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Canada $4 95 U.S. $3.95 




Figure costs 
on home utilities 



Computerize menu 
and grocery lists 




Estimate materials 
and costs for 

heme imp rove me 
Organize refund 




The Best Money Can Buy 





HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shask ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 
Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 
(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM . $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 



ADOS ROM (24 or 28 pin PROM) 




$40 



$99. 
$79. 



.$30. 
$30. 
$20. 
$40. 



ADOS is a product of SpectroSystems of Miami Florida 
and Is fully supported by the author. The HDS version of 
ADOS supports 2 drives, 40 track, 6ms trk-to-trk drives 
only, either Single Sided or Double Sided. 
TKBUG Monitor and DOS 1.0 

on PROM (24 or 28) $40. 

New, unique CoCo software monitor in ROM designed 
for a minimum of key strokes and fully compatible with the 
1.0 version of disk basic. Features 33 single key com- 
mands, allowing the user to quickly display and screen 
edit RAM In either hex or ASCII format. Also allows the 
user to dump screen or memory to printer, set break points, 
alter baud rate, set 64K RAM mode, and more, TKBUG 
by TOMMY KEETON. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



Ordering Information : 

Use our WATS line to place ''your order * ^ vn, MasterCard, 3 1 Wire Transfer. Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any nu>n ■ qgi i -'i-j funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COO orders are -gcce^len as well as purchase orders from 
government agents* to-- iiem* are gfilppnd off the shelf with the exception of hard 
drive products th&i gr? rusttei^ nu\\\. UPS greund is Dm Bflqjvurd means of shipping 
unless otherwise spacilied. Shipping mks Bwallaoffi wan wnuvil 



1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 



after 



after 




Tandy 200 24K$649 
Tandy 600 32K $1269 
ModeMOO 24K$425 





Tandy 1000 $685 
Tandy 1000HD$ 1539 
Tandy 1200HD $1599 





BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 1 Drive 128K 685.00 

Tandy 1000 HD 10 Meg. 256K 1539.00 

Tandy 3000 1 Drive 512K 1969.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-105 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 660.00 
Radio Shack DWP-220 Daisy Wheel469.00 
Silver Reed EXP-500P Daisy Wheel 229.00 

StarSG-10 245.00 

StarSG-15 410.00 

Panasonic P-1091 259.00 

Panasonic P-1092 339.00 

Toshiba 1340 439.00 

Okidata 192 375.00 

Epson LX-80 245.00 

Epson FX-85 369.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-3 Modem 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-5 Modem 99.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem Pac 79.00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 2212 315.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 139.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pack Interface 89.00 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69.95 
Radio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Amdek Color 300 Monitor 265.00 
Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor 139.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor 149.00 
Goldstar Amber Monitor 99.00 
Radio Shack VM-2 Green Monitor 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

Approach Control Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Slueth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Mark Data Graphic Adven. 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util by Mark Data 29.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerm by PXE Computing39.95 49.95 

TelePatch by Spectrum • 19.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 89.95 

Deft Extra 39.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0 59.95 

Max Edit by Derringer 1 9.95 

Elite Calc 69.95 69.95 

Elite Word 69.95 69.95 

Elite File (disk only) 74.50 

DynaCalc (disk only) 99.95 

Word Pack II by PBJ 134.95 

VIP Writer (tape & disk) 69.95 

VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Order any 2 software pieces listed 
and take 10% off their listed price. 
All Radio Shack software 10% off list. 
Send for complete list. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 





r r i 

[MoilvrCardj 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



- 



* 



Under 
The 




58 




100 




130 




Cover illustration copyright © 1986 
by Fred Crawford 



j— s The small cassette tape 
^ symbols beside features 
and regular columns Indicate that 
the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAIN- 
BOW on tape, ready to CLOAD and 
run, For full details, check our 
rainbow ON tape ad on Page 183. 



FEATURES 



Our 20 Carat Gold Winners/Jt/ffa Kapfhammer & Philip Helm 
ADVENTURE CONTEST REPORT The best of the best! 

The CoCo Zone/ Bruce K. Bell, O.D 



ADVENTURE CONTEST WINNER Enter into another dimension 



"SI The Maze of Moycullen/7rtomas £ Riley 



ADVENTURE CONTEST WINNER Solve the mystery of the maze 

fHI Loop Until Done/Bruce W. Ronald 



FINANCIAL PLANNING An IRA/Keogh Plan estimator 
[=>] House Value/Harry W. Hallstrom 



REAL ESTATE Assessing the market value of your home 
Zeroing in on Halley's Comet/ Ronald Pettus 



ASTRONOMY Compute the comet's exact location for best viewing 
[=1 College Expense Fund/ Jerry R. Whittlesey 



BU DGETING How to save for your children 's higher education 
[HI Refund-A-File/Dona/d A. Turowski 



HOME ECONOMICS Make a thrifty habit even more satisfying 
{=} Nouveau Rock 'n' Roll/8/7/ Bernico 



MUSIC Putting your tunes on the "radio 



ft 



HI Electrical Cost Calculator/Denn/s Anderson 



BUDGETING Figure cost projections on your home utilities 
Happy Birthday Balloons/Gary Huffman 



ENTERTAINMENT Graphics and the traditional birthday music 
[=] Plantlog/La/ry £ Jones. 



HOME HELP The plants are always greener on the CoCo side 
HI Bassmate/ Tommy Grouser 



RECREATION The lure of computerized bait selection 



HI Doing the Disk-O-Step/Dave Trapasso. 



DISK UTILITY Not a dance, but a disk alignment aid 
[=1 Julie "The Moused/Stephen P. Clark 



DATABASE The convenience of using "point and press" 
Hire the CoCo-Handiman/Leonard Hyre 



HOME HELP Estimate materials and costs for home improvements 
The Computerized Shopping Lls\/Dennis H. Weide 



HOME HELP Let CoCo do the thinking on your next grocery trip 



20 



26 



58 



70 



79 



83 



92 



95 



100 



102 



122 



124 



130 



149 



157 



162 



216 



NEXT MONTH: The smell of the ink ribbon, the roar of the printer! Our 
May issue will feature some "printer's devil" delights. We'll highlight printer 
capabilities with screen dump programs, crossword puzzle generators and 
much morel May will include our usual abundance of useful programs and 
games, hardware and software product reviews. 

Look to the rainbow for the printed word — the best source of information 
anywhere for the Color Computer. 



COLUMNS 



H BASIC Training/ Joseph Kolar 



Practicing the two-column format 

Building April's Rainbow/Jaffa Kapfhammer _ 

A many-hued preview of this month's offerings 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



142 



16 



Presenting the "Delphi Advantage" 

Education Notes/Sfeve Blyn 

Locating points on a graph 

Education Overview/ Michael Plog, Ph.D. 

The demographics of education 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 



116 



136 



139 



12 



The makings of memory and how it works 
\sl Wishing Well/Fred B. Scerbo 



104 



118 



Life Skills: Learning the value of numbers 



DEPARTMENTS 

Advertiser Index 

Back Issue Information 
CoCo Clubs 



CoCo Gallery 
Corrections. 



Letters to Rainbow 
One-Liner Contest 
Information 



256 
197 
173 
114 
103 
_6 



Received & Certified. 
Reviewing Reviews- 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



Subscription Information 
These Fine Stores 



180 
182 

167 
207 
254 



.190 



RAINBOWTECH 



[=] Barden's Buffer/ William Barden, Jr. 
Pi to 10,000 digits 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 

KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

Featuring a trig library in C 

"Accessible Applications" will return next month. 



228 



224 



238 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Product Review Contents 



179 



The 


ou /a y 

— > » * \ — iU, 


kd6&^ — 




April 1986 Vol. V No. 9 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor Tamara Renee Dunn 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Reviews Editor E. Monica Dorth 
Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk, 

Judi Hutchinson, Angela Kapfhammer, 

Shirley Morgan 
Technical Editor Dan Downard 
Technical Assistants Cray Augsburg, Ed EHers 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, Joseph Kolar, 

Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, Fred Scerbo, 

Richard White 
Consulting Editors Danny Humphress, 

Belinda C. Kirby, T. Kevin Nickols 

Art Director Jerry McKiernan 
Designers Tracey Jones, Heidi Maxedon, 

Kevin Quiggins, Sandra Underwood 
Production Assistant Cindy Jett 

Chief of Typography Debbie Hartley 
Typography Services Jody Doyle, 
Suzanne Benish Kurowsky 



President 



Faisoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 
RAINBOWfest Coordinator Judy Brashear 

Editorial Director James E. Reed 
Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 
Creative Director Jerry McKiernan 
Public Relations Manager Holly J. Weaver 

Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Accounts Payable/A DP Lisa Ragan 

Fulfillment Services Director Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Fulfillment Services Asst. Dir. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
RAINBOW ON TAPE Production Doug Orr 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Monica Wheat, Pam Workhoven 

Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 

Director Cindy Shackieford 

Advertising Representative Shirley Duranseau 

For RAINBOW Advertising 
and Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 256 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Faisoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone {502) 
228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and the rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSuFT, Inc., 1986. THE RAINBOW is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever, • Tandy, Color BASIC, Extended Color BASIC and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. CompuServe is a registered 
® trademark of CompuServe Inc. • Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries 
is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and 
their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only, 



LETTERS TO THE M/k 




CoCo Sherlock 
Misses the Color Clue 



Editor: 

I have been working on programs that use 
artificial color in PMDDE 4 for some time 
now. I know the colors switch randomly 
when you press Reset or turn the computer 
off. Is there any way for the program to 
detect if the color is reversed other than the 
standard "If the border is blue press Reset. 
If the border is red press any key." 

Jeremy Spiller 
Shirley, MA 

Editor's Note: The artifacted col- 
ors are due to the signal received 
by the television or monitor, thus 
the computer has no way of detect- 
ing which is set. 

Editor: 

I was wondering if there is a POKE to stop 
the LIST command. » 

Scott Henry 
Hermitage, PA 

Editor's Note: Try POKE 383,158 
to disable and POKE 3B3.0 to 
restore the LIST command. 

Editor: 

When I POKE with an &H in the POKE, my 
computer gives me a syntax error. For that 
matter, anything with an &H in it gives me 
an SN Error. Could you tell me what is 
wrong? 

Matt Chesmore 
Rowley, I A 

Editor's Note: The &H prefix only 
works with Extended Color basic. 



BACK TALK 

Editor: 

In the December 1985 issue of THE rain- 
bow [Page 6], a reader asked if there have 
been any improvements to the "Simple Text 
Processor" that was published in the Janu- 
ary 1985 issue [Page 103]. Yes, I have revised 
it in many ways. I have added a page pause 
feature for printing on single sheets of paper. 
I have changed the underlining code from 
and *>• signs to a single SHIFT@ key control, 
which appears on the screen as a square 
block. I have added sound for the main 
menu (sounds beep if wrong key is pressed). 
Any ASCII file (like basic programs) can be 
loaded from the disk. I have also added a 
slashed zero feature for typewriters that do 
not print slashed zeros. The revised Text Pro 
is completely position-independent. If 
anyone is interested in these changes, con- 
tact me at 1423 N. Cleveland Street, 92667, 
(714) 639-3996. 

Ashok Basargekar 
Orange, CA 

No Envy Necessary 

Editor: 

I read the rainbow front to back as soon 
as it arrives in the mail. Tom Heiliger's letter 
in the February 1986 issue, Page 6, stuck out 
because of the word "envious" in reference 
to the Amiga. I was sure that word was 
reserved for other computer owners to use 
when speaking of the CoCo! 

Mr. Heiliger has had his CoCo for over 
a year and should be reminded to dig deeper 
into the rainbow for the scoop about 
multitasking, A few drives here and there 



and the OS-9 system should make Tom 
stand up and drop his envy. Tom, get ready 
for 35-meg hard drives, two Deluxe RS-232 
Paks, a modem and a couple of different 
printers all at the same time. With the new 
2.0 Version of OS-9, 1 doubt the CoCo will 
be obsolete anytime in the near future! 

Mike Redelsheimer 
St. Louis, MO 

Gathering the PEEKs, POKEs 
and EXECs 

Editor: 

In the December 1985 issue my letter 
appeared on collecting PEEKs, POKEs and 
EXECs. For this, I thank you. The response 
I received was terrific, and because of that, 
this should be a super list. I am writing to 
let everyone know who sent me a list that 
I have a good start on the organization of 
all the data I've received. Rest assured that 
some day you will get a cumbersome letter 
in the mail and my proposition will be 
fulfilled. 

To those who didn't see my previous 
letter, refer to "Letters to the Rainbow" in 
the December 1985 issue, Page 8. You can 
also find my address there. I Ve decided I will 
make a deadline of April 30. Any contribu- 
tions received after that will go on an 
updated list. 

David Mount 
West Monroe, NY 



Choosing Chips 



Editor: 

I wish Tandy would have updated their 



6 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Color Computers with ROM chips contain- 
ing features such as those found in CoCo 
Max. Also, it would be nice if they could 
make the Color Computer easier to program 
by doing away with the FDR -TO -NEXT loop 
and substituting a simple statement. This 
would help to bring BASIC closer to English. 
I find it very hard to follow three- 
dimensional graphics programs that require 
initial values to be set for a number of 
parameters. Maybe they should think about 
an extended graphics chip. In fact, it would 
be nice to have a choice of chips to tailor 
your computer. 

Travis Burford 
Valhalla, NY 



Delphi Enthusiast 

Editor: 

Congratulations on the great work your 
staff is doing on the CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
It's fantastic! If there are any CoCo enthu- 
siasts out there who haven't joined yet, I 
encourage them to do so immediately! 

Leonard K. Huh 
Dallas, TX 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

For those readers who are using Roger 
Schrag's great Super Patch EDTASM+ 
[September 1983, Page 66], I have a hint as 
to how to change the Baud rate to suit their 
printing needs. 

First, load Super Patch but do not exe- 
cute, then POKE &HE26 , x ; with 'x' being the 
new Baud rate code. Poking &H2G , 1 will, for 
example, change the Baud rate to 9600. 
Next, resave the program using 5RVEM 
"name " , &HE00 , &H37FF , &HE00. 

Lee Glawe 
Waukesha, WI 

Extraordinary Print 

Editor: 

I have a little hint that anyone with a 
DM P- 105 printer and Color Scripsit may be 
interested in. If you are tired of the ordinary 
print style that is selected automatically 
when the printer is powered up, here is relief 
for your boredom. Turn your computer and 
printer on and enter the printer character 
style code. For example, here is the code for 
bold type: PRINT tt-2, CHR$(27); 
CHR$ ( 31 ) . After that, turn off the computer 
without turning off the printer. Insert Color 
Scripsit and turn the computer on. If you 
follow these instructions, when you print 
your document, it prints in the typestyle 
selected. 

Jason Johnston 
Lillooet, British Columbia 

Error Subterfuge 

Editor: 

I have a tip for those with ADOS from 
Spectrosystems who use the ERROR com- 
mand. You may have already noticed that 
the RENUM command totally ignores any line 
number after ERROR while it rearranges all 



the rest. To get around this, edit your line 
with the ERROR command in it and directly 
after it, place a GOTO or G05UB to the same 
line. For example, if Line 10 reads ERROR 
1340 then edit it to read ERROR 1340 : GOTO 
1340. When the computer completes the 
RENUM, just edit Line 10 and rematch the line 
numbers, deleting the additional GOTO. 

Eric Santanen 
Stanhope, NJ 

Green Screen 

Editor: 

A small tip that some CoCo- Lisp users 
may find handy. Initially, the Co Co-Lisp 
screen is set to Hi-Res buff. Since this causes 
artifact colors, the following function can be 
defined to make the screen green: 

(DEFINE '( 

(GREEN (LfiMBDR ( ) (POKE &HFF22 
244))) 

n 

The function GREEN can then be called by: 
(GREEN) 

Eric Richards 
Auburn, AL 

A Friend in DeskMate 

Editor: 

Just a quick note about a piece of software 
I've come across, DeskMate. 

I've grown weary of complex writers such, 
as VIP. DeskMate is very simple, but serves 
most of my needs. The documentation is 
good but almost not needed; help is to be 
had almost everywhere. The 32 characters 
across is fine because I'm not on a tablecloth. 

The part I don't like is the PAINT file. It 
uses memory and is a waste. The $100 price 
tag is deceiving though — my deluxe joy- 
stick doesn't compare to a mouse. 

Go ahead and review it. You will find little 
use for the documentation because it's so 
friendly. 

Gary Pagac 
SPO, WA 

Editor's Note: Read the review of 
DeskMate on Page 198 of this 
issue. 



Assembler Agony 

Editor: 

In reference to the assembly article, 
"What's the Diagnosis?" Page 67 of the 
February 1986 issue, I've been had again. 
the rainbow is ahead of the tape this month 
and as the program looked interesting, I 
loaded ED TA SM and got at it — spent three 
hours typing and when I tried to assemble 
it, it bombed. This has happened to me 
several times. I can make it if the program 
is for Radio Shack's EDTASM or there are 
instructions for changing the things that 
won't work as printed. Colin Stearman 
didn't use it but explained how to make it 
work. 

I realize there are several assemblers out 
there and most may be better than the 



EDTASM. However, I can't help but believe 
that we must be a large portion of your 
readers. It would be nice if the assembler the 
author used was noted in the first part of the 
article even if he won't or can't tell us what 
needs to be changed for EDTASM. At the 
time I bought my CoCo, I was living out in 
the sticks in western Nebraska and could 
find no one who could answer my questions 
about assembly language programming. I 
bought CCEAD, which was a waste of 
money since when it arrived they said, "Here 
it is, if you don't understand it, go buy a 
book." I did that but the books at that time 
started at the middle and worked from there. 
Didn't really get off the ground till I got a 
DOS assembler. However, there were more 
and more good programs coming that I was 
unable to convert to this DOS (it's tough to 
teach an old dog new tricks). 

I now have the Disk BASIC and use Stear- 
man's mod part of the time. I live close to 
a CoCo club with over 60 members and have 
all kinds of expert help. 

William P. Frame 
Niceville, FL 



A Closer Look 

Editor: 

I would like to make a suggestion for your 
reviews section in rainbow. I think you 
should consider using photographs of the 
actual product to help describe your reviews. 
This would help the reader from paying $30 
or more for a program and finding that he 
or she could have gotten a better version of 
the same game or utility for a comparable 
price. I think the rainbow is an excellent 
magazine, and I particularly enjoyed the 
Princeton RAINBOWfest last October. 

Erik McCullough 
Lafayette Hill, PA 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I own a Color Computer 2 with a DWP- 
220. I'm a high school Spanish teacher and 
have been trying to get a listing for some 
Spanish software and Spanish character 
print wheels for my printer but have been 
unsuccessful. Any help in this matter would 
be greatly appreciated. Write to me at 24 
Howe Road, 11727. 

Anna R. Cuyar 
Coram, NY 

Come Fly with Me 

Editor: 

I have owned a CoCo for about a year 
now and think it's about the most useful tool 
I've ever owned. I also fly airplanes in my 
spare time and would like to combine both 
hobbies, except that I have not seen a 
program written for the CoCo concerning 
flight planning. I have seen many ads for 
aircraft flight planning written for just about 
any computer you can name. Surely CoCo 
can handle the job! 

Does anyone know of any programs that 
exist concerning this issue? Any help would 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 7 



be greatly appreciated. My address is 39 
Edgewood Road, 63701. 

Eric Thompson 
Cape Girardeau, MO 

Credit Lines 

Editor: 

I have owned my CoCo for a little over 
a year. I use it mostly for writing letters (on 
Telewriter-64), doing spreadsheets (on 
Elite* Calc) and for financial work. Since I 
don't have time to learn to program, I must 
rely on either commercial software or 
articles in THE RAINBOW. 

I am currently looking for a program to 
provide a payment schedule for lines of 
credit. It must be able to list each monthly 
payment and the amount of interest and 
principal for each payment for the life of the 



loan (similar to many amortization pro- 
grams). It must also be able to handle 
increases in the balance outstanding (i.e., 
drawing on the line), pre-payments, changes 
in the interest rate on a monthly basis and 
variances in the term of the line. I own a gray 
box CoCo, upgraded to 64K, with a cassette 
system. I would appreciate any assistance 
you could provide. My address is 55 Glaston 
Court, 12186-9567. 

Lee B. Pearsall 
Voorheesville, NY 

A Last Resort? 

Editor: 

I would like to know if there are any good 
programs for running a resort. I think I 
would need a very good calendar program. 
You have to put down (on paper) when, how 



long and where (which cottage) people are 
staying. I am using a 64K CoCo tape-based 
system with an Epson LX-80 printer. Send 
any information to me at 14329 Cleveland, 
60469. 

Craig J. Vincek 
Posen, IL 



'Bridging' the Gap 

Editor: 

I am a bridge game buff and an owner of 
the Radio Shack CoCo 2 64K computer. 
Why is it that I cannot find a game manu- 
facturer that produces a software game 
which will randomly deal over 1,000,000- 
plus deals of bridge hands that I can either 
bid or defend against with the aid of the 
computer? 



NEXT 



°io, 



presents 



*2 ft 



i r« 



s 



v. 



K 4* 



Eg 



ft*' 



Actual screen graphic! 



.\\v\v 



Are you tired of being forced to constantly type directions or pick up and put down provisions? 
Are you frustrated at discovering the right logic only to be stumped by the game's vocabulary? 
Plateau of the Past eliminates these annoyances without sacrificing excitement. If you enjoy the 
challenge of a fast-paced adventure, then this game is for you! 



Prepare yourself! The journey ahead of you will surely be perilous. You are hereby forewarned 
of possible encounters with strange beasts! If you survive these dangers, you must still find the 
missing idols and attempt to reach the forbidden village. Good luck, you'll need it! 



Terms: Cash, Check, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD 
ADD $2.00 Shipping & Handling US and Canada 
ADD $5.00 Shipping & Handling outside the US and Canada 
'ADD $3.00 COD charge 
Illinois residents add 6.25% sales tax 

Software Authors, call or write for info. 



^7 — TM 


j 









ZYTEK LTD. 
P.O. BOX 701 
BLUE ISLAND, IL 
60406 



Plateau of the Past 
$26.95 32K DISK ONLY 

Call Mon. thru Sat. (9-5) 
(312)597-1919 
Also order by mail 



8 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Such games are available for the Commo- 
dore 64K, Apple, IBM PC and Zenith 
computers but not for the Radio Shack 
Tandy PC. I already own Bridge Tutor from 
Radio Shack and am looking for something 
a little more sophisticated to sharpen my 
skills. Anyone knowing of one, write to me 
at 9587 Via Bernardo, 91504. 

Matt Kusior 
Burbank, CA 

Editor: 

I was just reading the February 1986 issue 
of rainbow and I noticed a lot of requests 
for specialty programs for farming and 
ranching. I am not a professional scientist, 
I am not even an amateur one, but I do like 
science, especially astronomy, and I would 
like to see more software about the sciences. 
There are plenty of kiddy programs, but I 
would like serious explanatory, discovery or 
self-teaching programs that would delve 
deeply into a subject [so one could] really 
learn it thoroughly. 

I don't know where you can get a college 
level, self-teaching program for the CoCo, 
or an upper division geology, physics, 
astronomy, biology, engineering, electron- 
ics, oceanography course, etc. Are there any 
such courses or programs and where can I 
purchase them? My address is 7136 Tait 
Street, 92111. 

Thomas F. Heiliger 
San Diego, CA 



No Sleeping on the Job 

Editor: 

I have a new colon (:). Fact is, I had it all 
the time but I didn't know where to put it. 
For six months I lay sleepless — worry, 
worry, worry! 

Then in "Corrections" for rainbow Feb- 
ruary 1986 [Page 168], the Delbourgos said 
if I would refer to Line 150 in Earthrot 
(August 1985, Page 73) and put it between 
THEN and CSflVEM, it would solve my prob- 
lem. 

Glory be! It sent my world spinning. If I 
knew what to POKE to slow it down, I could 
go back to sleep. 

M.S. "Mac" McPherson 
Dallas, TX 



The Underestimated Printer 

Editor: 

Each month as I page through the rain- 
bow, I see several ads for various printers 
to use with the CoCo but hardly any for the 
Toshiba printers. I recently bought a To- 
shiba PI 340 and, having investigated all the 
other printers that are popular among CoCo 
owners, I must say there is no other printer 
that even approaches it for the combination 
of quality and speed. Furthermore, if you 
buy the serial version of the printer, all you 
need to run it are the right plugs correctly 
wired on a serial cable. No special interface 
is necessary. With the Toshiba's ability to 
print letter quality (not near-letter quality) 
and the fonts and character sets it offers, 
which can be accessed via the control codes 
in a word processor such as Telewriter-64, 
it's hard to imagine any printer offering 
more versatility and quality for the CoCo 
owner. 

I am writing this letter for two reasons: 
First, there may be other CoCo owners who 
have wanted to get this particular printer but 
have received conflicting advice from sales- 
people about whether or not it runs with the 
CoCo. The answer is yes, not only does it 
run with the CoCo, it runs beautifully. It is 
only a matter of having the right cable and 
setting the right DIP switches. 

Second, the Toshiba also has excellent 
capability for graphics, but as far as I can 
find out, none of the standard CoCo graph- 
ics programs will drive it. I have ViziDraw 
and that doesn't work. It seems a shame to 
have two excellent graphics tools as the 
CoCo and the Toshiba and not have them 
working together. Is there anyone out there 
who has the Toshiba and has written a 
graphics printer driver for it? If so, I would 
appreciate hearing from you. My address is 
119 Queenlily Road, 19057. 1 would also be 
glad to offer any help to anyone who wants 
to know about running the Toshiba with the 
CoCo and, in particular, with Telewriter-64 
(a marriage made in computer heaven). 

John Beuttler 
Levittown, PA 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

My friend has recently purchased a 64K 
upgrade from Radio Shack for his CoCo 2. 
The chips came without instructions. If you 
could supply instructions it would be greatly 
appreciated. 

Ezra Dreisbach 
Vashon, WA 

Editor's Note: Check out Ed Filers' 
article, "RAM/ROM Upgrade 
Roundup," May 1984, Page 49. 

Editor: 

Having both Graphicom and Graphicom 
II, I am very interested in the incredible 
graphics that are being sent in [for "CoCo 
Gallery I would like to know if there is any 
way of getting these "works of computer 
art." 

One of my motivating reasons [for this] 
appeared in the July 1985 RAINBOW [Page 
179], this being Hal Katschke's "Hood." I 
would be very proud to be able to add this 
portrait to my own CoCo Gallery. 

Thank you for producing a magazine 
worthy of the Color Computer. Keep up the 
informative articles and, especially, the 
"CoCo Gallery." 

Lance Mc Comber 
Prince George, British Columbia 

Editor's Note: Many BBSs around 
the country have picture libraries 
as downloads. We are considering 
putting out a "CoCo Gallery Col- 
lection" disk. Stay tuned. 

Editor: 

I recently purchased a disk drive for my 
CoCo, which has been modified for 64K, 
and would like to purchase a good editor/ 
assembler on disk but haven't seen any ads. 
I'm interested in those available by mail 
order as I'm stationed on Adak Island 
(Aleutian chain) and computer stores just 
aren't available! Can you recommend any 
6809 editor/ assemblers for disk? 

John Bow den 
FPO Seattle, WA 

Editor's Note: It would not be fair 
for us to recommend one of our 



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April 1986 THE RAINBOW 



advertisers' products over another. 
They are there in the ads. If you 
want, you could try OS-9. It comes 
with a built-in editor/ assembler. 

Code for Condensing 

Editor: 

In your January 1986 issue of rainbow, 
Page 210, there is a one-liner program called 
Labeler. I am using a CoCo 64K model 
#3127 and a D MP- 105 printer. The program 
works just fine. My question is, what 
changes can I make to have the printing in 
either condensed or compressed type instead 
of standard print? 

Harry Marcus 
Las Vegas, NV 

Editor's Note: Check your printer 
manual to find the codes required 
to accomplish these styles. Then 
just add lines at the beginning of 
the program, such as: 

PRINTB-2, CHR$(X)CHR$(Y) 

where 'X' is the escape code (27) 
and 'Y' is the code for what you 
want the printer to do. 



Scoreboard Blues 

Editor: 

I was disappointed to discover that both 
"Scoreboard" and "Scoreboard Pointers" 



were missing from the February 1986 issue. 
I know you said in an earlier issue that the 
two had a low readership, but this was 
according to a survey taken at a RAIN- 
BOWfest, and I would doubt the validity of 
this survey in connection with the overall 
readership of the magazine . . . 

Richard Salomon 
Plymouth, IN 

Editor: 

I have had a subscription to THE rainbow 
for a little under a year . . . one of my 
favorite parts is "Scoreboard" and "Score- 
board Pointers." I was so surprised when I 
looked for it in the February 1986 issue and 
found that you had canceled it. I think the 
"Scoreboard" was a very good part of the 
rainbow, and that it should be continued. 
With "Scoreboard" and "Scoreboard Poin- 
ters" gone, I think there will be a big hole 

in THE RAINBOW. 

Brent Brown 
Boise, ID 

Editor's Note: "Scoreboard" and 
"Scoreboard Pointers" have not 
been discontinued; they are now 
bimonthly columns. Look for 
them next month. 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

I welcome THE rainbow's arrival each 
month, especially the article dealing with 



machine language programming and utili- 
ties. It was terrific news to hear William 
Barden, Jr. is writing a monthly column in 
THE rainbow. Your staff becomes better 
each month. Keep up the excellent work. 

James A. Connolly 
Prince Edward Island, Canada 



Waiting Room Recreation 

Editor: 

... I was considering buying a CoCo for 
my medical practice to keep records, etc., 
and knowing there is a fine magazine like 
yours backing up the product clinches the 
idea. I'm also considering putting a CoCo 
with games in a special area in the waiting 
room for my younger patients to enjoy while 
waiting . . . 

Dr. Mario F. Pistilli 
Joliet, IL 



THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 

Letters to the editors may also be sent to 
us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: 

EDITORS. 

Continued on Page 252 



ARTS AND LETTERS 



Frederic Zalac 
2b<* ParKdaie 




Envelope of the Month r , . ~ , 

v Frederic Zalac 

Rosemere, Quebec 



1 0 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



nothing beats 
a Tandy printer* 




Tandy printers make fine print quality, 
graphics and high performance affordable. 



For your best value and selection in 
top-quality printers, shop your local 
Radio Shack Computer Center. We've 
got what you need, whatever your print- 
ing requirements. 

Versatile Business Printer 

The DMP 430* (26-1277, $899) is a 
132-column dot-matrix printer with an 
18-wire print head that delivers supe- 
rior correspondence characters. Choose 
from micro, italic and double-high fonts, 
as well as bit-image graphics. In the 
draft mode, the DMP 430 delivers a fast 
180 characters per second. 

Low-Cost, Triple-Mode 

Personal Printer 

The DMP 130* (26-1280, $349.95) 
lets you choose from word processing, 



data processing and dot-addressable 
graphics. Prints in four character styles: 
standard or italic cursive in draft or cor- 
respondence modes. 

Budget-Priced High Performer 

The DMP 105 (26-1276, $199.95} is 
ideal for data processing and general- 
purpose use. Features a bit-image 
graphics mode, too. 

High-Resolution Ink-Jet Printer 

The CGP 220 (26-1268, $599) quietly 
prints text and graphics in yellow, vio- 
let, red, green, cyan, magenta and 
black! And because there's no ribbon to 
wear out or become contaminated, the 
print quality remains excellent. 

See the complete selection of printers 
and accessories at Radio Shack today. 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



r 

i 

i 

i 
i 

i 
■ 
i 
■ 



Free 1986 computer 
catalog! 
Send me a copy. 

Mail To: Radio Shack 

Dept. 86-A-904A 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, Texas 76102 



Name 



"I 
I 

1 

I 



Company 
Address _ 
City 



State 
2IP_ 



Phone 



1 

I 
1 
I 
I 
I 





Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and at participating stores and dealers. DMP 430 requires special order at some locations. *IBM Compatible. 

IBM/Reaistered TM International Business Machines Corp. 



CoCo Forever! 



Iwas having lunch with Bob and Gerry, Sr. this week. Bob is the 
president of our printing company and Gerry, Sr. (sometimes known 
simply as "Senior") is the top VP. Naturally, the subject of magazines 
in general, and computer magazines in particular, came up. 

Before there even was a Senior at the company, Bob did us a big favor 
and "took in" THE RAINBOW when we were having some bad printing 
problems. 

As many of you know, the first few issues were "printed" on a photocopy 
machine at the local drug store. After that, we went to a "traditional" 
printer for a few issues, but growth was so rapid that we needed what is 
called a "web" press to keep down costs. We found a web printer locally 
who could provide high-quality newsprint (white and fairly thick as 
opposed to the gray thin stuff you get with your newspaper). We were there 
for about three months, although Bob's company did the cover and bound 
the magazine together. 

One day there was a big problem. The cover "slid" cockeyed when it 
was folded over the inside of the magazine because the cover was of slick 
paper and the insides were "full of air." Our web printer needed something 
called a perforator wheel to cut air holes in the pages and, without it, the 
insides were blooming out and caused the cover to slide. 

We were printing something like 15,000 copies of THE RAINBOW at the 
time — a pretty small press run for Bob's company. For the kind of big 
magazine presses they had (also web presses, by the way), they needed to 
run at least 20,000 for it to be worthwhile for them and for us. In addition, 
we had enough newsprint to print one more issue of THE RAINBOW and 
Bob's presses would require an immense cleanup if he used the paper that 
was on hand. Yet, he did it, and we've been with Bob's company ever since. 

Bob had perforator wheels, of course. After one more issue of "newsprint 
insides" we went to "slick" pages — and a month after that we were past 
the 20,000 copies we needed to make using Bob's plant really economical. 

It has been a good relationship for both of us, of course. We've got a 
local printer who "understands" us (most of the time), and Bob's company 
gets about one-fourth of its gross revenue from us. They also print our 
other publications, PCM, SOFT SECTOR and VCR. 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 




3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full -screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 




64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVII/VIII, DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and muiti-tine headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su r e saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append Hies with disk 
and /or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes.'* This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



...truly a state of the art word processor, 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you 
have questions, or would like to order by 
Visa or Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 
(weekdays, 8AM-4PM PST). Dealer 
inquiries invited. 

(Add $2 for shipping. Californians add 6% 

state tax.) 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a 
trademark of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy 
Corp; MX-80 is a trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



The conversion to "slick" pages also 
began the biggest period of growth in 
THE rainbow's history. We went from 
15,000 paid circulation to just short of 
50,000 in less than a year. Now, we 
hover between 70,000 and 80,000 a 
month. 

It was somewhere around this time 
that Senior arrived on the scene and, 
seeing all this growth, looked for some 
other computer magazines to print. 
They did one, briefly, but that was all. 
Still, Senior read a lot of computer 
magazines for quite some time. 

Therefore, I thought it was pretty 
interesting when he told me the other 
day that he thinks he understands why 
THE RAINBOW (and its sister publica- 
tions) has prospered in a market where 
others seem to fall by the wayside right 
and left. 

"It really isn't like a computer mag- 
azine at all," Senior said. "It's more 
like a catalog. It has bright colors, 
interesting ads, things for people to do. 
It's so different from most of the com- 
puter magazines I've read that it almost 



isn't a computer magazine. It's some- 
thing else entirely." 



"We're all something 
special, we Color 
Computer people. And 
our computer is 
special, too." 



I just smiled. Senior doesn't have a 
computer to call his own (I've been 
working on it, though), so he can't really 
understand. But what it is is the CoCo 
Community. We're all something spe- 
cial, we Color Computer people. And 



our computer is special, too. After all, 
do you know anyone who loves his or 
her IBM PC? I don't. 

With some measure of apologies to 
the many people whose allegiance to 
CoCo is shared with their following of 
the New England Patriots, we CoCo 
people are a lot like the Chicago Bears 
— we're the "Grabowskis" of the com- 
puter world. But just look what the 
Grabowskis can do — with our compu- 
ter or with our football team! 

No, I do not expect that we'll ever 
have a ticker tape parade through 
downtown Ft. Worth. But maybe we 
should. 

We shut out Commodore in the first 
round of the play-offs, did the same to 
Atari in the second and have pretty well 
smeared Apple, too, although they did 
score a couple of times. 

I don't know if the Bears are starting 
on a dynasty, but the CoCo is certainly 
well down that road. 

Bear down, CoCo! CoCo forever! 

— Lonnie Falk 




r 



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— the international, independent magazine for Dragon owners. 



Each issue of Dragon User contains: 

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Dragon User, % Business Press International, 205 E. 42nd St., New "York, NY 10017." 






14 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 




YOU COULD FALL IN LOVE WITH 

AUTOTERM! 

IT TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 




SMARTEST 
TERMINAL 



GOOD 
LOOKIN' 



AUTOTERM shows true upper/ 
lower case in screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, or 64 characters with 
no split words. The width of 32 
has extra large letters. Scrolling is 
forward, backward, and fast. Block 
graphics pictures are displayed 
automatically and can be scrolled. 

The screen's top line shows 
operating mode, unused memory 
size, memory on/off, and caps- 
lock on/off. It also gives helpful 
prompts. 



SWEET 
TALKIN' 



KEY-BEEP can be on/off. Unac- 
ceptable keystrokes cause a lower 
pitched BOP! This ERROR- 
BEEBOP can be on/off. 

Talks to other computers with 
Full or Half Duplex; Baud Rate of 
110, 150, 300, 600, 1200; Parity as 
even, odd, mark, space, none; 7 
or 8 bit Word; any Stop Bits; all 
128 ASCII characters; true line 
Break; XON/XOFF protocol; and 
optional line-at-a-time transmis- 
sion. Able to send and receive 
text, block graphics, BASIC and 
ML programs. A 64K machine 
holds up to 45,000 characters 
(33,300 in HI-RES). 

DUAL PROCESSING lets you 
review & edit while more data is 
coming in. 

XMODEM for disk file transfer. 



Fully supports D.C. Hayes and 
other intelligent modems. 

Talks to your printer with any 
page size, margins, line spacing, 
split word avoidance. Embed your 
printer's control sequences for 
boldface, underlining, etc. Narrow 
text can be automatically spread 
out. 

You'll also use Autoterm 
for simple word processing 
and record keeping 

You can display directories, 
delete files, transmit directly from 
disk, and work with files larger 
than memory. Easily maintain a 
disk copy of an entire session. 

Compatible with TELEWRITER 
(ASCII) & other word processors. 

SMOOTH 
WALK IN' 

AUTOTERM moves smoothly 
and quickly between word proces- 
sing and intelligent terminal 
action. Create text, correct your 
typing errors; then connect to the 
other computer, upload your text, 
download information, file it, and 
sign-off; then edit the received 
data, print it in an attractive 
format, and/or save it on file. 

Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly, too! 
Any operating parameter, such as 
screen width, can be altered at 
any time. Uncompleted com- 
mands can be cancelled. 




PUTTY IN 
YOUR HANDS 



The word processor can be 
used to create, print, and/or save 
on file your personal KSMs. They 
let AUTOTERM act like you. For 
example, it can dial through your 
modem, sign-on, interact, perform 
file operations, & sign-off; an 
entire session without your help. 
KSMs can answer the phone, 
prompt the caller, take messages, 
save them, hang-up, and wait for 
the next call. The KSM potential 
is unbelievable! 

NO OTHER COMPUTER IN 
THE WORLD CAN MATCH 
YOUR COCO'S AUTOMATIC 
TERMINAL CAPABILITIES!!! 



WHAT THE 
REVIEWERS SAY 

"AUTOTERM is the Best of Class." 

Graham, RAINBOW, 6/83 

"The AUTOTERM buffer system is 
the most sophisticated — and one of 
the easiest to use. 

Banta, HOT CoCo, 9/84 

"Almost a full featured word 
processor. . ." 
Ellers, RAINBOW, 11/84 

"AUTOTERM's excellent error- 
handling routines, thorough docu- 
mentation, and logical, easy-to-use 
command structure make it stand 
out." 

Parker, HOT CoCo, 5/85 



AVAILABLE IN CANADA 

from 

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Edmonton, Alberta 



CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

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11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Please hire the mentally retarded. They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! Phyllis 




Educational Programs 



^ Questions ? ? 

• * 0 

Questions — a powerful, easy to use, 
authoring program! Questions has as 

many uses as its owners have creativity. 
Teachers have used Questions to develop 
pre and post tests, to make copies of the 
same test with questions in a different 
order, and to review and reinforce difficult 
lessons with their students. But Questions 
is not limited to school uses. Enterprising 
people have found other uses for it. Party- 
givers have used it to personalize games 
for baby and wedding showers, and for 
creating their own trivia games. Adminis- 
trators "have used it for inservice training. 
Children have written their own riddles 
with it. If you own Questions, you'll find a 
way to use it. You will also be pleased with 
its many fine features: 

* Word processing commands that al- 
low you to make changes as you type 

* Screen commands so you do not have 
to constantly refer to the manual 

* Options to take the quiz on the com- 
puter or to print a hard copy of it 

* Sequential or random presentation of 
questions 

* The ability to print the same test with 
questions in a different order 

* The printing of an answer key 

* The option to use expanded printer 
lettering to create large print tests. 

* The ability to save quizzes to cassette 
or disk 

* A review feature which permits stu- 
dents to study questions that have 
oeen missed 

* A record keeping system 

* Multiple choice, true/false, or fill 
in the blank formats. 

Questions is truly a professional authoring 
program that meets the needs of all of its 
users. 

16K ECB - Cass. $19.95 
32K ECB - Cass. $24.95 
32K Disk - $26.95 

Reading Comprehension Series 
Grades 2 - 4 

B5's Reading Comprehension Series is a 

set of data fifes to be used with the Ques- 
tions program described above. Each file 
contains over 100 questions, organized 
into 6 to 8 sequential lessons. Lessons 
build from simple to complex. This series 
emphasizes the thinking aspect of reading . 
Simple sentence structure allows the stu- 
dent to concentrate on thinking skills. 

Main idea ★ Sequencing 
Fact & Opinion * Cause & Effect 

Each Title: Cassette - $10.95 
Disk $12.95 
Complete Series of 4 Titles: 
Cass. - $39.95; Disk - $41.95 

Most B5 programs are available 
(GT through Radio Shack® Express 
Order. 

A irademirk of Tandy Corp; 



B-5 Software Co. 

1024 Balnbridge Place 
Columbus, Ohio 43228 
Phone (614) 276-2752 



BUILDING APRIL'S RAINBOW 

CoCo Housepitality . . . 

Homemade Strategies 
Homespun Remedies 
Homegrown Delights 





Hello, CoColand! At this point in the magazine you usually hear from our managing 
editor, Jim Reed. Well, Jim is off to Palo Alto, California, to serve the CoCo 
Community at the first RAINBOWfest of 1986, but he has lent me his toolbox for 
"Building April's Rainbow." Following Jim's knowledgeable footsteps is never an easy task, 
but I delighted in the opportunity to introduce you to our new Home Help issue. 

Over the past several years we have tried to meet the needs of all areas of our readership. 
We have had issues focusing on programs and tutorials for the beginner, the programmets 
and hackers, the hobbyists and gamers, and the students and educators. To welcome the 
rapidly growing home organizer segment of our readership, we have been searching for 
programs specifically for use in the home. 

There is no doubt the CoCo can be an extremely useful tool around the house. While 
appliances and machinery such as the washing machine, vacuum cleaner, power mower 
and table saw were designed to make jobs around the house much easier, there is still a 
need for organizing ail the other time-consuming chores that go into making a comfortable, 
well-kept home. With the use of all the specifically designed programs, the CoCo can become 
a multipurpose household tool to help you organize jobs quickly and efficiently, so there 
is enough time left over to enjoy all the fun the CoCo also has to offer. 

In this special Home Help issue, Dennis Weide will assist you in the tedious task of grocery 
shopping and menu planning with Shop List. And, to help you save money on grocery 
items and more, Donald Turowski's Refund- A- File will keep track of your refund forms 
and qualifying proofs of purchases (POPs). 

For the jack-of-all-trades, Leonard Hyre gives us The CoCo-Handiman, a. program that 
will help estimate the cost and amount of material needed to complete those long overdue 
home decorating projects of painting, wallpaper hanging and paneling, pouring concrete, 
and laying tiles and carpet. And to beautify those new additions even more, Larry Jones' 
Plant Log provides an easier way to care for your plants by keeping track of the individual 
requirements of each one. 

For the astronomers and science buffs, Ronald Pettus' Halley86 points us in the right 
direction for viewing the once-in-a-lifetime event of Halley's Comet. Who knows? If you 
miss the comet on this go 'round, Ronald's program may help your grandchildren find our 
celestial visitor when it reappears in the year 2062. 

Dennis Anderson's Electrical Cost Calculator figures the cost of running individual 
appliances by breaking down your electric bill to determine the amount of watts used and 
the length of time the device is on, which could help you find and cut some of the unnecessary 
costs around the home. 

And, if you're interested in saving more money, Bruce Ronald's IRA Estimator shows 
you how funds invested in an IRA or Keogh account can accrue to significant sums over 
the years. Jerry Whittlesey's College Expense customizes a plan to save for your childrens' 
college education. 

When all your "home" work is finally neatly organized, and you're ready for that well- 
deserved fishing trip, Tommy Crouser offers Bassmate to assist you in picking the right 
lures based on a number of factors and conditions. 

However, if just staying home enjoying new and exciting Adventures is more your idea 
of fun, then you're in for a big treat. Not only does this issue contain many terrific home 
help programs, but here at last is the announcement of the 20 winners of the Third Annual 
rainbow Adventure Contest! The best bonus for our readers, though, is the listing of the 
grand prize-winning Adventure, The CoCo Zone, by Dr. Bruce Bell, and the 16K Best of 
Show Winner, The Maze of Moycullen, by Thomas Riley. Both offer hours of entertainment 
for all of the CoCo users in the household. 

With our usual mix of offerings, it's 260 pages all for the CoCo, and all for less than 
$2.60 per issue at the current subscription rate of $31 per year. That's less than a penny 
per page! Who else offers so much in one issue just for the Color Computer? 

— Jutta Kapfhammer 



1 6 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



Have you yet subscribed to 

COCO TIME 

A monthly magazine on tape and disk 

Now every month you can get 8-10 ready- 
to-run utilities, programming tips & hints, 
business applications, home management, 
tutorials, and educational programs. Also 
a Buy 'N Sell section and much, much 
more. NO GAMES, ONLY REAL STUFF! 

Each issue shipped to you 
by first-class mail. 

Programs written by computer wizards like 
Kishore M. Santwani and Gary T. Jes. 

SUBSCRIBER BENEFITS 

• Free advice/help on your Basic and ML 
programs, whenever possible. 

• Free Buy'N Sell ads on computers and 
software 

• 10% off on all Microcom software/ books 

• Subscribers encouraged to submit 
programs for inclusion. (Contact us.) 

EVERY YEAR YOU GET OVER 
$1 500 WORTH OF SOFTWARE. 
So Act Now! 



DECEMBER 1985 

• 40 K BASIC (For 64 K Cassette Users) 

• Super INPUT/LINE INPUT 

• Tape-to- Tape Copy (Basic and ML) 

• Mailing List (Disk Only; Many Functions) 

• Banner Maker (7" Letters/ Numbers) 

• Single Page LIST/DIR 

• Alpha Directory 

• Disk Tutorial (Part 1 of 1 0 part series) 

• Spell 'n Win Series 1 (400 words/4 
levels) 

The market value of these programs is 
OVER $150, DOUBLE the price of our 
annual subscription. 



Subscription Rates 
(USA & Canada) 

Tape 

1 Year $65 
6 Months $40 
Single $10 
(Other countries add 25%) 
Pay by VISA/MC/Check/MO 



Disk 

$75 
$50 
$15 



THOUSANDS OF PROGRAMMERS USE THESE 
UTILITIES DAILY. SHOULDN'T YOU? 




UTILITY ROUTINES 

for the TANDY 
& TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER (Vol. 1) 

This powerful book for Basic and ML Pro- 
grammers, includes program explanation, 
memory requirements, and an annotated 
source listing for the utility routines given 
below. These routines If bought individually 
will cost you HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. 

These are 1 00% Position Independent ML 
Utilities and require no ML programming 
knowledge. 

COMMAND KEYS: Access most Basic com- 
mands with 2 keystrokes. 
CURSOR STYLES: Create OVER 65000 Cursor 
Styles. 

FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get full length error 
messages. 

KEY CLICKER: Ensure key input accuracy. 
PAUSE CONTROL: Put Basic/most ML pro- 
grams "on hold." 

REPEAT KEY: Repeat ANY key. 5 different key 
speeds. 

REVERSE VIDEO {Green and Red): Eliminate 
eye strain. 

SPOOLER(16K,32K, 64 K): Don't wait for those 
printouts, 32K Spooling Butter in 64 K. 
SUPER SCROLLER(64K Only): Save and exam- 
ine everything that scrolls off the text screen. 
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! 
Compatible with 16K/32K/64K ECB/Cassette 
and Disk Systems and CoCo I and CoCo II. 

BOOK $19 95 
THESE ROUTINES (READY-TO- RUN) 

ON CASSETTE/DISK: $24:95 
BOTH BOOK& CASSETTE/DISK: $36.95 

BEST OF 

COCO TIME '85 

(UTILITIES) 

1 8 best selected utilities from 
COCOTIME 1985 like: In Memory 
Disk Drive for 64K Cassette Users, 
CoCo Disk Zap, Basic Program 
Packer, Tape Encryption (Basic), 
Disk Encryption (Basic), Graphics 
Screen Dump for DMP Printers, 
Basic Search, EZ Disk Master, 
Function Keys, Graphics Zoom, 
Tape Index System, 40K Basic (for 
64 K Cassette Users), Alpha Direc- 
tory, Banner Creator, LIST/DIR 
Pause, Disk Mailing List, Super 
INPUT/LINE INPUT, and Tape-to- 
Tape Copy. 

Disk or Cassette, 

Only For $26.95 

DISK ANTI-PIRATE $59.95 
HIDE-A-BASIC 1 .1 $24.95 
BOTH $79.95 




500 POKES, PEEKS 
*N EXECS for the 
TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER 

NEVER BEFORE has this information of vital 
significance to a programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book will help you 
'GET UNDERNEATH THE COVER' of the color 
Computer and develop your own HI-QUALITY 
programs, SO WHY WAIT? 

This book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs, andEXECsto: 

• Auto start our Basic programs. 

• Disables most Color Basic/ECB/Disk Basic 
commands. 

• Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY and RESET 
BUTTON. 

• Generate a Repeat-Key. 

• Merge two Basic programs. 

• Transfer Rompaks to tape (for 64 K only). 

• Speed up your programs. 

• RESET, MOTOR ON/OFF from keyboard. 

• Restart your Basic program thru the RESET 
BUTTON. 

• Produce Key-Clicks and Error-Beeps. 

• Recover Basic progams lost by NEW, ?10 ERRORS 
and faulty RESET 

• Set 23 different GRAPHIC/SEMIGRAPHIC modes. 

• Set 1 5 of the most commonly used Baud Rates. 

• Allow you more plays in 23 of your favorite arcade 
games. 

• AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 1 6K/32K/64K 
COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK BASIC SYSTEMS 
and CoCol and CoColl. 



only $16.95 



Basic Programming Tricks Revealed- $1 4.95 
Color Basic Unravelled- $1 9.95 
Extended Basic Unravelled- $1 9.95 
Disk Basic Unravelled- $1 9.95 
All 3 Unravelled Books- $49.95 
FACTS- $14.95 



Telewriter-64- (Cas) 

(DSK) 

TELE PATCH 

mm 

COCO MAX II 
Y CABLE FOR COCO MAX 
PRO-COLOR-FILE 2.0 
DYNACALC 
AUTOTERM (CAS) 

(DSK) 

THECOMPLETE RAINBOWGUIDE 
TO OS-9 (book only) 18.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 DISK 
PACKAGE (2 disks) 29.00 



49.95 
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MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



Our software/books are available at all leading dealers in USA& Canada. 
To Order: Order by phone & get a $2 refund for your phone call. 

VISA, MC, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
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please add Sales Tax. Call for discounts on bulk quantities. Dealer 
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VISA' 



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24-HOUR ORDER HOT LINE (7 DAYS A WEEK): (716) 223-1477 



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CO 



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1 Edgell Road, Framingham, MA 01701 (617) 872-9090 Telex-383425 

Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9:30 am to 5:30 pm (E.S.T.) Sat. 10:00 am to 3:30 pm 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. 

TERMS: 

M.C./Visa/Amex and personal checks 
accepted at no extra charge. 
Shipping: Please call for amount. 
Not responsible for typographical errors. 
Prices subject to change. 



CANADA 

1720 CHARETTE STREET 
BUBERNAY, LAVAL, CANADA H7E4L9 
514-662-3224 



Service! Service! 

All in stock products are shipped within 24 hours 
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Repair/ Warranty service is performed within 24 
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accept C.O.D., foreign and APO orders. School 
and D&B corporate PO.'s accepted. 



TRS/80 Registered Trademark Tandy Corp. Apple Registered Trademark Apple Computer Corp. 

IBM-PC Registered IBM Corp. Franklin Registered Trademark Franklin Corp. Max/80 Registered Trademark Lobo 

LDOS Reg. Logical System Inc. Dosplus — Micro Systems Software _____ Newdos/80 — Apparat 



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FLOPPY DISK DRIVES, POWER SUPPLIES AND CABINETS 

Our Disk Drives are UL approved — Our Floppy Drive Cabinels and Power Supplies 
are Underwriters Laboratory Listed and have passed the required Federal 
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Warranty on all disk drives Is one full year parts and labor. Warranty on floppy disk 
drive power supplies is five (5) years. In warranty or out of warranty service is 24 hour 
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Full Height — Tandon 

100-1 Single Sided 40 tk Bare S 99.95 

In Case with Power Supply , 139.95 

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In Case with Power Supply 149.95 

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With Second DOS System — JDOS, RSDOS, and Booklet 69.95 



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/PC- 2 Floppy Drives « Monochrome Monitor, MS-DOS $1,299.00 

5meg/XTtra - 1 Floppy Drive - Monochrome Monitor, MS-DOS $1,599.00 

lOmeg/XTtra - 1 Floppy Drive - Monochrome Monitor, MS-DOS 1,799.00 

20meg/XTtra - 1 Floppy Drive - Monochrome Monitor, MS-DOS 1,995.00 

Internal Tape Backup For Any Of Above systems Add $449,95 

Color for above systems 500.00 



PRINTERS 

Dot Matrix 

Citizen $ Call 

Star Micronics — S.G. Series starting at $259.95 

Panasonic 1090 249.95 

Daisy Wheel 

Silver Reed 440 80 Column 12 CPS 315.95 

550 132 Column 19 CPS 439.95 

770 132 Column 36 CPS 895.00 

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Apple/Franklin Printer Interface w/Graphics and Cable , 84.95 

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Printer Paper — Microperf Edge 1000 Sheets 16.95 



Surge Protectors — - Line Filters 
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SL Waber — 6 Outlets with Swhch 



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MODEMS 

Volksmodem 300 Baud $199.95 

Mark XII 1200/300 Baud Autodial 299.95 



ALL IN-STOCK ITEMS SHIPPED WITHIN 24 HOURS. SAME DAY SHIPPING 
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MISCELLANEOUS 

Diskettes in 10 Pack from S 9.95 

Twoprint Switches from 99.95 

Disk Drive Cables from 16.00 

Maintenance Cleaning Kits 12.00 

Parallel Printer Buffers 8 K 149.95 

Floppy Disk Drive Cables 

1 Drive 16.00 

2 Drives 18.95 

Heaih/Zenith 2 Drive Cables — Shielded 24.95 



80 



© 
1985 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT, INC 



1 Edgell Road, Framingham, MA 01701 (617) 872-9090 Telex-383425 

Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9:30 am to 5:30 pm (E.S.T.) Sat. 10 am to 3:30 pm 

SERVICE POLICY — Our Professional Technical Staff Is Available To Assist You Monday Through Saturday. 
WARRANTIES — Up To One Full Year Parts And Labor. Floppy Disk Drive Power Supplies — Five (5) Years. 
SERVICE — 24 Hour Turn-A-Round On All In-Stock Parts. Dealer Inquiries Invited. Call 617-872-9090 

Please Call For Shipping, Toll Free 1-800-343-8841 

Handling And I nsurance. Please Call For Our Latest Price Saving Specials. Without Notice. 



AO VENTURE CONTEST REPORT 



And now, the moment you've been 
waiting for . . . It's time to announce 




T 

r W contest \M W 




By Jutta Kapfhammer and Philip Helm 

Adventure Contest Judges 



mmmmm 



mmm 



m 



We've struck it rich! Once 
again, we've journeyed to the 
end of the rainbow in search 
of the elusive pot of gold. And when we 
found it, we couldn't have been happier, 
for within it was the vast collection of 
entries to the Third Annual RAINBOW 
Adventure Contest. First sight of the 
shining treasure showed that we were in 
for something special. We knew that 
among all the grand Adventures in the 
pot, there would be enough riches to 
share with everyone. 

For those who do not know, Adven- 
ture games are comprised of fictitiously 
created situations and predicaments 
that involve fantasy characters, stra- 
tegic escape tactics and out-of-this- 
world attempts to gain fortune. The 
mind-boggling challenges that Adven- 
ture games offer provide an escape from 
the real world, as we soon found after 
being elected to judge this year's pro- 
gramming competition. 

The judging assignment was wel- 
comed with open arms, however, we 
realized a sacrifice was necessary. Late 
nights on the town with friends had to 
be given up. Well, the late nights re- 
mained, but the parties weren't with our 
regular crew of friends — they were with 
wizards, ghosts, serpents, dwarfs and an 
endless number of weird characters. 
And, their idea of a good time included 
casting spells, setting traps, sending us 
on wild goose chases, stealing our 
possessions, and using every deceitful 
trick imaginable to torment us, often to 
our death. How could we even think 
about going to sleep when we were 
trapped in some continuous maze with 
something called a "Vanta" hounding 



our every move? 

Of course, the biggest trap we found 
ourselves in was our sudden addiction 
to playing Adventure games. After 
playing only a few, our hunger for more 
Adventure became so intense that it 
sometimes won out over our hunger for 
substantial food. Fast : food bags, pizza 
delivery boxes, candy bar wrappers and 
soft drink cans cluttered the room. At 
one point we even considered naming 
the upcoming book The Rainbow Book 
of Adventures and Junk Food Diet 
Plan. 

Embarking on the journey in search 
of the best Adventure entries was a 
pleasant but difficult experience. As 
judges, we mixed business with plea- 
sure, working and playing diligently to 
pick what we think are this year's most 
mystifying and entertaining Adventures 
assembled by amateur programmers. 
Although there were less entries in this 
year's competition, it didn't take long to 
realize there were more high-quality 
programs. With a dramatic increase in 
the number of new programmers who 
entered this year's contest, new ground 
was broken with novel ideas and innov- 
ative techniques. Just having a chance 
to view them first-hand was indeed 
rewarding. 

We again had contestants from all 
around the globe. Entries were received 
from all over the United States; from 

McKinleyville, California, to Man- 
hasset Hills, New York; from Bay City, 
Michigan, to the Florida Keys. They 
also arrived from our Mexican and 
Canadian borders, Brazil, Australia, 
Puerto Rico and places that had us 
daydreaming about exotic vacations. 



We heard from programmers from all 
walks of life, including doctors, moth- 
ers, farmers, white collar and blue collar 
workers, and many young students. A 
fiction writer and an actor also got in 
on the apt. It simply demonstrates that 
with the proper skills, Adventure pro- 
gramming is a hobby that almost 
anyone can enjoy. 

It was plain to see from the beginning 
that the judging of so many excellent 
programs would not be an easy task. 
From just opening the packages, some 
of the entries had us intrigued even 
before turning on the computer. With so 
many nicely written articles, accompa- 
nied by excellent art, intricate maps and 
step-by-step solutions, good impres- 
sions were made immediately. 

Knowing that each contest unveils 
new dimensions in programming, there 
was a sense of anticipation with each 
and every entry we reviewed. We found 
many improvements over last year's 
winners that immensely enhance the 
involvement of playing Adventure 
games. 

Once again, the graphics entries 
highlighted the contest. Because there 
were so many really good graphics 
programs, there are more graphics 
winners than in the previous contests. 
Even a majority of the text Adventures 
include brilliant graphics title screens. 
We thoroughly enjoyed the vivid scenes 
portrayed throughout the graphics 
Adventures. 

The dialogue used in the Adventures 
is stimulated by the use of some new 
command concepts that are not often 
seen. One, for instance, uses a graphics 
display of the available commands, 



20 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 



which are chosen using the joystick and 
a code letter on the keyboard. In others, 
sophisticated parsers are used to trans- 
late complex sentences into two-word 
English key words for the computer to 
respond. Clever verb commands such as 
ASK, which allows for two-way com- 
munication with characters in the Ad- 
venture, and LISTEN, which makes it 
possible to hear what others in a room 
are saying, were also offered. All add to 
the feeling of reality with just a little 
imagination. 

More impressive creativity is shown 
in some by the use of "subgames" within 
the Adventure. They range from simu- 
lated chess games to number-guessing 
games to even video arcade-type games. 
Another program uses a graphics direc- 
tional map that traces the player's 
moves. Both features make the games 
more enjoyable and easier to follow. 

As in the past, excellent sound effects 
and music are used throughout this 
year's Adventures. And, of course, 
many more incorporate our favorite 
features: the HELP command, score 
tallying, randomized play and the 
game-save feature. It is important that 
we continue to see improvements and a 
wide range of new techniques with every 
new contest. Hopefully, this and future 
programming competitions will help 
broaden the knowledge and the full 
potential of the Color Computer. 

Hundreds of hours were obviously 
spent by this year's group of winning 
contestants on their programs. All of 
them should take great pride in their 
dedication in creating quality programs 
that exhibit such sophistication, profes- 
sionalism and creativity. 

Although our generous advertisers 
have contributed some very nice prizes 
for the 20 winning Adventure pro- 
grammers, the recipients of the best 
award will be you, our readers. That's 
because, once again, all of the runners- 
up will be published in an illustrious 
collection, The Third Rainbow Book of 
Adventures. You're sure to have loads 
of fun with all the Adventures and, who 
knows, you may just come up with a few 
terrific ideas of your own for THE 
rainbow's next programming competi- 
tion. 

We take great pleasure in presenting 
the following awards to the 20 finalists 
in the Third Annual RAINBOW Adven- 
ture Contest: 

Honorable Mention goes to William 
Smit, a 12-year-old from St. Johns, 
Newfoundland, for his inviting pro- 
gram entry, Let Me Out O' Here. The 
name says it all for this one-room 



Adventure since the objective is to get 
out. Several creative verbs are used and 
many objects must be retrieved to aid 
the escape. 

Honorable Mention goes to Danny 
De Busk of New Tazewell, Tennessee, 
for his graphics entry, Mr. Dead. Given 
10 different suspects, 10 possible 
murder weapons and 10 potential 
rooms where the killing may have taken 
place, a murder mystery must be solved 
through a series of deductions. Al- 
though not an Adventure in the true 
sense, the delightful graphics and fun in 
playing it make it quite worthy of 
recognition. 

The Best Mini Adventure Award 
goes to Matt Hazard, a 14-year-old 
from Columbia Station, Ohio, for his 
graphics beginner Adventure, Escape. 
The totally joystick-controlled game 
involves only four rooms, but a cloistral 
surprise awaits those who make it to the 
end. 

The Magic Sparkler Award goes to 
Don Sheerin of Phoenix, Arizona, for 
Amulet. Don, a building inspector, did 
a top-notch job of constructing his 
entry, and his fine work could not be 
overlooked by the judges. Finding the 
five hidden gems and the amulet among 
the dozens of objects throughout the 24- 
room mansion provides endless fun. 

The Back-to-the-Future Trophy is 
awarded to 16-year-old Jason Hunter 
Dolinsky of Manhasset Hills, New 
York, for The Time Machine. His Ad- 
venture relives history through three 
different time zones: two in the past and 
one in the future. The entire journey 
must be completed in two hours and the 
time is displayed on the screen. That is, 
of course, as long as the wristwatch is 
in the possession of the traveler. A 
clever LISTEN command is offered and 
sometimes comes in handy when others 
are in the room talking. Jason's remark- 
able invention of The Time Machine 
captures the feeling of the creation of 
history 

The 16K Best of Show is awarded to 
Thomas E. Riley of Johnsonville, New 
York, for The Maze of Moycullen, an 
entertaining beginner Adventure, which 
begins on Page 58 of this issue. Thomas 
did a fine job of utilizing low resolution 
graphics by showing a bird's-eye view of 
an occupied room, and with the text 
display of all pertinent information 
(verb list, inventory, directions) also on 
the screen, makes it easy to understand 
and a delight to play. Even the youngest 
of Adventurers can enjoy this one, as all 
commands selected are entered simply 
by pressing a single key. 



The 16K Runner-Up is awarded to 
Mike Shay of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 
for Ghost Town, one of the shortest 
programs among this year's entries. 
Drinking is crucial to continuing the 
Adventure and you can wander for 
hundreds of moves discovering all sorts 
of fun things. Or, you can solve the 
game in only 31 moves, if the clever and 
tricky hints that Mike provides are used 
wisely. 

The First Aid Award goes to Joab C. 
Jackson of Owings Mills, Maryland, for 
his graphics entry, Balm. This exciting 
program provides relief for those who 
have been brutalized by other Adven- 
ture games and seek revenge. Joab, with 
unsparing assistance from Barbara 
Jackson, has created a most unusual 
and interesting theme. The player be- 
comes the Adventure with the task of 
stopping eight invaders with traps 
placed throughout the game. The eight 
invaders all seek a disk that holds the 
secret to the ultimate question and you 
must protect it. 

The Hard-Nut-to-Crack Award goes 
to Franklin Marrs, a fiction writer from 
Columbia, Missouri, for his mysterious 
Adventure, The Professional. Franklin 
has compounded the already difficult 
task of returning a client's stolen jade 
necklace by creating a random Adven- 
ture that hides it in one of five locations. 
He has also incorporated an ASK 
command, which allows the private 
detective to request clues from people 
he meets during his rendezvous. It's a 
mind-boggling Adventure that de- 
mands playing again and again. 

The Ghost Busters Award goes to Jon 
Blow of San Diego, California, for The 
Escape of Embroilment. It is definitely 
the most difficult Adventure of this 
year's entries. An excellent assembly of 
exciting features makes it as enjoyable 
as any. Since Jon offers three video 
games and a slot machine, different- 
colored ghosts that scatter inventory, 
and a gun with different and unknown 
settings for zapping each of the multi- 
colored threats, his game should keep 
you busy and frustrated for a long time. 

The Maze Amazes Award goes to 
Curtis Keisler, a high school senior 
from Barnwell, South Carolina. His 
graphics entry, The Evil Crypt, is prob- 
ably the most unique Adventure among 
this year's contestants. There are three 
levels in the cryptic maze, the doldrums, 
the catacombs and the dungeons, with 
enough action in each to keep you 
Adventuring for quite some time. Stair- 
ways must be found to travel between 
levels. The graphically displayed por- 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 21 



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tion of the maze that shows exactly 
where you are at the time is very nicely 
done and gives just enough direction to 
keep you moving using the four arrow 
keys. However, there is a lot of ground 
to cover and plenty of treacherous 
obstacles and hidden dangers to view as 
you approach them. There are also 
magical objects to be found, many 
essential in killing the Evil Lord who 
dwells within. 

The No Nukes Award is presented to 
Scott McCleary of Palmyra, Pennsylva- 
nia, for his graphics entry, Spymaster. 
The graphics presented in the Adven- 
ture rated very high with the judges. Not 
only is each room shown, but the entire 
inventory is graphically displayed in a 
most creative manner across the bottom 
of the screen at all times. Beeping tones, 
which sound for each letter of the 
scrolling text and the input commands, 
add another nice effect to this exciting 
search for the stolen nuclear weapons. 

The (G)Rand-McNally Award is 
presented to Fred D. Provoncha of 
Lynbrook, New York, for his innovative 
Adventure, Aandark. This great plane- 
tary exploration is made even better 
with the use of an area map that tracks 
your every move. The capability to view 
a map of the entire region, showing 
where you have traveled and where you 
can proceed, is a brilliant addition to the 
program. Being from a young, self- 
taught programmer, Fred's entry 
should be an inspiration to many. 

A Standing Ovation for an Outstand- 
ing Performance is given to Walt 
Thinnes of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, for 
his original entry, The Actor's Night- 
mare. A splendid graphics title screen is 
accompanied by two fine musical selec- 
tions. The Adventure takes place in a 
theater and, being an actor and theater 
technician, Walter did an excellent job 
on the layout and description. The plot 
is quite intriguing. As the real star 
performer, you have 10 minutes or 120 
moves to prevent your fickle under- 
study from going on in your place and 
ruining your career. There are many 
obstacles on your way to the stage in the 
vast, confusing theater. This, combined 
with the time limit and one logical, but 
tricky, twist should send even the best 
of Adventurers to the start of this game 
several times before it is solved. 

The Best Adventure in a Continuing 
Series goes to Chris McKernan of 
Mississauga, Ontario, for his most 
enjoyable graphics entry, The Sword 
and the Sorcerer. It is a four-part 
journey with each part being linked to 
the next, making it an Adventure of an 



Adventure. Chris, who also won an 
award in the Second Annual RAINBOW 
Simulation Contest, has again pro- 
duced some fine graphics and incorpo- 
rated lots of surprises within the pro- 
grams. The addition of a ROOM 
command, used to examine the room 
for objects, and an ASK command, for 
obtaining helpful hints from people in 
the game, are just a few of the reasons 
this Adventure series was a big hit with 
the judges. 

The Take 'Em Single-Handedly 
Award goes to Mike Anderson of Tuc- 
son, Arizona, for his creation, The 
Adventures of Johnny Zero. With help 
from his brother, Mark, Mike has 
programmed a totally graphics Adven- 
ture packed full of enticement. It is 
played entirely with the use of one-letter 
commands, and movement through the 
game is done smoothly with single 
touch responses to its questions. Mike 
shows good taste with his use of a clue- 
giving CoCo that is Johnny Zero's 
companion throughout the Adventure. 
But of course, what spy would be caught 
dead without one? 

The Non-Graphics Runner-Up 
Award goes to Philip Newton, a 15- 
year-old honor roll student from Cleve- 
land, Tennessee, for The Adventure of 
Cleopatra's Pyramid. The game in- 
cludes 36 verbs and accepts full senten- 
ces and multiple commands (up to three 
in one entry). It is a classic Adventure 
through deserts and pyramids that 
captures the realism of "being there." 
You have to eat and drink, and fight off 
scorpions, cobras and deadly croco- 
diles, all of which move about as you are 
playing. You are also constantly pes- 
tered by a wandering mummy, who will 
steal your possessions and hide them 
throughout the catacombs. And, if 
that's not enough, you stand the risk of 
being stranded in the desert forever if 
you don't complete the quest in five 
days. It all adds up to a sophisticated 
and challenging Adventure that pro- 
vides spine-tingling excitement. 

Non-Graphics Best of Show and 
Third Place goes to Ann B. Mayeux of 
Key West, Florida, for her brilliant 
entry, Time Travelers. She has a degree 
in psychology, and with two small 
children to care for, Ann somehow 
found the time to create an Adventure 
that offers seven times the excitement in 
one. As a time traveler, you have the 
option of choosing any one of seven 
historical places in which to travel. 
There are fantastic treasures and many 
dangers awaiting those who trek into 
the age of dinosaurs, King Arthur's 



Camelot, El Dorado, Ancient Rome, 
Sherlock Holmes' England, the roaring 
'20s and even the future. The success of 
the treasure hunting in time determines 
your standard of living when you return 
to the present. If your collection is 
incomplete, life in a lowly New York 
City tenement could be your just re- 
ward. 

Graphics Runner-Up and Second 
Place is awarded to Carlos Eduardo 
Rocha of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, for his 
entry, Iconia. Carlos' all-graphics Ad- 
venture uses the four arrow keys for 
traveling and incorporates a clever use 
of symbols, or icons, for commands. 
The eight icons, always graphically 
displayed on the screen, are used to: 
open doors, get or leave objects, look at 
or use objects, push buttons, show an 
inventory or finish the mission. A 
joystick must be used to operate the 
icons, making it the most original 
utilization of commands in this year's 
competition. And, with creatures that 
run around scattering the objects al- 
ready obtained, it also is one of the most 
difficult. 

Graphics Best of Show and Grand 
Prize is presented to Dr. Bruce Bell, an 
optometrist from Rockmart, Georgia, 
for his excellent graphics Adventure, 
The Co Co Zone. This grand-prize win- 
ning Adventure was, in fact, the very 
first program chosen to evaluate from 
the heaping pile of entries. The profes- 
sionalism we discovered by merely 
opening the package and glancing 
through the comprehensive documenta- 
tion kept this one in our minds as the 
graphics winner from beginning to end. 

In addition to being the most 
professional-looking, well-organized 
entry, Co Co Zone is packed full of 
outstanding features. Three BASIC pro- 
grams, which include machine language 
subroutines, make up this quality Ad- 
venture with its superb graphics. One of 
the programs creates 10 of the best 
graphics screens we have seen produced 
on the CoCo. The Adventure includes 
a game-save feature and a verb list that 
must be discovered during game play. 
An arcade-like subgame is embedded 
into the program and sound effects are 
cleverly used throughout the Adven- 
ture. The smooth-running program 
makes full use of 64K, operates on a 
cassette- or disk-based system and 
includes a 32K modification. 

The judges' decision was unanimous 
in choosing CoCo Zone as the very best! 
Our hats off to Dr. Bruce Bell for his 
magnificent winning Adventure, which 
appears on the following pages. □ 



24 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



MIDI-ize Your CoCo With 




All of those marvelous, musical sounds yWve been 
dreaming about can come to life through your Tandy 
Color Computer, MIDI equipped keyboard 
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With COLORCHESTRA, you can create 
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Once you've keyed or played your composition into 
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COLORCHESTRA works with you to record music 
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PF PANTF.ST WIN 





( ross the harrier inio another 
dimension known as . . . 



• THE 

coco 





• 

Program by Bruce K. Bell, O.D. 



the prison guard slams the eel! dour in your lace 



and walks away laughing, you wonder how in the world a 



perfcclly organ i/gd vacation has turned into a mysteri 



ous prison sentence. With the use of the Rubfx Wnalion 
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outlined and booked what promised to be u'^mply marvelous 



i mi. toAwwm 



vacation. It was almost as if the entire 
trip would be controlled by the CoCo. 
But since being arrested and found 
guilty of a crime you could not possibly 
have committed, you have to wonder if 
your program was somehow sabotaged. 

Not long after reaching your destina- 
tion, the news of the disappearance of 
the infamous African jewel was made 
public. The most magnificent and mys- 
tifying of all stones was on a touring 
exhibition, but was stolen before mak- 
ing it to the museum. However, the local 
police announced they had a suspect in 
mind and felt they would have the 
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Sacrificing your curious preoccupa- 
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resume the vacation, you packed your 




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YOU SEE! CAiXNfT 

MHflT HEXT? P 

YOUR KEY WORKED. XT 19 MUOCKED 



backpack for an afternoon of sightsee- 
ing and some off-the-beaten-path ex- 
ploring. However, before making your 
exit, a troop of uniformed officers 
bolted through the door of the beach 
hut, handcuffed you and provided an 
escort to the city's Hall of Justice. 
Although never resisting, you were 
literally dragged into the courtroom. 
With no booking, no processing and 
without making one comment in your 
defense, you were found guilty of steal- 
ing the African jewel. The result of the 
mock trial: a sentencing of imprison- 
ment for an undetermined amount of 
time. 

You must have been framed. Could 
the Rubix Vacation Planner have some- 
thing to do with this mess? You know 
you could prove your innocence in a fair 
trial, but not hopelessly stuck behind 
bars. Your imagination ponders escape. 
Fat chance! But suddenly, a nervous- 



Dr. Bruce Bell practices optometry in 
Rockmart, Georgia, and uses his Co Co 
extensively in both his home and bus- 
iness. He particularly enjoys teaching 
learning-disabled children with visual 
problems. Dr. Bell has also written and 
published Arcade Games in BASIC for 
the Color Computer. 




r( \ . • you were found 
guilty of stealing the 
African jewel. The 
result of the mock 
trial: a sentencing of 
imprisonment for an 
undetermined 
amount of time, " 



looking guard approaches delivering a 
tray of food. The meal looks less than 
appetizing. As you lift the napkin to 
wipe the perspiration from your brow, 
a note falls to the floor. The guard 
dashes away. You can disregard the note 
and dream of being rescued, or pay heed 
to it, which could lead you on an Ad- 
venture through another dimension 
known as . . . The Co Co Zone. 

Loading Instructions 

The Co Co Zone Adventure requires 
64K Extended Color BASIC and consists 
of three BASIC programs: CoCo Draw, 
Boot and CoCo Zone. Some of CoCo 
Draw's subroutines (lines 1-25) are 
taken from Fred Scerbo's "Wishing 
Weir program, Seven More PMODE4 
Colors (THE rainbow, January 1985, 




location: 

EXITS; 
YOU SEE! 



ARSENAL 
U 

RIFLE 



fiUNCASE 



WHAT NEXT? ► 

ALARM PROTECTED, HOWE ME YOU SEE 
0H£ RIFLE AGAINST THE MALL 
OUTSIDE THE 0UHCA6E 



Page 32), and were used by express 
permission. The CoCo Draw program 
creates and saves the 10 graphics screens 
that are used in the game. The screens 
are loaded in the upper 32K of a 64K 
Color Computer. Boot loads the ma- 
chine language routines and the 10 
graphics screens created by CoCo 
Draw. CoCo Zone is the actual game, 
which is also loaded and executed by 
Boot. 

Carefully type in Boot (Listing 1) and 
save a copy on either cassette or disk. 
If you are saving on cassette, the disk 
controller must be unplugged (if you 
plan to also RUN CoCo Zone with the 



controller unplugged) due to the differ- 
ent address of graphics video memory 
on a non-disk system. Then, type in 
CoCo Draw (Listing 2) and save a copy. 
If you are saving on cassette, you may 
wish to CSflVE'TDCODRfiW" on a separ- 
ate tape; it may be stored away since it 




IOC At tOM: 
YOU SEii 



t! U£i«i f 



CAIKIf 



WHAT HIXT? * 



is not needed for actual game play. You 
must also return the same cassette — 
which you saved earlier as Boot (Listing 
1) — to the cassette recorder. Returning 
the same cassette enables you to save the 
10 graphics screens created by CoCo 
Draw, following the Boot program. 
Now, RUN CoCo Draw and a colored 

screen appears. If it is red, press ENTER 
to continue. If the screen is blue, press 
Reset and RUN the program again until 
the screen is red. After the color test, 
you are asked if you wish to observe the 
graphics screens while they are being 
drawn. Though this will spoil some of 
the Adventure's mystery, it allows you 
to spot any obvious typing mistakes 
before playing the game. The choice is 
up to you, but the process is quite time- 
consuming, especially for cassette. If 
you choose not to see the scenes being 
created, a message informs you of the 
program's progress. 

After CoCo Draw's creating and 
saving process is complete your cassette 
or disk should contain 1 1 files: the Boot 
program and the graphics screens Zone 
0 through Zone 9. It is particularly 
important that the 11 programs are 
saved on the cassette in this order. The 
final step of game preparation is to type 
in and save the actual CoCo Zone game 
(Listing 3) following Zone 9 on your 
cassette or disk. 

You are now ready to play The CoCo 
Zone Adventure. Simply CLDRD or 
L0fiD"B00T" and RUN. However, on 
cassette systems, after running Boot you 
must also ENTER RUN at the OK prompt. 
The color test appears and game play 
will begin. 

32K Disk Modification 

The CoCo Zone uses bank switching 
for storage and retrieval of many of the 
game's graphics. However, in a 32K 
computer, the upper 32K of memory is 



28 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



not available, therefore, the program 
cannot be loaded in its entirety. In order 
to reserve enough memory, save (by 
running Co Co Draw) Zone 0 through 
Zone 9 on your game disk and make the 
following changes to listings 1 and 3. 

On the Boot program, Listing 1: 

• DELete lines 6-9, 12-13 and 30-31. 

• Replace Line 5 with 5 FDR K=1TD 
2000: NEXT 

• Replace EXEC32714 in Line 32 with 
LDflDM"ZDNE 9. PIC" 

On Co Co Zone, Listing 3: 

• Replace EXEC32714 in Line 138 
with GDSUB187:LD RDM "ZONE" 
+STR$(X-l)+"/PIC": 
EXEC32211 

• Replace POKE451,10:EXEC32714 
in lines 179 and 184 with GDSUB 
1B7:LDRDM''ZDNE 9. PIC": 
EXEC32211 

Co Co Zone's graphics screens will 
now be called from the disk drive 
individually, allowing it to be played on 
a 32K disk system. 

Hints on Playing the Adventure 

Since Co Co Zone contains a true 



directional map, tracing your moves 
can be extremely helpful. One-letter 
directional commands can be used (N, 
S, E and W) and you can always LOOK 
in any of the four directions (e.g., 
LOOK NORTH). Two-word com- 
mands are used: a verb followed by a 
noun. The first three letters of each verb 
and the first four letters of each noun 
can be used as abbreviation if desired to 
speed game play. 

The program keeps track of the 
number of command entries made. 
Each command is referred to as a move, 
and by typing SCORE, the number of 
moves made at that point is revealed. 
However, entering SCORE does not 
count as a move. 

In case the BREAK key is inadvert- 
ently pressed during game play, the Hi- 
Res screen will not be affected. By 
entering GOTO 4, the screen is cleared 
and play may resume by typing LOOK at 
the WHAT NEXT? prompt. You may 
also quit playing at any point by enter- 
ing QUIT. Then, when prompted with 
ARE YOU SURE?, enter YES, or just 
*Y*. The program performs a cold start 
and will be erased from memory. 

You may save and retrieve your game 
at any stage if desired. To save a game, 



enter SAVE and you are asked if the save 
is to disk or cassette. Entering 'D' or 'C 
initiates a disk or cassette save, respec- 
tively. Entering 'A' aborts the proce- 
dure. Before responding, however, 
prepare your disk or cassette for saving. 

To load a saved game, enter LORD. 
Again you are prompted for disk or 
cassette (or abort). Prepare your disk or 
cassette and press the appropriate letter, 
*D\ 'C or 'A'. Press ENTER and after 
loading, the game resumes at the point 
at which you saved the Adventure. 

The challenge of Co Co Zone is not 
only to prove your innocence, but to do 
so in as few moves as possible. But you 
must remember, once you enter the 
Co Co Zone, trying to exit could result 
in death. Unless, of course, you are able 
to make the right moves at precisely the 
right time. However, as Dr. Bell might 
also remind you, don't bury yourself in 
the Co Co Zone without an escape plan! 

(Questions regarding CoCo Zone 
may be directed to Dr. Bell at 137 
Samanda Circle, Rockmart, GA 30153. 
Please include an SASE when writ- 
ing.) □ 

— Jutta Kapfhammer and Philip Helm 
A dventure Contest Judges 



★ ★★★★★ SELECTED SOFTWARE *★★★*★ 



SOLDERLESS UPGRADE KITS 



With easy-to-follow instructions 

64K FOR E BOARD 
64K FOR F BOARD 
64K FOR COC02' (ALL MODELS) 
'All Korean models require one solder joint. 



$39.95 
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$29.95 



NOTE: All ICs used in our kits are first quality 150 NS 
prime chips and carry one full year warranty, 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 



COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED 
EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED 
ALL 3 BOOKS 
THE FACTS (BOOK) 

ULTRA 80C DISK EDITOR - ASSEMBLER 
BUG OUT & THE ORACLE 
ALL 6 ITEMS 



$17.96 
$17.96 
$17.96 

ONLY $39.95 
$14.96 
$2435 
$1435 

ONLY $59.95 



MURA MINI MODEM* 
& AUTOTERM** 

$54.95 (disk add $5.00) 
CoCo Cable $9.95 
'Direct connect 300 Baud manual ansawer/ 
originate with power supply & phone cable. 
-'Newest version. 



COCO MAX I tape only $64.95 

COCO MAX II disk only . $74.95 

Y-BRANCHING CABLE $27.95 

DS-69A DIGISECTOR ft C-SEE III SOFTWARE .... .149.95 

HJL-57 KEYBOARD $69.95 

PBJWORKPAKII $125.00 

THE INTRONICS EPHOM Programmer 

Program Up to 64K Eprom $139.95 

DATABASE (Eprom Eraser) $39.95 

2784 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $5.95 

27128 HIGH SPEED COMPATIBLE $7.95 

ROM PACK P.C. BOARD 

with case tor 27xx $9.95 

TEAC 558 DS/DD Half Height Drive $109.95 



CASE AND POWER SUPPLY $49.00 

NEW J ft M DISK CONTROLLER 

with J Doi 1.2 $129.00 

DISKETTE CAROUSEL $24.95. 

ZENITH ZVM-123 GREEN $99.00' 

ZENITH ZVM-122 AMBER $109.00 

VIDEO PLUS $24.95 

VIDEO PLUS IIC ........ $34.99 

VIDEO PLUS IIU $34.95 

REAL TALKER i 

With 3 talking garnet $49.95. 

REAL TALKER II 

With 3 talking gamea 154.85" 

NUMBER JACK THE HJL Numeric Key Pad $79.95 



Monthly Special 

B-Ball (Rompak) 
$14.95 



I 1 

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Take a closer 


look. . . 

TAPE 


DISK 








DYNACALC 




$74.95 


SAILOR MAN (64K) 


$23.95 


$27.95 


PROCOLOR FILE 20 




$49.95 


WORLDS OF FLIGHT 


$23.95 


$26.35 


MASTER DESIGN 




$29.95 


DRAGON SLAYER 




$23.95 


TELEWRITER 84 


$39.95 


$47.95 


DRACONIAN 


$22.95 


$24.95 


SUPER SCREEN MACHINE 


$35.95 


$38.95 


SR-71 


$23.15 


$24.75 


RAINBOW SCREEN MACHINE 


$23.95 


$26.95 


BUZZARD BAIT 


$22.35 


$18.95 


PEN PAL 




$64.95 


GALAGON 


$16.95 


$18.95 


AUTOTERM 


$31.95 


$39.95 


LUNAR ROVER PATROL 


$16.95 


$18.95 


ADOS 




$27.95 


MS GOBBLER 


$16.95 


$18.95 


SUPER BACKUP UTILITY 




$44.95 


LANCER 


$16.95 


$18.95 


THE PEEPER WITH SOURCE 


$24.95 


$26.95 


CUBIX 


$16.95 


$18.95 


GRAPHICOM 




$17.95 


FROGGIE 


$16.95 


$18.95 


32K GAMES 




SPACE PAC 


$21.95 


$21.95 








EDUCATIONAL PAC 


$19.95 


$19.95 


P51 MUSTANG 


$23.95 


$27.95 


GHOST GOBBLER ROM PACK (18K) 




$19.95 


Optional Cable 


$9.95 




TREASURY PAC 


$29.95 


$29.95 



WE PAY SHIPPING in the United States, Canada & Mexico. 
Overseas please add 10%. (MN Residents add 6% sales tax.) 
We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or money order. U.S. 
funds only for foreign orders. C.O.D. please add $2.00. 
{USA only). 



to SELECTED SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 32228, Fridley, MN 55432 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 612-757-2439 
INFORMATION 612-757-1026 (11 A.M. -2 P.M. C.S.T.) 
SAME DAY SHIPPING BEFORE 1 P.M. C.S.T. 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 29 



9.... 
18 .. 
25 .. 
END 



60 
.74 
159 
141 



Listing 1: BOOT 

0 'COCO ZONE BOOT 1.0, (C) 1985 
BRUCE BELL 

1 PMODE4 , 1: POKE179 , 2 : PCLS : SCREEN 
1, 1: IFINKEY$=""THEN1 

2 CLEAR2j3j3, 32210 :CLS: PRINT "COCO 
ZONE (BOOT) l.j3","(C) 1985 BRUCE 

K. BELL": PRINT: INPUT "CASSETTE 0 
R dISK" ;CD$:IFCD$<>"C"ANDCD$<>"D 
"THEN2 

3 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32, 124) ; 

4 PRINT"YOU ARE SEATED IN A DING 
Y COURT-ROOM, ENDURING HEAT SO S 
TI FLING THAT NOT EVEN THE FLIES 
HAVE BOTHERED TO DROP IN. YOU 



HAVE BEEN TRIED FOR THEFT OF 
THE PRICELESS AFRICAN JEWEL 

FOR", "WHICH YOU KNOW YOU ARE INN 
OCENT . 

5 F0RK=J3T05 3 : RE ADD $ : POKE 3 2 7 14+K , 
VAL("&H"+D$) :NEXT 

6 DATA34,37,7F,l,EA,CC,8j3,l,lj3,9 

E , BC , BE , 1 , EA , 30, IF, 27, 5,C3,B,FF, 
20,F7,1F,1,C3,B 

7 DATAFF,FD,7F,FE,A6,A0,1A,50,7F 
, FF , DF , A7 , 80 , 7 F , FF , DE , 1C , AF , BC , 7 

F, FE,26,ED,35,B7,0,0 

8 FORK=0TO4 : IFCD$="C"THENCLOADM" 
ZONE"+STR$ (K) ELSELOADM" ZONE "+STR 
$(K)+".PIC" 

9 POKE491 , K+l : EXEC32714 :NEXT 

10 PRINT" A MILDLY PLUMP JURY 
FOREMAN SMILES AT A PREOCCUPIED 

JUDGE ASHE STATES A VERDICT OF 
GUILTY 1 THE JUDGE WINKS AT AN O 
VERCONFI-DENT DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
AS HE PRONOUNCES SENTENCE. A 
SENTENCE" 

11 PRINT "THAT NEITHER HE NOR YOU 
FULLY COMPREHEND. ONE WHOSE O 

NLY LIMITS ARE THE BARRIERS 

OF THE IMAGINATION. FOR YOU HA 
VE JUST CROSSED OVER INTO THE . . 



Our Expansion Connector Breadboard 
Lets You Acquire Data 
And Control Outside Devices 
With Your CoCo 

Good for schools and individuals. Put your versatile 
CoCo to work sensing and controlling external events 
using the simple techniques and fundamentals given in: 
*TRS-80 Color Computer Interfacing, With Experi- 
ments, Book No. 21893 $14.95 with the *Expansion 
Connector Breadboard, CC-100 $34.95 and the 
*Experiment Component Package, CC- 150 $67.50 
containing all of the components needed to do the 
experiments in the book. (See the Hardware Review in 
Nov. 1985.) 

Add $1.50 per item for shipping, or get all three for 
$105.00 plus $3.00 shipping. 

Virginia residents add 4% tax. VISA and Master Card 
accepted. 703-651-3153. 

Write for our catalog listing interface breadboards for 
other popular microcomputers, related books, and 
scientific software for data analysis and experiment 
optimization. 



PUTTING 
HANDS 
AND 
MINDS 
TOGETHER 




Qroup 0ecknology, <£ld. 



P.O. BOX 87 • CHECK, VIRGINIA 24072 

TRS-80 is a trademark of Radio Shack, a Tandy corporation. 




C OS, COG, (M0 n C-12, C-2D, G-2A, €-32 



From the leading supplier of Computer 
Cassettes, new, longer length C-12 s 
(6 minutes per side) provide the extra 
few feet needed for some 16K programs. 

• BASF-LHO (DPS) world standard tape. 
■ Premium 5 screw shell with leader. 

• Internationally acclaimed. Thousands ol 
repeat users. 

• Error Free • Money back guarantee. 

r^w Call: 818/700-0330 

r fOfl IMMEDIATE DELIVERY^* 
on Credit Card Orders. 



BUY THE BEST, AT FACTORY-DIRECT PRICES 



4t 500 C-12'i or C-10't — Mr each 
w/Uoels. add *t ■ Shipping $17<500 
500 Boxes Ut ea ■ Shipping J10/5OO 
(Free Caddy otter docs not apply) 




TRACTOR FEED • DIE-CUT 
BLANK CASSETTE LABELS 

WHITE S3 00/100 J20 001000 
C0LOREO LABELS • Pastels 
Red. Blue. Green Yellow. Lavender 
14 00/100 S30 00/1000 



CASSETTE 5T0RAGT aiQt 

Holds 12 cassettes EZ.-B 
w/o boxes -C^v,_ 
includes edpe Ut*i^ 
and index card 




FREE 



ORDER NOW... MAIL TO - 

VORK lO 

ORDER FORM - - - 



ITEM 


1 DOZEN 


2 DOZEN 


TOTAL 


C06 


□ 7.00 


□ 13.00 




C-06 


□ 


□ 13.00 




C 10 


□ 7.50 


□ 14.00 




C-12 


□ 7.S0 


□ '<•» 




C-20 


□ 8.75 


□ 16 50 




C24 


□ 9.00 


□ 17-00 




C-32 


□ 11.00 


□ 21.00 




Hard 8o« 


□ 2-50 


D <-00 




Writ labels 


□ 3.00/100 


□ 20.00/1000 




Color Labels 

Cninr 


□ 4.00/100 


□ 30.00/1000 




Slcrage Caddy (tf 2 95 ea Qly 




SUB TOTAL 




Calif residents add sales tax 




Sntpptftg/tiandbflg 


3.50 


Outside ti Continental Stales — Additional St 
per caddy per doi cassenes or boxes 




TOTAL 





Chatsworth, CA 91311 

Each cassette includes 2 labels only. Boxes sold separate- 
ly.. In Continental U.S. shipment by U.P.S. If Parcel Post 
preferred, check here. □ 

Check or M.O. enclosed □ Send Quantity Discounts □ 
Charge to credit card. VISA □ MASTERCARD □ 



— Exp. 



Card No 
Name 
Address . 

City 

Signature - 

Ask about our DUPLICATING SERVICE 



State/Zip 



Phone 



30 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



II 



12 F0RK=5T09 : IFCD$="C"THENCLOADM 
"ZONE"+STR$ (K) ELSELOADM"ZONE"+ST 
R$(K)+".PIC" 

13 POKE491,K+l:EXEC32714 :NEXT 

14 FORK=0TO502:READD$:POKE32211+ 
K,VAL("&H"+D$) :NEXT 

15 DATA3^ , 8D,0, 19,BF, 1, 68, 30 , 8D, 
0, 76, BF, 1, 6B, 86, 7E, B7 , 1, 67 , B7 , 1, 
6A,86,39,A7,8C,E5,39,0,34,37,D6, 
6F,26,5C 

16 DATA1F,2,DC,88,C4,E0,E7,8C,F0 
,86,C,3D,DB,89,E0,8C,E8,D3,BC,C3 
,P,60,9E,88,8C,5,0,25,3,C3,C,0,1 

E, 2,81 

17 DATAFF,27,16,81,D,27,1A,81,8, 
27, 16, 81, 20,27, 12, 81, 2F,2F, A, 81, 
5B,2C,6,20,A,86,2E,20,6,86,5B,20 
,2,86,2F 

18 DATA8E,7E,52,80,2D,30,8,4A,26 
, FB, C6 , 8 , A6 , 80 , A7 , A4 , 31 , A8 , 20 , 5A 
,26,F6,35,B7, 34, 37 , 86 , FF, 20 , 9C, F 

F, DF,D7,D5,D5 

19 DATAD7 , DF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , C7 , BB , BB , BB , BB , BB , C7 , FF , 
EF, CF,EF, EF, EF, EF, 83 , FF, C7 , BB, FB 
,E7,DF,BF,83,FF 

20 DATAC7 , BB, FB, E7 , FB, BB, C7 , FF, B 
B, BB, BB, 81, FB, FB, FB, FF, 83 , BF, C7 , 
FB,FB,BB,C7,FF,C7,BF,BF,A7,9B,BB 
,C7,FF,83,FB,F7 

21 DATAEF , DF , BF , BF , FF , C7 , BB , BB , C 
7 , BB , BB , C7 , FF , C7 , BB , BB , C3 , FB , FB , 
C7 , FF , FF , BF , BF , FF , FF , BF , BF , FF , FF 
,FF,FF,FF,EF,EF 

22 DATADF , BF , F7 , EF , DF , BF , DF , EF , F 
7 , FF , FF , FF , FF , 8 3 , FF , FF , FF , FF , BF , 
DF , EF , F7 , EF , DF , BF , FF , C7 , BB , FB , E7 
, EF , FF , EF , FF , EF 



23 DATACF , AF , EF , EB , E7 , EF , FF , EF , D 
7,BB,83,BB,BB,BB,FF,87,BB,BB,87, 
BB, BB, 87 , FF, C7 , BB, BF, BF, BF, BB, C7 
, FF , 8 7 , BB , BB , BB 

24 DATABB , BB , 8 7 , FF , 8 3 , BF , BF , 8 7 , B 
F,BF,83,FF,83,BF,BF,87,BF,BF,BF, 
FF, C3 , BF, BF, B3 , BB, BB, C3 , FF, BB, BB 
/ BB ; 8 3 i BB / BB f BB 

25 DATAFF, 83 , EF, EF, EF, EF, EF, 83 , F 
F, FB, FB, FB, FB, FB, BB, C7 , FF, BB, B7 , 
AF , 9F , AF , B7 , BB , FF , BF , BF , BF , BF , BF 
,BF,83,FF,BB,93 

26 DATAAB , BB , BB , BB , BB , FF , BB , 9 B , A 
B, B3 , BB, BB, BB, FF, C7 , BB, BB,BB, BB, 
BB, C7 , FF, 87 , BB, BB, 87 , BF, BF, BF, FF 
, C7 , BB , BB , BB , AB 

27 DATAB7 , CB, FF, 87 , BB, BB, 87 , AF, B 
7,BB,FF,C7,BB,BF,C7,FB,BB,C7,FF, 
83 , EF, EF, EF, EF, EF, EF, FF, BB, BB, BB 
, BB , BB , BB , C7 , FF 

28 DATABB, BB, BB, BB, BB, D7 , EF, FF, B 
B , BB , BB , BB , AB ,93, BB , FF , BB , BB , D7 , 
EF, D7 , BB, BB, FF, BB, BB, D7 , EF, EF, EF 
,EF,FF,83,FB,F7 

29 DATAEF , DF , BF , 8 3 , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F, FF, FF, EF, FF 

30 FORK=0TO13 : READD$ : P0KE3 2745+K 
,VAL("&H ,, +D$) : NEXT 

31 DATA1A,50,7F,FF,DF,A6,80,7F,F 
F,DE,1C,AF,A7,A0 

32 PMODE4,1:PCLS0:FORK=1TO100:PS 
ET(RND(255) , RND (96 ) +95 , 5) :NEXT:P 
OKE491,10:EXEC32714 :SCREEN1,1 

33 POKE492,PEEK(3 60) :POKE493,PEE 
K(361) :P0KE494, PEEK (363) :P0KE495 

, PEEK (3 64) :' store unmodified ram 
vector 

34 I FCD $ = 11 C " THENCLOAD " COCOZ ONE » E 
LSELOAD"COCOZONE" , R 



Listing 2: COCODRAM 



15 


170 


24 


, 132 


33 


. . .216 


39 


3 


45 


, 175 


50 


7 


56 


140 


60 


248 


64 


. . .197 


END 


12 



0 'COCO ZONE (DRAW) 1.0, (C) 198 
5 BRUCE K. BELL 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



**************************** 

* SEVEN MORE PMODE4 COLORS * 

* BY FRED B. SCERBO * 

* 149 BARBOUR ST . N . ADAMS . MA* 

* COPYRIGHT (C) 1984 * 
**************************** 



7 CLEAR1000:R=3 :B=2 

8 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : PMODE 
3:PCLS3 

9 IFINKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN11ELSE9 

10 'START COLOR SET 

11 CLS0:PMODE4,1:PCLS0:SCREEN1,1 
:DIM Y(3) ,B(3) ,G(3) ,S(3) ,P(3) ,L( 
3) ,V(3) : LINE (32,0) -(48,5) ,PSET,B 
F 

12 FORX=31TO47STEP4:PSET(X,0,0) : 
PSET(X+2, 1,0) :PSET(X+1,4,0) : PSET 
(X+3,5,0) : NEXT 

13 FORX=32T047STEP8:PSET(X,8) :PS 
ET(X+4,9) :LINE(X,12)-(X+1,12) , PS 
ET : LINE (X+4 , 12 ) - (X+5 , 12 ) , PSET : LI 
NE(X+2,13) -(X+3,13) , PSET : LINE (X+ 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 31 



6,13)-(X+7,13) ,PSET 

14 PSET(X,16) :PSET(X+1,17) :PSET( 
X+4,16) :PSET(X+5,17) :PSET(X+1,20 
) :PSET(X+5,21) :NEXTX:PM0DE3 :COLO 
R2 , 3 : LINE (32 , 24 ) - (48 , 24 ) , PSET : LI 
NE (32, 25) -(48,25) , PRESET 

15 PM0DE4: GET (32,0) -(47,1) ,Y,G:G 
ET(32,4)-(47,5) , B,G: GET (32 , 8) - (4 
7,9) ,G,G:GET(32,12)-(47,13) ,S,G: 
GET(32,16)-(47,17) ,P,G:GET(32 , 20 
)-(47,21) ,L,G: GET (32, 24) -(47,25) 
,V,G 

16 GOT026: 'PAINTING ROUTINES 

17 LC=VAL (MID$ (PT$ ,2,3)): TC=VAL ( 
MID$(PT$,6,3) ) :RC=VAL(MID$(PT$,1 
0,3) ) :BC=VAL(MID$(PT$,14,3) ) 

18 XX$=LEFT$(PT$,1) : IFXX$="Y"THE 
N19ELSEIFXX$="B"THEN20ELSEIFXX$= 
"G"THEN21ELSEIFXX$="S"THEN22ELSE 
IFXX$= I, P II THEN23ELSEIFXX$="L"THEN 
24ELSEIFXX$="V"THEN25ELSERETURN 

19 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16:PUT(ZZ,YY) -(ZZ+15, 

YY+1 ) , Y , OR : NEXTZZ , YY : RETURN 

20 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16:PUT(ZZ,YY) -(ZZ+15, 

YY+1) , B, OR: NEXTZZ, YY: RETURN 

21 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16 : PUT (ZZ,YY)- (ZZ+15, 

YY+1) , G, OR: NEXTZZ, YY: RETURN 

22 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16:PUT(ZZ,YY)- (ZZ+15, 

YY+1) , S, OR: NEXTZZ, YY: RETURN 

23 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16 : PUT (ZZ,YY)-( ZZ+15, 

YY+1) , P, OR : NEXTZZ, YY: RETURN 

24 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16 : PUT (ZZ,YY) -(ZZ+15, 

YY+1 ) , L , OR : NEXTZ Z , YY : RETURN 

25 FORYY=TC TO BC STEP2 : FORZZ=LC 
TO RC STEP16 : PUT (ZZ,YY) -(ZZ+15, 

YY+1) , V, OR: NEXTZ Z,YY: RETURN 

26 CLS: PRINT "COCO ZONE DRAW 1.0" 
, 11 (C) 1985 BRUCE K. BELL" ,,,,,: I 
NPUT" CASSETTE OR dISK OPERATION" 
;Q$ : IFQ$<>"C"ANDQ$<>"D"THEN26 

27 PRINT: INPUT "DO YOU WISH TO VI 
EW THE PICTURESAS THEY ARE DRAWN 

( Y/N) " ; 1$ : IFI$=" Y"THENSCREEN1 , 1 

28 FORA=0TO9 : IFI$<>"Y»THENPRINT@ 
352, "DRAWING PICTURE #"A 

29 PCLS5:DRAW"BM0,0C0R255D96L255 
U96" : 0NA+1G0SUB32 , 37 , 40 , 45 , 50 , 55 
, 60, 65 , 68 , 71 : F$=»ZONE"+STR$ (A) : I 
FQ$="C" THEN 30E LSEVERI F YON : SAVEMF 
$+" . PIC" , 3584 , 6656 , 3 80 : GOT03 1 

30 PK=PEEK(188) *256+PEEK(189) :CS 
AVEM F$,PK,PK+3072,380 

31 NEXTA: PRINT@384 , "JOB COMPLETE 



D" : END 

32 DRAW"BM255,96C0H10L200U20R100 
BR3R97ND20F6BF2F2U20G2BG2G6BE10L 
20NU90G6NU9 6L154NU9 6BE10NE6U50R6 
ND44R54D44NL54D6L60BR74NE6U50R6N 
D4 4R5 4 D4 4NL54 D6L6 0 " : PAINT (96,4), 
0,0:PAINT(170,4) ,0,0 

33 PT$="Y092, 003-148, 046" :GOSUBl 
7 :PT$="Y166, 003-220, 046" :GOSUB17 
: DRAW"BL14NU50BR74NU50BR10NU50BL 
70BD4BL84L20G10D8L10NU90G22":POK 
E178,2:PAINT(80,4) , ,0 : POKE178 , 1 : 
PAINT (128, 70) , ,0 

34 FORK=60TO210STEP30:LINE(K,70) 
- ( K+20 , 80 ) , PRESET , BF : CIRCLE ( K+ 10 
,75) ,2,5:NEXT:PAINT(128,94) ,0,0: 
FORK=0TO2 : POKE178 , K: F0RX=1T08 : CI 
RCLE(8,42) , (3-K) *8-X, , .8:NEXTX,K 
: PAINT (2, 2) , ,0:POKE178, 124: PAINT 
(254,4) , ,0:PAINT(40,4) , ,0 

35 G$="C0U3LD3LU3LD3LU6ED4RU6ED7 
RU16G2D2F2U8RD14EU22ED20EU30LD10 
» : FORK=96T013 6STEP8 : X=K+74 : DRAW" 
BM=K ; , 4 8XG$ ; BM=X ; , 4 8XG$ ; " : NEXT 

36 RETURN 

37 LINE(15,0)-(239,75) ,PSET,BF:P 
T$=" Y0 16 , 000-2 3 9 , 07 3 " : GOSUB17 : FO 
RX=24T0239STEP24 : FORY=10TO40STEP 
30 : POKE178 , 2 : LINE (X, Y) - (X+16 , Y+2 
2) , PSET, BF: CIRCLE (X+4,Y+10) ,2,0: 
NEXTY , X 

38 DRAW"BM239,0C0D75F15BL255E15" 

: CIRCLE (128, 95) ,50,0, .2, .5,l:POK 

E178,l: PAINT (128 ,90) , ,0: PAINT (50 

,90) ,0,0 :PT$="S000, 075-255, 095": 

GOSUB17 : DRAW"G15BR255H15" : POKE17 
8, 212: PAINT (2, 2) , ,0 : PAINT (250 , 2 ) 

,,0 

39 RETURN 

40 DRAW"BM255,83C0M-34,-25NU58L2 
8NU58G8NU66L66U8NU58L84NU58G4BM1 
26,4R52D52L26NU52L26U52BD17BR7U4 
R4U4R4D4R4D4L4D4L4U4L4BR26U4R4U4 
R4D4R4D4L4D4L4U4L4" : POKE178 , 2 : PA 
INT(139,18) , ,0:PAINT(165,18) , ,0: 
PAINT(190,2) , ,0: CIRCLE (146, 30) ,2 
,0:CIRCLE(158,30) ,2,0 

41 PAINT(100,4) ,0,0:PAINT(200,4) 
, 0,0:PT$="S022, 001-110, 052" :GOSU 
B17 : PT$="S194 , 001-216 , 052 " : GOSUB 
17 : FORK=5TO40STEP5 : CIRCLE ( 150 , 80 
) ,K,0, .2:NEXT:PT$="P111, 072-190, 
088":GOSUB17 

42 CIRCLE(20,66) ,20,0, .3, .5,1:CI 
RCLE(20,76) ,20,0,-3,1, .5:CIRCLE( 
40,71) ,4,0,1.3, .25, . 75 : CIRCLE (0 , 
71) ,4, ,1.3, .75, ,25:DRAW"BM40,66C 
0R6FND10M-14 , +29R6M+8 , -18D18L2NU 
12 LU 10" ' 



32 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



43 LINE (7)3, 10) - (95, 40) , PSET, BF: C 
IRCLE(82,22) ,9,5,1, . 1 ,. 9 : CIRCLE ( 
88,22) ,5,5,1, .8, . 2 : PAINT (82 , 25) , 
5,5: DRAW"BM75, 22C5G4D2E6C0BR11BU 
2U4BD8D4C5BD5L14BD2Rlj3BF2L12 " 

44 P0KE178,1:PAINT(2,94) , ,0:PAIN 
T(39,94) , ,0:POKE178,104:PAINT(2, 
2) , ,0:PAINT(254,2) , , 0 : RETURN 

45 DRAWBM255, 70C0M-84 , -30NU40" : 
PAINT (200,20) ,0,0:PT$="S171,000- 
256,7j3":GOSUB17:DRAW"L12R2BF18D6 
L2D28L4NU28H2U26L8D10L4NU10H2U8R 
18L12 6R2 D2 6F2NU2 8R4U2 8L8U6R40BR3 
R85BL128H24D6NF24F2D2 6F2NU2 6R4U2 
2H8U6R12NU14D6F12R100U18NM+30 , +2 
4U08H12L88M-ll,+6" 

46 PAINT (128, 40) ,0 ,0 : PT$="Y038 ,0 
14-134 ,051" : G0SUB17 : DRAW 11 M+ 11 , -6 
R88F12ND2 6L20NH12L68NH12M-11,+6N 
H12D20H12BL14L24BR40BU08F6UH6BR3 
0BD6R8DL8BR28R8UL8BR28R8DL8":PAI 
NT(136,20) ,0,0 

47 P0KE178,2:PAINT(128,55) , ,0:PO 
KE178,1:PAINT(2,90) , , 0 : DRAWBM18 
0 , 4C5D12M+18 , +4U16L18BD20M+18 , +4 

D14M-18,-6U12BM+28,+6M+22,+4D20M 
-22 , -8U16BU8M+22 ,+4U22L22D18BM+3 
2 ,+6U24R16D28M-14, -4BD8M+14 ,+4D2 



2M-15,-4U22": PAINT (128, 55) , ,0 

48 POKE178,1:PAINT(2,90) , ,0:DRAW 
"BM180,4C5D12M+18,+4U16BM20,0C0D 
25R16BE12BR8U12" :PAINT(22,2) ,0,0 
: DRAWC5BG2L4BD2R2BF2L4BD2R3BF2L 
5BG8BL2H4G8NL2E8U6NF6NG6U2LH2UER 
3FDG2":POKE178,201:PAINT(2,2) , ,0 
:PAINT(170,2) , ,0 

49 RETURN 

50 DRAW" BM18 8 , 9 5U2 6NR6 6 " : PAINT ( 2 
48,90) ,0,0:PT$="Y190, 071-254, 93" 
: G0SUB17 : DRAW"M+48 , +27L16M-20 , -1 
2D12 " : PAINT (204, 93), 0,0: DRAW" BM1 
26 , 0D60NR12 8M-104 , +33M-22 , -8" : PA 
INT (40, 93) ,0,0:PT$="P000, 060-248 
,95":G0SUB17 

51 DRAW"C0U85R22D91BD2BEllM+88,- 
27U10M-88,+18ND18BU10M+88,-15U10 
M-88 , +5ND20BU10M+88 , -3U8M-88 , -5N 
D15BU6NU12M+88 , +4U6" : FORK=0TO3 : P 
0KE178,K*6+31: PAINT (96, K*18+2) , , 
0:NEXT:POKE178,2:PAINT(4,4) , ,0 

52 LINE(186, 5) -(232,60) , PSET, BF: 
DRAW"BM139 , 8C0R26D28L2 6U28F3R20N 
E3D22NF3L20NG3U22D14BRE2F4E8F4E" 
:POKE178,l: PAINT (146, 12) , ,0:POKE 
178,2 : PAINT (146, 30) , ,0: CIRCLE (15 
0, 18) , 2 , 5 : PT$="Y186 ,005-232 , 60" : 



GIVE SPEED AND POWER TO YOUR COCO-2! 



WURBO 



ith TURBO BASICS you can get foryourTRS-80 color 
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with DISK-BASIC and you can run your already existing pro- 



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grams without trouble. Here are some features of TURBO 
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Look at this benchmark for the "Sieve of Erathosthene M 
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COCO-2 


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BASICA 


31.3 


192.9 


34.9 


159.0 


20.1 


146.5 



-8 characters variables 
-64K RAM access without special command 
-DISK-BASIC commands (ROM 1.0 or 1.1) 
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and more... 

Why use a slow BASIC if you can afford a fast and improved 
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□ Check enclosed □ Visa 

□ Master Card □ American Express 

Account Number 

Signature 



Card Expiration Date. 
Name 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



DIDAKTEK P.O. Box. 9755 Sainte-Foy, Quebec 

G1V 4C3 CANADA 

Tel.: 1-800-463-5369 1-418-651-8321 



Sainfe-Foy Stanford Toronto 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 33 



Howard Medical Company 

1690N.EIston Chicago, Illinois 60622 
(312) 278-1440 



m ACCEPT 



VISA 

MasterCard 
American Express 
COD or Checks 
School P.O.'s 



New Dual Mode EPSON 

The new Epson LX-80 offers printing flexibility in 
two modes: one mode allows you to print in a quick 
(100 cps) dot-matrix style for programming and 
graphics, and the Near Letter Quality mode (16 
cps) produces precise (240 dots per inch), 
beautiful type for correspondence, reports, and 
similar purposes. The LX-80 offers 160 different 
type-style combinations, including Pica, Elite, 
Enlarged, Emphasized, Condensed, Subscripts 
and Superscripts, and type-styles can be selected 
quickly from the top control panel or from program 
control. Comes standard in friction feed; tractor op- 
tion is also available. 

LX-P package includes an LX-80, a serial inter- 
face, a Color Computer to Epson cable, and 
Printer Tutorial that teaches you how to pro- 
gram the different type styles ($29.95 value). 

LX-P: LX-80 package $317 ($7 shpg) 

ET-1 tractor option for LX-80. $29.50. 

SF-1 Single-sheet feeder for the LX-80. $145 ($7 
shpg) 



Epson 


RX-80 FT repack 


$207. 


Epson 


LX-80 New 


$249. 


Botek 


Serial to parallel converter 


$68.45 


Howard 


CoCo to Epson cable 


$25. 



MONITORS 



123 Zenith 12" Green Screen, 640 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 15 MHz band width. $114 ($7 shpg) 



123A Zenith 12" Green Screen Special, $67.50 

($7 shpg) 80 Column non glare 



122 Zenith 12" Amber Screen, 640 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 15 MHz band width. $117 (7 shpg) 



131 Zenith 13" Color Monitor with speaker, 
composite & RGB jack, 240 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 2.5 MHz band width. $166 
($14 shpg) *CLOSEOUT 40 Column 



141 Roland 13" Color Monitor with speaker, 
270 dots x 200 dots resolution, 4MHz band width 
$247 ($12 shpg) 

All monitors require video controller. 

Reverse video free with monitor order. 

MEMORY 

64K Upgrades— 1 Year Warranty 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete instructions. Re- 
move old chips and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace cuts. $28.45 ($2 
shpg) 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering needed. Capacitor 

leads must be cut. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 
64-2 for COCO 2. Kit requires one solder point, no 

trace cuts. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 




CONTROLLERS 



New Controller from J&M: Has switch that allows 
either JDOS or RS DOS to be the disk operating 
system; eliminates software compatibility problems, 
while preserving the advantages of J&M's gold con- 
tacts and data separator. Also added to the DC-2 is 
a parallel port, which means a serial interface is no 
longer needed to make a parallel printer (like the 
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DC-2 Disk Controller with JDOS. $ 1 28 ($2 shpg) 

RS-1: RS DOS ROM Chip. $20.00 ($2 shpg) 
DC-1 Disk Controller reads and writes to 35 and 40 
track single and double-sided drives for all models 
of the Color Computer w/ JDOS. $128 ($2 shpg) 
VC-1 Video Interface mounts inside Color Computer 
by piggy-backing IC on top of interface— no solder- 
ing, no trace cuts. All models give composite video 
& sound. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-2 for COCO 2— mono only. $26.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-3 for COCO 2-— both color or monochrome 

$39.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-4 for new Color Computer (no sockets, chips are 
soldered to mother board). Attaches with spring- 
loaded clips. Color or mono. $39.45 ($2 shpg) 



Epson Homewrlter HM1 has serial pick 
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$258 ($7 shipping) 




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The EJ-P Package 

The Epson LX-80 Printer teamed with our new 
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Printer with ET-1 tractor; DC-2 controller; 
parallel Color Computers to J&M cable; 
Epson Printer Tutorial ($29.95 value). 

Complete EJ-P package $425.00 ($7 shpg) 



System requirements: CoCo with 

Add $2 for 



HOWARD QUALITY STANDS 

New TS-1X Mon- 
itor Stand: De- 
signer-beautiful 
stand with clear 
corner posts, 
easy side access 
to ROM port, re- 
set and on/off 
buttons. $39.50 
($3 shpg) » 

TS-1: Standard 13" monitor stand for the original Color 
Computer. Specify black, ivory or clear. 15" x11" x4", 
$29.50 ($3 shpg) 

TS-2: Same as above for the COCO 2. $29.50 ($3 
shpg) 

PS-1X Printer Stand features new noise-suppressing 
foam top and cork base. 15" x11" x2V 2 ". $24.95 ($3 
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10:00-3:00 Sat. 

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THE COfOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



It's called the premier Color Computer magazine for good 
reason. THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and most 
comprehensive publication a happy CoCo ever had! Is there any 
wonder we get letters daily praising THE RAINBOW, the 
magazine one reader calls "A Pot Of Gold" for his Color 
Computer. 

THE RAINBOW features more programs, more information 
and more in-depth treatment of the Tandy Color Computer than 
any other source. 

A monthly issue contains up to 300 pages and as many as two 
dozen programs, 15 regular columns and more than 20 product 
reviews. And advertisements: THE RAINBOW is known as the 
medium for advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else about new 
products! Hundreds of programs are advertised in its pages 
each month. 

