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Tandy 1200HD $1599 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 10001 Drive 128K 685.00 

Tandy 1000 HD 10 Meg. 256K 1539.00 

Tandy 3000 1 Drive 51 2K 1969.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-105 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 660.00 
Radio Shack DWP-220 Daisy Wheel469.00 
Silver Reed EXP-500P Daisy Wheel 229.00 

StarSG-10 245.00 

StarSG-15 410.00 

Panasonic P-1091 259.00 

Panasonic P-1092 339.00 

Toshiba 1340 439.00 

Okidata 192 375.00 

Epson LX-80 275.00 

Epson FX-85 419.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-3 Modem 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-5 Modem 99.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem Pac 79.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 2212 315.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 139.00 
Extended Basic Rom KM 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pack Interface 89.00 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 
Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Color 300 Monitor 265.00 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor 139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor 149.00 
Goldstar Amber Monitor 99.00 
Radio Shack VM-2 Green Monitor 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Slueth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Mark Data Graphic Adven. 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util by Mark Data 29.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTerm by PXE Computing39.95 49.95 

TelePatch by Spectrum 19.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 89.95 

Deft Extra 39.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 59.95 

Max Edit by Derringer 19.95 

Elite Calc 69.95 69.95 

Elite Word 69.95 69.95 

Elite File (disk only) 74.50 

DynaCalc (disk only) 99.95 

Word Pack II by PBJ 134.95 

VIP Writer (tape & disk) 69.95 

VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Order any 2 software pieces listed 
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P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark ot Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




74 




FEATURES 



[=1 I Can See Clearly Now/Lynn Sundberg 



114 




PROGRAMMING UTILITY Make listings more readable 



0=0 Picture Show/ Jeff Wrt/te 



GRAPHICS UTILITY An easy way to display graphics files 
The Face of Falsoft/J/Vn fleecf 



ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL A peek behind the Rainbow 
Festive CoCo/H. Allen Curtis 



GRAPHICS A new color spectrum for the CoCo 



n^jj Amnotron AnimationMrchor Wright 



GRAPHICS An interesting display using the lower PMODEs 
The Evictor/ Paul Jensen 



GAME When the landlords need help, they call you 
Disk Controller Transplant/Kerry M. Armstrong. 



HAR DWARE PROJECT Permanent "patches" using an EPROM 

Remote CoCo/ Marty Goodman 



HARDWARE PROJECT Build a lap keyboard for computing comfort 



■=] Vicious Vic/ Jay fl. Hoggins 



GAME An intellectual challenge for strategists 
CoCo Cat/Jerry McKiernan 



ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL An iron-on transfer of our favorite cat 

f=1 Classic Clothes/flofcerf C. Mantowski 



UTILITY Make your own iron-on transfers 
CoCo Mouse/Sfeve Bjork 



MOUSE UTILITY A user-friendly point-and-pick interface 

CoCo to MS-DOS/Marty Goodman 

DOS UTILITY Transfer text files 



20 



26 



37 



46 



54 



62 



68 



71 



74 



114 



115 



121 



176 



S Tightrope/J//77 Bennet 



_188 



EDUCATION Use the computer to dress up vocabulary quizzes 
The Fifth Year of Rainbow/Les//e A. Foster 



193 



INDEX A guide to articles, reviews and authors of the past year 



Cover illustration 
by Pip Pullen 



The small cassette tape 
^ symbols beside features 



and regular columns indicate that 
the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's rain- 
bow on tape, ready to cload and 
RUN. For full details, check our 
rainbow on tape ad on Page 1 47. 



NEXT MONTH: Our action-packed Games issue will require your deepest 
concentration so you'll not be in jeopardy of losing our many challenging 
offerings. We had our checkers looking for "chess" the right amusements for 
your delight, and what they came up with is no charade. No password is 
needed to enjoy our festive diversions, but avoid a monopoly of the issue to 
ward off a family feud. 

The price is right so Simon says to follow the leader tp the rainbow, the 
number one information source for the Color Computer. 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/ Joseph Kolar 

Translation sensation 

Building July's Rainbow/ Jim Reed 

Managing Editor's comments 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



93 



16 



88 



OS-9 support and Marty Goodman 's database report 



H Education NoXes/Steve Blyn 



Developing logical reasoning skills 

Education Overview//W/c/?ae/ P/og, Ph.D. 

Computers for special education 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 



Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

Investigating the PIA 

H Wishing Well/Free/ 8. Scerbo 



132 



135 



12 



108 



98 



Achieving arcade game speed in BASIC 



DEPARTMENTS 



Advertiser Index 



Back Issue Information 

CoCo Cat 

CoCo Clubs 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



The Crossword Creator 
Contest 



Letters to Rainbow 
The Pipeline 



240 
153 
.114 
204 
_18 
151 

131 

_6 



One-Liner Contest 

Information 

Rainbow Info 



Received & Certified 
Scoreboard 



Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



104 



Subscription Information 
These Fine Stores 



182 
_36 
147 
138 
140 



113 

^87 
238 



RAINBOWTECH 



Accessible Applications/H/cftard White. 
CoCo word processing 

^-IBarden's Butter/William Barden, Jr. 



Interfacing tricks for BASIC and assembly language 
Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 
KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 



212 



216 



210 



224 



Choices: The reason for modularity 

PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Product Review Contents 



145 



The 


Id) f^f\ 

J Jj!Lr~~\\ 


X 


8i4 




July 1986 Vol. V No. 12 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor Tamara Renee Dunn 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapf hammer 
Copy Editor Jo Anna Wlttman Arnott 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 

Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk, 
Angela Kapfhammer, Shirley Morgan 

Technical Editor Dan Downard 
Technical Assistants Cray Augsburg, 
Chris Wehner 

Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, Joseph Kolar, 
Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, Fred Scerbo, 
Richard White 

Consulting Editors Ed Ellers, 
Danny Humphress, Belinda C. Klrby, 
T. Kevin Nickols 



Art Director Jerry McKiernan 
Designers Jody Gilbert, Tracey Jones, 

Heidi Maxedon, Kevin Quiggins, 

Sandra Underwood 
Production Assistant Cindy Jett 

Chief of Typography Debbie Hartley 

Typography Services Jody Doyle, 
Suzanne Bentsh Kurowsky 



Faisoft, Inc. 
President Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 
RAiNBOWfest Coordinator Judy Brashear 

Editorial Director James E. Reed 

Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 

Creative Director Jerry McKiernan 

Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Accounts Payable/ADP Lisa Ragan 

Fulfillment Services Director Bonnie Frowenfeid 
Fulfillment Services Asst. Dir. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Monica Wheat, Pam Workhoven 

Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 

Director Cindy J, Shackleford 

Advertising Representative Shirley Duranseau 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 240 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Faisoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAiNBOWfest and the rainbow and RAiNBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KYand additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1986. THE rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pakare registered® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. CompuServe is a registered 
® trademark of CompuServe Inc. • Subscriptions to THE RAINBOW are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries 
is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and 
their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A 
refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two issues are mailed. NO refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



LETTERS TO THE 





Candid CoCo 



Editor: 

I was reading the "Letters to the Rain- 
bow" section in the December 1985 issue 
when I saw Bill Bernico's letter asking you 
to show the staffs faces. I took a fast look 
at the portrait you showed and noticed the 
horrible quality. I decided to send a photo 
of what I imagine you guys look like to share 
with all rainbow readers. 

Top row, from right to left: Dan Down- 
ard, Steve Blyn, Bill Barden, Michael Plog, 
Richard White, Joseph Kolar and Richard 
Ramella. 

Bottom row from left to right: Dale 
Puckett, Tony DiStefano, Lonnie Falk (the 
one with the punched nose), Jutta Kapf- 
hammer, Fred Scerbo and Jim Reed. (Lon- 
nie Falk was punched to put his head in 
place. He was getting crazy about his CoCo, 
even talking to it!) 

Fabio Luis De Paoli 
Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Your drawing comes close. Hope 
you like this months cover. 




BACK TALK 

Editor: 

In the January 1986 "Letters," [Page 6] 
Mr. Garrett writes about standardization of 
programs and documentation. I agree with 
him completely. But, until that magic day 
arrives and our fantasies materialize, I have 
a suggestion about the oddball sizes of 
manuals for our software. Get a large three- 
ring binder. Use the largest size three-ring 
plastic pencil holders to hold smaller pam- 
phlets. The 8V4 by 11 clear plastic sheet 
protectors hold several normal size pages. 
Now, when I take down my ECB manual, 
I'm not rained on by other things! 

I also want to thank Mrs. White for a hint 
many months ago about using 3 by 5-inch 
cards and a recipe box for hints and short 
program notes. If you include page number, 
month and year of rainbow, it's easy to go 
directly to the source without thumbing 
through all the magazines. 

Please start rainbow on disk. Thank you 
for a wonderful magazine. 

Christine Terrio 
Bothell, WA 

One Man's Junk . . . 

Editor: 

I read Basil Garrett's letter [Page 6] in the 
January 1986 issue. He said 60 to 70 percent 
of the programs he has for the CoCo are 
junk. I think the CoCo is a very good system 
and the programs made for it are also very 
good. If he or anyone else thinks some of 
their programs are junk then send them to 
me. I would be grateful for the opportunity 
to get some new software. My address is 
P.O. Box 482, 46157. 

Tony Bonnet 
Monrovia, IN 



CoCo Compared 

Editor: 

I was amazed at the word "envious" in 
Tom Heiliger's letter [Page 6] in the Febru- 
ary 1986 issue. Therefore, to make things 
clearer, I have decided to compare the 
Amiga, the CoCo, the Mac and the Atari 
520ST 

First of all, let's check out the micropro- 
cessors. Amiga, 16 bit; 520ST, 16 bit; Mac, 
16 bit; and CoCo, 16 bit. 

Amount of voices generated by popular 
sound programs: Amiga, four voices; 
520ST, four voices; Mac, four voices; and 
CoCo, 12 voices. 

Maximum display of on-screen text 
generated by popular word processing 
programs: Amiga, 80 * 24; 520ST, 80 * 24; 
Mac, 80 * 24; and CoCo, 85 * 24. 

Memory: Amiga, expandable to 256 K; 
520ST, expandable to 512K; Mac, expanda- 
ble to 512K; and CoCo, expandable to 
512K. 

That about sums up everything. As for 
software and support, there is no compar- 
ison because the other machines haven't 
been around long enough. 

By the way, the rainbow is the largest 
magazine dedicated to one computer in 
existence- No other source gives you more 
information. 

Tio Babich 
Miller Place, NY 

Valuation is Complex 

Editor: 

I trust your April 1986 article "House 
Value" [Page 79] was done tongue in cheek 
and has been accepted that way by your 
readers. While the author may have been 
frustrated in the inconsistency of the free 
advice he received, he has not stumbled 
upon a shortcut to property valuation. It 
might at times yield a figure that reflects 
current value, but so is a fortune-telling 
game accurate some of the time. 

An appraiser is trained to analyze current 
market information (sales, listings, building 
costs, financial trends, etc.) and provide a 
logical estimate of value to guide a prospec- 
tive buyer, seller or lender. Reliance on a 
historic assessed value and an inflation 
factor unrelated to the neighborhood (let 
alone city or state) where the home is located 
will yield only an assessed value updated for 
inflation. 

Glenn W. Bridger, ASA 
Madison, WI 



6 THE RAINBOW July 1986 




YOU COULD FALL IN LOVE WITH 

v AUTOTERM ! , 

** IT TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE^ 



WORLD'S 
SMARTEST 
TERMINAL 



GOOD 
LOOKIN' 



AUTOTERM shows true upper/ 
lower case in screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, or 64 characters with 
no split words. The width of 32 
has extra large letters. Scrolling is 
forward, backward, and fast. Block 
graphics pictures are displayed 
automatically and can be scrolled. 

The screen's top line shows 
operating mode, unused memory 
size, memory on/off, and caps- 
lock on/off. It also gives helpful 
prompts. 



SWEET 
TALKIN' 



KEY-BEEP can be on/off. Unac- 
ceptable keystrokes cause a lower 
pitched BOP! This ERROR- 
BEEBOP can be on/off. 

Talks to other computers with 
Full or Half Duplex; Baud Rate of 
110, 150, 300, 600, 1200; Parity as 
even, odd, mark, space, none; 7 
or 8 bit Word; any Stop Bits; all 
128 ASCII characters; true line 
Break; XON/XOFF protocol; and 
optional line-at-a-time transmis- 
sion. Able to send and receive 
text, block graphics, BASIC and 
ML programs. A 64K machine 
holds up to 45,000 characters 
(33,300 in HI-RES). 

DUAL PROCESSING lets you 
review & edit while more data is 
coming in. 

XMODEM for disk file transfer. 



Fully supports D.C. Hayes and 
other intelligent modems. 

Talks to your printer with any 
page size, margins, line spacing, 
split word avoidance. Embed your 
printer's control sequences for 
boldface, underlining, etc. Narrow 
text can be automatically spread 
out. 

You'll also use Autoterm 
for simple word processing 
and record keeping 

You can display directories, 
delete files, transmit directly from 
disk, and work with files larger 
than memory. Easily maintain a 
disk copy of an entire session. 

Compatible with TELEWRITER 
(ASCII) & other word processors. 

SMOOTH 
WALK IN' 

AUTOTERM moves smoothly 
and quickly between word proces- 
sing and intelligent terminal 
action. Create text, correct your 
typing errors; then connect to the 
other computer, upload your text, 
download information, file it, and 
sign-off; then edit the received 
data, print it in an attractive 
format, and/or save it on file. 

Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly, too! 
Any operating parameter, such as 
screen width, can be altered at 
any time. Uncompleted com- 
mands can be cancelled. 




PUTTY IN 
YOUR HANDS 



The word processor can be 
used to create, print, and/or save 
on file your personal KSMs. They 
let AUTOTERM act like you. For 
example, it can dial through your 
modem, sign-on, interact, perform 
file operations, & sign-off; an 
entire session without your help. 
KSMs can answer the phone, 
prompt the caller, take messages, 
save them, hang-up, and wait for 
the next call. The KSM potential 
is unbelievable! 

NO OTHER COMPUTER IN 
THE WORLD CAN MATCH 
YOUR COCO'S AUTOMATIC 
TERMINAL CAPABILITIES!!! 

WHAT THE 
REVIEWERS SAY 

"AUTOTERM is the Best of Class." 
Graham, RAINBOW, 6/83 

'The AUTOTERM buffer system is 
the most sophisticated — and one of 
the easiest to use. . ." 
Banta, HOT CoCo, 9/84 

"Almost a full featured word 
processor. . 
Ellers, RAINBOW, 11/84 

"AUTOTERM's excellent error- 
handling routines, thorough docu- 
mentation, and logical, easy-to-use 
command structure make it stand 
out." 

Parker, HOT CoCo, 5/85 



AVAILABLE IN CANADA 

from 

Kelly Software Distributors 
Edmonton, Alberta 



CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Please hire the mentally retarded. They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! Phyllis 



Disk Zapper to the Rescue 

Editor: 

This is to comment on Bill Bernico's letter, 
March 1986, Page 7. 

Richard Duncan wrote on the commu- 
nications programs, Co BBS, January 1986 
[Page 142]. He pointed out difficulties 
attendant to using the programs from disk, 
transferred from tape. 

Any of the zap programs, but specifically, 
Quick Zap, December 1985 [Page 118] 
makes the change of the offending slash to 
an alpha or numeric character easy. With the 
revised title, you are home free. 

Merle Miller 
Albuquerque, NM 

Editor: 

This is in reply to the letter from Bill 
Bernico in the March 1986 issue. He trans- 
ferred some programs from tape to disk and 
found some of the files had illegal names 
making them impossible to load (e.g., SCFf 
EDI on tape became SCF/EDI/BAS on 
disk). 

You do not need to reformat the disk and 
start all over again. All you need is a disk 
zapper program that lets you rename the 
files in the directory. There are several 
available that will handle the job, including 
VIP Disk Zapper, Sonburst's Sector Inspec- 
tor (now sold by Tom Mix), Spectrum's 
Disk Utility, or Kolesar's XTD. 

Every disk user should own at least one 
of these valuable programs. As a personal 
preference, I favor a combination of Sector 
Inspector and Disk Utility. TXD is some- 
what less sophisticated than the others, but 
worth considering for its relatively low price. 

Neil Edward Parks 
Beachwood, OH 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

I have just purchased a Canon Typestar 
7 that doubles as a typewriter and printer. 
It is limited as a printer. However, I am able 
to print out my programs with it and it 
works with Telewriter-64. 

Using Canon's Serial Interface-30 I have 
been able to run it with the CoCo 2 ECB. 
The following hookup works: Standard RS- 
232 plug into Canon Interface — jump pins 
20 and 6. CoCo Pin 2 to RS-232 Pin 4. CoCo 
Pin 3 to RS-232 Pin 7. CoCo Pin 4 to RS- 
232 Pin 3. 

The Typestar 7 accepts ASCII Code. 
Hope this will help someone else. 

Alfred H. Johnson 
Kaaawa, HI 

POKE Corrects Infinite Looping 

Editor: 

Despite Microsoft's correction of LEAX - 
100,5 (DECB 1.0) to LEAX -$100, S 
(DECB 1.1) in the COPY routine, they have 
still failed to correct the problem of locking 
when an error disrupts a COPY in progress. 
The files are opened for direct access, but are 
not handled in the usual way for such files. 
Thus, when an attempt is made to close the 



file prematurely, the file pointers have 
unexpected values, causing infinite looping. 

To bypass this problem in the 64K all- 
RAM mode of operation, for DECB 1.0, 
POKE &HCAEG; for DECB 1.1, POKE 
&HCBBB, 36. This changes a BEQ (branch 
if equal) to a BHS (branch if higher or the 
same). Having made similar oversights in 
assembly language programming, I can 
easily understand the ease of introducing, as 
well as the difficulty in detecting such a bug. 
After a COPY error, POKE &H948, 9: POKE 
&H949, 137: POKE &H94R, 10: POKE 
&H94B, 137 to prevent the OB error mes- 
sage. I don't have a patch for that part yet. 

Another useful 64K POKE: prior to a 
BACKUP, POKE X , 32 and afterward POKE X , 
39 ( X = &HDG0C for 1 .0 &HD6FF for 1 . 1 . This 
will cause I/O errors to be ignored during 
the backup, so partially crashed disks can be 
salvaged. 

Jerry Miller 
E. Setauket, NY 

FC Errors Result of Typos 

Editor: 

I have heard from several readers about 
errors in Gopher It [January 1986, Page 18]. 
These errors are a result of typos and not the 
program itself. Many beginners are stumped 
by such errors (and rightly so). These errors 
are very deceiving because they tell you to 
look in the wrong spot. The solution is to 
double-check every line in the program 
before running it the first time, rainbow 
makes this easy to do because programs are 
listed in the same 32 character width format. 
Remember, every line needs to be checked, 
every blank space is important and every 
comma is necessary, 

rainbow on tape solves all problems and 
saves hours of typing. Beginners have much 
to learn, however, from typing in programs 
themselves. Not only will they learn new 
programming techniques, but trouble- 
shooting these nuisance errors will do 
wonders for their deductive powers of 
reasoning. 

Steve Sward 
Bellevue, NE 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I own a CoCo 2 64K and I'm a farmer in 
Saskatchewan. There are two things I would 
like to ask. First, are there any farm pro- 
grams out there for the CoCo 2? If so, where 
can I get them? Second, I would like to know 
if someone can tell me if there is a commu- 
nication program I can find in Winnipeg, 
Canada for Grass Roots, a farm database. 
If not, would someone be interested in 
writing one? Let me know. My address is 
Box 303, S0E 0A0, 

Francis Rodier 
Arborfield, Saskatchewan 

Making the Grade 

Editor: 

I am a teacher and I'm looking for a grade 
book program and a good screen dump 



program that works on a DMP-105. If 
anyone has any of these programs, please let 
me know. Send correspondence to 3203 
Ricewood, 77365. 

Ralph Traynham 
Porter, TX 

Misplaced Operator's Manual 

Editor: 

I recently acquired a TRS-80 Videotex 
Terminal (RS Cat. No. 26-5000, in an old 
silver-gray case) from a friend. Unfortu- 
nately, my friend no longer had the opera- 
tor's manual and Radio Shack can't supply 
one. If any readers have an operator's 
manual they'd like to part with or photocopy 
for me, I'd like to hear from them. My 
address is Department of Political Science, 
223 Derby Hall, Ohio State University, 
43210. 

Thomas W. Holloway 
Columbus, OH 

Service Station Programs Needed 

Editor: 

I would like to correspond with any of 
your readers who have used the CoCo 2 in 
their garage or service station business. I 
want to computerize my husband's inven- 
tory and accounting systems. Tips and help 
are requested; particularly programs you 
feel are best suited to our industry. Please 
write to P.O. Box 1729, L3Z 2B9. 

Mrs. Paul Campbell 
Bradford, Ontario 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

Can you tell me where I can find or get 
a tape to disk program? I have a year's 
supply of rainbow but I have never seen this 
program. 

Edward R. Dillon 
Huber Heights, OH 

"A Tape to Disk Transfer Vehicle" 
can be found on Page 48 of the 
January 1984 issue. 

Spreadsheet Search 

Editor: 

If anyone of your readers can direct me 
to a spreadsheet that works with J-DOS and 
perhaps a PBJ Word-Pak II, I would appre- 
ciate hearing about it. My address is 2843 
West 40th Street, 60632. 

Kenneth Siwicki 
Chicago, IL 

No Keyboard Letter 

Editor: 

My CoCo 2 is 64K ECB and is the CoCo 
1 size: long back with ventilation on sides. 
What keyboard letter is it (E,F)? 

Charlie Benziger 
Exeter, NH 

There is no such reference as "key- 
board letter. "However, the circuit 
board is probably an 'F* board. 



8 



THE RAINBOW July 1966 



i 




s Battle the 
st of Disk Drives 



New Lower Price 

Un-DISK Drives $4&95? 

$34.95 

You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



Un-DISK uses your computer's extra 
memory like a fast disk drive. 

Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs. 

Un-DISK is INVISIBLE. Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VDOS. 

Un-DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

Un-DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all . . . 

Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

Un-DISK should be in the library of every 
serious CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J. Esser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 



OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited, the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if you already own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk. 

EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . 
Additional Power For $14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK! 

• VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5, 10, 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DISKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• VDUMP can allow you to save a whole lot 
of rainbow on tape in a SINGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK. 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally! Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $34.95 

The Preble VDUMP $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U.S. and Canada $1.50 

or $5.00 to other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 
Canadians may order from Kelly Software 



Line Packing Problems 

Editor: 

I have had trouble entering several of your 
longer one- and two-liners. I can type all but 
the last one or two characters. The cursor 
is still flashing but CoCo will not take any 
further additions. I have tried omitting the 
space after the line number, but CoCo puts 
the space back in when I try to run or list. 
Any suggestions? 

Maryann Moore 
Brunswick, GA 

This problem is known as line 
packing. Just enter as much of the 
line as you can and then use the 
edit mode "extend" command to 
enter the last few characters. 

A Patch for DeskMate 

Editor: 

I would like to know if anyone has come 
up with a patch to use DeskMate with Radio 
Shack's DMP-105 printer at 2400 Baud. I 
also want to know if anyone has a patch for 
speeding up the disk drive stepping rate for 
versions 1.01.00 and 2.00.00 of OS-9. Please 
contact me at 911 North Grand Avenue, 
72160. 

/. R. Waggoner 
Stuttgart, AR 

See The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 for Version 1.01 altera- 
tions. Also, keep an eye on "Kiss- 
able OS-9" for DeskMate and 
Version 2.0 modifications. 



THE RAINBOW QUEST 

There I was, stuck at home with the flu, 
I had solved all my Adventures, and there 
was nothing to do. 

The mailman drove up to my house 
in his truck, 

And suddenly, I had been blessed with some 
very good luck. 

I ran out of my room, and tripped 
on the stair, 

I just had to know — was rainbow there? 

I felt that happiness was very near, 
And when I found rainbow, I shouted, 
"It's here! It's here!" 

With Lonnie Falk, Fred Scerbo and 
Tamara Dunn, 

I just have to say, "rainbow, you're 
Number One!" 

Ryan Hushion 
Massapequa Park, NY 



Customized Teacher's Aid 

Editor: 

I am a chemistry professor at Saginaw 
Valley State College. I had a program that 
recorded and did grades on an Apple. I was 



never very happy with the program; it was 
just not easy to use. Then, Teacher's Aid by 
Garry L. Shelton appeared in the September 
1985 issue of rainbow [Page 46], It is a 
useful program, however, there are several 
parts of the program that were of little use 
to me and it lacked some things I needed, 
so I changed it. 

I raised the limit for number of grades to 
1 10. 1 added a routine that allows grades to 
be printed either with student names and 
numbers, or with student numbers alone. I 
added a section that calculates the mean and 
median for each test. As part of the printout 
routine, the program prints out how many 
students fall into each of the grade ranges: 
100-90, 89-80, 79-70, 69-60, 59-50 and below 
50. Finally, I added a routine that sorts 
grade totals from highest to lowest and 
prints them. I use this in calculating final 
grades. 

I eliminated the section on display data, 
since that can be done through the Enter 
Data or Print Data sections. I eliminated the 
Drop Lowest Grade routine, because the 
Enter Data part is so easy to use that I can 
drop the lowest grade and enter the final 
exam score at the same time. I left the Enter 
Data section alone, except to remove Letter 
Grade, Days Absent and Percent Absent. 

If my modifications can be of use to 
anyone, write to me at 6383 Leven Drive, 
48604 and I'll send a listing, or send me a 
blank tape and 111 CSflVE it for you. 

George W. Eastland, Jr., Ph.D. 

Saginaw, MI 



International Rainbow 

Editor: 

I was telling my friends about the rain- 
bow and how I'm getting pen pal mail from 
all over the U.S. and Canada. Today I got 
a letter from Peru. I've seen letters in this 
column from Australia, Japan, Germany, 
and the Netherlands, to name a few. Just 
how widespread is rainbow's audience? 
Could you print a list of the countries that 
know about or receive your magazine? 
Obviously, it's more than just a national 
publication. 

Bill Bernico 
Sheboygan, WI 



Arabian Gulf Fiji 


Panama 


Argentina 


Finland 


Philippines 


Australia 


France 


Poland 


Austria 


Germany 


Saudi Arabia 


Bahamas 


Great Britain 


Scotland 


Belgium 


Haiti 


Singapore 


Bermuda 


Holland 


South 


Brazil 


Honduras 


America 


Canada 


Hong Kong 


Spain 


Central 


Israel 


Sweden 


Africa 


Italy 


Switzerland 


Chile 


Japan 


Trinidad 


Columbia 


Malta 


USSR 


Denmark 


Mexico 


Venezuela 


Dominican 


Netherlands 


West 


Republic 


New Guinea 


Germany 


Egypt 


New Zealand 


West Indies 


El Salvador 


Norway 





CoCo Gallery on Tape 

Editor: 

I love the "CoCo Gallery" and would like 
to have some of the listings. I understand the 
listings are too long to be included on 
rainbow on tape, but could you include the 
first-place picture? It would be a nice 
addition to the already great rainbow on 

TAPE. 

I want to thank Roy Geeo (March 1986, 
Page 7) for that helpful POKE. 

If anyone is interested in a good monthly 
newsletter that does not cost much, I suggest 
Dynamic Color News by Dynamic Electron- 
ics Inc. (ad in March 1986, rainbow, Page 
91). 

Neil Edge 
Williston, FL 

Newsletter Debut 

Editor: 

I want to announce the Lewis Clark 
Exchange newsletter. It offers programs, 
reviews and articles. Subscription is $10 a 
year in the U.S., $14 in Canada/ Mexico and 
$18 overseas. The address is 1130 Bryden 
Avenue, 83501. 

Leslie Miller 
Lewiston, ID 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

Thanks to the rainbow, a complete 
journal of programs, listings, and informa- 
tion — a CoCo I have, a CoCo I shall always 
have! Thanks, and keep me on the edge of 
my seat! 

Kevin Hobbs 
Shelburne, Nova Scotia 



BOUQUETS 

Editor: 

Please let me take this opportunity to 
publicly thank the staff of Speech Systems 
for their help in repairing my Voice Pak. I 
have owned their Voice Pak for a year now 
and when something went wrong, I mailed 
it back and it was returned good as new in 
less than a month at no charge. Thank you 
to Rich Parry and all the people at Speech 
Systems. You provide great support for your 
product. 

Sgt. Christopher L. Cheshire 
Travis AFB, CA 

Quick Service Appreciated 

Editor: 

I recently purchased a dual disk drive 
from ELI Heffron & Sons, Inc., and received 
the drive two days later. I'd call that good 
service. 

Phil Levesque 
Lewiston, ME 

Editor: 

I would like to express my thanks to one 
of your advertisers, True Data Products. 
They sold me an SG-10 printer. It was great 
to receive it within one week. 

David Eckrot 
Tillsonburg, Ontario 



10 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



CoCo's Force: THE rainbow Network 

Editor: 

THE rainbow network and our CoCos are 
better than any of us ever thought they 
would be. Case in point: I have been using 
CAIS, a checkbook reconciliation program 
by After Five Software, for the past two 
months. 

I have used the system on six different 
accounts with as many as 200 transactions 
on each. I had a few questions initially and 
was able to receive immediate help by 
directly calling the programmer of this 
software. I suggested there needed to be a 
way of editing the checkbook balance. 

Behold, two weeks later I received a 
diskette and printed instructions for upgrad- 
ing the software. Where else but our own 
CoCo/ RAINBOW and independent network 
of programmers can you get that attention 
and service? By the way, there was no charge 
for the upgrading. This program has saved 
me hours and hours of time and my tax 
preparer loves it, too. It was an ad in 
RAINBOW that led me to this software. 

Richard J. Lederman 
Bakersfield, CA 

We welcome After Five Software 
as a new advertiser starting with us 
this month. 

A Nice Way to Do Business 

Editor: 

A note of thanks for your promotion in 
December 1985. Following receipt of your 
coupons, I received assorted goodies and 
catalogs. Many in time for Christmas. What 
fun! 

I purchased CoCo Writer II from More- 
ton Bay and thought I might pass along a 
bit of its pleasures. 

I sent my order in over a holiday weekend. 
Despite this, I received my program in less 
than a week. One of the programs had a flaw 
and, upon notification, a new one was sent 
by return mail. I had some difficulty with the 
program and, again, received an immediate, 
most courteous response. What a nice way 
to do business. 

Dolores Rosenthal 
Los Angeles, CA 



PEN PALS 

Editor: 

I am in search of a CoCo pen pal who is 
willing to teach me how to program in 
machine language. I have pretty well mas- 
tered basic programming (except for the 
USR and DEFUSR commands). I am 15 years 
old and have a 64K Color Computer 2, disk 
drive, cassette recorder and a Microline 83/ 
A printer. You can contact me at 1859 East 
8th Street, 85203-6649. 

If anyone can tell me where I can get a 
good screen dump program for the Micro- 
line 83/ A printer, please contact me. 

Andrew Bartils 
Mesa, AZ 

• IVe been a proud owner of the CoCo 2 
for three years. I would like to know if there 



is a BBS in the Fresno area. If there is, please 
write or call. My address is 607 E. Magill, 
93710; my phone number is (209) 432-7230. 

Mike Cycon 
Fresno, CA 

• I am looking for a pen pal. I am 1 1 years 
old and own a TRS-80 MC-10 computer. 
Please write me at 7287 S. Clermont Drive, 
80122. 

Greg Carrasco III 
Littleton, CO 

• I would like to contact some rainbow 
subscribers who have programmed lotto 
programs with success. Write me at 4908 
Cypress Drive, 60162. 

Joseph Dooley 
Hillside, IL 

• Anyone wanting a pen pal can write me. 
I will do my best to answer all letters. My 
address is 6130 Beech Grove Drive, 46151. 

Harry H. Gould, Jr. 
Martinsville, IN 

• I am a handicapped free-lance writer. I 
purchased my CoCo for word processing 
but enjoy using it in other ways for recrea- 
tion. I have a 64K ECB system with disk 
drives and would like to correspond with 
other CoCo users. My address is P.O. Box 
186, 67567. 

Marilyn Phemister 
Pawnee Rock, KS 

• I would enjoy having some pen pals. I 
own a CoCo 2, disk drive, cassette recorder, 
modem and a DMP-130 printer. My address 
is P.O. Box 873, 71023. 

Tommy McClure 
Doyline, LA 

• I would like to know if there are any 
serious 11 -year-old CoCo users out there 
besides me. If you avidly program on the 
CoCo, I'd like to hear from you. Write me 
at 217 Haggetts Pond Road, 01810. 

Brandon Rhodes 
Andover, MA 

• I would like to hear from all teenagers 
who use CoCos. I am 16 years old and don't 
know anyone in my area that is an avid 
CoCoer. Send a letter and include your age. 
Also, send a quarter or an SASE so I can 
write back. Write me at 19 Crowley Street, 
14772. ' 

John F. Plumb 
Randolph, NY 



• I would like to have some pen pals. I 
have a 64K CoCo 2, tape drive, touch pad 
and a DMP-110 printer. I'm especially 
interested in pen pals with a touch pad and/ 
or a DMP-110. My address is 741 Alicia 
Walk, Apt. E, 44306. 

Keith Selbee 
Akron, OH 

• If anyone is interested in having a pen 
pal in Argentina please write me. My ad- 
dress is as follows: 

Luis Blando 
Independencia 189 
San Rafeal 
Mendoza, Argentina 5600 

• I'm looking for pen pals and would like 
to exchange letters — especially with CoCo 
Max artists. Also, anyone who has written 
a Hi-Res (PM0DE4) screen dump for the 
DMP-105 printer please write me. 

Fabio Luis De Paoli 
Rau Des Ferreira Franca 

N#4Q 
APTO-153 C 
Sao Paulo, Brazil 05446 

• I would like a pen pal in any state of the 
U.S.A. I have a 64K CoCo 2 (tape system). 
I am 14 years old. 

Craig Anderson 
16 Lilliput Street 
Broadmeadows 3047 
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 

• I don't know many users of a Tandy 
Color Computer in my country. If you are 
a CoCo user and live in Belgium or the 
Netherlands, please write to me. 

G Nottebaert 
HOGE WEG 156 
Over Boelare, Belgium 9500 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 

Letters to the editors may also be sent to 
us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: 
EDITORS. Be sure to include your complete 
name and address. 



ARTS AND LETTERS 




Envelope of the Month 



Charles Lebeda 
Los Alamos, NM 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 1 



Well, here it is. Our Fifth Anniversary Issue. We're bursting with 
pride to have served the CoCo Community for the past half- 
decade, and we look forward to continuing that service. 
How come? Because I happen to believe the Color Computer is a classic 
that will endure. Even if there were no new CoCo on the horizon (and 
believe me, as best I can tell, there is), the original CoCo and CoCo 2 are 
the best single pieces of hardware computerdom has brought us. 

Back when I was just a youngster, my father worked for Remington Rand 
and sold UNIVAC computers. In those days they were called "electronic 
brains" and took up a whole floor of a building. That floor, by the way, 
was usually a basement, because the old computers needed huge amounts 
of cool air to keep all the vacuum tubes from blowing. The basement 
locations gave the cooling a head start. 

I used to sit at the dinner table with Mom and Dad and a couple of 
friends and listen to my dad talk about electronic brains. Why, these 
wonderful machines were able to do all sorts of calculations, could keep 
track of things like driver's license numbers (as long as you had lots of 
punched cards for storage) and even print out things on paper! 

Dad didn't know much about how to run a computer, but he sure knew 
how to sell them. He put in the first "computerized" state driver's license 
system arid one of the first insurance company computer systems. When 
the insurance company outgrew its first computer, he arranged for them 
to give it to the University of Alabama School of Business — and then 
sold them another. 

What continually amazes me, though, is that one of those early, giant 
UNIVAC machines actually had less power than my first Color Computer. 
And I didn't have to program it with punch cards, either. My point is that 
what we thought of as a revolution with the introduction of the electronic 
brain is actually becoming a revolution today — placing electronic brains 
in everyone's home, and at an affordable cost. 

One tends to wax nostalgic on the eve of an anniversary. And five years 
is certainly a milestone. Not too many computer magazines have made it 
that long. I think the fact that THE RAINBOW is strong and healthy says 
a lot for the CoCo Community, the Color Computer and the folks at Tandy 
who made (and continue to make) it happen. 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User -friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 5 1 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fun. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24! 1 Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 5 1 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVII/VIH, DMP-10O720O, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable /disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as welt as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su r e saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and /or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



.truly a state of the art word processor... 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 
Radio Shack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a trademark 
of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp; MX-80 is a 
trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



We started out in a spare bedroom of my house. I shared 
the room with my two girls, who used it to watch TV. I guess 
I had something like 15 square feet of my very own for THE 
rainbow back then. Now we've got some 17,000 square feet 
on three floors of the Falsoft Building. 

I was, of course, the first employee, but Pat Hirsch was 
the first paid employee (I worked for free). We're both still 
here — along with 73 or so others. 

I know that many of you wonder what all of us look like 
and what "the house that rainbow built" looks like, too. 
So part of our special Fifth Anniversary edition is an artistic 
look at most of us on this month's cover. Inside, you'll see 
our building and many members of our staff. Thank you 
all so much for helping us get here. 

Our special treat is inside — a CoCo Cat iron-on created 
especially for the occasion by our resident CCCC (CoCo 
Cat Creator) and art director, Jerry McKiernan. Youll also 
note that we're planning on running copies of the best CoCo 
Cat color renditions in future issues — our way to help carry 
our Fifth Anniversary celebration throughout the year. 

It is really interesting how CoCo Cat has captured the 
spirit of the CoCo and THE RAINBOW. Jim Reed wanted me 
to buy a CoCo Cat costume and have someone walk around 
at RAINBOWfest in it — like those animal mascots sports 
teams have. I'm sorry, we couldn't find anyone willing to 
wear the thing. 



w We're here, happy and 
healthy, supporting the 
grandest little computer 
in the world . . 



One of our surprises is yet to come, but I am sure it will 
be greeted with cheer by all. Sometime in the next couple 
of months, we will begin to wrap all subscription issues of 
THE RAINBOW in brown paper to protect them from damage 
in the mail. I'd say this is the most requested item in our 
files. We've finally been able to put it together. I know that 
handling of the magazine by the Postal Service has been a 
problem for many of you. I think that now we'll get it solved. 

I am breaking with tradition in not thanking a long list 
of people for their help, guidance, support and encourage- 
ment in the past year. To be very honest, the list is just too 
long and there is always the chance someone will be left out. 
In putting together the list a year ago, we caught several 
omissions at various stages that would have been very bad 
had they not been included. 

But there is one person who is, indeed, so important it 
would be impossible to leave them out — and that person 
is you. Without your kindness, support, helpfulness, 
enthusiasm and dedication to the Color Computer and the 
CoCo Community, there would be no CoCo Community 
and no rainbow either. 

To paraphrase Tiny Tim, "Thank you, every one!" We're 
here, happy and healthy, supporting the grandest little 
computer in the world and proud you let us be part of that 
world. 

So, perhaps it is fitting that we do not say Happy 
Anniversary to us, but Happy Anniversary to you! After 
all, it's your Community, and we're proud to be a part of 
it. 




— - Lonnie Falk 



With every one of us in the 
picture appearing on Page 44, 
we needed someone to snap the 
shutter. Our local pharmacist, 
Thomas Bond, Jr., came over 
and filled the bill with a profes- 
sional touch. 



1 4 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



ARK ROYALGAMES 



BAT TLE HYMN 




THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG 



BATTLE HYMN The Battle of Gettysburg. Command Lee's army of 39 Divisions, 
including Stuarts cavalry brigades, and infantry division under the command of 
such famous names as Johnson, Heth, McLaws, Hood, Early and Pickett. Try to 
do what the real Confederates couldn't: destroy Mead's army at Gettysburg. New 
movement and turn structure; form lines, rally, limber and unlimber cannon, back- 
step, and do your best to outflank the Union line at Gulp's Hill, Devil's Den or Big 
Round top. Historical, with an Ark Royal touch. Available also on the IBM PC (Tandy 
1000). Graphics are hi res; game is machine language throughout. <jj29 00 




ADVENTURE ISLAND (32K) Coco, disk only. Your plane has crashed on a deserted 
island and you must use all of your wits to stay alive. Beautiful half -screen picture 
graphics take you through jungle and beach in this fun-filled machine language 
adventure. Comes on two disks. ^23 00 




Disk only! SAGA-THE SORCERER'S 
CURSE 32K 100% hi-res, 100% ML 
graphic adventure. Fantastic!— $22 

Disk only! REDSTAR 32K 100% hi-res 
1 00% ML. Futuristic wargame involv- 
ing NATO and the WARSAW 
PACT.— $22 

BARBAROSSA 64K 100% hi-res 
100% ML game of the war in Russia 
1941-1944. "A Blockbuster," says 
Hot Coco's Peter Paplaskas. Reviewed 
Jan. '86 Hot Coco.— $25 (Tandy 1000) 

D-DAY Our second 64K 100% hi-res 
100% ML, this one dealing with the Al- 
lies invasion of France in 1 944. Mas- 
sive! No review date set yet. — $23 

PHALANX 32K 100% hi-res, 100% 
ML game of Alexander the Great. No 
review date set yet.— $20 



ANZIO 32K Semigraphic wargame. 1 
or 2 players. Simultaneous movement. 
No review date set yet.— $20 

COMPANY COMMANDER 32K ML 
routines. Tactical squad level wargame 
set in WWII. 12 scenarios, add-on ex- 
pansion modules. Dec. '85 Rain- 
bow. — $23 disk or tape 

RIVER CROSSING 32K ML routines. 
A Company Commander add-on mod- 
ule, but you no longer need C/C to play 
it.— $23 

CINCPAC BATTLE OF MIDWAY 32K 
100% hi-res 75% ML. The battle that 
turned the tide of war. Aug. '85 
Rainbow.— $20 

ESCAPE FROM DENNA 32K ML rou- 
tines. Semigraphic Dungeon adventure 
game. No review date set yet.— $18 



BATTLE OF THE BULGE 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Aug. 
'85 Rainbow.— $15 

BATTLE FOR TUNIS 32K Semigraph- 
ic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Sept. '85 
Rainbow.— $15 

ACROSS THE RUBICON 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. Feb. '84 
Rainbow.— $15 

WATERLOO 32K ML routines. Semi- 
graphic wargame. Mar. '84 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

KAMIKAZE 32K Hi-res graphic war- 
game. Apr. '83 Rainbow.— $15 

BOMBER COMMAND 32K disk, 16K 
tape. Semigraphic wargame. ML rou- 
tines. Jan. '84 Rainbow. — $10 

GUADALCANAL 32K Semigraphic 
wargame. ML routines. — $10 




Prices on all programs include shipping to U.S., APO's, Canada. COD's (CIS A only) 
add 10%. Florida Residents add 5%. For disk version add $2. All Orders shipped 
within 24 hours. Programs require Color Computer TM (Tandy Corp.) or TDP Sys- 
tem 100 Computer TM (RCA). Many programs soon to be available on MS-DOS 
systems. 



P. O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 786-8603 



ADVANCED 

B AS I C 
PROGRAMMING 

AID 

Now there is a product which 
integrates the most used utility 
functions for your COCO. It works 
with all Extended Color Basic 
COCOs, 16k, 32k and 64k. Look at 
the features available* no need 
for a text processor to create or 
change programs. Saves disk space 
and time because programs do not 
have to be saved in ASCII format. 



COPY 
more 
MOVE 
more 
FIND 
and 



COMMAND : 
statements 
COMMAND : 
statements 



Copy one or 
in a program 

Move one or 
in a program 



COMMAND: Find a string 
REPEAT FIND for string. 
MULTIPLE EDITING SESSIONS: 
You can edit two programs at 
once and MERGE all or part. 
This also allows you to RUN 
one pgm while editing another 
SCROLLING: Allows for down 
or up scrolling through pgm. 
AUTOMATIC EDIT: You can enter 
edit of current line without 
specifying the line number. 
COMMAND KEYS: One keystroke 
enters most basic commands. 
REPEATING KEYS: Auto repeat. 
AUTOMATIC LINE NUMBERING: 
Set start and increment. 
BASIC FORMATTING: ON/OFF 
control, for easier reading 
of list/print multiple stmts 
KEYBOARD CLICKER: ON/OFF 
CLEAR KEY DISABLE: ON/OFF 
AUTOMATIC MENU LOADER: If you 
have a favorite menu pgm you 
can load it automatically. 

* AUTOMATIC PROGRAM EXIT: Run 
another ML pgm w/no pwp off. 

ALSO SUPER PROGRAMMING AID: You 
get Advanced Programming Aid plus 

* PROGRAMMABLE COMMAND KEYS: 
You get a command editing 
Program to make the keys do 
what you want, enter up to 
2S0 characters with one key. 

ADVANCED PROGRAMMING AID $24.95 
SUPER PROGRAMMING AID $29.95 
Upgrade from ADV to SUPER $14.95 

ALSO: GO-THELLO - a popular board 
game, 1 or 2 players, 3 levels of 
difficulty on 1 player. $12.95 

BSS DISK MANAGER: copy, move, kill 
run, rename etc. handy for disk 
management make it simple: $14.95 

$2.00 S & H specify DISK or TAPE 

Banger t Software Systems 
P. 0. BOX 21056 
Indianapolis, IN 46221 



BUILDING JULY'S RAINBOW 



Still Beginners, Five Times Over 



A generation or so ago, when I was a member of the sliding board and 
swings crowd on the playground at school, I occasionally was taunted 
about how my mother was "just a third-grade teacher," as if somehow, 
by now, she should have reached the ninth grade or so, at least. It was a challenge 
I took up with relish. I'd prop my fists on my hips and launch into them with 
a "Ha, ha, ha. That's all you know," and lecture on how it took a lot of 
specialized training to be an elementary school teacher. 

A few years later, Mom became a first-grade teacher and remained one for 
20-some years until her retirement. According to my by-then ingrained logic, 
if being a primary instructor was so important, then teaching the first grade 
must be the zenith of the teaching profession — I still feel that way. 

Getting off on the right foot is so very important; that's why the rainbow 
has such a strong focus on the beginner. While we are celebrating our fifth 
anniversary, we make a very deliberate effort to keep the new user in mind in 
every issue. We remain firmly committed to this precept, even though if many 
had their way, we would be doing only "fifth year" material at this juncture. 

Just look at our expert panel of contributing editors. Without a doubt, each 
of them could be delving into some really "heavy stuff if they chose to do so. 
But, instead, all of them devote the major portion of every article to material 
selected with the beginner (in that area) in mind. That such is the case is not 
a matter of editorial decree (our contributing editors have a totally free hand 
in their selection of subject matter and direction), but shows a consensus that 
we must always keep the novice uppermost in our minds. That is easier said 
than done. 

All too often, authors evolve according to their interests: that is, early on, 
they write BASIC programs, but as time passes they "graduate" to the so-called 
"low-level" languages, as if the ultimate calling for authors is to think in 
assembly language, or even straight Hex code. That might be a logical course 
for professional programmers, but for writers it is a primrose path. THE 
RAINBOW is a teaching environment and the majority of our readers will always 
be beginners. 

Most recently, my concern is that the lure of the much-rumored "new CoCo" 
will be irresistible to our RAINBOW writers and that "everyone who is anyone" 
will be racing to support the new machine. Well, folks, the "user base" for a 
long time to come is going to be those who have the present machine, and our 
readership's need, for both the short and the medium term, is mainly going 
to be for material to support the present Color Computer. Our advertisers as 
well as contributors would do well to keep this in mind. 

Lest our veteran readers become worried that we won't keep up with their 
changing needs, too, let me relate a story of my father's. While school 
superintendent, Dad would sometimes visit in the classroom as an observer. 
On one such visit, he recognized a notably bigger boy who was repeating the 
first grade. "John," he asked the boy, "how do you like school?" The immediate 
response: "I like school OK, but if they don't get me out of this damn rabbit 
book, I'm going to quit." 

So, even though THE RAINBOW is now 5 years old, we want to reach those 
who've had their CoCo for only five months, or five days. And, though we all 
want to see the new generation of CoCo, we are not going to abandon the 
machine we have right now. And, to remain true to those who've been with 
us a long time, well continue to provide both a full mix of subjects and the 
very latest information on our Color Computer, the rainbow's no rabbit book, 
but rather a dynamic, evolving monthly magazine with something for everyone 
in the CoCo Community. We believe it's based on an educational philosophy 
youll want to subscribe to. 



— Jim Reed 



1 6 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



Have you yet subscribed to 

COCO TIME 

A monthly magazine on tape and disk 

Now every month you can get 8- 1 0 ready- 
to-run utilities, programming tips & hints, 
business applications, home management, 
tutorials, and educational programs. Also 
a Buy 'N Sell section and much, much 
more. NO GAMES, ONLY REAL STUFF! 

Each issue shipped to you first-class. 

Programs written by computer wizards like 
Kishore M. Santwani and Gary T. Jes. 

MANY SUBSCRIBER BENEFITS 

EVERY YEAR YOU GET OVER 
$1 500 WORTH OF SOFTWARE. 

So Act Now! 

JANUARY 1986 

• 40K Disk Baste 1.0 

• 40K Disk Basic 1.1 

• Line Cross Reference for Basic Programs 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Dump 

• Basic Line Copy 

• ML to Data Converter 

• Home Bill Manager 

• Disk Tutorial ( Part 2 of 1 0 part series) 

The market value of these programs is 
OVER $150, DOUBLE the price of our 
annual subscription. 

Subscription Rates (USA & Canada) 

Tape Disk 

1 Year $65 $75 

6 Months $40 $50 

Single $10 $15 

(Other countries add 25%) 



Choose from over 100 Utilities 



UTILITIES BONANZA 1 

OVER 20 best-selected and oft-used 
utilities: 40 K Disk Basic 1 .0/1,1 . Basic 
Line Copy, Line Cross Reference for 
Basic Programs. Home Bill Manager. ML 
to Data Converter, Appointment Calendar 
(with time clock!), Disk- to-Tape Copy 1.0/ 
1.1, Numeric Keypad for Basic Programs, 
Expanded Basic ( 1 0 new features!) 
Double Bank (use your" hidden" 32 K from 
your 64 K Computer), Master Disk Cat- 
aloger, Graphics Lettering (Two Sizes!), 
LLIST Enhancer (with page numbering!), 
Single Stepper (Super Debugger for 
Basic Programs!), ROM Switcher, Super 
Tape-to- Disk Copy 1 .0/1 .1 (with auto- 
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16K. 32 K, or 64 K CoCo I and CoCo II 
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DISK ONLY$29.95 




UTILITY ROUTINES 
for the TANDY 
& TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER (Vol. 1) 

This powerful book for Basic and ML Pro- 
grammers, includes program explanation, 
memory requirements, and an annotated 
source listing for the utility routines given 
below. These routines if bought individually 
will cost you HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. 

These are 1 00% Position Independent ML 
Utilities and require no ML programming 
knowledge. 

COMMAND KEYS: Access most Basic com- 
mands with 2 keystrokes. 
CURSOR STYLES: Create OVER 65000 Cursor 
Styles. 

FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get fuli length error 
messages. 

KEY CLICKER: Ensure key input accuracy. 
PAUSE CONTROL Put Basic/most ML pro- 
grams "on hold" 

REPEAT KEY: Repeat ANY key. 5 different key 
speeds. 

REVERSE VIDEO (Green and Red): Eliminate 
eye strain. 

SPOOLER( 1 6 K. 32 K, 64 K): Don't wait for those 
printouts, 32K Spooling Butter in 64K. 
SUPER SCROLLER (64K Only): Save and exam- 
ine everything that scrolls off the text screen. 
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! 
Compatible with 16K/32K/64K ECB/Cassette 
and Disk Systems and CoCo I and CoCo II. 

BOOK $19.95 
THESE ROUTINES (READY- TO- RUN) 

ON CASSETTE/DISK: $24:95 
BOTH BOOK & CASSETTE/DISK: $36.95 

BEST OF 

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1 8 best selected utilities from 
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Basic Search, EZ Disk Master, 
Function Keys, Graphics Zoom, 
Tape Index System, 40K Basic (for 
64K Cassette Users), Alpha Direc- 
tory, Banner Creator, LIST/DIR 
Pause, Disk Mailing List, Super 
INPUT/LINE INPUT, and Tape-to- 
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Disk or Cassette, 

Only For $26.95 

DISK ANTI- PI RATE $59 . 95 
HIDE- A- BASIC 1.1 $24.95 
BOTH $79.95 




500 POKES, PEEKS 
'N EXECS for the 
TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER 

NEVER BEFORE has this information of vital 
significance to a programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book will help you 
'GET UNDERNEATH THE COVER' of the color 
Computer and develop your own HI-QUALITY 
programs, SO WHY WAIT? 

This book includes 
POKES, PEEKS, andEXECsto: 

• Auto start our Basic programs. 

• Disables most Color Basic/ECB/Disk Basic 
commands. 

• Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY and RESET 
BUTTON. 

• Generate a Repeat-Key. 

• Merge two Basic programs. 

• Transfer Rompaks to tape (for 64 K only). 

• Speed up your programs. 

• RESET, MOTOR ON/OFF from keyboard. 

• Restart your Basic program thru the RESET 
BUTTON. 

• Produce Key-Clicks and Error-Beeps. 

• Recover Basic progams lost by NEW, ?10 ERRORS 
and faulty RESET. 

• Set 23 different GRAPHIC/SEMIGRAPHIC modes. 

• Set 1 5 of the most commonly used Baud Rates. 

• Allow you more plays in 23 of your favorite arcade 
games. 

• AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 1 6K/32K/64K 
COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK BASIC SYSTEMS 
and CoCol and CoColl. 



ONLY $1 6.95 



Basic Prog. Tricks Revealed - $1 4.95 
Color Basic Unravelled- $19.95 
Extended Basic Unravelled - £1 9.95 
Disk Basic Unravalled - $1 9.95 
All 3 Unravelled Books- $49.95 
FACTS- $16.95 



Telewriter-64. (Cas) 

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COCO MAX II 
Y CABLE FOR COCO MAX 
PRO-COLOR-FILE 2.0 
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THE COMPLETE RAINBOWGUIDE 
TO OS-9 (book only) 18.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 DISK 
PACKAGE (2 disks) 29.00 



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MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

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Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



Our products are available at leading dealers in USA, Canada, & Australia. [ *y *| 

To Order Order by phone & get a $2 refund for your phone call. 

VISA, MC, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 

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please add Sales Tax. Immediate shipment. Dealer inquiries invited. 1 ■ 



24-HOUR ORDER HOT LINE (7 DAYS A WEEK): (716) 223-1477 




Don Duquet 

America 

Our second prize goes to Don for his 
work depicting America's national 
symbol and motto. Don lives in Wins- 
low, Maine, and used basic for this 
proud clarion of independence. 




p 

R 

i 

I 

L 



Edward B. Mallalieu 

Uncle Sam 

In celebration of America's spirit of 
independence, Edward gifts the 
gallery with this portrait of a stern but 
beloved gentleman. Created with 
basic, this well-known persona takes 
first prize. 





P 
R 
I 

Z 
E 



George Aloia 

4th of July 

George lives in Margate, Florida, and 
captures a CoCo celebrating Ameri- 
ca's Independence Day. George used 
CoCo Max for this kinetic keyboard. 




M|k$ Ci tf II ffl 1 1 L J 



rrsrn 



<i* 



Michael Chu 

Chapel 

Bringing our gallery to a conclusion, 
Michael offers patrons a serene and 
graceful view of a pastoral setting. 
Michael lives in Montclair, California, 
and used CoCo Max II for this work. 





h 

r[ 



Tim Laun 

Abraham Lincoln 

Using /W/cro Illustrator, Tim creates a 
caricature of one of America's most 
distinguished presidents. Tim lives in 
Kiel, Wisconsin. 




Send your entry on either tape or disk 
to: 

CoCo Gallery 
THE RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
Attn: Jody Doyle 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! 

You are invited to nominate original work for 
inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." 
Share your creations with the CoCo Community! 

Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, 
address and phone number, detailing how you created 
your picture (what programs you used, etc.) and how 
to display it. Also, please include a few facts about 
yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this 
means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere. 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of 
$15 and a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions will 
also be given. 

Jody Doyle, Curator 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 9 



PROGRAMMING UTILITY 



A powerful utility for more readable listings 



I Can See Clearly Now 



By Lynn Sundberg 



£YRLIST is a utility program in- 
tended to give a more powerful 
version of LLIST to the BASIC 
programmer for debugging or docu- 
mentation of a program. It gives two 
types of printout: a 32-column screen 
image like THE rainbow's format, or a 
by-statement column. 

To illustrate how the by-statement 
printout can help in tracing program 
logic, I have taken the liberty of running 
Harris Allen's one-liner contest winner 
(RAINBOW, December 1984, Page 212) 
through SRLIST to produce the follow- 
ing printout; 



0 IFAO0THENFORA-1TO4 : 
FORB-0TOU 
X-X+A(A) : 
Y»Y+A(A+1) J 

IFFPOINT (X , Y) "5THENPRINTC I "TURNS 
"J 

ELSEPSET(X,Y) I 
IFINKEY$«""THENB-0 1 

NEXTt 

ELSEOC+lJ 
NEXT: 
NEXTt 
GOTO0: 

EI£EIFINKEY$-" M THENPRINT M CRAM/PR 
ESS KEY" l 
GOTO0 
ELSEPMODE4 , 1: 
PCLS: 

SCREEN1, 1 J 
A(2)-lJ 
A(4)— It 
A-lr 
GOTO0 



Lynn Sundberg, a senior chief in the 
U.S. Navy, lives in San Diego, Califor- 
nia. He enjoys altering programs to suit 
his needs. 



There have been simpler programs 
that give the two formats, but much of 
SRLIST's value comes from niceties 
such as a two columns per page print- 
out, page numbering, run date and 
program title. Unlike most pretty print 
programs that are a machine language 
routine residing in memory along with 
the program being printed, SRLIST is 
a stand-alone program that uses a 
program saved in ASCII format (SAVE 
"NAME'\fi) as an input file. 

To make iST^L/iSTcompatible with as 
many CoCo configurations as possible, 
hardware requirements and hardware 
control coding have been kept to a 
minimum. The program works on a 
16K CoCo, yet Line 5 uses all available 
standard BASIC memory in a 64K ma- 
chine. It does require ECB and an 80- 
column printer. 

As written, the program is for a disk 
system. For cassette systems, make the 
following modifications; change Line 
1 10 to: PRINT0416 , "SET CRSSETTE TO 
STRRT OF " ; X $ : I N P U T Z $ : P R 
INT@41G,B$:PRINT; change the two 
Bis in Line 115 to 8-1; change the (1) 
in Line 125 to (-1); change the 81 in 
Line 130 to tt-1. 

Printer codes are used in Line 10 to 
set printer tabs to 1 and 40, while the 
code in Line 350 positions the printer at 
the 40th space. Line 360 contains a code 
for "top of form." You may have to 
change these codes for your printer. Or 



remove all printer codes with the fol- 
lowing changes: 

1) Delete Line 10 

2) Replace Line 355 with 

PR I NT8 - 2 , LEFTS ( LS ( Y ) +SS$ , 39 ) 
; :L$(Y)=B$:PRINT8-2,L$(Y+Z 
+1 ) : L$ ( Y+Z+l ) =B$ : NEXT 

3) The FOR statement in Line 360 
should read 

FOR X-=0 TO ? 

where the question mark is replaced 
with whatever number gets you to the 
start position of the next page. A little 
experimentation will be required to find 
this number, but it will be a small 
number. 

Removing the printer codes causes 
the program to run slower because it 
fills memory with old print lines and 
stops to clean itself every page or so. 

To use SRLIST, save the program to 
be printed in ASCII format and run 
SRLIST. A screen displays reminding 
you the program being printed out must 
be in ASCII format. The screen then 
clears and requests input for program 
parameters. 

It asks for the date and the program 
name. If the program uses the BAS 
default extension, SRLIST automati- 
cally adds it to the program name. 



20 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Next it requests type of run, either by- 
statement columns or 32-character 
columns with a default to the by- 
statement run. The next parameter is 
paper type. Continuous paper is the 
default value and once started, the 
program runs to completion. If the 
single-sheet option is chosen, the com- 
puter stops and prompts you to enter a 
new sheet of paper for each page. 

Following the program parameters, 



you are asked for three sub-parameters 
that can be changed after each run made 
on the same program. The first sub- 
parameter is the number of the first line 
to be printed. The second is the the end 
line. If the end line is less than the first 
line, the program defaults to 9999. Line 
numbers higher than 9999 can be pro- 
cessed, but in the printout only the four 
right-hand digits are printed. The third 
is the starting page number. 



These sub-parameters allow printing 
of a portion of a program, or reprinting 
a program section while keeping page 
continuity. 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 3086 Min- 
uteman Street, San Diego, CA 92124. 
Please enclose an SASE when writ- 
ing.) □ 



The listing: SRLIST 

5 CLE AR50 : CLEAR MEM-1000 

10 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ; "D" ;CHR$ (1) 

;CHR$(40) ;CHR$ (0) 

15 WC$="WORKING" : WS$="working" : S 
P=l 

20 B$="":S$=" ":S5$=" ":SS$= 

STRING$(41," ") :E$="ELSE":C$=":" 
: I$="IF" :R$=" 1 " : RR$="REM" : Q$=CHR 
$(34) 

25 L=-1:DIM L$(103) 
30 1 START 

35 CLS:PRINT@33, "SRLIST BY L.SUN 
DBERG" : PRINT@97 , "S-LIST GIVES A 
BY STATEMENT" :PRINT@131, "PRINTOU 

mil 

40 PRINT@193,"R-LIST GIVES A 32 
CHARACTER" : PRINT@227 , "PRINTOUT" 
45 PRINT@321, "SRLIST IS A STAND 
ALONE" :PRINT@353 , "PROGRAM BUT DO 
ES REQUIRE THAT" : PRINT@385 , "THE 
PROGRAM BEING LISTED" : PRINT@417 , 
"BE IN askii FORMAT" 
5jZf FORX=0TO1500:NEXT 
55 CLS : PRINT@105 , "DATE " ; : INPUT 
DA$ : PRINT@110 , DA$ : PRINT@129 , "PRO 
GRAM NAME ";: INPUT PN$ : PRINT@142 
,PN$ 

60 PRINT@165,"TYPE RUN S-STATEM 
ENT" : PRINT@207 , "R-3 2 CHARACTER" : I 
NPUTX$ 

65 PRINT@207,B$: PRINT :IFX$="R" T 
HENT=1 : PRINT® 175 , "R-3 2 CHARACTER" 
70 PRINT@195, "TYPE PAPER C=CONT 
INUOUS":PRINT@2 39, "S -SINGLE SHEE 
T":INPUTX$ 

75 IFX$="S" THEN PRINT@207 , "S-SI 

NGLE SHEET" :TP=1 

80 PRINT@224,B$:PRINT:PRINT 

85 'RUN LOOP LIMITS 

90 PRINT@291,"START LINE " ; : INPU 

TSL:PRINT@302,SL 

95 PRINT@325, "END LINE " ; : INPUTX 
:IFX>SL THEN EL=X ELSE EL=9999 
100 PRINT@334,EL:PRINT@355,"STAR 
T PAGE "; : INPUTX :IFX>0THEN SP=X 
105 PRINT@366,SP:X$=PN$ 



110 X=INSTR (X$ ,"."): Y=INSTR (X$ , » 
/") :IFX=0AND Y=0THEN X$=X$+».BAS 



n 



115 OPEN"I",#l,X$:INPUT#l,X$ 
120 1 READ LOOP 

125 GOSUB320:IFEOF(1) THEN 3 80 

130 LINEINPUT#1,X$:X=INSTR(X$,S$ 

) :A=VAL(LEFT$(X$,X) ) 

135 IFA<SL THEN12 5ELSE IFA>EL TH 

EN380 

140 IFT=0THEN175 

145 1 PROCESS 32 CHAR LINE 

150 L=L+1:IFL>103THEN GOSUB335 

155 IFLEN(X$) >32THEN165 

160 L$(L)=X$:GOT0125 

165 L$(L)=LEFT$(X$,32) :X$=MID$(X 

$,33) :GOSUB320:GOTO150 

170 1 PROCESS BY STATEMENT 

175 P$=RIGHT$(S5$+LEFT$(X$,X) ,5) 

:X$=MID$(X$,X+1) :XX=1:A=0 

180 I=INSTR(XX,X$,I$) :IFI>0AND I 

<30R A=l THEN 245 

185 C=INSTR(XX,X$,C$) :IFC>0THEN 
195 

190 P$=P$+X$:GOSUB405:GOTO125 
195 Q=INSTR(XX,X$,Q$) :R=INSTR(XX 
,X$,R$) :RR=INSTR(XX,X$,RR$) : IFRR 
>0AND R>RR THENR=RR 
200 IFQ>0THEN230 
205 IFR>0THEN22 5 

210 P$=P$+LEFT$ (X$,C) :GOSUB405:P 
$=S5$:IFA=1THEN P$=P$+S$+S$ 
215 XX=l:IFC=LEN(X$) THEN125 
220 X$=MID$(X$,C+1) :GOTO180 
225 IFR<C THEN190ELSE210 
230 IFQ>R AND R>0THEN22 5 
235 IFQ>C THEN210 

240 XX=INSTR(Q+l,X$,Q$)+l:IFXX=l 
OR XX=LEN(X$)+1 THEN190ELSE185 
245 A=1:E=INSTR(XX+1,X$,E$) : IFE= 
0THEN185 

250 C=INSTR(XX,X$,C$) :Q=INSTR(XX 
,X$,Q$) :R=INSTR(XX,X$,R$) :RR=INS 
TR(XX,X$,RR$) :IFRR>0AND R>RR THE 
N R=RR 

255 IFO0 AND C<E THEN 200 

260 IFQ>0THEN300 

265 IFR>0AND R<E THEN 225 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 21 



- 



OWL-WARE 

WINCHESTER BASIC 



CREATE BEAUT IFUL PICTURES WITH 



ANNOUNCING... the Development of a Major Breakthrough in 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR COMPUTER!!! 

Several months ago OWL-WARE introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer. 
Now we are about to introduce the only RSDOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, although there are 10 
directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but If you do, all flies saved from RSDOS are available to OS9. All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into, only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don't like. 

Call for further details and availability on this breakthrough product!!! 




WITH 

DRIVE v 
BELOW ONLY... 



<Kf-r* WITHOUT -k-- 

$50. DRIVE $75. 



vers, 
a.o 

m convt n l tri t / oiTi c r t en Jll nu 

h Accepts input froM X- p 2Si„.„- 

TOUCH-P ROT MOUSE or JOYSTICK 
m n.gn ificat ion Mode * 
h Drew wltti custom peftntoruihef 
m Cftu 'ftf-ntno fKitcntna 
n "Feint-* commend 
M 10 colors et e time 
m Pictures ere reedy for use in 

BASIC programs 
■ Lettering in enu tilt 
h Screen dump to Color Inh-Jtt 

or otner Tandy printers 



64K DISK 



$29.95 



r « • ? - 1 



mm 



m 



J 



i - 



OS-9 HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives- 
Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
Memory!!! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes... 
Software, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interface. 

/=ZAS//: OS-9 and RSDOS... M 7h/'s /nay or&ve rfc be. J>e.r-fe<r-+: m&f/bo 

$525. 5 MEG $659.10MEG 

S799.20MEG 




Interface & 
Software Only $99. 



OWL-WARE 

is pleased to announce 
an exclusive arrangement 
to Distribute the L.R. TECH 
Hard Drive Interface and Software. DEALERS INQUIRES INVITED 



NOTE: Interface is not Interrupt 
Driven Like Our Competition. 

Therefore, the System Clock 
does not Lose Time During 
Hard Drive Access. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULT1-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 



ililiWl 



UICW 3-DZttENSlOMftL OBJECTS FROM ANY 
ANCLE HITH 



h On 



nutnltnt , on-screen menu 
poor t f input froin x-PRD, 
OUCH-PAD, MOUSE or JOYSTICK 
llf-in screen dump to Tandy 
r inter t 

lcuiates dlMm Ions for gou 
roM just a rough sketch 
ot s or calculates lines and 
r ei 

-screen sketching mode 



64K DISK 



$29.95 




OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 

TECHNICAL ADVICE 
(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 




J 



/ 





u 

SHhhh... Ask about the WISPER DRIVE!!! 



Ml 

'^bmvE0$179.to$239. «.«. 

...Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0, 1,2,3 Combos. Double 

drive 1 $99.to$145. Quad 



NOW AVAILABLE !!! 

SUPER-TROLL 




OWL-WARE'S version of the 
DiBtro (CRC) Controller by 
Tony DiStefano.This has sockets 
for 4 ROM Chips. ...only $15.00 
additional with a Drive 0 System. 

ADD ON OPTIONS: 

CDOS $6. 

Parallel Printer Port $25. 

Real Time Clock $10. 

80 Column Card $49« 

Just Controller $99. with CDOS 
to $195. with ALL options 



All drives are new and fully 
assembled. We ship 

FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at NO ADDED CHARGE! 

CHINON and Other Brands known 
as the highest quality made. 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 



Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



We have RSDOS, JDOS, 
OWL DOS, ADOS available on 
ROM. Call about Double Sided 
or Special Needs. 



TOLL FREE 
ORDER LINE 
(800) 245-6228 

Call for 
LATEST 

PRICES!!! 



WARRANTIES 

90 day - 1 YEAR 




M.C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA Res Include 6% Tax 
PA (215) 682-6855 



OWL TIP 



We stock Single Sided Drives, but 
at the Current Prices why not 
BUY Double Sided??? 



OWL-WARE SOFTWARE 

BUNDLE: DISK TUTORIAL 

2 UTILITIES 
2 GAMES 

DISK TUTOR 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
QUICK, PAINLESS KNOWLEDGE OF DISK 
BASIC (THIS PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN 
TUTOR IS EASILY WORTH THE BUNDLE'S 
TOTAL PRICE). 

OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
25% FASTER DISK ACCESS AND ALLOWS 
USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 
SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

2 GAMES 

2 GAMES FROM OUR STOCK. 
BOTH HAVE SOLD FOR OVER $17. EACH. 

IF SOLD SEPARATELY OVER 
$125.00 WORTH OF SOFTWARE!!! 

only $24.95!!! 

(or even better) 
$4.95 with 
DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 



27J3 C=INSTR(XX,X$,C$) 
275 IFC=J30R OE THEN2 9 j3 

28) 3 P$=P$+LEFT$(X$,C) :GOSUB4j35 
285 P$=S5$+S$+S$:X$=MID$(X$,C+1) 
:XX=l:GOT0245 

29) 3 P$=P$+LEFT$(X$,E-1) :GOSUB4)35 
295 P$=S5$:X$=MID$(X$,E) :XX=1:G0 
T0245 

3)3)3 IFR>0AND R<Q THEN2 65 
3)35 IFQ>E THEN27)3 

31) 3 XX=INSTR(Q+1,X$,Q$)+1:E=INST 
R(XX,X$,E$) :IFE=)3THEN185ELSE25)3 
315 1 WORKING LOOP 

32) 3 IFW=)3THEN W=l: PRINT@4 6)3 , WC$ 
ELSE W=)3:PRINT@46)3,WS$ 

325 RETURN 

33J3 ' PRINT PAGE LOOP 
335 PRINT@448 , B$ ; : IFTP=1THEN INP 
UT" INSERT PAPER - <ENTER>" ; Y$ EL 
SE PRINT 

34) 3 Y$=LEFT$(PN$+SS$,4)3)+RIGHT$( 
SS$+DA$+" PRINTOUT" ,4)3) :PRINT#-2 
, Y$ : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 

345 IFL>1J33THEN Z=51ELSE Z=L/2 

35) 3 FORY=)3TO Z 



355 PRINT#-2,L$(Y) ; : L$ (Y) =B$ :PRI 
NT#-2,CHR$(9) ;L$(Y+Z+1) :L$(Y+Z+1 
) =B$ : NEXT 

3 6)3 FORZ=Y T053 :PRINT#-2 : NEXT J PR 

INT#-2 ,RIGHT$ (SS$+SS$+"PAGE"+STR 

$(SP) ,8)3) :SP=SP+l:L=)3 

365 PRINT@448,B$:PRINT#-2,CHR$(1 

2) 

37) 3 RETURN 

375 • END ROUTINE 

38) 3 CLOSE:GOSUB3 35 

385 PRINT© 4 48 , "ANOTHER RUN";:INP 
UT" Y/N";X$ 

39) 3 IFX$="Y" THEN FORX-256 TO 41 
6 STEP32 : PRINT@X, B$ : NEXT: L=-l : GO 
T09)3 

395 CLEAR2)3)3:CLS:END 

4)3)3 1 STORE STATEMENT LINE 

4)35 L=L+1:IFL>1)33THEN GOSUB3 35 

41) 3 GOSUB32)3:P=LEN(P$) :IFP>39THE 
N42)3 

415 L$(L)=P$: RETURN 

42) 3 L$(L)=LEFT$(P$,39) :P$=S5$+MI 
D$(P$,4)3) :IFA=1THEN P$=S$+S$+P$ 
425 GOT04)35 





V/S4 



DERBY CITY SOFTWARE 

"The Place to Shop for ALL your COCO Needs" 

*** Guaranteed - The Lowest Prices - The Latest Versions - Guaranteed *** 




WORD PROCESSING 



Telewriter 64 (D) $53.95 

Telepatch (D) $17.95 

Telegraphies (D) $22.45 

Master Design (D) $26.95 

DATABASE MANAGEMENT. 



(Save 10%) 
(Save 10%) 
(Save 10%) 
(Save 10%) 



Pro-Color-File 2.0 enchanced (D) 

Pro-Color-Forms 2.0 (D) 

Valet (D) 

SP READSH E ET 

Dynacalc 

Dynagraph 

Sidewise 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Colorcom/E 

Colorama BBS 

Time Module for Colorama BBS 



t 53.95 
26.95 



(Save 10%) 
(Save 10%) 
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D 
D 
D) 



$71.95 
SI 7.95 
$22.45 



(Save 10%] 
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D 



$44.95 
$89.98 
$53.95 



[Save 10%) 
Save 10% 
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MAJOR SYSTEMS UTILITIES— 

Disk Utilities 2.1 A 

64K Disk Utility Package . . . 
CoCo Util. (MSDOS Transfere) 
Spit-N-lmage 3.2 



Disk Sort & Order (JDOS or RS DOS) . 
CGP-1 1 5 Printer/Plotter Screen Dump . 

Gemini-Epson Screen Dump 

DMP-100 & Compatibles Screen Dump 
The CoCo Greetinq Card Desiqner , . . 
MUSIC & SPEECH SYSTEMS 



• (D) 
.(D) 

■ (D) 

• (D) 
(D) 
.(D-T) 
.(D-T) 
.(D-T) 

■ (D) 



$24.00 
$21.00 
$29.00 
$29.00 
$20.00 
$21.00 
$19.00 
$19.00 
$24.00 




EARS (Requires 'Y' Cable) 

Super Voice (Reqires 'Y' Cable) 

RS Speech & Sound Translator 

Symphony 12 (Requires 'Y' Cable). . . . 

Stereo Pak (Requires 'Y' Cable) 

Synther 77 Plus 

CoCo MIDI 

Musicia 2 

Super Voice Songbook (Vol. 1 or Vol. 2) 
Super Voice Songbook (Bothe Vols.). . . 



D) 
D) 
D 
D 
D 
D) 
D-T) 
D-T) 
D) 
D) 



$97.50 
$75.00 
$23.50 
$78.50 
$38.50 
{28.50 
538.50 
128.00 
119.00 
137.00 



DISKETTES & TAPES 

5V Diskettes 75 cants each 

(Tyvec envelope - Hub rings - WP tabs - Lifetime guarantee) 

C-6 Cassette Tapes 50 cents each 

CABLES - SWITCHES & MORE 

40 Pin (Dual) *Y' Cable $ 29.00 

40 Pin (Triple) 'Y' Cable $ 36.00 

RS-232c 2 -Position Switch $ 29.00 

DOS Switcher (Jumper select 24-28 Pin Combination). . , .$ 35.00 

Universal Video Driver (Mono or Color Monitors) $ 29.00 

CHIPS - UPGRADES & EPROM PROGRAMER 

64K Upgrade (Set of 8 - 41 64s - 1 50 ns) $ 16.00 

64K Upgrade (Set of 2 -4464s - 'A' Models only) $ 32.00 

6809E CPU Chip $ 15.00 

Intronics EPROM Programer $139.00 

27128 (28 Pin - 16K - EPROM) $ 5.00 

EPROM burned with your program - your chip ........$ 20,00 

DISK CONTROLLERS 

DISTO Supercontroller $ 99.00 

(Includes - CDOS + 3-28 Pin sockets and Extra Parallel Port) 

Parallel Printer Adapter $ 19.75 

Real Time Clock i> 39.75 

Display 80 (80 column - Clock - Printer Adapter) S 99.75 

MPROM Programer (EPROM Programer) !S 59.75 

JFD-CP (JDOS + 24 Pin socket & Parallel Port) $135.00 

DISK DRIVES 



TEAC 54A (40 Track - SS/DD-Bare) $125.00 

TEAC 55B (40 Track - DS/DD-Bare) $135.00 

PRINTER & PRINTER INTERFACE 

GEMINI SG-10 $249.00 

PBH 'BRITEFACE' Parallel Printer Interface $ 59.00 

SG-10 Printer & Briteface Interface Together $300,00 

(Gemini-Epson Screen Dump is FREE with this purchase!) 
GRAPHICS 



CoCo MAX 1 1 (Requires 'Y* Cable) 

UPGRADE (For MAX I Owners) 

MAX EDIT (Font Generator - MAX I & II) 



D 
D 
D 



$71.95 
$18.00 
$17.95 



Save 10%) 
Save 10% 
Save 10%) 



orders $3.00 shipping & handling. KY 
3025 Kozy Kreek Drive, 



residents add 5% 
Louisville, KY 



sales tax COD (add $2.00)/VISA/MasterCard/Cash 
40220-2567 / 1-800-628-2828-996 




24 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 




Each issue of the RAINBOW is a vital resource that you 
will refer to again and again, to gain insights, to explore 
new areas of interest or simply to refresh your memory. So, 
you need to keep your copies of THE rainbow safe — in 
high-quality, vinyl binders that provide complete protec- 




magazine's name in gold lettering on both the front and the 
spine. They're a handsome addition to any room. 



These distinctive red binders not only ensure that your 
rainbows stay in mint condition, but they showcase your 
collection as well. Each binder is clearly embossed with the 




space and eliminate the clutter on a permanent basis. You 11 
spend more time on your CoCp and eliminate those 
frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two handsome binders, which hold a full 1 2 issues 
of THE rainbow, is only $13,50 (please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling). 



ssues 



To help you complete your collection of THE RAINBOW, 
we're offering a special discount on past issues with the 
purchase of one or more sets of binders. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues of 
THE rainbow at the same time you order your binders, you 
are entitled to $1 off each magazine, which normally sells 
for the single issue cover price. For an order form, please 
refer to our "Back Issue Information" page (check Table of 




t 




Contents under departmentaUistings). Also with this offer, 
copies of the "Official And Compleat Index To THE 
rainbow" (a comprehensive index of rainbow's first three 
years, July 1981 through June 1984), usually priced at $2.50, 
may be purchased for only $ 1 with a set of binders, 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you order back issues 
now while supplies last 



YES Please send me 



: 




at $13.50 per two- 
handling). If your order is to be sent via U.S. Mail 



binder set (plus $2.50 per set for shipping 

to a post office box or to another country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
U.S. currency only, please. 

Order one or 

I also want to take advantage of a special savings of $1 off the single issue cover price for back 
issues with the purchase of a set of binders. (Minimum order of 6 magazines. An order form from 
a recent issue indicating the back issues you wish to receive should accompany this order.) 

I want to purchase the first three-year index to the rainbow (July 1981 through June 1984) at 
the special price of $1 (regular price $2.50) with my purchase of one or more sets of binders. 




Name _ 
Address 
City 



■ '■ ■ lll'lil It' l l ^ l^ ' ll.l. » ■ W 'lW HM I M l t\ " I I ■ < I ■! I II 



.ii.i. — . .. 



i i t i i i M ii n. f y;) .' " . 



.... ............ ii ,, ■ ii ,.,i I , n i i n , i n i»ii<iw. » »»'iii < w.»i'i.<w»i P ii l iii i ii l) iii n i l i 'n il 'm i . i m i i ii i n 



■ i in i n i ^>rfi ' iii<«ii».i<i. 



*7, . 



,t »4iyw .i i " » ' i l. . l i ii.ii> i« i i ' i nn n w mmr 



ti ii j i 



State 



□ My check in the amount of 

Charge to: □ VISA 

Account Number 

Signature , , . — ^ 



is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

□ MasterCard □ American Express 
; Expiration 



, .41 1 



FT 



— 







Mail to; Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, prpspeot, KY 40059. 



.■^4^1 y. ■ 




..,...,!« W... H ■ I' III |j H I.. M ill I I II H | 

, ■ " \ S t '\^:.-^!.-^ilii i 'A ;. ,'.v';V 
k , .S, r 

mm. mmmk mlm. MM ' .i 1 



-5 i -. ; S:V'<:, " 



- 




26 THE RAINBOW July 1986 




32K 
Disk 



H 



Ihn 



r 



[ RAINBOW 




By Jeff White 



/\ £i a child I always wanted to 
x draw pictures, but my best 

efforts looked worse than a 2-year- 
old 's finger painting. In my mind I 
could see the pictures I wanted to 
draw, but could never get my hands 
to transfer them to paper. 

Then I got a Color Computer! 
What a great tool for a would-be 
artist. It was the answer to my prob- 
lem. Of course I have to edit each 




fc U.l.LIJLLL I 

xoccccr 

3ECCCEGL. 
3EEEGEEEI 
3EEGGEEEI 
JEEEEEEEI 

"Eccnci 

!GEEG! 
3EEEGI 
^EECEEOGI 
0EEEEEEEI 

^eeeceeei 

2EEECEE< 
EEECEEI 
EEEGCEI 

ncccEi 



qnGEEEGEEOECEEC 

r>. fcrnEccccccEncc 

EEEEGEEGGCEEnf 

rrncccccEEccnt 

^CCrCEGEEECEt 
1 EEGEGEEEEOEt 
'EEC? EEEEEEEGEGGI 
!EKf- . /JCCEEEEEGCEt 
SEEL ^irtTEGGEEEEEEGGt 

:oEcnEErErrf 

■CECGEEEEEEt 
XGEGEECCEf 

:eeeeeececc 



M 1 



A it .. * 



7fte aftove is a CoCo Max //fe. 
Use the up- and down-arrow keys 
to scroll the pages. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE filename: MAGICIAN 



picture over and over, but at least I get 
my mental pictures on the screen for 
others to see and enjoy. 

I try to collect as many pictures as 

Jeff White is a self taught programmer and 
has had a Co Co for three years. He is 
president of the Carrollwood CoCo Club 
and owner of Merlin's Software. Jeff lives 
in Tampa, Florida. 

July 1986 THE RAINBOW 27 



I can and have 20 disks full of picture files. I enjoy the artistic 
works of others and use them as inspiration for my own 
creations. I had a problem when I viewed them, though. It 
was necessary to load each picture into memory to see it. 
To help me do this, I wrote Picture Show. 




ill & 



RAINBOW ON TAPE filename: WIZfiRD 

Picture Show is easy to use. It is menu driven and does 
practically everything for you. The program starts with a 
BASIC loader. This loader has the pokes to set the colors. 
The title page comes up and if the color set is wrong, just 
press Reset. If the colors are right, press ENTER. The pokes 
restart the program in memory and allow you to set the 
colors. 




RAINBOW ON TAPE filename: LflTECQCD 

Once the colors are correct, you have the option to read 
the instructions. You may choose to view the pictures 
individually or automatically and which drive to read. If you 
choose to see the pictures individually, it presents a menu 
of the files on that disk. Enter the number of the file you 
want to see and press enter. The file is then loaded into 
view. If the file is a Co Co Max file, use the up- and down- 
arrow keys to see both pages. Press ENTER to return to the 
menu. 

If you choose to see the pictures automatically, Picture 
Show loads all the files on the disk and, if they are Co Co 
Max files, scrolls the pages by itself. If you choose 

28 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



automatic, make sure the only BIN files are picture files 
because the program loads any BIN file on the disk. 

If you have any suggestions or comments, please write 
to me at 1304 Four Seasons Blvd., Tampa, FL 33613. 

Editor's Note: To demonstrate Picture Show's operation, 
four picture files will be included on this month's RAINBOW 
ON TAPE immediately following the Picture Show program 
listing. When transferring these files to disk, they must be 
given extensions of BIN, MAX or PIC, followed by the ML 
Addresses listed on the RAINBOW ON TAPE printed 
menu. □ 




RAINBOW ON TAPE filename: MERLIN 



Wf 3 



200 


, 26 


960 , . 


12 


360 


216 


1070 , 


90 


510 .. 


....227 


1170 . 


....183 


660 


74 


1280 . 


188 


810 . 


... 8 


END , 


37 



T 



Editor's Note: To generate the underscore (_) in the following listing, 
use the SHIFT and up-arrow keys. The backslash (\) is generated 
by pressing the shift and clear keys. 

Listing 1: LOADER 



1) 3 

2) 3 

3) 3 

4) 3 

5) 3 

6) 3 

7) 3 



8)3 



PICTURE SHOW 
BY JEFF WHITE 
(C) 1986 

13)34 FOUR SEASONS BLVD. 
TAMPA, FLA. 33613 
(813) 971-4451 
LOADER PROGRAM WITH AUTO 
RESTART AND PICTURE DATA FOR 
PICTURE SHOW 

CLS3 : PRINT§235 , "one moment" ; 
9)3 POKE1262,32 

I) 3)3 CLEAR3)3)3)3, &H7F4 2: GOTO 14)3)3 

II) 3 'PICTURE DATA 

12) 3 S=6:E=&H1D:IF PEEK(&HCj3)3)3) =& 
H44 THEN D=l:S=S+8 :E=E+8 

13) 3 POKE &H7FFC,S: POKE &H7FFD,£:PO 
KE&H7FFE , E : POKE&H7FFF, &HFF 

14) 3 FORI=&H7F42 TO&H7FF7 :READ H$ 
:POKE I,VAL("&H"+H$) :NEXT 

15) 3 DATA EC,8D,)3,B8,83,)3,1F,ED,8 
D,)3,AD,A3,8D,)3,AB,43 ,5)3,5C 



160 DATA EB,8D,0,8C,1A,50,7F,FF, 

DF,9E,33,30,6,10,8E,80,0,86 

170 DATA 8,A7,8C,3A,86,6,A7,8C,3 

4, A6, 8)3,80, 30 ,48, 48,48,59,6a 

180 DATA 8C,29,27,E,6A,8C,25,26, 

F4,E7 , A0,C6 , 8,E7 , 8C, 1C, 20 ,EB 

190 DATA 86,6,A7,8C,14,A6,80,26, 

A,A6,4,81,22,26,C,30,5,A6 

200 DATA 80, 80, 30, 48, 48, 20, D9,0, 

0,8E,80,0,10,AE,8C,50,A6 

210 DATA 80,A7,8C,47,6F,8C,45 ; A6 

, 80, A1,8C,3F, 2 6 ^,£6,80^6,80^7 

220 DATA A4,8D,15,8D,22,5A,26,F7 

,20,4,A7,A4,8D,A,8D,17,27,E2,7F 

230 DATA FF,DE,1C,AF,39,10,AC,8C 

,1E,24,4,31,A8,20,39 / 31,A9,E8 

240 DATA 21,39,6D,8C,F,26,B,10,A 

C,8C,E,26,3,6C,8C,4,1A,4,39 

250 READZ:EXEC&H7F42 

260 GOTO1340 

270 DATA1 

280 "Itl?@40?@i3 • 000?@73 ' 3dl0D4004 
10O@710D50@4410Cd4PD0000>3@\73Pd 

290 ";l'h=2 , L>3@\73Pd;l'h=2 'L>3@ 
\73Pd;l'h=2 'L>3@\73Pd;l'h=2 'L>3@ 
300 l, 000?@C3o@80?@io'000?ooo?cal 
O011tl0AE00jKR85VH' ISIV4001PI645@m 
310 "0EAAdI6ATM7@O@4Ad57A'000>kM 
A gO A gK]gk] fkMnkM A gO A gK]gk] fkMnkM 
320 ,,A gO A gK]gk]fkMnkM A gO A gK]gk]f 
kMnkM0000ooo3gMg3gmoOol?MgL?Ogmo 

330 »OOO@80?@io 1 0001DEm0AED0L7@5 

AE0> j k3 A 0OPN6PiZN06n j kk [ \>hOSin? 
340 "WhN7inm0Cim0KW0000k]fkMnkM A 
WC] f K] cjm A iLNcL A W0 A gK] gk] f kMnkM A 
350 "gO A d:A<g<b<K>c<S5k0' ;]gk]d0 
003oo ' aeM@aMKGCo3 7Ee3 5e] M?oom0P0 
3 60 "m2?oo?glo? @=oocmo?co0000m0I 
E0OkoH0EEEHFhkQ A 8 ioPHKXl A A A bik ; W 
370 "XX>JOWijNOWinnO@4n?WPi A 3P00 
00k] fkMnh=@8nHm0@H6AVHSd001nkM A g 
380 "0 A gK]gk"] fkMnh0N<g=cLcMK@f 9L 
000 A gO A g@000?oo6?Ok?Okg6?lHmo\mo 
390 "_LHoood203dlOodlOkoooodl?kd 
4_10oflPm0EWHgl_IflPIfMQn@41o'00 

400 "041001PH@40InGT0D5EE0>jk[SQ 

A > Vhkk [ _ A A n j kkR0 0 QhLWIbL7 1 oT 10 @ 7 
410 "Y A @0>0 A 00003 A gK]gk\4AR4a4QP 

HFlTA<2101@nkM A gO A gK] gk] f kMnh019 

420 "VKVo?dl9_a002kMnkM0000oooSG 
NognegSon=MkoOkGN?ooo@80? @4o 1 = 1 A 
430 11 ;d A 9 : 2PYb071 'od4_lLQF0 « 4IWI 
fITaLN>31aoooOCmo?CO00005AD5IFDE 
440 "5>7on0EEEE@lk[\0QhNPIRlV8fP 

k[S\ AA VjJS A 7QioWinO@5oWinOW10003 
450 " A gK]gk]fkMniM>gM A GC]gk]fkMn 
kM A gO A gK]gk] fkMnh5ha<2HK<c<S4ch' 
460 "85 A gO A g@000?ooookmoOgnooooo 

gmoOkOOOOd203dl?10LN9RH61VH6AXL 



470 " '00ml;o0OUQH6ITm0QUI6AVH?Tl 
0O10003dlUD0OOlH0EED0;_XPlSSh05V 
480 "HPJPk[ [X A H4@LG5al0711LC107a 

'm0ElT0000>kM A gO A gK]gk]fkMnkM A gO 
490 ,IA gK]gk]fkMnkM A gO A gK]gk]fkMn 
kM A gO A gK]gk] fkMnkM0000oom , moO , mo 
500 "M l og3gmo3emWOooo@80?ooo , m0o 
\;0 • ?S1 « <W2o000ml ; oh81 1 H< ;7Shodl 
510 "In?clMR<0n0h?10003dleF5PAlE 

E@GQY@D1VIV1VH4I0AT5I@FDU15AAO@@ 

520 "E@000>kM A gO A gK]gk] fkMnkM A gO 
A gK] gk] f kMnkM A gO A gK] gk] f kMnkM A gO 
530 ,,A gK]gk]fkMnkM0000oomMcMGIgM 
eMol5OGl?Ogd7ooo@80?oool<@Ok6a<C 
540 "6o=S<ah006ml;o0<OVI200Qo@7o 
hLWInK61Pko0000m0@ : 0P120_@42P8?0 

550 "P;dl0X23 , 82m0@:0P120_@42P8? 
0P;dl0X23 • 82m0@:0Pl20PX: 20P03082 
560 "ltl0@:0Pl20_@42P8?0P?dl0X23 '8 

2m0@:0P120_@42P8?0000ool4gMgLgMg 
570 "Lohae_Mc]MHcooo@80?@4ocPCm0 
BF5QH6U A 100?@Bo' 3o<30bm0bc<? 1 00? 
580 "10003dl7X2o'82m0Aj0_120_@4N 

P;o0P;dl7X2o'82m0Aj0_120_@4NP;o0 

590 "P9jNWQh0>3d2P10H7Qj0_120_@4 

NP;o0P;dl7X2o'82m0Aj0_120_@4NP;o 
600 "0000ool@moL l mOHGoa3moCgmoAg 
ooo@80? @4oaRC51A 1 L7 iPB13P0PKoooo 
610 ,l PcltlKFa\Kg^l_K6g<30ool0cl=32 , 

_d2 inOclool0003dl7X2o « 82NWYjN0 

620 »31007dl7X2o , 82m0Aj0_120_@4N 

P;o0P;dl7X2o_@G0?120_@4NP;o0P;dl 

630 "7X2o l 82ltl0Aj0_120WYjN7P0h000 

0 ? ookgMkno_gKom_mo_knoO_oood2 03d 

640 "1?18 • 1G5 ' L7= 1 LWAiP0,0ooon0>< 
e=C4ah@45LGM' l?oo3<d<3?@ ; ?aj 4hGh 
650 "00?10003dl7X2o , 82NWYj>P8300 
00@61P0<00001PL70 ' \000Ng] iN0 7O00 
660 "ljNWQ0m0X0h83n0O@;08020?@4N 

03h001hN71'0>000?@4@?@=0?OOO_@5o 

670 l, okoo_@5ookooo@80?@4oaR; ,A 9b 
>Qh>lR8b>7Sooanln?@4S?R' V8 ' 7033o 
680 "o" 3c@43d34j>21\hN?odl01PH60 
0h000m0A'0?00<0P60@0003Sll A oQgeni 

690 "_LW_kn?\K21L000MW2 1 8=3P1?0? 
@40O@40?P7ltl0D0A4Cdl002mld00@8000 

700 "3ooclgMglgMcOo<7MgL7Mg=ooom 

0P0OOOO3dl?61a>Af=9D5Q?@63oon68? 
710 "eQH61oHflVHO'00ool0o\70C<k> 

c<7oc<K6 ' 179c<3b0P?om0 1 0m0D10000 
720 "0H51?0<00021gmoN A Goono\gah0 
0O_ooonOVIXE3 0=oolo?ooocloco 1 m0\ 

730 "?00<30O@B004210P@8420H10D0OO 

mom0OoOo@8oo@80?@4oan?Chl?7ho?cl 
740 "n?3aooool0cePL3PLS2ClHS '00o 
omh6hS8m0C>SPhN?ShNWXk6h7<00?100 
750 "008210§8D52Q8CdlPP000P820Wn 

m0@0 A 7Sh<37 » 1? [ jl_9P00 ; JT0a<\?3 • 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 29 



76p "laapmpo 1 'oQgTc'pos'iTiwia 

Ph?§4j371 l pj3j3p<3Q6PO@= 4 0?oo7Ve]7Fe 
770 »]7_lNKFdMKFdNoood2p3dl?oj3Wk 
2iW8k7Tj 6aWh30oooh0XmFUPH7Q\K6aY 
78)8 n lpp?ooj3?ol f <c>c<W3ol?lb<c?c 
\clo , 00o l j3j3j321j3@83dlp3dlj38?j3P8J6 

790 "SXjp dl@^ljp]o2P_@4NP8opP9j 

Nj;@ : 010@61Pho??c31?looool ' 023 1 82 
8J3J3 M 2QXJ6P8Oj3P8j>SXJ0Q12j3PX:0P: 
2HaX2m0X0oolgem [Mf ] LgocOGf ] gJecO 
810 "ooo@80?@4ob0?TC0 1 <S : b\94>02 
3oogl01aD50L4=0DTAiP00oolOSlo?C l 
820 "l?m0Ho3dm?c:Ln?3aoo00000PXJ0 
W120 J34NP ; O0P ;dl7X2o 1 82 6QX jNP ; O0 
830 "P;dl7X2o 1 82m0Aj0P?d3@0 1 3o3? 
?<3oo ' 02o 1 8 2m0Aj 0_120_@ 4NP ; O0P ; d 
840 " 17X2 o 1 8 2m0Aj 0Sl20000oomoOoo 
oogmoogmoooooOgoooo@80?ooooPR3iK 
850 »Fa\O6aXH67010oooo68_2hW8j7P 
h68S8hN?@Ho f 0007YjNP;o0P;dl7X0m , 
8 60 " 1 7GSP2NP ; O0P ; dl7X2 o 1 8 2m0A j 0 
_120J34NP;o0PlPP83dlP0?7 1 10 1 @92F 
870 "]Xj>P;o0P;dl7X2o' 8205mlMP7n 
0P;dl7X2o«82 m0 A j 0_1 20000 oon>gMkO 
880 " gmf >ohkMg ] oOgHkooo @ 8 0 ?ooogl 
01a@40<0?3gmlOGcloooo03m6APH6MWI 
890 n fAUa0@?ooo?Wbi>c\k>OWlO31oo 
oQj>c A in3 1 o 1 0007YjNP;o0P;dl7X2hO 



"XPNDR2 and SuperGuide - 
an Ideal Expansion Card Set' 9 



— RAINBOW 2/86 
HARDWARE REVIEW 




XPNDR2 $39.95 each or 2/$76 
This prototype card features a 40 pin 
connector for projects requiring an on- 
line disk system or ROM paks. The 
CoCo signals are brought out to wire- 
wrap pins. Special gold plated spring 
clips provide reliable and noisefree 
disk operation plus solid support for 
vertical mounting of the controller. The 
entire 4.3*7 inch card is drilled for ICs. 
Assembled, tested and ready to run. 

XPNDR1 $19.95 each or 2/$36 
A rugged 4.3*6.2 inch bare breadboard 
that brings the CoCo signals out to 
labeled pads. Both XPNDR cards are 
double-sided glass/epoxy, have gold 
plated edge connectors, thru-hole 
plating and are designed with heavy 
power and ground buses. They're 
drilled for standard 0.3 and 0,6 inch 
wide dual in-line wirewrap sockets; 
with a 0.1 inch grid on the outboard end 
for connectors. 

SuperGuide $3.95 each 
Here is a unique plastic insert that 
aligns and supports printed circuit 
cards in the CoCo cartridge port. Don't 
forget to ORDER ONE FOR YOUR 
XPNDR CARDS. 



Included with each XPNDR card 
are 8 pages of APPLICATION 
NOTES to help you learn about 
chips and how to connect them to 
your CoCo. 



To order or for technical informa- 
tion call: 

(206) 782-6809 

weekdays 8 a.m. to noon 

We pay shipping on prepaid orders. 
For immediate shipment send 
check, money orderorthe number 
and expiration date of your VISA or 
MASTERCARD to: 



ROBOTIC 




MICROSYSTEMS 



BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 



900 "koOam_L' 7e01aOGem?4=h>3Vm A M 
WP2o • 82NWUkN' ?30 • 41m0L03kno_3fm7 
910 "CdlOTajNSWGlkMgLTm'LaNhGi 
loTNIam_Mg]h0_l20_@4NP;o0P000?oo 
920 "?mooOkoO?ologomo_mlooood203 

dl?10oF=QHO@5ILD43?ooo l 3O<3TL3TL 
930 "C8C4O0OOO 1 7h70a4h30? 1 o5h70 
k6i_IT2?010ol0001jNWX2o' 82NWUiN' 
940 "Of3Xg=bn_Zj A T0oco?moWn?]kUN 
go0oomo03mak]?PlO@4ogR77o@4Ooooo 
950 H co3m0CoOglo?mlNjOOgkno?m0S_ 
Kho_oooooWjm0P;dl7X2o' 80003oolOK 
960 " f lOKf lOo 1 mgM ' mOKgOoom0P0m0C 
o7YbMW828V;WKWQ'00?oooclOWalO?an 
970 "OWil07cooo' ln61Sdl=WHgmQHm0 
EI67h00?10001jNWP3ka , imL A fM6c[d[ 
980 » : ZFUZjPW12h_;bhW; jn_9Bl_Xbl 
_; k0_; j nWclm0CnWWod5?17nognm0 [og 
990 H ln0P_@4NP;o0P;dl7X2o'80003o 
oo@6O@Kol7em3Geml?oom0P0iti0Co7hod 

1000 "Ko0Q l TC3T3Pml;o03K3?@4k0 
cl30cdlN 1 <? » 00o 1 0007Xj f A 90 1 X ;dl7 
X 

1010 n 2o'82m0Aj0_120_@4NP;o0P;dl 
7X2 o 1 8 2m0A j 0_120WY j N [ [ 2ko ; ho_@ @o 

g 

1020 H nogo@9oocj0_@4NP;o0P;dl7X2 
o 1 80003oom3Gem3Gec3oOkno_kViOooo 

m 

1030 "0P0OOOO 1 9bVQXjN=VKnQPHC<7S 
d4_ll<BH<f9Ra\O@5\k6IV<'68C01o , 0 

0 

1040 "07YjNP;o0P;dl7X2o , 82m0Aj0_ 
120_@4NP;o0P;dl7X2o'82m0Aj0 120 

@ 

1050 "4NP;o0P9j>\[bl jm0Glm0Kno 

?cjnO?goooo_cno? • 3dl7X2o 1 82m0Aj0 

1060 "120000oomoooooinMom0[om0P0 
ooooh@PoF5PH65mKFAS 1 00?d4_l7hAP< 
A 

1070 " A Kclo@5no?fiT'Hh047o l 0007Q 
hN031003dl7P0O000m0Ah0? • 00?@4N03 
1 

1080 "003dl7P0O000m0Ah0?'00?@4N0 
31003dl7P0O000m0Ah0? '00?@4N0341? 

3 

1090 l, dl?S'c800m0Ah0? , 00?@4N03hm 



Visit the 
CoCo Community Center 
THE RAINBOW S CoCo SIG 

on 
DELPHI 



30 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



j3@j3ml?omj3Pj3oooooQR3aLGl ' Hd=PLUg0 

110J3 M 3d4_nj3_h'<IRHf<c<k>CTm?3'n 
OWkdl?lj3j3j31m07em07 ioNWeiM7 lh@V9 2 
H 

1110 »TLR8P=7@PP97@\93BAd2j3TM2PT 
=0 f ioKWm A 0 f ioKWm *pf5f50 >gM A GC ] gKUd 
k 

112)3 "MfiM>gM A GC]gKUdkMfiM>gM A GC 
] gKUdkMf iM< 6 1 A ARI f IUHgMVA @ < 7 Lj3j3 0 
3 

113J3 "ooo@?EOoompP ( 0oooo7h3lQ82pl 
h>j3TXChj3)37d4_10OAPHCDd] 9RH6Rh A ;d 
M 

114J3 "7AH61VlPKoj3j3j3j34QXG4QXA4SXG 
4QZ9TR9<8TM31T=B@b:3j3R?3j3f93@[« 
7 

1150 "> • U?S\o>klk_o A onkokPj3p0 ; ] 
gk] f kMnkM A gO A gK] gk] f kMnkH\gCTd ; 1 
f 

1 1 60 " k] b j M A cA ] W3 PgCQbIe< 3 8 f ? VK7 
Q 1 0@=g0000oood3eGooo@80?@ ; oo@40o 

@ 

1170 "DO • 3_PX8D52 @X : 0TA4 A>SX j 07a 
ll?3ol000293I0@4A8j5i8Jk?o A Ofho3 
P 

1180 "71nncil A 0>gbioK3h< 1 >k?kSn> 
PBRlk_l A ?lk'k_o A 0000\4BO[ : '<Slb\ 
K 

1190 "8boP03 A gK]gj0;?e]K6ao@4a]n 
001\gK]d0>5QH63mH61PHL002M'000?O 
o 

1200 ,, m0mEoood203d8olOWalOOgod4? 
10000WKQ: : 4e<oTeKB' 3g;h>kok_n A 0n 
c 

12 10 " lk_o A onkok_o A onkok_o A onkok 
_o A o0;ok_o A 0000 A a26c\K6Q_@4I\<00 
> 

1220 "gL A 7M A 0?<El@713@594NL00; ]g 
kP5 ' 1 1C4 1 <3> 1 <S@h002M 1 000?OOm0mE 
o 

1230 M ood203d>O10001OTm3 ; jmmk3BF 
eQ<B>ADD6k_k A onho003Ronkok_o A onk 
o 

1240 "k_o A onkok_323nkok_o A 0000 A d 
5HFAUIF5TI>ERI4B721@ ] g3X3lQH60l8 
> 

1250 M 2WIPE31bkMnkM2<?4a<30cl79d 
>4007L0003ooo@?EOoom0P0m3Wo0000X 
W 

1260 "=:FB40NPR97H A 93HTMRhT=i?3 A 

3 ' hok_o A onkok_o A onkok_cP • bkok_o A 
o 

1270 "nkokP000 ; ] gk] f kMnkM A gO A gK] 
gk] f kMhHPof 5PH7aPH6ESa • H— A gO A g@3 
m 

1280 »HV9PH6IVIV3300Qg0000OOod3e 
GOOO@80?@±O • 00018B>1LB6T : : 2B7a8e 
4 




SUMMER ROUNDUP 

GRAPHIC ADVENTURE GAMES (disk only) 

Darkmoor Hold 29.95 

Dragon Blade 29.95 

Hall of the King. 39.95 + 

Hall of the King II 39.95 + 

Scepter of Ursea 24.95 

To Preserve Quandic 34.95 + 

( + two disk adventure) 

UTILITIES 

Colorkit 29.95* 

Disk Manager 19.95 

Disk to Tape 19.95 

Disk Zapper 29.95 

Maillist (disk only) 29.95 

Microartist 19.95* 

Oracle 24.95 

RomFree 19.95 

RTD Trio 44.95 

GRAPHIC SIMULATIONS/ARCADE 

City War 19.95* 

Flight 19.95* 

Gravitor 14.95* 

Jumbo Jet 19.95* 

Warp Factor X 34.95 

MISCELLANEOUS (disk only) 

Airnav (flight plans) 59.95 

Color Disk Trivia 24.95 

Trivia Question disks 9.95 

Lizpack (statistics) 175.00 

Fantasy Gamer's Pack 19.95 

GENEALOGY/ASTROLOGY 

Family-Tree 24.95* 

Super Astrology 19.95* 

TEXT SIMULATIONS/ADVENTURES 

Adventure in Wonderland 19.95* 

Gangbusters 14.95* 

Viking II 19.95* 

EDUCATION 

Mathpac 14.95* 

Music Reader 29.95* 

Phonics I & II 14.95* 

Preread 1, 2, 3 14.95* 

Spelling w/voice 19.95* 

*ADD $5.00 FOR DISK VERSION 



PROTECTION POLICY — We believe our customers are honest — all of our 
software can be backed up using standard procedures. 
YOUR PERSONAL CHECK IS WELCOME — no delay. Include $1.50 for 
shipping tor each order + $2.00 for COD. AZ residents add 5% sales tax. 
Orders shipped within two days. 

DEALERS AND AUTHORS INQUIRES are always welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dist, Ltd., P.O. Box 11932, Edmonton, Alberta 
T5J 3L1, (403) 421-8003 

SUMMER SALES PRICES GOOD ON ORDERS RECEIVED 
BY AUGUST 31, 1986 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG OF 
GREAT COCO PROGRAMS 
FOR QUESTIONS OR ORDERS 

CALL (915) 584-7784 ^ COT 1 ^qQCO 




*\0) DO**" I fO** j ry. 











VfSA 









SEND ORDER TO: 
PRICKLY PEAR SOFTWARE 
213 LA MIR ADA 
EL PASO, TEXAS 79932 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 31 



129)3 "A0LPXGTU2h\NRXX?Mfl;Raj ;2i 
<JTXP88d?SQj>SQhN?AdLP0002kMnkM A 

g 

1300 »0 A gK]gk]fkMnkM A g0 A 7C\g;Qfk 
MnkM A gO A gK] gkPe0o\;0 1 ?W0 ' <W2o000 
M 

1310 « 1 000?@Coo@80?@il000020P<?l 
P\41PH10PX70PX20 1 420P@43 ' @510 1 21 

1320 "§?0P821' 820 1 P93@\90@8 : 1« 84 
00002 •L>3@\73Pd;l'h=2 'L>3@\73Pd; 

1 

1330 " 'h=2 • L>3@\73Pd; 1 'h=0 1 L61@< 
73P430 • 852 1 L0000?@Cn?@400 
1340 CLS3 

1350 ' RESTART DATA 
1360 A=PEEK(116)*256+PEEK(117)-2 
0:X=INT (A/256) :Y=A-(X*256) :P0KE1 
13 , 85 : P0KE114 , X : P0KE115 , Y : FORI=A 
TO A+17 : READ B: POKE I,B:NEXTI: 
DATA 18,182,255,3,138,1,183,255, 
3 , 189 , 173 , 3 3 , 189 , 172 , 2 3 9 , 12 6 , 173 
,158 

1370 PRINTS 2 2 8, "LOADING — > pictu 

re show" ; 

1380 POKE1270,32 

1390 RUN" SHOW. MSP" 
1400 PCLEAR8: GOTO 110 




210 198 

400 88 

620 210 

860 113 



1100 214 

1200 17 
END 42 



Listing 2: SHOW 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

20 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 20 

30 FORT=lT04 : PCOPY T TO T+4:NEXT 

40 P=RND( -TIMER) 

50 P=RND(4) -1 

60 POKE178,P 

70 A=0:B=0:C=255:D=191 

80 FORT=1TO100 

90 LINE (A, B) - (C, D) ,PSET,B 

100 A=A+1 : B=B+1 : C=C-1 : D=D-1 

110 NEXT T 

120 B=3:CLS(B) 

130 PRINT"do you need instructio 
ns (y/n)?"; 

140 POKE1026,32:POKE1030,32:POKE 
1035, 32 : POKE1048 , 32 : POKE1049 , 32 : 
POKE1050 , 40 : POKE1052 , 47 : POKE1054 
,41:POKE1055,63 



150 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 150 

160 IF A$="Y" THEN 1080 

170 CLEAR: DIM C$ ( 11) , PIC$ ( 68 ) ,EX 

T$(68) 

180 B=3 

190 CLS(B) 

200 PRINT" automatic or indiv 
idual?" 

210 POKE1024,32:POKE1025,32:POKE 
1026 , 32 : POKE1027 , 32 : POKE1037 , 32 : 
POKE1040,32:POKE1052,32:POKE1053 
, 32 : POKE1054 , 32 : POKE1055 , 32 : POKE 
1051, 63 

220 AI$=INKEY$:IF AI$="" THEN 22 

230 IF AI$="A" THEN A=l ELSE A=2 
240 PRINT@256," (ENTER 

)= 

250 POKE1279,95 

260 PRINT@224, "" ; : INPUT "ENTER DR 

IVE NUMBER (0 , 1 , 2 , 3 ) " ;K 

270 IF K<0 OR K>3 THEN 200 

280 DRIVE K 

290 B=3:CLS(B) 

300 GOSUB550 

310 PRINT@392, "enter the number" 



/ 



320 PRINT@425, "of the picture"; 

330 POKE1425,32:POKE1421,32 

340 POKE1448,32:POKE1451,32:POKE 

1455,32:POKE1463,32 

350 PRINT© 4 5 6, "to be loaded"; 

360 POKE1482 ,32 :POKE1485, 32 :POKE 

1492,45:POKE1493,62 

370 POKE1494,32:POKE1495,32 

380 PRINT© 4 8 8, "type (q) to quit" 

• 

390 POKE1516,32 :POKE1517, 60: POKE 
1519 , 62 : POKE1520 , 32 : POKE1523 , 32 
400 PRINT© 4 70 , " " ; : LINE INPUT"" ;F 
$ 

410 FORT=1496TO1503 : POKE T,62:NE 
XT 

420 IF F$="Q" THEN 890 
430 F=VAL(F$) 

440 IF F<1 OR F>C THEN 370 
450 P$=PIC$(F)+"/"+EXT$(F) 
460 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l 
470 LOADM P$ 
480 I=7:PMODE4,l 

490 IF (PEEK(&H155) AND 8)=0 THE 
N 1=1+1: IF I=>19 THEN I=19:GOT05 
10 

500 IF (PEEK(&H156) AND 8)=0 THE 
N 1=1-1: IF I<=7 THEN I=7:GOTO510 
510 POKE &HBA,I+I:SCREEN1,1 
520 IF INKEY$OCHR$(13) THEN 490 
530 GOSUB720 



32 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



540 GOTO 3 10 

550 'GET FILE NAMES 

56)3 FOR X - 3 TO 11 

570 DSKI$ K, 17 ,X,A$, B$ 

580 IF (LEFT$ (A$, 1) =CHR$ (&HFF) ) 

THEN 600 

590 C$(X)=A$+LEFT$(B$,127) :NEXT 
X 

600 POKE&HFF40 ,0 : X=X+1 : C=l 
610 FOR Y = 3 TO X: FOR Z=0 TO 7 
620 IF MID$(C$(Y) ,Z*32+9,3)="BIN 
» OR MID$(C$(Y) ,Z*32+9,3)="MAX" 
OR MID$(C$(Y) ,Z*32+9,3)=»PIC" TH 
EN 630 ELSE 680 

630 PIC$ (C) =MID$ (C$ ( Y) ,Z*32+1, 8 ) 

640 EXT$ (C) =MID$ (C$ (Y) ,Z*32+9,3) 

650 0$=LEFT$(PIC$(C) / 1) 

660 IF (O$=CHR$(0) OR 0$=CHR$(&H 

FF)) THEN 680 

670 C=C+1 

680 NEXT Z:NEXT Y 

690 IF A=l THEN GOSUB790 

700 C=C-1 

710 IF C=0 THEN 1260 

720 MID=INT(C/2)+l 

730 CLS(B):TAB=1 

740 FOR D - 1 TO C 

7 50 PRINT© TAB , USING" # # " ; D ; : PRINT 

». — > ";PIC$(D) ; 

760 TAB=TAB+32 : IF D=MID THEN TAB 
=16 

770 NEXT D 
780 RETURN 

790 'AUTOMATIC DISPLAY 
800 FOR D=l TO C-l 
810 POKE15870 / 111 
820 IF C=l THEN 1260 
830 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 
840 P$=PIC$ (D) +"/"+EXT$ (D) : LOADM 
P$ 

850 FORT=1TO800:NEXTT 

860 IF PEEK(15870)<>111 THEN GOS 

UB 990 ELSE PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

870 NEXTD 

880 C=C-1 

890 GOSUB720 

900 PRINT@384,"DO YOU WISH TO DO 

ANOTHER DISK? " 
910 PRINT6428 , » (yes/NO) " 
920 FORT=1TO300:NEXTT 
930 PRINT@428, " (YES/no) " 
940 FORT=1TO300:NEXTT 
950 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 900 
960 IF A$="Y" THEN 170 
970 IF A$="N" THEN 980 ELSE 950 
980 POKE113,0:EXEC40999 
990 S=6:IF PEEK(&HC000)=&H44 THE 
N S=S+8:U=S+24 



1000 PMODE4,l:SCREENl,l 

1010 FORT=1TO500:NEXTT 

1020 FOR V=S TO U:GOSUB1070:NEXT 

V 

1030 FORT=1TO500:NEXTT 

1040 FORV=U TO S STEP-1:GOSUB107 

0 : NEXTV 

1050 FORT=1TO500:NEXTT 

10 60 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : RETURN 

1070 POKE&HBA,V:FORT=1TO100:NEXT 

T : SCREEN 1 , 1 : RETURN 

1080 'INSTRUCTIONS 

1090 CLS 

1100 PRINT" instructions 
ii 

1110 PRINT: PRINT "GO GET YOU YOUR 
POPCORN AND YOURDIET COKE AND S 

IT BACK AND ENJOYTHE SHOW. 

1120 PRINT: PRINT "PICTURE SHOW IS 
A VERY EASY TO USE PROGRAM. IT 
IS MENU DRIVEN AND GIVES YOU 2 
WAYS TO SEE YOUR" ; 

1130 PRINT "PICTURES." 

1140 PRINT@448 / " press spaceba 
r to continue " ; 

1150 POKE1480,32:POKE1489, 32:POK 
E1492,32 

1160 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 116 
1170 CLS 

1180 PRINT»1. automatic—- > LETS 

YOU SIT BACK AND YOUR COMPUTE 
R DOES THE REST. IT WILL EVEN SC 
ROLL 2 PAGEMAX FILES BUT THEY MU 
ST HAVE AN EXTENT ION OF <BIN>, < 
MAX>, OR <PIC>. 

1190 PRINT"2. individual — > LETS 

YOU PICK WHICH PICTURE YOU WAN 
T TO LOOK AT. IT WILL ALSO SCRO 
LL 2 PAGE MAX FILES BY USING TH 
E UP AND DOWN ARROW KEYS, THEN 

PRESS THE "; 
1200 PRINT "< ENTER> KEY TO GET BA 
CK TO THE MENU. " 
1210 PRINT 

1220 PRINT@480, " press spaceba 
r to continue "; 

1230 POKE1512 / 32:POKE1521,32:POK 
E1524,32 

1240 A$=INKEY$MF A$=»"" THEN 124 
0 

1250 GOTO170 
1260 CLS(B) :DIR 

1270 PRINT: PRINT "THERE ARE NO <B 
IN>, <MAX>, OR <PIC> FILES ON 
THIS DISK" 

1280 FORT=1TO4000:NEXT 

1290 GOTO170 /rv 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 33 



800-443-1444 orders 



Howard Medical Computers 



Zenith 1 30 Color Monitor 



Medium resolution 2,5 MHz 240 x 200 dots 
Same as 131 except No RGB 
With 90 day Zenith warranty 
Monitors require video controller See page 34 



$15 

Was $39! 



V^Vo^ ($14 shipping) 



Epson RX-80FT 




c 



Friction and tractor 80 column 
Bidirectional dot addressable 100 CPS 
Free Howard Printer tutorial included (a $29.95 value) 

RX100 • - NEW 



$207 

Was $318 
($7 shipping) 

$362 



Zenith Green Monitor 



12" Zenith 123A Green Screen is easy on the eyes 
High resolution: 640 dots x 200 dots, 

15 MHz band width ^ G 

Composite video monochrome 



es t>P*U Reg. $149 

($7 shipping) 



$67 



50 



I 



J&M Controller 



JFD-CP 
with J DOS 



Metal case: I/O buffered 

Parallel port for Gemini and Epson printers 

Hard Disk driver included 

Single switch lets you switch from J DOStoRS DOS 
Gold contacts & data separator 



$128 

Reg. $149 
($2 shipping) 



RS DOS ROM 



ROM chip makes J&M compatible 

24 pin fits both versions of J&M controller 
Release 1,1 

Howard Medical Computers 



$20/ea 

Reg. $40 
($2 shipping 



Box 2, Chicago, IL 60690 



Hours; 8-4 Mon.-Fri. 
10-3 Sat. 



(312) 278-1440 



Howard Medical offers a 30-day return guarantee on all hardware we sell. Return equipment to us within 30 days 
for a refund (less shipping) if you are unsatisfied for any reason Quantities limited and subject to availability. 



Drive 0 and 



, 269 95 



One double sided drivy 
controller so yno can 
one. You can even 
CoCo ^ 



with dnublcr board and new RS 
the equivalent of 2 drives in 
from 0 to I . Works with all 



AMBER MONITOR 



59 



95 



Epson "n Com re* 5650 has a 12" screen with 900 lines. 
Rush 3 u L i cm fnr 110 rulumn igxl and 13 MHZ band width, 
reluil price wan 13^35. 13" Ccdtir Monitor (not shown}, 
I tOU' only $139.95. These art new^ in fin; lory ^ e.- ii 1 1! m 1 
cartons, NOT uaed, repacked, or refurbished. Add 7,tiQ 
a/h. Monitor Interface for utiy eulor Computer 29.9Ek 




9 





2 Drives 



299 



95 



Both our drive 0 and 1 in one case, widi cable and R,S, 
controller. The best just got better! 



Drive 1 Upgrade 

119 9S 

Add a second '/i height drive lu your Rydio Shack^ 
26-3129. Conic* with 3 minute installation instructions, 
Acre wdriver required. Double sided version (Drive 1 and 
2) and doubler board add 79.00 






Drive 



,125 



95 



Your Choice 
Silver or White 

SUPER DRIVE SALE 



199 



95 



Drive 0 



Special prices on new first qua] ity disk drives. They even have GOLD connectors mi ?lifttwk . . , Some otiwr places charge 22^,00 for 
dr. 1 and2.99.(X)ioj"dr,1), not us! Drive I is for mod l> Second Color Computer drive, or external mod III >IV« Drive I just plugs into the 
extra connector on your Drive 0 cable. Both drives, are compatible with any version of die Coior Computer and all versions of drives. 
Drive 0 isyoiir first Color Computer drive ami come* complete with cable, manual, and R.S, controller. Fur double-sided drive and 
doubler board add 79.00 (for Drive 0 A iw ] & 2). flare full hgt SSDD drive only 79.95. 

THE COMPUTER CENTER 

901-761-4565. 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 38 H9 
Add S4.99 for shipping and handling— Visa, MC & money orders accepted. No CODs 
Allow am additional 2 weeks for personal cheeks— Drive faceplates niaj vary slightly 

Prices subject to change without notice, Radio Shack is a ra-grshared trademark of Tandy Corporation 






How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program 
listings in the rainbow are formatted for 
a 32-character screen — so they show 
up just as they do on your CoCo screen. 
One easy way to check on the accuracy 
of your typing is to compare what char- 
acter "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings 
come out the same — you have a pretty 
good way of knowing that your typing is 
accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But, do read the text before you start 
typing. 

