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THE COOR CCWU7ER M 

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Our Graphics IssiJP 




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WORLDS OF FLIGHT (WOF) is a "view" 
oriented flight simulation for the TRS-80 
Color Computer, written entirely in 
Machine Language. "View" oriented 
means that the pilot may determine his or 
her position by actually dewing the sur- 
rounding landmarks as opposed to using 
instruments whioh sense navigational 
references, This is a major departure from 
"instrument only" simulations which can 
be achieved through BASIC programs. 
Most instrument maneuvers and pro- 
cedures may be practiced. The craft is a 
light-weight, single-engine airplane with 
k>w wings. A no$e wheel which is both 
Sleerable and retractable is also modeled. 
Some aerobatics are possible including 
sustained inverted flight, aileron roils, 
spins and stalls. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $29.95 DISK $32,95 





i. 




N I 



I II • | 



The Experts Say: 



C.L — "As a pilot I found "Flight" to 
be an outstanding simulation. 

M.H. — "No one has created a more 
realistic flight simulator for the Color 
Computer. " 

D. HOOPER, pilot for major airline — 
"An outstanding flying experience. 
Very realistic." 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



• MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX 
LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 

I ARCADE ACTION GAMES I 

TO ORDER CALL «1W967-0444 



Y From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 

PLUS after PLUS after PLUS 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

COMPUTERS 

Model 4 Portable 

64K w/2 Drives 1020 

Model 2000 2Dr 2299 

Model 12 1 Drive 2360 

Model 16B 1Dr 256K 3965 

MODEMS 

Hayes Smart mod em II 215 

AC-3 125 

DC Modem I 89 

DC Modem II 160 

PRINTERS 

Silver Reed EXP400 D.W. Par. 309 

Silver Reed EXP550 D.W. Ser. 430 

CGP115 159 

CGP220 Ink Jet 545 

DMP110 299 

Toshiba 1340 (24 wire head) 779 

Gemini 10X 289 

Gemini Powertype 345 

Panasonic P1091 315 

Smith Corona Fastext 190 

Prowriter 8510 345 

Okidata and Epson CALL 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



ETC. 




Juniors Revenge 


28.95 


Disk Drive Controller 


139 


Pac Attack 


24.95 


Extended Basic Kit 


39.95 


Block Head 


26.95 


PBH Ser/Par Conv. 


69 


Lunar Rover Patrol 


24.95 


64K Ram Chips 


62.95 


Lancer 


24.95 


Deluxe Keyboard 


35.95 


Typing Tutor 


23.95 


HJL Keyboard 


79.95 


Galagon 


24.95 


CCR-81 Recorder 


52 


Scott Adams Adventures 


19.95 


Deluxe Joystick (each) 


35.95 


Sea Dragon 


34.95 


Joysticks (pair) 


22 


Colorcome 


49.95 


Video Plus (monitor adapter) 


24.95 


Telewriter 64 


49.95 


Video Plus IIC 


39.95 


O-Pak (disk) 


34.95 


Amdek Color 1 + Monitor 


299 


Key-264K 


39.95 


Amdek Video 300 Green 


145 


Deft Pascal 


79.95 


Amdek Video 300 Amber 


159 


Elite-Calc 


59.95 


Taxan Color 210 Monitor 


265 


VIP Writer 


69.95 


Taxan Green 


130 


VIP Calc 


69.95 


Taxan Amber 


139 


VIP Terminal 


49.95 






VIP Database (disk) 


59.95 


SOFTWARE (Tape Version) 


Graphicom 


29.95 


The King 


26.95 






Screen Print (specify printer) 


19.95 


Order any 2 software pieces listed 


Buzzard Bait 


27.95 


and take 10% off their listed price. 


World of Flight 


29.95 


All Radio Shack software 10% off list. 


Colorpede 


29.95 


Send for complete list. 





com 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



r r s • tv i$ a registered trademark ol Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 





COMPUTERS 



FEATURES 



COVER art * by Fred Crawford 



[jg] The small Cassette tape 
symbols beside features and 
regular columns indicate that 
the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's 
RAINBOW ON TAPE, ready to 
CLOAD and RUN. For full 
details, check our RAINBOW 
ON TAPE ad on Page 213, 



H Creating Moire Patterns In PMODE 4/ Paul Faulstich 

GRAPHICS UTILITY Getting more colors on your screen 

H The CoCo School Marm/ Judy M. Dacus, David M. Ddfcus. 
EDUCATION Part II — Spelling practice and testing 

S Developing A Database Manager/ Bill Nolan 

DISK TUTORIAL The use of direct access disk files 

Everything To Know About CoColAndv Kluck 

TUTORIAL GETting and PUTting statements 

Take Stock Of Your Portfolio With 
Pro-Color-File/Jorge Mir 

TUTORIAL Design your own database 

S For PMODE 4 Screen Enlargement 

There's BLOWUP /Joseph Kohn 

GRAPHICS UTILITY Creating larger graphics 

H Tell Your Fortune With Tarot/ Amir Dimitri , 

GAME Revealing your future — it 's magic! 

(HI Lo-Res Graphics For The 'ASCII-ing'A//™ Schmidt -\ 

GRAPHICS Multiple uses of Lo-Res Graphics 

\s\ The Art Of Joystick Painting/tfr/aA? Preble . 

GRAPHICS A handy graphics editor program 



18 



25 



32 



38 



45 



57 



74 



90 



97 



119 



.131 



[HI Expanding Little E's Powers///. Allen Curtis 

PROGRAMMING UTILITY Little E gets bigger 

S Preserving The Classics By Patching 

Art Gallery/P^/ S. Hoffman 

GRAPHICS An artistic enhancement 

To Pack Or Not To Pack/ Burt Wit ham , Jr. . 140 

TUTORIAL Spread out those lines 

S In Pursuit of Presidential Jrma/Mike Knolhoff 146 

GAME Hail to the chiefs 

EsS The Home Hurricane Tracking Station/^ Jones, 

Wayne Davis, Gene Clifton 161 

GRAPHICS PROGRESSION Your CoCo can be a meteorologist 



H Cooking With CoCo/ f Colin J. Stearman - 

EXPANDING BASIC Part IV, an appetizer for keyboard entry 

My CoCo Is Not IBM Compatible/ Bob Rosen 

COMMENTARY IBM vs. CoCo — an opinion 



.180 



.238 



NEXT MONTH: November is our data communications issue, and will include a 
comprehensive listing of CoCo BBS systems across the country, a terminal program, 
and a hardware project for adding auto answer to your Modem I. Along with our usual 
mix, we'll also have a big league "graphics" special for football fans! 

We'll have more games, more home use programs, more educational material and 
more information on our Color Computer than is available anywhere else. 

Look for November's Rainbow! 



COLUMNS 



^ -ntM /fa* 



BASIC Training/ Joseph Kolar 

A problem solver's day at the races 

Bits And Bytes Of BASIC/ Richard White. 
Rainbow Checkbook 



Building October's Rainbow///™ Reed . 
Those long, long listings 

Byte Master//?. Bartly Betts 



60 



.250 



16 



243 



The real thing — writing your own assembly language program 

CoCo Graphics/ Don Inman 174 

Color LQGO with printing 

CommLink//?. Wayne Day 126 

Welcome to the world of telecommunications 

Earth To Ed/Ed Ellers 234 



Beam up those "tech" questions 

B Education Holes/ Steve Blyn _ 

Read the directions! 

Education Overview/ Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
The computer as a classroom tool 

PRINT #-2,/Lawrence G Folk 

Editor's notes 

Turn Of The Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

The modem to printer connection 

H Wishing Well/ 'Fred Scerbo , 



52 
.23 
.12 
.66 



.104 



The CoCo tournament programs 

"GameMaster's Apprentice" and "School Is In The* Heart Of A Child" will 
return next month. 



RAINBOWTECH 



Downloads/Dan Downard 

Answers to your technical questions 

KISSable OS-9/ Dale L. Puckett 

An anniversary special 

Eal Personable Pascal/ 'Daniel A. Eastham 
Representing collections of data 



DEPARTMENTS 

Advertiser Index 



.258 



261 



.265 



Back Issue Information. 
Corrections 



Letters To Rainbow. 

The Pipeline 

Rainbow Info 



Received And Certified . 



272 
263 
237 
_ 6 
136 
144 
188 



Reviewing Reviews 
Scoreboard— _ — 



Scoreboard Pointers . 
Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Subscription Information 
These Fine Stores 



191 
170 
172 

225 
_ 65 
270 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

Product Review Contents - 




October 1984 



Vol. IV No. 3 



187 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Fslk 

Managing Editor James E, Reed 

Senior Editor Courtney Noe 

Technical Editor Dan Downard 

Copy Editor Suaan Remini 

Submission* Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Review* Editor Monica Dorth 

Editorial Assistant* Valarie Edwards. 
Wendy FaJk, Suatanne Banish Kurowsky, 
Greta Martin-Enefe, Lynn Miller, Shirley Morflan 
Kevin Nickots, Tamara Sotley 

Technicai Assistant EdEHera 

Contributing Editor* Boo Albrecht, R. Bartly Betts 
Steve Btyn, R. Wayne Day, Tony DiStefano, 
Dan Eastham, Frank Hogg, Don Inman, 
Joseph Kolar, Michael Piog, Dale ? ucfcett, 
Fran Saito, Paul Seartoy, Fred Scerbo, 
Richard White 

Art Director Sally Nichols 

Asalstant Art Director Jerry McKleman 

Oeflgner* Peggy Henry, Neal & Lauroft, 
Kevin Quiggins 

Advertising Coordinator Charlotte Ford 

Advertising Representative KateTucci 

Advertising Asalstant Debbie Baxter 
(602) 220-4492 

General Manager Patricia H. Mimch 

Asst. General Manager tor Finance Donna Shuck 

Bookkeeper Diane Moore 

Advertiiing Accounts Doris Taylor 

Dealer Accounts J udy Quashnock 

Administrative Assistant to the Publisher 
Marianne Booth 

RAtNBOWfeet Site Management WifloFalk 

Director of Fulfillment Services Bonnie Shepard 

Aaat Customer Service Manager Deidra Henry 

Customer Service Repreaentatlve Sandy Apple 

Word Processor Manager Lynda Wilson 

RAINBOW ON TAP€ Subscriptions Monica Wheat 

Research Assistants Laurie Fatk f 
Loretta Varda, Kara Voit 

Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Production Assistant Melba Smith 



AavMiltlag •««* M«fk«tins Offles tor tft# Wefttra ttetss aad 
province: Cindy SftacMctord, dJrsclor, 12110 UstUtan *«**», 
Suite 8, P.O. Sox 74-578, PuyaHup, WA M373-0578. Pfcor*: (SMj 
84S-77S6. Twrltortt* Nw*Ud«fc AK, AT, CA, CO, Ml, *D, NT, NV t 

NM, OR, UT, wa> WY, C«nsetea Pmkmw pf asxmUi, BctUefa 

THE RAINBOW ii rtfwwwoted to tht eastern United Ststes by 
Q»rtan4 Aatodstet. )n&, P.O. am S.M.S., Ourtwry, MA 
ami > (8 1 7 ) S34 -S4S4 of S34-654S. AdwliMro SSSt «# tte suwu- 
Nppf msy contact thom tor (wtavr arfawn«Ui*». TwrttoriM 
tnckKteO: AL, CT,D£, DO, FL, OA, It, IN, KY, lit, NO NA, Mf > MS, 
f^,NHm.NV,OHPA,RltaC,T^ 
i*o*» oi Ontario, OvtMtosc. 



TH« RAINBOW is published every month of the year by 
FALSQFT, Inc., 9529 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 3*5, 
Prospect. KY, 40059. Phone $02) 528-4492. thsraiw- 
bow and the rainbow logotypes are * trademarks of 
FALSOFT, Inc. 

Second class postage paid Prospect. KY and addi- 
tional offices. USPS H. 705-050 {ISSN No. 0746-4797). 
POSTMASTER: Send address change* to THE RAINBOW. 
P.O. Box 385, Prospect. KY 40059. forwarding Postage 
Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid 
from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa* Ont- 
ario, Canada. 

Entire contents * by FALSOFT, Inc., 1984. the raw- 
bow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its 
subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any 
means is prohibited Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is 
expressly prohibited. AH programs herein are distrib- 
uted In an as is" basis, without warranty of any Hind 
whatsoever. 

TRS-80. Color basic, Extended Color Basic, Scrips*! 
and Program Pak are * trademarks of the Tandy Corp. 
CompuServe is a * trademark of CompuServe inc. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $26 per year in the 
United States. Canadian and Mexican rates are U.S. $35. 
Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $65, air mail US. 
$100. AH subscriptions begin with next available issue. 

Limited back issues are available. Please see notice 
tor issues which are in print and costs. Payment 
accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, 
Cash, Check or Money Order in U.S. currency only. 



LETTERS TO THE 






ARTS AND LETTERS 




U.S. r%Vtw*y4* 
P.O. Be* *o<* 
Prosper KY 100S<\ 



Envelope Of The Month 



Jon Blow 
San Diego, CA 



A RAINBOWfest ENTHUSIAST 

Editor: 

1 had a really great time at the rainbow- 
fest in Chicago and was pleased to see that 
the exhibit was held in a larger area than 
1983's Chicago rain Bow test. 1 not only had 
fun, but 1 found it informative and found 
many good bargains. 1 will have to say, 
though, that 1 spent much time watching 
demonstrations of Graphkom. It was quite 
a drive from Hopkinsville, Ky., to Chicago, 
111., but it was well worth it. Thanks for the 
Color Computer's greatest magazine. 

Mike Baker 
Hopkinsville, KY 



I enjoy reading rainbow from cover to 
cover. What 1 like most is the print. For a 
Granny this means a lot. 

1 recently made an index card file for each 
program in all of my issues. What makes it 
so nice is that I found all correction updates, 
too. 

I enjoy taking computer classes and buy- 
ing all the magazines for the CoCo. rain- 
Bow is number one cm my list. 
Keep up the good work! 

Mrs. Joyce Gutter} 7 
Stockbridge, GA 



KUDOS 



Editor: 

I am the proud owner of a gray 64K 
Extended cassette-based CoCo. 



Editor: 

"Reviewing Reviews" is one of the most 
outstanding features of any magazine, any- 
where. In the April 1984 issue, Page 220, 
Edward Lowe said it the way it is. He and 
the rainbow are to be congratulated. 

Lawrence Pinter 
Yokohamashuchu, Japan 



Editor: 

I have owned a Color Computer for all of 
one month now and I already have 1 1 issues 
of your fantastic magazine. Every issue 1 get 
is something, to look forward to. When 1 
read your article on how to upgrade a CoCo 
2to64K of memory I immediately ordered a 
set of chips and violated my computer's war- 
ranty by opening it up and installing the 
extra memory. Your instructions were per- 
fectly simple and accurate. The modification 
worked perfectly and now I can type in all 
those programs that I was missing because I 
had only 16K. 

By the way, when using your utility A 
Bigger Byte For BASIC (January 1984, 
Page 74) I noticed that the Reset button 
causes the computer to revert to normal 
ROM mode (at least in the 32K mode any- 
way). I found that a simple POKE 65503,0 
would switch the computer back into all 
RAM mode without affecting the basic 
program or any variables. POKE 65502,0 
switches to normal ROM mode so 1 can go 
between the two at will in case 1 want to use 
the speed-up poke. 

Thanks for a great magazine and keep up 
the fine work. 

David Voerman 
Qualicum Beach 
British Columbia 



CONSTRUCTIVE SUGGESTION 

Editor: 

1 have been reading rainbow for several 
months and find it interesting and informa- 
tive. 1 have, in fact, shifted my subscription 
from another computer magazine to rain- 
bow since it seemed that tlfey were providing 
less and less for the Color Computer. The 
one area that 1 did like, however, was con- 
struction (hardware) articles that apply to 
the Color Computer as Well as to others. 
Thus, I, for one, would be happy to see even 



6 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



more construction articles in future issues of 

RAINBOW. 

Keep up the ^ood work. 

John R. Hanson 
Winter Springs, FL 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

One request that 1 have heard most on my 
Black jak program (April 1984, Page 97) is 
that people would like to see the dealer have 
one up card as well as the players. For that 
reason 1 have included two line changes that 
should fill the need. I would like to say that 1 
feel rainbow is the best thing that happened 
for our CoCo. Keep up the fine work. 

Replacement lines: 

2120 FOR T=6 TO 7: GOSUB3050: 

GOSUB3700: GOSUB2040: 1FT=6 

THEN GOSUB 3l80:GOTO2160 ELSE 

PUT(122,4)-(142,34),D: 

GOSUB3440: T=2: RETURN 

2150 FORX^l TO 500:NEXT:FOR T=7 
TO IO:GOSUB3050: GOSUB3700:lFT-7 
THEN GOSUB 3180: GOTO2170 ELSE 
GOSUB2040: GOSUB3 180:1F T=8 
THEN 

2180 ELSE IFT=9 THEN 2190 ELSE 
IF T=|0 THEN 2200 

Steve Kincade 
Toronto, Ontario 

A HELPFUL STUNT 

Editor. 

Regarding my program Stunt Pilot as it 
appeared in the rainbow, March 1984, 
Page 67, because of a bug in the Extended 
basic ROM and the PCLEAR5 command 
in Line 4, when you first type RUN enter 
the computer will return "? UL error in 4." 
Ignore this message. Type RUN enter a 
second time and Stunt Pilot will run as 
expected. 

If anyone having problems with Stunt 
Pilot will phone me before 10 p.m. (Eastern 
Time) or write to me (please enclose a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope), 1 will do my 
best to get them "flying." The more detail 
you give about the problem the better chance 
1 will have to \>e of help. 313 Sage Rd., 
40207; phone (502) 895-4636. 

Bob Poppe 
Louisville, KY 

Editor. 

Thanks for publishing Charles M. Thon- 
en's Mail Mover in the May issue, Page 75. 
For me, it certainly paid for a year's sub- 
scription to rainbow. 

Good as it is, 1 think 1 have an improve- 
ment your readers will like. Adding the fol- 
lowing two lines will allow you to see how 
many records you have made, how many 
bytes are used afid how many bytes are left. 

180 PRINTY; '-RECORDS"; (LL+ 
(30*Y));"= IBYTES USED" 

190 PR1NT@1 36, ( 1 3(XXMLL+(30* Y)));^= 
BYTES LEFT"; 

Doug McLaughlin 
Oxnard> CA 



Editor: 

I just finished running Mail Mover by 
Charles M. Thonen. It is really a super pro- 
gram and for any of your readers who may 
have had trouble getting it to run on disk, 
here are a couple extra files. 

In addition to Mr. Thonen's fixes found 
on Page 75 of the May issue of rainbow: 

1) Delete the negative sign in Line 6140. 

2) If lockup occurs with option 9 then 
delete the high speed poke in Line 8020. 

3) My Gemini 10X prints garbage when it 
encounters PRINTtt-U, "". To get the same 
effect just enter a space between the quotes. 
The lines concerned would be 7200, 7260, 
7370 and 7410. 

4) 1 use a green phosphorous monitor and 
due to that, the edit options' orange cursor 
was invisible. To get the arrow cursor, 
change the CHR$(255) in Line 2130 to 
CHR$(62). 

5) This next tid-bit is not a fix, just a big 
help. Add two extra lines: 

1 GOTO 14000 

14000 PCLEARLGOTO120 

6) It wasn't mentioned, but remove the 
remark sign in front of Line 180. 1 found it 
extremely helpful to not only see remaining 
memory, but the data file name and number 
of files as well. So 1 edited it. 

175 YY=Y-I:1F YY=-I THEN YY=0 
1 80 PR 1NTTAB( 1 )"space="M EM "file 

"FF$" size"YY 
As 1 said before, Mail Mover is a super 
program and befits a super magazine. 

Terry Wilson 
Baton Rouge, LA 

Editor: 

If you would like to practice typing or 
wish to leave a message on your computer, 
you may not wish to load in or type in 
another program. In this case, just type 
POKE 159,0. Note; After entering this mode, 
there is no way to escape it. 

Jon Blow 
San Diego, CA 



TIRED FINGERS 

Editor: 

1 enjoyed your Rainbow Book of .Ad- 
ventures very much. Although the long 
hours it took one to type them in, 1 found the 
Adventures top rate. 

1 have started writing an Adventure., 1 
would like to thank you for all your tutorials 
on Adventures. It has improved my games a 
lot.. 

My question is: Will the rainbow be 
planning another Adventure contest? If so, 
when? 

Nathan Fischer 
Ponchatoula, CA 

Editor's Note: You missed it! The 
winners of our second contest will be 
announced next month. Our third 
annual contest will be launched next 
spring, but it's not too early to get 
started. By the way, we do offer a 
cassette tape of all the programs in the 
first Rainbow Book of Adventures. 



BE FORTHFUL' 

Editor. 

1 would like to see some articles on the 
forth language. Surely, there must be many 
others that have some supplier's version and 
would join me to request a column on it., 

We do have regular columns, now on 
PASCAL, os-9, assembly language and BASIC, 
of course. We will not get (forth articles 
and columns) unless we let ourselves be 
heard! So, let's be real fort hful! Anyway, we 
must not struggle along on our own, when so 
many others are being provided with their 
languages; we must speak up and do it for 
ourselves! 

May the forth be with us! 

Thomas 4- Earl 
Greenwich, RI 



NEED COCO INFO 

Editor: 

A call to teachers, publishers, pro- 
grammers, and users: The school district 
where 1 work is installing a computer lab full 
of CoCos. We would appreciate helpful 
advice from anyone who has worked with 
the CoCo in schools. Send replies to 2400 
Cornwall Drive, 45385. 

James Vending 
Zenia, OH 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

Will some reader please write in with a 
recommendation (or plans) for a home 
computer table? 

1 would like an example of both a pur- 
chased and homemade product; allowing for 
a monitor, disk drive and printer. 

Lloyd E. Wing 
Owosso, MI 

Editor: 

Vm a 64 K Disk Extended Color basic 
user. As an electrical designer for machine 
tool control systems, 1 would be interested in 
hearing from anyone who has developed a 
wiring diagram/schematic program for 
CoCo. Write me at Route 1, Box 29BB, 
54157. 

Dick Freeman 
Peshtigo, WI 

Editor: 

1 am looking for a language translator 
program. It should meet the following cri- 
teria: 

1) It must use very little of 16K's memory 
and be easily adaptable to 32K and 64K, 
leaving lots of space for data. 

2) The screen menu should feature: add a 
word, delete a word, input/output to tape or 
disk and translate a word. Other features 
such as change a word or sort alphabetically 
could be added. 1 can always insert a REM 
at the beginning of these routines. 

3) The add and delete functions 
should be available in both English and the 
foreign word. 

4) The translate function should work 
as follows: key in the English word and have 
CoCo print the foreign word to screen. Key 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 7 



i 



in the foreign word and have CoCo print the 
English equivalent to screen. 

1 am willing and able to key the English 
words and their foreign equivalents into the 
DATA statements, but I am not able to 
come up with the working "guts*' of this 
program. 1 f any of you hackers consider this 
a challenge, 1 would appreciate receiving 
whatever you come up with. Good Luck! 
My address is 8376 W. Street, Route 185, 
45308. 

Greg Ellis 
Bradford, OH 

A COLLECTOR'S ITEM 

Editor: 

1 have been searching the rainbow and 
other computer publications for a CoCo 
program for use in the hobby of postage 
stamp collecting. It should consist of a pro- 
gram or system of programs that will main- 
tain a stamp inventory and print an inven- 
tory list. So far 1 have not located such a 
program in these publications or in Linn's 
Stamp News. 

If any of your readers know of a source for 
such programs, 1 would appreciate a letter 
telling where they can be obtained. My 
address is 1410 Shelby Parkway, 33904-5761 . 

Arthur H. West 
Cape Coral FL 

Editor: 

1 would like a program that would figure 
interest on U.S. savings bonds from year 
1970 to current and be able to update it each 
year. The bonds have a variable rate which 



makes it more of a challenge. I haven't been 
able to find anything on this in any of the 
computer books or magazines. Any assist- 
ance would be greatly appreciated. The 
bonds are EE Series from $25 to $1000. 

Ronald Huntzinger 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 

Editor's Note: We suggest you look at 
LiV Ole Interest Monitor in the Sept. 
1984, Page 51, issue of the rainbow. 

Editor: 

How can 1 make a simple CoCo dialer to 
use with my modem? 

Will someone publish the plans in THE 
rainbow or do 1 have to buy them? 

Tom Mills 
Chicago, IL 

Editor's Note: See An Automatic 
Phone Dialer for Radio Shack's 
Modem II in Nov. 1983 rainbow, 
Page 53. 



PEN PAL SERVICE 

Editor: 

1 first would like to congratulate your 
magazine. 1 can remember when it was just a 
newsletter! And now look at it! 

The reason I am sending this letter is 
about Micro-Zone Pen Pal service. Pen Pal 
is a service where people send letters to us 
and they are forwarded around the world to 
other users and back again. If the readers 



would like more information, please send a 
SASE. We are also forming a computer 
club. 

Write to: Micro-Zone Computers, 7931 
N.W. 35 Ct., Apt. 3, 33063. 

Jon Jacobs 
Coral Springs, FL 



CLUBS, CLUBS, CLUBS 

Editor: 

The CoCo'Phile Society of Syracuse is a 
Color Computer User Group in Syracuse. 
We meet at the Data'Phile, 207 Melrose 
Ave., North Syracuse every third Saturday 
of the month at 8 p.m. For more informa- 
tion, please contact Tim Ashley at (3 1 5) 463- 
6477 or Dan Button at (315) 422-9531 or 
672-3694. 

Dan Button 
Camillus, NY 

Editor: 

1 have formed the CoCo S1G, a special 
interest group of the Jefferson State Compu- 
ter Users Group (formerly Jackson Amateur 
Computer Society) in Bedford, Ore. We 
meet on the first Friday of each month. The 
main group puts out an eight-page news- 
letter each month. If you would like more 
information or would like to receive our 
newsletter, contact me at 2847 LaMirada, 
97504, or call (503) 779-4618. 

Andy Dater 
Medford, OR 




The Best Selling Program for Young Children 
Mow /Wailable for: TR5-80 Color Computer- 
16K disk or cassette and TR5-80 Models 
I/III-32K disk or 16K cassette 

(line fun educational games for children ages 2% to 6 



5, IlKU^ 

(formerly Counterpoint Software, Inc.) 

7807 Creekridge Cr. 
Minneapolis, MN 55435 



Please rush me Early Games for Young Children 



f Circle one: 
Model I Disk 
Model III DisK 

flame 



\ 



Color Computer DisK Model I 
Color Computer Cassette 



I Cassette 



Phone Orders: 800 328-1223 
Minnesota: 612—944-3912 

Educators Endorse: "Early Games can help children 
learn new concepts, information and skills, and 
also introduces them to the joys and benefits of 
home computers." 

Peter Clark, faculty 
Institute of Child Development 
University of Minnesota 

Mo adult supervision required. The Picture Menu 
gives children control. They can: 



\ 



Ctty 



State 



JUL 



□ My check for $29.95 is enclosed (Minnesota residents add 6% sales tax). 

□ Charge to VISA □ Charge to Mastercard 



I 



Acct. Mo. 



Expiration Date 



\ 
1 



Match numbers 
Count Colorful 
Blocks 

• Add Stacks of 
Blocks 

• Subtract Stacks 
of Blocks 

Draw and 
Save 
Colorful 
Pictures 



• Match Letters 

• Learn the Alphabet 

• Spell their Mames 

• Compare Shapes 



All 

nine games 
lor $29.95 




8 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Color Power II 

Expands Your CoCo to CP/M 2.2 



t t t COLOR POMER II FEATURES I I * 



34 INCLUDES CP/M 2.2 WHICH ALLOWS iOU TO RUN THOUSANDS OF CP/N PROGRAMS 

3$ GENERATES HIGH QUALITY 38 COLUMN BY 24 LINE DISPLAY AS IN THIS REAL PHOTO 
37 WITH UPPER and (oyer case characters an your coiposue ; ndeo lorutors 
98 INSTRUCTIONS INCLUDES ON USING MOTOROLA 5345 DIRECTLY FROM YOUR CoCo 
89 

18 INCLUDES SEPARATE POWER SUPPLY (HELPS KEEP YOUR CoCo COOL) 
II 

12 INCLUDES POWERFUL FOUR MHz Z-38A MICROPROCESSOR 
13 

14 SUPPORTS DOUBLE-DENSITY DISK FORMATS FOR MAXIMUM STORAGE CAPACITY 
1 5 

16 ABSOLUTELY NO S4K CoCo OR CoCo II HARDWARE MODIFICATIONS NEEDED 

1 / 

18 OPTIONAL Ultra Ten * bu Double Density Software: ALLOWS 

19 YOUR CoCo TO OPERATE AS AN 30 COLUMN BY h LINE COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL 
28 

21 POPULAR CP/M SOFTWARE AVAILABLE 
22 

123456789812345678981£3456789fll234567898i234567890123456789ei234567898123456789« 



Plug Color Power II into the expansion port of your 64K 
CoCo or CoCo 2, plug your disk controller into Color Power 
II, and insert our disk into your drive. You are now ready to 
run thousands of CP/M programs such as WordStar® , 
MailMerge® , SpellStar® , and Starlndex™ and to run Ultra 
Term + to create an 80 column by 24 line terminal. 

Your CoCo is now a CP/M compatible computer that 
includes CP/M 2.2 and generates an 80 column by 24 line 
display on your 80 column monitor with upper and lower 
case characters. 



r 

Introductory Prices: 

Color Power II (includes CP/M 2.2) $329.00 

Add Ultra Term + . .* 55.00 

Color Power II plus WordStar® & MailMerge® $498.00 
Add SpellStar® and Starlndex™ for only..., $ 79.00 

Call or send check, money order, Visa or MasterCard 
number with expiration date to the address below. 
N.J. residents add 6% sales tax. 



Color Power Unlimited, Inc. 

1260 Springfield Ave., P.O. Box 606-F, New Providence, N.J. 07974 (201) 665-9646 



I Color Power is a trademark of Color Power Unlimited, inc. 

CP/M is a trademark ot Digital Research, Inc., WordStar, MailMerge, SpellStar, and Starlndex are trademarks ot MicroPro International Corp. 




Free Book 
worth 
$14.95 
wtthMCh 
order. See 

offer below! 



DMAGf 



Several menu driven aids to 
keep your disks clean & tidy 

■ Copy, load, rename and delete files 
as you step thru the disk directory 
with single keystroke commands. No 
more frustrating file name spelling 
errors! 

■ Page feature displays 26 directory 
files at a time. No more dir "fly -by." 

■ Sort directory and store on disk in 
alphabetical order. 

■ Find machine language start/end/ 
execution addresses. 

■ For single or multiple drives. 

■ R.S. color DOS— 16k minimum 
required. 

■ Supplied on disk— $19.95 



PRO-LOt 



Control access to sensitive 
programs and files. 

■ The PRO-LOC loader allows 
programs to be saved to disk in a 
password protection mode. The 
program will not load or run unless 
proper password supplied. 

■ Data and text files can also be 
"locked" with PRO-LOC. 

■ Easy to use— menu driven 
commands. 

■ R.S. color DOS with 16k minimum 
required. 

■ Supplied on disk— $ 19.93. 

FREE with each order— 

THE POWER OFTHETRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER. This illustrated book is 
compiled with 29 NEW programs for 
fun and education. A guide to 
programming the futt range of cotor 
Lompfiifci eapab -t helps users 
write inteiftgent and weil thought out 
programs Regular price §14.95. 

We accept Master Card, VISA, check 
or money order. 

Original cotor computer software 
wanted. High royalties paid. 



Please send me: 

DMAGICC" $19.95 

PRO-LOC (a $1 9.95 

Add 5% sales tax if a resident of 
Massachusetts 



TOTAL 



NAME 



C»*DIT CAflO 



CftfOiT CARD NUMBER 



DORISON HOUSE PUBLSHERS. INC 

824 Park Square Building 
Boston Massachusetts 021 16 



Editor: 

The North Atlanta Color Computer Club 
is in Atlanta. We meet on the fourth Tuesday 
at the Tucker-Federal Northlake Mall. Call 
Chips Inc., 457-2447 for more information 
or call me at 396-5395. The "old" Smerna 
CoCo Club is being incorporated. Both 
clubs are now putting out newsletters. Don't 
forget about the CoCo Board BBS at 378- 
4410. 

David Gresch 
Dunwoody, GA 

Editor: 

1 would like to announce the formation of 
a CoCo club in the Dranesville District area 
of Virginia and also the outlying Reston 
area. This club would be an assembly of 
interested teens meeting to share interests 
and their advice with one another. The club 
would meet at willing members' houses 
every two weeks. Two of our first members 
are also planning to run BBS's in the not too 
distant future. We would like to share our 
own BASIC and machine language programs, 
if possible. For more information, call Craig 
McCormick (703) 281-9352, 9431 Shouse 
Drive, 22180. 

Craig McCormick 
Vienna, VA 

Editor: 

Anyone interested in joining an interna- 
tional MC-10 club can send a SASE for 
details. 

Also, 1 am running 64K with version 1.1 
disk. My ham call is VE3GGR and 1 am 
involved in all phases of ham radio including 
Digital Amateur Radio, SSTV, RTTY, 
voice, CW, etc. My address is Box 2771, 
POA 1KO. 

L Stephen Coker 
Huntsville, Ontario 



GROWERS SEEK NETWORK 

Editor: 

In the August issue of rainbow was a 
letter from grain farmer Dennis Rogers of 
Ashton, Idaho, inquiring as to the wherea- 
bouts of a program for grain farming. 

Well, I am an Idaho farmer also and use 
the Color Computer in my farming opera- 
tion. I know there must be many more out 
there who farm and also read rainbow. I 
would like to see a clearing house started for 
those involved in agriculture — someplace 
where we could share our programs with 
other farmers. 

The one drawback I can see about the 
Color Computer is the relative absence of 
professional agriculture-related software. 
Farmers, lets hear from you. I would be 
willing to get the ball rolling. 1 have a couple 
of agriculture related programs 1 have writ- 
ten for my operation and I would be willing 
to share them, or trade for some of yours. 
Even if you have no self-written programs, 
let's hear from you anyway! My address is 
Rt. #1, Box 4133, 83301. 

Also, thanks to RAINBOW for the best 
CoCo magazine available! 

Kelly Klaas 
Twin Falls, ID 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 

Editor: 

I would like to announce my BBS in 
Joplin. It is run on a CoCo computer but 
open to everyone. The system is on seven 
days a week from 7 a.m. -12:30 a.m. Cafl 
(417) 781-4020. 

I would also like to thank you for the best 
CoCo magazine around. I read rainbow 
from cover to cover every month. 

David Morgan 
Joplin, MO 

Editor: 

Colorama BBS of Yonkers is now in 
operation. Downloads, uploads, boutique, 
want ads, etc., 24 hours. (91 14) 965-7600. 

Fred Siudym (SYSOP) 
Yonkers, N Y 

Editor: 

I would like to announce the operation of 
a TRS-80 Color Computer BBS, a modified 
version of the Silicon Rainbow Products 
board. Readers may call the BBS anytime 24 
hours a day. The number is (209) 835-6496. 

Dennis Neaiherland 
Tracy, CA 



THE EVANSVILLE CONNECTION 

Editor: 

1 would like to announce a new BBS has 
started in the Evansville, Ind. area. The 
Evansville Connection is on-line Saturdays 
and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. It fea- 
tures E-Mail, download of CoCo programs, 
graphics, and news of interest to all CoCo 
users. The number to call is (8 1 2) 476-9453. 

Brad Callahan 
Evansville, IN 

Editor: 

Once again we have an announcement 
about our bulletin board. This time it in- 
cludes an address change plus many upgrades 
to the system. Your readers have been the 
greatest with support of the system sending 
us uploads for others to share all the time. 
Some of these being of commercial quality. 
With the overwhelming selection of down- 
loads and uploads we have gone to a three 
double-sided, 40-track disk drive system so 
all this can be made available to all users. 
Our new address is Westchester BBS, 440-54 
North Broadway, 10701. 

We are planning a second BBS in the 
Manhattan area of N.Yl within the next few 
weeks. The number for the second board will 
be listed on the BBS in Westchester (914) 
965-2355 when we are up and running. 

Many thanks for all the help from a great 
magazine that truly is looking out for the 
CoCo user and all those who are also helping 
them out. 

Bill Graspo 
Yonkers, NY 

Editor: 

Our three BBSs in St. Joseph, Mo. are on 
24 hours. The phone number is (816) 232- 
4932. 

Rick Drozd 
St. Joseph, MO 



10 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




Heat Up Your COCO 

With T&M'S Hot Disk Con troller 



Upgrade your COCO by adding JDOS advanced disk operating 
system, top quality disk drive, and VlP-Witer*, a powerful word 
processor. 

J&M Systems offers this package for a remarkably low price 
that gives you a plug-compatible disk drive for both the original 
COCO and the COCO-2. 

Gold contacts assure reliability, built-in digital phase locked 
loop means NO adjustments, and disc operations are supported by 
JDOS. The controller also supports RS DOS, FLEX' , and OS/9' . 

JDOS implements all RS DOS Basic commands, plus many 
more, including Auto line numbering, DOS to boot OS/9, and 
RUNM to load and run machine language programs. 

You may also choose to format disks 40 track (single or double 
side) as well as 35 track RS compatible. Up and Down arrow keys 
support scrolling: a feature everyone wants! 

VIPAVriter, gold-edged JFD DISK CONTROLLER card, 
JDOS in ROM, complete drive, cable, and Manuals: all for 
only $379. 



J&M SYSTEMS: 

The Driving Force For Your Color Computer! 

* VIP- Writer to a registered trademark of Soft Law 

'FLEX is a registered trademark of Technical Systems Consultants, Inc. 

"OS/9 Is a registered trademark of Microwarc, Inc. 



To Order Fill Out This Coupon or Call 505/265-1501 



I'd like more Information on these products: 

PLEASE SEND ME: A top-quality complete SSDD 180K disk drive 

with cable, a gold-edged JFD Disk Controller card (JDOS in ROM), VIP- WRITER 
word processing program, and manuals all for only $379. 



Name . 



Address - 



City/State/Zip . 



I WANT TO USE VISA* OR MASTERCARD* 

Card # Exp. Date 



Signature . 



. Enclosed is my check or money order. 



<//A 

J&M SYSTEMS, LTD. 



137 UTAH NE • ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. 87108 • 903/88B-1M1 



I am going to break one of our rules this month. Historically, I have felt it 
improper — or inappropriate — for THE rainbow to comment editorially in 
any way on our own competition. 
I made this rule for a reason. First of all, we have always had competition in some 
measure and I just believed that it would not be "right" for us to use our own 
editorial pages to say things about the state of the market. 

Second of all, we as publishers of a magazine, always make a lot of subjective 
decisions; not the least of which is in our reviews. We spend a great deal of time on 
reviews — wishing them to be as accurate as possible. We also want them to be 
impartial and objective and, in some way, I have always felt, in order to ensure that, 
we should avoid taking a partisan stance in any way. 

The way this goes is to say that if we are partisan in one area, what keeps us from 
being partisan in others? I spent more than a decade in the news business with a 
newspaper in Birmingham, Ala., and with United Press International. The one 
thing we were told in all of these situations was that journalism and advocacy do not 
mix. 



Certainly, newspapers have editorial pages, where they express opinions. And, it 
might easily be argued, this column is — in a way — an editorial page. But, frankly, 
1 have always felt you would rather read about things here other than the magazine 
business. Particularly from our perspective. 

I have departed from this "rule" twice. Once when another magazine decided to 
cut out THE rainbow Seal of Certification from any advertisements appearing in it 
and the other when a competitor folded. In the first case, I was concerned that 
someone viewed the Seal as a publicity ploy by THE rainbow, especially since no 
other CoCo (or computer) magazine banned the Seal from its pages. In the second 
instance, we were getting a lot of questions about the status of another competing 
magazine that went out of business and I felt it was our "duty" to, at (east, inform as 
many people as we could that this was the case. To my knowledge, no formal 
announcement was ever made by that magazine. 

So, perhaps, history repeats. By now, many of you may be aware that The Color 
Computer Magazine is terminating publication with its October issue. It is my 
understanding that subscribers to that publication will receive notice of its demise 
and be offered a subscription to a non-CoCo specific computer magazine in its 
place. Don't hold me to the latter information, though. 

In a way, we feel sad to see The Color Computer Magazine leave the field. It was 
an intensely competitive journal — in the editorial, subscription acquisition and 
advertising sales fields. Kerry Leichtman, its editor-in-chief, was interested in the 
Color Computer and succeeded, 1 think, in putting out a publication of profes- 
sional quality. 

So, the CoCo World is evolving. An important aspect of all th^s is the impact 
which the existence of several CoCo publications has had on t(ie market. My 
feeling, expressed many times in private, is that I believe it hurt the market more 
than it helped. 

1 recall when The Color Computer Magazine and another competitor, Hot 
CoCo, first began publishing. All of a sudden, advertisers were telling me that now 
they had a way to go after even more sales. Readers were saying that they had the 
opportunity for even more information. It did look beneficial to everyone. 

That turned out not to be so. Readers found out they were spending an inordi- 
nate amount of money on magazines — money which could have been used for 
other purchases. Advertisers, by and large, discovered that the added sales they 
gained were miniscule compared to added costs. And they had to recover that 
added advertising cost somehow — and, of course, it came from you. 

From the day THE rainbow began as a two-page newsletter, I have always 
believed we need to serve the reader first. But, as some fierce and well-funded 
competition developed, we spent some money on things we otherwise need not have 
— such as subscription promotions. These promotional costs were reflected in 
increased cost for subscriptions. 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns x 24 lines 
True lower case characters 
User-friendly full -screen 
editor 

Right justification 
Easy hyphenation 
Drives any printer 
Embedded format and 
control codes 
Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 
Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THK ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer, The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 
The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI t Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fun. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 
Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one Of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVII/VIII, DM1M00/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable /disable justification. 
Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print arty number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sure saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 
Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes.*' This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



...truly a state of the art word processor... 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write, the TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 
Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755*1258 
(weekdays, 8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries 
invited. 

(Add $2 for shipping. Calif ornians add 6% state tax. Allow 2 
weeks for personal checks. Send self -addressed stamped 
envelope for Telewriter reviews from CCN, RAINBOW, 
80-Micro, 80-U.S. Telewriter owners: send SASE or call for 
information on upgrading to Telewriter-64. Telewriter- 
compatible spelling checker (Spell 'n Fix) and Smart Terminal 
program (Colorcom/E) also available. Call or write for more 
information.) 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a 
trademark of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy 
Corp; MX-80 is a trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



RETIRE EARLY? 
WHY NOT! 

HOW? PRACTICE THRIFT AND 
PLAN WISELY. THE THRIFT IS UP TO 
YOU, BUT FOR PLANNING . . . 

YOU NEED THE 

RETIREMENT PLANNING 

MODEL 
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ABOUT RETIREMENT PLANNING 

By the year 2010, today's $8800 auto will cost 
$40,000 if inflation averages 6%. Inflation makes 
retirement planning essential. Proper retirement 
planning requires a complex year-by-year analysis 
which must consider these factors: 

* Your investment program * Inflation 

* Tax-deferred savings * Pension 

* Social Security * Taxes 

START NOW 

Start your planning now. Try different retirement ages 
and vary your investment program goals. The 
objective is to develop a plan for early retirement 
which eases doubt regarding your future financial 
security. 

WHAT THE MODEL DOES 

First, the model helps you organize your present 
assets. The model then projects these assets, along 
with estimated pension and social security, to the 
retirement age you select. Based on this projection, a 
detailed cash flow analysis is conducted for each 
year of your retirement. 

The factors listed above are considered in all 
calculations. Each analysis stops when your funds 
deplete or when the analysis carries to the age of 
100. The model is designed for "what if" analysis and 
optional printer output. 

AN .ESSENTIAL TOOL FOR COMPREHENSIVE 
RETIREMENT PLANNING 
* * * * 

FULLY DOCUMENTED 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

From the author of "Real Estate Investment," "Bond 
Analysis," "Owner Financed Real Estate" and "Homeowner 
Selling Analysis" as featured by Petrocci Freelance 
Associates. 



REQUIRES 16K EXTENDED 
COLOR BASIC 

ILL. RESIDENTS ADD 
8% SALES TAX 

SEE RAINBOW REVIEW 
JULY 1984 

"... RPM does exactly what it 
says it will do in fine style." 



TAPE $34.95 
DISK $39.95 

A&P SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box 202 
Glenview, IL 
60025 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Certainly, some will argue that competition has made us a 
better publication, and, in a number of cases that is, indeed, 
so. But I would like to believe that we would have done the 
same reader-oriented things anyway. After all, we began 
typesetting THE RAINBOW when there was no competitive 
compulsion to do so; we instituted a "slick" format because 
we felt the CoCo deserved it; we added color, increased the 
number of pages and came up with unique ideas simply 
because we wanted to. And, we'll keep on doing so with or 
without competition. 

What is the "bottom line" on all of this, as the business 
people say? 

First of all, it means we probably will be able to cut back 
on the price increase we have been looking at for subscrip- 
tions at the end of the year. We will still probably have a 
slight increase — simply because the cost of paper and 
postage keeps going up — but, by eliminating some of the 
non-reader-oriented things we have had to do, we will be 
able to operate a little more economically. And we can pass 
that savings on to you. 

Second, it means we will most likely be able to hold the 
line on advertising rate increases for a while. This may not 
seem important, but it is. Paul Searby of Computerware, for 
example, has often voiced the problem of the high cost of 
bringing a product to market — and that certainly includes 
cost of advertising. This means more affordable software 
because it reduces a software company's expenses. 

It also means more companies have a chance to get into 
the business in the first place. We started THE RAINBOW on a 
$2.50 investment (excluding our CoCo, which we already 
had) and we've always tried to encourage new businesses in 
our market. Holding the line on ad costs simply makes it 
possible for access to our advertising to be more affordable. 
Honestly, I am proud of the many companies which started 
with THE RAINBOW and have built themselves into nice 
businesses through our advertising. 

I am not trying to say that the demise of a single magazine 
means a whole new world is waiting out there, but I do think 
this development is reflective of several significant changes 
that are taking place. For those in the publishing business, it 
is always disturbing when a publication dies — even if that 
publication was a competitor. To Kerry and others asso- 
ciated with The Color Computer Magazine go our best 
wishes and hopes for success in the future. They produced a 
good magazine and should be proud of their efforts. 

Don't let me forget about RAINBOWfest! The first show 
of our new season is coming up Sept. 28-30 in Princeton, 
N.J. There is, of course, a ticket order form in this issue. 

RAINBOWfest-Princeton looks like it is going to be an 
outstanding show and we sure want you to come. We have a 
special discount fare from our official airline, United, and a 
special discount rate from our official car rental agency, 
National. An added bonus: Since it is so close to my birth- 
day, we're serving cake on Friday night to everyone who 
attends. There are a couple of things we have up our sleeve. I 
think this is one show you really won't want to miss! 

Please come to RAINBOWfest. It will be nice to see 
everyone again. And, you Easterners, remember that the 
Midwest took the show attendance "record" away from you 
last spring. Now, you can get it back. 

By way of finally, I also wrote last month about our plans 
to publish several new books in the coming months. They 
will be marketed under the general heading of The Rainbow 
Bookshelf, although they will still be called Rainbow Books. 
You'll be seeing The Rainbow Bookshelf logo in the coming 
months. 

— Lonnie Falk 



14 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Saguaro 
Software 

Kidstuf 

Picture. Letter, or Number Association. 
Play an old-time tune with correct 
answer (7 songs), buzzes when wrong 
& waits for correct choice. 8 screens. 

Tape - $19.95 
Disk - $24.95 



Amdek Color I Plus 
Color Monitor 

$299 

Video Driver - $20 W/ Purchase 




Amdisk 3 
Amdek Dual 3" Disk Drive 

New Low Price 



$450 



Includes 2 Diskettes 
And 2 Drive Cables 
(One Amdek, One 5V«") 
First Box Of Diskettes - $45.00 (Reg. $55) 
R.S. Controller - $135 With Amdisk 3 



GAMES 



PRICKLY-PEAR 

• irav©iiii luuci 

V^CKyWOKy 

* Lignr Kunn©i 

♦ | l imKA 1/""}+ 

• Color ti^isk TrrviQ 


32K 18.75 
32K 18.75 
18.75 
18.75 
22.75 




14.75 


* With f"V»lr»r Triv/in 
Willi V^AJKJl lllvlvj 


7.50 


Ariv*»nti iro in WonciArlond 


32K 18.75 




18.75 


cni AKin 


32K 18.75 


nlynT 


14.75 


rOOTDQH 


14.75 


Gangbusters 


14.75 


Great- Word Game 


14.75 


Monsters & Magic 


32K 14.75 


Naked Gamer 


16.75 


Teeeofff 


18.75 


Viking! 


14.75 


TOM MIX 




*\AA~»rlH rsf Plinht 
wonu yji niyni 


32K 23.75 


V_,l IVJI \ 1VJK3\ J 


32K 19.75 


VVkJlt7l IvUW IVIUIUI HO 


19.75 


'Draconian 


32K 21 .75. 


'Quix 


32K 19.75 


'Etec * Tron 


19.75 


Junior's Revenge 


32K 22.75 


Space Shuttle 


32K 22.75 


SR-71 


32K 22.75 


PFA 

rrn 




* Guillotine 


7.75 


« Rasher 


14.75 


Dunk-a-Ouck 


Tape 14 75 


Inspector Ciuesoau 


A A 7* 


rani rQK 


16.75 


Stagecoach 


14.75 


TYCOON 


Tape-3iK 14.75 






Flying Tigers 


16K 19.75 


*jyi iivja jiuiicw 


8.75 


Silly Syntax 


16.75 


SAGUARO 


19.95 


Ultimate Bingo - Jackpot 


Confusion 


19.95 


O L/f5>Kt?l I.W5 


IU TOT 


Paper - 3,000 Sheets 


32.75 


Blank C-15 Tapes 


.75 


100% Tested Disk SSDD 5 1/2" 


Box of 10 $20 


10 Year Guarantee 




P S. Disk Manuol 


$17 


• Denotes New Programs 



EDUCATION 
PRICKLY PEAR 

Music Reader 26.75 

Phonics 1 or 2 (tape only) 18.75 

Prereader 1, 2& 3 18.75 

PFA 

"Alphabet 8.75 

Chalkboard Math 15.75 
Ed. Pack 123's. ABC's, Big-Bigger 

Biggest, Shapes 18.75 

SUGAR 

Bible Stories 21.75 

Great USA 15.75 

Prereader 15.75 

Presidents of the U.S. 16K 19.75 

APPLICATIONS 
PRICKLY PEAR 

Famiiy Income Organizer (disk) 22.75 

'CoJorcal 18.75 

Satellite Tracker 59.75 

Super Astrology 32K 18.75 

PFA 

'Family 11.75 

•Little Leaguer 32K 18.75 

Stock Manager 31.75 

Super Bowling Secretary 32K 19.75 

Hurricane Tracker 1 1 .75 

Stress Evaluator 18.75 

SUGAR 

Radio System 23.75 

Co-Co Calligrapher 32K 1 9.75 

UTILITY 

23.75 



Rlmastr 

PRICKLY PEAR 

Clone Master 
Color Kit 

Tape Omni Clone (-tape) 
Super Scroll 
Rom Free 
Modern Master 

PFA 

'Text Master Graphics 
Super Disk Utility (disk) 
'Master Graphics Tool Kit 

SAGUARO 

Move-it! 

SUGAR 

Auto Run 15.75 
Semigraf 32K 15.75 
Screen Machine 
Super Screen Machine 

Add $3.00 For Disk, $6.00 For Amdisk 



Tape-32K 29.75 
26.75 
22.75 
64K 18.75 
64K 18.75 
16K 18.75 



32*11*5 
35.75 
32K 29.75 



Tim's 

Tim's Mail 



15.95 

20.75 
15.75 

23.75 
35.75 



NEW FROM 
SAGUARO SOFTWARE 



OTHXO 

Othello® machine language game for the 
16K Co-Co. 2 modes of ptoy - yqu against a 
friend or vou against the comojtef. When 
playing the computer, it will play hard or easy, 
In either, you had better think hard! OOjecs of 
the game is to Changs the q^oonenffi spots 
to yours by placing your mocker at the ena of a 
row started by your marker. Nol as easy as it 
sounds! Tape or disk, $24.95. Amdek, S29.95. 



Do Or Die! 

The year is 4001 AD. You are a cargo trucker 
delivering a load in the Dorfian star system. 
Your mission is to get back to your home 
planet of Irat, afive. Can you survive the 
journey? Tape or disk - S24.95. Amdek - 
$29.95. 



Treasure Hunt 

A graphics text adventure. You walk with our 
graphics character through desert, moun- 
tains and city to seek the elusive treasure of 
gold. Super graphics with a person who 
walks with you at each turn. 64K. Tape- 
$24.95. Disk-$29.95. 



Co-Co Receivables 

Keep track of all those accounts with current 
list of accounts, statement printing, last ac- 
tivity date, and current month's transactions, 
debits & credits. Disk storage of data. 32K 

disk. $29.95, 



Co-Co Keno 

Bring Las Vegas' Keno game home with Co- 
Co Keno Bet $1, $3 or $5 & mark off 1 to 15 
spots...can you beat the odds & win 
$50,000? 16K high resolution screen. Keno 
chart print included. Tape-$24.95, Disk- 
$29.95, Amdek-$34.95. 



Loveless Manor 

Trapped in a bedroom by your evil aunt, 
you've admired Queen Cinderella's castle in 
the distance...and you've just discovered 
she's a distant cousin. Can you escape to her 
protection? 32K. Great Word Adventure. 
Tape-$19.95, Disk-$24.95, Amdek-$29.95. 



EH 



Arizona Residents Add 7% Tax • Add $1 .00 Per Program For Shipping ( $4.00 Maximum) - Dealer Inquiries Wetaome»Some Quantities Limited* Ask About Royalties 

7331 E. Beverly - Tucson, AZ 85710 • 1-800-223-5369, Ext. 260 • Monday-Friday, 8AM-5PM MST 



VISA 



REAL 
TIME 
CLOCK 



RTC10 



Full featured, yet very easy to use, 
RTC-10 is a quartz-based. Time/Date 
clock contained in a compact ROM case. 
RTC-10 makes it simple to access the 
time and date with just a few Basic 
PEEKS. A 2-year + replaceable battery 
(included) keeps time accurate when the 
computer is off and even when the 
cartridge is unplugged. 




ONLY $89.00 

Compatible with any 16K or greater, 
Extended or non-extended Color 
Computer, RTC-10 may be used with or 
without a Radio Shack or any other Multi- 
Slot unit. To use it with a disk, without a 
Multi-Slot, order the Y-cable below. 

Completely assembled, tested and ready 
to plug-in and use, with programs 
included for clock setting and for 
continuosly displaying the Time/Date in 
the upper right corner of the video 
screen. ONLY $89.00 



COCO CABLES 

Top quality cable and connectors with 
all gold plated contacts 



Y-CABLE- 40 conductor, 1 ft. long. 1 
Male, 2 Females. Allows you to connect 
your disk controller pack and the RTC-10 
Clock or most voice synthesizers, etc. 
ONLY $29.95 

DISK PACK EXTENDER CABLE 40 

Conducter, 2 ft. long, 1 Male, 1 Female. 
Lets you place your disk controller pack 
where you want It, out of your way. 
ONLY $2295 

CUSTOM FLAT CABLES- Call-in or send 
us your requirement. We will quote a 
reasonable price for the cable you need. 



Custom Computer Products 

6 Dogwood Court 
Goshen. NY 10924 
(914) 469-9780 



ccp 



ADD $3.00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING & HANDLING 
FOR C.O.D.. INCLUDE AN ADDITIONAL $3.00 
NY RESIDENTS MUST INCLUDE SALES TAX. 



BUILDING OCTOBER'S RAINBO 



Everyone Wants More RAM . . . 
All Of Us Want More Programs . . 
It's A Matter Of Give And Take 



M; 



441% yW^emory is getting cheap," says Dale Puckett in this month's 
: installment of his "KISSable OS-9" column, adding that "64K is 
.not enough." Obviously, the technological promise is for more and 
more memory in smaller and smaller packages. While that forecast carries with it 
the prospect of higher resolution, more features and sundry other extras, 1 'd have 
to argue that increased memory has its expensive side, too. 

You see, the longer that program listings get, the more space they take up in THE 
RAINBOW and, thus, we have fewer pages left for other articles. While THE 
rainbow's phenomenal growth has helped offset the effects of longer listings, we 
have begun to feel the squeeze. The submissions just keep getting longer. 1 suppose 
that most writers have had their machines awhile and have elected to upgrade to 
more memory, and, once having done that, it's difficult to resist the temptation to 
use all available memory in programs under development. 

Now, I'm not suggesting we go back to 4K, nor am I preaching about efficiency 
in programming. It's just that I'm in a quandary as to how our magazine should 
evolve. We feel a strong commitment to publishing all listings, in their entirety. 
But, if the longest are the best — and you're unlikely to do in 1 6K what you can in 
32K — the direction this leads us in is toward fewer articles and longer listings. In 
our recent Adventure contest, for instance, we've received games that keep 
accessing the disk as the game progresses — and some fill an entire disk and would 
take an entire issue of THE RAINBOW to print! At what price excellence? 

Few would argue the point that the longer our listings are, the less likely people 
are to type them in. Thus, as we continue our commitment to publish all listings, 
the result is that increasing blocks of pages are being used by fewer and fewer 
people — percentage-wise, at least. A peculiar situation when you think about it; 
programs are the meat of THE RAINBOW, yet could we have too much meat? It 
would appear so. As good as the longer listings are, we could run two or three 
short articles with programs in the space devoted to some of the longest listings 
— and, after all, many readers have I6K systems and can't use the "biggies" 
anyway. What to do? 

Run just the shorter programs? How can we if the longer listings are the best? 
Print just the articles and direct readers to our RAINBOW ON TAPE service? 
RAINBOW ON TAPE is a valuable adjunct, but we're a magazine first. There is much 
to be learned from scanning a listing, even if you don't type it in; that's the best way 
to learn BASIC programming. Bar code? No, we use it in a sister publication, but it 
takes up more space than a BASIC listing — and only your computer can read it! 
Soundsheets? Too expensive. Print listings three columns per page instead of two? 
Maybe we should. Maybe we musi. What do you think? 

Clearly, we must rely increasingly on THE rainbow's program evaluation 
process, which is already an intensive, time-consuming editorial activity. Longer 
programs? Absolutely, if they are worth the room they take up and appeal to a 
large segment of our readers. But, mainly, we'll be striving for a delicate balance, a 
mix. We'll also encourage writers to weigh the "expense" of a long program when 
maybe a shorter version would do almost as well. And, we'll remind our writers 
that they were beginners once, too, and didn't they enjoy those "program quick- 
ies" that could be typed in only a few minutes. You see, more memory has its 
expensive side, too. 

If you share my concern for cutting expenses, here's the worn bi}t worthy tip I 
usually close with: subscribe to the rainbow and save; we'll send you about 1 28K 
in programs every month — more K at less price! 

— Jim Reed 



16 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




As a result of the programming language requirement of the Advanced Placement (AP) Tests, 
Pascal has become the standard language used in High Schools and Colleges today. On the 
Color Computer, DEFT Pascal is the standard. 



DEFT Benc h $49-95 



DEFT Edit 

Full screen Editor 

DEFTI4nker 
(see DEFT Pascal) 

DEFT Lib 

create and maintain 
program object libraries 



DEFT Debugger 

tfei&g Pascal machine 
programs symbolically 
DEFT Macro/6809 

supports entire 6009 

instruction set, 

lets you define your own 

instructions 



DEFT Pascal $79.95 

DEFT Pascal Compiler DEFT Linker 
complete Pascal language, combines multiple program 
generates machine objects into one binary 

language object program 

DEFT Pascal Workbench $119.95 
(DEFT Pascal And DEFT Bench Together) 



All DEFT software and programs developed with DEFT software are BASIC 
ROM independent and use all of the memory in your Color Computer 
without OS-9, All you need is DEFT software and a TRS-80 Color Computer 
with Extended Disk BASIC, at least 32K of RAM and One Disk Drive. Software 
licensing arrangements am available for schools. Dealer inquiries welcome. 



For Product Questions Call 
1-301-283-1300 
For Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 24Hrs 
1 £00*308-3238 Operator 8 

In Virginia 
1-800-542-2224 Operator 8 
DEFT Products are also hveu i able through these fine 



SYSTEM! 



Quantity of Each: _ DEFT Pascal _ DEFT Beach 
_ DEFT Pascal Workbench 

Method of Payment (check one) D Check Enclosed 
O VISA D Master Card Q COD 



DEFT Systems, Inc. 
Suite 4, Damascus Centre 
Damascus, MD 20872 



Account Number 



I 



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THE PROGRAM STORE 
center plus 
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Ail orders are shipped UPS within 24 hours of receipt. Add 3% tor shipping and handling; Maryland 
residents add 5% for State Sales Tax; add $2.00 for COD. 



GRAPHICS UTILITY 




/ 




Anyone who has worked with the 
TRS-8<rs Hi-Res graphics 
knows that they are far from 
perfect. When you put various lines 
near each other, they might be in differ- 
ent colors. This is known as the moire 
(mor-AY) effect. Using this fault of the 
computer system, and optical illusions 
created by crowded lines, I discovered 
that it is possible to get eight colors on 
the PMODE4 screen, not including the 
background color! This creates incredi- 
ble possibilities. Apparently, Radio 
Shack and Motorola realized this when 
creating the 6809 — the special effect 
only happens when using SCREEN 1,1. 
This is useful, because the colors are 
hard to control, and could pose a prob- 
lem when not wanted (i.e., drawing elec- 
trical schematics). If you end up with 
unwanted colors in your Hi-Res pro- 
grams, then use SCREEN1,0 (more 
information can be found in Chapter 4, 
Going Ahead With Extended Color 
BASIC). 

The first program is titled 8-COLOR. 
It shows eight lines on the screen, each 
one a different color. You may have to 
adjust some of the controls on your TV 
to tell the difference, but the difference 
is there. 1 won't give names for the dif- 

(Paul Faulstich is a 15-year-old student 
at Somerville High School in New Jer- 
sey. He uses his computer to write 
school reports, letters to his paper route 
customers; to learn about program- 
ming; and for fun.) 

18 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



ferent colors, because they are slightly 
different on every CRT, and they can be 
altered by the color and tint controls. 

Line 50 draws a vertical line in an 
even-numbered column (100). Line 60 
draws a vertical line in an odd-numbered 
column (121). The others use the moire 
effect to create other colors by blending 
lines that are next to each other. As far 
as 1 know, horizontal lines are the same 
color at all times. 

The second program shows a true 
moire pattern. Before computers, moire 
patterns were two designs on transpar- 
ent materials that created optical illu- 
sions when placed one atop another. 
Often, one was a set of concentric cir- 
cles, and the other consisted of many 
lines going from the middle to a little 
more than the outermost circle. (See 
Figures 1 and 2.) This program draws 85 
lines in PMODE 4, from (129,0) to the 
bottom of the screen in steps of three, 
from (0,191) to (255,191). Without the 
space, it would look like a triangle at the 
bottom of the screen, and with a larger 
space the optical illusion wouldn't exist. 

When the patterns of Figure 1 and 
Figure 2 are placed on top of each other 
the moire pattern is formed. 

The third program is one that caused 
much frustration when we wrote it, and 
sometimes an FC Error will still result, 
but very rarely. It randomly picks two 
points, and draws a line between the 
two. Then it moves both points and 
draws a new line. When the point hits 
the end of the screen, it will bounce off 



at a 45-degree angle. This can result in 
some very interesting turns. I have added 
many options, which have made the 
program much more enjoyable, but can 
easily be removed to save time and 
memory by deleting Lines 240 to 320, 
and 350 to the end. 

The clear key will clear the graphics 
screen, because after awhile the screen 
will look jumbled. Hitting 'E' will End 
the program, and the computer will tell 
you the coordinates used. *S' will let you 
change the Step increment (or gap be- 
tween lines). This is set by the computer 
at four when you start. *W' will run a 
new random line using your specified 
Step increment, while 'R' will Run a 
new random line using the computer's 
set gap of four. k P' wil Pause the pro- 
gram (like shift and i @'), but you must 
hit 'P' again to continue. 'O' will run the 
same pattern Over again and *C will 
Change screens (from SCREEN 1, 1 to 
1,0 or 1,0 to I, I), to show you how to 
prevent the various colors. 4 H' will dis- 
play a Help menu in case you are like me 
and will forget which letters to use. 

The fourth program is a demonstra- 
tion of my favorite pattern from the 
bouncing lines program. To fully 
appreciate it, you must wait until it 
starts overlapping itself, then pause it 
and play with the color controls. It con- 
tains no options, because there is no 
need for them. 

I would like to know if someone can 
figure out how to make the third pro- 
gram 100 percent errorless. 



By Paul Faulstich 



Listing 1: 

10 REM 8 COLORS IN PMODE 4 

20 PM0DE4, 1 

30 PCLS 

40 SCREEN 1 , 1 

50 LINE < 100, 0) - < 100, 191 ) , PSET 

60 LINE (121,0) -(121, 191) , PSET 

70 LINE ( 130, 0)-< 130, 191) , PSETI LI 

NE (131,0)- (131, 191) , PSET 

80 LINE (151,0) -(151, 191) , PSET: LI 

NE ( 152, 0) - ( 152, 191 ) , PSET 

90 LINE(169,0)-(169, 191) ,PSET:LI 

NE( 170,0) -(170, 191) , PSET: LINE (17 

1,0)-(171, 191) ,PSET 

100 LINE (186,0) -(186, 191) , PSET: L 

INE( 187,0) -(187, 191), PSET: LINE (1 

88,0) -(188, 191) , PSET 

110 LINE (201,0) -(201, 191) ,PSET:L 

INE (202,0) -(202, 191) , PSET: LINE (2 

03,0)-(203, 191) , PSET: LINE (204,0) 

-(204, 191) , PSET 

120 LINE(212,0)-(212, 191) ,PSET:L 
INE(213,0)-(213, 191) , PSET: LINE (2 
14,0>-(214, 191) ,PSET:LINE(215,0) 
-(215, 191) , PSET 
130 GOTO 130 



Listing 2: 

10 PMODE 4,1 
20 PCLS 



30 SCREEN 1, 1 

100 FOR T=0 TO 255 STEP3: LINE ( 12 
9,0) - (T, 191 ) , PSET: NEXT 
200 BOTO 200 



^ 1 

110 79 

340 206 

END 77 

Listing 3: 

10 REM BOUNCING LINE 

20 Q=4 

30 SCR=1 

40 PM0DE4, 1 

50 PCLS 

60 SCREEN 1, 1 

70 V1«Q: V2»Q:V3=Q: V4«Q 

80 REM STRING ART DESIGN 

90 X»(RND(INT(255/Q) ) )*Q:Y*(RND( 

INT(191/Q) ) )*Q 

100 A=(RND(INT(255/Q) ) )*Q:B=(RND 
(INT(191/Q) ) )*Q 

ii0 sa»a:sb-b:sx-x:sy«y 

120 A«A+V1 
130 B*B+V2 
140 X»X+V3 
150 Y*Y+V4 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 19 



T 



1 OlMCOTT I 

S* COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND ACCESSORIES 



PRINTERS 

(SEE PRINTER INTERFACE BELOW) 

SPIRIT ( SAME AS MXBO) $289.00 

OKIDATA 92P ( 1 60 CPS) $435.00 

CORRESPONDENCE QUALITY! 

it NEW! ★ NEW! * 

A BAH LQ-20P (PARALLEL) .$389.00 

18 CPS-DAISY WHEEL- LETTER QUALITY 
TRACTOR FEED. , ,,.,.....$ 79.00 



MONITORS 

(SEE MONITOR INTERFACE BELOW) 
ALL WITH NONQLARE SCREEN. 

-NEW PRICE** 0y AMDEK (2 YEAR WARRANTY) 

COLOR 1+ $284.00 

VIDEO 300(G) ,$149.00 

VIDEO 300(A|. $159.00 

GORILLA (GREEN). $99.00 

GORILLA (AMBER). ... $109.00 



ENDICOTT JOYSTICK 
$19.95 EACH $37.95 FOR TWO 

ANALOG TVPF PLUGS RIGHT IN! 
r uh. we rotund 6ni ENDtOOTT JOYSTICK k> be WhWfa 
and responsive ..ttulU to ta*t. the Endwn model Is a 
solid buy the RAINBOW. Octet*,,- i 982 

..provided the best feel of aH (to Joysticks tested. 
...(a) rugged unit at an affordable price N 
SO micro, March 1963 



"NEW~~PRICES" 

PRINTER INTERFACE 

pbh SERIAL/PARALLEL 

SWITCHABLE: 300 TO 9000 BAUD. 
PRINTER AND MODEM CONNECTIONS. 
NOTHING ELSE REQUIRED. 

jWer^T $59.95 

PURCHASED WITH PRINTER ... $54 00 



MONITOR INTERFACE 

VIDEO PLUS $24.96 

(COLOR OR MONOCHROME) 
PURCHASED WITH MONITOR $20.95 

VIDEO PLUS MM $26 95 

{MONOCHROME FOR COLOR II) 
PURCHASED WITH MONITOR . $22.95 

VIOEO PLUS IIC .$39.95 

(COLOR FOR COLOR II) 
PURCHASED WITH MONITOR . . .$33 95 



>*new" BLANK MEDIA -p*ice*« 

ELEPHANT SSSD ... $19.00 

ELEPHANT SSDO. $21.00 

ELEPHANT DSDD $26.00 

BASF GuAiiM£THIC SSDD. . ... . . $23.00 

BASF CHJAUMETRIC DSDD. $28.00 
C-TQ CASSE lONE DQZ.J .... I 7.50 



WI0O 

ATARI JOYSTICK ADAPTER 

$17 95 



MEDIA STORAGE 
TAPE 

TAPE CAROUSEL (HOLDS 25) $13 00 



DISKETTE 

FL1PNFILE 10 .,.$5.45 

FUPN FILE 25. ..<... . ... , $23.95 

FLIPN FILE 50. . . ¥ , . - > $29.95 

DISK BANK 5 I HOLDS 50). , ..$13.95 



l-NEW 



SUPER -PRO KEYBOARD 

BY: MARK DATA pggg] 
ADAPTER REQUIRED ON 
COMPUTER BOUGHT AFTER 10/82. 
KEYBOARD. JA+9!T $56.95 ADPT $3.95 



VOL KS MOD EM 

BY: ANCHOR AUTOMATION 
300 BAUO. DIRECT CONNECT 
MANUAL ANSWER. MANUAL DIAL 

INCLUDES CABLE $69.95 



WICO JOYSTICK 

BIG BAT HANDLE 
SPRING RETURN OR FREE FLOAT 
ANALOG TYPE ~ PLUGS RIGHT INI 

$38.95 EACH 



Look at These Discounts and Compare...Remember WE PAY SHIPPING! 

SOFTWARE PRICES SHOWN ARE 20°/o OFF LIST PRICE! 



SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 

T 

> GALAGON , «♦. ,.....$19.95 

> PENGON. .. «,*«„,.».►»♦■ .,„..>... . .$19.95 

> COLOR PANIC. .... $19.95 

>CUBIX. ........,...$19.95 

> LANCER ...$19.95 

> MS GOBBLER. ...» ..$19.95 

WHIRLYBIRD RUN. ....$19.95 

LUNAR ROVER PATROL. ........ . . .$19.95 

COMPUTERWARE 

T 

I> MR. DIG . .......$22.35 

> JUNIOR S REVENGE $23. 1 5 

RANDOM BASIC (OS-9). 

> COLOR BASIC COMPILER 

64K SCREEN EXPANDER (64K). . . .$19.95 

♦ THE SOURCERER(RDOS). $27.95 

THE SOURCERER (OS-9) 

> MACRO ASSEMBLER & XREF (R DOS). 
MACRO ASSEMBLER &XREF (OS-9).. 

> COLOR EDITOR .......,....$ 1 9.95 

^COLOR MONITOR. . .$19.95 

>MOON HOPPER ..$19.95 

BLOC HEAD (Q-BERT) , $21 55 

DOODLE BUG (LADY BUG). .$19.95 
GRAN PRIX.. ...$17.55 



D 

$2315 
$23 15 
$23.15 
$23.15 
$23.15 
$23.15 
$23.15 
$23.15 



D 

$24.75 
$25.55 

.$60 00 
$31 95 
$22.35 
$31.95 

.$31.95 
$39.95 
$39 95 
$23.95 
$22.35 
$22.35 
$23.95 
$22.35 
$21.55 



SOFT LAW 

T 4 D INCLUDED 

Q VIP WRITER (INC SPELLER!)..... ..$47.95 

QVIPSPELLER ...... .... $31.95 

OVIPCALC. ,.....$47 95 

Q VIP TERMINAL... , .$39.95 

Q VIP DATA BASE $47 95 (DISK) 

OVIPDISK-ZAP ,..$3995 (DISK) 



WRITEP/SFELLER-CALC- 

DATABASE $13900 

ENTIRE LIBRARY. , . , $210.00 



ELITE SOFTWARE 

t o 

□ ELITE-WORD $47.95 $47.95 

ELITE-WORO/SPEL.. , .. .$59.95 

ELITE-SPEL . . . , , $23.95 

O ELITE-CALC. . $47 95 $47.95 

□ ELITE-FILE . .. rl ....$5960 

ENTIRE LIBRARY (DISK) ,.,,.1157.00 

PROGRAMMERS INSTITUTE 

T D 



> COMPLETE PERSONAL 
ACCOUNTANT ~ ( 1 ,2*3) 



$59 95 $63 95 



SPECIAL SALE! 
30% OFF 



PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

T O 

> MUSIC READER. . $24 45 $27.96 
* ERLAND $17.45 $20 95 

> TRAVELIN TOAD. .$17.45 $20.95 

> OCKYWOKY $17.45 $20.95 

> ADVENTURE IN WONDERLAND. $17.45 $20.95 

THE DISK MANAGER « >. .$20.95 

THE DISK MASTER. . ■ $17.45 

COLORKIT { Programming Utility) ... $24.45 $27.95 
FLIGHT... . ... $13.95 $17.45 



COGNITEC 



D TELEWRITER 64. 



T D 

$39.95 $47.95 



TOM MIX T 

> OUIX. , . $19.95 

elec*TRON . ■ .$19.95 

> WORLDS OF FLIGHT, . $23.95 

SKRAMBLE .$19.95 

> SR-71 $23.15 

>CLTBER. ., $22.35 

> BUZZARD BAIT. $22 35 

> AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER , .$23.15 

> SPACE SHUTTLE. ........... , ..$23.15 

> THE KING $21,55 

> COLOR GOLF.. , $14.35 

TAPE TO DISK $14.35 

DISK TO TAPE . , .$14.35 

SCREEN PRINT ROUTINE. ... $1595 

(Specify Printer) 



$22.35 
$22.35 
$26.35 
$22.35 
$25.55 
$24.75 
$24.75 
$25.55 
$25.55 
$23.95 



$17.55 



ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 

T D 

* FIRE COPTER.. . , ..$19.95 

# SAIGON: THE FINAL DAYS. . .. .$19.95 

♦ EARTHQUAKE. $19.95 

♦ AIRLINE ..$19.95 

> SEA DRAGON , . . $27.95 

> TRIAD ■ . ... ,....$27.95 

> DISKEY (Utility To Examine And Repair Disks, 

Plus Computer Diagnostics.) ... , $39.95 



B5 SOFTWARE 

T 

MONEY • » ... .$15.95 

BORROW.. . . .... ..$15.95 

CARRY $15.95 

MATH FACT... , $1355 

ABCS .... $ 7.95 

ALL.. , $64.00 



NOTE: ALL SALES FINAL NO RETURNS UNLE 

♦Requires 16K Ext. Basic Minimum. £>Req 


ss defective. ADDITIONAL LISTINGS IN OUR 

uires 32K Ext. Snsfc Minimum D We Recommend 32K or 64 


FREE CATALOG - CALL OR WRITE. 

K. Others 16K Ext. Std. Basic MinirtWi. 


WE PAY SHIPPING TO U.S.A . CANADA, AND MEXICO. 
C.O.D. ADD $2.00(U.S.A. ONLY). ALLOW 2 WEEKS FOR 
CHECKS TO CLEAR NO P.O. BOXES MUST HAVE STREET 
ADl?**ES£ SHIPPING OTHER COUNTRIES ADD $2.00 
EACH SOFTWARE ITEM AND EACH JOYSTICK ADD 
$9.00 EACH ALL OTHER ITEMS (NO MONITORS OR 
PRINTERS SHIPPED OUTSIDE U.S.A.). ITEMS ARE 
SHIPPED AIR MAIL. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 


SffDICOf? 

Computer Software And Accessories 

2806-A S. MEMORIAL PARKWAY 
HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 35801 

VISIT OUR STORE 

PRICES IN AD ARE MAIL ORDER ONLY 


PHONE ORDERS 
205/536-4400 

(PHONE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK) 
<S£I WE PAY SHIPPING! 



160 IF A=(INT(255/Q)-1>#Q THEN V 
1=V1*-1 

170 IF B-(INT<191/Q>-1)*Q THEN V 
2-V2*-l 

180 IF A"<0 THEN V1=V1*-1 

190 IF B-<0 THEN V2-V2*-l 

200 IF X»(INT<255/Q)-1)*Q THEN V 

3=V3*-1 

210 IF Y-(INT<191/Q>-1)*Q THEN V 
4=V4#-1 

220 IF X=<0 THEN V3»V3#-1 

230 IF Y=<0 THEN V4=V4»-1 

240 A*=INKEY*:IF A*="E" THEN 350 

250 IF A*="S" GOTO 600 

260 IF A*="R" THEN RUN 

270 IF A*»CHR*<12) THEN PCLS 

280 IF A»="P" GOSUB 380 

290 IF 49**0- THEN 390 

300 IF A*="H" GOSUB 430 

310 IF A*<-"C" GOSUB 580 

320 IF A*-"**" THEN 30 

330 LINE(X,Y)-<A,B),PSET 

340 GOTO 120 

350 CLS: PR I NT: PR I NT "THE VARIABLE 
SX , Y, A, B WERE: ":PRINTSX,SY,SA,SB 
360 PRINT: PRINT 
370 END 

380 X«-INKEY*:IF X*<>"P" THEN 38 

0 ELSERETURN 

390 X =SX : Y=SY : A=SA : B«SB 

400 V 1 «Q : V2=Q : V3=Q : V4=Q 

410 PCLS 

420 GOTO 120 

430 SCREEN0,0 

440 CLS 

450 PRINT" help" 

460 PRINT" »E* = eND" 

470 PRINT" 'S' - STEP CHANGE" 

480 PRINT" *R* = rUN" 

490 PRINT" 'P* = pAUSE" 

500 PRINT" 'CLEAR' - clear 

510 PRINT" '0' = RUN oVER" 

520 PRINT" 'C = CHANGE SCREEN" 

530 PRINT" 'W « RUN wITH NEW IN 

CREMENT" 

540 PRINT" 'H' - hELP" 

550 INPUT" PRESS 'ENTER' "I ZZ 

560 SCREEN 1,1 

570 RETURN 

580 IF SCR=1 THEN SCR=0 ELSE SC= 
1 

590 SCREEN 1,SC: RETURN 
600 SCREEN 0,0 
610 CLS 

620 INPUT" WHAT IS THE STEP I NCR 
EMENT YOU WANT" ; Q 
630 SCREEN 1,1 
640 GOTO 30 



Listing 4: 

10 PMODE4, 1 

20 PCLS 

30 SCREEN1,1 

40 Vl«4: V2-4: V3«4: V4-4 

50 REM STRING ART DESIGN 

60 X=132:Y*148 

70 A=56:B=1 12 

80 LINE(X,Y)-(A,B),PSET 

90 A=A+V1 

100 B=B+V2 

110 X=X+V3 

120 Y=Y+V4 

130 IF A=252 THEN V1»V1#-1 
140 IF B=188 THEN V2»V2*-1 
150 IF A=0 THEN Vl«Vi*-i 
160 IF B=0 THEN V2=V2»-1 
170 REM ALL DONE FOR A AND B 
180 IF X=252 THEN V3»V3*-1 
190 IF Y«188 THEN V4=V4*-1 
200 IF X*0 THEN V3=V3*-1 
210 IF Y=0 THEN V4=V4*-1 
220 GOTO 80 



Your 64k C0C0 has up to 88k of memory 
You have 64k of RAM and 24k of ROM 
Use all of this from BASIC with 
this machine language program 



PHANTO 




EMORY 

TRILLIUM^ SYSTEMS 

With this you can:- 

- Use 32k more data storage 

- Chain from program to program 

- Use 16 bit Integers 

- Dynamically redimension arrays. 

Also included 9 using the PHANTOM, are 

PUTIL - A disk utility program 

P-INVENT - A RAM based inventory 
program using 64k of RAM. 

Tape or Disk TRILLIUM SYSTEMS 

versions 67 King St. East 

IT <2 t?Q qcpp OSHAWA, ONTARIO 

u.a.^y.y^ed CANADA LIH IB4 
P&H inc 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 21 




I 



Compare it with the rest. 
Then, buy the best. 



tf you've been thinking about 
spending pood money on a new 
keyboard for your Color Computer, 
why not get a good keyboard for 
your money? 

Designed from scratch, the 
H J 1-57 Professional Keyboard 
is bufH to unlock ALL the 
potential performance o t your 
Color Computer, Now, you can 
do real word processing and sail 
through lengthy listings.., with 
maximum speed; minimum errors. 

At 179.95, the HJL-57 Is reason- 
ably priced, but you can find 
other CoCo keyboards for a few 
dollars less. So, before you buy, 
we suggest that you compare. 

Compare Design, 

The ergonom I catty -su per! a r 
HJL-57 has sculptured, low 
profile keycaps; and the three- 
color layout la Identical to 
the original CoCo keyboard. 

Compere Construction. 

TheHJL-57hasarlg.dlzed 
aluminum baseplate for solid, 
no-flex mounting. Switch contacts 
are rated for 100 million cycles 
minimum, and covered by a spill- 
proof membrane. 



Compare Performance. 

Offering more than full-travel, 
bounce-proof key switch es p the 
HJL-57 has HFl/EMI shielding that 
eliminates Irritating noise on 
displays; and tour user-definable 
function keys {one latch able), 
spec I ally -positioned to avoid 
inadvertent actuation, 



Free Function Key Program 

Your HJL-67 kit Includes usage 
Instructions and decimal codes 
produced by the function keys, 
plus s free sample program 
that defines the function 
keys as follows: F1 ^ Screen 
dump to printer. F£ = Repeat 
key (latching), F3 = Lower case 
upper case flip (If you have 
lower case capability). F4 = 
Control key; subtracts 64 from 
the ASCII value of any key 
pressed. Runs on disc or tape; 
extended or standard Basic 



Compare Installation, 

Carefully engineered for easy 
Installation, the HJL-57 requires 
no solderi ng,, d rl III ng o r g lu ing . 
Simply plug It in and drop It 
right on the original CoCo 
mounting posts. Kit Includes a 



Ordering Information: Spaetfy qwfei (Onflmal, F-v&rslon, or CoCo 2), Piymanl by C.O.O.. chuck, 
Ma&tBf Ca rd or Visa . Crtdll CB rfl customers include compla!» card number and expiration date. Add 
$2.00 fti« shipping (13.50 for Craft}. New Ygrk atats TaSidanta add 7% SlLH tlx. 
Dealer Inquiries Inw-lted. 



new bezel for a totally finished 
conversion. 