But what makes THE RAINBOW is its people. People like Fred 
Scerbo, who write special programs at the request of readers. 
Experts like Dick White and Joseph Kolar, two of the most 
knowledgeable writers on BASIC. Communicators like R. Wayne 
Day, who stay abreast of telecommunications advances. Or, 
Dan Downard, RAINBOW technical editor, who answers our 
readers' toughest questions. Educators like Dr. Michael Piog 
and Steve Btyn, who show how CoCo can be used at home or 
school. Advanced programmers like Dale Puckett, who guide 
you through the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. Electron- 
ics experts like Tony DiStefano, who explain the "insides" of the 
CoCo. These people, and many others, visit you monthly 
through columns available only in THE RAINBOW. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the wide 
spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color Computer — from 
beginners' tutorials and arcade games to telecommunications 
and business and finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to expand your 
CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly reviews by independent 
reader reviewers take the guesswork out of buying new software 
and hardware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE RAINBOW 
to be an absolute necessity for their CoCo. With all this going 
for it, is it surprising that more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW 
subscribers renew their subscriptions? 

We're willing to bet that, a year from now, you'll be doing the 
same. For more information call (502) 228-4492. 



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What goes well with 
the Rainbow? 




Rainbow On Tape! 



We call it the other side of THE RAINBOW and we may 
have to raise the price just to call your attention to it. With 
as many as two dozen programs every month, RAINBOW 
ON TAPE is a luxury service at a bargain basement price. 

What is it? RAINBOW ON TAPE is a monthly cassette 
tape adjunct to THE RAINBOW and it's brimming with all 
the programs (those over 20 lines long) that fill the pages 
of the magazine. All you do is pop the cassette in your tape 
recorder and they're ready to run. No more lost weekends 
— or week nights — typing, typing, typing. With RAINBOW 
ON TAPE, you can read the article in the magazine then, 
in seconds, you load it up and run it. Yes, you could type 
them in yourself, as many people do. But all of them? Every 
month? There simply isn't enough time. 

Isn't it time your CoCo became a full-time computer 
instead of a typewriter? Think how your software library 
will grow. With your first year's subscription, you'll get 
almost 250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications — the full spectrum of THE 
RAINBOW'S offerings without the specter of keying in 
page after page and then debugging. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE — the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at 
a price that's "small potatoes." Food for thought. To get 
your first heaping helping, just fill out and return the 
attached reply card. No postage necessary. 

Discover the other side of THE RAINBOW. It's not only 
a time-saver, it's the key to a whole new outlook! 



95 



64K EXT. BASIC 134 

Color Computer II 

Monitor Interface for above CoCo If 29.95 plus 7,50 installation, (color & green compatible) 






2 Drives 299 95 

Both our drive 0 and 1 in one case, with cable and 
R.S. controller. The best just got better! 



Drive 1 Upgrade 

Add a second *fe height drive to your Radio Shack 
36-3129. Comes with 3 minute installation instruc- 
tions, screwdriver required. 







Drive 1 





Your Choice 
Silver or White 

SUPER DRIVE SALE 



199 



95 



0 



Special prices on new first quaiity disk drives, They even have GOLD conn&ctors on the back.. .Some other 
places charge 229.00 for dr. 1 md 299.00 for dr. 0, not us! Drive 1 is for mod I, Second Color Computer drive, or 
extern al mod Jl I ; IV. Drive 1 j ust p I ugs rnto the extra co nnector o n your Drive 0 cable Bot h d rives are co mpati b le 
with any ve rsio n oi the Color C o mpu ter and al I versions of drives. D rive 0 is your first Color Co m puter d rive and 
comes complete with cable, m a nual , an d R .S. controJ I e r. For do ubre-s i ded, add 45, 00 (only for those who have 
DS-DOS. boards and knowledge) Bare fulf hgt SSOD drive only 79.95, 

THE COMPUTER CENTER 
901-761-4565, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 38119 km* 
Add $4.9D far shipping and handling— Visa, MC & money orders accepted 
Allow an additional 2 weeks for personal checks— Drive faceplates may vary slight ly 



subject iti 
nhansjtr wnnoui no- 
bee. 



G0SUB17:CIRCLE(194,35) ,2,0 

53 DRAW f, BM186,5C^R46D55L46U55BF6 
BR2R10BR10R10D16L10NU16BL10NU16L 
10U16BD30R10BR10R1J3D16L10NU16BL1 
0NU16L10U16" : POKE178 , 106 : PAINT ( 1 
68, 4), ,0 

54 RETURN 

55 DRAW"BM240,95C0M-40,-24L3j3F6H 
30NU47L146D30R174D8NL174" : PAINT ( 
4,50) ,j3,j3:PT$="Yj302, 049-166, 075" 
:G0SUB17 : DRAW"U8H6NR8NH24F6D8" : P 
OKE178,1:PAINT(230,92) , ,0:DRAW"C 
0L3D10L4U10L2D1J3" : POKE178 , 2 : PAIN 
T (4 , 83 ) , ,0 

56 POKE178,99:PAINT(180,4) , ,0:FO 
RX=4T0144STEP6 : FORY=4TO44STEP10 : 
PRESET (X , Y) : NEXTY , X : FORX=6T012 : C 
IRCLE(164,25) , X-6 , 5 : CIRCLE (164 , 2 
5) ,X,J3:CIRCLE(194,25) , X-6, 5: CIRC 
LE(194,25) ,X,0:NEXT:FORK=1TO75:X 
=RND(174) :Y=RND(6)+76:PRESET(X,Y 
) : NEXT 

57 DRAW"BM130,24C0Dlj3LU10R6L12UR 
12UL12UR12UL12BM14 , 13L20UR20UL20 
UR20D28LU28LD28LU28BM65,24R30DL3 
0DR3 0 DNL2 5 DNL2 0 DNL1 5 DNL10 DNL5 11 : C 
IRCLE(99,28) , 4 ,0 : CIRCLE ( 100 , 27 ) , 
4,0: DRAW" BM3 0 , 3 4U6ED7ND6RU6BR4D6 



RND8U7FD6BR4U6ED7ND4RU6BR4D6RND6 
U7FD6" 

58 DRAW"BM46,4D5R2U5HUD7NL3R3DL6 
DR6D5L2U5L2D5L2U5BM110 , 41C0EL2ED 
2U7ER3EU7HL3HU5EHEHEHEHEHEHBM110 
, 61L30ER30EL30ER30BM72 , 54U12LD12 
GU12GD12LU12LD12GU12LD12LU12LD12 
HU12LD12HU12HD12LU12 " : CIRCLE ( 65 , 
42) ,10, 0, .4:P0KE178,1:PAINT(65,4 
2) , ,0: CIRCLE (65, 50) ,3 

59 DRAW"BM226,34C0M+4,+2D30FU30F 
4U12H4M-2 , -1G4D6" : PAINT (228 , 28) , 
0,0: RETURN 

60 DRAW"BM255,80U56H20D56F20":PA 
INT (252 , 70) ,0,0:PT$="Y234, 004-25 
5,080": G0SUB17 : DRAW"U5 6H20D5 6F2 0 
H3 2NU4 8 L40U4 4M-4 , +2 D4 6NE4 L3 6U3 0N 
R36U16NR36M+4 , -2NR36BD6D6BD14D8B 
D10BL4L2 0U3 0NU4G4D2 9NE4L3 0U3 0NR3 
0E4NR30U4NR30BF6BL4R6BR10R6BD6BL 
4L18D20R18U20" 

61 DRAW"BG4L10BG10BD9L20G4U6BU2U 
22NL40E4ND30L48NF4NU20M-20,+10Dl 
8E24D14BD2D14NR40G24BE2BU6U20E8D 
20G8BE12U20E6D20NG6BR8BU2U20R14D 
20L14BR18U20R14D20L14BM252 , 70H12 
U10F12D10BU16H12U10F12D10BU16H12 
U10F12D10" 



ADOS 



ENHANCED, EPROM-ABLE 
DISK BASIC 



Now, you can supercharge Basic with an impressive array of extra features 
WITHOUT sacrificing compatibility! ADOS is compatible with virtually 100% of 
commercial software. Customizing utilities are provided to allow user-defined 
command abbreviations, baud rate, step rate, tracks per disk (35 or 40), support of 
double-sided drives, and more. After customizing ADOS, you can have it burned into 
an EPROM that plugs into the Disk Basic ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a 64K 
disk utility. <EPROM + burning will cost about $20-we provide information 
concerning how you can have this done.) Features include: * repeat and edit of the 
last direct-mode command • 26 definable control-key abbreviations • automatic line- 
number prompts • DOS command • lowercase command entry (a fine complement to 
a Lowerkit or PBJ WordPak) • COPY (filename) to (drive number) • AE error override 
option • RAM command (64K) • RUNM command • text echoing to printer • ML 
monitor • text file scan • enhanced directory • error trapping • hi-rea text utility 
included (42, 51, or 84 characters per line) 

"/ COULD NOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THAT WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS." 

THE RAINBOW, December 1984 
"/ LOVE ADOSI ...A QENUINEL Y FIRST RATE PRODUCT." 

Color Micro Journal, February 1985 
"I WONT PART WITH MY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING ...NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS." 

Hot CoCo.May 1985 

Disk . . . J27.85 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 



Monitor machine-language programs AS THEY ARE RUNNING! Peeper actually 
timeshares with the target program, giving FULL CONTROL as ML programs run. 
Switch Instantly between watching regular program output and Peeper's trace of 
registers and stack on screen or printer. Inspect memory in any of 26 display modes. 
Execution speed can be varied from full speed to the barest crawl, or halted entirely, 
as programs run. Single-stepping, breakpoints, memory or register examine/change. 
Relocatable, supports 64K use. (16K required) See February '85 review. 
Disk . . 123.95 Tape. . . 121.95 Assembler source lis ling . Add 3.00 



NEXT BEST THING TO 



DRIVE 



Fastape allows cassette I/O at 3000 baud-TWiCE NORMAL SPEED. It uses the high- 
speed (POKE 65495,0) mode, and makes it convenient to etay in this mode 
throughout. Features automatic adjustment of cassette and printer parameters when 
speed mode is changed. Control-key functions for many Basic commands and for 
changing speed modes. Compatible with all file types, and can be used with 
Telewriter 64 and many other tape utilities. (16K required) See July '83 review. 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 

No delay on personal checks 
f'lprjQsr.- adrj S2 00 =ihigmi> nq Sorry n 



\ 11111 N. Kendall Drive, 

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X "** Miami, Florida 33176 

(305) 274-3899 Day or 

no credit cards or COD'S ^ ve 



I 



I 




w Software <r 




'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95 — ONLY $24.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business. 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement (current & 'YTD'), journal, ledger, 899 accounts & 2350 entries 
on 32k & 64k (710 accounts & entries on 16k) (disk only). Version 1,2 has screen 
printouts. Rainbow Reviews 1.1 - 9/84 : 1.2-4/85 

'OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95 — ONLY $19.95 

Fifing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 
fields with 255 characters per field (4080 characters/record). Sort, match & print 
any field. User friendly menu driven. Manual included (32k/64k disk only). 

Rainbow Review 3/85, Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use In your programs. Easy drawing and manip- 
ulation of circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on 
line HELPS at all times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects 
on the screen. Can be used as a stand-alone graphics editor, instruction Manual. 
GRAPHICS EDITOR. Reg. $39.95— ONLY $19.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 
Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK 1 Accounts Receivable. (Avail. io/oi/as). 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, 
total due sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP- 
TRAK' General Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & 
more. User friendly/menu driven. Includes manual. $39.95 or $49.95 General 
Ledger & Accounts Receivables. (Disk Only). 

OSS UTILITY DISK 

Contains: Transfer utilities between RSDos and OS9 which also allows manipula- 
tion of RS files with OS9 programs. EXPANDABLE MULTILEVEL HELP. 
CPTREE— copies directory structures with no temp, files. Two calculators, plus 
ten other utilities. $19.95 (Disk Only— Available 10/15/85) OS9 is Microware TM. 

'COCO WINDOWS' Available 10/31/85 
With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key 
board (k licks) and 10 programmable function keys, Allows the user to create 
multiple windows from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup end auto line 
numbering. Four function calculator, with memory. The above options can be 
called anytime while running or writing in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES, 
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $19.95 (disk or tape) includes manual. 

THE OTHER GUY 8 SO FT ware (Add $2.50 for pottage A handling) 

P.O. Box H, 55 N. Main C.O.D., Money Order, Check fn U.8. Funds 

Logan, UT 64321 <B£1) 7$3-7U« <Flt«* specify If JAM centroihrj 



I 
I 

I 

* 
■ 

t 
I 

* 

I 

* 

I 

■ 

I 

* 

I 
I 

■ 

I 
I 

■ 

I 

* 

I 
I 

* 

I 

# 

I 

* 

# 

I 



36 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 



62 G$="Dlj3G6F6R2E6H6U10LDlj3" : DRA 
W"BL43BU24XG$;BH16XG$;BL117BU1J3X 
G$ ; BD6j3NG18R9 1ND4G16BG2R4E14 " :.P0 
KE178,2:PAINT(6,54) , , J3 : PAINT ( 18 , 
42) , ,j3: PAINT (32, 38) , ,J3 : PAINT (5J3, 
38) , ,f&: PAINT (1)3, 7j3) , , )3 : DRAW"CJ3D1 
4L2U12G3D9LU8" 

63 PRESET(6,54) : PRESET (18 , 44) :PR 
ESET(32 / 38) : PRESET (5J3, 38) :P0KE17 
8,1: PAINT ( Ij3j3 , 9 j3 ) , , J3 : PAINT (2 , 7J3) 
, ,0:PAINT(21j3,28) , jd , J3 : PAINT (194 , 
22) ,J3,0:PAINT(80,22) , $ ,0 : POKE178 
,133: PAINT (2, 2) , , J3 : PAINT ( 252 , 2 ) , 
,j3:POKE178,lj35:PAINT(4j3,2) , ,0 

64 RETURN 

65 LINE(J3,J3) -(255,96) , PSET, BF:CO 
L0R5 , 5 : F0RK=1T0255STEP2 : LINE (K, R 
ND(1J3)+3J3)-(K+RND(4) -l,RND(lJ3)+6 
J3) , PSET: LINE (K, RND ( 1J3) +5J3) - (K+RN 
D(4)-2,RND(1J3)+8J3) , PSET: NEXT: FOR 
K=1T015 : CIRCLE (205 , 15 ) , K, 5 : NEXT : 
FORK=lT01j3)3: PRESET (RND (255) ,RND( 
3J3) ,5) :NEXT 

66 DRAW"BM19j3,15Cj3Rlj3F2DG2L4G2L4 
": PAINT (196, 17) ,J3,J3:DRAW"BM22J3,1 
J3L1J3GDFR4FR6" : PAINT (2 14, 12) ,j3,J3 

67 RETURN 

68 DRAW"BMJ3, 3j3R13j3NM-16,+65R2j3NM 



+155, +46NR155 ": PAINT (14j3, 90) ,)3,j3 
:DRAW"Llj3C5F6LH6BF12F8LH8BF16F10 
LH10BF20F12LH12CJ3" : FORX=0TO254ST 
EP4:U$="NU"+STR$ (RND(5)+10) : DRAW 
» BM=X ; , 30XU$ ; RXU$ ; RXU$ ; RXU$ ; " : NE 
XT 

69 POKE178,l:PAINT(2,2) , ,J3:P0KE1 
78,2:PAINT(2,9J3) , ,J3 : PAINT (250, 40 
) , ,0:FORX=lTO20j3: PRESET (RND (255) 
,RND(65)+30) : NEXT : FORX=1TO80 : PSE 
T(RND(255) ,RND(15) ,5) :NEXT 
7)3 RETURN 

7 1 COLOR5 , J3 : PCLS : FORK=0TO5 : CIRCL 
E(K+64,62) ,16,5,1.1, .1, .85: CIRCL 
E(K+64,58) ,8:CIRCLE(K+82,60) ,8,5 
,1.1, .1, .85: CIRCLE (K+98, 58) , 8 : CI 
RCLE(K+144,58) ,8:NEXT 

72 DRAW"BM122,48M+3,-5FR15M-16,+ 
29R8E3M+2 ,+7M-3 , -2L17M+16 , -29L6M 
-4 , +1BM156 , 48R4M+8 , +12U11M-2 , -1R 
6GD30M-9,-24D21M+l,+2L6E2U24H4BM 
174 , 48R10E2D6H2L5D8M+5 , -2D6M-5 , - 
1D12R5E2D6H2L10M+1 , -2U22M-1 , -2 " : 
PAINT(137,49) , 5 , 5 : PAINT ( 17)3 , 62 ) , 
5, 5: PAINT (176, 62) ,5,5 

73 FORK=1TO200 : PSET (RND (255) ,RND 
(96) ) : NEXT 

74 RETURN 




Listing 3: COCDZONE 

0 'COCO ZONE 1.0, (C) 1985 BRUCE 
K. BELL 

1 EXEC32211 

2 CLEAR500, 32210: DIM D(140),R(14 
J3) ,R$(24) ,0$(37) ,0(37) ,P(18) 

3 GOT0199 

4 PRINT@256,STRING$(128,32) : PRIN 
T@2 5 6, "LOCATION: " ; : IFR$ (R (R) )=" 
TUNNEL" ANDO ( 11 ) <20 0THENPRINT " TOT 
AL DARKNESS " : PM0DE2 , 1 : PCLS0 : PMOD 
E4 , 1 : GOTO7ELSEIFR=60ANDP ( 4 ) =1THE 



NPRINT"IN THE CASKET" : IFP (0) <2TH 
ENIFP ( 5 ) =1THENPM0DE 2 , 1 : PCLS0 : PMO 
DE4,l:GOT07 

5 X=0:PRINTR$(R(R) ) : PRINT@3 20, "Y 
OU SEE: " :FORK=0TO37 :IFO(K)=R THE 
NX=X+1:PRINT@319+X*11,0$(K) 

6 NEXT: T=0 : PRINT @ 3)3 8 , "VIEW: "MID 
$ ( "NSEW" ,U, 1) : PRINTQ288 , "EXITS : 
"; :F0RK=1T04:IF(D(R)ANDV(K) )=V(K 
) THENPRINT@292+3*K,MID$ ( "NSEW" ,K 
,1) : NEXTELSENEXT 

7 P (2) =P (2 ) +1 : PRINT© 3 84 , "WHAT NE 
XT" ; : INPUTA$ : IFA$=" "THEN7ELSEPRI 
NT@384,STRING$(126,32) ; :PRINT@41 

6 " " * : 

8 ' D=INSTR ( 1 , "NSEW" , A$ ) : IFD=0THEN 
2 3ELSEU=D:IF(D(R)ANDV(D) )<>V(D)T 
HEN22ELSEI FU= 1THENR=R- 1 j3 E LS E I FU= 
2 THENR=R+ 10 E LSE I FU= 3 THENR=R+ IE LS 
ER=R-1 

9 ONU GOTO10,11,12,13 

10 C=-10:W(0)=8:W(1)=2:W(2)=1:GO 
T014 

11 C=10:W(0)=4:W(1)=1:W(2)=2:GOT 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 37 



EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 




• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SU PER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 
Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 





FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TARE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 





VISA 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



it 



ems 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6 1 /4% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 
(312)879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 



EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



TM # 




HIGH INTELLIGIBILITY SPEECH IS HERE 

EARS is far more than a speech recognition systenf that enables your computer to listen to you. EARS 
and the EARS SPEECH LIBRA|Yjbring '|iigh quality''^ [leech to the Color Computer*. EARS doesn't sound 
like a ''computer" or "robot-," it sounds like real people. It sounds, natural since we use real people to 
create the^speech. J 

HERE'S HOW IT'S DONE. Speech Systems has FfcMALE aupd CHILDREN'S VOICES COMING /THE LIBRARY Each group of the library con- 
invested nearly $10,000 in special audio digitiz-^ f SOON. Tr|e technique we use is independent V tains woroVdesigned for a particular applica- 
ingand speech compression equipment. Each 4 of the speaker. A male announcer is presently tion. The SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY contains 




phrase is spoken by a human announcer dig- ^ used, female and young people's voices cog^ 
itized and then compressed so very little mem- jl p ing soon 
ory is used, typically less than 400 bytes pejt 
word. For those familiar with the Texas InstruV 
ments "SPEAK anctSPtLi" line of educatioriaj^ 5 
toys, you are aware gof the results. For thosl 
wishing a demonstration, call (312) 879-6844. 



ft 



* % 




NERAL 1 V 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



v OVJ OWN * 




phrases designed for process or home control. 
The EDUCATIONAL LIBRARY has those words 
to help ensure keeping a child's attention. 
Words may be put together to form sentences 
and easily produced from BASIC, so you can 



AGAIN 
ALL 
AND 
AT 
BUY 
CALL 
CASE 
CENT 
CLEAR 4 
CLOSE % 
COMPUTER 
CONNECT 
DAY 
DIAL 
DOLLAR 
DOWN 
DOOR 
EAST 
END 
ENTER 
FAST 
FASTER 
FIFTH 
FIRST 

2 disks 



GET 

GO 



0 



HOUR 
IS 

LEFT 
LEVEL. 
LOVE 
MORE 
MULTIPLY 



OUT 
PASS 
PENNY? 

please! 

QUARTER 
\, k READY 
REACH 
RIGHT 
^SECOND 
SELECT 

send 

SET 



; START 
STOP 



SCIENTIFIC 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



ABORT 

ADJUST 

ALARM 

AMPERE 

ATTENTION 

BRAKE 

BUTTON 

CANCEL 

CAUTION 

CENTIGRADE 

CHANGE 

CHECK 

CONTROL 

CURRENT 

DANGER 

DEGREE 

DISK 

EMERGENCY 

EQUAL 

ERROR 

EVACUATE 

FAHRENHEIT 

FAIL 

FAILURE 



FIRE MICRO 
FREQUENCY MILE 



FEET 

FLOW 

FORCE 

FUEL 

GALLON 

GAS 

GRAM 

HERTZ 

HIGH 

HIGHER 

INCHES 

INTRUDER 

KILO 

LIMIT 

LOAD 

LOCK 

LOW 

MEASURE 

MARK 

MEG 

MEGA 

METER 



I 




MILL] : 
MINUS" 
MINUTE 
NORMAL 
OPERATOR 
PER 

PERCENT* 
PHASE 
POUND 
PRESSURE 
PULSE? 
RANGE 
SAFE 
SMOKE 
SPEED; 
SWITCH 
SYSTEM 
TEMPERATURE 
TEST 
VOLT 
WARNING 
WEIGHT 




GENERAL 2 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



write your 
s 



own 

to 



programs with incredible 



<0 



Alphabet/Numbers 
SPEECH LIBRARY 




ADD 
ASK 

ASSISTANCE 
AUTO 
BUT 
COCO 
COMPLETE 
CONTINUE 
COPY 
CORRECT 
COST 
DATE 
DECREASE 
DEPOSIT 
DIME 
DIVIDE 
DRIVE 
ENTRY 
EXIT 
FLOOR 
FORWARD 
FROM 
GOING 
GREAT 



HELLO 

HELP 

HERE 

HOLD 

INCORRECT 

INCREASE 

JUST 

KEY 

LESS 

LESSER 

LIGHT 

LOWER 

LOWEST 

MONEY 

MOVE 

NEAR 

NEED 

NEXT 

NOT 

NOTICE 

ONWARD 

OPEN 

OR 

OVER 



PRESS 
PLACE 
PLAY 
POINT 
QUICK 
RADIO 
RECEIVE 
RECORD 
REPLACE 
REVERSE 
ROOM 
SERVICE 
SIDE 
SLOW 
SLOWER 
SPACE 

STATION 

THANKYOU 

THIS 

TOTAL 

TRY 

TURN 

USE 

YOUR 



*5 * 



#* f 



disks f. . . $19.95 



EDUCATIONAL 
EARS SPEECH LIBRARY 



TWO 
THREE 
FOUR 
FIVE 
SIX 

SEVEN 
EIGHT 
NINE 
TEN 

ELEVEN 
TWELVE 
THIRTEEN 
FOURTEEN 
FIFTEEN 
SIXTEEN 
SEVENTEEN 
EIGHTEEN 
NINETEEN 
TWENTY 
THIRTY 
FORTY 
FIFTY 
SIXTY 
SEVENTY 
EIGHTY 
NINETY 
HUNDREQ 

2 disks 



> 



A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

I 

J 

K 
L 



1 




ALPHA 
BRAVO 
CHARLIE 
DELTA 
ECHO 
FOXTROT 
GOLF 
HOTEL 
1&DIA 
JQLIETT 
KfLO 
LIMA 
MIKE 

NOVEMBER 

OSCAR 

PAPA 

QUEBEC 

ROMEO 

SIERRA 

TANGO 

UNIFORM 

VICTOR 

WHISKEY 

X-RAY 

YANKEE 

ZULU 

MILLION 



.AFTER 
AM1E h 
ANSWER' 
AROUND 
AREA v 
AWAY 



FRACTION 



BEFORE 
BOB 
BOX 
BOY 
CAN 
CAT 
CHAIR 
^CHRIS 
CLASS 
DAY 
, DECIMAL 
DESK 

DIFFERENCE 
DO 
DOG 
DRINK 
FALL 
FIND 



GIVE > 
GOOD* 
HILL 
HORSE 

It AURA* 
LIKE 
LINDA 
LISA 
MAKE 
MEAGAN 
MEASURE 
-MISSING 
MODIFY ' 

NAME 
NIGHT 
NOUN 
PEOPLE 
PERIOD 
PHRASE 
PRODUCT 




PUT 

QUESTION 
RACHAEL 
RICHARD 
SAY 

SENTENCE 

SINK 

SIT 

SIGN 

SOLVE 

SPELL 

SQUARE 

SPRING 

SUBTRACT 

SUMMER 

TABLE 

TAKE 

TEACHER 

TIM 

TOM 

UNDER 

VERB 

WOULD 

WINTER 



^* • ; $19.95 

i Custom 

E^RS SPEECH LIBRARY 

Tor those needing a custom vocabulary, 
Speech Systems offers customized speech li- 
brariesjat the rate of $15 per phrase {5 seconds 
rjrfax.), 10 phrases minimum order. Provide an 
Sudiojcassette tape with phrases or use our 
announcer. . . K t- Minimum $150.00 




2 disks $19.95 2 disks $19.95 



*EARS and Disk system required. 

tCustom Library not part of introductory offer. 





9 



T.M. 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 

WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 




SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSl-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






SUPIR VOICE 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Device 


f|||p SSl-263 f^fz 


SC-01 


SP-256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 




1 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 




1 


1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


':^V/': > :'' ' '-^ ^'T^'- ' "V V'*:''-'**^* 'AV"''*':' '" "V' '.V':" '- 


1 


1 

, 


1 


Vocal Tract 
Filter Settings 




1 


1 


1 


Basic unit 
ol Speech 


fii phonemes 
4 durations each 


64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 


4096 {3Z absolute levels 
with 8 inflection speeds) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 

Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
May 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 





VISA* 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V*% sales tax 



V/' 



Speech Svfst 



ems 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

1 colo5ama e (312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



6 



TALKING SOFTWARE 



9 



FOR THE VOICE, SUPER VOICE ™, RS SPEECH & SOUND PAK 




RADIO SHACK® 
SPEECH & SOUND TRANSLATOR 

We believe that no COCO speech 
synthesizer gives you the power 
and flexibility of the SUPER 
VOICE. Nevertheless, some have 
decided to go with the Radio 
Shack SPEECH & SOUND PAK. 
For those we've decided to open 
our TALKING LIBRARY by offer- 
ing the SPEECH & SOUND 
TRANSLATOR . Just load this pro- 
gram and our entire library is open to you. 

But that's not all, this program adds features. You get increas- 
ed intelligibility, the power of an exception table to specify 
specific pronunciations, $12,81 is spoken in dollars and cents, 
1,234,567 is spoken in millions, thousands, and hundreds, and 
much more. $24.95 





TERMTALK All the features of an intelligent telecom- 
munications program plus what appears on the TV is spoken. 

• Upload and Download programs • Control Xmit Protocols 

• Full or Split Screen • Buffer Editing 

• Normal or Reverse Video • It talks 

Please specify version (VOICE or RS SPEECH & SOUND PAK) 
Tape $39.95 Disk $49.95 

TALKING BINGO BINGO was never like this. The VOICE or 
SUPER VOICE makes all the calls while you sit back and play. 
Comes with 20 playing cards and 200 markers. High Resolu- 
tion graphic screen, 3 timing level, ball count and pause con- 
trol. $24.95 

ESTHER the talking psychoanalyst. An excellent example of 
artificial intelligence. She may not solve all your problems, but 
her insight will amaze you. Just like the original Eliza. $24.95 

SCORE E-Z A yahtzee type game. Up to six can play. $24.95 



ADVENTURES 



CULT OF THE CAVE BEAR You're a stranded time 
traveler 50,000 years in the past. Can you fix your time 
machine while still surviving in this alien environ, and make it 
back? $29.95 

SHIP HUNT Play Battleship with your CoCo. All status 
reports are spoken. Ready battery, aim, fire at will ! $24.95 

FINAL COUNTDOWN You must stop the mad general 
from launching a missile at Moscow and causing WW III. Has 
multiple voices for added realism. $24.95 



STAR TALK You're the Star Fleet Captain. Your 
mission. ..destroy the enemies' Dragon Star Ships. All status 
reports are spoken! $24.95 

FOOL'S CROSSING The world's first TALKING HI-RES 
GRAPHICS adventure. Finding the hidden treasure is the easy part, 
getting back home is another story. $24.95 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR Create talking adventure 
games that are 100% Machine Language. Up to 99 rooms, 255 
objects, 70 command words and 255 conditional flags. 

64K Disk $39.95 



——SUPER VOICE SONGBOOKS— == 

These two songbooks were specifically designed for the SUPER VOICE, the only speech synthesizer flexible enough to allow singing. 



VOLUME I (POTPOURRI) A collection of miscellaneous tunes 
for everyone. Songs include: How Much Is That Doggie in the Win- 
dow, Daisy, Aloha Oe, Old McDonald and more. $19.95 



VOLUME 2 (NURSERY RHYMES) Includes: Twinkle 
Twinkle Little Star, Mary Had A Little Lamb, 3 Blind Mice, the Alphabet 
Song and more. May be used with SUPER TALKING HEADS so 
they (Paul & Pauline) sing the songs. $19.95 



EDUCATION 



ANIMATED SENTENCES The child 
builds complete sentences from a graphic 
menu using keyboard or joystick. The action 
is then spoken and acted out graphically. It's 
a great way to learn the parts of speech (i.e. 
verb, subject, noun, etc.). $24.95 

KING AUTHOR S TALES A creative 
writing tool to allow a child to write compos- 
itions, or short stories. Q & A option is also 
included. $29.95 

COLOR MATH Addition, Subtraction, 
Multiplication, and Division are mastered. 
Student may specify difficulty level. $24.95 

SPELL-A-TRON Student builds a dictio- 
nary of words to be quizzed on. Perfect for 
Spelling B. $24.95 



SPELLING TESTER A graphic spelling 
game. The student is shown objects to be 
spelled. $9.95 

POETRY CREATOR The VOICE 
speech unit is used to speak poetry that is 
created. $9.95 

SHORT STORY MAKER A program 
to create and speak stories created by the 
child. $9.95 




FOREIGN LANGUAGE Learn a 
foreign language. French dictionary is in- 
cluded. $9.95 

PRESIDENTS The student is able to 
master the Presidents of the U.S. $9.95 

STATES A program designed to aid the 
student in learning correct spelling of the 
states. $9.95 

CAPITALS Learning the State's Capitals 
is made more interesting using speech. 

$9.95 

HANGMAN A word guessing game. You 
must guess the word before you hang. $9.95 

MATH DRILL A program to help teach 
arithmetic. $9.95 



All software, except as noted, shipped on tape but may be moved to disk. 



SYMPHONY 





TM 



A 12 VOICE POLYPHONIC STEREO MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 



NEW! 
61 NOTE 
KEYBOARDS 

12 SIMULTANEOUS 
VOICES 

STEREO & MONO 

4 NOISE 
GENERATORS 

SOUND EFFECTS 

PLAYS AND MAKES 
MUSICA 2 FILES 



SUPER POLYPHONIC. Speech Systems is 
proud to bring you SYMPHONY 12, a poly- 
phonic 12 voice hardware stereo music synthe- 
sizer for the Color Computer. SYMPHONY 12 
also gives you 4 noise generators for percus- 
sion synthesis and sound effects. The PIANO 
KEYBOARD and MUSICA 2 (sold separately) 
turns your COCO into a real music machine 
with incredible flexibility, 

STEREO and MONO. By connecting SYM- 
PHONY 12 to your home stereo system, music 
is produced in stereo, 6 voices from each chan- 
nel. However, you don't need to have a stereo 
system, all 12 voices also come out of your TV 
or monitor. 

PICK AN INSTRUMENT. SYMPHONY 12 lets 
you choose from 10 preset instruments to syn- 
thesize chimes, violin, oboe, banjo, 
harpsichord, piano and more. You can even 
change instruments as the music plays. 

SOUND EFFECTS. SYMPHONY 12 is a sophisti- 
cated sound generator. 12 voices and 4 noise 
generators give you incredible sound effect 
capability. We have included gun shot, explo- 
sion, racing car and more. 



p > i p i i i- m r r 
t f t i i i rii ii i 

* J i i t 4 r r r r i i 
i f f * i i i i - 







f w 





WATCH IT PLAY, As SYMPHONY 12 plays, a 
graphics display of a piano keyboard shows 
the notes playing. The display is entertaining 
as well as very educational. 

PLAY MUSICA 2 FILES. Thousands of MUSICA 
2 users will be excited to know SYMPHONY 
12 plays all music developed using MUSICA 2 
like you have never Seen or Heard it. In fact 
we highly recommend the use of MUSICA 2 
as a composition development tool for SYM- 
PHONY 12. Use MUSICA 2's superior graphics 
input capability and then play it through SYM- 
PHONY 12. You can also take advantage of 
our MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) 
to give you access to over 500 music pieces 
representing 20 hours of music. 

ULTIMATE MUSIC DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM. 
SYMPHONY 12, MUSICA 2, and the PIANO 
KEYBOARD give you incredible flexibility. Im- 
agine sitting down at the PIANO KEYBOARD, 
playing a piece and recording it as you play 
just as you would to a tape recorder. Save your 
masterpiece and then using MUSICA 2 edit it 
if you like and print it. If you have a MIDI 
synthesizer, you can take the music and play 
it using COCO MIDI (sold separately). Try that 
on an IBM, APPLE, or COMMODORE (good 
luck). 



PIANO KEYBOARD. For those wishing to turn 
SYMPHONY 12 into a real polyphonic synthe- 
sizer we offer the extremely powerful and ver- 
satile PIANO KEYBOARD. The PIANO 
KEYBOARD was deisgned to be used in our 
entire music product line. You can use it with 
SYMPHONEY 12, MUSICA 2, SYNTHER 77 
PLUS, and even our advanced speech synthe- 
sizer, SUPER VOICE. 

When using MUSICA 2, you will be using 4 of 
the 12 voices available from SYMPHONY 12. 
To take advantage of the full 1 2 voice capability 
of SYMPHONY 12 you may use either the 
Color Computer's keyboard or the PIANO 
KEYBOARD. 

Y-CABLE or MULTI-PAK. Tape users using both 
SYMPHONY 12 and the PIANO KEYBOARD 
will require a Y-CABLE. Disk users will require 
the Triple Y-Cable or MULTI-PAK. 

SYMPHONY 12. You get over a dozen music 
and sound effect selections and complete 
documentation. Software is shipped on Tape 
or Disk. 

SYMPHONY 12 $79.95 

SYMPHONY 12 (with Keyboard order) . $59.95 
OPTIONS 

MUSIC LIBRARY (each volume) $29.95 

MUSICA 2 $29.95 

PIANO KEYBOARD (61 note) $119.95 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6%% sales tax 



Speech Stf4 

t 



ems 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 
(312) 879-6811 (24 HRS. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 



ft COCO MIDI SEQUENCER/EDITOR <7 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, 
it doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from 

• Supports 8 digital tracks. 

• 1,500 events per track. 

• 12,000 events all 8 tracks. 

• May be used as an 
advanced sequencer 

• User friendly high res. 
graphics display. 

• Menu driven. 

• Help command explains 
features. 



our entry level MUSICA 2 COCO MIDI system that plays 
MUSICA files or our Professional COCO MIDI SYSTEM. 




urn***.*** 


<:""«** 
MM 


Mil I M MM m I M W 

: : ' • ■ 


§n umnm 


ill u \\w\m i 



Real time recording. 

Save your masterpiece to 
tape or disk. 

Tempo may be modified. 



Playback any or all 8 tracks at any tempo. 
Tracks may be deleted, copied, transposed or mixed. 
Filter out unwanted channel or type of MIDI data. 
Simple music text editing. 
Requires 64K. 
Transposition. 



Comes complete with Rom Pale 
Hardware interface, cables, 
manual, and software. Disk 
users require Y-Cable or Multi- 
Pak $149.95 

Now under development, 
voicing patch libraries for the 
Casio CZ series of synthesizers. 

CZ-101 USERS! 

We offer the CZ-101 CONNEC- 
TION and the 61 NOTE PIANO 
KEYBOARD to turn the 101 into 
a professional full size synthe- 
sizer. 

CZ-101 CONNNECTION . $29.95 
61 NOTE KEYBOARD . $119.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



COCO MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it 
through your music synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes 
from our MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create 
your own music using the best music composition program 
available, MUSICA 2 (sold separately). 



COCO MIDI includes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthe- 
sizer $39.95 Tape or Disk 



MUSIC LIBRARY 



TM 



The MUSIC LIBRARY series consists of 8 volumes: 100 
through 800 each sold separately. Each contains over 100 four 
voice music selections with a playing time of over 3 hours 
each. The disk version is shipped on 5 full disks. When 
coupled with the STEREO PAK, the music is reproduced with 
unsurpassed realism. 

A JUKEBOX program is included to allow you to select specific 
songs or automatically play each. These songs are ready to 
go, you don't need MUSICA 2 or a knowledge of music. 
MUSICA 2 users may customize each song. Each volume sold 
separately, specify tape or disk $29.95 Tape or Disk 



MUSIC LIBRARY 100 
Stage, Screen, & TV 
Music of the 70's 
Music of the 60's 
Music of the50's 
Old Time Favorites 
MUSIC LIBRARY 200 
MUSIC LIBRARY 300 
MUSIC LIBRARY 400 
MUSIC LIBRARY 500 
MUSIC LIBRARY 600 
MUSIC LIBRARY 700 
MUSIC LIBRARY 800 



Classical 

Christmas (popular) 

Christmas (traditional) 

Patriotic 

Polka Party 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 
(another 100 selections) 



Entire Library 
30 Hours of 
Music! 

40 disks 
or 

25 tapes 



SYNTHER 77 PLUS 



You control vibrato pattern, Bender rate, Volume level as 
well as Attack, Decay, Sustain, and Release (ADSR envelope). 
As you play you can record, then edit and save it to disk or 
tape. You can even fine tune it to match other instruments. 



The PIANO KEYBOARD is not necessary, you can use your 
COCO keyboard but the PIANO KEYBOARD makes your 
COCO a real music instrument $29.95 Disk only 



STEREO PAK 



TM 



Plug this gem into your computer, connect to your home stereo 
system and sit back and enjoy music realism. The STEREO PAK 
is a hardware music synthesizer that plays our MUSIC LIBRARY 
series and MUSICA 2 music in stereo. Because it was designed 
specifically with music reproduction in mind, the sound is 
superb. The highs are crisp and clear while the bass notes will 
rattle your walls. tnte/nally we use two high performance 8 bit 
digital to analog converters to assure fidelity. 

The STEREO PAK is all hardware. It is intended as an enhance- 
ment for MUSICA 2 and our MUSIC LIBRARY series. Disk users 
will require our Y-CABLE or a MULTI-PAK $29.95 



i - .31 





^61 NOTE PIANO KEYBOARD 




Our new 61 note {5 octave) full size keyboard is perfect for the 
beginner or professional. To give the PIANO KEYBOARD the most 
flexibility, we give you a choice of 5 different products to use: 
SYMPHONY 12, MUSICA 2, SYNTHER 77 PLUS, SUPER VOICE, and 
the CZ-101 CONNECTION. 



The PIANO KEYBOARD and SYM- 
PHONY 12 turns the COCO into a 12 
voice music synthesizer. When used 
with MUSICA 2, the PIANO KEYBOARD 
provides a user-friendly means of input- 
ting music. For those wishing control 
over Vibrato, Volume, Bender, as well 
as Attach, Decay, Sustain, and Release 
(ADSR), we offer SYNTHER 77 PLUS, 
a monophonic synthesizer. SUPER 
VOICE, COCO's most advanced speech 
synthesizer, doubles as a music synthesizer when used with the 
PIANO KEYBOARD. For those with the Casio CZ-101 music synthe- 
sizer, the CZ-101 CONNECTION allows you to connect the "full 
size" PIANO KEYBOARD to give you standard keyboard. 

61 NOTE PIANO KEYBOARD \ $119.95 

CZ-101 CONNECTION $ 29.95 



MUSICA 




$29.95 




•When in stereo mode, music is 
played through our STEREO PAK 
(purchased separately). 

• Loudness of each voice may be 
individually specified. 

• Memory available is constantly 
displayed. 

• Voice waveshapes may be 
exchanged between voices at any 
point. 

• Tempo may be specified and may 
even be altered as the music plays. 

• Flats and sharps supported. 
'Billions of timbre combinations. 

• High resolution graphic display, 
looks just like sheet music. 



• MUSICA 2 is 100% software, no need for 
hardware unless you want music produced in 
STEREO. In that case, the STEREO PAK may be 
purchased separately. It's a must for the 
audiophile! 

* Repeat bars allow repeating of music without 
re-inserting music a second or third time. 

* 30 page manual describes all. 

• Requires 64K. 



1 9$ 97445111 2 75 987560011 
3 3:95577100 4 9:9544320! 




SEES 



i: j 



Output music to your printer 
(Gemini 10X, Epson, R.S. printers). 




Tape or Disk 



•Allows you to specify key signature. 

• Voice timbre (waveshape) may be 
altered by specifying harmonic 
content just like stops on an organ. 

• During editing, voice being inserted 
is displayed. 

• Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading of music. 

• Measure bars aid in reading and 
developing music. 

• Each voice may be visually 
highlighted for easy identification. 

•4 Voices produced simultaneously. 

• Input notes from Coco keyboard, 
joystick, or Piano Keyboard. 



• Play music from your own BASIC program. 

• Block copy music for easy music development. 

• 100% machine language so it is lightning fast. 

• Vibrato effect easily produced. 

• With STEREO PAK, voices may be switched 
between left and right speakers as music plays. 

• Durations include; whole, half, quarter, 
eighth, sixteenth, thirty-second, sixty-fourth, 
and triplet. 



ft MUSIC THEORY <J & 



COURSE 1 



This course covers all the basics from music notation & duration, 
key signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the keyboard. This is 
an entry level course recommended as a prerequisite for Course 
2. 32K Disk only $49.95 



COURSE 2 

A more advanced course that deals with : Major and Harmonic Minor 
scales, interval spelling, Triad (Chord) theory, Inversions, Dominant 
7th chords, and ear training of the intervals. 32K Disk only . $49.95 



HOME COMMANDER 



9 



The HOME COMMANDER easily connects to the 
cassette port of your Color Computer and lets you 
control appliances in your home. 

NO WIRES NECESSARY 

The HOME COMMANDER uses your home's 
existing electrical wiring to control virtually any- 
thing. Appliances are controlled via small control 
modules available at your local SEARS or Radio 
Shack store. 

ON FRIDAY 7:42 PM, OFF 
SUNDAY 1:26 AM 

Included FREE is a program to allow you to control 
up to 256 devices and specify the time and date 
they are to be activated. That's right, the software 
has its own built in accurate clock. 




$59.95 




Imagine controlling a light or TV with your voice. 
When used with our Electronic Audio Recognition 
System, EARS, you can literally control any 
appliance. 

PLUG'N POWER USERS 

If you were disappointed in the software that 
came with the Radio Shack PLUG'N POWER unit, 
and you probably were, we'll offer you our pow- 
erful software separately. An early version is de- 
scribed in the Feb., April, June, and August 1983 
issues of RAINBOW. Our current version is even 

better $19.95 

PLUG'N POWER is a trademark of Radio Shack® 



PRECISION TIME MODULE $59.95 



— INCLUDES OS9 DRIVER — 






Now your computer will always know the correct 
time and date. This amazing precision time mod- 
ule is calibrated to the National Bureau of Stan- 
dards (WWV) atomic clock and you should never 
have to change it. 

Use the PRECISION TIME MODULE to add the 
time element to your games or use on BBS. If you 
like, purchase separately our BBS. 
COLORAMA BBS (64 K, 1 drive minimum) $99.95 

BATTERY BACKUP 

Even when your computer is off, the clock 
keeps correct time by operating using the 
internal battery backup system. 




MONTHS, LEAP YEARS & DST 

The PRECISON TIME MODULE automatically 
adjusts for the different number of days in 
each month as well as leap years. And believe 
it or not, it adjusts for DST so you don't have to 
remember if it's SPRING FORWARD or FALL 
FORWARD. 



Y-CABLE $28.95 

Why pay $100 to $200 for a multi-pak. With 
the Y-CABLE, you can connect your disk 
system to your computer along with either 
our STEREO PAK music synthesizer, our 
VOICE, SUPER VOICE speech synthesizers, 
or our PRECISION TIME MODULE. All con- 
nectors gold plated. 



TRIPLE Y $34.95 

We developed the Triple Y-Cable specifically 
for those interested in both speech synthesis 
and speech recognition. The Triple Y-Cable 
lets you connect EARS and SUPER VOICE to 
your color computer along with your disk 
system. 






t% Need an 

^ ATTENTION EXPERIMENTERS! «*« $2900 

Interested in building your own project? Disks (any quantity) $1.49 

Our oversized board gives plenty of room Tape C-10, C-20 $0.69 

for construction whilethe sturdyaluminum Advanced Hard Tape Box $0.29 

case with black satin finish assures protec- Q hjp 6321 $2.95 

tion and a professional appearance. SSI-263 74LS138 $0 79 

Prototype Board only $19.95 M495 7407 $ °* 79 

Prototype Enclosure only $19.95 * IC sockets 14, 16, 22 pin $0.29 

Buy both for $29.95 IC sockets 24, 28, 40 $0.39 





V/' 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V4% sales tax 



Speech Systems 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

coloSa^ (312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 



014 

12 C=1:W(0)=2:W(1)=4:W(2)=8:GOTO 
14 

13 C=-1:W(0)=1:W(1)=8:W(2)=4 

14 IFR$ (R(R) ) <> 11 TUNNE L " THENF=0 : B 
=5ELSEF=5 : B=0 i IFO ( 11 ) <2 0 0THEN4 

15 PM0DE2 , 1 : PCLSB : PM0DE4 , 1 : COLOR 
F, B: LINE (0,0) -(255,96) ,PSET,B:X= 
INSTR(1,S$,LEFT$(R$(R(R) ) ,3) ) :X= 
(X+2)/3 : IFX<10GOTO138ELSEONX-9GO 
TO140, 144 , 146 , 151, 154 , 157 , 160 , 16 
2,163,165,169 

16 IFR=50ANDP(12)=1THENN=18:GOTO 
54ELSEIFR=65THEN41ELSEIFR=52THEN 
IFP ( 13 ) =1THENN=22 : G0T059ELSEIF0 ( 
22)=52THENN=21:GOT0124 

17 IFR=70THENPRINT@416 , "THERE AR 
E SOME NUMBERS SCRIBBLEDON THE N 
ORTH WALL" : IFU=1THENPRINT@106 , P ( 
15) "="P(16) "="P(17) 

18 IFR=69ANDP(18)=0THENPRINT"THE 

RE IS A PADLOCKED DOOR TO THEEAS 

T" : IFU=3THENDRAW"BM110 , 90C0U70R5 

0ND70BG12L26D20R26U20" : P0KE178, 6 
4:PAINT(126,36) , ,0 : P0KE178 , 0 

19 IFR=10THENPRINT"YOU ENTERED A 
TRAP FOR POTENTIALESCAPEES. YOU 
ARE IN ISOLATION FROM WHICH TH 

ERE IS NO ESCAPE . " ; : FORK=1TO20 : P 
MODE 2 , 1 : POKE 17 9 , K : PCLS : PLAY "L2 5 5 

; 04 ; 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 6 ; 7 ; 8 ; 9 " : NEXT : PMOD 
E4,l:GOT0178 

20 IFR=14THENR=31:GOT014ELSEIFR> 
1THENIFO(1)OR AND0(1)<145THENPR 
INT" THE NOTE FROM GEORGE WAS FOU 
ND AND YOU HAVE BOTH BEEN CAUGH 
T":GOT0178 

21 G0T04 

22 PRINT@448,"YOU CANNOT GO THAT 
WAY": GOTO 4 

23 AV$=LEFT$(A$+" ",3):AN$=MID 
$(A$+» ",INSTR(1,A$," ")+l,4) 
:V=INT( (2+INSTR(l,V$,AV$) )/3) :N= 
INT( (3+INSTR(l,N$,AN$) ) /4) 

24 ONV GOT025,25,39,39,46,49,49, 
51,61,62,68,75,76,82,84,86,88,90 
, 92, 99, 103, 104, 108, 113, 118, 121,1 
21 , 124 , 126 , 128 , 130 , 133 : PRINT"SOR 
RY. I DO NOT UNDERSTAND. " : G0T04 

25 IFP(5)=1ANDR=60THEN14:GOTO4EL 
SED=INSTR(1, "NORTSOUTEASTWEST" , A 
N$ ) : IFD>0THENU= ( D+3 ) /4 : ONU G0T01 
0 , 11, 12 , 13ELSEIFAN$="L00K"THEN14 
: GOT04ELSEIFN>15THEN3 1ELSEIF0 (N) 
<150THENPRINT"YOU DO NOT HAVE IT 
. " : GOTO 4 

26 IFN= 10RN= 1 2 THENPRINT " THERE IS 
WRITING ON IT"ELSEIFN=2THENPRIN 

T"IT IS TORN. IT IS A LIST OF SO 



MESORT . " : MID$ (N$ , 5 , 4 ) ="LIST" : 0$ ( 
2 ) ="LIST"ELSEIFN=4THENPRINT"RIFL 
E SHELLS 11 ELSE IFN=5THENPRINT "OXYG 
EN MASK"ELSEIFN=6THENPRINT"0XYGE 
N BOTTLE MARKED FULL" 

27 I FN= 9 THENPRINT "HAND OPERATED" 
ELSEI FN=1 1THENPRINT " CONTAINS BAT 
TERIES"ELSEIFN=13THENPRINT"S0FT 
LENS " E LS E I FN= 1 4 THENPRINT "VERY SH 
ARP " E LS E I FN= 1 5 THENPRI NT " VERY S TU 
RDY IN APPEARANCE" 

28 IFN=8THENIFP (0 ) =0THENPRINT"A 
BOOK OF MATCHES WITH ONLY ONE MA 
TCH IN IT "ELSEPRINT" COMPLETELY E 
MPTY" 

29 IFN=3THENIFP ( 1) =0THENPRINT"TH 
E SHELL CHAMBER IS EMPTY"ELSEPRI 
NT "THERE IS A SHELL IN THE CHAMB 
ER" 

30 GOT037 

31 IFO (N) OR THENPRINT "THAT IS N 

OT HERE" :GOTO4ELSEIFN=16ORN=30TH 

ENPRINT " THERE IS WRITING ON IT"E 

LSEIFN=17AND0 ( 3 ) <0THENPRINT"ALAR 

M PROTECTED. HOWEVER YOU SEEONE 
RIFLE AGAINST THE WALL OUTS 

IDE THE GUNCASE. "; :0(3)=29 

32 IFN=19AND0 (4) <0THENPRINT"FULL 
OF AMMO AND APPEARS VERY HEAV 

Y" : 0 (4) =R ELSEIFN=2 1 THENPRINT "A 
REMBRANDT ORIGINAL I BELIEVE "ELS 
EIFN=2 5AND0 ( 9 ) <0ANDO ( 10 ) <0THENPR 
INT "THE DRILL AND SHOVEL LOOK"," 
INTERESTING" : 0 ( 9 ) =R : 0 ( 10 ) =R 
3 3 IFN=2 4THENIFP ( 4 ) =0THENPRINT" I 
T IS EMPTY"ELSEIFP(5)=0THENPRINT 
"IT IS OPEN "ELSE PRINT "TOTAL DARK 
NESS . " 

34 IFN=2 6THENPRINT"SLOW EASY RAP 
IDS "ELSEIFN=27THENPRINT" LOOKS IN 
VITING"ELSEIFN=29THENPRINT" THERE 

IS A SIGN ON IT":O(30)=R ELSEIF 
N=3 1THENPRINT" SHE IS HUGE AND UG 
LY. ALSO SHE IS DROOLING AS SHE 

APPROACHES "ELSEIFN=35THENPRINT" 
TYPE <A> I THINK." 

35 IFN=23THENPOKE178,88:LINE(0,0 
) -(255,95) ,PSET,BF:POKE178,P(14) 
: LINE ( 100 , 50 ) - ( 156 , 95 ) , PSET , BF : P 
OKE178 , 0 : POKE 17 9,0: PRINT "WONDER 
WHAT IS BEHIND IT?" 

36 IFN=33THENPRINT"A STURDY BRAN 
CH ARCHES ACROSS THE PIT OPENI 
NG ABOVE"ELSEIFN=34THENR=R+10 :G0 
TO14ELSEIFN=37THEN180 

37 IFPEEK(1440)=96THENPRINT"YOU 
SEE NOTHING SPECIAL" 

38 G0T04 

39 IFO(N)=150THENPRINT"YOU ALREA 



46 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



DY HAVE THAT":GOT04ELSEIFO(N)>=j3 
AND0(N)OR THENPRINT " THAT IS NOT 
HERE" : GOT04ELSEIFN=37THEN44ELSE 
IFN>150RO (N) <j3THENPRINT" YOU CANN 
OT GET THAT":GOT04ELSEIFP(3) >6TH 
ENPRINT"YOUR HANDS ARE FULL": GOT 
04 

4)3 P(3)=P(3)+l:0(N)=15j3:PRINT"TA 
KEN" : IFN=6ANDR=5j3THENLINE ( 158 , 52 
)-(166,43) ,PSET,BF E LS E I FN= 5 ANDR 
=5j3THENLINE ( 158 , 40 ) - ( 170 , 3 4 ) , PSE 
T, BF 

41 IFR=65THENIFO(9)=15j3THENDRAW" 
BM110 , 41C5EL2ED2U7ER3EU7HL3HU5EH 
EHEHEHEHEHEHCj3 " 

42 IFR=65THENIFO(lj3)=15j3THENPOKE 
178, 99: LINE (222, 24) -(236, 7j3) ,PSE 
T,BF:POKE178,j3 

4 3 IFR=10 J3 THENI FN= 1 1THENPRINT " YO 
U TRIPPED AND SPRAINED YOUR AN 
KLE" 

44 I FN= 1 2 THENGOTO 14ELSEIFN=37 THE 
NPRINT"YOUR GREED HAS DEFEATED Y 
OU. YOUARE NOW TRAPPED IN THE PO 
OL AS GEORGE ESCAPES" :GOT0178 

45 G0T04 

4 6 IFNO80R0 (N) < 1 5J3THENPRINT " YOU 
CANNOT DO THAT": GOTO 4 ELS EI FRO 6 



j3THENPRINT " YOU HAVE WASTED YOUR 
ONLY MATCH AND PROBABLY THE GAME 

":P(j3)=l:GOT04 

47 IFP(j3)>j3THENPRINT"YOUR MATCH 
IS ALREADY SPENT" : G0T04ELSEP (ft) = 
2 : PM0DE2 , 1 : PCLS5 : PM0DE4 , 1 : PRINT" 
A MESSAGE APPEARS ATTACHED TO 
THE CASKET LID OVER HEAD. IT 
SAYS ..." 

48 PRINT@j3 , "YOU FOOL. IT WAS I W 
HO STOLE THEAFRICAN JEWEL. AND I 
T WAS I WHO FRAMED YOU. ONLY YOU 

WILL NEVER TELL BECAUSE ONLY I 
KNOW YOU AREHERE AND I WILL NEVE 
R TELL. " , , "GEORGE RUBIX" : GOTO 4 

49 IFO(N) <>150THENPRINT"YOU DO N 
OT HAVE THAT"ELSEPRINT"OK. YOU N 
0 LONGER HAVE IT. " :0(N) =R:P(3) =P 
(3)-l 

5j3 GOTO 4 

51 IFN=36ANDR=36THENPRINT"USE TH 
E FOUR ARROW KEYS TO" , "POSITION 
THE CURSOR AND PRESS ENTER TO 
OPEN DESIRED CUPBOARD. " ; : K=j3 : Z=2 
:GOSUB134ELSE54 

52 PRINT@416,STRING$(95,32) ;:PRI 
NT@416 , " 11 ; : POKE178 , j3 : LINE (X, Y) - ( 
X+16,Y+22) ,PSET,BF:IFX=P(lj3)ANDY 



nuL 



■ • ■ ■ • 




• 9 - • 



• • ■ m 



I 



I 



:reen 



^ COLOR CHARACTER GENERATOR ^ 



RAINBOW 

A NEW DIMENSION IN COLOR COMPUTING 



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•Full 224 tevt and graphic characters. Underline in all PM0DE5. 
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•All machine languagei user transparent. Supports all BASIC» 
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vertical mode. 

• Use up to 4 defineable window screens of any size. Also 
includes horizontally scrolling (crawling) one line screens. 

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Epson 4 Gemini printers. < Please specify) 

• Special Trace Delay can be used to debug programs one line at 
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fc printer simultaneously. 

•A must for all color computer owners. Once you try it you 
won't write another program without it. 



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(519) 681-0133 



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STATION B 
LONDON ONTARIO 
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MINIMUM REQUIREMENT 
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Tape to Disk upgrade available for *8US or *10CDN. We pay 
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please add *1. Other countries please add S2. Charge orders 
please add *1 . 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 47 



=40THENX=X+5 : DRAW"BM=X ; , 60C5U6NR 
6E2R6NG2D6G2NL6BM24 , 10" : PAINT (X+ 
2,58) ,5,5:0(19)=R:PRINT"THERE IS 
A SMALL BOX HERE"ELSEPRINT"NOTH 
ING IMPORTANT" 

53 GOTO 4 

54 IFN<>18ANDR<>50THEN58ELSEIFP( 
11)=0THENPRINT"IT IS LOCKED" : GOT 
04ELSEP(12)=1:LINE(154,6)-(176,5 

4) ,PSET,BF:FORY=18T054STEP12:DRA 
W" BM154 , =Y ; C5ER2 0GL2 0 " : NEXT : IFO ( 

5) =-lTHENO(5)=R 

55 IF0(6)=-1THEN0(6)=R 

56 IFO(6)=R THENDRAW"BE2BR4HU5E2 
U2R2D2F2D5GL4" : POKE178 , 1 : PAINT ( 1 
62,50) , ,5:POKE178,0 

57 IFO(5)=R THENDRAW"BM158,40C5E 
6F6L12" :POKE178,2:PAINT(162,38) , 
,5:POKE178,0:GOTO4 

58 IFN<>22ORO(22)<>52THEN60ELSEP 
RINT" COMBINATION?", :INPUT"1ST NU 
MBER" ;N1: INPUT"2ND NUMBER" ;N2 : IN 
PUT"3RD NUMBER" ;N3:IFN1=P( 15) AND 
N2=P ( 16 ) ANDN3=P ( 17 ) THENPRINT @ 4 6 4 
,"SAFE IS OPEN"ELSEPRINT@464 , "IT 

DID NOT WORK":GOT04 

59 LINE(139,8)-(165,36) ,PSET,BF: 
DRAW"BM139,3 6C5E4U20NH4R18NE4D20 
NF4L18C0 " : P ( 13 ) =1 : IFO ( 7 ) =-lTHENO 
(7)=R 

60 IFR=29ANDN=17THENPRINT"AN ALA 
RM SOUNDS QUICKLY SIGNAL= ING TH 
E GUARDS" :GOT0178ELSE4 

61 IFN<>3 30RRO13 5THENPRINT"WHEE 
... THAT WAS FUN. " : GOT04ELSEPRI 
NT "A SUCCESSFUL JUMP ...", "YOU HA 
VE CLEARED THE PIT. 11 :R=133 :0 (3 3) 
=134:GOT014 

62 IFR(R) <>12THENPRINT"HOW IN TH 
E WORLD WILL YOU DO THAT?": GO 
TO 4 ELSE INPUT "WHAT TYPE OF STROKE 
? <1> BUTTER=FLY <2> FREE STYLE 

<3> DOG PADDLE" ;A$:A=VAL(A$ 
) :PRINT@416,STRING$(94,32) ; : PRIN 
T@416,""; :ONA GOT063, 64,65 :GOT04 

63 PRINT "YOU SHOULD GO OUT FOR T 
HE OLYM= PICS":GOT066 

64 PRINT "A LIBERAL; NO DOUBT": GO 
T066 

65 PRINT"HOW ABOUT SOME ALPO?" 

66 PRINT "YOU MADE IT TO THE OTHE 
R SIDE" : IFD (R) =1THEND (R) =2ELSED ( 
R)=l 

67 GOT04 

68 IFN=3 6ANDR=3 6THENFORX=24T0238 
STEP24 : FORY=10TO40STEP30 : POKE178 
, 2 : LINE (X , Y) - (X+16 , Y+22 ) , PSET , BF 
: CIRCLE (X+4 , Y+lj3) ,2,01 NEXTY , X : 0 ( 
19 ) =-1 : IFO ( 4 ) =3 6THENO ( 4 ) =-1 



69 IFN<>18ORRO50THEN71ELSEP(12) 
=0 : POKE178 , 3 : LINE ( 154 , 6 ) - ( 176 , 54 
) , PSET , BF : DRAW" BM159 , 2 1C0U4R4U4R 
4D4R4D4L4D4L4U4L4" : CIRCLE ( 158 , 30 
) ; 2:POKE178,2:PAINT(165,18) , ,0:P 
OKE178 ,0 : IFO (5) =50THENO (5) =-1 
10 IFO(6)=50THENO(6)=-1 

71 IFN=24ANDP(4)=1THENPM0DE2,1:P 
CLSp : PMODE4 , 1 : PRINT "OK" : 0 ( 2 4 ) =0 : 
P(5)=1ELSE4 

72 PMODE2 , 3 : PCLS5 : PMODE4 , 1 : PRINT 
@256, "AFTER A WHILE; THE CASKET 
BEGINSTO MOVE . . . " : FORK=1TO900 : NE 
XT: PRINT "THEN YOU HEAR A TRUCK E 
NGINE. . .":PRINT:A$="L25501;l;2;3 

; 6 ; 4 ; 8 ; 9 ; 11 ; 3 ; 2 ; 12 ; 4 ; 6 ; 1 ; " : FORK= 

1TO50 : PLAYA$ : NEXT : F0RK=1T05J3J3 : NE 
XT 

73 PRINT: PRINT "AFTER A FEW KNOCK 
S AND BANGS ALLMOTION CEASES AND 

YOU HEAR DIRT HITTING THE CASKE 
T. " : FORK=12TO0STEP-1 : PLAY"V=K; "+ 
LEFT$ (A$, 21) +»V12P"+STR$ (RND(1J3) 
) :NEXT 

74 IFO(5)O150ORO(6)O15J3THENPRI 
NT@416, "SINCE YOU DO NOT HAVE TH 
E OXYGENMASK OR BOTTLE; YOU HAVE 

QUICKLYSUFFOCATED FROM LACK OF 
OXYGEN" ;: GOTO 17 8 

75 IFINSTR ( 1 , "NSEW" , LEFT$ ( AN$ , 1 ) 
) >j3THENA$=LEFT$ ( AN$ , 1 ) :GOT08ELSE 

IFN=270RN=240RN=29THEN76ELSE PRI 
NT"YOU CANNOT GO THERE AT THIS T 
IME":GOT04 

76 IFN=3 3 ANDR=13 4THENPRINT"GOOD 
TRY BUT THE WALLS ARE TOO SLIPP 
ERY . "ELSEIFAN$="WALL" THENPRINT" T 
HIS IS DRIVING ME CRAZY TOO" 

77 IFP (5) =j3THENIFN=24ANDR=6j3THEN 
IFP (4) ^THENPRINT "OK. YOU ARE IN 

THE CASKET" : P (4 )=1:D(60)=0: GOTO 
14ELSEPRINT"OK. YOU ARE OUT OF T 
HE CASKET" : P ( 4 ) =0 : D ( 60 ) =1 : GOT014 

7 8 IFN=2 7 THENIFR=1 1 1 THENPRINT " TH 
AT WAS REFRESHING" : R=110 : GOT014E 
LSEPRINT "AH . . . JUST WHAT THE DOC 
TOR" , "ORDERED" : R=lll : GOT014 

79 IFN=15ANDR=134ANDP(8)=1THENPR 
INT "IT WAS QUITE A STRUGGLE BUT 
YOU PULLED YOURSELF OUT":R=135:0 
(33)=135:GOT014 

80 I FN= 2 9 ANDR= 1 4 J3 THENPRI NT " THE F 
ENCE WAS CHARGED AND NOW SOARE Y 
0U":G0TO178 

81 GOTO 4 

82 IFN=18ANDR=50THENIFP(11)=1THE 
NPRINT"IT IS ALREADY UNLOCKED"EL 
SEIFO(7)<15^)THENPRINT"YOU DO NOT 

HAVE THE KEY "ELSEPRINT" YOUR KEY 



48 THE RAINBOW April! 986 



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Dealer enquiries welcome 
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Mind-tingling actions 



THE SECOND RAINBOW BOOK OF 





Twenty-four of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled await you in this latest offering from The Rainbow 
Bookshelf. Journey through time, fight World War III, win 
the heart of a beautiful and mysterious princess. Experience 
the titrations of the most rugged Adventurer without ever 
leaving your seat. 



J 



Order The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and among the 24 program 
listings you'll receive are: 



Yellow Submarine — Meet the Beatles and attempt to 
outlast the Blue Meanies while enjoying some of the 
Fab Four's all-time musical hits. 
Ring Quest — Regain possession of a magical ring and 
save a^indom. 

Time Tripper — Lost in another dimension. 



Chief inspector — Who killed B.L. Brown? 

Sir Randolf Returns — The sequel to a favorite from our 

first Adventure book. 

Siiverton House — Where's the money been stashed? 
Ice Princess — Just one glance at this beauty will steal 
your heart. 



Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mark Fetherston, Jeff Crow, Larry Lansberry, 
J.C. Jackson, Robert W. Mangum II, Robert Poppe, David Taylor, Gregory Clark, Steve Skrzyniarz, David L. Dawson, Curtis Boyle, 
Bruce K. Bell, Pat Pugliano, Pat and John Everest, Mike Fahy, Scott Settembre, Darin Anderson, Robert L. Thomas, Terrance Hale, Paul 
Hensel, Philip Courie, Michael Dennison and Robert Dickau. 

The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures sells for only $13.95! 

THREE BONUS PROGRAMS 

WHEN YOU BUY THE SECOND RAINBOW ADVENTURES TAPE! 

That's right You'll receive a total of 27 fantastic Adventures when you get the Second Rainbow 
Adventures tape. The three bonus games are Castle Thuudo, by Carmen D. Michele; Halls of 
Dungeon Death, by Eric and Mark Riel; and Caves of Kalakh, by Jane Fisher — programs with 
listings too lengthy to include in the book. Save yourself hours of typing listings. Load these great 
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The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape is only $13.95. 

The tape is an adjunct and complement to the book. Even if you buy the Second Rainbow 
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Keep your Rainbow Bookshelf up-to-date! 
See Page 126 for additional Rainbow Bookshelf offerings. 





□ Please send me 
The Second Rainbow 
Book Of Adventures 
for $13.95* 



□ Please send me 
The Second Rainbow 
Adventures Tape 
for $13.95 




The Rainbow Bookshelf™ 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed.* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 



Account Number 
Signature 



Exp. Date 



Mail to: The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures, 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 

'Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S., add $4. Allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
U.S. currency only, please. 



WORKED. IT IS UNLOCKED" :P (11) =1 
ELSEPRINT"YOU CANNOT DO THAT" 

83 GOT04 

84 IFN=18ANDR=50THENIFP(11)=0THE 
NPRINT"IT IS ALREADY LOCKED"ELSE 
IFO(7)<150THENPRINT"YOU DO NOT H 
AVE THE KEY M ELSEPRINT"OK":P(ll)= 
0ELSEPRINT"YOU CANNOT DO THAT" 

85 GOTO 4 

86 IFO(10)<150THENPRINT"YOU HAVE 
NO S HOVE L " E LS E I FR< > 60 THENPRINT " 

NO EFFECT"ELSEIFP(4)=1ANDP(5)=1T 
HENIFP(6)=1THENPRINT"Y0U MADE A 
HOLE IN THE CASKET WALL. THE L 
OOSE DIRT ALLOWED YOUTO DIG TO T 
HE SURFACE . " : R=71 : GOSUB14ELSEPRI 
NT "THE SIDES ARE TOO HARD." 

87 GOT04 

88 IFO(9)<150THENPRINT"YOU HAVE 
NO DRILL"ELSEIFP(4)OlORP(5)<>10 
RR< > 60 THENPRINT " WHAT A NICE ROUN 
D HOLE YOU HAVE MADE"ELSEIFP(0) - 
2THENPRINT"A DRAFT OF AIR EXTING 
UISHES YOURMATCH" : P ( 6 ) =1ELSEPRIN 
T"TOO DARK" 

89 GOTO 4 

90 IFO(N)O150THENPRINT"YOU DO N 
OT HAVE IT TO THR0W"ELSEIFN<>150 
RR<> 134 THENPRINT " GOOD THROW . " : GO 
T049ELSEPRINT"YOU HAVE APPARENTL 

Y HAD PRACTICE THE ROPE IS TIGHTL 

Y HOOKED ON THE BRANCH ABOVE." 
:P(8)=1:0(15)=134:P(3)=P(3)-1 

91 GOT04 

92 IFN<16ANDO (N) < 1 5 0THENPRINT " YO 
U DO NOT HAVE THAT" :GOT04ELSEIFN 
>15AND0(N)OR THENPRINT "THAT IS 
NOT HERE" :GOT04 

93 I FN= 1THENPMODE 2 , 1 : PCLS5 : PMODE 
4,1: PRINT" IT IS A NOTE FROM GEOR 
GE RUBIX. .A NERVOUS BUT FRIENDLY 

GUARD.":PRINT@0,"I KNOW YOU ARE 
INNOCENT AND HAVEA PLAN FOR YOU 
R ESCAPE. ";ELSE95 

94 PRINT" GET THE OXYGEN MASK FR 
OM THE INFIRMARY. THEN GO TO THE 

MORGUE AND HIDE IN AN OPEN CAS 
KET. YOU WILL BE BURIED BUT I W 
ILL COME DIG YOU UP. YOUR CELL 
DOOR IS UNLOCKED. PLEASE DESTROY 

THIS NOTE.":GOT04 

95 IFN=2THENPMODE2 , 1 : PCLS0 : PMODE 
4,1: PRINT "THE LIST SAYS . . . " : P=0 : 
FORK=lTOLEN (V$) STEP3 : PRINT@P,MID 
$ ( V$ , K , 3 ) ; : P=P+4 : NEXT : GOT04 

96 I FN= 1 6 THENI FU= 3 THENPRINT " ETCH 
ED ON THE WINDOW IS ..." : PRINT@10 
9, "WARDEN" ,* :GOT04ELSEPRINT"YOU A 
RE NOT FACING IT" 



97 IFN=12THENPRINT"IT SAYS... ME 
DICALERT. I WEAR CONTACT LENSE 
S . " , "GEORGE RUBIX"ELSEIFN=30THEN 
PRINT"IT SAYS... DANGER. HIGH VO 
LTAGE. "ELSEPRINT"THERE IS NOTHIN 
G TO READ." 

98 GOT04 

99 IFAN$<>"GUN "ANDN03THENPRINT 
"YOU CAN ONLY SHOOT GUNS":GOT04E 
LSEIFO (3) <> 150 THENPRINT "YOU HAVE 

NO GUN.":GOTO4ELSEIFP(1)=0THENP 
RINT"YOUR GUN IS EMPTY" :GOT04 ELS 
EP(1)=0 

100 INPUT"AT WHAT ARE YOU AIMING 
" ;A$: IFA$="LOCK"ANDR=69THENIFU<> 
3 THENPRINT "YOU ARE NOT FACING IT 
" : P (1) =1 : GOT04ELSEPRINT"THE PADL 
OCK FALLS TO THE FLOOR AND THE 
DOOR SWINGS OPEN":P(18)=l:D(69)= 
3:GOT014 

101 I FA $= " S PI DER " THENPRINT " YOUR 
SHOT GREATLY ALARMED THE SPIDE 
R WHO INJECTED YOU WITH A DEADL 
Y POISON" :GOT017 8 

102 PRINT "YOU SHOULD NOT PLAY WI 
TH GUNS":GOT04 

103 INPUT "ARE YOU SURE ";A$:A$=L 
EFT$ (A$ , 1) : IFA$=" Y"THEN179ELSE4 

104 INPUT "SAVE TO DISK OR TAPE 0 
R ABORT ";A$:A$=LEFT$(A$,1) :IFA$ 
=»A"THEN4ELSEIFA$="D"THENDN=1ELS 
EDN=-1 : PRINT@448 , "POSITION TAPE . 

PRESS PLAY=RECORDAND PRESS <ENT 
ER> . " ; : INPUTA$ 

105 PRINT@0, "SAVING" ; :GOSUB187 

106 OPEN"0" , DN, "ZONEDATA" : PRINT# 
DN,R;0$(2) :PRINT#DN,MID$(N$,5,4) 
:FORK=0TO18:PRINT#DN,P(K) ; : NEXT : 
FORK=1TO140:PRINT#DN,D(K) ; : NEXT : 
F0RK=1T037:PRINT#DN,0(K) ; :NEXT:C 
LOSE 

107 EXEC32211:GOT04 

108 IFAN$="GUN "ORN=3THENIFO (3) < 
150THENPRINT"YOU HAVE NO GUN": GO 
T04ELSEIFO(4) <150THENPRINT"YOU H 
AVE NO AMMO":GOT04ELSEP(l)=l:PRI 
NT "CHAMBER IS LOADED" : GOT04 

109 INPUT"LOAD FROM DISK OR TAPE 
OR ABORT" ;A$ : A$=LEFT$ (A$ , 1) : I FA 

$="A"THEN4ELSEIFA$="D"THENDN=1EL 
SEDN=-1:PRINT@448, "POSITION TAPE 
. PRESS PLAY AND PRESS ENTER." 
J * INPUTAS 

110 PRINT @0 , "LOADING" ; : GOSUB187 

111 OPEN" I" , DN, "ZONEDATA" : INPUT* 
DN,R,0$(2) , O$:FORK-0TO18:INPUT#D 
N,P(K) : NEXT :FORK=lTO 140: INPUT #DN 
, D (K) : NEXT : F0RK=1T03 7 : INPUT # DN , O 
(K) : NEXT : CLOSE : MID$ (N$ , 5 , 4 ) =0$ 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 51 



The Ultimate 
Color Computer 

Enhancements 
for Productivity 
from HJL Products 



m 




To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get information 
into and out of the system. 

This is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer. 

The Keyboard $79.95 

The overwhelming favorite of serious 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program. 
Installs in Just a few minutes with no 
soldering. 

The Numeric Keypad - $89.95 

The NumberJack is a self-contained, 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshlfted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
all necessary connectors for quick and 
easy installation without soldering. 




PROD 






The Monitor Adapter • $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, and is easily 
Installed without clips, Jumpers or 
soldering (except in some later CoCo 2s 
with soldered-in video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor - $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used it you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
below) 

The BASIC Utility - $25.95 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any color computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, word wrap, global search, 



and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-legendable 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 

Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800-462-4891 
International calls: 718-235-8358 




Ordering Information: Specify model (Original, F-verslon, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3.50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 



112 EXEC32211:GOT014 

113 0NRND(4) G0T0114 , 115, 116 , 117 

114 PRINT" YOU ARE ON YOUR OWN.": 
GOT04 

115 PRINT "ARE YOU SURE YOU ARE C 
UT OUT FORTHIS.":GOT04 

116 PRINT"YOU ARE TRAVELING IN A 
DIFFERENTDIMENSION. " : GOT04 

117 PRINT"YOUR SOLUTION IS THE K 
EY TO THE IMAGINATION .": GOT04 

118 X=0 : PMODE2 , 1 : PCLS5 : PMODE4 , 1 : 
PRINT @0 , "YOU HAVE" ,* : F0RK=1T03 6 : 1 
FO (K) >1 4 9 THENPRINTTAB (11)0$ (K) : X 
=1 

119 NEXT : IFX=0THENPRINTTAB (11) "N 
OTHING . " 

120 G0T07 

121 IFO(N)<150THENPRINT"YOU DO N 
OT HAVE THAT" : G0T04ELSEIFNO11TH 
ENPRINT " YOU CANNOT TURN "AV$" TH 
AT" : G0TO4ELSEIFV=2 6THENIF0 ( 11) =2 
00THENPRINT"OK" : O ( 11) =150ELSEPRI 
NT "ALREADY OFF" 

122 IFV=27THENIFO(11)=150THENPRI 
NT "OK" : 0 (11) =200ELSEPRINT"ALREAD 

Y ON" 

123 G0T014 

124 IFN=21ANDR=52THENLINE(139,8) 
-(165,36) ,PSET,BF: CIRCLE (152, 22) 
,3, 5:0(22) =R ELSEPRINT"THAT HAD 
NO EFFECT" 

125 G0T04 

126 IFO(N)<>150THENPRINT"YOU DO 
NOT HAVE THAT"ELSEIFN=1THENPRINT 
"GOOD IDEA. THEY WILL NEVER FIND 

THE "AN$" ON Y0U.":0(1)=145ELSE 
PRINT "THAT COULD BE DANGEROUS. B 
ESIDESYOU ARE NOT EVEN HUNGRY." 

127 G0T014 

128 I FN=2 3 ANDR= 5 3 THENPRI NT " A DOO 
RWAY IS REVEALED! 11 :D (53) =9: P(14) 
=0: GOTO 3 5 

129 PRINT" BE CAREFUL. YOU MIGHT 
HURT YOUR BIG T0E.":G0T04 

130 IFO(N)O150THENPRINT"YOU DO 
NOT HAVE IT":GOT04ELSEIFN<>120RR 
<>13 1THEN13 2ELSEIF0 ( 14 ) =150THENP 
RINT"THE SPIDER WAS DISTRACTED B 

Y ITS SHINE LONG ENOUGH FOR YOU T 
0 CUTYOURSELF LOOSE AND ESCAPE": 
R=132:0(12)=-l:P(3)=P(3)-l:GOT01 
4 

131 PRINT 11 THE SPIDER WAS MOMENTA 
RILY DIS= TRACTED; BUT WITHOUT A 

KNIFE YOUCANNOT ESCAPE" :GOT0178 

132 PRINT" I WOULD NOT ADVISE THA 
T": GOTO 4 

133 P(2)=P(2)-l:PRINT"YOUR SCORE 
IS"P(2)" MOVES .": G0T04 



134 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$=" A "THENY=Y-30 
ELSEIFQ$=CHR$ ( 10 ) THENY=Y+3 0ELSEI 
FQ$=CHR$ (8) THENX=X-24ELSEIFQ$=CH 
R$ ( 9 ) THENX=X+24ELSEIFQ$=CHR$ ( 13 ) 
THENRETURN 

135 IFY<10THENY=10ELSEIFY>40THEN 
Y=40 

13 6 IFX<24THENX=24ELSEIFX>216THE 
NX=216 

137 POKE178,K:LINE(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4 
) , PSET, BF: POKE178 , Z : LINE (X, Y) - (X 
+4,Y+4) ,PSET,BF:GOT0134 

138 IFX<1THEN188ELSEP0KE491,X:IF 
P (5) = 1 ANDR= 6 0 THENPMO DE 2 , 1 : PCLS0 : 
PM0DE4 , 1ELSEEXEC3 2 714 

139 G0T016 

140 FORX=40TO220STEP180: CIRCLE (X 
,80) ,16,0, .3,0, .5:CIRCLE(X,80) ,8 
,0, .3,0, .5:CIRCLE(X,64) ,16,0, .3, 
0, .5: CIRCLE (X, 60) ,16,0, . 3 : PAINT ( 
X,60) ,0,0:N=X-14:DRAW"BM=N; ,80E2 
R2F2M-8 , -16NU4BR32NU4M-8 , +16E2R2 
F2":NEXT 

141 DRAW"C0BM128,90R5E5U32G5L5H5 
D32NF5BU4M-48 , -24D2M-4 , -2U26M+4 , 
+2ND24M+48,+20BR15M+45,-27D24NM- 
45 , +32D2M+4 , -2U25NM-4 , +2U2H2M-54 
, -14L2M-57 , +20G2D2BR16M+40 , +16R8 
M+38 , -22M-40 , -12L2M-44 , +16D2H2U2 
M+46 , -17RM+42 , +12D2G2" 

142 DRAW"BM0 , 60M+70 , -20BR118BU8M 
+68,+6":POKE178,l:PAINT(2,90) , ,0 
: PAINT (128, 30) , ,0:POKE178,60:PAI 
NT (100, 50) , ,0: PAINT (150, 60) , ,0:P 
AINT(130,60) , ,0:POKE178,2 :PAINT( 
40,70) , ,0:PAINT(220,70) , ,0:PAINT 
(130,55) , ,0:PAINT(2,90) , ,0:POKE1 
78,64:PAINT(2,2) , ,0 

143 G0T016 

144 PM0DE1, 1:PCLS6:PM0DE4, 1:DRAW 
"BM0,85C0M+101,-25NU60M+155,+30" 
:IF0(12)=R THENCIRCLE(100,70) ,9, 
5, .5 

145 G0T016 

146 DRAW"BM0,85C0M+100,-25NU60M+ 
136, +35" 

147 FORX=0TO100STEP8:LINE(X,85-X 
/4) -(100,X*. 6) , PSET: LINE (X+4, 85- 
(X+4) /4) - (0,85- (X+4 ) * • 6) , PSET: NE 
XT : FORX=0TO112STEP8 : LINE (0 , X* . 7 ) 
- (X* . 8 5 , 0 ) , PSET : NEXT : F0RX=2 0TO0S 
TEP-5 : LINE ( 100 , X+35) - (0 , X) , PSET : 
NEXT: FORX=0TO100STEP12: LINE (X,0) 
-(100, 35-. 3 5*X) , PSET: NEXT 

148 FORX=0TO96STEP8: LINE (100, .6* 
X) - ( 100+X , 0 ) , PSET : LINE ( X+100 , 60+ 
X/4)-(100, 60-.6*X) , PSET: NEXT: FOR 
X=104TO136STEP8 : LINE (X+100 , 60+X/ 
4) -(X,0) , PSET : NEXT :F0RX=142T0155 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 53 



STEP6 : LINE (X+100 , 9 5 ) - ( X , 0 ) , PSET : 
NEXT: FORX=160TO250STEP6 : LINE (X, 0 
)-(255,250-X) ,PSET:NEXT 

149 FORX=4TO60STEP6: LINE (X+100, 6 
0+X/4 ) - ( 198+X , 0 ) , PSET : LINE ( X+160 
, 74+X/4 ) - ( 255 , X) , PSET : NEXT : FORX= 
0TO24STEP6 : LINE (X+224 , 90+X/4 ) - (2 
55,62+X) , PSET : NEXT : POKE 17 8 , 2 : PAI 
NT (128, 90) , ,0:FORX=0TO6STEP3:POK 
E178 ,X/3 : LINE (30+X, 20+X) - (60-X, 4 
0-X) , PSET , BF : NEXT 

150 GOT016 

151 FORX=0TO255STEP2 : DRAW"BM=X; , 
25C0U10U"+STR$(RND(15) )+"BM=X; ,3 
5RU10U"+STR$(RND(15) )+"BM=X; ,95R 
M+"+MID$(STR$(RND(3) ) ,2)+",-"+MI 
D$(STR$(RND(20)+25) , 2) +"BM=X; , 95 
RU10U"+STR$ (RND (10) ) :NEXT 

152 POKE178,1:PAINT(2,50) , ,0:FOR 
X=1TO100:PRESET(RND(255) ,RND(10) 
+25) :NEXT 

153 GOT016 

154 DRAW»BM0,75C0R255U50H20L10G1 
0L70M-100 , +30L45" : CIRCLE ( 180 , 65) 
,40,0,1, .46, .05: PAINT (2, 2) ,0,0 :P 
OKE178,1:PAINT(2,70) , ,0:POKE178, 
2: PAINT (2, 90) , ,0 

155 FORX=1TO10: CIRCLE (40, 20) ,X,5 
: NEXT : FORX=1TO100 : PRESET (RND (255 
) ,RND(20)+75) : PSET (RND (255) ,RND( 
75) ,5) : NEXT: PAINT (180, 65) ,0,0: PA 
INT(2,70) ,0,0 

156 DRAW"BM0, 75C0R255" : CIRCLE (18 
0,65) ,40,0,1, .46, .05:GOTO16 

157 DRAW"BM0,65C0M+73,-10E2R2U2E 
2R2U2E2R2U2E44R4F44F2R2D2F2R2D2F 
2R2D2M255, 75" : CIRCLE (128 , 75) , 60, 
0, .2 : CIRCLE ( 128,78) , 60 , 0 , . 2 , . 5 , 1 
:POKE178,2:PAINT(128,90) , ,0 

158 POKE178,l:PAINT(128,75) , ,0:P 
AINT(2,2) ,0,0: PAINT (250, 2) ,0,0 :P 
MODE 3 , 1 : FORK=0TO7 : D=8*K+4 :X=126- 
K*8 : Y=13 6+K*8 : DRAW" BM=X ; , 0C6D=D ; 
BM=Y ; , 0D=D ; " : NEXT : DRAW" BM+20 , +4U 
65BR30D74BM-224,-12U70BR30D60":P 
MODE 4 , 1 

159 GOT016 

160 PMODE2,1:PCLS0:PMODE4,1:DRAW 
"BM128,48C5NU48NE48NR96NF48ND48N 
G48NL96NH48" : FORK=0TO48STEP8 : Y=4 
8 -K : DRAW " BM128 ,=K; R=Y ; F=Y ; G=Y ; L= 
Y ; L=Y ; H=Y ; E=Y ; R=Y ; » : NEXT 

161 GOT016 

162 PMODE2 , 1 : PCLS0 : PMODE4 , 1 : GOTO 
16 

163 DRAW"BM128,70C0M-50,-30M+16, 
-6F36U40NM-3 6 , +4M+3 6 , +4G3 6M+50 , - 
30NH10M-16 , -6H12NM+18 , +8M-22 , -2N 
D10M-2 2 , +2NG12M-2 0 , +8G10 " : POKE17 



8,1: PAINT (2 , 2 ) , ,0 : PMODE4 , 1 

164 GOT016 

165 PRINT@37,1;TAB(69)2;TAB(70) " 
B" ; : FORK=18T066STEP24 : CIRCLE (50 , 
K) ,10,0: NEXT: PRINT@2 66, R$(R(R) ) : 
PRINT@298 , STRING $ ( 10 , 32) : PRINT @ 2 
98 , "" ; : I FR=3 1THENPRINT " N" ELS E PRI 
NT"E" 

166 PRINT@4 16, "WHICH FLOOR <1;2; 
B>" ; : INPUTA$ : IFA$="2 "THENPRINT"A 

HOST OF GUARDS AWAITS YOU.": GOT 
0178ELSEIFA$="1" THENI FR= 3 2 THENR= 
31:PRINT"UP WE GO. . . "ELSEPRINT"Y 
OU WERE ON THE FIRST FLOOR" 

167 IFA$="B" THENI FR= 3 1THENR= 3 2 : P 
RINT " DOWN WE GO. . . "ELSEPRINT"YOU 

WERE ALREADY IN THE BASEMENT" 

168 GOT04 

169 H=0:PMODE2,l:PCLS0:PMODE3,l: 
DRAW" BM0 , 95C6R255BM5 , 90U50E40R16 
5F40D50L245":PAINT(2,2) ,6,6:X=12 
8:Y=86 

170 PRINT@266,R$(R(R) ) 

171 PRINT@416,"YOU HAVE ENTERED 
THE LASER OB= STACLE COURSE. YO 
U MUST TRAVERSETHIS DANGEROUS CO 
URSE . " : FORK=1TO2000 : NEXT : PRINT@4 
16, "USE THE 4 ARROW KEYS TO GET 
THE WHITE CURSOR TO THE TOP OF T 
HE SCREEN. PRESS <ENTER> " ; : INPU 
TA$ 

172 A=RND(165)+45:B=RND(165)+45 

173 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=CHR$(8)THENX= 
X-2ELSEIFA$=CHR$ (9) THENX=X+2ELSE 
IFA$=CHR$ ( 10 ) THENY=Y+2ELSEIFA$=C 
HR$(94)THENY=Y-2 

174 IFY<4THENPRINT@416,STRING$(6 
4,32) "CONGRATULATIONS; YOU MADE 
IT" : R=22 : GOT014ELSEIFPPOINT (X, Y) 
05THEN17 2ELSEPSET ( X , Y , 8 ) : DRAW" B 
M=A ; , 0 C7 D=Y ; BM=B ; , 0 D= Y ; " : PRES ET ( 
X, Y) 

175 DRAW" BM=A ; ,0C5D=Y;BM=B; ,0D=Y 
;":IFA=X THEN177 

176 GOTO 17 2 

177 H=H+1 : IFH=1THENPRINT@224 , "WO 
UNDED" : GOTO 1 7 2 ELS E I FH= 2 THENPRINT 
@ 2 2 4 , " FATALLY WOUNDE D " : GOTO 178 

178 F0RK=1T05 : PLAYT$ : NEXT 

179 PCLS5:POKE491,10:EXEC32714:P 
RINT@288,"FOR YOU THIS ADVENTURE 

IS OVER. " , , , : INPUT"CARE TO PLAY 
AGAIN" ; A$ : IFLEFT$ (A$ , 1) ="N"THEN 
POKE113,0:EXEC40999ELSE2 

180 PMODE2 , 3 : PCLS5 : PMODE4 , 1 : PRIN 
T@256,"THE JEWEL BRINGS ONLY DOO 
M TO THOSE WHO POSSESS IT. GEO 
RGE IS TRAPPED FOR ETERNITY IN T 
HE POOL" :F0RK=1T05:PLAYT$: NEXT 



54 THE RAINBOW April 1936 



WMCMMMMM 





• Menu oriented 

• Upload/download. Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 

• Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 

• Definable macro keys 

• Works with standard serial port, RS232 
PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack. Includes all drivers. 

• Works with standard screen. XSCREEN, or 
WORDPAK 80 column board 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



XMENU 



Creates a menu driven environment for OS-9. 
• Create your own menus • Works with standard screen, 

XSCREEN, WORDPAK, O-PAK 
with source $59.95 



$29.95 



OS-9 hkes screen 
51/64/85 chars per line • Easy menu operation 

$19.95 with source $39.95 



XDIR & XCAL 



Hierarchial directory 

• Full sorting 

• Complete pattern matching 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



OS-9 calculator 

• Decimal, Hex, Binary 

• +, — *,/. AND, OR, XOR, NOT 



OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 




POWER 





XWORD 



OS-9 word processing system. 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or O-PAK 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, underline, 
super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 



$69.95 



with source $124.95 



Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with XWORD/XMERGE source $199.95 



OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 



AND FOR RS DOS 



SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING This 
sales-based accounting package is designed for 
the non-accounting oriented businessman. It also 
contains the flexibility for the accounting oriented 
user to set up a double entry journal with an almost 
unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, 
transaction driven Accounts Receivable and Ac- 
counts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check 
Register, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and 
a Journal Posting List. $79.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Includes detail 
ed audit trails and history reports for each customer, 
prepares invoices and monthly statements, mailing 
labels, aging lists, and an alphabetized customer 
listing. The user can define net terms for commer- 
cial accounts or finance charges for revolving 
accounts, This package functions as a standalone 
A/R system or integrates with the Small Business 
Accounting package. $59.95 



These programs are us$r friendly and menu 
driven. Sample transactions are included. Each 
package features a hkes screen. Each requires 
a printer, a minimum of 32k and at least 1 disk 
drive. 



PAYROLL Designed for maintaining personnel 
and payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salaried 
employees with 8 deductions each. Calculates 
payroll and tax amounts, prints checks and main- 
tains year-to-date totals which can be automatical- 
ly transferred to the SBA package. Computes each 
pay period's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be withheld. 
Additional outputs include mailing list, listing of 
employees, year-to-date federal and/or state tax 
listing, and a listing of current misc. deductions. 
Suited for use in all states except Oklahoma and 
Delaware. $59.95 



DMS Database Management System. Search, 
sort, calculated fields, disk and tape inter- 
faces. $24.95 



CBK Complete check register with statement 
balancing. Includes full amortization program and 
wage analysis program. $24.95 



AUT085 Hi-res screen. 51/64/85 characters 
per line, inverse characters, automatic line 
numbering. $19.95 




MICROTECH 




1906 JerrokJ Avenue 
JSt. Paul, MN 651 12 

Deafer inquiries invited 
.OS-9 is a tradmiii of Microware 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



€6 1 2) 633-6 101 



181 PRINT" YOU NOW RETURN TO CIVI 
LIZATION WITH THE CASKET NOTE P 
ROVING YOUR INNOCENCE" : FORK=l 
T05 : PLAYT$ : NEXT 

182 PMODE2 / 3:PCLS5:PMODE4 / l:PRIN 
T@256 , "GEORGE WAS NEVER FOUND. I 
T WAS ASSUMED HE ESCAPED TO SOU 
TH" , "AMERICA . " : F0RK=1T05 : PLAYT$ : 
NEXT 

183 PRINT: PRINT" BUT YOU KNOW GEO 
RGE HAS ESCAPED TO A PLACE BEYON 
D SPACE AND", "TIME. A PLACE KNOW 
N AS THE . . . " : F0RK=1T05 : PLAYT$ : NE 
XT 

184 PCLS5:POKE491,10:EXEC32714:P 
RINT@288, "YOU HAVE WON THE ADVEN 
TURE" , "IN"P ( 2 ) "MOVES" : PRINT : PRIN 
T"CARE TO PLAY AGAIN?" 

185 A=RND(235)+10:B=RND(25)+10:F 
ORK=5TO0STEP-5 : FORX=1TO10 : DRAW'B 
M=A ; , =B ; C=K ; NU=X ; NE=X ; NR=X ; NF=X ; 
ND=X ; NG=X ; NL=X ? NH=X ; " : NEXTX , K 

186 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="Y"THEN2ELSEI 
FA$="N"THENPOKE113 ,0 : EXEC40999EL 
SE185 

187 POKE 3 60 , PEEK ( 492 ) :POKE361,PE 
EK(493) :POKE363,PEEK(494) :POKE36 
4,PEEK(495) : POKE3 2211 , 48 : RETURN: 

'get initial ram hooks 

188 FORK=pT03:Z=84-12*K:FORW=2TO 
j3STEP-l : ONW+1GOSUB189 , 192 , 195 : NE 
XTW,K:GOT016 

189 IF(D(R+K*C) ANDW(0) )<>W(0)THE 
NX=223:GOSUB197:X=192-64*K:DRAW" 
BD6 L=X ; D=Z ; R=X ; U=Z ; " : K=4 

190 RETURN 

191 'right walls 

192 X=254:GOSUB197:IF(D(R+K*C)AN 
DW ( 1 ) ) =W ( 1 ) THENDRAW" BD6L3 2 D=Z ; R3 
2"ELSEDRAW"M-32 , +6 ;D=Z ;M+32 , +6" 

193 RETURN 

194 'left walls 

195 X=0:GOSUB197:IF(D(R+K*C)ANDW 
( 2 ) ) =W ( 2 ) THENDRAW" BD6R3 2 D=Z ; L3 2 " 
ELSEDRAW'M+32 ,+6 ;D=Z ;M-32 ,+6" 

196 RETURN 

197 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (ABS (X-32*K) ) +" 
,"+STR$(6*K) : RETURN 

198 ' 

199 FORK=0TO2 4 : READR$ ( K) : NEXT : DA 
TAA JAIL CELL, A HALL, AN EMPTY RO 
OM , ARSENAL , STORAGE ROOM , INFIRMAR 
Y , WARDEN ' S OFFICE, SHOP, KITCHEN, I 
SOLATION WARD , MORGUE , FIELD , RIVER 

BANK, SAUNA ROOM, HOT TUB, A LONEL 
Y ROAD 

200 DATA CAVE OPENING, TUNNEL, PIT 
, CLEARING , A CAVERN , WEB , POOL , ELEV 
ATOR, LASER TEST ROOM 



201 FORK=0TO140:READD(K) ,R(K) :NE 
XT : DATA 2 , ,2,, 3, 1,3, 1,3, 1,7, 1,3,1 
,3,1,7,1,3,1,0,0,2,1,7,1,7,1,1,1 
,14, 1,3, 1,2, 1,14, 1,3, 1,5, 1,2, 24, 
11,1,11,1,1,8,14,1,3,1,5,1,10,1, 
1,3,12,1 

202 DATA8, 23,2, 23, 3,1, 3,1, 15, 1,1 
,4,10,1,3,1,3,1,9,1,6,1,3,1,7,1, 
7,1,11,1,3,1,7,1,3,1,7,1,1,5,8,1 
,2,6,8,2,12,1,2,2,3,1,15,1,1,2,1 

0. 1.1.10.2.2.3.1.3.1.9.1.2.7.3.1 
,11,1,3,1,1,1,1,9 

203 DATA6, 11,7, 11,7, 15,7, 11,7,11 
,7,11,7,11,1,12,7,11,5,11,14,11, 
15,11,15,15,15,11,15,11,15,11,15 
,11,1,12,15,11,13,11,10,11,11,11 
,11,15,11,15,11,15,11,15,11,11,1 
,12,15, 11,13,11,2,17,3, 17,3,17,7 
,17,7,17,3,16,3,15,3,15,11,15,13 
,13 

204 DATA, 14, 2, 17, 7 ,17, 15 ,17 ,13,1 
7,6,17,5,17,6,17,1,20,12,15,6,17 
, 3 , 17 , 11 , 17 , 11 , 17 , 9 , 17 , 10 , 17 , 13 , 
17,12,17, ,22,12,15, ,21,2,17,2,17 
,,18,3,17,9,17,10,17,11,17,1,17, 
8,19 

205 F0RK=1T037:READ0$(K) ,0(K) :NE 
XT 

206 DAT ANOTE, 1, PAPER, 7, RIFLE, -1, 
AMMO , -1 , MASK, -1 , BOTTLE , -1 , KEY , -1 
, MATCHES ,24, DRILL, -1 , SHOVEL, -1 , F 
LASHLIGHT , 100 , BRACELET, 111 , CONTA 
CT, 106, KNIFE, 112, ROPE, 123 

207 DATAWINDOW, 9 , GUNCASE ,29, CAB I 
NET , 50 , BOX , -1 , DOOR, 9 , PICTURE , 52 , 
SAFE, -1 , PANEL, 53 , CASKET, 60 , TOOLS 
,65, RIVER, 78, HOT TUB, 110 , GAS , -1 , 
LINK FENCE, 140 , SIGN, -1, SPIDER, 13 

1, WEB, 131, PIT, 134, POOL, 119, BLOOD 
,13 5, CUPBOARDS, 3 6, JEWEL, 129 

208 V$="LOOEXAGETTAKSTRPUTDROOPE 
JUMSWICLOGO CLIUNLLOCDIGDRITHRRE 
ASHOQUISAVLOAHELINVOFFON MOVEATK 
ICGIVSCO" 

209 N$="NOTEPAPERIFLAMMOMASKBOTT 
KEY MATCDRILSHOVFLASBRACCONTKNIF 
ROPEWINDGUNCCABIBOX DOORPICTSAFE 
PANECASKTOOLRIVETUB GAS FENCSIGN 
SPIDWEB PIT POOLBLOOCUPBJEWE" 

210 V(l)=8:V(2)=4:V(3)=2:V(4)=l: 

S$="ARSSTOINFMORWARSHOKITFIEA LS 
AUHOTCLERIVCAVA CWEBPITPOOELELAS 
" : K=RND (-TIMER) : FORK=15T017 : P (K) 
=RND(35) :NEXT 

211 PMODE4 , 1 : COLOR0 , 5 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : 
T$="T5L804GP8G#P8GP8EP8" : F0RK=1T 
O6:PLAYT$:NEXT:P(10)=RND(9) *24:P 

( 14 ) -2 : PCLS5 : CLS : R=2 : A$="W" : GOTO 

8 



56 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



y 




s Battle the 
t of Disk Drives 



New Lower Price 

Un-DISK Drives $4&9S? 

$34.95 

You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



Un-DISK uses your computer's extra 
memory like a fast disk drive. 

Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs. 

Un-DISK is INVISIBLE. Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VDOS. 

Un-DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

Un-DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all . . . 

Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

Un-DISK should be in the library of every 
serious CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J. Esser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 




OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited, the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if you already own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk. 

EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . 
Additional Power For $14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK! 

• VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5, 10, 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DISKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• VDUMP can allow you to save a whole lot 
of rainbow on tape in a SINGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK. 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally! Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $34.95 

The Preble VDUMP $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U.S. and Canada $1.50 

or $5.00 to other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 
Canadians may order from Kelly Software 



ADVENTURE CONTEST WINNER 




You must solve the secret of this 
mysterious maze to save the people of 
your village . . . 



mh* 3H»2e of 

untnlUn 



program fag t&tpmtas JC* Jfttbg 



Muhra, leader of the Catella Village, you and 



your entire family have been captured and taken prisoner 



by the vile Doghedra and his barbaric warriors. 



Knowing you as peaceful people who never carry defense 



weapons, the capture was harmless. But, the intentions were 
not, for Doghedra has planned your imprisonment to help hit 



village prospw. And, if the scheme 



works, he will reign supreme. 



Since the people of your village are 
extremely agricultural, and Doghedra's 
are not, his first demand is for your 
people to grow sufficient grain and 
produce to feed his pernicious tribe 
through the winter. Second, the first- 
born daughters from each family of 
your village must be brought to his 
camp to become subservient wives for 
his warriors. Finally, 20 of your strong- 
est men will have to go to work in 
Doghedra's mines, and for each man 
that dies, one will be chosen to replace 
him. If all demands are met, you and 
your family will be freed. If not, all of 
you will encounter a torturous death. 

Your family, although distressed, 
knows since you are a proud represen- 
tative of your village, that Doghedra's 
demands will never be met. But, they do 
not know that you are only one of a few 
who remembers the long-forgotten 
custom of these warriors. Fortunately, 
Doghedra is another who knows that a 



Thomas Riley is an auditor for the state 
of New York. His main interests in 
software are business applications and 
games. Developing educational soft- 
ware for his son is his next goal 



condemned man is permitted to request 
a challenge. To honor the custom, your 
plea is granted. 

Of course, the request does not dis- 
turb the fearless leader; if you survive 
the challenge he has in mind you will 
make him the richest and most powerful 
leader of the land, for you are to enter 
the maze of Moycullen to recover the 
treasure within. 

The maze was built generations ago 
by a powerful race of people to safe- 
guard their riches. But, the entire race 
was annihilated during war, leaving no 
one to pass on the secret of the maze. 

Doghedra has you just where he 
wants you. Since hundreds of his 
strongest warriors were never seen 
again after entering the maze, he knows 
whatever happens, satisfaction will be 
his reward. However, surviving the 
maze and recovering the treasure is the 
only way to save your family. 

Loading and Playing Instructions 

The Maze of Moycullen is a text 
Adventure that runs on a 16K Color 
Computer by entering P0KE25,6:NEW 
before loading. The command is needed 
to clear sufficient memory for the 
program. 



Traveling through the maze and 
performing the necessary task is simpli- 
fied with the use of one-letter direc- 
tional commands, as well as verb and 
noun responses. For example, enter 'N* 
to GO NORTH, or T' for TAKE, then 
'A' for APPLE to take the apple when 
prompted with TAKE WHAT? 

A bird's-eye view of each room is 
graphically displayed in the upper left 
corner of the screen. In all the rooms, 
the floor is shown in black, while the 
walls are depicted in blue and buff. By 
viewing the graphics display, an avail- 
able exit can easily be chosen. 

All valid verbs are displayed in the 
upper right section of the screen as are 
the items in the player's possession. The 
bottom half of the screen prints the 
activities of the occupied room, any 
objects within the room and in the 
player's possession, and prompts the 
player for the one-letter commands. 

(Any questions regarding The Maze 
of Moycullen may be directed to Mr. 
Riley at RD #1, Box 144F1, Johnson- 
ville, NY 12094. Please include an 
SASE when writing for a reply.) □ 

— Jutta Kapfhammer and Philip Helm 

A d venture Contest Judges 








3365 


147 


100 


124 


3430 . 


195 


1250 . . 


114 


4220 


229 


1430 . 


9 


4250 


206 


2100 . 


26 


4285 


143 


2170 . 


1 


5100 


16 


2302 . , 


187 


5225 


121 


2368 . 


206 


5295 


, 119 


2460 


237 


50000 


....211 


3140 


120 


50940 


....209 


3302 


17 


END 


....253 



16K users, before loading: P0KE25,S:NEW 
The listing: M0YCULEN 

1 CLS : PRINT@108 , "THE MAZE" : PRINT 
@170, "OF MOYCULLEN" : PRINT@234 , "B 
Y TOM RILEY" 

2 TD$=CHR$(128) : FOR Y=3 31T0338:P 
RINT@Y , TD$ ; : NEXTY : PRINT@3 4 0 , TD$ ; 
:PRINT@3 65,TD$; : PRINT@3 69 , TD$ / :P 
RINT@ 3 7 2 , TD$ : PRINT© 3 9 5 , TD$ ; : PRIN 
T@397 ,TD$ ; : PRINT@399 , TD$ ; : PRINT© 
401,TD$; :PRINT§403,TD$;TD$ 

3 PRINT@427,TD$; : PRINT@431 , TD$ ; : 
PRINT@436,TD$; : FOR Y=459 TO 468: 



PRINT@Y , TD$ ; : NEXTY 

4 PLAY"03L8CDL4.EL8DL4CCDC02L2AL 
4GL2EL4 GAL1 6 AG AO 3 CL2 DL8 CDL2EL4DL 
2CL4EL202A03L4C02L2GL403CL202EL4 
DL2C03L4C02L2G03L4C02L2E03L8C02B 
03L2C02L4B03L2 . CL2C" 

5 READ D:PRINT@D, "*"; :PLAY"L4B": 
PRINTED, " ";:IF D= 3 3 9 THENGOTO 1,0 E 
LSEGOT05 

7 DATA363,364,396,428,429,43j3,39 
8,3 66,367,3 68,400,432,433,434,40 
2,370,371,339 

10 CLS : GOSUB50000 : PRINT@7 , "N" ; : P 
RINT@97, "W"; :PRINT@109,"E"; :PRIN 
T@231, "S" ; : PRINT© 2 58, "I SEE" ; 
100 GG=0 : BB=0 : JJ=0 : RR=0 : AA=0 : 00= 

0 :MM=0 : FF=0 :UU=0 : NS$=" NOTHING SP 
ECIAL" : IM$="NOT A VALID MOVE":W$ 
=CHR$(175) :P$=CHR$(207) :YC$="YOU 

CAN'T TAKE THAT" : YK$=" YOU CAN'T 

KILL THAT" 
1100 GOSUB50800 
1102 GOSUB50500 
1104 GOSUB50200 
1106 GOSUB50300 
1108 GOSUB50900 



60 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



1110 PRINT @ 2 90, NS$: GO SUB 60000 
1120 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO2100ELSEIF 
Z$=»E"THENGOTO1200ELSEPRINT@353 
, IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@352 , " " : GO 
TO1110 

1200 GOSUB50700 
1202 GOSUB60100 
1204 GOSUB50900 
1206 GOSUB50200 

1210 IF FF=0THENPRINT@290 , "FLAMI 
NG TORCH"ELSEPRINT@290,NS$ 
1215 GOSUB60000 

1220 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO2200ELSEIF 
Z$="E"THENGOTO1300ELSEIF Z$="W" 
THENGOTO1100 

1230 IF Z$="T"ANDFF=0THENPRINT@3 
53 , ,r TAKE 11 : PRINT@385 , "what" ; : GOTO 
1250ELSEIF Z$="T"THENPRINT@353 , " 
THERE IS NOTHING TO TAKE" : PLAY 11 L 
4AB" : PRINT@353 , " ":GOTO1210 
1240 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
11*10353," ":GOTO1210 

1250 GOSUB60010 

1260 IF Z$="F"THENPRINT@3 85 , "FLA 
MING TORCH" : PRINT @ 4 17, "FLAMING T 
ORCH TAKEN" : FF=1 : PLAY"L4CD" : GOTO 
1270ELSEPRINT@385 , YC$ : PLAY"L4AB" 
1270 PRINT@353," ": PRINT : PRINT : G 



OTO1204 

1300 GOSUB50800 
1302 GOSUB50100 
1304 GOSUB50900 
1306 GOSUB50200 

1310 PRINT@290,NS$:GOSUB60000 
1320 IF Z$="E"THENGOTO1400ELSEIF 
Z $=" W" THENGOTO1200ELSEPRINT@ 3 5 3 
,IM$:PLAY"L4AB":PRINT@353, " ":GO 
TO 1310 

1400 GOSUB50500 
1402 GOSUB50700 
1404 GOSUB50200 
1406 GOSUB50400 
1408 GOSUB50900 

1410 IF UU=0THENPRINT@290 , "UGLY 
CYCLOPS "ELSEPRINT@ 2 90, "DEAD CYCL 
OPS" 

1415 GOSUB60000 

1420 IF Z$="N"ANDUU=1THENGOTO240 
0ELSEIF Z$="N"THENGOTO1450 
1425 IF Z$="W"ANDUU=1THENGOTO130 
0ELSEIF Z$="W"THENGOTO1450 
1430 IF Z$="K"ANDUU=0THENGOTO146 
0ELSEIF Z$="K"THENPRINT@3 53, "SHE 
IS ALREADY DEAD" : PLAY" L4AB" : PRI 
NT@353," ":GOTO1410 
1440 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 




Authorized Star Micronics Service Center * Call for return authorization number. 

THE WAITING IS OVER! 

THE SUPER COSMOS CONNECTION 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTER WITH BUFFER! 

YOU JUST CANT BUY A BETTER 
SERIAL/PARALLEL CONVERTER! 

ORDER YOURS TODAY 
- 8K SUPER COSMOS CONNECTION 

ONLY $129.95 

8K RAM CHIP SOLD SEPARATELY - $15.95 each 

3 FOR $42.95 

16K VERSION -$144.95 
24K VERSION - $154.95 
32K VERSION -$169.95 



SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERSION 

110 TO 19,200 BAUD, 7 OR 8 BIT 

8K BYTES STANDARD BUFFER 

(USER EXPANDABLE TO 32K IN 8K STEPS) 

COPY/CLEAR, LED PUSH BUTTON (MULTIPLE COPIES) 

MODEM SWITCH AND ALL CABLES 

COMPLETE WITH POWER PAK AND SIMPLE INSTRUCTIONS 
WORKS WITH AN V PARALLEL PRINTER OR YOUR MONEY BACK 
HIGHEST QUALITY CONSTRUCTION, TWO-YEAR WARRANTY 



TEST RESULTS: (19,056 BYTE PROGRAM 

LISTING AT 9600 BAUD.) 



32K SUPER COS-CON 

36.8 Seconds 



OTHER INTERFACE 

4 mln. 59.8 sec. 



IF YOU'D RATHER BE USING YOUR COMPUTER THAN WAITING 
FOR YOUR PRINTER THE WAIT IS OVER. 




NO SURCHARGE FOR 
CREDIT CARDS 




8K SUPER COSMOS CONNECTION 
AND STAR SG-10 PRINTER 

$379.00 Package S&H Included! 



Reviewed in Dec. 1985 Rainbow 



Shipping Included! 



Dealer Inquiries on Company Letterhead invited. 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 61 



Move your Co Co into the "big leagues " with 
£lite Saturate and PBJ Word Pak II 

FULL 80 COLUMN CAPABILITY 



No Tools— Everything plugs together 



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'/'» ELITE SOFTWARE & PBJ UQPD-PAKW 

a 

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Elite»Calc/3.0/PBJ* (Disk only) 80 column display 

$79.95 



Elite»Spel/PBJ* (Disk only) 80 column display 
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Elite»Word/PBJ. Elite»Fiie/PBJ* (Disk only) 
80 column display $79.95. Elite»Comm/PBJ* 
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Hardware required: 
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Our Price $89.95 
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,4 Y M Cable Connector $25.00 



Disk Manager/PBJ . . . Lets you move files from 
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Not available thru Radio Shack. 



SPECIAL OFFER — For a limited time, you can buy 
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201 Penn Center Blvd., Suite 301, • Pittsburgh, PA 15235 •(412)795-8492 



WELL RESPECTED 

& 

HIGHLY ACCLAIMED 



WORD PROCESSOR 

Elite*Word is highly respected for its powerful 
features AND excellent ease-of-use. Don't compro- 
mise one for the other . . . Elite* Word is ready to do 
your letters and reports. 32K req. 

Elite* Word (Disk) -Radio Shack #90-01 84 $69.95 

Elite* Word (Tape) -Radio Shack #90-0183 $69.95 

Elite* Word /OS-9- Radio Shack #90-0 186 $79.95 

Elite*Word/PBJ- (Disk or Tape) 80 column display $79.95 




Elite* Word is a terrific word processor with an im- 
pressive list of features, yet it's easy to learn and use. 

— Stuart Hawkinson, HOT COCO 



I like Elite* File . . . it's power and speed have to be 
seen to be appreciated. 

-Ed Lowe, RAINBOW 



Bruce Cook's Elite*CaIc is, . . . potentially one of the 
great Color Computer programs. ... is the easiest to 
use and most intuitive of the major CoCo speadsheet 
calculators." 

-Scott Norman, HOT COCO 



SPELLING CHECKER 

Elite* Spel checks your text against its powerful 
24,000 word dictionary, and does the job FAST. 
You won't wait long with Elite*Spel reading your 
text. 32K req. 

Elite*Spel (Disk only) -Radio Shack #90-0185. . , . $39.95 
Elite*Spel (When purchased with 

Elite* Word from ELITE) $ 15.00 

Elite*Spel / PBJ' (Disk only) 80 column display. . . . $49.95 



TERMINAL PROGRAM 



Elite*Comm turns your CoCo into a powerful 300 
baud terminal, and it's smooth and easy to use. 

Elite*Comm (Tape or Disk) $39.95 

Elite*Comm / PBJ* (Tape or Disk) 

80 column display $49.95 





Too often, "power" is achieved at the expense of 
simplicity of operation. Elite Software has more than 
met that challenge with their Elite* Word . . . 
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SPREADSHEET 

Elite*Calc/3.0 gives you more features than the 
widely acclaimed Elite*CaIc. You get Window 
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storage and more. 32K req. 

Elite*Calc/3.0 (Disk) -Radio Shack #90-01 88 . . . . $69.95 
Elite*Calc/3.0 (Tape) -Radio Shack #90-0) 97 . . . $69.95 

Elite*Ca!c (Original ver. 1.2) Tape or Disk $39.95 

Elite*Calc/3.0 / PBJ* (Disk only) 80 column display $79.95 



DATABASE MANAGER 



Elite*File is the database manager that handles 
more total records, larger records, and manipulates 
data faster. Whether your data is Inventory Items or 
recipes, Elite*File is the correct choice. 32K req. 

Elite*File (Disk only) -Radio Shack #90-0189 .... $74.50 
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•Requires PBJ Word Pak hardware 






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£llt* Soft 

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Av»Ha&*» via Expr«w Ord«r 



201 Penn Center Blvd., Suite 301, • Pittsburgh, PA 15235 • (412)795-8492 



INT@353, GOTO1410 

1450 PRINT@3 53, "BEFORE YOU CAN E 
SCAPE, THE CYCLOPS SEPERATES 

YOUR HEAD FROM YOUR NECK. T 

00 BAD"; :PLAY"L104C03C02C" :CLS:G 
OTO2260 

146)3 PRINT§353 , "KILL" : PRINT0385 , 
"what" ; :GOSUB60010 
1470 IF Z$="U"THENGOT0148j3ELSEPR 
INT@385 , YK$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 
," " : PRINT : GOTO 14 10 
1480 PRINT@385,"UGLY CYCLOPS": PR 
INT@417,"WITH What"; :GOSUB60010 
1490 IF Z$="B"ANDBB=1THENG0T0149 
5ELSEIF Z$="B"THENPRINT§417 , "YOU 
DON'T HAVE THAT" : PLAY" L4AB" : PRI 
NT6353 , " " : PRINT: PRINT: G0T014 10 
1492 IF Z$="F"AND FF=1THEN G0T01 
495ELSE IF Z$="F"THEN PRINT@417, 
"YOU DON'T HAVE THAT" : PLAY"AB" : P 
RINT@353 , " " : PRINT : PRINT : G0T0141 
0 ELSE PRINT @ 4 17, "THAT WON'T WOR 
K" : PLAY"AB" : PRINT@353 , " " : PRINT : 
PRINT : G0T014 10 

1495 IF Z$="B"THEN PRINT@422 , "BR 
OADSWORD" :UU=1:PLAY"03C01C02C" :P 
RINT@3 53 , " " : PRINT : PRINT : G0T014 1 
0 ELSE PRINT@353, "YOU MANAGE TO 
START HER CLOAK ON FIRE. A VER 
Y ANGRY CYCLOPS PROCEEDS TO EAT 
YOU ALIVE" : PLAY"L104A01A02A" : CL 
S:GOTO2260 
2100 GOSUB50600 
2102 GOSUB60400 
2104 GOSUB50600 

2110 IF RR=0THENPRINT@290 , "RATS" 
ELSEPRINT@290 , "BURNED RATS" 
2115 GOSUB60000 

2120 IF Z$="N"ANDRR=0THENGOTO215 
0ELSEI F Z $= " N " THENGOTO 3100ELSEIF 
Z$="S"ANDRR=0THENGOTO2150ELSEIF 
Z$="S"THENGOTO1100ELSEIF Z$="E" 
THENGOTO 2 200 

2140 IF Z$="K"ANDRR=0THENGOTO216 
0ELSEIF Z$="K"THENPRINT@353 , "THE 
RE IS NOTHING TO KILL" : PLAY"L4AB 
":PRINT@353," ":GOTO2110 
2145 PRINT® 3 53 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO2110 
2150 PRINT© 3 53 , "BEFORE YOU CAN L 
EAVE, THE RATS SURROUND YOU. AS 
YOU ARE DEVOURED, YOU THI 

NK - 'MY POOR FAMILY'"; :PLAY" LI 
GFGL4GFG" : CLS : GOTO 2 2 60 
2160 PRINT@353 , "KILL" : PRINT@385, 

"what" ; :GOSUB60010 

2170 IF Z$="R"THENGOTO2180ELSEPR 
INT@385,YK$: PLAY " L4 AB " : PRINT @ 3 5 2 
," ": PRINT :G0T02 110 



2180 PRINT@385, "RATS" : PRINT@417 , 
"WITH what" ; :GOSUB60010 
2190 IFZ$="F"ANDFF=1THENPRINT@42 
2 /'FLAMING TORCH" : RR=1 : PLAY"L201 
C02C" : PRINT@353 , " " : PRINT : PRINT: 
GOTO2110ELSEPRINT@417, "YOU DON'T 

HAVE THAT" : PLAY"L4ABA" : PRINT@35 
2 , " " : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : G0T02 115 
2200 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "THE WALL SW 
INGS AWAY AT YOUR TOUCH. AS 
YOU STEP INTO THE ROOM, YOUR 
FOOT FAILS TO STRIKE ANY FLOOR. 