Finally, the little cassette symbol on 
the table of contents an d at the begi n- 
ning of articles indicates that the pro- 
gram is available through our rainbow 
on tape service. An order form for this 
service is on the insert card bound in the 
magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was 
first given to the Tandy Color Computer 
by its many fans, users and owners. 

However, when we use the term 
CoCo, we refer to both the Tandy Color 
Computer and the TDP System-100 
Computer. It is easier than using both of 
the "given" names throughout the rain- 
bow. 

In most cases, when a specific com- 
puter is mentioned, the application is for 
that specific computer. However, since 
the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer 
in a different case, these terms are 
almost always interchangeable. 



The Rainbow Check Plus 




The small box accompanying a pro- 
gram listing in the rainbow is a "check 
sum" system, which is designed to help 
you type in programs accurately. 

Ra in bow Check PLUS counts th e 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed In the 
rainbow. On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given. When you 
reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 



To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in 
the program and CSRVE it for later use, 
then type in the command RUN and press 
enter. Once the program has run, type 
NEW and press enter to remove it from 
the area where the program you're typ- 
ing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the 
rainbow, whenever you press the down- 
arrow key, your CoCo gives the check 
sum based on the length and content of 
the program in memory. This is to check 
against the numbers printed in the 
rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure you 
typed in the correct basic program code. 
For more details on this helpful utility, 
refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on Page 
21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
in the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 

10 CLS : X=256*PEEI< ( 35 ) +178 
20 CLERR 2S,X-1 
30 X=256*PEEI< (35)+l?B 
• 40 FDR 2=X TO X+77 
50 RERD Y: W-W+Y: PRINT Z,Y;U 
60 POKE 2, Y: NEXT 
70 IFW=7985THENB0EL5EPRINT- 

"DRTR ERROR": STOP 
B0 EXEC X: END 

90 DRTR 182,:% 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DRTR 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DRTR 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DRTR 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DRTR 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DRTR 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 128 
150 DRTR 230, 132, 38, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
160 DRTR 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DRTR 159, 166, 16G, 132, . 28, 254 
180 DRTR 189, 173, 198, S3, 22, 126, 0 
190 DRTR 0 , 135, 255, 134, ;4^;;55 
200 DRTR 51 , 52v41,:0 



Using Machine Language 



Machine language programs are one 
of the featu res of the rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these pro- 
grams into memory so you can operate 
them. 

The easiest way is by using an editor/ 
assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor/assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into the CoCo and 
then have the editor/assembler assem- 
ble them into specific instructions that 
are understood by the 6809 chip, which 
controls your computer. 



When using an editor/assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the rainbow's 
listing into CoCo. 

Another met h od of gettin g an assem- 
bly language listing into CoCo is called 
"hand assembly." As the name implies, 
you do the assembly by hand. This can 
sometimes cause problems when you 
have to set up an ORIGIN statement or 
an EQUATE. In short, you have to know 
som ething about assembly to hand- 
assemble some programs. 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand-assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CLEfiR200,&H3F00:I=&H3FB0 
20 PRINT "RDDRESS:";HEX$(I) ; 
30 INPUT "8VTE";B$ 
40 POKE I,VAL("&H"+B$) 
50 I =1+1: GOTO 20 

Th is program assu mes you have a 16K 
CoCo. If you have 32K, change the 
&H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F08 and change 
the value of I to &H7F80. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our 
way of helping you, the consu mer, The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product that carries the Seal 
has been physically seen by us, that it 
does, indeed, exist and that we have a 
sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hard- 
ware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their pro- 
ducts to the rainbow for certification. 
We ascertain that their products are, in 
actuality, what they purport to be and, 
upon such determination, award a Seal, 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction." The certification pro- 
cess is different from the review process. 
You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whethe r the prod u ct i s 
right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the rainbow and 
the certification process. Certification is 
open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded 
to any commercial product, regardless 
of whether the firm advertises or not. .! 

We will appreciate knowing of in- 
stances of violation of Seal use. 



Fifth Anniversary Special 
The Faces of Falsoft: the Rainbow Makers 



The story and pictures that 
follow are our way of 
celebrating the evolution of 

THE RAINBOW Over 

the past five years. 
We want you to meet some of 
the many folks here in Prospect 
who help produce THE 
RAINBOW and its 
sister publications. 
At right, Jerry McKiernan, 
RAINBOW art director, is also 
Falsoft creative director, 
overseeing the company's 
design staff. 
Below, Jo Anna Arnott (left), 
rainbow copy editor, also 
manages production of the 
monthly MOTD newsletter. 
Senior Editor Tamara Dunn 
divides her time and expertise 

among several 
Falsoft publications. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE 

production is handled by Mark 
Herndon, an avid CoCo user 
outside of work, too. 







rrr H r 




v 




Falsoft Editorial Director 
Jim Reed is also managing 
editor of the rainbow and 
oversees the CoCo 
SIG on Delphi. 



Our typesetting 
department is headed by 
Debbie Hartley (left), who 
also compiles our 
"Scoreboard" feature. 
Suzanne Kurowsky (seated) 
also handles "CoCo Clubs," 
"Letters to Rainbow" and 
SCORECARD, our weekly 
sports publication. 
Typesetter Jody Doyle is 
also curator of our popular 
"CoCo Gallery." 




Melba Smith is responsible for In- 
house printing, such as 
RAIN BO Wf est materials, office 
stationery and disk and tape 
packaging. 




bit of reflection 
is generally in order at 
anniversary time, yet 
we are forging ahead 
so quickly these days, 
it seems almost 
perilous to take our 
eyes off the road. 

Five years. That's 
old for a computer 
magazine, but the 
emphasis here at 
Falsoft is 

unmistakably on the 
newness of it all. New 
building. New office 
equipment. New 
computers. New 
publications. And, so 
many new faces. 

What a difference 
five years makes. 
Those of us who've 
been here awhile feel 
like doting 
grandparents: 
"Goodness gracious, 
Falsoft, my, but you've 
grown!" Mix in with 
that, "Wonder how big 
you'll be in another 
five years?" 



Cameraman John Pike makes 
plate-ready negatives from art boards 

of finished pages/ 




From what began as 
a hobbyist's two-page 
newsletter, we now 
have a still-growing 
firm of 70-plus 
employees with seven 
publications: four 
monthly magazines 
and three weekly 
newspapers. Add to 
that our rainbow on 
tape service and two 
disk services, as well 
as two online 
information services 
on Delphi and perhaps 
you'll forgive our 
impulse to show you 
some pictures of the 
Falsoft family. We just 
happen to have some 
right here. 





Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson (above, left) handles 
product reviews for all of our publications. Editorial 
Assistant Angela Ka pi hammer doea proofreading 
and associated production- 




In "CoCo Control," Technical Assistant Cray Augsburg 
checks programs and prints listings. 

In the art department (below left) Jerry McKiernan proofs 
a matchprint. Designer and VCR Art Director Kevin 
Quiggins and Art Production Manager Cindy Jett (at tables) 
work on layout and paste-up. SOFT SECTOR Art Director 
Sandy Underwood (foreground) places completed art 
in flat files. 

Below right, Cindy puts on the finishing touches. 



i 4 




Assistant Editorial Director Juita 
Ka(.?1 harnmflr (left) supervises editorial 
production and eoordipaJes program and 
article submissions. Shirley Morgan keeps 
the editorial "copy flow" imaging. 
Farmer RAINBOW staff member Ed Ellers 
(befow left] is now managing editor ol soft 
SECTOR, our monthly tor Sanyo computer 
users. Chris Wehner hand Tea toe 
technical side o( PCM 
At bottom lefi Is PCM 
Ail Director Tracay Jones. 
RAINBQWfest Coordinator Judy Brashear 
(seated) discusses Che show catalog layout 
with designs Heidi Maxedon, who is also 

art director of scoregard. 






w 



hile THE RAINBOW 

is clearly Falsoft's 
flagship publication, 
PCM has climbed to 
132 pages monthly 
and celebrates its own 
third anniversary this 
month. VCR 
Magazine, our venture 
outside the computer 
realm, is scarcely five 
months old but is 
already up to 80,000 
issues monthly. 

With our own in- 
house design staff, 
typesetting operation, 
subscription and 





support services and 
even our own camera 
room, our editorial 
operation can create, 
launch and maintain a 
wide variety of 
■ publishing interests. 
At this writing, four 
books are in various 
stages of production. 

In this fifth year of 
Falsoft, we are using 
some five railroad cars 
of paper each month. 
Our ink comes in 
barrels. Yes, we're 
proud of how far we've 
come, and we're 
excited about the road 
ahead. Clearly, these 
are team pictures! 




Sue Hodgers (at left, above) is administrative assistant 
to the publisher while Patricia Hirsch, the very first on 
the Falsoft payroll, is now general manager 
of l he company. 

Business Assistant Won lea Wheat (standing) talks to 
Receptionist Pann Worktioven, whose friendly Voice you 

usually hear when calling us. 

While Advertising Reprasentative Kim Vincefif (left) 
and Doris Taylor, Fats oft advertising coordinator, are 
located In our Prospect headquarters, we are also 
represented by McVey-Mlchaela in New York, Garland 
Associates In Boston and Shack leford 4 Nolan, Davis, 
Gregg and Associates on the West Goasl, 




Our weekly newspaper specialists {below) 
include Da^id Miner, Skyline managing 
edilor, talking with Judy Colgate, 
production manager. Paste-up artist J ody 
Gilbert is at right and across the table Is 
Classified Advertising Coordinator 
Teresa WiElett. 






In subscription and support services (left 
to right), Patricia Eaton is word processing 
manager. Department director is Bcrmie 
Frowenfeid, shown speaking with Beverly 
Bearden. assistant customer service 
manager. Sandy Apple is assistant director 
oi fulfillment services, while Sharon Smith 
(back, right) ts a business assistant- 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore checks a 
ledger while Donna Shuck, assistant 
general manager for finance, 

sums it gp. 




Mark Herndon 
makes 1 1 copies of 

RAINBOW ON TAPE 

with each 45-second 
pass, but It still takes 
days to produce the 
8,000 or more tapes 
sold monthly. 



T 




hese aren't all the 
faces of Falsoft. Our 
list of contributors 
now numbers in the 
hundreds: personal 
computer 
programmers to 
sports commentators, 
hardware hackers to 
media critics, 
nationally-known 
authors to local 
newspaper journalists, 
the Falsoft crew 
makes quite a crowd. 
Yet, from shipping 
clerk to senior editor, 
advertising 
representative to 
bookkeeper, artist 
to technician, 
secretary to 
production 
manager, we all 
share a common 
bond with Lonnie 
Falk, the founder of 
Falsoft: as far as 
we've come in these 
past five years, 
wherever we go 



Janice 
Easiburn, who is in 
charge ot dispatch,, 
selects a few 
cassettes to fill a back 
issue order. 





from here and 
whatever we 
find, we'll always 
share that special 
excitement that comes 
from examining our 
own copy of still 
another edition, 
delivered while the 
presses are still 
rolling. There's a 
special something that 
the very latest issue 
always holds for all of 
us. And, this time, our 
picture's in it! 




PCM Managing Editor Danny 
Humphreys (above) does custom 
programming when he ftnds time. 



Belinda Kirby (standing) is 
editorial manager of The East End 
Voice and the Louisville Skyline, 
while Jean Fultz handles the 
newspapers' accounting. 




Sportswriter Garry Jones (feft) confers with SCORECARD 
Editor John Crawley. scorecard covers University of 
Louisville sports. 

Below, Judy Quashnock, of dealer accounts, visits 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter. 





VCR magazine's 
Managing Editor Kevin 
Nickols (left) has a 
picture selection session 
with VCR Executive 
Editor Vince Staten. 



Beverly Taylor 
(standing) handles 
advertising accounts and 
Lisa Ragan is in 
accounts payable/ADP. 





The many faces of 
Falsoft, assembled for 
the first time just for 
RAINBOW readers. 
About seven minutes 
together and then it 
was back to business 
as usual 

Smile quickly, we're 
on deadlinel 




Business Assistant Laurie Falk (left) and 
Editorial Assistant Michele Hardman take a 
moment to visit in the reception area. 



Located just outside of Louisville, 
Kentucky, in the small town of Prospect, the 
Falsoft Building is, indeed, the house that 
RAINBOW built. 





"/ guess it's a trifle out of the ordinary for a 
magazine's staff to bask in its own spotlight, so to 
speak, but we like to think we've earned ourselves 
a moment of recognition and celebration; It's our 
way of stopping to smell the roses and having a bit 
of an open house, too. It's also a way to share our 
Fifth Anniversary album with the entire CoCo 
Community. " 

— Lonnie Falk 





of Fa I soft 





FRONT ROW 

1) Suzanne Benlsh Ktirowsky 

2) Janice Easiburn 

3) Debbie Hartley 

4) Jody Doyle 

5) Danny Humphress 
S) Tracey Jones 
7) Lonnie Falk 
B) Heidi Maxedon 
9} John Crawl ay 

10J Ed Ellers 
11) David Miller 
12} Chris Wehner 
13} Jerry McKiernan 




SECOND ROW 

14} Jody Gilbert 

15) Judy Colgate 

16) Donna Knebel 

17) Kim Vincent 

18) Doris Screwing 

19) Judy QuMhnack 

20) Sandy Apple 

21) Bonnie Fro we nf eld 

22) Beverly Bearden 

23) Jo Anna Arrcott 

24) Pat Hirsch ^1 

25) Angela Kapfhammer 
2.6) Lauren Pack 

27) Jutta Kapfharmmer 



THIRD ROW 

28) Sandra Und&rwood 

29) Cindy J *!t 

30) Shirley Morgan 

31) Melba Smith 

32) Pat Eaton 

33) Diane Moore 

34) Doris Taylor 

35) Beverly TayJor 

36) Monica Wh^at 
37J Judy Brashear 
33 j Lisa Rag an 
391 Judl Hutchinson 
40) Sheri Taylor 
41} Sue Rodgers 
42) Tim Shaw 



BACK ROW 

43) Tamara Dunn 

44) Kenneth Hay den 

45) John Pike 

46) Kevin Nickels 

47) Belinda Ktrby 

48) Sharon Smith 

49) Ray Baldwin 

50) Donna Shuck 

51) Cray Augsburg 

52) Parn Workhoven 

53) Debbie Baxter 

54) Jean Fultz 

55) Tom Cecil 
56} Teresa WMIetl 

57) Garry Jones 

58) Jim Reed 



"Pic* we. Day" at Falsoft was the first 
lime we've brought so many of ojr folks 
together at once. Nonetheless, there were 
several "excused absence*" that were, 
shall we say, creative. 

Laurie Falk> for instance, was "being 
fitted with my cap and gown.'* Her 
Ballard High School graduation was a 
few days away. As for Michclc Hard man, 
H T had to go with Laurie/ 1 

Jeanne Richer was late, "because 
somebody pulled the stems off of two 
tires on my new car r " Jerry H unlcy was 
"hung up at an advertiser^," while Bob 




Woerner says he was "washing news- 
paper racks." 

Joe Edmondson was on another fish- 
ing trip, but Dan Downard declared 
"H alleys Comet got me off schedule." 
Moonlight singer Brent Watson "had a 
noontime giy, man." 

"Qh go&h. the baby cried all night/ 
said Carol Timmons, blaming it all on 4- 
rnonth-oid Mary Brooke. Judd Tenen- 
baum claimed our scheduled time "con- 
flicted with oiy appointment for the 
I until fig booth, " and Wendy Falk was. 



way up in Badger Land, taking final 

eitams at the University of Wisconsin. 

^Afesi Coaster! Cindy Shack leford and 
Shirley Duranse-au were m Puyallup, 
Washington. Bill McVey was in New 
York" Rich DiGiacomo, L.A,; and Jack 
Gar la iid in Massachusetts, Pierce and 
Edith Taylor were across the street, 14 A rc 
we on daylight lime again?" 

"Picking up some cables at Radiu 
Shack/* pleaded Mark ITerndon, but 
Kevin Qulggins was "right there in she 
back row ■ — 1 was tying my shoe." /^i 

July 1^6 THE RAINBOW 45 



Festive CoCo: 

Ready to PAINT the Town 



By H. Allen Curtis 



In his "Wishing Well" column (THE 
RAINBOW, November 1984 through 
January 1985) Fred Scerbo devel- 
oped ingenious BASIC procedures for 
painting in seven "new" PMDDE4 colors. 
After sampling his procedures, my 
greed took over. I wanted even more — 
more colors, more speed, more flexibil- 
ity in painting adjacent objects and 
more memory economy. 

In the July 1983 issue of Color Com- 
puter Magazine, I showed how to add 
another command, DYE, to the BASIC 
vocabulary. I have been working to 
refine and improve the DYE command. 
The result is a new basic command, 
* PAINT. It works somewhat like PRINT 
but can paint a multitude of colors and 
is much faster. 

The format is *PAINT X,Y, C, K; 
where 'X'is a number (zero to 255) that 
defines the X-coordinate, 'Y' is a 
number (zero to 191) that defines the Y- 
coordinate, 'C'is a number (zero to 255) 
specifying the odd-row color combina- 
tion, and 'K' is a number (zero to 255) 
specifying the even-row color combina- 
tion. Note the absence of parentheses in 
the * PAINT format. 

As in the PRINT command, the 'X' 
and 'Y* values correspond to coordi- 
nates within the object to be painted. 
Using Fred Scerbo's procedures, the 
odd rows of any painted object are one 
color combination and the even rows 
another. Objects painted with *PAINT 
use the same idea, but with 'C and 'K' 
controlling the color combinations of 
alternate rows. * PAINT only works on 
a buff background. 
Table 1 gives the values of -C and 'K' 

H Allen Curtis lives in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. He is interested in 17th and 
18th century history and enjoys biking 
through the colonial capital He balanc- 
es past and present with his computer 
work. 



that yield Fred Scerbo's seven colors 
along with cyan, orange, black and buff. 
The colors labeled cyan and orange are 
not exactly those colors, but are close 
enough. Many other colors can be 
generated by choosing different 'C and 
'K' values. I will refer to the colors in 
Table 1 as 1 1 -color set zero. 






Table 1 




Color 


C 


K 


Yellow 


238 


187 


Blue 


119 


221 


Gold 


128 


8 


Silver 


204 


51 


Purple 


136 


68 


Lime 


64 


4 


Violet 


85 


170 


Cyan 


85 


85 


Orange 


170 


170 


Black 


0 


0 


Buff 


255 


255 




There are two short commands, *1 
and *2, complementing * PAINT. These 
commands allow convenient switching 
to three additional 11-color sets: one, 
two and three. Color sets one, two and 
three can be obtained from color set 
zero by executing *1, *2, and both *1 
and *2, respectively. Cyan, orange, 
black and buff are common to all four 
color sets. The other colors in sets one, 



two and three are shades that defy 
accurate description. 

The program that lets you add 
♦PAINT, *1 and *2 to CoCo's BASIC 
vocabulary is called Star Paint and is 
shown in Listing 1. Star Paint is com- 
patible with Extended Color BASIC 
systems with either cassette or disk. It 
was developed on a disk ROM 1.0 
system but also works with the disk 
ROM 1.1. 

The heart of Star Paint is a 420-byte 
machine language routine. This routine 
is comprised of the DflTR values in lines 
100 through 310. Lines 10 and 20 check 
your accuracy when typing in the DRTR 
values. Lines 30 through 50 make sure 
Star Paint is saved at the correct time. 

In lines 60 through 80 the ML routine 
is stored in a protected area imme- 
diately following Star Paint, but before 
the area for storing BASIC variables. 
Line 90 adjusts the ML routine for 
compatibility with your particular 
system configuration. When the routine 
is stored, lines 10 through 310 are no 
longer needed and are deleted by the last 
command in Line 90. 

Special care should be taken in typing 
all lines containing PEEKs and POKEs — 
lines 2, 60, 70, 80 and 90. Any mistakes 
could cause loss of the program when 
run. 

When Star Paint has been typed in 
and saved, run it. After the break in 




46 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 





SPREADSHEET 
ANALYSIS 

by 

Radio /haek 





« 



CANNED SOFTWARE 
FOR MY COCO?" 



Choose Radio Shack's 
Dynacalc™ program — 
all you add is data. 

Want a powerful spreadsheet pro- 
gram for your Color Computer? 
Then reach for Dynacalc, a high- 
energy worksheet chocked full of 
performance features (26-3275, 
$99.95). With disk-based, high- 
performance Dynacalc, your Color 
Computer system helps keep your 
figures under control. 

Calculated to please 

The Dynacalc recipe keeps your 
budgetary diet well balanced. Need 
help in calculating your personal 
budget, cash management, inven- 
tory analysis, income-tax prepara- 
tion, or any other complicated 
computational courses? Leave it to 
Dynacalc. You can get instant an- 
swers to "What if . . . ?" questions. 



Quick and easy to prepare 

Dynacalc takes the complex plan- 
ning schemes you have cooking up 
in your head and lays them out on 
the table. Why spend all day in the 
kitchen with a calculator, pencil and 
eraser when you can get results at 
the push of a key? 

With Dynacalc you simply add 
your basic ingredients (numbers, 
formulas and labels) to a well- 
organized grid of columns and 
rows. Then you can adjust the rec- 
ipe to your taste. Change a single 
ingredient and your entire work- 
sheet is automatically recalculated. 
You can test the outcomes of vari- 
ous plans and strategies in an in- 
stant. What a timesaver! 

Come shop with us 

Stop by your local Radio Shack 
and pick up Dynacalc right off the 



shelf. And while you're there, take a 
look at our complete stock of nour- 
ishing software. Or send for our 
new 1986 Software Reference and 
Computer Guide. We've got classic 
programs for every taste! 

Radio /haek 

The Technology Store' 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



■ n j^B on WBH 
Send me an RSC-16 Computer Catalog. 



■ 
I 
I 

I 

1 



Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-23 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 

Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



I 
I 

I 
f 




Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and at participating stores and dealers. Oynacalc/TM Computer Systems of St. Louis. 0S-9/TM Microware and Motorola, Inc. 

Dvnacalc contains no artificial additives. 



Line 50, type CONT and press ENTER to 
continue program execution. When 
execution is finished, list the program. 
Notice it now contains only two lines of 
BASIC: the REM statements in lines 1 and 
2. Make Line 2 an active one by deleting 
the REM. Do not delete any other part. 

To determine whether or not you now 
have a correctly working version of Star 
Paint, add the following lines to the 
program: 

10 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS1 : 5CREEN1 , 1 : 

*PFIINT128,96,85,170 

20 BOTD20 

Then run the augmented program. If 
the screen is quickly painted violet 
(alternating lines of cyan and orange) 
then it is fine. Otherwise, check over 
Listing 1, 

Once Star Paint is working, delete 
lines 10 and 20 and save the resulting 
version. To use the *PAINT command 
in a program you are writing, load the 
two-line version of Star Paint and add 
your program. 

The two-line version must always be 
used with the same system configura- 
tion as the one on which it was gener- 
ated. For use with another system 



configuration, run the Listing 1 version 
of Star Paint on that particular system 
to generate another two liner. 

A Rainbow 

Listing 2 demonstrates some of the 
capabilities and idiosyncrasies of the 
♦PAINT command. It also provides a 
reasonable facsimile of THE RAINBOW 
logo. To obtain Listing 2, start with the 
two-line Star Paint and type lines 3 
through 390. 

Note that lines 6 through 15 contain 
the color palette for painting with nine 
colors from color set zero. The color 
associated with Line 6 is yellow and is 
indicated by the letter 'Y' following 
GDT015. The colors associated with 
lines 7 through 14 are indicated in a 
similar fashion. Non-numerical charac- 
ters can be appended to GOTO line 
numbers with no effect. This offers a 
handy and inexpensive REM facility. 

When the logo program is run, the 
screen should be painted orange. If the 
screen turns cyan, press the Reset but- 
ton and rerun the program. Continue 
the sequence until you obtain an orange 
screen. Fred Scerbo's colors were de- 
fined relative to the production of 
orange when each screen byte has a 



value of 170, hence the necessity for the 
color synchronization process. 

After obtaining an orange screen, 
press ENTER to start meaningful pro- 
gram execution. Note the drawing of 
nature's rainbow is quickly painted, 
whereas the name, RAINBOW, is com- 
paratively slow in being generated. The 
former was painted with *PAINT and 
the latter with PRINT before being 
moved via GETs and PUTs. Remember, 
♦PAINTing must always occur on a buff 
background; thus, *PAINT could not 
be used to paint the name rainbow 
over the already-painted rainbow. 

You might ask, why not draw and 
*PAINT the name, RAINBOW, first? 
Then, draw and *PAINT the rainbow 
around the name. Besides being more 
complex to produce the logo in such a 
manner, the * PAINT command cannot 
always fill in small areas and the result- 
ing logo would probably be less pleasing 
to the eye. 

Lines 130 through 180 are used to 
paint the six arcs of the rainbow. For 
instance, the orange arc of Line 130 is 
painted using the * PAINT command 
three times at three different sets of X, 
Y coordinates. This illustrates that the 
number of *PAINTs needed to fill an 



Listing 1: PRINT 1 

1 REM *** STAR PAINT *** 

BY H. ALLEN CURTIS 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 

2 REM POKE334,158:POKE335,27:POK 
£336,11)3 : POKE337 , 26 : POKE401, 126 : 
POKE402 , 1 : POKE403 , 78 

10 FORI=0TO419 : READD$ : D=VAL ( " &H" 
+D$) :C=C+D:NEXT:CLS 
20 I FC< > 4 4 6 1 7 THENPRINT " DATA ERRO 
R" : STOP 

3J3 PRINT© 16 2 , "IF YOU HAVE NOT AL 
READY SAVED STAR PAINT, DO SO 
NOW." 

4j3 PRINT: PRINT" IF YOU HAVE SAV 
ED STAR PAINT, TYPE CONT AND P 
RESS ENTER." 
50 STOP 

60 X=256*PEEK(27)+PEEK(28)+420:A 

=INT(X/256) :B=X-256*A 

70 POKE474,A:POKE475,B:POKE27,PE 

EK(474) :POKE28, PEEK (475) : CLEAR 

80 X=256*PEEK(27)+PEEK(28) :M=X-4 

20 : FORI=M TOM+419 : READD$ : D=VAL ( " 

&H"+D$) :POKEI,D:NEXT 

90 FORJ=0TO2;POKEM+4+J, PEEK (401+ 



J) :NEXT: DEL10- 

100 DATA 81,AD,27,3,7E,C2,4D,9D, 
9F,81,C3,27,23,8B,79,81,AA,27 
110 DATA 5,44,81, 55,26, EC, 97, 50, 
9E,BA,33,89,18,0,DF,51,9D,9F,A6 
120 DATA 84,98,50,A7,80,9C,51,26 
,F6,35,90,86,3,97,7C,9D,9F,BD 
130 DATA B7,3D,34,10,32,61,BD,B2 
,6D,A,7C,26,F2,BD,B7,3D,9F,42 
140 DATA 35, 54, D7, 42, D7, 45, IF, 10 
,C6,20,3D,D3,BA,1F,3,1F,10,54 
150 DATA 54,54,8D,2B,F,44,1F,32, 
8D,11,3,7C,D6,50,8D,1F, 3 3,A8,E0 
160 DATA D6,43,D7,45,C6,FF,D7,44 
,1F,31,DC,BA,C3,17,E1,DD,7D,9C 
170 DATA 7D,25, 1,39, IF, 30,93, BA, 
2A,9, 1F,98,DD,50,5A,4C,DD,52,39 
180 DATA D6,51,3A,A6,84,5C,D1,52 
,26,59,5A,D1,53,2 6,17,81,FF,27 
190 DATA EC,84,3,81,3,27,5E,A6,1 
,81,FF,27,6,84,C0,81,C0,27,52,39 
200 DATA 5A,D1,53,22,26,81,FF,27 
,48,E6,1F,C1,FF,26,4,C,53,20,DA 
210 DATA 84,C0,81,C0,26,8,A,51,A 
,52,30,1F,20,30,A6,84,84,3,81,3 
220 DATA 26,CA,20,26,81,FF,27,22 
,A,51,30, 1F,A6,84,81,FF,27,18,A 
230 DATA 52,20,D2,5A,5A,D1,53,22 
,E,81,FF,27,A,E6,1,C1,FF,26,A0,C 
240 DATA 51, 30, 1,96, 51, 97, 53, E6, 



48 THE RAINBOW July 1986 





DATABASE 
MANAGEMENT 

by 

Radio /hack 




"CANNED SOFTWARE 

FOR MY COCO?" 



Choose Radio Shack's 
Profile® program — 
all you add is data. 

You want quick-and-easy gourmet 
software, not "junk food" That's 
why we offer powerful Profile data- 
base management (26-3274, $49.95) 
for your disk-based Color Com- 
puter system. 

A Profile database is easy to pre- 
pare, Mix all your files together, 
then quickly separate the ones you 
want. Keep track of names and ad- 
dresses, inventory, collections, 
recipes — anythi ng! 

No muss, no fuss 

With Profile, it's easy to set up a 
complete data-management system. 
You add your own ingredients to 
suit your taste, and you can design 
up to nine screen-display formats 



for each file. You can include as 
many as 35 fields on each record. 

You can store as many records as 
you have room for on your diskette. 
Or for extra-big helpings, add a sec- 
ond disk drive. Profile lets you cook 
up vast libraries of information. 

To serve, just add a printer to cre- 
ate up to nine different reports for 
each file. You can print your stored 
information, as well as the results of 
Profile's automatic calculations. 

Mix it all together 

Profile lets you sort your records 
by defining up to nine different ac- 
cess methods, using as many as 
three different levels of sorting per 
method. Profile even lets you spoon 
in spreadsheet files from Dynacalc. 

Come shop with us 

Stop by your local Radio Shack 
and pick up Profile right off the 



shelf. And while you're there, take a 
look at our complete stock of nour- 
ishing software. Or send for our 
new 1986 Software Reference and 
Computer Guide. We've got classic 
programs for every tastel 

Radio /hack 

The Technology Store' 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



9P 



I 
I 

1 

i t 

Mi 



Send me an RSC-16 Computer Catalog. 




Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. B7-A-23A 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth TX 76102 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



I 

- | 
jj 




Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and at participating stores and dealers. Profile/Registered TM Tandy Corporation. Dynacalc/TM Computer Systems of St. Louis. 

0S-9/TM Microware and Motorola, Inc. Profile contains no artificial additives. 



object depends on the shape of the 
object. More common objects such as 
rectangles and circles can be painted 
with one * PAINT, but with other ob- 
jects you have to experiment to deter- 
mine the number of *PAINTs needed. 

Generally, * PAINT fills in objects as 
follows: It paints downward until a 
local minimum is found at the boundary 
or until it reaches a pointed area too 
narrow to paint. It then paints upward 
in an analogous manner. 

To produce the rainbow, the arcs are 
sequentially *PAINTed from top to 
bottom with one exception, the fourth 
arc is * PAINTed last. The fourth arc, 
the blue one, was *PAINTed after the 
fifth, the cyan arc, to prevent bleeding. 
♦PAINTing an object a darker color 
than an adjacent object can sometimes 
cause bleeding of the darker color onto 
the adjacent object. 

Upon the completion of THE RAIN- 
BOW logo, the program goes into a 
closed loop in which the color sets are 
continually changed by means of the *1 
and *2 commands of Line 360. Press the 
BREAK key to terminate the program. 
To see the program execute without the 
color set changes, delete Line 360 and 
rerun the program. 



Making Pie Charts 

Listing 3 provides a more practical 
application of the *PAINT command: 
the construction of pie charts. Lines 1 
through 100 are the same as those line 
numbers in Listing 2. Delete lines 110 
through 390 from Listing 2, and type 
lines 1 10 through 240 from Listing 3 for 
the complete pie chart program. 

The pie chart program begins with 
the now familiar test screen that, if cyan, 
must be adjusted to orange using the 
Reset button. 

Pressing ENTER yields a blank screen 
for about two seconds. After that a pie 
chart is rapidly constructed and 
♦PAINTed. 

Each time ENTER is pressed, another 
pie chart is formed with different-sized 
wedges. Most of the time taken in chart 
formation is to determine the wedge 
sizes through random number genera- 
tion. 

After viewing the formation of sev- 
eral pie charts, note that most wedges 
are completely *PAINTed. However, 
because of the smaller size and/ or 
orientation of some wedges, the 
*PAINTing is not complete. The central 
circle is used to hide imcompletely 
* PAINTed wedges. For a better cover- 



up of insufficient *PAINTing, change 
5CREEN1, 1 in Line 130 to 5CREEN0,1. 

It should be mentioned that the X,Y 
coordinates for *PAINTing are calcu- 
lated as the size and orientation of each 
wedge is determined. The calculations 
are made in such a way that only one 
♦PAINT command is required for each 
wedge drawn. 



Painting with Other Color Sets 

In both of the demonstration pro- 
grams, objects were initially * PAINTed 
with the colors of color set zero and 
other color sets were obtained by exe- 
cuting the *1 and *2 commands. There 
may be occasions when you want to 
* PAINT directly with color sets one, 
two and three. Table 2 has been in- 
cluded to facilitate direct *PAINTing. 

In the table, the numbered suffixes 
for *C and 'K' indicate the associated 
color set. The "CI," "KI" values (I = one, 
two or three) in the first row of Table 
2 are those obtained by executing * 1 , *2, 
or both *1 and *2 on yellow values in 
color set zero. There are analogous 
correspondences in the other rows of 
the table. 



402,l:POKE4j33,78 

3 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : GOSUB 
14 

4 IFINKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENCLS0 : PMOD 
E4 , 1 : SCREENJ3 , J3 : GOTO10J3ELSE4 

5 1 COLOR PALETTE 

6 C=238:K=187:GOT015Y 

7 C=119:K>=221:GOT015B 

8 C=128:K=8:GOT015G 

9 C=2J34:K=51:G0T015S 

10 C=136:K=68:GOT015P 
C=64:K=4:GOT015L 
C=85 : K=170 : GOT015V 
C=85:K=85:GOT015C 
C=170 : K=17J3 : GOT0150 
* PAINTX , Y,C,K: RETURN 



84, CI, FF, 26, 
250 DATA A, 5 
5C,3A,D7 ,52, 
260 DATA 45, 

52 ,26, EE ,33, 
270 DATA C8, 
C, 96, 43, 97, 4 
280 DATA 24, 
57, 24, C, 57, 2 
290 DATA 45, 
DA, 45, E4, 84, 
300 DATA 24, 
58,24,0,58,2 
310 DATA 45, 
,45,E4,84,E7 

,0,0 



3C,D6,45,E7,84,30,1F 
3,2A,F0,D6,51,1F,31, 
E6,84,C1,FF,26,4B,D6 
E7,80,C,52,C6,20,D1, 

C8,E0,D,7C,26,3,33 

40,3,44,26,3,96,42,8 

5,16,FF,26,E6,84,57 

C9,57,24,C6,57,24,F, 

4,C,57,24,9,E6,84,D4 

20,9,C6,F0,8C,C6,C0, 

E7,84,20,A7,E6,84,58 

BC,58,24,B9,58,24,F, 

4,C,58,24,9,E6,84,D4 

20,9,C6,F,8C,C6,3,DA 

,84,20,9A,16,FE,5F,0 



11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



Listing 2: PRINT:?; 

1 REM *** STAR PAINT *** 

BY H. ALLEN CURTIS 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 

2 POKE334 , 158 :POKE335, 27 : POKE336 
,110:POKE337,26:POKE401,126:POKE 




50 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



TSED1T 



WORD 
PROCESSING 

by 

Radio /haeK 



"CANNED SOFTWARE 

FOR MY COCO?" 



Choose Radio Shack's 
TSEDIT and TSWORD— 
all you add is data. 

Looking for low-cost word pro- 
cessing that's got more vitamins 
than the average alphabet soup? 
Then pick TSEDIT word process- 
ing (26-3264,$34.95) and TSWORD 
text formatting (26-3267, $39.95) 
for your disk-based, 64K Color 
Computer system. 

Packed with the nutrition 
you need for "wp-power" 

TSEDIT comes with more than 
the minimum daily requirement of 
powerful features: full-screen edit- 
ing, true lowercase letters, side 
scrolling, variable character-display 
size, global editing and multiple file 
merging. It's got everything you 
need to write a spicy novel, a taste- 
ful resume, a luscious letter, or even 
a delicious ,. . > recipe! 



Mix with TSWORD to create 
gourmet "masterpieces" 

TSWORD interacts with TSEDIT 
to give your documents a polished, 
professional appearance. After you 
type your text, TSWORD presents a 
graphic "layout" of each page. You 
can experiment with several format 
standards and see the effects of 
your decisions instantly with one 
quick "taste-test." 

TSWORD lets you set up or 
change such format standards as: 
top, bottom and side margins, para- 
graph indentation, running headers 
and footers, printing fonts, centered 
lines, tabs, justification, linespacing 
and page breaks. There's everything 
you need to whip up delectible 
four-star servings. 

Come shop with us 

Stop by Radio Shack and pick up 
TSEDIT and TSWRITE right off 



the shelf. And while you're there, 
take a look at our complete stock of 
nourishing software. Or send for 
our new 1986 Software Reference 
and Computer Guide. We've got 
classic programs for every taste! 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 




Send me an RSC-16 Computer Catalog. 




Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. B7-A-19A 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Name 



Address 
City 



■ 



State 



ZIP 




Phone 




Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and at participating stores and dealers. 0S-9fi"M Microware and Motorola, Inc. TSEDIT and TSWRITE contain no artificial additives. 









Table 2 








CO 


KO 


CI 


Kl 


C2 


K2 


C3 


K3 


238 


187 


68 


17 


187 


238 


17 


68 


119 


221 


221 


119 


34 


136 


136 


34 


128 


8 


42 


162 


213 


93 


127 


247 


204 


51 


102 


153 


153 


102 


51 


204 


136 


68 


34 


238 


221 


27 


119 


187 


64 


4 


234 


174 


21 


81 


191 


251 


85 


170 


255 


0 


0 


255 


170 


85 


85 


85 


255 


255 


0 


0 


170 


170 


170 


170 


0 


0 


255 


255 


85 


85 


0 


0 


170 


170 


85 


85 


255 


255 


255 


255 


85 


85 


170 


170 


0 


0 



Using P0KE17B,n to paint objects 
with various color combinations has 
been popular. Those same color combi- 
nations are easily achieved with the 
♦PAINT command and often at greater 
speed. 

Listing 4 demonstrates this *PAINT 
capability. This program consists of the 
two-line version of Star Paint with five 
other lines. 

The demonstration begins by paint- 
ing the screen using the PDKE17B,n. 
The color combination is randomly 
selected. When the screen is painted, 
there is a pause, then a position on the 



screen is examined to determine the *C* 
and 'K' values needed to reproduce the 
screen's present color combination. 
Next the screen is cleared to buff and 
♦PAINTed. This program illustrates the 
extreme speed advantage of * PAINT. 

In Conclusion 

In *PAINTing, a color combination 
is filled in horizontally until a drawn 
boundary is reached at each side. If 
there is no boundary at the right, for 
instance, painting can continue to the 
next line at the left of the screen. To 
prevent this, draw a vertical line at the 
right and/ or left boundary of the screen 
before *PAINTing such areas. The lines 
can be removed later. 

Without the two-line version of Star 
Paint, the commands * PAINT, *1 and 
*2 do not execute but produce SN 
errors, The hook address to the compu- 
ter's error-processing subroutine was 
changed to an address leading to Star 
Paint's own error-processing subrou- 
tine, which accepts * PAINT, *1 and *2 
as valid BASIC commands and initiates 
their execution. 

Because of the location of the ML 
routine that contains the error- 
processing routine, establishing an 



acceptable hook address is no trivial 
matter. Every time you add, delete or 
change a line of BASIC programming, 
the location of the error-processing 
subroutine is likely to change. A fixed 
hook address, RAM address 334, was 
chosen. 

Line 2 of the two-line version of Star 
Paint POKEs a four-byte, ML subrou- 
tine to addresses 334 through 337. The 
four-byte subroutine calculates the 
current entry address of the error- 
processing subroutine and causes entry 
to it. Addresses 334 through 337 are 
ordinarily employed in storing USRB 
and USR9 addresses in strictly cassette- 
based systems. Therefore, the use of 
Star Paint places a small restriction on 
those systems. USRB and USR9 must not 
be used in programs with *PAINT, *1 
or *2. 

Now that * PAINT can be added to 
CoCo's BASIC repertoire, I wish Fred 
Scerbo would put his remarkable pro- 
gramming skills to work in producing 
a *PAINTed graphics masterpiece. 

(You may direct questions about this 
program to Mr. Curtis at 172 Dennis 
Drive, Williamsburg, VA 23185, phone 
804-229-7086. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing.) □ 



2 GOSUB6 i Y«64 : X=2 3 6 s GOSUB6 : X=24 
®56 JGOSUB6 

:Y=4 6: GOSUBI2:X-56:Y-50 
: GQSUB12 : X-31 : Y=64 2 GOSUB12 
160 X-127 : Y«55 : GOSUB13 : X«55 r Y-66 
; GOSUB15 :X«19j3 : Y»6j3 : GOSUB15 : X=16 
13 : Y«58 : GOSUB15 

170 X-12 7 : Y«60 : GOSUB10 ! X=9 0 : Y«64 
: GOSUB15 : X-165 : GOSUB15 
180 X«12 7 ! Y»50 i GOSUB7 : X»40 : Y«6 4 : 
G0SUB15 : X-180 : Y-54 : GO SUB 15 
190 LINE (0 ,66) - (255 ,70) , PRESET, B 

m 01 DRAWBM0 , 1 50U3 6R2 0 FR2 FR2 FRFD 




250 DRAW"BM78 , 150U36R9D36L9" :PAI 
NT(80,148) ,0,0 

260 GET (78, 110 )-(88 , 150) ,R,G:PUT 
(78,20) - (88 , 60) ,R,AND:GOSUB380 
270 LINE (92 , 150) - (92, 114) , PSET:L 
INE- ( 103 , 114 ) , PSET : LINE- ( 117 , 140 
) , PSET: LINE- (117 , 114) , PSET: LINE- 
(125,114) , PSET: LINE- (125, 150) ,PS 
ET : LINE- ( 114 , 150 ) , PSET : LINE- ( 100 
, 12 4 ) , PSET : LINE- (100 , 150 ) , PSET : L 
INE- ( 92 ,150) , PSET : PAINT (94,148) , 

m 

280 GET (92, 110) -(125,150) ,R,G:PU 
T(92, 20) -(125 , 60) , R , AND : GOSUB3 80 
290 DRAWBM130, 150U36R22FR2FR2FR 



D2G3L10»:PAINT(3,146) ,0,0 
220 GET (0,110)- (40 , 1 50) ,R , G : PUT ( 
1 , 20) - (41 , 60 ) ,R, AND: GOSUB380 
230 LINE (36, 150) -(50,114) ,PSET:L 
INE- (59 , 114) , PSET: LINE- (7 3, 150) , 
SET : LINE- (66, 150) , PSET: LINE- (63 
,142) , PSET: LINE (60, 136) -(55, 122) 
, PSET: LINE- (50 ,136), PSET : DRAWM+ 
0 ,+0NR10BD5BL2NR14» : LINE- (44 , 150 
) , PSET : LINE- ( 3 6 , 150 ) , PSET : PAINT ( 
38 , 148) ,0,0 

240 GET(36,110)-(73,150) ,R,G:PUT 
( 36 , 20) - (73 , 60) ,R, AND : GOSUB3 8 0 



GLGLGL25BR8BU22U8R13FRFD4GLGL13B 
D6R11FRFRDFD3GDLGL13U10" : PAINT (1 
32,148) ,0,0 

300 GET (130, 110) -(172, 150) ,R,G:P 
UT ( 1 30 , 20 ) - ( 1 7 2 , 60 ) , R , AND : GOSUB3 

310 CIRCLE (184, 132) , 18 ,0 , 1 .08 : CI 
RCLE ( 184 ,132) , 12 ,0, 1 : PAINT (184 , 1 
47) ,0,0 

320 GET(166,110)-(202,152) ,R,G:P 
UT ( 166 ,21) -( 202 ,63) , R, AND : GOSUB3 
80 

3 30 LINE ( 212 , 150 ) - ( 202 , 114 ) , PSET 
: LINE- (211 , 114) , PSET : LINE- (217, 1 







52 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



E-(233,114) ,PSET:LINE-(239,138) , 
PSET : LINE- (245,114), PSET : LINE- ( 2 
54,114) , PSET: LINE- (244,150) ,PSET 
: LINE- (234 , 150) , PSET: LINE- (228 , 1 
26) , PSET: LINE- (222, 15j3) , PSET 
340 LINE- (2 12, 150 ), PSET: PAINT (21 
4,148) ,0,0 

350 GET(202,110)-(255,150) ,R,G:P 
UT(202,20) -(255, 60) , R , AND : G0SUB3 
80 

360 GOSUB390:*1:GOSUB390:*2:GOTO 
360 

370 GOTO370 

380 LINE (0,110) -(255, 152 ), PRESET 
, BF : RETURN 

390 FORI=1TO500: NEXT: RETURN 
Listing 3: PAINT 3 

1 REM *** STAR PAINT *** 

BY H. ALLEN CURTIS 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 

2 POKE334,158:POKE335,27:POKE336 
, 110 : POKE337 , 26 : POKE401 , 126 : POKE 
402,1:POKE403,78 

3 PMODE4,l:PCLSl:SCREENl,l:GOSUB 
14 

4 IFINKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENCLS0 : PMOD 
E4 , 1 : SCREEN0 ,0 : GOTO100ELSE4 

5 ' COLOR PALETTE 

6 C=238:K=187:GOT015Y 

7 C=119:K=221:GOT015B 

8 C=128:K=8:GOT015G 

9 C=204:K=51:GOTO15S 

10 C=13 6:K=68:GOT015P 

11 C=64:K=4:GOT015L 

12 C=85:K=170:GOTO15V 

13 C=85:K=85:GOT015C 

14 C=170:K=170:GOTO15O 

15 *PAINTX,Y,C,K: RETURN 

100 PCLS1:COLOR0,1:SCREEN1, 1 

110 DIMW(95) :SCREEN0,1:PCLS1:CIR 

CLE (30, 30) ,30, 0,1: PAINT (30, 30) ,0 

,0:GET(0,0)-(60,60) ,W,G 

120 R=20 : B=0 : 1=0 : PI=3 . 144888 :A=P 

I*.l 

130 PCLS1:SCREEN1,1:CIRCLE(128,9 
6) ,80,0,1: LINE (128, 96) -(208,96) , 
PSET 

140 A(I)=RND(R) 

150 IFA(I) >R*.5THEN140 

160 B=A(I)+B:B(I)=B:R=R-A(I) 

170 1=1+1 :IFI=7THEN190 

180 IF20-B(I-1)>3THEN140 H 

190 A(I)=20-B(I-1) 

200 B(I)=20:FORJ=0TOI:B(J)=A*B(J 
) :C(J)=B(J)-.5*A*A(J) :X=80*COS(B 
(J) ) :Y=80*SIN(B(J) ) :IFJ<I THENLI 



NE(128,96)-(128+X,96-Y) , PSET 
210 X=70*COS(C(J) ) :Y=70*SIN(C(J) 
) :X=128+X:Y=96-Y:ON J+l GOSUB13, 
11,10,14,12,8,6,7,9 
220 NEXT 

230 PUT(98, 66) -(158, 126) ,W,AND:* 
2:*1:SCREEN1,1 

240 K$=INKEY$:IFK$OCHR$(13)THEN 
240ELSE120 

Listing 4: PAINT 4 

1 REM *** STAR PAINT *** 

BY H. ALLEN CURTIS 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 

2 POKE334, 158:POKE335, 27:POKE336 
, 110 ! POKE337 , 2 6 : POKE401 , 12 6 : POKE 
402,1:POKE403,78 

100 PMODE4,1:PCLS1:COLOR0,1:SCRE 
EN1,1 

110 POKE178,RND(255) :PAINT(128,9 
6) ,,0 

120 F0RI=1T01999:NEXT 

130 C=PEEK(256*PEEK(186) ) :K=C:PC 

LSI : FORI=1TO500 : NEXT : *PAINT128 , 9 

6,C,K 

140 K$=INKEY$:IFK$OCHR$(13)THEN 
140ELSE100 ^ 




ADOS 



ENHANCED, EPROM-ABLE 
DISK BASIC 



Now, you can supercharge Basic with an impressive array of extra features 
WITHOUT sacrificing compatibility! ADOS is compatible with virtually 100% of 
commercial software. Customizing utilities are provided to allow user-defined 
command abbreviations, baud rate, step rate, tracks per disk (35 or 40), support of 
double-sided drives, and more. After customizing ADOS, you can have it burned into 
an EPROM that plugs into the Disk Basic ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a 64K 
disk utility. (EPROM + burning will cost about S20--we provide information 
concerning how you can have this done.) Features include: • repeat and edit of the 
last direct-mode command * 26 definable control-key abbreviations • automatic line- 
number prompts • DOS command • lowercase command entry (a fine complement to 
a Lowerkit or PBJ WordPak) • COPY (filename) to (drive number) ■ AE error override 
option • RAM command (64K) • RUNM command • text echoing to printer • ML 
monitor • text file scan * enhanced directory • error trapping • hi-res text utility 
included (42, 51, or 64 characters per line) 

"/ COULD NOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THAT WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS." 

THE RAINBOW. December 1984 
"I LOVEADOSI ...A GENUINELY FIRST RATE PRODUCT." 

Color Micro Journal, February 1985 
"I WONT PART WITH MY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING . . . NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS." 

Hot CoCo.May 1985 

Disk... $27.95 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 



Monitor machine-language programs AS THEY ARE RUNNING! Peeper actually 
timeshares with the target program, giving FULL CONTROL as ML programs run. 
Switch instantly between watching regular program output and Peeper's trace of 
registers and stack on screen or printer. Inspect memory in any of 26 display modes. 
Execution speed can be varied from full speed to the barest crawl, or halted entirely, 
as programs run. Single-stepping, breakpoints, memory or register examine/change. 
Relocatable, supports 64K use. (16K required) See February '85 review. 
Disk. $23.95 Tape $21.95 Assembler source lisling . .Add 3.00 



BEST THING TO 



DRIVE 



Fastape allows cassette I/O at 3000 baud -TWICE NORMAL SPEED. It uses the high- 
speed (POKE 65495,0) mode, and makes it convenient to stay in this mode 
throughout. Features automatic adjustment of cassette and printer parameters when 
speed mode is changed. Control-key functions for many Basic commands and for 
changing speed modes. Compatible with all file types, and can be used with 
Telewriter 64 and many other tape utilities. (16K required) See July B3 review. 
-Tb?* . . .nm si i.m ME* DlftCOLWT f>Ri«i| 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 



No delay on personal checks 
Plnasi' ittJd S<' 00 snipping Sony 




11111 N. KendaH Drive, 
Suite A 108 
Miami, Florida 33176 
(305) 274-3899 Day or 



fiu cnidd cards or COD s 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 53 




GRAPHICS 



IfiK 



■ 

^ m 

J L- ■.rl 



Art interesting graphics display using the lower PMODEs 







matron is an animation program which uses a form of bi-screen 
i animation. This means it switches back and forth between graphics 
"pages. This is accomplished by having the computer count from one 
to Two, one representing a graphics page (PMODE 4 , 1), and two representing 
another graphics page (PMDDE 4,5). When you use higher PMODEs, you have 
to PCLEftR B, and this wastes h lot of memory in 16K. 

I used PMODE 2 in this program to demonstrate that it isnt necessary to 
use higher PMDDEs to create bi-screen animation. 

It your computer wont use the speed-up POKE (POKE 65495,8), delete it 
from the program before running it, 

(You may direct questions about this program to the author at 1112 N. 
Keen? Road, Clearwater, FL 33515. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing. ) □ 



Archor Wright is a student at Clearwater High School in Clearwater, Florida. 
He is an inventor and has served as a volunteer computer counselor. 



By Archor Wrighl 



The listing: flMNQTRON 

PCLEARa:POKE6 54 9 5,0' CREATED BY 
t ' ARCHOR WRIGHT 

1 GOSUB15:GOSUB2:GOSUB15:GOSUB3: 
GOSUB15 : GOSUB4 : G0SUB15 : GO SUBS : GO 
SUB1 5 i GOSUB2 i GOSUB 15 : GOSUBll : GOS 
UB15 : GQSUB12 : GOSUB 15 : GOSUBll : GOT 

2 GOSUB 7 : GOSUB 5 : DRAW" BK=T ; , 94GDG 
' D9 FDR3U9BU4BR5DFD9GDLU9 D1JE) L4UD4R 
D2R3U4D1 5GD3 L9HTJER4 FR2EBL3HU1 6 11 : 
SCREEN! , 1 : RETURN 





3 GOSUB7 : GOSUB5 : DRAW"BM=T; , 94GDG 
D9FDR2U5RU4BR4D4LD5R2UEU9HUHBD15 
BLL4D3RD2R3U5BRRD4LU4D8RD8GD3L9H 
UER4FR2EBL3HU8LU8LD8LD8L4GDFR" : S 
CREEN1 , 1: RETURN 

4 GOSUB7 : GOSUB5 : DRAW"BM=T; , 94GDG 
D9FDRU3RU3RU3BR4D3LD3LD3R3UEU9HU 
HBD14BL3DL4UD4RD2R3U6R5D4L2U4D6R 
D5RD6GD3L9HUER4FR2EBL3HU6LU5LU3B 
L2BU4D6LD5LD6FR2 EREBL7 BDL4GDFR5 " 
: SCREEN! , 1: RETURN 

5 T=23 6-G: V=234-G: DRAW"BM=V; ,8J3C 
4S4ER8F2D9GL2HU6HL5GLHU2EGBF2BDL 



54 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



D3RU2RD2UR5L6DG2R3 FRLHLD3R2D2R6U 
3BMJ3 , 13J3C4R255" : PAINT (V+4 , 8J3) , 4 , 
4 : IFO220THENGOSUB7 : GOTO 16 

6 RETURN 

7 Z=Z+1 

8 IFZ=1THENPM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 

9 IFZ=2THENPMODE4 , 5 : PCLS1 : Z«J3 
ljS RETURN 

i# GOSUB7 : GOSUB5 : DRAW"BM=T ; , 94GD 

GD9FDR4U5LU4BR4D4RD5RU11HUHBD15B 

RD5L3U2LU4DR4D5LD3LD7GD3L9HUER4F 

R2EBL3HU7RU9LD4BR8FD5RD7GLGL2DL6 

FR9U3 " : SCREEN1 , 1 : RETURN 

12 GOSUB7:GOSUB5:DRAW"BM=T; ,94GD 

GD9FDR5U3LU3LU3BR4D3RD3RD4L4UD4R 

D2R3U17HUHBD21LD2LD6GD3L9HUER4FR 

2EBL3HU6RU5RU4L2D3RU3BR9D6LD4RD7 

GLGL8DFR9U3 " : SCREEN1 , 1 : RETURN 

14 G=G-4: RETURN 

15 G=G+4: RETURN 

16 F0RT=J3T02 10 : GOSUB14 : GOSUB11 : G 
OSUB14 : GOSUB12 : GOSUB14 : GOSUB11 : G 
OSUB14 : GOSUB2 : GOSUB14 : GOSUB3 : GOS 
UB14 : GOSUB4 : GOSUB14 : GOSUB3 : GOSUB 
14 :GOSUB2 : NEXTT : GOSUB2 : PLAY 11 V31L 
3 503 AC" : LINE (j3,j3)-(255,131) ,PRES 
ET,BF:POKE178,3 :LINE(255,131) -(j3 
,0) ,PSET,BF 



17 FORT=6j3T016STEP-2 : GO SUB 7 : H=T/ 
2 : DRAW" BM19 4 , 9 6C4U=H ; E=T ; D=T ; D=T 

; D=T ; H=T ; U=H ; " : SCREEN1 , 1 : NEXTT : F 

0RT=1T016 : H=17-T : G0SUB7 : DRAWBM1 
94,88 C4E=H ; D=H ; Dl 6 D=H ; H=H ; L=T ; Ul 
6R=T ; " : SCREEN1 , 1 : NEXTT : FORT=178T 
O70STEP-4 : G0SUB7 : DRAW" BM=T ; , 8 8 C4 
R16D16L16U16" : SCREEN1 , 1 : NEXT 

18 F0RT=1T016 : H=17-T:GOSUB7 : DRAW 
"BM7 j3 , 8 8 C 4 R=H ; D 1 6 L=H ; G=T ; U=T ; U 1 6 
U=T; F=T ; " : SCREEN1 , 1 : NEXTT : F0RT=1 
T016 : G0SUB7 : H=17 -T : DRAW" BM5 4 , 7 2C 
4D=H ; D3 2U3 2U=H ; R=T ; F16L=T ; D=H ; Gl 
6 " : SCREEN1 , 1 : NEXTT : PLAY" V3 1L9 9 " : 
FORT=0TO7 : PLAY" V-03 FED" : NEXTT 

19 FORT=j3T05 : PLAY"V-p2DEC" : NEXTT 
: FORT=j3T07 : PLAY"V-01GFE" : NEXTT :R 
UN24 

2J3 Z=Z+1 

2 1 IFZ=1THENPM0DE2 , 1 : PCLS 

22 I F Z = 2 THENPMO DE 2 , 3 : PCLS J Z=j3 

23 RETURN 

24 F0RT=1T062 STEP2 : G0SUB2 J3 : DRAW" 
BM=T; , =T ; S=T;R2LF2BR2H2FRHF2BR2H 
2 RLFRLFRBF2 BL7 RLFRLFRBR2 H2 RF2BR2 
H2RFD" : SCREEN1 , 1 : NEXTT : PLAY"L7 7 A 
CEDCEDCEDCP2 " : PCLS 1 : RUN 



★ ★★★*★ SELECTED SOFTWARE ★★★★★* 



SOLDERLESS UPGRADE KITS 

With easy-to-follow instructions 



64K FOR E BOARD 
64K FOR F BOARD 
64K FOR C0C02' (ALL MODELS) 

'All Korean models require one solder joint. 



$39.95 
$29.95 
$29.95 



NOTE: All ICs used in our kits are first quality 750 HS 
prime chips and carry one full year warranty 



BASIC ROMs DISASSEMBLY 



COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED 
ALL 3 BOOKS 

ULTRA 80C DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 
BUG OUT & THE ORACLE (M.L. Monitor) 
ALL 5 ITEMS 

500 POKES, PEEKS, 'N EXECS 
UTILITY ROUTINE (VOLUME 1) 
WITH ROUTINES ON TAPE OR DISK 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 
ALL 9 ITEMS 



$17.95 
$17.95 
$17.95 

ONLY $39.95 
$29.95 
$14.95 

ONLY $59.95 
$16.95 
$19.95 
$36.95 
(TEPCO) $16.95 
ONLY $119.95 



COCO MAX tape only $64.95 

COCO MAX II disk only $74.95 

Y-BRANCHING CABLE $27.95 

DS-69A DIGISECTOR & C-SEE III SOFTWARE $149.95 

HJL-57 KEYBOARD $69.95 

VOLKS MODEM $54.95 

THE INTRONICS EPROM Programmer 

Program Up to 64 K Eprom $139.95 

DATARASE (Eprom Eraser) $39.95 

2764 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $5.95 

27128 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $7.95 

ROM PACK P.C. BOARD 

with case for 27xx $9.95 

TEAC 55B DS/DD Half Height Drive . $109.95 



WIZARD'S CASTLE 

64K Graphic Adventure 
By Spectral Associates 
Disk only $19.95 



CASE AND POWER SUPPLY 

NEW J & M DISK CONTROLLER 

with J Dos 1.2 * 

DISKETTE CAROUSEL 

ZENITH 2VM-123 GREEN 

ZENITH ZVM-122 AMBER 

VIDEO PLUS 

VIDEO PLUS IIC 

VIDEO PLUS IIU 

REAL TALKER I 

With 3 talking games 

REAL TALKER II 

With 3 talking games 

NUMBER JACK THE HJL Numeric Key Pad 



Top 5 Spectral Associates 
games in one package: 
Galagon, Lancer, Cubtx, 
Frogyie & Lunar Rover Patrol 
tor only $34.95 tape or disk 



$49.00 



$129.00 
. $24.95 
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$109.00 
. $24.95 
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$49.95 

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$79.95 



Take a closer look. . . 












TAPE 


DISK 




TAPE 


DISK 


DYNACALC 




$74.95 


P51 MUSTANG 


$23.95 


$27.85 


PROCOLOR FILE 20 




$49.95 


SAILOR MAN (64K) 


$23.95 


$27.95 


MASTER DESIGN 




$29.95 


WORLDS OF FLIGHT 


$23.95 


$26.35 


TELEWRITER 64 


$39.95 


$49.95 


DRAGON SLAYER 




$23.65 


SUPER SCREEN MACHINE 


$35.95 


$38.95 


SR-71 


$23.15 


$24.75 


RAINBOW SCREEN MACHINE 


$23.95 


$26.95 


BUZZARD BAIT 


$19.95 


$22.95 


PEN PAL 




$64.95 


GALAGON 


$16.95 


$18.85 


AUTOTERM 


$31.95 


$39.95 


LUNAR ROVER PATROL 


$16.95 


$18.85 


ADOS 




$27.95 


MS GOBBLER 


$16.95 


$18.85 


SUPER BACKUP UTILITY 




$44.95 


LANCER 


$16.85 


$18.85 


THE PEEPER WITH SOURCE 


$24.95 


$26.95 


CUBIX 


$18.95 


$18.85 


GRAPHICOM 




$19.95 


FROGGIE 


$16.95 


$18.95 


BEST OF COCO TIME 85 


$26.95 


$26.95 


SPACE PAC (10 M.L. GAMES) 


$21.95 


$21.95 


UTILITIES BONANZA 




$29.95 


EDUCATIONAL PAC (6 PROGRAMS) 


$19.95 


$19.95 


DISK UTILITIES 2.1A 




$24.95 


ADVENTURE PAC (5 GAMES) 


$19.95 


$18.85 


TELEPATCH II 




$19.95 


TREASURY PAC (30 GAMES) 


$29.95 


$28.95 



WE PAY SHIPPING in the United States, Canada & Mexico. 
Overseas please add 10%. (MN Residents add 6% sales tax.) 
We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or money order. U.S. 
funds only for foreign orders. C.O.D. please add $2.00. 
(USA only). 



to: SELECTED SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 32228, Fridley, MN 55432 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 612-757-2439 
INFORMATION 612-757-1026 (8 A.M. - 5 P.M. C.S.T.) 
SAME DAY SHIPPING BEFORE 1 P.M. C.S.T. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 55 



VP 



EARS 



TM 



Audio 

Recognition 

System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

• HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 







t 



cs*- 0 ' 



Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming, imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 




~ & <»Sfc- W 




cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 




VISA 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'//* 



Speech Sy$t 



ems 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V4% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 
(312)879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 



EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



TM 9|c 




HIGH INTELLIGIBILITY SPEECH IS HERE 

EARS is far moFffthan a speech recognition system that enables your comfkiter to listen to you. EARS 
and the EARS SPEECH LIBRARY§>ring fiigh quality'^eeeh to the Color Computer. EARS doesn't sound 
like a "computer" or "robot|"*1t sounds like real people. It sounds natural since we use real people to 
create the* speech. -y f J 

MALE %pd CHILDREN'S VOICES COMING 
SOON. Trfe technique we use is independent 
of the speaker. A male announcer is presently J# 
used, ferrlale and young people's vojces cogp* 



HERE'S HOW IT'S DONE. Speech Systems has | 
invested nearly $10,000 in special audio digitiz- ( « 
ing and speech compression equipment. Eg.cn 
phrase is spoken by a human announcer dig- ■« 
itized and then compr6ssee( ? so very little merrf-j 
ory is used, typically. jess than 400 bytes pe^rf 
word. For those familiar with the Texas InstriiV 
ments "SPEAK and SfELi" line of education^ 
toys, you are aware of the results. For those | 
wishing a demonstration , "cal I (312) 879-6844. 




» mg soon. a 



■ 




GENERAL % 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 




noW ARENT 

vooc 1An 
vou own 

GENERAL 2 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 




THE LIBRARY. Each group of the library con- 
tains words designed for a particular applica- 
tion. The SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY contains 
phrases designed for process or home control, 
The EDUCATIONAL LIBRARY has those words 
to heljb ensure keeping a child's attention. 
Words may be put together to form sentences 
and easily produced from BASIC, so you can 
write you r own programs with incredible 
speech quality. 



Alphabet/Numbers 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



AGAIN 
ALL 
AND 
AT 
BUY 
CALL 
CASE 
CENT 
CLEAR 
CLOSE 
COMPUTER 
CONNECT 
DAY 
DIAL 
DOLLAR 
DOWN 
DOOR 
EAST 
END 
ENTER 
FAST 
FASTER 
FIFTH 
FIRST 

2 disks 



GET * 



OUT 
PASS 
fENNYf 
PLEASEf 
QUARTER 

\ Ready 




LEFf^ % %: 



IE* 



LE 



RIGHT 
SECOND 
ELECT 
END 



0 



» MULTIRuy % ;STOPj 
\NEAR y «-*c*itn* 

IEED 



- - 

THE 
TIME 




ADD 
ASK 

ASSISTANCE 

AUTO 

BUT 

COCO 

COMPLETE 

CONTINUE 

COPY 

CORRECT 

COST 

DATE 

DECREASE 

DEPOSIT 

DIME 

DIVIDE 

DRIVE 

ENTRY 

EXIT 

FLOOR 

FORWARD 

FROM 

GOING 

GREAT 



HELLO 

HELP 

HERE 

HOLD 

INCORRECT 

INCREASE 

JUST 

KEY 

LESS 

LESSER 

LIGHT 

LOWER 

LOWEST 

MONEY 

MOVE 

NEAR 

NEED 

NEXT 

NOT 

NOTICE 

ONWARD 

OPEN 

OR 

OVER 



PRESS 
PLACE 
PLAY 
POINT 
QUICK 
RADIO 
RECEIVE 
RECORD 
REPLACE 
REVERSE 
ROOM 
SERVICE 
SIDE 
SLOW 
SLOWER 
SPACE 
STATION 
THANKYOU 
THIS 
TOTAL 
TRY 
TURN 
USE 
YOUR 



v.". - . 



two; 

THRfiE 
FOUR 
FIVE 
SIX 

SEVEN 
EIGHT 
NINE 
TEN 

.ELEVEN 

THIRTEEN 
FOURTEEN 
BFfEER, 
1 SIXTEEN 

SEVENTEEN 
EIGHTEEN 
NINETEEN 
TWENTY 
THIRTY 
FORTY 





FIFTY W 

SIXTY,* 
SEVENTY 
EIGHTY 

NINETY v 
HLfNDRE 



2 disks $19.95 




ALPHA 
BRAVO 
CHARLIE 
DELTA 
ECHO 
FOXTROT 
GOLF 
HOTEL 
INDIA 

LFMA 
MIKE 

N-QVEMBER 
OSCAR 
PAPA 
QUEBEC 
ROMEO 
SIERRA 
TANGO 
UNIFORM 
VICTOR 
WHISKEY 
X-RAY 
YANKEE 
ZULU 
MILLION 



SCIENTIFH 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



ABORT 

ADJUST 

ALARM 

AMPERE 

ATTENTION 

BRAKE 

BUTTON 

CANCEL 

CAUTION 

CENTIGRADE 

CHANGE 

CHECK 

CONTROL 

CURRENT 

DANGER 

DEGREE 

DISK 

EMERGENCY 

EQUAL 

ERROR 

EVACUATE 

FAHRENHEIT 

FAIL 

FAILURE 



FIRE MICRO 
FREQUENCY MILE 



FEET 

FLOW 

FORCE 

FUEL 

GALLON 

GAS 

GRAM 

HERTZ 

HIGH 

HIGHER 

INCHES 

INTRUDER 

KILO 

LIMIT 

LOAD 

LOCK 

LOW 

MEASURE 

MARK 

MEG 

MEGA 

METER 



« % 

ft 



MILL! 

MINUS 
MINUTE- 
NORMAL 

OPERATOR 
PER * 

PERCENT* 
PHASE 

POUND 
PRESSURE 
PULSE! 
RANG^ 
SAFE £ 
SMOKE 
SPEECH 
SWITCH 
SYSTEM 
TEMPERATURE 
TEST 
VOLT 
WARNING 
WEIGHT 



1 



§ 

RAFTER 
AM IE, 
* ANSWER 
AROUND 
AREA v 
AWAY * \ 
BEFORE 
BOB . 
BOX 
BOY 
CAN 
CAT 
CHAIR 
<$IRIS 



EDUCATIONAL 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY « 

IJ RACTljO N v X **PU T 

' question 



GOOD* <*C RICHARD 



1 



HILL 
HORSE 



DAY 1 ** * £ 
.DECIMAL 
DESK 

DIFFERENCE 

DO 

DOG 

DRINK 

FALL 

FIND 



jDrrl 
MORA 
LIKE 
LINDA 
LISA 
MAKE 
MEAGAN 
MEASURE 
MISSING 
MODIFY 
NAME 
NIGHT 
NOUN 
PEOPLE 
PERIOD 
PHRASE 
PRODUCT 



SAY 

SENTENCE 
^SINK 

SIT 
1 SIGN 
4 SOLVE 

SPELL 

SQUAREX 
SPRING 
SUBTRACT 
SUMMER 
TABLE 
TAKE 
TEACHER 
TIM 
,TOM 
UNDER 
VERB 
WOULD 
WINTER 



THOUSAND 
ZEfO 

'2diskl I $ 19 - 95 

CUSTOM 

EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 

For those needing a custom vocabulary, 
Speech ; Systems offers customized speech li- 
braries at the rate of $15 per phrase (5 seconds 
max.), 10 phrases minimum order. Provide an 
iudio cassette tape with phrases or use our 

Minimum $150.00 




2 disks $19.95 2 disks $19.95 



*EARS and Disk system required. 

tCustom Library not part of introductory offer. 



SYMPHONY 

A 12 VOICE POLYPHONIC STEREO MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 





NEW! 
61 NOTE 
KEYBOARD] 

• 12 SIMULTANEOUS 
VOICES 

• STEREO & MONO 

• 4 NOISE 
GENERATORS 

• SOUND EFFECTS 

• PLAYS AND MAKES 
MUSICA 2 FILES 



SUPER POLYPHONIC. Speech Systems is 
proud to bring you SYMPHONY 12, a poly- 
phonic 12 voice hardware stereo music synthe- 
sizer for the Color Computer. SYMPHONY 12 
also gives you 4 noise generators for percus- 
sion synthesis and sound effects. The PIANO 
KEYBOARD and MUSICA 2 (sold separately) 
turns your COCO into a real music machine 
with incredible flexibility. 

STEREO and MONO. By connecting SYM- 
PHONY 12 to your home stereo system, music 
is produced in stereo, 6 voices from each chan- 
nel. However, you don't need to have a stereo 
system, all 12 voices also come out of your TV 
or monitor. 

PICK AN INSTRUMENT. SYMPHONY 12 lets 
you choose from 10 preset instruments to syn- 
thesize chimes, violin, oboe, banjo, 
harpsichord, piano and more. You can even 
change instruments as the music plays. 

SOUND EFFECTS. SYMPHONY 12 is a sophisti- 
cated sound generator. 12 voices and 4 noise 
generators give you incredible sound effect 
capability. We have included gun shot, explo- 
sion, racing car and more. 





? f ? , JJFJL J t J ? ? 

r rr I r V f i i: i i 
ii i i r.r j r t t i i 
i it: # f lit 






i 



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■^Zj^- srtn&Fi , sti®pyr i 

■'••5 "iJ •!> 




WATCH IT PLAY. As SYMPHONY 12 plays, a 
graphics display of a piano keyboard shows 
the notes playing. The display is entertaining 
as well as very educational. 

PLAY MUSICA 2 FILES. Thousands of MUSICA 
2 users will be excited to know SYMPHONY 
12 plays all music developed using MUSICA 2 
like you have never Seen or Heard it. In fact 
we highly recommend the use of MUSICA 2 
as a composition development tool for SYM- 
PHONY 12. Use MUSICA 2's superior graphics 
input capability and then play it through SYM- 
PHONY 12. You can also take advantage of 
our MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) 
to give you access to over 500 music pieces 
representing 20 hours of music. 

ULTIMATE MUSIC DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM. 
SYMPHONY 12, MUSICA 2, and the PIANO 
KEYBOARD give you incredible flexibility. Im- 
agine sitting down at the PIANO KEYBOARD, 
playing a piece and recording it as you play 
just as you would to a tape recorder. Save your 
masterpiece and then using MUSICA 2 edit it 
if you like and print it. If you have a MIDI 
synthesizer, you can take the music and play 
it using COCO MIDI (sold separately). Try that 
on an IBM, APPLE, or COMMODORE (good 
luck). 



PIANO KEYBOARD. For those wishing to turn 
SYMPHONY 12 into a real polyphonic synthe- 
sizer we offer the extremely powerful and ver- 
satile PIANO KEYBOARD. The PIANO 
KEYBOARD was deisgned to be used in our 
entire music product line. You can use it with 
SYMPHONEY 12, MUSICA 2, SYNTHER 77 
PLUS, and even our advanced speech synthe- 
sizer, SUPER VOICE. 

When using MUSICA 2, you will be using 4 of 
the 12 voices available from SYMPHONY 12. 
To take advantage of the full 12 voice capability 
of SYMPHONY 12 you may use either the 
Color Computer's keyboard or the PIANO 
KEYBOARD. 

Y-CABLE or MULTI-PAK. Tape users using both 
SYMPHONY 12 and the PIANO KEYBOARD 
will require a Y-CABLE. Disk users will require 
the Triple Y-Cable or MULTI-PAK. 

SYMPHONY 12. You get over a dozen music 
and sound effect selections and complete 
documentation. Software is shipped on Tape 
or Disk. 

SYMPHONY 12 $79.95 

SYMPHONY 12 (with Keyboard order) . $59.95 
OPTIONS 

MUSIC LIBRARY (each volume) $29.95 

MUSICA 2 $29.95 

PIANO KEYBOARD (61 note) $129.95 



FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



-//' 



Speech. Si 



it 



ems 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge , $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V4% sales tax 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 
(312)879-6811 (24HRS. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 



ft COCO MIDI SEQUENCER/EDITOR <7 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, 
it doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from 

• Supports up to 16 tracks. 



our entry level MUSICA 2 COCO MIDI system that plays 
MUSICA files or our Professional COCO MIDI SYSTEM. 



2,000 events per track. 

4,000 events all tracks. 

May be used as a 
sequencer. 

User friendly graphics 
display. 

Menu driven. 

Metronome available. 

Real time recording. 

Save your masterpiece to 
disk. 

Tempo may be modified. 
Quantizing to 32nd or 64th. 



to > > • > i i i i i < . A 




Playback any or all tracks at any tempo. 

Tracks may be deleted, copied, transposed or mixed. 

Filter out unwanted channel or type of MIDI data. 

Simple music editing. 

Requires 64K disk system. 

Transposition. 



Comes complete with Rom Pak 
Hardware interface, cables, 
manual, and software. Disk 
users require Y-Cable or Multi- 
Pak $149.95 

Now under development, 
voicing patch libraries for the 
Casio CZ series of synthesizers. 

CZ-101 USERS! 

We offer the CZ-101 CONNEC- 
TION and the 61 NOTE PIANO 
KEYBOARD to turn the 101 into 
a professional full size synthe- 
sizer. 

CZ-101 CONNNECTION . $29.95 
61 NOTE KEYBOARD . $129.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



COCO MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it 
through your music synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes 
from our MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create 
your own music using the best music composition program 
available, MUSICA 2 (sold separately). 



COCO MIDI includes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthe- 
sizer $39.95 Tape or Disk 



MUSIC LIBRARY 



TM 



The MUSIC LIBRARY series consists of 8 volumes: 100 
through 800 each sold separately. Each contains over 100 four 
voice music selections with a playing time of over 3 hours 
each. The disk version is shipped on 5 full disks. When 
coupled with the STEREO PAK, the music is reproduced with 
unsurpassed realism. 

A JUKEBOX program is included to allow you to select specific 
songs or automatically play each. These songs are ready to 
go, you don't need MUSICA 2 or a knowledge of music. 
MUSICA 2 users may customize each song. Each volume sold 
separately, specify tape or disk $29.95 Tape or Disk 



MUSIC LIBRARY 100 
Stage, Screen, & TV 
Music of the70's 
Music of the60's 
Music of theSO's 
Old Time Favorites 
MUSIC LIBRARY 200 (anothe 
MUSIC LIBRARY 300 (anothe 
MUSIC LIBRARY 400 (anothe 
MUSIC LIBRARY 500 (anothe 
MUSIC LIBRARY 600 (anothe 
MUSIC LIBRARY 700 (anothe 
MUSIC LIBRARY 800 (anothe 



Classical 

Christmas (popular) 
Christmas (traditional) 
Patriotic 
Polka Party 
r 100 selections) 
r 100 selections) 
r 100 selections) 
r 100 selections) 
r 100 selections) 
r 100 selections) 
r 100 selections) 



Entire Library 
30 Hours of 
Music! 

40 disks 

or 
25 tapes 



SYNTHER 77 PLUS 



You control vibrato pattern, Bender rate, Volume level as 
well as Attack, Decay, Sustain, and Release (ADSR envelope). 
As you play you can record, then edit and save it to disk or 
tape. You can even fine tune it to match other instruments. 



The PIANO KEYBOARD is not necessary, you can use your 
COCO keyboard but the PIANO KEYBOARD makes your 
COCO a real music instrument $29.95 Disk only 



STEREO PAK 



TM 



Plug this gem into your computer, connect to your home stereo 
system and sit back and enjoy music realism. The STEREO PAK 
is a hardware music synthesizer that plays our MUSIC LIBRARY 
series and MUSICA 2 music in stereo. Because it was designed 
specifically with music reproduction in mind, the sound is 
superb. The highs are crisp and clear while the bass notes will 
rattle your walls. Internally we use two high performance 8 bit 
digital to analog converters to assure fidelity. 

The STEREO PAK is all hardware. It is intended as an enhance- 
ment for MUSICA 2 and our MUSIC LIBRARY series. Disk users 
will require our Y-CABLE or a MULTI-PAK $39.95 




^61 NOTE PIANO KEYBOARD 




Our new 61 note (5 octave) full size keyboard is perfect for the 
beginner or professional. To give the PIANO KEYBOARD the most 
flexibility, we give you a choice of 5 different products to use: 
SYMPHONY 12, MUSICA 2, SYNTHER 77 PLUS, SUPER VOICE, and 
the CZ-101 CONNECTION* 



The PIANO KEYBOARD and SYM- 
PHONY 12 turns the COCO into a 12 
voice music synthesizer. When used 
with MUSICA 2, the PIANO KEYBOARD 
provides a user-friendly means of input- 
ting music. For those wishing control 
over Vibrato, Volume, Bender, as well 
as Attach, Decay, Sustain, and Release 
(ADSR), we offer SYNTHER 77 PLUS, 
a monophonic synthesizer. SUPER 
VOICE, COCO's most advanced speech 
synthesizer, doubles as a music synthesizer when used with the 
PIANO KEYBOARD. For those with the Casio CZ-101 music synthe- 
sizer, the CZ-101 CONNECTION allows you to connect the "full 
size" PIANO KEYBOARD to give you standard keyboard. 

61 NOTE PIANO KEYBOARD v . $129.95 

CZ-101 CONNECTION $ 29.95 



MUSICA 





• When in stereo mode, music is 
played through our STEREO PAK 
(purchased separately). 

• Loudness of each voice may be 
individually specified. 

• Memory available is constantly 
displayed. 

• Voice waveshapes may be 
exchanged between voices at any 
point. 

• Tempo may be specified and may 
even be altered as the music plays. 

• Flats and sharps supported. 

• Billions of timbre combinations. 

• High resolution graphic display, 
looks just like sheet music. 



• MUSICA 2 is 100% software, no need for 
hardware unless you want music produced in 
STEREO. In that case, the STEREO PAK may be 
purchased separately. It's a must for the 
audiophile! 

• Repeat bars allow repeating of music without 
re-inserting music a second or third time. 

• 30 page manual describes all. 

• Requires 64K. 



mu:ich n s. 4 

1 9197445060 2 75 98750000 
3 3:95577000 4 9s9544320| 



!04S=HEMQRY 



Output music to your printer 
(Gemini 10X, Epson, R.S. printers), 




$29.95 




■f WWW 



Tape or Disk 



• Allows you to specify key signature. 

• Voice timbre (waveshape) may be 
altered by specifying harmonic 
content just like stops on an organ. 

• During editing, voice being inserted 
is displayed. 

• Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading of music, 

• Measure bars aid in reading and 
developing music. 

• Each voice may be visually 
highlighted for easy identification. 

• 4 Voices produced simultaneously. 

• Input notes from Coco keyboard, 
joystick, or Piano Keyboard. 



• Play music from your own BASIC program. 

• Block copy music for easy music development. 

• 100% machine language so it is lightning fast. 

• Vibrato effect easily produced. 

• With STEREO PAK, voices may be switched 
between left and right speakers as music plays. 

• Durations include: whole, half, quarter, 
eighth, sixteenth, thirty-second, sixty-fourth, 
and triplet. 



a MUSIC THEORY <7 



COURSE 1 

This course covers all the basics from music notation & duration, 
key signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the keyboard. This is 
an entry level course recommended as a prerequisite for Course 
2. 32K Disk only $49.95 



COURSE 2 



A more advanced cou rse that deals with : Major and Harmonic Minor 
scales, interval spelling, Triad (Chord) theory, Inversions, Dominant 
7th chords, and ear training of the intervals. 32K Disk only . $49.95 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 

WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 




#9? 



i*5 XX 



_ ■. 




SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






SUPER VOICE 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Oevice 


SSI-263 


SC-01 


SP-256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 




1 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 


mi- 


i 


1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


8 


1 


1 


1 


Vocal Tract 
Filter Settings 


255 


1 


1 


1 


Basic unit 
of Speech 


64 phonemes 
4 durations each 


64 phonemes 


64 aliophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 


4096 (32 absolute levels 
with B inflection speeds) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 

Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. 
Until Sept. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 




32K 
Disk 



the 

mwn > 

RAINBOW 
J.. -.V 



If you have problem tenants and 
they've gotten out of hand, you need 
to call . . . 



The Evictor 



By Paul Jensen 



When the landlords can't get 
non-paying (or other) tenants 
out of the building they call 
you . . . the Evictor. 

Your job is to push the tenants out the 
building's windows. (No more Mr. Nice 
Guy!) To do this, you (the white block) 
move the joystick left and right to push 
the tenants (which are blue) off the floor 
they are on. For every floor they fall, 
you get 50 points. However, these 
tenants have no wish to leave their 
homes, so they get out the old mega- 
laser-ray-cannon rifles (which, remark- 
ably, only kill evictors) and shoot 
everywhere, hoping to get you. 

These tenants know they are no 
match for you, therefore, they try to 
escape by descending to the ground 
floor. If one of the tenants reaches it, he 
unlocks the front door, lets everyone 
else out and you lose the game. 



Paul Jensen lives in Forest, a small town 
in Ontario, Canada. He is 15 years old 
and enjoys playing the guitar and com- 
puter programming. 



Being the disrespectful creatures they 
are, they prefer to descend by burning 
a hole in the floor to get to the one 
below. Whenever this occurs, it costs 
you 25 points, plus the 50 points lost for 
not being able to pitch them out of a 
higher window. 

Needless to say, you prefer to take the 
elevator, which is located in the middle 
of the building. To use it, just walk onto 
it and point the joystick up. or down. 

At the top of the screen, a bonus clock 
ticks away. After you have disposed of 
all 10 tenants, you are given 10 points 
for each bonus point, and are then 
transported to yet another building to 
do some landlord's dirty work. 

When you lose the three evictors, the 
game ends. If your score is in the top 
10, you are asked for your initials. The 
10 best scores (stored in the file 
TOPTEN/EVC) are saved with each 
game. The whole score save routine is 
located at Line 50000 and I would be 
happy if anyone else would like to use 
it with their own games. 

To load the game, just type it in and 
save it on a disk. Then RUN it. It asks 
if your computer can use the speed-up 
POKE. Answer 4 Y' or *N' accordingly. 
Then it asks if you want to initiate the 
TOPTEN/EVC file. If this is the first 
run, answer with YES. This step only has 
to be taken once. What it does is erase 
the high scores on the disk. 

After these two questions are an- 
swered, a title screen appears. Then, 
after a key is pressed, the building shows 
up, and some comments scroll at the 
bottom of the screen. (The graphics in 
Evictor are in SET/ RESET format. I 
wanted to make the game in machine 
language but I haven't yet found a good 
ML random number routine. Does 
anyone know of one?). 

Press a key again. You'll hear a few 
bars of Basin Street Blues, and you're 
off to the races. 

I think this game could be used on a 
cassette system if the high score saving 
function was removed. 

I hope you enjoy Evictor, and may 
you never get zapped by an ornery 
tenant. 

( You may contact the author at Box 
1035, Forest, Ontario, Canada N0N 
1J0, phone 519-873-4173. Please en- 
close an SASE when writing.) □ 



62 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



The listing: EVICTOR 









In 








240 83 








430 116 








650 8 








760 59 1 








980 5 








END 76 I 












************************ 


2 KrjJXL 


* 




* 


O "D 17 TUT 


* 


EVICTOR * 


A "DT?M 

ft KrjJXL 


* 




* 


R "DT7M 
O KrjJXL 


* 


BY PAUL JENSEN * 


6 REM 


* 


FEBRUARY 1986 * 


7 REM 


* 




* 


8 REM 


* 


BASIN STREET * 


9 REM 


* 


BLUES WRITTEN BY * 


10 REM* 


SPENCER WILLIAMS * 


11 REM* 


ARRANGED BY JOHN * 


12 REM* 


EDMONDSON * 


13 REM* 




* 



14 REM************************ 
100 CLEAR1500 

110 CLS: INPUT "CAN YOUR COMPUTER 
HANDLE THE SPEED-UP POKE";A$: 
IF LEFT$(A$,1)="Y" THEN HI=65495 
:LO=65494 ELSE HI=32768 : LO=32768 
1 POKE WHERE IT WON'T HURT ANYT 
HING 

120 INPUT "INITIATE 'TOPTEN/EVC 
FILE? TYPE 'YES' IF YOU WANT TO"; 
A$:IF A$="YES" THEN GOSUB50000 
130 CLS0:ZZ=1:NN$="EVICTOR" 
140 FORT=1030TO1284:POKET-1, 128: 
POKET , 207 : POKET+4 , 128 : POKET+5 , 17 
5:CC=CC+1:IFCC=32 THEN CC=0 : POKE 
T-1,ASC(MID$(NN$,ZZ,1) )AND191:ZZ 
=ZZ+1 
150 NEXT 

160 POKET-1, 128: POKET+4, 128 : PRIN 

T@40,"BY PAUL JENSEN" ;: PRINT@72 , 

" FEBRUARY 1986";: PRINT@ 13 6 , " PRES 

S ANY KEY."; 

170 IFINKEY$=""THEN170 

180 POKEHI,0 

190 D$=STRING$(28,32)+"*** EVICT 
OR *** BY PAUL JENSEN BOX 10 
35 FOREST, ONTARIO, CANADA N0N 
1J0 DEVELOPED IN FEBRUARY OF 1 
986 FOR THE RAINBOW. USE THE RI 
GHT JOYSTICK TO PLAY. PRESS ANY 
KEY TO START GAME . "+STRING$ ( 32 , 3 
2) :L=1058:EL$=STRING$(2,220) 
200 MG(1)=&HCB:MG(2)=&HCF:MG(3)= 
&HC7 :EL=79 : BL$=STRING$ (2 , 128) : LL 



=3 

210 CLS0 

220 CO=0:FORT=66TO482STEP64:PRIN 
T@T, STRING$ (28 , 140) ; : NEXT : PRINTS 
480,STRING$(2,239) ; : POKE1534 , 239 
:POKE1535, 239:FORT=79 TO 482STEP 
64:PRINT@T,STRING$ (2, 128) ; : NEXT : 
PRINT@EL,EL$; :BN=50:IF P1=0 THEN 

GOTO 7 20 
230 FORT=1TO10 

240 D=RND(512)+1023 :IF PEEK(D+32 
)<>140 OR PEEK(D+1)=175 OR PEEK( 
D-l)=175 OR D>=1442 THEN 240 ELS 
E D(T)=D:POKE D,175:NEXT 
250 GOSUB1050 

2 60 TN=TN+1:IF TN=11 THEN TN=1 
270 IF D(TN)=0 THEN 260 

280 POKEL,207 
290 JS=JOYSTK(0) 

300 IF JS<5 THEN DI=-1 ELSE IF J 
S>58 THEN DI=1 ELSE DI=0 
310 POKEL,MG(DI+2) 

320 IF PEEK(L+32+DI)=140 OR PEEK 
(L+32+DI)=&HDC THEN POKEL,128:L= 
L+DI 

330 IF PEEK(L+DI)=175 THEN 660 
340 POKEL,&HCF 

350 IF PEEK(L+32)OSHDC THEN 380 
ELSE JS=JOYSTK(l) 

360 IF JS>58 AND EL<>463 THEN PR 
INT@EL, BL$ ; : POKEL, 128 : L=L+64 : EL= 
EL+64:PRINT@EL,EL$; : POKEL, 207 
370 IF JS<5 AND EL<>79 THEN PRIN 
T@EL,BL$; : POKEL, 128 :EL=EL-64 :L=L 
-64 : PRINT@EL, EL$ ; : POKEL, 207 

3 80 REM 

390 REM *** MOVE TENANTS *** 

400 T=D (TN) 

410 DI=RND(3)-2 

420 IF PEEK(T+32+DI)=128 THEN DI 
=0 

430 POKET, 128 :T=T+DI: POKET, 175 

440 REM *** LANDLORD RAY *** 

450 IF RND(5)<>1 THEN 540 

460 IF RND(2)=1 THEN DI=-1 ELSE 

DI=1 

470 RY=T 

480 RY=RY+DI : IF PEEK(RY)=128 THE 
N P0KERY,188 

490 IF ZP=0 THEN IF RY=L THEN ZP 
=1 ELSE ZP=0 

500 IF PEEK (RY+32) =140 THEN 480 
510 IF PEEK (RY) =188 THEN POKERY, 
128 

520 RY=RY-DI : IF RYOT THEN 510 
530 IF ZP THEN 740 
540 REM *** BURN HOLE IN FLOOR 
550 IF T>=1442 THEN 1060 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 63 



560 IF RND(15)<>1 THEN 610 

570 POKET+32 / 128:POKET / 128:T=T+3 

2 : POKET, 175 : FORDL=1TO100 : NEXTDL : 

POKET, 128 :T=T+32 : POKE T, 175 

580 SC=SC-25:IF SC<0 THEN SC=0 

590 GOSUB730 

600 POKET-32,140 

610 REM 

620 BC=BC+l:IF BC=5 THEN BC=0:BN 

=BN-1: IF BN<0 THEN BN=0 : 

630 PRINT@10,USING"BONUS ###";BN 

• 

640 D(TN)=T 
650 GOTO260 

660 TE=L+DI : FORT=lTO 10: IF D(T)= 
TE THEN 670 ELSE NEXT:GOTO260 
670 POKE TE,128:TE=TE+DI:POKETE, 
175 

680 IF PEEK(TE+32)<>128 THEN D(T 
)=TE:GOTO 2 60 

690 IF PEEK(TE+64)=140 THEN POKE 
TE+32 , 128 : TE=TE+32 : POKETE, 175 : FO 
RDL= 1TO 100 : NEXT DL : POKETE , 1 2 8 : TE= 
TE+32 : POKETE , 175 : D (T) =TE 
700 POKETE ,128: TE=TE+ 3 2 : POKETE , 1 
75:SC=SC+25:GOSUB730:IF PEEK ( TE+ 
32)<>239 THEN 700 ELSE POKETE ,12 
8 : D (T) =0 : SC=SC+25 : GOSUB730 : CO=CO 
+1:IF CO=10 THEN 1040 
710 GOTO260 

720 F0RT=1 TO LEN(D$) -31:PRINT@4 
8 3 , MID$ (D$ , T , 2 6 ) ; : F0RDL=1T015 : IF 
INKEY$="" THEN NEXTDL, T:G0T07 20 
ELSE PRINT@483,STRING$(26,128) ; 
: G0SUB7 3 0 : GOTO 2 3 0 

730 PRINT@483,USING"SCORE ##,### 

LANDLORDS # » ; S C ; LL ; : RETURN 
740 FORDL=1TO50:POKEL,128:POKEL, 
207: NEXT 

750 FORT=1TO10:PRINT§483," **** 
* YOU BURN! ! ***** ";:F0RDL=1T0 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This program accepts your input and then 
produces the integer factors of that number. For 
larger numbers, you might try the speed-up POKE 
(POKE 65495,0). To end the speed-up mode, enter 
POKE 65494,0. 

The listing: 

0 CLS : Z=44539 : INPUT "NUMBER 11 ;A: PR 
INT" YOUR FACTORS : " : F0RB=1T0A : C=A 
/ B : I FC< B THENPRINT 11 HIT<ENTER> " : E 
XECZ : RUNELSEIFCOINT (C) THENNEXTE 
LSEPRINTB ; C ; "/" ; :NEXTELSEPRINT"H 
IT<ENTER>" : EXECZ : RUN 

Chinarut Ruangchotvit 
Ramsley, NJ 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



100:NEXTDL: : PRINT@483 , STRING$ (26 
,128) ; :FORDL=1TO100: NEXTDL: NEXT 
760 ZP=0 

770 LL=LL-1:IF LL>-1 THEN G0SUB7 
30:GOTO260 

780 PRINT@235, "GAME OVER"; 

790 PLAY"V15T3L4CDCL1D# 

800 FORDL=1TO1000: NEXTDL 

810 POKELO,0 

820 FORDL=1TO500: NEXTDL 

830 CLS: PRINT "YOUR SCORE WAS"SC 

840 0PEN"I",#1,"T0PTEN.EVC" 

850 FORT=1TO10: INPUT #1,I$(T),S( 

T) :NEXT:CL0SE#1 

860 FORT=1TO10 : IF S(T)>SC THEN N 
EXT:GOTO960 

870 PRINT"YOUR SCORE PLACES #";T 
880 A$="***" 

890 PRINT "ENTER INITIALS:" 

900 F0RG=1T03 

910 PRINT@340,A$; 

920 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN920 

930 MID$(A$,G,1)=Z$:NEXTG 

940 PRINT@340,A$; 

950 FORF=10TO T STEP-1: 1$ (F) =1$ ( 
F-l) :S(F)=S(F-1) :NEXT:S(T)=SC:I$ 
(T) =A$ 

960 PRINT@480, "PRESS <ENTER> TO 
SEE HI SCORES"; 

970 IFINKEY$OCHR$(13)THEN970 
980 CLS: PRINT" *** BEST SCORES 
TO DATE ***" 
990 PRINT 

1000 FORT=1TO10:PRINTUSING"## % 

% ###,###";T;I$(T) ;S(T) :NEXT:PRI 

NT : PRINT" PRESS <ENTER> » 

1010 IFINKEY$OCHR$(13)THEN1010 

1020 0PEN"0",#1,"T0PTEN.EVC" 

1030 FORT=1TO10:WRITE#1,I$(T) ,S( 

T) :NEXT:CLOSE#1:RUN190 

1040 FORF=BN TO 0STEP-1 : SC=SC+10 

:PRINT@10,USING"BONUS ###";F; :G0 

SUB730 : PLAY"T50CEG" : NEXTF : Pl=l : L 
=1058 : EL=79 : G0T02 10 
1050 PLAY"02T4L8.FL16FL8.DL16DL4 
E-L8EL4 . FP2P4L4FL8 . B-L16B-L8 . A-L 
16GL8FL4 . GP2P4L4FL4 . B-L8B-L4A-A- 
GL8GL8G-L2G-P8L8B-L8 . A-L16GL8 .FL 
16DL8E-L16EL8FL4D-L4.0-B-0+P4":R 
ETURN 

1060 PLAY"V31" : FORS=1TO10 : POKED ( 
S) , 128 :PLAY"T10CE-GV-V-V-" :NEXTS 
:GOTO780 

50000 REM ***** INITIATE FILE ** 
*** 

50010 PRINT "INITIATING TOPTEN/EV 
C. . .":0PEN"0",#1,"T0PTEN.EVC":F0 
RT=1TO10 : WRITE # 1 , " * * * 11 , 0 : NEXT : CL 
0SE#1: RETURN 



64 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



i-rhe most em » had 



CoCo Ma* 
• -;redioie 



most 
ever 



No 



marketeer t . 

review 9 a " any product a ro 
'never gwen a ™£ are 's CoCo 

IMax (Harare, © 



and 
#6 



presentable picture vZ** 0 a i 
hours just donriii„« * V e s Pent 

experience. Buy it, you WOfVt 
,1986 — — m 



fhe art enSrSS I Sta > of 
° n much mom 222 yo . u f, 'nd 
/machines CnW pen * ,v « 
/ '"vestedlhe & a / e h ™ 
search hat wrt ° f !! me a ™ 
■*s success, and K fy secures 

the pack is wen consti uctea, I 
the user's manual is complete I 
i with illustrations and well I 
organized. An outstanding buy 
tor the performance. 
Colorware's advertisement 
I accurately describes the I 
product. Their delivery was 
timely as promised. 
■Rainbow June jgj^^ 



These were reviews of CoCo Max I. 
CoCo Max II will blow your socks off 

with even more power ! 



New bidirectional shrink and stretch 
New rotate function 
9 new fonts (for over 200 typestyles) 
A new "Glyphic font" of small pictures 
A 68 page scrapbook 



Point and click to load files (no typing) 
Full error reporting, crash proof 
Custom patterns can be saved 
Printing in color (with CGP 1 15 or 220) 

MUCh more. (Note: CoCo Max II Is available on disk only) 



The reviews are nice, but see it for yourself* and drawyourown conclusion. 

•If you are not delighted with your CoCo Max II, we will Immediately refund your purchase, Including postage beck. 



COLORWARE 



CallToll Free 800-221-0916. 



For mora information on 
CoCo Max, turn tha paga. 



You'll use it all the time and love using it 



WhatisCoCo Max? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




CoCo Max disk system, with Y-cable. 



Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
puli down menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 
The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 





Pull down menus 



IJIMBMXifi*.-. 
■■■■I *s«|KHZvU 



Zoom in I 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fat bits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color, imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 1 5, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




Inside the Hl-Res Input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
1 0% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
491 52 points! (256x1 92). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge), inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi-Res Pack. 

Electronic Typesetting... 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 14 built in fonts each with 16 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles I 




' Examples of printouts 



Printing Your Creations 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80), 





»nl \ IMS 



Jettison Report 

fuit unth the tig Scoopi 



Z5« 



no mfljoa n Ews today 

Reporters Desperate 

'Tfc.y iItiti iit Ko no»i 
11 good ntTj but h.ck 1 1 
-.ouii ic» sr let if iaeo- 
thing 4ooin'i h.ppon quick*' 
R.ecrlor E.rl SchBidl 11 > 
bcro4 <n<i unh.fpT »»n 
'I f »»llr ten i c»r» Ton iot 
itmli XDtslag o.ir novp.r.i 
(round hire * iitj Scheldt 
Schmdi • Jl yeer alt) native 
o( lilt cur bu of ion COBI 
in 1e the nevio.p.r office 
»ittoui • Isnglc nor/ But 
Ihn voek if different t c - 
cording to Jehsidi.Tve con- 

ltdered COBBItUflg * crtae 

BYiitf m»i 10 brook in. 
icifcuni tui I cia< think 
of .evicting navivorthy <hti 
»oul4ii i |ii at in trouble 
Unor Tib Jtnuon «ao*» 
litili >y Be.'ny tor fl>. un- 
tuck? crov "Voen I »•« a 
repcrtor »» mor hid ihil 
protlem 1 ihmk thoio guyi 
«ro th. l.ncst bunch of oubi 
I v, kyr .».« ■ n.ior lomion 




Why Li thii lidg Smiling? 

Ion Schv.ru or 117 [ 6th Si 
voi inferred &ondoy 'hot 
lfe< hoi *cr. ttO id the tkc?5 
Svoopnokti Sot page 




Lift in thi fait lam not all 
it's cracked up to be 

So Yen think ydu vor.t to 
ec nits locae gloffiiroui field 
Like Tclovirton or tfrvrpaperr 
You think you tec would 
lita to bring m tht tit bucks 
ond run ncici vi'li the- :eteb- 
rttier 1 Vol] farg.i li Running 
> n.. ijofer lounli liko fur. 
I knov but before you go off 
half* :c*ked and s'art your 
avn pa; or or t uv i 7 V 
notion lit'on to 'ko voice of 
rtlloh 

I! i»k*s • lot of ctor.ry to 
run o net'ipaper tor example 
farting even o ctLon peper 
'■outJ :ott cvar JI1 SCO Boor 



o 



Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 



COCO M»X 



coco Mom 

COCO HON 



CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 

CoCo Max 



CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



CoCo flax 
CoCo Mux 

CoCo /*tax 
CoCo Max 



mm 

fee© mm 



Over 200 typestyfes to 
choose from! 

generate flyers. 





Q\ Fun for children while 
^3 stimulating creativity. 




A new way to express 
your Imagination. 



The whole family will enjoy 
CoCo Max. Here are a few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80). 




Pulley 



String 




II! 'llllllllllllMllll 'CI 



Table 



TIMER 



SPRING 
BALANCE 



PUUCY 



Business graphs, charts, 
diagrams. Also memos 





Junior's homework 
and science projects. 
Term papers too I 



0 



Video portrait 

(with optional digitizer), 




this is 
a cartoon 





© This Is a cartoon. 

CoCofkOLlL 




© 



schematics 
and floor plans. 



CoCo Max II 

^jj) Logos and letterheads. 



System Requirements: 

Any 64K CoCo and a standard joystick or 
mouse. (The koala pad and the track ball work, 
but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a Multi-Pak or our Y-Cable. 
CoCo Max is compatible with any Radio Shack 
DOS and ADOS, 

Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes 
almost all the features of CoCo Max I! except 
Shrink, Stretch, Rotate, and GfyphJcs. Also, it 
has 5 fonts instead of 1 4. 
CoCo Max is not compatible with JDOS, 
DoubleDOS, MDOS, OS-9, the X-pad, and 
Daisy Wheel Printers. 

Printers Supported: 

Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronix, Delta 1 0, 1 0X, 1 5, 1 5X, SG- 
10,Okidata 82A, 92, 93, C. Itoh Pro-writer, 
Apple Image-writer, Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet, 
Radio Shack DMP 100, 105, 110, 120,200, 
400, 500, Line Printer 7, Line Printer 8, TRP- 
100, CGP-220. (DMP-130 use Line Printer 8), 
PMC printers, Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 1 5 



CoCo Max on tape .... . * . , $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max I! (disk only) ♦ .. ,,,$79,95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade; CoCo Max to CoCo Max I! 

New disk and manual , . $1 9.95 

New features of CoCo Max 1 1: 14 fonts and glyphic 
font, dynamic shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive 
capability, 68 page scrapbook, point and click file 
load, color printer drivers, full error reporting. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to disk 

manuals, disk and binder , , . „, . r , , $24.95 

Y-Cable: Spec/a/ Price. . . . $1 9.95 

Super Picture Disks #1 , #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks $29.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with It, 
we will refund every penny* 



Font Editor Option 

A font is a set of characters of a 
particular style. CoCo Max includes 
1 5 fonts. You can create new fonts of 
letters, or even symbols or graphics 
with the font editor. Examples: set of 
symbols for electronics, foreign 
alphabets, etc — ^ $1 9.95 

Video Digitizer DS-69 

This new Low Cost Digitizer is the 
next step in sophistication for your 
CoCo Max system. With the DS-69 
you will be able to digitize and bring 
into CoCo Max a frame from any video 
source: VCR, tuner, or video camera. 
Comes complete with detailed 
manual and C-SEE software on disk. 
Multi-Pak is required. 

New Low Price Save $50 $99.95 

New: faster DS-69A. $1 49.95 



Colorware Incorporated 
COLORWARE 79-04 A Jamaica Avenue 

Woodhaven, NY 11421 



800 221-0916 

Orders only. 

NY & info: (718) 296-5916 
Hours: 9-5 Eastern time. 



Add S3. 00 per order for shipping. 
We accept Visa, MC, checks, M.O 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
NY and CT i add sates tax. 
Shipping to Canada is $5.00 
Overseas, FPO, APO add 10% 



it 



VISA 



DISK UTILITY 



By Kerry M. Armstrong 



The CoCo disk controller 
manufactured by Tandy/ 
Radio Shack Corporation 
contains a 24-pin ROM chip in 
which Disk BASIC, a very simple 
disk operating system, resides. 
Better disk operating systems for 
the CoCo have been designed by 
individuals and third party 
vendors. These DOSs can usually 
be customized to utilize such 
things as 40-track and double- 
sided drives, faster step rates, 
additional commands and / or util- 
ities, etc., 

While most of these tasks can be 
accomplished with the use of short 
machine language programs or 
POKEs, they generally must be 
loaded and executed every time 
the computer is turned on or 
Reset, and are often not worth the 
trouble to use. However, if these 
same patches could be placed 
permanently into ROM with the 
DOS, then they would be present 
at every startup of the computer. 
Using an Erasable Programmable 
Read Only Memory, EPROM, 
they can be permanently installed, 
nently installed. 

The pin-for-pin EPROM avail- 
able for the 24-pin DOS socket on 
the disk controller board is the 
68764 or 68766. These cost about 
$40 new and $20 used. (Because 
EPROMs are erasable, they can 
be erased, programmed and used 
many times.) However, there does 
exist a series of EPROMs (2764 
and 27128) that can be utilized. 
They sell new for about $3.50 and 
$4.50, respectively, and can often 
be obtained for about $1.50 used 
The only drawback is that these 



Kerry Armstrong, an assistant 
district attorney, is considered a 
leading authority among Texas 
prosecutors on the creation and 
computerization of worthless 
check systems, and has written 
extensively on the subject. He also 
writes both the newsletter for the 
Fort Worth Color Computer 
Users' Group and CoCo, a 
monthly column on a regional 
videotext service. 



r 




are 28-pin chips and thus are not pin- 
for-pin compatible with the 24-pin 
socket on the disk controller board, 
which means you can't just pluck out 
the old DOS-ROM and stick one of 
these in its place. 

In the February 1985 issue of RAIN- 
BOW, instructions were provided for the 
modification of a 28-pin EPROM and 
a 28-pin chip socket that, when wired 
together, could be plugged directly into 
the 24-pin RS-DOS socket. (See 
"Cooking With CoCo," by Colin J. 
Stearman, Page 146.) This method is an 
effective way to adapt a 2764 EPROM 
to be used in the disk controller, and 
does have the advantage that you may 
always pull the EPROM / ADAPTER 
out of the socket and put the old disk 
back in. 

On the other hand, this method also 
has a couple of distinct disadvantages. 
First, the adapter method requires that 
you do some soldering directly to some 
of the EPROM pins, which could, if 
you're not careful, result in damage to 
the EPROM. Secondly, the adapter 
method does not allow you to take 
advantage of nearly 8K additional 
memory space that is available in the 
DOS area and could be utilized for 
additional DOS commands and/ or in 
ROM utilities. 

The 2764 is an 8K EPROM and 
would occupy memory locations 
&HC000 to &HDFFF, as does Disk 
BASIC. Memory locations &HE000 to 
&HFEFF are wasted space on the 
CoCo (about 8K). This space contains 
a mirror image of Disk BASIC. 

The 27128 is a 16K EPROM and the 
additional memory can be utilized by it. 
However, it will not work properly in 
the adapter because there is no access 
line to the upper 8K of memory in the 
27128. 

In light of this diagnosis, we come to 
the purpose of this treatise, that of 
doing a permanent surgical transplant 
modification on the RS-Disk Con- 
troller so that 2764 and 27128, 28-pin 
EPROMs, may be used, 

(NOTE: Tandy/ Radio Shack has 
marketed three different CoCo disk 
controllers to date. With the manufac- 
ture of the second and third controller 
board, they have left off several of the 
"lands." The third and newest type of 
controller board does not have the 
necessary land to access the upper 8K 
on a 27 128 EPROM. The required land 
is number 37 as indicated in Figure 3.) 

Risk Disclosures 
A good surgeon always warns of the 





possible risKs 
and side effects. 1) 
Same old thing youVe 
heard before: opening any- 
thing made and sealed by Radio 
Shack voids the warranty. 2) Do not 
attempt this surgery unless you have 
some skill at PC board soldering. 3) 
Always use proper CMOS handling 
procedures by properly grounding 
yourself and the PC board. (Which 
means don't get all static-ey on this 
project.) 

The Transplant Surgery 

Let's get down to the business of 
doing a socket transplant on the disk 
controller. We need some wire-wrap 
wire (RS# 278-501) and the all impor- 
tant 28-pin socket. There are three types 
of 28-pin sockets, only one of which will 
do for our project. We don't want the 
wire-wrap type. We want the type that 
has its pins running parallel to the sides 
of the socket. In other words, exactly 
like the pins on the EPROM. 

Once you have obtained these items, 
you need to get your tools together and 
set up the operating room. 

Pre-Op 

Prepare the 28-pin socket for trans- 
planting into the controller by doing the 
following steps, preferably in order: 

1) Prepare a six-inch piece of wire- 
wrap wire by stripping off approxi- 
mately 1 Vi inches of insulation from one 
end 

2) Look at the computer-mating end 
of the disk controller to determine if 
land 37 is missing (type 3 controller 
board). If it is missing, then the proce- 
dure is a little different and is so noted. 

3) Carefully solder the bare part of 
the wire to near the tops of pins 27, 28 
and 1 (and 26 if type 3 board). Start at 
27 (26 on type 3 board) with the wire 
and end at pin 1, so that the remaining 
4 l /i inches of insulated wire run off pin 
1. It helps to wrap the wire around the 
pins before soldering. CAUTION: Do 



not 

apply too 
much heat for 
too long as the socket 
will melt and be unusable. 
(See Figure L) 

4) If you have a controller board with 
a land 37, solder another piece of six- 
inch wire to near the top of pin 26. 

5) Solder one last piece of six-inch 
wire near the top of pin 2. 

6) Finally, if you have the type 3 
board, clip off the excess wire coming 
from pin 1 and clip off pins 27 . 28, 1 and 




2 just below the soldered connections. 
Do not clip off pin 26. 

6a) If you have one of the other two 
boards, do not clip off the wire coming 
from pin 1, but clip pins 26, 27, 28, 1 
and 2 just below the soldered connec- 
tions. 




The Operation 

The 28-pin socket prepared for trans- 
planting, it is time to bring our patient, 
the disk controller, into the operating 

July 1986 THE RAINBOW 69 































1 * 


■ r 28" 


> 






.■<• • 








2 


27 






1 


1 1 


■ 24 






3 


26 


> 






2 


23 






■ 

■ 4 • • ■ ■ 


"25- 






OLD 24* 


3 


22 




-c 


5 


24 






PIN RS- : 


4 


21 


> 




6 


23 


> 




DOS * 


5 


20 


> 




7 


22 






ROM * 


6 


19 






8 


21 


3- 






7 


18 






9 


20 


3- 






8 


17 






10 


19 


> 






9 


16 






11 


18 


> 






10 


15 






12 


17 




NEW 28 PIN 




11 


14 






13 


16 




EPROM 


m 


12 


13 


- . i 




'U- 


" 15' 






m 

• 


' ... 


• ■ 


■ 


■ 

■ 

1 - 

Figure 3 











39 37 

COMPONENT SIDE I I 
OF DISK CONTROLLER 
PC BOARD. (*NOTE 
NOT ALL VERSIONS HAVE 
ALL OF THE LANDS PRESENT) 

Figure 4 



31 9 I-(MISSING) 




room. Prep the patient by carefully 
peeling back the outer skin label, locate 
the joining screw and remove it. Then, 
with consummate surgical skill, spring 
the plastic locking tabs at one end of the 
controller, thus exposing the internal 
organs of your patient. Next, carefully 
pry out the 24-pin DOS-ROM chip and 
set it aside on a piece of conductive 
foam (RS# 276-2400) for safekeeping. 
(After all, that chip is worth at least 
$30.) 

The next step is the most difficult, 
and the biggest test of surgical skills. 
You must desolder and remove the 24- 
pin chip socket. Take a deep breath and 
with soldering iron in one hand and 
solder sucker in the other, begin. Once 
you have done this, the operation is 
halfway over. 

Once the removal process is com- 
pleted, only a few additional prepara- 
tory steps remain before the actual 
transplant phase of the surgery begins. 
You should next execute the following 
surgical procedures. Next, on the con- 
troller board, locate and cut the trace 
that went to pin 18 of the 24-pin socket. 
Make sure you completely cut the trace 
so that there is no remaining contact. 
Locate and cut the trace that went to pin 
21 of the 24-pin socket. Place a small 
piece of electrical tape on the controller 
board across the end of where the old 
socket sat, to provide an extra safe- 
guard of insulation from accidental 
contact with the PC board. If you do 
not have a type 3 board, the tape should 
also cover the hole for pin 24 of the old 
24-pin socket (See Figure 2.) 



ELECTRICAL TAPE 


1 

: U*4 


OLD PIN# 24 


1 1 


^SOCKET HOLE 


I 1 


ON DISK 


■ I 


CONTROLLER 


■ 1 

■ I 


PC BOARD 


■ ■ 




■ 1 




■ 1 




■ I 




■ 1 




Figure 2 



The Transplant 

We now turn to the actual transplant 
of the 28-pin chip socket into the disk 
controller. It is here you demonstrate 
your surgical skills by re-connecting the 
arteries of the PC board that carry the 
date lines to the brains of the disk 



operating system. Perform the follow- 
ing steps. 

1) Insert the 28-pin socket into the 
holes left by the 24-pin socket with the 
rear of the new socket in the same 
position as the old was (pin 14 to 12, 15 
to 13, etc.). (See Figure 3.) 

2) Solder the socket in place being 
careful not to create any solder bridges 
between the pins. 

3) If you have the type 3 board, go 
to step five, otherwise cut the wire 
coming off socket pin 1 to the necessary 
length and solder it near the end of land 
9, (a +5v source). (See Figure 4). 

4) Likewise solder the wire from pin 
26 to land 37. 

5) Solder the wire from pin 2 to land 
31. 

6) On the PC board, solder a jumper 
wire from the solder pad for the trace 
that went to former pin 18 and connect 
it to pin 23 of the 28-pin socket. 

7) Solder a jumper from pin 14 of the 
28-pin socket to pin 20 of the 28-pin 
socket. 

At this point, it would be very helpful 
to have a nurse around to wipe your 
brow. However, as this is a cheap op- 
eration, you'll have to do that yourself. 



Post-Op 

As with every good surgical proce- 
dure, it is necessary to inspect your 
work before closing up. Check your 
patient's internals for lost tools, ban- 
dages, swabs, etc. Be particularly care- 
ful to inspect all solder connections and 
make sure you have no bare wires 
touching where they shouldn't. 

Finally, insert your programmed 28- 
pin EPROM, making sure the notches 
are all orientated the same way, and 
close up the case, installing the screw. 

Physical Therapy 

Now to see if it works. Hook up all 
the cables, plugs, drives, computer, etc. 
Place your finger on the computer's on/ 
off button. Take a deep breath and 
push. If all went well, your DOS sign- 
on message should be displayed. If not, 
shut it down, check the patient for 
insurance and go back to square one. 



(Questions may be directed to Mr. 
Armstrong at 4612 Harwen Terrace, 
Fort Worth, TX 76133. Please enclose 
an SASE when writing.) □ 



70 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



HARDWARE PROJECT 



Build a lap keyboard and you'll have a 



Remote 



Control 



CoCo 



By Marty Goodman 



One of the single most crippling 
aspects of the present day Color 
Computer is the fact that its 
keyboard is physically fixed in the main 
"mother unit" box. 1 prefer to sit back 
in a reclining desk chair while typing. I 
cannot stand being hunched over a 
desk. 

Over the last few years my partner 
and I have designed and built nearly a 
dozen remote Color Computer key- 
board units and cables. We considered 
marketing such an item, but after per- 
fecting a design for one we realized the 
necessary retail cost of such an item 
would be too high for it to succeed in 
the market. Only Tandy, with its in- 
house injection molding capabilities 
and mighty marketing muscle, is able to 
bring such an add-on item to the 
market. But, it has shown no signs of 
interest. 

Making a lap keyboard for your 
CoCo is not hard for a hacker of even 
modest experience and ability. Nor is it 
terribly expensive. Here are some tips 
for those who would embark on such a 
project. Note that these are just tips. 
This is not intended as a "how to" 
article, but as a collection of helpful 
hints for someone who already has a 
good idea how to do the job. 

You will need to run at least 15 lines 
between the CoCo and the keyboard. I 
also suggest running the Reset and 
Ground lines so you can put a remote 
Reset button on the lap keyboard. I also 
send the +5 volt line to the keyboard to 
support a power-on pilot light, and I 
send the "unused" extra keyboard PIA 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world, 
Marty is the database manager of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo Sig on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California. 

July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 71 



line as well. This comes to a total of 19 
wires for my protocol. 

Now comes the tough choice of a 
cable. The simplest way to go is to use 
ordinary rainbow ribbon cable, 20 
conductor. This has the enormous 
advantage of being widely available and 
easy to work with. It does tend to tear, 
though it should work well if treated 
with care. I have used 20 conductor 
shielded ribbon cable for some of my 
remote keyboards. Such shielding does 
not really limit RFI, but will make your 
cable much more sturdy. Shielded rib- 
bon cable is, however, much harder to 
work with, and if you are not familiar 
with how to use it I'd suggest you stay 
away from it. 

The PIA chips that talk to the key- 
board were not designed to send signals 
over long wires. But experience has 
shown that there is no problem when 
the keyboard is separated by less than 
eight feet of cable. I suggest you keep 
the keyboard cable under six feet, since 
there is a foot or two of wire inside the 
keyboard case and the CoCo. 

I arranged for my keyboards to plug 
into my CoCo. The connectors I used 
were DB25 style. These are widely 
available and come in versions that can 
crimp on (IDC type) to ribbon cable. 



The next problem is the choice of 
keyboard to use. One of the best choices 
is the CoCo II keyboard itself. Or an 
HJL or Mark Data keyboard. If you 
can find one, a discarded Model III 
keyboard is also an excellent choice. 
The Model III keyboard is wired very 
like the CoCo keyboard. Obtain sche- 
matics to see how few changes are 
needed to make it work properly. I also 
very much like the feel of the Model III 
keyboard. 

Do not try to rewire other types of 
keyboards. Some keyboards available 
on the surplus market use Hall effect or 
capacitive switches. Neither will work 
on a CoCo. Even keyboards that do use 
ordinary spst NO type switches are not 
good choices. 

If you are using an existing CoCo 2 
type keyboard, you need a way to 
connect to the plastic ribbon connector. 
This is easy. Just order one or two of 
part number AJ 7504 from Radio 
Shack National Parts in Fort Worth, 
Texas. When they ask you what product 
it is for, say it's for the CoCo 2 Cat. No. 
26-3134. This item is an inexpensive 
AMP connector that fits the plastic 
ribbon cable. Solder that connector to 
a bit of printed circuit board and solder 
one end of the 20 conductor cable to it. 



Making contact with the PIA lines in 
the CoCo where the keyboard normally 
plugs in is a little more tricky. You may 
wish to desolder the existing connector 
from the CoCo board and replace it 
with a piece of ribbon cable directly 
soldered in. Then just crimp a DB 25 
connector on the other end of the 
ribbon cable and mount it on a face 
plate put where the old keboard used to 
go. If you are using an older CoCo, you 
will find the connector on the CoCo 
mother board is a little easier to use. 

Finally, you must make a cabinet for 
your lap keyboard. I've used a lot of 
different approaches. In one case I used 
an LMB brand keyboarder chassis box. 
In another I used a Model I shell as the 
keyboard case. By far the nicest looking 
case was one that my partner Leonard 
Haines made from plywood. Another 
alternative is to literally saw off the 
front part of your CoCo (talk about 
hacking) and use that. I have seen this 
done successfully. I suggest putting the 
remote Reset button in the rear of the 
keyboard case, and a little recessed. It's 
easy to reach when you want it, and 
hard to hit accidentally. 

If you have questions, I can be 
reached via Delphi, under username 
MARTYGOODMAN. 




Authorized Star Micronlcs Service Center * Call for return authorization number. 

THE WAITING IS OVER! 

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Reviewed in Dec. 1985 Rainbow 



Shipping Included! 



Dealer Inquiries on Company Letterhead invited. 



72 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



More than a book , . 