Compa re Warrant lea, 

The HJL-57 Is built so welt, It 
carries a full, one-year warranty. 
And, it is sold with en exclusive 
15-day money^back guarantee. 

Compare Value. 

You know that a bargain Is a 
bargain only so long as It lasts. 
If you shop carefully i we think 
you will agres^The HJL-57 1$ 
the last keyboard your CoCo will 
ever need, And that's reel value. 

Order Today. 

Only$79£5 p iheHJL57te 
available for immediate shipment 
for either the original Color 
Computer (sold prior to October, 
1 9B2) or the F-verslon and TOP-100 
(introduced In October, 1982}, 
and the new 64 K CoCo, Now also 
■vaflable tor CoCo 2, 

CaN 1*11 Free 

1 -800-828-8968 

in N*wYork 1 «Q(M«3-4ff«i 




PRODUCTS 

Dhf. at Touchstone Technology knc. 
MSBuffflloRMd p P.Q.Bdx 24954 
HaehGMW, New Yorfc 14624 

Telephone: (7 16) 



EDUCATION OVERVI1 



The Computer As A 
Classroom Tool 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



From lime to time I get mail from 
people, either wishing to express 
a pmni of view, disagreeing with 
me about something, correcting a mis- 
take 1 make, or simply sharing ideas. 
This month I would like to respond pub- 
licly to a Letlcr from a teacher. Gary 
Gernert leaches social studies in Way- 
nesburg, Pt-nn. Through a strange com- 
bination of events, the social studies 
department U now in charge of 1 6 Color 
Computers fcliich must be "incorpo- 
rated into the regular classroom." Mr. 
Gernert is coordinator/advisor for this 
task. 

The problem is that while the Color 
Computer represents a superior piece of 
equipment, there is not much educa- 
tional software for secondary social 
studies class *s, So, gentle readers, 1 give 
you a problem to ponder and an outlet 
for your creativity. If any of you know 
of any good programs for secondary 
social studies, please get in touch with 
Mr. tiernert. Also, for you pro- 
grammers out there with a really great 

(Michael PIw received his Ph.D. degree 
from the University of Illinois. He has 
taught fodtii studies in high school, 
worked in a central office of a school 
district, and currently is employed at the 
Illinois Sfttfv Board of Education.) 



software package, why not send it to 
him? If you want to sell your software, 
why not let the students in Waynesburg 
field test it for you? Professional pro- 
grammers and software houses would 
be well advised to have students and 



"The computer is a tool 
of education. It is only one 
tool, and should be used 
with other tools by profes- 
sional educators to pro- 
vide a set of growth expe- 
riences for students." 



teachers field test software. The market- 
ing advantages of classroom tested 
material are well known, and appre- 
ciated by buyers. 

Please recognize that Mr. Gernert is 
not asking for free software. That idea is 



mine; 1 am asking for him. His letter to 
me was simply asking if I knew of any 
good educational programs for his 
classes. In fact, if anyone writes to me 
and asks for free software, 1 would 
probably not be sympathetic or overly 
helpful. I do not know anything about 
the materials budget for Waynesburg, 
but I expect they have some money to 
purchase software. 

This plea is only part of the article for 
this month. It seems to me there are 
other points to be considered in the 
situation described above. 

The computer is a tool of education. 
It is only one tool, and should be used 
with other tools by professional educa- 
tors to provide a set of growth experi- 
ences for students. When we think of 
computers in schools, let us not get car- 
ried away with Computer Assisted 
Instruction. Yes, it is a significant tool 
for the teacher. But, there are other 
ways to use a computer in school. 

Consider for a moment CM I — 
Computer Managed Instruction. With 
a simple database program, the students 
in Waynesburg could have their records 
computerized. Teachers in the social 
studies department could keep scores 
from tests and classroom work stored 
on diskette. A simple BASIC program 
could transfer the information from a 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 23 



database program to a listing of grades. 
Now, I do not know how grade cards 
are handled in Waynesburg. My own 
experience was many hours with a cal- 
culator, then even more hours in the 
teachers* lounge waiting for the cards 
for seniors, names beginning with L-Z. 
Imagine having your Color Computer 
go through the database information, 
averaging scores (with weights) and 
printing a list of students and grades. 
The time spent transferring that to the 
grade cards would be almost nothing! I 
can picture a group of social studies 
teachers, with coffee cups in hand, jok- 
ing among themselves while the other 
department teachers are frantically try- 
ing to find that one grade card that fell 
behind the chair. 

Grades are only one example of CM I. 
Why not have attendance taken by the 
computer? Students could key in their 
name (or ID number) when arriving in 
class. By the time announcements are 
made and homework papers collected, a 
printout of present and absent students 
would be waiting for the teacher. 

For classes involving reading assign- 
ments, the Color Computer is an ideal 
tool to keep track of material completed 
by each student, as well as dates of com- 
pletion. This type of use might also 
involve a database system. Output 
might possibly not even need additional 
BASIC programming. A simple listing of 
assignments completed and not com- 
pleted might be all the teachers want 
from this system. 

An ambitious project for the class- 
room would be to put tests on the com- 
puter [Check last month's "education 
issue" of THE rainbow for some good 
ones.]. Such a program would have to 
be able to accept different questions (as 
the tests change) and keep scores saved 
on diskette or tape. Security would have 
to be part of the system, so students 
could not change grades or items missed 
on the test. Output for teachers would 
be a listing of students and scores 
(maybe dates also), and a listing of stu- 
dents who have not yet completed the 
test. This would only work in an 
extremely individualized classroom — 
with students taking tests at different 
times during the day. 

I will not go on with these examples. 1 
am sure you readers have already 
thought of an example from your situa- 
tion that fits with the general thread 
presented here. The point is that com- 
puters can be used for many purposes 
involving management of instruction. 



There are other aspects of using the 
computer as a tool for education. Many 
years ago, I taught a sociology class in 
high school. One project we had in class 
was to conduct a sociological study in 
the community. The students selected 
the topic of "generation gap" to be stu- 
died. (Yes, this was many years ago, 
when that term was popular.) The class 
constructed a questionnaire that asked 
for opinions on a variety of topics — the 
war in Vietnam, abortion, political 
preferences, and other items I cannot 
remember. We administered this ques- 
tionnaire to students in the school, and 
asked them to take copies home to have 



"A curriculum that in- 
eludes the computer as an 
integral part of student 
learning, but as only a 
single tool, would be a 
truly innovative aspect for 
American education." 



their parents complete. We then submit- 
ted the results to statistical techniques 
to determine if indeed parents and 
children held different views. 

The students got firsthand experience 
in what a sociologist does for a living, 
and learned what some of the readings 
in class were all about. Unfortunately, 
they had to spend many class hours with 
calculators to get the statistical results. 
This was time away from the main les- 
son, but was something that had to be 
done. 1 did not have a computer at that 
time; in fact, no one had a microcompu- 
ter. But had that class been able to use a 
microcomputer to store and examine 
the results, we would have had more 
time to spend on the analysis, and prob- 
ably conducted several other tests of the 
data. This would be an ideal example of 
using the computer as a tool for an edu- 
cational experience. Instead of having 



to teach about computers, or having les- 
sons from computers, the students 
would have had a practical application 
of the use of computers in a real life 
experience. 

I am not suggesting that students in 
Waynesburg conduct a sociological 
study with the use of the Color Compu- 
ter. I am suggesting that similar applica- 
tions could be instituted in the social 
studies department. 

Another brief example comes to 
mind (and then I promise to stop with 
the examples). Another class I taught 
was economics. This was not "how to 
balance a checkbook" economics, but 
the theory of economic behavior of 
humans. Much of the class time was 
spent dealing with numerical data: 
stock market quotes, corporate balance 
sheets, foreign trade, etc. If a computer 
had been available to me at this time, 
the entire course might have been dif- 
ferent. By putting some of the material 
we had in a spreadsheet program, the 
students could have gained a much bet- 
ter understanding of demand, supply, 
profit, and other economic concepts. 

The computer has many more uses in 
schooling than simply "drill and prac- 
tice." A curriculum that includes the 
computer as an integral part of student 
learning, but as only a single tool, would 
be a truly innovative aspect for Ameri- 
can education. 1 know of no such cur- 
riculum. Perhaps we will see such a set 
of educational experiences for Waynes- 
burg. 1 hope so. 

The social studies faculty and stu- 
dents at Waynesburg have a unique challenge. 
The thing about challenges is that they 
cut both ways. There is no other way to 
grow and learn than to be faced with a 
challenge. However, the risk of failure is 
always present. To reduce the risk as 
much as possible, 1 would give one more 
piece of advice to Mr. Gernert. Develop 
a plan for computer use in your schools. 
Do not try to overload the use, but 
determine what the machines will be 
used for, and how they will be used. 
Good luck to Waynesburg! 

For those who have information, 
advice, software for Mr. Gernert, please 
send it directly to him at 401 Bridge 
Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Send- 
ing anything to me will only delay for- 
warding to Waynesburg. If you want to 
communicate with me, please feel free 
to write me at 829 Evergreen, Chatham, 
I L 62629. 

Until next month, keep on develop- 
ing challenges for yourself. ^ 



24 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



EDUCATION 



16K 

ECB 



RAINBOW I I 



K The CoCo 
School Marm 



I 



Rirt 2 

By JtadyMDacus 
and 

David M Dacus 




nthis 

second of \ 
two articles we 
will present the pro- W% fc> 
grams to produce an integrated 
and automated spelling practice and 
examination system. The programs pre- 
sented here require the support of the programs 
presented last month. Last month's programs provided stu- 
dent practice and preparation. These programs provide individual eval- 
uation of student progress, and recording and display of the grades. Both the 
spelling practice program AudioSpell presented last month, and SpellTest pres- > 
ented this month, use the tape recorder to produce the necessary pronunciation 
and use of the words in sentences. The sound tape is controlled by the computer 
so that the tape pauses for student responses after each word. We have used color 
block graphics to facilitate understanding, particularly for younger children. 

The systems approach we have taken to automate practice and examination 
sessions of the weekly spelling lessons for elementary and secondary schools is 
designed to work as follows. The student receives preparatory practice on the 
week's words with the program, AudioSpell. The student is tested for ability 
to spell the week's words using a format identical to the practice 
sessions by Spelling Test, After the student completes the weekly 
spelling test, his or her grade is recorded to tape to be retrieved 
later and placed in the class gradebook. The Word Load 
program provides an easy means of placing the week's 
spelling words on a data tape for either the 
AudioSpell or the Spelling Test programs. 



October 19S4 THE RAINBOW 25 




Exhibit Hall opens at 1 0 a.m. 
and closes at 6 p.m. 
Sunday — Exhibit Hall open from 
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



The fun and excitement of RAINBOWfest 
is coming your way . . . and now there will 
be a RAINBOWfest near you! 

For the 1984-85 season, we've scheduled 
three RAINBOWfests in three parts of the 
country. Each one will offer fun, excitement, 
new products, seminars and information for 
your CoCo! And for those who (perish the 
thought) don't like CoCo as much as you, 
we've scheduled each RAINBOWfest in an 
area that will provide fun and enjoyment for 
the whole family. 

Our Princeton, New Jersey, show is being 
held at the Hyatt Regency Princeton, which 
offers special rates for RAINBOWfest. The 
show opens Friday evening with a 7 p.m. to 
10 p.m. session. It's a daytime-only show 
Saturday — the CoCo Community Breakfast 



is at 8 a.m., then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10 a.m. and runs continuously 
until 6 p.m. There will be no exhibition 
hours or seminars Saturday evening. On 
Sunday, the exhibit hall opens at 11 a.m. 
and closes at 4 p.m. 

Our highly popular CoCo Community 
Breakfast will again feature a well-known 
figure from the Color Computer Commun- 
ity. And the exhibition will be interspaced 
with a number of seminar sessions on all 
aspects of CoCo — from writing in machine 
language to making your basic work better. 

But most of all. there will be exhibitors. 
Lots of them. All ready to demonstrate pro- 
ducts of every kind. Some with special pro- 
grams and hardware items to introduce. 
Others with show specials. 



Tickets can be secured directly from the 
rainbow. We'll also send you a special 
reservation form so you can get your spe- 
cial room rate. 

Come to RAINBOWfest . . . help us all 
celebrate CoCo Community at its finest. 

United Airlines and the rainbow have 
joined together to offer a special discounted 
fare to those attending RAINBOWfest- 
Princeton. Simply by calling United at the 
toll free number listed below and identifying 
our meeting, with account number 481-1, 
you will be eligible for a 20 percent discount 
on the Easy Saver Fare. The only require- 
ment is a Saturday night stay. 

(800) 521-4041 
Account Number 481 -I 



RAINBOWfest-Princeton, New Jersey 
Date: September 28-30, 1984 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Room*; $64 per night, single or double 

(Special Rate Deadline, 

September 7) 
Advance Ticket Deadline: 
September 21, 1984 



RAINBOWfest-lrvine, California 

(L.A. area) 
Date: February 15-17, 1985 
Hotel: The Marriott Inn 
Rooms: $65 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: 
February 8, 1985 



RAINBOWfest-Chicago, Illinois 
Date: May 17-19, 1985 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $49 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: 
May 10, 1985 



RAINBOWfest Princeton 



Seminar Program And Speakers 



• Frank Hogg Advanced 

Operating Systems 

Frank is the president of Frank Hogg Labor- 
atory and a forerunner in FLEX and OS-9 
systems. 

• Jim Reed Writing For RAINBOW 

Jim, managing editor of the rainbow, will 
talk about how you can submit programs 
and articles to magazines for fun and profit. 
He is also senior editor of pcm — and editor- 
ial director of soft sector (for the Sanyo). 

• Dale Puckett Beginner's Tour Of OS-9 

Beginner s Tour of BASIC09 

A free-lance writer and programmer, Dale 
has worked with microprocessors since 
1976 and has just completed his first book, 
The Official BASIC09 Tour Guide. Dale will be 
available to sign copies of his book at 
RAINBOWfest. 

• Peter Stark Advanced 

Operating Systems II 

Peter is a professor of electrical and compu- 
ter engineering technology in the City Uni- 
versity of New York and is president of Star- 
Kits Software Systems Corp. 



Dan Downard Machine Language 

For The Beginner 

Dan Downard is the technical editor for the 
rainbow and an electrical engineer. He has 
been involved in electronics for 24 years 
through ham radio (K4KWT). His interest in 
computers began about five years ago and 
he has built several 68XX systems. 



Paul Hoffman 



Inside CoCo Graphics 



Paul Hoffman is an independent designer/- 
artist and Color Computer programmer. He 
is the author of Computerware's Semi Draw 
and a number of X-Pad programs. 

Women And 
. Computers/Using Your 
Susan Davis Color Computer In 

Home Based Business 

Susarv co-owner of Sugar Software, will 
lead a panel discussion on women's involve- 
ment in the world of the Color Computer. 

Steve Blyn Computers In 

The Classroom 

Steve, an award-winning rainbow colum- 
nist and teacher, has written many educa- 
tional programs for Computer Island. 



• Julie A. McGee director of software development for Tandy Home Education 
Systems, will be our keynote speaker at the CoCo Community Breakfast, Saturday morning 

,at 8 a.m. 



FREE Rainbow poster 

for first 500 tickets ordered. 

FREE T-Shirt to first five people 
from each state who buy tickets. 



Make checks payable to: 
THE RAINBOW 



MAIL TO: 

RAINBOWfest 
P.O. BOX 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
(502) 228-4492 



YES, I'm coming to RAINBOWfest! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special 
advance sate price. Send me tickets for (check one): 



O Princeton, New Jersey 
Please send me: 



Irvine, California 



Chicago, Illinois 



three day tickets at $9 each 

one day tickets at $7 each 

Circle one: Friday / Saturday / Sunday 
Saturday breakfast tickets at $12 each 

Handling Charge $1 
TOTAL ENCLOSED (U.S. FUNDS ONLY, PLEASE) 

D Also send me a hotel reservation card for Princeton 



NAME (please print)^ 
STREET & NUMBER . 
CITY & STATE 

TELEPHQNE__=_ 
COMPANY 



total . 
total . 



total . 



ZIPCODE- 



Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. 
VISA, MasterCharge, American Express accepted. 

My Account # __~.Ex. Date: 

Signature ~_ 




Data tapes created by Word Load are 
interchangeable between the practice 
and testing programs. The Grade List 
program lists student grades recorded 
by Spelling Test. AudioSpell and Word 
Load were presented last month. This 
month we present and explain the func- 
tions of Spelling Test and GradeList. 

The Audio Spelling System is design- 
ed to operate on the I6K Extended 
Color BASIC Radio Shack Color Com- 
puter with nothing more than a tape 
recorder and color television. 

Routines are provided for the use of a 
line printer if it is available. Modifica- 
tions are presented later in the article for 
modifying the programs for use on a 
level one basic CoCo. 

Spelling Test 

The materials needed are: 

Program Tape or Disk — Program 

Name SpelTest 
Spelling Words Tape (to be made 

using Word Load) 
Grades Tape 

Color Computer, television, and tape 
recorder 

Line printer or student-provided pen- 
cil and paper 

Here are the instructions: Spelling 
Test is self-instructing, and works nearly 
identically to the AudioSpell program. 
If the student is familiar with operation 
of the Color Computer and loading 
programs from tape, he or she should be 
able to operate the program with no 



assistance. Otherwise, load and run the 
program for the student. Then place the 
Spelling Words tape in the recorder and 
push the play button. When the student 
completes the exam, a hard copy list of 
the exam will be printed for the student 
if you have a line printer. The exam 
listing will print the student's spelling of 
each word. When a word has been mis- 
spelled, an X is placed beside the word, 
and the correct spelling printed beside 
the incorrect word. The percentage score 
is printed at the top of the listing under 
the student's name. If a printer is not 
available, the student should be pre- 
pared to copy misspelled words from 
the screen. When the exam listing is 
completed, the student will be instructed 
to get the teacher. The keyboard will 
accept only the code word "KEY- 
WORD" to continue the program. Insert 
the Grades tape into the tape recorder, 
type in "KEYWORD," enter, and fol- 



(Judy Dacus has a Ph.D. in curriculum 
and instruction and her specialties are 
curriculum development and science 
education. She is currently math, 
science, and computer science instruc- 
tor for Mesilla Valley Christian Schools. 
Mike Dacus is an operations research 
analyst for The U.S. Army Training 
And Doctrine Command Systems 
Analysis Activity (TRASA NA)at White 
Sands Missile Range, N.M. Both have a 
strong interest in computers in 
education.) 



low the instructions for recording the 
student's grade to the Grades tape. 

Grade List 

The materials needed are: 

Program Tape or Disk - Program 

Name GradList 
Grades Tape or Data File on Disk 
Line Printer or Pencil and Paper 

The instructions are: The GradeList 
program is self-instructing. If you have 
a printer, each student's grade will be 
printed for you. If you do not have a 
printer it will be necessary for you to 
copy each student's grades from the tel- 
evision screen. 

Modification Of The Programs 

It is good practice to make a copy of 
the program and store away the original 
program before making modifications. 
This allows you to fall back to the origi- 
nal program if something should happen 
to the copy while you are making the 
modifications. 

Five seconds recording time was select- 
ed as optimum for the average user. 
This time can be easily modified to suit 
the individual teacher's needs. To change 
recording time, it is necessary to change 
only one value in each of three pro- 
grams. The Color Computer requires 
one second to count to 460 in a FOR . . . 
NEXT loop such as the one found in 
Line 280 of the Word Load program. 
To change the length of time allowed to 
pronounce the word and use it in a sent- 
ence, you must multiply the number of 
seconds desired times 460 and place the 
resulting value in Line 280 of the Word 
Load program. Line 290 of the Audi- 
oSpell program, and Line 280 of the 
Spelling Test program in place of the 
value 2300. All three programs must 
contain the same value in the timing 
loop for the tapes to be read correctly. 

Using Programs When No Printer Is 
Available 

If you do not have access to a printer, 
you may want to eliminate the student 
input regarding the printer. If you have 
a printer and always intend to have 
misspelled words printed rather than 
displayed on the TV screen, you may 
wish to eliminate the choice of TV dis- 
play. To eliminate choice of the printer, 
change the expression "Do you have a 
printer (yes or no)" in Line 360 of Spell- 
ing Test to "Press enter to continue," 
and eliminate everything after the vari- 
able A$ in Line 360. Next, eliminate 
program Lines 400 through 460. To 
eliminate the choice of printing the list 
to the TV, modify Line 360 exactly as 



28 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



above, and eliminate program Lines 370 
through 390. 

Changing Printer Codes 

The printing algorithms of these pro- 
grams are written using ASCII codes 
for an Epson MX-80 printer. This print- 
er uses CHR$(1 4) to print double width 
characters and CHR$(10) as a line feed 
command. If your printer does not use 
these two codes you must substitute 
your printer code for CHR$(14) in 
Lines 4 10,420, and 710 in Spelling Test, 
and Line 200 of Grade List, and substi- 
tute your printer's equivalent of CHR$ 
(10) in Lines 410, 420, and 710 of Spell- 
ing Test, and Line 200 of Grade List. 

Modification To Run On A Non- 
Extended CoCo 

As the programs are listed, they are 
for use on an Extended Color basic 
machine. To use these programs on a 
level one machine requires only removal 
or replacement of one reserved Extended 



word. The screens are formatted with 
the reserved word STRINGS. This com- 
mand prints a string of N copies of the 
ASCII character X as in PRINT @ 0, 
STRINGS (N,X). To substitute for the 
STRINGS command using level one 
BASIC you can substitute the algorithm 



by entering 
keyboard. 



a shift-up arrow on the 



15FORI=lTO 32, 
CHR$(169):NEXTI 



sc$ ~ sc$ + 



You will need one line and one vari- 
able for each different color band you 
wish to print. After you have set up the 
variable at the front of the program, you 
may then substitute the command — 
PRINT SCS — in place of each PRINT 
STRINGS command in the program. 

Explanation Of ASCII Symbol 

In Line 110 of SpellTest the listing 
shows an underscore character in par- 
entheses in the instructions to be printed 
to the screen. On the computer screen 
this shows as a left arrow, and is made 




Disk Version Availability 

We have developed versions of the 
spelling programs modified for the Disk 
Extended Color Computer. Using the 
system on disk will allow automated 
recording of grades in a grade file with- 
out teacher intervention. It will also 
expedite and facilitate student use of the 
spelling programs. For those who use 
disk systems, the authors will provide a 
copy of the complete set of programs for 
disk on a tape for $10. Our address is 
206 Capri Road, Las Cruces, NM 88005. 
If you have problems with your entered 
version of these programs, be sure you 
have thoroughly proof-read your code 
before writing or calling. Please send a 
self-addressed stamped envelope with 
your request for help or you can call us 
at 505-524-3389. Please call between 5 
and 10 p.m. Mountain Time. 



JUDY M. AN 
CAPRI, LAS 



Listing 1: 



10 ' SPELLING EXAM 
20 * COPYRIGHT 1982 BY 
D DAVID M. DACUS, 206 

CRUCES, NM 88001 
30 CLEAR 2000: NW - 50: DIM WRD*(N 
W> , W* (NW) , N* (30) , G* (30) 
40 CLS: PRINT90, STRING* (32, 175) ; : 
PRINT842, "SPELLING EXAM" 
50 PRINT864, STRING* (32, 175) ; "HI ! 

MY NAME IS COCO THE COLOR COM 
PUTER. CALL ME COCO. THAT* SWHA 
T ALL MY FRIENDS CALL ME. " 
60 PRINT8192, STRING* (32, 175) ; : IN 
PUT "WHAT IS YOUR NAME"; NAM* 
70 PRINT8256, STRING* (32, 175) ; "TH 
AT'S A NICE NAME - "NAM*" . " : PRIN 
T8320, STRING* (32, 175) ; 
80 PRINT8352, "DO YOU KNOW HOW I 
WORK? (TYPE NOAND I WILL TELL YO 
U WHAT TO DO) PLEASE TYPE YES OR 

NO AND PUSH < ENTER >" 

90 INPUT A*: IF LEFT* (A*, 1) m "Y" 

THEN 140 
100 CLS: PRINT80, STRING* (32, 175) I 
"I WILL SAY THE WORD, I WILL USE 

THE WORD IN A SENTENCE, AND THE 
NSAY THE WORD AGAIN. WHEN I 

FINISH THE WORD I WILL ASK YOU 

TO SPELL IT. ":PRINT8192, STRING* 



(32,175); 

110 PRINT" IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE 
USE THE BACK ARROW (_) TO ERAS 
E. ":PRINT@288, STRING* (32, 175) ; : I 
NPUT"PUSH < ENTER > TO CONTINUE"; A 
* 

120 CLS: PRINTS0, STRING* (32, 175) ; 
"WHEN YOU THINK YOU HAVE SPELLED 
THE WORD CORRECTLY, PRESS < ENTER 
>. " : PR I NTS 128, STRING* (32, 175) J 
130 INPUT "PUSH < ENTER > TO CONTIN 
LIE" J A* 

140 CLS: PRINT80, STRING* (32, 175) ; 
"NOW WE ARE READY TO START 

SPELLING THIS WEEK'S WORDS.": PR 
INT896, STRING* (32, 175) ; 
150 PR I NT "PLEASE CHECK TO SEE TH 
AT THE TAPE MARKED - SPELLING 

WORDS - IS IN THE TAPE RECORDE 
R, THE TAPE IS REWOUND, AND T 
HE RECORDER IS ON PLAY.": 

PRINT8288, STRING* (32, 175) ; 
160 INPUT "WHEN YOU HAVE CHECKED 
ALL THIS, PUSH MY < ENTER > BUTTON 

AND I'LL MOVE THE TAPE TO GET R 
EADY. "; A*:CLS:PRINTSTRING*(32, 17 
5); "I AM LOADING THE WORDS FROM 
TAPE" 

170 I ■ 0:W = 0:W* - "" 
180 OPEN"I", #-1, "WORDS" 
190 IF EOF (-1) THEN 240 
200 I m I + l 
210 INPUT #-1, W* 
220 WRD*(I) » W* 
230 GOTO 190 
240 CLOSE #-1 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 29 



250 NW - I 

260 CLS: PRINTS0, STRING* <32, 175) ; 

: INPUT "WHEN YOU ARE READY FOR YO 

UR FIRST WORD PUSH MY < ENTER 

> BUTTON . " ; A* : CLS : PR I NT80 , S 

TRING* (224, 175) ; " LISTEN 

CAREFULLY. ■ 

270 FOR I - 1 TO NW 

280 AUDIO ON:MOTORON:FOR V « 1 T 

0 2300: NEXT V:MOTORQFF: AUDIO OFF 

290 SKIPF "marker" :cls: PR int@0,s 

TRING* (224, 175); 

300 INPUT "PLEASE SPELL THE WORD 

YOU JUST HEARD. ";W* (I) 

310 IF W*(I) « WRD*(I) THEN R = 

R + 1 ELSE W - W + 1 

320 PRINT@28B,STRING*<32, 175) ;: I 

NPUT "READY FOR THE NEXT WORD"; A* 

:CLS:PRINTS0,STRING*(224, 175) ; " 

LISTEN CAREFULLY" 
330 NEXT I 

340 CLS: AUDIO OFF: PR I NTS0, STRING 
*<32, 175);" YOU ATTEMPTED TO SPEL 
L ";NW;" WORDS. ":G = (R 

/(W+R)>*100 

350 PR I NT "YOU MISSPELLED ";W;" W 
ORDS OUT OF " ; W+R; " ATTEMPTS FOR 

A SCORE OF ";G;"7.. " 

360 PRINTS2B8, STRING* (32, 175) ; : I 
NPUT "DO YOU HAVE A PRINTER (YES O 
R NO)"; A*: IF LEFT* (A*, 1) = "Y" T 
HEN 400 

370 CLS: PRINT "THESE ARE THE WOR 
DS MISSED ":FOR I = 1 TO NW 
3B0 IF W*(I) <> WRD*(I) THEN PRI 
NT WRD*(I) , :NEXT I ELSE NEXT I 
390 PRINT: I NPUT "WHEN YOU HAVE CO 
PIED THESE WORDSON A PIECE OF PA 
PER PUSH <ENTER>";A*:GOTO 470 
400 CLS : PR I NTS0, STRING* (224, 175) 
; "PRINTING SPELLING TEST" 
410 PRINT#~2, CHR* ( 14) ; "SPELLING 
TEST FOR "; NAM*; CHR* (10) ; CHR* (10 
) 

420 PR I NT#~2 , CHR* (14);" YOUR GRAD 

e - ";g; "y.";cHR*(i0) ;chr*(10) 

430 PRINT#~2, "YOUR SPELLING", "M 

I SSED " , " CORRECT SPELL I NG " 

440 FOR I - 1 TO NW 

450 PRINT#-2, i;".";w*(l),:lF W*( 

I) <> WRD*(I) THEN PRINT#-2, " 

X",WRD*(I) ELSE PRINT#-2, "" 
460 NEXT I 

470 CLS : PR I NTS0 , STR I NG* ( 224 ,175) 
;"GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR SPELLING. 

COME PRACTICE WITH ME FOR NEXT 

WEEK'S TEST." 



480 PRINT8320, STRING* (32, 246) ; : I 
NPUT "PLEASE GET YOUR TEACHER"; A* 
490 IF A* <> "KEYWORD" THEN 480 
500 CLS:PRINTS0,STRING*(64, 134) ; 
"WE ARE NOW READY TO RECORD 
GRADES. " 

510 INPUT "IS THIS THE FIRST GRA 
DE TO BE RECORDED THIS WEEK"; A 
* 

520 IF LEFT*(A*,1) - "Y" THEN X 
• l:N*(l) = NAM*:G*(1) = STR*(G) 
:GOTO 730 

530 CLS: PRINTS0, STRING* (64, 134) ; 
"BE SURE THAT THE - GRADES - TAP 
EIS IN THE RECORDER, THE TAPE IS 

REWOUND, AND THE RECORDER IS ON 

PLAY. " 

540 I NPUT "WHEN YOU ARE READY PUS 

H <ENTER>";A*:CLS:PRINTe0,STRING 

* (224, 134) ; "LOADING GRADES." 

550 I « 0:N* ■ "":G* - "" 

560 OPEN "I", #-1, "GRADES" 

570 IF EOF (-1) THEN 620 

580 1=1+1 

590 INPUT #-1, N1*,G1* 

600 N*(I) = N1*:G*(I) = Gl* 

610 GOTO 570 

620 CLOSE #-1 

630 N*(I+1) = NAM*:G*(I+1) - STR 
*(G):X =1+1 

640 CLS : PR I NT@0 , STR I NG* ( 224 , 1 34 ) 
;:INPUT"DO YOU WANT A LIST OF AL 
L GRADES"; A* 

650 IF LEFT*(A*,1) <> "Y" THEN 7 
30 

660 I NPUT "DO YOU WANT l.CRT OR 2 
.HARDCOPY LISTING"; A: IF A ■ 2 TH 
EN 700 

670 CLS: PR I NT "LI ST OF GRADES" 
680 FOR I m 1 TO X:PRINT N*(I),G 
*(I):NEXT I 

690 INPUT "PRESS < ENTER > TO CONT 

INUE. "; A*: GOTO 730 

700 CLS : PR I NTS0 , STR I NG* ( 224 , 1 34 ) 

; "PRINTING GRADES." 

710 PRINT#-2, CHR* ( 14) ; "LIST OF 

GRADES" ; CHR* ( 10) ; CHR* ( 10) 

720 FOR I - 1 TO X:PRINT#-2, N*( 

I ) , G* ( I ) : NEXT I 

730 CLS: PR I NT@0, STRING* (64, 134) ; 
"NOW WE WILL RECORD GRADES TO 

TAPE. REWIND THE TAPE, AND PUSH 

PLAY AND RECORD." 
740 I NPUT "WHEN YOU ARE READY PUS 
H < ENTER >. " ; A* 

750 MOTORON:FOR V - 1 TO 2500: NE 
XT v:motoroff 



30 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



760 OPEN '•O", #-1, "GRADES" 

770 FOR I » 1 TO X 

7S0 Nl* - N*<I):G1* = G*<I> 

790 PRINT#-1, N1*,G1* 

800 NEXT I 

810 CLOSE *-l 

820 CLS : PR I NT@0 , STR I NG* ( 224 , 1 69 ) 
; "THE RECORDING OF GRADES IS 
FINISHED. ": END 



Listing 2: 

10 REM THIS PROGRAM LISTS GRADES 
RECORDED BY THE SPELLING TEST P 
ROGRAM 

20 'COPYRIGHT 1982 BY JUDY M. AN 
D DAVID M. DACUS, 206 CAPRI, LAS 

CRUCES, NM 88001 
30 CLEAR 500:DIM N* <50) , G* <50> 
40 CLS:PRINT@0,STRING*<64, 134) i " 

WE ARE NOW READY TO LIST GRADES. 

n 

50 PR I NTS 128, STRING* (32, 134) ; "BE 
SURE THAT THE - GRADES - TAPE IS 
IN THE RECORDER, THE TAPE IS RE 

WOUND, AND THE RECORDER IS ON PL 

AY. ":PRINTa288,STRING*<32, 134) i 

60 INPUT "WHEN YOU ARE READY PUSH 
< ENTER > " ; A* : CLS : PR I NT@0 , STR I NG* 

(224, 134 >; "LOADING GRADES." 

70 I = 0:N* = "":G* - "" 

80 OPEN "I", #-1, "GRADES" 

90 IF EOF (-1) THEN 140 

100 1=1+1 

110 INPUT #-1, N1*,G1* 

120 N*(I> = N1*:G*(I> = Gl* 

130 GOTO 90 

140 CLOSE *-l 

150 INPUT "DO YOU WANT l.CRT OR 2 
.HARDCOPY LISTING" $ A: IF A - 2 TH 
EN 190 

160 CLS:PRINT"LIST OF GRADES" 
170 FOR X - 1 TO I!PRINT N*(X>,G 
*(X>:NEXT X 

180 INPUT "PRESS < ENTER > TO END 

PROGRAM. "| A*: GOTO 220 

190 CLS: PRINTS0, STRING* (224, 134) 

; "PRINTING GRADES." 

200 PRINT#-2, CHR*(14>;"LIST OF 

GRADES" 5 CHR* ( 10) ; CHR* ( 10) 

210 FOR X m 1 TO I:PRINT#-2, N*( 

X),G*(X>:NEXT X 

220 END 



w/ TRS 



PRODUCTS FOR THE 
TRS 80 COLOR COMPUTER 



EDITTRON 



© 



Full-Screen BASIC Program Editor 
WILL SAVE YOU TIME! 



LetEplTTRON cut your programming time In half! 
You will appreciate the absoMe ^ase at which 
this Full-Screen Editor allows you to INPUT, EDIT, and 
DEBUG your BASIC programs. 

EDITTRON performs these functions: 



CURSOR-CONTROL 

Directional Movement 
Screen Scrolling 
Home the Cursor 
Limit the Cursor 
Down Page 
Up Page 
Search a Line 
Call a Line 
Find a String 
Repeat Find 



SCREEN-EDITING 

★ Change Characters 

★ ExtencTaLlne 

★ Kill a Line 

★ Insert Characters 

★ Delete Characters 

★ Move a Line 

★ Split a Line 

★ Copy a Line 

★ Merge Two Lines 

★ Auto-Numbering 
Other Features Include: Auto-Repeating keys, Key 
Tone, user-friendly Prompts and Error Messages, 
ond comprehensive, easy-io-read Documentation. 



EDITTRON is a 3K. fully posillon- Independent 
Machine Language program that requires a 
minimum 16K of RAM, and Extended Color BASIC. 

CASSETTE $ 30 DISKETTE $ 35 



MACHINE LANGUAGE UTILITIES 



FUNCTION— Gives you 10 user-definable Function keys, 
each can be up to 100 characters in length. (16K) 

COMPRESS— Removes unnecessary spaces and 
unwanted remarks from your BASIC programs. (16K) 

AUT0-NUM — Automatically generates sequential line 
numbers for easier BASIC program entry. (4K) 

R0M-B00T— Gives access to your full 64K of RAM, 
allowing you to use the upper 32K of memory, (64K) 

HI-BASIC^ Runs your program from the upper 52< oF 
RAM, freeing-up the lower 32k for flaia, graphics, etc. iftdKl 



DISK— One for $15, Two or more for $10 each. 
CASS.— One for $12, Two or more for $8 each. 



HARDWARE PRODUCTS 



ROMs 

BASIC ROM \.\ , . . .»45 M 
BASIC BOM 1.2 ....•36°° 

E.C.B. ROM 1.1 •eO** 

O.E.C.&. fiQM1.1...*36 M 

RAM* 

4164-64KRAM •6 B » 

S et of Eight *80*» 

4116-16KRAM M" 

Set of Eight 

I.G. ft 
MHz MPU . . •28 M 
2 MHz MPtP . «30»» 

aftH21-2MHzP|A.. , 10~ 

Mfl^-SAJVl «26 M 

6M7- VDG *20 # * 

1 MHz Set of Four . . »e5 M 

2 MHz SeloF Four *70" 

■6822 — H.D P A *15" 

7*802- NOR Sate »1 M 
7*B1 39 -Dec-Oder. . »2" 



SERIAL SWITCHERS 

These bi-directional swiicriers 
□Maw you to expand your 
serial pori to two or three 
peripherals or to connect 
one penph#raf to two or 
three computers. They are a 
compact 2x3x1% inches 
and are available with a 
mounted piior righ(. 

2 Ports ...*25" 

3 Port* *30 M 

Add for Pilot Light 



MISC 

VT-B302 Pi lot light Ki> »7" 

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(714) 639-4070 

VIDTRON 



TMl 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 31 




The fourth of a six-part series. 



The Use Of Direct Access 

Disk Files 



By Bill Nolan 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This article is the fourth in a series 
of six about using direct access 
disk files on the Color Computer. 
Specifically, we are looking at the use of 
these direct access disk files in database 
manager programs. A database man- 
ager is any program designed to keep 
track of some related pieces of informa- 
tion on a computer. In this tutorial ser- 
ies we have been learning about data- 
base manager programs and direct ac- 
cess disk files by looking at a particular 
type of database manager — a mailing 
list program. You will find that the 
principles we use to write a mailing list 
program can be easily applied to any 
other type of database manager program. 

In working with database managers, 
we use the terms field, record, and file. 
In our mailing list program, the entire 
group of names, addresses, cities, states, 
ZIP codes, and phone numbers make 
up the file. All of the information about 
one person is a record, and each piece of 
information is a field. 

When complete, the mailing list pro- 
gram will be a fairly nice one. It will 



(Bill Nolan, who teaches "Programming 
In BASIC" at the college level, owns 
Prickly- Pear Software Co. and has 
written several commercially successful 
software packages.) 

32 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



search or sort on any field, and the sort 
method will be much faster than many 
commercial database programs. It will 
handle up to about 400 names. 

The program listing with the article 
this month is the same as last month, 
and is part of the final program. This 
section will allow you to type in your 
information, store it on the disk, retrieve 
it, and print it on the screen or printer in 



"A database manager is 
any program designed to 
keep track of some related 
pieces of information on a 
computer." 



several formats. We have been going 
over this program line by line, and last 
month we had covered about half of this 
listing. 

This month we will cover the section 
concerned with printing out the data on 
the screen or printer, and the rest of the 
subroutines. Next month we will add 
the search section to the program, and 
the following month we will finish the 



program with the addition of the sort 
section. 

The print section of the program 
starts at Line 4000, and you will want to 
refer to the listing while we go over it. 
Lines 4000 and 40 1 0 clear the screen and 
print a menu on the screen. A menu is a 
list of choices, just like you get at a 
restaurant, and this menu has five choi- 
ces. In order they are: Print on Screen; 
Print on Printer; Print on Labels; Print 
Phone Number List; and Return to the 
Main Menu. These are numbered from 
one to five, and the user is told (on the 
screen) to press one of those numerals. 
The INKEYS command at the end of 
Line 40 10 is there to clear out the key- 
board buffer. Line 4020 gets the user's 
response and checks it to see if it is really 
a number from one to five. If it is, Line 
4030 goes to five different line numbers, 
depending upon which digit was pressed. 

If users choose to print either on the 
screen or on labels, they will be sent to 
4 1 00. If they choose to print on the print- 
er they will be sent to 4200. If they 
choose a phone number list, the pro- 
gram branches to 4300, and if they 
choose the main menu, the branch is to 
Line 500. 

First let's suppose that they chose to 
print on the screen or labels. Line 4I00 
does a GOSUB to 5500 to open the file 
buffer to the disk, clears the screen, and 





By Bill Dunlevy & Doug Prayer 

Exploding with color, racing with 
fast animation, and roaring with 
sound, this great non-violent game 
is destined to be a classic! The 
review in February's issue of RAIN- 
BOW says this: "A Fun Investment ' "it 
is totally unique" "I found it very tough 
to tear myself away from playing the 
game long enough to write about it! In 
short, CASHMAN is one fun game.| 
Buy it." 




Dozens of levels and screens (more 
than FORTY!) offer anyone, from be- 
ginner to expert, as much good clean 
fun as they want! Higher levels in- 
clude special Mystery Pieces and Ex- 
pert Puzzle Pieces and Expert Puzzle 
Screens. Play alone or go for the 
ultimate challenge of two-player si- 
multaneous competition. Run along 
the colorful girders, jump across the 
tremendous chasms, climb the ropes 
and ladders, or grab a BYRD and fly to 
get the loot before your opponent 
does, but watch out! The KATS are on 
the prowl and your opponent is toss- 
ing eggs! Run, jump, climb, or fly to 
your nearest Color Computer and 
play CASHMAN! 



By Jeffery Sorenson 
& Phillip MacKenzie 

All alone in the silence of space, you 
switch on the viewrport to look at the 
brilliant stars And then you see THEM: 
a massive hoard of bat-like aliens, 
swarming towards you! The ship trem- 
bles under the distant explosions of 
enemy fire. You have only one chance 
for survival - Fight! As you attempt to 
defeat each new wave of enemy ships, 
they only get stronger and faster! If by 
some miracle you survive the first 
assay K, you find yourself pitted against 
enemies so swift, powerful, and out- 
right evil that only one name fits them 
- DEMONS! And if that's not enough, 
they bring out the heavy artillery - the 
Mother Ship! Engaging in battle, you 
see a dark cloud against the stars: 
another invasion fleet! 




Created in the same spirit of the 
classic arcades games like Phoenix 
and Galaga, DEMON SEED is a great 
package of arcade fun and action. 
Different screens of bats, demons, 
and special challenge rounds 
keep the excitement high and 
e competition stiff! 

32K-Tape $27.95 
Disk $29.95 



By Bill Dunlevy & Harry La f near 

Tired of games that only have a few 
screens or force you to follow strict 
levels? In TIME BAND IT, you virtually 
create your own game! You can 
choose from more than TWENTY 
places through-out the game, with 
more than 1 5 distinct variations and 
levels of difficulty in each place; this 
means over 300 variations! 



flMIS 12740 33 



castle e*t¥nciiki» 




Use the TIMEGATES to travel to the 
three different Worlds of Time, each 
containing a multitude of colorful 
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WORLD, recapture the days of yes- 
teryear in WESTERN WORLD, and 
reach for the stars in FUTURE 
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and escape with the treasures of time. 
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Crisp Supergraphics, colorful scroll- 
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and over THREE HUNDRED 
SCREENS -it's all here! The 
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awaits! 




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Pontiac, Michigan 48054 
Orders & Info: (313) 666-4802 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Add $3.00 for 
shipping in the U.SA- $5.00 in Canada. Dealer 
inquires invited. 



see us at 



182,582 BYTES FREE* 

SSI 





CONTROLLERS 



DC-1 
$134 



VC-1 
$24.45 



VC-2 
$26.45 

VC-3 
$39.45 



ROM disk controller reads & 
writes to 35 and 40 track single 
and double sided drives with all 
models of the color computer 

(J&M) ($2 shipping) 

Video interface mounts inside 
color computer by piggybacking 
IC on top of interface-no solder- 
ing and no trace cuts ($2 shpg) 

for color computer 2 - 
monochrome only ($2 shpg) 

for color computer 2 - color and 
monochrome ($2 shpg) 



. . . with the Howard 
DRIVE 0 PACKAGE 

• Double-sided Half- 
height Drive-359,424 
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• J&M Controller 

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* 1 56,672/5349.95 » 447 7 bytes/$ x $395 = 
176,8421 - 359,242 * 182,582 fcytea free 



MONITORS 

122 Zenith 12" Amber screen, 640 X 
$134 250 dots, 15 MHz resoiution. 

($6 shpg) 

123 Zenith 12" green screen, 640 X 
$98 250 dots, 1 5 MHz resoiution. 

($6 shpg) 

131 Zenith 13" Color Monitor with 
$334 speaker, 390 X 200 dots, 2 5 
MHz resolution ($9 shpg) 

SK-1 Sakata 1 2" Color Monitor, 400 X 
$269 200 dots, 15 MHz resolution 
($6 shpg) 

AM Monitors need video controller 



$16.25 
SURGE 
SUPPRESSOR 



SS-1 
$16.25 

Reg. 

$48 

value 

($2 shpg) 




GEMINM0X 

$318 120 cps, 10" wide fric- 
Oj tion & pin-feed printer. 



Jb 



Includes internal Gemini 



serial interface and color 
computer to Gemini cable. 
g ($6 shipping) 



Our Unmatched Guarantee 

We offer a 30-day, full-refund guarantee 
that is unmatched in the business. In addi- 
tion, all products are covered by manufac- 
turer warranty, and our Howard stands 
are warranted for 1 year. 




Howard Medical Computers 

Box 2, Chicago, IL 60690 

Cat.No Number Desc. (inc. color) 



Telephone (31 2) 944-2444 



Unit cost 



Shpg. 
$ 



Cost 
S 



$3Mp etwcfc of money order enclosed 



Name . 



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COD (add 1.65) _ 

Total order £ 



TV STANDS 







COCO 2 


TS-1 


15W x T1D x 4H 


TS-2 


$29.50 


for 13" screen 


$29.50 


TS-4 


24vVx 11D x 4H 


TS-3 


$39.50 


for 19" screen 


$39.50 


PS-1 


18Wx 15Dx 2%H 




$19.95 


for ail popular printers 






add $5 for bottom feed slot 



TV stands come with ROM pack cut-out. 
Specify Ivory or Smoked Gray Shipping 
$275 for each stand. 



New! 

Call our color 
computer bulletin 
board . . . 
(312) 278-9513 



CO J£ CD c_ 

^ ^ a) O 

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Get Your Very Own Pot 0' Gold! Rainbow On Tape Tops Typing 



Here's your chance to have a Pot 0" Gold full of programs, articles and information about CoCo 
every month of the year! A subscription to the Rainbow is only $28* and you won't miss a single 
chock-full issue. 

As the premier magazine for the TRS-80 Color, TDP-100 and Dragon-32 and -64 computers, the 
Rainbow has more of everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor 
and subscribe to the Rainbow today! 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. Non-U.S. rates higher. U.S. currency only, please. 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of the Rainbow. 
□ NEW □ RENEW (Attach Label) 

Name 

Address 

City 



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ZIP. 



□ Payment Enclosed 
Charge □ VISA 

Account Number 

Signature . 



(Payment must accompany order) 

□ MasterCard □ American Express 

Card Expiration Date 



'Subscriptions to th« Rainbow are $26 a year in the United States. Canadian and 
Mexican rate is $35 U.S. funds. Surface rate elsewhere is $65 U.S. funds. Air mail is 
$100 dollars U.S. funds. All Subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please 
allow 5-6 weeks for the first copy. 



Tired of spending all your valuable computer time typing in those long, but wonderful, Rainbow 
programs each month? Now there is Rainbow On Tape to help ease the pain. 

Each month all the lengthy programs (over 20 lines) in the Rainbow can come to you ready-to- 
run, thanks to Rainbow On Tape. At $70* per year — or $8 a tape * * — it is the biggest bargain 
going. 

Back issues are available beginning with April, 1982. (except May 1983). Each month's tape will 
arrive at approximately the same time as that month's issue of the Rainbow. 

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•Subscriptions to Rainbow On Tape are $70 in the United States. $80 U.S. funds in 
Canada and Mexico and $95 U.S. funds in all other countries. 

"Back issues of the tapes are $8 in the United States, $10 U.S. funds for Canada, 
Mexico and all other countries. 

















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9 



What goes well with 
the Rainbow? 




Rainbow On Tape! 

We call it the other side of the rainbow and we may have to 
raise the price just to call your attention to it. With more than 
two dozen programs every month, Rainbow On Tape is a 
luxury service at a bargain basement price. 

What is it? Rainbow On Tape is a monthly, cassette tape 
adjunct to the rainbow and it's brimming with all the pro- 
grams (those over 20 lines long) that fill the pages of the 
magazine. All you do is pop the cassette in your tape 
recorder and they're ready to run. No more lost weekends 
—or weeknights — typing, typing, typing. With Rainbow On 
Tape, you can read the article in the magazine then, in 
seconds, you load it up and run it. 

Yes, Rainbow On Tape is brimming with the programs that 
fill the rainbow's pages each month. And, yes, you could 
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Isn't it time your CoCo became a f ulltime computer instead 
of a typewriter. Think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 300 new 
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that's "small potatoes." Food for thought. To get your first 
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Discover the other side of the rainbow. It's not only a 
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SPECIAL VALUES!! 

We at Michtron werer astonished by the response we received from our readers in regafds to our 
Grand Open ing safe. Business has been so brisk that we have decided to offer another special s 
This wiii give ail our vaiued customers another chance to cash in on some super saving? 1 



SUPER SALE W SLIMLINE DRIVERS 

Disk Drive and Controller are only $329,95, This may 
not be the lowest price you wiii find in the Rainbow, but 
we can guarantee it wiii be the best disk drive you can 
buy. Most special prices are for big, old, outdated f ull 
size drives. We are offering you the newest design, Slim 
Line TEAC disk drives. These are exceptional quality 40 
track disk drives. They are guaranteed for 6 months, 
twice as long as most disk drives. For a controller, we 
offer the J & M with gold plated contacts. Asa special 
bonus with each disk drive, we wilt include a dual power 
sbpply and case. Now or at a later date, you can add a 
second disk drive for very little money. 

1 TEAC 40 Track Slim Line 

Disk Drive and Controller... ............. ..$329.95 

2 TEAC 40 Track SHm Line 

&l*k Drives and Controller. * . $479.98 

DISKS 

We buy approximately 5,000 disks a month for resale to 
our customers and for our own use as a software 
publisher. We buy only premium quality SENTINEL 
diskettes. We buy them In bulk (no labels, no boxes) to 
save money. We, In turn, pass these savings to our 
customers. These diskettes are unconditionally guar- 
anteed to be f hefinest you haw used orwe will prom ptiy 
refund your money. The diskettes are guaranteed by 
both Sentinel and MichTron for LIFE; if they ever cease 
to work, return them and we will send you new ones. 

10 Disks with Tyvek Sleeves-$ 19.95 
10 Disks with Vinyl Sleeves-$21.95 
10 COLORED Disks with Sentinel Sleeves-$24,95 

WONDER PHONE WITH BUILT-IN MODEM 

This amazing new product combines a phone and 
modem together for easy, low-cost operation. Uni* 
tech's (tm) Data Phone can do it alii It has pulse or tone 
dialfng, adjustable ringer volume, mute key, and redial 
key. Frequently used numbers can be stored and 
recalled at the touch of a button. It even has a 'Hands 
Free 1 mode with a speaker which lets you talk from any 
part of your room. The most exciting feature is the built- 
in, 300 baud modem! One connection from your com* 
puter and personal communication reaches a new 
height So why only buy a modem, when you can get a 
full-feature phone for free! 

1 Unltech Data Plione with Modem $100*05 
1 Color Computer Connecting CsWe • $9.95 




GRAPHICOM 

A constant hit at computer shows, GRAPHICOM 
best graphics program ever written for the COCOI 
GRAPHICOM wad three years in the making, and you 
can see every minute in its quality and ease of use. 
GRAPHICOM has features that you would expeM 1 rom 
systems casting hundreds of times mora 

**Powertul drawing tools: "rubber band" drawing; 
"stamps"; rotating pictures; mirrored, masked, and 
reversed Images, and much morel 

**Easy to use: uses two Joysticks, or one joystick 
and koala pad; operated by a large* simple picture* 
based menu* 

♦♦Incredible output capacity: Transmit pictures 
over modems or amateur radio! GRAPHICOM 
even has a screen dump function that works with 
over 20 different printers! 

GRAPHICOM is simple enough that anyone can 
use It, yet it's so powerful that a seasoned artist can 
achieve new frontiers of creativity. 

Requires 64K and disk drive. Only $29.95 

ORAPHtCOM PICTURE DISKS 

Marvel at the wohders of computer aided art with the 
amazing gallery 0f picture disks for use with GRAPH- 
ICOM: 

Picture Disk #1 -Features drawings and tutorials tor 
GRAPHICOM, 

Disk #2-Presents Elvira, mistress of the dark and her 
friends (great drawings and digitized photos). 

Disk #3-Exceilent drawings and more exarrtptes of 
using a digitizer. 

Disk #4-Electronlc circuits and symbols. 

GRAPHISET -More than It font screens: Roman; Greek, 
Cuftive, special symbols and more* 

Disk #8-A multitude of brilliant color patterns that 
allows personal use as welt as learning, 

Disk #7-lncludes varying shapes and sizes of geo* 
metric figures. 

Disk #8'Another disk filled with font character * in- 
cluding Oide English, and LCD typdbut 

Picture Disks are $19.95 $ach t and $10.00 for every 
additional disk, or $39.95 for all five, 
additional disk, or $34.95 for ail four. 




6655 HiQMandRaad, Pontias* Ml 48054 
(313) 666-4800 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add $3.00for«hippinfl in trie U3A - 
$5.00 for Canada. Dealer Inquires Invited. 



prints a warning on the screen if the 
person has chosen to print on labels. 
Line 4110 sets up a loop based upon 
how many records are in the file, gets a 
record from the disk, and does a GOSUB 
to Line 7200 to put the information into 
an array. (Many of the subroutines have 
already been covered in previous install- 
ments of this series.) 

Line 4 1 20 checks the value of the vari- 
able PO to see whether the printing is to 
go to the screen or to labels, and branch- 
es to the subroutine at 5300 for the 
screen or 5000 for the labels. We will go 
over these in a moment. Line 4130 
closes the loop that was opened in Line 
41 10, and Line 4 140 closes the file buffer 
and returns to the printing menu at Line 
4000. Here the user can choose another 
print option or return to the main menu. 

The short subroutine at Line 5300 
prints one record on the screen, does a 
GOSUB to 7000 to make the computer 
wait until a key is pressed, and then 
returns. The subroutine at 5000 is a bit 
more complex. First, set the variable FL 
to be equal to one. This is a flag that will 
be used by the search section of the pro- 
gram. Next, Line 5000 checks the value 
of the variable LC. This variable was set 



by users when they decide whether they 
wanted labels printed last name first or 
first name first. Remember, the names 
are entered and stored last name first to 
make alphabetizing easier, so if the user 
chose to have the labels printed first 
name first, it must be turned around. 

If the user chose to have the label 
printed first name first, Line 5000 will 
do a GOSUB to 5100, and the subrou- 
tine that starts at 5100 and continues 
until 5150 will turn the name around 
(using the comma after the last name as 
a marker). Lines 5010 to 5040 are used 
to remove the extra spaces after the city 
name. (Remember, the fields are padded 
out with spaces so that a short city takes 
up the same disk space as a long city.) 
Once these string functions are com- 
pleted the actual label is printed at Line 
5050, while Line 5060 spaces down to 
the top of the next label. I am not 
explaining the string handling sections 
in detail because that is a subject that 
would require a few articles all to itself, 
and these are devoted (mostly) to disk 
file handling. Let me know if you want 
to hear about the string handling. 

Going back to the menu choices in the 



print menu, so far we have covered choi- 
ces one and three. If you choose number 
two (Print on Printer), you will be sent 
to 4200. Line 4200 does a GOSUB to 
Line 5500 to open the file buffer and 
prints a warning about the printer on 
the screen. Lines 42 1 0 to 4230 are a loop 
that get all of the records from the file 
one at a time and print them on the 
printer. Line 4240 closes the file buffer 
and goes back to the print menu at 4000. 
The subroutine from 4300 to 4340 is 
almost the same as that at 4200, except 
that only the name and telephone num- 
ber (menu option number 4) are printed 
on the printer. 

That about covers the printing sec- 
tion of this program, and all of the other 
lines were covered in earlier articles in 
this series. Remember, next month we 
will add the section that conducts search- 
es of the data, and we will go over it line 
by line as we have done here. The fol- 
lowing month we will do the same for 
the sort portion of the program and also 
go over the methods you would use to 
customize the program. In the mean- 
time you can be typing in your names 
and addresses. See you in November's 
issue. 



The listing: 



V/ 




560 . 


100 


1200 .. 


.. 185 


4210 


37 


5120 .. 


.. 153 


END . 


69 



10 CLS:GOTO 11000 
20 CLEAR 15000 

30 DIM ST* (400) ,ST<400) ,R*<6> 
40 PRINT: PRINT" WORK ON WHICH FI 
LE?": INPUT F* : GOSUB 5500: CLOSE # 
1 

50 IF LR<1 THEN PRINT: PRINT" THI 
S IS A NEW FILE": PRINT: PLAY" AB": 
GOSUB 7000 

60 CLS: PR I NT: PR I NT "DO YOU WANT L 
BELS PRINTED: ": PRINT: PRINT" 1. L 
AST NAME FIRST": PRINT" 2. FIRST 
NAME FIRST": PR I NT: PR I NT "PLEASE S 
ELECT 1 OR 2":K*=INKEY* 
70 K*=INKEY*:LC=VAL<K*> : IF LC<1 
OR LC>2 THEN 70 ELSE SOUND 150, 1 
500 CLS 

510 PRINT: PRINT" 
MENU " : PR I NT : PR I NT 

DS" 

520 PRINT: PRINT" 
S" 

530 PRINT: PRINT" 



1. 



MAIN 
ADD RECOR 



SORT RECORD 



3. SEARCH RECO 



RDS" 

540 PRINT: PRINT" 4. PRINT RECOR 
DS" 

550 PR I NT: PR I NT" 5. END PROGRAM 

II 

560 PRINT: PRINT" PLEASE ENTER YO 
UR CHOICE <l-5> ":k*=inkey* 
570 K*=INKEY*:K=VAL(K*> : IF K<1 O 
R K>5 THEN 570 ELSE SOUND 150,1 
580 ON K GOTO 1000,2000,3000,400 
0, 10000 

1000 CLS: GOSUB 5500: CLOSE #l:CR= 
LR+l: PRINT" YOU ARE ADDING RECO 
RD #";CR: PRINT" TO THE FILE ";F 
* 

1010 PRINT: PRINT"NAME (LAST NAME 
, FIRST NAME)?": LINE INPUT R*(l) 
1 020 PR I NT : PR I NT " ADDRESS? " : L I NE 
INPUT R*(2) 

1030 PRINT: INPUT "CITY? ";R*(3> 
1040 PRINT: INPUT "STATE CODE? 
;R*(4> 

1050 PRINT: INPUT"ZIP CODE? "5R 
*(5) 

1060 PRINT: INPUT "PHONE #? ";R* 
(6) 

1070 GOSUB 5500: GOSUB 7 100: GOSUB 
7200 

1080 CLS: FOR X=l TO 6 
1090 PRINT: PRINTR*(X> 
1100 NEXT X 



36 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



1110 PR I NT: GOSUB 7020 
1120 IF K*="Y" THEN 1200 
1130 CLOSE #1 : CLS: PRINT: PRINT" F 
I ELD TO CHAN6E?'*:G0SUB 6500 
1140 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" OLD DATA I 
S: ":PRINTR*(CF> : PRINT: PRINT" ENT 
ER NEW DATA:": LINE INPUT R*<CF>: 
SOTO 1070 

1200 PUT #1,CR: CLOSE #1:CLS 
1210 PRINT: PRINT" WANT TO ADD MO 
RE? (Y/N) ":K*=INKEY$: GOSUB 7030 
1220 IF K*«"Y" THEN 1000 ELSE 50 
0 

4000 CLS: PR I NT: PR I NT" PRINT ALL 
RECORDS SECTION" 

4010 PRINT: PRINT" 1. PRINT ON S 
CREEN " : PR I NT " 2. PRINT ON PRINT 
ER": PRINT" 3. PRINT ON LABELS": 
PRINT" 4. PRINT PHONE # LIST":P 
RINT" 5. RETURN TO MAIN MENU":P 
R I NT: PR I NT" PRESS A NUMBER <l-5 
> ":K*=INKEY* 

4020 K*=INKEY*: PO-VAL <K*> : IF PO< 
1 OR P0>5 THEN 4020 ELSE SOUND 1 
50, 1 

4030 ON PO GOTO 4100,4200,4100,4 
300 j 500 

4100 GOSUB 5500: CLS: IF P0=3 THEN 
PLAY "CDEF": PRINT" MAKE SURE PR 
INTER AND LABELS ARE SET UP A 
ND ON LINE": GOSUB 7050 
4110 FOR X=l TO LR:GET #l,X:GOSU 
B 7200 

4120 IF PO=l THEN GOSUB 5300 ELS 
E GOSUB 5000 
4130 NEXT X 

4140 CLOSE #l:GOTO 4000 
4200 GOSUB 5500: PLAY "CDEF": PR I NT 
" MAKE SURE PRINTER IS ON LINE": 
GOSUB 7050 

4210 FOR X=l TO LR:GET #l,X:GOSU 
B 7200 

4220 PRINT#-2,R*<1) ; " ";R*<2):P 
RINT#-2,R*<3> ; " ";r*<4>;" ";r* 
(5);" ";r*<6> :print#-2, "" 
4230 NEXT X 

4240 CLOSE #l:GOTO 4000 
4300 GOSUB 5500: PLAY "CDEF": PRINT 
" MAKE SURE PRINTER IS ON LINE": 
GOSUB 7050 

4310 FOR X=l TO LR: GET #l,X:GOSU 
B 7200 

4320 PRINT#-2,R*<1> ; " "$R*<6> 
4330 NEXT X 

4340 CLOSE #l:GOTO 4000 

5000 FL=l:IF LC=2 THEN GOSUB 510 

0 

5010 FOR Y=LEN<R*(3>> TO 1 STEP 



-1 

5020 IF MID* (R* (3) , Y, 1 ) <>" " THE 
N 5040 
5030 NEXT Y 

5040 R*(3>=LEFT*(R*(3) , Y) 
5050 PRINT#-2,R*(1) :PRINT#-2,R*( 
2) :print#-2,R*<3> ; ", ";r*<4> ; " 
";r*(5> 

5060 FOR Y=l TO 3:PRINT#— 2, " ":NE 
XT Y: RETURN 

5100 P=INSTR(1,R*<1) ,","): IF P=0 

THEN RETURN 
5110 N1*»RIGHT*<R*(1) ,30-(P+l> ) : 
N2*=LEFT* <R* ( 1 ) , P-l > 
5120 FOR Y=LEN<N1*> TO 1 STEP -1 
5130 IF MID*<N1*, Y, 1><>" " THEN 
5150 

5140 NEXT Y 

5150 N1*=LEFT*(N1*, Y> :R*<1)=N1«+ 
" "+N2*: RETURN 

5300 cls: pr i nt: pr i nt" record #" 
;x: print: for y=l to 6:printr*(y) 
:next y: print: gosub 7000: return 

5400 FL=1 : FOR Y=l TO 6: PRINT R* ( 

Y):NEXT Y: PRINT: RETURN 

5500 0PEN"D",#1,F*,99 

5510 FIELD #1,30 AS N*,30 AS A*, 

15 AS C*,2 AS S*,9 AS Z*, 13 AS P 

* 

5520 LR=LOF < 1 > : RETURN 

6500 PRINT: PRINT" 1. NAME": PRINT 

" 2. ADDRESS": PR I NT" 3. CITY": PR 

INT" 4. STATE": PR I NT" 5. ZIP COD 

E": PRINT" 6. PHONE #": PRINT 

6510 PRINT" PRESS A NUMBER (1-6) 

":K*=INKEY* 

6520 K*»INKEY*:CF=VAL(K*> : IF CF< 
1 OR CF>6 THEN 6520 ELSE SOUND 1 
50, l: RETURN 

7000 K*= I NKE Y* : PR I NT " PRESS AN 
Y KEY TO CONTINUE" 

7010 IF INKEY*="" THEN 7010 ELSE 

SOUND 1 50 , 1 : RETURN 
7020 PRINT" IS THIS CORRECT? <Y/ 
N> ":K*=INKEY* 

7030 K*=INKEY*:IF K*<>"Y" AND K* 
<>"N" THEN 7030 ELSE SOUND 150,1 
: RETURN 

7050 FOR X=l TO 2000: NEXT X:RETU 
RN 

7100 LSET N*=R* < 1 ) : LSET A*=R*(2) 
: LSET C$=R* <3> : LSET S*=R*(4>:LSE 
T Z*=R*(5) :LSET P*=R*<6> : RETURN 
7200 R*(1)=N*:R*<2>=A*:R*<3)=C*: 
R* ( 4 > =S* : R* ( 5 ) - Z * : R* < 6 > =P* : RETUR 
N 

10000 CLS: UNLOAD: END 
11000 PCLEARl:GOTO 20 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 37 



TUTORIA 



ECB I 



The third in a five-part series on . . . 



Everything 

You Always 

Wanted To Know 



About The Color Computer 

But Radio Shack Didn't Tell You 



By Andy Kluck 



38 



THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Here's part three of my semi- 
monumental, almost noteworthy 
assemblage of CoCo trivia. This 
installment features a demonstration of 
how a little known feature of the GET 
and PUT statements can be used to 
speed up animation. 

Tape Files and PRINT 

According to the April ^2 issue of 
Radio Shack's newsletter, . .the only 
difference in creating/ maintaining disk 
files as opposed to tape files is the device 
you specify when you open the buffer." 
While this may be true on the machine 
language level, there is an important dif- 
ference in the way PRINT works with 
different device numbers. When PRINT 
is used with device number -2, zero, or 
one to 1 5 for a disk file, items in the list 
followed by a semicolon are printed 
with nothing following, and items fol- 
lowed by a comma are followed by the 
necessary number of spaces to f ill up the 
comma field. If there is no comma or 
semicolon at the end of the list, a car- 
riage return is printed; this complies 
with standard Basic's definition of 
PRINT However, for device -I, the 
cassette file, a carriage return is printed 
after each item in the list, whether it is 
followed by a semicolon or a comma. 

(Andy Kluck is an electrical engineering 
student at the University of Texas at 
Austin.) 



Therefore, PRINTonly works the same 
with cassette files and disk files when 
there is only one item printed in each 
statement, and the statement does not 
end with a comma or semicolon. By 
printing a carriage return after each 
item, Basic's designers were able to 
insure that a file made by: 

PRINT#-1,A$,B 
Would be properly retrieved by: 
INPUT#-1,A$,B 

Disk basic solves this same problem 
differently — by including the WRITE 
statement, which places quotation marks 
around strings and commas between 
items. It also provides a more compre- 
hensive version of INPUT which is used 
only with disk files. 

DLOADM 

The Extended basic manual's sum- 
mary lists a DLOADM statement that 
"Loads a machine language program." 
Actually there are both a DLOAD for 
loading basic programs and a DLOADM 
for loading machine language over the 
RS-232 port using a special protocol; 
however, DLOADM doesn't work in 
Extended BASIC 1 .0 without the Disk 
ROM because of a bug. 

EDIT 

Besides the editing functions given in 



the manual, three other commands are 
available: 

A — Cancel changes and edit the 
same line again 

Q — Cancel changes and quit 

E — Same as ENTER 

PMODE and SCREEN 

According to the Extended BASIC 
manual's summary, PMODE "Selects 
resolution and memory page to start 
on." Actually, PMODE selects which 
starting page and mode are used for 
plotting statements (PSET, CIRCLE, 
DRA W, PCLS, etc.) and the PPOINT 
function, but it does not adjust which 
pages are visible even if SCREEN 1,1 



on the screen. Also, something like: 
PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1J: PMODE 
3,1 will display in PMODE 4 but draw 
in PMODE 3. Because the picture ele- 
ment size in PMODE 4 is one half the 
interval of one period of the color TV 
chroma signal, alternating light and 
dark bits produce "artifact colors." Pic- 
tures drawn in PMODE 3 and displayed 
in PMODE 4, SCREEN 1,1 have four 
distinct colors: 



Color Number 

1 or 5 

2 or 6 

3 or 7 

4 or 8 



Resulting Color 
Black 

Red or Blue-green 
Blue-green or Red 
White 



"Because the picture element size in PMODE4 
is one half the interval of one period of the color 
TV chroma signal, alternating light and dark 
hits produce 'artifact colors. * Pictures drawn in 
PMODE3 and displayed in PMO0E4, SCREEN 
1,1 have four distinct colors 



has been executed. This feature is useful 
in displaying one picture while drawing 
the next: PMODE 3,5: SCREEN 1,0: 
PMODE 3,1 causes drawing on pages 
one to four but leaves pages five to eight 



The red and blue-green colors tend to 
reverse randomly when Reset is pressed. 
PMODE4 in SCREEN 1.0 also produc- 
es these colors, but they are usually 
washed out by the green tint. Inciden- 



tally, graphics generally don't work in 
the second 16K of the piggy-backed 
memory expansion, but this shouldn't 
be a problem unless you do something 
like FILES 2,14000. 

Saving pictures on tape or disk 

To save the picture set-up in the last 
PMODE statement on tape, try: 

CSAVEM "filename", PEEK(&HBA) 
*256, PEEK(&HB7)*256-1,&HB44A 

or on disk, 

SAVEM "filename/ PIC", PEEK 
(&HBA)*256, PEEK(&HB7)*256-1, 
&HB44A 

Loading pictures back gets a little 
more complicated, since the location of 
the graphics pages is moved around 
depending on whether or not Disk BASIC 
is in the system, and the values in the last 
FILES statement. For pictures saved on 
disk, if you always use the standard 
FILES setting and only save pictures 
starting from the first graphics page, it 
should always be safe to simply: 

LOADM "filename/ PIC" 

Before saving or loading a disk pic- 



• I D — ■■■■■■■ CIBH BS^Sl .'Bib ■ • 



THE BOOK THAT CAN LA UPiCH A 1000 PROGRAMS 

500 POKES PEEKS N EXECS 

FOR THE TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 



NEVER BEFORE has this information of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily available to everyone. It will help 
you develop your own Ml— QUALITY Basic and ML programs. 
SO WHY WAIT?? 

This Book includes 80 pages of information on almost ALL 
POKE, PEEK and EXEC commands with full explanation and 
comments on the use of EACH command. 



This book will help you gain the power of Assembly Language 
thru Basic and will make possible various intricate cassette, 
disk and printer operations. It will also help you utilize the 
System Configuration and GET UNDERNEATH THE COVER of 
the Color Computer. 

This book includes POKEs, PEEKS & EXECs to: 
Autostart your Basic programs. 

Disable Color Basic commands like LIST, LLIST, POKE, EXEC, 
CSAVE, CSAVEM, CLOAD, CLOADM and NEW. 
Disable ECB commands like DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROFF. DLOAD, 
RENUM, PCLEAR and PRINT USING. 

Disable Disk Basic commands like DIR, SAVE, KILL, LOAD, 
MERGE, RENAME, DSKINI, BACKUP, DSK1$ and DSKO$. 
Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY and RESET BUTTON. 

Generate a Repeat-Key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS" to tape (for 64k only). 
Speed Up your Basic programs. 
Reset, MOTOR ON and MOTOR OFF from keyboard. 

Restart your Basic program thru RESET BUTTON. 
Produce Key-Clicks and Error-Beeps. 




Recover Basic programs lost by NEW, ?IO ERRORS and faulty 
RESET. 

Set 23 different GRAPHIC /SEMIGRAPHIC modes. 
Set 15 of the most commonly used Printer Baud Rates. 

Allow you more plays on 23 of your favorite arcade games. 

AND MUCH MUCH MORE11I 
COMMANDS FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH 16K/32K/64K COLOR 
BASIC/ ECB CASSETTE & DISK SYSTEMS AND CoCo I AND CoCo I I 

ONLY $16.95 

ORDER TODAYI Visa, MC, Check or MO. COD add $2.50. Please 
add $2.00 S6cH (foreign $5.00 S&H). NY 5 residents please add 
sales tax. ALL orders shipped WITHIN 24 HOURS!! 

MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

FO Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450 
PH: (716) 223-1477 

(9AM - 9PM 7 Days a Week). 

Dealer Inquiries Invited. 




October 1984 THE RAINBOW 39 



ture by this method, have the program 
test location $BA to make sure it con- 
tains 14 ($0E) and stop the save or load 
if it doesn't, since this indicates either 
FILES has been used ox PMODE did 
not specify page one as the start page. 
With cassette pictures, the address of 
the screen can't always be made the 
same. If a picture is both saved and 
loaded on a system without Disk basic, 
it should be sufficient to set PMODE 
the same as is was when the picture was 
saved and CLOADM the file. In pro- 
grams written to be compatible with 
Disk BASIC, cassette pictures should be 
loaded in such a way that the start 
address on the tape is ignored, and the 
correct address of graphics page one is 
used instead, using a subroutine like: 

10000 POKE &H78,0 fc MARK CAS- 
SETTE FILE CLOSED 
10010 POKE&H 1D1,0 4 INDICATE 
MATCH ANY FILENAME 
10020 EXEC &H A648 * READ FILE 
HEADER 

10030 POKE&HlE7,PEEK(&HBC): 
POKE &H 1 E8,0 fc SET LOAD AD- 
DRESS TO START OF PAGE 1 
10040 EXEC &HA505 4 FINISH 
CLOADM 
10050 RETURN 



When loading a picture from either 
cassette or disk, there should be at least 
four pages PC LEA Red so if the file 
happens to be from PMODE 3 or 4 (6K 
long), it won't run over onto the BASIC 
program. 

DRA W and PL A Y 

Radio Shack's decsriptions of DRA W 
and PLA Y leave out any mention of 
Extended Basic's special feature for 
using numeric variables instead of con- 
stants in their strings. Suppose you 
wanted to set DRA W's angle and scale 
values according to variables and draw 
a line of variable length up from the 
cursor. Using the techniques given in 
the manual, you would have to create a 
string with the correct numbers inserted: 

DRAW "A"+STR$(X)+"S"+STR$ 
(Y)+"U"+STR$(Z) 

However, recently somebody discov- 
ered that an equals sign, a variable 
name, and a mandatory semicolon may 
be substituted anywhere a numerical 
constant is expected in a DRAW or 
PLAY string. Using this convention, 
the above line becomes: 

DRAW "A=X;S=Y;U=Z;" 



This is also useful in PLA Y; for exam- 
ple, if 'N' has been set to a legal note 
value number (1-12), the instruction 
PLAY "=N;" will produce the note. 
Incidentally, the Extended BASIC man- 
ual states that the option 'B' should 
always precede the 'M' command in 
DRAW strings. In fact, the 'M' com- 
mand without *B' is the only way to 
specify a line to be drawn at any non- 
standard angle. 

GET and PUT 

Although you would probably never 
guess it from reading the Extended 
BASIC manual, GET and PUT can be 
used in two completely different modes 
of operation. I will refer to these as the 
fexact mode and the Speed mode. Exact 
mode is best for small images, when 
speed is not important, or where a logi- 
cal operation is needed; it is specified by 
using one of the five options with PUT 
or the , G suffix with GET Note that the 
, G actually only specifies which mode to 
use; it does not affect the "graphic 
detail" or resolution of the image. The 
manual says options shouldn't be used 
in PMODEs 0, /, or 3, but I have found 
nothing to support this as long as the 
programmer recognizes that use of any 
option other than PSET'm a four-color 




PARENTS! 

GET A KID 

HOOKED 



— -= ON COMPUTERS 

Send for our unique LOGO STARTER program. Use it with 
your 16K Color Computer and Color LOGO from Radio Shack 
(Cat. No. 26-2722). 

Teachers agree: LOGO is the best way to introduce children 
to computers. Now, with LOGO STARTER you won't have to 
read a book or instruction manual. Just load the LOGO 
STARTER tape. 

Your child will draw exciting designs right from the start. You 
won't waste your time on a lot of tedious typing. And your child 
will be on the way to computer literacy. $-j j 



+ 
* 

* 

♦ 




SPEED READING 

Busy executives! Students! Increase 
your reading speed dramatically. 

Best available speed reading program 
for the CoCo. Reading material appears 
on the TV screen at the speed you select, training you to read 
faster. You can even change the speed while reading. 

Complete with 6 different text selections. Plus a drill to 
improve visual span and perception. $-j y gg 

WILD PARTY 

A naughty, sexy computer game for 2 to 6 couples. RAINBOW: 
"Would definitely liven up most parties." $27 95 



All programs on cassette tape for 16K Color Computer. Ext'd 
BASIC not required. Prices include postage (PA resid. add 6%). 
Send check to Dept. R, P.O. Box 210, Jenkintown, PA 19046. 



b&b software 

*++*44444 t444t #4*4 4 1444444++4 44444***4*44444+4* 44* 

40 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




— The 
Incredible New 
Football Simulation 
for the Color Computer! 

* Pass, Run, or Kick — You call the Play s! 

* Compete with friends or challenge the computer. 

* Contains extended basic and non-extended basic 
versions for 16K cassette color computers. 

Send $16.95 (check or money order) for each game (Colorado 
residents add 3'/2% sales tax). Allow four weeks for delivery. 



r 
i 



Big B Software 

P. O. Box 91 

Broomfield, Colorado 80020 



I Please send me _ 



game(s) @ $16.95 each. 



Name, 



Address 



\ City, State, Zip_ 




Library 



Available By Express Order At 
Your Local Radio /hack Store! 



The Library Concept 

State of the Art, Quality, integrity, 
Compatibility and Affordability. Five 
things good software must posses. 
Five things that epitomize lhf? VIP 
Library™. Each program is the 
diamond of its class, true excellence. 
These programs are first in features, 
first in power, first in memory, and 
all are affordably priced. 



State Of The Art 

All Library programs are written in 
machine code specifically for the 
Color Computer, to work without 
the interference of a separate 
operating system such as FLEX. From 
this comes speed and more work- 
space for you. Unlike other programs 
for the Color Computer which are 
said to be 64K compatible, VIP 
Library™ programs are not Ufftftfed to 
between 24 and 30 K of workspa< i ■ in 
64K. Library programs have Memory 
Sense with BANK SWITCHING to 
fully use all 64K, thus giving up to 
51 K with a disk version and up to 
53K with a tape version. 



Easy To Use 

Each Library program was carefully 
designed to be extremely easy to 
use. Built-in on-screen help tables 
are at your fingertips, as are menus 
of all kinds. Every effort is made to 
use logical, intuitive and easy-to- 
remember commands. The manuals 
have been thoughtfully prepared to 
cover every aspect of the program, 
and they have complete tutorials to 
get you going right away. We set the 
standard! 



Lowercase Displays 

State-of-the-Art graphics allow 
instant use of four display colors, and 
eight lowercase displays featuring 
descending lowercase letters. You 
can select from 51, 64 or 85 columns 
by 21 or 24 lines per screen, with 
wide or narrow characters in the 64 
display. These screens provide a 
pleasant and relaxing way to perform 
your tasks, with as much text on the 



. . PICTURE getting your 
instantaneous investment report 
over the phone, using it in your 
spreadsheet calculation, 
generating a report, and writing 
a memo including that report 
and data from your database with 
your word processor, and all this 
with VIP Library 1 *" programs 



screen as is possible. Each program is 
easy to learn and a joy to use. We 
take pride in the stringent testing 
done to make these programs per- 
form flawlessly. Every feature, every 
convenience, sleek, simple and 
elegant. 

Total Compatibility 

All Library programs are 
compatible. Transfer and use of files 
between programs is easy and 
carefree. What's better, when you 
have learned one program the others 
will come easy. And every program is 
the best of its kind available. 



The Library Programs 

For your writing needs is the VIP 
Writer™, and its spelling checker, the 
VIP Speller™. For financial planning 
and mathematical calculations you 
can use the VIP Calc™. To manage 
your information and send multiple 
mailings there is the VIP Database™. 
For sending all these files to and 
from home or the office and for 
talking to your friends you can have 
the VIP Terminal™. Finally, to fix 
disks to keep all your Library files in 
good repair we offer the VIP Disk- 
ZAP™. 

Mini Disk Operating System 

The Disk versions each have a Mini 
Disk Operating System which will 
masterfully handle from 1 to 4 drives. 
It offers smooth operation for such 
features as the ability to read a 
directory, display free space on the 
disk, kill files, save and automatically 
verify files, and load, rename and 
append files. Library programs simply 
do not have the limitations of BASIC. 

Professionalism 

Each volume of the Library is 
beautifully bound in a cloth-bound, 
gold embossed binder, and comes 
with a matching slipcase to protect 
your investment. 

The Library will grace your work 
area with the professionalism it 
deserves. Welcome the VIP Library™ 
into your home and office. 



Radio Shack is a registered trademark of 

Tandy Corporation. 

©1983 by Softlaw Corporation 



VIP WritergF 

By Tim Nelson ^f&Wir^^ 
RATED TOPS IN RAINBOW, HOT COCt), ^ 
COLOR COMPUTER MAGAZINE & COMPUTER USER 

The most powerful and easy-to-use word processor is available in the 
showpiece and workhorse of the Library: The VIP Writer™. Because of its 
undisputed superiority over all Color Computer word processors, it was 
selected by Dragon Data Ltd. of England and TANO in the U.S., to be the 
Official Word Processor for their line of Dragon microcomputers. 

The result of two years of research, the VIP Writer 7 " offers every 
feature you could desire from a word processor. It is the most 
powerful, fastest, most dependable and most versatile. With the hi-res 
displa\ , workspace and compatibility features built into the Library the 
Writer is also the most usable. 

". . . Nearly every feature and option possible to implement on the 
Color Computer. The design of the program is excellent; the programming 
is flawless." October 1983 "Rainbow" 

"Among word processors for the CoCo, VIP Writer stands alone as the 
most versatile, most professional program available. " May 1984 "Computer 
User" 

"Word processing with VIP Writer is like driving a high-performance 
vehicle . . . This Ferarri of a package has more features than Telewriter, Easy- 
writer (for the IBM PC), or Applewriter." October 1983 "Hot CoCo" 

The Writer will work with you and your printer to do things you 
always wanted to do. Every feature of your printer can be put to use, 
every character set, every graphics capability at any baud rate, EVEN 
PROPORTIONAL SPACING. All this with simplicity and elegance. You 
can even automatically print multiple copies. 

