 .$24.95 
Disk Interface/Rom Pak Extender - Move 
your disks/ROM Paks further away .$24.95 
40 P in Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk 
w7Voice, Word Pak, CoCo Max . etc ..$29.95 
Tr iple RS232 Switcher - Now select one 
of any three RS232 peripherals ...$39.95 
40 Pin Triple "Y" Cable - Hook up any 3- 
Voi c^7Word/RS232/Di g i ti zer PAKs ..$39.95 
RS Multi-Pak Extender^$39r»5: $27.95 



C-10 tapes in any quantity 49 cents 

5~T74 " Diskettes , any quantity .99 cents 

QS-9 Quick Reference Guide $3.95 

Rompak w/Blank PC Brd-27xx series .$9.95 
CoCo Keybd Adapter - Convert 26-301 6 & 
277-1019 keybds to D/E CoCo's! ...$9.95 
Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV 
interference created by CoCo! ....$19.95 

The Magic Box - Load Mod I/I I I Basic 
program tapes into the CoCo ......$24.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs 
TDTsk 1.0 1.1, JD0S) in J&M ctlr .$24.95 
Prig CoCo I "D" Rev motherboard . Includes 
all chips (SAM, CPU, PIA's, VDG) except 
RAM and Ext Basic ! Spare Parts ! $29.95 
HJL-57 Keyboard - Save $7.00!!! ..$72.95 

Specify Model/Revision Board 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM $79.95 

EARS -CoCo's first Voice Recognition unit 
w755Z accuracy & 64 Voice Prints ! $99.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
PO BOX 21272 
WOODHAVEN NY 11421 



ER HOT LIN 
718-B3B-1344 



S 
P 
E 
C 
I 

A 
L 

6 

4 
K 

R 
A 
M 

C 
H 
I 

P 

S 

1 
9 

■ 

9 
5 



<»<M> COLORFUL UTILITIES 




mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



||f|f|^^ CoCo??? CoCo CHECKER is the answer! ! Wi 1 1 tesl^Qfegji^lS 

j|l|pS|3^^^ Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, PIAs, VD^^hil^iia^ 

more!! 16K TAPE/DISK $19-95 (see 'W^^^^^^M^s^^. 



MULTI-PAK CP AK 



§feggS%t ROM P AK s yfe j-yo u r 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant 
p lugging in of ROMPAKs now by keeping all your PAK software on disk . Includes PQKEs for 
%^PROBLEM^0^^^^Qnc\u d i ng the NEW J6K PAKS! (Demon Attack, Dragons Lair, etc) 64K DISK $24.95 



TELE PATCH II 



W^^^mBMUR^^fi T E L E PAT CH plus the classically proportioned characters of Ipl^lZARD 
;j(^19^|||#ont w/TRUEr lowercase descenders! Get BOTH & SUPERCHARGE your TW-64 li^^i^i;!^^ 



SPIT IM IMAGE 



super upgrade from Disk Omni Clone! Back everything up! This amazing program handles " non 



W§ M$uper upgrade from Disk Oi 

standard " disks with ease. We haven't, found any disk yet that it can't handle. Don't ever be caught 
without a backup again! Lowest price too! Beats most "copy protection" programs' 32K DISK $29.95 



COCO SCREEN DUMP 



screen dump program for the Panasonic, Epson & Gemini printers ever! Have the option of 
W standard or reverse images w/regular or double sized proportional pictures. 600-9600 Baud too! A 
M • must for Graphicom and CoCo Calendar users. 16K TAPE/DISK $19.95 (see Nov '84 Rainbow Review) 



OISK UTILITY 2.1* 



^ynultt-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively ; 
sort, move, rename and kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy and backup. 
• • Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, plus the size, load addresses and entry points of all 
J^#rograms. Single command execution of both Basic and ML programs. 32K/64K DISK $24.95 " Disk 
Utility has proven itself very quickly at my house" - Ed Ellers Oct '84 Rainbow Review pg. 220 



SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 



Now you can write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter -64, VIP Writer, etc.) and convert 
them to special Highly Detailed character sets ! Some of the character sets supported are Italics , 
QiSL Errgltsh , Futuristic and Block . A character set editor is included to create custom sets or 
modify existing ones! Supports most DISK $29.95 (see Dec '85 Rainbow Review) 




t:?i^ dd 24 N£W Disk commands with 2 Hi -Res screens! Supports 40 track & Double - Sided drives, 6 ms 
stepping, auto disk search, error trapping & "EPROM ABLE ". 64K DISK New LOW price!! $24.95 

miMM— ^ ■ ■ — ^ . ' ■ • . , ■.->->• ''^""'iAVy- ••" 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR 



gg-ave time and d|sign pro looking diagrams using a 480X540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows . 
Over 30 electronic symbols w/JO definable symbols . (Even Logic gates & Multipin chips!) Print hard 
[ ' cop y and save to disk . 64K DISK 3499©Sl New LOW price! 1 1 $29,95 (see Jan '84 Rainbow Review) 



T.i<vV,4(&: : 



Basics provides (23) of the most used BASIC cmds w/one keystroke plus scrolling & editing 
Ill/single key! Also included is a 32 character typahead BUFFERED keybd w /auto key & repeat plus 
a 32K Print Spooler & Ptr Echo!! 64K DISK $29.95 (see Jan '86 Rainbow Review pg. 192) 

— '■i-NM-l'l jj^-r.t.r 



Use your CoCo to keep track of your checking and savings accounts! Printout individual personal 
checks! 32K/64K TAPE $t9.95 DISK $29.95 (see April'85 pg. 210 & Oct'85 pg. 197 Rainbow Reviews) 

ii^Mv?* • -■ ■■■h*k:Z". I 



THE ULTIMATE GRAPHIC ADVENTURE 




make a move. Includes three skill levels, 60 Hi-Res screens & Game Save Feature. 64K DISK $24.95 



BUY ANY 5 PROGRAMS 
GET A DOUBLE SIDED 
DRIVE 0 FOR $199.95 
NO OTHER DISCOUNTS CAN BE APPLIED 



♦NOW AVAILABLE BY EXPRESS ORDER AT 
YOUR LOCAL RADIO SHACK STORE!!! 

ASK TO SEE THE RADIO SHACK 
DEMO DISKS - FC*0249 & FC*0919H! 




COCO TEXT UTIL 



TTicludes utilities that most CoCo word processors (TW-64, VIP Writer, etc.) leave out! Reset margins 
to correct length for uploading, convert all UPPER CASE text to mixed upper/lower, display total 
BYTE count, EASY rename & kill functions! DISK $19.95 (see May '86 Rainbow Review) 



COCO VIDEO TITLER 




Start your VCR tapes with dazzling title frames followed by professional countdown to black fade- 
outs! Use a title page editor with several sizes of text & background colors! 32K TAPE $19.95 



PENPAL 



It's here! CoCo's answer to 1-2-3 ! PENPAL combines Word Processing, Communications, Graphics, 
Data Base & Spread-sheet into a' single integrated software package! 64K DISK INTRO PRICE $69.95 



64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 



Take advantage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an additional 8K of RAM available by relocating 
the Ext Basic ROM from $8000 to fD800. Copy ROMPAKS to disk (even~ TT protected f> PAKS) and create 
a 32K SPOOL buffer for printing. DISK $24.95 (see July ! 83 Rainbow Review) 



TAPE /DISK UTILITY 



A powerful package 
copy of an entire disk 
& 



transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic 
programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. Ajso copies tape to 
tape & prints tape & disk -directories. TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 



A A 



SUPER DUPER UTILITIES 



lift 



Finally! At last! A "SUPER DUPER" utility software package all rolled up into ONE!!! Includes such 
great utilities as: CoCo Disk Zap, Disk Encryption, Disk Mailing List, E2 Disk Master, Graphics 
ZOOM, Banner Creator, Function KEYS, Super INPUT/LINEINPUT, Basic Program PACKER, Alpha 
Directory;- Basic SEARCH and much, much more!!! 32K DISK $29.95 (see June '86 Rainbow Review) 



COCO CALENDAR 



organized for f 86 TODAY with the CoCo Calendar! Designed for recording the entire yeaHs 
occassions and daily appointments so you can plan ahead. You can store HUNDREDS of entries and 
our GRAPHIC Calendar will show aU MEMOS! 32K DISK $19.95 (see Mar '86 Rainbow Review) 



THE OS-9 SOLUTION 



a program that creates a " USER FRIENDL Y" environment within OS-9! The OS-9 SOLUTION 
replaces 19 of the old "USER HOSTILE" commands with single keystroke, menu driven commands. No 
more typing in complex long pathnames or remembering complicated syntaxes! Set all XMODE 
parameters at the touch of keys!J&9t85TNew LOW price!!! $24.95 (see Sept '85 Rainbow Review) 



COCO-UTIL 



Now 
DOS 



u 



m 



can have the power to easily transfer Radio Shack Color Computer disk 
ine - including the Tandy 1000 £ JBM PCIi! You can also transfer MS- 



files to your 
files to 



M.S*v 



CoCo disk, even format CoCo disks! CoCo-Util will save you countless hours of retyping! No need to 
move your computer or printer anymore! Requires 128K MS-DOS computer w/2 disk drives - $29.95 



SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 



Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the 
following 12 programs to customize your own SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA! CoCo Checker, 
Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, 
Fast Dupe II, 64 K D i s k Ut i I i t y , S pec tr urn DOS , CoCq Calendar, Schematic Draftirigl Processor, OS-9 
Solution, Graphicom, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value) for only $99.95!!! 




WOODHAVEIM NY 11421 

COD ORDER HOT LINE 718-835-1344 




Figure 3: Plugs/Jacks Wiring (rear view) 

J 4 J 1 - J3 




This is particularly important for pro- 
grams that are adversely affected by 
having joysticks plugged in during 
operation. 

You will need the following parts: 
One 6-pin DIN plug, #274-020; three 6- 
pin inline DIN jacks, #274-021; an 
experimenter box, #270-2301; a two- 
pole, six-position switch, #275-1386; 
one knob, #274-407; five feet of five- 
conductor stranded wire; dry-transfer 
lettering; epoxy; and electrical tape or 
shrink tubing. 

The tools needed include: a drill, 14- 
inch and 3 /g-inch drill bits, flat metal file, 
small screwdriver, small Phillips screw- 
driver, wire strippers, pliers, soldering 
iron and solder, and a hacksaw. 



Figure 2: Switch 

Bend tab back 




Construction 

First, take the metal cover off the 
project box by removing the four Phil- 
lips screws at each corner. Mark the 
positions of the holes to be drilled on 
the plastic bottom of the box (see Figure 
1). Then drill these holes using the l A- 
inch drill bit. Use the file to remove any 
burrs from the inside of the box. 

Mark the position of the switch 
mounting hole on the metal cover. Drill 
this hole using a %-inch drill bit. Again, 
remove any burrs from the rear of the 
cover. To mark the switch positions on 
the box cover, you need to temporarily 
install the switch and knob. Prepare the 
switch by sawing off all but a half inch 
of the shaft. File the rough edges after 
cutting. Find the locking tab and bend 
it down so it is even with the top surface 
of the switch (see Figure 2). Mount this 
switch on the metal cover using the 
hardware provided and tighten gently 
with the pliers. Then attach the knob to 
the switch shaft. Rotate the knob, 
marking positions 1, 2, 3 and off lightly 
on the cover with pencil. After these 
have been marked, remove the switch 
and knob. Apply the dry-transfer letter- 
ing at these positions. 



The next step is to wire the cables and 
jacks. If five-conductor cable is not 
available in your area, substitute five 
#22 gauge stranded wires twisted to- 
gether, or use the wire from an old 
broken joystick. Prepare one 36-inch 
and three five-inch cables by removing 
one inch of the outer jacket and strip- 
ping % inch of insulation from each 
individual wire at both ends. Remove 
the covers from the jack and plugs and 
solder these wires as shown in Figure 3. 
Before replacing the covers, be sure to 



Figure 4: Switch Wiring Diagram 
J3 J2 J1 




Pin 5 



Pin 3 

Pin 5 Jl J2 J3 
1 2 4 



* * * 




Match remaining wires from pins 1, 2 and 4. 
Twist each group together, solder and insulate 
with electrical tape. 



inspect the solder connections for 
shorts. 

Insert the remaining ends of the wires 
from the plugs into the three holes in the 
rear of the project box and the wire 
from the jack into the front. Wire the 
switch according to Figure 4. Note that 
only two of these lines will be switched: 
the +5V and ground lines. The others 
will be matched, soldered together and 



covered with electrical tape or he* 
shrink tubing. 

To secure the wires attached to Ji-J 
and keep them from pulling out of th 
box, apply a small amount of epoxy a 
the point where these wires enter th 
inside of the box. Allow the epoxy t« 




dry thoroughly before going to the next 
step. 

Fasten the switch to the metal cover 
and align the knob with the positions 
marked on the metal cover. Be aware 
that only the first four positions of the 
switch will be used. 

Finally, reassemble the box, being 
sure to tuck the wires carefully inside. 
As a finishing touch, you may want to 
cover the dry-transfer letters with clear 
nail polish to keep them from rubbing 
off. To test, simply plug the switcher 
into a joystick port and add your joy- 
sticks or other control devices in posi- 
tions 1, 2 and 3. You can now enjoy the 
convenience of switching without un- 
plugging. 

(Questions about this project may be 
directed to the author at 6835 Colleen 
Drive, Youngstown, OH 44512. Please 
enclose an SASEfor a reply.) 



112 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



HOW DO YOU TOTE A RAINBOW? 

It's simple — Give a RAINBOW gift certificate . . . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
sou rce for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — over 250 
pages loaded with as many as 24 
programs, 15 regular columns 
and lots of helpful hints and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more search- 
ing for lost copies of the rain- 
bow. Your collection will be safe 
at home. 

Give a rainbow gift Certificate 
and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 

Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



From: 

Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp. date 

Signature 

Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 






C. W. "Harry" Harriman 
Pioneer 1 837 
Sauntering back through history 
garners second prize for Harry, who 
lives in Bradford, Massachusetts. He 
used basic to create this memorable 
train. 



mi; 



H 
P 

Z 

e 

I 



wm 
mm 




m 



® 

p 
n 
i 

z 

E 



Todd Larsen 
Where Worlds Meet 

Parallels of planets through a saw- 
toothed fracture initiate this month's 
gallery. Todd lives in Mobile, Alabama, 
and created his worlds with McPaint. 



P 
R 
I 

Z 
E 



11- I.I I 

L ■* f J 





PIONEER " 




Charlie Fulp 
Basketball Zone 

Using CoCo Max, Charlie presents the 
gallery with an encompassing view of 
the all-American sport of basketball. 
Charlie lives in South Boston, Virginia. 



114 



THE RAINBOW August 1 966 




Seth Williams 
Saturn 

From Benson, Arizona, Seth used 
basic to enhance the planet Saturn for 

the patrons of the gallery. 




Robin Moulder 
Beginning Golfer 

Robin enlightens the gallery with this 
humorous caricature for the novice 
golfer, created with CoCo Max. Robin 
lives in Stone Mountain, Georgia. 




E 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! 

You are invited to nominate original work for 
inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." 
Share your creations with the CoCo Community! 

Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, 
address and phone number, detailing how you created 
your picture (what programs you used, etc.) and how 
to display it. Also, please include a few facts about 
yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this 
means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere. 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of 
$15 and a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions will 
also be given. 

— Jody Doyle, Curator 



James Farmer 
Comet 

With Halley's Comet in his thoughts, 
James, who lives in Charleston, South 
Carolina, used Micro Illustrator to 
create this fiery panorama. 




Send your entry on either tape or disk 

to: 

CoCo Gallery 
THE RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
Attn: Jody Doyle 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 115 



HARDWARE PROJECT 



Make your deluxe joystick 
firebuttons electrically parallel 



The 



Quick 



Joystick 



Bruce Goshorn is a U.S. Navy Ord- 
nance supervisor and author of several 
safety articles in naval publications. His 
main interests are Co Co speech and 
music synthesis. 





By Bruce W. Goshorn 



I .C y° u own a Radio Shack deluxe 
I I" joystick (Cat. No. 26-3012A) 
m m you may have realized that the 
black firebutton has no effect when 
pressed. A note in the accompanying 
manual states as much. With this ex- 
tremely simple hardware modification, 
you can make it better. All you need is 
a Phillips screwdriver and a hot solder- 
ing iron. In fifteen minutes you'll have 
the versatility of two firebuttons. And 
away we go. 

Make sure the stick is in the "spring- 
loaded to center" position. If not, hold 
the joystick in one corner and flip both 
black tabs away from the "free" posi- 
tions. This disconnects the tabs (and the 
joystick bottom) from the rest. With the 
bottom facing up, loosen the two screws 
with the screwdriver until they ratchet. 
Lift the bottom free and place it on the 
table with the four feet up. Direct your 
attention to the top portion. If you 



fumble it and the stick assembly falls 
free from the upper part of the case, 
don't panic. Keep the assembly together 
and slide it back into the slots between 
the three black posts. 

Place the stick down into a suitable 
holder (I used a roll of bathroom tissue) 
to steady it. Locate the blue wire and 
separate it from the rest by carefully 
pulling it up to a gentle loop from cable 
end to black firebutton. Measure about 
a half inch from where it exits the cable 
end and cut it in two. You should end 
up with an inch or so attached to the 
firebutton. Strip a quarter inch of 
insulation from it. Notice the white wire 
attached to the red firebutton lug. 

Gently pull all other wires away from 
this lug so the iron won't melt their 
insulation. Unsolder the white wire and 
remove any excess solder. Twist the free 
end of the one-inch blue wire around the 
free end of the white wire when it's cool 
and solder these together. Resolder the 
lug where the white wire came from and 
let it cool. Now solder the white-blue 
combination to the lug. Press the other 
wires down between the stick assembly 
and the black button. Make sure there 
are no wires over the post in the corner. 

With the cable pointing away from 



you, pick up the bottom case and, with 
the catalog number away from you and 
both X and Y tabs flipped away from 
their "free" positions, place the bottom 
case on the top part, align and tighten 
the two screws. You're ready to test. 

Power up the CoCo. At the prompt, 
press a few random keys. Press the red 
firebutton and try to type. There should 
be no response. Release the red button 
and press some keys. Letters should 
appear. Repeat this procedure with the 
black firebutton. Response should be 
the same. Incidentally, if the CoCo 
won't take input from the keyboard, 
you probably have a stuck firebutton. 
Unplug the joystick(s) and, if normal 
operation returns, replace or repair the 
offending joystick. 

Your firebuttons are now electrically 
parallel. Use the one most convenient 
for the particular application. 

I've always believed that even the best 
things can be better, and this stick is the 
best yet. I hope you enjoy your new 
hardware. 

(Questions about this project may be 
directed to Mr. Goshorn at 1423 
Wyoming Court, Orange Park, FL 
32073, 904-276-2327. Please enclose an 
S AS E when writing.) /55v 



116 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



rTftft Complete Rainbow Guide To OS-9 i 

The book that demystifies the state-of-the-art operating system 
•|0r ffte^Tandy Color Computer. Authors Dale L. Puckett and Peter 
JD|bbit#ow you how to take advantage of OS-9's multi-tasking 
and multi-user features, and the capability of redirecting input 
and output commands at will. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide 
packed with hints and tips, tutorials and free software in the form 
of program listings. 

Book $19.95, Disk $31.00 (2 disks, book not included) 

The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

Features 20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
Simulation programming competition. You are the Commander- 
Jijn-Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, an air 
traffic controller at one of the nation's busiest airports, the owner 
of your own software business, a civil defense coordinator in 
charge of saving Rainbow City from a raging flood, a scientist 
conducting experiments on Mars . . . Your wits are on the line. 
Book $9,95, Tape $9.95 



The Rainbow Book of Adventures 

A collector's item containing 14 winning programs from the 
rainbow's very first Adventure contest. Includes such favorites 
as SirRandolf of the Moors, Search for the Ruby Chalice, Deed 
of the York, Horror House, One Room, The Door and Dr. Avaloe. 
Plus, hints and tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $7.95, Tape $7.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Our newest arrival features 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
games ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue 
Meanies, find a hidden fortune, or win the heart of a beautiful 
and mysterious princess. Experience the thrills and chills of the 
most rugged Adventurer without ever leaving your seat. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos, Island 
and more! 

Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



•••<:•:--• * 



Coming soon 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 



I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

(book only) $19.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) $31 .00 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) $ 7.95 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) $ 7.95 



Name 




Address 

City 

State _ 



ZIP 



□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13.95 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape ■ $13.95 
Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4.00 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 




Wit HltAMl 



Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Mail to: Rambow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Please note; The tapes ax>d disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, they are intended to be an 
adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or disk, you will still need the appropriate book 
Is a registered trademark of the Mtcroware Systems Corporation. ■< 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 



0n^ 




TM 



Coco 



IF YOU 



P 



of sl 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



All Voices On 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 





FILE EDIT HIDI HISC 



LEGEND 



Wimmm Block delete 



} 1 Block copy 



4-3 



4 



IA 



J9L 




4 ' ' ■ W * urM Vf > 



2 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not a 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



is Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 

12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 

drum machines. 
i> Output any voice on any of the 16 MIDI 

channels. 
^ Transpose music to any key. 
\* Modify music to any tempo. 
\* Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose. 
i> Key signature lets you specify sharps and 

flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
f Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 

(#LC164). 

j> Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

j> Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 

LYRA OPTIONS 



Solo capability 
v 0 Block edits are highlighted. 

Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
*> Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 

Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 
^ Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece. 
Help menu makes manual virtually 
unnecessary. 

LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power, 

*^ Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

i> Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 

LYRA (Disk Only) #LY122 $54.95 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(T or D) #LC164 $14.95 

LYRA STEREO ENHANCER 

Gives the LYRA stereo output when used with 

the STEREO PAK or ORCHESTRA 90. 

(T or D) #LS149 $14.95 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $14.95 

We accept CASH. CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada ..... $5.00 

COD Charge , $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/4% sales tax. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(T or D) #LS1 77 $19.95 

STEREO PAK 

Plugs into the COCO ROM cartridge slot allow- 
ing easy connection to your stereo system. 
#SP193 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 800 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

<T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 

COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorwave. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack. 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 



C/ P C ^/ BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

<^£l££(l!Z <ZZ*Ult£i7ll (312) 879-6880 



TM 



■a 



COCO MIDI 



SEQUENCER/EDITOR 



nIow your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. Whether 
/ou have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it doesn't 
natter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our entry level 



MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our Professional 
COCO MIDI SYSTEM. 



• Supports up to 16 tracks. 

» Up to 8000 events per track. 

• May be used as a sequencer. 

• User friendly graphics display. 

• Menu driven. 

• Metronome available. 

• Real time recording. 

• Save your masterpiece to disk. 



f » 1 1 » » i i 1 1 
> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 » i 

• » i > i i \ « i ( 
• » » « 1 1 1 » » 




J2 




Playback any or all tracks at any tempo. 

Tracks may be deleted, copied, transposed, or mixed. 

Filter out unwanted channel or type of MIDI data. 



• Tempo may be modified. 

• Quantizing to 32nd or 64th. 

• Simple music editing. 

• Requires 64K disk system. 

• Transposition. 

Comes complete with Rom Pak 
Hardware interface, cables, 
manual, and software. Requires 
Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
Disk only. #CM147 . . . $149.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series {sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Includes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
Tape or Disk. #CM126 $39.95 



DX-7 LIBRARIAN 



TM 



RAM cartridges for the Yamaha DX-7 aren't cheap and don't hold 
all the sounds you would like. The DX-7 LIBRARIAN is a program 
that when used with COCO MIDI, lets you save and load any 



number of sounds. Save sounds individually or as a group letting 
you load the DX-7 in seconds. 

Disk only. #DX143 $29.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to -your MIDI synth. 

#MK167 $29.95 



MUSICA TO COCO MIDI 



This program is for COCO MIDI users that wish to convert MUSICA 
files so they can be played by COCO MIDI. It opens your MIDI 



synths to our MUSIC LIBRARY and much public domain music. 
Disk only. #MC193 $29.95 



MUSIC LIBRARY 



TM 



The MUSIC LIBRARY series consists of 8 volumes: 100 through 
800 each sold separately. Each contains over 100 four voice music 
selections with a playing time of over 3 hours each. The disk 
version is shipped on 5 full disks. When coupled with STEREO 
PAK, the music is reproduced with unsurpassed realism. 

A JUKEBOX program is included to allow you to select specific 
songs or automatically play each. These songs are ready to go, 
you don't need MUSICA 2 or a knowledge of music. MUSICA 2 
users may customize each song. Each volume sold separately, 

specify tape or disk. #MLXXX $29.95 

List of 800 songs #LS800 $3.00 



MUSIC LIBRARY 100 

Stage, Screen, & TV 
Music of the 70's 
Music of the 60's 
Music of the 50's 
Old Time Favorites 
MUSIC LIBRARY 200 
MUSIC LIBRARY 300 
MUSIC LIBRARY 400 
MUSIC LIBRARY 500 
MUSIC LIBRARY 600 
MUSIC LIBRARY 700 
MUSIC LIBRARY 800 



Classical 

Christmas (popular) 

Christmas (traditional) 

Patriotic 

Polka Party 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 



Entire Library 
30 Hours of 
Music! 
40 disks 
or 

25 tapes 




TM 



Ml 



SYMPHONY 12 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



o 




o 



O 



mm*,. 



spe.cjJ-rioN 



0 



0 



4 



If you want to compose music, experiment, or STEREO AND MONO. By connecting SYM- PIANO KEYBOARD. For those wishing to turn 

just listen to music, LYRA is the tool you need. PHONY 12 to your home stereo system, music is SYMPHONY 12 into a real polyphonic synfhe- 

LYRA represents the new state-of-the-art super produced in stereo, 6 voices from each channel. sizer we offer a full size 61 note piano 

user friendly software. Pull down menus and However, you don't need to have a stereo system, keyboard. 

icons make composing music as easy as pointing all 12 voices also come out of your TV or monitor. , users u - both SYMPHONY 12 and the 

with a joystick or mouse and clicking. LYRA is „„„„ .^.w *~ . i . . PiAwn wcvroappi r^ t ] ra vtarif 

™u|' y ffl inrfiviHiiallvrnntrnllpH vnirpcs Yn.i SOUND EFFECTS. SYMPHONY 12 is a sophisti- PIANO KEYBOARD will require a Y-CABLE. 

capable of 8 individually controlled voices. You generator 12 voices and 4 noise Disk systems require a Triple Y-CABLE or 

may take advantage of the 8 voice power of catea so . Seneraior. u voices ana * noise r h k 

LYRA using external MIDI synthesizers or SYM- S*? era to\8 ,ve X 0 " '"credible sound effect capa- ^'"^ t nr - . q 

PHONY 12. We believe that LYRA and SYM- bl,lt Y- We have included gun shot, explosion, rac- lyr5T^S?phONY 12 ^nhancfr ' ' 

PHONY 12 was a match made in heaven. For a In 8 car and more - ^ 7 S 7 YMPHONY 12 ENHANCER $ig ^ 

limited time, when you ^ will SYMPHONY 12. You get over a dozen music and PIANO KEYBOARD #PK1 85* Y.Y.Y. $169.95 

include free the LYRA SYMPHONY 12 CONNEC- SQUnd fiffect seIections and com p| e te documenta- DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TION, a $19.95 value. tjon Software js shipped on Tape or Disk. TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 

GUITAR CHORD BOOK 

This program, written by a guitar instructor of 17 years, displays in high Whether you are a beginning guitar student or an advanced player, you 

resolution graphrcs the exact fingering for over 100,000 chord combina- will find this quick reference to guitar chords invaluable. 

tions. You may even tune your guitar to the computer and play along. 32K Disk only #CC153 $29.95 

MUSIC THEORY 

COURSE 1 COURSE 2 

This course covers all the basics from music notation & duration, key A more advanced course that deals with: Major and Harmonic Minor 

signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the keyboard. This is an entry scales, interval spelling, Triad (Chord) theory, Inversions, Dominant 7th 

level course recommended as a prerequisite for Course 2. chords, and ear training of the intervals. 

32K Disk only. #MT101 $49.95 32K Disk only #MT102 $49.95 




EARS 



TM 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



0& 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 




you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or ''TV OFF". . $24.95 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



Speech SyAt 



emA 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada , ., $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V4% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 
1 col^ma e (312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



32K 
ECB 




I 



the 



RAINBOW 



2 





// tafces a skilled boxer to come out 
the winner when you're in . . . 




By Tim Jones 




fter seeing the 
new Rocky mov- 
ie, I just had to 
try and make a 
.boxing game for 
my CoCo. Finally, after sev- 
eral long weeks I came up with 
Boxing. 

The object of the game is to 
gain as many points as possi- 
ble, beat all three opponents 
and never get knocked down. 

When you run the game, the 
title screen appears and a short 
song is played. The scoreboard 
is then presented. This shows 
your physical strength as op- 
posed to your opponent's. Also 
on this screen are the fight and 
round numbers and the total 
score, which is updated after 
every fight. 

The game screen is com- 
posed of several parts. At the 
top your opponent's strength is 
represented by a blue bar; your 
strength is shown at the bot- 
tom. You are the man marked 
"U.S.A." At the left of the 
screen is a red time bar. When 
this bar reaches the bottom, 
the round ends. 



Move the joystick in the 
direction you want to go (with- 
out pressing the button). To 
punch with the left hand, press 
the firebutton. To punch with 
the right hand is a little harder. 
First move the joystick to the 
right, and then press the fire- 
button. Since throwing a right 
punch is harder, you receive 
more points for hitting with it. 

Every time you hit with the 
left hand, your opponent's 
power decreases by 10, your 
power increases by five, and 
your score increases by five 
points. If you hit with the right 
hand, his power decreases by 
15, yours increases by five, and 
your score increases by 10. The 
same also goes for him. 

Decreasing the opponent's 
strength to zero knocks him 
down. In order to advance a 
fight, either knock him out 
completely, or last three 
rounds with a score higher 
than his. 

To knock out the first oppor 
nent completely, decrease his 
power to zero. To knock out 
the second opponent 



Tim Jones is a high school student in Clinton, Louisiana. Be enjoys 
working with 



pletely, you must knock him down twice in one round. To 
knock out the third opponent you must have three knock 
downs in one round. Note: There is no count after a knock 
down, so stay alert! 

Game play is rather sluggish, so I have included a POKE 
65495,0 in Line 130. If your computer can't use it, just 
delete that line. As you can see, the game is long; buying 
rainbow ON tape can save hours of debugging. Enjoy! □ 




160 207 

280 131 

500 118 

690 179 

850 150 

970 228 

1170 143 



1310 3 

1450 71 

1560 232 

1690 50 

1810 114 

1910 142 

2080 10 

END 73 



The listing: BOXING 

1 1 TIM JONES 

2 1 P.O. BOX 7938 

3 ' CLINTON, LA. 70722 

4 ' COMPLETED JAN. 20, 1986 
10 PCLEAR4 : CLEAR500 : RESTORE 

20 RO=1:FI=1:L(1)=90:L(2)=60:L(3 
) =50 : KO=0 

30 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN0 , 0 

40 CLS(0) :FORY=l TO 5:FORX=l TO 

3 2 : READ A 

50 A$ (Y) =A$ (Y) +CHR$ (A+48) :NEXT X 
,Y 

60 PRINT@33,A$(1) ;A$(2) ;A$(3) ;A$ 
(4) ;A$ (5) ; 

70 PRINT@239 , "BY" ; : PRINT@300 , "TI 
M JONES"; 

80 DIM M(70) ,M2 (70) ,GL(40) ,P2 (90 
) ,P1(80) ,PA(80) ,PB(90) ,R1(80) ,R2 
(90) ,RA(80) ,RB(90) ,FL(200) 
90 POKE65494,0 

100 A$= " T 3 04 L8 EL4 GL1AL8AL4 BL1E " 

110 PLAY"XA$;L8EE;XA$;" 

120 PLAY " T3 L8 DCL4 DL8 CDL2 EL8 DDL4 C 

L8C03L4BL8BL1AL4AO4AL1D" 

130 POKE65495,0 

139 ' GRAPHICS FOR GAME 

140 DRAW" C4 " : LINE (45 / 30)-(210,16 
0) ,PSET,B 

150 LINE (45 , 30) - (35, 20) ,PSET,BF 
160 LINE(210,160) -(220, 170) , PSET 
,BF 

170 LINE(210,30)-(220,20) ,PSET,B 

F 

180 LINE(45,160)-(35,170) ,PSET,B 
F 

190 L$ (1) ="BM96 , 23C3R6U4L6D8R2C2 
R8C3R6L6U8R6D8R2C2R2C3U8D8R8C2R2 
C3U6E2R4F2D6U4L6R8C2D4R2C3U8F8U8 



R2C2R2C3D8R5EU5H2L2": 'POLAND 
200 L$ (2) ="BM113 , 21C3H2L4G2D5FR5 
EU2C2R4D3U8C3D7RFR5EU7R2C2R2C3D8 
R5EU2HL2R2EU3L4R4C2R4D8C3U7RER5F 
D7U4L6": 'CUBA 

210 L$(3)="BM101,19C3D7FR5EU7R2C 
2R2D8C3R2C2R2C3R6U4L6U4R8C2D8R2C 
3R2C2R2C3R6U4L6U4R8C2R2D8C3R2C2R 
2C3U8R5FD3GL2F3R2C2R2C3R" : 'U.S.S 
.R. 

220 M1$="U8HL8G2D8FR9E" 
230 M2$="U8HL34G2D8FR35E" 
240 DRAW"BM116,70;C3 ;XM2$;" 
250 DRAW"BM166,70;C2;XM2$;" 
260 DRAW"BM102,70;C2;XM1$;" 
270 DRAW"BM154,70;C3;XM1$;" 
280 CLS: PRINT" SCORE 
".•PRINT "YOU: 0 

HIM: 0": PRINT© 2 3 6, "FIGHT 1":PRIN 

T@268 , "ROUND 1" : PRINT@362 , "TOTAL 

S CORE " : PRINT @ 4 3 1 , " 0 " 
290 LINE(88, 71) -(88,61) , PSET 

300 LINE(104,71)-(104,61) , PSET 

310 DRAWC2" 

320 LINE(140,71)-(140,61) ,PSET 
330 LINE(156,71)-(156,61) ,PSET 
340 PAINT(138,63) , 2 , 2 : PAINT (158 , 
63 ) , 2 , 2 : PAINT ( 144 , 63 ) , 3 , 3 




350 LINE(132,57)-(138,60) ,PSET,B 
F 

360 LINE(156, 57) -(162,60) ,PSET,B 

F 

370 DRAWC3" 

380 PAINT(84,63) , 3 , 3 :PAINT(110, 6 
3) ,3, 3: PAINT (93, 63) ,2,2 
390 LINE(82, 72) -(88,76) , PSET, BF 
400 LINE(106,72)-(112,76) ,PSET,B 

F 

410 DRAWC4" 

420 LINE(80,77)-(90,83) ,PSET,BF 



124 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



430 LINE ( 104 , 7 7 ) - ( 114 , 83 ) , PSET , B 

440 PSET (104, 83,1) : PSET (114, 83,1 
) :PSET (114,77,1) : PSET ( 104 , 77ft) 
,450 PSET (80, 8 3,1) : PSET (90, 83,1) : 
PSET (90 , 77,1) : PSET (80, 77,1) V'fl 
460 GET(72, 56) -(124,88) ,M,G 
470 GET (80 ,77 ) - ( 116 ,83) ,GL,G 
480 PUT ( 1 30 , 50 ) - ( 1 6 6 , 5 6 ) , GL , PSET 
490 GET (12 2, 46) -(174,76) ,K2,MiM 
500 .LINE ( 122, 46)- (150, 60), PRESET 

510 PUT(138,32)-(174,38) ,GL,PSET 
520 LINE(158,32)-(172,38) , PRESET 

\i Mai T—r 

f -LJ X 

530 DRAW" C2 " : LINE (138 , 39 ) - (132 , 6 

'i0fvPSE$S~^ 

540 LINE ( 14 4 , 3 9 ) - ( 13 8 , 60 ) , PSET : L 
INE(138,39)-(144,39) , PSET: PAINT ( 
140 , 40 ) / 2 , 2 

5 50 ' GET '( 1 2 8 , 3 1 ) - ( 168 , 7 2 ) , P2 , gIIs 
560 PUT(136,40) -(172,46) ,GL,PSET 
570 LINE(150,40)-(170,49) , PRESET 
, BF : GET (128, 40) -(168,72) ,P1,G 
580 LINE ( 1 30 , 3 2 ) - ( 1 50 , 60 ) , PRESET 
, BF "WM 
590 PUT (122, 46) -(17 4, 76) ,M2,PSET 
600 PUT(150,32)-(186,38) ,GL,PSET 
610 LINE ( 154 , 50) - ( 164 , 56 ) , PRESET 

620 DRAW»C2" : LINE (152 , 39) -(156, 6 
0 ) , PSET mV >^>^>-. 1 : ; > 

630 LINE (162, 60) - (158,39) ,PSET:L 
INE-(152,39) ,PSET 
640 PAINT (154, 41) ,2,2 
650 GET(128,32)-(168,72) ,PB,G 
660 PUT (152, 40) -(188, 46) ,GL,PSET 
670 GET(128,40)-(166,72) ,PA,GI#» 
680 LINE (72, 56) -(124, 88) , PRESET, 
BF:PUT(74,28)-(126,60) ,M,PSET 
190 LINE ( 10 6 , 4 9 ) - ( 11 6 , 5 5 ) , PRESET 
,BF : PUT ( 100 , 67 ) - ( 13 6 , 9 9 ) , GL , PSET 
700 DRAW"C3 » : LINE ( 108 , 45) - ( 101, 6 
6) , PSET: LINE ( 116 , 45 ) - ( 110 , 66) ,PS 
ET : LINE ( 10 4 , 6 6 ) - ( 10 8 , 6 6 ) , PSET : PA 
TNT(110,50),3,3 
710 GET ( 78 , 3 3 ) - ( 118 , 7 3 ) , R2 , G 
720 PUT(102,58)-(138,64) ,GL,PSET 
730 GET(78,33)-(118,64) ,Rl,G®fK? 
740 LINE (82, 56)- (120,78), PRESET , 
III: PUT ( 74 , 28) -(126,60) ,M, PSE# 
750 LINE (80, 45) -(94, 58) , PRESET, B 
F: LINE (45, 30) -(180, 30) ,PSET 
760 PUT ( 64 , 67 ) - ( 100 , 73 ) , GL, PSET 
770 DRAW"C3" : LINE (82 ,45)- (88,66) 
,PSET:LINE(90,45)-(96,66) , PSET : L 
INE-(90 , 66 ) , PSET : PAINT (92, 64tf3 , 

780 GET (80, 33 ) - ( 118 , 73 ) , RB, G|§lff 



790 PUT (62, 58) -(98, 64 ) ,GL, PSET 
800 GET(80,33)-(118,64) ,RA,G 
810 DRAW" C 4 1 : LINE ( 1 6 , 50 ) - ( 2 6 , 140 
J ]? S El T B F 

8 20 LINE ( 4 8 , 18 ) - ( 20 6 , 2 8 ) , PRESET , 
BF 

830 DRAW»C3 » : LINE (56 , 10) - (127 , 16 

I , PSET ■, BF : DRAW"C4 " : LINE ( 54 ,10) - ( 

200 ,16), PSET , B : LINE (128, 11) -(19 8 

,15) , PRESET, BF ^^^iW^y^r-^/^ 

840 DRAW"C3 " : LINE ( 5 6 , 17 6 ) - ( 127 , 1 

82) ,PSET , BF: DRAW" C4 " : LINE (54 , 17 6 

)-(200,182) , PSET, B: LINE (128, 177) 

-(198 , 181) , PRESET , BF 

850 X=100 :Y=102 : X2=100 : Y2=60:TI= 

51:H=127:H2=127S5Pfc?i : :::/-- 

860 LINE (48, 32) -(206, 156) , PRESET 

870 DRAW»C4» : LINE (45 , 30) -(210,16 

0),pset,b 

880 PAINT (0,0) ,2,4 

890 DRAW"C3" : LINE (16 , 50) - (26, 140 

} ■ t- :ir-;frh?f'-y-'; ' : •■ ' 

900 PAINT ( 50 , 19 ) , 2 , 2 : DRAW L$ ( FI) 
910 DRAW"BM106 , 164C3D7RFR5EU7R2C 
2R2D8C3R2C2R2C3R6U4L6U4R8C2D8R2C 
3R2C2R2C3U6E2R4F2D6R2C2R2C3L2C2L 
2C3U4L6": "U.S.A. 

920 DRAW"BM6 , 40C3R4L2D4R2C2R4C3U 
4R2C2R2C3D4U4R4D4U4R4D4R2C2R2C3R 
4L4U2R2L2U2R4" : ! TIME 

929 » START OF MAIN ROUTINE 

930 SCREEN1,0:PLAY"T4L2O4CC" 
940 MX=JOYSTK(0) :MY=JOYSTK (1) :TI 
%TI+ . 5 : LINE ( 18 , TI ) - ( 2 4 , TI ) , PRESE 
T:IF TI=139 THEN PLAY"V15T4L304C 
CCC":GOTO1670 \&^if-&££p ^ 'r'.'r 
950 IF Y=<Y2+30 THEN Y=Y+2 ... 
960 IF X=<46 THEN X=46 ELSE IF X 
=>156 THEN ^'15^5 :'• 

970 IF Y=<32 THEN Y=32 ELSE IF Y 
*&£2J& iTHEN." Y»-£"28 

980 PUT(X,Y)-(X+52,Y+30) ,M2 ,PSET 
990 PUT( X2, Y2 ) - ( X2 + 52,Y2+ 32) ,M , P 

SET ; :?:"' v ^^^^^^^^^^jlX^h. 
1000 IF RND(100)=<L(FI) THEN 102 

1010 IF RND(2)=1 THEN 1400 ELSE 

1020 IF Y2+30=>Y THEN Y2=Y2-2 " 
10 30 IF RND(10 ) THEN X2=X2-4 

else :xl*x2:i4 : ;:;:«^ :. 

1040 IF RND(10)=>5 THEN Y2=Y2+2 

else Y2=Y2-2 fM Ia:Ss^^&:Z:'; 

1050 IF X2=<46 THEN X2=46 ELSE I 
F X2=>156 THEN ^&$?M^M 
1060 IF Y2=<32 THEN Y2-32 ELSE I 
F Y=>128 THEN Y=128 7;^ : ~Aj : y 
1070 IF PEEK(65280) =12|||0R PEEK( 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 125 



65280)=254 THEN 1130 
1080 IF MX=<10 THEN X=X-4 
1090 IF MX=>50 THEN X=X+4 
1100 IF MY=<10 THEN Y=Y-2 
1110 IF MY=>50 THEN Y=Y+2 
1120 GOTO940 

1130 IF MX=>50 THEN ELSE 1250 
1140 LINE (X+32 , Y+3 ) - (X+42 , Y+ll) , 
PRESET , BF 

1150 PUT(X+6,Y-7) -(X+44, Y+39) ,PA 
OR 

1160 IF PPOINT (X+30,Y-10) =4 THEN 
HG=1 

1170 IF PPOINT (X+3 6 , Y-10 ) =4 THEN 
HG=1 

1180 IF PPOINT (X+34,Y-13) =4 THEN 
HG=1 

1190 LINE(X+30,Y-8)-(X+40,Y+l) ,P 
RESET, BF 

1200 IF HG=1 THEN HG=0 : PLAY"T4L2 
55V3101ADCFBAGEDV16ACGADV4EABCAE 
DB":GOTO940 

1210 PUT(X+6,Y-15)-(X+46,Y+25) ,P 
B,OR 

1220 LINE(X+28,Y-15) -(X+38,Y+1) , 
PRESET, BF 

1230 IF PPOINT(X+32,Y-16)=2 THEN 
H=H-15 : H2=H2+5 : S2=S2+10 : GOSUB13 
60 

1240 GOTO 940 

1250 LINE (X+8, Y+3 ) -(X+l8, Y+ll) ,P 
RESET , BF 

1260 PUT(X+6>Y-7) -(X+46, Y+39) , PI 
OR 

1270 IF PPOINT (X+18, Y-10) =4 THEN 
HG=1 

1280 IF PPOINT (X+16,Y-12) =4 THEN 
HG=1 

1290 IF PPOINT (X+24,Y-12) =4 THEN 
HG=1 

1300 LINE (X+14,Y-8) -(X+24,Y+1) ,P 
RESET, BF 

1310 IF HG=1 THEN HG=0 : PLAY"T255 
L255V3101ADCFBAGEDV16ACGADV4EABC 
AEDB" : GOTO940 

1320 PUT(X+6,Y-16)-(X+46,Y+25) ,P 
2, OR 

1330 LINE (X+14 , Y-15) - (X+26 , Y+2) , 
PRESET , BF 

1340 IF PPOINT(X+20,Y-16)=2 THEN 
H=H-10:H2=H2+5:S2=S2+5:GOSUB 13 
60 

1350 GOTO 940 

13 60 IF H=<57 THEN LINE (57 , 11) - ( 
199,15) , PRESET, BF:PLAY"V15T4L404 
ADEFA" :GOTO 1390 

1370 PLAY"T4L255V30O1 ; 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 
6" 

1380 LINE(H, 11) - (199, 15) ,PRESET, 



BF: DRAW" C 3 " : LINE (H2 , 177) - (55 , 181 
), PS ET,BF: RETURN 

1390 S2=S2+10:H=127:H2=127:KO=KO 
+1:GOTO1680 

1400 LINE(X2+32,Y2+21)-(X2+42,Y2 
+27) , PRESET, BF 

1410 PUT (X2+4 , Y2+6) - (X2+44 , Y2+37 
) ,Rl,OR 

1420 IF PPOINT (X2+30 , Y2+38) =4 TH 
EN HG=1 

1430 IF PPOINT (X2+34, Y2+38) =4 TH 
EN HG=1 

1440 IF PPOINT (X2+34 , Y2+41) =4 TH 
EN HG=1 

1450 LINE(X2+28,Y2+31) -(X2+38,Y2 
+37) , PRESET, BF 

1460 IF HG=1 THEN HG=0 : PLAY"T4L2 
55 V3101ADCFBAGEDV16ACGADV4EABCA 
EDB" : GOTO 940 

1470 PUT (X2+4,Y2+6)- (X2+44,Y2+46 
) ,R2,OR 

1480 LINE(X2+26,Y2+29)-(X2+38,Y2 
+46) , PRESET, BF 

1490 IF PPOINT (X2+34,Y2+47) =3 TH 
EN H2=H2-10:H=H+5:S1=S1+5:GOTO 1 
510 

1500 GOTO940 

1510 IF H2=<57 THEN LINE (57, 177) 
-(199,181), PRESET , BF : PLAY"V15T4L 
404ADEFA" : GOTO 1540 
1520 PLAY"T4L255V30O1 ; 1 ; 2 ; 3 7 4 ; 5 ; 

6" • #1 | 

1530 LINE(H2, 177) -(199,181) , PRES 
ET,BF:DRAW"C3":LINE(H,11)-(55,15 
) ,PSET,BF:GOTO 940 
1540 POKE65494 ,0 : PLAY"T303P4L2CL 
3 CL8 CL2 CE -L8 DL3 DL8 CL3 C02 L8 BO 3 L2 C 
P2":CLS: PRINT: PRINT" YOU LOST T 
HIS TIME AROUND, BUT YOU CA 

N ALWAYS CHALLANGE HIM TO A R 
E-MATCH.":GOTO 2160 
1550 GOTO 940 

1560 LINE (X2+8 , Y2+16) - (X2+18 , Y2+ 
27) , PRESET, BF 

1570 PUT(X2+6,Y2+6) -(X2+44, Y2+37 
) ,RA,OR 

1580 IF PPOINT (X2+16, Y2+39) =4 TH 
EN HG=1 

1590 IF PPOINT (X2+20,Y2+39) =4 TH 
EN HG=1 

1600 IF PPOINT (X2+18,Y2+40) =4 TH 
EN HG=1 

1610 LINE(X2+12,Y2+29)-(X2+22,Y2 
+38) , PRESET, BF 

1620 IF HG=1 THEN HG=0 : PLAY"T4L2 
55V3101ADCFBAGEDV16ACGADV4EABCAE 
DB":GOTO940 

1630 PUT (X2+6,Y2+6) - (X2+44 , Y2+46 
) , RB , OR 



'■if y-*iA 



1 26 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



1640 LINE (X2+12 , Y2+29 ) - (X2+24 , Y2 
+46) , PRESET , BF 

1650 IF PPOINT(X2+20,Y2+47)=3 TH 
EN H2=H2 -15 :H=H+5:S1=S 1+10: GOTO 
* . 1510 

1660 GOTO940 

1670 RO=RO+1:KO=0:IF R0=4 THEN 1 
720 ELSE CLS: PRINT" 
SCORE" : PRINT" YOU: ";S2 ; " 

HIM: " ;S1:PRINT@236, "FIGH 
T " ; FI : PRINT@2 68 , "ROUND ";RO:PRI 
NT@3 62, "TOTAL SCORE" : PRINT© 430 , S 
C:FOR T=1TO2000: NEXTT :GOT08 10 
1680 IF KO=l AND FI=1 THEN FI=2: 
RO=0 : SC=SC+S2 : S1=0 : S2=0 : GOSUB176 
0:GOTO1670 

1690 IF KO=2 AND FI=2 THEN FI=3 : 
RO=0 : S C=SC+S2:S1=0:S 2=0 : GOSUB 176 
0:GOTO 1670 

1700 IF KO=3 AND FI=3 THEN SC=SC 

+S2 : GOSUB 1760: GOTO 1740 

1710 LINE (55, 177) - (127 , 181) , PSET 

, BF: LINE (55 , 11) -4 (127 , 15) , PSET, BF 

:LINE(128, 177) -(199, 181) , PRESET, 

BF: LINE (128 , 11) -(199 , 15) , PRESET, 

BF:GOTO940 

1720 IF SI >- S2 THEN CLS: PRINT: 
PRINT" HE WON BY A SPLIT DECIS 
ION" : GOTO 1540 

1730 IF SKS2 THEN CLS : PRINT : PRI 
NT" YOU WON BY A SPLIT DECISION 
":IF FI=3 THEN 1750 ELSE F0RT=1T 
01000 : NEXTT : KO=0 :FI=FI+1 : RO=0: SC 
=SC+S2 :S1=0 : S2=0 : GOTO 1670 
1740 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOU KNOCKED 

OUT THE CHAMPION!!!!" 
17 50 S C=S C+S 2 : FORT= 1T0 1000 : NEXTT 
:GOTO1870 

1760 FORT=1TO20:CLS(2) :PRINT@2 68 

, "knockout" ; 

1770 PLAY"T255CDEFGAB" 

1780 CLS (2) 

1790 PLAY"T255AC" 

1800 NEXT 

1810 RETURN 

182 0 DATA 142 , 140, 140 ,137 ,128,13 
4, 140, 140, 137, 128 ,137 ,128 , 128 , 12 
9,136,132,140,141,140,140,128,13 
9, 128 , 128 , 128, 138 ,129 , 140 , 140, 14 
0,137 

1830 DATA 128,138,128,128,133,12 
8,138,128,128,133,128,128 , 137,12 
9,136,128,128,128,133,128,128,12 
8, 138 , 137, 128 , 128 ,138,133, 128 , 12 
8,128,128,128 

1840 DATA 142,140,140,137,128,13 
8,128 , 128 , 133, 128,128, 129 , 137 , 12 
8 , 128 , 128 , 128 ,133 ,128 ,128 ,128,13 
8,128,137,128,138,13 3,128,128,12 



9,131,128 

1850 DATA 138,128,128,133,128,13 
8,128,128,133,128, 129,136 , 128 , 13 
7,128,128,128 , 133,128, 128, 128,13 
8 , 128 , 128 , 137, 138 ,133 ,128, 128 , 12 
8,133,128 

1860 DATA 140,140,140,136,128,13 
2 ,140 , 140 , 136,128,136 ,128,12 8,12 
8,136, 132 , 140,140 ,140,140 , 128 , 13 
6,128,128,128,13 6,128,140 ,140,14 
0,136,128 

1870 PM0DE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN0 , 0 

1880 POKE65494/0 

1890 FOR X=100TO162 STEP12 

1900 DRAW" BM " +STR$ ( X ) +" , 96C2D90R 

2U90R2 D90R2 C4U90R2 D90R2U90 " 

1910 NEXTX 

1920 DRAW"BM172 , 96 ; C2D90R2U90" 
1930 DRAW"C3" : LINE (142 ,96)- ( 174 , 
133) ,PSET,BF 

1940 FOR Y=100 TO 130 STEP 6: FOR 
X=146 TO 170 STEP 6 
1950 PSET(X,Y,2) : PSET (X+2 , Y+3 , 2) 
: NEXTX, Y 

1960 LINE(142,96)-(172,133) ,PSET 

1970 GET (100,96) -(176, 191) ,FL,G 
1980 PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 
1990 Y=Y-2 til 

2000 PUT(90,Y)-(166,Y+95) ,FL,PSE 

rn 

2010 READ N SfSi 
2020 IF N=-I THEN 2080 
2030 SOUND N+ 100,1 
2040 IF Y=18THEN Y=Y+2 
2050 GOTO 1990 

2060 DATA 47,47,25,25,47,47,8,8, 
25,33,47,59,70,47,47,47,47,47,25 
,25, 47, 47, 8 ,8,85,80,85,93 ,59,85, 
85,85,47, 93 , 93,85,76,76,70,70,76 
2070 DATA 85,70,59,47,76,76,76,7 
6,76, 59,59, 76,76,47,47,47,59,76, 
47,85,76,-1 
2080 F0RT=1T08 

2090 X=RND ( 200) +25:Y=RND( 140 ) +20 
2100 FORR=1TO30 STEP5 
211J3 C=RND(3)+1 
2120 CIRCLE (X,Y) ,R,C 
2130 NEXTR , T 
2140 FORT=1TO2000: NEXTT 
2150 CLS : PRINT : PRINT" THE PRESI 
DENT OF THE UNITED STATES CO 

NGRATULATES YOU FOR WINNING T 
HE TITLE OF. . . ": PRINT: PRINT" 
WORLD HEAVY-WEIGHT BOXING" : PRINT 
@2 3 6, "CHAMPION" 

2160 PRINT : PRINT" YOUR FINAL 
SCORE WAS"; SC: PRINT rPRINT TAB (12 
) "GAME OVER": END 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 



THE NEW GENERATION 




Ml 



WORD PROCESSOR 2.S 

TAPE OR DISK VERSION 

A feature packed program that rums your CoCo into an of- 
fice machine. Create and save letters and documents with the 
Word processor tailored for the NX- 10. 



COMPLETE NX-10 

PRINTER SYSTEM 



5K BUFFER • IMPROVED NLQ • QUAD HIGH & 
WIDE PRINTING • EXTENDED CHARACTER 
SETS • 10 INTERNATIONAL FONTS • IN-THE- 
CASE ADJUSTABLE TRACTOR • REVERSE 
LINE & FORM FEEDS • 120 CPS (DRAFT) 30 
CPS (LQ) • FONT CONTROL & MARGIN CON- 
TROL FROM CONTROL PANEL • 1 YEAR 
WARRANTY SERVICEABLE NATIONWIDE • 
AUTOMATIC LINE CENTERING • LEFT OR 
RIGHT HAND JUSTIFYING • SINGLE 
SHEET PAPER FEED • 7 GRAPHICS MODES 

COMPLETE SYSTEM 

NX-10 • BLUE STREAK II • SUPER GEMPRINT 
TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL • WORD PROCESSOR 2.2 



$309 



95 



+ $10 Shipping 
and Insurance 



BLUE STREAK II 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 



• RUN COCO I or II to PARALLEL PRINTER 

• HIGH QUALITY TOGGLE SWITCH ELIMINATES CABLE SWITCHING 

• 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 SWITCHABLE BAUD RATES 

• AC POWER OPTIONAL-NOT NEEDED WITH NX-10 PRINTER 

• COMPLETE WITH ALL CABLES AND CONNECTORS 

• THRU-PUT EQUIVALENT TO c _ _ WTDDT ™ 
BUFFERED INTERFACES ffT^ ammwo 

•] YEAR WARRANTY 



RAINBOW 

' (Oiii.t «1.0« 
Uli 



PAID! 





SUPER GEMPRINT 

CUSTOM SOFTWARE 









:; : ::.;-S: : y :r;:-;:;:cy.;:;:;:x ; : :: : x x; : : :;iv xWxW ;S£:W:S 


■■■■■■ ::•:.-•:••:•::>;:• 




: '*■:.' 






*x * " i*. '. . '. '. -i-x-x-x-x-x-i-x-x 
: >.■*•.*;.. d-.-.y.- .*.*.-.• .-. 









"Overall, Super Gemprint is very well-written and documented. 

-Rainbow December 84 review. 



BONUS! TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

FREE WITH SUPER GEMPRINT 

Menu driven program for the CoCo. Teaches and shows the new 
user the numerous features of the NX-10. 



SUPER GEMPRINT AND 

TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 



A / and Handling 



DAYTON ASS 



m 



ESsf. INC 



DUN & BRADSTREET LISTED 

7201 CLA1RCREST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



AUTO 'ORDER LINE 
1-800-251 STAR 
Personal Service 
(513) 236-1454 




A2D Deluxe Joystick 

Additional Control/C/nsoft . 

Adventure in Mythology 



f 1*1 r * ■ ■ ■ ■ «*«;'« P f i k *■ 



«' V . »- »' * • f * • > •■' »' « 



Clever Graphics Animation/Sagrt/aro Software . 139 

CoCo Base I 

Powerful and Full of Surprises/JW Enterprises . ^ ■-,>,...,. .152 

CoCo Keyboard 

The 'Chiclet' Cure/Spectrum Projects . . >. * > . . , . . . * . , . . 

Computer Bankbook and Business Bankbook 

Check It Out/Sunrise Software , , ... m % 

Oarkmoor Hold 

Graphics Adventure or Fantasy Simulation/Pr/c/c/y-Pear Software . . .... .135 

Mailing List 

Maintain Address and Telephone Files/Dafa Information . . ., . . * , .149 

Master Disk 

A Simple Program to Catalog Files/flob's Software , . ....... — . , . ,150 

Modem Pak 

Basic Telecommunications Package/Raof/o Shack — . . . . . . . ,146 

Pinball Factory 

Rings Up Points/ MichTron . . . , , . , . , .1 

Portraits of Christ 

The Gospel of John/Sovere/gn Grace Software 

Rommel 3-D 

Challenging, Fast Movjp^ 

Salvdlsk 



* + 



141 



• .....'.p + i.f4 . 1 38 



Rescue Your Dlsks/pf«» Cc&tiM 



nce/SdS's Software . 





137 

« *» « ««»•««. I W r 




Skance 

fake 

U-Buff 

A No-Frills Printex-iauttfr/O/ffffa/ Ssrwfllf 2 - £ . . > . y 51 

Vpftbrfrtier 

A Stimulating C ha I tefig e/lnfocom , , , ... ... Jm^®* . . . . 

Wizard's CasUe ^ 

JGreat NoviSes and Pros A\'\ke/ Spectrum Projects * + . T^L , \. . . 



■ \ 






1 




1 



The monthly magazine that's reader-friendly 

If you're interested in the highly popular Model 100, the Tandy 200, the brand new portable Tandy 
600 or Tandy's new generation of MS-DOS computers — the 1000, 1200, 2000, or the exciting new 
Tandy 3000 — PCM is for you! 

PCM, The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users, is brought to you by the same 
people who bring you THE RAINBOW, the premier magazine for the Color Computer. Need we say more? 

So, if you're ready to add portability or step up to MS-DOS, stay with Tandy and THE RAINBOW family 
by subscribing to PCM! 

FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from THE RAINBOW that readers want programs to type in , so each month we bring you 
an assortment of them, including games, utilities, business applications and graphics. 

BAR CODE, TOO! 

Also, PCM is the only computer publication in the world (that we know of) that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory with the sweep of a wand l 

TUTORIALS GALORE 

Add to this our regular tutorials on telecommunicating, hardware and machine language, as well 
as BASIC programming tips and product reviews, and we think you'll find we're one of the most 
informative and fun magazines on the market today. 

So if you're ready to add portability or step up to MS-DOS, stay with Tandy and THE RAINBOW family 
through PCM. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p,m. EST. For other inquir- 

ies call 502-228-4492. 



YES! Please send me a one year (12 issues) 
subscription to PCM for only $28/ A savings of 22% 
off the newsstand price. 



Name 



Address 



City State ZIP 

In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. 

Charge to my: VISA MasterCard American Express 

Acct. # Expiration Date 




Signature 



"Canadian subscribers U.S. $35. Surface rate elsewhere $64, airmail $65. Allow 6 to 6 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
U.S. currency only, please. 

Mail to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



THE FOLLOWING PRODUCTS have 
recently been received by the rainbow, examined by 
our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow 
Seal of Certification, your assurance that we have 
seen the product and have ascertained that it is what 
it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been 
issued to: 



Max Fonts, a collection of 72 fonts for 
use with the CoCo Max graphics pro- 
gram. Fonts can be typed onto the 
screen utilizing all of CoCo Max's text 
style combinations such as bold, italics, 
outline, etc. Font names automatically 
appear in CoCo Max's pull-down 
menu. Derringer Software Inc., P.O. 
Box 5300, Florence, SC 29502, disk of 
24 fonts, $24.95; set of 3 disks, $64.95. 

Ultra Telepatch, a 64K program requir- 
ing one disk drive and Telewriter-64. 
This new version of Telepatch includes 
word delete, integrated type-ahead 
keyboard scan with buffer, in memory 
disk I/O menu with no loss of buffer 
memory and more. CMD Micro Com- 
puter Services Ltd., 10447-124 Street, 
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5N1R7, 
$19.95 plus $2 S/H. 

The Last Word, a word processor that 
requires 64K and OS-9. Features pull- 
down menus, on-screen formatting and 
22,000 word online dictionary. Edit files 
larger than memory, and define macros, 
pagination, headers and footers. Com- 
puterware, Box 668, Encinitas, CA 
92024, disk $49.95 plus $2 S/H. 

LI Utility Pak, an OS-9 productivity 
enhancement. Package contains Filter 
Kit #1, Filter Kit #2, Hacker's Kit #1 
plus several new programs. D.P. John- 
son, 7655 S W Cedar crest Street, Port- 
land, OR 97223, $49.95. 

Karate, a 64K game using karate kicks 
and punches to score points. Requires 
one or two joysticks depending on 
number of players. Diecom Products, 
6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, Can- 
ada L9T2X8, tape or disk, $28.95 U.S.; 
$38.95 Canada. 