A MILESTONE 



OMPLETE RAE !S 





readable- cede tD t 
OS-9 operating s\ 
languages '). bfirng 

OS-9 has SO rnari'j 
need a gui"ae i c , v. 

as Tfre Con 
show you how 
potential of jtftjs 
implementation 

philosophy : - , 

Co -author ©a ft ■ 

Dibble — gftf 
9 — The Gompm 
demysLifiea the dy 
gives the Coiu'r Gi 
flexibility than 
on the market - 
confidence to re^s 

With me Camm 




you will be p; 
the multiias 
standards for 
For only $18' 



Also Avai lab lei 

TVie Rainbow Guide To OS-9 Disk. An adjunct 
he book fef th&- tutorials, and the mckao^ ofl 



ers;, us& short fjioduies of 
Uijd cdmplex programs. The 
at^paqd tfte^ghlevei 
? y.o.g m a k e t he }o b •eatsy.. r ■ 

i.^'iiTiQjS-jgcii'is for tf thsi you 
■ iri u lC r.'o - s '( y e and thorou g h 



M v oall want 
\rs of typing in 



Name 



□ Please send me The 
Complete Rainbow Guide To 
OS-9 for $19.95.* 



□ Please send me The Rainbow 
Guide To OS-9 Disk (a 
package of two disks) for 
$31.* Does not include book. 

Signature 




Address 

City State ZIP 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. 



□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 











VISA* 














i 



Account Number Card Expiration Date 

Mail to: 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone {credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 per book shipping and handling in U.S. Outside U.S. add $4 per book. Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. KY residents 
add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. ALL ORDERS IN U.S. FUNDS. 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation. 



GAME 




A challenge for strategists 





ance is Vital for 
Victory Over Vicious Vic 

By Jay R. Hoggins 





icious Vic is a game of chance 
and strategy. It is not a shoot- 
em-up arcade-type game. 
Your player is placed on a grid. Also 
randomly placed on the grid are electric 
fences, acid pots and, of course, the Vic 
fellows. Accumulate points in this game 
by destroying the Vicious Vic charac- 
ters. 

The first screen has eight Vies on it. 
If you are successful in clearing that 
screen, a new screen is generated with 
two more Vies than the previous screen 
had. Your turn is over when one of the 
Vies gets you or you bump into a pot 



time you move your player one 
step in any of the eight possible direc- 
tions, each Vic moves one step towards 
you. You may take as much time as 
needed between each move. The Vies 
will not move until you do and no 
penalties to your score are assessed. 

If you place your right hand on the 
keyboard in the normal touch typing 

Jay Hoggins is a field engineer for 
Eastman Kodak where he services com- 
puter output microfilm and computer 
assisted retrieval equipment. Jay uses 
his Co Co for everything from word 
processing to programming in BASIC 
and machine language. 



position, your middle finger is on the *K' 
key. This game allows you to move the 
player as if it is always at the 4 K' key 
position. In order to move the player 
one step to the left, press the key directly 
to the left of the 'IT (the \T key). In order 
to move the player diagonally up to the 
right, press the key which is diagonally 
up to the right of the 'K' (the 4 0' key), 
and so forth. To remind you which keys 
to use, the lower right corner of the 
game screen shows the player sur- 
rounded by the keys that may be pressed 
for the corresponding directions of 
movement. 

Since the Vies are not terribly intel- 
ligent, they can be brought to an un- 
timely end by moving your player so as 
to cause one or more Vies to collide with 
a pot or a fence. Do this to clear the 
screen of Vies while being careful not to 
step into a pot or a fence yourself. 

Each time a Vic is electrocuted by a 
fence, you receive 1 1 points multiplied 
by the number of the screen you are on. 
Each time a Vic meets his end by step- 
ping into an acid pot, you get 12 points 
multiplied by the screen number. If you 
are very clever, you can cause a Vic to 
bump into another Vic. This will net 
you 13 points times the screen number. 

To maximize scoring, take the time to 
carefully plan your moves. This is 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 75 



particularly true on the higher num- 
bered screens since the number of points 
you receive is multiplied by the screen 
number. 

If a Vic is electrocuted, both the Vic 



and the fence disappear. But if a Vic 
steps into an acid pot, only the Vic is 
destroyed and the acid pot survives to 
claim another victim. Take advantage 
of this by aligning your player behind 



an acid pot. Then you can move back 
and forth, causing the Vies to step into 
the pot one at a time. Be careful, 
though. One may sneak up behind 
you! □ 



40 
154 
158 
161 
165 
169 
243 
250 



189 
85 
172 
98 
188 
128 
244 
238 



400 ........ 0 

610 215 

672 191 

730 242 

840 8 

1070 37 

1190 170 

1350 10 

1510 154 



1680 


57 


1930 


....58 


2200 . 


, ,165 


2360 


....64 


2520 , 


. , .229 


2670 


...11 


2769 


,107 


END 


...244 



The listing: VIC 



**************************** 

VICIOUS VIC 
(C) 1985 BY JAY R. HOGGINS 

1747 PATRICIA WAY 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

84116 

**************************** 



1 

2 
3 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 "INITIALIZATION 

11 CLEAR500, &H7DFF: CLEAR 1000 

12 DATA 158,186,48,137,17,235,95 
,79,111,128,139,1,129,4,38,248,4 
8,136,28,203, 1,193,40,38,238,57, 
158, 186, 79, 95, 111, 128, 195, 0, 1,16 
,131,17,160,38,245,57 

13 FOR AD=&H7E00 TO &H7E19 :READQ 
:POKE AD , Q : NEXTAD 

14 FOR AD=&H7F00 TO &H7F0F:READ 
QtPOKE AD, Q: NEXTAD 

15 DEF USR0=&H7F00:DEF USR2=&H7E 
00:DIM NA(20) ,P(64) ,F(12) ,FA(20) 
,HA(20) ,MA(20) ,VA(20) ,C$(37) ,EX( 
20) ,VS(20) ,HH(20) ,HI(20) 

30 GOTO 15 3 

38 1 

39 'PRINT CHARACTERS TO HIRES SC 
REEN 

40 X$=STR$(XB) :Y$=STR$(YA) :W$="B 
M"+X$+", "+Y$:DRAW W$:FOR LP=1 TO 

LEN (N$) :L$=MID$(N$,LP,1) :L=ASC( 
L$) 

50 IF L>=65 THEN L=L-54 : GOTO90 
60 IF L=32 THEN L=10:GOTO90 
70 IF L=8 THEN L=37:GOTO90 
80 IF L<=57 THEN L=L-48 
90 DRAW C$(L) :NEXTLP: RETURN 

99 ' 

100 'PUTS FENCE AROUND GRID 



110 Y=2:FOR X=3 TO 243 STEP 10 :P 
UT(X,Y) -(X+7,Y+4) ,FA,PSET:NEXTX 
120 X=243:FORY=8 TO 134STEP6:PUT 
(X,Y)-(X+7,Y+4) , FA, PSET : NEXTY 
130 Y=134:FORX=243 TO 3 STEP-10: 
PUT(X,Y) -(X+7,Y+4) ,FA,PSET:NEXTX 
140 X=3:FOR Y=134 TO 2STEP-6:PUT 
(X, Y) - (X+7 , Y+4) , FA, PSET: NEXTY 

150 RETURN 

151 ' 

152 'TITLE SCREEN 

153 DATA 3,0,1,5,1,0,1,1,1,41,1, 
55,1,50,1,15,1,50,1,5,1,55,1,40, 
1,55,1,40,1,50,1,14,1,5,1,54,1,0 
,1,14,1,0,2,5,1,55,1,40,1,55,1,4 
0,6,0,1,5,1,0,1,1,1,41,1,55,1,50 
,1,55,1,54,1,5,1,55,1,41,1,55,2, 
50,1,14,1,15,1,55,1,0,1,14,1,0,2 
,5,1,55 

154 DATA 1,41,1,55,1,50,38,0,1,1 
,1,40,1,5,1,0,1,15,1,0,1,50,1,5, 

1,0,1,54,1,1,1,40,2,50,2,14,1,5, 
1,0,1,5,1,0,1,14,1,0,1,54,1,1,1, 
40,1,14,6,0,1,1,1,40,1,5,1,0,1,1 
5,1,0,1,50,1,5,1,0,1,54,1,1,1,40 
,2,50,2,14,2,0,1,5,1,0,1,14,1,0 

155 DATA 1,54,1,1,1,40,1,14,39,0 
,1,50,1,14,1,0,1,15,1,0,1,50,2,0 
,1,54,1,1,1,40,2,50,1,14,1,15,1, 
54,1,0,1,1,1,40,1,50,1,0,1,54,1, 
1,1,40,8,0,1,50,1,14,1,0,1,15,1, 
0,1,50,2,0,1,54,1,1,1,40,2,50,1, 
14,1,5,1,55,1,0,1,1,1,40,1,50,1, 



M MM M HHMHM HUH Iffl l~f If l"tMM H ftftrt i 



*f H M 
M M M 

* * H 

■«r * M 

M 



MM* M 

M 



i 



« M 



Smmmm hmhh mm 



CR*V 
SCfttift 
NUhftlfl LiFl 



m # n 
rt mm 

BmRHmmm mmmmm mH 
••ftct© |u t si 



76 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



0 1 54 

156 DATA 1,1, 1,4)3, 40,0,1,14, 1,5)3 
,1,0, 1,15, 1,0,1,50, 1,5, 1,0, 1,54, 
1,1,1,40,2,50,1,14,1,0,1,5,2,0,1 
,51,1,40,1,0,1,54,1,1,1,40,1,14, 
7,0,1,14,1,50,1,0,1,15,1,0,1,50, 
1,5,1,0,1,54,1,1,1,40,2,50,2,14, 
1,5,2,0,1,51,1,40,1,0,1,54,1,1,1 
,40 

157 DATA 1,14,39,0,1,5,1,40,1,1, 
1,55,1,50,1,55,1,54,1,5,1,55,1,4 
1,1,55,1,50,1,55,1,54,1,15,1,55, 
2,0,1,15,1,0,1,5,1,55,1,41,1,55, 
1,50,7,0,1,5,1,40,1,1,1,55,1,50, 
1,15,1,50,1,5,1,55,1,40,1,55,1,4 
0,1,15,1,50,1,5,1,54,2,0,1,15,1, 
0,1,5,1, 55 

158 DATA 1,40,1,55,1,40,294,0,1, 
4,23,0,1,4,7,0,1,5,1,40,22,0,1,5 
4,7,0,1,1,1,50,21,0,1,1,1,50,8,0 
,1,54,21,0,1,5,1,40,8,0,1,15,21, 
0,1,5,9,0,1,5,1,40,20,0,1,15,9,0 
,1,1,1,40,20,0,1,14,9,0,1,1,1,50 
,20,0,1,54,9,0,1,1,1,50,20,0,1,5 
4,10,0 

159 DATA 1,54,20,0,1,50,10,0,1,5 
4,19,0,1,1,1,50,10,0,1,54,8,0,1, 
B,1,FF,1,FE,1,80,7,0,1,1,1,50,10 
,0,1,54,8,0,1,3D,1,FF,1,FD,1,E0, 
7,0,1,1,1,50,10,0,1,55,7,0,1,3,1 
,FE,1,7F,1,F3,1,FE,7,0,1,1 / 1,50, 
10,0,1,55,7,0,1,3F,1,FF,1,80,1,F 
,1,FF,1,C0 

160 DATA 6,0,1,1,1,40,10,0,1,55, 
7,0,2,FF,1,FD,2,FF,1,F0,6,0,1,5, 
1,40,10,0,1,15,6,0,1,1,2,FF,1,FD 
,2,FF,1,FC,6,0,1,5,1,40,10,0,1,1 
5,6,0,1,7,2,FF,1,FD,2,FF,1,FE,6, 
0,1,5,1,40,10,0,1,15,6,0,1,F,2,F 
F,1,FD,3,FF,1,80,5,0,1,5,1,40,10 
,0,1,15 

161 DATA 6,0,1,1F,2,FF,1,FD,3,FF 
,1,00,5,0,1,5,1,40,10,0,1,15,1,4 
0,5,0,1,3F,2,FF,1,FD,1,DF,2,FF,1 
,E0, 5, 0,1, 15, 1,40, 10, 0,1, 5, 1,40, 
5,0,1,7F,2,FF,1,FD,1,DF,2,FF,1,F 
0, 5, 0,1, 15, 11, 0,1, 5, 1,40, 5,0, 3, F 
F,1,FD,1,DF,2,FF,1,F8,5,0,1,15,1 
1,0,1,5,1,40 

162 DATA 4,0,1,1,3,FF,1,FD,1,DF, 
2,FF,1,FC,5,0,1,15,11,0,1,5,1,50 
,4,0,1,7,3,FF,1,FD,1,DF,2,FF,1,F 
E,5,0,1,55,11,0,1,5,1,50,4,0,1,F 
,3,FF,1,FD,4,FF,1,80,4,0,1,55,11 
,0,1,5,1,50,4,0,1,1F,3,FF,1,FD,4 
,FF,1,C0,4,0,1,55,11,0 ; 1,5,1,50, 
4,0,1,3F 

163 DATA 3,FF,1,FD,4,FF,1 / E0,4,0 



,1,55,11,0,1,5,1,50,4,0,1,7F,3,F 
F,1,DD,4,FF,1,F0,4,0,1,55,11,0 / 1 
,5,1,50,4,0,1,7F,3,FF,1,DD,4,FF, 
1^0,4,0,1,55,11,0,1,1,1,54,4,0, 
4,FF,1,DD,4,FF,1,F8,3,0,1,1,1,54 
,11,0,1,1,1,54,3,0,1,1,4,FF,1,DD 
4 FF 1 FC 

164 DATA 3,0,1,1,1,54,11,0,1,1,1 
,55,3,0,1,1,4,FF,1,DD,4,FF,1,FC, 
3,0,1,5,1,54,11,0,1,1,1,55,1,50, 
2,0,1,3,4,FF,1,FD,4,FF,1,FE,3,0, 
1,55, 1,54, 11,0,1,1,3,55,1,5a,!, A 
B,4,FF,1,FD,4,FF,1,FE,1,AA, 1,D5, 

2,55,1,54, 11,0, 1,1,3,55,1, 5A, 1,2 
7,4,FF, 1,FD 

165 DATA 5,FF,1,22,1,D5,2,55,1,5 
4,11,0,1,1,3,55,1,58,1, 8F f 4, FF,1 
,FD,1,DF,4,FF,1,88,1,D5,2,55,1,5 
4,12,0,3,55,1,5A,1,3F,4,FF,1,FD, 
1,DF,4,FF,1,E2,1,D5,2,55,1,50,12 
,0,3,55,1,58,1,9F,4,FF,1,FD,1,DF 
,4,FF,1,C8,1,D5,2,55,1,50,12,0,3 
,55,1,5A,1, 3F, 4, FF,1,FD 

166 DATA 1 / DF,4,FF,1,E2,1,D5,2,5 
5,1,50,12,0,3,55,1,58,1,BF,4,FF, 
1,FD,1,DF,4,FF,1,E8,1,D5,2,55, 1, 
50,12,0,1,15,2,55,1,5A,1,7F / 4,FF 
,1,FD,5,FF / 1,F2,1,D5,2,55,1 / 40,1 
2,0,1,15,2,55,1,58,5,FF,1,FD,5 / F 
F,1,F8,1,D5,2,55,1,40,12 / 0,1,15, 
2 , 5 5 , 1 , 5A , 5 , FF , 1 , FD , 5 , FF 

167 DATA 1,FA, 1,05, 2, 55, 1,40,12, 

0. 1.5.2.55.1.58.5,FF,1,DD,5,FF,1 

,F8,1, 05,2,55,13,0,1,1,2,55,1,5a 
,5,FF, 1,DD,5,FF, 1,FA,1,D5, 1,55,1 
,54,13,0,1,1,2,55, 1,58, 5, FF, 1,DD 
,5,FF,1,F8,1,D5,1,55,1,50,14,0,2 
,55,1,5B,5,FF,1,DD,5,FF,1,FE,1,D 
5,1,55,1,40,14,0,1,15 

168 DATA 1,55,1,5B,5,FF,1,DD,5,F 
F,1,FE / 1,D5,1,55,17,0,1,1,5,FF,1 
,FD,5,FF,1,FC,19,0,1,1,5,FF,1,FD 
,5,FF,1,FC,19,0,1,3,5,FF,1,FD,5, 
FF,1,FE,19,0,1,3,5,FF,1,FD,1,DF, 
4,FF,1,FE,19,0,1,3,5,FF,1,FD,1,D 
F,4,FF,1,FE,19,0,1,7,5,FF,1,FD,1 
,DF ; 5,FF, 19, 0,1,7 

169 DATA 5^,1^0,1^,5^,19, 
0 / l / 7,5,FF,l,FD,l,DF,5,FF,19 / 0 / l 

,7,5,FF, 1,FD,6,FF,19,0, 1,7,5,FF, 

1, FD,6,FF,19,0,1,7,5,FF,1,FD,6,F 
F,51,0,1,7,12,FF,19,0,1,F,12,FF, 
1,80,18,0 ; 1,F,12,FF,1,80,18,0,1, 
F, 12, FF, 1,80, 180, 0,1, 55, 1,3, 1,55 
,3,0,1, 15,1,40, 1,D5 

170 DATA 1,40,22,0,1,55,1,41,1,5 
5,3,0,1,15,1,50,1,55,1,40,22,0,3 
,55,3,0,1,15,2,55,1,40,22,0,1,15 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 77 



Check Out Our Systems — High QUALITY 4 layer TURBO motherboard at the LOWEST prices. 
Our hard drive systems — an EXTRA megabyte of Storage FREE 

(more megabytes for less megabucks) 

Our monitors are high resolutions with minimum 1.000 lines 

— They even have their own tilt and swivel base at no added cost. — 

Powered by a heavy duty power supply, and offering TRUE turbo speed. 

ONE FULL YEAR WARRANTY 



COMPARE OUR SYSTEMS — 

SYSTEM-A-SINGLE FLOPPY SYSTEM 

$899.95! 





TURBO M is the COMPETITION 

TURBO M PC COMPLETE SYSTEM 
Dual Speed CPU — 4.77 AND TURBO 
NEC V20 PROCESSOR 

640 K memory 2 parallel ports 

8 slot motherboard Clock calendar 

1 35 Watt Power Supply Game Port 

Monochrome TTL Card Keyboard 5151 Style 

Monochrome Display High Res Ram spooler and 

Tilt and Swivel Base Monitor Printer spooler system 

Serial oort (2nd obrt opt.) DOS 2.1 1 



SYSTEM 22-HARD DRIVE SYSTEM 
22 MEGABYTE SYSTEM 
$1.399.95! 




Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 




TURBO M / AT— COMPLETE SYSTEMS 

STARTING AT $2,359.95 !!! 
ONE FULL YEAR WARRANTY 

Comes Complete with 



'ft 



> i ! i i ! < i- i r i * 

i ! j i i i > r i i j 

N t • » > * 1 • 1 





6 and 8 MHZ Switch Selectable 
8 Slot Motherboard 
192 Watt Power Supply 
1 .2 Megabyte Floppy Drive 

1 Full Megabyte of Memory on Motherboard 

2 Parallel Ports — 2 Serial Ports 
Clock Calendar 

Hercules Compatible Monochrome Card 
Monochrome Display-High Resolution 
Tilt and Swivel Base 
DOS 3.1 — AT Keyboard 




ADD-IN BOARDS TO HELP YOU BUILD YOUR SYSTEM 



TURBO-M Motherboad 
Dual Speed 

$299.95 


Monochrome Graphics 
Card with 
Printer Port 

$94.95 


Floppy I/O Card 
Controls Two Floppy 
Drives. Serial Port 
Parallel Port Clock 
Calendar Game Port 

$109.95 


Winchester Hard 
Drive Controller 

$139.95 


10 Megabyte and 20 Megabyte Drives 
Complete System 
Drive. Controller. Cables 
and easy to follow 
instructions. 

$369.95 $469.95 


Color Graphics 
Card with 
Printer Port 

$118.95 


135 Watt 
Power Supply 

$89.95 


Multi Function Card with 
Space for 384 K of 
Memory. Serial Port. 
Parallel Port Clock 
Calendar. Game Port 

$89.95 


5151 Compatible 
keyboard with Separate 
Cursor and 
Number Pads 

$124.95 


Monochrome Monitor 
with High Resolution 
Tilt/Swivel Base 

$179.95 


Floppy Drive Card 
Control up to 
Four Drives 

$79.95 


P.C.DOS 3.1 

$80.00 


Flip Top Cabinet 
with Speaker 

$64.95 



MEGADISK™ HARD DRIVES 

Our Hard Drive Systems Are Compatible With 
IBM PC and AT, HEATH/ZENITH, COMPAQ, COLUMBIA, PC CLONES, TAVA, EAGLE 
TRS/80 Models I / III / IV / 4D/ 4P/ MAX 80 / COLOR COMPUTER, Tandy 1000 



Systems come complete with drive, controller, cables, 
hardware and easy to follow instructions. 
5 megabytes starts at S239.95 



10 megabytes, 
20 megabytes, 



starts at $369.95 
starts at $469 95 



60 megabytes . ..starts at $1,299.95 

REMOVABLE MEDIA SPECIAL 

5 Megabyte Cartridge Hard Drive Now 
Specially Priced! 



Systems come complete with one free software driver for TRSDOS 6, 
LDOS 5.1 .x, DOSPLUS 3.4/4, or NEWDOS 80.CP/M is available. 

5 megabytes $449.95 

10 megabytes .op $679.95 

15 megabytes < A\ \r. $749.95 

20 megabytes "Vv. $849.95 

24 megabytes . . . . , $899.95 

30 megabyte-fixed & removeable $1,399.95 

40 megabytes $1,299.95 

50 megabytes $1,449.95 



Warranty information: TURBO-M systems come with a full year warranty for parts and labor. 

TURBO-M systems are guaranteed to run all programs such as LOTUS, SYMPHONY, AUTOCAD, 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR, DBASE, MICROGRAPFX, WORDSTAR, LEADING EDGE W/P. RBASE. 
MEGADISK hard drives are fully warranteed for parts and labor. 



TERMS and CONDITIONS: 

All prices are cash discounted. However, we do 
accept MC. VISA, AMEX & DISCOVER credit cards. 
Please inquire. 

C.O.D.'s are accepted-No deposit required. 
Purchase Orders-Corporate, Government & School 
P.O.'s are accepted. Please call for details. 
Shipping Costs are calculated per order. 
Please call for total. 

Shipments of all in-stock products are made wtthm 
24 hours, same day service is available upon 
request at no added cost. 
Not responsible for typographical errors. 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT, INC 

1 Edgell Road 
Framingham, MA 01701 

1-617-872-9090 

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 am to 5:30 pm (est) Sat 4:00 pm 

Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 
Dealer Inquiries Invited 



Services Returns: It is our policy to repair all service 
returns within 24-48 hours. Normally same day turn- 
a round is accomplished. It is necessary to have a 
(R)eturn (M)aterial (A)uthonzation to insure 
speedy service. 

IBM. TAVA. COLUMBIA. 5151, COMPAQ, EAGLE. 
TRS/80. HEATH/ZENITH are registered trademarks 
of IBM Corp., Tava Corp.. Columbia Computer Corp. 
Key Tronics Corp. Compaq Corp. Eagle Computer. 
Tandy Corp. Zenith Corp. respectively 
1 986 Software Support. Inc. All nahts reaervpri 



Prices Change 
Every Day. 
Please Call 
1-800-343-8841 
For Lower Prices. 



PRICE BREAKTHROUGH 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



Prices Change 
Every Day. 
Please Call 
1-800-343-8841 
For Lower Prices. 



Super Sale on New Hard Drives 
Announcing MEGADISK PLUS + 

Complete Systems! for the TRS 80 Model I/III/TV/4P, Color Computer, IBM-PC & AT, Max/80 
Software Drivers: LDOS, NEWDOS/80, DOSPLUS, TRSDOS 6.x, CP/M available 





MEGAOISK js 





Fixed and Removeable PLUS + SYSTEM 



Drive a 5 to 50 Megabyte Hard Bargain Starting at $449. 95 

Removeable Cartridge Systems Now Available!!! 




Call Toll Free Ordering l-800-343i|f41 





High Quality Lowest Price 
Drive 0, 1, 2, 3 
for the 

Color Computer 
Starting at $199.95 



CANADIAN CUSTOMERS PLEASE CALL 514-383-5293 



TERMS and CONDITIONS: 

Ail prices are cash discounted. However, we do 
accept MC. VISA, AMEX & DISCOVER credit cards. 
Please inquire 

C O.D.'s are accepted-No deposit required. 
Purchase Orders-Corporate. Government & School 
P.O.'s are accepted. Please call for details. 
Shipping Costs are calculated per order. 
Please call tor total. 

Shipments of aH In-stock products are made within 
24 hours, same day service is available upon 
request at no added cost. 
Not responsible tor typographical errors 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT, INC 

1 Edgell Road 
Framingham, MA 01 701 

1-617-872-9090 

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 1 0 am to 5:30 pm (est) Sat 4:00 pm 

Toll Free Ordering 1-800-343-8841 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



Service & Returns: It is our policy to repair all service 
returns within 24-48 hours. Normally same day turn- 
a-round is accomplished. It is necessary to have a 
(R)eturn (M)atenal (A)uthorization to insure 
speedy service 

IBM, TAVA, COLUMBIA. 5151, COMPAQ, EAGLE, 
TRS/80, HEATH/ZENITH are registered trademarks 
of IBM Corp.. Tava Corp.. Columbia Computer Corp, 
Key Tronics Corp. Compaq Corp. Eagle Computer, 
Tandy Corp. Zenith Corp. respectively. 
• 1986 Software Support, Inc. All rights reserved 



,1,55,1,54,3,0,1,5,2,55,23,0,1,1 
5, 1,55, 1,54, 3, 0, 1,5, 2, 55, 23, 0,1, 
5,1,55,1,50,3,0,1,1,1,55,1,54,24 
,0,1,55,5,0,1,15,1,413,6213,111,16130 
FF 

200 PMODE4,1:SCREEN1,1:PCLS(0) :A 
D=PEEK(186)*256+PEEK(187)+&H02E0 

201 FOR E=l TO 861:READC,B$:FOR 
AD=AD TO AD+C-l:POKE AD,VAL("&H" 
+B$) :NEXT AD, E 

239 ' 

24)3 'INITIALIZE SCORES 

241 N$ (1) =" JAY" :N$ (2) ="BRADLEY" : 
N$ ( 3) ="BARBRA» : N$ ( 4 ) ="BARBRA" : N$ 
(5)=" ANY NAME":N$(6)="WHAT NAME" 
:N$(7)="THAT NAME":S(1)=2847:S(2 
)=1698:S(3)=3145:S(4)=4542 

242 • 

243 'INITIALIZE STRINGS 

244 A$(1)="THESE INSTRUCTIONS AR 

E ABBRE- VIATED, FOR MORE COMPLE 

TE INSTRUCTIONS PLEASE READ THE 

ARTICLE PROVIDED IN THE RAINBOW, 
ii 

245 A$(2)="the object of the gam 
e-" 

246 A$(3)="YOU ARE TRAPPED IN A 
FIELD, SURROUNDED BY ELECTRIC FE 



Formaker 

clean paperwork for business 



NCES. A NUMBER OF CRAZY CHARACT 
ERS (NICKNAMED VIC) ARE OUT TO G 
ET YOU. YOU MUST TRY TO DESTROY 

THEM BEFORE THEY DESTROY YOU. 
WITHIN THE GRID ARE RANDOMLY PLA 
CED ELECTRIC FENCES AND" 

247 A$(4)="ACID POTS. BOTH OF T 
HESE ARE FATAL TO VIC. HOWEVER 
THEY ARE FATAL TO YOU TOO! YOU 
MUST MOVE WITHIN THE GRID" 

248 A$ (5)=" AVOIDING THE POTS AND 
FENCES WHILE LURING VIC INTO TH 

EM. one note- IF VIC TOUCHES A 
FENCE, BOTH THE FENCE AND VIC WI 
LL BE DESTROYED. BUT IF VIC TOU 
CHES AN ACID POT, ONLY VIC WILL 
BE DESTROYED." 

249 A$(6)="how to play the game- 
ii 

250 A$(7)="FOR EVERY STEP THAT Y 
OU TAKE, EACH VIC WILL TAKE ONE 
STEP TOWARDS YOU. YOU MAY MOVE 
IN ONE OF EIGHT DIRECTIONS. THE 

KEYS ON THE KEYBOARD SURROUND- 
ING THE K KEY MOVE YOU IN ONE OF 

THE EIGHT DIRECTIONS. FOR" 
2 60 A$ (8)=" INSTANCE, THE I KEY I 
S DIRECT- LY ABOVE THE K KEY AND 

WILL MOVE YOU ONE STEP STRAIGHT 

UP THE SCREEN. THE M KEY IS DO 
WN AND TO THE LEFT DIAGONALLY FR 
OM THE K KEY. IT WILL CAUSE YOU 

TO MOVE DIAGONALLY DOWN TO THE 
LEFT. " 

270 C$ (0)="BM+0,+lD2BM+l,+lRlBM+ 

l,-lU2BM-l,-lLlBM+5,+0" 

280 C$(l)="BM+l,+lD0BM+0,+3R2LlU 

4BM+4,+0" 

290 C$(2)="R3D2L3D2R3BM+3,-4" 

300 C$ (3)="R3D2L3R3D2L3BM+6,-4" 

310 C$(4)="D2R3D2U4BM+3,+0" 

320 C$ (5)="R3L3D2R3D2L3BM+6,-4" 

330 C$(6)="D2R3D2L3U4R3BM+3,+0" 

340 C$(7)="R3D4BM+3,-4" 

350 C$ (8) ="R3D2L3U2D4R3U4BM+3 ,+0 
ii 

360 C$ (9)="R3D4U2L3U2BM+6,+0" 

370 C$(10)="BM+6,+0" 

380 C$ (ll)="BM+0,+lD3U2R3D2U3BM- 

l,-lLlBM+5,+0" 

390 C$ ( 12 ) ="D4R2BM+1 , -1U2D1L2R2U 
1BM-1 , -1L2BM+6 , +0 " 

400 C$ (13 ) ="D4R3UlBM+0 , -2U1L3BM+ 
6,+0" 

410 C$ (14)="R2BM+1,+1D2BM-1,+1L2 
U4BM+6,+0" 

420 C$ (15) ="D4R3L3U2R3L3U2R3BM+3 
,+0» 

430 C$ (16) ="D4U2R3L3U2R3BM+3 ,+0" 



Totally Menu Driven 
Customize with company information 
, Complete "on screen" instructions 



FORMS: 

invoice 
quote 

purchase order 
mall order 
confirm order 
receipt 



STORES: 

complete forms 
item list 
subquotes 
letters 
footnotes 
customer info 



SEPARATE CONFIGURE 

PROGRAM: 

for company info 
quote & inv. # 
w/auto sequencing 
auto date 



FIGURES: 

quantity 
list 
net 

discount 
subtotals 
tax, etc. 

PRINTS: 

letterhead 
envelope 
multiple copy 
emphasized 

$49 32k ECB disc 



"You have to look good to the customer , . . This 
program helps . . . Ov providing neat, well-prepared 

ms The RAINBOW, May 1986 



send for more information: 



Challenger Software 

42 4th Street 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 
Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



RAINBOW 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



80 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



44j3 C$(17)="D4R3U2LlBM-2,-2R3BM+ 
3,+j3" 

45j3 C$(18)="D4U2R3D2U4BM+3,+j3" 
460 C$ ( 19 ) ="R3LlD4RlL3RlU4BM+5 , + 

470 C$(2j3)="R3LlD4L2UlBM+6,-3" 

480 C$(21)="D4U2RlBM+l,+lRj3BM+j3, 

-2RJ3BM+1, -lRj3BM+j3,+4Rj3BM+3 , -4" 

49J3 C$(22)="D4R3BM+3,-4" 

500 C$(23)="D4U3R3D3U4BM+3,+j3" 

51j3 C$ (24 ) ="D4U3R1BM+1 , +1R1D2U4B 

M+3,+j3" 

520 C$(25)="D4R3U4L3BM+6,+j3" 

530 C$(26)="D4U2R3U2L3BM+6 / +0" 

540 C$(27)="BM+0,+lD2BM+l,+lRlUl 

R1D1U3BM-1, -1L2BM+6 , +0" 

550 C$(28)="D4U2R3BM+0 / +2L0BM-l / 

-lLj3BM+l,-lU2L3BM+6,+j3" 

560 C$ (29) ="R3L3D2R3D2L3BM+6 , -4" 

570 C$(30)= ll R3LlD4LlU4BM+5,+0" 

580 C$(31)="D4R3U4BM+3,+j3" 

590 C$(32)= M D3BM+1,+0D1R1U1BM+1, 

+0U3BM+3,+0" 

600 C$(33)="D4UlR3DlU4BM+3,+j3" 
610 C$ (34 ) ="R0BM+1, +1D2R1U2BM-2 , 
+3R0BM+3 , +0R0BM+0 , -4R0BM+3 , +0" 
620 C$(35)="D1BM+1,+1D2R1U2BM+1, 
-1U1BM+3,+0 h 

630 C$ ( 3 6) ="R3BM-1 , +1L0BM-1 , +1L0 

BM- 1 , + 1 D 1R3 BM+ 3,-4" 

640 C$(37)="C0D4RlU4RlD4RlU4BM+2 

,0C1« 

648 « 

649 1 PLAY THEME SONG 

650 PLAY"T2O2L4GP200GP200GP200L8 
.E-P200O3L16B-P200" :PLAY"02L4GP2 
00L8.E-P200O3L16B-P200O2L2GP200" 
:PLAY"O3L4DP200DP200DP200L8.E-P2 
00L16B-P200" : PLAY"O2L4G-P200L8 . E 
-P200O3L16B-P200O2L2GP200" 

658 ' 

659 'PRINT COPYRIGHT & WARNING 

670 DRAW M C0":YA=144:XB=20:N$="CO 
PYRIGHT 1985 BY JAY R HOGGINS" :G 
OSUB40 : YA=152 : XB=20 : N$=" WARNING" 
: GOSUB40 : YA=160 : XB=20 : N$="THE PR 
OGRAMMER GENERAL HAS" : GOSUB40 : YA 
=168:XB=20:N$="DETERMINED THAT T 
HIS PROGRAM MAY" :GOSUB40 : YA=176 : 
XB=20:N$="BE ADDICTIVE" 

671 GOSUB40 : YA=184 : XB=20 :N$="USE 
AT YOUR OWN RISK" : GOSUB40 : DRAW" 

CI" 

672 FOR D=l TO 2000:NEXTD 

679 'CLEAR SCREEN 

680 CLS(RND(8) ) :PRINT§192 / "" 

688 ' 

689 'SET UP GRAPHICS 



690 PMODE4,l:PCLS:PSET(97,56,l) : 
PSET(103,56,1) :PSET(99,57,1) :PSE 
T(101,57,l) :PSET(99,59,1) :PSET(1 
01,59,1) :PSET(97,60,1) :PSET(103, 
60,1) : GET (97, 56) -(104,60) ,EX,G 
700 FOR X=100 TO 102 STEP2 : FORY= 
40 TO 44 STEP4 : PSET ( X , Y , 1 ) : NEXTY 
,X:FORX=98 TO 104 STEP6 : FORY=41 
TO 43:PSET(X,Y,1) : NEXTY, X: GET ( 98 
,40) -(104,44) ,HH,G:FOR X=98 TO 1 
04 STEP2:FOR Y=41 TO 43 STEP2 : PS 
ET(X,Y,1) :NEXTY,X:GET(98,40) -(10 
4,44) ,HI,G 

710 FOR X=9 8 TO 104: FOR Y=88 TO 
90:PSET(X,Y,1) :NEXTY,X:FOR X=100 
TO 102: FOR Y=87 TO 91 STEP 4 : PS 
ET(X,Y,1) :NEXTY,X:PSET(97,87,1) : 
PSET (105, 87, 1) : FOR X=100 TO 102: 
FORY=88 TO 90 STEP2 : PSET (X, Y,0) : 
NEXTY, X: GET (97, 87) -(105,91) ,VS,G 
720 PCLS:FOR X=100 TO 102 STEP 2 
:FOR Y=40 TO 44 STEP 4:PSET(X,Y, 
1) :NEXTY,X:FOR X=98 TO 104 STEP 
2:FOR Y=41 T043 : PSET (X, Y, 1) :NEXT 
Y,X 

730 XP=97:FOR X=XP TO XP+6 STEP6 
: FORY=56TO60 : PSET (X, Y, 1) :PSET(X+ 



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July 1986 THE RAINBOW 81 



1, Y, 1) : NEXTY , X: Y=56 : PSET (XP+2 , Y+ 
1,1) : PSET (XP+3 ,Y+1,1) :PSET(XP+4, 
Y+1,1) :PSET(XP+5,Y+1,1) 
740 PSET (1)31,72,1) : PSET (99 , 73 , 1) 
: PSET (1)91, 73,1) : PSET (1)33 ,73,1) :P 
SET (1)31, 74,1) :PSET (1)31, 75,1) :PSE 
T (99, 76,1) : PSET (1)33, 76,1) 

75) 3 FOR X=98 TO 1^4 : FOR Y=88 TO 
9)3 : PSET (X,Y,1) :NEXTY,X:FOR X=l)3)3 

TO 1)32: FOR Y=87 TO 91 STEP 4: PS 
ET(X,Y, 1) :NEXT Y, X: PSET (97 , 87 , 1) 
: PSET (1)35, 87,1) :FOR X=100 TO 1)32 
: PSET (X, 88,0) :NEXTX 

76) 3 GET (97 , 56) - (1)34 , 6)3) , FA, G 

77) 3 GET (98 , 4)3) - (1)34 , 44 ) ,HA,G 

78) 3 GET(99 , 72) - (1)33 , 76) ,MA,G 

79) 3 GET(97,87)-(1)35,91) ,VA,G 
8)3)3 GET (97 , 97) -( 1)35 , 1)32 ) ,NA,G 
8)38 • 

8)39 'ASK IF PLAYER WANTS INSTRUC 
TIONS 

81) 3 PRINTQ192," DO YOU WANT I 
NSTRUCTIONS? PRESS Y 
OR N" 

82) 3 Z$=INKEY$:A=RND(1)3) :IFZ$=""T 
HEN820ELSEIFZ$O"Y"THEN1120 

828 1 

829 'PRINT INSTRUCTIONS ROUTINE 

830 W$=A$(1) :G0SUB85J3 

840 FOR R=2 TO 8 : W$=A$ (R) : GOSUB8 

6)3 :NEXTR: GOSUBl)3 4)3 : GOTOl 12)3 

850 CLS(RND(8) ) :X=2:PRINT@3, " VI 

CIOUS VIC INSTRUCTIONS "; 

860 IF X>15THEN1020 

870 IF LEFT$(W$,1)=" "THENW$=RIG 

HT$ (W$,LEN(W$)-1) :GOTO870 

880 IF LEN(W$)<=30 THEN A$=W$ : GO 

TO930 

890 FOR Q=31 TO 1 STEP-1 

900 A$=MID$(W$,Q,1) 

910 IF A$=" "THEN920 ELSENEXTQ 

920 Q=Q-l:A$=LEFT$ (W$,Q) 

930 B$=A$ 

940 IF LEN(A$)>29 THEN 970 ELSE 
FOR P=LEN(A$) TO 2 9 
950 B$=B$+" " 
960 NEXTP 

970 PRINT@X*32-31,B$; 
980 X=X+1 

990 IF LEN(W$)<=30 THEN RETURN 
1000 W$=RIGHT$(W$,LEN(W$)-Q) 
1010 GOTO860 
1020 GOSUB1040 
1030 GOTO850 

1040 PRINT@482," PRESS ANY KEY T 

0 CONTINUE " ; 

1050 FOR D=l TO 50 

1060 IF INKEY$=" "THEN NEXTD ELSE 
1110 



1070 PRINT@482," 

it • 

1080 FOR D=l TO 50 

1090 IF INKEY$=" "THEN NEXTD ELSE 

1110 
1100 GOTO1040 
1110 RETURN 

1118 ' 

1119 'SET UP SCREEN FOR SHOWING 
HIGH SCORES 

1120 NL=8:MN=8:PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

1128 ' 

1129 'SCORE SORTING ROUTINE 

1130 Q=l:FOR T=1T05:F0R C=T TO 6 
:IF S(7)<=S(C) THEN S(7)=S(C):N$ 
(7)=N$(C) :Q=C 

1140 NEXTC : FORRB=Q TO T STEP -1: 
S(RB)=S (RB-1) :N$(RB)=N$(RB-1) :NE 
XTRB:S(T)=S(7) :N$(T)=N$(7) :S(7)= 
0:NEXTT:GOSUB100 

1148 ' 

1149 'PRINT HIGH SCORES 

1150 N$="HIGH SCORES" :YA=40:XB=8 
2:GOSUB40 

1160 N$=N$ (1) : YA=50:XB=70:GOSUB4 
0 

1170 N$=STR$(S(1) ) :XB=124+6*(6-L 
EN(STR$(S(1) ) ) ) :YA=50:GOSUB40 
1180 N$=N$(2) :YA=60:XB=70:GOSUB4 

0 

1190 N$=STR$(S(2) ) :XB=124+6*(6-L 
EN (STR$ (S (2) ) ) ) :YA=60:GOSUB40 
1200 N$=N$(3) :YA=70:XB=70:GOSUB4 

1210 N$=STR$(S(3) ) :XB=124+6*(6-L 
EN(STR$(S(3)))) :YA=70:GOSUB40 
1220 N$=N$ (4) :YA=80:XB=70:GOSUB4 

1230 N$=STR$(S(4) ) :XB=124+6*(6-L 
EN(STR$(S(4) ) ) ) :YA=80:GOSUB40 
1240 N$=N$ (5) : YA=90:XB=70:GOSUB4 

0 

1250 N$=STR$ (S (5) ) :XB=124+6* (6-L 
EN(STR$(S(5) ) ) ) :YA=90:GOSUB40 
1260 S(6)=0 
1268 ' 

12 69 'ASKS FOR PLAYERS NAME 

1270 N$="PLEASE TYPE IN YOUR NAM 

E" : YA=110 : XB=28 : GOSUB40 : SOUND100 

,1 

1280 LA=0:N$="":NA$="":XB=185 
1290 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$=""THEN1290 
1300 PLAY"O4T50BO3":IF Z$=CHR$(8 
) THEN 1370 

1310 IF Z$=CHR$(13) THEN 1390 
1320 IF ASC(Z$)<65 OR ASC(Z$)>90 

THEN 1290 
1330 N$=Z$:YA=110:GOSUB40:XB=XB+ 
6 



82 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



134) 3 NA$=NA$+Z $ : LA=LA+ 1 

135) 3 IF LA=8 THEN 139)3 

136) 3 GOT0129)3 

137) 3 LA=LA-1:IF LA<)3 THEN LA=j3 
1375 IF LEN(NA$)<=)3 THEN 144)3 
1380 NA$=LEFT$ (NA$,LEN(NA$) -1) :X 
B=XB-6 : N$=Z $ : G0SUB4 )3 : G0T012 9)3 

1388 • 

1389 'SET UP GAME PLAYING SCREEN 
139)3 PCLS 

14) 3)3 IF NA$="" THEN NA$=" " 

141) 3 N$(6)=NA$:N$=NA$:YA=148:XB= 
10:GOSUB4)3 

142) 3 N$=STR$(S(6) ) : XB=76+6* (6-LE 
N(STR$(S(6) ) ) ) :YA=148:GOSUB4)3 

143) 3 N$="SCREEN" : XB=1)3 : YA=159 : GO 
SUB4)3 

144) 3 N$=STR$( (MN/2)-3) :YA=159:XB 
=100:GOSUB40 

145) 3 N$=" NUMBER LEFT" : YA=17)3 : XB= 
l)3:GOSUB4)3 

146) 3 N$=STR$(NL) :YA=17)3:XB=76+6* 
(6-LEN(N$) ) :GOSUB4)3 

147) 3 PUT(126,144)-(132,148) ,HA,P 
SET 

148) 3 PUT(127,154)-(134,158) ,FA,P 
SET 

149) 3 PUT(127,164)-(131,168) ,MA,P 
SET 

15) 3)3 PUT(125,174)-(133,178) ,VA,P 
SET 

151)3 N$="ACID" : YA=144 : XB=144 : GOS 
UB4)3 

1520 N$=" FENCE" : YA=154 : XB=144 : GO 
SUB4)3 

153) 3 N$=" YOU" : YA=164 : XB=144 : GOSU 
B4)3 

154) 3 N$="VIC" : YA=174 : XB=14 4 : GOSU 
B40 

155) 3 PUT(203,158)-(207,162) ,MA,P 
SET 

156) 3 DRAW"BM13 6,146R4BM13 6,156R4 
BM136,166R4BM136,176R4" 

157) 3 N$="U I 0":YA=148:XB=191:GO 
SUB4)3 

158) 3 N$=" J" : YA=158 : XB=19 1 : GOSUB4 

159) 3 N$="L" : YA=158 : XB=2 15 : GOSUB4 

16) 3)3 N$="M" : YA=168 : XB=191 : GOSUB4 
% 

161) 3 DRAW"BM2)36 / 17)3D2L2R3U2" 

162) 3 DRAW"BM218,17)3D1L1U1" 

163) 3 DRAWBM186, 144R36D34L36U34" 
1632 G=USR)3(NL) 

1638 G0SUB1)3)3 

1639 • 

164) 3 'PUT RANDOM FENCES ON GRID 



165) 3 FOR P-l TO 52 

166) 3 X=RND (23) 

167) 3 Y=RND(21) 

168) 3 X=(X*l)3)+3 

169) 3 Y=(Y*6)+2 

17) 3)3 IF PPOINT (X, Y) <>)3 THEN 166)3 

171) 3 PUT(X,Y) -(X+7,Y+4) ,FA,PSET 

172) 3 NEXTF 
1729 » 

173) 3 'PUT RANDOM HOLES ON GRID 

174) 3 FOR H=l TO 1)3 

175) 3 X=RND(23) :Y=RND(21) 

176) 3 X=(X*10)+4:Y=(Y*6)+2 

177) 3 IF PPOINT (X-1,Y)<>)3 THEN 17 
5)3 

178) 3 IF PPOINT (X+2,Y+2)<>)3 THEN 
175)3 

179) 3 PUT(X,Y) -(X+6,Y+4) ,HA,PSET 

18) 3)3 NEXTH 

18) 39 » 

181) 3 'PUT RANDOM VIC'S ON GRID 

182) 3 FORD=l TO 32 : P (D) =)3 : NEXTD 

183) 3 FOR M=l TO MN 

184) 3 X=RND(23) :Y=RND(21) 

185) 3 X=(X*l)3)+3:Y=(Y*6)+2 

186) 3 IF PPOINT (X,Y)<>)3 THEN 184)3 

187) 3 IF PPOINT (X+l, Y+l) <>)3 THEN 
184)3 

188) 3 PUT(X,Y) -(X+8,Y+5) ,VA,PSET 

189) 3 P( (M*2) -1)=X:P(M*2)=Y 

19) 3)3 NEXTM 
19)39 ' 

191) 3 'PLACE AND FLASH THE PLAYER 

192) 3 X=RND(23) :Y=RND(21) 

193) 3 X=(X*l)3)+5:Y=(Y*6)+2 

194) 3 IF PPOINT (X-2,Y)<>)3 THEN 19 
2)3: 'CATCHES MAX'S AND FENCES 

195) 3 IF PPOINT (X-l,Y+2)<>0 THEN 
192)3: 'CATCHES HOLES 

196) 3 PUT(X,Y) -(X+4,Y+4) ,MA,PSET 

197) 3 FOR D=l TO 2)3 

198) 3 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$<>" "THEN2)35)3 

199) 3 NEXTD 

2)3)3)3 PUT(X,Y) -(X+4,Y+4) ,NA,PSET 

2)31)3 FOR D=l TO 2)3 

2)32)3 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$<>"»THEN2)35)3 

2)33)3 NEXTD 

2)34)3 GOT0196)3 

2)35)3 PUT(X,Y) -(X+4,Y+4) ,MA,PSET 

2)36)3 IF Z$="U"THEN2150 

2)37)3 IF Z$="I"THEN2160 

2)38)3 IF Z$="O"THEN2170 

2)39)3 IF Z$="J"THEN218)3 

2100 IF Z$="L"THEN2190 

211) 3 IF Z$="M"THEN22)3J3 

212) 3 IF Z$=", "THEN221)3 

213) 3 IF Z$=" . "THEN222)3 
2140 GOT0196)3 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 83 



215)3 XN=X-10:YN=Y-6:GOTO2230 
2160 XN=X:YN=Y-6:GOTO2230 
2170 XN=X+10:YN=Y-6:GOTO2230 
2180 XN=X-10:YN=Y:GOTO2230 
2190 XN=X+10:YN=Y:GOTO2230 
2200 XN=X-10:YN=Y+6:GOTO2230 
2210 XN=X:YN=Y+6:GOTO2230 
2220 XN=X+10:YN=Y+6:GOTO2230 
2230 IF PPOINT(XN-2,YN)=5 AND PP 
OINT(XN-1,YN)=0 THEN 2280: 'CHECK 
FOR VIC 

2240 IF PPOINT(XN-2,YN)=5 AND PP 
OINT(XN-l,YN)=5 THEN 2380:'CHECK 

FOR FENCE 
2250 IF PPOINT(XN-l,YN+2)=5 THEN 

2 4 30:' CHECK FOR HOLE 
2260 PUT(X / Y)-(X+4 / Y+4) ,NA,PSET 
2270 X=XN:Y=YN:PUT(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4 
) ,MA,PSET:GOTO2470 

2279 • 

2280 'YOU HIT A VIC 

2290 PUT(X,Y)-(X+8,Y+5) ,NA,PSET: 
XN=XN-2 

2300 PUT(XN,YN)-(XN+8,YN+5) ,VS,P 
SET 

2310 PLAY"T4O2L4GP200GP200GP200L 
8 . E-P200O3L16B-P200O2L4GP200L8 . E 



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<v Software <h 

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'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— ONLY $24.95 

"Double-Entry" Genaral Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
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Rsinbow Review 3/85, Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
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Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphics bargain of tht year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. (Avail. io/ove5). 

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TRAK' General Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking ft 
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Ledger ft Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

'COCO WINDOWS' Available 10/31/85 
With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key 
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multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line 
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Logan, UT 64321 (601 1 763-7620 |NHM fetff If JftM can Iroi It 



-P200O3L16B-P200O2L2G" 

2320 PUT(XN,YN)-(XN+8,YN+5) ,VA,P 

SET:FORD=l TO 100:NEXTD 

2330 PUT(XN,YN) -(XN+8,YN+5) ,VS,P 

SET: FOR D=l TO 100:NEXTD 

2340 PUT(XN,YN)-(XN+8,YN+5) ,VA,P 

SET: FOR D-l TO 100:NEXTD 

2350 PUT(XN,YN)-(XN+8,YN+5) ,VS,P 

SET: FOR D=l TO 100:NEXTD ' 

2360 PUT(XN,YN)-(XN+8,YN+5) ,VA,P 

SET: FOR D-l TO 200:NEXTD 

2370 GOTO1120 

2379 » 

2380 ' YOU HIT A FENCE 

2390 PUT(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4) ,NA,PSET 
2400 PUT(XN-2,YN)-(XN+5,YN+4) ,EX 
, PSET 

2410 PLAY"T255AGAGAGAG" : PUT (XN-2 
,YN)-(XN+5,YN+4) , FA, PSET: PLAY "AG 
AGAGA" : PUT (XN-2 , YN) - (XN+5 , YN+4 ) , 
EX, PSET : PLAY " GAGAGAGAGAGAG " : PUT ( 
XN-2, YN)- (XN+5, YN+4) , FA, PSET 
2420 GOTO1120 

2429 • 

2430 ' YOU HIT A HOLE 

2440 PUT(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4) ,NA,PSET 
2450 PLAY " T 2 5 5 ABCDE FG " : PUT (XN-1, 
YN) - (XN+5 , YN+4 ) , HH , PSET : PLAY "ABC 
DEFG" : PUT (XN-1 , YN) - (XN+5 , YN+4 ) , H 
I , PSET : PLAY "ABCDEFG" : PUT (XN-1 , YN 
)-(XN+5,YN+4) , HA, PSET 
2460 GOTO1120 

2470 'VIC MOVE ROUTINE (MN=NUMBE 
R OF ROBOTS) 

2480 FOR DQ=1 TO MN*2 STEP 2 
2490 IF P(DQ)»0 THEN 2780 
2500 IF NL=0 THEN GOTO2830 
2510 XR=P(DQ) :YR=P(DQ+1) 
2520 QX=X-XR-2 

2528 ' 

2529 'SET UP MOVE DIRECTIONS 

2530 IF QX<0 THEN H=-10 
2540 IF QX=0 THEN H=0 
2550 IF QX>0 THEN H=10 
2560 QY=Y-YR 

2570 IF QY<0 THEN V=-6 
2580 IF QY=0 THEN V=0 
2590 IF QY>0 THEN V=6 
2600 QX=XR+H : QY=YR+V 

2608 ' 

2609 'CHECK TO SEE IF A VIC GOT 
YOU1 

2610 IF QX=X-2 AND QY=Y THEN PUT 
( QX , Q Y ) - ( QX+ 8 , QY+ 5 ) , VA , PSET : X=XR 
: Y- YR : XN=QX+ 2 : YN-QY : GOT02 2 90 

2618 ' 

2619 "SEE IF VIC HIT A VIC 

2620 IF PPOINT(QX,QY)=5 AND PPOI 



84 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



I 



Con*P«* crwarC@ $ ProdUCt$ ° f '*« *o 



Color Connection III 

by BJ Chambless 

This is the most comprehensive modem package 
for the Color Computerl All standard protocols are 
supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full 
support of the auto answer/auto dial feature for 
both Hayes compatible and Radio Shack modems 
is provided. You can use all baud rates when 
using the Radio Shack Deluxe RS232 program 
packl A big buffer of up to 42K is offered (64K is 
required for maximum buffer size.) You can print 
directly from the buffer, and files bigger than the 
buffer can be uploaded. The automatic XON/X- 
OFF protocol downloads direct to disk as welll 
Printer baud rates are selectable from the 
software. 

The hi-res 51 x 24 screen has optional inverted 
colors and anti-truncation. All printable characters 
are available at the keyboard and all control char- 
acters are supported including ESCape, RUB, DEL, 
etc. Single key macros allow easy entry of often 
used passwords and ID'S with a single key touch. 
Our introduction to Data Communications tutor- 
ial and glossary of terms are included. You won't 
find a better telecommunication package any- 
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32K RSDOS Disk $49.95 



JV^tr Mitsuba 1200 

■pt^JaT? Modem 

$199 

CoCo cable $25.00 

A perfect clone of the popular (and expensive) 
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300 baud operation, direct connect, touch tone or 
pulse dialing, full or half duplex, speaker alert to 
busy signal, and complete compatibility with the 
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Universal 
Video Plus 

composite video interface 
for ail Color Computersl 

We would like you to look at our Universal 
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the best buy in CoCo monitor drivers everl 

• The Universal Video Plus works with every 
CoCo. Easy-to-follow, clear Instructions 

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• All cables (audio & video) are included. No 
need to buy extenders or extra cables as 
required by other drivers. 

• Heavy duty construction, evidenced by 
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• Shielded audio & video cables insure that 
no extra RF interference is introduced from the 
Universal Video Plus, unlike other interfaces. 

• The adjustment pot on the Universal Video 
Plus makes it easy to optimize the video sig- 
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• Our advanced design gives the highest 
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• Installation Is easy. There is no soldering 
and no dismantling of the RF shield. 



Robot Odyssey 



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Adventure game or advanced education? You 
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Robotropolis is an underground city inhabited by 
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grabber, an antenna, four thrusters, four bumpers, 
and a battery. You must learn to operate, modify, 
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While having fun you will learn about the inside 
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Require* 64K, Disk $34.95 



Universal Video Plus 



$34.95 



Dual Double-Sided 
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Monitors 

NAP Monochrome Monitors 

The 20 mh2 band width, 800 fine resolution, and 
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Green 12" Amber 12" $105.00 

plus $5 shipping 

SAKATA Color Monitor 

Beautiful 13" color display with 280 x 300 line 
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$175 plus $15 shipping 



S399 



Includes controller, DOS manual, cabinet, 
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Computerware is a federally registered trademark 
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Canadian distribution by Kelly Software, 
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• pages of hardware 
over 50 software products 
^ • informative articles & product reviews 

» -* monitors, disk drives, modems, printers, joysticks, & more. 
• business applications, OS-9 software, personal productivity tools 
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send for our free catalog & get $3 off with this coupon. 



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+ 




XTERM 



• Menu oriented 

• Upload/download. Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 

• Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



OS-9 Communications program. 

• Definable macro keys 

• Works with standard serial port, RS232 
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• Works with standard screen. XSCREEN, or 
WORDPAK 80 column board 



$49.95 



with source $89.95 



XMENU 

Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 
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$ 29a 95 with source $59.95 



OS-9 hi-res screen 

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Hierarchial directory OS-9 calculator 

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OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 



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OS-9 word processing system. 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, underline, 
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$69.95 with source $124.95 



Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with XWORD/XMERGE source $199.95 



OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 



— 



AND FOR RS 




n 



SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING This 
sales-based accounting package is designed for 
the non-accounting oriented businessman. It also 
contains the flexibility for the accounting oriented 
user to set up a double entry journal with an almost 
unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, 
transaction driven Accounts Receivable and Ac- 
counts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check 
Register, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and 
a Journal Posting List. $79.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Includes detail 
ed audit trails and history reports for each customer, 
prepares invoices and monthly statements, mailing 
labels, aging lists, and an alphabetized customer 
listing. The user can define net terms for commer- 
cial accounts or finance charges for revolving 
accounts. This package functions as a standalone 
A/R system or integrates with the Small Business 
Accounting package. $59.95 



These programs are -user friendly and menu 
driven. Sample transactions are included. Each 
package features a hi-res screen. Each requires 
a printer f a minimum of 32k and at least 1 disk 
drive. 



PAYROLL Designed for maintaining personnel 
and payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salaried 
employees with 8 deductions each. Calculates 
payroll and tax amounts, prints checks and main- 
tains year-to-date totals, which can be automatical- 
ly transferred to the SB^ package. Computes each 
pay period's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be withheld. 
Additional outputs include mailing list, listing of 
employees, year-to-date federal and/or state tax 
listing, and a listing of current misc. deductions. 
Suited for use in all states except Oklahoma and 
Delaware. $59.95 



DMS Database Management System. Search, 
sort, calculated fields, disk and tape inter- 
faces. $24.95 



CBK Complete check register with statement 
balancing. Includes full amortization program and 
wage analysis program. $24.95 



AUT085 Hi-res screen. 51/64/85 characters 
per line, inverse characters, automatic line 
numbering. $19.95 




MICROTECH 
CONSULTANTS 

||||% 1906 JerroEd Avenue 
IHVpSI Paul, MN 55112 

. OS-9 is a trademark of Microwatt 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



C6 1 2) 633-6 101 



NT(QX,QY+1)=0 THEN 2 63/3 ELSE 267 
0 

263/3 PLAY"T30O1CGCGCGCT2O3" 
2640 PUT(XR,YR) - (XR+8 , YR+5) , NA,P 
SET:NL=NL-1 : S (6) =S (6) +10* ( 1 . 3 ) * ( 
(MN/2) -3) :P(DQ)=0:P(DQ+1)=0 
2650 IF NL=0 THEN GOTO2830 
2660 GOT0278/3 

2668 • 

2669 'VIC HITS A FENCE? 

2670 IF PP0INT(QX,QY)=5 AND PPOI 
NT(QX,QY+1)=5 THEN 2 680 ELSE 272 

0 

268/3 PUT(XR,YR) -(XR+8, YR+5 ) ,NA,P 
SET:NL=NL-1:S(6)=S(6)+1/3*(1.1) *( 
(MN/2)-3) :P(DQ)=/3:P(DQ+l)=/3 
2 690 PLAY"T2 5 5AGAGAGAG" : PUT ( QX , Q 
Y ) - ( QX+7 , QY+4 ) , FA, PSET: PLAY " AGAG 
AGA" : PUT (QX, QY) - (QX+7 , QY+4 ) , EX,P 
SET: PLAY" GAGAGAGAGAGAG" : PUT (QX, Q 
Y) -(QX+7, QY+4) ,FA,PSET:PUT(QX,QY 
)-(QX+8,QY+5) ,NA,PSET 
2700 IF NL=0 THEN GOT0283/3 
2710 GOTO2780 

2718 • 

2719 'VIC HITS A HOLE? 

2720 IF PPOINT(QX+3,QY)=5 AND PP 
0INT(QX+3,QY+1)=5 THEN 2730 ELSE 

2770 

2730 PUT(XR,YR)-(XR+8,YR+5) ,NA,P 
SET:S(6)=S(6)+10*(1.2)*( (MN/2)-3 
) :NL=NL-1:P(DQ)=0:P(DQ+1)=0 
2740 PLAY"T255ABCDEFG" :PUT(QX+1, 
QY) -(QX+7, QY+4) ,HH,PSET: PLAY "ABC 
DEFG" : PUT (QX+1, QY) - (QX+7 , QY+4 ) ,H 
I , PSET : PLAY"ABCDEFGT2 " : PUT ( QX+1 , 
QY)-( QX+7, QY+4) , HA, PSET 
2750 IF NL=/3 THEN GOTO2830 
276/3 GOTO2780 

2768 1 

2769 'MOVE VIC WITHOUT HITTING A 
NYTHING 

2770 PUT(XR,YR)-(XR+8,YR+5) ,NA,P 
SET : PUT ( QX , QY ) - ( QX+8 , QY+5 ) , VA , PS 
ET:P(DQ)=QX:P(DQ+1)=QY 

2780 NEXT DQ 

2788 ' 

2789 'UPDATE SCORE 

2790 AC=USR2 (NL) :N$=STR$ (S (6) ) :X 
B=76+6*(6-LEN(STR$(S(6) ) ) ) :YA=14 
8:G0SUB4/3 

2792 1 

2793 'UPDATE SCREEN NO. 

2794 N$=STR$( (MN/2) -3) :YA=159:XB 
=100:GOSUB40 

2798 ' 

2799 'UPDATE NUMBER OF VI CS LEFT 

2800 N$=STR$(NL) :YA=17/3:XB=76+6* 



(6-LEN(STR$ (NL) ) ) :GOSUB40 
281/3 GOTO1960 

2819 • 

2820 'YOU CLEARED THE SCREEN 
2830 AC=USR2 (NL) :N$=STR$(S(6) ) :Y 
A=148:XB=76+6*(6-LEN(STR$(S(6) ) ) 
) : GOSUB4 /3 : MN=MN+ 2 : NL=MN 

2835 N$=STR$( (MN/2) -3) :YA=159:XB 
=1/3/3 :GOSUB40 

2837 N$=STR$(NL) :YA=170:XB=76+6* 
(6-LEN(STR$ (NL) ) ) :GOSUB40 
2840 FOR D=220 TO 230 : PMODE3 , 1 : S 
CREEN1 , 1 : SOUNDD, 2 : PMODE4 , 1 : SCREE 
Nl , 1 : FORDA=lT01/3 : NEXTDA: NEXTD : FO 
R D=l TO 1/30: NEXTD 
2850 GOT01632 




About Your Subscription 



Your copy of THE RAINBOW is sent second class 
mail. If you do not receive your copy by the 5th 
of the month of the publication date, send us a card 
and we will mail another. Canadian subscribers 
and foreign airmail allow two additional weeks. 

You must notify us of a new address when you 
move. Notification should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to the month in which 
you change your address. Sorry, we cannot be 
responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an "account 
number" and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U.S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. This applies to everyone except those 
whose subscriptions are through our distributor 
in Australia. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 87 



DELPHI BUREAU 

Building an 

OS-9 Support Network 



We are happy to welcome an old 
friend as a new staff member 
on the RAINBOW Color SIG. 
Steve Bjork (6809ER), a professional 
programmer, joined the staff in May. 
Steve is now handling the OS-9 topic in 
our database. 

Steve holds a degree in computer 
science and began working with compu- 
ters in 1972. 

In the late 1970s Steve started a small 
computer company, Computer Light 
and Sound, selling software for the 
TRS-80 Models I and III. Most of these 
programs were games, light pen drivers 
and software-controlled voice and 
music synthesizers. 

About 1980, Steve started work for 
Datasoft Inc. It was here that Steve was 
introduced to the Color Computer and 
he began writing software for it. Some 
of Steve's programs Tandy has mar- 
keted are Zaxxon, Sands of Egypt, 
Micro- Painter, Clowns & Balloons, 
Mega-Bug, Audio Spectrum Analyzer 
and Popcorn, Steve was soon in charge 
of all software that Datasoft wrote for 
Tandy. 



Cray Augsburg is RAINBOW'S technical 
assistant and has an associate's degree 
in electrical engineering. He and his 
wife, Ruth Ann, have two children and 
live in Louisville, Kentucky. His user- 
name on Delphi is RAIN BOW MAG. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow's CoCo SIGop 



In 1983 Steve left Datasoft to start his 
own company, SRB Software. At SRB, 
Steve oversees all program develop- 
ment. In the past three years they have 
produced such programs for the Color 
Computer as Stellar Life Line, Ghana 
Bwana, One on One, Pitfall II and The 
Motion Picture. 

Public domain software like Coterm 
and the Mouse interface are also being 
developed at SRB. Steve says he feels 
"software houses should pay back the 
user who purchases their products by 
developing such free software." 

Steve has also developed many hard- 
ware devices over the years. He has 
developed a home control system based 
on the CoCo 2 that includes an alarm 
system. One of this system's novel 
options is turning on a lawn watering 
system when an intruder is detected by 
the computer's infra-red sensors, thus 
making it easier to identify the culprit. 

Steve's hobbies include remote- 
control cars and planes, video games 
and going to Disneyland. 

We are sure you will find his knowl- 
edge of the 6809 microprocessor and his 
dedication to similar systems will make 
OS-9 a viable force on the Delphi 
network. After all, he is the 6809ER! 

Surcharges 

A surcharged file is simply a program 
or group of programs for which you 
must pay an extra fee in addition to 
connect time charges for the right to 



88 THE RAINBOW July 1 966 



download. They are denoted by a dollar 
sign ($) at the end of the group name. 
In the CoCo SIG, all surcharged files 
carry a charge of $3.50. 

All files in the rainbow on tape 
database area, for instance, are sur- 
charged. Some of the files appearing in 
the OS-9 database are surcharged: those 
from the "KISSable OS-9" column in 

RAINBOW. 

There are some questions as to just 
how the system charges you for down- 
loading these "extra-cost" files. Try to 
visualize a group of files (there may only 
be one file in some groups) as a room. 
When you open the door to that room 
and enter, the door automatically closes 
behind you. While you are in the room, 
you may download as many of the files 



**Try to visualize 
a group of files 
• • . as a room. 
When you open 
the door and 
enter, the door 
automatically 
closes behind 



you 



55 



as you want, as many times as you want. 
When you are satisfied with what you 
have, you may leave the room 
(CONTROL-Z) and the door again closes 
behind you. 

It is at this point that you are charged 
for your downloads. You are only 
charged $3.50 regardless of what you 
have done in that room. If none of your 
download attempts were successful or 
they were aborted, you are not charged 
at all. This should clear up any ques- 
tions, but if you are still concerned, 
contact me through the Forum. 

Shopping 

While the Shopping area of our Color 
SIG is being used to market Falsoft 
products — magazines and books, for 
instance, may be ordered online — we 
are phasing in other advertisers as well. 
For more information on how to 



market your products in Shopping, 
contact Jim Reed (JIMREED) at RAIN- 
BOW. 

Polls and Surveys 

If you need other opinions on a 
burning question, you may create a poll 
online to survey our SIG members. Just 
type POLL at the main SIG menu 
prompt. Up to 20 polls can be posted 
at the same time. 

At regular intervals of about two 
months, Jim Reed will archive the polls 
in the Topics section of the SIG, so even 
the older polls are available for review. 
You may review the results as well as the 
candid comments of other users in the 
Topics section. It is very easy to create 
your own survey, so you might give it 
a try. 

Baud Comparison 

Not long ago, Marty Goodman 
(MARTYGOODMAN) asked me to 
run a little test since I use a 2400 Baud 
modem. He wanted to find out what the 



download time differences would be 
between 300, 1200 and 2400 Baud. I 
took a little time one Saturday after- 
noon to do this. 

With Mikeyterm in hand (or rather, 
computer), I went into the MS-DOS 
SIG database to find a good, large file. 
I stumbled across Yahtzee, which is 
15,232 bytes, or 119 blocks long. Using 
Xmodem protocol, I downloaded the 
file three times to achieve the following 
results: 

300 Baud — 10 min. 21 sec. 
1200 Baud — 3 min. 52 sec. 
2400 Baud — 2 min. 55 sec. 

Marty downloaded the file at 1200 
baud to get a check on my results and 
it took three minutes and 53 seconds 
(almost exactly the same). 

The fact that 2400 Baud was nowhere 
near twice as fast as 1200 came as no 
suprise. As Marty explains it, the hand- 
shake time required for downloading 
takes up a good deal of the overall time. 
This fraction becomes larger at higher 



Database Manager's Report 



A Cray Augsburg (RAINBOW- 

/% C?MAG) has already told you, 
im >3the biggest news in our data- 
base is the arrival of Steve Bjork as our 
official OS-9 section leader. Steve is 
actively involved in developing OS-9- 
based software. Soon his name will be just 
as well-known as the author of definitive 
OS-9 programs as it is currently for Disk 
Extended basic games and graphics. 

We look forward to the rapid growth of 
the OS-9 section and we already have plans 
to allocate more section topics to cover 
what we anticipate will be a growing 
number of OS-9 users. The Delphi CoCo 
SIG is committed to fully supporting OS- 
9. We want to see a section where both 
software developers and end-users can use 
the Delphi CoCo SIG as a meeting place 
to share ideas and develop more and better 
OS-9 software options, and where those 
with questions can go for prompt and 
authoritative answers. 

Over the last three months IVe devel- 
oped and stocked the Graphics, General, 
Utilities, Product Reviews and Hardware 
Hacking topic areas. Cray has been stock- 
ing the Games topic area. Don Hutchison 
(DONHUTCHISON) and Art Flexser 
(ARTFLEXSER) have joined me in build- 
ing the Source Code for 6809 Assemblers 
topic (formerly known as the Assembly 
Language topic) area. 

We want to encourage those with their 
own or public domain Music files to 



contact either me or Cray on Delphi. We 
may be able to arrange free connect time 
for you to assist you with uploading such 
material, and in part repay you for your 
efforts. 

New in the Database 

Genera! 

IVe posted instructions on how to use 
the DOT commands in the forum to make 
your messages appear neater to others who 
read them, and a report on the loss of the 
last spare GOES (WEFAX) satellite in the 
explosion of a Delta Rocket booster. Erik 
Gavriluk (ERIKGAV) has given us two 
computer essays on programming humor 
and Cray has added a classic prankster 
program, Fool. 

Source Code for 6809 Assemblers 

Don Hutchison has put several tutorials 
here, and Art Flexser is in the process of 
uploading some of his. These are combi- 
nations of essays and assembly language 
source code to aid the beginning and 
intermediate assembly language pro- 
grammer. This series of tutorials was 
originally written by Don and Art for 
CompuServe's CoCo SIG, and appears 
here through their generosity and with the 
kind consent of Wayne Day, SysOp of the 
CompuServe CoCo SIG. 

Don has also uploaded source code for 
SuperDupe, one of the best single-drive, 
disk duplication utilities written. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 89 




Show Schedule: 

Friday evening 

— Exhibits open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Saturday 

— CoCo Community Breakfast at 8 a.m. 

— Exhibits open at 10 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. 

Sunday 

— Exhibits open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



Hncdon 



\ 

/ 




RAINBOWfest is the 
only computer show 
exclusively dedi- 
cated to your Tandy Color 
Computer. Nowhere else 
will you see as many pro- 
ducts, have access to the 
top experts, or be able to 
attend free seminars. It's 
the next best thing to re- 
ceiving the latest issue of 
THE rainbow in your mail- 
box! 

Every RAINBOWfest 



features many delightful 
surprises. It's a great op- 
portunity for commercial 
programmers to show off 
new and innovative pro- 
ducts for the first time. You 
get the jump on new capa- 
bilities for your CoCo. In 
exhibit after exhibit, there 
are demonstrations, op- 
portunities to experiment 
with software and hard- 
ware, and special RAIN- 
BOWfest prices. 



You can set your own 
pace between visiting ex- 
hibits and attending the 
valuable, free seminars on 
all aspects of your CoCo — 
from improving basic 
skills to working with the 
sophisticated OS-9 oper- 
ating system. 

Many of the people who 
write for the rainbow — 
as well as those who are 
written about — are there 
to meet you and answer 



X A A A 



s 
s 




s 




your questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people, 
just like you, who share 
your interest in the Color 
Computer. It's a person- 
to-person event, as well as 
a tremendous learning ex- 
perience, in a fun and re- 
laxed atmosphere. 

To make it easier for you 
to participate, we schedule 
RAINBOWfests in differ- 
ent parts of the country. If 
you missed the fun in Chi- 
cago, Illinois, why don't 
you make plans nowto join 
us in Princeton? For 
members of the family who 
don't share your affinity for 
CoCo, you'll be comforta- 
ble knowing that RAIN- 
BOWfest is located in an 
area with many other at- 
tractions. 



The Hyatt Regency- 
Princeton offers special 
rates ($79, single or double 
room) for RAINBOWfest. 
The show opens Friday 
evening with a session 
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's 
a daytime-only show Sat- 
urday — the CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast (sepa- 
rate tickets required) is at 
8 a.m., then the exhibit hall 
opens promptly at 10 a.m. 
and runs until 6 p.m. Sun- 
day, the exhibit hall opens 
at 11 a.m. and closes at 4 
p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOW- 
fest may be obtained di- 
rectly from THE RAINBOW. 

We'll also send you a spe- 
cial reservation form so 
you can get your special 
room rate. 



Come to RAINBOWfest! 



r 



FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders received from each state. 




The POSH way to go. 

You may wish to have your travel arrangements handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assistance, Inc., of 
Louisville, The people at POSH are very familiar with both 
RAINBOWfest and the area in which it is being held. So, for the 
same POSH treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH 
at (502) 893-3311, All POSH services are available at no charge 
to RAINBOWfest attendees. 



YES, I'm coming to Princeton! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance sale price. 
Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 

Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 
Saturday CoCo Breakfast at $12 each total 

Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt 
Regency-Princeton ($79, single or double room). 



$1.00 



Name (please print) 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



Telephone 

Company 

□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Exp. Date 

Signature 



Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky call (800) 847-0309. 

Advance ticket deadline: Oct. 10,1986. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will 
also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full 
price. 



Baud. The actual transmission time is 
relatively stable and small 

Marty mulled over this information 
for a few days and came up with an idea. 
What if someone were to write a "var- 
iable block length" protocol? The ideal 
would be one that started transmitting 
blocks of 128 bytes. As more and more 
blocks are transmitted error free, the 
software would start transmitting in- 
creasingly larger (256 bytes, 512 bytes) 
blocks. If an error were to occur, the 



"The fact that 
2400 Baud was 
nowhere near 
twice as fast as 
1200 came as no 



surprise 




next blocks would be small again and 
start the increase all over. With this type 
of protocol, much of the system over- 
head in file transfer could be eliminated. 
If anyone is interested in this idea, 
please contact us. 

As those who visit the Delphi CoCo 
SIG already know, Marty has agreed to 
produce a new technical question-and- 
answer column for RAINBOW, beginning 
with the August issue. Marty's column 
succeeds the popular "Earth to Ed" 
series. 

Ed Ellers was recently promoted to 
managing editor of Soft Sector maga- 
zine here at Falsoft. 

We welcome Marty's technical exper- 
tise on the pages of rainbow and 
remind you that the quickest way to get 
your technical questions answered is to 
post them in the CoCo Sig forum. 

Next Month 

In the past several issues we have 
discussed many of the ideas and con- 
cepts presented on our CoCo SIG. In 
the August issue we will backtrack and 
present a detailed description of how to 
upload and download programs from 
the databases. 



I've uploaded a set of six assembly 
language subroutines for use in assembly 
language programming to handle screen 1/ 
O and create a point-and-pick menu selec- 
tor. 

Erik has uploaded specification infor- 
mation for his McPaint printer drivers to 
assist assembly language programmers 
who wish to write their own assembly 
language drivers for McPaint. 

Don has also provided source code for 
some disk and tape scanning utilties. These 
provide the start, end and execute ad- 
dresses of ML programs. And he has 
provided source code for Babybas, a 64K 
RAM program allowing you to turn a Disk 
Extended basic computer into an Ex- 
tended basic or Color basic computer 
without pulling out the disk drive con- 
troller. 

Games 

Michael Holman (MHOLMAN) has 
given us a "Mad Libs" type game, where 
you fill in adjectives and adverbs to com- 
plete a story in a humorous way. Bill 
Lippert (BEERBELLY) has given us a 
Yahtzee game, rainbow Magazine has 
added 20 former Chromasette arcade and 
Adventure games to this database. 

Graphics 

IVe just added a gallery of 19 original 
works of art by Noel Fallon. Noel uses 
Graphicom, CoCo Max and Graphicom 
IL IVe also put up a new version of the 
Eclipse Editor by Danny Brown. This is a 
dedicated "fat bits" type editor for touch- 
ing up graphics images created with other 
graphic editors. Written in assembly lan- 
guage with a joystick and firebutton- 
driven interface, it represents months of 
work by Danny. An earlier version was 
sold by Moreton Bay Software, who 
kindly consented to allow us to post this 
version free of any surcharge. 

IVe also posted a group of converter 
programs that allow CoCo owners to 
download and view Commodore 64 Doo- 
dle art files, and a program called Flags 
that draws the flags of about 30 different 
nations. 

Richard Trasborg (TRAS) has contrib- 
uted a likeness of Zsa Zsa Gabor. Erik 
Gavriluk has given us an interesting rota- 
tion demo, and Mark Kowit (TOBOR8) 
has contributed some pop art-like digitized 
images of everyday things. Keith Smith 
(UGLY) has given us a wryly amusing sign 
called Attaboy. James Barnes (SEAJAY) 
has contributed a printer graphics pinup 
calendar. Erik has also given us a gallery 
of art by Erik White. 

Utilities 

Bill Haesslein (BILLH) has given us a 
driver for the Radio Shack version of the 



Wordpak 80-column card, designed to run 
with ADOS. Robert Pierce (RPIERCE) 
has provided Trackdump, a program that 
uses the track-read command to show all 
the details on your disk, including the 
sector header and gap bytes not seen by 
normal Zap utilities. Michael Holman has 
given us a mini-BBS program, and Bill 
Lippert has provided some pascal trigo- 
nometric utilites. 

Don Hutchison has given us Nutrax, a 
utility that formats an additional five 
tracks on 35-track disks without hurting 
the old 35 tracks. This can aid those 
converting their systems to 40-track Disk 
Extended basic varients. Don has also 
uploaded a color testing utility called 
ColorBar. 

One of most amazing new uploads is 
KDSK from Kenneth Wuelzer (WUEL- 
ZERKEN), a complex disk zap utility for 
Disk Extended basic, FLEX, and MS- 
DOS disks. This one must be seen to be 
believed! 

Art Flexser has uploaded a package for 
fast disk duplication. This program comes 
with source code and documentation, as 
well as a working binary object code 
version. 

rainbow Magazine has uploaded eight 
new utitilies including a Hi-Res screen 
driver, business grahics package, CGP-1 15 
screen dump program and a LIST com- 
mand disabler. Those eight were originally 
released as Chromasette programs. 

OS-9 Database 

Just prior to Steve Bjork's coming 
aboard, Cray uploaded the June 1986 
RAINBOW Magazine "Kissable OS-9" soft- 
ware to the OS-9 database. 

SIG Etiquette 

On occasion, folks PAGE us on the 
CoCo SIG. Whenever we can, we speak 
with members. But, at times, we may be 
busy and unable to rush to conference. We 
suggest you first use the SEN command 
(SEN USERNAME message you want to 
send) to ask us if we are free. Try "SEN 
USERNAME are you free for a chat?" 
That way, we have the option of respond- 
ing "Sorry, am busy right now." 

Conclusions 

We are pleased with our growth in the 
database so far, but much needs to be 
done. We look forward to a dynamic and 
expanding OS-9 section under the leader- 
ship of Steve Bjork, and we will continue 
to work on expanding all other sections. 
Indeed, some big suprises are awaiting 
Delphi users over the next few months. 
Stay tuned! 

— Marty 

(MARTYGOODMAN) 

Delphi CoCo SIG Database Manager 

/Z5\ 



92 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 





4K 




f the 1 

mmmm 

RAINBOW 

J- -L 


■ 


1 AKlJNlr JsAMC lKAlJNlJNCx 







Translation Sensation 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Our objective today is to create an 
educational program that may 
be of value to you, your siblings, 
children or friends. 

We are going to make a foreign lan- 
guage sentence translation program. 
The plan is to display a sentence in one 
language on the text screen and under- 
neath it display a translation in a second 
language. It may be translated word by 
word, phrase by phrase or in toto. 

The Creative Process 

How do you transfer an idea into 
reality? First, conceptualize the idea in 
its most basic component. In this in- 
stance, the sentence and its translation 
in a second language must be placed on 
the screen. Color, available in Color 
BASIC, will be used to enhance the 
presentation. 

Even though you may visualize an 
idea in great detail, it is not good 
practice to try to work up an intricate 
idea. As you add bits and pieces to the 
program, you will constantly modify 
and alter the creation. New insights will 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer and special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of CoCo. 



cause you to deviate further from the 
original concept. Assuredly, the end 
result will be something more sophisti- 
cated than that visualized at the begin- 
ning. 

Further, when you use the sup- 
posedly "final" version of the program, 
you will get many ideas for change. It 
will metamorphose again and again 
through additional periods of develop- 
ment. 

This is the greatest benefit to a pro- 
grammer as opposed to a ready-made 
software user. The user of a store- 
bought program buys a program — 
nothing more. He is confined to the 
parameters of the software. He can do 
no more than what the author envi- 
sioned. 

On the other hand, the budding 
programmer, having created his pro- 
gram from a modest beginning, can 
bend the program to his will by altering, 
expanding and enhancing it over a 
period of time — each version just a bit 
better than the previous one. There is a 
sense of accomplishment and fun for the 
creator. 



The Translation Program 

What language shall we use to dem- 



onstrate? Latin is fine because it has 
long vowel signs that can be dispensed 
with. German has umlauted vowels 
(indicated by two dots over the vowel) 
and a special double *S' character. These 
can be overcome by adding an 'E' after 
the umlauted vowel and using "SS." 
French, Spanish and Italian all have 
special accent marks. But I hesitate 
using any of these languages without 
being able to indicate the accent marks 
for this demo program. 

There is one language, Romanian, 
that has special characters and accents 
that can be used to illustrate how a little 
ingenuity can solve this problem. I also 
wanted to use an unfamiliar language to 
show more forcefully the value of this 
type of program. 

There are five characters in Roman- 
ian that present problems. In my pro- 
gram, these non-English characters are 
represented by symbols. A 'T* with a 
commma underneath (pronounced 
"TS") became the up-arrow. An 'S' with 
a comma underneath, (pronounced 
"SH"), became the dollar sign. The 
gutteral T and an old-fashioned 'A' 
became the apostrophe, and an ac- 
cented 'A' became the '@' sign. 

Now, to work! From Listing 1, key in 
lines 1, 2, 10, 20 and 21. In Line 1, the 



July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 93 




1 



f^iajftY 





/ Max Fonts Max Edit 



/Voiv jw ca/? /?ai/e to 72 fonts for creating 
dazzling type-set titles and special displays! 

3 SETS OF 24 FONTS 

WHICH ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD! 



soy* 



each 



3m 



95 



©1985 Snard Enterprises 



Written by Wally Bayer and Mike Shawaluk 



A FONT EDITOR FOR COCO MAX 

• Edit current fonts 

• Create new fonts 

• Design symbol fonts 

• Comes with pre-defined fonts 

• CoCo Max I & II compatible 



$1095 



Written by: Michael W. Shawaluk 

CoCo Max* is a registered trademark ot Cotorware. 




(Disk Only) 



SETONE 



SET TWO 



SET THREE 



Digital Small 

Digi+al medium 

Digital Large 

Futura 

IBrid Sinai! 

f!"!k ]J"!t !! !!"!t I! <!"•! {!"!> <f"fk HIM 

lb (Nil is J imhihibiis. 

waifs 



® 



DfllsBsiSiOnDlDi 1 




Victory 

Baby Taath *m«M 




Flm Print 

Normande Small 



Mormande Medium 

NORMANDE LG 

Pisno 



cHctfclow 

Kolots 



CTSlil^E.!!IPII§l!. 



S3 

PeiqNOT SmaII 

PeiciNOT Larqe 
PFocFinfn smntt 
PRCCRnH ITBELJIKJCTB 



B ipf<3m ;i Btl«H:k Small 

fiitipka belic. 




i 101 nri r* o i j c t o i 

Mocnofl Cwai/t 

Mocnofl JIapre 

4^ ^ Q ^ 

POIE1T OUT 

PriiYuoLi'u SawaSI 

PREETFOUT LPIRQE 





Bocklin 

Croatlway 

lOIRiDAIDW^V ENGR. 

Dot Matrix 



i 



Old ^nalisii 
b n n n pa at» 

urns sin 



STIENCEL 





In man 

Tip Top 










WEJLT*LE\ 



W» 1 id I' 




PRO-COLOR-FILE 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

ENHANCED 2.0 

60 Data Fields for each record 
1020 spaces available per record if needed 
Maximizes multiple drive operation 
28 equation lines (+-7) 
IF-THEN-ELSE logic test in equations 
Full Screen editing on up to 4 data entry screens 
Key click and auto key repeat 
Stores custom designed report formats 
Obtain totals, averages, or summaries for any field 
Output reports to printer, screen, or disk file 
Send data out to a DYNACALC compatible file 
Separate label generator for up to 10 across labels 
Pre-define up to 16 indexes for searching/reporting file 
Sorts 750 records in under 5 minutes 
User defined selection menus 
Repeated tasks performed with one keystroke 
Comes with 75 pages of documentation in a 3 ring binder 
Supported by a national users group 
Full time programmer support 
Supplied on an unprotected disk 



PRO-COLOR-FORMS 2.0 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRO-COLOR-FORMS will access data files created with 
PRO-COLOR-FILE and merge them with a letter or place them 
on pre-printed forms. 

• STORE UP TO 6 FORMATS • USER DEFINED PAGE SIZE 

• SUPPORTS SPECIAL PRINTER CONTROL CODES • RIGHT 
JUSTIFICATION • PASSWORD PROTECTION • MERGES 
WITH GRAPHICS FROM MASTER DESIGN OR 
TELEGRAPHICS • 

PROCOLORDIR 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, inc. 

PRO-COLOR-DIR will read your directories and create a 
master data file that can be accessed by PRO-COLOR-FILE 
for sorting and reporting. 1000 + records can be stored on 
one diskette with valuable information about each program. 

You can obtain hard copies of the information and create 
labels of the filenames for placing on the diskette itself. 

• DISK ID NAME • FILENAME/EXT • TYPE OF FILE 

• DATE CREATED • DATE UPDATED • NUMBER OF 
GRANS ALLOCATED • NUMBER OF SECTORS 
ALLOCATED AND USED • MACHINE LANGUAGE 
ADDRESSES • , 

FOR BOTH jT 




DYNACALC 

SPREAD SHEET FLEXIBILITY 

(Includes Dynagraph, Sidewise) — I 

Telewriter-64. 



WORD PROCESSOR POWER 



$QQ95 



SIDEWISE 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Add anew "twist" to your printer's capabilities! 

SIDEWISE makes your printer do something you never 
thought possible -print side ways! 

SIDEWISE will read in any ASCII text file and print it out 
side ways using a Radio Shack, Epson, Okidata, C-ltoh or 
Gemini printers having dot-graphics ability. 

SIDEWISE 0S9 is compatible with DYNACALC 0S9 and 
requires Basic09 

SIDEWISE 0S9 
(Disk only) 




SIDEWISE RS-DOS 



UlUfJdUUftS WIUI UTIVMUHLU 1/03 dllU 



coco Max 11 

GRAPHICS SUPERIOR ^ I 



@ SUMMARY 

© 1985 Derringer Software, Inc. 

If you use your spreadsheet program to keep track of youi 
expenses then ©SUMMARY can help you analyze those 
expenses. For example, if you indicate a "Category" for each 
expense then @ SUMMARY will produce a report that shows 
a total for each category, the highest amount, the lowest 
amount and the average amount. In addition, ©SUMMARY 
can produce a hi-res line graph or bar graph of the analysis 
and allow you to place titles on the graph. A hardcopy of the 
graph can also be generated as wed as saved to disk. 

the analysis can be saved in a "data file" which can be 
loaded into DYNACALC or read in by @ SUMMARY for future 
additions to the analysis. If you use other Spreadsheets such 
as ELITE*CALC then you have added a graphing feature to 
your spreadsheet applications. The analysis can also be saved 
in an ASCII file which can be read by word processors for 
inclusion in a report. 

@ SUMMARY is compatible with any spreadsheet program 
that can generate an ASCII text file of worksheets. 



* RS-DOS version included FREE with DYNACALC 

0S9is a registered trademark of MICRO WARE and MOTOROLA. 

TELEGRAPHICS 

© 1984 by Derringer Software. Inc. 

PRINT HI-RES GRAPHICS USING TELEWRITER-64! 

Use C0C0 Max, Graphicom or other graphics programs to 
create letter heads and print them while using Telewriter-64. 

Telegraphies interfaces with Radio Shack, Epson, Gemini, 
C-ltoh and Okidata printers having dot-addressable graphics. 
A simple modification to Telewriter-64 will allow you to exit 
Telewriter via the DISK I/O MENU and print out the graphic 
without affecting any of your text in the buffer. 

This is the same feature that is included in our MASTER 
DESIGN program. Since we felt you don't need to buy two 
graphics editing programs, we have made this feature available 
at a reduced price. 





Specify RS-DOS 
or OS9* 



(disk only) 



$1095 



*0S9 version does not 
have Hi-Res graphing 

and requires Basic09. 



DYNACALC is a registered trademark of Computer Systems Center 

ELITE* CALC is a trademark of Elite Software 

0S9 is a registered trademark of MICRO WARE and MOTOROLA. 



(Available Only On Disk) 

NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLICABLE 



MASTER DESIGN 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Generates lettering in hi-res graphics that can be different 
sizes, skinny, bold, textured, drop shadowed, raise shadowed 
or tall. Also interfaces with the Telewriter-64 word processor 
for printing hi-res displays with your letters. 

take full advantage of all the extended BASIC hi-res graphic 
commands including boxes, circles, lines, copy displays and 
utilize GET and PUT features. Added commands include mirror 
reflection, turn displays backwards or upside down. Squish 
displays, create dot patterns for shading or diagonal lines. 

The Letterhead Utility allows you to access hi-res graphics 
from Telewriter-64, your own BASIC programs or 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS. 

Interfaces with dot matrix printersjraving dot addressable 
graphics. 




See reviews in: 

July '84 Rainbow, Oct. 84 Hot C0C0 



Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300, Florence, SC 29502-5300 

To place an order by phone, call: (803) 665-5676 

10 AM and 5 PM EOT 

Check, Money Order, VISA or MasterCard 



South Carolina residents add sales tax. 

Include $3.00 for UPS Shipping - $5.00 U.S. Mail - $9.00 Air Mail 

Canadian Distributor-Kelly Software 
Australian Distributor-Computer Hut Software 

This SUMMER SIZZLER SALE may end without notice. 



beginning of the first language is located 
on the fourth row, one space in from the 
left margin (X=97). The translation 
begins four lines below, one space in 
(Y=225). 

In order to have a colored screen 
background, I decided to use all the 
colors except green, Color 1. This was 
done by Z=RND(7)+1. Green never 
appears because if CoCo produces a 
random 1, it must add 1, giving Color 
2. Color 6 (cyan) doesn't give much 
contrast, so as an afterthought, if Z=G, 
we told CoCo to reject it and try again, 
otherwise to the next program line 
called. 



Lines 2 through 9 are reserved for 
GDSUBs. GOSUBs can be put at high line 
numbers after the main program. But, 
being lazy, I prefer to key in one digit 
GOSUBs rather than three or four digit 
ones. This stratagem saves typing time, 
memory space and wear and tear on my 
mind recalling GOSUB numbers. They 
are conveniently grouped at the begin- 
ning of the program for easy reference. 

Look at Line 2. We want to print at 
'X' (beginning at the left side) the 
sentence designated by string X$, T' 
number of characters/ spaces. This is 
the first language sentence. The semi- 
colon chops off the trailing blanks at the 
end of the sentence rather than allowing 
them to continue to the right margin. 
Then the program waits until any key 
is pressed. At location 'Y\ we begin 
from the left (starting) side of the second 
language sentence to show 'Q' number 
of characters/ spaces that translates the 
equivalent T' characters/ spaces of the 
first language. It waits for a key press 
and returns. 

Line 10 is a dual purpose line. It clears 
the screen to some color *Z' and directs 



96 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



CoCo to GDTQ20. 

Each time you go to a new work area, 
you change the GOTO to bypass all the 
lines completed and go directly to the 
desired site. 

Program segments, incremented by 
10 are from Line 20 through 980. Each 
segment has three or four lines incre- 
mented by one. 

In Line 20, string X$ designates the 
first language. The sentence is enclosed 
within quotes. Two initial blank spaces 
precede the text of the sentence. After 
the punctuation mark, a single blank 
space follows. 

Line 21 presents the Y$ string, (the 



second language) in the same rigid 
format. 

An important note: In this program, 
the invisible vertical line (refer to last 
month's tutorial) will always fall di- 
rectly underneath the opening quote. 
For the purposes of locating any 'P' or 
'Q' character or space, the first line of 
a sentence begins at the opening quote, 
numbered zero. Following the imagi- 
nary vertical line, the second line begins 
with character/ space 32. The next row 
begins with number 64, then 96 and 
finally 128. 

The length of the statements is con- 
fined to 159 letters/ spaces, primarily 
because long lines are unwieldy to 
program or study. 

Next, we'll tell CoCo how to display 
the two sentences. Look at lines 20 and 
21. Count the number of characters/ 
spaces in the string. Did you count 27? 
Key in 22 P=27. Now count the number 
of characters/ spaces in Line 21. Did 
you get 26? Add Q=2G:G0SUB2 and 
press enter to tell CoCo what we want 
it to do. Now run it. If you used 
P=31:Q=P (0=31) instead, you would 



get the same result because CoCo stops 
at the actual end of a string. Change T' 
to 159 and try it. 

If you count less than the total con- 
tents of a string, you will get a shortened 
sentence. Try using P=24. This is ex- 
actly what we want. Now we know that 
we can chop the sentence into segments 
at whatever point we select. Delete Line 
22 and look at lines 20 and 21 again. We 
will take this equivalent pair of sentenc- 
es and, section by section, create an 
ongoing translation. 

Count the number of spaces up to and 
including the space after the first word 
in X$. Did you get six? Key in 22 P=6:. 
Do the same for the first word in Y$. 
Did you get eight? Add Q=B:G0SUB2. 
G0SUB2 only acts on LEFTS (X$, 6) and 
LEFTS ( Y$ , 8 ) . Run this and then press 
break. List lines 20 and 21, edit Line 
22 and let's do the next word. 

Remember, we conveniently work 
from the screen. Count the number of 
characters/ spaces and include the one 
after the second word in X$. Press 'X' 
to get to end of the line and add : P-ll. 
Using the same system, find the value 
of 'Q' in Y$ and add :Q=12:G0SUB2. 
Again, run and press BREAK then list 
lines 20 and 21, and edit Line 22. Count 
up to and include the space after the 
third word in both X$ and Y$ to deter- 
mine T' and 'Q'. Press 'X' to end and 
add the appropriate information; now 
run. Did you remember to add G0SUB2 
at the end? Since P=19 and Q=19, you 
can use P=19 and Q=P. Press BREAK 
and finish the sentence. You should 
have added :P=27:Q=26:GDSUB2 to 
Line 22. Again, run and press BREAK. 

You could separate this sentence in 
two more ways. Edit Line 22, type 32 
and D, press ENTER and run. In other 
words, you can break it up into phrases 
or groups of words or display the whole 
works. For practice, revise Line 22 to 
display two words at a time, working 
from the listing on the screen, then 
delete Line 22. 

Remember, G0SUB2 is used only to 
add sections to a program, not to 
display the entire sentence. We will 
create G05UB3 specifically to display the 
entire sentence as a unit. 

Key in lines 3, 30, 31 and 990. Look 
at Line 3. The limit of characters to be 
displayed is 159. CoCo displays the 
entire string up to our predetermined 
limit, in turn. We will select a new 
screen, but we won't reject Color 6 this 
time. Well call up a new screen and 
return. To bypass the segment at Line 



"We will take this equivalent pair of 
sentences and, section by section^ 
create an ongoing translation. " 



20 to go to a new work area, edit Line 
10, press 'X*, the left arrow twice, type 
30 and press ENTER. 

List lines 30 and 31. Accomplish the 
mission with 32 G0SUB3. Run this and 
press BREAK. Change G0SUB3 to 
G05UB2 and try it again. 

Now delete Line 32 and list lines 30 
and 31. "Pun" corresponds to "I put." 
The other words are equivalent. Count 
the first segment. It ends one space after 
"Pun" to get 4 P* value. The first trans- 
lated segment ends one space after "put" 
to find Q value. Key in 32 P=6:Q=B: 
gosub2. Run and press BREAK. 

List lines 30 and 31. "O carte" is 
equivalent to "A book" so we can count 
up to and include the spaces after the 
'E' and *K' respectively to get 'P' and 'Q\ 
Edit Line 32, press *X' and ENTER then 
type :P=14:Q=15:G0SUB2 and run it. 
Press BREAK and list lines 30 and 31. 
Edit Line 32, press ENTER and 'X\ Let's 
add "pe" and "on" respectively. Ob- 
viously, we must add three to each 
previous 4 P* and 'Q' value. Type 
:P=17:Q=18:G0SUB2 and run. 

To add the balance of each line you 
could do it the regular way: Press 
BREAK, edit Line 32, press 'X' and 
ENTER. Type P=26 : Q=27 : G0SUB2. Run 
this and press break. Instead of 
P=26:Q=27:GDSUB2, why not use 
:G0SUB3? Try this: Edit Line 32, press 
*X' and ENTER. Backspace to the colon 
after G0SUB2. Type G0SUB3 and run it. 

That's better, isn't it? We saved the 
bother of counting and keying in the 
final segment and still displayed it. 

Press BREAK and list Line 32. Study 
Line 32 and notice the sequence, GO 



SUB2 : G0SUB3, at the end of the line. We 
know that when we break up a sentence 
into parts we use G0SUB2 at the end of 
each part. We know the final segment 
is added on without calculation by using 
G0SUB3. Therefore, in a sentence 
broken up into two or more parts, the 
usual ending is G0SUB2:G0SUB3. This 
suggests making a G0SUB4 to replace 
GDSUB2:G0SUB3. 

Key in Line 4. To see if it works, edit 
Line 32, press 'X' and enter. Back- 
space to the '2' of G0SUB2. Type 4, press 
enter and run. We have completely 
eliminated figuring out the values for 
the last segment. 

The rule is — when we get to the next 
to the last segment of a sentence, after 
calculating the values of *P' and *Q\ we 
add G0SUB4. The G0SUB4 causes 
GDSUB2 to place the next to last segment 
on the screen. GDSUB3 then overprints 
what is on the screen and adds the 
balance of the sentence. 

If you do not follow the system 
faithfully, you may get lines that slip to 
the left. This is due to not maintaining 
the compulsory space at the end of a 
segment. Recheck the P's and Q's. 

Key in lines 5, 40 and 41; list lines 40 
and 41. This is an exact word-for-word 
translation. Sometimes it is desirable to 
display the first language for preview 
before dissecting it to display the com- 
ponent parts. Line 5 accomplishes this 
mission. 

On your own, working from the 
screen, determine the values of 'P' and 
'Q' and display each pair of words in 
succession. If you are encountering 
gremlins, check Line 42 of the listing. 



When you get it right, you will want to 
put G0SUB5 into action. 

Edit Line 40, press 'X' and enter. 
Type :G0SUB5, press ENTER and run. 
Substitute G0SUB3 for G0SUB5 and see 
the difference. 

Thus far, we have kept our sentences 
short enough to fit on one screen line. 
Press break and list Line 41. These are 
the most characters/ spaces we can fit on 
a line. This is the only instance when we 
do not leave a trailing space. We are 
forced to put the closing quote directly 
underneath the opening quote. Press 
BREAK and run. The period is at the 
right edge. Press break. Insert the 
usual ending blank space and see what 
happens, then RESTDRE the line to its 
original state. 

Key in 22 G0SUB3 and 32 G0SUB3 to 
make the two segments display some- 
thing. Mask Line 990 with a REM. 

Key in Line 999. This line clears the 
screen to a random color and puts the 
repeating legend on top of the panel, 
indicating that we have viewed the 
entire program. After a pause, the first 
part of Line 20 is automatically dis- 
played. Note that Line 10 was bypassed 
and on repeat, CoCo goes to Line 20 
and runs through the entire program. 
Of course, after finalizing the program, 
you would want to EDIT 10 to begin at 
Line 20 so it starts at the beginning. 

Next month, we will continue and 
explore multiple-line sentences: where 
the word order is not compatible for a 
word-for-word translation, where one 
segment is separated by intervening 
words and other ways to present sen- 
tences for study. □ 



The listing: LflNGTUTR 

0 1 LISTINGl 

1 X=97:Y=225:Z=RND(7)+1:IF Z=6 G 
OTOl ELSE GOTO10 

2 PRINT@X, LEFT$(X$,P) ; :EXEC44539 
: PRINT @Y, LEFT $ (Y$,Q) ; :EXEC44539: 
RETURN 

3 P«159 : Q=159 : PRINT@X , LEFT$ (X$ , P 
) ; : EXEC44539 : PRINT @Y , LEFT$ ( Y$ , Q) 
;:Z«RND (7)+l: EXEC 4 4 539: CLS Z : RETU 
RN 

4 GOSUB2 : GOSUB3 : RETURN 

5 P=159:PRINT@X,LEFT$(X$,P) ;:EXE 
C4 4 5 3 9 : CLS Z : RETURN 

10 CLSZ:GOTO20 

2j3 X$=" CEI CARE AS CULT @ 'NVA A @ 
it 



21 Y$=" THOSE WHO LISTEN LEARN • 

22 GOSUB3 

3j3 X$=" PUN O CARTE PE UN RAFT, 
ii 

31 Y$=" I PUT A BOOK ON A SHELF 
ii 

32 GOSUB3 

40 X$=" NE VOM DUCE M'INE DIMIN 
EA A @. " 

41 Y$=» WE SHALL GO TOMORROW MO 
RNING . " 

4 2 P=5 : Q=p : GOSUB2 : P=9 : Q=l l : GOSUB 
2 : P=14 : Q=P : GOSUB2 : P=2 0 : Q=2 3 : GOSU 
B4 

990 'GOTO990 

999 CLSZ: PRINT© 10," REPEATING. . 
" ; : FOR S=l TO 1000 : NEXT : GOT02 0 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 97 



Achieving Arcade Game 
Speed in BASIC 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the "Wishing Well" submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 't forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use but 
remain the property of the author. 

How many years has it been now? 
THE RAINBOW is having 
another anniversary! It seems 
only yesterday that I had my first phone 
conversation with Lonnie back when 
the magazine was four pages long and 
done by photocopying. The first pro- 
gram I gave Lonnie was a simple BASIC 
arcade game called Zelda's Bat Bottle. 
That arcade game was the beginning of. 
a long friendship which eventually 
resulted in the creation of "The Wishing 
Well," a forum to share your ideas and 
wishes. 

While most of my offerings in those 
early issues of THE rainbow were 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



games, there have been only a few times 
in the past few years that I have offered 
an arcade-style game. Therefore, to help 
celebrate the fifth anniversary, I am 
offering a revised listing of one of my 
favorite creations, Advanced Star* 
Trench Warfare. 

Humble Origins 

The "advanced" part of the title does 
not have anything to do with the skill 
level required to play the game. Rather, 
I had created an earlier version of the 
game in the pages of THE rainbow back 
in November 1982. That game, Star* 
Trench Warfare was a very short pro- 
gram with none too elaborate graphics. 

The purpose of that game was to try 
something totally new with the Color 
Computer. While fooling around with 
the concept of Star*Trench, I decided 
to view the screen with a set of red and 
blue 3-D glasses. At that time several 
TV stations were broadcasting the old 
3-D classics Creature From The Black 
Lagoon and Gorilla, so local chain 
stores were handing out free 3-D 
glasses. I happened to glance at some 
CoCo graphics while preparing to view 
one of the movies when, low and be- 
hold, the glasses seemed to give the 
graphics a 3-D look. 

Naturally, I completed the game and 



let Lonnie know that THE RAINBOW 
would have the honor of printing this 
first pseudo 3-D computer game. The 
response to the game was so good that 
Wayne Green even made reference to it 
and to THE RAINBOW in his rival pub- 
lication, 80 MICRO. Since the game 
seemed to work with machine language 
speed from BASIC, I decided to rewrite 
the program and publish an advanced 
version. 

Thanks to Lonnie and the staff of THE 
RAINBOW, we have a forum for our 
software in these pages. Judging from 
my mail, many of you are just as grate- 
ful to him as I am. Otherwise, RAINBOW 
wouldn't be celebrating another anni- 
versary. 

Therefore, to help celebrate with my 
friends at THE RAINBOW I have chosen 
to offer Advanced Star* Trench War- 
fare in a slightly updated version, rather 
than let it collect dust on my disks. 

The Program 

Star*Trench is written entirely in 
BASIC and fits in a 16K Extended Color 
BASIC machine without any modifica- 
tions. The code is extremely tight as 
compared to recent listings in the 
"Wishing Well." The first difference is 
that the lines of the program are num- 
bered by ones rather than tens. This is 



98 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



HOW DO YOO SHARE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — 

Give a rainbow gift 

certificate . . . 



Share the rainbow with your 
friends a gift subscription to the 
premier information source for the 
Color Computer. Then, each month, 
ail year-round, they'll enjoy the 
spectrum of rainbow programs, 
articles and information written 
exclusively for their CoCo! 

First, they'll receive a handsome 
card announcing your gift. Then, 
they'll be reminded of you each 
month when they receive up to 300 
pages of the rainbow — including 
as many as 24 programs, 15 regular 
columns and up to 20 product re- 
views. 

When you give a rainbow gift 
certificate, you'll also be safeguard- 
ing your own collection. No more 
frantic searching for those back 
issues you've lent to a friend. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate and 
let your friends in on something you 
already know — the rainbow is the 
perfect companion for the Color 
Computer! 



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because the program uses nearly all 
available memory. I have even reduced 
to one line the REM statement title that 
usually fills the top of the listing. 

The published version of this game 
had an 1MB title card which I have since 
discarded for a newer look using the 
Titlemaker program from a few months 
ago. For those who want to speed up the 
already rapid action, I suggest you add 
this line: 0 POKE65495,0, and save the 
program before running it. I have left 
this line out of the listing and the 
rainbow on TAPE version so as to not 
mess up anyone's disk drive. Re- 
member, use this poke with caution. 
Always PDKE65494,0 to return to 
normal speed. 

The rapid motion of the moving 
trench is accomplished using the PCOPY 
command. At the start of the program, 
PCLEAR6 to reserve two extra graphics 
pages (five and six). BASIC in PMDDE3 or 
4 uses four graphics pages to fill the 
screen. Pages five and six are kept from 
view to store our two views of the 
moving trench. 

At the beginning of the program, we 
draw the two views of the trench and 
PCOPY them to pages five and six. Later 
on, as these pages are PCOPYed to our 
visible page three (which is the third 
quarter of the screen from the top), they 
will give the illusion of motion. Since 
the PCOPY command is actually a ma- 
chine language routine called from the 
computer's ROM, it executes instantly, 
giving a rapid animation effect. 

I have included an illustration to 
show the technique. The top four pages 
give the full screen. Directly below it in 
memory are the two trench graphics, 
which are copied up to page three. This 
technique was also used in Snail's 
Revenge from a few years ago. Natu- 
rally, I will use it again if it gives the 
effect I am looking for. 

Playing the Game 

The theme of Star* Trench is a famil- 
iar one. You must defend the star trench 
from attack by alien spacecraft. The 
action is viewed from the cockpit win- 
dow of a single pilot spacecraft. The 
moving trench is in front of you. Press 
the red firebutton on the right joystick 
to activate the forward lasers. The 
joystick aims the shots in nine possible 
positions (three up and down, three left 
and right). As you fire shots, the energy 
level decreases. If you run out of energy, 
you crash into the trench. (If you sur- 
vive three minutes without being hit, 







BS 1 




Pages one 

through 

four 



MM 




rriiiiitfliaitiititifi 



'"iwiiiiumimmiiin 

"'"^Hiilillllllllllllllllllllllll 

" II Ml! HUH J I 

•••mti 

\r 




Page Ave 



rriiiffiiiriiiiiriiiifiiiuiiiifiintiiiiiitiiiiiti 

A *"fJL f iifii!ifitifiiiiiiiiiiiir!iiiiifunii[ 

"'""'•"IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIII 
r.WMiiuiii! 

V 




Page six 



ABOVE: Pages one through four show the action screen while the animation 
frames are kept out of our vision in pages five and six. 



you get a free recharge.) If you do not 
destroy the alien craft within its first ten 
movements, it begins shooting back. If 
you get hit, your shields crack and you 
dive into the trench. Whenever your 
craft is destroyed, your gauges recharge 
if you have any lives remaining. You 
only get six. 

When you have run out of lives, the 
screen displays the score and the pre- 
vious high score. Press ENTER to begin 
a new game. 

Final Notes 

For a real treat, try the game with a 
pair of 3-D glasses. I think you will like 
the effect. 



I am glad to give this game a parting 
shot by presenting it in these pages. Not 
long after it was released, a psycholog- 
ical firm in California contacted me and 
asked permission to obtain a modified 
version of the game to test reflex re- 
sponses. Naturally, I was thrilled to see 
the game put to some serious use. Jim 
Reed also told me it was one of his 
favorite games since it didn't take too 
much effort to play, but was still a lot 
of fun. 

Therefore, you can imagine how glad 
I am to finally offer it to all of the 
faithful RAINBOW subscribers and 
"Wishing Weir' fans. 

See you next month! □ 



100 THE RAINBOW July 1986 




7 


208 


15 ... 


178 


20 


102 


28 ... 


28 


37 ... 


83 


51 ... 


....188 


END . 


....180 



The listing: TRENCH 




' ADVANCED STAR* TRENCH WARFARE 
BY FRED B. SCERBO (C) 1982 , 1986 
60 HARDING AV.N. ADAMS, MA012 47 
GOTO 61 

CLEAR2 60 : CLS0 : PRINTS TRING$ ( 32 , 
252) ; : PRINTS 4 4 , "advanced" ; : PRINT 
@96,'»"; 

f) F0RI=1T0192 : READA : PRINTCHR$ (A+ 
128 ) ; : NEXT : DATA62 , 60 , 60 ,56 , 60 , 62 
,56,62,61,53 , 60, 58 , 68 ,77 ,76, 69,7 
6,74, 69 , 76,76 ,72,79 , 66, , 74,78,76 
,72, 69, 64, 69,6,0, 60, 6,0,58, , 58, , 62 
~ f 6X ,53,61 , 56 , ,69, , 69 , 77,72, 6 9,76 
76,72 

DATA74,77,66,74,74, , ,69,76,77, 
0, 60, 60 , 56, 48, 56, ,56, 52 , 52 , 52,6 
0,48 ,68, , 68,68 ,76,68,7 6, 76,72,72 
H 7 6 ,72,76 ,76 , 72, 68 , 6 4 , 68 , 42,37, 
,42,46,44, 44,42,46,44,44, 42, ,37, 
44, 44 ,44,44,40,46,44, 44,44,42, 46 
44,44,42,37,44,44,44 
' DATA42 ,37, , 42,46,44 , 44, 42,46,4 
5 , 4 4 , 40 , , 37,44, 44,44, 44,40,46,44 
,44 ,44 , 42 ,46,45 , 44,40 ,37, 44,44, 4 
4,44,44,44 ,40,40, >. ,40 ,40 , 36,44,4 
4 , 32 ,36, , , , , , 40 , , , ,40 ,40 ,36,44, 4 
4,36,44,44,44 

© PRINT@ 3 20 , STRING$ ( 32 ,2 43) } : PRI 
NTQ391, " BY FRED B. SCERBO ";.:PRI 
NT@423,» (C) 1982 & 1986 " ; 





© DIMS$(3) ,G(3) ,H(3) ,G$(3) ,H$(3) 

Z $( 9 ) • ■^•-w.,-- 

<P SCREEN0 , 1 : PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS2 : PMODE 
4 , 1:Q$="BRC0NU4RU4RD4RU4RD4RU4RN 
L4D2NL4D2L6C1" : FORI=0TO9 : READZ $ ( 
: NEXT 

DATABR2U4R3D4NL3 , BR4NU4BR, BR2 
2R3U2NL3 BD4NL3 , BR2R3U2NL2U2NL3 B 
D4 , BR2BU2NU2R3U2D4 , BR2R3U2L3U2R3 
BD4 , BR2U4NR3D2R3D2NL3 , BR2BU4R3D4 
, BR2U4R3D2NL3D2NL3 , BR2BU2NR3U2R3 
D4 

11 E $ = " NR2 DNR2 DR2 BR " : LINE (0 , 18) - 
(112 , 0) , PRESET: LINE- (144 ,22) , PRE 
SET , BF : LINE- (2 56, 47) , PRESET: LINE 
(256,18) -(144,0) , PRESET: LINE (0,4 
7) - ( 112, 22) , PRESET : LINE (0 , 4 8 ) - ( 2 
56,48) , PRESET 

12 PMODE 3 , 1 : PAINT ( 10 , 30) ,3,1: PAI 
NT ( 2 4 6 , 30 ) , 3 , 1 : PAINT (128,44) , 3, 1 
: PMODE 4 , 1 : PCOPY1T04 : RL=6 : TS=0 

13 A=2 : B-104 : C=24 : GOSUB2 3 :A=6 : B= 
72 : C=3 0 : GOSUB2 3 : A=12 : B=40 : C=3 8 : G 
OSUB23 : A-16 : B=8 : C=44 : GOSUB23 : GOS 
UB15 : PCOPY1T05 : PCOPY4T01 

14 A=4 : B=8 8 : C=28 : GOSUB2 3 : A-10 : B= 
56 : C=3 4 : GOSUB2 3 : A=l4 : B=2 4 : C=4 2 : G 
OSUB23: GOSUB 1 5 : PCOPY 1TO 6 : GOTO 16 

15 PMODE 3 , 1::.$-"U24C2F2E4F2G4C4N 
H3F20L24" : DRAW "C 4 S 4 BM0 , 47 " +R$ : R$ 

="U24L4C2H2G2F4C4NE3G20R28" : DRAW 

"BM255 , 47"+R$ : PAINT (3, 41) ,4,4 : PA 

INT (2 53 , 41) ,4, 4 : PI-TODE4 , 1 : RETURN 

16 PMODE 3 , 1 : PCLSl : COLOR2 , 1 : LINE ( 
0,40) -(76,20) ,PSET 

17 LINE- (180, 20) ,PSET: LINE- (256, 
40 }, PSET : LINE ( 7 6 , 20 ) -(0,0) , PSET : 
LINE ( 180 , 20) - (256 ,0 ) , PSET : PAINT ( 
10,2) , 2 , 2: PAINT (10, 20) , 4,2 : PAINT 
(2 46,20V a f 2 : PMODE 4 , 1 : LINE (0 , 144 
) - (2bv , , PSET, BF : FORI= 1TO 6 5 : P 
SET(RND(256) ,RND(66)+30) :NEXT 

18 PMODE 3 , 1 : FORI=0TO10STEP2 : LINE 




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July 1986 THE RAINBOW 101 



(0,192-1) -(76,160-1) ,PRESET: LINE 
-(180, 16J8-I), PRESET: LINE- (256, 19 
2-1) , PRESET: NEXT: PAINT (12 8, 190) , 
2,l:PMODE4,l 

19 FORI=2TO18STEP4:FORY=20TO236S 
TEP216: CIRCLE (Y, 158) ,1,0, .5-(I/l 
00) :NEXTY,I:FORY=40TO216STEP176: 
CIRCLE (Y, 148) ,5,0, . 4 : NEXT: LINE (0 
,150) -(30, 144) , PRESET: LINE (256,1 
50)-(226,144) , PRESET 

20 FORI=18TO60STEP2:LINE(I,192) - 
(76,164) ,PSET: LINE (256-1, 192 )-(l 
80,164) ,PSET:NEXT:LINE(80,164) -( 
176 , 176) , PRESET , BF : LINE ( 70 , 180 ) - 
(186,192), PRESET , BF : F0RI=8 2T017 2 
STEP6:PSET(I,164) : PSET (I , 176) :NE 
XT: FORI=82T0172STEP2 : LINE (I , 167 ) 
-(1,173) ,PSET:NEXT 

2 1 F0RI=7 8T017 8STEP2 0 : CIRCLE (1,1 
85) ,3,1, .7:NEXT:FORI=18TO70STEP6 
:LINE (256-1,0) -(176, 16) , PSET: LIN 
E(I,0)-(80,16) , PSET: NEXT: LINE (82 
,2) -(174, 18) , PRESET, BF: LINE (84, 4 



)-(172,16) ,PSET,B 

22 GOSUB39:GOT024 

23 LINE (0, A) -(B, A) , PRESET: LINE- ( 
B+1,C) , PRESET, BF:LINE-(255-B,C) , 
PRESET : LINE- ( 2 5 6-B , A) , PRESET , BF : 
LINE- ( 2 5 6 , A) , PRESET : RETURN 

24 0=1:WW=5:S$(1)="BL6U7R2D7NL2U 
3 R2 FR2 ER2D3R2U7L2D3L2HL2GL2 " :S$ ( 
2 ) = " LHNU2 L2NU2 LHL2 NF4NE4R2 ER3 ER2 
FND2R2ND2RFR2NH4NG4L2GL3GL" 

2 5 R$="U2RFL2RFBR" :G(1)=30:G(2) = 
127:G(3)=226:H(1)=60:H(2)=75:H(3 
)=90:G$(1)=»30,":G$(2)=»127,»:G$ 
(3)=»226,»:H$(1)="60":H$(2)="75" 
:H$(3)=»90":YP=0 

26 PM0DE4 , 1 : YP=YP+1 : PCOPY5T03 : SC 
REEN1 , 1 : E=RND ( 3 ) : F=RND (3 ) 

27 DRAW"BM"+G$ (E) +H$ (F) +»C1"+S$ ( 
0) :ER=ER+l:IFYP<10THEN29 

28 DRAW"C1BR2NG8NF8C0NG8NF8C1" : P 
LAY"01L255C03 " : QS=RND (9) : PC0PY6T 
03 : IFQS>8THENGOSUB48 

29 POKE339,255:IFPEEK(339)=255TH 



The Handicapper 




Use your Color Computer to improve your perfor- 
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All the information you need is readily available in 
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Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound Hadicap- 
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three for only $79.95. 




Federal Hill Software 
_ 8134 Scotts Level Road 

Baltimore, MD 21208 
Orders: 800-628-2828 Ext. 850 
Information 301-521-4886 




J&R ELECTRONICS 

Complete 256K and 51 2K Memory Expansion Systems 
(Hardware, Software and documentation included) 
User friendly software, programmer not required 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

★ We have eliminated the necessity to piggyback for 51 2K versions! ★ 
RAMDISK — Fast disk I/O, 35/40 track (two RAM drives with 51 2K) 

PCOPYMOR — More than 30 PM0DE 4 screens in memory at once! PC0PY command modified to accept 
PC0PY 1 to 128. More than 70 PM00E 4 screens and PC0PY 1 to 302 with 51 2K versions (or 30 PM00E 
4 screens with one RAMDISK). 

SPOOLER — HUGE printer buffer for offline storage inside your computer while the printer's busy. Custom- 
izable from 30K to over 200K (500K with 51 2K versions). Buffer can be turned off /on copied using simple 
PRINT CHR$ commands. 

PABER — Load multiple BASIC programs into memory at once! 8 (16 with 512K versions) pages of 32K 
with a PAGE command added to BASIC. Page PEEKs and POKEs access data in other Pages. 4 (8 with 
51 2K versions) pages of 64K in 64K modes. Fully commented source code provided for this one! 
Plus — Various utilities and demo's. Detailed documentation, programs, system memory usage, and a 
lot more included. 

089 Ramdlik — Fast 0S-9 disk I/O! 35/40 track single sided or 40 track double sided (512K) Ramdisk 

under 0S9! GOOD'S 0S9 Ramdisk (Rainbow Feb '66) with fully commented source code and install files 

added by J&R. (Requires 0S9 operating system) 

ALL software above is configurable for 256K/512K operation. 

Software shipped on disk, add $10.00 for software on tape. 

(0S9 RAMDISK not available on tape). 

ALL boards below are 256K/51 2 K capable, software & documentation included. 

New SAM (74LS785) not included (use your 74LS783), 74LS765 recommended for 2.0 MHz operation. 