Although all versions feature tape save and load, the disk version 
provides the Mini Disk Operating System common to the whole 
Library, plus disk file linking for continous printing. 

Professional features of particular note: 

* Memory-Sense with BANK SWITCHING to fully utilize 64K, giving not 
just 24 or 30K, but up to 53K of workspace with the tape version and 50K 
with the disk version. 

■ TRUE FORMAT WINDOW allowing you to preview the printed page 
ON THE SCREEN BEFORE PRINTING, showing centered lines, headers, 
FOOTNOTES, page breaks, page numbers, & margins in line lengths of 
up to 240 characters. It makes HYPHENATION a snap. 

■ A TRUE EDITING WINDOW in all 9 display modes for those extra 
wide reports and graphs (up to 240 columns!). 

■ FREEDOM to imbed any number of PRINTER CONTROL CODES 
anywhere, EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT 

■ Full 4-way cursor control, sophisticated edit commands, the ability 
to edit any BASIC program or ASCII textfile, SEVEN DELETE 
FUNCTIONS, LINE INSERT, LOCATE AND CHANGE, wild card locate, 
up to TEN SIMULTANEOUS block manipulations, word wrap around, 
programmable tabs, display memory used and left, non-breakable 
space, and headers, footers and FOOTNOTES. 

■ Automatic justification, automatic pagination, automatic centering, 
automatic flush right, underlining, superscripts, subscripts, pause 
print, single-sheet pause, and print comments. 

■ Type-ahead, typamatic key repeat and key beepfor the pros, ERROR 
DETECTION and UNDO MISTAKE features, 3 PROGRAMMABLE func- 
tions, auto column creation, and an instant on-screen HELP TABLE. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0141 
32K (Comes with tape & disk) $69.95 
VIP Writer — VIP Speller Combo comes in VIP Writer Binder. 

VIP Speller™ 

WITH A 50,000 WORD INDEXED DICTIONARY! 

By Bill Argyros 

Gone are the eyestrain, boredom and fatigue from endless proof- 
reading. VIP Speller™ is the fastest and most user-friendly speller for 
your CoCo. It can be used to correct any ASCII file — including VIP 
Library™ files and files from Scripsit™ and Telewriter™ It automatically 
checks files for words to be corrected, marked for special attention or 
even added to the dictionary. You can even view the word in context, 
with upper and lowercase. VIP Speller™ comes with a specially edited 
50,000 word dictionary which, unlike other spellers for the CoCo, is 
indexed for the greatest speed. The shorter your file, the quicker the 
checking time. And words can be added to or deleted from the 
dictionary or you can create one of your own. VIP Speller™ also comes 
with the Library's mini disk operating system. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0142 
32K DISK ONLY $49.95 

Lowercase displays not available with this program. 



VIP Itrittr - Wm to Heed ftui P<wer 

When you nant the pawer of a real tort techine, 
Mfceri you nant up to 85 characters per lint tilth 
ywr Color Computer, whert you Mint to *we your 
printer really «ove, you need W Writer. 

UIP Writer is a state-of-the-art word processor 
lor the pros. It is packed with cowwnds, feature* 
end option yet it's swple to learn end use. I&p 
else gives you on-line Help, and even an Vndo 
co*«end to undo HisUkes! 

ft neat feature is the Pre new MindoM. *tuoh 
#ee in use here. This feature allows uou to <jmm 
your tent just as it Mi 11 be printed - centered 
titles, page nunbers. footnotes, ever JJSTFICflTXOH 
«for even left ar«d rigV.-harJ *argins! 4: *r* 
guess work, VIP Ifriter is your ans*er! 
fa i LH 1 CH 1 LP 3 Ft! 51 



VIP Calc ™ 

By Kevin Herrboldt 

You can forget the other toy calcs — The real thing is here! No other 
spreadsheet for the Color Computer gives you: 

• 20 ROWS BY 9 COLUMNS ON THE SCREEN AT ONCE 

• LOWERCASE LETTERS WITH DESCENDERS 

• UP TO 16 CONCURRENT DISPLAY WINDOWS 

• FLOATING-POINT MATH 

• CHOICE OF SINGLE AND DOUBLE PRECISION 

• WORKS WITH BASE 2, 10, AND 16 NUMBERS 

• UP TO 512 COLUMNS BY 1024 ROWS 

• USER DEFINABLE WORKSHEET SIZE FOR MORE MEMORY 

• LOCATE FUNCTION TO FIND CHECK NUMBERS, NAMES, ETC. 

• COLUMN/ROW MULTIPLE SORTS 

• PROGRAMMABLE FUNCTIONS 

• IMBEDDABLE PRINTER CONTROL CODES 

• 21 ALTERABLE PRINT FORMAT PARAMETERS 

• ON-LINE HELP TABLES 

• DOES NOT REQUIRE FLEX OR BASIC 

VIP Calc™ is truly the finest and easily the most powerful electronic 
worksheet and financial modeling program available for the Color 
Computer. Now every Color Computer owner has access to a 
calculating and planning tool better than VisiCalc™, containing all its 
features and commands and then some, WITH USABLE DISPLAYS. Use 
Visicalc templates with VIP Calc'"! 

There's nothing left out of VIP Calc'*. Every feature you've come to 
rely on with VisiCalc™ is there, and then some. You get up to 5 TIMES 
the screen display area of other spreadsheets for the Color Computer 
and Memory-Sense with BANK SWITCHING to give not just 24, or 30, 
but UP TO -33KOF WORKSPACE IN 64K!!! This display and memory 
allow you the FULL SIZE, USABLE WORKSHEETS you require. You also 
get: User definable worksheet size, up to 512 columns by 1024 rows! * 
Up to SIXTEEN VIDEO DISPLAY WINDOWS to compare and contrast 
results of changes * 16 DIGIT PRECISION * Sine, Cosine and other 
trigonometric functions, Averaging, Exponents, Algebraic functions, 
and BASE 2, 8, 10 or 16 entry * Column and Row, Ascending and 
Descending SORTS for comparison of results * LOCATE FORMULAS 
OR TITLED IN CELLS * Easy entry, replication and block moving of 
frames * Global or Local column width control up to 78 characters 
width per cell * Create titles of up to 255 characters per cell * Limitless 
programmable functions * Typamatic Key Repeat * Key Beep * 
Typeahead * Print up to 255 column worksheet * Prints atjny baud rate 
from 110 to 9600 * Print formats savable along with worksheet * Enter 
PRINTER CONTROL CODES for customized printing with letter quality 
or dot matrix printer * Combine spreadsheet tables with VIP Writer 1 " 
documents to create ledgers, projections, statistical and financial reports 
and budgets. Both versions feature Tape save and load, but the disk version 
also has the Mini Disk Operating System of the entire Library. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0143 
32K (Comes with tape & disk) $69.95 



32K does not have hi-res displays, sort or edit. 



VIP Terminal™ 

RATED BEST IN lANUAftY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

By Dan Nelson 

From your home or office you can join the communication 
revolution. The VIP Terminal™ opeiit the world to you. You can 
monitor your investments with the Dow Jones Information Service, or 
broaden your horizons with The StfUfce of CompuServe, bulletin 
boards, other computers, even the rr^ainilr^niy at work. 

For your important communit .si ion needs you've got to go 
beyond software that only lets you rhji. You need a smart termnal so 
that you can send and receive programs messages, even other VIP 
Library 1 " files. VIP Terminal™ has' - more features than communications 
software for CP/M, IBM and CP/M i\h computers." Herb Friedman, 
Radio Electronics, February 1984. 

FEATURES: Choice of 8 hi-res lowercase diplays* Memory-Sense with 
BANK SWITCHING for full use of woi kipjcr * Selectively print data at 
baud rates from 110 to 9600 * Full 12B character ASCII keyboard * 
Automatic graphic mode * Word mo# (word wrap) for unbroken 
words * Send and receive LihMfy nh-v Machine Language & BASIC 
programs * Set communications baud rate from 110 to 9600, Duplex; 
Half/Full/Echo, Word length: 7 or 8, Pjriiy: Odd/Even or None, Stop 
Bits: 1-9 * Local linefeeds to screen * and load ASCII files, Machine 
Code & BASIC programs * I owerciisp masking * 10 Keystroke 
Multiplier (MACRO) buffers to perform repetitive pre-entry log-on 
tasks and send short messages * PrcgrdiTKflaNe prompt or delay for 
send next line * Selectable character I rapping * Send up to ten short 
messages (KSMs), each up to255 characters long, automatically, tosave 
money when calling long distance. 

All versions allow tape load and ^av-e of filesand KSMs, but the disk 
version also has the Mini Disk OfMNJimu System. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0139 
32K (Comes with tape & disk) $49.95 

(Tape comes in 16K but withoul hi-res displays) 



Available 
By Express Order 
At Your Local 

Radio /hack 

Store! 

Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation. 




VIP Database™ 

"ONE OE THE BEST" JULY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

By Tim Nelson 

This high speed MACHINE LANGUAGE program fills all your 
information management needs, be they for your business or home. 
And it does so better than any other database program for the Color 
Computer, featuring machine code, lowercase screens and mailmerge 
capabilities. Inventory, accounts, mailing lists, famiiy histories, you 
name it, the VIP Database™ will keep track of all your data, and it will 
merge VIP Writer™ files. 

The VIP Database™ features the Library Memory Sense with BANK 
SWITCHING and selectable lowercase displays for maximum utility. It 
will handle as many records as fit on your disk or disks. It is structured in 
a simple and easy to understand menu system with full prompting for 
easy operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All 
files are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. Full sort of records is 
provided for easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending 
or descending alphabetic or numeric order. Records can be searched 
for specific entries, using multiple search criteria. With database form 
merge you may also combine files, sort and print mailing lists, print 
"boiler plate" documents, address envelopes - the list is endless. The 
math package even performs arithmetic operations and updates other 
fields. Create files compatible with the VIP Writer™and VIP Terminal™. 
Unlimited print format and report generation with the ability to imbed 
control codes for use with all printers. 

As with all other Library programs, the Database features the 
powerful Mini Disk Operating System. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0140 
32K DISK $59.95 

64K Required for math package & mail merge 

VIP Disk-ZAP™ 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW!" 

By Tim Nelson 

Your database file disk, form letter disk, or BASIC program disk 
goes bad. An I/O error stops loading, or even backing up of the disk. 
Weeks, even months of work sit on the disk, irretrievable. Now 
catastrophic disk errors are repairable, quickly and with confidence, 
using the VIP Disk-ZAP™. It is the ultimate repair utility for simple and 
quick repair of all disk errors. Designed with the non-programmes in 
mind, the VIP Disk-ZAP™ will let you retrieve all types of bashed files, 
BASIC and Machine Code programs. 

This high-speed machine code disk utility has a special dual cursor 
screen display to look at the data on your disk. You are able to: Verify or 
modify disk sectors at will * Type right onto the disk to change 
unwanted program names or prompts * Send sector contents to the 
printer * Search the entire disk for any grouping of characters * Copy 
sectors * Backup tracks or entire disks * Repair directory tracks and 
smashed disks * Full prompting to help you every step of the way * 50- 
plus page Operators Manual which teaches disk structure and repair. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0144 

16K DISK $49.95 
Lowercase displays not available with this program. 



2^ To Order Direct 

1-800-328-2737 

Order Status and Software Questions call (805)968-4364 

MAIL ORDERS: $3.00 U.S. Shipping per product ($5.00 CANADA; $10.00 
OVERSEAS). Personal checks allow 3 weeks. 



132 Aero Camino 805/966-4364 
Goleta, California 93117 U.S.A. 



TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. VisiCalc is a trademark of VisiCorp. 

«M%3 by Soft law Corporation 



PMODE can cause predictable color 
changes; for example, using PRESET 
to PIJT an image or not over an area 
containing an image inverts each bit of 
the color code, causing colors one and 
four and colors two and three to reverse. 
Speed mode is specified by omitting 
either the ,G in GET or option in PUT 
after the array name. Instead of using 
the exact rectangle specified in the state- 
ment, the Speed mode widens the rec- 
tangle so that only entire bytes are 
affected, and the operation is done a 
byte at a time. To prevent confusion 
regarding how big a rectangle is really 
used, 1 recommend using only rectan- 
gles that already contain only complete 
bytes so that enlargement will not occur. 
Specifically, the rectangle s smaller X- 
coordinate should be an integer multi- 
ple of eight for PMODEs I, J, and 4 or 
16 for PMODEs 0 or 2, and the greater 
should be one less than such a multiple. 
If this condition is observed in all GETs 
and PUTs done in Speed mode, arrays 
made in the two modes are compatible; 
otherwise images made in one mode 
may be scrambled by PUT'in the other. 
This restriction points out the main dis- 
advantage of the Speed mode — there 



are only 32 discrete horizontal positions 
( 1 6 in PMODES 0 and 2) where arrays 
can be placed. This makes it most suit- 
able for vertical motion, but smooth 
horizontal motion can also be done by 
making four separate, slightly offset 
arrays of the same image, as demon- 
strated in the sample program. The 
speed advantage of this mode depends 
largely on how much time is used by 
other statements in the program; how- 
ever, a full screen PUT in Speed mode 
has been clocked at 1 1 times as fast as a 
PUT with option PSET, and a similar 
GET runs about six times as fast as a 
<7£Twith ,G. This should be useful for 
those who work with high-speed anima- 
tion, although it might have been more 
useful if it had been correctly described 
two years ago in the instruction manual. 
The manual also says that the array 
must be dimensioned with one element 
for each screen position; this seems a 
waste considering that a picture element 
is just one or two bits, and an array 
element is five bytes. Actually, the arrays 
are used much more efficiently than 
this, and a two-dimensional array is not 
necessary. 1 suggest this formula for 
determining the size of a sufficient array: 



DIM ARRAY ((X2-X1 + 1)*(Y2-Y1 
+1)/N) 

GET (X1,Y1)-(X2,Y2),ARRAY,G 

where X2>Xl t Y2>Y1, and N=40 for 
PMODEs 3 and 4, 80 for PMODEs I 
and 2, or 160 for PMODE 0. The size 
given by the formula may need to be 
increased somewhat to make up for the 
enlargement effect if Speed mode is 
used without following the even-byte 
convention. Notice that the book states 
that only about 1400 elements can be 
read into an array in a 1 6K system. If the 
correct array size is used, a whole 
PMODE 4 picture will fit in an array 
that uses about 6K of memory. 

Sample Program 

This program does an animation se- 
quence twice, first using PUT in exact 
mode, then in Speed mode. Even with 
the extra overhead involved in selecting 
which array to use, the animation runs 
about three times as fast in Speed mode. 
Note how the routine at 270 calculates 
even-byte coordinates for PUT'm Speed 
mode and selects one of the four arrays 
for smooth motion; also, Hex constants 
are used for added speed. 



The listing: 



V/ 

200 . . . 


37 


END 


195 



10 GOTO 330 
20 GOTO 40 

30 CLEAR 200: PCLEAR 4: GOTO 20 
40 DIM Al <33) , A2(33) ,A3<33> , A4(3 
3) 

50 FOR N=0 TO 1 

60 PMODE 4,1: PCLS0: SCREEN 1 , 1 : PMO 
DE 3,1 

70 CIRCLE < 38, 10) ,26,4, .3 
80 PAINT (38, 10) ,3,4 
90 GET<8,0>-<71,20) ,A1 
100 GET<6,0>-(69,20) ,A2,G 
110 GET (4,0) -(67, 20) , A3, G 
120 GET (2,0) -(65, 20) ,A4,G 
130 PCLS1 
140 X-10 
150 TIMER-0 



160 FOR Y-171 TO 92 STEP -2 
170 GOSUB 260 
180 NEXT 

190 FOR X-10 TO 190 STEP 2 
200 Y-Y-.5 
210 GOSUB 260 
220 NEXT 

230 PR I NT "SAUCER TOOK OFF IN"|TI 
MER/60J "SECONDS. " 
240 NEXT N 
250 END 

260 IF N-0 THEN PUT(X,Y)-(X+8eH3F 
,Y+«cH14), A 1,PSET: RETURN 
270 Z-X AND &HFE 

280 ON (Z AND &H7)/&H2 GOTO 300, 
310,320 

290 PUT(Z,Y)-(Z+«eH3F,Y+«eH14) ,Al: 
RETURN 

300 PUT(Z-«cH2,Y)-(Z+&H3D,Y+8eH14> 
,A2: RETURN 

310 PUT(Z-&H4,Y)-(Z+«eH3B, Y+&H14) 
, A3: RETURN 

320 PUT(Z-&H6,Y)-(Z+«cH39,Y+&H14) 
,A4: RETURN 

330 PMODE 0,1: PCLEAR 1 : GOTO 30 



44 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



the 
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rotect 
Jeficit. 
Jrban 
ap his 
And of, 
leighbor 
for our 
he mat- 
d early 
strict in 
12) 

ing w ith 
to cut 
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it been 



<♦> 



Take Stock Of 
Your Portfolio with 
Pro-Color-File 



<$> 



BY JORGE MIR 



A natural use of home computers 
is record keeping or electronic 
filing. As a result, I developed a 
program called UNIDATFL, short for 
Universal Data File. The original ver- 
sion appeared in the February 1982 
issue of THE rainbow and later on was 
enhanced and renamed DATAF/LE. I 
still use it quite often for simple record 
keeping, "to do" lists, reminders, etc. It 
is more like a note pad than a database 
system. 

Well, a few years have gone by since I 
bought my computer and now the pro- 
fessionals have had a chance to develop 




some very fine, sophisticated software 
for us. 

One of these professionals is Dennis 
Derringer of Derringer Software who 
has developed the Pro-Color- File data- 
base system for us. This is a powerful 
system which allows you to design your 
own databases, custom tailored to your 
needs without the need to develop any 
programs. The system does it all for 
you. 

1 have developed several Pro- Color- 
File applications, including the typical 
checkbook and name and address files 
which are always useful in the home. In 
addition, I have also developed other 
more sophisticated applications such as 
a stock portfolio system; a financial 
statement ratio analysis system that 
develops statistics on companies and, 
through various report formats, pre- 
pares comparison reports of competi- 
tors, customers, etc.; a travel and enter- 
tainment reporting system for business 
applications, plus others. 

The rest of this article is devoted to an 
explanation of the stock portfolio sys- 
tem. This application covers many of 
the powerful features of Pro- Co lor- File 
and 1 thought it might be of interest to 
THE RAINBOW readers. 

Each record in the stock portfolio 



(Jorge Mir is a certified public accoun- 
tant and is currently controller of a 
14 Fortune 500 " company. He publishes 
most of his original work on the Co Co 

through THE RAINBOW.^ 



FILENAME: STOCKS** 

DEFINED DATA FOR SEGMENT - 1 

FIELD : HEADING 



system contains a total of 146 characters 
stored within 23 different fields. These 
fields are stored in two different seg- 
ments and are accessible through three 
different screens for viewing or updat- 
ing. In addition, the system performs 13 
calculations on each record, and data 
can be selected and printed or shown on 
the monitor screen through six different 
report formats. 

Before going any further, an explana- 
tion of the various terms used in the 
previous paragraph is advisable. 

The length of each record that Pro- 
Color- File can handle is limited to 1 ,020 
characters. That is, up to 1,020 bytes 
can be stored per record. A record is 
made up of fields (up to a maximum of 
60) which the user defines indicating the 
title of each field as well as the length 
(number of bytes) to be stored in each 
field. Because of the Color Computer 
limitations, a 1,020 byte record cannot 
be processed unless it is broken down 
into 255 byte sections. Pro-Color- File 
refers to these sections as segments. 
Thus, each segment can contain up to 1 5 
different fields with a total of up to 255 
bytes each (4 * 255 = 1,020). The stock 
portfolio system stores data in two dif- 
ferent segments. The first segment con- 
tains 15 fields and uses a total of 89 
bytes. The second segment contains 
eight fields and uses a total of 57 bytes. 
This brings us to the total of 23 fields 
and 146 bytes included in each record as 
noted above. 

At this time, you should refer to the 



illustration of these segments under 
"Field Definitions" so you can see the 
various fields used in the stock protfolio 
system. 

The most important part of an effi- 
cient and effective database system 
is the record format. Before you design 
each segment, you must determine what 
type of data is to be stored in each 
record and how you are going to ma- 
nipulate and report it. For example, one 
of the requirements in the portfolio sys- 
tem is to sort data by date. Rather than 
storing the date fields in the familiar 
format of month-day-year, it is more 
efficient to store the date in year-month- 
day format so it can be properly sorted 
first by year, then month, then day. 

Also keep in mind that if the data is 
not contained in the record, it cannot be 
reported. This may sound too elemen- 
tary to even mention it, but you will be 
surprised how often I have designed 
databases and left out an important 
field which I subsequently needed. For 
example, after 1 designed the portfolio 
system, 1 found a need to report on 
stocks which had been held over a cer- 
tain number of months but I had failed 
to include this piece of data in each 
record. When referring to the field defi- 
nition illustrations, this might explain 
why the "months owned "appears as the 
last field in each record rather than after 
the date fields. 

Most of the fields in each record are 
self-explanatory and simply require that 



FIELD DEFINITIONS 



LENGTH 



1. - PUR YEAR 


2 


2. - PUR MONTH 


2 


3. - PUR DAY 


2 


4. - SALE YEAR 


2 


5. - SALE MONTH 


2 


6. - SALE DAY 


2 


7. - CO. NAME 


24 


8. - TYPE OF SEC 


4 


9. - PUR AMOUNT 


10 


10. - # OF SHARES 


6 


11 » PER SHARE 


6 


12. - SALE AMOUNT 


10 


13. PER SHARE 


6 


14. - STATUS 


1 


15. - GAIN/LOSS 


10 



frifrKt . 'My ■ . .. , 

Total data space * 89 

This segment is stored on Drive 0 



FILENAME; STOCKS** 

DEFINED DATA FOR SEGMENT - 2 



FIELD : HEADING LENGTH 



16. - 


FMV/SHARE 


6 


it. - 


TOTAL FMV 


10 


18. - 


UNR. G/L 


10 


19. 4 


CUR DIV RATE 


6 


20. - 


ANNUAL DIV 


10 


21. - 


FMV YIELD 


6 


22. - 


INV YIELD 


6 


23. - 


MONTHS OWNED 


3 



Total data space - 57 

This segment is stored on Drive 0 



46 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



EQUATIONS 



FIELD 

NO. = EQUATION 



% 11 - 09/10 % SHARE AMT 

2. 13 = 12/10 % SHARE AMT 

3. 13 « 13*14 % SHOW IF SOLD 

4. 15 = 12-9 % SALE AMT - PUR AMT 

5. 15 ¥ 15*14 % GAIN OR LOSS 

6- 17 1S*10 % CALCULATE TOTAL FMV 

7. 18 * 17-OS % UNREALIZED GAIN/LOSS 

8. 20 = 10*18% ANNUAL DIVIDENDS 
8- 21 =* 20/17 % CURRENT DIV YIELD 

10. 22 « 20/08 % INVESTMET DIV YIELD 

11. 30 * 04-01 ! YEARS OWNED 

12. 30 = 30**12"! EQUIVALENT MONTHS 

13. 23 = 05-02+30 ! MONTHS OWNED 



data be inputted by the user. Pro-Color- 
File provides us with the ability to make 
calculations as each record is entered, 
thus avoiding the need to enter such 
results manually. For example, the stock 
portfolio system contains various fields 
which the system automatically includes 
in each record such as (field number is 
included in parenthesis): cost per share 
(II), proceeds per share (13), gain or 
loss on sale ( 1 5), total fair market value 
of shares (17), unrealized gain or loss 
(18), dividend yield based on market 
value (21), dividend yield based on 
invested amount (22) and, finally, the 
last-minute-added months owned (23). 

One key field is the "status" field. This 
field is used to indicate whether the 
stock was sold or is still owned. If this 
field contains iT, the stock was sold, 
otherwise, the field contains a blank 
space. This is necessary since 1 wanted 
the system to calculate a gain or a loss if 
the stock was sold, but no such calcula- 
tion if it was still owned. 

Let's look at the calculations being 
performed in the stock portfolio system 
(refer to the "equations" illustration). 

The first two calculations develop the 
purchase and sale amounts per share. 
The third calculation shows the sale 
amount per share if the stock has been 
sold or shows a zero if it is still owned. 
Since the status field contains a blank 
until the stock is sold, the sale amount 
per share would develop a zero (any- 
thing times zero returns a zero). On the 
other hand, if the status field contains a 
*l '(meaning the stock was sold), the per 
share amount is multiplied times one 
and entered as such in the field. This 
same technique is used to develop the 
gain or loss on sale (calculation number 
five). 

Three calculations were used to de- 
velop the number of months owned. 
First, the system calculates the number 
of years owned (calculation II) and 
then converts this number to months 
(calculation 12) which when added to 
the difference between the month fields 
(calculation 13) results in number of 
months elapsed from the purchase date 
to the current date (more on the use of 
these dates later). 

Let's look at the equations a little 
closer. You will notice that each is 
followed by two different characters 
('%' or 4 0. The *%' is used when you 
want the calculation to return a number 
followed by a decimal point and two 
digits to the right of the decimal which is 
the format used for dollars and cents or 
ratios. The T is used when you want the 
result to be in whole numbers. If no 



symbols are used, then the result will 
not be adjusted. You will also note 
equation 12 contains the number 12 in 
quotes. This tells the system to take 
whatever is in field 30 and multiply it 
times 1 2 (rather than field number 1 2) in 
this particular instance. You might ask 
how can I use field number 30 when it 
has not been defined at all. Remember, 
there are only 23 fields contained in 
each record. Well, Pro-Color-File 
allows us to use fields temporarily with- 
out having to define or store them. In 
this instance I used field 30 to perform 
some calculations to get ready for the 
final calculation (number 13) where 1 
store the number of months owned in 
field 23. 

Pro-Color- File allows a total of 28 
calculations which can be performed on 
each record as it is entered. 

Unlike other database systems I own, 
Pro-Color- File allows you to design 
your own fill-in-the-blanks forms for 
entering data which are also used for 
viewing or updating records. The sys- 
tem refers to these blank forms as 
screens and you can have up to four of 
these screens. 

The system allows you to use any of 
the colors offered by the Color Compu- 
ter as your screen background or for 
coloring any section of your screen. I 
chose a black background with prompts 
in lower case so that characters are 
shown green on a black background. 
When you are defining screens, the sys- 
tem uses a screen editing routine so that 
you can place data anywhere on the 
screen. Several editing functions are 
also included in the system so that you 
can add lines, delete lines, etc., with 
ease. 



You will notice that after, or under- 
neath, every prompt there is a left 
bracket along with a number. This indi- 
cates the beginning of the data field 
along with the corresponding data field 
number. These data field numbers cor- 
respond to the fields previously defined 
under each of the two segments used. 
Between the brackets and the field 
numbers there are certain characters. A 
*#* indicates that it is alphanumeric 
(both characters and numbers); a V 
indicates that the data is a number fol- 
lowed by a decimal point plus two char- 
acters to the right of the decimal; and a 
T indicates that the field data is to be 
shown on the screen but cannot be mod- 
ified from the keyboard. 

On Screennumber one, all of the data 
is to be entered except for the per share 
purchased cost (line that starts with a 
*p'), per share sales price (line that starts 
with an V) and the gain or loss sale, all 
of which will be calculated by the system 
as data is entered. 

On Screen number two, most of the 
data is either calculated by the system or 
has been previously entered except for 
the current fair market value of the 
shares and the date (mm, dd, and yy). 
Please note that the date contained in 
fields four, five and six serve a dual 
purpose. If the shares have been sold, 
the date of sale is entered in these fields 
(Screen number one); if the shares have 
not been sold, these fields can be used to 
indicate the date the current fair market 
value is entered (Screen number two). 

On Screen number three, all of the 
data fields have been previously entered 
or calculated by the system except for 
the current dividend rate. 

October 1984 THE RAINBOW 47 



SCREEN NUMBER 1 

co name [$7 

type [$8 
number of shares [#10 



mo 
P [#2 
s [#5 



da 

[#3 
[#6 



[#1 
[#4 



each 
[!11 
[!13 



total gain or loss 
status [#14 



amount 

$[.9 

[-12 

$[115 



SCREEN DEFINITIONS 

SCREEN NUMBER 3 

co name [!7 
type [!8 

shares [!10 div [.19 
annual dividends [!20 



' • ; -.- 



current fmv 
investment 



[!17 
[!9 



yield 
021 

[!22 



SCREEN NUMBER 2 

co name [$7 

type[$8 shares [!10 
mm dd yy months fmv 



[#5 [#6 [#4 
current value 
amount invested 

gain or loss 



[!23 [.16 
$[!17 
$[!9 

$[!18 



So, three screens are used, each show- 
ing some common or unique data 
for that screen. One shows the current 
status of the transaction, the next one 
shows unrealized gains or losses and the 
third one shows the dividend yield data 
along with applicable data to make the 
screens meaningful as you review or 
enter the data. 

Now comes the fun and power of the 
Pro-Color- File system: the reporting 
capabilities. 

The system allows you to design and 
store up to eight different report for- 
mats. These can either be reports to be 
printed or simply shown on the monitor 
screen. 

The stock portfolio system uses six 
different report formats. The first five 
generate hard copy reports while the 
last one shows the data on the monitor 
screen. 

Report numbers one, three, four and 
five are designed for obtaining data on 
stocks currently owned while report 



numbers two and six are designed for 
obtaining data on stocks sold. 

Before you obtain data using the var- 
ious report formats, you need to prop- 
erly arrange it and sort it. For example, 
reports one through five require that 
records be sorted by company name 
while report number six requires records 
to be sorted by year. 

By selecting the appropriate report 
format and carefully selecting the sorted 
data, you can obtain numerous types of 
reports for various purposes. The sys- 
tem allows an ample variety of selection 
procedures for reporting purposes such 
as selecting all records or only those 
records which meet or do not meet cer- 
tain criteria. 

For example, using report format 
number one, you can select and print all 
of the stocks which are still owned, by 
selecting those records with a blank in 
the status field. You can further limit 
the items to be selected by indicating 
those for which a current fair market 



value has been entered, or those show- 
ing unrealized gains, or unrealized losses. 
You can even select those with number 
fields equaling, exceeding or falling be- 
low selected amounts, or dates, etc. 

It is beyond the scope of this tutorial 
to coverall of the possible types of selec- 
tions that could be made to produce 
specific type reports since the selection 
criteria that could be used is so flexible 
and encompassing. Even the compre- 
hensive manual supplied with the Pro- 
Color- File system cannot begin to cover 
the various possibilities available to the 
user in selecting and reporting data. 

Let's look into the report formats a 
little closer. First of all, you are allowed 
up to three lines for the titles and two 
lines for the column headings. Also, two 
additional title lines can be inserted at 
the time you are printing a report thus 
further allowing individual identifica- 
tion of reported data based on the selec- 
tion procedure followed. 

Your reports can contain any num-. 
ber up to 255 characters per line 
and, based on the printer capabilities, 
such data can be printed in single or 
multiple line formats per record. Pages 
can also be numbered automatically as 
the report is being printed. 

Looking at report format number 
one, you will notice that there are 96 
characters per line and a total of seven 
columns are printed out along with the 
appropriate column headings as noted. 
Just below each column heading, indi- 
cate whether the data is to be printed as 
alphanumeric (using or as numeric 
only (using *#*) using the same format as 
the 'print using' statement in basic. 
Underneath each of the field indicators, 
there is the familiar left bracket and 
field number so the system knows which 
data field to print. 



48 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



REPORT FORMATS 



— .+ — 1 0™+ — 20—+ — 30--+ — 40— +--> <50 — + — 60 — + — 70— +—80— +—-90 — +- 



REPORT NUMBER 1 

Indexed by "COMPANY NAME" 



DETAIL PORTFOLIO 
INDIVIDUAL TRANSACTIONS 



Page ## 



COMPANY NAME 

1ST 



SEC NO. OF —COST 

TYPE SHARES EACH TOTAL 

%% ##,### ###.## #,###,###.## 

[$8 £#10 [#11 t=9 



CURRENT 
FMV 

#,###,###.## 
I-" 



UNREALIZED 
GAIN/(LOSS) 

#,##,###,## 
[=18 



-+ — 10—+ — 20—+ — 30—+ — 40— +--> <50— +-— 60— + — 70—+ — 80— +— 90— +- 



REPORT NUMBER 2 

Indexed by "COMPANY NAME' 



SALE OF SECURITIES 
GAINS/LOSSES BY TRANSACTION 



Page ## 



COMPANY NAME 

% % 
[$7 



SHRS 

#,### 
[#10 



PURCHASED 
MO DA YR 

%%-%%-%% 
[$2[$3[$1 



SOLD 
MO DA YR 

[$5[$6[$4 



MOS. 
HELD 

#### 
[#23 



PROCEEDS 
FROM SALE 

###,###.## 
[-12 



ORIGINAL 
COST 

###,###.## 
[=9 



GAIN OR 

(LOSS) 

###,###.##(/ 
[=15 



-.-.+™-10— +— -20— +-— 30— + — 40— +--> <50— +— 60— + — 70—+ — 80— +—96— ^ 
REPORT NUMBER 3 

Indexed by "COMPANY NAME" Page ## 

DETAIL PORTFOLIO 
UNREALIZED GAINS/LOSSES BY TRANSACTION 



COMPANY NAME 

w 



SHRS 

#,### 

[#10 



PURCHASED 
MO DA YR 

[$2[$3[$1 



CUR DATE MOS. 



MO DA YR 

[$5[$6[$4 



HELD 

#### 

[#23 



CURRENT 
FMV 

###,###,## 

M7 



ORIGINAL 
COST 

###,###.## 

[=9 



GAIN OR 
(LOSS) 

###,###.##! 

[=18 



— +-—10—+ — 20—+ — 30— +— -40— +--> <50— + — 60—+ — 70— +—80— +—90— +• 

REPORT NUMBER 4 

Indexed by "COMPANY NAME" 



Page ## 





DETAIL PORTFOLIO 
DIVIDEND YIELD OF INDIVIDUAL INVESTMENTS 






NUMBER OF 


ORIGINAL 


CURRENT 


ANNUAL 


YIELD- 


COMPANY NAME 


SHARES 


COST 


FMV 


DIVIDENDS 


COST FMV 1 


% 


% 


###,### 


###,###.## 


###,###,## 


###,###,## 


##,## ##.## 1/ 


[$7 




[#10 


[=9 


(=17 


[=20 


[#22 [#21 



— .-f — 10~-+-— 20,-+ — 3Q-.-+^^> <-..+^.50— +— -60— +-— 70— + • 

REPORT NUMBER 5 

Indexed by "COMPANY NAME" 



DETAIL PORTFOLIO 
SUMMARY BY COMPANY 



Page ## 



COMPANY NAME 
£$ 



TOTAL 
INVESTMENT 

###,###.## 

1=9 



NO. OF 
SHARES 

###,### 

MO 



STOCK PRICES— 1 

LOW I HIGH I AVERAGE I 

###.## I ###.## I ###.## S 

[L11 [H11 imi 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 49 



REPORT NUMBER 6 

Indexed by "YEAR" 



GAIN/LOSS BY YEAR 
SCREEN REPORT 



YEAR PROCEEDS GAIN/LOSS 

19%% ###,###.## ###,###.##S 
[$ [#12 [#15 



At this point, you have further choic- 
es in determining how data is to be 
printed by using different characters 
between the left brackets and the field 
numbers. For example, a T is used to 
indicate the data is to be printed as 
alphanumeric data/#' indicates numeric 
data, fc=sl indicates numeric data plus 
totals to be printed at the end of the 
report. You can also use *@'to indicate 
you want the average of a numeric field 
to be printed, 4 L' for the lowest value or 
l H' for the highest value (more on this 
later). You can even print out numeric 
data as if it were alphanumeric data, 
such as printing the dates so that hy- 
phens can be placed between the year, 
month and day. 

One powerful reporting feature is 
that of summary reports. For example, 
let's assume you have purchased shares 
of various companies at various times 



and at various prices. By sorting the 
records by company name and using 
report format number five, you can 
obtain a summary listing by company (a 
single line printed for all records of the 
same company) showing the total 
amount invested, number of shares 
owned as well as the lowest, highest and 
average price of the shares owned. Like- 
wise, if the records are sorted by year, 
you can obtain a summary of gains or 
losses by year using report format num- 
ber six. Summary reports are obtained 
by placing an 'S* at the end of the data 
line as shown on report numbers five 
and six. 

One very helpful feature of the report 
writer contained in the Pro- Co lor- File 
system is that you are not impaired by 
the fact that the Color Computer only 
allows 32 characters of data to be dis- 
played on the screen at any one time. 



Using a special window effect, you are 
shown the entire report as if it were a 
worksheet right on the screen. You can 
actually scroll from left to right to view 
an entire report even though it might be 
255 characters per line. This feature is 
extremely useful in designing your re- 
ports with unequalled ease as compared 
to other systems. 

Since special printer codes can be 
selected for lines to be printed, Pro- 
Color-File can work with any of the 
popular printers used with the Color 
Computer, plus most of the printers 
converted to work with it. 

I have been using Pro-Color- File ever 
since it was first introduced and can 
safely describe it as one of the most 
powerful database systems 1 have thus 
far encountered for use with the Color 
Computer. In fact, I like it so well that I 
have formed a National User Group 
devoted to it whereby members can 
exchange information concerning the 
system along with enhancements, modi- 
fications, description of systems in use 
and even exchange databases created 
with the system. Although the group 
was recently formed, we currently have 
almost 100 members as of the date of 
this writing and continue to grow rapidly. 

You can obtain further information 
on this powerful database system by 
contacting Derringer Software directly 
or writing to our Pro-Color- File Na- 
tional User Group, 12851 W. Balboa 
Drive, New Berlin, WI 53151. 



DRIVE 0 or 
2 DRIVES 

$269. 



WITH J DOS & 
35 TRACK DRIVES 

ADD $5. FOR RS DOS 

& MANUAL or $10 
FOR 40 TRACK DRIVE 

40 TRACK DRIVES NOW ARE 
NEW 1/2 HEIGHT, DIRECT DRIVE 



Complete disk drives from... 

Aj C a INCLUDING CASE & POWER SUPPLY 
5>10y. 35 Tftack $159. 40 "fcack $169. 

PANASONIC 1/2 HEIGHTS 40 TRACK DRIVES 1 Drive $209. - 
$229. with Owl Doubter 2 DRIVE $399.-$415.with Owl Doubler 

NOW DOUBLE YOUR OWLS!!! $39.95 

OWL DOUBLER is a device that allows use of both sides 
of double sided drive ! Software independent sits inside 
case and. makes one disk drive 0&1 and the other 2&3! 

j M.C. & VISA Accepted 

m 




All drives unused 
35 Track Drives 
are manu- 
facturers 
overstock. 
6 month 
warranty 
on all drives 




OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown, PA. 
19539 

PA Res. Include 6%Tax 
(215) 682-6855 



50 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



★★★★★★★★★★ SELECTED SOFTWARE ★★★★★★★★★★ 

FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 



UPGRADE YOUR 
COLOR COMPUTER! 

Complete solderless kits with easy-to- 
follow instructions. 

4K-1GK FOR ALL BOARDS $19.95 

4K-32K FOR ALL BOARDS $54.95 

16K-32K FOR ALL BOARDS $39.95 
64K For E & F BOARDS 

&C0C0 2 $59.95 

•/f POSSIBLE, PLEASE SPECIFY 
BOARD REVISION WITH ORDER. 

NOTE: All ICs used in our kits are first 
quality 200NS Prime Chips and carry one 
full year warranty. 



SPECIAL OF THE MONTH 

JUNIOR'S REVENGE (32K) 
TAPE ONLY $21 .50 



THE HJL-57 KEYBOARD 

WITH FREE SOFTWARE 
FOR FOUR FUNCTION KEYS. 

$79.95 

• Please specify model 
(original, F version or COCO 2} 



VOLKSMODEM 

300 baud, direct connect, orig/answer 
automatically selected. Comes with alt 
COCO cables and battery. 

$74.95 



DISKETTE CAROUSEL 

• Precision Rotary 

• With 72 color-coded envelopes. 

$29.95 



BOOKS 

Color Basic Unravelled $19.95 

Extended Basic Unravelled . . . . $19.95 

Disk Basic Unravelled $19.95 

ALL 3 BOOKS ONLY $49.95 



MONITORS AND INTERFACE 



Zenith ZVM-123 Green $129.95 
Zenith ZVM 1 22 Amber $ 149.95 

BMC 9191 U medium res. 
w/sounrj $289.95 
$5 OFF Monitor with Video Plus purchased. 



VIDEO PLUS Color or monochrome 

for COCO $24.95 

VIDEO PLUS II C 

Color for COCO 2 $39.95 

VIDEO PLUS II M 

Monochrome for COCO 2 .... $26.95 



'REAL TALKER' 

With enhanced software on Tape and 
User's Manual 

Cartridge $59.95 

'REAL TALKER II' 

Same as above for COCO 2 

$69.95 
Y BRANCHING CABLE 

For Disk Systems $29.95 



STAR PRINTERS 



Gemini 1 0X 
Gemini 1 5X 


1 20 cpe 


♦279 
tAW 


Delta 1 0 
Delta 1 5 


1 60 cps & 
8K buffer 


#415 


Radix 10 
Radix 1 5 


200 cps & 
1 6K buffer 


♦515 
• 715 


PowerType 


DaisyWheel 


$398 



PBH Serial to Parallel switch selectable 
printer and modem interface 179.95 

Purchased with Printer $59.95 



TAKE 20% OFF ANY SOFTWARE ORDER 

All games are in 1 6K machine language unless noted. 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

1 DRACONIAN (32K) Will you be the next victim? 

1 SKRAMBLE Challenging destroy mission. 

' CRASH (32K) Mario is back again! 

1 WORLDS OF FLIGHT (32K) Siper realistic. 

1 SR-71 (32K Ext. Basic) A must for the adventurous. 

* TOUCHSTONE (32K) Excellent graphics. 
1 BUZZARD BAIT (32K) Just outstanding! 

* TRAP FALL Just like Pitfalls. 

* THE KING (32K) Just outstanding! 

SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 
1 GALAGON (32K) Truly state-of-the-art. 

* COLOR PANIC (32K) Excelent. 

1 CUBIX (32K) Outstanding with 16 skill levels. 

' FROGGIE (32K) The best of its type. 

' LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (32K) Just outstanding. 

GEOGRAPHY PAC Excellent learning tool with 4 
color hi res, maps. Extended Basic required. 

1 LANCER (32K) Excellent Joust-type game. 

* MS. GOBBLER (32K) Outstanding with 4 different 
mazes and 1 6 skill levels. 

■ WHIRLYBIRD RUN Excellent. 

* GHOST GOBBLER Highly rated Pac Man-type with 
1 6 skill levels and lots of action. 

INTRACOLOR 

* INTRACOLOR GRAND PRIX Exciting racing game. 

* WILLY'S WAREHOUSE (32K) Excellent graphics 
& sound. 

* CANDY CO. (32K) Can you save Q.P. Doll? 
Over 1000 frames. 

* COLORPEDE Just like the arcade. 

* ROBOTTACK Just like the arcade. 

DATA SOFT 

* ZAXXON (32K) Sega's official version. 

* POOYAN (32K) Konami's official version. 
Tape & disk included. 

* MOON SHUTTLE Nichibutsu's official version. 
Tape and disk included. 



TAPE 


DISK 


$27.95 


$30.95 


$24.95 


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$39.95 $39.95 
$29.95 

$29.95 



COMPUTERWARE 



* JUNIOR'S REVENGE (32K) Exciting! 

* GRAN PRIX (32K) Challenging race. 

* DOODLE BUG Just like Ladybug. 

AIMTECO SOFTWARE 

ROMPAK ONLY 

* 8-BALL For the pool-table lover. 

* GHOST GOBBLER by Spectral Associates 

* WHIRLYBIRD RUN by Spectral Associates 



TAPE 

$28.95 
$21.95 
$26.95 



DISK 

$31.95 
$24.95 
$29.95 



$29.95 
$26.95 
$26.95 



ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 

SAIGON: THE FINAL DAYS The most truly $24.95 
unique adventure ever. 

ADVENTURELAND Wander through an enchanted $ 1 9.95 
realm and try to recover the 1 3 lost treasures. 

EARTHQUAKE You will fear for more than your $24.95 
own life. 

** SEA DRAGON (32K) Outstanding underwater thrills $34.95 
and chills. 



UTILITIES AND APPLICATIONS 




RAINBOW SCREEN MACHINE 


$29.95 


$32.95 


SUPER SCREEN MACHINE 


$44.95 


$47.95 


TELEWRITER 64 


$49.95 


$59.95 


MASTER DESIGN 




$34.95 


PRO-COLOR FILE 'ENHANCED* 




$79.95 


COLORCOM/E Rompak or Oisk 


$49 


95 


CCEAD 


$ 6.95 




64K DISK UTILITY 




$21.95 


TAPE UTILITY 


$24.95 


$24.95 


MULTIPAK CRACK 




$24.95 


HOME BASE 




$49.95 


WORK BASE 1 




$64.95 


WORK BASE II 




$79.95 



* Requires Joystick ** Joystick Optional 



WE PAY POSTAGE on all orders in the United States & Canada. Overseas please add $3.00. (MN Res. add 6% sales tax.) 
We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or -ontjv order. U.S. funds onlv for foreign orders. C.0.0. please add $2.00 

fortdtg: SELECTED SOFTWARE, P.O. Bos 3222B, Fridley, MN 55432 



24 HOUR ORDER LINE 
<612) 757-2439 




If At First You 
Don't Succeed . . . 
Read The Directions! 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Are you the type who gets a new 
software utility, loads it in, and 
then promptly declares that it 
doesn't work? Or are you the type who 
reads the directions first? Too many of 
us are the first type. We have been 
wrongly trained in this 'Age of Marvels' 
to expect things to work automatically. 
Much to our dismay, sometimes they 
don't work that easily. 

Children often follow in the footsteps 
of their parents. My children too often 
expect software packages to operate 
automatically. They reflect the short- 
comings of the adults around them. 
Learning to read and follow directions 
are skills that we need to stress in the 
elementary grades and on through the 
higher grades. 

A careless approach to new material 
is not restricted by any means to soft- 
ware. The same person who overlooks 
software directions will also overlook 
directions in a variety of other areas. 
New household items and appliances 
are frequent examples. Did you ever try 



(Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two masters 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He and his wife, Cheryl, own 
Computer Island.) 



to assemble a backyard swing set with- 
out reading the directions? 

A child who does not read or listen to 
directions carefully in school can often 
receive a grade lower than his true abili- 
ties. Sometimes directions indicate cer- 
tain ways of entering answers so they 
are not overlooked by the scorer. A 
careful reading of the directions would 
indicate this. Other times, children who 
don't read directions may respond in- 
correctly, fully believing that they are 
correct. An example of this would be 
giving synonyms when antonyms were 
asked for, or some other unintentional 
mistake. 

Children are especially prone to over- 
looking directions on many of the 
standardized tests given to them. These 
tests can greatly affect decisions on the 
class placement of the child. Realizing 
the problem, many times teachers are 
instructed to read the directions aloud 
to the children while they read them to 
themselves before the test begins. 

One exercise I have always found 
successful in classes is utilized in this 
month's article. A sheet of paper is dis- 
tributed to each child. There are either 
nine numbers or letters printed on the 
sheet in Tic-Tac-Toe fashion. The point 
is to follow the leader's directions in- 
volving these numbers or letters. The 
directions may either be printed on the 



back of the sheet of paper, or read to the 
children by the leader. 

The leader may either be the teacher, 
or another student. Of course, parents 
could do this at home to reinforce the 
skill. Also, the exercise is worthwhile 
and at the same time entertaining for a 
parent and an impatient child waiting in 
a doctor's office, or an airport, as a non- 
computer activity. This exercise works 
equally well for oral or written direc- 
tions. 

1. Read this entire paper first 

2. Draw a box around C 

3. Draw a box around G 

4. Draw a line from C to G 

5. Draw a triangle around W 

6. Draw a figure 8 around B and S 

7. Draw a circle around M 

8. Draw a #4 between the letters K 
and A 



The first time that you try this exer- 
cise on a youngster, it is a good idea to 
add the additional written instruction, 

9. Do not write anything on this 
paper. 

You will be surprised how many 
youngsters will not get to the last in- 
struction until they have done all of the 



52 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



GAMES 
EDUCATION 



GUARANTEED 
QUALITY 



ARCADE 
UTILITIES 



SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES HAS PRODUCED THE HIGHEST QUALITY COLOR COMPUTER ARCADE 
GAMES FOR MORE THAN THREE YEARS. RADIO SHACK HAS LICENSED MANY OF OUR GAMES — 
HOW MANY OTHER ALLEGED "ARCADE GAME MANUFACTURERS" CAN SAY THAT? SPECTRAL IS 
THE STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE AND WE STAND BEHIND OUR PRODUCT. IF YOU ARE NOT 100% 
SATISFIED BY OUR ARCADE GAMES, RETURN THE GAME WITHIN 10 DAYS FOR A FULL REFUND. 



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UTILITIES 














Disk add J3.QO 












LANCER (JOUST) 


32K 


ML 


24.95 


ULTRA 80C (EDITOR-ASSEMBLER) 




ML 


n 
u 


49.95 


LUNAR ROVER (MOON PATROL) 


32K 


ML 


24.95 


DISK EDITOR (FIX & ALTER DISK DATA) 






n 
u 


24.95 


GALAGON (GALAGA) 


32K 


ML 


24 95 


BUGOUT (POWERFUL MONITOR) 




ML 




14 95 


MS. GOBBLER (MS. PAC MAN) 


32K 


ML 


24.95 


ORACLE (GRAPHICS MONITOR) 


32K 


ML 




24.95 


PLANET INVASION (DEFENDER) 




ML 


24.95 


SOUNDSOURCE (SOUND ANALYZER) 




ML 




14.95 


WHIRLYBIRD RUN (SCRAMBLE) 




ML 


24.95 


COMPUVOICE 










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32K 


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24.95 


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EB 


24.95 


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ML 


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DEBUG MONITOR) 




ML 




34.95 


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ML 


21.95 


TEXTPRO III (WORDPROCESSOR) 




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(D = 59.95) 44.95 


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ML 


24.95 


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ML 




24.95 


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32K 


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64K 


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D 


59.95 


COLOR ZAP (SPACE ZAP) 




ML 


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with EDITOR/ASSEMBLER 








89.95 


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21.95 












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32K 


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ML 


24.95 


ADVENTURE GAMES 






SPACE WAR (INTERPLANETARY COMBAT) 




ML 


21.95 













EDUCATION 



GEOGRAPHY PAK 

(FIVE DIFFERENT STUDIES) 
ALPHA SEARCH (ALPHABET TUTOR) 
QUIZSPIN (JOKER IS WILD) 
HORSEPLAY (VOCABULARY BUILDERS) 
PICKWHICH (SHAPE RECOGNITION) 
SPELLING MASTER (SPELLING TUTOR) 
SPANISH FOOTBALL (SPANISH TUTOR) 
TYPE ASSAULT (GRAPHIC TYPING) 
INTEGER MATH (MATH TUROR) 
TYPING TUTOR (TOUCH TYPING) 
DOLLARS & SENSE (MONEY TEACHER) 
SCHOOL MAZE (SCHOOL ADVENTURE) 



32K 
32K 



ML 



ML 



EB 


29.95 




14.95 


EB 


19.95 


EB 


19.95 




9.95 


EB 


14.95 


E8 


14.95 




19.95 




14.95 




19.95 


EB 


11.95 


EB 


11.95 



32K 



32K 



KEYS OF THE WIZARD 

(ADVANCE ADVENTURE) 
SYZYGY (3D GRAPHIC ADVENTURE) 
PRISON CITY 

(BASIC GRAPHIC ADVENTURE) 
CAVERNS OF DOOM 

(DUNGEON ADVENTURE) 
PIRATES AHOY (PIRATE ADVENTURE) 
MAZE ESCAPE (3D GRAPHIC MAZE GAME) 
NAUGUS (GRAPHIC/ARCADE) 
"ORIGINAL" ADVENTURE GAME 



MISCELLANEOUS 

LEMANS (GRAPHIC RACE GAME) 

GAMBLIN GAMES (3 CASINO GAMES) 32K 

TREASURY PAK (30 GAMES!!!) 32K 



ML 
ML 



ML 



ML 
ML 



ML 
ML 
ML 



EB 



EB 
EB 

FLEX + 



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19.95 
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14.95 
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SPECTRAL 

ASSOCIATES 

3418 SOUTH 90th STREET TACOMA, WA 98409 

ORDERS ONLY 800 426 1830 
ORDER PROCESSING AND INFORMATION 206 581 6938 

LOOK FOR THE FOLLOWING SPECTRAL 
ASSOCIATES GAMES AT YOUR LOCAL 
RADIO SHACK STORE: 

• MADNESS AND THE MINOTAUR 

• SLAY THE NEREIS 

• MICROBES 

• DOWN LAND 



INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTORS: 

KELLY SOFTWARE, EDMONTON, ALBERTA 
SECTOR SOFTWARE, DARTMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 
SPECTRUM SOFTWARE, ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA 



m 



D= DISK ONLY EB = EXT BASIC REQD 
ML = MACHINE LANGUAGE 

ALL PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED 

EXPRESS 

ORDER! 

ORDER BY VISA OR MASTERCARD AND 
YOUR ORDER WILL BE SHIPPED WITHIN 
ONE BUSINESS DAY — GUARANTEED OR 
YOU GET THE GAME FREE!! HARDWARE 
ITEMS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURERS 
AVAILABILITY. 

TOLL FREE ORDER LINE 

NO COD ORDERS 
SHIPPING AND HANDLING 
ADD 3% , $2.00 minimum 
CANADA ADD 6%, $3.00 minimum 
FOREIGN ADD 15%, $5.00 minimum 
WA residents add 7.8% tax 



instructions. It is a learned habit for 
many of us to ignore instruction one 
and plunge headlong into the task. 

This 'trick' will, of course, only work 
the first time on any individual, but it 
should serve to drive home the point. 

Our program draws the nine letters 
and the geometric shapes needed to 
complete the directions. Line 40 tells the 
computer to GOSUB300. Lines 300 to 
380 contain the drawings for the nine 
letters needed for the exercise. Line 390 
draws a number 4 which we also need. 
Line 400 RETURN back to Line 50. 

Lines 80 through 160 draw the nine 
letters on the screen in Tic-Tac-Toe 
fashion. Lines 170 through 180 wait for 
you to press the enter key. (CHR$(13) 
represents the ENTER key). When it is 
pressed, the program proceeds. Lines 



190 through 250 draw the completed 
diagram with the instructions carried 
out. Pressing ENTER again will repeat 
the procedure. 

This program will enable the child or 
class to view the results of the instruc- 
tion set on the computer screen. They 
can easily compare it to their own paper 
to check for accuracy. The program 
could, perhaps, be used as a pretest and 
retest for before and after some of your 
teaching on the topic of improving the 
reading of directions. 

It is an easy job to create other similar 
worksheets for the children to practice 
on. The directions are given by you on a 
separate sheet of paper or are read 
aloud by you. The only program changes 
would be on Lines 190 through 250. 

It is both fun and good practice in 



210...... 252 

END 82 



The listing: 



learning about CoCo graphics to figure 
out the drawing of the various graphics 
around the letters. Perhaps some of 
your children could assist in creating 
some of these additional graphics. Either 
their ideas or their actual programming 
assistance could be encouraged. 

The need to follow directions is just as 
important for teachers as for their stu- 
dents. We should all be careful to search 
the directions of our software purchases. 
Often there is an important first or last 
instruction that may tell us to make a 
backup copy to protect the original 
master disk. Another overlooked in- 
struction may be to enter a password 
before beginning the program. We really 
can't guess what all of the essential 
instructions are until we carefully read 
the directions ourselves. 



10 REM "FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS" 

20 REM "STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, NY, 1984 

30 PCLS : SCREEN 1,0: PM0DE3 , % I C I RCL 

E(50,50) , 10 

40 CLS:6OSUB300 



PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 



FOR THE RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 

* Runs any parallel printer from the Color Computer serial I/O port. 

* No hardware modifications or software patches needed. Works with 
all standard Color Computer commands including graphics. 

* Switch selectable baud rates from 300 to 9600. 

* All cables and connectors included. 

* 1 year warranty. 

* Most printers supply power at the parallel port. With these printers 
you may order your interface without the power module. 

( Printers known to require the power module are: 
Epson, Panasonic, and Mannesman Tally. ) 

* PRICE: Model CCP-2 with modem connector & switch $84. 

Model CCP-1 without modem connector & switch— --$69. 

Either model without power module deduct———— $3. 
Shipping costs included in price. 
Michigan residents add 4% sales tax. 



BOTEK INSTRUMENTS 

313-739-2910 4049 HAMPSHIRE, UTICA, MICH., 48087 Dealer inquiries invited 




CCP-1 OWNERS 

UPGRADE YOUR CCP-1 TO A CCP-2 I ! 

Send us your CCP-1 plus $17 ( includes shipping ) 
we will add the necessary cable and switch. 



54 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




BOOKS 



COLOR 
PERIPHERALS 



PRINTERS 



COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED 

EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED 

DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED 

SET OF 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS 

The Unravelled series is the ONLY, complete, 

TOTALLY commented and explained disassembly 

of COLOR BASIC. Complete memory map in each book. 

FACTS (Hardware Manual) 

6809 Assembly Language Programming 

Color Computer Songbook 

101 Color Computer Tips & Tricks 

55 Color Computer Programs 

55 More Color Computer Programs 

Color Computer Graphics 

6809 Programmers Reference Card 

MODEMS 

HAYES SMARTMODEM 300 

(300 BAUD, auto dial/auto answer) 

US ROBOTICS PASSWORD 300 
(300 BAUD) 

US ROBOTICS PASSWORD 

(1200 BAUD, auto dial/auto answer) 

DISK DRIVES 

TANDON Single Sided, DD 

TAN DON Double Sided, DD 

includes software to convert to two 

single sided drives 



CHIPS 



4164 RAM 
6809E CPU 
6883 SAM 
6821 PIA 
6622 PIA 
6847 VDG 



MISCELLANEOUS 



CCI MONITOR ADAPTER 
CCtl MONITOR ADAPTER 
RS232 3 WAY SWITCH BOX 
C-10 CASSETTES 
DISKETTE SSDD 

Box of 10 
BLANK ROM PAK PROJECT BOX 
The ANSWER (Disk Expander, Parallel 

interface, TERM program) 
64K RAM EXPANSION KIT 
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LEGEND 800(80 cps) 
LEGEND 1000(1 00 cps) 
LEGEND 1200 (120 cps) 
LEGEND 1500 (150 cps) 
RS232 Card 

OKIDATAML82A(120cps) 
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MONITORS 

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[ I 



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ORDER PROCESSING 206 581 6938 
AND INFORMATION 



3418 SOUTH 90th STREET 
TACOMA, WA 98409 



MASTER DESIGN 

fCJ 1984 By Cterrmeer Software. Inc. 



DOES MORE THAN JUST DRAW PICTURES 
IT'S A TEXT DESIGNER 

Master Design has the ability to generate lettering in the graphics mode from 
sizes 2 to 32 and In a wide range of styles. Size 2 offers a 42 x 22 line format 
while size 32 creates letters that take up over half the screen. Lettering can be 
skinny, bold, textured, tall, drop shadow, raised shadow and in different 
thickness. There's nine different settings for thickness and nine different set- 
tings for creating open lettering. 

IT'S A GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Take full advantage of hi res commands including GET. PUT. CIRCLE. PCOPV. 
PMOOE. LINE. BOX. BOX FILL. PAINT and other special features available only 
with Master Design. Master Design utilizes a "two cursor*' concept to allow 
quick formatting of boxes, lines and special patterns such as dot patterns for 
shading and diagonal, vertical or horizontal lines for creative backgrounds. You 
can create designs and use the TEXT designer to label areas or Place titles. You 
can also create mirror images of the display. 

COMES WITH A SCREEN PRINT ROUTINE 

Master Design comes with a 7 bit and 8 bit version of a hi res screen print 
routine so no matter what your printer is. we have it covered. Works in any 
pmode and can print normal or reversed images. 

DISK and CASSETTE I/O 

Save and load your creations to and from disk or cassette. You can even load 
hi res displays created by other programs to make changes. 

INTERFACES WITH TELEWRITER-64 

Wouldn't it be nice if you could design your own letter head in hi-res graphics 
and then print it out while using Telewriter-64? Master Design offers just that 
capability! The Letter Head Utility will let you convert any hi-res display so that 
it can be accessed while using Telewriter-64! The BASIC program modules are 
provided with step by step instructions. These BASIC modules can also be used 
in your own BASIC programs for printing displays without having to use the 
graphic pages. You can have upto 88 pages of graphics linked together for 
printing! 

THIS IS A 
SMALL EXAMPLE 
OF NHAT YOU 
GET FOR JUST: 




34.95 






DERRINGER 
SOFTWARE 
INC. 


TM 




Send Check or Money Order to: 
Derringer Software. Inc.. 
P. 0. Box 5300 
Florence. S. C. 29502-2300 see us at H PRINCETON 

Uisa/MC customers can call: (803J 665-5676 - 9:00 - 5:00 edt 

Requires 32K with at least one disk drive 
(Include $2.00 (or shipping and handling) 

Telewriter-64 fCJ 1983 t>v Cofnitec 



50 PCLS : PM0DE3 , i : SCREEN 1 , i 

60 COLOR6:LINE<15,20)-<240, 170), 

PSET,B 

70 PAINT<1,1),7,6 
80 DRAWS12;C8;BM50,50"+K* 
90 DRAWBMl 10, 50"+G* 
100 DRAWBM170,50"+M* 
1 1 0 DRAW " BM50 , 1 00 " + A* 
120 DRAWBMl 10, 100"+B* 
1 30 DRAW "BM170, 1 00 " +9* 
140 DRAW"BM50, 150"+C* 
1S0 DRAWBMl 10, 150"+Y* 
160 DRAWBMl 70, 150"+W* 
170 EN*-INKEY* 

1B0 IF EN*-CHR«<13) THEN 190 ELS 
E 170 

190 C0L0R6: LINE <40, 130)- <70, 155) 

,pset,b:rem h a box around c 

200 line < 100, 60) -< 130, 30) ,pset,b 

:REM"A box around g 

210 LINE<100,60)-<70, 130) ,PSET:R 
EM "A LINE FROM C TO B" 
220 LINE < 175, 120)- < 150, 160) ,PSET 
:LINE-<200, 160) ,PSET: LINE- < 175, 1 
20) ,PSET:REM"A TRIANGLE AROUND W 

II 

230 CIRCLE < 125, 90) ,30,6, .5: CIRCL 
E ( 180, 90) , 30, 6, . 5: REM"A FIGURE 8 

AROUND B AND S" 
240 CIRCLE < 178, 45) ,20: REM"A CIRC 
LE AROUND M 

250 DRAW"S8;BM50,75 ,, +FR*:REM" A 
4 BETWEEN K AND A" 
260 EN4-INKEY* 

270 IF EN*=CHR*(13) THEN RUN ELS 
E 260 

280 GOTO 280 

290 REM "HERE ARE THE LETTERS USE 
D IN THE PROGRAM" 

300 A*» " BU4R3FDHL2GDFR2ENU2FBR2 " 
310 B*= " BU6RD6NLBUFR2EU2HL2QBF3B 
R3" 

320 C*= ,, BRNR2HU2ER2FBD2GBR3" 
330 G*~ " BRNR2HU2ER2FNUD2NGD2GL2H 
BEBR5" 

340 «*= " RU6NLBD4R2NE2F2BR2 " 
350 M*= " BU4FND3EFND3EFD3BR2 " 
360 S*= " BUFR2EHL2HER2FBD3BR2 " 
370 W*= " BUNU3FENU3FENU3BR2BD " 
380 Y*= " BUNU3FR2ENU3D2GL2HBUBR6 " 
390 FR*="BR3U5G3R4BD2BR3" 
400 RETURN 



56 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



GRAPHICS UTILITY 



For PMODE 4 
Screen Enlargement, 
There's . . . 




By Joseph Kohn 



The graphics capability of the CoCo 
continues to be an essential and 
useful tool. The ability to create 
and manipulate graphics has been the 
subject of many articles and much soft- 
ware. The BLOWUP program described 
here should be a useful adjunct to most 
of these for the purpose of enlarging 
portions of the PMODE 4 screen. 

The program allows the user to load 
the PMODE 4 screen from either disk 
or tape. Then by using the right joystick, 
a portion of this "source" screen can be 
selected for "blowing up," or enlarging. 
The enlarging ratio is 2 to I, vertically 
and horizontally. The section of the 
source screen selected is 128 pixels wide 
by 96 pixels high, which is the size of 
one-quarter of the PMODE 4 screen. 



(Joseph Kohn is a systems engineer for 
TR W in San Bernardino, Calif. He is 
currently president of the Citrus Color 
Computer Club. His interests are graph- 
ics and utilities.) 



Pressing the fire button will enlarge this 
section to a full screen. 

The resulting blowup can be exam- 
ined or copied to the source screen, 
where it can be saved to tape or disk, or 
enlarged again. This provides for inter- 
facing BLOWUP 'to other graphics pro- 
grams such as a screen printer or Graph- 
icom, and allows repeated enlargements 
which can create some unusual effects. 

The BLOWUP program is shown in 
Listing 1 . The program is menu-oriented 
and contains the necessary instructions. 
The only additional note is that when 
viewing a graphics screen, pressing any 
key will return to the menu. Several safe- 
guards are provided so that the user has 
the option of aborting an operation and 
returning to the menu. 

BLOWUP uses all eight graphics 
pages. The source screen resides on 
pages one to five. The blowup is gener- 
ated on pages five to eight. By using 
eight pages, the source screen is pre- 
served and can be examined at any time. 
The source screen wi 1 1 only be destroyed 



by the COPY BLOWUP command, 
which copies the blowup screen to the 
source screen. The PCLEAR 8 state- 
ment in Line 40 sets up the graphics 
pages. If the program does not run as 
written, enter PCLEAR 8 before load- 
ing and running BLOWUP. 

The BASIC program is quite straight- 
forward, and requires little explanation, 
except for the graphics cursor routine 
and embedded machine language (ML) 
subroutine. The program structure, by 
lines, is: 

40-50 • Initialize 

60-80 ML subroutine 

90-120 Main menu 

130-180 Load source 

190-240 Save source 

250-260 Blowup instructions 

270-340 Graphics cursor 

350-360 Call to ML subroutine 

370 See source 

380 See blowup 

390-400 Copy blowup 

410-420 Utilities 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 57 



The program adapts automatically to 
use of disk or tape for determining 
where the graphics reside. Remember 
that page one starts at $600 without disk 
and $E00 with disk. This information is 
conveniently stored at $BA, which is the 
most significant byte (MSB) of the start 
of the page selected by the PMODE 
command. 

The sequence of generating the gra- 
phics cursor begins by establishing the 
start address of page one. This is accom- 
plished by SB in Line 270. The joystick 
inputs are weighted and then added to 
SB. The address AD is the location of 
the upper left (UL) cursor byte. This 
address is offset by 3055 bytes for the 
lower right (LR) cursor byte. 

To provide a non-destructive cursor 
that is visible regardless of screen con- 
tent, the value in the U L and LR bytes is 
first PEEKed. The same bytes are 
POKEd with their numerical comple- 
ment (Line 300). The original values are 



finally restored in Line 320. 

The cycle of reading the joysticks and 
blinking the cursor is repeated if neither 
the fire button (Line 340) or space bar 
(Line 330) are pressed. When the fire 
button is pressed, the program branches 
to Line 350 where the USR call is made 
to the ML subroutine. 

This subroutine is actually contained 
in Line 60 as the string MLS. Each pair 
of characters are a byte of M L code. The 
assembly listing is provided in Listing 2 
for illustration. The M L code is POKEd 
into memory by Line 70. Line 80 is pro- 
vided as a check on typing skills. If ML$ 
is not entered correctly, the program 
will end before the main menu appears. 

The ML subroutine begins by receiv- 
ing and processing the address of the 
UL cursor byte, AD, via the USR call 
and BASIC'S INTCNV subroutine. The 
X register (Line 1 1 0) is used as a pointer 
to the source screen byte being pro- 
cessed. The start and end of graphics 



pages five and eight are established by 
Lines 1 30 through 1 70. The Y register is 
used to point to the destination, or 
blowup, bytes being generated. 

Three loops are used. LOOP1 for 
eight bits of each source byte, LOOP2 
for 1 6 horizontal bytes of source screen, 
and LOOP3 for vertical increments until 
the end of page eight is reached. Note 
that each source byte generates two ver- 
tical and two horizontal destination 
bytes. 

The source screen is preserved by 
using the ROL ,X instruction to exam- 
ine each source bit. If a bit is k on\ the 
weight corresponding to that bit is se- 
lected from the TABLE values. This 
value is then ORed with the destination 
bytes. After completing LOOP1, a final 
ROL brings the source byte back to its 
original state. 

It is hoped that you find this program 
a welcome addition to your graphics 
repertoire. 



Listing 1: 

10 * BLOWUP 

20 * JOSEPH KQHN 

30 '22MAR84 

40 PCLEAR8:GOTO50 

50 CLE AR50 , &H4FFF : DEFUSR0=&H5000 
60 ML*= " BDB3ED 1 F0 1 96BA5F 1 F028B 1 8 
ED8C4786 1 0A78C44338C2D6984240BEC 
C4 AAA4EA2 1 EDA4EDA8203342ECC426EB 
6984300 131 226 A8C232EDD3 1 A8203088 
101 0AC8C 1 525CC39C00030000C000300 
00C00030000C00030000 " 
70 FORI=0TO(LEN(ML*)/2)-l:POKE&H 
5000+1 , V AL < fl &H n +M I D* (ML*, < 1*2) +1 
,2)): NEXT 

80 CK=0:FORI=*cH5000 TO ScH5055:CK 
=CK+PEEK ( I ) : NEXT: IFCK< >7973THEN 
END 

90 X*(0)="LOAD SOURCE": X*(1)="SA 

VE SOURCE" :X* (2)=" BLOWUP SOURCE" 

:X*(3)="SEE SOURCE" :X*<4)="SEE B 

LOWUP" : X* (5) ="CQPY BLOWUP" 

1 00 X «■ 11 BLOWUP " : QOSUB420 : FOR I *0T 

05:PRINTI+1". "X*(I ) INEXT 

110 PR I NTS480 , " CHO I CE? " 5 : G0SUB4 1 

0:K»VAL<K*>:IFK<1 OR K>6 THEN110 

120 ON K GOTO 130,190,250,370,38 

0,390 

130 X*=X*(0) :GOSUB420 

140 INPUT"dISK OR t APE" 5 I* 

150 LINE INPUT "FILE NAME? ";FI* 

1 60 I NPUT " READY " ; K* : I FK*= " N " THEN 

1 00ELSEPMODE4 , 1 : PCLS: SCREEN 1 , 0 

170 IFI*="D"THEN LOADM FI* ELSE 

CLOADM FI* 

180 GOTO 100 

190 X*=X*(1) :GOSUB420 



200 INPUT"dISK OR tAPE"$I* 

210 L I NE I NPUT " F I LE NAME? ";FI* 

220 I NPUT " READY " ; K* : I FK*= " N " THEN 

1 00ELSEPMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 0 

230 IFI*«"D"THEN SAVEM FI*,SB,SB 

+6144, SB ELSE CSAVEM FI*«SB,SB+6 

144, SB 

240 GOTO 100 

250 X*=X*(2) :GOSUB420 

260 PRINT"USE THE RIGHT JOYSTICK 

TO SELECT THE SOURCE SECT 

ION. ": PRINT: PRINT"PRESS THE FIRE 

BUTTON TO BLOWUP. "5 : PRINT: PRINT 
"USE THE space bar TO ABORT.": PR 
INT 

270 I NPUT " READY " ; K* : I FK«= " N " THEN 
1 00ELSEPMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 0: SB«PEE 
K(&HBA>*256 

280 JX=JOYSTK(0) : JY=JQYSTK(1) 
290 AD*SB+INT(JX/3.937)+32*INT(l 
.52381*JY) 

300 V 1 =PEEK (AD) : POKE AD , 255- V 1 : V2 
=PEEK ( AD+3055) : POKEAD+3055, 255- V 
2 

310 FB=PEEK (65280) 

320 POKE AD , V 1 : POKE AD+3055 , V2 

330 IFINKEY*=" "THEN 100 

340 IF FB=127 OR FB=255 THEN280 

350 PM0DE4 , 5 : PCLS0 : SCREEN 1,0: A=U 

SR0(AD) 

360 GOSUB410: GOTO 100 

370 PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1,0: G0SUB4 1 0 : 

GOTO 100 

380 PMODE4,5:SCREEN1,0:GOSUB410: 
GOTO 100 

390 X**X* (5) : GOSUB420: INPUT" ARE 
YOU SURE " ; K* : I FK*« " N " THEN 1 00 



58 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



400 PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1.0: FOR I =5T0S 


501B EC 


C4 


00230 


LDD ,U 


GET WEIGHT 


:PCOPY I 


to i-4:NEXT:sosuB4i0:eo 


501D AA 


A4 


00240 


ORA ,Y 




TO 100 




501F EA 
5021 ED 


21 
A4 


00250 
00260 


ORB 1,1 
STD ,Y 


PUT NEW VALUE IN DEST. 


410 K*« I NKEY* : I FK*= " " THEN4 1 0ELSE 


5023 ED 


A8 20 


00270 


STD 32, Y 


RETURN 




5026 33 


42 


00280 NOT1 


LEAU 2,U 


GET NEXT HEIGHT 


420 cls:x 


=LEN < X* > : Y* I NT ( < 32-X > /2 


5028 EC 


C4 


00290 


LDD ,U 




> : PRINTSTRING* (Y, "* M > X*STRINB* (3 


502A 26 


EB 


00300 


BNE LOOP1 


GO AT END 


2-Y-X, "* M 


) : RETURN 


502C 69 


84 


00310 


ROL ,1 






502E 30 


01 


00320 


LEAK 1,1 


GET NEXT SOURCE BYTE 


Listing 2: 




5030 31 


22 


00330 


LEAY 2,Y 


GET NEXT DEST. BYTE 


00010 ftBLOttUP 


5032 6A 


8C 23 


00340 


DEC <COUNT,PCR 






00020 *JQ9EPH KOHN 


5035 2E 


DD 


00350 


B6T L00P2 






00030 »23HAR84 


5037 31 


A8 20 


00360 


LEAY 32, Y 


SKIP DEST. RON 




00040 ft 


503A 30 


88 10 


00370 


LEAK 16,11 


SKIP UNUSED BYTES 




00050 ftEKTRYj 


503D 10AC 8C 15 


00380 


CHPY <ENDBYT,PCR 




00060 ft PASS SOURCE START BYTE WITH USR 


5041 25 


CC 


00390 


BLO LOOP3 


60 IF NOT AT END 




00070 » PflODE4,5 SELECTED 


5043 39 




00400 


RTS 




50M 


00080 DR6 $5000 






00410 ft 








00090 t 


5044 


C000 


00420 TABLE 


FDB 49152 


1 6384+32768 


5010 BD B3ED 


00100 START JSR IB3ED 1NTCNV 


5046 


3000 


00430 


FDB 12288 


4096*8192 


5003 IF 01 


00110 TFR D,X X=START BYTE 


5048 


0C00 


00440 


FDB 3072 


1024*2048 




00120 ft6ET START OF PAGE 5 AND END OF PAGE 8 


504A 


0300 


00450 


FDB 768 


256*512 


5005 96 BA 


00130 LDA $BA 


504C 


00C0 


00460 


FDB 192 


64+128 


5007 5F 


00140 CLRB 


504E 


0030 


00470 


FDB 48 


16*32 


5008 IF 02 


00150 TFR D,Y Y S START OF PAGE 5 


5050 


000C 


00480 


FDB 12 


4*8 


500A 8B 18 


00160 ADDA #$28 


5052 


0003 


00490 


FDB 3 


1*2 


500C ED BC 47 


00170 STD <ENDBYT,PCR 


5054 


0000 


00500 


FDB 0 




500F 86 10 


00180 L00P3 LDA 116 






00510 ft 






5011 A7 8C 44 


00190 STA < COUNT ? PCR 


5056 




00520 ENDBYT 


RUB 2 




5014 33 8C 2D 


00200 L00P2 LEAU <TABLE,PCR START OF NEI6HT TABLE 


5058 




00530 COUNT 


m i 




5017 69 84 


00210 LOOP1 ROL ,1 GET SOURCE BIT 




0000 


00540 


END 




5019 24 0B 


00220 BCC N0T1 GO IF 0 


00000 TOTAL ERRORS 









It's time we put our chips on the table 

. . . and showed you our best deals on computer hardware. 



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Call for prices and availability of your favorite software and hardware. All advertised items subject to availability. Prices do not include shipping and handling. All of the above units 
are covered by our 120 day carry-in warranty. 

TRS-80 Trademark Tandy Corporation. Prices subject to change without notice. Write for our FREE newsletter. 

TOLL FREE TENNESSEE 1-800-545-2502 I TOLL FREE 1 -800-251-5008 



DEIKER 

mm 



w 



DELKER ELECTRONICS, INC. 
P.O. Box 897 
Dept. R 

408C Nissan Blvd. 
Smyrna, TN 37167 



800-251-5008 
800-251-2502 (TENNESSEE) 
615-459-2636 (TENNESSEE) 
615-254-0088 (NASHVILLE) 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 59 



BASIC TRAINING 



ECB I 



A Problem Solver's 
Day At The Races 



Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Thus far, we have been concentrat- 
ing on the unique color capabil- 
ities of the Color Computer. It 
was fun creating and experimenting. 
Since there are some beginners who are 
more interested in the mathemathical 
problem-solving ability of the CoCo, 
why not give them their day in the sun? 

Ready? A little background! While 
showing an English visitor, Jim Saxby, 
Bognor Regis, Sussex, the myriad fea- 
tures of the CoCo, he interrupted me 

with, "But can it ?" Hasn't that 

happened when you were showing off 
some impressive programs to friends or 
relatives? Little do they know that it 
takes more than the wave of the hand to 
get that oP blank screen to display what- 
ever they fancy to view. 

The problem posed by our English 
friend had to do with betting a sum on a 
horse in three consecutive races. All 
three races had to be won to get paid off. 

If you bet a given number of dollars 
on a race at the going odds and won, 
you took the winnings and original sum 
wagered and placed the total on the next 
race at the going odds. Then, assuming 

(Joseph Kolar is a free-lance writer and 
programmer dedicated to proselytizing 
for computers in general, and the CoCo 
specifically.) 



you won, you took the winnings and the 
amount of the second bet and wagered 
the total on the third race. The question 
was, if you won and went to the cashier 
to collect your winnings, how much 
money should the cashier give you? The 
Englishman wanted a program to tell 
him the amount of money the cashier 
should fork over. 

Gambling is not my game. I don't 
know if that type of bet is unique to 
England or if we have something similar 
on this side of the Atlantic. 

Give it your best shot! But, how to 
proceed? 

Define the problem on paper with a 
simple example that will give the correct 
answer. This worked-out example can 
then be a reference that can be used to 
check out your problem-solving tech- 
niques. If you work up an algorithm 
(method used to solve the problem), and 
you get the correct answer when you 
substituted the figures in your reference 
(paper) solution, then you are on the 
right track. One right track only, be- 
cause one correct solution may hide a 
fault that will cause incorrect solutions 
for other entered data. 

This implies and demands that you 
should work out one or two additional 
examples on paper, using different fig- 
ures to give your algorithm the acid 



test. If you have three correct reference 
solutions, you can be fairly certain, if 
your program arrives at the same 
answers, that you have succeeded. 

Let us take the problem and make a 
simple wager. 

1) $1 is bet at 2 to 1 odds. You win! 

2) You get $2 plus $1. (Winning plus 
the amount of the wager.) 

3) You place the total, $3, on the next 
race at 3 to 1 odds. You win! 

4) You get back $9 plus $3. (Winnings 
plus the amount of the wager.) 

5) You place the total, $12, on the 
next race at 4 to 1 odds. You win! 

6) You collect $48 plus $ 12. Go to the 
cashier and pick up $60. 



Compressed, you have: 



Bet 

$ 1 
$ 3 
$12 



Odds 

2:1 
3:1 
4:1 



Total Received 

$ 2+$ 1=$ 3 
$ 9+$ 3=$ 12 
$48+$12=$60 



The object is to create a program that 
would take the above data and perform 
the required calculations to produce the 
final sum. 

First, assign variables to the three 
elements of the problem. Let N = the 
amount of the bet. Let X = the higher 
number of the odds, (first number). Let 



60 



THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Y = the lower number of the odds, 
(second number). 

At this point, you are drooling with 
anticipation to tackle the problem. Read 
no further and give it a go. 

As you well know, there is more than 
one way to skin this cat. 

After you have created your pro- 
gram, look over the three listings. Three 
ways are given to approach the prob- 
lem. The first one suggested the second 
and the second suggested the third. 

Here is one way to approach the 
problem. After making a set of refer- 
ence data and verifying the answers, you 
have control information. As you add 
program lines to your algorithm, you 
may check your progress by running a 
trial example using the control data. 
Assign needed variables as required. 

Look at listing TRIPLE. Input the 
known variables. They could be in any 
order, (Lines 10-30). Determine the 
formula that will give you the desired 
result, (Line 40). Do it on a piece of 
scratch paper. You want to get an 
answer of '3' using the three variables, 
4 N\ 4 X\ and fc Y\ That result will be 
called 4 Z\ You might have to fool 
around awhile until you get the right 
answer, 4 3\ Keep in mind that you may 
get the right answer, but your formula is 
incorrect. Do you see why we have two 
or more sets of control information? 
Next, print the total, *Z\ (Line 50). 

Playing it safe, Line 60 was added to 
make sure the odds were reset to zero. 

To continue; your routine, though 
not necessarily correct, is complete. 
Input the new information. Note that 
the amount now bet is fc Z\ Work out a 
formula so that you will have the same 
result in the second routine as the 
second routine of your control data. 
Print your answer, k A\ on the screen. 
Your second routine is complete. Re- 
peat the same train of thought for your 
final routine. Check by running your 
control information. To be safe, make 
sure you check at least two d ifferent sets 
of control data. 

If you perform all these seemingly 
tedious tasks, you will be certain that 
you have created a good, working pro- 
gram. It will save a lot of debugging 
time. 

Note: Line 60 is not repeated after 
Line 1 1 0. Why Line 60 in the first place? 
Having finished the first routine and not 
being sure where you are headed, it 
doesn't do any harm to clear to *0\ vari- 
ables that you will repeat with different 
data. "But," you remark, "they weren't 



used after the first routine?"' Right! We 
found that we didn't need to reset the 
variables in the first place. 

Two things worth mentioning about 
this anomaly: 1) You can always delete 
it. 2) You need not condemn yourself 
for including superfluous lines in your 
program. If it doesn't affect the results, 
no harm is done. In this case, it shows 
you were thinking and keeping all bases 
covered. As you become more expe- 
rienced, you would edit this line out. It 
is quite harmless. By the way, why was it 
unnecessary in our example? 