TOO LATE YOU REALIZEIT IS AN OP 
EN SHAFT!" 

2220 FOR X=1TO50/0:NEXTX 

2230 CLS (0) :PLAY"L305C04C03C02CO 

1CL100O5AO2" 

2240 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "YOUR SHATTE 
RED BODY LIES AT THE BOTTOM OF A 
THIRTY-FOOT SHAFT. YOUR LAST T 
HOUGHT IS OF YOUR FAMILY - WH 
0 WILL BE EXECUTED ATSUNDOWN." 
22 60 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT "DO YOU WI 
SH TO TRY AGAIN (Y/N)";AN$ 
2280 IF AN$="Y"THENCLS:GOTO10ELS 
EEND 

2300 GOSUB50400 
2302 GOSUB60300 

2304 GOSUB50200 

2306 GOSUB50900 

2310 IF AA=1THENPRINT@290,NS$ELS 
EPRINT@290, "ANGRY WIZARD" 
2315 GOSUB60000 

2320 IF Z$="W"THENGOTO2200ELSEIF 
Z$="N"ANDAA=1THENGOTO3 300ELSEIF 
Z$="N" THENGOTO 3355 
2330 IF Z$="K"ANDAA=1THENPRINT@3 
53, "THERE IS NOTHING TO KILL": PL 
AY"L4AB" :PRINT@353 , " " :GOTO2310E 
LSEIF Z$="K"THENPRINT@353 , "KILL" 
:PRINT@385,"what"; :GOTO2370 
2340 IF Z$="C"ANDMM<>1THENPRINT@ 
353, "YOU HAVE NOTHING TO CAST":P 
LAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 , " " :GOTO2310 
ELSEIF Z$="C"THENPRINT@353 , "CAST 

" : PRINT @ 3 8 5 , "what " ; : G0T02 3 60 

2350 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO2310 
2360 GOSUB60010 

2365 IF Z$="M"THENPRINT@385 , "MAG 
IC SPELL" :MM=-1:PRINT@417, "THE W 
IZARD IS IMMOBILIZED. " :PLAY"L1CD 
E " : PRINT @ 3 5 3 , " " : PRINT : PRINT : PRI 
NT@241," ";:GOTO2306 
2368 PRINT© 3 85 , "YOU CAN'T CAST T 
HAT" : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 , » » : PR 
INT:GOTO2310 
2370 GOSUB60010 

2375 IF Z$="A"THENPRINT@385, "ANG 



64 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



RY WIZARD" :PRINT@417, "WITH what" 
; : GOTO2380ELSEPRINT@385 , YK$ : PLAY 
"L4AB" : PRINTQ353 , » " : PRINT: GOTO 2 
310 

2380 GOSUB60010 

2385 IF Z$="B"ANDMM=-1THENG0T023 
90ELSEPRINT@353,"BEFORE YOUR WEA 
PON FINDS ITS MARK, BOLTS OF E 
NERGY FROM THE WIZARD'S FINGERS 

TURN YOU AND ALL YOUR POSSESS 
IONS INTO ASH.":PLAY"L101B02BL20 
1B02BL401B02B" : CLS : GOT02 2 60 
2390 PRINT@417, "BROADSWORD" :AA=1 
:PRINT@439,"WIZARD VANISHES AS 

BLADE STRIKES HIM" ; :PLAY"L205EO 
3E01E04E02E" : PRINT@353 , " " : PRINT 
: PRINT : PRINT : GOTO 2 3 10 
2400 GOSUB50600 
2402 GOSUB50300 
2404 GOSUB50900 

2410 PRINT@290 , "LIZARD" : GOSUB600 
00 

2420 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO3400ELSEIF 

Z $ = " S " THENGOTO 1 400 
2430 IF Z$="K"THENGOTO2450 
2440 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY" L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO2410 
2450 PRINT@353 , "KILL" : PRINT@385, 

"what" ; : GOSUB60010 

2460 IF Z$="L"THENGOTO2470ELSEPR 

INT@ 3 8 5 , YK$ : PLAY " L4 AB" : PRINT@ 3 5 3 

," ":PRINT:GOTO2410 

2470 PRINT@385 , "LIZARD" : PRINT@41 

7, "WITH what";:GOSUB60010 

2480 IF Z$="B"THENPRINT@422 , "BRO 

ADSWORD" : GOTO2490ELSEIF Z$="F"TH 

ENPRINT@422 , "FLAMING TORCH" : GOTO 

2490ELSEPRINT@417,"THAT WON'T WO 

RK" : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 , " " : PRI 

NT : PRINT : GOTO 2 4 10 

2490 PLAY"L2CL105BBBL402C" : CLS : P 
RINT: PRINT "THE LIZARD SCREAMS CA 
USING A STONE TO FALL FROM TH 
E CEILING - YOU ARE CRUSHED BE 
NEATH IT . " : PLAY " L1ABGFE " : CLS : GOT 
02260 

3100 GOSUB50500 
3102 GOSUB50900 
3104 GOSUB50400 

3110 IF BB=0THENPRINT@290, "BROAD 
SWORD"ELSEPRINT@290 ,NS$ 
3115 GOSUB60000 

3120 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO4100ELSEIF 

Z $= « S " THENGOTO 2 100 
3130 IF Z$="T"ANDBB=0THENGOTO314 
0ELSEPRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT6353," ":GOTO3110 
3140 PRINT@353,"TAKE":PRINT@385, 

"what" ; :GOSUB60010 



3150 IF Z$="B"THENGOTO3160ELSEPR 

INT@385 , YC$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 

, " ": PRINT :GOT03 110 

3160 PRINT@385 , "BROADSWORD" : PRIN 

T@417 , "BROADSWORD TAKEN" : BB=1 : PL 

AY"CCC" : PRINT@353 , " " : PRINT: PRIN 

T:GOTO3102 

3200 GOSUB50100 

3202 GOSUB60200 

3204 GOSUB50300 

3206 GOSUB50900 

3210 IF JJ=0THENPRINT@290,"JEWEL 
"ELSEPRINT@2 9 0 , NS$ 
3215 GOSUB60000 

3220 IF Z$="E"THENGOTO3300ELSEIF 

Z $=" S " THENGOT02 200 
3230 IF Z$="T"ANDJJ=0THENGOTO324 
0ELSEPRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOT03215 
3240 PRINT@ 3 53," TAKE " : PRINT@ 3 8 5 , 

"what" ; :GOSUB60010 

3250 IF Z$="J"THENGOTO3260ELSEPR 
INT@385,"YOU CAN'T TAKE THAT": PL 
AY"L4AB" : PRINT@352 , " ": PRINT: GOT 
03215 

3260 PRINT@385 , "JEWEL" : PRINT@417 
, "JEWEL TAKEN" : PLAY"CDA" : JJ=1 : PR 
INT@ 3 53," " : PRINT : PRINT : G0T03 2 0 6 
3300 GOSUB50500 
3302 GOSUB50600 
3304 GOSUB50700 
3306 GOSUB50800 
3308 GOSUB50900 

3310 IF JJ=1ANDAA=0THENPRINT@290 

, "ANGRY WIZARD" :G0T03 3 40ELSEPRIN 

T@290,NS$ 

3315 GOSUB60000 

3320 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO4300ELSEIF 
Z$="S"THENGOTO2300ELSEIF Z$="E" 
THENGOTO 3400ELSEIF Z$="W" THENGOT 
03200 

3330 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOT03315 
3340 GOSUB60000 

3350 IF Z$="K"THENGOTO3370ELSEIF 

Z $= » C " THENGOTO 3 3 60 
3355 PRINT@353,"THE WIZARD SAYS 
•OLAN COLAIN' YOU FIND YOURSELF 

THE SIZE OF A FLY AND TRAPPED I 
N THE WEB OF A VERY HUNGRY SPIDE 
R. " : PLAY"L103A04A01A02A" : CLS : GOT 
02260 

3360 IF MM<>1THENPRINT@353 , "YOU 
HAVE NOTHING TO CAST" : PLAY"L4AB" 
: PRINT@353 , " " : GOTO3340ELSEPRINT 
@353 , "CAST" : PRINT@385 , "what" ; :G0 
SUB60010 

3365 IF Z$="M"THENPRINT@385 , "MAG 
IC SPELL":MM=-1:PRINT@417,"THE W 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 65 



HOW DO YOU SHARE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — 

Give a rainbow gift 

certificate . . . 



Share the rainbow with your 
friends a gift subscription to the 
premier information source for the 
Color Computer Then, each month, 
all year-round, they'll enjoy the 
spectrum of rainbow programs, 
articles and information written 
exclusively for their CoCo! 

First, they'll receive a handsome 
card announcing your gift. Then, 
they'll be reminded of you each 
month when they receive up to 300 
pages of the rainbow — including 
as many as 24 programs, 15 regular 
columns and up to 20 product re- 
views. 

When you give a rainbow gift 
certificate, you'll also be safeguard- 
ing your own collection. No more 
frantic searching for those back 
issues you've lent to a friend. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate and 
let your friends in on something you 
already know — the rainbow is the 
perfect companion for the Color 
Computer! 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 

Name 



Address 
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.State 



ZIP 



From: 

Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
My account # Exp. date 

Signature 

Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 



Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency on//, please. AH subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 5 to 6 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



IZARD IS IMMOBILIZED" :PLAY"L2CDE 
" : PRINT§ 3 53," " : PRINT : PRINT : PRIN 
T§241," -- ";:GOTO3340 
3367 PRINT @ 3 8 5, "YOU CAN'T CAST T 
HAT" : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 , " " : PR 
INT:GOTO3340 

3370 PRINT@353 , "KILL" : PRINT@385 , 
"what" ; :GOSUB60010 

3375 IF Z$="A"THENGOTO3380ELSEPR 
INT@385 , YK$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 
, " ":PRINT:GOT0334j3 
3380 PRINT@385, "ANGRY WIZARD": PR 
INT§417,"WITH what"; :GOSUB60010 
3385 IF Z$="B"ANDMM=-1THENG0T033 
90ELSEPRINT@3 53, "BEFORE YOUR WEA 
PON FINDS ITS MARK, BOLTS OF E 
NERGY FROM THE WIZARD'S FINGERS 
TURN YOU AND ALL YOUR POSSESS 
IONS INTO ASH.":PLAY"L101B02B03B 
O2B":CLS:GOTO22 60 

339J3 PRINT@42 2 , "BROADSWORD" : AA=1 
:PRINT@439, "WIZARD VANISHES AS 
BLADE STRIKES HIM. " : PLAY"L205EO 
1E04E03E02E" : PRINT@353 , " " : PRINT 
: PRINT : PRINT : GOT03 3 0 8 
3400 GOSUB50700 
3402 GOSUB50900 
34j34 GOSUB50400 

3410 PRINT@290,NS$:GOSUB60000 
3420 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO4400ELSEIF 
Z$="S"THENGOTO2400ELSEIF Z$="W" 
THENGOT03 3 00 

343)3 PRINT§353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO3410 
4100 GOSUB50100 
4102 GOSUB50900 

4110 IF OO=0THENPRINT@290, "ORANG 
E SPHERE"ELSEPRINT@290,NS$ 
4115 GOSUB60000 

4120 IF Z$="S"THENGOTO3100ELSEIF 

Z$="T"ANDOO=0THENGOTO4140 
4130 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT§353," ":GOT04115 
4140 PRINT@353, "TAKE" : PRINT@3 85 , 
"What" : GOSUB60010 

4150 IF Z$="O"THENGOTO4160ELSEPR 

INT@385, YC$ :PLAY"L4AB" :PRINT@353 

," ": PRINT :GOT04 115 

4160 PRINT@385, "ORANGE SPHERE" :P 

RINT @ 4 1 7 , " ORANGE S PHERE TAKEN " : P 

LAY"L2DCD":00=1:PRINT@353, " ":PR 

INT : PRINT : GOTO 4 10 2 

4200 GOSUB50400 

4202 GOSUB50200 

4204 GOSUB50700 

4206 GOSUB50900 

4210 PRINTS 2 90, "STAIRS LEADING D 
OWN":GOSUB60000 

4220 IF Z$="W"THENGOT04225ELSEPR 



INT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@353 
," ":GOTO4210 
4225 GOSUB50800 

4230 PRINT§290, "A SMALL OPENING 

AND STAIRS" : GOSUB60000 

4235 IF Z$="E"THENGOTO4200ELSEIF 

Z$="W"ANDGG=1THENG0T04245ELSEIF 

Z$="W"THENGOTO4250 
4240 PRINT© 3 5 3 , IM$ : PLAY " L4 AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO42 30 

4245 CLS: PRINT" AS YOU COME THR 
OUGH THE OPEN- ING DOGHEDRA'S GU 
ARDS SEIZE YOU AND STRIP YOU OF 
ALL POSSESSIONSYOU ARE BROUGHT B 
EFORE DOGHEDRA. BEHIND HIM THE SU 
N IS BISECTED BY THE HORIZON." 

4246 PRINT" DOGHEDRA SPEAKS • YO 
U HAVE RETURNED WITH THE TRE 
ASURE FROM THE MAZE OF MOYCULLEN 
. YOU ARE A GRAND WARRIOR." 

4247 PRINT" AS I PROMISED, YOU 
AND YOUR FAMILY MAY GO FREE. 
FURTHER, NO LONGER WILL WE INV 
ADE YOUR LANDS, YOU AND YOUR P 
EOPLE MAY LIVE IN PEACE . ' " 

4248 PLAY"02L4G03CCL8DCL402AGG03 
CCDL2 . EL4 DDDDEGAGEL2 . G02L4AL16AB 
03C02BL4AGEG03C02BL2AL4GCEGL8AGL 
2EL8 . CL16EL4DCCL2C" 

4249 FOR Q=1TO2000:NEXTQ:CLS:GOT 
02260 

4250 CLS: PRINT" AS YOU COME THR 
OUGH THE OPEN- ING, DOGHEDRA'S G 
UARDS SEIZE YOUAND STRIP YOU OF 
ALL POSSESSIONSYOU ARE BROUGHT B 
EFORE DOGHEDRA. BEHIND HIM THE SU 
N IS BISECTED BY THE HORIZON." 

4251 PRINT" DOGHEDRA SPEAKS 1 YO 
U HAVE RETURNED FROM THE MAZ 
E OF MOYCULLEN ALIVE. YOU 
ARE A GREATWARRIOR. HOWEVER, YOU 

FAILED TO RETURN WITH THE GOLDE 
N TREASURE AS YOU WERE CHARGED. 

YOU AND YOUR FAMILY WILL BE E 
XECUTED. " 

4252 PRINT" AS A GREAT WARRIOR 
IT IS YOUR HONOR TO DIE FIRST SO 

AS NOT TO SEE YOUR LOVED ONES S 
UFFER. ' 11 ; 

4253 FOR X=1TO1000:NEXTX 

4260 FOR X=1TO25:PLAY"O1V20L4BL8 
V10BBB" : NEXTX 

4275 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" YOU ARE S 

TRAPPED TO THE SACRIFICIAL 

STONE. A LARGE SWORD IS RA 

ISED ABOVE YOUR HEAD AND... 

ii 

4280 FOR X=1TO10:PLAY"O1V20L4BL8 
V10BBB": NEXTX 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 67 



4285 CLS(j3):F0R X=1TO1000 :NEXTX 

4290 GOTO2260 

4300 GOSUB50700 

43j32 GOSUB5/34)3)3 

4304 GOSUB503J30 

4306 GOSUB50900 

43p8 GOSUB5J3500 

431j3 IF MM=0THENPRINT@290, "MAGIC 

SPELL"ELSEPRINT@290,NS$ 
432j3 GOSUB60000 

4330 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO5300ELSEIF 

Z $= » S " THENG0T03 3 0 0 
4340 IF Z$="T"ANDMM=,0THENGOTO4 35 
J3ELSEPRINT@353 ,IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INTl3353, M ":G0T04 3 2J3 
4 3 50 PRI NT @ 3 5 3 , " TAKE " : PRINT @ 3 8 5 , 
"What" 7 : GOSUB60010 

4360 IF Z$="M"THENG0T04 37J3ELSEPR 

INT0385 , YC$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT0353 

," ":PRINT:G0T0432J3 

437J3 PRINT§385, "MAGIC SPELL": PRI 

NT@417 , "MAGIC SPELL TAKEN" : PLAY" 

L203C02C" :MM=1:PRINT§3 53 , " " : PRI 

NT : PRINT : G0T04 30 6 

4400 GOSUB5j3700 

4402 GOSUB503J30 

4404 GOSUB50900 

441J3 PRINT@29p, "COBWEBS" :G0SUB6p 



000 

4420 IF Z$="N"THENGOTO5400ELSEIF 

Z $= " S " THENGOTO 3 400 
4430 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOT0441p 
5100 GOSUB50300 
5102 GOSUB50900 

5110 IF GG=0THENPRINT@2 90, "GOLD 

COINS"ELSEPRINT@290,NS$ 

5120 GOSUB60000 

5130 IF Z$="E"THENGOTO5200ELSEIF 

Z$="T"ANDGG=0THENGOTO5150 
5140 PRINT§353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO5120 
5150 PRINT@353 , "TAKE" : PRINT@3 85 , 
"what" ; : GOSUB60010 

5160 IF Z$="G"THENGOTO5170ELSEPR 

INT@3 85 , YC$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT@3 53 

," ": PRINT :G0TO5 120 

5170 PRINT© 3 8 5, "GOLD COINS" :PRIN 

T@417,"GOLD COINS TAKEN" : PLAY" L3 

C03L2C04L1C" :PRINT@353 , " ": PRINT 

: PRINT : GG=1 : GOT05 102 

5200 GOSUB50200 

5202 GOSUB50800 

5204 GOSUB60300 

5206 GOSUB50900 

5210 PRINT§290, "IDOL ON SOUTH WA 



□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 























8! 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



prPce price TANDY COMPUTERS 



OUR 



LIST OUR 
PRICE PRICE 



26-3136 16K Standard Color Computer 2 . . $1 19.95 $ 99.00 

26-3127 64K Extended Color Computer 2 . 199.95 169.00 

26-3131 Disk Drive 0 for Color Computer . . 299.95 240.00 

26-3130 Disk Drive 1 for Drive 0 199.95 169.00 

26-3008 Joystick 19.95 16.95 

26-3012 Deluxe Joystick (EACH) 29.95 25.00 

26-3018 Extended Basic Kit 39.95 36.00 

26-1208 CCR-81 Tape Recorder 59.95 50.00 

26-1 173 DCM-3 Direct Connect Modem . . . 59.95 50.00 

SOFTWARE 

30001210 Telewriter 64 Tape $ 49.95 $ 42.00 

30001220 Telewriter 64 Disk 59.95 49.00 

30001 1 10 VIP Writer 69.95 59.00 

30001140 VIP Database 59.95 49.00 

30001 150 VIP Terminal Disk 49.95 45.00 

30001170 VIP Integrated Software 149.95 139.00 

30001 1 30 SS/DD 1 0 Pack Diskettes 21 .00 1 4.00 



26-1 070 Model 4D Desktop 64K 2 FD & Deskmate$1 1 99.00 

25-1 000 Model 1 000 1 FD 1 28K & Deskmate 999.00 

25-1001 Model 1000 1 FD & 10 Meg HD 256K 1999.00 

25-3000 Model 1 200 1 FD & 1 0 Meg HD 256K 2499.00 

25-3001 Model 1200 Two FD 256K 1499.00 

25-4000 Model 3000 One FD 51 2K 2599.00 

25- 401 0 Model 3000 1 FD & 20 Meg HD 51 2K 3599.00 

26- 3901 Model 600 Port Comp 32K 1 3 1 /? Disk 1 599.00 

25-1021 CM4 Color Monitor 299.95 

25-1022 CM10 Color Monitor 459.95 

25- 3010 VM-3 Monochrome Monitor 219.00 

26- 5111 VM-1 Monochrome Monitor 199.95 

26-5112 CM-1 Color Monitor 599.00 

25-3043 Graphics Adaptor T-1200, T-3000 . 299.00 

25-3047 Deluxe Graphics Adapt T-1 200, T-3000 499.95 

25-3130 MS-DOS 2.1 1 /Basic Tandy 1200 . 89.95 

25-4104 MS-DOS 3.1/Basic/Deskmate Tandy 3000 99.95 



$ 895.00 
705.00 
1475.00 
1525.00 
1200.00 
1900.00 
2600.00 
1 1 95.00 
225.00 
380.00 
185.00 
165.00 
510.00 
185.00 
395.00 
75.00 
85.00 



PRINTERS AND ACCESSORIES 

26-1276 DMP-1 05 80 cps Dot Matrix $199.95 

26-1280 DMP-1 30 Dot Matrix 349.95 

20001025 EPSON LX-80 Printer 369.95 

20001515 EPSON LX-80 Tractor Feed 29.95 

20021070 OK I DATA 182 Printer 299.00 

20041020 STAR SG-10 Printer 299.00 

300091 10 BOTEK Serial to Parallel Interface 



CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-248-3823 

For Technical Questions and Information on our complete line of 
computer accessories and current prices: 

CALL 1-517-625-4161 

Mon, Wed. & Fri. 9-9, Tues. & Thurs. 9-6, Sat. 9-3 

All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Advertised prices are 
cash prices. C.O.D. accepted ($10.00 charge per carton on C.O.D. Call for further 
C.O.D. information.) M.C., Visa, add 2%. A.X., add 3%. All non-defective items re- 
turned will be subject to 10% restocking fee. Defective items require return merchan- 
dise authorization. Call for R.M.A. Number before returning. Delivery is subject to 
product availability. 

PERRY COMPUTERS • 124 SOUTH MAIN STREET • PERRY, Ml 48872 



$169.00 
285.00 
225.00 

25.00 
245.00 
250.00 

59.00 



68 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



LL":GOSUB60000 

5220 IF Z$="E"THENGOTO5300ELSEIF 
Z$="W"THENGOTO5240ELSEIF Z$="P" 
THENG0T05 2 5 0 

5225 IF Z$=»T"THENPRINT@353, "IDO 
L IS ATTACHED TO THE WALL";: PLAY 
"L4AB" :PRINT@353 , " " i GOTO5210 
523)3 PRINT@353 , IM$ : PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":GOTO5210 
5240 GOSUB50700 

5245 PRINT@353,"THE WALL SWINGS 
AWAY AT YOUR TOUCH TO REVEAL 
A HIDDEN ROOM" : PLAY" L201BEG" :PRI 
NT@353," ": PRINT :GOT05 100 
525)3 PRINT@353, "PUT" : PRINT@385 , 11 

what" ; :GOSUB60010 

5 2 60 IF Z$="J"ANDJJ=1THENG0T0528 
5ELSEIF Z$="0"AND00=1THENG0T0527 
0ELSEPRINT@385, "YOU CAN'T PUT TH 
AT ANYWHERE" : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT© 3 5 
3," ": PRINT: GOTO 5 2 10 
5270 PRINT@385 , "ORANGE SPHERE" :P 
RINT@417,"IN What"; :GOSUB60010 
5275 IF Z$="I"THEN PRINT@420 , "ID 
OL" :PRINT@448 , "SHARPENED STONES 
FLY FROM IDOL'SMOUTH PIERCING YO 
UR HEART"; :PLAY"L10O4ABAL2O1BAG" 
:CLS:GOTO2260ELSE GOTO5280 
5280 PRINT@417, "YOU CAN'T PUT AN 
YTHING THERE" : PLAY"L4AB" : PRINT© 3 
53," ": PRINT: PRINT: GOT052 1)3 
5285 PRINT© 3 85, "JEWEL" : PRINT@417 
, "IN what" ; : GOSUB 6)3)3 1)3 
529)3 IF Z$O"I"THENG0T0528)3ELSEP 
RINT @ 4 2 0 , " I DOL" : J J=- 1 : GOSUB5 )3 6)3)3 
:PRINT@449,"A HIDDEN ROOM APPEAR 
S"; :PLAY"L103A02B01AO2B" :PRINT@3 
53 , " " : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : GOSUB6)3 
000 

5295 IF Z$="S"THENGOT042)3)3ELSEPR 

INT§353,"THE WALL SWINGS BACK QU 

ICKLY" : PLAY"01C" : PRINT@384 , "AS I 

T SLAMS SHUT THE IDOL BREAKSLOOS 

E AND TOPPLES UPON YOU. YOUARE 

PINNED BENEATH IT. MY GUESS IS 

YOU WILL STARVE TO DEATH."; 

5297 PLAY"04L1A05L5A02L1BGEC" : CL 

S:GOT0226)3 

53)3)3 GOSUB5)31)3)3 

53)32 GOSUB5)34)3)3 

53)34 GOSUB5)36)3)3 

53)36 GOSUB5)39)3)3 

53)38 GOSUB5)37)3)3 

531) 3 PRINT@290,NS$:GOSUB60000 

532) 3 IF Z$="W"THENGOT052)3)3ELSEIF 
Z$=» S "THENGOT04 3 )3 )3 

533) 3 PRINT@353,IM$:PLAY"L4AB" : PR 
INT@353," ":G0T0531)3 



54)3)3 GOSUB5j31)3)3 
54)32 GOSUB5)39)3)3 

541) 3 PRINT@29)3 / "FUNNY HOLES IN W 
ALLS" : PLAY" L4AB" 

542) 3 PRINT@352, "YOUR FOOT STRIKE 
S A STONE THAT SINKS SLIGHTLY. 

INSTANTLY, POISON-TIPPED AR 

ROWS SHOOT FROM THE WALLS. YOU 
ARE DEAD. " : PLAY"L101AA02C01AA02C 
":CLS:GOT0226)3 

5)3)3)30 F$=CHR$ (128) :FOR Y=32 TO 1 
92 STEP 32 

5)3)31)3 FOR X=2 TO 12 : PRINT@ (Y+X) , 
F$ ; : NEXTX : NEXTY : RETURN 
5)31)3)3 FOR X=34 TO 44 : PRINT@X, W$ ; 
: NEXTX : RETURN 

5)32)3)3 FOR X=194 TO 2)34 : PRINT@X,W 
$ ; : NEXTX : RETURN 

5)33)3)3 FOR X=34 TO 194 STEP 32: PR 

INT@X , W$ ; : NEXTX : RETURN 

5)34)3)3 FOR X=44 TO 2)34 STEP 32: PR 

INT@X , W$ ; : NEXTX : RETURN 

5)35)3)3 FOR X=35 TO 43 : PRINT@X, F$ ; 

: NEXTX : RETURN 

5)36)3)3 FOR X=195 TO 2)33 : PRINT@X, F 
$ ; : NEXTX : RETURN 

507)3)3 FOR X=66 TO 162 STEP 32: PR 

INT@X , F$ ; : NEXTX : RETURN 

5)38)30 FOR X=76 TO 172 STEP 32: PR 

INT@X,F$; : NEXTX: RETURN 

50900 IF GG=1 THEN PRINT@145 , "GO 

LD" ; 

50910 IF BB=1 THEN PRINT@177 , "BR 
OADSWORD" ; 

50920 IF JJ=1 THEN PRINT@152 , " JE 
WEL" ; 

50930 IF 00=1 THEN PRINT§273 , "OR 
ANGE SPHERE"; 

50940 IF MM=1 THEN PRINT@241, "MA 
GIC SPELL"; 

50950 IF FF=1 THEN PRINT§209 , "FL 
AMING TORCH"; 

50960 PRINT@17, "NORTH SOUTH" ;:P 

RINT§49, "EAST WEST"; :PRINT@81, 

"TAKE PUT" ; : PRINT@113 , "KILL 

CAST"; : RETURN 

60000 PRINT@352,"*"; 

60010 Z$=INKEY$ 

60020 IF Z$="" THEN GOTO 60010 
60030 RETURN 

60100 FOR X=34 TO 44 : PRINT@X, P$ ; 
: NEXTX: RETURN 

60200 F0RX=194 TO 204 : PRINT@X, P$ 
; : NEXTX : RETURN 

60300 FOR X=34 TO 194 STEP 32:PR 
INT@X , P$ ; : NEXTX : RETURN 
60400 FOR X=44 TO 204 STEP 32: PR 
INT@X,P$; : NEXTX: RETURN ^ 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 69 




FINANCIAL PLANNING 



1 16K 




' the 
RAINBOW 




| ECB 







This IRA/Keogh Plan estimator 
allows for payroll deductions 



Loop 



Until 



Done 



I don't like it when the computer 
solves a complex problem a split 
second after I press ENTER. This 
program is quite the reverse. It could 
chug away for 20 minutes calculating a 
30-year projection using daily com- 
pounding and weekly contributions. 

This program almost didn't see the 
light of print. 1 had written it because 
I couldn't find any such program, and 
almost immediately after submission 
the August 1984 RAINBOW arrived with 
Leonard Hyre's very fine, fast and 
accurate IRA estimator. 

1 was surprised when RAINBOW said 
it wanted to publish my much slower 
estimator. At first I thought maybe they 
didn't like blindingly fast programs 
either, but on reflection 1 discovered my 
program does do a few things Mr. 



Bruce Ronald, an advertising copywrit- 
er, holds a bachelor's degree in speech. 
He has written a science fiction thriller, 
Our Man in Space, and the book of the 
musical, Dracula, Baby. He and his 
wife, Virginia, coauthor ed two prize- 
winning local histories of Dayton and 
its suburb, Oahwood — the latter on the 
Co Co. 

70 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Hyre's does not. It error traps excess 
contributions — anything over $2,000 
annually for wage earner IRAs and 
$2,250 for spousal IRAs. (If this 
amount is increased, as planned, you 
will need to edit program lines 440, 450 
and 730.) It allows for contributions 
made the way many of us make them, 
via payroll deduction. This program 
allows annual, monthly, twice monthly, 
biweekly and weekly contributions. 

This is what I would call a boilerplate 
program. If something didn't work, I'd 
add another line or another G0SUB 
routine. Here's an example, which I 
added after the original submission, 
that speeds the program up dramati- 
cally for those persons who contribute 
annually or monthly and have their 
interest compounded quarterly or 
monthly. 

Look at Line 825. It instructs the 
computer that those with quantity 
compounding and annual contributions 
skip both the monthly and daily loops 
required for the twice monthly, bi- 
weekly and weekly contribution rou- 
tines. Line 835, within the monthly 
loop, allows for monthly contributions 
while avoiding the time-consuming 



By Bruce W. Ronald 

daily loop. Lines 985 and 995 do the 
same within the monthly compounding 
loop. This results in a considerable 
speedup, from about 28 seconds per 
year to three seconds or less. 

But for daily compounding and/ or 
twice monthly, biweekly or weekly 
contributions, the daily loops are re- 
quired, forcing the computer to loop 
360 times each year. 

Quick Notes 

If you do not have a printer, you may 
eliminate lines 520, 550 and 590, and all 
lines that begin PRINTtt-2. To eliminate 
the introduction (just read it in the 
listing), don't type in Line 20 and the 
subroutine between 1490 and 1690. 

Lines 15 10 and 1520, for example, 
illustrate an interesting anti-ugly tech- 
nique that Dave Barr, president of one 
of Dayton's two Color Computer clubs, 
showed me. Type your line number and 
print, then advance the cursor to the last 
space on the line and enter your quo- 
tation mark. This forces the text to 
appear as you will see it on the screen. 
It avoids unsightly gaps and lets you 
hyphenate words, if needed. This tech- 
nique, although it obviously chews up 



memory, is ideal for programs with a lot 
of text, such as an Adventure game. 

Why no high-speed poke? My com- 
puter can handle it and it does speed up 
execution, but not so much as I would 
expect. If you wish to add it, put it in 
the three daily loop routines at 840, 
1000 and 1160 as POKE 65495,0: FOR 
2=1 TO 30. But if you are using a printer, 
you must POKE 65494 , 0 before each of 
the three printer GDSUBs. It should run 
on a 16K machine if you PCLEAR 1 
before loading. 

There is a slight cheat in the last line 
of the program — it adjusts biweekly 
and weekly contributions from 24 to 26 
and 48 to 52 respectively. 

Now make your CoCo work to show 
you how rich you'll be someday! 

(Mr. Ronald can be reached at 101 
Forrer Blvd., Dayton, OH 45419, phone 
513-294-8808. Please include an SASE 
when writing.) □ 



IRA/KEOGH Estimator 



THIS PLAN RUNS FROM 
INTEREST ASSUMED IS 



1986 TO 
11.5 % 



2026 
COMPOUNDED 



DAILY WITH CONTRIBUTIONS OF 



1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 
2)301 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019 
2020 
2021 
2022 
2023 
2024 
2025 
2026 



Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 
Contribution 



****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2 ,000 .00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2 ,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2 ,000.00 
****$2,000,00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
****$2,000.00 
•fit 



YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
KEAR-END 
KEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
if EAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
iTEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 
YEAR-END 



TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



****$2 
****$4 
****$7 
***$10 
***S14 
**+$18 
***$22 
***$27 
***$33 
***$39 
***$46 
***$54 
***$63 
***$73 
***$84 
***$97 
**$111 
**$127 
**$145 
**$165 
**$187 
**$212 
**$240 
**$272 
**$307 
**$347 
**$392 
**$442 
**$498 
**$561 
**$631 
**$711 
**$B00 
**$B99 
Si, 011 
$1,137 
$1,278 
$1,436 
$1,613 
$1,812 
$2,035 



$ 2000 
243.71 
760.81 
584 . 64 
752.55 
306.49 
293.48 



ANNU/' 



,30 
14 

,42 
65 
40 
45 



766 
784 
413, 
728. 
813, 
761, 
678.00 
681.05 
903.00 
492.38 
615.80 
460.21 
235.30 
176.34 



,26 
13 
12 

,88 
46 
84 

,16 
67 
54 



****$2,000 

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS:***$82,000.00 INTEREST EARNED: $1, 953 , 119 . 98 
FOR A MAN AT 65 THIS WOULD RESULT IN MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $**$25,852. 



547 
644 
799 
384 
819 
571 
168 
198 
325 
291.63 
930.30 
176.51 
079.09 
814.70 
703.38 
226.01 
043.92 
020.91 
247.84 
070.37 
119.98 

64 



150 49 1050 196 

340 88 1340 3 

490 86 1500 10 

680 78 1600 153 

790 84 END 103 

I 



The listing: IRflKEOGH 

1 REM SCARCELY ELEGANT BUT IT 
WORKS . 

2 REM BY BRUCE W RONALD 

3 REM 101 FORRER BLVD 

4 REM DAYTON, OHIO 45419 

5 REM *********************** 

10 CLEAR 500 
20 GOSUB 1490 
30 CLS 

40 PRINT 11 IRA/KEOGH ESTIMA 

TOR" 

50 PRINT: PRINT 

60 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM WILL SHOW 
YOU HOW" 

70 PRINT 11 FUNDS INVESTED IN AN IR 
A OR" 

80 PRINT "KEOGH CAN ACCRUE TO SIG 
NIFICANT" 

90 PRINT" SUMS OVER THE YEARS." 
100 FOR Q=l TO 1800: NEXT Q:CLS 



110 PRINT: PRINT: 

120 PRINT "YOU NEED TO INPUT SOM 
E DATA:" 

130 INPUT" YEAR YOU STARTED (OR W 

ILL START) YOUR PLAN";S1 

140 INPUT" YEAR YOU WILL FINISH Y 

OUR PLAN";S2 

150 Y=S2-S1+1 

160 PRINT "ANSWER THE NEXT QUESTI 
ON WITH A DECIMAL AMOUNT. EXAMPL 
E: ENTER 11 1/2% AS .115" 
170 I NPUT 1 1 ANT I C I PATE D ANNUAL RAT 
E OF INTEREST"; I 

180 IF I>1 THEN PRINT "DECIMAL V 
ALUE, PLEASE.": GOTO 170 
190 INPUT"TO BE COMPOUNDED? Quar 
tery/Monthly/ Daily" ;C$ 

200 IF C$="Q" THEN C 1 $= 11 QUARTERL 
Y" 

210 IF C$="M" THEN Cl$="MONTHLY" 

220 IF C$="D" THEN C1$="DAILY" 
2 30 PRINT "CONTRIBUTIONS TO BE M 
ADE — " 
240 PRINT" ' 

Annually?" 
250 PRINT" 

Monthly? " 
2 60 PRINT" Twic 
e a month?" 

270 PRINT" 

Bi-weekly?" 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 71 





VISA 



DERBY CITY SOFTWARE 

"The Place to Shop for ALL your COCO Needs" 




*** Guaranteed 



The Lowest Prices 



The Latest Versions 



Guaranteed *** 



SUPER 'COMBINATION' SPECIALS! 
WORD PROCESSING 



Telewriter 64 (D 

TW 64+Dynacalc (D 

TW 64+Pro-Color-File 2.0 enhanced . (D 
TW 64+Pro-Color-File+Dynacalc .'. . (D 

Telepatch (D 

TW b4+Telepatch (D 

TW 64+Telepatch + Dynacalc (D 

TW 64+Telepatch + Pro-Color-File . . . .(D 

Telegraphies (D 

Telegraphics+CoCo Max II (D 

TW 64+Telegraphics (D 

TW 64+Telegraphics+Telepatch (D 

Master Design (D 

Master Design+CoCo Max II) (D 

TW 64+Master Design (D 

TW 64+Master Design+Telepatch , , . (D 

Font Generator (D 

TW 64+Font Generator (D 

TW 64+Font Generator+Telepatch . (D 
TW 64+Font+patch+Telegraphics . . (D 
TW 64+Font+patch+ Mast. Desg. . . . (D 

DATABASE MANAGEMENT 

Pro-Color-File 2.0 enhanced * (D 

TW 64+Pro-Color-File 2.0 enhanced (D 
TW 64+Pro-Color-File + Dynacalc . (D 
TW 64+Pro-Color-File + Telepatch (D 
TW 64+P-C-F + patch + graphics (D 
TW 64+P-C-F + patch + M. Design (D 

Pro-Color-Forms 2.0 (D 

Pro-Color-File + Pro-Color-Forms (D 
Pro-Color-File+P-C-Forms+TW 64 (D 
PC-File+PC-Forms+TW 64+patch (D 
PC-File+PC-Forms+TW 64+calc (D 
File+Forms + TW 64+patch +cak. (D 

E-Z Base (D 



SPREADSHEET 

Dynacalc (D 

Dynacalc + Dynagraph .... (D 

Dynacalc + Sidewise (D 

Dynacalc + Dynagraph + Sidewrsf? (D 

TW 64 + Dynacalc (D 

TW 64 + Dynacalc + Dynagraph . (D 

TW 64 + Dynacalc + Sidewise . . (D 

TW 64+Dynacalc+graph+patch (D 

TW 64+Dynacalc+Sidewise+patch (D 

TW 64+calc+graph+wise+patch (D 

TW 64 + Dynacalc + Pro-Color -File (D 

TW 64+Dynacalc+P-C-File4 patch (D 

TW 64+calc+File+patch+graph (D 

Dynagraph (D 

Dynagraph + Sidewise . . (D 

Sidewise (D 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Colorcom/E (D 

Colorcom/E * Colorama BBS . (D 

C-Com/E+BBS+Time Module lot RBS ,{D 

Colorcom/E + TW 64 (D 

Colorcom/E + TW 64 + Telepatch . (D 
C-com/E+TW 64 + patch + P-C-Ftle . (D 
C-com/E+TW 64 + patch + Dynacalc. . (D 
com/E + TW 64 + patch + File + calc . (D 

Colorama BBS (D 

Colorama BBS+Time Module for BBS (D 

Time Module for Colorama BBS . . . .(D 
GRAPHICS 

CoCo Max II (Requires 'Y' Cable) . . .(D 
CoCo Max II upgrade for Max I owners (D 
Max Edit (Font Generator-Max I & II <D 

TW 64+PC-File+Dynacalc+Max II. . . ,(D 
TW 64+Telegraphics + CoCo Max II . (D 
TW 64+Telegraphics + patch + Max. . .{D 
TW 64+Master Design + CoCo Max II (D 
TW 64+Master Design + patch + Max . (D 
TW 64+graph + patch + max + EDIT . (D 
TW 64+Design + patch + max + EDIT (D 



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All orders add $3.00 shipping & handling, Ky. residents add 5% 
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OTHER SUPER 'COMBINATION' SPECIALS ! ! 

* Buy any two of the following programs SAVE 

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These discounts pertain to only 'MAJOR SYSTEMS UTILITIES' 
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MAJOR SYSTEMS UTILITIES 

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OS-9 Solution (Disk Utility 2.1 for OS-9 (D) $ 39.00 

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(A totally unique approach to household based filina systems.) 

in Rainbow Valet = "personal servant".) 
you order any other program & mention that you would like) 



(Soon to be reviewed 
{to order valet also 



CGP-I'i5 Printer/Plotter Screen "Dump . . . . . . . . (D-T 



you will get a $10.00 added discount' 0 



Gemini-Epson Screen Dump (D-T) $ 



21.00 
19.00 



DMP-100 & Compatibles Screen Dump (D-T $ 19.00 

The CoCo Greeting Card Designer (D) $ 24.00 

Schematic Drafting Processor (D $ 29.00 

MUSIC & SPEECH SYSTEMS 

Ears .... (Requites ' Y ' Cable) <D) $ 97.50 

Super Voice .... (Requnes 'Y' Cable (D) $ 75.00 

Radio Shack Speech & Sound Translatoi (D) $ 23.50 

Symphony .... (Requires 'Y* Cable) (D) $ 78.50 

Stereo Pak . . . . (Requires 'Y' Cable) (R) $ 38.50 

Synther 77 Plus (D) $ 28.50 

CoCo MIDI (T-D) $ 38.50 

Piano Keyboard (2 1/2 Octabe - 32 Notes) $ 80.00 

Piano Keyboard (4 Octave • 49 Notes) $120.00 

Musica 2 > . (T-D) $ 28.00 

Music Theory ((D) $ 48.00 

Music Library (100 ot 200 oi 300 oi 400 oi 500) (T-D) $ 29.00 

Music Library (All Five Libianes) (T-D) $100.00 

Super Voice Songbook (Vol. 1 ot Vol. 2) . . (D) $ 19.00 

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Termtalk . (T) $ 38.50 - (D) $ 48.50 

DISKETTES & TAPES 

5 1 /4" Diskettes. 75 cents each 

(Tyvec envelopes Huh nncjs WP tabs L itebme guarantee) 
C-6 Cassette Tapes 50 cents each 

CABLES - SWITCHES & MORE 



$ 



29.50 
36.00 
$ 29.00 
$ 39.00 
$ 35.00 
29.00 



40 Pin (Dual) ' Y ' Cabl»\ 

40 Ptn (Triple) ' Y' Cabh? $ 

RS-232c 2-Position Switch. 

RS-232c 3-Posmon Switch 

DOS Switcher (Jumper select any 24-28 Pin Combination) . 
Univeisal Video Driver (Mono or Color Monitors) $ 

CHIPS - UPGRADES & EPROM PROGRAMER 

64K Upgrade (Set of 8 -4164s ■ 150ns) $ 16.00 

64K Upgrade (Set of 2 4464s - *A* Models only) $39.00 

6809E CPU Chip $ 15.00 

Introntcs EPROM Piogramer $139.00 

27128 (28 Pin - 16K - EPROM) $ 5.00 

27128 ('Burned' with your program - Guaranteed work) ... $ 25.00 

*Any EPROM burned with your program - you supply chip* . $ 20.00 

DISK CONTROLLERS 

DISTO Supercontroller $ 99.75 

(Includes CDOS • 3.28 Pin sockets and t xtra Parallel Port) 

Parallel Punter Adapter $19.75 

Real Time Clock $39.75 

Display 80 (80 column - Clock Printer Adapter) . . $99.75 
MPROM Proqramer (EPROM piogramer) $59.75 

JFD-CP ( JDOS ♦ 24 Pin socket and Parallel Port) $135.00 

DISK DRIVES 

TEAC 54A (40 Track-Gold Edqe Connectors-SS/DD-Bare) . . $125.00 
TE AC 55B (40 Track-Gold Edge Connectors-DS/DD-Bare) . . $135.00 

PRINTER & PRINTER INTERFACE 

GEMINI SG-10 $249.00 

1 20 cps True descenders 2 K Buffer Tractor and F riction F eeds. 
Roll, fan fold and single page. One full year warranty and "Near 
Letter Quality" mode. Full dot addressable graphics! 

PBH 'BR ITE FACE' Parallel Printer Interface $ 59.00 

F irst 'intelligent' serial to parallel interface! Auto set 600 
to 9600 baud rates - without turning any switches! 
SG-10 Printer and Briteface Interface Together $300.00 




(Gemini Epson Screen Dump is FR C 
(D)-DISK (T) = TAPE (D-T) * DISK OR TAPE (R) ROMPAK 

3825 Bardstown Road. Suite 232 Louisville. KY 40218 

(502) 454-6809 



with this purchase!) 




280 PRINT" 

Weekly?" 

290 PRINT 

300 INPUT 11 ENTER FIRST LETTER OF 

YOUR CHOICE";D$ 

310 IF D$="A" THEN Z $ = " ANNUALLY 1 1 

32)3 IF D$="A" THEN M=l 

330 IF D$="M" THEN Z$="MONTHLY 

340 IF D$="M" THEN M=12 

350 IF D$="T" THEN Z$="TWICE MON 

THLY" 

360 IF D$="T" THEN M=24 

370 IF D$="B" THEN Z$="BI-MONTHL 

Y" 

380 IF D$="B" THEN M=2 6 

390 IF D$="W" THEN Z$="WEEKLY" 

400 IF D$="W" THEN M=52 

410 INPUT"HOW MUCH PER PAYMENT"; 

C 

420 INPUT"TYPE OF IRA: Wage earne 
r/Spousal" ;T$ 

430 IF T$="W" GOTO 440 ELSE 450 

440 IF (C*M)>2000 AND T$="W" THE 

N T4=2000: GOSUB 720 

450 IF (C*M)>2250 AND T$="S" THE 

N T4=2250:GOSUB 720 

460 INPUT"AMOUNT,IF ANY, AT STAR 

T OF YEAR"; A 

470 PRINT 11 NOTE . IF YOU ARE CONTR 
IBUTING ONAN ANNUAL BASIS, THIS 
PROGRAM ASSUMES THE CONTRIBUTI 
ON IS MADE" 

480 PRINT "AT THE START OF THE Y 

EAR. IF THIS IS NOT THE CASE, 

YOU SHOULD START ONE YEAR LATER 
it 

• 

490 PRINT" IF ANY DATA IS INCORRE 
CT, PRESS break AND TYPE run TO 
GET CORRECT DATA INTO THE PROGRA 
M. 

500 T=A: PRINT: PRINT 

510 TC=M*(C*Y) :E=M*C 

520 INPUT"OUTPUT TO Screen OR Pr 

inter" ;0$ 

530 CLS:PRINT"THIS COMPOUNDING W 

ILL TAKE UP T045 SECONDS PER YEA 

R. PLEASE BE PATIENT .": PRINT 

540 IF 0$="S" GOSUB 1350 

550 IF 0$="P" GOSUB 1400 

560 IF C$="Q" GOSUB 800 

570 IF C$="M" GOSUB 960 

580 IF C$="D" GOSUB 1120 

590 IF 0$="P" GOTO 640 

600 PRINT TAB (2) "TOTAL CONTRIBUT 

ION : " ; 

610 PRINT USING"**$###, ### . " ;TC+ 
A 

620 PRINT TAB (2) "INTEREST EARNE 



D:"; 

630 PRINT USING "**$###,###.##"; 
(T-TC) :GOTO700 

640 PRINT#-2," TOTAL CONTRIB 

UTIONS : " ; 

650 PRINT#-2 , USING"**$###, ### . ## 
" ; TC+A ; 

660 PRINT#-2," INTEREST EARNED:" 

670 PRINT#-2, USING "**$###,###.# 
#" ; (T— TC) 

680 PRINT#-2, "FOR A MAN AT 65 TH 
IS WOULD RESULT IN MONTHLY PAYME 
NTS OF $"; 

690 PRINT* -2, USING "**$##,###.## 
";T/ (12*6.56) :REM ANOTHER APPROX 
IMATION 

700 PRINT: PRINT" TO RUN AGAIN WIT 
HOUT INTRO DUC- TION, TYPE 'CLS:R 
UN120-" 
710 END 

720 CLS:PRINT"FOR AN IRA, YOU CA 
NNOT INVEST" 

730 PRINT "MORE THAN $2000 PER Y 
EAR AS A WAGE EARNER, NOR MORE 
THAN $2250IF IT IS A JOINT ACCO 
UNT WITH ONLY ONE SPOUSE WORKI 
NG. " 

735 PRINT"YOUR ";Z$;" CONTRIBUTI 

ONS MAY NOT EXCEED $";(T4/M) 

740 PRINT " HOWEVER A KEOGH ACCOUN 

T CAN GO MUCH HIGHER. DO YOU WI 

SH TO CHANGE YOUR AMOUNT?" 

750 INPUT" Yes/No" ;T1$ 

760 IF T1$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE 

IF T1$="Y"THEN C=0 

770 INPUT "HOW MUCH";C 

780 IF (C*M)>2000 AND T$="W" GOT 

0 720 ELSE RETURN 

790 IF (C*M)>2250 AND T$="S" GOT 
0 720 ELSE RETURN 

800 FOR L=l TO Y : REM QUARTERLY L 
OOP 

810 IF D$="A" THEN T=T+C 



EXPAND YOUR COCO! 

ADD FEATURES FROM THE LARGER COMPUTERS! 



DISK OWNERS 

Up to 4 operating systems, or 
2 DOS'S and your best programs 
in one chip. Goes inside 
DISK CONTROLLER 



TAPE USERS 

Up to 32K of your favorite 
programs in a ROM PACK! 
Menu driven. Just plug it in 
and EXEC 



EASY INSTALLATION - FREE DETAILS 

WRITE TO: 



$15.00 UP 



INOVATIVE SYSTEMS 



1 10 Sell Road 
Rome, NY 13440 



SEND 
S.A.S.E. NOW1 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 73 



820 FOR K=l TO 12 

825 IF D$="A" GOTO 870 

830 IF D$="M" THEN T=T+C 

835 IF D$="M" GOTO 870 

840 FOR Z=l TO 30 

850 GOSUB 1700 

860 NEXT Z 

87J3 IF K=3 THEN T=T+T*(I/4) 
880 IF K=6 THEN T=T+T*(I/4) 
89J3 IF K=9 THEN T=T+T*(I/4) 
900 IF K=12 THEN T=T+T*(I/4) 
910 NEXT K 
920 GOSUB 1290 
930 S1=S1+1 
940 NEXT L 
950 RETURN 

960 FOR L=l TO Y:REM MONTHLY LOO 
P 

970 IF D$= H A" THEN T=T+C 

980 FOR K=l TO 12 

985 IF D$="A" GOTO 1050 

990 IF D$="M" THEN T=T+C 

995 IF D$="M" GOTO 1050 

1000 FOR Z=l TO 30 

1010 GOSUB 1700 

1040 NEXT Z 

1050 I2=T*(I/12) 

1060 T=T+I2 

1070 NEXT K 

1080 GOSUB 1290 f 
1090 S1=S1+1 
1100 NEXT L 
1110 RETURN 

1120 FOR L=l TO Y:REM DAILY LOOP 
1130 IF D$="A n THEN T=T+C 
1140 FOR K=l TO 12 
1150 IF D$="M" THEN T=T+C 
1160 FOR Z=l TO 30 
1170 GOSUB 1700 
1180 I3=T*(I/360) 
1190 T=T+I3 
• 1200 NEXT Z 
1210 NEXT K 
1220 GOSUB 1290 
1230 S1=S1+1 
1240 NEXT L 
1250 RETURN 

1290 IF 0$="P" GOSUB 1440 

1300 PRINT: PRINT SI;" CONTRIBUT 

IONS : " 

1310 PRINT USING"**$###, ###.##•• ; 
E 

1320 PRINT" YEAR-END TOTAL:"; 
1330 PRINT USING"**$###, ###.##"; 
T 

1340 RETURN 

1350 PRINT » IRA/KEOGH ESTI 

MATOR" 



1360 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"THIS PROG 
RAM RUNS FROM";Sl "TO ";S2;"." 
1370 PRINT "INTEREST IS"; (1*100) 
;"% COMPOUNDED " 
1380 PRINT Cl$ 

1390 PRINT "WITH CONTRIBUTIONS M 

ADE OF $" ;C;Z$:RETURN 

1400 PRINT#-2, TAB (20) "IRA/KEOGH 

ESTIMATOR" 

1410 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 

1420 PRINT#-2, "THIS PLAN RUNS F 

ROM";S1;"TO";S2 

1430 PRINT#-2, "INTEREST ASSUMED 
IS "; (1*100);"% COMPOUNDED ";C1 
$;" WITH CONTRIBUTIONS OF $";C;Z 
$ : RETURN 

1440 PRINT :PRINT#-2, SI, " Contri 

but ion: " ; 

1450 PRINT#-2,USING"**$###,###.# 

# " ; E ; 

1460 PRINT#-2," YEAR-END TOTAL: 
ii • 

1470 PRINT#-2,USING"**$###, ###.# 

#" ;T 

1480 RETURN 

1490 PRINT"AN IRA IS A TAX-DEFER 
RED WAY TO BUILD A NEST EGG FOR 
YOUR RE- TIREMENT. YOU MAY INV 
EST UP TO" 

1500 PRINT "$2000 OR UP TO 15% O 
F YOUR EARN-ED INCOME , WHICHEVER 
IS LOWER PERYEAR. COUPLES WITH T 
WO INCOMES MAY HAVE TWO IRAS , EA 
CH SUBJECT" 

1510 PRINT 11 

TO THE SAME MAXIMUMS. THERE IS A 

'SPOUSAL' IRA FOR COUPLES WITH 

ONLY ONE WAGE-EARNER. EACH must 

HAVE AN IRA. THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT 

IS THE LOWER OF 15% OF INCOME" 

1520 PRINT " 

OR $22 50. THEY NEED NOT BE EQUAL 
ii 

1530 INPUT"PRESS ENTER TO CONTIN 
UE" ;Y$ 

1540 Y$=INKEY$:IF Y$=" " THEN 15 
40 ELSE 1550 

1550 CLS: PRINT " 
THE MAXIMUM ALLOWED IN ANY ONE 
ONE SPOUSAL ACCOUNT IS $2000." 
1560 PRINT" THE KEOGH PLAN IS 
FOR SELF- EMPLOYED PEOPLE AND A 
LLOWS CON- TRIBUTIONS OF UP TO T 
HE LOWER OF15% OR $30,000." 
1570 PRINT" YOU MAY START TO R 
ECIEVE YOURFUNDS FROM EITHER PLA 
N AT 59 1/2 YEARS OF AGE AND YOU 
MUST START" 



74 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



158j3 PRINT 11 BY 7j3 1/2. THE MONEY C 
AN BE TAKENALL AT ONCE OR IN INS 
TALLMENTS . " 

159/3 PRINT" THE MONEY WILL BE 
TAXED AS INCOME BUT YOU MAY BE 
IN A LOWERBRACKET AT THIS TIME. 



ii 



PRESS ENTER 



16J3J3 PRINT: INPUT" 

TO CONTINUE" ;Y$ 
1610 Y$=INKEY$:IF Y$=" "THEN 161 
0 ELSE 1730 

1620 CLS: PRINT" THIS IS BUT A 
BRIEF OVERVIEW OF THE IRA AND K 
EOGH PLANS." 

1630 PRINT" CHECK ALL THE FACT 
S WITH AN ACCOUNTANT OR AN INVE 
STMENT PLANNER AT YOUR BANK, 

S&L, CREDIT" 

1640 PRINT " 
UNION OR BROKERAGE HOUSE TO 
AVOID ANY PROBLEMS. THERE ARE 
SEVERE PENALTIES FOR EARLY WITH- 
DRAWAL . " 

1650 PRINT " 
BUT THIS IS THE BIGGEST BREAK 
THE 'LITTLE MAN' HAS EVER RE- 
CIEVED FROM HIS GOVERNMENT." 
1660 PRINT: PRINT 

1670 INPUT"PRESS ENTER TO RUN TH 
E PROGRAM" ;Y$ 

1680 Y$=INKEY$:IF Y$=" " THEN 16 
80 

1690 RETURN 

1700 IF D$="T" AND Z=15 THEN T=T 
+C 



•B" 



1710 IF D$= 
+C 

1720 IF D$= 
90 

1730 IF D$= 
90 

1740 IF D$= 
P 

1750 IF D$= 
90 

1760 IF D$= 
90 

1770 IF D$= 
90 

1780 RETURN 

1790 T=T+ (C*l. 083 ): RETURN: REM AP 
PROXIMATION TO ADJUST BI-WEEKLY 
AND WEEKLY CONTIBUTIONS TO MONTH 
LY LOOP 



»T" AND Z=30 THEN T=T 

'B" AND Z=15 GOSUB 17 

AND Z=30 GOSUB 17 
'W" AND Z=7 GOSUB 179 

'W" AND Z=14 GOSUB 17 

'W" AND Z=21 GOSUB 17 

'W" AND Z=2 8 GOSUB 17 



FIGHTER 
PILDT 



~7~ 






Fighter Pilot 

An original arcade gamel Wave after 
wave of attacking aircraft attempt to 
shoot you down as yau maneuver your 
fighter into the wild blue yonder, 
blasting enemy fighters, bombers and 
paratroopers out of the sky, Joystick or 
keyboard operation. "Pause game" 
feature. Disk version saves high scores. 
32K. 100% Machine Language. 

Tape $24.95 
Disk $29.95 

Mission of 
Vengeance 

A fantasy graphics adventure. You are 
Garotte Severinn, master thief, spy, and 
assassin. Your mission is to kill the evil 
wizard Neeman, recover the holy 
scepter of Tash, and escape from 
Neeman's castle. The reward is a 
fortune in gold, but beware... many 
dragons and monsters stand between 
you and the gold! 32K, one disk drive 
required. 

Disk or Amdek $24.95 



Pumpman 



You'll dig this 100% machine language 
arcade game! The Pumpman carries a 
pump that he fires at aliens Paoky and 
Dragon as they change forms and 
chase him around under the ground, 
15 different screens, "pause game" 
feature. As fun and challenging as the 
original arcade version! 32K, one 
joystick required. 



Tape $24.95 
Disk $29.95 



Hires + 

High Resolution 
Screen Enhancer 

HIRES + is a programmer's utility that 
adds o number of features to BASIC: A 
high resolution screen with true upper 
and lower case letters and variable 
screen width, scroll protect, key repeat, 
error-trapping, visual input routine, 
reset protection, true break disable 
and more! 16K tape. 

$19.95 



Menu Maker 

The Ultimate In easy disk access and 
organization! Menu Maker is a 100% 
machine language utility that allows 
you to place attractive, customized 
menus on all of your diskettes and, with 
one one key press, load any program of 
your choice. Menu Maker is com- 
patible with RS DOS 1.0 and 1.1 (soon 
with others!) and supports multiple- 
drive systems. 32K, one disk drive 
required. 

Disk or Amdek $24.95 



Magazine Index 
System 

M.I.S. helps you organize and keep 
track of those important magazine 
articles. Features include transfer utility 
insuring compatibility with other data- 
base progroms, fast search routines, 
and the saving of data in a com- 
pressed format for more records per 
disk. 16K, one disk drive required. 

$14.95 



Software 
CloseoutM 

We're Blowing Out All 
Tom Mix • Mark Data 
Prickly-Pear 
Petrocci • Sugar 

Call Or Write For 
Lowest Prices Anywhere! 
Quantities Limited 

Write For Free Catalog! 

Gift Certificates 
Available 



Eagle $24.95* 

Lunar Lander. 32K, Joysticks Required. 

Marooned! $29.95 

Adventure. 32K, Disk Only. 

Blackjack Dealer $24.95* 

With Feeler Dealer. 32K 

Sketchpad $19.95 

Graphics Drawing Program. 32K. Disk Only. 

Alpha -40+ $19.95 

Formats 40* Tracks. More! 32K. Disk Only. 

Testmaker $29.95 

Creates T/F, M/C Tests Disk Only. 

Maycodfe $24.95* 

6809 Disassembler J2K 

* Add $5.00 For Disk 

We'll Ship Your Order 
For Only $1.00! 

Software Only - Hardware Shipped 
At Cost. 

Outside USA - $2.00 Per Progrom 



Saga 



< 303 > 728-4937 



Software Telluride, CO 81435 

CO. Residents Add 7% Tax • C O D. Orders Add $3.00 
Dealer Inquiries Invited! 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 75 



OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 

* — ^ ' ' 1 - " ~ TECHNICAL ADVICE 

(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 




Other Drive O Systems from $ 1 79. Double Sided 



drive o $199. $239. 

...Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0,1 Combos. 

DRIVE 1 $1 15. $145. 



Double 

Sided 

or 
Double 
Sided 
Quad 



NOW AVAILABLE !!! 

SUPER-TROLL 




}, 



OWL-WARE'S version of the 
Distro (CRC) Controller by 
Tony DiStefano.This has sockets 
for 4 ROM Chips. ...only $5.00 
additional with a Drive 0 System. 



ADD ON OPTIONS: 
CDOS 

Parallel Printer Port 
Real Time Clock 
80 Column Card 



$6. 
$25. 

$10. 
$49. 



Just Controller $99. with CDOS 
to $195. with ALL options 



All drives are new, direct drive, 
40 track and 6 ms. We ship 

FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at NO ADDED CHARGE! 

MITSUBISHI & TEAC are known 
as the highest quality made. 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 
not Full-height belt-driven 

drives. 

We have RSDOS, JDOS, 
OWL DOS, ADOS available on 
ROM. Call about Double Sided 
or Special Needs. 



Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



TOLL FREE 

ORDER LINE 

(800) 245-6228 

Call for 
LATEST 

PRICES!!! 



1 YR. 



WARRANTY 
ON ALL ITEMS!!! 




C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA Res include 6%Ta* 
PA (215) 682-6855 



OWL TIP: Drive costs have gone up. 

We have kept the listed price constant, 
but may have to raise them soon. 
We still have maintained quality despite 
competition.!!! 

OWL-WARE SOFTWARE 

BUNDLE: DISK TUTORIAL 

2 UTILITIES 
2 GAMES 

DISK TUTOR 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
QUICK, PAINLESS KNOWLEDGE OF DISK 
BASIC (THIS PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN 
TUTOR IS EASILY WORTH THE BUNDLE'S 
TOTAL PRICE). 

OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
25% FASTER DISK ACCESS AND ALLOWS 
USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 
SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

2 GAMES 

Our own CRYSTAL REVENGE and one other. 
Both have sold for over $17.00 each. 

IF SOLD SEPARATELY OVER 
$125.00 WORTH OF SOFTWARE!!! 

only $24.95!!! 
(or even better) 
$4.95 with 
DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 



OWL-WARE 

WINCHESTER BASIC 



ANNOUNCING... the Development of a Major Breakthrough in 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR COMPUTER!!! 

Several months ago OWL-WARE introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer. 
Now we are about to introduce the only RSOOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, Although there are 10 
directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but if you do, all files saved from RSDOS are available to OS9. All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don't like. 

Call for further details and availability on this breakthrough product!!! 




(KOC Until 

3>OO.Feb. 28th WITHOUT 



WITH 

DRIVE ^ 
BELOW $50. Thereafter 



(Kta Until 
3>DU.Feb. 28th 



DRIVE 



$75. 



Thereafter 



OS-9 HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives. 

Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
Memory!!! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes... 
Software, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interface. 

INTRODUCTORY PRICE... until Jan. 19th 

$495.5MEG $649.10MEG 

(19,500 + sectors) (39,100 sectors) 

$849.20MEG 

'.-WARE is pleased to announce 
"lusive arrangement to Distribute 
tech Hard Drive Interface 
>re. 





Interface & 
Software Only $99. 

NOTE: interface is not Interrupt 
Driven Like Our Competition. 
Therefore, the System Clock 
does not Lose Time During 
Hard Drive Access. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULTI-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 



DEALERS INQUIRES INVITED 



CREATE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES UITH 




m Convenient, en-fcrttn Mtnu 
m Accept f input from X-PUB, 

touch-pad { nnumt or joystick 
m nagnif icition rndt 

■ Draw with cuittm paintorufhvf 

m ^Falnt" coMMand 

■ 10 colon at a tim 

" BASIC pr oar a*M* 
m Lettering In inu till 
n tcreen aitmp to Color inn-Jet 
or otntr Tandy printer* 

I4K DISK iflO.SS 




VIEW J-OIHENSIONAL OBJECTS FROH ANY 
ANGLE UITH 




Convenient, on- tcreen Menu 
Supports input from x-pad, 
TOUCH-PAD, rWJUSC or JOYSTICK 

to Tenau 
for uou 



■Hiu-tn icreen 

Sr inter % 
levlatet fliHtm torn 



from juit a rough iketcn 
Piotf Or calculatti Unti 



•r c t 
Dn-lCrttn 



and 



de 



fleet citing 
sen DISK • 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 



MORE GOOD SOFTWARE 

GRAPHICOM 

3 disk package $29.95 

64K EXB disk 
SAM DIAMOND 

graphic adventure .... $29.95 

32K EXB disk 
HOT SLOT 

casino simulation .... $24.95 

32K EXB disk or tape 
ECLIPSE 

excellent pixel editor. . $19.95 

64K EXB disk 




wmi mm mm 



THE MOTION PICTURE 

A complete animation development system for your CoCo! 
An object oriented graphic screen developer. Using this 
tool you can quickly and simply animate your pictures. 
Take standard graphic screens that you develop and 
incorporate them into MOTION PICTURES. Animate up 
to eight frames, yielding smooth animation. Generate 
screens from objects and build screens from stored object 
files. Included are routines to display animation from 
BASIC. We believe you'll like this program, so we make 
this offer: We will send you a demonstration disk for $4.00 
which you can apply as a credit if you buy the program. 
Requires 64K. Disk, $39.95. 




MORE KEYS 

At last a quality numeric keypad for 
your Color Computer. This 15 key 
numeric pad plugs inside your com- 
puter and gives you the convenience 
of rapid numeric data entry. Dimen- 
sions; length 6V2" (165mm), width 4" 
(101 mm), height 3" (76 mm). Baked 
black enamel finish. Specify computer 
model. MORE KEYS complete with 
cable and connector. 

$69.95 

RESET-POWER-SWITCHES Either kit add $2 * 00 
A REAL IMPROVEMENT shipping and handling. 

Move the power switch and reset 
switch where they belong. An LED 
power on light too! High quality parts, £| m 

D and E boards totally solderless. The 0 9 9 
F board and some models of the 
CoCo II require soldering. 

Reset 1 Coco 1 $24.95 i ■ ■ ■ 

Reset 2 CoCo 2 $27.95 — V mm mm 

64K UPGRADES 

P — E Board (solderless - 

'$Jw**JL£> p ictured > $39.95 

4 ^f£Lx flffiw* F Board . . „ $26 95 

*5S f" 1 * CoCo 2 (except 26-3134A&B and 

fg; 26-3136A&B) $26.95 

CoCo 2 (models 26-3134A&B and 
26-3136A&B $39.95 

Guaranteed Pretested Havin 9 trouble with your CoCo? We 

have the chips you need. Call us. 
(805) 962-3127 



DOUBLE DRIVER I 

The BEST monitor driver available. 
Color composite, monochrome and 
audio output. For original CoCo D, E 
and F boards. $24.95. 

MONO II 

Mono II for Color Computer 2. An 
excellent monochrome monitor driver 
that has audio output also. Specify 
model needed. 

$24.95. 






PLANETARIUM 



1 



i 




A five program celestial 
package. A star gazer's aid. A 
program to familiarize you 
with the appearance of the 
major constellations. 21 first 
magnitude stars. Moon 
phases. Day or night sky. 
Any latitude. 33 constella- 
tions. Charts planet locations 
from A.D. 0 to the year 
10,000. Requires 16K 
Extended Basic. $19.95 



DOUBLE DRIVER II 

Finally a monitor driver for 
the Color Computer II that 
lets you use a monochrome 
and a color monitor 
simultaneously. We're proud 
of this new driver. The six 
transister circuit provides op- 
timal signal mixing and signal 
gain. Excellent monochrome 
output and better quality 
resolution in the color ouput 




than any driver we have 
seen. Audio output also. Fits 
all models of the Color Com- 
puter II. $29.95. 




THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The CoCo Switcher allows you to hook up 
three peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Con- 
nect your modem, printer and any other 
RS-232 compatible peripheral to the CoCo 
Switcher. An LED on the CoCo Switcher 
shows if your computer is on or off at a glance, 
The LED flickers when transmitting or receiv- 
ing data. 

$39.95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division of Moreton Bay laboratory 
316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 

Ordering information 

Send $2.00 shipping and handling per order. We ship 
within 1 working day on receipt of order. Blue Label 
Service available. California residents add 6% sales tax. 





REAL ESTATE 



16K 




f the 
• ■I* 

RAINBOW 


ECB 








Are you selling your home and need to find out a fair 
asking price? With a few simple questions answered, it's 
easy to figure 



Assessing the Market Value 

of Your Home 

By Harry W. Hallstrom 



Back a couple of years ago 1 was 
interested in selling my home, 
but not quite sure what I should 
be asking as a fair price. The first thing 
I did, as I'm sure just about everyone 
does, was get out the phone book. After 
a careful selection of three real estate 
agents, I gave each one a call. When all 
were met and given the grand tour each 
asked me, "What are you asking as a 
selling price range?" Now wait a minute, 
I thought, they are supposed to tell me 
what a good asking price is. I n time they 
all did, but they were all different. The 
price spread was almost $20,000 on a 
house that is about $120,000 in value. 
That's when I decided there must be a 
better way to accurately determine the 
true market value of a home. 

After thinking about it for several 
weeks, I realized that all real estate is 
assessed by the city or town to which 
you pay taxes. Most cities/ towns also 



Harry Hallstrom is a self-taught com- 
puter programmer and hobbyist who 
works in a large telecommunications 
company as a CAD/ CAM designer 
using a VAX 11/780, He has an asso- 
ciates degree in mechanical engineering 
and lives in Northfield, Connecticut 
with his wife and two daughters. 



reassess properties every so often — 10 
years seems to be the average time span 
between assessments. With that infor- 
mation, I wrote House Value to help 
determine the current market value of 
a piece of property. Three pieces of 
information are required to run the 
program: What year did you purchase 
your home or when was it last assessed, 
at how much was it assessed and what 
is the percentage of assessment? 

Most homeowners know the answers 
to these three questions. If you do not 
know, there are several ways to find out. 
The first is to call the city hall and ask 
the tax collector. Another way is to call 
the bank holding the mortgage on your 
home and ask if they can help you with 
those questions. If you get an itemized 
tax bill, usually the assessed value and 
percentage of asessment is furnished on 
the bill. 

House Value takes the assessed value 
and determines the actual value based 
on the percentage of assessment. Once 
that is determined, the national infla- 
tion rate is added to each year from the 
year of purchase or last assessment to 
the present year. 

How the Program Works 

Type in the listing and save a copy to 
disk or tape before running. You are 



greeted with a title screen and the first 
data entry point, "year home was 
bought?" Enter the year your home was 
purchased or the last year of assess- 
ment, which ever is later. For example, 
if your home was purchased in 1968 but 
reassessed in 1975, then enter 1975. You 
must enter a year between 1968 and 
1985, and as a four-digit year. Lines 13 
through 17 look for this entry and verify 
if the year is between 1968 and 1985. I 
used 1968 as the earliest year allowed, 
figuring most real estate property has at 
least been reassessed since that time. 

The next data entry point is "assessed 
value at purchase?" Here again, this 
means at the time of purchase or latest 
assessment. Enter this figure as a dollar 
figure (the '$' sign is not necessary). 
Keep in mind if you have added some- 
thing permanent to the property since 
buying or assessment to add that to the 
assessed value. Suppose you added a 
$5,000 solar system last year; by all 
means add $5,000 to the assessed value. 
Lines 18 through 21 look for this entry. 

The last piece of information you 
have to enter is the "percent of assess- 
ment?" Lines 22 through 26 look for this 
data. Lines 27 through 31 perform the 
necessary mathematical calculations to 
determine present value. Once the 
assessment figure is entered the screen 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 79 



redisplays the data and the true market 
value based on 100 percent assessment. 
You are prompted to hit any key to 
continue. Lines 27 through 36 perform 
this function. You are then asked if you 
want a screen listing of "house value 
each year" or "present value?" Lines 37 
through 43 look for a keyboard entry 
and verify it is the correct key input. 

Lines 44 through 62 are the years 
from 1968 to 1985. Based on your 
earlier input the program continues 
down the lines until it finds the year 
match. At that point, the new market 



value is calculated based on the national 
inflation rate. Note that Line 62 as- 
sumes an inflation rate of 4 percent. 
When the exact figures are published by 
the federal government you might want 
to correct this line. In any case, they 
won't be far from 4 percent. Lines 63 
through 67 display the "present market 
value" with a pause for user input to run 
the program again or end. Lines 68 
through 71 restart the program or end 
it, depending on your input. Lines 72 
through 76 are the subroutine used to 
cycle through each year if you selected 



a yearly listing of the increasing market 
value. 

House Value can easily be modified 
to direct the data to a printer. I didn't 
have any need for that, so it wasn't 
done. Feel free to use and modify this 
program any way you wish. If there is 
enough interest in a printer version I 
will work something out and perhaps 
add it as a later article. 

(Any questions you may have about 
this program can be sent to the author 
at Marsh Road, Northfield, CT 06778. 
Please enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 




19 57 

41 31 

32 12 

63 41 

END 163 



The listing: HOUSEVRL 



PROG NAME "HOUSEVAL.BAS 1 

HARRY W. HALLS TROM 
MARSH ROAD 

NORTHFIELD, CT. 06778 
VERSION 1.6 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

9 CLS:EY=0 

10 PCLEAR1 : CLEAR1000 

11 CL$=STRING$(254,32) 

12 FOR I=1029TO1050:READX:POKEI, 
X:NEXT:FOR I=1065TO1078 : READX: PO 
KEI,X: NEXT: FOR I=1094TO1113 : READ 
X:POKEI,X:NEXT 

13 PRINT@96,STRING$(32,&H3D) ; 

14 PRINT@165, "YEAR HOME WAS BOUG 
HT" : PRINT@198 , " ' YYYY 1 11 ; : LINEINP 
UT YR$ 

15 IF YR$<"1968" OR YR$>"1985"TH 
EN SOUND2 00 , 3 : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 1 ) 11 
ENTER A YEAR BETWEEN 1968-1985": 
FORT=1TO3000 : NEXT : PRINT© 12 8 , CL$ : 
GOTO 14 

16 IF LEN(YR$)<4 OR LEN(YR$)>4 T 
HENPRINT@12 8 , CL$ : GOT014 

17 YR=VAL ( YR$ ) 

18 PRINT@160,CL$ 

19 PRINT@163, "ASSESSED VALUE AT 
PURCHASE 

20 PRINT@203 ,"$";: LINEINPUT AV$ 

21 IF LEN(AV$)=<0 THENPRINT@128 , 
CL$:GOT019 



22 PRINT@160,CL$ 

23 PRINT@169, "% OF ASSESSMENT 

24 PRINT© 2 10,"%": PRINT© 207, ; :LIN 
EINPUT AA$ 

25 AA=VAL(AA$) :IF AA=<0 OR AA>10 
0 THENPRINT@128,CL$:GOT023 

2 6 PRINT@160,CL$ 

2 7 AV=VAL ( AV $ ) : AA=VAL ( AA$ ) 

28 IF AA= 100 THEN 31 

29 AA=100-AA 

30 NV=AV*(AA/100) :MV=AV+NV.GOT03 
2 

31 MV=AV 

32 print@165 , "house purchased: " 
;yr$ 

3 3 print© 2 2 9, "assessed value"; :p 

RINTUSING" $###,###";AV 

34 PRINT@290 , "MARKET VALUE", *YR;: 
PRINTUSING" $###,### ";MV 

35 PRINT@394, "HIT ANY KEY 

36 EXEC44539 

37 PRINT@160,CL$ 

38 PRINT@166, "LIST VALUE eACH YE 
AR 

39 PRINT@207, "OR 

40 PRINT@231, "LIST pRESENT VALUE 

41 PRINT© 3 2 7, "ENTER e OR p " ; 
: LINEINPUT A$ 

42 IF A$="E" THEN EY=1 ELSE IF A 
$="P"THEN 43 ELSE41 

43 PRINT@128,CL$ 

44 IF YR=1968 THEN SV=MV* .042 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 • INFLATION=4.2% 

45 IF YR=1969 THEN S V=MV* . 0 5 4 : MV 
=MV+SV: YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 • INFLATION=5.4% 

46 IF YR=1970 THEN SV=MV* .055 :MV 
=MV+SV: YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 ' INFLATION=5.5% 

47 IF YR=1971 THEN SV=MV* . 034 : MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 ' INFLATION=3.4% 



80 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 



48 IF YR=1972 THEN SV=MV* . J3 3 4 : MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=3.4% 

49 IF YR=1973 THEN SV=MV* . J388 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATIONS. 8% 

50 IF YR=1974 THEN SV=MV* . 122 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=12.2% 

51 IF YR=1975 THEN SV=MV* . j3 7 : MV= 
MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSUB 
72 , INFLATI0N=7% 

52 IF YR=1976 THEN SV=MV* . f3 4 8 : MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+l:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=4.8% 

53 IF YR=1977 THEN SV=MV* . 068 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+l:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATIONS. 8% 

54 IF YR=1978 THEN SV=MV* . 09 :MV= 
MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSUB 
72 'INFLATION=9% 

55 IF YR=1979 THEN SV=MV* . 133 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+l:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=13.3% 

56 IF YR=1980 THEN SV=MV* . 124 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=12.4% 

57 IF YR=1981 THEN SV=MV* . J389 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+l:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=8.9% 

58 IF YR=1982 THEN SV=MV* . J339 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+l:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 1 INFLATION=3 . 9% 

59 IF YR=1983 THEN SV=MV* .038 :MV 
=MV+SV:YR=YR+l:IF EY=1 THEN GOSU 
B72 'INFLATION=3.8% 



60 IF YR=1984 THEN SV=MV* .04 :MV= 
MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSUB 
72 'INFLATION=4.0% 

61 PRINT@128,CL$ 

62 IF YR=1985 THEN SV=MV* .04 :MV= 
MV+SV:YR=YR+1:IF EY=1 THEN GOSUB 

72 'INFLATION=4.0% 

63 PRINT@128,CL$ 

64 PRINT© 16 6, "PRESENT VALUE @";Y 
R 

65 PRINT@235,USING"$# ,###,###" ;M 
V 

66 PRINT@3 62,"HIT ANY KEY 

67 EXEC44539 

68 PRINT@160,CL$ 

69 PRINT@325," RUN AGAIN y/n 

70 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""THEN70 

71 IF A$="Y"THEN9 ELSE IF A$="N" 
THENCLS : PRINTTAB ( 9 ) "PROGRAM ENDE 
D" : END ELSE70 

72 IF YR=198 6 THEN GOTO 63: PRINT 
@128, CL$ 

73 PRINT@196, "VALUE @" ; YR; "=" ; : P 
RINTUSING" $###,### ";MV 

74 PRINT@325, "HIT ANY KEY TO ADV 
ANCE 

75 EXEC44539 

76 RETURN 

77 DATA 72,79,85,83,69,96,86,65, 
76,85,69,96,67,65,76,67,85,76,65 
,84,79,82 

78 DATA 66,89,96,72,110,72,65,76 
,76,83,84,82,79,77 

79 DATA 86,69,82,96,113,110,118, 
96,96,96,96,96,91,67,93,96,113,1 
21,120,116 



SSS 



OUTLINER 



SNAP • STUDY • SYSTEM is quick and simple. 

There are no forms to design or set up. 
Just start entering records as in a book. 
At any time, use the arrow keys to browse 
through chapter headings, pages, items. 
It's easy to add, revise, delete, print. 

A unique and cozy filing system is used. 
There are NO FILE NAMES to remember i ! ! 

RECORD reference notes for books, talks, 
g-iides, checklists, requirements, 
things to remember, note, review. 

PLjAN an outline or summary for reports, 
manuscripts, agendas, duties, 
any ideas or projects to be done. 



£OBS PILE PARTIAL PRItfKOT 
HOME 

HOUSE MAINTE3NANCE 

je kitchen washers 
Paint utility room 
Replace light bulbs 
Check smoke alarm **** 
Car service MOST 9AM 
YARD 

Prune hedge, shrubs 
Gate hinges - fix 
Clean our eave troughs 
Marigolds-seed MAR 1st 

ENGINEERING 
PROJECT » 200 
Preliminary plan 
etc .... 



3 sample files are 
included (see left) 

32< DISK, 1 DRIVE 
$19.95 U.S. $25 CAN 
(+$2 Shipping) 



COZY SOFTWARE 

25142 53 Ave 
Aldergrove 
British Col^imbia 
CANADA V0X1A0 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 81 





Toll Free 
Orders Only 
800-245-6228 



Information 
301-521-4886 



If You Pay Taxes 

Need Coco-Accountant 



If you've just fought a losing bout with your tax 
return, you need Coco-Accountant in your corner! 
This 32/64K home and small busineess accounting 
program is everything you need to keep track of your 
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Just spend a few minutes each month entering 
your data: checks, cash outlays, credit card ex- 
penses or income. In any order. CoCo-Accountant 
takes the whole mess and makes sense out of it. 
Here's what it does: 

■ Lists and totals entries by month, ofsetting in- 
come against expenses. 

■ Lists and totals entries by account, payee or 
income source, for a month or a whole year. 

■ Provides a year-to-date summary by account. 

■ Prints a spreadsheet showing activity by ac- 
count and month for the whole year. 

■ Flags deductible expenses. 

■ Flags expenses subject to sales tax and com- 
putes the sales tax you paid. 

■ Sends reports to screen or printer. Stores da- 
ta on tape or disk. 

Our customers say it's the most useful piece of 
software they own. It's so easy and flexible that 
you'll be delighted, too! So stop stuffing your re- 
cords in a shoebox and join the computer age! Co- 
co-Accountant is only $34.95 on tape or disk. 
Please specify memory and whether you want tape 
or disk. 




Baseball Stats 
For Your League! 

If you're a coach, play- 
er or baseball fan, you'll 
love Baseball Statpak! 
This series of programs 
will keep track of a team 
or an entire league, with 
incredible screen displays 
and printouts. 
Batter's Scorecard tracks AB, Hits, Runs, Walks, 
RBI's, HR's, SO's, Errors and On-base Percentage 
for up to 180 players! Pitcher's Scorecard tracks 
Games, IP, Hits, Walks, Runs, SO's and ERA for up 
to 60 pitchers. Team Scorecard will keep standings 
for an entire league! 

Lightning-fast machine language sort on any stat 
makes this an invaluable coaching tool! You've seen 
these stats for the Big Leagues in your newspaper. 
Now you can have them for your league, whether it's 
Little Leauge, High School, College, or Amateur 
Softball! Baseball Statpak is available on 16K Tape 
or 32/64K Disk. Extended Basic Required. Only 
$34.95, on tape or disk. 




Thoroughbred, Harness, Greyhound 




■HORSE RACES* 




■HARNESS RACE! 




DOG RACES- 



Use your Color Computer to improve your performance 
at the track! These 1 6K programs for Thoroughbred, Har- 
ness and Greyhound racing rank the horses or dogs in 
each race quickly and easily, even if you've never handi- 
capped before. All the information you need is readily avail- 
able from the Racing form, harness or dog track program. 
We even provide diagrams showing you where to find each 
item! 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, past 
performance, weight, class, jockey's record, beaten favor- 
ite and post position. Harness factors include speed, post 
position, driver's record, breaking tendencies, class, park- 



ed-out signs and beaten favorite. Greyhound factors in- 
clude speed, past performance, maneuvering ability, favor- 
ite box, class, kennel record, beaten favorite and breaking 
ability. 

We include complete instruction and a wagering guide 
that tells you which races to bet and which to avoid — one 
of the real secrets of good handicapping. You can buy a 
more expensive handicapper, but we don't think you can 
buy a better one! Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound 
Handicapper, $34.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for 
$54.95 or all three for $74.95. 




Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore. Md. 21208 



lAottriCa'i 



Determining altitude and azimuth for your 
given location and time, this program points , 
the way to our once-in-a- life time celestial 
visitor 



* • • 




••• 



* ' « ♦ 



Comet Halley and its elongated 
tail filled the nightly heavens 
during the 1910 appearance. 
Halley's current visit finds it farther 
from the earth and thus much fainter. 
In fact, astronomers judge it the least 
spectacular appearance in 2,000 years 
and we won't see it again for 76 years. 
Light "pollution" in modern cities will 
further thwart suburban comet 
watchers. 

Halley wili be visible again, low in the 
southern sky, during the months of 
February, March and April of this year. 
The best aids for viewing this once-in- 
a-lifetime phenomenon are dark skies, 
binoculars mounted on a camera tripod 
and knowledge of exactly where to 
look. 

The BASIC program, HA LLEY86, 
computes the comet's exact location for 
your locale, date and local time. The 
comet's coordinates are given as an 
altitude and an azimuth. 



Ron Pettus works in the field of oper- 
ations analysis and holds a degree in 
physics. His hobbies include astronomy 
and volunteer work at a science mu- 
seum. He and his teenage son, Jason, 
hgve co-owned a Color Computer for 
four years. 



•* ■ if 



* 



Altitude and Azimuth 

To better understand altitude and 
azimuth, picture yourself standing 
inside a large circle marked off into 360 
equal segments and numbered zero to 
359. When you face the segment marked 
zero you are looking due north. As you 
turn to the east the numbers increase, 
and at due east you are looking at the 
segment numbered 90. The numbers 
continue to increase as you turn and at 
due south the number is 180. Facing 
west the number has increased to 270. 
This describes azimuth, which corre- 
sponds to conventional compass head- 
ings ranging from zero to 360 degrees. 

Now, hold your arm straight out and 
point to the horizon. This corresponds 
to an altitude of zero. Start moving your 
arm up. As your arm moves upward the 
altitude increases, and halfway between 
the horizon and straight up the altitude 
is 45. Eventually, with your arm point- 
ing straight up, the altitude is 90 (its 
maximum value). 

Using the Program 

For a 16K computer, PCLERR1 to 
provide enough memory. The program 
first asks if a printer is connected, then 
offers the opportunity to enter a tem- 
porary latitude and longitude represent- 
ing your location: WANT TO CHECK 
LAT & LONG? To permanently store 
your location in the program, modify 



• • • 

By Ronald Pfcttus 



lines 110 and 120. Line I 10 contains 
your Hour Angle (longitude divided by 
15) and Line 120 your latitude. Both 
values must be in decimal form. If you 
find longitude or latitude in degrees, 
minutes and seconds, divide the minutes 
by 60 and seconds by 3,600 and add 
both to degrees. Your value is now in 
decimal. You can find the latitude and 
longitude of many cities in an almanac, 
atlas, or even from a local airport. 

Next, you are asked a series of ques- 
tions requiring month, day, year, time" 
and time zone for use in the computa- 
tions. The program accepts standard 
and daylight time for Eastern, Central, 
Mountain and Pacific time zones. For 
other zones modify lines 280-390. Use 
the 24-hour time system for inputs. For 
example, 3:15 a.m. is 0315 and 10:30 
p.m. is 2230. In other words, add 1200 
to the time beginning with 1 p.m. 

You now choose Halley's comet ('H') 
or ask for the location of some other 
celestial object CO 1 ). When you select 
Halley's comet, the rest of the operation 
is automatic. If you select some other 
object, you must enter Right Ascension 
and Declination coordinates for the 
object from an almanac or astronomy 
magazine. 

At this point the program prints the 
azimuth and altitude for eight 15- 
minute intervals. It also makes a paper 
copy if you have a printer. 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 83 



Using Altitude and Azimuth 

Now, how do you use this informa- 
tion to find H alley's comet? Take your 
binoculars outdoors on a clear evening, 
as far from city lights as possible, with 
your listing of altitudes and azimuths. 
Using the azimuth coordinate, turn to 
the correct direction. Then tilt the 
binoculars to the correct altitude or 
elevation. A negative altitude means the 
object is below the horizon and not 
visible. 

This process is quicker and more 
accurate if you use a compass or, better 
yet, mount your binoculars on a camera 
tripod and make a pair of "setting 
circles." A pair of inexpensive plastic 
protractors are easily converted for this 
use. An article by Paul Burke describing 
homemade setting circles and the theory 
of altitude-azimuth conversion appears 
in the April 1982 issue of Astronomy 
magazine. 



Checking the Program 

Here is a sample calculation to check 
the program if you typed it in. Use a 
Longitude of 90 degrees, 12 minutes, 21 
seconds and Latitude of 38 degrees, 37 
minutes, 45 seconds (for St. Louis, 
Missouri). Use the date 1,1,84 and a 
time of 2000,C(8 p.m. Central Standard 
Time). Select 'CV (Other Object) and 
enter the following coordinates for the 
star Betelgeuse in Orion: Right Ascen- 
sion (hours) = 5, Right Ascension (min- 
utes) = 54; Declination (degrees) = 7, 
Declination (minutes) = 24. Your dis- 



2130 51 137 

2145 53 142 

2200 54 14B 

If it doesn't look like this check lines 
1100-1400. 

Several abbreviations appear on the 
screen display of this program. They are 
interpreted below. 



play should be: 






TIME 


RLT 


fiZ 


2000 


36 


113 


2015 


39 


116 


2030 


42 


120 


2045 


44 


123 


2100 


47 


128 


2115 


49 


132 



Rfi 


Right Ascension 


DEC 


— Declination 


DEG 


— Degrees 


MIN 


— Minutes 


SEC 


— Seconds 


HR 


— Hours 


fiLT 


— Altitude 


RZ 


Azimuth 



(You may contact the author of this 
program with any questions at 1228 
Fordyce Lane, St. Charles, MO 63303; 
phone 314-946-7848 after 6 p.m. MST. 
Please enclose an SASE when writ- 
ing.) □ 



220 


102 


1620 


,231 


470 


. 106 


1987 


.... 85 


690 


140 


2060 


. 26 


950 


49 


2093 


.,250 


1150 


, 238 


END 


. . .183 


1380 


54 







T 



HALLEY 1 S 



The listing: HALLEYBG 

10 'HALLEY FINDER 
20 '1986 

30 'BY RONALD PETTUS 
40 CLS: PRINT @ 195," 
COMET FINDER" 

50 PRINT @ 262," 1986" 

60 PRINT @ 295, "BY RONALD PETTUS 
ii 

70 FOR 1=1 TO 1500 
80 NEXT I 
90 CLS 

100 CLEAR 100 

110 DATA 6.0137407 

120 DATA 38.629167 

130 DIM M$(308) ,K(19) 

140 PRINT " PRINTER ON? (Y/N) " 

150 PP$=INKEY$ 

160 IF PP$="» THEN 150 

170 CLS: PRINT § 2 34, "LOADING DAT 

A" 

180 READ LC,LX 'READ HOUR ANGLE 
& LAT FROM LINES 110 & 120 
190 FORI=0 TO 18:READK(I) :NEXTI 
'READ YEAR FACTORS FROM LINES 19 
82-2000 
200 CLS 

210 PRINT "WANT TO CHECK LONG & L 
AT? (Y/N) " 



220 A$=INKEY$ 

230 IF A$="" THEN 220 

240 IF A$="Y" GOSUB 1610 

250 INPUT" INPUT MONTH, DAY , YEAR (X 

X,XX,XX) " ;MO , DY , YR 

2 60 PRINT" INPUT START TIME AND T 
IME ZONE." 

270 PRINT "USE 24 HOUR TIME AND T 
HE ZONES:" 

280 INPUT"E,C,M,P,ED,CD,MD,PD" ;S 

T,ZN$ 

290 '** 

300 '** ADJUST FOR TIME ZONE 
310 '** 

320 IF ZN$="E" THEN U=5 

THEN U=6 
THEN U=7 
THEN U=8 
THEN U=4 



330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 



IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 
• ** 



ZN$= 
ZN$= 
ZN$= 
ZN$= 
ZN$= 
ZN$= 
ZN$= 



»E" 

II C H 

"M" 
ii p ii 

••ED" 
••CD" 
"MD" 
••PD" 



THEN U=5 
THEN U=6 
THEN U=7 



400 

410 '** MENU AND SELECTION ROUTI 
NE 

420 '** 

430 PRINT "DO YOU WANT HALLEY » S C 
OMET OR OTHER OBJECT (H/O) ? 

440 D$=INKEY$ 

IF D$="" THEN 440 
IF D$="0" THEN 820 

IF D$="H" THEN 490 
'FUTURE USE 
IF CK=1 THEN 530 
CLS: PRINT § 2 3 4, "LOADING DAT 



450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
A" 



510 FOR 1=1 TO 7 4 : READ M$(I):NEX 



84 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



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Sheet, Income Statement, and Transaction Register. Your 
financial information is at your fingertips! 

CHECK LEDGER $125 

This is a single-entry bookkeeping system which allows the 
users to define a chart of income and expense accounts. Year- 
to-date totals are maintained for each account as well as com- 
plete checking account history. By just entering your checking 
account information, you can have always-current visibility 
over your income and expense ledgers. Financial statements 
and taxes are a snap! 

PAYROLL $175 

This is the most comprehensive payroll you'll find on a 
micro-computer. Besides collecting key employee information, 
it allows entry of pay rates for standard hours, overtime, and 
salary. Hourly, salary, and commissioned employees may be 
paid weekly, bi-weekly, semi-monthly, and monthly. Two types 
of special monthly deductions are also accommodated. Year- 
to-date, quarterly, monthly and current totals are maintained. 
All federal reporting is done automatically and your state com- 
putations are also included. 



INVENTORY CONTROL $125 

This system is designed to help the retailer, distributor, or 
businessman to keep control of this important factor. It stores 
your cost and quantity information, updates it immediately, 
and offers you key management reports with useful summaries 
at any time. With four costs, four locations, selling history, and 
vendor information for each item, you will always have the facts! 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE $125 

This system can give you the tools to plan your business' 
growth by controlling expenditures and forecasting cash require- 
ments. It helps a small business manage and track its cash 
liabilities by collecting vendor invoice information and report- 
ing the business' cash commitments and payment history. 
Along with standard payables reports, it also includes 
payment forecast reports. 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE $125 

All businesses need to know who owes them money! This 
system provides reliable and timely information regarding the 
status of all customer accounts. You can know instantly which 
accounts are past due, forecast how much money to expect 
to receive for cash flow planning, and keep on top of your cus- 
tomers' credit positions. Customer name, address, credit limit, 
invoice, and payment information is recorded and reports of 
all information including customer statements are available 
upon your request. 




COMPUTERWARE ® 



P.O. Box 668 • Encinitas, CA 92024 • (619) 436-3512 



Computerware is a federally registered trademark of Computerware. 



Dealer inquiries Invited 



T I 


'READ HALLEY DATA FROM LINES 


99)3 IF PP$<>"Y" THEN 11)30 


2047-2120 


1)3)30 PRINT#-2 , "DATE : "MO"/"DY"/"Y 


52/3 


CK=1 


R; 


530 


DN=INT(275*MO/9) -2*(INT( (MO+ 


1)31)3 PRINT#-2 , "TIME ZONE:"ZN$ 


9)/12) J+DY-30 


102)3 PRINT#-2, "OBJECT: "NA$ 


540 


A=DN-46:IF A<1 OR A>74 OR YR 


103)3 PRINT#-2 , "RA: " ;RH; "H"RM; "M 


<86 


OR YR>86 THEN 58)3 


ii • 


550 


GOSUB 72)3 


1)34)3 PRINT#-2 , "DEC: "DD"D"DM"M" 


560 


GOSUB 77)3 


1)35)3 PRINT#-2," TIME", "ALT AZ" 


570 


GOTO 88)3 


1)36)3 PRINT#-2, , "DEG DEG" 


580 


CLS 


107)3 '** 


5913 


PRINT @ 167, "SELECT A DATE F 


1080 '** COMPUTE ALTITUDE & AZIM 


ROM" 


UTH 


600 


PRINT @ 199, "02/16/86 - )34/3 


1090 •** 


0/86 


i" 


1100 I=YR-82:IF 1=2 OR 1=6 OR 1= 


610 


PRINT : PRINT 


10 OR 1=14 OR 1=18 THEN YF=1 ELS 


62j3 


GOTO 25)3 


E YF=2 


630 


'FUTURE USE 


1110 DN=INT (275*MO/9) -YF* (INT ( (M 


640 


'FUTURE USE 


0+9)/12) )+DY-30 


650 


'FUTURE USE 


1120 FOR J=0 TO 8 


660 


•FUTURE USE 


1130 UT=U+FIX (ST/100) +( (ST/100-F 


670 


•FUTURE USE 


IX(ST/100) ) *100/60)+(J/4) 


680 


• ** 


1140 GM=K(I)+( .0657098232*DN)+(1 


69j3 


'** UNPACK DATA FROM DATA ST 


.0027379093*UT) 


ATEMENTS 


1150 LS=GM-LC 


700 


• ** 


1160 IF LS>24 THEN1170 ELSE 1190 


710 


•FUTURE USE 


1170 LS=LS-24 


72j3 


RH=VAL(LEFT$ (M$ (A) , 2) ) 


1180 GOTO 1160 


730 


RM=VAL (MID$ (M$ (A) , 3 , 2 ) ) 


1190 LS=LS*15 


740 


DD=VAL(MID$(M$(A) ,5,3) ) 


1200 RA=(RH+(RM/60) ) *15 


750 


DM=VAL (MID$ (M$ (A) ,8,2) ) 


1210 HA=LS-RA 


760 


RETURN 


1220 DE=SGN(DD) * (ABS (DD) +DM/60) 


770 


NA$="HALLEY ' S COMET" : RETURN 


1230 R=57. 29577951 


78)3 


'FUTURE USE 


1240 DR=DE/R:LR=LX/R:HR=HA/R 


79)3 


i ** 


1250 X=( (SIN(DR) *SIN(LR) )+(COS(D 


8)3)3 


'** INPUT FOR OTHER OBJECTS 


R) *COS (LR) *COS (HR) ) ) 


81)3 


« ** 


12 60 IF X=l OR X=-l THEN1270 ELS 


82)3 


INPUT" INPUT OBJECT NAME" ;NA$ 


E X=X-FIX(X) 


83)3 


INPUT"INPUT RIGHT ASCENSION ( 


1270 AR=ATN(X/SQR(-X*X+1) ) 


HRS, 


MIN) " ;RH,RM 


1280 AL=AR*R 


84)3 


INPUT "INPUT DECLINATION (DEG, 


1290 X=( (SIN(DR) -SIN(LR) *SIN(AR) 


MIN) 


" ; DD , DM 


))/(COS(LR)*COS(AR)) 1 


85)3 


• ** 


1300 IF X=l OR X=-l THEN1310 ELS 


86)3 


'** SCREEN LIST ROUTINE 


E X=X-FIX(X) i 


87)3 


• ** 


1310 ZR=-ATN(X/SQR(-X*X+1) )+l. 57 1 


88)3 


CLS 


08 


89)3 


PRINT " DATE : "MO " / " DY " / " YR ; 


1320 AZ=ZR*R 


90)3 


PRINT "TIME ZONE:"ZN$ 


1330 IF HA>0 THENAZ=360-AZ 


91)3 


PRINT"OBJECT: "NA$ 


1340 UT=(FIX(UT-U) *100) + (UT-FIX( 


92)3 


PRINT "RA : " ; RH ; "H"RM ; "M " ; 


UT))*60:IF UT>2400 THEN UT=UT-24 


93)3 


PRINT TAB (13) "DEC: "DD"D"DM"M 


■ 00 


Ml 




1350 AL=FIX( ( (AL*10)+.5)/10) 


940 


PRINT TAB (3) "TIME" ; TAB (12 ) "A 


1360 AZ=FIX( ( (AZ*10)+.5)/10) i 


LTITUDE" ; TAB (24) "AZIMUTH" 


1370 PRINT TAB ( 2 ) UT ; TAB ( 14 ) AL ; TA 


95)3 


PRINT TAB (13) " (DEG) " ,"TAB(25) 


B(25) AZ 


" (DEG) " 


1380 IF PP$<>"Y" THEN 1400 


96)3 


' ** 


1390 PRINT#-2,UT,AL;AZ 


97)3 


'** PRINTER ROUTINE 


L^py) NElAl J 


98)3 


' ** 


141J3 •** 



86 THE RAINBOW April 1986 

i 

1 

\ ■ 



Personal Productivity Tools from 

Computerware® 

The Complete 

Electronic 
Organizer 

by Warren Ulrich III 




"a 



C.E.O. 



II. V 




With this desktop software your 
CoCo becomes your own personal 
administrative assistant. Load 
C.E.O. first thing each workday and 
everything you need is at your 
fingertips! Screens are shown in an 
easy-to-read 51x24 hires display 
with upper and lower case. The 
Macintosh-like icons (pictures for 
commands) make it simple and fun 
to be organized, efficient, and on 
time! 

DATE BOOK: 

You'll never miss an important 
occasion again! C.E.O. 's calendar 
stores an entire year's 
appointments. Each day has 
entries for one special occasion, 
one memo, and hourly notes for 8 
am to 5 pm. You can display or 
print any daily schedule or a 
whole week at a time. 

CALCULATOR: 

A full four function calculator is 
at your fingertips! 

CLOCK: 

The accurate real-time software 
clock keeps date and time, beeps 
on every hour, and has a 
convenient alarm you can set to 
remind you of those important 
appointments. Let C.E.O. do your 
clock watching for you! 



FREEFORM FILE DRAWER: 

C.E.O.'s free-form data base 
keeps your important info a few 
keystrokes away. Just type in 
your notes (up to 4600 characters 
with a 48 character title line) the 
same way you'd jot them down 
on a scratch pad. Your notes will 
be neatly organized and saved for 
instant retrieval! The 
sophisticated keyword search 
can scan all of the titles for any 
occurrence of a given phrase, 
making it easy to find notes on 
any topic. And there's room for 
alot of info— up to 479 entries can 
be stored on the data disk! 

You can display or print any or all 
entries upon request. C.E.O.'s 
mini-formatter helps print it in 
easy-to-read style. Now you can 
keep track of clients, business 
notes, minutes of meetings, or 
"whatever" with ease! 

MEMO PAD: 

If you need to jot a note to 
yourself or someone else, just 
pull up C.E.O.'s convenient 
memo pad and type away! When 
you're done,, save and/or print it 
as you see it! Use it for quick 
memos, business 
communications, or personal 
reminders. It's easy, quick, and 
organized! 

REQUIREMENTS: $49.95 

64K and at least one disk drive 
are required. C.E.O. supports two 
drive operation when available. 



To Order 

Add $2 surface or $5 air shipping. 
California residents add 6% sales 
tax. VISA and Mastercard 
welcome. Personal checks .izb. 
held for bank clearance; 

' v 1 - '■ * ■".u*"*, 1 • • 

Call or Write to: 
Computerware® 
Box 668 

EncinUas, CA 92024 
(619)436-3512 

Ask for our complete catalog! 

Computerware® is a federally registered 
trademark of Computerware 



Don't Forget! 



by Warren Ulrich III 

With Don't Forget! you can record 
the entire year's occasions and 
daily appointments. Each day has 
4 Special Occasions, 2 Memos, 
and hourly notes for 6 am-9 pm. 
Display or print any daily sched- 
ule—or a whol e week . V ou'l I 
remember every important event! 

32K Disk $32.95 




New Version! 

CoCo 
Cookbook 

by N. Manchevsky* 

CoCo Cookbook is more than 
just a recipe index! It is a true 
free format data base, Designed 
to store and retrieve a large 
number of recipes, each can use 
up to 3040 characters with title, 
ingredients, and instructions. To 
store other data just ignore the 
words recipe, etc. and enter 
whatever you want to store and 
retrieve! The powerful keyword 
search lets you find entries with 
any special word (or ingredient)! 
A new, powerful copy feature will 
selectively copy recipes to a new 
diskette using the keyword 
search, helping you to organize 
your info easily and quickly! 
(This feature requires at least two 
drives.) Over 200 recipes are now 
included. These great dishes 
alone are worth the price! 

32K Disk $32.95 




Merge 'n Mail 

by Oris Erving 

Designed to maintain, merge, and 
print mail list information, it 
includes a mail-merge feature that 
can insert your name and address 
info into letters created with your 
word processor. 64K Disk $32.95 



Personal Finance System 





by BJ Chambless 



Your CoCo is your personal book- 
keeper. Set a monthly budget, 
personal chart of accounts, and 
then enter each transaction. PFS 
compares monthly expenses with 
your budget and prints personal 
financial reports. Tax time is so 
much easier! The special invest- 
ment and loan module calculates 
details of financial transactions 
like mortgage payments, princi- 
pals, amortization tables, interest 
rates, and more so you can ana- 
lyze your current and future 
investments. With PFS you will 
not only keep your finances organ- 
ized but can do important analysis 



as 

■•■ ." .■"^.■'■■■■' < ''^^V\" 



32K Disk $32.95 



Lam 



1420 
1430 
1440 
1450 
1460 
1470 
70 

1480 
1490 
1500 
1510 
1520 

0 

1530 
1540 
1550 
1560 
1570 
1580 
1590 
LONG 
1600 
1610 
1620 
1630 
1640 



•** CHECK FOR NEW INPUTS 
i ** 

PRINT" ANOTHER OBJECT? (Y/N) " 

A$=INKEY$ 

IF A$="" THEN 1450 

IF A$="Y" THEN 1480 ELSE 15 

CLS 

PRINT" ANOTHER TIME? (Y/N) " 

B$=INKEY$ 

IF B$="" THEN1500 

IF B$="Y" THEN 1530 ELSE 43 

PRINT" ANOTHER DATE? (Y/N) " 
C$=INKEY$ 

IF C$="" THEN 1540 

IF C$="Y" THEN 250 ELSE 260 

END 

• ** 

•** CHECK AND CHANGE LAT & 

• ** 

LD=FIX(LC*15) 
LM=FIX( (LC*15-LD) *60) 
LI=LM/60 

LS=INT( (LC*15-(LD+LI) ) *3600 



) 

1650 L1=FIX(LX) 



COLOR BANKBOOK $19.95 



BUSINESS BANKBOOK 

SYSTEM ONE 

FOR ONE DISK DRIUE 

*49.95 

SVSTEM TWO 

FOR TWO DISK DRIDES 



*49.95 



SUPER DISK UTILITV 



# RADIOIOG 



* 9.95 

* 9.95 



WRITE FOR MORE 
INFORMATION. 



ALL PROGRAMS INCLUDE MANUALS , 
REQUIRE 3£K AND 1 DISK DRIVE. 
ADD f£.0» SHIPPING * HANDLING 
FLORIDA RES. ADD SZ SALES TAX 



SOFjTiUinRiE 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



8901 NUI 26 ST DEPT R 
SUNRISE, FL 33322 



1660 L2=FIX( (LX-L1) *60) 
1670 LI=L2/60 

1680 L3=INT( (LX-(L1+LI) ) *3600) 
1690 PRINT " LONG : " ; LD ; " D " LM ; "M" LS 

;"S LAT:";L1;"D"L2;"M 

"L3;"S" 

1700 PRINT"WANT TO CHANGE LONG? ( 
Y/N) " 

1710 A$=INKEY$ 

1720 IF A$="" THEN 1710 

1730 IF A$="N" THEN 1760 

1740 INPUT "INPUT LONG (XX, XX, XX) 

DEG,MIN, SEC" ;LD, LM, LS 

1750 LC=(LD+LM/60+LS/3600)/15 

1760 PRINT "WANT TO CHANGE LAT? ( Y 

/N)" 

1770 A$=INKEY$ 

1780 IF A$="" THEN 1770 

1790 IF A$="N" THEN 1820 

1800 INPUT "INPUT LAT (XX , XX, XX) D 

EG,MIN,SEC" ;L1,L2,L3 

1810 LX=(Ll+L2/60+L3/3 600) 

1820 RETURN 

1982 DATA 6.62240808 

1983 DATA 6.60649392 

1984 DATA 6.59057904 

1985 DATA 6.64037496 

1986 DATA 6.62446008 

1987 DATA 6.60854592 

1988 DATA 6.59263200 

1989 DATA 6.64242696 

1990 DATA 6.62651304 

1991 DATA 6.61059792 

1992 DATA 6.59468400 

1993 DATA 6.64447896 

1994 DATA 6.62856504 

1995 DATA 6.61265112 

1996 DATA 6.59673600 

1997 DATA 6.64653192 

1998 DATA 6.63061704 

1999 DATA 6.61470312 

2000 DATA 6.59878800 

2047 DATA 2051-1208 

2048 DATA 2049-1225 

2049 DATA 2048-1242 

2050 DATA 2046-1259 

2051 DATA 2044-1317 

2052 DATA 2042-1335 

2053 DATA 2041-1353 

2054 DATA 2039-1412 

2055 DATA 2037-1431 

2056 DATA 2035-1450 

2057 DATA 2034-1510 

2058 DATA 2032-1530 

2059 DATA 2030-1551 

2060 DATA 2029-1612 

2061 DATA 2027-1634 

2062 DATA 2025-1656 

2063 DATA 2023-1719 



88 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



2064 
2065 
2066 
2067 
2068 
2069 
2070 
2071 
2072 
2073 
2074 
2075 
2076 
2077 
2078 
2079 
2080 
2081 
2082 
2083 
2084 
2085 
2086 
2087 
2088 
2089 
2090 
2091 
2092 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



2021 
2020 
2018 
2016 
2014 
2012 
2010 
2007 
2005 
2003 
2000 
1957 
1954 
1951 
1948 
1944 
1941 
1937 
1932 
1927 
1922 
1916 
1909 
1902 
1854 
1845 
1835 
1824 
1811 



1742 
1806 
1831 
1857 
1924 
1952 
2021 
2051 
2123 
2156 
2230 
2306 
2344 
2424 
2507 
2551 
2638 
2728 
2820 
2916 
3015 
3117 
3223 
3333 
3446 
3603 
3723 
3845 
4009 




Makes learning so much FUN . . . 
. . . that kids think it's a game! 

level 1: Echos each key pressed in solid 
block letters and plays a random 
melody. 

LEVEL 2: The user echos the random 

number or letter. The computer 
responds with a random melody. 

level 3: The user echos random words 
displayed. The computer echos 
with a random melody. 

$24 16k ECB 



send for more information: 



disc or tape 



Challenger software 

42 4th Street 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 
Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



RAINBOW 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



2093 
2094 
2095 
2096 
2097 
2098 
2099 
2100 
2101 
2102 
2103 
2104 
2105 
2106 
2107 
2108 
2109 
2110 
2111 
2112 
2113 
2114 
2115 
2116 
2117 
2118 
2119 
2120 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



1757 

1740 

1722 

1702 

1640 

1616 

1551 

1524' 

1458' 

1432 

1407' 

1344' 

1323' 

1303' 

1246' 

1231' 

1218' 

1206- 

1156- 

1146- 

1138- 

1130' 

1124- 

1118- 

1113' 

1108' 

1104' 

1100' 



■4134 
•4256 
•4414 
■4524 
•4623 
•4706 
•4730 
•4732 
■4709 
•4624 
■4517 
■4353 
■4215 
4028 
3836 
3643 
3450 
3300 
3114 
2934 
2759 
2630 
2506 
2348 
2235 
2127 
2024 
1925 



Formatter 

the fastest, most complete 
office package yet! 

Totally Menu Driven 
Customize with company information 
Complete "on screen" instructions 



FORMS 

letter 

invoice 

quote 

purchase order 
mail order 
confirm order 
receipt 



STORES 

complete forms 
item list 
subquotes 
letters 
footnotes 
customer info 



SEPARATE CONFIGURE 
PROGRAM 

for company info 
printer options 
quote & inv. # 
w/auto sequencing 
auto date 

send for more information: 



FIGURES 

quantity 

list 

net 

discount 

subtotals 

tax 

freight, etc. 



PRINTS 

form feed 
letterhead 
envelope 
multiple copy 
emphasized 



$49 32k ECB d 



sc 



Challenger Software 

42 4th Street 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 
Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



RAINBOW 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 89 




( 

f 



I 



( 



Computer Island Educational Software 

227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, New York 10312 

(718) 948-2748 

PROGRAM TITLE GRADES MEMORY PRICE PROGRAM TITLE GRADES MEMORY price 











PRESCHOOL 








Preschool 1 - countina 


Pre-K 


16K Ext 


1 1 95 


Preschool II - addina 


Pre-K 


16K Ext 

1 V' \ 1 — A I , 


1 1 9S 


Preschool III - alphabet 


Pre-K 


16K Ext 


1 1 95 


Music Marvel-olav sonas 


Pre-K 1 


16K-Ext 


1 1 95 


Arrow Games - 6 names 


Pre-K 1 


32K-Ext 


21 95 


First Games - 6 damps 


Prp-K 1 

I I 15,1 Vj.il 


32K-Ext 


?4 Q5 


Mr. Cocohead-facemaker 


K-3 


16K~Ext 


16 95 


Bentlev Bear 


Pre-K 


32K-Disk 


29 95 


LANGUAGE ARTS 








Beyond Words 1-3 parts 


3-5 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Beyond Words 2-3 parts 


6-8 


'32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Beyond Words 3-3 parts 


9-12 


1?K-Fxt 


iq qc; 


Vocabulary 1-1000 words 


3-5 


Jt.i\ LAI. 


I <J.iJ\J 


Vocabulary 2-1 000 words 


6-8 




1 q cm 


Vocabulary 3-1000 words 


9-12 


•Jit r\ l_ al. 


1Q 


Context Clues 


4, 5,6, or 7 


1 RK-Fxt 


1 7 


Cocojot - jotto game 


3-up 




1 1 


Reading Aids - 4 parts 


2-4 


TfiK-Fxt 


1Q 


King Author- writing tool 


2-6 


1 6/32 Ext. 


29.95 


Cocowheel of Fortune 




32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Context Clues 


2-3 


o<if\-tXu 


i y.yo 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 






French Baseball-200wds. 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


French Basebali-500wds. 


4-up 


32K-Ext 


1 9.95 


Spanish Baseball-200wds 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Spanish Baseball-SOOwds 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Italian Baseball-200wds. 


4-uf> 


16K-Ext. 


1 1.95 


Hebrew Alphabet 


beginners 


16K-Ext. 


11.95 


Hebrew Utility 


drawing utility 


16K-Ext. 


15.95 


CRITICAL THINKING PROBLEMS 






Memory Castle-Sunburst 


4-up 


32K-disk 


44.95 


Factory by Sunburst 


>4-Up ; 


32K-disk 


44.95 


Pond by Sunburst 


2-up 


32K-disk 


44,95 


Teasers by Tobbs-Sunb. 


4-up 


32K-disk 


44.95 


Inner City - simulation 


7-up 


32K-disk 


49.95 


Find The Math Sequence 


4-up 


32K-Ext. 


19.95 


Stranded-graphic advent. 


4-up 


32K-disk 


24.95 


TEACHER/STUDENT AIDS 






Colorgrade - gradebook 


Adult 


32K-disk 


29.95 


Quizmaker - write quizzes 


5-up 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


ETT typing tutor {Cocowar^ouse) 


4-up 


16K-Ext. 


21,95 


The PUZZler (CotorConnection) 


4-up 


32K-disk 


29.95 



MATH 

Opening a Bank Account 4-7 

Dollars & Sense 2-4 

McCoco's Menu 3-5 

Moneypak 2-5 

Graph Tutor 3-7 

Graph-It 7-up: 

Math invaders 1-8 

Mathquiz - 4 operations 2-5 

Addition & Subtraction 2-3 

Skill Tutor Series 

Division Tutor 3-7 

Multiplication Tutor 3-%. 

Factors Tutor 5-8 
Fractions Tutors (3: programs); 

addition, subtraction or rnuiuplication 4-8 

Trigonometry 8-10 

Equations Linear 7-9 

Equations Quadratic 8-11! 

Arith. Diagnostic Disk 3-8 

Fraction Diagnostic Disk 4-9 

Verbal Problems Series 
Distance Problems 
Area & Perimeter 
Pizza Game 
Sales & Bargains 
Comparison Shopping: 
Binary Dice Game 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Know Your States 
History Game 
States & Capitals 
Explorers & Settlers 
Famous American Women 
Street Map Game 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Name That Song 1 ,2,6r : 
Music Drill 
Science Game 
Computer Literacy 
5 Educational Programs 
with Lightpen 
Chemistry Tutor 

Disk indicates available on disk only 
Tape prices given. 
Add $5.00 for any program on disk. 



32K-disk 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
32K-ExL 
16K 

16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 
16K-Ext. 

16K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K-Ext. 
32K.Ext. 
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orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



The Computer-Aided 
College Expense Fund 

By Jerry R. Whittlesey 



With the cost of a college edu- 
cation skyrocketing and the 
student loan program drying 
up, parents who aspire to a college 
education for their children are recog- 
nizing the need for a college expense 
fund. Some already have a "nest egg" 
for that purpose. Others are setting up 
a fund to which they will make regular 
contributions. 

This program, College Expense, per- 
mits forward-looking parents to ex- 
plore their options based on certain 
assumptions. The user enters the 
amount of the "nest egg," called "initial 
deposit," the interest rate expected, the 
planned annual contribution to the 
fund and the expected annual costs 
when the kids are in college. 