Part numbar Prlca Daserlptlon 

#1001 $39.95 Banker II bare board (with long pin socket, does not include memory 

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#1002 $69.95 Banker II bare board + parts (does not include Memory Expansion Board) 

#1004 $129.95 Banker II (256K, upgradable to 512K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1005 $169.95 Banker II (51 2K) assembled & tested with memory 

#1006 $15.00 Memory Expansion Board 

#1007 $29.95 Memory Expansion Board + parts 

#9000 $89.95 Down Under Controller. Ram Pack size controller with BD0S Gold 

plated, high reliability edge connectors, jumpers for 24/28 pin ROM. 
Compatible with COCO I and COCO I). 

#9001 $35.00 BD0S (Enhanced DOS on 27128 EPROM) 

#9002 $5.00 64K switch 

#9003 $19.95 Banker II software pack 

#9004 $24.95 New SAM 74LS785 (required only for 2.0 MHz operation) 

To place an order, write to J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045, OR call (301 ) 987-9067 
or (301) 788-0861. 

HOURS: Weekdays 7 p,m.-9 p.m.; Sat. Noon-5p.m. EASTERN TIME. 

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DIATE DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model # (i.e. 26-3136), Oisk or Tape when ordering. 
QUANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For information on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 
788-0861. C0CD II 26-31 XX owners call (soldering experience may be required). 



1 02 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



EN35 

30 PCOPY5TO3:X=JOYSTK(0) :Y=JOYST 
K(l) :IFX<20THENP=1ELSEIFX>40THEN 
P=3ELSEP=2 

31 IFY<20THENQ=1ELSEIFY>40THENQ= 
3ELSEQ=2 

32 LINE (0,94) -(G(P) ,H(Q) ) , PSET:L 
INE- (0,94) , PRESET: LINE (256, 94) -( 
G(P) ,H(Q) ) ,PSET: : LINE- (256 ,94) ,P 
RESET : PLAY"L255GC" : K=K+1 : PC0PY6T 
03 : IFK>89THENGOSUB48 

33 LINE(174-K,167)-(174-K,173) ,P 
RESET :IFP=E AND Q=F THEN3 4ELSE3 6 
3 4 F0RW=1T02 : DRAW" CI " : F0RI=1T02 : 
DRAW'S 8 BM" +G$ (E) +H$ (F) +"NU7ND7NL 
7NR7NE3NF3NG3NH3C0S4"+S$ (0) :NEXT 
I , W : FORW=1T02 : PM0DE3 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 
: PLAY"01T1CBC03 " : PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 
1,1: NEXTW : Ml=Ml+5 : M2=M2+2 : M3=M3+ 
(0-1) : G0SUB3 9 : 0=0+1 : YP=0 : PC0PY5T 
03:GOT036 

35 FORW=1TO150: NEXTW 

3 6 PCOPY6T03 : GOSUB60 : IFER=>150TH 
ENGOSUB53 

37 IF0>2THEN0=1 

38 GOT026 

39 IFMK10THEN41 

40 M2=M2+1:M1=0 

41 IFM2>9THENM3=M3+1:M2=0 

42 IFM3>9THENM4=M4+1:M3=0 

4 3 IFM4>9THENM5=M5+1 : M4=0 

44 IFM5>9THENM6=M6+1:M5=0 

45 IFM6>9THENM7=M7+1:M6=0 

46 IFM7=>10THENM7=0 

47 DRAW"S8BM83 , 14"+Q$+Z$ (M7) : DRA 
WQ$+Z$ (M6 ) +Q$ : DRAWZ$ (M5) +Q$+Z$ (M 
4 ) +Q$ : DRAWZ $ (M3 ) +Q$+Z $ (M2 ) : DRAWQ 
$+Z$ (Ml) +"S4" : RETURN 

4 8 K=0 : DRAW" CI 11 : F0RV=1T02 : DRAW" S 



16BM128 , 84U4E5H3E3BM128 , 84H9L9H3 
BM128 , 84NL9" : DRAW"G6L12NH9E7H2U3 
H3BM128 , 84ND11F10NG3H10R11NF9E2U 
4" :DRAW"NH4E4F11E3S4" :F0REX=1T03 
: PM0DE3 , 1 : SCREEN1 ,0 : PLAY"L25501B 
D" : PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : NEXTEX : DRA 
W"C0":NEXTV 

49 YP=0:PMODE1,3:SCREEN1,1:PLAY" 
L25O1GP70" :PMODE0,3 : SCREEN1, 1 : PL 
AY"L200BGFDCO3 " : CLS0 : SCREEN0 ,0 : G 
OSUB60 : PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

50 CIRCLE (58+ (RL*20) ,185) ,3,0, .7 
: RL=RL-1 : IFRL<=0THEN55 

51 G0SUB5 3 : RETURN 

52 DRAW"S28BM44 , 82"+R$+"U2"+E$+" 
NR2U2R2BRD2UR2UD2BRU2R2DNL2 DBR"+ 
R$+ "U2 NR2 DBRRDNL2 BRU2 " +E $+ " S 4 " : R 
ETURN 

53 K=0 : DRAW"C2 " : PM0DE3 , 1 : SCREEN1 
,0 : C0L0R3 , 2 : GOSUB52 : FORI=82T0172 
STEP2 : LINE ( 1 , 1 67 ) - ( 1 , 17 3 ) , PSET : P 
LAY"L255CBT255":PCOPY WW T03 : IFW 
W= 5 THENWW= 6 E LS EWW= 5 

54 NEXT : DRAW" CI" : GOSUB52 : PM0DE4 , 
1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : GOSUB60 : ER=0 : RETURN 

55 CLS:NS=(M7*10 A 6)+(M6*10 A 5)+(M 
5*10 A 4)+(M4*1000)+(M3*100)+(M2*1 
0) +M1 : PRINT@325 , "PRESS ENTER TO 
CONTINUE" 

56 PRINT@71,"HIGH SCORE" ;TS : PRIN 
T@135,"YOUR SCORE" ;NS 

57 IF NS>TS THEN TS=NS 

58 IFINKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN59ELSE58 

59 RL=6:M1=0:M2=0:M3=0:M4=0:M5=0 
: M6=0 : M7=0 : GOSUB60 : G0SUB3 9 : G0T02 

60 DRAW"BM"+G$ (E) +H$ (F) +"C0"+S$ ( 
0) : RETURN 

61 PCLEAR6 : GOTO 3 





ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING for the TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 



At Last - The book exclusively for you and your C6Cb !! 
You've learned BASIC and are now ready to learn assembly 
language programming. This hands-on guide begins with 
the basics and progresses to the expert level; 
revealing programming conventions and techniques and 
all the internal capabilities of the TDP-100, CoCo 1 
and 2. At every step of the way are illustrations, 
sample programs, and plain English explanations. All 
sample programs are shown as assembled with Radio 
Shack's EDTASM+ cartridge. Plus, a complete chapter 
explains how to use all EDTASM+ capabilities. This book 
describes how to write subroutines, interrupt handlers, 
programs that control the graphics display modes, 
cassette, disk, keyboard, sound, joysticks, serial I/O, 
interrupts, and use of ROM resident subroutines. Also 
covered are the MC6809E microprocessor, the video 
display generator (VDG), peripheral interface adapters 



(PIA), SAM, memory, and how they all work together. 
Suitable as a high school or college textbook. 
CHAPTERS : The Binary Number System - Memory and Data 
Representation ■ Introduction MC6809E Microprocessor - 
Addressing Modes of the MC6809E - MC6809.E Instruction 
Set - Assembly Language Programming with EDTASM+ - 
Assembly Language Programming - Assembly Language and 
Extended Color BASIC - Internal Control and Graphics - 
Technical Details. 

289 pages TRS-80 & EDTASM+ are 

soft cover trademarks of Tandy Corp 

$16.00 U.S. plus $1.50 shipping. Check or money order. 
RI residents please add 6% sales tax. Inquire about 
volume discounts. 

Published and TEPCO 
sold by 30 Water Street 

Portsmouth, RI 02871 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 103 



BUFF THAT JOB Omnitronix Inc. 
now produces a low-cost, work-horse 
printer buffer. The RAMJET 256K 
Print Buffer comes standard with 256K 
of memory and is designed to connect 
between the computer and the printer. 
The unit comes in either serial (RS-232) 
or parallel versions and is compatible 
with standard parallel or RS-232 print- 
ers. Other features include a pause 
mode for using single sheets of paper, 
a UL/CSA approved power supply and 
a two year warranty. Suggested list price 
is $269. For more information contact 
Omnitronix Inc., P. O. Box 43, Mercer 
Island, WA 98040, (206) 236-2983. 

LITERARY FINDS Howard W. Sams 
& Co. has announced its introduction 
of two items to the book scene. The 
Computer Dictionary, now in its fourth 
printing, is a comprehensive dictionary 
of basic computer terms and a hand- 
book of computer-related topics. The 
author provides the reader with infor- 
mation on topics including fiber optics, 
sensors and vision systems. The 576- 
page book retails for $24.95. Computer- 
Aided Logic Design provides informa- 
tion on the use of computers as a 
valuable tool in developing and verify- 
ing the operation of electronic designs. 
The book uses examples such as burglar 
alarms and traffic light controllers as a 
basis for combining theory and tech- 
niques with the application of 
computer-aided design tools. The book 
also includes two BASIC listings for a 
logic simulation program and a logic 
minimization program designed to run 
on most personal computers. Suggested 
retail for the 448-page book is $25.95. 
Contact Howard W. Sams & Co., 4300 
W. 62nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46268, 
(317)298-5400. 

3ft sfc sfc 

CLASSROOM TOPICS Sunburst 
Communications has released its 1986 
catalog of educational software. Offer- 

1 04 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



ings include programs designed for the 
CoCo as well as several other personal 
computers. Several programs pre- 
viously unavailable in CoCo versions 
are now included. Contact Sunburst 
Communications, Room DH7, 39 
Washington Avenue, Pleasantville, NY 
10570-9971. 

A2D Technical Hardware Inc. has 
introduced its new SPAD-12 analog-to- 
digital converter. While this particular 
converter is intended for IBM and 
compatible computers, it is usable by 
any system with a standard RS-232 
interface. More importantly, the com- 
pany's first offering in this area of 
technology was the introduction of the 
CCAD-B and the AD-8 converters. The 
CCAD-B is a 16 channel, 12-bit 
converter retailing for $119 for either 
cassette or disk. The AD-8 is an 8 
channel, 8-bit converter. It retails for 
$119 for disk or cassette. The above 
prices include hardware as well as 
software. For more information contact 
Technical Hardware Inc., P.O. Box 
3609, Fullerton, CA 92634, (714) 628- 
1126. 

* * * 

68K POWER PLAY Frank Hogg Lab- 
oratory Inc. has announced its intro- 
duction of a versatile 68020-based 
multi-user computer system. The QT 
20x system supports up to 28 users and 
up to 14 megabytes of RAM. The 
operating system is OS-9/68K. All 
models have a 12.5 MHz 68020 micro- 
processor with two megabytes of RAM. 
For a base price of $3,695 you receive 
a QT 20x motherboard, one expansion 
card (four-user, two megabyte), case 
and supply and one floppy drive. The 
motherboard accepts up to seven ex- 
pansion cards. You receive the same 
system with an added 20-megabyte hard 
drive for $4,495. For those wanting to 
put more power under the hood of their 
IBM cases, FHL is also carrying an 
IBM upgrade option. For $2,995 you 



get the motherboard and expansion 
card to replace the motherboard you 
presently have. All drives and devices 
connected to the SASI ports on these 
systems are DMA. Contact Frank 
Hogg Laboratory Inc., 770 James 
Street, Syracuse, NY 13203, (315)474- 
7856. 

* * * 

ACROSS THE SEAS Hayes Micro- 
computer Products has announced that 
it will begin marketing the Smartmo- 
dem 2400(tm), 2400B(tm) and Transet 
1000(R) (128K RAM) in Singapore and 
will begin shipments of Transet 1000 
(128K RAM) to the United Kingdom 
and Hong Kong. Both modems operate 
at 2400 bps, 1200 bps, or 0-300 bps over 
dial-up or leased lines and are compat- 
ible with all Hayes, Bell 103/212A, and 
CCITT V.22 and V.22bis modems. They 
also provide adaptive equalization, call 
process monitoring, and diagnostics 
and testing. The modems have received 
Singapore Telecom approval and join 
the Smartmodem 1200(tm), Smartmo- 
dem 1200B(tm), and Smartcom II(R) 
communications software as part of the 
Hayes Pacific Basin product line. 

* * * 

ACCESSORIES 3M has introduced 20 
new products to its line of computer 
accessories. 3M accessory products are 
designed for four primary product or 
service areas: diskettes, data cartridges, 
printers and computer care. The new 
additions augment each area. Eleven of 
the products are in the diskette area. 
The most unique is DataSaver(tm) disk 
filer, a hard plastic storage box for up 
to ten 5 14 -inch diskettes. The unit 
mounts on the side of the CRT monitor 
or any other vertical surface. Other 
notable products include a two-piece 
universal printer stand and a multi- 
positional, non-magnetic copy holder 
(great for typing in listings from THE 
rainbow). For further information 
contact 3M, P. O. Box 33600, St. Paul, 
MN 55133-3600. 




HOME RUN! 



256K Bd - $129.95 
512K Bd - $169.95 

(Requires RS Multi-Pak) 



OS-9 
DRIVER 
$24.95 



The first 256K/512K memory bd for the 
CoCo II ! Inside this low noise metal 
case lives 256K/512K of memory and all 
the circuitry to access it as a RAMDISK ! 
Compatible w/all CoCo ll's even 26-3127 & 
26-31 34A/B (see June '86 Rainbow Review) 



mum SUPER 

GRAND SLAM / 

Tony Di Stefano (Turn of the Screw Guru) 
has done it again ! ! ! Coming soon is 
SUPER DISK - a HARD DRIVE adapter that 
will fit inside the Super Controller or Super 
Ram. It will be able to access one or two 
FIVE, TEN or TWENTY MEGABYTE Hard 
Disk Drives. Write for more exciting details ! 

COMING... SUPER COPY ! ! ! 




STRIKE 1 - RAM ! 

(NOT available for CoCo ll's) /"\Q_ Q 

********* ^° 9 

Thunder Dupe 2 - Format & J* HDIN/CD 

>C Backup a FULL diskette (68^ L/rll V Ln 

gransT in ONE PASS! Up to > ^ ^ ^ _ 

- 4 Disk Drives?!! $24.95 & <StOA OR 

********* q>^.»o 

The first 256K memory Bd for the CoCo! 
Load four 32K pgms at once, emulate a 
40trk RAMDISK, 60K Print Spooler, FAST 
access, 30+ Hi-Res screens in memory!! 
$99.95 (see Sept '85 Rainbow Review) 

DOUBLE RAM - Upgrades a THUNDER RAM from 256K to 
512K giving TWO independent RAM Disks! $79.95 




STRIKE 3 - A HIT! 

Feature packed hardware & software 
Graphics System! Includes: Pull-Down 
Menus, Icon processing, multiple Font 
styles, full graphic editing plus a special 
Input Module for 256x192 joystick input. 
64K DISK $79.95 w/Y-Cable $99.95 
Requires Multi-Pak or Y-Cable ($29.95) 
CoCo Max I - II Disk Upgrade - $19.95 
CoCo Max (TAPE) $69.95 Mouse Pad $14.95 



SUPER CONTROLLER 
STRIKE 2 -DOS! 



EPROM Programmer 
^ $59.95 ^ 



Uses 2764 ($6.95) 
or 27128 ($14.95) 

EPROMS ! (Requires Super Controller) 

The most AMAZING CoCo Disk Controller 
ever! Switch up to 4 DOS's (up to 16K) 
via a single software POKE! Choose 
between R/S 1.0/1.1, Spectrum DOS, 
ADOS, JDOS, Stearman DOS - $99.95 

Spectrum DOS $29.95 and/or ADOS $39.95 w/purchase 
or Super Controller (Buy 'em both for $59) 

Enhanced Display 80 - Add an 80x24 
display, Real Time Clock & Centronics 
Parallel Printer interface to your Super 
Controller ! Includes SMOOTH SCROLLING 
& Switchable Video Input !! $129.95 
NEW! OS-9 Driver for Display 80 $24.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS, INC. 

PO BOX 21272 
93-15 86TH DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN NY 11421 

Shipping $3.00 (Foreign $5.00) 
COD $2 extra - NY Res add tax 
COD Order Line 710-441-2807 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

COLORFUL COMPUTING 



COMMUNICATION 





C0L0RC0M/E - A complete smart 
terminal package! Upload, 
Download, Hi-Res (51X24) 
screen, 300/1200 Baud, Offline 
Printing. 32/64K Disk * - $39.95 
*- Now with DELPH I & Compuserve 
XMODEM support! Download ML! 
COMPUSERVE 5hr Start Kit $29.95 



MODEMS 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiilllllllllllllllllllllilll 



1200 BAUD 
$129.95 



** 



Hayes compatible! Super for the 
DELPHI & C ompuserv e CoCo Sig! 
300/1200 Baud, Auto- dial / answer 
** Requires Modem cable .$19.95 




KEYBOARDS 




WORD PROCESSING 




TELEWRIJER-64 _ Three Hi -Res 
screens, true lowercase char's 
right justify, full screen 
editor. Tape $49.95 Disk $59.95 
TELEPATCH - A TW-64 enhancer ! ! ! 
True bjock move, Ov erstri ke & 
TSPOOL mode, Type Ahead Buffer 
FASTER Disk I/O 64K Disk $19.95 




PRINTERS 

^ IHIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllll l^ 



GEMINI 10X - closeout $179.95 
GEMINI N X-10 - 120 cps, tract- 
frict feed, NLQ mode! - $249.95 
KAMELEON -Low cost Parallel Ptr 
Interface! 600/9600 Baud $49.95 
BriteFace -The first INTELLIGENT 
Ptr Interface! Al 1 Baud rates 
with NO switches to turn $59.95 




us 



MONITORS 



gu imm iimnuimiiimiH m innnnimmn 



HJL-57 - Save $7.00 !! - $72.95 
HJL Number Jack Keypad - $79.95 
-Specify Model /Revision Board- 
CoCo Key bd Software - Finally! 
An ENHANCED Function Key Pgm! 4 
most wanted features: 9600 Baud 
Poke, Text Screen Dump, Line 
Listing & Cold Start-DSK $14.95 





Monitor Stand $24.95 




MONOCHROME Monitors - CRISP 
80x24 Hi-Res screens! $79.95 
Uni versal Video Driver - Works 
w/ al 1 monitors & CoCos!- $29.95 

Anti - Glare Screen $24.95 

TT ^COLOR Monitors $169.95 

TAXAN Tuner-Receive TV channel s 
on any composite monitor $99.95 





SAVE $1 o 



OFF COLORCOM/E WITH A HAYES MODEM 

OFF TELEWRITER-64 WITH ANY PRINTER, 
KEYBOARD OR MONITOR 



SAVE $1 0 



COD ORDER HOT LINE - CALL 718-441-2807 



ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

COLORFUL COMPUTING 



ftftftftftftftftftft, 



SPREADSHEET 




I 



Cflmpeti tion 



]DtNACALC| 

Screen 32X16 51X24 

Precision 9 digits 16 digits 
Hi-Res Graphics NO YES 
Visicalc cmd format NO YES 
New low price! 64K Disk $69.95 
Side "Wise -Print D YNACALC files 
up to 255 chars- si deways ! £24-95 




DISK DRIVES 




DRIVE 0 System* - SS/DD, 6ms, 
40Trk, Super Controller $199.95 
Double Sided Drive 0 * $239.95 
DRIVE 0 & 1 System* - $299.95 
Disk Drive 1, 2 or 3 - $119.95 
Disk Drive 1 for RS FD501-Cat# 
26-3131 (Save $100!) - $99.95 
* PLUS: controller-manual-cable 



hTIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIe 



DISK SOFTWARE 



** 




1. Fast Dupe II 

2. EZ Base (Database) . . 

3. Graphicom , 

4. Graphicom Part II . .., 

5. Greeting Cd Designer , 

6. Blackjack Royale ..... 

7. Spect'm Adv Generator 

8. HARDCOPY (Specify PTR) 



$14.95 
$24.95 
$24.95 
$24.95 
$24.95 
$24.95 
$29.95 
$29.95 



Sllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 




ftftftftftftftftft 



ATA BASE MANAGER 





PRO-COLOR FIL E 2.0 - 60 Data 
Fids, 8 Report Fmts, 4 Screen 
Fmts, 1020 bytes/record, Sort 3 
Fields, Global Search, FAST ML 
Sort, Create Files Compatible 
w/ DYNACALC ! - Disk $49.95 
Pro Color Di_r and PCF Forms - 
Buy r em both for only $29.95 




GAME CONTROLLERS 




Wj.co C ommand Adapter - Now you 
can hookup 2 Atari type joystks 
to your CoCo for only $19.95! 
Wico Trackball -Rapid fire & 36CP 
action! Reg. $69.95 - Now $19.95 
DELUXE Joystick - 360 Degree 
control with cente r return or 
analog positioning - $27.50 




COCO II UPGRADES 

nmnn 



ml 



Want to upgrad e your new $69/ 
$88 CoCo II? 7See below ! !) 
4464 DRAMs - two chip 64K 
upgrade for 26-31 3 4A and 26- 
3134B Korean CoCo fFs ..$39.95 
Extended BASIC - 28 pin ROM for 
26-3134 A7B~CoCo II 's ...$34.95 
Buy 'em BOTH for only - $69.95 




DISK SOFTWARE * * 

Buy any 2 - Save 10% 
Buy any 3 - Save 15% 
Buy any 4 - Save 20% 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS, Inc. 

PO BOX 21272 
93-15 86th DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN NY 11421 



FREE - Send for our 
CoCo catalog flier 111 
Dealer inquiries invited I 

Software submissions 
welcomed 1 



All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



Interfacing externals to the computer 




stigating 





By Tony DiStefim 




mm 

■ nmmm 



mmmmm. 



i 



This month I'm looking deeply 
into a PIA, The letters PIA stand 
for Peripheral Interface Adapter. 
The Color Computer uses two of the 
PXAs. The older, regular CoCo uses two 
MC6821 PIAs. The newer CoCos and 
the CoCo 2s use one MC6821 and one 
MC6822. The differences between the 
two are minor. The 6822 is called an 
IIA. This stands for Industrial Interface 
Adapter. Both have the same pinout 
and function in the same way. I will 
describe the differences between them 
later in this article. 

It's interesting to v know what PIA 
stands for, but what does it do? A PI A 
provides the means of interfacing exter- 
nal hardware or devices to a computer 
In our case, the MC6809 CPU. Most 
devices do not conform to the specifi- 
cations of a CPU. Take, for instance, a 
switch. That's right, an everyday house- 
hold switch. It turns on the lights, stove, 
radio and so forth. It works well, but is 
not computer compatible. This is where 
a PIA comes in. It's a go-between from 
the CPU to the switch. With a PIA and 
a little circuit, the CPU can tell if the 
switch is on or off. Or in CPU terms, 
a zero or a one* This is known as an 
input. If the computer had to control $ 



>-"-- 



Tony DiStefano is well-known as an 
early specialist in computer hardware 
projects. He lives in Laval Quest, Que- 
bec. 



light or a motor, a PIA would be 
to switch a transistor on or off and, in 
turn, the transistor would control a 
relay and the relay would turn the 
motor on or off. This is known as an 
output. 

This particular PIA has two bkJirec^ 
tional eight-bit peripheral data buses 
for interface to external devices and 
four individually controlled interrupt 
input lines, two of which can be used as 
outputs. It also has programmed con- 
trolled interrupt and interrupt disable 
capability plus two control registers and 
two data direction registers. 

The PIA, like many other devices, 
looks like memory to the CPU. There- 
fore, the PIA must have address lines, 
data lines and control lines such as chip 
enable and read/ write, Figure 1 shows 
the pinout of an MC682 1 PIA chip, You 
should, by now, recognize many of the 
pins and their names. The following is 
a pin-by-pin description of this chip. 

Vss — Signal ground. A reference to 
which all other signals are measured. 

PAO to PA7 The first eight peri- 
pheral data lines, which can be pro- 
grammed as outputs or inputs, 

PBO to PB7 — The second eight periph- 
eral data lines, which can be pro- 
grammed as outputs or inputs. 

CBI — Is an input only line that sets 



interrupt 
register. 



of the B control 



CB2 — Is either an interrupt input line 





1 




40 


I CA| 


J* AO L 


2 

f 3 




19 






™ c 










PA 2 | 


4 




37 




PA 3 | 


5 




36 


i 1 RSO 


PA4 | 


6 




35 


ZD Rsi 








34 


| RESET 


pa* 


1 |§ 




33 


~i 


DO 


PA? |_ 






33 


Z) 


Dl 


PBO | 


IQ 




31 


1 1 k 




IJ 








D3 


PB2 | 


12 




29 




CM 


PH3 


13 




28 


^ D5 


PB* | 


14 




27 


1 D6 


PB5 I 


15 




26 


1 D7 


PH6 [ 


16 




25 




E 


PR7 


! 17 




24 


13 cs i 




16 




23 


1 CS2* 


CB2 


19 




22 




VCC [ 






21 




RIW 



MCG82I 

Figure 1 



108 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



A CHIP OFF THE OLD... 

6821 Standard PIA $9.95 

6822 Industrial Grade PIA ..$14.95 

6847 VDG Chip $19.95 

6809E CPU Chip (NEW LOW PRICE) ...$19.95 
Basic RDM 1.2 Chip (30% FASTER) ..$19.95 
68769 (Fits Disk Basic Skt) Eprom.$19.95 
Basic ROM l.TTNewest version) ...$24.95 
Disk ROM 1.1 (New DOS Comnand) ..$29.95 
New SAM Chip w/heatsink (74LS785). $29.95 
Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE. $29. 95 
Eprom Eraser - 3 min erasure time. $49. 95 
Model 100 8K Upgrade - (SAVE $70). $49. 95 
CoCo First Aid Kit - includes 2 PIAs, 
6809E & SAM (Be Prepared Ml) ....$59.95 
64K CoCo II - w7NEW keyboard ....$149.95 
EpromTrgmr (2ms speed/2K - 16K).$149.95 
TandylOOO 51 2K Upgrade-SAVE p50.$169.95 

COCO LIBRARY... 

A History of the CoCo / 1 980-1 986 . $3. 95 

CoCo Memory Map $14.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed. $14.95 
The FACTS - Inside "guts" of CoCo.$16.95 



500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide .............. $19. 95 

Assembly Language Programming ....$19.95 

Color Basic Unraveled ........... .$19.95 

Extended Basic Unraveled Jg. $19.95 

Disk Basic (1.0/1.1) Unraveled ...$19.95 

New! CoCo H Service Manual * . $24.95 

SEC0ND~ Book & Tape of Adventures .$29.95 
Official 0S9 Manual Set ....$39.95 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9.$19.95 
W/Two Disk Package of demo pgms ..$49.95 
Color / Extended / Disk Basic Unraveled - 
Complete 3 Book Set - Save $10! ..$49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF... 

CoCo Light Pen -^24s«5. Save $5!.. $19. 95 

Compujnze "V" Box - More positive 

connections than a "Y" Cable .....$29.95 

Super Voice - SC-02 Synthesizer ..$79.95 

PBJ WORDPAK-RS HiRes 80x24 dlsply $99.95 

Micro Works DS-69A Digitizer $149.95 

Tandy 1000 2nd Drive (SAVE $40) .$159.95 

* - Specify CoCo II Catalogu e Number 

All ord«r« plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $6.00) 

COD add $2.00 «xtra 
NY8 Residents add 8alaa Tax 



COCO CABLES AND... 

Printer / Modem 15' Extender Cable .$14.95 
Tire d of unplugging devices from your 
RS232 port? Try a RS232 "Y" Cable .$19.95 
Disk Drive Cable (3"4pln - 34pinT.$19.95 
Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) ....$19.95 

JoystickTMouse 10' Ext Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) ..$24.95 
Null Modem Cable - 4 pin to DB25 .$24.95 
Disk Interfa ce /Rom Pak Extender - Move 
your disks/ROM Paks further away .$24.95 
40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk 
w7Voice, Word Pak, CoCo Max. etc ..$29.95 
Triple RS232 S witcher - Now select one 
of any three RS232 peripherals ...$39.95 
40 Pin Triple "Y" Cable - Hook up any 3- 
Voice7Word/RS232/Digitizer PAKs ..$39.95 
RS Multi-Pak Extender^t3*r9S; . ... .$27.95 

OTHER QOOD STUFF... 

C-10 tapes in any quantity .....49 cents 
5 1/4 " Diskettes , any quantity .99 cents 

OS-9 Quick Reference Guide ...$3.95 

6809E Quick Reference Guide ..$3.95 

32K , 64K or 128K RAM Button $4.99 

Blank -1 ^" Rev. motherboard .....#..$9.95 
Rompak w/Blank PC Brd-27xx series .$9.95 
CoCo Keybd Adapter - Convert 26-301 6 & 
277- 1019 keybds to D/E CoCo's! ...$9.95 
26-301 6 CoCo Keyboard - Fits "F" board & 

26-3026/27 CoCo 1 1 * s $14.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV 
interference created by CoCo! ....$19.95 

The Magic Box - Load Mod I/I I I Basic 
program tapes into the CoCo ......$24.95 

DOS Switcher ~>. Select from any two DOSs 
TDisk 1.0 1.1, JD0S) in J&M ctlr .$24.95 
HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM ..^11.... $79. 95 

EARS -CoCo ' s first Voice Recognition unit 
w795Z accuracy & 64 Voice Prints ! $99.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
PO BOX S1S72 
93-1 S 86TH DRIVE 
WOOD HAVEN NY 11421 

COD ORDER HOT LINE 
71 8-441 -2807 



(r 








1 




Something possibly wrong with your CoCo??? CoCo CHECKER is the answer !! Will test your ROMs, 
RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, Printer, Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, "PIAs, VDG, Internal 
Clock Speed, Multi-Pak Interface and more!! 16K TAPE/DISK $19-95 (see Jan '85 Rainbow Review) 



MULTI-PAK CRAK 



Save ROM PAKs tb your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant 
plugging in of ROMPAKs now by keeping all your PAK software on disk . Includes POKEs for 
"PROBLEM" ROMPAKs- including the NEW 16K PAKS! (Demon Attack, Dragons Lair,etc) 64K DISK $24.95 




%ll the FEATURE S of TELE PATCH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD 
($19.95) font w/TRUE lowercase descenders! Get BOTH & SUPERCHARGE your TW-64 for only $29.95 



SPIT IM IMAGE 



A super upgrade from Disk Omni Clone! Back everything up! This amazing program handles "non 
standard " disks with ease. We haven't found any disk yet that it can't handle. Don't ever be caught 
without a backup again! Lowest price too! Beats most " copy protection " programs! 32K DISK $29.95 



COCO SCREEN DUMP 



The best screen dump program for the Panasonic , Epson & Gemini printers ever! Have the option of 
standard or reverse images w/regular or doubie sized proportional pictures. 600-9600 Baud too! A 
must for Graphicom and CoCo Calendar users. 16K TAPE/DISK $19.95 (see Nov '84 Rainbow Review) 



DISK UTILITY 2.1* 




A m ulti - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling, Utilize a directory window to selectively 
sort, move, rename pand kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy and backup. 
Examine contents c^f lilies,, the Granule Table, plus the size, load addresses and entry points of all 
programs. Single command execution of both Basic arid ML programs. 32K/64K DISK $24.95 " Disk 
Uti lity has proven itself very quickly at my house" Ed Ellers Oct '84 Rainbow Review pg. 220 



SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 



Now you can write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter-64, VIP Writer, etc.) and convert 
them to spec ial Highly Detai led character sets ! Some of the character sets supported are Italics , 
Old English , Futuristic and Block . A character set edi to r^ fSjj included to create custom sets or 
modify existing ones! Supports most dot- matrix printers! DISK $29.95 (see Dec '85 Rainbow Review) 



SPECTRUM DOS 



Add 24 NEW Disk commands with 2 Hi-Res screens! Supports 40 track & Doubie - Sided drives, 6 ms 
stepping, auto disk search, error trapping & "EPROMABLE", 64K DISK *$£&&5i New LOW price!! $24.95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR 



Save tim e and design pro looking diagrams using a 480X540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows . 
Over 30 electronic symbols w/10 definable symbols. (Even Logic gates & Multipin chips!) Print hard 
copy and save to disk. 64K DISK 549^S: New LOW price!!! $29.95 (see Jan '84 Rainbow Review) 




Basic+ provides (23)oftheiTic^^Jse 
w/single key! Also included is a 32 character typahead BUFFERED keybd w/auto key & repeat plus 
a 32K Print Spooler & Ptr Echo!! 64K DISK $29,95 (see Jan f 86 Rainbow Review pg. 192) 



COCO c 



Use your CoCo to keep track of your checking and savings accounts! Printout individual personal 
checks! 32K/64K TAPE $29.95 DISK $39.95 (see April f 85 pg. 210 & Oct'85 pg. 197 Rainbow Reviews) 



ULTIMATE GRAPHIC ADVENTURE 



Wizard's Castle is a graphic adventure game with deadly creatures, magic spells and traps of all 
types which are RANDOMIZED at the beginning of each session so that no 2 adventures will be the 
same! REAL TIME ACTION keeps the game's characters interacting even though you may be waiting to 
make a move. Includes three skill levels, 60 Hi -Res screens & Game Save Feature* 64K DISK $24.95 




UY ANY 5 PROGRAM 
A DRIVE Bf FOR $159.9 

OTHER DISCOUNTS CAN BE APPLIED 



OW AVAILABLE BY 
EXPRESS ORDER AT 
YOUR LOCAL RADIO 
SHACK STORE ! ! 



COLORFUL UTILITIES 




COCO TEXT UTIL 



I 



eludes utilities that most OoCo word processors. (TW-64, VIP Writer, etc.) leave out! Reset margins 
to correct length for uploading , convert all UPPER CASE text to mixed upper/lower, display total 
BYTE count, EASY rename £ Mn_ functional DISK $t9.95 (see May '86 Rainbow Review) 



COCO VIOEO TITLE 



Start your VCR tapes with dazzling title frames followed by profession countdown to blNok fade 
outs! Use a title page editor with several sizes of text & background solur s 1 16K TAPE $19.95 



PENPAL 



It's here! CoCo's answer to 1 -2-3 ! PENPAL co mbines Word Processing, Communications, Graphics. 
Data Base & Spreadsheet into a single i ntegrated software package! 64K DISK INTRO PRICE $69.95 



64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 



Tr^ke advantage of an expanded 84 K machine. Make an additional 8K of RAM available by relocating 
the Ext Basic ROT from $6000 to $DBQfi , Q&pfc RQMPA^S \ to disk, (even "protectee? 11 PAftS) arid create 
a 32K SPOOL butter for printing. DISK $21.95 (see July '83 Rainbow Review) 



TAPE/DISK UTILITY 



A powerful package Ui^L transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic 
copy of an qui [ \ \ e disk or programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to 



DUPER UTILITIES 



tape & prints tape & di.sk directories. TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 

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or a peripheral control output line. 

Vcc — This is the five volt input that 
powers the chip. 

R/W — This input controls the PI A as 
a read or a write to the registers. 

CSO — Chip Select 0 is an active high 
input. When this pin is low the chip is 
disabled. 



line used to access one of four locations 
on the PIA. 

RSO — This input is the first address 
line used to access one of four locations 
on the PIA. 



CS2 — Chip Select 2 is an active low 
input. When this pin is high, the chip is 
disabled. 

CS1 — Chip Select 1 is an active high 
input. When this pin is low, the chip is 
disabled. 

E — This is the Enable clock or the 'E' 
clock. Used to enable input or output. 

D7 to DO — These are the eight data 
lines that the CPU uses to read and 
write data to the PIA. 



IRQB — This active low output is used 
to generate an interrupt to the CPU 
from port B. The method of interrupt 
depends on how the control register is 
set up. 



RESET — This active low input initial- 
izes the PIA to power up conditions. 

RSI — This input is the second address 



IRQA — this active low output is used 
to generate an interrupt to the CPU 
from port A. The method of interrupt 
depends on how the control register is 
set up. 

CA2 — Is an input only line that sets 
the interrupt flags of the B control 
register 

CAI — Is either an interrupt input line 
or a peripheral control output line. 

First let me talk about the structure 
of the PIA. Basically, there are two 
ports. Each port has two control lines. 
Each PIA has two address lines and 







Register 
Bit 


Location 
Selected 


RSI 


RSO 


CRA-2 


CRB-2 


0 


0 


1 


X 


Peripheral Reg. A 


0 


0 


0 


X 


Data Direction Reg. A 


0 


1 




X 


Control Reg. A 


1 


0 


X 


1 


Peripheral" Reg. B 


1 


0 


X 


0 


Data Direction Reg. B 


I 


1 




X 


Control Reg. B 



Table 1: Internal Addressing 



BITS 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


I 


0 


CRA 


IRQ 

Al ; 


IRQ 

A2 


CA2 Control 


DDR 
A 


CAI 
Control 


CRB 


IRQ 
BI 


IRQ 
B2 


CB2 Control 


DDR 
B 


CA2 
Control 



Table 2: Control Registers 



takes up four memory locations in the 
CPU's memory map. 

Table 1 shows the memory map of a 
PIA. Address locations 0 and 2 are 
ports A and B respectively. Address 
locations 1 and 3 are control registers 
A and B respectively. I hope by now you 
can recognize addresses by binary bits. 
It may be a little confusing as to what 
CRA2 and CRB2 have to do with the 
memory map. There are actually six 
registers to a PIA. But, if you remember 
your binary math, six is not an even 
power. 

The designers could have added 
another address line and wasted the 
other two address locations. But in- 
stead, they put a software switch in the 
control register. Bit 2 to be exact. When 
the switch (bit 2) is low (zero) then 
address 0 or 2 becomes a data direction 
register. If you write a one in any bit 
position in that register, that bit be- 
comes an input. On the other hand, if 
you write a zero, that bit becomes an 
output. 

After all bits have been selected as ins 
or outs, then turn the switch at CRA2 
or CRB2 back to a one. Now the 0 and 
2 addresses become input and output 
peripheral ports as programmed. 

The next part of the PIA is a little 
more complex. This includes control 
bits and interrupts. Along with the two 
eight-bit ports, this PIA also has four 
other pins. There are two pins used for 
inputs or outputs and there are two pins 
that are inputs only. These four pins 
work in conjunction with the bits in the 
control register of the PIA. Table 2 
explains the bit names of control regis- 
ter A (CRA) and control register B 
(CRB). 

Let's look at CAI and CB1 first. They 
are inputs only. On given conditions, 
these inputs generate an interrupt. Bits 
0 and 1 in the respective control regis- 
ters have the following influence on the 
interrupts. If bits 0 and 1 are both low 
(either register), the interrupts are 
disabled and no interrupts go through. 
Only the interrupt flags are set on the 
falling edge of the input. If bit 1 is low 
and bit 0 is high, the falling edge of the 
CAI or CB1 input causes an interrupt 
and sets the flag. Bit 1 high and bit 0 
low sets the flag on the rising edge of 
the input but does not cause an inter- 
rupt. Bit 1 high and bit 0 high causes an 
interrupt and sets the flag on the rising 
edge of the input. The CAI and CB1 
interrupt flags are on bit 7 of the respec- 
tive control byte. In other words, bit 1 



112 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



enables or disables the interrupts and 
bit 0 controls on which edge the input 
causes an interrupt. 

Bits 3, 4 and 5 of the control byte 
control the CA2 and CB2 pins. These 
pins are a little more flexible than the 
C Al and CB 1 pins. They can be outputs 
or inputs controlled by bit 5. If bit 5 (on 
either control byte) is high, then the pin 
is an output. If it is low, then it is an 
input. When bit 5 is low, bits 4 and 3 
make these pins behave exactly like bits 
1 and 0 make pins CA1 and CB1 be- 
have. When CA2 or CB2 are initialized 
as outputs, they behave a little differ- 
ently. 

Let's look at CA2 first. There are four 
possible combinations of operation. 
The first is when bit 4 is low and bit 3 
is low. This goes low after the first 
negative transition of the E clock after 
the CPU reads Port A. It returns high 
when the interrupt flag is set (CRA-7) 
by the active transition of the CA1 
signal. If bit 4 is low and bit 3 is high, 
it is the same, but goes high after the 
first 'E' clock cycle. This mode is used 
mainly as an acknowledgment of a read 
(handshaking) to another peripheral. If 
bit 4 is high and bit 3 is low, C A2 is low. 



If bit 4 is high and bit 3 is high, CA2 
is high. This mode is used when CA2 is 
to be used as a latched bit to control an 
external device. 

Next there is CB2. There are also four 
possible combinations of operation for 
this output pin. When bit 4 is low and 
bit 3 is low, this pin goes low on the 
positive transition of the first 'E' clock 
as a result of a write to the B port; then 
goes high again when the interrupt flag 
bit (CRB-7) is set by an active transition 
of the CB1 input. When bit 4 is low and 
bit 3 is high it is the same, but goes high 
again on the positive edge of the first 4 E' 
clock following that write. This mode is 
used when there is a need to autostrobe 
or select an exterior device. If bit 4 is 
high and bit 3 is low, it causes CB2 to 
go low and stay low. If bit 4 is high and 
bit 3 is high, it causes CB2 to go high 
and stay high. This is another latched 
bit to control an external device. 

In Conclusion 

There you have it, the internal work- 
ings of a PIA. As I stated before, there 
are two such beasts in our CoCos and 
CoCo 2s. If you want to add a third 
PIA, the most logical place to put it in 



the memory map would be in the Spare 
Chip Select area. This is at $FF40 and 
is 16 bytes long. That is the same place 
that the contoller is mapped. You could 
always use a Multi-Pak Interface. You 
should now know enough about CPUs 
and signals to interface this PIA to the 
computer, but for those of you who are 
still unsure, I have included some guide- 
lines. 

Using the pinout of the PIA in Figure 
1 and the pinout of the CoCo expansion 
bus in earlier articles, connect the 
following signals together. Five volts to 
five volts. Ground to ground. All eight 
data lines to all eight data lines. The first 
two address lines of the CPU to RSO 
and RSI respectively. The R/W line to 
the R/W l ine. The 'E' clock t o the 'E' 
clock. The RESET line to th e RESET 
line. The SCS line to the CS2 line. And 
finally, CSO and CS 1 to f ive vol ts. You 
can connect IRQA and IRQB to the 
cart line of the computer, but watch out, 
this can (under certain conditions) 
cause an interrupt that makes the com- 
puter crash. Make sure you know what 
you're doing with the interrupt routines 
for the CoCo and the setting of the 
interrupt pins in the PIA. ^ 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that are 
useful /helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and it 
is best to make several saves, at least one of them in 
ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time to 
key in programs. All programs should be supported by 
some editorial commentary explaining how the program 
works. Generally, we're much more interested in how 
your submission works and runs than how you devel- 
oped it. Programs should be learning experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed infor- 
mation on making submissions, please send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submissions 
Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some more 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

(A DIVISION OF DATAMATCH, INC.) 

DATAMA 
D I SKET 

DOUBLE SIDE / DOUBLE DENSITY 
10/ $9. 00 100/«85.00 





AMATCH 
I PPYS * 

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10/*9.95 100/*95.00 

SENT I Mi 




OR DS,DD - 12 AST'D COLORS 
12/*12.95 100/*99.95 

ALL DISKS COME WITH TYVEK SLEEVES, LABELS, N.P.TA8S 

COLOR RIBBONS: Red, Green, Blue, Brown 
GEM/OKI 4/S10.00 
EPSON 4/S24.00 
■ APPLE/NEC 4/$24.00 

Add $2.50 S/H In U.SA - Canada Add $3.50 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 

Send check or money order payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

9020 Hemingway, Redford, Ml 48239 
(31 3) 937-3442 

Send Card Number and Exp. Date 
Mln. Charge Order $20.00 





July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 113 




/ M££D ^O/yfS //£*J> F&om 
OF 5/V7/er. * . 




ZjLjL 5** TO /T TM4T -TM* j£sT Oaj*s A#jT 





JUST -F&i^ouJ 7W£ /A/S7l€(/ 3£i~oi*s /UM> 5G*jP 

A rc*<p/** f/Ycrfo Of yvt//ZS£&f /UJ0 you< /It*** 
W/T# ytXAL. AA**9£ A£&**S3 7~0 . 



5c?*Jty. PHoVfS c^tMXtr as A&TV&tLD. 




{ 



£&A£>Sf / Ve 
3B-EAJ PRINTED®-! 




D set iron on the cotton setting. jt face do wn on the sh.rt 

2 > KffiffitS Sffn^aS^^r about 20 to 25 seconds, 
3) SK Se a adV ^^^KSB-n transferred. 

making sure all areas ot in or marker 

made especially tartnw ^purp 

Be sure to place a piece u< ^ 



114 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



By Robert. (]. Mantowski 




A company in California has spe- 
cial printer ribbons that allow 
you to print graphics to your 
printer and then use the printout as an 
iron-on transfer. This bit of information 
intrigued me and I thought it would be 
fun to produce my own iron-on. But I 
had a problem: Most of my graphics 
programs do not have a left-to-right flip 
function in them. I sat down to write 
one that was fast, simple and could be 
called from BASIC so even those not 
familiar with the program could use it. 

I finally came up with the Flip-L2R/ 
BIN program. It is very compact and is 
position independent so it can reside 
almost anywhere in memory. It will 
handle both PMODE 4 and CoCo MAX- 



Bob Montowski works as a security aid 
for the Pennsylvania state hospital and 
lives in Norristown. He is an avid OS- 
9 user and runs an OS-9 BBS called The 
Graphics Pub, 



size pictures. If the wrong value is 
passed to Flip-L2R/ BIN, the picture 
will not be flipped. 

Flip-L2R/SRC is source code from 
EDTASM+ you can use to assemble 
Flip-L2R/ BIN with any extra features 
you want to add. If you don't have 
EDTASM+, then use Flippoke/B AS to 
poke the ML code into memory. 

Flip- L2Rj BIN \% the assembled code 
ready to use. The program Bootflipj 
BAS is a simple program for loading in 
Flip-L2R/ BIN and the pictures you 
want to flip. Bootflip/ BAS prompts for 
the name of the picture to load and then 
asks if the file is a PMODE 4 or CoCo 
MA X-size picture. 

The program goes to Hi-Res and 
shows you the flip in action. Watch 
closely because the flip only takes one- 
quarter second. It is about one-half 
second for a CoCo MAX-sxzq picture. 
If you flipped a CoCo MAX-size pic- 
ture, the program does the flip and 
shows the PMODE 4,1 and the PMODE 



4 , 5 screens to prove the flip was done 
right. 

After the flip is done, the program 
prints how to save the new picture to 
disk and then ends. This is to give better 
control over which disk the new pro- 
gram is to be saved on and under what 
name. To use the program again, type 
GOTO 20. 

To order those special print ribbons, 
call Under ware Diversions Inc. at (415) 
591-0660 or they can be reached at 1550 
Winding Way, Belmont, CA 94002. The 
ribbons cost about $20 and are available 
for Apple Imagewriter, Epson, Okidata 
and Gemini printers. 

You must have your own screen 
dump program to get the flipped picture 
to the printer. The company also sells 
colored markers to color in the iron-on. 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at B-18 1151 
Sterigere Street, Norristown, PA 19403, 
phone 215-277-6951. Please enclose an 
SASE when writing.) □ 



Listing 1: BOOTFLIP 


22 


PRINT" 1. PMODE 4": PRINT" 2. CO 


CO 


MAX SIZE":PRINT"WHICH FORMAT 


1 CLEAR 2j30,&H7Ej3j3:LOADM n FLIP-L2 


IS 


PICTURE " ; : INPUT N 


R/BIN" 


30 


SCREEN 1,1 
LOADM N$ 


2 PCLEAR 8 


40 


10 DEFUSR0=&H7E15 


50 


FORI=1TO2000 : NEXT 


20 PMODE 4,1 


60 


A=USR0 (N) 


21 PCLS : CLS : LINE IN PUT 11 NAME OF P 


70 


SOUND 100,10 


IX TO LOAD? ";N$ 


81 


IF N=2 THEN PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 115 



1,1: FOR 1=1 TO 1000 : NEXT : SOUND 1 
00,20:PMODE 4, 5: SCREEN l,l:FORI= 
1 TO 1000: NEXT: SOUND 200, 20: CLS: 
PRINT"PICTURE HAS BEEN FLIPPED! " 
82 IF N=l THEN CLS : PRINT "SAVE TO 
DISK AS: " : PRINT" SAVEM"+CHR$ (34) 
+"NAME"+CHR$ (34) +" , &HE00 , &H25FF, 
40999" 

84 IF N=2 THEN CLS : PRINT" SAVE TO 
DISK AS: " : PRINT" SAVEM"+CHR$ (34) 
+ "NAME"+CHR$ (34)+",&HE00,&H3DFF, 
4J3999" 

90 PRINT"TYPE GOTO 2j3 TO RUN AGA 
IN" 



Listing 2: FLIPPOKE 

2 'A BASIC PROGRAM TO POKE FLIP- 
L2R/BIN 

4 'INTO MEMORY FOR THOSE WITHOUT 
EDTASM+ 

5 'BOB MONTOWSKI 

6 'APT B-18 1151 STERIGERE ST. 

7 'NORRISTOWN, PA. 194)33 71615, 
531 

8 ' 

9 ' 

10 CLEAR 200,&H7E00 

11 CLS: PRINT "POKING M/L INTO MEM 
ORY NOW ..." 

20 FOR I=&H7E00 TO &H7EBE 

30 READ N:POKE I,N 

31 PRINT@32,I;" ";N 

40 NEXT I 

41 PRINT: PRINT "M/L CODE IN MEMOR 
Y":PRINT"HIT ANY KEY TO SAVE COD 
E TO DISK" 

42 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 42 

50 SAVEM"FLIP-L2R/BIN" , &H7E00 , &H 

7EBE,&H7E15 

60 END 



100 DATA 0,8,4,12,2,10,6,14,1,9 
110 DATA 5,13,3,11,7,15,15,0,1 
120 DATA 248,255,79,95,189,179,2 
37,16,131 

130 DATA 0,1,16,37,0,155,16,131, 
0 

140 DATA 2,16,46,0,147,193,1,38, 
11 

150 DATA 142,14,0,204,0,192,237, 
140,217 

160 DATA 32,9,142,14,0,204,1,128 
,237 

170 DATA 140,206,18,16,142,0,33, 
230,0 

180 DATA 231,140,198,196,15,51,1 
40,175,166 

190 DATA 197,72,72,72,72,167,140 
,186,230 

200 DATA 140,181,84,84,84,84,166 
,197,171 

210 DATA 140,174,167,140,169,49, 
62,52,32 

220 DATA 166,97,230,134,231,140, 
159,196,15 

230 DATA 166,197,72,72,72,72,167 
,140,149 

240 DATA 230,140,145,84,84,84,84 
,166,197 

250 DATA 171,140,137,167,140,133 
,230,140,129 

260 DATA 166,97,231,134,230,141, 
255, 122 

270 DATA 231,0,48,1,53,32,16,140 

280 DATA 1,46,162,48,136,16,16,1 
74, 141 

290 DATA 255,99,49,63,16,140,0,0 
39 

300 DATA 9,16,175,141,255,86,22, 
255,134 

310 DATA 57,57 



Listing 3: FLIP-L2R 00001 ****»A"/rATfrA-A"A-A ^ 

00002 *BOB MONTOWSKI 

00003 *APT. B-18 1151 STERIGERE ST. 

00004 *NORRISTOWN, PA. 19403 

00005 *7 1615, 531 

00006 *(C) 1985 

00007 *iWr**^**)Br^****^^ 

00008 *THIS PROGRAM IS RELOCATABLE POSITION INDEPENDANT CODE 
00010 ****^*^^****^**iMr*^***^ 

00015 *A M/L PROGRAM TO FLIP A PMODE 4 OR COCO MAX SIZE PICTURE 
00020 *FROM LEFT TO RIGHT . . . 

00025 *CALL THE PROGRAM FROM BASIC WITH THIS ROUTINE 

00027 *05 PCLEAR 8 

00030 *10 CLEAR 200,6cH7E00 

00035 *20 LOADM"FLIP-L2R/BIN" 



116 THE RAINBOW July 1986 









00040 


*30 DEFUSR0=&H7E15 












00045 


*40 LOADM" PICTURE/BIN" 












00055 


*55 REM 


N-l FOR 


DISK SYSTEM AND PMODE 


4 PICTURE 








00065 


*65 REM 


N=2 FOR 


DISK SYSTEM AND COCO MAX SIZE PICTURE 








00070 


*70 A=USR0(N) 














00075 


*75 REM 


FLIP IS 


DONE NOW DO A (C) SAVEM OF THE NEW PICTURE 








00076 


* ( C ) SAVEM" PIC/BIN" , &HE00 , &H25FF , 409 9 9 








00077 


* FOR PMODE 4 PIC ON DISK SYSTEM 










00078 


* (C ) SAVEM" PIC/MAX" , &HE00 , &H3DFF , 409 9 9 








00079 


* FOR COCO MAX SIZE PIC 


ON DISK SYSTEM 








00080 










00085 




7E00 






00100 




ORG 


$7E00 












00101 


*MTRROR 

* 1 J. -L JlVLV. \w/ 1a. 


IMAGE TABLE FOR 


BYTE VALUES FROM HEX 0 TO HEX F 


7E00 




00 


00105 


TABLE 


r ud 






0 


7E01 




08 


00110 




FPR 




"mtpphp r\i? uttv 


1 


7E02 




04 


00115 




T7PD 

r \jd 




rllKKUK Ur nrLA 


o 
z 


7E03 




0C 


00120 




r ud 




mtpp^p mr xjity 
rilKixUrv. Ur liHA 


Q 

o 


7E04 




02 


00125 




r ud 




rllKKUK Ur liHA 


/. 


7E05 




0A 


00130 




r Od 




WTDDrtD r\T? ITT7V 

rllKKUK Ur HliiX 


c 
D 


7E06 




06 


00135 




TTfR 

r ud 




MTDDOD TJT7 V 

nlKKUK Ur hrLA 


0 


7E07 




0E 


00140 




FCB 


m 


MIRROR OF HEX 


1 


7E08 




01 


00145 




FCB 


m 


MIRROR OF HEX 


Q 
O 


7E09 




09 


00150 




FCB 


$09 


MIRROR OF HEX 


Q 


7E0A 




05 


00155 




FCB 


$05 


MIRROR OF HEX 


A 
A 


7E0B 




0D 


00160 




FCB 


$0D 


MIRROR OF HEX 


D 


7E0C 




03 


00165 




FCB 




MIRROR OF HEX 


c, 


7E0D 




0B 


00170 




FCB 


m 


MIRROR OF HEX 


D 


7E0E 




07 


00175 




FCB 


w 


MIRROR OF HEX 


F 


7E0F 




0F 


00180 




FCB 


$0F 


MIRROR OF HEX 


F 


7E10 






00190 


REPEAT 


RMB 


2 






7E12 






00195 


LEFT 


RMB 


1 






7E13 






00200 


RIGHT 


RMB 


1 






7E14 






00205 


TEMP 


RMB 


1 






7E15 


4F 




00206 


START 


CLRA 








7E16 


5F 




00208 




CLRB 














00209 


*GET VALUE FROM 


BASIC AND CHECK TO BE 


SURE >=1 AND <=2 


7E17 


BD 


B3ED 


00210 


GETVAR 


JSR 


$B3ED 






7E1A 


1083 


0001 


00215 




CMPD 


#$0001 






7E1E 


1025 


009 B 


00220 




LBLO 


ERROR 






7E22 


1083 


0002 


00225 




CMPD 


#$0002 






7E26 


102E 


0093 


00230 




LBGT 


ERROR 












00231 












7E2A 


CI 


01 


00235 




CMPB 


#$01 






7E2C 


26 


0B 


00240 




BNE 


NV2 






7E2E 


8E 


0E00 


00245 




LDX 


#$0E00 


START OF PMODE 


4 GRAPHICS/DISK SYSTEM 


7E31 


CC 


00C0 


00255 




LDD 


#192 


# OF ROWS ON PMODE 4 PICTURE 


7E34 


ED 


8C D9 


00260 




STD 


REPEAT, PCR 




7E37 


20 


09 


00265 




BRA 


FLIP 






7E39 


8E 


0E00 


00280 


NV2 


LDX 


#$0E00 


START OF PMODE 


4 GRAPHICS/DISK SYSTEM 


7E3C 


CC 


0180 


00290 




LDD 


#384 


# OF ROWS ON COCO MAX PICTURE 


7E3F 


ED 


8C CE 


00295 




STD 


REPEAT, PCR 




7E42 


12 




00360 


FLIP 


NOP 


VARIABLES ARE SET FOR 


TYPE SYSTEM/TYPE PICTURE 


7E43 


108E 


0021 


00365 


FLIP2 


LDY 


#33 






7E47 


E6 


00 


00370 


FLIP3 


LDB 








7E49 


E7 


8C C6 


00375 




STB 


LEFT, PCR 




7E4C 


C4 


0F 


00380 




ANDB 


#$0F 






7E4E 


33 


8C AF 


00385 




LEAU 


TABLE, PCR 




7E51 


A6 


C5 


00390 




LDA 


B,U 







July 1986 THE RAINBOW 117 



7E53 


48 






00391 


LSLA 




7E54 


48 






00392 


LSLA 




7E55 


48 






00393 


LSLA 




7E56 


48 






00394 


LSLA 




7E57 


A7 


8C 


BA 


00395 


STA 


TEMP , PCR 


7E5A 


E6 


8C 


B5 


00400 


LDB 


LEFT , PCR 


7E5D 


54 






00405 


LSRB 




7E5E 


54 






00410 


LSRB 




7E5F 


54 






00415 


LSRB 




7E60 


54 






00420 


LSRB 




7E61 


A6 


C5 




00425 


LDA 


B,U 


7E63 


AB 


8C 


AE 


00450 


ADDA 


TEMP , PCR 


7E66 


A7 


8C 


A9 


00455 


STA 


LEFT , PCR 


7E69 


31 


3E 




00460 


LEAY 


-2,Y 


7E6B 


34 


20 




00461 


PSHS 


Y 


7E6D 


A6 


61 




00462 


LDA 


i,s 


7E6F 


E6 


86 




00463 


LDB 


A,X 


7E71 


E7 


8C 


9F 


00470 


STB 


RIGHT , PCR 


7E74 


C4 


0F 




00475 


ANDB 


#$0F 


7E76 


A6 


C5 




00485 


LDA 


B,U 


7E78 


48 






00486 


LSLA 




7E79 


48 






00487 


LSLA 




7E7A 


48 






00488 


LSLA 




7E7B 


48 






00489 


LSLA 




7E7C 


A7 


8C 


95 


00490 


STA 


TEMP , PCR 


7E7F 


E6 


8C 


91 


00495 


LDB 


RIGHT, PCR 


7E82 


54 








LSRB 




7E83 


54 






00505 


LSRB 




7E84 


54 






00510 


LSRB 





3* 



MicroWorld 



3 



230 Moorestown Rd. Wind Gap, PA 18091 

(215) 759-7662 

Call or write (or Price List 

LOW PRICES ON 100% 
Radio Shack Equipment 

(with full warranty) 

New Slimline Drive 0 

Slimline Drive 0 & 1 installed . 

Prices subject to change! 
Prices include shipping! 



...$235.00 
. . . $399.00 



64K Extended $145.00 

Sakata 13" Monitor $180.00 

With monitor driver $210.00 

Multipack Interface $ 75.00 

DMP-105 $159.00 

DMP-130 $275.00 

Diskettes, any quantity, lifetime warranty $ 1.50 
Tandy 1000 $695.00 

Quantities are limited! 

10% off Computerware 
10% off all Radio Shack Sale Items 
15% off Radio Shack Hardware 
20% off all Radio Shack Software 




Co Co - Cooler £§> 




• Brings operating 
temperature 
to ambient, 
regardless 

of 

accessory 
load 

• Reduces 
tempera- 
ture of 

ENTIRE computer . . . not 
just the SAM chip 

• Easy 1-minute installation 

• $44.95 



Companion Keyboard Cover $9.95 



Send For Free Catalog Of Co Co Software & Computerware 

• For Fastest Service Send Money Order Or Certified Check 
• Add $2.50 Shipping For Continental U.S. 

• Add $4.00 Shipping For. AK, HI APO's, P. O. Boxes, & Canada 
• Add $15.00 Shipping For Overseas 
• Add $3.00 For 220-250 Volt Model 

• California Residents Add 6 l /2% Sales Tax 
• Add $3.00 For C.O.D. 



REM Industries, Inc. 

9420 "B"LurlineAve. t Chatsworih, CA 9131 1 

i (818)341-3719 



118 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



7E85 54 






00515 

r r 




LSRB 




7E86 A6 


C5 




00520 




LDA 


B,U 
> 


7E88 AB 


8C 


89 


00545 




ADDA 


TEMP, PCR 


7E8B A7 


8C 


85 


00550 




STA 


RIGHT, PCR 


7E8E E6 


8C 


81 


00555 




LDB 


LEFT,PCR 


7E91 A6 


61 




00560 




LDA 


1,S 


7E93 E7 


86 




00561 

r r 




STB 


A,X 








00562 














00563 








7E95 E6 

m mmm m* mw <fe^ 


8D 


FF7A 


00565 




LDB 


RIGHT, PCR 


7E99 E7 


00 

r r 




00570 

r r r 




STB 


^ ■ 


7E9B 30 


01 

r 




00575 




LEAX 


l.x 


7E9D 35 


20 




00576 




PULS 


Y 


7E9F 108C 




00580 

r r r 




CMPY 


#$0001 

~ r r r 


7EA3 2E 


A2 




00585 




BGT 


FLIP 3 


7EA5 30 


88 


19 


00590 

r r r 




LEAX 


16, X 


7EA8 10AE 


8D 


FF63 


00595 




LDY 


REPEAT , PCR 


7EAD 31 


3F 




00600 




LEAY 




7EAF 108C 


9999 


00601 




CMPY 


#$0000 


7EB3 27 


99 




00605 




BEQ 


FINI 


7EB5 10AF 


8D 


FF56 


00610 




STY 


REPEAT, PCR 


7EBA 16 


FF86 


00615 




LBRA 


FLIP2 








00617 


*MY ERROR ROUTINE IF D<1 OR D>2 IS TO JUST RETURN TO BASIC 








00618 


*YOU MAY ADD 


YOUR OWN CODE HERE TO PRINT AN ERROR MESSAGE 








00619 

r r ^ " 


^BEFORE 


RETURNING TO BASIC 


7EBD 39 






00620 ERROR 


RTS 




7EBE 39 






00625 


FINI 


RTS 






9999 


00630 




END 




00000 TOTAL ] 


ERRORS 











PLUG THIS INTO YOUR COCO 

Engage mind and Connect the world 

(or at least the electrical signals used to control 
outside devices and instruments) 




* Expansion Connector Breadboard, CC-100, accesses 
the data, address, and control buses, $34.95 

*TRS-80 Color Computer Interfacing, With Experi- 
ments, No. 21893, explains and illustrates principles, 
$14.95 

* Experiment Component Package, CC-150, contains 
the parts needed to do the experiments, $67.50 

Add $1.50 per item for shipping or get all three for 

$105.00 plus $3.00 shipping. 

Virginia residents add 4% sales tax. 

VISA/Master Card accepted. Call 703-651-3153. Free 

catalog available. 



PUTTING 
HANDS 
AND 
MINDS 
TOGETHER 




Main tow 

Qroup Shcknology, jStd. 
P.O. BOX 87 • CHECK, VIRGINIA 24072 





MailwCuiU ] 



AT LAST* I \ 

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VfSA 



P.O. Box 1061 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-1061 
717-821-2946 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 119 



The art of entertainment 





Pinball Factory by Kary McFadden 

The video game comes full circle in this glorious tribute to the original. 
Classic pinball spings to life as never before, with fresh new angles that 
only the computer can offer. Crisp graphics, sound, and fast, smooth 
action give this machine-language arcade game a realistic, responsive feel 
you'll hardly believe. There are even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" 
the machine! 

In addition to playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of 
creative pleasure as you design, build, and edit your own screens. Save 
and load your favorite creations. The joystick-controlled cursor makes it 
all easy. 

Change the board: build with bumpers, tabs, and a multitude of solid 

obstacles to form any configuration imaginable. 
Change the face: draw your own title board with lines, rays, and shape 

patterns. Add text in three different colors, and two dirrent sizes. 
Change the rules: alter the gravity, bounce, and scoring! 

64K Color Computer required. $34.95 




Speed Racer by Steven Hirsch 

The checkered flag drops as your pulse rises in this lively new 
arcade game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D rano- 
rama that sets the stage for the most exciting race the CoCo 
has ever seen. 1 

Vie for time as you speed through the curves at incredible 
speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of the pack, but 
step lively since some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! 

Four challenging raceways, complete with obstacles and 
colorful 3-D scenery, put your skills to the test in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 

32K Color Computer required. $34.95 





Rommel 3-D by Kary McFadden 

You clutch the tank controls, searching for any sign of the 
enemy. Suddenly a blip appears on radar! Frantically, you 
move your tank into position. At last you spot the elusive 
enemy tank! Facing it, you race to lock sights and fire before 
he does! 

Enter the ultimate battle-zone in this exciting 3-D tank com- 
bat game. Strategy, speed, and your tank's cannon are your 
only hope as you wind through a three-dimensional course 
inhabited by impenetrable barriers and enemy tanks. 

Dazzling graphics and lifelike sound take you a step beyond 
the ordinary in this fast, machine-language arcade game. Enter 
the next dimension, ROMMEL'S troops are waiting for you! 

32K Color Computer required. $29.95 




576 S. Telegraph, Pontuc, MI 48053 
Orders and Information (313) 334-5700 
Prices Do Not Include Shipping and Handling 




PROGRAMMING UTILITY 



16K 




ECB 





the 
RAINBOW 




Faster than keyboard entry - 

more user-friendly than arrow keys 

— able to leap whole screens in a single bound. 

Yes, it's . • • 



CoCo Mouse! 



T_*h e past 15 years I have seen 
I l^the user interface for compu- 

-M*-M.-Mters improve greatly. First I 
used punch cards to enter my programs 
into a computer. Next came the hard 
copy terminal, but it was like using a 
typewriter (very slow and noisy). Now 
finally, the home computer with its 
display and keyboard makes for faster, 
quieter and easier user interface. 

True, we have come a long way since 
the punch card, but the keyboard is not 
always the best way to talk to a com- 
puter. An example is the game Mega- 
Bug) you can use the keyboard's arrow 
keys to control the game, but the joy- 
stick makes it easier to play the game. 

The same is true for most programs 
written in BASIC. Moving a pointer on 
the screen to select an option from the 
menu is more user friendly than looking 
at the screen, then pressing keys to tell 
the computer what to do. 

Steve Bjork has been a programmer for 
over 15 years. In his association with 
DataSoft he has authored such pro- 
grams as Zaxxon, Sands of Egypt and 
Mega-Bug. He now handles product 
development for his own company, 
SRB Software, and has produced Stel- 
lar Life Line, Ghana Bwana and PitFall 
II among others. Steve lives in Simi 
Valley, California 




This is where The Mouse comes in. 
It uses a Color Computer mouse (or 
joystick) as a point-and-click user 
interface. By moving the mouse, a 
pointer (cursor) is moved around on the 
screen. When the cursor is over the 
option wanted, press the button on the 
mouse to select it. No more looking 
away from the screen to hunt for keys 
to enter your selection. 

About a year ago I placed in public 
domain my first version of The Mouse 
Version 1.0. After receiving many re- 
quests for a few options to be added, 
Version 2.0 of The Mouse is ready for 
release. 

The Mouse is an assembly language 
program that displays a moving cursor 
and prints upper- and lowercase text on 
the Hi- Res graphics screen. This Hi-Res 
text driver has a format of 32 columns 
by 24 lines with a scroll-protect window 
option. Bell and click sounds also have 
been added to round out the package. 

Software Overview 

The Mouse communicates with a 
BASIC program via a USR function and 
the PRINT command. The 60-hertz 
interrupt is used to draw the cursor on 
the screen and read the joystick's posi- 
tion and button status. The Mouse can 
poll the right or left joystick ports, 
CoCo Max Hi- Res input module, the 



By Steve Bjork 

Radio Shack X-Pad or the Hi-Res Joy- 
stick Convert for the cursor position 
and button status. The PRINT com- 
mand is redirected from the standard 
green text screen to a Hi-Res screen text 
driver whenever the Hi-Res screen is 
displayed. The USR function has 14 
commands that can be passed to it. 
They are: 

USR(O) — This command turns off 
the cursor (pointer) on the screen. Make 
sure the cursor is off before using any 
BASIC graphics commands. 

USR(l) — This command turns the 
cursor on. The cursor should only be on 
when a selection is to be made from the 
screen. 

USR(2) — This function returns the 
X position of the cursor (and the joy- 
stick). 

USR(3) — This function returns the 
Y position of the cursor (and joystick). 

(Note: Because the Color Computer 
joystick port uses a six-bit DAC system, 
they only return a value of zero to 63. 
To get full-screen movement of the 
cursor, the zero to 63 from DAC is 
multiplied by two for zero to 126 across, 
or multiplied by three for zero to 1 89 up 
and down. The CoCo Max hardware, 
X-Pad and Hi-Res Joystick Interface 
options return a full 128 by 192 read- 
ing.) 

July 1986 THE RAINBOW 121 



- 



— 



USR(4) — This function is used to 
find out if the button has been pressed. 
A zero is returned if the button has not 
been pressed since the last time the 
command was used. A one is returned 
if it was pressed. 

USR(5) — This function returns the 
up/ down status of the button. A zero 
is passed if the button is not pressed or 
a one if the button is pressed. 

USR(6) — This command is used to 
unlink (turn off) The Mouse system. 
This command must be used when 
ending the BASIC program. When any 
other command is used, The Mouse is 
automatically linked into the Color 
Computer system. 

USR(7) — This command plays a bell 
sound. 

USR(8) — This command plays a 
click sound. 

USR(9) — This command selects the 
right joystick as the input device for 
cursor movement and button status. 
This is the standard input device for The 
Mouse and is automatically selected 
when The Mouse binary file is loaded 
into memory. 

USR(IO) — This command selects 
the left joystick for cursor position and 
button status. 

USR(ll) — This command selects 
the Co Co Max Hi-Res Input Module 
for cursor position and button status. 

USR(12) — This command selects 
Radio Shack X-Pad for cursor position 
and button status. 

USR(13) — This command selects 
Hi-Res Joystick Interface for cursor 
position and button status. 



Tables 1 and 2 are for quick reference 
of the USR commands and the screen 
control code for the Hi-Res screen text 
drivers. 

To make the binary file of The 
Mouse, type in Listing 1 and save it. 
Now run the program. If an error is 
encountered in one of data lines the 
program prints the line number and 
stops. After all the data lines have been 
converted, the program asks if the 
binary file should be saved to tape or 
disk. 

The disk version of The Mouse bi- 
nary file has a load address of zero and 
needs an offset address whenever it is 
loaded into memory. To load this file in 
the end of memory of a 16K system, a 
load offset address $3400 should be 
used (LDRDM "MOUSE", &H3400). 

The cassette version has a starting 
address of $3400 and ending address of 
S3FFF. If the file is loaded on a 32/64K 
system, a load offset of $4000 will put 
it at the top of memory ($7400 to 
$7FFF). 

Using the Mouse Software 

Now that you have an idea of what 
the commands are, let's see how to use 
them. Lines (Listing 2) is a BASIC pro- 
gram that uses The Mouse to draw lines 
on the screen by selecting the start and 
end points. The program also has the 
option to exit or clear the screen. 

Line 100 clears space for The Mouse 
and Line 120 loads it in. Note: this 
program is configured for loading in 
The Mouse from disk. If you are using 



Table 1 

USR commands 

0 Turn off Hi-Res cursor. 

1 Turn on and display Hi-Res cur- 
sor. 

2 Get Joystick X position (0 to 127). 

3 Get Joystick Y position (0 to 191). 

4 Get button press. If button was 
pressed, senses the last use of this 
command and a ~1 is returned. 
Else a 0 is returned. 

5 Get button status. The number 
-1 is returned if the button is 
pressed down. Else a 0 is returned. 

6 Disable Mouse software, unlink 
its hooks. 

7 Play Bell sound. 

8 Play Click sound. 

9 Select right Joystick for input 
device. 

10 Select left Joystick for input de- 
vice. 

11 Select Coco Max Hardware for 
input device. 

12 Select Radio Shack X-Pad for 
input device. 

13 Select Hi- Res Joystick Interface 
for input device. 



this program on a casette-based system, 
delete Line 120 and remove the apos- 
trophe O from Line 140. 

Line 150 defines USR function zero 
with The Mouse address. The next line 
tells BASIC to clear and display a 6K Hi- 
Res screen. 

To make easy use of the scroll-protect 
windows, lines 170 through 180 define 
three types, full screen, top line and 




240 


151 


1250 


88 


1010 


181 


1310 


163 


1070 


159 


1360 


2 


1130 


242 


1420 . 


126 


1190 


3 


END 


....68 



Listing 1: MOUSE 



0 GOTO 2000 

10 'THIS PROGRAM MAKES A MOUSE 
'BINARY FILE 

•COPYRIGHT 1986 BY SRB SOFTWA 



20 
30 
RE 
40 
50 



'THIS IS A PUBLIC DOMAIN 
•SOFTWARE BY STEVE BJORK 
100 CLEAR 50,&H33FF 
110 MOUSE=&H3400 
120 CLS:P=MOUSE:LN-1000 
130 READ L$,C:S=0 

140 PRINT §0 , "WORKING ON LINE" ; L 
N 



150 FOR X=0 TO 63 

160 V=VAL("&H"+MID$ (L$,X*2+1,2) ) 

170 POKE P,V:S=S+V:P=P+1 

180 NEXT X 

190 IF COS THEN PRINT "DATA ERR 
OR IN LINE" ;LN: END 

200 LN=LN+10:IF P<MOUSE+&HBFF TH 
EN 130 

210 CLS: PRINT "SAVE TO DISK OR CA 
SETTE? (D,C) 

220 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="D" THEN 300 

ELSE IF I$<>"C" THEN 220 
2 30 PRINT "PRESS ENTER WHEN READ 
Y TO SAVE TO CASSETTE." 
240 IF INKEY$OCHR$ (13) THEN 240 
2 50 CSAVEM" MOUSE " , MOUSE , MOUSE+&H 
BFF,&HA027 

2 60 PRINT"MOUSE BINARY FILE IS N 
OW ON THE TAPE . " 

270 PRINT "THE LOAD ADDRESS IS $3 

400-$3FFF" 

280 END 



122 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Table 2 

Screen Control Codes 

0 Nil, do nothing. 

1 X-position, Y-position — Set cur- 
sor position. 

2 Select white on black characters. 

3 Select black on white characters. 

4 X-position, Y-position, X-length, 
Y-length — Set window position 
and size. 

5 Move text cursor left 

6 Move text cursor right. 

7 Play bell sound. 

8 Backspace. 

9 Move cursor to next tab position. 

10 Move down one line with scroll 
(line feed). 

1 1 Move up one line. 

12 Clear screen and home cursor 
(form-feed). 

13 Carriage return. 

14 to 31 and 128 to 255 are not defined 
at this time. 

32 to 127 are printable characters. 



draw area. Information for window 
placement and size is pasted to The 
Mouse by printing a control code 
number four and four bytes of data. The 
format is: 4, X-position, Y-position, X- 
length, Y-length. The X-position is any 
of the first 31 columns (0-30). The Y- 
position is any of the first 23 lines (0- 
22). The X-length is from 1 to 32 ex- 
position) in size. The Y-length is from 
1 to 24 (Y-position) in size. 
After using any of the USR functions 



The Mouse is linked in the PRINT 
command and the 60-hertz interrupt 
and that's what the U5R(0) in Line 190 
does. Lines up to 260 print the instruc- 
tions to the program. Line 270 waits for 
the user to press the button to continue. 
The GOSUB in Line 500 clears the work 
area. 

After turning on the cursor, the 
computer waits for the user to press the 
button to place the starting point of the 
line. This is done in lines 290 through 
350. Next comes the end point selection 
by pressing the button one more time 
after moving the cursor on the screen 
(lines 360 to 400). 

The interrupting of the cursor points 
on the screen is done by the subroutine 
at lines 410 to 490. If the cursor point 
selected (by pressing the button) is on 
the work area, then the X and Y loca- 
tion is returned. If the Clear option is 
selected, the screen is erased to black. 
If the Exit option is selected, the pro- 
gram unlinks The Mouse from the 
system and ends the program in lines 
520 through 530. 

Whenever the screen is changed by 
drawing a line, clearing the screen or 
placing a dot, the cursor must be turned 
off and then turned back on after all 
changes are made. The reason for this 
is the cursor makes a copy of the area 
underneath before drawing on the 
screen. When it is turned off or moved, 
the old area is restored. The Lines 
program is good for demonstrating The 
Mouse, but not much else. 

Now let's look at real application of 
the point-and-pick user interface, the 
Disk Drive Timer. This program (List- 



ing 3) makes extensive use of The 
Mouse and icons. 

After running the programs, you see 
four disks on the screen. Each disk 
represents disk Drive 0 to 3. To test the 
speed of a disk drive, first select the disk 
icon representing the drive by moving 
the cursor (arrow) over the disk and 
pressing the button. The computer tests 
to see if the disk drive is online with a 
disk in it. If there is no error, then that 
disk drive's icon is inverted to show it 
is the selected drive. 

At the bottom of the screen is the 
command menu with three options. 
First is the Disk Speed History. This 
command builds a bar graph of the 
drive's speed over along period of time. 
Press the button to exit this command. 

Next is the Adjust Speed command. 
This command displays in real time the 
speed of the drive. Again, press the 
button to exit this command. 

The last is the Exit command. This 
unlinks The Mouse and exits the pro- 
gram. 

Now that you understand how to use 
The Mouse, let's see what you can write! 
Send those programs (along with doc- 
umentation) to the RAINBOW or upload 
them to rainbows CoCo SIG on Del- 
phi. 

So much for this month, next time 
we'll look at how The Mouse works by 
taking a peek at its assembly language 
source code. 

( You may contact the author about 
any questions at 2529 Ellington Court, 
Simi Valley, CA 93063, phone 805-583- 
5166. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing.) □ 



29)3 1 THESE LINES ARE FOR DISK 

300 INPUT "WHAT DRIVE SHOULD THE 

FILE BE SAVED TO";D 

310 IF D<)3 OR D>3 THEN 3)3)3 

320 SAVEM"MOUSE:"+CHR$(48+D) ,MOU 

SE,MOUSE+&HBBF,0 

33) 3 OPEN"R" , 1 , "MOUSE/BIN : M +CHR$ ( 
48+D) ,1 

34) 3 FIELD #1, 1 AS R$ 

350 LSET R$=CHR$(0) : PUT #1,4 
360 LSET R$=CHR$(0) :PUT #1,5 
370 CLOSE 

380 PRINT "THE MOUSE BINARY FILE 

AS A LOAD ADDRESS OF 0" 

390 PRINT" A LOAD OFFSET MUST ALW 

AYS BE USED!" 

400 END 

1000 DATA "16025A01003FFFFF1FFFF 
F0FFFFF07FFFF03FFFF01FFFF00FFFF0 
JZS7FFF003FFF001FFF001FFF00FFFF30F 
FFFF87FFFF87FFFF87FFF00000040000 



06000007000", 8307 

1010 DATA "007800007C00007E00007 
F00007F80007FC0007C0000460000060 
000030000030000000000CFFFFFC7FFF 
FC3FFFFC1FFFFC0FFFFC07FFFC03FFFC 
01FFFC00FFF",6837 

1020 DATA "C007FFC007FFC03FFFCC3 
FFFFE1FFFFE1FFFFE1FFF000000 10000 
01800001C00001E00001F00001F80001 
FC0001FE0001FF0001F0000118000018 
00000C00000" , 5094 

1030 DATA "C000000000F3FFFFF1FFF 
FF0FFFFF07FFFF03FFFF01FFFF00FFFF 
007FFF003FFF001FFF001FFF00FFFF30 
FFFFF87FFFF87FFFF87FF00000004000 
00600000700", 9629 

1040 DATA "0007800007C00007E0000 
7F00007F80007FC0007C000046000006 
000003000003000000000FCFFFFFC7FF 
FFC3FFFFC1FFFFC0FFFFC07FFFC03FFF 
C01FFFC00FF",6882 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 123 



1050 DATA "FC007FFC007FFC03FFFCC 
3 FFFFE1FFFFE1FFFFE 1FF0000000 1000 
001800001C00001E00001F00001F8000 
1FC0001FE0001FF0001F000011800001 
80000000000", 6279 

1060 DATA "0C00000000023E0169015 
B015E0161016602A0046904B402B402B 
402B402B402B40000000000000000000 
000000000000000FFFF0000000000000 
00000001820" ,2501 

1070 DATA "000000000000000000000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 
00000000000" ,0 

1080 DATA "000000000000000000000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 

00000000000000000000000000000000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 
00000000000" ,0 

1090 DATA "000000000000000000000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 
000003410308D01DBBC010D351027513 
476FC010D338DFF3EED4117021FED523 
08D01C0BF01'\3064 

1100 DATA "0DFC0168ED43308D041EB 
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DFF5658AF4710BF0123A680A7A05A26F 
9EC8DFF52ED49308D03A4AF8DFF48357 
64D2624BDB3",7037 

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581E6512BED",7464 

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300019BBA1F",6433 

1130 DATA "01E6E45757E78DFE5F308 

5AF8DFE5A35028403C6603D33CB8610E 
68DFE4D26379CBA252934528603E68DF 
E3CC12024139CB7240F3402A684A7A0A 
4C4A8C830A7",7607 

1140 DATA "843502300133415C4A26E 
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6EC84EDA1A4C4A8C830E441E8C831ED8 
1A684A7A0A442A8C832A784334330881 
E6A8DFDE226" , 7729 

1150 DATA "DA35C134011A50E651C4B 
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FE751318DFDE0AE588610E65A26299CB 
A251D3412E6578603A750C12024089CB 
72404A6A0A7" / 7149 

1160 DATA "8430015C6A5026ED35123 
088204A26D93581A750ECA1ED81E6A0E 
78430881E6A5026F1358117FF9BAE41B 
F010DEC43FD0168EC47FD01235F39C00 



9E75F39338D",7218 

1170 DATA "FD6FAE45A640AA5181402 
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7AF5217FE9C2006E64027026A40308C0 
73410347F6ED8018D23ED45E654A6562 
7075D26096A",5802 

1180 DATA "5620095D2706E7558602A 
7563B009D009D013D01100014A65F483 
08CF0EC866E8B4F8D6DEC52634F2B428 
EFF00A68823E68820340684F7A78823A 
601E6033406",6121 

1190 DATA "C4F7E7038A08A7018D238 
6C03D3402A60184F7A7018D16543 5021 
F023506A701E703 3506E78820A788231 
F2039340186FFA78820862D4A26FDCC0 
27E1A50A788",6096 

1200 DATA "205A26FDA6842B0712121 
25C26F65A3 58134028EFF00A602C6FFE 
70235045C53EA84A70253C403E75439A 
65F8DE334408EFF00A6882 3E688201F0 
284F7A78823",6816 

1210 DATA "A601E6031F038A08A701C 
4F73404E68DFC5E585858EAE0E7038D2 
28603 3D3404A60184F7A7018D1558340 
41F30E703A7011F20E78820A78823 350 
435C2CC4080",6350 

1220 DATA "3402CA02E78820C802A68 
42B04E0E42002EBE4350244810126E65 
45439F6FF6054B6FF613406F6FF62C50 
22607EC52EDE45F2010C5042704A653A 
761C5082704",6946 

1230 DATA "A652A7E4C401E75435863 
4068EFF908D158D13C6C03DA7E48D0C4 
4A7618D07438480A7543586A680C60A5 
A26FD398D2A34011A5086E68D3B1F89C 
4F7CA02F7FF",7670 

1240 DATA "208D30C602F7FF204A4A8 
11224E83501B6FF23 84F7B7FF23 5F39B 
6FF238A08B7FF23B6FF0184F7B7FF01B 
6FF0384F7B7FF03 39C6B45A26FD398DD 
F860A1F895A",8294 



Di-s-fc Drive Speed Tes-ter 
by S leve BJ orfc 
Cop-yrighl 1 985 by SRB Software 



C> i -s-k Drive Selector 

B 0 0 0 

HJaiirj Drive Drive Drive 

DJ 1 2 3 

P 1 e ?^e k se 1 ec t di^fc drive 



Corivnand Henu 

Drive Speed History 
fldjusl Drive Speed 
Exit Pro^r am 



124 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



1250 DATA "26FDF6FF20C8F0F7FF204 
C814C25EE20BFC6088CC6027EAC46273 
B814026373402B6FF2284E088E035022 
62ABDB3E43440338DFB3C6F506C50E04 
E820024F8EB",7796 

1260 DATA "4EA6504AA14D24C9ED5B3 
5409DA52706812C26C09D9F6E9DFB200 
075004D004101740186019901A43404F 
6FF22C8E0C4E0DA6F350427046E9DFAF 
93262347633", 6783 

1270 DATA "8DFAEEE65D308CD258EC8 
5308BA6E4AD84E65CCAE08605DD8835F 
6A14D2503A64D4AA75B6F5D39A14E250 
3A64E4AA75C6C5D3901100111010E015 
60116017201", 6740 

1280 DATA "7DFEFB015B01920073018 
800E1005F810D220848308CDCEC866E8 
B8020816022301700A5E65CE14E25066 
F5C6C5B8D38318D0165C6083D31ABEC4 
BE35B9BBA1F",6426 

1290 DATA "01C608A6A0A85EA784308 
8205A26F46C5C39E64EE05C5A2B0B340 
4862017FFBB350420F26F5C6C5B3402E 
65BE14D25576A5B8D55860FA740A64D4 
A2731A64B9B",6532 

1300 DATA "BAE64C1F01A64D4A48484 
83412E64E542406A6890100A780E7502 
70AEC890100ED816A5026F6351230882 
04A26DDC608A65E3414E64EA7805A26F 
B3514308820",6159 

1310 DATA "5A26EF8602A7403582347 
68602A74017FBFF35F68DF3860AA740E 
C4B9BBA1F01A65EE64D5858583414E64 
EA7805A26FB35143088205A26EF6F5B6 
F5C8602A740",7038 

1320 DATA "396F5E398601A75D39860 
3A75D39811F241CA74C408B20A74E6F5 
B6F5C6C5D398117240AA74B408B18A74 
D6C5D396F5D16FE1E27F9A14E22F5A74 
E6C5D3927EE",6100 

1330 DATA "A14D22EAA74D6F5D3986F 
FA75E39EC5B5A2A08E64E5A4A2A024C5 
FED5B862017FEB96A5C39A65C4A2A03A 
64E4AA75C39A65C4CA14E25014FA75C3 
96A5B2A05A6",6510 

1340 DATA "4D4AA75B39E65CC40750C 
B088620340617FE8835065A26F639000 
000000000000008080808080008000A0 
A0A00000000000A0A1F0A1F0A0A00081 
E281C0A3C08" , 2783 

1350 DATA "003232040810262600102 
828102A241A000808100000000000040 
81010100804000804020202040800082 
A1C3E1C2A08000008083E08080000000 
00000080810" ,898 

1360 DATA "000000003E00000000000 
000000008080002020408102020001C2 
2262A32221C000818080808081C001C2 



2020C10203E001C22020C02221C00040 
C143E040404",956 

1370 DATA "003E20203C02023C001C2 
2203C22221C003E220404080808001C2 
2221C22221C001C22221E02221C00000 
80000080000000008080008081000040 
81020100804" ,1190 

1380 DATA "0000003E003E000000100 
80402040810001C220204080008001C2 
2021A2A2A1C001C22223E222222003C2 
2223C22223C001C22202020221C00382 
42222222438", 1550 

1390 DATA "003E20203C20203E003E2 
0203C202020001C22202E22221C00222 
2223E222222003E08080808083E000F0 
2020202120C002224283028242200202 
0202020203C",1833 

1400 DATA "0022362A2A22222200223 
2322A262622001C22222222221C003C2 
2223C202020001C2222222A241A003C2 
2223C282422001C22201C02221C003E0 
80808080808", 1898 

1410 DATA "002222222222221C00222 
22222141408002222222A2A362200222 
214081422220022221408080808003E0 
2040810203E003820202020203800202 
01008040202", 1548 

1420 DATA "000E02020202020E00081 
C3E08080808000008183E18080000000 
000000000000000000C020E120D00202 
03C2222223C0000001C2220221C00020 
21E2222221E",961 

1430 DATA "0000001C223E201C00040 
A081C0808080000001C22261A021C202 
02C32222222000800180808081C00001 
80808080828102020242830282400180 
8080808081C",1226 

1440 DATA "000000764949494900000 
02C322222220000001C2222221C00000 
02C32322C202000001A26261A0202000 
02C322020200000001C201C021C00080 
81C08080A04",1530 

1450 DATA "000000222222261A00000 
02222221408000000414149493600000 
0221408142200000022221E02021C000 
03E0408103E000408100810080400080 
80800080808", 1136 

1460 DATA "000804020402040800000 
020500A04000 0FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF4 D4 
F5553452056455253494F4E20322E302 
0434F50595249474854203 139383 6204 
25920535242", 4776 

1470 DATA "20534F465457415245204 
14C4C205249474854532052455345525 
64544205055424C494320444F4D41494 
E20425920535445564520424A4F524B2 
00000000000" , 4038 

2000 PMODE 0,1:PCLEAR 1: GOTO 100 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 125 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER 



IT'S THE BEST!!! 
Great Price! Only $29.95 



Carefully engineered to 
work with ALL Color 
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including the newest 
COCO II. Enables your 
COCO to operate with a 
video monitor instead of a 
television. 



• Works with monochrome 
monitors! 

• Works with color 
monitors! 

• Audio Connection 
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• Easy installation- 
no soldering! 



QUALITY VIDEO MONITORS 



Sakata SC- 100 - Streamlined ?f3f composite 
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CGS Amber Screen - High quality 12" 
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Zenith Amber ~ Excellent performance... Zenith quality. 12" Screen, 
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Order a quality monitor from us and get a Universal 
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GRAFX SCREEN 



Versatile new screen dump software for your Star compatible 
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positive or negative and more! 51/4 Disc ONLY $14.95 



PRINTERS 



NEW StarNX-10 model printer 

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IL 




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SERIAL TO PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 



300 to 9600 baud. Complete with 
all cables and connectors. 



Only $49.95 



NEED MORE MEMORY? 64K Memory Expansion Kit 



All parts and complete inductions 
(for 'E' and 'F' boards and Coco II). 



NOW ONLY 
$19.95 



DISC DRIVES 



Teac 55B DSDD Drive , $119.95 

J&M'JFD-CP Controller 

with DOS ; 139.95 

Dual cabinet, power supply holds 
2 horizontal 1/2 height drives ... . 79.95 

Drive one upgrade for new Tandy 
dual horizontal cabinet ....... 1 19.95 

Disc drive cable 24.95 

Radio Shack DOS Rom 1.1 
w/manual . * . 29.95 




DISC STORAGE 



Attractive, heavy duty acrylic case with 
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SUPER BARGAIN ONLY $9.95 
Purchase this attractive storage case including 10 discs for $21.95. 




COCO UTIL II — NEW VERSION 

Transfer Coco disc files to your IBM compatible computer. 
You may also transfer MS-DOS files to a Color 
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Coco Util has been so popular we decided to 
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extended directories, faster, improved menu 
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CoCoUttf users upgrade to the new version for only $12,95 including shipping and handling. 





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THE TWIN — Works exactly like Lotus 1-2-3. Excellent users manual. 

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FOR THE SERIOUS COCO USER 



Accounting System - very popular ledger 

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Easy File - get organized with this 

user friendly data management system $59.95 disk 

Super Screen - Best screen enhancement program available. 
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DISCS • CASSETTES • ROMS 



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Basic 1.2 ROM < . . . . „s $39.95 

Extended 1 J ROM w/Manual - . > >,« $49.95 



CuberTank 

Kill IIIMIIIIIIIH ■ IIMmillinilllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllMlllllllllMII 11 IUIII II Mill II Mill II I M N I 

—- 1 fg\ COPYRIGHT 1985, 

limiHHHHIDMtlU 

Si 



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THIS ONB HAS IT ALU! 




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Intelligence has intercepted a coded message 
revealing a plan to conquer Earth. Four of your 
Shocktroopers must infiltrate the heavily defended 
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TRG-5 attack saucer sub-assemblies. 



Other Super Arcade Games: 

Tut's Tomb 
Time Fighter 




VOftTEX 




The Sixth & Most Challenging 
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FACTOR what |s |t? what secrets doe$ jt ho , d? 

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the futuristic world 
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All games - 
Cassettes $24.95 
Discs $27.95 
32K required. 



By Bob Withers 
and Steve O'Dea 

JOIN US IN THIS 
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also available 
for IBM & Tandy 
1000/1200 



OTHER 


EXCITING ADVENTURES 1 


• Caiixto Island • Shenanigans • Sea Search 
• Trekboer • Black Sanctum 








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MM 


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for exciting program marketing details. We accept MasterCard and VISA, Distributed in Canada 
by Kelly Software. 



V/ 101 



190 ... . 
350 .... 
END 0 



243 

...5 



Listing 2: LINES 

10 ' LINES/BAS 

20 'THIS IS A DEMO PROGRAM FOR 

30 'THE MOUSE (2.0) PROGRAM FROM 

40 »SRB SOFTWARE 

50 ' WRITEN BY STEVE BJORK 

60 'YOU MUST HAVE MOUSE/BIN 

70 'TO RUN THIS PROGRAM 

100 CLEAR 200,&H33FF:MO=&H3400 

110 ' ADD A ' TO THE START OF TH 

E NEXT LINE IF ON A CASSETTE SYS 

TEM 

120 IF PEEK ( MOUSE )<>2 2 THEN LOAD 
M "MOUSE" , MOUSE 

130 'REMOVE THE • FROM THE NEXT 
LINE IF ON A CASSETTE SYSTEM 
140 'IF PEEK (MOUSE) <>22 THEN CLS 
.•PRINT "LOADING MOUSE (2.0) BINAR 
Y FILE" :CLOAD"MOUSE" 
150 DEF USR0=MOUSE 
160 PMODE 4, 1:PCLS0: SCREEN 1,1 
170 FOR Y=0 TO 2 :WINDOW$ (Y) =CHR$ 
(4) :FOR X=l TO 4 

180 READ A:WINDOW$(Y)=WINDOW$(Y) 
+CHR$(A) :NEXT X,Y 

190 U=USR(0) : PRINT CHR$ ( 3 ) ; WINDO 

W$ ( 1) ; CHR$ ( 12 ) ; " Exit Clear" ; 

WIND0W$ ( 2 ) ; 

200 PRINT WINDOW$ ( 2 ) ; CHR$ ( 2 ) ; CHR 
$ (12) ; " A A " 
210 PRINT" A A ";STRING$( 
3,95) ; "Clears screen" 

220 PRINT" A ": PRINT" A " ; STRING 
$(12,95) ; "Exits program" ;CHR$ (13 

) 

230 PRINTTAB(13) ; "Lines" : PRINTTA 

B ( 9 ) ; "by Steve B j ork" : PRINT 
240 PRINT"Use the cursor to sele 
ct the start and end points o 
f a line.": PRINT 

250 PRINT "The top line has two o 
ptions, Exit-exit program, 

Clear- Clear the scree 

n." 

260 PRINT: PRINT "Press the button 
to continue." 

270 IF USR(4)=0 THEN 270 
280 GOSUB 500 

290 U=USR(1) 'TURN ON CURSOR 
300 GOSUB 4 10: IF M=l THEN 300 
310 U=USR(0) 'TURN OFF CURSOR 
320 Y1=Y:X1=X 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 127 



330 PSET (X*2,Y,1) 

340 U=USR(1) 'CURSOR ON 

350 U=USR(8) 

360 GOSUB 410: IF M=l THEN 290 

370 U=USR(0) 'cursor off 

380 LINE (X1*2,Y1)-(X*2,Y) ,PSET 

390 U=USR(1) :U=USR(7) 

400 GOTO 290 

4 10 TY=USR ( 3 ) : TX=USR ( 2 ) 

420 IF USR(4)=0 THEN 410 

430 Y=USR ( 3 ) : X=USR ( 2 ) 

440 IF YOTY OR XOTX THEN 410 

450 IF Y>=9 THEN M=0: RETURN 

460 IF X<24 THEN 510 

470 IF X<32 THEN 410 

480 IF X>56 THEN 410 

490 M=l:U=USR(7) :GOSUB500:U=USR( 

1) : RETURN 

500 PRINT WINDOW$ (2) ;CHR$(2) ;CHR 
$ ( 12 ) ; WINDOW$ (0 ) ; : RETURN 

510 'remove cursor and system 

520 U=USR(0) :U=USR(7) :U=USR(6) 
530 STOP 

540 DATA 0,0,32,24 
550 DATA 0,0,32,1 
560 DATA 0,1,32,23 



28 


141 


220 


28 


400 


220 


630 


91 


820 


244 


2100 


126 


END 


...103 



List 

0 
1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



ing 3: DISKTIME 

DISKTIME/BAS 
PROGRAMED BY STEVE BJORK 
COPYRIGHT 1986 BY 
SRB SOFTWARE, U.S.A. 
MOUSE/BIN (VERSION 2.0) IS 
USED BY THIS PROGRAM. 
A 64/3 2K COLOR COMPUTER WITH 
A JOYSTICK OR MOUSE IS NEEDED 
FOR TESTING THE SPEED OF A 
DISK DRIVE. 

'BEFORE A SPEED TEST CAN BE 
'USED ON A DRIVE IT MUST BE 
'SELECTED FIRST. JUST MOVE 
•THE ARROW ON THE SCREEN OVER 
•THE DISK TO BE TESTED AND 
■PRESS THE BUTTON. 
'A NEW DRIVE MAY BE SELECTED 
•AT ANY TIME FROM THE MAIN 
'MENU. 

'THE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
100 

110 



SCREEN ARE 3 COMMANDS, 
DRIVE SPEED HISTORY, ADJUST 
DRIVE SPEED AND EXIT PROGRAM 
HISTORY GIVES A BAR GRAPH OF 
MOTOR SPEED. 

ADJUST IS FOR TUNING THE 
DRIVE SPEED. 

EXIT IS TO END THE PROGRAM 
PRESS THE BUTTON OR REMOVING 
THE DISK FROM A DRIVE IN 
TEST WILL EXIT THE TEST. 

THIS PROGRAM HAS BEEN PLACED 
PUBLIC DOMAIN BY STEVE BJORK 
AND SRB SOFTWARE FOR PRIVATE 
USE ONLY! THIS SOFTWARE MAY 
NOT BE USE (IN PART OR IN 
WHOLE) AS PART OF ANY 
MARKETED PRODUCT. 



PCLEAR4 : PMODE 4,1:PCLS1 
CLEAR 50,&H73 7F:MOUSE=&H73 80 
:DIM D(3) ,P(60) ,C(23,17) ,MENU$(3 
) ,A(7,7) 

120 IF PEEK (MOUSE) <>2 2 THEN LOAD 
M" MOUSE", MOUSE 

130 DEF USR0=MOUSE : DEF USR1=&H7F 
80 

150 FOR X=&H7F80 TO &H7FFF : READ 
UCPOKE X,U:NEXT X 

160 DEF FND(U)=INT( (300- ( (U-2237 

0)/74.56) ) *10+.5)/10 

170 U=USR0(0) 'LINK IN MOUSE 

180 D(0)=41:D(1)=42:D(2)=44:D(3) 

=104 

190 SC=PEEK(&HBA) *256:SD=-1 

200 FOR Y=SC TO SC+544 STEP 32 

210 FOR X=Y TO Y+2 :READ D 

220 POKE X,D:NEXT X,Y 

230 GET (0,0)-(23,17) ,C,G 

250 FOR X=0 TO 2 : READ MENU$(X):N 

EXT 

260 PCLSl:FOR Y=SC TO SC+224 STE 
P 32 

270 READ D:POKE Y , D : NEXT 

280 GET (0,0)-(7,7) ,A,G 

290 FOR Y=0 TO 1 : WINDOW$ (Y) =CHR$ 

(4): FOR X=l TO 4: READ U:WINDOW$( 

Y)=WINDOW$(Y)+CHR$(U) :NEXT X,Y 

300 PCLS1: SCREEN 1,1: PRINT WINDO 

W$ (0 ) ; CHR$ ( 3 ) ; CHR$ ( 12 ) ; : PRINT@19 

9, "Disk Drive Selector" ;: FORD=0T 
03 

310 GOSUB 2000: NEXT: LINE (0,46)- 
(255,100) , PRESET, B: LINE (0,57) -(2 
55,57) , PRESET 

320 PRINT@3 6, "Disk Drive Speed T 
ester":PRINT@73,"by Steve Bjork" 
330 PRINT @ 9 7, "Copyright 1985 by 



128 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



DeskMate 7-in-l software 
makes your Color Computer 

better than even 



Now our popular DeskMate® 
software is available for disk-based 
Color Computers! DeskMate 
(26-3259, $99.95) features seven 
popular personal-productivity 
programs — all on one disk! A 
general-purpose TEXT entry and 
editing program is ideal for writing 
correction-free letters, memos and 
short reports. LEDGER, a simple 
spreadsheet program helps you do 
budding, sales forecasting, profit- 

and-loss projec- 
tions and other 
"What if...?" 
calculations. Us- 
ing the four- 
color PAINT 
CALENDAR picture editor, 



oaa uku sate 



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LEDGER 





. ■ 1 II 111 I* 


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you can create 
colorful charts, 
graphs, designs 
and "doodles" 
on your screen. 
Print a copy on 
a dot-matrix or 
ink-jet printer. 
The INDEX CARDS personal filing 
system lets you enter and edit data 
and perform simple sorts and search- 
es. It's ideal for keeping track of 

names and ad- 
dresses. TELE- 
COM gives you 
access to na- 
tional informa- 
tion services, 
TELECOM plus transmits 



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and receives 
files from other 
computers by 
phone (requires 
modem). A sim- 
ple monthly cal- 
endar program 
displays "to 
do's" for any date. CALENDAR is 
an easy way to organize your day. 
A four-function CALCULATOR is 
available within the operations of 

any application. 

Don't have a 
disk drive? You 
can add one for 
just $299.95. 
1 1 1 "™ (26-3131). 
TEXT EDITOR Come in today! 



IfriflU.Mfi.r.Mi:' " 

"C'f" Ml , 



Radio /haeK 

The Technology Store 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



Se 

i 

■ 



Send me an RSC-16 Computer Catalog 



Mail To: Radio Shack 
Dept. 87-A-19, 300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Name 



Address. 
City 

I 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



I 
I 
I 
I 

J 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and par- 
ticipating stores and dealers. DeskMate/Registered TM 

Tandy Corp. 



Di*k Drive Speed Tester 
b^j Sieve BJorfc 
Cop^ri^hl 1385 by SftB Software 



Disk Drive Selector 




m m m 



Drive Drive 
1 2 



Dr i ve 

3 



Press Button lo Exit Test 



1 1 |ll Mill II IIIHMtMIIHlllfMI tlMIII HIIIHIIII l|IMMIIII|> 

270, 230 290 300 310 320 330 



SRB Software" ; 

340 LINE (0 , 4) - (255 , 36) , PRESET, B 
350 U=USR(0) :GOSUB2100:PRINT@522 

/'Command Menu" 

3 60 FORX-0TO2 : PRINT CHR$ ( 3 ) ; : GOS 
UB2050:NEXTX 

37)3 LINE (0 , 123) - (255, 171) , PRESET 
,B:LINE(0,138)-(255,138) , PRESET 
380 IF SD=-1 THEN PRINT @ 4 20 , "Pie 

ase select disk drive" 

400 U=USR(4) :U=USR(1) :U=USR(7) 

410 IF USR(4)=0 THEN 410 

420 Y=USR ( 3 ) : X=USR ( 2 ) 

430 IF Y<61 THEN 410 

440 IF Y>78 THEN 600 

450 A=X AND 31: IF A<12 OR A>23 T 

HEN 410 

460 A=INT(X/32) : IF A=SD THEN 410 
470 U=USR(0)+USR(8) 
480 IF SDO-1 THEN D=SD: SD=A: GOS 
UB 2000 

490 SD=A:D=SD:G0SUB 2000 

500 G0SUB 3000:GOSUB 2 100: PRINT© 

551, "Testing for Drive ";CHR$(SD 
+48) ; 

510 FOR X=l TO 300: NEXT 

520 U=USR1(0) :GOSUB3010:IF U>0 T 

HEN 350 

530 GOSUB 2100:PRINT@518,"Disk D 
rive not on line" ; :PRINT@548 , "or 
a disk is not in drive" ; 

540 PRINT § 6 12, "PRESS BUTTON TO C 
ONTINUE " ; : U=USR ( 4 ) +USR ( 7 ) 
550 IF USR(4)=0 THEN 550 
560 D=SD:SD=-1: GOSUB 2000 
570 GOTO 350 

600 IF Y<144 OR Y>167 THEN 410 

610 Y=INT( (Y-144)/8) 

620 A=LEN(MENU$(Y) ) *2 

630 IF X<64-A OR X>64+A THEN 4 10 



IF 



P=A 



640 IF SD=-1 AND Y<2 THEN 410 
650 U=USR(0) :X=Y: PRINT CHR$(2);: 
GOSUB2050 

660 U=USR(7):IF X=2 THEN 999 

670 GOSUB 3000:FORX=1 TO 300:NEX 

T 

680 IF USR1(0)=0 THEN GOSUB 3010 
:G0T0 530 

690 IF Y=0 THEN 800 
700 GOSUB 1000:A=-1:U=USR(4) 
710 U=USR1(0):IF U=0 THEN GOSUB 
3010: GOTO 350 

720 IF USR(4)<>0 THEN GOSUB 3010 
:U=USR(8) :G0T0 350 ELSEP=FND(U) : 
PRINT @ 5 20 , US ING " ###.# ##.#!";P 
;INT(ABS(300-P) *3.33)/10;"%" 
730 IF P<272 THEN P=270 ELSE 
P>327 THEN P=327 
740 P=INT( (P-270) *4.2666) :IF 
THEN 710 

750 IF A>-1 THEN LINE (A-2 , 152) - ( 
A+5,159) ,PSET,BF 

760 A=P : PUT (A-2, 152) -(A+5,159) ,A 
,PSET:GOTO 710 

800 GOSUB 1000: FOR X=0 TO 60:P(X 
) =0 : NEXT : U=USR ( 4 ) 

810 U=USR1(0):IF U=0 THEN GOSUB 
3010: GOTO 350 

820 IF USR(4)<>0 THEN GOSUB 3010 

:U=USR(8) :G0T0 350 

830 P=INT(FND(U) -270) :IF P<0 THE 

N P=0 ELSE IF P>60 THEN P=60 

840 IF P(P)>=40 THEN 810 

850 P(P)=P(P)+1 

860 LINE(P*4+8,160-P(P) )-(P*4+9, 

160-P(P) ) , PRESET 

870 GOTO 810 

999 U=USR0(6) : END 





130 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



TEP 4J3 : LINE (X, 162 )- (X, 168 ) , PRESE 
T : NEXT : FOR X=J2) TO 252 STEP 4: LIN 
E(X,162)-(X,165) , PRESET: NEXT 
1J310 PRINT@672,CHR$(3) ;"27j3 28J3 
290 Zpp 310 320 330";CHR$(1 

) ; CHR$ ( 4 ) ; CHR$ ( 13 ) ; "Press Button 
to Exit Test"; .-RETURN 

2000 IF SD=D THEN PRINT CHR$(2); 
:PUT(24+D*64 ,61) - (47+D*64 ,78) ,C, 
PRESET ELSE PRINT CHR$ ( 3 ) ; : PUT ( 2 
4+D*64,61)-(47+D*64,78) ,C,PSET 
2010 PRINT§322+D*8, "Drive" ;CHR$ ( 
1) ;CHR$(D*8+4) ;CHR$(11) ;CHR$(48+ 

D) ; : RETURN 

2050 PRINT CHR$(1) ;CHR$(16-LEN(M 
ENU$(X) )/2) ;CHR$(18+X) ;MENU$(X) ; 

t RETURN 

2 100 PRINTWINDOW$ ( 1) ; CHR$ ( 3 ) ; CHR 
$ (12) ;WINDOW$ (0) ; '.RETURN 
3000 POKE &HFF40,D(D) : RETURN 

3010 POKE &HFF40 , 0 : RETURN 
9000 DATA 77,39,17,57,255,255,25 
5,255,0,166,140,252,39,5,1,74,140 
,245,175,106,59,52,113,2 6,80,254 
,1,10,239,140,230,51,140 
9010 DATA 232,255,1,10,48,140,55 
,175,140,220,111,140,219,142,0," 
,182,255,72,16,142,127,255,206, 
55,72,198,224,99,140,201,247 
9020 DATA 255,72,30,136,30,136, 
98,2,229,196,38,9,49,63,38,248, j. 
11, 140, 181, 32 , 18 , 48 , 1 , 38 , 252 , 111 
,140,172,32,9,182,255 
9030 DATA 72,132,124,31,16,32,14 
,134,208,183,255,72,30,136,30,13 
6,182,255,72,79,95,174,140,140,1 
91,1,10,53,113,126,180,244 
10000 DATA 0,0,0,63,255,252,63,2 
55,240,63,255,243,63,255,240,63, 
255,252,63,195,252,63,129,252,63 
,129,252,63,195,252,63,255,252,6 
3,255,252,63,231,252, 63,231,252, 
63,231,252,63,231,252,63,255,252 

/0/0/0 

10010 DATA "Drive Speed History" 
, "Adjust Drive Speed", "Exit Prog 
ram" 

10020 DATA 239,239,239,239,1,131 
199 239 

10100 DATA 0,0,32,24, 0,14,32, 



9> 



1 
1 



10 







The Crossword 

; > i 1111 

Creator Contest 



Can you create a totally symmetrical 
crossword piizzle using the Word+ pro- 
gram and the specifications outlined in 
the accompanying article on Page 38 of 
the May 1 986 issue of the rainbow? If so, 
you may wish to enter The Crossword 
Creator Contest. And, if we choose to 
print your crossword puzzle, you will be 
awarded a special prize. 

Send us a disk or cassette copy of the 
data file of your puzzle created by Word+ 
along with a printed copy of the cross- 
word puzzle — including the clues and 
answers. Be sure to put a title on the 
puzzle and if possible, follow a general 
interest theme. .II 

Entries will be judged on the folio 
criteria; i 



wmm 



Puzzle symmetry 
Number of words 
Spelling 

Creativity j 
Thematic originality 
Understandability 
Ease of loading data 
Neatness 
Packaging 

Enter as often as you like! Please note: 
We consider your act of entering the 
contest as consent to publish your crea- 
tion. 

The Crossword Creator Contest is 
open to all rainbow readers, advertisers 
and employees o!f Falsoft, inc. 

Send entries to: 
Crossword Creator Contest 
c/o THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 







July 1986 THE RAINBOW 131 



EDUCATION 



16K 
ECB 



IN B'Gw I 




Developing Logical 
Reasoning Skills 



_ 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This month's article concerns de- 
velopment of reasoning powers. 
Our program presents an exer- 
cise in logical thinking. A statement and 
a conclusion are presented and the 
user's task is to decide whether the 
conclusion is true or false based only on 
the original statement. 
For example: 

Statement: All CoCo owners buy the 
rainbow magazine. 

Conclusion 1: All rainbow readers , 
own a CoCo. 

Conclusion 2: Some CoCo owners buy 
THE rainbow magazine. 

Here is a picture to help visualize this: 




Rainbow 
Readers 




Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



Conclusion 1 is false because owners 
of other computers or people who do 
not even own a computer may also buy 
THE rainbow. Conclusion 2 is true. The 
word some can mean any amount from 
one to all. Or looked at another way, 
certainly some CoCo owners buy THE 
rainbow if we are told that all of them 
buy it. 

This kind of reasoning is necessary to 
develop abilities in abstract math skills 
as well as computer programming skills. 
Modern math courses on all levels stress 
logical thinking skills. This is good 
because many times students under- 
stand the arithmetic of a math task but 
don't really understand how or when to 
apply it. Activities that encourage 
logical thinking in math are as impor- 
tant as those that teach skills. 

To varying degrees, our example of 
logical thinking is also stressed in many 
math courses. The ultimate degree is the 
syllogism. A syllogism is a pair of 
premises or statements with one conclu- 
sion. Syllogisms are really the next step 
up in our program. An example of a 
syllogism is : 

Statement 1: All horses have four legs 
Statement 2: My cat has four legs 
Conclusion: My cat is a horse 

This conclusion does not follow 
because my cat can be one of many 
other four-legged creatures besides 
horses. Boolean algebra and truth 
tables are ways to approach this type of 
example. But for our purposes, we will 
draw a picture of the two statements. 
This helps many students visualize the 



problem better. The illustration is called 
a Venn diagram and is merely a picture 
of our example syllogism to show 
whether the conclusion is true or not. 




Computer programming also stresses 
skills in logic. For example, here is a 

simple program that illustrates poor 
logic. 



132 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



10 A = 10 : B = 0 

20 FDR T = 1 TO 100 

30 IF C> 10 THEN PRINT"HELLO" 

40 fi = fi + 1 

50 B = B + 2 

60 C = fi - B 

70 NEXT T 

The value of the variable 'C never 
reaches 10 and the program therefore, 
never prints the "hello" message. Try 
this short program for yourself. Fixing 
it is a simple challenge and good prac- 
tice for a beginner. 

Our program presents one premise or 



statement and one conclusion to be 
judged true or false by the user. The 
DATA lines actually contain three con- 
clusions for each statement. One is 
randomly chosen. After 10 turns, a 
score is given and the program may be 
run again or ended. 

Line 30 sets the dimensions of the 
data to be entered and read. "A$" and 
'N' represent the five possible state- 
ments. "B$" represents the three possi- 
ble conclusions for each statement and 
"C$" represents the correct answers. 

Lines 50 through 60 read the DATA 
lines. The variable 'K' in Line 80 is the 
program counter. There are 10 ques- 
tions to a round. When the counter 
reaches 1 1, Line 100 sends the program 
to the score card and end routines on 
lines 300 through 350. Lines 140 
through 200 randomly choose and print 



a statement and its accompanying con- 
clusion. Lines 210 through 260 ask for 
the answer and tell the user whether or 
not he is correct. 

Exercises similar to ours are also 
often stressed in language arts classes. 
These exercises help develop critical 
reading skills. They are a popular way 
to combine development of careful 
reading for details or drawing conclu- 
sions skills with a little fun. 

Please feel free to alter or add to the 
DATA lines for your purposes. Re- 
member to adjust the DIM statements 
and the value of 'N* on Line 30 if they 
are changed. Encourage the children to 
draw illustrations to help them think 
out problems that give them trouble. As 
always, we at Computer Island are glad 
to hear about your experiences with 
these programs. □ 



The listing: TRUEFAL5 

1J3 REM TRUE & FALSE REASONING 
2j3 REM STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, NY, 1986 

3J3 DIM A$(5) ,B$(15) , C$ (15) :N=5 
4J3 P$=STRING$(32,179) :R$=STRING$ 
(32,188) 

5j3 FOR T= 1 TO N : READ A$(T):NEXT 
T 

6J3 FOR T=l TO N*3 :READ B$(T),C$( 

T) :NEXT T 

7J3 CLS5:K=K+1 

8J3 IF K=ll THEN 3j30 

9J3 PRINT§12 , "LOGIC" ; 

ljajZJ PRINT@j3,"#=";K; 

110 PRINT@28 / "R=";CR; 

12)8 PRINT@32,P$; : PRINT© 128 ,R$ ; 

13J3 PRINT@64, M READ THE STATEMEN 

T. DECIDE IF THE CONCLUSION IS 

TRUE OR FALSE."; 

14 J3 R=RND(N) 

15) 3 PRINT@192 , "statement" ; 

16) 3 PRINT@224,A$ (R) 

17) 3 L=RND ( 3 ) 

18) 3 H=(R-1)*3+L:R=H 

19) 3 PRINT@288, "conclusion" ; 
2)3)3 PRINT@32j3,B$(R) 

21) 3 PRINT© 3 84 , "answer here: 

22) 3 EN$=INKEY$ 

23) 3 IF EN$="T" OR EN$="F" THEN 

24) 3 ELSE 22)3 

24) 3 PRINTEN$ 

25) 3 IF EN$=C$(R) THEN PRINT@4)3)3 / 
"CORRECT" :CR=CR+1:PLAY"04L55CEGG 
ECEGGEC" 



26) 3 IF EN$OC$(R) THEN PRINT@4)3)3 
, " S ORRY " : PLAY " O 3 L2 )3 GG " 

27) 3 PRINT@486 , "PRESS ENTER TO GO 
ON" ; 

28) 3 N$=INKEY$ 

29) 3 IF N$=CHR$(13) THEN 7)3 ELSE 



ii 



1986 

BEST OF THE UPGRADES LIST 

1. Memory 64K DRAMS . . .from ... $ 19 

256K Kits 98 

2. ROM/BASIC Color Basic 1 .2 ...... $ 19 

Extended Basic 1.1 . . 29 

Disk Basic 1.1 29 

ADOS 40 

3. Storage Drive 0 $209 

Drive 1 (external] 135 

Drive 1 (internal] 80 

4. Controllers J&M (you supply DOS] $ 89 

'Super Controller' .... 95 

5. Monitor Driver Original Coco .... $ 24 

Coco II 34 

6. Monitors Hi-Res Green/Amber ... $ 89 

Color with audio 169 

7. Lower Case Kit $ 49 

8. Deluxe Keyboards . . . .from . . . .$ 59 

Please specify model or cat # of your CoCo when or- 
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CS! POLYGON COMPUTERS 

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LOS Angeles, CA 90017 

(213) 4434386 
Ca. Res. 6 1 /2% tax Shipping: $2 Software 

Visit our Retail Store Charges: $5 Hardware 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 1 33 



280 

300 CLS: PRINT "YOUR GRADE THIS TI 
ME WAS"CR*10;"%" 

310 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS ENTER TO G 
0 ON OR E TO END"; 
320 R$=INKEY$ 

330 IF R$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN 
340 IF R$="E" THEN CLS: END 
350 GOTO 320 

360 REM HERE ARE THE STATEMENTS 
370 DATA NOT ALL VIOLIN PLAYERS 
ARE BOYS 

380 DATA ALL STUDENTS MAKE GOOD 
GRADES 

390 DATA NOT ALL DOGS ARE BLACK 
400 DATA ALL TELEVISION SETS ARE 
COLOR 

410 DATA MANY PEOPLE PLAY BASEBA 
LL 

420 REM HERE ARE THREE QUESTIONS 

FOR EACH STATEMENT 
430 DATA SOME VIOLIN PLAYERS ARE 

GIRLS , T 

440 DATA VIOLIN PLAYERS CAN BE B 



OYS,T 

450 DATA ALL VIOLIN PLAYERS ARE 
GIRLS , F 

460 DATA SOME DON'T MAKE GOOD GR 
ADES , F 

470 DATA NO STUDENTS MAKE GOOD G 
RADES , F 

480 DATA MOST STUDENTS MAKE GOOD 
GRADES , T 

490 DATA ALL DOGS ARE NOT BLACK, 
T 

500 DATA ONLY SOME DOGS ARE BLAC 
K,T 

510 DATA NO DOGS ARE BLACK, F 
520 DATA NOT MANY TV SETS ARE CO 
LOR, F 

530 DATA NO TV SET IS COLOR, F 
540 DATA EVERY TV SET IS COLOR, T 
550 DATA SOME PEOPLE PLAY BASEBA 
LL, T 

560 DATA SOME PEOPLE DON'T PLAY 
BASEBALL, T 

570 DATA NO ONE PLAYS BASEBALL, F 




r 



r 



0g£ 




#/# 

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• reviews of the latest software 

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reviews of Dragon peripherals and add-ons 
technical advisory service 
programming articles for users 





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Subscription rates US and Canada airspeeded □ US $29.95 for 12 issues/ 1 year 
□ US $53.90 for 24 issues □ US$71 .90 for 36 issues. Send this form to 
Dragon User, % Business Press International, 205 E. 42nd St., New "York, NY 10017 






134 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 



Special Education 
and The Computer 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Almost every school district in 
this country includes handi- 
capped students. Special educa- 
tion programs provide services for 
handicapped students with a variety of 
conditions. They can be severe physical 
handicaps, perceptual learning disabil- 
ities, speech or language impairments, 
or a host of other types of conditions 
that limit a student's ability to succeed 
in a regular classroom. 

Technological advances have pre- 
sented both promise and problems for 
special education students. While tech- 
nology has provided many opportuni- 
ties for handicapped people, problems 
have been created that add further 
limits and constraints to handicapped 
people. For example, consider the 
telephone. Alexander Graham Bell 
invented the telephone while working 
with deaf education. The original inten- 
tion of the telephone was as a hearing 
aid. After moving into the area of mass 
communication, the telephone has 

Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in a central office of a 
school district and currently is em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



actually become a limitation to deaf 
people. Most of us consider the tele- 
phone as a means of communication. 
Almost every household in this country 
has a telephone and it is impossible to 
think of a business without one. Yet, to 
the deaf, the telephone is an instrument 
of restriction. Special equipment is 
needed for the deaf to use a normal 
telephone. How ironic. 