PRINT M EM will give you a reading 
of available memory during the course 
of developing a program. PRINT Xm\\ 
give you the current status of variable 
4 X' under the same conditions. You 
might PRINT X,Y> (without a line 
number) and get the answer, 0,0, prov- 



ing Line 60 to be unnecessary. 

Another test, if you suspect you have 
a superfluous line or routine in your 
program: LIST and insert 'in front of 
the suspect line/ lines and RUN. This 
can be very helpful. 

If you run TRIPLE until after the 
second race result, BREAK and PRINT 
X;Y;N, why do you get 1,3,1 instead of 
I J J which you know from your data to 
be the correct answer? 

PRINT X where 'A" is a variable you 
want to check, is a valuable tool in a 
long program to keep track of the value 
of 'A^at a given program line. It comes 
in handy when you are debugging, as- 
suming you know what the variable 
should be. 

Look at listing TRIPLEA, a variant 
of TRIPLE. All the odds were listed 
first. Y,X for the first race. Y1,X1 for 
the next race and Y2,X2 for the last 
race. Why did you have to define the 
variables differently in this program? 
INPUT a\\ the odds first. Then INPUT 
the wager. Modifying the algorithm in 



TRIPLE, you get the intermediate and 
final results. 

Check it against your prepared con- 
trol information. 

The program, TRIPLEA suggested 
the last variant, TRIPLES. The thought 
was to enter all the variables, eliminate 
the intermediate sums and just produce 
the only sum that really matters; the 
final sum. 

This meant that you had to get a new 
formula. The almost incomprehensible 
but correct formula, listed in Line 80 of 
TRIPLEB, is not the only possible form 
the formula could take. In fact, you may 
care to get a more meaningful formula. 
Hint: Look over the other two listings 
and see what ideas you get. Line 80 is 
difficult to decipher, but if you want to 
puzzle it out, substitute the number 
values of the variables. 



Again and again, you have proven 
that there is more than one way to do 
anything on the CoCo. Figure out a 
better formula for TRIPLEB and prove 
it to yourself. 

1 hope you enjoyed working out the 
problem presented by our English cous- 
in, Jim Saxby. It may have practical 
value for him but we profited by using it 
as a vehicle to learn a bit more about 
programming. 

Beginning with this month's "graphics 
issue," an added feature to "Taking 
BASIC Training" will be a short pro- 
gram listing, without comment, that 
will create an interesting graphic display. 

This is a bonus for interested begin- 
ners and a reward for all the faithful 
readers of this column. 

There will be a different, unpublished, 
original graphic every month to give the 
beginner some practice in keying in 
short listings and provide an interesting 
display. The listings will appear at the 
end of the regular article. 



"If you perform all these seemingly tedious 
tasks, you will be certain that you have created a 
good, working program. It will save a lot of 
debugging time." 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 61 



* COLOR COMPUTER WORD PROCESSOR * 



★ COLOR COMPUTER DICTIONARY ★ 



EliteWord 

Also Available On OS-9 



Elite* Spel 



THE SECOND GENERATION WORD PROCESSOR IS HERE! 
ELITE^WORD Is a high performance, all machine language, 
Full Screen Editor which offers an ease-of-use that is simply 
incredible. ELITE*WORD has many powerful features not 
found in other word processors for the Color Computer. 
ELITE •WORD also offers a printed output flexibility that can 
handle your sophisticated home and business applications. 

MAJOR features Include: 

Very easy to use • Top screen line reserved for HELP dis- 
play/Command prompts • Excellent for BOTH program 
editing and word processing • TWO text entry modes; 
Insert or Exchange • Auto Key-Repeat • Smooth display 
scroll for easier proof reading • True Upper/Lower case 
display with lower case descenders • Hi-Res text "View" 
mode displays text exactly as it will be printed; including 
text Justification, Auto Line Centering, dynamic Margin 
changes, Top and Bottom Margins, Page Numbering, and 
Page Breaks • Include feature (disk only) permits In- 
cluding several file names within one output document; 
total document will have sequential page numbering if 
desired • Fast Disk I/O; no loading of overlay files to 
slow down operation • Variable Text (Mail Merge) 
capability for Form Letter generation 

32K Extended Basic Required for ROM routine calls • Variable TAB 
stops • User definable Headers and Footers • Smooth cursor move- 
ment over text; in any direction (including vertical) • Page Forward 
or Backward through text • Jump to beginning or end of text • Auto- 
matic text centering • Automatic text Word-Wrap if desired • True 
Block text Move, Delete, or Copy • Delete entire screen line • Back- 
space and Delete Character • Delete character above cursor • Find 
a string of characters • Global Replace character string • Two Hi- 
Res screen displays; 32 x 1 9 for text entry/editing, 64 x 1 9 for for- 
matted text viewing • Continuous Memory display • Over 22K file 
size in 64K machines • Easy generation of ASCII files • Save/Load 
text files (in ASCII if desired) • Program remembers last File Name 
loaded or saved, and will write to it by default if desired • All I/O 
errors trapped and recoverable • Disk commands for Change Drive, 
Directory and Free Space • Print Format features allow user to 
specify Left Margin, Line Length, Line Spacing, Top and Bottom 
Margin, Duplicate Copies, Right-Side text Justification, Page Pause, 
Page Numbering, and more • Dynamically change any print Format 
features within text • Imbed Hex codes and printer Font changes 
within text. 

Additional OS-9 version features: 

Edit two files simultaneously • Save or Print only a portion of the text 
buffer • Edit files larger than memory (uses disk as buffer) • Block 
Copy from one file to another • Execute any OS-9 command from 
Editor 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola. 

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OS-9 Disk $79.95 

OS 9 & RS Disk $109.95 



This program cannot spell AARDVARK or SALUBRIOUS or 
VICHYSSOISE, but it is very easy to use and it's FASTI All 
potentially misspelled words are identified in a single pass 
through it's 24,000 word dictionary. ELITE*SPEL is fully 
compatible with ELITE^WORD and supplements the best 
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often use the word AARDVARK, ELITE^SPEL can learn it and 
up to 4,000 other words that are in your common vocabu- 
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is included as an integral part of the program, not as sepa- 
rate programs. 

MAJOR features include: 

Easy to use, menu commands • Single pass dictionary 
search • 1,000 word memory dictionary of common 
words • 20,000 word dictionary included • Room for 
4,000 of your own words • List suspect words on screen 
or printer • List all words used with number of occur- 
rences • Learn individual words that were correct in file • 
Learn entire files of words • Delete words from diction- 
ary • Apply corrections to file in batch or interactive 
modes • Works in single or multiple drive systems • All 
machine language for maximum speed • 32K disk 
required. 



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All software features: 

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* Cross-file Compatability 

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* Comprehensive Manual 

* Nationwide User-group Support 

* Handsome Vinyl Binder 

* Revision Upgrade Program 



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"Elito+Word la a terrific word processor with an impressive list 
of features, yet it's easy to learn and use " 

-Stuart Hawkinson, HOT COCO 

"I was more than satisfied with Elite*Word . . . After the review, 
I would not hesitate to compare it with the two best selling 
word processors And my comparison places it at the top of 
the Nat" 

-A. Buddy Hogan. RAINBOW 



* COLOR COMPUTER DATA BASE MANAGER . * 



Elite-File 



COLOR COMPUTER WORKSHEET * 



THIS IS IT! ELI TE* FILE is the Data Base Manager thai Color 
Computer users have been waiting for. ELITE+FILE is for 
everyone who needs to store and retrieve information. 
EL^TE^FILE is a full-featured relational Data Base Manager 
with all the editing and report formatting features that are 
typically found on much larger computer systems. Compare 
record structure flexibility, total record capacity, information 
processing ability, speed of program response, printed out- 
put flexibility, and you'll agree that ELITE*FILE may very well 
be the most powerful/useful program ever written for the 
Color Computer. 

MAJOR features Include: 

All machine language for speed • Flexible, user defined, 
data record structures • Up to 255 characters per record 
field • Up to 255 fields per record • Up to 2000 charac- 
ters per record • Up to 4000 records per file • Up to 1 6 
files can be open at the same time for information pro- 
cessing • Edit, Scan, Sort, Select Record Information; all 
done FAST • Output reports to Screen, Printer, or ASCII 
Disk file • Place output data by Field Name, with Custom 
Text anywhere on the printed page • Perform math oper- 
ations (+, *, /) between Field contents • Produce tabu- 
lated reports from multiple record contents • Generate 
column totals across record field contents. 



Compatible with Elite»Calc and Elite»Word files • User friendly 
combination of Menu driven input, and single key commands • Sup- 
ports up to 4 drives • Minimum 32K RAM, Disk required • Nested 
sub-field definitions • Up to 8 fields in Primary Key • Copy record 
definition from file to file • View/Print record definition • Input/Add 
records with easy to use field name format display • Edit records 
with full screen "type over" editor • Copy records to repeat identical 
data • Load Elite^Calc worksheets into random access data files • 
Scan mode for quick data retrieval • Locate any record by field con- 
tents • Select specific groups of records by field content with full 
logic combination capabilities • Sort records in ascending or des- 
cending order by any field, or group of fields • Calculate values from 
combinations of field contents • Output any subset of fields in any 
order for printed reports • User setable print formats; Page Title, 
Top and Bottom Margin, Line Spacing, Page Length, Page Pause, 
Form Feeds and more • Output format also supports TAB, VTAB, CR, 
PAGE, text, HEX printer controls, and more • Join up to four sub-files 
to extend data record for printing • Produced detailed repetitive re- 
ports, for output on preprinted forms, using output formats written on 
Elite»Word • Variable Text Insert feature of Elite«Word is fully sup- 
ported • Refile old record data into NEW record structures • Data, 
Field Definitions, Indices ail stored on a single file • Memory resi- 
dent, no program overlays from disk • Single program performs ail 
features • List disk Directories and "Kill" files without leaving the 
program • Data files also accessible from BASIC programs. 



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EliteCalc 



ELITE*CALC is a powerful, full featured worksheet calcu- 
lator designed especially for the Color Computer. Answer 
"what if" questions, prepare reports, maintain records and 
perform other tasks that, until now, required sophisticated 
business computers. ELITE*CALC is a serious tool for those 
who want to do more than play games. 

MAJOR features include: 

Ease of use • Individual cell formulas • Copy Blocks of 
cells • Full cell-edit capability • Easy 132 column page 
width • Changeable Baud rates • Graph format for bar 
charts * Sort (ascending or descending) • Sample 
worksheets included. 

Single character commands • Help displays • 255 maximum rows • 
255 maximum columns • Available memory always displayed • 
Rapid Entry modes for text and data • Selectable, automatic, cursor 
movement • Insert, Delete, Move entire rows or columns • Replicate 
one cell to fill a row or column with selectable formula adjustment • 
All machine language for speed • Extended BASIC required for ROM 
routine calls • Automatic memory size detection for 1 6K, 32K, or 
64K • > 20K bytes storage available in 32K systems • Math opera- 
tors: + , — , x, /, !,(,)• Relation operators: «,>,<,<=,>«,<>• 
Logic Operations: AND, OR, NOT • Conditional Formula: IF, THEN, 
ELSE • Trig Functions: SIN, COS, TAN, ATN • Log Functions: LOG, 
EXP, SQR • Misc. Functions: INT, FX, ABS, SGN, RND • Range Func- 
tions: SUM, AVERAGE, COUNT, MIN, MAX, LOOKUP • Definable 
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Individual column width settings • Adjustable row height to insert 
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mats set by cell, row, or column • Dollar format, comma grouping, 
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formats • Left and Right cell contents justification • Full page for- 
matting • All formats stored with worksheet on disk (tape) • Save/ 
Load Disk (tape) files in compact memory form • Scan disk di- 
rectories • Output ASCII file for word processor input capability • 
Memory resident code ... no repeated disk calls. 



THE BEST FOR ONLY 



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"E//fe«Ca/c is a great spreadsheet program! This professional 
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Listing 1: 

0 '<TRIPLE> 

1 CLS: PRINT 

10 INPUT" ODDS";Y 

20 INPUT" TO";X 

30 INPUT" AMT. OF BET " ; N 

40 Z=N*Y/X+N 

50 PRINT" TOTAL "Z 

60 Y=0:X-0 

70 INPUT" ODDS";Y 

80 INPUT" TO";X 

90 PRINT" AMT. BET";Z 

100 A«Z*Y/X+Z 

110 PRINT" TOTAL "A 

120 INPUT" ODDS";Y 

130 INPUT" TO"?X 

140 PRINT" AMT. BET "A 

150 B=A*Y/X+A 

160 PRINT" TOTAL "B 

Listing 2 

0 " <TRIPLEA> 

1 CLS: PRINT 

10 INPUT "FIRST RACE ODDS N |Y 
20 INPUT"TO";X 

30 INPUT "SECOND RACE 0DDS";Y1 
40 INPUT "TO"; XI 
50 INPUT "THIRD RACE 0DDS";Y2 
60 INPUT"T0";X2 

70 PRINT: INPUT" AMOUNT OF BET";N 
80 A=N*Y/X+N 

90 PRINT "TOTAL AFTER 1ST RACE"} 
A 

100 B=A*Y1/X1+A 

110 PR I NT "TOTAL AFTER 2ND RACE"; 
B 

120 C=B*Y2/X2+B 

130 PRINT "FINAL TOTAL" ;C 

Listing 3: 

0 *<TRIPLEB> 

1 CLS: PRINT 

10 INPUT "FIRST RACE ODDS";Y 
20 INPUT"TO";X 

30 INPUT "SECOND RACE 0DDS";Y1 
40 INPUT "TO" J XI 
50 INPUT "THIRD RACE 0DDS";Y2 
60 INPUT"TO";X2 

70 PRINT: INPUT" AMOUNT OF BET" ;N 
80 PR I NT "FINAL TOTAL-"; <( N*Y/X 
+N)*<Y1/X1)+(N*Y/X+N) )*<Y2/X2)+( 
<N*Y/X+N)»(Y1/X1)+<N*Y/X+N) ) 

Listing 4: (Bonus) 

0 ' STROBEA 

10 ' <C) 1984, J. KOLAR 

30 PM0DE3:PCLS:PM0DE4 

40 A=90:B=86:R=76 



64 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



50 DIM S<7),T<7) 

60 CIRCLE <8, 8) ,8, 1 : CIRCLE <7, 7) , 8 

6 1 DRAM " BM8 , 8NL3NR3NU3ND3NE3NF3N 
B3H3" 

70 BET <0, 0) — < 16, 16) ,S,G 

72 CIRCLE < 38, 8) ,6, 1 : PAINT (40, 8) , 

1,1 

73 QET<30,0)-<46,16),T,B 
80 PCLS : SCREEN 1, 1 

90 FOR Q-.2 TO .05 STEP -2 
100 F0RZ-1.5T04.5 STEPQ:C-Z 
110 C=45+C+R*180 

120 X-INT(A-6+R*COS<C) ) :Y-INT(B- 
8+R*SIN<C) ) 

130 PUT(X+36, Y+10)-(X+52,Y+26) ,S 
,OR 

135 PUT(X+36,Y-»-10)-<X+52,Y+26),T 
, AND: SOUND 100, 1 

140 X»INT(A-6+R*SIN(C)):Y»INT<B- 
8+R*C0S<O) 

150 PUT<X+36,Y+8)-<X+52,Y+23),S, 
OR 

155 PUT<X+36,Y+8)-<X+52,Y+23) ,T, 
AND: SOUND 100,1 
160 NEXT Z,Q 

1 70 PLAY " V20O3L8CO2AF A03L 1 6CAFAA 
FACV 1 5L8FAAFV 1 0L4C " : BOTO90 ^ 



Ab< 



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Forget Those Point Spread Blues! 

With Pigskin Predictions! 

Pigskin Predictions, the best-selling NFL Handicapper 
from Rainbow Connection Software, is now part of our 
library. And we're absolutely delighted! Why wrestle 
with those Sunday point spreads? Let your Color Com- 
puter do the work for you! And what a job it does: 

• Menu-driven selection of schedules, ratings, divi- 
sion races, predictions or results by team or week. 
Seven different reports to screen or printer! 

• Easy onece-a-week entry of scores — no complex, 
meaningless stats! 

• Predicts scores of all games for remainder of sea- 
son each week! 

• Calculates projected won-tost records for all 
weeks. 

• Maintains home field advantage and power ratings 
for all teams! 

• 1984 schedule data file included free. Or enter the 
schdule yourself. 

• 32K enhanced version features dazzling Rainbow 
Writer screen display! Seeing is believing. 16K 
abridged version included too. 

If you're a football fan, you'll be absolutely amazed 
at the power of this program. 16/32K Extended Basic 
required. Only $35.95 on tape or disk. 1984 data tape or 
disk for previous owners only $13.95. 

t *d*r*l Hill Softiuor* 88S William SI, Baltimore, Md. 21830 301-685-6254 VISA/MC Welcome 




October 1984 THE RAINBOW 65 



RN OF THE SCREW 



The Modem To 
Printer Connection 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Of all my projects, the short and 
fast ones seem to be the most 
popular. The ones that seem to 
better the computer and help the user on 
his quest for good computing are the 
ones that people call me to thank me 
for. 1 also get ideas from these people. 
For instance, the "Dual Cassette" pro- 
ject was an idea I got from a reader. 
When I presented this, 1 had forgotten 
his name, and wanted him to call me. 
Well, he did; his name is Lennie James. 
Thank you, Lennie, for the idea. The 
basis of this month's article actually 
came from several people. It is based on 
the RS-232 port of the Color Computer. 
The original question was this: Is there a 
way to connect a printer and a modem 
together so that everything that comes 
from the modem can also go to the print- 
er at the same time? The answer is "yes. * 
There are many ways of doing this. 
Some are very easy and fast, others 
require a bit more work and money. Til 
tell you the theory on how to do it and 
let you decide on what method to use. 
What is RS-232 anyway? The full 

(Tony DiStefano is well known as an 
early specialist in> Color Computer 
hardware projects. He is one of the 
acknowledged experts on the "insides" 
ofCoCo.) 



name for this is E1A RS-232C. E1A 
stands for Electronic Industries Associa- 
tion. The E1A RS-232C standard de- 
fines the interfacing between data term- 
inal equipment and data communica- 
tions equipment employing serial binary 
data interchange. Electrical signal and 
mechanical aspects of the interface are 
well specified. The complete RS-232C 
interface consists of 25 data lines. This 
would seem to be enough signals for a 
complex parallel communication line, 
but many of the 25 lines are very special- 
ized and a few are undefined. Most 
computer terminals only require from 
three to five of these lines to be opera- 
tional. Table 1 briefly describes all 25 of 
the defined lines. 





Table 1 


PIN 


DESCRIPTION 


1 


Protective Ground 


2 


Transmitted Data 


3 


Received Data 


4 


Request to Send 


5 


Clear to Send 


6 


Data Set Ready 


7 


Signal Ground 


8 


Received Line Signal 




Detector 


9 


Unassigned 


10 


Unassigned 


11 


Unassigned 



12 


Sec. Rec'd Line Sig. 




Detector 


13 


Sec. Clear to Send 


14 


Sec. Transmitted Data 


15 


Transmission Signal 




Element Timing 


16 


Sec. Received Data 


17 


Receiver Signal 




Element Timing 


18 


Unassigned 


19 


Sec. Request to Send 


20 


Data Terminal Ready 


21 


Signal Quality 




Detector 


22 


Ring Indicator 


23 


Data Signal Rate 




Selector 


24 


Transmit Signal 




Element Timing 


25 


Unassigned 




Table 2 


PIN 


DESCRIPTION 


1 


CD — Status Input 




Line 


2 


RS2321N — Serial 




Data Input 


3 


GROUND — Zero 




Voltage Reference 


4 


RS2320UT — Serial 




Data Out 



66 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



I 

federal Hill Software i 

FINE PRODUCTS FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER, DRAGON AND MC 10 I 



Mon CoCo Parle Francais! 
Mi Coco Habla Espanol! 

These delightful 16K Extended Basic pro- 
grams will teach your youngsters a basic 
French or Spanish vocabulary. Each lan- 
guage package contains two programs 
with a total of 1,000 words in a colorful 
game format that teaches children to think as well 
as memorize. They'll have great fun as they watch 
the letters hop across the screen and slip into 
place. Perfect for home or classroom. We include 
a list of the vocabulary words for study guides or 
lesson plans. Spanish or trench, only $24.95 on 
tape, $27 95 on disk. Both languages only 
$39.95, tape or disk. 



The Handicapper 



Use the power of your computer to improve your 
performance at the track! Separate programs for 
harness and thoroughbred horses make it a snap 
to rank the horses in each race! Using information 
readily available from the thoroughbred Racing 
Form or harness track program, you can handicap 
a race in five minutes and a whole card in less 
than an hour! We even provide diagrams showing 
where to get the information you need. 

Factors include speed, class, post position, past 
performance, jockey or driver's record, weight, 
parked out signs, beaten favorite and other 
attributes. Complete instructions and betting 
guide. Versions for all Color Computers, MC-10's 
and Model 100's. State computer type and 
memory when ordering. Harness or thoroughbred, 
$27.95 each, tape or disk. 

NEW GREYHOUND HANDICAPPER! Now use 
your Color Computer for greyhounds, too! This fine 
handicapping program, written by a successful 
greyhound trainer, does it all. Using speed, 
breaking ability, favorite box, kennel performance, 
and other factors, it ranks the dogs in each race 
and recommends quinnella, trifecta and exacta 
bets. For Color Computer only, $27.95 tape or 
disk. 

SPECIAL! Any two handicappers, only $39.95. 
All three only $54.95. 




Tax Relief! 



Were your taxes a hassle this year? Then 
you need Coco- Accountant II. This 32/64K 
home and small business accounting pro- 
gram is everything you need to keep track of 
your finances and make income tax time a 
breeze. Use your canceled checks, credit 
card receipts, payroll and bank stubs. Coco-Ac- 
countant II will list and total expenditures by year, 
month, account and payee or income source. It 
tracks tax deductible expenses and payments 
subjects to sales tax. It even calculates the sales 
tax you paid. 

The program offsets income and expenditures to 
produce net cash flow reports. It prints out a 
spreadsheet showing your year at a glance, 
balances your checkbook and prints a monthly 
reconciliation statement. The 32K version handles 
450 entries in RAM The 32 K disk version stores 
500, while the 64K tape and disk versions store 
an amazing 900 entries. State memory size when 
ordering. Only $27.95, tape or disk. 




Play Blackjaq! 



This lightning fast, full casino Black- 
jack simulation will boggle your 
mind! Up to 5 players and 9 decks. 
The computer deals and plays vacant hands by 
card-counting rules! Blackjaq keeps track of win- 
nings and losings, displays two card-counting 
alogrithms and card distribution, and can even 
print out the results of each hand. Requires 16K 
EXT. Only $27.95, tape or disk. 

Use All 64K! 

Did you feel gypped when you found out your 
64K computer had only 32K of memory in BASIC? 
We sure did. So we invented HID N RAM, the 
most powerful 64K programming tool on the 
market. With HID 'N RAM you can access that 
hidden 32K of memory from a BASIC program and 
use it to store and sort your data. Write a 28K 
program and still have more than 30K left to store 
numbers, names, addresses or other data. It even 
has a machine language sort routine! The package 
includes complete instructions and a demonstra- 
tion program- -a mailing list that holds 450 names 
and addresses IN RAM! Only $27.95, tape or disk. 



Federal Hill Software 

FINE PRODUCTS FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER, DRAGON AND MC 10 



825 William St. Baltimore, Md. 21230 301-685-6254 



We accept checks, money orders, Visa and 
Master Card. Add $1.50 for shipping and 
handling of software, $5.00 for disk drives. 
Credit Card orders should include card num- 
ber, exp. date and signature. 




PRICKLY- PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP 100 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



ALL NEW!!! 32K VIKING II — The most popular simulation of all time was Viking!, by Bill Nolan, and now here is the long 
awaited VIKI NG II. This great program, by the origianl author, is twice as long and lots more fun. See if you have what it takes 
to become King or Queen in ancient Norseiand, and along the way, see why VIKING! clubs were formed all over the USA to 
play the first VIKING!. Tape - $24.95 Disk - $29.95 

ADVENTURE IN WONDERLAND — This 32 K machine language adventure was THE most popular program for five 
months. If you don't have it, you have missed the best adventure experience available on your computer. Tape - $24.95 
Disk - $29.95 

COLOR DISK TRIVIA — The summer sensation — a great game for 1 to 4 players, 1 100 challenging questions in 5 
categories, and everything you need to develop your own question disks. A FULL disk - $29.95 Additional question disks are 
available with 1 100 questions each on the Bible, Sports, Entertainment, and Questions for Children. $19.95 each. 

OCKYWOKY — If you like MYSTERIES or board games like CLUE, you will love OCKYWOKY. It is the best mystery 
simulation you will find on the Coco. It's complete with color graphics, sound, suspense, and a beautifully printed book This is 
not just another copy of a board game, it's a REAL computer mystery game, and it's different each time you play. 32 K Tape - 
$24.95 Disk $29.95 



ORAVITOR — A new machine language arcade game for the Coco that needs only 1 6K of RAM , and yet gives you 1 6 levels 
of play, 10 high-res playing screens in color, multiple voice music, and a practice mode. Fly from planet to planet (each one 
different), and see if you can destroy the enemy bases, or challenge the twisting passage to the reactor on the death base. No 
joysticks needed. AWESOME!! Tape - $24.95 Disk - $29.95 

THE COMPLEAT ENCHANTER — A 100% GRAPHICS ADVENTURE with a ton of rooms and lots of options. Can you 
fight your way in and defeat the dungeon lord Asmodeus? Even the fights are in high-res graphics. Needs 32K. Tape $24.95 
Disk - $29.95 

■ONANZA PACK FOR FANTASY GAMERS — Bill Nolan, the author of the Dragon's Byte column, brings you over 1 00 K 
of fantasy gaming programs on a single disk These are not games. They are useful computer programs for anyone who plays 
fantasy games. With instructions. 32K disk only. $29.95 

COLOR KIT — This program has been in our top five for over a year. It is the ultimate programmer's utility, giving you a full 
screen editor, keyclick, 35 new commands, programmable keys,and lots more. There are other programmer's utilities on the 
market, but all are sad imitations of the original COLORKIT. You know what they say — "Accept no substitutes." Tape $34.95 
Disk $39.95 

STATISTICS - STATISTICS - STATISTICS - STATISITCS - STATISTICS - STATISTICS - STATISTICS 
UZPAC — If you have a need to do statistical analysis, this is the program you have been waiting for. The only statistics 
package that comes close needs $3,000 worth of computer to run, costs $1995 for the software, and this one is better! 
LIZPAC is 850K of programming, filling 7 disks, and comes with a manual that is nearly 200 8V2 by 1 1 pages long in a quality 
binder. It will do anything you need to do in statistics (including graphic display). In its manual, the list of features and 
functions is FIVE PAGES long, while the list of included programs is THREE PAGES long. Call for specific information. The 
package is friendly to use, and requires no specialized computer knowledge. 32K disk - $195.00 

CUSTOMER SERVICE - CUSTOMER SERVICE - CUSTOMER SERVICE - CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Prickly-Pear Software is constantly re-affirming our committment to be the best in the industry in customer service. We trust 
our customers. ALL orders are shipped either the day they are received or the next business day .We trust our customers. We 
never hold your order while we wait for your check to clear. We trust our customers. All of our software can be backed up using 
ordinary standard methods. We trust our customers. We welcome COD, VISA, and Mastercharge orders. We trust our 
customers. If your Prickly-Pear Software ever fails to load, we will replace it FREE — no time limit No matter what happened 
to it. (Even if the dog chewed it!) We trust our customers. 

TO FURTHER OUR AIM OF THE ULTIMATE IN CUSTOMER SERVICE, WE HAVE ADDED AN 800 TELE PHONE NUMBER SO YOU CAN 
CALL US TOLL FREE WITH QUESTIONS, COMPLAINTS, AND (WE HOPE) ORDERS. UNLIKE SOME OTHER 800 NUMBERS, THIS IS 
NOT JUST A MESSAGE SERVICE. CALL TOLL FREE AND TALK TO PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE. 

1-800-223-5369 EXTENSION 256 

Send for our free Catalog of 50 Great Programs for your C0C0 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — all of our 
software can be backed up using standard backup 
procedures. 



Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. 
Canadian dealers should contact Kelly Software 
Distributors, Ltd.. P.O. Box 11932. Edmonton, Al- 
berta T5J-3L1 (403)421-8003 



ts 



Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include 
$1.50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping free 
on $50.00 or larger orders). AZ residents add 7% sales 
tax. Orders shipped within two days. 



Stocked by Quality Dealers, or 

Send Order To PRICKLY- PEAR SOFTWARE 

8532 E. 24th Street 
Tucson, Arizona 85710 
(602) 886-1505 



The Color Computer uses only four 
of these lines. They are the four most 
used in small computers. Table 2 shows 
the pin and description for the Color 
Computer version of the RS-232. Pin 1 
on the computer is equal to pin 5 or pin 
8 on the EIA RS-232C; pin 2 on the 
computer is equal to pin 3; pin 3 on the 
computer is equal to pin 7; and pin 4 on 
the computer is equal to pin 2. 

So much for the theory, now for the 
good part. The secret to this is to con- 
nect the Transmit (Serial Output) of the 
modem to the Receive (Serial Input) of 
the printer. Now there are many ways to 
do this. It all depends on what kind of 
equipment you have. If you are one who 
just unplugs your printer cable to plug 
in your modem, you will have the most 
to do. If you have one of the several 
switchers available for your modem and 
printer, all you need is a switch and a 
piece of wire. 

Step 1 

Follow these instructions if you have 
a switcher. If you don't have an SPST 
switch, RS #275-624 is good and small. 
First you have to take the switcher 
apart. You will need the right screw- 
driver. After the switcher is apart, locate 
the connector that the modem connects 
to. Solder one end of a piece of wire to 
pin 2 of that connector. Solder the other 
end of this wire to one end of a SPST 
switch. Solder one end of another piece 
of wire to the other end of the switch. 
Now locate the connector that the print- 
er connects to. Solder the last end of 
wire to pin 4 of that connector. Mount 
the new switch somewhere in the switch- 
er. Close up the switcher. I'll show you 
how to use it later. 

Step 2 

Follow these instructions if you do 
not have a switcher. Undo the modem 



connector that plugs into the computer. 
Solder a wire to pin 3 in the connector. 
Using a piece of tape, label this wire "G" 
for ground. Solder another wire to pin 2 
of the connector. Reassemble the con- 
nector. Undo the printer connector that 
plugs into the computer. Solder a wire 
to pin 3 in the connector. Label this wire 
"G" for ground. Solder another wire to 
pin 4 of the connector. Reassemble the 
connector. Solder the two wires labeled 
G together. Solder the other two wires 
to each side of an SPST switch. Mount 
the switch any way you want. 

"Is there a way to con- 
necta printer and a modem 
together so that every thing 
that comes from the modem 
can also go to the printer 
at the same time? The 
answer is 'yes.* 9 ' 



In order that the printer prints all that 
comes in on the modem, the printer 
parameters must be set correctly. Most 
modem communications use 300 Baud. 
That means your printer must be set to 
300 Baud. Other parameters, like seven 
or eight bits, even, odd or no parity, 
must also be set right. That will depend 
on what parameters the host computer 
is using. The fact is that all these para- 
meters must be looked into before the 
printer will function right. Another thing 
I should mention is that the printer may 
or may not print what you type. That 
depends if you are working in full or 
half duplex mode. If you are in half 
duplex, you will not see on paper what 
you type; with full duplex you will see it. 
At certain times you may not want to 
see what you type in, so just change to 



half duplex if the host computer will 
alloty you. 

The next thing you must do is set up 
the wiring correctly. If you are using 
Step* I , then you must set the switch you 
installed to the "on" position and the 
switcher to the modem side. When you 
want to use the printer alone, make sure 
that the switch is in the "off position 
and the switcher is set to the printer side. 
If you followed Step 2, then plug in the 
modem connector and turn the switch 
on. When you want to use the printer, 
turn the switch off and plug the printer 
connector on. 

During normal printing, there is hand- 
shaking going on between the printer 
and the computer. That is, before the 
printer sends out a character to the print- 
er, the computer checks if the printer is 
busy. If it is, the computer will wait until 
the printer is ready. In modem com- 
munication, there is no such handshak- 
ing. That means if the printer is busy 
and the modem transmits a character, 
the printer will miss that character and 
not print it. This is especially true when 
the printer is doing a carriage return or 
line feed. If your printer has an input 
buffer and can print faster than about 
30 characters per second (300 Baud) or 
120 characters per second (1200 Baud) 
you will not miss any characters. Anoth- 
er way to avoid missing characters is if 
the host computer can be programmed 
to wait after every carriage return; the 
printer would have time to catch up. 

If you have problems with one of my 
projects or you want to discuss one of 
your own projects, I have reserved Mon- 
day nights for this. I'll be happy to talk 
with you if you call me then. The 
number t6 call is (514) 473-4910. But 
limit the Calls to Monday nights, any 
other time is forbidden fruit. 

Well, that is it for this time, good 
modem printing. ^ 



♦ LOCAL* IN * LOS * ANGELES * LOCAL* IN * LOS * ANGELES * LOCAL* IN * LOS * ANGELES * * 



* SOFTWARE * 

Bertamax, Inc. (Educational) 
Compute rxcare (All) 
Custom Software (No Disc) 
Frank Hogg Labs (OS-9 & Flex) 
Key Color Software (Key 264K) 
Tom Mix (All) 
Petrocci Freelance (All) 
Platinum Software (!) 
Soft law (VIP & Colorquest) 
Speech Systems (All) 
Sugar Software & (Super) 
Moreton Bay (More) 
and Much More. 

We are a discount house-Call. 




* E.D.C. INDUSTRIES * 
Software • Hardware • Support 
Educational • Small Business • Games 

VOICE (213) 258-6593 10 AJf.-101\M. 
BBS (213) 258-0640 24 HRS. 

* GRAND OPENING * 
6130 YORK BOULEVARD 

(Near North Figueroa St.) 

POST OFFICE BOX 417 1 • 
LOS ANGELES, € A. MOM 



★ OCTOBER SPECIALS * 

Amdek Dble. Drives $435.00 

Star Power Type Daisy $409.00 

Amdek Green Monitor $137.00 

J-Cat Modem $111.00 

Gorilla Amber Monitor $101.00 

Bjork Blocks $29.05 

See us for: 

PBH Elephant 

Hayes Gemini 

Interfaces Controllers 

Speech Music 

ALWAYS MORE AND BETTER 
CALL US LAST! 



* LOCAL * IN * LOS * ANGELES * LOCAL * IN * LOS - ANGELES " LOCAL * IN * LOS * ANGELES * 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 69 




SR-71 

SR71 1$ a fast action game in which you are the pilot on a mission to take 
photographs of missile sites in Russia and deliver them to our processing 
laboratory in Japan. So real you wll! feet as if you are In the cockpit on a real spy 
mission. Elude Russian missiles as well as their detection devices. Another 
Tom Mix exclusive. A must for the adventurous. Fantastic graphics, color and 
sound. 32K Ext. Baste TAPE $28.95 DISK $31.95 



SKRAMBLE 

Your mission is to penetrate 
the enemy skrambie system and 
destroy their headquarters. You 
will start with three of our latest 
spacefighters equipped with 
repeating cannon and twin 
bomb launcher, if you succeed 
in evading the elaborate ground 
defenses, you will arrive at the 
Cave where flying becomes 
more difficult, in the cave are 
UFOs, after which you must avoid a hall of meteorites. Very few pilots 
succeed this far, but if you do, then you must enter the Fortress, follow* 
ed by the Maze. One or two player game. Machine Language, high spaed, 
Arcade action. Full color graphics with sound. Keyboard or joystick con- 
trol. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 





GRABBER 

A pac type game. Two complete mazes 
Jump from one to the other. Probably the 
most outstanding sound you havs ever 
heard. Arcade Action. Method of play, you 
are the Grabber. The object Is to grab the 8 
treasures and store them in the center 
boxes. You start with 3 Grabbers and get 
extra ones at 20,000 points. Watch out tor 
the googlies! Super high resolution 
graphics. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




CUMBER 



Approaches the excitement and challenges 
of any Video Arcade. The hazards of 
CU*BER are many. Help CU*BER 
change the colors on the pyramid while 
avoiding many of the dangers always pre- 
sent. Vipers, the Nurd, the Dork, bonus 
points all add up to another exciting 
release from Tom Mix Software. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




AIR TRAFFIC 
CONTROLLER 

Air Traffic Controller is a computer 
model of an air traffic control situation 
for the TRS-80 Color Computer. Remote- 
ly Piloted Vehicles (RPV's) are operated 
by the controller in a situation similar to 
that of a commercial airline in that you 
must regulate landings and takeoffa of 
the vehicles. 

32K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $25.95 DISK $31 .95 



KATERPILLAR II 

The color computer has needed a 
perfect centipede type game since 
day one. You will throw all Imita- 
tions aside when you see this. So 
close to the arcade you will start 
digging for quarters. Graplc to equal 
"The Ring" and "Buzzard Bait." 
Joysticks required. 

18K MACHINE LANGUAGE 

TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 




TRAPFALt 

The "Pitfalls" In this game are 
many. Hidden treasures, jump over 
the pits, swing on the vine, watch 
out for alligators, beware of the 
scorpion. Another game for the Col- 
or Computer with the same high 
resolution graphics as "The King?' 
16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 

TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




******* **SWU 

! M Shinny 

ffi m* * 





FANGMAN 

Fang man is a high-resolution graphics arcade- 
type game based on the Dracula fegend. Plot 
of Game: You're Dracula in your castte, stalk- 
ing through s labrynth of passages in search 
of invading villagers seeking to destroy you 
by blocking your every path with deadly 
crosses. Their ally the Sun also wanders your 
halls, trying to touch you and turn you to bones 
and dust. Fortunately, you have allies of your 
own, the vampire bats who cahse down the 
villagers, holding them till you arive. Joysticks 
required. 16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 



BUZZARD BAIT 

We've done it again. You thought The King 
was great? Wait til you see thistl Outstanding 
high resolution graphics, tremendous sound 
make this ''Joust" type game a must for your 
software collection. As you fly from cloud to 
cloud you will enjoy sky nigh excitement deal* 
ing with the challenges presented to you by 
this newest release by Tom Mix Software. 
Joysticks required. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 



TAPE S27.SS 



DISK $30.95 




SCREEN PRINT ROUTINE Prints contents of your graphic screen to an 
Epson, Microline or Radio Shack DMP Printers. Prints positive or reverse 
format. Horizontal or vertical, small and large printout. Print left, right or 
center of page. Specify printer when ordering. TAPE $19.95 DISK $21.95 
TAPE TO DISK New version works on both 1.0 and 1.1 DOS. Load the 



UTILITIES 



contents of most tape to disk automatically. Machine Language 
TAPE $17.95 DISK 



$21-95 



COLOR MONITOR Written In position independent code. (May be 
located In any free memory). Very compact. Only occupies 1174 bytes of 
memory. Full featured, Includes Break-Pointing of machine language 
programs, register display and modify, memory dispiay and modify, and 
biock memory move commands. Displays memory In hex and ascli for- 
mat on one line 8 bytes long. Machine Language 
TAPE $24.95 DISK $27,95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



■ADD $2.00 POSTAGE & MANDLING*TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 

•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX* 

LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE . 

S ARCADE ACTION GAMES Egj 

(616) 957-0444 




Mike 35ughcij 

tl* i 





DRACONIAN 

You brace yourself as your ship materializes in the enemy 
sector. Your engine roars to life, and you consult the long* 
range scanner for the position of the nearest enemy base. As 
you head for the base, blasting asteroids and space-mines in 
your path, you suddenly notice a monstrous space-dragon 
looming before you. Reacting quickly, you dodge his deadly 
fire-breath and blast him out of existence. 

Finally, the enemy base comes into view. Avoiding the 
enemy fire, you destroy the gun turrets one by one with your 
rapid-fire torpedoes. Then, with the explosions still echoing 
around you, you rescue the astronaut who was being held 
prisoner by the enemy. Your mission is far from over, however, 
as there are more bases to destroy and more astronauts to 
rescue before the sector will be secured. And all must be done 
quickly; if you are too slow, the invincible DRACONIAN will 
surely seek you out as its next victim. 

This is it — the single most impressive, awe-inspiring arcade 
game you can buy for your Color Computer. High-resolution 
graphics, awesome sound effects, four-voice music, and quali- 
ty you have to see to believe! Experience the realism of 
DRACONIAN today! 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27*95 DISK $30.95 



wm j 





CRASH 



This game is a high resolution Machine 
language program with outstanding Arcade 
type graphics. The game consists of 4 
screens. Fly the airplane over and through 
obstacles. Piloted by "Mario" who also ap- 
peard in "The King". The object Is to conquer 
one screen after another but don't "Crash". 
Great fun for the whole family. For t or 2 
players. Uses joysticks, 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE 124.95 DISK $27.95 



CHAMBERS 

Exerting high resolution graphics game. Multi- 
ple screens. Outstanding sound. Chambers 
is loosely based on Cosmic Chasm. The ob- 
ject in each level is to destroy ail of the evH 
creatures in each room and then go Into the 
main reactor room and blow up the base, 
JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 




* i. vV* t I 




WAREHOUSE 
MUTANTS 

Journey through the warehouse seek- 
ing out the Mutants who are out to 
destroy you. WATCH OUT! They wilt 
push crates trying to crush you! 
Outstanding realism— high resolu- 
tion graphics— multiple screens. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
16K MACH. LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 
DISK $27.95 



QUIX 

This one Is after a popular ar- 
cade game with a similar name. 
Simply frustrating— you'll love 
It, Done In high resolution 
graphics with Super Sound. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACH. LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 
DISK $27.95 





MS. MAZE 

MS. MAZE is remarkabte in that it combines 
brilliant color, high resolution, detailed 
graphics, and music witti a vary playable 
game. Anything that could be done to make 
the Color Computer look and play like the ar- 
cade version has been done. MS. MAZE is 
without question the closest thing to the ar- 
cade Pac games that I have seen for the Coco. 
JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24,95 DISK $27.95 



PAK-PANIC 

pakman is steered thru a maze eating dots 
and pcwerpitla. Pakman is pursued by four 
monsters who try to catch and kid htm. If 
Pakman eats a powerpill he becomes power- 
ful and can eat monsters. Monsters try to 
avoid a powerful Pakman. As monsters are 
eaten their ghosts appear on the top of the 
screen. When seven ghosts have appeared 
one will fly across the screen or they wilt link 
together forming a centipede that wtlf travel 
thru the maze. Pakman has no power against 
ghosts and centipedes and must avoid them 
or be killed. JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 




PAK TWINS BOTH MS. MAZE & PAK PANIC FOR ONLY 



44.90 TAPE 

50.90 DISK 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFDRD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



•ADD $2.00 POSTAGE & HANDLING'TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 
•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX» 
LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 

SB ARCADE ACTION GAMES 

(616) 957-0444 



r 



™ Tom Mix Software Now Offers ™ 
The Complete VIP Library System 



VIP Writer™ 

RATED TOPS IN RAINBOW, HOT 
COCO, COLOR COMPUTER 
MAGAZINE & COLOR COM- 
PUTER WEEKLY 
32K (Comes with tape & disk) 
$59.95 (Includes VIP Speller) 

VIP Speller™ 

WITH A 60,000 WORD INDEXED 
DICTIONARY! It can be used to 
correct any ASCII file— including 
VIP Library™ files and files from 
Scripsit™ and Telewriter™. 32K 
DISK ONLY $39.95 



VIP Calc™ 

You can forget the other toy 
calcs— The real thing is here! No 
other spreadsheet for the Color 
Computer gives you so many 
features! 32K (Comes with tape & 
disk) $59.95 32K does have hi-res 
displays, sort or edit. 

VIP Terminal™ 

RATED BEST IN JANUARY 1984 
"RAINBOW" Choice of 8 hi-res 
lowercase displays * Memory- 
Sense with BANK SWITCHING for 
full use of workspace. 32K (Comes 



VIP 

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with tape & disk) $49.95 (Tape 
comes in 16K but without hi-res 
displays) 
VIP Database™ 
INCLUDES MAIL MERGE 
CAPABILITIES TOOI 32K DISK 
$59.95 64K Required for jnath 
package & mail merge. 

VIP Dlsk-ZAP™ 

Repairs crashed disks. 
16K DISK $49.95 Lowercase 
displays not available with this 
program . 




mm 



ELECTRON 



Electron Is composed of four subgames. You must complete one tevef in order to ad- 
vance to the next. SuppHed wtth tour men, you are subjected to more difficult games 
as you move ahead. Beam Buggy, Prachnids, Force Fields and a Ware! 
JOYSTICKS REQUIRED, 16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.05 DISK $27.95 




THE KING 



This game contains all 4 ful graphic screens like the popular arcade game. Exciting 
sound and realistic graphics. Never before has the color computer seen a game like 
this. Early reviews say simply outstanding. JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $26.95 DISK $29.95 




THE FROG 

This one will give you hours of exciting play. 
Cross the busy highway to the safety of the 
median and rest awhile before you set out 
across the swollen river teaming with hidden 
hazards. Outstanding sound and graphics. Ray 
from keyboard or joysticks. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




KING TUT 

Journey through the caverns of King Tots 
tomb. You are on a quest to find treasures hid- 
den in the cavrns below. You light your way 
with only a small candle that grows dimmer as 
time passes. Watch out for the snakes and the 
ghost of King Tut himself. Five screens 
challenge your abilities every step of the way. 
Joysticks required. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30,95 




, THE TOUCHSTONE 

You are one of many priests of Ra who has ac- 
cepted the challenge of the touchstone. The 
challenge is a way for any of Pa's followers to 
become a favored high priest Given limited 
use of Ra's powers, you will battle hidden 
dangers. Entering the mazes, you must be 
ready for anything. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. Ml 49506 



•ADD $2.00 POSTAGE & HANDLING'TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 

• MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX* 

LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE . 

ImSi ARCADE ACTION GAMES Mm 

(616) 957-0444 




SPACE SHUTTLE 

This program gives you the real feel- 
ing of flight. Full instrumentation 
complete to the max. Radar, 
aitimeter, air speed, artificial 
horizon, fuel gauge, a mission 
status panel and much more. Actual 
simulation of space flight, weather 
conditions must be considered. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 

32K EXTENDED BASIC 

TAPE $28.95 DISK $31 .95 




EDUCATIONAL 

VOCABULARY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

16K Extended b«ste/32K for printer output TAPE $39.95 DISK $42.95 

The Vocabulary Management System (VMS) is a series of programs designed to aid a parent or teacher In help- 
ing children to learn and practice using vocabulary and spelling words. The 9 programs that comprise the VMS in- 
clude a full feature data entry/edit program, three printer output programs and 5 vocabulary/spelling game pro- 
grams. The system's many outstanding features include: 



-As many as 300 vocabulary words 

and definitions may be in 

the computer's memory at one time. 
-Words and definitions may be 

saved on disk or tape. 
-Remarks and/or comments can 

be saved with word files. 
-A disk loading menu allows 

students to load disk files without 

typing file names. 



—Word lists may be quickly alphabetized 
—The three printer segments allow 

you to create and print individualized 

tests, puzzles, word-searches and 

worksheets. 
—Answer keys may be printed 

for all worksheets and puzzles. 



—The printer segments allow 
full use of your printer's 
special features. 

—The 5 game programs are based 
on sound educational principles 
and provide practice In identifying 
words and matching them with 
their definitions In a fast-paced 
set of activities. 



STORY PROBLEMS 

STORY PROBLEMS Is a program that is designed to give practice in 
solving story problems (sometimes called statement thought or word 
problems) on the Color Computer, it is suitable for use in either a home 
or school environment. It is also a tool that will allow you to create new 
story problems to suit your children's needs and ability levels. It has 



MATH DRILL 

MATH DRILL Is a program designed to help children to practice addi- 
tion, subtraction, multiplication and division skills on the Color Com- 
puter. It has several features that make its use particularly attractive: 

• Up to 6 students may use the program at the same time. 

• Answers for addition, subtraction and multiplication are entered 
from right to left, just as they are written on paper. 

• Commas may be included in the answers. 

• Partial products for the multiplication problems may be computed 
on the screen. 

• Division answers that have a remainder are entered as a whole 
number followed by the letter "R" and the remainder, 

• The are ten, user modifiable, skill levels. 

• A "SMILEY FACE" is used for motivation and reward, its size in* 
creases relative to the skill level. 

• Skill levels automatically adjust to the student's ability. 

• A timer measures the time used to answer each problem and the 
total time used for a series of problems. 

• After a problem has been answered incorrectly the correct answer 
appears under (above in division) the incorrect answer. 

REQUIRES 16K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $19.05 DISK $22.95 



ESTIMATE 

ESTIMATE is a program designed to help children to practice estimating 
the answers to addition, subtraction, multiplication and division pro- 
blems on the Color Computer. It has many features that make its use 
particularly attractive: 

• Up to 5 students may use the program at the same time. 

• There are 5, user modifiable, skill levels. 

• The acceptable percent error may be changed as a student's skill im- 
proves. 

• A timer measures the number of seconds used to answer each pro- 
blem and the total time used for a series of problems. 

• If a problem has been answered incorrectly, the student Is told the 
percent error and asked to try again. 

• If a problem is answered incorrectly a second time, the student is 
told the correct answer and the range of acceptable answers is 
displayed. 

• A report is given at the end of each set of problems that Includes the 
number of problems done, the number of problems answered cor- 
rectly on the first try and the average percent error. 

• The (BREAK) key has been disabled so that a child will not in- 
advertently stop the program from running. 

REQURIES 16K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $19.95 DISK $22.95 



many features that make it particularly attractive: 

• Story problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, divi- 
sion or a combination of the four are presented to the student by 
slowly scrolling each letter of each problem onto the screen. 

• Up to 5 students may use the program at the same time. 

• There are 4, user modifiable, skill levels. 

19K EXT, BASIC TAPE $19.96 DISK $22.95 



TEACHER'S DATABASE 

TEACHER'S DATABASE is a program designed to allow a teacher to 
keep a computerized fite of Information about his/her students. There 
are many features that make this program particularly attractive: 
■ Information on as many as 100 students (or more) may be in the com- 
puter at one time. 

• bach student may have as many as 20 (or more) individual items of 
data In his/her record. 

• The program will run from cassette or disk. 

• Cassette and disk files are completely compatible. 

• The program is menu driven. 

• Records may be easily changed, deleted, combined or added. 

• Information about students may be numerical or text. 

• Records may be quickly alphabetized. 

• Records may be sorted by various criteria. 

• Records may be reordered (ranked) based on test scores or other 
data, 

• Data displayed during a sort may be printed on a printer or saved on 
disk or cassette as a new file. 

• A full statistical analysis of data may be done and sent to the printer. 

• Student test scores may be weighted. 

REQURES 32K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $39.95 DISK 942.95 



PRE ALGEBRA I INTEGERS 

INTEGERS is a series of four programs designed to give students prac- 
tice in working with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and 
the comparison of integers. It has many features that make a very 
valuable toot for introducing and/or maintaining skills: 

• Up to 4 students may use the program at the same time. 

• There are 9, user modifiable, skill levels. 

• Students are given two opportunities to answer a problem. 

• A detailed report of student performance, Including number correct 
on first try, number wrong, total time used and percentage acorn, is 

? resented at the end of a series of problems, 
he programs will run on a 16K TRS-80 Color Computer with or 
without disk drive. 

Four distinct problem formats are presented. The first presents pro- 
blems in this format: ~ 12 + -9 = y. The second program presents a 
problem with missing numerals in this format: -7 - ? = 19. The third 
program presents a problem with a missing sign: 8 - ?6 = 14. The last 
program asks the student to determine the relationship ( = , or ) bet- 
ween two statments 3-9 (??) - 4 - 5. 

TAPE $29.95 DISK $32.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



•ADD $2.00 POSTAGE & HANDLING'TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 

•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX» 
_ LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE , 

59 ARCADE ACTION GAMES EgH 

aB ^ L (616) 957-0444 





32K 
ECB 




Tarot is a form of magic to predict the future. It is 
basically a set of playing cards with special pictures 
for fortune telling. Tarot is surrounded with mystery 
and legend. The precise origin of these ancient cards is not 
known with certainty. It is widely believed that these cards 
originated in Europe, however, there are indications that the 
earliest use of tarot was in India, China and possibly Egypt 
in the form of clay tablets. Museums and libraries today 
possess original tarot decks dating from the 14th century. 

The word "tarot" is a French adaptation of "tarocco," a 
game played in Italy during the 14th century with these 
ancient cards. 



(Amir Dimitri is a telecommunications consultant, 
holds a B.S. in engineering and is a member of the 
Corporation of Engineers of Quebec. In 1970 he 
mechanized the telephone switch network require- 
ments and construction expenditure for Bell Canada 
Montreal Area Engineering. He and his wife, Dora, 
have three children.) 



The tarot deck has 78 cards. Fifty-six cards are known as 
the Lesser Arcana. These are divided into four suits; Spades, 
Clubs, Hearts and Diamonds with King, Queen, Cavalier 
and Page. The remaining 22 cards are known as Trump or 
the Major Arcana cards. These are numbered XXI to 1 plus 
an unnumbered card known as "The Fool." The ordinary 
pack of playing cards today is a direct descendant of the 14th 
century tarot deck; the Trump cards were dropped, the 
Cavalier and Page cards were combined into today's jack, 
and "The Fool" became the joker. 

Could fortunes be revealed with tarot cards? In 1 4th 
century Italy, a daughter amused her noble family with 
hand-painted tarot cards; in 16th century Germany a schol- 
ar delved into the hidden meaning of the tarot cards; gypsies 
wandered throughout Europe for centuries interpreting 
tarot to eager questioners; in the courts of France, carto- 
mancers and diviners foretold catastrophic events to Napo- 
leon. 

It is said that some readings are so accurate as to defy 
rationale, other readings are so inaccurate as to offer little 
insight to the questioner. Is this due to some ancient wisd 



74 



THE RAINBOW October 1984 



ttle 




or pure fantasy? Regardless, tarot has enjoyed a history of 
more than 500 years and is the forerunner of today's modern 
pack of cards. 

The procedure used in spreading the tarot cards requires 
the questioner (person seeking an answer to a question) to 
shuffle the cards face down while stating out loud his specific 
question to the reader (diviner). The reader then lays out the 
cards in a prescribed sequence and interprets their symbolic 
meaning. It is found that for fortune telling, the 22 Major 
Arcana cards suffice and the Lesser Arcana cards could be 
avoided for simplicity. In this method, the reader lays down 
the top 10 cards of the shuffled 22-card Major Arcana deck. 

Each Major Arcana card has a descriptive title and a 
symbolic picture for interpretation. These cards represent 
the physical and spiritual forces that influence people, 
namely; Strength, Power, Storms, Death and Religion. 

Tarot cards cannot be read from opposite directions as 
conventional cards. If the card is laid down in reverse 
(upside down), then the interpretation is weakened or re- 
versed. The presence of one card next to the other strength- 
ens or weakens the interpretation. Readings are based not 
only on the specific interpretation of each card, but the 
relative proximity in which the cards fall, their frequency 
and whether a card is upside down (reversed). 

The author of this program has merely mechanized this 
procedure for the enjoyment of the user. Effort has been 
spent to faithfully represent each of the 22 Major Arcana 
cards graphically, together with their respective interpreta- 
tions in text and provide a comprehensive reading based on 
the methodology stipulated above. The user can now ques- 
tion the computer and find out whether it can really foretell 
the future with the tarot cards! 

After unplugging the disk controller, loading Tarot and 
RUNning it, the user is prompted; "WHAT IS YOUR 
QUESTION?" Upon entering the question, the following 
prompt appears: "THE CARDS HAVE BEEN SHUF- 
FLED — DO YOU WISH A RE-SHUFFLE (Y OR N)?" 
Each time the user presses ENTER, a graphic display of each 
of the 10 top cards is shown in sequence together with the 
associated text interpretation based on order, symbolic 
meaning and position (reversed). After the 10th card is 
displayed, a reading in text format is automatically dis- 
played for the benefit of the user together with an answer to 
the question posed. Each display is accompanied with a tune 
to alert the user. Finally, the user is prompted for another 
reading if desired. Upon termination, a tune is played 
together with a closing statement for posterity. 

This is how the program works: Setup takes place in Lines 
10-1410 with calls to subroutines to run the card shuffling 
randomizing ( 1 670), card display ( 1 730), reversed card logo, 
etc. Tarot reading routines take place from Lines 1450-1700. 
Lines 1730-61 10 perform the Extended BASIC graphics sub- 
routines for the Major Arcana 22-card deck. The arrays 
dimensioned in Line 220 hold the following: 

C = Card number 

1$ = Card interpretation 

N = Card weighting 

R$ = Reversed card interpretation 

R = Reversed card weighting 

N$ = Card order interpretation 

D$ = Display interpretation (summary) 

D = Display weighting 

Change the statements and graphics and good fortune 
shall follow you for the rest of your days! 




170 179 2550 

400 243 2760 

670 216 2940 

970 33 3110 

1170 40 3300 

1420 44 3530 

1640 98 3700 

1850 .... 122 3940 

2050 .... 167 4120 

2290 .... 137 4270 



161 4460 .... 103 

. 23 4660 .... 143 

206 4840 .... 120 

101 5010 45 

169 5300 82 

. . 9 5440 85 

150 5620 .... 149 

. 44 5760 .... 138 

234 5890 .... 138 

127 6050 37 

END .... 222 



L 



The listing: 
10 CLEAR500 

20 A3*="T4;03;L2;C;L4;02;B;L8; a; 
L2. ;G; " 

30 la*= m C8;U10; 
;R5" 

40 LB*« n C85U10; 
;D5;C5;R5" 
50 LC** M C8;ui0; 

5" 

60 LD*« M C8SU10; 

;C5;R7" 

70 LE*= M C8;U105 
;R5;C5;R5." 
80 LF*="C8$U105 

;C5;R10 M 
90 LG*= ,, C8;U10; 
2;R2;D5;C5;R5" 

100 LH*="C8; U10; D5; R5; U5; D10; C5; 

R5 H 

110 Li^ ,, C5;R3;C8;ui0;Di0;C5;R7 M 
120 LJ*="C8;U2;D2;R3;U10;D10;C5; 

R7" 

130 LL*= M C8;U10;D10;R5;C55R5 H 

140 LM*="C8;ui0;R4;D5;U5;R4;Dl0; 
C5;R5 m 



R6;D5;L6;R6;D5;C5 
R6;D5;L6;D5;R6;U5 

R5;L5;D10?R5;C55R 
R45F2;D65Q2*L4;R4 
R5?L5;D5;R5?L5JD5 

R5;L5;D5;R5;L5?D5 
R5;L5;di0;r5;us;l 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 75 



T 



1 m \0k 1 KJ4z 11 PR sill As FS illS: niAs P 1 ^ i R^ 11 


590 


N5-1 :R5— 1 


ita 1 nta'TflllMflsRAinifl!! AsRAsP^s 


600 


I* (6) -"KINDNESS, HUMILITY" 


R5 M 

91 w 


610 


R* (6) —"SUSCEPTIBILITY, INSEN 


17A 1 pAa'Tfll 1 11 A 2 PAi n«w2 1 A f R A 2 P*% s H 
x / v vjtw 9 wo fUivf r\o y i/^j f lo J r\o 9 L#o 9 1/ 


SITIVITY" 




620 


N6-l:R6— 1 


1 OA 1 R Ass 11 PR 2 1 1 1 A 2 P7 2 n*=* 2 17* DA - no • cr 


630 


I* (7) -"LOVE, BEAUTY" 


31 Dl S C5s R5 M 


640 


R*(7)-"INRELIABILITY, FICKLE 


4T» L_0? M WDf nu) UU) LW| UWf nw| Lwf i/w 


NESS" 


s R*Ss n*S2 P*S: PS" 

9 9 Lf\J 9 V#Jp r\w* 


650 


N7-1IR7— 1 


1 H PR 8 P**t 2 RT 2 PR 2 1 1 1 A 2 1 T2RA2I 
.£1919 LI?" LOy Lup Hwp Lap Ui v| LOf nOp L 


660 


I * ( 8 ) - " CHALLEN8E , TR I UMPH " 


T 2 n 1 A 2 P^ I RR " 
Op UXVf ww 9 no 


670 


R* ( 8 ) - " DEFEAT , RES I QN AT I ON " 


9 1 A II Ms 11 PR "111 A- r>1 As R*S 2ll1A2niA2P 
^XI9 LU»- LOp Ulc'p Uivp nupultrp Ulvp L 


680 


N8-l:R8— 1 


■31 R5" 

«_p 9 r\w 


690 


I$<9)as»VIRTUE, HONOR" 


97« 1 lifts 11 P"* 2 PA 2 PR 1 I4A 2 1 IA 2 HA 2 PA 2 FA 

zzK' lvi ■ Ls*j 9 r\*T 9 wO 9 n*? 9 uo 9 1/0 p r*tp t*r 


700 


R* (9) — " ABUSE , I NTOLERE ANCE " 


8 1 IA2 HA 2 AA t P^ 2 DO" 

9 UO 9 I/Of 13 *r 9 Ljp f\7 


710 


N9»l:R9— 1 


OTA 1 Y mtm 11 PR f 1 1 1 • Ffl "111 • ni ■ OA • UA • 1 1 1 
£OV LA?" Lopui pCdpUl pUlpl9 i tprl l rpUl 


720 


I* (10) -"PRUDENCE, CAUTION" 


9 1/1 9 rOp 1/1 9 LJp r\0 


730 


R* ( 10) =" RASHNESS " 


jl*tW or?- LDp r\3 


740 


Ni0-i:Ri0— 1 


?5A l>IM r<??) 


750 


I*(11)="F0RTUNE, LUCK" 


7AA HTM T*f7^> 


760 


R*(11)-"FAILURE, INTERRUPTIO 


97a HTM hlfO'?! 


N" 




9Qrt HTM R* / 99 \ 
ZOc' i/X 11 r\? \ / 


770 


Nll = l:Rll— 1 


90a nTM p/99\ 
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780 


I * ( 1 2 ) - " C0URA8E , ENER6Y " 


T A A nTM hi* / i A > 

OI9I9 Uln Nf Wxf) 


790 


R» ( 1 2 > = " WEAKNESS , TYRANNY " 


T1A nTM nt/1 A) 


800 


N12-HR12— 1 


T9« nTM n / 1 a > 


810 


I* (13) -"READJUSTMENT, TRANS I 


tt« KI99k1 " D99k-1 


TION" 


0*919 pi? \ x / 99 ***r r r\c.ofcpl I ruol 1 lUpl** 


820 


R«(13)-"E80ISM" 


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830 


N13-HR13— 1 


T^SA KJ* = M #**TMMFTMATC ThlWfll UPH 

Ouv in? \ » wwwxnrici/iH 1 c x imvlji— ven 


840 


I* (14) -"LOSS, FAILURE" 


ClM 1 www 


850 


R* ( 1 4 ) - " RECOVERY" 


TAA hi* f T 1 = 11 *«•«• final IIP nFQTTMV### 

OOP m \ w / s ww iruuHL Un i/tg| X PI T www 


860 


N14— l:R14— 1 


II 


870 


I* (15) -"PATIENCE, MODERATION 


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O / 19 Pi? \ *t / ™ wwwi/x w 1 HiM 1 rH3 1 www 


II 




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880 


R*( 15) -"DISCORD, HOSTILITY" 


7QA iM / A * =2"*»«Pf |TI IRC ThlPI I IPhlPP** 


890 


N15»l:R15— 1 


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900 


I? (16) -"VIOLENCE, DISASTER" 


AAA hi* / "7 N h"***TUC ni ICOT T fthlPD 

m0W pf? \ / / m *** i nb UUtb I 1 UNtn*** 


910 


R* ( 1 6 ) - " FREEDOM , ENL I QHTENME 


X 19 N? \ 0 / — ***tNV 1 KUNrltN I fiL r RL 1 


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920 


N16— l:R16-l 


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930 


R* ( 1 7 ) - " ENTRAPMENT , OPPRESS I 


ATA hi* i 1 A* a"*##PCQI 11 T 11 
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ON" 




AAA T* i 1 * ss"TUni IRI4T1 PQQhIPQQ PYTR 
*r*?l9 X ? \ X 7 — 1 nUUun 1 LCODnCDD y CA 1 n 


940 


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HV HUHlNLC, 


950 


I* (18) -"HOPE, SATISFACTION" 


«cA 0* H \ -"APATUV hlPRI TftSPhlPP 11 


960 


R*( 18) -"PESSIMISM, DISAPPOIN 


AAA hi 1 s 1 » 01 z 1 


TMENT" 


A7A T* /9\ — •••Qk'TI 1 rDCATTUTTV" 
*r/v ±W\^.J — Olv.lL-L-9 wntRI XVX 1 T 


970 


N18-l:R18— 1 


A0A D* / 9\ 9 HT 9JOPPI IR T TV nci AV 11 


980 


I* (19) -"CAUTION, DECEPTION" 


AOA MO = 1 • D9b- 1 


990 


R* ( 1 9 ) - " DECEPT I ONS , M I STAKES 


VAA T A / T\ _ IIMT CnnM CrDCklTTX/H 

3vv I?\o/* WISDUn, StRtNITY 


•1 




310 I?C1/1" HISEKYj DECEPTION 


1000 N19=-l : R19=l 


DZ0 \ 0 / s CONCE I T p SELF I SHNESS 


1010 I* (20) -"HAPPINESS, SUCCESS" 


■TA hITz 1 ■ DT«- 1 


1020 R«(20>="UNHAPPINESS, LONELI 


■CA A T * / A * = 11 APT T Oh! PPORPCQQ » 
□*rlff X w V *r / = HLt 1 X UPI y rnuoniiaa 


NESS" 


550 R* (4)-" INDECISION, ANXIETY" 


1030 N20»l:R20— 1 


560 N4-1 :R4— 1 


1040 I* <21> -"DEVELOPMENT, PROMOT 


570 I* (5) -"AUTHORITY, WEALTH" 


ION" 


580 R« ( 5 ) - 11 FEEBLENESS " 


1050 R* (21) -"DELAY, DISILLUSION" 



76 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



1060 N21=i:R21=-l 

1070 I * ( 22 ) 88 " PERFECT I ON , SUCCESS 

•I 

1 080 R* < 22 ) - " I MPERFECT I ON " 
1090 Y=0 

1100 G0SUB6 1 20 : PR I NTS 1 32 , " BY AMI 
R DIMITRI":'3352 BREARD, BROSSAR 
D J4Z 2E2 QUEBEC— CANADA 1981 
1 1 10 FORTM=1TO500: NEXTTM: PR I NTS 1 
32, "";: INPUT "WHAT IS YOUR QUEST I 

on- j a* 

1 1 20 I FLEN ( Q* ) >25THEN 1 660 
1130 FOR Jl=l TO 10 
1140 GOSUB 1670 
1150 NEXT Jl 

1160 G0SUB6 1 20 : PR I NT@224 , " THE CA 
RDS HAVE BEEN SHUFFLED-DO YOU WI 
SH A RE-SHUFFLE ": INPUT" <Y OR N 
> " ; G* 

1170 IF G*="N" THEN 1230 

1 1 80 G0SUB6 1 20 : PR I NTQ97 , " THE CAR 

DS ARE BEING RE-SHUFFLED NOW" 

1190 FOR 1=1 TO 22 

1200 C(I>=0 

1210 NEXT I 

1220 GOTO 1130 

1230 FOR J=l TO 10 

1 240 PR I NT6480 , " " ; : G0SUB6 110:1 NP 

UT"PRESS< ENTER > TO SEE EACH CARD 

"|H*:CLS 

1250 FOR U=l TO 22 

1260 IF C(U)OJ THEN 1400 

1270 M*="" 

1280 RX=RND (Y) : IFRX>. 5 AND RX<.5 
5 THEN 1290 ELSE 1300 
1290 M** 8 " (REVERSED) " 
1300 GOSUB 1730 

1310 PRINT"TAROT CARD #"J""M* 
1320 PR I NTS 100, "INTERPRETATION: 

II 

1330 PR INTO 132, " 

1340 PRINTS225, N*(J) 

1350 I FM*<>" (REVERSED) " THEN 13 

80 

1360 D*(J)=R*(U) :D(J)=R(U) 

1370 PRINT@290,D*(J) : PRINT: GOTOl 

390 

1380 D*(J)=I*(U):D(J>=N(U> : 80T0 

1370 
1390 GOTO 1410 
1400 NEXT U 
1410 NEXT J 
1420 GOSUB 1720 

1430 PR I NT© 130, "PRESENTLY THERE 
IS" 

1440 IF D(7)+D(l)-0 THEN 1470 
1450 PRINT@162,D*(1) " "D*(7)"-" 



1460 GOTO 1480 

1470 PRINTei62,D«(7)". M 

1480 PRINTS 194, "TO OTHERS YOU AR 

E":PRINT@226,D*(8) ", » 

1490 PR I NT 6258, "YOUR THOUGHTS TE 

ND TOWARD " : PR I NTe290 , D* ( 9 ) " . " 

1500 GOSUB 1720 

1510 PR I NTS 162, "ALTHOUGH IN THE 
PAST YOU HAD" 

1520 IF D(4)+D(5)»0 THEN 1550 
1530 PRINTei94,D*(4) " "D*(5)", H 
1540 GOTO 1560 

1550 IFD(4)— 1 THEN PRINTS194,D« 
(4) ", "ELSE PRINTei94,D«(5) ", " 
1560 PRINT8226, "YOU WILL BE IMME 
D I ATEL Y " : PR I NT8258 , " I N VOL VED WIT 
H":PRINT@290,D*(2) 

1570 PRINTS322, "IN THE FUTURE TH 
ERE WILL BE" 

1580 IF D(6)+D(3)»0 THEN 1610 
1590 PRINT@354,D*(6) " "D*(3)"." 
1600 GOTO 2070 

1610 IF D(6)-l THEN PRINTS354,D* 
(6) " . "ELSE PR I NTS354 , D* (3) " . " 
1620 GOSUB 1720 

1630 PRINTS 130, "REGARDING YOUR Q 
UEST I ON , " : PR I NT@ 1 62 , CHR* ( 34 ) Q*CH 
R*(63)CHR*(34) :PRINT6194, "THE CA 
RDS REVEAI " : PR I NT8226 , D« ( 1 0 ) " 

II 

■ 

1640 GOSUB 1720: PR INTS4 18, ""; : INP 
UT" ANOTHER READING? (Y OR N)";Q* 
: IFQ*»"N"THEN6140 
1650 CLS: GOTOl 100 

1660 G0SUB6 120: PRINTS 100, "IN FOU 
R WORDS OR LESS, ": GOTOl 110 
1670 Z»(RND(Y)»22+1) 
1680 X=INT(Z) 

1690 IF C(X)<>0 THEN 1670 
1700 C(X)=C(X)+J1 
1710 RETURN 

1 720 G0SUB6 110: FORTM= 1 TO3000 : NEX 

TTM: CLS: G0SUB6 1 20 : G0SUB6 1 30 : PR I N 

T8194, "";: RETURN 

1730 PMODE 3, 1 

1740 PCLS 

1750 SCREEN 1,1 

1760 ON U GOSUB5990, 1790, 1970,23 
20, 2800, 2990, 3190, 3470, 3660, 3890 
, 4070, 4280, 4490, 4690, 4900, 5050, 5 
220, 5420, 5530, 5700, 5780, 5900 
1770 FORTM=1TO1000:NEXT TM 
1780 RETURN 

1790 DRAW"BM50, 190? R170J U20; L170 

;U150;R170;U20;L170;D190;R170;U1 

90" 

1800 DRAW "BM 135, 16; "+LI* 

1810 DRAW"BM80, 185; "+LL*+LE*+SP* 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 77 



1820 DRAWLB«+LA*+LT« 

1830 DRAWLE*+LL* 

1840 DRAW LE*+LU*+LR« 

1850 DRAWBM50, 1 16; C8; E39; R32; U8 

; L8 | R44 ; L8 ; D36 ; L28 ; U28 " 

1860 DRAW " BM220 ,116; H39 ; L32 " 

1870 DRAWBM176, 116;U5;L84;D5;R8 

4" 

1880 DRAW "BM 124, 152; U24; L36; D6; R 

16; L22; D6; R22; L16; D6; R16; L10; D6; 

R30" 

1890 DRAWBM144, 152; U24; R36; D6; L 

16;R22;D6;L22;R16;D6;L16;R10;D6; 

L30" 

1900 CIRCLE (120, 56) ,5,8, 1,0, 1 
1910 CIRCLE < 148, 56), 5, 8, 1,0, 1 
1920 CIRCLE (135, 36) ,5,8, 1,0, 1 
1930 PAINT (120, 56) ,8, 8: PAINT (148 
,56) ,8, 8: PAINT (135, 36) ,8,8 
1940 PAINT (130, 76), 7, 8: PAINT (124 
,113) ,7,8 

1950 PAINT (175, 80), 6, 8 
1960 RETURN 

1970 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
1980 LINE (50, 100) - (220, 100) , PSET 
1990 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20), PSET 
2000 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170), PSET 
2010 DRAW "BM 130, 16; "+LI«+LI* 
2020 DRAWBMl 12, 185; "+LJ4+LU* 
2030 DRAWLN*+LO*+LN* 
2040 DRAWBMl 24, 52; C8; U20; F4; D4; 

R4; E4; F4; D4; R4; E4; F4; D16; N; F8; H8 
;L20;U4;R20;F8" 

2050 DRAWBMl 24, 52; D2;R12;F6;D12 

;F12;U8;H4;U4;E2;U8" 

2060 DRAW"BM124,64;L4;E4 U 

2070 DRAW " BM 1 32 , 80 ; U9 " 

2080 DRAWBM136,96;N;E15;N;H15" 

2090 DRAWBM136, 1 16; H4; R8; 64" 

2100 CIRCLE (136, 54) , 15,8, (24/15) 

j ■ 25 | ■ 5 

2110 CIRCLE (136, 56) ,24,8, (32/24) 
, .6, l: CIRCLE (136, 56) ,24,8, (32/24 
),0, .0625 

2120 CIRCLE (132, 100) ,20,8, 1, .5, . 
75: CIRCLE ( 140, 100) , 20, 8, 1 , . 75, 1 
2130 LINE (160, 100) -(184, 20) , PSET 
: LINE ( 164, 100) - ( 188, 20) , PSET 
2140 CIRCLE (136, 120) ,4: CIRCLE (13 
6, 120), 16,8,1, .5, l: CIRCLE (136, 17 
2) , 16,8, (48/16) , .5, 1 
2150 CIRCLE (96, 158) ,20,8, 1, .375, 
.75: CIRCLE (108, 132) , 20, 8, 1 , . 375, 
.875 

2160 CIRCLE (176, 158), 20, 8,1,. 75, 
l: CIRCLE (164, 132) ,20,8, 1, .625, 1 
2170 CIRCLE (176, 158) ,20,8, 1,0, . 1 
25: CIRCLE (164, 132) , 20, 8, 1 ,0, . 125 



2180 PAINT (136, 90) ,5,8 
2190 PAINT (136, 98) ,8,8 
2200 PAINT (154, 98) ,8,8 
2210 PAINT (140, 56) ,7,8 
2220 PAINT (154, 50), 8, 8 
2230 PAINT (136, 50) ,8,8 
2240 PAINT (140, 35) ,8,8 
2250 PAINT (60, 98) ,6,8 
2260 PAINT (184, 98) ,6,8 
2270 PAINT (200, 168) ,5,8 
2280 PAINT (153, 72) ,6,8 
2290 PAINT (136, 168) ,8,8 
2300 PAINT (166, 168) ,7,8 
2310 RETURN 

2320 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
2330 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20), PSET 
2340 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170) , PSET 
2350 DRAWBMl 22, 16; "+LI«+LI*+LI* 
2360 DRAWBM70, 185; "+LL*+SP*+LI* 
2370 DRAWLM* +LP* : DR AWLE* +LR* : DRA 
WLA»+LT«: DRAWLR*+LI«: DRAWLC4+LE* 
2380 CIRCLE (132, 32) ,4,8, 1,0, 1 
2390 CIRCLE (132, 44), 8, 8,1,. 375, 1 
2400 CIRCLE (132, 44) ,8,8, 1,0, . 175 
2410 CIRCLE (112, 44), 4, 8, 1,-3, 1 
2420 CIRCLE (112, 44) ,4,8, 1,0, . 175 
2430 CIRCLE (120, 44), 4, 8, 1,0, .5 
2440 CIRCLE (144, 44) ,4,8, 1,0, .5 
2450 CIRCLE (152, 44), 4, 8,1, .375, 1 
2460 DRAWBM126,52;C8;N;U8;L6;N; 
H6; L4; N; H8; D8; R32" 

2470 DRAW " BM 1 48 , 60 ; U8 ; N ; E8 ; L4 ; N ; 

E6;L6;U4" 

2480 CIRCLE (116, 64) ,4,8, 1, .25, .7 
5 

2490 CIRCLE (148, 64), 4, 8,1,-75,1 
2500 CIRCLE (148, 64), 4, 8, 1,0, .25 
2510 CIRCLE (132, 76) , 12,8, (16/12) 
,0,1 

2520 CIRCLE (116, 80), 12, 8,1,. 25,. 
75 

2530 CIRCLE (148, 80) , 12,8, 1, .75, 1 
2540 CIRCLE (148, 80) , 12,8, 1,0, .25 
2550 DRAW "C8 ; D6 ; U8 " : DRAW " BM 1 48 , 9 
2;C8;D4" 

2560 CIRCLE (120, 96), 6, 8,1,. 125,. 
625 

2570 CIRCLE (144, 96) ,6,8, 1, .875, 1 
2580 CIRCLE (144, 96) ,6,8, 1,0, .375 
2590 DRAWBMl 24, 100; N; U14; N; G12; 
D4" 

2600 DRAWBMl 40, 100; N; U14; F12; D4 

tl 

2610 CIRCLE (120, 108) ,2,8, 1,0, 1 
2620 CIRCLE (144, 108) ,2,8, 1,0, 1 
2630 CIRCLE (128, 112) ,2,8, 1,0, 1 
2640 CIRCLE (136, 112) ,2,8, 1,0, 1 
2650 CIRCLE (104, 120), 12, 8,1,. 25, 



78 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



WAIMLOO 





Across The Rubicon 


II 





KsWifftAZG BOMBER COMMAND 



WE CHALLENGE YOU! 




WAR WAR WAR WAR 
GAMES ! GAMES ! GAMES ! GAMES ! 



tUBGATUSI 



(0 



IT) 

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CM 
V) 



X 
LU 

CC 

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CM 
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CLASSICAL AGE EUROPE. . . 

2 PLA YER GAME 
The Winds of War are blowing across the northern frontier, 
the Emperor issues orders to his field commanders, who 
little realize the doubts tormenting their leader! There is too 
little in the treasury, too little known of the enemy, and too 
vulnerable are the imperial cities and their precious farm 
lands to pilliage and capture. And if this is not enough, his 
armies are green as May grass. But ... J ACT A ALEA EST! 
The die is cast. The campaign must begin... Printer 
recommended. 



GUADALCANAL 




AMERICA STRIKES BACK! 

August. 19*3 The Marines fc»M landed in America s first often 
of WWII and the stage is set With captured food and equip 
if and virtually no chance of resupply the Marines must ex- 
pand then perimeter complete Henderson field, seek out an 
illusive and insidious enemy, and put up with the incessant daily 
bombing Not to mention the spine shattering cry of BANZAI His- 
oncat. except that this lime YOU command the 1st Marines Send 
patrols into a teeming tungle capture Japanese camps, sortie air 
er. interdiction and search pray tor that supply ship Co for it. 
Leatherneck SFMPf ft FV 



WATERLOO 32k 

CASSETTE.... $24.95 

KAMIKAZE 32k 

CASSETTE.... $24.95 

ACROSS THE RUBICON 

CASSETTE.... $24.95 32k 

GUADALCANAL 32k EXT 

CASSETTE.... $24.95 

BOMBER COMMAND 

CASSETTE.... $22.95 
16k EXT 

P. 0. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 
904-786-8603 







BATTLE. FOR TUNIS 




A 1 or 2 player game that places you In North Africa in 
1943. Patton has Just been recalled to Europe to help plan 
the invasion of Sicily; Rommel is In Berlin. You have the 
opportunity to replace two of history's greatest generals In 
this challenge for control of Tunisia. Each player controls 
the actual ground forces present at the time. 

In the one player game, you control the Axis forces and 
try to do what Rommel's veterans couldn't: Hold Tunis! 

Play Is on a battle screen wtth an overall strategy map 
available for general reconnaissance. Intelligence and sta- 
tus reports, as well as air power, are also available. 



m 
o> 

CM 

I- 
X 
LU 

JX 

O 
_j 

o 
o 

CM 

CO 

I 



D 
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<r 
O 

UL 

LU 
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I- 
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00 



UJ 



OTHER ARK ROYAL GAMES... 

STAR BLAZER — 32K 17.95 

KAMIKAZE — 16K 14.95 

ACROSS THE RUBICON — 16K 14.95 

MISSION EMPIRE — 32K 22.95 

MISSION EMPIRE — 16K 17.95 

GALATIC TAIPAN — 32K 17.95 

Prices on All games All Programs require Color 

include shipping. Florida ComPuterTM (Tandy Corp) or 
Resident add 5% tax. TDP System 100 ComPuter"" 

(RCA) 

All games available on Disk — Add $3.00 

We pay shipping on all prepaid orders to 
USA and CANADA. C.O.D.s Accepted 
Foreign orders add 10%. 



.925 




2970 PAINT (140, 48), 8, 8: PAINT (132 


2660 


CIRCLE (160, 120) , 12,8, 1, .625 


, 100) ,7, 8: PAINT (160, 140) ,8,8:PAI 


>i 




NT (200, 140) ,6,8 


2670 


CIRCLE ( 160, 120) , 12, 8, 1 , 0, . 2 


2980 RETURN 


5 




2990 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 


2680 


CIRCLE (104, 136) ,4,8, 1, .75, 1 


3000 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) , PSET 


2690 


CIRCLE (112, 136) ,20,8, 1, .75, 


3010 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170) , PSET 


1 




3020 DRAW'BMl 28, 16; "+LV* 


2700 


CIRCLE ( 120, 136) ,12,8,1,. 25, 


3030 DRAW " BM 1 00 , 185; "+LJ* 


.5 




3040 DRAWLU*+LP* : DRAWL I *+LT* : DRA 


2710 


CIRCLE( 144, 136) , 12,8, 1,0, .2 


WLE*+LR* 


5 




3050 DRAW"BM132,36;C8;G8;H8;G4;L 


2720 


CIRCLE (152, 136) ,20,8, 1, .5, . 


4;H4;L4;F12;N;R40;D12" 


73 




3060 DRAW h R40;U12;E12;L4;G4;L4;H 


2730 


CIRCLE (160, 136) ,4,8, 1, .5, .7 


4;68;H8" 


5 




3070 CIRCLE (132, 76) ,20,8, (24/20) 


2740 


CIRCLE(120 160) , 12,8, 1, .75, 


, .875, l: CIRCLE (132, 76) ,20,8, (24/ 


1 


20) ,0, . 125: CIRCLE (132, 76) ,20,8, ( 


2750 


CIRCLE (144, 160), 12,8, 1, .5, . 