Memory Bank, a 64K computer pro- 
gram that allows full use of the second 
32K in 64K color computers. A RAM 
disk is also included that allows the 
second bank to be used for storing 
programs. Computer can be configured 
for the "all-RAM" mode, allowing 
modification of the BASIC, Extended or 
Disk ROMs, and placing a BASIC pro- 
gram in the upper 8K of memory. Dy- 
namic Electronics Inc., P.O. Box 896, 
Hartselle, AL 35640, tape, $27.95; disk 
$29.95, plus $3 S/H. 

Physcho: 1, 64K games requiring one 
disk drive. Package of eight psycholog- 
ical exercises tests skills in observation, 
reaction time and memory. Lomiq, c.p. 
105 Succursale A, Jonquire, Quebec, 
Canada G7X 7V8, $34 U.S., $45 Can- 
ada. 

DS-69/69A Digisector, an enhanced 
version of 64K video digitizer that 
accepts NTSC standard video input 
from a source such as closed-circuit 
television camera or videotape recorder 
and converts the analog video signal to 
digital data. Micro Works, P.O. Box 
1110, Del Mar, CA 92014, $149.95. 



RESETCHG, a machine language pro- 
gram that changes the reset vector in 
64K mode so when the Reset button is 
pressed, the CoCo stays in 64K mode. 
Neat-O-Software, Route 3, Box 205, 
Kingsport, TN 37664, tape $10 plus $2 
S/H. 

Dragon Blade, a graphics Adventure 
game requiring 64K ECB and one disk 
drive. The scenario places you in a time 
of swords and sorcery, when only the 
bravest of men could destroy the foulest 
of beasts. Your quest for the legendary 
blade leads you to the Forest of Lore 
and it is from here that your Adventure 
begins. Prickly-Pear Software, 2640 N. 
Conestoga A venue, Tucson, AZ 85749, 
$29.95. 

Wizard's Castle, a 64K graphics Adven- 
ture game requiring one disk drive. The 
objective is to save the princess by 
collecting 24 objects and returning them 
to the king. Your enemy is the wizard, 
who has the power to bring back to life 
the creatures you slay in the quest to 
save the princess. Spectrum Projects, 
P.O. Box 21272, Woodhaven, NY 
11421, $24.95 plus $3 S/H. 

CoCo Keyboard, a new Color Compu- 
ter 2 keyboard to fit your old-style 
Color Computer (silver or white case), 
TDP-100 and older CoCo 2. Drops in 
with no soldering or cutting necessary. 
Spectrum Projects, P.O. Box 21272, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $14.95. Adap- 
tor for 1982 and previous computer 
(D&E Boards), $9.95. A dd $3 S/H. 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all 
manufacturers of products for the Tandy Color 
Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Sea/, the magazine certifies the 
product does exist — that we have examined it and 
have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, 
these hardware or software items will be forwarded 
to the rainbow's reviewers for evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 31 



REVIEWING 




Color LISP 



Editor: 

I must take exception with Mr. Dooman's 
software review of Color LISP in the May 
1986 rainbow. Mr. Dooman compares LISP 
to both forth and basic. These are numer- 
ical languages, basic is a good general 
purpose, data-processing programming 
language. FORTH is an extendable, fast 
interactive, compiled, stack-oriented con- 
trol language, lisp is a symbolic manipula- 
tion language, extendable by user defini- 
tions. 

Mr. Dooman complains about the docu- 
mentation using brackets instead of paren- 
theses. The documentation does not contain 
brackets in the examples — parentheses are 
used in all examples and all examples have 
been tested to ensure they function as 
described. Not one of our many customers 
have complained about "brackets." 

As Mr. Dooman pointed out, there are no 
standards in lisp function syntax. In our 
implementation, the syntax of M APCAR is: 
MAPCAR/ list/function. In some other 
LlSPs the syntax is: MAPCAR/function/ 
list. The syntax can easily be changed to 
reverse the arguments simply by defining a 
new function such as: (DE MAPC (fns lis) 
(MAPCAR lis fns)). All examples in the 
documentation have been fully tested. The 
snytax is clearly stated with ample examples 
to illustrate the proper use. Also the com- 
plete function definitions are provided. 

Mr. Dooman mentions none of the fea- 
tures of this implementation for the Color 
Computer such as: low resolution graphics, 
integrated into architecture of the Color 
Computer, joystick, sound, cassette func- 
tions, disk functions, printing, PEEK, POKE, 
USR, firebutton, break, load and save lisp 
objects, load and save lisp work spaces, and 
long error messages. This implementation 
was especially designed to take advantage of 
the limited resources of the Color Computer. 
The stack and node area can be redefined to 
explore different areas of interest. EXPRs, 
FEXPRs, and machine language subrou- 
tines are supported. 

Though lisp is an interactive language, 
this implementation has been optimized for 
both speed and size. We feel we have a good 
and reliable product which enables CoCo 



owners to experiment with a language used 
extensively in artificial intelligence. Our goal 
was to provide a powerful, flexible, extend- 
able and reasonably priced software pro- 
duct. 

Jim Bachman 
Frost Byte 



Super RAMdisk 

Editor: 

Thank you for reviewing the DISTO 
Super RAMdisk and giving it a fair shake 
[June 1986]. I would like to inform you that 
a "hardware" user's manual is now available. 
The OS-9 software and documentation has 
been upgraded to V2.0. Anyone who has a 
print spooler, or any other utility for my 
RAMdisk may contact CRC Inc., 10802 
Lajeunesse, Montreal, Quebec, Canada for 
more details. 

Tony DiStefano 
DISTO 



DeskMate 



Editor: 

In Mr. White's review of DeskMate for 
the CoCo in the May 1986 RAINBOW, he 
mentioned that the Calendar utility was not 
useful beyond 1999. If he were to enter his 
data as 4/25/2000 instead of 4/25/00 (which 
defaults to 1900), he would find the correct 
date in the correct year. You can use years 
as late as 9999. 

Norman Koslow 
Richmond, VA 



TX Word Processor 



Editor: 

I am comparably new to the computer. I 
got started with the CoCo in August 1985 
and ordered rainbow at that time. 

Since I had purchased the CoCo primarily 
for word processing, the TX Word Proces- 
sor in "Received and Certified" (November 
1985, Page 188) caught my attention. I 
ordered it and, while waiting, I went to work 
on Color Scripsit as it came with the com- 
puter. After TXcame, I made a quick change 



and found it so much better in every way. 
After your review that found TX juvenile 
[March 1986, Page 209], I tried still another 
word processor, but it too was difficult to 
run and had very poor documentation, so I 
went back to TX Version 01.08P. I feel your 
reviewer was over-educated for the job and 
I think the readers are getting shortchanged 
because of the review. 

This is being written using TX, and it is 
still my favorite. I would like to see another 
review, preferably by an operator instead of 
a programmer. There are a lot of us out here 
who are beginners. 

A.J. (Andy) Cryder 
St. James City, FL 



The Best Epson 
Screen Dump Utility 

Editor: 

My program, The Best Epson Screen 
Dump Utility , was reviewed by R.W. Odlin 
in a recent issue [February 1986, Page 216]. 
My thanks to your reviewer for taking the 
time to carefully test the program. 

However, one comment in the review has 
left me scratching my head — that is the 
matter of pixels being swapped from left to 
right with Graphicom screens. The reviewer 
did not contact me regarding this problem, 
and I don't understand how it could happen. 
The sample printouts on the package are of 
Graphicom screens, and they certainly do 
not exhibit this problem. 

I have no idea how Mr. Odlin loaded the 
Graphicom screens into memory, but if the 
GOBIN utility (included with Graphicom) 
is used, I can assure your readers they will 
have no problem printing out pictures with 
The Best Epson Screen Dump Utility. 

Bob van der Poel 
CMD Micro Computer Services Ltd. 



We welcome letters to "Reviewing Re- 
views" and remind you that they may also 
be sent to us through the MAIL section 
of our new Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



132 THE RAINBOW August 1986 






Those Great RAINBOW Programs 

Without All The Fuss! 
Subscribe to rainbow on tape! 



Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of THE rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 



Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 




Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $105 for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 
bill. 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, rainbow ON tape can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of THE rainbow's Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past August issues are 
also available for immediate download in the RAINBOW ON 
TAPE Database area in THE rainbow's Color Computer SIG 
on Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



RAINBOW ON TAPE is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOW ON TAPE, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, (credit card orders only) call 
800-847-0309, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call 502-228-4492. 



Programs from Our Past Games Issues: 

August 1985 — Brotan the Blue, a game based more on luck 
and risk than on skill; Quest for the Falcon's Lair, a game that 
lets you fight for Earth's freedom; Random Mosaics, a 
graphics program: Soccer Instructor, a text and graphics 
game instruction for soccer novices; Operation Feedom, a 
game to save captive scientists; He//o, a disk utility solution 
for the directory's too-speedy scroli; Earthrot and Pageturn, 
graphics programs which simulate the spinning Earth; A 
Caterpillar's Alphabet, an educational game designed to 
teach the alphabet to preschoolers; Oodles of Games for4K, 
six short games to amaze and amuse; Amphibia, an alien 
planet's moon base destination game; Phone, a home help 
program that showcases your phone messages; Sir Eggbert 
Jumper, a one-player game with a "swords and sorcery" 
theme; Doghouse, a short game to challenge visual reflexes 
of everyone from toddlers to adults; and Vision, a health 
education program that tests your eyesight. 

August 1984 — The Jungle, a game of survival on safari 
without joysticks; The Dragon's Gold, climbing to the top of 
his lair is a very dangerous game; Trapperr, an error trapping 
utility; M*A*S*H Trivia Quiz, 200 questions to test your 
memory; Instrument Flight Simulator, a serious exercise in 
flight simulation; IRA Projection, a finance program to project 
IRA earnings: The Trip, a mix of Adventure and arcade-type 
games; Stock Market, second part of a tutorial on writing a 
Simulation; Air Raid on the Keyboard, a game to sharpen 
reflexes; Olympics, a graphics program that displays the 
universally known connecting rings; Disk Drive Speed Check, 
a disk utility; and Expanding BASIC, part 1 1 on enhancing DOS. 



Software Review* 



Pinball Factory 
Rings Up Points 

I've never been a big fan of computer pinball — until now. 
I've tried practically every CoCo pinball game on the 
market, and while most of them have been good, after a 
few games I would invariably become bored. After all, these 
games only offer the choice of a few playing fields, and even 
the most diehard pinball fan is sure to soon tire of playing 
the same game over and over and over. 

Enter Pinball Factory from MichTron, a terrific new 
game which not only lets you play pinball on your CoCo, 
but lets you create your very own pinball game. Pinball 
Factory is similar to Pinball Construction Set on the Apple, 
and it puts new life into a very old game. 

Pinball Factory comes on disk and is accompanied by a 
set of easy-to-read, complete instructions. I was glad to see 
that the disk was not copy protected and was accompanied 
by instructions on making a backup disk for your own use. 
Loading the game is as simple as putting the disk in the drive 
and typing RUN "PINBRLL". After the title page appears, 
you have the option of playing the current game, loading 
a new game from disk (eight sample games come on the 
disk), modifying the current game or creating a new one, 
saving your creation to disk, or taking a directory of the 
pinball files on the disk. The program requires only one 
drive, but can use a second drive if you have one. 

Load a game by moving the on-screen pointer with 
keyboard, mouse or joystick to the section of the screen 
marked LORD and press ENTER (or the joystick button) then 
point to the file you want to load and press ENTER again. 
There is no need to type in the filename from the keyboard. 
Because the pinball data files are stored in a special format, 
they do not appear on the disk directory, and the manual 
warns not to save any other files on your pinball diskette. 

Once loaded, selecting Play from the screen lets you play 
the current pinball game. You then have control of the two 
flippers and can "tilt" the board in one of three directions 
(left, right and up) to make the ball go where you want it. 
The graphics are in black and white only, but are quite good 
nonetheless. The animation is good and, except for a few 
rare moments, flicker-free. Sound effects are adequate, but 
not diverse. Pause and Quit options are provided. 

The area in which Pinball Factory shines is in the creation 
and modification of your own pinball games. You can 
control the placement of everything except the flippers; you 
can even design your own high-resolution graphics logo for 
your pinball game. You can place bumpers of varying types 
around the board. When the ball hits one of these, you score 
a certain number of points — it is up to you how many 
points each type of bumper is worth, as well as how many 
points it takes to earn extra balls — and your ball is 
deflected back at a fast speed. There are even "multirail" 
bumpers which provide bonus points if all rails are hit. 
Pinball Factory also allows you to place polygons anywhere 
on the board. These polygons act only as physical obstruc- 
tions, yielding no points and hindering the balls. They may 
be used to change the shape of the playing board or increase 
the challenge. Once placed, any object on the board can be 
removed or changed, and the program provides a test option 
for trying out your creation. Up to 90 objects may be put 
on the playing field. 



Once the playing field is set up, you can change the rule! 
of the game. This includes setting the speed, the pull o: 
gravity on the ball, the number of balls, and the elasticity 
(which controls how fast the ball will bounce off ar 
obstruction). As I mentioned before, you can also change 
the scoring rules, thus making the games harder or easier. 

Overall, this is an excellent game. Unlike past pinbaL 
games, Pinball Factory puts you in control of the entire 
pinball game, letting you tailor games to your particulai 
liking. You can even design pinball games with friends and 
have a pinball marathon or competition. Because Pinball 
Factory does not lock you into a particular game, it kept 
my interest, as I'm sure it will yours. The only minor bug 
I found was that the selection (menu) pointer scrolls off the 
screen in one direction but not the other, which was 
sometimes annoying, but doesn't affect game design or play. 

Suggestions? MichTron could have included more 
features to build a pinball game from, such as ramps, 
optional flippers, moving targets, etc., or a feature to let the 
user design his own bumpers or polygons. Letting the user 
create his own sound effects or background music would 
have put the icing on the cake, but Pinball Factory is a most 
enjoyable game as it now stands. 

On a scale of one to five, I would rate Pinball Factory 
as follows: playability, 5; sound effects, 3; keeps interest, 
4; price vs. value, 3; graphics, 4; speed/ animation, 4; 
documentation, 4; and overall rating, 4. 

As a final note, I was impressed by the trust MichTron 
puts in their customers. Not only was the game able to be 
backed up, but MichTron offers a guarantee of satisfaction 
and a 30-day warranty. If you even remotely like pinball, 
I think you can trust that you'll enjoy Pinball Factory. 

(MichTron, 576 S. Telegraph, Pontiac, MI 48053, 313-344- 
5700, 64K disk required, $34.95) 

— Eric Tilenius 



CoCo Cat 



SOME&OPY 'J OOr TV &ECSDE 
W/SO PATES MOffE AT7EA/TJOP 
/A/ POC/SE. - 7pE 

COAfPcrPP Of ME..' 
TV 




AFT&? All . . . WPAT5 MORE 
/MPOXTAATT- SPEED OJZ 
/3E/U/TY? 




i t 




ft 




Poo-boy! ffflf was a 
GAVO caMPM/soA/L 





134 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



oftware Reviewi 



Darkmoor Hold: A Valuable 
Software Library Addition 

Wandering through the dirnly-lit corridors of a myste- 
rious castle in search of adventure and riches is a daydream 
many of us romantics share. Until the CoCo came along, 
dreaming and reading were the extent of my fantasies. Now 
with software such as Darkmoor Hold, by Prickly-Pear, I 
san finally wander to my heart's content. 

Darkmoor Hold is a graphics Adventure/ Simulation that 
puts you, a human mercenary, in charge of a trio of 
adventurers hired by the ruler of a troubled kingdom. It 
seems an evil wizard is killing the king's beloved taxpayers 
and he would like you to remedy the situation. The wizard's 
castle, Darkmoor Hold, is comprised of 10 levels, each 
consisting of 20-plus rooms. You must survive all 10 levels 
while gathering better armament and treasure on the way. 
Since I was only able to get to level six, I can't testify as 
to what happens when you finally reach the wizard on the 
10th level. 

Darkmoor Hold has a different format than most 
Adventures on the market. In fact, it may be closer to a 
fantasy Simulation than an Adventure. The screen has the 
appearance of an ancient parchment scroll and is split into 
several parts. The top one-third shows a 3-D graphics 
representation of the rooms and corridors through which 
you wander. The bottom two-thirds is divided into three 
columns, allowing you to enter commands for each of the 
three adventurers. You, the human, a small but powerful 
Dwarf and a magical Elf make up the trio. The commands 
you can enter are predefined and consist of just under 20 
choices. Examples are directions, search to find objects, 
fight to defend yourself and inventory. As my combat 
experience proved, 80 percent of the time you will find 



Two-Liner Contest Winner ... 

This one allows you to enter the number of options 
on your gameboard's spinner. Then it will randomly 
select one. It might even eliminate those spats about 
how you "accidentally" bumped the spinner to alter 
the outcome. 

The listing: 

1 CLS : PRINTTAB ( 5 ) "ELECTRONIC DIC 
E" :PRINTTAB (10) " HOW MANY S I DES 
INPUT "ANY NUMBER PLEASE " ;A:CLS: 
PRINT "THE DICE ARE ROLLING" : FORT 
=lT05j3 : SOUND2 5,1: NEXTT : ORND (A) : 
CLS: PRINT" YOU ROLLED ";C:PRINT"0 
UT OF A POSSIBLE " ;A 

2 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS ENTER FOR AN 
OTHER ROLL" : PRINT"TO END PRESS T 
HE BREAK KEY" : INPUTZ$ : GOTOl 



v:.<*: 



Aaron Newell 
Orlando, FL 

(For this winning twq-iiner contest >eniry; the author has been sent copies 
■of bb(H '.The Rambpto Book o/iSimw/^ffe^ ah^M companion The Rainbow 
Simulations fype$ 



yourself entering fight. To call this game a slugfest would 
be putting it mildly. While I'm sure there are strategies to 
be developed, most of the time it's hard enough just staying 
alive. 

Traveling through the various levels you face creatures 
of increasing power. On each level all the creatures look the 
same and only the Elf can correctly identify them. The 
graphics for the rooms and creatures are all very well-done 
and add considerably to the enjoyment of the game. In 
addition, for those of you who find spare time hard to come 
by, the game has a SAVE and LOAD feature allowing you to 
explore a little at a time. 

The program is not copy protected, has a guaranteed free 
replacement for as long as you own it and is supported by 
some of the most considerate people I have ever done 
business with. There are many good companies selling 
CoCo software today and I can testify, without hesitation, 
that Prickly-Pear is one of the leaders. 

I liked the program and would recommend it to any 
fantasy buff. I do feel, however, that the more experienced 
adventurers and role players out there might find the 
challenge a little too limited for their tastes. On the other 
hand, inexperienced adventurers who want a sample of 
Dungeon exploring, would do well to consider this program 
for their library. 

(Prickly-Pear Software, 2640 N. Conestoga Ave., Tucson, 
AZ 85749, 64K ECB and one disk drive required, $29.95) 

— Ken Boyle 




BUSINESS SOFTWARE 
$ PORTFOLIO $ 

BUSINESS DATABASE SYSTEMS 



★ Reviewed in HOT CoCo Dec. 1984 & RAINBOW Feb. 1985 ★ 

• DATABASE MANAGEMENT - define, reorganized & update a database 

• SPREAD SHEET - calculations to update database 

• REPORT MODULE - customized report formats with headings & totals 

• WORD PROCESSOR - merge database with custom letters, labels, & reports 

• MACRO PROCEDURES - store any report calculations with sorts & selections 

• UTILITIES - generate, merge, summarize, & summarize-post 

• 216 PAGE MANUAL WITH STEP-BY-STEP TUTORIAL 

• WORKBASE I (600 Records) $49.95 - WORKBASE II (1200 Records) $59.95 

BUSINESS APPLICATION PACKAGES 

• READYTO-USE - 50-page manual, database, calculations, & reports 

• SELF-CONTAINED - purchase & use any package independently 

• BUILT-IN DATABASE FUNCTIONS - selectively display/print records 

• COMPREHENSIVE - all major accounting functions addressed 

• EASY TO USE - all packages are entirely menu driven 

• EXPANDABLE - use any application database with WORKBASE DATABASE 

• PROVEN - currently used in businesses, churches, and accounting firms 

• COST EFFECTIVE - $29.95 per package - $24.95 when 2 or more purchased 



★ INVENTORY CONTROL 

★ SALES ORDER ENTRY 

★ ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

★ PAYROLL 

★ RENTAL PROPERTY 

ALL SOFTWARE REQUIRES 32K/64K TRS-80 CoCo & 1 DISK DRIVE 
★ FREE CATALOG AVAILABLE * 



★ ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

★ GENERAL LEDGER 

★ PURCHASE ORDER ENTRY 

★ CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 



ORDERING: CHECK, MONEY ORDER, 
COD, MASTERCARD, VISA 

Price includes shipping in USA 
NC residents add 4.5% sales tax 



WORKBASE DATA SYSTEMS 
P.O. Box 3448 
Durham, NC 27702 
Call Toll Free 1-800-334-0854 ext 887 
(919) 286-3445 NC Residents only 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 135 



Software R e vie ivJSSSSSS 

Wizard's Castle — Great for 
Novices and Pros Alike 

If you remember those Saturday afternoons when you lay 
in front of the TV and watched the Good Guys save the 
Princess, you have the premise of Wizard's Castle in a nut- 
shell. Don't let me fool you into thinking that it will be quite 
as easy as that, however. This is a very pleasantly frustrating 
game. 

Wizard's Castle, a graphics Adventure game, comes with 
excellent documentation. It includes a list of verbs and 
nouns to use in playing the game. It also covers the creatures 
you have to kill in order to save the Princess. Remember 
the descriptions of these creatures or you may try to kill 
one that just might help you. 

One of the frustrating things that makes this game hard 
is not only do you have to kill the creatures, but just when 
you think everything is fine, the wizard brings them back 
to life. Even if you manage to hack the wizard to death, 
he can come back to life, too. Some of the creatures, like 
the Ore, follow you around. Others, like the Gnome, will 
just take all your coins, laugh and leave. 

One of the saving graces is the "eerie glow;" just when 
you think you're going to die, it surrounds you, rejuvenates 
you, and the game goes on. The game also includes a help 
function which, if you ask the right question, will give you 
clues. To keep it interesting the author used riddles for the 
clues. 



The help you receive is dependent upon your status in 
the game. There are three variables in Wizard's Castle: 
condition, score and experience. Condition is your physical 
strength and varies with how many dragons you've fought 
and how well you've done. In wandering around the 
kingdom you may find apples to eat or water to drink and 
they will boost your condition. And if you get lucky, the 
eerie glow will surround you and really give a push. 

During your travels you find any of 24 different objects. 
If you can manage to get these back to the King, you are 
awarded points (either as score or experience, or both). 
Experience points can also be earned by actions like killing 
your enemies. Experience points are needed to be able to 
do some of the actions in the game. But, with more 
experience, you fall into more traps. You have the option 
of trading score for experience. The only thing I could not 
understand from the documentation was what the score 
points were for except buying experience. 

There are three levels of play. In level one the creatures 
are a little easier to kill, points are easier to earn and it just 
seems you are luckier. Level three is hard; even moving 
through the game drains some of your strength away. The 
creatures are harder to kill, they're trickier, and traps pop 
up more often. The documentation states that level three 
should take about eight hours (or more) to play. The game 
is in real time, so even if you don't see a cyclops waiting 
when the screen comes up, don't sit still too long or he may 
come after you. 

There are several nice features with this game, such as 
the Freeze command. To stop and think, you can enter 
FREEZE and the game is on hold until you want to play some 
more. You can also save the game you're playing onto the 
game disk to be able to pick up where you left off. Wizard's 
Castle will talk to you if you have a Radio Shack Sound/ 
Speech Cartridge, but I didn't think it helped much (at least, 
it didn't tell me how to win). To quit, type UNCLE, and you 
can start all over. 

Even though / never saved the Princess, I believe you will 
find Wizard's Castle well worth the money no matter what 
your level of expertise with Adventures. It is easy enough 
for those of us who play just for relaxation; and difficult 
enough for the die-hards who think they can master 
anything. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 



64k CoCo Users! 

IMAGINE A DOS THAT 

Is Configured for YOUR System 
Allows up to 54 K of Workspace 
Handles AO & BO Track Drives 

& Double- sided Drives 
Simplifies Machine Language 

with 90 System Calls 
Automatically Dates Files 

HELP IS HERE WITH 




"►►small CBK] operating system 



PROGRAM DISK (including FORMAT BACKUP & COPY UTILITIES) with detoiled USERS MANUAL 
ond 1 PATCH of y our choica Si9.95'plu» S3JD0 i/h add I PATCHES $9.95 eoch 

'N ] rasidsnti add 6% salai tax 

PATCHES AVAILABLE FOR 

• MICROWORKSt Editor/AuwnbUr DisoitembUr 

* DCBUG REVIEWED IN MAY 1986 

• COMPUTERWARE: Edtlor B. MocroAuambler DAtKJU/^VA/ 

• OUGGER S GROWING SVSTEmi C 1 2 & 2 5. V^-^V KAIfNBUW 

• Elite software: El.t* word A^**^aV 

• DOUBLE OENSlTYtClrl.rm (3 3 & 4 I. 111 

• COGNITEC: T#|.wntif 64 |0 & 1 RAINBOW 

• RA0IO SHACK! EDTASM» & SCRIPSIT carindqei certification 

PROGRAMMERS REFERENCE GUIDE B. DISK UTILITIES ALSO AVAILABLE $22.95 .och 

SOtSTMHN CNTCRPRISBS, INC. 

CALL OR WRITE: SOISTMANN ENTERPRISES. INC. 
P.O. BOX 257 P.O. BOX 330 

BUOQ LAKE. N.J. 07BZB WEST BERLIN. N.J. 08091 
{2OII347-0763 (6091768-4183 



Hint . . . 

Disk Directory Printout 

If you have a long disk directory and want to see 
all of it, or if you simply wish to have a hard copy 
printout of your directory, one simple command 
allows you to do this easily. 

Just POKE 111,254:DIR and the entire disk 
directory will appear on your printer, even if it is too 
long to be fully displayed on the screen. 



Ruth Graham 



1 36 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



Software Reviem 



Rescue Your Disks 
with Salvdisk 



Salvdisk (salvage disk) is a machine language utility for 
salvaging information from a damaged disk. It may be used 
with files consisting of BASIC, machine language programs 
or data. Using Salvdisk, you can copy one granule at a time 
to either another disk or a different granule on the same 
disk. After moving a file, you can modify the disk directory 
to use the data in its new location. Salvdisk requires a Color 
Computer with a disk drive and 32K of memory. 

Salvdisk is supplied on a disk without the usual instruc- 
tions. (But instructions are provided.) After doing the 
machine language LDADM "SALVDISK" and EXECuting, a 
title page (with copyright notice) appears. At this point, 
press any key to continue. The second screen asks whether 
you desire written instructions. If you respond with a 'Y', 
the program allows you to select the Baud rate, and the 
instructions are sent to the printer. If you're familiar with 
the program, this can be bypassed by responding with an 
4 N\ 

Having entered the main part of the program, you are 
given a choice to Load Granule, See Granule, Dump 
Granule, Alter Directory or Return to BASIC. 

Load Granule reads the specified granule's contents into 
CoCo's memory. (Granules one through 68 store files; 
granules 69 and 70 comprise the directory.) 

See Granule displays the contents of a previously loaded 
granule one sector (256 bytes) at a time. The display, 
however, is generally illegible — showing primarily graphics 
patterns and an occasional identifiable character. 

Dump Granule allows you to write a previously loaded 
granule into a new granule of your choice. You may want 
to write it to the same granule number on another 
(undamaged) disk, or write it to an unused granule on the 
damaged disk. 

Alter Directory allows you to update the directory after 
moving a granule (or granules) around. Without this step, 
the computer would not know where to look for the 
relocated file. 

Return to BASIC allows you to test modifications without 
having to turn off the computer and accessories. This is 
convenient because a test file (called "try it") is created when 
you modify the directory. By using EXEC, RUN or read, you 
can confirm the correctness of your work. 

Being a relative newcomer to the world of disks, I have 
not (yet) crashed a disk. But I know it's just a matter of 
time, so I welcomed the opportunity to review this program. 
Unfortunately, 1 was disappointed. In order to use Salvdisk, 
it is imperative to be able to identify the granules associated 
with each file. This task would be easy if I could use the 
program to read the contents of each sector and granule, 
but the resulting display when 1 "view" the granule is 
predominately graphics patterns with only rarely identifi- 
able characters. 

I tried this program with both binary and ASCII files 
without success. I called the author to discuss my difficulty, 
and he explained that this was normal. He also explained 
that determining the granules that contain a program is 



accomplished through trial and error. And to further 
complicate the salvage procedure, the granules must be 
relocated in correct order, while the order on the damaged 
disk is not necessarily consecutive — the granules compris- 
ing a program may be numbers 34, 35, 50 and 26. When 
salvaging these, they must be relocated in the correct 
sequence. In other words, I have to write granule 34 first, 
then 35, then 50, then 26 to consecutive granules on the new 
disk — 10, 11, 12 and 13, for example. And, the correct 
order can only be determined through trial and error. 

I also tried, unsuccessfully, to identify the starting granule 
of the test program by reading the directory (using the read 
granule activity on granules 69 and 70, as specified in the 
instructions). 

The two pages of instructions are neither complete nor 
well-written, but are sufficient to experiment with the 
program. 

In summary, attempting to use this program reinforces 
the necessity of making frequent backups of critical disks. 
The distribution of Salvdisk is unique, in that the author 
has not set a price; rather, he will send you a copy of the 
program if you send him a formatted disk. When you 
execute the program, one of the opening screens explains 
that the author would appreciate a donation if you find 
Salvdisk useful. 

(Free CoCo Software, P.O. Box 2231, Westovcr, WV 26502) 

— Jerry Oefelein 



BA SIC COMPILER 

WASATCH WARE believes that users of the Color Computer deserve the 
right to use all 64k of RAM that le available In the computer, ana have 
fast machine language programs that use the full potential of the 6BC)y 
microprocessor. That is why the BASIC compiler, called MLBASIC was 
developed. Here are some of the reasons that make this compiler one of 
the best bargains In this magazine: 

- h*p »ii 64k of RAM for program storage and/or variables 

~ V'ull floating Point arithmetic expressions with functions 

- FMJ.3. sequential and direct access disk flies allowed 

- BASIC source and M.L. output I/O to disk, tape or memory 

- Uany new commands that expand your programming capability 

Commands Supported 



1. I/O -Commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEW DIR DRIVE DSKIS 

GET INPUT KILL. LSET OPEN PR I NT 

2. Program Control Commands 

CALL END EXEC FOR STEP NEXT 

THEN ELSE ERROR ON. .GO RETURN STOP 



DSKOS 
PUT 



FIELD 
RSET 



GOSUB GOTO 
SUBROUTINE 



FILES 
USING 



IF 



3. Hath Functions 

ABS ASC ATN COS 

IKT LEN LOG LOC 

SGN SIN SQR TAN 

4. String Functions 

CURS INKEYS LEFTS MIDS 

5. Graphic/Sound Commands 
COLOR CLS CIRCLE DRAW 
PMODE PRESET PSET RESET 

6. Other/Special Commands 

DATA DIM LL1ST MOTOR 

TAB VERIFY DLD DST 

REAL SREG SWP VECTD 



CVN 
LOF 
TIMER 



MKNS 



LINE 
SCREEN 



EOF EXP 
PEEK POINT 
VAL 



RIGHTS STRS 



FIX IKSTR 
PPOINT RND 



STRINGS 



PAINT 
SET 



POKE READ 
IBSHFT LREG 
VECTI 



PCLEAR PCLS PLAY 
SOUND 



REM RESTORE RUN 

PCOPY PMODD PT\ 



Compiled Prograta Speed (Time in minutes : seconds ) 



Program Interpreter MLBASIC 

Era tosthenea Sieve 6 : 58.7 0 : OG . 3 
Matrix Fill , Mult ,Sum 

10x10 0:30.9 0:02,5 

String Manipulation 6:22.5 2:17.7 

Floating Point 0:32.6 0:30.6 

Disk I/O 

(2000 PRINT/INPUTS) 2:21.5 0:27.6 



RAINBOW 

Certification 

SEAL 



DON'T HESITATE. . .BUY MLBASIC TODAY 



Disk - $69.95 
Tape - $69.95 
Both - $74.95 



64 K REQUIRED 



Include $4.00 Shipping and Handling 

Utah residents add 5.75 % tax 

Check or Honey Orders Only (No C.O.D.) 



WasatchWare 

7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, UT 
84121 



CALL (801) 943-6263 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 37 




Software RevieWi 



SUMMER ROUNDUP 

GRAPHIC ADVENTURE GAMES (disk only) 

Darkmoor Hold 29.95 

Dragon Blade 29.95 

Hall of the King 39.95 + 

Hall of the King II 39.95 + 

Scepter of Ursea 24.95 

To Preserve Quandic 34.95 + 

( + two disk adventure) 

UTILITIES 

Colorkit. . . h 29.95* 

Disk Manager 19.95 

Disk to Tape 19.95 

Disk Zapper 29.95 

Maillist (disk only) 29.95 

Microartist 19.95* 

Oracle 24.95 

Rom Free 19.95 

RTD Trio 44.95 

GRAPHIC SIMULATIONS/ARCADE 

City War 19.95* 

Flight 19.95* 

Gravitor 14.95* 

Jumbo Jet 19.95* 

Warp Factor X 34.95 

MISCELLANEOUS (disk only) 

Airnav (flight plans) 59.95 

Color Disk Trivia. 24.95 

Trivia Question disks , . . , 9.95 

Lizpack (statistics) 175.00 

Fantasy Gamer's Pack 19.95 

GENEALOGY/ASTROLOGY 

Family-Tree 24.95* 

Super Astrology 19.95* 

TEXT SIMULATIONS/ADVENTURES 

Adventure in Wonderland 19.95* 

Gangbusters 14.95* 

Viking II 19.95* 

EDUCATION 

Mathpac 14.95* 

Music Reader 29.95* 

Phonics I & II 14.95* 

Preread 1, 2, 3 14.95* 

Spelling w/voice 19.95* 

*ADD $5.00 FOR DISK VERSION 

PROTECTION POLICY — We believe our customers are honest — all of our 
software can be backed up using standard procedures. 
YOUR PERSONAL CHECK IS WELCOME — no delay. Include $1.50 for 
shipping for each order + $2.00 for COD. AZ residents add 5% sales tax. 
Orders shipped within two days. 

DEALERS AND AUTHORS INQUIRES are always welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dist., Ltd., PO. Box 11932. Edmonton, Alberta 
T5J 3L1. (403) 421-8003 

SUMMER SALES PRICES GOOD ON ORDERS RECEIVED 
BY AUGUST 31, 1986 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG OF 
GREAT COCO PROGRAMS 

FOR QUESTIONS OR ORDERS 

CALL (915) 584-7784 ^ — k HM? 1 * - - 





















* V 







SEND ORDER TO: 
PRICKLY PEAR SOFTWARE 
213 LA MIRADA 
EL PASO, TEXAS 79932 



Action-Packed Rommel 3-D 
Requires Practice 

With anxious hands, you hold the controls of your death 
machine in hopes of finding the enemy. The mission appears 
simple, but you know in your heart that this will be one 
of the harder missions you face. 

Rommel 3-D is a game of speed and skill. You have a 
tank that must seek and destroy other tanks and planes 
trying to destroy you. As you destroy them, you receive 
points and if you gain enough points you receive bonus 
tanks. The challenge is to develop a strategy that enables 
you to increase your scores constantly. 

A joystick is not needed to run the game. Use the arrows, 
or the T', 'L\ 4 W or *Q f keys to move and the space bar 
to fire the cannon. Scoring is accomplished by directly 
hitting the enemy tanks or planes. Points are given for 
hitting three different things: dumb tanks worth 1000 
points, smart tanks worth 1500 points and planes worth 
1300 points. You receive one bonus tank for every 10,000 
points you get until 100,000 points after which it takes 
20,000 points to get a bonus tank. On the screen you see 
flat land with mountains on the horizon. Scattered around 
this land are various obstacles you cannot move through. 
The enemy vehicles are three-dimensional tanks or airplanes 
in various colors. In the middle of the screen are the sights 
for your tank. They become smaller when an enemy tank 
or plane is in firing range. In the upper right hand corner 
there is a radar screen. Your tank is the center of that screen 
with other vehicles appearing as blips in relative position 
to you. 

The only way to win at this game is to practice. If you 
get in trouble, move your tank backwards and to the left 
or right very fast and maybe you won't get hit. The only 
strategy that worked for to me was to keep moving. 

When I played this game I got killed very fast at the 
beginning, but as I played I did get better slowly. The game 
is a challenge, fast moving and fun. If you are into action- 
packed war games then this game is worth looking at. 

(MichTron, 576 S. Telegraph, Pontiac, Michigan 48053, 
313-334-5700, 32K required, disk $29.95) 

— Thomas E. Nedreberg 



>l0 Amway Distributors - Cocoachiever 

software package drastically reduces time spent 
hassling with paperwork! Menue-driven - user 
friendly, assists in preparation and checking SA- 
ls or warehouse orders; verification of phoned- 
in orders; supplies monthly PV/BV totals and 
calculates monthly refunds. Has wholesale price 
list stock numbers; can add to or delete stock 
numbers or distributor files from memory. 
Required for operation: TRS-80 Color, 64K; 
Disk:l - ssdd; Printer: optional, PRICE: 
, H9.95. Contact: T&M Enterprises, 2301 Crom- 
$ well Drive, St. Maries, ID 83861. Ph: 208-245- 
3944. 



138 



THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



oftware Review* 



Clever Animation in 
Adventure in Mythology 

Fans of graphics Adventure games will enjoy Saguaro 
oftware's new game, Adventure In Mythology. The 64K 
lachine-Ianguage game is available on tape or disk. The 
isk can be backed up, but the backup copy will not run. 
>n loading the backup copy, you get a message that says 
le files can be recopied to the original disk if necessary. 

The game does not load from JDOS or from the disk 
ersion of ADOS. I had no problem with DECB 1.0. 
according to the instruction sheet, the game can be used 
/ith the Tandy SSC Speech Sound Pak. But even without 
lat accessory, the game is not totally silent — there are 
its of music and sound effects built in. 

Adventure In Mythology comes in a simple, yet most 
ttractive package. The instructions are short and to the 
toint. 

The graphics are cleverly animated. For example, when 
ou are in a rain forest, you can actually see the rain coming 
lown. If you have a key to open the castle door, you see 
t open up. 

As the name of the game implies, the Adventure is based 
>n the popular tales of ancient mythology. Among the 
iharacters you encounter are King Minos, Ariadne, Icarus 
tnd Galatea, just to name a few. "Your goal," we are told, 
Is to win the hand of the beautiful Atalanta, the swift- 
unning huntress." I never got to meet her, though, because 

kept getting mugged by bandits, trapped in inescapable 
ooms, drowned in the ocean and tripped up in the darkness 
)f the famous Labyrinth. 

Like other games of this type, Adventures In Mythology 
:an take many hours to play, so youll find the ability to 
iave a game in progress and reload it later very handy. The 
iisk actually allows ten different saves — so you can save 
one game at several landmarks along the way. Then if you 
get killed, you can go back to any of those saved points and 
try again from that point. 

(Saguaro Software, Box 1864, Telluride, CO 81435, tape 
$24.95, disk $27.95) 

— Neil Parks 



Hin t . . . 

What's Your ROM Version? 

With all the talk about new ROMs, you may be 
wondering exactly which ROM you have. If you have 
an older CoCo with Extended BASIC, just read the 
version number of your Extended BASIC at the top of 
the screen on power up. Then, to see which Color 
BASIC ROM you have, type EXEC 41175 and press 

ENTER. 

If you have the new ROMs, Extended BASIC will 
be Version LI and Color basic will be Version L2. 

On the CoCo 2, Color BASIC will always be Version 
1.2 or 1.3 (which are functionally identical). 




Back copies of many issues of the 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents 
for each additional issue for postage and 
handling if sent by United Parcel Service. 
There is a $5 charge for the first issue, 
plus a $1 charge for each additional issue 
on orders sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not 
deliver to a post office box or to another 
country. 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 
are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All others are in regular magazine 
form. VISA, MasterCard and American 
Express accepted. Kentucky residents 
please add 5 percent state sales tax. In 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
and no C.O.D. orders are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To order, just fill out the form on the 
next page and mail it with your payment 
to: 



THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




August 1986 THE RAINBOW 139 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 



(See overleaf for instructions.) 
(Payment must accompany back issue orders. We do not bill.) 

□ Please send me the following back issues: 





MONTH 


VOLUME 1 






NO. 


YEAR 




PRICE 


1 


JULY '81 


PREMIER ISSUE 


$2.00 


□ 


2 


AUG. '81 




$2.00 


□ 


3 


SEPT. '81 


EDUCATION 


$2.00 


□ 


4 


OCT. '81 


PRINTER 


$2.00 


□ 


5 


NOV. *81 




$2.00 


□ 


6 


DEC. '81 


HOLIDAY 


$2.00 


□ 


7 


JAN. '82 




$2.00 


□ 


8 


FEB. '82 




$2.00 


□ 


9 


MAR. '82 




$2.50 


□ 


10 


APR. '82 




$2.50 


□ 


12 


JUNE '82 


VOLUME 2 


$2.50 


□ 


11 


JUNE '83 


PRINTERS 


$2.95 


□ 


12 


JULY '83 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 3 


$2.95 


□ 


1 


AUG. '63 


GAMES 


$2.95 


□ 


2 


SEPT. '83 


EDUCATION 


$2.95 


□ 


3 


OCT. '83 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


□ 


4 


NOV. '83 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


5 


DEC. '83 


HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


□ 


6 


MAR. '84 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


□ 


9 


APR. '84 


GAMING 


$3.95 


□ 


10 


MAY. '84 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


□ 


11 


JUNE '84 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ 


12 


JULY '84 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 4 


$3.95 


□ 


1 


AUG. '84 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 


2 


SEPT. '84 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


□ 


3 


OCT. '84 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


□ 


4 


NOV. '84 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


5 


DEC. '84 


HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


□ 


6 


JAN. '85 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 


7 


FEB. '85 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


□ 


8 


MAR. '85 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


□ 


9 


APR. '85 


SIMULATIONS 


$3.95 


□ 


10 


MAY '85 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


□ 


11 


JUNE '85 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ 


12 


JULY '85 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 5 


$3.95 


□ 


1 


AUG. '85 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 


2 


SEPT. '85 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


□ 


3 


OCT. '85 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


□ 


4 


NOV. '85 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


6 


JAN. '86 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 


7 


FEB. '86 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


□ 


8 


MAR. '86 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


□ 


9 


APR. '86 


HOME HELP 


$3.95 


□ 


10 


MAY '86 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


□ 


11 


JUNE '86 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ 


12 


JULY '86 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 6 


$3.95 


□ 


1 


AUG. '86 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to our first three years, July 1981 
through June 1984, is printed in its entirety in our July 1984 issue. 
Separately bound copies are also available. $2.50 □ 



Note: Our Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes, including RAINBOW ON TAPE 
indexes, are included in the July 1985 and 1966 issues, respectively. 

TOTAL 

KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

U.S. MAIL CHARGE 

SHIPPING & HANDLING 

U.P.S. CHARGE 

TOTAL AMOUNT 

ENCLOSED 

Name 



Address 



City State ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or charge to my: 

□ visa □ mc Dae 



CARD # 



EXPIRATION DATE PHONE # 

SIGNATURE 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Software Review ^S^SH^S^^^ 

Take a Chance — Play S kance 

Do you like games of chance such as Yahtzee or dice? Dc 
you like to go one-on-one with your computer and 
sometimes win? If so, you're a likely candidate for Skance. 

The program is written entirely in BASIC and requires a 
16K CoCo with Extended Color BASIC. 

When I ran the program, the instructions were simple and 
straightforward. Besides the instruction screen, there are 
four other screens you will use: The Player Screen lists all 
of the players, the Score Screen shows the current scores, 
the Dice Screen shows the dice being rolled and the Winner 
Screen gives the winner's name and score. 

After the instructions, you are asked how many people 
will be playing. Up to four people can play or you can play 
against the computer. 

The object of the game is to score as many points as 
possible. To score, you need to stop rolling the dice before 
your point number comes up a second time. Your point 
number is the first number you rolled. 

The game consists of seven rounds of play. After the 
seventh round, the winner's screen comes up and displays 
the winner's name and score. Although the computer keeps 
track of all players' scores and who is playing, once a player 
begins rolling the dice, there is nothing displayed on the 
screen to tell the players who is rolling. We found this to 
be a problem. 

After you decide how many people are going to play, the 
screen indicates whose turn it is. There are two options: 
press the 'A' to roll the dice or press the 'S' to see the current 
scores. If the 'A' is pressed, a screen comes up showing two 
dice. After each roll, you are given three choices: roll again, 
see score, or next player. These are chosen with the 'A', 'S' 
and 'N' keys. If any other key is pressed, your turn ends 
and the next player is up. 

This game requires no skill to play, but if you like games 
of chance, this may be for you. 

(Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, Cleveland, OH 44107, send 
formatted disk and return postage.) 

— John H. Appel 



One-Liner Contest Winner , . . 

Here is a tricky one. Use your joystick to move the 
racer through the course. Watch out for the obstacles! 

The listing: 

p POKE65495 , 0 : CLSp : A=1248 : B=9 : C= 
128: FORT=j3TOA*A : POKE! 4 7 2 +RND ( 3 j3 ) 
, 9 6 : D=2 -RND ( 3) : FORS=0TO4 :B=B+D : B 
=B-(B=j3) + (B=19) : POKER, C : R^JOYSTK 
(j3) /2+A: PRINTSTRING$ (B, 11 " ) STRIN 
G$ (13 , CHR$ (C) ) : IFPEEK (R) -C THENP 
OKER , 8 6 : NEXTS , T ELSECLS4 : PRINT "T 

IME= !, T; :PLAY»01L3G2":RUN 

Lonnie McClusky 
Toney, AL 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



1 40 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



Software Review SS^SSSS^SS^SSS^\ 

Portraits of Christ Presents 
the Gospel of John 

Get out your copy of 2010 by Arthur C. Clarke and youU 
;ee in the introduction he reveals that the entire text of this 
lovel was mailed from Sri Lanka to New York on a single 
iiskette. He was heralding the arrival of the age of 
:echnology. Now, in the same tradition, is the book I 
received for review from Sovereign Grace Software, 
Portraits of Christ. 

Two CoCo-formatted diskettes contain ASCII text files 
which can be loaded by your word processor and read on- 
screen or printed out. Both the documentation and an 
introductory file explain the screen and printer formatting 
necessary for proper hyphenation and paging. Using 
Telewriter, all files loaded without a hitch. Following the 
formatting parameters produced a well-organized screen 
layout of 63 characters per line and a printout properly 
paged and aligned. (A call to the author, Pastor Mark 
Camp, indicated that the disks now contain a program 
APrint, that can be run to get a hardcopy without a word 
processor of your own.) There are 21 chapters plus a title 
page and disk information file. 

The book is essentially a discussion of the New Testament 
Gospel of John. It presents the idea that a unique aspect 
of Jesus Christ is emphasized in each chapter of John. 



Sample titles include "Jesus Christ — Consoler" and "Jesus 
Christ — King." 

In the 1 5th century, the Spanish mystic Fray Luis de Leon 
published a work called Los Nombres de Dios (The Names 
of God) which approached the idea with the same method 
for the entire Bible. But Portraits of Christ is not just a 
theological discussion. The nature of Portraits of Christ can 
be accurately described as fundamental Christianity. Its 
stated purpose is evangelical. 

I got the feeling that each chapter may have originally 
been a sermon delivered by its author. Each chapter 
concludes by directly addressing the reader to encourage a 
decision of a spiritual nature. 

To sum up this offering by Sovereign Grace Software 
without bias, it is a literate, well-prepared presentation of 
the Gospel of John written for the purpose of teaching about 
the nature of Jesus Christ from a perspective of evangelical, 
Protestant Christianity. 

Pastor Camp told me that he would like $10 for the two- 
disk set but admitted he is willing to accept donations of 
any amount as well. He is, not surprisingly, more interested 
in spreading the word than reaping profit. 



(Sovereign Grace Software, 221 Highview Dr., Ballwin, MO 
63011, 64K disk $10) 

— Dennis A. Church 



****** SELECTED SOFTWARE ****** 



SOLDERLESS UPGRADE KITS 

With easy-to-follow instructions 



64K FOR E BOARD 
64K FOR F BOARD 
64K FOR COC02* (ALL MODELS) 

'All Korean models require one solder joint. 



$39.95 
$29.95 
$29.95 



NOTE: All ICs used in our kits are first quality 1.50 NS 
prime chips and carry one futf year warranty. 



BASIC ROMs DISASSEMBLY 



COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED 
ALL 3 BOOKS 

ULTRA 80C DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 
BUG OUT & THE ORACLE (M.L. Monitor) 
ALL 5 ITEMS 

500 POKES. PEEKS. 'N EXECS 
UTILITY ROUTINE (VOLUME 1) 
WITH ROUTINES ON TAPE OR DISK 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 
ALL 9 ITEMS 



$17.95 
$17.95 
$17.95 

ONLY $39.95 
$29.95 
$14.95 

ONLY $59.95 
$16.95 
$19.95 
$36.95 
(tepco) $16.95 
ONLY $119.95 



COCO MAX tape only $64.95 

COCO MAX II disk only $74.95 

Y-BRANCHING CABLE $27.95 

DS-69A DIGISECTOR & C-SEE III SOFTWARE $149.95 

HJL-57 KEYBOARD $69.95 

VOLKS MODEM $54.95 

THE INTRONICS EPROM Programmer 

Program Up to 64K Eprom $139.95 

DATARASE (Eprom Eraser) $39.95 

2764 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $5.95 

27128 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $7.95 

ROM PACK P.C. BOARD 

with case for 27xx $9.95 

TEAC 55B DS/DD Half Height Drive $109.95 



WIZARD'S CASTLE 

64K Graphic Adventure 
By Spectral Associates 
Disk only $19.95 



CASE AND POWER SUPPLY $49.00 

NEW JAM DISK CONTROLLER 

with J Dot 1.2 $129.00 

DISKETTE CAROUSEL $24.95 

ZENITH ZVM-123 GREEN $99.00 

ZENITH ZVM-122 AMBER $109.00 

VIDEO PLUS $24.95 

VIDEO PLUS IIC .$34.95 

VIDEO PLUSIIU $34.95 

REAL TALKER I 

With 3 talking gamei $49.95 

REAL TALKER II 

With 3 talking game $54.95 

NUMBER JACK THE HJL Numeric Key Pad $79.95 



Top 5 Spectral Associates 
games in one package; 
Galagon, Lancer, Cubix, 
Froggie & Lunar Rover Patrol 
for only $34.9& tape or disk 



Take a closer look. . . 












TAPE 


DISK 




TAPE 


DISK 


DYNACALC 




$74.95 


P51 MUSTANG 


$23.95 


$27.95 


PROCOLORFILE 20 




$49.95 


SAILOR MAN (64K) 


$23.95 


$27.95 


MASTER DESIGN 




$29.95 


WORLDS OF FLIGHT 


$23.95 


$26.35 


TELEWRITER 64 


$39.95 


$49.95 


DRAGON SLAYER 




$23.95 


SUPER SCREEN MACHINE 


$35.95 


$3B.95 


SR-71 


$23.15 


$24.75 


RAINBOW SCREEN MACHINE 


$23.95 


$26.95 


BUZZARD BAIT 


$19.95 


$22.95 


PEN PAL 




$64.95 


GALAGON 


$16.95 


$18.95 


AUTOTERM 


$31.95 


$39.95 


LUNAR ROVER PATROL 


$16.95 


$16.95 


ADOS 




$27.95 


MS GOBBLER 


$16.95 


$16.95 


SUPER BACKUP UTILITY 




$44.95 


LANCER 


$16.65 


$18.95 


THE PEEPER WITH SOURCE 


$24.95 


$26.95 


CUBIX 


$16.95 


$18.95 


GRAPHICOM 




$19.95 


FROGGIE 


$16.05 


$18.95 


BEST OF COCO TIME 85 


$26.95 


$26.95 


SPACE PAC (10 M.L. GAMES) 


$21.95 


$21.95 


UTILITIES BONANZA 




$29.95 


EDUCATIONAL PAC (6 PROGRAMS) 


$19.95 


$19.95 


DISK UTILITIES 2.1A 




$24.95 


ADVENTURE PAC (5 GAMES) 


$19.95 


$19.95 


TELEPATCH II 




$29.95 


TREASURY PAC (30 GAMES) 


$29.95 


$29.95 



WE PAY SHIPPING in the United States, Canada & Mexico. 
Overseas please add 10%. (MN Residents add 6% sales tax.) 
We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or money order. U.S. 
funds only for foreign orders. C.O.D. please add $2.00. 
(USA only). 



send to SELECTED SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 32228, Fridley, MN 55432 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 612-757-2439 
INFORMATION 612-757-1026 (8 A.M. - 5 P.M. C.S.T.) 
SAME DAY SHIPPING BEFORE 1 P.M. C.S.T. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 141 



NEW 

DISK 
DRIVES 

STARTING AT 

89. 

WITH CASE & 
POWER SUPPLY 

$12995 



New Low Price! 



40Tks 6Ms 

, ^Double Sided 
Double Density 



40 or 80 Tracks 
1/2 Hght.Teac/Panasonic 



TANDON MPI TEAC 

* 

Speed 6 ms tk to tk and up 
Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty now 1 YEAR 



CALL FOR 
SALE 

PRICES 



We carry only the finest quality disk drives*no seconds*no surplus 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! all drives fully tested&warranteed 

Complete Disk Drive with Power Supply&Case Tea? $129.95 

Two Drives in Dual Case & Power Supply jeac <no-za-erc call 

1/2 ht double sided double density Disk Drives .(Panasonic/Teac)$ $119-95 

1/2 ht double sided double density Disk Drive with ps&case ^99^5 CALL 

low to use your new drive system on audio cassette 

Single ps&case $44.95 Dual 1/2 ht ps&case $54.95 Dual ps&case. . Call 



$129.95 



Color Computer Controller fJ&M) 

DRIVE 0 FOR RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 

TANDON, MPI OR TEAC DRIVE(SINGLE SIDED 40 TRACKS SPEED 5 MS TRK TO TRK & UP) 
POWER SUPPLY and CASEJWO DRIVE CABLE WITH ALL GOLD CONNECTORS . 
<^J&M CONTROLLER, MANUAL and DOCUMENTATION $^40^ SALE ! 

^V. DRIVE 6 FOR RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 



^ ^ PANASONIC 1/2 HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED DOUBLE DENSITY DRIVE SOOK unformatted 
^ POWER SUPPLYand CASE, 2 DRIVE CABLE WITH ALL GOLD CONNECTORS 



-kv- rUWtn bUrrLTanQ UAbt, £ UHlVt UADLt Wl I H ALL uULU UONNLUIUHb .o p* 

J&M CONTROLLER, MANUAL and DOCUMENTATION $£7S&T Y,.. SALE! 

TAKE ADDED SAVINGS ON TWO DRIVE SYSTEMS ^^^^ 

DISKETTES with free library case ilHR — $1795 

Unadvertised Specials j^B^H $Call 

Drives c leaned, a ligned& tested w ■ ™ $29.95 

TECHNICAL STAFF ON DUTY, PLEASE CALL FOR ASSISTANCE. 



CALL US TODAY!! 
£ ORDER TOLL FREE 



617 278 6555 

1-800-635-0300 



*DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. 

617-278-6555 

TRUE DATA PRO D UCTS 

9 SOUTH MAIN ST 
UXBRIDGE, MASS. 01569 

617-278-6555 



We welcome 
Visa /Master Charge 



HOURS MON -SAT 9-6 (EST) 



• Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 

• C.O.D. Add $2.00 



New Hard Drives 



IBM XT 



COMPLETE SYSTEM 



JUST PLUG IN 



Call For 
BEST PRICE 



COMPATIBLE 





Warranty - One Full Year 



call for low price 



5 to 20 Megabyte, ready to run on the TRS 
80 Model I/III/IV/4P, color computer, 

SCREEN DUMP PROGRAM 

64K UPGRADES $19.95 The best screen dump program for the Epson& Gemini 



VIDEO DRIVER 

ENABLES YOUR COCO TO OPERATE WITH A 
VIDEO MONITOR INSTEAD OF A TELEVISION! 



$24.95 



Panasonic 1091 Printer 239.95 

1091 Printer& SP3& Screen Dump 299.95 



printers ever!! Have the option of standard images 
-reverse w/regular or double sized pictures s-| g95 

sp-3 interface for Color Computer 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem/printer switch— no need for 
Y-cables or plugging/unplugging cables 




PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
Call for current pricing 



Only: 

$54.95 



PRINTERS 



$219 





N 



MOD 



COMPLETE SYSTEM 




now 
with 
screen 
dump 



f 




TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 SOUTH MAIN ST. 
UXBRIDGE, MASS. 01569 




Nothing more to buy! 

Dealer inquiries invited 



CALL US TODAY!! 617"278"6555 
I ORDER TOLL FREE 1-800-635-0300 



Software Review^ 



Check out Computer and 
Business Bankbook 

By Neil Parks 



Sunrise Software has two new programs available that 
not only serve as check registers, but also print checks. If 
you pay the same creditors every month, this could prove 

to be a real work saver. 

Computer Bankbook is designed for home users. Busi- 
ness Bankbook — available in two versions — is a similar 
program designed for business users. Both programs are 100 
percent BASIC and come on disks that can be backed up. 
Both come with a "code plug." This bit of hardware plugs 
into the right joystick port, and without it the program is 
unable to run. 

Since Computer Bankbook is a BASIC program with no 
machine code, it should be compatible with all operating 
systems, but it isn't. The disk I tested appeared to run 
properly under JDOS, but certain data fields, which I 
wanted to leave empty (as permitted by the program), were 
filled with random garbage. Attempts to edit the data via 
the program's edit routine resulted in various crashes and/ 
or loss of entries. 



GRAFPLOT 



NEW 



— THI 



GRAFPLOT DEMO i 



JEBT J LIST 

Investment Projection 



T-Bills, FY '8? 



«S.OO DISK fc TAPE ">n 
REFUND W/PURCHASE w 
"A GREAT PACKAGE % 
GETS EVEN BETTER" <f§ 
- RAINBOW 

SO DAY ~ 
UNCONDITIONAL^^ 
MONEY-BACK 
GUARANTEE ! ! 



01 
L3 



NEW! s PRE 

-Full-page Printed 



RAINBOW 

CfRTiFiCtllDN 
SEAL 



T 



T 



T 



T 



ADSHEETS 



& 



Graphs !! 



0 




So 



u 



l 



00- 



CD 

I 



O 
a* 



2 4 6 8 10 12 

Momths Since T-Bill Investments 

: AUTOMATICALLY LOADS DATA FROM MOST POPULAR SPREADSHEETS. 

291. GRAPHING SYMBOLS AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 

AUTOMATICALLY SCALES AND LABELS ALL THREE OF THE AXES. 

CALCULATES MATH FUNCTIONS, INTEGRALS AND MOVING AVERAGES. 

FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN W/ COMPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 

FULL-PAGE SCREENPR I NTS ON ANY PR INTER I SPECIFY WITH ORDER 

REQUIRES 32K EXT. BASICi TAPE - *40.00 DISK — *4S.OO 



NEUJ • ■ 
F>R I NTER 



^Picture ^Perfect 



|NJF=-Ft 1 INJT 



rvJEUJ ! ! 
LIT I l_ I TY 
ROGRAM 



GET "PICTURE PERFECT" FULL-PAGE PRINTOUTS EVERY TIME! 
"PERFECTLY SIMPLE" TO OPERATE - "SIMPLY PERFECT" RESULTS! 
"PERFECTLY COMPATIBLE" WITH ALL DOT MATRIX PRINTERS ! 

GET "PERFECT CONTROL" OF I HEIGHT, WIDTH, POSITION, 
BAUD RATE, DOT DENSITY, NEGATIVE IMAGES, ETC. 

THE "PERFECT SOLUTION" TO YOUR GRAPHICS PRINTING NEEDS ! 

COMPATIBLE WITH GRAPH I COM AND COCO MAX PICTURES ! 



ONLY m: 



- OO OIM 



BUY BOTH PROGRAMS & SAVE » ± O - OO 

CALL NOW FOR FREE INFORMATION (413) 347-7337, OR WRITEl 

HAWKE8 RE8EARCH SERVICES l 839 8TANF0RD AVE, OAKLAND, CA 94608 
YOUR PERSONAL CHECK 18 WELCOME! 8HIPMENT WITHIN 4B HOURS! 

AtiO #3,00 SH [ FF [ Hfji QM flLL rjf*£ERB. Cfl. HEB IDEM 7 B ADD EJflLElH T.u,v 



I had no problems with DECB 1.0 or the disk versioi 
of ADOS, so I presume that the problem with JDOS i 
caused by differences in direct-access disk formatting, bu 
I don't know. Copying the program to a JDOS-formatte< 
disk did not help. 

The program ends by cold-starting the computer (POKE 
113,0: EXEC 40999). With the disk version of ADOS, there 
is garbage on the screen, but pressing the Reset button 
restores the built-in DOS. Computer Bankbook is a natural 
for ADOS's RSV high-resolution text screen — or would 
be, but for some superfluous semicolons which should be 
removed from the menu-printing routines. The Edit screens 
actually work much better with RSV than they do with the 
regular 32-by-16 display. 

The eight-page manual is well-written and easy to 
understand, though a couple of points were left out that 
probably should have been mentioned. 

The first step in setting up the check register is to enter 
a beginning balance. Although there are only seven items 
on the main menu, the beginning balance is selected by 
pressing '8'. That was probably done because, after entering 
the balance, you won't use that routine again for a year. 

There are two ways to enter checks. If you are going to 
have the computer print your checks, you use the Check 
Printer routine. When each check is printed, it is automat- 
ically entered into the register. For creditors you pay on a 
regular basis, enter their names and addresses into a file. 
Then every time you want to send a check to one of those 
creditors, you call up that file. Enter the last check number 
used, and the check or checks printed are properly 
numbered. 

There is also the option of special checks, for which the 
name and address of the payee is not stored in the file. 

The second method of entering checks in the register is 
also the method for entering deposits — the Add Checks/ 
Deposits Manually selection. The manual suggests that you 
may wish to use the Check Printer routine in preference over 
the Add Manually option even if you don't plan to have 
the computer print your checks. Personally, I disagree. I 
found the Add Manually option much easier to use. 