The technology of microcomputers 
also provides promise and problems for 
the handicapped. I do not think anyone 
doubts that computers have provided 
much more benefit for handicapped 
people than harm. Computer applica- 
tions have allowed a wide range of 
opportunities for the handicapped that 
were impossible to believe just a few 
decades ago. Implanted electronic con- 
trollers operate artificial limbs, allow- 
ing mobility for paralyzed people. 
Computers "read" written text, then 
translate it into sensory impressions for 
the blind allowing access to documents 
that are not in braille. 

Yet, there are restrictions for the 
handicapped using computers. An or- 
thopedic handicap can cause trouble for 
people using a computer keyboard — 
from a mild annoyance to an impossi- 
bility. Adaptive equipment can be ob- 



tained or created, but the trouble is still 
there. Fairly expensive special equip- 
ment is required for blind people to use 
microcomputers. Generally, the greater 
the visual impairment, the greater the 
cost of the adaptive equipment. 

A discussion about computers and 
the handicapped involves two separate 
components. First is the application of 
computers to problems associated with 
the different handicaps. In general, 
computers are used to improve options 
for handicapped people. Second, how- 
ever, the way computers are built, 
access for the handicap is generally 
limited. 

Most of the examples of dealing with 
computer applications for the handi- 
capped are in situations other than 
schools. But there is use of computers 
for the handicapped in the school arena. 
At the end of 1983, about 60,000 com- 
puters were used for the handicapped in 
schools. By the end of 1985, over 
200,000 computers were in use. Much of 
this use is in record keeping. Teachers 
and administrators keep track of stu- 
dents and services provided in order to 
report to funding sources, especially the 
federal government. Federal reporting 
can be a complex process and is greatly 
assisted by microcomputers. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 135 



A i * 1 

Metric Industries 




-rrrr- 


ft . 



Model 101 Interface $39.95 



The Model 101 is a serial to 
parallel interface intended for use 
with a COCO and any Centronics 
compatible parallel input printer. 
The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
baud rates (300-9600). The 101 
is only 4* x 2' x 1 " and comes 



with all cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer. 




The Model 104 Deluxe Interface $51.95 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel Interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
of a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch). 
This feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 



etc.) to your computer. You may 
then select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5* X 2.5* X 1.25' 
and comes with all cables and 
connectors for your computer. You 
supply the serial cable for your 
modem or other serial device. 




Model 103 Combo $6&95 



With the turn of a knob the 
model 103 switches your 
computer's RS232C serial port 
to any one of 3 outputs — 2 
serial and 1 parallel. The serial 
ports may be used for modems, 
serial printers or even another 
computer. The parallel port can 



be used with any Centronics 
compatible printer. The 103 has 
the best features from the 101 
and 102: color coded position 
Indicator lights, 6 switch 
selectable baud rates, heavy 
anodized aluminum cabinet, and 
many more. 




Model 102 Switcher $35.95 



The Model 102 has 3 switch 
positions that allow you to 
switch your computer's serial 
output between 3 different 
devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has 
color coded lights that indicate 
the switch position. These 



lights also act as power 
indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with 
the 102 are color coded labels 
that can be applied to your 
accessories. The 102 has a heavy 
guage anodized aluminum cabinet 
with non-slip rubber feet. 




Cassette Label Program $6.95 



Other Quality Items 



New Version 1.2-Tape transfera- 
ble to disk. Now save and 
load Labels from tape or disk. 

This fancy printing utility prints 
5 lines of Information on 
pinfeed cassette labels. "Cas- 
sette Label" is menu driven and 
Is very easy to use. It uses the 
special features of your 
printer for standard, expanded 
or condensed characters. Each 
line of text is automatically 
centered. Before the label 
is printed, It is shown on your 



CRT — enabling you to 
make changes if you like — 
then print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The 
program comes on tape and it 
is supplied with 24 labels to 
get you started. 16K ECB 
required. 

I ■ . * 




E 


.Ma 




ii : i 






r 









1&. i-AI 

Mi:iM-Ml III ;i. | Eh 



c 



High Quality 5 Screw Shell C-10 
Cassette Tapes $7.50 per dozen 

Hard Plastic Storage Boxes for 
Cassette Tapes $2.50 per dozen 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00 per 100 
Colors $3.60 per 100 (Red, Blue, 
Yellow or Tan) 



rii riM IW Uttfltti una-. Mi 








* 






\ MoitvrCovd 











THE 101, 103 AND 104 ALL 
REQUIRE POWER IN ORDER TO 
OPERATE. MOST PRINTERS 
CAN SUPPLY POWER TO YOUR 
INTERFACE. STAR, RADIO 
SHACK, AND OKI DATA ARE JUST 
A FEW THAT DO. EPSON DOES 
NOT. THE INTERFACES CAN 
ALSO BE POWERED BY AN AC 
ADAPTER (RADIO SHACK MODEL 
273-1431 PLUGS INTO ALL 
MODELS). IF YOU REQUIRE A 
POWER SUPPLY, ADD A "P" TO 
THE MODEL NUMBER AND $5.00 
TO THE PRICE. (MODEL 101 P 
$44,95, MODEL 104P $56.95 AND 
MODEL 103P $73.95) 



The Model 101, 102, 103 and 104 
will work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory size. 
These products are covered by 
a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101, 103 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel input 
printer including Gemini, Epson, 
Radio Shack, Okidata, C. loth and 
many others. They support 
BASIC print commands, word 
processors and graphic com- 
mands. 

We manufacture these products. 
Dealer inquiries are invited. 



To order call our 24 hour order 
line 513-677-0796 and use 
your VISA MASTERCARD 
request C.O.D.or send check or 
money order to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Free shipping on orders over 
$50.00. Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. 

Orders under $50,00 please add 
$2.50 for shipping. 



But when the computer is used for 
record keeping tasks, teachers, admin- 
istrators and clerks operate the compu- 
ter. Special education students should 
have the same opportunity to develop 
computer literacy as other students. 
Indeed, for many handicapped stu- 
dents, some of the best employment 
opportunities lie in the area of data 
processing. 

In order to make computers fully 
accessible to the handicapped, different 
types of modifications are required. In 
some cases, hardware needs to be mod- 
ified. For the blind, a television screen 
is useless. A device that translates 



"The computer is a 
motivating device. 99 



television symbols to a special braille 
pad allows computer access for blind 
persons. One-handed typists generally 
have a problem when two keys must be 
held down together, such as a control 
key and another key. A simple modifi- 
cation is required in this case. 

Software modifications are also im- 
portant for special education students. 
For example, a student with a learning 
disability needs software that provides 
structure and organization to help with 
perceptyal difficulties. Motivational 
comments used by many programmers 
are inappropriate for the emotionally 
handicapped learner. A student with a 
severe emotional handicap can be very 
adept at picking up negative body 
language from the teacher. While the 
computer itself may be "value free,'* 
instructional programs are often not. 
Thus, some software is not useful for 
certain special education students. 

The computer can and should be 
utilized by these students. The compu- 
ter is a motivating device for students, 
handicapped and non-handicapped 
alike. It allows the student to determine 
the pace of the lesson, which is a crucial 
component of education for the handi- 
capped. Schools should give special 
education students access to computers. 
It may well be that computers will give 
a student access to his future. /R\ 



136 THE RAINBOW July 1986 




The monthly magazine that's reader-friendly 

If you're interested in the highly popular Model 100, the Tandy 200, the brand new portable Tandy 
600 or Tandy's new generation of MS-DOS computers — the 1000, 1200, 2000, or the exciting new 
Tandy 3000 — PCM is for you! 

PCM, The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users, is brought to you by the same 
people who bring you THE RAINBOW, the premier magazine for the Color Computer. Need we say more? 

So, if you're ready to add portability or step up to MS-DOS, stay with Tandy and THE RAINBOW family 
by subscribing to PCM! 

FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from THE RAINBOW that readers want programs to type in , so each month we bring you 
an assortment of them, including games, utilities, business applications and graphics. 

BAR CODE, TOO! 

Also, PCM is the only computer publication in the world (that we know of) that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory with the sweep of a wand ! 

TUTORIALS GALORE 

Add to this our regular tutorials on telecommunicating, hardware and machine language, as well 
as BASIC programming tips and product reviews, and we think you'll find we're one of the most 
informative and fun magazines on the market today. 

So if you're ready to add portability or step up to MS-DOS, stay with Tandy and THE RAINBOW family 
through PCM. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquir- 

ies call 502-228-4492. 

□ YES! Please send me a one year (12 issues) 
subscription to PCM for only $28/ A savings of 22% 
off the newsstand price. 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. 

Charge to my: VISA MasterCard American Express 

Acct, # Expiration Date 

Signature - 

"Canadian subscribers add U.S. $7, Surface rate elsewhere $64, airmail $85. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales 
tax. U.S. currency only, please. 

Mail to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 






★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 




Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the CoJor Computer world 
your high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW'S 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed 
— legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high 
score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE 
RAINBOW. The "Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our new 
Delphi CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to; editors. 



* C u rre n t Record Holder 



Shutout 



* 



ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW 13/35) 



*Mrc<™*i VVnilshaski, Mendon. CT 
3,m Rick Qusatt. Granhe CI1y. IL 

3 .aw Nill Edge, WHiiston, *L 

3j0 W i v us* Nfllaon . Er«f wall. NY 
1,494 fisovon tiull-vdJ. Ai.urr. DK 
AMPHIBIA (THE RAINBOW fl/H5*i 

1 1 JDQ- *Danlel B-iab^d-. CWrfi url mtf. W a 
6.AB5 David Saivirtnri?, New Knnjinglfln. PA 
AN DRONE f Tfltfto ittBCk; 

□fl.aQl? *ShM«: Bali ma n . BeLlondart, *A 
f.V ,3QL> r^irsh Hart. Saaltle. WA 
64,300 El|Wi*lB FWIIkpa, Ecanav'lla, Wl 
27,340 tflk* TlfUMii, Mani lowcc. Wl 
■" 'j'T R 0 BLAST ftfurff Znitt} 

IS i.Mflft *Dnvid Salvajc-ra, New Ker sing Ion. PA 
53.T2S Sdwifd Va^al S? , F naburtfh, PA 
illl Frifcuch. WhllahBJI. PA 
HATS AfoO BUGS (THE RAINBOW, 7/B4| 

* ii,BQQ *Mifihanl Rflsei*b*rg. Praa<onbuf0, 
4,400 Jar ktobsatt. P'aihFald. Wl 
j.Bfld J ny L ose GuHpc'i VI 5 
3.MU Mk^figI SdoU. .M>hpii(iwn, NY 
:'.Mn Steven Bu Hard, Allen, 



BEAM RIDER tSpectnt A**O0t*tK.<} 



■t.g&g oeo 
3.042 47a 

747 2W 



+JemGB OaK.ny. Nnihf HCn, TH 
Evelyn Thornpwr;, N*idfcr|and, T>L 
747 2W Robed Eerlng, S^i5 C::rrnnl 

SaBkelchewen 
:i 1 D.4Efl f rayof Nigel, Swift Current. 
Sa&*a1chewan 
BLACK BEARD'S ISLAND fAJOVASGFrj 

65 *jaT Hilraon, SlBcksburg, VA 
7D Roy □ QranL.TDledc-.c5H 
7°- jal' Hadeig. WlnMe o. *S 
BLACK fiAWCTUM iMmh Dnis.) 

■ ilC * jell -■'ill ;edi i, fliacksburg, VA 
QUeWMABTER /NO ^^OFIy 

i-Tli.tiSCi Bl John Hi&rHatic Faila. NV 

27tf,500 Atpn Prejeft, Longwo&d, f L 

Jein*FflJnoOl& Mo/fi, Loiatlaylfle, 
Quvbiti- 

lflB.1 75 Scoll Purrorm, RosulLfi- Purk . N J 
9S.E75 ChrleCajw, Central. SC 
BRQTAN THE BLUE I THE P,AlNSO^. 6/9S) 

*Ro.Mrt Obrin0er, Wayne, 
BUBBLE WARS (THE HAINBOW5M96/ 
2fi,EH)D ♦CrtrdkLeidlg.Clln'on, 
M.40L- Dbh^I Cecil, baroalown, KV 
T4.LLST Tn/idry Carter Jt, Alv^ralB*. CA, 
U9TOUT rfl*tfia SheaA:J 



n/.cnnrj 

21,1150 



ia.4ca 

BUZZARD JBAhJ 



■k Gordon Rack, Davervpcrt. lA 
Chn'M^ r nulonflftld, c ,n«.i 1 Srltc Mnr-c. 

M.fcm MtCr-Mflr+7, iduhq Fails, |D 
Ghrii Z&jp-Ka, Nurtn AdBirva, MA 
Wayne Dert ii, Blue inane, IL 
WB'h MotE . aruB Ift-and. IL 
Faro Mta> 



4,-t55.'50 *paul Nl^rnrlll, Qa\r\u fqrry, OT 

3,Qftl , Ml fiAnBDQT Mnygr. EbbL Grautlbuin, *JV 

1,l£3,B£0 R.yprri ynnng. Shnlliuld. MA 

gftOt&QQ Frubrsr Wnlucifl. Guluupar, VA 

947.4^0 Qbrucn Heck. Dave#ipon rA 

BT.aSQ J^rad Jdlay. Byf la, QH 

CANDY CO- {Intrvtfttofl 

1 *Kir * udrahi^, LivarfjOQl, OH 
CANYON CLIMBER iflrtn'ic Shaw A j 

a.gBB.QDa *Brai\ncn Besflay, L^e Oak FL 

9,12ft,1DG OflryMDhnaDvi TiHalnn, AZ 

1 >2fi,6rra Chad McCJdUbit. nuihvHlD) IN 

1 .34 r.Bflii Lucy forego, Leflinnipicn, Onlnrla 



Fanctier, HcchaMT, NH 
Chuck Terc4irn- N. Eichuate, R I 
Chflatophnr Pah* BownajiYllle. 

Onlaib 
Scott Klomnlftr, Grainy. CT 
Tf Icia Pradnr, afmpcy^n Wr 
Sandy KlamJrw, ^rnnby, CT 
cn.ria Radn'-ond, Wivlcrvillp, M£ 
Ka^ln flad wan. Blue ralflnd. IL 
CASHUAN iMiobTronl 

S4S.903 *Gftp"diQir» Rock, Davenport, |A 
Nnid Naumarm, Haibgy. ID 
¥,om Mil^P. Honj^lan IX 
Spily Naun:jnri l lilHfv C 
Edvwn Prijirmr. DKnerd, GA 



1,004,000 
407,200 
180,400 

4n,QH3 
45.0M 



3D.05& 
27^530 
2^1 



CLQVVN5 & BALLOONS i ^diV;- SVitfrtj 

+Feyn Kflurflr, Auguara. GA 
60,690 Wary LrUftOnl, Msd'san, MS 
57,070 Paul WibOH, Ml- Plamena, Ml 
46,4fl0 Jcyrii V/*icoti . Mi. Clamana. Ml 
40,610 SlophDiilB K-P^nr*. MopfW. 
COLOR BASEBALL .-r^aof.'P $*wk; 

#Frank D'Arnatd, Snaol(lVn u NV 
707-0 *Cn>a|aln ChlUla. Trai?-Riviprcr», 
□uebac 

549-CF •Skltrpflf Taday, Efisl Lyrna, CT 

Ella-wonh Summflra, JaQkscnvtllta, FL 
VAZ -0 *f>lava M-j non. r o^? t^i^ry. MA 
COLOtttii-ACKJACK | THE RAINBOW HVMr 
H +Weyna DEwitt, 91 jb lalund . |L 

Ht^an DaMiH, BluB Iftinn-tf-. IL 
COLOR CAft^OWSOFTj 

1A7.M4 *pnvld Ente^menn, Man^e. NV 
COLOR OUT rCa'PiTi,!! SciiTwAffrJ 

34,Dfl5 *Tlm RUvb. StEvinfiUl lb, V.l 
COLOR PEOE ffftfrflcplor^ 

3,157,194 *JaFin Rfty, OiiOdlailavlllEi, TW 
1,QEfi,020 KflUH Oi#e«n, MftMFlISi GA 
1 .QpS.DCO Oibi I Queen . M^rj«bta, GA 

I'-.- Mariana FrnuHc BlHptuland, LL 
fly.bi-n Kevin fladtfan, Blu» islPind, |L 
40,234 Keji Oawvtl. Blue l«lend, IL- 
19.290 Hu^o Frauato, B^ue Island, IL 
COLOR POKER [THE RAINBOW, AlBZ) 

3,241 ,60ft *Enr] La 0*34* Foster, Lyachevurg, 
CRYSTLE CASUfcS >Jhvti#titVi&ten) 

95Q. 1 BE- *M Ichf ill B«innrs| i, Ca icary Al Defta 
305,060 Dan Milento, Cfllgary, Alberta 
EJ&.761 £dwtp. Prmhpr, Oitnard, CA 
E5&,3dO Jefi Dlngtr, Edgawncd M.D 
545.DO0 Joy Rob*r fl , W|n1|a|cj, KS 
DALLAS QUEST f l*ncft> S.h'irky 

HV +DnuglJiK Bah, CUrHian, OK 

90 Roy Oram, "ciado. DH 

91 JcM<i SemciTm, Akron. QH 

92 DaMld A &*iirlgy Johns-an. 
LeictiMqr, NO 

To*nmy McCiuru, DpyNne, LA 
Rnbnri Suiidfiriafld, Sacramento, CA 

*Oim'v& Enlanmann, Monroe NY 
OehkhsE ^Spdcr/Bi 1 Aaaacifiresj 

9$5 .4DD +3ab DewlH, Bii^ff laUmd-, IL 
DEMOLITION DERBY /fta^D Sl7!ir.J;/ 

104 ,900 *Wieneel Oavidfion. Crtrt-ertvli If, GA 
ifiD.flOO 5m1I LaMffa, GMde. OR 
97.ROD HlUat McriB. Chicago. IL 
fla.,500 Kallh Tyalnger, AatwborO, WC 
flB,B?D0 Skipper Teday. Lymn, CT 
D7 ,600 Joyra ^alaiii. ML Clamana, M i 
DEMON ATTACK t fmngit:} 

E4.1D5 *Jqn Ruhrlbw, DunCBJivllfca. TX 



63 

OEATH TRAP 

40,fl74 



BJ.lSfi Tracy Salznian, caSalle, CK> 
4p,775 V.ike y;alBDn, NarltivlHe. iSiV 
,34,9 W 3klp Frtamon 0-tTUB Halgt'lE., OA 
35,195 n^ar Ding.'etflp.e oneppi'Hi.l, NC 
DESERT RIUEfl (R*0io SntcH) 

6fi,fl7? +Janina Freafiicn, Cjlfua Helghla Ca 
65,315 Skip FtMfnan, dltup Halghla. OA 
B I ,S 11* Mich&trt Lri^tfy, Ofagei-., OH 
a7.9l£ Kcn<imn Mnrkn: HnuSlnfl TX 
57.5B0 KeM* MMIa r . Ho^Lnn. TK 
DONPAN ftiad/e .^rtacK / 

K>.5QD TkRodnrjc MRldanido, YVhnsiflr C^ 
DOODLEBUG (CcntputirviBffj; 
2.fl7fli.4B0 #Pcben Helfera, Sparca. k 
:sO,33D Kr:" Dewlir, Blue Island. IL 
DOUBLE BACK rtfacVc Shack? 
? ( 5flfJ.300 # Euga*is Flocaa, ^tone Htdge, NY 
tliR 400 Plane Guerncn, Mc.nUesl. punb^r 
4SD.600 Michael Brer^nsn . Caipery , A ibnrtn 
13,610 CFi<la4meVaJlmar. Richmond Hill. NV 
11.300 Owen Edson, Sherrran OekE-CA 
DOWNLANO i* Ffaotfo ^h^j 

6B,M^ aC-Oopsr ValitntiH, Vavanby, 

Pnlish CnUimbi^ 
JS,29i1 Chuck Mwcy. Bflkrir.tliel X CA 
38,01-4 . jprnas Podr* Roafldala. 

Brlllah Columbia 
37,B30 John Siier, Da^on, OH 
33.450 Mike t. nde.il . ManMo-WQ*:, Wl 



DflAGON FIRE f^aoiO 5.^cfrj 

t23,12fl *Rupa<1 voung, Sheffield MA 
Glllea Gauf* Srllery. Ounbm; 
53,B7a "valhanael Heller. Kennnr, LA 
5M.2S1 Jerhianva Jackton, TaHulnh LA 
lO.onfi Gwen Edao-^, Sherman OttKe. CA 
17,QET Ed^i.n Oaanc, Hondurea, 
Cflrtlre* Anwnca 
liisnr- Ndu-I Salin-, D.n 

4,1 Ei SliiphDn Sp»*k , P^j t SL. Lu^ia, FL 
DUfJOEON GUEST /Comwlcirwjjrd) 

r .9.tlii& +Aibon Selig^. Lachina, Ow*?«c 
DU NK E^ -M LJNK EY I ntetiW-irc irca .' 

279. 900 + Jor. 3ot»mlcU. Gu»4)iO, MM 
ilfl.-flOD Mark Abanfean, Deltale, 

Satkazcne^an 
1 !".'•! C00 Pai Leal hrure. ?*ewark , D£ 
r^.900 Mlehael Drouin, Jleeda ^prlno , MD 
4'7.3O0 E*lrnir Caaaai:, Eaalari. Pasan^e. 
Mova Ekjmia 
E-LEC'TRON /Tiim Mf^J 

45- .590 #Bymn AKdrd. Rayi :-v- ■ . 
4C ^iQ Brad Gaucher, Hlnlcn , Al ben a 
J3 790 Craifj GK»entnwtY, im 

3L?.&26 John Mcrrla. Hussbu^, WA 
ENCHANTER ffft/MtwnJ 

135^66 *D*vW TiiHutCn, WjkiaiTialHaru, VA 
HI?-'t15 Sfcou Rfjiirnan Behendod rA 
FALCON'S LAJR |TME pAIMBOW, 3/35 1 
1B.45-1 'ft'jcyca Smith, Bulta^, ^A 
17,453 Michnal Bcolt,. Johnstown NV 
15.757 Daniel Cach. €lard«iC'^n. KY 
1 4.627 Alexander Tfld-ay. Ertat Lyrnu, CT 
12,497 fticrt Taelor Hav^dy, PA 
FJGHTEft WLOT fS-flou.7n3j 

250.-'SCI A-GlOMnn Aiyfly, £l. i_<Mjia MO 
FJHE5T0RM | THE RAINBOW Vf&\ 
i 25,050 *John GriK, Peabody. MA 
Bobov Shblko. EMtan. PA 
2.0&Q R/ook WhlUpn. jaiLitKih, Mi 
1 ,S0fi Rfefc BuMa, Grfjnlrp CJr^ 'l 
fROOOlE r^jdrrcirj!; ipgej^iriiij 

?A, tCufilp Tjiylu 1 , -SqariM3ro4i9ih, C 1 1 *i. _• 



★★★*★★★★★★★★★★★★*★★★★★★★★★★★* 



138 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



2E,fl4C GaMlari Taylof , Scarborough Onterlu 
H.26C] Mprmrro FrauelD, BIub laranu, tL 
t,2W Chri*ior^«rTav*af. ScaiLiurtiu^l', 
Qnlano 

B.JOD Minrr E*parzn, Hi .ti island. iL 
GALACTrC ATTACH iflaoVs o«hacfrJ 

SAM *Cooper Vaiantin, Vavanby", 

British Colurftfcfa 
Li,H:!ii AWion! |aro*l& Owego.fW 
SU.B7Q Gran Bergman, Ha/ilia, iflraal 
1 W 1 0 flan Volar^, Ogdanaburg 
GALA60N fSlji^nr/ Associates) 
1 JO&.fiiWj aJackIb Maddoa, Iran Siaiioi i, <nc 
Wfl.TDil Kb^Ii Djetn. Mariarta, HA 
d&?.0UD r^ajtOuean. Marltlia, Ga 
"fl!fi,Mij ahawr Oor#ay. Collage- Pfj*til , NY 
*l3.Ki!0 Alice Watr.eu-nl, CuiIhph Pnml NY 
GHANA BWAMA iTiatWo ^i^jl^ . 

A 5B.&^D +Oen-j Walla, Slint^e: Ty 

345 add nupart Vrjuny., ghuri'ejd, MA 
New a^rwiak 

ibJ.PaU Jeina* &|nn, ijSUrtr, IN 

SHB.54D Byron AHurd Puvlvivn NO 

246,540 tfe.fi Mu«|, Richmond, GA 

B45.,S20' flanstv Apliag*. fqn WgHh.. T){ 

I5S.U50 Dharr-o* 3hlpFT^n t Oritur, MO 

90 MD Whs Hnl, v^h&h, WA 

57,230 tlqS Dnvyirl fllUB lilttipd, IL 
GH Q£T G 0 QGL Efl fSpuor«/ Asso^arMJ 
1Q?,:WP +firrg- fiir>aan. Lcwa^l, MA 
"l^W Shulnln CHIHIb. 1raiB-Ri'*MfW- 
C'uaa.BC 

7ff,W0 dylvii-n Caalonguay, Chintnilnril, 
CiiabBC 

■iMiiQ Jan VYeaiB/lNatHAkawln. Alfarfffl 
H/fiiW Alan Brazen. Lonowood ft. 
H.OKJ K&ti/i Radwan B|u& iW'iSi >l 
GBLDflUNNER 

tiS6,MQ * Jaa&a 3arnten. C*ii?rmrrv flock. QO 
tffl4,65n My.'v: dliPirrrt. His , 

Ouabac 

37.1,fl&ft fcppian li<r Jp-.,j^a|a'rtKKy € T 
■350,450 £|ti*tn ft.ryti>, 5*. ,q*|Aa, JVlO 
271 rjjQ Anerisw RsbVw, WcKKllnvi'lB. WA 
THE INTE RPLANETAR y FH Urt FLV (TH E tU | 4EOW 1 ,'05) 
37JDO *Sgcrt4 Parkins, Port Orange. Fi 
2h 503 Jtan Jngglm, Band, 0*1 
22.000 Slovnn &ui|Rrri, AlkwT, Ok 
i ! : SCiij MichMl Scroti. JannElnwn, MV 
<NtfAfi<ON OF THE FlYING 
SAUCBb ^EOPUe 'THE RAINBOW, ^/aSj 

W *MifhiiBl Clerics. SeeWd, *W 

1 , IftX-CtiO +WIP5 MaCaiftrtW s3fl(:i rftlh- ID 
^ \W; \m Uwn B iat En iai pria^, AL 
l,97ftr&QD ^n<ltiew Ramafl^ IMrrofl Ml 

w&il TtSLi Crrn-Oj Gorndhi, G»±nid«i\ llH 
Mlka WQcher, Dahtil. CT 
KAflATC r"y«eom Rradueji ■ 

1 ft.UOO #Jlm DoylB. Barriulevillu, WV 
■I OaO Sr.wr Slillrllfin, Bp linr-rirjM, |A 
KEYS PF THE WIZARD (Spvtffnf A JftKifl^Rf J 

BS^. #Jtihii Fulltin, Dpydroni, VA 
TWE KING (TMn^ijrj 

*,oi^BDg ^FrtjSinr MdlMrrt, Culpepi?;;VA 

2, -|&i,BKI Tfm Rhb». SlBMcm^lle, MP 
l ,B70.BfiO Vtimnda fm. Sa^ra , P,A 
l.sna.BdO Kovm Comnll. GrranCcWn. PN 

vg,MQ Kevin ^qd^n, B.ia fl \tifu\Q. jL 
KLEWDATHU fflnef-'P Stan*, 



*Pni- Sho^nahgn Quarts HlM 
□rvn Franran, WsbUbIcb, C3H 
Jri^ ^rlbbie, rjaVfinport, IA 
flrlan Ennis Wjl/wp^o-n I^C 
Qardan A i^af Pifii: I'&Ljiitoii, WA 

*i^sftn UicjUl Hicht-Dfl Park, k 
Rush Guloy. p4?rt Orcfra, WA 
UjiulH LiiiHgtJ. I nvnl, Oirtbaci 
J.j '« n P.LHj-'jri, Ry ii. NH 

Klrh NedrubiK] Ll-jurpJOaK QH 
AIba 5ai.igtr,La(Jhi^tr h QUi*Piii- 
LAHCtfl {.SfMGwai Ataoftfi/si^i 

nr-'Jioi don Alvarhflj l-nn-.m 
ILFMAN5 /S'pacfB/ Asaocisrea/ 

0-57 * Roben EerlriQ, £*IPL Qurfwtl , 

O'H ^rauor NDrOtJ, ^^V1t Cuj-rani. 
aBntrnQh^BJ'. 



1,347,030 

1,177 HO 
412.Q0B 
Kdi.WL- 

KllQL-K OUT|7.' 
1BB.3S3 
152,050 
M^lflO 
19*7.930 

130.-135 



CA 



MA 



^•73 CAf la WMghr, Fr^HciOn, 

MAHNE95i AND THE MINOTAUR fflnq'ifl JFPJns* J 

aaa -^Jfrt>n FuPlon, Boydton. VA 
MAHHLE MAZE ■'□■dCGrfl PtndiiGt*} 
3O,3B4,Ti]0 
IDF ?5D 
1Di.5B0 
M.-03D 
-S3,^10 



A-Melvm Shui-j> Jr., Rni^muni MM 
Dan Bd'j^b, NiunliP, CT 
atfrphdn*j OudllBHii, iauian. GusbBC 
Brian U\\jf$%, Galler^aVi 

B^r, Brat E'llBrp'iSii AL. 



"02,9^10 

100,4t0 
00 -tTO 
30,0=0 




ME DA-BUD fF-bdiO S!\&£k\ 

"'I. 'J7A +Tin-; Rub-b, SLa^appvilb, Ml 
17,250 Keith Q-jteu, MaJiftlla, QA 
t*,flB- Mlchaal G^ri^O; SfiAlL.:m. rsV 
14.7B5 BLajn jamiH&Gh, K^g«ton, Qfllflr n 
14,211 Sfir>l! Swidl*. Rr^Jncgr, WA 
1 0.055 LahG* 1J rniir. Stirling CftVl OA 
MICROBES f rfrrfg Shn^^J 

517,050 *M»cin4al 4 P&vid tlflTOiio, 

rVprtk^vjtlp 1 , PA 
i s- ,oao John Gy&m. , OdiUTibN, M& 

17SM0 Hiram tfipn nil Blua IslrvTid II 
MONKEV KONG i Mjirf .^ifsiff/nuj 

£22 +Krr§1a Ciia^ilr, =Npm F^rnagnrj 

N£Wtt ScciLia 
478 Dlftfl- BlPpdrJau, OliBrbum Parle, 
rjuabtsi 

-365 Work Fnrns. Da bp Rivnr Onlarlo 
MONSTER MAZE / RnriJo SnncfrJ 

j'HO +Wanda Jnnan. 6ranfcf ord. Crniafn 
$0;4190 H»*peJi Vounfl SualMeld, Mr\ 
(W. 1 2D Stava Thtwiaa^ Ogdsnaburg, NY 
4J,ti 1 0 Tfm Oraj^i, KBlvoha, MO 
&4,'H0 Coopoi ValEnlirp vavanby, 
Bridal* Columbia 
«OON HOPPER fCoflrpL-rarwflfflJ 

S76,a&ri *RanB RlnQiiatla, Rivia^u^Loup 
Quabac 

KrrbLD CpDufcJl, Eattprn Fnmgpii 

"Jgya EaL'dEl<i 
CrjUg Gqrnwl. Gn^ninwr IN 
BrUN Bi&S. EhfttrprlMl, AL 
Mali V«n^«. irrbipnn. IN 
MR, DjG fQtiti\pw\urMK r nt 
^7.000 #Brnnnon B^^Ufy, Live Oak. FL 
9.787,000 Jeff Robarg, W^riBld, KB 
5 FauM J.ime*. Lu mberton, TX 

^,^1,900 Slepnane Ouziiieau, Lhuio/i QuabBL 
MS- MAZE r Tent Mtxj 

1 1^,530 *J3aa-r3E FrsusLo. Bl ue laJand, IL 
MUDFlESr^hrrany 

77.^00 + Er- K Huilrmr^, HochBara-i Hillit M I 
B5.70n Kavifi Cornell, Graenwwn. PN 
HINJA WARRIOH fPfO$fBn\rt\6r : s G^fltf^ 
1 DiL 000 *EriO G^BdsL-jfia, Dca|a, FL 
105,300 Spentar F.fttfwa*. B^tftn Pouga ( LA 
55,1 go Larry 3rrafna, HumboldS, 
Saakalchawdn 
Sec I: Enmsn, BaMa Mead. NJ 
Mih* McGallariy. Idatip FaJI*. ID 
Mxity ciaPiarra, M^WdUpflb HiB. , 
fjijohrji; 

NUKE AVENGER f 7* 0 SvltWwj 

iJEUW *Cnri5 CDtarnan. Marldan. C'l 
ONE^ON«ONE fftarfki SrjBaJkJ 

*Toby JacHQbi, 3eltelDmnina OH 
V^a* 'HMI. Vaanon WA 
MichaalUzinnij? C?roaon. Oh 
•E'lN HuHrrtan, Hocfiaater mill, Wl 
Mark Lang, Dawn4BYllta r CA 
Jaramy HackWdjlh, l^axburg, id 
OPEratiOH FHFEDOM jTHEflAlNEJOVi 1 , B7B5J 
7^,-523 *Klrbv5rnllt>. VoTk, PA 

Ed Was4barg, Janaan Eteaoh, FL 
Mary Edwaroa, impE-iial, MO 
Paul Walcorl. Ml Cla^Biia^ Ml 
Awnandar tadav*. Eaaj Lyrns, CT 
PANJC BUTTON rflp^io Shartl 

1,1 20 * -. r- i! >. ;u| H*lr#r H WpnPor, <-A 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RlDEflQ f.Rjttp/u 
50.2&J ft-Rod riyo MaJdanado, WMIta. CA 
PENGUIN THE RAINBOW, 2^5) 

^B.250- *PB'jl WegCirn, Carp P DhLflAO 
44,559 Kevin Gailagnai - . Zhi\ la Hbfllca. CA 
20,750 George Bcdirafla. Euraka, GA 
B.4T0 Joseph TDkarl S,'.. B 'OaSiUnr. PA 
i ,650 Roben Nicosia, Gioverav< He. MV 
PLANET INVASION \&p#itr*} AJ*3C«Jeaj 
i li5;CHM #J Immy. Dt>vle, tiarackviME, WV 
IS6.&30 Ttvamaa *^Dyor. Brooklyn, NV 



€0,301? 
53.2DC- 
43,703 



890-D 
680-41 
k;^ r. i 



£3,347 
?fl,6T4 
lH r FJB2 
T2,6i^ 



B7,7D-> AlanPriirnn Lcngwood H L 
5a,a50 Ghlnittir QtHIHa, TTO|s-F1lvlerea. 
□uabac 

>j..J5u Pftul Hots, Han^iB. laraej 
POLT^RGPIST f.f?flci'to Stmtif) 

7,430 **^^riarri ^ariara*. TraiB-Rii'ieiaa, 
Quedao 

e.OflO 9i Hy FfllHu H, Citflri&jlan. Sc 
4, HQ.' Slflva 7honvi3.. tigdanaburp, NY 
4.0B& rfoaaph T^ksre Jr., Bloasburg *V 
n,4*0 0nrt Spring or Odka^BBfi, I A 



.H, 7B5.CO0 * Ron Collins, ClarHrwrr. SC 
1.967,00!? Jon So^i". Snnlard. FL 
1 201} TnorniK Mayar, Brooklyn, N V 
26*^00 P«t Lonlhrum, Ha^ark, Dfe 
2&&.<}» Andrew Rsaraa. FjaKrkaJ, WA 
BT.flM Bhawn Corv*ay, GoUage Fo.nL, 
SOd Davia. Del F-jf rjaiorlo, 
San Franciaco, C-A 
Sil.iiai Chxislopher Paila. BowmanMl^lS, 
OnlaflD 

700 ferry ! s B^an>. flA^a laland, rL 
?0.?!:0 WaynB Dewrtl. Blufl 1 la>antf , |L 
1 7,5 &0 Hugcr Frn-iiEto, HJub Jsland, I L 
POPCORN r'Prrdic Shirt} 



U;{i. luu 
■"16,630 
57.690 



56,5il0 

E-0,210 
37,760 

30,1(10 



IN 



rMati Ha wnann, RJcrwnand. VA 
^ellh Aj^charnafer. Nnpaiaon, Ori 
Me' lie Boudraaul!, Foi-.-Carrlar, 

D uadjac: 
Brnca Johfiaon, Vavuntay, 

Brlllair Caiumtila 
Slch awadr'j, 3paiic4r MA 
Gl«n Bilttdaau, Oharbwnr Par 1 *. 

Pju'WhIpbII. Ml- CJBrmi?ia,Mi 
PRO GG-L* fCun7^uff/ir*rfiJ 

09 irDnvid ^siifay, ahBlsyvi llu, 
PROJECT NCRULA rftrroVp Shnok) 

^.&1S *ChTiinopPiHr HomrtncB, 
Mji^nnnUa Par% NY 
iHD Mr*n*inn Frrvitsh'. BIipb Islnnd IL 
Q UE BIT I ^Wk^l ftfl ProdfrJcr^J 

E^iSU *NnM er?c]r, WHIiEiDP, h"L 
QUIXfTorp^J 

99& +WlltH*r Jarnaa . Cnaruat^r.. wv 
E£„4&4 Mariano ^fBUSto. Sl^a Island, h 
' 6. a Mark Moiel, Blue • aland, i L 
RACER IhE RAINBOW, 3/55 1 

30i 9 *Klroy 3mMh, York. PA 
2B5 4 Jennifer WoiBt>a, Sil rardflie . n A 
t76 Nell Ecga, Wll»iajnri. FL 
150 Craig Cornell, Gn^dfliowii, IN 
13 '3 R£bBJl NuiOflia, GltiUiirtvllla, NV 
RA DlO BALL i Hfl d;o $t\&6i\ .1 



■I .510,7-10 
■ H30,5Ca 

301,350 
t.050,250 

711.WD 



JHLea Do'fi, £au C-JnlhUi Wl 
iara Grace, BadimijiQ, MD 



Brian Mathernei, Gritina, j_A 
Pal MoiMfft, fUmmh- GA 
Tina HeUars.. Sparta, \l 
ROBOTTACK f fri if UdP/<rJ 
1 C20,5-"0 than Wu-Auvhmn apmnny. Ontnrici 
K*llh Srnsl^i f-tothnny, Onkr+rip 
ChfrJ MdC^llBn, ^-uaHvl'la, IN 
OaugtaR Hoiik, PaoJla. IL 
SLapr^nt OuzHIbbu A Daniel Clou 

Lfluion, Ouabeo 
Oiilad Gagpu, SHlery. Quobec 
ROMMEL 3-D nMr'eh7ronj 

fi^.OiW *Todd f-kjogs. Como* 
flTltiEh Columr; rj 

GS-TM Alas^ Sal'ijE r, Lachha, 0 u as>aG 
:■.!.!. z*¥j Rodnay Mujllnaauv, Slg; Hafboi 
RUN FOR fOOH LIFE -|TtiE RAINBOW, Afte) 



&31.250 
*27,6C0 
59S.1 F:0 
S47.&C0 

539,790 




QliSOU 

Su.i'r.u 
20,000 
20,050 
20,050 



+ EJpan Jenaen, Draylan VaUsy 
A*ba4la 

Krtrrup Guddand Oshiwa. Dntnrl 
Dfl^rid Crall, Rflanuku. VA 
Ryaif Davhn, Lpulsvli*- KY 
Br :an Vo^aa. J&aptr, lAi 



SAILOR MAH f7om Mixj 

579, ICO *Alan brazen, Long wood, FL 
74 1 ,150 Bryan i.eri , caigar^. Ai bn i a 
587,350 Ke^ln Carfatl, QrBBfnown, IN 
567-.050 Jon Sows* sanlord, Fl 
3-7B.SG0 Brannon Baxlay, Live Oak FL 
347,650 Morgar Gregorv, Aa'an, PA 
190,050 lodd Hoaga, uoniOH 

British ColurnfaMO 
: ,R,^(i K nr. f^nwiri !:!! s.-p LilpnrJ. 1 1 




★★★★★★★★★★****★ 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 139 



******** ********************* 




SAM SueUTH PA. <C3/t>puftt*ff/#J 

tD ■frjof r. Fullan Bopdton.VA 
OF EGYPT fflfltfiD SfiKfr J 
77 *J*<r HMlisan, Blacksbupg VA 
SEA ohaGGN :^nytf"?rij."fl iMiftmaltarui; 

21,200 iKSogrgs Frauato, Hltrt Island, JL 
tiEA SEARCH ,|Marfr D-Htu) 

04 *Ba* DoriiiE, Sii/E laiBfld, IL 
SHAMUfl fRutfki Stwutfl 

17.-3M *fltefriflO MsliJoriado, WhM:ier, OA 
SHEHAHlQANB fMsr* M*.) 

ft] *Roy Cranl . TGlediD, OH 
95 J*rT Hillrion, Blackfiburg, VA 
5fS David Kfly, Wilihipag, MflnHoda 
9G Ed EttoVHI, N&ii|1et>**, PA 
SHOCK TflOOPCFt \MnfXP*t4} 

214.KK1 *Fml»r MalCCirn, CulJMfWf. VA 

Erik Kirlfnun. Rochester HIJIb, Ml 
Rgdney MLniriflfl'jji, QkJ Harba*". WA 
Gordon Akamai, TauMwi MA 
AO* Sali^w, Lactvlne, CJueHat 
SHOOTING Q ALLER¥ fflfttfta SAJrtj 

:?2fl,810 +M*G iwaj Clflrtda, S^alard, Nv 
CUT Farnidr McGrfr^j Df, TK 

Qrj:jx!i Columbia 
Kfln DfrwiH. Blue- Inland. IL 
hHriun Ejiprinu Blua 1 J H_ 
SKIINO Stack,' 

4:69 *Tim Ndnti, Emporia, K9 

Scp't Clfrvfingar, Faf/mourrt, IN 
Billy ¥ alduiil, Charieaior., SC 
K*vm Gallagher, Bants Mojuca, GA 
Ann-EJi-y Paras, WeBEmlnaier. CA 
• : Wri-fthl, FradarlcLan, 
\-qw Brurifcwkk 
SHHAHBLE .' TofU M fv , 

I QB.Eac- *<Sh i» GagFifl, Snlury, Quirtm: 
SLAV THE NER.IU3 iHatfia Sft*r:*.l 

284 .BOB #Joy«9 WaJcoK, Ml Gleans, M* 
SPACE AHBU9H fCom^rerwflrwJ 

395.500 * a; Ice ttaBn&uah I, Callous Polni, N V 

I I 5.5£D Shawn Corwoy, CcWeG* Polnl, NY 
2P.4B.rj ffBo* CBfwpa M |, Santurce, 

Puana flma 



150,4*0 



227,940 
34,000 

1&.SO0 



1:00 
i.OO 

1:13 



SPACE ASSAULT Iflasdio S/itwA; 



£J2.>20 
rtKJ.300 

■aa.E-ao 




*UJHV Ui£k*¥CKrd Bamon. AF 
Jim Tutkfr*. Cq-rnmerra, 

Michnfli Pr^pfh, fia^da Spflng, MEJ 
Qaar^B F rjiuslQ B!u& Island, li- 
8PACE 3KUTUE SIMULATOR \T£Hp Mh) 
55a #PDbori HMfriv, SpnHii ll 
SPEED FIACEP. iWcr>fiC.'\f 



143,310 

139,210 
1 29,950 

flD.25:- 

easeo 



N 



* Brian KlnQ, On'Dndfi. FL 
K^'in Cornel, Grc*ntflWitt 
C*it|b HDfrlBfw,. Bmpha, 
Alan Orpzfln. LongrtdOU, n. 
JfeM Dlnor?r. €dpuwond, MP 
John SlflB Ml. JupllrJr, PL 
Mv> Motel.. Blue Klitnd, IL 
ChrlH-laphar Potte, BoflrrnpuvlUp. 
DfltariQ 
3TAP BLAZE ffla^D 5tMC* } 

e.400 *Jnhn dupliJI, Cnl-jrT»hin. MO 
e, J JOO Chns Ca^flfnnn. Mtridbri, OT 
e,"\Q0 Curtis PnHlar Jr., Enfcurprian . Al 
7,050 A nfiraaa Thaler. ContlociDk, Q yflhtic 
6.B50 Scott lacJiflrtB, RpChHlftr, NY 
STAR SHIP CHAMELEON rOomOLJtor^nnw 

48,000 ■♦flief} filiGdeau, Olterbum PnrK. 
UuetHQ 

STELLAR LIFE-UHE fFfadiG S.h^.V., 

5Q.5B0 ASIaran Moony. Aualin, TX 
57,550 Michelle ttynw . Slannrl'i-titd, 
TEMPLE OF ROM f ^adit 5flau^/ 



ATjrnaShjr Bla*iofl- J^c^n^fiviUrT. FL 
Boriya HLfnt, n<chmofid<, CA 
CT»f iBiopher PiOTmrtoa. 

fca&aapeaua park, r*V 
Tlmpahy Hannon r Hlofilcmd, IN. 
Betan Maltiama, Oret^a. LA 

t'^ByJIfl +T*i r rV M«na. 5t. 'Daiherinaa. 
CkilariO 

Steven Cpla^unaio, R&slyn, PA 
K^istijpliti LHallei F1 Wa^rifi, IN 
MjJfK Oteflh. WhriM&jfl. Aloarla 
SyJ^ain CaaiQpiguay. Crtjcoulimi, 



1^22,400 
35&.4CW 
93&,arjK> 

11B3D1: 



747 460 
2l*fi10 



TUBE FRENZT^SJ^J/^ 

125 -BOO * Shawn Corway. Colraga Point, NY 
BT,T5D Alice WHS-r.B ,w . Col iej?5 PolnS, 
TUTS TOMB :M3\1t DfllaJ 

a-^7,M0 * Jar-y Au-jtin, BaraftDD, Wl 
225,160 Robert Wright. Nnnh Dueensland, 
Aii alalia 

■ 39,980 N \P0i& Poullftl CciQrt, MotHe, AL 
1 B9.940 Mike WlcCaherty , tdaha FailH. I D 
121,740 Ed" Marti ftson, Nevntirt KC 

WABP FACTOR X fFflttty-P&W} 
12,e3fl,efj-t AGorc-on AWarp:az, Tau-nton, MA 

wlimLEVDlRD RUN fspautt\ A^o^aJesJ 
1 1 7.000 + Je|1 Ray. N. GiartwL&ft, SC 
149,40c ^yivain Caasonguay, Chlcnulhhl. 

5^,500 Jay Auat, Marlbotough, CT 
47, 050 Michel LaBrjii. AnjkSu, Outb»i 
43,aFjft Giun Bil^ifeau, DUerburn Park. 
Dnlarlo 

WILLY'S WAREHOUSE ftx/trtvatat) 

fl.^ BO!) *Wh- ilyn daPierre. Maacquclte Mia . 
Quc>b&G 
2rA.Kl{C*l|'D.Tra?o«} 



l-VOSI.OQO 
l,af>ft.500 
253,400 

I SD ! 'Jij 

10?.UOO 

9^.;oo 



*R/ron Allurd. RaytgWh, MO 
□in Brnwn. Pi«;tslgrd.. NY 
Bpb DowJtLaigfl l!v-uf»d. IL 
Ttiomwir Mnyc'f. ^roaklyn, NY 
RiChBrd Shih, TDr^ance, CA 
Josh ^.'Idriks, ZuphyrhlJla r Fl 
Ch'ig Cdl«rtian r M4Hidun, CT 
ppnal^S Hublnr, Swbni^mpk, |L 
Lfr;Ld|by l-k^ylnu f, u 'I Lah« Lily, UT 
SflnM Khjrr-mor. Gr^hby, CT 
£OMX (TKE RAINBOW. 10.^ i 

21 ,100 #PnilHp Jcftrson, SctHsviIIb, VA 
13,500 M'dflgl Elchnwn. -^^u^ RipidJ, MN 
6,330 JaJfrv Lffnfl. HuffiflT, PA 
5,500 Elaljij SUan, Uaep Piver, Ontnrlo 



e-..« 

4&.KI0 



> — Debbie £ti*rtfcy 



SCOREBOARD 




In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we of fer this col umn of 
pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. \ F you have some interest- 
ing hints and tips, we encourage you to share them by sending them to 
\ \\ie ScQrenpard, c/o the rainbow 



FEEDBACK 

ScGrebanrrf; 

in answer to &ome qutstio-fii; asked b^ 1 
Tommy Grouser in the Score board Poin- 
iErs ,fr of (hp March i^sue v concenuiig 
The Vortex E&M&r< if vou inok aL the 
battery, you wiHs&e one reason why the lime 
oiuchme dwfis not work:. 

There is no water availably but fruit juicu 
works jus.1 fine, aithough you have to 

iqueeTfi your own, h also helps to read rhe 

notes on the iheory of ihe maohSne w5uk fc yuu 
are in it s and, of course, insert the correct 
caTtrid£-c. 

To open the safcj you must tui n i]ie dial 
Lo ihe correct combination. The combi na- 
tion is a date found on a document, but you 
have Lo travel back tn time sn order to fi nd 
the document. 

Richard Kitig 
Plymouth, f/V 





In response to Donald Dare "s letter (May 
1986)^, concerriin& how to kill the wizard in 
Dtmg&ons tif Daggarm/u vou have to hit 
him lb fee times with ih& Energy Ring and 
also bit hbn about 20 times with (he Elvish 
Sword, 

Don bray 
Austell, GA 



Scoreboard: 

in response lo Scott Bellman^ letter (May 
1986), here isj some help with Zork L To 
inflate tbe raft, you must open the sluice 
gates. To open the gates, you must get the 
wrench from the maintenance room (be sure 
to putth all buttons except the blttc one and 
don't Target tbe tuhe of gunk and ihe 
screwdriver). Also, don't worry- about the 
thief - you will confront him later on> but 
for now i kt him take your ireasurcs (be iurc 
be takes tbe Jeweled Egg), 



You t an return eo daylight by going up tin! 
cbi£tLney h but you can only carry up one 
thing. Also, try praying al the altar with the 
cotton. You will find yourself at the clearing, 
or be bind 1he house, Tbe trapdoor wit! now 
always stay open, so start to put ihe treas- 
ures tn the trophy tase, 

Jeremy Hackworth 
fieJchurg, ID 



In response to Scott He[] man's letter in the 
May 1 9B6 issue, yes you can enter the temple 
in the game Enchanter, Firs I be sure to save 
your position — you will need to cast the 
Gzmoo spell on yourself, 

MSfctrf Rlre 
Panama City, FL 



1 40 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



*★★★★★**★★★*★*★**★★★★**★*★*★★ 



Scoreboard: 

In response to Dan Franzen's question 
(May 1986) concerning jumping the pit in 
the game Madness and the Minotaur, there 
are two mazes. There are also two pits. The 
one in the corner of the room can be found 
ill one maze or the other; it alternates after 
each game. You look at the pit in the corner 
to get different items. The other pit is in the 
center of the room — it does not alternate. 
Ybu jump this pit and it takes you to the 
forest. 

David Ford 
Kaufman, TX 



drop all of them into the sack. Then climb 
the ladder and proceed with the moves given 
by David, The flaw in David's advice is 
dropping the sack the second time, because 
the sack disappears! 

Speaking of Dallas Quest, can anyone tell 
me how to get the elephant (Roger) to 
cooperate at Dumbo *s nest, or how to get the 
natives to let me pass at the cave entrance? 
How do you use the ring? When you type 
USE RING, the response is "How?" If anyone 
can help please write to the "Scoreboard." 

Rodrigo Maldonado 
Whittier, CA 



same thing happens when you escape from 
a bat through a "transfer portal" (the white 
dot with a circle around it). 

You can press shift and clear to change 
the background color. To return to black 
background, press ENTER. 

In Cyrus Chess, you must have your 
queen next to the computer's king. While 
your queen is there, it can't be taken. 

Timothy Bishop 
Jacksonville, FL 



GREAT BALLS OF FIRE 

Scoreboard: 

In Dragon Fire you can acheive a higher 
score if you continue dodging the fireballs. 
In higher levels, keep dodging the fireballs 
and you will rack up many points. Re- 
member, don't leave until the score stops 
increasing. You may want to stay away from 
the upper inside part of the castle for fear 
of being dusted or killed by the fireballs. 

If anyone has solved Pyramid or Madness 
and the Minotaur, please send some clues. 

Jermaine Jackson 
Tallulah, LA 



G^TTA THROTTLE 

Scoreboard: 

Here is a hint for JLemans: Use a joystick 
that is only four directional and hold the 
throttle down* 

Robert Eering 
Swift Current, Saskatchewan 



To respond to other readers' inquiries and 
requests for assistance, reply to "Scoreboard 
Pointers," c/o THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will imme- 
diately forward your letter to the original 
respondent and, just as importantly, well 
share your reply with all "Scoreboard" 
readers in an upcoming issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL section 
of our new Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type 
SEND and address to: EDITORS. 

— Debbie Hartley 



UNBELIEVABLE GAS MILEAGE 

Scoreboard: 

I just made a discovery while playing 
Worlds of Flight. One of my favorite things 
to do is to fly until I run out of gas and then 
glide to a safe landing. I landed (out of fuel) 
and without thinking about it I restarted the 
engine. Surprisingly, the engine started. At 
first I thought there was only enough gas to 
make it to the refueling area, so I refueled 
and took off. 

I ran out of gas again and landed safely, 
but this time I restarted the engine and took 
off and flew. But, I did not run out of gas 
— I flew for three hours with the gauge 
reading empty. That's some gas mileage! 

Christopher L. Cheshire 
TAFB, CA 



UNDOCUMENTED COMMAND 

Scoreboard: 

There is an undocumented command in 
the Cyrus Chess program. To get a printout 
of the board, press 'S' then *S' again. 

Reed Darsey 
Mobile, AL 



HOLD ON TO THE SACK 

Scoreboard: 

I have some tips for anyone who owns 
Pegasus and the Phantom Riders (they work 
better during Phase two and three and the 
Lagoons). Always stay at the top-middle of 
the screen. This way the Phantom Riders 
cannot get higher than you, leaving you in 
a perfect position to kick all rising riders. 

I also have a correction on some advice 
submitted by David Rodriguez (May 1986, 
Page 146) for Dallas Quest. Although the 
advice was very useful, it had one flaw. 

After bribing the monkey, make these 
moves: DROP ALL, PULL CURTAIN, GET 
LIGHT, CLIMB LADDER, LIGHT LIGHT and 
DROP LIGHT. Go east, then south and get the 
sack, mirror, pouch, photo and ring and 



FIGHTING KEYS 

Scoreboard: 

: 0 have some hints for your readers who are 
fans of Knock Out, When fighting Canvas 
Kid, press the up arrow key (this puts your 
fists up) and then keep on pressing the *2' 
key. Be sure to stop punching when he stops 
or he gets more energy. Do not press the 
space bar when you have the "KO" sign. 
Sometimes using it is effective, but most of 
the time he beats you to it and throws in a 
couple of punches. 

When fighting Ricky Rickshaw, all you 
have to do is hit the *2' key. He may reverse 
the situation if you use the space bar. 

When fighting Farmer Fred, use the same 
method as when fighting Ricky Rickshaw. 
However, you may need to throw a couple 
of punches with the T key. If he throws a 
few punches in a row and you are unable to, 
dodge to the left and then immediately 
punch him. 

When fighting Knock Out Kid, you 
should mainly punch with the '2* key. Dodg- 
ing is not advisable — he is much faster than 
you. 

Also, in To Preserve Quandic, what 
should I do when I get to the Snake Master? 

I am totally lost on Blackbeards Island 
and The Vortex Factor. 

Also, how do I refuel my oxygen in the 
game Mars-80! Any help would be greatly 
appreciated. You can write to the "Score- 
board." 

John Licata 
Richton Park, IL 



CRYSTAL BALL BENEFIT 

Scoreboard: 

I have some hints for Temple of ROM. 
You have to be in a big area for the bats to 
be killed. Also, if you get the crystal ball for 
3,000 points instead of 1,500 points, every- 
thing is doubled until you kill the bat. The 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 141 



Look What's New at NOVflSOFT! 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 




ou. 



, OirectionsKHestiNor 
"IT'I Vou're drivins 

aour sports car* 




1120 C! ick to stop 



I New Release I 
Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Required 

Disk $21.95 




he re is -.i J.j-. ,ii ri c □ k I ac-c here, 



The Misadventures of Eddie 

Another great Novasoft adventure. The ol' 
man in the mines' rebellious son, Eddie, is 
roaming through time, creating havoc— and 
you must bring him home in order to return 
to your own time! Over 140 locations, 50+ 
commands, in hi-res graphics. Experienced 
adventurers will love this one! 



Requires 64K 



Disk S21 .95 




Goldrunner 

Travel the maze in your never-ending search 
for gold- but beware of trap doors, burly 
guards and other hazards! 33 screens. 

64K Joystick or Keyboard 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 



PI 

Bam 

mt 



Hillli 

fViqaoa:i:Batj~ *,■> vat 
ii.rpBpnisan \\nft 



l l tSlSXT OhHC -iix 





Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required 
Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 



CREDITS 




COINS 




COINS t 
IN 0 RETURN HftHME 



IPBYS Q fl L Y ON LIT LIME S 



Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

16K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27^5 



Other Best Sellers 

Martian Crypt- Life once existed on Mars! 
Find the hidden Martian crypt. Animated 
hi-res graphic adventure with sound effects. 

32K Tape $18.95 Disk $21.95 

Skyway- Ma nuever your craft along the 
skyway avoiding enemy craft, mines, sky 
bugs and holes! 32K and Joystick. 

Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 

Blackboard's Island-Find Blackbeard's 
treasure but be ever mindful of the hazards 
along the way. Graphic adventure. 

32K Disk $19.95 

Brewmaster - Move along the end of the 
bars, serving beer to your thirsty customers. 
Fast-paced action. 32K & Joystick. 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 

CoCo Crosswords- Master set has 27 
puzzles, four levels of difficulty. Pull down 
menu. Additional sets have 30+ puzzles 
each. 

32K Master Set Disk $24.95 
Sets #2, #3, #4 just $12.95 ea. on Disk 

Color Car- Fast moving racing lets you 
"bump & jump" other racers through the 
course. 

64K & Joystick. Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 



Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man-Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
1 60 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 

The King- 

32K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian - 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze— 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Kater Pillar II- 

1 6K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants - 

1 6K Tape $1 8.95 Disk $21 .95 
Buzzard Bait- 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 

NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

4285 Bradford N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 

• Dealers welcome 

• Many more titles -write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/957-0444 





VISA 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 



Educational Best-Sellers! 




P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations— 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 




Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Joysticks Required 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II -Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32K TDBI $42.95 Tape $39.95 

Fractions- A Three- Prog ram Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 



Factpack- Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/*-/x" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System— Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 16K Ext. Basic/ 
32K for Printer Output 
Tape $39.95 Disk$42^5 

Math Duel -A challenging math game that 
pits you against the computer in a game 
of wits. Use your knowledge of factors, 
multiples and prime numbers to gather 
points against your CoCo. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 



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CT 

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linst 



TftP Bl . 
rcr z iioii 



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1 > I UUN 

- mcv > 



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« i • * 



Approach Control Simulation 
From Beta soft Systems. 

"Caught in a blinding snowstorm, two jet 
airliners are on a collision course. The 
pilots are unaware of the imminent danger. 
Hundreds of lives are at stake. A high-speed 
disaster is inevitable unless you act fast..." 
This and many other exciting scenarios 
await you as an Air Traffic Controller. The 
thrills, challenges and frustrations you'll 
experience with this authentic, real-time 
simulation will give you countless hours of 
discovery and adventure. 

32K Machine Language 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34795 

We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 



New! Tandy 1000/1200/3000 -I BM/PC-Compatable Software! 



Inventory Mate -General purpose 
inventory program suitable for a variety 
of applications. Inventory turnover and 
transactions are kept on permanent 
record. Has automatic item count 
adjustment when shipping or receiving. 
Also generates reports suitable for 
many uses! $79.95 

Postal Express -Lightning-fast general 
purpose mail program for home, small 
business. Each file stores up to 500 
entries; in-memory storage for quick 
operation; automatic selective printing 
options using global search and cate- 
gorizing features; Zip Code ordering, 



alphabetizing, accepts 9-digit and 
foreign Zips as well! $49.95 

Special Delivery --Comprehensive mail 
list program for businesses, featuring 
versatility found only in much more 
expensive packages! Up to 2000 entries 
held in each file; additional address line 
can be placed anywhere in the 
individual mailing label; categorize and 
print entries according to custom 
needs; Zip Code ordering, alpha- 
betizing, uses 9-digit and foreign Zips, 
too! $79.95 

More Tandy-IBM/PC software available. 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 

• Full use of 64K RAM 

• 100% Machine Language 

• No ROM Calls 

• Selectable Drive 

• Support 1-4 drives 

• Menu Selected functions 

• "Cold Start" exit to Basic 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler— the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT- Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Disk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector— Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast 3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21.95 

Sector Inspector- Alphabetize, backup and 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 Bradford N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

616/957-0444 
Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/957-0444 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors -We pay top 
royalties! 




THE NEW GENERATION 




COMPLETE NX-10 

PRINTER SYSTEM 



• 5K BUFFER • IMPROVED NLQ • QUAD HIGH & 
fi WIDE PRINTING • EXTENDED CHARACTER 
SETS • 10 INTERNATIONAL FONTS • IN-THE- 
CASE ADJUSTABLE TRACTOR • REVERSE 
LINE & FORM FEEDS • 120 CPS (DRAFT) 30 
CPS (LQ) • FONT CONTROL & MARGIN CON- 
TROL FROM CONTROL PANEL • 1 YEAR 
WARRANTY SERVICEABLE NATIONWIDE • 
AUTOMATIC LINE CENTERING • LEFT OR 
RIGHT HAND JUSTIFYING • SINGLE 
SHEET PAPER FEED • 7 GRAPHICS MODES 



J)>cayon'* 

WORD PROCESSOR Z.Z 

TAPE OR DISK VERSION 

A feature packed program that rums your CoCo into an of- 
fice machine. Create and save letters and documents with the 
Word processor tailored for the NX-10. 



COMPLETE SYSTEM 

NX-10 • BLUE STREAK II • SUPER GEMPRINT 
TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL • WORD PROCESSOR 2.2 



$309 



95 



+ $10 Shipping 
and Insurance 




BLUE STREAK II 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 



• RUN COCO I or II to PARALLEL PRINTER 

• HIGH QUALITY TOGGLE SWITCH ELIMINATES CABLE SWITCHING 

• 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 SWITCHABLE BAUD RATES 

• AC POWER OPTION AL-NOT NEEDED WITH NX-10 PRINTER 

• COMPLETE WITH ALL CABLES AND CONNECTORS 

• THRU-PUT EQUIVALENT TO y ^ - _ qhtpptmp 
BUFFERED INTERFACES //SrSfl ^4^5 5H1 ™ U 

• 1 YEAR WARRANTY 



PAID! 





SUPER GEMPRINT 

CUSTOM SOFTWARE 



••••• 



4 4 Overall, Super Gemprint is very well- written and documented." 

-Rainbow December 84 review. 



BONUS! TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

FREE WITH SUPER GEMPRINT 

aL Menu driven program for the CoCo. Teaches and shows the new 
user the numerous features of the NX-10. 



SUPER GEMPRINT AND $ 
TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 



17 



95 + $2 Shipping 
and Handling 



DAYTON ASS 



fi 



ES=. INC 




DUN & BRADSTREET LISTED 

7201 CLAIRCREST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



AUTO -ORDER LINE 
1-800-251 STAR 
Personal Service 
(513) 236-1454 



RAINBOW REVIEW 



Advanced Programming Aid/Super Programming Aid 

Programming Made Simple/Sangerf Software Systems . . . . . 158 

DSKUTIL 

Easy to Use Four-in-One Package/H.D.R Software 153 

Easy Gradebook & Easy Grade% 

Grading System for Teachers/Teachers Are Us Software 154 

Homeware 

A Home Management System/ Tothian Software . ...... ■ «.*... 169 

Infomania 

A Comprehensive BBS Guide/ Houghton Mifflin , . , ... .157 

Introduction to the Doctrines of Grace 

Print Religious Files in Book Form/Sovere/gn Grace Software - . . * . . . ... 165 

Keep-Trak A.R. 

Generate Attractive Business Statements/ The Other Guy's Software 162 

LI STAID 

Format basic Listings/A/eaf-0 Software 165 

OS-9 Version 2.0.0 

New and Improved Package/Tandy Corp. .166 

OTERM 

OS-9 Terminal Program/New World Technologies , > , . ,w-. x . . . 148 

Racing Analysis Package 

Let CoCo Pick the Winners/Software Exchange 1 67 

Shock Trooper 

Action-packed and Challenging/Mark Data Products 157 

Snap Study System 

Records Notes and Ideas/Cozy Software 164 

Software Bonanza Package 

Popular 12-Program Package/Specfri/m Projects, Inc. 149 

TXD 

An Unusual Disk Zapper/ Kolesar B/S .... . , ..151 

Telepatch II & Wizard 

Expand Telewriter-64/Specfrum Projects, Inc 168 

U.S. Stamp Inventory Management System 

Orders Collection Chaos/Crocfreff Software , . 1§6 

Vortex Factor 

An Adventure with a Change of Pace/Mark Data Products 152 

Witness 

A Classic Whodunit//nfocom . + . , .,163 

XWord/XSpell/XMerge 

OS-9 Word Processing/M/erofecft Consultants, inc . , ..... 1 70 

Zork I 

A Fantasy Out of This World/ 1 nfocom .150 

1 MM 






Lif; 



r 




VIDEO MONTHLY 



A funny thing has happened in the home video 
market. As it gets easier and easier to watch what 
you want, it gets harder and harder to decide 
what that might be. 

Dozens of new tapes are released into the stores every 
week, along with hundreds of hours of programming on 
the network and cable channels. It has reached a point 
where even the most devoted videophile can use a little 
help sorting through it all. 
Now that help is available. 

Inside VCR you will find clear, easy-to-read reviews 
of all the best new releases. You II find out about little- 
known videos — what they're about and where to get 
them. And in the feature articles, you'll find some very 
entertaining reading about the entertainment business. 

Now that you've discovered VCR, you won't want to 
risk missing a single issue. You can save yourself the 
trouble of walking to the newsstand each month, and 
save yourself some money at the same time. 

Just fill out the attached card and drop it in the mail. 
Or even easier, call (502) 228-4492 and ask for Sandy. 
She'll see to it that VCR is delivered right to your door 
each and every month of the year. 



ii piiiniiimTFiP'"" ■ > ■ ■ «■■■■ 



lj Yes, enter my subscription for 
I the next 12 issues of VCR. 

jj At only $15, that's 36 percent off the regular newsstand price. 

Name — 

Address 

City 



■ 

i 



□ My check in the amount of 



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-ZIP 

is enclosed. 




(In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 
|| Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. Number Exp. Date 

Signature 

♦Subscriptions to VCR are $15 a year in the United States. Canadian rate is U.S. $22, Air mail rate elsewhere is 
U.S. $60. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents 
II add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

lj To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
j For other inquiries call 502-228-4492. 



[ Mail to: VCR, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 



i 



I 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



THE FOLLOWING PRO DUCTS have 
recently been received by the rainbow, examined by 
our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow 
Seal of Certification, your assurance that we have 
seen the product and have ascertained that it is what 
it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been 
issued to: 



The Color Filing System, a 32K filing 
system that requires a single disk drive 
and speech sound pack. Color Alloy 
Talking Software, 1124 Denney Drive, 
Duluth, MN 55805, disk $7 plus S3 
S/H 



OS-9 Pascal, a PASCAL language system 
designed to operate under the OS-9 
operating system. The package includes 
the PASCAL reference manual and two 
disks. It is an implementation of the 
language according to the ISO standard 
7185.1 Level 0. Exceptions and exten- 
sions are given in the manual. The 
package allows one to create and com- 
pile PASCAL programs into P-code. 
Translation of the P-code into native 
code is also allowed. Tandy Corp., 
available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide, disk $99.95 

Probaloto Version 2.0, an improved 
version of a 16-32K ECB lottery pro- 
gram which is menu driven and incor- 
porates mathematical formulas for 
weighing numbers either positively or 
negatively. New features include 'R' to 
reset, making it easier to reset the 
printer or size of the lottery; return to 
main menu after printing or setting up 
data file; exiting program without going 
to main menu; and selection of less than 
four numbers. Gary Olander, 322 Hay- 
market Place, Gahanna, OH 43230, 
cassette/ disk $19.95 

C-Compiler, a package allowing C- 
language software development under 
the OS-9 operating system. This imple- 
mentation is tightly based on the Ker- 
nighan and Ritchie standard. The ref- 
erence manual discusses the specifics of 
this compiler, memory management 
using C ana interfacing C programs with 
routines written in basic-09. Also in- 
cluded are two diskettes containing the 
compiler and the C library. Tandy 
Corp., available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide, disk $99.95 



Bowling League Secretary, a 32K pro- 
gram that requires one disk drive and 
printer. This set of programs keeps team 
and individual statistics. Enter scores 
and statistics, and results are automat- 
ically printed out. Built-in backup files 
and data printouts maintained to re- 
cover from crashes. TOMELA*Co., 
P.O. Box 2162, Doylestown, PA 18901, 
disk $49.95 



PBBS 4.2, an OS-9 Bulletin Board 
System. Features include multiple mes- 
sage bases and download sections, four 
levels of access, private mail, XMO- 
DEM, 300/1200/2400 Baud, expanda- 
ble operation. Message base size and 
access levels are definable. Works with 
any version of OS-9. Requires RS-232 
program pack, multipack, OS-9 and 
BASIC-09, and auto-answer modem and 
480KB of disk space. S.D. Roberson, 
1702 West Mountain View Drive, 
Mesa, AZ 85201, disk $50 



Telepatch II and Wizard, enhancements 
to Telewriter-64. Telepatch II is de- 
signed to allow the disk I/O portion of 
Telewriter to be RAM resident. Also 
has keyboard buffering. Wizard is a 
replacement character set for 
Telewriter-64. Spectrum Projects Inc., 
P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $29.95 plus $3 
S/H 



Software Bonanza Package, create your 
own software package by choosing 12 
of the following programs: CoCo 
Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo 
Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spec- 
trum Font Generator, Tape I Disk Util- 
ity, Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, 
Spectrum Dos 1.0, CoCo Calendar, 
Schematic Drafting Processor, OS-9 
Solution, Graphicom, EZ Base, Black 
Jack Royale 2.0. Spectrum Projects 
Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $99.95 plus $3 
S/H 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all 
manufacturers of products for the Tandy Color 
Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW, 

By awarding a Sea/, the magazine certifies the 
product does exist — that we have examined it and 
have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, 
these hardware or software items will be forwarded 
to the rainbow's reviewers for evaluation. 

— Judl Hutchinson 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 147 



Software Review^^SSSS^SSSS^SSSST/^\ 

OTERM is a Pleasing 
Telecommunications 
Environment 

And to think I believed I would be without an OS-9 
terminal package. As SIGop of the rainbow Color SIG, 
I often require some method of downloading OS-9 pro- 
grams. In the past, I have downloaded files using a terminal 
program running under Disk BASIC. Then I loaded OS-9 
and Xcopied the files to OS-9. If I had only known then 

what I know now. 

OTERM is a terminal program running under the OS- 

9 operating system. More precisely, it is a very pleasing 

telecommunications environment. It is as though you are 

sitting in the captain's chair with universal control at your 

fingertips. The only annoyance with program operation I 

was able to find is that OTERM uses OS-9's CLEAR key as 

the control key. Most other programs I have used operate 

with the down-arrow key as the control key. Once I was used 

to the difference, the world was before me. 

On entering OTERM, you are presented with an options 
screen. This lets you alter the various communications 
parameters to suit the system you want to contact. These 
options include, along with the expected parameters, the 
ability to clean the incoming data (control word-wrap) and 
to strip linefeeds from incoming data before sending it to 
a file or the printer. 

Once you have chosen the parameters, you may save them 
to a file for future use. You may also load a previously saved 
options file. The next time you go into OTERM, you may 
select an options file from the same command line used to 
call OTERM. This can come in very handy when you have 
several sets of parameters you use regularly. 

Just as OTERM allows creating options files, it allows 
creating function key definitions files. There are 256 bytes 
of string space which may be divided among function keys 
one through nine in any manner wanted. You can set up 
one key to cause the auto-dial modem to dial and set up 
another to issue your username for logging in. For the sake 
of security, don't assign one key to send your password. 
Who knows what your friends might do with that informa- 
tion. 

From the function keys menu, which is accessible from 
the command mode, you may add, kill, or display the setting 
for a given key. You can also save and load function key 
files to or from the disk. This allows changing the function 
key settings while online, giving an unlimited number of 
function keys. These files, just as the options files, may be 
loaded from the same command line by which you enter 
OTERM. 

Perhaps one of the most beneficial areas of OTERM is 
the command mode. Just press CONTROL- ALT (clear-'®') 
and you are ready to issue a single-key command abbre- 
viation. If you do not remember all of the command 
abbreviations, just press 'M' and a command summary 
appears on the screen. The only fault I find with this routine 
is that you must remember the abbreviation you were 
looking for, go back to communications and use CONTROL- 
ALT to get back into the command mode to issue the 
command. This only occurs if 'M' is used to view the 
summary. 



The command mode allows you to issue shell commands 
to OS-9, go to the function key menu and generally control 
other aspects of your communications. You may even tell 
OTERM to send a copy of the screen to the line printer. 
Keep in mind, though, that its power is possible only 
because of the operating system under which it is running. 
The same features would be difficult, if not impossible, to 
include in a terminal program under Radio Shack Disk 

BASIC. 

File transfers are easily accomplished while using 
OTERM. The program supports both the buffer-capture 
method and downloading using the Xmodem protocol. 
Also, the capture buffer allows you to use the DC2/DC4 
transfer procedure for automatic buffer control. Manual 
buffer control, however, may be used. 

You can, of course, print, save, load and transfer the 
contents of the capture buffer. An interesting option, 
however, lets you get the screen. If you issue the G command 
for the buffer, whatever appears on the screen is appended 
to the contents of the buffer. This can be very useful for 
taking down bits and pieces of information from different 
places on a communications network. It can also be a time 
saver if you happen to forget to open the buffer before 
reading something online. Just issue the command and the 
information will be in the buffer. 

Xmodem uploading and downloading is quite simple to 
use. Just instruct the remote computer to prepare itself, go 
to the command mode and issue the Up or Down com- 
mand. You are prompted for whether the file is in binary 
or ASCII format. Then you are asked for a filename 
(pathname) under which OTERM is to store the file. Then 
transfer begins. As the buffer is filled, OTERM saves the 
old contents out to disk, thus allowing very large files to 
be transferred. You even have an abort option for Xmodem 
transfers, which is a feature most other terminal programs 
don't have. 

If you get tired of the old 32-column screen, OTERM may 
be configured to work with the Hi-Res program of O-Pak 
from Frank Hogg. This modification is well documented, 
very simple to perform and gives quite acceptable results. 
Also, for those who own Wordpack //from PBJ, if you have 
installed the OS-9 drivers, OTERM will use the 80-column 
screen. 

My only gripe with the OTERM package is the documen- 
tation. The expert may have few problems, but the novice 
may become frustrated trying to wade through the manual. 
In general, the manual is well-written. However, it does not 
give the user any way to tie all the information it contains 
together. A complete command summary would be very 
helpful in mentally compiling the information. As an 
experienced user of telecommunications, I found it quite 
frustrating that I was afraid to boot up the package without 
reading through the manual four times. It is true, however, 
that the program tends to pull the information together once 
it is running. 

All in all, OTERM is an excellent package. Though it 
requires a Multi-Pak Interface and an RS-232 card, it 
includes more than enough features at a reasonable price. 
In my little black book, OTERM has four stars by its name. 

(New World Technologies, Box 1209, Dublin, OH 43017, 
$39.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Cray Augsburg 



148 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Software Review ^SSSEESSSESSSSSST/Z\ 

Software Bonanza Package: 

What You Need 
is What You Get 

A package deal of popular programs has been announced 
by Spectrum Projects that allows you to create your own 
Software Bonanza Package. You choose 12 programs from 
the following: Co Co Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo 
Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spectrum Font Generator, 
Tape/ Disk Utility, Fast Dupe II, 64 K Disk Utility, Co Co 
Calendar, Schematic Drafting Processor, OS-9 Solution, 
Graphicom, EZ Base, Black Jack Roy ale 2.0 and Spectrum 
Dos 1.0. This last program, Spectrum Dos 1.0, fixes a 
number of bugs inside the CoCo's ROMs, adds 24 new 
commands and gives the user a high-density screen of 32, 
51 or 64 characters per line. 

New commands are: 

DOS — works just like the one in 1.1 Disk BASIC. 
ERROR — Similar to an DN ERROR GOTO trapping 
routine. 

FLEX — Boot up FLEX without the need of running 
a special boot loader. 

RUNM — Single statement LOAD and EXEC of machine 
language programs. 

PPEEK — Prints the 16-bit value of a specified memory 
location. 

PPOKE — Stores a 16-bit value in a specified memory 
location. 

AUTO — Automatically generate line numbers when 
entering a BASIC program. 

INVERT — Reverse screen color. 

NORMAL — Return to normal screen. 

WAIT — A memory saving timer routine. 

LMOVE — Copy and delete BASIC program lines. 

RATE — Sets the drive seek rate for any or all drives. 

TRACKS — Sets the number of tracks for any or all 
drives. 

HELP — Lists all these commands onto a Hi- Res screen. 

OLD — Restore a program that has been erased by NEW. 

FKEY — Define up to nine programmable keys. 

LCOPY — Duplicate a BASIC line of code. ^ 

BREAK — Disable the BASIC key. 

MEMO — A full text screen editor and screen dump to 
the printer. 

FLIP — Invert the text screen. 

EXIT — Return from Hi-Res to normal text screen. 

ECHO — All output sent to the screen also goes to the 
printer. 



Visit the 
CoCo Community Center 
THE RAINBOW'S CoCo SIG 

on 
DELPHI 



New Features are: 

35/40 track drives can be used. 

Auto-disk search for all drives. 

One button text screen dump. 

One button loading of a BASIC program. 

Lowercase Readable (commands can be in lower case). 

Auto-key repeat. 

New cursor (any printable character). 
New prompt (anything you want). 
Reset protected. 

Fixed commands are: 

DIR — Prints side-by-side directory on the screen as well 
as free granules. 

DSKINI — Prints messages to let you know what it's 
doing. 

All of the programs are individually packaged and 
contain ample documentation. Spectrum Products adver- 
tises this package for $99.95. That represents quite a bargain 
since the total package of 12 programs purchased individ- 
ually would cost over $300. This is a good chance to increase 
your CoCo software library by choosing programs that fit 
your needs. Consult past issues of THE rainbow for further 
details and reviews of most of these programs. 

(Spectrum Projects, P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Dr., 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $99.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



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July 1986 THE RAINBOW 149 



Software ReviewJSSSSS^SSSSSSSSS'r^s 

Zork I is Out 
of This World 

Ready for a trip to a place where the only limitations are 
those created by your mind? A dark, magical place where 
wonderful and sometimes horrible things happen? A place 
inhabited by elves, gnomes and other mysterious creatures? 
Then come to the Great Underground Empire of Zork. 

Transportation to this place is via your imagination, the 
Color Computer and Zork I. What is Zork /? Infocom, the 
creator of Zork, refers to it as an interactive fantasy. 

For those not familiar with interactive fantasies, they are 
stories in which you play the main character. Your own 
thinking and imagination determine the principal charac- 
ter's actions and guide the story. You are presented with a 
series of locations, items, characters and events. You interact 
with the story in a variety of ways: moving from place to 
place, becoming familiar with your surroundings, exploring 
locations and reading descriptions. 

An important element of interactive fiction is puzzle 
solving. Encountering a locked door or a ferocious beast 
is a challenge to be conquered using certain items found by 
careful exploring as you travel. 

The fun of Zork I is in surmounting these obstacles, 
finding fabulous treasures, avoiding being eaten by exotic 
creatures and solving diabolical puzzles in the Underground 
Empire. 

Instructions are entered from the keyboard. The program 
tells where you are, reveals anything obvious you should 
know about the situation (the subtleties are for you to 
discover) and waits for a response. 

A typical situation screen might read: "You are on a small, 
rocky beach on the continuation of the frigid river past the 
falls. The beach is narrow due to the presence of the white 
cliffs. The river crosses over the falls to the east and a narrow 
path continues to the southwest." 

What you do next controls how the game interacts with 
you. You could choose to dig for treasure on the beach, 
continue on the path or sit down and have a beer. Sometimes 
what you want to do is not in the program, and you are 
given a message like "I don't know the word beer" or "that 
sentence isn't one I recognize." 

However, it is amazing what the program will respond 
to. Once, when I was frustrated with a particular situation, 
I jokingly typed in SCREfiM. Zork came back with a very 
satisfying "Aarrggghhhh!" 

Conversations with Zork / are often bizarre. If you decide 
to put on the green calico hat, the response could be, "the 
munchkins giggle, but remain unconvinced that you're a 
witch." Zork l is also very flexible in the ways a command 
can be worded. Light Lamp, Turn on the Lamp, Turn the 
Lamp on, Activate the Lamp and Light the Brass Lantern 
all result in turning the lamp on. 

There is more than one solution to this game. Measure 
your progress at any time by asking for the score. It 
increases as you solve puzzles, perform certain acts, visit 
certain locations and gather the various treasures hidden in 
the crevices of the Great Underground Kingdom. You also 
get points for putting treasures in the trophy case. You lose 
points if a thief steals the treasures or you are killed. 



At any time, you have the option of saving your current 
position. This is highly recommended as there are times 
when rash moves result in sudden death. However, 
reincarnation is as simple as reloading the game to a 
position before your foolhardy move. 

Saving is also necessary because Zork I is a long, 
complicated game. To master Zork I takes a lot of time, 
experimentation with different strategies and some plain 
dumb luck. Infocom will provide (sell, that is) an official 
hint book and map of the lands of Zork for those hopelessly 
caught in a quagmire. 

The hint book is ajewel. The clues are revealed by rubbing 
the answers with a magic pen. Hints are often given in 
stages, in hopes the Adventurer will use his head rather than 
the book to solve the riddles. 

Zork I is packed in a box that has enough teasers and 
goodies on it to thrill the hearts of Adventurers of any age. 
It is a book-type package containing the program disk, a 
storybook with the history of the Underground Empire, an 
operations guide and a nifty map written in an encrypted 
language. 

Originally written for other computers, Zork I does not 
take advantage of all the CoCo's capabilities: no graphics, 
no sound, no speech. You have to use your imagination to 
visualize the game. 

Zork I is a well thought-out, thoroughly debugged joy 
of a program. It requires a 64K Color Computer with at 
least one disk drive. If you are yearning for an Adventure 
trip to somewhere a little different, Zork I is for you. 

(Infocom, distributed by Tandy Corp., available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide, $34.95, Hint Book $7.95) 

— Bruce Rothermel 



Two-Liner Contest Winner , r . 

This two-liner draws a line between two points 
which move around the perimeter of a circle at 
different speeds, or increments. After running it, 
you are prompted for three values: the increment 
for the first point, the increment for the second 
point, and the number of times the first point goes 
around the circle. Try it with several different 
values. It accepts non-integer values as well. 

The listing: 

J3 PI«3 . 141593 : DEFFNX (A) « (SIN (A) + 
1) *128 : DEFFNY (A) = (COS (A) +1) *96 : A 
*j3 : B«J3 : INPUT "INCREMENT FACTORS/T 
IMES AROUND (A, B,T) 11 ;AA, BB,T;PM 
0DE4 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 : FORX=j3TOPI*2 
STEPPI/AA/T : A=A+PI/AA : B=B+PI/BB : 
LINE (FNX (A) , FNY (A) )-(FNX(B) , FNY ( 
B) ) , PSET : NEXT : PLAY" LI 6G" 
1 IFINKEY$=»"THENlELSEj3 

Philip Edmonds 
Kanata, Ontario 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



150 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Software Review JI^SSS^SSESESEESSS/ZZ\ 

TXD Is an Unusual 
Disk Zapper 

Fred Kolesar wrote this disk-zapper program, TXD, 
using Disk ECB 1.1. The program is written mostly in 
BASIC, but it contains a few machine language routines 
embedded into the BASIC code. The machine code appears 
in tokenized form as comments at the end of some of the 
BASIC statements. This appears to be a variation of the 
familiar string-packing process in which tokenized 
machine-code routines are inserted into string variables. 

TXD doesn't run under Disk ECB 1 .0, but it does run 
properly in JDOS, and, with the high-speed POKE deleted, 
under the RAM version of ADOS. 

However, once up and running, it works on disks that 
have been formatted by Disk basic 1 .0. It can work on disks 
formatted by JDOS, but not everything works properly. 
And in any case, it can't read or write to any track beyond 
Track 34. 

TXD is not copy-protected. The purchaser's name is built 
into one of the BASIC lines that contains the tokenized 
machine code and cannot be modified. There are two things 
that can be changed, if necessary, before saving TXD to the 
working backup disk. You can delete the high-speed poke 
and set the Baud rate for the printer. 

I found the 10-page instruction manual to be a bit difficult 
to read due to numerous sentence fragments. But once I 
loaded the program and started using it, I found its 
operation to be straightforward, and I was able to learn its 
various functions without much difficulty. 

One of the easiest things to do is alphabetize the directory. 
It is also easy to change the name of any file. TXD can copy 
data contained in any sector to any other sector on the same 
disk, or, if you swap disks, to another disk. {TXD assumes 
you have only one drive. Even if you set another drive as 
the default, all disk input and output will be done on Drive 
0 only.) 

The data contained in any sector is displayed on the 
screen, or can be printed in ASCII form. When editing the 



CORRECTIONS 



"What's the Diagnosis?" (February 1986, Page 67): Craig 
Bobbitt has written to tell us of a small error in his 
MEMDIAG program. When the LONG option is chosen, 
the variable TEMP, which tells the program when it needs 
to jump around the program area, is not initialized. The 
short-term fix for this is to always use the SHORT option 
first. Then TEMP will be initialized. 

To correct the situation altogether, Craig suggests placing 
copies of lines 97 and 98 immediately following Line 159 
in the source code. 

For quicker service, Corrections will be posted on Delphi 
as soon as they are available in the Info on Rainbow topic 
area of the database. Just type DflTfi at the CoCo SIG 
prompt and INFO at the Topic? prompt. 



sector, the decimal value of any byte is also available. (Since 
any byte that contains an ASCII value of 32 or less appears 
as a space, it is important to read the decimal value 
carefully.) This differs from other zapper programs which 
show Hex values instead of decimal. 

Another interesting feature is file tracing. With the 
directory on the screen, you can select any file for tracing. 
The trace shows the track and sector in which the file starts, 
the track and sector in which it ends, and the number of 
bytes used in the last sector. You may then exit the trace 
mode, or continue, in which case TXD goes through the 
file, sector by sector, with hard copy available if desired. 
(This is where there may be a problem with disks in the 
JDOS format. Unlike Disk basic, JDOS doesn't always 
store files in consecutive tracks. TXD will try to trace these, 
but sometimes picks up garbage sectors along the way.) 

This trace feature makes possible what the manual calls 
the ultimate listing. If you save your basic program to a 
disk in ASCII form, a listing can be printed that shows the 
track and sector where each part of the program is stored. 

TXD claims to be able to read Model IV and Tandy 1000 
disks. I was unable to test that claim, but I did try a disk 
from an IBM PC, and was able to copy a couple of sectors 
to a CoCo-formatted disk. TXD cannot read the directory 
track of a Model IV disk, so complete instructions are 
supplied for making your own directory and allocation table 
entries for the files you want to copy for use on a CoCo. 

TXD is not without its faults. I don't think it would take 
much effort to redo the manual and clean up the sentence 
structure and misspellings. Mr. Kolesar has chosen to place 
a PCLEAR1 near the beginning of the program. So you may 
have to run the program a second time to get it started. 
(Alternatively, you could bring the program in by typing 
PCLERR1:RUN"TXD.) 

The manual states that anytime you specify a hard copy 
printout and the printer isn't ready, a printer not on message 
will appear on the screen, and the program will wait for you 
to either turn the printer on or change your mind. That's 
true some of the time. But if you're in the trace routine and 
the printer isn't ready, the program hangs up, and youll 
have to Reset and run again. 

One bug is the failure to trap erroneous use of the CLEAR 
key. In the edit mode, if you want to enter any value not 
available from the keyboard, such as ASCII 0 or 255, first 
depress the CLEAR key to get into the ASCII mode, then 
enter the value in decimal form. You remain in this ASCII 
mode until you press the ENTER key alone. But I erroneously 
pressed the clear key again and it fulfilled its usual CoCo 
function of erasing the entire screen. Recovery isn't too 
tough, but you have to start editing the sector all over again. 

TXD uses the basic DSK I $ and DSKD$ commands to read 
data from and write data to the disks, so any error will crash 
the program. For example, I had a disk with a bad sector, 
and when I tried to read that sector, the program ended with 
an 1/ O Error. When I tried to write to a write-protected disk, 
I got similar results. More sophisticated zapper programs 
are capable of reporting such errors and continuing, but 
then, more sophisticated programs aren't available for only 
$14.95. 

(Kolesar B/S, 7 Ladd Road, Westfield, PA 16950, $14.95 
plus $2 S/H) 

— Neil Parks 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 151 





Software Reviewt 



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Vortex Factor is an 
Excellent Change of Pace 



At 2:30 a.m. I realized it was time for a change of pace. 
My search for the Lost Secret of Charopangoland was 
proving useless. Unfortunately, I had been in this situation 
a million times before. Some unrecognizable monster, 
described only as "a snake" was attacking me. There I sat, 
stuck again. The dull green glow of the monitor illuminated 
the costs of an Adventurer's life: bloodshot eyes, a flat Pepsi, 
cramped fingers and a tired, confused look of disbelief. I'm 
stuck. I give in. I can't take anymore. Arrrgh! 

Has this ever happened to you? This phenomenon known 
as jelly brains occurs after too many late-night Adventure 
sessions. Most know the best cure is to go to bed and try 
again tomorrow. Many times, however, that's not enough 
— a change of pace is needed. 

An ideal change for Adventure addicts is Mark Data's 
newest release, Vortex Factor. 

Vortex Factor, like other Mark Data Adventures, 
provides an excellent graphics backdrop for the storyline. 
Prospective Adventurers find themselves in a 21st century 
museum, complete with a non-working time machine and 
an assortment of apparently mundane objects. The purpose 
is to fix the time machine, gather treasures from past and 
future time, and bring them back to the present. Sounds 
simple, eh? 

Actually, Vortex Factor presents a number of very 
difficult obstacles. Close inspection of every object is 
required and nothing should be left behind. Great care 
obviously went into the construction of the Adventure, 
making sure that puzzles aren't easily solved. 

Although very enjoyable, the playability of Vortex Factor 
is somewhat paradoxical. The graphics are exquisite, but 
are certainly secondary to the text input of the game. It is 
frustrating when an object is clearly recognizable on the 
screen, yet is not supported by the text interface. The 
graphics are beautifully implemented, but are not necessary 
or even very helpful to the Adventurer. 

The instructions provided with the game assist in loading 
the program and getting the Adventurer started, but are not 
meant to teach the entire vocabulary. A game save option 
is provided, but oddly enough, only saves to cassette on both 
the disk and cassette versions of the game. 

I recommend Vortex Factor to anyone who prefers 
graphics Adventures to their text counterparts. Vortex 
Factor offers excellent graphics and storyline, but lacks 
some of the features of a straight-text Adventure. This is 
a necessary trade-off for a program that only requires 32K 
of memory. 

Mark Data has done an excellent job implementing 
Vortex Factor on the CoCo, and it is a perfect change of 
pace. 

(Mark Data Products, 24001 Alicia Parkway, #207, Mission 
Viejo, CA 92691, requires 32K, cassette $24.95, disk $27.95) 

— Eric Oberle 



152 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Software Review m 



Easy to Use DSKUtil: 
A Four-in-One Package 

H.D.R. Software has released a series of disk utility 
programs that are useful for a 64K Color Computer system 
with at least one disk drive. Of the four utilities contained 
in DSKUtil, one requires an additional program that will 
be discussed later. The disk is unprotected. 

The four programs that make up this utility are: 

Backup — Unlike the CoCo BACKUP command, this 
utility uses the full 64K of RAM and only copies those disk 
sectors that are actually being used. This results in fewer 
disk swaps on a single disk system. This utility only works 
on standard BASIC disk files. 

A feature I like is the option to select the head stepping 
rate on the drive. The program also lets you know if you 
try to backup either an unformatted disk or one with data 
already stored on it. 

Diskfind — This handy utility keeps track of up to 3,000 
disk files. It stores the information in a data file called 
DSKINDEX/DAT. This menu-driven utility is easy to use 
and features the ability to send the records to a standard 
80-column printer in alphabetical order. You can also find 
a file using its file extension, or even parts of the filename. 

Disk Check — This utility gives important information 
about a crashed disk using two options. 

Option 1 checks an entire disk for bad sectors. If it locates 
bad sectors, the program enables you to construct "poin- 
ters" around them. 

Option 2 analyzes the disk's directory. It displays a list 
of all files currently on the disk as well as killed files. It then 
displays a list of the granules used by each file in the order 
used and any errors present. It also displays the granule 
allocation table. 

All the needed tools are provided to allow real disk file 
recovery and error correction using the Diskzap utility on 
the disk. 

Diskzap — This program requires another program from 
H.D.R. called The Enhancer. 

Diskzap provides two options. The first is a file informa- 
tion option. It displays the requested file in either ASCII 
or binary format. The second option allows changing the 
disk file information. A View mode is used to allow you 
to see what's going on by track, sector and granule. You can 
even send the information to the printer. There is also a help 
screen available. 

DSKUtil shows a lot of thought on the part of the author 
and the result is software that is useful and fun to use. The 
documentation is ample and gives the user sufficient 
information to fully utilize the software. The optional 
Enhancer program normally sells for $18 but is $12 if 
ordered with DSKUtil. 

(H.D.R. Software, 27 Doyle Street, St. John's, Nfld., 
Canada A1E 2N9, $39.95) 

— Jerry Semones 




Back copies of many issues of the 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents 
for each additional issue for postage and 
handling if sent by United Parcel Service. 
There is a $5 charge for the first issue, 
plus a $1 charge for each additional issue 
on orders sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not 
deliver to a post office box or to another 
country. 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 
are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All others are in regular magazine 
form. VISA, MasterCard and American 
Express accepted. Kentucky residents 
please add 5 percent state sales tax. In 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
and no C.O.D. orders are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To order, just fill out the form on the 
next page and mail it with your payment 
to: 



THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




July 1986 THE RAINBOW 153 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 

(Payment must accompany back issue orders. We do not bill.) 

□ Please send me the following back issues: 





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Software Reviewi 



Easy Gradebook and Easy 
Testwriter have Potential 

By Dennis Church 

Easy Gradebook attempts to ease the complexity of 
recording and averaging grades for the classroom teacher. 
It is supplied on either tape or disk and facilitates saving 
and loading to either format. 

In general, Easy Gradebook allows the entry of students' 
names and grades to compile a class list, the saving of that 
file to disk or tape, and reporting to either screen or printer. 
The class list file may be loaded, viewed and ordered 
alphabetically or by class average. 

Actually there are two grade averaging programs. One 
accepts grade input in the form of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 for F, 
D, C, B and A. A second program accepts percentage 
grades. 

Each of these assumes certain levels for letter grade 
equivalents to numerical averages. To change them, the 
author suggests either editing the program (he gives the line 
numbers to edit) or returning the program with a letter of 
explanation. He offers to do the editing at no charge. 

Easy Gradebook is obviously a more developed program 
than %Grade. Easy Gradebook offers Baud rate selection 
(9600 or 600), repeated onscreen memory updates and the 
ability to select only failing averages (called smokups) for 
reporting. 

Both Easy Gradebook and %Grade present menus of 10 
items to the user: 

1) Student Averages presents the names and averages to 
either the screen or printer. 

2) Add A Student is the routine for creating the student 
list, and can also add more students to the current list. 

3) Edit A Student Record allows changing the student 
name, changing any previous grade or adding grades. 

4) Order sorts the class lists either alphabetically or by 
average. 

5) Print allows printing the class list, grades and averages 
to the screen or printer. Single students may be selected for 
this feature as well. 

6) Delete A Student does just that. 

7) Print Subject Average reports the combined average 
grade of a particular class. 

8) Redo A Student's Grades is designed to give the entire 
class a new set of grades, which is useful for averaging grades 
of the same class for a different subject or starting a new 
grade period with the same students. 

9) Load File/ Restart/ Main Menu. It loads class lists, 
restarts the program (necessary if memory already contains 
a class list) and gives access to a main menu from which 
disk users can start one of three programs: Easy Gradebook, 
%Grade or Easy Testwriter. 

10) Save File saves class lists and averages to either tape 
or disk. 

The overall performance of the grade averaging programs 
is acceptable, especially for only $15. But they show a lack 
of polish and flexibility that teachers really need in software. 
Beyond the main menus, answering queries is sometimes 
accomplished by spelling the entire word, other times only 
the initial is necessary. 



154 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Some answers are indiscernable without listing the 
program. For example, choices for Baud rate are "1 or 87," 
but the program expects a'l'or T as the answer. 

Editing a student's grade requires selecting the grade by 
number, but the screen formatting does not make that clear. 
Also, when editing a grade, the screen presents the grades 
only, without the student's name to confirm you are altering 
grades for the right student. 

The three menu items that can lead to printer output use 
different prompts, which makes learning the program 
unnecessarily complicated. Startup of Easy Gradebook 
reports memory size, but it flashes by too quickly to read. 
When entering grades, however, it is reported after each 
entry, which is unnecessary since it does not change after 
each grade entry. 

Loading a file to Easy Gradebook requires answering six 
or seven different queries. While the option to see the 
directory is useful, it is not made available on all disk access 
options. 

For some reason, printing the students' grades produces 
in duplicate, two across, both to screen and printer. A better 
format is produced by a different print option. 

Printouts that are longer than a page will not skip the 
11-inch perforation. There will be long printouts, too, 
because from three to five lines are devoted to each student, 
depending on whether you choose to see just the averages 
or the grades, too. 

On the positive side, all print options give the choice of 
screen or printer. Response to prompts is speedy and 
improper answers to prompts do not hang up the program. 
Viewing students' averages on the screen makes use of the 
arrow keys to progress forward or backward through the 
list. Grades entered as numbers are converted to letters 
automatically. 

The ability to use percentage grades actually requires a 
second, modified version of the Easy Gradebook program. 
Both programs are included for the same price. Some of 
the quirks of Easy Gradebook are not present in %Grade, 
but it operates basically the same way. Disk users can select 



One-Liner Contest Winner ... 

This one-liner reverses whatever number you put 
in. Enter a four digit number at the prompt. The 
interesting thing is that it allows you to enter all 
four digits at the same time. 

The listing: 

1J3 CLS: INPUT "INPUT A FOUR DIGIT 
NUMBER" ;X:T»INT(X/1000) : H=INT ( (X 
-T* 10.00 ) / 10 0 ) : E=INT ( ( X-T*1000-H* 
100) :U=X-T*1000-H*100-E*10 :R 
=U*1W+E*l^j34-H*lj3+T : PRINT" THE R 
EVERSAL IS" ;R: INPUT "DO YOU WANT 
TO TRY AGAIN" ;Y$: IF Y$«"YES" OR 
Y$="Y" THEN RUN ELSE END 

Tony Kimmel 
El Monte, CA 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of jboth The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



either program on startup so it would be easy to use both 
kinds of grade systems, which you may want to do for 
different subjects. 

Documentation is five sheets of typing paper in a plastic 
binder. It is a sparse explanation of all the menu items, some 
advisories about using the program and the details of 
changing the program to accommodate a different grading 
scale. There is, however, an additional source of documen- 
tation: a VHS format video cassette available for $10. The 
tape shows the screen while the software's author explains 
and demonstrates each option. The demonstration lasts 
fifteen minutes and is clear and informative. In addition, 
the tape also demonstrates the use of a second program 
available from this author, Easy Testwriter, 

I can recommend Easy Gradebook if the buyer is willing 
to accept the program's flaws in exchange for its reasonable 
price. The potential buyer should realize it is not easy to 
add grades to an existing class list. It is not feasible to enter 
class grades until you want the final average. 

I want to encourage the program author to add polish 
and flexibility. Then his program would appeal to a wider 
variety of teacher needs. 

I cannot recommend, however, a second program, Easy 
Testwriter, which is designed to produce printed multiple- 
choice tests. It is available, along with Easy Gradebook, for 
$25 or $15 separately. Disk users with both programs may 
select either from an opening menu. 

Easy Testwriter designs a multiple choice test which may 
be output to the printer and saved to disk. It also prints 
an answer key for the teacher. An interesting and potentially 
useful feature is the ability to combine previously saved test 
questions into a final exam. 

Menu selection is straightforward and clear. Entering test 
questions, and correct and incorrect answers is clear. 
Viewing the questions after creation or loading is easy and 
quick. Editing the question is a valuable option, but the 
prompts are not at all clear when editing. 

Easy Testwriter is flawed in the following ways. No 
provision is made for tests longer than one page. Skipping 
for page perforation must be taken care of outside the 
program. The Baud rate option, which the gradebook 
program has, is not present here. 

The documentation says that true/ false questions may be 
created, and I attempted three different two-answer tests. 
The program logic takes care of randomly placing the 
answers, but my tests always came out with the correct 
answer first, except for one question. This is not good 
pedagogy. Kids become more interested in the answer 
pattern than the question material after a few answers. 

In creating a multiple choice test, the program performed 
well until I exercised the edit option. Then I got answers 
that appeared in the wrong question. 

When attempting to merge tests to compose a final, some 
question lines were blank while other questions appeared 
as answers. Viewing before printing was no help since this 
did not show up on the screen version of the questions and 
answers. 

As is the case with Easy Gradebook, this program has 
great potential if its flaws can be fixed. 

(Teachers Are Us Software, 518 West 5th St., Peru, IN 
46970, Easy Gradebook cassette or disk $15, Easy Testwriter 
disk $15, both $25, VCR documentation for both $10) 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 155 



Software ReviewSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^SSSSSST/^s 



U.S. Stamp Inventory 
Management System 
Orders Collection Chaos 

Many of us have collected stamps from time to time, but 
the wiser of us have maintained our collections and seen 
significant growth in value. In fact, as many financial 
advisors and publications tell us, stamp collections have 
improved in value in recent years, more than stocks, bonds, 
real estate and most other usual investments. As even those 
of us who just dabbled remember, there are thousands of 
different stamps of U.S. issue alone. How do we keep track 
of our inventory in today's electronic world? With the 
CoCo, of course! 

Crockett Software, of St. Ann, Missouri, has developed 
a program for stamp management designed specifically for 
the CoCo. This program, called U.S. Stamp Inventory 
Management System, consists of three interactive pro- 
grams, written in BASIC, which allow the collector to create 
a file of his stamps, inventory it periodically, update it and 
obtain printouts of his inventory and current retail value. 

The program manual is well-written and easy to follow. 
It states that the program is written for a 64K CoCo 2 with 
disk drive. My review copy arrived on cassette tape with 
specific instructions for loading to two diskettes. Using a 



At Last — INTERCOMP SOUND presents: 

PROFESSIONAL MIDI PRODUCTS FOR 
THE COLOR COMPUTER!! 

At InterComp our objective is to support Midi hardware/software for the 
Color Computer to the fullest. Within the next year or so you can expect 
a variety of products such as librarian/patch programs (Korg, Yamaha, 
Casio, etc. . .), graphics editor and system exclusive software. Don't go out 
and buy another computer for your MIDI system!!!!! Our products are 
designed with the professional in mind, be it for studio, performance, home 
recording or music education. Here is the start of more to come! 

COLOR MIDI CONNECTION — This interface plugs into the cartridge slot. 
It contains 3 Midi outputs, 1 Midi input, and a female connector for the disk 
controller (no Y-cable is required) $98.00. • 

SYNTRAX 1.00 — With this sequencer you will quickly control your Midi 
system! Major features include: 16 polyphonic tracks, interactive editor, 
30,000 bytes for note storage, independent repeats for any track, all midi 
channel control data (program changes, channel #, velocity, pitch wheel, 
etc.), int/ext sync for Midi drum machines (or another sequencer), 
programmable tempo, transposition, clefs, key signatures, chords, complex 
rhythms, use up to 4 disk drives, sequence chaining and linking, notes/Midi- 
events can be specified with a resolution of 1/384 note! Requires 64K, disk 
drive, COLOR MIDI CONNECTION — $75.00. 

SYNTRAX 2.00 — All the features of SYNTRAX 1.00 plus: real/step time 
record (notes, velocity, program changes, and controllers), input filtering, 
programmable split points, punch in/out anywhere, easy and quick editing 
of Midi data, supports J&R's 512K upgrade for a tremendous amount of 
storage for recording! $1 25.00 (Customers that already have SYNTRAX 1 .00 
can upgrade to ver. 2.00 for $50) 

SYNLIB 1.0 — Expandable Multi-Instrument Voicing Librarian. Buy what 
you need, when you need it. Includes pull down menus, SYNTRAX 2.0 
compatibility and ease of expandability to set up the studio instantly. Synlib 
with one librarian Module — $45. Roland TR707/727 Lib. Module — $20.00. 
Korg EX800 Lib. Module — $20. Yamaha, Casio Lib. Modules Avai. soon! 

Include $3 for shipping (CODs add $2). Residents of N.Y. state add sales 
tax. Mail check or money order to: 



INTERCOMP SOUND 
129 LOYALIST AVE 
ROCHESTER, NY 14624 

Phone:716-247-8056 



tape to disk program, I was able to follow the instructions 
for loading the three programs and four ASCII routines 
with no problems. Two diskettes are required. One for 
general (front of the book) stamps and the other for special 
(back of the book) stamps. 

The programs are user friendly with Help commands and 
escapes throughout. The menus are very clear and allow 
foolproof operation from one program to another. 

The manual states that "some modifications may be 
required depending on individual applications. If the 
customer finds it too difficult to make the required 
modifications, a one-time assist is provided by our 
company, upon return of the purchased system diskette 
along with a list of inventory file requirements and postage." 
This sounds like a fair offer to cover the possibility of 
specific collection differences. This program specifically 
addresses U.S. stamps only, but covers an incredible variety 
of parameters. 

There are forty categories of general files shown, each of 
which can contain many individual issues. In each of those 
files, stamps are categorized under Scott or Minkus 
numbers (widely accepted catalogs). They are then subca- 
tegorized as singles, coils, sheet, strip, block and other 
forms. In addition, stamps are categorized according to 
condition such as, superb, very fine, damaged, mint, no 
gum, regum, etc. 

The collector can create an inventory file using the first 
program, Modify, for thousands of stamps with their 
descriptions, condition, cost and retail value. He can also 
put into the files Want stamps not in his current inventory, 
to direct future purchases. The program is configured with 
96 files possible. The collector can modify the file headings 
to reflect his particular collection. 

The program allows updating stamp retail values through 
its Retup program, and also allows corrections and 
deletions as changes occur in the collection. It provides 
comprehensive printouts of total inventory with all 
categories listed, and a printout of total inventory cost, 
current individual value and total collection value. 

All in all, I found this program to be very well put 
together, and certainly a valuable, if not vital, tool for any 
serious stamp collector. It is easy to use and maintain, and 
is well worth the purchase price of $44.95. 

(Crockett Software, P.O. Box 1221, St. Ann, MO 63074, 
64K disk required, $44.95) 

— Mel Siegel 



CoCo Trend 

Name brand software 
Hi* at least 20% off 

-^£ e • suggested retail. 

15001 dpry Dr. Huntsville, AL 35803 
(205) 880-COCO (2626) 
Call or write for free catalog. 



1 56 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



Book Review 



r /7s\ Software Review 



Infomania — A 
Comprehensive BBS Guide 

If you own a CoCo and a modem, more than likely you 
have logged onto some local and distant bulletin boards and 
sampled what they have to offer. If this is the case, then you 
have just barely scratched the surface of what is available. 

Infomania, The Guide to Essential Electronic Services, 
by Elizabeth M. Ferrarini, gives information on over 250 
services you can access with a computer and modem. 

Most of this 314-page paperback book is divided into 
chapters that cover such categories as online stock brokers, 
up-to-the-minute news and weather reporting, electronic 
mail, job hunting, shopping and travel information. 

Are you doing a research paper and looking for published 
information on a particular topic? Several services are listed 
that search one or more computerized databases for you. 
Infomania presents information on what each service has 
to offer and, in some cases, walks you through a sample 
session. 

Most of these services do not come cheap. According to 
the book, some of the data searches may cost up to $100 
an hour. The book also covers general services such as The 
Source, CompuServe and Delphi. 

Infomania doesn't list the local numbers for the services, 
but usually tells whether you can access them via Uninet 
or Tymnet. A phone number for each service is provided 
for more information. 

The first chapter is an overview of computer commu- 
nications and the terminology used. The book is for anyone 
who has a computer or terminal and a modem. 

(Houghton Mifflin Co., 2 Park Street, Boston, MA 02108, 
$14.95) 

— Chuck Wozniak 



Action and Challenge 
Define Shock Trooper 

Just when you think the game writers have run out of 
scenarios, along comes a program that restores your faith 
in the future of space games. 

Such a game is ShockTrooper, created by Mark Data, 
a long-time pacesetter in innovative programming. The 
challenges are seemingly endless and the difficulty level is 
enough to frustrate even veteran game players. It is 
complete with sound effects and the nice assortment of color 
graphics that we've come to expect in top-of-the-line 
programs. 

In ShockTrooper, you are the squad commander and 
have received word that aliens are planning to conquer 
Earth. Your mission is to infiltrate the alien base and destroy 
it. You also must escape with parts from their new TRG- 
5 space saucer and return them to Earth scientists for 
analysis. 

Four highly-trained shocktroopers are placed under your 
command, ^ach supplied with the latest in attack equipment 
— electro guns, inviso devices and porta-bombs. 

The alien base consists of mazes containing perplexing 
enemy defenses. Among these defenses are lasers, which 
emit powerful energy bolts; rotating lasers, which can be 
stunned but not destroyed; zaproid robots, which enter 
through an opening in the ceiling; and forcefields. 

Your weapons are useless in the filter grids of the tunnel 
sections. The most important areas of the base are protected 
by rows of ceiling-mounted emitters that drop radioactive 
particles. 

One of your most important weapons is the inviso device. 
It makes you invisible and protects you from laser bolts, 
radiation particles and zaproids. However, anytime you use 
the device or another weapon, your radiation level is 
increased and is indicated by a bar meter at the top of the 
screen. You die if the level reaches a certain amount. 

The aliens have captured many of your troopers and 
imprisoned them in special brain-draining chambers 
throughout the base. You must disable each chamber to 
prevent the aliens from obtaining vital secrets. 

The game consists of 14 screens that become increasingly 
fascinating and more difficult to negotiate. This is a quality 
game in every respect. Obviously time and care have gone 
into it. If you're looking for a challenge, I recommend 
Shock Trooper. 

(Mark Data Products, 24001 Alicia Parkway, # 207, Mission 
Viejo, CA 92691, cassette or disk $24.95) 



One-Liner Contest Winner , * . 

This routine draws the face pf a clock and then 
gives you a taste of old England. 

The listing: 

1 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1 , 1 : LINE ( 1 
28 , 48) - ( 128 , 96 j , PSET: LINE- ( 160 , 1 
16) ,PSET:CIRCLE(128,96) , 5j3 : PLAY" 
V20O3L4CEDO2L2GP4L4GO3L4DEL2CP4O 
3L4EDC02L2GP4L4G03DEL2CP402CP2CP 
2CP2C" 



Blake CV Hughes 
Hahn t W. Germany 

(For this winning one-linef cofitest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



Barbara Combes 



Visit the 
CoCo Community Center 
THE RAINBOW'S CoCo SIG 

on 

DELPHI 

July 1986 THE RAINBOW 157 



Software ReviewZS^^ZSSSSSSZSSSS^/TZs 

A dvanced BA SIC 
Programming Aid and Super 
Programming A id 
are Great Values 

By James Ventling 

All of us have wished at one time or another that Tandy 
had added certain commands and capabilities. Anyone who 
programs in BASIC knows the CoCo is limited in its built- 
in functions. 

When the CoCo first appeared with only 4K memory and 
Color BASIC, lines with bugs had to be completely retyped. 
Line editing appeared with Extended BASIC and life was 
made easier. 

With more memory, programs grew larger and harder to 
manage. Some programmers tried using word processors to 
write their programs but had to use ASCII files and couldn't 
test run a program while using the processor. 

From time to time, utilities have appeared to try to take 
care of one shortcoming or another, but having all the 
various utilities and programming aids contained in a single 
program has not been accomplished — until now. 

Bangert Software Systems has put together a group of 
programming aids intended to fill the void. Advanced 
Programming Aid is a compact 2,752-byte, relocatable 
machine language program. It can be used with either a 
disk- or tape-based system and works with any ROM 
version. You'll need Extended BASIC and 16K memory or 
more, (it does not take advantage of the extra memory in 
a 64K system). 

Using Programming Aid is very simple. If you're not 
using Hi-Res graphics you may want to first PCLERR 1, 
particularly if you only have 16K. Type RUN "RPR" (or 
CLORD and RUN for tape). The next thing you see is the 
banner message and you are ready to use Programming Aid. 

Programming Aid does not get in your way; you can use 
the CoCo the same as before. It doesn't require or impose 
any special restrictions or formats. You could ignore it and 
never know it was there — but you won't want to when you 
discover how useful it is. 

The commands and functions are entered by using two 
keystrokes. First the control key (down arrow) is pressed, 
then the key for the command of your choice. I consider 
it a real convenience to be able to use one hand to enter 
commands rather than have to put down whatever I'm 
holding in order to press several keys simultaneously. This 
is just one example of the friendliness of this program. 

Let's look at the functions this program has to offer. 

Automatic Line Numbering — When you select this 
command a line number appears on the screen waiting for 
you to type in a line of BASIC. When that line is entered 
the next line number automatically appears. You have the 
option of specifying the start and increment values for line 
numbers, though the program will not let you run over 
existing lines. If you reach an existing line, the automatic 
line numbering stops. Each time the automatic numbering 
is interrupted, the program remembers where it left off and 
begins there again unless otherwise instructed. 



Automatic Loading of Menu (Disk only) — If you have 
a menu program written in BASIC, you can load and run 
it with just two keystrokes. A check is made to be sure there 
is no program in memory that would be erased. There is 
a very simple menu program included for demonstration 
but it can be replaced with any BASIC program of your 
choice. 

Keyboard Clicker — Each time you press a key it makes 
a clicking sound. This is an option I find very helpful when 
typing in code from a magazine listing. The click sound lets 
you know if a key is missed or hit accidentally without 
having to look up at the screen. If you don't want the click 
option you can turn it off. 

Suspend — This is a very exciting feature. This command 
lets you suspend, or hide the program you are working on. 
Your program will seem to have disappeared. Now you can 
check the listing of another program, type in a new program, 
run another program, or anything else you like, all without 
interfering with the hidden program. The RESTORE com- 
mand brings your original program out of hiding. This is 
also an easy way to merge programs. While the original 
program is hidden, you can load and edit an additional 
program. Any BASIC code left in memory is appended to 
the end of the original program when it is brought out of 
hiding. 

Copy — The Copy command copies a line or a group 
of lines in your program. You specify the line or range of 
lines to be duplicated and where in the program you want 
the copy to go. Line numbers are automatically changed on 
the copy. A check is made to be sure you don't copy over 
or erase existing lines. 

Move — Similar to the Copy command, the Move 
command copies a line or group of lines to a new location 
in the program. However, the original group of lines is 
deleted. 

Find — If you've ever had to search through a long listing 
for something, then you will appreciate this command. Find 
allows you to search through a program for the occurrence 
of any string up to 17 characters long. The search string is 
remembered, so after finding one occurrence, you can enter 
the Find command to find the next occurrence without 
retyping the characters you are searching for. 

Termination — You can eliminate Programming Aid 
without affecting your BASIC program (to execute another 
machine language program for example). Though the 
manual doesn't mention this, while Programming Aid is 
active, its functions are carried over into the running of your 
basic program (such as Key Click). More about this later. 

Program Scrolling — There are times when I want to look 
at a program line by line. Tandy didn't provide any way to 
do this. Programming Aid not only allows you to scroll 
through a listing one line at a time, but you can view the 
lines in forward or reverse order. In addition, the scrolling 
starts with the line last worked on. With the Scroll command 
you may never use the old LIST again. 

Repeating Keys — You are able to repeat any key 
(including the backspace) by just pressing that key and then 
holding down the CLEAR key. I found this to be especially 
useful when editing a line. 

Basic Program Formatting — When turned on, this 
option takes a line containing multiple statements and lists 
each of those statements on a separate line, indented several 
spaces. This works for both the screen and printer and is 
even active as you are typing in a line. As soon as you type 
a colon the cursor jumps to the next line. I find it useful 



158 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



when printing a hard copy to share with others, and 
beginners may find it helps when debugging a program. 

Clear Key Disable — You have the option of turning off 
the usual CLEAR key function. Accidently clearing the 
screen can be most annoying, especially if you are typing 
in a long line of basic. This is fairly easy to do since the 
CLEAR and the ENTER are side by side. With the CLEAR 
disabled you need never suffer this misery again. 

Current Line Edit — This command automatically puts 
you in the Edit mode for the line last worked with. This 
saves time and typing since neither the usual Edit command 
nor the line number need be entered. 

Command Keys — This is not a single function but a 
whole range of commands. You do have an option of 
whether or not to load the command keys table. It takes 
up approximately 280 additional bytes but it is worth it. By 
pressing the control key (down arrow) and then another key, 
a whole string of characters is automatically typed in for 
you. For instance, the letter 'A' gives you Audio O, 'B' gives 
Backup, *C gives Circle(, and so on. The command key table 
included contains 26 of these command strings (one for each 
letter on the keyboard). These command keys are easily 
remembered after a short time and save a tremendous 
amount of typing. A disadvantage is having all the keys pre- 
defined for you. For example, the 'Z' key gives CLDflD". If 
you have a disk based system as I do, you would probably 
want to replace the CLOPD" string with something more 
useful. This problem is overcome with Advanced Program- 
ming Aid's sister program, Super Programming Aid. 

Super Programming Aid contains all of the above plus 
a program to create your own command key tables and a 
new loader which asks which table you want to use with 
the programming aid. Not only can you make a command 
key table tailored to your own specific needs and habits, 
but you can make a number of different tables for different 
purposes and situations. 

Menus and prompts make it easy to build or modify a 
command key table. You can define as many as 36 command 
keys and each key can be assigned a string up to 250 
characters long. If you like, a command string can end with 
a carriage return (the enter key) so that a command will 
automatically execute. 

Though not mentioned in the documentation, I found the 
features of Programming Aid (when active) are carried over 
into your BASIC program. When the BASIC program is 
running, you will find that Key Click, Key Repeat, Clear 
Key Disable and the Command Keys are in force and 
operating. This opens up some interesting possibilities. You 
could even create a command key table for program 
responses. 



Of course, these programs are copyrighted and you can 
not sell or distribute any portion of them. 

Advanced Programming Aid and Super Programming 
Aid are very modestly priced and the value is excellent. This 
kind of quality software needs to be encouraged. If you like 
the program, tell all your friends but please don't give away 
illegal copies. At this price, everyone can afford to buy their 
own. Let's support the development of fine software. 

The manual is clear and detailed. It includes a table of 
contents, technical information and a command summary 
page. Each function is fully explained and examples are 
given. 

Once you have read the manual you will probably never 
need to refer to it again. Onscreen prompts, status messages 
and error messages keep you from getting lost or confused. 
Also included with the program is a customer-comment 
survey and a postcard for asking any questions you might 
have. 

Though my description may seem long-winded, the 
programs are very simple and easy to use. I could not find 
any bugs or problems. Everything works with convenience 
and style. This is the kind of utility that should be included 
with every CoCo sold. For usefulness and value, Advanced 
Programming Aid and Super Programming Aid have my 
vote for best buy of the year. 



(Bangert Software Systems, P.O. Box 21056, Indianapolis, 
IN 46221, A dvanced A id $24.95, Super A id $29.95, tape or 
disk) 



GRAFPLOT 



NEM ! 



I MPROVED ! 



(AMI 



LOW 



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GRAFPLOT DEMOl 
•5.00 DISK OR TAPE 
REFUND W/PURCHA8E £ 
"A GREAT PACKAGE 
GETS EVEN BETTER" 
- RAINBOW 

30 DAY 

UNCOND I T I ONAL 
MONEY— BACK 
GUARANTEE ! ! 