24/20) , . 375, . 625 


75 




3080 CIRCLE (132, 76) ,32,8, (24/32) 


2760 


PAINT (122, 50) ,8, 8: PAINT (142 


, .375, .625: CIRCLE (132, 76) ,32,8, ( 


,50), 


8,8 


24/32) , .875, 1 : CIRCLE ( 132, 76) ,32, 


2770 


PAINT(116,80) ,7,8:PAINT(148 


8, (24/32) ,0, . 125 


,80), 


7,8 


3090 CIRCLE (132, 104) ,20,8, 1, .625 


2780 


PAINT (104, 120),8,8:PAINT(20 


, .875 


0. 160), 6, 8 


3100 DRAW'BMl 12, 92; C8; N; L20; 68; D 


2790 


RETURN 


12; 64" 


2800 


LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 


31 10 DRAW" BM152, 92; N; R20; F8; D12; 


2810 


LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) , PSET 


F4" 


2820 


LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170) , PSET 


3120 CIRCLE (92, 112) ,20,8, 1, .5, .7 


2830 


DRAW" BM 127, 16; "+LI*+LV* 


5 


2840 


DRAW " BM90 , 185; "+LL*+SP* 


3130 CIRCLE (172, 112) ,20,8, 1, .75, 


2850 


DR AWLE* +LM* : DRAW LP*+LE* : DR 


1 


AW LR*+LE*:DRAWLU*+LR* 


3140 CIRCLE (116, 116) , 16,8, 1,0, .5 


2860 


CIRCLE ( 132, 48) , 4, 8, 1 , 0, 1 


: CIRCLE (148, 116) , 16,8, 1,0, .5 


2870 


CIRCLE ( 132, 52) , 20, 8, 1 , . 5, 1 


3150 CIRCLE (172, 92) , 100,8, (56/10 


2880 


DRAW "BM 132, 40; C8; N;R4; N; D4; 


0) , .22, .471 


N;L4;N;U4" 


3160 DRAWBM72, 1 12; C8; D58; R120; U 


2890 


DRAW'BMl 12, 52; D2" : DRAW "BM 15 


58" 


2,521 


ID2" 


3170 PAINT (180, 168) ,8, 8: PAINT (15 


2900 


CIRCLE ( 1 16, 60) , 8, 8, 1 , . 5, 1 : C 


0, 112) ,7, 8: PAINT (200, 168) ,6,8 


IRCLE(132,60) ,8,8, 1, .5, 1: CIRCLE ( 


3180 RETURN 


148,60) ,8,8, 1, .5, 1 


3190 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 


2910 


DRAW'BMl 08, 60; D4; F8; R8; N; Ul 


3200 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) , PSET 


2$ R16; Hi U12; R8" : DRAWE8; U4; D4; G8 


3210 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170) , PSET 


;D4;L32|U4" 


3220 DRAW " BM 1 27 , 1 6 ; " +LV*+L I * 


2920 


CIRCLE (88, 72) , 28, 8, 1,0,. 25: 


3230 DRAWBM90, 185; "+LL*+SP* 


CIRCLE < 176, 72) ,28,8, 1, .25, .5 


3240 DRAWLA*+LM* : DRAWLO*+LU* : DRA 


2930 


DRAW " BM 1 32 , 76 ; 68 ; L4 ; D20 ; E8 ; 


WLR*+LE*: DRAWLU*+LX* 


R8;F8;U20;L4;H8" 


3250 DRAW " BM 1 32 , 28 ; C8 ; N ; 648 ; N ; D6 


2940 


CIRCLE (104, 108) , 12,8, 1, .25, 


4;N;F48" 


.75: CIRCLE (160, 108) , 12,8, 1, .75, 1 


3260 DRAW " BM 1 3 1 , 30 ; N ; D62 ; R2 ; D62 ; 


: CIRCLE < 160, 108) , 12, 8, 1 , 0, . 25 


R3;64;H4;R8" 


2950 


CIRCLE (104, 148) ,28,8, 1,-75, 


3270 CIRCLE (96, 76) , 12,8, (8/12),. 


1: CIRCLE (160, 148) ,28,8, 1, .5, .75 


375, 1 


2960 


CIRCLE (132, 124), 48, 8, (36/48 


3280 CIRCLE (96, 80) , 12,8, (8/12) , . 


),0, 


.675: CIRCLE (132, 124) ,48,8, (3 


5,1 


6/48) , .925, 1 


3290 CIRCLE (120, 76) , 12,8, (8/12), 



80 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



WHERE'S-IT 

by C.E. Laldlew 

What programs are on this disk? Which 
disk is my WIDGET program? 
WHERE' S-iT will answer these questions 
for you and maintain disk directory index 
files with up to 972 programs in each. 
Completely user-friendly, just run 
WHERE 'S*IT and follow the prompts to: 
Create index fttes holding up to 972 
programs 
Load or save existing index files 
Add, delete or update index files for a 

specific disk 
Sort index files alphabetically with a 
machine language sort 
List index files to screen 
Print index ©Mt with 162 programs to the 
page 

Disk only $19.95 

(32K Extended Color BASIC) 



We are also a dealer for 
the following companies: 
Moreton Bay Software 
Computerware 
Spectrum Projects 
Mark Data, Amdek, Epson 
Pal Creations. Tom Mix 
PBH Computer, Inc. 
Spectral Associates, 
Cognitec, Elite Software 
Prickly Pear. Botek 
Cobra Software 
and many more fine companies 



JARB 

I SOFTWARE | 
I HARDWARE | 

1636 D Avenue, Suite C 
National City, CA 92050 
After hours: 
BBS 619-474-8981 
Orderllne: 
619-474-8982 



T.A.G 

THE 
ADVENTURE 
GENERATOR 




Cassette. ...,.$34.95 
Disk/Amdisk $39.95 



FEATURES 

Creates stand-alone programs 
Up to 100 rooms, 60 objects, 30 command words, and 9 conditional flags 

Supports tape and disk output 
Optional printer output of important sections during creation of ADVENT URE 
Complete documentation 
Includes sample ADVENTURE 
Works with all models of the CoCo except MC-10 
Requires 32K Extended Color BASIC 



^ GRAY LADY 



by Terry A. Steen 

Control your submarine in its efforts to destroy the enemy fleet. You 
must launch your sub to surface missiles while avoiding the depth 
charges. Five different types, hi-res graphics and spectacular 
sounds. Also a talking version included at no extra charge for those 
who have an SC01 based voice pack. Four screens and progressive 
difficulty make this all machine language program a real bargain. 



Cassette: $19.95 



Disk/Amdisk: $24.95 



U.S. COD orders accepted, no charge cards please. 
Shipping and handling $3.00 
California residents please add 6% sales tax 



COLOR TERM + PLUS + 



If you're looking for the finest terminal software you can buy, look no further! And now we've added a high-res fterteii display that 
gives you 32 by 16, 42, 51, or 64 by 24 lines.* And you can switch between the high-res screen and the normal screen without destroying 
what you have in the buffer! + PLUS + we have a buffer editor, complete up and down load support, on-line cassette or disk reads and 
writes, off-line and on-line scrolling, pre-entry of data before calling, word wrap, buffer printing, selective printing, change any 
parameter so you can communicate with any other computer. You can send and receive Basic programs, ASCII file, as well as machine 
code, + PLUS + you can save your buffer to tape (Tape or Rom version) or disk (Disk version). You can communicate with the local 
BBS, Compuserve™, The Source™, the main frame at work or school, other color computers, Apples, IBM PC'S, TRS-80 Model I, II, 
III, IV, 12, 16, 100, or any other computer via RS-232. 




Compare these features with any other terminal program: 
32 x 16, 42, 51, 6x24 Screen 
Communications BAUD Rate: 110-19200 
Printer Baud Rate: 600-9600 
Select Half or Full Duplex. 
Select Odd, Even, or no Parity. 
Select 7 or 8 Bit Words. 
Send Control Characters. 
Send a True Line Break. 
Separate Keys for Escape and Rubout. 
Select All Caps If Needed. 
Word Wrap - Eliminate Split Words. 

(32 Character Mode) 
Selectable Reverse or Normal Video. 

(32 Character Mode) 

•Disk and Rom Pack only (not on tape). PRICE: $29.95 (TAPE) 



BBS 817-387-8381 



HARDWARE 

SUPER PRO KEYBOARD — Mark Data replacement. . $64.95 
DOUBLE SWITCH I — This is our original switch box. Two 
LEDs show you which port is being used, 1 or 2. High quality 

parts, and a new great looking yellow face plate $29.95 

DOUBLE SWITCH II — Same as the above switch box, but we 
have added three RCA jacks, and a switch which allows you to 
switch between your 80 column board output, and your com- 
puter output at a touch instead of unplugging $39.95 

VIDEO SWITCH — Switch between your 80 column board, 
and your computer's output. Two LEDs display the 

device : $19.95 

DOUBLE CABLE — If you don't have a lot of money to spend, 
you can hook a modem and a printer up at the same time using 

this Y-Cable. Works with most printers .$14.95 

WORD PAK (80 Column Board) — This is one of the finest 
pieces of hardware to come along since the CoCo. Allows you 
to display a real 80 column screen, not the graphics that are 
sometimes difficult to read. Comes with a software driver that 

will interface basic into the 80 column board $ 139.95 

Y-CABLE — Used with the WORD PAK when disk drives are 
being used. Not needed if you own some type of multi-port 

device, the Multi-Pak interface for instance $29.95 

DOUBLE DRIVER — Best video driver available for the Color 
Computer. Made by our friends at Moreton Bay Software. 

Specify regular CoCo or CoCo II $24.95 

DOUBLE SPEAKER — This plug-in device gives you sound 

with a monitor. Plugs right in, nothing to solder. $19.95 

HARD DISK DRIVE FOR THE CoCo WITH CONTROLLER: 

5 MEG HARD DISK DRIVE $1299.95 

10 MEG HARD DISK DRIVE $1599.95 

$2.00 shipping and handling on all orders. $3.00 charge on C.O.D. orders, 
Mastercard and VISA accepted. Texas residents add 5% sales tax, Allow 
two weeks for personal checks. 
Send 20 cent stamp for free catalog. 

Double Density Software 



Scroll Protect Up to 9 Lines. 

Automatic Capture of Incoming Files, Send One Line At a 

Time From Your Buffer. 
Has Programmable Prompt for "Send Next Line!!" 
Buffer Size Indicator. 
Complete Up and Down Load Support. 
Improved Buffer Editor. 
On/Off Line Scrolling of Buffer. 
On/Off Cassette or Disk Reads and Writes. 
Pre-Enter Data Before Going On-Line. 
Save/Load Machine Code, Basic Programs or Files. 
Select Printer Line Feeds If Needed or Ignore All Line Feeds 

in Buffer. 

$39.95 (ROM PACK) $39.95 (DISK) 




MasterCard 



920 Baldwin Street 
Denton, Texas 76205 
Phone 817/566-2004 




DOUBLE DOS II 
NEW AND IMPROVED!! Double Dos II is an enhanced version 
of our original DOUBLE DOS program. The original Double 
Dos was so well received that we decided to add even more 
capabilities, and fix some of the limitations in the original pro- 
gram. With Double Dos you can use 35, 40 or 80 track (double 
and single sided) drives all on one system, all at the same time. 
(The use of double sided drives will limit you to three drives.) 
Works with all types of 5*4 or 3 inch drive systems and All com- 
mands are supported in Double Dos! Double Dos is totally 
transparent to your basic programs! If your system selection is 
80 tracks, a FREE command will return 158 granules! Compare 
this to the 68 granules your system now returns. You get 78 
granules with a 40 track drive, 10 more than the 35 track 
system. EVERY command in basic is supported by Double Dos. 
There is only one limitation, you can only open any number of 
files to one drive at a time, otherwise everything else is the 
same. Plus you get some great new commands!! Look at what 
Double Dos will allow as new disk basic commands: 
BAUD 1-6 ... change the BAUD rate with a command, no 
pokes! 

TRACK 35,36,40,80 ... change the number of tracks. 
DOUBLE ... enable the double sided option. 
PDIR ... print your directory to the printer. 
DUMP ON/OFF ... send a basic program to a friend without us- 
ing a terminal program! 

RATE 6,35 ... change the head stepping rate. 

VIDEO ON/OFF ..« will give you a reverse screen without a 

hardware modification. 

SCROLL 1-255 ... change the screen scrolling speed. 
COMMAND ... will list all new commands. 
DUPE 0-2 ... will allow copy & backup from one side of a disk 
to the other side on double sided systems! 
DATE ... you can enter the month, day, and year which will be 
stored in the directory of your disk each time you save a pro- 
gram or file, and you can see it when you use the DIR com- 
mand! Very useful when looking for the most current file or 
program! 

AND, all commands can be used inside basic programs because 
they have been added to disk basics list of commands! You also 
get full reset protection, which means that you will stay in the 
64K mode until you power-down. 
PRICE: $29.95 (DISK ONLY) 64K Required 



REAL EIGHTY-COLUMN DISPLAY! ^ 

ULTRA TERM + # 

PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL 



This program is the ultimate in coco 
communicating!! Ultra Term + is used 
with a plug-in 80 column board* that 
gives you True 80 columns, not the 
graphics display that is unreadable at 80 
columns. This is trury a Professional 
Package that is so easy to use that once 
you have used it, you'll wonder why 
other packages are so difficult to use, (ex- 
cept for Color Term + Plus + that is!) 
After using a terminal program that can- 
not give you True mainframe terminal 
emulation, you will find Ultra Term + 
indispensable! Ultra Term + even has a 
host mode that allows you to echo 
characters like full duplex mainframes 
do! There are also 10 macro keys which 
will allow you to save passwords, phone 
numbers, modem programming informa- 
tion, etc. + PLUS + you can save them to 
disk. Also, like all Professional terminal 
programs you can save your current pa- 
rameters. This saves you set up time when 
moving from one system to another. 
+ Plus+ when used with the parallel 
printer port' ■ you can print what is com- 
ing in. And what about documentation? 
Every feature is explained in detail and 
indexed for fast look up! There is also a 
comprehensive help section to aid those 
unfamiliar with telecommunications. 
Although this program was designed for 
the Professional a total novice can use it 
with ease. Check all the features listed 
below and then you decide who has the 
world s smartest terminal! 
Baud Rates: 1 10-4800 (communicate) 

600-9600 (printer). 
Screen Format: 80 x 25 w/true upper & 

lower case. 
Select half, full duplex or echo. 
Select odd, even, mark, space or no parity. 



Send all 128 characters from keyboard. 
Select 7 or 8 bit words. 
Select 1 or 2 stop bits. 
Send a true line break. 
Select all caps if needed. 
Automatic capture of incoming files. 
X on/X off capabilities. 
Merge text or programs in buffer. 
53,000 character buffer (64K). 
Send and receive BASIC, FILES and 
machine code. 
10 macro keys. 

Four buffer send modes (dump, 

prompted, manual & time delay). 
Buffer size indicators (bytes used & 

bytes remaining). 
Buffer editor w/auto key repeat. 
Scroll forward & reverse to view buffer 

& print viewed screen option. 
Selectable printer formats (line feeds, 

etc.). 

Selectable trapping (if incoming 

characters. 
Print while receiving data* 
Buffer editor has these features: 
Move forward and reverse through 
buffer. Insert, type over, delete lines 
or characters. 

Block deletion or start to end of buffer 

delete. 
Save and load macros. 
Save and load parameters. 
Use 1-4 disk drive (w/SAVE, LOAD, DIR. 

& granule display). 
Easy to use MENU driven format. 
Comprehensive users manual. 
Works with ALL Radio Shack™ Disk 

Systems and all models of color 

computers. 

Still not convinced? How about a 15 
day, money back guarantee? If you don't 
like the package for any reason, we will 



refund your money upon return of a like- 
new package. t Who out there is offering 
you this kind of deal? And customer sup- 
port was never better. Simply fill out your 
registration card and send it back to us 
and you will be notified when new 
features, improvements, etc. become 
available because all registered owners 
will receive Free upgrades for a $5:00 
shipping and handling fee). 

As with all good Professional programs, 
Ultra Term + is all machine code. This 
program has been tested by those both 
familiar and unfamiliar with communica- 
tions programs. And when you call for 
some technical support, you won't get an 
answering machine during our business 
hours ( 10-5 CST M-Sat .) under normal cir- 
cumstances. Technical help is usually 
available all day. 

PRICE: Ultra Term + - $55.95 (Disk) 
Word*Pak (80-eolumn board; in- 
cludes a software driver so you 
can use your basic programs 
with no modification in most 
cases!), . , .$139.95 + $3.00 S&H 

Y-Cable $29.95 (Required if 
expansion port not used with 
disk drives) 
Complete Package Ultra Term + , 
Word Pak & Y Cable [subtract $20. (Ml if 
not needed] is only $210.00 

'Ultra Term + supports the 80 column 
board made by PBJ. Inc. If you already 
have the board, simply order the pro- 
gram, but those of you who don't can get 
a good deal. 

'•Parallel Printer Port from PBJ, Inc. 
tLess $10.00 restocking charge. 



DOUBLE SPOOLER 

Tired of waiting for your listings? print 
outs? etc.? This is THE Spooling Program!! 
No need to save your programs in ASCII. 
You can also spool your files and you can 
spool ANYTHING you print on the screen 
while a program is running! Requires a 
minimum of 32K AND the 64K computer 
can spool really LARGE files!! Plus more!! 
PRICE: $19.95 (Tape) $21.95 (Disk) 

DOUBLE MAILER 

At last a powerful, easy to use, mailing 
list program for a reasonable price. Up to 
200 names can he held in memory for you 
to change, modify, search or print as you 
like. Plus, you can print out up to 1800 
names without touching the keyboard. 
Save thousands of names on each disk. 
The machine language sort routine will 
sort 200 names in as little as 6 seconds! 
Supports single or double wide labels. 
Three and four line labels can be inter 
mixed without leaving gaps in your 
listings! All menu driven, and easy to use. 
Printer support gives 600-9600 BAUD 
selection, and different print sizes if you 
wish. 16K Extended 



Double 80 Plus 

Announcing a BREAK-THROUGH! Now you can own an 80 column board for $99.95. 
And you can choose the software you want to buy instead of being charged for 
something you don't want. Y-Cable available for use with disk drives. Look at these 
features and compare: 
TRUE 80 COLUMN OUTPUT 

BUILT IN SWITCH FOR COCO OR DOUBLE 80 PLUS 

ADJUSTABLE VIDEO OUTPUT 

GOLD PLATED EDGE CONNECTOR 

DRIVERS AVAILABLE FOR BASIC, OS9 and FLEX 

DISPLAY ALL ASCII CHARACTERS 

ALTERNATE CHARACTER SETS AVAILABLE 

METAL CASE (not cheap plastic) 

ULTRA TERM + available for this board 

BACKED BY A 90 DAY PARTS AND LABOR WARRANTY 

PRICES: DOUBLE 80 PLUS (80 column board) $99.95 

Y-CABLE . .29.95 

BASIC DRIVER 12.95 

OS9 DRIVER 12.95 

FLEX DRIVER (available soon) 12.95 

ULTRA TERM + (disk only) 55.95 



0,-5 

3300 CIRCLE < 120, 80) , 12,8, (8/12), 
0, .5 

3310 CIRCLE < 144, 76), 12,8, (8/12), 
0,.5 

3320 CIRCLE (144, 80) , 12,8, (8/12) , 
0, .5 

3330 CIRCLE (168, 76) , 12,8, (8/12), 
.3, 1 

3340 CIRCLE (168, 76), 12,8, (8/12), 
0, . 173 

3350 CIRCLE < 168, 80) , 12,8, (8/12) , 
.3, 1 

3360 CIRCLE (88, 120), 12,8, 1,-23, 1 
3370 CIRCLE (112, 120), 12, 8,1,. 5,1 
3380 CIRCLE (112, 120) , 12,8, 1,0, .2 
5 

3390 CIRCLE ( 152, 120) , 12, 8, 1 , . 25, 
1 

3400 CIRCLE (176, 120) , 12,8, 1, .5, 1 
3410 CIRCLE (176, 120) , 12,8, 1,0, .2 
5 

3420 DRAW "BM 100, 148; N; H20; N; E20" 
3430 DRAW "BM 164, 148; N; H20; N; E20" 
3440 PAINT (112, 120), 8, 8: PAINT (17 
6, 120), 8, 8 

3450 PAINT (200, 168) ,7, 8: PAINT (14 
4,76) ,7, 8: PAINT (120, 76), 7, 8 
3460 RETURN 

3470 LINE (50, 190)-(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
3480 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20), PSET 
3490 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170), PSET 
3500 DRAW "BM127, 16; " +L V*+L I*+LI* 
35 1 0 DRAW " BM90 , 1 85 ; " +LL*+LE*+SP* 
3520 DRAWLC*+LH*:DRAW LA*+LR«:DR 
AW LI»+LO«+LT* 

3530 CIRCLE (124, 36) ,2,8, (4/2),. 7 
5, 1 : CIRCLE ( 124, 36) ,2, 8, (4/2) , 0, . 
25 

3540 CIRCLE (124, 40), 8, 8,1,. 75, l: 
CIRCLE (96, 44) , 20, 8, ( 16/20) , 0, . 25 
3550 CIRCLE (124, 52) , 12,8, 1, . 125, 
. 375: CIRCLE ( 1 12, 68) , 8, 8, 1 , . 5, 1 
3560 CIRCLE (124, 52) , 12,8, 1, .625, 
.75 

3570 DRAW "BM104,68;C8;H4;U8 n 
3580 CIRCLE (132, 92) ,28,8, 1, .5, .7 
5: CIRCLE (132, 92) ,28,8, (52/28) , .7 
5,1 

3590 DRAW " BM 1 32 , 92 ; C8 ; N ; L28 ; R28 " 
3600 CIRCLE (132, 132) ,28,8, 1,0, 1: 
CIRCLE ( 132, 132) , 20, 8,1,0,1 
3610 CIRCLE (132, 132) ,8,8, 1,0, 1 
3620 DRAW "BM 128, 128; CB; N; L16; N; U 

16;C5;R8;C8;N;U16;N;R16" 

3630 DRAW"C5;D8;C8;N;R16;N;D16;C 

5;L8; C8;N;L16;D16" 

3640 PAINT (132, 90) ,7, 8: PAINT (144 



, 120), 8, 8: PAINT (120, 120) ,8,8: PAI 
NT (120, 140) ,8, 8: PAINT (144, 140) ,8 
,8: PAINT (200, 168) ,8,8 
3650 RETURN 

3660 LINE (50, 190) -(220,1 ), PSET, B 
3670 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) , PSET 
3680 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170), PSET 
3690 DRAW'BMl 17, 16; "+LV*+LI»: DRA 
WLI4+LI* 

3700 DRAW"BM90, 185; "+LL«+LA*+SP« 

:drawlj*+lu*:draw ls*+lt*:draw l 

I*+LC*+LE* 

3710 CIRCLE (132, 36) ,4,8, 1,0, l:DR 
AW" BM132, 40; C8; 84; D16; L28; D4; R32 

;n;H4;R32;U4" 

3720 DRAW"L28;N;64;U16;H4" 
3730 LINE (100, 64) -(92, 88) , PSET 
3740 LINE (100, 64) -(108, 88) , PSET 
3750 LINE (164, 64) -(156, 88) , PSET 
3760 LINE (164, 64) -(172, 88) , PSET 
3770 CIRCLE (100, 88) ,8,8, 1,0, .5 
3780 DRAW " BM92 , 88 ; C8 I R 1 6 " 
3790 CIRCLE (164, 88), 8, 8, 1,0, .5 
3800 DRAW"BM156,88;C8;R16" 
3810 DRAWBM76, H6;C8;D4;F4;L4;D 
32; R4; 84; D4; R8" : draw h U4; H4; R4; U3 
2;L4;E4;U4;L8" 

3820 DRAWBM76, 136; L12; D4; H4; L4; 

D8;R4;E4;D4;R12" 

3830 LINE (212, 140) -(84, 136) , PSET 
3840 LINE (212, 140) -(84, 144), PSET 
3850 PAINT (132, 44) ,7, 8: PAINT (68, 
140) ,7, 8: PAINT (200, 168) ,6,8 
3860 PAINT (100, 80) ,6, 8: PAINT (164 
,80) ,6,8 

3870 PAINT (100, 90) ,8, 8: PAINT (164 
,90) ,8,8 
3880 RETURN 

3890 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1), PSET, B 
3900 LINE (50, 20) - (220, 20) , PSET 
3910 LINE (50, 170) - (220, 170) , PSET 
3920 DRAW'BMl 27, 16; "+LI*+LX* 
3930 DRAW "BM 100, 185; "+LL*+SP* 
3940 DRAW LE*+LR*: DRAW LM*+LI*:D 
RAW LT*+LE* 

3950 CIRCLE (176, 52) ,8,8, 1, .5, l:C 
IRCLE(176,52) , 12,8, 1, .5, 1 
3960 DRAW"BM188,52;C8;62;H2" 
3970 DRAW"BM167,52;D92;R4;U92" 
3980 CIRCLE (92, 72), 8, 8, (12/8),. 5 
,1 

3990 DRAW " BM99 , 72 ; L 1 6 " 

4000 CIRCLE (92, 72), 12, 8, (16/12), 

.5, 1 

4010 DRAW" BM80 , 72 ; L8 ; D52 ; R4 ; U4 I R 

32;D4;R4;U52;L8" 

4020 DRAW " BM76 , 76 ; D40 | R 1 2 I N ; R8 | U 
8; R8; D8; R12; U40; L32" 



84 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



4030 DRAW " BM92 , 96; N; E8; N; R8; N; F8 

; N; D8; N; G8; N; L8; N; H8; U8" 

4040 PAINT(110, 114) ,7,8:PAINT(16 

9, 140) J 7, 8: PAINT < 200, 168) , 6, 8: PA 

INT (100, 70) ,7,8 

4050 PAINT < 92, 70) ,6,8 

4060 RETURN 

4070 LINE <50, 190) -(230, 1),PSET,B 

4080 LINE <50, 20) -(230,20) ,PSET:L 

INE(50, 170) -(230, 170) ,PSET 

4090 DRAW"BM128, 16; " +L X * : DRAW " BM 

55, 185; "+LL*+LA*+SP* 

4100 DRAW LR*+LO*:DRAW LU«+LE*+S 

P«:DRAW LD*+LE*+SP* 

4110 DRAW lf*+lo*:drawlr*+lt*:dr 

AW LU*+LN*+LE* 

4120 CIRCLE (132, 60), 4, 8, 1,0,1: CI 
RCLE (132, 60) ,8,8, 1,0, l: CIRCLE (13 
2,60) ,24,8, 1,0, l: CIRCLE (132, 60), 
32,8,1,0,1 

4130 DRAW"BM132,60;C8;N;E18;N;F1 

8;N;G18;N;H18" 

4140 DRAWBM130,57;U25;L6;E8;F8; 
L6;D25" 

4150 CIRCLE (144, 104) ,38,8, (20/38 
),0, .25 

4160 CIRCLE (184, 104) ,4,8, 1, .5, 1: 
CIRCLE ( 108, 104) , 80, 8, (64/80) , 0, . 
25 

4170 CIRCLE (144, 132) ,8,8, 1, .5, l: 
CIRCLE(142, 132) ,6,8, 1, .5, 1 
4180 CIRCLE < 108, 132) ,44,8, (36/44 
) , 0, . 25: CIRCLE ( 108, 132) , 40, 8, (32 
/40) ,0, .25 

4190 CIRCLE (108, 132) ,28,8, 1,0, .2 

5: CIRCLE (108, 164) ,4,8, 1, .25, .75: 

CIRCLE (108, 162) ,4,8, 1, .25, .75 

4200 CIRCLE (104, 116) , 12,8, 1, .5, 1 

: CIRCLE (104, 116) ,8,8, 1, .5, 1 

4210 DRAW"BM112, 116;D12;R4;U12": 

DRAWBM92, 1 16; D12; R4; U12" 

4220 CIRCLE (80, 144) ,8,8, 1, .5, l:C 

I RCLE (80, 144) , 4, 8, 1 , . 5, 1 

4230 DRAW " BM72 , 1 44 ; D8 ; R4 ; U8 " : DRA 

W " BM84 , 144;D8;R4;U8" 

4240 PAINT (132, 26) ,8, 8: PAINT (132 

,30) ,8, 8: PAINT (132, 34) ,8,8 

4250 PAINT (132, 44) ,8, 8: PAINT (132 

,60) ,8, 8: PAINT (116,60) ,8,8 

4260 PAINT (148, 60) ,7, 8: PAINT (142 

, 140) ,7, 8: PAINT (200, 168) ,6,8 

4270 RETURN 

4280 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
4290 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) ,PSET:L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) , PSET 
4300 DRAW" BM 126, 16; "+LX*+LI* 
4310 DRAW " BM 1 00 , 185; "+LL*+LA*+SP 
* 



4320 DRAW LF*+LO*: DRAW LR*+LC*+ 
LE* 

4330 CIRCLE (96, 54) , 16,8, 1,0, l: CI 

RCLE (168, 54) , 16,8, 1,0, 1 

4340 DRAW "BM 156, 52; C8; L12J D4; N; R 

12;D4;G4;D4" 

4350 LINE (140, 68) -(148, 100) , PSET 
4360 DRAW " BM 1 44 , 5 2 ; H4 ; G4 ; L4 ; D4 ; R 
8;G4;D4" 

4370 DRAW " BM 1 40 , 48 ; L4 ; N ; D4 ; L4 ; N ; 
D6; L4; N; D6; L4; D6; N; R8" 
4380 DRAW"BM124,56;D4;F4;D4" 
4390 DRAWBM128, 1 16; R4" : DRAWBMl 

24, 52; L12" : DRAWBMl 24, 56; L12" 
4400 DRAW"BM124,56;R16" 

4410 DRAW"BM208,92;E12" 

4420 CIRCLE (128, 92) ,8,8, (24/8),. 

25, .75 

4430 CIRCLE (164, 100) , 16,8, 1, .5, 1 
: CIRCLE (200, 100) ,20,8, (12/20) , .5 
, .875 

4440 CIRCLE (156, 116) ,24,8, (8/24) 
,0, .5: CIRCLE (220, 116) ,40,8, (32/4 
0) , .25, .5 

4450 CIRCLE (164, 144) ,20,8, 1, .75, 
l: CIRCLE (200, 128) , 16,8, (42/16) , . 

25, .5 

4460 PAINT (96, 54) ,7, 8: PAINT (120, 
54) ,7,8: PAINT ( 128, 55) ,7,8 
4470 PAINT (168, 54) ,7, 8: PAINT (148 
,54) ,7, 8: PAINT (200, 54) ,8,8 
4480 RETURN 

4490 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
4500 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) ,PSET:L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) ,PSET 
4510 DRAW " BM 121, 16; "+LX*+LI*+LI* 
4520 DRAWBMl 00, 185; "+LL*+LE*+SP 
* 

4530 drawlp*+le*:drawln*+ld*+lu* 

4540 DRAW " BM 104,36; C8; D12; R60; Dt 
22;R12;U134;L72" 

4550 DRAW " BM 1 20 , 36 ; D24 ; R2 ; U24 ; D2 

4;R6;U4;L16;D24;n;d16;L4" 

4560 DRAW64; D20; R16; U16; N; U8; Rl 

2;U16;L4;D8;L8;U20" 

4570 DRAW" BM104, 104; L4; D8; L4; G4; 

D20; F4; R32; E4; U12; H4" 

4580 DRAWL4;U16;L4" 

4590 DRAWBMl 24, 120; L16; D8; R16; D 

4" 

4600 DRAW " BM 1 24 , 1 20 ; L24 ; D 1 2 " 

4610 DRAWBMl 12, 120; Nl D8; N; U8; R2 

;N;U8;N;D8;R4;U8;L18" 

4620 CIRCLE (112, 148) ,8,8, 1,0, 1 

4630 DRAWBMl 04, 148; D12; F4; N; U10 

; R4; N; U8; R4; N; U10; E4; U12" 

4640 PAINT (116, 88) , 8, 8: PAINT ( J 2-4 

,58) ,8,8 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 85 



4650 PAINT < 112, 148), 8, 8: PAINT < 12 
4, 84), 8, 8 

4660 PAINT < 106, 158) ,7,8: PAINT < 1 1 

0, 158) , 7, 8: PAINT ( 1 14, 158) , 7, 8: PA 

INT < 118, 158), 7, 8 

4670 PAINT <200, 168) , 6, 8 

4680 RETURN 

4690 LINE <50, 190) - (220, 1 ) , PSET, B 
4700 LINE (50, 20)- (220, 20) , PSET: L 
INE (50, 170) - (220, 170) , PSET 
4710 DRAW'BMl 19, 16; " -»-LX*-«-L I * : DRA 
W LI*+LI* 

4720 DRAW "BM 105, 185; "+LL*+LA»+SP 
* 

4730 DRAW LM*+LO*:DRAW LR4+LT* 
4740 CIRCLE ( 132, 64) , 28, 8, (24/28) 
, .375, 1: CIRCLE (132, 64) ,28,8, (24/ 
28) ,0, . 125 

4750 CIRCLE (132, 80) , 16,8, 1,0, .5 
4760 LINE (132, 64) -(136, 76) , PSET 
4770 LINE (136, 76) -(128, 76) , PSET: 
LINE (128, 76) -(132, 64) , PSET 
4780 DRAW " BM 1 28 , 64 ; C8 ; H4 ; L8 ; G4 ; D 

4;F4;R8;E4;U4" 

4790 DRAW M BM 1 36 , 64 ; E4 ; R8 ; F4 ; D4 ; B 

4;L8;H4;U4" 

4800 CIRCLE (104, 106) ,4,8, (6/4) ,0 
,1 

4810 CIRCLE(160, 106), 4, 8, (6/4), 0 
,1 

4820 CIRCLE (104, 142), 4, 8, (6/4), 0 
,1 

4830 CIRCLE (160, 142), 4, 8, (6/4), 0 
,1 

4840 LINE (104, 104) -(160, 140), PSE 
T 

4850 LINE (104, 108) -(160, 144), PSE 
T 

4860 LINE (104, 140) -(160, 104) , PSE 
T 

4870 LINE (104, 144) -(160, 108) , PSE 
T 

4880 PAINT (120, 64) ,8, 8: PAINT (144 
, 64) , 8, 8: PAINT (200, 168) , 8, 8 
4890 RETURN 

4900 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
4910 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) , PSET: L 
INE (50, 170) -(220, 170) , PSET 
4920 DRAW "BM 120, 16; "+LX«+LI»: DRA 
WLV* 

4930 DRAW " BM87 , 1 85 | " +LT*+LE* : DRA 
W LM*+LP»:DRAW LE*+LR*: DRAWLA*+L 
N»:DRAWLC*+LE» 

4940 CIRCLE (132, 28), 12,8, (6/12), 
0, l: CIRCLE (132, 48), 12,8, 1,0, 1 
4950 DRAW"BM132,40;C8;N;L8;R8" 
4960 CIRCLE (172, 56) , 12,8, 1, .625, 
1 : CIRCLE ( 172, 56) , 12, 8,1,0,. 125 



4970 CIRCLE (92, 56), 12, 8,1,. 325, . 
875: CIRCLE ( 132, 96) , 20, 8, (36/20) , 
.5,1 

4980 DRAW " BM 1 00 , 48 ; C8 ; F20 ; 620 ; N ; 

F12;64;D4;R4;E4" 

4990 DRAW " BM 1 64 , 48 ; 620 ; F20 ; N ; 6 1 2 

;F4;D4;L4;H4" 

5000 CIRCLE (84, 96) , 8, 8, (32/8) , . 7 
5,1: CIRCLE (84, 96), 8, 8, (32/8), 0,. 
25 

5010 CIRCLE (180, 96), 8, 8, (32/8),. 
25, .75: CIRCLE (98, 128) , 14,8, (8/14 
) , .5, l: CIRCLE (166, 128) , 14,8, (8/1 
4), .5,1 

5020 DRAW"BM112,96;D48;68;R56$H8 
;U48 M 

5030 PAINT (132, 28) ,7, 8: PAINT (200 
, 168) ,7,8 
5040 RETURN 

5050 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
5060 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20), PSET: L 
INE (50, 170) - (220, 170) , PSET 
5070 DRAW "BM 125, 16; "+LX«+LV* 
5080 DRAWBM95, 185; " +LL*+LE*+SP1i 
: DRAWLD*+LI«: DRAWL A«+LB*: DRAWLL* 
+LE* 

5090 CIRCLE (152, 36) ,8,8, 1, .875, 1 
: CIRCLE ( 152, 36) , 8, 8, 1 , 0, . 25 
5100 CIRCLE (148, 40) , 12,8, 1, .875, 
l: CIRCLE (148, 40), 12,8, 1,0, . 125 
5110 CIRCLE (112, 36) ,8,8, 1, .25, .6 
25: CIRCLE (116, 40) , 12,8, 1, .375, .6 
25 

5120 CIRCLE (132, 64) ,32,8, (24/32) 
, .5, 1: CIRCLE (132, 56) , 16,8, (8/16) 
,0, .5 

5130 CIRCLE (116, 64) ,28,8, (40/28) 
, .375, .625: CIRCLE (148, 64) ,28,8, ( 
40/28) , . 875, 1 : CIRCLE ( 148, 64) , 28, 
8, (40/28) ,0, . 125 

5 1 40 DRAW " BM 1 04 , 52 ; C8 ; H 1 2 " : DRAW " 
BM160,52;E12" 

5150 DRAW'BMl 16, 56; 64; D8; F4; R8; E 

8;F8;R8;E4;U8;H4" 

5 1 60 DRAW " BM96 , 84 | E4 I F32 | E32 ; F4 " 
5170 CIRCLE (132, 128) ,26,8, (36/26 
) , 0, . 5: CIRCLE ( 132, 128) , 22, 8, (32/ 
22) ,0, .5 

5180 DRAW'BMl 08, 120; C8; 68; R16; H8 
" : DRAW'BMl 32, 120; 68; R16; H8" : DRAW 
"BM156, 120;68;R16;H8" 
5190 DRAW"BM130, 128; D42; R4; U42" 
5200 PAINT (132, 52), 8, 8: PAINT (108 
, 126) ,7, 8: PAINT (132, 126) ,7,8:PAI 
NT (156, 126) ,7, 8: PAINT (110, 130) ,7 
, 8: PAINT ( 132, 130) , 7, 8: PAINT ( 154, 
130) ,7, 8: PAINT (132, 168) ,7,8 
5210 RETURN 



86 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



5220 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1>,PSET,B 
5230 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) ,PSET:l_ 
INE(50,170)-(220, 170),PSET 
5240 DRAW " BM 1 20 , 1 6 J " +L X*+L V* : DRA 
WLI* 

5250 DRAW ■ BM55 , 185) " +LL*+L A*+SP* 
: DR AWLM* +L A* : DRAWL I *+LS$ : DRAWLO* 
+LN*+SP*: DRAWLD»+LE*+SP«: DRAWLD* 
+L I * : DR AWLE* +LU* 

5260 CIRCLE (112, 100) , 12,8, 1, .5, 1 
5270 DRAW " BM50 , 1 24 J C8 ; R52 ; N S U24 ; 
R24 ; N ; U24 ; R44 ; N ; R52 ; U60 ; L8 " 
5280 DRAW"BM160,64;N;D12SU12;L8; 
N; L16; U8; Ni L8" : DRAW "BM 152, 44; R4; 

U8;L4;n;L4}U8;L8;D8;L8;D8;li6;D1 

6JL12" 

5290 LINE (180, 44) -(184, 56) ,PSET, 

B: LINE (208, 48) -(200, 60) ,PSET,B:L 

INE(184,64)-(176,80) ,PSET,B:LINE 

(186, 80) -(188, 92) ,PSET,B 

5300 LINE (188, 108) -(196, 116) ,PSE 

T,B 

5310 DRAW"BM184, 100; L8; U8J F8" : LI 
NE( 144, 64) -(128, 84) ,PSET,B 
5320 DRAWBM92, 36; 612; H8; 68; H8; 6 
8; D16; F12; E8" : DRAW " BM68 , 68 ; F8 ; 64 

; F4 ; E8 ; F4 ; 64 ; F4 ; E8 ; F8 " 

5330 DRAW " BM 1 04 , 88 ; E8 ; H4 ; E8 ; H 1 6 ; 

64;n;64;h4;E8;H8" 

5340 LINE (88, 64) -(72, 64) ,PSET,B: 
LINE (144, 84) -(128, 64) ,PSET,B 
5350 LINE (120, 152) -(208, 132) ,PSE 
T: LINE (108, 156) -(208, 136) ,PSET 
5360 LINE (120, 152) -(132, 140) ,PSE 
T: LINE (108, 156) -(120, 144) ,PSET 
5370 LINE (132, 140) -(72, 152) ,PSET 
: LINE (120, 144) -(72, 156),PSET 
5380 DRAW " BM208 , 1 32 ; D4 " 
5390 LINE (72, 148) -(76, 160), PSET: 
DRAW" BM76, 160; L 16; El 2" 
5400 PAINT (112, 100) ,7, 8: PAINT (13 
2, 80) , 7, 8: PAINT (200, 168) ,8,8: PAI 
NT (190, 100) ,7,8 
5410 RETURN 

5420 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
5430 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20), PSET: L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) ,PSET 
5440 DRAW'BMl 10, 16; " +LX*+LV* : DRA 
W LI*+LI* 

5450 DRAW'BMl 05, 188; " +LL*+SP* : DR 
AW LE*+LT* : DRAW LO*+LI*: DRAW LL* 
+LE* 

5460 DRAW " BM 1 32 , 36 ; C8 ; D48 " 
5470 LINE (132, 36) -(160, 124) , PSET 
: LINE ( 132, 36) - ( 104, 124) , PSET 
5480 LINE (180, 68) -(132, 84) , PSET: 
LINE (180, 68) -(104, 124) , PSET: LINE 
( 180, 68) -(84, 68) , PSET 



5490 LINE (160, 124) -(132,36), PSET 

: LINE (160, 124)-(132,84>;PSET:LIN 

E(160, 124) -(84, 68), PSET 

5500 LINE (132, 84) -(104, 124) , PSET 

: LINE (132, 84) -(84, 68) , PSET 

5510 PAINT (200, 168), 7, 8 

5520 RETURN 

5530 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) , PSET, B 
5540 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) , PSET: L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) ,PSET 
5550 DRAW'BMl 10, 16; "+LX*+LV«: DRA 
W LI*+LI*+LI* 

5560 DRAW'BMl 05, 185; "+LL*+LA»+SP 

*:draw ll*+lu*:draw ln*+le* 

5570 CIRCLE (132,54) ,26,8, 1,0, l:C 
IRCLE ( 132, 60) , 32, 8,1,0,1 
5580 CIRCLE (120, 104) ,8,8, (12/8) , 
0, .75: CIRCLE (120, 104) ,8,8, (12/8) 
, .875, 1 

5590 CIRCLE(144, 104) ,8,8, (12/8) , 
0, .625: CIRCLE (144, 104) ,8,8, (12/8 
),.75, 1 

5600 DRAW'BMl 20, 104; C8; N; U12; E8" 
5610 DRAWBM144, 104;N;U12;H8" 
5620 CIRCLE (132, 116) ,4: CIRCLE (13 
2, 116), 12,8, 1, .3, .5: CIRCLE (132, 1 
16), 12,8, 1,0, .2 

5630 CIRCLE (132, 116) , 16,8, 1, .31, 



FOR GIRLS ONLY! 

^ An easy-to-use program in high resolution 

^ color that will attract little girls to computers. 

THE DESIGNER: Create original clothes for a 
high-fashion model, using more than 1 ,000 style 
combinations in thousands of color and fabric 
options, or design your own original fabrics from 
textures, stripes and plaids in color combina- 
tions almost never seen on the Color Computer. 
The memory "closet" will hold up to 30 different 
outfits at once, so girls can save their favorites and 
show them off. Simple to use and an excellent 
manual is included. 
Program requires 32K Extended Color Basic 

Disk: $24.95 

Name: 

Address: 

City: r .-State: - - - _ - Zip: - - - - - 

COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT CO 

Enclosed is my check for $24.95 
Charge my Q Visa or O Mastercard 

Card# Exp. date: 

Signature: 

Suite 141 A 12345 Lake City Way, NE 

Seattle, WA 98125 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 87 



. 56:CIRCLE< 132, 116) , 16,8, 1,0, . 18 
: CIRCLE (132, 116) , 16,8, 1, .94, 1 
5640 CIRCLE < 132, 140), 8, 8, (24/8), 
0,1 

5650 CIRCLE (124, 152), 8, 8,1,. 125, 
.75 

5660 CIRCLE (140,152), 8, 8,1,. 75, 1 
: CIRCLE (140, 152) ,8,8, 1,0, .375 
5670 PAINT (132, 54) ,7, 8: PAINT (120 
, 108) ,8, 8: PAINT (144, 108) ,8,8:PAI 
NT ( 132, 1 16) , 8, 8: PAINT ( 120, 122) , 8 
,8:PAINT(144, 122) ,8,8:PAINT(132, 
140) ,8,8:PAINT(120, 152) , 8, 8: PAIN 
T(144, 152), 8, 8 
5680 PAINT (200, 168) ,7,8 
5690 RETURN 

5700 LINE (50, 190) -(220,1 ),PSET,B 
5710 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) ,PSET:L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) ,PSET 
5720 DRAW" BM 120, 16 J "+LX«+LI*+LX* 
5730 DRAW"BM95, 185; " +LL*+LE«+SP* 
5740 DRAW LS*+LO«:DRAW LL*+LE*:D 
RAW LI*+LL* 

5750 CIRCLE (132, 80), 40, 8, 1,0, l:C 
IRCLE(132,80) ,44,8, 1 , 0, 1 : CIRCLE ( 
132, 80) , 52, 8,1,0,1: CIRCLE ( 132, 80 
) , 64, 8,1,0,1: CIRCLE ( 132, 80) , 80, 8 
, 1 , . 875, 1 : CIRCLE ( 132, 80) , 80, 8, 1 , 
0, .625 

5760 PAINT (132, 80) ,8, 8: PAINT (174 
,80) ,7, 8: PAINT (180, 80) ,7, 8: PAINT 
(188,80) ,7, 8: PAINT (200, 80) ,7,8: P 
AINT(216,80) ,7,8 
5770 RETURN 

5780 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
5790 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) ,PSET:L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) ,PSET 
5800 DRAW " BM 1 20 , 16; "+LX*+LX*: DRA 
WLI* 

5810 DRAW"BM85, 185; " +LL*+LE*+SP* 
: DRAW LJ*+LU*:DRAW LG*+LE* : DRAW 
LM*+LE* : DRAW LN*+LT* 
5820 CIRCLE (120, 52) ,20,8, 1, .5, l: 
CIRCLE (84, 68) ,28,8, 1, .0625, .875: 
CIRCLE (156, 72) ,24,8, 1,0, .5: CIRCL 
E ( 176, 60) , 20, 8, 1 , . 75, 1 : CIRCLE ( 17 
6, 60) , 20, 8,1,0,. 25: CIRCLE ( 168, 44 
), 12, 8,1, .5,1 

5830 DRAW " BM 1 68 , 20 ; C8 ; G28 ; F4 ; E32 

•I 

5840 CIRCLE (104, 4) ,60,8, 1, . 125, . 
25: CIRCLE (182, 82), 52, 8, 1, .5, .625 
5850 CIRCLE (104, 76) ,24,8, (12/24) 
, .75, l: CIRCLE (104, 70) ,2,8, (6/2), 
.25, .75: CIRCLE (128, 76) ,24,8, (12/ 
24) , . 25, . 5: CIRCLE (128, 82) , 2, 8, (6 
/2) , . 75, 1 : CIRCLE ( 128, 82) , 2, 8, (6/ 
2) ,0, .25 



5860 DRAW 11 BM 132, 128|C8|L32;D4;R5 

2;D8;N;Ri2;L4;D4;R20;U4iL4" 

5870 DRAW "BM 132, 128; R20; U8; L4; U4 

; R20; D4; L4; N; L12; D20" 

5880 PAINT (200, 168) ,7,8 
5890 RETURN 

5900 LINE (50, 190) -(220,1 ),PSET,B 
5910 LINE (50, 20) -(220, 20) ,PSET:L 
INE(50, 170) -(220, 170) ,PSET 
5920 DRAW " BM 1 20 , 16; "+LX*+LX*: DRA 
WLI* 

5930 draw " bm 1 00 , 1 85 ; " +ll*+le*+sp 
*:draw lm*+lo*:draw lnk+ld*+le« 

5940 CIRCLE (132, 88) ,48,8, 1,0, 1 
5950 DRAW " BM 1 20 , 40 ; C8 ; D 1 2 ; R8 ; E4 ; 
R16; D8; L28; 68; D16; F4; R12; D24" 
5960 DRAW "BM 128, 108; F12? E16; U16; 

E8;H16;R4;F12;E12" 

5970 PAINT (132, 88) ,6, 8: PAINT (100 
,88) ,7,8 
5980 RETURN 

5990 LINE (50, 190) -(220, 1) ,PSET,B 
6000 LINE (50, 170) -(220, 170), PSET 
60 1 0 DRAW " BM 1 1 5 , 1 85 ; " +LL*+LE*+SP 
*:DRAW LM*+LA«+LT* 
6020 CIRCLE (152, 68) ,28,8, 1, .5, l: 
CIRCLE (160, 68) ,20,8, 1, .5, l: CIRCL 
E(152,72) , 12,8, 1, .5, l: CIRCLE (156 
,72), 8, 8, 1,.5, 1 : CIRCLE (112, 72), 1 
2, 8, 1 , . 5, 1 : CIRCLE ( 108, 72) ,8,8,1, 
.5, 1 

6030 CIRCLE (132, 88) ,24,8, 1, .625, 
.875: CIRCLE (132, 88) ,20,8, 1,0, 1 
6040 DR AW " BM 1 1 6 , 72 ; C8 ; D4 ; R32 | U4 " 
6050 CIRCLE (132, 76), 16,8,1,. 125, 
. 375: CIRCLE ( 132, 76) , 16, 8, (24/ 16) 
, .1,-42 

6060 CIRCLE (116, 88) , 12,8, 1, .25, . 
75: CIRCLE (148, 88) , 12,8, 1,-75, ISC 
IRCLE ( 148, 88) , 12,8, 1 , 0, . 25 
6070 DRAW " BM 116, 100; C8; 620; R12; D 

12;E12;F12;E12;F12;U12;R12;H20" 

6080 PAINT (132, 60) ,8, 8: PAINT (152 

,60) ,7, 8: PAINT (132, 72), 8, 8: PAINT 

(132,95) ,8, 8: PAINT (108, 88) ,7,8: P 

AINT(156,88),7,8 

6090 PAINT (200, 168) ,6,8 

6100 RETURN 

6110 PLAY" XA3«; " : RETURN 

6120 CLS:PRINTe38, "#**TAROT CARD 

S***": RETURN 

6 1 30 PR I NTS7 1 , " ****RE AD I N6***« " : 
RETURN 

6140 CLS:6OSUB6110 

6150 b*="L4?f;L2;e;d;L2. ;C;P32;L 
4;g;L2;a;L4;P32;a;l2. ;B;P32;L4;B 
;03;Ll. ;c" 

6160 PLAY "XB* 5": END ^ 



88 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



PRO-COLOR-SERIES 



®1984 BY DERRINGER SOFTWARE, INC. 



3©[1©DY S BUT IM®[1@DY HAS &©ME DT L©[MlOi^ AMD BETTER THAW U£ 
A fully intergrated series of programs that offers a full range of information tracking capability. 



PRO-COLOR-FILE 'Enhanced* 



$79.95 



PRO-COLOR-FORMS* 



$39.95 



This is the main link in the series. With PRO-COLOR-FILE, you can 
design a full featured database that is custom tailored to your needs. 
Its ability to allow the user to custom define formats is unmatched by 
anything else on the market. A full range of features for information 
handling is available for any application you might have: 

* 60 Dafa Fields for storing data 

* 7020 bytes capacity per record 

* Variable record length capability 

* Multi-drive drive ability 

* Allows maximum system storage 

* 4 Custom designed screen formats 

* 28 Equation lines (+-*/) 

* 8 Custom designed report formats 

* Send reports to printer or screen 

* Summarize file by groups of records 

* Column totals and averages 

* Posting routine performs file wide calculations and updates fields 

* 6 Custom designed mailing label formats 

* Custom designed menus for selection of reports and label formats 

* Selectable password protection for data entry screens and reports 

* Sort any size file 

* 3 level sort capability 

* Select options for sorting or reporting subsets of a file 

* Duplicate records and fields 

* Cursor controlled text editing 

* Fast record selection via indexing 

* Global file searching 

As a database is created, all of the formats are stored in a file which 
means you won't have to enter it each time you want to print a report or 
label. Once your database is up and running, you can install a limited 
menu that will lead even the most timid user through the program. 
Since menu selection of report formats are custom made, you'll know 
exactly which format does what. 

PRO-COLOR-FILE is also supported by a NATIONAL USERS' group. 
Their quarterly newsletter is packed with ideas for using PRO- 
COLOR-FILE to its fullest. A listing of database programs that have 
already been created is also provided for comparing notes with other 
users. Useful database information such as magazine articles are 
available on a data disk for use on your own system. 

Think about it, how can a program exist for over a year and a half, be 
sold in every state and overseas, and have the support of a national 
users' group? Simple, it's that good! 



This is the second link in the series. PRO-COLOR-FORMS offers the 
ability to merge data files with text files. Just imagine being able to 
place the data you enter with PRO-COLOR-FILE anywhere on a sheet 
of paper, either by itself or within an external source of text, then you'll 
have the picture. This means you could write a general lettertoalistof 
people but have each one custom printed with their name and 
address. You can pre-enter checks into a data base and then have the 
checks printed on form-feed checks. You might even use form-feed 
statements for sending out to customers at the end of each month. All 
of the parameters can be modified to indicate just what size "page" 
you need for any application: 

* 6 Menu Selectable formats 

* Page width from 40 to 133 characters 

* Lines per page from 7 to 66 

* Supports printer control codes 

* Converts any ASCII file for use 

* Prints multiple copies 

* Interfaces with PRO-COLQR-FILE 

* Password protection 

If you need to generate forms from your data files then chances are 
you can do just that with PRO-COLOR-FORMS. Form letters, billing 
statements, index cards, or even post cards can be used easily. 



PRO-COLOR-DIR** 



$24.95 



The latest addition to the series is a utility for organizing disk direct- 
ories into one nice listing. PRO-COLOR-DIR reads the directory of a 
diskette and then stores valuable information about each program 
into a master data file. This data file can then be accessed by PRO- 
COLOR-FILE for sorting, searching and reporting. PRO-COLOR-DIR 
will create a record for each filename on a diskette and store the 
following information about each one: 

* Diskette ID name 

* Date diskette was created 

* Last date diskette was updated 

* Filename and extension 

* File type (BASIC, ML, Text, Data) 

* Number of Grans allocated 

* Number of sectors allocated and used 

* Machine Language program addresses 

PRO-COLOR-DIR allows for hardcopies of a single diskette's files and 
has a versatile label printing routine. A global replace function can 
re-store a diskette's files with deleted files being removed or new ones 
appended automatically. 



>*PRO~COLOR-FORMS & PRO-COLOR-DIR Require PRO-COLOR-FILE to be used** 



'Requires 32K Disk Basic* 




Give your Color Computer 
| a Masters Degree in Business. 

SALE 

PRO-COLOR-FILE 'Enhanced* $79.95 
PRO-COLOR-FORMS $39.95 
PRO-COLOR-DIR $24.95 
ALL THREE PROGRAMS $124.95 (Best Value) 



see us at 



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Add $3.00 for 
Shipping & Handling 
Over seas add $15.00 



Derringer Software lnc. f P.O. Box 5300, Florence, S.C, 29502 — (803) 665-5676 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Note: AH of our programs have registration cards - If you've purchased one from another dealer, then you should be registered 
with us. If not, send your name, program ID#and where the program was purchased. We want to keep you informed about changes. 



Lo-Res Graphics 
For The 'ASCII-ing' 



Hi-Res graphics are all the rage. 
And CoCo is certainly no 
slouch in that area. But let's not 
forget that Lo-Res graphics are very 
useful, too. In fact, there are some very 
distinct advantages to using them for 
certain applications. Particularly useful 
are the Lo-Res ASCII block graphics 
characters. The what? 

For instance, try this. POKE 1234, 
255. That orange rectangle that has 
magically appeared on your screen is 
ASCII graphics character 255 (ASCII 
Code 255). Since it has appeared on 
your text screen which resides from 
1024 to 1535 (decimal), then obviously 
here is one kind of graphics that can be 
mixed with text. And since it uses 
ASCII Codes, it can be "massaged" in a 
program arithmetically. 

ASCII (American Standard Code for 
Information Interchange) Codes are an 
industry attempt to put some standardi- 
zation into data recognition between 
different computers and among data 



(Jim Schmidt is a senior system analyst 
by profession. He specializes in financi- 
al I business systems development. In his 
spare time, he writes articles and pro- 
grams for publication using CoCo.) 



handling peripherals, like printers. Be- 
tween ASCII Code 32 and 127 things 
are pretty much standard. Belpw 32 and 
above 127, all bets are off. Our little 
gem, the CoCo, uses the codes above 
127 (128-255) to afford us with a ple- 
thora of colorful little graphics block 
characters. These "characters" have no 
direct keyboard access as do the letters 
and numerals. We can POKE them or 
PRINT them to the screen as with any 
other character using their ASCI I Code 
in a POKE or by using CHR$ in a 
PRINT. We can use the ASCII Codes in 
arithmetic expressions to derive other 
ASCII Codes. Because the ASCII Code 
is numeric, we can randomize it and 
display the result (as I did in the title 
screen in the program that accompanies 
this article). 

"OK," you ask, "what do these guys 
buy me?" I 'm glad you asked ! Here a re a 
few of the uses I've put them to: 

1) Title and trailer screens 

2) Game play boards 

3) Maps for games/ Adventures 

4) Borders around text screens 

5) Emphasis or eye-catchers 

6) Graphs or charts 

Since block graphics are so easy to i 
use, I (being devoutly lazy) use them. 



By Jim Schmidt 




i 



However, a text screen full of block 
graphics is, in reality, a matrix of 32 
characters by 16 lines. Trying to figure 
out where to POKE what character in a 
full screen can be a bit much. 1 decided 
to let CoCo help me design and create 
these screens. 1 wanted a program that 
would: 

1) Create screens a line (32 charac- 
ters) at a time 

2) Create each line a byte at a time 

3) Create each line a group of bytes at 
a time or a line of all one byte 

4) Copy the previous line with one 
keystroke 

5) Copy any previously created line 

6) Modify any previously created 
line(s) 

7) Display the screen at any point in 
its creation 

8) Save finished screens to tape or 
disk for later load/ modification 

9) Generate a screen and driver pro- 
gram and save to tape or disk 

10) View the ASCII blocks to aid in 
selecting appropriate blocks for 
the screen construction 

1 like to rough out a screen first by 
sketching it on a grid of 32 x 1 6 squares. 
I hate drawing grids, so if you have a 
printer, then Listing I is a grid drawing 
program that should work with any 
printer at 10 characters per inch. 



The Screen Generator — How To Use It 

The following refers to Listing 2, the 
Block Graphics Generator (BGG). After 
you have roughed out your screen on a 
grid or otherwise, the next step is to 
select the graphics characters for each 
line. You can then note them on the 
grid,, although you will have to write 
small. From the menu, select HELP 
You will then be prompted to enter a 
number from one to 255. This is then the 
number of the ASCII character from 
which the display will begin showing 
you what the various ASCII characters 
look like. The display will continue until 
it reaches character number 255 or you 
press k Q* for quit. 4 P' will pause the dis- 
play, fc R' will resume after a pause. A 
single graphic character will be shown 
next to the ASCII Code for that charac- 
ter and a line of the characters will dis- 
play to give you some perspective. AH 
255 ASCII characters can be displayed, 
but the color characters begin at 128. 

At this point you should know what 
you want to create and the ASCII 
values that go into each line to make up 
your screen. It is now a matter of using 
the BGG to actually create the screen 
line by line. 

The Functions 

(A) LL — Creates a line of 32 (ALL) 
of the same code 

(B) YTE/ BYTE — Creates a line one 




i 



Bber 1984 THE RAINBOW 91 



byte at a time keeping you informed 
where you are in the line (used for 
detailed areas) 

(G)ROU P/ GROU P — Creates a line 
in 'hunks' of the same code and 
tracks your progress 

(R)EPEAT — Copies the immediate- 
ly previous line 

(C) OPY — Copies the requested pre- 
viously created line (by line num- 
ber) 

(M)ODIFY — Lets you change any 
existing line 

(D) ISPLAY — Lets you see how 
your screen looks at any point in its 
creation 

(S)AVE — Actually save or load, lets 
you store a completed screen for 
later retrieval/modification. Build a 
library of screens for later customi- 
zation. 

(P)ROGRAM — Will generate a 
driver program for your completed 
screen and save the program with 
your screen in Data statements. This 
program is saved in ASCII format 
just as if you had done so with the t A 
option of SA VE and CSA VE. 
LOAD or CLOAD and run nor- 
mally. The line numbers generated 
are very high so that this program 
can be appended or merged behind 
your program within which you wish 



to use this screen. Two versions are 
available, with or without "visibil- 
ity" as the screen is drawn. Here is an 
area where the more astute of you 
might wish to make some changes to 
my program. For instance, you might 
prefer to have your screen loaded 
into string variables and PRINT 
them. This is the fastest way to dis- 
play your screen, but you will have to 
fight the text scroll routine to do it. 
(Hint: Print the first 15 lines and 
POKE the 16th. Be sure to use a Vat 
the end of the PRINTed lines.) 
(H)ELP — This will display the 
characters and their ASCII Codes. 

Some Final Notes 

Let your imagination go. Put color 
and style in your programs. Be user- 
friendly to your favorite user — you. 

After you have saved your completed 
screen with or without driver logic, you 
will be given the option of clearing 
memory or not. You may want several 
versions of the same basic screen saved. 
And by replaying 4 N' to the above 
prompt, you can continue to modify 
and save the same screen as often as you 
wish. Actually, the BGG is one big loop. 
It never ends until you hit BREAK or 
Reset. But, if you respond fc Y' to the 
prompt, you begin again at the menu 



with cleared memory (the computer's, 
not yours). 



Attention 16K/ tape users: Because of 
the large string space requirement, to 
make BGG fit in 16K, delete Lines 100- 
760, 1000, and 30000-30800. Also, you 
must PCLEARl. I'm afraid that 16K 
and disk won't fly because of the disk 
buffers. Maybe one of you can chop it 
down enough to run on I6K disk, but I 
frankly haven't had much luck doing so. 

1 am greatly interested in seeing any 
screens of unusual interest or usage that 
you may create. I'd appreciate hearing 
from you and seeing such screens. Also, 
like all programs, BGG is never fin- 
ished. Let me hear from you if you 
enhance BGG in some nifty way. 

A word on using these screens in your 
programs. Please don't think that the 
screens created by BGG can only be 
static. There are several ways of "updat- 
ing" a screen dynamically while your 
program is running. POKE and/ or 
PRINT to it. Use several screens in data 
statements and bounce around among 
them. Animation it is not. Eye-appeal 
enhancer, interest raiser it can be. Per- 
haps more on these techniques in a later 

RAINBOW. 

Have fun! 




Listing 1: 

100 '--LISTING ONE 

200 9 

300 CL3:PRINT«100, " M A T R 

I X": PRINT 
400 PRINT 11 COPYRIQHT <C> 

1983" SPRINT 
500 PRINT" J. J. SCHMID 

T M : PRINT 

600 PRINT 11 ALL RIQHTS RESE 

RVED" 

700 FORX»1TO900:NEXT:CLS 

800 CL8;PRINT940, "MATRIX PRINT": 

PRINT 

900 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM REQUIRES: 



(INCLUDING TEAR 



no VERTICAL TAB 



< ENTER > W 



1000 PRINT" 
H" 

1100 PRINT" 
ER INCH" 
1200 PRINT" 
TIONED JUST" | 
1300 PRINT" 
ON" 

1400 PRINT" 
PAPER" 



6 LINES PER INC 
10 CHARACTERS P 
PRINT HEAD POSI 
UNDER PERFORATI 
9 1/2 X 11 INCH 



1500 PRINT" 

STRIPS) 
1600 PRINT" 
S SET" 

1700 PRINT: PRINT" 
HEN READY" 
1800 LINEINPUTQ* 
1900 A»0 

2000 FORZ-1T033 
2100 ST*«ST*+": " 
2200 NEXTZ 
2300 FQRX«1T08 
2400 PRINT#-2 f "" 
2500 NEXT 
2600 PRINT*— 2, H 
PHICS SCREEN GENERATOR DESIGN MA 
TRI X " : PRINT#~2» " " : PRXNT#-2 f " " 
2700 PRINT#-2» "POSITION— 
«>1 11111111122222 
2222233 3" 
2800 PRINT#~2*" 1 
901234 5 67 
56789012 
2900 PRINT#~2,"* 
3000 FQRY*1T016 
3100 A«A+1 

3200 PRINT#-2, STRING* <&% "-" > 
3300 PRINT#-2,3T»* SPRINT#-2, M 



GRA 



2 3 4 S 6 7 
8 9 0 12 3 
LINE NO." 



8 
4 



92 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



— "I A 
3400 NEXT 
3500 A-0 

3600 PRINT#-2, STRING* (65, "-"> 
3700 PRINT0-2,"" 
3800 FORK- 1 TO 18 
3900 PRINT8-2, 
4000 NEXT 

4100 CL8 : PR I NT9204 , " AGA I N??? " 
4200 R*-INKEY*:IFR*-" H THEN4200 
4300 CL8 

4400 I FLEFT* ( R* , 1 > - " Y " THENRUNELS 
EEND 



4300 
6000 .. 
7900 .. 
9900 .. 
11900 . 
13700 . 



148 

. 20 
.. 5 
108 



15510 ., 
16900 .. 
18700 . . 
19800 ... 



229 30000 
. 58 END . 
236 



. . 85 
. 206 
. 203 
, 215 
. 209 
. 131 



— BY JIM SCHMIDT 

196A ARLENE CT. 
WHEELING, IL. 

60090 



Listing 2: 

100 ' — LISTING TWO 

200 * — BLOCK GRAPHICS — 
300 ' — SCREEN BUILDER — 
400 ' 

500 ' — A UTILITY PROGRAM — 
600 ' 
700 
710 
720 
730 
733 • 

740 '—COPYRIGHT <C> 1983 — 
750 » — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — 
760 * 

1000 CLEAR4200 

1050 CLS0:GOSUB30000 

1500 DIML*(16):DIMP*(32> 

1600 CLS: L-l: GOTO 1800 

1700 L«L-H:CLS:IFL«17 THEN 7400 

1800 PRINT85, " ":PRINT933, "*LL (A 

SCI I #) " : PRINT848, "bYTE/BYTE" 

1 900 PR I NT097 , " gROUP/ GROUP " : PR I N 

T0112, "rEPEAT LAST LINE" 

2000 PRINTei61, M cOPY A LINE":PRI 

NT® 176, "mODIFY A LINE" 

2 1 00 PR I NTG225 , "dl SPLAY " : PR I NT02 

40, "sAVE /LOAD SCREEN" 

2200 PR I NT02Q9, "pROGRAM SAVE": PR 

INTS304,"hELP (ASCII) " 

2300 PRINT8359, "ENTER YOUR CHOIC 

E" 

2400 IF L<17 THENPRINT8424, "NEXT 

LINE IS " I L 
2500 A*-INKEY*:IF A*-"" THEN 250 
0 



2600 IF A* -"A" OR A*-"B" OR A*- 
"C" OR A*-'^" OR A*-"H" OR A*-"S 
" OR A*-"D" OR A*-"M" OR A*-"R" 
OR A*«"P" THEN SOUND 1 69, l: SOUND 1 
69,1 

2700 IF L<17 THEN IF A«-"B" THEN 
3S00 

2600 IF L<17 THEN IF A«»"R" THEN 
5900 

2900 IF L<17 THEN IF A«-"A" THEN 
6400 

3000 IF L<17 THEN IF A«-"C" THEN 

0500 
3100 IF A** 
3200 IF A*= 



:"D' 

"M" 



THEN 7400 
THEN 12900 
3300 IF A*="S" THEN 15450 
3400 IF L<17 THEN IF A*="G" THEN 
10900 

3500 IF L«17 THEN IF A*«"P" THEN 
17200 

3600 IF A*-"H" THEN 9700 
3700 GOTO2500 
3600 P»l:CLS 

3900 CLS: PRINT01 , " " : PRINT"LINE»" 

iL|"COLUMN-"|P 

4000 PRINT: PRINTL*(L>: PRINT 

4300 PR I NT "ENTER ASCII VALUE WA 

NTED OR < ENTER > TO REPEAT LAS 

T ONE." 

4400 PRINT 

4500 INPUT "CHARACTER ASCII VALUE 
"|CH* 

4600 S0UND222, IMF P-32 THEN SOU 
ND222, 3 

4700 IF CH*-"" THEN 5100 

4800 IF LEN(CH*> <3 THEN CH*»STR 

ING* (3-LEN (CH«) , "0" > +CH« 

4900 NN«VAL(CH*> 

5000 IF NN <1 OR NN>255 THEN PRI 

NT " I NVAL I D ENTRY " : S0UND7 , 7 : FORH= 

1 TO300 : NEX T : GOTO3900 

5100 IF CH«-"" AND LEFT* (L*(L> , 3 

)-"" THEN PRINT0490, "NO ENTRY YE 

T" : SOUND7 , 7 : FORH- 1 TO400: NEXT : GOT 

O3900 

5200 IF CH*-"" THEN CH*»SA*:GOTO 

5400 
5300 SA*=CH* 
5400 L*(L)«L*(L)+CH* 
5500 IF P-32 AND BR*«"Y" THEN BR 
*»» «• ; L«SL: GOTO 1700 
5600 IF P-32 THEN 1700 
5700 P-P+l 
5800 GOTO3900 
5900 L*(L)-L*(L-1> 
6000 IF L*(l)»"" THEN PRINT0359, 
"NO VALID LINE YET":SOUND7,7:FOR 

H» 1 TO300 : NEX T : CLS : GOTO 1 800 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 93 



6100 PRINT8359," LINE REPEATED 

":S0UND222, 1 
6200 FORH=1TO400:NEXT 
6300 GOTO 1700 

6400 CLS:PRINT9128, "":INPUT"ENTE 
R ASCII CODE FOR ENTIRE LINE";CH 
* 

6500 IF LEN<CH*><3 THEN CH*=STRI 

NG* (3-LEN <CH*> , "0" > +CH* 

6600 IF LEN(CH*>>3 THEN PRINT" 

TOO L0NG":S0UND7,7:F0R H=1TO40 
0: NEXT: GOTO 6400 

6700 IF VAL(CH*>>255 OR VAL(CH*> 
<1 THEN PRINT" INVALID ENTRY 

" : S0UND7, 7: FORH=1TO400: NEXT: GOTO 
6400 

6800 FOR TY»1 TO 32 
6900 L*(L)=L*(L)+CH* 
7000 NEXT 

7100 PRIHT" LINE BUILT"; SO 

UND222,6* 

7200 FORH=1TO400:NEXT 
7300 GOTO 1700 

7400 CLS : PS- 1 : L= 1 : BB= 1 024 : EB= 1 05 
5 

7500 F0R0L=1T016:F0RIL*BB to eb: 
IFL*(L>«"" THEN 9600: BY*-MID* (L* 
(L> , PS, 3) : POKEIL, VAL <BY») : PS=PS+ 
3 : NEXT : EB=EB+32 : BB-BB+32 : PS- 1 : L- 
L+l:NEXT 

7600 FORIL-BB TO EB 
7700 IFL*(L>-"" THEN 9600 
7800 BY*«MID*(L*(L> ,PS,3> 
7900 POKEIL, VAL < BY*) 
8000 PS-PS+3:NEXT 

8200 EB=EB+32 : BB-BB+32 : PS- 1 : L-L+ 
1 : NEXT 

8400 NM*="Y":FORH*1TO2500:NEXT:P 
RINT3224, " THE SCREEN IS READY 
TO SAVE": FOR H-1TO50: S0UND222, 1 
: NEXT : CLS : GOTO 1 800 
8500 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 

NEXT LINE IS *tL 
8600 PRINT 

8700 IF L-i THEN PRINT" N 

O LINES EXIST YET":S0UND7,7:FORH 

* 1 TO400 : NE X T : CLS : GOTO 1 800 

8800 INPUT"LINE # OF LINE TO BE 

COPIED" ;LN 

8900 PRINT 

9000 IF LN»>L OR LNM6 THEN PR I 
NT" THAT LINE DOES NOT EX 1ST": SO 
UND7, 7: FORH-1TO400: NEXT: CLS: GOTO 
1800 

9100 L*(L>«L*(LN> 

9300 PR I#T: PRINT" LINE CO 

PIED":S0UND222,6 

9400 FORH-1TO400:NEXT 



9500 GOTO 1700 

9600 FORH- 1 TO2500 : NEXT: CLS : GOTO 1 
800 

9700 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "ENTER 0 TO 
RETURN TO MENU" 
9900 INPUT "START AT NNN";ST 
9950 IFST«0 THENCLS: GOTO 1800 
10000 IFST >255 THEN PR I NT "255 H 
AX I MUM" : S0UND7, 7: FORDE-1TO400: NE 
XT:CLS:GOTO9700 
10050 CLS 

10100 FOR H-ST TO 255 

10300 PRINTQ264, "PRESS Q TO QUIT 

II 

10302 PR I NTS 101, "PRESS P TO PAUS 
E DISPLAY" 

10303 PRINTS 133, "PRESS R TO RESU 
ME" 

10320 Q*=INKEY* 

10500 IFQ*-"Q" THEN CLS:S0UND222 
,6: GOTO 1800 

10510 IFQ*="P"THENGOSUB 40000 
10520 PRINT8200,"ASCII "JSTl"- " 
I : POKE 1 235, H 

10530 F0RLL-1344T01375:P0KELL,H: 
NEXT 

10600 FOR HH-1T01 000: NEXT 
10700 ST-ST+1 
10800 NEXT: CLS: GOTO1800 
10900 P=l 

11000 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINTL*(L) 
11200 PRINT" BUILDING LINE NO "|L 
: PRINT 

11300 PR I NT "NEXT COLUMN IS "JP:P 
RINT 

11400 PRlNT"POSITIONS REMAINING" 
"J <32-P)+l 
11500 PRINT 

11600 INPUT "ASCI I *")CH*:S0UND22 
2,1: IF P=32 THEN S0UND222, 1 
11700 PRINT 

11800 IFCH»=""THEN 11000 

11900 IF LEN(CH*><3 THENCH*«STRI 

NG* (3-LEN (CH*> , "0" > +CH* 

12000 NN=VAL(CH*) 

12100 IFNN<1 OR NN>255 THENPRINT 
"INVALID ENTRY":S0UND7,7:F0RH=1T 
0400: NEXT: GOTO 1 1000 
12200 INPUT "HOW MANY";HM 
12250 S0UND222, 1 

12300 IF HM> <32-P)+l THEN PRINT 
" TOO MANY " : S0UND7 , 7 : FORH- 1 TO400 : 
NEXT: GOTO 12200 

12400 F0RL0*1T0HM:L*<L)»L*(L)+CH 

*:p»p+i:next 

12800 if p»33 then 1700 else 110 

00 

12900 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: P-t 



94 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



13000 INPUT-NUMBER OF LINE TO NO 
DIFY";NL 

13100 IF NL»0 OR NLM6 THEN CLS: 
8OTO1800 

13150 IF L*(NL>-"" THEN PRINT813 
0 f u NO SUCH LINE EXISTS" : S0UND7, 7 
: FORM- 1 TO400 : NEXT: CLS : 60T0 1 800 
13200 PRINT 

13300 PRINT'VEVIEW OR dELETE AND 

DO OVER?" 
13400 RD*-INKEY«: IF RD*-"" THEN 
13400 ELSE SOUND222,6 
13300 IF RD*<>"R" AND RD*<>"D" T 
HEN 13400 

13600 IF RD*«"D" THEN SL-L-1:L«N 
L: BR*""Y" : L* <L> -" B : 8OTO3800 
13700 SL«L:ML*»L*(NL> 
13800 FOR LO-1 TO 96 STEP 3 
13900 OB*«MID* <L» (NL) r L0,3) 
14000 CLS: PRINT 

14100 PRINT"COLUMN NUMBER- "|P 
14200 PR I NT "ENTER Q TO QUIT CHAN 
6ES" 

14300 PRINT-THIS BYTE IS NOW • "! 
OB* 

14400 I NPUT " < ENTER > IF OK OR ENT 
ER NEW VALUE" I NB* 
14500 S0UND222,6 

14600 IF NB*-"" THEN P-P+1:80T0 
15300 

14700 IF NB*="Q" THEN 15400 
14800 IF LEN<NB*><3 THEN NB*=STR 
INS* (3-LEN <NB*> , ,, 0" ) +NB* 
14900 NN-VAL <NB*> 

15000 IF NN<1 OR NN>255 THEN PRI 
NT " I NVAL I D ENTRY " I S0UND7 , 7 : FORH- 
1 TO400 : NEXT : 80T01 3800 
15100 MID*<ML*,L0,3>«NB* 
15200 P-P+l 
15300 NEXT 

15400 l*<nl>-ml*:l«sl:cls:gotois 

00 

15450 cls:print:print:print" 

dISK OR tAPE??": PRINT: PRINT 
15460 QU*«INKEY*:IFQU*-""THEN154 
60 

15470 IF0U*O"D" AND QU*<>"T"THE 
N 15450 

15480 I FQU*= "D" THENDV= 1 ELSEDV— 1 

15500 PRINT: PRINT" READY 

YOUR DRIVE": PRINT 

15510 FORDE=1TO1000: NEXT 

15600 CLS: PR I NTfi 137, "»AVE OR 10A 

D??" 

15700 SL*»INKEY*: IF SL*«"" THEN 
15700 

15800 S0UND222,2:IF SL*<>"S" AND 
SL*<>"L" THEN 15600 



15848 PRINT 

15850 IF SL*-"S» AND L<>17 THENP 
RINT"NOT A COMPLETE SCREEN" :SOUN 
D7 , 7 : FORH-1 TO400: NEXT : CLS: GOT018 
00 

15900 IF SL*-"S" THEN SL*«"0" EL 
SE SL*-"I" 

16000 PRINT: INPUT "FILENAME" ;FI* 

16100 FI*-LEFT*(FI* f S> 

16200 PRINT*294," OPENING FILE" 

16300 OPEN SL«,*DV,FI« 

16400 PRINT8293, " <ANY KEY TO BE 

8IN>" 

16500 Q«-INKEY«: IF Q*«"" THEN 16 
500 ELSE SOUND 222,2 
16600 F0RL-1T016 

16700 if sl*-"i" then input #dv, 
l*<l) :prints294, " reading " 
:for rt-itoi00:next 

16800 IF SL*="0" THEN PfclNT#DV,L 
*<L>:PRINT0294," WRITING ":FO 
RWT-1TO100:NEXT 
16900 PRINT8296," 
17000 NEXT 
17100 CLOSEttDV 
17105 IF SL*-"I" THEN17140 
17110 PR I NT "WANT STORAGE CLEARED 
<Y/N>?" 

17120 Q*- I NKE Y* : I FQ*- " " THEN 1712 
0 

17130 IFQ*-"Y" THEN RUN 

17140 L« 17: CLS: GOTO 1800 

17200 IF ND*-"" THEN DIM DA*<32> 

17210 ND*-"Y" 

17300 CLS: PR I NT® 200, "hIDDEN OR v 
ISIBLE?" 

17310 OP*- 1 NKE Y* : I FOP*« " " THEN 173 
10 

17320 IF0P*O"H"AND0P*O"V"THENl 
7310 

17330 CLS:PRINTQ200, "PLEASE WAIT 

II 

» * • 

17400 np-i:d«i:l-i 

17500 FQRHH-63000 TO 63015 

17600 F0RH-1T032 

17700 NB*=MID*(L*<L),NP,3> 

17800 IF SW*»"Y" THEN 18200 

17900 FU*-STR*<HH> 

1 8000 UF*»R I GHT* < FU* , 5 > 

18100 DA*<D>-UF*+" DATA":SW*-"Y U 

18200 IF H<32 THENDA* <D> -DA* (D) + 

NB*+CHR*(44> ELSE DA* < D ) =DA* ( D ) + 

NB* 

18300 NP-NP+3 
18400 NEXT 

18500 NP-i:L»L+l:D-D+i:9#*-"N" 
18600 NEXT 

18650 IFOP*="H"THENI1*-"63016 PC 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 95 



LS : SCREEN 1 "ELSE 1 1 *« " " 

18700 I 2*- "630 17 BB= 1 024 : EB= 1 055 

II 

18800 I 3*= "630 18 FOR 0L-1T016" 
18900 I 4*- "630 19 FOR IL-BB TO EB 

M 

19000 I 5** "63020 READ BY* " 
19100 I6*-"63021 POKEIL, VAL (BY*) 

■I 

19300 I7*»"63023 NEXT" 

19400 I 8*- "63024 EB=EB+32: BB-BB+ 

32" 

19500 I9*«"63025 NEXT" 

19550 IFOP*="H" THEN I A*= " 63026 SC 

REEN0 " ELSE I A*= " " 

19575 IB*- "63027 FORT 1 = 1 TO3000 Z N 
EXT" 

19580 S0UND234, 1 : FORDE=1TD50: NEX 
T:S0UND234 ( 1 

19600 CLS: PRINT872, "SUBROUTINE C 
REATE" : PRINT: PRINT 
19610 PRINT" tAPE OR dIS 

K ?": print: PRINT 

1 9620 QU*= I NKEY* : I FQU*= " " THEN 1 96 
20 

1 9630 I FQU* < > " T " ANDQU*< >"D" THEN 1 
9600 



CHEAPEST PRICES 
ON 

COLOR COMPUTERS 

16KStd 109.95 

16K Ext. Basic 149.95 

64K Ext. Basic 199.95 

Special 2 Joysticks and a Bustout game 
Reg. 49.90 18.95 

Over 125 Color Computer Programs 
in Stock 




The System 100 from Tandy 

THE COMPUTER CENTER 

5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 38119 

901—761-4565 

CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 
ADD $4.75 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING 



19640 IFQU*«"T"THENDV=-1ELSEDV«1 
19700 I NPUT " F I LENAME " J F I * 
19800 IF QU*«"T "THENPR I NTe233,"R 
EADY RECORDER " ELSEPR I NT6233 , "REA 
DY DISK DRIVE" 

19900 PRINT8294, "<ANY KEY WHEN R 
EADY>" 

20000 Q*»INKEY*:IF Q*-"" THEN 20 
000 

20100 OPEN"0",#DV,FI* 

20200 F0RH-1T016 

20300 PRINT*DV,DA*<H> 

20400 IF QU*="T"THENPRINT«294, " 

WRITING TAPE ":FORWT*1TO10 
02 NEXT 

204 10 1 fqu*' " d " thenpr i nt8294 , " 

writing disk ":forwt«1to100 
:next 

20500 PRINTS294," 

20550 FORWT= 1 TO 100: NEXT 

20600 I FQU*= " T " THENPR I NT8294 , " 

WRITING TAPE " ELSEPR I NT8294 
," WRITING DISK 
20700 NEXT 

20000 print#dv, i 1*: print#dv, 12*: 
print#dv, 13*: print#dv, 14*: print* 
dv, 15*: print#dv, 16*: print#dv, 17* 
:print#dv, I8*:print#dv, 19*: print 
*dv, ia*:print#dv, ib* 

20810 CLOSEttDV 

20820 PR I NT "WANT STORAGE CLEARED 

<Y/N>?" 