(The manual says that if you wish to use the Check Printer 
routine without actually printing checks, you must change 
one line from a GDSLIB to a REM. What they forgot to mention 
is that this change affects only the regular checks, not the 
special ones.) 

Although the manual doesn't make it clear, all checks and 
deposits must be entered with a two-digit month. For 
example, January 25 has to be 01/25, not 1/25. If you enter 
the month with only one digit, the entry is accepted, and 
the check is printed properly. But the routine that prints out 
the transactions for a particular month keys on those two 
digits, so any entry with a one-digit month is omitted from 
the listing. 

The day can go either way — 12/4 and 12/04 are equally 
acceptable. The year is optional. Although the Computer 
Bankbook manual doesn't expressly say so, it becomes 
obvious that one year is the maximum length for the file, 
because the printout for one month doesn't key on the year. 

All entries for a given month must be consecutive. 
Otherwise, the balance column in the printout for that 
month will look strange. This may cause a slight problem 
if you write a lot of checks early in the month, before you 
get your statement and find out how much interest you 



1 44 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



arned for the preceding month. But you can always date 
he interest deposit as of the first of the new month to get 
jound that. Again, this is a point that should have been 
nentioned in the manual but wasn't. 

Each check is considered to be outstanding until you 
ndicate, either on entry or editing, that it should be canceled 
cleared). When you get your monthly statement from the 
>ank, just print out a list of outstanding checks. A total will 
>e printed with it. Add that total to the present balance and, 
f it agrees with the bank's balance, you've made balancing 
'our checkbook quick and easy. (Deposits are considered 
canceled on entry, but you can always edit one to outstand- 
ng if it occurred too recently to be on the bank statement.) 

Each check and deposit may be assigned an account 
lumber. Here's where the program really proves its value, 
ifou can print out a list of transactions for each account 
lumber, for any one month or for the entire file, and the 
ist will be automatically totaled. For example, let's say all 
/our checks for charitable organizations are assigned to 
iccount 18. Tax time comes and you want a total of 
charitable contributions — it's as easy as printing out 
iccount 18 for the year. For this feature alone, Computer 
Bankbook is well worth twenty bucks. 

There are a few quibbles, albeit minor ones. Author 
James Goldsberry did not make allowances for writing a 
check larger than $999.99. The program can handle it, but 
the printout looks strange because it exceeds the "print 
using" format. (Four-figure deposits and balances look 
OK.) 

There is a slight inconsistency in those routines that 
require a Y/N response. In some of them, the ENTER key 
is interpreted as Yes, in others as No, and in yet others as 
no response. Obviously the third situation is the most 
desirable and should have applied in all cases. 

When you enter the beginning balance (via menu option 
8), I suggest you enter the amount as zero. Then, as your 
first transaction, post a deposit in the amount of the 
balance. Use the edit function to change the name from 
"deposit" to "beginning balance" or "balance forward" or 
whatever. That way, if you ever need to recall the file for 
a prior year, you don't have to make any adjustment to the 
beginning balance. This method lets you use the same disk 
for more than one checking account at the same time — 
your personal account, your spouse's account, a joint 
account, etc. When you finish working with each account, 
just copy the CHECKS . INF file to a library disk under the 
name of your choice, and recall the one wanted by killing 
CHECKS. INF on the system disk and copying the appro- 
priate file in its place. You can have several years for several 
accounts stored on one library disk. That makes more sense 
to me than creating a new system disk for each account file, 
as the standard procedure would require. 

Business Bankbook is essentially the same program, with 
a few added features. The main difference is that instead 
of assigning each transaction to one account, you can assign 
up to four accounts. So if an invoice includes merchandise 
cost, freight and tax, for example, each of these components 
can be posted to its own account. Enter the amount for each 
account, and the total is calculated automatically. 

Business Bankbook comes in two different versions. 
System I (also known as Bank 7. 1 or 7.3) uses one disk drive. 
System II (alias Bank 9.1 or 9.3) assumes two drives — one 
for the system disk and one for data storage. The beginning 



balance entry appears on the menu in Business Bankbook, 
but works the same as in Computer Bankbook. (With 
System II, my alternative method of the zero beginning 
balance becomes even more useful: You don't even have to 
kill and copy files to go from one to another. Just rename 
the appropriate file on the data disk to or from CHECKS 
-INF.) 

The 10-page manual for Business Bankbook was appar- 
ently written some time after the other one, because it does 
mention that each file should contain one fiscal year, and 
it does not suggest using the check printer routine to enter 
checks without printing them. 

I did not test Business Bankbook under the non-Tandy 
operating systems, but since the two programs use similar 
direct-access disk I/O routines, I would expect the results 
of such a test to be the same as they were for Computer 
Bankbook. 

Business Bankbook allows you to enter a table of Active 
Accounts, consisting of any account numbers you regularly 
use, and a name for each account. This chart can be printed 
out at any time, and will appear in numerical order even 
if you didn't enter them in order. Also, the account names 
in the table appear on the check vouchers. 

Unfortunately, there are two bugs in this routine. In the 
Edit mode, you are asked if you want to change the account 
number or account name. But any change in the account 
name erroneously produces a random change in the 
number, and any attempt to change the number fails. Also, 
if you use an account number that is not in the table, the 
check printing routine puts an inappropriate name in 
instead of a blank space. There is one line on the System 
I program that says RUN BANK -10. However, BANK. 10 is 
a file which occurs only in System II. Somebody didn't 
debug as thoroughly as he should have. 

On the plus side, by the time Business Bankbook was 
written, Mr. Goldsberry corrected the inconsistency in his 
Y/N routines, so that only a 'Y' or an 'N' would be accepted 
as a response. 

Business Bankbook also has a routine called Convert that 
allows you to convert your Computer Bankbook files to the 
Business Bankbook format if you want to upgrade. The 
Business Bankbook manual says that a Computer Bank- 
book file of about 300 records takes seven granules of disk 
space. After conversion to the Business Bankbook format, 
the same data occupies eleven grans. 

The manuals for both Computer Bankbook and Business 
Bankbook state that the check printing routines are 
expressly designed for use with Nebs Computer Forms 
tractor feed checks #9025-1, and that Line Printer VII, 
DMP-100, and possibly other inexpensive printers can't 
handle such heavy paper. 

With each program comes a checklist to fill out and send 
in if you have occasion to write to Sunrise Software. "Please 
outline the problem you encountered in as much detail as 
possible," says Sunrise. "We will do all we can to help you 
solve it." I like that. 



(Sunrise Software, 8906 NW 26 St., Sunrise, FL 33322, 
Computer Bankbook, 32K, one disk, $19.95; Business 
Bankbook, specify System I for one drive or System II for 
two drives, $49.95; $2 S/H) 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 145 



Hardware PA,/,VfclJ/M — 

New Modem Pak 
is ^Interesting' 

The new Modem Pak from Radio Shack is quite an 
interesting piece of equipment. As a hardware item it 
exhibits a concept that is very useful to the Color Computer 
user. Imagine, a modem you just plug into your CoCo's 
cartridge port. 

Those who have learned the hard way and upgraded from 
Commodore to the CoCo may remember the old Vic 
modem. This new modem from Tandy goes a bit further 
than that one, though. The old Vic modem required the use 
of a tone capable telephone with a removable handset. The 
Modem Pak works with either a tone or rotary line and is 
direct-connect. Just plug the modem into the phone outlet 
and dial the number with your family phone. 

The Modem Pak is a good, basic telecommunications 
package all wrapped into one small plastic case. It includes 
the interface to its internal 300 Baud modem via a 6551 
ACIA. It also includes communications software in ROM. 

The Modem Pak is very easy to operate. If you are using 
the Multi-Pak Interface, you can put the Modem Pak in slot 
one, two or three, and then set the selector for the 
appropriate slot. If you are not using the MPI, just plug 
the Pak right into the side of the CoCo. Then plug the unit 
into the phone line, type EXEC &HC000 and you are ready 
to go. A menu of options appears on the screen. If you press 
the space bar, a second menu appears. Press it again to 
return to the first menu. 

Several options are included in addition to the standard 
parameter options. Besides being able to alter the standard 
communications parameters, you can adjust the printer 
Baud rate, Xmodem timeout, cassette and printer buffer 
sizes, and turn the ASCII filter on or off. 

The internal software lets you switch the printer Baud rate 
between 600 and 1200 Baud. Unfortunately, it does not 
allow you to go any higher than this. My printer likes to 
operate at 9600 Baud. 

The Modem Pak does allow the use of the Xmodem 
protocol for file transfer. However, any files to be transmit- 
ted must be in ASCII format. Also, there is no provision 
for the user to supply addresses if he or she wishes to save 
a machine-language program from the buffer to a tape. I 
found this implementation of Xmodem to be very awkward, 
primitive and limited. It would still be advisable for users 
of this product to transfer files using the ASCII transfer 
method, which seems to be pretty reliable. 



The ASCII filter option is very useful. When this optic 
is turned on, all control characters are stripped from tl 
transmitted data. Any characters over 80 Hex are filter* 
out. If you want to transmit data containing graphics codi 
or special key codes, just set this option to "off." 

A very interesting feature of the Modem Pak is its "dua 
combined" buffer. When communicating, there are tw 
buffers; a cassette buffer for data you may want to save an 
a printer buffer for sending data to the printer. The tot 
combined buffer space may not be more than 28K, but yo 
can use any configuration of cassette and printer buffer size 
not exceeding this limit. I found that, under most circuir 
stances, a printer buffer size of IK is more than enougl 
The only time data stays in this buffer is if the printer i 
offline. Otherwise, if the printer function is turned on, a 
received data is immediately sent to the printer as well a 
the screen. This is great for getting a hard copy while onlint 

With the cassette buffer, you may save or load data t 
or from tape, clear the buffer, or view its contents. Thes 
features are very useful additions to transmitting data fror 
or receiving data into the buffer. They will benefit mos 
users. 

A feature that will benefit CoCo owners with *B' revisioi 
CoCo 2s is the true lowercase option. If your CoCo is se 
up to use the new VDG Tandy has been using, the Moden 
Pak can recognize this and be set so that you get true lower 
case during communications. 

One thing I thought was poor was the lack of suppor 
for disk systems. As it stands, the Modem Pak works onl] 
with tape-based systems. This is because the software ii 
ROM makes it very difficult to work with the disk. The uni 
is set up so it can operate under OS-9 version 2.00.00 
provided you have the Ml or M2 driver and the appropriate 
descriptor installed. In this case, it will work with a disl? 
system. Who knows? Maybe Tandy has some future 
terminal package software plans in mind. It sure would be 
nice, however, to use this package under Disk Basic. 

The ROM based operating software of the Modem Pa* 
is much enhanced over that included in the Deluxe RS-235 
Pak. The unit itself is a great step in the right direction. 
However, I feel certain additional features would have 
increased the value of this product. For instance, inclusion 
of an RS-232 jack on the side would have allowed use with 
external modems. Along with this, Tandy might have 
included a provision for altering the communications Baud 
rate when using an external modem. With prices dropping, 
many people are going the extra bit and buying 1200 Baud 
modems. It is a shame they won't be able to use them with 
the Modem Pak. Also, I feel the inclusion of what Tandy 
calls Xmodem is nothing more than a waste of good ROM 
space. They might as well have left this "feature" out. 

Despite any shortcomings, the Modem Pak is a well-built 
piece of equipment. The documentation is more than 
adequate and covers all phases of operation. In their usual 
style, Tandy has included the schematic and programming 
examples for controlling the modem in BASIC or assembly 
language. I can recommend this unit for those who do a 
moderate amount of telecommunicating. Its relatively low 
price far outweighs its shortcomings for these people. Ill 
give the Modem Pak a three-star rating on my four-star 
scale. 

(Tandy Corp., available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 
$89.95) 



ANALOG AND DIGITAL I/O PORTS 

6809 Processor, ZK Eprom & 8K Static Ram. 
Interfaces directly to I/O Port 48K Ram expansion board. 

SINGLE BOARD 6809 CPU 

Parallel 8 bit input & output for your CoCo, and Models 1, III, 4. 

• MODULAR DESIGN FOR ADDITION OF MULTIPLE PORTS 



SINGLE BOARDS (Rtqulrtt 5V Supply) 

I/O port kit (J 107 K) $35 

A-D/D-A Interlace (J202K)* $35 

CoCo Adapter-required for CoCo (J110K) $15 

5 Volt Power Supply (D100K) $25 

Relay Array Kll (J027K) $32 
•requires J107K I/O Port kit 

Stand Alone 6809 CPU Board (MX 90) $40 

48 K Static Ram Board (M8 498) $50 

D & A Research 

400 Wilson Avenue 
Satellite Beach, FL 32937 
305/777-7853 



COMPLETE SYSTEMS 

DIGITAL MEMORY SCOPE-ConvertB 
the CoCo TV display Into an oacllllscope 
screen. 'Maximum Sample Rate ... 10 khz. 

DIGITAL RECORDER and DELAY — Record 
and play back audio signals up to ten seconds. 
(S102M) $169.00 

2716 EPROM Programmer-Programs 
and verifies from CoCo's memory. 
(S103M) $149.00 



— Cray Augsburg 



1 46 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 






* t 




"Si 



BATTLE HYMN 

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG 

BATTLE HYMN The Battle of Gettysburg. Command Lee's army of 39 Divisions, 
including Stuart's cavalry brigades, and infantry division under the command of 
such famous names as Johnson, Heth, McLaws, Hood, Early and Pickett. Try to 
do what the real Confederates couldn't: destroy Mead's army at Gettysburg. New 
movement and turn structure; form lines, rally, limber and unlimber cannon, back- 
step, and do your best to outflank the Union line at Culp's Hill, Devil's Den or Big 
Round top. Historical, with an Ark Royal touch. Available also on the IBM PC (Tandy 
1000). Graphics are hi res; game is machine language throughout. £29 00 





91JW 



ADVENTURE l$UH> 



ADVENTURE ISLAND (32K) Coco, disk only. Your plane has crashed on a deserted 
island and you must use all of your wits to stay alive. Beautiful half-screen picture 
graphics take you through jungle and beach in this fun-filled machine language 
adventure. Comes on two disks. $23 00 



Disk only! SAGA-THE SORCERER'S 
CURSE 32K 100% hi-res, 100% ML 
graphic adventure. Fantastic! — $22 

Disk only! REDSTAR 32K 100% hi-res 
1 00% ML. Futuristic wargame involv- 
ing NATO and the WARSAW 
PACT. — $22 

BARBAROSSA 64K 100% hi-res 
100% ML game of the war in Russia 
1941-1944. "A Blockbuster," says 
Hot Coco's Peter Paplaskas. Reviewed 
Jan. '86 Hot Coco.— $25 (Tandy 1000) 

D-DAY Our second 64K 100% hi-res 
100% ML, this one dealing with the Al- 
lies invasion of France in 1944. Mas- 
sive! No review date set yet. — $23 

PHALANX 32K 100% hi res, 100% 
ML game of Alexander the Great. No 
review date set yet.— $20 



ANZIO 32K Semigraphic wargame. 1 
or 2 players. Simultaneous movement. 
No review date set yet. — $20 

COMPANY COMMANDER 32K ML 
routines. Tactical squad level wargame 
set in WWII. 1 2 scenarios, add-on ex- 
pansion modules. Dec. '85 Rain- 
bow.— $23 disk or tape 

RIVER CROSSING 32K ML routines. 
A Company Commander add-on mod- 
ule, but you no longer need C/C to play 
it.— $23 

CINCPAC BATTLE OF MIDWAY 32K 
100% hi-res 75% ML. The battle that 
turned the tide of war. Aug. *85 
Rainbow.— $20 

ESCAPE FROM DENNA 32K ML rou- 
tines. Semigraphic Dungeon adventure 
game. No review date set yet.— $18 



BATTLE OF THE BULGE 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Aug. 
•85 Rainbow.— $15 

BATTLE FOR TUNIS 32K Semigraph- 
ic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Sept. '85 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

ACROSS THE RUBICON 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. Feb. '84 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

WATERLOO 32K ML routines. Semi- 
graphic wargame. Mar. '84 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

KAMIKAZE 32K Hi-res graphic war- 
game. Apr. '83 Rainbow.— $15 

BOMBER COMMAND 32K disk, 16K 
tape. Semigraphic wargame. ML rou- 
tines. Jan. '84 Rainbow.— $10 

GUADALCANAL 32K Semigraphic 
wargame. ML routines. — $10 




Prices on all programs include shipping to U.S., APO's, Canada. COD's (USA only) 
add 10%. Florida Residents add 5%. For disk version add $2. Ail Orders shipped 
within 24 hours. Programs require Color Computer TM (Tandy Corp.) or TDP Sys- 
tem 1 00 Computer TM (RCA). Many programs soon to be available on MS-DOS 
systems. 



P. O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 786-8603 



Software Review* 



Interactive Wishbringer — 
A Stimulating Challenge 

On a scale of one to 10, Pd give Wishbringer 9.95+ points. 
Wishbringer is an interactive fantasy — you interact with 
the program to create a story with many possible solutions. 
Unlike many Adventure games, which accept only two- 
word phrases (typically a verb and object), Wishbringer 
encourages you to talk to it in complete — even compound 
— sentences. Every aspect of this package has been carefully 
designed and implemented. 

To enjoy this fantasy, you need a CoCo 2 with 64K of 
memory and a disk drive. Optional items include a second 
disk drive and a printer. 

The object of this fantasy is to free the seaside village of 
Festeron of trolls, vultures and fortress-like towers. At the 
fantasy's beginning, you are a postal clerk, with the task of 
delivering a strange-looking letter to the local Magick 
Shoppe. When you succeed in reaching the shop, you learn 
that the proprietor's cat has been kidnapped by the Evil 
One. She asks you to rescue her cat, and in return she will 
give you a stone with magical powers — Wishbringer. Upon 
leaving the Magick Shoppe, you discover that the once quiet 
and peaceful village has become a battleground between the 
forces of good and evil. Only you, with the magical 
assistance of Wishbringer, can rid the town of its evil 
inhabitants. 



Formatter 

clean paperwork for business 

Totally Menu Driven 
Customize with company information 
Complete "on screen" instructions 



FORMS: 

Invoice 
quote 

purchase order 
mall order 
confirm order 
receipt 



STORES: 

complete forms 
Item list 
subquotes 
letters 
footnotes 
customer Info 



SEPARATE CONFIGURE 
PROGRAM: 

for company Info 
quote & Inv. # 
w/auto sequencing 
auto date 



FIGURES: 

quantity 
list 
net 

discount 
subtotals 
tax, etc. 

PRINTS: 

letterhead 
envelope 
multiple copy 
emphasized 

$49 32k ECB disc 



'You have to look good to the customer . . . This 
program helps . . . by providing neat, well-prepared 
forms . . ." 

The RAINBOW, May 1986 



send for more information: 



Challenger Software 

42 4th Street 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 
Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



RAINBOW 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The documentation supplied with this program is superb. 
The 25-page, color instruction manual contains the legend 
of Wishbringer and complete operating instructions, 
Suggestions are presented for the novice, and even a sample 
script is included to illustrate how the fantasy develops. 
Instructions are given to save a position in the fantasy and 
to restore to that point. Additional instructions allow you 
to send the actual script you create to the printer. Appen- 
dices describe system commands, list some recognized 
verbs, explain error messages (called Wishbringer Com- 
plaints), and present copyright and warranty information. 
Appendix G gives a brief biography of the fantasy's 
originator, Brian Moriarty. 

But the documentation doesn't stop with the superb 
manual. Also included is a poster-sized postal map (also in 
color) of Festeron, showing the roads and identifying many 
of the buildings (but not the Magick Shoppe). A reference 
card summarizes much of the information presented in the 
manual. It also details a diagnostic procedure which will 
check if the story data are correct (complete and undam- 
aged). (This allows you to determine whether a problem is 
hardware- or software-related.) 

Still another piece of documentation is the sealed letter 
you are to deliver to the Magick Shoppe. You open this only 
when instructed by the fantasy to do so. 

The packaging is excellent. In addition to the documen- 
tation, Infocom has included a warranty registration card 
(submitting this card gets you a complimentary subscription 
to the New Zork Times newsletter) and several pieces of 
advertising literature. One of these announces the availa- 
bility of hints and maps for purchase. 

Although I am past the age that is so fascinated with 
games, I really enjoyed doing this review. I was constantly 
challenged and frequently surprised as the fantasy evolved. 
The documentation left nothing to my imagination (except, 
of course, the fantasy itself). Response was quick, and often 
revealed the author's sense of humor. 

(Infocom, available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, disk 
$34.95) 

— Jerry Oefelein 



Two-Liner Contest Winner ... 

Pick Me is rather interesting, but you'll have to type 
it in to find out what it does. 
The listing: 

5 CLEAR5j3j3:PMODE4,l:SCREENl,j3:PC 
LS : DRAW"BM71 , 1J38 ; CI ; L4H4U12E28R6 
4F28D12G4L4 ;BM92 , j3 ;D65R64U64 ;BM1 
84 , 96 ;R15E5U7L12H8L15 ; BM8J3 , 160 ;D 
12U6R6U6D12R1C0R4C1U12R12D12L12R 
13CJ3R16C1U12D6R6U6D12R1CJ3R4C1U12 
D12R6U12D12RlCj3R4ClU12F4E4D12 H 
Ijd N$= M D12RD1J3RD8RD7RD6R12U7RU8R 
Ulj3RU12H4L12G4 f! :K$="UEU2E2U2E2U2 
R11D2F2D2F2D2F":F0RY=88T01J34 STE 
P16 : FORX=71T0155 STEP28 : C=INT (Y/ 
1J34) :Z=ABS(Y-192) :DRAW"BM=X; ,=Z; 
; ,f +N$+K$+ f, BM=X; , =Y ;C1 ; "+N$+«0= 

C ; "+K$ : NEXTX : NEXTY : GOTO10 m . , 

::g V Tim Buck 

Akron, OH 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



1 48 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



Software Review mSS^SSSSSSSSSSSSS^r^\ 

Keep in Touch with Mailing 
List/Data Information 

A number of mailing list programs, capable of storing 
addresses and printing on self-sticking labels have been 
available over the years. Mailing List /Data Information by 
Crockett Software, offers several unique features that make 
it attractive. It can store and sort a large number of 
addresses, store additional data for each address, sort by 
number or letter, and can rapidly search using key words 
or numbers. 

My review copy of this program arrived on cassette tape 
which is easily converted for disk operation. I would 
strongly recommend disk operation because of the ease of 
computer/ disk interaction versus the difficulty of storing 
and updating data on tape. The program requires a slight 
change in a statement (AO$=DISK from TAPE) to convert 
to disk. The programmer did an excellent job in making the 
program so easily convertible. 

Mailing List /Data Information contains two programs. 
The first, PCEXT must be run first if you have Extended 
BASIC to condition the computer. Then run GEMLIST 
which is the operating program. The program runs on 16K 
or 64K systems with or without Extended BASIC. The 
number of files available is limited by RAM size. Two 
hundred files are available for 64K. 

The manual is well-written with good, easily followed 
instructions. It contains a useful appendix of states and 
commonly used abbreviations, a tapedisk routine for 
converting tape data files to disk and a merge program for 
combining two or more records. 

On running the program, the user is given the option of 
creating records or loading recorded data. Input is in the 
form of a name, three address lines and three data lines. 
The name is entered with last name first, but a print option 
allows it to be printed first name first. Commas may not 
be used. One may use all or a part of the address lines. The 
data lines, which are not printed for labels, are useful for 
telephone numbers, occupation names or other descriptive 
information. This is particularly useful in the search routine 
where you can call out by address or data item. 

The program locates records by I.D. number, name or 
any term used. It sorts files by file number, name or ZIP 
code. It also allows editing of all input for changes of 
address or any input data changes. Files may be reviewed 
at varying rates of scrolling. 



Visit the 
CoCo Community Center 
THE RAINBOW S CoCo SIG 

on 
DELPHI 



Storing files is easily accomplished using the Record 
command. Retrieval is facilitated by an automatic DIR 
which displays stored filenames. 

Printing can be for all addresses and data or addresses 
alone. When printing labels, the Address Only option is 
used. The program prints two self-stick labels across a page, 
or single labels. It also prints on one-inch or one-and-one- 
half-inch labels. One minor irritation was a printed 
statement following label printout of the number of labels 
printed, which wasted a label and upset the spacing for more 
labels. I eliminated that irritant by changing Line 66 in 
GEMLIST 

Need your plumber but can't remember his name? Locate 
the file with "Plumber" in the data. It would also be useful 
for Church or other organization mailing lists, small 
businesses (or larger ones), anywhere you want to file and 
maintain names, addresses, and pertinent data. 

As far as program limitations are concerned, it will store 
up to 200 records for a 64K system. However you can 
maintain several 200 record files on a disk by simply using 
a different filename for each one. 

I would recommend this program for maintaining your 
address and telephone files. It is the best that I have seen 
because of its speed and multifeatured capability, particu- 
larly the Locate and Sort capability. 

(Crockett Software, P.O. Box 1221, St. Ann, MO 63074, 
tape or disk $29.95) 



— Mel Siegel 



J&R ELECTRONICS 

Complete 256K and 51 2 K Memory Expansion Systems 
(Hardware. Software and documentation included) 
User friendly software, programmer not required 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

* We have eliminated the necessity to piggyback for 51 2K versions! * 
RAMDISK— Fast disk I/O, 35/40 track (two RAM drives with 51 2 K) 

PCOPYMOR — More than 30 PM0DE 4 screens in memory at once! PC0PY command modified to accept 
PCOPY 1 to 128. More than 70 PM0DE 4 screens and PC0PY 1 to 302 with 512K versions (or 30 PM0DE 
4 screens with one RAMDISK), 

SPOOLED — HUGE printer buffer for offline storage inside your computer while the printer's busy. Custom- 
izable from 30K to over 200 K (500K with 51 2K versions). Buffer can be turned off /on copied using simple 
PRINT CHRS commands. 

PA6EB — Load multiple BASIC programs into memory at once! 8 (16 with 512K versions) pages of 32K 
with a PAGE command added to BASIC. Page PEEKs and POKEs access data in other Pages. 4 (8 with 
51 2K versions) pages of 64K in 64K modes. Fuliy commented source code provided for this one! 
Plus— Various utilities and demo's. Detailed documentation, programs, system memory usage, and a 
lot more included. 

0S9 Hamdlsk — Fast 0S-9 disk I/O! 35/40 track single sided or 40 track double sided (512K) Ramdisk 

under 0S9! GOOD'S 0S9 Ramdisk (Rainbow Feb '86) with fully commented source code and install files 

added by J&R. (Requires 0S9 operating system) 

ALL software above is configurable for 256K/512K operation. 

Software shipped on disk, add $10.00 for software on tape. 

(0S9 RAMDISK not available on tape). 

ALL boards below are 256K/512K capable, software & documentation included. 

New SAM (74LS785) not included (use your 74LS783), 74LS785 recommended for 2.0 MHz operation. 



Part number Pries Description 

#1001 $39.95 Banker II bare board (with long pin socket, does not include memory 

Expansion Board) 

If 1 002 $69.95 Banker II bare board + parts (does not include Memory Expansion Board) 

#1004 $129.95 Banker II (256K, upgradable to 512K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1005 $169.95 Banker II (51 2K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1006 $15.00 Memory Expansion Board 

#1007 $29.95 Memory Expansion Board + parts 

#9000 $89.95 Down Under Controller. Ram Pack size controller with BDOS Gold 

plated, high reliability edge connectors, jumpers for 24/28 pin ROM. 
Compatible with COCO I and COCO II. 

#9001 $35.00 BOOS (Enhanced DOS on 27128 EPROM) 

#9002 $5.00 64K switch 

#9003 $19.95 Banker II software pack 

#9004 $24.95 New SAM 74LS785 (required only tor 2.0 MHz operation) 



To place an order, write to J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MO 21045, OR call (301 ) 987-9067 
or (301) 788-0861. 

HOURS: Weekdays 7 p.m -9 p.m.; Sat. Noon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME. 

Add $4.00 shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS $7.00), COD charge $3.00. Maryland residents add 
5% state tax. 

CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS OR COD's only please (personal check — 2 weeks for clearance). IMME- 
DIATE DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model # (i.e. 26-3136), Disk or Tape when ordering. 
OUANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For information on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 
788-0861. COCO II 26-31 XX owners call (soldering experience may be required). 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 49 



Hardware Review, 



Software Review 



A2D Deluxe Joystick: 
What More Could You Ask? 

The A2D Joystick is slightly larger than the standard 
CoCo joysticks I'm used to. It's about the size and shape 
of other deluxe joysticks on the market, which is to say just 
about right. It appears to be well and sturdily constructed. 
The firebutton has more "throw" than the run-of-the-mill 
model, and has a very positive action. 

Unobtrusively tucked away on the bottom of the case are 
two small dial-type switches that control the modes of 
operation. A flip of a switch allows self-centering operation 
or free-floating operation. The two axes are controlled 
independently, so the horizontal can be free-floating while 
the vertical is self-centering (or visa-versa). 

The mechanical trim adjustment for each axis is accom- 
plished by way of two slide switch mechanisms located on 
the top of the case. These slides are stiff enough to prevent 
accidental adjustment. To test the operation of these trims, 
I wrote a short BASIC program to display the integer (zero 
to 63) returned by JOYSTK(O) thru JOYSTK(3), as 
determined by the positions of the horizontal and vertical 
axes of both joysticks. In the free-floating mode, centering 
the trim control allows the full range of zero to 63. 
Maximum trim adjustment shifts these values by approx- 
imately 23 (zero to 40 or 23 to 63). In the self-centering 
mode, the trim allows adjustment of the "position" returned 
to by the centering mechanism. The centering mechanism 
seems to be very precise. Once adjusted to a certain number 
with the trim adjustment, the centering always returns to 
that number. 

Using the same program mentioned above, I tested the 
A2D against the common garden variety RS joystick. With 
the RS it was difficult to move smoothly one number at a 
time. It was also difficult to stop on a chosen number — 
I got the feeling that a sneeze two doors down might change 
the display from 39 to 40. With the A2D, however, one step 
at a time was a breeze. In free-floating mode I could stop 
on 39 and set the joystick down on the desk without 
affecting the display. This level of precision must be an 
advantage for any application. Co Co Max came imme- 
diately to mind. While I was not able to test it with CoCo 
Max, I'm certain the additional control offered by the A2D 
would be very helpful with a system which allows joystick 
control of the entire 256 by 192 Hi-Res screen. 

A2D: what more could you ask of a joystick? 

(Cinsoft, 2235 Losantiville Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45237, 
$27.50) 



Master Disk — A Simple 
Program to Catalog Files 

Master Disk assists in cataloging all your disk files. Il 
requires 32K and is based on a program by Paul Selig in 
the December 1983 issue of THE RAINBOW. Master Disk will 
create, sort and save a disk library of filenames. It can hold 
up to 18 directories or 250 program names in a single file. 
Multiple files can be created so you can catalog all your disk 
files. 

After correcting four bugs, I found this program easy to 
use, and it does its job well. The bugs were minor and 
probably caused by the author trying to strip out spaces, 
etc. I have reported these to the author and I'm sure they 
will be cleaned up by the time you read this review. 

Master Disk is menu driven and provides good on-screen 
prompts. There are two menus. The main menu allows you 
to create a new directory or recall an existing directory. The 
activity menu allows you to add to file, find a selected 
program, review entire file, or save to disk. Master Disk will 
record the disk filename and extension and the disk name 
(up to nine characters) for each file. 

Reports can only be printed to the screen. When looking 
at the screen reports, 10 files are displayed at a time. 

There is no hard copy documentation with this program. 
There are enough on-screen instructions to satisfy that need. 
There is no information supplied with the program to 
indicate what size CoCo is needed. 

If you are looking for a simple program to catalog disk 
files, then this may be the one. But you may be disappointed 
if you're looking for something that is sophisticated and has 
lots of features. 

Master Disk is a freeware program, so the most you're 
out is postage if you don't like it. 

(Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, Cleveland, OH 44127, send 
blank formatted disk and return postage) 

— Michael Hunt 



One-Liner Contest Winner ... 

Use the *P' and the '@' keys to maneuver your racer 
around the course. Upon running the program, enter 
a number from one to 15 at the L prompt to enter the 
skill level (level one is most difficult). 

The listing: 

1 PRINTK"KM" : INPUT"!," ; D : R=0 : CLS : 
PRINT@288,STRING$(192 / 46) ; :P=16- 
D/2 : C=1359 : FORB=0TO1 : : K=K+1 : B 
$=INKEY$ : PRINT@480+P, "#"STRING$ ( 
D, 4 6 ) " # " : IFPEEK ( C ) =9 6THEN1ELSEPO 
KEC, 42 : C=C+ ( B$=" P " ) - ( B$= " @ " ) : P«P 
+RND(3) -2:P=P-INT(P/(28-D) ) :D-D+ 
RND(3)-2:D=D-INT(D/13) I NEXT 

Jeff Noyle 
Georgetown, Ontario 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



Stanley Townsend 



See You at 
RAIN B O Wf est-Pri nceton 
October 17- 19 



1 50 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



in the present Color Computer) and chal- 
lenged the audience to imagine the resolu- 
tion this would provide. 

Steve Bjork is now the OS-9 database 
section leader on rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi. Welcome aboard Steve and thanks 
for the inspiring words. 



**S equential A SCII 
text files from Disk 
BASIC load into IBM 
PC editors without a 
hitch, although you 
have to add line feeds 
after each carriage 
return when using 
some editors. 99 



Amiga, Apple He, Atari ST-520, IBM PC, 
Macintosh, Robotics and the VME bus 
were the buzz words at the OS-9 community 



buffet Sunday morning at RAINBOWfest 
Chicago. What do all these computers have 
to do with OS-9? They will all run it soon! 
That's the word from James W Moore Jr., 
the Coordinator of Technical Services at 
Microware. Bill told about 35 OS-9 aficio- 
nados the 68 K world has not had an across- 
the-board operating system and Micro- 
ware's OSK is the ideal candidate. Why? 

"OSK gives you the ability to move 
software across many different machines," 
Moore said. "This will be great for software 
developers." 

After mentioning all the new OSK ports, 
Moore turned the audience's attention to 
CD-I, noting that the applications well use 
everyday in our homes in 1988 haven't even 
been dreamed up yet. "The possibilities are 
staggering," he said. 

And, how does this affect the Color 
Computer OS-9 user? "They 11 be way ahead 
in the game," Moore said. "CoCo OS-9 gives 
them a gateway to the 68000 software used 
heavily by industry today. Since the 6809 
and 68000 bear such a strong family herit- 
age, it is very easy to port most applications 
from the 6809 to the 68000. Besides, the 6809 
is the best and probably the last 8-bit 
processor. It is still an important product, 
but more importantly, it is a mature prod- 
uct. It has a lot of life yet." 

Moore predicted as all these new OS-9 
ports and systems appear, the programmer 
with CoCo OS-9 experience will have an 



edge. Their knowledge is directly applicable. 
"There is a window of opportunity opening 
up," he said. "Go for it." 

Bill Moore and User Group president 
Brian Lantz both called 1986 the year that 
OS-9, an underground classic for several 
years, hits the light of day. "We have seen a 
lot of interest from the press and the public 
in the past several months," Moore said. 
"Some are even naming OS-9 as a potential 
competitor to MS-DOS in the 68000 world." 

With the world waking up to the wonders 
of OS-9, it's a shame that only 35 people 
were able to join Users Group members for 
the OS-9 Community Buffet. I hope to see 
you at the OS-9 Buffet during RAINBOW- 
fest Princeton. 

Getting the Words on Disk 

Many people on the CoCo SIG and at 
RAINBOWfest Chicago have asked us to 
recommend a good word processor for use 
on OS-9. It's a personal choice and it 
depends on the hardware you are using. 
However, since problems seem to be pop- 
ping up with many of the established word 
processors when they are used with some 80- 
column cards and Tandy's OS-9 Version 
2.00.00, well offer a few thoughts. 

If you are still using a standard issue 
CoCo without a hardware 80-column card, 
here's something you might want to think 
about. Why not use the Desk Mate editor? 
Then, feed your file into the Shareware 




MicroWorld 



3 



230 Moorestown Rd. Wind Gap, PA 18091 

(215) 759-7662 

Call or write for Price List 

LOW PRICES ON 100% 
Radio Shack Equipment 

(with full warranty) 

New Slimline Drive 0 $235.00 

Slimline Drive 0 & 1 installed $399.00 

Prices subject to change! 
Prices include shipping! 

64K Extended $145.00 

Sakata 13" Monitor $180.00 

With monitor driver $210.00 

Multipack Interface $ 75.00 

DMP-105 $159.00 

DMP-130 $275.00 

Diskettes, any quantity, lifetime Warranty $ 1.50 
Tandy 1000 $695.00 

Quantities are limited! 

10% off Computerware 
10% off all Radio Shack Sale Items 
15% off Radio Shack Hardware 
20% off all Radio Shack Software 



At Last — INTERCOMP SOUND presents: 
PROFESSIONAL MIDI PRODUCTS FOR 
THE COLOR COMPUTER!! 



At InterComp our objective is to support Midi hardware/software for the 
Color Computer to the fullest. Within the next year or so you can expect 
a variety of products such as librarian/patch programs (Korg, Yamaha, 
Casio, etc. . .), graphics editor and system exclusive software. Don't go out 
and buy another computer for your MIDI system!!!!! Our products are 
designed with the professional in mind, be it for studio, performance, home 
recording or music education. Here is the start of more to come! 

COLOR MIDI CONNECTION — This interface plugs into the cartridge slot. 
It contains 3 Midi outputs, 1 Midi input, and a female connector for the disk 
controller (no Y-cabie is required) $98.00. 

SYNTRAX 1.00 — With this sequencer you will quickly control your Midi 
system! Major features include: 16 polyphonic tracks, interactive editor, 
30,000 bytes for note storage, independent repeats for any track, all midi 
channel control data (program changes, channel #, velocity, pitch wheel, 
etc.), int/ext sync for Midi drum machines (or another sequencer), 
programmable tempo, transposition, clefs, key signatures, chords, complex 
rhythms, use up to 4 disk drives, sequence chaining and linking, notes/Midi- 
events can be specified with a resolution of 1/384 note! Requires 64K, disk 
drive, COLOR MIDI CONNECTION — $75.00. 

SYNTRAX 2.00 — All the features of SYNTRAX 1.00 plus: real/step time 
record (notes, velocity, program changes, and controllers), input filtering, 
programmable split points, punch in/out anywhere, easy and quick editing 
of Midi data, supports J&R's 512K upgrade for a tremendous amount of 
storage for recording! $125.00 (Customers that already have SYNTRAX 1 .00 
can upgrade to ver. 2.00 for $50) 

SYNLIB 1.0 — Expandable Multi-Instrument Voicing Librarian. Buy what 
you need, when you need it. Includes pull down menus, SYNTRAX 2.0 
compatibility and ease of expandability to set up the studio instantly. Synlib 
with one librarian Module — $45. Roland TR707/727 Lib. Module — $20.00. 
Korg EX800 Lib. Module — $20. Yamaha, Casio Lib. Modules Avai. soon! 

Include $3 for shipping (CODs add $2). Residents of N.Y. state add sales 
tax. Mail check or money order to: 



INTERCOMP SOUND 
129 LOYALIST AVE 
ROCHESTER, NY 14624 

Phone: 716-247-8056 



200 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



because it lets you perform physical input/ 
output operations directly to a disk. Nor- 
mally, you would be reading or writing to 
a directory or a file. When you append the 
commercial "at" sign (@) to a device, you 
are telling OS-9 that you want to treat the 
entire disk mounted in the drive as one 
logical file. And, since Logical Sector 
Number 0 is the first logical sector on any 
disk, patch looks at it as soon as it is called. 
Now let's look at the two script files. 

Script File Number 1 

mOOOl 

q 

Script File Number 2 
m 000 1 

00 
40 
01 

oo 

/ 

i 0EB4 0IFF 00 

q 

The first script file simply positions 
patch's edit pointer to the second byte in the 
file. The 05 then replaces the 08 and the AO 
replaces the 00. The slash (/) tells patch you 
want to exit the edit mode. The 'q' lets you 
exit from patch. 

The second script file is used after the 
RAM disk contains the information from 
your floppy disk. First, it changes the second 
and third bytes back to 08 00, or 2,048 
sectors. Then, it changes the number of 
sectors per track, 12 Hex, in the floppy, back 
to 40 Hex or 64 in the RAM disk and 
restores the number of bytes in the RAM 
disk allocation map to 0100. 

The two additional changes are needed 
because when you backup the floppy to the 
RAM disk, Logical Sector Number 0 from 
the floppy disk is copied into Logical Sector 



Number 0 of the RAM disk. If you didn't 
change it back, OS-9 would think the RAM 
disk was a 1,440 sector floppy disk. 

The next to last line in the second script 
file restores the last part of the RAM disk's 
bit map to its original state. In patch y the *i' 
means initialize. We are initializing, or 
clearing, each byte between 01B4 and 01FF 
to 00. Here's why. 

The bit sector allocation map begins at 
0100 on both the floppy disk and the RAM 
disk. The bit map from the 1,440 sector 
floppy disks ends at 01 B3. We need to tell 
OS-9 that all the sectors beginning with 
sector number 01B4 are free and may be 
used by other files. We do this by clearing 
them. The same procedures work with any 
size floppy disk and any size RAM disk if 
you change the two script files to match the 
two disks you are working with. 

OS-9 at RAINBOWfest Chicago 

Congratulations to Steve Bjork of SRB 
Software in Simi Valley, California, Steve, 
who just last February received the "most 
improved attitude award" from the OS-9 
Users Group when he finally started writing 
programs for OS-9, delivered the keynote 
address at the CoCo Community Breakfast, 
and much of his speech was about OS-9. He 
gave a sneak preview of the new "Model 13" 
from Tandy complete with slides of the two 
"Mickey Mouse" processors it reportedly 
contains. It looked like he shot them on 
location at Disneyland where he once 
worked. 

Following his short audio-visual presen- 
tation, Bjork highlighted the progress the 
Color Computer has made, spotlighting the 
new 80-column cards, the Tandy Sound/ 
Speech Cartridge and the Deluxe RS-232 
Pak. Asked why he uses the RS-232 car- 
tridge instead of the pseudo serial port on 
the back of the CoCo, Bjork replied that he 
doesn't do "bit banging." 

He talked about selling computers to 
people who have never used one. "Some 
can't even use a hammer!" he said. "We need 
to make it easier for them to run a computer. 
I'm no different. When I want to write a 



letter, I want to write a letter, not write a 
program to write a letter." 

After mentioning the new hardware, 
Bjork revealed the secret of why Tandy has 
moved all its software production over to 
OS-9. "When you add all these devices, you 
need an operating system. Without OS-9, all 
you have is Microsoft basic. Besides, Mi- 
crosoft doesn't know how to write an oper- 
ating system. Just look at MS-DOS," he 
said, generating a round of laughter from the 
crowd. 

"After much research, Tandy picked up a 
then relatively obscure operating system 
named OS-9," Bjork said. "Today they only 
support three operating systems: MS-DOS, 
OS-9 and Xenix. They needed an operating 
system to carry their software in case they 
changed their machine." 

Bjork also praised the OS-9 programming 
languages, noting that they are almost 
completely bug free. Few operating systems 
manufacturers can say that today. Non- 
experienced users will find it much easier to 
use the CoCo in the future. He said the OS- 
9 based DeskMate was a step in the right 
direction, giving beginners a lot of easy-to- 
use functions at a reasonable price. 

He sparked the imagination of the au- 
dience when he talked about the new CD- 
I standard recently introduced by Sony and 
Phillips. CD-I, which features interactive 
audio, video and computer data, is driven by 
a special version of OS-9. To get people 
thinking, he talked about a "bird book," 
telling the audience they would be able to 
give their CD-I based portable computers 
the location, time of year and a description 
of the mystery bird they were looking at. The 
computer could then return the name of the 
bird. He thought it might be possible to feed 
the sound of the bird into the computer and 
match it with the pre-recorded sound of the 
bird stored on the compact disk. 

Bjork called CD-I an appliance computer 
and said it would give birth to entertainment 
disks beyond our wildest imagination. As a 
technical aside, he mentioned that the VDG 
chip in the CD-I players uses 100K of 
memory for each picture (compared to 6K 



OS-9 ™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full use of 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sector edit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO— Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboards and mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 

FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOSTM diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. OS-9 
driver and test software included. $199.00 

All disk prices are for CoCo OS-9 format; for other formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, 
add $1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added 
for COD. 



D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS Is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 199 



experiments, you gain a practical tool and 
a knowledge of another facet of OS-9 at the 
same time. 

This month, the desire to experiment was 
driven by the fact that I do not own 80-track 
double-sided drives but do own one of Tony 
DiStefano's brand new 512K Super RAM 
cards from CRC Inc. If I used the tricks I 
published in June with the 512K RAM Disk 
and double-sided 40-track drives, I would 
lose nearly 200K of fast RAM disk, not a 
viable alternative. I wanted to put every byte 
of the 512K RAM Disk to work. 

Finally, one afternoon while plodding 
along the Mt. Vernon bicycle trail, I had a 
brainstorm. "Why not format the RAM disk 
to its full 512K capacity and then go in and 
change Logical Sector Number 0 to make 
the backup command think the RAM disk 
was the same size as the floppy disk. I could 
then do the backup quickly. After the 
backup command had finished its job, I 
could change Logical Sector Number 0 back 
to its original state and make OS-9 believe 
the RAM disk was full size. In real life, it 
wasn't quite that simple, but it worked. 

We'll look first at Logical Sector Number 
0. At the highest level, OS-9 communicates 
with many different types of hardware 
through a hierarchy of file managers, device 
drivers and device descriptors. An OS-9 
module named IOMan, short for Input/ 
Output Manager, manages the flow of 
information. To do this job, it relies on 
several subroutine packages designed to 
communicate with different types or classes 
of hardware. 

The most used of these subroutine pack- 
ages are SCF, short for Sequential Charac- 
ter Files, and RBF, for Random Block Files. 
SCF contains a set of routines designed to 
work with any hardware that sends or 
receives data sequentially. For example, a 
terminal sends one character at a time from 
its keyboard. Likewise, the printer receives 
one character at a time. SCF manages the 
flow of these characters to the modem, 
printer, terminal or any other serial device 
you have attached to the Color Computer. 

However, floppy disks, hard disks and 
RAM disks behave differently — they send, 
receive and store information one block at 
a time. If you were to describe them academ- 
ically, you would probably call them 
random-access or block-oriented mass 
storage devices. 

The RBF module is intelligent enough to 
maintain the logical structure of every file 
stored on all random access devices. It sends 
and receives 256 bytes at a time to your 
hardware by using the proper device driver. 
However, RBF never needs to deal with the 
physical details of the read or write opera- 
tion. The device driver keeps track of things 
like the physical track and sector address of 
all data on each disk. RBF only needs to 
worry about the logical sector number. 

The first logical sector on a disk is Logical 
Sector Number 0. The number of the last 
logical sector is one less than the total 
number of sectors available on the disk. The 



device driver, CCDisk in Color Computer 
OS-9, translates each logical sector number 
passed by RBF to the physical track and 
sector address. 

RBF is generic and knows how to com- 
municate with many different storage de- 
vices. But before it communicates, RBF 
must know what type of device it is talking 
to. To find out, it reads the information 
stored in Logical Sector Number 0 of the 
disk mounted in the device. During this 
read, the driver picks up a lot of information 
about the physical layout of the disk. Two 
of the most important details are the number 
of tracks on the disk and the number of 
sectors in each track. 

This first logical sector is also known as 
the identification sector. The next logical 
sector contains the first part of a bit map, 
or allocation map, that may fill as many as 
256 sectors on a large hard disk drive. This 
bit map tells OS-9 which sectors have 
already been used to store data and which 
may be used by additional files. The bit map 
in the 512K RAM disk we are going to 
modify just fills Logical Sector Number 1. 

Following the bit map, you will find the 
root directory of the disk. When we modify 
Logical Sector Number 0 of our RAM disk 
to make it look like a floppy disk, we are 
changing the first four bytes in the sector. 
Later, after we have backed up the floppy 
disk to the RAM disk, we need to change 
the first six bytes back to their original state 
and rewrite part of the bit map. But first let's 
look at the information stored in Logical 
Sector Number 0. 

During our experiment, we are going to 
change the value of the total number of 
sectors on the RAM disk to equal the total 
number of sectors on our floppy disk. If we 



look at Logical Sector Number 0 imme- 
diately after we format the RAM disk, we 
find the first three bytes are 00 08 00 Hex 
or 2,048 decimal sectors. That makes sense 
since 2,048 * 256 equals 524,288 or 512K. On 
the other hand, our double-sided, 40-track 
floppy disk contains 1,440 decimal sectors. 
If you translate 1,440 to Hex you get 05 AO. 



So to pull our first trick we must change th< 
00 08 00 to 00 05 AO. Since the first byte oj 
each value is zero, we need only change tfy 
second and third bytes of each three-bytt 
value. 

While we are examining Logical Sectoi 
Number 0 of our RAM disk, we need to note 
two other values. We need to know tnc 
number of sectors per track and the numbei 
of bytes in the allocation map. When w« 
look at the chart, we see that this informa- 
tion is stored at an offset of three and foui 
bytes, respectively, from the beginning of the 
sector. During our examination, well notice 
that our 512K RAM Disk was formatted 
with 40 Hex or 64 sectors per track. Well 
also see that our RAM disk has 01 00 Hex 
or 256 bytes in its allocation map. Jot this 
information down; well need it later. 

We used the patch utility from Computer- 
ware's OS-9 Disk Fix and Utilities package 
to make the changes. Further, we put our 
input to patch in two script files and wrote 
a short procedure file to do the entire job for 
us. First, here is the procedure file. 

load echo 

echo Formatting Ram Disk Now 

format /r(3f >/nil 

yDisto Ram Disk 

echo Patching Ram Disk Now 

patch /Rj?@ <scriptl >/nil 

echo Backing Dp Disk Now 

backup #90 /DJ2f /R(3f »/nil 

yy 

echo Restoring Ram Disk Size Now* 
patch /R0<3 <script2 >/Nil 

echo Enjoy Your New Super Ram 
echo from Tony Distefano and CRC 
unlink echo 



There are a couple of things you should 
notice in the procedure file above. First, we 
are patching something called "/ R0@." And 
second, the device descriptor nil. The latter 
allows you to throw away the output of a 
program. It comes with Version 2.00.00 of 
OS-9 from Tandy. 

The pathlist above, /R0@, is special 



Information Stored 


Offset 


Name in OS9Defs File 


Number of sectors on disk 


00 


DD.TOT 


Number of sectors on each track 


03 


DD.TKS 


Number of bytes in allocation map 


04 


DD.MAP 


Number of sectors in each cluster 


06 


DD.BIT 


Root directory 


08 


DD.DIR 


Owner's User Number 


0B 


DD.OWN 


Attributes of Disk 


0D 


DD.ATT 


Internal disk ID number 


0E 


DD.DSK 


Number of sides and density 


10 


DD.FMT 


Number of sectors per track 


11 


DD.SPT 


Reserved space 


14 


DD.RES 


First sector in boot file 


15 


DD.BT 


Size of boot file 


18 


DD.BSZ 


Time /date disk created 


1A 


DD.DAT 


Name of Volume 


IF 


DD.NAM 


Path Descriptor Stuff 


3F 


DD.OPT 



198 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



KISSable OS-9 



Experimenting with 

RAM Disks 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Progress has been plodding along at a 
snail's pace here at KISSable OS-9 
headquarters. Our original $499, 4K, 
1979 "Model D" CoCo finally bit the dust 
and we were forced to lay out $69 to replace 
it with a 16K CoCo 2. The 16K status didn't 
last long, however; about an hour after we 
picked it up, MOTD Editor Bruce Warner 
and I had installed 64K memory chips. I 
needed to get online fast because I was 
falling behind in the testing of all the new 
equipment/software now available to CoCo 
OS-9 aficionados. 

One of the most exciting opportunities 
came from Fran McGee at Tandy who 
loaned us a 15-megabyte hard disk to use for 
a month or two. Next month, we hope to 
present an action-packed chronology of our 
adventures. This month, we follow up on the 
RAM disk experiments we presented in the 
June issue. We'll show you another trick that 
lets you do backups from a floppy and still 
use all the available space on the RAM disk. 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale 
works as a U.S. Coast Guard chief 
warrant officer and lives in Alexandria, 
Virginia. 



We'll be telling you about some of the 
information stored in Logical Sector 
Number 0 on all OS-9 disks. We'll also look 
at a CoCo/ IBM data transfer utility pack- 
age and feature a UNIX-like stat routine 
written in assembler for OS-9, a BASIC09 
pretty printing program and a C program 
that adds a header to the standard line.c 
utility. 

First however, we must pass along an 
addendum and a correction. Tom Roginski 
of Owl- Ware, P.O. Box 116-D, Mertztown, 
PA 19539, 800-245-6228, contacted us about 
the Winchester basic we described in the 
June issue. Al Reinhart, the program's 
author, sent us the information earlier this 
year. He called the program wbasic. The 
proper name for the program is Winchester 
basic and you can buy it from Owl- Ware. 
The price is $50 when you buy an Owl- Ware 
hard disk drive — $75 when you buy it alone. 
We try to include the name and address of 
the vendor when we describe a program, but 
this one slipped through the cracks. 

Turning to corrections, in May we gave 
you a really slick shortcut to use when you 
need to OS9Gen a new disk. Unfortunately, 
my fingers weren't listening to my mind and 
I typed the wrong command line. The 
command line should have read, Is ! 
os9gen /Dl <ENTER>. To use this tip, create 
a new directory. Then, copy or save the 
modules you want in the new OS-9 boot file 
into this new directory. Finally, use the CHD 
utility command to make the new directory, 
the current data directory and type the 
command line above. Of course, you must 



have a freshly formatted disk loaded in 
Drive / Dl when you execute this command. 

After developing and testing the proce- 
dures needed for this month's RAM disk 
experiments, I was surprised to receive a 
message from Dennis Skala on rainbow's 
Delphi CoCo SIG. He had taken a similar 
approach with his RAM disk. 

"I read your June column with interest, 
especially the handstands you were doing 
while trying to get a floppy disk quickly 
copied to a RAM disk without losing a large 
chunk of the RAM disk's capacity. I went 
through a similar process when I first started 
using my RAM disk," Dennis said. 

"I didn't think of formatting the floppies 
in a non-standard way. Rather, I rewrote the 
backup utility and removed the requirement 
that the drives have the same number of 
sectors. This means I can copy any type of 
disk to the RAM disk — single- or double- 
sided, 40- or 80-track. I wrote the new 
backup command so that the balance of the 
RAM disk in excess of the floppy's capacity 
remains free," Skala said. "I also picked up 
a bonus — I can now quickly backup a 
standard Radio Shack 35-track disk to one 
of my 40-track drives." YouH be happy to 
know that Skala has uploaded his new 
backup command to the OS-9 database 
section of rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi 
and it is available there for you to download. 

One of the main reasons we publish these 
little experiments is to provide a practical 
project to share some of the details that 
make a complex operating system like OS- 
9 powerful. When you duplicate one of these 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 97 



And even then you couldn't 
access as many CoCo 
goodies as you get in 
Public Domain Software 
Copying Company's special pre- 
selected package deals Check 
it out: 

1 TOOLS— 4 disks, 62 files. 
Includes: Basic 64, BSearch 
DiskTest, DOS64,DSBoot, 
Print-DIR, Recover, Romback, 
Romfix, Scrn51, Backup, Unlock, 
MultBack, Spell & Fix Free Ware, 
Manual, Diet, Build, List, Append, 
Addword, Teleterm, Ker- 
mit, Superforth, tjhi 
16KForth, Editor, N> 
32K Forth, Manual. 



rver- 

25 



2 GAMES— 4 disks, 59 files. 
GAMES IN BASIC include: 
Gunner, Life, Poker, Bio 
rythm, Hangman, Go, Fractal, 
World 3D, Lovetrek, Nude, Star- 
trek, Reverse, Scramble, Pizza. 
FAST MACHINE LANGUAGE: 
Pong, Squash, Blockade, Germ, 
Grid, 3D-Tictac, Zerog. SIMULA- 
TIONS & ADVENTURE: Cave, 
Wargame, NORAD, W 
arcoyle, KingTUT,M>^P 



Civilwar, icewar. 



3MUSICA MANUAL & 
UTILITIES— 4 disks, 80 
files. Includes: Addplay, 
Boogie, Circus, Clowns, Hyden, 
JBGood, Sonata3, Straw, #3 Foggy, 
Funeral, Hardday, Joplin, Peanuts, 
Rock, Stranger, Camelot, Dia- 
mond, Fantasyll, Greengras, Star- 
Wars, Superman, RootBeer, Ghos- 
Bust, Mash. 201, Stelmo, Balstar, 
Messiah. Raiders, 
Watermus. Toc-N**^ 1^ 
cata, Fuge, etc. 

4GRAPHIC0N PICTURES— 
these pictures demonstrate 
the ability of the Color 
Computer to produce exciting art. 
Graphicon need- 
ed. Modifyabte. 
4 disks. 



exemny an. 

25 



5 PICTURE DISKS -2 disks, 
35 files. Turn your CoCo into 
a Mac includes: McPaint, 
Icons, Epson/DRV, Animate, Bal- 
loon, Hebrew, Typing, RSDMP/ 
DRV. Animation Disk includes Ro- 
tate, Shuttle, 
Triangle, Glass, Star, 
Baseball, Donduck. 



$ 



uuuei no- 

15 



6 FOR THE 0S9 OPERATING 
SYSTEM-2 disks, 20 + 
files. Includes programs 
from BASIC09, ASM and C: 
Finance, Clk, MathDemo.c, 
Bounce. c, rafDemo.c, Primes.c, 
WC.c. Six text ad- 
ventures for 0S9 
operating system. 



$ 



7 



ALL THE 
ABOVE- 
♦130 value: 



15 
80 



s 

> 

ft 

e 




ORDERS: Include full name, com- 
plete address, phone with area 
code (important!). Specify for 
CoCo. Include $3 P/H per ord, 
Phone: credit cards only. Over- 
seas: add 80c per disk U.S. post- 
age. N.Y. include 8.25% tax, pre- 
paid only. Canada: postal money 
orders, U.S, $ only. We also have 
P.O. Software for Ms. Dos, CP/M. 
Catalogs: $4. We sell 2 Drive 
Ms.Dos portable 512k, $895. We 
are a copying service providing 
programs from Users Groups; cor- 
rections solicited. Please include 
$2.40 handling with any returned 
(postal mangled etc.) disk. Con- 
tent not warranteed. 



The Public Domain Software 
Copying Company 

(est. 1983) 

33 Gold Street, New York City 10038 
212/732-2565 



changes, subscripting and superscript- 
ing. For example, you could call for 
extended letters to type a title or head- 
ing and return to normal type for the 
body of text. 

Print formatting commands change 
format settings in PenPal itself like 
margins, page lengths, line spacing, 
centering of text, right justification, 
page numbering options, form feed 
(new page) and wait after each page is 
printed. The only thing missing is page 
headers. These formatting commands 
permit changes to be made in the middle 
of the text. For example, you could 
change the left margin to indent a 
quotation or a list. When the quotation 
is entered, a formatting command is 
included to reestablish the original 
margin for the following text. If you 
don't like the default settings for the 
basic document, lead off with print 
formatting commands at the beginning 
of the document. Justification and page 
numbering choices would certainly be 
made there. 

Write has a few limits. You cannot 
print out a book manuscript by queuing 
files as with Telewriter and DynaForm. 
It does not do mail merge. It lacks 
headers, footers and footnoting capa- 
bility. But, most users will never miss 
these. 

A final consideration is the way 
PenPal saves the text buffer. Like 
DeskMate and a bunch of non-CoCo 
programs, paragraphs are written into 
the buffer without delineation of lines 
within the paragraph. A carriage return 
character ends the paragraph. 

The file on disk is in ASCII format, 
but apparently lacks the end-of-file 
designation BASIC expects. To read a file 
into a BASIC program, two things must 
be done. First, carriage returns must be 
inserted into long paragraphs to break 
them into segments short enough to fit 
into a BASIC string variable. This must 
be done by editing the file in PenPal and 
inserting carriage returns at the end of 
every second or third line on the screen. 
PenPal shows you where there are 
carriage returns in the document. Next, 
the file must be run through a BASIC 
program to save the text to a new disk 
file that handles the end-of-file properly. 
The following is an example of a pro- 
gram to do this. 

The program simply opens an input 
and an output file as defined by the user. 
The directory for each drive used is 
displayed as a convenience. Strings are 
read in with LINEINPUTB1 , fl$ and 
printed both to the screen, so one sees 
some action, and to the second file. One 



4 CLEAR10000 

5 CLS: PRINT: INPUT" DRIVE # INPUT 
FILE"; ID$: PRINT: ID=VAL ( ID$ ) : DIRI 
D : PRINT : INPUT" INPUT FILE NAME" ;F 
1$: IP$=FI$+" : "+ID$ 

10 OPEN" I" #1 IP$ 

12 PRINT : INPUT" DRIVE # OUTPUT 

FILE »; OD$: PRINT :OD=VAL (OD$) : DIR 

OD: PRINT: INPUT "OUTPUT FILE 

NAME" ;FO$ : OP$=FO$+" : "+OD$ 

15 OPEN"0",#2,OP$ 

20 IFEOF (1) THEN CLOSE: END ELSE L 

INEINPUT#1,A$ 

30 PRINTA $ : PRI NT #2 , A $ , 

40; GG^O20 

would expect EOF(l) in Line 20 to 
detect the end of file and close both files, 
Since a proper end of file is lacking, the 
program ends with an IE Error which 
causes basic to close the files anyway. 
The output file will be a proper ASCII 
file that will load into a BASIC program 
or into Telewriter. 

Though I am typing this in PenPah 
Write, I will transport it to Telewriter 
for printing because I want headers on 
each page. 

From this examination of the Write 
module, you can get the flavor of the 
rest of PenPal. The Calc, Database and 
Telecom modules each combine much 
more than minimum functionality 
coupled with some unique features. 
Each are easy to learn and use. Some 
operations like the screen update in the 
Write module and the recalculation in 
Calc are unusually fast while none seem 
especially slow. All are function key 
driven with a function key strip dis- 
played or, in Graphit, displayable. 

My overall impression was good at 
RAINBOWfest, and a full day with the 
package has reinforced that. The only 
problem that might be significant is in 
the file saving operation on a JDOS- 
formatted, 40-track disk. It seems to be 
wasting disk granules. Fewer granules 
are reported to be available than should 
be for the number reported used. For 
example, if I add up the granules used 
by the files on a 40-track disk, I find 19 
of 78 granules used, but only 45 free. 
Fourteen granules have been lost some- 
where. This problem appears to be 
associated with a 40-track disk format- 
ted with JDOS since disk space all adds 
up on a 35-track disk formatted by Disk 
BASIC. 