Based on these assumptions, the 
program displays the balance in the 
fund at the beginning and end of each 
year. As an option, the program also 
provides a printout of the starting 
balance, annual contributions (depos- 
its), interest earned, expenses and the 
ending balance for each year from the 
present through the graduation of the 
youngest child. 



Jerry Whittlesey is general manager for 
Harvey Press, Inc., a commercial print- 
ing company in New Orleans. 

92 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



The program is customized to reflect 
the author's situation (two children, one 
of whom will start college in the fall of 
1986; the other in 1989), However, it 
may easily be adapted to any situation. 

To customize College Expense, it's 
best to start by charting the educational 
events from this year forward. Here is 
a chart of the author's circumstances: 



#1 


#2 




1985 




None in college - ■ no 






expenses. 


1986 % 




One in college half-year 






— no loop required. 


1987 1 




One in college full year 






— two-year loop. 


1988 1 




One in college full year 






— two-year loop. 


1989 I 


Vi 


One full year: one half 






year — two-year loop. 


L990 \h 


1 


One full year: one half 






year — two-year loop. 


1991 


1 


One in college full year 






— two-year loop. 


1992 


1 


One in college full year 






— two-year loop. 


1993 


Vi 


One in college half-year 






— no loop required. 



With these circumstances in mind, 
let's take a look at how the program 
works. 



Lines Function 

20-50 Asks for input of the four 

variables. Holds the initial 
deposit amount for use in 
lines 280 and 550. Converts 
interest to a percentage. 

60 Used to format screen. If 

you do not have PRINT 
USING, just change Line 
220 to PRINT X , fl , F : RE 
TURN. 

210 This subroutine calculates 

interest (note that it as- 
sumes a mid-year contri- 
bution and simplistically 
credits the fund with only 
one-half a year's interest 
for that year's contribu- 
tion). It then calculates the 
balance for the year (R) 
before expenses. 

80-220 Calculation section. If the 
circumstance occurs only 
once (1985,1986 and 1993), 
*X' is assigned the value of 
that year, no FOR X= loop 
is set up, and no NEXT X is 
required at the end of the 
line. The F= part of the line 
is the key component (see 
chart). 'D' is the expected 
cost or expense per year. 
The F= components by 
year are: 1985, F=R; 1986, 



230-560 



F=R-(D/2); 1987, F=R- 
D; 1988, F=R-D; 1989, 
F=R-(D*1.5); 1990, F=R- 
(D*1.5); 1991, F=R-D; 
1992, F=R-D; and 1993, 
F=R-(D/2). 

Performs essentially the 
same function, but pro- 
vides a printout. If the user 
does not want this feature, 
just change Line 230 to 
END. 



Remember that PRINTtt-2 is the 
command for the Line Printer VII. It 
should be changed to LPRINT for sys- 
tems using that command. 

If the user is fortunate enough to be 
planning well ahead — or unfortunate 
enough to have lots of kids — the screen 
display capacity may be exceeded and 
the early years will scroll off the screen. 
The fix is to change Line 10 to read: 

10 'COLLEGE EXPENSES:CL5:S=0 



Then delete RETURN from Line 220 and 
add these two lines: 

222 5=5+1: IF S=12 THEN 224 ELSE 
RETURN 

224 FOR T=l TO 1500:NEXT 
T: 5=0: RETURN 

The delay created in Line 224 may be 
lengthened or shortened by changing 
the number 1500. □ 



Sample Run 












*************** COLLEGE EXPENSES 


*************** 






With an initial deposit of $ 5000 


at 8 % interest. . 






if we make 


an annual 


contribution 


(or deposit) of $ l 


1 tAffifA 




and the expenses per 


year are $ 750 , this is the sche 


2dule: 




YEAR 


START 


DEPOSITS 


INTEREST EXP1 


SNSES 


END 


1985 


5,000 




440 


0 


6,440 


1986 


6>440 


1,000 


555 


375 


7,620 


1987 


7,62$ 


i , 000 


650 


750 


8,520 


1988 


8,520 




722 


750 


9,491 


1989 


9,491 




799 ] 


L , 125 


10,166 


1990 


10, 166 




853 : 


L f 125 


10, 894 


1991 


10,894 


1,000 


912 


750 


12,055 


1992 


12,055 


1 , P00 




750 


13,310 


1993 


13, 310 


i,00P 


% 105 


375 


15,040 



1W *Tf\ 



170 . 
310 . 
END 



192 
118 

.54 



T 



The listing: COLLEGE 

10 'COLLEGE EXPENSES :CLS 

20 PRINT: INPUT" INITIAL DEPOSIT"; 

A:H=A 

30 PRINT: INPUT "INTEREST RATE " ; B : 
E=B/100: 'INTEREST 

40 PRINT: INPUT" CONTRIBUTION PER 
YEAR" ; C 

50 PRINT: INPUT "COST PER YEAR" ; D 
60 FA$=" #### ###,### 
###,###" 

70 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" YEAR BEG 

INNING END" 

80 X=1985:'NONE IN COLLEGE 

90 GOSUB 210:F=R:GOSUB 220:A=F:' 

F=YEAR-END AMOUNT 

100 X=1986:'ONE IN COLLEGE HALF 
YEAR 

110 GOSUB 210 : F=R- (D/2 ): GOSUB 22 



0:A=F 

120 FOR X=1987 TO 1988: 'ONE IN C 
OLLEGE 

130 GOSUB 210:F=R-D:GOSUB 220:A= 
F : NEXT X 

140 FOR X=1989 TO 1990 : 1 TWO IN C 
OLLEGE (1-1/2 EACH) 
150 GOSUB 210:F=R-(D*1.5) :GOSUB 
220 :A=F: NEXT X 

160 FOR X=1991 TO 1992: 'ONE IN C 
OLLEGE 

170 GOSUB 210:F=R-D:GOSUB 220:A= 
F : NEXT X 

180 X=1993:'ONE IN COLLEGE HALF 
YEAR 

190 GOSUB 210:F=R-(D/2) :GOSUB 22 
0 

200 GOTO 230: 'G=INTEREST 

210 G=(A*E)+( (C*E)/2) :R=A+C+G:RE 

TURN 

220 PRINT USING FA$ ; X, A, F : RETURN 
230 PRINT"" :PRINT"WOULD YOU LIKE 

A PRINTOUT<Y/N>?" 
240 R$=INKEY$:IF R$="" THEN 240 
250 IF R$="Y" THEN GOTO 260 ELSE 

END 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 93 



##,# 



260 FM$=»#### ###,### 
##,### ##,### 
## ###,###" 

270 PRINT#-2 , "*************** CO 
LLEGE EXPENSES ***************"; 

PRINT#-2 / "" 

28/3 PRINT#-2, "With an initial de 
posit of $"H" at "B"% interest.. 



ii 



290 PRINT#-2 , "if we make an annu 

al contribution (or deposit) of 
e up ii ii 

*f V* f * • 9 

3/3/3 PRINT # -2 , "and the expenses p 
er year are $"D",this is the sch 
edule : " 

31/3 PRINT#-2,*"' 

320 PRINT#-2, "YEAR START 

DEPOSITS INTEREST E 

XPENSES END" 
3 30 PRINT#-2,"" 
340 X=1985:'NONE IN COLLEGE 
350 GOSUB 550:F=Q 
3 60 J=0: GOSUB 560:H=F 
370 X=1986:*ONE IN COLLEGE HALF 
YEAR 

380 GOSUB 550:F=Q-(D/2) 



390 J=D/2: GOSUB 560:H=F 

400 FOR X=1987 TO 1988: 'ONE IN C 

0 LLEGE 

410 GOSUB 550:F=Q-D 

420 J=D:GOSUB 560:H=F:NEXT X 

430 FOR X=1989 TO 1990: 'TWO IN C 

OLLEGE (1-1/2 EACH) 

440 GOSUB 550:F=Q-(D*1.5) 

450 J=D*1.5:G0SUB 560 :H=F: NEXT X 

460 FOR X=1991 TO 1992: 'ONE IN C 

OLLEGE 

470 GOSUB 550:F=Q-D 

480 J=D: GOSUB 560 :H=F: NEXT X 

490 X=1993:'ONE IN COLLEGE HALF 

YEAR 

500 GOSUB 550:F=Q-(D/2) 

510 J=D/2: GOSUB 560 

520 PRINT"": PRINT" DO ANOTHER <Y/ 

N>?" 

530 R$=INKEY$:IF R$=" "THEN 530 
540 IF R$="Y" THEN GOTO 10 ELSE 
END 

550 G=(H*E)+( (C*E) /2) :Q=H+C+G:RE 
TURN 

560 PRINT #-2, USING FM$ ;X, H, C, G, J 
, F : RETURN 




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94 THE RAINBOW April 1986 




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m? 1 1 I 

RAINBOW 



Using this handy utility makes a 
thrifty habit even more satisfying 

Waste Not, Want Not 
with Refund-A-File 

By Donald A. Turowski 



Did you ever notice the forms 
hanging in your local store that 
say "Get $2 Back!'? Did you 
wonder if anybody ever bothered to 
take one and actually use it? 

What? You mean you actually sent it 
in? And, you say you actually got $2 
back? 

Well, that makes you a "refunder"! 
Welcome to the growing world of "re- 
funding." You're not alone, of course. 
Millions of people, men, women, even 
children, use these forms on everything 
from soup to nuts. Even software for 
personal computers! 

For these people, the following pro- 
gram will be of great use. Refund-A- 
File is a filing-type program for the avid 
(and occasional) refunder. Refund-A- 
File keeps a disk file of your available 
refund forms so you don't have to 
physically sort through them to see if 



Donald Turowski has a bachelor's 
degree in education and teaches algebra 
and computer literacy in the Burrells 
School District in Natrona Heights, 
Pennsylvania. He is married and has 
two children. 



you have that $5 rebate on the new 
coffeemaker that you want to buy. 

Refund-A-File will print a hard copy 
of your refund forms if you want. It will 
also add to your list, delete from your 
list and replace forms on your list with 
other forms. 

Oh, there's one more option I should 
mention. Refund-A-File will also al- 
phabetize your list. No more looking 
through the entire list for an item; it will 
be as easy as A, B, C. 

Refund-A-File is menu driven for 
relatively easy use. It can be used to 
store a disk file of refund forms or can 
be used to store your proofs of purchase 
(POPS) that so many refunders keep 
until needed for a refund. In fact, it can 
also be used to make out your weekly 
or monthly shopping list if you simply 
use Option 1 and then use the printer 
Option 5. And, if you want to have your 
shopping list alphabetized, just use that 
option before printing. 

If you do not want to type in Refund- 
A-File^ send a check or money order for 
$9.95 to me at 1236 Ninth Avenue, 
Natrona Heights, PA 15065. I'll send 
you Refund-A-File so you can start 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 95 



using it in your refunding activities. 

Briefly, here are some features and 
hints for Refund- A- File. 

1) Storage available for 300-400 
items. 

2) As you enter items, be brief — for 
example, do not enter Minute Maid 
orange juice $1 refund but condense it 
to: Minute Maid OJ $1-3/31/86. 

In this way, you'll save room for as 
many items as possible. Notice that you 
can include the expiration date for the 
refund if you want. This may reduce the 
number of items to 300, but should be 
worth it. 

3) Use Refund- A- File to update your 
forms, POPS and qualifiers frequently. 

4) Be sure to use the end-session 
option before shutting off the machine 
since it contains the reminder to save 
any changes you made in your file. The 
one time you do not use it probably will 
be the time you'll forget to save your 
updated file! 

5) The Alphabetizing Routine will 
take time to complete, depending on the 
number of items in your list. There will 
be a tone to indicate when it is com- 
pleted. 

6) When replacing or deleting items, 
you must determine the number of the 
item (refer to Option 5 to view the list). 



7) When printing the list on the 
printer, you will be asked for a title. This 
will appear on your printout at the top. 

8) Happy refunding! 

(You may contact Mr. Turowski with 
any questions about Refund- A- File at 
1236 Ninth Avenue, Natrona Heights, 
PA 15065, phone 412-224-6529. Please 
include an SASE when writing.) □ 



Example 1 is a sample of the printout 
that is produced by the printer option 
of Refund- A- File. Example 2 is the 
alphabetized version of the first list. 



Example 1 

1 Tide$l Refund 5/30/85 

2 Ziploc Free Bread 9/30/85 

3 Oreo/Hi-C 11/30/85 

4 Glad $1 6/30/85 

5 Preil$l.50 8/30/85 

6 Axion Coupons 7/31/85 

7 Biz $2 6/30/85 

8 Tang Free Pitcher 6/30/85 

9 Dole Pineapple 11/30/85 

10 Nabisco $20 12/31/85 

11 Kraft Barbeque 8/30/85 

12 Kraft Cheeses 8/30/85 

13 Heinz Ketchup $1 6/30/85 

14 Zipwax Refund 7/30/85 

15 Mr. Coffee $4 12/31/85 



Sample Printout 

CoCo Refund List 

1 ADOLPHS $1 REFUND 

2 AIRWICK $3 OFFER 

3 ALPO $1 REFUND 

4 AT&T LONG DISTANCE 

5 AUNT JEMIMA FREE BUTTER 

6 BAKERS CHOICE COOKBOOK 

7 BIC DEAL 

8 BLACK&DECKER/GE REBATES 

9 BUFFERIN $2 OFFER 

10 CADBURY FREE MILK 



Example 2 

1 Axion Coupons 7/31/85 

2 Biz $2 6/30/85 

3 Dole Pineapple 11/30/85 

4 Glad $1 6/30/85 

5 Heinz Ketchup $1 6/30/85 

6 Kraft Barbeque 8/30/85 

7 Kraft Cheeses 8/30/85 

8 Mr. Coffee $4 12/31/85 

9 Nabisco $20 12/31/85 

10 Oreo/Hi-C 11/30/85 

11 Prell $1.50 8/30/85 

12 Tand Free Pitcher 6/30/85 

13 Tide $1 Refund 5/30/85 

14 Ziploc Free Bread 9/30/85 

15 Zipwax Refund 7/30/85 




108 149 6050 77 

2030 ......45 7006 209 

3070 109 END 198 

4900 183 



T 



The listing: REFUND 

2 GOTO 9000 

3 CLS(RND(8) ) : PRINT@ 3 2*8+10 , "REF 
UND-A-FILE" ; : PRINT@32*15+1 , "PROG 
RAMMER: D. A. TUROWSKI, 1985 " ; : FOR 

Q=l TO 2000: NEXT Q: FOR Q=l TO 6 
0: PRINT© (RND(450) ) ,"$"; :PRINT@32 
*8+10, "refund-a-file" ; :PRINT@32* 
10+10, "disk version" ;: SOUND Q+5 
0,1: NEXT Q:SCREEN0,1 

4 FOR Q=1TO2000:NEXT Q:CLS 

5 GOSUB 10000 
20 CLS 

30 PRINT@32*2, " ******select c 

hoice******" : PRINT 

40 PRINT" (1) input f orms/qualif ie 

rs" 

50 PRINT" (2) replace f orms/qualif 
iers" 

60 PRINT" (3) add to the list" 



70 PRINT" (4) delete items from li 
st" 

80 PRINT" (5) print entire list" 
90 PRINT" (6) save items on disk" 
100 PRINT" (7) load items from dis 
k" 

105 PRINT" (8) alphabetize list" 

107 PRINT" (9) search f orms/qualif 
ier list" 

108 PRINT" (10)end session" 

110 PRINT@32*14+10,"(1-10)"; 
120 INPUT M 

130 IF M<0 OR M>10 THEN 20 

140 ON M GOSUB 1000,2000,1020,30 

00,4000,5000, 6000, 6500,8000,7000 

150 GOTO 20 

900 REM ROUTINE TO 

1000 REM INPUT/ ADD ITEMS 

1010 Y=l 

1020 CLS .-PRINT" input/add items r 
outine" 

1030 PRINTS 3 4 , "PRESS <ENTER> WHE 
N FINISHED" 

1040 PRINT : PRINT "ITEM" Y; 

1045 INPUT S$(Y) 

1046 IF LEN(S$(Y) )>25 THEN PRINT 
"PLEASE RE-ENTER A SHORTER NAME" 
:GOTO 1045 

1050 IF S$(Y)= ,f " THEN RETURN 



96 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Ij355 PRINT "ENTER EXPIRATION MONT 

H": INPUT EX$(Y) 

1J360 Y=Y+1 

1J370 GOTO 104j3 

19)3j3 REM ROUTINE TO 

2pj3j3 REM REPLACE ITEMS 

2005 N=J3 

201J3 CLS : PRINT "rep lace items rou 
tine" 

202J3 PRINT© 3 4, "PRESS <ENTER> WHE 
N FINISHED" 

203j3 PRINT: INPUT "ITEM NO. TO RE 
PLACE" ;N 

204J3 IF N=0 THEN RETURN 

2050 INPUT "REPLACEMENT ITEM";S$ 
(N) 

2051 IF LEN(S$(N) )>25 THEN PRINT 
"PLEASE RE-ENTER A SHORTER NAME" 
:GOTO 2050 

2055 PRINT "ENTER EXPIRATION MONT 

H": INPUT EX$(N) 

2060 GOTO 2000 

2900 REM ROUTINE TO 

3000 REM DELETE ITEMS 

3005 N=0 

3010 CLS: PRINT "delete items rout 
ine" 

3020 PRINT@3 4, "PRESS <ENTER> WHE 



N FINISHED" 

3025 PRINT "NOTE — >delete from hi 
ghest" : PRINT" item numbe 

r to ": PRINT" lowest item 

number I " 

3030 PRINT: INPUT "ITEM NUMBER TO 

DELETE" ;N 
3035 IF N>Y-1 THEN 3030 
3040 IF N=0 THEN RETURN 
3050 FOR X=N TO Y-2 
3060 S$(X)=S$(X+1) 
3065 EX$(X)=EX$(X+1) 
3070 NEXT X 

3080 S$(X)="":EX$(X)="" 

3090 Y=Y-1 

3100 GOTO 3000 

3900 REM ROUTINE TO 

4000 REM PRINT ITEMS 

4001 CLS: PRINT "LI ST ITEMS ON SCR 
EEN(S) OR ON PRINTER (P) ?" : PRIN 

T" ENTER 'S' OR ' P'";: INPUT W 

$ 

4002 IF W$="P" THEN D=-2:T=10:PR 
INT" ENTER A TITLE FOR YOUR LIST 

" : LINE INPUT M$:PRINT"be sure pr 
inter is on line!": SOUND 200, 3 :P 

RINT" PRESS enter WHEN PRINTER IS 
ON LINE TO BEGIN PRINTING 



TRS-80 COMPUTER DISCOUNTS 





COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3127 64k color comp 
26-3131 1st disk drive 



PRINTERS 



26-1276 DMP 105 
26-1277 DMP-430 
26-1278 DWP-220 
26-1280 DMP-130 



165.00 
269.95 



160.00 
660.00 
475.00 
269.00 



MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1000 mod 1000 
25-1004 128K memory board 

25- 1005 2nd drive mod 1000 

26- 3211 Monochrome moniter 
26-1070 mod 4D 64k 2dr. 
26-5103 mod 2000 2dr. 
26-5104 mod 2000 HD 



750.00 
169.95 
160.00 
125.00 
920.00 
1,400.00 
2,200.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of TRS-80 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 

IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 97 



!":INPUT R$:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) ;M$: 
CLS(8) 

4003 IF W$="S M THEN D=0:T=0:CLS 
4010 FOR X=l TO Y-l STEP 15 
4020 FOR Z=X TO X+14 
4025 IF D=-2 THEN PRINT@32*8 , " p 

rinting stand by ! ! 1 J ! ! ! J ! ! ! " : I 

F S$(Z)="" THEN 4040 

4030 PRINT#D, TAB (T) ;Z; S$(Z) 

4040 NEXT Z 

4050 LINE INPUT "PRESS <ENTER> T 
0 CONTINUE" ;C$ 

4055 IF D=-2 THEN CLS(RND(8)) 
4060 NEXT X 
4070 RETURN 

4900 REM ROUTINE TO 
5000 REM SAVE ITEMS ON DISK 
5J31J3 CLS (8) : PRINTS 13 5, "save item 
s on disk" ; 

5015 SOUND 200, 3: SOUND 200,3 
5025 PRINT@32*8+8, "insert data d 
isk" ; 

5030 PRINT§32*10,"nEW FILE OR rE 
PLACE FILE (N/R) " ; : INPUTQ$ : IF Q$= 
"N" THEN 5040 ELSE KILL"COUPONS/ 
DAT" 

5040 PRINT@388 , "PRESS <enter> WH 

EN READY"; 

5050 LINE INPUT R$ 

5055 CLS (0) :PRINT@224, "saving da 

ta on disk stand by!";: SOUND 2 

00,3 

5060 OPEN "0",#1, "COUPONS" 

5070 FOR X=l TO Y-l 

5080 WRITE* 1, S$(X),EX$(X) 

5090 NEXT X 

5100 CLOSE #1: RETURN 

5900 REM ROUTINE TO 

6000 REM LOAD ITEMS FROM DISK 

6010 CLS(4) :PRINT§134,"load data 

from disk!"; : SOUND 200,3 
6020 PRINT§32*8+8, "insert data d 
isk!"; 

6040 PRINT@388 , "PRESS <enter> WH 

EN READY"; 

6050 LINE INPUT R$ 

6055 CLS (0) :PRINT§224, "loading d 

ata from disk-stand by";: SOUND 2 

00,3 

6060 OPEN"I",#l, "COUPONS" 
6070 Y=l 

6080 IF EOF(l) THEN 6120 

6090 INPUT #1, S$(Y),EX$(Y) 

6100 Y=Y+1 

6110 GOTO 6080 

6120 CLOSE #1: RETURN 

6500 REM ALPHABETIZE ROUTINE 

6510 CLS(RND(8) ) :PRINT@32*8, "sta 



nd by alphabetizing list!" - 

6520 FOR 1=1 TO Y-l 

6530 FOR J=I+1 TO Y 

6535 IF S$(J)="" THEN 6580 

6540 IF S$(I)<S$(J) THEN 6580 

6550 T$=S$(I) :F$=EX$(I) 

6560 S$(I)=S$(J) :EX$(I)=EX$(J) 

6570 S$(J)=T$:EX$(J)=F$ 

6580 NEXT J, I 

6590 CLS (3) :PRINT@32*8, "alphabet 
izing completed !!!!!!!!": SOUND 2 
00 , 3 : FORQ=1TO500 : NEXTQ : RETURN 
7000 CLS: FOR B=l TO 8:CLS(RND(8) 
) : SOUND 200, 2: NEXT B 

7005 PRINT§32*3, "before ending t 
his session, ": PRINT"be sure to s 
ave all changes" : PRINT"on your d 

isk file! ! ! " : PRINT: PRINT" if you 
are sure you want to" : PRINT"end 
the session, then press 'E'":PRI 
NT"otherwise, press and <enter> 
any other" ; 

7006 PRINT" key to return to the 
main menu" 

7010 INPUT R$ 

7020 IF R$="E" THEN CLS: END 
7030 GOTO 20 

8000 CLS: PRINT" search rout 

ine" : PRINT: PRINT 

8010 PRINT"WHICH MONTH'S LIST DO 

YOU WANT TO SEARCH FOR" : INPUT 
MM$ : CLS : PRINT§10 , MM$ : PRINT : MM$=L 
EFT$ (MM$, 3) 
8020 FOR X=l TO Y 

8030 IF MM$=LEFT$ (EX$ (X) ,3) THEN 

PRINT S$(X) 
8035 FOR Q=l TO 100 '.NEXT Q 
8040 NEXT X 

8050 PRINT"press <enter> to cont 
inue ";:LINEINPUT CR$:GOTO 20 

9000 PC LEAR 1 : CLEAR19000 : DIM S$( 
300) ,EX$ (300) :GOTO 3 
10000 PRINT "THIS PROGRAM WILL KE 
EP A FILE OFYOUR REFUND FORMS OR 
QUALIFIERS IN YOUR INVENTORY.": 
PRINT"YOU WILL HAVE ROOM FOR ABO 
UT 100-200 ENTRIES (DEPENDING ON 
THEIR LENGTH) ! " 

10010 PRINT "THERE WILL ALSO BE A 
PRINTER OPTION FOR YOUR LIST 
IF YOU WANT A HARD COPY FOR REF 

ERENCE . " 

10015 PRINT"note: DO NOT USE CO 
MMAS WHEN ENTERING ITEM 

S!" < 
10020 PRINT@32*13+5 , "PRESS enter 
TO CONTINUE" ;: LINE INPUT R$ : CLS 
: RETURN G\ 



98 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Radio Shack's Color Computer T 

WE ON 
OUR BEST! 

64K Memory! Extended BASIC! 
Cut $ 20...new low price $ 199.95 



The Color Computer 2 is an af- 
fordable computer that allows you 
to write programs tailored to your 
personal and household needs. It's 
ideal for small-business and pro- 
fessional uses alike. With the 
built-in Extended BASIC lan- 
guage, you can access 32,000 
characters of memory. To access 
the full 64K memory, simply add a 



disk drive and the optional OS-9 
disk operating system. 



The powerful Color Computer 2 
26-3127, was 219.95 in Cat. RSC- 
5) creates detailed color graphics 
from simple, one-line commands, 
and is ideal for drawings, designs, 
charts, engineering diagrams and 
even animation! 






Ready-to-run software can help 
you set up personal and house- 
hold budgets, create a household 
inventory, keep track of your in- 
vestments, write letters and re- 
ports and record recipes. 

With a wide range of educa- 
tional software available, your 
children can use the Color Com- 
puter 2 to help strengthen their 
math, spelling and reading skills. 
The family can even play exciting 
computer games. The system 
attaches to any TV and is easily 
expanded. 

Get the Color Computer 2 and 
your family will immediately start 
to enjoy the advantages of home 
computing . . . together! 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 




I 
I 
1 
I 
I 



Send me a new 
1986 computer catalog 

Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 86-A-904 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, Texas 76102 




Name 



Company , 
Address _ 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Telephone 



■ 

- I 

- 1 

: ■ 

- ■ 

J 




TV not included. Price applies at Radio Shack Computer 
Centers and at participating Radio Shack stores and dealers. 



Surely everyone at one time or 
another has fooled around with 
the SOUND and PLRY commands. 
Maybe you've even gone so far as to 
compose a tune or two. OK, now what 
do you do with those tunes? You need 
a method of presenting them. Some way 
other than just as a musical program 
alone. If you run a program that simply 
plays a song, chances are after one or 
two runs, you've heard all you care to. 

Bill Bernico is a self-taught computerist 
who enjoys golf, music and program- 
ming. He is a drummer with a rock band 
and lives in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. 



Suppose you have five or 10 or 20 
songs. How do you get folks to listen? 
A menu-driven selection type program 
is one way. (BORING!) You could 
present five or 10 or 20 song programs 
individually. (BORING!) 

How about putting your songs into a 
program like RADIOS Displayed are a 
radio and the needed instructions. The 
radio has a digital readout dial and 
pressing the up- or down-arrow keys 
helps you "tune in your favorite sta- 
tion." 

Once tuned in, press ENTER and the 
program randomly plays any one of a 



number of your favorite tunes. Line 
5000 states ZQ=RND ( 5 ) :0N ZQ 
GDSUB 6000,7000,8000,9000, 

10000. That leaves room for five of 
your own tunes. If you have more or less 
than five, change Line 5000 accordingly. 
Also, my lines 6000-10000 are there only 
as examples of how the RRNDDM option 
selects a tune. Delete lines 6000-10000 
and use them to store your own music. 

The lines where each of your own 
selections start should be the same as 
the lines mentioned in Line 5000. Don't 
forget to include a RETURN statement 
after your music. □ 



The listing: RADIO 
10 'RADIO 

2) 3 'BY BILL BERNICO 

3) 3 1 7)38 MICHIGAN AVE. 

4) 3 'SHEBOYGAN, WI 53)381 




5J3 '(414) 459-735)3 

6) 3 1 

7) 3 CLEAR 5)3)3 

8) 3 SP$="BR3 

9J3 A$="BR3U5ER2FD2NL4D3 

1)3)3 C$= " BR3 BR4 BU5HL2 GD4 FR2 E BD 



1 00 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



110 D$="BR3RU6NLR2FD4GNL2BR 

120 E$="BR3U6NR4D3NR3D3R4 

130 H$="BR3U3NU3R4NU3D3 

140 I$="BR3R2U6NL2NR2D6R2 

150 M$="BR3U6F2DUE2D6 

160 N$="BR3U6F4NU4D2 

170 0 $= " BR3 BRHU4 ER2 F D4 GNL2 BR 

180 P$="BR3U6R3FDGL3D3BR4 

190 R$="BR3U6R3FDGL3RF3 

2)3)3 S $— " BR3 BUFR2 EUHL2HUER2 FBD5 

210 T$="BR3BU6R4L2D6BR2 

220 U$="BR3BUNU5FR2ENU5BD 

230 W$="BR3NU6E2UDF2NU6 

240 FOR G=0 TO 9 

250 READ GX$(G) 

260 NEXT G 

270 DATA " BR3 BRHU4 ERFD4 GNLBR2 

28)3 DATA"BR3R2U6NGD6R2 

290 DATA"BR3BU5ER2FDGL2GD2R4 




p s n t n 

K n JJ J_ U 

3 00 DATA "BR3BU5ER2F DGNLFDGL2 NHBR 
3 

310 DATA"BR3BR3U6G3R4BD3 

320 DATA"BR3BUFR2EU2HL3U2R4BD6 

330 DATA"BR3BU3R3FDGL2HU4ER2BD6B 

R 

340 DATA" BR3BU6R4 DG3 D2 BR3 

350 DATA"BR3BRHUER2EUHL2GDFR2FDG 

NL2BR 

360 DATA"BR3BRR2EU4HL2GDFR3BD3 
370 PMODE 4,1:PCLS 1: SCREEN 1,1: 
COLOR 0,1 

380 DRAW"BM150,32R59U16L59D16BL2 
0U2 5 Dl 30R100U1 30 L100 
390 FOR X=145 TO 225 STEP 23:CIR 
CLE (X, 45) ,8:PAINT(X,45) ,)3,)3:NEXT 

X: CIRCLE (18)3, 100) ,33 
400 CIRCLE (180 , 100) ,13: PAINT (180 

,100) ,0,0 

410 DRAW"BM130,59 

420 FOR X=l TO 25 : DRAWR100D3L10 

0":NEXT X 

43)3 DRAW"BM130,59 



440 FOR X=l TO 33 : DRAW"D78R3U78" 
:NEXT X 

450 DRAWBM0, 18)3S12 "+R$+A$+D$+I$ 
+0$ 

460 DRAW"BM13)3,137S4L2)3HLHLHLHL5 
HLHLHUHUHUHUEUEUEURURURURFRFRFRF 
RFDFDFDFDGDGDGDGLGLGLGLGLGLGL4HL 
2HL3HLHLHUHUHUHUHUHUHLHLHLHL3HL3 

HL3GLGLGLGLGLGLGDGDGDGDGD2GD2GD2 
GD5FDFD12 

470 PAINT(35,165) ,0,0:DRAW"BM31, 

170D10RU9R9DL9DR9D7LU7 

480 DRAW H BM10,20S4"+T$+O$+SP$+T$ 

+U$+N$+E$+SP$+R$+A$+D$+I$+0$ : DRA 

W"BM8,30 n +U$+S$+E$+SP$+T$+H$+E$+ 

SP$+U$+P$+SP$+A$+N$+D$ : DRAWBM12 

, 40 "+D$+0$+W$+N$+SP$+A$+R$+R$+0$ 

+W$+S$ 

490 DRAW"BM1)3 , 8)3"+H$+I$+T$+SP$+E 
$+N$+T$+E$+R$+SP$+T$+0$ : DRAW'BMl 
4 , 90"+H$+E$+A$+R$+SP$+M$+U$+S$+I 
$+C$ 

500 SC=530 
510 GOSUB 590 

520 II$=INKEY$:IF II$=""THEN 520 

530 IF II$=CHR$(94)THEN SC=SC+10 

540 IF SC>161)3 THEN SC=530 

550 IF II$=CHR$ (10) THEN SC=SC-1)3 

560 IF SC<53)3 THEN SC=1610 

57)3 IF II$=CHR$(13)THEN GOSUB 50 
00 

580 GOTO 510 

590 GG$="" 

600 SS$=STR$(SC) 

610 LS=LEN(SS$) :SS$=RIGHT$(SS$,L 
S-l) 

620 L=LEN(SS$) 

630 FOR A=l TO L 

640 NN$=MID$(SS$,A,1) 

650 V=VAL(NN$) 

660 GG$=GG$+GX$(V) 

670 NEXTA 

680 DRAW"BM150,30C1S8"+OG$ 
690 EXEC 43345 
700 OG$=GG$ 

710 DRAW"BM150,30C0S8"+GG$ 
720 RETURN 

5000 ZQ=RND(5):0N ZQ GOSUB 6000, 
7000, 8000 , 9000 , 10000 : RETURN 
6000 PLAY " T 100 1CDEFGABAGFEDC " :RE 
TURN 

7000 PLAY I, T1)302CDEFGABAGFEDC ,I :RE 
TURN 

8000 PLAY"T10O3CDEFGABAGFEDC" :RE 
TURN 

9000 PLAY"T10O4CDEFGABAGFEDC" :RE 
TURN 

10000 PLAY"T10O5CDEFGABAGFEDC" :R 
ETURN /» 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 101 



A Little Electrical 

Cost Calculator 



By Dennis Anderson 




Every summer I wonder how 
much it costs to run the air con- 
ditioner. Every winter I wonder 
how much spot heaters cost in electrical 
usage. This program, Electrical Cost 

Dennis Anderson is a technical field 
service representative. He likes to un- 
wind with his two Co Cos, RAIN BOW and 

RAINBOW ON TAPE. 



Calculator^ was written to stop my 
wondering. 

Entering information from your 
electric bill allows you to break down 
the charges into a meaningful format. 
There is a display that shows the rela- 
tionship between watts used and the 
length of time the device is on. The 
program is fairly straightforward. You 
may find the method of using PRINT 
USING interesting. The format is set up 
on Line 20 and is used from lines 100 
to 130. 



After the cost chart is displayed, you 
have the option of entering the watts 
used on a particular appliance and the 
time you will be using it in hours. The 
answer is simply displayed. You may 
find that knowing the cost of running 
a particular device will save you money. 
I find the cost of running my CoCo and 
television is remarkably low. I wish the 
operating costs of some other utilities 
were the same. 

(Questions about this program may 
be sent to Dennis at 942-67 Street, Apt. 
2A, Brooklyn, NY 11219, phone 212- 
680-1950. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing.) □ 



102 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



The listing: ELECTRIC 




DENNIS ANDERSON 
942-67 STREET 
BROOKLYN N.Y. 11219 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

lj3 CLS : PRINT@3 , "ELECTRICAL COST 
CALCULATOR" 

2J3 Y$="$#.##":Z$="$##.## » 

3j3 PRINT: INPUT "ENTER KILOWATT US 

AGE FROM BILL ";KW 

4J3 INPUT "MONTHLY CHARGE FROM BIL 

L (ENTER AS 24.12) " ;MC 

50 'CALCULATE HOURLY COST PER WA 

TT 

60 C=MC/KW:H=C/1J3J3J3:D=H*24:WE=H* 
168:M0=H*72J3 

7j3 PRINT@229, "ELECTRICAL COST TA 
BLE" 

8J3 PRINT@263, "1J3 1J3J3 25J3 
5j3j3" 

9J3 PRINT§294, "WATTS WATTS WATTS 
WATTS " 

10j3 PRINT @ 3, 2 J3, "HOUR " ; : PRINTUSIN 

G Y$ ;H*10 ; : PRINT" " ; : PRINTUSING 

Z$;H*lj3j3,H*25j3,H*5j3j3 

110 PRINT@352 , "DAY " ; : PRINTUSIN 

G Y$ ; D*1J3 ; : PRINT" " 7 : PRINTUSING 

Z$ ; D*1J30 , D*2 50 , D*500 

120 PRINT§3 84, "WEEK ";:PRINTUSIN 

G Y$ ;WE*10 ; : PRINT" " ; : PRINTUSING 

Z$;WE*100,WE*250,WE*500 

130 PRINT§416, "MON. ";:PRINTUSIN 

G Y$ ;MO*10 ; : PRINT" " ; : PRINTUSING 

Z$;MO*100,MO*250,MO*500 
140 : INPUT" 'D' FOR DETAIL 'E' T 
0 END" ;A$ 

150 IF A$="E"THEN STOP 
160 CLS: PRINT: INPUT" ENTER POWER 
CONSUMPTION OF UNIT IN WATTS (V 
OLTS*AMPS) ";PC 

170 PRINT: INPUT" ENTER HOURS OF 
OPERATION"; HO 
180 IC=H*(HO*PC) 

190 PRINT: PRINT" YOUR COST WILL 
BE "; : PRINTUSING" $$## ###.##••; rIC 
200 PRINT: 

210 PRINT§448, "PRESS 'A' TO CALC 
ULATE ANOTHER ELSE PRESS 'Q' TO 
QUIT" ;: INPUT A$ : IFA$="A"THEN GO 
TO 150 ELSE IF A$="Q"THEN STOP E 
LSE 21J5 

220 ' *LAST LINE* 



CORRECTIONS 

"Accessible Applications: MAILLABL" (November 
1985, Page 247): Richard White tells us of some changes 
that need to be made to his program. 

1) Change DD=1 to DD=2 in Line 110. 

2) Line 205: PRINTB-2 needs to be changed to PRINTttDD 
and CT=CR ( 6 )+CR ( 7 ) needs to be changed to CT = 
CT+CT(G)+CR(7). 



"Received and Certified "(February 1986, Page 189): Due 

to an error in communications, the incorrect address was 
listed for The Electronic Assistant Lighting Designer. The 
correct address is: Theater Literate Software, The Compu- 
ter Literacy Center, 3301 W. Oak Street, Kissimmee, FL 
32741. We are also informed that the program comes only 
on cassette at the present time. 



"Cross-Reference Your Programs with XREF" (Febru- 
ary 1986, Page 169): Mr. Van Dusen advises us that a 
problem occurs with this program when using a printer that 
does not recognize CHRI ( 12 ) as a form feed character. You 
may either change the appropriate codes in lines 68 and 92 
or replace those lines with: 

68 P0KELO,j3:IFZZ=j3THENZZ=l:GOTO6 
9ELSEFORZQ=LZT06 6 : PRINT#-2 : NEXT 
92 POKELO^rFORZQ^ZTOGSiPRINTl^ 
2 : NEXT 



"Destination: Moon Base Amphibia" (August 1985, Page 
106): Nick Bradbury has informed us that his program wjll 
not run with the disk controller plugged m. Also, you may 
contact him with questions before 9 p.m. EST at (615) 966- 
0172. 



"Coco Bells" (December 1985, Page 36): Joseph Urbas 
writes to tell us that the fourth value in Line 200 controls 
the tempo. The article stated that it was the third value. 
Also, some CoCos may require the following line in the 
program: 

225 poKEssais^sja 



"The Electronic Valentine Maker" (February 1986, Page 
19): Brian P. Roden tells us that due to the renumbering 
of his program, the modification listed in his article for using 
the Valprint program (Listing 1) on printers other than a 
CGP-115 was incorrect. 

The correct modification is: 

1 CLS 
DEL 46-95 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 103 



TURN OF THE SCREW 



The Makings of Memory 
and How it Works 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Remember AND, OR and XOR 
gates? Along with these gates 
came simple truth tables and 
Boolean expressions. All the gate exam- 
ples that were given were two inputs and 
one output. Most of these gates also 
come in multiple inputs and a variety of 
outputs. For example, Figure 1 shows 
a four-input NAND and a three-input 
OR. If you also examine the 
accompanying truth tables, you will see 
that the rule of thumb for these gates 
still applies. (See my column in the 
February 1986 RAINBOW, Page 154, for 
the rules to logic gates.) Some gates are 
made, for instance, to have up to 13 
inputs, but they are used mostly for 
memory mapping. I'll be going into 
more detail about memory mapping in 
a future article. No matter how many 
inputs you have, though, all the same 
rules apply. 

Another property of logic gates 
(which have more to do with hardware 
than logistics) that we haven't touched 
on yet is the type of output. So far, all 



Tony DiStefano is well-known as an 
early specialist in computer hardware 
projects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Que- 
bec. 



the outputs we have talked about are 
either ones or zeros; a one being a 
positive voltage (+5 volts in the case of 
the CoCo) and a zero being no voltage 
or ground. There are two other types of 
outputs to consider. The open-collector 
output and the tri-state output. 

Let us look at the tri-state output 
first. "Tri," meaning three, tells us there 
are three posible output conditions. 















,,,1 — — < 




4 INPUT NAND 



3-INPUT OR 
Figure 1 



How can that be with a binary output? 
The word binary implies two condi- 
tions. What is the third state? The third 
state is called high-impedance. That is 
when the output is neither one nor zero. 
It is as if the output was not connected. 
The physical connection to the chip is 
still there (in the chip), but the internal 
connection is broken as if a switch was 
inserted. 



Examine Figure 2a. It shows an 
example of how a tri-state gate works. 
It is not practical to show a switch every 
time there is an output that has tri-state 
capabilities. Figure 2b shows us how a 
tri-state output is symbolized. The extra 
line shown is for the tri-state output 
control. It is an input. Depending on the 
chip, this input can be active high or 
active low. By active, I mean that the 
switch (Figure 2a) is closed. Active high 
means the switch is closed when a one 
is present at the tri-state control input. 
Active low is when a zero is present. 

This type of output is needed when 
there are two outputs connected to- 
gether. Look at Figure 2c and try to 
think what logic level Point B is if Point 
A=0 and Point 0 1 . This could lead to 
some problems. One gate wants to be 
five volts and the other wants to be 
ground. A short circuit exists and one, 
if not both gates, can suffer damage. A 
condition like this cannot exist. It is up 
to the system designer to make sure 
there is no possibility for output con- 
flicts such as the one in Figuie 1c. 

However, in a computer, there are 
times when two outputs must meet and 
go into one (or more) inputs. It is then 
necessary to use tri-state outputs. The 
main use of tri-state outputs is when 



1 04 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



256K 





HOME RUN / 



256K Bd - $129.95 
512K Bd - $169.95 

(Requires RS Multi-Pak) 



OS-9 
DRIVER 
$24.95 



The first 256K/512K memory bd for the 
CoCo II ! Inside this low noise metal 
case lives 256K/512K of memory and all 
the circuitry to access it as a RAMDISK ! 
The CoCo II answer to THUNDER RAM 
is here - NOW !!! 




STRIKE 1 - RAM / 



Easy installation, 

software and 
tech information! 

(NOT available for CoCo ll's) 



OS-9 
DRIVER 
$24.95 



The first 256K memory Bd for the CoCo! 
Load four 32K pgms at once, emulate a 
40trk RAMDISK, 60K Print Spooler, FAST 
access, 30+ Hi-Res screens in memory!! 
$99.95 (see Sept '85 Rainbow Review) 

DOUBLE RAM - Upgrades a THUNDER RAM from 256K to 
512K giving TWO independent RAM Disks! $79.95 




STRIKE 3 - A HIT! 

Feature packed hardware & software 
Graphics System! Includes: PulhDown 
Menus, Icon processing, multiple Font 
styles, full graphic editing plus a special 
Input Module for 256x192 joystick input 
64K DISK $79.95 w/Y-Cable $99.95 
Requires MulthPak or Y-Cable ($29.95) 
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CoCo Max (TAPE) $69.95 Mouse Pad $14.95 




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BACK ^ 





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STRIKE 2 - DOS! 

EPROM Programmer 

^ $59.95 ^ 



Uses 2764 ($6.95) 
or 27128 ($14.95) 

EPROMS ! (Requires Super Controller) 

The most AMAZING CoCo Disk Controller 
ever! Switch up to 4 DOS's (up to 16K) 
via a single software POKE! Choose 
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DISPLAY 80 - 80 column display, RTC, 
& Ptr port. (Req. Super Controller) $99.95 

CDOS 3.2 $19.95 and/or Spectrum DOS $29.95 
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SPECTRUM PROJECTS, INC. 

PO BOX 21272 
93-15 86TH DRIVE 
WOODHAVENNY 11421 

Shipping $3.00 (Foreign $5,001 
COD $2 extra - NY Res add tax 
COD Order Line 710-441-2807 



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SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 

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COMMUNICATIO 




COLORCOM/E - A complete smart 
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SPECTRUM PROJECTS, Inc. 

PO BOX 21272 
93-15 86th DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN NY 11421 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



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FREE - Send for our 
CoCo catalog flier !!! 
Dealer inquiries invited I 
Software submissions 
welcomed l 



there must exist, on a single connection, 
more than one output. An example of 
this is right on the CoCo. When you add 
a ROM pack or a disk drive controller 
to your computer, the pack and the 
computer share common connections, 
therefore both must have tri-state out- 
puts. 



IN 



-o OUT 



IN o 



o 



CONTROL 
o OUT 



CONTROL 
B 

— o 



< 



-o C 



Figure 2 



The second type of output is open- 
collector. In electronic terms, the output 
circuitry means that the last transistor 
connection to the output pin is the 
collector. The emitter is connected to 
ground and the base connects to the 
previous transistor. Now, to speak 
English. Figure 3a shows a typical open 
collector output. If you are not up on 
your electronics, and that is a bit too 
much to swallow, let's look at it in 
another way. 




The output of an open collector gate 
can be seen as a switch with one end 
connected to ground. It has two states: 
1) if the output is high (one), it is high 
impedance, not a logical one, as if it 
wasn't connected; 2) if the output is low 
(zero), it is logical zero or ground. 
Figure 3b shows the equivalent circuit 
to an open-collector output. 

There is no special symbol for an 
open-collector gate — only the data 
sheet of the gate in question will tell. 
Usually, open-collector outputs have a 
resistor connected to plus voltage that 
gives it away. There are specific uses for 
this type of output. I will not go into too 



much detail here, but an example of this 
is in the disk controller. The controller 
uses open-collector outputs to control 
the disk drives. 

Now it's time to move on to new 
material. So far, all the gates we have 
looked at have a given output for given 
inputs. If the inputs are removed, the 
output is no longer valid. In a computer, 
there is a need to remember previous 
events. For example, when you use a 
calculator to add two numbers, the first 
number must be remembered or stored 
to be used later. The ability to remember 
a previous event in a computer is called, 
yes, you guessed it, memory. The sim- 
plest form of memory is one bit. A one 
or a zero is one bit of memory. A flip- 
flop is a logic gate with memory. The 
simplest form of flip-flop is called the 
R-S (Reset, Set) flip-flop. It is made by 
using two gates we have already looked 
at. 

Examine the diagram in Figure 4a. It 
uses two NAND gates. A NOR gate 




could also be used; the only difference 
is that the polarity required to activate 
the device is inversed. Given that the 'S' 
and 'R' inputs are both ones, the out- 
puts 'Q' and "*Q" (the use of the symbol 
'*' simply means not or active low; it is 
usually shown using this symbol or as 
a small black bar above the character) 
would be one and the other zero. The 
outputs are always the complement of 
each other. 

Due to the nature of this circuit, it is 
impossible to tell which output is which 
when power is first applied. It is an 
indeterminate state. If we were to 
change the 'S' input to zero and then 
back to one, we would have what is 
known as a pulse. A pulse is a change 
of logic state for a predetermined 
amount of time, then it returns to its 
original state. That means if a signal is 
normally one, a pulse is a negative- 
going pulse. If the signal is normally 
zero, a pulse is a positive-going pulse. 

This comes right in line with what is 
called the active state. Let's say we have 
a signal that is high (one) when it is idle 
(doing nothing) and when we want this 
line to do something, it goes low (zero). 
This is called active low. The same is 
true in reverse: A signal that is normally 
low and pulses high to activate is called 
active high. 

To get back to our flip-flop, the result 
of a low pulse on the 'S' line "flips" the 
outputs to a known state. The 'Q' 
output is one and "*Q" is zero. If we 
were to pulse the 'R' line, the outputs 
"flop" to just the opposite. If both 'R' 
and 'S' were to be pulsed, the output is 
again indeterminate. The truth table for 
an R-S flip-flop is shown in Figure 4b, 
The symbol for a NAND R-S flip-flop 
is shown in Figure 4c. 

The next diagram, Figure 5a, is called 
a clocked R-S flip-flop. This is used 
when it is necessary to set up the input 
conditions, but delay the actual setting 
or resetting action until a pulse is given 
from another source. The CK (clock) 
line is used to inhibit the 'S' and 'R' lines 
from entering the flip-flop stage. Follow 
the logic using the truth table in Figure 
5b. Figure 5c shows the symbol for this. 

To continue our quest to understand- 
ing memory, let's go one step further. If 
we were to add an inverter to the 'R' side 
of our R / S flip-flop and tie its input to 
the 'S' side (Figure 6), we now have a 
D-type flip-flop. The D-type flip-flop is 
one step closer to making a memory 
chip. The 'D' stands for data. The 
logical state of 'D' is transferred to the 
'Q' output on the leading edge of the 



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Printer/Modem 15' Extender Cable .$14.95 
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C-10 tapes in any quantity ... ..49 cents 
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6809E Quick Reference Guide $3.95 

32K. 64K or 128K RAM Button .......$4.99 

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COCO SCREEN DUMP 



The best screen dump program for the Panasonic, Epson & Gemini printers- ever! Have the option of 
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DISK UTILITY 2.1* 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively 
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SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 



4* 



Now you can write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter-64, VIP Writer, etc.) and convert 
them to special Highly Detailed character sets! Some of the character sets supported are italics, 



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SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PR 



Save; t im e and design pro looking diagrams using a 480X540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows , 
Over 30 electronic symbols w/10 definable symbols. (Even Logic gates & Multipin chips!) Print hard 
copy and save to disk. 64K DISK ]$49s8S. New LOW price!!! $29.95 (see Jan '84 Rainbow Review) 



10* 



BASIC* 




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COCO c 



Use your CoCo to keep track of your checking and savings accounts! Printout individual personal 
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package that transfers- tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an aytoiflfti# . 
copy of -a^ntiite ;v ;di Sfeof: programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to 
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SUPER DUPER UTILITIES 



finally! Atf|lilf^^yp|^ DUPER" utility software package all rolled up into ONE!!! Includes sueft 
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THE OS-9 SOLUTION 



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~- ~~ ' ■ - — — - — .... . . . • • - ..... ■ 



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COD ORDER HOT LINE 718-441-2807 



CK 



> 



> 



1 



1 




a 



1 



1 



CK 



SL 



NO CHANGE 



1 



INDETERMINATE 

I 



0 


S Q 
CK 

Q 

R 












0 



c 

Figure 5 



clock pulse. The word "edge" in this 
context means the precise moment the 
pulse changes state. This means the 
instant the CK input goes high, the gate 
('A' or 'B') that has the one transfers to 



the R/S section of the D-type flip-flop. 
When the CK line returns to il-s inactive 
zero state, the data is locked into the 
flip-flop. 

You can say that this is a one-by-one 



memory chip. It is a far cry from the 
65,536-by-eight memory capabilities of 
the CPU inside the CoCo. Can you 
imagine how big the computer would be 
if it had 524,280 chips in it? We will work 
up to that next month. In the meantime, 
back to the flip-flop. 

There are many limitations to the 
simple D-type flip-flop. The main one 
being that since there is a single input 
(apart from the clock), the *D' input 
must remain stable for the duration of 
the clock pulse. This is to ensure that the 
data is accurately transmitted to the 
output. There are many types of flip- 
flops. For right now, I will go into 
detailed explanations of only the ones 
that will help us understand the mak- 
ings of a memory chip. 

The next diagram, Figure 7a, shows 
a more sophisticated flip-flop. It is 
labeled a "positive-edge triggered D- 
type flip-flop" (whew, what a mouth- 
ful). This gate is one step closer to 
resembling the memory chips inside 
today's computers. The 'S' and 'R' 
inputs are normally one or active low. 
The CK line for now should be zero. 
When the CK goes high, the output of 
Gate B goes low, causing the R-S flip- 
flop formed by 'E' and *F' to be set. If, 
while the CK is still one, the 'D' input 
changes, the output of Gate D changes, 
although this has no effect on the output 
since Gate C is inhibited by the output 
Gate B. 

When CK returns low, the output of 
'B' goes back to one, but *C is now 
inhibited by the zero state of the CK. 
The output now reflects the 'D' input. 
This circuit is very similar to one bit in 
a RAM chip. Figure 7b shows the 
symbol for this gate and Figure 7c 
shows the truth table. 

The CoCo's CPU reads and writes 
data eight bits (one byte) at a time. This 




112 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



is not a big problem for us; all we have 
to do is make eight flip-flop circuits for 
every byte we need. There is, however, 
another problem we have not yet seen. 
This and most CPUs do not have sepa- 
rate input and output pins. That would 
make 16 pins. Instead, it has only eight 
pins, commonly known as the data bus, 
and one direction pin. This direction pin 
is known as the read/ write line, or *R/ 
W for short. The *R/ W pin on this CPU 
is active low for writing. That means 
when this output is high, the CPU is 
reading or entering data (the action of 
transferring data from memory to the 
CPU). Likewise, when it is low, it is 
writing or producing data (the action of 



transferring data from the CPU to 
memory). 

With just a few more gates, the 
famous positive-edge triggered D-Type 
flip-flop will concede to the CPU's 
demands. Figure 8 shows one way of 
making this happen. Remember the tri- 
state output described earlier in this 
article? Well, it is finally put to good use. 
The 'R' and 'S' lines are the same as 
before. In most memory circuits, they 
are never used. The 'Q' line, however, 
is tied to the input of a tri-state buffer. 
The *Q in this case is not used. The 
output of the buffer becomes the new 
T)' line. This is also the input, but a new 
line has been added — it is the *R/W 



input. When this input line is high and 
the CK line is high, the action is a read. 
The tri-state Buffer A is activated, 
therefore the output of 'Q' appears at 
the 'D' line. 

When the *W/R line is low and the 
CK line is high, the action is a write. The 
'Q 1 output is blocked by the tri-state 
Gate A, but Gate B allows the 4 D' input 
to be transferred to the R/S flip-flop 
and, therefore, memorized into this bit. 
This is the basis of how memory storage 
works in a computer. 

Next time, well look at how many 
bits of memory form bytes and how 
many bytes of memory form a memory 
map. □ 



S o 



R o — r 



CK Q 



0 O 













0 


CK 


Q 


0 


0 


t 


0 


1 


1 


1 


1 


0 



Figure 7 



One-bit Memory Cell 



D o- 



R/W o 



CK o 




Figure 8 



o NC 



April 1 986 THE RAINBOW 113 






William Sheriff 
Hand 

William lives in Aurora, Colorado, and 
dexterously used CoCo Max for a deft and 
adroit entry that assured he'd be handed 
first prize in a giddy gallery. 



Rich Sganga 
Clever Disguise 

Using Micro Illustrator, Rich continues 
our gallery theme with a display of the 
axiom, "Where there's a will, there's a way" 
(if we may be pardoned for the unbearable 
use of that cliche). Rich lives in Brentwood, 

New York. 




114 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 





p 

R 
I 

Z 
E 



Tom Sganga 
Snake 

Rich's brother, Tom, also used Micro 
Illustrator for an entry he thought didn't 
have a leg to stand on. We agreed to put 
this charmer In our gallery rife with tom- 
foolery. (Sorry, Tom, we didn't mean that 
personally.) 



Steve Poates 
New Wave 

Steve lives in Mobile, Alabama, and used 
Graphicom for a windingly droll comment 
on the drift of some popular music cur- 
rents. We rippled with delight but were 
threatened by parts of the staff if we dared 

call it "groovy." 



o 





Send your entry on either tape or disk 
to; 

CoCo Gallery 
THE RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
Attn: Monica Dorth 



Chris Young 
Nerds 

He's from Fort Worth in the Lone Star State 
And Chris Young we congratulate 

For a brace of waggish nerds 

We salute in rhyming words. 
McPaint was the tool in this portrait. 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! 

You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in 
upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your creations 
with the CoCo Community! 

Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and 
phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what 
programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please 
include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means 
no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or 
material that's already been submitted elsewhere. 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of $15 and 
a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions will also be given. 

Monica Dorth, Curator 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 115 



DELPHI BUREAU 



Presenting the 

^Delphi Advantage' 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow's CoCo SIGop 



This month we have several items 
of interest. First on the agenda is 
the rate increase by Delphi — the 
first increase since start-up in May 1983. 
To most of you, this change is old news. 
We apologize for the delay in reporting 
this. You see, we are two months ahead 
of you and when hot news breaks, we 
appear to be two months behind. At any 
rate, the cost increases, effective March 
3, 1986, are shown in Table 1. Look the 
table over carefully to see how it affects 
you. 

To help offset the effect of the rate 
increase, Delphi has introduced the 
"Delphi Advantage." This is a new 
membership plan that assures you 
Delphi's lowest access rates. As a 
member of this plan, your rates will 
never exceed the standard rates of 12 
months earlier. As an added attraction, 
Delphi will begin sending you the latest 
editions of Delphi handbooks and 
command cards at no extra charge. The 

Cray Augsburg serves as RAINBOW'S 
technical assistant and holds an asso- 
ciate's degree in electrical engineering. 
He and his wife, Ruth Ann, have twp 
children and live in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. 



Old Rates (/hr) 
Home Office 



$9.60 



New Rates (/hr) 
Home Office 



$6.60 



Direct Dial $6.00 

(from Boston, Toronto) 
Basic Rate* $6.00 $16.00 $7.20 

(Mainland U.S. and Canada, via Tymnet and Uninet) 



Basic Rate* $9.00 $19.00 

(Alaska and Hawaii, via Tymnet) 

Basic Rate* $16.80 $16.80 

(Puerto Rico, via Tymnet) 

Datapac $16.80 $16.80 

(Canada) 

International** $8.00 $8.00 
(other than Canada) 



$10.20 
$18.00 
$18.00 
$8.00 



$9.60 

$17.40 

$20.40 

$18.00 

$18.00 

$8.00 



* Includes network (Tymnet and Uninet) charges. 
** International connect charges are exclusive of telecommunications 
charges, which are billed separately. 



cost of the Delphi Advantage package 
is $12, but this fee is being waived for 
first-time plan members who sign up 
before June 1, 1986. 

A potential drawback to the Delphi 
Advantage for some users is that you 
must commit to using at least $24 worth 
of Delphi services each month. Your 
account will be charged for this amount 



even if you only spend a few minutes 
online in a given month. The terms of 
membership for the Delphi Advantage 
are as follows: 

Eligibility 

1) Delphi members using credit card 
billing are eligible. 

2) Direct-bill customers are eligible if 



116 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



the monthly fee is paid in advance. 

3) A Delphi member with unused con- 
nect time credit becomes eligible once 
that credit is cleared from his account. 

Benefits 

4) Advantage plan members are assured 
Delphi's lowest access rates. 

5) Members will receive updated hand- 
books and command cards. 

6) Members can participate in periodic 
surveys concerning Delphi. 

Fees 

7) Entry into the Advantage plan carries 
a $12 fee. 

8) The entry fee is waived for first-time 
plan members who join before June 1, 
1986. 

9) Members pay a monthly fee of $24 
in exchange for $24 worth of connect 
time during either home or office time. 

Applications and Billing 

10) Customers may apply online at any 
time. 

11) A Delphi Advantage membership 
becomes valid at 4 a.m. EST on the first 
billing day of the month following 
application approval. 

12) The $24 monthly fee is billed to a 
customer's credit card or direct-bill 
account on the monthly billing day, 
which is posted online in "Using Del- 
phi." 

Consider these membership terms 
and how they apply to you. 

2400 Baud at No Surcharge 

In a related matter, Delphi also offers 
2400 Baud telecommunications. In 
addition to operation at 300 Baud, there 
is no surcharge for 1200 and 2400 Baud 
service. This means no extra charge for 
downloading programs more quickly. 



Who, What, Where and How? 

There has been some confusion on 
the SIG as to who to send what and how. 
For future reference, "Letters to Rain- 
bow," "Reviewing Reviews" and 
"Scoreboard" material can be sent to us 
through Delphi by addressing such 
correspondence to EDITORS. Please 
use MAIL rather than FORUM for this 
purpose. Similarly, inquiries and orders 
should be MAILed to ORDERS. 

Online Shopping 

When in THE rainbow's Color Com- 
puter SIG, do check out our SHOP- 
PING service. There you can enter 
subscriptions to rainbow and order 
back issues of RAINBOW, binders and 
offerings from The Rainbow Bookshelf 
including RAINBOW ON TAPE. 

Also, when online, do take the time 
to enter a profile for other SIG members 
to see. At the CoCo SIG prompt enter 
MEMBER, type I -AM and answer the 
questions. It's that easy. You're not done 
yet, however! Now, at the MAIN Del- 
phi prompt (where you first log on), 
select PEDPLE, type I -AM and answer 
those questions, too. Then when people 
do a /W USERNAME in CONFerence, or 
type /WHO 1 5 USERNAME at the CoCo 
SIG or Forum prompts, they will be 
able to see who you really are. 

New Uploads! 

A special thank you to those who 
really make THE rainbow Color Com- 
puter SIG what it is. The following 
people have been so kind as to upload 
their programs: 

William Borie, DISKBANK, DATA 
PAC.TXT (Datapac XMODEM set 
routines). 

Jim Burris, MIJ, SQROFF 
(checkers/ tiddly winks on a 3-D board). 

Kevin Davidson, KDAVIDSON, A 



BASIC Adventure (a game about BASIC). 

Marty Goodman, MARTYGOOD- 
MAN, TERMREV. TXT (review of 
smart terminal programs). 

Eldon Griffiths, LEMANS, EPROM 
Burner (software driver). 

Craig Hutchinson, CRAIGHUTCH, 
Bear Down Chic Bears (music). 

Don Kline, DON13, 3-D Four in a 
Row (four in a row, but now in 3-D). 

Stephen Macri, DRACMAN, AD 
DRESS. BAS (address list program) 
and GOBANG.BAS (a five-in-a-row 
game). 

Art Martin, ARTMARTIN, MUL 
TIZAP.BAS (modification of Quick- 
zap from December 1985 RAINBOW). 

Jim Manning, JIMBM, Budget (a 24- 
category budget program) and HOME 
BUD.BAS (a 48-category program). 

John Phelps, SPCMAN, DMAN 
(menu-driven disk manager). 

Dale Puckett, DALEP, Banker Driv- 
ers (to drive the Banker256K). 

George Quellhorst, OLDUTCH, 
THEFILE (filing/ addressing utility), 
3DTICTAC.BAS and ON EC HECK 
.BAS (games, of course), DESIRING 
.BIN (a little music to take you Bach) 
and CONVERTBAS (a six-way base 
conversion utility). 

Eric Richards, ERICJAMES, 
SKELETON.BAS (PM0DE4 skeletons). 

Michael Schneider, MSCHNE 
IDER, A Menu For Deft PASCAL 
JVorkbench 

Ken Schunk, KENSCHUNK, UN 
DERD OG/ MA X (mightier than CoCo 
Max?). 

Douglas Trites, RUGBY, Christmas 
Present Tags (four-color tags with the 
CGP-115 printer). 

We have also added several dozen 
new programs to the various topic 
sections of the database. □ 



Two-Liner Contest Winner * i , 

This two-liner displays decimal equivalent of 
each ASCII character, then displays how it will 
look when used with a PRINT statement. Finally, 
it shows you what appears when the value is poked 
into a screen memory location. 

The listings: 

j3 CLS : FORX=10TO19 : FORY=8T054 : SET 
(Y,X,5) : NEXTY : FORY=13T049STEP6 : R 
ESET(Y,X) : RESET (Y+1,X) : NEXTY, X:F 
ORX=1J5T014 ; FORY=12T02 1STEP3 : RESE 
T (Y,X) : NEXTY : FORY=30TO4 5STEP3 : RE 
SET (Y/X) : NEXTY , X : PRINT @ 13 4 , "2 4 
7 9 : : PRINT @ 3 2 5 > " 1 3 



5 6 8 j3 - @"; 

2 PLAY"L8" : PLAYE$ : PLAY I? 02" :E$=IN 

KEY$:IFE$=" ,I THEN2ELSEIFE$= I '0 II THE 

NE$= H 1P" : GOT02ELSEIFE$= lf : M THENE$ 

= ll ll l, :GOT02ELSEIFE$= 1, -"THENE$= ,l l 

2" :GOT02ELSEIFE$= l! @ II THENE$= ,l l ,l :P 

LAY" 03 " : GOT02ELSE2 



Garry L. Shelton 
Kannapolis, NC 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 117 





1 16K 




Ihe 1 




WISHING WELL 


ECB 




mmmm 

RAINBOW 

7.- -A 





Continuing the "Life Skills " series . . . 



Learning the Value 
of Numbers 




By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the u Wishing Well," submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 't forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use but 
remain the property of the author 



Two months ago I said I would 
start a new series of programs 
designed to review skills that 
youngsters need to master for survival 
in the real world. The series, called "Life 
Skills," would alternate between real- 
life Simulations and skills quizzes. The 
first program, in the February 1986 
RAINBOW, was a Simulation of subtrac- 
tion skills. This month, I'm presenting 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



the second installment in this series: 
Computer Mathdrillj Number Identifi- 
cation. I hope you find this offering as 
valuable and innovative as the first. 

The Wish 

Your letters and comments continue 
to suggest that I keep creating programs 
that will help your youngsters in their 
educational development. Granted, 
many of you have requested more 
graphics, such as a Rockfest III or more 
games. I assure you those things are in 
the development stage as well. 

Many individuals who purchase a 
computer for their family often have an 
educational application in mind. More 
than once this application has proven 
the deciding factor between a CoCo 
and, say, a new washer. I need not 
remind you, though, that good educa- 
tional software is hard to find because, 
quite often, a) the person writing the 
program is not an educator, or b) the 
individuals who know what they want 
taught don't know how to program. 

Since computers mostly deal with 
manipulating numbers, and math pro- 
grams are usually the easiest to concep- 



tualize, too often these programs revert 
to a quiz of addition through division 
with any skill level included. Some of 
you may recall that my Adventure game 
of a few months ago, Math Miner, was 
a radical departure from this format. 
Many of you have indicated that you 
like that style, so something else new is 
in the works along those lines. 

However, too often, skills in actual 
number or digit analysis are lacking 
when it comes to computer programs. 
Before a student can effectively move on 
to a skill like rounding off decimals, the 
student must be able to determine what 
the value of the digit in the tenths place 
or where the hundredths place is. 

Many students have difficulty review- 
ing this skill since it must usually be 
done with pencil and paper or with the 
guidance of an instructor. This is not 
always practical in a classrom with a 
high pupil-to-teacher ratio. 

Therefore, our wish to be granted this 
month will be to develop a program that 
helps a youngster analyze the place 
value of numbers and digits. The result 
is our second "Life Skills" program on 
number evaluation. 



118 THE RAINBOW April 1986 

1 



Metric Industries 



The Program 

Be sure to take great care in typing 
in the DATA statements at the beginning 
of the program; be sure to include every 
string of commas you see. You may 
recall that last month's program, Title 
Maker, was used to create the DATA for 
this screen. Please refer back to that 
article for an explanation of why the 
blank commas are used. 

On running the program, the "Life 
Skills" title appears. You are asked to 
select a skill level from one to four (1- 
4). Level one creates a four-digit 
number with one decimal place; level 
two creates a six-digit number with two 
decimal places; level three creates an 
eight-digit number with three decimal 
places; finally, level four creates a 10- 
digit number with four decimal places. 
This allows the user or the instructor to 
set a level of difficulty that matches the 
level being covered in the classroom. 

Upon selecting the level, the screen 
clears and displays (if, for example, you 
are on level one): 

YOUR NUMBER 324.5 

Directly under the number is an 
arrow pointing to one of the places in 
the number. Before selecting the place, 
the arrow dances around the bottom of 
the number so as to appear to heighten 
the random nature of its selection. Next, 
a selection of letters and corresponding 
places are displayed. In this case, it will 
be: 

(D) HUNDREDS 

(E) TENS 

(F) ONES 

(G) TENTHS 

The reason the selections start with 
(D) and not (A) is because the most 
difficult level (four) starts with the 
hundred-thousandths place, which 
would be displayed at that level starting 
with the letter (A). 

The program has been written so only 
the applicable categories are displayed 
at any given time. 

The screen next displays: 

WHICH PLACE IS THE ARROW 

POINTING TO ? 

In the case of level one, only the keys 
D through G respond. If you press any 
key other than the '(a)' key, the program 
does not respond. The *@' key is used 
to check your score or end the program. 

If your answer is correct, the screen 
responds appropriately and indicates 
the correct letter choice as well. If the 
answer is wrong, the screen flashes and 



Model 101 Interface $39.95 



The Model 101 is a serial to 
parallel interface intended for use 
with a COCO and any Centronics 
compatible parallel input printer. 
The 101 has 6 switch selectable 
baud rates (300-9600). The 101 
is only A" X 2* X 1 * and comes 



with all cables and connectors for 
your computer and printer. 




The Model 104 Deluxe Interface $51.95 



The Model 104 is a serial to 
parallel interface like the Model 
101 but it has the added feature 
of a serial port (sometimes 
referred to as a modem switch). 
This feature allows the connection 
of a parallel printer and any 
serial device (modem, serial printer 



etc.) to your computer. You may 
then select either output, serial or 
parallel, with the flip of a switch. 
The 104 is only 4.5* X 2.5" X 1.25" 
and comes with all cables and 
connectors for your computer. You 
supply the serial cable for your 
modem or other serial device. 




Model 103 Combo $68.95 



With the turn of a knob the 
model 103 switches your 
computer's RS232C serial port 
to any one of 3 outputs — 2 
serial and 1 parallel. The serial 
ports may be used for modems, 
serial printers or even another 
computer. The parallel port can 



be used with any Centronics 
compatible printer. The 103 has 
the best features from the 101 
and 102: color coded position 
indicator lights, 6 switch 
selectable baud rates, heavy 
anodized aluminum cabinet, and 
many more. 




Model 102 Switcher $35.95 



The Model 102 has 3 switch 
positions that allow you to 
switch your computer's serial 
output between 3 different 
devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has 
color coded lights that indicate 
the switch position. These 



lights also act as power 
indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with 
the 102 are color coded labels 
that can be applied to your 
accessories. The 102 has a heavy 
guage anodized aluminum cabinet 
with non-slip rubber feet. 




Cassette Label Program $6.95 



New version 1.2-Tape transfera- 
ble to disk. Now save and 
load Labels from tape or disk. 

This fancy printing utility prints 
5 lines of information on 
pinfeed cassette labels. "Cas- 
sette Label" is menu driven and 
is very easy to use. It uses the 
special features of your 
printer for standard, expanded 
or condensed characters. Each 
line of text is automatically 
centered. Before the label 
is printed, it is shown on your 



THE 101, 103 AND 104 ALL 
REQUIRE POWER IN ORDER TO 
OPERATE. MOST PRINTERS 
CAN SUPPLY POWER TO YOUR 
INTERFACE. STAR, RADIO 
SHA3K, AND OKI DATA ARE JUST 
A FEW THAT DO. EPSON DOES 
NOT THE INTERFACES CAN 
ALSO BE POWERED BY AN AC 
ADAPTER (RADIO SH/CK MODEL 
273-1431 PLUGS INTO ALL 
MODELS). IF YOU REQUIRE A 
POWER SUPPLY, ADD A "P" TO 
THE MODEL NUMBER AND $5.00 
TO THE PRICE. (MODEL 101 P 
$44.95, MODEL 104P $56.95 AND 
MODEL 103P $73.95) 



CRT — enabling you to 
make changes if you like — 
then print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The 
program comes on tape and It 
is supplied with 24 labels to 
get you started. 16K ECB 
required. 



VUCltt L 



i f u* ii. s iv 



UHI 



c 



c 



[Kill i 



Other Quality Items 

High Quality 5 Screw Shell O10 
Cassette Tapes $7.50 per dozen 

Hard Plastic Storage Boxes for 
Cassette Tapes $2.50 per dozen 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00 per 100 
Colors $3.60 per 100 (Red, Blue, 
Yellow or Tan) 









VISA 




[ Moi tw C mi ) 









The Model 101, 102, 103 and 104 
will work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory size. 
These products are covered by 
a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101, 103 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel input 
printer including Gemini, Epson, 
Radio Shack, Okidata, C. loth and 
many others. They support 
BASIC print commands, word 
processors and graphic com- 
mands. 

We manufacture these products. 
Dealer Inquiries are invited. 



To order call our 24 hour order 
line 513-677-0796 and use 
your VISA MASTERCARD 
request C.O.D.or send check or 
money order to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Free shipping on orders over 
$50.00. Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. 

Orders under $50.00 please add 
$2.50 for shipping. 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 119 



a sound indicates the choice is not 
correct The user must continue until 
the correct answer is entered. After all 
the places in the number have been 
covered, the second half of the quiz 
format is activated. 

The screen next prints: 
WHAT IS THE DIGIT AT PLACE F? 
or one of the other letter answers. Now 
the user must identify the number that 
appears in, say, the tens place, and press 
the number key (0-9) as it appears at the 
top of the keyboard. The correct and 
incorrect answer responses are the same 
as in the first half. 

Therefore, as you can see, this drill 
helps quiz and reinforce both the skills 
of identifying the place value in a digit 
and the correct title of each place. The 
quiz can be stopped at any time by 



pressing < @' to check the score. Pressing 
6 C from the score card allows the user 
to continue taking the drill after check- 
ing the score, although a new number 
is generated if this continue function is 
used in the middle of a generated 
number. 

MC-10 Changes 

To keep those who still have MC-10 
computers happy, you must make the 
following changes to make this program 
work on your 20K machine. Change the 
REM statement in Line 50 from: 

50 REM IF MC-10 THEN MC=15360 
to 

50 MC=15360 

In Line 130, you must change the 
value of (-TIMER) to (9999), since 
MC-10 has no timer. Also, in lines 370 



and 455, you must delete the commands 
that read: 

PMODE4,1:5CREEN0,1 
and 

SCREEN0,0 
since these are graphics commands that 
only work in Extended Color BASIC. 
The rest of the program should work as 
listed. All remaining instructions are the 
same. 

Conclusion 

I have been using an earlier version 
of this drill for some time now. It has 
proven to be very valuable in develop- 
ing and reinforcing math skills. I hope 
you find it equally useful as you add it 
to your collection of educational and 
"Life Skills" programs, which can only 
be found in THE RAINBOW. □ 



95 
185 
265 . 
360 . 
440 . 
END 



.151 
.238 
.233 
..68 
..18 
..31 



The listing: L I FE5KL2 



T 



10 REM************************** 
15 REM* LIFE SKILLS MATH DRILL * 



20 REM* 
25 REM* 
3)3 REM* 
35 REM* 
40 REM* 



NUMBER EVALUATION 
BY FRED B.SCERBO 
60 HARDING AVE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1986 
45 REM************************** 
50 REM IF MC-10 THEN MC=153 60 
55 CLS0:FORI=1TO32:PRINTCHR$(156 
) ; : NEXT 

60 FORI=lT019 2 : READA : I FA=0 THENA= 
16 

65 PRINTCHR$ (A+112 ) ; : NEXT 

70 F0RI=1T032:PRINTCHR$(147) ;:NE 

XT 

75 DATA109 , 104 , 96 , 109 , 104 , 10,0 , 11 
0,108, 106,109, 108,109, , ,30,28,26 
, 29 , , , 30 , 20 , 30 , 20 , 30 , 16 , 20 , 30 , , 2 
1,28,29 

80 DATA101, , ,101, , ,106,96,104,10 

1, ,100, , ,26, ,24,21,16,22,16, ,26, 

,26, ,16,26, ,21, ,20 

85 DATA101, , ,101, , ,107,106,96,10 

1,99,98, , ,27,19,18,21,22,16, , ,26 

, ,26, ,16,26, ,21,19,19 

90 DATA101,,,101,,,106,104,,101, 

i i i i i ,26, 21, 20, 18, , ,26, ,26, ,16,2 

6/ / / / 21 

95 DATA101, , 106, 101, , ,106, , , 101, 



" NUMBER EVALUAT 
BY FRED B.SCER 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1 
SKILL LEVEL (1 



,97, ,16,2 6, ,2 6,21, ,20,18, ,26, ,26 

,21,16,26,21,21, ,21 

100 DATA103,99,106,103,98,97,107 

,,,103,99,103, ,,27,19,26,23,18, , 

27,17,27,17,27,23,17,27,23,21,19 

,23 

105 PRINT@293," COMPUTER MATHDR 
ILL 11 ; 

110 PRINT@325," 
ION " ; 

115 PRINT@357," 
BO " ; 

120 PRINT@389, M 
986 "; 

125 PRINT@453," 

-4) "; 

130 X$=INKEY$ :MU=RND (-TIMER) :IFX 
$=•' "THEN130 

135 RR=VAL(X$) :IFRR<1THEN130 

140 IF RR>4THEN130 

145 ON RR GOTO150,155,160,165 

150 M=4:P=7:Y=3:GOTO170 

155 M=3:P=8:Y=2:GOTO170 

160 M=2 :P=9: Y=1:GOTO170 

165 M=1:P=10:Y=0:GOTO170 

170 REM START PROGRAM 

175 K=0:CLS:FORI=1TO10:B(I)=0:NE 

XT I 

180 FORI=1TO10 : A ( I ) =0 : NEXTI : FORI 
=M TO P 

185 A(I)=RND(11) -1:IF A(I)=0THEN 
185 

190 NEXTI: IF Y=0THEN A(1)=RND(10 
) 

195 CLS: PRINT© 3 3, "YOUR NUMBER"; 
200 FORI=lT06:IF A(I)=0 THEN POK 
EMC+ 1069+1, 96 

205 IF A(I)<>0 THEN POKEMC+ 1069 



120 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



+I / 111+A(I) 

210 NEXTI : POKEMC+ 1076 , 110 : F0RI=7 
TO10:IF A(I)=0 THEN POKEMC+ 1070 
+1,96 

215 IF A(I)<>0 THEN POKEMC+ 107)3 

+I,111+A(I) 

220 NEXTI 

225 FORI=1TO10:A(I)=A(I) -1:NEXTI 
230 IFY=3THEN260 
235 IF Y=2THEN255 
240 IF Y=1THEN250 

245 PRINT@97/ 11 (A) HUNDRED THOUSA 
NDS " ; 

250 PRINT@129,"(B) TEN THOUSANDS 
it . 

255 PRINT@161," (C) THOUSANDS"; 
260 PRINT@193," (D) HUNDREDS"; 
265 PRINT@225, " (E) TENS" ; : PRINT© 
257," (F) ONES"; :PRINT@289," (G) T 
ENTHS " ; : IFY=3THEN2 8 5 
270 PRINT@321," (H) HUNDRETHS " ; : I 
F Y=2THEN285 

275 A$="THOUSANDTHS" : PRINT0353 , " 

(I) ";A$;:IF Y=1THEN285 

280 PRINT@385, " (J) TEN ";A$; 

285 PRINT@2 15, "PRESS @";:PRINT@2 

47, "TO END." 

290 FORQ=M TO P 

295 J=P-M+l:C=RND(J)+M-l:IF B(C) 

=1THEN295 

300 B(C)=1 

305 F0RJW=1T05 : FORPW=M TO P+l:PO 
KEMC+ PW+1101,94:FORKW=1TO9:NEXT 
KW : POKEMC+ PW+ 1 10 1 , 9 6 : NEXTPW , JW 
310 IFC<=6 THEN POKEMC+1101+C, 94 
315 IFC>6 THEN POKEMC+1102+C, 94 
320 PRINTQ449 , "WHICH PLACE IS TH 
E ARROW"; : PRINT© 4 81, "POINTING TO 

?" ; 

325 B$=INKEY$:POKEMC+1519,255:PO 

KEMC+1519 , 223 : POKEMC+1519 , 175 : PO 

KEMC+1519 , 96: IFB$="@"THEN485 

330 IFB$=""THEN325 

335 E=ASC(B$) : IFE< (64+M) THEN325 

340 IFE>(76-Y)THEN325 

345 POKEMC+1088+(C*32) ,106: SOUND 

200,l:IF (E-64)OC THEN 370 

350 PRINT@497, "CORRECT !"; 

355 SOUND100,1:FORH=1TO1700:NEXT 

H : FORH=15 2 0TO1 5 3 5 : POKEMC+H ,96: NE 

XTH 

360 NR=NR+1:POKEMC+1088+(C*32) ,9 
6 

365 GOTO380 

370 FORH=1TO4:SOUND50,9:PRINT§49 
7 , "WRONG" ; : PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN0 , 1 : SO 
UND25 , 9 : PRINT@497 , "WRONG" ; : SCREE 
N0 , 0 : NEXTH 

375 FORH=1520TO1535: POKEMC+H, 96: 



NEXTH : NW=NW+ 1 : POKEMC+ 1088+(C*32) 
,96:GOT0325 

380 IFC<=6 THEN POKEMC+1101+C, 96 
385 IFC>6 THEN POKEMC+1102+C, 96 
390 NEXTQ 

395 FORI=1472T01535:POKEMC+I,96: 
NEXT : FORQ=M TO P 

400 J=P-M+l:C=RND(J)+M-l:IF B(C) 

=0THEN400 

405 B(C)=0 

410 PRINTS 4 4 9, "WHAT IS THE DIGIT 
AT PLACE"; :PRINT@476,CHR$(C+64) 

• II 9 II 

415 B$=INKEY$:POKEMC+1088+(C*32) 

, 106: POKEMC+1088+ (C*32) , 96 : IFB$= 

"©"THEN485 

420 IFB$=""THEN415 

425 E=ASC(B$) :IFE<48THEN415 

430 IFE>57THEN415 

435 SOUND100,l:IF (E-48)<>A(C) T 
HEN 455 

440 IF C<=6THENPOKEMC+1101+C,94 
445 IF 06THEN POKEMC+ 1102+C,94 
450 NR=NR+l:PRINT§497,"CORRECT ! 
" ; : SOUND100 , 1 : FORG=1TO1700 : NEXTG 
: FORG= 1520TO1535: POKEMC+ G , 9 6 : NEX 
TG:GOT0465 

455 NW=NW+1 : F0RH=1T04 : SOUND 50 , 9 : 
PRINT@497 , "WRONG" ; : SCREEN0 , 1 : SOU 
ND25, 9 : PRINT@497 , "WRONG" ; : SCREEN 
0,0: NEXTH 

460 FORH=1520TO1535: POKEMC+H, 96: 
NEXTH : GOTO 4 15 

465 IF C<=6 THEN POKEMC+1101+C, 9 
6 

470 IF C>6 THEN POKEMC+ 1102+C,9 
6 

475 NEXTQ 

480 GOT0175 

485 REM SCORE CARD 

490 REM NW=WRONG:NR=RIGHT 

495 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

500 PD=NR+NW: PRINTTAB ( 3 ) "PROBLEM 

S COMPLETED = "PD: PRINT 

505 PRINTTAB (3) "CORRECT RESPONSE 

S = "NR: PRINT 

510 PRINTTAB ( 3 ) 11 INCORRECT RESPON 

SES = "NW: PRINT 

515 TR=NR+NW : I FTR= 0 THENTR= 1 

520 SC=INT(NR/TR*100) 

525 PRINTTAB (3) "YOUR TOTAL SCORE 

= "SC"%": PRINT 
530 PRINTTAB ( 3 ) "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N 
) OR (C) ?»; 

535 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN535 

540 IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 

545 IFX$="N"THEN CLS: END 

550 IFX$="C"THEN 175 

555 GOT0535 ^ 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 121 



Happy Birthday Balloons 



By Gary Huffman 





The listing: BIRTHDAY 




280 222 

350 211 

END 140 



f i l I l I I I I I i j i l I I i I i t I I i n I I 

I HAPPY BIRTHDAY BALLOONS I 
1 BY GARY HUFFMAN 1 

i COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 1 
1 21)81 7TK AVE SO ! 
! GREAT FALLS, MT. 59405 ! 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 11 II Mill 11 11 



THE fiAiNBQW April 1&BG 



Greet your family and friends 
with this birthday salute. The 
program produces a scene of 
eight balloons with the "Happy Birth- 
day" greeting. When the scene is drawn 
and painted, the tune "Happy Birthday" 
is played. It is then followed with my 
own jazzy arrangement of the same 
song. If a birthday is not the occasion, 
but you like the picture, just add a line: 
235 GOTO 235. □ 

Formerly a letter carrier, Gary is now 
a clerk for the U.S. Postal Service. He 
enjoys playing guitar, singing and pro- 
gramming on his Co Co. He and his 
wife, Paula, and two children live in 
Great Falls, Montana. 





Bp PM0DE3,1:PCLS2:SCREEN1,)3 
9P CIRCLE (1)3)3,5)3) ,3)3,3, 1.25:DRAW 
"C3BM1)3)3 , 86G5R1)3H5" : PAINT ( 1J30 , 50 
) ,3:PAINT(1)3)3,88) , 3 : CIRCLE (10 f 5 

0) ,25,1,1.25, .5, .7p 

1) 3)3 LINE (130,18)3) -(1)3)3 , 85) ,PSET 
11)3 LINE (13)3, 18)3) -(13)3, 6)3) ,PSET 



120 CIRCLE (130 ,30) ,25,1,1. 25:PAI 

NT ( 150 , 40 ) , 1 : DRAW" C1BM130 , 58G5R1 

0H5" : PAINT ( 130 , 61) , 1 : CIRCLE ( 130 , 

30) ,20,3,1.25, .5, .7 

130 CIRCLE (190, 55) ,30, 4, 1.25: DRA 

W"C4BM190 , 90G5R10H5" : PAINT ( 190 , 5 

5) ,4:PAINT(190,93) , 4 : CIRCLE (190, 

55) ,25,1,1.25, .5, .7 

140 LINE (130, 180) -(190, 85) ,PSET 

150 CIRCLE (160, 80) , 25 , 3 , 1 . 25 : PAI 

NT (160 , 80) , 3 : DRAW"C3BM160 , 108G5R 

10H5 11 : PAINT (160, 111), 3: CIRCLE ( 16 

0,80) ,20,1,1.25, .5, .7 

160 LINE(130,180)-(160,103) ,PSET 

170 CIRCLE (120, 100) , 30, 1, 1.25:PA 

INT (120 , 100) ,1 : DRAWC1BM120 , 13 5G 

5R10H5": PAINT (120, 138) ,1 

180 LINE(130, 180)-(120, 132) , PSET 

190 CIRCLE(85,95) , 33 , 4 , 1. 25:PAIN 

T(85,95) ,4:DRAW"C4BM85, 133G5R10H 

5": PAINT (85, 13 6) , 4 : CIRCLE (85 , 95) 

200 LINE(130,180)-(85,130) , PSET 
210 LINE(130, 180) -(100, 115) , PSET 
220 CIRCLE (100, 90) ,25,2, 1.25:PAI 
NT ( 100 , 90) , 2 : DRAWC2BM100 , 118G5R 
10H5 » : PAINT (100, 121), 2: CIRCLE ( 10 
0,90) ,20,1,1.25, .5, .7 
230 CIRCLE(30,30) ,25, 4, 1.25:PAIN 
T (30 , 30) , 4 : DRAW"C4BM30 , 58G5R10H5 
" : PAINT (30 , 61) , 4 : C0L0R1 , 2 : LINE ( 3 
0,60) -(35, 110) , PSET: CIRCLE (30, 30 
) ,20,1,1.25, .5, .7 

240 DRAW"C4BM25,115D30R7U15R8D15 
R7U30L7D10L8U10L7 " : PAINT ( 30 , 12 5) 
/4 

250 CIRCLE (62, 135) ,10,1,1, .15, .9 
: DRAW"C1BM70 , 130U4R7D18L7U4 " : CIR 
CLE (62, 135) ,5,1: PAINT (68, 135) ,1 
260 DRAW"C3BM87,130U4R7D4U4L7D25 
R7U10":CIRCLE(102,135) ,10,3,1, .6 
5 , . 3 6 : CIRCLE (102, 135), 5, 3: PAINT ( 
94,135) ,3 

270 DRAW"C4BM120,130U4R7D4U4L7D2 
5R7U10": CIRCLE (135, 135) ,10,4,1, . 

65, .36:CIRCLE(135,135) ,5,4:PAINT 
(127,135) ,4 

280 DRAW"C3BM152,127F8G15R9E23L9 

G3H3L9":PAINT(159,130) ,3 

290 DRAW"C3BM10, 155R7D4U4L7D30R7 

U4": CIRCLE (24, 163) , 10 , 3 , 1 , . 65, . 1 

5: CIRCLE (25, 177) , 10 , 3 , 1 , . 85 , . 4 : C 

IRCLE(24,163) , 5 , 3 : CIRCLE (2 5 , 177 ) 

,5,3:PAINT(15,160) ,3 

300 DRAW"C1BM40 , 170D15R7U15L7 " : C 

IRCLE(44,160) , 5, 1: PAINT (44 , 160) , 

1: PAINT (44, 175) ,1 

310 DRAW"C3BM57 , 170R7D4U4L7D15R7 



U6": CIRCLE (71 ,177) ,8,3,1,-60, .89 
:CIRCLE(71,184) , 8 , 3 , 1, . 60, . 88 : DR 
AWC3BM75, 173D4" : PAINT (60 , 175) , 3 
320 DRAW ,I C4BM90,170U5R7D5R5D7L5D 
8L7U8L5U7R5" : PAINT (93 , 175) , 4 
330 DRAW"C1BM113,155R7D15U15L7D3 
0R7U5": CIRCLE (128, 177) ,10,1,1, .6 
2, .1: CIRCLE (124, 184) ,8,1,1, .62, . 
047 : DRAW"C1BM13 3 , 185R3U3" : PAINT ( 
116,160) ,1 

340 CIRCLE(155, 177) ,10,3,1, .15, . 
9 : DRAWC3BM162 , 172U18R7D32L7U4" : 
CIRCLE ( 155 , 177 ) , 5 , 3 : PAINT ( 165 , 17 
8 ) , 3 

350 CIRCLE(185, 177) ,10,4,1, .15, . 
9 : DRAW"C4BM19 3 , 172U4R7D18L7U4" : C 
IRCLE(185,177) , 5 , 4 : PAINT ( 191, 177 
)/4 

360 DRAW"C1BM212,168F8G15R9E23L9 

G3H3L9": PAINT (219, 171) ,1 

370 DRAW"C3BM245, 155D20R7U20L7": 

CIRCLE (249, 183) ,5, 3: PAINT (248, 16 

0) ,3:PAINT(249,183) ,3 

380 SCREEN1, 1:FORX=1TO250:PSET(R 

ND(255) ,RND(191) ,RND(8) ) :NEXT 

390 FORY - 1TO 1 5 : FORX= 1TO 100 : NE XTX 

: SCREEN1 , 1 : FORX=1TO100 : NEXTX : SCR 

EEN1,0:NEXTY 

400 PLAY"O3T5L4CP100CL2DCFL1EL4C 

P100CL2DCGL1FL4CP100CO4L2CO3AL4F 

P100FL2EL1DL4B-P100B-L3AFGFP1" 

410 SCREEN1,1:PLAY"T5L4CP100CL2D 

CFL1ET8L4CDEGAEGEDCP4T5L4CP100CL 

2 DCGL1FT8L4 FGA04 CD03 A04 C03AGFP4T 

5CP100CO4L2CO3AL4FP100FL2EL1DT8L 

4B-P100B-FP100FDP100DCO2A+P4T5O3 

L4B-P100B-L1AFGFP1T8L4FP100FDP10 

0DCO1AGL1FP1" : RUN 




April 1986 THE RAINBOW 123 



HOME HELP 



16K 

Disk 



' f 



Always 
k>Co Sid 



er- 



By Larry L Jones 




The big secret to having a green 
thumb is knowing how often to 
feed and water your plants 
(most people water too often, which 
kills them faster than not watering 
often enough). Also important is 
knowing how much light to give each 
plant, If you have a variety of plants, 
it can be a real hassle remembering the 
requirements of each. 

Plantiog is a file program for the 
Color Computer with at least 16K that 
remembers individual plant require- 
ments for you. Though most of the 
menu options are self-explanatory, I 
will go through each of them for those 
who are new to database-type pro- 
grams. 



Larry Jones is a self-taught pro- 
grammer. He is currently working 
toward degrees in English and compu- 
ter information systems at the Univer- 
sity of Southern Indiana in Evansville. 



Menu Options 

After loading Plantiog, the menu 
appears on the screen; the first option, 
LOAD FILE, is in inverse letters. 
Each time the space bar is pressed the 
next option appears in inverse and the 
previous option returns to normal 
print* Press ENTER when the option 
desired is in inverse letters. The menu 
then wraps around, that is, when you 
reach the last option, press the space 
bar again and you will be back on 
LOAD FILE. If ENTER is pressed for 
the wrong option, don't worry — each 
time you press ENTER from the menu 
you get a Y/N prompt; if you answer 
'N', nothing happens and you can 
make another choice. 

LOAD FILE: This lets you load 
information from a previously saved 
file (more on that later). You may 
specify the filename or simply press 
ENTER if the file is saved as PLDAT. 
You may load a file from tape or disk. 

SAVE FILE: This allows you to 
save an information file you have 
entered using the ADD TO FILE 




option. Again, you may specify the 
filename or press ENTER to save the file 
as PhD AT, and you may save the file 
to tape or disk. 

CHECK TODAY: This option is 
very handy. After loading your file, 
this option prompts for the date (be 
sure to enter all dates in day/mpnth/ 
year separated by slash marks and use 
double digits, for example: 01 / 12/85). 
Plantiog then compares the date with 
the next water and feed dates of each 
plant in the file. If any are due or 
overdue, it prints that plant's record 
on the screen and asks if you want to 
update the water and feed dates. You 
should water/ feed the plant in ques- 
tion and enter 'Y' in reply to the 
prompt. The program automatically 
updates the next water and feed dates 
for that plant. This procedure is re- 
peated for each plant that is due, then 
you are returned to the menu. If you 
have updated a record, be sure to save 
your new file by choosing the SAVE 
FILE option. 

LOOK ALL: This allows you to 




THE RAINBOW 





look at your entire file. Each record is 
printed on the screen; when you are 
ready to see the next record, press any 
key. When you reach the file's end, you 
are returned to the menu. 

LOOK ONE: If this option is chosen, 
you are shown all the plant names in 
your file and asked to enter the name 
of the plant whose record you wish to 
see. That record is printed on the screen 
and you may press any key to return to 
the menu. 

CHANGE ENTRY: This lets you 
correct misspellings or change the 
elapsed time between watering or feed- 
ing (in case your guess or the book was 
wrong). You are shown the names of the 
plants in the file and asked which 
contains the line you want to change. 
Enter the plant name and that record is 
printed on the screen. You are then 
asked which line you want to change. 
Enter the label (plant name, light, etc.), 
the old line is printed at the bottom of 
the screen, and you are asked to enter 
the corrected line. Next, you are asked 
if you want the old line replaced by the 
new line. If you answer *Y\ the change 
will be made; if you answer 'N\ no 
changes are made. You may press 'M' 
to return to the menu. Remember, if a 
change is made you must save the new 
file or the change will not be recorded. 

ADD TO FILE: This option is used 
to create a new file or add to an existing 
file. If you wish to create a new file, do 
not load a previously saved file but go 
directly to ADD TO FILE. If you wish 
to add to a previously saved file, load 
the file then choose the ADD TO FILE 
option. You are shown the record 
number (T for a new file or 1 plus the 
number of records in an old file) and 
prompted to enter the necessary infor- 



mation for each record. This option 
asks for plant name, light, type of food, 
last water date, number of days between 
watering, last feed date and number of 
days between feeding. The last input 
allows you to enter any comments or 
reminders. ADD TO FILE automati- 
cally computes the next water and feed 
dates. You may add as many new re- 
cords as desired as long as the total for 
that file does not exceed 50. When 
finished, enter *** at the plant name 
prompt and you are returned to the 
menu, at which time you should save the 
new or expanded file. 

DELETE FROM FILE: Even the 
best of us lose one every now and then. 
This option lets you remove the 
unpleasant memory from the file. You 
are shown the plant names in the file 
and asked which you wish to remove. 
Enter the name of the plant and you are 
asked if you really want to delete that 
record. If you answer 'Y\ the record 
ceases to exist and each record with a 
higher number is dropped down one to 
fill the gap. You are returned to the 
menu where you should save the new 
(shorter) file. If you answer *N' to the 
delete prompt, you are returned to the 
menu with no changes. 

All sequential files work more or less 
the same, so if you are interested in 
learning how to write a file program you 
might want to study Plantlog. The REM 
statements tell what lines do what. The 
variable list is shown in Figure 1. 

Plantlog makes it easier to care for 
your plants, and if you don't have any, 
this program gives you some ideas on 
how to brighten up that dreary compu- 
ter room. Plants not only brighten up 
a room, but also give off oxygen. When 
you are programming, you need all of 



Figure 1 



Variables 


Function 


Ml$ array 


Menu options (capi- 




tals) 


M2$ array 


Menu options (in- 




verse) 


L$ array 


Labels (plant name, 




etc.) 


E$ array 


Holds file after load- 




ing 


TI$ 


Title 


F$ 


Filename (LORD- 




SflVE) 


TD$ 


Today's date (check 




today) 


C$ 


Line to change 




(change entry) 


CIS 


New line (change 




entry) 


DV$ 


Device (tape-disk) 


LN$ 


Prints a line on the 




screen 


Y$ 


Used for all yes/ no 




prompts 




Number of records in 




file 


NF 


Number of fields in 




record 


L array 


Used to center menu 




option on screen 


ED/EM/EY 


Day/ month/ year en- 




tered (check today) 


DW/MW/Y1 


Water day/ month/ 




year (check today) 


DF/MF/YF 


Feed day/ month/ year 




(check today) 



the oxygen you can get! 

(Any questions about this program 
may be directed to the author at 1713 
Delmar Avenue, Evans ville, IN 47712, 
phone 812-424-1026. When writing, 
please enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 




The listing: PLRNTLOG 



90 .. 
240 . 
300 . 
440 . 
560 . 
END 



138 
.33 
239 
84 
208 
.18 



T 



10 CLEAR:CLEARlj3j3j3:NR=5j3:NF=lj3:M 
U=8 : DIME$ (NR,NF) : LN$=STRING$ (32 , 
45) :TI$="plant log " 
2j3 REM get labels 

3J3 FORX=l TONF:READL$ (X) : NEXT: DA 
TA PLANT NAME, LIGHT, CURRENT FOOD 
, LAST WATER DATE , # DAYS WAIT(W), 
next water date, LAST FEED DATE , # 
DAYS WAIT (F), next feed date, COM 

MENTS 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 125 



-:v. ' ■•'\v'--..' ! '--V-^--V-. ' - V . i^-'v' ' '- 




The Complete Rainbow Guide To OS-9 

: The book that demystifies the state-of-the-art operating system 
for the Tandy Color Computer Authors Date L, Puckett and Peter 
pllibte show you how to take advantage of OS-9's multi-tasking 
and multi-user features, and the capability of redirecting input 
and output commands at will. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide 
packed with hints and tips, tutorials and free software in the form 

Book $19.95, Disk $31.00 (2 disks, book not included} 



The Rainbow Book of Adventures 

A collector's item containing 14 winning programs from the 
rainbow's very first Adventure contest Includes such favorites 
as Sir Randolf of the Moors, Search for the Ruby Chalice, 0||§ 
of the York, Horror House, One Room, The Door and Dr. Avatoe. 
Plus, hints and tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $7.95. Tape $7.95 



Features 20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
Simulation programming competition. You are the Commander- 
in-Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, an air 
traffic controller at one of the nation's busiest airports, the owner 
of your own software business, a civil defense coordinator in 
gchai^'bf :savihg Rainbow City from a raging flood, a scientist 
5londucting experiments on Mars . . . Your wits are on the line. 
Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Our newest arrival features 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
games ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue 
Meanies, find a hidden fortune, or win the heart of a beautiful 
and mysterious princess. Experience the thrills and chills of the 
most rugged Adventurer without ever leaving your seat. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castte, Curse of Karos, Island 
and morel 

Book $13,95, Tape $13.95 




Coming soon 



c<.f;^*rf^,,., 

-v'.V ■■■<>; 




» 




/ want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

(book only) $1 9.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) $31 .00 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) $ 7.95 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) $ 7.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13.95 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape $13.95 

Add $1 .50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 

Outside U.S., add $4.00 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 4 weeks for delivery) Total 



Name 




Address 

City 

State _ 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 











mrnmrn 









Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 





tail to: Ratfi&ow Bookshelf, The Falsoit Building, P.O. Box Prospect, KY 40059. To order by phone, calk (502) 

Please ^ole - The 19 pes a no ..disks offered by The Rainbow &oohsri&l' are not siartd-alono i>r-o<Jucls. Thai is, the/ are I Mended to b& an 
adjunct ana connpleme^t to the books. Even Jf you buy ine tape or d^sk, /ou *i(r sllli n&&d tha appropriale book, 
is a re$i sirred iradBmark of ilt& Mitroware Systems Corporation. 




TEM THEN enter" ; : 1=1 : Y=128+ (1*32 
)+L(l) 

90 REM scroll title 

Ij3j3 FORX=l TO100:IFINT(X/10)=X/1 

0 THENPRINT@11,RIGHT$(TI$,LEN(TI 

$)-X/10) ; :PRINTLEFT$(TT$,X/1J3) 

11J3 REM get menu input 

120 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=CHR$(32)THEN1 

3J3 ELSEIFI$=CHR$(13)THEN15p ELSE 

NEXT: GOTO 1J3J3 

130 PRINT@Y,M1$(I) :I=I+1:IFI>MU 
THENI=1 

140 Y=128+(I*32)+L(I) :PRINT@Y,M2 
$(I) :GOTO100 

150 PRINT @Y+LEN (Ml$ ( I) ) , " ( Y/N) " ; 

: INPUTY$ : IFY$="N" THENPRINT6Y+LE 

N(M1$(I) ) ,STRING$(6,32) :GOTO100 

ELSEIFY$<>"Y" THEN 150 

160 REM check for empty file buf 

fer 

170 IFIOI ANDI<>7 THENG0SUB7 2 0 
180 CLS:ON I GOTO 200,230,260,35 
0,390,410,460,510 

190 REM load file 

200 GOSUB580:OPEN"I", #DV,F$:FORX 

=1 TONR : F0RY=1 TONF: INPUT #DV,E$ ( 

X,Y) :IFE$(X,1)= H ***"THEN210 ELSE 

NEXTY : NEXTX 

210 CLOSE#DV:GOTO80 

220 REM save file 

230 G0SUB5 80 : OPEN" 0 " , # DV , F $ : FORX 
=1 TONR: F0RY=1 TONF : WRITE # DV , E $ ( 

X,Y) :IFE$(X,1)="***"THEN240 ELSE 

NEXTY : NEXTX 

240 CLOSE #DV:GOTO80 

250 REM check today 

260 PRINT@224,"ENTER TODAY'S DAT 

E (DD/MM/YY) " : INPUTTD$ : IFLEN(TD$ 

)<>8 THENCLS:GOTO2 60 ELSEED=VAL( 

LEFT$ (TD$ ,2) ) : EM=VAL (MID$ (TD$ , 4 , 

6) ) : EY=VAL (RIGHT$ (TD$ , 2 ) ) 

270 F0RZ=1 T0NR:IFE$(Z,1)="***"T 

HEN80 ELSEIFE$(Z,6)=TD$ 0RE$(Z,9 

) =TD$ THENCLS : PRINT : X=Z : G0SUB3 60 

:GOTO290 

280 ED=VAL (LEFT$ (TD$ ,2)): EM=VAL ( 
MID$(TD$,4,6) ) : EY=VAL (RIGHT $ (TD$ 
/2)) 

282 DW=VAL(LEFT$(E$(Z,6) ,2) ) :MW= 
VAL(MID$(E$(Z,6) ,4,6) ) :YW=VAL(RI 
GHT$ (E$ (Z, 6) ,2) ) :DF=VAL(LEFT$ (E$ 
(Z,9) ,2) ) :MF=VAL(MID$(E$(Z,9) ,4, 
6) ) :YF=VAL(RIGHT$(E$(Z,9) ,2) ) :0$ 

=" overdue" 

284 IFEY>YF OR EY>YW THEN289 

285 IFEM>MF OR EM>MW THEN289 




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Disk I to II 20.00 
Tape I to Disk II 

25.00 



%nd DELUXE JOYSTICK 



EXCELLENT FOR COLOR COMPUTER 
USE IT FOR GRAPHICS, GAMES, ETC. 

CoCo owners will appreciate this high quality, 
durable joystick. Open gimbal design ... self- 
centering or free-floating operation. Mechanical 
trims on both axes ... eight foot cable ... firing 
button has lifetime 5,000,000 presses. A two- 
button version of the Deluxe Joystick is available 
for the Tandy 1000. DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 




$27.50 each 
$49.95/ pair 



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SHIPPING will be charged at our ACTUAL COST 
Ohto residents add 5 S*/o Sales Ta* COD add 2 00 



1 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 127 



286 IFED>DW AND EM>=MW OR ED>DF 
AND EM>=MF THEN289 

288 GOTO330 

289 CLS:PRINTO$:X=Z:GOSUB360 

290 PRINT: INPUT "UPDATE WATER (Y/ 
N) ";Y$:IFY$="N"THEN310 ELSEIFY$< 
>"Y"THEN290 

300 Y=6:E$(Z,4)=TD$:GOSUB640 
310 INPUT"UPDATE FEED (Y/N)";Y$: 
IFY$="N"THEN330 ELSEIFY$<>"Y"THE 
N310 

32)3 Y=9 : E$ ( Z , 7 ) =TD$ : GOSUB640 : CLS 
: PRINT : GOSUB3 60 : GOSUB5 6 0 
330 NEXTZ:GOTO80 
340 REM look all 

350 FORX=l TONR: IFE$ (X, 1) =»***»T 
HEN370 ELSECLS:PRINTTAB(9) "file 

entry #"X:PRINTLN$:GOSUB3 60:GOSU 

B5 60 : NEXTX : GOT03 7 0 
360 FORY=l TONF-l:PRINTL$(Y) 11 : » 
E$(X,Y) :NEXTY:PRINTL$(10) ":"E$(X 
,10)1 RETURN 

370 CLS: PRINTTAB (10) "end of file 

" : GOSUB560 : GOTO 80 

380 REM look one 

390 GOSUB620 : CLS : PRINT: GOSUB3 60 : 
GOSUB560:GOTO80 

400 REM change entry 

410 GOSUB620 

420 CLS : PRINT : GOSUB3 60 : PRINT : INP 
UT"LINE TO CHANGE OR M FOR MENU" 
7C$:IFC$="M"THEN80 ELSEFORY=l TO 
NF:IFL$(Y)=C$ THEN4 3 0 ELSENEXTY: 
GOTO420 

430 PRINTL$ (Y) " : "E$ (X, Y) : PRINT" 
NEW "C$; :INPUTC1$:IFLEN(C1$)<1 T 
HEN430 ELSEE$(X,Y)=C1$:IFY=4 ORY 
=7 THENZ=X:Y=Y+2:GOSUB640 
440 INPUT"IS THIS CORRECT (Y/N) " 
?Y$:IFY$="N"THEN430 ELSEIFY$="Y" 
THEN4 2 0 ELSE440 
450 REM add to file 
460 FORX=l TONR:IFE$(X,l)="***"0 
RE$(X,1)=""THEN470 ELSENEXTX : PRI 
NTTAB (11) "file full":GOSUB560:GO 
TO80 

4 10 FORZ=X TONR : CLS : PRINTTAB ( 9 ) " 

file entry #"Z:PRINTLN$; -.PRINT "d 
ates must be: day/month/year. d 
ouble digits separated by / e 
xample (01/02/85) " :FORY=l TONF 

480 IFY=6 ORY=9 THENGOSUB640 : PRI 
NTL$ (Y) " : "E$ (Z, Y) :NEXTY 
490 PRINTL$ ( Y ) " : " ; : INPUTE$ (Z , Y) 
: IFE$ (Z , 1) ="***" THEN8 0 : NEXT Y : NEX 
TZ ELSENEXTY:NEXTZ:CLS:PRINT@246 
,"file full":GOSUB560:GOTO80 

500 REM delete from file 

510 GOSUB620: CLS: PRINT :GOSUB3 60: 



PRINT: INPUT "DELETE THIS ENTRY (Y 
/N) " ; Y$ : IFY$="N"THEN80 ELSEIFY$< 
>"Y"THEN510 

520 CLS :PRINT§22 4 , "DELETING "PN$ 



ii 



www 

530 FORZ=X TONR:FORY=l TONF:E$(Z 
,Y)=E$(Z+1,Y) :NEXTY:IFE$(Z,1)="* 
**"THEN550 
540 NEXTZ 

550 PRINT :PRINTPN$" HAS BEEN DEL 
ETED" : GOSUB560 : GOT08 0 

560 PRINT@485, "any key to contin 
ue" ; 

570 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=»"THEN570 ELS 
E RETURN 

580 PRINT@234,"tAPE OR dISK";:IN 
PUTDV$ : IFDV$="T"THENDV$="TAPE" :D 
V=-l ELSEIFDV$="D"THENDV$="DISK" 
:DV=1 ELSE580 

590 PRINT@289, "FILENAME OR <ENTE 
R> FOR PLDAT": PRINTTAB (12) ; : INPU 
TF $ : I FLEN ( F $ ) =0 THENF $= " PLDAT " : P 
RINT@334,F$ ELSEIFLEN (F$) >8 THEN 
590 

600 PRINT: PRINTTAB (2) "READY "DV$ 
" AND PRESS enter"; :INPUTY$:RETU 
RN 

610 REM look for entry 

620 FORX=l TONR STEP2 : IFE$ (X, 1) = 
»***» THEN625 ELSEPRINTE$ (X, 1) " 
- "; :IFE$(X+1 / 1)="***"THEN625 EL 
SEPRINTE$(X+1, 1) :NEXT 
625 PRINT : PRINTLN$ 7 : INPUT " PLANT 
NAME"7PN$:IFLEN(PN$)<1 THEN 6 20 E 
LSEFORX=l TONR+l:IFE$(X,l)=PN$ T 
HENRETURN 

630 IFE$(X,l)="***"ORX=NR+l THEN 
PRINT: PRINTPN$" NOT FOUND" :GOSUB 
560:GOTO80 ELSENEXT 
640 D=VAL(E$ (Z , Y-l) ) :DD=VAL(LEFT 
$(E$(Z,Y-2) ,2) ) :DM=VAL(MID$(E$(Z 
,Y-2) ,4,6) ) :DY=VAL(RIGHT$(E$(Z,Y 
-2), 2)) 

650 DD=DD+D : IFDM=2 ANDDD>28 THEN 

DD=DD-28 : DM=DM+ 1 : GOTO 6 80 
660 IFDM=1 ORDM=3 ORDM=5 ORDM=7 
0RDM=8 OR DM=10 ORDM=12 THEN I FDD 
>31 THENDD=DD-31:DM=DM+1:GOTO680 
670 IFDD>30 THENDD=DD-30 : DM=DM+1 
680 IFDM>12 THENDM=1 : DY=DY+1 
690 DD$=MID$(STR$(DD) ,2) :IFLEN(D 
D$)=l THENDD$="0"+DD$ 
700 DM$=MID$ (STR$ (DM) ,2) :IFLEN(D 
M$)=l THENDM$="0"+DM$ 
710 DY$=MID$(STR$(DY) ,2) :E$(Z,Y) 
=DD$+" / "+DM$+ " / "+DY$ : RETURN 
720 CLS:IFE$(1,1)="" THENPRINT@2 
31, "file buffer empty" :GOSUB560: 

GOTO80 ELSERETURN 



128 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 



The publishers of the Rainbow 
are taking an interest 
in a different type of programming 




THE HOME VID 



t;:.iil ; , j-|tfrM; 



Previews of More Than 70 Nsw Tepee 
Taperi' Guide to Network find GaWe 



"ifwiif 





Yes, I'm ready for some real entertainment! Send 
the next 12 issues of VCR to my door. 

Subscribe now for only $15 and save 36% off the regular newsstand price. 



Name _ 
Address 
City 



□ My check in the amount of 



State 



is enclosed. (In order to 



hold down costs/we do not bill.) 
Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Exp. Date 

Signature _ — 

♦Subscriptions to VCR are $15 a year in the United States. Canadian rate is U,S. $22. Air mail rate elswhere is U.S. 
$60. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 5 tcj/6 weeks for first copy. Kentucky residents add 
5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



That's right. We've decided 
that programs like Shenani- 
gans and Symphony 12 aren't 
the only great ones around. There 
are also Silver Streak and Star Trek 
and Some Like It Hot — software 
of a different sort. 

That's why we've published 
VCR, The Home Video Monthly, 
the magazine for the new gener- 
ation of home viewers. 

Home video has evolved 
beyond the "hacker" era, when 
you needed a degree in electron- 
ics just for a little entertainment. 
Most people don't care about how 
the signal-to-noise ratio and wow- 
and-flutter specs of their equip- 
ment compare to the latest mod- 
els. They simply want to know how 
best to use and enjoy the equip- 
ment that they have. 

And that is what VCR offers — 
how to get the very best in home 
entertainment from your equip- 
ment. 

Each month, VCR brings you 
previews and ratings of every new 
offering on tape and disc: music 
videos, children's shows, how-to 
guides, and movies, movies, mo- 
vies. 

We tell you which shows the 
critics themselves will be taping on 
the networks and cable, along with 
tips from the experts on how to get 
the best possible reproductions. 
And you can turn to us for the 
answers to your questions, ranging 
from the trivial to the technical. 

Even more, each month we fea- 
ture exclusive interviews with the 
stars and the star-makers, along 
with articles designed to help you 
relive some of your fondest video 
"memories" of the past. 

Yes, programming is more than 
spreadsheets and databases. And 
we know you'll want to be a char- 
ter subscriber to the guide to the 
very best in entertainment soft- 
ware. 



Mail to: VCR, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 




This program is for the fisherman 
who can't select the right lure to 
use. After you enter the condi- 
tions, it selects from over 1,000 different 
combinations of the body type, weight 
of sinker, metal color, base color and 
how to retrieve it. Bassmate should run 
on a 4K standard CoCo and answers the 
question, "Which lure should I use 
today?" 

How To Use It 

When you run Bassmate it plays some 
music then asks for the conditions 
(season and water temperature, water 
depth, time of day, cover, water clarity 
and wind). Then CoCo computes your 
answers and produces the right lure. 



Fishing with a Plastic Worm 

When it's early and there is a grass 
cover, the program will select a worm. 
Actually, worm fishing can be done in 
almost any kind of conditions and 
should be used at least half of the time 
when bass fishing. Here's what happens 

Tommy Grouser is 14 and a ninth 
grader at Dunbar Junior High in Dun- 
bar, West Virginia. His hobbies are 
fishing, playing tennis, building models 
and programming his CoCo. 




/ 






A 












PRICKLY- PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-100 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED 



HALL OF THE KING 

This program combines all the things you look for in a great 
two disk graphics adventure program. The Hi-Res graphics 
are superbly done. The text portion of the screen and the 
graphics change quickly as you move through the HALL 
OF THE KING. You can move freely from one portion of 
the adventure to another. Call up your inventory at any 
time. You can even save or load a game at AN Y time. HALL 
OF THE KING will challenge even the most seasoned 
adventurer. 

HALL OF THE KING requires 64K EB and one disk drive. 
This exciting two disk adventure comes packaged in a 
vinyl case $39.95 

HALL OF THE KING II - THE INNER CHAMBER 

Continue your quest for the Earthstone in The Inner 
Chambers of the HALL OF THE KING. Outstanding 
graphics help show the way to success in your search to 
help restore the legendary power of the Earthstone to the 
dwarven race. The deeper you travel into the inner 
chambers, the more difficult your progress becomes. 
HALL OF THE KING II has all the fine feature of the first 
adventure. It is designed to follow the original HALL OF 
THE KING but may be played as a stand-alone adventure. 
The adventure fills two disks and comes packaged in a 
handsome vinyl folder. It requires one disk drive and 64K. 
$39.95 

WARP FACTOR X 

If you have been waiting for a game for you r color computer 
that has everything, your wait is over. WARP FACTOR X is 
here. This all graphics simulation game requires strategy, 
fast thinking, an eye for detail, and above all experience in 
knowing the capabilities of your starship and its computer. 
(See review in Feb. 85 issue of Rainbow.) It requires 32K 
one disk drive and comes packaged in a vinyl library case. 
$34.95 

DARKMOOR HOLD 

You and your comrades will explore the levels of Darkmoor 
Hold in an effort to gain great riches and defeat the dark 
wizard. The Wizard will soon realize the threat you pose 
and the many monsters you meet and battle will become 
stronger and more powerful as you move through the 10 
levels of Darkmoor. A keen eye will help you find weapons 
and armor to aid your battle along with treasures for you to 
keep. Your party consists of a Dwarf, an Elf, and you, the 
Human, each with their own special attributes. The 
weapons, armor and treasure are placed randomly in each 
level to provide a new challenge each time you play. You 
may also save the game you are playing since defeating 
the evil Wizard is not an easy task. It has great graphics 
and an impressive text screen to give you more fun than a 
barrel of elves. Requires 64KEB and 1 disk drive. $29.95 




DRAGON BLADE 

Animated Graphics Adventure 

This 100% hi-res graphics adventure features many 
animated screens which will delight the avid adventurer. 
You search for the magic Blade which is the only way to rid 
your homeland of the fearsome dragon which has risen 
from a long rest to terrorize your village. Fi(( your screen 
with super graphics as your try to solve the difficult 
challenge the village leaders have set before you. Dragon 
Blade requries 64K Extended Basic and 1 disk drive. 
$29.95 

UTILITIES 

Microartist — Ver. 2.1 — see the review in the Dec. 85 
issue of Rainbow. Req. 32k and joystick. TAPE — $24.95 
DISK — $29.95 

Disk Zapper — Ver. 1 .8. The best. Edit and examine disks 
directly, use up to 40 tracks full copy utility allows easy 
transfer of files from disk to disk, format any number of 
tracks, and lots more. $29.95 

Oracle II — The ultimate monitor, $29.95 

RTD Trio — Take advantage of this special offer. This 
package of three utility programs includes our new DISK 
TO TAPE, TAPE TO DISK (version 2.0), and ROMFREE 
(version 2.0). TAPE TO DISK moves BASIC, ML and DATA 
files from tape to disk automatically — one program or an 
entire tape. It even fixes those programs that load at hex 
600 so they work on a disk system. ROMFREE moves 
ROM packs to tape or disk easily, and fixes them so you 
just load and EXEC. ROMFREE now accomodates the 
larger 1 6K ROM packs. You won't believe how easy it is to 
protect your software library! These programs are shipped 
on tape. Requires 1 6K. $49.95 ($24.95 each if purchased 
separately) 

Prickly Pear Maillist — Ver. 2.0 — You won't find a mailing 
list program anywhere that will out-perform this one. Req. 
32K and one disk drive. Only $29.95 



I 



POLICY ON PROTECTION — We 
believe our customers are honest 
— all of our software can be 
backed up using standard back- 
up procedures. 