Chart of Household Budget Categories 

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Weeks Since Starting New Budget 



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CREATES PROFESSIONAL LOOKING GRAPH8 IN JU8T MINUTES. 
AUTOMATICALLY LOADS DATA FROM MOST POPULAR SPREADSHEETS. 
OVER 100 GRAPHING SYMBOLS AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 
AUTOMATICALLY SCALES AND LABELS ALL THREE OF THE AXES. 
CALCULATES MATH FUNCTIONS, INTEGRALS AND MOVING AVERAGES. 
FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN W/ COMPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 

16K TAPE - OS. 00, 32K TAPE - 440.00, 32K DISK - 445.00 



CHECKING ACCOUNT INFORMATION SYSTEM 

Let your CoCo ease the task of nanaging your checking 
accounts with CAIS. Record deposits, checks, ATn 
transactions, interest, service charges and other 
debit/credit transactions. Reconcile and balance your 
accounts in sinutes. Search and edit capabilities. 

Requires 32K and 1 disk drive tain). Printer optional. 

To order, send check or (ID for 24.95 plus 2.50 S/H tos 
(SC res. add 51 sales tax) 

After Five Software 

M. Box 210975 
Coluibii, S.C. 29221-0975 

(Reviewed in RAINBOW April *B6 issue, pg. 1B5) 



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July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 59 



DataPaek II Plus 

Super Smart Terminal Program 
With Auto-Log Language Processor 
X-MODEM Disk File Transfer Support 
VT-100 & VT-52 Terminal Emulation 

c> No lost data when using Hi-Res Display On-Line, Even at 1200 Baud. 
<& 9 Hi-Resolution Display formats, 28 to 255 colums by 24 lines. 
(c> True Upper and Lower Case Hi-Resolution Displays. 
& 45K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Display and Disk (worst case). 
(& Kill the Hi-Res Display option for an Extra 6K of buffer space. 
tS- ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 
<& Directly record receive data to a disk file while online. 
& VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

Automatic File Capture. 
<& Programmable Baud Rates from 300 to 19200 Baud. 
<& Programmable Word Length, Parity and Stop Bits. 
O Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 
(& Send full 128 character set from Keyboard including Control Codes. 
Ct* Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no loss of data. 
<& Complete Buffer Editor, Insert, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 

Automatic Key Repeat for Buffer Editing. 
& 9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers can store entire programs. Only limited 

by the size of available memory. 
(CJ* Programmable Control Character Trapping. 
& Programmable Prompt Character or Delay to send next line. 
c> Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 Baud. 
& Send Files directly from the Buffer or Disk. 
(E> Supports True Line Break Transmission. 
Ct* Save and Load Text and Program Key buffers to Disk or Tape. 
Ct* Disk Commands include: Load, Save, Kill and Directory. 
t> Display on Screen or Output contents of the BUffer to Printer. 
t> Automatic Memory Sense 16-64K (32K required for Hi-Res display). 
(C> Program and Memory Status Displays. 
& Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

Auto-Log: is a communications programming language that will enable you to automatically have 
DataPaek II plus Dial the phone, wait for and respond to log-on prompt messages, send commands 
to a remote system to perform a specified task, or even to send an entire program automatically. 

SUPPORTS: PBJ Word-Pak I & II and Double Density 80 Column Cards, 

PBJ Parallel Printer Card and Dual Serial Port (2SP-Pak), 
Radio Shack Deluxe RS-232 Program Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 32K and Disk $59.95 

(add $3.00 for postage & handling, for COD orders add an additional $2.50) 

Cer-Comp 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
S (702) 452-0632 © 



HI-RES II SCREEN COMMANDER 

Are you tired of looking at the 1 6 line by 32 character display on 
your CoCo? Do you wish you could see more lines and characters? 
Then HI-RES II is the answer, it can give you the big screen display 
you've always wanted. It will display 24 lines of 32, 42, 5 1 , 64 and 
even 85 true upper and lower case characters per line without any 
hardware modifications. 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package 
available for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is 
completely compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program 
is loaded, everything works the same as before, only you have a 
much better display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed 
text and Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate 
text and graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key 
repeat feature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the 

screen. HI-RES II features over 30 special control code functions 
that allow you to change characters per line, protect display lines, 
change background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse 
video, underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works 
on all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides 
automatic reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you 
press reset. 

Only $24,95 for Tape and $29,95 for Disk 

EDT/ASM 64D 

64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER w/DEBUG 

EDT/ASM 64D is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & 
Assembler. It has a Hi-Resolution 5 1 , 64 or 85 column by 24 line 
display, so you see your program listings easily. It also supports the 
PBJ 80 Column Word-Pak cards. The disk also contains a free 
standing Machine Language Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

The Editor in EDT/ASM 64D is the most powerfull, easy to use 
Text Editor available in any Editor/ Assembler package for the Color 
Computer, It even has automatic line number generation for easy 
entry of program material. Some of it's features include: 

cJ* Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

<r> Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 

<r> Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

<r> Load & Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

c> Move or Copy single & multiple text lines. 

<r> Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

<r> Hi-Res Text Display 28 to 85 columns by 24 lines. 

<r> Supports the PBJ 80 Column cards Word-Pak I & II. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D is the part that creates 
the Machine Language program. It processes the source file(s) 
created or edited by the text editor and creates a LOADM or 
CLOADM binary file on either Disk or Tape. Using library files you 
can assemble an unlimited size file, using several different disk 
drives. 

Supports conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 
<r> Supports Disk Library files (include), 
c?* Supports standard motorola assembler directives 
<r> Allows multiple values for FDB & FCB directives. 
<r> Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 
<r> Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADM format. 
<e> Supports up to 9 open disk files during assembly. 
c> Allows assembly from editor buffer, Disk or both. 
<r> Full description text error messages. 

DEBUG is a free standing program debugger which provides all 
the functions supported by most system monitors. Some of them 
include: 

Examine and change the contents of memory. 
<r> Set and display up to 10 breakpoints in memory, 
& Remove single or multiple breakpoints. 
c> Display/Change processor register contents. 
<r> Dump Memory in Hex and ASCII format, 
c?* Fill Memory range with a specified data pattern. 
c5> Move a block of memory. 
<r> Search memory range for data pattern. 
<r> Disassemble memory into op-code format. 

Requires 32K and Disk $59,00 



"The Source 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine lan- 
guage programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assemb- 
ler Source Code for a fraction of the cost of other Disassembler/ 
Source generator programs. And, the Source has all the features 
your looking for in a Disassembler. 

<& Automatic Label generation. 
sy Allows specifying FCB, FCC and FDB areas. 
<r> Save, Load and Edit FCB, FCC, and FDB map on Disk. 
<& Disassembles programs directly from Disk 
<& Output complete Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, 
Screen or both. 

Generates Assembler compatible source flies directly to disk. 
<& Generated source files are in standard ASCII format. 
t> Built in Hex/ASCII dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FDB 

areas in a program. 
<&- Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 
<& Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy, 

almost foolproof operation. 
<&- Written in fast machine language, one of the quickest and 

easiest to use Disassemblers available. 

Requires 32K and Disk $34,95 

TEXTPRO III 
"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

9 Hi-Resolution Display Formats from 28 to 255 columns by 24 
lines. 

True Upper and Lower Case display format. 
<& Three Different Programmable Header lines, re-defmable at 
anytime. 

Programmable Footer line & Automatic Footnote System. 
z> 10 Programmable Tab stops & 7 Tab Function Commands. 
O" Automatic Line Justification, Centering, Flush left and Flush 
right. 

<&- On screen display of underlining and Double size characters, 
<& Change indents, margins, line length, etc. at anytime in a 
document. 

<& Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a 
full disk. 

<& Easily imbed any number of format and control codes for 
printers. 

Automatic Memory sense 1 6-64K with up to 48K of 
workspace. 

Ct* Typist Friendly line and Command format entry w/ auto key 
repeat. 

Fully supports the use of 80 column hardware cards. 
TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed 
for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not 
like most of the other word processing programs available for the 
Color Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to 
write letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be 
better off with one of the other word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processing program with extensive document 
formatting features to handle large documents, term papers, man- 
uals, complex formating problems and letter writing, then TEX- 
TPRO is what your looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally 
different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and 
formatting information that you imbed directly in your text. There 
are over 50 different formating commands you can use without ever 
leaving the text your working on. There are no time comsuming, 
and often furstrating menu chases, you are in total control at all 
times. The formatted output can be displayed directly on the screen, 
showing you exactly what your printed document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed. This includes margins, head- 
ers, footers, page numbers, page breaks, underlining, column 
formating and full justification. 

Disk $59.95 Tape $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 

To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or C.O.D. call us at the 
number listed below (Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
S (702) 452-0632 S 



Software Review JSSZZZSZZZZZZZZZT^ 

Generate Attractive Business 
Statements with Keep-Trak 

Keep-Trak is a series of business programs from The 
Other Guy's Software. The first program in the series, 
General Ledger, was reviewed in the October 1984 RAIN- 
BOW. A later version was reviewed in April 1985. 

Accounts Receivable is the second program in the series. 
It can be used in conjunction with General Ledger, or it can 
stand alone. I have not had the opportunity to try General 
Ledger, so this review of Accounts Receivable is based solely 
on its ability to stand alone. 

Accounts Receivable sets up customer files (name, 
address, payment, credit limit, etc.), posts receivables 
transactions (purchases, payments, returns, etc.) to a 
journal, and prints out monthly statements that look very 
professional. 

It is written in machine language, but some of the code 
is stored in files that seem to resemble BASIC statements. 
It requires 32K and at least one disk drive. If you have two 
drives, you can keep your program disk in one drive and 
a data disk in the other. The disk is not copy-protected. 

The disk that I tested does not run under JDOS, but 
according to The Other Guy's catalog, JDOS-compatible 
versions of its products are available. I tried to use the 
program with the disk version of ADOS. Although at first 
it appeared to run properly, I soon discovered that some 
of the data files were being filled incorrectly. Entries of 
customer addresses were overwriting space intended for 
comment lines, and vice versa. With Disk BASIC 1.0, I had 
no problem. 

The program is menu driven, and fairly straightforward 
in its operation. But the 48-page manual lacks clarity. On 
the subject of selecting a file starting date for customers with 
a past-due balance, we are told: 

"This can be handled by the starting date being one month 
prior to the date that Customer Statements will be sent and 
adding the total amount owed and entering that amount 
into the Receivable Journal (program #3) or by having the 
starting date three months prior to the date that Customer 
Statements will be sent and bring the Receivable Journal 
up to date." 

But if you wade through this verbiage, the program is not 
difficult to learn to use. 

Step one is the creation of customer files. Customer files 
are divided into two categories, called installment files and 
non-installment files. In an installment file, a separate 
interest rate, late fee and monthly payment may be entered 
for each customer in the file. In a non-installment file, 
payment terms are the same for all customers in that file. 
(So it's possible to have a non-installment file of customers 
who pay their bills in installments — these are known as 
part principal due customers.) 

You can have several files of either type, each with up to 
999 customers (subject to available disk space). 

Step two is entering the Billing Company data — that 
is, your company's name and address, and any comments 
that you would like to have printed on the statements. You 
can omit the name and address if statements are printed on 
letterheads. This information is entered for each file, which 
can be handy if your company does business under more 
than one name. 



Step three is posting customer transactions to a Receiv- 
able Journal. You may use either a single-entry or a double- 
entry accounting method. If you use the double-entry 
method, you then have the opportunity to verify that the 
journal is in balance and to make corrections. In some cases 
it is better to delete an erroneous entry and re-enter it 
correctly, while in other cases it is better to /make a 
correcting entry. In a few cases, trying to do either will cause 
problems. 

There is a routine that automatically calculates interest 
and late fees due, but it has a problem, as explained in the 
manual: 

"On Installment customer files, interest is calculated on 
the total amount owed. Therefore, if new charges are 
incurred on the 15th of the month and interest was last 
calculated on the first of the month, when interest is again 
calculated on the first of the next month, the interest 
calculated for the charges on the 15th will be for 30 days 
and not 15 days." The same applies for part principal due 
files. 

Two methods of correction are offered in the manual, 
both of which involve calculating the interest for part of the 
month. But the program won't allow this. Once the interest 
calculation routine is run for a file, the old ending date 
becomes the new starting date, and it can't be changed. That 
is, if you've calculated interest from June 1 to July 1, the 
only thing you can do is calculate interest from July 1 to 
some later date. 

After the journal is balanced and printed, the statements 
for each customer are printed. You can choose to print 
multiple copies. If you chose to reference a comment from 
the comment file, it appears with the transaction on the 
statement. Additional comments may be entered when the 
statement printing routine is selected. If the customer has 
a credit balance, the words "Credit Balance — No Payment 
Due" are automatically printed on the statement. I like that. 

The statements list each transaction in chronological 
order, with a column for debits and a column for credits, 
as well as description and reference columns. These monthly 
statements are informative and easy to read. 

Finally, the receivables are "aged." A report of past due 
customers can be displayed or printed, and mailing labels 
can be printed for sending notices. 

Each journal file can hold about 1 ,500 entries, after which 
it must be consolidated — that is, all transactions will be 
replaced by totals for each customer and account number. 
You can print a hard copy of the journal before consolidat- 
ing, or save the original file to another disk for future 
reference. (Consolidating can be done more often, if desired. 
You may want to have a consolidated journal for each 
month or each quarter.) 

After pressing 'E 5 for end from the main menu, the OK 
prompt and a flashing cursor appear. At that point, any 
command entered produces a syntax error. Pressing the 
Reset button puts a message on the screen to the effect that 
The Other Guy's Software offers a reward to catch 
copyright violators. The only way to reactivate the 
computer is to turn the power off and then back on. 



(The Other Guy's Software, P.O. Box H, Logan, UT 84321, 
32K disk, $39.95 plus $2.50 S/H ) 

— Neil Parks 



162 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Software Review< 



The Witness — 
A Classic Whodunit 



Had enough of dungeons and spaceships? Need some- 
thing that your spouse/ parent can enjoy on the CoCo? Then 
try The Witness. 

You have just 12 hours to solve a murder that may not 
even have happened yet, or face the displeasure of your 
captain. 

The clues? A matchbook, a newspaper clipping, a 
telegram and a possible suicide note. The suspects? A 
sinister Oriental butler, a very independent rich girl, a 
business man, his dead wife's lover and others. Who did it? 
For that matter, who was the victim? If you're not careful, 
it could be you! 

Infocom is well-known for involved interactive fiction 
programs which have been available for more expensive 
computers for several years. Now they have brought their 
experience to our favorite machine. 

This program is flawlessly packaged with great documen- 
tation. One little extra I really appreciated was the re- 
sealable box that can hold all the little pieces of evidence 
that would probably soon be lost. 

The Witness is a 1930s-style whodunit. You and the 
faithful Sergeant Duffy have to interview suspects, analyze 



evidence and accuse the perpetrator within the 12-hour time 
limit. 

At any point, you have the option to save the work you 
have done so far. This is a good idea because, if you get 
bumped off, it is necessary to start over unless your position 
was saved at an earlier point. 

This is not just another maze search. In Witness, you must 
logically solve a problem using interviews and police 
methods. 

The action can be livened up with unlikely moves on your 
part. They will provoke some interesting responses from the 
other characters. 

I predict that even seasoned mystery readers will not solve 
this problem easily, and jumping to a conclusion early in 
the game will probably have you pounding a beat in the 
boondocks. 

The game is played by making choices and giving 
directions to the computer. Your choices at any juncture are 
numerous and so are the number of possible story lines. 
Your location (such as driveway entrance) and the time (e.g., 
8:02 p.m.) are continuously displayed and updated along 
the top of the screen. 



(Tandy Corp., available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 
requires 64K, $34.95) 



— John McCormick 



Canadians! 

We are Canada's largest distributor of Color 

Computer products. 



Send for your free copy 
of our 1986 Catalog 







Katrynews 






VOL 3 


KELLY SGFTWaPE 


SOmMRC 




C<STROJTORS 


FORTveaxcfl 




LMTED 


COMPUTER 





Kellynews-3 is now available 
and contains news, hints, 
programs and articles from 
the crew of Kelly Software. 

Please note our new 
phone number. 

Phone: (403) 236-2161 



We have moved to 
our new location. 




Kelly Software 
Distributors Ltd. 

P.O. Box 608, 
Station 'T Calgary 
Alberta T5H 2H2 



Call now . . . 




(403)236-2161 

Call our ordcrline 
for quick delivery. 

We accept phone orders 

on your VISA or 
Master Card. No C.O.D. 



I 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 163 



Introducing... 

telewriter-64 Character Set Editor 

finally.. A utility irrat allows you to CU Mom ire the character 
setto your own spe-eWlcalionsI Includes 3 new (anls (one 
with true descender*! ), works with all versions. Written by 
TEi,EM7CH author Bob van der Poel- 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 

• Mil \\K\ It !!? (A lb U Sk Vn Jlh £f CU!^ NflFC 



Software Review, 





Adventure In 
Mythology 

By Scott Cabit 

An animated graphics adventure. 
Battle monsters and discpver treasures 
as you assume the personalities of 
various heroes In ancient Greek myth- 
logy! You goal is to win the hand of the 
beautiful Atalanta, the swift-running 
huntress. But beware of the perils and 
obstacles that stond in your way as you 
journey through ancient Greece! Four- 
voice music and sound effects, auto- 
matic speech when using a Tandy SSC 
speech pok. Load and Save feature, 
over 250 locations. 64K Machine lan- 
guage. 

Tap e $21.95 Disk $24 ,95 

Fighter Pilot 

An original orcade game! Wave after 
wave of ottacking aircraft attempt to 
shoot you down as you maneuver your 
fighter into the wild blue yonder, 
blasting enemy fighter, bombers, and 
paratroopers out of the sky. Joystick or 
keyboard operotion, "pause game" 
feature. Disk version saves high scores. 
32K. 100% Machine Language. See 
February '86 Rainbow for review. 

To pe $21,95 Disk $2 4.95 

Disk Utility Package 

12 great disk utilities in one packoge! 
Includes Archive, Backup (35 or 40 
track), Format (35 ar 40 track...fast!), 
Find (searches file for a pottern, reports 
all occurances), Compare (compares 
two disk files). Occount. and Menu 
(reads all disks in the system and 
displays a sorted directory from which 
to choose). 32K, one disk drive required, 
See February '86 Rainbow for review. 

Disk $19,95 



The Andrea CoCo 

By Art Martin 

Another great animated graphics 
adventure! All you came down to the 
Yacht Club for was to get a drink and 
maybe play a little poker. Heck, 
nobody would ever guess that the 
closest thing you owned to a real yacht 
was the one over your fireplace. It was 
in the bar that you heard rumors of 
earth-shattering events about to take 
place, you step out onto the wharf to 
get a little air when your natural 
curiosity and sense of adventure start 
to work.. .Can you save the world? 
Superb graphics, save & load feature. 
64K, one disk drive required. 

Disk $24.95 



Pumpman 

You'll dig this 100% ML arcode game! 
The Pumpman caries a pump that he 
fires at aliens Pooky and Dragon as 
they change forms and chase him 
around underground. 15 different 
screens, "pause game" feature, 
bonuses. As fun and challenging as the 
original arcade game! 32K, one joy- 
stick required, 

Tape $21,95 Disk $24.95 



CGP-220 
Screen Dump 

A graphics screen dump utility for the 
CGP-220 Ink Jet Printer. Features in- 
clude: Fost machine language, four- 
color and one-color versions, special 
CoCo Max version, user-selectable 
colors, regular or double-size printout. 
16K. 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 



Coming Soon...Otto'$ Oddysey! 
64K Graphics Adventure 

By Steve Hartford 



More Great Software!!! 



Eagle 

Lunor Lander, 32K 

Marooned! 

Graphic Adventure, 32 K Disk 

Blackjack Dealer 

With Feeler Dealer, 32K. , 

Alpha 40+ 

Formats 40+ Tracks. 32K Disk 



$21.95* Maycode $21.95* 

6809 Disassembler, 32K. 

$24.95 Menu Maker $19.95 

ML Utility, 32K Disk 

$21.95* Hlres+ $19.95 

Screen Enhancer, 16K Tape 

$19.95 64K Print Spooler $9.95 

64 K Tape 
'Add $3.00 For Disk 



Q n/vi i -» m We Ve Mo VQd - 

Ofl QU&lU 4137E. Bermuda 

Software 

Add $1.00 For Shipping • C O.D. Orders Add $3.00 
Arizona Residents Add 7% Tax • Dealer Inquiries Invited 
Call Or Write For Free Catalog! 

Authors * were Seeking Qcod Software Now! 



164 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



P 



Snap Study System 
Records Notes and Ideas 

Cozy Software's Snap Study System keeps track of your 
mental ramblings in a rather elaborate file consisting of 
boxes, main files, subfiles and items. You have the options 
to save your ideas to disk, print a hard copy, and change 
or delete as needed. 

From our sample file we learn that the subject box can 
be divided in up to eight main files. Each one of the main 
files can, in turn, have up to eight subfiles, which can have 
up to eight items. All this information can easily be entered 
or examined by using the arrow keys in a manner like many 
spreadsheet programs. 

For example, if I wanted to keep track of jobs to do, I 
could first divide the Jobs box into up to eight parts. There 
could be one part for home jobs, one for at work jobs, one 
for moonlighting jobs and so forth. These are the main files. 
Now I can take the Home main file and divide it into eight 
more sections, such as in what parts of the home these jobs 
are located. And then, under these subfiles, I can enter up 
to eight items, such as what needs to be done. I can continue 
this for all of the main and subfiles if desired. 

To view this at a later date, just select the Jobs file and 
scan through it. 

It may sound like this program will take weeks to learn, 
but this is not the case. Snap Study System is extremely 
simple to understand. The program is written in BASIC, 
comes on a disk and requires 32K and one drive. 

The documentation is a 1 3-page booklet that we found 
wanting. For example, if you follow the directions in the 
startup procedures, you wont be able to make use of the 
example files. Also, if you press the keys as you read along, 
a prompt asking if you want memory cleared appears a step 
or two before the documentation tells you about it. These 
are minor errors, and the rest of the documentation and the 
program itself are quite easy to understand. 

My main complaint involves the Print Report instruc- 
tions. Here you are advised that you are able to enter printer 
control codes for your particular printer, but no explana- 
tion follows. I was able to figure it out, but I thought it could 
have been more carefully written. 

I believe the program could have allowed you to change 
the drive default and the printer Baud rate while operating, 
and I found it somewhat disquieting to use BASIC'S KILL 
command to remove empty files from the disk. However, 
in all fairness, I must add that removing unused or empty 
files is not necessary. 

Snap Study File ran well and I was unable to crash it. 
But the program seemed to stall occasionally after aborting 
a disk save, and the keyboard response is often slow when 
leaving the viewing screen to the menu. 

To sum up, Snap Study File is an easy-to-master filer/ 
outliner, but $19.95 may be a little steep for a program with 
these limitations. x 

(Cozy Software, 25142 53 Avenue, Aldergrove, British 
Columbia, Canada VOX 1 AO, disk $19.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Bill Tottingham 



Software Review 



f /7s\ Software Review 



Formatting BASIC Listings 

with Listaid 

Listaid is a BASIC program that creates a machine 
language routine to format BASIC listings. It breaks up a 
line of BASIC so that each new statement starts on a new 
line and is indented. The minimum requirement is 4K Color 
BASIC 1.1. OK, I've seen a few of these before, let's try it. 

The first thing it wants is a start location. There isn't a 
default value and none is given in the documentation. 

The top of RAM for my machine is 32767 so I'll try 32700. 
Ah ha, the program didn't like that. It told me that number 
was too high. I'll try 32650. That works. 

The program now wants to save the program. I choose 
disk and name it Listaid. Now I'll LDRDM it and see if it 
works. Wait a minute. The instructions say I need to clear 
memory before executing the program. Let's see, CLERR 
200, 32649. Now to EXEC and list some BASIC code: 

5 fll=0 
:B1=0 
:C1=0 
:D1=0 

That worked fine. Let's try some more: 

10 IF Rl=l THEN Rl=2 ELSE IF Bl= 
1 THEN Bl=2 ELSE Cl=l 

Oh, Listaid doesn't recognize the ELSE, only colons. Let's 
try something else: 

20 RP$="VRLUE5 CONTAINED IN VRRIRBLES 
: Rl, Bl, RND CI RRE TEST DRTR" 

Hmm, I didn't type all those spaces in the middle of Line 
20. Listaid doesn't seem to know the difference between a 
colon that separates statements and a colon within a string. 

I'd better check the EDIT mode. Good, the EDIT mode 
is unaffected by Listaid. With EDIT, I can see that Line 20 
doesn't really contain all those spaces. 

I wonder how to turn Listaid off. The instructions don't 
say anything about it. I think I'll try EXEC again. Bad news, 
typing EXEC a second time causes the computer to lock up 
and Reset doesn't help. That could be a big problem if you 
forget and do it again. You could lose all your code. 

Now for the real test. Does it work with different printers? 
Great! It does work. Evidently the program must use 
ASCII. 

Listaid works well onscreen or with any printer. The $10 
price is very reasonable, too. 



(Neat-O-Software, Jerry D. Forsha, Rt. #3, Box 205, 
Kingsport, TN 37664, $10 plus $2 S/H) 

« 

— James Ventling 



An Introduction to the 
Doctrines of Grace 

An Introduction to the Doctrines of Grace is a disk full 
of ASCII files that make a book when printed out. It is one 
of two books written by Pastor Mark Camp of Sovereign 
Grace Software. 

Pastor Camp's letter to the editor in the March 1986 issue 
of RAINBOW said he would make a copy of these books for 
anyone who sent him the disks. He received so many, he 
decided to buy a bunch of disks and sell them with the books 
on them. Pastor Camp said he is not doing this for the 
money, but he cannot afford the time it takes to copy them. 

The documentation is complete. Required is a word 
processor that can handle up to a 20K buffer and a printer. 
If you do not have a word processor, there is a basic 
program on the disk that will print it out for you. 

It is advisable to have a word processor with margin 
settings because word break dashes are inserted at the end 
of many lines. He gives you the margin settings that work 
the best. 

Pastor Camp has put Bible references within the book to 
allow easy checking. 

Though the book is copyrighted, he encourages people 
to share it with others. He asks only that you tell the 
recipient to consider a donation to his ministry. 

Everything about this software is great. I advise you to 
check it out. It is very good reading. 

(Sovereign Grace Software, 221 Highview Drive, Ballwin, 
MO 63011, $10.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Bill Krauss 



One-Liner Contest Winner . , . 

This file creates the famous Yin and Yang symbol 
on the PMODE A screen. 

The listing: 

1J3 PMODE 4 ,1:SCREEN1,1:PCLS1: COLO 
RJ3 >1 : CIRCLE (128 ,96) ,90 : CIRCLE ( 12 
8,141) ,45, ,1, .75, .25: CIRCLE (128, 
51) ,45, ,1, .25, .75 : CIRCLE (128 , 13 8 
) , 2J3 : CIRCLE ( 12 8 , 4 8 ) , 2 j3 : PAINT (128 
, 2J3) ,J3,J3: PAINT (128, 138) ,J3 ,0 : FORX 
=lTOlj3j3j3j3j30:NEXT 



Charles Lammers 
Yakima, WA 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



« 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 165 



Software Review SS^^SESE^S^^S? 

New and Improved: 
OS-9 Version 2.00 

OS-9 version 2.00 is an update package for earlier 
versions of OS-9. It consists of two disks (an updated system 
disk and a new boot/config disk) and an 81 -page booklet 
describing the changes made to the original system disk as 
well as the new utilities. 

The most obvious change in the package is the addition 
of the Config utility. This program allows you to create a 
new system disk with only the drivers and modules you 
choose. To use Config, boot OS-9, then change disks 
inserting the boot/config disk in / dO. At the OS-9 prompt, 
type /d0/cmds/conf ig. The utility then displays a menu 
and asks if you want to use one or two drives. After 
answering, you are given a choice of devices to be included 
on the new system disk. The list of choices is quite extensive 
and includes some surprises: 



/term 32 


standard TV 32-column display 


/term 80 


optional 80-column video display 


/d0 


floppy disk Drive 0 


/dl 


floppy disk Drive 1 


/d2 


floppy disk Drive 2 


/d3 


floppy disk Drive 3 


/h0-15 


hard disk Drive 0, 15 meg 


/h0-35 


hard disk Drive 0, 35 meg 


/hl-15 


hard disk Drive 1,15 meg 


/hl-35 


hard disk Drive 1, 35 meg 


/P 


printer using standard RS-232 port 


/tl 


terminal using standard RS-232 port 


111 


terminal using optional RS-232 pack 


/t3 


terminal using optional RS-232 pack 


/ml 


modem 


/rh2 


modem 


/ ssc 


speech/sound cartridge 



After selecting the devices, the user must also select the 
1/ O routines and the power line frequency (60 hertz U.S.A. 
or 50 hertz Europe), The user also chooses the command 
set for the new system disk: (N)o commands, (B)ASIC 
commands, (F)ull command set, (I)ndividually select 
commands, or (?) receive help on command choices. 

After making the appropriate choices, the user is 
prompted to insert a formatted disk in Drive /dl for a two- 
drive system or Drive / dO for a one-drive system and the 
process completes itself except for disk swaps necessary on 
a one-drive system. I was a little disappointed to find the 
new system disk was not bootable from Disk BASIC, but that 
can be remedied using the Cobbler utility. 

Another new feature is optional DOS Help. This consists 
of two files. The first file is the Help program itself. It must 
be copied from the boot/config disk CMDS directory to 
the /d0/cmds directory of the system disk. The Help 
program uses the data file CMDS. HP which must be copied 
from the boot/config disk to the /d0/sys directory of the 
system disk. 

Once the Help files are in place, the user simply enters 
at the OS-9 command line HELP plus the command he wants 
help with. The program supplies information about the 
command and the necessary syntax. 



The third new utility is Iniz. It is intended to initialize 
a port or other device at the start of an OS-9 session, forcing 
the allocation of buffer space before other programs use it. 
Forcing allocation early in the session prevents memory 
fragmentation which can rob the system of valuable RAM. 

The program resides in the /d0/cmds directory. It is 
called, preferably from the Startup file, by Iniz device- 
names. 

The fourth new utility, Tuneport, is my favorite. This 
program sets the loop counter for the serial port enabling 
the user to work at a higher Baud rate. Tuneport resides 
in the /d0/cmds directory. To call it, the user types 
TUNEPORT /p or TUNEPORT /tl to set the delay times for 
either the printer or the terminal. 

The utility presents the current Baud rate, sends a test 
message to the printer or terminal and asks the user for a 
new value. If the message was successfully transmitted, the 
user replies with a carriage return. Otherwise, the user must 
supply a new value to try. This continues until the proper 
delay time has been established and the program ends with 
a carriage return. 

If the user wants the change to be permanent, he must 
run Cobbler. 

Several utilities have been changed in version 2.00. Most 
of the changes were made to accommodate the 80-column 
screen. 

There have been other changes too. All keys are self- 
repeating. When a key is pressed for more than one second, 
it automatically repeats. 

The '@' key now acts as the 'ALT' key. This adds 128 to 
the ASCII value of a key pressed. 

The Getstat function now gives values for several key 
combinations that were missing. 

FORMAT has been changed to allow almost unprompted 
formatting of disks. 

And finally, OS9GEN has been changed to allow those 
with single drives to use it. In previous versions only 
Cobbler was available without two drives. 

I received OS-9 version 2.00 as an addendum, not as a 
complete package. I don't know if it is available any other 
way. The documentation is quite good. The changed 
modules are examined in detail as are the new facilities. 

Overall, I had trouble with only one instruction. The 
manual says to insert the config/ boot disk in /dO with the 
execution directory set to /d0/cmds and to type CONFIG, 
When I did this I got an error message. Typing /d0/cmds/ 
config worked well. 

If you don't own a previous version of OS-9, 1 recommend 
you try to get a complete package. The documentation is 
not meant to be a complete guide to the OS-9 operating 
system and the manual supplied assumes the user already 
knows the basics of OS-9 use. 

1 like OS-9 version 2.00 very much. I wish the authors 
had included an option to make bootable disks with the 
Config program. The Tuneport program worked like a 
champ and my printer now hums along at 9600 Baud. All 
of the programs written for earlier versions of OS-9 ran 
perfectly. 

I recommend OS-9 version 2.00 highly. It is refreshing to 
find something new and improved. 

(Tandy Corp., available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 
64K, one disk drive and OS-9 required, $69.95) 

— Larry Goldwasser 



166 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Software Review* 



Let CoCo Pick the Winners 
with Enhanced Racing 
A nalysis Package 

Whether you live at the track or are just a casual racing 
enthusiast, the Enhanced Racing Analysis Package from 
Software Exchange is what you're looking for. 

This racing handicapping software can help predict 
favorable horses for betting when you visit the track. 
According to the documentation, this program picks 
winners in the money 70 percent of the time. 

The program comes on cassette or disk. I examined and 
reviewed the cassette version, which comes with a copy on 
both sides of the tape, and two sheets of documentation for 
loading and running the program. 

After CLOflDing and typing RUN, a menu screen appears 
with four choices: Thoroughbred Racing analysis, Harness 
Racing analysis, Bet Return analysis and End. 

The Thoroughbred Racing analysis consists of various 
prompts requiring knowledge of the horses involved for 
each race. Factors such as track length, number of entries, 
post positions, morning line odds, speed rating information, 
last positions in stretch run of last three races and final 
positions at end of the last three races run by the horse are 
needed. 

With these factors, the program produces a rating for 
these horses, which can be used with your personal hunches 
to, hopefully, produce a winner at the track. All of the 
information required can be found on a racing sheet. 

There are two items worth mentioning about the 
thoroughbred portion of Enhanced Racing Analysis. On the 
menu screen for track length, there are two entries for a 
track length of one mile. Both items nine and 16 had this 
listing. It seems that item 16 should have been two miles. 

In my opinion, another item that could have been 
included is the track variant, an important factor relating 
to the conditions of the track (dry, muddy, etc.) on which 
the speed rating is determined. Many racing fans consider 
the track variant when looking at the speed rating. 
Enhanced Racing Analysis does not seem to consider this 
factor in the final ratings of the horses. 



ANALOG AND DIGITAL I/O PORTS 

SINGLE BOARD 6809 CPU 

Parallel 8 bit input & output for your CoCo, and Models 1, III, 4. 

• MODULAR DESIGN FOR ADDITION OF MULTIPLE PORTS 
DIGITAL I/O PORT KIT INCLUDES 

4.5" x 6" Printed circuit board; All components; Cable (Plugs To CoCo Adapter) 
Diagnostic software listing (BASIC); and Manual. {Requires 5V 100 ma tupply) 



SINGLE BOARDS 
I/O port kit (J107K) 
A-D/D-A interlace (J202K)* 
CoCo Adapter- required for CoCo (J110K) 
S Volt Power Supply (D100K) 
Relay Array Kit (J027K) 
•requires J107K I/O Port kit 
Stand Alone 6809 CPU Board (MX 90) 

D & A Research 

400 Wilson Avenue 
Satellite Beaoh, FL 32937 
305/777-7853 



S3S 
$35 
$15 
$25 
$32 

$40 



COMPLETE SYSTEMS 

DIGITAL MEMORY SCOPE— Converts 
the CoCo TV display into an oscilliscope 
screen. (S101M) $149.00 
DIGITAL RECORDER and DELAY— Record 
and play back audio signals up to ten seconds. 
(S102M) $169.00 
2716 EPROM Programmer-Programs 
and verifies from CoCo's memory. 
(S103M) $149.00 



The Harness Racing analysis portion of the program has 
basically the same format. Information required about the 
horses includes track length, number of entries, post 
position, time in last race for each horse (minutes and 
seconds) and best time of last three times. It also produces 
a rating of the horses that can be used with your hunches. 

Both the thoroughbred and harness racing choices also 
provide for an optional printed copy of the ratings that 
could be taken to the track. 

The Bet Return analysis is a routine to determine your 
financial status from your bets. It provides a simple gain/ 
loss calculation based on the amount bet for each race. 

Overall, the Enhanced Racing Analysis is a straight- 
forward program. Although not specifically mentioned in 
the instructions, the program should run in 16K or larger 
machines. According to a note on the instruction sheet, this 
program is for entertainment purposes only with no 
guarantees that it will always produce a winner. The 
instructions given with the software are adequate to get the 
program up and running. 

This program would be of interest to those CoCo users 
who are avid horse racing fans since its price of $49.95 may 
be a bit expensive for the general CoCo user. However, just 
one great night at the local track could pay for this program 
quickly. Now, where's that racing sheet for today's races? 

(Software Exchange, P.O. Box 5382, W. Bloomfield, MI 
48033, cassette or disk $49.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Donald A. Turowski 




BUSINESS SOFTWARE 
$ PORTFOLIO $ 

BUSINESS DATABASE SYSTEMS 

★ Reviewed in HOT CoCo Dec. 1984 & RAINBOW Feb. 1985 * 

• DATABASE MANAGEMENT - define, reorganized & update a database 

• SPREAD SHEET - calculations to update database 

• REPORT MODULE - customized report formats with headings & totals 

• WORD PROCESSOR — merge database with custom letters, labels, & reports 

• MACRO PROCEDURES - store any report calculations with sorts & selections 

• UTILITIES - generate, merge, summarize, & summarize-post 

• 216 PAGE MANUAL WITH STEP-BY-STEP TUTORIAL 

• WORKBASE I (600 Records) $49,95 - WORKBASE II (1200 Records) $59.95 

BUSINESS APPLICATION PACKAGES 

• READY-TO-USE - 50-page manual, database, calculations, & reports 

• SELF-CONTAINED - purchase & use any package independently 

• BUILT-IN DATABASE FUNCTIONS - selectively display/print records 

• COMPREHENSIVE - all major accounting functions addressed 

• EASY TO USE — all packages are entirely menu driven 

• EXPANDABLE - use any application database with WORKBASE DATABASE 

• PROVEN — currently used in businesses, churches, and accounting firms 

• COST EFFECTIVE - $29.95 per package - $24.95 when 2 or more purchased 



★ INVENTORY CONTROL ★ 

★ SALES ORDER ENTRY * 

★ ACCOUNTS PAYABLE * 

★ PAYROLL * 

★ RENTAL PROPERTY 

ALL SOFTWARE REQUIRES 32K/64K TRS-80 CoCo & 1 DISK DRIVE 
★ FREE CATALOG AVAILABLE ★ 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
GENERAL LEDGER 
PURCHASE ORDER ENTRY 
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 



ORDERING: CHECK, MONEY ORDER, 
COD, MASTERCARD, VISA 

Price includes shipping in USA 
NC residents add 4.5% sales tax 



WORKBASE DATA SYSTEMS 
P.O. Box 3448 
Durham, NC 27702 
Call Toll Free 1-800-334-0854 ext 887 
(919) 286-3445 NC Residents only 



July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 67 



Software Revievj^SSSSSSSSSSSSS^^S^\ 

Telepatch II and Wizard 
H Expand Telewriter-64 

A revised version of Telepatch called Telepatch II has 
been released and offers some nice improvements. Most 
notably, Telewriter-64 can be configured to have the disk 
I/O resident in RAM or loaded in from disk as currently 
done. This really makes Telewriter-64 shine since disk 1/ 
O is instant. In effect, it becomes a RAM Disk and is 
lightning fast. 

However, there is a price to pay for this convenience and 
that price is memory. Specifically, the buffer is reduced from 
the usual 24,889 characters to 20,793. 

The Telepatch II disk contains a program called 
PATCH Rl BAS that gives you this option during config- 
uration. 

Another new feature is the addition of a buffered 
keyboard. One of the problems with the original Telewriter 
was it had a tendency to occasionally drop characters, 
especially during the insertion mode. This new version 
totally cures that old bug. A new keyboard routine 
remembers what characters have been typed. 

The most obvious change is all of the cassette choices on 
the main menu are no longer visible. The choices Read In, 
Save, fcsave, Append and Verify are still there and fully 
functional; you just can't see them. This was done to reduce 
confusion with the corresponding disk functions. Besides, 
Telepatch //only works on a disk system. 



One other nice feature is the addition of a characters used 
count and space available as part of the disk menu. The 
other features such as key repeat, key click, visible carriage 
returns, overstrike mode and disk drive stepping rate are 
just like the original Telepatch and can be configured in the 
boot program. 

If you like Telewriter-64 as much as I do, you will love 
what Telepatch II adds. 

If Telepatch II isn't enough, how about Wizard! Wizard 
is a well-done character set that replaces the standard 
character set in Telewriter. It features nicely-shaped 
characters with a touch of curl and true descenders. Wizard 
works on any version of Telewriter-64 including 16K. 

Although the program works well, I found the loading 
process for disk to be a little clumsy. You must first load 
and EXEC Telewriter in order to get the original character 
set into memory. Then you open the disk drive door and 
select disk 1/ O thus forcing an 1/ O Error. Next, type CLEAR 
10, then load and run WIZ.BAS. This brings up the Wizard 
title page and loads the new character set into memory. I 
don't like the idea of forcing a disk 1/ O, especially by leaving 
the drive door open. 

I discovered that after selecting the disk I/O and BASIC 
from the menu, I could then load and run Wizard. I then 
typed EXEC and pressed the Reset button. 

Either works fine, but I would like to see a more user- 
friendly way to use this otherwise fine character set. Neither 
Telepatch II nor Wizard are copy protected, so back-up 
copies are easy to make. 

I think these two programs are excellent choices for the 
Telewriter-64 user. The price is reasonable and both are 
availabe for the package price of $29.95. 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O.Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $29.95 plus $3 S/H) 



BASIC COMPILER 



•ABATCHWARE believes that users of The Color Computer deserve the 
right to use all 64k of RAU that 1b available In the computer, and hdve 
fast naehine language programs that UBe the full potential of the 6bliy 
microprocessor. That is why the BASIC compiler, called MLBASIC was 
developed. Here are some of the reasons that make this compiler one of 
the best bargains In this magazine: 

- Use all 64k of RAM for program storage and/or variables 

- full Floating Point arithmetic expressions with functions 

- Full sequential and direct access disk files allowed 

- BASIC source and M.L. output I/O to disk, tape or memory 

- Many ae« comaandB that expand your programming capability 



Commands Supported 



1. I/O -Commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEM 
GET INPIT KILL 



DIR 
LSET 



DRIVE 
OPEN 



DSKIS 
PR I NT 



DSKOS 
PUT 



FIELD 
RSET 



2. Program Control CommondB 

CALL END EXEC FOR STEP NEXT 

THEN ELSE ERROR ON., CO RETURN STOP 



OOSUB GOTO 
SUBROUTINE 



FILES 
USING 



IF 



3. Math Functions 

ABS ASC ATN COS 

INT LEN LOG LOC 

SGN SIN SQR TAN 

4. String Functions 

CHRS IN KEYS LEFTS MIDS 

5. Graphic/Sound Commands 
COLOR CLS CIRCLE DRAVi 
PMODE PRESET PSET RESET 

6. Other/Special Commands 

DATA DIM LLIST MOTOR 

TAB VERIFY DLD DST 

REAL SREG SWP VECTD 



CVN EOF 
LOF PEEK 
TIMER YAL 



EXP 
POINT 



MKNS 



RIGHTS STRS 



FIX INSTR 
PPOINT RND 



STRINGS 



LINE PAINT PCLEAH PCLS PLAY 
SCREEN SET SOUND 



POKE 

IBSHFT 

VECTI 



READ 
LREG 



REN 

PCOPY 



RESTORE RUN 
PMODD PTV 



CoBplled Program Speed (Time in minutes : seconds) 



Program Interpreter MLBASIC 

Eratosthenes Sieve "6: 58.7 0:06,3 
Matrix Fill, Mult ,Suro 

10x10 0:30.9 0:02.5 

String Manipulation 6:22.5 2:17.7 

Floating Point 0:32.6 0:30.6 

Disk I/O 

(2000 PR I NT/ INPUTs) 2:21.5 0:27.6 



RAINBOW 

CumncATiON 

SEAL 



DON'T HESITATE. . .BUY MLBASIC TODAY 



Disk - S69.95 
Tape - S69.95 
Soth - S74.95 



64 K REQUIRED 



Include >4.00 Shipping and Handling 

Utah residents add 5.75 % tax 

Check or Money Orders Only (No C.O.D.) 



WasatchWare 

7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, UT 
84121 



CALL (801) 943-6263 



168 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Jerry Semones 



Two-Liner Contest Winner + . . 

Here is a routine that plays a tune from a popular 
movie. The programming aspects of how to create 
repeated phrases are rather interesting. Enjoy this 
one and then tear it apart. 

The listing: 

1 A$="03 ;L8;D;G;A;B;L4;A;L2;F+;L 
8;D;G;A;B;L2.7A;L8;D;G;A;B;L4;A; 
L2 ; F+ ; L8 ; F+ ; G ; F+ ; D ; L2 . ; D" : B$= M 04 
;L8;D;C+?03;L8;B;A;04;L2 . ;C+;03; 

L2;B;L4;A;04;L8;D;C+;03;B;A;04;L 

2 . ; C+ ; L8 ; D ; C+ ; O 3 ; B ; L4 ; A ; 04 ; L2 ; C+ 

;03;B;L4;A;L8;F+;G;F+;D;L2. ;D" 
2 PLAY A$ : PLAYA$ : PLAYB$ : PLAYB$ : P 
LAY A$:PLAYA$:GOT01 

Paul Wigowsky 
Woodburn, OR 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



Software Review ^SSZSSSSSST/^ 

Homeware: A Home 
Management System 

Tothian Software has released Homeware, a group of six 
programs (called modules) intended to help the CoCo user 
with various household chores. Each module is loaded and 
run separately. Homeware may be purchased as a set, or 
each module may be bought individually. Although sold on 
tape, all have provision for use with either tape or disk. 

Of these programs, the Director module has the most 
desirable features. It is set up as a name, address and 
telephone number program, but can be used to keep track 
of birthdates or other information. In contrast to most 
programs of this kind, the information entered becomes a 
new data line in the program itself. After entering the names 
and addresses, the whole program is saved on a separate 
tape (or on disk). This is particularly useful for data not 
updated often and for the tape user tired of searching for 
the correct data tape. 

The program has a search routine which functions rapidly 
to find any specified portion of the entries made. Names 
and addresses can be printed out in mailing label form and 
you can choose either all of the names or specify each one 
individually. The information can also be printed out across 
the page. Portions of the entry may be printed too. For 
example, just names and telephone numbers without the 
addresses. 

The Savings and Loans modules, although separate 
programs, are sold together and provide information on 
interest calculations. The Loans module, in particular, is 
helpful. Enter the amount you can afford to pay each month 
and the number of years to pay back the loan. You are then 
provided with the amount the loan can be. 

The JNVEN module is a simple database program to keep 
track of various items. It writes the data entered to tape or 
disk. But the instructions provided do not give enough 
information to permit proper use. If the data is entered with 
one category being the number of items and another 
category the value of that item, a printed list of total value 
can be obtained. Nowhere in the program or documentation 
was this indicated. 

The Calendar module prints, either on the screen or to 
a printer, a calendar for the month and year you request. 
If the printer has an elongation mode, you can enter very 
brief notes for the applicable dates. When the calendar is 
printed, these notes are listed numerically under the 
calendar page for that month. Notes entered cannot be 
saved for later retrieval. 

The word processor module, Homwrite, is rather 
primitive. It has both typewriter mode and insert modes. 



Visit the 
CoCo Community Center 
THE RAINBOW'S CoCo SIG 

on 
DELPHI 



Individual letters may be deleted by using the BREAK key. 
There is no word wrap, so words break at the end of each 
32-character line. The end of a paragraph is signaled by 
typing enter and a colored block appears in the text at that 
point, but the cursor does not move to a new line. Tabs may 
also be set or text centered, both of which are indicated on 
the screen, but the cursor does not move over the specified 
number of spaces. A routine allows rapid forward and 
backward scrolling through 15 lines of text, but there is no 
repeat key function to allow rapid cursor movement 
through the text. 

Prior to printout, a menu allows changes in margins, line 
length and page length. In contrast to the screen display, 
the text is printed so that no word is split at the end of a 
line." The printout is single spaced, although extra spaces 
may be added after each paragraph. 

To summarize, the Director module is very useful for 
people with a tape system who wish to maintain a name and 
address file without having to search for a separate data 
tape. The Savings and Loan modules also work well. The 
calendar is perhaps less than what most people would expect 
from a computerized calendar program and the inventory 
program suffers from somewhat inadequate instructions. 
The final program, Homwrite, is not on a par with the other 
modules. It lacks so many common features that I hesitate 
to call it useful. 

(Tothian Software, Inc, P.O. Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 
16248, 16K ECB, set $49.95, individual modules $19.95) 

— Carol Kueppers 



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July 1986 THE RAINBOW 169 



Software Review ^SSSSSSSSSSS 

XWord, XSpell and XMerge 

are Xtra Good 

by Larry Goldwasser 

XWord, XSpell, XMerge is a complete word processing 
system for OS-9 users. The X series consists of four free- 
standing programs for use under the OS-9 operating system 
on the Color Computer. 

The first program is XWord. It contains both XEd, a text 
editor, and XPrint, a text formatter and printer driven The 
major advantage to having these programs separate is the 
ability to use XEd to process OS-9 procedure files. I have 
never liked the editor supplied with OS-9 and I believe that 
others will want to use XEd too. 

XEd must be installed in the current execution directory 
via the copy command. If you use only one drive (always 
a problem with OS-9) you must first load Copy and then 
proceed with a single drive copy. 

In addition to XEd, a screen driver must be installed. The 
screen drivers supplied are XCodes, the normal CoCo 
screen, ,OPAK for O-PAK, .XS for XScreen, and .XP for 
Wordpdk. All of the drivers automatically adjust for the 
screen size you are using. 

To start using XEd, type XED followed by either the 
filename you want to edit or the OS-9 memory option. At 
startup there is approximately 4 l A K. You are greeted by 
a blank screen with a status line on top. The status line gives 
tabs, overwrite or insert mode, wordwrap status and cursor 
position. 



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With XEd, carriage returns are visible allowing the user 
to see where lines will end. XEd uses the CLEAR key as a 
control key and commands are entered as some variation 
of the control key plus at least one other key. The arrow 
keys are used to move the cursor non-destructively around 
the document. 

The authors chose to stay with the OS-9 standard Clear 
A for insertion and Clear D for deletion instead of 
remapping the keyboard. For regular OS-9 users this should 
cause no problems. Most of the commands are accessible 
through the Clear C command mode entry. Command mode 
commands are: ?, H, T, B, F, R, V, A, X, U, K, O, D, I, 
W, Q, Z, P, S, C, M, L, N, G and E. Obviously, there is 
not room in a review to cover all these, but I will try to cover 
the most important ones. 



Command 


Function 

M. MH VII VII 


9 

• 


list available command mode commands 


H — 


list edit mode commands and explanations 

A -fc- V V AjA- A K* AAA V A A A A A A A^p A A ^ta P fc^ W A A %V V A A A A A V A A A »rf 


T 

X 


move cursor to ton of text (\x\ buffer onlv^ 

lllv Y v vUl Jul lv l> V L/ VI IvAl 1 111 L/LlllVl Will j J 


B — 


move cursor to bottom of text (in buffer 




onlV) 


F — 

Ja 


find a strinc 

A 111U fc* O VI lllfc 


R — 


find and replace a string with another 




string 


V — 


find and verify a string before replacing it 


A — 


find and replace a string again 


X — 


set tab 


u — 


unset tab 


K — 


kill all tabs 


O — 


execute an OS-9 command and return 


I — 


toggles overwrite mode on and off 


W — 


toggles wordwrap mode on and off 


Q - 


quit editing 


Z — 


abort editing (does not save work) 


P — 


quit editing and print 


M — 


get more text to edit (from file) 


G — 


get file (file insertion) 


E — 


define user programable keys ( 4 K\ *N\ 'O' 




and 'U') 



This is not a complete list of the available commands but 
rather the ones I used the most. There is a whole set of block 
commands which I have ignored but are very useful. One 
note I should make is that the Q command automatically 
saves current work. 

XPrint is the text formatter and printer driver supplied 
with the XWord system. It consists of three files: XP, Index 
and INIT.?. The question mark stands for the abbreviation 
of your printer. XPrint includes several printer drivers as 
well as the information necessary to change one of these to 
your printer. 

When you have finished modifying the file, it must be 
copied into the execution directory as INIT.XP and the 
attribute of this file must be changed to allow it to be 
executable. This is done by typing RTTR /d0/cmds/ 
INIT.XP E. 

If you use more than one printer, you have the option 
of calling the init file wanted on the XPrint command line. 
You cannot do this if you call XPrint from XEd with the 
Clear C P command. 

Most of the commands XPrint uses are entered on a 
format line. A format line starts with a period and calls the 
formatting options overriding the format options specified 
in the init file. These format options can be included in the 



1 70 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



command line or they can be in the text file itself (preceded 
by a period which must be the first character in the line). 

This may seem a little complicated, but that's the price 
for the ability to change virtually any formatting option. 
These options include: 

Margin (may be different for odd or even number pages) 
TM — top 
BM — bottom 
LM — left 
RM — right 

PL — page length (must be the same for even and odd 
pages) 

Line Format (may be different for odd or even pages) 
L — left justified 
C — centered 
R — flush right 

J — justified (except those ending in carriage returns) 

A — all lines justified 

LS — line spacing 

PG — end page and force new page 

OP — force end page and start at top of next odd page 

EP — force end page and start at top of next even page 

PP — page pause after printing 

SP — force specified number of blank lines to be printed 
NL — force specified number of lines to be printed in a 
block 

FI — include file specified in printing 

The list of available options is quite lengthy and if there 
are any omissions, I couldn't find them. Both header and 
footer insertions are supported and the page number may 
be included in either. Page numbers may be in either Arabic 
or Roman numerals. Tabbing is fully supported and this 
option includes the headers and footers. 

Printer commands include font changes, print quality 
changes, underline, double strike, size of characters and 
spaces, width changes, superscript and subscript, italics and 
so forth. 

If something needs to be changed in the printing of the 
text you may imbed a special instruction within a back-slash 
(\) character. This printer code is not limited to the printer 
presets specified in the init file, but may be any special 
printer code chosen by using \z( printer cade)\. 

XPrint also uses the program module Index to store, in 
a file, words and the current page number the user wants 
to save for later printing as an index page. This file prints 
three inches wide allowing two columns per page. There are 
many options which I have omitted. 

All the options mentioned worked well and exactly as 
described. I had to make extensive changes to the closest 
init file to my printer. I did this without difficulty by 
consulting the printer code summary from the printer users 
manual. 

The documentation supplied with XWord is excellent. 
The printing and binding make the documentation easy to 
use. The index and table of contents simplify looking up 
a specific topic. In short, the seventy-five pages give the user 
all the information needed. I felt the section on XEd was 
easier to use than the section on XPrint. 

At first I was puzzled about where to use the format lines 
in XPrint. The examples given helped me to use the 
program, but still left me with questions. I had to do some 



experimentation to find out how some sections really 
worked. 

The major complaint I have is not really a program fault. 
I do not have O-PAK, X Screen, or Wordpak80. This forced 
me to use the X Codes 3 1 -character screen. The cursor is very 
busy in XEd and if you watch the screen it is annoying. One 
thing which would make the program easier to use is a 
repeat key, at least for cursor movement. 

In summary, this is a very effective and complete word 
processing system. I would recommend XWord to anyone 
who uses OS-9 on the Color Computer. 

The third program I reviewed is XSpell, a spelling checker 
for text files. It can also detect obvious typographical errors 
which would result in nonsense words. X Spell is called from 
the execution directory. The user may switch disks if 
necessary to get the file to be checked in the drive. 

The program then prompts for the name of the file to be 
checked. Give the name of the file including any pathnames 
necessary. XSpell opens the file and asks whether you want 
to consider as a word any group of characters enclosed by 
spaces or carriage returns (A) or only consider reasonable 
words (S). Using the *S' selection eliminates any word or 
group with numbers, etc. 

Generally, the user would choose selection 'A'. XSpell 
reads the entire file and constructs a list of all the words 
in the document. After digesting the file, the program asks 
for the name of the dictionary to use. This dictionary can 
be DICT (20,000 words), or DICT40 (40,000 words), the 
two dictionaries supplied with the program, or it could be 
a dictionary of your own creation. 

After the dictionary file is opened, the program asks if 



TIME MASTER Calendars, biorhythms, human 
compatibility, more. Fun at parties. Printer 
optional. Reviewed 12/85. 16K ECB. $19.95 

PERPETULIFE Challenging board game based on 
Life. Play a friend or play (lose to) CoCo. 
Reviewed 4/86. 16K ECB/ML . $19.95 

GRAPHIC ECHO New! Versatile graphic screen 
dump for RS dot matrix printers. Regular or 
enlarged images. Positive or negative images. 
Adjustable margin or auto-centering. Works in 
all 5 PMODEs. 16K/32K ML. $14.95 

TEACHER PAK PLUS The works for teachers. $47.95 



HOMEWARE New! Give your CoCo real power at 
home. Printer preferred. Works with tape or 
disk, five 16K ECB/ML modules: 

CALENDAR - Draw calendars for any date. 
Various formats. Add appointments, memos. 
SAVINGS/LOANS - Work out a personal savings 
plan. Decide if you can afford that loan. 
DIRECTORY - Keep track of phone numbers, 
addresses, etc. Print address labels, 
INVENTORY - For home insurance records, 
hobbles, small business. Very flexible. 
HOME-WRITER - ML word processing powerful 
enough for home use but easy enough to be 
totally mastered in one short sitting. 
Single modules: $19.95 Whole set: $49.95 

All programs sold on tape. Send check or money 
order, no cash (Pa, residents add 67.) to: 

Tothi an Software, Inc. 

RAINBOW BOX bDO RAINBOW 



""Sir' 0 " Rimersburg, Pa. 16248 



H-l 



All of these programs carry the Rainbow Seal. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 171 



you intend to update the dictionary with any new words it 
encounters. You also are given the option of starting a 
dictionary file with new words. These options are important 
if you plan to use the speller with technical reports or legal 
forms. Each time the program encounters a new word it 
requests a disposition on the word. The choices are: D, add 
all words to the dictionary; A, add this word to the 
dictionary; I, ignore this word and go to the next; M, mark 
this word as being incorrect; X, mark all words as incorrect; 
and Q, quit and return to DOS. Options A and D are not 
valid if you have previously selected not to add words to 
the dictionary. 

After all unknown words have been processed, XSpell 
asks if you want to write a new text file. If yes, the program 
asks whether corrected or marked. Selecting Marked causes 
the entire text file to be rewritten with the questionable 
words marked by three asterisks trailing the word. If you 
select Correct, the text file is rewritten and as the program 
encounters each of the words you have selected as wrong, 
it prompts you to correct it. If the word was actually correct, 
you may choose to ignore the word and go on or mark the 
word to be looked at later. 

One of the nicer features of XSpell is the ability to create 
its own dictionary. This can be created in one of two 
formats, either full format or compressed. The full format 
is simply a text file with words in it followed by a carriage 
return. The compressed mode offers the advantage of 
reduced disk space requirements and easier, quicker 
handling. Its main disadvantage is the relative difficulty for 
editing. 

The obvious solution is to keep two dictionaries, one in 
full format and the other an exact copy except in com- 
pressed form. In either form the dictionary must be sorted 
in alphanumeric order making the easiest method of 
creating the program XSpell itself, which has a module 
designed to do this specific task. 

When the user starts the program, he is asked if the new 
words are to be saved into a new dictionary or added to 
the old dictionary. This process creates a new dictionary or 
enlarges the current one. An XSpell dictionary may span 
several disks; the program prompts the user when to switch 
disks. 

I found XSpell easy to use, but somewhat disappointing. 
Other spellers I have used offer the user the closest correct 
spellings it has on file. The user may select one of these 
spellings to be substituted or the user may correct the word 
from the keyboard. XSpell gives no such alternatives. The 
user must enter the correct spelling from the keyboard 
without benefit of the program's own dictionary. This forced 
me to have two dictionaries, one on disk and one in my 
hand. 

One other problem I encountered with the XSpell 
program is its inability to distinguish imbedded control 
commands unless they are separated from the text by 
spaces. When I failed to use both leading and trailing spaces, 
the program presented these codes as words and prompted 
me for a disposition. Neither of these problems was very 
serious, but both were annoying. 

XMerge is an upgrade to the XPrint module included in 
the XWord package. XMerge supports all of the formatting 
and printing commands available with XPrint and adds a 
few new ones of its own. They include: RP, Repeat text file 
X number of times; MF, Merge file name; RV, Read 
variables; PV, Prompt for variables; and SV, Set variable 
equal to string. 



XMerge, like XPrint, must first be copied into the current 
execution directory. The program is then called with any 
command line options desired. XMerge, through the use of 
its special merge commands, allows the user to take 
variables from one file and combine them with the text from 
another file as it is printed. 

This is the mechanism by which those personalized 
computer generated letters are made. This is also the way 
a mailing list is merged into a form letter. XMerge makes 
this process very easy. The user simply makes a form letter 
as a text file and includes, within square brackets, a variable 
name such as Name. The user must also make a merge file 
with a list of names. When XMerge encounters the 
bracketed variable, it looks at the merge file and selects the 
first name and inserts it. On the next form letter it takes 
the next name and so on. The user may have many such 
variables and the merged variable may be any combination 
of letters, numbers, or symbols up to eighty characters. All 
must be on one line, ended by a carriage return. The variable 
must be declared in a format line and the merge file must 
have been opened by the MF= command. 

XMerge also allows the user to stop at each variable and 
prompt for keyboard input to be inserted in the text file. 
This is the .PV option. Something to remember: All files 
to be handled must be in ASCII. 

The documentation for XMerge is complete and easy to 
understand. The examples given by the authors are clear 
and make the program much easier to use and understand. 

As a general summary, the X series is a fine program 
group. If it has one weak link, it is XSpell which is not as 
full-featured as the other modules. I would rate XSpell as 
good and the other modules as excellent. If you use OS- 
9 on the Color Computer, you could not make a finer 
purchase than XWord, XSpell, XMerge. I recommend it 
highly. 



(Microtech Consultants Inc., 1906 Jerrold Ave., St. Paul, 
MN 55112, XWord $69.95, XSpell $39.95, XMerge $24.95, 
all three $114.95, plus $3 S/H) 




Visit the 
CoCo Community Center 
THE RAINBOW'S CoCo SIG 

on 
DELPHI 



1 72 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 





y i y ^ 




r r 



Those Great RAINBOW Programs 

Without All The Fuss! 
Subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 



Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

. ■ . ■ . :y..:-/-. • . - r **rM 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
la all other countries. Theannual subscription 
rate for mimbowon tape is $80 within the U.S,; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $1 05 far all other 
countries. U.S. currency on//i please. Jn order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do ntrt 
bill. 




NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, RAINBOW ON TAPE can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of the rainbow's Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past July issues are also 
available for immediate download in the RAINBOW ON TAPE 
Database area in the rainbow's Color Computer SIG on 
Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



rainbow on tape is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOWON TAPE, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, (credit card orders only) call 
1-800-847-0309, 8 a.m. -5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call 1-502-228-4492 



Programs from Our Past July Issues: 

July 1985 (Fourth Anniversary Issue) — Musicfest, eight of 
America's most-loved patriotic songs; The Right Track, 
makes use of all 40 or 80 tracks of a drive and both sides of 
a double-sided drive; Anniversary SpeciaL'The Ultimate 
Program, two "What If?" Simulations, World War II and Stock 
Car Racing, including a Simulation generator for writing 
scenarios; Jetpack Challenge, an arcade type game for 
practicing maneuvering skills; USA Flag, creates a represen- 
tation of the Stars and Stripes; Eye Saver, displays light 
characters on a dark background for easier screen reading; 
Rapid Reading, utility to increase your reading rate to 600 
words per minute; Machine* Code Loader, utility to allow the 
use of machine language without an editor/assembler; 
Rockfest II, a tutorial and graphics display of logos from rock 
group favorites; plus 18 additional programs. 

July 1984 (Third Anniversary Issue) — American Patrol, a 
graphics and musical salute to Independence Day; Landlord, 
a Simulation of the popular board game, Monopoly; Cooking 
With CoCo, the first in a series of programs to enhance disk 
operating systems; Anniversary Special: Arconiax Assign- 
ment, the first-ever scratch-and-sniff Adventure; Slash, a 
printer utility to help in distinguishing zeros from the letter 
'O'; Bats and Bugs, an arcade-type thriller; Reverse, a game 
of logic; Cassette Label, prints customized labels for musical 
tapes; Orbital Motion, the first in a series on creating 
Simulations; plus six more programs. 



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Transfer CoCo Text Files 

to MS-DOS Disks 



By Marty Goodman 



TF the last installment of this 
I series I discussed transferring 
A-lMtext files from a single-sided 
MS-DOS disk to the CoCo. In this 
month's article, I will discuss formatting 
a disk (using the CoCo) as a single-sided 
MS-DOS disk and transferring text 
files from the CoCo to that MS-DOS 
disk. 

This converter is designed to work 
with Disk Extended BASIC versions 1.0 
and LI only. The program is not in- 
tended to work with OS-9 or other 
CoCo operating systems. It should 
work properly with most Disk Ex- 
tended BASIC Enhancements. It has 
been tested using ADOS from Spectro- 
systems and functions properly under 
that set of enhancements. 

You need a CoCo with at least two 
single-sided disk drives. I have required 
the use of two 40-track capable disk 
drives because with one drive the con- 
version would be unacceptably slow. 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. 
Marty is the database manager of rain- 
bow's CoCo Sig on Delphi. His non- 
computer passions include running, 
mountaineering and outdoor photo- 
graphy. Marty lives in San Pablo, 
California, 

176 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



There is no support provided for single- 
drive systems or double-sided drives. 
Old gray CoCo drives from Tandy 
probably won't work with this program 
because most of them can access only 
35 tracks. Almost all disk drives sold in 
the last two years by Tandy and by third 
party sources are 40-track capable and 
should work fine. 

Note that this program package is 
more useful than the one I presented 
before, in the sense that any MS-DOS 
machine can read files from a single- 
sided MS-DOS disk. So, when transfer- 
ring files from CoCo Disk BASIC format 
to MS-DOS machines, the fact that a 
CoCo (typically) has only single-sided 
drives available is not as much of a 
disadvantage as it was in the case of file 
transfer in the other direction. 

This package consists of the follow- 
ing programs: 

MS19GENBAS — This BASIC pro- 
gram creates the machine language file 
MS19SET.BIN. 

MSFORMAT.BAS — BASIC driver 
program for MS19SET.BIN. 

ADDLF.BAS — BASIC utilty for 
adding line feeds to CoCo text files. 
This will be needed in most cases to 
condition CoCo files prior to transfer- 
ring them. 

COC02MS.BAS — main CoCo to 
MS-DOS converter 



All of these programs are presented 
in this article, are available on RAINBOW 
ON TAPE, and are downloadable from 
the Delphi CoCo SIG from the RAIN- 
BOW ON TAPE area. Source code for 
MS19SET.BIN is posted in the free 
download area of Delphi's CoCo SIG 
under the filename MS19SET.SRC. 

Formatting 

To transfer CoCo files to a disk that 
will be read by an IBM PC or other MS- 
DOS machine, we must have a disk 
formatted in the way MS-DOS expects: 
40 tracks, nine 5 12-byte-long sectors per 
track and nine sectors per track. One 
can make up such a disk on an MS- 
DOS machine by using the command 
FORMRT B: 

What if you want to move files to an 
MS-DOS disk and all you have is the 
CoCo? It happens that the CoCo is 
capable of formatting a disk in MS- 
DOS fashion (single-sided only, of 
course, assuming single-sided drives). 
My little utility MSI9SET.BIN, com- 
bined with the BASIC driver program 
MSFORMAT.BAS allows you to do 
this. First type in and save to disk 
MS19GEN.BAS. Then run the pro- 
gram. It creates and saves to disk the 
needed machine language program 
MS19SET.BIN. 

After creating the program 
MS19SET, be sure to have it on the 



same disk with MSFORMA T. BA S. 
Now run MSFORMA T.BAS. You are 
instructed to put a blank, unformatted 
disk into Drive 1 and press ENTER. The 
disk will be formatted in MS-DOS 
fashion. Some minimal amounts of 
specific data entered into key sectors in 
the FAT (File Allocation Table) and 
Directory sectors will make the disk a 
proper blank MS-DOS type disk. Never 
simply LORDM and EXEC MS19SET.BIN. 
If you do, it will attempt to format the 
disk in Drive 0. 

Technical Tip 

There is an idiosyncrasy in the NEC 
disk controller chip used on virtually all 
IBM PCs and clones. Unlike the West- 
ern Digital disk controller chip used in 
the CoCo and Model IV, the NEC chip 
performs an automatic hardware reset 
when it sees the index sector hole. So 
when programming a Western Digitial 
chip to format a disk to be read by an 
NEC controller chip, you should be 
careful to make the initial gap between 
the index sector hole and the first sector 
header somewhat bigger than you 
would if writing a format track for the 
Western Digital chip itself. If you don't, 
the machine trying to read the disk with 
the NEC chip may sometimes fail to see 
the first sector on a given track because 
the NEC chip is still recovering from its 
automatic reset. 

Full source code (in Macro 80C 
format) for MS19SET.BIN is available 
in the free download section of the 
Delphi CoCo SIG, in the assembly 
language topic area. Feel free to exam- 
ine it and compare how I did the format 
routine there to how Microsoft did the 
format code for the Color Computer's 
DSKINI command. A complete disas- 
sembly of the Disk BASIC DSKINI com- 
mand can be found in Spectral Asso- 
ciates Disk Basic Decoded, available 
from both Spectral Associates and from 
Spectrum Projects. 

Note also that if you are trying to read 
an ordinary CoCo format disk on an 
IBM PC or other MS-DOS machine 
with an NEC controller chip and are 
having problems getting the IBM PC to 
read the first sector on the disk, try 
putting a piece of tape over the index 
sector hole on the disk. The index sector 
hole is not used in ordinary sector reads, 
so covering it will not hurt the ability 
of the controller to read the disk. 

The Line Feed Problem 

Although my converter program 
faithfully transfers every byte in a text 
(or other) CoCo file to an MS-DOS 

format disk in proper MS-DOS file 



format, this is not sufficient for practi- 
cal file transfer of ASCII text. In the last 
installment we saw how MS-DOS type 
files come with Line Feed control char- 
acters (LFs) after each Carriage Return 
control character (CR). There we had to 
use a special program after conversion 
to strip out the line feeds so as not to 
confuse the CoCo word processors that 
not only don't use the line feeds, but also 
choke on them when encountered in a 
file. 

For conversion in the reverse direc- 
tion, we must (in nearly all cases) add 
an LF character to the CoCo Text File 
after each Carriage Return in the text. 
If we fail to do this, the converted file 
is unreadable to most MS-DOS based 
word processors. So, before moving a 
CoCo text file to an MS-DOS disk, 
convert it to a file with added LFs using 
ADDLF.BAS. This program is a clever 
hybrid of BASIC Disk I/O and ML file 
conditioning written by Art Flexser and 
enhanced by Don Hutchison. Both of 
these folks can be found on the Delphi 
SIG (user names ARTFLEXSER and 
DONHUTCHISON). It is included in 
this article by the kind permission of its 
author. 

Simply run ADDLF.BAS. It 
prompts for the filename of the file to 
be conditioned and then for the file- 
name of the conditioned file that will be 
written. Then it adds LFs after each CR 
it finds, and rewrites the file to the new 
filename specified. 

File Conversion 

You are finally ready to use CO- 
C02MS.BAS, the main file converter 
program. This program is written in 
BASIC and is commented. The program 
is essentially self-prompting and menu 
driven. Simply LDflD and run the pro- 
gram. Put a CoCo Disk BASIC type disk 
in Drive 0 and a single-sided MS-DOS 
format disk in Drive 1 . Press ENTER and 
the program confirms that a proper type 
MS-DOS disk is indeed in Drive L It 
reads the directory of the CoCo disk in 
Drive 0, and puts the directory entries 
on the screen as a menu for you to select 
the filename you want to convert. Note 
that a completely full CoCo disk can 
have up to 68 separate files on it, so if 
there are more files, the program re- 
minds you there are more to be seen if 
you press the appropriate arrow keys. 

A note here on user interface design: 
This arrangement of file selection is 
inferior to a true point and pick selec- 
tion routine, where all filenames are 
scrolled past a pointer and you press the 
firebutton or ENTER key to select a file. 
But it is far superior to blindly typing 



in a filename and being expected to get 
the spelling and syntax precisely right. 

Select a file by pressing the letter 
associated with the filename. The screen 
clears and you are asked to confirm the 
choice. Press ENTER again and file 
conversion begins. The time needed 
depends on the size of the file, but goes 
fairly rapidly (roughly 2400 Baud). 
During conversion, the screen displays 
the number of bytes still to be con- 
verted. After the conversion is com- 
pleted, you are asked for a filename to 
be assigned to the file as it exists on the 
MS-DOS disk. You can then exit the 
program or restart it. 

Note that all files converted to the 
MS-DOS disk will be written to the root 
directory. This program is incapable of 
creating or writing to subdirectories on 
the MS-DOS disk. The program also 
adds some trash to the end of a file after 
converting it. Usually this trash is from 
the file itself. So don't be alarmed if at 
first glance you see what appears to be 
a file with a few of its last lines cut off. 
Most likely, if you look back you will 
see the true end of the file. This minor 
flaw is due to my lazy decision to write 
MS-DOS files in even 512-byte-sector 
size increments. 



Man's Best Friend? 




Goodman 



For the last four years IVe been 
doing nearly all of my day-to- 
day computing on a heavily re- 
packaged Radio Shack 'D* board Color 
Computer. This unit is powered by a 
linear power supply I designed and 
built. When the unit was first built, the 
power supply showed some problems 
whenever the disk drives were accessed. 
Black bars appeared on the screen 
during such access. I traced this prob- 
lem to bad head room on the input to 
my 12-vplt regulators. I added an 
autotransformer to boost the incoming 
voltage to greater than 120 VAC. This 
cured the problem for the next four 
years. 

About a week ago the problem re- 
turned. More and more during disk 
access, the screen was darkened by slow 
moving black bars. The problem got 
worse over the next few days. Eventu- 
ally the bars sometimes appeared even 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 177 



Hacker Tips 

Hackers will note that I have success- 
fully used the MS2 COCO program 
(presented in the previous installment of 
this series) to transfer CoCo machine 
language programs and CoCo token- 
ized BASIC programs I downloaded 
from Delphi over to my CoCo Disk 
BASIC disks using my IBM PC clone. I 
deleted statement 5050 from 
MS2COCO to insure a pure byte for 
byte transfer, then transferred the files 
to the CoCo Disk. I loaded the .TXT 
files created into MIKEYTERM 4.0 
and saved them as binary ML program 
or Compressed (tokenized) BASIC, 
whichever was appropriate to the given 
file. With compressed BASIC programs, 
I'd often get a DS Error when loading 



a file, but the file had loaded fully and 
properly. Saving the result back to disk 
cleaned up the file so that I had a 
working tokenized BASIC file. 

If you do not have Mikeyterm, con- 
dition the file by using a disk zapper 
program to edit the two flag bytes in the 
directory entry that tell Disk BASIC 
what kind of file it is going to deal with. 
Mikeyterm is available in the free 
download section of Delphi's CoCo 
SIG Data Communications database. It 
is the terminal program I use when I am 
telecommunicating with my CoCo. 



Acknowledgments 

I'd like to thank Fred Cisin, author 
of Xenocopy for MS-DOS computers, 



when the disk drives were not spinning. 
The screen would occasionally flicker, 
too. I measured the AC line voltage 
from the outlet the computer was 
plugged into and found it a little on the 
low side. It measured between 106 and 
118 volts. No other appliance in my 
house seemed affected, though 1 occa- 
sionally noticed the lights flickering, 
too. 

As a quick fix, I hooked up a variac 
to my computer's AC input and 
Roosted the incoming voltage by about 
five percent. This completely cured the 
problem of the black bars. I called the 
power company and told them the 
power they were supplying was down 
by a few percent and it was affecting my 
computer. I wanted to know if they 
were going to be standardizing around 
a new and lower power for my area, so 
that I could redesign my computer's 
power supply accordingly. They sent 
out a service person. 

He arrived the next day and quickly 
determined the power in the computer's 
outlet was .down by five to 10 percent. 
He measured the incoming power to the 
house and found it to be normal. He 
decided to check the secondary breaker 
box in my basement. 



When he removed the front panel, we 
were confronted with a sizzling noise 
and the sight of a bright yellow arc 
around one of the main 220 volt lead- 
in wires. The wire and the main bus bar 
were just under red hot, I learned that 
20 years ago when the house was wired, 
the contractor had used aluminum 
wiring for the main 220 volt line. Alu- 
minum wiring has a long history of 
causing houses to burn down (with 
several associated fatalities) due to its 
tendency to get loose in its contacts, 
oxidize, develop resistance and begin to 
arc. 

The scientific explanation is quite 
clear: My poor design of the linear 
power supply for the CoCo had caused 
it to be overly sensitive to lowered 
incoming AC voltage. An idiosyncrasy 
in the CoCo l's video circuitry caused 
a slight decrease in the 12-volt line and 
resulted in the appearance of black bars 
on the screen. My CoCo is a mere 
machine —* a box of silicon chips and 
copper wire. Yet, during the time I was 
fixing the 220 volt contact in the fuse 
box, it was hard for me not to believe 
my devoted CoCo had sent a warning 
to me that saved my life. □ 



for his endless patience in teaching me 
what I needed to know of MS-DOS file 
structure. And Don Hutchison and 
Cray Augsburg (RAINBOWMAG on 
Delphi) for beta testing this material. 
Art Flexser deserves special mention for 
his kindness in donating his ADDLF 
program to this package. 



Other Fine Products 

I'd like to remind readers who need 
to do file transfers between the CoCo 
and other machines of the three other 
commercial programs mentioned in the 
previous installment of this series. 

Mark Data Products makes a pro- 
gram called CoCo Util that converts to 
and from Disk BASIC on an MS-DOS 
type machine. Note that this is an MS- 
DOS program and runs only on MS- 
DOS machines. It is available from 
Mark Data Products, 24001 Alicia 
Parkway, No. 207, Mission Viejo, CA 
92691,(714) 768-1551. 

D.P. Johnson makes conversion 
utilities to handle file conversions 
betwen OS-9 disks and MS-DOS disks. 
These utilities run on the Color Com- 
puter under OS-9, and support double- 
sided disk drives. D.P. Johnson, 7655 
S.W. Cedarcrest St., Portland, OR 
97223,(503) 244-8152. 

For those with an IBM PC or other 
MS-DOS machine who want the ulti- 
mate in file conversion utilties, let me 
recommend Xenocopy II. This program 
runs on nearly all MS-DOS machines 
and will read from, write to and format 
over 250 different disk formats. This 
includes OS-9, Color Computer and 
hundreds of CPM varient formats. If 
you obtain special hardware, this con- 
version program also supports a 
number of 8-inch and 314-inch disk 
formats. Xenocopy II is available from 
Xensoft, 1454 6th Street, Berkeley, CA 
94710,(415) 525-3113. □ 



Listing 1: MS19GEN 
5 GOTO 5)3)3)3)3 

1) 3 NAM$="MS19SET . BIN" 1 FILENAME 

2) 3 S=&H3)3)3)3 1 START ADR 

3) 3 T=&H3242 ' ENDADR 

4) 3 B=&H3)3)3)3 'EXEC ADR 

7) 3 CLS : PRINT@256-32 , "NOW GREAT IN 
G THE FILE" 

75 PRINT "I'LL COUNT BACKWARDS." 

8) 3 PRINT "WHEN I HIT ZERO I'LL BE 
DONE . " 



9)3 X=)3 
10JB CKSM=J3 

I) 35 FOR C=)3 TO 31 

II) 3 READ H$ 

12) 3 IF H$="END" THEN GOTO 9)3)3 

13) 3 D=VAL("&H"+H$) 

14) 3 POKE S+X+C,D:CKSM=CKSM+D 

145 BB=T-(X+S+C) 

146 IF BB<)3 THEN GOTO 15)3 

147 PRINT@334,BB 

15) 3 NEXT C 

16) 3 READ DSUM 



1 78 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



170 IF DSUMOCKSM THEN GOTO 500 

180 X=X+32:GOTO 100 

500 K=INT(X/32) 

510 CLS: SOUND 100,10 

520 PRINT© 2 5 6, "ERROR IN LINE ";1 

000+K 

530 END 

900 CLS: PRINT "PUT A DISK IN DRIV 
E 0" 

910 PRINT "TAP ENTER TO SAVE" 
920 PRINT" ";NAM$ 
930 PRINT"TO YOUR DISK." 
940 A$=INKEY$ 

950 IF A$OCHR$(13) THEN GOTO 94 

960 SAVEM NAM$ , S , T , B 

980 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ALL D 

ONE ! " 

990 END 

1000 DATA BE,C0, 6, 6F,84,AD,9F / C0 
, 4 , 6D , 6 , 10 , 2 6 , 1 , 90 , 17 , 1 , 9A , BE , C0 
/ 6,7F,9,85,6F / 2,86 / C0,B7,FF,48,l 
7, 3280 

1001 DATA 1,5E,10,26,1,79,BE,C0 / 
6,20,1C,81,16,25,8,B6,9,86,8A,10 
,B7,FF,40,86,53,B7,FF,48,1E,88,1 
E,88, 2955 

1002 DATA BD, 31, 80, 10, 26,1, 58, A6 
,2,17,1,1B,BD,31,78,10,8E,FF,4B, 
1A,50,8E,30,79,BF,9,83,8E,40,0,B 
6,FF, 2965 

1003 DATA 48,86,FF,B7,9,82,C6,F4 
,F7,FF,48,B6,9,86 / 8A,80 / B7,FF,40 
, E6 , 80 , E7 , A4 , 20 , FA, BE , C0 , 6 , B6 , FF 
,48,1C, 4852 

1004 DATA AF, 84, 44, 10,26,1,18,60 
,2,A6,2,B1,31,A7,10,25,FF,99,8E, 
40,0,CC,FC,FF,ED,81,CC,FF,0,ED,8 
1,CC, 3898 

1005 DATA 0,0,ED,81,8C,42,0,25,F 
9,BE,C0,6,86,3,A7,84,CC,40,0,ED, 
4,CC,0,2,ED,2,AD,9F,C0,4,6D,6, 3 
279 

1006 DATA 10,26,0,DB,86,4,A7,3,A 
D,9F,C0,4,6D,6,10,26,0,CD,CC,0,0 
,FD,40,0,FD,40,2,FD,40,4,86,3, 2 
781 

1007 DATA A7,3,AD,9F,C0,4,6D,6,1 
0,26,0,B3,86,5,A7,3,AD,9F,C0,4,6 
D,6,10,26,0,A5,8E,40,0,CC,F6,F6, 

3119 

1008 DATA ED,81,8C,42,0,25,F9,8E 
,40,0,86,E5,A7,84,30,88,20,8C,42 
,0,25,F6,BE,C0,6,86,3,A7,84,86,6 
,A7, 3562 

1009 DATA 3,AD,9F,C0,4,E6,6,10,2 
6,0,74,6C,3,A6,3,81,A,25,EC,BE,C 



0,6,CC,40,0,ED,4,86,2,A7,84,86, 
3095 

1010 DATA 0,A7,2,C6,1,E7,3,AD,9F 
,C0,4, 6D,6,10,2 6,0,4E, 6C,3,E6,3, 
CI, A, 25, EC, 6C, 2, A6, 2, 81, 28, 25, 2 
681 

1011 DATA E0,7F,FF,40,F,F0, 39, 8E 
,41,E,C6,A, 5A,27,8,A7,84,30, 89,2 
,80,20,F5,39,8E,2 2,2E,30,1F,2 6,F 
C,39, 3144 

1012 DATA 10,8E,0,0,31,3F,27,8,B 
6,FF,48,85,1,2 6,F5,39,86,D0,B7,F 
F,48, IE, 88, 1E,88,B6,FF,48,86,80, 
39, 7F, 3439 

1013 DATA FF,40,86,55,97,F0,39,2 
8,7F,FF,40,39,8E,40,0,CE,32,B, 10 
,8E,0,5,8D,39,31,3F,10,8C,0,0,26 
,F6, 2915 

1014 DATA 4F,B7,32,42,86,1,B7,32 
,41,CE,32, 15, 10, 8E,0, 12, 8D, IF, 31 
,3F,10,8C,0,0,2 6,F6,B6,32,41,4C, 
B7,32, 2594 

1015 DATA 41,81,A,25,E4,CE,32,39 
,8D,7,8D,5,8D,3,8D,1,39,EC,C1,C1 
,BB,27,A,C1,CC,27,B,E7,80,4A,26, 
FB, 3446 

1016 DATA 39,F6,32,42,20,F5,F6,3 
2,41,20,F0,96,4E,14,0,3,F6,1,FC, 
50,4E,C,0, 3,F5,1,FE,1,AA,1,BB,1, 

3112 

1017 DATA CC,1,2,1,F7,16,4E,C,0, 
3,F5,1,FB,80,FF,80,FF,80,FF,80,F 
F, 1, F7, 44 , 4E, FF, 4E, FF, 4E,FF, 4E, F 
F, 4247 

1018 DATA 4E , 0 , 0 , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 
, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F, FF, FF, 7473 

1019 DATA END 

50000 PCLEAR 1:G0T0 10 



Listing 2: MSFDRMRT 



5 LOADM "MS 19 SET" 

10 CLS:PRINT"PUT BLANK DISK IN D 
RIVE 1" 

20 PRINT "HIT ENTER WHEN READY" 

30 IF INKEY$="" THEN GOTO30 

50 POKE &HEB,l:EXEC 

60 IF PEEK(&HF0)<>0 THEN GOTO 10 

0 

70 CLS: PRINT "YOUR DISK IS FORMAT 
TED " 

80 PRINT"AS AN MS DOS SINGLE SID 
ED DISK" 
90 GOTO110 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 179 



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100 CLS: PRINT "ERROR FORMATTING T 
HE DIS" 

110 PRINT" TAP ENTER TO RERUN PRO 
GRAM" 

120 A$=INKEY$ 

13)3 IF A$OCHR$(13) THEN GOTO 12 
0 

140 GOTO 10 



Listing 3: ADDLF 

10 'LINEFEED ADDER 

20 'ART FLEXSER, MARCH 1986 

30 ' 

40 'MODIFIES ASCII FILES BY ADDI 

NG A LINEFEED AFTER EACH 

50 'CARRIAGE RETURN IF ONE IS NO 

T ALREADY PRESENT. 

60 ' 

70 CLEAR200,&H7E00 

80 FORI=&H7E00 TO &H7E37 :READ P$ 

:POKEI,VAL("&H"+P$) : NEXT 

90 DATA 80,18,80,26,80,13,81,00, 

26,F6,8D,0E,81,0A,27,F4, 34,02 

100 DATA 86,0A,8D,0B,35,02,20,E8 

,C6,01,D7,6F,7E,C5 

110 DATA 97,C6,02,D7, 6F,AD,9F,A0 

,02,0F,6F,6E,9F,A0,02,0D,70,27 

120 DATA 04,0F,6F,32,62,39 

130 IF PEEK(&HC004)O&HD6 THEN P 

OKE&H7E20, &HC4 

140 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 8 ) " 

LINEFEED ADDER" : PRINT 

150 LINEINPUT "NAME OF INPUT FILE 

: " ; I $ 

160 LINEINPUT "NAME OF OUTPUT FIL 
Et ";0$ 

170 OPEN "I", #1,1$ 
180 OPEN "0",#2,0$ 
190 EXEC&H7E00 
200 CLOSE 
210 END 



V 210 


30 


17130 


«... 225 


360 


, .163 


20020 


....250 


525 


129 


25000 


....140 


1120 


78 


25160 


....134 


2120 


172 


30050 


. . .47 


10010 


..162 


40050 


....164 


15050 . . 


, 9 


END 


....179 



t 



Listing 4: CDC02MS 

5 CLEAR 4000, &H5DFF 

10 DIM NAM$(64):DIM SG(64) 

20 H=PEEK(&HC004) : L=PEEK ( &HC005 ) 

:DKON=H*256+L 



30 CQ=0:MQ=1 'SET DRIVE # FOR CO 
CO AND FOR MS DOS DISK 
100 CLS : PRINT© 3 2 , " COLOR COMPU 
TER TO MS DOS" 

105 PRINT" FILE CONVERSION UTI 
LITY" 

110 PRINT: PRINT" (C) JAN 1986 MA 
RTY GOODMAN" 

115 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" PUT COCO 

DISK IN DRIVE 0" 
120 PRINT: PRINT" PUT MS DOS DIS 
K IN DRIVE 1" 

125 PRINT: PRINT" (MS DOS DISK MUS 
T BE FORMATTED" 

130 PRINT"AS ONE SIDED 9 SECTOR 
PER TRACK) " 

140 PRINT: PRINT" *** TAP ENTER 
TO PROCEED ***» 

150 IF INKEY$OCHR$ (13) THEN GOT 
0 150 

200 REM READ IN COCO GAT AND MS 
DOS FAT, AND READ COCO DIRECTOR 

Y 

210 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "NOW SETTING 

UP FOR FILE TRANSFER" 

215 PRINT: PRINT "THIS WILL TAKE A 

BOUT 10 SECONDS" 

220 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 

PLEASE WAIT" 
230 POKE &HEA,2:POKE &HEB,CQ:POK 
E &HEC,17:POKE SHED, 2: POKE &HEE, 
&H5F:POKE &HEF, 0 
235 EXEC DKON 

240 IF PEEK(&HF0)<>0 GOTO 9100 
250 FOR N=2 TO 3 

255 POKE &HEB,MQ: POKE &HEC,0:POK 
E &HED,N: POKE &HEE , &H72+ (N-2 ) *2 
257 EXEC DKON 

260 IF PEEK(&HF0)<>0 THEN GOTO 9 
000 

265 NEXT N 

270 GOSUB 30000 

300 REM DISPLAY COCO DIRECTORY 
AND SELECT A FILE TO CONVERT 
310 PAGE=1 

315 IF LE=0 GOTO 9200 
320 REM LOOP 
325 CLS 

330 B=(PAGE-1) *22+l 
335 F=B+21 

340 IF LE<F THEN F=LE 
350 J=0 

355 PRINT§INT(J/2) *32 , CHR$ ( J+65) 
360 PRINT@INT(J/2) *32+2,NAM$ (J+B 

) 

365 J=J+1:IF B+J>F GOTO 395 

370 PRINT§INT(J/2) *32+16 , CHR$ ( 65 

+J) 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 181 



375 PRINT@INT(J/2) *32+18,NAM$ (J+ 
B) 

380 J«J+l:IF B+J>F GOTO 395 
390 GOTO 355 
395 GOSUB 10000 
400 A$=INKEY$ 

402 IF A$=CHR$(32) THEN GOTO 100 

405 IF A$="" GOTO 400 

410 IF PAGE=2 THEN GOTO 475 

415 IF PAGE=1 GOTO 450 

420 IF A$=CHR$(10) THEN PAGE= 2: 

GOTO 320 

430 GOTO 500 

450 IF LE<22 GOTO 500 

455 IF A$=CHR$(94) THEN PAGE=2:G 

OTO 320 

460 GOTO 500 

475 IF LE<44 THEN GOTO 480 

477 IF A$=CHR$(94) THEN PAGE =3: 

GOTO 320 

480 IF A$=CHR$(10) THEN PAGE=1:G 

OTO 320 

500 A=ASC(A$) 

510 A=A-65+B 

515 IF A<0 THEN GOTO 400 
520 IF A>F GOTO 400 
525 CLS 

530 PRINT© 3 2 , "YOU HAVE CHOSEN: " 





On 




THE RAINBOW'S 

e-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 

Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 




535 PRINT : PRINT" " ; : PRINTNAM 

$ (A) : PRINT 

540 PRINT: PRINT "IF THIS IS CORRE 
CT, TAP ENTER" 

545 PRINT" IF NOT, TAP ANY OTHER 
KEY" 

550 A$=INKEY$ 

555 IF A$="" GOTO 550 

560 IF A$OCHR$(13) THEN GOTO 32 

570 GOTO 1000 
900 END 

1000 REM MAIN FILE CONVERSION LO 
OP 

1005 CLS:PRINT@256, " BYTES TRANS 

FERRED: " 

1010 FZ=0 

1015 YY=0 

1020 G=SG(A) 

1025 ZQ=33 

1030 REM LOOP 

1035 EF=0 

1040 GOSUB 40000 

1045 U=9 

1050 IF G<70 GOTO 1100 

1060 U=G-100 

1100 FOR J=l TO U 

1110 L=&H6000+(J-1) *512 

1120 FZ=FZ+512 

1121 PRINT@2 56+19, FZ 

1122 IF G<68 GOTO 1130 
1125 IF J=U THEN EF=255 
1130 GOSUB 25000 

1135 IF YY=0 THEN WW=OC 

1137 IF YY=0 THEN YY=255 

1140 IF CXN=&HAAA THEN GOTO 9300 

1150 NEXT J 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . , 

This little program will be familiar to many of 
you. It emulates the etch-a-sketch idea. Just use 
your joystick to draw. When you are tired of one 
picture and want to start over, press the firebutton 
(it sure beats shaking your computer upside-down). 

The listing: 

10 A=L : B=U : PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 
/l 

20 U=(JOYSTK(l) *3) :L=(JOYSTK(0) * 
4) :K=PEEK(65280) :PSET(L,U) :LINE( 
A, B) - (L,U) , PSET: IFK=1260RK=254TH 
EN 10 E LS EA=L : B=U : GOTO 20 

Stan Hiatt 
Atlantic Beach, FL 



(For this winning two-liner Contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



182 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



116)3 IF EF=255 THEN GOTO 2j3j3j3 

1170 GOTO 1J33J3 
CLS 

2)31)3 PRINT @ 3 2, "TYPE IN A FILE NA 
ME FOR THE" 

2)32)3 PRINT"FILE ON THE MS DOS DI 
SK" 

2)33)3 PRINT"USE UP TO 8 LETTERS" 

2)34)3 PRINT: INPUT A$ 

2)35)3 IF LEN(A$)=)3 THEN GOTO 2)31)3 

2)36)3 B=LEN(A$) 

2)365 IF B=)3 THEN GOTO 2)3)3)3 

2)37)3 IF B>8 THEN GOTO 2)3)3)3 

2)375 IF B=8 GOTO 2)395 

2)38)3 A$=A$+STRING$ (8-B, " ") 

2)395 A$=A$+"COL" 

21)3)3 REM WRITE DIR ENTRY TO MS 

DOS DISK 

21)35 GOSUB 2)3)3)3)3 

211) 3 IF A$="" THEN GOTO 93)3)3 

212) 3 POKE &HEA,3:POKE &HEB,MQ 

213) 3 REM WRITE TWO COPIES OF UPD 
ATED FAT TO MS DOS DISK 

214) 3 FOR N=2 TO 5 

2145 LO=&H72+(N-2*INT(N/2) ) *2 

215) 3 POKE &HED, N : POKE &HEE , LO 

216) 3 EXEC DKON 

217) 3 NEXT N 



218)3 GOTO 3)3)3 

9)3)3)3 CLS : PRINT" BAD MS DOS DISK": 
END 

91) 3)3 CLS : PRINT "BAD COCO DISK": EN 
D 

92) 3)3 CLS: PRINT" COCO DISK IS BLA 
NK" 

921) 3 PRINT" PUT ANOTHER ONE IN D 
RIVE )3" 

922) 3 PRINT" AND TAP ENTER" 

92 3)3 IF INKEY$OCHR$(13) THEN GO 

TO 923)3 

924)3 GOTO 1)3)3 

93) 3)3 CLS:PRINT"MS DOS DISK IS FU 
LL" 

931) 3 PRINT "PUT ANOTHER MS DOS DI 
SK IN" 

932) 3 PRINT 11 DRIVE 1 AND TAP ENTER 



it 



933) 3 IF INKEY=" " THEN GOTO 9 33)3 

934) 3 GOTO 1)3)3 

1)3)3)3)3 PRINT@12*32 , "SELECT FILE B 

Y TAPING A LETTER" 

1)3)31)3 IF LE<22 THEN GOTO 1)3)35)3 

1)3)32)3 IF PAGE=2 THEN GOTO 1)31)3)3 
1)3)33)3 IF PAGE=3 THEN GOTO 1)32)3)3 
1)3)34)3 PRINT "TAP UP ARROW TO SEE 



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CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 

IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 183 



MORE ENTRIES"; 


17200 REM WRITE TO EVEN CLUSTER 


10050 


PRINT "TAP SPACE BAR TO RES 


ENTRY NUMBER 


TART PGM"; 


17210 B1=16*N2+N3 


10060 


RETURN 


17220 B2=B2 AND &HF0 : B2=B2+N1 


10100 


IF LE>44 GOTO 10150 


17230 POKE &H7200+GCN,B1 


10110 


PRINT "TAP DN ARROW TO SEE 


17240 POKE &H7200+GCN+1,B2 


PREV ENTRIES"; 


17250 RETURN 


10120 


GOTO 10050 


17300 B1=PEEK(&H7200+GCN) 


10150 


PRINT "TAP UP ARROW TO SEE 


17310 B2=PEEK(&H7 200+GCN+1) 


MORE ENTRIES"; 


17320 B3=PEEK(&H7200+GCN+2) 


10160 


PRINT "TAP DN ARROW TO SEE 


17340 RETURN 


PREV ENTRIES"; 


20000 REM FIND FREE MSDOS DIR EN 


10170 


GOTO 10050 


TRY 


10200 


PRINT "TAP DN ARROW TO SEE 


20001 REM WRITE A$ INTO THAT ENT 


PREV ENTRIES"; 


RY, WITH ATTRIBUTE BYTE SET TO 2 


10210 


GOTO 10050 


20002 REM LEAVE FILE SIZE BLANK 


15000 


REM READ FAT 


20003 REM THIS IS EQUIV OF AN 


15001 


REM GN =CLUSTER ENTRY # 


'OPEN' STATEMENT 


15002 


REM GN=0 TO 440 


20004 REM IF A$="" ON RETURN THE 


15003 


REM CV = CONTENTS OF THE 


DIR SPACE IS FULL 


CLUSTER NUMBER REQUESTED 


20005 REM A$ IS A STRING 11 BYTE 


15005 


FB=&H7200 


S LONG 


15010 


GIN=INT(GN/2) 


20006 REM WITH FILE NAME AND EXT 


15020 


GCN=3*GIN 


ENTION 


15030 


GF=GN-2*GIN 


20007 REM WW=# OF FIRST CLUSTER 


15040 


B1=PEEK (FB+GCN) 


ENTRY 


15050 


B2=PEEK(FB+GCN+1) 


20010 A$=A$+CHR$(&H20)+STRING$(1 


15055 


B3=PEEK (FB+GCN+2 ) 


4,CHR$(0) ) 


15060 


N1=(B1 AND &HF0)/16 


20020 X=WW:GOSUB 45000 


15070 


N3=(B2 AND &HF0)/16 


20030 G1$=CHR$(L) :G2$=CHR$(H) 


15080 


N5=(B3 AND &HF0)/16 


20035 GOSUB 46000 


15090 


N2=B1 AND &HF 


20040 A$=A$+G1$+G2$+CHR$(D1)+CHR 


15100 


N4=B2 AND &HF 


$(D2)+CHR$ (D3)+CHR$ (0) 


15110 


N6=B3 AND &HF 


20045 GOSUB 20100 


15120 


IF GF=0 GOTO 15200 


20050 IF A$="" THEN RETURN 


15150 


C V=N 3+N6*16+N5*256: RETURN 


20060 FOR Q=0 TO 31 


15200 


CV=N2+N1*16+N4*256: RETURN 


20062 POKE MDB+K*32+Q,ASC(MID$(A 


17000 


REM WRITE A CLUSTER VALUE 


$,Q+1,1)) 


INTO 


A GIVEN CLUSTER NUMBER 


20064 NEXT Q 


17001 


REM GN=CLUSTER NUMBER, CV 


20070 POKE &HEA,3:POKE &HEB,MQ 


IS THE 12 BIT VALUE TO BE PUT TH 


20075 EXEC DKON 


ERE 




20080 RETURN 


17003 


REM THIS IS ALL DONE TO FA 


20100 FOR N=0 TO 3 


T BUFFER AREA. 


20110 MDB=&H7600:MSB=&H76 


17010 


Nl=INT(CV/256) :T=CV-256*N1 


20120 POKE &HEA,2:POKE &HEB,MQ:P 


17020 


N2=INT (T/16) 


OKE &HEC,0:POKE SHED , 6+N : POKE &H 


17030 


N3=T-16*N2 


EE, MSB: POKE &HEF,0 


17050 


GIN=INT(GN/2) 


20130 EXEC DKON 


17060 


GCN=3*GIN 


20135 IF PEEK(&HF0)<>0 THEN GOTO 


17070 


GF=GN-2*GIN 


9100 


17075 


GOSUB 17300 


20140 FOR K=0 TO 15 


17080 


IF GF=0 GOTO 17200 


20150 FB=PEEK (MDB+3 2 *K) 


17100 


REM WRITE TO ODD CLUSTER E 


20160 IF FB=&HE5 THEN RETURN 


NTRY NUMBER 


20170 IF FB=0 THEN RETURN 


17110 


B2=B2 AND &HF : B2=B2+16*N3 


20180 NEXT K 


17120 


B3=16*N1+N2 


20190 NEXT N 


17130 


POKE &H7200+GCN+1,B2 


20195 A$="": RETURN 


17140 


POKE &H7200+GCN+2,B3 


25000 REM FIND FREE CLUSTER 


17150 


RETURN 


2 5001 REM WRITE SECTOR AT LOC L 



184 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



TO THAT CLUSTER 
25j3^2 REM FIND NEXT FREE SECTOR 
25J3J33 REM UPDATE FAT 

25004 REM RETURN WITH NEXT FREE 
CLUSTER 

25005 REM CXN= ENTRY # OF NEXT FR 
EE CLUSTER 

25006 REM IF NO MORE FREE CLUSTE 
RS CXN SET = &HAAA 

25007 REM IF EF=255 THEN DON f T B 
OTHER TO FIND NEXT CLUSTER 

25008 REM AND WRITE END CLUSTER 
FLAD INTO FAT 

25010 Q=INT(L/256) :QL=L-256*Q 

25040 IF ZQ=33 THEN CXN=2:ZQ=0 

25050 FOR GN=CXN TO 3 52 

25060 GOSUB 15000 

25070 IF CV=0 GOTO 25100 

25075 IF CV=&HFF7 GOTO 25100 

25080 NEXT GN 

25090 CXN=&HAAA: RETURN 

25100 REM FIND NEXT FREE GRAN 

25105 0O=GN 

25110 IF EF=255 THEN GOTO 25200 

25120 FOR GN=OC+l TO 352 

25130 GOSUB 15000 

25140 IF CV=0 THEN GOTO 25200 

25150 IF CV=&HFF7 THEN GOTO 2520 

25160 NEXT GN 



2 5170 CXN=&HAAA: RETURN 

2 5200 CXN=GN 

2 5210 GN=OC:CV=CXN 

25215 IF EF=*255 THEN CV=&HFFF 

252 20 GOSUB 17000 'WRITE GAT ENT 

RY TO BUFFER 

25230 REM CALC TRACK AND SECTOR 
FROM OC 

25240 T=INT( (OC-2 ) /9 ) +1 : S=OC+7-9 
*T+1 

2 5250 POKE &HEA, 3 : POKE &HEB,MQ:P 
OKE &HEC,T:POKE &HED,S:POKE &HEE 
,Q:POKE &HEF, QL 
25260 EXEC DKON 
25265 POKE &HFF40,8 
252 70 RETURN 

30000 REM READ COCO DIRECTORY 

30001 REM NAM$ (N)=ENTRY 

30003 REM SG(N) = FIRST GRANULE 

30004 REM ALL FILE TYPES WILL BE 
CONVERTED 

30005 REM LE=NUMBER OF LAST ENTR 
Y 

30010 K=-1:N=1:LE=0 

30020 REM LOOP 

30030 K=K+1 

30040 S=INT(K/8)+3 

30045 KS=K-8* (INT(K/8) ) 

30050 DSKI$ 0,17,S,A$,B$ 

30060 C$=A$ 




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July 1986 THE RAINBOW 185 



30070 IF KS>3 THEN C$=B$ 

30080 KS=KS-(4*INT(KS/4) ) 

30090 T$=MID$(C$,32*KS+1,32*(KS+ 

D) 

30100 FB=ASC(LEFT$(T$,1)) 

30110 IF FB=0 THEN GOTO 30030 ! K 

ILLED ENTRY 

30120 IF FB=2 55 THEN RETURN 'DON 

E. . . EXIT ROUTINE 

30130 REM PROCESS VALID ENTRY 

30140 NAM$(N)=LEFT$(T$,8) 

30150 NAM$(N)=NAM$(N)+" •» 

30160 NAM$(N)=NAM$(N)+MID$(T$,9, 

3) 

30170 SG(N)=ASC(MID$(T$,14,1)) 
30180 LE=N:N=N+l:GOTO 30030 

40000 REM INPUT 2 GRANS INTO THE 
DATA BUFFER 

40001 REM G=FIRST GRAN ON ENTRY 

40002 REM G= NEXT GRAN ON EXIT 

40003 REM IF NO MORE, G=100 + NU 
MBER OF VALID 512 BYTE SECTORS 

40004 REM IN THE BUFFER AREA. 
40010 DF=0 'FIRST GRAN 
40020 REM LOOP 

40025 IF DF>1 THEN RETURN 

40030 DB=&H6000:IF DF<>0 THEN DB 

=&H6900 

40040 GT=G:IFGT>33 THEN GT=GT+2 
40050 T=INT(GT/2) :Q=GT-2*T 



40055 S«1:IF Q<>0 THEN S=10 
40060 GOSUB 41000 

40100 G=PEEK(&H5F00+G) 1 GET NEXT 

GRAN # 
40110 DF=DF+1 
40120 IF G<69 GOTO 40020 
40130 G=G-&HC0 
40140 IF G>9 GOTO 9100 
40150 IF G<1 THEN GOTO 9100 
40160 G=G+1 

40170 IF DF=2 THEN G=G+9 
40180 G=INT(G/2) :G=G+100 
40190 RETURN 

41000 REM BRING GRAN INTO BUFFER 

41010 FOR N=0 TO 8 

41020 POKE &HEA/2:POKE &HEB,CQ:P 

OKE &HEC,T:POKE &HED, S+N: POKE &H 

EE, DB/2 5 6+N: POKE &HEF,0 

41030 EXEC DKON 

41035 IF PEEK(&HF0)<>0 THEN GOTO 

9100 
41040 NEXT N 
41050 RETURN 

45000 H=INT(X/256) : L=X-256*H : RET 

URN 

46000 D3=INT (FZ/65536) 
46010 FZ=FZ-65536*D3 
46020 D2=INT(FZ/256) 
46030 D1=FZ-D2*256 

4 6040 RETURN ^ 



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CALL 1-517-625-4161 

Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-9, Tues. & Thurs. 9-6, Sat. 9-3 

All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Advertised prices are 
cash prices. C.O.D. accepted ($10.00 charge per carton on C.O.O. Catt tor farther 
C.O.D. information.) M.C., Visa, add 2%. A.X., add 3%. All non-defective items re- 
turned will be subject to 10% restocking fee. Defective items require return merchan- 
dise authorization. Call for R.M.A. Number before returning. Delivery is subject to 
product availability. 

124 SOUTH MAIN STREET • PERRY, Ml 48872 



26-3136 16K Standard Color Computer 2 
26-3127 64K Extended Color Computer 2 
26-3131 Disk Drive 0 for Color Computer 

26-3130 Disk Drive 1 for Drive 0 

26-3008 Joystick 

26-3012 Deluxe Joystick (EACH) 

26-3018 Extended Basic Kit 

26-1208 CCR-81 Tape Recorder 

26-1 173 DCM-3 Direct Connect Modem . 



$119.95 
199.95 
299.95 
199.95 
19.95 
29.95 
39.95 
59.95 
59.95 



$ 99.00 
169.00 
240.00 
169.00 
16.95 
25.00 
36.00 
50.00 
50.00 



SOFTWARE 



30001210 Telewriter 64 Tape 


$ 49.95 


$ 42.00 


30001220 Telewriter 64 Disk 


59.95 


49.00 


30001110 VIP Writer 


69.95 


59.00 


30001140 VIP Database 


59.95 


49.00 


30001150 VIP Terminal Disk 


49.95 


45.00 


30001170 VIP Integrated Software 


, . 149.95 


139.00 


30001 1 30 SS/DD 1 0 Pack Diskettes 


21.00 


14.00 



PRINTERS AND ACCESSORIES 

26-1276 DMP-105 80 cps Dot Matrix $199.95 $169.00 

26-1280 DMP-1 30 Dot Matrix 349.95 285.00 

20001025 EPSON LX-80 Printer 369.95 225.00 

20001515 EPSON LX-80 Tractor Feed 29.95 25.00 

20021070 OKIDATA 182 Printer 299.00 245.00 

20041020 STAR SG-10 Printer 299.00 250.00 

300091 1 0 BOTEK Serial to Parallel Interface 59.00 

PERRY COMPUTERS • 



186 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



ai. 



ftware 



For the serious student . • . 
. from Preschool to College 





I 



Ages 3-5 

Hand-eye coordination 
Colors 
Shapes 
Numbers 

Great graphics and music 
Reading readiness skills 
Capital letters 
Small letters 

Learn to associate letters and letter blends with the 

sounds they make 

Requires 32K ECB and joysticks 



I 



PreReader 



A 



J* R V 



4 * 



1 L^l'* 




$19.95 -Tape 
$24.95 - Disk 



GALACTIC 
HANGMAN 




SUGAR 

Both 16K ECB and 
32K ECB versions 
included on tape 
$17.95 

For grade 2 and up 

Exciting version of popular word guessing game 
Play against the computer or a friend 
Outstanding high-resolution graphics and animation 
Great sound effects and music 
700 word vocabulary included 
Create your own word files 

- your child's spelling list 

- foreign language vocabulary 

- specialized word list, i.e., geographic, chemistry, 
physics 

Broaden your vocabulary 

Both 16K ECB and 32K ECB versions Included on 
tape 

Easily moved to disk 



MRTH MISSION 



5H0 T TIMER 
ROWER LEUEL 



hi. I. Mil. U lil. 1. 1, 1, 1, hi. I. Ii hi.! 



UJ 

Z 
□ 

M 

ft 
LU 
ID 

z 

IE 



iu (Mi nn nn r^i s 



z 

en 
rn 

TV 

N 
□ 

z 

rn 



■R = 1 



W = 



BO 
+ 32 



51= 29 



PL= HO 



5C=100 



Math Mission is an educational game designed to rein- 
force early math skills in the four math operations: 

Addition 
Subtraction 
Multiplication 
Division 

• Can be played on any of four optional levels of 
difficulty 

• Joystick oriented to develop hand-eye 
coordination 

• Shot timer simulates a classroom time test 

• Picture, sound, and word rewards 

MATH MISSION requires 32K ECB and 

1 joystick 

Available on both Tape and Disk 

$24.95, either version 



Dealer and author inquiries are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kcllv Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 11932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
421-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS onlv. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 
1710 North 50th Avenue 
Hollywood, Florida 33021 
(305) 981-1241 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Add 81.50 per program for postage 
and handling. Florida residents add 
5% sales tax. 

COD orders are welcome. CIS orders 
EMAIL to 70405, 1374. No ref unds or 
exchanges. 



t "1 













Language teachers will find it easy to walk . . . 



The 
Vocabulary 

Tightrope 



The computer is an amazingly 
effective tool for the language 
teacher to use in motivating 
students to study vocabulary. The task 
of memorizing words and definitions 
can be made much more attractive if 
dressed up with computer graphics and 
sounds and presented as a game. 

The object of Tightrope is to match 
definitions or synonyms with words in 
a randomly arranged multiple-choice 
quiz. Correct answers advance the 
tightrope walker safely across the rope 



Jim Bennett teaches art and calligraphy 
at a private school and a college. He, his 
wife and three children live in Front 
Royal, Virginia and are all avid CoCo- 
ists. 




By Jim Bennett 



and add points to the score. Incorrect 
answers take away points; a third mis- 
take causes the man to fall and the game 
ends. 

If the student does not know the 
meaning of a word, a See Answer 
option allows the correct answer to be 
shown without penalty. The program 
then automatically throws that word 
back into the hopper to be pulled out 
again later in the quiz. Incorrect re- 
sponses also cause the word to be called 
up again. When a correct response is 
given, the word is eliminated and does 
not reappear. 

I have chosen to use the data tape 
approach in setting up the quiz (instead 
of writing the words and meanings 
directly into the program), because I felt 
strongly that the program would have 



188 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



its greatest usefulness in a real class- 
room situation if the teacher had com- 
plete control over the contents of the 
quiz and he or she was able to chain- 
link lists so they could be read into the 
program in series. 

Making a data tape is quick and easy 
because a tape making and editing 
routine is provided in the program 
itself. Simply load Tightrope, set up 
another tape for recording, run the 
program, and enter TCHR at the first 
prompt. This is the code that accesses 
the special routine. For making changes 
in lists previously recorded, enter the 
word EDIT. 

Twenty words are required to make 
up a quiz. A word can be up to 2 1 letters 
in length and a definition can use as 
many as 25 characters (including punc- 



tuation and spacing). Since LINE INPUT 
commands have been used, the program 
accepts all punctuation marks. 

The program contains a number of 
operations that might be of use to others 
in their programming. The display of 
text characters on the graphics screen is 
achieved by reading a series of DRRW 
commands into an array (Line 280) 
which can then be recalled through the 
use of ASCII code numbers (Line 800). 
All the characters on the CoCo key- 
board are available except the sign, 
which draws a check mark, and '@', 
which underlines the previous charac- 
ter. 

The graphics figures were drawn and 
painted first in block fashion (lines 330- 
340). Detail was then added pixel by 
pixel via P5ET commands (lines 350- 



370). The speed-up POKE, used in three 
places in conjunction with graphics 
operations, may be eliminated. 

Lines 490-580 contain the routine for 
setting up a multiple choice quiz. A 
word is chosen at random and its cor- 
rect definition and two other definitions 
are arranged in random order under- 
neath. Choice number four is the See 
Answer option. 

When the quiz ends, either by suc- 
cessfully getting the man to the other 
side or by making him fall, the program 
automatically reruns. This allows for 
smooth transition from quiz to quiz. 

(You may direct questions about this 
program to the author at P. O. Box 425, 
1308 Belmont Ave., Front Royal, VA 
22630, phone 703-635-1354. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing.) □ 



W \ 

105 227 580 9 

140 247 710 180 

245 180 780 67 

340 196 900 25 

450 219 END 73 

The listing: TITER0PE 

10 I**************************** 

20 1 * tightrope * 

3J3 ' * BY JIM BENNETT * 

40 '* COPYRIGHT 1986 * 

50 '**************************** 

55 1 

60 CLS : PRINT@71 , "A LEARNING PROG 
RAM" : PRINT6111 , "BY" : PRINT@13 6 , "J 
IM BENNETT, 1986" 

70 CLEAR1500:PCLEAR8:DIMV(20,40) 
,L$(58) ,Q$(20) ,A$(2j3) , D (20) : PRIN 
T@290,CHR$ (25/3) "ready"CHR$ ( 12 8 ) " 
tape"CHR$(128) "and"CHR$ (128) "pre 
ss"CHR$(128) "enter"+CHR$(245) :IN 
PUTW$ : IFW$="TCHR"THEN820ELSEIFW$ 
="EDIT"THEN890ELSEPRINT" PLEASE 

WAIT WHILE DATA LOADS" 
80 SOUND20j3,2:OPEN"I" , #-l,W$:FOR 
X=1TO20 : D (X) =X : LINEINPUT#-1 , Q$ (X 
) :LINEINPUT#-1,A$ (X) :NEXT:CLOSE# 
-1:SOUND200,2:PRINT" ...ALMOST 
READY ..." 