Next month I will discuss the other 
modules. 

PenPal is available from Four Star 
Software, Box 730, Streetsville P. Q, 
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, L5M 
2C2. Price is $89.95 U.S. Canadian 
price is $119.95. The program is also 
available from some U.S. dealers so 
check rainbow advertisements. 



1 96 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



name); F3, Free; F4, Kill; and F5, Dir, are 
identical to Disk BASIC functions. The 
real fun begins with F6, Step, which 
changes the stepping rate of the disk 
drives and F8, Trks, which allows selec- 
tion of 35- or 40-track drives. You need 
another DOS like ADOS, CDOS or 
JDOS to format disks to 40-tracks. 

I ran into problems when I tried to 
set up a 40-track disk. I used JDOS to 
format a disk with 40 tracks and backup 
the PenPal program disk to it. I ended 
up with a 35-track disk probably be- 
cause the file allocation table copied is 
for 35 tracks. Next I formatted another 
disk for 40 tracks and used JDOS to 
copy a number of files across. Part of 
each file was lost. Next I formatted a 40- 
track disk and placed it in Drive 1. I 
booted PenPal and checked available 
sectors on Drive I. Free reported 73 
granules rather than 78. I was able to 
load files into PenPal from the 35-track 
data disk and save them onto the "40- 
track" disk, but never recovered the five 
lost granules. More on JDOS 40-track 
format problems later. 

Finally, from the Main Menu, F7 
saves all current settings to a Config file. 
This way, when you boot PenPal, Drive 
1 can automatically be the default drive. 
All current printer defaults are set as 
well. 

As I mentioned before, the files 
pertaining to a particular application 
are listed under its name on the main 
menu. The extensions clue PenPal on 
what belongs where. For example, all 
files saved from Write and saved as 
ASCII files from other applications 
carry a WP extension. Move the cursor 
over a blank entry under the application 
to start a new file or over an existing file 
name to start editing. If a new file is 
chosen, you are asked for a filename. 

Write is the word processor. One of 
the first things I noticed was the 32,510 
byte text buffer. This holds a lot of text. 
Any article in this RAINBOW would fit. 
This compares with about a 12K buffer 
in DeskMate. 

PenPal is much like DeskMate in 
cursor movement and editing methods. 
It supports block commands to delete, 
copy and move text. It also supports 
buried printer control commands with 
the ability to tailor these commands to 
your printer and save these codes to the 
Config file using F7 from the main 
menu. Nine commands are available, 
each with a toggle on and a toggle off 
form. While six come predefined for 
RS-DMP printers, you can change 
these for your printer. These are needed 
to provide for underlining, font 



Metric Industries 









Model 101 Interface $39.95 



The Model 101 is a serial to 
parallel interface intended for use 
with a COCO and any Centronics 
compatible parallel input printer. 
The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
baud rates (300-9600). The 101 
is only 4* x 2* x 1 * and comes 



with all cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer. 




The Model 104 Deluxe Interface $51.95 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
of a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch). 
This feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 



etc.) to your computer. You may 
then select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5* X 2.5" X 1.25* 
and comes with all cables and 
connectors for your computer. You 
supply the serial cable for your 
modem or other serial device. 





Model 103 Combo $6&95 



With the turn of a knob the 
model 103 switches your 
computer's RS232C serial port 
to any one of 3 outputs — 2 
serial and 1 parallel. The serial 
ports may be used for modems, 
serial printers or even another 
computer. The parallel port can 



be used with any Centronics 
compatible printer. The 103 has 
the best features from the 101 
and 102: color coded position 
Indicator lights, 6 switch 
selectable baud rates, heavy 
anodized aluminum cabinet, and 
many more. 



Model 102 Switcher $35.95 



The Model 102 has 3 switch 
positions that allow you to 
switch your computer's serial 
output between 3 different 
devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has 
color coded lights that indicate 
the switch position. These 



lights also act as power 
Indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with 
the 102 are color coded labels 
that can be applied to your 
accessories. The 102 has a heavy 
guage anodized aluminum cabinet 
with non-slip rubber feet. 



Cassette Label Program $6.95 



New Version 1.2-Tape transferra- 
ble to disk. Now save and 
load Labels from tape or disk. 

This fancy printing utility prints 
5 lines of information on 
pinfeed cassette labels. "Cas- 
sette Label" is menu driven and 
is very easy to use. It uses the 
special features of your 
printer for standard, expanded 
or condensed characters. Each 
line of text is automatically 
centered. Before the label 
is printed, it is shown on your 



CRT — enabling you to 
make changes If you like — 
then print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The 
program comes on tape and It 
Is supplied with 24 labels to 
get you started. 16K ECB 
required. 



noprrtc I***. m?*nm ■ ut ttm 



Other Quality Items 

High Quality 5 Screw Shell C-10 
Cassette Tapes $7.50 per dozen 

Hard Plastic Storage Boxes for 
Cassette Tapes $2.50 per dozen 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00 per 100 
Colors $3.60 per 100 (Red, Blue, 
Yellow or Tan) 

















{mm | \ 


• 









THE 101, 103 AND 104 ALL 
REQUIRE POWER IN ORDER TO 
OPERATE. MOST PRINTERS 
CAN SUPPLY POWER TO YOUR 
INTERFACE. STAR, RADIO 
SHACK, AND OKI DATA ARE JUST 
A FEW THAT DO. EPSON DOES 
NOT. THE INTERFACES CAN 
ALSO BE POWERED BY AN AC 
ADAPTER (RADIO SHACK MODEL 
273-1431 PLUGS INTO ALL 
MODELS). IF YOU REQUIRE A 
POWER SUPPLY, ADD A "P" TO 
THE MODEL NUMBER AND $5.00 
TO THE PRICE. (MODEL 101P 
$44.95, MODEL 104P $56.95 AND 
MODEL 103P $73.95) 



The Model 101, 102, 103 and 104 
will work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory size. 
These products are covered by 
a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101, 103 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel input 
printer including Gemini, Epson, 
Radio Shack, Okidata, C. loth and 
many others. They support 
BASIC print commands, word 
processors and graphic com- 
mands. 

We manufacture these products. 
Dealer inquiries are invited. 



To order call our 24 hour order 
line 513-677-0796 and use 
your VISA MASTERCARD 
request CO.D.or send check or 
money order to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Free shipping on orders over 
$50.00. Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. 

Orders under $50,00 please add 
$2.50 for shipping. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 195 




64K 
Disk 



ACCESSIBLE APPLICATIONS 



Getting in Touch 
with Pen Pal 



By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Many people I spoke with at the 
Chicago RAINBOWfest are 
very satisfied with DeskMate, 
considering it is a beginner's level 
program. But, the folks at Four Star 
Software aren't satisfied since they are 
selling PenPal to do the same things. 
James Norrie of Four Star gave me a 
demonstration and ended up selling a 
copy to me. The last thing I need is 
another program to do word process- 
ing, spreadsheets, databases, graphing 
and telecommunications. However, 
PenPal looked so good, I felt I had to 
give it a real workout and let you know 
what I found. PenPal requires a 64K 
CoCo with one disk drive. Two drives 
are better. 

There needs to be two sets of stand- 
ards when judging software of this type. 
One is- the power and usefulness of the 
individual modules and the other is the 
value of the total package to the average 
user who doesn't want or need most of 
the bells and whistles in the more 
powerful, single-application packages. 
Let's look at each application in Pen- 
Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
and has a long background with micro- 
computers and specializes in BASIC 
programming. With Don Dollberg, he 
is the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



Pal, then make a judgment on the whole 
and look at the pieces more critically. 

All applications use a common 51- 
character by 24-line screen in the high 
resolution graphics mode. Screen up- 
date is the fastest I have seen on the 
CoCo. One problem I have with Tele- 
writer is that characters are lost when 
the wordwrap scrolls the screen and 
starts a new line. This has not happened 
on PenPal. The whole screen seems to 
move up one line as a unit and the word 
being wordwrapped goes to the left 
margin. 

The top line of the screen displays a 
command line in reverse video. This is 
where things like the module name and 
current filename are displayed. The 
bottom two lines display a function key 
strip, again in reverse video. Up to 10 
functions are displayed which are called 
by pressing the CLEAR key and a 
number together. Some applications 
have more than 10 functions in which 
case the F0 (CLEAR-'O') toggles the 
display of the alternate function key 
strip. Only those functions currently 
displayed by the function key strip can 
be called, but the alternate strip is easily 
toggled into view. 

The five alternate functions are called 
by pressing shift, clear and the 
number key together. AFl invokes a 
simple calculator that uses the com- 



mand line at the top of the screen and 
does not interfere with the display for 
the application you are in. AF2 allows 
the user to change the printer defaults 
such as margins, page lengths, Baud 
rate and the like. The defaults are 
displayed one at a time in the command 
line at the top of the screen and pressing 
ENTER leaves the setting unchanged and 
moves to the next. This is much faster 
than loading graphics configuration 
screens and saving them as DeskMate 
does. You have the option of saving the 
new defaults from the main menu. In 
addition, the defaults are maintained as 
you move from application to applica- 
tion during a session. 

AF3 toggles the screen background 
color between green and buff. AF4 calls 
the help file appropriate for the appli- 
cation and AF5 produces a directory of 
the default drive. AF12 exits an applica- 
tion without saving the file. What is key 
12? It's the minus sign. CLEAR and the 
minus key (F12) will exit any function, 
application, or the program from the 
main menu. 

When you LOfiDM PenPal and type 
EXEC, you see the main menu. It pre- 
sents a five-part table headed by the 
application name with the names of the 
files listed below. The function key strip 
displays disk file functions. Fl, Swap, 
changes the default drive. F2, Name(Re- 



194 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



w 300 



Listing 3: CHRRGEN 



....234 

500 181 

END 1 



100 1 CHARACTER GENERATOR TEST PR 
OGRAM 

110 CLEAR 100,&H3FFF 

120 POKE &H413C,&H42 

130 POKE &H413D,&H00 

140 FOR I=&H4200+65*8 TO &H4200+ 

65*8+26*8-1 

15)3 READ A: POKE I, A 

160 NEXT I 

170 FOR I=&H4200+32*8 TO &H4200+ 
32*8+7 

180 POKE 1,0 
190 NEXT I 

200 LOADM^CHARGEN" , &H4000 
210 DEFUSR0=&H4000 
220 PMODE 4,1 
230 SCREEN 1,0 
240 PCLS 

250 A$=CHR$ (0 ) +CHR$ (0) +CHR$ ( 1) +» 
TANDY" 

260 B=VARPTR(A$) 
270 A=USR0(B) 

280 C$=CHR$(50)+CHR$(50)+CHR$(2) 
+" COLOR COMPUTER" 
290 B=VARPTR(C$) 
300 A=USR0(B) 

310 D$=CHR$(40)+CHR$(100)+CHR$(6 

)+"SUPER" 

320 B=VARPTR(D$) 

330 A=USR0(B) 

340 GOTO 340 

350 DATA 16,40,68,68,124,68,68,0 
360 DATA 120,36,36,56,36,36,120, 

0 

370 DATA 56,68,64,64,64,68,56,0 
380 DATA 120,36,36,36,36,36,120, 

0 

390 DATA 124,64,64,120,64,64,124 

400 DATA 124,64,64,102,64,64,64, 

410 DATA 60,64,64,76,68,68,60,0 
420 DATA 68,68,68,124,68,68,68,0 
430 DATA 56,16,16,16,16,16,56,0 
440 DATA 4,4,4,4,4,68,56,0 
450 DATA 68,72,80,96,80,72,68,0 
460 DATA 64,64,64,64,64,64,124,0 
470 DATA 68,108,84,84,68,68,68,0 
480 DATA 68,100,84,76,68,68,68,0 
490 DATA 56,68,68,68,68,68,56,0 
500 DATA 120,63,68,120,64,64,64, 

0 

510 DATA 56,68,68,68,84,72,52,0 
520 DATA 120,68,68,120,80,72,68, 

0 

530 DATA 56,68,64,56,4,68,56,0 
540 DATA 124,16,16,16,16,16,16,0 
550 DATA 68,68,68,68,68,68,56,0 
560 DATA 68,68,68,40,40,16,16,0 
570 DATA 68,68,68,68,84,108,68,0 
580 DATA 68,68,40,16,40,68,68,0 
590 DATA 68,68,40,16,16,16,16,0 
600 DATA 16,56,84,16,16,0,0,0 



CoCo's Best 
& Fastest 
Spreadsheet 

RS-DOS 
VERSION 



(WITH GRAPHICS) 



Computer Systems Center 

42 Four Seasons Center #122 
Chesterfield, MO 63017 
(314) 576-5020 




OS-9 
VERSION 



Exclusively 

from 
Radio Shack 

Stock No. 26-3275 



Works with 80-Column Hardware 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 193 



whether that pattern is a character or some other symbol. 

Next month we'll be back with more CoCo assembly language 
topics. In the meantime, use those PCRs and move around a 
little! □ 



Listing 1: 



3E00 
3E00 
3E01 
3E02 B6 
3E05 F6 



3E00 
3E01 



00100 *MOVE CHARACTER SUBROUTINE 
J? (J U0 ORG S3E00 

00120 CHAR RMB 1 
00130 SPEED RMB 1 
00140 START IDA CHAR 
00150 LDB SPEED 



RESERVE FOR CHARACTER CODE 
RESERVE FOR SPEED 
GET CHARACTER 
GET SPEED 



Listing 2: 



9999 BD 

0003 IF 
0005 A6 
9991 80 
0009 25 
000B A7 
000F AE 
JJPLI EC 
0013 ED 
0017 A6 
0019 A7 

001D 3? 

001F AF 



B3ED 

84 

03 
3A 

8D 0UD 

91 
84 

8D 011A 
92 

8D 0116 
03 

8D 010A 



0023 A6 


9D 


0106 


0027 C6 


08 




0029 3D 






00 2 A E3 


8D 


010E 


PJJ2E ED 


8D 


00FD 


0032 8D 


19 




BDF34 EC 


8D 


P0F5 


003B C3 


0001 


003 B ED 


8D 00EE 


003F 6A 


8D 00E9 


0043 26 


DE 




0045 EC 


8D 00EB 


0049 BD 


B4F4 


004C 39 






P04D A6 


8D 


00E1 


0051 34 


02 




?j753 86 


08 




0055 A7 


8D 


00DB 


005 9 A6 


8D 


00D6 


005D A7 


8D 


00D4 


0061 A6 


9D 


00CA 


0065 A7 


8D 


00CD 


0069 8D 


31 




006B 6C 


8D 


00C3 


006F 6A 


8D 


00C2 


0073 26 


EC 




0075 EC 


8D 


00B6 


0079 C3 


0001 


007C ED 


8D 


00AF 


0080 6A 


8D 


00B0 


0084 26 


D3 




0086 A6 


8D 


00A9 


008A C6 


06 




008C 3D 






008D EB 


8D 


00A0 


0091 E7 


8D 


009 C 


0095 35 


02 




0097 A7 


8D 


0097 


009 B 39 






009C A6 


8D 


0091 


00A0 34 


02 




00 A2 86 


06 




00A4 A7 


8D 


008F 


00A8 A6 


8D 


0087 


00AC A7 


8D 


0088 


00B0 6F 


8D 


0085 


00B4 A6 


8D 


007E 


00BB 2A 


04 




00BA 6C 


8D 


007B 


00BE 8D 


IB 




00C0 6C 


8D 


006D 


00C4 6A 


8D 


0070 



00100 
00110 

00120 
00130 
00140 
00150 
00160 
00170 
00180 
00190 
00200 
00210 
00220 
00230 
00240 
00250 

99269 
99219 
00280 

00290 
00300 
00310 
00320 
00330 
00340 
00350 
00360 
00370 

99**9 

00390 
00400 
00410 
00420 
00430 
00440 
00450 
00460 
00470 
00480 
00490 
00500 

99519 

00520 
00530 
00540 
00550 

99W 
00570 
00580 
00590 
00600 
00610 
00620 
00630 
00640 
00650 
00660 
00670 
00680 
00690 
00700 

99K9 

00720 
00730 
00740 
00750 
00760 
00770 
00780 
00790 
00800 
00810 
00820 
00830 
00840 
00850 
00860 
00870 
00880 
00890 
00900 
00910 



* WRITE TEXT ON GRAPHICS SCREEN PROGRAM 

* INPUT: INPUT ARGUMENT POINTS TO STRING PAR BLK 

* AS-CHR$(X)+CHRS(Y)+CHRS(SF)+"TEXT. . ." 

* OUTPUT : OUTPUT ARGUMENT CONTAINS NEXT X.Y 

WTEXT 



CONVERT POINTER TO SPB 
NOV IN X 

GET LENGTH OF STRING 
ADJUST FOR X.Y.SF 
GO IF NULL STRING 



SB3ED 
D,X 
,X 
#3 

VTE020 

CCNT.PCR STORE FOR LOOP CONTROL 
+2,X GET STRING ADDRESS 
,X GET XY 

XX.PCR STORE 
+2,X GET SF 
SF.PCR SAVE SCALE FACTOR 
+3.X BUMP PAST SF 
TEXT.PCR STORE AS POINTER 

[TEXT.PCR] GET NEXT CHARACTER 
#8 8 BYTES PER CHARACTER 

FIND OFFSET FROM START 
CHTAB .PCR NOW POINTS TO CHAR 
CHAR.PCR STORE FOR OUTPUT 
WRITEC WRITE THIS CHARACTER 

TEXT.PCR GET TEXT POINTER 
#1 BUMP TEXT POINTER 

TEXT.PCR STORE FOR NEXT ACCESS 
CCNT.PCR DECREMENT COUNT 
CO IF MORE CHARS 



JSR 
TFR 
IDA 
SUBA 
BLO 
STA 
LDX 
LDD 
STD 
LDA 
STA 
LEAX 
STX 

*MAIN LOOP HERE 
VTE010 LDA 

LDB 

MUL 

ADDD 

STD 

BSR 

LDD 

ADDD 

STD 

DEC 

BNE WTE010 
*NO MORE CHARACTERS HERE 
VTE020 LDD XX.PCR CET CURRENT X.Y 

JSR SB4F4 CONVERT BACK FOR OUTPUT 

RTS RETURN 

♦WRITE A CHARACTER SUBROUTINE 



WRITEC LDA 
PSHS 
LDA 
STA 

*MAIN LOOP HERE 
VRI010 LDA 
STA 

*INNER LOOP HERE 
WRI020 LDA 

STA 

BSR 

INC 

DEC 

BNE 

LDD 

ADDD 

STD 

DEC 

BNE 

* WRITTEN 8 ROWS 
LDA 
LDB 
MUL 
ADDB 
STB 
PULS 
STA 
RTS 



YY.PCR GET CURRENT Y 
A SAVE FOR RETURN 

#8 8 ROWS PER CHARACTER 

WCNT, PCR SAVE FOR COUNT 



SF.PCR 
WORK1.PCR 

[CHAR.PCR] 
ROW, PGR 
SETROW 
YY.PCR 
WORK1 , PGR 
WRI020 
CHAR.PCR 
#1 

CHAR.PCR 
WCNT , PCR 
WRI010 
HERE 
SF.PCR 
#6 



GET SCALE FACTOR 
SAVE FOR SET ROW SR 

GET ROW BIT PATTERN 
SAVE 

WRITE A ROW 
BUMP Y POINTER 
DECREMENT SF COUNT 
GO IF MORE EXPANSION 
GET ROW PATTERN PTR 
BUMP ROW PATTERN PTR 
SAVE FOR NEXT ROW 
DECREMENT ROW COUNT 
GO IF NOT 12 



GET SCALE FACTOR 
6 BITS PER ROW 
COMPUTE X EXPANSION 
XX.PCR ADJUST X 
XX.PCR POINT TO NEXT CHAR POS 
A GET ORIGINAL Y 

YY.PCR RESTORE Y 
RETURN 



*SET A ROW SUBROUTINE 
SETROW LDA 

PSHS 

LDA 

STA 

*MAIN LOOP HERE 
SET010 LDA SF , PCR 

STA W0RK2.PCR 
*INNER LOOP HERE 



XX.FCR GET CURRENT X 
A SAVE FOR RETURN 

#6 6 COLUMNS /ROW 

COCNT.PCR SAVE FOR LOOP CONTROL 



GET SCALE FACTOR 
SAVE FOR EXPANSION OF X 

SET020 CLR BIT. PCR SET BIT TO 0 

LDA ROW, PCR GET REMAINING PATTERN 

BPL SET030 GO IF 0 

INC BIT, PCR SET BIT TO 1 

SET030 BSR PSET SET ONE BIT 

INC XX.PCR BUMP X POSITION 

DEC W0RK2.PCR DECREMENT SCALE FAC 



CHTAB 



BYTE 0 
CHAR 0 


BYTE 1 
CHAR 0 


BYTE 2 
CHARO 


K 


BYTE 7 
CHAR 0 


BYTEO 
CHAR 1 


1 










1 BYTE 3 
CHAR 65 


BYTE 4 
CHAR 65 


BYTE 5 
CHAR 65 


I ^ 1 

« 


BYTE 6 
CHAR 127 


BYTE 7 
CHAR 127 




V. 



























Typical Pattern 



Data Value 
16 
40 
68 
66 
124 
68 
66 
0 



8 Bytes/Character" 

128 characters =1024 bytes 



CO 

CM ^[ CM CO 

r- » P) i- CO ^ CM f 




This row 

always 

blank 



Figure 6: Character Definition 



00C8 


26 


E6 


00920 




BNE 


SET020 


GO IF MORE X BITS 


00CA 


68 


8D 0068 


00930 




LSL 


ROW, PCR 


SHIFT BIT PATTERN LEFT 


00CE 


6A 


6D 0065 


00940 




DEC 


COCNT.PCR DECREMENT COLUMN COUNT 


00D2 


26 


D4 


00950 




BNE 


SET010 


GO IF MORE COLUMNS 








00960 


*ONE ROW DONE HERE 




00D4 


35 


02 


00970 




PULS 


A 


RESTORE X 


00D6 


A7 


8D 0057 


00980 




STA 


XX.PCR 


FOR NEXT ROW 


00DA 


39 




00990 




RTS 




RETURN 








01000 






























01010 


*PSET OR PRESET 


SUBROUTINE 


00DB 


E6 


8D 0053 


01020 


PSET 


LDB 


YY.PCR 


GET CURRENT Y 


00DF 


86 


20 


01030 




LDA 


#32 


32 BYTES PER ROW 


00E1 


3D 




01040 




MUL 




FIND BYTE OFFSET 


00E2 


C3 


0E00 


P1050 




ADDD 


#SE00 


NOW POINTS TO BYTE ROW 


m* 


ED 


8D 0051 


01060 




STD 


LOC , PCR 


SAVE FOR ACCESS OF BYTE 


99Z9 


E6 


8D 0044 


01070 




LDB 


XX.PCR 


CURRENT X 


00ED 


86 


20 


01080 




LDA 


#32 


THIS IS DIVIDE BY 8 


00EF 


3D 




01090 




MUL 




QUOTIENT IN A 


00F0 


IF 


89 


01100 




TFR 


A, B 


Q NOW IN B 


00F2 


4F 




01110 




CLRA 




Q NOW IN D 


00F3 


E3 


8D 0043 


01120 




ADDD 


LOC, PCR 


NOW POINTS TO ACTUAL BYTE 


00F7 


ED 


8D 003F 


01130 




STD 


LOC, PCR 


STORE FOR ACCESS 


00FB 


1083 


2600 


01140 




CMPD 


#SE00+6144 TEST FOR OUT OF PAGE 


00FF 


24 


2A 


01150 




BHS 


PSET99 


DO NOTHING IF OUT 


0101 


1083 


0E00 


01160 




CMPD 


#$E00 


TEST FOR OUT OF PAGE 


0105 


25 


24 


01170 




BLO 


PSET99 


DO NOTHING IF OUT 


0107 


E6 


8D 0026 


01180 




LDB 


XX.PCR 


GET CURRENT X 


010B 


C4 


97 


01190 




ANDB 


#7 


GET BIT POSITION 


010D 


86 


80 


01200 




LDA 


#128 


MS BIT FOR MASK 


010F 


5D 




01210 


PSET10 


TSTB 




TEST BIT COUNT 


0110 


27 


04 


01220 




BEQ 


PSET15 


GO IF FOUND 


0112 


44 




01230 




LSRA 




SHIFT MASK 


0113 


5A 




01240 




DECB 




DECREMENT COUNT 


0114 


20 


F9 


01250 




BRA 


PSET10 


CONTINUE SHIFTING 


0116 


6D 


8D 001F 


01260 


PSET15 


TST 


BIT .PCR TEST BIT FOR 0 OR 1 


01 1A 


26 


97 


01270 




BNE 


PSET20 


GO IF 1 


011C 


43 




01280 




COMA 




COMPLEMENT MASK 


01 ID 


A4 


9D 0019 


01290 




ANDA 


[LOC, PCR] RESET THE BIT 


0121 


20 


04 


01300 




BRA 


PSET25 


GO TO STORE 


0123 


AA 


9D 0013 


01310 


PSET20 


ORA 


[LOC, PCR] SET BIT 


0127 


A7 


9D 000F 


01320 


PSET25 


STA 


[LOC. PCR] STORE BYTE WITH BIT 


012B 


39 




01330 


PSET99 


RTS 




RETURN 








01340 






























01350 


*WORKINC VARIABLES - COULD BE STACK, BUT ... 


012C 






01360 


CCNT 


RMB 


1 


# OF CHARACTERS TO DISPLAY 


012D 






01370 


TEXT 


RMB 


2 


POINTER TO BASIC TEXT 


012F 






01380 


CHAR 


RMB 


2 


POINTER TO CURRENT CHAR PAT 


0131 




FP 


01390 


XX 


FCB 


-1 


CURRENT X 


0132 




FF 


01400 


YY 


FCB 


-1 


CURRENT Y 


0133 






01410 


SF 


RMB 


1 


SCALE FACTOR 


0134 






01420 


WCNT 


RMB 


1 


# OF ROW COUNTER 


0135 






01430 


WORK1 


RMB 


1 


WORKING 


0136 






01440 


ROW 


RMB 


1 


CURRENT ROW BITS 


0137 






01450 


COCNT 


RMB 


1 


CURRENT COL COUNT 


0138 






01460 


WORK2 


RMB 


1 


WORKING 


0139 






01470 


BIT 


RMB 


1 


CURRENT BIT 


013A 






01480 
01490 


LOC 


RMB 


2 


BYTE CONTAINING BIT 






















01500 


^CHARACTER PATTERN TABLE. 8 ROWS /CHARACTER 








01510 


*FOR 128 CHARACTERS -1024 BYTES. 


013C 




9999 


01520 
01530 


CHTAB 


RMB 
END 


2 





00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



192 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



The effective address is therefore S3E0C, 
:he location of ARG1. 

The other program counter relative in- 
structions compute the address in the same 
fashion. Since PCR-type instructions don't 
contain an absolute address, they can be 
placed anywhere in memory and execute 
properly, even if they refer to locations 
inside the relocated program. The expense 
of using the PCR instructions is memory 
(PCR instructions are longer), more com- 
plexity and giving up a few other addressing 
modes (you can't use auto-increment ad- 
dressing together with PCR, for example). 

A Character Generator for Graphics Mode 

To tie all of these concepts together, we've 
written a Character Generator program, 
shown in Listing 2. The program allows you 
to write any normal text character on the 
screen in graphics mode in upper- and 
lowercase. It also allows you to change the 
size of the characters. The program assumes 
you are in PMODE 4 (256 by 192, two-color 
mode), you are using graphics page one and 
you have a disk system. 

The input parameters to the system take 
the form of a BASIC string. The first char- 
acter of this string is the 'X' position repre- 
senting the upper left-hand corner of the first 
character. The second character of the string 
is the corresponding 'Y' position. The third 
character is the size of the characters to be 
written on the screen, from one to 16. The 
remainder of the string is the text to be 
written. As an example, suppose that you 
wanted to write "This is a test" in the center 
of the screen. The height of text for a text 
screen is 12 pixels high and the width is eight 
pixels. However, character positions for this 
program are eight pixels high by eight pixels 
wide to allow packing 24 lines on the screen. 
The center of the screen is at X=128, Y=96. 
The input string looks like this: 

ZZ$-CHR$(128)+CHR$(96)+CHR$(1)+"THIS IS k TEST" 

The screen output looks like Figure 4. 



1 




• X=129 










i 


\ 




THIS IS A TEST 






Y=96 








B PIXELS 
HIGH (OUT 
OF 256) 








m 14*B=112 PIXELS 
WIDE 




Figure 4: 




Sample Character Generator Output 



The ZZ$ string variable string was used 
only as an example. Any string variable can 
be used, as long as it has the *X' and 'Y' 
positions and magnification factor in the 
first three bytes. The sequence for calling the 
Character Generator uses the VfiRPTR func- 
tion: 

1000 ZZ$=. . . 

1010 B=VARPTR(ZZ$) 

1020 A=USR(B) 



Of course, the program must have been 
relocated to protected memory and a DE 
FUSR done to define the start — all of the 
steps we described earlier. The program is 
relocatable, by the way, so that it can be used 
anywhere in memory you want to put it. 
Program counter relative addressing is used 
throughout the code. 

Listing 3 shows a typical use of the 
Character Generator in writing sample text. 
The program must be on the disk in binary 
form (the output of an assembler). The 
program is relocatable and may be moved 
anywhere in RAM, but allow 318 bytes for 
the program. Change DEFUSR0 accordingly. 
The resulting display for this test driver is 
shown in Figure 5. 



. B pixels high 
yS starts at 0.0 






TANDY*""*" 






COLOR COMPUTER 


— 18 pixels high 
starts at 50,50 




SUPER - 


46 pixels high 

starts at 40,100 


Figure 5: Test Driver Display 



To change the size of the text, use another 
value in the third byte. This byte represents 
the magnification factor. To display charac- 
ters 24 pixels high you'd have: 

ZZ$-CHR$(12A)+CHR$(9?)+CHR$(3)+ B This is larger text" 



The program uses a 1,024-byte character 
pattern area called CHTAB, or Character 
Table. The address of this table must be 
POKEd into locations $13C and $13D as 
shown in Listing 3. The Character Table can 
be directly after the Character Generator 
program, or may be anywhere else in mem- 
ory. The first eight bytes in this table 
represent the pattern for an ASCII character 
of zero, the next eight bytes the pattern for 
an ASCII character of one, the 65th set of 
eight bytes represent the pattern for 'A', and 
so forth. You can fill in your own characters 
for ASCII codes not normally used in the 
Color Computer, such as codes zero through 
31. Each set of eight bytes represents the 
eight rows that make up a character, as 
shown in Figure 6. 

The basic test program shows the pat- 
terns for the uppercase alphabetic characters 
A through Z and for a space character. Fill 
in the remaining characters as the need 
arises. All 128 positions in the table can be 
used, and any symbols meaningful to you 
can be used. Don't forget that the "scale 
factor" allows an expansion of each pattern, 



The Universal 
Maclnker(s) " 
are here 

Re-ink any Fabric 
ribbon automatically 
for less than 

5<U 



Now one Universal Cartridge 
Maclnker (UC) re-inks all fabric car- 
tridges and one Universal Spool 
Maclnker (US) re-inks all spools, We 
have Maclnker(s) dedicated to 
specialized cartridges, zip pack, har- 
monica etc. Over 1000 printer brands 
supported. Use your Maclnker to re- 
ink your dry, fabric cartridges (for 
less than 5 cents in ink) and watch the 
improvement in print-out quality. Our 
new, residue-less, lubricated, dot 
matrix ink yields a darker print than 
most new ribbons. Or get any of our 
basic ink colors: brown, blue, red, 
green, yellow, purple and use 
Maclnker to create and/or Re-ink 
your own colored cartridges. We 
have uninked or colored cartridges 
for the popular printers and ribbon 
re-loads for any printer. Operation is 
extremely simple & automatic with 
new, twin drive electric motor that 
supports CW and CCW rotating car- 
tridges. A good quality fabric ribbon 
of average length can be re-inked 
almost indefinitely. In our tests one re- 
inked Epson* 80 ribbon has outlived 
the estimated life of the print-head!! 
We receive consistent & similar feed- 
back from our customers. As of 
August 85 we have' over 40,000 MAC 
INKER(s) in the field, in. 5 continents 
(220 V motors available). Maclnker 

SJC) is $60.00. Cartridge drivers are 
8.50/ea. We still have our first 
generation, dedicated Maclnker(s) 
for most popular printers. Prices start 
at $54.95 with most units below $60.00. 
Maclnker has been reviewed, ap- 
proved and flattered in most 
magazines and even in the NEW 
YORK TIMES and the CHICAGO SUN 
TIMES. 




Universal Cartridge Mac Inker 



Computer 
Friends 

6415 S.W. Canyon Ct. 
Portland, OR 97221 
(503) 297-2321 

Order toll free 1-800-547-3303 

or ask for free detailed brochure. 
Dealers inquiries welcome. 

*EPSON is a trademark of EPSON CORP. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 191 



Assembly language: 



START 



JSR $B3ED 

TFR D,X 

LDA ,X 

LDB 1,X 



point to block 
get 45 

get 233, etc. 



Suppose we had a program that refer- 
enced a parameter block at the beginning of 
the program area, something like this: 



Is this really better than just assigning a 
block of protected memory for the parame- 
ter block? Probably not, but it is an alter- 
native method, 

VfiRPTR is handy, though, when working 
with strings. If VfiRPTR is used to find the 
location of a string, it returns not the address 
of the string, but the address of a five-byte 
string parameter block as shown in Figure 
3. The third and fourth bytes of this parame- 
ter block (+2 and +3) point to the location 
of the string itself. If this string address is 
used in the assembly language subroutine, it 
must again be converted to an integer value 
in D by a JSR $B3ED as shown here: 



3E00 00 

3E01 00 00110 

3E02 B6 3E00 00120 

3E05 F6 3E01 00130 



XPOS FCB 
YPOS FCB 
START LDA 
LDB 



0 for x position 

0 for y position 

XPOS get X position 

YPOS get Y position 



You can see that the LDA and LDB 
assembled as "extended" addressing types of 
instructions. Each instruction consists of a 
one-byte operation code ($B6 and $F6) 
followed by a two-byte address ($3E0O and 
$3E01). What would happen if this code 
were incorporated into DfiTfi statements and 
then moved to the $4000 area? The result 
would look like this: 



4000 00 00100 XPOS FCB 0 

4001 00 00110 YPOS FCB 0 

4002 B6 3E00 00120 START LDA S3E00 
4005 F6 3E01 00130 LDB $3E01. 



for x position 
for y position 
get X position 
get Y position 



basic: 



100 A$-" COLOR COMPUTER" 
110 B-VARPTR(A$) 
120 DEFUSR0-&H3E00 
130 A-USR0(B) 



Assembly language: 



START 



JSR 
TFR 



SB3ED 
D,X 



convert to integer address 
X now points to string 



Although the locations in which the 
instructions were stored changed, the refer- 
ences were still to $3E00 and S3E01. Ob- 
viously, when this program was executed, A 
was loaded with the contents of location 
$3E00 and B with the contents of location 
$3E01 instead of the new locations at the 
beginning of the program, $4000 and $4001. 

This problem occurs for all references to 
data locations inside the program, but not 
to external fixed areas. If there were a 
parameter block at memory area $5000, for 
example, an LDA $5000 would be valid 



VARPTR(A$) 




STRING LENGTH 



ADDRESS MSB 



ADDRESS LSB 



BYTE 0 
1 
2 
3 
4 



N | O 


W 


t 




s 


t 


T 


H 





Figure 3: String Parameter Block 



Relocatability 

In our examples and in last month's 
column, we assumed for the most part the 
machine language code generated and 
stored in DATA statements started at a fixed 
location — &H3E00 in our examples. A 
typical assembly language program can't be 
stored and executed just anywhere in mem- 
ory. Let's see why. 



wherever the program was moved. The same 
thing applies to system memory areas like 
the text or graphics screens — they are at 
fixed locations. 

The problem also applies to JMP and 
JSR instructions, which jump to locations 
specified by absolute addresses within the 
instruction, generated at assembly time. 
Branches, however, use relative addressing 



in which the effective address for the branc 
is computed by adding the contents of tr, 
program counter to a displacement vali 
within the instruction. Look at this pre 
gram: 



3E00 


00100 


ORG 


$3E0f 


3E00 7E 3E05 


00110 FIRST 


JMP 


NEXT 


3E03 00 


00120 


FCB 


0 


3E04 00 


00130 


FCB 


0 


3E05 20 F9 


00140 NEXT 


BRA 


FIRS1 


0000 


00150 


END 





This program doesn't do anything; it's a 
infinite loop. It does illustrate jumping an 
branching, however. The JMP NEXT ir 
struction assembles with a jump locatio 
(after the IE op code) of 3E05. The BRy 
FIRST, though, does not use an absolut 
address. Instead, it uses a displacemen 
value of F9. When this displacement valu 
is added to the contents of the progran 
counter, the result is the branch address. Th 
program counter always points to the nex 
instruction after the current one beinj 
executed, in this case, at $3E07. Addinj 
S3E07 and $F9: 

S3E07 
+ $FFF9 



$3E00 



The displacement value is "sign extended' 
to the left, which must be done for negative 
displacements of $FF through $80 (indicat- 
ing branches backwards). Positive displace- 
ments of $00 through $7F (indicating 
branches forward) may be added without 
sign extension. In any event, the result is the 
jump address of $3E00. The BRA FIRST 
could have been replaced with a JMP 
FIRST instruction, but this instruction 
would have used three bytes instead of two 
bytes and not have been relocatable. 

There's a way to make all instructions 
relocatable. It's a special addressing mode 
called "program counter relative." An 
example is shown here: 



3E00 00100 
3E00 A6 8D 0008 00110 
3E04 E6 8D 0005 00120 

3E08 6E 8D 0002 00130 

3E0C 00 00140 

3E0D 00 00150 

3E0E FD 0000 00160 

3E11 86 01 00170 



FIRST 
ARG1 
ARG2 
NEXT 



ORG 
LDA 
LDB 

JMP 
FCB 
FCB 
STD 
LDA 



$3E00 

ARGl.PCR 

ARG2,PCR 

NEXT , PCR 

0 

0 

BOTH 
#1 



The machine language assembled for the 
LDA ARG1 ,PCR starts off with an op code 
of A6, followed by an addressing mode byte 
of 8D. The addressing mode byte is used by 
the 6809 to determine how the address 
should be computed. In this case, the effec- 
tive address is computed by adding the 
contents of the program counter to the 
displacement value of 0008, found in the 
, third and fourth bytes of the machine 
language. The program counter points to 
$3E04 at this point so: 

$3E04 
+ $0008 



$3E0C 



190 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



tie D register to an integer value and returns 
: in the variable used on the left side of the 
ISR call. 

Here's a simple example of the whole 
irocess. The assembly language subroutine 
dds one to an input argument and returns 
he incremented value. It's a useless subrou- 
ine, but itlJ give you a better idea of how 
he process works. 



30 ' TRIVIAL AL SUBROUTINE 
L0 CLEAR 1000.&H3DFF 
20 CLS 

J0 FOR 1-&H3E00 to &H3E09 
^0 READ A: POKE I, A 
50 NEXT I 
60 DEFUSR0-&H3E00 
70 INPUT "VALUE-" ;V 
80 V - USR0(V) 
90 PRINT "VALUE NOV"; V 
00 GOTO 170 
10 DATA &HBD , &HB3 , &HED , &HC3 , &H00 , &H01 
20 DATA &HBD,&HB4,&HF4,&H39 



'protect memory 

♦ 

'move mach lang 



'define start of ml 
' input value 
1 call al subroutine 
'return and print 
1 loop 



The assembly language code for this is: 



BD B3ED 00100 

1(7(73 C3 0001 00110 

1006 BD B4F4 00120 

1009 39 (70130 



JSR $B3ED 'convert input 

ADDD #1 'bump by one 

JSR $B4F4 'reconvert 

RTS ' return 



As you can see from the assembly lan- 
guage program, the only processing actually 
done in the program is to add one to the 
contents of the D register. The first JSR 
converts the input argument (found in 
variable V in the basic program) to a value 
in D. The second JSR reconverts the con- 
tents of D (now V plus one) to variable V 
for output. The RTS, of course, just returns 

to BASIC. 

Packing Arguments 

Although only one integer value is al- 
lowed, there's no reason several arguments 
can't be packed into that single value. 
Suppose you have an assembly language 
subroutine to move a character around the 
screen. The inputs to the subroutine would 
be the character and the speed of movement. 
These two arguments could be packed into 
the single 16-bit integer value of the USR call 
by doing this: 



100 ' HOVE CHARACTER SUBROUTINE 
110 CLEAR 1000.&H3DFF 
120 CLS 

130 FOR I-&H3E00 to &H3EXX 

140 READ A: POKE I,A 

150 NEXT I 

150 DEFUSR0-&H3E00 

170 INPUT "CHARACTER—" ; CS 

175 INPUT "SPEED (0-255>-";S 

176 CLS 

180 A - USR0( ASC((C$)*256+S) 
200 GOTO 170 



'protect memory 
'move mach lang 



'define loc'n of al 
1 input character 
' input speed 

'pack two arguments 
1 recrun here 



The character is converted to an eight-bit 
ASCII code by the ASC(C$). It is then 
packed into the most significant byte of the 
input argument by the ASC(C$)*256. The 
speed is also an eight-bit value and is in the 
least significant byte of the input argument. 
In the assembly language subroutine, the 
two arguments appear in the D register as 
shown in Figure 1, after they have been 
converted by a JSR SB3ED. 




This same scheme of packing multiple 
arguments can be used for input and output 
to pack as many as 16 single-bit arguments 
into the input or output parameter. On the 
input side, the arguments are packed by 
multiplying the value by a power of two so 
that it's shifted left and adding in other 
arguments. On the output side, the argu- 
ments are unpacked by ADDing and then 
dividing by the same power of two. Some 
examples are given in Figure 2. 



ARG1 


ARG2 


ARG3 


ARG4 



Input: 

100 D=ARG1M096+ARG2*256+ARG3*16+ARG4 
110 A=USR0(D) 

Output: 

110 A=USR0(D) 

120 ARG1 = INT(A/4096) 

130 ARG2=INT((A-ARG1 *4096)/256) 

140 ARG3=INT((A-ARG1*4096-ARG2*256)/16) 

150 ARG4=A-ARG1*4096-ARG2*256-ARG3*16 

Figure 2: Packing Four Arguments 



Parameter Block 

Another way of passing multiple argu- 
ments to and from an assembly language 
subroutine is by a parameter block. The 
parameter block is a special area in memory 
set aside to hold input and output argu- 
ments. A simple example of this is shown in 
Listing 1, which is the partial assembly 
language listing of the move character 
subroutine. The first two bytes of the 
subroutine are reserved for the character 
and speed input parameters. The actual 
subroutine starts at &H3E02 rather than 
&H3E00. 

The basic code for calling this subroutine 

is: 

100 'MOVE CHARACTER SUBROUTINE 
110 CLEAR 1000.&H3DFF 
120 CLS 

130 FOR I-6.H3E00 to &H3EXX 
140 READ A: POKE I,A 
150 NEXT I 
160 DEFU5R0-&H3E00 
170 INPUT "CHARACTER-" ;C$ 

175 INPUT "SPEED (0-255)-" ;8 

176 CLS 

1B0 POKE &H3E00, ASC(C$) 
190 POKE &H3E01, S 
200 A - USR0(0) 
200 GOTO 170 



'protect memory 
'move mach lang 



'define start of al 
'input character 
' Input speed 

'poke character value 
'poke speed value 
'go to al subroutine 
'return here 



The USR call uses dummy arguments 
rather than packing the two input parame- 
ters into a single argument. The two input 
parameters are stored in &H3E00 and 
&H3E01 by two POKEs. As long as the input 
parameters are byte values (zero to 255), the 
POKEs work fine. The assembly language 
subroutine does not make a call to $B3ED, 
as there is no argument to convert. It simply 



picks up the first argument from &H3E00 
(character) and puts it into A and the second 
argument from &H3E01 (speed) and puts it 
into B. 

This concept can be used to pass any 
number of arguments. Just allocate a large 
enough chunk of memory to accommodate 
all of the input and output arguments and 
then do PDKEs before the subroutine is called 
and PEEKs after the subroutine is called to 
access the arguments. 

It's important to note that the parameter 
block holding input and output arguments 
must be in a protected portion of memory. 
Any address greater than the CLEPR address 
can be used, and the parameter block can be 
before or after the actual subroutine. Don't 
forget to specify the actual starting address 
of the subroutine, rather than the start of the 
parameter block, if the parameter block is 
located before the subroutine. 

Using VARPTR 

The VARPTR function in BASIC is also 
handy for passing parameters to assembly 
language subroutines. The VPRPTR function 
returns an address to a specified variable. 
Suppose that you had a variable called AA. 
This code: 

100 AA-3 

110 B-VARPTR(AA) 

120 PRINT PEEK(B) , PEEK(B+1) , PEEK(B+2) , PEEK(B+3) , 
PEEK(B+4) 

prints 130, 64, 0, 0, 0. Where's the 3? That's 
a long story. 

You'd expect to see a zero byte followed 
by a three byte, representing a binary integer 
number of three. However, Color Computer 
BASIC variables are always a "floating-point" 
format, even when you are working with 
integer limits, such as PEEKs and PDKEs. The 
130, 64, 0, 0, 0 represents a power of two 
equal to 130 minus 128 and a fraction of 
0.11000000. The result is the power of two 
(2 squared or 4) multiplied by + X A) = 4 
* (%) = 3. This is not the easiest way to 
represent numbers, and it would be very 
tedious to have to convert to this floating- 
point format every time you wanted to pass 
parameters to assembly language. The 
floating-point representation is why the JSR 
$B3ED and JSR $B4F4 are used to convert 
and reconvert variables passed to and from 
assembly language subroutines. 

There's nothing that says that a dummy 
variable cannot be used to store parameters, 
however. This code stores 100, 45, 233, 15 
and 37 in the location of dummy variable 
A A. The location of the dummy variable A A 
is then passed to the assembly language 
subroutine. However, the assembly lan- 
guage subroutine must still go through the 
"convert" subroutine to get a 16-bit address 
value in D to point to dummy variable AA. 

basic: 

100 AA-p 

110 B— VARPTR (AA) 

120 POKE B.100: POKE B+1,45: POKE B+2,233: POKE B+3.15: 

POKE B+4,37 
130 DEFUSR0-&H3E00 
140 A-USR0(B) 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 89 



BARDEN'S BUFFER 



More Interfacing Tricks 
for Assembly Language 
and BASIC 

By William Barden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last month we described the elemen- 
tary steps in tying together short 
assembly language subroutines with a 
basic program. Although assembly lan- 
guage is a more difficult language in which 
to write computer programs, it offers one big 
advantage over basic and other "high level" 
languages — speed. There are many things 
that can be done in assembly language that 
just cannot be done in other languages. In 
the last column we suggested you start using 
assembly language by interfacing, or joining 
together, short assembly language subrou- 
tines to improve your basic program's 
efficiency. 

We discussed the difference between 
assembly language and machine language — 
machine language is made up of the binary 
data the 6809 recognizes as part of its 
instruction set while assembly language is a 
more English-like representation of instruc- 
tion mnemonics. The assembly language 
form is translated into machine language by 
a program called the assembler, typically the 
Radio Shack EDTASM+ assembler. 

We also described some assembly lan- 
guage programs and mechanisms to inter- 
face them to BASIC. The BASIC statement that 

Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 
100 magazine articles on various computer 
topics. His 20 years experience in the indus- 
try covers a wide background; program- 
ming, systems analyzing and managing 
projects ranging from mainframes to micro- 
computers. 



defines where in memory the assembly 
language code resides is DEFUSR, as in 110 
DEFUSR = &H3E00. The BASIC statement to 
actually make the jump is USRn, as in 1B0 
R = U5R0(0). Each assembly language 
subroutine must have an ending RTS in- 
struction, which acts like a BASIC RETURN 
statement, returning to the point just after 
the USR call. 

Before an assembly language subroutine 
can be used, however, the memory area in 
which it is to reside must be protected by a 
BASIC CLEAR statement, as in 110 CLEAR 
1000,&H3DFF. This prevents BASIC from 
overwriting the machine language bytes as 
it stores data such as strings and its own 
internal variables. The machine language 
code making up the assembly language 
subroutine is moved into this protected area 
by loading a machine language program 
from disk or cassette, or by reading DRTR 
statements in BASIC and doing a series of 
PDKEs. We chose the POKE route for our 
examples. 

The USRn statement in BASIC has an 
argument in it that represents an integer 
value. A single integer value can be passed 
to the assembly language subroutine by this 
argument in a statement such as 1B0 R = 
USR0(1000), which passes the value of 
1,000. The assembly language subroutine 
may pass an argument back by the USR. The 
argument is returned in the variable on the 
left side of the USR statement; in this exam- 
ple, Variable A contains the result. However, 
it's perfectly all right to pass no arguments 



and to use dummy variables in the USR 
statement. 

Well continue with more tricks in inter- 
facing assembly language with basic in this 
column. 

Passing Multiple Arguments 
to AL Subroutines 

The argument passed to an assembly 
language subroutine must be an integer 
argument — a numeric expression, variable, 
or combination that can be resolved down 
to the value of -32768 through +32767. Here 
are some typical USR calls: 



100 A = USR0(1000) 

200 VX - USRl(AC) 

300 AN = USR4(1000 - ZT) 



Passing One Argument 

In the assembly language subroutine itself 
(as we saw last month), the code must do a 
JSR $B3ED to convert the input argument 
to a 16-bit value in the D register (the A and 
B accumulators). After this is done, the 
assembly language subroutine can use the 
input argument as required — to define a 
delay, to point to a work area, to define a 
character, or any other application. 

To pass an argument back to basic, a JSR 
$B4F4 is done in the assembly language 
code. This converts an output argument in 



1 88 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



he CD interface. The article also said that 
operating language will be used in 
hese interfaces. Have you heard about this 
»r is it just another rumor? 

Jim Casselman 
Goodfellow AFB, TX 

Jim, the 68000 microprocessor and Mi- 
roware were the hot subject of discussion 
it the last RAINBOWfest. Microware has 
>een awarded a contract to develop the 
operating system for Phillips and Sony, the 
wo pioneers in Compact Disc technology, 
t seems to be the next major breakthrough 
n storage media. 1 can't wait to see one. 



Device Overload 

• / have a 64K Color Computer 1 with a 
J&M disk drive system and a DCM-5 Auto I 
Answer modem. How does one operate a 
disk controller, a DS-69A Digitizer, a 
CoCoMax joystick port and an RS-232C 
Deluxe Pak all at once? It is all on one 
switch, and obviously it would be very 
difficult to switch to each slot. This leaves 
the option of switching using software. 

Jeff Wozniak 
Apply Valley, MN 

Even though you can both hardware-, 
and software-select a Multi-Pak slot, the 
address and data lines are connected to the 
device at all times, Jeff. This means by 
adding address decoding circuitry to the 
accessories you mention, they can all be 
resident at the same time. Remember, the 
CoCo can switch between these devices 
about 250,000 times a second. 



Nonexistent Clock Signal 

• I recently purchased a VIC 1525 graphics 
printer by Commodore. It resembles the 
DMP-100 printer by Radio Shack. 

I would like to use the 1525 with my 
Co Co. Can it be done? What wiring config- 
uration do I make to connect serial 1 1 0 
ports? 

Philip Tack 
Worthington, PA 

Philip, according to the diagram you sent 
us, the VIC 1525 requires a clock signal from 
the computer. This signal is not present on 
the CoCo serial port. 



Disk Drive Debate 

• / am debating buying a hard disk or a 
floppy disk drive. How compatible is an 
Amdek hard disk with the software on the 
market, and how much extra storage does 
it have? 

Byron Fast 
Kleefeld, Manitoba 

Byron, I am not aware of an Amdek hard 
disk. I do know that Amdek makes a V/2 



inch floppy disk. It is the same as a 514 inch 
floppy disk, except it is packaged a little 
differently. It has the same storage capacity. 
I would recommend you have at least one 
5i4 inch disk drive in your system. 



New VDG for Older CoCos 

• The CoCo has an MC6847 Video Display 
Generator (VDG) that is less than perfect. 
Motorola has designed a new VDG, the 
MC6847T1, which will soon be released for 
full production. What does it do? It makes 
clearer symbols, changes the *o from square 
to circular, adds a slash to the zero and gives 
lowercase with descenders. The MC6847T1 
has a data latch 74LS273 and a buffer 
74LS244 on board. 

How can you use it? Find the VDG 
(MC6847T1) when released. Remove the 
74LS273 from the circuit board and jumper 
the socket so the lines go straight through. 
Use two sockets (40 pin) to make a jumper 
socket for the VDG. Jumper the data lines 
3 through 8. Connect pin 10 to pin 25 with 
a 2.5 K ohm resistor. This allows pseudo 
colors. Connect pins 12, 17 and 24. This 
disables the I I O lines not used by the Co Cos. 
This is the area that replaces the 74LS244 
(buffer). It would require extensive wiring to 
use it. Connect pin 13 of the VDG to pin 11 
of the 74LS273 socket. This is the RAS 
signal and it stabilizes the output. Connect 
an SPDT switch by connecting one side to 
pin 1 of the VDG, center to pin 31 of the 
VDG, and the other side to pin 31 of the 
VDG socket. Make sure pins 12, 13, 25, 26 
and 31 are not connected through to the 
circuit board side. 

What happened to the lowercase? This is 
caused by a ROM text screen 0 reset; to 
disable it use POKE 359,57. The only 
problem with this poke is that if you are 
running a graphics program and have an 
error in it, the text screen does not come 
back with the error message. You must enter 
text screen. Next enter POKE 65314, X. 

If X is: Text is: 

0-7 Black letters on green upper- 

case and reverse video. 

8-15 Red letters on orange upper- 

case and reverse video. 

16-23 Black letters on green upper- 
case and lowercase. 

24-31 Red letters on orange upper- 

case and lowercase. 

32-39 Light green letters on dark 
green uppercase and reverse 
video. 

40-47 Orange letters on red upper- 
case and reverse video. 

48-55 Light green letters on dark 

green uppercase and lower- 
case. 

56-63 Orange letters on red upper- 
case and lowercase. 

64-71 Dark green letters on light 

green uppercase and reverse 
video. 

72-79 Red letters on orange upper- 
case and reverse video. 



80-87 Black letters on light green 

with light green border upper- 
case and lowercase. 

88-95 Red letters on orange with 

orange border uppercase and 
lowercase. 

96-103 Light green letters on dark 
green uppercase and reverse 
video. 

104-1 1 1 Orange letters on red upper- 
case and reverse video* 

112-119 Light green on dark green up- 
percase and lowercase. 

120-127 Orange letters on red upper- 
case and lowercase. 

128-255 Graphics. 

You can get data sheets on the MC6847 
and MC6847T1 from Motorola, as well as 
any other component they produce, by 
requesting it. 

William Capich 
FPO, NY 

Thanks for the information, William. 
There seems to be a lot of interest in the 
684 7T1 , and due to your help we can all put 
one in our older CoCos now. 



Memory Exploration 

• I'm writing a machine language program 
to allow exploring CoCo memory. I want it 
to work in 64 K RAM mode without the 
ROM support. I have to build every routine 
and most of them are finished except two: 

IN KEY — I can't figure out how lean scan 
the PIA for the shift key. 

RS-232 — I don 7 understand how to send 
information to the printer and how the 
timing process works. 

Marc Gagnon 
Cap-de-la- Madeleine, Quebec 

Marc, you need to obtain a disassembly 
of basic to fully understand the INKEV$ and 
RS-232 routines. Color BASIC Unravelled 
will do nicely. 

If you want to try on your own, the 
INKEYS routine starts at $A564. The test for 
the shift key routine is at $ A22E. The RS- 
232 output routine starts at $A2BF. All of 
the above addresses are for Color basic 1.2. 
Good luck. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through the MAIL section of our new 
Delphi CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick DELPHI MAIL, then type 
SEND and address TO: DANDOWNARD. 
Be sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 187 



DOWNLOADS 

Non-Standard 

Disk Drive Troubles 



• / have a problem with a Tandon Disk 
drive 1 system. I own a 64 K Extended basic 
Co Co 2 and a TRS-80 Drive 0 with Disk 
basic LI (Cat. No. 26-3029). 

When the Tandon Drive 1 is connected, 
it works fine, but when I try to use my Radio 
Shack Drive 0, I always get an 1/ O Error. 
To use the Radio Shack Drive, I have to 
disconnect or turn off the Tandon Drive. 

When both are connected, the indicator 
light on the Radio Shack Drive goes on, but 
the head inside the Tandon Drive goes back 
and forth searching for the program or tries 
to read a directory for Drive 0. 

Ben Takemura 
Honolulu, HI 

Ben, it appears that the drive select lines 
on your Drive 1 are being enabled for both 
Drive 0 and Drive 1. A normal disk drive 
uses two pins for drive select and has binary 
decoding circuitry to distinguish which drive 
it's supposed to be. CoCo disk systems use 
a separate drive select pin for each of four 
possible drives. 

Get a copy of the rainbow for July 1985 
and read "Getting On the Right Track" by 
Colin Stearman. This is an excellent article 
discussing the use of non-standard disk 
drives (non-Tandy) with a CoCo. 



Keep Your Cool 

• Some time ago someone offered a sche- 
matic to change the RS Modem I to auto- 
answer (and possibly auto-dial). I would like 
some information, please. 

I own an F board and am running 64 K, 
one drive, LI Disk basic and LI Color 
basic. I have upgraded to 150 ns 64 K chips, 
a 68B09E and a 68B2L lam able to run the 
CoCo in 3x mode and, about 50 percent of 
the time, retain graphics. Is there anything 
I can do about the 2N6594 transistor which 
creates a heat problem? I replaced it with 
heavy-duty NTE219 and heat sunk it, but I 
still need to run a fan on it. 

Kenneth Harman 
Bakersfield, CA 

You are correct Kenneth. In the No- 
vember 1984 rainbow, Tony Sharp wrote 
an article on how to convert a Modem I to 
auto-answer. It was titled "Adding an Auto 
Answer." 

The only thing a heat sink does is allow 
the heat to dissipate. Unless the heat sink is 
external to the computer, the heat stays 
inside until air from the ventilation holes 
cool it. It*s best not to block the ventilation 
holes by enclosing your computer. If you do, 
it's necessary to add a fan to get rid of the 
heat. 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

fine. When I take my equipment to Radio 
Shack it works great! I take it home and it 
doesn't work. 

I have tried everything, cleaning the 
heads, turning off different appliances etc., 
but it still does not work. Any help would 
be appreciated. 

Josh Alkire 
Toledo, OH 

It sounds like you have some type of 
power line disturbance in your home, Josh. 
I suggest you operate the tape recorder from 
batteries just to see if it's the power line. 



Half-Power 64K? 

• / have a 64 K ECB CoCo and a cassette 
recorder. I know that without a disk drive 
and operating system I can only access 32 K 
RAM. Does this mean I only have a 32 K 
system or can I run cassette programs like 
The Sailor Man that require 64 K? 

Mike Frei 
Horicon, WI 

Mike, you don't need a disk drive, or an 
operating system to use 64K in your CoCo. 
You can indeed play your favorite 64K 
games from tape. A disk operating system 
allows for more efficient use of your 64K, 
but it's not necessary. 



CD Rumors A-flyin' 

• / read in the Computer Shopper that the 
68000 processor will be used as the CPU for 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago and he has built several 
68 XX systems. 



Elusive I/O Error 

• I am 12 years old and I own a 64 K Color 
Computer 2 and a CCR-82 cassette re- 
corder. Whenever I try to load a long, 
program I receive an 1/ O Error. Sometimes, 
such as early morning, everything works 



186 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



0G300 
rr^rr 


FDB 

£ U -L» 


JPORT- TOYTAR 


TNPTTT 


10700 




S 20 Y 


AMn riAP T PITPT nimi 

AfiU UAU ULVbL DATA 


00400 
rr^rr 


FDB 

A W XJ 


GETMAX- JO YTAB 




10800 


TFR 


n y 

"1 x 


Awn c a up Turu 
AH1J OAVC Intfl 






7PAD- TOYTAR 




10900 


ANnA 

All UA 


m9 55-R 
ff*. 33 -O 


xUan Otr SOUND BIT 


y y oyy 


FDR 

CUD 


HTRF 0 .- TOYTAR 
nllUfW JUL 1 AO 




11000 


1TA 
J 1 A 






00700 
rr 'rr 








1 1 100 








OflftOfl TOYSTV 


T TiA 


TOYTYP TT 


PTTT TOYQTTTY TYPT? 