20822 Q*»INKEY*:IF Q*-"» THEN 20 

822 ELSE S0UND222 f l 

20824 IFQ*-"Y" THEN RUN 

20900 CLS: GOTO 1800 

30000 FOR KK-1024TO1535 

30100 VV«RND<125> 

30200 POKE KK.W+130 

30300 NEXT 

30400 FORDE- 1 TO 1 500 : NEXT 
30600 SOUND 169,2: SOUND 1 69, 1 
30710 S0UND169, l:PRINT864," BL 

OCK" 

30720 S0UND169, l:PRINT8160, " ":P 

RINT8171, "GRAPHICS" 

30730 SOUND 1 69 p 2 : PR I NTS256 , " ":P 

RINT8276, "GENERATOR" 

30740 SOUND 169, l:PRINT8352, " ": 

PRINT8358, "BY - JIM SCHMIDT" 

30750 PRINT8448, " COPYRIGH 

T <C> 19G3 " 

30795 FORDE- 1 TO 1 500 : NEXT 
3079G CLS 
30800 RETURN 

40000 QQ*-INKEY*: I FQQ*» " R " THENRE 
TURNELSE40000 m 



96 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



GRAPHICS 



31K 
DISK 
ECB 



1 1 1 




painty 



By Brian Preble 



£>f ketch is a color graphics editor for 
a 32K Color Computer with Ex- 
tended BASIC and at least one 
joystick. It works in PMODEs 3 and 4. 

Sketch contains all the normal com- 
mands used in most graphics editors 
such as CIRCLE, LINE, BOX, DRA W, 
PAINT, etc. It also has a feature that 
sets it apart from all other BASIC gra- 
phics editors I've seen. In most editors, 
if you choose a command you don't like, 
you must painstakingly erase the results 
and then redraw anything that was 
destroyed. 

With Sketch, if you don't like some- 
thing, press 4 X' and the screen is re- 
stored to its original display. If you 
decide you like it, press the space bar 
and the screen will be updated. You 
must press the space bar to save a com- 
mand! If you don't, the screen will be 
restored if you move the joystick or 
change modes. 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 97 




SPELL BOMBER 




In the ABC program, all 26 letters spring up in 
color to the familiar ABC tune. Then, colorful 
detailed pictures depicting each individual letter 
of the alphabet appear one by one. Your child's 
fascination will mount as he or she correctly 
presses the letter on the keyboard and is 
rewarded with a musical tune before the next 
detailed picture is drawn line by line onto the 
screen: AIRPLANE for A, BUS for B, CLOWN^j 
for C and so on to ZEBRA for Z. Truly a must^V 
program for the preschool to first grade age' 
group! 

CoCo 16K ECB . , . 7. .Tape; $19.95 Disk: $25.95 



CRISS CROSS MATH 



As the program begins, your child is presented with a nine square 
playing board. It is your choice as to which square you choose. After a 
choice is made, a MATH PROBLEM appears in the square. You score 
your first X by answering the problem correctly. If your answer is 
incorrect, the square clears and your opponent is allowed his choice of 
squares. The game is over when three squares vertically, horizontally, or 
diagonally are won by the same player. .When playing against the 
computer, every answer you get wrong is won by the computer. Multi- 
level ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION program. 
C0C0I6K Tape: $12.95 



FRACTIONS 



SIDE ONE: Fraction Lessons, explains fractions with the aid of graphics. 
Child studies the different ways fractions can be represented. Lessons 
Include: 

IMPROPER FRACTIONS 

MIXED FRACTIONS 

PROPER FRACTIONS 
Many educators have praised the use of motion and color to display the 
fractional equivalents. 

SIDE TWO: Fraction practice, offers a random computer generated quiz. 

Atari 16k Tape: $19.95 

CoCo16k *: Tape: $19.95 



JOYSTICK DRAW 



Joystick Draw is the simple way to explore your artistic talents! Program 
operation is easy enough for a child to use, but effective enough that 
TCE uses it to design many sophisticated high-resolution graphic 
screens. Joystick Draw's design allows you or your child to save those 
masterpieces for future revisions or for use in other programs 
(instructions included). Your child will spend many hours enjoying this 
program and at the same time improving his or her eye hand 
coordination! You will find Joystick Draw to be an easy way to design 
those more sophisticated graphics for your own programs! 
C0C0I6 ECB Tape: $16.95 



As captain of your ship, you must destroy the enemy bonfiber by spelling 
the mystery word. In this exciting and educational game the bomber gets 
closer with each inaccurate letter. You have only EIGHT tries to guess 
the mystery word or your ship will be bombed! If you Guess the word 
correctly, GENERAL QUARTERS will sound and your [ship will fire a 
missile to destroy the bomber, Three levels are available: EASY, 
MEDIUM, and HARD. Challenging for all ages! 

Atari16K Tape: $18.95 

CoCo 1 6k ECB Tape: $1 8.9$ Disk: $22.95 

Vic 2013k '. Tape: $18.95 



SPELLING BEE 



The word is pronounced vocally and it is up to you to type in the correct 
spelling. If wrong, the computer will be your friend and finish the word on 
the screen for just an instant. OK! Try typing the word in again. STILL 
WRONG! The computer wants success and allows you to see the word 
again this time a little- longer. If you just can't spell the word, the 
computer realizes you need to learn to spell the word and leaves the 
word on the screen for you to copy. Try your best and the computer has 
a surprise for your reward! 

SPELLING BEE I . . . GRADE 1 & 2 SPELLING BEE III . . .GRADE 5 & 6 
SPELLING BEE II ..GRADE 3 &4 SPELLING BEE IV . .GRADE 7 & 8 
CoCo 16k ECB TAPE: $16.95 Each 



TC— INVENTORY 



Many insurance companies offer a discount for policy holders which 
have complete inventories on file. TC Inventory is Resigned to help 
you organize, maintain, and compile the personal belpngings of your 
home. Program is user friendly and menu driven. TC — Inventory allows 
input for location of item, price of item, serial number of item, date of 
purchase, and a text written description of the iterrti. Don't put off 
recording your personal belongings until its too late. Requires printer for 
hard copy. 

CoCo 32k ECB Tape: $ 1 6.95 




TEACHING CLOCK 



Torn between teaching time on a digital or a 
conventional (face and hands) ckj>ck? Well, this 
program combines the two I using high 
resolution graphics and prompts! [Your child will 
learn to tell time with the aid of a specially 
designed CLOCK! Child enters; the time, if 
wrong, the center of the c\o$k displays a 
graphic aid. If the child is corrtect a musical 
reward is heard. Program offer£ three levels: 
hours, quarter hours, and five minute intervals. 

Apple 48k Disk: $19.95 

Atari 32k Tape: $16.95 

CoCo 16k ECB ... . Disk: $19.95 Tape: $16.95 



Additional Educational Software available 

for Color Computer, TDP 100, Atari ®, 
Apple ® , Commodore 64 ® , and VIC 20 ® 



vtsa 



P.O. Box 2477 Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 {301)963-3848 



How to use Sketch 

Sketch is a simple program to use. To 
move the cursor, simply move the right 
joystick in the direction you want. 

To choose a command, press the key 
for the command desired. These com- 
mands may be listed by pressing 4 H'for 
help. 

For a circle, move the cursor to the 
center of the circle and press *C\ You 
may then move the joystick and a circle 
will be drawn with the cursor as a point 
on the circle. If you like it, press the 
space bar and it will be saved. If you 
don't, press fc X' to cancel it. 

The other commands work in a sim- 
ilar manner. Move the cursor to the 

origin of the line, box, etc. Then press a 

key and move the joystick. 

One exception to this rule is the 
WRITE command. This command 
allows you to type letters and other 
characters directly on the graphics 
screen. To use this command, move the 
cursor to the position of the first letter 
and press 'W. You are now in the 
WRITE mode. Anything you type will 
be shown on the screen except lower- 
case. To erase what you wrote, press the 
DELETE key (left arrow). To save what 
you wrote, press ENTER. If your letters 
aren't in the right position, move the 
joystick and type again; there is no need 
to press DELETE. 

Two especially useful commands are 
GET k G' and PUT 'P\ Use GET to store 
an image in a buffer for use somewhere 
else in the picture or if it wasn't placed 
quite right. For example: You drew a 
picture of a house and later decided you 
wanted it somewhere else. You would 
have to move to one corner of the house 
or other object (give yourself some clear 
space) and press 'G\ Then move to the 
opposite corner. A box will form indi- 
cating the area you will be storing. 
When you have it all, press the space bar 
and it will be stored. 

To put it somewhere else, press *P* 
and a house will appear near the cursor. 
Move the joystick and the house or 
other object will move with it. Press the 
space bar when it is properly positioned 
or *X' to erase it. 

Bear in mind that the <|jET command 
only stores an object, it dpes not erase it. 
You must do that manually if you 
desire. 

The LINE and RAY commands don't 
end until 4 X' is pressed. These com- 
mands are similar to each other, but 
LINE continues from where the pre- 
vious line left off and RAY always starts 
from the point where it was chosen. 



The Menu 

By far the most powerful command in 
Sketch is *M\ This command brings up 
a menu screen from which all other 
commands are controlled. Displayed on 
the menu are a number of commands 
followed by various numbers. The mean- 
ing of the numbers will become clear 
when you use that particular command. 
To use a command, press the key shown 
in inverse video (green on black) for that 
command. 

For example: If you want to change 
colors, press TT(for Draw). The screen 
will clear and the prompt "FORE- 
GROUND COLOR?"m\\ be displayed. 
Type in the desired color (0-3) and press 
ENTER. The prompt "BACKGROUND 
COLOR?" will appear. Answer that in 
the same manner. 

MOVE is the rate of movement of the 
cursor. Its default is 1,1. The first 
number is the number of dots moved each 
time the joystick is moved left or right, 



"By far the most power- 
ful command in Sketch is 
6 M\ This command brings 
up a menu screen from 
which all other commands 
are controlled " 



and the second is the number of dots 
moved up or down. Thus, if MOVE was 
2,3 the cursor would move two left or 
right and three up and down. In the 
draw or erase modes ("+", "-") this 
would result in dotted lines. 

Pattern is a command that allows 
patterns of colors to be used instead of 
solid colors. For example, if you had a 
foreground pattern of 48 and drew a 
filled-in box (F) the box would show up 
as a series of vertical bars in PMODE4. 
If the foreground pattern was I, the 
same box would show up in blue or red 
instead of the usual black or white. The 
range of patterns allowed is 0-255. Back- 
ground pattern is used for clearing the 
screen. 

Pattern is turned on by pressing 4 A' 
and selecting your foreground and back- 
ground patterns. It is turned off by set- 
ting the normal foreground and back- 



ground colors as described above. 

The SAVE and LOAD commands 
will save or load a picture from disk. To 
change them to tape, change Line 69 to: 

69 INPUT-PRESS ENTER TO CON- 

TINUE"X$:CSAVfiMF$,1536,7679, 
1536 

And change Line 61 to: 

61 SCREEN I CLOADMFS 

WRITE determines the size of the let- 
ters; 4 is normal, 8 is double, 1 2 is triple, 
and so on by fours. 

Hi Speed Poke Problems 

If your computer can't handle POKE 
65495,0 you will have to remove it from 
Lines 1, 43, 57, 61 and 69. By "can't 
handle," I mean the screen goes crazy. 1 
don't mean that some keys don't re- 
spond. If you are one of the latter then 
simply press SHIFT with the offending 
key. This should do the trick. 

How It Works 

The main body of Sketch is contained 
in Lines 2 to 16. These lines read the 
joystick and keyboard. If the joystick is 
moved, the screen is restored and con- 
trol is passed to the appropriate subrou- 
tine for the command chosen. If the 
joystick wasn't moved then the key- 
board is read for a mode change, char- 
acter to be typed, or a cancel/ save 
command ( 4 X' or space). If a key wasn't 
pressed then the cursor is blinked if 
necessary and control returns to the 
joystick checker; otherwise, control is 
passed to the appropriate subroutine as 
above. 

The subroutine at Line 85 copies the 
display screen to the backup screen 
when the space bar is pressed, the pro- 
gram is first run, or SHIFT/CLEAR is 
pressed. 

The subroutine at Line 84 copies the 
backup graphics screen to the display 
screen when *X' is pressed, the joystick is 
moved, or the cursor blinks. 

These routines are a little faster than a 
machine language routine would be due 
to the time that would be needed to call 
such a routine from basic and its lack of 
response to the high-speed poke. 

Here's one last hint. The GET/ PUT 
option "NOT" in the menu will not put 
the contents of the GET buffer on the 
screen; instead, it will reverse an area of 
the screen the same size as the GET 
buffer. That is, black becomes white, 
white becomes black, red becomes blue, 
etc. 

1 hope you enjoy this program. 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 99 




The listing: 

1 P0KE65495 , 0 : CLS : PCLEAR8 : PM0DE4 
, 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : G0SUB85: CX-128: CY=9 

6: M=i : ch=. 9: cs=i :CE-i : sx=i : SY-i : 

PF-5: PB-3: S-4: DIML* (58) : FORX-0TO 
58: READL* < X) : NEXT: C*-"0+MCBFLRZ W 
-DSP J \X?OT": O*- " CDLMPQRSWSX A " : CF 
-5 : CB-0 : D I MS ( 1 500 ) : PO-4 : COLORCF , 
CB 

2 X-JOYSTK(0):Y-JOYSTK(1) 

3 A*= I NKE Y* : I FM= i 0THEN4ELSE I FA*= 
■ " THEN4 1 ELSE I FA*- " H " S0SUB84 : SOT 
086ELSE I FA*- " J ■ S0SUB38ELSE I FA*- " 
M " B0SUB84 : S0T046ELSE I F I NSTR ( C* , A 
* ) -0OR A*= " " THEN4ELSEM— I NSTR < C* , A 
* > : A*- FL-0 : 80SUB84 

4 IFM< MTHEN0NM-1B0SUB17, 84, 18, 2 
0, 22, 24, 24, 26, 43, 27, 28, 30, 32, 38, 
39,40,42,74,79 

5 I FX >0 AND X < 63 AND Y >0ANDY< 63ANDM< 
>1THEN2 

6 I FM< >2ANDM< > 1 1 S0SUB84 

7 I F X -0THENC X — C X -S X 

8 IFCX<0THENCX=255 

9 IFX=63THENCX=CX+SX 

10 IFCX>255THENCX=0 

11 I F Y-0THENC Y-CY-SY 

12 IFCY<0THENCY=191 

13 IFY=63THENCY-CY+SY 

14 IFCY>191THENCY-0 

1 5 DRAW ■ BM " +STR* < CX ) + " , " +STR* < C Y 
) : IFM< >1 1 ANDM< >10ANDM< >2THENIFPA 
m 1 THENDRAW " BRRH2NDS2NHRF2NUE2 " EL 
SEIFPPOINT(CX+l,CY)=CF ANDPPOINT 
(CX , CY+1 ) -CF THENDRAW" C=CB; BRRH2 
ND82NRF2NUE2C-CF ; " ELSEDR AW " C-CF $ 
BRRH2ND62NRF2NUE2 " 

16 60T02 

17 1 FFL=06OSUB84 : FL- 1 : PSET ( CX , CY 
) : RETURNELSEPSET < CX , CY ) : RETURN 

18 IFFL-0THENXE-CX:YE=CY:FL=1 

19 CIRCLE <XE, YE) , SQR < (CX-XE) A 2+( 
CY- YE ) A 2 ) , , CH , CS , CE : RETURN 

20 IFFL=0THENXE=CX:YE-CY:FL«1 

21 LINE (XE, YE) -(CX, CY) , PSET, B: RE 
TURN 

22 IFFL-0THENXE=CX:YE=CY:FL-1 

23 LINE (XE, YE)- (CX,CY) , PSET, BF:R 
ETURN 

24 IFFL=0THENXE-CX:YE-CY:FL»1 

25 LINE (XE, YE) - <CX, CY) , PSET:RETU 
RN 

26 PAINT <CX, CY) , ,PB: RETURN 

27 I FFL-0SOSUBS4 : FL= 1 : PRESET < CX , 



CY) : RETURNELSEPRESET <CX , CY) : RETU 
RN 

28 IFFL=0THENXE=CX:YE=CY:FL«1 

29 CR=SQR < (CX-XE) A 2+ (CY-YE) A 2) : F 
ORX9-0TOCR: CIRCLE (XE, YE) , X9, CB, C 
H, CS, CE: NEXT: CIRCLE (XE, YE) , CR, CF 
, CH, CS,CE: PAINT (XE, YE) ,PF,PB:RET 
URN 

30 IFFL-0THENXE-CX:YE-CY:FL-1 

31 SET(XE,YE)-(CX,CY),S,S:LINE(X 
E , YE ) - (CX , CY ) , PSET , B : 6X-ABS ( XE-C 
X ) : SY-ABS ( YE-CY ) : RETURN 

32 ONPO S0T033,34,35,36,37:RETUR 
N 

33 PUT(CX,CY)-(CX+SX,CY+SY),6,PS 
ET: RETURN 

34 PUT(CX,CY)-(CX+8X,CY+SY),8,PR 
ESET: RETURN 

35 PUT(CX,CY)-(CX+SX,CY+SY) ,S,AN 
D: RETURN 

36 PUT(CX,CY)-(CX+SX,CY-f6Y),S,0R 
: RETURN 

37 PUT(CX,CY)-(CX+SX,CY+SY) ,S,NO 
T: RETURN 

38 P0KE65494 , 0 : CLS : 60SUB84 : PR I NT 
"CURSOR IS AT"CX", "CY: PRINT: INPU 
T"JUMP CURSOR T0";CX,CY:P0KE6549 
5,0: SCREEN 1 : RETURN 

39 PCLS:S0SUB85:CX=128:CY=96:M=1 
: RETURN 

40 60SUB84:M-l: RETURN 

41 I FM- 1 THEN2ELSE I FM«20RM« 1 1 SOSU 
B85: M=l : 60T02ELSE60SUB84: ONM-160 
SUB17, 1, 18,20,22,24,24,26,43,27, 
28, 30, 32, 38, 39, 40, 42, 74, 79: IFM-1 
360SUB84 : M=l : 80T02ELSE60SUB85: IF 
M— 7THENFL— 0 : 60T02ELSE I FM— 8THEN2E 
LSEM=l:S0T02 

42 M—2: RETURN 

43 P0KE65494 , 0 : DRAW " S-S | "3 I FA*- " 
" THENRETURNELSE I F ( A* > " Z " ORA*< CHR 
* ( 1 3 ) ORA*-CHR* (21)) ANDA*< >CHR* ( 8 
) THENRETURNELSE I FA*-CHR* (13) THEN 
M-l : S0SUB85: P0KE65495, 0: RETURNEL 
SE I FA*=CHR* ( 8 ) 60SUB84 : M= 1 : P0KE65 
495, 0: RETURNELSEDRAWL* (ASC ( A*) -3 
2) 

44 I FS< >4THENDR AW " S4 " : RETURNELSE 
DRAW " BL6 " +L* ( ASC ( A* ) -32 ) + " S4 " : RE 
TURN 

45 M*=STR*(SC) :DRAW"BM0, 12C1S8": 
G0SUB43: SC-SC+P: M*=STR* (SO : DRAW 
" BM0 , 1 2C3S8 " : 60SUB43 : DRAW " C 1 " : L I 
NE (208, 0) - (255, 12) , PSET, BF: DRAW" 
BM2 10,1 2C4 " : M*=STR* ( F ) : 60SUB43 : R 
ETURN 

46 POKE65494,0:CLS:PRINT@13, "OPT 
I0NS":PRINT@45, " " 

47 PRINT" CIRCLE ="CH" , "CS" , "CE 



100 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



QUALITY SOFTWARE AND PERIPHERALS FOR YOUR COMPUTER 



MA 



SKYLINE'S BIG 10 

ChesireCat 



Graphicom {64K disk) 


$29.95 


Cognitec 




Telewriter 64 tape 


$49.95 


Telewriter 64 disc 


$59.95 


Custom Software Engineering 




Graphic screen print, specify printer 


$ 9.95 


Eigen Systems 




Colorcomm/E, disk or cart. 


$49.95 


Stripper 


$ 7.95 


CCEAD 


$ 6.95 


BASIC Aid cartridge 


$34.95 


Micro Works 




Macro 80C Editor Assembler 


$99.95 


SDS 80C Editor Assember 


$89.95 



SKYLINE'S OWN 

BESTSELLERS 

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The most powerful statistics program available for 
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Macro 80C super enhancement! Disk $19.95 
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Allows double-sided 40 80 track drives! $19.95 
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Sets up an internal 32K memory disk for rapid stor- 
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Why pay more? Allows dumping from ROMpak to 
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This is what you need to get the most from your 64K 
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Programmers — this is a must! This powerful tool 
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Flexible data base manager. 16K. Now only $12.95 
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You can pay more - but will it be better? 1 6K. $29.95 
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OUR CUSTOMERS SOUND 
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of set-up. 

M.S.. California 



$60 Software Bonus 
With Memory Upgrade 

That's right — Skyline's famous 64K Upgrade 
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ATTENTION ADVENTURE FREAKS! 

k * 




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Inquire For Foreign Shipping 

FAST ORDER LINE (31 2) 286-0762 
24-HR MODEM ORDER LINE 
(312)286-9015 



ORDERING INFORMATION 

*$10 shipping, handling & insurance on printers. Amdisk, and monitors. $5 on 
modems, $2 on all other orders. All prices U.S. funds. 

Skyline Marketing Corp, 451 0 W. Irving Park Rd. Chicago, IL 60641 

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48 PRINT" dRAW «"CF","CB 

49 PRINT" mOVE ="SX","SY 

50 PRINT" pAINT ="PF","PB 

51 PRINT" PaTTERN = " S : I FPA=0THEN 
PR I NT " OFF " ELSEPR I NTTF " , " TB 

52 PRINT" WRITE ="S 

53 PRINT" SAVE": PR I NT" 10AD":P 
RINT" qUIT" 

54 PRINT" rESOLUTION" 

55 PRINT" gET/PUT OPTION *"PO:P 
RINT: PRINT" ExIT TO SCREEN" 

56 I*=INKEY*: IFINSTR(0*, I*)=0ORI 
$= » » THEN56ELSE 1=1 NSTR ( 0* , I * ) 

57 I F I *= " X " THENP0KE65495 , 0 : SCREE 
N 1 : G0T02ELSECLS : ON I G0SUB58 , 59 , 6 
0,63,64,65,66,68,71,72, ,73: S0T04 
6 

58 input"circle height" ; ch: input 
"circle start" jcs: input "circle e 
nd";ce: return 

59 input "foreground color ";cf: in 
put " background color " ; cb : p a=0 : co 
lorcf,cb: return 

60 cls:print@74, "load picture" :p 
r i nt@224 , ; : l i ne i nput " f i lename : " 
;f* 

6 1 screen 1 : p0ke65495 , 0 : loadmf* 

62 g0sub85: return 

63 i nput "speed _, j sx , sy: return 

64 i nput " pa i nt color " ; pf : i nput " b 
order color " s pb : return 

65 CLS : END 

66 I NPUT "RESOLUTION (3 OR 4)";R: 
IFR=3THENPM0DE3, 1 : SCREEN 1 , 0ELSEI 
FR=4THENPM0DE4, 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1ELSECL 
S:G0T066 

67 G0T046 

68 CLS: PRINT874, "SAVE PICTURE" :P 
R I NTS224 , ; : L I NE I NPUT " F I LENAME : " 
5F* 

69 P0KE65495 , 0 : S AVEMF* , 3584 , 9727 
,0 

70 RETURN 

71 INPUT"SIZE (4 IS NORMAL) " ; S: R 
ETURN 

72 I NPUT "OPT I ON ( 1 =PSET , 2=PRESET 
, 3= AND , 4=0R , 5=N0T ) " ; PO : RETURN 

73 I NPUT "PATTERN (FOREGROUND, BA 
CKGROUND ) " ; TF , TB : PA= 1 : POKE 1 78 , TF 
: POKE 1 79 , TB : RETURN 

74 IFFL=0THENXE=CX: YE=CY:FL«1 

75 RO=INT(SOR( (CX-XE) ~2+ (CY-YE) ~ 
2) > 

76 IFR0/3OINT(R0/3)THENR0=R0+l: 
GOT076 

77 RO=RO/3: IFR0>32THENR0=32 

78 DRAW " BM " +STR* < XE ) +" , "+STR* (YE 
) +"C=CF; S=RO; BM+0, -6R2F4D4G4L4H4 
U4E4R2BM+0, 6S4" : RETURN 



79 iffl=0THENXE=cx:ye«cy:fl»i 

80 ro=int(sqr( (cx-xe) "2+ (cy-ye) 

2) ) 

81 IFR0/4OINT(R0/4)THENR0=R0+l: 
G0T081 

82 R0=R0/4: IFR0>32THENRO=32 

83 DRAW " BM " +STR* ( XE ) + " , " +STR* < YE 
) +»C=CF; S=RO; BM+0, -4F8L16E8BM+0, 
4S4": RETURN 

84 DRAW " S4 " : FORSC= 1 T04 : PCOP YSC+4 
TOSC: NEXT: RETURN 

85 DRAW"S4":F0RSC=1T04:PC0PYSC T 
OSC+4: NEXT: RETURN 

86 CLS : PR I NTT AB (13)" HELP " : PR I NTS 
TRING*(32, 131) 5 

87 PRINT"c=CIRCLE", "+=DRAW" 

88 PRINT"d=DISK", "0=MOVE" 

89 PR I NT " b =B0 X " , " -=ERASE " 

90 PR I NT "f -FILLED BOX" , "m=MENU" 

91 PRINT"1=LINE", "h=THIS HELP" 

92 PRINT"r=RAY", "j=JUMP" 

93 PRINT"g«GET < SHIFT-CLEAR 
>=CLEAR" 

94 PR I NT " p=PUT " , " x "CANCEL " 

95 PR I NT " z =P A I NT " , " < SPACE >=STORE 

II 

96 PR I NT " o«=OCT AGON " , " t -TR I ANGLE " 

97 PR I NT " w-WR I TE " , CHR* (127)" «UNW 
RITE" 

98 PR I NT " < ENTER >=STORE WRITE" 

99 PR I NT: PR I NT" USE THE JOYST 
ICK TO MOVE" J 

1 00 I F I NKE Y*« " " THEN 1 00ELSESCREEN 
1 : G0T02 

101 FORI=0TO58:READL* ( I ) : NEXT 

102 DATA"BM+7, 0 

1 03 DATA " BM+2 , 1 U&M+0 , -2U5BM+5 , 7 

1 04 DATA " BM+ 1 , -4U2BM+2 , 0D2BM+4 , 4 

1 05 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0U6BM+2 , 0D6BM-3 , -4 
R4BM-4, 2R4BM+3, 2 

1 06 DATA " BM+4 , — 5L2NUND5L2D2R4D2L 
4BM+7, 1 

1 07 DATA " UE4UBM-4 , 0DBM+4 , 4DBM+3 , 
0 

1 08 DATA " BM+5 , 0NEH4UERFDGL2GDFR2 
E2BM+2,2 

1 09 DATA " BM+2 , -5EBM+4 , 6 

110 DATA " BM+3 , 0H2U2E2BM+4 , 6 

1 1 1 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0E2U2H2BM+6 , 6 

112 DATA " BM+3 , -3NU2NR2ND2NL2NHNE 
NFNGBM+4 , 3 

113 DATA " BM+2 , - 1 U2NU2NL2R2BM+3 , 3 

114 DATA " BM+2 , 0NUGBM+6 , - 1 

1 1 5 DATA " BM+0 , -3R4BM+3 , 3 

116 DATA " BM+2 , 0UBM+5 , 1 

117 DATA"UE4UBM+3,6 

118 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0HU4ER2FD4GL2BM+6 , 
0 

119 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0RNRU6GBM+6 , 5 



102 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



1 20 DATA " NR4UERE2UHL2GBM+7 , 5 

121 DATA " BM+0 , - 1 FR2EH2E2HL3BM+7 , 
6 

1 22 DATA " BM+3 , 0U2NRL3UE3D3BM+4 , 3 

1 23 DATA " BM+0 , - 1 FR2EU2HL3U2R4BM+ 
3,6 

1 24 DATA " BM+4 , -5HL2GD4FR2EUHL3BM 
+7,3 

125 DATA"UE4UL4BM+7,6 

1 26 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0HUEHUER2FDGNL2FDG 
L2BM+6,0 

1 27 DATA " BM+0 , - 1 FR2EU4HL 2GDFR2BM 
+4,3 

1 28 DATA " BM+2 , - 1 UBM+0 , -2UBM+5 , 5 

1 29 DATA " BM+ 1 , 1 EUBM+0 , -2UBM+5 , 4 

1 30 DATA " BM+4 , 0H3E3BM+3 , 6 

131 DAT A " BM+ 1 , -2R3BM-3 , -2R3BM+3 , 
4 

1 32 DATA " BM+2 , 0E3H3BM+5 , 6 

1 33 DATA " BM+ 1 , -6ER2FDG2BM+0 , 2DBM 
+4,0 

1 34 DATA " BM+0 , -3UER2D4LNH2R3EU3H 
2L5G2D4F2R3BM+3, -1 

1 35 DATA " U4E2F2D2NL4D2BM+3 , 0 

1 36 DATA " U6R3FDGNL3FDGL3BM+7 , 0 

1 37 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0HU4ER2FBM+0 , 4GL2B 
M+6,0 

1 38 DATA " U6R3FD4GL3BM+7 , 0 



1 39 DATA " NR4U3NR2U3R4BM+3 , 6 

1 40 DATA " U3NR2U3R4BM+3 , 6 

1 4 1 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0HU4ER2FBM+0 , 2NL 1 D 
2GL2BM+6,0 

142 DATA " U3NU3R4NU3D3BM+3 , 0 

1 43 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0RNRU6NLRBM+4 , 6 

1 44 DATA " BM+0 , - 1 FREU5NLRBM+3 , 6 

1 45 DATA " U3NU3RNE3F3BM+3 , 0 

146 DATA " NU6R4UBM+3 , 1 

1 47 DATA " U6F2NDE2D6BM+3 , 0 

1 48 DATA"U6FDF2DFNU6BM+3, 0 

149 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0HU4ER2FD4GL2BM+6 , 
0 

1 50 DATA " U6R3FDGL3BM+7 , 3 

151 DATA " BM+ 1 , 0HU4ER2FD3GNHNFGLB 
M+6,0 

1 52 DATA " U6R3FDGL2NLF3BM+3 , 0 

1 53 DATA " BM+0 , - 1 FR2EUHL2HUER2FBM 
+3,5 

1 54 DATA " BM+2 , 0U6NL2R2BM+3 , 6 

1 55 DATA " BM+0 , - 1 NU5FR2EU5BM+3 , 6 

1 56 DATA " BM+0 , — 6D2FDFNDEUEU2BM+3 
,6 

1 57 DATA " NU6E2NUF2U6BM+3 , 6 

1 58 DATA " UE4UBM-4 , 0DF4DBM+3 , 0 

1 59 DATA " BM+0 , -6D2F2ND2E2U2BM+3 , 
6 

1 60 DATA " NR4UE4UL4BM+7 , 6 




AUTOTERM 

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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 103 



RAINBOW WISHING WELL 



16K 

ECB 



RAINBOW 

32 3 a 1 



Streamline competitive pairing and bracketing with . . . 

The CoCo 

Tournament Programs 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for a 
program that you would like to see writ- 
ten for the CoCo, submit it to "The 
Rainbow Wishing WelV'cjo THE RAIN- 
BOW. If an idea looks especially worth- 
while and challenging, Fred might be 
able to write a program to do your task. 
Remember, this is basic so make your 
requests as specific as possible. All pro- 
grams resulting from your suggestions 
are for your own use, but remain the 
property of the author. 



Ti 



lhe Rainbow Wishing Well" 
has been in full swing for 
several months now, and a 
number of varied fields have been 

(Fred Scerbo is a special needs instruc- 
tor for the North Adams Public 
Schools. He holds a master s in educa- 
tion and published some of the first 
software available for the Color Com- 
puter through his software firm, Illus- 
trated Memory Banks.) 



covered, ranging from education to 
graphics to athletic applications. This 
month we offer a pair of line printer 
programs which will handle the creation 
of double elimination brackets for any 
kind of tournament competition, whe- 
ther it be for basketball, wrestling, 
bridge, chess, or even something like a 
spelling bee. The time-consuming paper- 
work that goes along with such prepara- 
tions can now be reduced to a minimum 
with the programs which you will find 
listed in these pages. 

Let's take a look at some of the plan- 
ning which can go into tournament 
preparations just so we can get some 
idea of how your CoCo can become a 
super time-saver at this task. 

Planning A Tournament 

If you have been following "The 
Wishing Weir for the last few months, 
you will by now be familiar with the fact 
that 1 help coach a high school wrestling 
team. Even before 1 went to our first 
tournament, I was familiar with the type 
of pairing bracket which would be used 
for determining who faced whom for 
any given match. Just as you would find 
in any type of regular athletic pairing 
involving teams, even I knew that if you 
had eight teams, then team one faces 
team eight, team two faces team seven, 



team three faces six, and so on. This 
type of face-off is easy to figure because 
the team with the most wins ranks 
number one, and so on and so forth. 

After sitting down a^ a pairing meet- 
ing for the Berkshire Hills Conference 
Christmas Tournament, I soon found 
out that things are not always so black 



"This month we offer a 
pair of line printer pro- 
grams which will handle 
the creation of double 
elimination brackets for 
any kind of tournament 
competition . . " 



and white when dealing with a tourna- 
ment early in the season when team or 
individual records are not yet deter- 
mined. In other words, it is not always 
so easy to determine who ranks first or 
second, or worse yet, wI|io ranks eighth, 
thus getting the honor of being sacri- 
ficed to the number one team! 

This is not the only problem which 



104 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




NEW GOOD STUFF 
FOR EVERY COLOR COMPUTER 



Turn your Color Computer into a graphic design center with the ease of a 
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and including an entire high-resolution screen. Designed for those with some 
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• A full set of logical and pixel manipulation functions simplifies the 
development of complex figures. 

• An editor lets you zoom in and work on every detail of your design. 
Toggle between the "macro" and "micro" screens for perspective on 
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• Nine animation buffers allow you to preview each sequence to ensure 
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• Versatile I/O routines store a graphic screen on cassette or floppy disk ; 
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If you're looking for the finest graphic development utility available for your 
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push your imagination to the limit — with MagiGraph! 

By Kevin Dooley. Cassette $34.95 (16K required); Disk $39.95 (32K Ex- 
tended Color BASIC required); Amdisk cartridge $44.95. 



CSPOOL 
Color Computer Print Spooler 



Stop Waiting Around for the Printer! CSPOOL allows you to use your printer 
and computer concurrently, takes only 26 bytes of Color Basic's memory, and 
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RAM, CSPOOL allows you to run other programs while your printer is doing its 
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SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 



MACR0-80C: DISK-BASED EDITOR, 
ASSEMBLER AND MONITOR— With all the 
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MACR0-80C supports the complete Motorola 6809 
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assembler (SDS-80C), MACR0-80C contains many 
more useful instructions and pseudo-ops which aid 
the programmer and add power and flexibility. The 
screen-oriented editor is designed for efficient and 
easy editing of assembly language programs. 
MACR0-80C allows global changes and moving/ 
copying blocks of text. You can edit lines of 
assembly source which exceed 32 characters. 
DCBUG is a machine language monitor which allows 
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points, etc. 

Editor, assembler and monitor— along with 
sample programs— come on one Radio Shack com- 
patible disk. Extensive documentation included. By 
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SDS-80C: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 
SYSTEM— Our famous editor, assembler and 
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MICROTEXT: COMMUNICATIONS VIA 
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Microtext can be used with any printer or no printer 
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MICRO WORKS COLOR FORTH 

• Faster to program in than Basic 

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• Executes in less time than Basic 

The MICRO WORKS COLOR FORTH is a Rompack 
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MACHINE LANGUAGE 

MONITOR TAPE: A cassette tape which allows 
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MONITOR ROM: The same program as above, 
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SOURCE GENERATOR: This package is a disas- 
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generates your own source listing of the BASIC 
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HARDWARE 



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ROMLESS PACKS for your custom EPROMS — call 
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TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER GRAPHICS, by Don 
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ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE GRAPHICS FOR THE 
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GAMES 



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comes to mind when dealing with bracket- 
ing. Sure, if you have eight individuals 
or teams, you use an eight-person 
bracket. There is no big problem, but 
what happens when you have nine or 10, 
or only five or six? There are no five- 
person brackets for competition (unless 
we are dealing with a sport like freestyle 
wrestling, where no one is seeded num- 
ber one and you face everyone in your 
category once. The final positions are 
determined by your total number of 
points for the day.). 

It is here that I was introduced to the 
concept of the bye. To put it very 
simply, a bye is a free-ride, a chance to 
advance to the next level of the bracket 
without facing an opponent. If we are 
dealing with the type of competition 
where total accumulated points count, 
then a bye can hurt you. If we are using a 
bracket system as presented in these 
programs, a bye can be very helpful. 

The nature of the bye thus poses us 
with a simple yet annoying problem. 
How do we decide who gets the bye? If it 
always were to go to the top seeds, then 
the top positions would become even 
more valuable resulting in even greater 
arguments at the pairings. Equally so, it 
makes no sense to assign the byes to 
your weakest competitors, since it would 
give them an unfair advantage over 
those who had earned the right to a 
higher position on the bracket. 

Therefore, the only fair way to assign 
the byes are at random, (see where your 
CoCo comes in yet?) This is not as easy 
as it may sound. Let us say that we are 
dealing with 1 1 players. This would 
require that we use a 16-person bracket 
with five byes. Each of the 1 1 players (or 
teams) should have an equal shot at 
receiving one of the byes. At the same 
time, the byes must be equally divided 
between the top and bottom halves of 
the bracket. Not only that, you must 
make sure that you never have a bye 
facing a bye on your bracket. This 
would be foolish since no one would 
gain any advantage from this. 

To get around this problem, I have 
been at pairing meetings where the indi- 
viduals doing the pairings would have 
to resort to ripping up small pieces of 
paper and drawing lots to determine 
who gets the byes and where they go on 
the bracket. This often has to be done 
several times to insure that the byes do 
not face each other. This can consume a 
great deal of valuable time, especially if 
the pairings are being done at the same 
day as the competition. 



Back To The Wishing Well 

It only took one pairing meeting for 
me to realize that the CoCo could easily 
solve many of the problems involved in 
bracketing and pairing. The object of 
the programs would be: 

1) Allow the user to enter the names 
of players or teams more quickly than 
they could be done by hand. 

2) Give each player or team an equal 
shot at receiving the bye. 

3) Insure that a bye never faces a bye. 

4) Print out the entire bracket, ad- 
vancing players/ teams which receive 
byes and print the consolation bracket. 

5) Allow score sheets or labels with 
the matched pairs to be printed from the 
single entry of data. 

6) Print multiple copies of the same 
bracket. 



"/ will let you in on a 
little secret. This program 
can also work on a Radio 
Shack Model 100 portable 
computer. All you have to 
do is change PRINT#-2, to 
LPRINT and alter the 
PRINT@ numbers to match 
the Model WO screen." 



Goal number five is especially valu- 
able since some type of score sheet has 
to be used, regardless of what kind of 
competition this is. This is an area 
where it is also easiest to make an error 
when doing the writing by hand. You do 
not want the wrong players facing each 
other. I was actually at a tournament 
where this happened because of a writ- 
ten error and, believe me, it can be a 
"real can of worms." 

The two programs listed here are for 
eight and 16 positions. I have also writ- 
ten a 32-position bracket, but it is longer 
than both of these two combined. For 



those who would find the 32-position 
bracket useful, send a self-addressed 
stamped envelope to "The Wishing Well" 
c/o THE rainbow and 1 will send you 
details on how to get a copy of the 
listing. 

You might be wondering why I just 
didn't list the 32-level bracket and let it 
be used for all numbers. This is because 
you do need an eight-bracket for up to 
eight or fewer positions, a 16-bracket 
for nine to 16, and a 32 for 17 to 32 
positions. Since using a 32-level bracket 
is very rare in any type of competition, I 
felt the eight- and 16-level brackets 
would be more useful to the general 
public. (Besides, you can always use two 
16-brackets by dividing your groups 
into two pools. Thus, the top finalists in 
each pool would face each other for first 
and second place while the top two 
second place finalists would face each 
other for third and fourth place, and so 
on.) 

Another thing you will notice is that 1 
have once again used DA TA statements 
rather than INPUT for disk and tape 
files. Don't get me wrong. I don't want 
you to think I always use DA TA state- 
ments (especially since this is not the 
most user friendly way to write pro- 
grams for the general public). Instead, I 
like to have programs such as this con- 
tain the necessary information so you 
can get a better idea of what the pro- 
gram does and how it works after typing 
it in or loading it from rainbow on 
TAPE. It shouldn't take too much work 
if you want to alter this program by 
changing the READ commands to IN- 
PUT. I usually prefer to use DA TA at a 
tournament since someone has always 
given me an incorrect spelling of some- 
one's name. This way, I can usually just 
EDIT the DATA. 

One important thing to remember is 
that this program is virtually useless 
without a line printer capable of han- 
dling at least 80 characters per line. I 
have also included the CHR$ commands 
to generate the condensed mode of 132 
characters per line as found on the Oki- 
data Microline 82 A and 92A printers. If 
your printer uses different codes, con- 
sult your manual to change to the cor- 
rect CHR$ codes. The regular 80 char- 
acters per line should work on all stand- 
ard CoCo line printers since all line 
printers recognize CHR$(30)zs standard- 
sized print. 

Now let's see what steps you can take 
to use this program for your own 
pairings. 



106 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Using The Program 

All information for these programs 
begins at Line 1000. Therefore, your 
first two pieces of information in Line 
1000 should be first, the number of 
actual participants in this bracket, and 
second , the number of names which will 
actually be seeded. Thus, Line 1000 
should appear like this: 

1000 DATA 6,3 

Six is the number of participants. 
But, what do we mean by the "number 
seeded," which in this case is three? 
Well, in this case, it means that we have 
decided that out of the six names we 
have entered into DA TA, only the first 
three have sufficient records to be rank- 
ed first, second, and third respectively. 
The remaining three can be ranked in 
any random order the computer choos- 
es. (For example, in wrestling, these re- 
maining three might be first year wrest- 
lers who have no record of wins or losses 
yet, and therefore, cannot be logically 
ranked fourth, fifth and sixth by any 
criteria. Thus* they may even appear in 
the seventh of eighth positions depend- 
ing on where the byes go.) Therefore, 
the group deciding the pairings would 
usually have ranked the first three posi- 
tions and have left the remaining names 
to a random position. 

If we had a 16-bracket, our numbers 
might be something like this: 1000 DA TA 
11,4, which means we have 1 1 partici- 
pants (with five byes) and only the first 
four listed will be ranked first through 
fourth. The remaining seven participants 
will end up seeded at random, with just 
as great a chance at receiving a bye as 
any other participant. We might have a 
circumstance where the numbers would 
be: 1000 DATA 16,16 which would 
mean 16 participants all ranked in the 
order listed with no byes. 



The next DA TA line reads: 

1010 DATA JUNIORS,ASSORT- 
ED 

The two strings here would indicate a 
category (JUNIOR wrestlers in this 
case) with a subname (ASSORTED) 
which could also be the weight class 
(145 POUNDS). You could put any 
pieces of information you wish for these 
two strings, especially if you are using 
this for something other than sports 
(say, bridge or chess). 

The remaining DATA lines would 
have two pieces of information for each 
participant: NAME and AFFILIATION 
(such as school or town or whatever you 
choose). 

That's all it takes. RUN the program 
and it will sort the names and byes. You 
will then be asked to press 'R' for regu- 
lar print (80 characters per line) or 4 S' 
for small ( 1 32 characters per line). If for 
some reason you do not like the arrange- 
ment, you can run the program again 
for a new sort, or you have the option of 
reprinting the same sheet, say, for the 
other coaches in the room. 

Keep in mind, this program only does 
the pairing. It does not do any steps 
beyond that. It assumes you will fill in 
the following lines of the brackets as 
they proceed by hand. In any case, you 
have a very neat sheet to work with, 
done much more quickly than you could 
possibly do by hand. 

After printing all your sheets, you 
also have the option of printing labels or 
names on score sheets that you may 
have already prepared. (This is helpful if 
your line printer uses single sheets as 
well as tractor feed paper.) The printing 
is designed to fit tractor feed labels set 
two to a sheet. If you misprint a label, 
you can either reprint it or go on to the 



next set of names. They will be paired 
left to right as they should be, such as 
position one with 16, two with 15, and 
so on. 

There! All the hard work is done. 
Now you can get down to work on the 
competition. 

I will let you in on a little secret. This 
program can also work on a Radio 
Shack Model 100 portable computer. 
(All you have to do is change PRINTft- 
2, to LPRINT and alter the PRINT® 
numbers to match the Model 1 00 screen. 
You may also need to change the ran- 
dom number generator. For some rea- 
son I had to on mine although the 
Model 100 handbook did not seem to 
indicate that this was necessary.) In fact, 
I usually use my pairing program with a 
Model lOOwhich 1 am starting to like as 
much as the CoCo. If you haven't tried 
the Model 100, give it a try. It is the 
perfect companion to the CoCo since 
with the use of a null modem (which you 
can make for about $8) and a terminal 
program you can dump back and forth 
between the two machines with the 
greatest of ease. (1 can even use the 
CoCo disk drive to store my Model 100 
programs in this very way, rather than 
spending another $800 on the Model 
100 disk drive system.) 

If you ever need to bracket, these 
programs will do it for you. As 1 men- 
tioned earlier, if you need the 32-posi- 
tion bracket, drop me a line and a 
SASE for details. I also have the free- 
style bracket available for wrestling, but 
since that is too specific in its use, it 
would not be wise to list it in "The Wish- 
ing Well" since so few of you could use 
it. At least these programs have other 
uses besides sports. 

Next month, watch for something 
very, very different. I have a really dif- 
ferent type of wish to grant which most 
of you should find very useful. 




Listing 1: 

10 REM************************* 
20 REM* PAIRING PROGRAM FOR * 
30 REM* EIGHT POSITIONS * 
40 REM* BY FRED B. SCERBO * 
50 REM* 149 BARBOUR ST. * 



60 REM* NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 * 
70 REM* COPYRIGHT <C> 1984 * 
80 REM************************* 

90 CLS 

t00 PRINT@101, "EIGHT POSITION PA 
IRING" 

110 PRINT:PRINTTAB< 15) "BY" 

120 PRINT: PRINTTAB<9) "FRED B- SC 

ERBO" 

1 30 PR I NT : PR I NTT AB < 7 > " COP YR I GHT 
<C> 1984" 

140 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS < ENTER > T 
O BEGIN SORTING" 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 107 



GREAT COCO PRODUCTS 




SUPER 
SCREEN 



The Color Computer Supercharger 

• A big 52 character by 24 line screen 

• 'PRINT @' is fully implemented on the big screen 

• Easily combine text with Hi-res graphics 

• Auto-key repeat for greater keyboard convenience 

• The ON ERROR GOTO' statement is fully implemented 

• Control codes for additional function 

Super Screen comes with complete, well detailed instructions and is available on cassette 
or disc. It adjusts automatically to any 16K or greater. Extended or Disc basic Color 
Computer or TDP-100 and uses only 2K of memory in addition to the screen memory 
reserved during power up. Guaranteed to be the most frequently used program in your 
software library.. .once you use it, you won't be without it! 

Hoi CoCo, Jan. '84 "Super Screen represents a quality utility program that fills a definite 
need for the serious CoCo user. No other programs on the market so far have offered the 
error-trapping utility of Super Screen." 

Color Computer Magazine, May '84 "Super Screen is a worthy addition to anyone's 
software library. It has become my most used utility and has made programming in BASIC 
on the Color Computer a joy..." 

Cassette $29.95 Disc $32.95 



EASY-FILE 

t^** Data Management System 

0 Need a good mailing list or customer list program? How about a program to keep 
track of your investments, your computer magazines, or record collection? Do you 
have an inventory of at! household items for insurance purposes? EASY-FtiE will do 
all of these things and many more. 

0 tASY-flLE makes data managing a breeze with single key menu selections, 
extensive error handling procedu res, a demonstration data file and a detailed, easy 
to understand instruction manual 

0 EASY-FILE is powerful too. It automatically enhances your monitor screen to a full 
upper and lower case 51 character by 24 line display. EASY-FILE allows up to 30 data 
fields and provides password file protection, selectable numeric totalling, and 
complete data searching and editing capabilities. You can quickly enter, locate, 
review and modify data records, and even transfer records from one file to another. 

0 Sorting? You betJ SASY-HLE allows you to sort up to 5 levels of data and allows you 
to define upper and lower limits as- well. You can sort in many different ways and 
save the results in individual index files. These index files may be used later to 
determine what will appear on your printed reports. 

£ Reports are easily prepared with EASY-FILE because it offers so many automatic 
features, There is no need to generate complex feport forms; With EASY-FILE you 
simply select from a list of options to determine what your report and header will 
look like. There are countless variations. EASY-FILE takes care of tab slept and field 
spacing automatically. Prepare horizontal reports 1,80 or 132 columns), vertical 
reports or labels! Save your favorite report formats right in a data file so they may be 
used whenever you need them. 

0 The EASY-FILE master disc and instructions are packaged in an attractive 3-ring 
binder, Requires 32K and at least one disc drive. 

Order yours now! Get organized for only $59,95! 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER 

Carefully engineered to work with ALL Color Computer models, including the new 
COCO II 

ENABLES YOUR COCO TO OPERATE WITH A VIDEO MONITOR INSTEAD 
OF A TELEVISION 

• Works with Monochrome Monitors! • Audio Connection Included! 

• Works with Color Monitors! • Easy Installation—No Soldering! 

• Great Price! ONLY $29.95 



ORDER ENTRY SYSTEM 

Rainbow, Feb. *84 "If you are looking for a program to keep track of your sales and print 
invoices, then this one will take care of those needs quite well. ..A good program that 
would serve the invoicing needs of a small company quite nicely." 

The Mark Data Products sales order processing system provides a fast, efficient means to 
enter orders, print shipping papers and invoices, prepare sales reports, and monitor 
receivables. The system automatically enhances the monitor screen to a 51 character by 24 
line display. 32K of memory is required along with an 80-coiumn printer and one or more 
disc drives. 

The MOP Order Entry System is a family of programs which operate interactively by means 
of a "menu" selection scheme. Upto 900 products may be defined and a single disc system 
can hold over 600 transactions. When the operator selects a task to be performed, the 
computer loads a program designed to handle that task from the system disc. The system 
disc contains all of the programs required to create, update and maintain data files and 
prepare the necessary paperwork including shipping and invoice forms, daily sales 
reports, a monthly {or other period) sales report and a receivables report. 

This order entry software equals or exceeds higher priced packages for other computers 
and includes a detailed operating manual. ONLY $99.95 



SUP** 



PRO 




ONLY 

.95" 



• Original key layout 
• Fast, easy installation — no soldering 
• Individually boxed with full instructions 



• Smooth "Touch Typist" feel — no sagging 

am 



$64«^F3^ • U.S. made — high quality, quad cold contacts 

• Professional, low profile, finished appearance 

* Computers produced after approximately October 1982 require an 
additional keyboard plug adapter. Please add $4.95. 



ACCOUNTING SYSTEM 

Rainbow, May 'M "Considering what it can do to organize a small business, it is quite a 
value. " 

Hot CoCo, June '84 "...a serious, professional accounting program and weti worth its 
price. The programs are complete and simple to use." 

The Mark Data Products Accounting System is ideal for the small businessman needing a 
fast, efficient means to process income and expenses, prepare detailed reports and 
maintain most of the information required at tax time. The system is a family of programs 
which operate by means of a "menu" selection scheme. When the operator selects a task 
to perform, the computer loads a program designed to handle that task from the system 
disc. The system disc contains all of the programs required to create, update and maintain 
data files and prepare the necessary accounting reports including a transaction journal, 
a P & L or income report, an interim or trial balance and a balance sheet. 

Up to 255 separate accounts may be defined and a single disc system can hold over 1,400 
transactions. This system automatically enhances the monitor screen to a 51 character by 
24 fine display, 32K of memory is required along with an 80*column printer and one or 
more disc drives. 

This accounting software equals or exceeds higher priced packages for other computers 
and includes a detailed operating manual. ONLY $99.95 




FREE - Send for our NEW 24 page catalog! 



Mark Data Products 



I 



24001 ALICIA PKWY., NO. 207 • MISSION VIEJO, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 

SHIPPING: All orders under $100 please add $2 regular, $5 air. AH orders over $100 please add 2% regular, 5% air. California residents please add 6% sales tax. Orders outside 
the continental U.S., check with us for shipping amount; please remit U.S. funds. Software authors— contact us for exciting program marketing details. We accept MasterCard 
and VISA. Distributed in Canada by Kelly Software. 



$$ SAVE MONEY ON YOUR $$ 
CASSETTE & DISC SUPPLIES 

CASSETTES 

We bu^cassettes &*d discs in large quantities for our own use and can pas* thesavingson 

ta> you. ' '■' 

^C-10 Casw9te^w/ljbeli .59 .*av 10 far $$.50 

CaweKe stordge bai .2$ lfl hrw J.00 



514 DISCS 

High quality nationally advertised brand. Guaranteed Performance* We wfH replace any 
disc that fails during normal use. Discs are single sided, double density, reinforced hub 
with Tyvek sleeve, $2.25 each 10 for $19.95 



Basic 1 .1 

Extended "it w/mamtai . 
DkcVI 



ROMS 



■ ■ i ■ r • ■ • i i ■ i ■ 



r r- . i V | i | i i r . t 



$39*95 



NEED MORE MEMORY? 

64K Memory Expansion KH 

AH parts and comptete instructiOm (For T and *#i boards and CoCo iff 
$59.95 



COCO DISC DRIVES !* 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS INCLUDE: 

• Hi-Quality Teac Thin Line Drives 

• Attractive, Beige Dual Drive Cabinet/Power Supply 

• Fill Panel for Single Drive Disc Systems 

• Radio Shack or J & M Controller 

• Cable and Operating Manual 

• Full 90 Day Warranty 

Single Drive (SSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller 

Additional Drive 

Two Drives (SSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller 

Single Drive (DSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller 

Additional Drive 

Two Drives (DSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller. 




Dual Cabinet/Power Supply 

Disc Controller (Radio Shack or J & M) 

Connecting Cable 

Radio Shack DOS ROM 1.1 



. . 79.95 
. 139.95 
. . 24.95 
. . 39.95 



VIP SOFTWARE 

•: W-ec«!Ty rhp nv:Ki asked for softlaw products (or your convenience. 

VIP Writer , fm ,., , ■ , - ..... i .... $99,95 

VI P Terminal ---- - 49.95 

vipcafc.... , „ 1 1 1 ,mm 



^ SUPER BUG 



Mark Data Products SUPER BUG is a powerful, relocatable machine code monitor 
program for your CoCo. If you are a beginner, the program and documentation are an 
indispensable training aid, helping you to gain a better understanding of your Color 
Computer and machine code programming. If you are an accomplished cornputerist, 
SUPER BUG's capabilities, versatility and convenience will prove invaluable during 
programming and debugging. 

SUPER BUG offers so many outstanding features that we are unable to list them all in this 
limited space, but here are a few; hex and alpha numeric memory display, modify, search, 
and test; full printer support with baud rate and line feed select; up to 220 breakpoints; 
mini object code disassembler; 64K mode setup; decimal, hex and asci code conversion 
routines and extensive documentation. 



Tape $29.95 



Disc $32.95 



INFORMATIVE BOOKS 

."Your Color Computer" by Doug Mosher 

Over 300 pages of detailed information. ..an indispensable introduction to your Color 
Computer, complete with diagrams, photographs, and a BASIC thesaurus and command 
reference section. A CoCo encyclopedia. $16.95 
"Programming Hie 6809" by Rodney Zaks 

One of IN best machine language texts available — * required reference material. This 
book explains how to program the 6609 in machine language, covering all aspects 
prDpeu-ively dnd >Y>t* ,r, a | tiU , 'v $15.95 



QUALITY VIDEO MONITOR S 





SAKATA COLOR SC-100 - $289.95 TAX AN AMBER SCREEN - $139.95 



The SC-100 is a streamlined 13" 
composite monitor which produces 
sharp, brilliant colors. The cabinet is 
made of durable styrene and is available 
in an attractive off-white color. Includes 
audio with speaker and earphone jack. 
We highly recommend this color 
monitor because of its excellent 
performance and beautiful styling. 

SPECIAL: Order one of these quality monitors from MDP and get our 
Universal Video Driver for just $24.95! 



A 12" amber screen composite monitor 
of the highest quality with exceptional 
reliability and performance. 18 MHZ 
bandwidth. Attractive off-white 
cabinet. We use this monitor in our 
offices. 



SUPER. NEW GAMES! 





CASSETTE 
$24.95 

DISC 

$27.95 



TIME FIGHTER 

Pilot your MD-64 fighter through a hazardous 
time tunnel. Your mission is to destroy the 
dreaded Time Guardian who threatens the 
natural order of the universe. In order to reach 
this menace you must fight aerial dangers from 
strange and different time zones. If you like fast 
action, this one's for you! 16K required. 

Rainbow, March '84 "One of the best in your 
library of computer games. It's a real gem." 



W 

M 

iE0xCiXODJ.-ClT|T|p ^ 
^rVi tWi^t 



CCIXGc h pns r r o * 




TUTS TOMB 

Explore the ancient, mystical tomb of the great 
Pharoah. Find the magical keys which lead you 
to unbelievable treasures as you out-maneuver 
the creatures that slither and swarm about you. 
Super fast arcade action — this one will knock 
your socks off with 16 screens of incredible color 
and sound. Fabulous! 32K required. 
Hot CoCo, April '84 "State of the art CoCo 
graphics. A first rate game." 



CASSETTE 
$24.95 

DISC 

$27.95 



Mark Data Products 



SHIPPING: All orders under $100 please add $2 regular, $5 air. All orders over $100 please add 2% regular, 5% air. California residents please add 6% sales tax. Orders outside 
the continental U.S.. check with us for shipping amount; please remit U.S. funds. Software authors— contact us for exciting program marketing details. We accept MasterCard 
and VISA. Distributed in Canada by Kelly Software. 



150 X*-INKEY*:RS«RND (-TIMER) : IFX 
♦-CHR* (13) THEN 1 60ELSE 1 50 
160 REM START SORT 
170 CLEAR 1000 

1 72 B YE*=CHR* < 95 ) +CHR* < 95 ) + " BYE " 
+CHR* < 95) +CHR* < 95) 

174 cls: prints128, string* (32, "*" 
>:printtab(8)"n0w sorting names" 
: print: printstring* (32, "** > 

176 DIM TB(8,2),BB(8,2),PL*(16), 
SC*<16) ,PR*<16) ,PF*(16),SB<16> :L 
L*=CHR*(95) 

178 FORI =1T04: READ TB(I,1):NEXT 
180 DATA 1,8,5,4 

182 F0RI=1T04:READ BB(I,1):NEXT 
184 DATA 3,6,7,2 
186 READ NW,CF,DV*,W*:NB=8-NW 
188 FOR I=1T0CF:READ PL*(I),SC*( 

i>:next:mu=nw-cf:if MU=0 THEN 1 96 

ELSE FORI=lTO MU 
190 FT=RND<MU) : IF SB(FT+CF)=1 TH 
EN 190 

192 SB(FT+CF)=1:READ PL*(FT+CF), 

SC*(FT+CF) :NEXTI 

194 FORI=lTO NW:NEXT 

196 FORI=l TO CF 

198 FOR Y=1T04 



COMPUTER GRADE 
• DATA TRAC • 

BLANK CASSETTES 



C-Q5, C-06, C-10, C-12, C-20, C-24, C-32 



From the leading supplier of Computer 
Cassettes, new, longer length C-12 s 
(6 minutes per side) provide the extra 
tew feet needed for some 16K programs. 

• BASF-LHD (DPS) world standard tape. 

• Premium 5 screw shell with leader. 

• Internationally acclaimed. Thousands of 
repeat users. 

• Error Free • Money back guarantee 

Call: 818/700-0330 

^FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
on Credit Card Orders. 



BUY THE BEST, AT FACTORY-DIRECT PRICES 



500 C-12 i or C-10 s— 38 c eecr 

w/labels. add 4« • Shipping $17/500 
500 Boxes 13? n • Shippino $10/500 
(Free Caddy offer don not apply) 



HE* 



TRACTOR FEED • OLE-CUT 
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WHITE $3 00/100 $20 00/1000 
COLORED UK LS • Pi&tets - 
Red. Slue. Green. Yellow. Lavender 
$4 00/100 $30 00/1 000 



CASSETTE STORAGE fc*»r 

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FREE 

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■im not apply to 6*3 Ekrl-K 



ORDER NOW . . . MAIL TO - 

YORK lO 91 

ORDER FORM - - «= 



ITEM 


1 DOZEN 


2 DOZEN 


TOTAL 


C05 


□ 7.00 


□ 13.00 




C-06 


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□ 13.00 




C-10 


□ 


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C-12 


□ 7.M 


□ 14.00 




C-20 


□ 8.75 


□ 16 50 




C-24 


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C-32 


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n 21-00 




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Chatsworth, CA 91311 



Each cassette includes 2 labels only. Boxes sold separate- 
ly. In Continental U.S. shipment by U.P.S. If Parcel Post 
preferred, check here. . 

Check or M.O. enclosed □ Send Quantity Discounts 
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TB(Y,2)«2 
BB(Y,2)=2 

246 



THEN 210 



THEN 210 



200 IF TB(Y,1)=I THEN 
202 IF BB <Y, 1 > =1 THEN 
204 NEXTY, I 
206 U=l:IF NB=0 THEN 
208 FOR 1=1 TO NB 
210 K=RND(4) 
212 IF U=0 THEN 228 
214 IF TB(K,2)=>1 THEN 210 
216 WW=INT(K/2) : WW=WW*2: IF K-WW= 
1 THEN 222 

218 IF TB(K-1,2)=1 THEN 210 
220 G0T0224 

222 IF TB(K+1,2)=1 THEN 210 
224 TB(K,2)=1 
226 U=0:GOTO242 
228 IF BB(K,2)=>1 THEN 210 
230 WW=INT(K/2> :WW=WW*2: IF K-WW= 
1 THEN 236 
232 IF BB(K-1,2)=1 
234 G0T023B 
236 IF BB(K+1,2)=1 
238 BB(K,2)=1 
240 U=l:B0T0242 
242 NEXT I 
244 Q=CF+1 
246 FOR 1=1 TO 4 

248 IF TB(I,2)=2 THEN PR*(TB(I,1 

> > =PL* <TB ( 1 , 1 ) > : PF* (TB ( 1 , 1 > > =SC* 
<TB<I, 1) ) 

250 IF TB(I,2)=1 THEN PR*(TB(I,1 
) )=". .BYE. . ":PF*(TB(I, 1) ) = , " , 
252 IF TB(I,2>=0 THEN PR*(TB(I,1 

> >=PL*(Q) :PF*(TB(I, 1) )=SC*(Q> :Q= 
Q+l 

254 NEXT I 

256 FOR 1*1 TO 4 

258 IF BB(I,2)=2 THEN PR*(BB(I,1 

> >=PL*(BB(I, 1) ) :PF*(BB(I, 1) )=SC* 

(fie (i,i>) 

260 IF BB(I,2)=1 THEN PR*(BB(I,1 
))=".. BYE. . " : PF* (BB (1,1))="" 
262 IF BB(I,2>=0 THEN PR*(BB(I,1 
) ) =PL* (Q) : PF* (BB ( I , 1 > ) =SC* (Q) : Q= 
Q+l 

264 NEXT I:6OTO270 

266 F0RI=lT08:PRINT#-2, I,PR*(TB( 

1,1)) :NEXTI 

268 F0RI=lT08:PRINT#-2, 1+8, PR* (B 
B(I, 1) ) INEXTI 

270 F0RI=1T04:IF PR* ( I ) =" . . BYE. . 
" THENSS* ( I ) =PR* (9-1 > ELSE I F PR* ( 9 
-I ) =" . . BYE. . "THENSS* ( I ) =PR* ( I ) EL 
SESS*(I)=" " 
272 NEXT 

274 CLS: PR I NT© 128, STRING* (32, "*" 
): PR I NT ".PRINT "PRESS <R>EGULAR OR 
<S>MALL PRINT": PRINT: PRINTSTRIN 
G*(32, "*") 



110 



THE RAINBOW October 1984 



276 X*=INKEY*: IFX*="S"THEN278ELS 

E I F X *= " R " THEN2S4ELSE276 

278 X=4 : L**STR I NG* ( 20 , 95) : SP*=ST 

R I NG* < 20 , 32 ) : V*=CHR* ( 1 24 ) : ES*=ST 

RING* (41 , 32) : Q=4: HJ=8: PRINT#-2, C 

HR* ( 29 ) : FL*=STR I NG* < 24 , 95 > 

280 FR*=" <FIRST PLACE) " : PP=20: H 

S*»STR I NG* < 1 0 , 3 ) : HL*=L* : A=1:B=12 

: C=32 : D=53 : E=74 : F=95 : G= 1 1 8 

282 G0T0288 

284 X=4 : L*=STR I NG* ( 1 6 , 95 > : SP*=ST 

RING* (16, 32) : V*=CHR*U24> :ES*=ST 

R I NG* ( 33 , 32 > : Q=0 : H J =0 : FL*=STR I NG 

*<8,95) :FR*=" (FIRST) " 

286 PR I NT#-2 , CHR* ( 30 ) : PP= 1 6 : HS*= 

STRING* (8, 32) : HL*=STRING* (8, 95) : 

A= 1 : B=4 : C=20 : D=37 : E=54 : F=63 : G=74 

288 IF FP=1THEN292 

290 FOR 1=1 T08 : QP=LEN ( PR* ( I ) ) : PR* 

( I ) =PR* ( I ) +STRING* (PP-QP, 95) : NEX 

TI 

292 REM START PRINTING 

294 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+26+Q*3)DV*" - 

"W*:PRINT#-2, " ":PRINT#-2, " 1. 
"TAB (B) PR* ( 1 ) TAB (E+3+HJ*2) " 1ST " 
L* 

296 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(1) 
298 PR I NT#-2 , T AB ( C ) V*L*TAB ( E+3+H 
J*2)"2ND "L* 

300 PRINT#-2," 8. "TAB (B) PR* (8) V 
*TAB(D) V* 

302 PRlNT#-2,TAB(D)V*TAB(E+3+HJ* 
2) "3RD "L* 

304 PRINT#-2,TAB(D-1) "X"V*L* 
306 PRINT#-2, " 5. "TAB (B) PR* (5) T 
AB ( D ) V*T AB ( E ) V*T AB ( E+3+HJ »2 ) " 4TH 
"L* 

308 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(4)TA 
B(D)V*TAB(E) V* 

310 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*V*TAB(E)V 

*TAB(E+3+HJ*2) "5TH "L* 

312 PRINT#-2," 4. "TAB (B) PR* (4) T 

AB(C)V*TAB(E) V* 

314 PRINT#-2,TAB(E) V* 

316 PRINT#-2,TAB(E)V* 

318 PRINT#-2, " 3. "TAB (B) PR* (3) T 

AB(E)V*HL* 

320 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(3)TA 
B(E)V*" "FR* 

322 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*TAB(E)V* 
324 PRINT#-2, " 6. "TAB (B) PR* (6) V* 
TAB (D) V*TAB (E) V* 
326 PRINT#-2, TAB (D) V*TAB (E) V* 
328 PR I NT#-2 , TAB (D-l ) "Y" V*L* V* 
330 PRINT#~2," 7. "TAB (B) PR* (7) T 
AB (D) V* 

332 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(2)TA 
B(D)V* 



334 PRINT#-2,TAB(C) V*L*V* 

336 PRINT#-2," 2. "TAB (B) PR* (2) V 

* 

338 PRINT#-2, " " 
340 PRINT#-2, " " 

342 I F X*= " S " THEN344ELSE I FX*= " R " T 
HEN346ELSE342 

344 L*=STR I NG* ( 20 , 95 ) : SP*=STR I NG 
* (20, 32) : V*=CHR* (124) :ES*=STRING 
* (41 , 32) : Z=8: Q=4: HJ=8: PRINT#-2, C 
HR* ( 29 ) : FL*=STR I NG* ( 1 3 , 95 ) : FR*= " 

(THIRD PLACE ) " : G0T0348 
346 L*=STR I NG* ( 1 2 , 95 ) : SP*=STR I NG 
*(12,32) :V*=CHR*(124) :ES*=STRING 
* ( 25 , 32 ) : Q=0 : H J =-8 : FL*=STR I NG* ( 9 
,95) :FR*=" (THIRD) " : Z-0Z PRINT#-2 
, CHR* (30) 

348 REM CONS. BRACKET 

350 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+26+Q*3) "CONSO 

LATION BRACKET" : PR I NT#-2, " " 

352 PRINT#-2, " " 

354 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)L* 

356 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( X ) SP*V* 

358 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)SP*V*L* 

360 PR I NT#-2 , T AB ( X ) L* V*SP* V*L* 

362 PR I NT#-2 , T AB ( X +25+Q*2+ Z ) V*SP 

*V* 



tend 



Plain Wrap' 
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A), Diskettes are soft sectored, unformatted *R1 

In Continental U.S., shipments by U PS. 

If Parcel Post preferred, check here □ 

Check or M O enclosed □ Send Quantity Discounts Q 

Charge to credit card: VISA Q MASTERCARD □ 



Card No. 



City . 



Signaftitft . 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 



111 



364 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+Z> " LOSER 

Y "L*V*SP*V* 
366 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)ES*" "SP*V*L* 
LL* 

368 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)L*SP*" "SP*V 
*" (THIRD) M 

370 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)SP*V*TAB(34+X 
+HJ)SP*V* 

372 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)SP*V*L*SP*" " 
V* 

374 PR I NT#-2 , TAB (X ) L* V*SP* V*L* V* 
376 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+25+Q*2+Z)V* 
378 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+Z) " LOSER 
X "L*V* 

380 CLS0:PRINTQ224, " PRESS <ENTE 
R> FOR BOUT SHEETS. ": PRINT" PRES 
S <A> FOR ANOTHER BRACKET. " 
382 X *= I NKEY* : I F X *=CHR* (13) THEN3 
84ELSE I F X *= " A " THEN274ELSE382 
384 SN=1:F0RQ=1T04 

386 BP* < 1 >=PR$ <Q) :BP* <2>=PR$<9-Q 
) 

388 FR*(1)=PF*(Q) :FR*(2)=PF*(9-Q 
) 

390 R=Q:U=9-Q 
392 BOSUB408 
394 6OSUB400 



BASIC COMPILER 

Craat* Maehina Language Program f rom Baaic Prograaa 

Tnete right, vl th this powerful integer Cospller, called IWTBAS1C, 
one can trenalete Basic prograaa to Machine Language. Thoee who do not 
want to laarn Aeeeably Language can ue« thla utility prograa to craata 
thoa* fast aachlne language prograaa every ambit loua programmer drtui of 
creating. Even fully coapltant Assembly Language programaera »111 find 
IRTBASIC a vary valuable utility. IWTBASIC *as designed apeclMcally to 
produce efficient 6809 machine coda by utilising the powerful instruction 
aet available. 

laTBAJIC, developed by lASATCHWAJtl, feature. til atandard Baalc 
command words iacluding two-dimensional arrays, multiple coamande per line 
and at rinse. In addition, INTBASIC of fere commands that are not available 
with Color or Citanded Color Basic. All 64k of RAM can be used for prograa 
atorage and/or variable storage, and sll 32k of ION can be acceaaed within 
the ai.l. prograa. Compiled programs can be celled froa a Baalc prograa, 
thua making Interfacing easy. 

IPT8A8IC has many faaturea that some of the lower priced Baalc 
Compilers can't offer. Here are Juat a owe of them: 

•Ho Dlak ayatea Is required, although It eaa run froa dlak 
-Extended Color Baalc la HOT required 
-Enables the full 64k of ffle to be usad 
-16k macblaea can run IRTBASIC 

In addition, IHTBASIC la written in Machine language, not Baalc. 
Thla meane that compile tlaea are very abort. Bow short? IITBASIC can 
eoaplle a 10 thousand byte Machine Language prograa in aa little aa 30 
eeconds I 

Some other reaaona to buy I STB A3 1 C 

-By converting Basic prograaa to aacbina language, program execution 
tlmea are decreased by a factor of 501 

-Machine Language prograaa can perform many thing* that a Baalc 
prograa cannot do. Unlimited poaalbllltlee exist when uaiag machine 
language. 

-Tarleble etoraga la efficiently allocated, and therefore larse 
arraya Bay be uaed. For example, the Integer array AO0000) la allowable 
on 64* machines. 

-More than one prograa cab reside in memory at once. Aa apposed to 
Baalc which only allows one prograa at a tlae in the computer. 

-Syatea utility software can be easily developed using IRTBASIC. 

-Machine langusge prograas thst take pages and pages of Asseably 
Language source to create, can be created with leaa than a page of a 
co*p*r*bl* Baalc source, when compiled with IRTBASIC. 

-Vereiona for 16,32 and 64k computer* are all included for tba 
aaae low pries. 

POR'T HESITATE. . .BUT IRTBASIC TOP AT 

Teraloaa for the Color Computer II are available. 
Pleaaa apeclfy computer type (I or II). 



TAPE- |39.95 
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7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
RAINBOW 84121 
annnuno* Call (801) 943-6263 



396 NEXTQ 
398 GOTO380 

400 CLS0:PRINT@256, " (R)EPEAT CO 

PY OR (N)EXT SHEET ?"; 

402 FOR QJ=lT04:PRINT#-2, " ":NEX 

TQJ 

404 X*=INKEY«: IFX*="R"THENG0SUB4 
08 ELSE IFX*="N"THEN RETURN ELSE 

404 
406 6OTO400 

408 PRINT#-2,CHR*(30> ;TAB<10) "CO 
LOR " STR I NG* ( 15, 95) TAB (53) " COLOR " 
STRING* (15, 95) 

410 PRINT#-2,TAB(2> ; :PRINT#-2,US 
ING"###. ";R+VJ? :PRINT#-2,TAB(45) 
; :PRINT#-2,USING"###. ";U+VJ 
412 PRINT#-2,TAB(10) "NAME: ";BP6 
<1) ; TAB (53) ;BP*<2) 

414 PRINT#-2, "DRAW NO. FROM: "F 
R*(1>;TAB(43)"DRAW NO. FROM: "F 
R*(2) 

416 FOR RP«lT02:PRINT#-2, "SESSIO 

N: "SN;" cat: ";w*;TAB(43) ; :next 
rp 

418 RETURN 

990 REM FIRST NUMBER IS TOTAL # 
OF PARTICIPANTS - SECOND NUMBER 
IS THE NUMBER RANKED 
1000 DATA 6,3 

1005 REM ENTER GROUP , CATEGORY 
1010 DATA JUNIORS, ASSORTED 
1015 REM ENTER NAME, AFFILIATION 
1020 DATA ANDY POTVIN,DRURY 
1030 DATA DAVID LANOUE , MT . EVERET 
1040 DATA DAN TROMBLEY, DRURY 
1050 DATA KEVIN TASSONE, DRURY 
1060 DATA SEAN HOHMAN, MT. EVERET 
1070 DATA MIKE BEAUDR Y , DRURY 



174. 
220. 
262. 
296. 
324. 