Your personal check is welcome 
— no delay. Include $1,50 ship- 
ping for each order. AZ residents 
add 5% sales tax. Orders shipped 
within two days. 



Dealer and author inquiries are 
always welcome. Canadian deal- 
ers should contact Kelly Software 
Distributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 1 1 932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1 (403) 
421-8003. 



FOR QUESTIONS OR ORDER CALL 602-749-2864 
SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG OF 
GREAT COCO PROGRAMS 



Stocked by Quality Dealers, or 

Send Order To PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

2640 N. Conestoga Ave. 
Tucson, Arizona 85749 
(602) 749-2864 




when a worm passes a bass: The bass 
stays in place and sucks in the worm 
from as far away as 15 inches. 

The worm jumps into its mouth 
because of the powerful outward thrust 
made with both gills when its mouth 
opens, which creates a forceful suction. 
It takes less than 1/24 of a second. 



When you feel the tug on your worm, 
set the hook with all your muscle. You 
must do it before the bass blows it back 
out. If you don't catch it, don't worry. 
It's only a part of the game. 
Conclusion 

The lures the program picks usually 
catch bass, but will also catch walleye, 



big trout, northern pike, pickerel and 
salmon. Don't be surprised if you end 
up catching an award-winning fish. 

If you have any questions or prob- 
lems send an SASE, or if you just want 
to tell me the biggest fish you've ever 
caught, write to 112 Greenbrier Lane, 
Dunbar, WV 25064. □ 




130 171 

310 7 

530 96 

690 109 

END 23 



The listing: BRS5MRTE 

1 REM************************** 

2 REM* * * * * TRS-80 ***** 

3 REM***** bassmate ***** 

4 REM***** BY ***** 

5 REM***** TOMMY CROUSER ***** 

6 REM************************** 



THE EXPERTS AGREE 

"The non-programming beginner can use it to do useful calculations without 
learning a lot of programming and the experienced programmer can make the 
program do some complex and powerful jobs with relative ease ... I use the 
program often to do things which would otherwise take more time." 

Donald Mcgarry, RAINBOW 
"An advanced programmable calculator. CoCo Solver may be the most versatile 
package ever developed for the Color Computer." 

Gary Clemens, Hot CoCo 
"In my 20 years of mainframe experience, I've never seen anything like it." 

H. Lawrence Elman, Hot CoCo 

CoCo Solver And The Program Generator 

A user says "My son uses it for math and science homework, especially when 
there's a test." We like it because it is fun, easy to use and is surely the best 
calculator anywhere. 



NEW 

FOUR YEARS IN DEVELOPMENT — This unprotected disk contains 34 granules 
of programs, designed by a professional engineer, to be the best data base 
program for you. What package is this? 

COCO BASE I — A DATA BASE MANAGER — TEN 32K PROGRAMS which are: 

THE BEST AT INPUT — Our screen editor makes keyboard entry a snap. 

THE BEST AT OUTPUT — You'll marvel at the reports you'll produce. 

THE BEST AT SHARING INFORMATION — Create report files with information 
from as many other files as you wish. Never re-key data. You'll be suprised 
how easily you can move specific data items around. Let one file update 
another. 

THE BEST POWER — All the string and numeric functions and operators 

necessary for you to make any comparison or calculation with your data. 
THE BEST AT COMPATIBILITY — Works with all CoCo printers, and all operating 
systems. Compatible with any data base you've set up with Basic and with 
most ASCII files as well. 

600 records of 1000 characters maximum. Field length to 255. 
A WORKHORSE! YOU'LL USE IT OFTEN BECAUSE IT WORKS SO WELL. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK. 



CoCo Solver . . . tape or disk . . . REG. $49.95 ... on sale for $39.95 
COCO BASE I . . . disk only . . . $49.95 
SALE ENDS MAY 15 . . . ACT NOW 
32K and Extended Basic required . . , Add $2 for shipping. 
Tennessee residents add sales tax please. 



JTJ ENTERPRISES 
P.O. Box 110841 
Nashville, Tennessee 37211 

No delay on check or money order. Sorry, no credit cards. 



10 CLS 

20 PRINT " 

e 



TRS-80 bassmat 



BY 



TOMMY CROUSER 



it 

30 
40 
50 
60 
E" 
70 
80 



PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 



ii 



ii 



FOR" 



rainbow MAGAZIN 



FOR S=l TO 5 

SOUND 100, 5: SOUND 130, 3: SOUND 
100, 5: SOUND 80, 3: SOUND 130, 5: SO 
UND 160, 3: SOUND 130, 5: SOUND 100, 
3 

90 NEXT S 

100 SOUND 100, 5: SOUND 130,3:SOUN 
D 100, 5: SOUND 80,3 
110 CLS 

"SEASON: 1>SPRING (WT: 

2>SUMMER (WT: 
3>FALL (WT: 
4>WINTER (WT: 



120 PRINT 
35-55 F) 
55-80 F) 
40-60 F) 
15-35 F) 



WT: WATER TEMPERATURE 



•i 



PRINT 
INPUT SEA 

IF SEA<1 OR SEA>4 THEN 110 
CLS 

PRINT "WATER DEPTH (FT) : 



1>1 
2>1 
3>3 



130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
-12 
3-29 
0-60" 
180 PRINT 
190 INPUT WD 

200 IF WD<1 OR WD>3 THEN 160 
210 CLS 

220 PRINT "TIME OF DAY: 1>EARLY 

2>MID-DA 
Y 3>LATE" 
230 PRINT 
240 INPUT TD 

250 IF TD<1 OR TD>3 THEN 210 
260 CLS 

270 PRINT "COVER: 1>TIMBER 

2>ROCKS 



132 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



3>GRASS 
4>N0NE" 

28J3 PRINT 
290 INPUT COV 

300 IF C0V<1 OR COV>4 THEN 260 
310 CLS 

320 PRINT "WATER CLARITY: 1>MUDD 

Y 2>MURK 

Y 3>CLEA 
R" 

330 PRINT 
340 INPUT WC 

350 IF WC<1 OR WC>3 THEN 310 
360 CLS 

370 PRINT "WIND: 1>CALM 

2>MODERATE 
3>STRONG" 

380 PRINT 
390 INPUT W 

400 IF W<1 OR W>3 THEN 360 
410 CLS 

420 FOR Y=l TO 100 

430 PRINT@203, "computing"; 

440 PRINT@RND(512) ,"*"; 
450 SOUND RND(255),1 
460 NEXT Y 
470 CLS 

480 PRINT "BODY TYPE:" 

490 IF COV=l AND TD=1 THEN PRINT 

"chugger" 

500 IF COV=l AND TD=2 THEN PRINT 

"spoon": GOTO 610 
510 IF C0V=1 AND TD=3 THEN PRINT 

"lizard": GOTO 610 

520 IF COV=2 AND TD=1 THEN PRINT 

"jig": GOTO 610 
530 IF COV=2 AND TD=2 THEN PRINT 

"grub": GOTO 610 
540 IF COV=2 AND TD=3 THEN PRINT 

"buzzbait":GOTO 610 

550 IF COV=3 AND TD=1 THEN PRINT 

"worm" : GOTO 610 

560 IF C0V=3 AND TD=2 THEN PRINT 

"spinner": GOTO 610 

570 IF COV=3 AND TD=3 THEN PRINT 

"minnow" : GOTO 610 
580 IF C0V=4 AND WD=1 THEN PRINT 

"shallow crankbait" :GOTO 610 

590 IF COV=4 AND WD=2 THEN PRINT 

"midwater crankbait" : GOTO 610 

600 IF C0V=4 AND WD=3 THEN PRINT 

"deepwater crankbait" 
610 PRINT "WEIGHT OF SINKER:" 
620 IF WD=1 AND W=l OR WD=1 AND 
W=2 THEN PRINT "1/8": GOTO 670 
630 IF WD=1 AND W=3 OR WD=2 AND 
W=l THEN PRINT "l/4":GOTO 670 
640 IF WD=2 AND W=2 OR WD=2 AND 



W=3 THEN PRINT "3/8": GOTO 670 



650 

W=2 

660 

1" 

670 

680 



IF WD=3 AND W=l OR WD=3 AND 
THEN PRINT "1/2": GOTO 670 
IF WD=3 AND W=3 THEN PRINT 



PRINT "COLOR:" 

IF WC=1 THEN PRINT 



"f luoresc 



"gold": GO 
"silver" 



ent":GOTO 710 
690 IF WC=2 THEN PRINT 
TO 710 

700 IF WC=3 THEN PRINT 
710 PRINT "BASE COLOR:" 
720 IF SEA=1 OR SEA=3 THEN PRINT 

"medium": GOTO 750 
730 IF SEA=2 THEN PRINT "light": 
GOTO 750 

740 IF SEA=4 THEN PRINT "dark" 
750 PRINT "RETRIEVE:" 
760 IF TD=1 THEN PRINT "slow": GO 
TO 790 

770 IF TD=2 THEN PRINT 
OTO 790 

780 IF TD=3 THEN PRINT 
ii 

790 INPUT "AGAIN" ;A$ 
800 IF A$="Y"OR A$="YES"THEN 110 
ELSE END /R\ 



" jerky" :G 
"moderate 




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April 1986 THE RAINBOW 133 



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1-800-635-0300 



Locating Points 
on a Graph 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This month's article presents a program that enables 
students to practice locating points on all four 
quadrants of a graph. 
A good start to understanding graphs is a simple number 
line, as shown in Example 1. This beginner's number line 
deals only with positive numbers. The arrow at the end of 
line indicates that the line could go on and on. Students may 
practice simple addition and subtraction on such number 
lines. They can solve them mentally or may count fingers 
to figure out the solution of examples such as 3 + 2 or 4 
-3. 







Example 1 


--.--> 


9 


* 

l 


• « • 

2 3 4 


5 



Often, the next step in this skill is to introduce negative 
numbers (Example 2). We can do this by extending a 
number line to include numbers less than zero. Understand- 
ing of negative numbers can be enhanced by using the 
analogy of temperatures falling below zero degrees. Again, 
examples may be practiced either mentally or using fingers 
to count out the answer. 




Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional and gifted children, 
holds two master's degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handicapped. He owns 
Computer Island and lives in Staten Island, New York. 



The next step in this learning process is to describe a point 
in relation to both the 'X' and *Y* axes. This, of course, 
normally takes place several grades later in school. (We are 
condensing several grades into a mini-course for the 
purposes of this article.) The lower left-hand corner 
indicates the (0,0) location. We count across to get the 'X' 
location and up to get the 'Y' location. Example 3 below 
has three points to find for practice. 



Example 3 





! 


1 




! 


! 


3 


I — 

■ 












! 


! 






! 




! 


f 

• 






i 

• 


2 


C — 


---!--- 






» 




f 

* 


i 

■ 






! 




! 


! 






! 


1 


!--• 






---A-- 


* 




! 


! 






f 




! 


! 






f 


9 


! 


• 




i 


• 




0 


1 


2 


3 


4 



Point A is located at position 3,1. 
Point B is at position 4,3. 

Point C is a little bit tricky. It is a zero amount across 
on the horizontal axis and two places up on the vertical axis. 
It is therefore at position 0,2. 



The last step in this learning utilizes all four quadrants 
(Example 4). The 0,0 position and axes lines run through 
the middle of this graph creating the four quadrants. The 
top right-hand quadrant is often referred to as Quadrant 
L. We continue to count counter-clockwise to the other 
quadrants. Quadrant four is the bottom right-hand 
quadrant. 



1 36 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



Example 4 



Quadrant 2 



! 



-3 



+2 



B 



+1 



Quadrant 1 
! ! 



-2! 



-1! 



-l 



-2 



-3 



1! 



3! 



D 



Quadrant 3 



Quadrant 4 



Point A is located at position +2,+2. 
Point B is located at position ~2,+ 1 . 
Point C is located at position -3,-3; 
Point D is located at position +1>*5& 



Our program asks students to locate a given point on a 
graph that demonstrates all four quadrants. If correct, 
another point appears. If incorrect, the child may try again 
until correct. We feel this is the type of skill area that most 
middle-grade students can master completely with time. At 
any rate, this skill (at this level of sophistication) soon 
becomes an all or nothing proposition. Therefore, we made 
no attempt at any kind of scoring. 

We ask that students be requested to indicate a sign before 
each number. Positive numbers, as well as zero, are 
commonly assumed to be positive. We felt, however, that 
it is a good practice to include a sign before each number. 
The extra effort involved in placing the sign can result in 
better comprehension of the skill in the long run. 

Lines 460-660 store graphics representations of the 
letters, numbers and signs that we will need. They are stored 
as strings for easy drawing of them later. Lines 60-160 draw 
lines of the graph. Lines 170-240 select and draw a random 
point on the graph. This point is represented to the 
computer by the letters 'C and 'D\ 

Lines 300-400 get and interpret the student's answer. This 
answer is represented to the computer as 'M' and 'N\ If 
M=C and N=D, then the child is correct and a happy tune 
is played. If incorrect, the child's answer is erased and a new 
answer may be entered for the same example. 

The program may be continued or ended after a correct 
answer. Pressing the 'E' key ends the program; pressing any 
other key presents a new example. We at Computer Island 
hope this program helps your child or students to better 
understand and enjoy this type of graph. □ 



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For information on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 788-0681. 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 137 



^ — 

240 204 

360 153 

END 21 



The listing: GRAPH 



10 REM" FINDING POINTS ON A GRAPH 
ii 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 
D, NY, 1986" 

30 PCLS:SCREEN1,1:PM0DE4,1:CIRCL 

E(128,96) , 10:PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

40 CLEAR 3000 

50 GOSUB 460 

60 FOR T= 1 TO 10 

70 LINE(20+L,5)-(20+L,120) , PSET 

80 L=L+24 

90 NEXT T 

100 FOR T=l TO 7 

110 LINE ( 10 , 10+K) - ( 2 4 5 , 10+K) , PSE 
T 

120 K=K+18 
130 NEXT T 

140 REM" DRAW MIDDLE AXES" 

150 LINE(114, 3)-(118, 122) , PSET, B 

F 

160 LINE(5, 62) -(250, 66) ,PSET,BF 

170 REM"CHOOSE THE POINT" 

180 X= RND(10)-1 

190 A=20+X*24 

200 Y=RND(7)-1 

210 B=10+Y*18 

220 CIRCLE (A, B) ,5 

230 C=X-4:D=Y-4 

240 IF Y=0THEN D=3 ELSE IF Y=l T 
HEN D=2 ELSE IF Y=2 THEN D=l ELS 
E IF Y=3 THEN D=0 ELSE IF Y=4 TH 
EN D=-l ELSE IF Y=5 THEN D=-2 EL 
SE D=-3 

250 DRAW"S8A2BM10, 140 "+W$+H$+E$+ 
R$+E$+SP$+I$+S$+SP$+T$+H$+E$ 
260 DRAW"BM20 , 160"+P$+O$+I$+N$+T 
$+SP$+N$+0$+W$ 

270 COLOR 1: LINE (170, 170) -(240,1 
70) ,PSET 

280 CIRCLE (195, 165) ,5,1,1, .01, .2 

5 

290 DRAW"BM165,155"+SP$ 
300 NN$=INKEY$ 

310 IF NN$="-" THEN DRAW E8$ ELS 



E IF NN$="+" THEN DRAW E9$ ELSE 
300 

320 EN$=INKEY$ 

3 30 IF EN$="0" THEN DRAW E0$ ELS 
E IF EN$="1" THEN DRAW El$ ELSE 
IF EN$="2" THEN DRAW E2$ ELSE IF 
EN$="3" THEN DRAW E3$ ELSE IF E 
N$="4" THEN DRAW E4$ ELSE IF EN$ 
="5" THEN DRAW E5$ ELSE 320 
340 M=VAL (EN$) : IF NN$="-" THEN M 
=-M 

350 DRAW"BM210, 155"+SP$ 
3 60 MM$=INKEY$ 

370 IF MM$="-" THEN DRAW E8$ ELS 
E IF MM$="+" THEN DRAW E9$ ELSE 
360 

380 Z$=INKEY$ 

390 IF Z$="0" THEN DRAW E0$ ELSE 
IF Z$="l" THEN DRAW El$ ELSE IF 
Z$="2" THEN DRAW E2$ ELSE IF Z$ 

="3" THEN DRAW E3$ ELSE IF Z$="4 

" THEN DRAW E4$ ELSE IF Z$="5" T 

HEN DRAW Z5$ ELSE 380 

400 N=VAL(Z$):IF MM$="-" THEN N= 

-N 

410 IF M=C AND N=D THEN PLAY"L10 

CDECDEGGGG" : GOTO 430 

420 IF MOC THEN COLOR 0: LINE(1 

50,150) -(250,180) , PSET, BF:GOTO 2 

70 

430 GN$=INKEY$ 

440 IF GN$="E" THEN 450 ELSE IF 
GN$<>"" THEN RUN ELSE 430 
450 CLS : END 

460 REM" THE LETTERS AND NUMBERS" 
470 E$="BER3U2NL2U2L4BG5BL2" 
480 G$="BUR4U3HL2GDRBG3BL4" 
490 H$="BUU2NU2R4NU2D2BGBL9" 
500 I$="BR2BUU4BU2BD7BL8" 
510 N$="BUU4F4U4BG5BL5" 
520 0$="BEHU2ER2FD2GL2BGBL6" 
530 P$="BER3U2NU2L3GNFBG2BL4" 
540 R$="BEHERNH2R2NU2D2L3BGBL6" 
550 S$="BU2FR2EHL2HER2FBG4BL6" 
560 T$="BUR2NU4R2BDBL10" 
570 W$="BUU4F2E2D4BGBL9" 
580 E0$=O$ 

590 E1$="BE2NU3DEBFBGBL9" 
600 E2$="BENR3HER3U2L4BG5BL" 
610 E3$="BENR3HENR2HER3BG5BL5" 
620 E4$="BENU4E3L4BG4BL2" 
630 E5$="BER4U2L3HER3BG5BL5" 
640 E8$="BR4BU4R4BL12BD4" : 1 MINUS 
SIGN 

650 E9$="BR4BU4R4L2U2D4U2BL12BD4 
": 'PLUS SIGN 

660 SP$="BE4BUBG5BL5" ' ***SPACER 
670 RETURN 



138 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 



Examining the effects of some important trends that 
are beginning to evolve. . . 

The Demographics 
of Education 

By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The field of demography is con- 
cerned with the vital statistics of 
a population — things like 
births, deaths, marriages, income for 
families. Demographic information is 
produced in large quantities by the 
federal government, all state govern- 
ments and many private concerns. 
Demographers use mathematical tech- 
niques to predict future growths of 
populations and to plot trends. Gener- 
ally, these predictions are so accurate 
that we have come to accept them 
almost without question. 

Sometimes demographic reports 
catch a wider public notice than just the 
planners using the information. A 1984 
report from the U.S. Bureau of the 
Census, for example, claimed that only 
four percent of the nation's households 
are traditional — father works, mother 
does not, with two children under 18. 
This finding was supposed to point out 
the changing demographic features of 



Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in a central office of a 
school district and currently is em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



American families. It is true that mod- 
ern families are changing compared 
with their grandparents: more mothers 
work outside the home, family size is 
smaller and couples are having their 
first child at an older age. 

In this particular case, however, the 
finding distorts the truth by the use of 
the term "traditional. " The definition is 
too restrictive. It excludes families we 
would normally consider traditional: 
three-child households; two children, 
one 15 and one 19 (both must be under 
18); etc. Thus, while the interpretation 
is somewhat correct (modern families 
have different demographic characteris- 
tics than families of the past), the case 
is overstated. 

Educational institutions are just one 
segment of society very interested in 
demographic results. Demographic 
findings are used to plan for future 
activities. Those institutions that do not 
plan tend to find themselves having 
difficulty when suddenly confronted 
with a changed population. We should 
not limit our idea of educational insti- 
tutions just to public schools. People 
who develop and sell educational mate- 
rials are also part of this institution, as 
well as private schools, colleges, busi- 
ness schools, etc. 



Over the past 40 years, education has 
become a big business. In 1945, the 
percent of the Gross National Product 
(GNP) spent on all schools — kinder- 
garten through college — was two 
percent. That is two cents out of every 
dollar made in America. In 1975, edu- 
cation's share of the GNP had risen to 
7.7 percent. In 1984, it fell to 6.7 per- 
cent, due in part to declining numbers 
of school-age children. The percent fell, 
but total dollars for education rose from 
$119 billion in 1975 to $245 billion in 
1984. It is no wonder that people in- 
volved in the education industry are 
very interested in projected demograph- 
ic changes. And changes are predicted: 
The market for education (generally, 
children from 5 to 18 years old) is not 
static. 

For the near future, demographic 
predictions indicate a changing propor- 
tion of people in different age groups. 
The number of children aged 6 to 13 will 
increase, while 14- to 17-year-olds will 
decrease. This means elementary 
schools will have more students in the 
future than currently enrolled, while 
secondary schools will have fewer stu- 
dents. 

Within the next decade, little change 
is expected in the number of preschool- 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 139 




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ers. In 1985, 3.7 million births were 
recorded. This will (based on the best 
predictions available now) rise slightly 
until 1990, then fall to 3.5 million births 
by 1995. Based on current information 
and demographic predictions, the 
number of preschoolers (children aged 
1 to 5) for the next decade will be: 

1985 — 17.8 million 
1990— 18.5 million 
1995 — 18.0 million 

The numbers are not the only thing 
changing about future students in the 
schools of this country. The type of 
parent is also changing. There is a 
smaller proportion of households rear- 
ing children today than in the 1970s. 
Most families with several children (as 
opposed to one or two children) are in 
low income groups. 

Right after World War II, this coun- 
try experienced the "baby boom" as 
soldiers returned home and started 
families. These "baby boomers" are 
now having their own children. Even 
though they tend to have fewer children 
than their parents or grandparents, 
because there are so many baby boom- 
ers, the total number of births is grow- 
ing. 

The parents of infants and preschool- 
ers today are interested in education. 
The baby boomers who are now new 
parents are the best-educated genera- 
tion in American history. One out of 
every four men and one out of every five 
women of this generation have a college 
degree. These new parents are creating 
a market for educational products. The 
emphasis is for starting educational 
activities earlier, and having more 
comprehensive activities than ever 
before in our history. 

There is also an emphasis on "quality 
time" with children, especially for 
families with both parents working. 
This term may be less used today than 
a few years ago, but the concept appears 
just as powerful when parents make 
decisions about entertainment and 
purchases for the home. 

This educational market is repre- 
sented by purchases of learning toys, 
books and computer software. The 
buying patterns of parents of infants 
and preschoolers is different than that 
of parents a few decades ago. Parents of 
young children are now taking the role 
of teacher. If you want to see a graphic 
example of this relatively new market, 
visit a toy shop or preschool department 



of a large store. You will notice an 
emphasis on educational toys that just 
a few years ago represented a very small 
market. 

The emphasis on early education is 
expected to continue as children grow. 
Older children (in elementary and per- 
haps even high school) will represent an 
expanding market for educational 
materials sold for home use. It is impos- 
sible, of course, to predict the success or 
failure of a single company such as 
Tandy, but indications are that compu- 
ter hardware and software educational 
products will continue to represent a 
large market until the end of the cen- 
tury. Thus, machines like the Color 
Computer will probably continue to 
enjoy large sales. Also, we should 
expect to see more products (and pro- 



"The baby boomers 
who are now new 
parents are the best- 
educated generation in 
A merican history . . . 
creating a market for 
educational products. 99 



ducers) of educational software for 
younger children, as well as fqr school- 
age children. 

One outcome of the changing demo- 
graphic features of young children is the 
growth in private schools in the past 
decade. The National Center for Edu- 
cation Statistics estimated 5.7 million 
children, aged 3 to 6, were in preprimary 
programs in 1983, up 33 percent since 
1970. Enrollment in such programs 
(mostly private, but not necessarily 
church related) is expected to increase 
25 percent to 7.1 million by 1993. 

What does this mean for schools? 
Some predictions can be made just 
considering the projections for the 
number of students in the future. In 
1984, teacher supply was slightly larger 
than teacher demand. In 1985, the 
situation was reversed; demand for 
teachers was slightly larger than the 



teacher supply. This gap, which creates 
a teacher shortage, is expected to in- 
crease in the future. By 1993, it is 
estimated that over 220,000 teachers 
will be needed, but only about 130,000 
teachers will be available. 

The teacher shortage is compounded 
by attitudes about schools and teaching. 
In 1985, the National Center for Edu- 
cation Statistics found that 43 percent 
of public school teachers would not 
become teachers if they "were starting 
over again." In 1966, only nine percent 
of public school teachers would have 
selected a different career. This attitude 
on the part of teachers is understanda- 
ble, given the bad press schools have 
received lately. It does not, however, 
inspire confidence that the teacher 
shortage can be solved by 1993. 

A teacher shortage means more than 
simply larger numbers of students in 
classes. With a shortage of teachers also 
comes a shortage of programs. Public 
schools (as well as mainstream private 
schools) will probably have to offer the 
fundamental curriculum areas, but 
reduce the non-academic studies that 
are now "electives" for students. Sub- 
jects such as art, music and computer 
instruction may have to be reduced in 
public schools for lack of trained 
teachers. 

Therefore, one prediction, based on 
a very liberal interpretation of the 
demographic information available, is 
the growth of the "auxiliary" school. 
Parents may wish to send their children 
to the regular public school for aca- 
demic courses and, especially, the 
college-bound curriculum. Additional 
subjects parents consider important 
may well be taught out of school. 
Indeed, computer instruction is a likely 
candidate for an auxiliary school. In 
many communities today, computer 
courses are taught outside the school by 
computer specialists, not regular 
teachers. 

The idea of the auxiliary school is not 
common in our culture. While such 
programs exist, and have existed for 
decades in this country, they are cur- 
rently dealing with a small number of 
students. Now may be the time for you 
to start thinking of setting up your 
special program, so you can be ready for 
the 1990s. 

I welcome any comments, sugges- 
tions or thoughts you have to share. I 
can be reached at 829 Evergreen, Cha- 
tham, IL 62629, or on Delphi with the 
user name MPLOG. □ 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 141 



Practicing the 

Two -Column Format 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Sometimes we get so engrossed 
with the arcane mysteries of 
CoCo that we forget there is a 
wealth of golden information waiting to 
be mined from BASIC. 

Every beginner who trudges through 
the first chapters of a BASIC text quickly 
learns that a comma can be used to 
create a second column, providing a 
tool to develop columnar lists. In this 
tutorial, expect to explore this feature 
of our beloved CoCo, mainly the crea- 
tion of word lists in a two-column 
format. 

Our raw material will be the present 
and future tense of the German verb "to 
love." If you are studying German or 
some other language, this tutorial will 
point you toward ideas that, with 
CoCo's aid, could make your studies 
more interesting. 

Key in lines 10-19 of Listing 1 and 
RUN. You will see the present tense of the 
verb, "to love." 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer and special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of CoCo. 



Ich liebe 
Du liebst 
Er liebt 
Wir lieben 
Ihr liebt 
Sie lieben 



I love 

You love (singular) 
He loves 
We love 

You love (plural) 
They love 



Now type LI5T-19. In Line 10, we 
cleared the screen, dropped down a row, 
indented two spaces, printed ICH 
LIEBE, spaced over with the space bar 
to the seventeenth space of the PRINT!? 
screen location (the beginning of the 
right half of the screen) and printed 
WIR LIEBEN. 

Line 1 1 proved to be a bit easier to 
create. We could RUN and see if the 
character T is aligned under 'W\ If it 
isn't, it is no problem to either delete or 
insert spaces to line it up. It is no big 
deal to move the first character of the 
second column left or right. 

Type EDIT to get in the edit mode. 
Advance the cursor with the space bar 
so it is in the blank area between the two 
phrases, press 'D' to delete one space; 
2D to delete two spaces. Press T and the 
space bar once to insert one space; T 
and the space bar twice to put in two 
spaces. Press ENTER to get out of the 
edit mode. RUN and check alignment. 



In Line 13, add the third person 
singular and plural in a similar manner. 
Line 19 is a good device for you to add 
to your ever-increasing storehouse of 
knowledge. CoCo awaits your pleasure 
and when you are ready, EXEC44539 
allows you to continue by depressing 
any key except BREAK. 

Line 20 combines lines 10-12 and 19 
into a multiple statement line. Each line 
is separated by a colon. The colon warns 
CoCo that a new statement follows. 

Line 30 creates the same word list 
using the comma to advance to the next 
entry's beginning location. Note that 
one big PRINT line is used to enter the 
entire word list. The advantage is that 
PRINT need not be used to add each 
phrase of the list. Make sure each 
phrase is enclosed in quotes. 

If you indent the left column, you 
must take care to indent whenever a 
succeeding left column is added. If the 
sum of the characters and spaces is less 
than 15 in all the phrases, this is a 
painless way to make a two-column list. 

A good method of attack is to key in 
one row at a time. RUN and check for 
errors and misalignment, then make 
any necessary adjustments and go on to 
the next row. 



142 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



The art of entertainment 





Pinball Factory by Kary McFadden 

The video game comes full circle in this glorious tribute to the original. 
Classic pinball spings to life as never before, with fresh new angles that 
only the computer can offer. Crisp graphics, sound, and fast, smooth 
action give this machine-language arcade game a realistic, responsive feel 
you'll hardly believe. There are even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" 
the machine! 

In addition to playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of 
creative pleasure as you design, build, and edit your own screens. Save 
and load your favorite creations. The joystick-controlled cursor makes it 
all easy. 

Change the board: build with bumpers, tabs, and a multitude of solid 

obstacles to form any configuration imaginable. 
Change the face: draw your own title board with lines, rays, and shape 

patterns. Add text in three different colors, and two dirrent sizes. 
Change the rules: alter the gravity, bounce, and scoring! 

64K Color Computer required. $34.95 




Speed Racer by Steven Hirsch 

The checkered flag drops as your pulse rises in this lively new 
arcade game. The roaa twists to trie horizon on the 3-D pano- 
rama that sets the stage for the most exciting race the CoCo 
has ever seen! 

Vie for time as you speed through the curves at incredible 
speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of the pack, but 
step lively since some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! 

Four challenging raceways, complete with obstacles and 
colorful 3-D scenery, put your skills to the test in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 

32K Color Computer required. $34.95 





WW 



Rommel 3-D by Kary McFadden 

You clutch the tank controls, searching for any sign of the 
enemy. Suddenly a blip appears on radar! Frantically, you 
move your tank into position. At last you spot the elusive 
enemy tank! Facing it, you race to lock sights and fire before 
he does! 

Enter the ultimate battle- zone in this exciting 3-D tank com- 
bat game. Strategy, speed, and your tank's cannon are your 
only hope as you wind through a three-dimensional course 
inhabited by impenetrable barriers and enemy tanks. 

Dazzling graphics and lifelike sound take you a step beyond 
the ordinary in this fast, machine-language arcade game. Enter 
the next dimension, ROMMEL'S troops are waiting for you! 

32K Color Computer required. $29.95 




576 S. Telegraph f Pontiac, MI 48053 
Orders and Information (313) 334-5700 
Prices Do Not Include Shipping and Handling 




There seems to be more than one way 
to do anything. PRINTTflB can also be 
used to create our word list. Key in Line 
40. Using PRINTTflB, we begin at Loca- 
tion 2, effectively indenting two spaces 
by putting the '2' within parentheses (2) 
arid within a brace of quotes enter the 
first phrase. Without further punctua- 
tion or delineating marks, key in TAB 
followed by (16) to get us to the seven- 
teenth space in the row. Then within 
quotes, type in the second phrase. 

Recall that the first space at the left 
margin is PRINTTflB ( 0 ) . Thus, PRINT 
TAB (2) is really the third space in the 
row. This is the most satisfying manner 
to make two-column lists of text. 

In lines 41 and 42, the PRINTTAB 
locations are the same as in Line 40 (2 
and 16) as would be the locations of any 
addition lines. 

To summarize: If you use the PRINT 
TAB method between the two text 
phrases enclosed within quote marks 
that comprise the two columns, insert 
TAB ( X ) , where 'X' is the desired PR I NT@ 
location. 

For the beginner, this system will do 
yeoman service. It is readily visualized 
in the listing and the rows can be 
speedily realigned horizontally by 
changing the 'X' value. Likewise, it is 
simple to edit. 

You could use PRINT0 to make a two- 
column list, however, it is too unwieldy 
and confusing. Forget it, unless you 
want to practice working with PRINTS. 

Key in Line 50. Who said you have 
to use only one system? Here we have 
a row of PRINTTAB, followed by a row 
using the "comma ploy." Notice that a 
comma follows at the end of the 



TAB (16) entry to tell CoCo to move 
over to the next column; in this case, the 
first column in the third row. The third 
row is put on using the PRINT method, 
wherein we space over with the space 
bar tb pick up the starting location to 
begin the second column on the row. 

Don't you think that instead of 
:PRINT we could have inserted a 
comma? Try it! Yes, we could, but that 
creates a new modification. After the 
first PRINT line, as in Line 10, contin- 
uingto use the PRINT format, you could 
have added the information in lines 1 1 
and 12, using the comma to start a new 
row. For practice, rework lines 10-19, 
using this modification to make a mul- 
tiple statement program line. 

In Line 60, we will compare the 
present tense, "love," with the future 
tense, "will love," side by side. We are 
going to make a single, multiple state- 
ment line that separates each phrase 
with a comma. 

Type NEW and carefully key in Line 60 
and RUN. What a mess! But, have no 
fear, a little editing will put it right. 

The first row is properly located. The 
second row begins over where the sec- 
ond column begins. The reason is that 
the second column of the first row used 
up all 16 locations and the next char- 
acter would be on the new line. The 
comma told CoCo to go on to the next 
column. Obviously, we must remove the 
comma. If you take out the comma, 
what happens? It is OK. You may also 
remove the two quotes on either side of 
this particular comma. 

Type EDITG0 and press ENTER. Type 
in 45 and press the space bar. The cursor 
is on top of the comma. Press 4 D' to 



delete it and ENTER to get out of edit 
mode. 

If it is confusing to find L1EBENDU 
bunched up without a space, put the 
quotes back in. A newcomer can visu- 
alize it easier if the two phrases are 
separated into separate units. 

Now, notice that the fourth row 
overlaps into the fifth row, causing 
havoc by pushing over the phrase IHR 
L1EBT to the next column. We must 
work within the constraints put upon us 
by CoCo. We must break up W1R 
WERDEN L1EBEN and move 
L1EBEN under W1R WERDEN. Big 
job? No! Edit Line 60 by inserting 
between WIR WERDEN and LIEBEN 
two commas („) and remove the blank 
space. The two commas cause it to move 
over two columns, just where we want 
it. 

Type EDITG0, press ENTER, then type 
120 and press the space bar. Tap the 
space bar a few times so the cursor is 
between the 'N 1 and *L\ Type T to get 
in the insert mode. Type in two commas 
and press the up arrow and SHIFT at the 
same time to get out of insert mode. 
Press 4 D' to get rid of the blank space. 
Press ENTER to get out of edit mode. 

After checking over your work, you 
will notice that you have to give the next 
line the same treatment. Checking 
again, you see that you get a little more 
practice and ditto on the last row. 

Wouldn't the whole mess look better 
with blank rows between the phrases? 
Yes, each line would stand out and be 
easier to read. But, where to begin? 
What to do? 

RUN the program. Consider that ICH 
WERDE LIEBEN ends the first row. If 



Listing 1: GERMAN 
J3 'LISTING1 

1J3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" ICH LIEBE 
WIR LIEBEN" 

11 PRINT" DU LIEBST IHR LIE 
BT" 

12 PRINT" ER LIEBT SIE LIE 
BEN" 

19 EXEC44539 

2j3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" ICH LIEBE 
WIR LIEBEN": PRINT" DU LIEBST 
IHR LIEBT": PRINT" ER LIEBT 
SIE LIEBEN" :EXEC44539 
3J3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" ICH LIEBE", 
"WIR LIEBEN"," DU LIEBST", "IHR 
LIEBT"," ER LIEBT", "SIE LIEBEN" 
:EXEC44539 



4j3 CLS: PRINT: PRINTTAB (2) "ICH LIE 
BE"TAB(16) "WIR LIEBEN" 

41 PRINTTAB (2 ) "DU LIEBST"TAB ( 16) 
"J.HR LIEBT" 

42 PRINTTAB (2 ) "ER LIEBT"TAB (16) " 
SIE LIEBEN" :EXEC44539 

5J3 CLS: PRINT: PRINTTAB (2) "ICH LIE 
BE"TAB(16) "WIR LIEBEN"," DU LIE 
BST","IHR LIEBT " : PRINT " ER LIEB 
T SIE LIEBEN" :EXEC44539 

6J3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "ICH LIEBE","I 
CH WERDE LIEBEN", "DU LIEBST", "DU 
WIRST LIEBEN", "ER LIEBT" , "ER WI 
RD LIEBEN", "WIR LIEBEN" , "WIR WER 
DEN LIEBEN", "IHR LIEBT", "IHR WER 
DET LIEBEN", "SIE LIEBEN", "SIE WE 
RDEN LIEBEN" 



1 44 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



we put two commas between that 
phrase and the next, DU LIEBST, that 
should give us two empty columns; in 
effect, an empty row. 

Type EDIT60. If you left in the two 
quotes, then type 45 and press the space 
bar, then tap over to get beyond the first 
quote. Type I to get in insert mode, then 
two commas, and press ENTER to get 
out of edit. If you yanked the two quotes 
then type EDITG0, type 45 and press the 
space bar and left arrow to get on top 
of 4 D\ Type I to get in insert mode. Type 
two commas enclosed in quotes (", , ") 
and press enter to get out of edit mode. 



Now RUN; check your work by press- 
ing BREAK, type EDITG0, type 60 and 
press the space bar. Advance using the 
space bar until you are over the comma 
after LIEBEN. Type I to get in insert 
mode, insert two commas („) and press 
ENTER to get out and RUN. See? 

Now you may finish up the others one 
at a time. Remember that you are only 
adding these blank-line producing com- 
mas after the LIEBEN in the second 
column and not after WERDET or 
WERDEN. 

If you feel confident, EDIT60, then 
type 100 and press the space bar. Tap 



the space bar until it is on top of the 
comma after LIEBEN. Now perform 
the following: Type I and two commas, 
press the up arrow and SHIFT at the 
same time, space over to the next 
LIEBEN, (about 35 spaces), type I and 
two commas, press the up arrow and 
SHIFT together. Tap over to the next 
work zone. After the third insertion, 
press ENTER and RUN. 

I guess we beat that ox to death! Here 
is the quote for today: "I love you, Mr. 
CoCo." And your lesson for today? 
Repeat after me, "Ich liebe dich, Herr 
CoCo." □ 



Listing 2: VOYO 
0 ' YOYO 

5 1 (C) 1984, J KOLAR 

3j3 PMODE4 / l:PCLS 

4j3 A=126:B=9j3:R=72:PI=1.7j3 

5j3 DIM S(13) 

60 DRAW" BM8 , 4NU4NL4NR4ND4NE4NF4N 
G4NH4" 

7f5 GET(0,0)-(12,10) ,S,G 
8j3 PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
175 FOR S=15 TO 3 STEP-6 
18j3 F0RZ=1T0676 STEPS : C=Z 
19j3 C=9j3+C*PI/18j3 



195 K=R 

2j3j3 X=INT(A+R*COS (K) ) :Y=INT(B+R* 
SIN(C) ) 

210 PUT(X+80,Y)-(X+68,Y+10) ,S,PS 
ET 

213 X=INT(A+R*SIN(C) ) :Y=INT(B+R* 
COS(C) ) 

215 PUT (X-5 , Y) - (X+7 , Y+10) ,S,PSET 
220 NEXT Z,S 

230 PLAY f, O3V25L8CV30EV25CO2BABV2 
0O3CL16EEFFGGV15EEFFGGL8GFEL4CO2 
V20BO3L2C 11 

240 GOT0175 /S\ 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This program gives you an idea of the enthusi- 
ast's affection for the CoCo. Type it in and run it! 

The listings: 

1 PM0DE4,1: PCLS :SCREEN1,1: DRAW" B 
M106 / 8;R43D12L43U12D12BD5R42D35G 
20H20U35R10D44U44R20D44" : CIRCLE ( 
128,96) / 6:DRAW"BM109 / 90;M12 3,90M 
128 ,77M133, 9^1148, 9J3M13 6, 99M141, 
112M128 , 103M115 , 112M120 , 99M109 , 9 
0" : DRAW"BM116 , 17 ;G1L4H2U3E2R4F1B 
D5R5H1U2E1R2F1D2G1L2BR17G1" 

2 DRAW M L4H2U3E2R4F1BD5R5H1U2E1R2 
F1D2G1L2 11 : PAINT ( 11 5 , 30 ) 7 1 : PAINT ( 
145,40) ,1:PAINT(126,89) ,1:DIM V( 
100,1,1) : GET (0,0) -(255,1) ,V:FORC 
=0TO191 : PUT (0 , C) - ( 255 , C) , V, NOT: N 
EXTC : FORX=1TO2000 : NEXTX : I$=INKEY 
$ : IFI $= 1 1 1 " THENRUNELSE I FI $= » f ' THEN 
RUN : END 

C.W. Harriman 
Bradford, MA 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Second Rainbow Advennirex Tape,) 



E.T.T . Electronic Typing Teacher 

by CHERRYSoft 

Learning to type the right way can save you hours of tedious 
work when entering programs into your CoCo, and this is just 
what ETT was designed to do. Devote a little time every day prac- 
ticing with ETT and before you know it you will be typing with con- 
fidence. Entering those programs will no longer be the chore it 
use to be. 

ETT's video keyboard lets you practice with all the keys labeled, 
all the keys blank or only the "home" keys labeled. The visual 
cues guide you while you learn to type without watching your 
fingers. ETT shows your accuracy, response time, and words per 
minute. You will quickly see that you are improving with practice 

With the sentences provided by ETT learning to type can be fun. 
Over 1000 variations chosen because they include every letter in 
the alphabet. You can also create your own practice sets. This 
outstanding program was written by a certified teacher and pro- 
fessional programmer and comes with a ten page student 
manual-study guide. Requires 16K Extended Basic. 

95 



SOA95 free $OQ 

Cassette SHIPPING Disk Ctt 

ETT is being used in schools throughout the U.S. 
See ETT at your favorite dealer or order direct. 
DEALER INQUIRES INVITED 

m &CoCo 
c Waithouse 

Where Shopping By Mail is "USER FRIENDLY" 

500A N. DOBSON - WESTLAND, Ml 48185 
Phone (313) 722-7957 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 145 



Tired of the 
same old utilities? 



Would you like to protect your disk software from un- 
authorized copying, but still allow your users to make 
back up copies? Then 




? Then m 




is for you! 



$99.95 - Disk 



Don't waste your valuable time and effort concocting anti- 
piracy schemes. Spend your time developing new pro- 
grams and then Piratect f ™ ; them. Piratector will protect your 
Basic or ML programs using many different sophisticated 
techniques, while still allowing your users to create (non- 
executable) backups that can be used to recover a 
"crashed" master disk. 

Piratector offers much more than just software protection. 
Several ML utilities are provided including: 



PIRATECTOR features: 

• Protects Basic or ML programs 

— Encryption 

— ML AUTO Loader 

— Basic Break Disabler 

— Error catcher 

— Reset Button Disable 

• Utility subroutines included 

• Automate your duplication if 
multiple drives are used 

• Each copy will be "finger printed" 
with incrementing serial numbers 



COMBINER 



SEMIGRAF - 



GETLIN 



appends ML subroutines with 
your Basic program. 

full featured high-resolution 8 
color semigraphic graphic edi- 
tor to build title screens for your 
programs. 

keyboard input subroutine for 
easy development of MENU 
oriented software (Basic or 
ML) 



SEA\li;itilF 
(fi'niiliics Editor 

Tape - $19.95 
Disk - $24.95 

Graphics editor to create and modify your own pictures 
Pictures can be used as a title tureen for a program 
Create a series of pictures to make a slide show 
Both Extended and non-Extended Basic 
versions on the same tape 
High Resolution 

Semigraphic modes 8, 12, and 24 
(64 x 64, 64 x 96 and 64 x 128) 
8 colors 

Combine text with graphics 
Auto-repeat and "magic" delete 
Requires 16K 



//ZD ED\ $19.95 



AUTO RUN 



AUTO RUN 64 $24.95 

Software that you design and sell can be enhanced by 
using the Auto Run Loader. Sugar Software will allow you 
to do this without requesting royalties. 



Starts up your Basic or ML program automatically 
— no need to type EXEC or RUN 
Locate your program anywhere in memory 
Graphics editor helps you create attractive title screens 
for your program 

Gives your program the professional touch 
Provides an audio introduction for your program 
Create "slide shows" with a series of title screens 
Used by many CoCo software houses 
Requires 16K ECB 



Dealer and author inquiries are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kellv Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (408) 
421-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS onlv. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

1710 N. 50th Ave. 
Hollywood, Florida 33021 
(305) 981-1241 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar 5>oftware products is available. 



Add $1.50 per program for postage and 
handling. Florida residents add 5% sales tax. 
COD orders are welcome. CIS orders EMAIL 
to 70405, 1374. No refunds or exchanges. 



VISA 




tware 



Use your CoCo, your 8-bit dot addressable graphics 
printer and the CoCo Calligrapher to create beautiful 
signs, invitations, flyers, greeting cards, diplomas, cer- 
tificates, awards and love letters. 

The original Calligrapher letters are 36 points ( 1 12 inch) 
high and variably spaced. It includes an easy-to-use , 
menu-oriented program and these three typestyles: 



Old English Cartoon 

(DM ^n^\i$h Cartoon 

Gav Nineties 

Gay Nineties 

The CoCo Calligrapher requires 32K ECB. 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 



ADDITIONAL TYPESTYLES 

These tapes of additional typestyles are available for 
$19.95 each. They can be easily moved to disk. The 
original Calligrapher program is required. 

Tape 1 - Reduced, Reversed, and Reduced-Reversed 
versions 



Old English 



Gay Nineties 



Cartoon 



These disks of additional typestyles are 
available for $49.95 each. 

Disk 1 - all type styles on Tapes 1 , 2 and 3. 
Disk 2 - all type styles on Tapes 4, 5 and 6. 

Tape 4: Wild West/Checkers 

Wild West CWer 



All typestyles on Tapes 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 include Stan- 
dard (1/2 inch), Reversed, Reduced, and Reduced- 
Reversed unless otherwise noted. 



Tape 5: Star 



Hebrew 



Tape 2: Broadway/Old Style 



t 



Tape 3: Business/Antique 



EBusiness S&tiffqtic 



Stars 

Victorian (Standard and Reverse only) 

HlcTcrl an 

Tape 6: Block/Computer 

Block 

CampuTEPi 



Stye dalligrapljer. 



$39.95 

Requires OS-9 Version 01.01.00 and a dot matrix print- 
er. The OS-9 Calligrapher reads a standard input text 
file which contains text and formatting directives to pro- 
duce standard utput for printer or disk. You can specify 
which font to use; centering; left, right or full justification; 
line fill; narrow mode; margin; line width; page size; 
page break and indentation. 



These disks of additional typestyles are available for 
$49.95 each. They are not compatible with the CoCo 
Calligrapher typestyles or program. OS-9 typestyle 
disk must be used with the OS-9 Calligrapher. 

Disk 1 - OS-9 version of all type styles on Tapes 1 , 2 and 1 
3. 

Disk 2 - OS-9 version of all type styles on Tapes 4, 5 and 
6. 



Dealer and author inquiries arc al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kellv Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.'O. Box 11932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
421-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS only. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

1710 N. 50lh Ave. 
Hollywood, Florida 3302 1 
(305) 981-1241 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar software products is available. 



Add $1.50 per program for postage and 
handling. Florida residents add 5% sales tax. 
COD orders are welcome. CIS orders EMAIL 
to 70405, 1374. No refunds or exchanges. 



vrsA 





ARK ROYAL GAMES celebrates the New Year with reduced prices on all 
games,. .even our two newest releases! 



new! SAGA-THE SORCERER'S 
CGRSE 32K 100% hi-res, 100% ML 
graphic adventure. Fantastic! Disk only 
— $22 

new! REDSTAR 32K 100% hi-res 
1 00% ML. Futuristic wargame involv- 
ing NATO and the WARSAW 
PACT. Disk only —$22 

BARBAROSSA 64K 100% hi-res 
100% ML game of the war in Russia 
1941-1944. "A Blockbuster," says 
Hot Coco's Peter Paplaskas. Reviewed 
Jan. '86 Hot Coco,— $25 

D-DAY Our second 64K 100% hi-res 
1 00% ML, this one dealing with the Al- 
lies invasion of France in 1944. Mas- 
sive! No review date set yet. — $23 

PHALANX 32K 100% hi-res, 100% 
ML game of Alexander the Great. No 
review date set yet.— $20 

ANZIO 32K Semigraphic wargame. I 
or 2 players. Simultaneous movement. 
No review date set yet. — $20 

COMPANY COMMANDER 32K ML 
routines. Tactical squad level wargame 
set in WWII. 1 2 scenarios, add-on ex- 
pansion modules. Dec. '85 Rain- 
bow. — $23 disk or tape 

RIVER CROSSING 32K ML routines. 
A Company Commander add-on mod- 
ule, but you no longer need C/C to play 
it.— $23 







C1NCPAC BATTLE OF MIDWAY 32K 
1 00% hi-res 75% ML. The battle that 
turned the tide of war. Aug. '85 
Rainbow.— $20 

ESCAPE FROM DENNA 32K ML rou- 
tines. Semigraphic Dungeon adventure 
game. No review date set yet. — $18 

BATTLE OF THE BULGE 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Aug. 
'85 Rainbow.— $15 

BATTLE FOR TUNIS 32K Semigraph- 
ic wargame. 1 or 2 players. Sept. '85 
Rainbow.— $ 1 5 

ACROSS THE RUBICON 32K Semi- 
graphic wargame. Feb. '84 
Rainbow. — $ 1 5 

WATERLOO 32K ML routines. Semi- 
graphic wargame. Mar. '84 
Rainbow. — $15 Wmm 

KAMIKAZE 32K Hi-res graphic war- 
game. Apr. '83 Rainbow. — $15 

BOMBER COMMAND 32K disk, 16K 
tape. Semigraphic wargame. ML rou- 
tines. Jan. '84 Rainbow.— $10 

GUADALCANAL 32K Semigraphic 
wargame. ML routines. — $10 

THE POWER OF THE TRS-80 COM- 
PUTER Book. Loaded with great 
programming information. — $ 1 0 
(Shipped book rate) 



Prices on all programs include shipping to U.S., APO's, Canada. COD's (<JSA only) 
add 10%. Florida Residents add 5°o. For disk version add $2. All Orders shipped 
within 24 hours. Programs require Color Computer TM (Tandy Corp.) or TDP Sys- 
tem 100 Computer TM (RCA). Many programs soon to be available on MS-DOS 
systems. 



P. O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 786-8603 







f Ihe 1 




DISK UTILITY 


Disk 




1 RAINBOW 





Not a dance, but a disk alignment aid . . . 



Doing the 
Disk-O-Step 



By Dave Trapasso 



If you've ever tried to do a disk 
alignment, you know it is necessary 
to have complete control over the 
drive on which you are working. This 
means being able to go to a selected 
track at will, and being able to turn the 
drive motor on and off. 

The problem with using most other 
disk zapper-type utilities results from 
the fact that they actually try to read the 
data from the disk. If there is a problem 
with the disk, such as alignment, the 
utility generates an error and gives up, 
or keeps stepping back to track zero 
then to the track in order to retry 
reading it. 



This is not very helpful while trying 
to keep the motor on and the head still 
at the track you are checking. This 
utility, Disk-O-Step, lets you do just 
that. As a matter of fact, you can use 
most of the functions of the utility 
without a disk in the drive and with the 
door open! 

Since this is the age of electronic 
information storage, rather than print 
the instructions they are included in the 
program. This means you will never lose 
them and have to hunt through all your 
manuals or back issues of THE rainbow 
to find the instructions to the program. 

Disk-O-Step is very simple to use and 



is menu driven. As a bonus, the pro- 
gram even includes a disk speed test. 
Note that the program is fully com- 
mented for debugging and for any 
changes you wish to make. Example: 
Look at lines 80, 90 and 100. You may 
want to change the maximum number 
of tracks or the step rate to suit the drive 
with which you are working. Only 16K 
of memory is required, provided that 
you PCLERR 1 before loading the pro- 
gram. More than 16K of memory does 
not require any changes. Of course, 
Disk BASIC is required. 

So, "step out" and have a good 
time. □ 



— 

\ff 190 132 

410 7 

610 179 

820 254 

1010 174 

1190 108 

1360 238 

1540 95 

1730 41 

1930 255 

2080 55 



2250 84 

2400 226 

2560 60 

2710 52 

2860 1 

3020 148 

3170 177 

3320 133 

3480 49 

3630 187 

END 58 



The listing: DI5K5TEP 

lj3 PC LEAR 1: CLEAR 5j3j3,&H4FBF 
2J3 FOR I=&H4FCj3 TO &H4FE3 1 POKE 



IN MACHINE CODE FOR DISK SPEED T 
EST 

3J3 READ D$ 

4 S3 POKE I,VAL(' ! &H"+D$) 
5p NEXT I 
60 CLS 4 

7J3 RES=3 'OP CODE FOR RESTORE CO 
MMAND 

8p SI=&H5j3 'OP CODE FOR STEP IN 

@ 6MS, USE &H53 FOR 3j3MS 

9J3 SO=&H7j3 'OP CODE FOR STEP OUT 

@ 6MS, USE &H73 FOR 3j3MS 
1J3J3 MAX=3 4 'MAX # OF TRACKS 
110 C=&H29 ' SELECT DRIVE ft, DOU 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 149 



BLE DENSITY 

120 DN=0 1 DRIVE NUMBER 0 
130 MS=0 ' MOTOR STATUS= OFF 
140 TRK=&HFF49 'FLOPPY DISK TRAC 
K REGISTER 

15)3 COM =&HFF48 'FLOPPY DISK COM 
MAND & STATUS REGISTER 
160 DRV=&HFF40 'FLOPPY DISK SELE 
CT REGISTER 

170 PRINT §2 31, "disk alignment a 
id"; 

18)3 PRINT §260, "WRITTEN BY- DAVE 

TRAPASSO" ; 
190 PRINT §297, "OCTOBER, 1984"; 
200 PRINT §448, "WOULD YOU LIKE 
INSTRUCTIONS" ; 

210 Z$=INKEY$ :IF Z$="" THEN 210 
220 IF Z$="Y" THEN GOSUB 1970 
2 30 CLS 

240 GOSUB 780 'RESTORE DRIVE 0 T 
0 TRACK 0 

250 PRINT §0, "TOGGLE MOTOR ON/OF 
F= M" 

260 PRINT "RESTORE TO TRACK 0= R 



ii 



270 PRINT "0 TO 3= SELECT DRIVE 
#" 

280 PRINT "STEP DRIVE IN= I" 
290 PRINT "STEP DRIVE OUT= 0" 
300 PRINT "GOTO TO TRACK= G" 
310 PRINT "READ TRACK'S SECTOR I 
N HEX= H" 

320 PRINT "READ TRACK'S SECTOR I 
N ASCII= A" 

3 30 PRINT "MOTOR SPEED TEST= S" 
340 PRINT "COMMAND:" 

350 PRINT @384, "track zero swit 
ch" 

360 PRINT @416, "motor" 
370 PRINT @448, "drive #" 
380 PRINT §480, "track #"; 
390 1 * KEY BOARD INPUT ROUTINE* 
400 POKE 3 39,2 'KEY REPEAT THE ' 
I' KEY 

410 POKE 345,2 'KEY REPEAT "THE ' 
0' KEY 

420 POKE DRV,C 

430 CK=PEEK(COM) AND 4 

440 IF NOT MS THEN POKE DRV,0 'I 

F MOTOR STATUS OFF, SHUT OFF MOT 

ORS 

450 IF CK=4 THEN PRINT §402, "ON 

" ELSE PRINT §402, "OFF" 

460 IF MS THEN PRINT §422, "ON "; 

ELSE PRINT §422, "OFF"; 
470 TK=PEEK (TRK) 'FIND OUT WHAT 
TRACK ALOPPY CONTROLLER THINKS W 
E 'RE AT 





=INKEY$ 






IF 

-L- X 


c$=' 


•0" 


THEN 


700 


IF 


C$=' 


•1" 


THEN 


700 


IF 


c$=' 


•2" 


THEN 


700 


IF 


c$=' 


1311 


THEN 


700 


IF 


C$=' 


•R" 


THEN 


750 


IF 


c$=' 


•I" 


THEN 


950 


IF 


c$=' 


•0" 


THEN 


1010 


IF 


c$=' 


•G" 


THEN 


1110 


IF 


C$=' 


•S" 


THEN 


1810 


IF 


C$=' 




THEN 


1320 


IF 


C$=» 


'A" 


THEN 


1610 


IF 


C$<>"M 


" THEN 540 



480 PRINT §488, TK;" "; 
490 POKE &H97E,TK • TELL DOS WHA 
T TRACK WE ARE AT FOR EACH DRIVE 
500 POKE &H97F,TK 
510 POKE &H980,TK 
520 POKE &H981,TK 
530 
540 
550 
560 
570 
580 
590 
600 
610 
620 
630 
640 
650 
660 

670 ' * CHANGE MOTOR STATUS* 
680 MS= NOT MS 
690 GOTO 420 

700 DN=VAL(C$) 1 GET NUMERICAL V 
ALUE OF DRIVE NUMBER SELECTED 
710 IF DN=0 THEN C=&H29 'CODE FO 
R DRIVE 0 SELECT 

720 IF DN=1 THEN C=&H2A 'CODE FO 
R DRIVE 1 SELECT 

730 IF DN=2 THEN C=&H2C 'CODE FO 
R DRIVE 2 SELECT 

740 IF DN=3 THEN C=&H68 'CODE FO 
R DRIVE 3 SELECT 
750 GOSUB 770 'RESTORE THE 
ED DRIVE TO TRACK 0 
760 GOTO 420 

770 '*THIS SUB RESTORES CURRENT 
DRIVE TO TRACK 0* 

780 GOSUB 1070 'TURN ON DRIVE & 

WAIT FOR IT TO SPEED UP 

790 POKE COM, RES 'ISSUE RESTORE 

COMMAND TO CONTROLLER 

800 FOR 1= 0 TO 100 'LOOK FOR TR 

ACK 0 SWITCH THIS MANY TIMES 

810 CK=PEEK(COM) AND 4 'READ TRA 

CK ZERO SWITCH 

820 IF CK=4 THEN 900 'IF ON THEN 

WE ARE DONE 
830 NEXT I 'CHECK SWITCH AGAIN 
840 PRINT §320, "DRIVE? PUSH ENTE 
R" 

850 A$=INKEY$ 

860 IF A$="" THEN 850 

870 IF A$OCHR$(13) THEN 60 

880 GOSUB 1280 'CLEAR THE INPUT 

LINE 

890 GOTO 7 80 'TRY TO RESTORE AGA 
IN 



SELCT 



150 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



900 MS=0 

910 IF PEEK(TRK) <> 0 THEN 830 
920 CK=PEEK(COM) AND 4 
930 IF CK=0 THEN 830 
940 RETURN 

950 '*THIS STEPS THE DRIVE IN* 
960 IF TK=MAX THEN 390 'IF WE AR 
E ALL THE WAY IN, THEN DON'T DAM 
AGE DRIVE 

970 IF MS THEN 990 'IF MOTOR IS 
ALREADY ON, LET'S SPEED THINGS U 
P 

980 GOSUB 1070 'TURN ON SELECTED 
MOTOR 

990 POKE COM, SI 'ISSUE STEP IN C 
OMMAND TO CONTROLLER 
1000 GOTO 390 

1010 '*THIS STEPS THE DRIVE OUT* 
1020 IF TK=0 THEN 420 ' IF WE ARE 
ALL THE WAY OUT, THEN DON'T DAM 
AGE DRIVE 

1030 IF MS THEN 1050 'IF MOTOR I 
S ON, THEN LET'S SPEED THINGS UP 
1040 GOSUB 1070 

1050 POKE COM, SO 'ISSUE STEP OUT 

COMMAND TO CONTROLLER 
1060 GOTO 390 

1070 POKE DRV,C 'SELECT DRIVE & 
TURN ON MOTORS 

1080 FOR 1= 1 TO 50 'DELAY FOR M 
OTORS TO COME UP TO SPEED 
1090 NEXT I 
1100 RETURN 

1110 '*THIS STEPS TO THE SELECTE 
D TRACK* 

1120 PRINT §320, "input track # " 
1130 INPUT TK$ 

1140 T=VAL(TK$) 'GET NUMERIC VAL 
UE OF INPUT TRACK NUMBER 
1150 GOSUB 1280 'CLEAR THE INPUT 
LINE 

1160 IF T<0 THEN 1110 'CHECK FOR 

ILLEGAL VALUES 
1170 IF T>MAX THEN 1120 
1180 M=MS 'SAVE PRESENT MOTOR ST 
ATUS, RESTORE WILL TURN IT OFF 

1190 GOSUB 770 'NOW RESTORE TO T 
RACK 0 

1200 MS=M 'PUT BACK ORIGINAL MOT 
OR STATUS 

1210 GOSUB 1070 'TURN ON DRIVE M 
OTORS 

1220 IF T=0 THEN 390 'IF THEY WA 
NTED TRACK ZERO, WE ARE THERE 
1230 FOR 1=1 TO T 'STEP IN ONCE 
FOR EVERY TRACK NUMBER 
1240 POKE COM, SI 'ISSUE STEP IN 



COMMAND TO CONTROLLER 

1250 IF PEEK (COM) AND 1 THEN 125 

0 'SEE IF COMPLETE 

12 60 NEXT I 
1270 GOTO 420 

1280 '*THIS SUB. CLEARS THE INPU 
T LINE* 

1290 PRINT @320," 

•i . 

1300 PRINT @352," 

it . 

1310 RETURN 

1320 '*THIS DISPLAYS SECTOR FROM 

CURRENT DRIVE & TRACK IN HEX* 
1330 GOSUB 1480 'INPUT SECTOR NU 
MBER, & READ IT 
1340 P=1024 

1350 GOSUB 1390 'SHOW 1/2 OF SEC 
TOR IN HEX 

13 60 A$=B$ 'SET UP TO SHOW 2ND H 
ALF IN HEX 

1370 GOSUB 1390 'SHOW OTHER 1/2 
IN HEX 

1380 GOTO 1580 'WAIT FOR INPUT T 
0 RESUME 

1390 FOR I = 1 TO 128 'LENGTH 0 
F 1/2 OF SECTOR 

1400 H=ASC(MID$(A$,I,1) ) 'MAKE H 

EX CHAR. OF EACH 

1410 HL=INT(H/16) :HR=H-HL*16 

1420 HL=HL+55 : IF HL<65 THEN HL= 

HL+57 

1430 HR=HR+55 :IF HR<65 THEN HR= 
HR+57 

1440 POKE P,HL : POKE P+1,HR 
1450 P=P+2 

14 60 NEXT I 
1470 RETURN 

1480 '*THIS READS THE SECTOR INP 
UT, FROM THE CURRENT DRIVE & TRA 
CK* 

1490 PRINT @320, "input sector # 
( 1-18 ) " ; 

1500 INPUT SN$ 

1510 SN=VAL(SN$) ' GET NUMERIC VA 
LUE OF SECTOR # INPUT 
1520 GOSUB 12 80 'CLEAR THE INPUT 
LINE 

1530 IF SN<1 THEN 1480 'SEE IF I 

T'S A LEGAL VALUE 

1540 IF SN>18 THEN 1480 

1550 DSKI$ DN,TK,SN,A$,B$ 'READ 

SECTOR FROM DISK INTO A$ & B$ 

1560 CLS 

1570 RETURN 

1580 IF INKEY$="" THEN 1580 
1590 CLS 
1600 GOTO 250 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 151 



r 



161)3 '*THIS DISPLAYS SECTOR FOR 
CURRENT DRIVE & TRACK IN ASCII* 
1620 GOSUB 1480 'INPUT SECTOR NU 
MBER, & READ IT 
1630 N=l 

1640 FOR I=j3 TO 15 1 SHOW THIS MA 
NY LINES OF ASCII 

1650 AD=I+48 1 SHOW HEX ADDRESS 0 
F EACH "LINE, MAKE IT ASCII 
1660 IF AD> 57 THEN AD=AD+7 'COR 
RECT ASCII FOR HEX 'A-F» 
1670 PRINT @(32*I) ,CHR$(AD) ;"0= 
"; 'NOW PRINT ADDRESS ON LINE 
1680 FOR P=N TO N+15 'SHOW THIS 
MANY CHARS/ LINE 

1690 Z$=MID$(A$,P,1) 'GET CHARS 
ONE AT A TIME 

1700 IF Z$="" THEN Z$="." 'CHECK 

FOR UNPRINTABLE CHARS. 
1710 IF ASC(Z$)>&H7F THEN Z$="." 
1720 IF ASC(Z$)<&H20 THEN Z$="." 
1730 PRINT Z$; 'NOW SHOW CHAR. 0 
N SCREEN 
1740 NEXT P 

1750 N=P 'UNDATE CHAR. POINTER F 
OR NEXT LINE 

1760 IF N< 128 THEN 1790 'CHECK 



Canadians 



Send for your FREE copy 
of our 1986 Catalog 




I Kellynews Vol-3 is now available and 

contains news, hints, programs and articles 
from the crew at Kelly Software. We are 
Canada's largest national distributor of 
Color Computer products and we stock all 
the latest games, utilities, simulations and 
business programs. We encourage all 
Canadian Color Computer owners and 
Dealers to send for our FREE catalog. 



Kelly Software Distributors Ltd. 

P.O. Box 1 1 932 
Edmonton. Alberta T5J 3L1 
Tele (403) 421-8003 



FOR SECOND 1/2 OF SECTOR 

1770 N=l 'SECOND 1/2, RESET CHAR 

. POINTER 

1780 A$=B$ 'SET UP TO SHOW 2ND 1 

/2 OF SECTOR 

1790 NEXT I 

1800 GOTO 1580 

1810 CLS 3 

1820 GOSUB 1070 

1830 PRINT @228 , "MOTOR SPEED=" ; 
1840 POKE COM, RES 
1850 EXEC &H4FC0 

1860 T=256*PEEK(&H4FE4)+PEEK(&H4 
FE5) 

1870 IF T<>0 THEN 1900 

1880 RPM=0 

1890 GOTO 1910 

1900 RPM=(5600/T) *300 

1910 IF INKEY$<>"" THEN 1590 

1920 PRINT @240,""; 

1930 PRINT USING "###.# ";RPM; 

1940 PRINT " RPM "; 

1950 GOTO 1850 

1960 DATA 34,12,8E,0,0,B6,FF,48, 
30,1,27,12 ,84, 2,2 6, F5,8E, 0,0, B6, 
FF, 48, 30, 1,27, 4 ,84, 2 ,27,F5,AF,8D 
,0,2,35,92 

1970 CLS: PRINT "THE 'M' KEY WIL 

L TURN THE MOTORS"; 

1980 PRINT "ON OR OFF. IF PUSHED 

WHILE THE" 
1990 PRINT "MOTORS ARE ON, THEY 
WILL SHUT" 

2000 PRINT "OFF & VICE-VERSA. AN 
Y MENU ITEM" 

2010 PRINT "MAY BE SELECTED WITH 

THE MOTORS" 
2020 PRINT "IN EITHER STATE. IF 
AN ITEM IS" 

2030 PRINT "SELECTED WITH THE MO 
TOR OFF, THE"; 

2040 PRINT "COMMAND WILL TURN ON 

THE MOTORS,"; 
2050 PRINT "EXECUTE, & TURN IT B 
ACK OFF. IF" 

2060 PRINT "THE MOTOR IS ON, IT 
WILL STAY ON"; 

2070 PRINT "AFTER THE COMMAND EX 
ECUTES , " 

2080 PRINT "EXCEPT FOR THE RESTO 
RE COMMAND" 

2090 PRINT "WHICH WILL ALWAYS SH 
UT THE" 

2100 PRINT "MOTOR OFF AFTER IT I 

S DONE . " 

2110 GOSUB 3860 

2120 PRINT "THE »R' KEY WILL RES 
TORE THE" 



152 THE RAINBOW April! 986 



TEN MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS 

3»out DTNACALC 

THE ELECTRONIC SPREAD-SHEET FOR OS-9 SYSTEMS 



1. what is an electronic spread-sheet, anyway? 

Business people uses spread-sheets to organize col- 
umns and rows of figures. DYNACALC simulates the 
operation of a spread-sheet without the mess of 
paper and pencil. Of course, corrections and 
changes are a snap. Changing any entered value 
causes the whole spread-sheet to be re-calculated 
based on the new constants. This means that you 
can play WHAT IF? to your heart's content, 



2. is DYNACALC just for accountants, then? 

Not at all. DYNACALC can be used for just about any 
type of job. Not only numbers, but alphanumeric 
messages can be handled. Engineers and other 
technical users will love DYMACALC's fifteen-digit 
math and built-in scientific functions. With 6809 
DYNACALC you can build worksheets as large as 256 
columns or 256 rows (18278 columns or 9999 rows 
in 68000 versions). There's even a built-in sort com- 
mand, so you could use DYNACALC to manage small 
data bases — each row of the worksheet is 
one record. 



3. What Will DYNACALC do for ME? 

That's a good question. Basically the answer is that 
DYNACALC will let your computer do just about 
anything you can imagine. Ask your friends who 
have Lotus 1-2-3, VisiCalc, or similar programs, just 
how useful an electronic spread-sheet program can 
be for all types of household, business, engineering, 
and scientific applications. 



4. Do I have to learn computer programming? 

NO! DYNACALC is designed to be used by non- 
programmers, but even a Ph.D. in Computer Science 
can understand it Built-in HELP messages are provid- 
ed for quick reference to operating instructions. 



5. Do l have to modify my system to use dynacalc? 

Nope. DYNACALC uses any standard OS-9 configura- 
tion, so you don't have to spend money on another 
CPU board or waste time learning another operating 
system. 



6. Will dynacalc read my existing data files? 

You bet! DYNACALC has a beautifully simple method 
of reading and writing data files, so you can com- 
municate both ways with other programs on your 
system, such as the Stylo-Craph word processor, 
Sort/Merge, data base systems, or other programs 
written in Basic09, C PASCAL, FORTRAN, and so on. 



7. HOW fast is DYNACALC? 

Very DYNACALC is memory-resident, so there is no 
disk I/O to slow things down, The whole data array 
(worksheet) is in memory, so access to any point is 
instantanious. DYNACALC is 100% machine code for 
blistering speed. 



8. is there a version of dynacalc for my system? 

There's a version of DYNACALC for EVERY OS-9 
system. Unless you have a CoCo, you need a CRT ter- 
minal with at least 80 characters per line, and direct 
cursor addressing. You can mix different brands of 
terminal on the the same system. The CoCo OS-9 
version is compatible with 80-column hardware 
cards, or will work with the standard 32x16 screen. 



9. how much does dynacalc cost? 

Radio Shack sells the CoCo OS-9 version for $99.95. 
The general 6809 OS-9 version is priced at $250; 
$595 for the 0S-9/68k version. Foreign orders add 
$10 per copy for postage. We encourage dealers to 
handle DYNACALC since it's a product that sells in- 
stantly upon demonstration. Call or write on your 
company letterhead for more information. 



10. Where do l order dynacalc? 

If you have a CoCo, order # 26-3275 at your local 
Radio Shack store. Otherwise, see your local 
DYNACALC dealer, or order directly from CSC at the 
address below. We accept telephone orders from 10 
am to 6 pm, Monday through Friday Call us at 
514-576-5020. Your VISA or MasterCard is welcome. 
All orders are shipped on 5" diskette unless you 
specify otherwise. Please tell us if you need 
Microware (standard) or Mizar format. 



computer Systems Center 

42 Four Seasons Center #122 
Chesterfield, MO 63017 USA 

(314) 576-5020 




DYNACALC Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

OS-9 and Basic09 are trademarks of Microware & Motorola. 
1-2-3 is a trademark of Lotus Development corp. 

VisiCalc is a trademark of Visicorp. 
Stylo-Graph is a trademark of Stylo Software, inc. 
Radio Shack is a trademark of Tandy corp. 



DYNACALC W OS 9 



2130 PRINT "THE HEAD OF THE CURR 
ENT DRIVE TO"; 

2140 PRINT "TRACK 0. THE RESTORE 
COMMAND" 

2150 PRINT "WANTS THE TRACK 0 SW 
ITCH TURNED" 

2160 PRINT "ON. IF AFTER AN ALLO 
TTED AMOUNT" 

2170 PRINT "OF TIME, THE SWITCH 
DOES NOT, A" 

2180 PRINT "'DRIVE ?' MESSAGE AP 
PEARS. THIS" 

219)3 PRINT "OCCURS IF THE DRIVE 
IS NON-" 

2200 PRINT "EXISTENT OR SLOW. PU 
SHING ENTER" 

221)3 PRINT "WILL TRY TO RESTORE 
AGAIN, WHILE"; 

2 220 PRINT "ANY OTHER KEY WILL R 
E START THE" 

2230 PRINT "PROGRAM." ' 
2240 GOSUB 3860 

2250 PRINT "ENTERING A '0 TO 3' 
WILL SELECT" 

22 60 PRINT "THE DRIVE # THAT YOU 
WANT TO" 

2270 PRINT "WORK WITH. SELECTING 
A DRIVE" 

2280 PRINT "WILL AUTOMATICALLY R 
ESTORE THE" 

22 90 PRINT "DRIVE TO TRACK 0, SO 
THAT THE" 

2300 PRINT "PROGRAM WILL KNOW WH 
ERE THE HEAD"; 

2310 PRINT "IS ACTUALLY POSTITIO 
NED." 

2320 GOSUB 3860 

2330 PRINT "THE 'I' COMMAND STEP 
S THE DRIVE" 

2340 PRINT "IN 1 TRACK, (MOVES T 
HE HEAD ONE" 

23 50 PRINT "TRACK TOWARD THE CEN 
TER HOLE OF" 

2360 PRINT "THE DISK). THE 'O' C 
OMMAND STEPS"; 

2 370 PRINT "THE DRIVE OUT 1 TRAC 
K. BOTH KEYS"; 

2380 PRINT "AUTOMATICALLY REPEAT 

IF HELD" 
2390 PRINT "DOWN. IF THE MOTORS 
ARE ON" 

2400 PRINT "BEFORE EITHER KEY IS 

HELD DOWN," 
2410 PRINT "THE DRIVES WILL STEP 

MUCH" 

2420 PRINT "FASTER SINCE THE PRO 
GRAM DOESN'T"; 

2430 PRINT "HAVE TO WAIT FOR THE 



MOTORS TO" 
2440 PRINT "COME UP TO SPEED BEF 
ORE IT" 

2450 PRINT "STEPS." : GOSUB 3860 

2460 PRINT "THE 'G' COMMAND WILL 
ii 

2470 PRINT "AUTOMATICALLY STEP T 
HE DRIVE TO" 

2480 PRINT "THE DESIRED TRACK # 
ENTERED. THE"; 

2490 PRINT "COMMAND ACTUALLY RES 
TORES THE" 

2500 PRINT "DRIVE TO TRACK 0, TH 
EN STEPS IN" 

2510 PRINT "ONCE FOR EVERY TRACK 

#. IT WILL" 
2520 PRINT "LEAVE THE MOTOR ON/0 
FF STATUS" 

2 530 PRINT "UNCHANGED." : GOSUB 3 
860 

2 540 PRINT "THE 'H' COMMAND WILL 

ACTUALLY " 
2 550 PRINT "READ THE DATA FROM T 
HE CURRENT" 

2 560 PRINT "TRACK #, FOR THE SEC 
TOR ENTERED."; 

2570 PRINT "IT WILL DISPLAY THE 
DATA IN HEX-"; 

2580 PRINT "ADECIMAL NOTATION. D 
UE TO THE" 

2 590 PRINT "LIMITED SIZE OF THE 
SCREEN, 2 56" 

2 600 PRINT "BYTES OF DATA (1 SEC 
TOR) , WILL" 

2 610 PRINT "JUST FIT ON THE SCRE 
EN AT ONCE," 

2 620 PRINT "BUT THIS MEANT LEAVI 
NG OUT ALL" 

2 630 PRINT "THE SPACES & ADDRESS 

INFORMATION"; 
2 640 PRINT "HOWEVER, THERE ARE 1 
6 BYTES OF" 

2 650 PRINT "DATA/LINE. BY COUNTI 
NG LINES," 

2 660 PRINT "YOU CAN TELL WHICH R 
ELATIVE BYTE"; 

2 670 PRINT "# YOU ARE LOOKING AT 



PRACTICAL PLANE GEOMETRY 

9 FIGURES with DEFINITIONS, FORMULAS , AND SOLUTIONS FOR 58 
FIGURE ELEMENTS, MORE THAN 200 FRIENOLY FORMULAS, MENU DRIVEN 
For Architects, Carpenters, Draftsmen, Engineers, Estimators, 
Farmers, Realtors, Students, Surveyors, or similar interests. 



"PLANEGEO" - A double-sided disk with Definitions, 
Formulas, Solutions, and Manual (screen output ).{ 

"PGCALPRT" - A single-sided disk with Solutions , RAINBOW 
and Printer Output of your inputs and results. COTTIFICATION 
The Definitions and Formulas are in the Manual. SEAL 

Programs $25.00 ea . separately or both for $40.00 pp U.S.A. 
Order from TASC - P.O.Box 42825-330 [corrected from prev- 
ious ad), or 10619 Bayou Glen, Houston, TX. 77042. No C.O.D. 
or charge cards. Send your SASE for more information. 



1 54 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



II 



2680 GOSUB 3860 

2690 PRINT "THE 'A' COMMAND IS S 
IMILAR TO" 

2700 PRINT "THE 'H' COMMAND, & W 
ILL READ A" 

2710 PRINT "SECTOR AND DISPLAY I 
T IN ASCII." 

2720 PRINT "UNPRINTABLE CHARS. A 
RE SHOWN AS" 

273)3 PRINT "A ' . 1 THE COLUMN ON 
THE LEFT" 

2740 PRINT "SHOWS THE RELATIVE B 
YTE # OF THE"? 

2750 PRINT "FIRST CHAR. IN THAT 
ROW. THE 'A'"; 

2760 PRINT "COMMAND ALSO SHOWS 1 
6 BYTES OF" 

2770 PRINT "DATA/LINE." : GOSUB 3 
860 

2780 PRINT "caution: DO NOT USE 
EITHER THE" 

2790 PRINT "'A' OR »H' COMMAND U 
NLESS THE" 

2800 PRINT "DRIVE IS AT LEAST SO 
ME WHAT" 

2810 PRINT "ALIGNED, & CAPABLE 0 
F READING" 

2820 PRINT "DATA. THE PROGRAM US 
ES THE DSKI$"; 

2830 PRINT "BASIC STATEMENT TO R 
EAD THE" 

2840 PRINT "SECTOR FROM DISK. TR 
YING TO READ"; 

2850 PRINT "FROM A DRIVE, UNABLE 
TO READ" 

2860 PRINT "SECTORS, WILL RESULT 

IN AN I/O" 
2870 PRINT "ERROR. BOTH THE 'A' 
& 'H'" 

2880 PRINT "COMMANDS WERE INCLUD 
ED AS AN AID"; 

2890 PRINT "TO THOSE THAT DON'T 
HAVE AN" 

2900 PRINT "OSCILLISCOPE AND/OR 
AN ALIGNMENT"; 

2910 PRINT "DISK." :GOSUB 3860 
2920 PRINT "THEY WILL LET YOU VE 
RIFY THAT" 

2930 PRINT "THE HEAD IS ACTUALLY 

POSITIONED" 
2940 PRINT "OVER THE SAME TRACK 
THAT THE" 

2950 PRINT "DISK CONTROLLER THIN 
KS IT'S AT . » 

2960 PRINT "(TRACK 0 SWITCH ADJU 
STMENT. THE" 

2970 PRINT "TRACK ZERO SWITCH ST 
ATUS IS" 



2980 PRINT "SHOWN FOR THIS REASO 
N.)" 

2990 PRINT "FOR EXAMPLE, STEP TO 

TRACK 17, &"; 
3000 PRINT "READ SECTOR 3 USING 
THE 'A'" 

3010 PRINT "COMMAND. THIS IS PAR 
T OF THE" 

3020 PRINT "DIRECTORY. IF THE NA 
MES OF THE" 

3030 PRINT "FILES STORED ON THE 
DISK DON'T" 

3040 PRINT "APPEAR, THEN THERE I 
S A PROBLEM."; 
3050 GOSUB 3860 

3060 PRINT "THE OBJECT OF THE TR 
ACK 0 ADJUST"; 

3070 PRINT "IS TO FIND OUT WHERE 

THEY DISK" 
3080 PRINT "CONTROLLER THINKS TH 
E HEAD IS AT"; 

3090 PRINT "VS WHERE IT IS PHYSI 
CALLY AT." 

3100 PRINT "UPON STARTUP, DOS DO 
ES A RESTORE"; 

3110 PRINT "TO GET IT'S REFERENC 
E POINT. NOW"; 

3120 PRINT "BY COUNTING THE # OF 

TRACKS IT" 
3130 PRINT "STEPS IN OR OUT, IT 
SHOULD KNOW" 

3140 PRINT "WHAT TRACK IT IS AT. 
IF THE" 

3150 PRINT "SWITCH TURNS ON SAY 
AT TRACK 1," 

3160 PRINT "THE CONTROLLER GETS 
FOOLED &" 

3170 PRINT "WHEN IT STEPS IN 17 
TIMES TO" 

3180 PRINT "READ THE DIRECTORY, 
IT ACTUALLY" 

3190 PRINT "IS AT TRACK 18. THE 
RESULT IS AN"; 

3200 PRINT "I/O ERROR." : GOSUB 3 
860 

3210 PRINT "THE ACTUAL TRACK & S 
ECTOR #'S" 

3220 PRINT "ARE WRITTEN ONTO THE 

DISK DURING"; 
3230 PRINT "THE FORMATTING PROCE 
SS. IF THE" 

3240 PRINT "TRACK NUMBER READ IS 
NOT THE" 

3250 PRINT "SAME AS THE ONE IT T 
HINKS IT'S" 

3260 PRINT "AT FROM THE TRACK 0 
SWITCH, DOS" 

3270 PRINT "KNOWS SOMETHING IS W 
RONG . " 



April 19S6 THE RAINBOW 155 



328)3 PRINT "DOS WILL TRY TO REST 
ORE SEVERAL" 

3290 PRINT "TIMES TO PROPERLY PI 
CK UP THE" 

3300 PRINT "TRACK 0 SWITCH BEFOR 
E DECIDING" 

3310 PRINT "TO GENERATE AN I/O E 
RROR . " 

3320 PRINT "THIS IS THE EXTRA CL 
UNKING SOUND"; 

3330 PRINT "THAT IS SOMETIMES HE 
ARD AFTER" 

3340 PRINT "YOUR SYSTEM IS FIRST 

TURNED ON" 
3350 PRINT "WHEN YOU DO A DISK A 
CCESS. "; 
3360 GOSUB 3860 

3370 PRINT "THE OBJECT OF AN ALI 
GNMENT TEST" 

3380 PRINT "IS TO FIND OUT HOW T 
HE HEAD IS" 

3390 PRINT "FINELY POSITIONED WI 
THIN THE" 

3400 PRINT "TRACK. FACTORY WRITT 
EN DISKETTES"; 

3410 PRINT "SHOULD HAVE THE TRAC 
KS WRITTEN" 

3420 PRINT "AT FAIRLY CLOSE TO T 
HE IDEAL" 

3430 PRINT "LOCATION. IF YOUR DR 
IVE IS OUT" 

3440 PRINT "OF ALIGNMENT, YOU MA 
Y NOT KNOW" 

3450 PRINT "IT TILL YOU TRY TO R 
EAD & WRITE" 

3460 PRINT "A DISKETTE FROM ANOT 
HER DRIVE, &"; 

3470 PRINT "FIND I/O ERRORS OR M 
ULTIPLE" 

3480 PRINT "RESTORES WHILE DOS T 
RYS TO" 

3490 PRINT "PERFORM IT'S OPERATI 
ON." 

3500 GOSUB 3860 

3510 PRINT "TO CHECK THE TRACK 0 

ALIGNMENT , " 
3520 PRINT "USE THE 'G» COMMAND 
TO GO TO" 

3530 PRINT "TRACK 17 (THE DIRECT 
ORY) . USE" 

3540 PRINT "THE 'A' COMMAND TO R 
EAD SECTOR 3"; 

3550 PRINT "THE DRIVE SHOULD BE 
ABLE TO READ"; 

3560 PRINT "THE SECTOR with out 

moving the" 

3570 PRINT "head, AND THE NAMES 
OF THE FILES"; 



3580 PRINT "STORED ON THE DISK S 
HOULD APPEAR"; 

3590 PRINT "ON THE SCREEN. USE A 
WRITE" 

3600 PRINT "PROTECTED, STANDARD 
TRDOS FORMAT"; 

3610 PRINT "FACTORY WRITTEN DISK 
ETTE FOR" 

3620 PRINT "BOTH THE ALIGNMENT Sc 

TRACK 0" 
3630 PRINT "TESTS." : GOSUB 3860 
3640 PRINT "IF THE DRIVE RESTORE 
S & TRYS TO" 

3 650 PRINT "READ AGAIN, & THEN S 
UCEEDS , " 

3660 PRINT "THIS COULD BE AN IND 
ICATION OF" 

3670 PRINT "AN ALIGNMENT OR DIRT 
Y HEAD" 

3680 PRINT "PROBLEM. IF IT FAILS 

ALTOGETHER, "; 
3690 PRINT "TRSDOS WILL GENERATE 

AN I/O" 

3700 PRINT "ERROR. THIS COULD BE 

A VERY BAD" 
3710 PRINT "ALIGNMENT OR BAD TRA 
CK 0 ADJUST." 
3720 GOSUB 3860 

3730 PRINT "THE FINAL TEST IS TH 
E DISK" 

3740 PRINT "SPEED TEST. USE THE 
•S' COMMAND" 

3750 PRINT "TO MEASURE IT. THE S 
PEED SHOULD" 

3760 PRINT "BE 300.0 +/~ 2 RPM. 
THERE IS AN" 

3770 PRINT "ADJUSTMENT POTENT I OM 
ETER INSIDE" 

3780 PRINT "THE DRIVE. A MACHINE 

LANGUAGE" 
3790 PRINT "PROGRAM MEASURES THE 

TIME IT" 
3800 PRINT "TAKES FOR THE INDEX 
HOLE IN THE" 

3810 PRINT "DISK TO PASS BY, (1 
REVOLUTION) " 

3820 PRINT "AND THE PROGRAM DISP 
LAYS THE" 

3830 PRINT "SPEED CONTINUALLY ON 

THE SCREEN."; 
3840 PRINT "HOLD DOWN ANY KEY TO 

TERMINATE" 
3850 PRINT "THE TEST & RETURN TO 

THE MENU." 
3860 PRINT @ 480, "HIT ANY KEY T 
0 CONTINUE"; 

3870 IF INKEY$ ="" THEN 3870 
3880 CLS : RETURN 



156 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Here's a database program that, as the 
author says, "shows the wisdom of the 
'point and press' user environment. " 



Julie f The Mouse' 



About seven years ago I saw the 
Xerox Star and decided I 
needed one. Forget about typ- 
ing "CONTROL-R-shift-*-slash" to get a 
computer to perform some function, 
just roll the little mouse around. With 
a little hand-eye coordination I could 
see that when the mouse moved left, the 
arrow on the screen also moved left. 
Press the button and whatever the 
arrow is pointing to is called to action. 

I went back to my keyboard and 
typed away with the consolation that 1 
couldn't afford a Star. "Control-R- 
escape!" Then Apple brought out the 
Lisa computer, complete with mouse. I 
couldn't afford that either. Then Apple 
introduced the Macintosh and mouse; 
more affordable, but 1 already had a 
Radio Shack Color Computer and lots 
of programs I had spent months getting 
used to. 

Then I read that Radio Shack had 
introduced a mouse for the Color Com- 
puter. Since I had the computer, all I 
needed was the mouse. I dashed off to 



Stephen P. Clark is a computer special- 
ist at Florida State University. He has 
worked in data processing for J 5 years, 
and has a master 's degree in computer 
and management information systems 
from American University in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 



the nearest Radio Shack and looked at 
it. It was the right size, had a tail like 
a mouse, and had a button eyeball like 
the Star/ Lisa/ Mac mouse devices. It 
plugged into the joystick plug on the 
back of the computer and had a ball 
underneath that rolled when it moved. 

"I want to see a word processing 
window overlapping a spreadsheet 
window and a graphics window," I said 
to the sales person. 

He pulled out three ROM packs and 
stacked them up on the counter. I 
recognized them since I already had two 
of them at home. 

"How do you make the mouse con- 
trol these?" I asked. 

He answered, "Oh, the mouse works 
like a joystick. Anywhere you can use 
a joystick, you can use the mouse." 

Since I had a joystick, 1 didn't see the 
need for a "rodent" that did the same 
thing. 1 left without buying one, but I 
knew what I needed: software! I would 
first write a program to use the mouse, 
then buy one. A database seemed a 
natural application for the mouse. Not 
a large system with detailed formatting 
requirements and inquiry procedures, 
but a small one that would allow me to 
store names, addresses, references to 
magazine articles and other miscellane- 
ous items. 



By Stephen P. Clark 



The system would be like an index 
card file in that it would: 1) Have 
unformatted records, 2) Be indexed 
alphabetically, 3) Have no restrictions 
on updating and 4) Be accessed without 
typed commands. The hardware con- 
straints were that it had to run in a 16K 
Color Computer with one disk drive; 
the software constraints were that it 
should be written in BASIC with no 
special PEEKs or PDKEs. The result was 
Julie. 

The Julie Program 

The Julie program requires most of 
the user random-access memory 
(RAM) in a 16K system with one disk 
drive. Part of this RAM is needed to use 
the direct (ramdom access) disk files, 
part is used for string manipulation, and 
most of the rest is filled by the program. 
Having more than 16K will not improve 
performance, so you will not miss 
anything if you only have 16K. 

To start Julie, do the following: 

1) Turn everything on. 

2) Insert diskette in Drive 0. 

3) Type RUN "JULIE" and press 
ENTER. 

The first thing that happens is the 
screen is blanked (cleared to black 
color) and then filled with green in small 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 157 



chunks. This is as close to opening 
graphics as possible on a 16K system. 
Once the screen is all green, you will get 
a display that looks like the following: 

FILES: (102K flVRILflBLE) 
EXIT 
-> OPEN NEW FILE 

This is the Files screen. If there are any 
Julie files on the disk you are using, the 
names will be included in the list. Up to 
12 files can be included on a single 
diskette, a limit set by the number of 
lines on the screen display. 

Using the mouse you can move the 
arrow up or down to make a selection. 
Left and right movement of the mouse 
will not have any effect on the arrow. 
Move the arrow until it points to the 
option or file you want, then press the 
button. Since buttons tend to become 
worn and need to be pressed hard at 
times, I added feedback in the program; 
Whenever a button press is detected, the 
word "button" appears on the right side 
near the top of the screen. This is true 
throughout the program, so look for it 
if you are having trouble with your 
button. 

The choices lead to the following 
actions. 

Exit: This ends the program and 
returns to the familiar OK prompt. You 
are back in basic. 

Open New File: This is the way to 
create a new Julie file. If you point to 
this option and press the button, you 
will be asked for a filename. The name 
can be up to eight characters long, using 
the normal rules for naming files. Do 
not enter an extension since the pro- 
gram will add /JDF. This allows it to 
search the directory and find the files it 
can use. 

Filename: Any Julie (/JDF) files 
previously created are listed on the Files 
screen. If you point to the name of the 
file and press the button, that file will 
be opened for you. You can then add 
more data, modify existing data or just 
browse through the file. You can do all 
three while the file is open, and without 
changing modes or running another 
program. 

The Open File Screen 

When you open a file, you are pre- 
sented with a screen that looks like this: 

ROD EDIT EXIT INDEX DELETE FILES 
flBCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ+-WORD 



0 RECOROS IN filename 

1 58 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



This is the Open File screen. It is the 
basic means of communicating with a 
Julie file. The top "window" is where the 
arrow, under control of the mouse, 
operates. Within this window, the 
arrow can be moved freely up, down, 
right or left. It can be placed over a letter 
and will block the letter from view. As 
soon as you move the mouse (arrow), 
the letter will reappear. 

Use the same technique of pointing to 
something and pressing the button. To 
make a selection, you must place the 
arrow below what you want to select. 
On the top line, "add" through "files," 
you can point to any letter of the word. 
Be careful when selecting "delete." 

Line three of the top window contains 
the letters of the alphabet, a plus sign 
and minus sign and "word." This line is 
used to search the file for entries. 
Pointing to 'E' and pressing the button 
will find any entries beginning with *E\ 

"You could have an 
entire diskette for 
books, say, if your 
book collection is 
extensive. It could 
contain files like 
Fiction, Nonfict, 
Science, Computer 
or whatever 
categories you can 
think of." 



and so on. The plus sign will move to 
the next record, while the minus sign 
will move back one record; you can use 
these to step through the file sequen- 
tially. "Word" is used to search for 
entries containing a particular word or 
group of characters. Select it and you 
will be asked to enter a word to search 
for. 

In all the file search options, you can 
find the next similar record by pressing 
the button again, without moving the 
arrow. If you move the arrow, the 
program starts over. For example, point 
to a letter, then press the button. If a 
record is found, it will be displayed; 
press the button again and the next 
record will be displayed. Continue this 
until all have been displayed. 

The top line of options works as 
follows. 

Add: This is the way new records are 
added to a file. The top selection win- 
dow will be replaced with an instruction 



window for editing a record. The record 
will be entered in the middle window. 
The editor is a full-window editor and 
you can move the cursor anywhere in 
the window and type something. A low 
"beep" will sound as each key is pressed. 

The arrow keys move the cursor in 
four directions, but it will not leave the 
middle window. The enter key moves 
you to the next line. When you type 
something, it will be entered at the 
cursor position, and the cursor will 
advance one position. If you want to 
change a letter, put the cursor over it 
and type the new letter. SHiFT-Ieft-arrow 
will delete whatever is under the cursor; 
SHlFT-right-arrow will insert a space; 
the CLEAR key is used to end the pro- 
cess. 

The first letter in the record you enter 
is used to index the record, so plan 
ahead. If you do not start it with a letter, 
an 'X' is inserted. 

Edit: This works exactly like Add, 
except that you start with an existing 
record from the file instead of a blank 
record. To edit, you must first display 
the record, then move the arrow to Edit 
and press the button. Press the clear 
key to restore the record in the file. 

Exit: This is exactly like the Exit on 
the Files screen; it returns you to basic. 

Index: This shows you the index of 
all the first letters of all the records in 
the file. Periods are used to denote 
empty records. You can have up to 249 
records in one file, which would fill up 
most of a diskette. 

Delete: Used to delete records from 
a file. First, you must display the record 
by searching for it through the normal 
means, then, while it is on the screen, 
move the arrow to the Delete option 
and press the button. 

Files: This returns you to the Files 
screen so you can open another file, 
start a new file or simply exit. With this 
option it is easy to move back and forth 
among files without stopping and start- 
ing several programs, as is the case with 
some database systems. 

Records, Files and Databases 

A record is the smallest unit of data 
in Julie. It is composed of 249 charac- 
ters and can be in any format. You can 
put any text or numbers you want in a 
Julie record. The main disadvantage to 
the unformatted approach is that indi- 
vidual items are not recognized as being 
distinct. If you are searching for the 
word "Smith," you will also get "Black- 
smith," "Smithsonian," etc. 

A file is a collection of records in 
Julie. They do not have to be related, 



but should be to help you locate things 
in the future. I have a file called "Ad- 
dress" to keep my address book, and 
one called "Articles" to keep references 
to published articles. One called 
"Books" could be used to inventory 
books, and one called "Records" could 
keep your record collection in order. 
The only limit is your imagination. 

A diskette could reasonably be called 
a database. I have limited the system to 



operating on a single diskette, which 
must contain the program and the data 
files. You could have an entire diskette 
for books, say, if your book collection 
is extensive. It could contain files like 
Fiction, Nonfict, Science, Computer or 
whatever categories you can think of. 
The fact that books are in separate files 
does not present a problem, since you 
can go back and forth between files 
easily. 



I have found this program to be 
useful for storing many types of data. 
It is a pleasure to move the cursor 
around the screen with a joystick (I still 
haven't purchased a mouse), and shows 
the wisdom of the "point and press"user 
environment. 

(Any questions about this program 
may be directed to Stephen Clark, 1503 
Childs Street, Tallahasse, FL 32303; 
phone 904-644-4836.) □ 



The listing: JULIE 



220 , 


12 


540 ... 


...129 


680 , . 


1 


2110 


225 


2800 , 


40 


4050 


86 


6040 


41 


9020 


25 


9340 . 


146 


END 


...184 



10 GO TO 10000 
20 CLEAR 2000: DIM FX$ ( 12 ) : 1 CONTI 
NUE HERE 

100 'JULIE - AN EXPERIMENTAL LIS 

A WORKALIKE PROGRAM 

105 ' (C) 1983 BY S. P. CLARK 

110 GOSUB 9300: 'INITIALIZE 

120 IF PSNOLPSN THEN GOSUB 8000 

: 'PRINT SCREEN 

130 LPSN=PSN:CUR$=CHR$ (94) : ' SAVE 

CURSOR POSITION 
140 XC=INT(JOYSTK(0)/2)+l: 'LEFT- 
RIGHT READING 

150 YC=INT(JOYSTK(l)/4) +1: 'UP-DO 
WN READING 

155 IF YC>3 THEN YC=3 

160 PSN=YC*32+XC-1: 'CALCULATE CU 

RSOR POSITION 

170 IF YC=2 THEN CUR$=CHR$ (126 ) 
180 PRINT@PSN,CUR$; : 'WRITE CURSO 
R 

190 GOSUB 3000: 'CHECK BUTTON 
200 IF BUTTON=0 THEN 120: 'REPEAT 

IF NOT PRESSED 
210 LPSN=0: 'RESET CURSOR POSITIO 
N 

220 IF YC=1 AND XC<5 THEN GOSUB 

4000:GO TO 120: 'ADD NEW 

225 IF YC=1 AND XC<9 THEN GOSUB 

1500: GO TO 120: 'EDIT 

230 IF YC=1 AND XC<14 THEN CLOSE 

: END : 'END PROGRAM 

233 IF YC=1 AND XC<20 THEN GOSUB 
7000: GO TO 120 : ' SHOW INDEX 

23 5 IF YC=1 AND XC<27 THEN GOSUB 
5000: GO TO 120: 'DELETE CURRENT 

RECORD 



237 IF YC=1 AND XC>27 THEN CLOSE 
:GO TO 100:' START OVER 
240 IF YC=3 AND XC<27 THEN GOSUB 
6000:GO TO 120: 'SEARCH FOR MATC 

H 

243 IF YC=3 AND XC<29 THEN GOSUB 
2800: GO TO 120:' MOVE 1 RECORD 

245 IF YC=3 AND XC>28 THEN GOSUB 
2 500: GO TO 120:' WORD SEARCH 

250 GO TO 120: 'REPEAT 

500 ' 

RECORD INPUT/EDIT 

5 10 C=l : CUR$=CHR$ (159) : SR$=CHR$ ( 
93) :SL$=CHR$ (21) : PRINT@409 , STRIN 
G$(7,CHR$(128) ) ; 

512 IF LEN(WL$)<249 THEN WL$=WL$ 
+STRING$(249-LEN(WL$) , " ") 
515 U$=CHR$(94) :D$=CHR$(10) :L$=C 
HR$ ( 8 ) : R$=CHR$ ( 9 ) : CR$=CHR$ ( 13 ) : C 
S$=CHR$ (12) : 'POSITION CHARACTERS 
520 PRINT @0 , "COMMANDS : arrows CO 
NTROL CURSOR, shift R/L = INSERT 
/DELETE CHAR, enter = NEXT LINE, 

clear = END." 
540 IF C<1 OR C>249 THEN C=l 
560 PRINT @1 60, WL$ ; : PRINT@159+C , C 
UR$ ; 

590 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" "THEN 590 E 
LSE SOUND 150,1 

600 IF A$=U$ THEN C=C-3 2:GO TO 5 
40 

610 IF A$=D$ THEN C=C+32:GO TO 5 

40 

620 IF A$=L$ THEN C=C-l:GO TO 54 

630 IF A$=R$ THEN C=C+l:GO TO 54 
P 

640 IF A$=CR$ THEN C=32*INT ( (C+3 
l)/32)+l:GO TO 540: 'CARRIAGE RET 
URN 

650 IF A$=SL$ THEN I$=RIGHT$ (WL$ 
,249-C)+" " :MID$ (WL$,C)=I$:GO TO 
540 

660 IF A$=CS$ THEN 690: 'CLEAR = 
END 

665 IF A$=SR$ THEN I$=MID$ (WL$ , C 
,249) :MID$(WL$,C)=" "+I$:GO TO 5 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 159 



40 

670 MID$(WL$,C,1)=A$:C=C+1:G0 TO 
5 40:' ADD CHARACTER 

68 0 i CHECK FIRST CHARA 

CTER AND RETURN 

690 L$=LEFT$ (WL$, 1) : IF L$<"A" OR 

L$>"Z" THEN MID$(WL$,1,1)="X" 
695 RETURN 

1000 ' 

FIND NEXT INDEX RECORD MATCH 
1010 IF REC<0 THEN REC=0 
1020 I=REC+1 

1030 REC=INSTR(I,INDX$ / MATCH$) 
1040 IF REC>LOF(l)-l THEN REC=0 
1060 RETURN 

1500 i 

EDIT RECORD 

1505 IF REC<1 OR REC>LOF(l)-l TH 
EN RETURN 

1510 GOSUB 500:' EDIT 

1520 GOSUB 2000 : • STORE ON DISK 

1530 WL$=STRING$ (249," "): 'BLANK 

IT OUT 
154 0 RETURN 

2000 ' 

PUT RECORD IN SLOT "REC" 

2010 IF REC<1 OR REOLOF(l) THEN 

2100 
2015 GET#1,1 
2020 PRINT #1,WL$ 
2030 PUT #1,REC+1 
2050 MID$(INDX$,REC,1)=WL$ 
2080 PRINT #1,INDX$ 
2090 PUT #1,1 

2100 REC=0 
2110 RETURN 

2500 ' 

WORD SEARCH ROUTINE 
2510 IF WORD$<>"" THEN 2520 
2512 PRINT@160,STRING$(255," "): 
PRINT© 1 6 0, "ENTER THE WORD TO SEA 
RCH FOR " 

2514 LINE INPUT "?" ;WORD$ :REC=0 : 
NWS=0 : SMSG$=» "+LEFT$ ( WORD$ , 8 ) 
2516 IF LEN(SMSG$)<10 THEN SMSG$ 
=SMSG$+STRING$ ( (10-LEN (SMSG$) ) , 11 

2520 REC=REC+1:PRINT@160,STRING$ 
(255." ") 

2530 IF REC>LOF(l)-l THEN WORD$= 
"":GO TO 2600 

2540 IF MID$(INDX$,REC,1)="." TH 
EN 2520 

2550 GET #1,REC+1 

2560 LINE INPUT #1,WL$ 

2570 IF INSTR(1,WL$,WORD$)=0 THE 

N WL$="":GO TO 2520 

2580 NWS=1 



2590 RETURN 

2600 IF NWS=1 THEN SMSG$= " no 

more" ELSE SMSG$="not found" 

2 605 WORD$="" 
2 610 RETURN 

2800 ' 

NEXT RECORD + OR - 
2810 IF XC=27 THEN REC=REC+1 
2820 IF XC=2 8 THEN REC=REC-1 
2830 IF REC<1 OR REC>LOF(l)-l TH 

EN SMSG$=" no more" : RETURN 

2840 IF MID$(INDX$,REC / 1)="."THE 
N 2810 

2845 PRINT@160,STRING$(255," ") 
2850 GET#l,REC+l:LINE INPUT #1,W 
L$ 

2860 RETURN 

3000 ' 

CHECK BUTTON PUSH 

3010 BUTTON=0: 'SET INI T I ALLY=NO 
3020 TEST=PEEK(65280) : 'READ BUTT 
ON 

3030 IF TEST=255 OR TEST=127 THE 

N RETURN: 'NO PRESS 

3040 BUTTON=l: 'SET FOR YES , 

3045 PRINT© 54," button " ; 

3050 GO TO 3020: 'REPEAT UNTIL UP 

4000 • 

ADD A RECORD FROM INPUT 

4005 REC=0: 'INITIALIZE SEARCH 

4010 MATCH$=" . " 

4020 GOSUB 1000 : ' FIND EMPTY SLOT 
4030 IF REC<1 THEN REC=LOF(l) 
4040 IF RE0248 THEN WL$="*** TH 
IS FILE IS FULL ***":RETURN 
4045 IF FREE(0)<5 THEN WL$="*** 
THIS DISK IS FULL ***":RETURN 
4050 WL$=STRING$(2 49, " ") 
4060 GOSUB 500: 'INPUT RECORD 
4080 GOSUB 2000: 'PUT RECORD TO D 
ISK 

4085 WL$=STRING$ (255, " ") 
4090 RETURN 

5000 ' 

DELETE A RECORD 

5010 IF REC<1 OR REC>LOF(l)-l TH 
EN 5050 

5020 WL$=" ..." 

5030 GOSUB 2000:REC=0 

5040 SMSG$=" delete" 

5045- SOUND 100,5 

5047 WL$=STRING$ (255, " ") 

5050 RETURN 

6000 ' 

SEARCH FOR MATCHING RECORD 
6005 MATCH$=CHR$ (XC+64) 
6007 SMSG$="not f ound" : IF REC >0 
AND LMATCH$ = MATCH$ THEN SMSG$ 



160 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



II 



="no more 

6010 IF LMATCH$=" 11 THEN REC=0 

6015 LMAT CH $ =MAT CH $ 

6020 GOSUB 1000:' FIND MATCHING R 

ECORD 

6030 IF REC=0 THEN WL$=STRING$ (2 
55," ") :PRINT@54,SMSG$; 
6040 IF REO0 THEN GET#1 , REC+1 : L 
INE INPUT #1,WL$:SMSG$=" 



ii 



6045 PRINT@160,STRING$ (255, " ") 
6050 RETURN 

7000 ' 

SHOW THE INDEX 
7010 WL$=INDX$ 
7020 REC=0 

7030 SMSG$=" index" 
7040 RETURN 

8000 1 

PRINT A SCREEN 

8010 PRINT @0, LI $; 

8015 IF LPSN>0 THEN SMSG$=" 

" : WORD$=" " : LMATCH$=" " 
8020 PRINT@32,STRING$(23," ");SM 

SG$ ; 

8030 PRINT© 64, L3$? 

8040 PRINT@96,BLNK$; 

8050 PRINT@128,STRING$(32,CHR$(1 

28)); 

8060 PRINT@160,WL$ 

8070 PRINT@416,STRING$(32,CHR$(1 

28)) ; 

8080 PRINT @ 448, BLNK$; 

8085 PRINT@480,LOF(1) -1;" RECORD 

S IN 11 ; NAME $ ; 

8090 RETURN 

9000 1 

SET UP WINDOWS 

9j310 WORD$="":LMATCH$= M " 

9J320 CLS3 :PRINT§167, "OPENING ";N 

AME$; 

9j33j3 L1$="ADD EDIT EXIT INDEX DE 
LETE FILES" 

9040 L3$="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUV 
WXYZ+-WORD" 

9050 BLNK$=STRING$(32," ") 

9060 LPSN=0 

9070 PSN=1 

9080 CUR$=CHR$(94) 

9085 NL=LEN (NAME$) : IF NL>8 THEN 

NL=8 

9090 L$=LEFT$ (NAME$ , NL) +"/ JDF" 

91j30 OPEN "D" , #1, L$ , 256 

9105 IF L0F(1)<1 THEN INDX$=STRI 

NG$ (249,"."): REC=0 : WL$=INDX$ : PRI 

NT #1,INDX$:PUT #1,1 

9110 GET #1,1 

9120 LINE INPUT #1,INDX$ 



":CLS0 
ii . 



9130 WL$="":CLS 
9140 RETURN 

9300 i 

SELECT FILE 
9310 NF=0:FX$ (1)="ZZ 

:FX$(0)="exit": PRINT " 

9320 FOR 1=3 TO 11:DSKT$ 0,17,1, 

L$ , R$ : L$=L$+LEFT$ (R$ , 127 ) 

9330 FOR J=0 TO 7:CP=J*32 

93 35 PRINT " " ; 

9340 IF MID$(L$,CP+9,3)<>"JDF" T 

HEN 9440 

9350 T=ASC(MID$(L$,CP+1,1) ) :IF T 

=0 OR T=255 THEN 9440 

9360 R$=MID$ (L$,CP+1,8) 

9 370 'INSERT IN SORT ORDER 

9 380 FOR K=l TO NF 

9390 IF R$<FX$ (K) THEN 9410 

9400 NEXT K 

9410 FOR L=NF TO K STEP -1:FX$(L 

+1)=FX$(L) : NEXT L 

9420 NF=NF+1:FX$ (K)=R$ 

9430 IF NF>11 THEN 9452 

9440 NEXT J 

9450 NEXT I 

9452 L$="open"+CHR$ (128) +"new"+C 
HR$(128)+"file" 

9455 CLS:IF NF<12 THEN NF=NF+1 : F 
X$(NF)=L$ 

9460 PRINT@0," FILES: (";INT 
(FREE(0) *2304/1000) ;"K AVAILABLE 

)" 

9490 FOR 1=0 TO NF 

9500 PRINT " ";FX$(I) 

9510 NEXT I 

9515 IF NF>9 THEN PRINT@448 , " *** 

LIMIT 12 FILES PER DISK ***"; 
9520 LPSN=0 

9522 XC=JOYSTK(0) :NI=INT(JOYSTK( 
l)/4) :PSN=(NI+1) *32+4 

9523 IF PSN>420 THEN PSN=420 

9524 PRINT§LPSN, " " ; : PRINT @PSN, 
"->"; :LPSN=PSN 

9526 GOSUB 3000:'CHECK BUTTON 
9528 IF BUTTON=0 THEN 9522 
9530 IF NK0 OR NI>NF THEN PRINT 
@54," "; :GO TO 9522 

9535 NAME$=FX$(NI) 

9540 IF NAME$=L$ THEN PRINT@492, 
STRING$ ( 8 , CHR$ (128)) ; "/JDF" ; : PRI 
NT@480,"FILE NAME :";: INPUT NAME$ 
9545 IF NAME$="exit" THEN CLOSE: 
PRINTS 4 48,"";: END : 1 EXIT 
9547 IF LEN (NAME$) >8 THEN NAME$= 
LEFT$ (NAME$, 8) 
9550 GOSUB 9000 
9560 RETURN 

10000 PCLEAR1:FILES3 :GO TO 20 _ 



April 1986 THE HAINBOW 161 



Hire the CoCo 
Handiman 



By Leonard Hyre 




o, what do you do now that 
all the aliens are dead and you 
don't want to process any 

words?" 

If you have a computer, then you 
know the person whose words I'm 
quoting. He or she just doesn't see how 
a computer could be of any use to them. 
Well, you might just load up CoCo- 
Handiman and give him a demonstra- 
tion. 

Actually, CoCo- Handiman can be 
your helper around the house. If you 
want to do some paneling, painting, 
wallpapering, or if you wish to carpet 
a room, pour a concrete patio, or even 
tile a bath or ceiling, then this program 
is for you. Whatever the job, just choose 
from the menu and answer prompts on 
the screen. A printed "job estimate" is 
optional after each calculation. This is 
very handy for comparing the final cost 
of a project using various price ranges 
for construction, or for determining 
how much material will be needed for 
a particular job. 

Leonard Hyre is the author of Federal 
Hill Software's Handicapper series and 
a number of articles for RAINBOW. He 
also published several articles in rain- 
bows sister publication, SOFT SECTOR, 
for Sanyo computers, and is the author 
q/"Sanyopoly, a new Sanyo game from 
Michigan Software. 

162 THE RAINBOW April 1986 





No instructions for use are necessary. 
Just make a couple of dry runs for each 
menu selection and you'll be an expert 



Program Structure 

Eight separate subroutines make up 
the bulk of CoCo- Handiman. These 
consist of a title screen, six different 
calculation routines and a printer out- 
put. Each can easily be followed 
through without difficulty. 

Title Screen: Lines 1145-1165 are 
used to display the title and author's 
name (ego stroke). Alternately poking 
359 with 57 and 126 causes the text on 
the screen to flash between black on 
green and red on orange. After a few 
seconds the program jumps to the menu 
screen (lines 30-90). Of interest to the 
novice might be the use of the INSTR 
command in Line 85. This is a powerful 
CoCo command, not available on many 
machines costing much more. 

Paneling and Painting: Lines 95-160 
are shared by Paneling and Painting 
equally. The necessary measurements 
are obtained here. Paneling continues 
from Line 1 65 through 2 1 0 and painting 
is completed from 215 through 305. 

Wallpaper: This subroutine occupies 
lines 310-405, first obtaining needed 
measurements and wallpaper data from 
the user before offering an estimate of 
rolls needed and total cost. 



Sample Printouts 

************************************************* V ******************** 

********************************************************************** 

COCO-HANDIMAN 
JOB ESTIMATE 

********************************************************************** 
********************************************************************** 



CARPETING CALCULATION: LIVING ROOM 

MAIN AREA 50 BY 30 FEET 
COST PER SQ/YD$ 3.00 

YOU WILL NEED 166 SQUARE YARDS 
TOTAL COST: $ 498.00 

********************************************************************** 
********************************************************************** 

COCO-HANDIMAN 
JOB ESTIMATE 

********************************************************************** 
********************************************************************** 



CONCRETE ESTIMATE 

*****MAIN AREA***** 

WIDTH 100 FEET 0 INCHES 
LENGTH 120 FEET 0 INCHES 
DEPTH 10 FEET 0 INCHES 

TOTAL CUBIC YARDS REQUIRED : %4444.44 

*********************************** *********************************** 
********************************************************************** 

COCO-HANDIMAN 
JOB ESTIMATE 

********************************************************************** 
********************************************************************** 



FLOOR TILE CALCULATIONS: MASTER BEDROOM 

MAIN AREA 30 BY 40 INCHES 
USING 9 INCH TILES, 
YOU WILL NEED 21 TILES 



890 .. 


....250 


965 . 


,175 


1000 


96 


1055 . 


148 


1085 


, 125 


END 


....190 



5 REMCOCO HANDIMAN 
1J3 REM32K COCO 

15 REM(C)1986 L.HYRE CAMBRIDGE M 
D 

20 CLS 

25 GOSUB 1145 

3J3 CLS:GOSUB645:PRINTSTRING$(66, 
246)" COCO** HANDIMAN 
" ;STRING$(66,246) ; : PRINTSTRING$ 
(11,255);" THE MENU ";STRING$(11 
j 2 5 5 ) / 



35 ZZ=j3:ZY=j3:ZX=j3:WN=j3:WP=j3:DR=j3 
: NF=j3 : GN=J3 : CG=j3 : CP=j3 : NW=j3 : SB=j3 : T 
W=J3 : HW=j3 : NZ=j3 : ND=J3 : CR=J3 : WM=J3 : LM= 
J3 : AW=J3 : AL=j3 : BW=J3 : BL=j3 : CW=j3 : CL=j3 : 
CX=# : WX=j3 : YD=j3 : WF=J3 : WI=j3 : LF=J3 : LI 
==j3:HF=j3:HI=j3 

4j3 AW=j3:AK=j3:AL=j3:AI=j3:AH=j3:AJ=j3 

: TW=J3 : TX=j3 : TL=j3 : TY=j3 : TH=j3 : TZ=j3 : W 

TL=j3:LTL=j3:OQ=j3 

45 PRINTTAB (11) ;"1. PANELING" 

5J3 PRINTTAB (11) ; 11 2 . PAINTING" 

55 PRINTTAB ( 11) ;" 3. WALLPAPER" 

6 J3 PRINTTAB ( 1 1 ) ; " 4 . CARPET ING " . 

65 PRINTTAB (11) ; "5 . CONCRETE" : PRI 

NTTAB (11) ; "6. TILES" 

7J3 SOUND12 5,1: PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 8 ) ; 

"YOUR CHOICE?": SOUND125 , 1 : PRINT 

STRING$(32,142) ; 

75 AN$=INKEY$ 

8j3 IF AN$=" "THEN 75 



Carpeting and Tiles: These two menu 
choices ('4' and '6*) share the same basic 
calculation, with special requirements 
for each being differentiated by the 
original menu selection string, AN$(4 
or 6)! (lines 415-570). Also, a room 
outline is on-screen to show the user 
some of the terminology to be encoun- 
tered. The room is drawn by printing 
CHR$(128) as needed. Lines 580-620 
complete the carpeting routine. Tiles 
are finished up with lines 825 through 
915. 

Concrete: Lines 655-820 handle the 
concrete chores. This one required a bit 
more detailed drawing as an example so 
the PMODE 1 screen is called up for a 
drawing of a concrete pour (optional to 
user). 

Print Routine: Lines 920-1125 pro- 
vide printer owners with optional job 
estimates. I must now make a confes- 
sion. My friend Mike Himowitz is the 
creator of the print routine. Wow, I'm 
glad to get that off my mind! I think you 
will agree he has done a super job here. 

Final Comment 

I believe you will find CoCo- 
Handiman a useful addition to your 
CoCo software library. It's not the type 
of program you will use every day, 
rather one that will be used as any other 
tool — when the need arises. 