1 1 200 
Hipp 


t nA 


1 Y 

A »* 


GET JO I STICK/AUDIO 


so 900 
yy syy 


T STA 

i-l*J Ul 




MTTT RY 9 FOR 1 A OTfFCFT 
nuj-i 01 i. run. 10 utf qli 


11300 




5 Y 
3 , A 


aLULUTUK BIT 


01003 


LEAX 


JOYTAB , PCR 


GET VECTOR OFFSET TABLE INPUT 


11 400 


TPP 


n tt 
u , u 


AiND SAVE THEM TOO 


01100 


LDD 


A,X 


GET OFFSET FOR THAT ONE 


11500 


OR A 


wo 


CT7T T7r ,f P V TJTTATXTXTf* 


01200 


JMP 


D,X 


CALL THE INPUT READING 


11600 


QTA 

OAA 


1 , A 




01300 








1 1 700 


AMnR 
Ail U O 


* ecu 0 


SET RIGHT JOYSTICK FOR NOW 


01400 *THIS ONE READS JOYSTICK POSITION FROM HI -RES INTERFACE FROM R-S 


1 1 800 


PQUQ 
ratio 


B 

B 


a Kin O a tt Y7 Tn» TAiAir 

AND SAVE IT OR NOW 


yljyy rtxiulia 








11900 
rr 


LDR 

mm x> 


O U I X ITtUA 1A , JT OK 


GET RIGHT/LEFT FLAG 


fl1 hflfl 


RSR 


RTTTQTA 
SU IS 1 A 


i»n fZVT RTTTTOM CTATTTQ 


12000 
^^rrr 


TCT R 




rUl IHh oil {p) IN BIT Z 


01 700 
y j. /yy 


urn 


Y TOY TT 


RFT OT T5 Y Y PO^TTTOTJ 


12100 


TCT R 




m flan 
y xoyy 


uun 


1?T TP TT 


nn TUT OPATITHP TO TT\nTC A CTTP 


12200 
*-^*-Fr 


LSLR 






(21 000 


BUT 
Dni 




/evTp RTTATlT'Mn 1/7 TUP TTMT7 1 N 


12300 

A, Ajjyv 




Sa 
» or 


NUW bbULUT LhrT/RIGHT 


norma 








12400 


STB 


3 , A 


y* a^ji 


t nv 




paqp AnnppQC np pnoTc 

OASE. AJJUrULbb Ui rUK.ll> 


12500 








ao o ao 


t r»A 

UJA 


eon y 


PITT TUTT CnTTTjn DH /nPU RTT 

(j£il Inc. bUufiU UN/Urr oil 


12600 

XXUJ0Jf 


RSR 


TOVQYfl 


Art £ D TT 1 T\AP nr 1 n T?f\Ti \7 

DU 0 oil DAC READ FOR Y 


no inn 

p/ jpp 


t nn 


c 9 a t 


tun nif BTTC 
ATlU UAu Olid 


12700 


t nA 

1 il» A 


Ai^ 


AMT> UA VP TUT? ft rt*f\ £. 1 

AlWU nAKr. Tlib p TO oJ 


nn /.an 


rbnb 


iJ 


CAT7I7 'PTJ^W 

SAVE TH&M 


1 7800 


MTTT 




TO p TO 189 STEPS OF 3 




ANDA 


dt^F7 
ffyf / 


TITRN OFF ^OtTNn 
l u run ur r ju un u 


] 2900 
*■* y rr 


rono 


O 
0 


AiND oAVCi IT 


09 fiaa 


OTA 


?iJ 1 A 




13000 


TJTA 


1 Y 

A t A 


VTHLT CfT T7^T» V DAPTTTnu 

nUH obLLCT' a POSITION 










1 31 00 


ANnA 
BnU A 


TF Z 3 3 ~ 0 


Di KC.OC.TTING xHE SELECT BIT 




T HA 


1 , A 


HFT TUP T Q RTT AMT) 
uLl 1 nL Li * a • D X 1 Avi U 


13200 


STA 

w XA 


1 X 

A , A 




an oao 


LUD 


1 Y 
J ,A 


If C ATT OP TUP TnV CFT UPTflB 

ci. o , nil ur inc. jui bcixuiutt. 


13300 


BSR 


TOYSKfl 


nn £ rtt nA c rno v dactttmi 

UU 0 DAI UAU E UK A xUolllUN 


jjjpyy 


PCUC 


n 
u 


SAVE. IrLCrl 


13400 


TCT n 




ruUSJS r 1U oJ xU {l TO l^o STEP 2 


j*3iyy 








13500 


PSHS 


R 


S A VP TT pnp Hnu 
oava xx run. iiuw 




Aaua 


Ir^r / 


CPT PPT TOVQTTTY O 


1 3630 


A A AX 


tt n 

U|U 


PPCTOPP TnV/AITTA 

K-EiOXUKiL JUI/AUIO 


a^oa 
J* jJ"" 


DID 


5 If 

J , A 




13700 


0x0 


^ Y 


CPT rpTno 
ofix*C,U AUK. 


aiioa 
y.myy 


no * 




ANT1 ^FT FOT Y TNPTTT OF TOYQTTOF 


1 3S00 




1 Y 

A > A - 




01 S CIO 

yj jyy 


CTA 


1 Y 
1 • A 




13900 
■ J ~rr 








03600 

yj oyy 










1 r rv. 


y n 
1 , u 


nXiOlUnx. oUUnxl UN oil AND DAC 


03700 

y J / yy 


U A\. 


HIRESl 


READ Y VAL 0-255 


14100 


STB 


S20 X 




O3A00 


LDA 
1 . 1 * fi 


#192 


MAKE IT 0 TO 191 

a ttJM -1- A A J A. 


14200 


STA 

w a n 


S23 X 

y a> J ) 




03900 
y J^|* 


MTTT. 






14300 


PULS 


a 


HPT Y PnQTTTOM nATA 
u£iX A rUalllUCI XiAlA 


OAOOO 


PSHS 

17 Olid 


A 

A 


SAVE THE Y POSITIOrJ 


14400 


PITLS 

X U A^O 


pc n a 

r u t u , a 


f3PT Y PnQTTTnM nATA ATJn PVTT 
SMSmX X xUOXXAUCi UA1A All U LAI 1 


oai oa 








1 4500 








0A9 00 


T T1A 


1 , A 


^FT FOT Y TNPUT FOR RFAnTNfi 


14600 JOYSK0 


t nn 

l hi/ u 


A^AORO 
iPoHyoy 


QTART HAf T PVPT 
O XAK.A UAU LLVCL 


flAlftO 


ATCU A 




RY RP^FT T ^R OF CJPTFOTOR 


1 A700 JOYSK1 

A*1/yjF wUltf^l 


A dild 


A 
A 


QAUP CTABT HTTMRPP 
OAVC OXAAX nUnDDA 


Jf H'tyji 


STA 


l.X 




14800 


ui\D 


*2 


MAIfP PPTHTPP HTfiH 


a/, sad 


BSR 


HIRESl 


HO A 0 TO 255 RFAT3TNG 


14900 


STB 


S20 X 


SEND TT TO THE T5AC 


OA6O0 


LSRB 




MAKE TT 0 TO 127 FOR X 

rUUVL XX Xw A. A. / A WAX A 


15000 


EORB 


#2 


REMOVE PRINTER RTT 

Ok ri raw T 1_» f nln 1 C»A O X X 


OA70O 


PULS 


A 


GET SAVED Y POSITION 

WAX kJAA V AW X 1 UJ1 1 


15100 
AJ *-rr 


LIJA 


> A 


TC TT A ROUP OP RPTnU? 
AO AX ADUV£i UK DCXAJH I 


y^ayy 


TFR 


D.Y 


SAVE ROTH X & Y 


15200 


BMI 


J0YSK2 


SiCTP TF AROVF 

wMf XE ADuiL 










15300 










PULS 


D 


OFT 0TJ1 DATA OF SFLFCTOR 


15400 


SUBB 

tp W 0 *J 


e 


RFMnVF 1/7 TF RPT/iU 

ALnU V Ed X/ <x IT DDXAJH 


051JJB 


STA 


1,X 




15500 
■ LJ J rr 


BRA 


JOYSK3 






STB 


3,X 




15600 








JJ53JI0 










AXJUD 


c 
» 0 


Ann 1 /7 TP A BrtTIF 
AX/U X/Z If ADUVL 


Ale/, tin 


PULS 


D 


GET SOUND ON/OFF AND DAC DATA 


i sfiaa TOYO.V3 


PUT Q 


A 
A 




()( Cflf/T 

P5 3pp 


STB 


520, X 


All U £UL 1 UK-L 


15900 


T ^RA 






05600 


STA 


$23, X 




1 6000 


HHP A 
un x a 


JLl 
W A 




rf c t of At 

B5/JJ0 


TFR 


Y,D 


LOAD Ur X at X VAL (SAVED IN Y; 


16100 


RWF 


TOYSY1 


XAlUx O XArLCiO 


JJDoJJjJ HIRES9 


RTS 




rlXIT 


16200 


LOAD 




PTTT TUP nir RTTC TM fl 5 RTT 

rui inc. uau dxxo aci y~3 DAI 


05900 








1 6300 


T CD R 




PflP TnYCTTfY WAT 
fUK JUIalluAi VA-Li 


rt f ft ft ft -I- mi t T 

UoyyP * THIS 


IS A HI -RES INTERFACE 


nr * R /ft mf\ O C C \ 

READ QP TO 223) 


1 6400 
x o*ty y 


RTS 
nxo 




ANn PYTT 
All U ** * 1 1 


P&ipp HIKEbl 


PSHS 


CC 


bAVL IRQ fit r IRQ FLAGS 


1 6 500 








ft f a ft ft 

06200 


LDA 


#$FF 


USE DAC (OF CASSETTE) TO RESET 


1 6600 YPAT) 
xooyy Atnu 


t nR 


9 r E oy 


PPT V-DAn Y PnCTTTrtM 

uCl A - rAJJ A rUolllUN 


nfl ft ft 

06 3^0 


STA 


$2P,X 


THE TIMING RAMP GEN. 


1 6700 
ao / yy 


T CP R 




nAAD 11 )i 10 12/ 


ft e i ft ft 

064^0 


LDA 


#45 


THIS SHOULD DO IT 


i Anna 
xooyy 


t nA 


yf r Ol 


UDA A-rUS I POSITION 


fJ6 5>JyT HIRES2 


DECA 




DO A TIMING LOOP 


1 6000 
ao yyy 


PQUQ 

rono 


n 


caup tt pnp npn a TrTwo 
oAvtj Al run. UrDAlElCib 


ftCC ft ft 

Jfobjf JJ 


BNE 


HIRES2 




1 7 ana 
x/yyy 


t nR 

X*U D 


pre oz 


PPT CTATTTC rtP V PA TV 
liCil olAxUo Ut A- PAD 


06700 








17100 
a/ xyy 


RTTR 

D X X D 




TQ PPM TM PDrtTTWTTV? 
AO rCtCi API f rt-UAAflA 1 1 f 


P&SPP 


LDD 


#2*256+126 


UbLD TO STAKr lIMING RAHr 


1 7 9 flfl 


RMP 


yp Am 

ArAXfx 


nnMIT TTPnATP THVTTAT TT? KTrt*l» 

UUa 1 urDAlE. JUiVAL It NOT 


06900 


ORCC 


#$50 


DISABLE IRQ & FIRQ 




t nn 


v Tnv TT 
IJ U I , u 


PT CP PPT AT n 7 f. V Prttf TTlTrtW 

Cil<o£i IjEiI UxA) a at i POSITION 


07000 


STA 


$2P,X 


START TIMEING RAMP 


1 7AOO 


QTn 
O IU 


e 
1 a 


Alan GAWP TT 
ATll) SAVE, 11 


P7100 HIRES3 


DECB 






1 7 500 


fTTin 

uUU> 




PLAAX. rECi Ur (NUI PrvEobEDj 


07200 


BNE 


HIRES 3 




1 7 <aa 


PD A 


vp a n 0 


DO NOT LOOK AT NEw A 5t Y 


P7300 HIRES 4 


LDA 


,x 


HAS J -STICK MATCH RAMP7 


1 7700 YPAn! 
A/ / yy AxAUA 


RTTR 
0A 1 D 


MA 
fr*t 


TC PPM TH V UlOPTTIt 

lo rEN IN A nAKblNr 


07400 


BMI 


HIRES5 


YES, THEN EXIT LOOP! 


i 7 Ann 
x / Oyy 


ppn 


vp a n i 
Ar AD i. 


wc tucvt nor 1 tt 
YES , THEN USE IT 


0750P 


NOP 




MAKE LOOP THE RIGHT TIMING 


1 7 nan 


T nA 


Y Tnv TT 
A J U A , U 


PITT TU1T f"l T r\ V tirtOTTinM 

UE1 InE ULD A POSITION 


07600 


NOP 






i Roaa 
loyyjA 


QTA 
O 1 A 


1 Q 
A 1 O 


TTPnATP TUP flTn V TTAT 

UrDAlE. THE ULD A VAL. 


07700 


NOP 






ipi an 








07800 


INCB 




NO, DOWN COUNT THEN 


1 R700 YPAn7 
xo^yy ATAUA 


RTTR 
DA 1 0 


wo 


TC PPM TM V WAPPTM* 

lo rtw an i nAKfjlnr 


07900 


BNE 


HIRES4 


IF NO TIME OUT THEN LOOP AGAIN 


i R1O0 
x o jyy 


RFO 


yp a no 

AXAXiy 


VFC TUPM TTPnATP 


08000 








1 8400 
x o nyy 


t nA 

XaXVA 


Y TOY TT 
X«JU I 1 U 


PT CP TTCP nT n V PnCTTTflM 
CLiOD UoE. UlxU I rUoAlAUN 


08100 


DECB 




MAKE IT 255 IF TIMED OUT 


1 8 500 

XO Jj9jff 


STA 
O AA 


e 
» 0 


TTPnATP tup nT n V VAT 


08200 HIRES 5 


PULS 


PC.GC 


EXIT WITH ERROR (RESTORE IRQS) 


1R600 YPAnQ 
xooyy ArAU/ 


a h n R 

All U D 


ill 
Wl. 


PPT VPM CTATTTC 
uE. 1 r£.N o 1A1 Uo 


08300 








1 H 700 


CTP 


BTTTnUH TT 
DU 1UWH ( U 




08400 








1 ttann 
loopy 


rULo 


rC , D 


EXIT READ A- PAD 


08500 *THIS DOES A 


BUTTON READ OFF THE RIGHT/LEFT JOYSTICK 


i o q nn 
IBSyp 








08600 BDTSTA 


PSHS 


A 


SAVE RIGHT/LEFT FLAG 


I9ppp GETMAX 


PSHS 


D 


■irHlTTl IIIUMTI T*f\T\ T SWT TT i T 

SETUP TEMP FOR JOY VAL. 


08700 


LDX 


#$FFP? 


POINT TO THE 1/0 PORT 


19 ipp 


t nv 


#9 r r ? p 


POINT TO COCO MAX PORT 


03800 


LDA 


2,X 


GET THE KEY SELECT DATA 


i o ?an 


RCD 

Don. 


ppAnw 


pPAn phdt lun qvtd tt 
KEAJj rUKl AND oAlr I x 


06900 


LDB 


#$FF 


SELECT NO KEYS 


i a laa 
19JPP 


n co 
dob. 




KEAD PURT 


99999 


STB 


2,X 


TO READ JUST THE BUTTONS 




T nn 

LAJU 


a 7 


AMn WAVP n Tf\ Ot( Trt 

AND ftAAx. y 1U Z3j iU 


99199 


PULS 


B 


GET RIGHT/LEFT BUTTON SELECT 


i o 5oa 


MTTT 




n Tn loi 
y IU A?A 


992?? 


INGB 




MAKE IT »'01 n (R) OR "10" (L) 


1 Q600 
X7 oyy 


STA 
O AA 


Q 


POP Y PnCTTTnM 
E UK. I rUOAAAUH 


99399 


COMB 




MAKE SELECTED BIT ZERO 


1 9700 
a* /yy 


RSR 
oon. 


RFAnMY 


RFAH PORT 
x urv.i 


09400 


ORB 


,x 


IS GET THAT BUTTON BIT 


1 QROfl 


T QP A 




uiifTJ TT fl Tfl 177 
FlAAXi AX y AU IA / 


09500 


STA 


2,X 


RESTORE KEY SELECT DATA 


1 aoao 


QTA 
O 1 A 


1 c 

A ,0 


Afin QAWP Y PrtCTTTnH 
AflU OAVE. A xUOAXAUCl 


096pp 


COMB 




MAKE IT A ONE IF PRESS 




PGP 
DocL 


p p a nw 


DPAn PrtDT 

ri r.fti) run.1 


09700 


ANDB 


#3 


ONLY RIGHT/LEFT BUTTON BITS! 


2pipp 


CUMA 




FOR BUTTON 


09800 


STB 


BUTDVN.U 


UPDATE BUTTON DOWN STATUS 


on*) fin 


a un a 


#12o 


<1Z8 THEN DOWN 


?99p0 


RTS 




AND EXIT 


oa'iaa 
*PJPP 


CT A 

0 1A 


niTTniTM IT 


>127 THEN UP 


10003 








*? t *99 


PTTT O 


rC , u 


UET A at I AND EXIT 


10100 *THIS 


ONE READS THE 6 DAC PORT FOR THE RIGHT/LEFT JOYSTICKS 


W99 








10200 JPORT 


LDA 


JOYTYP.U 


GET RIGHT/LEFT FLAG 


20600 RFATlMX 


LDA 

III/ fl 


X+ 

1 AT 


RFATj COCO MAY PORT 


ifl330 


BSR 


BUTSTA 


GET BUTTON DOWN STATUS 


29799 


LDB 


#1P 


DO A TIME DELAY LOOP 


10400 


PSHS 


U 


SAVE VARIABLE BLOCK POINTER 


29699 RDHX1 


DECB 






WW 

\9*99 


LDX 
LDA 


#$FF30 

$23,X 


POINT TO I/O PORTS 
GET SOUND ON BIT 


2P9PP 
21PPP 


BNE 
RTS 


RDMX1 


AND EXIT 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 85 



028)30 CKPB 

02900 BHS 

03000 COM 
03100 . 

03200 CURON0 PSHS 

03300 TFR 
03400 

03500 CMP A 

03600 PSHS 

03700 BLO 

03800 NEC A 
03900 CURON1 LDB 

04000 HUL 

04100 PULS 

04200 BLO 

04300 COMA. 

04400 COMB 

04500 ADDD 
04600 CURON2 ADDA 

04700 TFR 

04800 LDB 

04900 ASRB 

05000 ASRB 

05100 STB 

05200 LEAX 

05300 STX 

05400 PULS 

05500 AN DA 



#128-12 

CURON0 

FAST.U 

B 

X,U 

#192+5 
CC 

CURON1 

#32 

CC 

CURON2 



NOW TEST IF PART OF X LEN OFF 

OF SCREEN (SKIP IF SO) 

DO FAST CURSOR DRAW ALL ON SCREEN 

SAVE X POSITION 

LOAD U WITH CURSOR SHAPE DATA 

IS THE LINE A NEGATIVE LINE? 
SAVE TEST FLAGS 

IF SO THEN MAKE POSITIVE LINE 
CONVERT LINE TO MEMORY POSITION 

GET TEST FLAGS 
SKIP IF PLUS 
NEC THE D REG 



05600 
05700 
05800 
05900 
06000 
06100 
06200 
06300 



LDB 
MUL 
LEAD 

LDA 
LDB 
BNE 



06400 CUR0N3 


CMPX 


SSTART 


06500 


BLO 


CURON6 


06600 


PSHS 


X.U.A 


06700 


LDA 


#3 


06800 


LDB 


STRIP+D/ 


06900 CUR0N4 


CMPB 


#32 


07000 


BHS 


CURON5 


07100 


CMPX 


SEND 


07200 


BHS 


CURON5 


07300 


PSHS 


A 


07400 


LDA 


,x 


07500 


STA 


,Y+ 


07600 


ANDA 


,u 


07700 


EORA 


3*16, U 


07800 


STA 


,x 


07900 


PULS 


A 


08000 CURON5 


LEAX 




08100 


LEAU 


i,u 


08200 


INCB 




08300 


DECA 




08400 


BNE 


CUR0N4 


08500 


PULS 


X.U.A 


08600 CURON6 


LEAX 


32.X 


08700 


LEAU 


3,U 


08800 


DECA 




08900 


BNE 


CURON3 


09000 


PULS 


PC, CC.U 



#1 

SSTART OFFSET TO BASIC SCREEN POSITION 

D,X AND PUT IN 16 -BIT POINTER 

,S GET X POSITION 

GET BYTE POSITION ON SCREEN 

BY 1/4 

STRIP+DATA.FCR SAVE FOR COUNTING LATER 
B,X ADD IT TO THE SCREEN POINTER 

MEMPOS+DATA , PGR AND MEMORY POINTER TOO 
A GET THE X POSITION 

#3 GET THE OFFSET INTO THE BYTE ON LINE 

#3*16*2 SIZE OF SHAPE 

MUL IT BY THE SHAPE SIZE IN "B" 
D.U AND OFFSET THE SHAPE POINTER BY IT 

#16 NUMBER OF LINE IN CURSOR OF DATA 

FAST+DATA, PCR DO WE DO A FULL OR PART DRAW? 
ONFAST SKIP IF FASTI 



IS THIS LINE ABOVE THE SCREEN? 

SKIP IF OFF THE SCREEN 

SAVE POINTER AND Y- COUNT 

3 BYTE PER LINE 

GET (BYTE) LINE POSITION 

ARE WE TO FAR LEFT/RIGHT? 

SKIP THIS BYTE IF SO 

IS THE BYTE ABOVE SCREEN? 

SKIP BYTE IF SO 

SAVE X COUNTER 

GET DATA OFF THE SCREEN 

SAVE IT IN UNDER BUFFER 

AND IT WITH MASK OF CURSOR 

THEN FLIP BITS WITH EOR DATA 

AND PLACE IT ON THE SCREEN 

GET X COUNT 

MOVE NEXT BYTE ON THE LINE 

AND NEXT BYTE IN SHAPE DATA 

MOVE TO NEXT BYTE STRIP 

DONE WITH THIS LINE? 

NO, LOOP BACK THEN 

RESTORE POINTERS TO START OF LINE 

MOVE SCREEN POINTER TO NEXT LINE 

MOVE SHAPE POINTER TO NEXT LINE 

ARE ALL LINES DONE? 

NO, LOOP BACK 

RESTORE IRQS, VAR POINTER & EXIT 



09100 

09200 *THIS IS A FAST CURSOR DRAWER 



09300 ONFAST STA 
09400 ONFST1 LDD 
09500 



COUNT+DATA.PCR SET LINE COUNTER 



09600 
09700 
09800 
09900 
10000 



STD 
ANDA 
EORA 
ANDB 
EORB 
STD 



15100 CUR0F5 LEAX 



15200 
15300 
15400 
15500 



DECA 

BNE 

PULS 



• X 

,Y++ 
»U 

16*3, U 
l.U 

16*3+1, U 
,X++ 
32, X 

CUROF1 
PC.CG 



15600 OFFAST 


STA 


COUNT, U 


15700 OFFST1 


LDD 


,Y++ 


15800 


STD 


,X++ 


15900 


LDB 


,Y+ 


16000 


STB 


,x 


16100 


LEAX 


32-2, X 


16200 


DEC 


COUNT, U 


16300 


BNE 


OFFST1 


16400 


PULS 


PC.CC 


16500 






16600 *D I SABLE MOUSE 


SOFTWARE 


L6700 DSABLE 


LBSR 


TURNOF 


L6800 


LDX 


OLDIRQ.U 


16900 


STX 


$10D 


17000 


LDD 


OLDIO.U 


17100 


STD 


$168 


17200 


LDD 


OLDCOM.U 


17300 


STD 


$123 


17400 


CLRB 




17500 


RTS 





GET FIRST 2 BYTES OF LINE 

SAVE THEM IN UNDER BUFFER 

AND THE MASK DATA 

FLIP DATA TOO 

NOW THE NEXT BYTE ON LINE 

PUT BOTH ON SCREEN 
MOVE TO NEXT LINE 
ARE ALL LINES DONE? 
NO, THEN LOOP BACK 
TURN ON IRQS AND EXIT 

SET UP LINE COUNTER 

GET FIRST 2 BYTE OF UNDER DATA 

AND PUT IT ON SCREEN 

GET LAST BYTE ON LINE OF UNDER 

AND PUT IT TOO ON SCREEN 

MOVE TO NEXT LINE ON SCREEN 

ALL LINES DONE? 

LOOP IF NOT 

TURN OF IRQS AND EXIT 



TURN OFF CURSOR IF ON SCREEN 

GET OLD IRQ VECTOR 

AND PUT IT BACK 

GET OUTPUT VECTOR 

AND PUT IT BACK 

GET OLD COMMAND TABLE VECTOR 

AND PUT IT BACK 

RETURN A ZERO FOR FUCTION 

AND EXIT 



18200 * 13 - HI -RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE 
18300 SELJOY SUBB 
18400 
18500 
18600 

18700 *THIS 
18 800 IRQ 
18900 
19000 
19100 
19200 
19300 
19400 
19500 
19600 
19700 
19800 
19900 
20000 

10100 
10200 
10300 
10400 
10500 
10600 

10700 
10800 

10900 

11000 
11100 

11200 * TURN OFF CURSOR (#0) 



SUBB 


#9 


FIRST SELECT COMMAND (RIGHT) 


STB 


JOYTYP.U 


SELECT JOYSTICK TYPE 


RTS 




AND EXIT 


THE 


IRQ PATCH FOR THE 


MOUSE SOFTWARE 


LEAU 


DATA , PCR 


SETUP VARIABLE POINTER 


LDX 


NEWJOY.U 


GET THE NEW JOYSTICK X & Y POSITIOI 


LDA 


HOLD ,U 


MAKE SURE THAT CURSOR IS OFF IF 


ORA 


CSTAT.U 


ON HOLD 


CMPA 


#64 


IF CURSOR IS TURNED OFF OR HOLD 


BEQ 


IRQl 


>0 THEN REMOVE CURSOR. . . ELSE. . . 


CMPX 


YJOY.U 


IS THE OLD AND POSITION THE SAME 7 


BEQ 


IRQ2 


SKIP DRAW CURSOR THEN 


PSHS 


X 


SAVE NEW X fir Y POSITION 


LBSR 


CUROFF 


REMOVE CURSOR 


PULS 


X 


RESTORE NEW X & Y POSITION 


LDA 


HOLD.U 


IS CURSOR ON HOLD? 


BNE 


IRQ2 


SKIP IF SO 


LDA 


,x 


GET LAST BYTE ON LINE 


STA 


,Y+ 


SAVE IN UNDER BUFFER 


ANDA 


2,U 


AND WITH MASK 


EORA 


2+16*3, U 


FLIP WITH DATA 


STA 


»x 


PUT ON SCREEN 


LEAU 


3,U 


GOTO NEXT LINE IN SHAPE 


LEAX 


32-2 ,X 


SKIP TO NEXT LINE ON SCREEN 


DEC 


COUNT+DATA.PCR 


ARE ALL LINES DONE 


BNE 


ONFST1 


NO, LOOP BACK 


PULS 


PC.U.CC 


RESTORE IRQS, VAR POINTER fit EXIT 



PSHS 


CC 


ORCC 


#$50 


LDB 


CSTAT , U 


ANDB 


ii ft [>> £ A 

#255-64 


STB 


CSTAT.U 


BSR 


CUROFF 


PULS 


PC , CC 


PSHS 


CC 


ORCC 


#$50 


t tmi 
LAjD 


box AT , U 


BrL 


OLXIT 


A VTT"\ T> 

ANDB 


Wl.il 


STB 


CSTAT.U 


LEAY 


CURBUF.PCR 


t nv 
LDX 


\XTT~L/ DAP Tf 

Mi Mr OS , U 


t r\ a 
LDA. 


fflo 




"U A CT T1 


BNE 


OFFAST 


CMPX 


SSTART 


BLO 


UUKUr j 


PSHS 


A,X 


LDB 


STRIP, U 


LDA 


#3 


STA 


COUNT, U 


CMPB 


All) 


BHS 


CUROF3 


CMPX 


SEND 


BHS 


CUR0F3 


LDA 


,Y+ 


STA 


,x 


LEAX 


i,x 


INGB 




DEC 


COUNT, U 


BNE 


CUR0F2 


PULS 


X.A 


STX 


YJOY.U 


LBSR 


CURON 


BRA 


IRQ3 


LDB 


HOLD.U 


BEQ 


IRQ3 


DEC 


HOLD.U 


LEAX 


<IRQ5,PCR 


PSHS 


X 


PSHS 


U,Y,X,D ( CC,DP 


JMP 


[OLDIRQ.U] 


BSR 


JOYSTK 


STD 


NEWJOY.U 


LDB 


BUTDWN.U 


LDA 


BUTCNT.U 


BEQ 


IRQ6 


TSTB 




BNE 


IRQ7 


DEC 


BUTCNT.U 


BRA 


IRQ9 


TSTB 




BEQ 


IRQ9 


STB 


BUTTON, U 


LDA 


#2 


STA 


BUTCNT.U 


RTI 





17600 

17700 * SELECT TYPE OF JOYSTICK TO USE (9-13) 

17800 * 9 - RIGHT JOYSTICK 

17900 * 10 - LEFT JOYSTICK 

18000 * 11 - COCO MAX HI-RES INPUT MODULE 

18100 * 12 - RADIO SHACK X-PAD 



11400 
11500 
11600 
11700 
11800 

11900 OEXIT 
12000 

12100 CUROFI 

12200 

12300 

12400 

12500 

12600 

12700 

12800 

12900 

13000 

13100 

13200 

13300 

13400 curof: 

13500 
13600 
13700 
13800 
13900 

14000 curof; 

14100 

14200 

14300 

14400 

14500 

14600 CUROF 

14700 

14800 

14900 

15000 

20100 IRQl 

20200 

20300 

20400 IRQ 2 
20500 
20600 
20700 

20800 IRQ3 

20900 

21000 

21100 

21200 

21300 IRQ 5 

21400 

21500 

21600 

21700 

21800 

21900 

22000 

22100 

22200 

22300 

22400 IRQ6 

22500 

22600 

22700 IRQ7 
22800 

22900 IRQ9 

Listing 3: 



00100 * JOYSTICK DRIVERS 

00200 JOYTAB FDB JPORT-JOYTAB 



SAVE IRQ FLAGS 

TURN OFF IRQS 

GET CURSOR STATUS FLAG 

DISABLE DRAWING CURSOR ON IRQ 

AND SAVE NEW STATUS 

REMOVE CURSOR IF ON SCREEN 

TURN ON IRQS AND EXIT 

SAVE IRQ FLAGS 

TURN OFF IRQS 

GET CURSOR STATUS 

EXIT NO CURSOR ON SCREEN 

SET CURSOR ON SCREEN FLAG 

TO OFF AND SAVE 

GET BUFFER OF DATA UNDER CURSOR 
GET SCREEN (MEM) POSITION OF CURSOR 

NUMBER OF LINES OF CURSOR 

WAS CURSOR DRAWN FAST OR CLIPED? 

SKIP IF FAST! 

IS MEMORY POINTER BELOW SCREEN? 
SKIP IF SO 

SAVE SCREEN POINTER & LINE COUNTER 

GET BYTE X POSITION 

3 BYTES PER LINE 

SET X COUNTER WITH IT 

TOO FAR LEFT OR RIGHT? 

SKIP IF SO 

IS MEMORY POINTER ON SCREEN? 

SKIP IF OFF SCREEN 

GET UNDER CURSOR BYTE 

PUT IT ON SCREEN 

MOVE TO NEXT BYTE ON LINE 

MOVE INDEX COUNTER 

ARE ALL BYTE DONE ON THIS LINE? 

NO, THEN LOOP BACK 

GET START OF LINE POINTER & COUNTER 
UPDATE CURSOR POSITION 
DRAW CURSOR 

ARE WE ON HOLD? 
SKIP IF NOT 

COUNT IT TILL ZERO THEN 

SETUP RETURN ADDRESS 

PUT IT ON STACK FOR AN RTI 

FILL IN THE REST OF RTI STACK DATA 

CALL BASIC'S IRQ VECTOR 

NOW WE ARE BACK, DO JOYSTICK READ 
AND SAVE THE X & Y POSITIONS 
GET BUTTON UP/DOWN FLAG 
AND BUTTON DE- BOUNCE COUNTER 
SKIP IF AT ZERO 

IS BUTTON PRESSED 7 

RESTART BUTTON COUNT (SKIP TO IT) 

ELSE DEC DEBOUCE COUNT 

SKIP (ALL DONE HERE) 

IS BUTTON UP? 
SKIP IF SO 

SET JUST PRESSED FLAG 
RESET DE- BOUNCE COUNTER 

EXIT IRQ 



VECTOR TABLE FOR DOING JOYSTICK 



1 84 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



WW 

um 

121J7P 
122?? 
123J3JJ 

1250(1 
1260(7 
1270J7 
12800 
12900 
13000 
13100 
13200 
13300 
13400 
13500 
13600 
13700 
13800 
13900 
14000 
14100 
14200 
14300 
14400 
14500 
14600 
14700 
14800 
14900 
15000 
15100 
15200 
15300 
15400 
15500 
15600 
15700 
15800 
15900 
16000 
16100 
16200 
16300 
16400 
16500 
16600 
16700 
16800 
16900 
17000 
17100 

W00 
40100 
40200 
40300 
40400 
40402 
40500 
40600 
40602 
40700 
40800 
40900 
41000 
41100 
41300 
41500 
41600 
41700 
41800 



STX 

CLR 

LDX 

LDB 

CHPB 

BNE 

LEAY 
LSLB 
STX 
STY 

SLOOP LDA 
STA 
DECB 
BNE 

LDB 
STD 
LEAS 
STX 

COMERR PULS 



$168 

PMODE.U 

$123 

$120 

#935 

COHERE. 

COMB OF, PGR 

OLDCON.U 
8123 
,X+ 
,Y+ 

SLOOP 



COMBUF+7*2 , PCR GET ADDRESS OF OLD PRINT COMMAND 



AND SET SYSTEM WITH IT 
CLEAR (RESET) PRINTING MODE 
GET ADDRESS OF COMMAND TABLE 
GET # OF COMMANDS 
IS IT 53 COMMANDS? 
SKIP ADDING @ IF NOT 

GET SPACE FOR HOLDING TABLE 
2 BYTES PER COMMANDS (FOR COPY) 
SAVE OLD POINTER ADDRESS 
POINTER TO MOUSE COMMANDS BUF 



OSR1 



TSTA 

BNE 

JSR 

CMPD 

BHI 

PSHS 

LEAU 

LEAY 

LSLB 

LDD 

LEAY 

PULS 

JSR 

PULS 

CLRA 

JMP 



OLDPRT.U 
NPRINT.PCR 
COMBUF+7*2,PCR 
X,Y,U,D 



USR9 

$B3ED 

#LASTCM 

USR9 

X.Y.U.B 

DATA, PCR 

COMTAB.PCR 

B,Y 
D,Y 
B 
,Y 

X,U,Y 

CLR TOP 
$B4F4 CONVERT 



* GET X POSITION FUCTION (#2) 
GETX LDB XJOY.U 

USR9 RTS 

* GET Y POSITION FUCTION (#3) 



GETY 



LDB 
RTS 



GETBUT LDB 
CLR 
RTS 

GETDVN LDB 
CEXIT RTS 



YJOY.U 



BUTTON, U 
BUTTON, U 



BUTDVN,U 



SAVE FOR PATCH SUBR. 
GET ADDRESS OF THE PATCH FOR PRINT 
UPDATE JUMP TABLE FOR NEW PRINT 
THEN RESTORE THE REGS 

IS THE VARIABLE A STRING OR NUMBER 

EXIT IF STRING 

PUT FUNCTION NUMBER IN THE D REG 

IS IT TOO BIG? 

EXIT IF SO 

SAVE SOME REGS 

SET U REG TO VARIABLE BLOCK 

GET FUNCATION (COMMANDS) TABLE 

MUL FUNCTION BY 2 (16 BIT) 

GET OFFSET FROM TABLE 

ADD IT TO Y FOR ADDRESS OF IT 

RESTORE FUNCTION NUMBER IN B REG 

AND CALL THE FUNCTION 

RESTORE OTHER REGS 

HALF OF 16 BIT RETURN 

D REG TO NUMBER & EXIT 



GET CURSOR X POSITION 
AND RETURN IT 



GET CURSOR Y POSITION 
AND RETURN WITH IT 

GET JUST PRESS BUTTON FLAG 
AND RESET THAT FLAG 
THEN EXIT 

GET BUTTON UP/ DOWN STATUS 
AND EXIT 



* MY ASSEMBLER USES "+GET" TO INCLUDE A FILE WHEN THE SOURCE CODE 

* IS TOO BIG FOR ONE FILE 

* THE +GET IS LIKE "USE" IN THE OS -9 ASSEMBLER 



+GET 
+GET 
+CET 
+GET 
+GET 

FCC 
FCC 
FCC 
FCC 

ENDPRG EQU 
END 



HOUSE2 
MOUSE 3 
MOUSE4 
MOUSE 5 
MOUSE6 



GET CURSOR DRAW CODE 

GET JOYSTICK DRIVERS 

GET SOUND & SCREEN DRIVERS 

GET SOUND & SCREEN (PART 2) 

GET CHR DATA FILE 



•MOUSE VERSION 2.0 1 

•COPYRIGHT 1986 BY SRB SOFTWARE ' 

'ALL RICHTS RESERVED • 

•PUBLIC DOMAIN BY STEVE BJORK 1 

END OF PROGRAM POINTER 



Listing 2: 



00100 

00200 
00300 
00400 

00500 
00600 
00700 
00800 
00900 

01000 

01100 
01200 

01300 
01400 
01500 
01600 

P1700 
01800 
01900 
02000 
02100 
02200 
02300 
02400 
02500 
02600 
02700 



♦MOUSE 2 /ASM FILE NUMBER 2 



TURNON PSHS 
ORCC 
LDB 
ORB 
STB 
BSR 
PULS 



CURON 



LDB 
BMI 
BITB 
BEQ 

PSHS 

ORCC 

ORB 

STB 

LEAX 

LEAY 

LDD 

SUBA 

SUBB 

CLR 

CHPA 

BHS 



CC 

#$50 

CSTAT , U 
#64 

CSTAT.U 

CURON 

PC.CC 

CSTAT,U 
CEXIT 
#64 
CEXIT 

CC.U 

#$50 

#128 

CSTAT ,U 

CURDAT.PCR 

CURBUF.PCR 

YJOY,U 

,X+ 

,x+ 

FAST.U 

#192-16 

CURON0 



SAVE IRQ ENABLE FLAG 
DISABLE IRQ CURSOR DRAW 
GET CURSOR STATUS 
SET DRAW CURSOR FLAG 
AND SAVE IT 

DRAW CURSOR IF NOT ALREADY ON 
TURN IN IRQ AND EXIT 

IS CURSOR ON SCREEN ALREADY? 
SKIP IF SO 

SHOULD CURSOR BE PLACED? 
NO, THEN EXIT 

SAVE BLOCK POINTER CPU STATUS 
DISABLE IRQS 

SET CURSOR STATUS TO SHOW 

THAT CURSOR IS ON SCREEN 

GET CURSOR SHAPE DATA 

GET BUFFER FOR SAVE SCREEN UNDER IT 

GET CURSOR POSITION 

UPDATE POSITION WITH HOT SPOT 

DATA FOR NEW POSITION 

RESET FAST FLAG TO CLIP DRAW 

IS THE FULL CURSOR ON THE SCREEN 

SKIP IF PART OF Y OFF SCREEN 







Can you prjeate a totally symmetrical 
crosswbrd pujzzlb using the Word+ !pr0- 
cjrarfi arid the specifications outlined in 
the accompanying article on Page 38 6f 
the May 1986 issue of therainbow? (f sq, 
you may wish to enter The Crdssv^or]j 
Creator Contest And, : if i/ve jch6osje tp 
print your crossword puzzr 

awarded a special prize, j -f | r 

. ! Send us a disk or cassette cop^of the 
data file of your puzzle created byj Wprd* 
along with! a printed copy of the crbss- 
word puzzle -f- including the clues and 
answers. Be £ure to pyt a title ionj the 
riuzite and if Ipossible, follow a general 
interest th^me. | \ j j | | J 

ed on the folio 



Entries wi I Ibe j 
criteria:: -I - 

Puzzle symmetry 
I Number of words 

Spelling | I j m 

\ Creativity ! 
t Thematic origi 



Understandability 
Ease of loading data 
Neatness 
Packaging 



+- 



j Eriterjas often as yjou like! Please note: 
We consider your act of j entering the 
co ntbst as conseipt tp p u b I Ish y o u r c^ear 



: 



* 1 



T 



| The Crossword Creator Cqritest is 
open to: all ra|nb6w ireaderjs, advertisers 

and employees of Falsoft;tnct 

1 T 1 13 j J HE? O 

Send entries to: 




Crossword Creator Contest 
c/oTHE 

The Falsoft Building 

Prospect, KY 40059 

! 






August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 83 



cursor drawing, fast and clipped. 

The cursor is put down byte by byte 
rather than dot by dot to speed up the 
drawing. If only one image of the cursor 
was used, there would be only 32 posi- 
tions across the screen. But the shape 
data has four-image offset (0,1,2,3) to 
give 128 positions. Of course, there are 
192 positions up and down. 

TURNOF (Line 28300) is the turn off 
cursor function (zero). This subroutine 
resets the cursor-enable bit and turns off 
the cursor. 

CUROFF is used to remove the 
cursor if it is on the screen. The cursor 
is removed by getting the old screen 
data from CURBUF and putting it on 
the screen. As with the cursor draw 
there are two types of removes, fast and 
clipped. 

DSABLE is the subroutine for func- 
tion number six, disable (or unlink) The 
Mouse. After turning off the cursor, the 
old interrupt, output and command 
vector are restored. 



S EL JOY is for functions nine to 13, 
select joystick type. 

Basic's 60-hertz interrupt vector is 
passed through IRQ to move the cursor, 
poll the joystick and button status, First 
the status cursor and HOLD flag are 
tested along with the joystick position 
to see if it has moved. If the cursor 
should be removed, then CUROFF is 
called. Next, if the cursor should be 
turned on (because of a new position or 
hold is no longer on), then CURON is 
called. 

Lines 37800 to 38100 call Basic's old 
interrupt subroutine. The disk drive 
M0T0R0FF and TIMER function will still 
work. Before end, the interrupt subrou- 
tine, the joystick and button status are 
polled. 

At the end of Listing 1 are three 
+GET instructions that include the 
other files needed to assemble the 
program. This +GET of my assembler 
is very similar to the USE directive of 
the OS-9 assembler. 



The FCC in lines 40900 to 41300 adc 
the copyright text to the end of The 
Mouse program. ENDPRG is the 
length of the program. 

Mouse 2 (Listing 3) is the joystick 
drivers used by The Mouse. The table 
of offsets called JOYTAB, is used by 
JOYSTK to call the right subroutine. 
Each polling subroutine updates the 
button up/down status flag (BUT 
DWN) and returns the Y-position (zero 
to 191) in the A register and the X- 
position (zero to 127) in the B register. 

Next month we will look at The 
Mouse source code for the Hi-Res 
screen text driver in files four, five and 
six. * 

Editor's Note: Since this month's and 
next month's listings are intended for 
reference purposes, no addresses appear 
with the assembly language listings. The 
listings are available for downloading 
from the SOURCE FOk 6809 AS- 
SEMBLERS topic area of the Delphi 
CoCo SIG database. □ 













05700 STRIP 


EQU 


. -DATA 


STRIP COUNT FOR DRAW CURSOR 


Listing 1: 








05800 

05900 MEMPOS 


FCB 
EQU 


0 

. -DATA 


SCREEN POSITION OF CURSOR 












06000 


FDB 


0 




rr^rr 


*M0USE/ASM 


VERSION 2.0 


LAST DATE 04/10/86 


06100 FAST 


EQU 


.-DATA 


FAST FLAG FOR DRAWING CURSOR 










06200 


FCB 


0 


t 


jpyi JJ0V 


* THIS 


IS THE 


SOURCE CODE FOR MOUSE SOFTWARE ON A COLOR COMPUTER 


06300 YCPOS 


EQU 


. -DATA 


Y POSITION FOR PRINTING ON SCREEN 




* COPYRIGHT 1986 BY SRB SOFTWARE, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 


06400 


FCB 


0 




00503 


* THIS 


PROGRAM IS PLACED IN THE 


PUBLIC DOMAIN BY STEVE BJORK 


06580 XCFOS 


EQU 


.-DATA 


XPOSITION FOR PRINTING ON SCREEN 


00630 


* FOR THE PRIVATE USE ONLY! 




06680 


FCB 


0 




00700 


* THIS 


CODE (ALL/PART) MAY NOT 


BE USED IN ANY MARKETED PRODUCT 


06700 PMODE 


EQU 


.-DATA 


WHAT PRINT MODE IS PROGRAM IN 


00800 


* WITHOUT WRITTEN CONSENT FROM 


SRB SOFTWARE . 


06800 


FCB 


0 




03900 










06900 INVERT 


EQU 


. -DATA 


FLAG FOR INVERTED TEXT 


01030 


* THIS 


PROGRAM WILL PLACE A CURSOR ON THE SCREEN AND MOVE IT EVERY 


07008 


FCB 


0 




81100 


* 1/60 OF SEC 


• 




07130 JOYTYP 


EQU 


. -DATA 


TYPE OF JOYSTICK INPUT (0-4) 


01230 


* IS ALSO HAS 


A HI-RES SCREEN TEXT DRIVE. 


07200 


FCB 


0 


01300 










07300 HOLD 


EQU 


.-DATA 


USE TO HOLD DRAWING CURSOR 


01430 


S START 


EQU 


$BA 16 BIT 


POINTER TO START OF GRAPHIC SCREEN 


07400 


FCB 


0 




01500 


SEND 


EQU 


$B7 16 BIT 


POINTER TO END OF GRAPHIC SCREEN 


07503 OLDIRQ 


EQU 


. -DATA 


PLACE TO PUT OLD IRQ VECTOR 


01600 










07680 


FDB 


SFFFF 


01700 










07700 OLDIO 


EQU 


.-DATA 


PLACE TO PUT OLD OUTPUT VECTOR 


01830 




ORG 


0 START OF PROGRAM 


07800 


FDB 


0 




31980 










07900 NEWJOY 


EQU 


. -DATA 


NEW X St Y FOR NEXT CURSOR POSITION 


02888 


BEGPRO 


LBRA 


USR VECTOR 


FOR USR FUNCTION 


08000 


FDB 


0 




82183 


CURDAT 


RMB 


16*3*2*4+2 


SPACE FOR CURSOR DATA 


08100 OLDCOM 


EQU 


. -DATA 




02200 










08200 


FDB 


0 




02300 


* THIS 


TABLE 


IS USED TO SELECT 


WHAT FUNCTION TO DO 


08300 OLDPRT 


EQU 


. -DATA 




02400 


COMTAB 


FDB 


TURNOF - COMTAB 


9 CURSOR OFF 


08400 


FDB 


0 




02500 




FDB 


TURNON - COMTAB 


1 CURSOR ON 


08500 WDYPOS 


EQU 


.-DATA 


SCROLL WINDOW Y POSITION 


02600 




FDB 


GETX- COMTAB 


2 GET X POSITION 


08680 


FCB 


0 




02730 




FDB 


GETY- COMTAB 


3 GET Y POSITION 


08700 WDXPOS 


EQU 


.-DATA 


SCROLL WINDOW X POSITION 


02880 




FDB 


GETBUT- COMTAB 


4 GET BUTTON PRESS 


08800 


FCB 


0 




02933 




FDB 


GETDWN-COMTAB 


5 GET BUTTON STATUS 


08900 WDYLEN 


EQU 


. -DATA 


SCROLL WINDOW Y SIZE 


03000 




FDB 


DSABLE -COMTAB 


6 DISABLE IRQ FROM SYSTEM 


09000 


FCB 


24 




03100 




FDB 


PING- COMTAB 


7 BELL 


09100 WDXLEN 


EQU 


. -DATA 


SCROLL WINDOW X SIZE 


03200 




FDB 


CLICK- COMTAB 


8 CLICK SOUND 


09200 


FGB 


32 




03300 




FDB 


SELJOY-COMTAB 


9 SELECT RIGHT JOYSTICK 


09300 FLIP 


EQU 


. -DATA 


FLAG FOR HI-RES JOYSTICK 


03430 




FDB 


SELJOY- COMTAB 


10 SELECT LEFT JOYSTICK 


09400 


FCB 


0 




03500 




FDB 


SELJOY-COMTAB 


11 SELECT COCO MAX 


09500 








03680 




FDB 


SELJOY-COMTAB 


12 SELECT X-PAD 


09600 CURBUF 


RMB 


16*3+2 


BUFFER FOR DATA UNDER CURSOR 


03700 




FDB 


SELJOY-COMTAB 


13 SELECT HI-RES JOYSTICK 


09700 








03830 


LASTCM 


EQU 


(.- COMTAB )/2 


NUMBER OF COMMANDS 


09800 COMBUF 


RMB 


$35*2 


TABLE USED FOR HOOKING PRINT @ 


03900 










09900 








* NEXT 


IS THE 


ALL THE VARIABLES 


NEEDED BY THE MOUSE SOFTWARE 


10000 USR 


PSHS 


X 


SAVE VARIABLE POINTER 


04100 


* VARIABLES ARE INDEXED OFF THE 


U REG FOR SPEED AND SMALLER SIZE 


10100 


LEAX 


>IRQ,PCR 


GET MOUSE'S IRQ VECTOR 


04200 


DATA 


EQU 


.+16 


-16 TO +15 ARE THE FASTEST 1 


10200 


CMPX 


$10D 


IS SYSTEM VECTOR THE SAME? 


04300 


COUNT 


EQU 


. -DATA 


MAKE ALL LABLES AS OFFSET TO U 


10300 


PULS 


X 


RESTORE VARIABLE POINTER 


04400 




FCB 


0 


COUNT IS A COUNTER REG 


10400 


BEQ 


USR1 


SKIP VECTOR ARE THE SAME 


04508 


CSTAT 


EQU 


. -DATA 


STATUS FLAG FOR CURSOR 


10500 








04600 




FCB 


0 




10600 


PSHS 


X.Y.U.D 


ELSE SAVE ALL REGS 


04700 


YJOY 


EQU 


. -DATA 


CURSOR Y POSITION 


10700 


LDD 


$10D 


GET OLD IRQ VERTOR 


04800 




FGB 


9 




10800 


LEAU 


DATA, PCR 


POINT TO VARIABLE BLOCK 


04903 


XJOY 


EQU 


. -DATA 


CURSOR X POSITION 


10900 


STD 


OLDIRQ , U 


AND SAVE IT 


05000 




FCB 


9 




11000 


LBSR 


JOYSTK 


GET CURSOR X & Y POSITION 


05100 


BUT DWN 


EQU 


. -DATA 


BUTTON UP/DOWN 


11100 


STD 


YJOY.U 


SAVE SET IT 


05200 




FCB 


9 




11200 


LEAX 


IRQ, PCR 


GET NEW IRQ VECTOR 


05300 


BUTTON 


EQU 


, -DATA 


BUTTON BEEN PRESSED 


11300 


STX 


$10D 


AND SET SYSTEM VECTOR WITH IT 


05480 




FCB 


9 




11400 


LDD 


$168 


GET OUT VECTOR 


05500 


BUTCNT 


EQU 


. -DATA 


COUNTER FOR TEST BUTTON 


11500 


STD 


OLDIO ,U 


AND SAVE IT 


05600 




FCB 


9 




11600 


LEAX 


SPRINT , PCR 


GET NEW OUT VECTOR 



182 THE RAINBOW August 1986 







16K 






Disk 





rick to use the full range of the 5-bit 
)ffset (-16 to 15) is to set the U register 
16 bytes in the variable list. The value 
)f the first variable is now -16 (pre- 
viously zero), still in the 5-bit range. But 
low 16 more bytes (and a few more 
/ariables) can use the faster 5-bit offset. 

Let's see how the first file (Mouse 1 
— Listing 1) breaks down. The first 13 
ines are the standard comments and 
copyrights. SSTART and SEND are 
constants for Basic's screen pointer 
variables in direct page. SSTART holds 
the starting address of Hi-Res screen 
memory and SEND holds the ending 
address plus one. 

The first instruction is a long branch 
over the program variable tables, data 
buffers and command offset vectors to 
the USR handling code. The next 386 
bytes is the shape data for the Hi-Res 
cursor. By loading data qver this space, 
a new cursor shape can be displayed. 



COMTAB is a table vector offset for 
the 13 user functions. Each 16-bit entry 
in the table is an offset (how far way) 
from the start of the table to the address 
of the function. 

Next is the variable list used by the 
program. The Data label is set up 16 
bytes into the list for maximum use of 
the 5-bit offset. 

CURBUF is the buffer for saving 
what's on the screen before the cursor 
is placed. The cursor is removed by 
copying the old screen data from this 
buffer to the screen's memory. COM- 
BUF is used as Basic's command vector 
to intercept the *@' function in the 
PRINT command. 

So much for the variables and 
buffers, now for code. First is the USR 
function and commands. The routine 
first checks to see if The Mouse is linked 
into Basic's system. If needed, it hooks 
into the 60-hertz interrupt, output port 
and the PRINT command. 



Down at the label USR1 (Line 13900) 
the program tests for a string variable 
and aborts if it is. After getting the 
function number, the program jumps to 
a subroutine based on it. When the 
program returns, the number is passed 
to BASIC and ends the USR function. The 
subroutines for USR functions two to 
four are in lines 15800 to 17100. 

TURNON (Listing 2) is used to per- 
form function 1, turn on the Hi-Res 
cursor. This subroutine sets the cursor- 
enable bit of the cursor-status flag byte 
and draws the cursor on the screen. 

CURON is the code that does the 
drawing. After checking if it's OK to 
draw, it finds the screen's memory 
location for the cursor and determines 
if it should use the clip draw. A clip 
drawer only draws the part of the cursor 
that is on the screen. A clipper could be 
used even when it is not needed, but it 
is very slow, about seven times slower 
than the cursor draw without clipping. 
Because of this there are two types of 




August 1986 THE RAINBOW 181 



MOUSE UTILITY 



What's Inside a Mouse? 



r ■ i refresh your memory, The 
I f\Mouse is an assembly lan- 
JL \^guage program that displays 
and moves a cursor and prints upper- 
and lowercase text on the Hi-Res graph- 
ics screen. A BASIC program may access 
this interface by 13 user functions and 
the PRINT command. 

This month We are going to dive into 
the assembly language source code and 
see just how The Mouse does its magic. 
Because The Mouse is about 35K bytes 
long, it is broken down into six files. We 
will talk about three of them this month. 
We will see the assembly language side 
of the USR function and PRINT com- 
mand along with the code for drawing 
the cursor (pointer). Also, we will look 
at how the joystick and button informa- 
tion is polled. 

Steve Bjork has been a programmer for 
over 15 years. In his association with 
Datasoft he has authored such pro- 
grams as Zaxxon, Sands of Egypt and 
Mega-Bug. He now handles product 
development for his own company, 
SRB Software, and has produced Stel- 
lar Life Line, Ghana Bwana and PitFall 
II among others. Steve lives in Simi 
Valley, California 



Before getting started I should re- 
mind you that The Mouse and its source 
code are copyrighted (1986) by SRB 
Software with all rights reserved. It is 
presented in RAINBOW magazine for 
private use only and cannot be used (all 
or part) in any marketed product with- 
out written consent from SRB Soft- 
ware. 

A Few Points about Relative Code 

The Mouse is a code-relative pro- 
gram just like OS-9. The only difference 
is there is fio direct page for the program 
(the direct page is already used by 
BASIC'S system variables). The standard 
for address relative variables is LDA 
YJOY,PCR. 

This instruction (when using a 16-bit 
offset) is about four bytes and nine 
clock cycles long, a little on the big and 
slow side. If The Mouse was a small 
program with just a few variables, this 
would not be much of a problem. But 
the program is about 3K in size and 
contains 26 variables, which could 
waste about 200 or so bytes and make 
it run a little slower. 

If a 16-bit register was set up to point 
to where the variables are at run time, 
then a smaller and faster instruction 



could be used. In The Mouse the I 
register (User stack pointer, but no 
used by BASIC as such) is pointed to th 
variable block. The previous example 
could be changed to LDA YJOY,U. 

True, it does not look that different 
but it is only about 2 bytes and 5 clocl 
cycles long (about half the time anc 
size). In The Mouse two types of offset! 
are used, 5-bit and 8-bit. The 5-bit offsei 
has an advantage over the 8-bit by bein| 
one byte shorter and one clock cycle 
faster. But there is one problem with the 
5-bit offset, its limited range of -16 tc 
+ 15 from where the pointer is address- 
ing. Any offset out of this range must 
use an 8-bit offset, which is longer and 
slower. For this reason the most used 
variables are placed at the start of the 
variable table. 

If the U register was just a pointer 
to the start of the variables list, 
only the first 16 bytes (offset 
0 to 15) would use the 
5-bit offset and all other 
variables would use 
the longer 8-bit 
offset. One 





By Steve Bjork 



Part Two: Examining the point- 
and- pick interface 



180 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



f you don't need graphics, type PCLEflRl. 
3n a tape-based system you can type POKE 
>5,6:NEIW . 

Unless Brother has changed its design, 
hat 12-pin connector is not a standard serial 
>ort. You must send the signal from it to an 
idditional optional $150 device sold by 
brother, called the Brother IF 50 Interface. 
The IF 50 Interface plugs into the typewriter 
it one end with the required 1 2-pin plug, and 
it the other end provides a buffered (2K size) 
;erial and parallel port (you select one by a 
switch on the IF 50). 

On the DB-25 plug, which you will plug 
nto the IF 50 Interface, you must short pins 
I, 6 and 8. Then, hook up that plug via a 
;hree-wire cable to the standard CoCo four- 
pin DIN connector in the following manner: 
Pin 3 of the CoCo DIN goes to Pin 7 of the 
DB-25 which will plug into the IF 50, Pin 
\ of the CoCo DIN goes to Pin 3 of the DB- 
25 plug, and Pin 2 of the CoCo DIN goes 
to Pin 20 of the DB-25 connector. You will 
also have to properly set the Baud rate and 
word length, etc., on the IF 50 and the 
CoCo. 



• / noticed a peculiarity when writing a 
space game in BASIC'S PMODE 4. The blue 
ship I drew might be red the next time I turn 
on the computer or press the Reset button. 
Why is this? Is there any way to predict what 
color it will be? 

Jason France 
Yuba City, CA 

You have discovered the "artifact color 
flip" peculiarity of the CoCo. The Video 
Display Generator (VDG) chip initializes 
itself to either the rising or the falling edge 
of the video clock at any power up or reset 
cycle in a manner that is both random and 
can neither be detected nor affected by 
software. This determines whether your ship 
will be red or b|ue (and whether the back- 
ground will be blue or red!). There is no way 
to predict or control which set you will get 
unless you make some very sophisticated 
hardware modifications. 



• When running artifact color programs 
like Black Sanctum awiPitstop II, my CoCo 
2 presents a red and green artifact color set, 
not the red and blue set the game's instruc- 
tions say I should have. Is something wrong 
with my computer? 

Todd A. Black 
Merced, CA 

Before I can tell if something is wrong 
with your computer, I'd need to know if you 
are using a TV or a monitor. Have you tried 
adjusting the tint control on your TV or 
monitor? You might be able to adjust it to 
become red-blue using the tint control. If 



not, you may have a problem in your TV, 
monitor, computer or, most likely if you are 
using one, your color video monitor driver 
circuit. 



• My Extended BASIC 64 K 4 F' board com- 
puter loses all color when I press Reset. 
Replacing the VDG chip did not help. 1 
damaged the "flying circuit" in the plastic 
tube while I was working on my computer. 
The colors I do get are now strange. This 
circuit is not shown in the schematic I have. 
Do you know the values of the components? 

Edwin J. Mullican 
Gulfport, MS 

The CoCo I 'F' Board is a particularly odd 
case, because Tandy went into production 
with a board that in most cases simply failed 
to produce artifact colors. They had to add 
a fix after production of the board; that is 
the thing you referred to as the "flying 
circuit." 

The flying circuit consists of a 33K ohm 
resistor, a 27-micro henry inductor (choke) 
and a 75-pico farad capacitor all hooked in 
series, with one end connected to Pin 33 of 
the VDG (the video clock line) and the other 
connected to the composite video input to 
the Aztec RF Modulator. This point can also 
be found on the circuit board as the junction 
of R45 (470 ohms) and R45 (1.5K ohms). 
The video clock signal can also be picked up 
at one end of R37 (10K ohms). 

Note that early models of the CoCo I l F 1 
board had a different sort of fix: Tandy 
merely soldered a 56K ohm resistor between 
Pin 2 and Pin 12 of the 1372 chip (U6). You 
might want to experiment with using resis- 
tors between 33K and 56K between pins 2 
and 12 of the 1372 chip. In your testing, be 
sure to solder the resistor directly to the chip. 
The test won't be valid if you use any kind 
of jumper clip cables. 



• I am interested in a quality printer that is 
both fast and does not produce "dotty- 
looking" characters. In general, I have not 
seen print quality that I like from less than 
a 2 4- wire print head. What do you recom- 
mend? I do not want to get involved in 
interfaces or DIP switch settings or changes 
in wiring. 

Dorothy Dow 
Jacksonville, FL 

Brands to look for are Toshiba and 
Fujitsu, both of which, in my opinion, make 
better high-end 24-wire print head printers. 
Some of the slower Toshibas are offered for 
under $600. 

There is no way to avoid having to set DIP 
switches on printers no matter what printer 
or computer you own. Under Disk basic, 
essentially all features of any printer except 



proportional spacing can be accessed using 
Telewriter or VIP Writer. Under OS-9, 
Stylograph allows use of proportional 
spacing options. 



• / own a Zenith 123 A monochrome mon- 
itor and a Mark Data Products video driver. 
Both work well on my CoCo. The Zenith is 
rated at 640 by 200 dots resolution, or 15 
MHz band width. I see other monitors 
comparably priced rated at 700 by 200 dots 
and 20 MHz. What is the best resolution the 
CoCo can handle? What do add-ons like the 
Word-Pak RS and the DISTO 80-column 
card do for the Co Cos resolution? 

Bill Condie 
Freehold, NJ 

All monochrome monitors have adequate 
resolution to display the CoCo's Hi-Res 
image of 256 by 192 pixels. Indeed, specifi- 
cations such as dot resolution and mega- 
hertz band width are not good indicators in 
determining if one composite monitor is 
better than another. You simply must com- 
pare monitors with your own eyes. 

Both the Word-Pak RS and the DISTO 
80-column card have separate video signal 
creation hardware that produces a higher 
resolution video signal for display of text 
(only) in an 80-column by 25-line format. 
The DISTO card has the advantage of 
supporting underline and boldface display, 
and the Word-Pak RS has the advantage of 
allowing a hacker to tinker with both its 
character set and its display parameters to 
match it to odd-ball monitors. Both draw 
their characters in a roughly 5 by 7 matrix 
on a 640 by 200 pixel resolution screen. 
Compare this with the 256 by 192 pixel 
matrix that is the maximum a normal CoCo 
can display. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

For quicker response time, your questions 
may also be posted in the FORUM section 
of rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. In 
FORUM, type ADD and address your ques- 
tions to the username MARTYGOOD- 
MAN. Marty is on most every evening to 
respond to FORUM messages, and other 
CoCo SIG members may also reply to 
questions posted in this public message area. 
Please be sure to leave your name and 
address in any FORUM questions, since 
those of wide interest will be selected for 
publication in this column. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 179 



COCO CONSULTATIONS 



Introducing a new Rainbow column . . . 

Remedies from 
the CoCo Clinic 



By Marty Goodma 



• / would like to upgrade my old (gray) 
CoCo to display lowercase characters and 
would like to know what type of VDG is 
used. Is it a new standard IC, and if so, what 
is the type number, or is it a custom MC- 
6847 specially made for Tandy? 