. 49 
. 30 
139 
. 97 
. 64 



364 62 

398 218 

430 20 

490 184 

END .... 182 



Listing 2: 

10 REM************************* 
20 REM* PAIRING PROGRAM FOR * 
30 REM* SIXTEEN POSITIONS * 
40 REM* BY FRED B. SCERBO * 
50 REM* 149 BARBOUR ST. * 
60 REM* NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 * 
70 REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 1984 * 
80 REM************************* 
82 REM 

84 REM THIS PROGRAM USES 8 1/2 X 

11 INCH PAPER 
86 REM IF USING 8 1/2 X 14 PAPER 

SEE LINE 296 & DELETE IT 



112 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



90 CLS 

100 PRINT6100, "SIXTEEN POSITION 
PAIRING" 

110 PRINT: PRINTTAB ( 15) "BY" 

120 PRINT: PRINTTAB (9) "FRED B. SC 

ERBO" 

1 30 PR I NT : PR I NTTAB < 7 > " COPYR I GHT 
<C> 1984" 

140 PR I NT: PR I NT" PRESS < ENTER > T 
0 BEGIN SORTING" 

150 X*=INKEY*: RS=RND( -TIMER) : IFX 
*=CHR* (13) THEN 1 60ELSE 1 50 
160 REM START SORT 
170 CLEAR 1000 

1 72 BYE*=CHR* ( 95 ) +CHR* ( 95 ) + " BYE " 

+CHR* (95) +CHR* <95> 

174 CLS: PR INTO 128, STRING* <32, "*" 

): PRINTTAB (8) "NOW SORTING NAMES" 

: PRINT: PRINTSTRING* (32, "*") 

176 DIM TB(8,2) ,BB(8,2) ,PL*(16) , 

SC*(16) ,PR*(16) ,PF*(16) ,SB(16> :L 

L*=CHR*(95) 

178 FORI =1T08: READ TB(I,1):NEXT 
180 DATA 1,16,8,9,5,12,13,4 
182 FOR I=1T08: READ BB(I,1):NEXT 
184 DATA 3,14,6,11,7,10,15,2 
186 READ NW,CF,DV*, W*:NB=16-NW 
188 FOR I=1T0CF:READ PL*(I),SC*( 
I ) : NEXT: MU=NW-CF: IF MU=0 THEN 196 

ELSE FORI =1 TO MU 
190 FT=RND<MU> : IF SB (FT+CF) =1 TH 
EN 190 

192 SB(FT+CF)=1:READ PL*(FT+CF), 

SC*<FT+CF> :NEXTI 

194 FORI=lTO NW: NEXT 

196 FORI=l TO CF 

198 FOR Y=1T08 

200 IF TB(Y,1)=I THEN TB(Y,2)=2 
202 IF BB(Y,1)~I THEN BB(Y,2)=2 
204 NEXTY, I 

206 U=l : IF NB=0 THEN 246 

208 FOR 1=1 TO NB 

210 K=RND<8> 

212 IF U-0 THEN 228 

214 IF TB<K,2) = >1 THEN 210 

216 WW=INT(K/2) :WW=WW*2: IF K~WW= 

1 THEN 222 

218 IF TB<K-1,2)=1 THEN 210 
220 G0T0224 

222 IF TB(K+1,2>=1 THEN 210 

224 TB(K,2>=1 

226 U=0: G0T0242 

228 IF BB(K,2)=>1 THEN 210 

230 WW=INT<K/2) :WW=WW*2: IF K-WW= 

1 THEN 236 

232 IF BB(K-1,2>=1 THEN 210 
234 G0T0238 

236 IF BB(K+1,2)=1 THEN 210 



238 BB(K,2)=1 

240 U=l:G0T0242 

242 NEXT I 

244 GNCF+1 

246 FOR 1=1 TO 8 

248 IF TB<I,2)=2 THEN PR*(TB(I,1 
> > =PL* <TB < 1 , 1 ) ) : PF* (TB (1,1)) =SC* 
(TB(I, 1) ) 

250 IF TB(I,2)*1 THEN PR*(TB(I,1 

) ) =BYE«: PF* (TB (1,1))=*"" 

252 IF TB(I,2)=0 THEN PR*(TB(I,1 

) )=PL*(Q) :PF*(TB(I, 1) )=SC*(Q) :G= 

Q+l 

254 NEXT I 

256 FOR 1=1 TO 8 

258 IF BB(I,2)=2 THEN PR*(BB(I,1 
) ) =PL* (BB ( I , 1 ) ) : PF* (BB (1,1)) =SC* 
(BB(I, 1) ) 

260 IF BB(I,2)=1 THEN PR*(BB(I,1 

) )=BYE*:PF*(BB(I, 1) )-■•" 

262 IF BB(I,2)=0 THEN PR*(BB(I,1 

) ) =PL* (Q) : PF* (BB (1,1)) =SC* (Q) : Q= 

Q+l 

264 NEXT I:GOTO270 
270 F0RI=1T08:IF PR* ( I ) =BYE* THE 
NSS*(I)=PR*(17-I)ELSEIF PR* (17-1 
) =BYE* THENSS* ( I ) =PR* ( I ) ELSESS* ( 



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P.O. Box 878 Mauldin, S.C. 29662 
10 a.m. (803) 297-1067 8 p.m. 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 113 



I>»"" 

272 NEXT 

278 CLS: PR I NTS 128, STRING* (32, 
>: PR I NT: PR I NT "PRESS <R>EGULAR OR 
<S>MALL PRINT": PRINT: PRINTSTRIN 
G*(32, "*"> 

280 X*=INKEY*: IFX*="S"THEN282ELS 
E I F X *= " R " THEN288ELSE280 
282 X-4: L*»STRIN6* (20, 93) : SP*-ST 
RING* (20, 32) : V*-CHR* ( 124) : ES*=ST 
RING* (41 , 32) : Q-4: HJ=8:PRINT#-2, C 
HR* ( 29 > : FL*-STR I NG* ( 24 , 95 ) : FR*« " 
(FIRST PLACE ) " : PP=20 : HS*=STR I NG 
*(10,32) :HL*=L* 

2G4 A=l:B=12:C»32:D=53:E=74:F=95 

: 9-1 18 

286 G0T0292 

288 X-4: L*=STRING* ( 16, 95) : SP*=ST 
RING* ( 16, 32) : V*»CHR* (124) : ES*=ST 
R I NG* (33,32) :Q=0:HJ=0: FL*=STR I NG 
*(8,95) :FR*=" (FIRST) ":PRINT#-2,C 
HR*(30) :PP=16:HS*«STRING*(8,32) : 
HL*=STRING* (8, 95) 

290 A* 1 : B=4 : C=20 : D=37 : E=54 : F-63 : 
G=74 

292 IF FP»1THEN296 

294 FORI=lT016:QP=LEN(PR*(I) ) :PR 



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* ( I ) =PR* ( I ) +STRING* (PP-QP, 95) : NE 
XTI 

296 PR I NT#-2 , CHR* ( 27 ) CHR* ( 56 ) : 
REM DELETE THIS LINE IF YOUR 
LINEPRINTER DOES NOT CONDENSE 
PRINT VERTICALLY - THEN YOU MUST 
USE 8 1/2 X 14 INCH PAPER 
298 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+26+Q*3)DV«" - 

"W*:PRINT#-2, " ":PRINT#-2," 1. 
"TAB (B) PR* ( 1 ) TAB (E+3+HJ*2) " 1ST " 
L* 

300 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(D 
302 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( C ) V*L*TAB ( E+3+H 
J*2)"2ND "L* 

304 PRINT#-2, "16. "TAB (B) PR* ( 16) 
V*TAB(D) V* 

306 PRINT#-2,TAB(D)V*TAB(E+3+HJ* 
2) "3RD "L* 

308 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( D- 1 ) " A " V*L* 
310 PRINT#-2," 8. "TAB (B) PR* (8) T 
AB (D) V*TAB (E) V*TAB (E+3+HJ*2> "4TH 
"L* 

312 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V«" "SS*(8)TA 
B(D)V*TAB(E)V* 

314 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*V*TAB(E)V 

♦TAB ( E+3+HJ #2 ) * 5TH " L* 

316 PRINT#-2, " 9. "TAB (B) PR* (9) T 

AB(C)V*TAB(E)V* 

318 PRINT#-2,TAB(E)V* 

320 PRINT#-2,TAB(E)V* 

322 PRINT#-2, " 5. "TAB (B) PR* (5) T 

AB(E-l) »E"V*HL* 

324 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V«" "SS*(5)TA 
B(E)V*TAB(F)V* 

326 PRINT#-2,TAB(C>V*L*TAB(E)V*T 
AB(F)V* 

328 PRINT#-2, " 12. "TAB (B) PR* ( 12) V 

*TAB (D) V*TAB ( E ) V*T AB (F) V* 

330 PRINT#-2,TAB(D)V*TAB(E)V*TAB 

(F)V* 

332 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( D- 1 ) " B " V*L*V*TA 
B(F)V* 

334 PRINT#-2, "13. "TAB (B) PR* ( 13) 
TAB ( D ) V*TAB (F ) V* 

336 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(4)TA 
B(D) V*TAB(F)V* 

338 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*V*TAB(F)V 
* 

340 PRINT#-2," 4. "TAB (B) PR* (4) V 
*TAB(F)V* 

342 PRINT*-2,TAB(F)V*HL*CHR*(95) 
CHR* (95) CHR* (95) CHR* (95) CHR* (95) 
344 PRINT#-2,TAB(F)V«" (FIRST PL 
ACE) " 

346 PRINT#-2,TAB(F)V* 

348 PRINT#-2, " 3. "TAB (B)PR* (3) T 

AB(F)V* 

350 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(3)TA 



114 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



B<F)V« 

352 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*TAB(F)V* 

334 PRINT#-2, "14. "TAB (B) PR* ( 14) 

V*T AB ( D ) V*TAB ( F ) V* 

356 PRINT#-2 f TAB(D) V*TAB(F> V* 

358 PRINT#-2, TAB (D-l ) "C"V*L*TAB ( 

F)V« 

360 PRINT#-2, " 6. "TAB (B> PR* <6> T 

AB ( D ) V*TAB ( E ) V*T AB (F) V* 

362 PRINT#-2,TAB<C)V*" "SS*<6)TA 

B (D) V*TAB <E) V*TAB (F) V* 

364 PRINT#-2,TAB(C) V*L*V*TAB(E) V 

♦TAB <F) V* 

366 PRINT#-2, "11. "TAB (B) PR* ( 1 1 ) 

TAB < C > V*T AB < E ) V*T AB ( F ) V* 

368 PRINT#-2, TAB (E-l ) "F" V*HL*TAB 

<F)V* 

370 PRINT#-2,TAB(E)V* 

372 PRINT#-2," 7. "TAB (B) PR* (7) T 

AB (E> V* 

374 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*" "SS*(7)TA 
B(E)V* 

376 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*TAB(E)V* 
378 PRINT#-2, "10. "TAB (B) PR* ( 10) 
V*T AB ( D > V*TAB < E ) V* 
380 PRINT#-2,TAB(D)V*TAB(E)V* 
382 PR I NT#-2 , TAB (D— 1 ) "D" V*L* V* 



384 PRINT#-2, "15. " TAB ( B > PR* (15) 
TAB(D) V* 

386 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( C ) V* " "SS*(2)TA 
B(D)V* 

388 PRINT#-2,TAB(C)V*L*V* 

390 PRINT#-2 f " 2. "TAB (B) PR* <2) T 

AB(C)V* 

392 PRINT#-2, " " 

394 I FX*- " 9 " THEN396EL3E I FX *- " R " T 
HEN398ELSE394 

396 L*-STR I NQ* < 20 , 95 ) : SP*-STR I N8 
* ( 20 , 32 ) : V*-CHR» < 1 24 ) : ES*-8TR I N8 
* (41 , 32) : Z=8: Q=4: HJ=8: PRINT#-2, C 
HR* ( 29 ) : FL*«STR I N8* ( 1 3 , 95 ) : FR** " 

( TH I RD PLACE ) " : QOTQ400 
398 L*«STR I NS* ( 1 2 , 95 ) : SP*=STR I N6 
* ( 12, 32) : V*«CHR* ( 124) : ES*=STRING 
♦ (25, 32) : Q-0: HJ—8: FL*«STRING* (9 
,95) :FR*=" (THIRD) " : Z=0: PRINT#-2 
,CHR*(30) 

400 REM CONS. BRACKET 
402 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( X +26+Q»3 ) " CONSO 
LAT I ON BRACKET " : PR I NT#-2 , " " 
404 PRINT#-2,TAB(43+X+Q*6) "LOSER 
8 "L* 

406 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)L*TAB(43+X+Q» 
6)" "SP*V* 



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IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 115 



AVQ PRINT#-2,TAB<X)SP*V*TAB<43+X 

♦Q»6> " M SP*V*L* 

410 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>SP*V*L*TAB<43 

♦X+Q*&> M "SP*VV <FIFTH) " 

412 PRINT#-2,TAB<X)L»V*SP*V*L*TA 

B <43+X+Q*6) "LOSER H "L*V* 

414 PRINT#-2,TAB<X+23*Q*2+2)V*SP 

416 PRINT#-2,TAB<X+Z> ■ LOSER 

D "L*V*SP*V* 
418 PRINT#-2,TAB(X)ES* M M SP«V*L* 
LL* 

42* PRINT#-2,TAB<X>L«SP*" "SP*V 
♦SP*" "V* 

422 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>SP*V«TAB<34+X 
♦HJ ) SP*V*SPVG" V*L* 
424 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>SP*V*L*SPf" " 
V*SPV "V*SP*V* 

426 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>L*V*SP*V*L*V* 
SP* M "V*SP*V* 

428 PRINT#-2, TAB < X+25*Q#2+_ ) V*ES 
*" "V*SP*V* 

430 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+Z> " LOSER 
C M L*V*STRING»(Z,32) " LOSER 
E "L*LL*V*SP*V* 

432 PRINT#-2,TAB<X+12+Q*2) " "ES* 

SP*" "SP*V* 



434 PRINT#-2,TAB<X)E3*SP*SP*" 
"SP*V* 

436 PRINT#-2,TAB<X)L*SP*" "SP*" 

"SP*SP*V*FL* 
438 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>SP*V*TAB<X+34 
+HJ ) SP* " " SP*SP*V*FR* 
440 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>SP*V*L*SP*" 

"SP*SP*V* 
442 PR I NT#-2 , TAB ( X > L*V*SP*V*SP* " 

"SP*SP*V* 
444 PRINT#-2,TAB<X)ES*V*L*" "SP* 
SP*" "V* 

446 PRINT#-2,TAB(X+Z) " LOSER 

B "L*V*SP*V*SP*SP*" "V* 
448 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>ES*" "SP*V*L* 
LL*SP*" "V* 

450 PRINT#-2,TAB<X>L*SP*" "SP*V 
*SP*" "V*SP*V* 

452 PRINT#-2,TAB<X)SP*V*TAB<X+33 
+H J ) " " SP* V*SP* " H " V*L* V* 
454 PRINT#-2,TAB<X)SP*V*L*SP*" " 
V*SP*" "V* 

456 PR I NT# -2 , TAB < X ) L* V*SP*V*L*V* 
SP*" "V* 

458 PRINT#-2,TAB<X+33+HJ> V*ES*" 
"V* 

460 PRINT#-2,TAB<X+Z) " LOSER 



Specialist in educational software for your CoCo. Developed by educators to be teacher and student friendly. 
Special features include AUTO RUN, MENU DRIVEN, TALKING AND NON TALKING VERSIONS, and REWARDS. 
All programs are 16K Extended BASIC unless otherwise noted. 



ADDITION 

Preschool - 5th 
8 Levels 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 

MULTIPLICATION 

2nd grade - H.S. 
6 Levels 

(C) $15.95 (D) $18.95 

BEAT-THE-COMPUTER 
MULTIPLICATION 

3rd grade - ADULT 
Timed game vs. computer 
while practicing multiplication. 

(C) $15.95 (D) $18.95 

BEFORE/BETWEEN/ AFTER 
NUMBER DRILL 

Preschool - 5th 
(RAINBOW Review May '84) 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 

NUMBER READINESS 

Preschool - 1st 
Matching numbers with 
phic display. 
2K Extended Basic. 

(C) $24.95 (D) $27.95 



ALPHABET* 

Preschool - 1st 
(RAINBOW Review Dec. '83) 

6 Levels 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95* 

CLOCK ARITHMETIC* 

7 Levels 

Kindergarten - 3rd 
(RAINBOW Review Feb. '84) 
32K Extended Basic. 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 



SUBTRACTION 

Kindergarten - 5th 
13 Levels 

32K Extended Basic 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 



PRIMARY NUMBER SKILLS THE VOICE'' 



Preschool - 2nd 
1 1 Levels 

32K Extended Basic 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 

NUMBER/COLOR WORD* 

Preschool - 2nd 
8 Levels 

32K Extended Basic 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 



Make our programs talk by 

Rurchasing 'THE VOICE" 
ardware speech synthesizer. 
Just pluq into your ROM port 
and you re ready. 

'THE VOICE" $79.95 (cass. or disk) 

Connect your Disk Drives 

and THE VOICE" with Y CABLE. 

Y CABLE $29.95 



★Please add $5.00 for talking 
version of program. Both 
voice and non-voice versions 
provided with each talking 
program you order. 



WIZARD! 

Readable, elegant new 
character set tor your 
Telewriter-64* word processor. 
Crisp, calligraphic-style 
characters with true lower- 
case descenders install 
quickly in any CoCo system. 

(C) $16.95 



COLOR MAILBAG 

Creates mailing list and 
address labels. 

(C) $29.95 (D) $32.95 

SINGLE DRIVE DISK BACKUP 

Copy a complete disk in 

3 passes or fewer. See you at 

64K Disk Basic (D) $32.95 RAINBOWFEST/ Princeton!! 



Send self-addressed, stamped envelope for free catalog. 
Board of Education requisitions honored. 
Dealer inquiries invited. 
Add $1.50 per program shipping and handling; 
Tennessee residents add 7% sales tax. 
Mail check or money order to: 
CY-BURNET-ICS 

5705 Chesswood Drive, Knoxville, TN 37912 
Telewriter-64 is a trademark of Cognitec Phone 615-688-4865 



116 



THE RAINBOW October 1984 



A "L*V*STRING*(Z,32> " LOSER 

F "L*LL*V*:FP=1 
462 CLS0:PRINT@224, ■ PRESS <ENTE 
R> FOR BOUT SHEETS. ": PRINT" PRES 
S <A> FOR ANOTHER BRACKET. » 
464 X*=INKEY*: IFX*=CHR* < 13> THEN4 
66ELSE I FX *- " A " THEN278ELSE464 
466 SN=1:F0RQ=1T08 
468 BP*(1>=PR»<Q) :BP«<2)=PR*(17- 
Q> 

470 FR*<1)=PF*<Q) :FR*<2)=PF*<17- 
Q) 

472 R=Q:U=17-Q 
474 GOSUB490 
476 G0SUB482 
478 NEXTQ 
480 G0T0462 

482 CLS0:PRINT@256, " < R ) EPE AT CO 

PY OR <N)EXT SHEET ?"; 

484 FOR QJ=lT04:PRINT#-2, " ":NEX 

TQJ 

486 X«=INKEY»: IFX*="R"THENG0SUB4 
90 ELSE IFX*="N"THEN RETURN ELSE 

486 
488 GOT0482 

490 PRINT#-2,CHR*<30> ; TAB (10) "CO 
LOR "STRING* < 15, 95) TAB (53) "COLOR" 
STRING* < 15, 95) 

492 PRINT#-2, TAB (2) 5 : PRINT#-2, US 
ING"###. ";R+VJ; :PRINT#-2,TAB<45) 
; : PR I NT#-2 , US I NG" ### . " ; U+V J 
494 PRINT#-2,TAB(10) "NAME: ";BP* 
<1) ; TAB (53) ;BP*<2) 

496 PRINT#-2, "DRAW NO. FROM: "F 
R*(l) ;TAB(43) "DRAW NO. FROM: "F 
R*(2) 

498 FOR RP=lT02:PRINT#-2, "SESSIO 
N: "SN;" CAT: " ; w*» tab (43) ; : NEXT 
RP 

500 RETURN 

990 REM FIRST NUMBER IS TOTAL # 
OF PARTICIPANTS - SECOND NUMBER 
IS THE NUMBER RANKED 
1000 DATA 11,4 

1005 REM ENTER GROUP , CATEGORY 
1010 DATA JUNIORS, ASSORTED 
1015 REM ENTER NAME, AFFILIATION 
1020 DATA ANDY POT V IN, DRURY 
1030 DATA DAVID LANOUE, MT. EVERET 
1040 DATA DAN TROMBLEY , DRURY 
1050 DATA KEVIN TASSONE , DRURY 
1060 DATA SEAN HOHMAN, MT. EVERET 
1070 DATA MIKE BE AUDRY , DRURY 
1080 DATA KURT DIGRIGOLI , MON. MT. 
1090 DATA GORDY SOULE,MON.MT 
1100 DATA STEVE POTVIN, DRURY 
1110 DATA DAVE LUPIANI , MT. EVERET 
1120 DATA MATT LAMERE, DRURY g 




WLS NEST 



SOFTWARE 

' WE GIVE A HOOT ' 



NEW TALKING ADVENTURE! 

Can you imagine playing an adventure that talks? Well, our 
popular ADVENTURE STARTER comes in a talking ver- 
sion that is designed to operate with the Colorware Real 
Talker ® - AND - at no increase in price! With Adventure 
Starter you can learn to play those adventures the painless 
way. Adventure Starter consists of two separate and com- 
lete adventures. The first called "MY HOUSE" is a simple 
adventure with help available if you need it. The second 
adventure called "PIRATES" is a hard adventure but some 
help is available. When you finish your adventure duo 
you will be ready for the real toughies. We also include 
hints and tips on adventuring in general. 
Adventure Starter requires 16K EXT and comes on cassette. 
Please specify version on your order. 
TALKING ADVENTURE STARTER OR STANDARD 
ADVENTURE STARTER - $ 17.95 POSTPAID. 

FILE CABINET - Data Management System 
With FILE CABINET you can create and maintain re- 
JJ^w cords on anything you choose. Recipes, coupons, house- 
• hold inventory, financial records - you name it. You create 
records containing up to five fields you define. You can 
search, sort, modify, delete, save on tape and display on 
the screen or send to the printer. The program is user 
friendly and user proof. Error trapping and prompting 
are extensive. A comparable program would cost you much 
more. Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $19.95 

LABELIII (Reviewed in Nov. 83 Rainbow) 
With LABELIII you can develop and maintain a mailing 
f/r^Vi list. Display on screen or printer. Print lists or labels in 
M'SS? your choice of 1, 2, or 3 wide. Supports 3 or 4 line ad- 
dresses with phone optional. Fast machine language sort 
on last name, first name, or zip code. 
Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $19.95 

ESPIONAGE ISLAND (Reviewed in June 84 Rainbow) 
/fp^ Your have been dropped off on a deserted island by a sub- 
n aim sow marine. You must recover a top secret microfilm and signal 
" the sub to pick you up. Problems abound in this 32K text 

adventure. 

32K EXT POSTPAID DISK $20.95 - TAPE $17.95 
$100.00 FREE SOFTWARE 

We are looking for the shortest solution to BASHAN! 
We want to find the shortest solution to BASHAN and 
are offering $100.00 in free software to the person wno 
sends us the solution taking the least number of turns. 
Entries must be postmarked not later than October 30, 
1984. All submissions must contain the number of turns, 
your name, address and phone, and your step by step 
route. We will award duplicate prizes in the event of ties 
so if you find the shortest route you must be a winner. 
All awards and copies of the shortest route will be mailed 
by November 30th, 1984. If you enjoy adventures this is 
your chance to get $100.00 in free software and have 
fun doing it. 



KINGDOM OF BASHAN 
y^=^ Our most involved adventure to date. Bashan has a large vo- 
;22J cabulary and some unique problems to solve. You must enter 
* Bashan (not easy) collect the ten treasures of the kingdom 
while staying alive (even harder) and then return to the start- 
ing point with the treasures (even harder). If you can get the 
maximum 200 points in this you are an expert! 
32K EXT POSTPAID DISK $20.95 - TAPE $17.95 
*C.O.D. orders please add $1.50 
*No delay for personal checks 
IN A HURRY? CALL OUR HOOT LINE: (615) 238-9458 



OWLS NEST SOFTWARE 

P.O. BOX 579, OOLTEWAH, TN 37363 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 117 




The Rainbow's second Simulation Contest concluded September 1 and our judges are now busily reviewing the 
entries. Our contestants will have a chance to share their Simulation worldwide; not only will the top winners be 
published in the rainbow, but the top two dozen, or so, will be included in a special Simulation book, as well. And, just 
look at the prizes provided by these generous companies: 



K-BASIC Language Compiler for OS-9 and five DOs (Shell command language for OS-9) 

altogether valued at $544 Lloyd I/O 

Gift certificate for $400 in merchandise Microware Systems Corp. 

Complete package of Elite^Word, Elite+Spell, Elite*Calc and Elite^File, valued at $224.35 Elite Software 

Database/Mailer 64, LetterWriter 64, File Manager 64, F-Con 64, D1R, retail value $169.80 EVS Engineering 

Complete data communications package — a TDP Modem 1, VIP Terminal software, serial 

interface cable and "May Phone" (one-piece telephone), retail value $150 DSL Computer Products, Inc. 

Styleograph Word Processing Center, $120 . Great Plains Computer Com- 
pany, Inc. 

Gift certificate for $100 in merchandise Computerware 

Gift certificate for $100 in merchandise Prickly-Pear Software 

TDP Modem 1 , a $1 00 value The Rainbow 

Two-program package — C-Compiler, Relocatable Macro Assembler, retail value $99.90 Duggers Growing Systems 

Two-program package — ED T, The Chief Inspector, retail value $95.90 Sonburst Software 

Two-program package — Musica II, Stereo Pak, $79.90 Speech Systems 

Super Pro keyboard, $64.95 Mark Data Products 

Three-program package — Script, Stomp, Skeet, $63.75 Cancoco Software 

Three-program gift package worth $60 E.D.C. Industries 

Telewriter 64, $49.95 tape or $59.95 disk Cognitec 

Three-program package — Oki Dump 16K, Megamunk, Color Designer, $57.75 Color Connection Software 

Gift certificate for $50 in merchandise Petrocci Freelance Associates 

Space Frame Analysis program, $50 Kage Engineering 

Graf plot program worth $45 Hawkes Research Services 

INTBASIC program, $39.95 Wasatchware 

CoCo Cooler (choice of standard or CoCo 2), $39.95 Rem Industries, Inc. 

VT-8306PL 3-Port serial switch with pilot light, $35 Vidtron 

Speak Up! software voice synthesizer, $29.95 Classical Computing, Inc. 

Dozen C-12 Data Trac blank cassettes, box 10 plain wrap, single-sided, double-density 

diskettes, $25 York 10 

Gift certificate worth $25 Sugar Software 

Three-program package — XPNDRl, Super Guide, Application Notes, $23.90 Robotic Micro Systems 

Color Computer Article Index, $19.95 CoColndex 

Adventure generator valued at $19.95 Softech 

Two stuffed dragons, $15 Dymax 

Disk Memo Minder program, $9.95 'Merrick & Co. 

To be announced Metro Electronics 

To be announced Syntactics 



While winning contestants in the just-concluded contest will have the opportunity to be in our second Simulation 
book, look for the first Rainbow Book Of Simulations and its companion Rainbow Simulation Tape being published 
later this fall. The book features two dozen prize-winning Simulations from last year's contest and both it and the tape 
will sOon be available directly from the rainbow and through selected distributors. 




PROGRAMMING UTILITY 



4K or 
MC-10 



□ mm* P 
RAINBOW I 
• 3 1 




LITTLE E's 

Powers 



By H. Allen Curtis 



y ittle E was first presented in 
m the April '84 RAINBOW. It 
M m gave much-needed editing pow- 
ers to the MC-10 and the CoCo with 
Color BASIC, and also gave the Coco 
with Extended Color BASIC cursor con- 
trolled editing facilities. 

Little E will presently be endowed 
with vastly greater powers: 

1) It will be Used for the direct entry 
of new lines of basic, as well as for 
editing. 

2) After the completion of typing a 
new line 0r editing an old one, the 
next line will be displayed for you 
to type or edit. 

3) The cursor will be allowed upward 
movement. When the down arrow 
reaches its downward limit, it will 
move to a position three spaces 

(H. Allen Curtis resides in Willi- 
amsburg, Va. He is interested in 
1 7th and 1 8th century history and 
enjoys biking through the colonial 
capital. He balances past and pre- 
sent with his computer work.) 



from the top leftmost portion of 
the screen. 

4) Whether typing or editing a line 
on the MC-10, you will be able to 
type commands with a single key- 
stroke when the control key 
is depressed. 

5) Little E will be the foundation 
of a rudimentary word processor 
which can even be used with a 4K 
CoCo or MC-10. 

Upgraded versions of Little E Tor the 
CoCo and the MC-10 are presented in 
Listings 1 and 2, respectively. Each of 
the programs of Listings 1 and 2 gener- 
ates a machine language program that 
will be stored in high RAM. Rainbow 
Check Plus is also stored in the high 
RAM area. Running the program of 
Listing 1 or 2 will overwrite Rainbow 
Check Plus; therefore, do not run the 
new Little E until you have typed it 
correctly in its entirety. Upon complet- 
ing the typing correctly, save the new 
Little E on tape or disk before running 
it. 



The new Little £, like its predecessor, 
allows the BASIC interpreter of your 
computer to recognize the e command. 
The e command has the same format as 
before, but has greater capabilities. The 
right, left and down arrows still control 
cursor movement. Now, however, up- 
ward movement can be achieved with 
the down arrow. Deletion and insertion 
are accomplished in the same manner as 
they were formerly: Use the L. DEL. 
key on the MC-10 and the CoCo's 
clear key for deletion. Use Shift @ for 
insertion on either computer. 

To discover the new capabilities of 
the e command try the following 
examples: 

Example 1: Run the new Little E. 
After a few seconds a question will be 
printed on the screen. The question is 
concerned with Little E's word process- 
ing facilities which will be explained in 
Example 3. Therefore, type N in re- 
sponse to the question. Then type e60 
and press enter. Remember, to put the 
computer in the lowercase mode you 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 119 



must type 0 with the shift key depressed. 
Entry to the e command returns the 
computer to the uppercase mode. Line 
60 of the BASIC part of Little £ will be 
displayed. Note that the cursor is at the 
end of the displayed line. Press enter 
and Line 70 will replace 60 on the 
screen. Continue pressing ENTER until 
you reach Line 1 10. Type at the end of 
Line 1 10 the following: :REM EXAM- 
PLE1 and press ENTER. Then press 
BREAK to return to BASIC. Next, LIST 
60-110 to see that Lines 60 through 100 
have not changed but that Line 1 10 has, 
indeed, been altered. 

Pressing ENTER not only causes an 
edited line to be included in the BASIC 
program, but also brings the next line to 
the screen for possible editing. Pressing 
the BREAK key provides an exit from the 
e command without changing the origi- 
nal composition of a line. 

As was the case for the former e 
command, the position of the cursor 
when ENTER is pressed determines the 
end of the BASIC line added to the 
program. 

Example 2: LIST the entire basic 
program now residing in your compu- 
ter. Notice that there is no Line 800. 
Then type e800 and press ENTER. For- 
merly, the e command would not accept 
an unlisted line number. Type STOP 
:REMEX2 and press ENTER. Unlisted 
Line 810 is now ready for similar entry. 
However, press break and then LIST 
800- to verify that you have added Line 
800 to the program. 

Pressing enter causes a new line to 
be added to a current BASIC program 
and the advance to the next line for 
typing or editing. The next line dis- 
played always has a number 10 greater 
than the one just ENTERcd. 

Example 3: Rerun Little E. This time 
answer the question in the affirmative 
by typing Y. This answer prompts 
another question. Respond to that 
question by typing the number 32. Then 
use NEW to erase the BASIC program. 
Employing the e command, type the fol- 
lowing three lines: 

10 L$(0)=* 
20 L$(l)=" 
30 L$(2)=" 

MC-10 users will encounter a peculiar- 
ity: Line 10 of the erased program will 
be displayed. Just move the cursor next 
to the line number and type the new line. 
Lines 20 and 30 will then be initially 
blank as you would expect. Whether 
you have a MC-10 or CoCo, press 



break when you reach, Line 40. Type 
elO, press ENTER and type the following 
sentence: This illustrates one of Little 
E\ word processing features: wrap 
around. 

When Line 10 is displayed, you will 
have to switch your computer to the 
lowercase mode to type the sentence. 
When you finish the sentence, press 
enter and then break. Remember to 
switch back to the uppercase mode. 
LISTing should reveal that the three 
lines are now: 

10 L$(0)-This illustrates one of 
LITTLE 

20 LSOK'E^s WORD PROCESS 
ING features: 

30 L$(2)="WRAP-AROUND. 

You should have noticed the auto- 
matic transition from one line to another 



"To gain additional famil- 
iarity with Little E make 
up your own examples 
testing cursor movement, 
character deletion and 
character insertion" 



when you completed typing 32 charac- 
ters on a line. Also, if the final word of 
the line was incomplete, that word was 
deleted from the line and inserted at the 
beginning of the next line. Wrap-around 
is the name given to this word process- 
ing feature of the new Little E. 

It should be pointed out that the 
character line length is measured from 
the entry cursor position. Therefore, 
when you change an established line by 
means of the e command, you must not 
expect automatic wrap-around to occur. 

To gain additional familiarity with 
Little E make up your own examples 
testing cursor movement, character 
deletion and character insertion. In the 
case of the MC-10 verify that Little E 
now allows control key command 
typing. 

Example 3 is indicative of how Little 
E can be utilized in word processing. 
Lines 1 0 through 30 are characteristic of 



lines forming a skeleton program which 
you must employ in conjunction with 
Little E for word processing. Listing 3 
shows a typical skeleton program for 
theCoCo. Replacing each PRINIW-2 in 
Line 620 with LPRINT yields a typical 
MC-10 skeleton program. 

When you give body to the skeleton 
by using Little £to type 28 strings L$(I), 
the program will then print a full, 
double-spaced page on your printer. 

Depending on the size of your com- 
puter's RAM, you may wish to add fea- 
tures to the skeleton program. For 
instance, you may want to double the 
number of strings, L$(I), for a full, 
single-spaced page. You may wish to 
add a routine to display the page or part 
thereof on the video screen. 

The word processor consisting of the 
skeleton and Little Ehas the following 
properties: 

1) Line length can be specified. 

2) There is cursor controlled entry of 
lines. 

3) There is line-to-line wrap-around 
which is sufficiently fast for touch 
typists. 

4) Lines can be readily changed or 
replaced through editing. 

5) Editing can be used to move lines 
by merely changing the I values in 
the pertinent strings L$(I). 

6) Each page can be saved on tape or 
disk by CSA VEing or SA VEing, 
respectively, the filled in skeleton. 

7) Each saved page can be loaded 
from tape or disk by CLOADing 
or LOADing, respectively. 

8) Learning to u£e it is easy. 

As you can see, Little Fs word pro- 
cessor, though rudimentary, is rather 
powerful. 

New Little £, like its predecessor, is 
relocatable. So new Little E and Rain- 
bow Check Plus can be used together in 
the typing BASIC programs in the RAIN- 
BOW when the following changes are 
made: Replace Lines 10 and 30 of List- 
ing 1 with: 

10CLS:X=256*PEEK(116)-244 
30 X=256*PEEK(116)-243 

Similarly, replace Lines 10 and 30 of 
Listing 2 with: 

10 CLS:X-256*PEEK(16976)-401 
30 X=256*PEEK(16976)-400 

When using Rainbow Check Plus 
and Little £ together, always load and 
run the former before loading and run- 
ning the latter. 



120 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



HARD DISK 



5 meg $1295 

COMPLETE SYSTEM 



for the CO CO 
10 meg $1595 

JUST PLUG IN 



HARD DISK - OPERATING SYSTEM features 

•FULLY INTEGRATED INTO COLOR DISK BASIC 

• TAPE TO HARD DISK 

• DISK TO HARD DISK 
•HARD DISK TO TAPE 
•HARD DISK TO DISK 
•DU PLICATE 

• COLD START 

• M-RUN 

•ALL EXTENDED DISK BASIC COMMANDS 




without hard drive 
INTERFACE CARD & H-DOS 



operating system only 
$425.00 



peripheral H-DOS UTILITY PACK $129.00 
BOOT STRAPS OS-9 OR FLEX, MDIR (master directory) 



D/s ^ K CoCO 



TANDON DISK DRIVES 

40 track - 6 ms trk-trk 



TEAC DISK DRIVES 
FD-55series 

• Smodeis of 5-1/4 floppy difck drives 

• M2 the heignt of conventional drives 

• Choice of capacity from 125 KBytes to 16 MBytes 

• New TEAC ISIs reduce power consomptlon, increase 
reliability 

" Brushless DC direct drive motor 

• High-speed data access 



FULLY COMPATIBLE 




Super Sale on New Disk Drives 

Distributor for - SOFTWARE SUPPORT, INC. Framlngham, MA. 



128 K - RAM CARD 

INCREASE YOUR 64 K Co-Co OR Co-Co II TO 128 K RAM 

□ FITS COMPLETELY INSIDE YOUR COMPUTER. 

□ SWITCHES TWO NEW 32 K BANKS OF RAM IN AND OUT 
OF MEMORY. 

□ BANKS CAN BE MAPPED IN THE UPPER HALF OR 
LOWER HALF, OR CAN ALSO BE A SECOND COMPLETE 
64 K BANK. 

□ SWITCH TABLES INCLUDED. 

□ SIMPLE INSTALLATION AND DOCUMENTATION. 

□ A MUST FOR OS-9 USERS. 

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USA 

RCS MICRO INC. 
MAIN STREET 
DERBY LINE, VERMONT 
ZIP 05830 
TEL: 802-873-3386 
ORDER LINE 800-361-4970 




CANADA 

RCS MICRO INC. 
759, VICTORIA SQUARE 405 
MONTREAL H2Y 2J3 
TEL:(514) 287-1563 
ORDER LINE ONLY * ★ ★ 
QUEBEC - ONTARIO - MARJTIMES 

SOO-361-53 38 
WESTERN CANADA 300-361-5155 



TERMS: VISA - MASTER CARD - AMERICAN EXPRESS 



HOURS: MONDAY - SATURDAY 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM 




Listing 1: 

10 CLS: X=256*PEEK<116>-166 

20 CLEAR25,X 

30 X=256*PEEK<116>-165 

40 forz=x tox+420 
50 ready :w=w+y 
60 pokez,y:next 

70 i fw< >46 1 59thenpr i nt " data erro 

R":STOP 

80 P0KE474,1 

90 PRINT© 193, "DO YOU WANT WRAP-A 
ROUND? (Y/N) :GOSUB300:PRINTK 
*: IFK«<> M Y"THEN130 
100 PRINTS257, "TYPE A NUMBER BET 
WEEN 1 AND 80 TO SPECIFY LINE L 
ENGTH. "; 

110 gosub300 : i fasc ( k* ) = 1 3then 1 20 
elsel»»l«+k«:printk*s : iflen<l»x 

2THEN110 

120 L«VAL(L*> : IFL>0 AND L<81 THE 

NP0KEX+83,L 

130 EXECX: END 

140 DATA 48,140,15,191,1,143,134 
, 126, 183, 1, 142,48, 140,28, 191, 1, 1 
28, 57, 157, 165, 129, 101 , 38, 249, 122 
,1,26 

150 DATA 189,169,40,134,126,183, 
1, 127, 15,59, 157, 159, 126, 183, 100, 
13,59,38, 18, 12,59,236,2, 147,43 
160 DATA 39, 1 1 , 142, 2, 220, 159, 166 
, 12, 167, 189, 185, 156, 134,57, 183, 1 
, 127, 142,4,254, 166, 130, 129,96,39 
,250 

170 DATA 48,1,51,137,0,252,255,1 
,219, 159, 136, 125, 1,218,38,28, 124 
,1,218, 16, 158, 126, 166, 162,38,252 
,111 

180 DATA 160,166,160,39,5,189,16 
2, 133, 32, 247, 150, 125, 189, 162, 133 
, 158, 136, 166, 132, 151,44, 189, 161, 
177, 129,9,38, 18, 141,9 
190 DATA 140,4,252,36,242,48,1,3 
2, 199, 158, 136, 150,44, 167, 132,57, 
129, 12,38, 13, 158, 136, 140,4,253,3 
6,214 

200 DATA 166,1,167,128,32,245,12 
9, 10, 38, 17, 141 , 226, 140, 4, 221 , 36, 
5,48, 136,32 

210 DATA 32,214,142,4,3,32,209,1 
29,8,38, 11, 141,205, 140,4,0,39, 18 



2,48,31,32, 194, 129, 19, 38, 21 , 142, 
4,252, 156, 136,39,6 
220 DATA 166, 130, 167, 1 , 32, 246, 15 
0,44, 167, 1, 134,96,32, 151, 129,3,3 
8,3, 126, 172, 115, 129, 13,39,27, 140 
,4,252,44, 133 

230 DATA 188,1,219,44,8,189,162, 
133, 48, 1 , 22, 255, 120, 129, 32, 39, 5, 
151, 125, 127, 1,218, 142,2,220, 159, 
166,48, 1 

240 DATA 206,4,0,166,192,43,12,1 
29,64,37,6, 129,96,37,4, 139,96, 13 
9,96, 167, 128, 17, 147, 136,38,233 
250 DATA 111,132,125,1,218,38,10 
, 159, 126, 166, 130, 129, 32, 38, 250, 1 
11, 132, 157, 159, 189, 175, 103, 158,4 
3, 191 

260 DATA 2,218,189,184,33,215,3, 
189, 173, 1 , 37, 18, 220, 71 , 163, 132, 2 
11,27,221,27,238, 132,55,2, 167, 12 

8, 156 

270 DATA 27,38,248,182,2,220,39, 
28, 220, 27, 221 , 67, 219, 3, 137, 0, 221 
,65, 189, 172,30,206,2,216,55,2, 16 
7, 128 

280 DATA 156,69,38,248,158,65,15 

9, 27, 189, 173, 33, 189, 172, 239, 158, 
43, 198, 10, 58, 31 , 16, 189, 180, 244 
290 DATA 189,189,217,206,2,220,2 
23, 166, 166, 128, 167, 192, 38, 250, 22 
,254, 118 

300 K*= I NKE Y* : I FK*= " " THEN300ELSE 
RETURN 



150 255 

250 194 

END 21 



Listing 2: MC-10 

10 CLS:X-256#PEEK< 16976) -310 
20 CLEAR25,X 

30 X=256*PEEK ( 1 6976 > -309 

40 FORZ-X TOX+564: READY: W-W+Y:PO 

KEZ, Y: NEXT 

60 PRINT® 193, "DO YOU WANT WRAP-A 
ROUND? <Y/N) "; :GOSUB700:PRINTK 
*: IFK*< >"Y"THEN1 10 
70 PRINTS257, "TYPE A NUMBER BETW 
EEN 1 AND 80 TO SPECIFY LINE LE 
NGTH. "; 

80 gosub700 : i fasc < k* ) ■ 1 3then 1 00 
90 l*=l*+k*:printk*; : iflen<l*><2 

THEN80 

100 L=VAL(L*> : IFL>0 AND LX81 THE 

NP0KEX+145,L 

110 EXECX: END 

120 DATA 198,12,58,255,66,152,13 



122 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



16 K DOS CARD 

□ PLUGS INTO YOUR J-M DISK CONTROLLER AND 
ALLOWS YOU TO MAP ON AN EXTRA 8 K E-PROM 
ABOVE DOS. 

□ USE YOUR OWN 24 PIN, 8 K DOS AND ONE 2764 
E-PROM OR TWO 2764 E-PROMS. 

□ GREAT FOR UTILITIES OR A MACHINE LANGUAGE 
MONITOR. 

□ ON BOARD DE-CODING, ONLY ONE WIRE TO 
SOLDER. COMPLETE WITH INSTRUCTIONS. 




$19.95 



RCS DUAL DOS CARD 

WITH SWITCH SELECTOR 

DESIGNED TO ACCOMODATE TWO DIFFERENT DOS 
CHIPS INSIDE YOUR J-M DISK CONTROLLER. 

□ PIN TO PIN COMPATIBLE WITH RS-DOS AND J-DOS CHIPS. 

□ THE SWITCH ALLOWS YOU TO HARD SELECT ANY 
ONE OF THE TWO DOS SYSTEMS OF YOUR CHOICE. 

□ IN CENTER POSITION, THE SWITCH DISCONNECTS 
FROM THE DOS AND BRINGS YOU BACK TO BASIC. 

□ DESIGNED FOR ONE 24 PIN ROM AND A 28 PIN 
E-PROM OR TWO 28 PIN E-PROM CONFIGURATION. 

□ EASILY MODIFIED BY CUTTING TWO TRACES ON 
THE BACK OF THE BOARD. 



$19.95 

(Board with switch only) 




VIDEO PAL 



□ AUDIO-VIDEO INTERFACE 

□ MONOCHROME COMPOSITE OUTPUT 

□ EASY TO INSTALL, FITS UNDER YOUR KEYBOARD 

□ NO SOLDERING! 

□ BUILT-IN SPEAKER 

□ DOES NOT DISABLE YOUR REGULAR T.V. OUTPUT 

□ FULLY TESTED AND ASSEMBLED 

□ COMPLETE WITH INSTRUCTIONS. 

ALSO AVAILABLE FOR COLOR MONITORS 




$29.95 



PROJECT BOARD 

A MUST FOR EXPERIMENTS 

□ UNLIMITED CHIP POSITIONS 

□ GOLD PLATED EDGE-CARD CONNECTOR 

□ FITS INTO ANY RS DISK PACK 

□ HOLES PLATED THROUGH BOTH SIDES 

□ EASY TO WIRE - WRAP 

GREAT TO BUILD YOUR TURN OF THE SCREW" 
PROJECTS. 



$19.95 

(TWO FOR $34.95) 




USA 

RGS MICRO INC. 
MAIN STREET 
DERBY LINE, VERMONT 
ZIP 05830 
TEL: 802-873-3386 
ORDER LINE 800-361-4970 




J\](§o 



CANADA 

RCS MICRO INC. 

759, VICTORIA SQUARE 405 
MONTREAL H2Y 2J3 
TEL.:(514) 287-1563 
ORDER LINE ONLY ★ ★ ★ 
QUEBEC - ONTARIO - IWAHITiMES 

300^61-5338 
WESTERN CANADA BQQ-SS1-5155 



TERMS: VISA - MASTER CARD - AMERICAN EXPRESS 



HOURS: MONDAY - SATURDAY 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM 



4, 126, 183,66, 151,57, 157,243, 129, 
101,38,249, 122 

130 DATA 66,28,189,251,212,222,2 
44, 189,231, 168, 157,235, 189,230, 1 
78, 189,227, 185 

140 DATA 236,2,147,165,38,98,8,8 
,8,8,223, 137, 127,66, 132, 134,32, 1 
40, 134,33 

150 DATA 222,137,132,127,189,249 
,201, 166,0,8,77,39,71,246,66, 132 
, 129,34,38,5,200 

160 DATA 1,247,66,132,129,58,38, 
9, 197, 1,38,5, 196,253,247,66, 132, 
77,42,219,93,38 

170 DATA 216,129,133,38,2,202,2, 
129, 131 , 38, 2, 202, 4, 247, 66, 132, 12 
9,200,34, 191 

180 DATA 189,228,178,166,0,43,18 
6,8, 189,249,201,32,246,254,66, 12 
8, 150, 166 

190 DATA 167,0,57,254,66,128,198 
, 127,58,255,66,88, 125,66,87,38,2 
7, 124,66,87,254,66,91,9, 166,0,38 
200 DATA 251,8,166,0,39,5,189,24 
9,201,32,246, 182,66,90, 189,249,2 
01,254,66, 128,255,66, 128, 166,0, 1 
51, 166 

210 DATA 189,248,104,129,9,38,10 
, 141, 188, 140,64, 127,36,242,8,32, 
232, 129,21,38, 15,254,66, 128, 140, 
64 

220 DATA 128,36,217,166,1,167,0, 
8,32,244, 129, 10,38, 17, 141, 155, 14 
0,64,96,36,5, 198,32,58,32, 197,20 
6 

230 DATA 64,3,32,192,129,8,38,10 
, 141 , 134, 140, 64, 0, 39, 188, 9, 32, 17 
8, 129, 19, 38, 23, 206, 64, 127, 188 
240 DATA 66, 128, 39, 7, 9, 166, 0, 167 
,1,32,244, 150, 166, 167, 1 , 134, 96, 3 
2, 156, 129,3,38 

250 DATA 3,126,226,113,129,13,39 
,57, 140,64, 126,34, 197, 188,66,88, 
44,37, 125,66,58,38,6, 189,249,201 
,8,32, 181, 189,228 

260 DATA 178,166,0,8,60,54,132,1 

27, 222, 137, 189, 251 , 30, 223, 137, 50 

,56,77,42,237,222, 137 

270 DATA 32, 155, 129, 32, 39, 6, 183, 

66, 90, 127, 66, 87, 206, 66, 177, 223, 2 

44,8,223, 181,206,64,0,223, 183, 16 

6,0,42,8,246 

280 DATA 66,130,196,112,27,32,12 
, 129, 64, 37, 6, 129, 96, 37, 4, 139, 96, 
139,96,222, 181 , 167, 0, 8, 223, 181,2 
22, 183,8, 188 

290 DATA 66,128,38,215,222,181,1 
11,0, 125,66,87,38, 12,255,66,91,9 



, 166, 0, 129, 32, 38, 249 
300 DATA 111,0,157,235,189,230,1 
78, 222, 165, 255, 66, 176, 189, 227, 17 
, 215, 130, 189, 227, 185, 37, 28, 220, 1 
93, 163,0 

310 DATA 211,149,221,149,7,54,15 
9, 145, 15, 174, 0, 52, 50, 167, 0, 8, 156 
, 149, 38, 248, 158, 145, 50, 6, 182, 66, 
178,39 

320 DATA 37,220,149,221,189,219, 
130, 137, 0, 221 , 187, 189, 225, 254, 7, 
54, 159, 145, 15, 142,66, 173,50, 167, 
0,8, 156, 191 

330 DATA 38,248,158,145,50,6,222 
, 187,223, 149, 189,227,217, 189,226 
, 243, 220, 165, 195, 0, 10, 189, 236, 22 
7, 189 

340 DATA 244,38,60,206,66,178,22 
3,244,223, 181,56, 166,0,8,60,222, 
181 , 167, 0, 8, 77, 38, 241 , 56, 254, 66, 
152, 110,9 

700 K*= I NKEY* : I FK*= " " THEN700 
710 RETURN 

Listing 3: 

10 DIML*(27) 
20 L«<0)«" 
30 L*<1)= M 
40 L*<2>«" 
50 L*<3)=" 
60 L*<4)=" 
70 L*(5)= w 
80 L*<6)=" 
90 L«<7)=" 
100 L*<8>« M 
110 L»<9>=" 
120 L*<10)=" 
130 L*<11>=" 
140 L*<12)=" 
150 L*<13>»" 
160 L*<14>=" 
170 L«(15>»" 
180 L*<16)- M 
190 L*<17)=" 
200 L*<18>«" 
210 L»<19>*" 
220 L*<20>«" 
230 L*<21)=" 
240 L*<22)=" 
250 L*<23>=" 
260 L*<24)=" 
270 L*<25>=" 
280 L*<26>=" 
290 L*<27)=" 
600 STOP 
610 FORI=0TO27 

620 PRINT#-2, " m ;l*<i>: 
PR1NT#-2:NEXT 



124 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



To all our readers and customers... 

...I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, our customers, 
our project development team, and sales staff for making us Canada's 
largest Color Computer software & peripheral distributor. 

Our project team spends countless hours designing, developing and 
testing our fine products. Well beyond the call of duty, they spend their 
hours eating and breathing their work. Forty hour marathon shifts not 
uncommon, they're undoubtedly North America' s MOST gifted Color Computer 
team, having developed products that are precedent setting across the 
computer world. They are the back bone of our company, however the credit 
for their work could not be realized without the expertise of our sales 
staff. Our sales staff spends more time learning and understanding our 
products than they do marketing. They spend many personal hours studying 
our products in relation to you, the customer. They provide the link 
between the products and you. They were selected for their skills and 
friendliness to the customer. They bend over backwards to help you 
understand our products, and serve you in your needs.' 

Our marketing strategy is to help you understand the product. Our 
products sell themselves. The dedication and patience ,of our production 
techniciens who ensure our high quality standards cannot go unmentioned. 
Great care was taken by them on their own initiative to guarantee to you 
the finest workmanship money can buy. All of this would be to no avail if 
it wasn't for you, our customer. I would like to thank you for making us 
what we are. We appreciate your ideas and support and for you just being 
there . 

My special thanks to John Kunze, our brilliant systems design analyst 
for his tireless effort in bringing the Color Computer into the big league 
with his fixed hard drive system with an exceptional level of 
price/performance. 

To Gabriel Gal, our far sighted electronics engineer to give that 
extra muscle of a 128K to our Color Computer systems. 

The tolerance and forebearance of Karen Graham and Sharron Curley in 
coordinating our overall Canadian operation, who have turned many 
mountains into molehills. A sweet smile goes a long way. 

We have great confidence in Dan Pluta (MSc.) of University of 
Philidelphia who has the arduous task of heading up our U.S. operation. 
His skill and knowlege has impressed us all. We welcome his arrival into 
our team and pledge our utmost support to him and through him to all of 
our U.S. customers. 

And last, but far from least, to Tony Distefano, lord of CoCo 
hardware for his brilliant ingenuity in his design of the ROM based cards 
and color video interface. Also, his tid-bits, criticism and overall 
general aid which have proved to be invaluable to us. 

and as for me, I'm just the president... 

Robert Sajo 



USA 

RCS MICRO INC. 

MAIN STREET 
DERBY LINE, VERMONT 
ZIP 05830 
TEL: 802-873-3386 
ORDER LINE 800-361-4970 




CANADA 

RCS MICRO INC. 
759, VICTORIA SQUARE 405 
MONTREAL H2Y 2J3 
TEL:(514) 287-1563 
ORDER LINE ONLY + + + 
QUEBEC - ONTARIO - MARITIMES 

800-361-5338 
WESTERN CANADA 800-361-5155 



TERMS: VISA - MASTER CARD - AMERICAN EXPRESS 



HOURS: MONDAY - SATURDAY 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM 




Introducing a new bimonthly column . . . 

Welcome To 
The World Of 
Telecommunications 



By R. Wayne Day 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The world of communications for 
a Color Computer enthusiast is 
almost unlimited. CoCo owners 
are hooking into mainframe computers, 
radios, satellites, bulletin boards . . . 
you name it, and a CoCo owner has 
probably tried it. * 

Beginning this month, THE RAINBOW 
and I will try to ease your journey 
through the world of telecommunica- 
tions through this column, as well as 
give you an idea of some of the other 
communications applications that you 
can try with your CoCo. 

Td like your help in this effort, 
though. If you have some particular 
problem that's been plaguing you, or 
you have an interesting application for 
using the CoCo to communicate with 
someone or something else, be sure to 
let us know about it. My addresses are 
at end of this column. 



(Wayne Day, a traffic engineering sig- 
nal technician, is the SYSOP of The 
Color SIG of CompuServe, the world's 
largest consumer information service. 
He is also a certified paramedic and 
works par t-time for an Emergency Med- 
ical Service provider. His amateur radio 
operator call sign is WA5WDB.) 



What Are We Talking About? 

A simple description of telecommuni- 
cations (simple if you talk computer- 
ese) is "remote operation of a host sys- 
tem through a modem by means of a 
terminal emulator." 

Simple, right? 

Let's take "terminal emulator" and 
see what we can decipher in that, first. 

In the world of computers, quite a few 
of those used by businesses and univer- 
sities are not the personal computers 
that you and I are familiar with. Unlike 
a CoCo, they normally do not have a 
keyboard attached to the computer 
itself, and certainly don't use a televi- 
sion for output. 

So, how do the "big guys" talk to their 
computers? 

They attach terminals, input/output 
devices, to them. 

Terminals come in all shapes and 
sizes. Most all of them include a key- 
board for the operator to input data; 
some of them have video screens for the 
output, while others have printers at- 
tached to them. 

How does that fit in with the CoCo? 

What we're doing with the CoCo is 
running a program that makes our 
computer act like a terminal . . . con- 
verting anything we type on the key- 



board into ASCII (American Standards 
Code for Information Interchange) 
standard characters that can be under- 
stood by another system. 

On the flip side, we translate the 
ASCII characters the other computer is 
sending us, into data that the CoCo can 
display. 

The "remote" portion of that sen- 
tence means that we're somewhere else 
than the system we're "talking" to (also 
known as the "host"). 

And, "modem" is an abbreviation for 
MOdulator/ DEModulator, the hard- 
ware device that goes in between our 
computer and the telephone lines. It 
modulates, or converts, the electrical 
pulses the terminal program generates 
into audio tones that can be sent over 
the phone lines. 

In return, it demodulates the audio 
tones from the host system, into electri- 
cal pulses that our computer can use. 

Who Are These Hosts I Can Talk To? 

The electronic "hosts" come in all 
shapes and sizes. 

One of the more popular aspects of 
modem-ing is to hook into one of the 
thousands of Bulletin Board Systems 
that have sprung up around the world in 
the last few years. 



126 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



These BBSs, which we'll go into more 
detail about later, may be of general 
interest, or dedicated to a particular 
subject. There are quite a few BBSs ded- 
icated to the Color Computer, for ex- 
ample, while others may be of particular 
interest to owners of other computer 
systems, while still others may be dedi- 
cated to Adventure games, amateur 
radio, geneology, or maybe one of the 
many "boards" that are in-tune with a 
more adult crowd. 

There are al^o quite a few "VIDEO- 
TEXT" services available throughout 
the United States and Canada today 
that are available to CoCo owners 
through their modems. 

One such service, called "STAR- 
TEXT" is a joint project of the Fort 
Worth Star-Telegram newspaper and 
Radio Shack, and is available to com- 
puter users in the Fort Worth-Dallas 
area. 

Subscribers dial up a local telephone 
number and are answered by the STAR- 
TEXT host computer, which dishes out 
the news items, classifieds or other 
information that the computer user has 
asked for, all at $7.95 a month for 
unlimited access to the system. 

Other popular electronic services are 
the nationwide consumer-oriented in- 
formation services, such as CompuServe 
and The Source. 

On these services, you'll find a multi- 
plicity of things to do — shopping at 
home, on-line travel planning, electronic 
magazines, and a variety of services that 
are geared to a specific family of compu- 
ter users. 

One such service is The Color Com- 
puter Special Interest Group (CCSIG) 
on CompuServe, of which I am the sys- 
tems operator (SYSOP). 

The CCSIG is devoted to topics of 
specific interest to Color Computer users 
and can be compared to one of the local 
bulletin boards that are dedicated to the 



CoCo, but only up to a point. 

For example, a local BBS normally 
can handle only one person using it at a 
time, while on the CCSIG, since Compu- 
Serve is a multi-user facility, there's 
really no limit to the folks that can be 
"on" the S1G at one time. 

One of our more popular features, as 
a matter of fact, is based on the multi- 
user concept; CONFERENCE, where 
anyone can come on and "talk" to other 
users on the SIG. We have had as many 
as 30 users all "talking" to each other 
during a conference featuring Ken 
Kaplan, the president of Microware, 
who was talking about the OS-9 imple- 
mentation on the CoCo. 

Another popular feature of the 
CCSIG, as well as on local BBSs, is the 
database section of the service. In these 
databases, you can usually find pro- 
grams which are submitted by other 
users, available for "downloading" into 
your computer, so you can load it and 
run it later. 

Both The Source and CompuServe 
can be accessed through commercial 
communications networks called TYME- 
NET and TELENET. Additionally, 
CompuServe also maintains its own 
communications network, so that access 
to either network is usually just a local 
phone call away. 

On-line systems are not limited to 
hobby use, either. 

Color Computer users with terminal 
programs and a modem can also send 
"electronic mail" through the Post Of- 
fice's ECOM and MCI Mail. The ad- 
vantage in using one of these services, 
over the electronic mail offered by Com- 
puServe or The Source, is that the recip- 
ient does not have to own a computer in 
order to retrieve the mail. Instead, the 
correspondence can be sent through the 
normal carrier-delivered mail. 

Typesetting firms are now establish- 
ing electronic links so that computer 



users can come on-line with their sys- 
tems, and send a text file to be typeset by 
the firm, saving the time needed to send 
the copy, be it advertising or a newslet- 
ter, to the typesetter, as well as reducing 
the manual labor needed to get the copy 
into typeset form. 

I'm Convinced! What Do I Need To Get 
Started? 

To telecommunicate over the tele- 
phone, the minimum configuration 
you'll need is a computer, a modem, and 
terminal software. 

All of the Color Computers have an 
RS-232 port on the back of the com- 
puter. The modem will attach to the 
RS-232 port, either with a cable sup- 
plied by the modem manufacturer, by 
Radio Shack, or one that you can make 
on your own. 

Modems come in two basic styles: 
direct connection to the telephone lines, 
or acoustically coupling the telephone 
with the modem. 

The acoustically coupled modem is 
usually less expensive, and does not 
require any electrical connection to the 
telephone system, if that's a concern, or 
you plan to use the modem on a party 
line or a pay phone (that's a no-no for 
direct-connect modems, according to 
federal regulations). 

The handset fits into two rubber cups 
on the modem, and a little speaker and a 
microphone inside those cups take the 
tones from the phone, and work them 
into the innards of the modem. 

A direct-connect modem, on the other 
hand, usually has a modular-type plug 
so that you can just plug the phone line 
Hght into the modem. Being directly 
connected to the phone line, there's less 
chance of incorrect data being passed 
because of background noise in the 
room. 

Direct-connect modems can be "plain 
Jane" like the Radio Shack Modem 1, 



\ — ) COLOR CABLES (~\ 



* NEW LOW PRICES * 

RS-232 4-Pin DIN Printer Cables 1 0 ft $ 1 2.75 

3 ft Disk cables 
1 -drive $23.75 2-drives $29.75 

3-drives $34 80 4-drives $39.00 

Disk or Game Cartridge Ext., 3 ft $23.75 
Gold Plated Disk l/F solder plug $9 00 

Custom Cables upon request 
Extra length of any cables at $1 OO/ft 
Add $1 .75 for shipping and handling 
Kansas residents add 3% tax 



09 



C & C Engineering 
Wichita, Ks 67208 



Ph 



P.O. Box 8320 
316i 685 4561 



surv- calces;" 



versatile tool 

surveyors, 

realtors, land title companies, land owners. 
SURV-CALC can calculate land areas, latitudes 
& departures, missing lines, extensive curve 
data lists, unknowns in triangles, adds and 
subtracts angles, determines closure accuracy, 
SURV-CALC draws traverse on screen w/North 
arrow. Includes 2 versions, screen version and 
printer output version. Also includes screen 
dump program for LP VII & DMP-100 printers. 
Requires 32K ECB CoCo. TAPE $20.00 DISK $23.00 
GARLAND SOFTWARE 
P.O. BOX 23043, St. Louis, Mo., 63156 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 127 



or can have some extra bells and whis- 
tles like automatically dialing the phone 
for you, or automatically answering the 
phone, which is needed if you ever want 
to run a BBS of your own. 

Do you need a fancy modem? No, not 
really. What you're paying extra for is 
convenience and extra capabilities. You 
might want to get started with a less 
expensive modem, then upgrade later, 
as your needs and desires increase. 

In a future column, we'll take a more 
in-depth look, at modems, and discuss 
some of the various configurations they 
come in. 

The Terminal Program 

The terminal program is the real key 
to successful telecommunicating. 

Terminal programs come in two basic 
versions — smart and dumb. 

The "dumb" terminals allow you to 
type information on your keyboard and 
have it sent out the RS-232 port. They 
also receive info on the RS-232 line, and 
put it up on the screen. Usually, that's 
about all they do. 

Assume, though, for a minute, that 
you are going to call up a local BBS and 



want to check your electronic mail, and 
get a couple of new programs that have 
been put on the board by other users. 

If you had a terminal program that 
would allow you to load a message that 
you had composed on a word-processor 
before you logged onto the BBS, that 
would save you a lot of time over hand- 
entering the message to someone else. If 
the BBS was a long-distance phone call, 
that time would equal money in your 
pocket. 

Then, too, if your terminal program 
had the capability to "capture" the data 
sent from the BBS, you wouldn't have 
to write down your mail, letter by letter, 
in order to have some way of getting it 
on paper. You could just print a copy of 
the mail out on your printer. 

Now, on that downloaded program 
you wanted to save, you could just print 
it out and re-enter it if it were in BASIC, 
but what happens if it's in machine lan- 
guage? If your terminal had some way 
of sending and receiving data, and check- 
ing to make sure that data was correct, 
and it could save that data to disk or 
tape for you, your problem would be 
solved. 



All of those capabilities exist, in some 
form or another, on programs we refer 
to as "smart terminals, "and that will be 
our major topic of discussion next month 
in THE rainbow's annual Data Com- 
munications issue. 

Also, next month, we'll be publishing 
a selected list of some of the thousands 
of BBS systems in North America, espe- 
cially those BBS systems that are dedi- 
cated to the Color Computer! 

Let Me Hear From You 

As 1 mentioned earlier, I'd like to 
make this column as responsive to your 
needs as possible, so let us know what 
you want or need. 

If you're a CompuServe subscriber, 
you may send me EM AIL, or a message 
on The Color S1G. My CompuServe ID 
is 76703,376. 

My MCI Mail ID is; 20 1 -7723 and my 
TELEX address is: 650-201-7723. 
Or a letter can be sent to: 
Wayne Day 
P.O. Box 79074 
Fort Worth, TX 76179-0074 
If you desire a quick reply to your 
letter, please enclose a SASE. 



COLORFORTH™ FORTH COMPILER 

THERE IS LIFE AFTER BASIC! COLORFORTH is a figFORTH language compiler designed for use on the Color 
Computer. COLORFORTH Version 2.0 is available now with all these features and more: 

Can access ALL av/ailable RAM from 16K through 64K and will work with any current ROM 
Executes 10 to V> times faster than BASIC and can be programmed much faster 
5>0 additional commands are included beside the standard figFORTH commands 

You get BOTH cassette and RS/D0S versions, PLUS a resident figEDITOR, and an 82 page manual 
A special command that allows you to copy your program so that it can be run on a CoCo without 
first loading COLORFORTH 

ALL OF THE ABOVE FOR ONLY $49.95 



DECISION MAKER™ 

IF YOU HAVE EVER HAD TROUBLE MAKING UP YOUR 

MIND, THEN THIS PROGRAM IS FOR YOU! 
DECISION MAKER is a new concept in programs for 
the Color Computer, 
DECISION MAKER is ... 

* A step by step, interactive program to help 

you solve any problem 

* Designed using standard analytic techniques j ^f^v 

* A learning tool to discover the exact urxh 

processes used in reaching a decision RAINBOW 

* A valuable asset for anyone c«««cation 
DECISION MAKER requires 32K and Ext. Basic 
Complete with 16 page manual, only $24.95 



BIO- PSYCHO ME TER tm 

NOW YOU CAN INVESTIGATE THE HIDDEN REALMS OF THE 
HUMAN MIND! 

B 1 0-PSYCHOME TER is an authentic Bio-feedback 
device complete with software 
B I 0-PSYCHOME TER includes: 

* Bio-feedback graphing, Stress Reduction, and 

Memory Improvement modes 

* Machine Language, high speed graphics 

* Very sensitive hardware for optimum results 

* Printed manual with instructions and 

suggestions for use 
B 1 0-PSYCHOME TER requires 32K and Ext. Basic 
Complete, with manual, only $39.95 



We accept U.S. funds drawn on U.S. banks, VISA & MASTER CARD, & UPS C.O.D.s 
Add $2.50 shipping & handling 
Texas residents add 5% 

ARMADILLO INT'L SOFTWARE 

P.O. BOX 9351 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78766 





PHONE (512)835-1088 



128 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




SOFTWARE 



HELP 



User-expandable generic hejpfiitilif} 

• Includes data for online he^ with OS-9 uttl 

• Fast, efficient disk storage 

• Three levels of nesting 

• Wild Card searching 

• Automatic display of available help 

• Steps the user until he finds the answer 




DISK BACKUP 

Controlled hard (fak^u- floppy bockisp with restart 

capability 

• Handles files larger than output media 

• Single file. Wild Card seajich, current directory only, 
eurrt rtt-and-all-s uhdf retfories 

• Date and tiroc for mercmetrtal backup 

• Opefaior-friend^ handles error conditions smoothly 

• Use to create optimized disk* 



TERMINAL 



Communicationx program for OS*9 

• Use your micro as an intelligent terminal 

• Go online over phones or connect directly 

• Transfer data tn both directions 

• Menu-driven 

• XON/XOFF support required - 

• BASIC09/RUNB required 

DO WE HAVE YOUR NAME & ADDRESS 
For new products news & announcements? 



lot 





see us at II PRINCETON 

JBM'S MIDWARE 





VISA 



I 




Please send me: 

HELP ($69.00) 
DISK BACKUP ($99.00) 
TERMINAL (595.00) 
PA Sales Tax 6% 
Postage/ Handling JS 
TOTAL 



□ Vm interested, need more information 
SHIP TO : 



Mike Check/tocmry Qrdn 
p*y*ble to: The JBM Group. Int. 
Of by VISA/MASTERCARD 

Aect.f 

Zxp Ami* : 

Signature __ 



Rrquired Di^iribullnn; CoCo(Y/N): 

SW3Sirack __________ 

40 track _ 

SWUOlrack 

r 77 1 rich 



ORDER FROM 



the 



RfoTJ 



cy 



□ 



Dept. RB12 

The JBM Group, Inc. 

Continental Business Center 
Front & Ford Streets 
Bridgeport, PA 19405 



1 



group 



Tel: 215-337-3138/TWX: 510^60-3999 



' OS9 is ■ reentered trademark of Mlcrowwe Corp. 




From the programmer that brought ZAXXON* 
to the Color Computer,** 
Moreton Bay Software proudly presents 

BJORK BLOCKS. see us at 

An incredible graphic utility! Now you can design grapics just like the masters. You can even animate! User friend- 
ly. Precision drawing. Precision color selection. Fully menu driven. Only one joystick needed for menu selection 
and graphic creation. Compressed data storage or load and save 6K binary files. Almost impossible to crash. 
Create your own graphic adventure screens. Limitless applications in communication, education and program 
development. 

Requires 32K Extended Basic 
(64K for animation) 

$34.95 Tape or Disk 




Picture created with BJORK BLOCKS 



DOUBLE DRIVER 

The BEST monitor driver available, unlike some monitor 
drivers the Double Driver provides TRUE monochrome 
and color composite output. Audio Output. Solderless 
installation. $24.95 




64K UPGRADES 

Instantly access 64K via M/L Totally solderless kit to 
upgrade E Boards. Kit includes eight 4164 prime chips 
and chips U29 and U11 already soldered. E Board Kit 
$69.95 

Color Computer II kit requires soldering. $64.95 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division of Moreton Bay Laboratory 



316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA, 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 



Ordering information 
Add $2.00 shipping and handling per order. We ship within 24 hours 
on receipt of order. Blue Label Service available. California residents 
add 6% sales tax. 




GRAPHICOM 

Buy GRAPHICOM from us. Get an extra picture disk FREE! 

The perfect line drawing companion to BJORK BLOCKS. 

You must see this program to believe it! Create pictures 
and text on the same screen. Now you can create pictures 
as good as any graphic you have seen on the color com- 
puter. Write graphic adventures or educational programs. 
Requires 64K EXB, Disk Drive and Joy Sticks $29.95 

SPECIAL: Bjork Blocks and Graphicom $55.00 



MORE BUSINESS -Ver 3.12 The preferred business 
package. Completely interactive. General Ledger. 
Accounts Receivable. Accounts Payable. Customer 
Statements, Mailing Labels. Profit/Loss. Balance Sheet 
Statements. Our most powerful business package. Buy 
the best! 

32K Disk R/S DOS $99.95 



TRIVIA AND SOME SIGNIFICA 

Get 40% more question at 66% the cost! 

Great family or party game. More than 1900 questions in 
nine cataegories. 



HISTORY 



ANIMALS 



ENTERTAINMENT 
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
SPORTS AND GAMES ART AND MUSIC 
LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE 
POLITICS AND PLACES 
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTERS 

Challenging, educational and even funny at times. Best 
of all, you get the utility the programmer used to create 
these questions. All ready for you to create your own 
challenges. Make up questions about family history, high 
school basketball scores or your favorite TV series. 
Parents and teachers can use this to develop their own 
educational files. 

16K EXTENDED BASIC CASSETTE $19.95 
32K EXTENDED BASIC DISK $21.95 



*Zaxxon Reg TM Sega Corp. 
r *Color Computer Reg TM Tandy Corp. 




Preserving The 
Classics By 
Patching 
Art Gallery 



By Paul S. Hoffman 



Here's another graphics program 
modification, prompted by a 
letter to the rainbow way, 
way back in April 1982. Mr. Gary 
Burkhardt of Coldwater, Mich., asked 
for help in getting picture tapes from 
Radio Shack's Art Gallery dumped to 
printer. Not only is there no printer 
dump in Art Gallery, but Art Gallery 
picture tapes won't even load in using 
other programs or basic! Wouldn't it 
be nice if an Art Gallery picture could be 
saved like a standard machine language 
tape CSA VEM1 

Having played around with adapting 




Micropainter to operate from disk (THE 
rainbow, March *84), and having newly 
acquired my 64K upgrade (which makes 
modifying ROM Pak programs sim- 
pler), I decided to tackle Art Gallery's 
tape save routine. I found two prob- 
lems: Art Gallery creates tapes with a 
slightly different coding at the begin- 
ning, and the loading address is the 
same as the start of Basic's text page 
memory, $400. 1 have replaced the 'tape 
save' portion of Art Gallery with a rou- 
tine which creates a 'standard' machine 
language tape readable by Basic's 
CLOA DM routine. It turns out that Art 






Gallery will read these 'standard 1 tapes 
without any change in the tape input 
portion of the program. 

The tapes created by this revision to 
Art Gallery must be OFFSET LOAD- 
ED to be used by Extended or Disk 
Extended BASIC. If you are loading a 
tape into Extended BASIC (without disk), 
the offset is $200 (CLOA DM 
&H200). For Disk Extended BASIC, it's 
$A00 (CLOA DM "", &HA00). 

Note: Art Gallery does not put a file- 
name or title on a tape, so make sure to 
use two quotation marks to indicate a 
blank filename. 

The tapes will also load automatically 
into my disk version of Micropainter 
without worrying about the offset — 

then they can be saved directly to disk. 
For those without Micropainter, List- 
ing 3 will load files from modified Art 
Gallery tapes, display them, then save 
them to tape or disk at the revised 
addresses. The tapes will not load into 
The Micro Works' Magigraph because 
of the loading address; first transfer the 
pictures using Micropainter or Listing 
3, then you can make use of them with 

Mamapk 

To modify your version of Art Gal- 
lery, use Listing 1 . Make sure to start-up 
in non-disk Extended BASIC, and dis- 



(Paul Hoffman is an independent de- 
signer/artist and Color Computer pro- 
grammer. He is the author of Compu- 
terware's Semi Draw and a number of 
X-pad programs,) 

October 1964 THE RAINBOW 131 



able the cartridge auto-start by entering 
' POKE &HFF23J6. " With a Multi- 
Pak Interface or other selectable-port 
interface, select the slot with the Art 
Gallery cartridge. Otherwise, insert the 
Art Gallery cartridge very carefully. 
Note: Plugging or unplugging cartridges 
with the power on can cause serious 
damage. This is not recommended. Now 
run Listing I, which will copy the car- 
tridge contents to lower memory, alter 
the tape save routine, and add a short 
routine to move the whole program 
back up to its proper memory addresses. 
You will end up with a machine lan- 
guage program called ARTGAL saved 
on cassette tape. Turn off your compu- 
ter and then power up with the disk 
system engaged. Save the taped ART- 
GAL program to disk by typing the 



following: 

CLOADM "ARTGAL" ENTER 
SAVEM "ARTGAL/ BIN", &H4000, 
&H5014,&H5000 
ENTER 

On the same disk, save Listing 2 as 
ARTGAL/ BAS. Now when you RUN 
ARTGAL, the computer will be chang- 
ed to 64K RAM operation with the 
BASIC ROMs copied to RAM. This is so 
that Disk BASIC can load your program, 
but then be replaced by Art Gallery 
operating in RAM but at its 'correct' 
address location; starting at SC000, the 
beginning of cartridge memory. The 
ARTGAL/ BAS program will imme- 
diately execute the modified Art Gallery. 
You will not be able to return to BASIC 
because hitting Reset sends the compu- 



ter off into oblivion, never to return 
without turning it off and back on. 

Now, 1 can make modifications to 
any graphics in my files, using Micro- 
painter, Magigraph, Art Gallery, Gra- 
phicom, or the X-PAD — the files are 
almost fully interchangeable. Figure 1 is 
a drawing from the Art Gallery side of 
Radio Shack's Fantasy Images tape 
(Cat. No. 26-3304). Figure 2 is the same 
picture modified by adding a mirror- 
image rubber stamp using Graphicom 
and shifting to the P MODE 4 artifacted 
colors. Both images were printed on the 
Transtar-315 Color Printer. Radio 
Shack's CODUMP software for the 
Tandy CGP-220 Color Ink-Jet Printer 
will not print a PMODE ONE picture 
which is the mode used by Art Gallery in 
the proper ratio. 




Listing 1: 



10 * 



15 



20 



* CONVERTS <ART GALLERY > * 

* TO WRITE STANDARD * 

* MACHINE LANGUAGE TAPES * 

* P. HOFFMAN, 1984 * 
*************************** 

'NOTE: 64K NEEDED TO RUN 

FINAL PROGRAM! 
'REMEMBER TO START WITH ROM- 




112 W. WISCONSIN AV. 
KAUKAUNA, Wl 54130 
(414) 766-1851 
STOCK ITEMS SHIPPED SAME DAY! 



THE COMPLETE TRS-8Q® LINE 



ELITE CALC $54.95 
ELITE WORD $54.95 



THE COSMOS 
CONNECTION IS 
A COMPLETE SERIAL 
TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 
FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER TO 

THE GEMINI — 10X and 15X 
PRINTERS. 



• NO AC REQUIRED 

• SWITCHABLE 
BAUD RATE 
AT: 600 

1200 
2400 

• HIGH QUALITY 
CONSTRUCTION 

• COMPACT 

• 90 DAY 
WARRANTY 




ELITE FILE 
TOM MIX 
SOFTWARE 



$67.00 

CALL 

FOR 

PRICE 



•Pli» - U.S. ORDERS Add $10.00 Shipping & HundHns 

TANDY COAP PR1CES AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



GEMINI-1 
PACKAGE 
READY TO PLUG IN 
TO YOUR COLOR COMPUTER 
ONLY* 041,^ jfr^. 

4 $325.00% 

~£ GEMINI - 10X # 
H PACKAGE 



10X 
15X 



Delta 10 



$289.00 
$445.00 
$484.00 



Delta 15 - $597.00 




132 THg RAINBOW 



October 1984 



WICf Oftici. . 



PACK AUTO-START DISABLED 
(POKE &HFF23, 36), THEN 
30 " SWITCH TO THE INTERFACE SLOT 
CONTAINING ART BALLERY (IF 
YOU'RE USING MULTIPAK INTER- 
FACE) 

40 * SOFTWARE SWITCHING WITH A 
POKE IS PREFERABLE TO USING 
THE FRONT SWITCH ON THE 
INTERFACE. 

50 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" READY TO MO 

VE <ART GALLERY > TO RAM AND 

ALTER IT? < PRESS ANY 

KEY TO CONTINUE> 

60 IF INKEY* - " , ' THEN 60 

65 PRINT: PRINT" MOVING 

70 FORM-&HC000 TOSeHCFFF 

80 POKEM-«cH8000,PEEK(M) 

90 NEXTM 

100 FORX«1TO100 

110 READ A*,B* 

1 20 A*= " &H" +A* : B*« " &H " +B* 

130 PR I NT A*; " - ";B» 

1 40 POKE VAL ( A* > , VAL ( B* ) 

150 NEXT 

160 DATA 4529,8E,452A,01,452B,E2 
, 452C , 86 , 452D , 02 , 452E , A7 , 452F , 80 
170 DATA 4530, 6F, 453 1,80, 4532, 6F 



,4533, 80, 4534, CC, 
180 DATA 4537, ED, 
,453A,81,453B,86, 
190 DATA 453E,92, 
,4541,00,4542,86, 
200 DATA 4545, A6, 
,4548, 92, 4549, BD, 
210 DATA 454C,8E, 
,454F,9F,4550,7E, 
220 DATA 4553,97, 
,4556, 1C, 4557, 00, 
230 DATA 455A,27, 
, 455D , 83 , 455E , 00 , 
240 DATA 4561,02, 
,4564,86,4565,01, 
250 DATA 4568, BD, 
,456B,20,456C,E2, 
260 DATA 456F,97, 
, 4572, 7D, 4573, BD, 
270 DATA 4576,20, 
,5001,40,5002,00, 
280 DATA 5005, C0, 
,5008, 81, 5009, 8C, 
290 DATA 500C,27, 
,500F,A1,5010,20, 
300 DATA 5013, C0, 
310 PRINT: PRINT" 
LTERED PROGRAM 




The Companion 

Expansion Interface Units 

Basic Technology offers you 
the most features and best 
quality for the money! 

Compare these features: 







BT 


TRS-80 






COMPANION 


Multi-Pak 


• 


Power ON Indicator Light 


YES 


NO 


• 


Cold Start Reset 


YES 


NO 


• 


Gold Socket Connectors 


YES 


NO 


• 


Socketed Integrated Circuits 


YES 


NO 


• 


Manual Cartridge Selector 


Pushbutton 


Slide Switch 


• 


Keyboard/Program Selection 


YES 


NO 


• 


Cartridge ON Indicator 


YES 


NO 


• 


Extension Cable 


YES 


NO 


• 


Warranty 


180 days 


90 days 


• 


User's Manual w/schematics, 








parts layouts and parts lists 


YES 


NO 





Also for the Color Computer: 
BT-1010 Parallel Printer Interface ... $ 79.95 
BT-1020 Real Time Clock/Calendar . $109.00 
BT-1030 Versatile Interface Port $ 69.95 

Add $5 shipping and handling. Check, money order, VISA, 
MC (Account # and expiration date). COD charge $2 (req. 
certified check or M.O.). Michigan residents add 4% sales 
tax. 

basic 

IECHNOLOGY 



jjf^ The Companion — New Price . . $225.00 

~ BT-IOOO $250.00 

with 8K RAM $275.00 

ORDER TODAY OR SEND 
FOR FREE BROCHURE r 



SIS 



Dept. Q 



P.O. Box 511 



Ortonville, Ml 48462 



(313) 627-6146 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 133 



EY TO CONINUE) 

320 I F I NKE Y»» " " THEN320 

330 CSAVEM " ART6AL " , &H4000 , &H50 1 4 

, &H5000 

Listing 2: 

0 * ##***»»*#»♦#»#♦#*#********#»# 

* " ARTGAL / B A8 " — LOADS * 

* MODIFIED <ART OALLERY> * 
« FROM DISK & RUNS IT * 
*»*♦*#*#*»*♦»#*##»♦»**»»*»*#» 

1 ********* P. HOFFMAN ###»»*### 

*********** 1984 ************ 
5 *64K ROM-TO-RAM ROUTINE THANKS 

TO FRANK HOGG. 
10 CLEAR999 

20 DATA 26,80,190,128,0,183,255, 
222, 166, 128 

30 DATA 183,255,223,167,31,140,2 
24,0,37,241,57 

40 for 1=1 t02 1 : reada : a*= a*+chr* ( a 
>:nexti 

50 p=varptr<a*>+1 

60 POKEP, 126 
70 EXECP 

80 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" NOW IN RAM! 

II 

90 LOADM " ARTGAL /BIN" : POKE&HFF40 , 
0:EXEC&H5000 

Listing 3: 

* LOADS MODIFIED ARTGAL PIX * 

♦ TO EITHER EXTENDED OR DISK» 



* BASIC * 

1 * ****** P. HOFFMAN ********** 

2 ********** 1984 ************* 
10 PMODE1, UPCLS 

20 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" POSITION REC 
ORDER FOR PLAYBACK - THEN PRES 
S ANY KEY:" 

30 I F I NKE Y*= " " THEN30 ELSESCREEN1 
,0 

40 IFPEEK(&HBA>"6 THEN50 ELSEIFP 

EEK (&HBA) =&HE THEN80 ELSEGOTO140 

50 CLOADM " " t &H200 : GOSUB 1 00 

60 CSAVEMF* , &H600 , &H 1 200 ,413 

70 INPUT" ANOTHER PICTURE <Y/N> " 

; I * : I FASC < I * > =89 THEN20ELSEEND 

80 CLOADM" " , &HA00: GOSUB 1 00 

90 SAVEMF* , &HE00 , &H 1 A00 , 4 1 3 : GOTO 

70 

1 00 I F I NKEY«* " "THEN 1 00ELSE I NPUT " 
NAME FOR SAVED FILE" ; F*: * ****** 

*IF SAVING FOR DISK < MAG I GRAPH > , 
MAKE SURE TO USE "/MGF" EXTEN- 
SION * 

110 PRINT" PRESS ANY KEY WHEN RE 
ADY TO RE-RECORD THE PICTU 

RE. 

120 IF I NKE Y*="" THEN 120 
130 RETURN 

140 PRINT" GRAPHIC PAGES NOT SET 

PROPERLY" : CLEAR: PCLEAR4 
150 PRINT" PRESS < RESET > AND TRY 

RUNNING AGAIN — IF NO LUCK, 
TURN THE COMPUTER OFF AND RELO 
AD THE PROGRAM. ": END ^ 



Hint . . . 



How To Be A Printer Artist 
In One Easy Lesson 



Anyone not having "Printer Artist" from the November 
1983 issue of THE RAINBOW may find the following program 
useful. 

10 READ A$ 

20 FOR X=l TO LEN(A$) STEP 3 

30 B$=MID$(A$,X,3) 

40 C$=R1GHT$(B$,1) 

50 PRINT#-2,STRING$(VAL(B$),C$); 

60 NEXT X:PRlNT#-2:GOTO 10 

With this program you may enter each line of the printer 
mysteries as DA TA statements. For example: 



Line 

1. 23$P ) 1X,12N 

2. 19SP,IX,6SP,8$ 

would he entered as: 

101 DATA23 01X12N 

102 DATA 19 01X06 08$ 

Start DA TA statements at Line 101 (old line number plus 
100) and change INFO to a two-digit number followed by 
the character you want printed. You must also drop the 
commas. The 23SPJXJ2N becomes '23 01X12N', 

After you have any or all the lines changed, just type 
RUN. The program will print out the picture to your printer 
until it runs out of data. An OD Error will appear oh the 
screen but this will not hurt anything. You may then go back 
and edit any errors until you have your picture correct. Then 
SA F£each program for future use. 

Michael B. Kromeke 



134 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




Feat 



HI-RES SCREEN UTILITY 
ICLLaai - I o u b I e Height Ch * r ^" tgr s 

^ Dn Svr^en UHf ERL IN IMG 
Bell Lhiracler f one ?ener ator 
tchabl e Full Screen Reverse Midec 
ue Upper & ' 



char act 5 



Prcor-anable line lengths fro" 2£ t 

28 Characters per line 
32 Characters per I 1 ri e 
3 <> Characters per line 
42 Characters per line 
51 Characters per line 
6-1 Characters per line 

U ne lengths ce~ 85*128 fi. 255 are unreadable 
but; can be very usef ul For seems disela:-' I a>c 



i uncr ,vin; j.r <- |y prosr anab I e thru Bft 

■ lilLllL L Ur.J 'J1 I [E. , L including I L - 8- PRINT 



j ,*[,*- <■*£'! >■ f ro?r anabl e thru BASIC 



• FULLY BASIC COMPATIBLE 

• DISPLAY FORMATS OF 28 to 255 

CHARACTERS PER LINE 

• FULL 96 UPPER LOWER CASE CHARACTERS 

• MIXED GRAPHICS & TEXT OR SEPARATE 

GRAPHIC 81 TEXT SCREENS 

• INDIVIDUAL CHARACTER HIGHLIGHTING 

• REVERSE CHARACTER HIGHLIGHT MODE 

• WRITTEN IN FAST MACHINE LANGUAGE 

• AUTOMATIC RELOCATES TO TOP OF 16 32K 

• AUTOMATICALLY SUPPORTS 64K of RAM 

WITH RESET CONTROL 

• REVERSE SCREEN 

• ON SCREEN UNDERLINE 



• DOUBLE SIZE CHARACTERS 
■ ERASE TO END OF LINE 

• ERASE TO END OF SCREEN 

• HOME CURSOR 

• BELL TONE CHARACTER 

• HOME CURSOR & CLEAR SCREEN 

• REQUIRES ONLY 2K OF RAM 

• COMPATIBLE WITH ALL TAPE & 

DISK SYSTEMS 

$19.95 



INTRODUCING 

TEXTPRO III 

The Professionals" Word Processing System 



• 9 Hi-Resolution Display Formats: from 
28 to 255 Columns by 24 lines 

• True Upper /Lower Case Display 

• Three Programmable Headers 

• Programmable Footer 

• Automatic Footnote System 

• Automatic Memory Sense 16-64K 

• Up to 48K of Workspace on 64K 

• 10 Programmable Tab Stops 

• 7 Tab Function Commands 

• Automatic Justification 

• On Screen Underlining and Double 
Size Characters 

• Change Formatting at Any Time 

• Edit Files Larger Than Memory 

• Compatible with All Printers 

• Easily Imbed Any Number of Format 
and Control Codes 

• Typist Friendly Line and Command 
Format Entry 

• Automatic Key Repeat 

TEXTPRO III is the most advanced Text Editing and 
Word Processing System available for the Color Com- 
puter. One of the reasons for this is, Textpro works in a 
totally different way than the other Color Computer 
Word Processing programs. It uses simple 2 character 
abbreviations of words or phrases for commands. These 
commands are used at the beginning of a line and are 
preceeded by a period. Several commands can be 
chained together on the same line for ease of use. Thru 
these commands you tell the Word Processor how you 
want the margins set, line length, indenting information, 
and so on. You can change the way you want a docu- 
ment formatted at any point in the document. You also 
have the freedom to write without worrying about how 
long the line is or where the margins are and so on. The 
Word Processor automatically takes words from one line 
to the next and fills out the printed line to the desired 
length. You can even use the command to Input Text 
from the Keyboard while a document is being processed, 
and use that information to change the formatting or 
enter any other valid text Processor command. With this 
kind of flexibility and an extensive set of commands and 
functions available, its no wonder that TEXTPRO III is 
the most advanced Word Processing System. 