In case you are intimidated by the 
length of the program, I will be happy 
to send you a copy on tape for $4.50 to 
cover the cost. Just send the $4.50 along 
with your request to: Leonard Hyre, 
P.O. Box 403, Cambridge, MD 
21613. □ 




75 202 475 71 

135 86 550 233 

220 94 610 73 

285 95 695 132 

350 216 760 96 

430 23 815 24 



The listing: HRNDIMRN 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 163 



85 ON INSTR("123456",AN$)GOTO 95 

,95,31)3,415,655,415 

90 GOTO 75 

95 CLS:GOSUB625:PRINT@0,STRING$( 
32 ,204) : PRINT : PRINT"MEASURESMENT 

S ":PRINTSTRING$(16,131) : PRINT 

»HT OF WALL(FT/IN. ) " : INPUT "FT. " 
;HA$ :GOSUB625 : INPUT" IN" ;HB$ : GOSU 
B625 

100 PRINT "WIDTH A (FT/IN) ": LINEI 
NPUT"FT? " ; WF$ : GOSUB625 : LINEINPUT 
"IN?" ;WI$ : GOSUB625 : INPUT "NO . OF W 
ALLS THIS SIZE";AZ:GOSUB635:PRIN 
T" WIDTH B ( FT/ IN) ": LINEINPUT" FT? 
" ;WG$:GOSUB625:LINEINPUT"IN?" ;WJ 
$:GOSUB625:INPUT"NO.OF WALLS THI 
S SIZE";AX:GOSUB635 
105 CLS:PRINTSTRING$ (32,204) :PRI 

NT : PRINT "MEASUREMENTS " : PRINTS 

TRING$(16,131) 

110 INPUT"NO.OF REGULAR WINDOWS" 
;WN:GOSUB 625 

115 INPUT"NO.OF PICTURE WINDOWS" 

; WP : GOSUB62 5 : OQ=WP 

12J3 INPUT"NO.OF DOORS ";DR:GOSUB 

625 

125 ZZ=VAL(HA$) *12+VAL(HB$) 

130 ZY=VAL(WF$) *12+VAL(WI$) 

135 ZX=VAL(WG$) *12+VAL(WJ$) 

14 0 WA=WN*1152:WP=WN*2306:DA=DR* 

19 80 : RE=WA+WP+DA 

145 PCLS:GOSUB645 

150 GA=(ZZ*ZY) *AZ+(ZZ*ZX) *AX:GA= 
GA-RE 

155 NF=INT(GA/144) :NI=GA-(NF*144 
) 

160 IFAN$="1"THEN 165 ELSEIF A 
N$="2"THEN 215 ELSEIF AN$="3"THE 
N310 

165 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , " . ") ;: PRINT" 

WHAT ROOM ARE WE WORKING WITH? 
170 LINEINPUT RM'$:IF RIGHT$(RM$, 
4)<>"ROOM" THEN RM$=RM$+" ROOM": 
GOSUB625 
175 NP=NF/32 

180 CLS:GOSUB645: PRINT@0 , STRING 
$(64,200) ;: PRINT" PANEL CA 

LCULATIONS" : PRINTSTRING$ (32 ,200) 
185 PRINT" FOR YOU TO DO THE": PR 
INT" ";RM$: PRINT" YOU WILL NEED 
APPROXIMATLEY" : PRINTUSING" ### . #" 
;NP: PRINT" SHEETS OF PANEL" 
190 PRINTSTRING$ (32,200) 
195 PRINT "PRINT THIS (Y/N)"; 
200 LQ$=INKEY$:IFLQ$=""THEN200 
205 IF LQ$="Y"THEN GOSUB940 
210 GOTO 30 

215 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(33,208) ;:PR 
INT" PAINTING CALCULATIONS 



»;STRING$(33,208) ,* 
220 PRINT "WHAT ROOM ARE WE WORKI 
NG WITH?";STRING$(33,128) ; : LINE 
INPUT RM$:IF RIGHT$(RM$,4)<>" RO 
OM"THEN RM$=RM$+" ROOM" : GOSUB625 
225 PRINT"COST OF PAINT/ GALLON? $ 
" ; : LINEINPUT CG$ : GOSUB625 
230 PRINT "HOW MANY COATS WILL Y 
OU APPLY? 11 ; : LINEINPUT NC$ : GOSUB 
625 

235 PRINT"HOW MANY SQ. FT/GAL" :PR 
INT" DOES MFG . RECOMEND? " : LINEINP 
UT FG$:GOSUB625 

240 PRINT"WILL YOU BE DOING THE 

CEILING? (Y/N) 11 .-GOSUB625 

245 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 245 

250 IFA$=<>"Y"THEN 2 60 

255 NF=( (ZY*ZX)/144)+NF 

260 CLS:GOSUB645 

265 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(3 3,201) ; : PR 
INT" PAINTING CALCULATIONS 

";STRING$(33,201) ; 
270 PRINT: PRINT "TO PAINT THE " ; : 
PRINTRM$: PRINT "YOU WILL NEED ":G 
N=NF/VAL ( FG$ ) *VAL(NC$) :PRINTUSIN 
G» ###.#••; GN ; : PRINT " GALLONS . " 
275 PRINT: PRINT" THE APPROXIMATE 
COST WILL BE" 
280 CG=VAL(CG$) :CP=GN*CG 

285 PRINTUSING"$###.##";CP 
290 PRINT "PRINT THIS <Y/N>?" 
295 OG$=INKEY$:IFOG$=""THEN295 
300 IFOG$="Y"THEN GOSUB965 
305 GOTO 30 

310 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(33,202) ;" 

WALLPAPER CALCULATION ";ST 
RING$ (33 ,202) 

315 INPUT "WHAT ROOM ARE WE WORKI 
NG WITH ";RM$:IF RIGHT$ (RM$ , 4 ) <> 
"ROOM "THEN RM$=RM$+" ROOM": GOSUB 
625 

320 PRINT "MEASURE & RAISE RESUL 
T TO THE NEXT WHOLE FOOT J 
325 PRINT"NOTE: WE WILL BE USIN 
G STANDARD 3 6 SQ.FT. ROLL FOR CAL 
CULATIONS WITH 6 SQ. FT FOR PATTE 
RN MATCH. 

330 PRINT "ON OCCASION YOU MAY FI 
ND DOUBLE LENGTH ROLLS OF 72 SQ. 
FT. " 

335 INPUT"WILL YOU BE USING THE 1 
SINGLE' SIZE <Y/N>";SS$:PCLS 
340 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ (32, "*") "*** 
* *WALLPAPER MEASUREMENTS *****" ST 
RING$(32, "*") ;: INPUT" WIDTH WALL 
A" ;WA$: INPUT "NO. WALLS THIS SIZE" 
;NW 

345 INPUT"WIDTH WALL B";WB$:INPU 
T"NO. WALLS THIS SIZE";SB 



164 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



3 50 TW=VAL ( WA$ ) *NW+VAL ( WB $ ) * S B 
355 INPUT "HEIGHT OF WALLS" ;HW: IN 
PUT"NO . OF WINDOWS " ; NZ : INPUT "NO . 0 
F DOORS" ;ND 

3 6/3 RO=(TW*HW)/30-(INT(NZ)/2+ND) 
+1:IF SS$="N"THEN RO=RO/2 :RO=INT 
(RO) 

365 INPUT"COST PER ROLL";CR 
37/3 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(34 / 159) " 

WALLPAPERING " ; STRIN 

G$ ( 3 4 , 159 ) ; " FOR WALLPAPERING THE 
" : PRINTRM$ 

375 PRINT"YOU NEED ";INT(RO);" R 
OLLS" 

38/3 PRINT: PRINT "YOUR COST OF PAP 
ER IS "; 

385 PRINTUS ING" $###.##"; CR*RO : PR 
INT 

390 PRINT "PRINT THIS? <Y/N>" 
395 OG$=INKEY$ : IFOG$=" "THEN395 
400 IF OG$="Y"THEN GOSUB 990 
405 GOTO 30 

415 CLS:GOSUB645:PRINT STRING$(3 
2,200) ,*:IF AN$= " 4 " THENPRINT " 

** CARPETING A ROOM ** ";EL 
SEIFAN$="6"THENPRINT" ***T 
ILING A ROOM*** "; 
420 PRINTSTRING$(32,131) ; 
425 PRINT" TERMS TO UNDERSTAND:": 
PRINTTAB(5) "1-MAIN ROOM AREA" : PR 
INTTAB ( 5 ) " 2 -CUT OUTS " : PRINTTAB ( 5 
)"3-ADD ONS" 

43)3 PRINT§228,STRING$(24,128) :FO 
RDW=2 60TO4 20STEP3 2 : PRINT@DW , CHR$ 
(128): NEXTDW : FORDW=2 8 3 T03 7 9 STEP3 
2 : PRINT@DW , CHR$ (128): NEXTDW 
435 PRINT@380,STRING$(2,128) :PRI 
NT@443 , STRING$ (3 , 128) : FORDW=382T 
0446STEP32:PRINT@DW,CHR$(128) :NE 
XTDW 

440 PRINT§420,STRING$(27,128) : PR 
INT§263,STRING$(3,128) ; 
445 PRINT@266,"<-3 " ; : PRINT§333 , 
»<-l->" ; : PRINT§406 , "2->" ; 

450 PRINT@4 90, "press any key"; 

455 CT$=INKEY$:IFCT$=""THEN 455 

4 60 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ ( 3 3 , 179 ) ; "WH 
ICH ROOM ARE WE WORKING WITH"; ST 
RING$ (33, 179 ) ; : INPUTRM$ : IF RIGHT 
$(RM$,4)O"R00M"THEN RM$=RM$+" R 
OOM" 

465 IF AN$="4"THENPRINTSTRING$(3 
8,255) "MEASURING FOR CARPET" ;STR 
ING$(38,255) ; :ELSEIFAN$="6"THENP 
RINTSTRING$ (38 , 255) "MEASURING FO 
R TILES " ;STRING$ (38,255) ; 
47 0 IF AN$="4"THENPRINT"USE NEAR 
EST FOOT FOR MEASUREMENT" ;: ELSE 
IF AN$="6"THEN PRINT " PLEASE ENTE 



R TOTAL NUMBER INCHES"; 

475 PRINTSTRING$ (32,195) ;: INPUT 

"WIDTH MAIN AREA" ;WM: GOSUB625 : IN 

PUT "LENGTH MAIN AREA" ;LM: GOSUB 6 

25 

480 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(3 2,195) :PRI 
NT "ADD-ON Areas (Y/N) " : G0SUB625 
485 A1$=INKEY$:IFA1$=""THEN 485 
490 IF A1$="Y"THEN INPUT"WIDTH 
" ; AW : INPUT" LENGTH " ; AL 
495 IF A1$<>"Y"THEN 520 
500 PRINT"OK. ANY MORE? (Y/N)":G 
OSUB 635 

505 A2$=INKEY$:IFA2$=""THEN 505 
510 IF A2$="Y" THEN PRINT"I ONLY 
HAVE PROVISIONFOR 1 MORE AREA." 
:PRINT"SO ADD TOGETHER" : PRINT "AL 
L OTHER ADD ON 1 S " : F0RX=1T04 : PLAY 
"V3 1T150O4ACEGO5ACEG" : NEXTX 
515 IF A2$="Y"THEN INPUT"WIDTH 
" ; BW : GOSUB6 2 5 : INPUT" LENGTH 11 ; BL : 
GOSUB625 

520 IF AN$="4"THEN JQ$="FOOT" 
525 IF AN$="6"THEN JQ$="INCH" 
530 PRINTSTRING$(32,131) ; "NOW FO 
R 'CUT-OUTS '":PRINT "REMEMBER TO 
MEASURE TO NEAREST ";JQ$ 
535 PRINT "ARE THERE ANY?-":GOSUB 
635 

540 A3$=INKEY$:IFA3$=""THEN 540 
545 IF A3$<>"Y"THEN 570 
550 IF A3$="Y"THEN PRINT "WIDTH " 
; : INPUT CW: GOSUB625 : INPUT" LENGTH 

";CL:GOSUB625 
555 PRINT "ANY MORE 'CUT-OUTS'?": 
F0RX=1T05 : PLAY"V31O5T150AGAGAG" : 
NEXTX 

560 A4$=INKEY$:IFA4$=""THEN 560 

565 IF A4$="Y"THEN INPUT"WIDTH " 

; CX : INPUT " LENGTH " ; WX 

570 IF AN$="6" THEN 825 

575 PRINTSTRING$(3 2,131) :PRINT"C 

OST PER SQ. YARD": INPUT YC:GOSUB6 

25 

580 CLS:GOSUB645:PRINT@0,STRING$ 
(32,142) : PRINT" CARPETING CALCULA 
TION" : PRINTSTRING$ (32,142) 
585 PRINT"YOU WILL NEED APPROX." 

• 

590 CC=(WM*LM)+(AW*AL)+(BW*BL)-( 
CW*CL) - (CX*WX) : YD=CC/9 
595 PRINT INT(YD) ; "SQ . YDS" : PRINT 
"OF CARPET." 

600 PRINTSTRING$(32,142) : PRINT" Y 
OUR COST WILL BE ABOUT. ..": CS=YC 
*INT ( YD) : PRINTUSING" $#,###. ##";C 
S:PRINT"FOR THE ";RM$ 
605 PRINTSTRING$(32,131) ; "PRINT 
THIS? <Y/N>" : PRINTSTRING$ (32,131 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 165 



) 

610 OG$=INKEY$:IFOG$=""THEN 610 
615 IF OG$="Y"THEN GOSUB1015 
620 GOTO30 

625 PLAY"T100V31O5AGA" 
630 RETURN 

635 PLAY"T100V3 101GGGGG" 
640 RETURN 

645 PLAY"T100V31O5ACGACG" 
650 RETURN 
655 CLS 

660 PRINTSTRING$(38, 148) "CONCRET 
E VOL.MEASURE";STRING$(38,148) 
665 PRINT 11 FOR CONCRETE MEASUREME 
NT YOU CANFIRST OBTAIN THE HEIGH 
T, WIDTH AND DEPTH OF THE MAJOR 

PART OF THE PROJECT. THEN WE 
CAN 'ADD- ON' THE OTHER AREAS AS 
REQUIRED OR ' TAKE-OFF ' . " 
670 FORTI=1TO500:NEXT:SOUND125,1 
: PRINT: PRINT "DO YOU WISH TO SEE 
AN EXAMPLE »;:INPUT" <Y/N>";AN$ 
:IF AN$ SS "Y"THEN 675 ELSE 700 
675 PMODE1 / 1:PCLS:FORTI=1TO590:N 

EXT:SCREEN1,0 

680 LINE(0,0)-(255,181) ,PSET,B:D 

RAW" BM60 , 1 10 ;C3 ;R120G30L120E30D2 

0G30U20BD20R120U20BD2 0E30U20BD2 0 

L120BR120BG15U20R30G15L30BD20R30 

U20BD20E15U20BD20L30 

685 LINE (0,40) -(255, 40) , PSET 

690 DRAW"BM12 , 142 ;C4 ; D20R8E2U18H 

2L8BR4BU9D5BD30D5" :DRAW"BM206, 13 

0;C4;D16F4E4U16BD16F4E4U16BH3E8B 

G30BF3G8 

695 DRAW"BM110 , 80 ; C4 ; D20R12BR3BU 
10BR8L8BL20L8" : FORTI=1TO1600 : NEX 
T 

700 CLS:SOUND166,l:SOUND135,l 
705 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ (33,148);" 

CONCRETE MEASUREMENT ";ST 
RING$(33,148) 

710 PRINT "ENTER ALL MEASUREMENTS 
AS 'FEET' AND THEN REMAINING AS 
• INCHES 1 . " 

715 INPUT"WIDTH FT. " ;WF: INPUT"WI 
DTH + IN.";WI 

720 INPUT " LENGTH FT . " ; LF : INPUT " L 
ENTH + IN."; LI 

725 INPUT"HEIGHT (OR DEPTH) FT."; 
HF: INPUT "HEIGHT + IN.";HI 
730 MSQ=( (WF*12)+WI) *( (LF*12)+LI 
)*( (HF*12)+HI) 

735 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ (33,148);" 

CONCRETE MEASUREMENT " ;ST 

RING$(33,148) :INPUT"ANY ADD-ON A 
REAS (Y/N)";AO$ 

740 IF AO$="Y"THEN 785 ELSE 745 
745 INPUT"ANY TAKE-OFF AREA'S (Y 



/N) »;TU$ 

750 IF TU$="Y"THEN 805 ELSE 755 
755 VCU=MSQ/46656 

760 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ ( 3 2 , 14 8 ) ; "TO 
COMPLETE PROJECT YOU WILL USEAP 
PROXIMATLE Y " ; : PRINTUS ING" ###.#" ; 
VCU;:PRINT" CU.YDS OF" : PRINT "CON 
CRETE . " 

765 PRINT:PRINTSTRING$(32,131) ;" 
PRINT THIS? <Y/N>":PRINTSTRING$( 
32,131) 

770 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 770 
775 IF A$="Y"THEN GOSUB 1060 
780 GOTO 30 

785 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ (33,148) ;" 

CONCRETE MEASUREMENT ; ' " ; ST 
RING$ (33,148): GOSUB113 5 : INPUT"WI 
DTH FT.";AW:INPUT"WIDTH IN.";AK: 
INPUT " LENGTH FT . " ; AL : INPUT " LENGT 
H IN.";AI:INPUT"HEIGHT FT.";AH:I 
NPUT"HEIGHT IN.";AJ 
790 ACU=((AW*12)+AK)*((AL*12)+AI 
)*((AH*12)+AJ) 
795 MSQ=MSQ+ACU 
800 GOT0745 

805 CLS : PRINTSTRING$ (33,148);" 

CONCRETE MEASUREMENT ";ST 
RING$ (33,148): GOSUB1140 : INPUT"WI 
DTH FT. ";TW: INPUT "WIDTH IN.";TX: 
INPUT " LENGTH FT . " ; TL : INPUT " LENGT 
H IN.";TY:INPUT"HEIGHT FT.";TH:I 
NPUT" HEIGHT IN.";TZ 
810 TCU=( (TW*12)+TX) *( (TL*12)+TY 

)*( (TH*12)+TZ) 
815 MSQ=MSQ-TCU 
820 GOTO 755 

825 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(67,198) ;" 

TILE CALCULATIONS " ; STRING 
$ ( 67 / 198 ) 7 

830 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , 131) "ARE YOU 
USING 9 OR 12 INCH TILES (9 or 1 
2)" 

835 INPUT TL$ 

840 IF TL$="9"OR TL$="12"THEN 84 

5 ELSE 835 

845 TL=VAL(TL$) 

850 GOSUB885:W4=INT(CW/TL) :L4=IN 
T (CL/TL) :W5=INT(CX/TL) : L5=INT (WX 
/TL) 

855 TN=(W1*L1) :IF A1$="Y" THEN T 
N=TN+ (W2*L2) : IF A2 $= " Y " THEN TN=T 
N+(W3*L3) 

860 IF A3$="Y" THEN TN=TN-(W4*L4 
):IF A4$="Y"THEN TN=TN- (W5*L5) 
865 PRINTSTRING$ (32,198): PRIWE" Y 
OU WILL NEED ": PRINT INT(TN)+1;" 
TILES 

870 PRINTSTRING$(32,131) ; -.PRINT" 
PRINT THIS? (Y/N) " 



166 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



875 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 875 
88j3 IF A$="Y" THEN 1085ELSEGOTO 
3J3 

885 IF WM/TLOINT (WM/TL) THEN Wl= 

INT(WM/TL)+1 ELSE W1=WM/TL 

890 IF LM/TLOINT (LM/TL) THEN Ll= 

INT(LM/TL)+1 ELSE L1=WM/TL 

895 IF AW/TLOINT (AW/TL) THEN W2= 

INT(AW/TL)+1 ELSE W2=AW/TL 

90f5 IF AL/TLOINT ( AL/TL) THEN L2= 

INT (AL/TL) +1ELSE L2=AL/TL 

9J35 IF BW/TLOINT (BW/TL) THEN W3 = 

INT(BW/TL)+1 ELSE W3=BW/TL 

910 IF BL/TLOINT ( BL/TL) THEN L3 = 

INT(BL/TL)+1 ELSE L3=BL/TL 

915 RETURN 

920 PRINT#-2 , STRING$ (5,13) : PRINT 
# - 2 , TAB ( 5 ) STRING $ ( 7 0 , " * 11 ) : PRINT # 
-2,TAB(5)STRING$(70, "*") :PRINT#- 
2 : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 33 ) "COCO-HANDIMAN 
" : PRINT#-2 : PRINT #-2 , TAB (33) 11 JOB 

ESTIMATE" 
925 PRINT#-2:F0R ZV=1 TO 2: PRINT 
#-2,TAB(5)STRING$(70, "*") : NEXT 
930 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2: RETURN 
935 'REM PANEL PRINT 
940 GOSUB 920 

945 PRINT #-2, TAB (20) "PANELING CA 



LCULATION: "+RM$:PRINT#-2 
950 GOSUB 1115 

955 print #-2 , tab (20) "total sheet 
s needed: "; :print#-2,using"###. 
#";np 

960 RETURN 

965 GOSUB 920:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "P 
AINTING CALCULATIONS: "RM$: PRINT 
#-2 

970 GOSUB 1115 

975 print#-2,tab(20) "cost of pai 
nt: "+"$"+cg$+" per gallon" :prin 
t#-2, tab (20) "applying "+nc$+" co 
ats": if a$="y" then co$="ceiling 

included" else c0$=" ceiling not 

included" 

980 print#-2,tab(20)co$:print#-2 
, tab (20) "spread rate: "fg$" sq. 
ft pe gallon" :print#-2:print#-2, 
tab(20)"you will need ";:print#- 
2, using" ###.#" ;gn ; :print#-2," ga 
llons" : print* -2 , tab (20) "approxim 
ate cost: 11 ; :print#-2, using "$## 
##.##" ;cp 

985 RETURN 

990 GOSUB920:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "WA 
LLPAPER CALCULATION: "+RM$: PRINT 
#-2: IF SS$="Y" THEN S1$="SINGLE 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from every- 
one. We like to run a variety of programs that are useful/ 
helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and it is 
best to make several saves, at least one of them in ASCII 
format. We're sorry, but we do not have time to key in 
programs. All programs should be supported by some edi- 
torial commentary explaining how the program works. 
Generally, we're much more interested in how your sub- 
mission works and runs than how you developed it. Pro- 
grams should be learning experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of criteria. 
Those wishing remuneration should so state when making 
submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed infor- 
mation on making submissions, please send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submissions 
Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some more compre- 
hensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently sub- 
mitted to another publication. 




Co Co - Cooler Too 



• Brings operating 
temperature to 
ambient, 
regard- 
less of 
acces- 
sory load 

• Redu- 
ces tem- 
perature 

of ENTIRE computer 

not just the SAM chip 

• Easy 1-minute installation 

• $44.95 

Companion Keyboard Cover $9.95 



Send For Free Catalog Of CoCo Software & Computerware 

• For Fastest Service Send Money Order Or Certified Check 
• Add $2.50 Shipping For Continental U.S. 
• Add $4.00 Shipping For: AK, HI APO's, P.O. Boxes, & Canada 
• Add $15.00 Shipping For Overseas 
• Add $3.00 For 220-250 Volt Model 
• California Residents Add 6 l A% Sales Tax 
• Add $3.00 For C.O.D. 



REM Industries, Inc. 

9420 "B"Lurline Ave., Chatsworth,CA 91311 

L (81 8) 341-3719 j 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 167 



SIZE ROLL" ELSE IF SS$="N" THEN 
Sl$=" DOUBLE SIZE ROLLS " 
995 PRINT#-2,TAB(20) Sl$:PRINT#-2 
, TAB ( 20 ) "WALL HEIGHT: "HW" FEET": 
PRINT #-2 , TAB ( 20 ) NW" WALLS " VAL (WA 
$)« FEET LONG" : PRINT* -2, TAB ( 20 )S 
B" WALLS "VAL(WB$) M FEET LONG" 
1000 PRINT #-2, TAB ( 2)3 ) NZ "WINDOWS 
" : PRINT #-2 , TAB ( 20 ) ND "DOORS " : PRI 
NT#-2,TAB(20) "COST PER ROLL: " ; : 
PRINT#-2 , USING" $###.##"; CR : PRINT 
#-2 

1005 PRINT #-2 , TAB (20) "YOU WILL N 
EED "INT(RO)" ROLLS 11 : PRINT* -2, TA 
B(20)"YOUR COST: " ; : PRINT#-2 ,USI 
NG" $###.##"; CR*RO : PRINT # -2 , STRIN 
G$(5,13) 
1010 RETURN 

1015 GOSUB920:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "C 
ARPETING CALCULATION: "+RM$ 
1020 PRINT* -2: PRINT* -2, TAB (20) "M 
AIN AREA "WM" BY "LM" FEET" 
1025 IF A1$<>"Y" THEN 1035 
1030 PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "ONE ADD-ON 

"AW" BY "AL" FEET": IF A2$="Y" T 
HEN PRINT* -2, TAB (20) "OTHER ADD-0 
NS "BW" BY "BL" FEET" 
1035 IF A3$<>"Y" THEN 1045 
1040 PRINT #-2, TAB (20) "ONE CUTOUT 

"CW" BY "CL" FEET": IF A4$="Y" T 
HEN PRINT* -2, TAB (20) "OTHER CUTOU 
TS 11 CX" BY "WX" FEET" 
1045 PRINT#-2 , TAB (20) "COST PER S 
Q/YD" ; : PRINT #-2 , USING" $###.##"; Y 
C 

1050 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "Y 
OU WILL NEED" INT (YD) " SQUARE YAR 
DS":PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "TOTAL COST: 
« ; : PRINT# -2 , USING" $#,###.##»; CS 
: PRINT #-2 , STRING$ (5,13) 
1055 RETURN 

1060 GOSUB920:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "C 
ONCRETE ESTIMATE" : PRINT#-2 : PRINT 
#-2,TAB(20) "*****MAIN AREA*****" 
: PRINT # - 2 : PRINT # - 2 , TAB ( 20 ) " WI DTH 
"WF" FEET"WI" INCHES ": PRINT* -2, T 
AB (20) " LENGTH " LF " FEET "LI" INCHE 
S" :PRINT*-2,TAB(20) "DEPTH"HF" FE 
ET"HI" INCHES": PRINT #-2 
1065 IF AO$="Y" THENPRINT#-2 , TAB 
(20) »*****ADD-ONS*****" :PRINT#-2 
: PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 20 ) "WIDTH" AW" FEET 
"AK" INCHES": PRINT #-2, TAB (20) "LE 
NGTH"AL" FEET"AI" INCHES" : PRINT # 
-2, TAB (20) "DEPTH"AH" FEET"AJ" IN 
CHES":PRINT#-2 

1070 IF TU$="Y" THEN PRINT#-2,TA 
B(20) »******CUTOUTS*****" : PRINT# 
-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "WIDTH"TW" FE 



ET"TX" INCHES":PRINT#-2,TAB(20) " 
LENGTH"TL" FEET"TY" INCHES" :PRIN 
T#-2,TAB(20) " DEPTH "TH" FEET"TZ" 
INCHES" :PRINT# -2 

1075 PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "TOTAL CUBI 
C YARDS REQUIRED: " ; : PRINT#-2 , US 
ING"###.##";VCU 
1080 GOTO 760 

1085 GOSUB920:PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "F 
LOOR TILE CALCULATIONS: "+RM$:PR 
INT#-2 

1090 PRINT #-2 , TAB (20) "MAIN AREA 

"WM"BY "LM" INCHES 11 

1095 IF A1$="Y" THEN PRINT#-2,TA 

B(20)"ONE ADD-ON"AW" BY"AL" INCH 

ES" : IF A2 $=" Y"THENPRINT#-2 , TAB ( 2 

0) "OTHER ADD-ONS"BW" BY"BL" INCH 

ES" 

1100 IF A3$="Y" THENPRINT#-2 , TAB 
(20) "ONE CUTOUT"CW» BY "CL" INCH 

ES":IF A4$="Y" THEN PRINT#-2 / TAB 
(20) "OTHER CUTOUTS 11 CX" BY"WX" IN 

CHE S 11 

1105 PRINT* -2, TAB (20) "USING"TL" 
INCH TILES, ":PRINT#-2,TAB(20) "YO 
U WILL NEED" INT (TN) +1" TILES": PR 
INT#-2 , STRING$ (5,13) 
1110 INPUT "HIT <ENTER> FOR MENU" 
;PE:GOTO 30 

1115 PRINT #-2, TAB (20) "WALL HEIGH 
T: "+HA$+" FEET "+HB$+" INCHES": 
PRINT#-2,TAB(20)AZ; :PRINT#-2, " W 
ALLS "+WF$+" FEET "+WI$+" INCHES 
":PRINT#-2,TAB(20)AX; :PRINT#-2, " 
WALLS "+WG$+" FEET "+WJ$+" INCH 
ES" 

1120 PRINT#-2,TAB(20)WN" REGULAR 
WINDOWS" : PRINT* -2 , TAB (20) OQ" PI 
CTURE WINDOWS" : PRINT* -2 , TAB (20 ) D 
R" DOORS" 

1125 PRINT* -2: RETURN 
1130 PCLS: PRINT "GOOD LUCK!": END 
1135 PRINT"ADD-ONS 11 : PRINT .'RETURN 
1140 PRINT " CUTOUTS ": PRINT: RETURN 
1145 CLS0:FORS=10TO53:SET(S,7,4) 
:SET(S,14,3) : NEXT 

1150 FORS=7T014:SET(9,S,8) :SET(5 
4 , S , 8 ) : NEXT 

1155 PRINT@133," COCO-HANDIMA 
N 11 ; :PRINT@165,STRING$ (22,25 

5) ; :PRINT@197, " BY LEONARD HYR 
E "; 

1160 F0RTI=1T07:P0KE359, 57: SCREE 
N0 , 1 : PLAY" V2 1T5505EDC" : POKE3 59 , 1 
2 6 : SCREEN0 , 0 : PLAY"V2 1T5503EDC" : N 
EXT TI 

1165 FOR TI=1TO600:NEXT:PRINT@48 
6,"<C> 1986 CAMBRIDGE MD";:FORTI 
=1TO600: NEXT: RETURN ^ 



168 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 






TM 



Pure Seduction, Raw Power, Ultimate Elegance ! 

That's CoCo Max II. Go for It I 

You can't lose with this unmatched offer: 

A full 6 month complete money back guarantee. We will even pay the return 
postagel You don't risk a penny. Call Toll Free 

You'll use it all the time and love using it. 

Look at what thousands of people are doing with CoCo Max: 

Note: all the pictures below are unretouched screen photos or printouts (Epson RX-80). 



f «Tit0Oti Report 

fug witk tff tUj toooa 



25* 



no mflJOH ra ws todhy 

Reporters Desperate 

~ik*f Mr «• Mti 

U 1 0*4 UTI' »»< kxd I 
coult IBM »T t*k tf MW- 

Ikltf kaml »•»»** 1>1U)* 
tt*«rur tirl S<k*i41 it « 
*<t*4 1*4 *»i»MT ■•». 
1 r**Ur *»al tar*. Tail h>k 
«u*u it»kx»j ***r ki)MU 
•r*u*< k*ri \j*ri ltk«l«i 
Itkaltt. t Ji fmt Ui »*ttn 
•f ik* dir. ku of us mu 

lb (• Ik* »«Ti9*j»r ITTt** 

vilkotlt • rtnjU «lBfT. t*l 

tfctt «*«k u J.irir*»i. •«- 
<*r«toi u I<a»U*t.*l>* «w 
iM*r*4 c**auuia* » crlM 
■ flilf put t* »r*»* Ik* 
feliruai. kal I «M i ikU* 
o/ tsriklKf »«»iTBrikr vktt 
*-«ultat |<l a* la ln»ki*.' 
Jtaim* PmMlMUtU tk» 
MM" **x*al tit* ku V**a 
iklfiui Tltk k*atru»«T 

•T«r <u>« uji iiM««*.r'i 

•Jitloa fall* t* MU » tiafl* 

*»»r 




Wbg is this ladrj Smiling? 

Lou J<a«irii oJ IIT I. tik Si. 
Vu lo."or«»< IMItT 'k»l 

lb* kid »oo HQ .» ibt IMM 

iTHflKkU. 1*4 Ml* 4 " 




Liii in tht fist Iidi not til 
it 'i cricked up to to 

U Tom i Slot rou rial la 
t* tail ioat |l*>or*ui rt*M 
itk* nitnura •> i**>m***> 

Tto tkiat r«u. la*. v*ull 
Ilk* la krlsf la ik* kli »u«k) 
*al ruk ooi#i Vila lk* c*l«k- 
nut*' Vail t*ri*i II. tuaaiaf 
• a»vi*a*«r <ou>*> 111* Ua. 
I ka*v. kui »*r*r» t*j |* *tt 
a*lf-*o«Iit »n* hi" To»r 
•va Mhr. »»r ill 
nails*, una* t* tka VMM tt 




AMERICAN 



SCHNOID 



1985 



PROFIT 1 

2* 





Pulley 



String 



{J1L 



Business graphs, charts, 
diagrams. Also memos, 
presentions, and report 
covers. 



RECGADlrK- 
TIMES 




Table 



SPRlNw 
MASSES BALANCE 

I 

\ 

UVlA. 



S 

Fa 




PULLE 



Ft/n for children, (from 
age 31) while stimulating 
creativity. 



Publish a newsletter or 
bulletin; generate flyers. 



- -} » * * * 



coco max 
oooo rtAX 

coco Mom 
CoCo Man 



CoCo Ma* 
CoCo Max 



CoCo T-lax 
CoCo ttax 

coco Max CoCo Mm 
CoCo Max 






mm 



mm 



CoCo max 
CoCo Ulaz 

CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo Max 

coco Max @$mmm 

Over 200 type styles to 
choose from ! 

Printer Drivers included with CoCo 
Max li 

Epson MX, RX, FX and LX series, Gemini, Star, 
Micronix, Delta 10, 1 0X, 1 5. 1 5X. SG-1 0, Okldata 82 A, 
92, 93, C Hon Pro-writer, Apple Image-writer, HP 
Thinkjet, Radio Shack DMP 1 00. 1 05. 1 1 0. 1 20. 200, 
400. 600, Line Printer 7, Line Printer 8, TRP100, 
CGP-220.(DMP-130use Line Printer 8). PMC, Gorilla 
Bantne. 

Coior printing: CGP-200, CGP-1 1 5 



•fW 1 ' - »* • « ■ 

■ **** 





CART 



3 



l-IASf 



PCoCo PORT] 

Design work, such as 
schematics, floor plans, 



A new way to express 
your imagination. 




' this is 
a cartoon, 



1 




Junior's homework and 
science projects. Term 
papers tool 

COCO MAX 
Coco Max II 



COLORWARE 



For more information on 
CoCo Max, turn the page. 



This is a cartoon. 

Upgrade: CoCo Max tape to CoCo Max 

II disk $24.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price $19.95 

Super Picture Disks #1, #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

The DS-69 Digitizer 

New Low Price $99.95 



Logos, letterheads, and 
other graphic art work 
including light typeset- 
ting. 



CoCo Max on tape , $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual 

CoCo Max li (on disk only) $79.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual 

Upgrade: CoCo Max to CoCo Max 

II ...$19.95 

New features of CoCo Max ti: 14 fonts, dynamic 
shrink and stretch, rotate, multiple drive capability, 
68 page scrapbook, point and click file load, color 
printer drivers, full error reporting, New disk and 
manual. 



79-04 Jamaica Avenue, 
COLORWARE Woodhaven, NY 1 1421 

(718) 296-5916 



Toll Free Order Line 

800-221-0916 

Orders Only. NY* Info: 

eall (7161 296-5916 
Hourms 9-5 Eamtmrn Tlmm 




Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
We accept Visa, MC, checks, M.O. 
CO.D. add $3.00 extra. 
N.Y. residents add sales tax. 
Shipping to Canada is $5.00 
Overseas, FPO, APOadd 10% 



This is one of those rare 
programs that will captivate 
everyone in your family.... 
No one can see CoCo Max 
and not want to try it! 




We are all witnessing an exciting revolu- 
tion in microcomputers: a radically new 
kind of computer and software that 
opens a whole new world of creative 
power to computer users. 

It was inevitable that this exciting ap- 
proach would be brought to the CoCo. 
With this in mind, Colorware chose to 
go all out and maximize this new con- 
cept for the color computer. That meant 
designing not just software but hardware 
too. It meant thousands of hours of pure 
machine language programming. Rarely 
has this much effort been applied to one 
product for the Color Computer. 





UNMATCHED CAPABILITY... 

Because we took the maximum approach: 
highly optimized machine code combin- 
ed with hardware, CoCo Max truly 
stands above the rest as the ultimate 
creative tool for the Color Computer. It's 
unrivaled performance lets you create 
with more brilliance and more speed 
than any similar system - much more 
than you ever imagined possible. And, 
you can do it in black & white or color. 




All the sophisticated power of the bigger 
systems is there: Icons, Pull-Down Menus, 
full Graphic Editing, Font Styles, and all 
kinds of handy tools and shortcuts. 

Plug your joystick, mouse or touch pad 
into CoCo Max's Hi-Res Input Unit. Then 
use a delightfully simple Point-and-Click 
method to get any of CoCo Max's power- 
ful graphic tools. It has them all: 



You can Brush, Spray or Fill with any Col- 
or, Shading or Pattern. Use Rubber Band 
Lines and Shapes (square, rectangle, cir- 
cle, elipse, etc.) to create perfect illustra- 
tions with speed and ease. There's a Pen- 
cil, an Eraser and even a selection of 
Caligraphy Brushes. And, as you can see, 
CoCo Max can do a lot with text. 
All of the newest special effects are 
there: Trace Edges, Flip, Invert, Brush Mir- 
rors, etc. And all of the very latest super- 
capabilities like: Undo, which 
automatically reverses your mistakes, and 
Fat Bits which zooms you wav in on anv 
part of your subject to allow dot-tor-dot 
precision, 




THE BIG PICTURE 

The large image box in the middle of the 
CoCo Max screen is actually only a win- 
dow on an even larger image. Use the 
Point-and Click "Hand" to effortlessly 
move your window over any portion of 
the larger image. You have a working 
area of up to 3- 1 /2 times the area of the 
window itself. 

FLEXIBLE PRINTING... 

CoCo Max gives you many ways to print. 
Fill a whole page with \our image or 
condense two full CoCo screens to less 
than Va page for a finely detailed copy. 
"Dump" your CoCo Max screen full size 
or shrink it to Vi page size. 



FREEDOM TO CREATE... 

Anyone who wants to create anything at 
all on their CoCo screen or printer will 
certainly be very glad to meet CoCo 
Max. CoCo Max's friendly yet 
sophisticated graphic and text 
capabilities let you almost instantly pro- 
duce illustrations, diagrams, charts, 




graphs, and computer art - for serious 
use or just for creative fun. 




AN ABSOLUTE GUARANTEE 

CoCo Max is a hardware/software system 
that.no software-only system can 
match. Get CoCo Max and see your 
CoCo perform as it never could before. 
If you don't agree that CoCo Max is the 
ultimate creative tool for the Color Com- 
puter, simply return it within 20 days for 
a full, courteous refund from Colorware. 

THE HARDWARE... 

This is the key to CoCo Max's unmatch- 
ed performance. Did you know the nor- 
mal joystick input built into the Color 
Computer only allows access to 4,096 (64 
x 64) points on theCoCo screen? Yet, the 
Color Computer's high resolution screen 




has 49,152 (256 x 192) pixels. This means 
that a joystick, mouse or even a touch 
pad can, at best, only access about one 
tenth of the pixels on the CoCo screen. 

Most graphic programs ignore this hard- 
ware limitation of the Color Computer 
and give you only low-res control. 
Others attempt to overcome the limita- 




tion by using software schemes such as 
sliding windows. Although clever, these 
schemes yield sluggish and awkward 
results. Only CoCo Max does it the right 
way. The CoCo Max Hi-Res Input Unit 
plugs into your ROM slot and adds an 
entirely new joystick input to your com- 
puter - a precision one with a 49,152 
point resolution to match the CoCo 
screen exactly. 

Plug your same joystick, mouse or touch 





pad into this new input and you have a 
whole new kind of control. The dif- 
ference is remarkable. 




A DIGITIZER OPTION... 

We studied all the video digitizers 
available and picked the best of them to 
link with CoCo Max. The DS-69 from 
Micro Works was our choice. This op- 
tional device lets you capture the image 
from any video source (video recorder, 
camera, etc.) on your Color Computer. 




\\\m%xmm 



You may then use CoCo Max's graphic 
magic on it. The DS-69 is available as an 
option from Colorware from $149.95 
complete with its own software on disk 
or tape. Using the DS-69 with a disk re- 
quires an RS multi-pak adaptor. 




COCO MAX REQUIREMENTS 

The CoCo Max System includes the Hi- 
Res Input Unit, software on disk or 
cassette (please specify) and user manual. 
It will work on any 64K Extended or non- 




extended Color Computer. You'll need a 
Radio Shack or equivalent joystick, 
mouse or touch pad. Disk systems re- 
quire a Multi-Slot Interface or Y- 
Branching Cable. 

THE COMPLETE COCO MAX SYSTEM, 
with software on DISK $69.95 

with software on CASSETTE (Available 
Mar '85) $69.95 

Y-BRANCHING CABLEAi you have a disk 
system but do not have a Multi-Slot In- 
terface, use this economical 40-pin, 1 
male, 2 female cable to connect the 
CoCo Max Hi-Res input unit and your 
disk controller to your CoCo $27.95 

Sorry, COCO MAX is not compatible with JDOS 



COLORWARE 



Colorware Inc. 
78-03 F Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 647-2864 



VISA 



ORDERING IN FORMA TION 

ADD $3.00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING AND HANOI INC. 
C.O.D.'S ADD $3.00 EXTRA. 

SHIPPING AND HANDLING FOR CANADA IS $5.00 
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTER CARD, M.O.'S, CHECKS. 
N.Y. RESIDENTS MUST ADD SALES TAX. 



Why do more CoCo owners 

choose 'REAL TALKER'? 



Sure it's priced right, hut there's more,.. 



Thousands of Real Talker' owners know 'Real Talker' beats ALL 
other Coco voice synthesizers in ease of use and flexibility. And, 
NO other Coco talker has a clearer, more intelligible voice. 
That's quite a lot of advantage when you consider Real Talker's 
unbeatable price. Yet, Real Talker has some important features 
that you simply will not find in other Coco talkers: 



'5-4 Y' command - Youll have your 
computer talking brilliantly in just 
minutes thanks to this powerful 
new command. Type SAY 
"ANYTHING YOU WANT" and 
our words are instantly spoken, 
fs that simple. Think how easy 
this makes creating speaking Basic 
programs. Adding speech to your 
existing programs is a snap too. 



'Real Talker' is compatible with any 16K, 32K, 64K Extended or 
non-extended Color Computer. It works with any cassette or 
disk system and comes complete and ready to talk through your 
T.V. or monitor speaker. Price includes the 'Real Talker' elec- 
tronic voice synthesizer in a ROM pack, software on cassette 
(may be transferred to disk), and user manual. 





■ < i C -.V-A ' 



r, 



'CONVERT' - This is a truly power- 
ful command for the basic pro- 
gramer. CONVERT automatically 
transforms a machine language 
dependent speaking program into 
a stand-alone Basic program. In 
other words, you can effortlessly 
write speaking Basic programs tnat 
do not require a machine language 
translator in memory. This is a uni- 
que feature of 'Real Talker'. No 
other voice synthesizer gives you 
anything even remotely ap- 
proaching this type of capability - 
even synthesizers costing con- 
siderably more. 




TIOH 



'REAL Ts\Lh 



'Real Talker' is a full-featured electronic voice syn- 
thesizer unit built into a compact cartridge case. You 
simply plug it into the side of your computer. 



NOW INCLUDED WITH 
'REAL TALKER'. 

1. 'DR. 7/U/f-This interactive "Eliza" 
type psychoanalyst program will 
discuss your innermost problems 
at length. 

2. 'TALKING BATTLESHIP'AMs you 
vs. the computer in this speaking 
version of tne classic game. 

3. TALKING BLACKJACK'- Play for 
big stakes against a rather talkative 
casino dealer. 

ONLY 

$5995 



Other features include software controlled pitch, unlimited 
vocabulary text-to-speech, and even a program that will recite 
any ASCII file (such as from Tetewriter-64 & other word pro- 
cessors). You also get Colo rware's unique full-screen phoneme 
editor program that Jet's you experiment with and modify speech 
at it's most fundimental level. 



'REAL TALKER-V (for the original Color Computer) $59.95 

'REAL TALKER-2' (for the Color Computer-2) $64.95 

'Y • BRANCHING CABLE' For disk systems. If you have a disk 
system but do not have a Radio Shack Multi-Slot unit, this 
economical cable will allow to connect and use your 
Real Talker and Disk system together ...27.95 



TALK 




If you have a 'Real Talker', do not deprive yourself 
of this absolutely incredible machine-language 
Talking Head simulation program. While other 
talking head simulations use a minimal cartoon- 
like face, TALKHEAD uses high resolution, full- 
screen, digitized images of an actual person's face 
to create a life-like animated effect. 




SOFTWARE FOR THE 'REAL TALKER 

TALKHEAD can be easily commanded in Basic to 
appear on screen and say anything you want. 
Available on cassette or disk for only $19.95, 
TALKHEAD requires 64K and a Colorware 'Real 
Talker'. 

ONLY*19.95 

ACTUAL UNRETOUCHED PHOTO 



COLORWARE INC. 

f*f\l f%D\MiA DP 78-03F Jamaica Ave. 
wfc WWA%nC Woodhaven, NY 11421 

(718) 647-2864 



VISA 



* * ★ ORDERING INFORMATION ★ ★ ★ 



r - i 

[ MiiblOrC.nd J 



ADD $3,00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLINC. 
C.O.D.'S ADD $3.00 EXTRA. 

SHIPPING AND HANDLING FOR CANADA IS $5.00 
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTER CARD, M.O.'S, CHECKS. 
N.Y. RESIDENTS MUST ADD SALES TAX. 



We have compiled a list of 
Color Computer Clubs be- 
cause of the many requests 
we have received. CoCo Clubs may 
wish to exchange newsletters, share 
ideas for topics of discussion at 
monthly meetings, etc. 

Please let us know if we have 
omitted any clubs and send us com- 
plete up-to-date addresses. Only 
those clubs that have signed our 
"agreement form" will appear in this 
listing of CoCo Clubs. Also, please 
notify us if you wish to add or delete 
any names on this list. Send your 
information to: 

CoCo Clubs 
THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham Alabama Color Computer Club, Ro- 
bert Matthews, 3529 Laurel View Lane, Bir- 
mingham, 35216, (205) 933-0887 

Huntsville Color-80 Users Group, Jerry Crawford, 
15001 Glory Dr., Huntsville, 35803, (205) 881- 
9698 

ALASKA 

Alaska Color Computer Users' Group, Rick McDan- 
nel, 430C Beluga Ave., Ft. Richardson, 99505, 
(907) 428-0392 

ARIZONA 

Huachuca Hot Pokers, James Standley, 235-A 
Jeffords Street (NBU-96H), Ft. Huachuca, 
85613, (602) 458-8338 

Tucson Color Computer Club, Marshall R. Madole, 
3721 S. Le Beaux Place, Tucson, 85730 

ARKANSAS 

N.W. Arkansas Color Computer Club, Rebecca 
Cravens, P.O. Box 1 31 , Benton ville, 7271 2, (501 ) 
631-1807 

Central Arkansas CoCo Club, Melinda Braslovsky, 
1203 Erving Rdg., LP Cabot, 72023, (501) 982- 
8854 

CALIFORNIA 

California Computer Federation, (Sacramento 
Chapter), Mike Faulkin, 828 San Tomas Drive, 
David, 95616 

California Computer Federation, (San Fernando 
Valley Chapter), Jim Sutemeier, 9565 Reseda 
Blvd., #324, Northridge, 91324, (818) 993-5217 

California Computer Federation, (San Francisco 
Chapter), Dick Stanich, P.O. Box 7007, Red- 
wood City, 94063, (415) 366-4560, BBS (415) 
364-2658 

Color America Users Group, Mark Randall, 2227 
Canyon Rd., Arcadia, 91006, (213) 355-6111 

Los Angeles-Wilshire Color Computer Users' 
Group, Norm Wolfe, P.O. Box 11151, Beverly 
Hills, 90213 



The Davis CoCoNuts, Adam Sherman, 1818 
Haussler Dr., Davis, 95616, (916) 758-3195 

Sacramento Color Computer Club, Wayne Chri- 
sope, P.O. Box 9, Elverta, 95626 

North American CoCo - Orange County, Eric 
Wilson, 8405 Sweetwater Circle, Huntington 
Beach, 92646, BBS (714) 847-2268 

Joe Bennett, 1169 Florida Street, Imperial Beach, 
92023, (474-6213) 

CoCoholics and Tandy Computer Club, Kenneth M. 
Denny, 801 W. Roseburg Ave., Suite 200, Mo- 
desto, 95350, (209) 523-5176 

Ventura County Color Computer Club (VC4), John 
Bascue, Oxnard Public Library, 214 "C" Street, 
Oxnard, 93030, (805) 987-4752 or DATA (805) 
484-5491 

Sacramento CoCo Club, Charles Doughty, Box 
60511, Sacramento, 95860 

Salinas Color Computer Club, Larry Livingston, 501 
Monterey Highway, Salinas, 93908, (408) 484- 
9697 

Citrus Color Computer Club, Joseph Kohn, P.O. 
Box 6991 , San Bernadino, 9241 2, (71 4) 792-8721 

The MC-10 Newsletter Club, Jose J. Bray, 4730 
Cass Street, San Diego, 92109, (619) 483-8744 

Local Color— A CoCo Club of San Francisco, 
Andrew G. Kieval, P.O. Box 421242, San Fran- 
cisco, 94142 

San Joaquin CoCo Club, Steven Paul Moreno, P.O. 
Box 99024, Stockton, 95209, (209) 951-3938 

Silicon Valley Color Computer Club, Shawn Jipp, 
P.O. Box 61593, Sunnyvale, 940B8, (408) 749- 
1947 

CoCo Nutz Computer Club, Walter V. Seay, 68-461 
Highway 86, Thermal, 92274, (619) 397-4252 

Conejo Color Computer Users Group, Robert S. 

Rimmer, 472 Sundance Street, Thousand Oaks, 
* 91360, (805)492-4972 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Karen Schlotz- 
hauer, 23113 Dana Ave., Torrance, 90501, (213) 
539-2539 

COLORADO 

Lowry Microcomputer Club/CoCo Users' Group, 
Jerry D. Surritte, 2249 Moline St., Aurora, 8001 0, 
(303) 343-3273 

The ESCO Computer Club, David E. Schulz, 1299 
Harrison Street, Denver, 80206, (303) 388-6988 

Colorado Color Computer Club, Joe Applegate, 
P.O. Box 33492, Northglenn, 80233, (303) 650- 
9768 

FLORIDA 

Northwest Florida CoCo Nuts, William N. Lamb, 
P.O. Box 1032, Fort Walton Beach, 32549, (904) 
244-5281 

Alachua County CoCo Special Interest Group, 
Chris Meyers, P.O. Box 14927, Gainesville, 
32604, (904) 378-9598 

Jacksonville Color Computer Club, William H. 
Brown 111,2411 Hirsch Ave., Jacksonville, 32216, 
(904) 721-0282 

CoCo Chips Color Computer Club, 6 Belle Mead 
Circle, Largo, 33540, (813) 581-7779 

Broward County Color Computer Club, Timothy D. 
Neary, 51 0 S. W. 64th Ave., Margate, 33068, (305) 
972-4074 

South Brevard Color Computer Club, Benjamin S. 
Jerome, 496 Hillside Court, Melbourne, 32935, 
(305) 259-4609 

The Naples CoCo Club, Matt Tari, 3320 7th Avenue 
S.W., Naples, 33964, (813) 455-4830 

Color-6809 Users Group, Emery Mandel, 4301 1 1th 
Avenue North, St. Petersburg, 33713, (813) 323- 
3570 

C.C. Club of Sarasota, Ernie Bontrager, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd., Sarasota, 33582, (813)921-7510 

Broward CoCo Club, Sue Spahn, 11950 N.W. 29th 
Manor, Sunrise, 33582, (305) 741-4737 

IDAHO 

CoCo Questers, Scott Bellman, 2420 Salem Court, 
Bettendorf, 52722, (319) 359-7702 



CoCo-AG Farm Computer Users Group, Kelly 
Klass, Rt.1, Box 4133, Twin Falls, 83301, (208) 
733-4251 

ILLINOIS 

Town & Country CoCo, 5461 S. Kenwood, Chicago, 
(312) 493-3748 

Cook County Color Computer Club, Tim Powers, 
1633 Fifth Ave., Chicago Heights, 60411, (312) 
747-7062 

Peoria Color Computer Club, Harold E. Brazee, 102 
Twin Oaks Court, East Peoria, 61611, (309) 694- 
4703 

Illinois Color Computer Club of Elgin, Steven 
Stroud, 1098 Florimond Dr., Elgin, 60120, (312) 
695-3186 

Glenside Color Computer Club, Ed Hathaway, 8 W. 
Stevenson Drive, Glendale Heights, 601 39, (312) 
462-0694 

Kitchen Table Color Computer Group, Robert Mills, 
P.O. Box 464, Hanover, 61041, (815) 591-3377 

Northern Illinois Color Computer Club, 580 Milton 
Lane, Hoffman Estates, 60194, (312) 885-2573 

Motorola Microcomputer Club, Steve Adler, 1301 
Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg, 60196, (312) 576- 
3044 

Chicago OS-9 Users Group, 480 Gilbert Drive, 

Wood Dale, 60191, (312) 860-2580 
INDIANA 

Evansville Color Computer Users Group, Dave 
Jenkins, 1418 E. Illinois Street, Evansville, 
47711, (812)424-0099 

Three Rivers Users Group, George Barber, 2410 
New Haven Ave., Fort Wayne, 46815 

Indy Color Computer Club, Mike Davis, P.O. Box 
68702, Indianapolis, 46268, (317) 257-3300 

Southern Indiana Computer Club, Route 1, Box 459, 
Mitchell, 47446 

CoCo Program, Erik Merz, 310 Appletree Dr., 
Noblesville, 46060, (317) 842-1340 

IOWA 

Metro Area Color Computer Club, K.L. Knudtzon, 
3324 11th Ave., Council Bluffs, 51501 

Mid Iowa CoCo, Terry Simons, 1328 48th Street, 
Des Moines, 50311, (515) 279-2576 

Dubuque Tandy Users Group, Wesley Kullhem, 
1995 Lombard, Dubuque, 52001, (319) 556-4137 

Iowa City TRS-80 Users Group, Susan Chapler, R.R. 
6, The Woods, Iowa City, 52240, (319) 351-5959 

KANSAS 

KC CoCo Club, Gay Crawford, P.O. Box 11192, 
Kansas City, 661 1 1 , (913) 764-941 3 

Topeka Color Computer Club, Kevin Cronister, 
2224 Hope, Topeka, 66614, (913) 272-1353 

Color Computer Club of Wichita, Rex Rivers, 1205 
N. Mosley, Wichita, 67214, (316) 264-9193 

Walnut Valley C.C. Users Club, David Anderson, 
1212 E. 4th St., Winfield, 67156, (316) 221-0040 

KENTUCKY 

Perry County CoCo Users Group, Keith W. Smith, 
General Delivery, Hardburly, 41747, (606) 439- 
4209 

LOCO-COCO, Mike Standefer, 3141 Doreen Way, 
Louisville, 40220, (502) 458-6690 

LOUISIANA 

Red Stick Color Computer Club, Gary Cash, 8929 
Metairie Drive, Baton Rouge, 70810, (504) 293- 
7799 

Cajun CoCo Club, Bob Hoevel, 104 Karen St., New 
Iberia, 70560, (318) 365-7706 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Greater Boston Super Color Users Group, Robert 
Biamonte, 6 Boulder Drive, Burlington, 01803 

New England C.C. Users Group, Christopher E. 
Sweet, R.D. 2, Box 261, Harvard, 01451, (617) 
456- 8291 

Massachusetts CoCo Club, Jason Rahaim, Spring 
St., Lunenberg, 01462, (617) 582-6514 

CLUB 6809, Jean Salvas, 204 East Street, Spring- 
field, 01104, (413) 734-5163 

MICHIGAN 

Petoskey Area CoCo Club (PAC 3 ), Dennis Ho- 
shield, 670 Liegl Drive, Alanson, 49706, (616) 
347-0607 



April 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 73 



Color C.H.I.P.S., Jack Pieron, 3175 Oakhill Place, 
Clarkston, 48016, (313) 627-4358 

CCUG (Color Computer Users Group), Rich Van 
Maner, 0-599 Lake Michigan Drive, Grand 
Rapids, 49504, (616) 453-6695 

Grand Rapids Area Tandy Users Group, Robert M. 
Worth, Jr., 1726 Millbank S.E., Grand Rapids, 
49508 (616) 245-9324 

Greater Lansing Color Computer Users Group, P.O. 
Box 14114, Lansing, 48901 

Midland C.C. Club, Neil Drake, 709 Coolidge, 
Midland, 48640, (517) 631-2939 

The Greater Kalamazoo Color Computer Club, Mike 
Marcelletti, P.O. Box 265, Paw Paw, 49079, (616) 
657-3850 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

MISSISSIPPI 

Singing River C.C. Club, Mark Welch, 3605 Van- 
cleave Rd., #118, Gautier, 39553 

Gulf Coast Color Computer Assoc., Ed Keels, 22 
Christy Cove, Gulfport, 39503, (601) 832-1210 

CoCo Art Club, Joel Bunyard, Rt. 7, Box 10, Meri- 
dian, 39301,(601) 483-0424 

MISSOURI 

North County 80 Group, Tom Vogel, 12 Ville Donna 
Ct., Hazelwood, 63042, (314) 739-4078 

Mid-America Color Computer User's Group, Jerry 
Morgon, 807 Ponca Drive, Independence, 
64056, (816) 796-5813 

Coconuts, 1610 N. Marian, Springfield, 65803 

MONTANA 

Billings C.C. Club, Jayne Kenyon, 4306 Phillip, 
Billings, 59101 

NEBRASKA 

TRS-80 Color Computer Users Group of Lincoln, 
Jonathan Skean, 2629 South 15th St., Lincoln, 
68502, (402) 475-9815 

Siouxland Color Computer Club, Alan Pedersen, 
61 1 D Street, South Sioux City, 68776, (402) 494- 
2284 

NEVADA 

CAT. F.U.N., Paul A. Osborne, 201 Miners Road, 
Fallon, 89406, (702) 423-5789 

NEW JERSEY 

Intrasoft, Ravi Sakaria, 139 Candace Lane, Chatham 
Township, 07928, (201) 635-8025 

The Kid CoCo Club, Derrick Kardos, 1 1 Regal Drive, 
Colonia, NJ 07067, (201) 382-6862 

Bug 80 Users' Group, George R. Miller, Jr., Box 62, 
Glen Gardner, 08826 

Garden State Color Computer Users Group, Darren 
Nye, 5 North 20th Ave., Manville, 08835; Voice 
(201) 725-8385, Data (C.C.I.E. BBS) (201) 725- 
5028 

CoCo Club of W. Orange, Gregg Favalora, 12 
Blackburne Terrace, W. Orange, 07052, (201) 
736-1748 

Loco CoCo Club, Bud Lavin, 73B Wavercrest Ave., 
Winfield Park, 07036 

NEW MEXICO 

Chaves County Color Computer Club, Lee Mitchell, 
1102 Melrose Drive, Roswell, 88201, (505) 623- 
0789 

NEW YORK 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Albany Chapter) , Ron Fish, 
Box 4214, Albany, 12204 

Adirondack CoCo Club, (Athens Chapter), Pete 
Chast, P.O. Box 61, Athens, 12015 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Glens Falls Chapter), Dave 
and Richard Mitchell, 39 Center St., Fort Ed- 
wards, 12828 

Queensboro Color Computer Club, Bob Rosen, 
Springfield Blvd. & 56th Ave., Bayside, 11364, 
(212) 631-6233 

Island Color Computer Club, Charles Martin, P.O. 
Box 901, Bellmore, 11710 

Broome CoCo Club, Bucky Helmer, 57 Front St., 
Binghampton, 13905 

Kings Byte CoCo Club, Morty Libowitz, 1063 East 
84th St., Brooklyn, 11236, (718) 763-4233, BBS 
(718) 837-2881 



C.C. Club of Central N.Y., Joseph Short, 248 S. 
Fourth Ave., Ilion, 11357, (315) 895-7730 

Rockland County Color Computer Users Group, 
John S. Scibran, P.O. Box 131, Monsey, 10952, 
(914) 357-5580 

Olean Area CoCo Users Group, Herman L. Smith, 
P.O. Box 216, Olean, 14760, (716) 372-1170 or 
372-3121 

The CoCo Clan, John David, 56 Willowwood Lane, 
Staten Island, 10308, (718) 317-6228 

New York Color Computer User Group, Carl Glo- 
vinsky, 15 Bolivar St., Staten Island, 10314, (718) 
761-0268 

NORTH CAROLINA 

TRS-80 Users' Group of Charlotte, Jason Foodman, 
240 Medearis Dr., Charlotte, 28211 

Bull City CoCo Users Group, Todd Wall, 5319 
Durand Drive, Durham, 27703, (919) 598-1348 

Raleigh Color Computer Club, David Roper, P.O. 
Box 680, Garner, 27529 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Musica 2 Users Group (MUG), Solveig Pederson, 
71 1 3rd Street S.E., Valley City, 58072, (701 ) 845- 
5063 

OHIO 

CoCo Club of Youngstown, Timothy McFadden, 
P.O. Box 478, Canfield, 44406, (216) 788-4218 

Columbus & Central Ohio Color Computer Club, 
D.E. Sparrow, 19 E.N. Broadway, Columbus, 
43214, (614) 268-5366 

Dayton CoCo Users' Group, Steve Lewis, 4230 
Cordell Dr., Dayton, 45439 

Cincinnati TRS-80 Users Group, R.A. White, 44 Dow 
Court, Fairfield, 45014 

Dayton Are Color Computer Users Group, David R. 
Barr, 2278 Yorkshire PL, Kettering, 45419, (513) 
293-2228 

M.U.G. of CoCo— Middletown Users Group, James 
Carr, Middletown, 45042, (513) 424-6905 

Greater Toledo Color Computer Club, Ronald L. 
Hall, 9646 Garden Road, Monclova, 43542, (419) 
865-3663 

Northeastern Ohio (N.E.O.) CoCo Club, Tony 
Rugue, 527 Malvern Drive., Painsville, 44077, 
(216) 354-2736 

Tri-County Computer Users Group, William J. 
Loeffler, 2612 Dale Avenue, Rocky River, 44116, 
(216) 356-0779 

Miami Valley CoCo Club, R. Douglas Wales, 2065 
LeFeure Rd., Troy. 45373 

OKLAHOMA 

CoCo Inc., Robert L. Pace, 1726 W. Rose Oak Dr., 
Mustang, 73064, (405) 376-3569 

OREGON 

Willamette Valley CoCo Users, Brian James, P.O. 
Box 11468, Eugene, 97440, (503) 687-9286 

PENNSYLVANIA 

HUG-A-CoCo, George Lurie, 2012 Mill Plain Court, 
Harrisburg, 17110, (717) 657-2789 

Penn-Jersey Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 2742, 
Lehigh Valley, 18001 

CAPATUG, Inc., 340 Lewisberry Rd., New Cumber- 
land, 17070, BBS (717) 774-6543 

Skyline Color Computer Club of Berks County, 
Lewis F. Brubaker, 4874 Eighth Ave., Temple, 
19560, (215) 921-3616 

Pittsburgh Color Group, Ralph Marting, P.O. Box 
351, West Mifflin, 15122, (412) 823-7607 

William Tucker, P.O. Box 351, West Mifflin, 15122, 
(412) 466-3078 

RHODE ISLAND 

New England CoCo Nuts, P.O. Box 6604, Provi- 
dence, 02940 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

LoCo CoCo Club, L.W. Coyle, 4334 Flynn Drive, 
Charleston Heights, 29405, (803) 747-0802 

Invitation Software Group, Tom Reed, 3562 Lin- 
brook Dr., Columbia, 29204, (803) 786-0541 

Midlands 80 Computer Club, Tommy Sanders, P.O. 
Box 7594, Columbia, 29202, BBS (803) 755-3414 

Metropolitan Greenville CoCo Club, Ed Lowe, P.O. 
Box 6, Gray Court, 29645, (803) 876-3928 



Hilton Head Island CoCo Club, Kevin Clark, P.O. 
Box 6187, Hilton Head Island, 29928, (803) 785- 
9630 

Spartanburg County CoCo Club, Dennis Shattuck, 
473 Royal Oak Drive, Spartanburg, 29302, (803) 
583-3017 



TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga CoCo Club, Jim Perkins/Jim Cox, 
P.O. Box 9825, Chattanooga, 37412, (615) 870- 
2439 

Tri-Cities Computer Club, Gary Collins, P.O. Box 
4506 CRS, Johnson City, 37602-4506, (615) 929- 
1862 

Foothills Micro-Computer Club, Ron Williams, P.O. 
Box 1541, Maryville, 37801, (615) 984-4287 

Memphis Color Computer Users Group, Ben Bar- 
ton, 4903 Warrington Rd., Memphis, 38118, 
(901) 795-7075 or 362-5945 

TEXAS 

CoCo User Group, David Karam, 1809 Dexter, 
Austin, 78704, (512) 442-6317 

B/CS Color Computer Users Group, Dale Cuthbert- 
son, 1812 Michael Lane, Bryan, 77801, (409) 
822-0731 

Deer Park Color Computer Club, Donald Burr, 4314 
W. Grant, Deer Park, 77536, (713) 479-5313 

International Color Computer Club, Inc., Robert L. 
Garrett, 2101 East Main Street, Henderson, 
75652, (214)657-7834 

TRS-80 Users Group of New Braunfels, John 
Mendez,408 Acorn, New Braunfels, 78130, (512) 
629-3207 

The San Antonio Color Computer Club, James 
Leatherman, 2430 Rawhide Lane, San Antonio, 
78227, (512) 674-4294 

UTAH 

Ogden CoCo, Kathy Rush, 4535 S. 2600 W. Roy, 
Ogden, 84067 

Salt City CoCo Club, Dennis Mott, 720 E. Browning 
Ave., Salt Lake City, 84105, (801) 487-6032 

VIRGINIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Road, Dale City, 22193, (703) 670-4962 

Central Virginia Color Computer Club, Lane Lester, 
413 Woodland Circle, Lynchburg, 24502, (804) 
237-4188 

WASHINGTON 

Northwest Computer Club, Larry Haines, East 2924 
Liberty, Spokane, 99207, (509) 483-5547 

Mount Rainier Color Computer Club, Ron Amos, 
2450 Lenore Drive N., Tacoma, 98406, (206) 752- 
8735 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Kanawha Valley Personal Computer Club, P.O. Box 
5354, Charleston, 25311, BBS (304) 925-3338 or 
345-6502 

Mtn. State CoCo Users Group, Donald G. Barber, 
Jr., P.O. Box 1084, Morgantown, 26507, (304) 
599-4493 

Mil-O-Bar Computer Club, Jim LeMaster, P.O. Box 
130, Ona, 25545, (304) 743-4752 after 4 p.m. 

Blennerhassett CoCo Club, David Greathouse, Rt. 
9, Box 119, Parkersburg, 26101 

West Virginia Color Computer Club, William Muck- 
low, 949 Baier Street, St. Albans, 25177, (304) 
727-6764 

WISCONSIN 

CoCo-MUG, Tom Fandre, P.O. Box 10152, Milwau- 
kee, 53210, (414) 542-0600 

Southern Wisconsin CoCo Club, David C. Buehn, 
P.O. Box 411, Twin Lakes, 53181 



CANADA 
ALBERTA 

Calgary Color Computer Club, Don Towson, 832 
Cannell Rd. S.W., Calgary, T2W 1T4, (403) 281- 
2855 

Edmonton CoCo Users Group, Dexter Dombro, 
P.O. Box 4507 Stn. South, Edmonton, T6E4T7, 
(403) 461-4750 

Medley Computer and Electronics Club, P.O. Box 
1267, Medley, T4A 2M0 



174 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

North Island CoCo Club, Ann Marie MacKay, P.O. 
Box 1740, Port Hardy, VON 2P0 

Salmon Arm CoCo, David Coldwell, 2981 N. Broad- 
view, Salmon Arm, VOE 2T0, (604) 832-8247 

MANITOBA 

Winnipeg Micro-80 Users Group, Mel Seder, 884 
Ash St., Winnipeg, R3N 0R9, (204) 284-0376 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Color Computer Moncton Users Group (Co- 
CoMUG), Leo Allain, 91 Woodland Dr., Monc- 
ton, E1E3C4, (506) 382-2190 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Avalon CoCo Club, A.R. Thompson, 10 Foran St., 
St. John's, A1E4G1 • 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax Dartmouth CoCo Users Group, P.O. Box 
572, Dartmouth, B2Y 3Y9, (902) 469-3656 

ONTARIO 

ESSA Color Computer Club, Albert L. Ley, 40 Perry 
Street, Barrie, L4N 2G3, (705) 728-9481 

International Adventurer's Club, Maurice Dow, 84 
Camberley Cres., Brampton, L6V 3L4 

K-W C.C. Club, Peter Karwowski, 23 Hudson 
Crescent, Kitchener, N2B 2V7 

Kingston CoCo Club, Kenneth Bracey, 316 West- 
dale Ave., Apt. 4-C, Kingston, K7L 4S7, (613) 
544-2806 

London CoCo Nuts Computer Club, Harry K. 
Boyce, 180 Concord Road, London, N6G 3H8, 
(519) 472-7706 

Meadowvale Color Computer Club, Howard Porter, 
P.O. Box 186, Streetsville, Mississauga, L5M 
2B8 

Niagara Regional CoCo Club, Harry VanDyke, 7707 
Jubilee Drive, Niagara Falls, L2G 7J3 

Ottawa 6809 Users Group, Norm Shoihet, 1497 
Meadowbrook Road, Ottawa, K1B 5J9, (613) 
741-1763 

QUEBEC 

Club d'Ordinateur Couleur du Quebec, Inc., Centre 
de Loisirs St-Mathieu, 7110-8e Ave., St-Michel, 
Montreal, H2A 3C4, (514) 729-8467 

South Shore CoCo Club, Jacques Bedard, 33 
Lisilre, St-Constant, P.Q., J0L 1X0 

Le Club Couleur du Nord, Gabriel Pigeon, RR 2, 
Ville Montel, JOY 2S0, (819) 732-2346 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Regina Color Computer Club, Georges Glass, 26 
Tweedsmuir Bay, Regina, S4X 2B1, (306) 949- 
3942 

Saskatoon Color Computer Club, L. Curtis Boyle, 
35 Bence Crescent, Saskatoon, S7L 4H9 

AUSTRALIA 

Blacktown City TRS-80 Colour Computer Users 
Group, Keith Gallagher, P.O. Box 264, River- 
stone, New South Wales, 2765 

HELF CoCo Users Group, Elvis Lazic, 27 Jensen 
Street, St. Marys, New South Wales, 2760 

Color Computer Penrith User Group, Alexander 
Schofield, 15 Tasman Avenue, Lethbridge Park, 
New South Wales, 2770 

The Hills District Color Computer Club, Andrew 
Rankin, 42 Lucas Road, Seven Hills, New South 
Wales, 2147, phone (02) 674-3741 

CoCoHUG (Color Computer Hobart Users Group), 
Robert Delbourgo, 15 Willowdene Avenue, 
Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania, 7005 

ISRAEL 

The First Color Computer Club of Israel, Yosef 
Krinsky, Data Processing Division, 1 Radin 
Street, Netanya, Israel 

MEXICO 

MEXCOCO Users Group, Sergio Waisser, Pachuca 
87-109, Mexico City D.F., 06140, phone 553-11- 
98 

WEST GERMANY 

First CoCo Club Hamburg, Theis Klauberg, 2000 
Hamburg 65, Op de Solt 53 a, West Germany 



new 



Editor: 

Where are the MC-10 users? If you have 
an MC-10 and want to use it, drop me a line 
at 10226 N. 29th Street, 33612. Let's get an 
MC-10 users group started! 

H. Francisco 
Tampa, FL 



• We have approximately 80 members in 
the Atlanta Color Computer Users Group 
and have been in existence for three years. 
Meetings are the third Wednesday of the 
month at Nash Middle School in Cobb 
County at 7 p.m. Our newsletter is only $20 
per year. For more information contact the 
club at 5155 Moroney Mill Road, 30134. 

Terry E. Love 
Douglasville, GA 



• Our club is called CoCo Questers. We do 
print a newsletter. For more information 
please send an SASE to me at 2420 Salem 
Court, 52722. 

Scott Bellman 
Bettendorf, IA 



• I would like to announce the start of the 
first club for TP- 10 printer owners. The club 
is only $13 a year or $1.50 per month. Each 
month you get features — articles that you 
can write — free ads, comments and ques- 
tions for the TP and three to nine useful and 
fun programs (all mailed to you on tape). 
For more information or a subscription, 
write TP- 10 Club, 7632 Saddle Drive, 66502. 

Tim Lehmann 
Manhattan, KS 



• The Tri-City Color Computer Club 
meets the third Saturday of every month at 
the Butman Fish Library, 1716 Hancock, 
Saginaw. There are no dues, although we do 
send a club newsletter. Write to me at 1806 
34th Street, 48708. 

Ron Sujkowski 
Bay City, MI 



• The Grand Rapids Area Tandy Users 
Group meets at Radio Shack Computer 
Center, 3142 28th Street S.E. on the third 
Tuesday of each month. Write to me at 1726 
Millbank Street S.E., 49508 or call (616) 
245-9324. 

Robert Worth 
Grand Rapids, MI 



• Our club is called CCUG (Color Com- 
puter Users Group). Dues are $3 to cover the 
cost of our newsletter. Also send some public 
domain software as we are building up a 
library Contact me at 559 Lake Michigan 
Drive, 49504. 

Rich Van Monen 
Grand Rapids, MI 

• We have a club that meets on the first 
Tuesday of each month. There are no dues 
or fees. Call or write to me and I will be more 
than happy to answer any questions. My 
address is 61 1 D Street, 68776; phone (402) 
494-2284. 

Alan Pedersen 
South Sioux City, NE 

• Our group is a combination of users. The 
name CAT FUN stands for the Commo- 
dore, Apple, Tandy, Fallon Users Network. 
Send correspondence to P.O. Box 2155, 
89406 or phone (702) 423-8001. 

Paul A. Osborne 
Fallon, NV 

• I'd like to start a CoCo club for I6K 
owners only. Anyone interested who has a 
16K (not Extended basic) computer write to 
me at 115 Evelyn Avenue, 12010. 

J.R. Raczes 
Amsterdam, NY 

• If there is anyone in the Metrolina area 
interested in a CoCo club, please write me 
at Rt. l,Box 720-9, 28115. 

Jim Carroll 
Morresville, NC 

• The Tandy Color Computer Club of 
Minot, P.O. Box 1095, 58702. Call me at 
(701) 852-6651 for more information. 

Pete Fettig 
Minot, ND 

• Pd like to start a club for CoCo owners 
to exchange ideas. Interested CoCoists can 
get a newsletter by sending a first class stamp 
to CoComug, 3735 Stark Street, 43906. 

Charles D, Roman 
Bellaire, OH 

• Our club in Oklahoma City has about 
280 members with about 1 25 at each meet- 
ing. We meet the second Saturday of the 
month at the Red Cross Building at 10th and 
Hedson at 9 a.m. For information write to 
me at 1726 W. Rose Oak Drive, 73064. 

Robert L. Pace 
Mustang, OK 

• The LoCo CoCo Club meets on the last 
Tuesday of the month. Annual dues are $12 
for a monthly newsletter. For more informa- 
tion write me at 4334 Flynn Drive, 29405, 
or call (803) 747-0802. 

L. W. Coyle 
Charleston Heights, SC 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 175 



• I am interested in starting a users group 
in the Grand Prairie- Arlington area to share 
experiences with other owners of Tandy 
Color Computers. Contact me at (214) 246- 
4396 or write to 1026 Capetown Drive, 
75050. 

Albert J. Marks 
Grand Prairie, TX 



• We have put together a newsletter that 
is published 10 times a year. Send a letter 
that includes your name and address so we 
can send documentation to see if you are 
interested in signing up. Send to 5908 87th 
Street E., 98371. 

Mark Bell 
Puyallup, WA 



• I started publishing a newsletter called 
"About My MC-10." I would share a sample 
issue for the postage. Forty-two pages of 
back issues and a 100-program software 
catalog are available for $5. The current 
year's subscription is $10 to cover postage 
and photocopy expenses. Write me at E. 
2924 Liberty, 99207. 

Larry E. Haines 
Spokane, WA 



• The Mt. Rainier Computer Club meets 
at 7 p.m. the first and third Thursday of the 
month. For more information write me at 
2450 Lenore Drive N., 98406, or call 752- 
8735. 

Ron Amos 
Tacoma, WA 



• The Colour Computer User Group in 
Halifax meets the first Tuesday of every 
month at the Oxford Community School. 
Contact me at 6354 London Street, Halifax, 
or call (902) 455-6341. 

Paul A. Power 
Nova Scotia, B3I 1X3 

• The ESS A Color Computer Club meets 
at Our Lady of Grace School, Roth Street, 
Angus every other Monday at 7:30 p.m. For 
more information please call Eldon Doucet 
at (705) 424-1354 or me at (705) 728-9481. 

A.L. Ley 
Barrie, Ontario 

• Announcing a new CoCo club: Le Club 
CoCo La Tuque Inc. Our address is CP. 
458, La Tuque, G9X 3P4. We have approx- 
imately 35 members. 

Pierre Lortie 
La Tuque, Quebec 



• I would like to start a club for people 
using CoCo Max or Graphicom, so we could 
exchange ideas and tips. If anyone is inter- 
ested, please write to me at 258 Delisle, G7G 
3B3. 

Robert Delisle 
Chicoutimi, Nord, Quebec 



• The Southern Region Computer Club 
holds meetings at the Noarlunga Centre 
every third Tuesday of the month. For 
additional information contact Darren 
Ramsey 384-6728, Jan Lindner 382-7600 or 
me at 381-1036. 

Richard Boxall 
25 Longview Cres. 
O'Halloran Hill 
S.A., Australia 5158 

• A new CoCo users group has formed in 
Israel: The First Color Computer Club of 
Israel. The address is Data Processing 
Division, 1 Radin Street, Netanya, Israel. 
We have a vast library of utilities that are at 
our members' disposal. Meetings are an- 
nounced in our newsletter. For further 
information write to me at the above ad- 
dress. 

Yosef Krinsky 
Netanya, Israel 

□ 



Hint . * « 

Unpacking BASIC Programs 

If you have come across a program that has had its 
lines packed so tightly that parts of the lines can't be 
seen when listed, here is a way to make them visible 
again in a 64K CoCo. First RUN a program, such as 
this one from Frank Hogg, to put the CoCo in its 64K 
mode: 

Ijjt 1 ROMRAM 
2J3 CLEAR999 

3J3 DATA2 6, 80 , 19)3 , 128,0,183, 2 55,2 
22,166,128 

4J3 DATA183 ,255,223, 167 , 31, 140 , 22 
4,0,37,241,57 

50 FORI=lT021:READA:A$=A$+CHR$(A 
) : NEXTI 

60 P=VARPRT(A$)+1 
70 POKEP,126 
80 EXEC P 

90 PRINT"BASIC IS NOW IN RAM" 

Then simply enter POKE $HB81G, 4. This poke into 
the BASIC interpreter will allow the full line to be listed. 
This POKE will affect the LIST, LLI5T and ASCII save 
functions, but will not affect the EDIT mode. 



Hint . . . 

Disabling the Disk 
Controller 

Here's an easy way to modify your disk controller 
so that you can disable it without unplugging the 
controller pack. This is useful when you're running 
programs that won't work on a disk system. The only 
part needed is an SPST toggle switch, such as Radio 
Shack's catalog number 275-624. 

L Unplug the controller, open it, remove the circuit 
board and pull off the metal shield on the bottom. 

2. Remove the Disk BASIC ROM (a 24-pin chip), 
bend up Pin 24 and reinsert the chip. 

3. Connect Pin 24 of the ROM to one terminal on 
the switch. (These wires should be about six to eight 
inches long.) 

4. Turn over the board. Connect the other switch 
terminal to Pin 24 of the ROM socket. 

5. Replace the metal shield, mount the board in the 
bottom half of the case and replace the top. The wires 
should come out at the rear. 

With this modification in place, flipping the switch 
on will enable Disk BASIC, while switching it off will 
disable it. To change from Disk to Extended BASIC, 
switch it off and press the reset button. To go from 
Extended to Disk BASIC, type POKE 113 , 0 and ENTER, 
flip the switch on and press the reset button. 

Albert Rausch 
Ensival, Belgium 



176 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Protect Your Valuable 




DISTINCTIVE, 
DURABLE 
RAINBOW BINDERS 



Each issue of THE RAINBOW is a vital resource that you 
will refer to again and again, to gain insights, to explore 
new areas of interest or simply to refresh your memory. So, 
you need to keep your copies of THE rainbow safe — in 
high-quality, vinyl binders that provide complete protec- 
tion. 

These distinctive red binders not only ensure that your 
RAINBOWs stay in mint condition, but they showcase your 
collection as well. Each binder is clearly embossed with the 



magazine's name in gold lettering on both the front and the 
spine. They're a handsome addition to any room. 

They also make it possible for you to organize your work 
space and eliminate the clutter on a permanent basis. You'll 
spend more time on your CoCo and eliminate those 
frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two handsome binders, which hold a full 12 issues 
of THE RAINBOW, is only $13.50 (please add $2.50 $oiv. 
shipping and handling). 



Special Discounts On Past Issues With This Offer 



To help you complete your collection of THE RAINBOW, 
we're offering a special discount on past issues with the 
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When you place an order for six or more back issues of 
THE RAINBOW at the same time you order your binders, you 
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Contents under departmental listings). Also with this offer, 
copies of the "Official And Compleat Index vTp the 
RAINBOW" (a comprehensive index of rainbow's first three 
years, July 1981 through June 1984), usually priced at $2.50, 
may be purchased for only $1 with a set of binders. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you order back issues 
now while supplies last. 



YES. Please send me 



Set(s) Of RAINBOW binders at $13.50 per two- 



binder set (plus $2.50 per set for shipping and handling). If your order is to be sent via U.S. Mail 
to a post office box or to another country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
U.S. currency only, please. 

Order one or more sets of binders and take advantage of these exciting offers: 

I also want to take advantage of a special savings of $1 off the single issue cover price for back 
issues with the purchase of a set of binders. (Minimum order of 6 magazines. An order form from 
a recent issue indicating the back issues you wish to receive should accompany this order.) 

I want to purchase the first three-year index to the rainbow (July 1981 through June 1984) at 
the special price of $1 (regular price $2.50) with my purchase of one or more sets of binders. 



Name _ 
Address 
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□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 






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Ends Chaos in Checking Accounts/After Five Software . .185 

CoCo EPROM Programmer 

Has Variety of Functions/Specfru/r? Projects, Inc . . . .213 

The CoCo Greeting Card Designer 

Send Personal Wishes/Zebra Systems, Inc . 202 

CoCo Keyboard Software 

Increases Function Key DuWes/Spectrum Projects, inc. ... . . ... .191 

CoCo Max II 

Major Enhancements/Co/orware, Inc. .......... * , : . . .1 89 

Color Essential Math 

A Good Teaching Tool/Tandy Corp. , < , ,. . .203 

Complete Electronic Organizer 

Options Galore to get You in Order/Compuferware ^ ..... f . . , & . . .204 

Conquering Armies 

A Challenging Simulation/M/fc/ie// Software , ,s>. . . ■<>■.. . 192 

DeskMate 

An All-Purpose Package/Tandy Corp. >, ....... H . .... . . ....... > : , . .198 

Graf ix-3 

A Real OS-9 Bargai n/Aarc/var/c Software . , . . . . .... . ..... . . . . , 196 

Knock Out 

Action Abounds in Fast-Paced Game/Diecom Products ... ,. .209 

Menu Maker 

Gives Easy Access to Disk F\\es/Saguaro Software , . . . . ..... , , .210 

Panic Button 

fun for All Ages/ Tandy Corp. ..^ .... . . . . . . .207 

PenPal 

Useful and Affordable/Four Star Software ... . . . + . , . .. , . . , .184 

Perpetulife 

Provides Enjoyment for Board-Game Lovers/ Tothian Software. . . , . ... . .211 

PLANEGEO and PGCALPRT 

Euclid would be Proud/TASC .. 1 90 

SIDE WISE OS9 

Prints out Wide Spreadsheets/Derr/nger Software f ... . , , . . 21 2 

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An Excellent Music Synthesizer/Speec/7 Systems . , .. , •* 188 

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Have a Starry, Starry Night/Rococo Software 1 95 






\ 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products have recently been 
received by the rainbow, examined by our magazine 
staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the 
product and have ascertained that it is what it 
purports to be. 

This month the Seai of Certification has been 
issued to: 



EZ-Back, a 64K OS-9 utility to back up 
and restore all or part of a file system, 
reconstruct all fragmented files back to 
linearly sectored files to save time on 
disk reads/ writes and repositioning 
strategically critical sectors, such as 
directories, to minimize disk head 
travel. IV A Electronics, 6117 Gerard 
Morisett, Montreal Quebec, H1M3J8, 
disk $24 plus $2 S/H 

EZ-Manager, a 64K OS-9 utility to 
facilitate recursive search procedures, 
spool groups of files using simple text 
formatter to the printer and use of 
windows adaptable to the user's screen 
width to display the maximum amount 
of information, thereby replacing the 
"chd" and "dir" sequence. IV A Elec- 
tronics, 6117 Gerard Morisett, Mont- 
real, Quebec, HIM 3J8, disk $19 plus 
$2 S/H 

Easy Gradebook and Grade %, a 16/ 

32/64K utility for teachers to keep track 
of student data that may be sent to 
either screen or printer. Features in- 
clude editing (add or change grades or 
names), alphabetize by name or rank, 
up to 100 students (64 K), up to 50 
grades per student, letter grades and 
written in BASIC (suitable for user 
modification). Grade % is the same 
program but uses percentile scores 



rather than letter grades. Teachers Are 
Us Software, 518 West 5th, Peru, IN 
46970, cassette or disk $15 

Easy Testwriter, a 16/32/64K utility on 
disk for teachers to produce multiple 
choice or true/ false tests. Features 
include creation of questions, send to 
screen or printer, answers mixed ran- 
domly and up to 100 questions per test. 
A final exam may be compiled from 
questions on previous tests saved to 
disk. Teachers Are Us Software, 518 
West 5th Street, Peru, IN 46970, disk 
$15. A package of Easy Gradebook, 
Easy Grade % and Easy Testwriter is 
offered for $25 and a VCR tape explain- 
ing the programs is available for $10 

CoCo Text Util, an auxiliary utility 
program for use with most CoCo word 
processors. Features include resetting of 
margins for correct length for upload- 
ing, conversion of uppercase to mixed 
upper- and lowercase, display of total 
byte count, and rename and kill func- 
tions. Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. 
Box 21272, 93-15 86th Street, Wood- 
haven, NY 11421, disk $19.95 plus $3 
S/H 

Double RAM, a hardware plug-in 
assembly that increases the memory of 
Thunder RAM to 512K by adding a 



second bank of memory chips, a control 
module and a switch for bank selection. 
The unselected bank is placed in a 
standby state without losing its data. 
Thunder RAM must be installed and 
working properly and it is necessary to 
remove one wire from the Thunder 
RAM assembly and solder another to 
the circuit board. Spectrum Projects, 
Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Street, 
Woodhaven, NY 11214, $79.95 plus $3 
S/H 

The Vortex Factor, a 32K Adventure 
game with Hi-Res graphics depicting 
the various times and places you, the 
seeker, explore in your quest to unlock 
the secrets and treasures of the Vortex 
Factor. Mark Data Products, 24001 
Alicia Parkway, No. 207, Mission 
Viejo, CA 92691, cassette $24.95, disk 
$27.95 plus $2 S/H 

Shock Trooper, a 32K arcade game 
with Hi-Res graphics. The scenario pits 
four of your Shock Troopers against a 
heavily defended enemy base to steal 
attack weapons before they can be used 
to subjugate the Earth. Mark Data 
Products, 24001 Alicia Parkway, No. 
207, Mission Viejo, CA 92691, cassette 
$24.95, disk $27.95 plus $2 S/H 



1 80 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



Infomania: The Guide to Essential 
Electronic Services, a 314-page soft- 
bound book to inform novices and 
veterans of the myriad collection of 
electronic services, tips on what hard- 
ware/software is likely to meet a user's 
needs, what the electronic services offer 
and their costs to consumers, and eval- 
uations of over 250 electronic services 
available today. Houghton Mifflin 
Company, 2 Park Street, Boston, MA 
02108, $14.95 

Assembly Language Programming for 
the TRS-80 Color Computer, a 289- 
page soft-bound book that shows in a 
tutorial fashion how to program in 
assembly language. Hardware func- 
tions, capabilities of the CoCo and how 
to control them with assembly language 
are explained, and there is a chapter on 
how to use all EDTASM+ capabilities. 
TEPCO, 30 Water Street, Portsmith, 
RI 02871, $16 plus $1.50 S/H 

OS9 Utilities Package, a 64K OS-9 set 
of utilities with transfer routines for 
moving text between Disk BASIC and 
OS-9. Included among the commands 
are: GREP, a pattern search utility; 
CRYPT, a file encryption/ decryption 
utility; and CALC, a scientific floating- 
point calculator that evaluates arith- 
metic expressions. The Other Guy's 
Software, P.O. Box H, Logan, UT 
84321, disk $19.95 plus $2 S/H 



Homeware, a 16K home utility package 
consisting of six modules. A Calendar 
module creates calendars on screen or 
paper and adds notes to specific dates 
on a large format calendar. A Savings 
module calculates compound interest 
including principal, time (years), yearly 
rate of interest, future principal and 
interest earned. A Loan module calcu- 
lates time (years) to pay back, amount 
of payment, balloon payment and total 
amount repaid. A Directory module 
tracks telephone numbers, addresses, 
birthdays, other information and prints 
out address labels of up to four lines. An 
Inventory module tracks household 
possessions for insurance purposes, 
hobby items and/ or the inventory of a 
small business. A Home- Writer module 
is a word processor suitable for use in 
common household tasks such as mak- 
ing lists, recipes, memos and writing 
letters. Tothian Software, P.O. Box 
663, Rimersburg, PA 16248, entire set 
on cassette $49.95, individual modules 
on cassette $19.95, Saving and Loan 
sold as one module. 



Computer Underground, a 257-page 
soft-bound book by M. Harry on com- 
puter hacking, crashing, pirating and 
phreaking. Discussed are terminology 
and security measures for protecting 
computer systems and data. Loompan- 



ics Unlimited, P.O. Box 1197, Port 
Townsend, WA 98368, $14.95 

Telewriter-64 Character Set Editor, a 

32K ECB screen utility that allows the 
creation of modified character sets used 
by Telewriter-64 to suit user preference. 
Possible are true descenders, special 
characters and foreign language charac- 
ter sets. CMD Micro Computer Serv- 
ices Ltd., 10447 124th Street, Edmon- 
ton, Alberta, Canada T5N1R7, cassette 
$14.95 plus $2 S/H 

Starship Simulator, a 64K strategy 
game that places you in the role of 
starship captain fighting the Mions. 
Your weapons include phasers, photon 
torpedos, a cloaking device, warp 
speed, plasm bolts and a self-destruct 
mechanism, but every tactic deployed 
costs your finite energy supply. RDB 
Software, 379 Goodwin Rd., Eliot, ME 
03903, cassette $21.95, disk $26.95 

Comm-4, a hardware/ software serial 
communications interface package 
requiring an expansion device such as 
Multi-Pak or CC Bus. Users are allowed 
serial I/O capabilities utilizing four RS- 
232 channels. Supported are full 
modem control and the enhancement of 
multitasking and multi-user features of 
OS-9. Co Co Devices, P.O. Box 677, 
Seabrook, TX 77586, $108 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all 
manufacturers of products for the Tandy Color 
Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Sea/, the magazine certifies the 
product does exist — that we have examined it and 
have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, 
these hardware or software items will be forwarded 
to the rainbow's reviewers for evaluation. 

— Monica Dorth 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 181 



REVIEWING 





EDOS2.6 

Editor: 

In the December 1985 issue of the rain- 
bow, EDOS2.6 was reviewed [Page 235]. 
Many thanks. 1 must point out that the price 
reflected is incorrect. EDOS2.6 sells for 
$39.95 U.S. and $49.95 CDN. Also, a new 
version, EDOS2.7, is available and includes 
two new commands as well as a new prompt 
giving the default drive number. 

ED OS can be customized at no charge at 
the time of ordering from Micro Computer 
Services, and a 16K version of EDOS is 
currently being developed. It is intended for 
use in the new controllers that will accept 
16K E PRO Ms. Expected release date is the 
summer of 1986. 

Eldon Douce t 
Angus, Ontario 



TX 



Editor: 

I would like to respond to the review of 
TX by John Ogasapian [March 1986, Page 
209]. Few people need or use in their per- 
sonal correspondence underline, subscript, 
superscript, double-width print, etc. Few 
people write professionally at home with a 
CoCo. 

TX is intended for those users who just 
want to compose a simple letter or form on 
an 80-column by 66-line printer page. TX 
does this easily, at a cost of $12.95. Cer- 
tainly, heavyweight WPs give embeddable 
printer codes and a 10-page buffer, but in 
reality, how many people write a 10-page 
letter to grandma with italics, subscripts, 
etc.? 



TX displays the page exactly as it will 
appear on the printer. To accomplish this on 
a standard CoCo screen, reuses the screen 
as a window over the printer page, and the 
four arrow keys guide the screen and cursor 
around the page with the cursor being non- 
destructive. From the main menu, pressing 
enter moves to the page editor and change 
is the default mode of TX. While entering 
text, users can access the 16 function keys 
(that include center, string$, calculator, 
mark, erase and print block) by holding 
SHIFT and pressing ENTER. 

The program is in basic and the editor is 
admittedly slow, however the maximum 
typing speed has been changed from three 
characters per second to eight cps. TX holds 
one page at a time. When more are needed, 
users can store them, one at a time, on a 
diskette using disk 1/ O from the main menu. 
Printer control codes cannot be embedded 
within the text. 

If you need printer codes, or can't tolerate 
typing at eight cps, then TX isn't for you. 
But if you're looking for something with a 
simple format (what and where you type is 
what you get), TX is an inexpensive answer. 

Fred Kolesar 
Kolesar B/S 



Microartist 



Editor: 

I would like to thank John W. Robinson 
for the fine review of Microartist that 
appeared in the December 1985 issue of 
rainbow [Page 240]. We appreciate both his 
compliments and comments, which promp- 
ted the author, Woody Pope, to make several 
improvements to the program. A multiple 



GET/ PUT function is now available and the 
spray paint function has been enlarged. An 
UNDO function has been added to allow the 
user to correct mistakes before they become 
a permanent part of the picture. Microartist 
owners who would like to update their 
version to version 2. 1 may do so by sending 
their original tape or disk and $6.50 ($5 plus 
$1.50 S/H) to Prickly-Pear Software. 

Joanne Chintis 
Prickly- Pear Software 



Calculating Parts Per Million 

Editor: 

I would like to thank Mr. Odlin for his 
review of my program, Calculating Parts 
Per Million, March 1986, Page 195. I made 
PPM user friendly and added a routine to 
give the amount in tablespoons so that home 
gardeners could use it. 

Mr. Odlin has made some suggestions 
concerning the program flow and screen 
display. I have taken his suggestions to heart 
and revised the program. Now the error- 
trapping routines work better and the screen 
display looks better. I have also expanded 
the documentation to four pages so that it 
will be more easily understood, especially by 
home gardeners. 

Jose Garcia 
Green Horizons 



We welcome letters to "Reviewing Re- 
views" and remind you that they may also 
be sent to us through the MAIL section 
of our new Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 




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TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER USERS-MAGAZINE 
Sell or trade your unwanted programs or hardware in this monthly 
newspaper. Find great buys. List your club or BBS. Full of tips, arti- 
cles, reviews and programs for your COCO. Don't delay, subscrip- 
tion starts at only $5.00 per 12 issues (1 year) classified ads only 
$.15 a word, use seperate sheet of paper for classified ads. 
Yes- I would like a subscription to COCO ADS 

1 year third class mail $5.00 

1 year first class & Canada $10.00 



Name 



Address 



City, State 



: Zip 

Please have checks payable to - P D Software 
P.O. Box 13124 Houston, Texas 77219 



182 



THE RAINBOW April 1986 





V 





Enjoy Your RAINBOW Programs 

with the Greatest of Ease 
Subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




Each month, rainbow on tape gives you as many as two dozen ready-to- 
run programs from the current issue of the rainbow, excluding OS-9 
programs and those less than 20 lines. With just a one-year subscription, you'll 
receive more than 230 new programs. And, using the documentation provided 
by the magazine, all you have to do is load and run them. 



Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $105 for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, RAINBOW ON TAPE can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of THE RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG (Special 
Interest Group). 

The individual programs from our past April issues are also 
available for immediate download in the RAINBOW ON TAPE 
Database area in THE RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG on 
Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



RAINBOW ON TAPE is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOWONTAPE, you will still need 
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^=0 



Programs from Our Past April Issues: 

April 1985 (Hardware/Simulation issue) — CoCo Payroll, part 
two of a complete small business payroll; Landlord's Helper, 
part two of a program that manages rental property; Surface, 
a Simulation that takes you to the North Pole; Cardio, a 
Simulation that transfroms you into a heart specialist; The 
Adventure Writer's Toolkit, offers tips on writing your own 
Adventure; Run for Your Life, a survival game; Concert, a 
animated graphics program; Porsche, a graphics represen- 
tation of the Porsche 930 Turbo; and Wishing Well, a 
collection of educationa programs that help make learning 
more fun; plus four additional programs. 

April 1984 (Gaming issue) — Roulette, a betting game played 
on the numbered wheel; The Icing on the Cake, a tutorial on 
writing Adventure programs; Craps, a game played at the 
"Casino CoCo"; A Day at the Races, a BASIC game that 
simulates horse racing; Bingo, a game where your luck is in 
the cards; Biackjak, a game for the "21 and under" crowd; 
Memscan, a utility for the memory explorer; The Home Slot 
Machine, a real money saver for the BASIC gambler; Spinning 
Fortune's Wheel, a rotary "hangman" game for up to eight 
players; Place Your Bet, a pari-mutuel wagering system for 
your Derby party; plus seven additional programs. 



To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 



Software /?eWevvJSSZZZZSSSZSSSST?^\ 

PenPol is Useful 
and Affordable 

PenPal is an integrated software package that includes 
a word processor, a spreadsheet, database, communications 
package and a graphics package. Users have options to print 
out data from the spreadsheet and produce pie graphs, 
horizontal or vertical lines, dot or bar graphs. Files can be 
transferred between modules, saved to disk, sent to a printer 
or transmitted over a modem. All these functions can be 
accomplished without leaving the integrated program. 

Each program module has its own online help screen at 
the bottom of the screen. The keys '1' through '9\ '0', ':' and 

in conjunction with the CLEAR key and the SHIFT-CLEAR 
keys act as functions 1 through 12 and alternates 1 through 
12 respectively. 

PenPal requires 64K and at least one disk drive. While 
a graphics printer and a modem are considered optional, 
there are many features you will not be able to use without 
them. A second disk drive is also useful since you must have 
a program disk in Drive 0. If you only have one drive and 
must save disk space, you make a program disk that 
contains only the modules and help files you are using 
during that particular session. With two drives you have all 
the modules on the program disk in Drive 0 and you have 
a files disk in Drive 1 . Two drives increase the versatility 
of PenPal 

Besides the five modules in the integrated package, the 
main menu also allows manipulation of files. Function keys 
in the main menu allow swapping the default drives, 
renaming files, display free space on the default drive, kill 
files, display an expanded directory, change the drive step 
rates or run a configure program to set all of the above 
defaults. Along with these seven functions, PenPal has four 
alternate functions that are available at any time from any 
of the modules and main menu. A simple calculator is 
available, the option to set up the printer defaults, toggle 
between white and green screen display modes or a help file 
can be called up for the specific module currently engaged. 

Now, the individual programs do not always have all the 
bells and whistles some of the larger, more expensive 
programs have, but in a few cases PenPal has more bells 
but less whistles. For example, the Write module is slightly 
restricting in that you definitely do not get what you see, 
i.e., the way the text looks on the screen is not necessarily 
how the printout looks. In my opinion, this is the chief 
weakness of the program. I would like to see a 64-column 
mode. The screen is Hi-Res consisting of 50 columns. While 
the Write module does not have all the options some bigger 
programs have, it does have 18 functions, making the first 
nine function keys used twice. These functions include Find 
and Replace, an overstrike or insert mode, delete character 
and line functions and the ability to merge files to the end 
of the current file. Also available are multiple block 
functions. 

The Calc module includes most of the more popular 
functions. The spreadsheet is laid out into 255 columns and 
255 rows. Of course, you cannot have a 255 column by 255 
row spreadsheet but this layout does allow the user good 
flexibility. The Database module includes many options of 
the more popular databases. While no database is going to 



cover everyone's needs, PenPal's version should cover most 
requirements. 

The Graph-It module is very useful for creating graphs 
from the data of the Calc portion of PenPal. Users are given 
seven options of the type of graph to plot. As mentioned 
earlier, possible selections are a pie graph, horizontal or 
vertical line dot or bar graphs. Users can then add more 
than five styles of text as labels, print the graphs out using 
standard or double-width modes, or save the graph in a 
binary format and later modify it with any of the several 
commercially available graphics programs. PenPal comes 
with six printer drivers: Epson, Gemini, CGP-220, the DMP 
series, LP VII and VIII, and C. Itoh 8510A. This module 
has many options and a review could be written on just this 
module alone. It is the most powerful module of PenPal. 

The Telecom module is the last of the PenPal modules 
and is also well-designed. When at the main menu, users 
can choose any of the auto-log files they have created for 
any BBSs wanted or they can create a new auto-log file to 
get on a new BBS in the area. Once in Telecom, users have 
all the options of most terminal packages and maybe even 
some added features. 

For instance, you can use the auto-log file you called up 
or you can go straight to the terminal mode. For transferring 
data you have three protocols from which to choose. You 
can use the simple mode that has no built-in checks or you 
can use the very popular XMODEM protocol. You also 
have a third choice, PenPal's own protocol that uses a 
checksum to ensure error-free transmission. This last option 
can only be used if the other party also uses PenPal. 

The more I used PenPal the more impressed I became. 
It is nice to be able to switch between the modules quickly 
and have all the data from the different modules compatible 
with each other. There are other packages available that do 
this, but they are not as affordable as PenPal. It may be 
true that if taken separately, any one of the modules is not 
outstanding, but together, PenPal makes a very useful 
package. The weakest part of PenPal is the 50-column 
screen on the Write module, but I believe the power in the 
Graph-It module compensates for this weakness. 

The documentation is well-written and is very easy to 
follow. Four Star Software seems to have done it again, and 
I readily recommend PenPal. 

(Four Star Software, P.O. Box 730, Streetsville, Ontario, 
Canada, L5M 2C2, 64K disk $89.95 U.S., $119.95 CDN) 

— Dale Shell 



★ LARGE LABEL + 

MAKES SHIPING LABELS 

9 
58.50 

★ H0ME * 

INVENTORY 

A MUST FOR 
INSURANCE CLAIMS 

$8.50 



★ TAPE MENU * 

NAME TAPES 
AUTO-START PROGRAMS 
58.50 

★ WRITE A CHECK* 

WRITES PERSONAL CHECKS 
KEEPS LEDGER 

$8.50 



★ LABELS* 

FROM LIST OR MANUAL 

S8.50 

* ZINGER * 

MAKES COMPUTERIZED 
GREETING CARD 

$8.50 



@Dot Matrix Printer Elongated Print Required 

HAK Workshop, P.O.Box 9712, Anaheim, CA 92802 



1 84 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



Software Review sI^SSSSSSV^ 

CAIS Ends Chaos in 
Your Checking Accounts 

CAIS stands for Checking Account Information System, 
a disk-based program that requires at least 32K and a disk 
drive. It handles multiple drives for data disks and sends 
to any 80-column printer, but does not require one. It is 
written in BASIC in seven disk modules, which are accessed 
during the running of the program. It also PDKEs machine 
language routines that disable the BREAK key and enable 
virtually error-free screen input of data. 

CAIS records checking account transactions, including 
Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) transactions, interest and 
service charges, and other debits and credits into disk files 
that maintain a record of that account. The program then 
functions to reconcile your checking account when you 
receive your statement, maintaining a history of both 
reconciled and outstanding debits and credits. The program 
is capable of maintaining records on eight accounts using 
the same program disk, although additional data disks in 
additional drives are necessary for more than two at once. 
Each data disk is capable of holding three accounts. 

It also prints reconciliation summaries and account 
summaries. Although no accommodations are made within 
CAIS for advanced printer capabilities, they could easily 
be added by altering the BASIC program. 

Program functions are accessed through menus. The first 
order of business is to set up the accounts by name of bank, 
account number, whether it is an interest bearing account 
or not, and the drive number on which the data will be 
found. That account is then created on the disk. You may 
then post transactions, which include the listing of checks, 
deposits, ATMs, interest, service charges and miscellaneous 
debits or credits. 

When the bank statement arrives from the bank, you 
select the "reconcile account" option, which steps you 
through all your recorded transactions as you indicate, one 
by one, whether those transactions have been cleared or not. 
You are also prompted to indicate service charges and 
interest earned. When you are finished, CAIS creates a file 
of cleared transactions called a "history file" and maintains 
outstanding checks, etc., in an active file. This module offers 
the option of getting a printout of the reconciled and 
outstanding checks, as well as current summaries of your 
checking account. Naturally, the program maintains the 
current balance in your accounts at all times. 

Selecting the "display accounts" option offers the choice 
of seeing your current balance, reviewing your current 
transactions, searching for specific checks and getting a 
complete summary of any account. It is this module that 
offers editing capabilities for all transactions that have not 
yet been reconciled. Although you might expect to be able 
to get a printout of the account summary option, it is not 
possible from this menu. 

The last main menu is that offering the "file management" 
options. From this menu you can change or delete whole 
accounts or purge an account history. The latter is an option 
meant to clear the transactions from an account at the end 
of a quarter or a year. When an account history is purged, 
the option to print out all transactions of the purged period 



of time is offered. In a typical scenario, this printout would 
be a valuable reference to search for tax-deductible expenses 
at that time of the year. The purge also empties the data 
from the account disk file giving you a clean slate of disk 
• space on which to start a new year. 

A final option is to get a display of the disk utilization, 
which keeps you posted on the available disk space for any 
account. Three files are created for each account, one for 
credits, one for debits and one that holds cleared transac- 
tions. The number of disk granules used for each file, as 
well as the percent of disk space available, is given. 

I was especially impressed by two aspects of CAIS: the 
documentation and the screen input. The documentation is 
43 % X A by 1 1-inch pages in a soft vinyl folder, produced by 
a dot-matrix printer. But what impressed me is its organ- 
ization, clarity and lack of errors. Each menu is reproduced 
in the documentation, each option is explained whenever 
it is available, and proper use of indentation and boldface 
type make its use as both a tutorial and a reference possible. 
The last page is a form soliciting user comments. 

The screen input, accomplished by poking a machine 
language routine into memory, makes entry easy. I will use 
the entry of checks as an example. The data lines are check 
number, date, amount and payee. Data is entered into a blue 
field with arrow keys controlling the cursor. The check 
number is automatically updated after each check, but may 
be changed by typing the new number. The cursor moves 
to the next line when the field is full. The date must be 
entered by MM/DD/YY (Month, Day, Year — two digits 
each), but only changed data need be entered; other 
numbers stay as they were. The amount is registered as 
dollars until the user presses the decimal (period). It is not 
necessary to enter the decimal or zeros if there are no cents. 
The payee line is 30 spaces long. Since the search-for-checks 
function selects from any part of the string, you could use 
the ample field to describe checks by categories in addition 
to payee. 

The unfortunate part of CAIS is that one of the really 
useful parts of a program for recording all your checks is 
missing. After creating diskfuls of files with my year's 
checks, I would expect to be able to pull out expenses by 
categories that may be tax-deductible, get the total and a 
printout. Organization by category would also be useful for 
setting up budgets. The rather limited printout options are 
also a drawback. I would like to be able to change the printer 
Baud rate within the program. It would also be useful to 
get printed reports of checks from one date to another and 
reports showing all checks to specific payees. 

If you have more than one checking account, even up to 
eight, the program helps you track and update them all 
easily. I would like to see the implementation of my 
suggestions because the quality of CAIS leads me to expect 
good things from possible upgrades. Overall, however, 
CAIS is a good applications program that delivers a quality 
job for the dollar. 



(After Five Software, 8100 Bayfield Rd., Apt. 8-0, Colum- 
bia, SC 29223, $24.95 plus $2.50 S/H) 



— Dennis A. Church 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 185 



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DeskMate 7-in4 software 
makes your Color Computer 

better than even 



Now our popular Deskmate® soft- 
ware is available for disk-based 
Color Computers! DeskMate 
(26-3259, $99.95) features seven 
popular personal-productivity 
programs — all on one disk! 

A general-purpose TEXT entry 
and editing program performs 
search and replace, file merge and 
block select, copy and delete. It's 
ideal for writing correction-free 
letters, memos and short reports. 

A simple spreadsheet program in- 
cludes an easy-to-use menu and au- 
tomatic column formatting. You can 
use LEDGER to do budgeting, 
sales forecasting, profit-and-loss 
projections and other "What 
if . . calculations. 

A four-color picture editor lets 



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LEDGER 



you create lines, 
shapes, patterns, 
fills in areas 
with color and 
enter text. Using 
PAINT, you can 
create colorful 
charts, graphs, designs and "doo- 
dles" on your screen, then print a 
copy on a dot-matrix or ink-jet 
printer. 

The INDEX CARDS personal fil- 
ing system lets you enter and edit 

data and per- 
form simple 
sorts and 
searches. It's 
ideal for keep- 
ing track of 
names and 
addresses. 




INDEX CARDS 



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TELECOM, a 
communications 
program lets 
you access na- 
tional informa- 
tion services, 
TELECOM pl us transmit 

and receive files from other com- 
puters by phone (requires modem), 

A simple monthly calendar pro- 
gram displays "to do's" for any date. 
CALENDAR is an easy way to or- 
ganize your work day. 

A four- 
function CAL- 
CULATOR, with 
memory, is also 
available within 
any application 
without inter- 



1 



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TEXT EDITOR 




rupting the screen in the program 
you are currently using. 

If you don't already have a disk 
drive for your color computer, you 

can add one 
for just $299 
(26-3131). The 
51/4", thinline 
floppy drive 
plugs into your 
Program Pak® 
CALENDAR port for over 
156,000 characters of storage. Add 
a second drive at any time, too. 

Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 7 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 






Free! New 1986 Software Guide RSC-16. 



Mail to: Radio Shack 
Dept. 86-A-97, 300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, Texas 76102 



Name 



1 
1 

I 

; 

i 



Price applies at Radio Shack Computer Centers and par- 
ticipating stores and dealers. DeskMate/Registered TM 

Tandy Corp. 



I 
I 

1 
I 
I 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



Hardware/Software R e vie w^^SSZ^^SSST/^n 

Symphony 22 is an Excellent 
Music Synthesizer 

Symphony 12 is another release from Speech Systems and 
is one of a long line of excellent products developed by them 
for the Color Computer. Symphony 12 is a 12-voice 
hardware music synthesizer. It comes in a ROM pack along 
with tape/disk software that contains the necessary 
programs to operate the synthesizer and some sample music 
files for listening. This creation is a marvel for a machine 
that is supposed to have one operational voice. Some 
software developers have created programs with basic and 
machine language to create up to four voices, but this from 
Speech Systems emulates 12 separate voices. It features four 
noise channels and plays in stereo or mono. It can be hooked 
up to your home stereo or jam box. Special sound effects 
can be created and Symphony 12 is compatible with Musica 
files (Version 2.7). 

Symphony 12 alone comes with a program disk or tape 
and the ROM Stereo Pack. The options available include: 
Piano Keyboard (2Vi octaves) for $79.95, Piano Keyboard 
(4 octaves) for $1 19.95 and Y-Cable (required for disk) for 
$28.95. 

I used a Mutli-Pak Interface to connect the hardware 
cartridge and disk controller to my computer. I put the disk 
controller in Slot 4 and the sound cartridge in Slot 3. The 
sound cartridge has two RCA-type jacks that can connect 
to your stereo system. If you want to connect the stereo 
cartridge to your computer monitor, you need a Y-adapter 
cable so you can hear both output channels. Symphony 12 
comes with a stereo patch cord to connect the stereo 
cartridge to your stereo or computer monitor. 

I didn't have one of the piano keyboards for this review, 
therefore I had to use the CoCo keyboard. Symphony 12 
uses the bottom two rows of keys as the piano keyboard. 
The *Z' through */ ' keys are the white notes (A, B, C, D, 
E, F, G, A, B and C). The second row of keys, 'S' through 
*L\ are the black notes and correspond to B flat, D flat, 
etc. The CoCo keyboard allows you to play around with 
the various voices of Symphony 12. However, it is very 
limiting and difficult to play anything halfway serious. 
Octaves can be raised and lowered, but must be done 
manually by pressing the SHIFT key and one of the up- or 
down-arrow keys. You are given a visual piano keyboard 
on the computer screen and indicators are given as each note 
or chord is played. For serious users, Speech Systems and 
I both recommend one of their piano keyboards. 

If you are already a Musica owner, you may use your 
Musica creations with Symphony 12. However, only four 
voices are available to you. To take advantage of the 12 
simultaneous voices, you must create the music with 
Symphony 12. 

Symphony 12 gives you control of many aspects of 
generating various sounds. You have control of volume, the 
envelope (sound shape), noise, rhythm and preset instru- 
ment settings. The program comes with nine preset settings, 
each of which can be changed or adjusted to fit your 
particular needs. This allows the user to quickly change 
from one voice setting to another. Once you set up voicing 
to your liking, you can save the settings to tape or disk for 
future use. 



The music you create with Symphony 12 can be recorded 
in real time, or saved to disk or tape for future playback. 
When you press the 'R' key, everything you play is 
remembered by the computer and replayed at your 
command. The manual does not indicate how much the 
program can remember, but this is an excellent feature. If 
you make a mistake, you must start over again with the 
recording and the previous one is erased. A special feature 
of playing music is when you press a note to sound, you 
can "bend" the sound up or down. By pressing the CLEAR 
key you raise the pitch, and the shift-clear to lower the 
pitch. I found this feature absolutely fascinating! 

Envelope and noise control are somewhat complicated, 
but the manual gives very simple information to control 
these features. The manual also gives technical specifica- 
tions for the A4-3-8912 chip that is the heart of the 
Symphony 12 program. This would be useful to serious 
programmers and technical users. Noise can be used to 
accompany the sound so that it takes on a breathy quality, 
but noise and rhythm cannot be on at the same time. 

When playing musical files, you are asked if they are in 
the Musica format or the Symphony 12 format. You can 
play a Musica file in the Symphony 12 format, but 
remember, you can only use four voices. One nice feature 
this method allows is to change instrument settings as the 
music is played. This is particularly fun and enjoyable. You 
can also play each of the four voices as separate instruments. 

Symphony 12 has a demo program that shows how to 
create various sound effects. You hear a wolf whistle, race 
car, Pacman laser, bomb, steam locomotive, and a little 
Bach, among others. Symphony 12 files can be accessed 
from BASIC and the manual gives those instructions and a 
sample printed program. 

This program would be a great addition to any music 
lover or user's library. Symphony 12 does not support 
printer operations, therefore files must be recorded in the 
Musica format and transferred to the Musica program for 
printing. Speech Systems has quite a library of Musica files 
for your enjoyment and they are quite inexpensive. There 
is also a National Musica Users Group that supports this 
program. 

You can gather that I enjoyed Symphony 12. My only 
dream is to have a program that allows you to play a note 
on a keyboard (piano or computer), display the note on a 
musical staff, sound the note or chord and send it to a 
printer. Maybe that will be next from Speech Systems. 

(Speech Systems, 38W255 Deerpath Road, Batavia, IL 
60510, $79.95) 

— James Ray 



Sqg You dt 
RAINBOWfest-Chlcago 

May 23-25 



188 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Software Review^^SSSI^^SESSS^f^ 

CoCo Max II Features 
Major Enhancements 

Co Co Max His an enhanced version of the original Co Co 
Max graphics system that was reviewed in the June 1985 
issue of THE RAINBOW (Page 217). The materials I received 
for this review were for the upgrade to Co Co Max //from 
the original version of Co Co Max. If you're not familiar 
with CoCo Max, please refer to the previous review; IU be 
highlighting the enhancements to CoCo Max that upgrade 
it to CoCo Max II. 

CoCo Max II is available to disk users only for $79.95 
plus $3 shipping and handling. The original CoCo Max was 
discontinued after January 1986. CoCo Max owners may 
upgrade to CoCo Max II for a fee of $20 plus $3 to cover 
shipping and handling. 

The CoCo Max II upgrade comes with a non-copy- 
protected diskette and a 16-page User's Manual Addendum. 
The diskette contains the CoCo Max system, one picture 
(not much room on the disk for more), a second pattern 
set, and a BASIC program to configure the system for 
multiple drives, various printer models and Baud rates. 

My diskette contained machine language drivers for C- 
Itoh, DMP-100, DMP-105, DMP-110, DMP-120, DMP- 
200, DMP-400, Epson MX, Epson RX, Gemini, Gemini X, 
LP VIII, Oki 82, Oki 92 and TRP-100 printers. 

The User's Manual Addendum is comprehensive, illus- 
trated and well-organized like the original CoCo Max 
User's Manual, and its packaging matches the original. 

i 

New Features 

Multiple drives' are now supported; the CONFIG 
program supplied enables you to configure CoCo Max II 
for the number of drives in your system. "Clicking" the 
Drive option in the Files menu changes the working drive 
number. 