J.P.Schreur 
the Netherlands 

I suggest you purchase one of the lower 
kit adaptors commercially available. These 
are boards that utilize the ability of the old 
6847 to derive its character set from an 
external character generator EPROM. One 
is made by Green Mountain Micro of 
Roxbury, Vermont. It offers the advantage 
that you can reprogram the character gener- 
ator EPROM with your own character set 
of choice. 



• I need to purchase a color monitor. While 
referencing ads in rainbow I see that some 
monitors do not have a Hi-Res dot-matrix 
of 255 by 192 dots. How could this affect the 
CoCo display if the monitor matrix is 300 
by 300 dots, or 200 by 200 dots? Also, is there 
another VDG available for my CoCo that 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. 
Marty is the database manager of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 



would change the Hi- Res dot-matrix from 
255 by 192? 

Charles Stierhoff 
Dallas, TX 

Essentially, any make or model of com- 
posite color monitor will work fine on the 
CoCo. The ads that claim a given dot 
resolution merely refer to the maximum 
possible resolution the monitor can display. 
Thus, a monitor rated at 300 by 300 will 
nicely display the 256 by 192 CoCo Hi-Res 
screen. I do not believe there is a color 
monitor with resolution below 256 by 192. 



• I purchased a 16K standard BASIC CoCo 
2 and upgraded it to 64K ECB myself. I 
[later] purchased a second CoCo 2 l6Kand 
when I went to upgrade it to 64K ECB I 
found the PC board had changed. The PC 
board we have is Revision F. When I talked 
with the Radio Shack Computer Center they 
told me this board is [difficult] and costly to 
upgrade — the price is $120. You can 
purchase a CoCo 2 64 K ECB for about $150. 
The price to perform the upgrade does not 
make economic sense. Is there a solution? 

John Huth 
SCS, MI 

It would have helped if you had given the 
catalog number of the CoCo 2 you want to 
upgrade, but it sounds like an A or B model 
(number 26-3134A or 26-3134B). Inside this 
model are two (not eight) socketed RAM 
chips, usually flanked by two white single 
inline female connectors. Each of these chips 
(numbered 4416) has a total of 18 pins, not 
16 like the RAM chips in older CoCos. They 
are found more or less in the center of the 
circuit board. 



If your CoCo meets this descriptio: 
upgrading to 64K is both cheap and simpl 
First, purchase two 4464 RAM chips. (The; 
are available from Microprocessors Unlin 
ited of Beggs, Oklahoma, phone 918-26' 
4961, for roughly $4.50 per chip.) Remo> 
the two old 44 1 6 chips and replace them wit 
the 4464 chips. Look to the left and the froi 
(toward the keyboard) from the area wit 
the two RAM chips; you will spot tw 
jumper solder pads enclosed in a whit 
rectangular-like screen box drawn on th 
circuit board, labeled either J4 or 64K c 
both. Just connect those two points togethe 
(using a short piece of wire and a low-powe 
soldering iron) and your upgraae is coir 
plete. 



• When I turn on my Color Computer an* 
ask for the amount of available memory, i 
returns about 22 K (I have a 64K computer, 
What instruction do I give to obtain th 
most amount of memory? 

My typewriter is a Brother Compactroni 
60 and is computer-inter faceable. I /iav« 
contacted the manufacturer and they indi 
cate that it is fully compatible with the Colo, 
Computer. Unfortunately, its serial port ha 
12 pins. Do you know where I can get a 12 
pin male plug? 

Anthony Depalmi 
Plainfield, N. 

The BASIC operating system of the CoCc 
was only designed to use 32K of RAM. Tc 
use all 64K you need to write or buy appro- 
priate machine language programs, or use 
OS-9. Expanding available memory for use 
with Disk basic is virtually impossible 
because of the machine setup and the wa> 
basic was written in the ROMs. However, 
to get the most memory on a disk system, 



178 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



Protect Your Valuable Magazine Collection With . . . 




Each issue of THE RAINBOW is a vital resource that you 
will refer to again and again, to gain insights, to explore 
new areas of interest or simply to refresh your memory. So, 
you need to keep your copies of THE RAINBOW safe — in 
high-quality, vinyl binders that provide complete protec- 
tion. 

These distinctive red binders not only ensure that your 
rainbows stay in mint condition, but they showcase your 
collection as well. Each binder is clearly embossed with the 



DISTINCTIVE, 
DURABLE 
RAINBOW BINDERS 




magazine's name in gold lettering on both the front and the 
spine. They're a handsome addition to any room. 

They also make it possible for you to organize your work 
space and eliminate the clutter on a permanent basis. Youll 
spend more time on your CoCo and eliminate those 
frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two handsome binders, which hold a full 12 issues 
of THE RAINBOW, is only $13.50 (please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling). 



Special Discounts On Past Issues With This Offer 



To help you complete your collection of THE RAINBOW* 
we're offering a special discount on past issues with the 
purchase of one or more sets of binders. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues of 
THE RAINBOW at the same time you order your binders, you 
are entitled to $1 off each magazine, which normally sells 
for the single issue cover price. For an order form, please 
refer to our "Back Issue Information" page (check Table of 



Contents under departmental listings). Also with this offer, 
copies 6f the "Official And Compleat Index To THE 
RAINBOW" (a comprehensive index of rainbow's first three 
years, July 1981 through June 1984), usually priced at $150, 
may be purchased for only $1 with a set of binders. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest ypix order back issues 
now while supplies last. 



YES. Please send me set(s) of RAINBOW binders at $13.50 per two- 
binder set (plus $2.50 per set for shipping and handling). If your order is to be sent via U.S. Mail 
to a post office box or to another country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
U.S. currency only, please. 

Order one or more sets of binders and take advantage of these exciting offers: 

I also want to take advantage of a special savings of $1 off the single issue cover price for back 
issues with the purchase of a set of binders. (Minimum order of 6 magazines. An order form from 
a recent issue indicating the back issues you wish to receive should accompany this order.) 

I want to purchase the first three-year index to the rainbow (July 1981 through June 1984) at 
the special price of $1 (regular price $2.50) with my purchase of one or more sets of binders. 



Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, Prospect, KY 40059. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 



chived polls, go to the Topics section of 
the SIG. Jim archives older polls to 
allow users to create even more polls. 
Only 20 polls can be active at any given 
time. To vote on an active poll, type 
POLL from the CoCo SIG prompt. 

Jim has also been quite busy answer- 
ing Mail and Forum messages, as well 
as weeding out older Forum messages 
that no longer have any information 
value. It appears we have found a quick 
way to correspond with other CoCo 
enthusiasts. For the newcomers to the 
CoCo SIG, we ask that certain guide- 
lines be followed in sending messages. 
Questions and suggestions involving 
normal SIG operation should be sent to 
Jim Reed or me. This can be in either 
the Forum or via Mail, although we 
would like to see them in the Forum to 
keep them public. Questions about the 
database should be referred to Marty 
Goodman (MARTYGOODMAN) or 
Steve Bjork (6809ER). Any questions 
about the production of the rainbow 
should be sent to EDITORS and those 
concerning subscriptions should be sent 
to ORDERS. Any messages sent to 
EDITORS or ORDERS should be sent 
via the Mail section only, since they are 
not of general interest. 

Free SIG Time! 

We are pleased to announce the open- 
ing of a new section on our CoCo SIG. 
The section is titled Questions & Feed- 
back and is accessible from the main 
CoCo SIG menu. Selections offered in 
this new section include Feedback to Sig 
Staff, Order RAINBOWfest Tickets, 
Request for Free Upload Time and 
Trouble Report. 

The intent of the new section is to 
provide a quick method of obtaining 
help or services. To use this new feature 
just type QUE at the main CoCo SIG 
prompt. You will be presented with the 
menu of choices. Type the first three 
characters of the appropriate choice 
and then type READ. You will then be 
allowed to fill out a "form" that is 
simpler than typing your name. Just 
follow the prompts. 

To Jim Reed goes a big chunk from 
that pot-o -gold for all his perseverance 
(and late nights) working on getting this 
much-welcomed addition in operation! 



Next Month 

Next time I hope to continue our 
discussion of the database. Emphasis 
will be placed on uploading of files to 
our CoCo SIG. 



ics world. Paul Normand has given us a 
curious CHAIR- R- Us program, and 
Roger Bouchard (HARBIE) has up- 
loaded some striking animal images: in 
particular, a wildcat picture worth down- 
loading and examining. 

Ira Goldwyn (IRAG) recently arrived 
on the SIG with an immense number of 
graphics images. Most of these are car- 
toons or enhanced digitized pictures. His 
Famous Faces group includes W.C. 
Fields, Groucho Marx, Mr. Spock and 
(my favorite) Alfred E. Neuman. His 
Looney Tunes group includes Speedy, 
Tweety, Coyote, Elmer, Daffy and others 
of our friends. His cross-eyed Mona Lisa 
is an amusing bit of digitizer vandalism. 
I expect we'll be seeing more of Ira's 
material over the next few months. 

In the Product News section I have 
uploaded a 15K piece that describes 
nearly all I know [Editor's exclamation!] 
about 80-column cards for the CoCo. 
This is an exhaustive comparative review 
of all four 80-column cards made for the 
CoCo, with material for the novice and 
dedicated hardware hacker alike. This 
review has already been more popular in 
terms of download count in its first two 
weeks of existence than most other 
reviews that have been there for months, 
I also have uploaded a comprehensive 
review of the new Tandy Modem Pak for 
the CoCo. 

In the OS-9 database Kent Florian 
(DALEK) has given us the Dolphin 
Editor, a screen editor written in c. 
Denny Skala (DENNYSKALA) has 
provided a patch for function keys for 
Version 1.0 and Version 2.0. He has also 
given us an OS-9 driver for the J&R 
Banker 256/ 51 2K RAM upgrade. Allan 
H. Smith (LUTHER) has given us a 
driver for the Tandy Speech Sound Pak. 
(There are versions of this driver for both 
OS-9 Version 1.0 and Version 2.0.) 

We have a number of new games. Paul 
Normand has provided us with three new 
entries: Egyptian, Birdcreatures and 
Dicegame. The first two are "U-Zap-Em" 
sorts of games, Steve Maori has given us 
Drag. B AS, a drag race game. Finally, 
one of the authors of Graphic om and 
WEFAX decided to doodle with his 
forth system, and, as a little exercise, 
whipped out a simple version of that 
classic computer game Lunar Lander. 
This is in compiled forth (it is down- 
loaded and executed like any other 
binary program) and features very 
smooth graphics. A word of caution: 
This file is 27 K long! 

In the Music topic area, Ken Bragg 
(KILRCOCO) has submitted the first 
new music file we have seen in ages! The 
submission, Open Arms, is a darn good 
one. 

The CoCo SIG staff heartily thanks all 



members for their contributions to the 
database. 

A Look Back and a Look Forward 

Our database has been steadily grow- 
ing. The largest growth has been in the 
Graphics section, with the Utilities sec- 
tion close behind. Ira Goldwyn, a long- 
term CoCo BBS user, has amassed an 
immense library of Color Computer art, 
consisting of original art, cartoons and 
digitized pictures. He has contributed 
heavily to our Graphics database. Ira 
says he has over 2,000 CoCo art files in 
his library. I expect well be seeing quite 
a bit more from him. Soon, we expect to 
have the rainbow's "CoCo Gallery" 
pictures in the Graphics section, availa- 
ble to members without surcharge. 

The labors of our new OS-9 section 
leader, Steve Bjork, are beginning to be 
felt in the OS-9 database. OS-9 files are 
now promptly enabled. Steve has worked 
closely with some of the more recent 
contributors to improve their files. Ar- 
rangements are now in progress for 
software from the OS-9 users group to 
start appearing in our OS-9 library. And 
the "KISSable OS-9" program files from 
rainbow will soon be available in the 
OS-9 Data Library section, though ac- 
cessing those "KISSable OS-9" files will 
incur a $3.50 surcharge, as is the case with 
regular RAINBOW on tape material. 
Members will be alerted to this by a 
dollar sign ($) in the filename. 

Soon, I hope to find time to upload all 
of the WEFAX program material I have 
in my personal library, including a dozen 
or more graphics files of the documenta- 
tion for WEFAX, hand-drawn by the 
authors of WEFAX and Graphicom. 
Coming from these same folks will be an 
RTTY program to allow amateur radio 
operators to receive and transmit RTTY 
signals using the CoCo, and a Morse 
Code practice program that incorporates 
all of the latest ideas about how to 
properly learn the code and improve 
speed. Don Hutchison (DONHUTCHI- 
SON) will soon be uploading some useful 
schematics and associated documenta- 
tion for simple, rugged disk drive power 
supplies to the Hardware Hacking sec- 
tion. He and I have been working on 
these fo r the last few weeks, collaborating 
via Delphi Mail. I may also have time to 
upload some more font sets for Graphi- 
com. I plan to write some new product 
reviews, including a comparison of all 
available 256K RAM disk upgrades for 
the CoCo, and a comprehensive product 
review of the new DS 69 A video digitizer 
from Microworks, which is a most im- 
pressive product. 

— Marty 
(MARTYGOODMAN) 
Delphi CoCo SIG Database Manager 



1 76 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



Once you are in the file room and in 
>nt of the appropriate file cabinet, 
irt opening the drawers to see what's 
sre. Just type DIR to get a directory 
the various groups. Make sure to jot 
»wn any items you may want to down- 
ad. When the directory has finished 
se control-'O' to abort the output), 
pe RERD XXXX where "XXXX" is the 
ime of the group of files you want to 
e. You must READ a group before you 
n download it. 

What you should see now is a slew of 
formation about the group, such as 
e size, who submitted the files, what 
e files do and a list of the files in that 
oup. The last thing to appear on the 
reen is the ACTIDN> prompt. This is 
elphi's way of saying you can down- 
ad or list the file now. If you press 
^TER at this prompt, the information 
}out the next group in the directory is 
:nt to your screen. 

eady to Download 

To initiate an XMODEM download, 
'pe XM. You are prompted with: 
jpe three consecutive <Control- 
>'s to abort. 
K, receive! (text) 

In this case, the file is an ASCII file 
s indicated by "text" in the above 
xample. If the file is binary, "text" is 
eplaced by "blocked." At this point 
nitiate XMODEM receive on your 
srminal program. On Mikeyterm, this 
5 done by using CONTROL-'4\ 

The file should begin transfer into 
our computer. When transfer is com- 
pete, your terminal program prompts 
'ou. Save the file to tape or disk. It is 
vise to look at the contents of the buffer 
irst. If you can read each character in 
he buffer, the file should be saved as an 
\SCII file. If, however, the buffer 
contains what appears to be graphics 
characters and other "garbage," the file 
s in binary (not necessarily machine- 
anguage) and should be saved accord- 
ingly. 

To initiate an ASCII download, type 
DOW at the RCTION> prompt. Delphi 
responds with: 

3eady Press RETURN to begin: 

At this point, open the buffer on your 
communications software and press 
RETURN. As the file is transferred, you 
will see its contents scroll down the 
screen. Since binary files cannot be 
transferred in this manner, remember to 
save the file to tape or disk in ASCII. 

Final Notes on Downloading 

That's all there is to it! Once the file 



is saved, simply return to the commun- 
ications mode and continue having fun. 
If the group from which you down- 
loaded contains more than one file, you 
will probably want to get others, too. 
When you return to communications, 
Delphi will still be just "sitting" there. 
If you press ENTER, Delphi responds by 
starting a transfer of the next file in the 
group. If the group only contained one 
file, when you press ENTER, Delphi 
responds by sending the information for 
the next directory group to the screen. 
This is handy for downloading several 
consecutive files and groups. 

If there is more than one file in a 
particular group, you don't have to 



download the third file listed in the 
group, for example, just type XM 3 or 
DON 3 accordingly at the RCTI0N> 
prompt. 

To return to the database prompt for 
the database you are in, use CONTROL- 
4 Z\ To change to a different topic area, 
type SET XXX where "XXX" is the first 
three letters of the database area you 
want. 

If you have further questions, please 
direct them to Marty Goodman or me 
in Forum so that others may learn as 
well. 

On Other Items 

CoCo SIG Manager Jim Reed is busy 



download them all. If you only want to 



Database Report 

By Marty Goodman 

May, I uploaded a file to the 
I W% General topic area describing 
JL AMthe tragic loss of a GOES 
weather satellite because of a malfunc- 
tion in its Delta booster rocket Also 
present is a file on how to use DOT 
commands in messages to make them 
appear on the forum nicely formatted. 

Steve Bjork (6809ER) has contributed 
a random number generator in assembly 
language source code to our Source For 
6809 Assemblers topic area. Steve, one of 
the best known CoCo games pro- 
grammers has, over the last year, been 
producing a lot of code he has been 
placing in the public domain. His excel- 
lent Mouse utilities have been appearing 
in the pages of RAINBOW over the last 
couple of months. I have uploaded to the 
Source For 6809 Assemblers area the 
source code file for the MSI 9 SET form at 
program that allows a CoCo to format 
MS-DOS type disks. This code is highly 
commented, and while written to create 
a single-sided MS-DOS disk, can easily 
be modified to generate double-sided 
MS-DOS format. Art Flexser (ART- 
FLEXSER), author of ADOS and 
Peeper, has continued to upload more of 
his tutorials to the Source code section. 
Among them is a tutorial on how to 
program the PIAs of the CoCo to read 
the keyboard and an introduction to ML 
sorting. 

Our Utilities section has been expand- 
ing with new files from many members. 
Mark Kowit (TOBOR8) has uploaded 
Real Estate Management and Evaluation 
programs. Jim Manning (JIMBM) has 
uploaded a Homebudget program, and 
Bill Lippert (BEERBELLY) has given us 



archiving older polls. To see the ar- 

a delete disk file utility Milton Webb 
(MILTWEBB) contributed a disk utility 
program, and Paul N or m and (PAUL- 
NORMAND) has provided a program 
for cataloging video tapes (BETA. BA S). 
Chris Bergerson (CHRISB) donated a 
Disk Label Maker utility. 

In the Hardware Hacking topic area 
Steve Bjork has uploaded a utility for 
checking out the memory in a DISTO 
RAM Disk card. IVe uploaded an article 
on how to upgrade all models of CoCo 
2, and one discussing the use (and abuse) 
of high speed pokes on the CoCo. I also 
have uploaded a technical file for owners 
of the J&R Banker on how to fix the 
hardware so youll never have to disable 
the unit to run any CoCo program. This 
hardware fix cures the unit's problem of 
not working with programs that talk to 
the SAM using CLR instructions. Fi- 
nally, I have uploaded some alternate 
fonts for burning into 2716-1 EPROMs 
to improve the appearance of the char- 
acter set of the PBJ Wordpak-RS. In- 
cluded are utilities to create your own 
fonts. 

In the Graphics database, there is a 
staggering number of new and lovely 
uploads Stephan Macri (DR ACM AN) 
has given us a utility to convert the 
output of the C64 Doodle converter into 
CoCo Max file format. Mark Kowitt has 
provided us with a beautiful enhanced 
digitized image from the movie- The- 
Color Purple: a striking silhouette of 
Celie. Mark has also given us a whole 
group of digitized faces entitled Strange 
Faces, which further establishes digitized 
images as a true art form. Keith W. Smith 
(UGLY) has provided us with a poster 
showing some of Murphy's Laws, and 
Loren J, Howell (XENOS) has given us 
a CGP-115 dump program. Loren has 
also uploaded two pictures of butterflies, 
one of a Monarch and one of a Cyrus 
Morphus. I am impressed with the detail 
and accuracy of these images, and with 
their sheer beauty. Loren appears to b0 
a budding Audubon of the CoCo graph- 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 75 



DELPHI BUREAU 



Using the CoCo SIG 



By Cray Augsbur 

Rainbow's CoCo SIGo 
User Name: RAINBOWMA 



Let's take a trek into the workings 
of the database on the CoCo 
SIG, and while we're on this 
voyage, we'll look in detail at how to 
download and upload files while on 
Delphi. However, we first need to 
become more familiar with the funda- 
mentals. 

File Formats 

A file is a group of related characters 
and symbols. Generally the term "file" 
refers to a program, an article or a set 
of data. There are two different formats 
for the storage of information in files: 
ASCII and binary. Binary files are 
sometimes referred to as compressed or 
tokenized. An ASCII file contains 
readable characters, while a binary file 
contains characters that represent the 
zeroes and ones the computer works 
with. 

ASCII is the preferred format for text 
files or articles. It is sometimes best to 
store BASIC programs in the ASCII 
format. Incidentally, we request all 
BASIC files for uploading be stored in 
ASCII. Binary is used for the storage of 
tokenized BASIC files, machine language 
programs, graphics and music files. 
Infrequently, text files are stored in 
binary format. 

File Transfers 

There are two distinct methods of 
uploading and downloading files. These 
are the ASCII transfer method and 
XMODEM transfer. While the ASCII 
transfer can only be used to transfer 
ASCII files, XMODEM can be used to 
transfer both ASCII and binary files. 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
assistant and has an associate's degree 
in electrical engineering. He and his 
wife, Ruth Ann, have two children and 
live in Louisville, Kentucky. His user- 
name on Delphi is RAIN BOW MAG. 



ASCII transfer is simply the trans- 
mission or reception of a character-by- 
character image of a file. Since the 
ASCII code uses only the lowest-order 
seven bits of each byte, control codes 
and other special information (binary 
code) cannot be transmitted in this way. 
ASCII transfer involves no automatic 
error detection, so it is frequently 
unreliable for the transfer of informa- 
tion. 

The XMODEM protocol transfers 
complete bytes and, therefore, allows 
the transfer of binary information and 
control codes. When a file is being 
transferred via XMODEM from a host 
computer to a remote computer, the 
information is sent in groups (blocks) of 
128 bytes rather than a continuous 
stream. This allows for error detection 
in the transfer. 

Once a block is transferred, the host 
computes a checksum value based on 
the information contained in the block. 
The remote computer also does this, 
and sends the value back to the host. 
The host compares the computed values 
and, if they are the same, transfers the 
next block in the file. If the values do 
not match, the host knows the sent 
block was not correct and resends the 
block. Most XMODEM terminal pro- 
grams allow the host to send a correct 
block up to 10 times, if necessary. This 
allows for the transfer of error-free 
ASCII or binary files. It is for these 
reasons we suggest you use a terminal 
program that includes XMODEM ca- 
pability. If you do not have access to 
one, you can download Mikeyterm 
from the data communications data- 
base via ASCII transfer. Mikeyterm is 
an easy-to-use XMODEM terminal 
program that supports several system 
configurations including tape-based 
systems. 

Database Organization 

The CoCo SIG database can be 



viewed as a room full of file cabine 
There are 16 file cabinets; one for ea 
topic area of the database. Each cabir 
contains several drawers (we call the 
groups on Delphi.) Each drawer c. 
have one or more folders (files, 
programs) in it. 

Type DAT to get the database for t 
CoCo SIG. You will see a TOPIC 
prompt; enter the name of the topic ar< 
you want to peruse (see Table 1.) R 
member, Delphi allows you to enter tJ 
first few unique characters in place 
the entire name. A shorter method is 
include the topic name on the commai 
line with DPT. For instance, at the CoC 
SIG prompt type DAT GAM to enter tl 
games database. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Table 1 

Topic Areas of the 
CoCo SIG Database 

General Information 
Info on RAINBOW 
BASIC Programming 
OS-9 

Source For 6809 Assemblers 
Help 

Utilities & Applications 
Product Reviews & 
Announcements 
Hardware Hacking 

RAINBOW ON TAPE 

Games 

Data Communications 
Graphics 
Managers Only* 
Music & Sound 
Preview* 



* These areas are accessible only by 
SIG staff. Managers Only is used for 
the storage of suggestions by the 
staff. Preview is the area where new 
submissions wait before they are 
moved into the public areas. 



174 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



59J3 IFX$="@"THEN77j3 

595 X=ASC(X$) -64:IFX<1 OR X>PC T 

HEN585 

6J3J3 IFK(X)=1THEN615 

6J35 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY, BUT IT I 

S";Z$; :NW=NW+l 

610 GOT062j3 

615 PRINT: PRINT "YES! THE ANSWER 

IS"Z$; :NC=NC+1 
62J3 NT=NT+1:IF NT<lj3 THEN 630 
625 GOSUB785:NT=l 
63J3 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN63p 
635 IFX$="@"THEN77j3 
64j3 IFX$=CHR$(13)THEN37p 
645 GOT063J3 

65J3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" HOW WOULD Y 
OU WRITE OUT THE FOLLOWING D 

IGIT ?" 

655 PRINT: PRINT" => »;Z$ 

66j3 TM$=R$:TX=RND(2) :IFTX=2THEN6 

7J3 

665 D$(1)="A) "+R$:D$(2)="B) "+A 

L$ : AN$="A" : GOT0675 

67J3 D$(2)="B) "+R$:D$(1)="A) "+A 

L$:AN$=»B" 

675 GOSUB68j3:GOT0725 
68j3 PRINT: F0RY=1T02:R$=D$(Y) 
685 T=LEN(R$):IF T<=3pTHEN71j3 
69J3 FORI=3J3TO0STEP-1:IFMID$(R$,I 
,1)=" "THEN705 

695 IFMID$(R$,I,l)="-"THEN7j35 
7j3j3 NEXTI:GOTO710 

7J35 L$=" "+LEFT$(R$,I) :R$=RIGHT$ 

(R$,T-I) :PRINTL$:GOT0685 

710 PRINT" "R$ 

715 IFY=2THENRETURN 



720 PRINT :NEXTY 

725 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="A"THEN745 

73)3 IFX$="B"THEN745 

735 IFX$="@"THEN77J3 

740 GOT0725 

745 PRINT@160, ; : FORI=1TO320 : PR 

INT" ";: NEXT: PRINT© 192,"" 7 

750 IFX$=AN$THENPRINT" CORRECT! 

THE ANSWER IS:":NC=NC+1 

755 IFX$OAN$THENPRINT" SORRY! T 

HE ANSWER IS:":NW=NW+1 

760 D$ ( 1) =TM$ : D$ ( 2 ) =" " : GOSUB68 0 

765 GOTO620 

770 CLS : PRINT@101 , "YOU TRIED"NC+ 
NW" PROBLEMS &": PRINT© 165 , "ANSWER 
ED"NC" CORRECTLY" 

775 PRINT@229, "WHILE DOING "NW"WR— 
ONG." 

780 GOSUB785:GOT0825 

785 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

790 MS=INT(NC/NQ*100) 

795 IF MS<70 THEN RR=RR-1 

800 IF RR<0 THEN RR=1 

8J35 IF MS>95 THEN RR=RR+1 

81J3 IF RR>5 THEN RR=5 

815 ON RR GOSUB155, 160, 165, 170,1 

75 

820 RETURN 

825 PRINT@293, "YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 
%." 

830 PRINT (§35 7, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 

C) ?"; 

835 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 
840 IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 
845 IFX$="C"THEN370 
850 GOT0835 



PRINTERS!!! 

HgWl Star Micronics NX- 10 s 295 

Okidaca 192 (Parallel) J 370 

Okidata 192 (Serial) M2S 

Okidaca 182 J 240 

Silver Reed 550 (Daisy Wheel) $ 395 

Silver Reed 400 (Daisy Wheel)(Par. or Serial) $ 200 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo and IBM upon request. 

*I5 off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat Id!! 

SP-2 INTERFACE for EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch (*5°° extra) frees parallel port 
for use with other computers 

■ M9 9S (plus *3°° shipping) 

SP-3 INTERFACE for MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem /printer switch — no need for Y-cables or 
plugging/unplugging cables 

■ *64 9S (plus J3 00 shipping) 

Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS 

ALL 1/2 HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) $ 235 

Drive 0,1 (addressed as 4 drives! 

All above complete with HDS controller, cable, & drive 

in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives $ I09 

Dual Vi Height Case w/Power Supply *49 

Double Sided Adapter $ 2S 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions $ 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes *32& J 3s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: $ 5/drive or power supply, $ I0 max. 

Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft. — M0. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft.--*20. 
Other cables on request. (Add $ 3 00 shipping) 

C P.O. Box 293 
M Raritan, NJ 08869 

- N (201) 722-1055 

R ENGINEERING 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 73 



$) :L$=L$+A$(P) 
340 RETURN 

345 W=LEN(Z$) :F0RI=1T0W: IFMID$ (Z 

$,I,1)="."THEN355 

350 NEXTI _ 
355 D$=LEFT$(Z$,I) :E$=RIGHT$(Z$, 

W-I) :A=VAL(D$) :GOSUB265:R$=L$+"A 
ND " :Q=LEN (E$) :A=VAL(E$) :GOSUB26 
5 : AL$=R$+L$+C$ (Q+l) :R$=R$+L$+C$ ( 
Q) :L$=»» 

36J3 IF LEFT$(R$,9)="ZER0 AND "TH 
EN R$=RIGHT$(R$,LEN(R$)-9) 
3 65 RETURN 

370 CLS : F=RND ( G ) :L=RND(H) 
375 Q$=" ":PQ$="":IF F= J 0THEN4j35 
38j3 F0RY=1T0 F : K=RND (10) -1 : IF K= 
j3 AND F=l THEN K=l 

385 K$=STR$(K) :K$=RIGHT$(K$ / 1) :Q 

$=Q$+K$:NEXTY 

39j3 IF VAL(Q$)=J3 THEN37J3 

395 IF VAL(LEFT$(Q$,2) )=J3 THEN 3 7 

% 

400 IF L=0 THEN430 

405 Q$=Q$+" .":F0RY=1T0 L-l : K=RND 
(10)-1:IFK<4THEN K=0:GOTO415 
410 K=RND(10)-1 

415 K$=STR$(K) :K$=RIGHT$(K$,1) :P 
Q$=PQ$+K$:NEXTY 

420 K=RND(9) :K$=STR$(K) :K$=RIGHT 
$(K$,1) :PQ$=PQ$+K$ 
425 Z$=Q$+PQ$:GOSUB345 
430 IF DM=2THEN650 
435 CLS 

440 IF DM=0THEN455 

445 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER A DIGIT W 
HICH REPRESENTS THE FOLLOWING W 
RITTEN NUMBER. " : PRINT 
450 GOTO460 

455 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" WHICH DIGIT 



BELOW REPRESENTS THE FOLLOWI 
NG WRITTEN NUMBER ?": PRINT 
460 T=LEN(R$):IF T<=30THEN485 
465 FORI=30TO0STEP-1:IFMID$(R$,I 
,1)=" "THEN480 

470 IFMID$(R$ / I,1)="-"THEN480 
475 NEXTI:GOT0485 

480 L$=" "+LEFT$(R$ / I) :R$=RIGHT$ 

(R$ / T-I) :PRINTL$:GOTO460 

485 PRINT" "R$ 

490 IF DM=0THEN510 

495 PRINT: PRINT" => " ;:LINEIN 

PUTZZ$ 

500 IF VAL(ZZ$)=VAL(Z$)THEN615 
505 GOTO605 

510 P(1)=VAL(Z$) :P(4)=P(1)*10:P( 
3)=P(1) *10/100 

515 V=P(1)-INT(P(1) ) :V=V*10/100: 
P(2)=INT(P(1) )+V 

520 IF LEFT$(PQ$ / 1)O"0"THEN530 
525 TT=LEN(PQ$) :QT$=RIGHT$ (PQ$,T 
T-l) :QL$=Q$+QT$:P(2)=VAL(QL$) 
530 P$(l)=Z$:FORI=2T04:P$(I)=STR 
$(P(I) ) :NEXT:P$(5)=P$(l)+"0" 
535 FORY=lTO PC:IF RIGHT$ (P$ (Y) , 
3)<>"001"THEN550 

540 RT=LEN(P$(Y) ) -l:FORJ=RT TO 1 

STEP-1:IF MID$(P$(Y) / J / 1)="0"THE 
NNEXTJ 

545 P$(Y)=LEFT$(P$(Y) ,J) 

550 NEXTY 

555 FORY=lTO PC 

560 K=RND(PC):IF L(K) =1THEN560 
565 L(K)=1: K(Y)=K:NEXT 
570 FORI=1TO5:L(I)=0: NEXTI 
575 PRINT 

580 FORI=lTO PC : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) ; CHR$ 
(64+1);") " ;P$ (K(I) ) :NEXT 
585 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN585 



Robotize Your Co Co with EMC 



Our unique expansion hardware enables you to create a versatile automated control system. 
All EMC boards come fully assembled end computer tested. 

Model 1 00 Parallel Port (PIA) $53.85 

Features: Two 8 Bit Bi-Directional Porta, 4 Control Lines, Sample Software Provided 

Model 200 Buss Driver $83.75 

Features: TTL, Fanout of 10, 2 Card Slots and Flexible Ribbon Buss Provided. 
Additional Connectors Available. 



Model 400 Mother Board 

Features: 4 Slots, 5 Gold Pin Connectors, PC Board, for all Addr. Decoded Boards. 

Model 500 Motor Control Amp 

Features: TTL Compatable, LED Direction Indicators, Drives DC Motors 500 MA 
Max at 1 2 VDC. 



Purchases Add $3.00 Shipping & Handling with Check • Shipping is FREE 
with Money Orders • Florida residents add 5% sales tax • Send for 
FREE Brochure • For Information Call (813) 896-8295 



$54.75 
$43.70 





RAINtOW 

Hit 



MODEL 200 





_ IfUlllTHil! 

MODEL 100 




MODEL 500 

MODEL 400 

ELECTRONIC MOTION CONTROL 

P.O. Box 17271 • ARPT Station 
Clearwater, Florida 33520 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



1 72 THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



175 G=4 : H=4 : PC= 5 : RETURN 

180 PRINT@453, " (D)IGIT OR (W) RI 
TTEN "; 

185 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="D"THEN2J3J3 
190 IFX$="W"THEN DM=2:GOT023 5 
195 GOT0185 



L9j3 IFX$="W 
195 GOT0185 
200 PRINT@453," (S) ELECT OR (I)N 
PUT " ; 

?=INKEY$ : IFX$="S"THEN22J3 
?X$="I"THEN225 
)T02j35 



205 X$--^ 

210 IFX$=-j.-inr,JN- 
215 GOT02J35 
22j3 DM=J3:G0T023J3 
225 DM=1 
23j3 CLS 

235 K=RND( -TIMER) 

24J3 DATAONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, 
SIX, SEVEN , EIGHT , NINE , TEN , ELEVEN , 
TWELVE , THIRTEEN , FOURTEEN , FIFTEEN 
, SIXTEEN , SEVENTEEN , EIGHTEEN , NINE 
TEEN , TWENTY , THIRTY , FORTY , FIFTY , S 
IXTY 

245 DATASEVENTY, EIGHTY, NINETY, HU 
NDRED , THOUSAND , TENTHS , HUNDRETHS , 
THOUSANDTHS , TEN-THOUSANDTHS , HUND 



TH$=TH$+" ":A$(2J3)=B$(2) 
255 F0RI=1T05 :READC$ (I) :NEXT 
260 GOT037J3 
2 65 L$="" 

270 IFA=J3THENL$="ZER0 " :G0T034J3 
275 N$=STR$(A) :W=LEN(N$) :N$=RIGH 
T$ (N$,W-1) :W=W-1 
280 ON W GOTO320,32J3,3J35,30J3 
285 P$=LEFT$ (N$,2) :P=VAL(P$) :IFP 
>20 THEN295 

290 L$=L$+A$ (P)+TH$:W=3 :N$=RIGHT 
$(N$,3) .-GOT03J35 

295 P$=LEFT$(N$,1) :P=VAL(P$) :L$= 
L$+B$(P) :P$=MID$(N$,2,1) :P=VAL(P 
$ ) : L$=L$+A$ ( P) +TH$ : N$=RIGHT$ (N$ , 
3) :G0T03J35 

300 P$=LEFT$(N$,1) :P=VAL(P$) :L$= 

L$+A$(P)+TH$:N$=RIGHT$(N$, 3) :W=3 

305 P$=LEFT$(N$,1) :P=VAL(P$) :IF 

P=J3THEN315 

310 L$=L$+A$(P)+H$ 

315 W=LEN(N$) :N$=RIGHT$(N$,W-1) 

32J3 P$=RIGHT$(N$,2) :P=VAL(P$) :IF 

P>20 THEN3 35 

325 L$=L$+A$(P) ■ 
330 GOT034J3 

335 P$=LEFT$(N$,1) :P=VAL(P$) :L$= 
L$+B$(P) :P$=RIGHT$(N$,1) :P=VAL(P 



ADOS 



ENHANCED, EPROM-ABLE 
DISK BASIC 



Now, you can supercharge Basic with an impressive array of extra features 
WITHOUT sacrificing compatibility! ADOS Is compatible with virtually 100% of 
commercial software. Customizing utilities are provided to allow user-defined 
command abbreviations, baud rate, step rate, tracks per disk (35 or 40), support of 
double-sided drives, and more. After customizing ADOS, you can have it burned Into 
an EPROM that plugs into the Disk Basic ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a 64K 
disk utility. {EPROM + burning will cost about $20-we provide information 
concerning how you can have this done.) Features include: • repeat and edit of the 
last direct-mode command » 26 definable control-key abbreviations • automatic line- 
number prompts • DOS command • lowercase command entry (a fine complement to 
a lowerHit or PBJ WordPak) • COPY (filename) to (drive number) • AE error override 
option • RAM command (64K) • RUNM command • text echoing to printer • ML 
monitor • text file scan • enhanced directory • error trapping • hi res text utility 
included (42. 51, or 64 characters per line) 

"I COULD NOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THAT WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS." 

THE RAINBOW, December 1984 
"I LOVE ADOS! ...A GENUINELY FIRST RATE PRODUCT." 

Color Micro Journal, February 1985 
"I WONT PART WITH MY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING . . . NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS.' 

Hot CoCo.May 1985 

Disk . . S27.95 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 



Monitor machine-language programs AS THEY ARE RUNNING! Peeper actually 
timeshares with the target program, giving FULL CONTROL as ML programs run. 
Switch instantly between watching regular program output and Peeper's trace of 
registers and stack on screen or printer. Inspect memory in any of 26 display modes. 
Execution speed can be varied from full speed to the barest crawl, or halted entirely, 
as programs run. Single-stepping, breakpoints, memory or register examine/change. 
Relocatable, supports 64K use. (16K required) See February '85 review. 
Disk . . $23.95 Tape , . $21 .95 Assembler sourct listing . . . Add 3.00 



THING 



DRIVE 



Fastape allows cassette I/O at 3000 baud -TWICE NORMAL SPEED. It uses the high- 
speed (POKE 65495,0) mode, and makes it convenient to stay in this mode 
throughout. Features automatic adjustment of cassette and printer parameters when 
speod mode is changed. Control-key functions for many Basic commands and for 
changing speed modes. Compatible with all file types, and can be used with 
Telewriter 64 and many other tape utilities. (16K required) See July '83 review. 



"Tip*. . . U1M 




r phi CCI| 
















Jk. 



SPECTROSYSTEMS 



No delay on personal checks 
\ PiHMhi 1 ,igtl 00 *hinp«iK} >ii 



-»t g =zL\ 11111 N. Kendall Drive, 

:>7^^^5~^" Suite A 108 
/ V — Miami, Florida 33176 

(305) 274-3899 ,'Jay or 
no ciedil i.dids or CUD £ Fvo 



COLOR BHNKBOOK $19.95 

BUSINESS BANKBOOK 

SVSTEM ONE 

FOR ONE DISK DRIUE 

$49.95 

SVSTEM Till 0 

FOR TWO DISK DRIUES 

$49.95 



SUPEROISK UTILITY 



SEE REVIEW IN MAY 'SG 
RAINBOW PAGE 131 



$ 9.95 



$ 9.95 



RflDIOLOG 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY '*& 
RAINBOW PAGE £09 

CODE PRBCTICE $ 9.95 

ORDERS OR INFORMATION 

CALL 1-800-628-2828 
EMTENSION 552 

ALL PROGRAMS INCLUDE MANUALS * 
REQUIRE 3£K AND 1 DISK DRIVE. 
ADD J£.00 SHIPPING £ HANDLING 
FLORIDA RES. ADD SALES TAX 



SUNR'ISE 



SOFjTilllflR'E 



RAINBOW 

CCTTIFlCJkTtOH 



8901 NUI 26 ST DEPT R 
SUNRISE, FL 33322 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 171 



must enter the correct digit number to 
get a correct response. Keep in mind 
that the number entered must not have 
any commas in it. After a response has 
been given, you may press '(§)' for the 
score, but not during the input part. 
Otherwise, the '@' symbol is interpreted 
as an incorrect response. 

When you finally go to the score card, 
either press 'C to continue, *Y' to run 
the program again, or 6 N' to end the 
program. 

The program should fit easily into a 
16K CoCo, but if you have any doubts, 
PCLEAR1 first. You could also include 
the speed-up POKE as one of the lines, 
but quite honestly, the program runs 
rapidly enough as it is. 

A Few Words About Title Maker 

I have gotten letters from a few 
people who have had difficulty with the 
CoCo Title Maker from several months 
ago. While I don't have the time for 



individual replies, this should cover 
most of the concerns. 

First, some have written and asked if 
there were any mistakes in the listing. 
No, the listing is without error. Some of 
you may have made typing errors when 
keying it in. When in doubt, subscribe 

to RAINBOW ON TAPE. 

Some have said they get a ?DS error 
when trying to reload the BASIC pro- 
gram created by Title Maker. This 
happens only if you have left out a 
semicolon somewhere in the original 
listing. Recheck your typing. If that 
doesn't work, you could always load the 
new BASIC program into a word proces- 
sor like Color Scripsit. First try loading 
the program into BASIC. If you get the 
?DS error, it means you have a direct 
statement without a line number. List 
what has loaded to see in what line the 
problem appears. Then load the BASIC 
program into the word processor, and 
remerge the lines where this error oc- 



curs. Save the result and then relo 
into BASIC. 

Others say they have gotten the ?I 
error when trying to load the new BAS 
program from disk. This only happe 
if you analyze the screen and then sa 
the screen to disk in machine languaj 
What happens is that the machii 
language screen is saved with a /Bf 
extension. Use RENRME to give th 
machine language listing a /BIN exte 
sion, reload it into the Title Maker, ar 
then analyze it to disk. This should sob 
this very rare quirk. 

As a rule of thumb, it is better to sa 1 
first, and then analyze second. 

Conclusion 

I hope this fourth installment in t\ 
Life Skills series proves valuable to yc 
whether you are a teacher or ha\ 
youngsters in the family. Keep thinkin 
up those ideas, and 111 see what I ca 
come up with. See you next month. [ 



4/Z 



180 . 
270 . 
355 . 
450 . 
540 . 
640 . 
750 . 
END 



250 
188 
.68 
230 
156 
240 
156 
.29 



The listing: LIFE5KL4 

1)3 REM************************** 
15 REM* LIFE SKILLS MATH DRILL * 

* 
* 
* 
* 



20 REM* 
25 REM* 
30 REM* 
35 REM* 
40 REM* 



WRITTEN NUMBERS 
BY FRED B.SCERBO 
60 HARDING AVE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1986 



7, ,116,112, ,26,, 24, 21,, 22, 16,, 26 
, ,26, , ,26, ,21, , 2)3 

85 DATA117, , , 117, , ,123,122,80,11 
7,115,114, , ,27,19,18,21,22, , , ,26 
,,26, ,,26, ,21,19,19 
90 DATA117, , ,117, , ,122,120, ,117, 
112, ,,,, ,26,21,20,18, , ,26, ,26, , , 
26 , , , ,21 

95 DATA117, ,122,117, , ,122, , ,117, 
,113, , ,26, ,26,21,16,20,18, ,26, ,2 
6,21, ,26,21,21, ,21 

100 DATA119,115 / 122,119,114,113, 
123,112, ,119,115,119, , ,27,19,26, 
23,18, ,27,17,27,17,27,2 3,17,27,2 
3,21,19,23 

COMPUTER MATHDR 



45 REM************************** 
50 CLEAR800:DIMA$(20) ,B$(9) ,C$(5 
) ,P(5) ,P$(5) ,K(5) ,L(5) ,D$(2) 
55 CLS0:FORI=1TO32 :PRINTCHR$ (188 

) ; : NEXT 

60 FORI=1TO192:READA:IFA=0THENA= 
16 

65 PRINTCHR$ (A+128) ; :NEXT 

70 F0RI=1T032:PRINTCHR$(179) ;:NE 

XT 

75 DATA125,120,80,125,120,116,12 
6,124,122,125,124, 125, , ,30,28,26 
,29,, 16, 30, 20, 30, 20, 30, 16, 20, 30, 
,21,28,29 

80 DATA117, , ,117, , ,122,80,120,11 



WRITTEN NUMBE 



BY FRED B.SCER 



COPYRIGHT (C) 1 



PRINT@453," SKILL LEVEL (1 



ii • 



105 PRINT@293," 
ILL " ; 

110 PRINT@325," 
RS " ; 

115 PRINT@357," 
BO " ; 

120 PRINT@389," 
986 
125 
-5) 

130 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN130 
135 RR=VAL(X$) :IFRR<1THEN130 
140 IF RR>5THEN130 

145 ON RR GOSUB155, 160, 165, 170, 1 
75 

150 GOTO180 

155 G=2 : H=l : PC=2 : RETURN 
160 G=2 : H=2 : PC=3 : RETURN 
165 G=3:H=3:PC=3: RETURN 
170 G=3 : H=4 : PC=4 : RETURN 



170 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



ware 



Use your CoCo, your 8-bit dot addressable graphics 
printer and the CoCo Calligrapher to create beautiful 
signs, invitations, flyers, greeting cards, diplomas, cer- 
tificates, awards and love letters. 

The original Calligrapher letters are 36 points (1/2 inch) 
high and variably spaced. It includes an easy-to-use , 
menu-oriented program and these three typestyles: 



Cartoon 



Old English 

Gay Nineties 

Gey Nineties 

The CoCo Calligrapher requires 32K ECB. 
Tape $24.95/Disk $29.95 



ADDITIONAL TYPESTYLES 

These tapes of additional typestyles are available for 
$19.95 each. They can be easily moved to disk. The 
original Calligrapher program is required. 

Tape 1 - Reduced, Reversed, and Reduced-Reversed 
versions 



Old English 



Gay Nineties 



Cartoon 



u tm<<* t; tic t dsbafecdc 



All typestyles on Tapes 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 include Stan- 
dard (1/2 inch), Reversed, Reduced, and Reduced- 
Reversed unless otherwise noted. 



Tape 2: Broadway/Old Style 
IBroaduay D|t|$fy| 



C 



Tape 3: Business/Antique 



Business t&«f iqtte 



These disks of additional typestyles are 
available for $49.95 each. 

Disk 1 - all type styles on Tapes 1 , 2 and 3. 
Disk 2 - all type styles on Tapes 4, 5 and 6. 

Tape 4: Wild West/Checkers 

Wild West Cfietter 



Tape 5: Star 



Hebrew 



tars m^E? 



Victorian (Standard and Reverse only) 

eicTcrf em 

Tape 6: Block/Computer 

Block 

CompuTEPi 



©Ife ®^-9 Oklligraplier. 



$39.95 

Requires OS-9 Version 01.01.00 and a dot matrix print- 
er. The OS-9 Calligrapher reads a standard input text 
file which contains text and formatting directives to pro- 
duce standard utput for printer or disk. You can specify 
which font to use; centering; left, right or full justification; 
line fill; narrow mode; margin; line width; page size; 
page break and indentation. 



These disks of additional typestyles are available for 
$49.95 each. They are not compatible with the CoCo 
Calligrapher typestyles or program. OS-9 typestyle 
disk must be used with the OS-9 Calligrapher. 

Disk 1 - OS-9 version of all type styles on Tapes 1 , 2 and 

3. 

Disk 2 - OS-9 version of all type styles on Tapes 4, 5 and 
6. 



Dealer and author inquiries are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 11932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
421-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS only. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

1710 N. 50th Ave. 
Hollywood, Florida 33021 
(305) 981-1241 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Add $1.50 per program for postage and 
handling. Florida residents add 5% sales tax. 
COD orders are welcome. CIS orders EMAIL 
to 70405, 1374. No refunds or exchanges. 



vka 



level of the material if the work pre- 
sented is either too easy or too difficult 
for the user. 

To make this program more adapta- 
ble, I have limited the basic keywords 
to only those found in 16K Color BASIC. 
I have also intentionally left out any 
keywords which are not found in the 
MC-10 Color BASIC language such as 
ELSE or STRINGS. MC-10 users should 
change the value in Line 235 (235 
K = RND ( -TIMER )) to 235 K=RND(- 
9999) or some other number. You may 
want to insert this value in the middle 
of Line 185, too, if you want to make 
the program truly random on the MC- 
10. 

The first task I encountered in creat- 
ing this program was to write an algo- 
rithm (set of program commands) to 
take a number and translate it to its 
written form. This requires storing the 
names of the numbers in string arrays 
and combining them to create the cor- 
rect written equivalent. 

Naturally, we can't store all the 
possible written numbers; our program 
would be gigantic. We want to store 
only those root parts to be combined as 
needed. For example, we dont save a 
string as sixty-three but combine the 
strings for sixty and three to form our 
answer. Therefore, the DATA statements 
contain all our possible written roots. 

The next trick is to devise a way to 
create multiple-choice answers for a 
randomly generated number. However, 
since we need to deal with our numbers 
in their string form, a strange bug in 
BASIC caused me many hours of head 
scratching. It seems that every now and 
then, if we are dealing with STR$ and 
the VAL(X$) commands, basic decides 
to add a useless decimal tail to our 
number. Therefore, our string number 
of 23.56 may end up appearing as the 
mutant form 23.560001 when displayed 
on the screen. This causes great confu- 
sion to our user, so I had to find a way 
to chop off this tail whenever it appears. 

After some trial and error, I was able 
to come across a set of lines to do just 
that. You may notice that the com- 
mands to create and analyze the 
numbers and strings are longer than 
necessary and may cover circumstances 
which our random numbers may not 
require. This was necessary in order to 
make the algorithm work. 

These lines soon expanded into a full- 
blown program of 170 program lines. 
Funny how a simple idea can be ex- 
panded to such a degree. These are the 



steps we must take, however, in order 
to cover all the circumstances we want 
our program to deal with. 

The earliest version of this listing 
incorporated this CPL concept only if 
the student checked his progress. Since 
my recent programs have allowed the 
user to check progress, then continue, 
I have found many students will check 
their progress every two minutes. I felt 
this would be a way to discourage that 
practice by having the difficulty level 
increase if the score was above 95 
percent, or decrease if it was lower than 
70 percent. 



This did not prove suitable in cases 
where the student did not check the 
progress by pushing the *@' key. There- 
fore I included a routine to check the 
progress, without displaying it, every 
ten problems. If you want to change the 
minimum and maximum scores which 
trigger the change, alter the values of 70 
and 95 in lines 795 and 805. The variable 
'MS' stands for the Math Score for the 
program at that point. 

The result of these line changes is that 
the student can be using the program, 
reviewing the material, and the program 
will vary the skill level to match the 
student's ability. Thus, if a student is left 
on autopilot, (which I do not advise), 
there is less likelihood of wasting time 
on unsuitable material 

If our program generates a number to 
be identified and has to create multiple 
choice answers, it usually generates 
them by moving the decimal place to the 
left or right. Some students noticed a 
pattern in my earliest version so I later 
included commands to break this pat- 
tern. Therefore, if a zero appears in the 
tenths place, one of the multiple choice 
answers will extract the zero. This 
allows us a truly random creation of 
multiple choice responses. This extrac- 
tion occurs in about half of our cases. 

One option I have avoided is having 
the user enter a written number to 
match a number in digits. This would 
cause great confusion as the user might 
include an extra space or misspell one 
of the root words. For example, if an 



answer is one hundred and twenty-on 
hundreths, but was entered as one 
hundred and twenty one hundreths, i 
would be marked as incorrect. This onl; 
frustrates our student. 

Recently I was presenting some of m; 
earlier educational programs to a grouj 
of teachers in a private school when on 
of them expressed concern over m; 
program's use of the word Wrong whei 
an incorrect answer was used. Shi 
asked, "Couldn't you say Sorry instea( 
of Wrong? Wrong sounds so negative. 
Therefore, I have started using Sorn 
when an incorrect answer is entered. 



Using the Program 

On running the program, our Lift 
Skills title card appears. I have tried t( 
use a different color scheme with eacl 
one. You are asked to select a skill leve 
from one to five with one being th< 
easiest level. If a higher level is selected 
it continues to select problems from ar 
easier level as well in order to allow foi 
greater variety of selections. 
Your next choice is digit or written, 
Choosing ' W displays a number thai 
must be idenitified from the two choices 
listed below it. For example: 

HOW WOULD YOU WRITE OUT THE 
FOLLOWING DIGIT ? 
72.41 

Pi) SEVENTY TWO RND FORTY ONE 
THOUSfiNDTHS 

B) SEVENTY TWO RND FORTY ONE 
HUNDRETHS 

The user must press either *A' or 4 B' 
to respond. Pressing *@' gives the user 
a score card. 

If 'D' is selected for digit, then there 
are two possible choices, either select or 
input. 

The Select mode offers multiple 
choice digit answers to a written 
number. There may be anywhere from 
two to five multiple choice responses 
displayed, depending on the difficulty 
of the material. Pressing '(a)' gives the 
score card. 

If you choose the Input mode, then 
a written number is displayed. The user 



"The program will vary the skill level to 
match the student's ability." 



168 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



Computer- Paced 
Learning 



By Fred Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the "Wishing Well/' submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW, Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don '/ forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use but 
remain the property of the author. 



time passes, and more and 
more programs are written 
for our Tandy computers, 
software authors discover new uses for 
the BASIC language burned into the 
chips of our machine's ROM. This 
month's "Wishing Well" offering is no 
exception as we will introduce a new 
concept to our pages: CPL or Computer 
Paced Learning. This is done with our 
fourth Life Skills program titled Writ- 
ten Numbers. 

The Wish: What is CPL? 

More classrooms now have computer 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



terminals in them. Teachers across the 
country have purchased millions of 
dollars of software and have quite often 
been cheated out of their school dis- 
trict's limited financial resources. There 
have been two very serious drawbacks 
to this development. 

First, some school districts have 
joined in a game of one-upmanship by 
comparing expenditures on computers 
and software as if they were comparing 
new cars. This type of attitude can have 
a very negative impact on the goals of 
any computer program. What is needed 
is software geared to specific needs. 

The second error that occurs is the 
tendency to put students on "autopilot" 
once appropriate software is found. 
Some students will gladly work on a 
program covering material too easy for 
their ability. Unless the student's level 
and progress are closely monitored, the 
student will drift off, running like a 
plane on autopilot, oblivious to all real 
learning. 

Since we have a CPU (Central Pro- 
cessing Unit) in our machine capable of 
executing any logical command set 
given it, we can develop, with a little 
care, software which just might help us 
deal with these two problems. That's 
where the concept of CPL or Computer 



Paced Learning comes in. Our goal is to 
have our software actually monitor the 
student's progress during the running of 
the program and make adjustments in 
skill level based on that student's per- 
formance. 

The Program: Written Numbers 

Our first Life Skills program was a 
simulation that dealt with money hand- 
ling skills and subtraction. Our second 
program was Number Evaluation in 
which the place value of numbers was 
examined. Program three dealt with 
Ruler Reading Skills. In Written 
Numbers, however, we return to the 
math skills originally introduced in 
Number Evaluation. Rather than iden- 
tify the place in a number as was done 
in that program, this time we want to 
evaluate a number such as 55,697.25 
and translate it to its written form of 
fifty-five thousand six hundred ninety- 
seven and twenty-five hundreths. 

The first requirement of the program 
is that it have a variable skill level which 
can be selected from a menu. Next, it 
must deal with an evaluation of the 
numbers in both written and digit form. 
Third, it must allow for periodic check- 
ing of student score and progress. 
Finally, it must adjust the difficulty 




August 1986 THE RAINBOW 167 



HI-RES II SCREEN COMMANDER 

Are you tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on 
your CoCo? Do you wish you could see more lines and characters? 
Then HI-RES II is the answer, it can give you the big screen display 
you've always wanted. It will display 24 lines of 32, 42, 51 , 64 and 
even 85 true upper and lower case characters per line without any 
hardware modifications. 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package 
available for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is 
completely compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program 
is loaded, everything works the same as before, only you have a 
much better display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed 
text and Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate 
text and graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key 
repeat feature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the 

screen. HI-RES II features over 30 special control code functions 
that allow you to change characters per line, protect display lines, 
change background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse 
video, underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works 
on all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides 
automatic reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you 
press reset. 

Only $24,95 for Tape and $29,95 for Disk 

EDTIASM 64D 

64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER w I DEBUG 

EDT/ASM 64D is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & 
Assembler. It has a Hi-Resolution 51 , 64 or 85 column by 24 line 
display , so you see your program listings easily. It also supports the 
PBJ 80 Column Word-Pak cards. The disk also contains a free 
standing Machine Language Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

The Editor in EDT/ASM 64D is the most powerfull, easy to use 
Text Editor available in any Editor/Assembler package for the Color 
Computer. It even has automatic line number generation for easy 
entry of program material. Some of it's features include: 

c> Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

<& Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 

c> Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

c> Load & Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

c> Move or Copy single & multiple text lines. 

c> Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

Hi-Res Text Display 28 to 85 columns by 24 lines. 

<r> Supports the PBJ 80 Column cards Word-Pak I & II. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D is the part that creates 
the Machine Language program. It processes the source file(s) 
created or edited by the text editor and creates a LOADM or 
CLOADM binary file on either Disk or Tape. Using library files you 
can assemble an unlimited size file, using several different disk 
drives. 

{r> Supports conditional 1F/THEN/ELSE assembly. 
<r> Supports Disk Library files (include). 
(r> Supports standard motorola assembler directives 
<r> Allows multiple values for FDB & FCB directives. 
c> Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 
O* Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADM format. 
<& Supports up to 9 open disk files during assembly. 
c> Allows assembly from editor buffer, Disk or both. 
c> Full description text error messages. 

DEBUG is a free standing program debugger which provides all 
the functions supported by most system monitors. Some of them 
include: 

£5* Examine and change the contents of memory. 

<r> Set and display up to 10 breakpoints in memory. 

O* Remove single or multiple breakpoints. 

c> Display/Change processor register contents. 

& Dump Memory in Hex and ASCII format. 

<r> Fill Memory range with a specified data pattern. 

<r> Move a block of memory. 

<r> Search memory range for data pattern. 

& Disassemble memory into op-code format. 

Requires 32K and Disk $59.00 



"The Source" 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine lan- 
guage programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assemb- 
ler Source Code for a fraction of the cost of other Disassembler/ 
Source generator programs. And, the Source has all the features 
your looking for in a Disassembler. 

c> Automatic Label generation. 
<r> Allows specifying FCB, FCC and FDB areas. 
<r> Save, Load and Edit FCB, FCC, and FDB map on Disk. 
<r> Disassembles programs directly from Disk 
c?" Output complete Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, 
Screen or both, 

<r> Generates Assembler compatible source files directly to disk. 

Generated source files are in standard ASCII format. 
& Built in Hex/ASCII dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FDB 

areas in a program. 
<r> Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 
& Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy, 
almost foolproof operation. 
Written in fast machine language, one of the quickest and 
easiest to use Disassemblers available. 

Requires 32K and Disk $34,95 

TEXTPRO III 

"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

<r> 9 Hi-Resolution Display Formats from 28 to 255 columns by 24 
lines. 

<r> True Upper and Lower Case display format. 
Cr* Three Different Programmable Header lines, re-definable at 
anytime. 

<r> Programmable Footer line & Automatic Footnote System. 
c> 10 Programmable Tab stops & 7 Tab Function Commands. 
<r> Automatic Line Justification, Centering, Flush left and Flush 
right. 

<r> On screen display of underlining and Double size characters. 
<r> Change indents, margins, line length, etc. at anytime in a 
document. 

& Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a 
full disk. 

Cr- Easily imbed any number of format and control codes for 
printers. 

Automatic Memory sense 1 6-64K with up to 48K of 
workspace. 

<r> Typist Friendly line and Command format entry w/ auto key 
repeat. 

c5> Fully supports the use of 80 column hardware cards. 

TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed 
for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not 
like most of the other word processing programs available for the 
Color Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to 
write letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be 
better off with one of the other word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processing program with extensive document 
formatting features to handle large documents, term papers, man- 
uals, complex formating problems and letter writing, then TEX- 
TPRO is what your looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally 
different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and 
formatting information that you imbed directly in your text. There 
are over 50 different formating commands you can use without ever 
leaving the text your working on. There are no time comsuming, 
and often furstrating menu chases, you are in total control at all 
times. The formatted output can be displayed directly on the screen, 
showing you exactly what your printed document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed. This includes margins, head- 
ers, footers, page numbers, page breaks, underlining, column 
formating and full justification. 

Disk $59.95 Tape $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 

To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or C.O.D. call us at the 
number listed below (Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
E" (702) 452-0632 S 



HOT HARDWARE 



SUPER SOFTWARE 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER 

IT'S THE BEST!!! Great Price! Only $29,95 

• Works with monochrome 



Carefully engineered to 
work with ALL Color 
Computer models 
including the newest 
COCO IL Enables your 
COCO to operate with a 
video monitor instead of a 
television. 



monitors! 

• Works with color 
monitors! 

• Audio Connection 
included! 

• Easy installation- 
no soldering! 



PCX-II COMPUTER 



Total IBM compatibility at sensational prices!!! 

Complete computer systems starting as low as $649.00. 
Check our performance and prices. 



TANDY 1000 UPGRADES 



640K upgrade board with real time clock $1 89.95 

Serial Interface Board 49.95 

Parallel Interface Board 29.95 

Hayes compatible 300/1200 Baud deluxe modem 189.95 



QUALITY VIDEO MONITORS 



Sakata SC-100 Color monitor with speaker 

and earphone jack . . • » • . « »<■ » ♦ ••» ♦ »■•« » » » ■ ■ ■;♦..» « $179.95 

Samsung MD-1251 K Amber Screen - great price *„ , - . 89.95 

Magnavox BM-7622 Amber Screen - high quality, low price . . 99.95 

Order a quality monitor from us and get a Universal 
Video Driver for only $24.95 — Save $5.00. 



PRINTERS AND ACCESSORIES 



Citizen 120-D Printer, Deluxe features Only $219.95 

Star NX-10 Printer, New model for '86 279.95 

GRAFX SCREEN - versatile screen dump software. Print horizontal or 
vertical, image magnification, positive or negative and more - 5VV disc. 

ONLY $14.95 

GRAFX SCREEN — FREE with your printer order. 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 

300 to 9600 baud. Complete with 
all cables and connectors. 