90 i*******TEXT CHARACTERS****** 
100 DATA BR14 , BU12BR4D8BD4BL1R1B 
R10 , BU12BR2ND4BR4D4BD8BR8 , BU10BR 
4R1BD4NL4NR4BD4L1BD2BR10 , BR8BU10 
L3NU2L2G2F2R3F2G2L2NL3D2BR10 , BR 4 
U4NR2L2H2E2R2NU4R2BR8BD8 , BU2F2E6 
BD6BR6 



105 DATA BU12BR4D4BD8BR10,BU12BR 
4G4D4F4BR10 , BU12BR4F4D4G4BR10 , BU 
10BR8G8BU8F8BD2BR6 , BU10BR4D4NL4N 
R4D4BD2BR10 

110 DATA BR4BR1L1G2BR12BU2,BU6R8 
BD6BR6 , BR4BL1R1BR10 , BU2E8BD10BR6 
115 DATA BR6E2U8H2L4G2D8F2R4BR8, 
BU10BR2E2D12NL2R2BR8 , BU10E2R4F2G 
8D2R8BR6,BU10E2R4F2D2G2NL4F2D2G2 
L4H2BD4BR14BU2 

120 DATA BU12BR6G6D2R8NU6D4BR6,B 

U2F2R4E2U4H2L6U4R8BR6BD12 

125 DATA BU6BR2R4F2D2G2L4H2U8E2R 

4F2BR6BD10 , BU12R8D4G8BR14 , BR6L4H 

2U2E2NR2H2U2E2R4F2D2G2NL2F2D2G2B 

D2BR8BU2 , BE6L4H2U2E2R4F2D8G2L4H2 

BD4BR14BU2 , BU8BR4R1BD6L1BD2BR10 , 

BU8BR4R1BD6L1G2BR12 , BR6BU10G4F4B 

D2BR8 

130 DATA BU8NR8BD4R8BD4BR6 , BR2BU 
10F4G4BD2BR12 , BU10E2R4F2D2G4BD4B 
L1R1BR10 , BD2BL16R14BR2BU2 
135 DATA U8E4F4D4NL8D4BR6,U12R4F 
2G2NL4F4G4NL4BR10,BU10BR8H2L4G2D 
8F2R4E2BD2BR6,U12R4F4D4G4NL4BR10 
,U12R8BD6NL8BD6NL8BR6 
140 DATA U12R8BD6NL8BD6BR6 , BE8BU 
2H2L4G2D8F2R4E2U4NL4BR6BD6,U6NU6 
R8NU6D6BR6 , BR2BU12R2NR2D12NL2R2B 
R8 , BU12BR2R2NR2D12NG4BR10 
145 DATA U12BR8G6NL2F6BR6,BU12D1 
2R8BR6 ,U12F4ND4E4D12BR6 ,U10NU2F8 
NU10D2BR6,BR6E2U8H2L4G2D8F2R4BR8 
150 DATA U12R6F2D4G2L6BF4BR10,BR 
6L4H2U8E2R4F2D8G2D2F2BU4BR6,U12R 
6F2D4G2L2NL4F4BR6,BU2F2R4E2H8E2R 
4F2BR6BD10 

155 DATA BU12R4NR4D12BR10,BU12D1 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 189 



0F2R4E2U10BR6BD12 , BU12D8F4E4U8BR 
6BD12 , BU12D12E4NU4F4U12BR6BD12 
160 DATA U2E8U2BL8D2F8D2BR6,BU12 
D2F4ND6E4U2BR6BD12 , BU12R8D2G8D2R 
8BR6 

210 ' ******GRAPHICS DETAIL****** 
220 DATA 3,66,4,66,5,66,15,1)36,1 
6,106,17,106 

230 DATA6,54,11,54,5,60,9,94,14, 
94,15,100,5,69,4,68,15,110,16,10 
9 , 17 , 108 , 5 , 11 , 6 , 11 , 18 , 11 , 19 , 11 , 1 
0, 13 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 7 , 52 , 10 , 52 , 7 , 57 
,10,7,8,53,9,53,8,55,9,55,8,58,9 
, 58 , 6 , 64 , 12 , 64 , 8 , 64 , 10 , 64 , 9 , 67 , 1 
1,78,12,63,2,65,10,92,13,92,11,9 
3 

240 DATA 12,93,11,95,12,95,10,97 
,13,97,11,99,12,99,8,103,8,104,1 
4 , 104 , 10 , 104 , 12 , 104 , 11 , 107 , 9 , 118 
, 18 , 105 , 11 , 14 , 10 , 14 , 10 , 15 , 9 , 16 , 1 

2 

245 DATA 15,9,18,12,18,13,18,10, 
19,12,19,11,20,8,21,8,25,10,25,1 
2,25,14,25,11,31,11,52,11,33,11, 
34,11,35,11,36,11,37,11,38,11,39 
250 DATA 8,32,8,38,10,38,12,38,1 
4,38,999,12,32,11,30,11,29,11,28 
,34,26,34,27,34,28,34,29,34,30,3 
3,27,33,28,33,29,30,31,29,31,28, 
31,28,29,28,30,29,30,29, 32,28,33 
, 30, 30, 33 , 26 

260 • ******READ CHARACTERS****** 
270 POKE65495,0 

280 FORX=0TO58:READL$(X) :NEXT 
290 '******SET UP SCREEN******** 
300 PM0DE3 , 1 : PCLS1 : F0RX=4T019 : CO 
LOR2 : LINE (4 ,X*10) - (14 , (X*10) +10) 
, PSET , B : COLOR3 : LINE (244,X*10)-(2 
54, (X*10)+10) , PSET, B: NEXT: DRAW" C 
4BM2 , 40R250" : PCOPY1T05 : PCOPY2T06 
: PCOPY3T07 : PCOPY4T08 
310 PMODE4,5:DRAW"C5BMll,79U12L8 
F4G1H4U3R4U6L5U1R6U6R3D6R3U7R1D8 
L2D20L3 

320 »*****GRAPHICS FIGURES****** 
330 DRAWC5BM9, 119U12R8G4F1NF1E4 
U3L4U6R5U1L6U6L3D6L3U7L1D8R2D20R 
3" : PAINT (8 , 60) , 5 , 5 : PAINT (12 , 100) 
5 5 

340 DRAW"BM8 , 39U18H3U5R1D4F2R1U5 
R4D5R3E2U4R1D4G3L2D19R2 » : PAINT ( 1 
0,22), 5, 5 

350 F0RX=1T0111:READHP:IFHP=999T 
HENGET(0,0)-(20,40) , V, G : PUT (20 ,0 
) -(40,40) ,V,PSET:READHP 
3 60 READVP : IFX<2 5THENCL=5ELSECL= 

ft 

370 DRAW"BM4 , 40R40" : PSET (HP, VP, C 



L) :NEXT 

380 PMODE4,l:COLOR5:LINE(0,0)-(2 
55,7), PSET , BF : DRAW"C0S2BM85 , 6" : T 
$="SCORE: 0000" :GOSUB800:SCREEN1 

,1 

390 i ******ANIMATE CLIMBERS***** 
400 FORX=150TO50STEP-20:SOUND50, 
l:PMODE4, 5: GET (0,50) -(20,90) ,V,G 
SPMODE4,1:PUT(0,X) -(20,X+40) ,V,P 
SET : SOUND200 , 1 : PMODE4 , 5 : IFX=50TH 
ENDRAW" C5BM2 , 90R38 " 
410 GET(0, 90) -(20,130) ,V,G:PMODE 
4,1:PUT(0,X-10) -(20,X+30) ,V,PSET 
: NEXT 

420 PMODE 4,5: DRAW" BM2 , 1 3 0R3 8 " : SO 
UND190, 1: GET (0,130) -(20,170) ,V,G 
:PMODE4, 1: PUT (0,40) -(20, 80) ,V,PS 
ET:PMODE4,5:GET(0, 10) -(20,40) ,V, 
G: PMODE4,l: PUT (0, 10) -(20,40) ,V,P 
SET:SOUND220, 3 
430 POKE65494,0 

440 PMODE 3 , 1 : DRAWS4C4BM67 , 112 " : 

T$="TIGHTROPE":GOSUB800 

450 PMODE4 , 1: DRAWC5S2BM67 , 90" : T 

$=STRING$ (18, "?") :GOSUB800:DRAW" 

BM67, 130" :GOSUB800:FORX=1TO15:PL 

AY"T100O4V31ABCDEFG" : NEXT : DRAW"B 

M64,162":T$="MATCHING WORDS WITH 

" : GOSUB800 : DRAW"BM82 , 170" : T$="TH 

EIR MEANINGS" :GOSUB800 

460 FORX=1TO16:PLAY"T200V31O1ABC 

DEFG" : NEXT : NN=RND ( -TIMER) 

470 • *******ERASE SCREEN******** 

480 POKE65495,0:COLOR0:LINE(29,7 

2) -(232, 180) ,PSET,BF:POKE65494,0 

490 "*******QUIZ ROUTINE******** 

500 CN=RND(20) :IFD(CN)=0THEN500 

510 DRAW"S2C5BM56,80":T$=Q$ (CN)+ 

« = ?":GOSUB800 

520 P=RND ( 3 ) :Z=1 

530 S(1)=RND(20) :IFS(1)=CN THEN 5 
30 

540 S(2)=RND(20) :IFS(2)=CN ORS(2 
)=S(1) THEN540 

550 FORL=1TO3:V$=STR$(90+(10*L) ) 
: SC$="BM2 3 , "+V$ : DRAWSC$ : IFPOL T 
HENT$=STR$ (L) +" . "+A$(S(Z) ) : GOSU 
B800 : Z=Z+1 : GOTO570 

560 T$=STR$(L)+". "+A$ (CN) : GOSUB 
800 

570 NEXT :DRAW"BM30, 130" :T$="4. - 

—SEE ANSWER " : GOSUB800 : I$=INK 

EY$ 

580 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN580 

590 i********SEE ANSWER********* 
600 IFI$="4"THENDRAW"BM30, 164" :T 
$=Q$ (CN)+" =" :GOSUB800:DRAW"BM50 
,176": T$=A$ ( CN) : GOSUB800 : FORDD=l 



190 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



T02 000 : NEXT : G0T04 80 
610 « ******C0RRECT ANSWER******* 
620 IFVAL(I$)=P THEND (CN) =0 : PMOD 
E3 , 1 : COLOR3 : DRAW"S4 BM65 , 17 6 " : T$= 
"&CORRECT&" : GOSUB800 : F0RX=1T06 : P 
LAY"T150O5ABCDEFG" : NEXT : GOTO670 
630 IFI$>"4"ORI$<"1"THEN580 
640 ! *****INCORRECT ANSWER****** 
650 PLAY"T101C" : DRAW" BM3 0 , 164" : T 
$=Q$ (CN) + " =" : GOSUB800 : DRAWBM50 
, 176" : T$=A$ (CN) : GOSUB800 : FORDD=l 
TO2000 : NEXT : MQ=MQ+1 : 1 FH2 =0THEN4 8 
0ELSEIFMQOTHEN770ELSE740 
660 '****** *ANIMATE WALKER****** 
67)3 PM0DE4 , 1 : COLOR5 : LINE (127,0)- 
(17J3 , 6) , PSET , BF : TS=TS+100 : DRAW" C 
0S2BM127 , 6" : T$=STR$ (TS ) : GOSUB800 
680 IFH2=0ORH2=208THENE=14ELSEE= 
5 

690 FORX=lTOE:Hl=Hl+20:H2=H2+2 
700 PMODE4,5:DRAW"C5BM0,40R80" :G 
ET(Hl,10)-(Hl+20,40) ,V,G:PMODE4, 
l:PUT(H2,10)-(H2+20,40) ,V,PSET:I 
FHl=20THENHl=-20 

710 IFH2=234THENF0RX=1T01J3:PLAY" 
T7j3V3104AABBCCDDEEFFGG" : NEXT: POK 
E65495, J3: COLORS : LINE (29, 72) -(232 
, 180) , PSET, BF: COLOR3 : PMODE3 , 1 : T$ 
="G@R@E@A@T@ F@E@A@T@ ! ! ! " : DRAW'S 
4BM51, 128" : GOSUB80j3 : POKE 6 54 9 4 , 0 : 
FORX=1TO15:PLAY"T70V31O4GGFFEEDD 
CCBBAA" : NEXT : RUN 

72) 3 PLAY"T1)3)301GGBB" : F0RDD=1T05)3 
: NEXTDD , X : GOT04 8)3 

73) 3 1 ***********FALL************ 

74) 3 PMODE4,5:GET(0,)3)-(2)3,27) ,V, 
G: PUT (6)3, 63) -(8)3, 90) ,V, PSET: DRAW 
"S4C5BM61,99U4R1D4E6R6F6U1H6L6G5 
U1E5R6F6U2R1D4" 

750 PMODE4,1:COLOR0:LINE(2 6,72) - 
(232, 180) ,PSET,BF:PMODE4 ,5:DRAW" 
C5BM120,100R20":GET(120, 68) -(140 
,100) ,V,G:PMODE4,l:PUT(H2,8)-(H2 
+20 , X+39) , V, PSET : PMODE4 , 5 : GET (60 
,60)-(80,100) ,V,G 

755 PM0DE4, 1: FORX=45TO155STEP10 : 
PUT(H2,X) -(H2+20,X+40) ,V, PSET: PL 
AY"T120D":NEXT 

760 PLAY"T1C" : CLS3 ! PRINT@192 , "YO 
UR SCORE IS "TS: PRINT: PRINT 11 TRY 
NOT TO FALL NEXT TIME ! ! ! " : FORDD 
-1TO4500 : NEXT : RUN 

770 PMODE4,1:COLOR5:LINE(127,0) - 
(170 , 6) , PSET, BF : TS=TS-100 : IFTS<0 
THENTS=0 

780 DRAW"C0S2BM127, 6" :T$=STR$ (TS 
) :GOSUB800:GOTO480 

790 «******DRAW CHARACTERS****** 



800 FORX=lTOLEN(T$) :IN$=MID$ (T$, 
X,l) :IN=ASC(IN$) :IFIN<32ORIN>90T 
HENNEXTELSEDRAWL$ ( IN-3 2 ) : NEXT : RE 
TURN 

810 «******DATA TAPE MAKER****** 
820 CLS: PRINT" ******TEACHER ' S 
INPUT******" : PRINT: INPUT "NAME OF 

QUIZ" ;W$ 
830 FORX=1TO20 

840 CLS: PRINT "THERE ARE 20 WORDS 

AND MEANINGS:" 
850 PRINT "ENTER WORD "X:LINEINPU 
T Q$ (X) : IFLEN(Q$ (X) ) >21THENPRINT 
LEN(Q$ (X) ) -21" CHAR'S TOO LONG!" 
:GOTO850 
8 60 PRINT 

870 PRINT "ENTER MEANING "X:LINE 
INPUTA$ (X) : IFLEN (A$ (X) ) >25THENPR 
INTLEN(A$ (X) ) -25" CHAR'S TOO LON 
G ! " : GOTO870 
880 NEXTX:GOTO920 

890 PRINT: PRINT "READY TAPE - ENT 
ER QUIZ NAME": PRINT :INPUTW$:PRIN 
T" LOADING QUIZ" : OPEN" I" , #-l,W$ 
900 FORX=1TO20:LINEINPUT#-1,Q$ (X 
) :LINEINPUT#-1,A$(X) :NEXT:CLOSE# 
-1 

910 CLS : PRINT "THE OLD TITLE WAS 
"W$" WHAT IS THE NEW TITLE" ; : INP 
UTW$ 

920 CLS: PRINT" ******EDITING MO 
DE******" : PRINT :PRINT"PRESS <C> 
IF YOU WISH TO MAKE A CHANGE": PR 
INT"PRESS ANY OTHER KEY TO SEE N 
EXT WORD & MEANING" : PRINT: PRINT" 
USE <C> TO ENTER ADDITIONAL 
ITEMS" : PRINT: PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY 

TO BEGIN" 
930 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN930 
940 CLS : PRINT"THE TITLE IS "W$ 
950 FORX=1TO20:PRINT"WORD "X":": 
PRINTQ$ (X) : PRINT "MEANING "X" : " : P 
RINTA$ (X) : PRINT 

960 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 960 

970 IFI$O"C"THEN990 

980 PRINT "ENTER WORD "X:LINEINPU 

TQ$(X) :PRINT"ENTER MEANING "X:LI 

NEINPUT A$(X): PRINT 

990 NEXT 

1000 CLS : INPUT"READY RECORDER TO 
STORE DATA- PUSH enter WHEN R 
EADY" ; Z $ : PRINT : PRINT"RECORDING D 
ATA": OPEN "0",#-l,W$ 
1010 FORX=1TO20:PRINT#-1,Q$ (X) :P 
RINT#-1,A$(X) :NEXT 
1020 CLOSE#-l 

1030 PRINT: PRINT "THIS COMPLETES 
TEACHER'S INPUT": END 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 191 




The DS-69A is the best video digitizer available for your COCO at any price. This new, turbocharged version of our 
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Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. ?a7©[E^}2^ 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



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An index to the 
articles, reviews and 
authors appearing 
in THE RAINBOW 
from July 1985 
through June 1986, 
including an index 
to RAINBOW ON 
TAPE. 



I 4 1 



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Copyright© 1986, Falsoft, Inc. 



■ 



AN INDEX TO THE RAINBOW 
JULY 1985 - JUNE 1986 



This is the third index to the Rainbow, — the format 
has been unchanged from last year. Items that are also 
included in "Rainbow on Tape" have the symbol • after 
the page number. 



The subject breakdown, and number of items per 
heading are shown below. The number following in 
brackets is the total number of articles since July 
1981. 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE - 6 (40) 
BUSINESS -4 (29) 
CASSETTE - 1 (5) 
CLUBS -4 (7) 

COMMUNICATIONS - 17 (44) 
DATABASE MANAGEMENT -1 (9) 
DISK -11 (53) 

DRAGON COMPUTER - 0 (3) 

EDUCATION - ELEMENTARY - 16 (41) 

EDUCATION - GENERAL - 34 (144) 

EDUCATION - LOGO -0 (4) 

GAME -29 (203) 

GAME- ACTION -7 (12) 

GAME - ADVENTURE - 4 (22) 

GAME - SIMULATION - 2 (17) 

GENERAL -22 (133) 

GRAPHICS -47 (160) 

HARDWARE -.0(18) 

HARDWARE PROJECT- 10 (27) 

HARDWARE TUTORIAL - 5 (7) 

HOME APPLICATION - 15 (76) 

HOME FINANCE -7 (21) 

MC-10 MICRO COLOR COMPUTER - 0 (6) 

MUSIC -14 (38) 

OPERATING SYSTEMS - 0 (3) 

OPERATING SYSTEMS - OS9 - 18 (55) 

PASCAL -2 (13) 

PRINTER -6 (58) 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS - 19 (42) 
SOUND SYNTHESIS -3 (4) 
TUTORIAL - 12 (40) 
UTILITY -12 (122) 



PRODUCT REVIEWS - 270 (1353) 
AUTHOR INDEX - 304 (1364) 
ARTICLES -598 (2819) 



This index only covers the last year of publication— 
that is from July 1 985 to June 1 986. For the index to 
previous issues, either see the July 1984 issue (page 
259) for items from July 1981 to June 1984 and the 
July 1985 issue (page 229) for items from July 1984 
to June 1985. 

TOTAL NUMBER OF ARTICLES 
(July 1981 to June 1986) - 2819. 

An index to "Rainbow on Tape" from July 1985 to 
June 1986 is included— it is arranged alphabetically 
by the name of the program, with a short descrip- 
tion, and contains337 titles. The previous "Rainbow 
on Tape" programs were indexed in the July 1985 
issue on page 238, and contained 800 programs- 
giving a total of 1 137 programs. 



Leslie A. Foster is a Librarian with Dalhousie 
Ocean Studies Programme in Haiifax, Nova 
Scotia, Canada. He is the co-editor of "Marine 
Affairs Bibliography"— an index to law of the sea 
literature, and has owned a Color Computer since 
April, 1981. 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

Barden, William, Jr. "Disassembling the secrets of 

ROM." (1986, May) 227 
Barden, William, Jr. "The straight, hard facts about 

Assembly Language." (1986, February) 119 
Betts, R. Bartly. "Flashing in 6809." (1965, July) 84 • 
Betts, R. Bartly. "Interfacing machine language with 

BASIC." (1985, August) 96 • 
Dean, Mike. "Defeat de bugs." (1986, February)38* 

— Help in hand assembly problems. 
Weide, Dennis H. "Machine code loder." (1985, 

July) 144» — Use machine language without an 

editor/assembler. 

. BUSINESS 



Bernico, Bill. "Financing: The economic advantage." 
(1986, March) 7"\» — Calculate installment loans. 

Hill, Eddie. An annual expense tracking and man- 
agement system." (1986, March)W2* — Correc- 
tion, May 1986, p. 127. 

Tottingham, Bill. "Receipt maker and file." (1986, 
March) 22 • — Correction, May 1986, p. 127. 

Whaley, Clarence. 'The rule of 78s."(7986, March) 36» 
— Determine installment loan payments. 

CASSETTE 

Carmichael, Craig. "The secret to loading those 
double speed tapes." (7986, February) 76 



CLUBS 

"CoCo community." (7985, July) 244 
"CoCo community." (1985, October) 156 
"CoCo community." (1986, January) 221 
"CoCo community." (7986, April) 173 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Augsburg, Cray. "Database ditties." (7986, June)91 
— Delphi news. 

Augsburg, Cray. "Presenting the 'Delphi Advan- 
tage."' (7986, April) 116 

Augsburg, Cray."Setting the stage for 'spring clean- 
ing.'" (7986, May) 92 — Delphi news. 

Chouinard, Daniel. "The phone file trader." (1985, 
November) 36» — Communications program to 
trade files over the phone. 

Curl, John R."Here by popular demand: New Delphi 
announcements." (1986, March) 210 

Curl, John R. "The latest on our newest dimension: 
The CoCo SIG." (7986, January) 183 — News on 
the Delphi Information Service. 

Curl, John R."Some noteson downloading. "(1986, 
February) 88 — Delphi hints. 

Day, R. Wayne. "Harvesting summer's bumper crop 
of BBS's." (7985, November) 61 

Day, R. Wayne. "Music and a terminal program, 
too?" (7985, September) 88 • — Discussion of 
"Orchestra-90." 

Day, R. Wayne. "A question and answer repertoire." 
(1985, July) 90* — Questions and answers on 
communications, BBS, etc. 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: a look atthe commands. 
(7985, December) 153* — Part 2 of a BBS pro- 
gram. 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: An introduction to the 
system and its special features." (1985, November) 
135 • —Complete BBS program. 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: How to modify the pro- 
gram to use the CoCo serial port." (7986, Febru- 
ary) 100» 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: Setting up various files 
to make the system operate." (7986, January) 
142* 

Landwehr, Larry. "CoCo conversation." (7985, No- 
vember) 124 — How to hook two CoCos together. 

Plog, Michael. "Educating with electronic commu- 
nications arid research." (7986, March) 154 — 
Thoughts on Delphi. 



Taylor, Scott M. "More power and protection for 
your BBS." (7985, November) 106* — Modifica- 
tions to "Remote" from November 1983. 



DATABASE MANAGEMENT 

Clark, Stephen P. "Julie The Mouse.'" (7986, April) 
157 • — A database program. 

DISK 

Dater, Andrew. "An easy way to run your programs." 

(7986, February) 36 • — Disk menu utility. 
DiStefano, Tony. "Switching double-sided disks." 

(7985, August) 162 
Dwight, Jeffry. "Zapping with confidence." (7985, 

December) 118* — A disk utility. 
Eichstaedt, Pete. "Gathering up scattered pro- 
grams." (7986, February) 94 • 
Goodman, Martin H. "A disk tinkerer's device." 

(7986, March) 84 • — Disk utility. 
Goodman, Martin H. "The great transformation." 

(1986, June) 182« — Conversions from MS-DOS 

to CoCo. 

Heyza, Doug. "Say 'hello- to this directory helper." 
(1985, August) 69 • — Correction, October 1985, 
page 228. 

Peake, Jim. "Discover the 'hidden' five tracks." 

(1986, June) 92 • 
Stearman, Colin J. "Getting on the right track." 

(7985, July)26» — Howtouse40or80tracksand 

double sided. Correction, January 1986, p. 231. 
Trapasso, Dave. "Doing the disk-o-step." (7986, 

April) 149« — Disk alignment. 
Wilson, Terry. "Crash-proof it!" (7986, February) 

31 • — Spare copy of disk directory. 



EDUCATION - ELEMENTARY 

Albrecht, Bob ; and Zamora, Ramon. "The Dragon- 
Town library." (7985, October) 98 — Review of 
books for teaching children and some elementary 
sound programs. 

Albrecht, Bob ; and Zamora, Ramon. "Help wander- 
ing star in the right direction." (1985, July) 79* 

Albrecht, Bob ; and Zamora, Ramon. "It's been a 
great two years." (7985, December) 56 — Hints for 
parents of young children. 

Albrecht, Bob ; and Zamora, Ramon. "Making your 
own mandala— guaranteed not to melt!" (7985, 
September) 142» — Programs for children. 

Albrecht, Bob ; and Zamora, Ramon. "Play and learn 
together— wonderment is contagious." ( 7985, 
August) 136» — Short demos for children. 

Bernico, Bill. "Elevator." (7985, October) 25 • — 
Learning aid for pre-schoolers. 

Blyn, Steve. "The daily schedule pictograph: A time 
for every purpose." (1985, September,) 44* —Pic- 
tograph to show child's daily schedule. 

Blyn, Steve. "The rainy day account." (7985, 
August) 1 48 • — Demo bankaccountforchildren. 

Blyn, Steve. "Take this message, please!" (7985, 
July) 42 • 

Blyn, Steve. "Teaching children time concepts." 
(7986, May) 1 38 • 

Hyre, Leonard. "Become a math whiz!" (1985, Sep- 
tember) '\8» — Math quiz. 

Knolhoff, Mike. "A caterpillar's alphabet." (7985, 
August) 83* 

Scerbo, Fred B. "CoCo, can you spare a dime?" 
(7985, August) 142* — Uses graphics to count 
change. 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Learning the value of numbers." 
(1986, April) 

Scerbo, Fred B. "A measure of success." (7986, 

June) 117* — Learn to read a ruler. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "A simulation of life skills." (7986, 

February) 148» 

EDUCATION - GENERAL 

Bernico, Bill. "Keeping the communication fines 
open." (7985, September) 39 • — Teaches sign 
language. 

Blyn, Steve. "Building language arts skills." (7986, 
March) 152* 



1 94 THE RAINBOW July 1 986 



Blyn, Steve. "Gaining insight into your child's self 

image." (1986, February) 134« 
Blyn, Steve. "Learning the art of written expression 

with proper punctuation." (1985, October) 45* — 

Review of punctuation marks. 
Blyn, Steve. "Locating points on a graph." (1986, 

April) 136 • 

Blyn, Steve. "Preparing for the right career choice." 

(1986, January) 108* 
Blyn, Steve. "Teaching language idioms." (7986, 

June ) 84 • 

Blyn, Steve. "Working with the electronic book part 

1. "(7985, November) 30 • — Prog ram to use Radio 
Shack's Electronic Learning Book. 

Blyn, Steve. "Working with the electronic book part 

2, " (1985, December) 30« 

Kolar, Joseph. "Creative programming for the . 
beg inner." ( 7986, January) 30* — Make multiple- 
choice quiz. 

LaBelle, Russ F. "Oh! Canada." (7985, September) 
124« — Geography of Canada. 

Lamonica, Mary; and Lamonica, James. "CoCo math 
class." (1986, January) 88* 

Ligon, Elizabeth. "CoCo-etry." (7985, September) 
130» — Program to write poetry. 

Mauro, Robert. "Bookmark: Your very own compur. 
terized Dewey decimal system." (1985, Sep- 
tember) 227 • — Provides index to a library. 

Osani, Keith. "Take word inventory with vocabu- 
lary." (1985, September) 80* — Simulate a dic- 
tionary. 

Plog, Michael. "Computers can play an important 

role in art education." (1985, October) 55 
Plog, Michael. "The demographics of education." 

(1986, April) 139 
Plog, Michael. "Developing effective computer 

literacy methods." (7985, July) 175 — Comments 

on computers in education. 
Plog, Michael. "Education Texas style." (1986, May) 

140 

Plog, Michael. "How valuable is the 'hands-on' les- 
son?" (1985, September) 102 — Discussion of 
computers in schools." 

Plog, Michael. "Integrating computers into class- 
room instruction." (1985, August) 150 

Plog, Michael. "The learning process: The impor- 
tance of 'how to think."' (1986, January) 117 

Plog, Michael. "Microcomputers: Not just a student 
learning tool." (1985, November) 102 

Plog, Michael. "Robots: Their place in education." 
(7986, June) 86 

Plog, Michael. "The schools get a report card." 
(7986, February) 138 

Plog, Michael. "Successful organizational factors 
for integrating computers in school." (1985, 
December) 45 

Rand, Penny L. "Learn those 'tricky words."' (1985, 
September) 117« — Practice in vocabulary. 

Scerbo, Fred B. "An educational adventure for the 
CoCo and the MC-10." (7986, January) 76« 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Super mathsheet generator II." 
(7985, November) 79 • 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Using your CoCo for educational 
plans." (7986, May) 131 • — Generate educational 
objectives. 

Shelton, Garry L. "Teacher's aid." (7985, Sep- 
tember) 46» — Record keeping for teachers. 

Sherman, Lynn C. ; and Baldassary, Walter. "CoCo 
testmaker." (7985, September) 30 • — Make mul- 
tiple choice tests. 

Taulli, T. C. "Scan it and understand it with rapid 
reading." (7985, July) 1 29 • — Correction, 
November 1985, page 184. 

Vasconi, Eugene, "Howto be an educated stargazer 
in 1 2 easy lessons." (7985, September) 55 • —Help 
with astronomy. 

GAME 

Barden, William, Jr. "The meaning of life." (7986, 
June) 196» — Description of game called "Life." 

Billen, David. "Zonx." (7985, October) 65 • —Action 
game. 

Brockschmidt, Kraig. "Brain games." (1985, 

December) 1 90 • — A collection of 5 games. 
Carlisle, Allen B. "Invasion of the flying saucer peo- 
"ple." (7986, March) 1 08 • 

Compton, David. "Set your sails, keep a weather eye 
out for storms and beware of the Jolly Roger." 



(7986, March) 18 • — Adventure game for young 
child. 

Franks, Bill. "A quandary of puzzles." (7986, Janu- 
ary) 25 • — Like a jig-saw puzzle. 

Frerking, Anthony. "The Commandos want you!" 
(7986, February) 180« 

Halfman, Scott. "Who will survive?" (7986, June) 
26 • 

Jones, Tim. "If your 'horse' comes in first, you lose!" 
(7985, November) 129» — Recreation of basket- 
ball game called horse. Correction, January 1986, 
p. 231. 

Jones, Timmy.'Take the plunge with CoCo." (7985, 

September) 163* — 10 meter platform diving. 
Kilby, Mike. "Firestorm." (7986, January) 122* 
Kolar, Joseph. "The Goolian Olympics of trig func- 
tions." (7985, July) 148» — Game using trigo- 
nometry. 

Krom, Matt. "As visions of the Pro-Am danced in 

their heads." (7986, May) 50 • — Golf game. 
Nelson, Mark. "Get down and dirty in New York's 

sewers with super rooter." (7986, May) 26* 
"Oodles of games for4K." (7985, August) 88 • —6 

short games. 
Pitel, Rick. "Trivia tic-tac-toe." (7985, December) 

69 • — Correction, March. 1386, p. 191. 
Price, Rolla. "Acrostics go high tech with Word+." 

(7986, May) 38 • — Design your own crossword 

puzzles. 

Ramella, Richard. "The $100 challenge." (7985, 
July) 180« — Contest using a CoCo game. 

Ramella, Richard. "Bubble wars." (7986, February) 
58 • 

Ramella, Richard. "No nines allowed." (7985, 

October) 36* — Game on 8 by 8 grid. 
Ramella, Richard. "Number bumper." (1985, 

October) 180» — Arcade game. 
Rice, Robert E. "Sidewinding skirmishes with video 

vipers." (7986, January) 99 • 
Rutter, Richard W. "Computer trapshooting." (7985, 

November) 18* — Simulates skeet shooting. 
Sabbatini, Mark. "Alpine slopes." (7985, December) 

204 • 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Fun for the whole family with gal- 
loping gamblers." (7985, December) 86 • 

Sward, Steve. "'Gopher it' {or 'turnip' wet)." (7986, 
January) 18» 

Teague, Dennis. "The word-hunt crossword puz- 
zle." (7985, December) 110* 

Wolcott, Larry. "Kung Fu fighting." (1986, March) 
66* 

Wood, James W. "Rid the screen of the menace." 
(7985, September) 167 • — Board type game. 



GAME - ACTION 

Bradbury, Nick. "Destination: Moon base Amphi- 
bia." (7985, August) 106« — Major correction, 
September 1985, page 129. — Additional correc- 
tion, April 1986, page 103. 

Britton, Steve, IV. "Operation freedom." (7985, 
August) 54 • — Correction, October 1985, page 
228. 

Dawson, David. "Sir Eggbert jumper leaps to the 
rescue." (7985, August) 129 • 

Fransen, Aaron. "The quest for the falcons' lair." 
(1985, August) 26» 

Goodson, Joey. "A-maze-ing maneuvering with jet- 
pack challenge." (7985, July) 106» 

Nation, Brad. "Which way did that mangy mongrel 
go?" (7985, August) 228 • 

Saporta, Alan A. "Brotan the blue." (7985, August) 
18» — Correction, October 1985, page 228. 



GAME - ADVENTURE 

Bell, Bruce K. "The CoCo zone." (7986, April) 26 • - 
Grand prize in adventure contest. Further instruc- 
tions, June 1986, p.220. 

Firedrake, George; and Albrecht, Karl. "Fantasy fare." 
(7985, July) 137 — General information on fantasy 
games. 

Kapfhammer, Jutta ; and Helm, Philip. "Our twenty 
carat gold winners." (7986, April) 20 — Results of 
third Rainbow adventure contest. 

Riley, Thomas E. "The Maze of Moycullen." (7986, 
April) 58 • — 16K winner of adventure contest. 



GAME - SIMULATION 



Firedrake, George; and Albrecht, Karl. "For the game- 
master, just the end of a beginning." (7985, August) 
154 — The last Gamemaster's apprentice column. 

Tyson, Bob. "The great Rainbow simulat/on pack- 
age. 1 ' (1985, July) 46* — Anniversary special- 
World War II, stock car racing and simulation gen- 
erator. Correction, November 1985, page 184. 



GENERAL 

Barden, William. "Pi to 10,000 digits." (7986, April) 
228 • 

Bernico, Bill. "CoCo, phone home." (7985, August) 
124» 

Bernico, Bill. "Important message. "(1985, October) 

176 — Mystery message 
Betts, R. Bartly. "Bit banging with Boole." (7985, 

September) 172 — Discussion of Boolean algebra. 

Foster, Leslie A. "The fourth year of Rainbow." 
(7985, July) 229 — Index from July 1984 to June 
1 985 and Rainbow on tape from April 1 982 to June 
1985. 

Goodman, Marty. "Now you see it, now you don't!" 
(7986, June) 90 — How to determine EPROM era- 
sure times. 

Green, Robert L. "As far as the eye can see." (7985, 

August) 230 • — Do it yourself eye examination. 
Moore, W. J. "Robocise." (7986, February) 116* — 

Exercise companion. 
Pettus, Ronald. "Zeroing in on Halley's Comet." 

(7986, April) 83 • — Calculations to view the 

comet. 

"The Rainbow's holiday shopping guide." (7985, 

December) 25 — Some gifts for Christmas. 
"The RAINBOWfest reporter." (7986, February) 81 

— Report on Princeton RAINBOWfest. 
"The RAINBOWfest reporter." (7986, May) 169 — 

Report on Palo Alto RAINBOWfest. 
Sheridan, Vincent H. "Soccer instructor." (7985, 

August) 47 • — Teach the basics of soccer, 
Suppe, Pasquale. "Handicappers enter the home 

stretch with Pace 1." (7986, May) 114* — Aid for 

the race track fan. 
"Volume 1, number 1." (7985, July) 98 — Reprint of 

the first issue of the Rainbow. 
White, Richard A. "Building a spreadsheet with 

template repetition." (7985, September) 148 
White, Richard A. "Direct comparison— exhibiting 

the power of spreadsheets." (7985, July) 154 — 

Use a spreadsheet as an order form. 
White, Richard A. "An explanation and review of 

spreadsheet functions." (7985, December) 267 
White, Richard A. "Going over spreadsheet data 

look-up functions." (7986, January) 251 
White, Richard A. "Using a spreadsheet as a file 

manager." (7985, October) 238 
Witham, Burt B., Jr. "Which award is which." (7985, 

December) 179» — Ham radio record keeper. 



GRAPHICS 

Aftamonow, Ellen; and Aftamonow, George. "Rudolph, 
the red nosed reindeer," (1985, December) 18* — 
Graphics'demo for Christmas. 

Barden, William, Jr. "Joysticks, touch pads and dig- 
itizing the world." (7986, January) 224* 

Bernico, Bill "The Zoom-bloom plant." (7986, Janu- 
ary) 129» — Graphics demo. 

Bernico, Bill. "A peace treaty for computer hackers and 
couch potatoes." (7986, March) 49« — Graphics 
demo. Correction, June 1986, p. 220. 

Betts, R. Bartly. "The long and winding road to 
assembly graphics." (1985, November) 90 

Borger, J. E., III. "CoCo unfurls Old Glory." (7985, 
July) 113 • — The flag using graphics. 

"The CoCo gallery." (7985, July) 1 78 — Samples of 
graphic art. 

"The CoCo gallery." (7985, August) 178 

"The CoCo gallery." (7985, September) 178 

"The CoCo gallery." (7985, October) 170 — 
Correction, November 1985, page 184. 

"The CoCo gallery." (7985, November) 178 



July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 95 



"The CoCo gallery" (1985, December) 210 
"The CoCo gallery." (1986, January) 114 
"The CoCo gallery." (1986, February) 178 
"The CoCo gallery." (1986, March) 114 
"The CoCo gallery." (1986, April) 114 
"The CoCo gallery." (1986, May) 18 
"The CoCo gallery." (1986, June) 114 
Delbourgo, Bob; Delbourgo, Daniel; and Delbourgo, 
Tlno. "Around the world in 1 8 frames." (7985, August) 
73« — Graphics demo of globe. Correction, February 
1986, p. 168. 

Delbourgo, Bob; and Delbourgo, Daniel. "Random 
mosaics." (1985, August) 40* — Lo-res graphics 
demo. 

Di Zazzo, Ernie. "Oh, long may they wave: A salute 
to the flags/77986, May) 42* — Flags of different 
countries. 

Dold, Charles W. "Dynamic computer graphics." (1985, 
September) 70« — How to draw 3-D pictures. 

Glaberson, Aryeh. "The eight lights of Chanukah." 
(1985, December) 196* 

Golias, Ruth E. "Home sweet home." (1986, May) 
20» — Graphics demo. 

"Graphics quickies." (1985, October)1&* —Various 
graphics demos. 

Hall, Mike. "Christmas pageantry." (7985, December) 
212 • — Graphics for Christmas. 

Kent, Jim. "Guppie graphics." ( 1985, October) 106* 
— Assembly language graphics 

Kerckhoff, Peter. "CoCoCad modification." (1986, 
February) 103* — Mod for DMP-120 printer. 

Kerckhoff, Peter. "CoCocad: The schematic scoun- 
drel." (1985, October) 130* — Computer aided 
design for CoCo. Additional listing, February 
1986, p. 103. 

Kohn, Joseph. "Pix files," (1986, February) 26* — 
Transfer picture files CoCo Max, Graphicom, etc. 

Kolar, Joseph. "A final session with the 'A' option." 
(1985, October) 83* — More on the DRAW state- 
ment. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Mastering the DRAW statement." 

(1985, August) 172» 
Kolar, Joseph. "PSET sail in the FOR/NEXT sea." 

(1986, May) MA* 
Kolar, Joseph. "A simple technique for creating 

animation." (1986, March) 39 • 
Kolar, Joseph. "Sprucing up an old design." (1985, 

September) 136 • — Use of the DRAW command. 
Kwong, Hong. "Design your own calendar pin-up." 

(1986, May) 63 • 
Matthews, Becky F. "Nothing phone-y about it: Ma 

Bell trips the light fantastic." (1986, June) 18* — 

Graphics and sound entertainment. 
Page, Dennis. "CoCoflow: CoCocad expanded." 

(1986, March) 31 • — Aid for drawing flow charts. 
Plaxton, John. "CoCo bakes a cake." (1985, July) 

99* — A birthday cake using graphics. 
Ramella, Richard. "Pattern blocks: Reality play." 

(1986, January) 40* — Shape game. 
Roden, Brian P. "The electronic valentine-maker." 

(1986, February) 18 • — Correction, April 1986, 

page 103. 

Santerre, Denis. "A lesson straight from the heart." 

(1985, October) 163» — Graphics demo to learn 

part of the heart. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "The CoCo puzzle maker." (1985, 

October) 72» — Jig saw puzzle on CoCo. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Return of baseball fever." (1985, 

September) 104 • — Baseball team logos. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Rock'n'rolling back to the CoCo 

rockfest." (1985, July) 162« — Graphics demo. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "The Wishing Well title maker." 

(1986, March) 157* — Title cards for your pro- 
grams. 

Thume, Wayne. "Color cartoons." (7985, October) 
58» — Graphics animation. 



HARDWARE PROJECT 

DiStefano, Tony. "The analog to digital converter, 

part 1 ." (1985, October) 42 
DiStefano, Tony. "The analog to digital converter, 

part 2: Putting the finishing touches on the 

analog-to-digital converter." ( 1985, November)^ 
DiStefano, Tony. "Look, Ma, no switch." (1985, July) 

36 — Normal and inverse video conversion. 



DiStefano, Tony. "Making CoCo shine with more 
LED's." (7985, September) 232 — Add LED's to 
RS232 line and move reset. 

Geoffroy, David; and Racine, Norman. "The permanent 
shift." (7985, August) 169 — Add a shiftlock key. 

Gernhardt, Henry C, Jr. "Rejuvenate father time 

with a chic quartz locked clock." (7986, June) 54 
Kitsz, Dennis. "The letter box printer buffer part 1 ." 

(7985, October; 232 
Kitsz, Dennis. "The letter box printer buffer part 2." 

(7985, November) 248 
Weide, Dennis H. "Sleep tight: Your CoCo is awake 

tonight part 1." (7985, December) 58 • — Use 

CoCo to watch your house. 
Weide, Dennis H. "Sleep tight: Your CoCo is awake 

tonight part 2." (7986, January) 58« 



HARDWARE TUTORIAL 

DiStefano, Tony. "A beginner's hardware course 

parti." (7986, January) 131 
DiStefano, Tony. "A beginner's hardware course 

part 2." (7986, February) 154 
DiStefano, Tony. "An introduction to timing." (7986, 

March) 62 

DiStefano, Tony. "Investigating the CPU." (7986, 
June) 101 

DiStefano, Tony. "The makings of memory and how 
it works." (7986, April) 104 



HOME APPLICATION 

Ball, Howard Lee. "Contest check list." (7985, Sep- 
tember) ~\80* — Program to keep scores in a con- 
test. 

Carson, Edward R. "The joys of early amortization." 

(7986, March) 163* — Mortgage calculator. 
Crouser, Tommy. "The lure of computerized bait 

selection." (7986, April) • — Use the computer 

to select proper fishing lure." 
Dean, James R. "Bulletin board standouts are easy 

with message maker." (7986, May) 36* — Use 

CGP-1 15 printer to make notices. 
Hanusiak, Alan. "CoCo's quick station log." (7985, 

November) 44 • — Log sheet for ham radio. 
Hartley, Eric. "Little black book." (7985, November) 

172« — Phone book program. 
Hyre, Leonard. "Hire the CoCo handiman." (7986, 

April) 162» — Calculate expenses of home 

repairs." 

Jones, Larry E. "The plants are always greener on 

the CoCo side." (7986, April) 124* — Aid in taking 

care of house plants. 
McNally, Irvin L. "Coax." (7985, November) 180« 

— For Ham radio operator— determine power line 

losses. 

Snider, Stephen. "CoCo takes the plunge: Pool 
maintenance made easy." (7986, June) 145 • 

Sullins, Mark S. "Livin' on CoCo time." (7986, Janu- 
ary) 173 • — Electronic calendar program. 

Talada, William. "The 15 minute Color Computer 
workout." (7986, March)26* — Exercise program. 

Weide, Dennis H. "The computerized shopping list." 
(7986, April) 21 6« — Correction, June 1986, p. 220. 

White, Richard A. "A mailing label printer for the 
spreadsheet." (7985, November) 245 • — Correc- 
tion, April 1986, page 103. 

Wood, James W. "Baseball card file." (7986, May) 
66* 

HOME FINANCE 

Anderson, Dennis. "A little electrical cost calcula- 
tor." (7986, April) ^2* 

Duf ur, Glen. "Juggle bills, juggle bills, juggle all the 
wayl" f 7986, March) 76* — Home budget analy- 
sis. 

Hallstrom, Harry W. "Assessing the market value of 
your home." (7986, April) 79 • 

Ronald, Bruce W. "Loop until-done." (7986, April) 
70» — Retirement plan calculator. 

Turowski, Donald A. "Waste not, want not with a 
refund-a-file." (7986, April) 95 • 

White, Richard A. "Spreadsheeting real data." 
(7985, August) 80 — Use a spreadsheet to calcu - 
late car expenses. 



Whittlesey, Jerry R. "The computer-aided college 
expense fund." (7986, April) 92 • 



MUSIC 

Bernico, Bill. "An adventure into sound experimen- 
tation." (7985, October) 124« — Demo of CoCo's 
sounds. 

Bernico, Bill. "Color my CoCo." (7986, January) 55» — 
Program to demonstrate music and graphics. 

Bernico, Bill. "Further adventure into SOUND 

experimentation." (7986, February) 164« 
Bernico, Bill. "Nouveau rock 'n' roll." (7986, >*pr/7; 100« 

— Dress up the.SOUND and PLAY commands. 
Golias, Ruth E. "Saturday atthe Bijou— remembering 
intermission sing-alongs." (7986, June) 36* — 
Music entertainment. 
Huffman, Gary. "Happy birthday balloons." (7986, 
April) 1 22 • — Music and graphics for your birth- 
day. 

Kolar, Joseph. "The beginning musician's 'tin ear 
lament."" (7986, February) 142 • — Discussion of 
PLAY command. 

Ludlum, Bob. "Music+: New commands, no bugs." 
(7986, June) 51 • — Additions to program of June 
1984, page 74. 

Matthews, Becky; and Matthews, David. "I want my 
CoCo TV." (7986, June) 42« — Music video entertain- 
ment. 

McNeice, Barry. "The music maker's accompanist." 
(7986, June) 20« — Draw blank sheet music on 
printer. 

Rutter, Marge. "CoCo dares you to name thattune." 

(7986, June) 66 • — Game with music. 
Tandberg, Dan. "CoCo instant music." (7986, June) 

62* — Aid in using PLAY command. 
Tauilli, T. C. "4th of July Musicfest." (7985, July) 

19« 

Urbas, Joseph M. "CoCo bells." (7985, December) 
36* — Some Christmas music. Correction, April 
1986, page 103. 



OPERATING SYSTEMS — OS-9 

Dollberg, Donald D. "Creating OS-9 system disks." 

(7986, February) 224 
Harris, Timothy A. "Mail09." (7985, July) 266 — 
Listings omitted from previous issue. See also 
November 1985, page 184. 
Lantz, Brian A. "The utility room." (7985, November) 
241 

Lantz, Brian A. "The utility room." (7985, December) 258 

— Adding more features to the LIST command. 
Lantz, Brian A. "The utility room." (7986, March) 216 

Puckett, Dale L. "Cliffhangers in the micro soaps." 

(7985, August) 236 
Puckett, Dale L. "Confessions of an enlightened 

spreadsheet user." (7985, November) 218 
Puckett, Dale L. "The Disk BASIC/OS-9 connec- 
tion." (7986, June) 208 • 
Puckett, Dale L. "Featuring a new text formatter." 

(7986, May) 235 
Puckett, Dale L. "Featuring a trig library in C." (7986, 
April) 238 

Puckett, Dale L. "Four easy assembly language 

experiments." (7986, January) 236 
Puckett, Dale L. "Granting requests for sample 
device drivers and descriptors." (7986, February) 
236 

Puckett, Dale L. "OS-9 gets good reception as 

NCC."(7985, October) 242 
Puckett, Dale L. "A short tutorial on C compilation." 

(7985, July) 252 
Puckett, Dale L. "A time for reflection." (7985, De- 
cember) 272 — Correction, February 1986, page 168. 
Warner, Bruce. "Getting started with the OS-9 oper- 
ating system." (7986, January) 134 
White, Richard A. "Firing up BASIC09." (7986, 
March) 226 

White, Richard A. "Getting started with BASIC09." 
(7986, February) 231 



1 96 THE RAINBOW July 1 936 



PASCAL 

Puckett, Dale L. "A getting-your-feet-wet course in 
OS-9 Pascal." (1985, September) 238 

Weide, Dennis H. "Changing printer parameters in 
Pascal," (1986, May) 222 • 



PRINTER 

Baldridge, Charles. "Versatile label maker elimi- 
nates messy hen scratches." (1986, May) 108* 

FitzSimmons, David S. "Printer designs." (1986, 
May) 95 • — Some samples of printer use. 

Ligocki, Ray. "Give your thoughts to the world: The 
old-time banner printer." (1986, May) 150» 

Short, Gene. "Plain Jane print needs an appoint- 
ment with the stylist." (1986, May) 88 • — Printer 
setup for Epson printer. 

Sullins, Mark. "Picprt: Good things come in all 
sizes." (7906, May)72* — Graphics screen printer 
utility. 

West, John. "Outfox those narrow printers with 
Rotate." (1986, May) 120* 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7985, July) 250 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1985, August) 234 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1985, September) 
236 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1985, October) 230 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1985, November)2A6 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7985, December) 256 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, January) 232 

— Correction, February 1986, p. 168. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, February) 222 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, March) 214 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, April) 224 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, May) 216 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, June) 194 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, July) 118 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, August) 92 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, September) 154 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, October) 154 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, November) 158 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1986, January) 102 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1986, March) 116 

SOUND SYNTHESIS 

Barden, William, Jr. "Listening to your CoCo with 
Assembly language." (1986, March) 237 

Gunn, Stephen. "An encore presentation for the 
analog to digital and back again," (7905, October) 
87 • 

Spiller, Martin; and Spiller, Jeremy. "CoCo synthesizer 
produces out-of-this-world sounds." (7906, June) 
122« 



TUTORIAL 

Betts, R. Bartly. "Uncomplicate programming tasks 
using your ROM routines." (7905, October) 29» 

DiStefano, Tony. "Exploring memory cells." (7906, 
May) 100 

DiStefano, Tony. "What is a VDG, anyway.?" (7905, 
December) 251 — List of acronyms and defini- 
tions. 

Haberer, Fredric M. "Renum with a twist." (7986, 
February) 1 1 2 

Koiar, Joseph. "A diversion a day keeps program- 
ming fey." (7905, November) 74 • — Some pro- 
gramming hints. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Enhance presentations with text 
panel formatting." (7986, June) 140* 

Kolar, Joseph. "Maximum learning with minimum 
effort." (7905, December) 100« — Hints for new- 
comers. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Practicing the two-column format." 

(7986, April) 142 • — Hints for beginners. 
Mir, Jorge. "Memory on a string$ budget." (7985, 

August) 166 

MitcheN, WiNiam. "Bleeps, bloops, bells and whis- 
tles." (1986, June) 108* — Make different sounds. 

"Primary pointers." (7986, January) 42 • —Useful 
programs for the beginner. 



Williams, John G. "The joystick fix-it." (7905, 
August) 226 — Software to make joysticks less 
sensitive. 



UTILITY 

Ambros, Marty. "A timekeeper for all occasions." 
(7986, February) 55 • — Clock utility. 

Bernico, Bill. "Presenting the star of the show- 
screen alternatives." (7986, January) 176» 

Bernico, Bill. "Screen pokes made easy." (7985, 
November) 162 • — Correction, December, 1985, 
page 208. 

Bobbitt, Craig V. "What's the diagnosis?" (7986, 
February) 67 • — Memory diagnostic program. 

Galus, John. "Quick restore." (7986, February) 
108» — Speed up BASIC search process. 

Nickel, Harold. "Auto-executing your tape pro- 
grams." (7986, February) 41 • 

Poynter, Chuck. "Marquee." (7906, March) 101 • — 
Attractive title and menu screens. 

Ruggles, James J. "64K custom setup." (7906, May) 
82 • 

Schechter, Gerry. "Enhancing the CLS command." 
(7906, February) 160« 

Schultz, Hans. "VARLIST: A quick and easy way to 
list program variables." (7906, March) 92« 

Van Dusen, Douglas. "Cross reference your pro- 
grams with XREF." (7986, February) 169« — Cor- 
rection, April 1986, page 103. 

Wong, Norman. "The eye saver." (7985, July) 124* 
— Inverse video with software. Correction, 
October 1985, page 228. 



PERSONAL AUTHORS 

Aftamonow, Ellen; and Aftamonow, George. "Rudolph, 
the red nosed reindeer." (7905, December) 18» — 
Graphics demo for Christmas. 

Albrecht, Bob; and Zamora, Ramon. "The Dragon-Town 
library." (7985, October) 98 — Review of books for 
teaching children and some elementary sound pro- 
grams. 

Albrecht, Bob; and Zamora, Ramon. "Help wandering 
star in the right direction." (7985, July) 79* 

Albrecht, Bob; and Zambra, Ramon. "It's been a great 
two years." (7985, December) 56 — Hints for parents 
of young children. 

Albrecht, Bob; and Zamora, Ramon. "Making your own 
mandala — guaranteed not to melt!" (7985, Sep- 
tember) 142# — Programs for children. 

Albrecht, Bob ; and Zamora, Ramon. "Play and learn 
together— wonderment is contagious." (7985, 
August) 136* — Short demos for children. 

Ambros, Marty. "A timekeeper for all occasions." 
(7986, February) 55 • — Clock utility. 

Anderson, Dennis. "A little electrical cost calcula- 
tor." (7986, April) 102* 

Augsburg, Cray. "Database ditties." (7986, June; 97 
— Delphi news. 

Augsburg, Cray. "Presenting the 'Delphi Advan- 
tage."' (7986, April) 116 

Augsburg, Cray. "Setting the stage for spring cleaning." 
(7986, May) 92 — Delphi news. 

Baldridge, Charles. "Versatile label maker elimi- 
nates messy hen scratches." (7986, May) 108» 

Bail, Howard Lee. "Contest check list." (7905, Sep- 
tember) 180 • — Program to keep scores in a con- 
test. 

Barden, William, Jr. "Pi to 10,000 digits." (7986, April) 
228» 

Barden, William, Jr. "Disassembling the secrets of 
ROM." (1986, May) 227 

Barden, William, Jr. "Joysticks, touch padsand dig- 
itizing the world." (7986, January) 224 • 

Barden, William, Jr. "Listening to your CoCo with 
Assembly language." (7986, March) 237 

Barden, William, Jr. "The meaning of life." (7986, 
June) 196» — Description of game called "Life." 

Barden, William, Jr. "The straight, hard facts about 
Assembly Language." (7986, February) 119 

Bell, Bruce K. "The CoCo zone." (7906, April) 26 • — 
Grand prize in adventure contest. Further instruc- 
tions, June 1986, p.220. 

Bernico, Bill "The Zoom-bloom plant." (7906, Janu- 
ary) 129» — Graphics demo. 



Bernico, Bill. "An adventure into sound experimen- 
tation." (7905, October; 124* — Demo of CoCo's 
sounds. 

Bernico, Bill. "CoCo, phone home." (7905, August) 
124* 

Bernico, Bill. "Color my CoCo." (7986, January) 55» — 
Program to demonstrate music and graph-ics. 

Bernico, Bill. "Elevator." (7985, October) 25 • — 
Learning aid for pre-schoolers. 

Bernico, Bill. "Financing: The economic advantage." 
(7986, March) 71 • — Calculate installment loans. 

Bernico, Bill. "Further adventure Into SOUND 

experimentation." (7986, February) 164» 
Bernico, Bill. "Important message." (7985, October; 

176 — Mystery message 
Bernico, Bill. "Keeping the communication lines 

open." (7905, September) 39* — Teaches sign 

language. 

Bernico, Bill. "Nouveau rock *n' roll." (7986, April) 100» 
— Dress up the SOUND and PLAY commands. 

Bernico, Bill. "A peace treaty for computer hackers and 
couch potatoes." (7986, March) 49« — Graphics 
demo. Correction, June 1986, p. 220. 

Bernico, Bill. "Presenting the star of the show- 
screen alternatives." (7986, January) 176 • 

Bernico, Bill. "Screen pokes made easy." (7905, 
November) 162* — Correction, December, 1985, 
page 208. 

Betts, R. Bartly. "Bit banging with Boole." (7985, 
September) 1 72 — Discussion of Boolean algebra. 

Betts, R. Bartly. "Flashing in 6809." (7905, July )QA • 

Betts, R. Bartly. "Interfacing machine language with 
BASIC." (7985, August) 96* 

Betts, R. Bartly. "The long and winding road to 
assembly graphics." (7985, November) 90 

Betts, R. Bartly. "Uncomplicate programming tasks 
using your ROM routines." (7985, October) 29 • 

Billen, David. "Zonx." (7985, OctoberJ65» —Action 
game. 

Blyn, Steve. "Building language arts skills." (7986, 
March) 152* 

Blyn, Steve. "The daily schedule pictograph: A time 
for every purpose." (7985, September) 44 • — Pic- 
tograph to show child's daily schedule. 

Blyn, Steve. "Gaining insight into your child's self 
image." (7906, February) 134* 

Blyn, Steve. "Learning the art of written expression 
with proper punctuation." (7905, October) 45 • — 
Review of punctuation marks. 

Blyn, Steve. "Locating points on a graph." (7906, 
April) 136* 

Blyn, Steve. "Preparing for the right career choice." 

(7986, January) 108* 
Blyn, Steve. "The rainy day account." (1985, 

August) 148* — Demo bankaccountforchildren. 
Blyn, Steve. "Take this message, please!" (7905, 

July) 42* 

Blyn, Steve. "Teaching children time concepts." 

(7906, May) 138* 
Blyn, Steve. "Teaching language idioms." (7906, 

June) 84 • 

Blyn, Steve. "Working with the electronic book part 

1. "(7905, November) 30* — Prog ram to use Radio 
Shack's Electronic Learning Book. 

Blyn, Steve. "Working with the electronic book part 

2. " (7985, December) 30 • 

Bobbitt, Craig V. "What's the diagnosis?" (7906, 
February) 67 • — Memory diagnostic program. 

Borger, J. E., III. "CoCo unfurls Old Glory." (7905, 
July) 1 %3 • — The flag using graphics. 

Bradbury, Nick. "Destination; Moon base Amphi- 
bia." (7905, August) 106» — Major correction, 
September 1985, page 129. — Additional correc- 
tion, April 1986, page 103. 

Britton, Steve, IV. "Operation freedom." (7905, 
August) 54 • — Correction, October 1985, page 
228. 

Brockschmidt, Kraig. "Brain games." (7905, 
December) 190» — A collection of 5 games. 

Carlisle, Allen B. "Invasion of the flying saucer peo- 
ple." (7986, March) 108* 

Carmichael, Craig. "The secret to loading those 
double speed tapes." (7986, February) 76 

Carson, Edward R. "The joys of early amortization." 
(7986, March) 163 • — Mortgage calculator. 

Chouinard, Daniel. "The phone file trader." (7905, 
November) 36* — Communications program to 
trade files over the phone. 



July 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 97 



Clark, Stephen P. "Julie The Mouse.'" (1986, April) 

157» — A database program. 
Compton, David. M Set your sails, keep a weather eye 

out for storms and beware of the Jolly Roger." 

(1986, March) 18« — Adventure game for young 

child. 

Crouser, Tommy. "The lure of computerized bait 

selection." (1986, April) 1 30 • — Use the computer 

to select proper fishing lure." 
Curl, John R. "Here by populardemand: New Delphi 

announcements." (1986, March) 210 
Curl, John R. "The latest on our newest dimension: 

The CoCo SIG." (1986, January) 183 — News on 

the Delphi Information Service. 
Curl, John R. "Some noteson downloading. "(7 986, 

February) 88 — Delphi hints. 
Dater, Andrew. "An easy way to run your programs." 

(1986, February) 36 • — Disk menu utility. 
Dawson, David. "Sir Eggbert jumper leaps to the 

rescue." (1985, August) 129« 
Day, R. Wayne. "Harvesting summer's bumper crop 

of BBS's." (1985, November) 61 
Day, R. Wayne. "Music and a terminal program, 

too?" (1985, September) 88 • — Discussion of 

"Orchestra-90." 
Day, R. Wayne. "A question and answer repertoire." 

(1985, July) 90 • — Questions and answers on 

communications, BBS, etc. 
Dean, James R. "Bulletin board standouts are easy 

with message maker." (1986, May) 36» — Use 

CGP-115 printer to make notices. 
Dean, Mike. "Defeat de bugs." (1986, February )38» 

— Help in hand assembly problems. 
Delbourgo, Bob; Delbourgo. Daniel; and Delbourgo, 

Tino. "Around the world in 1 8 frames." (7985, August) 
73* — Graphics demo of globe. Correction, February 
1986, p. 168. 

Delbourgo, Bob ; and Delbourgo, Daniel. "Random 
mosaics." (1985, August) 40 • — Lo-res graphics 
demo. 

Di Zazzo, Ernie. "Oh, long may they wave: A salute 
to the flags." (1986, May) 42 • — Flags of different 
countries. 

DiStefano, Tony. "The analog to digital converter, 

part 1/77985, October) 42 
DiStefano, Tony. "The analog to digital converter, 

part 2: Putting the finishing touches on the 

analog-to-digital converter." (7985, November) 84 
DiStefano, Tony. "A beginner's hardware course 

part 1." (7986, January) 131 
DiStefano, Tony. "A beginner's hardware course 

part 2." (7986, February) 154 
DiStefano, Tony. "Exploring memory cells." (7986, 

May; 100 

DiStefano, Tony. "An introduction to timing." (1986, 
March) 62 

DiStefano, Tony. "Investigating the CPU." (1986, 
June) 101 

DiStefano, Tony. "Look, Ma, no switch." (7985, July) 
36 — Normal and inverse video conversion. 

DiStefano, Tony. "Making CoCo shine with more 
LED's." (7985, September) 232 — Add LED's to 
RS232 line and move reset. 

DiStefano, Tony. "The makings of memory and how 
it works." (7986, April) 104 

DiStefano, Tony. "Switching double-sided disks." 
(1985, August) 162 

DiStefano, Tony. "What is a VDG, anyway.?" (7985, 
December) 251 — List of acronyms and defini- 
tions. 

Dold, Charles W. "Dynamic computer graphics." (7985, 

September) 70* — How to draw 3-D pictures, 
Dollberg, Donald D. "Creating OS-9 system disks." 

(7986, February) 224 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7985, July) 250 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7985, August) 234 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7985, September) 
236 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1985, October) 230 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1985, November,) 21 6 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7985, December) 256 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, January) 232 

— Correction, February 1986, p. 168. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7986, February) 222 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7986, March) 214 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (1986, April) 224 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7986, May) 216 



Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (7986, June) 194 
Dufur, Glen. "Juggle bills, juggle bills, juggle all the 
way!" (7986, March) 76« — Home budget analy- 
sis. 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: a look at the commands. 
(7985, December) 153* — Part 2 of a BBS pro- 
gram. 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: An introduction to the 
system and its special features." (7985, November) 
135« —Complete BBS program. 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: How to modify the pro- 
gram to use the CoCo serial port." (7986, Febru- 
ary) ^00• 

Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS: Setting up various files 
to make the system operate." (7986, January) 
142» 

Dwight, Jeffry. "Zapping with confidence." (1985, 

December) 1 1 8 • — A disk utility. 
Eichstaedt, Pete. "Gathering up scattered pro- 
grams." (7986, February) 94 • 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (7985, July) 118 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, August) 92 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, September) 154 
EHers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (7985, October) 154 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1985, November) 158 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed." (1986, January) 102 
Ellers, Ed. "Earth to Ed " (7986, March) 116 
Firedrake, George ; and Albrecht, Karl. "Fantasy 
fare." (1985, July) 137 — General information on 
fantasy games. 
Firedrake, George; and Albrecht, Karl. "For the game- 
master, just the end of a beginning." (1985, August) 
154 — The last Gamemaster's apprentice column. 
FitzSimmons, David S. "Printer designs." (7986, 

May) 95» — Some samples of printer use. 
Foster, Leslie A. "The fourth year of Rainbow." 
(1985, July) 229 — Index from July 1984 to June 
1985and Rainbow on tape from April 1982 to June 
1985. 

Franks, Bill. "A quandary of puzzles." (7986, Janu- 
ary) 25 • — Like a jig-saw puzzle. 
Fransen, Aaron. "The quest for the falcons' lair." 

(7985, August) 26 • 
Frerking, Anthony. "The Commandos want you!" 

(1986, February) 180 • 
Galus, John. "Quick restore." (7986, February) 

108* — Speed up BASIC search process. 
Geoffroy, David; and Racine, Norman. "The permanent 

shift." (7985, August) 169 — Add a shiftlock key. 
Gernhardt, Henry C, Jr. "Rejuvenate father time 

with a chic quartz locked clock." (7986, June) 54 
Glaberson, Aryeh. "The eight lights of Chanukah." 

(7985, December) 196» 
Golias, Ruth E. "Home sweet home." (7986, May) 

20* — Graphics demo. 
Golias, Ruth E. "Saturday at the Bijou— remembering 

intermission sing-alongs." (7986, June) 36 • — 

Music entertainment. 
Goodman, Martin H. "A disk tinkerer's device." 

(1986, March) 84* — Disk utility. 
Goodman, Martin H. "The great transformation." 

(7986, June) 182* — Conversions from MS-DOS 

to CoCo. 

Goodman, Marty. "Now you see it, now you don't!" 
(7986, June) 90 — How to determine EPROM era- 
sure times. 

Goodson, Joey, "A-maze-ing maneuvering with jet- 
pack challenge." (7985, July) 106» 

Green, Robert L. "As far as the eye can see." (7985, 
August) 230* — Do it yourself eye examination. 

Gunn, Stephen. "An encore presentation for the 
analog to digital and back again." (7985, October) 
87 • 

Haberer, Fredric M. "Renum with a twist." (7986, 

February) 112 
Halfman, Scott. "Who will survive?" (7986, June) 

26 • 

Hall, Mike. "Christmas pageantry." (7985, December) 

212* — Graphics for Christmas. 
Hallstrom, Harry W. "Assessing the market value of 

your home," (7986, April) 79» 
Hanusiak, Alan. "CoCo's quick station log." (7985, 

November) 44 • — Log sheet for ham radio. 
Harris, Timothy A. "Mail09." (7985, July) 266 — 

Listings omitted from previous issue. See also 

November 1985, page 184. 



Hartley, Eric. "Little black book." (7985, November) 

1 72 • — Phone book program. 
Heyza, Doug. "Say 'hello' to this directory helper." 

(1985, August) 69 • — Correction, October 1985, 

page 228. 

Hill, Eddie. An annual expense tracking and man- 
agement system." (7986, M arch ) 122 • — Correc- 
tion, May 1986, p. 127. 

Huffman, Gary. "Happy birthday balloons." (7986, 
April) 122* — Music and graphics for your birth- 
day." 

Hyre, Leonard. "Become a math whiz!" (7985, Sep- 
tember) 18« — Math quiz. 

Hyre, Leonard. "Hire the CoCo handiman." (7986, 
April) 162* — Calculate expenses of home 
repairs." 

Jones, Larry E. "The plants are always greener on 
the CoCo side." ( 7986, April) 124* — Aid in taking 
care of house plants. 

Jones, Tim. "If your 'horse' comes in first, you iose!" 
(7985, November) 129« — Recreation of basket- 
ball game called horse. Correction, January 1986, 
p. 231. 

Jones.Timmy. "Take the plunge with CoCo." (7985, 
September) 163 • — 10 meter platform diving. 

Kapfhammer, Jutta ; and Helm, Philip. "Our twenty 
carat gold winners." (7986, April) 20 — Results of 
third Rainbow adventure contest. 

Kent, Jim. "Guppie graphics." (7985, October) 106 • 
— Assembly language graphics 

Kerckhoff, Peter. "CoCoCad modification." (7986, 
February) 103* — Mod for DMP-120 printer. 

Kerckhoff, Peter. "CoCoCad: The schematic scoun- 
drel." 7985, October) ^30• — Computer aided design 
for CoCo. Additional listing, February 1986, p. 103. 

Kilby, Mike. "Firestorm." (7986, January) 122» 

Kitsz, Dennis. "The letter box printer buffer part 1 ." 
(7985, October; 232 

Kitsz, Dennis. "The letter box printer buffer part 2." 
(7985, November) 248 

Knolhoff, Mike. "A caterpillar's alphabet." (7985, 
August) 83 • 

Kohn, Joseph. "Pix files." (7986, February) 26* — 
Transfer picture files CoCo Max, Graphicom.etc. 

Kolar, Joseph. "The beginning musician's 'tin ear 
lament.'" (7986, February) 142» — Discussion of 
PLAY command. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Creative programming forthe 
beginner." (7986, January) 30 • — Make multiple- 
choice quiz. 

Kolar, Joseph. "A diversion a day keeps program- 
ming fey." (7985, November) 74 • — Some pro- 
gramming hints. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Enhance presentations with text 
panel formatting." (7986, June) 140 • 

Kolar, Joseph. "A final session with the 'A' option." 
(7985, October) 83 • — More on the DRAW state- 
ment. 

Kolar, Joseph. "The Goolian Olympics of trig func- 
tions." (7985, July) 148 • — Game using trigo- 
nometry. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Mastering the DRAW statement." 
(7985, August) 172« 

Kolar, Joseph. "Maximum learning with minimum 
effort." (7985, December) 100» — Hints for new- 
comers. 

Kolar, Joseph. "Practicing the two-column format." 

(7986, April) 142 • — Hints for beginners. 
Kolar, Joseph. "PSET sail in the FOR/NEXT sea." 

(7986, May) 174» 
Kolar, Joseph. "A simple technique for creating 

animation." (7986, March) 39 • 
Kolar, Joseph. "Sprucing up an old design." (7985, 

September) 136 • — Use of the DRAW command. 
Krom, Matt. "As visions of the Pro-Am danced in 

their heads." (7986, May) 50* — Golf game. 
Kwong, Hong. "Design your own calendar pin-up." 

(7986, May) 63* 
LaBelle, Russ F. "Oh! Canada." (7985, September) 

124 • — Geography of Canada. 
Lamonica, Mary; and Lamonica, James. "CoCo 

math class." (1986, January) 88» 
Landwehr, Larry. "CoCo conversation." (7985, 

November) 124 — How to hook up two CoCo's 

together. 



198 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Lantz, Brian A. "The utility room." (1985, November) 
241 

Lantz, Brian A/The utility room." (7985, December) 
258 — Adding more features to the LIST comand. 
Lantz, Brian A. "The utility room." (1986, March) 21 6 

Ligocki, Ray . "Give your thoughts to the world: The 
old-time banner printer." (1986, May) 150* 

Ligon, Elizabeth. "CoCo-etry." (1985, September) 
130* — Program to write poetry. 

Ludlum, Bob. "Music+: New commands, no bugs." 
(1986, June) 51 • — Additions to program of June 
1984, page 74. 

Matthews, Becky F. "Nothing phone-y about it: Ma 
Bell trips the light fantastic." (1986, June) 18 • — 
Graphics and sound entertainment. 

Matthews, Becky; and Matthews, David. "I want my 
CoCo TV." (1986, June) 42« — Music video entertain- 
ment. 

Mauro, Robert. "Bookmark: Your very own compu- 
terized Dewey decimal system." (1985, Sep- 
tember) 227 • — Provides index to a library. 

McNally, Irvin L. "Coax." (1985, November) 180* — 
For Ham radio operator— determine power line 
losses. 

McNeice, Barry. "The music maker's accompanist." 
(1986, June) 20» — Draw blank sheet music on 
printer. 

Mir, Jorge. "Memory on a string$ budget." (1985, 
August) 166 

Mitchell, William. "Bleeps, bloops, bells and whis- 
tles." (1986, June) 1 08 • — Make different sounds. 

Moore, W. J. "Robocise." (1986, February) 116» — 
Exercise companion. 

Nation, Brad. "Which way did that mangy mongrel 
go?" (1985, August) 228* 

Nelson, Mark. "Get down and dirty in New York's 
sewers with super rooter." (1986, May) 26 » 

Nickel, Harold. "Auto-executing your tape pro- 
grams." (1986, February) 41 • 

Osani, Keith. "Take word inventory with vocabu- 
lary." (1985, September) 80 • — Simulate a dic- 
tionary. 

Page, Dennis. "CoCoflow: CoCocad expanded." 
(1986, March) 31 • — Aid for drawing flow charts. 

Peake, Jim. "Discover the 'hidden' five tracks." 

(1986, June) 92 • 
Pettus, Ronald. "Zeroing in on Halley's Comet." 

(1986, April) 83* — Calculations to view the 

comet. 

Pitel, Rick. "Trivia tic-tac-toe." (1985, December) 
69 • — Correction, March 1986, p. 191. 

Plaxton, John. "CoCo bakes a cake." (1985, July) 
99 • — A birthday cake using graphics. 

Plog, Michael. "Computers can play an important 
role in art education." (1985, October) 55 

Plog, Michael. "The demographics of education." 
(1986, April) 139 

Plog, Michael. "Developing effective computer 
literacy methods." (1985, July) 175 — Comments 
on computers in education. 

Plog, Michael. "Educating with electronic commu- 
nications and research." (1986, March) 154 — 
Thoughts on Delphi. 

Plog, Michael. "Education Texas style." (1986, May) 
140 

Plog, Michael. "How valuable is the 'hands-on' les- 
son?" (1985, September) 102 — Discussion of 
computers in schools." 

Plog, Michael. "Integrating computers into class- 
room instruction." (1985, August) 150 

Plog, Michael. "The learning process: The impor- 
tance of 'how to think."' (1986, January) 117 

Plog, Michael. "Microcomputers: Not just a student 
learning tool." (1985, November) 102 

Plog, Michael. "Robots: Their place in education." 
(1986, June) 86 

Plog, Michael. "The schools get a report card." 
(1986, February) 138 

Plog, Michael. "Successful organizational factors 
for integrating computers in school." (1985, 
December) 45 

Poynter, Chuck. "Marquee." (1986, March) 101 • — 
Attractive title and menu screens. 

Price, Rolla. "Acrostics go high tech with Word+." 
(1986, May) 38 • — Design your own crossword 
puzzles. 

Puckett, Dale L. "Cliffhangers in the micro soaps." 
(1985, August) 236 



Puckett, Dale L. "Confessions of an enlightened 
spreadsheet user." (1985, November) 218 

Puckett, Dale L. "The Disk BASIC/OS-9 connec- 
tion." (1986, June) 208» 

Puckett, Dale L. "Featuring a new text formatter." 
(1986, May) 235 

Puckett, Dale L. "Featuring a trig library in C." (1986, 
April) 238 

Puckett, Dale L. "Four easy assembly language 

experiments." (1986, January) 236 
Puckett, Dale L. "A getting-your-feet-wet course in 

OS-9 Pascal." (1985, September) 238 
Puckett, Dale L. "Granting requests for sample 

device drivers and descriptors." (1986, February) 

236 

Puckett, Dale L. "OS-9 gets good reception as 

HOC" (1985, October) 242 
Puckett, Dale L. "A short tutorial on C compilation." 

(1985, July) 252 
Puckett, Dale L. "A time for reflection." (1985, 

December) 272 — Correction, February 1986, p. 

168. 

Ramella, Richard. "The $100 challenge." (1985, 
July) 180« — Contest using a CoCo game. 

Ramella, Richard. "Bubble wars." (1986, February) 
58* 

Ramella, Richard. "No nines allowed." (1985, 

October) 36» — Game on 8 by 8 grid. 
Ramella, Richard. "Number bumper." (1985, 

October) 180* — Arcade game. 
Ramella, Richard. "Pattern blocks: Reality play." 

(1986, January) 40* — Shape game. 
Rand, Penny L. "Learn those 'tricky words.'" (1985, 

September) 117* — Practice in vocabulary. 
Rice, Robert E. "Sidewinding skirmishes with video 

vipers." (1986, January) 99* 
Riley, Thomas E. "The Maze of Moycullen." (1986, 

April) 58» — 16K winner of adventure contest. 
Roden, Brian P. "The electronic valentine-maker." 

(1986, February) 18 • — Correction, April 1986, 

page 103. 

Ronald, Bruce W. "Loop until done." (1986, April) 

70* — Retirement plan calculator. 
Ruggles, James J. "64K custom setup." (1986, May) 

82 • 

Rutter, Marge. "CoCo dares you to name thattune." 

(1986, June) 66 • — Game with music. 
Rutter, Richard W. "Computer trapshooting." (1985, 

November) 18 • — Simulates skeet shooting. 
Sabbatini, Mark. "Alpine slopes." (1985, December) 

204 • 

Santerre, Denis. "A lesson straight from the heart." 

(1985, October) 163* — Graphics demo to learn 

part of the heart. 
Saporta, Alan A. "Brotan the blue." (1985, August) 

18» — Correction, October 1985, page 228. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "The CoCo puzzle maker." (1985, 

October) 72 • — Jig saw puzzle on CoCo. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "CoCo, can you spare a dime?" 

(1985, August) 142« — Uses graphics to count 

change. 

Scerbo, Fred B. "An educational adventure for the 

CoCo and the MC-10." (1986, January) 76 • 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Fun for the whole family with gal- 
loping gamblers." (1985, December) 86« 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Learning the value of numbers." 

(1986, April) 118« 
Scerbo, Fred B. "A measure of success." (1986, 

June) 117* — Learn to read a ruler. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Return of baseball fever." (1985, 

September) 104« — Baseball team logos. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Rock'n'rolling back to the CoCo 

rockfest." (1985, July) 162* — Graphics demo. 
Scerbo, Fred B. "A simulation of life skills." (1986, 

February) 148* 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Super mathsheet generator II." 

(1985, November)79* 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Using your CoCo for educational 

plans. "(1986, May) 131 • —Generate educational 

objectives. 

Scerbo, Fred B. "The Wishing Well title maker." 
(1986, March) 157 • — Title cards for your pro- 
grams. 

Schechter, Gerry. "Enhancing the CLS command." 
(1986, February) 160« 

Schultz, Hans. "VARLIST: A quick and easy way to 
list program variables." (1986, March) 92* 

Shelton, Garry L. "Teacher's aid." (1985, Sep- 
tember) 46 • — Record keeping for teachers. 



Sheridan, Vincent H. "Soccer instructor." (1985, 
August) 47* — Teach the basics of soccer. 

Sherman, Lynn C; and Baldassary, Walter. "CoCo 
testmaker." (1985, September) 30» — Make multiple 
choice tests. 

Short, Gene. "Plain Jane print needs an appoint- 
ment with the stylist." (1986, May) 88 • — Printer 
setup for Epson printer. 

Snider, Stephen. "CoCo takes the plunge: Pool 
maintenance made easy." (1986, June) 145 • 

Spiller, Martin; and Spiller, Jeremy. "CoCo synthesizer 
produces out-of-this-world sounds." (1986, June) 
122* 

Stearman, Colin J. "Getting on the right track." 
(1985, July) 26 • — How to use 40 or80 tracksand 
double sided. Correction, January 1986, p. 231. 

Sullins, Mark S. "Livin' on CoCo time." (1986, Janu- 
ary) 173* — Electronic calendar program. 

Sullins, Mark. "Picprt: Good things come in all 
sizes." (1986, May) 72 • — Graphics screen printer 
utility. 

Suppe, Pasquale. "Handicappers enter the home 

stretch with Pace 1." (1986, May) 114* — Aid for 

the race track fan. 
Sward, Steve. '"Gopher it' (or 'turnip' wet)." (1986, 

January) 18» 
Talada, William. "The 15 minute Color Computer 

workout." ( 1986, March)26» — Exercise program. 
Tandberg, Dan. "CoCo instant music. "(1986, June) 

62« — Aid in using PLAY command. 
Tauilli, T. C. "4th of July Musicfest." (1985, July) 

19« 

Taulli, T. C. "Scan it and understand it with rapid 
reading." (1985. July) ^29• — Correction, 
November 1985, page 184. 

Taylor, Scott M. "More power and protection for 
your BBS." (1985, November) 106* — Modifica- 
tions to "Remote" from November 1 983. 

Teague, Dennis. "The word-hunt crossword puz- 
zle." (1985, December) 110« 

Thume, Wayne. "Color cartoons." (1985, October) 
58» — Graphics animation. 

Tottingham, Bill. "Receipt maker and file." (1986, 
March) 22* — Correction, May 1986, p. 127. 

Trapasso, Dave. "Doing the disk-o-step." (1986, 
April) 149» — Disk alignment. 

Turowski, Donald A. "Waste not, want not with a 
refund-a-file." (1986, April) 95* 

Tyson, Bob. "The great Rainbow simulation pack- 
age." (1985, July) 46« — Anniversary special- 
World War II, stock car racing and simulation gen- 
erator. Correction, November 1985, page 184. 

Urbas, Joseph M. "CoCo bells." (1985, December) 
36 • — Some Christmas music. Correction, April 
1986, page 103. 

Van Dusen, Douglas. "Cross reference your pro- 
grams with XREF." (1986, February) 169* — Cor- 
rection, April 1986, page 103. 

Vasconi, Eugene. "How to be an educated stargazer 
in 12 easy lessons." (1985, September) 55* — 
Help with astronomy. 

Warner, Bruce. "Getting started with the OS-9 oper- 
ating system." (1986, January) 134 

Weide, Dennis H. "Changing printer parameters in 
Pascal." (1986, May) 222* 

Weide, Dennis H. "The computerized shopping list." 
(1986, April)2 J \§* — Correction, June 1986, p.220 

Weide, Dennis H. "Machine code loder." (1985, 
July) 144* — Use machine language without an 
editor/assembler. 

Weide, Dennis H. "Sleep tight: Your CoCo is awake 
tonight part 1." (1985, December) 58« — Use 
CoCo to watch your house. 

Weide, Dennis H. "Sleep tight: Your CoCo is awake 
tonight part 2." (1986, January) 58« 

West, John. "Outfox those narrow printers with 
Rotate." ( 1986, May) ^20^ 

Whaley, Clarence. "The rule of 78s." (1986, March) 
36« — Determine installment loan payments. 

White, Richard A. "Building a spreadsheet with 
template repetition." (1985, September) 148 

White, Richard A. "Direct comparison— exhibiting 
the power of spreadsheets." (1985, July) 154 — 
Use a spreadsheet as an order form. 

White, Richard A. "An explanation and review of 
spreadsheet functions." (1985, December) 267 

White, Richard A. "Firing up BASIC09." (1986, 
March) 226 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 199 



White, Richard A. "Getting started with BASIC09." 
(1986, February) 231 

White, Richard A. "Going over spreadsheet data 
fook-up functions." (1986, January) 251 

White, Richard A. "A mailing label printer for the 
spreadsheet." (1985, November) 245* — Correc- 
tion, April 1986, page 103. 

White, Richard A. "Spreadsheeting real data." 
(1985, August) 80 — Use a spreadsheet to calcu- 
late car expenses. 

White, Richard A. "Using a spreadsheet as a file 
manager." (1985, October) 238 

Whittlesey, Jerry R. "The computer-aided college 
expense fund." (1986, April) 92* 

Williams, John G. "The joystick fix-it." (1985, 
August) 226 — Software to make joysticks less 
sensitive. 

Wilson, Terry. "Crash-proof it!" (1986, February) 

31 • — Spare copy of disk directory. 
Witham, Burt B., Jr. "Which award is which." (1985, 

December) 179« — Ham radio record keeper. 
Wolcott, Larry. "Kung Fu fighting." (1986, March) 

66* 

Wong, Norman. "The eye saver." (1985, July) 124» 
— Inverse video with software. Correction, 
October 1985, page 228. 

Wood, James W. "Baseball card file." (1986, May) 
66 • 

Wood, James W. "Rid the screen of the menace." 
(1985, September) 167 • — Board type game. 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

"A/B-4 {disk drive system)." (1985, September) 214 
"ABC puzzle." (1986, January) 207 
"ACDITS." (1985, August) 217 
"Addline."(7985, July)2M 
"Advanced utilities." (1986, June) 174 
"Alcatraz." (1985, November) 212 
"Algebra." (1986, June) 179 
"Animator commercial." (1985, August) 212 
"Animator junior." (1985, August) 207 
"Backup zero." (1985, July) 200 
"Bararossa." (1986, January) 190 
"Baseball statistics package." (1985, December) 
242 

"BASIC+." (1986, January) 192 

"Basketball statistics package." (1985, November) 
213 

"BASTXT." (1985, October) 205 

"Battle for Tunis." (1985, September) 216 

"Battle of the Bulge." (1985, August) 197 

"Battle stations." (1986, January) 206 

"The best screen dump utility for Epson-type printers." 

(1986, February) 216 
"Biosphere." (1986, June) 167 
"Blackbeard's Island." (1986, February) 219 
"Blackjack dealer and Feeler dealer." (1985, 

December) 245 
"BMC monitor stand." (1986, March) 207 
"Bob's magic graphic machine." (1985, July) 213 
"Bomb scare." (1985, July) 204 
"Briteface."(7985, November) 195 
"Buzzworm." (1986, March) 188 
"C-SEE version 2.0 (1985, November) 204 
"CA IS— Checking account information system." 

(7986, April) 185 
"Calculating parts per million." (1986, March) 195 
"Cash prophet." (1985, December) 229 
"Cassette tape tester " (1985, August) 21 1 
"CBASIC." (1986, February) 198 
"CC-100 interface breadboard package." (1985, 

November) 191 
"CCZAP." (1986, March) 185 
"CD editor." (1986, June) 159 
"CGP-220 screen dump package." (1986, June) 173 
"ChesSD." ( 1985, December) 228 
"Christmas fantasia." (1985, December) 239 
"CINC-PAC." (1985, August) 198 — Correction, 

December 1985, page 208. 
"City war." (1985, December) 246 
"CMODEM." (1985, July) 196 
"CoCo calendar." (1986, March) 209 
"CoCo calligrapher." (1985, October) 215 
"CoCo checkbook disk." (1985, October) 197 
"The CoCo Chronicles (book)." (1986, February) 

218 

"CoCo cooler too." (1986, March) 188 



"CoCo echo." (1985, October) 208 

"CoCo EPROM programmer." (1986, April) 213 

"CoCo gardener." (1986, February) 204 

"CoCo greeting card designer." (1986, April) 202 

"CoCo incognito (book)." (1986, March) 208 

"CoCo keyboard cover." (1986, March) 191 

"CoCo keyboard software." (1986, April) 191 

"CoCo knitter." (1986, May) 195 

"CoCo life." (1985, November) 195 

"CoCo Logo for the TRS-80 Color Computer." 

(1985, July) 202 
"CoCo Max II." (1986, April) 189 
"CoCo paint." (1985, July) 215 
"CoCo solver and Program generator." (1986, Feb- 
ruary) 210 
"CoCo talker." (1985, August) 218 
"CoCo text util." (1986, May) 211 
"CoCo windows." (1986, May) 199 
"Color car action." (1986, January) 201 
"Color Computer machine monitor." (1985, October) 
219 

"Color disk manager." (1985, August) 210 
"Color essential math." (1986, April) 203 
"Color LISP." (1986, May) 195 
"Color math." (1985, July) 219 
"Color tape manager." (1985, July) 217 
"Colorcom/E." (7985, November) 211 
"Company commander." (1986, January) 191 
"Complete electronic organizer." (1986, April) 204 
"The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9." (1985, 

December) 248 
"Conquering armies." (1986, April) 192 
"Cookbook." (1985, September) 195 
"Corporation plus." (1985, December) 238 
"Cosmic paint." (1985, November) 193 
"Count to 100." (1985, August) 221 
"Crash." ( 1985, July) 221 
"Crossover." (1986, February) 202 
"Crystal." (1986, January) 205 
"Cyrus world class chess." (1985, August) 195 
"Dallas quest." (1985, September) 198 
"Data bank." (1985, August) 194 
"Datarase." (1985, July)2W 
"DeskMate." (1986, April) 198 
"DeskMate." (1986, May) 219 
"Disk management system." (1986, May) 212 
"Disk pilot." (1985, December) 233 
"Disk utility package." (7986, February) 214 
"DISTO Super RAM disk." (7986, June) 160 
"Don Pan." (7986, March) 199 
"Doomsday at 2100." (7985, September) 213 
"DOS switcher." (7986, February) 212 
"Dudal." (7985, September) 215 
"Dungeon quest." (7985, October) 197 
"Dynacalc OS-9." (7985, November) 208 
"EARS." (1985, October) 201 
"EDOS 2.6 ROM." (7985, December) 235 
"EMC circuit boards." (7986, February) 203 
"Enhancer 6.0." (7986, May) 207 
"Escape from Denna." (7986, February) 217 
"EZ cassette encrypt and EZ disk encrypt." (7985, 

October) 199 
"EZ profiler." (7985, October; 200 
"Fast food math." (7985, September) 206 
"Feuer and gasse." (7985, July) 204 
"Fighter pilot." (7986, February) 200 
"File 64." (7985, August) 214 
"Flashcard review." (7985, July) 192 
"The Font shop." (7986, January) 199 
"Football statistics package." (7985, October) 204 
"FORMAKER." (7986, May) 208 
"Franchise!" (7985, September) 202 
"French package." (7986, June) 168 
"Full character set board." (7985, September) 205 
"Fundgraf." (7985, November) 206 
"Geography USA." (7986, March) 206 
"Ghana banana." (7986, January) 207 
"Gold runner." (7986, March) 196 
"Goldkeys." (7985, December) 231 
"Golf handicaps." (7985, August) 215 
"Grafix-3." (7986, April) 196 
"Graphic physics." (7985, September) 21 1 
"Graphicom II." (7985, November) 209 
"Guide to computer magazines." (7985, October) 

195 

"Guide to super software for the TRS-80 Color 

Computer." (7985, September) 199 
"Hall of the King." (7986, June) 173 
"Handycode." (7985, August) 206 



"Hardcopy." (7985, October) 218 
"Health programs." (7986, June) 164 
"Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printer." (1985, July) 
224 

"Hi-res+." (7986, January) 195 

"House Doc." (7986, March) 202 

"Insights into personal computers (book)." (7986, 

January) 197 
"Introduction to computer math (book)." (7986, 

May) 204 

"Island adventure." (7986, January) 192 
"Junior typer." (7985, July) 206 
"Kansas City BASIC." (7986, February) 192 
"Klicker."(7985, July) 203 
"Knock out." (7986, April) 209 
"Label maker." (7986, January) 196 
"Label64." (7985, November) 212 
"Latin translator." (7985, November) 198 
"Ledger one." (7985, September) 207 
"Library 2." (7985, July) 220 
"Line editor." (7986, June) 165 
"Lissajous art." (7985, November) 213 
"Magazine index system." (1985, December) 224 
"The magic box." (7985, August) 216 
"Magic lessons." (7985, September) 211 
"Marble maze." (7986, March) 197 
"Marooned." (7986, February) 196 
"Master scoreboard." (7985, July) 218 
"Math mission." (7986, June) 158 
"Mathfun." (7985, August) 200 
"Medic." (7986, January) 209 
"Memodata." (7985, July) 209 
"Menu maker." (7986, April) 210 
"Merge 'n mail." (7985, October) 192 
"Metric mind." (7985, August) 196 
"Micro illustrator." (7986, March) 203 
"Microartist." (7985, December) 240 
"Missile math." (7985, August) 213 
"Money math." (7986, June) 172 
"Moneyopoly." (7986, February) 207 
"More Keys." (7985, September) 221 
"MORSER." (7986, January) 204 
"Multiple choice test." (7985, August) 202 
"Naugus." (7985, November) 196 
"No-stat II." (7985, November) 214 
"NurnberJack." (7986, June) 176 
"Nutriguide." (7985, October) 213 
"Omniverse." (7986, March) 184 
"One-on-one." (7986, May) 197 
"Orchestra-90/CC." (7986, March) 189 
"OS-9 calligrapher." (7986, February) 206 
"OS-9 hi-res screen dump." (7985, October) 220 
"OS-9 Ramdisk driver." (7985, December) 234 
"OS-9 solution." (7985, September) 197 
"Panic button." (7986, April) 207 
"Panic," (7986, January) 202 
"PAYROL/BAS." (7986, May) 184 
"Pegasus." (7986, May) 189 
"PenPal."(7986, April) 184 
"Perpetulife." (7986, April)2\\ 
"Personal bookkeeping 2000." (7985, October) 195 
"Personal finance system." (7985, August) 203 
"Petstore." (7985, October) 202 
"PIXGEN." (7986, February) 208 
"PLANEGEO and PGCALPRT." (7986, April) 190 
"Practical programming in Pascal." (7985, August) 
192 

"Print master." (7985, October) 198 
"Printed circuit expansion boards." (7986, January) 
209 

"Pro golf." (7986, May) 205 
"Probaloto."(7985, October) 196 
"Professor Pressnote's music machine." (7985, Octo- 
ber) 221 

"Protector." (7985, November) 202 

"Puzzler." (7986, March ) 190 

"Que bit." (7985, July) 200 

"Radiolog." (7986, May) 209 

"Rescue on Alpha II." (7986, May) 198 

"Robot BASIC." (7985, July) 208 

"RS-232 switcher." (7986, January) 210 

"RS232IO." (7985, October) 212 ' 

"S.O.S." (7986, May) 200 

"Scepter of Ursea." (7985, December) 230 

"School days." (7985, September) 221 

"SCRDMP10."(7986, June) 178 

"Screen inverter." (7985, September) 196 

"SDOS." (7986, March) 200 

"SemiGraphics support utility." (7986, June) 163 



200 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



"Side wise 0S9." (1986, April) 212 
"Simon." (1985, July) 210 

"Soccer statistics package." (1985, November) 201 
"Solar explorer." (1985, September) 204 
"Sound generator." (7985, October) 205 
"Space web." (1985, August) 201 
"Speak up! 3.3." (1986, January) 197 
"Spectrum font generator." (1985, December) 247 
"Spine align cushion." (1985, September) 212 
"Star trader." (1985, July) 214 
"Stylo-Pak." (1986, March) 192 
"Super controller." (1985, November) 205 
"Super cosmos connection." (1985, December) 227 
"Super directory catalog " (1986, March) 198 
"Super duper utilities." (1986, June) 181 
"Super LOGO." (1985, December) 241 
"Super tutor." (1986, June) 166 
"Super voice." (1985, September) 217 
"Superdisk." (7986, May) 191 
"Symphony 12." (1986, April) 188 
"Taxan's personal TV tuner." (1985, July) 222 
"Tele-addresser." (7986, January) 208 
"Telepatch." (7985, October) 209 
l Telewriter-64 character set editor." (7986, June) 
177 

"Testmaker." (7985, September) 1 92 

'Thunder RAM." (7985, September) 209 

"Thunder RAM." (7986, May) 206 

"ThunderDupe 2." (7985, December) 234 

"Time master." (7985, December) 243 

"To preserve quandic." (7985, July) 223 

"Track events." (7986, February) 200 

"Trading post." (7986, May) 192 

"Treasure of the Aztecs." (7986, April) 197 

"Trigger 64." (7986, January) 201 

"Trivia." (7985, October) 190 

"Try-o-tax." (7986, April) 208 

"TX word processor," (7986, March) 209 

"The ultimate Color Computer reference guide and 

toolkit." (7985, September) 220 
"Utility routines." (7985, November) 199 
"Vegas game pak." (7986, June) 175 
"VIDCODIT video digitizer." (7986, February) 197 
"View-edit." (7985, August) 219 
"Vincent Van CoCo." (7986, April) 195 
"Vizi Draw 1.0." (7985, September) 200 
"VOX chess." (7985, July) 195 
"War of the worlds." (7985, November) 197 
"Warehouse mutants." (7985, August) 220 
"Warp factor X." (7986, February) 195 
"Wizard's math board." (7985, December) 244 

"Wizard's tower." (7986, June) 177 

"XMENU." (7986, May) 190 

"XPNDR2."(7986, February) 213 

"XSCREEN." (7986, June) 169 

"Young writer's notepad." (7985, December) 236 

"15 meg hard drive (Tandy)." (7986, May) 196 

"232 Remote Plus." (7985, September) 217 

"26 hardware projects for the home computer 

(book)." (7986, May) 210 
"500 pokes, peeks 'n execs." (7985, August) 199 



RAINBOW ON TAPE 
July 1985-June 1986 

ADD SUB5 (7986, January) 90 —Math quiz 
ADDITION (7985, December) 30 —Electronic Learn- 
ing Book utility 
ALPHTIZR (7986, May) 97 —Sorting routine 
ALPSLOPE (7985, December) 206 —Game 
AMPHIBIA (7985, August) 108 —Action game 
ANALYZER (7986, March) 90 —Disk utility 
ANIMATE (7985, October) 60 —Color cartoons 

ANIMATIC (7985, July) Animated graphics ML 

program (from June 1985) 

ANIMCALC (7985, July) Animated graphics 

demo (from June 1985) 
ANTHEM (7985, July) 149 —Trigonometry game 
AWARDS (7985, December) 181 —Ham radio utility 
BALL (1985, October) 21 —Graphics demo 
BANKACCT (1985, August) 148 —Demo bank 

account for children 
BANNER (7986, May) 150 —Printer banner maker 



BASEBALL (7986, May) 68 —Baseball card file 
BASEBLL2(7985, September) 106— Baseball team 
logos 

BASSMATE (7986, April) 132 —Select your fishing 
iure 

BASTRAIN (7985, September) 141 -DRAW demo 
BASTRAN1 (7985, November) 76 —Programming 
hints 

BASTRAN2 (7985, November) 76 —Programming 
hints 

BASTRAN3 (7985, November) 76 —Programming 
hints 

BATS (7986, Marc/?; 48 —Graphics demo 
BIRDS (7986, March) 42 —Graphics demo 
BIRTHDAY (7985, July) 100 - Birthday cake graphics 
BOOKMARK f 7985, September) 228 —Library index 
BOOT (7986, April) 30 —Boot for CoCo Zone 
adventure 

BRAINGME (7985, December) 191 —Collection of 
5 games 

BROTAN (7985, August) 20 —Game 
BUBBLWAR (7986, February) 60 —Game 
BUCKLEUP (7985, July) 151 —Trigonometry game 
BYTECODR (7985, October) 31 —Tutorial on ROM 
routines 

BYTESCRN (7985, July) 88 —Assembly demo 
CADPRINT(7985, October) 148 — Computeraided 
design 

CAD PR I NT (7986, February) 103 —Update from 
Oct 1985. 

CALCLOCK (7986, January) 74 —Part of LCLA- 
LARM 

CALENDAR (7986, January) 43 — Display calendars 

CALENDAR (7986, May) 64 —Make a calendar 
CALLER (7985, August) 104 —Assembly demo 
CALTIME (7986, January) 173 —Calendar genera- 
tor 

CASH (7986, March) 73 — Calculate installment loans 

CASTLE (7986, June) 28 —Adventure game 
CHALENGE (7985, July) 182 —$100 challenge 
game 

CHARLIE (7985, October) 19 —Graphics demo 
CHICAGO (7986, January) 55 — Music and graphics 
demo 

CHNGQUIZ (7985, August) 145 —Elementary edu- 
cation game 
CLEANUP (7985, August) 90 —Short game 
CLOCK (7986, February) 56 —Clock utility 
CLOCKBAS (7986, February) 56 —Clock utility 
CNDCAPTL (7985, September) 128 —Canadian 
geography 

COAX (7985, November) 180 —Ham radio utility 
COBBSSYS (7985, November) 1 38 —BBS program 
COCOCAD(7985, October) 134 —Computer aided 
design 

COCODRAW(7986, April) 31 —Part of CoCo Zone 
adventure 

COCOFLOW (7986, March) 32 —Aid for drawing 
flow charts 

COCOZONE (1986, April) 31 —Adventure game 
CODELODE (7985, July) 146 —Machine code 
loader 

COL-POEM (7985, September) 132 —Write poetry 
COLLEGE (7986, April) 93 —Calculate a college 
fund 

COMMANDO (7986, February) 182— Game 
COMMHELP (7986, January) 1 1 2 —Job description 
CONVERT (7986, January) 46 —Measurement 
conversions 

CORE (7985, December) 108 —Newcomer's hints 
COTERM (7985, December) 175 —BBS system 
COUNTDWN (7986, January) 44 —Pause feature in 
program 

CRASHPRF (7986, February) 32 —Disk utility 
CREXPFLE(7986, March) 129— Business expense 

management 
CRUN (7986, February) 45 —Auto execute tape 

programs 

DANCE (7985, October) 85 —GET and PUT demo 
DATA (7986, May) 121 —Part of ROTATE 
DBL SIDE (7985, July) 31 —Disk utility 
DEBUG (7986, February) 39 —Assembly language 
utility 

DEMO (7985, August) 96 —Assembly demo 
DEMO (1985, October) 60 —Color cartoons 
DEMO 1 (7985, July) 87 —Assembly demo 
DEMO 2 (7985, July) 87 —Assembly demo 



DEMOPOKE(7985, November) 164 —Screen poke 
utility 

DIGITIZE (7986. January) 229 —Touch pad demo 
DISKMENU (7986, February) 37 —Disk utility 
DISKSTEP (7986, April) 149 —Disk utility 
DOGHOUSE (7985, August) 229 —Action game 
DRIVER (7986, June) 204 —For FASTLIFE or 
SLOWLIFE 

DUMP1 (7986. May) 95 —Graphics screen dump 
DUMP2 (7986, May) 96 —Graphics screen dump 
EARTHTROT (7985, August) 74 —Graphics demo 
EGGBERT (7985, August) 130 —Action game 
ELECBOOK (7985, November) 31 —Utility for Elec- 
tronic Learning Book 
ELECTRIC (7986, April) 103 —Calculate electricty 
costs 

ELEVATOR (7985, October) 28 —Elementary edu- 
cation 

ENLARGE (7986, May) 76 —Part of PICPRT 
ENTRTAIN (7986, June) 52 —Data for MUSIC+ 
EXPTRAKR(7986, March) 131 —Business expense 

management 
EYESAVER (7985, July) 128 —Inverse video 
F (7985, October) 109 —Assembly graphics 
FASTLIFE (7986, June) 201 —Game of "Life" 
FILESRCH (7986, February) 96— Disk utility 
FINDWORD(7986, March) 153 —Education 
FIRESTRM (1986, January) 124— Game 
FISH (7985, October) 118 —Assembly graphics 
FLAGS (7986, May) 42 — Flags of 6 nations 

FLARGE (1985, October) Bonus program 

FLASH (7985, July) 84 — Assembly demo 
FLCNLAIR (7985, August) 20 —Game 
FLIGHT 1 (7986, March) 42 —Graphics demo 
FLIGHT 2 (7986, March) 44 —Graphics demo 
FREEDOM (1985, August) 56 —Game 
GAMBLERS (7985, December) 87 —Gambling 

game 

GERMAN (7986, April) 144 —Programming demo 
GOPHERIT (7986, January) 20— Game 
GOSUBTUT (7986, June) 143 —BASIC program- 
ming aid 

GRAPH (7986, April) 138 —Find points on a graph 
GRAPHIC1 (7985, September) 74 —3-D pictures 
GRAPHIC2 (7985, September) 75 —3-D pictures 
GRAPHIC3 (7985, September) 76 —3-D pictures 
HALELUJA (7986, June) 52 —Data for MUSIC+ 
HALLEY86 (7986, April) 84 — Halley's Comet finder 
HAM UTIL (7985, December) Ham radio log 

sheet (from Nov. 1985). 
HAM UTIL (7985, December) — Ham radio log sheet 

(from Nov. 1985). 
HANDIMAN (7986, April) 163 —Calculate home 

expenses 

HANDSIGN (7985, September) — Bonus sign language 
HANOI (7985, October) 21 —Graphics demo 
HARDCOP1 (7986, May) 97 —Graphics screen 
dump 

HARDCOP2 (7986, May) 98 —Graphics screen 
dump 

HEART (7985, October) 164 —Graphics to demo 

heart function 
HEART (7986, May) 176 —Graphics demo 
HELLO (7985, August) 70 —Disk utility 

HELPDRAW(7985, October) 168 —Part of HEART 
HOME (7986, May) 21 —Picture of a house 
HOMEBDGT (7986, March) 77 —Home financial 
analysis 

HORSE (7985, November) 131 —Basketball game 
HOUSEVAL (7986, April) 80 —Determine house 
value 

IDIOMS (7986, June) 84 —Elementary education 
INDY4K(7985, August) 90 —Short game 
INSTALL (7986, February) 54 —For CRUN 
INTRFACE (7985, August) 102 —Assembly demo 
INVERTER (7986, January) 46 —Graphics demo 
IRAKEOGH (7986, April) 71 —Retirement planner 
JETPACK (7985, July) 108 —Action game 
JIGSAW (7985, December) 100 —Newcomer's 
hints 

JOYCOLOR (7986, January) 45 —Graphics demo 
JSTKLINE (7986, January) 228 —Joystick demo 
JSTKQUAD (7986, January) 229 —Joystick demo 
JSTKTEST (7986, January) 228 —Joystick demo 
JULIE (7986, April) 159 —Database program 
KOLAROLA (7986, February) 147 —PLAY tutorial 
KROMICO (7985, October) 20 —Graphics demo 
KUNG FU (7986, March) 67 —Game 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 201 



LABEL (1986, May) 108 —Label maker 
LADDER (1985, July) 150 —Trigonometry game 
LBLKBOOK (1985, November) 174 —Phone book 
program 

LCLALARM ( 1986, January) 66 —Burglar alarm 
LETRMMRY (1985, August) 91 —Short game 
LETRSKIP (1985, August) 85 —Elementary educa- 
tion 

LIFESKL2 (1986, April) 120 —Life skills math drill 
LINE (1986, May) 176 —Graphics demo 
LINEDRAW (1985, October) 18 —Graphics demo 
LISTING1 (7905, August) 177 —DRAW demo 
LISTING2 (1985, August) 177 —DRAW demo 
LISTING2 (1985, December) 108 —Newcomer's 
hints 

LOADER (1986, February) 102 — BB§ utility 
LOTTOGEN (1986, January) 42 —Pick your num- 
bers 

LSBDATA (1986, May) 126 —Part of ROTATE 
MAILLABL (1985, November) 247 —Mailing labels 
MARQUEE (1986, March) 102 —Title and menu 
screens 

MATHGEN2 (1985, December) — Math problem gener- 
ator (from Nov. 1985) 

MATHGEN2 (1985, November) 80 —Math problem 
generator 

MATHMINR (1986, January) 79 —Math quiz 
MAXCMP (7985, July) 93 —Graphics utility 
MAZEGAME (7985, August) 88 —Short game 
MCQUIZ (1986, January) 32 — Multiplechoice quiz 
generator 

MEMDIAG (7986, February) 67 —Diagnostic pro- 
gram 

MEMDUMP (7986, February) 41 —Auto execute 

tape programs 
MENORAH (7985, December) 196 — Chanukah 

graphics 

MESSAGE (7985, October) 176— Mystery message 
MESSAGE (7986, May) 37 —Bulletin board mes- 
sages 

MESSAGES (7985, July) 45 —Message center 
MILELOG (7986, May) 96 —Printer demo 
MINIGOLF (7986, May) 52 -Game 
ML GEN (1985, December) — Transfer files over phone 

(from Nov. 1985) 
ML GEN (7985, November) 37 —Transfer files over 

phone 

MORTGAGE (7986, March) 164 —Mortgage calcu- 
lations 

MOSAIC (7985, August) 42— Lo-res graphics demo 
MOYCULEN (7986, April) 60 —Adventure game 
MS2COCO (7986, June) 185 — MSDOS to COCO 
transfer 

MUSFEST (7985, July) 20 —4th of July music 
MUSIC+ (7986, June) 51 —Updated synthesizer 
program 

MUSPAPER (7986, June) 24 —Make music sheet 
paper 

NEWTIME (7986, May) 139 —Teach children time 
NMBRBMPR (1985, October) 182 —Arcade game 
NMBRMATCH (7985, November) 31 —Utility for 

Electronic Learning Book 
NONINER (7985, October) 38 —Game 
NORMAL (7986, May) 79— Part of PICPRT 
OASIS (7985, July) 80 —Elementary education 

OBJECTIV (1986, May) 135 —Generate educa- 
tional objectives 

OCNVRT (7985, September) 95 —Terminal part of 
ORCHESTRA90 

ONHOLD (7986, June) 18 —Sound and graphics 
demo 

ORATORY (7985, September) 182 —Contest score- 
keeper 

PACE 1 (7986, May) 117 —Race handicapper 
PAGETURN (7985, August) 76 —Graphics demo 
PARAJUMP(7985, July) 150— Trigonometry game 
PARALIFT (7985, July) 150 —Trigonometry game 
PART1 (7986, May) 28 —Game (Super-rooter) 
PART2 (7986, May) 31 —Game (Super-rooter) 
PATTERNS (7985, July) 83 —Elementary educa- 
tion 

PFRMDIVE (7985, September) 164 —Diving game 
PHONE (7985, August) 128 —Home helper 
PIANOBAS(7986, June) 126 —Sound synthesizer 
PIANOBfN (1986, June) 124 —Sound synthesizer 
PIANOSRC (7986, June) 133 — Sound synthesizer 
PIBASIC (7986, April) 232 — Pi to 10,000 digits 



PICGRAPH (7985, September) 45 —Show child's 

daily schedule - 
PICPRT (7986, May) 73 —Graphics screen dump 
PICSTICK (7985, August) 88 —Short game 
PINEW (7986, April) 231 —PI to 10,000 digits 
PI X FILES (7986, February) 28 —Transfer graphics 

files , 
PLANTLOG (7986, April) 125 -Water plants on 

schedule 

PRINTMAT(7986, May) 98 —Print formatter 
PROMNADE (7985, July) — Animated graphics demo 

(from June 1985) 
PTRNBLKS (7986, January) 41 —Shape game 
PUNCQUIZ(7985, October) 46— Review punctua- 
tion marks 

PUZLMAKR (7£>85, October) 73 —Jig saw puzzle 
PUZZLE (7985, December) 111 —Crossword puz- 
zle 

PUZZLER (7986, January) 28 —Jig-saw puzzle 
QUICKZAP(7985, December) 129 —Disk utility 
RADIALS (7985, October) 85 —DRAW demo 
RADIO (7986, April) 100 —Music and graphics 
demo 

RAINSIGN (7985, September) 40— Teach sign lan- 
guage 

RAPDREAD (7985, July) 130 —Reading exercise 
RCIRCSIN (7985, October) 21 —Graphics demo 
RCKFEST2 (7985, July) 166 —Graphics demo 
RECEIPT (7986, March) 24 —Business aid 
REDGREEN (7985, September) 168 —Board type 
game 

REDUCE (7986, May) 75 —Part of PICPRT 
REFSHEET (7986, January) 44 —List printable ascii 
codes 

REFUND (7986, April) 96 —Keep track of refund 
offers 

REMOTELD (7985, December) BBS utility 

(from Nov. 1985) 
REMOTELD (7985, November) 112 —BBS utility 
REMOTE2 (7985, November) 108 —BBS utility 
REMOVREM (7985, October) 151 —Remove REM 

statements 

REM2DEMO (7985, December) — BBS utility (from 
Nov. 1985) 

REM2DEMO (7985, November) 112 —BBS utility 
REPTGENR (7986, March) 145— Business expense 

management 
RESTORE (7986, February) 108 —BASIC utility 
REVTYPE (7985, August) 102 —Assembly demo 
RINGSONG (7986, June) 42 —Music and graphics 

demo 

RMTALARM (7985, December) 63 —Burglar alarm 
ROBOCISE (7986, February) 117 —Exercise com- 
panion 

ROBOMATH (7985, September) 20 —Math quiz 
ROCKET (7985, July) — Animated graphics demo (from 
June 1985) 

ROTATE 1 (7986, May) 121 —Printer utility 
ROTATE 2 (7986, May) 127 —Printer utility 
RTR (7986, May) 28 —Game (Super-rooter) 
RUDOLPH (7985, December) 21 — XMASgraphics 
RULEOF78 (7986, March) 36 — Installment loan pay- 
ments 

RULER (7986, June) 119 —Teach how to use a ruler 
SAMPLE (7985, August) 104 —Assembly demo 
SAUCER (7986, March) 109— Game 
SCF EDI (7986, January) 147 -BBS utitity 

SCREEN (7986, January) 176 —Graphics utility 
SCRNTYPE (7985, August) 98 —Assembly demo 
SETBAUD (7986, May) 226 —Use with SETPRT 
SETPRT(7986, May) 223— Change printer parame- 
ters in PASCAL 
SHADOW (7986, June) 44— Music demo 
SHOPLIST (7986, April) 219 —Computerized shop- 
ping list 

SHUTTLE (7985, August) 177 —DRAW demo 
SINGLONG (7986, June) 37— Music entertainment 
SKIPRINT(7986, January) 43— List cassette files to 
printer 

SLOWLIFE (7986, June) 201 -Game of "Life" 
SMF EDI (7986, January) 150 —BBS utility 
SMP EDI (7986, January) 166 -BBS utility 
SNDSTORY (7985, October) 128 —SOUND demo 
SNKCHASE (7986, January) 100 —Game 
SOCCER (7985, August) 48 —Soccer instruction 



SONGGAME (7986, June) 75 —Name that Tune 
game 

SONGS (7986, June) 67 —Name that Tune game 
SOUND (7985, October) 88 —Sound synthesis 
SOUND 2 (7986, February) 166 —SOUND utility 
SOUNDBSE (7986, June) 112 —Make different 
sounds 

SOUNDCAS(7986, June) 63 —PLAY demos 
SOUNDISK (7986, June) 65 —PLAY demos 
SPEAK2ME (7985, October) 19 —Graphics demo 
SPRINGBD (7985, September) — Bonus program 

STARFIND (7985, September) 56 —Astronomy 
helper 

STARS (7985, August) 138 — Short demo for children 

STARTUP (7985, December) 158 —BBS system 
STOCKCAR (7985, July) 72 —Simulation game 
STRIPLF (7986, June; 190 —Use with MS2COCO 
STYLIST (7986, May) 89 —Epson printer setup 
SUBTRACT (7986, February) 150 —Elementary 
ed ucation 

SUL EDI (7986, January) 158 —BBS utility 
SUPERCLS (7986, February) 162— Enhanced CLS 
command 

SUPRNOVA (7986, January) 37 —Graphic demo 
SWIMPOOL (7986, June) 146 —Swimming pool 

maintenance aid 
TAPEDIR (7986, February) 54 —For CRUN 
TEACHAID (7985, September) 49 —Teacher's 

record keeper 
TESTMAKR (7985, September) 32 —Make multiple 

choice tests 

THE SEED (7986, January) 130 —Graphics demo 
TICTACTO (7985, December) 70 —Trivia game 
TIN EAR (7986, February) 146 —PLAY tutorial 
TITLEMKR (1986, March) 159 —Title cards for pro- 
grams 

TITLPOKE (7985, November) 164 —Screen poke 
utility 

TITLPRINT (7985, November) 164 —Sample title 
TRACK (7985, July) 149 —Trigonometry game 
TRACK40 (7986, June) 93 —Disk utility 
TRADER (7986, March) 20— Game for young child 
TRIKWORD {1985, September) 118 —Vocabulary 
practice 

TRIVDATA (7985, December) 79 —Data file for 
TICTACTO 

TRIVUTIL (7985, December) 72 —Trivia game 
TRPSHOOT (7985, November) 21 — Trapshooting 
game 

TUGOFWAR(7985, July) 150— Trigonometry game 
TUTOR 1 (7986, June) 142 —BASIC programming 
aid 

TUTOR 2 (7986, June) 143 —BASIC programming 
aid 

TV SHOWS (7986, March) 50 —Graphics demo 
TYPANIC (7985, August) 91 —Short game 
USA FLAG (7985, July) 116 —Flag picture 
USER SYS (7985, December) 159 —BBS system 
VACATION (7986, May) 98 —Vacation planner 
worksheet 

VALNAME(7986, February) 23 —Valentine maker 
VALPRINT(7986, February) 20 —Valentine maker 
VARLIST(7986, March) 96— List program variables 
VISION (7985, August) 231 —Do-it-yourself eye 
exam 

VOCABLRY(7985, September) 82— Simulate a dic- 
tionary 

WHO AM I (7986, February) 135— Elementary edu- 
cation 

WORD+(798G, May) 39— Make crossword puzzles 

WORKOUT (7986, March) 28 —Exercise aid 
WORLDWAR (7985, July) 58 —Simulation game 
XFER16 (7985, November) 37 —Transfer files over 
phone 

XMASONGS (7985, December) 37 — XMAS music 
XMASSHOW (7985, December) 212 —Christmas 
graphics 

XREF (7986, February) 172 —Cross reference pro- 
gram 

YOYO (7986, April) 145 —Programming demo 

ZIP (7985, September) 141 —DRAW demo 

ZQNX (1985, October) 67 — Action game 

40 35 (7985, July) 33 —Disk utility 

40 80 (7985, July) 31 —Disk utility 

64KDRIVR (7985, October) 87 —Sound synthesis 

64KSETUP (7986, May) 83 —Utility 

r7S 



202 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



GANTELET 



Mission: F-16A SSA ULT 





>cori: 

! 5 8 h H' 



One, two or even three people can play Gantelet at 
the same time. You and your friends travel through 
the many levels in search of an exit to the next 
level. Avoid the Ghosts and other creatures that 
are out to stop you in your quest. Collect keys to 
open doors, treasures and magic potions to aid 
you in your battle. Watch out for hidden traps as 
you frantically search for the exit to the next level. 



64 k required 
tape or disk 



$28.95 u s. 

$38.95 Can. 



Fly your plane over land and water while avoiding 
enemy missiles, planes and helicopters attacking 
from the top and bottom of the screen. Use your 
radar to track objects as they approach the main 
screen. Bomb oil refineries, airports and destroy 
planes before they can take off from the airports. 
Watch out for missiles fired from hidden missile 
silos on the ground. Dozens of screens of detailed 
terrain plus increasing difficulty make this a great 
game for everyone. 

64 k and joystick required Joonr 
tape or disk $38.95 Can. 



PAPER ROUTE 




SCORE 



t 1 1,3|#. : 



As a paper boy, you ride your bike 
along your route delivering papers to 
your customers. Break customers' 
windows or damage their property 
and they will cancel their subscrip- 
tions! Earn bonus points by damag- 
ing non-subscribers' property. Avoid 
pedestrians, cars, and maybe even a 
mad dog in your attempt to deliver all 
of your papers! Detailed graphics and 
lots of surprises make this game a 
real challenge for everyone. 



64 k 

joystick required 
tape or disk 



$28.95 u.s. 

$38-95 Can 



MARBLE MAZE 



KNOCK OUT 



KARATE 




rim 



E * 3S 



it* : " mm 



Move your marble around 
the mazes in your search for 
the finish line! Avoid marble 
eaters, acid puddles and 
other creatures that inhabit 
the mazes. Eight different 
levels and great graphics 
make this game a must for 
your collection. 

joystick required 




M,1 



i I r£« 

frhJ*f 



Fight against five different 
boxers in this great boxing 
game! At first the boxers 
are easy to knock out, but 
beware, it gets harder as 
you move on rf The boxers 
are out to stop you in your 
quest to become champion 
of the world. Outstanding; 
graphics make this a must 
for your collection! 




Challenge the computer, or 
a friend to a Karate match! 
Use various Karate punches 
and kicks to knock your op- 
ponent down and earn 
points to win the match. 
When challenging the com- 
puter, your opponent's 
Karate skills increase as 
you win matches. This game 
is a challenge for even the 
expert game player. 



64 k required tape or disk $28.95 U.S. $38.95 Can. joystick required 



COMING SOON: 

Mission: 
RUSH'N ASSAULT 

IIMIIlSIIIHIIHHIIIIIMiUlllimiUHIIIKlirimrillMHmii 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 



We accept: 



VISA 



cheque or money order 




24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878-8358 
personal service 9-5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax. 
C.O.D. Canada only. 
Dealer inquiries invited 
Looking for new software. 



0 



CoCo Community 

We have compiled a list of 
Color Computer Clubs 
because of the many re- 
quests we have received. CoCo 
Clubs may wish to exchqnge 
newsletters, share ideas for top- 
ics of discussion at monthly 
meetings, etc. 