CoCo Max II has error reporting, a deficiency of the 
original. CoCo Max II informs you if the disk is full, or 
if you try to load a non-existent file. 

Files may now be loaded by "clicking" on the directory 
listing in addition to manual entry from the keyboard. 

A Clipbook file has been added to save any Clipboard 
file to disk under the filename CLIPBKXX/ S YS (where the 
"XX" is any two-digit number) for later retrieval. The 
maximum number of Clipbook files you can get on one disk 
is 68; they're saved in standard machine language format. 

The patterns created with the Edit Pattern function can 
now be saved to disk. The Files menu includes a Save 



Hint > . . 

Command Disable 

To disable the LIST and DIR commands on your 
computer, use POKE 158. This simple POKE can be 
undone by entering POKE 383 ,126. 



Pattern function to save the current pattern set in a file called 
PA TTERN3 1 MAX, You have no control over the filename 
the pattern set is saved under. If you want to make another 
pattern set to save, you must quit CoCo Max II, rename 
the PATTERN3 / MAX file and re-enter CoCo Max II. The 
next Save Pattern saves the pattern set as PATTERNS j 
MAX. The procedure to load a pattern set is the same as 
that for loading a picture: the file's address information 
causes it to load into CoCo Max ITs pattern tables rather 
than the picture area. 

Fourteen different character fonts are now supplied 
including the new Glyphic font. Some of these are size 
variations of one font (small, medium, large), but overall 
a good selection to fit many applications. The Glyphic font 
associates a small drawing to a key (similar to sprites on 
other computers), for instance, the 'a' key causes the 
Ipencil" icon in the tool kit to be drawn, the 'b' key, a pair 
oPeyeglasses, and so on. Youngsters will certainly be 
fascinated with this font, which allows them to make rubber 
stamp-like drawings by using the keyboard. 

Edit Pattern has a new feature that enables you to pick 
up a pattern from a picture by "dragging" the mouse over 
the picture area; releasing the button captures the pattern. 

A Window Locator has been added to the Show Page 
function that lets you select your working area from the 
entire picture in the Show Page display. 

A Rotate function has been added to the Edit menu. Parts 
selected by the Edit Box may be rotated 90 degrees 
clockwise about the center of the box. 

A dynamic two-dimensional Stretch feature has been 
added that lets you stretch or shrink part of the picture 
selected by the Edit Box. By holding down the space bar 
and dragging the mouse in the windowed portion of the 
picture, the window stretches or shrinks in the direction the 
mouse moves. 

Deficiencies 

CoCo Max II deficiencies are minor and few. Lack of 
access to file functions such as Kill and Rename are not 
serious, just slightly bothersome. CoCo Max has no 
provision for killing or renaming files. 

The inability to handle filenames in Disk BASIC syntax 
is annoying. I succeeded in saving a file called L JUNK on 
Drive 0; Disk BASIC would have recognized that I wanted 
the file JUNK on Drive 1, but CoCo Max thought the "1:" 
was part of the name. 

Though not deficiencies, here are a few things I'd like to 
see added to CoCo Max II: a programmable grid, such as 
one for printed circuit board layouts; a programmable zoom 
magnification; and rotation for increments smaller than 90 
degrees. 

Conclusions 

CoCo Max II offers a major improvement over the 
original CoCo Max in respect to file handling and error 
reporting. The enhancements of multiple drive support, 
window stretching and clipbook files provide a new level 
of performance to an excellent graphics system. 

(Colorware, Inc., 78-03F Jamaica Avenue, Woodha ven, NY 
11421, 64K disk, Y-cable or multi pack Interface, joystick, 
mouse or touch pad required, CoCo Max //disk $79.95 plus 
$3 S/H, CoCo Max II upgrade disk $20 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jesse W. Jackson 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 189 



Software Review! 



Euclid would be Proud 
of PLANEGEO 
and PGCALPRT 

By John McCormick 

PLANEGEO and PGCALPRT both do practically the 
same thing: they calculate the various parts of most plane 
geometric figures (square, circle, polygon, rectangle, 
parallelogram, trapezoid, right triangle, oblique triangle 
and ellipse) from the various combinations of data you have 
available (diagonal, side, area, etc.). These programs are 
aimed at engineers and others who have a regular need for 
these calculations. 

You might ask just why an engineer would need to have 
a program to tell him the area of a square is found by 
squaring one side. Well, if you do, please tell me (off the 
top of your head) what is the area of a circle having a chord 
length of 100 feet and a chord height of 10 feet? According 
to PLANEGEO the area is 53,092.917 square feet. 

Both PLANEGEO and PGCALPRT are written entirely 
in BASIC "to permit the user to make changes" (a comment 
in the documentation I found prophetic). 

The lack of machine language is no handicap since the 
actual calculations performed in the program are quite short 
and BASIC doesn't really slow down the operation at all. 

A nice touch is the Conversions program, which converts 
various data, such as feet, inches and fractions to feet and 
decimals, or the reverse, to the nearest Vi6 inch and also 
converts angles in various ways. 

PLANEGEO 

This program comes on a double-sided disk (which must 
be turned over for some calculations) and has a smaller 
user's manual because almost anything you want to know 
about these geometrical figures is included in the program 
itself. 

Talk about user friendly! There are over 100 menus in 
this program (if I didn't lose count) and you can even call 
up an illustration of a square and be shown graphically what 
a side looks like. The menus also offer a complete listing 
of the formulas used in all calculations and word descrip- 
tions of the process. 

These extensive help menus don't slow down the program 
(other than the fact that the extensive on-screen documen- 
tation requires the two-sided disk) because they only appear 
if you request to see them. Even this is not much of a 
problem since all calculations for a given shape are done 
with no disk changes. 

What PLANEGEO doesn't have is a way to print out the 
results, which brings us to: 

PGCALPRT 

This version does exactly the same calculations as the 
other but, because of the reduced on-screen documentation 
(the user's manual is over twice as big as PLANEGEO's), 
the entire program fits on one side of a disk, thus eliminating 
some delays. 

PGCALPRT prints out results. Unfortunately, in my 
opinion, it always prints out results. In fact, it won't even 
run without a printer online. This feature can lead to lots 
of wasted paper. 



BUGS 

I wish I didn't need to have this section but, alas, these 
very user-friendly programs do'contain some bugs. 

In PGCALPRT, for instance, if you try to exit the 
conversions portion of the program you find that the 
authors accidentally used the conversions subprogram from 
PLANEGEO and it therefore calls the wrong program (NE 
Error in Line 610). Anyone with experience in basic can 
easily repair this bug (change RUN"PLFINGE2" to read 
RUN "PGCALPRT"). This repair allows the program to 
operate but still leaves a problem. The version mistakenly 
used in PGCALPRT does not print out results. This means 
that after running a conversion you must copy down the 
results before returning to your calculations. TASC 
acknowledges the problem and I feel certain they will have 
it corrected. 

Another problem cropped up in PLANEGEO when 
trying to use "Parts of a Circle." Line 1800 contains a 
reversed ')' (close parenthesis mark) after POKE. The 
program ran fine when I changed this to '('(°pen parenthesis 
mark). 

Room for Improvement 

The first point is a matter of judgment. The program 
contains no provision to prevent erroneous input data (for 
instance, you can calculate the area of a one-sided polygon). 
One of the authors, a chemical/ mechanical engineer, told 
me that since the program is aimed at professionals he felt 
(subject to user complaints) that this modification is not 
needed. 

Personally, I feel such a user-friendly program cried out 
for this further enhancement to prevent accidental input 



o* 6 





THE RAINBOW'S 

One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 

Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 





1 90 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



but, on the other hand, since the program only performs 
very limited calculations, there is very little chance that an 
erroneous input would lead to further trouble. 

Now we come to what I consider a serious mistake. I did 
not like the fact that PGCALPRT did not allow me the 
option of printing or not printing my results; I think that 
changing this would be a great improvement in the 
usefulness of the program. 

It may be nit-picking, but the fact is that neither program 
addresses the problem of the trapezium (for those who need 
a refresher, a trapezium has four sides with no two parallel). 
The user's manual points out . . . "It is a very common 
figure. Most real property is of this shape ..." and 
recommends that a trapezium be broken down to two 
triangles and solved that way. This is certainly the way to 
approach a trapezium, but I feel a program that offers to 
define the area of a square should have presented more 
information about this "very common figure." 

I know it is easy for a reviewer to make suggestions since 
he didn't sweat over the original product, but I have a few 
anyway. 

The authors consistently point out that the program is 
designed for professionals, yet they include even the most 
elementary of explanations. This is not a fault, it is a virtue. 
I feel that if PLAN EG EO had a bit more information added 
it would make a fine educational tool; it is almost ready to 
give to a high school student in its present form, and 
certainly with a little added information (perhaps just a new 
user's manual) it would be a better educational program 
than many I have seen. 

My other suggestion is to make printing optional for 
PGCALPRT instead of mandatory. In my opinion, this 
would make it a better product for professionals. 

Conclusion 

Apart from some minor bugs, these are good programs 
— very user friendly. In my college days we carried slide 
rules and CRC books at all times and dreamed of programs 
like these. 

(TASC, 10619 Bayou Glen, Houston, TX 77042, 32K ECB 
and disk drive required, PLANEGEO disk $25, 
PGCALPRT disk $25, or both $40) 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest-Chicago 

May 23-25 



Software Review£SSSESSS^^^SSSSSSZ/7?\ 

CoCo Keyboard Software 
Increases Function Key Duties 

If you are among the people who have switched your 
original CoCo keyboard to one of the popular replace- 
ments, here is a short program you may be interested in. 

The CoCo Keyboard Software works on a 16/32/64K 
CoCo with Disk Extended BASIC. To start the program type 
RUN"B00T" and press ENTER. A title screen appears and 
allows you to specify how much memory your computer 
has. A short machine language program is loaded and auto- 
executes, resulting in these function key uses: 

HJL-57 and Micronix keyboards: 
Fl=Text screen dump 
F2=Tap & release-9600 Baud printer 

F3 + SHIFT= BASIC LIST 

SHIFT + F4=Cold Stai:t 
A Deluxe keyboard has these function key uses: 
ALT=Text screen dump 
CTRL=9600 Baud printer 

Fl + SHIFT=BASIC LIST 

SHIFT + F2=Cold Start 

My CoCo has the HJL-57 Keyboard and CoCo Key- 
board Software worked fine, although I did notice one bug. 
After hitting Fl for the text screen dump, the '@' symbol 
returns following the cursor. All the other functions worked 
fine. 

Although the HJL-57 Keyboard comes with a listing to 
program the function keys, the keys do things other than 
the screen dump, namely key repeat, upper-/ lowercase 
toggle and a control key. CoCo Keyboard Software then 
provides the user with three additional often-used functions 
and is inexpensive. 

The disk is not copy protected, so backup copies for your 
own use is not a problem. 

The documentation consists of a half page instruction 
sheet and is adequate for a short program of this nature. 

If you use the function keys on your replacement 
keyboard and/ or would like to increase their duties, CoCo 
Keyboard Software can fit your needs. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc. P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 $14.95 plus S/H) 

— David Gerald 



0S~9 BULLETIN BOARD 

PBBS 4.0 Features: 300/1200 Baud - A levels 
Definable drive names - Multiple sub-boards - Chat 
Operation visible on screen - EXPANDABLE 111 

Requires. OS-9 - Basic09 - TRS-80 RS-232 pak 
Multipak or Y -cable - 3 floppy drives or Hard drive 

Hayes-compatible modem. 

Send check or MO S. D. Roberson 
for $50.00 to: 1702 W. Mt. Veiw 

(AZ res. add 6.5%) Mesa, AZ 85201 

See PBBS in operation 24 hours a day: 602-899-1350 



ApriM986 THE RAINBOW 191 



Software Review 



7£\ 



Conquering A rmies 
is a Challenging Simulation 

Conquering Armies is a satisfy ingly difficult game to play. 
There are 50 levels of difficulty. Level 50 must be a real killer, 
because the highest I was able to go was level seven. The 
game is played on a map of the mythical kingdom of Glasco. 
You are the heir to the throne, and six of seven of your 
provinces have been taken over by enemy forces. Your task 
is to recapture your lands. (No matter at which level you 
play, this scenario stays the same, i.e., the same six provinces 
are always under enemy control and you are always in 
control of Avon.) 

Depending on the level of play selected, the number of 
troops you control will differ. They are divided into the 
categories of knights, light cavalry, men-at-arms and 
archers. Typing T at any point gives an inventory of the 
areas and troops you control and gives the option of 
creating an army with some or all of those troops. You also 
have one, two or three allies that can help by giving extra 
troops if you can get one of your armies to their castles — 
not always an easy task. The number of allies varies with 
the playing level and random chance. Each time you 
recapture one of your lands, you also gain troops. The 
liberated inhabitants also enlist with you, showing their 
gratitude by their willingness to be slaughtered in your next 
battle. 

The playing screen is a nicely done map. The small red 



The Coco Greeting Card Designer 

The Coco Greeting Card Designer can be used to design 
and print custom Greeting Cards for all occasions 
including: Valentine's Day, Birthdays, Mother's Day and 
more. 

It's easy to use and includes a library of predrawn Hi-Res 
Graphic Pictures! You can write custom messages on the 
cover and inside your cards in a selection of character 
fonts and sizes. An easy to use editor allows you to pick 
your type style, font size, and more. Two fonts and a 
selection of custom border patterns are included, and the 
easy to use editors allow you to create many more! 
The Coco Greeting Card Designer requires a Coco or 
Coco II with a minimum of 32k, One Disk Drive (Disk Ext. 
BASIC 1 .0/1.1, ADOS, or JODS). Some of the printers that 
the Greeting Card Designer supports are: EPSON RX/FX, 
GEMINI 10X or SG-10. C-ITOH 8510, DM P-1 00/1 05/400/ 
430, SEIKOSHA GP-100/250, LEGEND 808 and GORILLA 
BANANA. Send an SASE for current list of other compat- 
ible printers. See Review in April 86 Rainbow . . . 

Only: $24.95 

Plus $3.00 Shipping & Handling 
NY Residents add Sales Tax. 
UPS COD ADD $3.00 
VISA/MC Accepted 

ZEBRA SYSTEMS, 
INC. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Wood haven, New York 11421 
(718) 296-2385 
Dealer Inquiries Invited 

Colored Paper Packs — Now available are packs of 40 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 16 matching envelopes 
in bright RED, GREEN and BLUE. Perfectfor making your 
card unforgettable! Prjce $1 9 95 



RAINBOW 





castles represent castles that rule the country of their 
location. The large red castles are capital cities. Red lines 
mark off countries, with yellow areas controlled by you and 
green areas controlled by the enemy. A blinking green dot 
indicates an enemy army on the move. Since enemy 
territories are green, their armies are invisible until they 
cross your borders. They will occasionally flash, giving you 
the equivalent of a "rumor" of their approach, a nice touch. 
Your armies (you can have up to five armies active at any 
one time depending on the troops you control) also show 
as a blinking dot, visible at all times. You move your troops 
with the right joystick. 

You win this game by recapturing all your lands, a feat 
accomplished by successfully laying seige to each area's 
castle. Once you start a seige, the computer runs the battle. 
You will win a seige if you outnumber the defenders, but 
your troop strength is often reduced by ambushes that occur 
with distressing regularity, another realistic touch. Also, the 
enemy is likely to attempt to retake a castle they have just 
lost, so leaving a garrison behind is a must. This, of course, 
limits the amount of troops you can put in the field. 

You can also confront an enemy army in the field — here's 
where those "rumors" come in handy. Since the enemy 
moves at the same speed that your armies do, you must head 
into them or cut them off; there is no catching up with them 
in this game. Again, once the battle is joined, the computer 
takes over, and again, you will win if you outnumber the 
enemy, especially in the key areas of knights and light 
cavalry. The odds are slightly in your favor if you are 
defending a castle, slightly in the enemy's favor if you are 
beseiging them, and equal for a battle in the field (assuming 
equal numbers of forces). This is an attempt to recreate the 
actual odds of medieval battles, where the defenders of a 
castle did have an advantage over an attacking army. 

Earlier I said that you win the game by recapturing your 
lands. I find that this is not quite true. Once you have 
retaken your lands, the enemy launches anywhere from one 
to three more attacks. If you defeat these, you win. If the 
enemy recaptures one of your castles, the game continues 
with the enemy sending in increased numbers of troops, a 
touch you may not think of as a plus. 

It takes several playings to get a feel for this game, but 
your skill increases with each round. Luck does play a part 
in this game, but skill and foresight can carry you through 
some bad luck. There is just enough randomness (the 
ambushes, the number of allies, etc.) to make the game a 
challenge at any level. The game played smoothly at all the 
levels I tried. Indeed, the only complaint I have is the 
slowness of movement of the armies. All the people I invited 
to try this game, adults and children, had the same 
complaint. Some also complained about the length of time 
some of the battles took, but this becomes a problem only 
if you have or are confronting really massive (20,000+) 
numbers of troops. The documentation (three typed pages) 
is more than adequate. The game has many little pluses, 
even including some humor in the documentation.^ 

All in all, Conquering Armies is a winner — fun to play, 
and as challenging in its own way as some text Adventure 
games. 

(Mitchell Software, P.O. Box 194, Tomahawk, WI 54487, 
16K cassette or 32K disk $9.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Mark Williams 



1 92 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



PAPER ROUTE 




35t BONUS 

£>>;•:•.•:•::••.:< •v-.-:-:*'-.. :_:y>--' ''^::V/.-:v 



«CHt3 

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I i 1 S« 



As a paper boy, you ride your bike along your 
route delivering papers to your customers. 
Break customers' windows or damage their 
property and they will cancel their 
subscriptions! Earn bonus points by damaging 
non-subscribers' property. Avoid pedestrians, 
cars, and maybe even a mad dog in your 
attempt to deliver all your papers! Detailed 
graphics and lots of surprises make this game a 
real challenge for everyone. 

64 k and joystick required $28.95 u s 
tape or disk $38.95 can 



KARATE 



■>-> -it —r 



T I ft E 2M 
**1 p-l *« 



SCOJtE 




Challenge the computer, or a friend to a Karate 
match! In this game, you will use various Karate 
punches and kicks to knock your opponent down 
and earn points to win the match. When challeng- 
ing the computer, your opponent's Karate skills 
increase as you win matches. This game is a 
challenge for even the expert game player. 



64 k and joystick required $28.95 u s 

taPe ° rdiSk $38.95 Can 



MARBLE MAZE 



icm.i Tim 




Move your marble around the mazes 
in your search for the finish line! 
Avoid the marble eaters, acid puddles 
and other creatures that inhabit the 
mazes. Avoid falling into holes or off 
the edges of the maze. Eight different 
levels and great graphics make this 

game a must for your collection. 
;ongratulations to the contest 
winners! 

64 k and joystick required 
tape or disk $28.95 U.S. 

$38.95 Can. 



KNOCK OUT 




■ttm 




hock Wt-tW mzt** pmwzr* 



Fight against five different boxers in this great boxing game! At first the boxers are easy 
to knock out, but beware, it gets harder as you move on. The boxers are out to stop you 
in your quest to become champion of the world. But once you become champion your 
task is not over. You will then have to defend your title against those trying to regain the 
championship from you. Outstanding graphics make this a must for your collection! 

64 k required 

tape or disk $28.95 U.S. $38.95 Can. 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 



We accept: 





24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878-8358 
personal service 9-5 



Please add $2 for shipping 
& handling. Ontario 
residents add 7% sales tax. 

Dealer inquiries invited 

Looking for new software 



cheque or money order 

COMING SOON MISSION F-16 ASSAULT AND MISSION RUSH N' ASSAULT 




The monthly magazine that's reader-friendly 

If you're interested in the highly popular Model 100, the Tandy 200, the brand new portable Tandy 
600 or Tandy's new generation of MS-DOS computers — - the 1000, 1200, 2000, or the exciting new 
Tandy 3000 — PCM is for you! 

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Software Review \ 



Have a Starry, Starry Night 
with Vincent Van CoCo 

Vincent Van CoCo ( VVC) is a graphics utility that amazes 
you with the number of easy-to-use features provided for 
a price that would please even a tightwad. The program 
requires 32K ECB, a joystick or a mouse (two are preferred) 
and either a disk drive or cassette player. The disk version 
supports multiple drives but requires only one. VVC is 
supplied on a non-protected disk or tape, with an appeal 
to not make unauthorized copies. There is a registration 
card for the purchaser to fill out to receive news of future 
updates. 

The author of VVC was especially careful to make the 
program easy for even a beginner to use effectively, but also 
versatile enough to be useful to the seasoned veteran. This 
user friendliness begins with a user's guide printed on a 
separate 8>/i by 1 1-inch page, listing all 55 program options 
and the key combinations necessary to access them. Other 
software vendors would do well to include such a guide with 
software that uses many different options and key combi- 
nations. It is a breeze to use these features with this guide. 

If you are entering requested data, the program gives you 
an opportunity to re-enter the data if you make a mistake. 
If an error does crop up, or if you are hopelessly lost, typing 
G0T02 gets you back to where you were without disturbing 
the picture you have been creating. 

VVC allows you to create drawings through the use of 
either or both of the joysticks or mouse devices, or the arrow 
keys. You are presented with two cursors on the screen that 
are used to do the actual drawing. You select the color to 
be used as the background as well as the color in which to 
draw. VVC supports four color sets with both two- and four- 
color modes. The speed of cursor movement for drawing 
is under your total control. The arrow keys can be used to 
move the cursor one pixel at a time to allow for detailed 
drawing. 

You can shrink or enlarge the drawing, copy one half of 
the screen to the other half (for a mirror image effect), flip 
any part of the screen upside down and even store the screen 
on the other graphics page. This allows you to experiment 
and if you don't like the results, just use the "original" stored 
on the other page. You can change the color of any part 
of the screen at any time. While you only have a maximum 
of four colors to work with, you may paint any part of the 
screen in any of 255 varieties of color patterns. If you want 
to create pictures to be used for window displays, you can 
scroll up to eight parts of the screen all at the same time 
and in any of the four directions. This makes for a 
mesmerizing attraction unmatched by more expensive 
advertising displays I have seen. 

You can do the usual graphics editing things, like draw 
a box or a circle easily; cut a section of the screen, store 
it and later paste it somewhere else on the screen; turn on 
or off the color generated by movement of the cursor; 
replace or exchange colors on any part of the screen and 
store the results of your labor on cassette or disk for later 
use with VVC or your own BASIC program. VVC also 
features the use of text on the graphics screen and comes 
with four fonts and a utility that allows you to modify these 
or create your own,(you are told you can use these in VVC 
but are not told how). 



A unique feature of Vincent Van CoCo is the ability to 
scramble a picture so it looks like graphics garbage and 
thereby conceal it from the person who gains access to it 
without your approval and tries to view it with a BASIC 
program. A simple command unscrambles the picture to its 
original state. And speaking of access to the pictures, the 
documentation says that pictures created by VVC can be 
used with CoCo Max, Master Design, Graphicom, Graphi- 
com II and Bjork Blocks. I can vouch for all but the last 
one (I don't own Bjork Blocks). 

The author has included eight sample pictures that were 
created with VVC that will impress even the experienced 
user with the amount of detail. 

The documentation consists of 20 8V£ by 11-inch pages 
punched for a three-ring binder and stapled at the top. Also 
included is the one-page guide mentioned earlier. Each 
command and option is explained with enough detail to 
allow you to use it. Only in the explanation of the scrolling 
options does the language of the documentation require 
more than a beginner's knowledge of BASIC, and even this 
section is understandable overall to the novice. 

Vincent Van CoCo is an excellent value in a graphics 
editor for the CoCo. It is a comprehensive graphics editor 
but not a full-featured one. You can spend more money and 
get more complex features in a similar program, but for ease 
of use and versatility at an affordable price, VVC will be 
difficult to top. 

(Rococo Software, 3019 Sylvester Drive, Hartland, WI 
53029, tape $17.95, disk $18.95) 

— A. Buddy Hogan 



TfflTH 



fSftSSBL 



- - 32K ECB PROGRAMS - - 



TEACHER PAK PLUS Includes Teacher Pak and CoCo 
Testem described below $47.95 

COCO TESTEM Make multiple choice, matching, 
true/false, completion, and short answer 
tests. Requires printer with underline 
ability. Works with tape or disk $19.95 

COCO-LIFE II The living, patterns game. .$19.95 

- - 16K ECB PROGRAMS 

HGMEWARE New! Give your CoCo real power at 
home. Printer preferred. Works with tape 
or disk. Five modules: 

CALENDAR Draw calendars. Various formats. 

SAVINGS/LOANS Powerful calculating, tool. 

DIRECTORY Phone numbers, addresses, etc. 

INVENTORY For insurance, hobbies, business. 

HOME-WRITER Finally 1 . Easy word processing. 

Single modules. . .$19.95 Whole set... $49. 95 
TEACHER PAK Weighted & regular grading, seating 

charts, alphabetizing, statistical analysis. 

4 programs. Works with tape or disk . . . $34 . 95 

TIME MASTER Rainbow review 12/85 $19.95 

COCO GARDENER Discover computerized garden 

planning. Printer preferred $19.95 

PERPETUL 1FE Checkers & Life mixed $19.95 

GRAPHIC PHYSICS Rainbow review 9/85 $19.95 

COCO ECHO ML Rainbow review 10/85 $9.95 

All programs sold on tape. Send check or money 
order (no cash - Pa. residents add 6*/.) to: 



RAINBOW 

Ci.nriCititaN 



Tothian Software 
Box 663 
Rimersburg, Pa. 16248 



RAINBOW 

eiwt,»ic>r ioh 
KM 



All of these programs carry the Rainbow Seal 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 195 




TO 



UNI 



/ 



/ 



/ 



6 
8 
0 
9 



6 
8 
0 
0 
0 



TM 



196 



IF YOU HAVE ... 

• a terminal (or terminal program) 

• one or more disk drives (40 track or larger) 

IF YOU CAN ... 

• make or acquire cables 

• make or acquire a power supply 

• connect cables for terminal, drives, and 
power supply 

THEN YOU CAN ... 

• Step up to a 68000 UniQuad System 

for only $995 

UniQuad 1 $995 

68008 processor running at 8 Mhz 

4 serial ports 

2 parallel ports 

supports 2 floppy disk drives 

SASI bus for connection to hard disk drives 

128K bytes of RAM (expandable to 51 2K bytes) 

up to 32K bytes of ROM 

UniQuad 2 $1495 

68000 processor running at 10 Mhz 

4 serial ports 

2 parallel ports 

supports 4 floppy disk drives 

SASI bus for connection to hard disk drives 

I/O expansion bus 

51 2K bytes of RAM (expandable to 1 Megabyte) 
up to 128K bytes of ROM 

Both UniQuads come complete with: 

OS-9/68000, BASIC09, STYLOGRAPH, and DYNACALC 

HAZELWOOD COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

907 E. Terra, O'Fallon, MO 63366 31 4-281 -1 055 
MasterCard and VISA accepted 

THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Software Review* 



7£N 



Grafix-3 is a Real 
OS-9 Bargain 

Over the past four or five years, there have been a lot of 
graphics programs developed for the Color Computer. 
Many of them have been developed to take full advantage 
of CoCo's graphics abilities. Some, like CoCo Max, are 
extremely advanced, making their use and understanding 
easy, while others lack that extra something needed to make 
CoCo show its colors. 

Recently, Aardvark Software released Grafix-3, a new 
graphics program for the Color Computer. The newness of 
it is that it is the first graphics program I've seen (other than 
programming in BASIC09) that is used under OS-9. That and 
the $20 price tag make it a worthwhile investment. 

Grafix-3 is relatively simple to learn. It makes designing 
graphics much easier than programming in BASIC09 or any 
of the other programming languages available for OS-9, but 
there are some problems with it. 

Since writing my first user's guide, I've been very critical 
of software documentation. Add to that almost 20 years of 
professional writing experience and you have someone who 
can get cynical about sloppy writing. Grafix-3 is a program 
that shows the many reasons I am critical of documentation. 
Grafix-3'% documentation lacks illustrations and program- 
ming examples that would walk you through your first 
picture. Of the program itself, there are no program menus 
and no help options. You must learn the program and 
remember everything you've learned. This is far from the 
user-friendly, menu-driven software we've come to know. 

On the other hand, there isn't a whole lot to remember. 
Pictures can be created using either the arrow keys or the 
right joystick. Use of the joystick does require some 
keystrokes to set some software switches before you can use 
the joystick. Either method works as documented and 
requires little or no user intervention. 

Unlike most OS-9 programs, Grafix-3 has made one 
mistake. Most OS-9 programs allow some table on disk that 
is referred to for setting printer attributes and control codes. 
In this method, Grafix-3 could support any number of 
printers. Instead, it supports only two printers, the Tandy 
CGP-115 and the Okidata 82 A. Neither of these printers 
is manufactured any longer, one of the risks of supporting 
a limited number of specific printers. 

If you do any other programming requiring graphics, 
you'll be glad to find out that Grafix-3 has a Hex command 
that allows you to dump the Hex values of each byte of the 
graphics screen to the printer or disk. This can allow you 
to later read the values in from a BASIC09 program and show 
the screen or even include them directly in your programs. 

When you get to the bottom line, Grafix-3 only costs $20 
and does what it claims. That's a bargain for any program 
that works, and a real boon for OS-9 software. Considering 
all of these features, it is a great bargain. I'd recommend 
Grafix-3 to anyone running a Color Computer under OS- 
9 who is looking for graphics capabilities. 

(Aardvark Software, P.O. Box 60183, Palo Alto, CA 94306, 
disk $20) 

— Bruce Warner 



Software Review* 



Venture into the Jungle 
with Treasure of the Aztecs 

Have you ever considered taking a vacation in Mexico 
and exploring the Aztec ruins? If you have, but could never 
afford to get there, now's your chance! That is, if one has 
a good imagination and is keen for computer Adventures, 
Treasure of the Aztecs will interest you. 

This Adventure takes place circa 1520 — after Hernando 
Cortes conquered the Aztecs. You are among the soldiers 
searching the city to find the great treasure of the Aztecs. 
But there's a catch: you were rendered unconscious by some 
of the Aztecs during an attack. The last thing you can 
remember is following a trail into the jungle. Assuming your 
fellow soldiers are dead and the Aztecs are out there waiting, 
it is up to you alone to find the treasure while avoiding 
death. , 

Treasure of the Aztecs simply requires a 64K CoCo. 
There are versions for cassette and disk. I highly recommend 
using disk, since it would take an awfully long time to load 
in all the pictures from a tape. Joysticks are not required, 
as all input is through the keyboard. 

To play, just type LORDM "TREASURE" or CLORDM for 
cassette. The program automatically executes when it's 
finished loading. After you get the title screen and hear the 
song, just press the space bar twice to begin. The disk is 
copy protected. All pictures are on the disk in some type 
of compressed format, and all are loaded into memory 
before execution. It takes approximately 50 seconds to load 
them in from disk. Having all pictures in memory greatly 
speeds up the game and saves wear and tear on drives. 
However, one annoying aspect is that on some screens 
portions must be painted, but this only takes a few seconds. 

Game play is easy, especially moving around. All you 
have to use is the arrow keys, although at some points in 
the game you might have to type "climb." For example, if 
you want to "go north," you can either type it as such or 
just press the up-arrow key. An added feature of Treasure 
of the Aztecs is the Vocab command. Just type that and a 
brief list of possible commands are displayed on the screen. 
You can also quickly save or load previous games. So, if 
you think a dangerous spot is ahead, save the game before 
moving. The Help command also gives clues as to what 
should be done in certain situations. Last but not least, if 
you have a Radio Shack Speech/ Sound Pak, it can be used 
for added sound and voice. While I am not impressed with 
Radio Shack's voice chip, it does add a special touch to the 
Adventure. 

Treasure of the Aztecs is a very good program, entertain- 
ing for all ages. Scott Cabit, the program's author, did a 
nice job and I hope to see more work from him. If you're 
into graphics Adventures, I'm sure this one will keep you 
busy for hours. It did me, and I still haven't solved it! Good 
luck and happy hunting! 



(Computerware, 4403 Manchester Ave. Suite 102-Box 668, 
Encinitas, CA 92024, requires 64K, cassette $24.95, disk 
$27.95) 



— Darren Nye 



The 




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Software Review! 



7£\ 



DeskMate — An All-Purpose 
Package for CoCo 



198 



By James G. Kriz 



Beginning with the Tandy 1000, Radio Shack has been 
introducing an integrated software package called Desk- 
Mate for each of its computer lines — the MS-DOS 
machines, the Model IV and now, the CoCo. The term 
"integrated software" refers to a program that includes 
multiple applications instead of just one. The advantages 
of such a package include having just one program to do 
several different tasks, using similar commands in each 
different application and the ability to share files among the 
different applications. To see how DeskMate measures up 
to these advantages, it is important to remember that some 
comprehensive integrated packages for MS-DOS compu- 
ters are real "core hogs" — often requiring over 512K of 
memory to run — while our CoCo has a practical limit right 
now of only 64K. 

The DeskMate applications include a calendar, a text 
editor, a spreadsheet, a filer, telecommunications and paint 
(graphics drawing). In addition, it has a built-in calculator 
function that can be used anytime any of the other functions 
are in use. 

DeskMate runs under OS-9 and includes enough of the 
OS-9 operating system to function completely without 
having to purchase that system separately. This means the 
user needs a 64K CoCo with at least one disk to use 
DeskMate. I would recommend a second disk for file 
storage, although it is not an absolute necessity. A joystick 
or mouse is also recommended for efficient operation — I 
used a joystick for this review although I think a mouse 
would have been better. 

The functioning of DeskMate is similar to the idea 
originally developed by Xerox and made popular by the 
Macintosh. The screen displays icons (pictures) to represent 
the available applications and an application is selected by 
moving a pointer to its icon using the mouse or joystick and 
pressing the firebutton. Within each application are pull- 
down menus. A bar across the top of the screen contains 
the names of available functions in that application and 
pointing to the name pulls down a menu showing the 
options available. For example, a common function is one 
called "Files"; pointing to Files pulls down a menu including 
such options as Open, Close, Save, Merge and Help. Every 
option has a Help selection that explains in more detail what 
the other options do. Moving the pointer to an option and 
pressing the firebutton selects it. Now, let's take a look at 
each of the applications. 

The calendar function displays a one-month calendar on 
the upper half of the screen with the current day highlighted. 
Using joystick or cursor control keys, you can move forward 
or backward by day, month or year. The lower half of the 
screen is used to display reminder messages for the 
highlighted day. Messages may be entered, edited or deleted 
and are automatically saved. 

The text editor function is a word processor that includes 
copy, insert and delete. It does not support any printer 
control functions; special printer features such as underline, 
expanded or condensed print, etc., are not available. 



THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



The spreadsheet is a simple program handling elementary 
spreadsheet functions. It is very similar to Color Spectac- 
ulator. Movement through the spreadsheet is accomplished 
using either the joystick or the cursor keys. 

The filer uses the concept of index cards, and pictures the 
data on images of an index card file. Options include format 
of the index card, add, insert, delete, sort, search and print. 
The print simply lists all or selected records from a file. It 
cannot be formed into special formats such as labels. 

The telecommunications application requires the use of 
the RS-232 Program Pak — it will not function through the 
standard RS-232 port. Of course, this means you also need 
the Multi-Pak Interface since the disk controller is already 
plugged into the ROM port. A modem is necessary as it 
would be for any communications. The telecommunications 
application seems to be one of the most comprehensive in 
this package. It has keystroke multipliers, allowing the user 
to define certain keys for multicharacter entries such as 
passwords and user IDs. It allows setting of Baud rates, 
parity, word size, stop bits, line feed option and echo. This 
application is also capable of sending and receiving files. 

The paint application wins the award for most fun. It is 
similar to the "famous" MacPaint for the Macintosh. 
Through the use of pull-down menus, the user can select 
either the two-color PMDDE 4 with its pseudo colors or the 
four-color PMODE 3. Different tools are also selectable 
including a pencil, line, circle, paint brush, spray paint, 
eraser, etc. The palette option offers a wide choice of 
patterns and colors for filling shapes. Drawing can be 
accomplished by using either a mouse, a touch pad, a 
joystick or the cursor keys. I feel the mouse or pad would 
work best. 

One small problem is the joystick input only resolves 64 
by 64 points while the drawing is the 256 by 192 PMODE 4 
screen. This makes it difficult to align two lines or to 
precisely position a point. Pictures made using paint can 
be saved and recalled later for viewing or changing. Pictures 
can also be printed using a Radio Shack graphics printer. 
However, there is no provision for specifying non-Radio 
Shack printers such as Epson or Okidata. 



All DeskMate applications can save and load files and 
each file is linked to the application that created it. This 
means by selecting a file, the application that created it is 
first automatically loaded and then the file is loaded by the 
application. In other words, if a user is on the main menu 
screen and selects a text file, the text editor is first loaded 
and then the text file. DeskMate also allows limited linking 
of files across applications. It is possible, for example, to 
save a segment of a spreadsheet as text and merge that with 
text data in the editor as you might wish to do in certain 
business applications. I did not, however, find a way of 
mixing text and graphics in the same application. 

In general, the package is easy to use and it is difficult 
to really mess things up. The inexperienced user can safely 
try things without worrying about losing files. If, for 
example, you create some text using the text editor and then 
try to exit that application, it asks if you want the data saved 
and prompts for a filename. The documentation is very 
comprehensive, covering a total of 1 86 pages. It is well-done 
but there are a few points that could be more clearly 
explained. For example, in several places in the manual the 
user is encouraged to use a second disk for file storage since 
DeskMate is large and disk-intensive in its operation. 
However, there are no clear instructions in the manual as 
to how to designate to DeskMate that the files are to be 
placed on a disk in Drive I. The answer is to select the 
"folder" on the icon bar. The folder allows the changing of 
some of the file attributes including the device allocation. 
Simply change one of the file folders to 'Dl. DeskMate 
stores this on the system disk so it is not necessary to change 
the defaults every time the program is loaded. 

This brings up another point. DeskMate is not protected 
and the user is encouraged to make a backup immediately. 
I strongly concur! Disk-intensive DeskMate seems to be 
constantly reading and writing, so save your original and 
work from a copy. Other than a few minor flaws in the 
documentation, the only other problem I found is that the 
user can only select two printer Baud rates — 600 or 1200. 
I have an Okidata 92 and having to use 1200 Baud holds 
it back from running at its full capabilities. 

My overall opinion is that this is a well-done program, 
easy and fun to use. It does a good job of showing off just 
how much can be done with our favorite computer. But, 
should you buy it? The text editor is no match for full word 
processors like Telewriter-64. The spreadsheet can't 
compare to Elite*Calc or DynaCalc. The filer has many nice 
features but not as many as the better database programs. 
In other words, this single package can't provide everything 
youll ever need. I think the best marketing of this package 
would be to include it as part of the purchase price of a new 
CoCo just as is now done with the Tandy 1000. DeskMate 
provides a good overall set of applications that would 
suffice for the novice until he or she can access their needs 
and can acquire the specific software for those particular 
needs. In addition, the calendar, paint and telecommuni- 
cations applications may be all the average user would need 
or want in those areas. 



(Tandy Corp., available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 
requires 64K and one disk drive, $99.95 ) 



One- Liner Contest Winner . >. . 

This one-liner is called Catch, and that pretty well 
describes what the red and blue boxes are playing. 

The listing: 



1 CLS:PRINT@164,CHR$(191) :PRINT@ 
187 / CHR$(175) :E=128:Y=20:B$=STRI 
NG$ ( 2 j3 , 14 3 ) +" * 11 : FORA=lT02 2 : FORX= 

1TO Y : NEXTX : PRINT @ 1 6 5 , MI D $ ( B $ , A , 2 
2) ;CHR$(143) ;:NEXT A:E=E+l:SOUND 

191 f I: FORA-22T01STEP-1 : FORX—1TOY 
: NEXTX : PRINT© 165 , MID$ ( B$ , A , 20 ) J I 
NEXTA : E=E- 1 : SOUNDlj30 , 1 : RUN 

Bill Bernico 
Sheboygan, Wl 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



April 1 986 THE RAINBOW 1 99 




IIX'S MINI-CATALOG 



Educational Best-Sellers! 





5PF.I O 



P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations- 
against another player OR against the 
computer. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 




£888 

MM 




KlftS 



Jpaoff 



U fJTftC 




Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
"...the best out-the-window simulation 
avaiiabie for the CoCo." 

~ Dr. Scott L. Norman 
Hot CoCo, 1 2/84. 

32K Machine Language 
Flight Manual Included 
Joysticks Required 
Tape $29.95 Disk $34.95 



Teachers Database II— Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

■ Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32K TDBI $42.95 Tape $39.95 

Fractions -A Three- Prog ram Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk$35.95 



Factpack— Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-/X" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 

Vocabulary Management System —Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 1 6K Ext, Basic/ 

32K for Printer Output 
Tape $39.95 Disk $42.95 

Math Duel -A challenging math game that 
pits you against the computer in a game 
of wits. Use your knowledge of factors, 
multiples and prime numbers to gather 
points against your CoCo. 

32K Ext. Basic 
Tape $30.95 Disk $35.95 



7 

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Approach Control Simulation 
From Betasoft Systems. 

"Caught in a blinding snowstorm, two jet 
airliners are on a collision course. The 
pilots are unaware of the imminent danger. 
Hundreds of lives are at stake. A high-speed 
disaster is inevitable unless you act fast..." 
This and many other exciting scenarios 
await you as an Air Traffic Controller. The 
thrills, challenges and frustrations you'll 
experience with this authentic, real-time 
simulation will give you countless hours of 
discovery and adventure. 

No Joysticks Required 
Comprehensive Manual-Reference Guide 
32K Machine Language 
Tape $29.95 Disk $3495 



New! Tandy 1000/1200 and 
IBM/PC-Compatible Software Now 
Available! Write for a Catalog. 



We Have More Software 
Available Than Listed Here. 
Please Write for a Free Catalog! 



Unique Utilities! 

New! Use the tools we've used to create 
"Donkey King," "Sailor Man" and others! 

• Full use of 64K RAM 

• 100% Machine Language 

• No ROM Calls 

• Selectable Drive 

• Support 1 -4 drives 

• Menu Selected functions 

• "Cold Start" exit to Basic 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic 
loader 

MAS Assembler— the finest ever! 
(Includes EDT) 

Disk $74.95 

EDT- Effortless full screen editing w/2-way 
cursor. Text files to 48K+. Copy, save, 
move, delete, print blocks, much more! 

Disk $39.95 

Deputy Inspector -Alphabetize, resort and 
backup directory; fast 3-swap backups, 
copy files or programs, auto-reallocate 
granules during backup for faster loading, 
more! 

Disk $21.95 

Sector Inspector-Alphabetize, backup and 
print directory; repair crashes, LLIST basic 
programs, read in and edit 23+ grans, 
much more! 

Disk $29.95 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 Bradford N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

616/957-0444 

Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/957-0444 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors— We pay top 
royalties! 




Look What's New at NOVflSOFT! 



Top-quality software at 
affordable prices, written by 
well-known authors in 6809 
Machine Language 



11 J 1 Direct ions s«He5t#Horth-> 
"l t'i. VouVe drivina 

your srorts oar. 




h , • - - l - v - - . - - - - * , • T > A »»». 



//.VAWAV.'AV I 






trnr ets 



D129 CI icli to stop 



New Release 1 



Maui Vice 

Step into the shoes of Crockett & Tubbs, 
and gather evidence, photographs and wit- 
nesses to convict your suspects! With 
"windows" to select your options, hi-res 
graphics, and a new story generated each 
time you play. This is state-of-the-art that 
guarantees excitement and newness every 
time you play. 

64K Ext Basic & Joystick Required 
Tape $18.95 Disk $21.95 











mi 


3 


You see a cave. 





0k» 



here Is a dos»a necklace here. 



The Misadventures of 

Another great Novasoft adventure. The ol' 
man in the mines' rebellious son, Eddie, is 
roaming through time, creating havoc— and 
you must bring him home in order to return 
to your own time! Over 140 locations, 50+ 
commands, in hi-resgraphics. Experienced 
adventurers will love this one! 

Requires 64K 
Disk $21.95 




•m—mm*m wml AjM 
mm mm m» m **> WW MM n 
* *• mm mm mm • fmm mm mm 



SCORE ! 



Goldrunner 

Travel the maze in your never-ending search 
for gold -but beware of trap doors, burly 
guards and other hazards! 33 screens. 

64K Joystick or Keyboard 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 



UUEJU mmm ' J HHl^B l^m\i Mm* WMW ■ 

■ ' h n n n v :i r □ (. >t 

■ i- urni:' ' !■"■'■ uir 
| .-. nfi OJS i □□□ Gil 

PUTT tF|MS: 

!™" IBd fHlrU MUHY TO 
3|5E= TPpunnrr-iinn 5 ! 

Mil EKE IE L '.'E R VII ItC 



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$ % 7 7 



mmrwm 





Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one of 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required 
Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 



CREDITS 



PLAY *J COINS 






CDIfIS $ 
III 0 RETURN HANDLE 



PAYS ONLY Oil LIT LIHES 



Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! 

16K Ext. Basic Required 
Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 



Other Best Sellers 

Martian Crypt- Life once existed on Mars! 
Find the hidden Martian crypt. Animated 
hi-res graphic adventure with sound effects. 

32K Tape $18.95 Disk $21 .95 

Skyway— Man uever your craft along the 
skyway avoiding enemy craft, mines, sky 
bugs and holes! 32K and Joystick. 

Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 

Blackboard's Island -Find Blackbeard's 
treasure but be ever mindful of the hazards 
along the way. Graphic adventure. 

32K Disk $19.95 

Brewmaster— Move along the end of the 
bars, serving beer to your thirsty customers. 
Fast-paced action. 32K & Joystick. 

Tape $14.95 Disk $17.95 

CoCo Crosswords— Master set has 27 
puzzles, four levels of difficulty. Pull down 
menu. Additional sets have 30+ puzzles 
each. 

32K Master Set Disk $24.95 
Sets #2, #3, #4 just $1 2.95 ea. on Disk 

Color Car— Fast moving racing lets you 
"bump & jump" other racers through the 
course. 

64K & Joystick. Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 



Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Sailor Man -Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 
win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 

64K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 

Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
1 60 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 

The King- 

32K Tape $24.95 Disk $27.95 
Draconian— 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Ms. Maze- 

32K Tape $19.95 Disk $22.95 
Kater Pillar II- 

1 6K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 
Warehouse Mutants - 

1 6K Tape $1 8.95 Disk $21 .95 
Buzzard Bait- 

32K Tape $1 9.95 Disk $22.95 

NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

4285 Bradford N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 

Ordering Information 

• Add $3 shipping/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 

• Dealers welcome 

• Many more titles- write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 

Call 616/957-0444 





i 



Software Reviewi 



Send Personal Wishes with 
CoCo Greeting Card Designer 



The Co Co Greeting Card Designer is the maiden effort 
in the Color Computer software market for Zebra Systems. 
If this package is an indication, I look forward to their 
subsequent efforts. 

The program, on a non-copy protected diskette, allows 
the user to easily design and print personalized greeting 
cards for any occasion. A 32K CoCo or CoCo 2 is required, 
with one disk drive, Disk BASIC 1.0 or 1.1, or JDOS. Zebra 
Systems' list of tested compatible 80-column, dot-matrix 
printers is: Epson RX-80, FX-80, Gemini 10X, Star 
Micronics SG-10, Panasonic KXP-1090, KXP-1091, 
Memotech DMX-80, C. Itoh 8510AP, 8510AS, Leading 
Edge Prowriter, Seikosha GP-100, GP-250, Gorilla Banana, 
Radio Shack DMP-100, DMP-105, DMP-110 and DMP- 
400. 

The list also includes a number of printers that have not 
been tested but may be compatible (including the DMP-430, 
which I used with no problems), as well as a number of 
printers that are not compatible. The Radio Shack LP 
Series is included in this latter category, and indeed, I tried 
the program with a LP VII without success. If this program 
interests you, my advice is to contact Zebra Systems 
concerning compatibility if your printer is not on the above 
list. 

GCOOCCOOCOOCCOQOOOOCOOOOCCCSOOOOGOSO^ 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 8 



SOOPER HH OUR OWN 
DOOPER "BRAND" 
DISKS LABEL 

PROGRAMMER'S DISKS 

SS/DD 10/$ 9.00 100/S80.00 
DS/DD 10/$ 10.00 100/$90.00 

SENTINEL COLORS Gift Boxed 

13 COLOR DISKS FOR $13.95 

w/Tyvek Sleeves & ..abels 

100% Certified - Lifetime Warranty 

COLOR RIBBONS: Red, Green, Blue, Brown 
GEM/OKI 4/$10.00 
EPSON 4/$24.00 
APPLE/NEC 4/$24.00 

Media Mate Disk Bank $1 2.95 
Head Cleaner Kit $6.95 

Add $2.50 S/H in U.S.A - Canada Add $3.50 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 

Send check or money order payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

9020 Hemingway, Redford, Ml 48239 

(31 3) 937-3442 QHKI 

Send Card Number and Exp. Date y 



Min. Charge Order $20.00 



The documentation is very clearly written and easy to 
follow. The program itself is menu driven and so logically 
organized that, after the first time through, youH find 
yourself referring to the documentation only to select 
graphics icons and borders from the pictures there. 

The finished product created using The CoCo Greeting 
Card Designer consists of the cover of a card (printed upside 
down) in the upper-left quadrant of an %Vi by 1 1-inch sheet, 
and the inside fold of the card (right side up) in the lower- 
right quadrant. The result is that when the sheet is folded 
in quarters, a greeting card is created. The process used to 
design both the cover and the inside fold of the card is 
identical. 

The user may select from eight decorative borders and 
two fonts for the text. The text can be written in large or 
small characters, the large font allowing six lines of eight 
characters; the small font allowing 13 lines of 16 characters. 
The user may also select from 21 pre-drawn Hi-Res graphics 
icons, many in holiday themes. Included are a heart, a cupid, 
a birthday cake, a graduate and several Christmas symbols. 

These icons can also be printed either in large or small 
formats at selected locations: large on a three by three grid, 
small on a six by six grid. Text takes precedence over 
graphics, so letters are legible when superimposed over 
graphics. The product is impressive. As well as printing the 
card, the user may save it on disk, load a card from disk 
or edit a card. 

The more creative user has the option of creating unique 
designs for any of the three elements: text fonts, borders 
or graphics icons. The text characters can be designed on 
a 12 by 20 grid, the border elements on a 12 by 12 grid, 
and the graphics icons on a 32 by 56 grid. The editing is 
accomplished by cursor movement and setting or resetting 
of points in the grid. 

In the case of the graphics icons this is done on a Hi-Res 
screen with both a blown-up and near actual-size version 
appearing on the screen at once. Repetitive patterns can be 
quickly created using a Repeat command. The 1,792- 
element grid allows intricate designs. The custom designs 
of any of these three elements can be saved to mix and match 
on later card creations. 

This program is well thought out — easy to use, yet 
flexible enough to allow nearly endless variations. I highly 
recommend it to anyone wishing to create greeting cards 
with CoCo. 

Also available from Zebra Systems (at $19.95) is a Paper- 
Pack with 120 sheets of pinfeed computer paper in three 
colors with matching envelopes just the right size for these 
cards. This would certainly spruce up your creations. 

(Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., Woodhaven, NY 
11412, disk $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Stanley Townsend 



AMATEURS: See Us (WD8KJV) at: 
Miami Hamboree, Feb. 8 & 9 



Y'all 
Come 



See You at 
RA INB O Wfest- Chicago 

May 23-25 



202 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Software Review* 



V2s 



Color Essential Math — A 
Good Teaching Tool 



This was the first time I've been able to sit back and watch 
while one of the kids voluntarily took a piece of software 
for a spin. 

Cindy is 1 1 and in the sixth grade. She was having some 
problems with math facts when this package arrived for 
review by a happy coincidence. She was able to run the disk 
version of Color Essential Math on her own and find her 
own skill level. We were especially happy to find the cursor 
waiting for right-to-left answers (as you'd actually calcu- 
late). 

Volume I of Color Essential Math is designed for 
classroom use but it's written so a parent could use this as 
an aid at home. The package includes both the disk and tape 
versions along with a 26-page manual in a white plastic 
three-ring binder. It's for practice of addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division, and includes place value, 
rounding, factoring, exponents, square and conversion of 
fractions to decimal. 

Grade levels aren't discussed or noted, but I'd say this 
would help at any grammar school level. My own kids, third 
grade through sixth, were all challenged by it. This package 
doesn't replace the need for a nearby parent or teacher to 
explain basic ideas. It does provide lots of practice nailing 
down what you've learned. 

The manual assumes your computer is set up, but it does 
explain every step after that, including making of backup 
copies. The teacher is told how to set up for a placement 
test and options for varying time (one to 99 seconds) and 
number of problems per lesson (one to 99). 

A promotion/ demotion feature can be turned on or off. 
When on, it automatically moves your student along to the 
most appropriate next lesson or drops back for more 
practice on a weak point. Each lesson is outlined along with 
two examples of the problems your student is asked to solve. 

The manual doesn't try to explain math concepts . . . just 
how to use the programs. But this should pose no problem. 
The manual does have very detailed, step-by-step explana- 



All 'Caps' Down 

Ai£ you trying to switch from upper- to lowercase 
from within a BASIC program? To accomplish this, 
type POKE 282,0. To return to the uppercase mode 
just type POKE 282,255. 



tions with pictures so that either a parent or teacher can 
understand how to use the lessons for their own child or 
a classroom of children at different levels. I was impressed 
with the obviously professional care they took in explaining 
teaching concepts so even I could understand. 

The planning, guidance and examples in the manual 
reflect the work of professional educators at Bertamax, who 
have licensed Volume I to Tandy. 

The student doesn't need a manual because all entries are 
prompted on the screen and errors are trapped and 
explained. Impatient students who want to forge ahead can 
press any key to clear a correct answer and bring on the 
next problem at their own pace (and end a frustrating wait 
for the next problem). 

The program does give an on-screen progress report 
whenever requested, but it doesn't make any permanent 
record, and there is no save option. You or your student 
must write down where he or she stopped so they'll know 
where to pick up when coming back for future lessons. 

I do wish they had included more work on basic fraction 
concepts. My fifth and sixth grade girls both need help 
there. Dave (third grade) wanted time with the program, 
too. The program treats each child individually, so each one 
can earn "Good Job!" at his/her own level. I can honestly 
say all three enjoyed the challenge of Color Essential Math. 

(Tandy Corp, 1400 One Tandy Center, Ft. Worth, TX 
76102, Catalog No. 26-2643, disk/tape $120) 

— Bob Dooman 



XPNDR2 

for the CoCo 
DISK SYSTEM 




XPNDR2 $39.95 each or 2/$76 
This prototype card features a 40 pin 
connector for projects requiring an on- 
line disk system or ROM paks. The 
CoCo signals are brought out to wire- 
wrap pins. Special gold plated spring 
clips provide reliable and noisefree 
disk operation plus solid support for 
vertical mounting of the controller. The 
entire 4.3*7 inch card is drilled for ICs. 
Assembled, tested and ready to run. 

XPNDR1 $19.95 each or 2/$36 
A rugged 4.3*6.2 inch bare breadboard 
that brings the CoCo signals out to 
labeled pads. Both XPNDR cards are 
double-sided glass/epoxy, have gold 
plated edge connectors, thru-hole 
plating and are designed with heavy 
power and ground buses. They're 
drilled for standard 0.3 and 0.6 inch 
wide dual in-line wirewrap sockets; 
with a 0.1 inch grid on the outboard end 
for connectors. 

SuperGuide $3.95 each 
Here is a unique plastic insert that 
aligns and supports printed circuit 
cards in the CoCo cartridge port. Don't 
forget to ORDER ONE FOR YOUR 
XPNDR CARDS. 



Included with each XPNDR card 
are 8 pages of APPLICATION 
NOTES to help you learn about 
chips and how to connect them to 
your CoCo. 




To order or for technical informa- 
tion call: 

(206) 782-6809 

weekdays 8 a.m. to noon 

We pay shipping on prepaid orders. 
For immediate shipment send 
check, money order or the number 
and expiration date of your VISA or 
MASTERCARD to: 



ROBOT FC 




MICROSYSTEMS 



BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 203 



Software Review— M " IM " r /A\ 

Complete Electronic 
Organizer — Options Galore 
to get You in Order 

By Robert £. Foiles 

This may not be the usual way to start a review, but the 
"bug trapping" routine in Complete Electronic Organizer 
(CEO) is so unique that it rates being first. 

Built into CEO is a system-monitoring subroutine that 
kicks in if a program error is encountered. This routine takes 
over the program and prints to the screen a message 
instructing the user that a program error has been encoun- 
tered and the disk should be returned to Computerware with 
an explanation of what the user was doing just before the 
message appeared. Unfortunately, the routine also locks up 
the program and only a total system shutdown restores 
control of the computer to the operator. 

In the first run-through of the program the "bug trap" 
snapped and the original disk with my explanation as 
requested was shipped back to Computerware. A few days 
later a reply acknowledged receipt of the disk and noted it 
had been sent back to the programmer for review. Six days 
later, the corrected disk was mailed back (very good 
turnaround time, considering this exchange had to take 
place just before Christmas and from east to west coast). 

CEO is full of surprises, as you will learn, and most of 
the surprises were welcomed. Overall, CEO is a graphics 
delight. The program uses a 51 by 24 Hi- Res display for all 
its screens and has more options than a politician has 
excuses. 

The system requirements are a 64K Color Computer with 
at least one disk drive. If more than one drive is online, then 
a couple of additional options can function. The program 
works just as well with only one drive, but the user has to 
swap the system disk for a data disk as called for by the 
option selected. Most of the program is loaded into memory 
at startup, but a couple of the other options are loaded from 
the system disk as needed. 

The main menu screen shows the top of a desk with a 
border of either red or blue (border colors are random 
choice by CEO). Listed below the desk top, in two columns, 
are the program's options. Also appearing at the top of 
screen is the date and on the right side is a real-time clock. 
The user's name also appears after a "Good Day" message. 

To get the main menu, the program has a start-up routine 
that asks the user to enter the number of disk drives in use, 
Baud rate for the printer, user's name, the time and date. 
It also provides for the formatting of the data disk needed 
for either a single- or double-drive system. The disks must 
already be initialized for use in the drives (e.g., using the 
DSKINI command) and the program establishes the "tables" 
where the data is stored. When CEO asks for the time to 
be entered, it expects the time to be in a 24-hour format, 
i.e., 5 p.m. is entered as 1700. The date is entered as 
MMDDYYYY, i.e., 01011986 for New Year's Day. If the 
user does not change the system configuration, the program 
uses the previously entered data and only asks for a new 
time and date on future runs. 

The main menu displays the entered date and the time 
with the first digit, either a 'P' or 'A', followed by the hour 

204 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



and after a blinking colon, the minutes. The clock functions 
throughout all the options even if it is not visible in some 
screens. Since the clock is running in the background it is 
possible to use the alarm feature to sound off at the user's 
selected time. 

From within the main menu, the user is able to select any 
of the options by moving the box with the arrow keys so 
it encloses the option wanted. Tapping the ENTER key loads 
and/ or executes the option within the box. Some of the 
options execute within the main screen and three others 
have separate screens. The first group of options take care 
of the housekeeping for the program and are called up 
individually or by selecting the "Other Things" option. The 
main menu options are: 

1) Set Time allows the user to set the correct time, which 
might have been slowed because of extensive printer use. 

2) Adjust Time provides a means of correcting the speed 
of the clock for accurate time. 

3) Alarm Set/ Reset allows the user to preselect one time 
for the alarm to sound. This clock program "beeps" on the 
hour, but the alarm sounds a tone for almost a minute or 
until the space bar is pressed. 

4) Set Date allows the user to enter a new date after the 
start-up routine. While not covered in the manual, this 
option is necessary to move from one year to another. The 
program appears to have been designed to handle only one 
year at a time and will not move into a new year without 
using this option. A word of caution: If a new year is entered 
with the Set Date option, CEO overwrites the information 
in the data disk. The program prints to screen the month 
and year as entered at startup or as entered with Set Date 
and reads the saved data from the data disk, regardless of 
the year saved on that disk. The user must be sure to mark 
each data disk with the year on it to avoid such problems. 

5) Other Things option brings up a submenu of additional 
options: A) Set Baud Rate allows for a change of the Baud 
rate if the data is not entered at startup or if the user changes 
his system configuration with a new printer. B) Change # 
of Drives allows the user to add a second drive and adjust 
the program to accept the second unit online (or vice versa). 
As noted earlier, a couple of additional options come into 
play with two drives online. C) Change the Name provides 
for another individual's name to be entered on the "desk 
top" of the main menu screen. D) Return to Menu does just 
as the name suggests. E) Format a Data Disk turns an 
initialized blank disk into a data disk for the system to use. 
While not covered in the manual, when data or dates are 
to be entered into a new year, a formatted CEO data disk 
must be ready to receive the information. Thus, if a data 
disk had not been prepared for the new year, the user has 
to abort the option in use and return to the main menu to 
format a data disk. F) All of the Above option actually does 
a total start-up routine that covers all the steps needed to 
adapt the program to the user's configuration. G) Done for 
the Day is the command used to return to BASIC. It is the 
only safe way to exit the program without losing data. To 
get to this decision, the user must be in the main menu, then 
get into the submenu and answer "yes"; this is a somewhat 
cumbersome way to exit the program. It would be more 
convenient for the user if the Exit Routine was one of the 
major main menu options and maybe have the clock speed 
adjustment option become part of the housekeeping 
subroutines. 

The Calculator option draws the face of a standard 
pocket calculator as an overlay on the main menu screen. 
The calculator has a border of either red or blue depending 



on the color of the border around the desk. The design does 
brighten the screen. The graphics display of the calculator 
has a window into which the figures are entered from the 
computer's keyboard. The unit operates as a four-function 
calculator (add, subtract, multiply and divide). The usual 
keyboard keys are used to control the procedures. There is 
room for a nine-digit result and the digits are entered from 
left to right. If the results of a math operation require more 
than the nine spaces, the readout is given as a natural 
exponential of the number and no further number crunch- 
ing is allowed. The CLEAR key must be tapped to start 
another math problem. The 'S' key may be used to change 
the sign of a number. To end the option and return to the 
main menu the *@' key is used. 

The remaining main menu options have their own 
individual screens. For many users, the Calendar option will 
be the most frequently used option because of the many 
ways it can be set up and used. 

The Calendar option draws a familiar calendar with 
blocks and dates. The month presented the first time is the 
month of the year as entered in the start-up routine (or 
through the Set Date suboption). The day of the month is 
enclosed in a set of brackets. The days of the month are 
selected by moving the brackets with the arrow keys. Once 
a specific day of the month has been selected, tapping the 
ENTER key brings up a new screen. 

Across the top of this screen is a row of icons depicting 
operations that may be called up by moving the pointer 
under the specific icon (with the arrow keys) and tapping 
the ENTER key. Just below the icon line is a space for the 
name of the first item on the Clipboard to flash. Under that 
is the line that shows the name of the day of the week and 
the date (month, day, year) under consideration. Below that 
is a Special Occasion data field for a 32-character message 
to be logged. Below that line are 10 hourly entry fields 
(limited to 15 characters each) followed by a Memo field, 
which is also a 32-character field. When the program is first 
executed all these fields are empty until the user loads in 
appointments and saves the data. The dozen data fields are 
the backbone of the data entry of the calendar and are 
recalled from the data disk whenever that date is requested. 
A special feature of data entry into the Special Occasion 
line is that this date on the calendar has its number 



highlighted. Thus, when a month has any Special Occasion 
dates recorded, they are quickly visible. 

The program automatically activates the keyboard icon 
upon entry into scheduling operation. The icons depict the 
operation they support and the user can always tell which 
icon is operational because it is in inverse image. Because 
the keyboard option is active upon arriving at the selected 
date, the user can move the highlighted box down the 
appointment time lines with the arrow key to the selected 
time. The enter key is pressed and a blinking cursor 
appears at the head of the highlighted line allowing data 
to be typed in. When finished (15-space limit), the ENTER 
key is pressed again to hold the data in place and the user 
can move to another time line. To save the data entered for 
that day, the user moves the pointer to the disk icon and 
presses ENTER. A new submenu pops up. 

The user now must choose to save the date, save the data 
to another date or both, return to the day for more work, 
or return to the calendar and not save the data. An option 
is selected by moving the pointer in front of the option 
wanted and pressing ENTER to execute. With two disk drives 
online, the program is supposed to be able to transfer a 
Special Occasion date forward to another year to save 
typing in all those items. If this selection is attempted, a 
screen message shows up telling the user to insert a blank 
data disk in Drive 0 to receive the data. However, the 
program reads that disk, reports "disk not blank" and 
aborts the transfer. The same message appeared with a blank 
disk (not a formatted data disk). 

There are six additional icons to choose from while on 
the scheduling screen. The Help icon can be invoked and 
when the pointer is stopped under any of the other icons, 
pressing the ENTER key produces a Help screen of specific 
instructions for that icon. A handy feature when you don't 
want to go searching for the manual to look up something. 

The Scissors icon is used to cut a specific data field from 
the display screen. Once cut, the data field can be pasted 
to another field, tacked onto the Clipboard or even put in 
the "Trash Can." The cut and paste operation helps move 
data around within the same day without having to retype 
it, and by posting the data to the Clipboard, the data can 
be transferred to another day within the month or to 
another month of the same year. The Clipboard can hold 



One-Liner Contest Winner . » . 

If you enjoy word games, Anagram may help you 
with the guesswork. It takes any word you enter 
and randomly scrambles it. This means you don't 
have to decide how to best scramble the word. 

The listing: 

J3 INPUT "WORD" ; A$ : L=LEN(A$) :FORJ= 
1TOL: R=RND (L) :T$=MID$ (A$ , J , 1) : MI 
D$ (A$ , J, 1)=MID$ (A$,R, 1) :MID$ (A$, 
R, 1) =T$ : NEXT J : PRINTA$ 

Bruce Wulfsberg, MD. 
Moorestown, NJ 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape) 



Hint ■ . , 

Disappearing Act 

If you want to disable the output to your screen, 
just type'POKE 359,255. This causes the computer to 
appear to be locked up, Remember that any entered 
command will be executed, but the text will not appear 
on the screen. To get out of this and allow screen 
output, just type POKE 359 ,126, 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 205 



up to nine data fields in storage and the actual number of 
items stored are listed on the Clipboard outline. The top 
entry in the Clipboard file is flashed on the Clipboard data 
line just under the row of icons each time an icon is accessed 
as a reminder. If several items are posted on the Clipboard 
it may be necessary to remove the top items (by selecting 
the Scissors and the Trash Can icons) to get to the correct 
item to transfer. It takes some work shifting between icons 
to get the job done, but once familiar with what comes first, 
it really becomes fun to switch data around with just a 
couple of keystrokes. 

Another icon is the Duplicator. This icon allows for a 
duplicate copy of a data field to be created. For example, 
an item placed on Clipboard might be copied with Dupli- 
cator and moved to more than one location. 

The last icon is the Printer, which produces reports on 
a printer. Since no graphics symbols are used in the 
printouts, there are no special restrictions on the types of 
printers that will work with CEO. CEO produced pre- 
formatted reports on both an Okidata 82 and a DMP-200 
printer without problems. 

The Printer submenu allows for a printout of just the 
selected day being worked on, a printout for a week starting 
with the selected date, prints a monthly calendar (with the 
Special Occasion dates set off by asterisks) or prints out a 
listing of days by "key word." A search for a key word such 
as "birthday" or "doctor," between specific dates, produces 
a printout of those days. The key word to be used in the 
search must be exact or it will not be found. Again, there 
is a little extra effort by the programmer to set up a check 
in the system to see if a printer is online or not. 

Maybe the most useful report to be printed is the single 
page "week-at-a-glance" printout. Each day is printed with 
its day of the week, date and year and two columns of 
"Today's Schedule. "To exit the Calendar option and return 
to the main menu, the 'Q' key is tapped. 

The Phone Directory option also has its own screen and 
commands and handles up to 192 names and phone 
numbers in a fast and friendly way. The user is permitted 
to select one of six suboptions by moving the pointer to the 
proper selection and pressing ENTER. To add a person to 
the file, the Add Names suboption is selected and the user 
is presented a place to enter a name (up to 32 characters); 
by tapping ENTER the cursor moves to the phone line 
awaiting the number (up to 14 characters). Pressing ENTER 
again offers another sequence. Pressing ENTER with no entry 
returns the user to the menu. 

The manual suggests that entries be made with the last 
name first so when the program automatically sorts the 
names alphabetically they are in acceptable order. It is 
interesting that the Find routine locates a name in upper- 
or lowercase or presents name(s) and number(s) of all that 
group if only one letter is entered (i.e., just a V), Pressing 
ENTER lists the total file. 

One small quirk in this section is when the Change of 
Name suboption is used, CEO writes the old name to the 
screen and leaves it there even after the new name has been 
committed to the file. The screen stays cluttered until the 
user goes back to the main menu. 

The Note Keeper rounds out the complete organizing 
functions of CEO Six of the 15 pages of the manual are 
devoted to suboptions of this section. 

The data handling of this "free-form file drawer" is 
supposed to be made easier by the use of single letter codes. 
However, among the suboption codes is the use of the same 
letter code to accomplish different missions — confusing to 

206 THE RAINBOW April 1966 



say the least. Due to what must be a typing error, the manual 
also lists a key to be used as a command, but the Color 
Computer keyboard does not include such a key. 

The manual states that up to 479 records can be stored 
on the data disk, depending on how long each record might 
be. An individual record may be as long as 5,400 characters 
and its title must fit into a maximum 48-character line. The 
record titles are stored in an index file that can be called 
up for viewing. An individual record can be called up by 
title directly, and any record can be edited, have lines added 
or deleted, or be printed (a line at a time or total record). 

There are three different "search" routines in the 
command list. Two of the routines are used to locate a 
record by finding a key word within the title of the record. 
The GET and command worked. However, all too 
frequently the only response with Find (which was to locate 
a key word in a record) was a screen message "<E> Sorry 
No Match." 

The data entry into a record is not very user friendly in 
that only 230 characters are all the program accepts at a 
time. It is frustrating to be typing along from a source and 
realize the program had stopped accepting data a couple 
lines back. However, pressing the ENTER key moves the 
cursor down to an empty line and more data can be entered. 
The manual does not explain or warn the user of this little 
quirk. Also, trying to free up space by removing some 
records proved to be less than complete. While the record 
was gone from the disk, the title of the record remained in 
the index. 

On the bright side, the programmer created several 
special handling procedures that are great. The user can 
toggle the scroll rate from fast (default) to slow. The slow 
scroll of the data is smooth as it moves up/ down the screen. 
There is also a disk housekeeper routine that can be called. 
The Organizer command packs the disk to make the best 
use of the space. The manual notes that the system 
automatically invokes this command if the user tries to save 
a record and there is not enough room for it. The program 
provides a fast means to check disk space available and 
storage space in memory. The report gives the size of the 
record in memory (in bytes), the remaining amount of 
memory, the number of free records left and the amount 
of free disk space remaining. 

The last option is the Memo Pad, which allows the user 
to create one record (up to 5,400 characters) as the only 
entry in that file. This record can be called to screen or 
printed out. If a new memo is entered, it replaces the former 
message. 

CEO has many bells and whistles that work and are not 
just for show. However, the database portion of the program 
would not be my choice as a tool to use often. If someone 
wants an excellent appointment scheduling program, CEO 
is worth considering. The Calculator option may be useful 
to have online for those who might want to keep CEO up 
and running for most of the day and need a fast math job 
done. On balance, the appointment scheduling portion 
carries the day for CEO. 

The manual, 15 half-pages in length, covers most of the 
functions in detail. There are some omissions and typos that 
make the manual better than some, but with room for 
improvement. 

(Computer ware, 4403 Manchester Ave., Suite 102-Box 668, 
Encinitas, CA 92024, disk $49.95 plus $2 S/H) 



Software ReviewS^SSS^^SSElS^^^^fZs 

Panic Button is Fun 
for All Ages 

Imagine yourself working on an assembly line. Your job 
is to assemble one of the following six items: robot, house, 
cake, lamp, phone or TV set. 

To play the game, you need to follow these simple 
directions: 1) insert game cartridge, 2) plug in left joystick, 
3) turn on your CoCo, 4) turn on your TV set. 

The first screen allows you to set the level of difficulty 
you want to use. There are three difficulty levels to choose 
from — 1, 3 or 7. Number 1 is the easiest and number 7 
is the hardest level of play. I suggest that everyone start at 
Level 1 until they get used to playing this game. 

After choosing the level of play, the computer shows you 
how to assemble an item and how many items you need to 
assemble in the allotted time. When you are ready to play, 
just press the left joystick button. 

You are now in the assembly room and the different parts 
of the item start falling onto the conveyor belt. Your job 
is to assemble the item correctly and send the completed 
item to the shipping dock. If you don't assemble the 
specified number in two minutes, you are fired. 

But don't despair if you find yourself falling hopelessly 



behind; you can always press the panic button. This stops 
the conveyor belt for approximately 15 seconds and allows 
you to try to catch up. Be careful about using the panic 
button, as your foreman really frowns upon its use. 

If you successfully complete your assignment by assem- 
bling the correct number of items in the specified time limit, 
you advance to the next level. The next level will have you 
assemble a different item, plus one more item than you did 
in the previous level. 

When two levels of play are completed, you receive a 
reward. Could it be you get a raise in pay? Or maybe you 
will get a day off? No, if you successfully complete two levels 
of play, you get to throw a cake in the foreman's face! How 
sweet it is! 

When I received Panic Button, my whole family sat down 
around the CoCo for what turned out to be a really exciting 
evening of playing. Alice (my wife) got fired so many times, 
the foreman almost hated to see her go in to "work." 

My children (Lisa is 11, Eddie is 7) both enjoyed Panic 
Button very much. When they started playing, they couldn't 
make it past the first level of play. But after a few games, 
actually quite a few games, they were doing great! 

Panic Button turned out to be a lot of fun, but watch out 
— it can be addicting! 

(Tandy Corp., available in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 
requires 16K and joysticks, $19.95) 

— John H. Appel 



About Your Subscription 

Your copy of THE RAINBOW is sent second class 
mail. If you do not receive your copy by the 5th of 
the month of the publication date, send us a card and 
we will mail another. Canadian subscribers and 
foreign airmail allow two additional weeks. 

You must notify us of a new address when you 
move. Notification should reach us no later than the 
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change your address. Sorry, we cannot be responsible 
for sending another copy when you fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an "account number" 
and the subscription expiration date. Please indicate 
this account number when renewing or corresponding 
with us. It will help us help you better and faster. 

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torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 
P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. This applies to 
everyone except those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Australia. 



Two- Liner Contest Winner. . . 

Type in Scroller as listed. Once you have seen 
what it does, change Line 1 to meet your own needs. 
This can be a pretty useful subroutine, too. 

The listings: 

J9 CLS:PRINT@257,STRING$ (30,42) :P 
RINT@ 1 2 9 , STRING$ (30,42): Q=2 8 : REA 
DA$ : FORX=lTOLEN ( A$ ) +2 8 : Q=Q-1 : Q=Q 
*SGN(Q) :P$=MID$(A$,X+(Q-27) ,28-Q 
) : PRINT© 19 4+Q, P$ : FORT=1TO70 :NEXT 
T,X: RESTORE: GOTO 

1 DATA DISPLAY ANY MESSAGE HERE 

BY replacing this message WITH 0 
NE OF YOUR OWN IN LINE NUMBER 1. 

THE MESSAGE WILL BE REPEATEDLY 
DISPLAYED AS LONG AS YOU LIKE.O 
<><><><«MESSAGE SCROLLER»X«B 
Y JIM COCKRUM»><><><><> 

Jim Cockrum 
Martinsville, IN 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Second Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



u 

April 1986 THE RAINBOW 207 



Software Review A 



TRY-O-TAX Helps Organize 
Tax Preparations 

I may not be the typical customer for TRY-O-TAX. I 
have been doing my own income tax returns for over 20 
years, but always dread and hate the task. On the one hand, 
that means I search every year for a computer program to 
relieve the annual pain. On the other hand, it means I expect 
a tax program to do things very well that I already have 
much familiarity with. It may be I have higher standards 
of performance for tax software than the average person 
who is just trying to avoid a trip to an accountant. 

I have used two of the earlier versions of TRY- O- TAX'S 
annual offerings, and was hoping for major improvements 
this year. The 1985 program arrived early, but because of 
review deadlines that allow readers to see this in the prime 
tax season, it meant I was doing the 1985 Income Tax (with 
partially bogus projected figures) immediately after 
Thanksgiving. 

The 1985 version includes two impressive features. The 
first is an abbreviated program that allows the user to 
predict the following year's situation in order to estimate 
whether to change withholding or find a tax shelter. I found 
this mini-program quite useful for its intended purpose, and 
I would like to return to it each quarter throughout the 
coming year. I would buy that program separately as it is 
very user friendly, and while not too sophisticated, it did 
an excellent job. 



GRAFPLOT 



GRAFPLOT DEMO i 
•3.00 DI8K OR TAPE 
REFUND W/PURCHABE * 
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SET8 EVEN BETTER" 
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ZD ! SAME 1—OUJ PR I 

Chart of Household Bud^e-t Categories 




5 18 15 28 25 

Weeks Since Starting Neu Budget 

CREATEB PROFEBB I ONAL LOOKING GRAPHS IN JUBT MINUTES. 
AUTOMATICALLY LOADS DATA FROM MOBT POPULAR BPREADBHEETS. 
OVER 100 GRAPHING SYMBOLS AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 
AUTOMATICALLY 8CALES AND LABEL8 ALL THREE OF THE AXES. 
CALCULATES MATH FUNCTIONS, INTEGRALS AND MOVING AVERAGES. 
FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN W/ COMPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 

16K TAPE - «33.00, 32K TAPE - 940.00, 32K DISK - 945.00 



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The other feature is the ability to exit from the future 
estimation program by pressing a key that makes your 
computer (already pre-loaded with such information as 
your address) type out your order form for the following 
year's version of TRY-O-TAX. 

TRY-O-TAX works and prints out only in integer math. 
While Uncle Sam will accept your tax return with all figures 
rounded to the nearest dollar, most of us do not do our 
income tax that way. This may seem minor since it is legal, 
but it annoyed me. When I entered items to the cent and 
checked, I found TRY-O-TAX carried out the math 
correctly before rounding to the dollar. 

TR Y-O-TAX forces the user to transfer the data from his 
printout to his Form 1040, and provides plain paper 
substitutes (which the IRS will accept) for all the other 
attachments, schedules and forms. (The IRS demands use 
of their form only for the 1040 itself, although it is 
customary to use IRS forms throughout.) This, like the 
rounded dollar example, is legal and acceptable to the IRS, 
but it can be a nuisance to some of us. Many taxpayers must 
provide a copy of their return to someone else (e.g., a former 
spouse or creditor) and the format of the plain paper result 
doesn't have a professional appearance. 

Because the 1985 tax forms were not released when TRY- 
O-TAX went to press, the instructions warn the user that 
some line numbers may not match properly with the actual 
forms this year. The author states that correct 1985 tax rates 
and rules are used, and he seems (as far as I could check) 
to be correct. 

TRY-O-TAX needs to be run two or three times before 
the final pass because limitations in punctuation prevent 
proper entry of some business names and other data; the 
computer does not like commas in the middle of string 
input. The documentation is poor on such minor points as 
how to enter both spouses' Social Security numbers to 
match the proper printout format. This is another reason 
the user should cycle through the program more than once. 
The computation of excess Social Security withheld from 
more than one employer was omitted entirely. For me, that 
computation can double or triple the refund due back. 

In summary, TRY-O-TAX is better than the author's 
1984 version and is useful in helping one organize and do 
the first rough pass. But for me, for reasons mentioned, I'll 
send in my final income tax return done manually. 

(TRY-O-BYTE, 1008 Alton Circle, Florence, SC 29501, 
16K cassette or 32K disks $29.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— H. Larry Kim an 



ENHANCE YOUR COCO! 

The Enhancer gives you mixed text and graphics, 

user-defined keys, PROCEDURES, keyboard AUTO- 
REPEAT, scroll protect. It gives you true lower-case 
letters, 224 characters, user-definable characters, 
reverse/bold/underlined characters. The Enhancer 
adds 15 commands and 3 functions to your CoCo's 
vocabulary. It requires 64K, Extended BASIC. To 
order, please specify tape or disk and send $18.00 U.S. 
to: 

H.D.R. Software 
27 Doyle Street 
St. John's, Nfld. 

Canada A1E 2N9 Tel. (709) 364-3125 



208 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Software Reir/eivZSSSSSSS?^ 

Action Abounds 
in Fast- Paced Knock Out 

Knock Out by Diecom Products is a fast-action boxing 
game for a 64K CoCo. The object of the game is to become 
the Boxing Champion of the World. In order to become 
champion you must fight and defeat five opponents. The 
first boxer you face is a real sucker. I was able to beat him 
on my third try. (Perhaps I should point out that I'm no 
martial arts expert.) 

The first boxer makes a good practice opponent. Each 
new opponent becomes progressively harder to defeat, and 
as a matter of fact, I never got past the second boxer. I 
managed to knock down the second boxer several times but 
he always managed to finish me off first. I can only imagine 
how fast and smart the final challenger would be. To give 
you an idea of this second opponent, he resembles Mr. T % 

Knock Out is a fast and action-packed boxing game. Your 
boxer is outlined and transparent. This allows you to look 
through your boxer and see your opponent. During the 
game you go at your opponent toe to toe. 

Use the up arrow to move your boxer's hands or guard 
up, down arrow to move your boxer's hands or guard down, 
left arrow to make your boxer dodge to the left and right 
arrow to make your boxer dodge to the right. The 'Z' key 
makes your boxer punch with his left hand. If your boxer's 
guard is up, he punches to your opponent's head. If your 
boxer's guard is down, he punches to your opponent's body. 
The "?/" keys make your boxer punch with his right hand, 
with the same guard up/ down aims. The space bar makes 
your boxer punch with a right hook if he has knockout 
power. 

A knockout indicator is located on the left side of the 
screen. Each time you hit your opponent your knockout 
power increases. When you have enough power, the KO 
indicator starts flashing. If you hit your opponent when the 
KO indicator is flashing, you will take away a lot of his 
energy. However, your opponent tries to block your punch. 

While your boxer is dodging, moving or punching, you 
cannot make another move; you must wait until your boxer 
completes his move before commanding another move. If 
you try to make a move while your boxer is moving, the 
second move command is ignored. Movement speed 
increases and boxer reaction time decreases as you progress 
through the five challengers. 

On the left side of the screen there are two multicolored 
energy bars with the word "down" written between them. 
The top bar shows your opponent's energy and the bottom 
bar shows your boxer's energy. The boxer who lands a 
punch gains energy and the boxer hit by a punch loses 
energy. When a boxer's energy bar completely disappears 
the boxer is knocked down. 

When a boxer is knocked down a countdown indicator 
is displayed in the upper right corner of the screen. If the 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest-Chicago 

May 23-25 



count is less than 10 the boxer gets back up and some of 
his energy is restored. On the third knock down the fighter 
is knocked out and loses the fight. Each fight can last up 
to three minutes. If you do not knock out your opponent 
within three minutes you lose. After you knock out an 
opponent, you face another fighter until all five challengers 
are defeated. You must knock down each opponent three 
times, but your boxer can only be knocked down three times 
during the entire game. In order to win you must get through 
the first couple of fighters unscathed. 

A bonus scoring counter is located at the top right corner 
of the screen. At the beginning of each fight the counter 
contains 30,000 bonus points. As time goes by the counter 
counts down. When a challenger is knocked out the count 
in the counter is added to your score. The faster you knock 
out an opponent the higher the bonus score, and as stated, 
your boxer also receives points for hitting his opponent. 

Knock Out comes on disk or cassette and is accompanied 
by a brief user's booklet. The booklet is written clearly and 
is easy to understand. Following the instructions, I was up 
and playing the game in short order. If you buy the disk 
version, the 10 high scores can be saved to disk. 

I enjoyed playing Knock Out because there is a lot of 
action and excitement in this game for a reasonable price. 

(Diecom Products, 6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, 
Canada L9T 2X8, 64K required, disk or cassette $28.95 
U.S., $38.95 CDN plus $2 S/H) 

— Gabriel Weaver 



DYNAMIC COL-OF? NEWS 
A monthly Newsletter with Educational ma- 
terial for writing Programs, New Products, 
Product Reviews, Programs, and much more. 
*.15 yr. — Free Sample — 

PROGRAM SAVER 

Uninterrupted Power Source (UPS) provides 
power to RAMS during power failures. For 
all computers with 5 Volt RAMS. *59.95 

memory exf»amde:rs 

We have several types of solder less memory 
expanders from 64K to 512k. Call or write 
for detai Is. 

MEIMORY MANAGER 
(New Product) 
Software designed to manage the second 32K 
memory bank for 64K computers. Run basic 
programs in both banks, store programs in 
the second bank, link programs from one 
bank to the other. Allows copying ROMS to 
RAM and stacking programs in the upper 
memory. S27.95 Cassette, *29.95 Disk. 

SOFTWARE 
DVTERM 300-240O baud terminal Pgm. S14.95 
DISASM Decimal 6809 Assembler $19.95 
MPM Stack up to 5 programs in 32K S14.95 
Checks, Visa & MC Cards. Add $3 ship. 
Free Catalog. 24 Hour phone. 

DYNAM I O ELECTRON I OS 

BOX (205) "7^3 — 

I— IARTSEI I E , AL 3S<£>-<l-0 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 209 



Software Review «^^S^SISS^N 

Menu Maker Gives Easy 
Access to Disk Files 

By A. Buddy Hogan 

Menu Maker is a machine language utility that places a 
Hi-Res, user-definable graphics screen, disk name and disk 
directory menu on disks. Menu Maker requires a 32K CoCo 
with either Disk BASIC 1.0 or 1.1 and at least one disk drive 
(it will support multiple drives). If you have a non-standard 
Disk Operating System such as ADOS, JDOS or Spectrum 
DOS, Menu Maker will not work as supplied. However, 
for $15 you may copy your DOS onto disk (the documen- 
tation explains how to do this), send it in and receive a copy 
of Menu Maker that is compatible. Or, if you are really 
industrious, you may order the commented source code for 
Menu Maker for $10 and make the modifications yourself. 

Menu Maker is supplied on a non-protected disk and you 
are urged to make a backup before proceeding. This is 
particularly important when using this software because 
you must select between the two main programs on the disk; 
one for Disk BASIC 1.0 and the other for 1.1. You kill one 
and use the other. 

When you LOfiDM the main program, you are presented 
with a high resolution screen that is divided into two 
sections. The top section is a graphics of a CoCo and the 
name, address and phone number of Saguaro Software. At 
the bottom of the top section is a flashing box in which the 
words DISK MENU MAKER have been designed. This 
box flashes between a regular and inverse screen (dark 



becomes light, light becomes dark). The bottom of the 
screen displays the names of up to 24 files stored on the disk. 
The names are in Hi- Res, and the name at the top has arrows 
on each side that replace the traditional cursor. Centered 
right above the filenames is the name of the disk (in this 
case, Menu Maker Master Disk). 

You may run any of the programs on the disk by using 
the up- and down-arrow keys to enclose the name of the 
file you want to run with the "cursor" and pressing ENTER. 
Menu Maker runs almost any BASIC or machine language 
file (it ran all the ones I tried, but the documentation says 
"almost"). 

The filenames are displayed in up to three columns of six 
names each, with only the filenames being displayed, not 
the extensions. You may also read filenames from another 
disk into the Menu Maker high resolution screen by 
exchanging disks and pressing the BREAK key. The names 
of the files on the new disk are shown where the previous 
filenames were. 

So, what do you want with Saguaro's address on your 
disks? The whole idea of Menu Maker is to allow you to 
design your own menu screen(s) to jazz up your disks and 
gain easy access to each of the files on the disks. Alas, Menu 
Maker is not a graphics editor, so you have to supply your 
own design. The design may be created by any of the 
graphics editors for the CoCo (CoCo Max, Graphicom, 
Master Design, Micro Painter, etc.) capable of producing 
a standard binary screen file. If you want to see whether 
pictures created by your graphics utility are compatible with 
Menu Maker, type in the following program (from the 
Menu Maker documentation): 

10 PCLEflR 4:PM0DE 4,1:SCREEN 1,1 
20 LOflDM'TILENfiME" 
30 GDTD30 

You will have to create a screen that occupies the same 
amount of space as the sample screen that is provided with 
Menu Maker (roughly half of the screen) because the 
bottom half is reserved for the name of the disk and the 
filenames. Or you can just ignore the bottom half since it 
won't be seen. I used a sample screen supplied with a 
graphics utility I was reviewing simultaneously, and 
modified it so it would fit on the top half of the screen. Next, 
I ran a BASIC program called RECONFIG that allows you 
to customize the MENU program. Using this program, you 
may replace the MENU display screen with a screen you 
have developed, i.e., enable/ disable flashing, determine 
where the flashing will begin /end on the screen and set the 
rate at which the flashing will occur. 

A BASIC program is provided to allow you to name any 
disks in your collection on which you want to place a copy 
of MENU. This program displays anything contained in 
Sector 1 of Track 17 and cautions that anything already 
there will be overwritten by the name that you choose for 
the disk. The delay for this warning is so brief, though, that 
you have to be a speed reader to catch it (just increase the 
time delay in Line 2 of NAMEDISKto 2000). It would also 
be nice if the program didn't end after you've named one 
disk. A user with several disks to name doesn't want to have 
to run the program to name each disk. You can fix this by 
editing out the END in Line 10 and replacing it with a G0T01. 

After you've merged your own screen into MENU and 
named your disks, you are ready to copy the new MENU/ 
BIN program to your disks. From then on, when you put 
your disks in the drive, just type L0RDPTMENU", move the 



MicroWorld 



230 Moorestown Rd. Wind Gap, PA 18091 

(215) 759-7662 
Call or write for Price List 

LOW PRICES ON 100% 
Radio Shack Equipment 



(with full warranty) 
New Slimline Drive 0 $235.00 

Prices subject to change! 
Prices include shipping! 

16K Standard $ 62.95 

64K Extended $169.00 

Sakata 13" Monitor $199.00 

With monitor driver $230.00 

Multipack Interface $ 71.95 

DMP-105 $140.00 



64K Upgrade (150 NS) Top of the line . . .$29.95 
Diskettes, any quantity, lifetime Warranty $ 1.50 

Quantities are limited! 

1 0% off Computerware 
10% off all Radio Shack Sale Items 
15% off Radio Shack Hardware 
20% off ail Radio Shack Software 

210 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



cursor to the file you want to run, press ENTER and that's 
all there is to it. 

As a RAINBOW reviewer, I am encouraged to do exactly 
what a purchaser of the software would do if there is a 
problem — call the company. I couldn't get the RECONFIG 
program to let me change the point at which the flashing 
stops. I called Saguaro and learned they only distribute the 
software and any technical questions would have to be 
directed to the author. I called his number over an entire 
day and got nothing but a busy signal. So I can't tell you 
from experience whether you can modify the end of the 
flashing screen. 

I know that you can modify the point at which the 
flashing is to begin. The manual says that the values for start 
and end of flashing must be entered as Hex numbers and 
that the screen goes from $0000 (0) to S17FF (6,143). The 
RECONFIG program says that valid inputs for the 
modifications are $0000 to $25FF (9,727). The flashing 
begins on the sample screen at $0900 (2,304) and ends at 
$0B80 (2,944), which is the end of the upper portion of the 
screen available to you for modification. If all of this is 
confusing you, it confused me also. Any attempt to change 
the end of the flashing resulted in no change being made, 
but a hangup of the program if the up arrow was pressed. 

It would also be nice for the author to give the uninitiated 
a little help with Hex. In order to convert a decimal number 
to a hexadecimal number, type in "PRINT HEX$(X) "(where 
'X' is a decimal number between 0 and 65,535). Valid 
decimals to convert to Hex for the start of flashing are 0 
through 2944. 

The documentation consists of five 8V2 by 1 1-inch bright 
yellow pages. It does a good job of explaining how to use 
the features of the software, with the exception noted above 
related to the flashing screen option. 

This would be an especially useful piece of software if the 
filename display was not limited to 24 entries. Typically, a 
person interested in a disk utility like Menu Maker would 
use it for disks that store a number of utility or other files. 
Rather than search through a directory racing by, users 
would enjoy the ease of implementing a program (already 
stored on each such disk) that places all of the names neatly 
in front of them and allows selecting the one wanted by 
merely moving the cursor around with the arrow keys. As 
is, you must either limit the number of files on these disks 
to 24, or use Menu Maker to see only the first 24 files on 
the disk. 

(Saguaro Software, P.O. Box 1864, Telluride, CO 81435, 
disk $24.95 plus $1 S/H) 



See You at 
RAINBOWfest-Chicago 

May 23-25 



Software R e vie ,j/ f~\ 

Enjoyment for Board-Game 
Lovers with Perpetulife 

Perpetulife is something like a cross between the games 
of "Checkers" and "Life." The objective is to have more live 
cells than your opponent, and play is on a grid resembling 
the board games. The number of living cells you have 
depends on mathematical relationships with neighboring 
cells (yours or your opponent's). 

Without the right balance of cells around a particular cell, 
it will die. The perpetual creation and killing of individual 
cells allows much shifting of the tides during a game. 

In order to win Perpetulife, you must figure out how to 
position your cells to kill off your opponent's cells. It 
requires a good understanding of how the process works. 
I never figured out a good way of winning. I think with time 
and patience, or a better, understanding of the process than 
mine, you can enjoy Perpetulife. 

The instructions for the game are clear and the tape 
loaded with no problems. In fact, when I got home from 
work my 9-year-old had loaded the game and tried it out. 
He was disappointed it wasn't a fantastic arcade-like game. 

Perpetulife is written in a combination of BASIC and 
assembly language. The first time the program is run it loads 
in the assembler portion. It requires 16K and allows the 
option to play against human opponents or the C0C0. If 
you enjoy board games converted for the C0C0, Perpetulife 
will interest you. 

(Tothian Software, P.O. Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248, 
requires 16K, cassette $19.95) 

— A.R. Compton 



— » i " ~ m i ■-■ ■ ■ ! 1 1 1... i n 

Two-Liner Contest Winner 

Piano draws a piano keyboard on the screen. The 
keyboard ranges from middle C to high C. After 
running the program, press the number keys to play 
some music. 

The listings: 

5 GOSUB1J3 : F0RX=1T0255 : PRINT@Y*32 
+3,RIGHT$(STR$(X) , LEN (STR$ (X) ) -1 
) ; : PRINT@Y*32+14 , CHR$ (X) ; : POKE1J3 
24+Y*32+2 1 , X : Y=Y+1 : I~FY=15THENPRI 
NT§Y*32, ; : INPUT" PRESS enter" ;E$: 
GOSUB10 : NEXTE LS ENEXT : END 
10 CLS:Y=2:PRINT@6, "ASCII TABLE" 
;:PRINT@32," DECIMAL PRINT P 
OKE" ; : RETURN 

Garry L. Shelton 
Kannapolis, NO 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 21 1 



Software Review SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^ 

SIDE WISE OS9 Prints 
Wide Spreadsheets 

My wife is an accountant and keeps the books for several 
clients on our CoCo. We have often spent many boring 
hours taping pages together. As a matter of fact, we believe 
that the spreadsheet was invented by tape manufacturing 
companies. 

SIDE WISE OS9 makes this task unnecessary. I already 
owned SIDE WISE for Disk BASIC and was interested in 
the differences between these two different yet similar 
programs from the same author. 

SIDE WISE OS9 is a utility program that literally turns 
each ASCII character 90 degrees sideways, thus allowing 
you to print the length of the page rather than the width. 
It does this by reading each ASCII character from a file and 
re-creating it turned 90 degrees as a bit-graphics picture. 
There are several advantages and disadvantages to this 
technique. The primary advantage is that the character set 
is totally independent of the printer's built-in font set and, 
therefore, can be modified to accommodate many needs. 
The main disadvantage is speed. Since each character is a 
separate picture, it must be printed in graphics mode. 

I received SIDE WISE OS9 on a disk that contained five 
modules, i.e., 1) Setup, 2) Swise, 3) Setone, 4) Settwo and 
5) Swparam. The first two are program modules and must 
be copied into the current execution directory normally, 
/dO/cmds. The next three are data modules and must be 
copied into the current data directory, normally /d0. Swise 
and Setup are written in BASIC09 so the user must also have 
the RunB module in the execution directory. 

Once the modules are in place, the user types SETUP and 
is greeted with the setup menu, which contains: 1) printer 
type, 2) default output device and 3) paper width. 

The printer options include Radio Shack, Epson, C.Itoh, 
Okidata, and Gemini. The default output device would 
normally be jP printer. Paper width can be either eight inch 
or 14 inch. 

Once the setup is complete, all the user needs to do is enter 
SWISE at the command line and a menu appears giving 
several options, including: 1) filename, 2) output device, 3) 
column width, 4) maximum rows, 5) font, 6) print sidewise, 
7) perform OS-9 command and 8) exit to OS-9. 

The user must first take option one to select the filename 
to be printed. This filename may contain any pathnames 
necessary. If the rest of the displayed parameters are 
acceptable, the user then selects option six to print the sheet. 
The sheet may be printed as a background task by printing 
the sheet to another file, to be later LISTed to the printer 
as a background task. This is done by changing the output 
device (option 2) to a filename. This offers the advantage 
of not tying up the computer with the printing job, which 
is somewhat lengthy. Menu option three toggles between 
eight inch and 14 inch paper widths. Option four is 
calculated by the program. Option five is either standard 
or condensed print. Option seven allows you to execute an 
OS-9 command without leaving Swise. Menu option eight 
leaves Swise and exits to OS-9. 

After installing SIDE WISE OS9 V. 1.0 onto my OS-9 
V. 1.01 BASIC09 system disk and transferring a DynaCalc 
spreadsheet in ASCII, my first attempt to print it was a 
failure. Back to the instructions. Oops! Forgot to turn 



pagination off. The second try was successful. Out came my 
spreadsheet neatly printed sideways. 

Several things must be done to the spreadsheet to print 
it with SIDE WISE OS9. First, you must set the printer 
width to 80 and turn off the pagination. You must also close 
the output path to the printer so that the sheet is printed 
to a file, thus converting it to ASCII. You must also consider 
the size of the spreadsheet. If it will have too many rows, 
a factor that must be calculated based on whether you are 
printing in condensed or regular print and what width paper 
you are using, you must break the sheet up into smaller 
sheets before printing it to a file. 

SIDE WISE OS9 is very user friendly and anyone who 
is familiar with the OS-9 operating system would have no 
trouble using it. 

The documentation supplied with the program, while 
brief, is complete and easy to follow, leading the user 
through both installation and use. 

SIDE WISE OS9 is a handy utility to have if you have 
need of presentation-quality spreadsheets. Because of its 
slow printing speed (a sheet on my Epson at 600 Baud took 
approximately 10 minutes), it is not something you would 
use unless you really needed to. This is not really a program 
fault, but rather a characteristic of this type of program. 

There are a few things that I would like to see done to 
the program. First, I would like the documentation on 
standard S^-inch paper. The ones supplied were only 
printed four inches wide in tiny print that I found difficult 
to read without a magnifying lens. I would like to see the 
program supplied with a module to convert a spreadsheet 
file into the necessary number of files, thus freeing the user 
of this chore. Neither of these improvements would be very 
difficult and would increase user satisfaction enormously. 
I encountered one final problem. I was not able to change 
the Baud rate for printing. When I tried, using the OS-9 
XMODE /P baud= command, the printing became erratic 
and printed garbage at any speed except 600 Baud. I also 
tried it on OS-9 V. 1 .0 and got the same results. I must admit 
that I never print graphics on OS-9 and, therefore, I cannot 
say if the fault is with the program or with the bit-banger 
routine in OS-9 itself. 

At the cost of $39.95, SIDE WISE OS9 allows the user 
the option of printing nice-looking, wide spreadsheets. It 
is moderately easy to use and works well. I recommend it 
to anyone who needs this kind of utility. 

(Derringer Software, Inc., P.O. Box 5300, Florence, SC 
29502-5300, OS-9 and BASIC09 required, printer necessary, 
$39.95 plus $3 S/H) 

« 

— Larry Goldwasser 



Hint . . * 

Waiting for the Keystroke 

If you want your BASIC program to wait for a 
keystroke, just type EXEC 44539. This performs the 
same function as fi$=INKEY$: IF fl$="" THEN (next 
line). 

The computer waits for any key to be pressed before 
the program continues. 



212 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Hardware Revie wJSSSSZZ^^SS M "" MM " r /^N 

CoCo EPROM Programmer 
Has a Variety of Functions 

In the July 1983 RAINBOW (Page 70), we did a review of 
the first generation of The Intronics EPROM Programmer. 
Recently rainbow received a new model from Spectrum 
Projects, Inc., that is an improvement over the older model, 
even though the older model worked fine. 

First of all, who needs an EPROM programmer? Perhaps 
you have read all of the different articles on patching BASIC 
to make your disk drives step at six ms, or adding new 
commands. To make these changes permanent you must 
replace one of the ROMs inside your CoCo with an 
EPROM. 

The only way to program an EPROM is with an EPROM 
programmer. At the same time, as was pointed out in the 
previous review, a CoCo with The Intronics EPROM 
Programmer is a more than adequate substitute for a 
commercial programmer. These commercial models run 
upwards of $1,000 and require personality modules for each 
different type of EPROM. This model is a bargain at 
$149.95. 

A 16K non-Extended CoCo is all that is necessary. If you 
care to use the programmer with a disk system, you must 
have a Multi-Pak because the software is at the same address 
as your disk controller. Adequate instructions are given on 
how to relocate the software, but you still need a place to 
plug in both your disk controller and your programmer. The 
unit comes with a 10-page user's manual and a 90-day 
limited warranty. 

The CoCo EPROM programmer is in a plastic case about 
twice the size of a normal ROM pack. A hole cut in the 
top of the case exposes the 28-pin heavy duty ZIF (zero 
insertion force) socket to hold the EPROM. One nice thing 
that separates the Intronic's unit from others I have seen 
is an on-board power supply — no batteries to string 
together to come up with the proper programming voltage. 
In fact, the programming voltage (12.5-21-25V) is program- 
mable under software control. The unit normally plugs into 
your ROM port. 

Software is on an EPROM inside the unit, so powering 
up your computer and typing EXEC 49152 will boot the self- 
contained software. Functions include: 1) EPROM erased, 
2) Program EPROM, 3) Verify EPROM, 4) Move EPROM 



Hint . , * 

Disk Drive Peek-a-Boo 

Need to know what your drive is up to? The 
following PEEKs may help: 

PRINT PEEK C 235} — returns drive number 
PRINT PEEK (236) — returns track number 
PRINT PEEK (237 ) — returns sector number 



to memory, 5) Slide memory, 6) Examine/ change memory, 
7) Fill buffer with FFs, 8) Return to BASIC, 9) Change buffer 
address and 0) Change Vpp. 

The buffer for the programmer normally starts at $2000, 
but using menu function 9, it can be moved to anywhere 
in memory. This allows you to duplicate your ROMs 
without moving them. 

The CoCo EPROM Programmer has a wide variety of 
EPROM characteristics already in the software. No 
personality modules are necessary. Following are the 
choices: 



zjio/ jl i lo 


zK 


X 


Q 

o 


2532 


4K 


X 


8 


2732 


4K 


X 


8 


2564 


8K 


X 


8 


2764 


8K 


X 


8 


25128 


16K 


X 


8 


27128 


16K 


X 


8 


68764/6 


8K 


X 


8 


2732A 


4K 


X 


8 


27256 


32K 


X 


8 


27512 


64K 


X 


8 


2508 


IK 


X 


8 


2578 


IK 


X 


8 


2758 


IK 


X 


8 


MK2764 


8K 


X 


8 



As most experimenters are aware, the 68766 is the 
replacement for the pre-Korean CoCo ROMs. You can 
tinker around changing things as much as you like with this 
device. One nice bonus in the manual explains the wiring 
necessary to use the less expensive 2764 EPROMs in place 
of 68766s. 

One extra piece of software is included that is unique. A 
program named BIRP (BASIC in ROM pack) is included. 
This allows putting your favorite BASIC program in a ROM 
pack for automatic execution. You can even LIST protect 
the program if you wish. 

I think the CoCo EPROM Programmer is the nicest and 
most functional unit of its type on the market. It's a little 
more expensive than some of the competitors, but I think 
it's worth the investment. I programmed a few EPROMs 
with the demo unit and it worked flawlessly. 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY, 11421, $149.95 plus $3 S/H) 



Dan Downard 




April 1986 THE RAINBOW 213 



me companies 



will tell you 

their programs 
are integrated. 




software speaks 




r itself. 



Lots of companies claim that their programs are integrated. 
All they mean is that several programs are on the same disk. 
And only a few of them talk to each other. Crude systems that 
lack features can be a real headache. 

■ At Derringer Software, when we say our programs are 
integrated, we mean that our programs talk to each other. 
Our PRO-COLOR-SERIES is completely compatible with 
DYNACALC® and TELEWRITER-64.™ These three programs 
are among the most flexible on the market today. 

■ Investigate before you make any investment. Derringer 
Software will prove itself worthy. We produced the first serious 
database program for the Color Computer back in 1982. And 
it has remained the popular choice ever since. Now that's really 
saying something! 

Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300, Florence, SC 29502-5300 

To place an order by phone, call: (803) 665-5676 

10 AM and 5 PM EDT 

Canadian Distributor-Kelly Software 
Australian Distributor-Computer Hut Software 



PRO-COLOR-FILE 

©1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

ENHANCED 2.0 

• 60 Data Fields for each record 

• 1020 spaces available per record if needed 

• Maximizes multiple drive operation 
•28 equation lines (+-7) 

• IF-THEN-ELSE logic test in equations 

• Full Screen editing on up to 4 data entry screens 

• Key click and auto key repeat 

• Stores custom designed report formats 

• Obtain totals, averages, or summaries for any field 

• Output reports to printer, screen, or disk file 

• Send data out to a OYNACALC compatible file 

• Separate label generator for up to 10 across labels 

• Pre-define up to 16 indexes for searching/reporting file 

• Sorts 750 records in under 5 minutes 

• User defined selection menus 

• Repeated tasks performed with one keystroke 

• Comes with 75 paqes of documentation in a 3 ring binder 

• Supported by a national users group 

• Full time programmer support 

• Supplied on an unprotected disk 



$ 59 



95 



PRO-COLOR FORMS 2.0 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, inc. 

PRO-COLOR-FORMS will access data files created with 
PRO-COLOR-FILE and merge them with a letter or place them 
on pre-printed forms. 

• STORE UP TO 6 FORMATS • USER DEFINED PAGE SIZE 

• SUPPORTS SPECIAL PRINTER CONTROL CODES • RIGHT 
JUSTIFICATION • PASSWORD PROTECTION • MERGES 
WITH GRAPHICS FROM MASTER DESIGN OR 
TELEGRAPHICS • 

PRO-COLOR-DIR 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRO-COLOR-DIR will read your directories and create a 
master data file that can be accessed by PRO-COLOR-FILE 
for sorting and reporting. 1000 + records can be stored on 
one diskette with valuable information about each program. 

You can obtain hard copies of the information and create 
labels of the filenames for placing on the diskette itself. 

• DISK ID NAME • FILENAME/EXT • TYPE OF FILE 

• DATE CREATED • DATE UPDATED • NUMBER OF 
GRANS ALLOCATED • NUMBER OF SECTORS 
ALLOCATED AND USED • MACHINE LANGUAGE 
ADDRESSES • 



$ 



29 



95 



FOR BOTH 



DYNACALC 

SPREAD SHEET FLEXIBILITY 

(Includes Dynagraph + Sidewise) 



$JQ95 



Telewriter-64. 



WORD PROCESSOR POWER 

coco Max n 

GRAPHICS SUPERIOR 



$5495 



$JQ95 



MASTER DESIGN 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Generates lettering in hi-res graphics that can be different 
sizes, skinny, bold, textured, drop shadowed, raise shadowed 
or tall. Also interfaces with the Telewriter-64 word processor 
for printing hi-res displays with your letters. 

take full advantage of al I the extended BASIC hi-res graphic 
commands including boxes, circles, lines, copy displays and 
util ize GET and PUT features. Added commands include mirror 
reflection, turn displays backwards or upside down. Squish 
displays, create dot patterns for shading or diagonal lines. 

The Letterhead Utility allows you to access hi-res graphics 
from Telewriter-64, your own BASIC programs or 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS. 

Interfaces with dot matrix printers having dot addressable 
graphics. 



See reviews in 

July '84 Rainbow, Oct. 84 Hot CoCo 



$2995 



DYNAGRAPH 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

A UTILITY PROGRAM FOR OWNERS OF DYNACALC® 

DYNAGRAPH will transfer graphic files from DYNACALC 
to standard graphic files for further enhancing and labeling 
by graphic editing programs such as MASTER DESIGN, CoCo 
Max or Graphicom. 

DYNAGRAPH can also reduce a graph vertically and 
horizontally so that multiple displays can be combined 
into one. 



$1Q95 



included FREE with DYNACALC® 



max Edit 



© 1985 Snard Enterprises 

A FONT EDITOR FOR COCO MAX 

• Edit current fonts 

• Create New Fonts 

• Design Symbol Fonts 

• Comes with pre-defined fonts 

• CoCo Max IS II Compatible 

(disk only) 

Written by: Michael W. Shawaluk 

CoCo Mat % is a registered trademark ofColorware. 



$1Q95 



SIDEWISE 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Add a new 'twist" to your printer's capabilities! 

SIDEWISE makes your printer do something you never 
thought possible -print side ways! 

SIDEWISE will read in any ASCII text file and print it out 
side ways using a Radio Shack, Epson, Okidata, C-ltoh or 
Gemini printers having dot-graphics ability. 

SIDE WISE 0S9 is compatible with DYNACALC 0S9 and 
requires Basic09 

SIDEWISE 0S9 $£Q95 



(Disk only) 



SIDEWISE RS-DOS 



$2495 



* RS-DOS version included FREE with DYNACALC® 

0S9 is a registered trademark ofMICROWARE and MOTOROLA. 



TELEGRAPHICS 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRINT HI-RES GRAPHICS USING TELEWRITER-64! 

Use CoCo Max, Graphicom or other graphics programs to 
create letter heads and print them while using Telewriter-64. 

Telegraphies interfaces with Radio Shack, Epson, Gemini, 
C-ltoh and Okidata printers having dot-addressable graphics. 
A simple modification to Telewriter-64 will allow you to exit 
Telewriter via the DISK I/O MENU and print out the graphic 
without affecting any of your text in the buffer. 

This is the same feature that is included in our MASTER 
DESIGN program. Since we felt you dont need to buy two 
graphics editing programs, we have made this feature available 
at a reduced price. 



(Available Only On Disk) 



$2495 



Telewriter-64 + TELEGRAPHICS - $64.95 

(Save $20) 

CoCo Max II + TELEGRAPHICS - $84.95 

(Save $20) 

NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLICABLE 



@ SUMMARY 

©1985 Derringer Software, Inc. 

If you use your spreadsheet program to keep track of your 
expenses then ©SUMMARY can help you analyze those 
expenses. For example, if you indicate a "Category" for each 
expense then ©SUMMARY will produce a report that shows 
a total for each category, the highest amount, the lowest 
amount and the average amount. In addition, ©SUMMARY 
can produce a hi-res line graph or bar graph of the analysis 
and allow you to place titles on the graph. A hardcopy ot the 
graph can also be generated as well as saved to disk. 

The analysis can be saved in a "data file" which can be 
loaded into DYNACALC or read in by @ SUMMARY for future 
additions to the analysis. If you use other Spreadsheets such 
as ELITE*CALC then you have added a graphing feature to 
your spreadsheet applications. The analysis can also be saved 
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inclusion in a report. 

@ SUMMARY is compatible with any spreadsheet program 
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Specify RS-DOS 
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HOME HELP 




Let Co Co do all the thinking on your 
next trip to the grocery store 



*7^e @o*ttfiutencfect 




T>e*utU 70 cede 



Grocery shopping doesn't have to 
be such an unpleasant task any- 
more. Shoplist is a menu-driven 
program that allows you to enter dinner 
menus by number and print a shopping 
list. It requires 16K of RAM, Color 
BASIC, a printer and runs on disk or 
cassette systems. 

To get started, key in the BASIC 
program as listed. If you have a 16K 
machine, delete all the remarks and 
unnecessary spaces. The DATA state- 
ments starting at Line 1550 are a partial 
listing of the menu we use at our house. 
I have reduced the menu by about 80 
percent to simplify the sample print- 
outs. Youll have to type in your own 
data so it's not necessary to enter lines 
1550 to 2010. However, you may want 
to type in several of the lines just to see 



Dennis Weide is an avid computer 
hobbyist who teaches programming on 
the CoCo and IBM PC. He has written 
for all the major Co Co magazines, 
including many programs in RAINBOW, 
Dennis lives in Albuquerque, New 
Mexico. 



how the program handles the data and 
to ensure that your program works 
properly. 

Storing Program Data 

Storing data is easy but requires an 
explanation. Refer to the program 
listing and Table 1, and follow these 
simple instructions when entering data 
elements. It's a good idea to use a 
separate program line for each meal so 
editing or adding elements is easier. 
Always precede section titles with a 'Y' 
and a comma (,) as in Line 1550. The 
'Y' indicates that the next data element 
is a section title and will be printed in 
large font. In this case, the section title 
is "Main Course Dinners." 

Always precede meal titles with an 'X' 
and a comma (,) as in Line 1560. The 
'X' indicates that the next element is a 
meal title and will also be printed in 
large font. In Line 1560, the menu title 
is "Deep Dish Pasta." 

To enter the meal ingredients, enter 
the amount of the item first, followed 
by a comma and the name of the ingre- 
dient. In Line 1560, Deep Dish Pasta 
requires one jar of spaghetti sauce, one- 



half pound of ground beef, one bell 
pepper, etc. To end the list of ingre- 
dients, use double commas („). The 
program uses double commas to deter- 
mine the end of the DATA statement. 

A Sample Statement 

Let's try a sample statement before 
you enter your own data. Well enter the 
data for a hamburger dinner. Here's a 
list of ingredients we'll need. 
1 pound ground beef 
4 fresh potatoes 
1 fresh onion 
sweet relish 
catsup 
mustard 
1 tomato 

Now, here's how to enter this data in 
a statement. 

155 DATA X, HAMBURGER DINNER, 
1,LB(S) 

GR- BEEF, 4, POTATO (5) ,1, ONION 

(S) ,0, SWEET 
RELISH, 0, CATSUP, 0, MUSTARD, 1, 

TOMATO(S) , , 

The (S) is used to make plurals easier 
and can be omitted. Also, to save 
memory, you can abbreviate as much or 



21 6 THE RAINBOW April 1 986 



Tabled 

Data Element Requirements 

DRTfl >S Indicates meal title. 

Precede all meal titles 
with 'X', as in lines 
1560, 1570, et6. S 

DATA Indicates section ti- 

tles. Precede all sec- 
tion titles with 'Y', as 
in lines 1550, 1760, 
etc. 

Double commas Indicates end of in- 
gredients for specified 
meal. All meal lines 
should end with („). 
Do not put a space 
between commas. 
Dfifei ENb Place the word END 
^ at the end of selecta- 

ble items. Any data 
after this word are 
treated as miscellane- 
ous items. See Line 
1880. 

DATA LAST Place the word LAST 

at the end of dinner 
section of DATA state- 
ments. See Line 1710. 

DATA STOP Place the word STOP 

at the end of com- 
plete data listing. If 
this word is omitted, 
you will get an OD 
Error when you run 
the program. 



as little as desired. Using the abbrevia- 
tion "GR." instead of the whole word 
"ground" saves three bytes. Notice that 
sweet relish, catsup and mustard are all 
preceded by a zero (0). These items 
require less than an entire jar, so check 
your supply to see if you need them. 
Otherwise, cross them off the list. 

The program requires three other 
special words to function properly; they 
are shown in Table 1. The word LAST 
is used to indicate the last of the dinner 
DATA statements. In my program, Line 
1710 does this. Any DATA statements 
after Line 1710 can't be chosen auto- 
matically. 

The word END is used to indicate the 
end of the selectable menu items (see 
Line 1880). Any DATA statements after 
this element are treated as miscellane- 
ous items. All miscellaneous items can 
be entered under titles in any manner 
you wish. Use an asterisk (*) in titles as 
shown in Line 1890 if you want these 
titles to be printed in large font. Any 



miscellaneous items that also appear in 
the first part of the program data are 
compared before being printed. 

The last data element in the program 
must be STOP (see Line 2010). This 
element tells the program not to look 
for more data. If you follow the instruc- 
tions, you can add as many titles and 
selections as needed. 

Using Special Codes 

For those with a Line Printer VII, this 
program works as listed. For those who 
have a different printer, I have used 
control codes for all printer functions so 
you can change them as needed. Lines 
230 and 240 set the codes for the LP VII. 
Use Table 2 to determine the function 
of each code. If you have a printer that 
automatically returns to small font at 
the end of a printed line (such as Epson 
MX-80), delete PO$ from Line 230. It 
isn't necessary to delete it anywhere else 
in the program. 

You can also add the speed-up POKEs 
to the program to decrease the execu- 
tion time. However, if speed is not too 
important or if you aren't using a disk, 
I don't recommend the high-speed POKE 
because it causes too much internal heat 
to build up. 

Now Let's Try the Program 

After you have keyed in the listing 
and saved a copy to tape or disk, run 
the program. A program menu appears 
and youll be prompted to enter one of 
five choices: 

1 . Auto dinner selection 

2. Enter your selections 

3. List menu w/o ingredients 

4. List menu w/ ingredients 

5. Print shopping list 

Entering a '3' produces a printout 
similar to Sample Printout 1. It is a list 
of all menu items without ingredients. 
This list is used to make menu selections 
when running the program. Now let's 
discuss the remaining options. 

Auto Dinner Selection 

If you choose number T on the 
menu, the program prompts you to 
enter the number of dinners you want 
selected. This is a great option if your 
family can't agree on what to have for 
dinner. After entering the number of 
dinners, you're free to leave the compu- 
ter for a while and do something else. 
The computer randomly chooses the 
dinners, prints a complete menu with 
the ingredients for each dinner, then 
returns to the program menu. 