Only $49.95 



DISC DRIVES 



Teac 55 B DSDD Drive $11 9.95 Drive one upgrade for new Tandy 

j&M JFD-CP Controller dual no »™ntal cabinet . . 1 19.95 
with DOS 139.95 Disc drive cable 24.95 

Dual cabinet, power supply holds Radio Shack DOS Rom 1.1 
2 horizontal 1/2 height drives . .79.95 w/manual 29.95 

5'/-}" discs, double density, reinforced hub w/sleeve, guaranteed. 
$12.95 for 10 discs in an attractive storage box. 

G10 Cassettes w/iabels , 10 for $5.50 

Cassette storage box »..,..., 10 for $2.00 

Basic 1 .2 ROM ............ ,. $39.95 

Extended 1 ,1 ROM w/Manual , $49.95 

DISC STORAGE CASE - Attractive, heavy 

duty acrylic case with lock. Holds and SUPER BARGAIN 

protects 50 5 W discs, ON LY $9.95 

Purchase this attractive storage case including 10 discs for $21 .95. 

64 K Memory Expansion Kit. 

All parts and complete instructions (for 'E' and 'F' boards and COCO I!) 

NOW ONLY $19.95 



Cuberlank 

iriLllllimtlimimm ■ ll1lllMIJIHitlLM4l[llllLlklillhMtllllllljl||IMtMMIIIMITIIIItll1liaUltllllMltll1llll 

« f£\ COPYRIGHT 1985, 

lll|imilLl|<imiHlHHL1l|llll1llllUlllN l|ltlllllirilHUIIIl1ltlllltl|ll(MIMIIHIMMIhMHIIIkllLll1IHIMMIUIIMII 



01 

TIME 


1 ■ 









NEW! 
OUTSTANDING 
GRAPHICS! 




iii;i;iiHiM 



Tired of flying 
wimpy airplanes??? 

Want to try 
something macho 
for a change?? 

CYBERTANK is a real-time tank simulation that will get 

your adrenalin flowing! 

Your survival depends upon lightening-fast tactical decisions. Penetrate 
deep into enemy territory with powerful intelligence gathering devices 
and sophisticated armaments. Cannons, heat seeking missiles, flame 
throwers, pill boxes, battle tanks... THIS ONE HAS IT ALU! 



ORDER NOW! 64K Disk only. 
$27.95 



Other Super 
Arcade Games: 

Tut's Tomb 
Time Fighter 




ems® tfBBBPBe 

Intelligence has intercepted a coded message . 
revealing a plan to conquer Earth. Four of your 
Shocktroopers must infiltrate the heavily defended 
underground enemy base and steal all of the secret 
TRG-5 attack saucer sub-assemblies. 

SUPER ACTION ARCADE GAME!! 

^ The Sixth & Most Challenging 

\]tf\f$ T* ffT y of our Adventures 

T V#J* f C^V What is it? What secrets does it hold? 

FACTOR The seeker of treasures through time 

Other Exciting 
Adventures 

Calixto Island 
Shenanigans 

Sea Search • Trekboer 
Black Sanctum 



THE 



All games - 
Cassettes $24.95 
Discs $27.95 
32K required. 



and space must find 
out! From the Coliseum 
of ancient Rome to 
the futuristic world 
of tomorrow. 
UNFORGETTABLE 
ODYSSEY 



COCO UTIL II - NEW VERSION 



Transfer Coco disc files to your IBM compatible computer.^ 
You may also transfer MS-DOS files to a Color 
Computer disc. Save hours of retyping. 
Coco Util has been so popular we decided to 
make it even more powerful and versatile... 
extended directories, faster, improved menu 
selection system and more! $39,95 

Ccxo LUtl users upgrade to the now version for only $12.95 including shipping and handling 




FOR THE SERIOUS COCO USER 



Accounting System - very popular ledger 
system for small businesses $99.95 disk 

Order Entry - an excellent companion 
to the accounting system $99.95 disk 

Easy File - get organized with this 

user friendly data management system $59.95 disk 

Super Screen - Best screen enhancement program available. 
Cassette $29.95 Disk $32.95 

FREE— Send for our free flier. 




Mark Data Products 



24001 Alicia Parkway, No. 207, Mission Viejo, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 



SHIPPING: All orders under $100 please add $2 regular, $5 air. All orders over $100 please odd 3% 
regular, 8% air. California residents please add b% sates tax. Orders outside the continental U.S., check 



with us for shipping amount; please remit U.S. funds. Software authors— contact us for exciting 
program marketing details. We accept MasterCard and VISA, Distributed in Canada by Kelly Software. 



************************* 

** PROCESS ROUTINE ** 
************************* 



140 '************************ 

15)3 1 **GET FILE TO CORRECT ** 
160 ************************* 

170 ' 

18j3 CLS:PRINT@23j3, "" ; : INPUT "E 
NTER FILE # T 
0 BE CORRECTED" ;FI 
19j3 GOSUB 67j3 

2j3j3 IFFK10RFI>LOF(l)THENCLOSE#l 
:G0T018J3 

210 GET#1, FI : A1$=A$ : B$=B1$ : CLOSE 

#1 
22J3 
230 
240 
250 
260 

270 PS=1:POKE65495,0:CLS:IFSE=1T 
HENB$=STRING$ ( 64 , " ») 
280 IFSE=1THENPRINT@448, "TYPE PU 
ZZLE THEN PRESS ENTER": ELSE PRIN 
T@448,"DO CORRECTIONS THEN PRESS 
ENTER" 

290 C1$=MID$(B$,PS,1) :IFASC(C1$) 

>64ANDASC (Cl$) <91THENCUR$=CHR$ (A 

SC(Cl$)+32) :ELSECUR$=CHR$(128) 

300 C$=INKEY$:PRINT@0,B$:PRINT@P 

S-1,CUR$; :IFC$=""THEN290 

310 IFC$=CR$THENPOKE65494,0:GOTO 

380 

320 IFC$=L$ANDPS>1THENPS=PS-1:G0 
TO300 

330 IFC$=R$ANDPS<64THENPS=PS+1:G 
OTO300 

340 IF C$=L$ORC$=R$THEN300 
350 MID$(B$,PS,1)=C$ 



JANES 
JOHNS 



SCORE t 105.00 
SCORE I 0.00 



GONE OUER 
(l)-MEU GAtlE <2)-END 



3 60 IFPS<64THENPS=PS+1 

370 GOTO300 

380 CLS:PRINT@0,B$ 

390 PRINT@230 , "ENTER CATEGORY 

( 1 ) -PHRASE 

(2) -TITLE 



ii 



( 3 ) -PLACE 

(4) -PERSON 

(5) -PRESIDENT 



400 INPUT " 

(6) -BIBLE PHRASE 

MAKE SELECTION" ;A1$ 
410 IFA1$<"1"ORA1$>"6"THEN390 
420 GOSUB670 

430 LSETA$=A1$:LSETB1$=B$ 

440 IFSE=lTHENPUT#l,LOF(l)+l:ELS 

EPUT#1,FI 

45)3 CLOSE#l: RETURN 
460 1 

************************* 

** LIST FILE ROUTINE ** 
************************* 



470 
480 
490 
500 



510 CLS:PRINT@230, ""; :INPUT"DO Y 
OU WANT HARD 
COPY Y/N" ;C0$:IFC0$O"Y"ANDC0$< 
>"N"THEN510 
520 GOSUB670 

530 CLS: PRINT "FILE LENGTH=" ; LOF ( 
1) : INPUT "ENTER FILES : START, END" ; 
ST, EN: IF EN>LOF ( 1 ) THENEN=LOF ( 1 ) 
:ELSEIFST<10RST>LOF(l)OR EN<10R 
EN >LOF(l)ORST> EN THEN53j3 

540 ifco$="y"thenprint#-2 , chr$ (2 
7) ;chr$(2j3) :print#-2, "categories 
" ; cr$ ; " ( 1 ) -phrase " ; cr$ ; " ( 2 ) -titl 
e";cr$;" (3) -place" ; cr$ ; " ( 4 ) -pers 
on" ;cr$ ; "president" 
550 ifco$="y"thenprint#-2 :print# 
-2 : print#-2 , "record catagory 
nomenclature" 
560 forx=st to en 
57j3 get#1,x:a1$=a$:b$=b1$ 
580 print "record" ; x; cr$ ; "catagor 
y";cr$;a1$;"-";cat$(val(a1$) ) ;cr 
$;b$ 

590 if co$="y" then print#-2, u 
sing p$ ; x,a1$,b$ 
600 ifco$="n"thenfory=1to1500 : ne 

XTY 

610 NEXTX:CLOSE#l:IF CO$="Y"THEN 
PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; : RETU 
RN: ELSE RETURN 
620 
630 
640 
65j3 
660 ' 

670 OPEN "D", #1, "CATEGORY", 65 
680 FIELD#1,1AS A$,64 AS B1$:RET 
URN 

690 DATA PHRASE, TITLE, PLACE, PERS 
ON, PRESIDENT, BIBLE PHRASE 



* ************************ 

•** OPEN FILES ** 
* ************************ 



164 



THE RAINBOW August 1 986 



J2G1L2H1U1 

2170 DATA BR5BD10U8G4R6,BR6BD2L4 
D3R3F1D3G1L2H1U1,BR6BD3H1L2G1D6F 
1R2E1U3H1L1G1 , BR2BD2R4D2G3D3 
2180 DATA BR3 BD2R2F1D2G1L2R2F1D2 
G1L2H1U2E1H1U2E1,BD9BR2F1R2E1U6H 
1L2G1D2F1R2 , BR 4 BD3D1BD3D1 , BR 4 BD3 
D1BD3D1G1 

2190 DATA BR6BD2G4F4 , BD4BR2R4BD3 
L4 , BD2BR2F4G4 , BR2BD3E1R2F1D1G2D1 
BD2D1 

2200 DATA BR4BD6H1G1F1E1U1D1R2U2 

H1L3G1D3F1R4E1,BD9BR2U4R3L3U2E1R 

2F1D6 , BR2BD2R3F1D1G1L2R2F1D2G1L3 

U7 , BR6BD2D1U1L4D7R4U1 

2210 DATA BR2BD2R1D7L1R3E1U5H1L3 

, BR6BD2L4D3R2L2D4R4 , BR6BD2L4D3R2 

L2D4 , BR6BD3U1L4D7R4U3L1 

2220 DATA BR2BD2D7BR4U4L3R3U3 , BR 

4BD2L1R2L1D7L1R2 , BR6BD2D6G1L2H1 , 

BR2BD2D7U4R1E3G3F3D1 

2230 DATA BR2BD2D7R4 , BD9BR2U7F2E 

2D7 , BD9BR2U7F4D3U7 , BR2BD2D7R4U7L 

4 

2240 DATA BD9BR2U7R3F1D2G1L3 , BR2 
BD3D5F1R2E1F1H3F2U5H1L2 , BD9BR2U7 
R3F1D1G1L2F3D2 , BR6BD3U1L4D3R4D4L 
4U1 

2250 DATA BD2BR2R4L2D7 , BR2BD2D7R 
4U7 , BR2BD2D5F2E2U5 , BR2BD2D7E2F2U 
7 

22 60 DATA BR2BD2D1F4D2BL4U2E4U1 , 

BR2BD2D1F2E2U1BL2BD2D5 , BD2BR2R4D 

1G4D2R4 , BR5BD2L3D7R3 

2270 DATA BR2BD2D1F4D2 , BR3BD2R3D 

7L3 , BR4BD2G2E2F2H2D7 , BD6E2G2F2H2 

R4 

2280 DATA BR2F2 , BD6BR6H1L2G1D2F1 

R2E1U1D3 , BR2BD2D7R2E1U2H1L1G1 , BD 

5BR3F1BD2G1L1H1U1E1 

2290 DATA BR5BD2D6G1L2H1U1E1R1F1 

, BD6BR2R3U1H1L2G1D3F1R2E1 , BD9BR3 

U3L1R2L1U2E1R1F1,BD8BR2F1R2E1U4H 

1L2G1D1F1R2 

2300 DATA BR2BD2D7BR4U2H1L2G1 , BR 

4BD3D1BD2D3 , BR5BD2D1BD2D3G1L1H1, 

BR2BD3D4E3G2F3BL4U2 

2310 DATA BR4BD3D6 , BD9BR2U4F2E2D 

4 , BD9BR2U4D2E2R1F1D3 , BD9BR2U4R4D 

4L4 

2320 DATA BD9BR2U5R2F1D1G1L2 , BD9 

BR5U4H1L2G1D1F1R2 , BD9BR2U4D2E2R1 

, BD9BR2R2E1H1L1H1E1R2 

2330 DATA BD9BR4U6D2L2R4 , BD9BR2U 

4D4R5L1U4 , BD7BR2U2D2F2E2U2 , BD9BR 

2U4D4E2F2U4 

2340 DATA BD9BR2E4BL4F4 , BD9BR4U2 

H2F2E2 , BR6BD9L4E4L4 

2350 '**LAST ALPHA CHARACTER** 



******************** 

* * * DATA FOR MENU *** 
******************** 



2360 
2370 
2380 
2390 
2400 

2410 DATA ***************** 
2420 DATA * (1) -SOLVE * 
2430 DATA * (2) -BUY VOWEL * 
2440 DATA * (3) -SPIN * 
2 4 50 DATA ***************** 

2460 DATA 125,75,5,152,92,10,159 

,115, 90, 152, 13 6, 20, 120, 151, BR, 92 

,140,30,81,114,70,91,90,80 

2470 DATA 152,80,176,108,172,136 

,156,160,106,162,84,140,84,100,1 

00,80 

2480 DATA PHRASE, TITLE, PLACE, PER 
SON, PRESIDENT, BIBLE PHRASE 
2490 
2500 
2510 
2520 
2530 

2540 F0RTS=1T02 : PLAY"T602L8D#EGA 
L4CBAA-GG#L2AL4GG#AB-BP160+CO-BA 
A-GG#L2AL4GG#ABO+C" : NEXTTS : PLAY" 
T2 55L2 5 505 ": RETURN 



i 

' ************************* 

»** THEME SONG ** 
• ************************* 
i 




190 27 

350 174 

540 20 

END 143 



Listing 2: CREATOR 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 

75 FOR X=1T06:READCAT$ (X) :NEXTX 
80 CR$=CHR$ ( 13 ) : L$=CHR$ ( 8 ) : R$=CH 
R$(9) 

90 P$=" ##### %% % 



************************** 

* CREATE & CORRECT FILES * 

* FOR FORTUNE WHEEL * 

* (C) -OCT. 1984 * 

* BY : ARRON W.BRANIGAN * 
************************** 



%" 



ii 



100 CLS : PRINTS 2 30 , ,,n ; : INPUT 

(1) -CREATE FILES 

(2) -CORRECT FILES 

(3) -LIST FILES 

( 4 ) -END 

MAKE SELECTION" ;SE 

110 IFSE=4THENPOKE65494,0:END 

120 ON SE GOSUB 270 , 180 , 510 : GOTO 

100 
130 ' 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 163 



UB1870 

1570 CX=1 : IFWI=1THENRETURN 
1580 X1=30:Y1=172:SP=8:CH=0:CX=0 
:FX=0:GOSUB1870:A$="SORRY BAD GU 
ESS" : GOSUB1140 : GOSUB1870 : RETURN 
1590 • 

1600 ************************** 

161j3 1 ** END GAME ROUTINE ** 
162j3 ************************** 

1630 • 

1640 FORTG=lTORD : K$ (TG) = NEXTT 

G:«***ZERO K$ (TG) *** 

1650 Yl=3 6 : Xl=8 : Y=0 
1660 IFPL=1THEN1770 
1670 '****BUBBLE SORT**** 
1680 C=0 

1690 FORY=lTOPL-l 

1700 IFSC(Y)<=SC(Y+1)THEN1750 

1710 S=S€(Y) :S$=N$(Y) 

1720 SC(Y)=SC(Y+1) :N$(Y)=N$(Y+1) 

1730 SC(Y+1)=S:N$(Y+1)=S$ 

1740 C=l 

1750 NEXTY 

1760 IFC=1THEN1680 

1770 PCLS1:LINE(0,0)-(255,192) ,P 
RESET,B:LINE(2,2)-(253,190) , PRES 
ET, B 

1780 Xl=8 : Y1=0 : FOR BU= PL TO 1 S 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

(A DIVISION OF DATAMATCH, INC. ) 

D I SK 

DOUBLE SIDE / DOUBLE DENSITY 
10/*9.00 100/*85.00 





* f="L. I F>F> 

DS/DD - 2 NOTCHES, 2 ID HOLES 
10/*9.95 100/*95.00 

SENT I IM 




SS OR DS,DD - 12 AST'D COLORS 
12/*12.95 100/*99.95 

ALL DISKS COME WITH TYVEK SLEEVES, LABELS, U. P. TABS 

COLOR RIBBONS: Red, Green, Blue, Brown 
GEM/OKI 4/S10.00 ' 
EPSON 4/S24.00 
APPLE/NEC 4/S24.00 

Add $2.50 S/H in U.S.A - Canada Add $3.50 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 

Send check or money order payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

9020 Hemingway, Redtord, Ml 48239 

(313)937-3442 «Kl 




Send Card Number and Exp. Date 
Min, Charge Order $20.00 



TEP-1:Y1=Y1+12 :A$=N$ (BU) +"S"+STR 
ING$(10-LEN(N$(BU) ) ," ")+" SCO 
RE $"+STR$(SC(BU) ) +» .00" : GOSUB11 
40:N$(BU)= M ":SC(BU)=0:NEXTBU: '** 
PRINT SCORES" 

1790 X1=8*8:Y1=172-12:SP=8:A$="* 

* GAME OVER **" : GOSUB1140 

1800 Xl=8 *6 : Yl=172 : SP=8 : EX=1 : A$= 

"(l)-NEW GAME (2) -END" : GOSUB1140 

1810 G$=INKEY$: 1 ***RESET KEYBOAR 
D*** 

1820 G$=INKEY$:IFG$=""THEN1820 
1830 IFG$<"1"ORG$>"2"THEN1820 
1840 IFG$="1"THENGOSUB130ELSEPOK 
E65494,0:END 
1850 GOTO 530 
1860 ' 

************************** 

'*COPY SCREENS 5-8 TOl-4 * 
• ************************* 
i 

FORD=4T01STEP-l : PCOPYD+4TOD 
: NEXTD : RETURN 
1920 

************************* 

**FOLLOWING DATA IS FOR** 

**LEARNING THE ARROWS ** 
************************* 



1870 
1880 
1890 
1900 
1910 



1930 
1940 
1950 
1960 
1970 
1980 
1990 
2000 
2010 
2020 
2030 
2040 
2050 
2060 
2070 
2080 
2090 
2100 
2110 

2120 DATA C1BR1BD1D10R1U10R1D10R 
1U10R1D10R1U10R1D10R1U10C0 , BR4BD 
2D3BD2BD1D1, BR2BD2D1BR3U1 , BR3BD3 
D6BR2U6BF2L6BD2R6 

2130 DATA BR4BD2D8U1H2F2E2H4E2F2 
,BR3BD2D1BR3BU1D2G4D2BR3U1,BD10B 

R6U2H4U1E2F2G4D1F2E3 , C0BR4BD2D2C 

1 

2140 DATA BR5BD2G2D4F2 , BR3BD2F2D 
4G2 , BR4BD4G2F1E2F1G2 , BR4BD4D4BH2 
R4 

2150 DATA BR4BD9D1G1 , BD6BR2R4 , BR 
4BD8D1, BR2BD8E5 

2160 DATA BR4BD2L1G1D6F1R2E1U6H1 
LI , BR4BD2BG2E2D8L2R4 , BD4BR2U1E1R 
2F1D2G4D1R5 , BR2BD4U1E1R2F1D2G1F1 



DATA U23G4E4F4 
DATA E15L4R4D4 
DATA R23H4F4G4 
DATA F15U4D4L4 
DATA D23E4G4H4 
DATA G15U4D4R4 
DATA L2 3E4G4F4 
DATA H15R4L4D4 



************************* 

**FOLLOWING DATA'S FOR ** 

** LEARN THE ALPHABET ** 
************************* 



162 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



1080 NEXTX3 

1090 FL=FL+1:CH$(FL)=LT$: ***REME 
MBER CHECK VALUE*** 
1100 PC0PY1T05 

1110 CLS : X=0 : R=0 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : RETUR 
N 

1120 • 

1130 ************************** 

1140 1 *DRAW CHARACTER ROUTINE * 
1150 ************************** 

1160 • 
1170 Y6=0 

1180 X4=0:FORX2= 1T0LEN(A$) :X$=S 
TR$(X1+X4*SP) :Y$=STR$(Y1+Y6) :PLA 
Y" 1" : A1=ASC (MID$ (A$,X2 ,1) ) -31: DR 
AW"BM"+X$+", "+Y$+L$(A1) :X4=X4+1: 
IFY6=0ANDX4=32ANDEX=1THENY6=12 : X 
1=0 : X4=0 : NEXTX2 : ELSE NEXTX2 : PLAY 
"V31":DRAW"S4" 
1190 RETURN 
1200 ' 

1210 '************************* 
1220 '*BUY VOWEL AND DRAW ** 
1230 1 * BLANKS & PUNCTUATION ** 
1240 ************************** 

1250 1 

1260 IFE$="2"ANDSC(PI)<25THENRET 
URN 

1270 IFE$="2"THENDRAW"S4":X1=8:Y 
1=172 : SP=8 : GOSUB1870 : A$=N$ (PI) +" 

ENTER VOWEL ?" : GOSUB1140 
1280 IFE$="2"THENV$=INKEY$:IFV$= 
" "THEN128J3 

1290 PLAY"V3 1" : F0RDD=1T05 : PLAY"C 

DEFGAB" : NEXTDD : PLAY" V3 1 " 

1300 IFE$="2"THENIFV$=CHR$ (13) OR 

V$><"A"ANDV$><"a"ANDV$>< M E"ANDV$ 

>< ll e"ANDV$>< H I ,, ANDV$>< ,, i"ANDV$>< 

"0"ANDV$>< ,, O ,, ANDV$>< M U ,, ANDV$X ,, U 

ll THENPLAY"AAAAAAAAAAAAA" : GOT0128 

0 

1310 VC=0:X1=-8:Y1=1:FORX5=1TOLE 

N(C$) :X1=X1+8:A$=MID$(C$ / X5,1) :I 

FX5=3 3THENX1=0 : Yl=13 

1320 IFE$=""THENIFA$=" 1 "ORA$=" ! " 

ORA$="#"ORA$="$"ORA$=" : "ORA$=" ; " 

ORA$=" , "ORA$=" . "ORA$="?"THENGOSU 

B1140 

1330 IFA$=" "ANDE$=" "THENL$ ( 1) =B 

K$ : GOSUB1140 : L$ (1) =B1$ 

13 40 IFE$="2 "ANDV$=A$THENCH=1 : GO 

SUB1140:VC=1 

1350 NEXTX5 : IFE$="2 "THENSC (PI) =S 
C(PI) -25: PCOPY1T05: RETURN: ELSE P 
COPY1T05 : RETURN 
1360 ' 

1370 ************************** 
1380 '** SOLVE ROUTINE *** 
1390 ************************** 



1400 * 

14 10 WI=0 : SLV$=" '• : X1=0 : Yl=3 6 : SP= 

8:A$=CHR$ (123) :GOSUB1140 
1420 SV$=INKEY$:IFSV$=""THEN1420 
1430 IFSV$=CHR$(13)THEN1540 
1440 IFSV$=CHR$(8)THENSLV$=MID$( 
SLV$, 1,LEN(SLV$) -1) :A$=CHR$ (124) 
: GOSUB1140 : Xl=Xl-8 : GOTO1470 
1450 IFASC(SV$)>=8ANDASC(SV$)<=1 
3THENPLAY"01AAAAAAAAAAAAA05 " : GOT 
01420 : ELSEIFASC (SV$ ) >=91ANDASC(S 
V$ ) <=9 50RSV$=CHR$ (21) THENPLAY"01 
AAAAAAAAAAAA05" :GOTO1420: '***KIL 
L UNWANTED KEYS*** 

1460 A$=CHR$(124) : GOSUB1140 : SLV$ 
=SLV$+SV$ : A$=SV$ : GOSUB1140 : X1=X1 
+8 




TITLE 



RDUMD 2 




JfltlE IHPUT LETTER ? 



1470 LS=LEN(SLV$) 

1480 IFLS>31THENY1=48 

1490 IFLS=32THENX1=0 

1500 IFLS=31THENX1=248 

1510 IFLS<32THENY1=36 

1520 IFSV$=CHR$(8)THENA$=" ":GOS 

UB1140 

1530 A$=CHR$ (123) :GOSUB1140: GOTO 
1420 

1540 SOV$=SLV$+STRING$ (64-LEN(SL 
V$),» *'):'***ADD BLANK SPACES*** 
1550 IFC$=SOV$THENSC(PI)=SC(PI) * 
3 : FORTY=1TO10 : FORFD=0TO1 : SCREEN1 
, FD : PLAY"04EFG" : NEXTFD : NEXTTY : PL 
AY"01" : F0RDD=1T02 : F0RCC=1T04 : PLA 

Y" 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 6 ; 7 ; 8 ; 9 ; 10 ; 11 ; 120+" : 

NEXTCC : F0RCC=1T04 : PLAY "12 ; 11 ; 10 ; 

9 ; 8 ; 7 ; 6 ; 5 ; 4 ; 3 ; 2 ; 10- " : NEXTCC : NEXT 

DD:PLAY"05":WI=1 

1560 IFWI=1THENX1=0:Y1=1:EX=1:A$ 
=SLV$ : GOSUB1140 : F0RE=2T04 : PCOPYE 
+4T0E : NEXTE : Xl=8 : Yl=172 : SP=8 : DRA 
W"S4" :A$=N$ (PI)+" WINS ROUND $"+ 
STR$ (SC (PI) ) +" .00" : GOSUB1140 : GOS 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 161 



The art of entertainment 





Pinball Factory by Kary McFadden 

The video game comes full circle in this glorious tribute to the original. 
Classic pinball spings to life as never before, with fresh new angles that 
only the computer can offer. Crisp graphics, sound, and fast, smooth 
action give this machine-language arcade game a realistic, responsive feel 
you'll hardly believe. There are even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" 
the machine! 

In addition to playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of 
creative pleasure as you design, build, and edit your own screens. Save 
and load your favorite creations. The joystick-controlled cursor makes it 
all easy. 

Change the board: build with bumpers, tabs, and a multitude of solid 

obstacles to form any configuration imaginable. 
Change the face: draw your own title board with lines, rays, and shape 

patterns. Add text in three different colors, and two dirrent sizes. 
Change the rules: alter the gravity, bounce, and scoring! 

64K Color Computer required. $34.95 





Speed Racer by Steven Hirsch 

The checkered flag drops as your pulse rises in this lively new 
arcade game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D pano- 
rama that sets the stage for the most exciting race the CoCo 
has ever seen! 

Vie for time as you speed through the curves at incredible 
speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of the pack, but 
step lively since some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! 

Four challenging raceways, complete with obstacles and 
colorful 3-D scenery, put your skills to the test in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 

32K Color Computer required. $34.95 





Rommel 3-D by Kary McFadden 

You clutch the tank controls, searching for any sign of the 
enemy. Suddenly a blip appears on radar! Frantically, you 
move your tank into position. At last you spot the elusive 
enemy tank! Facing it, you race to lock sights and fire before 
he does! 

Enter the ultimate battle- zone in this exciting 3-D tank com- 
bat game. Strategy, speed, and your tank's cannon are your 
only hope as you wind through a three-dimensional course 
inhabited by impenetrable barriers and enemy tanks. 

Dazzling graphics and lifelike sound take you a step beyond 
the ordinary in this fast, machine-language arcade game, Enter 
the next dimension, ROMMEL'S troops are waiting for you! 

32K Color Computer required. $29.95 




576 S. Telegraph, Pontiac, MI 48053 
Orders and Information (313) 334-5700 
Prices Do Not Include Shipping and Handling 




10: ELSE DRAW"BM128,120C1S5;XA$(1 

);»:'**COPY PAGE 5-8 TO 1-4 AND 

GO PRINT PUNCTUATION AND SPACES* 
** 

770 IFGY=1THENX1=8:Y1=25:SP=8:DR 
AW"S4":A$=STRING$(12," ") :GOSUBl 
140:A$=CAT$(CAT) :GOSUB1140:X1=16 
0:A$=STRING$(9, " ") : GOSUB1140 : A$ 
="ROUND "+STR$(RO) : GOSUB1140 : PCO 
PY 1 TO 5:GY=0:GOSUB2540 
780 IF CW>= CV THENE$="l":GOT083 

0 

790 DRAW"C0S4 " : CH=0 : CX=0 : Xl=8 : Yl 
=172:SP=8:A$=N$(PI)+"S TURN:SCOR 
E=$"+STR$ (SC (PI) ) +" .00" : GOSUB114 

0 

800 PUT (60 , 96) - (196 , 156) ,M,PSET 
:X1=168:Y1=132: '**DISPLAY MENU** 
810 E$=INKEY$ : IFE$><" "THEN820ELS 
EA$=" " : GOSUB1140 : A$=" # " : GOSUB11 
40:GOTO810 




* (i)-SDLUE * 

* (2)-BUY UDUEL ♦ 

* (3)-SPIM # ♦ 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

JOHNS TURN : 5CDRE=$ 140.00 



82JZJ IF E$<"1"ORE$>"3"THEN810ELSE 
E=VAL(E$) 

830 PLAY"V31" :F0RDD=1T05:PLAY"CD 
EFGABV< " : NEXTDD : PLAY" V3 1 " 

84) 3 IF CW >= CV THEN PZ=PZ+1:X1= 
-16 : Yl=172 : SP=8 : EX=1 : DRAW'S 4" : GO 
SUB1870:A$="ONLY VOWELS REMAIN " 
+N$ (PI) + " SOLVE" : GOSUB1140 : PLAY" 
T2L2GL255T255" :E=1:CH=0 

85) 3 ON E GOSUB 1370 , 121J3 , 950 : • ** 
GOTO GUESS BUY VOWEL OR SPIN ROU 
TINE** 

860 IF CH=1THEN76J3 

87J3 IFCX=10RFL=640RWI=1 THENX1=J3 

: Yl=l : SP=8 : EX=1 : FOREE=lTOFL: CH$ ( 

EE ) =" " : NEXTEE : FL=j3 : NEXTRO : GOT016 

00 

880 IF PZ>= PL THENX1=0:Y1=1:SP= 
8 : EX=1 : A$=MID$ (C$ , 1 , TL) : G0SUB114 
0 : Xl=8 : Yl=3 6 : EX=1 : A$=" SORRY NO W 



INNER THIS ROUND" :GOSUB1140: FORE 
E=1T0FL: CH$ (EE) =" " : NEXTEE : FL=0 : N 
EXTRO: GOTO 1600 
890 GOTO 750 
900 ' 

910 '************************** 

920 '** SPIN ROUTINE ** 
930 ' ************************** 

940 ' 

950 DRAW"S5":T=RND(20) 
960 GOSUB1870 

970 FORE=lTOT:FORX=lT08:Y=X-l:DR 
AW"BM128 , 120C0 ;XA$ ( Y) ; " : DRAW'BMl 
28 , 120C1 ;XA$ (X) ; « : PLAY"GFE" : IFR> 
T+100THENGOTO980 ELSE R=R+3:FORT 
Z=1T0R : NEXTTZ : NEXTX : NEXTE : GOT09 7 

cj ; • ***spin*** 

980 IFX=5THENX1=8:Y1=25:SP=8:SC( 
PI) =0 : DRAW"S4C0" : FORTP=1TO20 : FOR 
TK=0TO1 : SCREEN1 , TK : PLAY"03BC" : NE 
XTTK : NEXTTP : A$=STRING$ ( 15 , " " ) : G 
OSUB1140:A$=" BANKRUPT" :GOSUB1140 
: PLAY"T4L4" : F0REC=1T05 : PLAY "03 CO 
1C" : NEXTEC : CH=0 : CX=0 : PLAY"T2 55L2 
55O5":GOTO1110 

990 DRAW"S4C0" : Xl=30 : Yl=172 : SP=8 
:A$=N$(PI)+" INPUT LETTER ?":GOS 
UB1140 

1000 PLAY"T255L255":W$=INKEY$: '* 
*SET PLAY fit RESET KEYBOARD** 
1010 LT$=INKEY$ : IFLT$=" "THEN1010 
1020 IFASC(LT$)>=8ANDASC(LT$)<=1 
3 THENPLAY " 0 1 AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 
O5":GOTO1010:ELSEIFASC(LT$)>=91A 
NDASC (LT$) <=950RLT$=CHR$ (21) THEN 
PLAY " O 1 AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAO 5 " : GOTO 1 

i***KILL UNWANTED KEYS*** 
1030 IF LT$=CHR$(32)ORLT$="A"ORL 
T $= " a " ORLT $="E" ORLT $ = " e " ORLT $= " I 
" ORLT $="i"OR LT$="0" ORLT $= " O " ORL 
T $=" U " ORLT $= 11 U " THENPLAY " 0 3 AAAAAA 
AAAAAAAAAA05 " :GOTO1010: «***KILL 
VOWELS*** 

1040 PLAY" V3 105 " : F0RDD=1T05 : PLAY 
"CDEFGABV<" : NEXTDD: PLAY" V31" 
1050 F0REG=1T052 : IFLT$=CH$ (EG) TH 
ENX3=0 : CH=0 : CX=0 : PLAY"05" : FORY5= 

1T04 : PLAY" 12 ; 11 ; 10 ; 9 ; 8 ; 7 ; 6 ; 5 ; 4 ; 3 
; 2 ; 10-" : NEXTY5 : PLAY"05" : Xl=8 : Yl= 

172:GOSUB1870:A$="LETTER ALREADY 
USED" : GOSUB114 0 : EG=0 : GOTO1110 : E 
LSENEXTEG 

1060 Xl=-8 : Yl=l : SP=8 : F0RX3=1T0LE 

N(C$) :X1=X1+8:A$=MID$(C$ / X3,1) :I 

FX1>248THENY1=13:X1=0 

1070 IFA$=LT$THENSC(PI)=SC(PI)+V 

AL(NB$(X) ) :CH=l:CW=CW+l:GOSUB114 

0«**INCREASE SCORE BY NUMBER OF 

LETTERS CORRECT*** 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 159 



280 *************************** 
290 '*****SET UP GRAPHICS****** 
3j3j3 •**** &TITLE SCREEN ***** 
3 1 0 *************************** 
320 ' 

330 PLAY"T255L25505" 

340 PCLS1:X1=0:SP=8:FORY=0TO4:DR 

AW"C0S4":Y1=Y*12:A$=M$(Y+1) :GOSU 

B1140:NEXTY: '**DRAW MENU** 

350 LINE (1, 1) - (135 / 59) , PRESET, B: 

GET(0,0)-(136,60) ,M,G: '**STORE M 

ENU** 

360 PCLS1:CIRCLE(128, 120) ,30,0 
370 PAINT (128, 120) ,0,0 



FDR TUNE UHEEL 

By flrron U.BrQni9qn 
(C)-0< t . 1985 




Press qnr key to be9in 



380 CIRCLE ( 128, 120 ) ,50,0: CIRCLE ( 
128,120) ,51,0 

390 SP=8:F0RS=1T08:READX1, Y1,A$: 

NB$ (S) =A$ : GOSUB1140 : NEXTS : 1 ** *DR 

AW NUMBERS ON WHEEL*** 

400 F0RS=1T08:READX,Y: LINE (128,1 

20)-(X,Y) , PRESET : NEXTS 

410 F0RS=1T06:READCAT$ (S) : NEXTS: 

1 **READ CATAGORIES * * * 

420 LINE (0 ,0) - (255 , 192 ) ,PRESET,B 

: LINE (5, 5) -(250, 187) , PRESET, B 

430 DRAW"BM128,120C1S5;XA$(1) ;C0 
ii 

440 FOR X=l TO 4:PCOPY X TO X+4 : 
NEXTX 

450 DRAW"C1S5BM128,120;XA$(1) ; " 
460 PLAY"V3105" : PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 
, 1 : Xl=51 : Yl=12 : SP=12 : DRAW"S6C0" : 
A$=" FORTUNE WHEEL" : GOSUB1140 : Xl= 
45:Y1=27:SP=9:DRAW"S4" :A$="By Ar 
ron W.Branigan" : PLAY "03" :G0SUB11 

40:X1=60:Y1=39:A$=» (C) -Oct. 1985" 
:GOSUB1140 

470 Xl=30:Yl=172:SP=9:A$="Press 
any key to begin" :PLAY"01" :GOSUB 
1140 : PLAY"05" : DRAW"S5" 



480 F0RG=1T08 : DRAW"BM128 , 120C1;X 
A$(G) ; " : PLAY " BAGFED" : DRAW" BM12 8 , 
120 C0 ; XA$ ( G ) ; 11 : 1 FINKE Y $ >< " " THEND 
RAW" BM12 8 , 120C1 ; XA$ ( 1 ) ; " : G0SUB2 5 
40:GOTO490:ELSE NEXTG: GOTO480 
490 DRAW"BM128,120C1;XA$(G) ; " : DR 
AW"S5":PM0DE4,5:LINE(5,5) -(2 50,1 
87) ,PSET,B 

500 SCREEN 1,1:DRAW"S4" 
510 1 

520 *************************** 
53j3 ' ********GAMEPLAY********** 
540 *************************** 

550 * 

560 PT=PL 

570 F0RR0=1T0RD 

580 POKE65494,0:OPEN "D",#1,"CAT 

EG0RY",65: ***OPEN FILE** 

590 FIELD#1,1 AS CT$,64 AS K$ 

600 SS=0:DS=RND(LOF(1) ) :GET#1,DS 

: CAT=VAL ( CT$ ) : C$=K$ : GY=1 

610 F0RSS=1T0R0:IFK(SS)= DS THEN 

600ELSENEXTSS: ' ***COMPARE IF FIL 

E IS ALREADY USED THIS GAME*** 

620 K(RO)= DS :CLOSE#l:POKE65495 

,0:'**SAVE FILE FOR FUTURE COMPA 

RE** 

630 TL=0:FORTL=64TO1STEP-1:IFMID 
$ (C$ , TL, 1) X" "THEN 6 40 : ELSENEXTT 
L:'**FIND LENGTH OF C$ MINUS BLA 
NK SPACES** 
640 1 

6 50 ' ************************** 

660 '* COUNT CONSONANTS * 
67j3 

680 PZ=0:CV=0:CW=0:FORZZ=1TO64:R 
$=MID$ (C$,ZZ,1) 

690 IFASC(R$) >65THENIFR$X"A"AND 
R$X"a"ANDR$X"E"ANDR$X"e"ANDR$ 
X"I"ANDR$X"i"ANDR$X"0"ANDR$X 
" O " ANDR$ X " U " ANDR$ X " U " THENCV=CV 
+1 

700 IFASC(R$)>47ANDASC(R$)<58THE 
NCV=CV+1 

710 NEXTZZ: ***END COUNT CONSONAN 
TS** 

720 PT=PT+1 : IFPT> PL THENPT=0 : ' * 
**SELECT WHO GOES FIRST EACH ROU 
ND*** 

730 PI=PT:E$="" 

740 PM0DE4 , 5 : SCREEN1 , 1 : DRAW"S4" : 
X1=0 : Y1=0 : SP=8 : EX=1 : A$=STRING$ ( 6 
4,CHR$ (125) ) :GOSUB1140:PMODE4, 1: 
SCREEN1 , 1 : CX=1 : • **DRAW SQUARES 0 
N PAGE 5** 

750 WI=0:PI=PI+1:IFPI> PL THENPI 
=1 

7 60 GOSUB1870:IFE$=""THENGOSUB12 



158 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



by the value of the spin multiplied by 
the number of times the letter appears 
in the puzzle. 

After the final round is played, the 
computer displays the scores from 
highest to lowest. If all consonants are 
shown before the puzzle is solved, the 
computer asks for the solution to the 
puzzle. If no one guesses correctly, then 
it displays SORRY NO WINNERS THIS 
ROUND and advances to the next round. 

Listing 1 , Fortune Wheel, is the main 
game. Listing 2 is for creating puzzle 
and category files for Fortune Wheel. 
When keying in Listing 1 be careful to 
space it just as it is in the listing. If you 
don't space correctly, you will get an SN 
Error. Be sure to type in both listings 
and save them on disk before using 
Listing 2 to create the puzzle file. This 
listing creates direct files and it will 
write on top of any file or program 
saved after establishing the puzzle file. 
This should be a dedicated disk. 

This game will only run on a 64K 
Extended BASIC machine. It uses direct 



access files so it works only with a disk 
drive. If you want to use it with a 
cassette, you need to modify lines 580 
through 620. 

I have used the speed up and slow 
down pokes (POKE 65495,0 and POKE 
65494,0) in several places in the pro- 
gram. I found that you must use them 
in lines 580 and 620 because these lines 
are in the retrieve record routine. 

One final note on Listing 1: In the 
alphabet DATfi lines, I have created a 
data record for the computer to draw 
every alphabet character (true upper- 
and lowercase) and all the punctuation 
characters on the keyboard. So when 
using Listing 2 to create puzzle and 
category records, feel free to use lower- 
case letters and punctuation. 

When you load and run the program, 
a menu appears giving the options to 
Create Records, Correct Record, List 
Records and End. When creating rec- 
ords, the computer enters a short word 
processing routine that allows you to 
type in a puzzle record up to 64 char- 



acters long. Once the record is the way 
you want it, press ENTER. The Enter 
Category menu pops up giving the 
choice of phrase, title, place, person, 
president and Bible phrase for catego- 
ries. 

If you choose the Correct Record 
option from the first menu, the compu- 
ter asks you to enter the number of the 
record you want and retrieves the rec- 
ord so you can correct it. After all 
corrections are made, press ENTER and 
the Enter Category menu pops up again 
for you to enter the record category. 

If you select Option 3 (List Records) 
the computer asks if you want a hard 
copy. Next it asks you to ENTER RE 
CORD : STRRT , END. Just enter the 
number for the first then the last record 
to be listed. The computer will list the 
records on the screen and printer. 

(You may direct any questions about 
this program to Mr, Branigan at 105 
Briar field Cove, Jacksonville, AR 
72076, 501-982-6067. Please enclose an 
SASE when writing.) □ 



^^80 



180 71 

370 184 

490 10 

660 50 

770 216 

870 91 

990 226 

1060 205 

1260 26 



1360 169 

1540 99 

1670 20 

1880 88 

2130 49 

2220 199 

2310 165 

END 136 



T 



it 



• *************************** 
•** FORTUNE WHEEL ** 

'** (C)-OCT.1985 ** 

>** BY : ARRON W. BRANIGAN ** 
i *************************** 
i 



Listing 1: WHEEL 

ija 

20 
30 
40 
50 
60 

70 CLEAR 1000 : PCLEAR8 : DIM L$(94) 
,11(15,15) ,CH$(56) :PT=1:GOSUB130: 
GOTO 160 
8)8 1 

9j3 1 *************************** 

Ijdfd '** PLAYER INPUT ROUTINE ** 
llj3 **************************** 

120 « 

130 CLS(RND(8) ) : PRINT@224 , ; : IN 



PUT 11 ENTER NUMBER OF ROUNDS 1-10" 
;RD: IFRD1ORRD>10THEN130 
140 CLS(RND(8)) : PRINT@224 , " 11 ; : IN 
PUT "ENTER NUMBER OF PLAYERS (10 
MAX) " ;PL:IFPL<1ORPL>10THEN140 
150 CLSRND(8) : FORX=lTOPL: PRINT"E 
NTER PLAYER" ;X ; "S NAME" ; : INPUTN$ 
(X) : NEXTX : RETURN 
160 CLS (8) :PRINT@224, 

PLEASE WAIT WHILE 

I CREATE GRAPHICS ":SCR 
EEN0 , 1 : PMODE4 , 1 
170 POKE65495,0 

180 L$ (92)="BD12R8" :L$ (93)="C1BD 
12R8C0" : 1 ***BUILD UNDERLINE STRI 
NG** 
190 
200 
210 
220 
230 

240 FORX=lT08 :READA$ (X) : NEXTX :FO 
RX=1T091:READL$(X) : NEXTX : FORX=lT 
05:READM$(X) : NEXTX: A$ (0) =A$ (8) :L 
$ (94) ="C1BD1D12R1U12R1D12R1U12R1 
D12R1U12R1D12R1U12C0L8D12R8U12 " 
250 B1$=L$(1) :BK$="C0"+MID$(L$(1 
),3,LEN(L$(1))) 

2 60 1 **END LEARN ALPH & ARROWS** 
270 1 



*************************** 

** LEARN ALPHABET & ARROWS** 
*************************** 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 57 



GAME 



Fortune Wheel 



This challenging 
game provides fan 
and excitement for 
the whole family 



By Arron W. Branigan 




ant to play a great family game? Then 
Fortune Wheel is for you. This game is 
fun for the entire family; up to 10 people 
can play at once. If you don't have anyone to play with 
you, it's just as fun to play by yourself. This game is very 
exciting — from the exhilaration of guessing the puzzle to 
the frustration of going bankrupt. 
When playing, the computer prompts are self-explanatory. 
When starting a game the program asks for number of rounds 
and players, and the names of the players. The screen then displays 
PLEASE WAIT WHILE I CREATE GRAPHICS. The title screen soon 
appears. Press any key to begin the game. 

The program retrieves a record for round one then sets up the 
screen. A menu appears allowing you to solve the puzzle, buy a 
vowel or spin. Select 1 to solve the puzzle (if you guess correctly, 
your score is multiplied by three and the game proceeds to the 
next round or end routine). Select 2 to buy a vowel ($25). Select 
3 to spin. 

If you choose to spin, you are asked to enter a consonant. 
If the letter selected is in the puzzle, your score is increased 

Arron Branigan is a technical sergeant in the US. Air 
Force and is pursuing a bachelor's degree in computer 
applications at Arkansas State University. He enjoys 
programming his computer and singing country 

and western music. 



156 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 







./ 



SCIENCE GAME 

32K EB - disk only/$29.95 
Over 600 questions in 9 categories/ 
Makes learning science ilacts furs. 
Game format, 1 or 2 players, teams. 
Grade 8 and up. ! : 

■ DougfM 
_ . - • i i 

ftOAO 



Dover 



;ity M»fH 

_ IlnstttuUO 



STREET MAP GAME 

32K .... $1 9;95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Hi-res. screen and graphics portray 
a typical section frf ;«i^^S^;'This 
one shows --pBQpWs^ ^iS^s^- the 
school, the park, ^iiiestiGiis on 
how to get from one place to another 
are asked and: thfe footsteps are 
shown. ; \ ^ - 

CHEMISTRY fliTOR 

;;^: : JpK : > : ,f}isfc,pnly - $29.95 
A hi^res, 4 part program that drills 
high school students in Elements, 
Symbols, Naming Compounds, 
Common Ions; and Balancing Equa- 
tions. Correct answer given after 2 in- 
correct resppnsesi^Valuable tool for 
studying chemistry. 

5 LIGHTPEN PROGRAMS 

32K EB - $44.95 
Five menu driven educational pro- 
grams designed for children in grade 
1 and 2, and special educational 
students. Basic addition, basic 
multiplication, shape series; pat- 
ching, number series matching and 
word rhyming are included. All on a 
HI-RES screen, with graphics. User 
nefed ; "only •{fea^ : fif|iSiii|| pen to 
operate the progr artist (tlGHT PEN 
w vv INCLUDED^ 



VERBAL MATH PROBLEMS 



PIZZA GAME 

32K EB~ tape/$19.95 
Learn to locate coordinates on a 
grid. HI-RES text and graphics. 



AREA & PERIMETER 

32K EB - tape/$19.95 
Triangles, rectangles, and circles 
are covered in this HI-RES text and 
graphics program. 



OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT 

32K~Disk Only - $24.95 
A set of programs designed to in- 
troduce and provide practice in the 
skills of filing out bank appiicatiorfl 
deposit and withdrawal slips, and 
computing bank account balances. 
Loaded with graphic presentations. 




SALES & BARGAINS 

32K EB - tape/$19.95 
Learn to find the discounted price, 
HI-RES text and beautiful graphics. 



<!■ '-i: 



-■ | i-rfv* 

■■r»i »-:.-v.<t-f, 

(! - - - ;^."„ ... 

DOLLARS & SENSE 

16K-Ext. - $14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 
5 Learn to make purchases. Graphie 
displays of items kids love. Player 
buys items using dollars and coins 
to practice using money correctly. 
Solutions given. 



DISTANCE PROBLEMS McCOCOS MENU 

32K EB - tape/$19.95 16K-Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 



Moving graphics and text combines America's favorite pastime-going |g| 



on a HI-RES screen. Rate xTime * 
Distance in all its forms. 



STREET MAP GAME 32KE.B. 
$19.95 Tape $24.95 Disk 

Hi - res screen and graphics por- 
tray a typical section of a street 
map, This one shows people's 
homes, the school, the park, the 
post office, etc. Questions are ask- 
ed on how to get from one place to 
another and the footsteps are 
shown after response. A fun way 
to improve map skills. 



to eat. Learn to buy and add up your 
purchases from a typical fast food 
restaurant menu. Gain skill in using 
money. Different prices each time, 

COCO WHEEL OF FORTUNE 

32K - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
, graphics and screen in this 
version of the popular TV show, 1-6 
players. Spin the wheel for points 
and guess a letter to solve one of the 
200 puzzles. Have fun while 
strengthening LA skills. 



Iff 



'■^■iv.,, ! ^V'ni*' i i 

'iv» » "SSt'.i 

'•*.,> !i vV'-i.vV,S. !, ..'y , .v^ „.?::s : . «V 



32K - disk only - $29,95 
An easy to use classroom grading 
program. Keeps grades for up to 6 
classes of up to 40 students per 
class. Many options including 



printer. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Computeni^lan 



(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1.00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



Computer Island Educational Software 

Green, Staten Island, New York 10312 

(718) 948-2748 



PROGRAM TITLE 



PRESCHOOL 

Preschool I - counting Pre-K 

Preschool II - adding Pre-K 

Preschool III - alphabet Pre-K 

Music Marvel-play songs Pre-K, 1 

Arrow Games - 6 games Pre-K, 1 

First Games - 6 games Pre-K, 1 

Mr. Cocohead-facemaker K-3 

Bentley Bear Pre-K 

LANGUAGE ARTS 

Beyond Words 1-3 parts 
Beyond Words 2-3 parts 
Beyond Words 3-3 parts 
Vocabulary 1-1000 words 
Vocabulary 2-1000 words 
Vocabulary 3-1000 words 
Context Clues 
Cocojot - jotto game 
Reading Aids - 4 parts 
King Author - writing tool 2-6 
Cocowheel of Fortune 4-up 
Context Clues 2-3 



1 6K Ext. 
16K Ext. 
16K Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-£xt. 
32K-Ext, 
16K-Ext. 
32K-Disk 



3-5 
6-8 
9-12 
3-5 
6-8 
9-12 

4,5,6,or 7 
3-up 



32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
16K*Ext. 
16K 

16K-Ext. 
16/32 Ext 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French Basebali-200wds. 4-up 
French Basebalf-SOOwds. 4-up 
Spanish Basebali-200wds 4-up 
Spanish Baseball-500wds 4-up 
Italian Baseball-200wds. 4-up 
Hebrew Alphabet beginners 
Hebrew Utility 



16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
drawing utility 1 6K-Ext. 



CRITICAL THINKING PROBLEMS 

Memory Castle-Sunburst 4-up 
Factory by Sunburst 4-up 
Pond by Sunburst 2-up 
Teasers by Tobbs-Sunb. - 4-up 
Inner City - simulation 7~up 
Find The Math Sequence 4-up 
Stranded-graphic advent. 4-up 

TEACHER/STUDENT AIDS 

Colorgrade - gradebook Adult 
Quizmaker - write quizzes 5-up 
ETT typing tutor (c^owarehOLJse) 4-up 

The Puzzler (CaforConnection) 4-Up 



32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-Ext. 
32K-disk 



32K-disk 
32K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-disk 




PRICE 


PROGRAM TITLE 


GRADES 


MEMORY 


PRICE 




MATH 




.* — , 





1 1 ,95 


Opening a Bank Account 4-7 


32K-disk 


24.95 


11.95 


Dollars & Sense 


2-4 


16K-Ext, 


14.95 


11.95 


McCoco's Menu 


3-5 


16K-Ext. 


14.95 


11.95 


Moneypak 


2-5 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


21 .95 


Graph Tutor 


3-7 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


24.95 


Graph-it 


7-up 


16K-Ext. 


14.95 


16.95 


Math Invaders 


1-8 


1 6K-Ext. 


17.95 


29.95 


Mathquiz - 4 operations 


2-5 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 




Addition & Subtraction 




16K 


11.95 




Skill Tutor Series 








19,95 


Division Tutor 


3-7 


1 6K-Ext. 


14.95 


19.95 


Multiplication Tutor 


3-7 


16K-Ext. 


14.95 


19.95 


Factors Tutor 


5-8 


16K-Ext. 


19.95 


19.95 


Fractions Tutors (3 programs) 








19.95 


addition, subtraction or multiplication 


4-8 


16K-Ext, 


19.95ea. 


19.95 


Trigonometry 


8-10 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


17.95 


Equations Linear 


7-9 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


11.95 


Equations Quadratic 


8-11 


32K.Ext. 


19.95 


19.95 


Arith. Diagnostic Disk 


3-8 


32K-disk 


49.95 


29.95 


Fraction Diagnostic Disk 


4-9 


32K-disk 


49.95 


19.95 


Verbal Problems Series 






19.95 


Distance Problems 


5-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 




Area & Perimeter 


5-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 




Pizza Game 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


11.95 


Sales & Bargains 


6-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


19 95 


Comparison Shopping 


4-7 


o^ir\-r_.Ai, 




1 1 ,95 


Binary Dice Game 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


19.95 










11.95 


SOCIAL STUDIES 








11.95 


Know Your States 


5-up 


32K-Ext 


19.95 


1 5.95 


History Game 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


14.95 




States & Capitals 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 




Explorers & Settlers 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


44.95 


Famous American Women 


6-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


44.95 
44.95 


Street Map Game 


3-5 


32 K- Ext. 


19.95 


44.95 
49.95 
19.95 
24.95 


MISCELLANEOUS 








Name That Song 1,2,or 3 2-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Music Drill 
Science Game 


3-up 
8-up 


16K-Ext. 
32K-disk 


19.95 
29.95 




Computer Literacy 


6-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


29.95 


5 Educational Programs 


1-2 or 






24,95 


with Lightpen 


3-6 


32K-disk 


44.95 


21 .95 


Chemistry Tutor 


10-up 


32K-disk 


29.95 


29.95 


Disk indicates available on disk only 







Tape prices given. 

Add $5.00 for any program on disk. 



can also be used to set up custom reports, print mailing 
labels, etc. The limits seem only to be in the user's ability 
to program in basic. Action templates could even be used 
on data files created by other programs if the user has 
sufficient experience. 

One of the other major differences between CoCo Base 
I and other database managers is CoCo Base A ability to 
create and execute batch files. These are created using 
Schedule and executed using Jobs. Schedule creates a job 
file of Action templates. Schedule allows the user to specify 
the templates to be used as well as the order and type of 
execution of these templates. For example, a report could 
be produced by using one template to print a header, the 
next to find, format and print a list of selected records, and 
a third to print a footer and totals. Templates can be 
executed once, once for each record in order, or once for 
each record in indexed order. Since templates can contain 
many lines of BASIC code, each one can be quite complex. 

Two final options are of interest to those who need to 
construct new databases from old ones, those who want to 
create very complex databases, or those like me who 
invariably enter large amounts of data into a database 
before they realize that the data structure is wrong. Transfer 
creates a new database which includes data from an existing 
database file. Additional fields can easily be included in the 
new database format, so additional fields can be added to 
a database. This feature alone could save countless hours 
of aggravation and programming. I always seem to need just 
one more field in any database I create after it is in use. 

Update gives CoCo Base I its claim to being a relational 
database manager. Update does not access several different 
related data files at once. Instead it moves selected fields 
from one data file to another. This requires that each of the 
files has a field common to the other. Update places fields 
in the correct record in the receiving database by looking 
at this "related field." Of course only one related field is 
used. 

This ability to combine data from several data files is 
useful for a number of things. To me, the most important 
use is in keeping individual files short and combining 
information from different files later when the combined 
information is needed. 

If you get the feeling that I am impressed with CoCo Base 
I you are correct; it fits my needs quite well. However, it 
has a few problems. First is error handling. There are 



One-Liner Contest Winner . 

This little one-liner produces some interesting 
graphics designs. It is almost kaleidoscopic. 

The listing: 

0 IFT=1THENX=9*RND(8) :F0RI=1T058 
STEP2 : A=209-X-I : B=258-X-I : C=49+I 
: PUT ( X+I , I ) - ( X+C , C ) , D , NOT : PUT ( X+ 
1,148-1) - (X+C, 99-1) ,D, NOT: PUT (A, 
I)-(B,C) ,D,NOT:PUT(A,148-I)-(B,9 
9-1) ,D, NOT : NEXT : GOTO0 : ELSEPM0DE4 
, 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS 1 : DIMD (0,98) :GE 
M0, JJ ) - ( 5J3 , 50 ) i pi G:T=1: GOTO 

Rob Weinberg 
$ an Francisco, CA 

(For this winning one-liner contest er|^y t the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



instructions in the manual that tell you what to type in case 
of an error. This works and is adequate, but it is inelegant. 
There should be some way of trapping errors before they 
dump the user back to the OK prompt. Another annoyance 
was with CoCo Base A inability to allow a record to be 
removed from a database. There are many times when a user 
would like to delete a record from a file. CoCo Base / does 
not allow this in a simple way. 

The last complaint has to do with nearly every database 
management system I have used. I have to keep telling the 
program the name of the files I am working on. I realize 
that this is the price one pays for having the ability to store 
different versions of each file, index, etc., but I still find it 
a nuisance. Unfortunately, if this "problem" is fixed it would 
have to be at the expense of flexibility. Given the choice, 
I'll vote for flexibility. 

The last comment I have is not so much a complaint as 
a suggestion to potential CoCo Base / users. Learn BASIC. 
Although CoCo Base I can be used by any non- 
programmer, the power of the program is best released by 
someone familiar with BASIC. You could learn BASIC as you 
go, but previous knowledge is extremely helpful. At first the 
program may seem weak or difficult to use, but after some 
practice I find that it can do a great many powerful and 
useful things. 



(JTJ Enterprises, P.O. Box 110841, Nashville, TN 37211, 
disk $49.95 plus $2 S/H) 




Co Co - Cooler ft 




• Brings operating 
temperature 
to ambient, 
regardless 
of 

accessory 
load 

• Reduces 
tempera- 
ture of 

ENTIRE computer . . . not 
just the SAM chip 

• Easy 1-minute Installation 

• $44.95 



Companion Keyboard Cover $9.95 



Send For Free Catalog Of Co Co Software & Computerware 

• For Fastest Service Send Money Order Or Certified Check 
• Add $2.50 Shipping For Continental U.S. 

• Add $4.00 Shipping For AK, HI. APO's, P.O. Boxes, & Canada 
• Add $15.00 Shipping For Overseas 
• Add $3.00 For 220-250 Volt Model 

• California Residents Add 6 l A% Sales Tax 
• Add $3.00 For C.O.D. 



REM Industries, Inc. 

9420 "B' LuriineAve.. Chatsworth, CA 9131 1 

(818) $41-3719 



August 1 986 THE RAINBOW 



w 

153 



Software Review ^S^SS^SSSSSSSB^N 

Powerful CoCo Base I 
is Full of Surprises 

By D. McGarry 

CoCo Base lis the latest offering from JTJ Enterprises 
of Nashville, Tennessee. I mention this because there is a 
strong family resemblance between CoCo Base / and CoCo 
Solver, JTJ's other product. Several neat programming 
tricks were included in both programs and both use the same 
machine language data entry editor. CoCo Base / stands on 
its own as a good, solid database program. If, however, you 
own and use CoCo Solver you will be able to extract 
maximum performance and flexibility from CoCo Base I 
with less effort than someone with no prior experience. 
Several features help CoCo Base I to stand out from the 
crowd of other database management systems. First, CoCo 
Base lis a relational database manager. This means that it 
can access more than one data file by referencing a field 
common to all files. Second, through the use of Jobs and 
Schedule options it allows the processing of batch files. 
Third, the Action option allows for the inclusion of BASIC 
statements to manipulate data. 

CoCo Base I comes on an unprotected disk which 
includes 10 program files and several sample files. All work 
is started by typing RUN "MENU" at the OK prompt. Menu 
options are Create, Put, Index, Action, Schedule, Jobs, 
Transfer and Update. 



The first step in creating a database is to use the Create 
option to create a structure file of the data fields. Each field 
is given a two-character name, description, length and type. 
Field types can be either character or numeric. The structure 
file can be edited at any time and can extend over several 
screen pages allowing for large or complex records. 

Once the structure file is saved, the Put option is used 
to add, edit, find and print records. Put uses the structure 
file defined with Create to show records and for data entry 
Put can use an existing file or create a new one as records 
are added. This allows the creation of several database files 
which all use the same data format. 

The next option is Index which does exactly what the 
name implies. Index files can be saved with their own names, 
so several index files can exist for the same data file. 

Up to this point, CoCo Base / looks and acts similar to 
most database management systems. The additional 
options make CoCo Base I different from any other 
database manager I have used. 

The most unusual and powerful uses of CoCo Base / start 
with the Action option. Action allows the creation of 
template files which can act on the database. Templates are 
sets of BASIC language statements that are added to the 
Action program as it runs. Action statements can be used 
to do nearly anything to the data file as far as I can tell. 
I used Action templates to average a set of grades for one 
of my physics classes. The grades each had a weighting 
factor. Some of the grades were numeric and some 
alphabetic. Even though it took some experimentation to 
get the template correct, Action allowed me to do this job 
more quickly than any other method I have used. Action 



TANDY COMPUTER DISCOUNTS 





COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3127 64k color comp 
26-3131 1st disk drive 



165.00 
269.95 



PRINTERS 



26-1276 DMP 105 
26-1277 DMP-430 
26-1278 DWP-220 
26-1280 DMP-130 



160.00 
660.00 
369.00 
269.00 



MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1000 mod 1000 

25-1004 128K memory board 

25-1005 2nd drive mod 1000 

25- 1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 

26- 1070 mod 4D 64k 2dr. 
26-5103 mod 2000 2dr. 
26-5104 mod 2000 HD 



700.00 
169.95 
160.00 
125.00 
920.00 
1,400.00 
2,200.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 

IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



152 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



Hardware ReviewST^^^^ ■■ ■ ST/^N Hardware Revie ^ 



CoCo Keyboard 
Beats the Chiclets 

Imagine . . . could someone actually like the "chiclet" 
keyboard on their 6 F* board CoCo? I did. I was accustomed 
to using that keyboard and I can hunt and peck with the 
best of them. Well, all that changed when I received my 
review assignment for the replacement keyboard offered by 
Spectrum Projects. 