Please let us know if we have 
omitted any clubs and send us 
complete up-to-date addresses. 
Only those clubs that have 
signed our "agreement form" will 
appear in this listing of CoCo 
Clubs. Also, please notify us if you 
wish to add or delete any names 
on this list. Send your information 
to: 

CoCo Clubs 
THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



ARIZONA 

Tucson Color Computer Club, Bill Nunn, 9631 E. 
Stella, Tucson, 85730, (602) 721-1085 

CALIFORNIA 

California Computer Federation, (San Fernando 
Valley Chapter), Pete Ellison, 366 West Provi- 
dencia Ave., Burbank, 91506, (818) 840-8902 

California Computer Federation, (San Francisco 
Chapter), Dick Stanich, P.O. Box 7007, Red- 
wood City, 94063, (415) 366-4560, BBS (415) 
364-2658 

Los Angeles-Wilshire Color Computer Users' 
Group, Norm Wolfe, P.O. Box 11151, Beverly 
Hills, 90213, (213) 838-4293 

The Davis CoCoNuts, Shneor Sherman, 1818 
Haussler Dr., Davis, 95616, (916) 758-3195 

Ventura County Color Computer Club (VC4), Doug 
McLaughlin, Oxnard Public Library, 214 South 
"C" Street, Oxnard, 93030, (805) 984-4636 or 
BBS (805) 484-5491 

Citrus Color ComputerClub, Jack Brinker, P.O. Box 
6991, San Bernadino, 92412, (714) 824-1866 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Patricia Scheffer, 
1435 W. 172nd Street, Gardena, 90247, (213) 
371-2016 

COLORADO 

The ESCO Computer Club, David E. Schulz, 1299 
Harrison Street, Denver, 80206, (303) 388-6988 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, Virginia 22193, (703) 
690-2453 

FLORIDA 

Northwest Florida CoCo Nuts, Lee Gottcher, P.O. 
Box 1032, Fort Walton Beach, 32549, (904) 678- 
8894 

Jacksonville Color Computer Club, William H. 
Brown 111,2411 Hirsch Ave., Jacksonville, 32216, 
(904) 721-0282 

CoCo Chips Color Computer Club, 715 5th Avenue 
NE, Largo, 33540, (813) 581-7779 

Broward County Color Computer Club, Timothy D. 
Neary, 510 S.W. 64th Ave., Margate, 33068, (305) 
972-4074 

South Brevard Color Computer Club, Benjamin S. 
Jerome, 496 Hillside Court, Melbourne, 32935, 
(305) 259-4609 

Color-6809 Users Group, Emery Mandel. 4301 11th 
Avenue North, St. Petersburg, 33713-5207, (813) 
323-3570, BBS (813) 321-0397 

C.C. Club of Sarasota, Ernie Bontrager, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd., Sarasota, 33583, (813) 921-7510 

GEORGIA 

The Northeast Atlanta Color Computer Club, Joe 
Novosel, P.O. Box 450915, Atlanta, 30345, (404) 
921-7418 

Atlanta Color Computer Users Group, Terry E. 
Love, 5155 Maroney Mill Rd., Douglasville, GA 
30134, (404) 949-5356 

ILLINOIS 

Peoria Color ComputerClub, Harold E. Brazee, 102 
Twin Oak Court, East Peoria, 61611, (309) 694- 
4703 

Illinois Color Computer Club of Elgin, Tony Po- 
draza, 1 19 Adobe Circle, Carpentersville, 601 10, 
(312) 428-3576 

Glenside Color Computer Club, Ed Hathaway, 8 W. 
Stevenson Drive, Glendale Heights, 60139, (312) 
462-0694 

Kitchen Table Color Computer Group, Robert Mills, 
P.O. Box 464, Hanover, 61041, (815) 591-3377 

Northern Illinois Color Computer Club, Kenneth 
Trenchard, Sr.. 6145 N. Sheridan Road 30, 
Chicago, 60660, (312) 973-5208 

Motorola Microcomputer Club, Steve Adler, 1301 
Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg, 60196, (312) 576- 
3044 

Chicago OS-9 Users Group, John Chasteen, 480 
Gilbert Drive, Wood Dale, 60191, (312) 860-2580 

INDIANA 

CoCo Program Exchange, Erik Merz, 3307 Arrow 
Wood Dr., Fort Wayne, 46815, (219) 749-0294 

Three Rivers Color Computer Club, George Barber, 
2410 New Haven Ave., Fort Wayne, 46803, (219) 
422-4961 

Southern Indiana ComputerClub, Route 1, Box 459, 
Mitchell, 47446 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

IOWA 

CoCo Questers, Scott Bellman, 2420 Salem Court, 
Bettendorf, 52722. (319) 359-7702 

Dubuque Tandy Users Group, Wesley Kullhem, 
1995 Lombard, Dubuque, 52001, (319) 556-4137 

KANSAS 

KC CoCo Club, Gay Crawford, P.O. Box 11192, 
Kansas City, 66111, (913) 764-9413 

Micro 80 Users Group, Kevin Cronister, 2224 Hope, 
Topeka, 66614, (913) 272-1353 

Color Computer Club of Wichita, Dave Brimmer, 
527 N. Pershing Ave., Wichita, 67208, (316) 685- 
9587 



KENTUCKY 

Perry County CoCo Users Group, Keith W. Smith, 
General Delivery, Hardburly, 41747, (606) 439- 
4209 

LOCO-COCO, Jim Spillman, 2405 Woodmont Dr., 
Louisville, 40220, (502) 454-5331 

LOUISIANA 

Cajun CoCo Club, Rick Herbert, P.O. Box 671, 
Crowley, 70526, (318) 788-3148 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Greater Boston Super Color Users Group, Robert 
Biamonte, 6 Boulder Drive, Burlington, 01803 

CLUB 6809, Jean Salvas, 204 East Street, Spring- 
field, 01104, (413) 734-5163 

MICHIGAN 

Color C.H.I.P.S., Jack Pieron, 3175 Oakhill Place, 
Clarkston, 48016, (313) 627-4358 

CCUG (Color Computer Users Group), Rich Van 
Manen, 0-599 Lake Michigan Dr., Grand Rap- 
ids, 49504, (616) 453-8351 

Grand Rapids Area Tandy Users Group, Robert M. 
Worth, Jr., 1726 Millbank S.E., Grand Rapids, 
49508 (616) 245-9324 

Greater Lansing Color Computer Users Group, P.O. 
Box 14114, Lansing, 48901 

Greater Kalamazoo Color Computer Club, Jim Rix, 
1835 Chevy Chase Blvd., Kalamazoo, 49008, 
(616) 344-7631 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

MISSISSIPPI 

Singing River C.C. Club, Mark Welch, 3605 Van- 
cleave Rd., # 1 1 8, Gautier, 39553, BBS (601 ) 875- 
8688 

Gulf Coast Color Computer Assoc., Ed Keels, 22 
Christy Cove, Gulfport, 39503, (601) 832-1210 

CoCo Art Club, Joel Bunyard, Rt. 16, Box 11, 
Meridian, 39301, (601) 483-0424 



MISSOURI 

North County 80 Group, Tom Vogel, 12 Ville Donna 
Ct., Hazelwood, 63042, (314) 739-4078 

Mid-America Color Computer User's Group, Jerry 
Morgon, 807 Ponca Drive, Independence, 
64056, (816) 796-5813 

Coconuts, 1610 N. Marian, Springfield, 65803 

NEBRASKA 

Siouxland Color Computer Club, Alan Pedersen, 
61 1 D Street, South Sioux City, 68776, (402) 494- 
2284 

NEVADA 

C.A.T. F.U.N., Paul A. Osborne, 201 Miners Road, 
Fallon, 89406, (702) 423-5789 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CoCo Nuts, Matthew Pietrusewicz, R.F.D. #1, Box 
548, Pelham, 03076, (603) 635-7098 

NEW JERSEY 

West Orange CoCo Club, Gregg Favalora, 12 
Blackburne Terrace, W. Orange, 07052, (201) 
736-1748 (let ring 12 times) 

NEW MEXICO 

Chaves County Color Computer Club, Lee Mitchell, 
1102 Melrose Drive, Roswell, 88201, (505) 623- 
0789 

NEW YORK 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Albany Chapter), Ron Fish, 
Box 4125, Albany, 12204, (518) 465-9793 

Adirondack CoCo Club, (Greene County Chapter), 
Pete Chast, P.O. Box 61, Athens, 12015, (518) 
945-1636 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Glens Falls Chapter), 
Richard Mitchell, 39 Center St., Fort Edwards, 
12828 



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0 



e 




204 THE RAINBOW July 1986 







4 



Island Color Computer Club, Joseph Castelli, P.O. 
Box 901, Bellmore, 11710, BBS (516) 783-7506 

Kings Byte CoCo Club, Morty Libowitz, 1063 East 
84th St., Brooklyn, 11236, (718) 763-4233, BBS 
(718) 837-2881 

C.C. Club of Central N.Y., Joseph Short, 248 S. 
Fourth Ave., Ilion, 13357, (315) 895-7730 

Rockland County Color Computer Users Group, 
Harold L Laroff, P.O. Box 131. Monsey, 10952- 
0131, (914) 425-2274 

Olean Area CoCo Users Group, Herman L. Smith, 
P.O. Box 216, Olean, 14760, (716) 933-7488, 
BBS (716) 933-7489 

The Rochester S-80 Computer Club, Inc., Gary 
Panepinto, P.O. Box 15476, Rochester, 14615, 
(716) 392-6133 

New York Color Computer User Group, Carl Glo- 
vinsky, 1 5 Bolivar St., Staten Island, 1 031 4, (71 8) 
761-0268 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Bull City CoCo Users Group, Todd Wall, 5319 
Durand Drive, Durham, 27703, (919) 598-1348 

Raleigh Color Computer Club, David Roper, P.O. 
Box 680, Garner, 27529 

OHIO 

Color Computer Club, Inc., William Wills, P.O. Box 
468, Canfield, 44406 

Dayton Color Computer Users Group, Steven E. 
Lewis, 4230 Cordell Dr., Dayton, 45439, (513) 
299-3060 

Dayton Area Color Computer Users Group, David 
R. Barr, 2278 Yorkshire PI., Kettering, 45419, 
(513) 293-2228 

Greater Toledo Color Computer Club, William Paul 
Saba Sr., 3423 Cragmoor Ave., Toledo, 43614, 
(419) 385-9004 

Tri-County Computer Users Group, William J. 
Loeffler, 261 2 Dale Avenue, Rocky River, 441 1 6, 
(216) 356-0779 

Miami Valley CoCo Club, Tim Ellis, 1805 W. Park- 
way Dr., Piqua, 45356, (513) 773-2244 

OKLAHOMA 

Green Country Computer Association, Michael 
Keller, P.O. Box 2431, Tulsa, 74101, (918) 245- 
3456 (DATA) 

PENNSYLVANIA 

HUG-A-CoCo, George Lurie, 2012 Mill Plain Court, 
Harrisburg, 17110, (717) 657-2789 

Penn-Jersey Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 2742, 
Lehigh Valley, 18001 

Skyline Color Computer Club of Berks County, 
Lewis F. Brubaker, 4874 Eighth Ave., Temple, 
19560, (215) 921-3616 

Pittsburgh Color Group, Ralph Mailing, P.O. Box 
351, West Mifflin, 15122, (412) 823-7607 

RHODE ISLAND 

New England CoCo Nuts, P.O. Box 6604, Provi- 
dence, 02940 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

LoCo CoCo Club, Larry Coyle, 4334 Flynn Dr., 
Charleston, 29405, (803) 747-0802 

Midlands80 Computer Club, Frank Eargle, P.O. Box 
7594, Columbia, 29202, TBBS (803) 791-7389 

Spartanburg County CoCo Club, Lawrence Easier, 
Jr., Rt. 1 Highway 221, Spartanburg, 29302, 
(803) 578-3120 

TENNESSEE 

Tri-Cities Computer Club, Gary Collins, P.O. Box 
4506 CRS, Johnson City, 37602-4506, (61 5) 929- 
1862 



TEXAS 

The San Antonio Color Computer Club, James 
Leatherman, 2430 Rawhide Lane, San Antonio, 
78227 

UTAH 

Salt City CoCo Club, Dennis Mott, 720 E. Browning 
Ave., Salt Lake City, 84105, (801)487-6032, BBS 
(801) 487-6787 

VIRGINIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, 22193, (703) 690-2453 

Central Virginia Color Computer Club, Roger Lee, 
Rt. 2 Box 175, Madison Heights, 24572 

WASHINGTON 

Northwest Computer Club, Larry Haines, East 2924 
Liberty, Spokane, 99207, (509) 483-5547 

Mount Rainier Color Computer Club, Ron Amos, 
2450 Lenore Drive N., Tacoma, 98406, (206) 752- 
8735 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Mil-O-Bar Computer Club, Jim LeMaster, P.O. Box 
130, Ona, 25545, (304) 743-4752 after 4 p.m. 

Blennerhassett CoCo Club, David Greathouse, 
1306 Wells Circle, Parkersburg, 26101 

WISCONSIN 

Southern Wisconsin CoCo Club, David C. Buehn, 
24607 67th Street, Salem, 53168, (414) 843-3830 

CANADA 

ALBERTA 

Calgary Color Computer Club, Don Towson, 832 
Cannell Rd. S.W., Caigary, T2W 1T4, (403) 281- 
2855 

Edmonton CoCo Users Group, Dexter Dombro, 
P.O. Box 4507 Stn. South, Edmonton, T6E 4T7, 
(403) 439-5245 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Salmon Arm CoCo, David Coldwell, RR #4, Site 26 
Comp. 13, Salmon Arm, V1E 4M4 

MANITOBA 

Winnipeg Micro-80 Users Group, Robert Black, 
1 755 King Edward St., Winnipeg, R2R 0M3, (204) 
633-7196 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax Dartmouth CoCo Users Group, Eugene 
Naugler, P.O. Box 572, Dartmouth, B2Y 3Y9 

Colour Computer Halifax User Group (CoCo Hug), 
Paul A. Power, 6354 London St., Halifax, B3L 
1X3, (902) 455-6341 

ONTARIO 

ESSA Color Computer Club, Albert L. Ley, 40 Perry 
Street, Barrie, L4N 2G3, (705) 728-9481 

K-W CoCo Club, P.O. Box 1291, Station C, Kitch- 
ener, N2G 4G8 

Kingston CoCo Club, Kenneth Bracey, 316 West- 
dale Ave., Apt. 4-C, Kingston, K7L 4S7, (613) 
544-2806 

London CoCo Nuts Computer Club, Harry K. 
Boyce, 180 Concord Road, London, N6G 3H8, 
(519) 472-7706 

Niagara Regional CoCo Club, Gerry Chamberland, 
6843 Cumberland Crt., Niagara Falls, L2H 2J9, 
(416) 357-3462 

QUEBEC 

Club d'Ordinateur Couleur du Quebec, Inc., Centre 
de Loisirs St-Mathieu, 71 10- 8e Ave., St-Michel, 
Montreal, H2A 3C4, (514) 270-7507 

Club ORCO-RS, Jacques Bedard, 33 Lisiere, St- 
Constant, P.Q., J0L 1X0, (514) 632-4311 

Le Club Couleur du Nord, Gabriel Pigeon, CP. 31 5, 
Barraute, P.Q., JOY 1A0, (819) 734-2577 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Saskatoon Color Computer Club, L. Curtis Boyle, 
35 Bence Crescent, Saskatoon, S7L 4H9, (306) 
382-1459, BBS (306) 384-8040 



FOREIGN 

AUSTRALIA 

Blacktown City TRS-80 Colour Computer Users 
Group, Keith Gallagher, P.O. Box 264, River- 
stone, New South Wales, 2765, (02) 627-4624 

COCOPUG, Harry Murphy, 8 Lois Court, Regents- 
ville, New South Wales, 2750 

CoCoHUG (Color Computer Hobart Users Group), 
Robert Delbourgo, 15 Willowdene Avenue, 
Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania, 7005 

ISRAEL 

The First Color Computer Club of Israel, J. Yosef 
Krinsky, Data Processing Division, 1 Radin 
Street, Netanya, Israel, (053) 52277 

MEXICO 

Mexcoco Users Group, Sergio Waisser, Paseo de la 
Soledad #120, Mexico City, D.F., 53920, phone 
294-36-63 

the NETHERLANDS 

Color Computer Club Benelux, Jorgen te Giffel, 
Eikenlaan 1, 4641 GB Ossendrecht, the Nether- 
lands 

WEST GERMANY 

First CoCo Club Hamburg, Theis Klauberg, Kriet- 
kamp 27A, Hamburg 65, West Germany 2000, 
FRG, phone (040) 536-36-76 



new clubs 



Editor: 

I would like to announce the existence of 
the Mobile Color Special Interest Group. 
For more information, call (205) 473-1049 
after 4 p.m. or write to 2056 South McVay 
Drive, 36605. 

Steve Poates 
Mobile, AL 

• I have a new club called Good CoCo. We 
now have a newsletter including free BBS 
numbers for the states and some of Canada, 
and discounts on programs written by Good 
CoCo staff. If you would like to join, please 
send $12.50 for a one year membership or 
$2 for a sample copy of the newsletter to 
3002 Liberty Tree Lane, 85741. 

Good CoCo 
Tucson, AZ 

• Anyone interested in joining the Cajan 
CoCo CJub of Lafayette, please write to P.O. 
Box 671,70526. 

Rick Hebert 
Crowley, CA 

• We would like to announce the existence 
of the Sacramento CoCo Club. For informa- 
tion, write to P.O. Box 214733, 95821-0733; 
or call BBS (916) 486-1594. 

Bill Drennon 
Sacramento, CA 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 205 



e 



0 





• The Pocatello Color Computer Club 
meets the second Tuesday of every month at 
ISU Vo-Tech, Trade and Tech, Room 316, 
7 p.m. For more information contact me at 
1730 West Quinn Road, 83202. 

Randy Poppe 
Pocatello, ID 



• I take great pride in introducing your 
readers to the Atlanta Color Computer 
Users Group based at P.O. Box 561, Doug- 
lassville, 30134. At present, we have approx- 
imately 80 members and have been in 
existence for several years. Meetings are the 
third Wednesday of the month at Nash 
Middle School in Cobb County, 7 p.m. (near 
Marietta-Smyrna area). Our newsletter is 
one of the best in the southeast and mem- 
bership is only $20 per year. For more 
information, contact Gary McConville (404) 
949-0369, Terry Love (404) 949-5356 or 
Charles Langley (404) 949-41 19. 

Terry E. Love 
Douglasville, GA 

• I would like to announce the start of the 
New Philadelphia Color Computer Users 
Group. The club has no fees. It was set up 
for exchanging ideas and information. A 
newsletter will be passed out every month to 
members. The newsletter will contain Pokes, 
Peeks, Execs, BBSs, articles and programs. 
Call (216) 364-5061 or (216) 343-8083 or 
write to 1025 Fourth Street NE, 44663. 

Alvin Tanpoco 
New Philadelphia, OH 



very close to the meeting date. Meetings 
start at 6:30 p.m. We welcome anybody who 
owns any type of computer and people who 
are interested in them. For information, 
write to Route 14, Box 289, 37801. 

Aaron Sentell 
Maryville, TN 

• Announcing the Middle Tennessee TRS- 
80 Users Group. For information write to 
1809 Eastside Avenue, 37206 or call our BBS 
(615) 262-2773. 

Steve Quails 
Nashville, TN 



» I would like to announce a change of 
lame for our club. Formerly the Color 
Computer Connection, we are now the 6809 
Club. We invite other clubs to exchange 
public domain software with us. We would 
also like to correspond with others about 
new pokes, hints, etc. All correspondence 
should be sent to 2449 Popham Ln. #246C, 
78617. 

Earl Quinones 
Del Valle, TX 



• Announcing the Bennington Color Com- 
puter Users Group. For more information 
write to Box 14, Willow Road, 05201 or call 
(802) 442-4094. 

Joseph Rogers 
Bennington, VT 



From: B0S1B : : TRRVELR 

To: EDITORS 

Subj : NEW COCO CLUB 

A new CoCo club has been formed in 
northern Virginia. It services the 
Fairfax County area, including D.C. 
and Maryland. For more information, 
call the Handy Tandy BBS at (703) 573- 
7282. 



• Anyone interested in forming a TRS-80 
Color Computer club in the northern Vir- 
ginia area, please contact Mike Saint at 
(703) 425-0053. If you would like to contact 
via modem, call CoCo Time BBS at (703) 
425-0874. Leave a message to SysOp with 
your name and number. 

Jeff Beckerman 
Burke, VA 



• I would like to inform your readers that 
there is a French CoCo club in Quebec. The 
club is called Quebec CoCo and works by 
corresponding. There are not meetings. We 
have a newsletter to exchange programming 
hints and programs. For more information, 
write to 10 de la ronde, Cap-Saute, GO A 
1L0. 

Eric Bernatchez 
Cap- Saute, Quebec 



• The Seacoast CoCo Tug Club meets the 
second Wednesday of every month at the 
Rye Public Library in Rye Center. For more 
information, send inquiries to 34 Rockrim- 
mon Road, 03848. 

Red Ahlberg 
Kingston, NH 



• I would like to announce the forming of 
the CoCo Nuts Color Computer Club. We 
will have a newsletter filled with programs, 
contests, hints on games, etc. For more 
information send an SASE to R.F.D. #1, 
Box 548, 03076. 

Matt Pietrusewicz 
Pelham, NH 

• We would like to inform CoCo owners of 
our new meeting place and time. We now 
meet at Showbiz Pizza in Foothills Mall 
every second and fourth Monday of each 
month, unless a big holiday occurs on or 



• Please inform your readers of a new 
CoCo club in Seattle. We have a monthly 
newsletter including one-liners, tips on 
Adventures, high scores, reviewing pro- 
grams and much more. For more informa- 
tion write to 18747 47th Ave. NE, 98155. 
Please include an SASE. 

Mitch Hart 
Seattle, WA 



• I'm starting a Color Computer games 
club called The Gargon. There are no dues 
and we print a newsletter every month. The 
club is for getting public domain games (and 
other programs) in circulation. Anyone is 
welcome. If you would like to join, send a 
self-addressed stamped envelope to 112 
Strangeway Avenue, 53555, or call (608) 
592-3597. 

Bill Mittel 
Lodi, WI 



• This letter is to announce the formation 
of the Argentine Color Computer Club. We 
have 100 members and are interested in any 
kind of application or program for the Color 
Computer. We are looking for clubs to 
correspond with from any part of the world. 
If you are interested, please write to: 

Pablo Morano 
Lavalle 1438 "1 " Cuerpo 5& Piso RR 

(1048) Buenos Aires 
Argentina 



• Anyone interested in logo language and 
forming The 6809 Logo's Club, can write me 
at: 

Newton Luiz Nickel 
Travessa Frei Caneca 
11 Apt.: 53 
Cur it ib a, Parana 
Brazil 80010 



-0- -0- -O 

206 THE RAINBOW July 1986 




• I would like to inform everyone of a new 
club in Kelowna called the Kelowna Color 
Computer Club. Anyone interested, please 
contact me at (604) 763-1 259 or write to 1 1 47 
Lawson Avenue, VI Y 6T7. Other club 
inquires appreciated. 

Colin McMillan 
Kelowna, British Columbia 



• As dedicated owners and users of the TRS 
Colour Computer, we are interested in 
hearing from other CoCo Clubs with the 
possibility of the exchange of newsletters 
and other information. 

Presently, we hold a general meeting on 
the third Tuesday of the month at Discovery 
Park (BCIT) 3700 Gilmore Way Burnaby. 
Entry is through security between 7:10 and 
7:30 p.m. only. We also have a special 
interest hardware group which meets on the 
second Sunday morning and the fourth 
Tuesday evening at a member's house. Write 
to us at P.O. Box 76734, Postal Stn. S, VSR 
5S7. 

Don Mac Donald 
Vancouver, British Columbia 



• The ESSA Colour Computer Club is 
pleased to announce the startup of a 
monthly newsletter called The CoCo Exam- 
iner. Our club will also be starting a BBS 
soon. For more information call (705) 728- 
8139 or write to R.R. #2, L4M 4S4. 

Mark Ervine 
Barrie, Ontario 

• The Toronto Color Computer Club is 
looking for other CoCo clubs around the 
world that are interested in trading public 
domain club libraries. In addition, we are 
also willing to exchange our newsletter with 
other club newsletters for the purpose of 
publishing articles of interest. This will allow 
us all to deliver interesting articles from a 
variety of sources to all clubs that partici- 
pate. Please note that The Toronto Color 
Computer Club newsletter is not copywrit- 
ed. All we ask is that when publishing 
articles from our newsletter, you state it is 
from the The Toronto CoCo Club. We will 
do the same for you. For more information, 
please write to 5 Penzance Drive, Ml K 4Z4, 

Wayne Finlay 
Scarborough, Ontario 



• I want to inform everyone of the existence 
of the Club Ordico De Shawinigan. Our 
activities take place every Wednesday at 7 
p.m. at the local CEGEP. For information 
write to CP. 1822 Station B. 

Michel Bruneau 
Shawinigan, Quebec 

• The First Color Computer Club of Israel 
is in need of public domain programs. Since 
our location prohibits us from calling BBSs, 
we are requesting any individuals and/ or 
clubs to send us public domain programs on 
ROM cassette or disk to add to our library. 
Please label all parcels with their value. 

J. Yosef Krinsky 
Radin College 
1 Radin Street 
Netanya, Israel 

• Any CoCo user in Puerto Rico who 
would like to be a member of our club can 
call me at 755-7598 or write to me at: 

Pedro A. Torres 
Cuernavaca 1699 
Venus Gardens 
Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 00926 



e 





Two-Liner Contest Winner - ^ - 

This program requires joysticks to operate. It is 
a basic alarm. Run the program and adjust your 
joystick 'til the alarm stops sounding. Then be 
creative and set it up to catch people who try to 
invade your CoCo room. Our more technically 
minded readers will be able to embellish the idea 
presented here. 

The listing: 

0 FOR Z=1TO50 : NEXTZ : CLS : PRINT" 
ALARM - BY ERIK MCCULLOUGH" : A=JO 
YSTK(0) :B=JOYSTK(l) :C=A*B: PRINT@ 
64 , "SET JOYSTK BETWEEN 970 AND 1 
010":PRINTTAB(13) C: IFCO70 OR C> 
1010 THEN PRINT@265, " — INTRUDER 
— "5GOTO 1:ELSE PRINT@265, "ALAR 
M IS SET": RUN 

1 SOUND 15J3 , 8 : SOUND 10J3 , 8 : RUN 

Erik McCullough 
Lafayette Hill PA 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry , the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations find its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



e 




DYMAMIC COLOR NE 
A monthly Newsletter with Educational ma- 
terial -for writing Programs, New Products, 
Product Reviews, Programs, and much more. 

$J5 yr. - Free Sample — 
DChl-l , Six PGMS include Character Genera- 
tor, Loan Interest, b Bank Switching. 
DCN-2, Five PGMS include Check Book, Sort, 
Study, It Address File Programs. 
DCN-i or DCN-2, *9.95 Tape, * J 1.95 Disk 

PROGRAM SAVEIR 
Uninterrupted Power Source (UPS) provides 
power to RAMS during power -failures. For 
all computers with S Volt memories. *59.95 

MEMORY EXPANDERS 
We have several types of solder less memory 
expanders from 64K to 512K. Call or write 
■for details. 

MEMORY MANAGER 
(New Product) 
Software designed to manage the second 32K 
memory bank for 64K computers. Copy R0M5 
to RAM and stack Programs in the upper 
memory or use the Friendly RAM Disk to 
quickly stored or load programs to or from 
the second memory bank. 

*27.95 Cassette. *29.95 Disk. 



Checks, Visa Si MC Cards. Add +3 ship. 
Free Catalog. 24 Hour phone. 



DYNAMI 
BOX 



TROM I 



(205) 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 207 



Computer Island Educational Software 

227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, New York 10312 

(718) 948-2748 

PROGRAM TITLE GRADES MEMORY PRICE PROGRAM TITLE 



GRADES MEMORY PRICE 











PRESCHOOL 








Preschool I - counting 


Pre-K 


1 6K Ext. 


11.95 


Preschool II - adding 


Pre-K 


16K Ext. 


11.95 


Preschool III > alphabet 


Pre-K 


16K Ext, 


1 1 .95 


Music Marvel-play songs 


Pre-K,1 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Arrow Games - 6 games 


Pre-K, 1 


32K-Ext. 


21.95 


First Games - 6 games 


Pre-K, 1 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


Mr. Cocohead-facemaker 


K-3 


16K-Ext. 


16.95 


Bentley Bear 


Pre-K 


32K-Disk 


29.95 


LANGUAGE ARTS 








Beyond Words 1-3 parts 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Beyond Words 2-3 parts 


6-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


beyond words o-o parts 


9-12 


Oil/ Cu* 


H ft ftC 

19.95 


Vocabulary 1*1000 words 


3-5 


32K-Ext, 


19.95 


Vocabulary 2-1000 words 


6-8 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Vocabulary 3-1 000 words 


9-12 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Context Clues 


4,5,6,or 7 


16K-Ext 


17.95 


Cocojot - jotto game 


3-up 


16K 


11.95 


Reading Aids - 4 parts 


2-4 


1 6K-Ext. 


19.95 


King Author - writing tool 


M 


16/32 Ext. 


29.95 


Cocowheel of Fortune 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Context Clues 


2-3 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 






French Baseball-200wds. 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


French Baseball-SOOwds. 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Spanish 3aseball-200wds 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Spanish Baseball-500wds 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Italian Baseball-200wds. 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Hebrew Alphabet 


beginners 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Hebrew Utility 


drawing utility 


16K-Ext. 


15.95 



•jh^-"-':.^...;-- 1 ■ if?'**"": i' •!••'-'•'„ 



CRITICAL THINKING PROBLEMS 

Memory Castle-Sunburst 4-up 
Factory by Sunburst 4-up 
Pond by Sunburst 2-up 
Teasers by Tobbs-Sunb. 4-up 
Inner City - simulation 7-up 
Find The Math Sequence 4-up 
Stranded-graphic advent. 4-up 

TEACHER/STUDENT AIDS 

Colorgrade - gradebook Adult 
Quizmaker - write quizzes 5-up 
ETT typing tutor (cocovva/enouse) 4-up 

The PUZZler (ColorConnection) 4-Up 



32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-disk 
32K-Ext. 
32K-disk 



32K-disk 
32K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-disk 




44.95 
44.95 
44.95 
44.95 
49.95 
19.95 
24.95 



29.95 
24.95 
21.95 
29.95 



MATH 

Opening a Bank Account 4-7 



2- 4 

3- 5 

2- 5 

3- 7 



Dollars & Sense 
McCoco's Menu 
Moneypak 
Graph Tutor 
Graph-It 
Math Invaders 
Mathquiz - 4 operations 
Addition & Subtraction 

Skill Tutor Series 
Division Tutor 
Multiplication Tutor 
Factors Tutor 

Fractions Tutors (3 programs) 
addition, subtraction or multiplication 

Trigonometry 
Equations Linear 
Equations Quadratic 8-11 
Arith. Diagnostic Disk 3-8 
Fraction Diagnostic Disk 4-9 

Verbal Problems Series 
Distance Problems 
Area & Perimeter 
Pizza Game 
Sales & Bargains 
Comparison Shopping 
Binary Dice Game 



2-3 
4-8 



5-8 



3-5 
6-8 



4-up 



32K-disk 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
16K 

16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 

16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-€xt. 
32K.Ext. 



32K-disk 

32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 



SOCIAL STUDIES 

Know Your States 
History Game 
States & Capitals 
Explorers & Settlers 
Famous American Women 

Street Map Game 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Name That Song 1,2,or I 
Music Drill 
Science Game 
Computer Literacy 
5 Educational Programs 
with Lightpen 
Chemistry Tutor 



Disk indicates available on disk only 

Tape prices given. 

Add $5.00 for any program on disk. 



24.95 
14.95 
14.95 
24.95 
19.95 
14.95 
17.95 
19.95 
1 1 .95 

14.95 
14.95 
19.95 



l9.95ea. 

24.95 
19.95 
19.95 
49.95 
49.95 

19.95 
19.95 
19.95 
19.95 
19.95 
19.95 



5-up 


32K-Ext. 


19,95 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


14.95 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


6-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


2-up 


iL ■ .$V>40; .s • 

16K-Ext. 


1 1 .95 


3-up 


16K-Ext. 


19.95 


8-up 


32K-disk 


29.95 


6-up 
1 -2 or 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


3-6 


32K-disk 


44.95 


10-up 


32K-disk 


29.95 



ll 



h 




ft 



V 



32K EB - disk only/$29.95 
Over 600 questions in 9 categories. 
Makes learning science facts fun. 
Game format, 1 or 2 players, teams. 
Grade 8 and up. 

MS 

tub 

Oouglis 
HOfptUI 




STREET MAP GAME t 

32K - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Hkes. screen and graphics portray 
a typical section of a street map. This 
one shows people's homes, the 
school, the park, etc. Questions on 
how to get from one place to another 
are asked and the footsteps are 
shown. 

CHEMISTRY TUTOR 

32K - disk only « $29.95 
A hi-res; 4 part program that drills 
high school students in Elements, 
Symbols, Naming Compounds, 
Common ions, and Balancing Equa- 
tions. Correct answer given after 2 in- 
correct responses. A valuable tool for 
studying chemistry. 

5 LIGHTPEN PROGRAMS 

32K EB - $44.95 
Five menu driven educational pro- 
grams designed for children in grade 
I and 2, and special educational 
students. Basic addition, basic 
multiplication, shape series mat- 
ching, number series matching and 
word rhyming are included. All on a 
HI-RES screen, with graphics. User 
need only to use the light pen to 
operate the programs. (LIGHT PEN 
INCLUDED) 



filRBAL MATH PROBLEMS 

PIZZA GAME 
32K EB - tape/$19.95 
Learn to locate coordinates on a 
grid. HI-RES text and graphics. 



AREA & PERIMETER 

32K EB - tape/$19.95 
Triangles, rectangles, and circles 
are covered in this HI-RES text and 
graphics program. 



& BARGAINS 

32K EB - tape/$19.95 
Learn to find the discounted price. 
HI-RES text and beautiful graphics. 



DISTANCE PROBLEMS 

32K EB - tape/$ 19.95 
Moving graphics and text combines 
on a HI-RES screen. Rate x Time c 
Distance sill its forms. 



STREET MAP GAME 
$19.95 Tape 



32K EJ, 
$24.95 Disk 



HI - res screen and graphics por- 
tray a typical section of a street 
map. This one shows people's 
homes, the school, the park, the 
post office, etc. Questions are ask- 
ed on how to get from one place to 
another and the footsteps are 
shown after response. A fun way 
to improve map skills; ; 



OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT 

32K - Disk Only - $24.95 
A set of programs designed to in- 
troduce and provide practice in the 
skills of filing out bank applications, 
deposit and withdrawal slips, and 
computing bank account balances. 
Loaded with graphic presentations. 
Grades 3-6. 



''J JL 




DOLLARS & SENSE 

16K-Ext. - $14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 
Learn to make purchases. Graphic 
displays of items kids love. Player 
buys items using dollars and coins 
to practice using money correctly. 
. Solutions given. 

McCOCO'S MENU 

16K-Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
America's favorite pastime-going out 
to eat. Learn to buy and add up your 
purchases from a typical fast food 
restaurant menu. Gain skill in using 
money. Different prices each time. 

COCO WHEEL OF FORTUNE 

32K « $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Wi-res. graphics and screen in this 
version of the popular TV show. 1-6 
players. Spin the wheel for poi nts 
and guess a letter to solve one of the 
200 puzzles. Have fun while 
strengthening LA skills. 

COLORGRADE 

32K - disk only - $29.95 
An easy to use classroom grading 
program. Keeps grades for up to 6 
classes of up to 40 students per 
class. Many options including 
weighted averages and hard copy to 
printer. 






RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



VISA 



(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 




Please add $1.00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



DOWNLOADS 

Rare Bird Won't Run 
on Disk System 



• / have a 64K CoCo LI that I up- 
graded myself, I am very happy with it 
until I come to a program like The Old 
Time Banner Printer (May 1986). I 
would like to be able to run this pro- 
gram from disk but there isn *t enough 
memory. Can I take the old 16K chips 
and piggyback them on the 64K chips 
and get 80 K? If not, is there any way I 
can get more memory space available so 
I can run a program like Banner from 
disk? 

Mike MacMonagle 
Roy, UT 



Mike, The Old Time Banner Printer 
is indeed a rare program, in that it will 
not run with a disk system. The problem 
is that disk buffers, the memory re- 
served to transfer the disk data to 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago and he has built several 
68 XX systems. 



RAM, occupy a sizable part of lower 
memory. At the same time, the pro- 
gramming techniques used in this article 
could be improved to make the program 
a little more compact and faster. This is 
usually not necessary, but who knows 
what some people will do for a large 
banner saying "The Rainbow." 

You cannot piggyback another 16K 
set of RAM chips on top of the 64K set. 
You can piggyback another set of 64K 
chips, but you will have to add bank 
selection hardware, and develop soft- 
ware to switch between the two banks 
of 64K chips. An easier way to solve the 
problem is to buy one of the commer- 
cially available 256K upgrade kits 
mentioned in recent reviews. This will 
still not let you run the program men- 
tioned, but you will have a lot more 
memory. 



BBS Setup 

• / am interested in setting up a multi- 
user BBS on my CoCo. Is this possible? 
Can the CoCo support a few users at 
one time? If so, how do I go about 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



setting up the system? Also, can you 
print a list of some commercial and 
public domain BBS software and hard- 
ware packages? I have had a heck of a 
time trying to find one. 

Arie M oiler 
Kensington, MD 

The only way I know to have a multi- 
user BBS, Arie, is to use OS-9. Even 
then, your system will be very limited 
due to the fact that you are working 
with a 64K system. One BBS I have seen 
that does this is Infoworld by Paris 
Radio Electronics. 

One public domain BBS I am aware 
of is COBBs, which recently appeared 
in THE rainbow. From all of the reports 
I have heard it is very good. 



Ham It Up, RAINBOW 

• / would like to add my. request to 
those you have already printed about 
more CoCo software for Hams. I 
wonder if anyone has tackled the prob- 
lem of building a plug-in such as the 



210 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



"Doctor DX" module that is available 
for the Commodore 64. 

Ray Peterson 
Bicton, W< Australia 

Ray, I have a lot of requests for Ham 
radio software. We print almost every 
article of this type that is submitted. As 
I have said before, if anyone knows of 
commercial or public domain Ham 
radio software, especially for packet, 
RTTY/CW and slow scan, please write 
and well publish a compiled list. 



Slow Scroll Help 

• Enclosed is the slow-scroll program I 
have been using for several years. I keep 
it on disk and use it with both tape and 
disk programs and with disk directories. 

Paulette Grantham 
Palo Alto, CA 



1 FORX=100/JTO1010 

2 READA : POKEX , A : NEXTX 

3 POKE383,126:POKE384,3:POKE385, 
232 : P0KE422 , 126 : P0KE423 , 3 : POKE42 
4,232 

4 DATA 52,16,142,0,1,189,167,211 
,53,16,57 

5 NEW 

6 'RUN, THEN POKE 100 3, 200 FOR 
SLOW SCROLLING (VARY 200 FOR 
DIFFERENT SPEEDS) 



Thanks for the help, Paulette. No 
more pushing the SHIFT- 4 ©' keys due to 
your generosity. 



Curing Printer Ills 

• I am writing in response to the prob- 
lems expressed with the SG-10 printer 
and the Graphicom/ Hardcopy family 
of printer drivers. I found that the best 
way to use the printer is in the IBM 
mode (DIP switch 2-2 off). 

Bill Kennon 
San Diego, CA 

Thanks, Bill. After discussing the 
matter with the guys at Computize, 
another modification was made to the 
program that added a little more line 
delay. This seemed to cure the problem, 
too. 



The No-Load CoCo Max 

• / own a gray Co Co that I upgraded 
to 64K I have no problem running the 



VIP Library or the DS-69. My problem 
occurs with CoCo Max. It loads, but the 
working screen is garbage and cannot 
be used. I purchased CoCo Max from 
J. &J. Electronics in Winnipeg, Canada. 
They verified the disk and the pack — 
all OK I contacted Colorware in New 
York and they returned me CoCo Max 
II. // still won't load. I purchased a 
CoCo checker program from J.&J. 
Electronics and all my systems check 
out OK Everyone has given me good 
service but I still cannot use CoCo Max. 
What 's the answer? 

Alain Jeansonne 
St. Augustine, Canada 

Alain, I would check your memory 
upgrade, or possibly the 6809E micro- 
processor. The VIP Library does not 
require 64K, but CoCo Max does. 



Terminal Confusion 

• / recently tried to add a front panel 
on I off switch. My problem is there are 
12 terminals on my on I off switch and 
I don't know which two terminals to 
solder to. I have a gray CoCo with a 
type 'F' board. 

Mike Moran 
Simsbury, CT 

Mike, four sets of contacts are actu- 
ally used to turn your CoCo on. Two of 
the contacts are in parallel, due to 
current rating required. The proper 
terminology for this switch is SI. See 
the diagram below for the correct con- 
nections: 



REAR OF BOARD 




COMPONENT SIDE 



Three-Signal RGB not Compatible 

• / am considering buying a color 
monitor. What is the difference between 
a composite and RGB monitor? Are 



they both usable with the CoCo? Also, 
are video drivers difficult to install? 

Donald Imwalle 
Batavia, OH 

Donald, a composite color signal has 
all of the color information on one 
signal. This is the type of signal gener- 
ated by all of the CoCo video drivers I 
have seen. Most are relatively easy to 
install and come with adequate instruc- 
tions. 

An RGB color signal has three separ- 
ate signals — red, green and blue — and 
is not compatible with the CoCo or any 
commercial drivers that I am aware of. 
This is due to the way video is generated 
inside the CoCo. It is not easily con- 
verted to RGB. 



Joystick Coordination 

• / have a problem with my 'E' version 
Color Computer. The problem is with 
the joysticks. When I try to read the 
joystick ports, the computer gives me 
the wrong coordinates. I tested the 
joysticks on my other CoCo, so I know 
they work. 

When I read the right joystick from 
left to right, I get a range from 10 to 19 
and when I read it top to bottom, it goes 
from seven to 56, often skipping many 
coordinates. When I read the left joys- 
tick left to right, I get a range from nine 
to 56 and the top to bottom range is the 
same as the left and right. Every time 
I use the joysticks they skip coordinates 
or give their wrong location. Can you 
please tell me what is wrong with the 
joystick ports and how I can fix them? 

Andrew Harkenrider 
Grosse Pointe, MI 

I suggest replacing Ul and U14. 
These two chips on the rear of the board 
near the joystick inputs interface the 
joysticks. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through the MAIL section of our new 
Delphi CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick DELPHI MAIL, then type 
SEND and address TO: DANDOWNARD. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 211 




ACCESSIBLE APPLICATIONS 



CoCo Word Processing 



By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Word processing is the leading 
task done on microcompu- 
ters. Word processing pro- 
grams come in a variety of types for 
various purposes. In the beginning, 
programs were very simple and were 
called text editors or line editors. They 
were line oriented. The user had various 
commands to access text one line at a 
time and other commands to edit the 
line. If that sounds primitive and some- 
what difficult to handle, it is. 

Five to ten years ago, computer 
memory was expensive, and large, 
friendly programs were not economical. 
In addition, most work was done on 
terminals connected to multitasking 
mini or mainframe computers with low 
capacity links. Time sharing, mostly 
over telephone lines at 1 10 or 300 Baud 
was common. Full-screen editing is 
impossible under these conditions. The 
bulk of the text editing was program- 
ming or setting up an application. 
As computing became less expensive, 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
and has a long background with micro- 
computers and specializes in BASIC 
programming. With Don Dollberg, he 
is the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



full-screen editing began to appear in 
word processing systems intended for 
business applications. Because of the 
variety of business needs, these word 
processing systems were powerful, but 
difficult to learn and use fully. 

At this point, we can define three 
types of word processing applications. 
First is the full-featured business word 
processor examplified by the Wang 
MultiMate and WordStar systems and 
software to name a few. Second is the 
word processor for the professional 
person such as an engineer, lawyer, 
college student, teacher or even writer 
who can most effectively compose text 
at a keyboard, but does not need many 
of the features in a business word 
processor. The last type of word proces- 
sor is for home and student use. 

CoCo Word Processors 

Telewriter was the first multi- 
featured word processor for the CoCo 
and remains the most used. Its selection 
of easily used features meets home and 
professional needs and some small 
business applications. It is also easy to 
learn. 

When the first ad for Telewriter 
appeared in November 1981, it sounded 
too good to be true. The three week wait 
for the package to arrive was one of the 



longest I have known. Frankly, I would 
not be writing for RAINBOW were it not 
for Telewriter. My keyboard skills are 
such that I must edit to get clean copy 
and I simply cannot get clean copy from 
a typewriter. 

Since then, other text editors and 
word processors have been offered for 
the CoCo. The VIP Writer under Disk 
BASIC is somewhat more powerful than 
Telewriter, particularly when it comes 
to printing a document. It has devel- 
oped a large group of users. But it is 
complex and should be used only if the 
features are needed. On the other end, 
Elite Word provides a user-friendly 
program with sufficient features to 
satisfy most home users. 

The arrival of OS-9 provided some 
interesting options including Dyna- 
Star/ DynaForm, Stylo Graph and The 
Last Word. These are all multifeatured 
packages competing for the profes- 
sional and business segments of the 
market. 

I have DynaStar and DynaForm and 
use them quite a bit for a number of 
reasons. First, the type ahead buffer in 
OS-9 eliminates lost characters when 
the screen is scrolled. This has always 
been a problem with Telewriter — it 
does not watch the keyboard as the 



212 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



screen is updated. Secondly, the editing 
commands duplicate those that Word- 
Star and quite a few other text editors 
like Sidekick and PC Write use on MS- 
DOS machines. Since I use these pack- 
ages at the office, it helps to use the same 
commands at home. And finally, I 
wanted a package that would operate 
under OS-9. 

The DynaStar I DynaForm package 
follows the pattern of a number of other 
word processors on other machines. 
The text editor is a separate program 
from the printer program. This maxi- 
mizes the text buffer available. To print, 
the user exits DynaStar. This saves the 
text to a disk file. The user then calls 
DynaForm giving the name of the file 
to be printed. Control codes placed in 
the text control both DynaForm and 
the printer. This method permits use of 
headers, footers, automatic page num- 
bering, margins, text and page lengths, 
new page control and a variety of other 
features including mail merge. 

Mail merge permits printing custom- 
ized form letters using variable text 
from a separate file. I am secretary of 
our local Tandy user group and one of 
my jobs is to send the renewal notices. 
My letter, which may be a bit different 
each month, contains the proper in- 
structions so DynaForm can find the 
second file and read in the addressee 
and saluation data. And it keeps print- 
ing customized letters until the end of 
the data file. 

Actually, my renewals file needs to do 
double duty. First it needs to be entered 
in a form from which mailing labels can 
be printed. Then it needs to be modified 
to serve as the variable data file for 
DynaForm. Now entering addresses 
and printing labels is easily done from 
most any word processor. If, however, 
printing is done using DynaForm, 
codes must be in the file to overcome the 
printing defaults for top and bottom 
margins since we want printing to start 
on the top label and continue label by 
label on the continuous label stock. 

I had some trouble overcoming those 
defaults in DynaForm, but it's a piece 
of cake with DeskMate's text editor and 
printer. The same is true for TSEdit 
under either OS-9 or Disk BASIC. A file 
produced by DeskMate is readable by 
both DynaStar and DynaForm. Desk- 
Mate only requires that the file have a 
.DOC extension which it automatically 
adds and for which it checks before 
loading a file. 

To print a file without margins from 
DeskMate, type @-* to call the icon bar, 



move the square over the printer icon 
and type ENTER. Set the top margin to 
zero, the page length to 66 and the 
length of text to 66 as well. 

The DeskMate printer is fairly basic. 
But, nowhere are there rules that say a 
file produced by DeskMate must be 
printed from DeskMate. If you have the 
complete OS-9 package rather than the 
limited version supplied with Desk- 
Mate, you can use most any of the 
printing programs available for OS-9 
including DynaForm. This also in- 
cludes Frank Malaney's Print Form text 
formatter, for which the source code 
was published in Dale Puckett's "KISS- 
able OS-9" column in the May 1986 

RAINBOW. 



". . . DeskMate did 

add the .DOC 

extension ... It is 

little things like this 

that give one a good 
feeling about software." 



Following the WordStar conven- 
tions, both DynaForm and Print Form 
look for formatting commands that 
start with a period (.) on a new line. 
Further, both programs expect line 
lengths to be established by the editing 
program. Finally, control characters, 
characters whose ASCII values are less 
than 32, may be inserted into the text 
to send predefined control character 
sequences to the printer. 

I know of no way that control char- 
acters can be placed in a DeskMate file 
so the printer controls are not available 
to the DeskMate user. What's lost is the 
the ability to start and stop underline, 
change type faces and the like. But all 
the other dot commands that control 
margins, headers, page numbering, etc. 
can be entered through DeskMate's text 
editor. 

Defined Line Lengths 

We have to do a little slight of byte 
to get DeskMate to produce a file with 
line lengths defined. That it can be done 
is a compliment to DeskMate and to 
OS-9. Use 8-* to call the Icon Bar and 
go to the printer. Set the left margin to 



zero, the text formatter handles that, 
and the line length to whatever you 
want. Most printers print 80-character 
lines. If you want eight-character mar- 
gins left and right, you need to subtract 
both the margins from 80. This leaves 
a 64-character line that works well. 
Next, set text length and page length to 
66 since the text formatter is going to 
handle pagination according to either 
DynaForm defaults or dot commands 
that you have included in the text file. 
Last, after printer device a file definition 
must be substituted for /P. 

DeskMate^ main menu displays four 
folders along the right side of the screen. 
These folders actually define paths to 
file directories. Folder three contains 
the path /DO/CMDS meaning the 
commands directory on Drive 0. I am 
writing this in DeskMate and my folder 
two specifies the path / Dl / RAINBOW. 
I have set my Printer device to be 
2:COL42 which means use the path for 
folder two and name the file COL42. 
Now when I print the file from Desk- 
Mate, line lengths are set at 64 and the 
text is sent to file COL42 rather than to 
the printer. Try that on an MS-DOS 
machine. A word of warning: Desk- 
Mate saves the last printer device defi- 
nition to a disk file, so remember to 
change it back to / P when you are done. 

At this point I have loaded the new 
file COL42.DOC into DynaStar. Note 
that DeskMate did add the .DOC ex- 
tension so the file could have been taken 
back into DeskMate. It is little things 
like this that give one a good feeling 
about software. 



Editing Features 

Let's talk about some editing features 
needed to make a text editor easy to use. 
First is word wrap. When the user 
reaches the end of line, the program 
should automatically move the first part 
of the word to the next line and then add 
the remaining letters. Most editors do 
this. One of my complaints with Dyna- 
Star is that word wrap is not the default, 
but must be set each time the program 
is booted. 

There are two ways to handle the text 
file. One is to preset a line length and 
have the program word wrap each time 
the length is reached and insert a car- 
riage return at the end of each line. 
Telewriter word wraps the line and not 
the display when the line length is 
greater than the display width. I gener- 
ally write in the 51-character screen on 
Telewriter and then reset the line length 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 213 



for printing. Telewriter lets you reset the 
screen to 64 of 85 character display 
widths so you can preview what your 
text will look like printed. DynaStar 
works much like Telewriter. I use a 64- 
character screen from O-Pac and use a 
64-character line. 

DeskMate employs the alternate 
approach. It word wraps the display, 
but doesn't set line length until printing. 
This is why we had to do some slight of 
bytes to get a proper file for DynaStar 
and DynaForm. 

In all cases, we have been talking 
about full-screen editors where the 
cursor can be moved using either arrow 
key or the WordStar diamond keys. I 
think DeskMate is fully as powerful as 
DynaStar and better than Telewriter 
when moving the cursor. It uses arrow 
keys alone or in conjunction with the 
SHIFT and CLEAR keys to provide easy 
control. 

DynaStar uses the WordStar dia- 
mond with the CLEAR key as the control 
key. For example, the CLEAR must be 
pressed while one of the following keys 
is used to move the cursor: 'E -up one 
line, 'D -right one character, 'X'-down 
one line and 'S'-left one character. For 
extended moves, hold CLEAR down and 
press 'F'-right one word, 4 C -down one 
screen, 'A -left one word or 'R -up one 
screen. Additional keys are 'G'-delete 
one character right, 'H'-delete one 
character left (backspace), T'-delete 
word to right and 'Y'-delete line. If you 
don't run into this convention on the 
CoCo, you probably will on some other 
machine. 

Telewriter provides right and left 
character delete with left arrow and 
clear/ left arrow as well as CLEAR/ 'K' 
to kill a line. DeskMate lets you enter 
the insert mode with '<§>*/ T and use 
backspace delete with '((d'/left arrow. In 
addition, DeskMate provides a select- 
delete combination that may provide 
the best control yet. Pressing '@7'6' 
puts DeskMate into the select mode and 
the arrow keys can be used to highlight 
selected text. Use the right arrows to 
select characters on a line, the up or 
down arrows to select lines of text, 
SHIFT/ up and down arrows to select 
screen of text or CLEAR/ up and down 
arrows to select to beginning or end of 
file. 

Once text is selected, it may be copied 
with 4 @7'3' or deleted with *@7*5\ 
Copy puts a copy of the text into a 
buffer. Text may subsequently be in- 
serted by moving the cursor to the 
insertion point and pressing '@7'4\ To 



make a move, you must make a copy, 
an insertion and then a deletion. 

In Telewriter and DynaStar, the start 
and end of the text are marked and the 
cursor is moved to the point of insertion 
for copying. Both support a delete of 
marked text. However, DynaStar does 
not remove the markers after an oper- 
ation unless you kill the text so you can 
make as many copies as you want 
without remarking text. Finally, Dy- 
naStar supports a move operation. 

Long Text Files 

How are long files handled? All the 
programs described have a buffer to 
hold text in memory. Generally, buffer 
size limits the size of the individual text 
file you can work with. My Telewriter 
can hold nearly 25 K of text. A typical 
rainbow column usually runs 15K to 
20K, If you are writing a book, make 
a separate file for each chapter and you 
shouldn't have any trouble. 

Our TIMS documentation filled 
three files. Telewriter supports a chain 
printing feature that allows a command 
at the end of one file to call the next file 
and to continue printing with full pag- 
ing and page numbering. So, we were 
able to print out the total documenta- 
tion in camera ready form. The subse- 
quent printings were typeset and pasted 
up so multiple disk files presented no 
problems. By the way, the files were sent 
by modem to the typesetting company 
and fed directly to the typesetter. 



"Buffer size limits the 
size of the text file you 
can work with/' 



This column goes to RAINBOW on a 
disk and is loaded directly to the type- 
setter for editing and then is typeset. 
Articles submitted with a tape or disk 
file along with a double-spaced, printed 
copy are more favorably received than 
th ose without. Each rainbow has 
general information on submitting 
material and on how to get more de- 
tailed information. 

Some word processors keep some or 
most of the text on a disk file during 
document preparation. DynaStar 
opens a scratch file at the beginning of 
the editing session. If the buffer fills, the 
user returns to the main menu and 
requests more space. Then all text 



before the paragraph containing the 
cursor is saved to the scratch file. At the 
end of the session the rest of the text is 
saved to the scratch file, which is closed 
and renamed to the filename selected. 
To edit that file, it is opened along with 
a new scratch file and enough text is 
loaded to fill about 80 percent of the 
buffer. This allows you to add new text. 
When more text is requested, the begin- 
ning of the document is saved to the new 
scratch file and more text is loaded from 
the old file. When the session is ended, 
all text in the buffer and in the old file 
is transferred to the scratch file. The old 
file is deleted and the scratch file is 
renamed. 

As a practical matter, file size is 
limited to half the available storage 
space on the drive holding the data 
directory. Many people replace the 
drivers supplied with OS-9 and run 40- 
track, 80-track, double-sided or hard- 
disk formats. Obviously, there is no real 
limit in file size if the necessary hard- 
ware and drivers are used. Couple this 
with the ability to chain print files in 
DynaForm and you could print all the 
text from all rainbows to date in one 
printing session. 

In Conclusion 

I have made no attempt here to 
provide a definitive study of word 
processing. Rather I have rambled on 
from my experience with a variety of 
programs. I like DeskMate and use it in 
spite of having Telewriter, TSEdit, and 
DynaStar. It does not do all I need to 
do, but I can always move the file into 
DynaStar to finish up. 

There are certain things all word 
processors must do to get words into the 
file and changes made. I consider Desk- 
Mate a low-cost implementation partly 
because of the other applications that 
come with the text editor. Still its 
performance is suprisingly good. I even 
like the 32-character screen; it is easier 
on my old eyes. And it is highly consis- 
tent with Text on the Model 100s and 
200s and DeskMate on the Tandy MS- 
DOS machines and better in some 
respects. If you need more and have OS- 
9, DynaStar I DynaForm do the job well 
and advertisments make The Last Word 
sound good. Under Disk BASIC, Tele- 
writer cannot be beaten. TSEdit is the 
most limited, having no text formatting 
capabilities. Still, at $34.95, you get 
both Disk BASIC and OS-9 versions that 
feature a variety of high resolution 
screens. I still load it up on occasion. 



214 



THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Recommended Reading for Your CoCo from . . . 



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The book that demystifies the state-of-the-art operating system 
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of program listings. 

Book $19.95, Disk $31.00 (2 disks, book not included) 

The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

Features 20 award-winning entries from THE rainbow's first 
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of your own software business, a civil defense coordinator in 
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conducting experiments on Mars . , , Your wits are on the line. 
Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



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Plus, hints and tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $7.95, Tape $7,95 



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Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



Coming soon 
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The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 



I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

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□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

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Mail to; Rainbow Bookshelf, The Fatsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

PJease note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, they are intended to be an 
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BARDEN'S BUFFER 



Interfacing Tricks for 
BASIC and Assembly 
Language 



By William Harden Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



One of the best ways to learn 
assembly language is to write 
short assembly language pro- 
grams and use them in conjunction with 
BASIC programs. This is called interfac- 
ing assembly language to BASIC. One 
reason for doing this is that the short 
assembly language programs can speed 
up BASIC programs dramatically. 

Need a fast sort of records in a disk 
file? Read in the records using BASIC 
and then go to an assembly language 
sort to put them in alphabetical order. 
Need a fast way to scroll data on the 
screen? Use an assembly language 
screen scroll program called by the main 
BASIC program. Combining assembly 
language with BASIC allows you to have 
the speed of assembly language with the 
text and formatting capability of BASIC, 
so you get the best of both worlds. 

In this column we'll show you how to 
go about interfacing simple assembly 
language programs to BASIC so you can 

Bill Bar den has written 27 books and 
over 100 magazine articles on various 
computer topics. His 20 years expe- 
rience in the industry covers a wide 
background: programming, systems 
analyzing and managing projects rang- 
ing from mainframes to microcompu- 
ters. 



try your hand at combining them. We'll 
keep it at a beginner's level, for the most 
part. Among the examples are an as- 
sembly language program that counts 
the number of words on the screen and 
an assembly language program that 
"explodes" screen text. 

Assembly vs. Machine Language 

The terms machine language and 
assembly language are often confusing 
so before starting, we should straighten 
out exactly what is meant by the two 
terms. 

There's only one language the 6809 
microprocessor in the Color Computer 
understands and that's machine lan- 
guage. The 6809 has a built-in set of 
instructions to do simple things like 
adding two numbers, transferring a byte 
from memory to a register in the 6809 
or the other way around and branching 
to a memory location (like a GOTO in 
BASIC). These instructions are decoded 
by the microprocessor from the ones 
and zeroes it reads in memory as it 
executes a machine language program. 
Each instruction is held in one, two, 
three or four bytes of memory, and are 
generally arranged in a long sequence of 
instructions that the 6809 accesses one 
after another. A branch can alter the 
order of the instruction sequence just 



like a GOTO or IF statement can alter the 
sequence in BASIC. A typical sequence 
of machine language numeric values is 
shown in Figure 1, along with the 
instructions represented. 

The built-in instruction set is gener- 
ally not used by writing down long lists 
of binary (or hexadecimal) values. 
Instead, a programmer writes down a 
mnemonic (memory jogging) abbrevia- 
tion for the instruction, such as ADD 
for the machine language code of 187 
(add two numbers) instruction and SUB 
for the machine language code of 176 
(subtract two numbers) instruction. 
These mnemonics are used even if the 
programmer is hand assembling the 
code, simply because it's easier to write 
instruction names rather than numbers. 
In the simplest form, the mnemonic 
names and the operands associated with 
the instructions are a form of assembly 
language. 

An assembler program is a computer 
program that translates mnemonic 
names and operands into the numeric 
machine language values the 6809 un- 
derstands. When an assembler program 
is used, the assembly language may 
contain more bells and whistles than the 
hand written mnemonics written by a 
programmer, but it's basically the same 
idea. Listing 1 shows the assembly 



216 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



language version of the machine lan- 
guage code of Figure 1. 



Listing 1: Assembly 

Language Coding 

BNE TSTEND GO IF NOT LINE START 
INC WC,PCR NEW LINE IN WORD CASE 
LDY #0 RESET "IN WORD" 



Assemblers 

The assembler we've been using in 
this column is the Color Disk ED- 
TASM assembler (or the EDTASM+ 
version for cassette). It's easy to use, 
inexpensive and contains enough fea- 
tures to make even experienced pro- 
grammers happy. We can't provide a 
tutorial on using EDTASM here, but if 
you refer to the manual, it's not too 
difficult to get to the point where you 
can assemble a short program. In the 
approach we're using this month, you 
don't have to do much more than just 
get a screen listing of the program — 
you won't have to worry about saving 
the program and reloading it. 



language programmers use hexadec- 
imal notation a lot, because so many 
things in a computer are done in powers 
of 16. The "hex" equivalent of 1024 is 
$400, where the '$' stands for hexadec- 
imal to follow. We'll use both decimal 
and hexadecimal values in the following 
examples to make life easier for those 
who don't understand hex notation. 

The problem is to write the ASCII 
code of 65 decimal ($41), representing 
an 'A' to the screen. Let's shoot for the 
screen center at line 8 (counting lines 
from 0) and character position 15 (again 
counting from 0). The memory location 
is at location (1024 + 7*32 + 15) or 1263 
($4EF). 

The program to do this is shown in 
Listing 2. It first loads the A register in 
the 6809 with a code of 65, then stores 
the contents of A to location 1263. The 
A register in the 6809 is a special high- 
speed memory location within the 6809 
and not in user memory. It's used to 
store temporary results and as a work- 



fnstruction 1 



0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 



0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 



0 110 110 0 



1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 



00000000 



0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 



0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 



1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 



00000000 



00000000 



Branch if not equal 
plus 8 locations 

Increment location 
(12 plus PC) 



Load Y register with 0 



Figure 1: Assembly Language Coding 



A Simple Program 

The simplest program I can think of 
that does anything useful is a program 
to write the letter 'A' on the text screen. 
The text screen uses memory locations 
from 1024 decimal through 1535 to 
store its 16 lines of 32 characters each, 
a total of 512 characters. Assembly 



ing 6809 memory location for process- 
ing data. The 6809 has another register 
called B which is used for the same 
purpose. 

Why two registers? Ideally, a micro- 
processor would have dozens of regis- 
ters such as these so all kinds of values 
could be held temporarily, but the two 



accumulators of the 6809 represent a 
compromise of price and integrated 
circuit technology. The LDA and STA 
are two mnemonics for the instructions 
involved. The 65 and 1263 are the oper- 
ands for each of the instructions. 

Listing 2 is a complete program. It 
stores an 'A' in the screen center. But, 
how can we use it? One way would be 
to assemble the program with a CoCo 
assembler such as EDTASM, store the 
resulting machine code in a machine 
code file on disk or cassette (called an 
object file) and then load it in and 
execute it by a system LOfiDM and EXEC 
command. The LOfiDM loads in the 
machine language bytes to memory. The 
EXEC transfers control to the machine 
language instructions and the 6809 then 
executes them one by one. 

Typically, the program would be 
located in an area of memory protected 
from BASIC, such as $3E00 (decimal 
15872, just under the 16K byte area). 
The two instructions would be at 
S3E00/ 1 and S3E02/3/4 in this case. 

If this program were executed, you 
would indeed see an 'A' appear in the 
screen center, superimposed on what- 
ever other characters were on the screen 
before the program executed (the screen 
is not cleared by the program or by the 
action of executing the program). But 
what happens next? 

After the STA 1263 is executed at 
locations S3E02/3/4, the 6809 attempts 
to execute the next machine language 
instruction, starting at location $3E05. 
However, this location was never filled 
with an instruction, and just about 
anything could be in the memory loca- 
tion at that point. In programming 
terms, this is garbage. As a result, the 
6809 tries to execute whatever it finds, 
which, at best, would be a meaningless 
set of random instructions. At this point 
you lose control and the system locks 
up, looping with meaningless instruc- 
tions. (At worst, it might jump to the 
middle of a ROM program, which 
could clobber disk files or do some 
other system shenanigans, but that's not 
too likely.) 

Simple BASIC and Assembly Lan- 
guage Interfacing 

What we'd really like to do is to store 
that 'A' from a controlled environment, 
like BASIC, and then come back to BASIC 
after the action. Is there a way to do it? 
I'm glad you asked . . . 

basic has "hooks" in it to transfer 
control to an assembly language pro- 
gram (really the machine language 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 217 



instructions of that assembly language 
program, but we'll call it assembly 
language here) and to get back from the 
assembly language. One hook is the 
DEFUSR statement. The other is the U5R 
statement. 

The DEFUSR statement tells BASIC 
where the assembly language is. Sup- 
pose that we had the two-instruction 
program at locations S3E00 through 
$3E04. We could tell BASIC where the 
assembly language program was by 
using 100 DEFU5R0 = &H3E00 or 100 
DEFU5R0 = 15B72. 

Whenever we wanted to store the 'A' 
in the center of the screen, we could tell 
BASIC to transfer control to those in- 
structions by the U5R statement, which 
in essence says "transfer control to the 
assembly language program at the 
location defined by the DEFUSR state- 
ment." In this case we'd have 1000 fl = 

U5R0(0). 

When Line 1000 is encountered by 
the BASIC interpreter, a transfer to 
location $3E00 is made and the pro- 
gram executes, storing the 4 A' on the 
screen. 

Returning from Assembly Language 

How do we get back to BASIC? After 



all, normally we'd want to jump out to 
execute a short piece of assembly lan- 
guage code and then come back to 
BASIC to execute more BASIC instruc- 
tions. The way this is done is with a 6809 , 
instruction called RTS, Return From 
Subroutine. RTS is identical in function 
to BASIC'S RETURN. It causes a return to 
the instruction following the one that 
caused the transfer. 

RTS is a normal 6809 instruction 
used as the last instruction in all 6809 
subroutines. It just happens to be a 
convenient instruction to use as a return 
to BASIC. When the 6809 executes the 
RTS, it goes to a special area in memory 
called the stack. It gets the first two data 
bytes from the stack and uses them as 
a return address. The return address in 
this case represents an address in the 
BASIC interpreter code just after the 
code that caused the transfer to take 
place. As a matter of fact, the instruc- 
tion executed to cause the transfer is a 
JSR-type instruction (Jump to Subrou- 
tine) which branches to the assembly 
language code and stores the return 
address in the stack. 

It appears then, that we have to 
modify the program slightly to include 



an RTS instruction to get back to 
BASIC. Listing 3 shows the new code. 
How Does the Code Get There? 

Before we can execute the instruc- 
tions, however, we must first guarantee 
the code is in memory. One way is to 
load the code by L0RDM (or CLQRDM), 
using the object file generated by an 
assembler such as EDTASM. Another 
way — the one we'll be using here — is 
to actually store it in memory from 
values in BASIC data statements. Incor- 
porating the code in BASIC data state- 
ments means that machine language 
code can be included in BASIC pro- 
grams, making the entire process a 
simple one-step process. 

Let's assume we're using the $3E00 
area as before. This BASIC code: 

130 FOR I - &H3EPP to &H3E05 
140 READ A: POKE I, A 
150 NEXT I 

160 DATA &H86,&H41 t &HB7 l &H04 > &HEF,&H39 

moves the machine language values 
from the DRTfl statements into the 
$3E00 area just as if the data was loaded 
from a LDADM (CLDRDM) file. Of course, 
the disadvantage of this method is that 
you wouldn't want to try it for a 
thousand-byte assembly language pro- 



Listing 2: Write an 'A' Program 



0000 86 
0002 B7 



41 

04EF 
0000 



00100 * "A" STORE PROGRAM 
00110 LDA #65 

00120 STA 1263 

00130 END 



A CHARACTER 

STORE IN SCREEN CENTER 



00000 TOTAL ERRORS 
Listing 3: Write an 6 A' Program Corrected 



0000 86 
0002 B7 
0005 39 



41 

04EF 
0000 



00100 * «A" STORE PROGRAM 
00110 LDA #65 

00120 STA 1263 

00130 RTS 
00140 END 



A CHARACTER 

STORE IN SCREEN CENTER 
RETURN 



00000 TOTAL ERRORS 
Listing 4; UDRDCNT1 







00100 


* WORD COUNT 


PROGRAM 




0000 8E 


0400 


00110 


LDX 


#$400 


PNTR TO SCREEN 


0003 108E 0000 


00120 


LDY 


#0 


"IN WORD" FLAG 


0007 6F 


8D 0036 


00130 


CLR 


WC,PCR 


ZERO WORD COUNT 






00140 


* MAIN LOOP HERE 




000B A6 


80 


00150 


LOOP LDA 


,x+ 


GET NEXT CHARACTER 


000D 81 


60 


00160 


CMPA 


#96 


IS IT BLANK? 


000F 26 


10 


00170 


BNE 


NOTBLK 


GO IF NOT BLANK 






00180 


* BLANK HERE 







218 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



gram. But for short programs, it works 
fine. The &H indicates hexadecimal 
values to BASIC. The hex values are 
taken directly from the program listing. 

Once the code is stored in the S3E00 
area, we're ready to execute . . . almost. 
Protecting Memory 

Actually, there's one important thing 
we should have done before storing the 
data — protect the memory area where 
the code is to be stored, basic uses a 
number of areas in high and low mem- 
ory, as shown in Figure 2. Variables and 
arrays are stored as required, working 
up towards higher memory. Strings and 
the stack area (the same stack we've 
been talking about) are stored in high 
memory, with the stack working down. 
If the area in which we're going to store 
the data is not protected, storage of 
stack or string data results in valid 
instruction data being clobbered. 
What's to be done? 

The CLEAR statement in BASIC is 
specifically used for this protection 
feature, along with setting the size of the 
string storage area. To protect the 
S3E00 area and provide 1,000 bytes of 
string storage (usually enough, depend- 



0011 


108 C 


0001 


00190 


CMPY 


#1 


ARE WE IN WORD? 


0015 


26 


1C 


00200 


BNE 


TSTEND 


GO IF NO 


0017 


6C 


8D 0026 


00210 


INC 


WC,PCR 


YES - BUMP WORD COUNT 


001B 


108E 


0000 


00220 


LDY 


#0 


RESET "IN WORD" 


001F 


20 


12 


00230 


BRA 


TSTEND 


TEST FOR END 








00240 


* NOT BLANK HERE 




0021 


108E 


0001 


00250 


NOTBLK LDY 


#1 


SET "IN WRD" 


0025 


IF 


20 


00260 


TFR 


Y,D 


PNTR TO D 


0027 


C4 


IF 


00270 


ANDB 


#$1F 


TEST FOR LINE START 


0029 


26 


08 


00280 


BNE 


TSTEND 


GO IF NOT LINE START 


002 B 


6C 


8D 0012 


00290 


INC 


WC , PCR 


NEW LINE IN WORD CASE 


002 F 


108E 


0000 


00300 


LDY 


#0 


RESET "IN WORD" 








00310 


* TEST FOR SCREEN END 




0033 


8C 


0600 


00320 


TSTEND CMPX 


#$600 


AT END? 


0036 


26 


D3 


00330 


BNE 


LOOP 


LOOP IF NO 








00340 


* SCREEN END 


HERE 




0038 


E6 


8D 0005 


00350 


LDB 


WC , PCR 


WORD COUNT TO B 


003 C 


4F 




00360 


CLRA 




NOW IN A, B 


003D 


BD 


B4F4 


00370 


JSR 


$B4F4 


CONVERT TO INTEGER 


0040 


39 




00380 


RTS 




RETURN 


0041 




00 


00390 


WC FCB 


9 


WORD COUNT 0 TO 255 






0000 


00400 


END 







00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



Listing 5: W0RDCNT2 

10)3 'WORD COUNT PROGRAM 
110 CLEAR 1000,&H3DFF 



Decimal 

0 

1024 

1536 



Working Storage 



Text Screen 



Graphics Pages 



16384 

or 
32768 



Basic 
Variables 



User 
Programs 

♦ 

String 
Storage 



T 
Stack 



Hex 
$0 

$400 

$600 (non-disk) 



Optional 
Area Protected 
By Clear 



$4000 or 
$8000 



Figure 2: BASIC Memory 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 219 



ing upon the program), you'd do 110 
CLEAR 1000, &H3DFF. 

Note that one less than the starting 
address of the program was used, as the 
protection address specifies the last 
location BASIC can use. If this statement 
is executed once at the beginning of the 
program, the area from S3E00 up will 
never be used by BASIC. 

At Long Last, An 4 A' Appears 

We're now ready to execute. The 
complete program looks like this: 

100 1 AL DEMO PROGRAM 

110 CLEAR 1999, &H3DFF 'procect $3E00 area and up 

12? CLS 

130 FOR I - &H3E0P Co &H3EJJ5 
11*9 READ A: POKE I. A 
15JJ NEXT I 

169 DATA &H86,&H&1,&HB7,&H(J6,&HEF,&H39 

170 DEFUSRp - &H3E0? 
180 A - USR0(0) 

190 GOTO 19JJ 

If you execute this BASIC program, 
you'll see the screen clear and an 'A' 
appear in the screen center. Ah, the 
magic of assembly language. But don't 
scoff, this is the basis for many more 
impressive and useful programs. 

Color BASIC Gotchas 

This sequence of steps is geared to 
Extended Color BASIC. The sequence 
for Color BASIC is essentially the same, 
but there are some differences. Color 
BASIC does not have a DEFUSR, and the 
address of the assembly language loca- 
tion must be PDKEd into locations 275 
and 276 decimal. For S3E00, for exam- 
ple, this would be 140 POKE 275,62: 
POKE 276,0 :REM 62*256+0 = 15872. 

Color BASIC also uses just a USR 
statement and not a U5R0 (or USRn) 
statement to make the transfer: 150 A 
= USR(0). 



More about the DEFUSR and USRn 
Statements 

In Extended Color BASIC, the format 
of DEFUSR is DEFUSRn, where the V 
may be a digit from zero through nine. 
DEFUSR0, DEFU5R1, . . . DEFUSR9 are 
tied in with the corresponding USRn 
statements which take the form USR0, 
USR1, . . . USR9. This means that 10 
different entry points in an assembly 
language program may be defined, each 
one addressable by a different combina- 
tion of DEFUSRns and USRns. Many 
times there is only one assembly lan- 
guage program involved, however. The 
DEFUSR and USR digit does not have to 
start from zero — you could have only 
one program with DEFU5R5 and USR5, 
for example. Since you can redefine the 
address specified by DEFUSR at any 
time, you can really have any number 
of entry points for assembly language 
programs, as long as you precede each 
entry by a new DEFUSR. 

100 DEFUSR5 - &H3E0J3 'first entry point 



The variable 'A' on the left of the equals 
sign in R = USRn(0) is also a dummy. 
Use any variable you'd like for this. A 
little later on we'll see how these vari- 
ables are used in passing data to and 
from the assembly language subroutine. 



2J3JJJJ A - USR5(JJ) 



3000 DEFUSR5 - &H3E10 



40|30 A - USR5(0) 



'go to AL code at $3E00 



'new entry point 



'go to $3E10 



The same thing applies to Color 
BASIC — PDKEing new values at 275 / 276 
sets up a new entry point as many times 
as you'd like. 

Dummy Variables 

We've been using a value of zero 
within parentheses for the USRn. This 
value is a dummy value that satisfies the 
syntax (format) of the USRn statement. 



How Big Can the AL Subroutine Be? 

In the preceding, we've used a three- 
instruction program to put an 'A' on the 
screen. In fact, we could make the 
assembly language subroutine as large 
as we want, anywhere from one instruc- 
tion Qust an RTS) to thousands of 
instructions. A final RTS returns to 
BASIC, however. (We say final because 
there may be any number of subroutines 
within the assembly language code, just 
as there are nested GDSUBs/ RETURNS in 
BASIC.) Typically though, useful assem- 
bly language code is on the order of 
dozens of instructions. Some of the 
things that may be coded in dozens of 
lines of assembly language are screen 
text processing such as word wrap, sorts 
of data into alphabetical order, sound 
subroutines to make noises and music, 
high-speed animation and fast disk file 
processing. 

Again, the idea is to find the parts of 
a BASIC program that really bog down 
in speed and break out these parts in 
assembly language code. Also, there are 
functions that are just not possible in 
anything other than assembly language 
because it's fast enough to handle real- 
world events such as sound generation 
and data communications (serial port) 
applications. 



12)3 


CLS 




320 


DATA 


&H8E, 


, &H00, 


, &H00,&H6F 


130 


FOR 1= 


&H3E00 TO &H3E41 


330 


DATA 


&H8D, 


, &H00, 


, &H3 6, &HA6 


14)3 


READ A 


: POKE I, A 


340 


DATA 


&H80, 


, &H81, 


, &H60, &H26 


150 


NEXT I 




350 


DATA 


&H10, 


, &H10, 


, &H8C, &H00 


16)3 


PRINT 


"THEY CAN HAVE MY" 


360 


DATA 


&H01, 


, &H2 6, 


, &H1C,&H6C 


17)3 


PRINT 


"COCO WHEN THEY PRY" 


370 


DATA 


&H8D, 


, &H00, 


, &H2 6, &H10 


18)3 


PRINT 


"MY COLD, DEAD" 


380 


DATA 


&H8E, 


, &H00, 


, &H00, &H20 


19)3 


PRINT 


"FINGERS FROM IT." 


390 


DATA 


&H12, 


, &H10, 


, &H8E, &H00 


2)3)3 


PRINT 




400 


DATA 


&H01, 


, &H1F 




21)3 


PRINT 


"IN THIS SECTION" 


410 


DATA 


&H20, 


, &HC4 , 


, &H1F, &H26 


22)3 


PRINT 


"YOU'RE GOING TO" 


420 


DATA 


&H08, 


, &H6C, 


, &H8D,&H00 


23)3 


PRINT 


"LEARN HOW TO" 


430 


DATA 


&H12, 


, &H10 , 


, &H8E, &H00 


24)3 


PRINT 


"PROGRAM. DON'T" 


440 


DATA 


&H00, 


, &H8C, 


, &H06,&H00 


25)3 


PRINT 


"WORRY, IT'LL BE" 


450 


DATA 


&H2 6, 


, &HD3 , 


, &HE6 , &H8D 


26)3 


PRINT 


"PAINLESS J " 


460 


DATA 


&H00, 


, &H05, 


, &H4F, &HBD 


27)3 


PRINT 


"(FROM A RADIO SHACK" 


470 


DATA 


&HB4 . 


, &HF4 , 


&H3 9,&H00 


280 


PRINT 


"MANUAL) " 


480 


DEFUSR0=&H3E00 


29)3 


PRINT 




490 


A=USR0 (0) 






3)3)3 


PRINT 


" THE COCO LIVES!" 


500 


PRINT 


1 @ 480, "WORD COUNT=";A; 


31)3 


DATA &H8E , &H04 , &H00 , &H10 


510 


GOTO 


510 







220 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Passing an Argument Back from an 
Assembly Language Subroutine 

How about another example of an 
assembly language program? This time 
we'll make it a little more useful. Let's 
try a program that counts the words on 
the screen. The hard part is coming up 
with the program in the first place. We'll 
use this following logic. A word is any 
text (including numbers and special 
characters) bracketed by spaces, line 
start, or a line end. In the line DISK 
EXTENDED COLOR BfiSIC 007 there are 
five words. More than one space may 
be present between words, as in 
UNDER LICENSE TO KILL. In this line 
there are four words. 

The program for counting words is 
shown in Listing 4. It reads characters 
from text screen memory, locations 
1024 through 1535, looking for space 
characters (96). Each time two space 
characters are found, a word count is 
incremented (one is added to the word 
count). 

The BASIC language program with 
embedded assembly language code is 
shown in Listing 5. It looks pretty much 
like the first example, but there are 23 
instructions in 66 bytes instead of three 
instructions in six bytes, as shown in the 
listing. This means that 66 values must 
be stored in the protected memory area. 
Also, the 'A' variable is used to receive 
the word count. Try this program from 
within any BASIC program — we've 
included a little driver program in BASIC 



to generate sample text on the screen for 
the count. 

The operation of the program is 
described in the listing and we won't go 
into the details here. However, there is 
one "gotcha" that should be explained. 
In order to pass back the word count, 
a ROM subroutine must be used. The 
subroutine is located at SB4F4 in the 
Color BASIC interpreter. This subrou- 
tine takes a value in the D register and 
converts it into a BASIC variable. The 
variable is then set equal to the dummy 
variable used in the USR call, in this case 
'A'. The call to SB4F4 is one way of 
passing back an argument computed in 
an assembly language subroutine to 
BASIC. We'll look at some other ways in 
the next column. 

Passing an Argument to an Assembly 
Language Subroutine 

As you might suspect, if you can pass 
an argument back from an assembly 
language subroutine, you can also pass 
an argument to an assembly language 
subroutine. As an example, look at 
Listing 6. It shows a short program to 
cause the letters EXPLODE to explode on 
the screen, flying apart as shown in 
Figure 3. The speed at which this is done 
is controlled by passing a value to the 
assembly language subroutine from 
BASIC — the smaller the value, the faster 
the explosion takes place. 

The BASIC version of this program is 
shown in Listing 7. Like the other two 




Figure 3: Screen Explosion 



programs, it has the machine language 
bytes in DATA values which are moved 
to the S3E00 area. The explosion speed 
is input from BASIC and then used in the 
argument of the U5R0 call. 

Within the assembly language code, 
the first action that must be taken is to 
call another ROM subroutine in Ex- 
tended BASIC at SB3ED. This ROM 
subroutine converts the BASIC variable 
to an integer value from zero to 65,535 
in the D register, which is then used to 
control the speed of the explosion. 

Again, this subroutine is one way to 
pass an argument to an assembly lan- 
guage program from BASIC, but not the 
only way. We'll look at alternative 
approaches next month. In the mean- 
time, try your hand at embedding short 
assembly language code in BASIC. A few 
samples will help in your understanding 
of the process. □ 



Listing 6: EXPL0DE1 



3E00 






00100 




ORG 


$3E00 










00110 


* EXPLODING SCREEN 




3E00 


BD 


B3ED 


00120 


ENTER 


JSR 


$B3ED 


CONVERT DELAY TO INTEGER 


3E03 


FD 


3E74 


00130 




STD 


DELAY 


STORE 


3E06 


108E 


3E51 


00140 




LDY 


#START 


SET TO TABLE START 








00150 


* OUTER 


LOOP 


SCANS TABLE 


3E0A 


7F 


3E76 


00160 


LOOP1 


CLR 


DONE 


RESET ACTIVITY FLAG 








00170 


* INNER 


LOOP 


HANDLES EACH CHAR 


3E0D 


AE 


A4 


00175 


LOOP 2 


LDX 


,Y 


GET CURRENT CHARACTER 


3E0F 


8C 




00180 




CMPX 


#$400 


TEST FOR OFF SCREEN 


3E12 


2D 


22 


00190 




BLT 


OUT 


GO IF OFF (UP) 


3E14 


8C 


05FF 


00200 




CMPX 


#$5FF 


TEST FOR OFF SCREEN 


3E17 


22 


ID 


00210 




BHI 


OUT 


GO IF OFF (DOWN) 


3E19 


86 


60 


00230 




LDA 


#96 


BLANK CODE 


3E1B 


A7 


84 


00240 




STA 


,x 


STORE BLANK 


3E1D 


EC 


A4 


00250 




LDD 


,Y 


GET LOCATION 


3E1F 


E3 


22 


00260 




ADDD 


+2,Y 


ADD DISPLACEMENT 


3E21 


ED 


A4 


00270 




STD 


,Y 


STORE NEW LOC 1 N 


3E23 


IF 


01 


00280 




TFR 


D,X 


IN X FOR INDEXING 


3E25 


8C 


0400 


00290 




CMPX 


#$400 


TEST FOR OFF SCREEN 


3E28 


2D 


0C 


00300 




BLT 


OUT 


GO IF OFF (UP) 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 221 



3F2A 8C 


05FF 


00310 


CMPX 


#$5FF 


TEST FOR OFF SCREEN 




07 


00320 


BHI 


OUT 


GO IF OFF (DOWN) 




24 


00330 


LDA 


+4,Y 


GET CHARACTER 


0T?01 A7 


84 


00340 


STA 


,x 


STORE NEW CHARACTER 


JJLJ J r U 


3E76 


00350 


INC 


DONE 


SET ACTIVITY 




25 


00360 OUT 


LEAY 


+5,Y 


BUMP TABLE PNTR 


3E38 108C 


3E74 


00370 


CMPY 


#TEND 


TEST FOR END OF TABLE 


QTTQH 9fi 


CF 


00380 


BNE 


L00P2 


GO IF NOT 






00390 * END 


OF ONE 


PASS HERE 




3F3F 7D 


3E76 


00400 


TST 


DONE 


TEST FOR ACTIVITY 


3E41 27 


0D 


00410 


BEQ 


ENDRET 


GO IF NO ACTIVITY 


3E43 108E 


3E51 


00420 


LDY 


#START 


RESET TO TABLE START 


3E47 BE 


3E74 


00430 


LDX 


DELAY 


USER DELAY 


3F4A 30 


IF 


00440 L00P3 


LEAX 


-1,X 


DELAY 


3E4C 26 


FC 


00450 


BNE 


L00P3 


FOR USER COUNT 


3E4E 20 


BA 


00460 


BRA 


L00P1 


CONTINUE 


3E50 39 




00470 ENDRET 


RTS 




RETURN HERE 






00480 * EXPLODE AT 


LINE 8, CP 


12 


3E51 


050C 


00490 START 


T7I T"\ TJ 


$50C 


E LOCATION 


3E53 


FFDF 


nrtzL net 

00500 


I? nu 
r Dd 


-33 


E DISPLACMENT 


3E55 


45 


00510 




'E' 




3E56 


050D 


00520 




$50D 


X LOCATION 


3E58 


001F 


rt«r Art 

00530 


T7TXT3 


31 


X DISPLACEMENT 


3E5A 


58 


rtrtC Art 

00540 


r OU 


'X 1 




3E5B 


050E 




r jjd 


$50E 


P LOCATION 


3E5D 


FFE0 


00560 


FDB 


-32 


P DISPLACEMENT 


3E5F 


50 


00570 


FCC 


• pi 




3E60 


050F 


00580 


FDB 


$50F 


L LOCATION 


3E62 


0020 


00590 


FDB 


32 


L DISPLACEMENT 


3E64 


4C 


00600 


FCC 


'L' 




3E65 


0510 


00610 


FDB 


$510 


0 LOCATION 


3E67 


FFE0 


00620 


FDB 


-32 


0 DISPLACEMENT 


3E69 


4F 


00630 


FCC 


■0 f 




3E6A 


0511 


00640 


FDB 


$511 


D LOCATION 


3E6C 


0(221 


00650 


FDB 


33 


D DISPLACEMNT 


3E6E 


44 


00660 


FCC 


f D' 




3E6F 


0512 


00670 


FDB 


$512 


E LOCATION 


3E71 


FFE1 


00680 


FDB 


-31 


E DISPLACEMENT 


3E73 


45 


00690 


FCC 


«E f 






3E74 


00700 TEND 


EQU 






3E74 


0000 

r r r r 


00710 DELAY 


FDB 


0 

r 


USER DELAY COUNT 


3E76 


00 


00720 DONE 


FCB 


0 


ACTIVITY FLAG 




0000 


00730 


END 






00000 TOTAL ERRORS 











S # S # S OU TUNER 



SNAP STUDY SYSTEM is quick and simple. 
There are no forms to design or set up. 
Just start entering records as in a book. 
At any time, use the arrow keys to browse 
through chapter headings, pages, items. 
It's easy to add, revise, delete, print. 

A unique and cozy filing system is used. 
There are NO FILE NAMES to remember 1 1 I 

RECORD reference notes for books, talks, 
guides, checklists, requirements, 
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PLAN an outline or summary for reports, 
manuscripts, agendas, duties, 
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CANADA V0X1A0 



222 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



Listing 7: EXPLDDE2 








100 

f f 


' EXPLODING TEXT PROGRAM 


110 


CLEAP 


. 1000,&H3DFF 




120 


CLS 










130 


PRINT@268, 


"EXPLODE" ; 




140 


r UK x 


=&H3E00 TO 


' &H3E76 


150 


KliiAD 


A: POKE I, 


A 




160 


INH] Al 


T 
X 








170 


HATA 
JJAX A 




otnD j i 


anni u j 


anr u 


180 


JJAX A 


un j Hi f 


JCW7 L 
ocn 


Qtri±p j 


ano Ci 


190 


DAI A 


JCWTP 
anjl!i / 


tuci 
«no x / 


an / r / 


anO Hi 


200 


JJAX A 


an /Of 




ailAfr 




210 


DAXA 


ocno >v ^ 


Ok i 1 !l/ *± ^ 




ruon 
c< n z jj 


220 


DA± A 


w nz ^ / 


ocno w / 




anr r 


230 


DATA 






ano o / 


anojci 


240 


HAT A 
JJAX A 


all A / 








250 


HATA 


ocno fx / 




anAft / 


anHi o 


260 




run o 




ftTTA A 

anAft i 


ami 


270 


HAT 1 A 
DAI A 




ano w 






280 


HATA 
DAI A 


ocnjc/fs 7 




jc»wo n 
a n z u i 




290 


HAT A 
DAi A 


otnov- / 


QtllJP ~J / 


anr r f 


two 0 


300 


DAI A 




anAo / 


anz ft f 


ann / 


310 


HAT A 
DAI A 


ocno ft / 


an / v- 






320 


DAI A 


anjL / 


an / O / 


ano x i 


run k 
anz o 


330 


HA T>A 
DAI A 


anXJ0 , 


run r% 

ano v«. , 


an J J_j ; 


an / 4 


340 


T"\^TiA 
DAI A 


anz o i 


anur ; 


ruin 
an / D / 


P.TJ O T? 

ano il 


3 50 


UAiA 


an / o i 


aii^ / f 


r tt rt*n 
anJdD / 


run 
anXJ0 


360 


DAI A 


f UQP 

anorj , 


an oili j 


anD X | 


rtlDP 

anr3£j 


370 


DAI A 


ano Jj j 


, &H74, 


ano p i 


CUT 17 

anXr 


380 


DATA 


&H26, 


, &HFC, 


&H2p, 


wilDn 


390 


HAT A 
JJA1 A 


&H39, 


, &H05 






400 


DATA 


&H0C, 


, &HFF, 


, &HDF , 


^NA 
* anft j 


410 


DATA 


&H05, 


, &H0D ( 




, &H1F 


420 


DATA 


&H58, 


, &H05 ( 


, SHpE, 


, &HFF 


430 


DATA 


&HE0, 


, &H50 ( 




, &H0F 


440 


DATA 


&H00, 


, &H20, 


F &H4C, 


, &H05 


450 


DATA 


&H10; 


, &HFF j 




, &H4F 


460 


DATA 


&H05; 


, &H11, 




, &H21 


470 


DATA 


&H44 , 


, &H05, 


F &H12 i 


, &HFF 


480 


DATA 


StHEl; 


, &H45 






490 


DATA 


&H00; 


, &H00, &H00 




500 


DEFUSR=&H3E00 






510 


A=USR0 (15000) 






520 


GOTO 


520 





















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for Modularity 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Life behind the keyboard of a 
Color Computer was once sim- 
ple. In the early years (circa 1 979) 
there was little software to pick from 
and third-party hardware did not exist. 
Today, it's a different story. There are 
enough programs to make your head 
spin. And on the hardware side, there 
are more disk controllers on the market 
than you can count on the fingers of one 
hand. 

Even though there are many choices 
today, you still have only 64K of mem- 
ory to work with in the Color Compu- 
ter. How do you manage hardware and 
software resources while dealing with 
this memory constraint? This month 
well look at various strategies and show 
how OS-9 and its modular design can 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author of The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale 
works as a U.S. Coast Guard chief 
warrant officer and lives in Alexandria, 
Virginia. 



help make the job easier. We'll also 
present a smorgasbord of information 
about current trends in the OS-9 world 
and pass along several short programs 
we hope you will find interesting. 

Device Descriptors 
and Drivers Revisited 

When we first began writing this 
column several years ago, we talked 
about the modular design of OS-9. With 
the release of Version 2.00.00 on the 
Color Computer, the importance of this 
design is obvious to anyone with more 
than a passing interest. Let's review. 

OS-9 lets you add new hardware to 
the computer by adding two new soft- 
ware modules — a device descriptor and 
a device driver. First, plug in the new 
hardware device. Then load the device 
descriptor and device driver into mem- 
ory. As soon as the two modules are 
loaded you can communicate with the 
new hardware by redirecting the stand- 
ard input and output paths to the new 
device descriptor. 

For example, as soon as you plug in 
the new 15-megabyte hard disk drive 
from Tandy, the OS-9 commands fol- 
lowing will put you on the air. The 
modules directory is located on the 
Boot/ Config disk that comes with OS- 
9 Version 2.00.00. 



0S9: load /dl/modules/cchdisk. dr <ENTER> 

0S9: load /dl/modules/h0_15 . dd <ENTER> 

OS 9: chx /hO/cmds <ENTER> 

OS 9: chd /hO <ENTER> 

The file cchdisk.dr is the device 
driver. It contains a short piece of 6809 
code that knows how to talk to the hard 
disk controller in the Tandy drive. Since 
OS-9 device drivers are reentrant, more 
than one device may use them at the 
same time. For example, you could plug 
in two of the Tandy hard disk drives and 
load in two device descriptors, /h0 and 
/hi. Yet, you would need only one copy 
of cchdisk. 

More About Device Descriptors 

OS-9 device drivers are generic. This 
means they can talk to any piece of 
hardware that uses the same chip. For 
example, the Aciapak driver that comes 
with OS-9 can communicate with any 
piece of hardware that uses the 6551 
chip. That's why it works with Tandy's 
deluxe RS-232 Pak and with PBJ's 2- 
SP Pak. Further, it can be used to send 
and receive characters from a terminal, 
a modem, a printer or any other 6551 
hardware. 

To send a file to a modem connected 
to one of Tandy's Deluxe RS-232 Packs 
plugged into the CoCo, simply redirect 
the standard output to a device descrip- 
tor that uses the Aciapak driver, /T2. 



224 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



The device descriptor does what its 
name implies, it describes the physical 
characteristics of your hardware. The 
device descriptor gives the device a 
name, defines its address or location in 
memory and names the device driver 
which will use it. It also tells that device 
driver which file manager will be send- 
ing data to the device. 

In reality, a device descriptor is 
merely a table stored in an OS-9 module 
which can be loaded in memory. An 
initialization table in each device de- 
scriptor defines a set of characters or 
parameters to tell the device driver what 
the device looks like at startup. For 
example, the device descriptor used by 
a terminal often tells the device driver 
that to backspace the cursor, the termi- 
nal must receive the character 8 dec- 
imal. OS-9 lets you change these initial 
parameters with two utility programs, 
Tmode and XMode. 

At Your Fingertips or On Your Disk 

The fact that device descriptors and 
device drivers can be loaded, used and 
unloaded freely is extremely important 
today as we add new hardware to our 
CoCo and try to make it all work in the 
same 64K of memory. To manage the 
transition to more powerful systems, we 
must understand our options. Thanks 
to the forethought of OS-9's designers 
at Microware, we can take one of two 
approaches. We have a choice. 

Most of us react the same at first. 
Let's put all our device descriptors and 
device drivers in the OS-9 boot file so 
they'll be there every time we want to 
use them. That's not a bad idea — on 
an OS-9 Level Two system. However, 
on an OS-9 Level One system, you can 
run into trouble pretty fast. 

For example, not long ago I added a 
ThunderRAM to my old gray CoCo. I 
had also just bought a Deluxe RS-232 
Pak from a local Radio Shack store. I 
was already running Version 2.00.00 
and liked the idea of having the NIL bit 
bucket descriptor and its driver ready to 
accept my garbage at any time. And, 
how could I do without the sound 
drivers for my Radio Shack Speech- 
Sound Pack? No problem, I simply used 
OS9Gen and made a new boot disk that 
contained the new descriptors and 
drivers in the OS-9 boot file. 

Immediately after booting the new 
boot disk, I ran the OS-9 MFree utility 
just for the fun of it. But I had only 130 
pages or just a little more than 30K of 
memory left to run my application 
programs. Definitely not satisfactory. 



For example, the Radio Shack C Com- 
piler from Microware needs about 150 
pages of free memory to operate prop- 
erly with typical source code files. It was 
time to look for an alternative ap- 
proach. 

OS-9's modularity and ability to load 
a file containing the driver and descrip- 
tor modules, to use the device and then 
unlink the modules provided the alter- 
native. I would only load the device 
descriptor and the device driver for the 
Deluxe RS-232 Pack when I was ready 
to communicate with another computer 
or a timesharing service. After I had 
sent my traffic, I would unload the 
device descriptor and device driver to 
save precious memory. I could do this 
with the descriptor and driver for the 
Sound-Speech Cartridge, the RAM- 
Disk and several other pieces of hard- 
ware attached to my Color Computer. 
First, we'll show you several ways to 
load and use device descriptors and 
driver. Here's one way: 

0S9: load /t2 

OS 9: load /ACIAPAK 

0S9: list afile >/t2 ; * or whatever 
0S9: unlink t2 
0S9: unlink ACIAPAK 

This approach gets the job done. 
However, you may be able to avoid a 
few keystrokes by saving both modules 
in the same file. 



0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
OS 9 
0S9 



save /dO/cmds/comms /t2 /ACIAPAK 
load comms 

list your_stuff >/t2 
unlink t2 
unlink aciapak 



A note of caution if you follow this 
approach. When you run the command 
line, load comms, OS-9 only links to t2. 
Aciapak is not linked. It is possible for 
the driver to become unlinked after it is 
used and if this happens, you will get an 
error message the next time you try to 
use the device. To get around this, a 
procedure file can be built to take care 
of everything. 

0S9: build /dO/comms 

? load t2 

? load ACIAPAK 

? link ACIAPAK 

? <ENTER> 

0S9: /dO/comms 

Then, when you want to use the 
comms port, you need only type 'c!0/ 
comms and OS-9 does the dirty work for 
you. Of course, you may want to let a 
procedure file take care of the unlinking 
too. 



0S9: build /d0/kill comms 

? unlink t2 

? unlink ACIAPAK 

? <ENTER> 

After you have built these procedure 
files a dialog might look something like 
this: 

OS 9: /dO/comms 

0S9: list much_stuff >/t2 ; 

* do your thing 
0S9: /d0/killcomms 

If you had used the filename comms 
when you built the file instead of /d0/ 
comms, it would have been stored in the 
current data directory. And, since you 
probably have many data directories, 
you would never know where to find it. 
If you give the procedure file a short 



"Unlink only 
attempts to unlink 
them once. 99 



name and put it in a specific place, you 
will always be able to find it. For this 
reason, /d0/t2 may be a better name 
than comms. Well leave that up to you. 

If you own one of the public domain 
unload utilities like the one we pub- 
lished several months ago, use it instead 
of unlink. Unload keeps unlinking the 
modules until it is sure they are out of 
memory. Unlink only attempts to un- 
link them once. If the link count is 
higher than one, the module will still be 
linked after running unlink. You will 
not have retrieved the memory. 

More on CD-I 

Last month we mentioned CD-I, the 
new Compact Disk Interactive Media 
recently introduced by Sony and Phil- 
lips. OS-9 is the brain behind this 
revolutionary entertainment, education 
and electronic publishing tool. The 
system is based on the small compact 
discs now being sold in record stores 
nationwide. But, CD-I goes the audio 
discs two better. It adds natural pictures 
and interactive capabilities. Informa- 
tion distribution will never be the same. 
Imagine talking encyclopedias, diction- 
aries, maps that take you on a talking 
picture tour of a city, textbook videos, 
etc. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 225 



Because CD-I is interactive, you will 
be able to quickly locate any informa- 
tion from the 600 megabytes stored on 
a disc. That's 150,000 printed pages of 
text to pick from, or about 20 hours of 
speech-quality sound. The software that 
drives the CD-I is based on the kernel 
of OS-9 68K plus a new CD-I file 
manager. 

I asked Dr. James W. "Bill" Moore 
Jr., the head of Microware's new edu- 
cation and training department, what 



compared to IBM picking MS-DOS," 
he said. "It says, 'OS-9 is OK."' 

Hogg speculates that the CD-I drive 
will be out first in 12 to 18 months and 
later expanded into a full-blown com- 
puter. "That will be great," he said. 
"Because this box will be OS-9." 

On the CoCo hardware front, Hogg 
hopes to someday offer a ready-made 
hard disk system. If everything works 
out, a 20-megabyte hard disk and an 80- 
track floppy disk complete with case 



^Imagine talking encyclopedias, dictionaries, 
maps that take you on a talking picture 



tour . 



99 



impact the CD-I explosion might have 
on CoCo OS-9 users. 

"Directly, none." Moore said. "The 
hardware that drives this machine goes 
beyond the 6809. However, CoCo OS- 
9 users have the benefit of a general 
knowledge of OS-9. This gives them an 
educational edge." 

Moore told me the OS-9 software will 
be buried deep in the machine and the 
user will never see it. At this point, the 
machine is actually a stand-alone unit 
and not a computer peripheral. How- 
ever he did not deny the possiblity of 
expanding one of these machines into a 
full computer. 

Microware will be sponsoring a few 
seminars for OS-9 users around the 
country sometime in the future and Bill 
promised to let us know the details and 
schedule as soon as plans are complete. 
Moore plans to talk about the impact 
of CD-I on the CoCo OS-9 user during 
his keynote address at the OS-9 Com- 
munity Breakfast during RAINBOW- 
fest Chicago. 



FHL Introduces New 68020 Computer 

Frank Hogg is really excited about 
the new CD-I revolution. When he 
called to tell me about a new computer 
in the FHL QT line, I asked him how 
he thought CD-I would affect OS-9. 
"First, it has built-in hooks to interface 
with other computers," he said. "This 
tells me it should work best with an OS- 
9 based computer." 

Hogg feels that Phillips and Sony 
teaming up with Microware will give 
OS-9 the stamp of approval it needs to 
be a tremendous success. "It can be 



and power supply may be available 
soon from FHL. 

Frank had called to talk about QT- 
20X, the in-house code name for a new 
FHL computer. The machine has a 
board with an IBM PC footprint and 
features a 68020 running at 12.5 meg- 
ahertz, real time clock, parallel and 
serial interfaces, DMA on the floppy 
and hard disk drives and the same S ASI 
interface used in earlier QT computers. 
The motherboard has seven long and 
one short expansion slots. Boards al- 
ready designed feature two megabytes 
of memory and four serial ports. With 
seven of these, you could have up to 28 
users on line sharing 14 megabytes of 
memory. Hogg hopes to sell the QT-20X 
with one of these expansion boards and 
all the software for less than $2,995. 

An OS-9 Bulletin Board 

We received a nice letter from Steve 
Roberson, (The Pubtender) out in 
Mesa, Arizona. Steve contributed a 
program called readdir to "KISSable 
OS-9" last year. He also asked if anyone 
knew of a way he could eavesdrop on 
his BASIC09 bulletin board program 
while it was running in the background. 
I didn't have the answer at the time, but 
Steve has since solved his problem and 
has written to share it with us. 

"I have completely rewritten the 
program and it now runs in the main 
Shell from / term. It accesses the ACIA 
Pack directly with PEEKS and PDKEs, so 
the device descriptor and device driver 
for /T2 are no longer needed," Rober- 
son said. "As a result, I can see and 
control everything going on and a chat 
mode was quite easy to rig up." 



Roberson realizes the disadvantages 
of this approach. The computer is no 
longer multiuser. But since a BBS 
program takes up nearly all the memory 
and disk space anyway, it wasn't a hard 
decision for him. He also plugged OS- 
9's modularity. 

"I have taken advantage of BASiC09's 
modular format to expand the code so 



Listing 1: cursor fx 

* CURSOR CONSTANTS * 

* CURSOR VV XX YY ZZ * 
Vc * 

* BLOCK 00 B0 47 1C * 

* UNDERLINE 07 BB 44 B8 * 

* BLINK BLOCK 60 8B 18 06 * 

* BLINK UNDER 67 80 IB A2 * 

* * 

* REPLACE EACH VARIABLE WITH * 

* THE PROPER CONSTANT FOR THE* 

* CURSOR TYPE OF YOUR CHOICE.* 

t 

tmode . 1 -pause 
load co80. io 
debug 
1 co80 
. .+3 
=al 
. .+4 
=58 
. .+14 
-VV 

. .+26e 
=08 
, .+3 
=0b 
=c6 
-VV 
=20 
=02 
=c6 
=20 
=86 
=0a 
=ed 
=d8 
=01 
=5f 
=39 
=XX 
=YY 
=ZZ 

q 

del -x co80.Io 
save /d0/cmds/co80. io co80 
unlink co80 
tmode .1 pause 
-t 



226 THE RAINBOW July 1986 



the source is now about 50K bytes long. 
The BBS is made up of about 30 small 
modules which are only in memory 
when they are needed," Roberson said. 

If you would like to see his BBS 
program in action, give his board, The 
Pub, a call at 602-899-1350. If you 
would like to run an OS-9 bulletin 
board in your community, Roberson 
will sell you his program, PBBS 4.0 9 for 
$50. It requires an RS-232 Pack, 
BASIC09 and OS-9. Steve's address is 
1702 West Mountain View Drive, Mesa, 
Arizona 85201. 



Miscellaneous Tips 

We have received quite a few letters 
and several inquiries on rainbow's 
Delphi CoCo SIG about Config, the 
new utility supplied with OS-9 Version 
2.00.00. It seems beginners are having 
a problem similar to the one they had 
when BASIC09 was first introduced. 
Follow these steps and there shouldn't 
be any problems. Remember, an aster- 
isk in the first character position in an 
OS-9 command line tells the system that 
the line is only a comment and is not to 
be executed. Boot OS-9 normally, then: 



0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
0S9 
OS9 
0S9 
OS 9 
OS 9 
OS 9 



load load 

* now remove the OS-9 System disk 

* and put the Boot/Config disk in 

* drive /dO. 
chx /d0/cmds 
chd /dO 
config 

* If you have two drives, answer 
two at the first Config prompt 
and insert a blank disk in drive /dl, 
Later when Config is ready for CMDS 
you will need to put the OS-9 
system disk back in drive /dO. 



I saw a note on the OS-9 SIG from 
someone who wanted to disable the 
auto-key repeat in OS-9 Version 
2.00.00. He didn't think it was an 



Listing 2: cursor 



* 

* CURSOR - COPYRIGHT (c) 1986 by S.B.GOLDBERG 
* 

* Changes cursor type when used with patched C08JJ 

* For 'WordPak I', 'WordPak II' and 'WordPak-RS' 

* WILL NOT WORK WITH UN PATCHED CO80! ! ! t ! 
* 

* Use: cursor <cursor_code> 

* cursor codes : 

* 0 - cursor off 

* 1 - block cursor 

* 2 - underline cursor 

* 3 - blinking block 

* 4 - blinking underline 
* 



if pi 

use 

endc 



/dJJ/def s/os9def s 



mod len, name ,prgrm+ob jet ,reent+l , entry , dsiz 



* 

code 

dsiz 
* 

name 



rmb 
rmb 
equ 

f cs 
fee 



250 stack & param. 



/cursor/ 

/(c) 1986 S.B.GOLDBERG/ 



* GET AND CHECK PARAMETER 
* 

entry ldd ,x get parameter 

cmpb #$20 only one param char? 

bhi bad no, exit with param error 

suba make binary 

bmi bad <0, exit with error 

beq turnoff 0, turn off cursor 

cmpa #5 >47 

bio save no , continue 

bad ldb #56 yes, parameter error 

bra out quit with error 
save deca adjust param, for tables 

sta code save adjusted parameter 

•k-k - k • M rkr/rfrkk kick^ ck m k i c k*&i r k^c1cki(k'kick 
* 

* GET ADDRESS OF MODULE IN RAM 
★ 

leax modname , per module name (co80) 
clra any type or language 

os9 f$link link to get address in U register 
bes out exit with error 
os9 f$unlink unlink module 

* 

* FIX CURSOR TYPE BYTES 

* AND CO80 CRC BYTES 
* 

leax tablel.pcr cursor- type table 
ldb code get code number 
Ida b,x get cursor-type byte 



PRINTERS!!! 

NEWL Star Micronics NX- 10 *295 

Okidata 192 (Parallel) $ 370 

Okidata 192 (Serial) $ 425 

Okidata 182... $ 240 

Silver Reed 550 (Daisy Wheel) $ 395 

Silver Reed 400 (Daisy Wheel)(Par. or Serial) $ 200 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo and IBM upon request. 

*I5 off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it!!! 

SP-2 INTERFACE for EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ( 5 5°° extra) frees parallel port 
for use with other computers 

■ $ 49 95 (plus $30° shipping) 

SP-3 INTERFACE for MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem/ printer switch — no need for Y-cables or 
plugging/ unplugging cables 

■ % M n (pUis *3<» shipping) 

Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS 

ALL Vi HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) s 235 

Drive 0,1 (addressed as 4 drives!) *350 

All above complete with HDS controller, cable, & drive 

in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives * 1 09 

Dual { h Height Case w/ Power Supply s 49 

Double Sided Adapter $ 25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions s 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes $ 32 & s 3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: $ 5/drive or power supply, *I0 max. 

Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft.— M0. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft— *20. 
Other cables on request. (Add *3 00 shipping) 

CP.O. Box 293 
~ . Raritan, Nj 08869 

\M (201) 722-1055 

R ENGINEERING 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 227 



enhancement. That feature, when I use 
it with the CLEAR/ A combination, saves 
me a lot of keystrokes while working 
with files. However, it's different 
strokes for different folks. Try this 
patch from Bill Dichaus. 

OffsetWas Change To 

102 27 21 

809 08 36 

80A C8 BD 

80B OA CF 

The first change makes the patch. The 
last three locations are the CRC bytes 
in the file. I prefer to use the OS-9 verify 
utility command rather than change the 
CRC manually. Do it this way. 

OS 9 : debug 

DB: L CCIO 

DB: . <SPACE> .+102 

DB: -21 

DB: q 

0S9: save cciotemp ccio 

0S9: verify <cciotemp >newccio u 

Kevin Darling on the OS-9 SIG came 
up with several patches to Version 
2.00.00 of CCIO. To make CCIO auto- 
lowercase, go to an offset of 35 bytes 
from the beginning of the module using 
the debugger and change the next three 
bytes, E7, C8 and 50, to 12, 12 and 12. 
Also, if you have an HJL keyboard with 
the four function keys, you can change 
the byte at an offset of 036F from 32 to 
80 to make the F4 key a case shift toggle. 
Then you won't need to hold down the 
CLEAR key and press the zero all the 
time. Also, Darling says if you use the 
following command line, the F3 key 
becomes the pause key. 

0S9: tmode psc=Bl 

A BASIC09 Graphics Hint 

Eric Harrison of Dunnellon, Florida 
was having trouble displaying graphics 
with BASIC09. His programs appeared to 



hang up while going through a loop 
displaying moving graphics. After 
much study he found the problem. It 
seems that BASIC09 sends graphics to the 
screen the same as it sends text to the 
screen. This means it pauses after every 
16 or so graphics output lines. You must 
then press a key to make it continue. If 
you don't, the program appears to be 
hung up. 

The solution is to use the tmode 
utility to set the -pause flag before 
sending out the graphics. From within 
BASIC09 use the following program line: 

SHELL "TMODE -PAUSE" 
Of course, at the end of the program, 
you will want to insert: 

SHELL "TMODE PAUSE" 

Making CCIO Longer 

Dennis Skala of Fairview, Pennsylva- 
nia sent us an interesting note to show 
how he made a patch to CCIO which 
made the module longer. You really 
have to get tricky since CCIO is always 
in use. I thought you would be inter- 
ested in Skala's algorithm. 

First, use the save utility to make a 
copy of CCIO on disk. Don't forget if 
you are using the O-Pak Hi-Res screen 
you must switch back to the Lo-Res 
screen before saving CCIO. Inciden- 
tally, the same holds true for the drivers 
that come with the Disto Enhanced 
Display card since CCIO is patched 
automatically when you switch to the 
80-column mode by changing the type 
byte with tmode. 

Now, use debug to rename the copy 
of CCIO in memory to DCIO by chang- 
ing the byte at an offset of 0E from 43 
to 44. This allows loading the copy of 
CCIO from the disk. 

Load a dummy module in memory to 
take up at least one page of space. Then 
load in CCIO and delete the dummy 



module. This creates some room after 
CCIO for the additional length. 

Use debug to patch the copy of CCIO. 
Then, use the save utility to save the 
patched version to a disk file. If you 
have also patched the CRC bytes, run 
verify to ensure that you didn't make 
any mistakes. 

Now, you can rename DCIO in mem- 
ory back to CCIO and make a new boot 
disk with the new copy of CCIO. 

The following patches give HJL 
keyboard users single-key access to 

CLEAR/ A, CLEAR/ W, CLEAR/ O and 
CLEAR/ BREAK, the CoCo OS-9 ESCAPE 

key. 

Version 2.00.00 CCIO Patch 



* After patches: 

* Fl - <CLEAR A> (repeat last line) 

* F2 - <CLEAR W> (terminal pause) 

* F3 - <CLEAR 0> (toggle lower/upper case) 

* F4 - <CLEAR BREAK> (escape) 

offsetnew value 

0208 28 
23A10 2C 05 CB 
23E 12 12 12 12 12 
24720 19 

809C1 3710 27 FA 47 
80F34 10 6C C8 67 CO 33 
81630 8D 00 07 E6 85 
81C35 10 16 FA 22 
82101 17 20 32 
8257B 4C 5E *new CRC 

If you are more comfortable follow- 
ing assembly code, here is how Skala 
generated the patches. 

org 2 
fdb $0828 

org $023A 

lbge patch 

nop 

nop 

nop 

nop 

nop 

cont equ * 



org $0247 
bra skip 



skip over unneeded code 



sta $ld,u fix initialization byte 

sta $292 ,u fix turn on cursor byte 

leax table2,pcr CRC table 

ldb code get code number 

Ida #3 adjust for 

mul cursor type address 

abx of CRC bytes 

leau $29e,u module CRC address 

ldd ,x++ get first 2 CRC bytes 

std ,u++ put in module 

Ida ,x last CRC byte 

sta ( u to module 

★ 

* SEND CDRSOR-ON CODE AND QUIT 
* 

leax curson,pcr cursor on code 

send ldy #2 2 bytes 

Ida #1 standard output path 

os 9 l$write turn on new cursor 



bcs out exit with error 
clrb clear error flag 
out os9 f$exit quit 

* 

* SEND CURSOR- OFF CODE AND QUIT 
* 



tumof f 


leax 


cursoff , per cursor-of f 


* 


bra 


send turn off cursor 


tablel 


fcb 


$0, $7, $60, $67 


table2 


fcb 


$b0,$47,$lc,$bb,$44,$b8 




fcb 


$8b,$18,$06,$80,$lb,$a2 


cursoff 


fcb 


$05, $20 


curs on 


fcb 


$05, $21 


modname 
* 


fee 


/co80 / 




emod 




len 


equ 


* 




end 





228 



THE RAINBOW July 19B6 



org $0256 
Shiftequ * 

org $0262 
skipequ * 



org $0809 

pacchcmpb #$37 shift key? 
lbeq shiftyes 
pshs z 

inc $67 ,usimulated control key 
subb #$33table offset 
leax Cable, pc 
ldb b,xkey code 
puis x 

lbra contback Co original code 

tablefdb $0117A, V 
fdb $02320, Break 

crcfcb $7Bnew CRC value 
fcb $4C 
fcb $5E 



back here for shift key 



Skala has also written RAMdisk 
drivers for the J & R Banker board. He 
and Bill Goode, who wrote the drivers 
we published several months ago, are in 
the same users group. Skala's drivers 
are fully bootable in an entirely legal 
way. They use less than one page of 
memory in the boot file and one page 
of the lowest available memory. He has 
also written an initialization routine 
that formats an entire RAMdisk in less 
than a second. I'm impressed. And, he 
has a duplication routine that lets you 
rapidly copy an entire floppy disk to the 
RAMdisk, even though the formats are 
different. This means you can use all of 
the space available on the RAMdisk. 

If you own a J & R Banker and would 
like this software, send Skala $4 and a 
self-addressed disk mailer. 

More Tips From Steve Goldberg 

Steve Goldberg wrote recently to say 
the response to his Utilipak package has 
been tremendous and to let you know 
the package has now been upgraded for 
use with OS-9 Version 2.00.00. He has 
added a new alarm utility and a proce- 
dure file that adds descriptions of all 
Utilipak commands to the Cmds.Hp file 
that comes with Version 2.00.00. The 
price for Utilipak is still only $25. And, 
if you bought the earlier version, you 
can get a copy of the new version by 
sending Goldberg a blank disk with a 
stamped return mailer. That's an up- 
grade bargain! 

Steve enclosed a change to the mod- 
ification of the Rep utility we published 
recently that causes the program to first 
look for the module in RAM and only 
attempt to load it from disk if it is not 
present in memory. This means you can 
load all the utilities you want to repeat 
together with Rep and then switch to a 
different disk. This is essential for users 
with only one drive. 

In .Rep's load module add these lines 



Listing 3: deiniz 



DEINIZ - COPYRIGHT (c) 1986 by S.B.GOLDBERG 



* 



Returns device buffer(s) initialized by 1 Iniz* to user RAM. 
Use: deiniz <devicename> [...] 

/d0/def s/os9defs 

len , name , prgrm+ob j ct , reent+1 , entry , ds iz 

2 parameter pointer 
200 stack 
2J?0 params 



/deiniz/ 

/(c) 1986 S.B.GOLDBERG/ 





ifpl 




use 




endc 


* 






mod 


* 




pointer 


rmb 




rmb 




rmb 


dsiz 


equ 






name 


f cs 




fee 



CHECK FOR PARAMETERS 



entry Ida ,x get parameter character 
cmpa #$0d parameter present? 
beq prompt no, prompt and quit 



* MAIN PROGRAM LOOP 



doit 


stx 


pointer yes, sve devname address 




clra 


use device capabilities 




os9 


i$attach attach to get table addr. 




bes 


error branch on error 




os9 


i$detach detach device 




bes 


out quit with error 




os9 


i$detach destach again 




bes 


out quit with error 


chkmore 


Ida 


,x+ get next param. 




cmpa 


#$20 space? 




beq 


chkmore yes, look again 




leax 


-l,x no, reset pointer 




cmpa 


#$0d another param? 




bne 


doit yes, do again 


no err 


clrb 


no, clear error flag 


out 


os9 


f$exit quit 




* ERROR 
* 


CHECK 


ROUTINE 


error 


cmpb 


#221 no module error? 




beq 


loop yes, display bad devname 




bsr 


screen display quit point 




bra 


out quit with error 


loop 


Ida 


,x+ yes, get param. char. 




cmpa 


#$20 end of param? 




bhi 


loop no, try again 




leax 


-l",x yes, reset to end of param. 




pshs 


x save end address 




tfr 


x t d put in D register 




subd 


pointer subtract start address 




tfr 


d,y put length in Y register 




ldx 


pointer address of param start 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 229 



immediately after the pshs u instruc- 
tion. 

os 9 f$link 
bcc saveit 

cnpb #221 module not available error code 
bne out 

Also add the label saveit to the begin- 
ning of the second line below. 

bcs out exit with error 

saveit stu head save header address 
puis uretrieve U register 

This Month's Program Listings 

Steve Goldberg hates large, blank, 
unblinking block cursors like the one 
generated by the new CO80 module 
which lets PBJ's WordPak work with 
OS-9 Version 2.00.00, so he wrote a 
patch. Since it is one byte longer than 
the original, you must do the patch 
before putting the module in the OS-9 
boot file. Just create the procedure file 
Cursor Fix with build or edit and run it. 
The assembly listing, Cursor, lets you 
instantly change the cursor type at any 
time after CO80 has been patched with 
Cursorfix. 

OS-9 Version 2.00.00 gives you an 
Iniz utility to initialize device buffers at 
startup to prevent memory fragmenta- 
tion. It does not include a Deiniz to let 
you grab back a page of unused buffer 



space. Goldberg wrote one. It works 
with Version 2.00.00 only. 

We have an international contributor 
this month. Margo H. Guda of Cura- 
cao, Netherlands Antilles sent us two 
BASIC09 listings. Menu can help make 
programming easier. Printplaatje is a 
screen dump utility to send a graphics 
screen to the printer. 

He also sent the following patches. 
They let Radio Shack's OS-9 Screen 
Dump program work with FHL's Hi- 
Res in memory. He took out the auto- 
matic logo printing and changed the 
option check list so the options are 
processed in lowercase. 

offset old new 

b5 76 00 
130 53 73 

13A 49 69 

142 43 63 

He noted that his DMP-120 printer 
has problems with the double width size 
used by the screen dump program so he 
changed it to print in condensed mode 
by changing the byte at an offset of 94 
from 17 to 14. 



And Finally, More Assembly 
and C Comparisons 

This month we feature two more of 
Kevin KuehFs utility programs in 
assembly language and C. Display is like 
the utility that comes with OS-9 except 
that it also accepts decimal and octal 
numbers. CP is a UNIX-like copy utility 
that copies a group of files into a 
directory or one file into another. 
Rather than delete the new file if it 
already it exists, it appends the new 
information to the end of the existing 
file. These programs give an excellent 
insight into how to write OS-9 utilities 
in either assembly or C. 



Next Month 

My gray CoCo gave up the ghost 
recently and I now am the proud owner 
of a new white Co Co 2 with a matching 
expansion interface. Hopefully, I will be 
able to get on with my evaluation of 
Tandy's new 15-megabyte hard disk 
now and the fantastic new DISTO 
hardware from CRC so I can give you 
a report next month. Till then, keep on 
hacking. □ 



bsr screen2 display bad device name 

leax nomod,pcr address of error message 

bsr screen put on screen 

puis x retrieve param. pointer 

bra chkmore look for more params 

* IF NO PARAMETERS PRESENT 

prompt leax pmpt,pcr address of syntax prompt 

f bsr screen put prompt on screen 

bra noerr quit 



* SCREEN 
* 


PRINT 


ROUTINE 


screen 


ldy 


#255 max. length of prompt 


screen2 


Ida 


#2 standard error path 




os9 


i$writln put on screen 




bcs 


out quit with error 




rts 




* 






pmpt 


fee 


/Use: deiniz <dev.name> [...]/ 




feb 


$0a 




fee 


/ release device buffer(s)/ 




feb 


SJZfd 


nomod 


fee 


/: device not found/ 




feb 


$0d 




emod 




len 


equ 


* 



Listing 4: menu 

PROCEDURE menu 

PARAM choice:STRING[100] ; u: INTEGER 

DIM workchoice: STRING [100] 

DIM i: INTEGER 

DIM choices ( 20) : STRING 

workchoice~choice 

GOSUB 10 

PRINT CHR$(12) 

PRINT 

PRINT TAB (18),"** Menu **" \ PRINT 
i-1 

WHILE choices(i)0"" DO 

PRINT TAB(10),i; " :"; choices(i) 

i-i+1 

ENDWHILE 

PRINT 

u=0 

WHILE u<l OR u>i-l DO 

INPUT "Enter your choice: " ,u 

ENDWHILE 

choice-workchoice 
END 

10 (* convert string choice into array 
FOR i-1 TO 20 \choices(i)«"" \NEXT i 
i-1 

REPEAT 

choices(i)=>LEFT$ (choice, SUBSTR( "/", choice) -1) 
choice=«RIGHT$ (choice ,LEN( choice) -SUBSTR( , choice) ) 
i-i+1 

UNTIL i>~20 OR SUBSTR("/" , choice)-? 

choices ( i) -choice 

RETURN 



230 THE RAINBOW July 1986 





FOR c-0 TO 6 


Listing 5: printplaatje 


yc»y+c 

IF yc<191 THEN 

RUN gfx("gcolr" ,x,yc, color) 


PROCEDURE PrintPlaatja 


IF color-5 THEN g-g+t(c) \ ENDIF 


BASE ? 


END IF 


DIM path; BYTE 


NEXT c 


DIM x ,y,yc,c, color, g,t (7) : INTEGER 


char(x)-CHRS(g) 


DIM char(256) :STRING[1] 


NEXT x 


DIM space: STRING [112] 


PUT #oath . suace 


FOR c-JJ TO 6 \t(c)-2 A (6-c) \NEXT c 


PUT #path,char 


space-"" \ FOR y-1 TO 112 \space«space+CHR$(128) \NEXT y 


PRINT #path 


OPEN #path, "/p" : WRITE 


NEXT y 


FOR y-1 TO 4 \ PRINT #path \NEXT y 


PRINT #path,CHRS(30) 


PRINT #path,CHR$(18) 


FOR y-1 TO 10 \ PRINT #path \NEXT y 


FOR y-1 TO 4 \ PRINT #path \NEXT y 


CLOSE #path 


FOR y-189 TO JJ STEP -7 \ FOR x«j? TO 255 \g-128 


END 



Listing 6: display a 

* DISPIAY: a replacement utility that displays the HEXADECIMAL, DECIMAL 
>v or OCTAL value typed. 

■>v 6809 Assembly Language 

>v •* 

* Kevin Kuehl 

* 8J?6 Division Road JH 

* Valparaiso, IN 46383 

* February 5, 1986 

>v 

* CALLS: display C Clears the screen (HEX parameter) 
>v display J2fdl2 Clears the screen (DEC parameter) 
>v display J2fol4 Clears the screen (OCT parameter) 

NAM Display 

IFP1 

USE /DJ2f/DEFS/OS9Defs 
ENDC 

MOD disend , disnam, PRGRM+OBJCT , REENT+1 , disent , dismem 
disnam FCS /Display/ 

* DATA AREA 

* 

ORG 0 



OS-9™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full use of 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sector edit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO— Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboards and mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOStm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. OS-9 
driver and test software included. $199.00 

AM disk prices are for CoCo OS-9 format; for other formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, 
add $1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added 
for COD. 



D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



July 1986 THE RAINBOW 231 



* PROGRAM AREA 
* 

disent LDA #16 get HEX conversion factor 

STA convfac save as default value 

CLR total total « 0 
dis05 LDA ,X+ get next parameter character 

CMPA #$0D are we at its end? 

BEQ ending yes, then go 

CMPA #$20 do we have 'WHITE SPACE 1 ? 

BEQ dis05 yes, then get next one 

CMPA # f 0 do we convert to HEXADECIMAL? 

BEQ convloop no, then go 

LEAX -1,X push back to last character