The auto option chooses the dinners 



from the dinner section of the program 
only. Originally, I had the program 
automatically select dinners, salads and 
desserts. This created problems when 
the program chose hot dogs and french 
fries for dinner, shrimp cocktail for the 
salad and chocolate mousse for dessert 
— these selections somehow didn't seem 
to go together. You can let the computer 
select your dinners, but youll have to 
select your own salads and desserts 
when it finishes. 



Entering your Selections 

The second choice on the program 
menu lets you select your own dinners. 
This is the option you will most likely 
use. You can use it before, after or 
without the auto dinner selection. The 
program prompts you for the number 
of entries you wish to make. A FOR/ 
NEXT loop is used to assign the entries 
to variable names. You enter the 
number of the dinner, salad, dessert or 
other item; not the item name. This is 
the number shown in Sample Printout 
1. The program prints a list of your 
selections with all the required ingre- 
dients, then returns to the program 
menu. 

Listing the Menu 

Entering a '3' or '4' from the program 
menu lists each dinner, salad, dessert or 
other menu item with its assigned 
number. For the purpose of this article, 
IH refer to all menu items as dinners. 
Option 3 (Sample Printout 1) lists the 
menu without the ingredients, while 
Option 4 (Sample Printout 2) lists all the 
ingredients below the dinner. These lists 
are used to determine the dinner 



Table 2 
Printer Control Codes 

PO$ ASCII Code 30 — Sets the 
printer to normal font 
(standard print size). 

Pl$ ASCII Code 3 1 — Sets the 

printer to large font (dou- 
ble width print). 

RTS ASCII Code 26 — Carriage 
return without line feed. 

LIS ASCII Code 10 — Carriage 
return with line feed. 

L2$ ASCII Codes 2 and 10 ^ 

Cause double line feed. 

L3$ ASCII Codes 3 and 10 — 

Cause triple line feed. 

(L2$ and L3$ can be replaced with 

ASCII Code 12 if your printer allows 

form feeds.) 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 217 



Sample Printout 1 

^c^c^*c^#C5*c MR I N COURSE DIMMERS **:*^#c 



4* , DEEP *JM PRSTR 

## 2 MERTBHLL SHHDW ICHES 

3 CH W CKEN OR I ENTRL 
« 4^ITRL|flH BEEF SANDWICHES 
** S RORST BEEF DINNER 
# S CH I CKEN KIEV 

** & CRERMED TUNR ON TORST 

4* e PEPPER STERK 

*# 9 POT RORST DINNER 

4r;%'W- ; ifcOPPY : JOES 

% 11 CHICKEN ENCH ILRDRS 

4* 12 CHICKEN CRSSEROLE 

4* : % 3 SPARE R IBS 

^fr^X^r^FIN I COTT I 

4* X& CHILI COH CRRNE 



number mentioned earlier and to verify 
that the dinner ingredients are correct. 

Printing the Shopping List 

The last choice on the program menu 
prints the entire shopping list (Sample 
Printout 3). Before printing the list, the 
program scans it and totals identical 
ingredients so they will only be printed 
once. This takes a little while, so you can 
go find other things to do. If you wish, 
you can change Line 940 to read: 940 
GOTO 1280. 



The shopping list is automatically 
printed after completing your selections 
and the computer has totaled them. 
This method saves a lot of time. 

The shopping list is printed in two 
sections. The first section is the list of 
ingredients for the dinners you or the 
computer have chosen. Duplicate items 
are only printed once, but the total is 
correct for the amount required for all 
dinners. The second section of the 
shopping list is all the miscellaneous 
items that will be printed every week. 





Sample Printout 2 


DINNEI 


R MENU 


# © Rl 


ERRER STERK 




1 LBCS* CUBE STEAK 
1 BELL PEPPER* S> 




8 GREEN ONION* S> 




fcTOMRTCKSX 




i CRMS) BEEF BULLION SOUP 




SOY SAUCE 




CORN STARCH 




S&SMflLL PKCCS-) RICE 



Sample Printout 3 

UPPLIES 



^ttCttcac HOUSEHOLD 

LAUNDRY DETERGENT 
DISHWASHER DETERGENT 
DISH DETERGENT <PRLMOL.TVE> 
AJAX CLEANER 
FABRIC SOFTENER 

MCXCXCXCXC BRKING SUPPLIES 5*: 5#C 5#«tC 5»C 

CAKE MIXES 

CHERRY PIE FILLING 

PIE CRUST MIX OR SHELLS 

CRIC30 SHORTENING 

CRISCO OIL 

PEANUT OIL 



You must compare this section of the list 
with what you have on hand and cross 
off anything that is not needed. 

1 If you print a shopping list and wish 
to add to it, choose T or '2' when the 
program menu appears. Make your new 
selections and print a new shopping list. 
You will have a complete list with the 
new dinner ingredients listed at the end 
of the list. 

Note that the first part of the shop- 
ping list contains only the items re- 
quired to prepare the dinners, salads, 
desserts or other selections chosen. The 
last part contains all items you want 
printed every week. If you wish to delete 
this option, don't enter any data using 
the DATA Y option. The program will 
then only print the selected items. 

Memory Requirements 

The amount of free memory after the 
program is loaded determines how 
much data the program can store. To 
use all the memory available, clear the 
graphics memory pages. For disk users, 
type the following: 
POKE 25, 14: POKE 3584,0: NEW 

ENTER 

For non-disk users, type: 

POKE 25, G: NEW ENTER 

After deleting all remarks, unneces- 
sary spaces and DATA statements, a 16K 
. disk system has about 9,865 bytes of free 
memory and a 32K disk system has 
about 26,249 free bytes available. A 
non-disk system has 2K bytes more free 
memory because the disk operating 
system (DOS) uses 2K. You can change 
the DIM statements in Line 270 to reflect 
what you need. To do this, type: 

RUN 5000 ENTER 
This program line counts the number of 
valid data elements and prints the 
dimension size on the screen. 

That's All, Folks! 

Shoplist is not a recipe program, but 
a shopping-list program. It can help 
plan your meals and grocery budget. 
When entering data elements, figure the 
amount of ingredients normally used to 
feed your family. We have a family of 
four, so each dinner is listed with the 
ingredients required to feed four people. 
If you're planning to have guests for 
dinner one evening, enter the dinner 
menu two or three times, as necessary, 
to increase the size of the dinner. 

After you've used this program for a 
week or two, it will make your grocery 
shopping easier — you won't have to 
return to the store for things forgotten! 
That alone should be worth the time 
and effort required to type it in. □ 



218 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



wir as 



.10 

..1 1620 77 

147 1680 195 

.75 1780 232 

21 

80 

END 104 



300 .... 
480 .... 
700 ... . 
920 .... 

1120 10 1860 

1320 120 1940 

1530 0 



The listing: SHOPLIST 



10j8 • 



MENU & SHOPPING LIST 



BY DENNIS WE IDE 
COPYRIGHT (1985) 



CONTROL CODES 



11)3 • 

120 ' 

13)3 ' 
140 ' 

15) 3 CLS: PRINTS 3 4, "DINNER MENU & 
SHOPPING LIST" 

16) 3 PRINT@1)34 , "BY DENNIS WE IDE" 

17) 3 PRINT@169 , "COPYRIGHT 1985" 

18) 3 

19) 3 
2)30 

21) 3 

22) 3 

23) 3 P)3$=CHR$ (3)3) :P1$=CHR$ (31) :RT 
$=CHR$(26) 

24) 3 L1$=CHR$(10) : L2$=STRING$ (2 , 1 
)3 ) : L3 $=STRING$ ( 3 , 1)3 ) 

25) 3 READ B$:IF B$="X" THEN DN=DN 
+1 

26) 3 IF B$» 11 LAST "THEN 270 ELSE 25 
0 

270 DIM MU$(7):DIM IT$(210):DIM 
IT(210) :DIM RD(7) 
280 1 
290 • 

300 ' PROGRAM MENU 

310 • 
320 • 

330 Ql-0 : CLS : PRINT : PRINT 

340 PRINTTAB(2) "DINNER MENU & SH 

OPPING LIST" 

350 PRINTTAB(8) "MAIN PROGRAM MEN 
U» 

3 60 PRINT: PRINTTAB(2 ) "1. AUTO DIN 
NER SELECTION" 

3 70 PRINTTAB ( 2 ) " 2 . ENTER YOUR SEL 
ECTION" 

380 PRINTTAB (2) "3 .LIST MENU W/O 
INGREDIENTS" 

390 PRINTTAB (2) "4. LIST MENU W/IN 
GREDIENTS" 

400 PRINTTAB (2) "5. PRINT SHOPPING 

LIST" 
410 PRINT : PRINT : Z=0 
420 INPUT" ENTER ONE OF THE AB 



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April 1986 THE RAINBOW 219 



OVE" ?M 


84 0 CLS ! PRINT! PRINTTAR M \ "HERE 1 S 


rx £* X X X pv • XxHi O X wXxHi 


YOUR PRINTER COPY" 


42 2 TP M^l HP M^R THFN 310 

11 1'IM VIj**J XilXLlN J 


850 PRTNT#-2 PlS:TjlS # POR RR=1 TO 

O *JW XTX\ Xli 1 ]f £* f XT X <y f XJ X • X V-/X\ X\X\ X lv 


423 IP P9=0 AND M=5 THEN 330 

TJ X* «J X X A — ' JL/ nil L/ 11 llllJll J J u 


3 

*J 


494. TP M<"} THFN PQ = 1 

4r t 11 l iS J J. 11 Hi IN XT27~ X 


860 PRTNTi — 2 "DTNNEP MENTT'^PTfi" - 

O VJ p XT X\ X IN X 7f ^ / U X IN li Xj X\ 11 XJ IN VJ / X\ 1 y f • 


43 0 ON M fiOTH R00 6 60 1 1 11010 

*i JJt/ vli 1*1 V7VJ XV-/ -jpp J \j\jyj i A. J.p p f A. ±.p p f 


NPYT RR 

liXiAl X\X\ 


1280 


870 FOR X=l TO ND • RESTORE • 7=0 

o f p x wx\ *\ x x v>/ 11 u • x\xj u x vjimj • xi ^^p 


44 0 GOTO 3 3 0 

i "X X/ V X V +J *J JJ 


880 READ AS: IF AS="X" THEN Z=Z+1 

\j p i\uni/ *iy • xx ny xiiuii xi xi ■ x 


45(3 1 


890 IF A$=MU$(X) THEN 9130 ELSE 9 


46,0 1 


3J3 


470 1 AUTO DINNER SELECTION 


900 PRINT#-2,L2$;P1$:F0R RR=1 TO | 


Aft 0 • 
ft O 


3 


A Q 01 I 

** y )y 


910 PRINT#-2,"# ,, Z;MU$(X) ;RT$; 


R0101 PT.Q • PPQTOPP • P' TNT • PPTNTTAR ( R 
Opp v^XjO • XxHi O X VJX\JCj • Jr.. iXiN X « 1 I\lii X InD ^ *J 


920 NEYT PR'PPTNT#— 2 P06 • T,1 6 • ftO<3 

c»p iiuAi xvrv. • xtxvxxn x ft £t f ±p V / XJX " wvu 


\ HATTTO HTNNPP CSPt^PT'TnU 11 
) nlllU UXlNlN JLXx OJLJj.vI* X XVJJN 


TTR 1000 
vj xj j-ppp 


R1 0 PPTMT* PPTMT 

O ±.p rl\lli X • lr Xx X IN X 


9 30 TP AS="END" THEN NEYT Y PT.9P 

Z/ *j p Xx A iy XjINXJ XXXXdXN IN Xj /i X XjXjOXj 


R2 0 TNPTTT" PNTPP NTTMRFP OP DTNN 

*J Ct xj llilU X Hi IN X J_jX\ li VJIIXjXjXX vl UXlNlN 


880 

\j \j p 




940 GOTO 330 


R10I PPTNT • PPTMTTAR ( 7 ^ "ONP MOMPNT 
D 3jj XrXxXXN X • rl\llN X IxiD \ r ^ WIN JL ITivJXTiJLlN X 


950 1 

-/ «j p 


PT PAQP \ " 
JrxjxVnp JL • 


960 1 

vj p 


R40 PPTNTTAR^^ "TWF POMPTTTFP T^ 

ZjHp XtxxXIN X X AD ^ «J ) XxlJL UvriJTU 1 JuA XO 


970 1 LIST INGREDIENTS ON SE 

-J 1 p XJX kJ X Xli V31\1jL/X1j11 X U nJXN kJ 111 


QPT PpfTTKr^ 1 ' 
O JL XjJL V*. X XlN O 


LECTION 

XJXJX^X J. VII 


RR0 PPTNTTAR f 1 0 ^ "VOTTP DTNNFPS " 

J J l/ XT XXXIN X InD I Itf j JL vUA JJllili£iI\U • 


980 1 

~* \J p 


R£01 POP Y=1 TO NH 


990 1 

z? z?p 


R70 PD (Y } =RND fDN^ 

*J l jJ XxU \ A j XXX 1 1J ^ xjin y 


1000 READ BIS B2S-IF RlS="" THPN 

p p p imj/iu xjx >y ^ xjx> y i ii xj x vp~ x xixjIN 


R80 POP Y=l TO ND # TF V=y THEN 60 

mj OjU X vA X X 1 v li 1/ i ± £ X J\ X llXJli VJ p«/ 


RETURN 


0 

a' 


1010 F1=F1+1 • IT f'FI i =VAL ^Rlfi^ • TTfi 

j~p -t- p x x x xix • xx ^ x x y v inxj ^ xj x y ^ • 11 y 


R90 TP PD Y^ =PD f THPN PD^Yi=PN 

~J Z? p XX XxXJ XxXJ \ J- J XXXXLXN XxXJ \ J\ J XVI i 


^pi^ =R2S 

l X X J XJX* y 


D(DNi:GOTO 580 


1020 IF VALfBl6j>0 THEN 1040 

ju xs xx v nu ^ u ±y ^ *^ Jt/ x i ixjxi x x/ *x iy 


600 NEXT Y X:GOTO 73 0 


1030 PRINT#-2 TAB M 2^ • R2 6 • GOTO 1 

-*~p *J p XX\ XXI X 7f £i i XXIJJ l X £* 1 f XJ £t <-J * wv X VJ X 


£1 01 • 


00 0 

ppp 


620 1 


1040 PRINT&-2 TABM0 \ ?B1$" "R2$» 

x p *X ^L/ XT X\ X Xl X 7T f AXJ 1 X X/ J / XJ X up XJ £t up • 


63 0 • SET,EOT YOTTP DTNNEPS 


GOTO 1000 

VJ w X >«/ X X/ X/ 


6 A 0 v 


1 050 1 


6 R0 1 


1060 1 


660 CT.S • PPTNT • PPTNTTAR ^ -S ^ "ENTPP 

\J \J JU V— XJO • XT X\X li X • XTXXXIN X X AiJ \ »J J Hi IN X HiX\ 


1070 1 "LIST SET.ECTTONS 

±p t p XJX u 1 kJ Xj XJXj vll VJIN uJ 


VOTTP QPT.PPTTOMQ II 
XvJUxv P JL XjJL X X VJiN D 


1080 1 


D / jO xrJ\xIN x • xrX\XlN X 


1090 1 


6ft 0 TNPTTT 11 PNTPP NTTMRPP OP ^PT.P 

XlNXrUX X-i IN X X-i X\ IN U 11 Xj X-i xv UI OJLJjJL 


1100 CLS I RESTORE • PRINT • PPTNTTAR ( 

XX^u/ p wXlu • XX Xj X vJXXXj • XTXxXXN X • XTXxXXN X XiMXJ I 


PTTOMQil •MTi 
V^XXvJInO / in u 


6^ "PRINTER POPY OP DATA" 

VJ f XT XV.XXN X XjX\ Uvi 1 VJX 1/Al A 


6Q0 POP X=1 TO ND 

VJ jJ X V_/X\ i\ — X X W IN X/ 


1110 READ AS! IF AS="Y" THPN Ol =0 

xxx p i\uni/ up • xx in up j^ x 1 1 Hi IN x \£ 


700 PPTNTTAR ( 1 \ "PNTPP SPT.ECTTON 

1 JJ JJ XTXxXlN X lAu \ ' ) -L XwXx IJXmJ 1 1 jV~» X XVh/XN 


1+1: GOTO 1170 


4 ii • • tnpttt pn/yi 

7f / • X IN Xr U X X\X/ \ A ^ 


1120 IF AS="Y" THEN 1130 PT.SP 11 

J, J. dp XX *1 up X X XX Hi IN X X *J p Hi XJuJ Hi XX 


710 MPYT Y 

i JLjJ INJLAX j\ 


60 
op 


HO (A PT Q • PPTKTT 1 • PPTUTTAP ( 1 \ limsTP "MC\ 
f £,p v^XjD • xr JxXIn X • xrKXiN X XriO \ t ) VJIN JL riU 


1130 PPAD R$ • PPTMTJi — 0 P1<«T^< 

X X -J p ALnU Dy i XT XxXlN X *ff x% ^ Jr X up / XjO up 


MPKTT PT.PACJP 1 •! 
XXIJL JM X Jr XjJLriO JL • 


114 0 POP PP=1 TO 3*PPTMTii — 9 R< *P 

X X *± p X IVTV. - ' X X \J «J • XT X\X li 1 |f £ / XJ up / X\ 


7^01 POP Y=T fPO KTFI • PTTQT'OP'R 1 • 7 — (A 
f J JO r VJXv A — X 1U IN JJ « J\ JL D X \J J\ JL • 4 — 


T$ J • NPYT PP 

X u* / • liXtAX Xvjtx 


7 / fll PPATi R^l • TP P£=HYH TWPKT 7=74-1 
f *±p XVJLAIJ D9 * li ID y — A X ilJLiN xi— ZiTl 


1150 PPTNTJt — 2 P0S • T.I < • nOTO 11101 

X X «Jpv XT XXX IN X 7f d f irp ^ / ±J±i? • wv X VjF x X XjO 


7R0i TP P^i— "PKTnil TWITKr 7 Q 01 
if Dy- JLiNJJ IJlJLiN top 


1160 TP AS="PND" THPN 330 PT.QP 1 

llOjW XX iTXup— XLXNXJ" XJxJLXN OOp JLJjOJL x 


TP PH ^ - 7 rpPTTKr 7 7 01 PT CP 7 A 01 
/Op XT JXJLJ N A ^ — XJiJLiN lip JLIjOJL / *±p 


110 

XX// 


7701 PPATi A ^ • MTT^ ( Y^ s=A < 
lip JxJLriU ny • lYLU y ^ A J "Ay 


1170 READ R6*PRTNT#— 2 PlS«"£"*01 

■A. J- t p XXXjAXJ XJ up • XT XXX IN Xff £ ^ XT ly / 7f / VjX 


78 0 NPYT Y 

/Op IN XL AX A 


;B$ ;P0S ;LlS 


7Q 01 • 


1180 TF M=4 THPN PPAD R$ P$ PT.QP 
x x vj pv xx 1 1 tc x xxxjin xxxjiriu H>up f v*. up XL XjO XL 


ft 0101 1 
Opp 


1110 

X X XpV 


810 1 "HAPHPOPV OP nTMMPP QPT. 

O Xp nfiX\L'L.Url UI X/X1N IN XLX\ OHiXj 


119 0 TP Cfi="" THEN PPTNT& — 2 T,2S» 

p XX V* up X XI Hi IN XTXXXIN X 7f f XjxI up • 


ECTION 


GOTO 111J3 


820 1 

w JJ 


1200 IF VAL(B$}>0 THEN 1210 ELSE 


83jZI • 


1220 



220 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



12 10 PRINT#-2,TAB(10) B$" "C$:GOT 
0 1180 

1220 PRINT#-2,TAB(12)C$:GOTO 118 
J3 

1230 



PRINT SHOPPING LIST 



1240 
1250 
1260 
1210 

1280 CLS : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 1 ) "HERE 
COMES YOUR SHOPPING LIST" 
1290 F1=F1+1:READ A$:IF A$="STOP 
" THEN 1310 

1300 IT$(Fl)=A$:GOTO 1290 
1310 FOR X=l TO Fl 

1320 FOR Y=l TO Fl 

1230 IF Y=X THEN 1350 

1340 IF IT$(Y)=IT$ (X) THEN IT(X) 

=IT(X)+IT(Y) :IT(Y)=0:IT$(Y)="" 

1350 NEXT Y,X 

1360 PRINT#-2,P1$;L3$;L3$:F0R RR 
=1 TO 3 

1310 PRINT#-2, "SHOPPING LIST";RT 

$;:NEXT RR 

1380 PRINT#-2,P0$;L2$ 
1390 FOR X=l TO Fl 

1400 IF LEFT$(IT$(X) ,1)="*" THEN 
1460 

141)3 IF IT$(X)>"" THEN 1420 ELSE 
1490 

1420 IF IT(X)>0 THEN PRINT#-2,IT 

(X) ;IT$(X) 

1430 IF IT$(X)="Y" THEN 1490 
1440 IF IT(X)=<0 THEN PRINT#-2,T 
AB(3) ;IT$(X) 
1450 GOTO 1490 

1460 PRINT#-2,Pl$:FOR RR=1 TO 3 
1470 PRINT#-2,IT$(X) ;RT$; :NEXT R 
R 

1480 PRINT#-2,P0$ 
1490 NEXT X:GOTO 3 30 
1500 " 
1510 
1520 
1530 
1540 

1550 DATA Y, ********* MAIN COURS 
E DINNERS ******** 
1560 DATA X,DEEP DISH PASTA, 1,JA 
R(S) SPAGHETTI SAUCE , . 5 , LB (S ) GR 
. BEEF, 1, BELL PEPPER (S) , 1 , ONION ( 
S),1,JAR(S) MUSHROOMS, 1, PKG (S) E 
LBOW MACARONI, 8, OZ. MO ZZ ERE LLA CH 
EESE, , 

1570 DATA X, MEATBALL SANDWICHES, 
1,JAR(S) PREGO SAUCE W/MUSHROOMS 
,1,LB(S) GR. BEEF,8,OZ. MOZZEREL 
LA CHEESE , 1 , PKG ( S ) STEAK BUNS , , 
1580 DATA X, CHICKEN ORIENTAL, 3, B 



RECIPE DATA 



ONED CHICKEN BREASTS , 2 , CAN ( S ) OR 
IENTAL VEGETABLES, 2, CHICKEN BULL 
ION CUBE(S) ,0,SOY SAUCE , 0 , CORN S 
TARCH, 1, BELL PEPPER (S) , 1, SMALL P 
KG(S) RICE,, 

1590 DATA X, ITALIAN BEEF SANDWIC 
HES, 1, LEFTOVER BEEF ROAST, 1, BELL 
PEPPER (S ), 1, BEEF BULLION CUBE(S 
) , 1 , TSP ( S ) ITALIAN SEASONING , 1 , P 
KG(S) STEAK BUNS, , 

1600 DATA X, ROAST BEEF DINNER, 4, 
LB(S) ROAST BEEF, 4, POTATO (S) ,2, P 
KG(S) FRE SH/ FRO ZEN VEGETABLES, , 
1610 DATA X, CHICKEN KIEV, 8, BONED 

CHICKEN BREASTS, 1, PKG (S) DRIED 
BREAD CRUMBS, 1, EGG(S) ,0, FLOUR, 3, 

GREEN ONION ( S ) , 0 , CHIVES , 0 , PARSLE 
Y,0, BUTTER, , 

1620 DATA X, CREAMED TUNA ON TO AS 
T,2,CAN(S) TUNA, 0, MILK, 0, FLOUR ,0 
, SLICED BREAD, 1, PKG (S) FROZEN PE 
AS ,0, SALT ,0, BLACK PEPPER,, 
1630 DATA X, PEPPER STEAK, 1 , LB (S) 
CUBE STEAK, 1, BELL PEPPER (S) , 8 ,G 
REEN ONION (S) , 1, TOMATO (S) , 1, CAN ( 
S) BEEF BULLION SOUP, 0, SOY SAUCE 
,0,CORN STARCH, 1, SMALL PKG(S) RI 
CE, , 

1640 DATA X,POT ROAST DINNER, 4, L 
B(S) CHUCK ROAST, 4, POTATO (S) ,8, C 
ARROT(S) ,2,ONION(S) , , 
1650 DATA X, SLOPPY JOES, 1, PKG (S) 
SLOPPY JOE MIX,1,LB(S) GR. BEEF 
,1,PKG(S) HAMBURGER BUNS, 1, CAN (S 
) TOMATO PASTE , , 

1660 DATA X, CHICKEN ENCHILADAS, 3 
, BONED CHICKEN BREASTS , 1 , PKG (S) 
CORN TORTILLAS , 1 , ONION ( S ) , 8 , OZ . 
COLBY CHEDDAR CHEESE, 1 , PKG (S) FR 
OZEN GREEN CHILI , 2 , CAN (S) CREAM 
OF CHICKEN SOUP, , 

1670 DATA X, CHICKEN CASSEROLE, 8, 
BONED CHICKEN BREASTS, 1, CAN (S) C 
REAM OF CHICKEN SOUP, 1, BELL PEPP 
ER(S) , l,ONION(S) ,0, WHITE COOKING 
WINE , , 

1680 DATA X, SPARE RIBS, 4, LB (S) P 
ORK SPARERIBS, 1, JAR(S) BARBEQUE 
SAUCE , 2 , FRESH/FROZEN VEGETABLES , 

1690 DATA X , MANICOTTI , 1 , LRGE JAR 
(S) SPAGHETTI SAUCE,8,OZ. RICOTT 
A CHEESE, 8, OZ. MOZZERELLA CHEESE 
,1/2,LB(S) GR. BEEF , 0 , PARSLEY , 1 , 
PKG(S) MANICOTTI NOODLES , 0 , SALT , 
0, BLACK PEPPER, , 

1700 DATA X, CHILI CON CARNE , 1 , LB 
(S) GR. BEEF,2,CAN(S) CHILI BEAN 
S,1,CAN(S) TOMATO SOUP, 1, BELL PE 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 221 



PPER(S) ,0, CELERY, 0, RED CHILI POW 
DER,0,SALT, , 
1710 DATA LAST 

172) 3 DATA Y, ***** BREAKFAST & LU 
NCH ***** 

173) 3 DATA X, CEREAL BREAKFAST , 1 , B 
OX(S) CEREAL, )3 , MILK, )3 , SUGAR, )3 , BR 
EAD, , 

174) 3 DATA X,EGGS & BACON , 8 , EGG ( S 
),1,LB(S) BACON,8,SLICE(S) BREAD 

175) 3 DATA X, FRENCH TOAST, 8 , SLICE 
(S) BREAD, 1,LB(S) BACON, )3 , MILK, 3 
,EGG(S) , 0 , CINNAMON , 0 , SUGAR , , 

176) 3 DATA Y, ********* SALADS *** 
****** 

177) 3 DATA X, STUFFED TOMATOES, 6, T 
OMATO(S) ,1,CAN(S) TUNA , 0 , MAYONNA 
ISE , 2 , CELERY , )3 , SWEET RELISH , , 

178) 3 DATA X,TUNA SALAD, 1, CAN (S) 
TUNA , 1 , ONION ( S ) , 0 , SWEET RELISH , )3 
, MAYONNAISE, )3, PARSLEY, 1,PKG(S) E 
LBOW MACARONI , , 

179) 3 DATA X, CHICKEN SALAD, 1, CAN ( 
S ) CHICKEN , 1 , ONION ( S ) , )3 , SWEET RE 
LISH , )3 , MAYONNAISE , 2 , CELERY , 1 , PKG 
(S) ELBOW MACARONI , , 

180) 3 DATA X, POTATO SALAD , 4 , POTAT 
O(S) ,)3, SWEET RELISH, 1, ONION (S) ,2 
, CELERY , 4 , GREEN ONION ( S ) , )3 , OLIVE 
S , )3 , MAYONNAISE , )3 , MUSTARD , , 

181) 3 DATA X, CARROT & RAISIN SALA 
D, 8, CARROT (S) ,1, SMALL PKG (S) RAI 
SINS , )3 , MAYONNAISE , )3 , SUGAR, , 

182) 3 DATA X, SHRIMP COCKTAIL, 16 , F 
RESH SHRIMP , 0 , CATSUP , )3 , HORSERADI 
SH,)3, WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE,, 

183) 3 DATA Y, ********* DESSERTS * 

******* 

1840 DATA X, BREAD PUDDING, 6 , SLIC 
E(S) BREAD,4,EGGS,0,MILK,0,SUGAR 
, )3, VANILLA, )3, SALT, 1, SMALL PKG(S) 
RAISINS , )3 , CINNAMON , )3 , NUTMEG , , 
1850 DATA X, APPLE CRISP, 1, CAN (S) 
APPLES IN WATER, 0, FLOUR, 0, BROWN 
SUGAR , )3 , CINNAMON , 0 , NUTMEG , )3 , SAL 
T,)3, BUTTER, , 

1860 DATA X, WATERMELON FRUIT BAS 
KET, 1, WATERMELON (S) ,1, HONE YDEW M 
ELON ( S ) , 1 , CANTALOPE ( S ) , 1 , PINEAPP 
LE(S) ,2,PINT(S) STRAWBERRIES , 1 , L 
B(S) GREEN GRAPES,, 
1870 DATA X, TRIFLE, 1, PKG (S) VANI 
LLA PUDDING/PIE FILLING, 1, PKG (S) 
JELLY ROLL, 1, PINT (S) WHIPPING C 
REAM, , 

188)3 DATA END 

1890 DATA Y,***** BATHROOM ITEMS 
*****, BATH SOAP, TOOTHPASTE (CRE 



ST) , HAIR SPRAY , SPRAY DEODORANT, S 
TICK DEODORANT , BATHROOM TISSUE ( 
TOILET PAPER) 

1900 DATA Y,***** HOUSEHOLD SUPP 
LIES *****, LAUNDRY DETERGENT, DIS 
HWASHER DETERGENT, DISH DETERGENT 

( PALMOLIVE ) , AJAX CLEANER , FABRIC 

SOFTENER 

1910 DATA Y,***** KITCHEN SUPPLI 
ES *****, GARBAGE BAGS , ALUMINUM F 
OIL, HANDI -WRAP, WAXED PAPER, ZIP-L 
OCK SANDWICH BAGS, PAPER TOWELS 
1920 DATA Y,***** DRINKS *****, S 
OFT DRINKS, MILK, FROZEN JUICES (0 
RANGE), HI-C SOFT DRINKS , CAPRI SU 
N SOFT DRINKS, COFFEE (FOLGER'S D 
RIP) 

1930 DATA Y,***** SNACKS *****, P 
OTATO CHIPS, ICE CREAM, POPCYCLES , 
POPCORN (CRACKER JACK) , HOSTESS C 
UPCAKES , LITTLE DEBBIE CUPCAKES 
1940 DATA Y,***** SPICES *****, V 
ANILLA EXTRACT, MAPLEINE FLAVORIN 
G , POWDERED SUGAR , SUGAR , FLOUR , SAL 
T, BLACK PEPPER, GARLIC SALT 
1950 DATA Y ,***** BAKING SUPPLIE 
S *****, CAKE MIXES, CHERRY PIE FI 
LLING, PIE CRUST MIX OR SHELLS, CR 
ICSO SHORTENING, CRISCO OIL,PEANU 
T OIL 

1960 DATA Y ,***** RELISHES & CHE 
ESES *****, SWISS CHEESE, CATSUP, M 
USTARD, PICKLES, VELVEETA CHEESE, A 
MERI CAN CHEESE , JALAPENO CHEESE, F 
ROZEN GREEN CHILI , COTTAGE CHEESE 
1970 DATA Y,***** PET SUPPLIES * 
****,DOG FOOD (CANNED), DOG FOOD 
(DRY), CAT FOOD (DRY), CAT LITTER, 

DOG TREATS 
1980 DATA Y,***** BREAKFAST FOOD 
S *****, MUFFIN MIX, FROZEN WAFFLE 
S , POPTARTS , WHEATIES CEREAL , FRUIT 

& FIBER CEREAL, LUCKY CHARMS CER 
EAL, CHEERIOS CEREAL, EGG (S) 
1990 DATA Y,***** MISC FOOD ITEM 
S *****, CANNED FRUIT , MARACHINO C 
HERRIES , COOKIES , CUP-A-SOUP , FRUIT 

ROLL , JELLO , LUNCHEON MEATS , PEANU 
T BUTTER, JELLY, BUTTER, WHITE BREA 
D,RYE BREAD 

2000 DATA Y ,***** FRESH FRUITS * 
**** , BANANAS , APPLES , ORANGES , PEAC 
HES , PEARS 
2010 DATA STOP 

5000 READ A$:IF LEFT$ (A$ , 1) ="*" 

OR A$=" M OR A$=" " OR A$="X" OR 

A$=»Y" THEN 5000 ELSE X=X+1:IF A 

$="LAST" THEN PRINT X/2+1 ELSE 5 
000 



222 THE RAINBOW April 1986 




The DS-69A is the best video digitizer available for your COCO at any price. This new, turbocharged version of our 
original DS-69 Digisector allows your 64K COCO to see clearly into the world of any television picture. 



SPEED! 

PRECISION! 

RESOLUTION! 

Compabitibility 

Compactness 

Convenience 

Ease of Use 



The fastest — 8 images per second! 

The highest — 64 levels of true grey scale! 

The finest — 256 x 256 picture elements! 

Use with a black and white or color camera, a VCR or tuner. 

Self contained in a plug in Rompack. 

Use with a Y-cable, Multi-Pak, PBJ Bus or plug directly into the cartridge slot. 
Software on disk will get you up and running fast! 



POWERFUL C-SEE ™ SOFTWARE 

C-SEE is the menu driven software package included with your DS-69A. Available on disk or cassette, it provides 
lightning fast 5 level digitizing to the screen, high precision 16 level digitizing for superb hard copy printout and 
simple keyboard or joystick control of brightness and contrast. Or call our driver routines from your own Basic 
program for easy 64 level random access digitizing. Pictures taken by the DS— 69A may be saved on disk or 
cassette by C-SEE and then edited with COCO MAX, MAGIGRAPH or GRAPHICOM for special effects. Any of the 
popular printers may be used to obtain printouts of images digitized by the DS-69A. 

ONE YEAR WARRANTY 

DS-69A Digisector & C-SEE III Software $149.95 

OR your DS-69 & $ 59.95 

MAGIGRAPH Graphics Editor on disk $ 39.95 



DS-69 DIGISECTOR " 

THERE'S ONLY ONE BETTER VIDEO DIGITIZER . . . 

And that's the DS-69A. The DS-69 is The Micro Works' original video digitizer, tried and true since 1984. It provides 
almost all the features of the DS-69A and is now available at a new low price. The DS69 features; 

SLUGGISHNESS 2 images per second. Quick enough to freeze all but the fastest moving pictures. 
IMCOMPATIBILITY Brightly colored scenes may be striped when using a color camera. 
INCONVENIENCE Will not work with a Y cable. 

Otherwise, it's a DS-69A. Precision, resolution, compactness, ease of use, software and warranty. 
Except one last thing. 

DS-69 Digisector & C-SEE III Software $ 99.95 

Superb image quality produced by both Digisectors. 




X ■ • ■a 




Screen 




Screen 



Printout 



NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of. your new DS-69A or DS-69 
you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full refund of the purchase price. 
We'll even pay the return shipping. If you can get any of our competitors to give you 
the same guarantee, buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 




Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 




DOWNLOADS 



Deciphering the Mystery 
of the DOS Command 



• / recently bought a disk game from 
Radio Shack. In the loading instructions 
it said, "If you have Disk BASIC Version 
LI (or greater), type: DOS and enter. " I 
looked through the book that came with 
the disk drive, but there was no mention 
of the DOS command. What I want to 
know is what the command does, and how 
can I use it in my programs? 

Tim Jones 
Clinton, LA 

Tim, the DOS command included in 
Disk BASIC 1.1 reads track 34 of the 
diskette in Drive 0. It assumes it is a 
machine language program that boots 
OS-9, but we can fool it to automatically 
execute any program we desire. An excel- 
lent article was written by Roger Schrag, 
entitled "A Special Use for the DOS 
Command." If you can find a copy of the 
November 1984 rainbow, the article 
should be quite helpful, but we'll reprint 
the program for your information. 



1 CLEAR 100J3:CLS 

2 PRINT"AUTO START ON 'DOS'" 

3 PRINT"^================== M 

4 PRINT 

5 PRINT "ENTER ANY COMMAND THAT" 

6 PRINT" YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE" 

7 PRINT "EXECUTED UPON TYPING" 

8 PRINT"IN 'DOS* :" 

9 LINEINPUT B$ 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
25 years through ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
six years ago and he has built several 
68XX systems. 



224 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



1)3 B$=B$+STRING$(255-LEN(B$) ,J3) 

11 FOR X=l TO 64: READ N$ 

12 N=VAL("&H"+N$) 

13 A$=A$+CHR$(N) :CK=CK+N:NEXT 

14 IF CK05775 THEN 39 

15 A$=A$+STRING$ (191,0) 

16 PRINT" INSERT TARGET DISK AND" 

17 LINEINPUT" PRESS ENTER " ;N$ 

18 DSKI$ J3,17,2,C$,D$ 

19 N$«MID$ (C$,67,1) 

20 IF N$<>CHR$(255) THEN 43 

21 E$=STRING$(66,2j31)+CHR$(255) 

22 F$=STRING$(128,255) 

23 DSKO$ p,17,2,E$,F$ 

24 OPEN" D",l, "DOS BOOT" 

25 PRINT#1,A$;CHR$(J3) ; :PUT#1,1 

26 PRINT#1,B$;CHR$(0) ; :PUT#1,2 

27 CL0SE:MID$(C$,67)=CHR$(2j31) 

28 DSKO$ 0,17,2,C$,D$ 

29 PRINT"FUNCTION COMPLETE" 

30 END 

31 DATA 4F,53,00,00,CE,01,6A,37 

32 DATA 12,B7,26,3C,BF,26,3D,8E 

33 DATA 26,1D,BF,01,6B,DC,8A,FD 

34 DATA 26,00, 7E / AC,7C / 0F, 70, AF 

35 DATA E4,BE,26,3F,A6,80,BF,26 

36 DATA 3F,4D,26,0E,B6,26,3C,BE 

37 DATA 26,3D,B7,01,6A,BF,01,6B 

38 DATA 86, 0D, 35,90,00,00,00,27 

39 PRINT" CHECKSUM ERROR — " 

40 PRINT"YOU HAVE ENTERED A" 

41 PRINT "DATA LINE INCORRECTLY" 

42 END 

43 PRINT "THE REQUIRED PORTION" 

44 PRINT"OF THE DISK IS BEING" 

45 PRINT"USED BY A PROGRAM" 

46 PRINT" ALREADY ON THE DISK" 

47 END 



Boot won't Boot 



• / recently purchased Version 01.00.00 
of the OS-9 operating system and am very 
interested in the assembler contained 
within the System disk. My system works 
fine with the exception of the assembler 
on the DEFS file. I cannot boot the 
assembler. I followed the instructions 
given in the OS-9 Program Development 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

manual exactly (and have tried many 
other tactics also, but I keep getting 
ERROR: CAN'T OPEN). 

Andy Ellinor 
Odessa, FL 

Andy, I think you are trying to assem- 
ble a file that is already in your directory. 
You invoke the assembler by having the 
source file in the working directory. The 
assembled binary file is then written to the 
execution directory (normally the CMDS 
directory). If the name of your source file 
is PROGRAM and you want the as- 
sembled file to be called BINARY, use the 
following command: 

OS9:ASM PROGRAM #16K O=/D0/ 
CMDS/BINARY >/P 

The #16K refers to the amount of 
memory used for the symbol table. The >/ 
P sends a listing to your printer. 



Looking for the Culprit 

• / have a problem with my 'F' version 
Co Co. When I try to CSRVE "filena 
me",fi it sounds like it just writes the 
beginning and the end of the file, and the 
computer skips all the data in between. I 
have Color basic 1.1, Extended BASIC 1.0 
and Disk BASIC 1.1. 

This quirk doesn 't bother me as much 
while programming in BASIC as it does in 
assembly language with my EDTASM+ 
ROM Pak. I can't write an unfinished 
source code onto tape; when typing in an 
assembly language program, I have to 
type it all in one sitting and assemble it 
to tape. If there is an error in the program, 



/ can't correct it If the program is very 
large (like 16 K), I usually get discouraged 
and decide not to waste a lot of time in 
order to type the whole program in again. 

Is the problem in my ROM? If it is, 
which one and where can I buy a replace- 
ment? If the problem is not in my ROM, 
please tell me where the problem is and 
how I can fix it. 

Mike Laster 
Cedar Hill, MO 

It sounds like you have tape recorder or 
relay problems, Mike. When ASCII data 
is encountered it is necessary to turn the 
tape recorder motor off and on between 
data blocks. If your cassette relay and tape 
recorder are working properly, you can 
usually see (or hear) it happening. I used 
to have the same problem when I wasn't 
using a Radio Shack tape recorder. 



Color Distress 

• Since I pur chased my CoCo ('F' board) 
a couple of years ago, there has been a 
problem with display of colors in the 
graphics PMDDEs. I asked Radio Shack to 
correct this when they upgraded to 64K, 
but there was no improvement. I decided 
then that the fault must be in the color 
convergence of the TV set I was using as 
a monitor, but recently I was able to check 
the convergence of the TV with a cross- 
hatch and color bar generator and found 
it was very near perfect. 

As a result, I have to conclude that the 
fault is in the video display generated in 
the CoCo. My conclusion is reinforced by 
the fact that software such as VIP Writer 
that I am now using with Hi- Res display 
works perfectly while using the black-on- 
green option, but blooms terribly with 
offset colors with a white background. 
This 1 attribute to the fact that green is one 
of the three primary colors for the TV 
display, while white requires an overlay of 
the other primary colors, which in this 
case, do not overlay exacly. 

My question is what is the most likely 
culprit in my CoCo video generation 
system and how do I correct it? If it is the 
VDG chip (MC6847), this would be 
relatively easy to replace, but I have a 
feeling the trouble is more of a tuning 
problem. How is the output of the CoCo 
modulated for TV use and could this be 
it? 

George Q. Slocum 
Ossining, NY 

George, the MC6847 produces only 
composite video. Before the signal gets to 



your TV, it is processed by a 1372 mod- 
ulator. The modulator is contained in a 
metal box in the rear center of your PC 
board. I doubt that the problem is in the 
6847, but rather in the RF modulator 
circuit. My old TV-repair days tell me that 
blooming is caused by overloading the 
input to your TV. 



Modem Musing 

• / have been contemplating buying a 
modem. Can you explain the different 
terminology? Will a 300 Baud modem 
work at 1200 Baud? What are the advan- 
tages of 1200 Baud? 

Doris Stewart 
Louisville, KY 

First of all, Doris, you cannot convert 
a 300 Baud modem to 1200 Baud. Bell 
Systems wrote the standards for modems. 
The most common type of modem is 
manufactured to the Bell 103 standard, or 
a 300 Baud, tone-shift telephone interface. 
All a modem does is convert the RS-232 
voltage levels coming from your computer 
to tones that can be transmitted over your 
telephone line. 

There are two common Bell standards 
used for 1200 Baud, the 202 and the 212. 
The standard 1200 Baud modem used for 
BBSs, etc., is the 212, or phase-shift 
standard. All of the modems I have seen 
in the rainbow conform to this stand- 
ard. 

The 201 standard is a tone-shifted 
model, but it's not in common use. You 
could possibly convert a 300 Baud modem 
to use the 201 standard, but then you 
would not be standard anymore! 

As far as whether to buy a 300 or 1200 
Baud modem, I guess the deciding factors 
are whether you are paying for connect 
time, how fast you type and read, and how 
much downloading you do. If your 
answers are "yes," "fast" and "a lot," you 
need a 1200 Baud modem. Otherwise, I 
wouldn't spend the extra money. 



Three Questions about Drive 0 

• I have a 64 K CoCo 2 and have recently 
purchased a Cat. No. 26-3029 Drive 0 with 
Disk BASIC 1.1 from the Radio Shack 
"discontinued" table. I have a few ques- 
tions concerning its operation. 

1)1 have been using utilities out of back 
RAINBOW issues. I have been using the 40- 
track utility out of "Getting on the Right 
Track" [July 1985, Page 26] and also 
ROM RAM from "Downloads" [March 



1984, Page 288 ]. I also have been using the 
POKES from the April 1985 issue [Page 
252] in the " Downloads" column to speed 
up my drive. I can run my drive at six ms 
without ?IO Errors. My question is, is it 
safe for me to run my drive at six ms? 
Could I harm my drive? 

2) My drive becomes very hot. I noticed 
through the vent that two three-pronged 
chips are causing the heat. The board has 
the codes VR1 and VR2 beside the chips. 
What can I do about this excess heat? 

3) 1 have tried to format the back side 
of a Tandy disk. I cut out a notch in the 
side, but when I try to format, I receive 
an ?IO Error. My friends C-64 will for mat 
the back side of a Tandy disk. Is there a 
way to get the CoCo to do it? 

Kevin Gibson 
Lubbock, TX 

Don't worry about your disk drives, 
Kevin. The only thing you do when 
operating them at six ms is speed up the 
stepping motor that positions the heads 
on the correct track. 

As far as the heat near VR1 and VR2, 
these are voltage regulators and they are 
supposed to dissipate heat as part of their 
function. 

When you notched the other side of 
your disks, I'll bet you didn't punch 
another timing hole through the inside of 
the jacket. This hole is approximately !4 
inch in diameter and located about an 
inch from the center of the disk. 

Be very careful not to touch the disk. 
Some people even remove the disk from 
the jacket by peeling back the end flap, 
removing the media and gluing the flap 
back when they are finished. Make your- 
self a template of the notch and the timing 
hole, then turn the disk over. Put the 
notch and the timing hole in the jacket at 
the same locations on the reverse side. 
Most people use an old "paper boy" 
punch for the timing hole. Its size is not 
real critical as long as it is at least as big 
as the previous hole. You should then be 
able to use the reverse side of your disks. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through the MAIL section of our new 
Delphi CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick DELPHI MAIL, then type 
SEND and address TO: DANDOWNARD. 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 225 



"The CBASIC Compiler" 

Now anyone can create fast efficient Machine Language Programs 
Easily and Quickly without having to use an Editor/ Assembler 



CBASIC is a fully integrated, easy to use Basic program Editor and Compiler package. CBASIC is 99% syntax compatible 
with Disk Extended Color Basic programs, so most Basic programs can be loaded and compiled by CBASIC with little 
or no changes required. The compiler is an optomlzing two-pass integer Basic compiler that can convert programs written 
In Disk Extended Color Basic into 100% pure 6809 Machine Language programs which are written directly to disk in a 
LOADM compatible format. 

The programs generated by the compiler can be run as complete stand alone programs. A built-in linker/editor will 
automatically select one and only one copy of each subroutine that is required from the interna! run-time library and insert 
them directly in the program. This eliminates the need for cumbersome, often wasteful separate "run-time" packages. 

CBASIC WAS DESIGNED FOR BOTH 
BEGINNING & ADVANCED USERS 

CBASIC is a Powerful tool for the Beginner or Novice programmer as well as the Advanced Basic or Machine Language 
programmer. The Beginner or Novice programmer can write and compile programs without having to worry about Stack 
Pointers, DP registers, memory allocation, and so on, because CBASIC will handle it for you automatically. All they have 
to do is write their programs using the standard Basic statements and syntax. For the advanced Basic and Machine 
Language programmers, CBASIC will let you take command and control every aspect of your program, even generating 
machine code directly in a program for specialized routines or functions. 

CBASIC adds many features not found in Color Basic, like Interrupt, Reset, and On Error handling. It also has advanced 
programming features that allow machine level control of the Stack and Direct Page registers, variable allocation, automatic 
64K RAM control, program origin and even multiple origins. It can even have machine language code generated within 
a program that executes just like any other Basic program line. 

FULL COMMAND SUPPORT & SPEED 

CBASIC features well over 100 Basic Commands and Functions that fully support Disk, Tape, Printer and Screen 1/ 
O. ft also supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in Extended 
Color Basic, and all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 

CBASIC is FAST. Not only will CBASIC compiled programs execute 10 to 1000 rimes faster than Basic, but the time 
it takes to develop a CBASIC program versus writing a machine language program is much, much shorter. A machine 
language program that might take several months to write and debug could be created using CBASIC in a matter of days 
or hours, even for a well experienced machine language programmer. We had a report from a CBASIC user that claimed 
a Basic program that used to take 3 hours to run, now runs in 7 to 8 minutes". Another user reported a program that 
took 1 to l 1 ^ hours to run in Basic, now runs in 5 to 6 minutes!!! 

MORE THAN JUST A COMPILER 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor. The Editor contained in CBASIC is used to Create 
and/or Edit programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor with functions designed specifically for writing and editing 
Basic programs. It has built-in block Move and Copy functions with automatic program renumbering. Complete, easy to 
use inserting, deleting, extending and overtyping of existing program lines. It is also used for Loading, Saving, Appending 
(merging), Killing disk files and displaying a Disk Directory. It also has automatic line number generation for use when 
creating programs or inserting sequencial lines between existing lines. You can set the printer baud rate and direct normal 
or compiled listings to the printer for hard copy. The built-in editor makes program corrections and changes as easy as 
"falling off a log". If CBASIC finds an error when compiling, it points to the place in the program line where the error 
occurred. All you have to do is tell the editor what line you want to start editing and when it is displayed, move the 
cursor with the arrow keys to the place where the error is and correct it. Just like (hat, it's simple. 

HI-RES & 80 COLUMN DISPLAYS 

CBASIC is the only Color Basic Compiler that includes Its own Hi-Resolution 51, 64 or 85 by 24 line display, It is also 
the only compiler that supports both the PBJ "Word-Pak" and the Double Density 80 column cards. All of these display 
formats are part of the standard CBASIC compiler package. Not only can these display formats be used for normal 
program editing and compiling, but CBASIC will also include them in your compiled programs! If you want CBASIC to 
include the display driver in your program, all you have to do is use a single CBASIC command "HIRES", The run-time 
display driver that CBASIC includes in your program is not just a simple display, but a full-featured display package. With 
the Hi-Resolution display package you can mix text & graphics, change characters per line, underline, character highlight, 
erase to end of line or screen, home cursor, home & dear screen, protect screen lines, and much more. All commands 
are compatible with our HI-RES II Screen Commander so you can easily develop screen layouts using Hl-RES and Color 
Basic before you compile your program. The same applies to using the 80 column card drivers. What other Basic compiler 
offers you this kind of flexibility? 

64K RAM SUPPORT 

CBASIC makes full use of the power and flexibility of the 6883 SAM (Synchronous Address Multiplexer) in the Color 
Computer. It will fully utilize the 96K of address space available in the Color Computer (64K installed) during program 
Creation, Editing and Compilation. CBASIC has a special command for automatic 64K RAM control. When used in a 
program, it allows the user to use the upper 32K of RAM space automatically for variables or even program storage at 
run-time. It will automatically switch the ROMs in and out when needed. There are also two other commands that allow 
you to control the upper 32K of RAM manually, under program control. No other Color Basic compiler directly supports 
the use of 64K RAM like CBASIC. 

ALL MACHINE LANGUAGE 

CBASIC is completely written tn fast efficient Machine Language, not Basic, like some other Color Basic compilers. 
Because of this, CBASIC can edit and compile very large programs. Even using the Hi-Resolution 51 by 24 line display, 
il can work with about a 34K program, and the 80 column card versions can handle almost 40K of program. Some of 
the other Basic compilers can only work with 16K or about 200 lines. Even working with large programs, CBASIC 
compiles programs with lightning fast speed. It will compile a 24K program to disk in less than 2 minutes! That's without 
a listing being generated. We've heard stories about some other compilers that take almost 10 minutes to compile a simple 
2-3K program. You might inquire about this when you look at some of the other compilers available. 



THE FINISHED PRODUCT 

Since CBASIC contains statements to support ALL of the I/O devices (Disk. Tape, Screen & Printer), Hi-Res Graphics, 
Sound, and Enhanced Screen displays, it is well suited for a wide range of programming applications, It generates a 
complete, Ready to Run machine language program. The finished product or program does not have to be interfaced to 
a Basic program to perform some of its functions or commands. This may seem obvious to you, but some of the other 
Color Basic compilers don't necessarily work this way. Some of their compiler commands need a separate Basic program 
in order for them to work. In some cases, require that a separate Basic program be interfaced to the compiled program 
to perform I/O functions, like INPUT, PRINT and so on. CBASIC doesn't do this. ALL of its commands are compiled 
into a single machine language program that does not require any kind of Basic program to make it work. 

COMPATIBILITY 

You may be wondering about those statements we made earlier concerning 99% or 99.9% syntax compatibility. What 
does that other 1% consist of? The biggest part of that 1% has to do with string arrays and variables. CBASIC does not 
use a "String Pool" like Color Basic. It uses absolute memory addresses to locate string variables and arrays. This is why 
CBASICs string processing is so fast, it also eliminates the time consuming "Garbage Collection" problem. When CBASIC 
allocates space for strings, it must know how much space to use for each string. When you Dimension a string variable 
in CBASIC, you must tell it how much space you want to save for each element, To Dimension an array of 40 strings, 
64 characters each, you would DIM DA$(40,64). If a string is not dimensioned, CBASIC will automatically allocate 32 
bytes for it. If you want a single string to have enough room for 200 characters you would DIM AX$(200) . For string 
arrays, you would still access the element you want, the same as Color Basic, to get string #30 from the array DAS, you 
would still use DA$(30), the only real change is in the DIM statement. For undeclared string arrays of 10 elements or 
less, CBASIC will automatically reserve space for 10 (0-9) strings of 32 characters. In some other Color Basic compilers, 
you have to declare EVERY string variable used in the progrm in a DIM statement. And, to create an array of 40 strings 
with 64 characters each, you would have to DIM AD$(2560), and then to access string #30, you would have to multiply 
30 x 64 and use a special variable name format or access it one character at a time. Not very compatible or convenient 
to use, and difficult at best. 

CBASIC REQUIREMENTS 

CBASIC requires a minimum of 32K RAM and at least one Disk drive. We strongly recommend that you have 64K. 
CBASIC is compatible with all versions of Color & Extended Basic and both Disk Basic VI. 0 and VI. 1. Programs 
compiled on either system will run on systems with different ROMs. CBASIC is NOT compatible with JDOS. 

DOCUMENTATION 

The Documentation provided with any program is very important to the user. This is especially true when you talk 
about a program as complete and complex as CBASIC. Even though CBASIC was designed to be the most User Friendly 
compiler on the market, we went to great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
comprehensive and complete enough for even the most sophisticated user. The manual included with CBASIC consists 
of approximately 120 pages of real information, not like some manuals that put just one or two short paragraphs on a 
page. If we did it that way, we could have easily created a three or four hundred page manual. The manual index breaks 
down each section of the manual and gives a 3 or 4 word description of each section and its items along with page 
numbers The manual has three sections, the Editor. Compiler and Appendix. Each of these is divided into subsections, 
with Section and Subsection titles printed at the top of each page. If you want to, you could find the information you are 
looking for by simply flipping through the pages and scanning the Section titles on the top of the pages. The Manual itself 
is an 8^ by 11 Spiral Bound book with durable leather textured covers. Some of the reports we have had from CBASfC 
users describe the manual as being the Best program manual they have ever used. 

COMPARE THE DIFFERENCE 

I 

CBASIC is not just another Color Basic Compiler. It is the only complete Basic Compiler System for the Color Computer. 
Compare CBASICs features to what other compilers offer and you'll see the difference. When comparing CBASIC to 
other compilers, you might want to keep some of these questions in mind. Does it support I/O functions? You can't write 
much of a program without PRINT, INPUT and so on. What about complex string statements, or string statements at all? 
How large of a program can you write? Can you compile a complex string like: MID$(RIGHT$(DA$(VAL(IN$) .LEN(LES)) .3,3)? 
Can you use two character variable names for string St numeric variables, like Basic. Does it support all the Hi-Res graphics 
statements including PLAY. DRAW, GET and PUT, using the same syntax as Basic? Do you ever have to use a separate 
Basic program? Can you take complete Basic programs and compile them without extensive changes? Will they work? 
How do you edit a program when it has errors compiling? 

PRICE VERSUS PERFORMANCE 

The price of CBASIC is $149.00. It is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and well worth the 
investment. We spent over 2 years writing and refining CBASIC, to make it the Best, most Compatible Color Basic 
compiler available. Most of our CBASIC users already bought one or more of the other compilers on the market and 
have since discarded them. We even traded in a few of them. If you want a cheap compiler, we'll sell you one of those 
traded in, at a good price. Before you buy a compiler, compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar for Dollar, CBASIC gives you more than any other Color Basic compiler available. 

t 

ORDERING INFORMATION 

To order CBASIC by mail, send check or money order in the amount of $149.00 plus $3.00 
for shipping and handling to the address listed below. 

To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD, call us at; (702) 452-0632 (Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Ave. 
Las Vegas, NV 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



DISK 

s 44.95 



Introducing The "Super Smart" 

DATA PACK II 

TERMINAL COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE 

Also Supports The PBJ 80 Column "Word Pak", Deluxe RS-232 Pak, 

Parallel Printer Card and PBJ 2SP Pak 

"FEATURES" 



No Lost Information When Using Hi-Resolution Display On Line 

ASCII Compatible File Format 

Full Text Buffering 

Terminal Baud Rates 300 to 9600 

Automatic Word Wrap Eliminates Split Words 

Full/ Half Duplex 

Automatic File Capture 

Programmable Word Length. Parity and Stop Bits 

Save and Load Text Buffer and Program Key Buffers to Tape 

or Disk 

9 Hi-Resolution Display Formats, 28 to 255 x 24 
True Upper / lower Case Display 
Kill Graphics Option for an Extra 6K 
Supports Line Break 



Freeze Display and Review Information On Line 

Send Files Directly from Buffer or Disk 

Full Disk Support for Disk Version 

Send Control Codes from Keyboard 

Separate Printer Baud Rates 110-9600 

Display on Screen or Output Contents of Buffer to Printer 

Automalic Memory Sense 16-64K 

9 Programmable Function Key Variable Length Macro Buffer 
Programmable Prompt Character or Delay to Send Next Line 
Programmable Control Character Trapping 
Programmable Open /Close Buffer Characters 
Automatic Key Repeat For Editing 
Program and Memory Status Displays 



TAPE 

s 34.95 




I 



"The Source" 

has arrived! 



Starship Falcon 

Graphics Adventure Game 



The Source brings the cost of Disassembler and Assembler Source code 

generation down to Earth. 

Now you can Disassemble Color Computer machine language programs and generate 
beautiful, Assembler Source Code for a fraction of the cost of other Disassembler/Source 

Generator programs. 

The Source has all the features and functions you are looking for in a Disassembler. 

Automatic label generation. 
Allows specifying FCB, FCC and FDB areas. 
Disassembles programs directly from Disk. 
Supports multiple origin disk files. 

Output complete Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer. Screen or both. 
Generates Assembler compatible source flies directly to disk. 

Generated source files are In standard ASCII format that can be edited by most word processors. 
Built In Hex/Ascll dump/display to help locate FCB, FCC and FDB areas In a program. 
Fast Disassembly mode for testing & checking FCB, FCC and FDB mapped areas. 
Built In Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 

Menu display with single key commands for smooth. Easy, almost foolproof operation. 



32K Disk $34*95 



GG£ DC 



Six months ago a terrorist group demanded to be designated the rulers of 
Alpha Sigma III, under the threat of world starvation on the planet Earth. The 
Federation denied their demands, so they released a biological weapon which 
has destroyed all known edible plant species from throughout the known gal- 
axy. To date no plant life has been able to survive on Earth. Recently, Federation 
undercover agents have reported a story told by a roving space trader, of a 
planet with abundant edible plant life. These plants have a reputation of being 
able to survive in all climates and in fact, are supposed to grow at an incredible 
rate. The Federation is desperate! If Earth's food source is not replaced soon, 
the Federation will have to evacuate all animal and Human life. Your mission 
is to go to the planet Zephyr and obtain the seed of these plants and return to 
Earth. Several Federation agents have been sent to obtain the seeds and none 
has returned! Can you get the seed and survive??? GOOD LUCK! 



32K Disk $21.95 



Screen Enhancement Program Comparison Chart 

PROGRAM FEATURES HI-RES II HI-RES I BRAND X 

NEW OLD 



NEW IMPROVED VERSION 

-UP TO 85 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
READABILITY 

- ADJUSTABLE A UTOMA TIC KEY REPEA T 

- PROPTECT 1-23 SCREEN LINES 

- CONTROL CODE KEYBOARD 

FULLY BASIC COMPATIBLE 

DISPLAY FORMATS OF 28 to 255 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
FULL 96 UPPER/LOWER CASE CHARACTERS 
MIXED GRAPHICS & TEXT OR SEPARATE 
GRAPHIC & TEXT SCREENS 
INDIVIDUAL CHARACTER HIGHLIGHTING 
REVERSE CHARACTER HIGHLIGHT MODE 
WRITTEN IN FAST MACHINE l-ANGUAGE 
AUTOMATIC RELOCATES TO TOP OF 16/32K 
AUTOMATICALLY SUPPORTS 64Kof RAM WITH RESET CONTROL 
REVERSE SCREEN 
ON SCREEN UNDERLINE 
DOUBLE SIZE CHARACTERS 
ERASE TO END OF LINE 
ERASE TO END OF SCREEN 
HOME CURSOR 
BELL TONE CHARACTER 
HOME CURSOR & CLEAR SCREEN 
REQUIRES ONLY 2K OF RAM 
COMPATIBLE WITH ALL TAPE & DISK SYSTEMS 



Hl-KES il SCREEN iLLLUJi 

Double Hei?ht Ch a rd - Urs 

On Screen UHDER L I N 1Mb 
Protect f r oh 1 to 23 Scree n line? 
Fu|I set >>f Cor sor Control FUhcttons 
T rue Upper & Lo wer c as? charact » r 



Adjustable line lengths froM 28 to 255 characters 
28 Characters per line 
32 Charscters per line 
) 6 Characters per line 
12 Characters per line 
51 Characters per line 
<1 Char irttrs Mr I in» 
£ (hc*t«* m lire 

Full Controf Code Kevboird 4 ftutoMalic Ke>" ReFeat 
fliHed Tent and Graphics in PMDfiE 1 and Much More. 

All functions are easit' program able thru BASIC 
Fully RA^IC rflHPAT IB! F including CL$ 6 PK'INT 5 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Buff/Biack 

Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 



$9J95 $OQ95 

A* T» TAPE A* J DISK 

ALL ORDERS SHIPPED FROM STOCK 
ADD $2.50 POSTAGE 



Circle Reader Service card #335 



Cffi 

ccnp 

5566 Ricochet Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 

(702) 452 0632 



Upper/Lower case characters Yes 
Mixed Texl and Graphics 
Separate Text & Graphics 
Print @ fully implemented 
Print @ on all line lengths 
Different line Irngths 
Automatic Kev Repeat 
Adjustable Kev Repeal 
Auto Repeat Disable 
Erase to end of line/screen 
Home Cursor 
Solid or Blinking Cursor 
CLS command supported 
X.Y Coordinate Cursor 

Positioning 
Double Size Characters 
Individual/Continuous 

Highlighting 
On Screen Underlining 
Clear Key functional 
16.12 & o4K Supported 
Green or Black Background 

Color 

Dual Character sets for 

Enhanced 64 and H5 

Characters per line display Yes 
Protected Screen Lines 

(programmable) 1 to 23 

Full Control Code Keyboard 

for Screen control directly 

from the keyboard Yes 
Programmable Tab Character 

Spacing Yes 
Full Screen Reverse Function Yes 
Switch to & from the Standard 

J 6 by 32 Screen for full 

compatability Yes 
On Error Goto Function No 
Extended Basic Required No 
All Machine Language Program Yes 
RAM Required in addition to 

Screen RAM 2K 
Program Price (Tape) $24.05 



Yes 

Yes Yes 
Yes Yes 
Yes Yes 
Yes Yes 
28 to 255 (9)28 to 255 (9) 



Yes 
No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 
No 

Buff/ Black 

Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 



Clear/L keysClear key 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
No 



No 
No 



No 

No 
Yes 



No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 

2K 

$19.05 



Yes 
Yes 
No 
Yes 

51 only 

51 only (1) 

Yes 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Buffy Black 

No 
No 

No 
No 
No 
Yes 

No 



No 
No 

No 

No 
No 



No 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

2K 

$29 95 





VISA. MASTERCARD AND C.O.D. ACCEPTED 




BARDEN'S BUFFER 



Pi to 10,000 Digits 



By William Harden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Imagine this scene: A friend who 
owns an Apple He or IBM PC walks 
into your house and makes his usual 
remark about your "toy CoCo." 
"What's it doing now," he says with a 
sneer, "warming up?" Casually flicking 
a piece of chad off the keyboard, you 
reply, "No, actually it's calculating pi to 
10,000 digits. . ." 

This was the scene I envisioned when 
I first planned this article. Many hours 
later, I'm a little weary, but still enthu- 
siastic about this month's topic, even 
though 10,000 digits may be a little 
optimistic. Imagine using your CoCo's 
number crunching ability to calculate pi 
to thousands of decimal places, some- 
thing that was never really done until 
the 1950s! A little background might 
explain the problem. 

Pi through History 

Pi, of course, is the ratio of the 
distance around a circle to the diameter 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and 
over 100 magazine articles on various 
computer topics. His 20 years expe- 
rience in the industry covers a wide 
background: programming, systems 
analyzing and managing projects rang- 
ing from mainframes to microcompu- 
ters. 



of the circle. As many of you know, pi 
is approximately 3.1416. A circle with 
a diameter of 10 inches, for example, 
has a circumference of about 31.416 
inches. It's important to note that pi is 
an irrational number — it's not "even" 
and goes on to infinity as a never ending 
fraction. The fraction appears to be 
made up of random digits. Translating 
the digits into text characters, for 
example, would produce every book 
ever written somewhere within the first 
billions of billions of digits. 

(Speaking of "bilyuns and bil- 
yuns". . . an interesting note here. Carl 
Sagan, in his new fictional work, Con- 
tact, uses the premise that somewhere 
after the first umpteen digits, pi is not 
random, but has an encoded figure in 
computer graphics of a circle, presum- 
ably put there by the Creator as proof 
that He exists!) 

Believe it or not, the Babylonians had 
calculated pi to be 3V& by about 2000 
B.C. Even more incredible, the Chinese 
had arrived at a value of pi of 3.14159 
by 264 A.D., an accuracy of 0.0003%! 

Early calculations of pi used a meth- 
od that inscribed thousands of polyg- 
ons, as shown in Figure 1. The approx- 
imation of a circle by polygons gave pi 
to within 35 decimal places by the 1600s. 
At that point, however, differential 
calculus was discovered, and it was 



found that pi could be expressed as an 
infinite series of terms. The best known 
of these series for pi was discovered by 
Leibniz in 1674: 

pi = 4(1 -1/3 + 1/5 -1/7 + ...) 



^Polygon 
(Multi-sided 




Circumference — 8S 
Length of S can be 
found by Geometry 



Figure 1: Finding Pi by 
Inscribed Polygon 



Try it with a basic program. It works, 
but requires hundreds of terms to get 
even several digits of accuracy. From the 
moment the infinite series method was 
discovered, a race for calculating pi to 
the most places ensued, just as it had 
with polygon approximations. Machin 
discovered a useful series in 1706, one 
that converged very quickly — only a 



228 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



few terms were required to yield pi to 
a dozen places or so: 

pi = 16(1/5 - 1/(3*5^3) + 1/(5*5^5 2- . . .) 
-4(1/239 + 1/(3*239^3) - (1/(5*239^5) + . . .) 

The Machin series and others have 
been used in recent times to calculate pi 
to thousands of places on large main- 
frame computers, just as they are typ- 
ically used to search for special prime 
numbers (Mersenne primes of the form 
2 /N N - 1). There's really not a great deal 
of use for the next hundred thousand 
places of pi or the next Mersenne prime, 
but it's fun to do because, like Mt. 
Everest, pi is there. And besides, maybe 
there is that graphical representation of 
a circle after the billionth digit or so. 

(An excellent and fascinating treat- 
ment of the history of pi from ancient 
times to the computer age is contained 
in the book A History of Pi by Peter 
Beckmann[St. Martin's Press, 1971].) 

Because It's There 

In this column we'll show you how to 
compute pi to many places — up to 
10,000 decimal digits if you're so in- 
clined (and have a few years)! It won't 
be an easy task, but it can be a fun 
project, and it's a perfect squelch to that 
friend or neighbor who owns an Apple 
He, IBM PC or Cray X-MP. (This 
column took about three times the 
nominal time to research and write, but 
I still had fun.) 

Multiple-Precision Variables 

One basic question in computing pi 
is how 10,000 digits can be represented 
in a computer system. There are several 
alternatives. You could store one digit 
in each byte, or maybe two digits in four 
bits, two per byte. Each four bits would 
be binary coded decimal, or bed. How- 
ever, bed is a little messy to work with 
for divides, although it's great for adds 
and subtracts. You could also use tried 
and true binary. A little review of binary 
probably won't hurt at this point. 

A byte can hold eight bits — values 
of 00000000 through 11111111 or zero 
through 255. Two bytes can hold zero 
through 65,535. Four bytes can hold 
zero through 4,294,967,296. As a matter 
of fact, you can make the binary oper- 
and as large as you wish. A good rule 
of thumb is that each 3.5 bits can hold 
one decimal digit. So 10,000 decimal 
digits require about 35,000 bits, or 
about 4,375 bytes. A better calculation 
of this is 10,000 divided by log base 10 



of 2 = 10,000/.301 or 33,219+ bits, 
4,152+ bytes. 

We'll use up to 4,154 bytes, therefore, 
to hold up to 10,000 decimal digits. For 
the sake of convenience in the following 
discussion, well call these 4,154-byte 
variables, MPVs or Multiple-Precision 
Variables. We'll need a number of these 
MPVs, some to hold temporary results 
and some to hold the final results, just 
as we use several variables in a basic 
program. 

Scaling and Division 

The next major problem is the actual 
calculation — how can we divide 1 by 
239, for example? In basic it is done by 
floating-point variables. We can't use 
floating-point here because we need the 
exact numbers to be represented. Typ- 
ical basic floating-point variables only 
allow 16 decimal digits of precision — 
we need thousands of digits of preci- 
sion! 

To accomplish addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division of the terms 
in the calculation, we'll use only integer 
arithmetic. A question you might be 
asking, though, is how can we get 
fractional results with integers? The 
answer is an old technique, dating back 
to the '50s or beyond — scaled numbers. 
Instead of using 1 in the term 1 / 239, 
well scale up the numerator by a factor 
of 10 followed by 10,000 zeros (for the 
maximum case), so the term becomes 
10,000,000,000..., 000/ 239. The result of 
the divide and other operations is 
always an integer number, and we can 
stick in the decimal point when we print 
the answer. I'll show you how it works 
shortly. The results of all adds, sub- 
tracts, multiplies and divides are kept in 
the MPVs in integer form, without 
fractions. 

The Algorithm 

In a difficult problem such as this, it's 
best to have a good algorithm before 
you go charging off into the actual code. 
There are many ways this calculation 
can be implemented, but the plan I came 
up with follows. First, the variables: 

1) Use three MPVs, called TEMPI, 
TEMP2 and SUM. 

2) Use a 16-bit variable called DIV- 
SOR to hold the 1, 3, 5, 7, etc., ... to 
be divided into the term. 

3) Use a 16-bit variable called LAST 
to hold the last divisor to test for the end 
of each of the two sets of divisions. 

4) Use an eight-bit variable called 
ODDEVN to control whether the term 



is added to or subtracted from the 
subtotal. 

Now the actual plan, divided into two 
parts, is computation of the first set of 
terms and calculation of the second set 
of terms: 

SUM <- 0 
TEMPI <- 1 
LAST <- XXXX 
ODDEVN <- 1 
D1VS0R <- 1 

while DIVSOR < LAST ao 
begin 

if D1VS0R-1 then TEMPI <- TEMPI/5 else 

TEMPI <- TEMPI/25 
TEMP2 <- TEMPI 
TEMP2 <- TEMP2/DIVSOR 

if ODDEVN-1 then SUM <- SUM + TEMP 2 else 

SUM <- SUM - TEMP2 
DIVSOR <- DIVSOR + 2 
flip ODDEVN to 1 if 0 or 0 if 1 
end 

SUM <- SUM*4 

TEMPI <- 1 

LAST <- XXXX 

ODDEVN <- 0 

DIVSOR <- 1 

while DIVSOR < LAST do 
begin 

if D1VSOR-1 then TEMPI O TEMPI/239 else 

TEMPI <- TEMPI/ (239*239) 
TEMP 2 <- TEMPI 
TEMP 2 <- TEMP2/DIVSOR 

if ODDEVN-1 then SUM <- SUM + TEMP 2 else 

SUM <- SUM - TEMP2 
DIVSOR <- DIVSOR + 2 
flip ODDEVN to 1 if p or 0 if 1 
end 

SUM <- SUM*4 

In case you're not familiar with the 
notation used here, it's a form of "PDL" 
or Program Design Language. Varia- 
bles are indicated by uppercase. The 
arrows indicate that a variable is set to 
the terms on the right-hand side of the 
equation. The begin and end words 
mark the beginning and ending of a 
block of operations. The while function 
means that the following block is to be 
done as long as the condition is true, in 
this case DIVSOR less than LAST. You 
can see that the sequence is divided into 
two parts, one for the 5/25 divides, and 
one for the 239/(239*239) divides. 

If you don't see how this works, try 
the algorithm with paper and pencil. 
Note that variable TEMPI holds 1/5 
the first time through, 1/5^3 the next 
time, 1/5^5 the next time, and so forth 
(or 1/239, etc., for the second part). The 
current DIVSOR is divided into the 
current power of '5' (or power of 239 
term). The result is then added to or 
subtracted from the SUM. 

The "LAST" values are not obvious. 
The values represent the last divisor 
(preceding the power) to be used. This 
divisor equals the power of the current 
term. Each term of the first set is smaller 
than the preceding term by about 1/ 
25th. Each term of the second set is 
smaller than the preceding term by 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 229 



about 1/(239*239). Divide the number 
of decimal digits in the MPV by .69897 
and add 10 percent of that for the LAST 
value for the first set. For example, if 
you're working with 10-byte MPVs, the 
80 bits can hold about 22+ decimal 
digits, so use 22+/. 69897 or 33 + 3 = 37 
as the LAST value. (LAST values must 
be odd.) Divide the number of decimal 
digits by 2.37 for the LAST value for the 
second set. In this example, 22+/ 2.37 
gives you 9+, or 1 1 to be safe. 

The only thing that's been left out of 
the algorithm is the scaling. In fact, T 
is not put into the MPV — a power of 
10 is, such as 10,000,000. ..,000. This 
poses a problem. How can you figure 
out the value to store into the MPV for 
the power of 10? For short length 
MPVs, it's easy. If the MPV is one byte, 
for example, you'd use $64, equivalent 
to 100. For two bytes, you'd use $2,710 
for 10,000. When you're working with 
10 followed by 10,000 zeros, though, it 
becomes impossible to calculate the 
actual value to be put into the MPV, or 
at least terribly difficult. About the only 
efficient way to do it is to let the com- 
puter do it for you. 

One way to store a power of 10 is to 
put 10 into the bottom of the MPV and 
then keep multiplying by 10. Because I 
wanted to be able to use any length 
MPV from several bytes to 4,154 bytes, 
I chose this method: 

MPV <- 1 

while highest byte of MPV - zero do 
begin 

MPV <- MPV*10 
end 

The result of this operation is shown 
for several lengths of MPVs in Figure 
2. 



Planning the Modules 

The structure of the program is 
shown in Figure 3. Like a lot of pro- 
grams, this structure didn't just jump 
from head to paper, but was modified 
during the design and coding process. 
There are 10 modules in the program. 

We'll start with the easiest ones first 
(perhaps you've noticed this flaw in my 
character by now) SHIFT shifts an 
MPV one bit to the left. This doesn't 
sound like much, but remember that all 
the bytes of the MPV, from a few bytes 
to 4,154 bytes, must be shifted with the 
high-order bit going into the low-order 
bit of the next higher byte, as shown in 
Figure 4. 



pi 

(MAIN) 



LOADZ 



LOADO 



TEAM 



MOVE 



CONVRT 



ADD3UB 



DIVIDE 



3 l_£ 



SHIFT 



Figure 3: PI Program Structure 



Before SHIFT 
Byte N 



Byte N+1 



Byte N+2 



(MPV) 





1010 1011 




1000 1001 




1010 1111 













After SHIFT 



(MPV) ■* — 



0101 0111 




0001 0011 




0101 1110 







Figure 4: Multiple Byte Shifting 



Easy Modules 

LOADZ loads a zero into all bytes of 
the MPV. 

LOADO first loads a zero into all 
bytes of the MPV. A scaled one is then 
loaded into the MPV. This involves 
loading T into the low-order byte of the 
MPV and then multiplying by 10 as 
described above. 

MOVE moves all the bytes of one 
MPV into a second MPV, a simple copy 
operation. 



1 Byte 



2 Bytes 



3 Bytes 



0000 0001 



0000 001 1 



1110 1000 



^2 ^10 



11 1110 1000 2 = 1000 10 



1x10x10x10 



0000 0001 



1000 0110 



1010 0000 



1 1000 0110 1 010 0000 2 = 10 0000, 
1x10x10x10x10x10 



* = Highest Byte 

Figure 2: Scaling a Value 



ADDSUB adds the contents of one 
MPV (the "source" MPV) to the con- 
tents of a second MPV (the "destina- 
tion" MPV), or subtracts the two 
MPVs. In doing this, any "carry" or 
"borrow" must be carried over to the 
next byte, just as in decimal addition or 
subtraction. 

The Heart of the Program 

DIVIDE is the heart of the program. 
This subroutine must be as fast as 
possible to cut down on the program 
overhead. The structure of DIVIDE is 
shown in Figure 5. A 16-bit divisor 
(DIVSOR or 5 or 239) is divided into 
the MPV The MPV is shifted into 
Register D one bit at a time. For each 
shift, a test is made to see whether the 
divide will "go." If so, a subtract of the 
divisor is done and a quotient bit is set 
to T. If not, the quotient bit is set to 
4 0\ Directly after the dividend is shifted 
into D, the next quotient bit is filled into 
the low end of the MPV. At the end of 
the divide, the quotient bits have filled 
up the entire MPV and the remainder 
of the divide is in D. 

Other Modules 

TERM is the subroutine that actually 
carries out the calculation of each term, 



230 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



□ 



Carry of Condition Codes 



B 



Quotient 
Blt(0 or 1) 



Bytes ot MPV 

'L. 



t 



16-Blt Divisor 
in Instruction 
Subtracted from 
D Register (A,B) 
if Divisor <=(C)+(D) 



One SHIFT per 
Iteration 



Figure 5: DIVIDE Structure 



There are three MPVs used in the 
program, designated TEMPI, TEMP2 
and SUM. To change the size of the 
MPVs, set the parameter Bytes to the 
number of bytes required. The number 
of Bytes must be even due to the meth- 
ods of storage and access in the pro- 
gram. I used values from four up to 
hundreds. Maximum size is on the 
order of 4,154 bytes. Remember that 
changing the number of bytes also 
requires that you change the TERM1 
and TERM2 "LAST" values. Too large 
a value for LAST and youH be wasting 
time; too small a value and you will lose 
digits in the answer. 

The SUM MPV is ORGed at the 
graphics display area (set this to $600 



adding or subtracting the term to SUM. 
TERM is called twice, once for each set 
of values. 

CONVRT is a convert to ASCII 
subroutine. After all of the calculations 
have been done, the result is in SUM as 
a scaled-up value. This huge binary 
number must now be converted to 
decimal by successively dividing by 10 
and saving the remainders, as shown in 
Figure 6. The remainders in reverse 
order represent the equivalent decimal 
number. Before they are printed, the 
decimal value of zero through nine is 
converted to ASCII by adding $30. The 
remainders are stored in a buffer, one 
remainder per byte. This buffer is more 
than twice as big as an MPV, so two 
MPVs and additional memory is used 
for the conversion process. 

PI is the "main driver" portion of the 
program. It calls the subroutines to 
implement the calculations and gener- 
ally oversees the operations. 

The Actual Assembly Language 

I don't mind telling you that the PI 
program grew far beyond what 1 had 
imagined it would consist of. However, 
it's still small enough for you to follow 
fairly easily. Its structure follows the 
physical arrangement in Figure 3 and is 
listed in Listing 1. 



SUM MPV Containing Binary # 





0000 0000 



0000 1010 



Divisor 
(10) 



Low 

(3) 

(1) 
(4) 



High 



0000 0011 



0000 0001 



0000 0100 



0000 0100 



0000 0001 



0000 0111 



Remainder from Last Divide 

Remainder 2nd to Last Divide 
Remainder 3rd to Last Divide 



Remainder from 2nd Divide 
Remainder from 1st Divide 



$30 Added to these Values to form 
ASCII Values 



Figure 6: Conversion of Final Result 



Listing 1: PI NEW 



km 

4000 16 0774 



0032 



00100 

mw 

00120 
00130 
00140 
00150 
00160 
00170 
00180 
00190 
00200 
00210 



* PI TO 10,000 DIGITS ON THE COCO I * 
ictrfrkickir/rk *Vtr*r*rt^*^WrtHlrft 

ORG $4000 

LBRA PI 

★BUFFERS AND WORKING STORAGE * 
frtckic k lck' k i r k'ifirkfe ' k k k A * * *■* ickttrk^rk*-kirk~k~k+k~k 

* CHANGE BYTES, TERM1, AND TERM 2 FOR * 

* DIFFERENT RESOLUTIONS OF PI * 

BYTES EQU 50 4154 BYTES - 10000 DIGITS 



for cassette systems). More about that 
later, but as you might guess, locating 
the SUM MPV in the graphics screen 
area allows you to see PI being com- 
puted. 

The program is ORGed at $4000. You 
can change this to below the $4000 area 
if you have a 16K system, but will not 
be able to use larger MPVs. (The pro- 
gram is about 400 bytes exclusive of the 
MPV areas.) The version shown was 
assembled with the Radio Shack Disk 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 231 









00220 


TERM1 


EQU 


181 


LAST DIVISOR, GRP 1 






0035 


00230 


TEKM2 


EQU 


53 


LAST DIVISOR, GRP 2 






0190 


00240 


BITS 


EQU 


8*BYTES 


-# BITS IN MPV 






0E00 


00250 


SUM 


EQU 


$E00 


DISK GRAPHICS SCREEN 






0E32 


00260 


ENDSUM 


EQU 


SUM+BYTES LAST BYTE OF SUM 








00270 




RMB 


1800 


BUFFER FOR 10000 BYTES 






470B 


00280 


TEMPI 


EQU 


* 


START OF TEMPI MPV 


470B 

w 






00290 




RMB 


BYTES 








473D 


00300 


NDTMP1 


EQU 


* 


LAST BYTE OF TEMP1+1 






473D 


00310 


TEMP2 


EQU 


* 


START OF TEMP2 MPV 


473D 






00320 




RMB 


BYTES 








476F 


00330 


NDTMP2 


EQU 


* 


LAST BYTE OF TEMP2+1 


476F 






00340 


SCALE 


RMB 


2 


#DEC DIGITS SCALE FACTOR 


4771 






00350 


ODDEVN 


RMB 


1 


$A9-ADCA; $A2-SBCA FOR ADDSUB 


4772 






00360 


LAST 


RMB 


2 


HOLDS LAST DIVISOR TO BE USED 


4774 






00370 


DIVSOR 


RMB 


2 


WORKING DIVISOR- 1,3, 5. .LAST 


4776 






00380 


SIGNI 


RMB 


1 


0 IF SIGNIFICANCE . 








00390 


***** * ft ***W»*T^r***S^^ 


fr************** 








00400 


* PI DRIVER 




* 








00410 


******** ************************* ****** 


4777 


CE 


0E32 


00420 


PI 


LDU 


#ENDSUM 


POINT TO LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


47 7A 


8D 


60 


00430 




BSR 


LOADZ 


ZERO SUM 


477C 


CE 


473D 


00440 




LDU 


#NDTMP1 


LS BYTE OF TEMP 1+1 


477F 


108E 


476F 


00450 




LDY 


#NDTMP2 


LS BYTE OF TEMP2+1 


4783 


8D 


64 


00460 




BSR 


LOADO 


LOAD 1 TO TEMPI (SCALE) 


4785 


CC 


00B5 


00470 




LDD 


#TERM1 


TERMINATOR 


4788 


FD 


4772 


00480 




STD 


LAST 


LAST DIVISOR 


478B 


86 


A9 


00490 




LDA 


#$A9 


SET ADD FOR FIRST TERM 


478D 


B7 


4771 


00500 




STA 


ODDEVN 


ADD/SUB FLAG 


4790 


CC 


0005 


00510 




LDD 


#5 


FOR FIRST DIVIDE 


4793 


8E 


0019 


00520 




LDX 


#25 


FOR SUBSEQUENT DIVIDES 


4796 


BD 


482C 


00530 




JSR 


TERM 


CALCULATE FIRST GROUP VALUE 








00540 


* NOW HAVE FIRST GROUP VALUE - MULTIPLY BY 4 


4799 


CE 


0E32 


00550 




LDU 


#ENDSUM 


LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


479C 


17 


0163 


00560 




LBSR 


SHIFT 


SUM<-*2 


479F 


CE 


0E32 


00570 




LDU 


#ENDSUM 


LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


47A2 


17 


015D 


00580 




LBSR 


SHIFT 


SUM«*SUM*4 


47A5 


CE 


47 3D 


00590 




LDU 


#NDTMP1 


LS BYTE OF TEMPl+1 


47A8 


108E 


476F 


00600 




LDY 


#NDTMP2 


LS BYTE OF TEMP2+1 


47AC 


8D 


3B 


00610 




BSR 


LOADO 


LOAD 1 TO TEMPI (SCALE) 


47AE 


CC 


0035 


00620 




LDD 


#TERM2 


TERMINATOR 


47B1 


FD 


4772 


00630 




STD 


LAST 


LAST DIVISOR 


47B4 


86 


A2 


00640 




LDA 


#$A2 


SET SUBTRACT FOR FIRST TERM 


47B6 


B7 


4771 


00650 




STA 


ODDEVN 


ADD/SUB FLAG 


47B9 


CC 


00EF 


00660 




LDD 


#239 


FOR FIRST DIVIDE 


47BC 


8E 


DF21 


00670 




LDX 


#57121 


FOR SUBSEQUENT DIVIDES 


47BF 


8D 


6B 


00680 




BSR 


TERM 


CALCULATE SECOND GROUP 








00690 


* NOW HAVE PI/4 - MULTIPLY BY 4 AGAIN 


47C1 


CE 


0E32 


00700 

WW WW 




LDU 


#ENDSUM 


LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


47C4 


17 


013B 


00710 




LBSR 


SHIFT 


SUM<-SUM*2 


47C7 


CE 


0E32 


00720 




LDU 


#ENDSUM 


LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


47CA 


17 


0135 


00730 




LBSR 


SHIFT 


SUM<-SUM*4 


47CD 


86 


FE 


00740 




LDA 


#-2 


PRINTER CODE 


47 CF 


97 


6F 


00750 




STA 


$6F 


ROUTE OUTPUT TO LP 


47D1 


CE 


0E32 


00760 




LDU 


#ENDSUM 


LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


47D4 


108E 


476F 


00770 




LDY 


#NDTMP2 


LS BYTE OF TEMP2+1 


47D8 


17 


00B3 


00780 




LBSR 


CONVRT 


CONVERT AND PRINT 


47DB 


39 




00790 




RTS 




RETURN TO BASIC 








00800 


****** *********************^ 








00810 


* LOAD 0 SUBROUTINE 


* 








00820 


* ENTRY: 


BYTES«=SIZE OF MPV IN BYTES * 








00830 


* 


(U)-END OF MPV+1 * 








00840 




AAAAAAKKn rCr 


nflnr toctooc TrrnTTCTL a a 


47DC 


8E 


0032 


00850 


LOADZ 


LDX 


#BYTES 


GET # BYTES 


47DF 


CC 


0000 

r r r r 


00860 




LDD 


#0 


LOAD 0 


47 E2 


ED 


C3 


00870 


LOA010 


STD 


»--u 


STORE 0 


47E4 


30 


IE 


00880 




LEAX 


-2,X 


DECREMENT COUNT 


47E6 


26 


FA 


00890 




BNE 


LOA010 


GO IF NOT DONE 


47E8 


39 




00900 




RTS 




RETURN 








00910 


* * I 1 — .|,.f ,,|i,|i,t„|i ■ « ■ * -| 

AAA XKKKn ITnTi W KwWKII wtVWwWkTP 


r************** 








00920 

w r r 


* LOAD 1 


. AND 


SCALE SUBROUTINE * 








00930 


* ENTRY: 


(U)-END OF MPV+1 * 








00940 


* 


(Y)-END OF TEMP MPV+1 * 








00950 


* EXIT: 


1 * 


SCALE FACTOR LOADED * 








00960 


* 


SCALE SET TO SCALE FACTOR * 








00970 


************************************** 


47E9 


34 


60 


00960 


LOADO 


PSHS 


Y,U 


SAVE POINTERS 


47EB 


8D 


EF 


00990 




BSR 


LOADZ 


ZERO MPV 


47ED 


35 


60 


01000 




PULS 


Y,U 


RESTORE POINTERS 


47EF 


86 


n 


01010 




LDA 


#1 


1 


47F1 


A7 


5F 


01020 




STA 


-l.u 


STORE FOR SHIFT AND ADD 



Assembler (26-3254). Use the /SR 
option and assemble to disk as 
PI NEW /BIN. 

A basic driver is shown in Listing 2. 
This driver simply loads the PINEWj 
BIN module, sets the graphics mode, 
then executes the PI program. 



Listing 2: PI BASIC 


w 


CLEAR 2J30,&H3FFF 


11J3 


LOADM "PINEW/BIN" 


120 


DEF USR0=&H4000 


13J3 


SCREEN 1,1 


14J3 


PMODE 1 


15J3 


PCLS 


16J3 


A=USR0(j3) 


17J3 


GOTO 17J3 



Program Notes 

Many of the subroutines use address 
pointers passed in Register U registers 
or U and Y. These pointers usually point 
to the end of an MPV plus *!«'. The 
reason for this is that auto- 
decrementing is used in many subrou- 
tines. A pointer to the MPV points to 
the low-order byte, as operations such 
as multiple-precision adds and sub- 
tracts and shifts start there. An instruc- 
tion such as STD ,-U (LOADZ) decre- 
ments Register U before the instruction 
is executed. After the decrement, the 
pointer points to the last 16-bit value. 
An autodecrement of ,-U works sim- 
ilarly, except the pointer points to the 
last byte after the auto-decrement. 
Using auto-decrement saves an LEAU 
-1,U or similar instruction. 

The name of the game in much of this 
code is efficiency, especially in subrou- 
tines such as SHIFT and ADDSUB, 
which are used constantly. In DIVIDE, 
for example, good programming prac- 
tice calls for using a divisor on the stack, 
or at worst, a memory variable. How- 
ever, the divisor in DIVIDE is stored in 
an immediate instruction field just for 
the sake of squeezing out some extra 
speed by eliminating the instructions 
required in the multiply loop. 

The LOADO subroutine uses a mul- 
tiply of times 10 after initially storing a 
*1\ We could have used a generic mul- 
tiply subroutine here, just as the DI- 
VIDE is a generic divide. However, we 
used a well-known trick multiply — a 
type of shift and add. Multiplying by 10 
is equivalent to shifting one bit left, 
saving the result as X2, shifting twice 
again to get eight times the original 
value, then adding the saved X2 term. 
The shift is done by the SHIFT subrou- 



232 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



tine, which we already have, and the 
multiple-precision add by ADDSUB. 

The ADDSUB subroutine stores the 
flag for add or subtract into the OP3 
instruction. The flag is also the actual 
opcode used for ADCA or SBCA. The 
two instructions are the same format 
otherwise. 

The CONVERT subroutine uses a 
common method of converting from 
binary to decimal. Divide any binary 
number by 10. Save the remainder and 
divide the quotient by 10 again. Con- 
tinue this process until the quotient 
reduces to zero. The remainders, in 
reverse order, are the equivalent de- 
cimal number. In this case we don't need 
to know how many digits are in the 
number to be converted, because that's 
handled automatically — the process 
stops when the quotient (residue, really) 
disappears. 

We could have added a decimal point 
after the first decimal digit in printing 
out the answer — it must be '3'. How- 
ever, we left it off in this version, having 
been beaten into apathy by the pro- 
gram. It might also have been nice to 
format the printout by arranging the 
data into groups of 10 digits. (All of this 
will be done in the next version.) 

Seeing the Calculations 

As I mentioned, PI actually lets you 
see the SUM term being calculated. 
When PI is executed, you'll see the 
screen clear. No further screen activity 
occurs while LOADO loads a scaled T 
into the first MPV. After this fill, 
however, the screen is partially filled 
with data. The amount of data depends 
upon the number of bytes you have 
selected for the MPVs and the screen 
mode used in the basic driver. The 
screen data represents the first value in 
SUM — the first term of the first set. 
As the program number crunches away, 
youll see the data change, each change 
occurring to portions of the data further 
and further to the right and down, 
representing less and less significant 
digits. If you're running a version of the 
program that prints many digits, with 
significant time delays between term 
updates, keep your eye on a spot on the 
screen until the next change to zero-in 
on the digit positions being modified. 

After the first set of data has been 
calculated, you'll see the next set of 
terms changing the data area. This set 
converges more rapidly. It starts from 
the high-order digits as well, but moves 
much faster through the screen area. 



47F3 7F 

¥ f L. mJ f X 


476F 

~ » V L. 


01030 

r r r 




CLR 


SCALE 


RESET SCALE FACTOR 


47F6 34 


60 

9 F 


01040 


LON010 


PSHS 


Y U 


SAVE POINTERS 


47F8 17 


0107 


01050 




LBSR 


SHIFT 

HJL X X 


X2 


47FB 35 


60 

9 F 


01060 




PULS 


Y U 


GET POINTERS 


47FD 34 

^ f C X/ 


60 

9 F 


01070 




PSHS 


Y U 


SAVE POINTERS 

w 1* v Xj A w LI X, uxVU 


47FF IE 


23 


01080 

F^F^F 




EXG 


Y U 


SWAP Y.U 


4801 17 


00B0 

FF D F 


01090 




LBSR 


MOVE 


SAVE X2 


4804 35 


60 


01100 

j0XXj0}0 




PULS 


Y U 


GET POINTERS 


4806 34 


60 

9 F 


01110 




PSHS 


Y U 


SAVE POINTERS 

lTl T Xj X w XII lii xX 4J 


a a an 1 7 


01 GIF 7 
FF* 1 


01 1 90 




T R^P 


CHTFT 
onxr i. 


3T4 




60 


011 30 
F Li - °F 




PULS 


y n 

I | u 


RFSTORE POTNTFRS 


480D 34 


60 


01140 

r ^F 




PSHS 


Y U 


SAVE POINTERS 

U f* T XU X v X LI X XJ 1\ W 


4A0F 17 
*to jc»r x f 


00F0 
FF^F 


01150 




LBSR 


SHIFT 

(JILX& X 


X8 


35 


60 


01160 

jp x A- w y* 




PULS 


Y U 


RFSTORE POTNTFRS 

CVClV X Vl\i-I 1 Villi XjX\0 


4A1A "\L 


60 
°F 


01 1 70 
yxx f y 




r o no 


Y II 
I ,u 




4A16 flfi 


A9 


01 1 80 

ff X X O J> 




LDA 


#£A9 


ADD CODF 


AA1 A nn 


AAFP 


1 1 Qfl 




TCP 




YA x Y9 ■ Ylfl 




en 
60 


ai 9aa 




r ULo 


V IT 
I , U 


f2FT POTNTFRS 

Lȣ< i. lUllli JLLVO 




A7 6F 
*♦ / Off 


on 91 a 




t nn 


ovnu!i 


^fiAT.F TS COUNT OF DIGITS 




FFF L 


CM 9901 




AUUU 


W X 


RITMP RY 1 




*♦ /Off 


(11 9 Ifl 

01Z30 




STD 


SCALE 


STORE 


AA96 Afi 
HO&Q AO 


f!A PF 
v»0 v»d 


011 9A0J 
jtf i. c. h y> 




LDA 


- BYTES ,U 


POINT TO FIRST BYTE 


AA9Q 97 




01 950 




BEQ 


LON010 


GO IF NOT NORMALIZED 


AR 9 R 1Q 
HOtD J7 




01 760 




RTS 




RETURN 






(311 970 








011 9A01 


* CALCULATE TERM SUBROUTINE * 






AM 90fll 


* ENTRY: 


(LAST) -LAST DIVISOR VALUE * 






am o nn 
01300 


* 


CD)- 


FIRST DIVISIOR - 5/239 * 






01 31 0 


* 


(X)- 


SUBSEQUENT 


DIVISORS * 






011 390J 
jp x j xw 


* 


(ODDEVN)-ADD OR 


SUB OP CODE * 






01330 


* EXIT: 


(SUM) HOLDS FINAL VALUE * 






01340 










489H FD 


484D 


01350 


TERM 


STD 


TPI020+1 


STORE 5 OR 239 


4A9F RE 


4A4A 


01 360 




STX 


TOP1+1 


STORE 25 OR 239*239 


4R^9 CC, 


0001 


01370 




LDD 


#1 


SET DIVISOR TO 1 


4835 FD 


4774 


01 380 

Jp X J O JP 




STD 


DIVSOR 


STORE DIVISOR 


4838 FC 


4774 


01390 


TFI010 


LDD 


DIVS0R 


GET DIVISOR 


483B 10B3 


4772 


01 400 
F^FF 




CMPD 


LAST 


TEST FOR LAST 


483F 22 


4C 


01 41 0 




BHI 


TPI090 


GO IF DONE 


4841 1083 0001 


01 490 




CMPD 


#1 


TEST FOR DIVISOR-1 


4845 27 


05 


ai a ^ or 




BEQ 


TPI020 


GO IF SO 


4847 CC 


9999 


or 1 A AOf 

)fl XHHJ0 


TOPI 


LDD 


#0 


SQUARED TERM 


484A 2j9 


03 


0(1 A 501 




BRA 


TPI030 


CONTINUE 


484C CC 


WW 


Oil 4601 

j0 J.*t O J0 


TPI020 


LDD 


#0 


SQ RT TERM 


484F CE 


473D 


011 A70I 
jff it / jfl 


TPI030 


LDU 


#NDTMP1 


LS BYTE OF TEMP1+1 


4852 8D 


6C 


0(1 AAA 




BSR 


DIVIDE 


TEMPI/5 OR TEMPI/25 


4854 CE 


476F 


on aooi 




LDU 


#NDTMP2 


LS BYTE OF TEMP2+1 


4857 108E 


473D 


ori sacr 




LDY 


#NDTMP1 


LS BYTE OF TEMP1+1 


485B 8D 


57 


(71 51 01 




BSR 


MOVE 


TEMP20TEMF1 


485D FC 


4774 


01 590 




LDD 


DIVSOR 


GET CURRENT DIVISOR 


4860 CE 


476F 


011 5301 
vij j jp 




LDU 


#NDTMP2 


LS BYTE OF TEMP2 


4863 8D 


5B 


011 540J 




BSR 


DIVIDE 


TEMP2<-TEMP2/DIVISOR 


4865 CE 


0E32 


ai s 5 of 




LDU 


#ENDSUM 


LS BYTE OF SUM+1 


4868 108E 476F 


ai s6oi 

j0 X J O j0 




LDY 


#NDTMP2 


LS BYTE OF TEMP2+1 


486C B6 


4771 


011 5701 




LDA 


ODDEVN 


GET ADD/SUB FLAG 


486F 17 


007D 


01 580 

JP X J O jff 




LBSR 


ADDSUB 


ADD/SUB TO TEMP2 TO SUM 


4872 FC 


4774 


01 590 




LDD 


DIVSOR 


GET CURRENT DIVISOR 


4875 C3 


0002 


01600 




ADDD 


#2 


DIVISORODIVISOR+2 


4878 FD 


4774 


01610 

V A- W _L. W 




STD 


DIVSOR 


SAVE FOR NEXT DIVIDE 


487B B6 


4771 


01620 




LDA 


ODDEVN 


GET ADD/SUB FLAG 


487E 81 


A9 


01630 




CMPA 


#$A9 


ADD? 


4880 27 


04 


01640 

V X W i V 




BEQ 


TPI040 


GO IF ADD 


4882 86 


A9 


01650 

V A- U J J* 




LDA 


#$A9 


SET TO ADD 


4884 20 


02 


011 660J 
yiio ay) 




BRA 


TPI050 


CONTINUE 


4886 86 


A2 


m c n n 

01670 


TPI040 


LDA 


#$A2 


SET TO SUB 


4888 B7 


4771 


mean 

01oo0 


TPI050 


STA 


ODDEVN 


STORE FOR NEXT ADD/SUB 


488B 20 


AB 


n 1 con 
01690 




BRA 


TPI010 


LOOP 


488D 39 




mi Torn 
017JJJJ 


TPI090 


RTS 




RETURN 






ni 71 oi 
0171}p 


ickirkickit k k k frk~k 1ctcti"*rk*-k-k •frfrk^riekirk * * irkickickif 






AM "790 
017Z0 


* CONVERT MPV TO DECIMAL AND PRINT * 






011 710J 
F L/ *F 


* ENTRY: (U)-END OF SOURCE MPV+1 * 






01740 


* 


(Y)-END OF DEST+1 2X MPV + * 






011 7 5(3 


* EXIT: 


SOURCE DIGITS PRINTED IN DEC* 






01 760 

ff X / Q jff 




488E 34 


20 


0(1 7701 


CONVRT 


PSHS 


Y 


SAVE END OF DEST AREA 


4890 CC 


000A 


ofi i act 


CON010 


LDD 


#10 


DIVISOR FOR CONVERT 


4893 34 


60 


01790 




PSHS 


U,Y 


SAVE PARAMETERS 


4895 8D 


29 


01800 




BSR 


DIVIDE 


X/10 


4897 35 


60 


01810 




PULS 


U,Y 


RESTORE 


4899 E7 


A2 


01820 




STB 




SAVE REMAINDER 


489B B6 


4776 


01830 




LDA 


SIGNI 


GET SIGNIF FLAG 



April 1966 THE RAINBOW 233 



>< 

X 



>Mh*> 



7 




RAINBOWfest is the 
only computer show 
exclusively dedi- 
cated to your Tandy Color 
Computer. Nowhere else 
will you see as many pro- 
ducts, have access to the 
top experts, or be able to 
attend free seminars. It's the 
next best thing to receiving 
the latest issue of the rain- 
bow in your mailbox! 
Every RAINBOWfest fea- 






Show Schedule: 

Friday evening 

— Exhibits open from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Saturday 

— CoCo Community Breakfast at 8 a.m. 

— Exhibits open at 10 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. 

Sunday 

— Exhibits open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



Matf ft 'ft 




7 

k 
V 



tures many delightful sur- 
prises. It's a great opportu- 
nity for commercial pro- 
grammers to show off new 
and innovative products for 
the first time. You get the 
jump on new capabilities for 
your CoCo. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there are demon- 
strations, opportunities to 
experiment with software 
and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 



You can set your own 
pace between visiting ex- 
hibits and attending the val- 
uable, free seminars on all 
aspects of your CoCo — 
from improving BASIC skills 
to working with the sophis- 
ticated OS-9 operating sys- 
tem. 

Many of the people who 
write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are writ- 
ten about — are there to 




XXXXXAAA. 



meet you and answer your 
questions. You'll also meet 
lots of other people, just like 
you, who share your inter- 
est in the Color Computer. 
It's a person-to-person 
event, as well as a tremen- 
dous learning experience, 
in a fun and relaxed atmos- 
phere. 

To make it easier for you 
to participate, we schedule 
RAINBOWfests in three 
parts of the country. If you 
missed the fun in Palo Alto, 
California, why don't you 
make plans now to join us in 
Chicago? For members of 
the family who don't share 
your affinity for CoCo, 
you'll be comfortable know- 
ing that RAINBOWfest is 
located in an area with 
many other attractions. 




The Hyatt Regency- 
Woodfield offers special 
rates ($60, single or double 
room) for RAINBOWfest. 
The show opens Friday eve- 
ning with a session from 7 
p.m. to 10 p.m< It's a 
daytime-only show Satur- 
day — the CoCo Commu- 
nity Breakfast (separate 
tickets required) is at 8 a.m., 
then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10a.m. and runs 
until 6 p.m. There will be no 
exhibition hours or semi- 
nars Saturday evening. On 
Sunday the exhibit hall 
opens at 1 1 a.m. and closes 
at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest 
may be obtained directly 

from THE RAINBOW. We'll 

also send you a special 
reservation form so you can 



get your special room rate. 
Come to RAINBOWfest! 



s * fj^^/ Your admis- 
^S^jdj^Sl sion to RAIN- 
BOWfest also entitles you to 
visit -PCMfest! It's a show 
focusing on Tandy's new 
generation of computers — 
the Tandy 1000, 1200, 2000 
and 3000 MS-DOS compu- 
ters, and the Tandy 1 00, 200 
and 600 portables. 

PCMfest is sponsored by 
our sister publication, PCM, 
The Personal Computer 
Magazine for Tandy Com- 
puter Users. The show will 
be in the same location as 
RAINBOWfest and the ex- 
hibit hours will be exactly 
the same. If you use one of 
the newer Tandy compu- 
ters, don't miss it. 





> 

v 



Join us at a future RAINBOWfest! 

RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey Rooms: $79 per night, single or double 
Dates: Oct. 17-19, 1986 Advance Ticket Deadline: Oct. 10, 1986 

Hotel: Hyatt Regency-Princeton 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders received from each state. 
FREE RAINBOW poster for first 500 ticket orders received. 



s 



YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance sale price. 
Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 

Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 
Saturday CoCo Breakfast at $12 each total 

Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt 
Regency-Woodfield ($60, single or double room). 



$1.00 



Name (please print) 

Address 

City 



State 



Telephone 
Company . 



ZIP 



/ 
\ 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Exp. Date 

Signature 



Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, call: (502) 228-4492. 

Advance ticket deadline: May 16, 1986. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will 
also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full 
price. 



489E 27 F0 



48AJJ A6 
48A2 8B 
48A4 34 
48A6 AD 
48AA 35 
4 8 AC 10AC £4 



A? 

9F A??2 
20 



48AF 23 
48B1 35 
48B3 39 



EF 
20 



48B4 


8E 


0032 


48B7 


EC 


A3 


48B9 


ED 


C3 


48BB 


3? 


IE 


48BD 


26 


F8 


48BF 


39 





01840 
01850 
01860 
01870 
01880 
01890 
01900 
01910 
01920 
01930 
01940 
01950 
01960 
01970 
01980 
01990 
02000 
02010 
02020 
02030 
02040 
02050 
02060 
02070 
02080 
02090 
02100 
02110 
02120 
02130 
02140 
02150 
02160 



BEQ 


CON010 


GO IF Q NOT 0 


* NOW PRINT FROM <Y) 




CON020 LDA 


,Y+ 


GET DIGIT 0-9 


ADDA 


#$30 


CONVERT TO ASCII 


PSHS 


Y 


SAVE POINTER 


JSR 


[$A002] 


PRINT 


PULS 


Y 


RESTORE POINTER 


CMPY 


,s 


TEST FOR END 


BLS 


CON020 


GO IF NOT END 


PULS 


Y 


RESET STACK 


RTS 




RETURN 



* MOVE ONE MPV TO ANOTHER * 

* ENTRY: BYTES-SIZE OF MPV IN BYTES * 

* (U)-END OF DEST MPV+1 * 

* (Y)-END OF SOURCE MPV+1 * 

* EXIT: DEST MPV NOW-SOURCE MPV * 

W**Wck^*-k1rtckiclr*rk k * ft * * * ************** 



MOVE 


LDX 


#BYTES 


GET # BYTES 


MOV010 


LDD 




GET SOURCE WORD 




STD 


,--u 


STORE IN DEST WORD 




LEAX 


-2,X 


DECREMENT COUNT 




BNE 


MOV010 


GO IF NOT DONE 




RTS 




RETURN 



* DIVIDE MPV BY 16 BIT DIVISOR 

* ENTRY: BYTES-SIZE OF MPV IN BYTES 

* BITS-SIZE OF MPV IN BITS 

* (U)-END OF MPV+1 

* (D)-DIVISOR 

* EXIT: (MPV) -QUOTIENT 

* (D) -REMAINDER 



* 
* 



48C0 


FD 


48DE 


02170 


DIVIDE 


STD 


OP1+2 


SETUP DIVISOR 


48C3 


FD 


48E3 


02180 




STD 


OP2+1 


SETUP DIVISOR 


48C6 


108E 


0190 


02190 




LDY 


#BITS 


LOAD # BITS IN MPV 


48CA 


86 


01 


02200 




LDA 


#1 


SET SIGNI TO NONE 


48CC 


B7 


4776 


02210 




STA 


SIGNI 


SIGNIFICANCE FLAG 


48CF 


CC 


0000 


02220 




LDD 


#0 


INITIALIZE MS BYTE 


48D2 


34 


40 


02230 


DIV010 


PSHS 


U 


SAVE MPV ADDRESS 


48D4 


8D 


2C 


02240 




BSR 


SHIFT 


SHIFT MPV 


48D6 


35 


40 


02250 




PULS 


U 


RESTORE ADDRESS 


48D8 


59 




02260 




ROLB 




LAST BIT TO D 


48D9 


49 




02270 




ROLA 




HIGH-ORDER BYTE 


48 DA 


25 


06 


02280 




BCS 


OP2 


GO IF HIGH -ORDER BIT 


48DC 


1083 


0000 


02290 


OP1 


CMPD 


#0 


DUMMY-TEST DIVISOR 


48E0 


25 


08 


02300 




BLO 


DIV020 


GO IF NO GO 


48E2 


83 


0000 


02310 


OP2 


SUBD 


#0 


DUMMY- SUBTRACT DIVISOR 


48E5 


6C 


5F 


02320 




INC 


-1,0 


SET Q-l 


48E7 


7F 


4776 


02330 




CLR 


SIGNI 


SET SIGNIFICANCE 


48EA 


31 


3F 


02340 


DIV020 


LEAY 


-1»Y 


DECREMENT # BITS 


48EC 


26 


E4 


02350 




BNE 


DIV010 


GO IF MORE 


48EE 


39 




02360 




RTS 




RETURN 



02370 
02380 
02390 



* MULTIPLE-PRECISION ADD OR SUBTRACT * 

* ENTRY: BYTES-SIZE OF MPV IN BYTES * 



After the second set of data has been 
processed, the program converts SUM 
(the screen) to ASCII. In doing so, it 
successively divides SUM by 10, mak- 
ing SUM smaller and smaller. When 
this happens, you'll see a blank portion 
in the data area growing and snaking 
through the data area as more and more 
leading zeros are produced in SUM. 
When SUM is reduced down to zero, 
the ASCII digits are printed from the 
temporary ASCII buffer. 

How Fast is PI and How does the 
CoCo Compare to Other Systems? 

TV is a fairly efficient program, but it's 
obvious that our CoCo is no Cray X- 
MP! It takes about three hours to 
generate and print 500 decimal digits 
and about 23 hours for 1,000 digits (see 
Figure 7). Mainframe computers typi- 
cally generate thousands of digits of pi 
in six to eight hours. For smaller MPVs, 
the speed drops dramatically and the 
screen is fun to watch. (As I write this, 
I'm running PI for 2,000 digits — 
estimated completion time is 240 
hours.) 

Could the PI program be sped up? 
Undoubtedly, both by more efficient 
code and by more efficient algorithms. 
This is a first attempt at the problem of 
generating pi and, frankly, it turned out 
to be an interesting project. It's one of 
those programming problems that 
simply can't be done in anything other 
than assembly language, where speed is 
all important. A perfect project for one 
of those silly hackers who can't think of 
anything but computers. 

Well, it's 3 a.m. now, and I'm going 
to bed. Maybe tomorrow I can speed up 
the program again. Call me after I've 
caught up on my sleep if you think 



Figure 7:P/to 1,000 Decimal Digits 



314 


1 


592653 


5 


8 


9 


7 


9 


3 


23 


8 


4 


6 


2 


6 


4 


3 


3 


6 


3 


2 


7 


9 


5 


0 


2 


8 


8 


4 


1 


97 


1 


69 


3993 


7 


5 


1 


0 


5 


82 


09 


7 


4 


9 


4 


4 


5 


9 


2 


30 


78 1 64062862089 


986 


2 


803482 


5 


3 


4 


2 


1 


1 


70 


6 


7 


9 


8 


2 


1 


4 


8 


0 


8 


6 


5 


1 


3 


2 


6 


2 


3 


0 


6 


64 


7 


09 


3844 


6 


0 


9 


5 


5 


05 


82 


2 


3 


1 


7 


2 


5 


3 


5 


94 


08 12848 1 1 1745 


028 


4 


10270 1 


9 


3 


8 


5 


2 


1 


10 


5 


5 


5 


9 


6 


4 


4 


6 


2 


2 


9 


4 


8 


9 


5 


4 


9 


3 


0 


3 


81 


9 


64 


4288 


1 


0 


9 


7 


5 


66 


59 


3 


3 


4 


4 


6 


1 


2 


8 


47 


56482337867831 


652 


7 


120190 


9 


1 


4 


5 


6 


4 


85 


6 


6 


9 


2 


3 


4 


6 


0 


3 


4 


8 


6 


1 


0 


4 


5 


4 


3 


2 


6 


64 


8 


2 1 


3393 


6 


0 


7 


2 


6 


02 


49 


1 


4 


1 


2 


7 


3 


7 


2 


45 


870066063 15588 


174 


8 


815209 


2 


0 


9 


6 


2 


8 


2 9 


2 


5 


4 


0 


9 


1 


7 


1 


5 


3 


6 


4 


3 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


5 


9 


03 


6 


00 


1 1 33 


0 


5 


3 


0 


5 


48 


82 


0 


4 


6 


6 


5 


2 


1 


3 


84 


14695194151160 


943 


3 


057270 


3 


6 


5 


7 


5 


9 


59 


1 


9 


5 


3 


0 


9 


2 


1 


8 


6 


1 


1 


7 


3 


8 


1 


9 


3 


2 


6 


1 1 


7 


93 


105 1 


1 


8 


5 


4 


8 


0 7 


44 


6 


2 


3 


7 


9 


9 


6 


2 


74 


956735 18857527 


248 


9 


122793 


8 


1 


8 


3 


0 


1 


1 9 


4 


9 


1 


2 


9 


8 


3 


3 


6 


7 


3 


3 


6 


2 


4 


4 


0 


6 


5 


6 


64 


3 


08 


602 1 


3 


9 


4 


9 


4 


63 


95 


2 


2 


4 


7 


3 


7 


1 


9 


07 


02 1 7986094370 


277 


0 


539217 


1 


7 


6 


2 


9 


3 


17 


6 


7 


5 


2 


3 


8 


4 


6 


7 


4 


8 


1 


8 


4 


6 


7 


6 


6 


9 


4 


05 


1 


32 


0005 


6 


8 


1 


2 


7 


14 


52 


6 


3 


5 


6 


0 


8 


2 


7 


78 


577 13427577896 


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Last Few Digits Invalid 



236 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



you've found a way to increase the Call me collect at any time if you can Next time, we'll present more assem- 
program by a factor of two or three, increase the speed tenfold! bly language topics. □ 







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April 1966 THE RAINBOW 237 



KISSable OS-9 



Featuring 

a Trig Library in C 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The column this month is short on 
prose — but long on listings. 
While we listen to the March 
winds blow and wait for the first hint 
of spring we feature a library of trig 
functions written in Micro ware C for the 
Color Computer. Several assembly 
language utility programs contributed 
by our readers round out the column. 

We received a nice Christmas card 
from Hiro Sugawara at the Ark Corpo- 
ration in Tokyo whom we met at Mi- 
croware's OS-9 Seminar in Des Moines. 
With the card was the "OS-9 is No. 1!" 
logo he distributes in Japan. We print 
it here to share the international flavor 
of OS-9. 




Dale L. Puckett, who is author of The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale 
works as a U.S. Coast Guard chief 
warrant officer and lives in Alexandria, 
Virginia. 



About Version 2.0 

Before we jump into a short descrip- 
tion of this month's contributions, well 
pass along a few news items that have 
crossed the desk during the past month. 
First, the Radio Shack catalog number 
for OS-9 Level 1, Version 2.00 is 700- 
2331. If you own OS-9 already, you may 
upgrade to the new version for $24.95. 
As we write this in early January, we 
still have not received our copy but we 
expect it any day. As soon as we get our 
hands on a disk well pass along our first 
impressions. 

Third party vendors will most likely 
be scrambling also as they attempt to 
ensure that their products run properly 
on the new version. When we talked to 
Tandy we also learned they plan to ship 
a new 100-page computer catalog to 
their stores. Deborah McAlister, Tan- 
dy's public relations manager, told me 
we can expect to see at least 40 pages 
of software — including a list of some 
of the express order programs. 

We have also received copies of Desk- 
Mate and D. L. Logo from Tandy. Both 
look great and the documentation really 
shines. Both manuals are written foi 
users. This means that people who need 
to get a job done with their computer 
will be able to do it quickly without 
searching through several manuals full 
of technical details they don't need. I 
have heard that DeskMate is a big seller 
in the Washington, D. C area, and one 
Coast Guard commander tells me he 
now uses it to keep all his household and 
investment records. I hope to be able to 



give you some first-hand observations 
soon. 

I'm sure glad my December 1985 
column hit the streets before DeskMate. 
It seems to have wiped out most of my 
wish list. Gerald Ross of Des Plaines, 
Illinois was quick to point that out. 
"Have you looked at DeskMate! It uses 
OS-9, and has a calendar, calculator, 
text editor, filing system and many 
other functions." 

Other New Products 

Computerware is now shipping a new 
advanced utilities package. The new 
KShell alone should be worth the price 
of the package. Written by OS-9 Users 
Group President Brian Lantz, it brings 
many of the features found in OS-9 
68K's Shell Command Interpreter to 
the Color Computer and other 6809- 
based computers. 

By the way, the Users Group now has 
a new address. If you need to contact 
them, write to 974