I received the keyboard and immediately installed it in 
my Color Computer. The documentation was brief and 
appeared incomplete. Nevertheless, replacing a keyboard is 
perhaps one of the easiest upgrades to perform on a CoCo. 
To make it even easier, the keyboard is the same as the 26- 
3016 keyboard retailing for $24.95 at Radio Shack (less 
installation). This means there is no cutting or soldering 
involved at all. 

Simply open the case (keep in mind this voids your 
warranty), unplug the old keyboard, plug in the new one 
and close the case. That's all there is to it. After that, you 
have a keyboard with full-size keys and a better overall feel. 

I found it very easy to get used to the new keyboard. 
Particularly since the key placement is the same as on my 
old one, but the new keyboard feels better and typing goes 
a lot smoother. Even touch-typists should like this keyboard 
more than some others on the market. 

The keyboard is designed to fit into any revision of Color 
Computer from the old *F' board to the present CoCos. The 
cable is the transparent, super-thin mylar conductor type. 
If you have a version earlier than the S F' board, Spectrum 
also sells an adapter that allows you to easily install the 
keyboard in your computer as well. Keep in mind, if you 
have one of the newer CoCo 2s this is the same keyboard 
you already have. 

I highly recommend this keyboard for anyone and 
everyone. Its low cost as well as ease of installation make 
it one of the best upgrade buys on the CoCo market today. 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, keyboard $14.95, adapter $9.95, 
plus $3 S/H) 



No Frills U-Ruff 
is an Excellent Value 

As much as we hate to admit it, the present-day world 
puts much emphasis on time. Hurry this and hurry that; it 
is as if we were in a race to the finish! Well, the U-Buff printer 
buffer from Digital Devices fits in nicely. 

I have given this little gem a thorough run for its money. 
Over the last month and a half, I have sent it files from 
Delphi, files from my word processor, data from my BASIC 
programs and graphics. It hasn't let me down yet. It has 
always printed each character reliably. 

For those who don't know, a printer buffer is nothing 
more than a go-between. It goes between your computer and 
printer. A printer is limited in speed. The print head can 
only move so fast across the page. However, a computer 
can send data much faster. So the buffer allows the 
computer to finish sending its data more quickly. Therefore, 
you don't have to wait all day for the printer to finish before 
going ahead with your work. 

As an example, when I told my system to print a 40. 5K 
file, the prompt was back on the screen in 83.5 seconds. I 
was already involved in my favorite game when my printer 
finished printing out the 30 double-spaced pages 15 minutes 
and 53 seconds later. 

The U-Buff is available in two configurations: 16K 
memory and 64K memory. A nice added feature is the 
average user can upgrade the unit from 16K to 64K by 
himself. The manual gives information on what chips to buy 
and how to install them properly. The only drawback is that 
the one-year warranty only applies to the configuration 
purchased from Digital Devices. Still, I believe this is very 
reasonable. 

The buffer is designed to accept input from any computer 
having a Centronics interface. Since my serial/ parallel 
converter terminates in a Centronics plug, I had no 
problems. The unit also terminates in a Centronics plug for 
the printer's parallel port. 

The U-Buff comes with a 14-page, easy to read pamphlet. 
The instructions cover installation, testing, troubleshoot- 
ing, upgrades and a whole slew of technical information plus 
a glossary. 

Despite its usefulness, keep in mind a printer buffer isn't 
for everybody. But anyone with a business or who does a 
lot of printing will surely welcome anything to help them 
out. 

The U-Buff is an excellent, no-frills printer buffer. For 
the reasonable price it is a good work horse with a good 
deal of backing from the manufacturer. This one gets four 
stars. 

(Digital Devices Corporation, 430 Tenth St., Suite N205, 
Atlanta, GA 30318, 16K $119.95, 64K $149.95) 



— Vic Roberts 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Here's a little disk utility for your toolbox. Just 
enter the track, sector and drive numbers at the 
prompt and you will be able to examine the disk. 

The listing: 

1 CLEAR 3jdjd: INPUT " TRACK : " ; T : INPU 
T 11 SECTOR: " ;S : INPUT "DRIVE : " ;D:DSK 
1$ D,T,S,A$,B$:PRINT A$;B$:RUN 

Anton Sipos 
Los Angeles, CA 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



— Cray Augsburg 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 151 



formatter we published recently, or the 
TSWord formatter. The Desk Mate editor is 
very easy to use and a nice way to enter text. 
Add the dot commands required by 
TSWord or other formatter and you can 
print it in any way you like. 

Many people also like TSEdit. It is based 
on the UNIX VI text editor and does an 
excellent job. The only reason I haven't 
bothered to use it is the fact that my fingers 
already have the DynaStar diamond mem- 
orized. 1 would hate to have to learn to touch 
type all over again. Yet, a friend of mine 
really likes TSEdit. He learned to touch type 
on TSEdit first. He enjoys working with the 
TSWord formatter but he has discovered 
one problem. I have confirmed the problem 
but still haven't figured out a solution. If you 
come up with one, please let me know. 

Since memory is limited, divide the writ- 
ing into shorter files and use TS Word's .NX 
command. That's fine. In fact, it's a good 
way to work, even if you don't need to. 
Unfortunately however, TSWord breaks to 
a new page every time it hits an .NX com- 
mand. What we need is a way to disable this 
page break so we can print continuously one 
page after the other. Here's an example you 
can use to print three individual files at one 
time. 

,nx part_one 
,nx part_two 
,nx part_three 

Many people on the CoCo SIG forum 
seem to believe DeskMate files are not 
compatible with other OS-9 programs. Not 
so. The secret can be uncovered in the 
documentation for the terminal program in 
DeskMate. The DeskMate editor automat- 
ically adds an extension, .DOC, to the end 
of the filename. Therefore, if you save a file 
named "Column" it will actually be named 
"Column.DOC." Save a DeskMate file then 
exit and run the dir utility. Then, go ahead 
and list or dump the file using the complete 
filename. It worked, didn't it? 

The reverse is also true and you could 
build a file and then edit it with the Desk- 
Mate editor if you give the file you are 
building a .DOC extension. For example: 

OS9: build Example . DOC <ENTER> 

While we're still talking about DeskMate, 
we should clear up another point. The 
DeskMate terminal program requires you to 
use the Deluxe RS-232 Pak. You cannot use 
the /Tl port on the back of the CoCo. 
Again, bit banging just doesn't work in a 
multi-tasking environment. If it did, the 
DeskMate programmers would have pro- 
vided the option to change it. They clearly 
state that you need the hardware AO A in 
the DeskMate manual. 

Good News for Graphics Programmers 

Eric at Color Venture Software, P.O. Box 
1729, Huntington Station, NY 11746 needs 
a good graphics programmer for an exciting 
CoCo project. He has been negotiating with 
Broderbound Software about porting The 



Print Shop, a best-selling program on the 
Apple and Commodore to the Color Com- 
puter. He wants to market it to Tandy, so 
it must be done in OS-9. Here's your chance! 
Give him a call at 516-271-8456. 

The CoCo/IBM Connection 

Many people use an IBM PC or clone at 
work these days. That's the bad news. The 
good news is that we can now work at home 
on our Color Computers, save our efforts on 
an IBM-compatible disk and carry it to 
work. In fact you can often get a lot more 
work done when you get away from the 
constant interruptions of the workplace. 

We owe our new freedom to James 
Hornsby, who has developed a set of utilities 
to let you read or write standard Radio 
Shack DOS single-sided disks as well as 
standard IBM PC single-sided disks. They 
use Dan Johnson's Color Computer OS-9 
SDisk driver and can also read and rename 
files on double-sided IBM PC disks. Since 
they run in OS-9 they also let you send OS- 
9 files to either Disk basic and IBM PC 
disks, or vice versa. They are most useful for 
transferring standard ASCII data files. 
Additionally, if you save a basic program 
in ASCII and transfer the file to the other 
computer, it should load without a problem. 

Sequential ASCII text files from Disk 
basic load into IBM PC editors without a 
hitch, although you have to add line feeds 
after each carriage return when using some 
editors. When you move ASCII text files 
from an IBM to the Color Computer, you 
must strip off the extra linefeeds. Hornsby 
gives you two utilities, addlf and striplf to 
take care of these jobs. 

All of Hornsby's utilities use OS-9's 
standard input and output path. This means, 
their output can be redirected to a file or 
used in a pipeline. If you avoid using pipes, 
you can even run these transfer utilities on 
a single-drive system. A typical single-drive 
command looks like this: 

0S9: RSread -s #10K /d0/f ilename . dat 
>/ dj?/ do cumen t s /my f i 1 e 

Here is a typical command line that uses 
a pipe. 

0S9: RSread /dl/f ilename. ext ! addlf 

When you run this command, RSread 
reads data from a standard Color Computer 
disk and writes it to OS-9's standard output 
path. But the pipe, noted by the exclamation 
mark (!) diverts this output to the input of 
the next program in the pipeline, addlf. The 
latter command adds a linefeed after every 
carriage return and sends its output to OS- 
9's standard output path. Since there are no 
more pipes and the standard output has not 
been redirected, the output of addlf appears 
on the terminal. Programs that work like 
addlf and striplf are called filters. 

To copy a file to an IBM disk use a 
command line similar to this: 

0S9: PCWrite /Dl/letter . txt 

</d0/letters/myletter 



Notice that PCWrite gets its input from 
a file named myletter, in a directory named 
letters on a disk mounted in Drive /dO. It 
does that because the standard input path it 
reads has been redirected to receive informa- 
tion from the file. It stores the file letter in 
an IBM file named letter.txt on a disk 
mounted in Drive /dl. 

In addition to the standard read and write 
operations, you can also format IBM disks 
and delete or rename IBM files with addi- 
tional utilities in the package. Be careful 
with IBM filenames containing the charac- 
ters special to the OS-9 Shell — !, # and &. 
You can only access files stored in the root 
directory of an IBM disk that uses hierar- 
chical directories. 



This Month's Listings 

Gregory A. Law, who has contributed 
several OS-9 tips in the past, has contributed 
his version of Dennis Derringer's Pager. B09. 
The program first appeared in MOTD 
several months ago. Law modified the 
program to make it print 66 lines per page, 
rather than 67 and taught it to recognize a 
second procedure in the source code. When 
the new Pager. B09 encounters an additional 
procedure, it skips to the next page and 
changes the header on the page to the name 
of the new procedure. The page numbering 
remains intact. He also corrected the way the 
program handles line numbers. Addition- 
ally, it prompts for an output device so you 
can use any parallel printer or even / TERM. 
Law challenges you to come up with a way 
to handle a BASIC09 program line in the form 
of: 

IF variable=data THEN 
variable=null \ ENDIF 

Presently, Pager. B09 treats the rest of the 
program following this line as if it were still 
in the IF loop. In other words, Pager only 
recognizes control structure keywords when 
they are at the beginning of a line. 

And here's another tip. Why not write this 
program so that it receives input from 
standard input and sends output to standard 
output. If you do this, you could use it as 
a filter. To make Pager. B09 read from the 
standard input path, take out this line and 
the conditional code following it: 

INPUT "File to list: "filename 

To make Pager. B09 send output to the 
standard output path, you must make 
similar changes. Take out the prompt for the 
output device and the code that uses it. 
Then, remove the following four lines: 

OPEN #path, filename: READ 
OPEN #pr inter, output : WRITE 
CLOSE #path 
CLOSE #printer 

Then, early in the program add the follow- 
ing two lines: 

path:=0( 
printer :-l 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 201 



After you do this, the program gets input 
from the standard input path when it en- 
counters the line, "READ ttpath, line". 
Likewise, it sends output to the standard 
output path when it encounters any line 
containing "print ttpr inter". 

Run Pager. B09 with OS-9 command lines 
like this: 

0S9: basic09 Pager 
<any_BASIC09_file >/P 

0S9: basic09 Pager 
<mor e_J3 AS IC0 9_J3our c e >a_spoo 1 er_f il e 

0S9; basic09 Pager 
<any_B AS I C0 9_S our c e 

The first command line sends its output 
to the printer. The second line saves the 
output in a file on disk which you can later 
print, and the last line sends the output to 
the Color Computer screen. 

While you are typing Pager. B09 into the 
CoCo you will find several program lines 
longer than the length of the screen. To get 
around this problem, type a linefeed char- 
acter and continue to type the program line. 
Remember, do not press the ENTER or 
RETURN key after you press the linefeed key 
— just keep typing. To generate a linefeed 
character on the Color Computer, hold 
down the CLEAR key and press the 'J' key. 
BASIC09 will let you enter the long series of 
IF ... OR ... OR .. . THEN statements in 
Pager. B09 if you do this. This series appears 
twice in the listing and both times the three 
lines of code in the listing should be entered 
as one line of code. 

A New line.c 

Law also modified the standard line.c 
program that comes with the Microware C 
compiler from Tandy. The program now 
paginates the listings at 66 lines per page and 
includes a header that prints the filename 
and pager number. He also gives you the 
ability to add the string "/*page*/ " to your 
own code. When the line.c sees this string it 
automatically skips to the top of the next 
page. This is a handy feature since it allows 
a way to add a simple comment to programs 
to keep a routine from being listed on two 
pages. 

Our final listing this month comes from 
Matthew Belmonte of Alexandria, Virginia. 
The listing stat.a is written in the RMA 
assembler format. RMA is the assembler 
called C.Asm in Microware C. It just might 
come in handy if you are trying to port C 
programs from UNIX over to OS-9. The 
short c program, example. c, shows how to 
use "stat( )" from within your own c pro- 
grams. To link stat( ) with example.c, use the 
following command line. 

clink /dl/lib/cstart.r 
example. r stat.r -#=/dl/ 
example -l-/dl/lib/clib.l 

That's it for August! But, never fear, next 
month should be just as much fun as we try 
to come up with a way to organize your 
disks. Till then, keep on hacking! □ 



Listing 1: new. pager 

(* BASIC09 Listing Utility *) 

(* Written by Dennis Derringer *) 

(* Modified by Greg Law *) 

DIM filename : STRING [20] ; line: STRING [2 00] 
DIM temp: STRING [200] 
DIM xline: STRING [60] 

DIM path, pr inter , page ,linecount , tabset : BYTE 

DIM proc: STRING [50] 

DIM output :STRING[5] 

DIM a , start , endpos : INTEGER 

DIM cnt : BYTE 

INPUT "Output device </P) i ", output 
IF output-" " THEN 

output :-"/p" 
ENDIF 

(* Main Loop *) 
10 PRINT CHR$<12) 

PRINT "BASIC09 Listing Pager" 

PRINT "Type 'end' or press [ENTER] to exit" 

PRINT 

INPUT "File to list: ", filename 

IF filename-" end" OR f ilename»"END" OR filename-"" THEN 

END 
ENDIF 

page:-l 
line count :— 1 
tabs et: -10 

OPEN #path, filename: READ 
READ #path,llne 
proc: -line 

OPEN #pr inter , output : WRITE 
GOSUB 100 

WHILE NOT(EOF(#path) ) DO 
READ #path,line 
REPEAT 

start : -SUBSTR(CHR? (10) , line) 

IF startO0 THEN 

line :«LEFT$( line, start -1)+" "+MID? (line , start+1,200) 
ENDIF V^^-'-^^y^^^H-- 

UNTIL start-0 

IF LEFT? (line , 4)»"ELSE" THEN 

PRINT #printer ,TAB(tabset-2) ; line 

line count :«linecount+l 
ELSE 

IF LEFT? (line, 7)-"ENDEXIT" OR LEFT$ (line, 5)— "ENDIF" OR 
LEFT? (line ,7)="ENDL00P" OR LEFT? (line , 8)«"ENDWHILE" OR 
LEFT? (line, 5)«"UNTIL" OR LEFT? (line ,4)— "NEXT" THEN 
tabset :«tabset-2 

ENDIF 

IF LEN(line)>60 THEN 
temp: -line 

xl ine : -LEFT? ( 1 ine , 60) 

start :-l 

endpos : -61 
REPEAT 

IF start-1 THEN 

a: -tabset 
ELSE 

a:-tabset+2 
ENDIF 
REPEAT 

endpos : -endpos - 1 



202 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



/'J 



:^^^0^0^po-s , 1) »" " OR endpos>LEN( line) OR 

IF endpos=JJ THEN 

endpos»6j? 
END IF 

xline : -LEFT $ (xline , endpos) 
line : »MID$ ( 1 ine , endpos+1 , 200) 
PRINT #printer,TAB(a) ; xline 
linecount :-linecount+l 
start : =-endpos+l 
endpo s : -61 

xl ine : -LEFT$ (line, 6$ } 
UNTIL line-"" 
line: -temp 
ELSE 

IF ASC(line)<58 AHD ASC(lins)>46 THEN 
cnt : -1 

REPEAT-'''' :J ;' ■■ 'gljfffi . ■ 

xl ine : -LEFT $ (line , cnt ) 

cnt:»cnt+l 
UNTIL MID$ (line, cnt, 1)«" » 
line : -MID$ ( line, cnt+1; 20) 

PRINT #printer,TAB(5) ; xline; TAB(tabset); line 
linecount :«linecount+l 
ELSE 



IF LEFT$(line , 9)=" PROCEDURE" THEN 

FOR a-1 TO 65-linecount 
PRINT #printer|GHR$(13) 

NEXT a 

proc :«line 

GOSUB 100 
ELSE 

PRINT #pr inter, TAB ( tabs et) ; line 
linecount : »linecount+l 

END IF 

END IF . . . . 

IF LEFT$ ( line, 2 )«"IF" OR LEFT $ (line , 6)-»EXITIF" OR 
LEFT$(line,4) «"LOOP" OR LEFT$ (line , 5 )«" WHILE" OR 
LEFT$(line,6)-"REPEAT" OR LEFT? (line , 3)»"FOR" THEN 
tabset : »tabset+2 

END IF 
ENDIF 

IF linecount>60 THEN 

FOR a»l TO 65 -linecount 

PRINT #printer,CHR$(13) > 
NEXT a 
GOSUB 100 
ENDIF 
ENDWHILE 

FOR a«l TO 65-linecount 

PRINT #pr inter , CHR$ (13) ; 
NEXT a 
CLOSE #path 
CLOSE #pr inter 
GOTO 10 

(* Subroutine to prinS^page Reading ■•*) 
100 PRINT #pr inter," n " 

PRINT #printer USING "tl0, s32, t65 ., \ Page : 1 , i3",proc ,page 
PRINT #pr inter, TAB (10) ; " Date / Time: "; DATES 
PRINT #pr inter," " 1# 1|§|I 
page :=page+l 
linecount :«3 
RETURN 



* LOCAL * IN * LOS * ANGELES * 



THE E.D.C. 




FLIPPY 
ATTACK! 



DON'T RUIN YOUR DISKS! 

Highest Quality Certified Diskettes. True 
Flippies— Already "Doubled". DS/DD 
10/S17.95 + S2.50 S & H 



2764 Eprom (10) 
27128 Eprom (10) 
6809E CPU 
6847 VOG 
6883 SAM 
LS785 NEW SAM 
RS DOS 1.1 
Ext. Bas. 1.1 
Est. Bas (28 Pin) 
4464 DRAM (2 chips) 
4164 DRAM (8 chips) 
Model 100 8K Upgrade 
Gold Rom "Y" Cable 



$4.50 ea. 

$5.50 ea. 
$17.95 
$17.95 
$24.95 
$29.95 
$22.95 
$24.95 
$29.95 
$34.95 
$19.95 
$34.95 
$22.95 



Quadrature fan Module B 

Piezo Electric — .11 Watts 
Fits IN Coco — No Surge 
5 CFM — Low Noise — UL 

$29.95 + 2.50S&H 

E.D.C. carries the most 
complete line of software 
and hardware in the market. 




*232 RemotePlus* by David derin 
y Require* RS232 Pah or PBJ 2SP 

Remote Terminal Program 
v Parallel to Keyboard 

No Lost or Garbled Data 
v* Error Trapping v Software Clock 
v* Disable Break Key v Inkey$ Support 
*-* New Terminal Program 

Conversation Mode ff/^^S 

All Ext. & Disk Commands RAINBOW 

20 Commands Added 

Perfect for BBS 
x> 4 Versions Inch Ext., 1.0,1.1 & JDOS 

Much More - Uses 4K 

$24.95 + 2.50 S A H (CA, ret + tax) 

VIP Writer/Speller is so good, it doesn't 
need the ads $59,95 

Always $2.50 S&H = lib. Can = Call 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 




COLOR & MICRO COMPUTERS 

Software • Hardware • Support 

Educational • Small Business • Games 
VOICE (213) 254-6809 10 A.M.-10 P.M. 
BBS (213) 258-0640 24 HRS. 
300 and 1200 Baud 

Extended Hours +Call before coming. 

6130 YORK BOULEVARD 

POST OFFICE BOX 42718 

LOS ANGELES, CA. 90042 

HlKi: CHEI KS r\1r-l Bl.E TO E .I*.C. 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 203 



Listing 2: linex 

/* line: list lines of file with numbers */ 



#include <stdio,h> 

main(argc,argv) 
char **argv; 
( 

char line [256]; 
register int count 
int linecount - 1; 
int page - 1; 
int a: 



if (--argc) 

if (freopen(*++argv,"r",stdin) NULL) { 
fprintf (stderr/'can't open file: %s\n'* ,*argv) ; 
exit(errno) ; 
) 

put_header (*argv , 1); 
linecount - 4; 
while (gets (line)) { 

if (stmcrapCline, H /*page*/"> 8) !- 0) { 

printf("%5d %s\n", ++count, line); 

linecount++; 

if (linecount > 64) { 

for (a - 1 ; a <» 67 - linecount; a++) 

printf ("\n")i 

put_header(*argv, page++); 

linecount - 4; 

) 

} else { 

for(a-l; a <« 67 - linecount; a++) 
printf (An"); 

putjieader(*argv, page++) ; 
linecount - 4 ; •. 



) 
) 

for(a - 1 ; a <■ 

printf("\n"); 

} 



67 - linecount; a++) 



put_header(line, page) 
char *line; 
int page; 
{ 

printf ( H \n%-6j?sPage: %5d\n\n", line, page); 
) 



Listing 3: stata 



*stat .a 

*C stat() call for 0S9 
*by Matthew Belmonte 
*860208 
READ, equ 
DIR. equ % 10000000 
ifpl 

use /Dl/DEFS/os9def s .a 
endc 

psect stat_a, 0,0,0, 0,0 
nam stat_a 
ttl stat 
stat: 
pshs u,y 
Idd #-65 

lbsr _stkcheck make sure enough room 
leas -33, s for scratch area 
Idx 39, s pathname argument 
leau ,x points to filename 
cpynam Ida ,x+ 
beq cpdone 
cmpa #'/ 
bne cpynam 

leau ,x save addr of last '/' 
bra cpynam 
cpdone .Ida' , 
sta l,s save char after the '/' 
Ida #'.+$80 parent dir 
sta ,u replace it w/ 
Idx 39, s 
Ida #READ.+DIR. 
os9 I$OPEN open it 
sta ,s save dir path desc 
Ida l,s 

sta ,u restore filename 
lbcs error 
find Ida , s 



S*S*S OUTUNER 



1 SNAP - STUDY ■ SYSTEM 



♦UNIQUELY FRIENDLY, learn in minutes. 

*NO FORMS to set up. Just start entering 
records. Use ARRCW keys to change levels, 
browse MAIN headings, SUB-headings, ITEMS. 

♦ADD - REVISE - DELETE at any level. 

♦NO FILE NAMES TO REMEMBER. Just choose 
a file box (A-H) from the screen listing. 

♦3 SAMPLE FILES and examples included. 

♦PRINT REPORT (printer codes permitted) 

♦NOT COPY PROTECTED ♦CLEAR MANUAL 

Best used every day to plan, check, review, 
Plan an outline for reports, jobs, duties, 
ideas, things to do. Reference notes for 
studies, books, checklists etc, etc. 



err 



JOBS FILE PARTIAL 
HOME 

HOUSE MAINTENANCE 

Change kitchen washers 
Paint utility room 
Check smoke alarm **♦♦ 
Car service MOW 9AM 

YARD 

Prune hedge, shrubs 
Gate hinges ~ fix 
Clean out eave troughs 
Marigolds-seed MAR 1st 

ENGINEERING 
PROJECT "200 
Preliminary plan 
Call traffic consultant 
re Tues 8:45 meeting 



BE ORGANIZED 1 



REQUIRE 32K DISK 
PRINTER RECOMMENDED 



ONLY $19.95 

CANADA $25 
ADD $2 shipping 



COZY SOFTWARE 

25142 53RD Ave 
ALDERGROVE, B.C. 
CANADA VOX 1A0 



204 THE RAINBOW August 1986 



leax l,s buffer 
ldy #32 record length 
os 9 I $ READ directory 
bcs error 
leax l,s 

leay ,u target filename 
cmpnam Ida ,x 
anda #%J2flllllll strip MSb 
cmpa , y+ 

bne find look @ next entry 
Ida ,x+ 
bpl cmpnam 

Ida ,y must be same length 

bne find so check for ! \0 ? 
Ida , s 

os9 I$CLOSE directory 
bcs error 

leax device, per "@" 

Ida #READ . 

os9 I$OPEN 

bcs error 

sta , s path desc 

ldx 30, s LSN (MS 16) 



Ida 32, s LSN (LS 8) 

clrb 

tfr d,u 

Ida , s 

os9 I$SEEK 

bcs error 

ldx 41, s &stbuf argument 
ldy #$100 sizeof (stbuf ) 
Ida , s 

os9 I$READ file desc sector 

bcs error 

Ida , s 

os9 I$CLOSE 

bcs error 

ldd #0 no error 
clenup leas 33, s done w/ scratch area 

puis y,u,pc 
error clra 

std errno error code 

ldd #-1 error flag 

bra clenup 
device fes "@" 

endsect 



Listing 4: statdemo 

/*a demonstration of the stat() call in 0S9 

written by Matthew Belmonte*/ 
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <direct.h> 
main() 
{ 

int i, mask; 

char name [80]; /*pathlist*/ 
struct fildes stbuf; /*inode info*/ 

static char attrb[] - { » d' , ' s 1 , 1 e ' , 1 w ? , f r ' , » e f , f w ? , 1 r 1 } ; 

printf ("filename? ") ; /*prompt*/ 

scanf ("%s" ,name) ; /*get pathlist*/ 

if ( stat (name, Sestbuf) == -1) /*call stat()*/ 

printf ("stat : error!\n") ; 
else 

■ 

{ 

printf ("\nowned by %d\n" , stbuf . f d_own) ; 

printf ("created on %02d/%02d/%02d\n", stbuf .fd_dcr[0] , stbuf .fd_dcr[l] , 
stbuf .fd_dcr[2]) ; 

printf ("last modified on %02d/%02d/%02d at %02d:%02d\n" , stbuf .fd_date[0] , 
stbuf ,fd_date[l] , stbuf .f d_date[2] , stbuf . f d_date [3] , stbuf . f d_date [4] ) ; 
printf ("%d links . \n" , stbuf . f d_l ink) ; 
mask = 0X80; 
for(i =0; i f= 8; i++) 
{ 

if (mask & stbuf .fd_att) 

putchar(attrb[i] ) ; 
else 

putchar( ' - ' ) ; 
mask »« 1; 
} 



} 



} 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 205 



THESE FINE STORES 
CARRY THE RAINBOW 

{ The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have | 
i other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you j 
j patronize those in your area. I 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix . 
Sierra Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

FayettevtJIe 
Uftte Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Chula Visla 
Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywoocl 

Lompoc 
Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

COLORADO 

Westminster 

CONNECTICUT 

Danbury 

DELAWARE 

Mlddletown 

Milford 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 
Cocoa . 
Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 
Jacksonville 



Melbourne 

North Miami 

Beach 
Orlando 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
Sarasota 
Sunrise 
Tallahassee 
Tampa 

Tltusvllle 

GEORGIA 

Bremen 

Cummings 

Jesup 

Marietta 

Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Aurora 
Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books . ■? 

Electronic World 

TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books; . 
Books Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 



Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Anderson News Co. 



R&RSoftware 
Software Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
World Book & News Co. 
L&H Electronics Emporium 
E.D.C. Industries 
Polygon Co. 
Tower Magazine 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Computer Literacy 



Software City 

Computer Serv. of Danbury 

Delmar Co. 

Mllfbrd News Stand 

Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



Software, Software, Inc. 
The Open Door 
Software Plus More 
Electronics Engineers 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
The Book Nook 
Book Town 
Deano's TV 
City Newsstand 
The Utile Store 

Aimar Bookstore 

Book Mania 

Bayd-Ebert Corp. 

Anderson News Co. 

Woifs Newsstand 

Family Computers 

Sunn/s at Sunset, Inc. 

Anderson News Co. 

Fine Print Bookstore 

Sound Trader & Computer Center 

Computrac 

Bremen Electronlcs/Radlo Shack 

Kent Radio Shack 

Radio Shack 

Act One Video 

Martin Music Radio Shack 

Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's & Brentano's 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. Dafton Booksellers 

N. Walbash Sr. 

West Jackson St 
Bob's in Newtown 
Bob's News Emporium 





Bob's Roaers Park 


MARYLAND 




Book Market 


Silver SDrina 




East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Diversey 
E.B. Garcia 8c Associates 
Kroch's & Brentano's 


MASSACHUSETTS 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Fltchburg 

Ipswich 

Uttleton 

Lynn 

Quincy 

Rehaboth 




South Walbash 
West Jackson 




516 N. Michigan 
835 N M ch aan 
Parkway Drugs 




Parkwest Books 


MICHIGAN 




Sandmeyer's Bookstore 


Alien Park 




Univ. of Chicago Bookstore 


Dearborn 




Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 


Durand 




Vldeomat, Inc. 


Harrison 


Chlllicothe 


Book Emporium 


Lowell 


Danville 


Book Market 


Mt. Clemens 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 






K-Mart Plaza 


Muskegon 




Northgate Mall 


Owosso 


East Mollne 


Book Emporium 


Perry 


Evanston 


Chicago-Main News 


Geneseo 


B & J Supply 


RosevfHe 


Kewanee 


Book Emporium 


Royal Oak 


Lisle 


Book Nook 


St. Johns 


Newton 


Bill's TV Radio Shack 


Sterling 


Oak Brook 


Kroch's & Brentano's 


Heights 


Oak Park 


Kroch's & Brentano's 


Tecumseh 


Paris 


Book Emporium 


Wyoming 


Peoria 


Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Market 


MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 
Willmar 




Illinois News Service 


MISSISSIPPI 


Schaumberg 


Kroch's & Brentano's 


Grenada 


Skokie 


Kroch's & Brentano's 


MISSOURI 

Farmington 


Springfield 


Book Emporium 


Sangamon Center North 




Town & Country Shopping Ctr, 


Kirksville 
Moberly 
St. Louis 


Sunnyland 


Book Emporium 


West Frankfort 


Paper Place 


Wheeling 


North Shore Distributors 





INDIANA 

Beme 

Columbus 

Garrett 

Greenwood 

Highland 

Indianapolis 



r 

Madison 

Martinsville 

Walbash 

IOWA 

Davenport 

KANSAS 

Topekd 

Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Danville 

Georgetown 

Hazard 

Hopklnsville 

Louisville 

Paducoh 

Paintsvllle 

Pikeville 

Princeton 

LOUISIANA 

Crowley 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Brockton 
Caribou 
Wdterboro 



White Cottage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems, inc. 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
The Computer Experience 
Computer Health Consultants 
Bookland, Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

Arco Office Supplies 
Radio Shack 
Mlttlng's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 

Palmer News, Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 
Lloyd's Radio 

Boyle Electronics 
Goodwin Electronics 
Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
The Computer Store 
Radio Shack 
R-Kat Electronics 
Gus-Stan Enterprises 
Miller Electronics 

Acadiana Newsstand 
The Book Rack 

Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 



University City 

MONTANA 

Whiteflsh 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls 

Cherry Hill 

Clinton 

Lawrencevllle 

Unwood 

Marmora 

Montvale 

Pennsville 

River Edge 

Rockaway 

Villas 

NEW MEXICO 

Atamogordo 
Albuquerque 

NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Eimira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Johnson City 
New York 



LayhIM Newsstand 

Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Corners Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Soft Ware House . . 
Arel Computer & Electronics 

Book Nook, Inc. 

DSL Computer Products 

Robbins Electronics 

Harrison Radio Shack 

Curt's Sound & Home Arcade Center 

Key Book Shop 

Michigan Radio 

The Eight Bit Corner 

C/C Computer Systems 

Perry Computers 

Perry Oil & Gas 

New Horizons 

Software City 

Clinton Electronics 

Sterling Book Center 
White Electronics 
Gerry's Book Co. 

Read-More News 
The Photo Shop 

Stereo Store of Grenada, Inc. 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Softwaire Centre 
Final Edition 

Consumer Electronics of Whiteflsh 
Hobby Town 

Computers & Components 

Hurley Electronics 

Verham News Corp. 

Village Computer & Software 
Software City 
Micro World It 

Micro Con Software Center 

Software City 

Outpost Radio Shack 

Software City 

Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 

Software City 

Software Station 

Art's Electronics 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Page One Newsstand 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 
Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 
On Line; Computer Access Center 
GA West & Co. 
Unicorn Electronics 
Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 
Coliseum Books 
Eastern Newsstand 
Grand Central Station, Track 37 



206 



THE RAINBOW August 1986 



N. White Plains 
Rochester;' 

Woodhaven 



200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1 ) 
55 Water Street 
World Trade Center #2 

First Stop News 

Idle Hours Bookstore 

Internationa} Smoke Shop 

Jonit Smoke 

PennBook 

Software City 

State News 

Usercom Systems, Inc.; 

Walden Books 

World Wide Media Services 

Software City 

Village Green 

World Wide News 

Spectrum Projects 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Aberdeen 

Gary 
Charlotte 



King Electronics 
Radio Shack 

News Center In Cory village 
Newsstand infi 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Boomers Rhythm Center 

Computer Associates 

JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
Utopia Software 
Huber Heights Book & Card 
WllkeNews 
News-Readers 
Girard Book & News: 
The News Shop 
T.W. Hogan & Associates 
Lakewood International News 
Brunner News Agency 
Edu-Caterers 
Wiike News 

Mount Orab Radio Shack 
Programs Unlimited 
Leo's Book & Wine Shop 
Fine Print Books 

Shortgrass Electronics 

Merit Micro Software 
Steve's Book Store 

Fifth Ave. News 

Software City 
Newborn Enterprises 
Larry's Stereo Shop 
Personal Software 
City Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Radio Shack 
All-Pro Souveniers 
Pitt Computer & Software 
Software Comer 
The Donna Comm. Co. 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Software Connection 



Havlock 
Hickory 
Marion 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Fargo 

OHIO 

Blanchester 
Canton 
Chardon 
Cincinnati 
Columbiana 
Coshocton 
Dayton 

faitoornx 
Girard 
Kent 
Kenton 
Lakewood 
Lima 

Mlamisburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Xenia 

OKLAHOMA 

Hobart 
Oklahoma 

City 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allison Park 
Altoona 
Brookville 
Malvern 
Philadelphia 

Phoenlxville 
Pittsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Tunkhonnock 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. Software Haus, Inc. 

Gaffney Gaffney Book Store 

Greenville Palmetto News Co. 

Hilton Head Megatron Corporation 

Spartanburg Software City 

Union Fleming's Electronics 



TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 

Nashville 
Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Elgin 
Ft Worth 
Houston 
Orange 
San Antonio 

UTAH 

Murray 

VIRGINIA 

Gaffon 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacama 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Ladysmith 
Milwaukee 



Sturgeon Say 

WYOMING 

Casper 



ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA: 

Klngsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Biairmore 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Clareshoim 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 
Fdirvlew 
Fax Creek 

Ft. Saskatoon 
Grande 
Cache 
Grande 
v Centre 
Hlnton 
Innisfall 
Leduc 
Lethbrldge 
Lloydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 



Anderson NewsCd 
Guild 8ooks & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
First Byte Computer Co, 
Computer Center 
Software, Inc. 
Mosko's Book Store 
Delker Electronics 

The Homing Pigeon 
Software Terminal 
MicroSolutlons 
Northway Books & News • 
CoCo Nuts 1 

Deseret Book ;. 

Electronics Marketing 
1-0 Computers 
Software City 

Adams News Ca, Inc. 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbies 'N BytQS; 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News & Hobby 

Electronics, Etc. 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid II 

Harvey Schwartz Bookshop 

Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 

Door County Electronics 

The Computer Store 



St. Paul Walter's Electronics 

Stettler Stettler Radio Shack 

Strathmore Wheatland Electronics 

Taber Pynewood Sight & Sound 

Westlock Westlock Stereo 

Wetaskiwln Radio Shack 



Informatlca Y Telecomunicaciones 



Paris Radio Etectronlcs 



Banff Radio Shack 
L&K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" AS.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Radio Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & IV 
Fox City Color & Sound 

AS.C Radio Shack 
Ft Mall Radio Shack 

The Stereo Hut: 

The Book Nbpk 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Bums Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chllliwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
.Langley 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksville 
Pentlcton 

Salmon Arm 
Sidney 
Smlthers 
100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

vlrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 



Compulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Langtey Radio Shack 
Microwest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksville TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Comer Grocery 
Matrix Computing 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 

Tip Top Radio & TV 



LA Wlebr Ltd, 
Goranson Elec, 
Central Sound 
Jodl's Sight 8t Sound 
G.L EnnsElec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 

Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood SeaportEiec. 



Carbonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Aurora 

Concord 
: Exceter 

Hamilton 

Hanover 

Huntsvitle 
AKenora 
f Kingston 

Ustowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Asslniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdaie 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO 

San Juan 



Slade Realties 

Atlantic News 

Compu Vision 
Ingram Software 
J. Macteane & Sons 
Dataman 

Modern Appliance Centre 
Huntsvllle Bee. 
Donny "B" 
T.M. Computers 
Modern Appliance Centre 
Max TV 
Dennis TV 



Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno uaroche 

>*'""•' ' '•' «i>' ■' "*.... *t* 
-".*—...» ■•*■ ,'. *-* .. .• .' ■ -.*."/• t \ , 

Telslar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Ubrary 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H&O Holdings 
America Ado, Inc. 



Software City 



i 
» 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, ! 

Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little { 

Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community j 

Newscenters. I 



August 1986 THE RAINBOW 207 



A D VER TISER 'S INDEX 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the RAINBOW when 
you contact these firms. 



After Five Software ;S . . .\ . . .73 
Ark Royal Games . > ► . . , . . 147 
35 Software . . .*,*;; . * . • » *;• «..:• • • «. ■ »49 
Canyon County Devices ,y > , . • * - .84 
Cer-Comp , .... ... * i . . > . i:V* ♦ * ,166 

Challenger. . . . •••• . - . . 1 48 

Cinsoft . . v,. . 68 

CNR Engineering. , . ^ > . ., v , . ... 173 
CoCo Trend »•».-.- . • . « ... * 44 

Cog ni tec . .... P F •-«.»* » * •» .96 

Colorware . . . ...»;• + . + + » . . * * .22, 23, 25 

Computer Center , . . . . . ,>v . .. . • . .35 

Computer Friends . , . ....... .191 

Computer Island . . .>> ► ► ► ► < 154, 155 
Computer Plus . . ... .... . . . . ..... 3 

Computerware . , . . . , . . ♦ >> . ♦ ♦ .53 

Computize, Inc. , .209 

Cosmos Computer Se rvic es Ih c < 

. . .^ 65 

Cozy Software . ..204 

D & A Research . * >;i . . . . ....... 1 46 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. . .......... . 128 

Derringer Software . . . . . . ,30, 31 

Dieco m j . . •»- . >• » . * * * * . . . . . .. . * * . I BC* 

Disto ......... ....65 

Dragon User . ... . , . , + + . 13 

DYNACALC. ....... . . . ... .193 

E.D.C. Industries .> .203 

Electronic Motion Control ... ..172 
Federal Hitl Software . . . . . ♦ v . . . .78 



Hard Drive Specialists . ... .> . . . . IFC 

Hawkes Research Services . . . . .144 

h i"*t ech «.»*«*• . . * . . . . . . . + -r * « . .52 

HJL dlv. of Touchstone 

Technology, Inc.. . ... .... ... . 10 

Howard Medical . .34, 210 

Intercomp Sounds .200 

J & M Systems * . .... BC 

J & R Electronics .. . .149 

Johnson, D.P. . .... ...» . . . . . . . . 1 99 

Kelly Software Distributors. .... . 69 

Mark Data Products 1 65 

Metric Industries .195 

MichTron. ..160 

Micro Works, The. , . , . . * . * . 85 

Microcom Software .>,... . . . . .16, 17 

Microtech Consultants Inc., .. . ..71 

MicroWorld . v. , l\ . .200 

Mix, Tom Software . . . .46 

Moretpn Bay . . . . 74 

Novasoft *■«■ . . * ]:* :* ; > ♦ > . . . . . ♦ , « . . 47 

Other Guys Software, The. . .... .66 

Owl-Ware . . . .\ . «.;;* . . . .14, 15 

P C fvl •..*«•« . .... • h . * < . . ..... h v 1 30 

Perry Computers . . .> .67 

Plan-Net Forms >. , .95 

Preble's Programs, Dr. . . . . . .99 

Prickly-Pear Software . + . .... , .138 

Public Domain . . ...... . . . . . .-. . 196 

PXE Computing . . v . . « . . . ........ 7 

Radio Shack . . . * . . . . .42, 43, 57, 59 



Rainbow Adventure Book II ...... .100 

Rainbow Binder .> + + 1 h *> ....... .177 

Rainbow Bookshelf. ...... . , rf . >117 

Rainbow Gift Subscription . ; 1 1 S 
Rainbow On Tape . v . . .133 

RAINBOWfest .... , . . .... . ..50, 51 

REM Industries....... 153 

Selected Software . . * * . . • < * • » * • 141 
Software House, The . . ? >.. . . . . .1 62 

Software Support, Inc . . . .38, 39 

Soistmann Enterprises, Inc. . ... 136 

Spectrogram .77 

Spectrosystems 171 

Spectrum Projects Inc. 

. . . .105, 106, 107, 109, 110, 111 
Speech Systems 

..118, 119, 120, 121 

Sugar Software ... , , <,* . .... . . .1 69 

Sunrise Software . . .-.v .171 

T & D Software . , .62 

T & M Enterprises H < , < * 138 

I"epco .....«*.............. : . . . 1 03 

Tothian Software Inc. . . ... . . .72 

True Data Products . . . . . . .142, 143 

VC/R . . « . . .* . . . . . - *h ..... ...... 20 

Wasatch ware . . . . . . . ......... .137 

Woodstown Electronics . . .... . .152 

Workbase Data Systems ....... 135 

Zebra. . • . . l . . » » . . * . . . . . . . . . * i « 




Call: 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Shirley Duranseau 

Advertising Representative 

12110 Meridian South, Suite 5 

P.O. Box 73-578 

Puyallup, WA 98373-0578 

(206) 848-7766 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



208 



RAfNBOW: Auau&fc 1986 



I DC VATT T /^rMTTUTA* for A hi-res graphic 
IKE IvU l#w \J1XI MM VJ screen print dump? 

HARDCOPY - Hardcopy is more than Just a screen print dump, compare these features wtth any 
ther graphic dump program on the market: 

• Full &RAPHICOM/GRAPHICOM PART II compatibility! Loads STANDARD 6K images, 
GRAPHICOM pictures, and COCO MAX pictures too! 

• BLACK fit WHITE or GREY SCALE printing. In GREY SCALE printing, colors are printed as 
user definable patterns. Supports hi-res In ail 4 GRAPHICOM display modes! 

• Is, 2x, 3x PRINTOUTS - Three menu options are reserved for the most frequently used prin- 
tout sizes; lx (quarter page), 2x (half page), and 3x (full page). 

• GRAPHIC LABELS • The label printing option allows the user to create custom mailing or disk 
labels with professional looking results. 

• GREETING CARDS - The greeting card option allows the user to custom design greeting cards 
using both text and graphics. 

• GIANT POSTERS - The poster option provides the user with a means of reproducing a hi-res 
graphic to a multi-sheet poster. 

• SPECIAL EFFECTS - The special effects option allows the user to directly control the printing 
directives; ROTATION, X/Y SIZE, X/Y FLIP, X/Y GRID, X/Y FILL, TAB, WINDOW, POS/NEG 
IMAGE, and more! 

• USER CALL ■ Have an application that HARDCOPY doesn't quite match? HARDCOPY routines 
can be added to EXTENDED BASIC through the USR command! 



HARDCOPY* requires a 64K Color 
Computer or Color Computer II, 
and at least one disk drive. It sup- 
ports 1 to 4 disk drives, keyboard 
or joystick input. Please specify 
printer and cat. number when 
ordering. 



IDS4B0/560-G Cat. 

Okt 82 A (Oklgraph) . . Cat. 

Okidata 92 Cat. 

Epson LX-80 Cat 

Epson MX-80 Cat 
Epson RX-80 .... 
Epson FX-80 , . , 



Wo. 170WD 
No. 179WD 
No. 171 WD 
No. 173WD 
No. 172WD 
Cat. No. 1 73WD 
Cat. No. 173WD 



fiiteman PLUS 



Cat. No. 177WD 



Gemini I OX Cat. No. 1 74WD 

Gemini SG-10/15 ... Cat. No. 178 WD 

DMP-105 Cat. No. 183WD 

DMP-1 10 Cat. No. 180WD 

DMP-120 Cat. No. 176WD 

DMP-1 30 Cat. No. 180WD 

DMP-200 . . Cat. No. 1 75WD 

CGP-220 . , Cat. No. 181 WD 




THE ULT I HATE PRINTER UTILITY 




©1984 WHITESH1ITH U:1.0 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



* Due to hardware differences, some features may function differently on certain printers. 1 HARDCOPY PRINT UTILITY $29.95 



YQJJ COULD SPEND 3100 00 0R M0RE T0 UPGRADE 



YOUR GRAPHICS SYSTEM, JUST BUY 



Eclipse (Zoom) $ 1 9.95/Moreton Bay 

Super Paint (Paint) $ 19.95/Michtron 

Shrinx (Reducer) $21.95/Grafx 



Text Master (Hi-Res Text) $29.95/Data Man 

G.C.U. (Disk Utilities) $19.95 Computize 



DISTRIBUTED BY CDMPUTIZE INC 




PAINT 




ROTATE 



ENLARGE 




©1984 WHITE 

ALL RIGHT 



111 ITH U:l.O 

ESERVED 



jRAPHICOM PART II $24.95 



OR YOU COULD SPEND $24.95 FOR GRAPHICOM PART II AND GET: 

a vldto processing package that provides many functions that art missing In Graphlcom. 
Here are Just a few of the features provided by Graphlcom Part II: 

ENLARGE/REDUCE/ROTATE 

Enlarge or reduce any portion of a graphic screen, just like a photographic enlarger! Rotate by any degree or 

fraction of a degree around any point on the screen. 

FAINT 

Paint or "fill-in" any irregular area on the screen! More than 50 different colored patterns available. Addi- 
tional paint oatterns may be user-defined. 
PAN ft ZOOM 

"Zoom in" x2, x4, or x8 on any portion of the screen to do fine pixel work. Allows editing of Graphicom 
character sets with ease! 
TYPESETTER & FONT EDITOR 

Add text in 16 different sizes, also supports user definable foreground & background colors. Design & Edit 
characters for use in the typesetter. 
PIXEL BLASTER 

Allows the user to easily substitute or remove colors. Widen lines, swap BLUE & RED without effecting 
BLACK & WHITE, etc. 

GRAPHICOM PART II DOES NOT REQUIRE GRAPHICOM TO RUNI 

Graphlcom Part II requires a 64K extended disk basic system, and supports 1 to 4 disk drives, keyboard or 
joystick (analog or switch type) input. It will load and save both Standard BIN files and Graphicom screens. 
All functions support color or Hi-Res operation, as well as the 4 screen display modes. 



NEW LOW PRICE! 
GRAPHICOM 
DIGITIZER $159.00 

Input directly Into Graphlcom for easy 
enhancements, manipulation, stamping, 
and storage. Accepts composite video 
signal in (l.Ov p-p) from video camera, 
VCR, video disc player, another com- 
puter, or other compatible video sources. 
View "off air" or "VCR" digitized video at 
close to real-time. "Snapshot" video 
frames to the digitizer's internal memory, 
No slow, data serial manipulation. 
Use with your multi-pak, "Y" box, or a 
"Y" cable ("Y" cable available at $19.95) 
Video is input via a "BNC" connector. 
External controls for HORIZONTAL POSI- 
TION. VERTICAL POSITION, HORIZON- 
TAL WIDTH, BRIGHTNESS, and CON- 
TRAST (FUZZ) settings. 
Don't be fooled by imitations. ..this is the 
GRAPHICOM VIDEO DIGITIZER ... the 
only digitizer that "DIRECTLY" inputs in- 
to Graphicom 

REQUIRES 64K COCO, 1 DISK DRIVE, 
AND 2 ANALOG JOYSTICKS. FREE 
GRAPHICOM PROGRAM, PICTURE 
DISK, AND GRAPHICOM UTILITY SUP- 
PLIED WITH PURCHASE OF VIDEO 
DIGITIZER (A $S0 VALUE). 



"Y" BOX 




$29.95 



GRAPHICOM $24.95 

Catalog No 111GD 

Simply stated • One of the finest graphic 
programs written for the Color Computer! 

FEATURES: 

• S-U-P-E-R U-S-E-R F-R-I-E-N-D-L-Y I 

• Supports 4. Hi-Res display modes 

• 4 page animation mode 

• Color Palette with over 1 5 color patterns 
for use with Hi-Res artifact 

• Send/Receive pictures over modem 

• Supplied utility allows capturing Hi-Res 
screens from most COCO arcade games 

• Multiple Hi-Res character fonts (user re- 
definable) 

• Supplied utility for transferring 
Graphicom screens to Basic or other 
M/L programs. 

• Supplied utility for loading screens from 
Basic or other sources 

■ Built in Hi-Res SCREEN PRINT (compati- 
ble with EPSON, C-ITOH, GEMINI- 10, 
OKI, plus Radio Shack's LP-VTI, LP-VIII, 
DMP-100, DMP-200, and GCP-115 
printers) from 110 to 9600 baud 

• SEND/RECEIVE slow-scan television 

• Many additional features, operating 
hints, hardware mod's and suggestions, 
etc. 

REQUIRES 64K COCO, 1 DISK DRIVE, 
AND 2 ANALOG JOYSTICKS 

NEW MASTER KEY II 

New Improved Version! A hardware product 
that takes control of any program regardless of 
protection. Now use with RS Multi-pak, "Y" 
cable or optional extender cable. Captures 
register contents as they were when Master Key 
II was engaged. Complete disassembler, 
memory save, and much more. Requires some 
familiarity with Assembly Language. 

ROM PAK Cat. No. I BOHR $ 99.95 

Cat. No. 161HR With Ext. Cable . . . $109.95 



PICTURE DISK SETS 

Available from COMPUTIZE 

4C - Artifact color palette 
5C - Large character sets (from Derringer Soft- 
ware) 

6C - Same as 5C but set up as stamp set 
Picture DUk Set 1 $19.95 

7 - Miscellaneous Art Set # 1 

8 - Miscellaneous Art Set #2 

9 - Miscellaneous Ads and Examples 
Picture Disk Set 2 $19.95 

10 - Miscellaneous Fonts 

1 1C- Artifact color palette type fonts 

Picture DUk Set 3 $14.95 

12C- Art demo from WHITESMITH 

13C- GRAPHICOM PART II function demo 

Picture DUk Set 4 $14.95 

GC II FONT DISKS 

Each disk contains 10 or more fonU. (4 ver- 
sions of each font, one for each dUplay mode). 

14C-GCII Fonts Disk#l 
15C-GCII Fonts Disk #2 
16C-GCII Fonts Disk #3 
GRAPHICOM PART U Pont DUks , . . $19.95 



TRIPLE TRANSFER 
UTILITY© 

Transfer contents of disk to tape • 
Transfer contents of tape to disk • 
Automatically relocates cassette pro- 
grams that conflict with the disk operat- 
ing system • Displays machine language 
program addresses • Copies ASCII, Basic, 
& Machine Language Programs • All con- 
tained in I menu driven program! 
REQUIRES 32K CC EXT. 

Cassette $19.95 . . Cat. No. 105CT 
Disk $24.95 Cat. No. 105CD 



SUPER BACK-UP 
UTILITY© 

. . .WITH S.B.U. FROM COMPUTIZE — 
YOU'LL NEVER NEED ANOTHER BACK- 
UP UTILITY FOR YOUR COCO!!! 
SUPER BACK-UP UTILITY WILL PER- 
FORM ALL OF THE FOLLOWING FUNC- 
TIONS.- 

1 . TAPE TO TAPE (Regardless of most 
protection schemes!) 

2. TAPE TO DISK (Move Cassette pro- 
grams to Disk!) 

3. AUTO RELOCATE (For those Cassette 
programs that conflict with Disk 
operating systems.) 

4. DISK TO TAPE (Place Disk programs 
onto Cassette) 

5. DISK TO DISK (Our powerful Split-N- 
Image Program, Copies regardless of 
most protection schemes!) 

• MENU DRIVEN 

• REQUIRES 32K EXTENDED COCO 

• REQUIRES 1 OR 2 DRIVES 

• ALL MACHINE LANGUAGE! I! 
COMPARE WITH OTHER INDIVIDUAL 
PROGRAMS COSTING IN EXCESS OF 
$100.00 

DISK $49.95 Cat. No. 107CD 



SPIT-N-IMAGE © 

M/L Disk Back-Up Utility 
There is no need to suffer the heartbreak 
of crashed disks any longer. Spit-N-Image 
will create a mirror image of your 
valuable disk programs which do not res- 
pond to normal back-up functions. Will 
also initialize and back-up in one pass. 
Data processing experts always insist on 
having a back-up — it's good a practice. 

REQUIRES 32K CC 
DISK $34.95 Cat. No. 101CD 



Check or M.O, 
Add S3.00 
shipping 




(215) 946-7260 P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 



PA residents 
add 6 % 
sales tax 




800-443-1444 orders 

SPECIALS 



Howard Medical Computers 





Zenith 123A Monitor 

• 12" Zenith 123A Green Screen is easy on the eyes 

• High resolution: 640 dots x 200 dots 

• 15 MHz band width non glare screen 

• 30 day warranty at over 1200 Zenith repair locations 

p b j Word Pack RS 

This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column display. It includes 
a built-in video controller to drive a monochrome monitor like our 123A. To 
get started, you need OS-9 2.0, a Y cable or multipack interface, drive 0, and 
a monochrome monitor. 



Color Monitor "Epson" 



Medium resolution 200 x 240 dots 
Built in speaker 
2 year warranty 



o v 



$67 50 

Reg. $1 1€ 
($7 shipping) 



$89 



($2 shipping 



$14. 

Was $359 
($14 shipping) 



Payrol/BAS™ 
W-2 

941 

VIP Intergrated Library 





$79. 9 
$29.9 

$29. 95 
$125. 

Was $149 
($2 shipping 




J&M CONTROLLER 

• Metal case: I/O buffered 

• Parallel port for Gemini and Epson printers 

• Hard Disk driver included 

• Single switch lets you switch from JDOS to RS DOS 

• Gold contacts & data separator 



JFD-CP 
with JDOS 



$12 

Reg. $14 
($2 shipping 



RS DOS ROM 

• ROM chip makes J&M compatible 

• 24 pin fits both versions of J&M controller 

• Release 1.1 



Howard Medical Computers 



1690 Elston, Chicato, IL 60622 



Hours: 8-4 Mon.-Fri. 
1 0-3 Sat. 



$20/ea 

Reg. $4( 
($2 shipping 




(312) 278-14 



Howard Medical offers a 30-day return guarantee on all hardware we sell. Return equipment to us within 30 days 
for a refund (less shipping) if you are unsatisfied for any reason. Quantities limited and subject to availability. 




GANTELET 



Mission: F16 ASSAULT 






1 





COR I 



HI 

C C 



5a 



i 



One, two or even three people can play Gantelet at 
the same time. You and your friends travel through 
the many levels in search of an exit to the next 
level. Avoid the Ghosts and other creatures that 
are out to stop you in your quest. Collect keys to 
open doors, treasures and magic potions to aid 
you in your battle. Watch out for hidden traps as 
you frantically search for the exit to the next leve 



64 k required 
tape or disk 



$28.95 u.s. 

$38.95 Can 



Fly your plane over land and water while avoiding 
enemy missiles, planes and helicopters attacking 
from the top and bottom of the screen. Use your 
radar to track objects as they approach the main 
screen. Bomb oil refineries, airports and destroy 
planes before they can take off from the airports. 
Watch out for missiles fired from hidden missile 
silos on the ground. Dozens of screens of detailed 
terrain plus increasing difficulty make this a great 
game for everyone. 

64 k and joystick required Soon* U ' S ' 

tape or disk $38.95 Can. 



PAPER ROUTE 




SC0*£ 



£,3S* eon«s 



***** 



As a paper boy, you ride your bike 
along your route delivering papers to 
your customers. Break customers' 
windows or damage their property 
and they will cancel their subscrip- 
tions! Earn bonus points by damag- 
ing non-subscribers' property. Avoid 
pedestrians, cars, and maybe even a 
mad dog in your attempt to deliver all 
of your papers! Detailed graphics and 
lots of surprises make this game a 
real challenge for everyone. 

64 k 

joystick required 
tape or disk 



$28.95 u.s. 

$38.95 Can. 



.t 



COMING SOON: 

Mission: 
RUSH'N ASSAULT 

SiHHirilHIIftHIKMIIHIIItHltlHlllHIIIIIimtWHIHHIlUI 



MARBLE MAZE 



KNOCK OUT 



KARATE 




tunc 



£5 32 



SCiJSE fitMilMS 





Move your marble around 
the mazes in your search for 
the finish line! Avoid marble 
eaters, acid puddles and 
other creatures that inhabit 
the mazes. Eight different 
levels and great graphics 
make this game a must for 
your collection. 

joystick required 



MOCK OWT f*0H ttSttW* 



Fight against five different 
boxers in this great boxing 
game! At first the boxers 
are easy to knock out, but 
beware, It gets harder as 
you move on,. The boxers 
are out to stop you in your 
quest to become champion 
of the world. Outstanding 
graphics make this a must 
for your collection! 




Challenge the computer, or 
a friend to a Karate match! 
Use various Karate punches 
and kicks to knock your op- 
ponent down and earn 
points to win the match. 
When challenging the com- 
puter, your opponent's 
Karate skills increase as 
you win matches. This game 
is a challenge for even the 
expert game player. 



64 k required tape or disk $28.95 U.S. $38.95 Can. joystick required 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 



We accept: 





cheque or money order 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 678-8358 
personal service 9-5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax. 
C.O.D. Canada only. 
Dealer inquiries invited 
Looking for new software. 



HEAT UP YOUR COCO ! 




HARD DRIVES 



Besides the obvious advantage of increased disk access 
speeds and a vast amount of storage, our COCO hard 
drives boast many innovative features. For instance, 

you may boot OS/9 

directly from 
JDOS - no 
intermediate 
boot floppy is 
required. Our 
software can 
run with virtually 
any Winchester with a 
ST412 type interface. Our drives have capacities of 5, 
10, or 20 MBytes (formatted), and may be either 
partitioned into up to 7 logical units or left as one 
large logical unit. Our COCO hard drive systems are 
complete with case, power supply, cables, OS/9 
drivers, and instructions, Prerequisite: OS/9, JFD-CP 
controller. 

5 W 5 MByte full size $495 
5V4" 10 MByte Vz size $650 
3V2" 20 MByte (shown above) $795 

JFD-CP DISK CONTROLLER 

Our new JFD-CP, compatible with both the original 
COCO and the COCO 2, features a parallel port to 

support a 
Centronics 
compatible 
printer or our 
hard drive, 
and an 

external ROM 
switch, which 
allows you to 
select JDOS or 
an optional KS 
"DOS-type ROM. It comes in 
a case and includes JDOS 1.2 and manual. JDOS 
implements all RS DOS commands, plus many 
more, including auto line numbering, error 
trapping, baud rate selection, OS/9* boot from *jjf 
floppy or hard drive, and Memory Minder**, our 
disk drive analysis> program (Precision Alignment 
Disk not included). 

JFD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS $ 139 

COCO-CLASSIC 

Our old JFD-COCO controller remains a strong 
seller. Some people just like old "classics" best! So 
we have brought it back at the lowest price ever! 

JFD-COCO Disk Controller^with JDOS $99 




TERMS 

One-year warranty on parts & labor; 30-day money 
back guarantee (except shipping) if not totally 
satisfied. Items must be returned in like new 
condition. 

Free shipping via UPS in continental United States 
for payment by VISA, MasterCard, or cashiers check. 
COD requires 10% prepayment by bank card plus 
3% shipping. Blue Label and foreign shipping extra. 



DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Upgrade your Color Computer by adding our new 
JFD-CP disk controller, supercharged with JDOS 1.2 

operating 
system, and a 
top quality 
drive with case 
and power 
supply. Comes 
complete with 
cable and JDOS 
manual. 





Drive 0 System with one single side drive 
Drive 0 System with one double side drive 
Drive 0, 1 System with two single side drives 
Drive 0, 1 System with two double side drives 



$279 
$349 
$389 
$489 



MEMORY MINDER** 

Memory Minder 

is a disk drive 
test program now 
included in 
JDOS. Used 
with a 
Precision 
Alignment 
Disk, 
Memory 
Minder allows 
you to check 
your drives for speed, 
alignment, sensitivity, hysteresis, 
and more! You can actually align or adjust the drives 
while viewing tKe graphics on the screen. No special 
equipment needed! 

^PRECISION ALIGNMENT DISKS (From Dysan) 
PAD*40Xl: Tests single side disk drives $26 
PAD40X2: Tests double/single disk drives $33 

Memory Minder is available on diskette for those 
who don't own a JFD-CP controller with JDOS. 
Includes Precision Alignment disk. 




Memory Minder: single side package 
Memory Minder: single/double side package 



*OS/9 is a registered trademark of Microware, Inc. 

**Memory Minder is a registered trademard of J&.M Systems, Ltd, 



J&M SYSTEMS, LTD. 

15100-A CENTRAL SE 
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 87123 
505/292-4182 



$59 
$75