5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 891 10 



Screen Formatting 

Textpro III has 9 Hi-Resolution Upper /Lower case 
display formats available, from 28 to 255 characters per 
line by 24 lines.. You also have advanced screen com- 
mands such as double size characters and on screen 
underlining. You can also use the standard 32 by 16 
display for systems having lower case hardware kits in- 
stalled. The display defaults to a 51 by 24 format that is 
easily switched to any other format available. Along with 
the Hi-Resolution screen we added automatic repeating 
keys Typomatic*." The rate is fully adjustable from ultra 
fast to super slow or can be turned off entirely for your 
convenience. 

64K Support 

Textpro III fully supports the use of 64K on the Color 
Computer. It has fast automatic memory sensing and 
configures itself accordingly. Textpro HI does not require 
Extended Basic or Flex to take full advantage of a 64K 
RAM system. On a 64 K Disk System there is over 64K of 
workspace available and files larger than memory are 
fully supported. Tape based systems have up to 48K 
available for workspace. 

Text Editor 

Textpro III has a full featured, line oriented screen editor. 
It supports single or multiple line copy and move, global 
or local search and replace of any character string, 
character insert and delete, block delete, adjustable 
speed automatic key repeat, single and automatic line 
edit, programmable underline and double width control 
coded, change screen background color and line 
lengths, automatic line numbering, line resequences 
and insert and delete line numbers. 

Disk A Tape I/O 

Textpro III uses fully compatible ASCII formatted files 
that do not have to be convened like some of the other 
Word Processing Systems. It will load, save and verify 
basic ASCII formatted tape files. The disk version sup- 
ports Load, Save, Directory, Kill, Append, Text Process 
file from Disk, Roll part of file to disk and get next portion 
of file from disk. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49.95 



r 




(702) 452-0632 



Standard Command* 

Textpro (II features a whole host of Document Format- 
ting commands. The setup command section includes: 
Line Length, Top, Left, and Bottom Margins, Page 
Length, Page Numbering on /off and Automatic Word 
Fill and Justification on /off. 

Some of the vertical control features include: test for 
number of lines left on the page, skip to next page, set 
page number, wait at top of page, single and multi line 
spacing, and skip blank lines. 

Textpro III features 3 programmable header lines that 
can be centered, left or right justified. It also has one pro- 
grammable footer line. 3 commands for continues, 
single and paragraph indenting, center text, underline 
and double width print commands. 

Footnote* and Special Command* 

Some of the special features allow imbedded control 
codes to access intelligent printer features like; 
superscript, subscript, change type font and even 
graphics. You can even imbed control codes within 
justified text. There is a command that automatically 
places footnotes at the bottom of the page, which can be 
very handy for term papers, etc. Another command 
allows you to display a message on the -screen and input 
text from the keyboard. This text is then printed as if it 
has been part of the original text, thus you can produce 
things like a personalized form letter. There is also a 
repeat command that allows you to repeat an entire 
document or a part of one as many times as needed up to 
255 times. This can be used to produce mailing labels or 
combined with the previous command to produce a 
selected number of personalized form letters. 

Tab Function* 

Textpro HI features an elaborate system of tab com- 
mands for complete control over column formatting. 
There are 10 programmable tab stops that can be de- 
fined or re-defined at any time in the text file. They can be 
used with the following tab commands; Center Over Tab 
Column, Right Justify to Tab Column, Decimal Align 
Over Tab Column, Left Justify to Tab Column (Normal 
Tab) and Horizontal Tab. Tab functions may also be 
used with a numeric tab column position for maximum 
flexibility. You can also define the Tab Fill Character to 
any printable character to fill in the blanks with dots, 
dashes, etc. 



All Orders Shipped From stock 
Add S2.50 Postage 



IP 



3 




RADIO SHACK is responding in a big 
way to third-party vendors who support 
theTRS-80 line of computers, including 
our favorite, the CoCo, They are spon- 
soring a series of "Personal Computer 
Showcases" in five cities, featuring ex- 
hibits by the major software producers, 
as well as manufacturers of monitors, 
printers and disk drives. Notable indus- 
try leaders will deliver keynote addresses 
and selected vendors will be conducting 
seminars. 

Each of the Showcases will begin at 
9 a.m. and continue through 7 p.m. The 
dates and location sites are: 

• Albert Thomas Hall Sept. 18-19 
Houston, TX 

• Merchandising Mart Sept. 25-26 
Atlanta, GA 

• Los Angeles Airport Hilton Oct. 3-4 
Los Angeles, CA 

• Madison Square Garden Oct. 17-18 
Rotunda 

New York, NY 

• Merchandising Mart Oct. 23-24 
Expo Center 

Chicago, IL 

As you might guess, THE RAINBOW 
will be represented , making friends with 
new CoCo owners and introducing them 
to the best source of information and 
programs for their computers on the 
market. 

Vendors will not be permitted to sell 
products at the Showcases, so it should 
be an ideal opportunity to go compari- 
son shopping for future purchases. And 
best of all, free tickets will be made 
available at Radio Shack Computer 
Centers in the Showcase areas. 



PACKING THEIR BAGS. Softlaw 
Corporation, currently headquartered 
in Minneapolis, Minn., is moving its 
entire operation to the sunny, beautiful 
Santa Barbara, Calif, area. Softlaw will 
now be operating from the "Silicon 
Beach" town of Goleta, continuing to 
develop software for TRS-80 and other 
computers. 

Softlaw Corporation's new address is 
132 Aero Camino, Goleta, CA 93117. 
Their WATS order line number, 1-800- 
328-2737, will remain the same. The 
customer service number for order stat- 
us and software questions, however, has 
been changed to 1-805-968-4364. 



THE UBIQUITOUS BOB ROSEN. 

New York, California and now Illinois. 
Spectrum Projects President Bob Rosen 
has announced that the official midwest 
distributor for the entire Spectrum line 
is Midwest Spectrum, P.O. Box 348380, 
Chicago, 1L 60634. No bulletin board 
— yet — but you can reach them at 
(312) 736-4405. 



CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN. Holmes 
& Company, Inc. has announced that 
they will now sell disks to individuals at 
the same price previously offered only 
to buyers for clubs and user groups. 
These are the same diskettes that are 
often sold with famous labels at inflated 
prices. They are certified at the factory 
and are covered by a disk-for-disk re- 
placement warranty for five years from 
the date of purchase. 

Also being offered, for those of you 
who are technically minded, is a copy of 
the ANSI standards that their diskettes 
conform to. For $1.50 per copy (it's 20 
pages long), it should prove fascinating 
if you're interested in diskette magnetics. 

Prices for the disks vary, beginning 
with SSDD Ten Paks for $14 and 
DSDDTen Paks for $19.50. Bulk orders 
for 25 and up begin at $1.20 each. For a 
complete price list and order form, write 
to Holmes & Co., 900 Lafayette Street, 
#407, Santa Clara, CA 95050, or call 
(408) 241-1505. 



COLOR AND HARMONY. Jay Hog- 
gins of Harmonycs Co. in Salt Lake 
City, Utah, and Darren Croft of Color 
Connection Software have recently an- 
nounced that they have entered into a 
marketing partnership. Software form- 
erly marketed by Harmonycs will now 
be marketed by Color Connection Soft- 
ware, and all direct inquiries should be 
made to Color Connection Software, 
1060 Buddlea Dr., Sandy, UT 84070. 



A GRAPHIC PRESENTATION. The 

University of Oregon will be holding its 
Third Annual Pacific Northwest Com- 
puter Graphics Conference on October 
29 and 30, 1984, in Eugene, Ore., at the 



Hult Center for the Performing Arts 
and Conference Center/ Hilton com- 
plex. The purpose of the two-day event 
is to provide a multi-disciplinary view of 
leading edge computer graphics appli- 
cations. 

This year's program features six gen- 
eral session presentations, a trade expo- 
sition, a non-commercial exhibit of 
computer graphics works, and a Mon- 
day evening film and video show. In 
addition, this year's agenda will include 
90-minute workshops focusing on ap- 
plications specific to various fields and a 
"microcomputing lab" for hands-on 
demonstrations. 

Special rates are available for meals 
and accommodations and discounts are 
available for early conference registra- 
tion. For a full list of fees and informa- 
tion on the general sessions, contact: 
Conference Manager, University of 
Oregon Continuation Center, Room 
333 Oregon Hall, Eugene, OR 97403; 
phone (503) 686-4231. 



TV BREAK. After finally purchasing a 
color monitor for your CoCo, didn't 
you feel that for that much money, you 
should be able to receive a television 
signal? Well, with the new television 
tuner being offered by the TAXAN 
Corporation, when you get tired of pro- 
gramming, you can just switch over to 
Late Night with David Letterman for a 
break. The Model 305 television tuner 
will convert any brand of composite 
monitor with audio capability into a tele- 
vision. And, because of the higher CRT 
quality in monitors, the picture should 
be much clearer than on most regular 
televisions. 

The unit is currently priced at $ 1 29.95. 
For further information, write to 
TAXAN Corporation, 18005 Cortney 
Court, City of Industry, CA 91748, or 
call (818)810-1291. 



MOVING ON UP. The Software Con- 
nection of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., has 
announced that it is moving to a new 
location with a greatly expanded show- 
room for their products. They now fea- 
ture more than 1,000 square feet of 
space dedicated solely to Color Com- 
puter software and peripherals. 

So if you've been looking for them 
and thought they had disappeared, 
search no longer. Their new address is 
4301 North State Road 7, Lauderdale 
Lakes, FL 33319; (305) 484-7547. 



136 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



THE COCO OPERATING SYSTEM 



FEATURES and COMMANDS - 


RS DOS 


SPECTRUMDOS 


Auto Disk Search - All drives file search 


NO 


YES 


MEMO - Full screen editor and screen dump 


NO 


YES 


AUTO - Automatically adds line numbers 


NO 


YES 


HIRES - Choice of 32, 51 or 64 characters 


NO 


YES 


ON ERROR GOTO - Traps all errors 


NO 


YES 


RUNM - Load & exec ML files instantly 


NO 


YES 


ECHO - Output to screen and printer 


NO 


YES 


Any type of drive can be added 


NO 


YES 



SEE AUG 'B4 RAINBOW REVIEW 



S4K DISK $49.95 




WEST DIVISION 

pa eox sees 

SAN JOSE, CA 951S7-OB66 
4DS-243-4558 



EAST DIVISION 
PO BOX S1S7S 
WOODHAVEN, NY 114S1 
71B-441-aSG7 



ALL ORDERS PLUS S3-0Q SHIPPING - NY RESIDENTS 



LIS TAX 



SPECIAL EDITION 



The Rainbow Book 
and 

Tape of Adventures 

$14,95 $3 S/H Sales Tax_ 

— — - ff* » ■ 9 



ANNOUNCING 
OUR NEW MID-WE 
DISTRIBUTOR ! 




PO BOX 3483BO 
CHICAGO, IL 60634 
31S-736-4405 

ALL ORDERS PLUS $3.00 S/H 
ILLINOIS RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 
COLORFUL COMPUTING 



SPREADSHEET 

ihii iw iiniini— 



Competition DYNACALC 
Screen 32X16 51X24 

Precision 9 digits 16 digits 
Hi-Res Graphics NO YES 
t/isicalc crad format NO YES 
DYNACALC now runs on CoCo DOS! 
New low price! 64K Disk $79.95 
(see Sept *B4 Rainbow Review) 



il H Ill WIIIIIIHIHIIIIHIII 

DISK DRIVES 

aiiiiiHiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiniiiini— 



DRIVE J3 System - 40 trks, Gold 
Platted Connectors - $299.95 
AWDEK System - B24K Bytes with 
3" Disk Cartridge - $499.00 
DISK CONTROLLER - $139.95 
(Systems include controller) 
DISK Drive 1, 2 or 3 - $169.95 
Single Drive PS & CASE - $59.95 



aimnni iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin m i 



UTILITIES (DISK) 
P iiwiiii iiiinnnfflnnnn 

1. CoCo Calligrapher ...$29.95 

2. FHL Q-PAK ..$34.95 

3. Super Forth ..$39.95 

4. Super Screen Machine .$49.95 

5. QS-9 $69.95 

6. FHL Flex $69.95 

7. DEFT Pascal $79.95 

8. Nicroliiorks mACR0-B0C.$99.95 



DATA BASE MANAGER 



SAVE $50 ! 





PRO-COLOR FILE "Enhanced" - 60 
Data Fields, 8 Report Formats, 
1020 bytes/record, Sorts 3 
Fields, 4 Screen Formats, 
Duplicate Records and Fields, 
Global Search - Disk $79.95 
(see June f 83 Rainbow Review) 




GAME CONTROLLERS 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii — 



WICQ Command Adaptor - Hookup 
2 Atari type joysticks- $19.95 
With 2 Atari joysticks- $39.95 
MACH II Joystick - Beats the 
competition! 360 Degree control 
with spring or positive true 
positioning and electrical trim 
adjustment on both axes- $39.95 



IS 



IS 




^JEW PRODUCTS 



- . ^jaiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiii iniiimiiiii 



POKES & PEEKS Manual $7.95 

YELLOW Mail Labels (1K) .$14.95 
CoCo 40Pin Project Board. $19.95 
Disk Drive Cleaning Kit .$24.95 
6 Outlet Surge Protector $59.95 

CoCo Koala Pad $99.95 

Bare Disk Drive $129.00 

64K to 12BK Upgrade ....$149.95 




WEST 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS PACT 
PO BOX 9866 PO BOX 21272 LHo I 

SAN JOSE, CA 95157-0866 WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 



ALL ORDERS PLUS $3.00 SHIPPING - NY RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 
COLORFUL COMPUTING 



m 



COMMUNICATION 



CQLQRCQM/E - A complete smart 
terminal package! Upload, 
Download, Hi-Res (51X24) 
screen, 300/1200 Baud, Offline 
Printing and much more. Rompak 
or Disk - $49.95 
(see Feb f 84 Rainbow Review) 



1 




WORD PROCESSING 



1 



a] 



TELEWRITER-64 - Top CoCo Word 
Processor for 2 years! Three 
Hi-Res screens, true lowercase 
characters, right justifica- 
tion, full screen editor. 
Tape $49.95 Disk $59.95 
(see June '83 Rainbow Review) 




MODEMS 



fim urn nnnnnnnnM 



m 



MI N I - MODEM - 300 Baud, 
Originate/Answer, Full Duplex, 
Direct Connect - $79.95 
J - C A T Modern - Lowest priced 
auto/ answer modem - $129.95 
HAYES Auto Dial/Answer $239.95 
ANCHOR - 300 /1200 Baud $299.95 
Prices include Modem cable. 



KEYBOARDS 



SUPER-PRO (Mark Data) $59.95 
PREMIUM (Micronix) $69.95* 
HJL57 PROFESSIONAL $79.95* 
KEYTRQNIC5 Keyboard - $89.95* 
* - Includes free software for 
function keys. Specify Model/ 
Revision Board. Computers made 
after OCT 1 82 please add $5. 



m 




PRINTERS 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Minimi 




GEMINI 10X* - 120 cps, 9X9 dot 
tractor/ friction feed $299.95 
EPSON RX-80 * - Faster than the 
MX-80 plus Graftrax! - $349.95 
* Parallel interface required. 
PBH Parallel Interface - Save 
$40 ±L ordered with above 
printers ! - $49.95 (Reg. $89. 95) 



ail mmim » hi i ira 



MONITORS 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiininniTiB 



MONOCHROME Monitors - 80X24 
screens plus Hi-Res w/AUDIO! 
Green - $99.95 Amber - $119.95 
BMC Color monitor - $269.95 
VIDEO PLUS - Video Interface 
for above monitors - $24.95 
CoCo II (nonochrome) - $29.95 
CoCo II (Color) Version - $39.95 



n 




SAVE $10 



OFF COLORCOM/E WITH ANY MODEM 

OFF TELEWRITER-64 WITH ANY PRINTER, 
KEYBOARD OR MONITOR 



SAVE $10 



ORDER PHONE LINES : 718-441-2807 & 408-243-4558 



Pacify 

I OR I 

Not To Pac k 

That's An Easy Question 

. 

By Burt Witham, Jr. 



Just a few days ago, I was taken to task for using packed 
lines in my programming for publication. I was told 
that I should use Pretty Print or Neat Print, or some 
such program, in order to make the program more readable, 
that is necessary for novice programmers. 

Well, I differ greatly with this position. It is often said by 
authors and editors that their programs should be a learning 
experience. The problem is that many programs teach poor 
programming techniques. One of these is the spreading out 
of lines for ease of reading. The novice doesn't realize that 
this is a convenience and actually programs in this manner, 
even when writing new programs of his own. 

Let's just look at the memory requirements for a few 
examples: 

I0CLS 

20 PRINT@129,"TEST" 
30 FORT=I T0999 
40 NEXTT 

Takes 44 bytes. 

1 0 C LS: P R I NT@ 1 29 "TEST": FO RT= 1 T0999: N EXTT 

Takes 34 bytes. 

10 CLS:PRINT @ 129, "TEST": FOR T=l TO 999: 
NEXTT 

Even this multiple command line (and not an uncommon 
way to print a program in computer magazines), is wasteful 
of memory at 38 bytes. 

Every line number takes four bytes, so combining lines 
can save a considerable amount of RAM in a program. 
Thus, line packing serves a very useful purpose and often 
can drop enough bytes to slip a program back into the next 
gran of a disk and thus save another gran of 2304 bytes! One 
of the beautiful things about CoCo is the ability to program 

(Burt Witham, a retired U.S. Navy captain, has pub- 
lished several programs for amateur radio operators in 
THE rainbow. He holds FCC call sign W4CN2. He 
also owns Burwith Computer Service Inc., specializing 
in software development for hams and small busi- 
nesses.) 

140 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



using multiple command lines. Only one command to a line 
is permitted on many other computers. 

This may seem like a simple matter and of little impor- 
tance in a short program, but proper techniques are impor- 
tant in short, as well as long, programs. Also, as a teaching 
technique, I think it is important to have the correct 
methods shown in a published program. Recently I had a 
novice user tell me that a 14K program he had typed in for 
his 16KCoCowould notrun. He kept getting an OM Error. 
His printout looked like this: 

10 CLS 

:CLEAR 500 
:DIM A$(12) 

You say, what's wrong with that? Line packing is used. Ah 
yes, but look carefully at the line. The novice typed it in just 
as it was presented ... all the spaces included. It turned out 
looking like this to the computer: 

10 CLS :CLEAR500 
:DIM A$(12) 

No wonder that he ran out of memory. But, he was merely 
doing what he thought was right and was misled by the 
method of program presentation. Therefore, if the printed 
program is to use a "neat print" technique, be certain to 
explain completely that this is for convenience of copying 
only. Also, be certain to explain that spaces between com- 
mands in the same line are used for clarity and should be 
removed when entering the data. Of course, there are a few 
rules of basic where spaces are required, such as: 

FORX=l TO2000 

IFX=34THENGOSUB1000 ELSEGOTO90 
1FX<2 0R X>9THEN20 

IVe seen many programs completely packed with no spac- 
es, but according to the best information that I have (The 
Little Book Of BASIC Style, by Nevison, Addison Wesley, 
1978), the examples above will run properly with no prob- 
lems and packing these will sometimes bomb a program. 

Extra spaces use processing time. Also, memory is pre- 
cious, use it well and wisely! 

, , 



Special price good with purchase of any Talking Software below! 
Offer expires Nov 15, 1984. All PAKs work w/$29.95 Disk m Y" cable! 




Talking CoCo BINGO - Same as the popular game of BINGO but this one talks! 
Contains 20 Bingo player cards, 200 markers with complete documentation. 
Additional features: Color Graphics, 3 timing levels, ball count and pause 
control plus Disk compatible. 32K EXT $24.95 

Talking Final Countdown - You must stop the mad general from launching a 
missle at the Russians and causing WW III ! Has multiple voices for added 
realism. 32K EXT $24.95 

Educational Software - Computer Island's educational programs turn your CoCo 
into a true teaching machine. Reinforce basic lessions with the aid of voice. 
Three/pak special includes Math Drill, Spelling Tester and Foreign Languages. 
16K EXT $24.95 

Talking Adventure Generator - Create talking adventure games that are 100% 
Machi ne Language and very fast in execution. Up to 99 rooms, 255 objects, 70 
command words and 255 conditional flags. Get a head start in the Rainbow 
Adventure contest NOW! 64K Disk $39.95 

Term Talk - A speaking smart terminal program for your CoCo. It contains all 
the features of an intelligent communications package, plus it talks! (Shades 
of War Games) 16K EXT Tape $39.95 Disk $49.95 (see Mar'84 Rainbow Review) 



All orders plus $3.00 S/H * NY Residents add sales tax 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

WEST DIVISION : EAST DIVISION : 

PO BOX 9866 PO BOX 21272 

SAN JOSE, CA 95157-0866 WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 

ORDER HOT LINES : 408-243-4558 & 718-441-2807 




COLORFUL UTILITIES 

****************** * * * * * * * *********** 

"SPECTRUM DOS - Add 24 NEW Disk cmtfs With 2 Hi-Res screens! Supports SS/DS drives, 
35-80 Trks, 6ms. -30ms. step rates w/auto disk search. Set hew cursor, auto line numbers, 
one key screen dump & EPROMABLE ! 64K DISK $49.95 (see Aug >84 Rainbow Review) 



MULT1-PAK CRAK - Save ROMPAKs tcx your 64K Disk system using the ftS Mu!ti-Pak 
Interface. Eliminate constant plugging in of ROMPAKs now by keeping all your PAK 
software on disk. Includes POKEs for "PROBLEM" R&MPAKs. DISK $24.95 



TAPE OMNI CLONE - Easily handles programs with auto loaders, no headers, no EOF 
markers, unusual size blocks and more! Now is the time get your tape software 
collection protected ... against loss!!! TAPE $24.95 



DISK OMNI CLONE - Back everything up! This amazing program handles *non standard" 
disks with ease. We haven't found any disk yet that it can't handle. Don't evei* be caught 
hout a backup again! Lowest price too! 32K DISK $29.95 




D SCREEN DUMP - The best screen dump program for the Epson & Gemini printers 
ever! Have the option of standard or reverse images w/regular or double sized pictures. 
9600 3aud too! A must for Graphicom and Bjork Block users. 16K TAPE/DISK $19.95 




ISK UTILITY 2.1 - A ffiMti-teatur^d tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a 
directory window to selectively sort, move, rename and kill file entries. Lightning fast 
Disk I/O for format, copy and backup, Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, plus 
the size, load addresses and entry points of all programs. Single command execution of 
both Basic and ML programs. 32K/64K Disk $24.95 (see review this issue) 



MASTER DESIGN - A text designer/editor to generate graphics mode lettering with 
multiple font sizes, textures, shadowing and thicknesses, plus special patterns for 
creative backgrounds. Comes with a screen print routine and Letter Ftead Utility that 
interfaces with Telewriter-64 and BASIC. DISK $34.95 (see July '84 Rainbow Review) 



BASIC COMPILER - Convert BASIC pgms into machine language. Produce faster and more 
compact code than BASIC Integer compiler w/16K~64K versions included. TAPS $39.95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING ~ Save time and design pro looking diagrams using a 480X540 pixel 
worksheet w/6 viewing windows. Over 30 electronic symbols w/10 definable symbols. Print 
hard copy and save to disk. 64K DISK $49.95 (see Jan '84 Rainbow Review) 



COLORAMA - A first-class Bulletin Board package... especially geared towards CoCo 
users... has an ordering section f Oti tho^e whoi want to run a mMl^order business*! 
supports Color Graphics*** one nice piece of work. 64K DISK $99.95 July -84 Rainbow 



MASTER MAIL - Easy to use... Handles 1000 addresses /single disk... FORM LETTER 
produces multiple letters*.. For serious applications. 32K DISK $49.95 Jan '84 Rainbow 

\ ICW €3T ccsr 

Dealer/Club inquiries invited 
Software submissions welcomed 



IN CANADA CALL 

"oL"Fpii5iF" 

800-361-5155 



COLORFUL UTILITIES 

it*********************************** 



AST DUPE H - The fastest Disk copier ever! Will format and backup a diskette in only 
one pass and can make up to 4 Disk copies at once in 2 minutes! The must utility for 
every Disk owner. 32K/64K DISK $19.95 (see May *84 Rainbow Review) 




HIDDEN BASIC - Protect your BASIC programs. Mask your code so CLOAD, CSAVE, LIST, 
EDIT, DEL and LLIST will not function. TAPE $19.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 



64 COL MOD I/III EMULATOR - Give CoCo a 64X16 screen. Run Model I/III graphics code 
without retyping the BASIC statements. 64K DISK $19.95 (see May '84 Rainbow Review) 



64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE - Take advantage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an 
additional 8K of RAM available. Copy ROM cartridges to disk and create a 32K SPOOL 
buffer for printing. DISK $21.95 (see July '83 Rainbow Review) 



TAPE/DISK UTILITY - A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape 
automatically. Does an automatic copy of an entire disk of programs to tape. Ideal for 
Rainbow On Tape to disk. TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept '83 Rainbow Review) 



FAST TAPE - Save and load cassette files at twice the speed! Now you can run tape 
and printer I/O operations in the high speed mode without a locked up system or I/O 
ERRORS! "If you are tired of waiting for those long tapes to load, I strongly recommend 
that you buy this fine utility.* TAPE $21.95 July f 83 Rainbow 



QRAPHICQM - The ultimate CoGo graphics development tool with sophisticated editing, 
preview animation, telecommunications and printer support. Hi -Res graphics for only 
$24.95. W/Spectrum's Menu Foot Switch $3495. 64K DISK (see April f 84 Rainbow Review) 



EZ BASE - A truly user friendly data base program at art affordable price. Maintain 
inventories, hobby collections, recipes, greeting card lists and much, much more! Hi-Res 
screen, up to 500 records with 15 fields^ record or field search, and a Mailing Labels 
option. 32K DIS024*95 (see July '84 Rainbow Review) 



BLACKJACK ROYALE . A Hi -Res graphics casino blackjack simulation an4 card counting 
tutor. Fully realistic play includes: double down, splits, surrender, insurance bets, 1-8 
decks, burnt c^rds, shuffle frequency and more! "This fine program is a must for the 
CoCo Blackjack player." (Aug f 83 Rainbow Review) 32K TAPE7EKSK $24.95 



SHIPPING S3.QO - NY RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

WEST DIVISION EAST DIVISION 

PO BOX 9866 PO BOX 21272 

SAN JOSE, CA 95157-0866 WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 

4D8-843-4SSB 718-441-2807 



RAINBOW Info 



How To Read Rainbow 

Please note that all the BASIC 
program listings you will find in the 
Rainbow are formatted for a 32- 
character screen — so they will show up 
just as they do on your CoCo screen. 
One easy way to check on the accuracy 
of your typing is to compare what 
character "goes under" what. If the 
characters match — and your line 
endings come out the same — you have 
a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But, do read the text before you start 
typing. 

Finally, the little cassette symbol on 
listings indicates that program is 
available through our Rainbow On Tape 
service. An order form for this service is 
on the insert card bound in the 
magazine. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Seal 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our 
way of helping you, the consumer. The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product which carries the Seal 
has been physically seen by us and that 
it does, indeed, exist. 

Manufacturers of products — 
hardware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their 
products to the Rainbow for 
certification. We ascertain that their 
products are, in actuality, what they 
purport to be and, upon such 
determination, award a Seal. This lets 
you know that we have seen the product 
and that it does, indeed, exist. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction." The certification 
process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read 
our reviews to determine whether the 
product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the Rainbow and 
the certification process. Certification is 
open and available to any product 
pertaining to CoCo. A Seal will be 
awarded to any commercial product, 
regardless of whether the firm 
advertises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of 
instances of violation of Seal use. 



Using Machine Language 

Machine Language programs are one 
of the features of the Rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these 
programs into memory so that you can 
operate them. 

The easiest way is by using an Editor- 
Assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor-assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into your CoCo and 
then have the editor-assembler 
assemblethem into specific instructions 
that are understood by the 6809 chip 
that controls your computer. 

When you use an editor-assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the Rainbow's 
listing into CoCo. 

Another method of getting an 
assembly language listing into CoCo is 
called "hand assembly." As the name 
implies, you do the assembly by hand. 
This can sometimes cause problems 
when you have to set up an ORIGIN 
statement or an EQUATE. In short, you 
have to know something about 
assembly to hand assemble some 
programs. 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS:";HEX$(I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE l,VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 1=1+1 :GOTO 20 

Th is program assumes you have a 1 6K 
CoCo. If you have 32K, change the 
&H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00. 



What's A CoCo 

CoCo is an affectionate name which 
was first given to the TRS-80 Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. As such, it is almost a generic 
term for three computers, all of which 
are very much alike. 

When we use the term CoCo, we refer 
to the TRS-80 Color Computer, the TDP 
System-100 Computer and the Dragon- 
32 Computer. It is easier than using the 
three "given" names throughout the 
Rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific 
computer is mentioned, the application 
is for that specific computer. However, 
since the TDP System-100 and TRS-80 
Color are, for all purposes, the same 
computer in a different case, these terms 
are almost always interchangable. 



Rainbow Check PLUS 

The small boxes that you see accom- 
panying programs in the Rainbow 
"Check system," which is designed to 
help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS will count the 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the num- 
bers you get to those printed in the 
Rainbow. On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given. When you 
reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in 
the program and CSAVE it for later use, 
then type in the command RUN and 
press [ENTER]. Once the program has 
run, type NEW [ENTER] to remove it 
from the area where the program you're 
typing in will go. 

Now, whenever you press the down 
arrow key, your CoCo will give you a 
checksum based on the length and con- 
tent of the program in memory. This is to 
check against the numbers printed in 
the Rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure that 
you typed in the correct basic program 
code. For more details on this helpful 
utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
page 21 of the February 1984 Rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
in the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEK(35)+178 

20 CLEAR25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEK(35)+178 

40 FOR Z-X TOX+77 

50 READ Y:W-W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

60 POKEZ,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THEN80ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERROR":STOP 
80 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182,1,106,167,140,60,134 
100 DATA 126,183,1,106,190,1,107 
110 DATA 175,140,50,48,140,4,191 
120 DATA 1,107,57,129,10,38,38 
130 DATA 52,22,79,158,25,230,129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171,128,171,128 
150 DATA 230,132,38,250,48,1,32 
160 DATA 240,183,2,222,48,140,14 
170 DATA 159,166,166,132,28,254 
180 DATA 189,173,198,53,22,126,0 
190 DATA 0,135,255,134,40,55 
200 DATA 51,52,41,0 



144 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



A CHIP OFF THE OLD.. 



COCO CABLES AND.. 



6821 Standard PIA $9.95 

6822 Industrial Grade PIA $14.95 

MC1372 CoCo Video Driver Chip $14.95 

6847 VDG Chip $17.95 

68764 (Fits Ext Basic Skt) Eprom .$24.95 
16K-32K-64K RAM Checker (ROMPAK) .$24.95 

6883 SAM Chip w/heat sink $29.95 

6809 E CPU Chip $29.95 

Basic ROM 1.2 Chip (30Z FASTER) ..$39.95 
Disk ROM 1.1 (New DOS Command) ..$39.95 



Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $49.95 
CoCo First Aid Kit (Be Prepared) 

(2 PIA^ 6809E & 6883) $69.95 

Intronics Eprom Programmer- 15 seconds 
for a 68764 ! All popular EPROM' s $139.95 



Four Pin Male to F our Pin Female 
Extension- 15 feet. Move your printer or 

modem to another location $14.95 

Tired of plugging and unplugging devices 
from the RS232 port? Make your life 
easier. Try our RS232 "Y" cable ..$19.95 

Joystick/light Pen Extender $19.95 

Disk Interface/Rom Pak Extender - Move 
your disks and ROM Paks where you want 
them. Go! d platted connectors. (3 feet) 

Note - NOT for use w/Multipak $29.95 

Triple RS232 Switcher - Now select one 
of any three RS232 peripherals ...$29.95 
40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk 
w/Voice or Word Pak, X-Pad. etc ..$29.95 



COCO LIBRARY... 

Color Computer Tech Manual $7.95 

IJl£ Worl_d Connection - All about 
Bulletin Boards, Modems ~& Sysops ..$9.95 

CoCo Memory Map $12.00 

CoCo Secrets Revealed $14.95 

The FACTS - Inside "guts" of CoCo $14.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide $18.95 

Disk Basic (1.0/1.1) Unraveled ...$19.95 

CoCoINDX - 1800 CoCo articles $19.95 

New! CoCo II Service Manual $19,95 

MORE GOOD STUFF... 

CoCo Light Pen w/6 programs $24.95 

16K DOS Card - Plugs into J&M controller 
and allows you to map an extra 8K Eprom 
above DOS. Great for utilities. ..$24.95 
CoCo Voice Chip - Votrax SCO! A ...$34.95 
PBH Parallel Interface - Beats Botek i 
300-9600 baud w/ptr-modem switch .$69.95 
The Spectrum Switcher - Have your Disk & 
Cartridge too! Dual Slot System $69.95 

Disk Interface w/1.1 ROM $139.95 

PBJ WORD-PAK 80X24 Video Board ..$139.95 
CoCo 10 Meg Hard Disk System ...$1495.00 

ALL ORDERS PLUS $3.00 S/H 



OTHER GOOD STUFF... 



C-10 tapes in any quantity 49 cents 

5 1/4 Diskettes in any quantity ...$1.99 
Joystick, Cassette or Serial plug .$3.99 

32K or 64K RAM Button $4.99 

GEMINI 10X/OKIDATA Ribbon $4.99 

Amdek 3" diskettes in any quantity. $5. 99 

Epson MX/RX 80 Cartridge $6.99 

Rompak w/Blank PC Brd 27xx series .$9.95 
RS Disk Controller Case $9.95 



The Disk Doubler - Doubleside your 5 1/4 
diskettes for 160K more storage ..$14.95 
Video Clear - Cleanup TVI for good $19.95 
The Magic Box - load Mod I/I 1 1 Basic 

program tapes into the CoCo $24.95 

DOS Switcher - Select any DOS (Disk 1.0 
T7T, JD0S) inside J&M controller .$24.95 
CoCo Cooler- State D,E or CoCo II $49.95 
Stereo Hardware Musi c Synthesizer w/3 
hours of (100) four voice songs! .$79.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

EAST DIVISION : 

PO BOX 21272 
WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 

WEST DIVISION : 

PO BOX 9866 

SAN JOSE, CA 95157-0666 



NY RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 718-441-SBQ7 / 408-S43-4558 



146 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



H AIL TO THE CHIEF S 

In Pursuit Of Presidential Trivia 



By Mike Knoihof f 



Once again it's time for that poli- 
tical circus we call a presidential 
election. By now we all know 
who is running for each party, and 
many of us have formed an opinion as 
to whom our next president will be. This 
year marks the 49th time our country 
has had a presidential election. 

Since that first election in 1788, we 
have had 40 different presidents. It is 
easy to remember those presidents 
whose terms of office occurred during 
our lifetimes, but who was our 12th 
president? Do you know who was presi- 
dent in 1 888? To what political party did 
John Tyler belong? Who was the only 
bachelor president? If you do not know 
the answer to these questions and would 
like to have some fun learning about our 
past presidents, Presidents will be of 
interest to you. 

If you have a 32K or 64K CoCo, 
simply type in the program as it is. If 
you have 16K you should refer to Table 
I to delete certain areas of the program. 
You must still PC LEAR 2 before you 
type in or load the modified program 
with 16K. The program does not use the 
speed-up poke, but it does use POKE 
359,60 to allow horizontal scrolling. 
This poke cannot be used on a disk- 
based system. Disk users can either 
unplug your controllers or delete POKE 
159,60 in Lines 20, 100, 120, and 1010 
and delete POKE 159,126 in Lines 120, 
600, and 1010. 



Instructions for the program are quite 
simple. The program is in quiz game 
format and allows for one to four play- 
ers. After entering the names of the 
players, there will be 12 rounds of ques- 
tions. (This could be modified in Line 
1 15.) If a player answers the question 
correctly he will receive a score of 25 to 
100 points, based on the type of ques- 
tion he answered and a random factor. 
If a player's answer is spelled incorrectly 
but is close, he will get one more chance 
to correctly spell his answer. 

When a player correctly answers three 
questions in a row, he will enter the 
bonus round. With 16K the player will 
simply score a random number of points 
between 50 and 100. With 32K the 
player goes to a special bonus screen. 
There he must correctly answer a presi- 
dential trivia question worth from 100 
to 200 points. No spelling mistakes are 
allowed on the bonus questions, so be 
careful typing in answers here. After the 
12 rounds of questions are completed, 
the final scores are recapped and the 
high score, whether a new score or a 
previous score, will be displayed. 



(Mike Knolhoff is a science teach- 
er who enjoys writing educational 
programs for his students and 
family. He resides in Sterling, III 
with his wife, Sharon, and their 
three children.) 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 147 



NEW 



MUSICA 2™ 



Join our MUSICA 
USER'S GROUP 



The best just got better. 

• Dump music to any dot matrix graphics printer. (Epson, 
Okidata, Gemini, 10X, R.S. printers, etc.) 

• Repeat any portion of music using repeat bars. 

• 4 Voices produced simultaneously. 

• Input notes from the keyboard or joystick. 

• Develop your own timbres by specifying 9 harmonics. 

• Change tempo at any point in the music any number of times. 

• Save or load music from tape or disk. 

• Music may be played from BASIC. 

• Music produced in stereo when used with the STEREO PAK. 

• 100% machine code so it is fast, no wait times. 

• Volume of each of the voices may be specified separately. 

• Available memory is constantly shown on screen. 

• Vibrato effect possible. 

• Waveshapes may be switched as the music plays. 

• A 30 page manual completely describes its operation. 

• Powerful music editing capabilities. 

• Double bar repeat, block move and title lines supported. 

Tape (32K) $34.95 Disk (32K) $39.95 




WESSk 



1 



NEW 



STEREO PAK 



Plug this gem into your computer, connect to your home stereo 
system and sit back and enjoy music realism. The STEREO PAK 
is a hardware music synthesizerthat playsour MUSIC LIBRARY 
and MUSICA 2 music in stereo. Because it was designed 
specifically with music reproduction in mind, the sound is 
superb. The highs are crisp and clear while the bass notes will 
rattle your walls. 

The STEREO PAK is all hardware. It is intended as an 
enhancement for MUSICA 2 and our MUSIC LIBRARY. Disk 
owners may use the STEREO PAK with the R.S. Multi-Pak or our 
Y-CABLE. ($29.95). 




NEW! 



MUSIC LIBRARY™ 100 



You get over 100 four voice songs with acombined playing time 
of 3 hours. That's right, 3 hours of music. You won't believe your 
CoCo could sound so good. To fit over 1 00 songs required both 
sides of 5 C-20 tapes and the disk version uses 5 full disks (that's 
a half box of disks). 

A JUKEBOX selection program is included to allow you to select 
specific songs or automatically play each. These songs are 
ready to go, you don't need MUSICA 2 ora knowledge of music. 

These songs were developed using the best music program 
available for the CoCo; MUSICA 2. The tunes may be used as 
source files for MUSICA 2 and changed by the user. When 
coupled with the STEREO PAK the songs are reproduced in 
stereo with unsurpassed realism. 



MUSIC LIBRARY 100 categories: 



Stage, Screen, and TV 
Music of the 70's 
Music of the 60 s 
Music of the 50*s 
Old Time Favorites 



Classical 
Christmas (popular) 
Christmas (traditional) 
Patriotic 
Polka Party 



MUSIC LIBRARY 200 

Our second set of 100 tunes, 3 1 /2 hours of music. 
MUSIC LIBRARY 300 

Our third set of 100 tunes, 3 more hours of music. 



MUSIC LIBRARY (AH Versions) 



(32K Tape) $34.95 

(32K Disk) $39.95 



see us at It PRINCETON 



t 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



If your dealer doesn't stock our 
products, ask for them. 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA, and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6 1 /4% sales tax for the STEREO PAK. 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (VOICE) 
(312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY, ANYTIME TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 
WE SHIP FROM STOCK WITHIN 48 HOURS. 



Playing Presidents is quite entertain- 
ing, and you'll be surprised at how much 
you can learn about our past presidents 
as you play it. One more thing. . .don't 
forget to update the data after Nov. 6th. 



V/ 




1330 . . 


.. 188 


100... 


32 


2090 .. 


...89 


200 


.... 1 


2228 .. 


254 


400... 


10 


2268 .. 


.. 114 


550. ... 


111 


2310 .. 


.. 249 


800... 


165 


2324 .. 


...74 


900 


19 


2340 


.. 149 


1130 


...84 


END .. 


168 



Table 1 — 16K Modifications 

1) Delete the following data lines: 
2040 -21 10 and 2300-2355 

2) Delete the following lines: 
15, 55, 65, 1010- 1130 

3) Add the following lines: 

1010 BS=RND(50)+49:PRINT@106,"BONUS SCORE"; 

1020 FOR X=ITO BS:PRINT@269,X;:SOUND125+X,l: 
NEXTX 

1030 FOR X=lTO8:PRINT@270," ";:FORK=lTO100: 
NEXTK 

1040PRINT@269,BS;:FORK=lTO200:NEXTK:NEXTX 
1050 S(PL)=S(PL)+BS:RETURN 



The listing: 

0 ' WW**************** 

1 » PRESIDENTS 

2 * BY MIKE KNOLHOFF 

3 ■ STERLING, IL 61081 

4 * DECEMBER 1983 

5 * ****************** 

6 CLS:R=RND< -TIMER) 

10 DIM L*(40) ,F*(40> ,P*<40> ,T*<4 

0) ,ST*<40> ,R*<40> ,TU28> 

15 DIM B*<75> ,BA<75> ,BS<224> 

20 POKE359,60 

25 P 1 *= " 02L255T255V3 1 * 

30 CLS0:PRINTS232, " PRESENTING.. 

II a 
• » 

50 GOSUB600:FORX=1TO128:READT(X> 
: NEXTX 

55 F0RX=1T0224:READBS(X) : NEXTX 
60 FORX=1TO40:READL*(X) ,F*(X> ,R* 
<X> ,P*<X) ,T*(X) ,st*<x> :nextx:gos 
UB750 

65 F0RX=1T075:READB*(X> ,BA<X> :NE 
XTX 

70 FORX=1TO4:S<X)=0: NEXTX 
90 CLS 

100 PRINT: P0KE359, 60: INPUT" HOW 
MANY PLAYERS (LIMIT 4>";P:IFP<1 
OR P>4 OR INT(P)OP THENPR I NT "IN 
VAL I D NUMBER . " : GOTO 1 00 
110 PRINT: FORX=lTO P : PR I NT " NAME 
OF PLAYER" X | : INPUTN* (X) : IF LEN(N 
*(X))>9THEN N*<X>=LEFT*(N*(X> ,9) 
: NEXTX :ELSENEXTX 
115 FOR R0=1T012:F0RPL=1T0 P 
120 POKE 359, 126:CLS:F0RX=1T0128 
:PRINTCHR*(T<X) ) \ I NEXTX : P0KE359, 
60 

130 PRINT6307, "scoreboard"; 

140 PRINTS369,N*<1) : PRINTS379, S < 

1) 

150 IFP>1THENPRINTS401,N*<2> :PRI 



NT@4U,S<2> 

1 60 I FP >2THENPR I NT8433 , N* ( 3 > : PR I 
NT8443,S<3) 

1 70 I FP >3THENPR 1 NTS465 , N» < 4 ) : PR I 
NT8475,S<4) ; 

180 PLAY P1*+"05GT4P8T25503G" 
190 R=RND(40) :Q-RND<6) :ON Q GOTO 
200 , 250 , 300 , 350 , 400 , 450 
200 PRINTei60,N*(PL) ", WHAT IS T 
HE FIRST" :PRINT"NAME OF "L*<R>", 

OUR " R* < R ) : PR I NT " PRES I DENT? " 
210 CA*-F*<R> :GOSUB500 
220 NEXT PL 
230 NEXT RO: GOTO 1200 
250 PRINTei60,N*(PL) ", WHAT IS T 
HE LAST NAME": PR I NT "OF OUR "R*<R 
)" PRES I DENT? " ; 
260 CA*-L*<R) :GOSUB500 
270 NEXT PL 
280 NEXT RO:GOTO1200 
300 PRINT«160,N»(PL) ", WHAT IS T 
HE LAST NAME": PR I NT "OF THE PRES I 
DENT WHOSE TERM OF" : PR I NT "OFF ICE 

WAS "T*<R>"?"| 
310 CA*«L*(R) :GOSUB500 
320 NEXT PL 
330 NEXT RO: GOTO 1200 
350 PRINT6160,N*(PL> ", IN WHICH 
STATE OR": PR I NT "STATE TO BE WAS 
"F*<R> :PRINTL*<R) " BORN?"; 
360 CA*=ST* (R> : GOSUB500 
370 NEXT PL 
380 NEXT RO: GOTO 1200 
400 PRINTei60,N*(PL> ", WHICH PRE 
SIDENT": PRINT" (1-40) WAS "F*<R>" 

"L*<R> "?" 
410 IF R<10 THEN CA*=LEFT* <R* <R> 
, 1 ) ELSE CA*»LEFT* <R* (R> , 2> 
420 6OSUB500 
430 NEXT PL 
440 NEXT RO: GOTO 1200 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 149 



450 PRINT8257, "1 FEDERALIST" I : PR 
INT«289,"2 REPUB/DEMO" I i PRINTS32 

1, "3 WHIG"? :PRINTe353, "4 DEMOCRA 
T " | : PR I NT@385 , " 5 REPUBL I CAN " J 
460 PRINTQ160, N*(PL) ", TO WHAT P 
OL I T I CAL " : PR I NT " PARTY DID "F*(R> 
" " L* ( R ) : PR I NT " BELONG? " $ 

470 CA**P*<R):GOSUB500 

460 NEXT PL 

490 NEXT RO:GOTO1200 

500 IF Q-&THEN LINE INPUT A* ELSE 

PR I NTS256 , " " I : L I NE I NPUT At 
510 I FA*=CA*THENPLAYP 1 *+ " 05CBCBC 
BCBCBCBC" : SP-0: GOTO800 
514 IF Q-5 AND CA»="22" AND A*=" 
24" THEN800 

516 IF Q-5 AND CA*="24" AND A*=" 
22" THEN800 

520 IF Q=50R Q=& THEN950 
525 IF SP-1THEN SP=0:GOTO950 
530 IF LEFT*<CA«,2>=LEFT*<A*,2>0 
R RIGHT* <CA*,2>=RIGHT*<A*,2> THEN 
PR I NTS320 , " CHECK YOUR " i : PR I NTS35 

2 , " SPELL I NG AND " ; : PR I NT6384 , " TRY 
AGAIN. ";: ELSE GOTO950 

540 PLAY P1»+"03":F0RX=1T05:PLAY 
"T4P4T255D" : NEXTX : SP-1 : PRINTS288 
, ""J : LINE I NPUT A* 
550 GOTO510 



600 P0KE359 , 1 26 : PMODE 1,1: PCLS 1 : S 
CREEN0 

620 C0L0R3, l: LINE (29, 15) -(224, 55 
),PSET,BF 

630 C0L0R4 , 1 : FORX-29TO209STEP 1 5 : 
LINE(X,55)-(X+15, 175) ,PSET,B:NEX 
TX 

640 FOR X -35TO220STEP30 : PA I NT ( X , 1 
00) ,4, 4: NEXTX 

650 FORX=50TO205STEP30: PAINT ( X , 1 
00) ,2, 5: NEXTX 

660 C0L0R3, 1: LINE (29, 135) -(128, 1 

75) ,PSET: LINE- (225, 135) ,PSET:LIN 

E(29, 15) -(29, 135) ,PSET: LINE (225, 

15) -(225, 135) ,PSET 

670 PAINT (10, 10), 2, 3: PAINT (10, 10 

),1,3 

680 DRAW " BM3 3 , 25C 1 D20U 1 0R 1 5U 1 0L 1 
5BR20ND20R 1 5D 1 0L 1 5R5F 1 0BR5BU20NR 
1 5D 1 0NR 1 0D 1 0R 1 5BR5BU20NR 1 5D 1 0R 1 5 
D 1 0NL 1 5BR5BU20R8L4D20L4R8BR5BU20 
D20R 1 0E5U 1 0H5L 1 0BR20NR 1 5D 1 0NR 1 0D 
1 0R 1 5BR5BU20ND20D2F 1 5D3U20BR5R7N 
D20R7BR5NR 1 5D 1 0R 1 5D 1 0L 1 5 " 
690 SCREEN 1 , 1 : RETURN 
750 PA*= " V30L2T3O38L4 . AL8B04L2CL 
4 . 03BL8AL4 . GL8AL4. GL8EL2DC" 
760 PB*= " V30T3O3L2GO4L4 . CLGDL2EL 
4. DL8CL4. DL8CL4DEDC03BA " 





■ 


Metric Industries 





For the color computer and TDP100 
Model 101 Interface $54. 95 



Serial to Parallel Interface 
Works with any Centronics Compatible 
Printer including Radio Shack, TDP, 
Gemini, Epson, Gorillia and 
many others 

Six switch selectable baud rates (300 
to9600) * 
90 day warranty 
Power Supply included 



Model 102 RS-232-C Switcher 

• Switches all three data lines $35^** 

• Indicator lights let you know computer 
is on 

• 3 position switch has silver plated 
contacts for high reliability 

• Color coded lights indicate switch 
position 

• Color coded labels for your printer, 
modem etc., supplied - 

Cassette Label Program $6. 95 

• Prints five lines of information on pin 
feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven — easy to use 





• Uses special features of your printer for 
standard, expanded and condensed 

, characters 

• 24 free labels included with program 

• Auto centering features for each line of 
text 

• 16K ECB required 

General Items 

• Gemini 10X Printer $319.00 

• Special Save — Printer & Interface 
$360.00 

• C-10 Cassettes $7.50/dozen 

• Hard plastic boxes $2.50/dozen 

• Pin-feed Cassette labels $3.00 per 100 

• Free shipping on all orders over $50.00 

• Add $3.00 for shipping on orders under 
$50.00 

• Ohio residents add 5.5% sales tax 

• Phone order line for VISA and 
MASTERCARD, orders accepted 24 
hrs. a day, call 513-677-0796 

or send check or money order to: 

Metric Industries 
Department R 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



150 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



770 PC*» " V30T3O3L20L4 . 04C03L8BL4 
A04C03BFL2EDL2. C" 
780 PLAY PA*+PB*:PLAYPA*+PC* 
790 RETURN 

800 IF Q<2 OR Q>3THEN 900 

80S BK*=STRING*(12, " "):PRINTe32 

0,BK*5 :PRINT@352,BK*5 :PRINT@384, 

BK*S 

810 IF R=20R R-6THENPRINT8288, "W 

HICH ONE: JOHN"; : PRINTS320, "OR J 

OHN QUINCY?"; :ELSE 8OTO830 

820 PRINTS352, ""; rLINEINPUT D*: I 

FD*=F* < R ) THEN900ELSE CA**F* < R ) : B 

OTO950 

830 IF R=90R R=23THENPRINTS288, " 
WHICH ONE: " ; :PRINT@320, "BENJAMIN 

OR " ; : PR I NT3352 , "WILLIAM?" I : ELSE 

QOTO850 

840 PR I NTS384 , " " ; : L I NE I NPUTD* : I F 
D*=F* (R) THEN900ELSE C A*=F* < R ) : 6 
OTO950 

850 IF R-170R R=36THENPRINT@288, 

"WHICH ONE: ANDREW"; : PR I NT ©320, " 

OR LYNDON?"; : ELSE GOTO870 

860 PR I NTS352 , " " I : L I NE I NPUTD* : I F 

D*=F* < R ) THEN900 ELSE CA*=F* < R ) : 8 

OTO950 

870 IF R=26 OR R=32THENPR I NT6288 
, "WHICH ONE: "; :PRINT@320, "THEODO 
RE OR " ; : PR I NTS352 , " FRANKL I N « ; : EL 
SESOTO900 

880 PR I NTS384 , " " ; : L I NE I NPUTD* : I F 
D*=F* < R > THEN900ELSE CA*=F* < R ) : 8 
OTO950 

900 SC=RND<25)+25:PLAY P1*+"05CD 
EF8AB" 

910 IF Q=20R Q=30R Q=5 THEN SC=S 
C+50 ELSE IF Q=4 OR Q=6 THEN SC= 
SC+25 

920 S(PL)=S(PL)+SC:PRINT©480, "CO 

RRECT! YOU 8ET"SC" POINTS" ; 

925 FORX*1TO1200:NEXTX 

930 B(PL)=B(PL)+1: IFB(PL)*3THEN1 

000ELSE RETURN 

940 RETURN 

950 PRINTS448, "WRONG ANSWER"; :B< 
PL) «0: PLAY P 1 * : FOR X = 1 TO30 : PLAY " C 
":NEXTX 

952 IFQ<>6 THEN 960 
954 IF CA**"1"THEN CA*="1 FEDERA 
LI ST "ELSE IF CA*="2"THEN CA**"2 
REPUB/ DEMO "ELSE IF CA*="3"THEN C 
A*="3 WHIG" ELSE IF CA*-"4"THEN C 
A*»"4 DEMOCRAT "ELSE CA*="5 REPUB 
LI CAN" 

960 F0RK=1T06 

970 PR I NTS480 , C A* ; : FOR X = 1 TO200 : N 
EXTX: PRINTS480, STRING* (16, " " ) ; : 
FORX=1TO50:NEXTX 



980 NEXT K 
990 RETURN 

1000 b(pl)-0:forx»0to8:cls(x) :so 
=rnd (50) : fork=0to200step50: sound 
so+k, 1:nextk:nextx:cls0 
1010 p0ke359 , 1 26 : forx- 1 t0224 : pr i 
ntchr*<bs<x>);:next x:poke359,60 

1020 PRINT8256, N* <PL) " : " i 
1030 I=RND(75) :PRINT@288,B*<I) I 
1 040 PR I NT8384 , " " 5 : L I NE I NPUT " YOU 
R ANSWER: ";a* 
1050 IF A*=L*<BA<I> )THEN1100 
1060 PRINTS453, "BETTER LUCK NEXT 
T I ME " ; : PR I NTS484 , " CORRECT ANS WE 
R: "L*<BA<I>>; 

1070 PLAY"T202V31L4CFGP128L4. 8L8 
AP 1 28L2 .A": FORK- 1 TO800 : NEX TK 
1080 RETURN 

1100 F0RX=1T04:PRINT©456, "THAT'S 
RIGHT! « "; :FORK=1TO100:NEXTK:PRI 
NTa456 , "that * s right!!";: PLAY " T2 
503C04C05C04C" : FORK-1TO100: NEXTK 
:NEXTX 

1 1 10 Q=RND (100) + 1 00 : PR I NTS485 , "Y 
OU SCORE"Q"POINTS"; :S(PL)=S(PL)+ 
Q 

1120 PLAY PA* 
1130 RETURN 



WttfHtmMM»(4tMt«HHtH»«Hf«tttHtttHttHttHtt< 

EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

tmiiftttH#tH!tttHHtH«ttH14M«tHHHHMttttHHttH 

CO I NS $24 . 95 

Counting coins, adding coins and Asking 
change. 3 skill levels each.Sueeary after 
every five problees.High res. graphics. 

ADDITION 124.95 
8 levels-computer adjusts to student. 
Easy-to-read large nuebers. Error correct- 
ion and printable sueeary.Easy to use. 

TIC— -TAG f 24 . 95 

Answer (+ f -,X) problees to Mi n tic-tac- 
toe squares. 3 time limits and incorrect 
answers gives the coeputer the square. 

TEXT $24.95 

Text writing for young chi ldren. large 
readable letters. Movable cursor for easy 
editing. 3 screens of text. Save/load/print 

(ltt*»ttfttHtttttt4tHtt*fttttHttttl«ttHttttff**M*ftU»t4 

ALL PROGRAMS OH CASSETTE 
HIHIHOH OF UK EXTENDED BASIC 
t24.95 EACH I 4 FOR 189.95 
ADD tl.99 POSTAGE AHD HAHDL1HG 
Rl RESIDEHTS ADD 61 SALES TAX 
SEHD CHECK OR HOHEY ORDER TOi 

tmiWHHt»Hi«t«tWlttlttitHHWittKttll | || l llll l | 

A WISH SOFTWARE 

f\ P.O. BOX 7366 / J^y 

Jf It JOHNBTON.RI 82919 

£j O (481) 232-2787 

(«t»ttt»tHttttM#ttllttttt*tHt»t«fttt»tt«t»t*tHttHttli 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 151 



1200 CLS5 : PR I NT972 , " FINAL SCORE 
S 

1210 print@135," ";N*<1);" ";:PR 

INT@147,S<1> ? 

1220 IF P>1THEN PRINT6167, ■ " ; N* 

<2>;" :PRINT@179,S<2> ; 

1230 IF P >2THEN PRINT8199, " ";N* 

(3);" :print@211,S(3> ; 

1240 IF P >3THEN PRINT@231," ";N* 

<4);" •■; :PRINT@243,S<4) ; 

1250 0L=HI:F0RX=1T04: IF S(X)>HI 

THEN HI=S(X) :HI*=N*(X) :NEXTX:ELS 

E NEXTX 

1260 IF HIOOL THEN PRINT@295, " 
NEW HIGH SCORE!! " ; ELSE PRINTS29 
4,"HIGH SCORE IS STILL "; 
1270 FOR X=1TO10:PRINT@359,STRIN 
G*<18, " ") ; :FORK=1TO50:NEXTK:PRI 
NTS359," ";HI*; M "; :PRINT@371,HI 

; :fork=itoi50:nextk:nextx 

1280 printq486, " another game <y 

/N>? 

1290 I«=INKEY«: IFI*="N"THEN CLS: 
END ELSE IF I*O"Y"THEN1290 
1300 PRINT@486," SAME PLAYERS (Y 
/N>? "; 

1310 I*=INKEY*: IFI*<>"Y"AND I*<> 
"N"THEN1310 

1320 FORX»1TO4:S(X)=0:B(X)=0:NEX 
TX 

1330 IFI*="Y"THEN115ELSE CLSrPRI 

NT: PRINT: GOTO 100 

1990 REM PRESIDENTS TITLE 

2000 DATA 143, 140, 140, 141, 140, 14 

0, 141, 140, 140, 141, 140, 140, 141, 14 

0, 140, 141, 140, 140, 143, 140, 140, 14 

1, 141, 143, 141, 140, 140, 141, 140, 14 

0, 141, 143 

2010 DATA 143,133,143,133,133,14 
3, 133, 133, 143, 143, 133, 143, 143, 14 
3, 133, 143, 133, 143, 133, 133, 143, 14 
3, 128, 141, 133, 143, 133, 143, 133, 14 
3, 143, 143 

2020 DATA 143, 129, 131 , 135, 129, 12 
9, 135, 129, 131, 143, 131, 131, 133, 14 
3, 133, 143, 133, 143, 133, 129, 131, 14 
3, 133, 132, 133, 143, 133, 143, 131 , 13 
1, 133, 143 

2030 DATA 143, 133, 143, 143, 133, 13 
9, 141, 132, 140, 141, 140, 140, 133, 14 

0. 132. 141 . 132. 140. 135. 132. 140. 14 

1, 133, 139, 133, 143, 133, 143, 140, 14 
0, 133, 143 

2040 REM BONUS 

2050 DATA 128,255,255,255,255,12 
8, 128, 128, 175, 175, 175, 128, 128,20 
7, 128, 128, 128,207, 128, 143, 128, 12 
8, 128, 143, 128, 128, 159, 159, 159, 15 
9, 128, 128 



2060 DATA 128,255,128,128,128,25 
5, 128, 175, 128, 128, 128, 175, 128,20 
7,207, 128, 128,207, 128, 143, 128, 12 
8, 128, 143, 128, 159, 128, 128, 128, 12 
8, 128, 128 

2070 DATA 128,255,128,128,128,25 
5, 128, 175, 128, 128, 128, 175, 128,20 

7, 207, 207, 128, 207, 128, 143, 128, 12 
8, 128, 143, 128, 159, 128, 128, 128, 12 
8, 128, 128 

2080 DATA 1 28 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 1 2 
8, 128, 175, 128, 128, 128, 175, 128,20 
7, 128,207, 128,207, 128, 143, 128, 12 
8, 128, 143, 128, 128, 159, 159, 159, 12 
8, 128, 128 

2090 DATA 128,255,128,128,128,25 
5, 128, 175, 128, 128, 128, 175, 128, 20 
7, 128,207,207,207, 128, 143, 128, 12 

8, 128, 143, 128, 128, 128, 128, 128, 15 

9, 128, 128 




2100 DATA 128,255,128,128,128,25 
5, 128, 175, 128, 128, 128, 175, 128, 20 
7, 128, 128, 207, 207, 128, 143, 128, 12 
8, 128, 143, 128, 128, 128, 128, 128, 15 
9, 128, 128 

2110 DATA 128,255,255,255,255,12 
8, 128, 128, 175, 175, 175, 128, 128, 20 
7, 128, 128, 128, 207, 128, 128, 143, 14 
3, 143, 128, 128, 159, 159, 159, 159, 12 
8, 128, 128 

2200 DATA WASHINGTON, GEORGE, 1ST, 

1, 1789-1797, VIRGINIA 

2202 DATA ADAMS, JOHN, 2ND, 1 . 1797- 

1801 , MASSACHUSETTS 

2204 DATA JEFFERSON, THOMAS, 3RD, 2 

, 1801-1809, VIRGINIA 

2206 DATA MADISON, JAMES, 4TH, 2, 18 

09-1817, VIRGINIA 

2208 DATA MONROE, JAMES, 5TH, 2, 181 
7-1825, VIRGINIA 

2210 DATA ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY,6TH, 

2, 1825-1829, MASSACHUSETTS 

22 1 2 DATA JACKSON , ANDREW , 7TH ,4,1 

829- 1 837 , SOUTH CAROL I NA 

2214 DATA VAN BUREN, MARTIN, 8TH, 4 

, 1 837- 1 84 1 , NEW YORK 

2216 DATA HARRISON, WILLI AM, 9TH, 3 

, 1841, VIRGINIA 

2218 DATA TYLER, JOHN, 10TH, 3, 1841 
-1845, VIRGINIA 



152 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



TALKIE A 




FOR THE 
'REAL TALKER' 



"Way beyond anything you 
have ever seen for the CoCo" 

That's a strong statement, we know. But wait untH you see TALKHEAD'! It's a 
dazzling creation— easily the most impressive display of CoCo graphics you can buy! 

If you have a 'REAL TALKER' voice synthesizer, DO NOT deprive yourself of this 
absolutely incredible Talking Head simulation program! TALKHEAD uses the 'Real 
Talker' and extremely high speed/high resolution machine language to create an 
audio-visual simulation that clearly goes way, way beyond anything that you have 
ever seen on ANY home computer! 

TALKHEAD's fast, smooth-talking animation is so stunningly life-like that it resembles 
a movie more than a cartoon! This page shows some still shots of the actual moving 
image as it will appear on your TV screen. 

And, TALKHEAD is a real snap to use in Basic, thanks to a new command that we 
give you: SAY. Type SAY "ANYTHING YOU WANT" and Talkhead instantly 
appears and speaks ANY text— it has an unlimited vocabulary! 

The most impressive CoCo program you can buy . . . 

TALKHEAD' is available on cassette or disk (please specify) for only $29.95. The 
cassette version can be transferred to disk in case you ever upgrade. TALKHEAD 
requires 64K of memory and a Colorware 'REAL TALKER' voice pak. 




PROGRAM BY TIM JENISON 



SPEECH PROGRAMMING BY H. PUNYON 



ONLY £OQ95 FROM 

COLORWARE 




'TALKHEAD's g^m, mouth and jaw move, realistically animating his speech. The effect is amazing! 



IMORE SOFTWARE FOR IHt "REAL TALKER' VOICE PAK] 



STELLAR 
SEARCH 
ADVENTURE 



If you ever had an urge to command the USS 
Enterprise, this talking version of 'STELLAR 
SEARCH' from Owl-Ware is for you! It 
uniquely combines the best aspects of 
'adventure' and graphic 'action' type games 
and puts the 'Real Talker' voice pak to good 
use. You'll find graphics galore in this 
exciting package containing more than 86K 
of action adventure. Requires 32K and a 
'Real Talker' voice pak. Cassette. ...$24.95. 
Disk.. ..$26.95 



TALKING 
EDUCATIONAL 
SOFTWARE 



SOFTWARE FOR CHILDREN 
FROM COMPUTER ISLAND 

Math Drill $ 9.95 

Foreign Languages $ 9.95 

Spelling Tester $ 9.95 

All 3 for Only $24.95 

Requires 16Kand a Colorware 
'Real Talker' voice pak. 



ADVENTURE 

STARTER 



The popular 'ADVENTURE STARTER' from 
Owl's Nest Software is now available in a 
speaking version for the 'Real Talker' voice 
tynthesizer. Adventure Starter is a painless 
and enjoyable way to learn about computer 
adventure games. Included are two 
adventures. The first is "MYHOUSE" 7 an 
easy game with plenty of help and hints. A 
second adventure, 'PIRATES', is more 
challenging. Both are great fun for the 
adventure minded. This is the only way to 
get into CoCo adventuring! Requires 16K 
Extended Basic and a 'REAL TALKER' voice 
pak. Cassette, only $17.95. 



[COLORWARE 



COLORWARE INC. 
78-03 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven NY 11421 
(212)647-2864 



VISA 



NttistftCi'ifti 



* ★ ★ ORDERING INFORMATION *** 

ADD $2.00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING & HANDLING. 
C.O.D. 'S; ADD $3.00 EXTRA. 
SHIPPING & HANDLING FOR CANADA IS $4.00 
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTER CARD, M.O. \ CHECKS. 
N.Y. RESIDENTS MUST ADD SALES TAX. 
ALL 5GfTWA*E GNTHSi FACE ItlQutlUh. A 
ZOLQUWAItl 'UEA.L TAtki V(W£ F PAX. 



THE TOP 4 COCO GAMES... 



TARGET c'*fr*i?\ 



W» 5 



CUBIX 

By Spectral Associates. Very 
much like the arcade smash! 
lump little Cubix around the 3D 
maze trying to change the color 
of all the squares. With Death 
Globes, Discs, Snakes, etc. 32K 
Tjpe $24.95 



ZAKSUND 

From Elite Software comes this 
fantastic arcade style space 
action game with 3 different 
stages of moving 3-D graphics. 
You've never seen anything like 
this on your CoCo! Great sound 
too! 32 K Tape: $24.95 





THE KING 

Previously called 'Donkey King', 
you simply cannot buy a more 
impressive game for your CoCo. 
With 4 different screens and 
loads of fun! From Tom Mix Soft- 
ware. 32K Tape: $25.95 



GHOST GOBBLER 

From Spectral Assoc. This 
"PAC" theme game has been 
improved several times. It is 
definitely the best of its type. Bril- 
liant color, action and sound, 
just like an arcade. 16K Tape: 
i2J qq 



j-Dvfi i-r i 



COLORCADE 

SUPERIOYSTICK MODULE 

3 RAPID 




Y $19.95 



JOYSTICK INTERFACE/RAPID FIRE/6 FT. EXTENDER ALL IN ONE! The 

Colorcade allows connection of any Atari type joystick to your CoCo 
(including the Wico Red Ball). These switch type sticks are extremely 
rugged and have a taster and more positive response. They will improve the 
piay of almost any action game. 

An adjustable speed rapid fire circuit is built in. Press your fire button and 
get a great burst of fire instead of just a single shot! You get a real advantage 
in shooting games that do not have repeat fire. 




THE BEST YOU 

CAN BUY 
WICO #f 5-9730 



$29.95 



WICO FAMOUS 
"RED BALL" 



ROM/ PROJECT/ 
PRODUCT CASE 




Give a professional look to your project 
or product! High quality 3 piece injection 
molded plastic with spring loaded door. 
Designed especially for the CoCo ROM 
slot. 

2 - 4 pes $5.50 Ea. 

5-9 pes $3.50 Ea. 

10-99 pes $2.75 Ea. 

100 & UP Call Us. 

P.C. board for 27XX tPROMS. . . $4.00 Ea. 



COLORWARE 
LIGHT PEN 




ONLY $19.95 

WITH SIX FREE 
PROGRAMS ON 
CASSETTE! 



The Colorware Light Pen plugs directly into your joystick port and 
comes with six fun & useful programs on cassette. Easy instruc- 
tions show how to use it with Basic and it's compatible with light 
pen software such as Computer Island's "Fun Pack." Order yours 
today. Only $19.95 complete. 



TELE WRITE R-64 



This is * Ktul wrfteahfd wlorgid rtoto of a 
black and white »5 MxM thfKter 
Mt that is serrated by ntlrtext-M". lot|te 
Sou there is also true lowercase* wt the rwrw 
irrer caw litters flat ntrily rweswt lower 
case chapters in other Color Cowpwter prtwrws. 

1«lewitr-M is truly the Host Kwerfvf and 
Masticated word iraejpMr you tan buv for your 
Color Cowvter or TJP-lOOT If *w o» f. ""inter 
or are thir*im of settiw one. wu really should 
not be without this mum. Telewriter can be 
n«S nith an* l«t 32K or b« systew and with an* 
Color Cwenrter cowmible winter, 

ftBCI W GHI JKl MOPQtSTUVim 

2l234567890!"MZl'<>« e C«5 

abedefthi i * I « n o f u i t h n y 

i » . * i <> »* t " it ii* c i * - 1 



DISK $59.95 

CASSETTE. .. $49.95 



Colorware researched the word 
processors available for the Color 
Computer. This is the best. Tele- 
writer-64 is a truly sophisticated sys- 
tem that is mafvelously easy to use. 
It works with any 16K, 32K or 64K 
system and any CoCo compatible 
printer. 



TOP-RATED COCO 
WORD PROCESSOR 



[COLORWARE 




TOLL FREE ORDERING 

800-221-0916 

ORDERS ONLY. N. Y. & INFO CALL (212) M7-2364 



R E Al L TAl L KE R 

HARDWARE Voice Synthesizer 

NEW from 

COLORWARE.. 
only... $59.95 

THINKING OF BUYING A 
COCO VOICE SYNTHESIZER? 

READ THIS.... 




Making your computer talk couldn't be any easier! 
'Real Talker' is a full featured, ready to use, HARDWARE 
voice synthesizer system in a cartridge pak. It uses the 
Votrax SC-01 phoneme synthesizer chip to produce a 
clear, crisp voice. 

FREE TEXT-TO-SPEECH 

Included free with 'Real Talker' is Colorware's 
remarkable Text-to-Speech program. This is a truly 
powerful machine language utility. What it does is 
automatically convert plain English to speech. And it has 
an unlimited vocabulary! For example, use it in the direct 
mode: Type in a sentence or a paragraph, even mix in 
numbers, dollar signs, etc., then press enter. The text is 
spoken. At the same time a phoneme string is generated 
which can be saved to cassette or disk, modified or used 
in a Basic program. 

We originally planned to sell this major piece of 
programming for about $40.00 but decided it was so 
useful that no 'Real Talker' user should be without it. 
Besides, it really shows off the capability of 'Real Talker'. 

Also included with 'Real Talker' is our unique Phoneme 
Editor program. It allows you to explore and create 
artificial speech at the phoneme level, Phenomes are the 
fundimental sounds or building blocks of word 
pronunciation. There are 64 different phenomes, as well 
as 4 inflection levels at your disposal Creating and 
modifying speech at the phenome level is both fascinating 
and educational. The Phenome Editor may also be used to 
customize the pronunciation of speech produced by the 
Text-to-Speech program. 



You don't have to use any of our utility programs 
though. If you write your own Basic Programs, you will 
find the pocket sized Votrax Dictionary (included free) is 
all you need to make your own Basic programs talk. This 
dictionary gives you quick access to the phenome 
sequences used to create approximately 1 400 of the most 
used words in the English language. 

How about compatibility? 'Real Talker' is compatible 
with any 16K, 32K, 64K, Extended or non-extended Color 
Computer. It works with any cassette or disk based 
system, with or without the Radio Shack Multi-slot 
expander. No other synthesizer under $100 can make this 
claim. Most other CoCo voice synthesizers require an 
expensive Multi-slot expander in order to work with the 
disk system. 'Real Talker' requires only an inexpensive Y- 
adapter. This is an important consideration if you plan on 
adding a disk or have one already. 

'Real Talker' comes completely assembled, tested and 
ready to use. It is powered by the CoCo and talks through 
your T.V. speaker so there is nothing else to add. Price 
includes Text-to-Speech and other programs on cassette 
(may be transferred to disk), User Manual and Votrax 
Dictionary. ONLY , $59.95 

'Y-BRANCHINC CABLE' For disk systems. This 40-pin, 3 
connector cable allows 'Real Talker' to be used with any 
disk system $29.95 

YOU DECIDE ... 

Order yours today on our Toll-Free Order Line. If you are 
not delighted with your 'Real Talker' system, simply 
return it within 30 days for a prompt, courteous refund. 



2220 DATA POLK, JAMES, 1 1TH, 4, 1845 

-1849, NORTH CAROLINA 

2222 DATA TAYLOR, ZACHARY, 12TH, 3, 

1849-1850, VIRGINIA 

2224 DATA FILLMORE, MILLARD, 13TH, 

3 , 1 850- 1 853 , NEW YORK 

2226 DATA PIERCE, FRANKLIN, 14TH, 4 

, 1 853- 1 857 , NEW HAMPSH I RE 

2228 DATA BUCHANAN, JAMES, 15TH, 4, 

1 857- 1 86 1 , PENNS YL VAN I A 

2230 DATA L I NCOLN , ABRAHAM , 16TH, 5 

, 1 86 1—1865, KENTUCKY 

2232 DATA JOHNSON, ANDREW, 17TH, 4, 

1 865- 1869, NORTH CAROL I NA 

2234 DATA GRANT, ULYSSES, 18TH, 5, 1 

869-1877, OHIO 

2236 DATA HAYES , RUTHERFORD , 1 9TH , 
5, 1877-1881, OHIO 

2238 DATA GARFIELD, JAMES, 20TH, 5, 
1881, OHIO 

2240 DATA ARTHUR, CHESTER, 2 1ST, 5, 
1 88 1 - 1 885 , VERMONT 

2242 DATA CLEVELAND, GROVER, 22ND, 
4, 1885-1889, NEW JERSEY 
2244 DATA HARRISON, BENJAMIN, 23RD 
,5, 1889-1893, OHIO 

2246 DATA CLEVELAND, GROVER, 24 TH, 
4, 1893-1897, NEW JERSEY 



2248 DATA MCKINLEY, WILLIAM, 25TH, 
5, 1897-1901, OHIO 

2250 DATA ROOSEVELT, THEODORE, 26T 
H, 5, 1901-1909, NEW YORK 
2252 DATA TAFT, WILLI AM, 27TH, 5, 19 
09-1913, OHIO 

2254 DATA WILSON, WOODROW, 28TH, 4, 
1913-1921, VIRGINIA 
2256 DATA HARDING, WARREN, 29TH, 5, 
1921-1923, OHIO 

2258 DATA COOLIDGE, CALVIN, 30TH, 5 
, 1923-1929, VERMONT 
2260 DATA HOOVER, HERBERT, 3 1ST, 5, 
1929-1933, IOWA 

2262 DATA ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN, 32N 
D , 4 , 1 933- 1 945 , NEW YORK 
2264 DATA TRUMAN , HARRY , 33RD ,4,19 
45-1953, MISSOURI 

2268 DATA EISENHOWER, DW I GHT, 34TH 
, 5, 1953-1961 , TEXAS 

2270 DATA KENNEDY , JOHN , 35TH ,4,19 
6 1 - 1 963 , MASSACHUSETTS 
2272 DATA JOHNSON, LYNDON, 36TH, 4, 
1963—1969, TEXAS 

2274 DATA NI XON, RICHARD, 37TH, 5, 1 
969- 1 974 , CAL I FORN I A 
2276 DATA FORD , GERALD , 38TH , 5 , 1 97 
4- 1 977 , NEBRASKA 



For Your TRS-80 Color Computer 



320 Full-time Audio Talk/Tutor Programs! 





We're Your Educational 
Software Source 

No. of Programs 



Course 

Language Arts 

(Spelling) 
Reading 
Comprehension 
Phonics 

English as a Second 

Language 
Mathematics 
Basic Algebra 
Physics 

Effective Writing 
History 



16 Programs 
64 Programs 
32 Programs 
32 Programs 

32 Programs 
64 Programs 
16 Programs 
16 Programs 
16 Programs 
32 Programs 



One-syllable a*j*t 




end in y usually 


just dcfcf | 1 1 


m 

mm 




Uhich h<is i 




11 ii 


*H 


■ a « 


H 



In Color, with Pictures and Text! 

All of our TRS-80 Color programs have easy to understand profes- 
sional announcer narration, not synthesized, robotic voices. All text 
is displayed in easy to road upper- and lowercase characters. Video 
clearly illustrates key concepts in each frame of the program. 

Only $4.40 per program ($8.80 for 2, one on each side of a half-hour 
cassette). $59.90 for 16 programs (8 cassettes) in an album. Send for 
catalog of over 1000 programs for Atari, TRS-80, Apple, etc. 
Dealer inquiries welcome 
For more information, or to order call: 

TOLL FREE 1-800-654-3871 

IN OKLAHOMA CALL (405) 288-2301 

[g)DORSETT 

^mmmw^ Educational Systems, Inc. 

Box 1226, Norman, OK 73070 



mm 



'56 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



2278 DATA CARTER, J AMES, 39TH, 4, 19 
77- 1981, GEORGIA 

2280 DATA REAGAN, RONALD, 40TH, 5, 1 
98 1 —PRESENT , ILLINOIS 
2300 DATA WHO WAS COMMANDER IN C 
HIEF OF THE FIRST CONTINENTAL 
ARMY?, 1, WHO HAD FALSE TEETH MADE 
FROM RH I NOCEROUS I VORY? , 1 , WHO 
WAS THE ONLY PRESIDENT TO BEELE 
CTED UNANIMOUSLY?, 1 
2302 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT COULD 
READ SEVENLANGUAGES?, 2, WHICH PRE 
SI DENT LIVED THE LONGEST?, 
2, WHO DIED ON JULY 4TH SHORTLY 

AFTER JEFFERSON DIED?, 2 
2304 DATA WHO BOUGHT THE LOUISIA 
NNA PURCHASE?, 3, WHICH PRES 

I DENT'S HOUSE WAS NAMED MONT 

ICELL0?,3,WH0 WROTE THE DECLARAT 
ION OF INDEPENDENCE?, 3 
2306 DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
I DENT TO WEAR LONG TROUSERS?, 4, 
WHO WAS LIVING IN THE WHITE 
HOUSE WHEN IT WAS DESTROYED BY 
THE BRITISH?, 4 

230G DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
I DENT TO SAIL ON A STEAMSHIP?, 5 
, WHICH PRESIDENT'S FATHER WAS 



ALSO A PRESIDENT?, 6, WHICH PRES I 
DENT WAS ALSO A PUBLISHED P 

OET?,& 

2310 DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
I DENT TO RIDE A RAILROAD TRAIN 
WHILE IN OFFICE?, 7, WHICH PRESID 
ENT WAS THE VICTIM OF THE FIRST 
ASSAS I NAT I ON ATTEMPT? , 7 , W 

HOSE HOUSE WAS CALLED THE H 
ERMITAGE?, 7 

2312 DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
I DENT TO BE BORN IN THE UNITED 
STATES?, 8, WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
IDENT TO DIE WHILE IN OFFICE?, 9 
, WHICH PRESIDENT HAD THE SHORTES 
TTERM <1 MONTH)?, 9 
2314 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT HAD TH 
E MOST <14) CHILDREN?, 10, WHO 
WAS THE FIRST PRESIDENT TO HAVE 

IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDINGS STAR 
TED AGAINST HIM?, 10, WHICH PRESID 
ENT HAD GAS LIGHTS INSTALLED IN 

THE WHITE HOUSE?, 11 
2316 DATA WHO WAS THE ONLY SPEAK 
ER OF THE HOUSE TO BECOME PRESID 
ENT?, 11, WHO DIED IN OFFICE AS A 
RESULT OF DRINKING COLD MILK AF 
TER EAT-ING CHERRIES ON A HOT DA 



A PICTURE IS WORTH . . . 



V 



inc. 

P.O. BOX 813 

N. Bergen, N.J. 07047 

(201) 330-1898 




This is a photosnph of >n *iU*i fllipLli produced with th« HOSi-PflK Vidto 
loard for thi Radio Shack tmr CHHCtr Tht cartridge tiiPU itto tht 
ftul/txpiftsioft port of an npinijin bin ir.j i$ coipatibie with an) lilt sjstei. 
The board ftatwrts th« *jLL ISC I ] iharwfctr set* proo/ambie screen fonits- 
prooratii&U cursor , and Di'lurf "ike HH 



LhliM vitY thf c-ir-tr-td|t is a 'Video Briver* software packaoe which 

inLMvitb lN kdlD-PAt i eti the suuei and adds a set of powerful *cr«« 
rut+atl sttSidLljr 

Hit tarlor E'*li t-i Erd c»r Uni 

Er-felE Li K Srnti hitrgElMi Ivmr Eon'riM 

M trfsV Pflijc j^irtl hlMf Siw -JharjEltrt iot- f ilt > 

li titn aVs*tt MM trmin fir- riprap*™"! nj thf 'U«r' in « a "to**** 

if! nd irwimtoi km Uj rt»+*i Thi wri-fflK can br in* mie-r til i* 

S>w* hi\t ui:h ttinfiM lrii*f>. or can Di used untor FLfK. DS-S. *-.t 
□Hh mrnriku tat"'> 

In addition to ui W-PH u m>* i Tal Liir of accessories for the 
Color Cciputer lirttdinf j sic tin u*\vi** selectable etpans ion b«< 
Centronics coopaHSlt FiriLLlL psr|, rr#L tie* c-lbfi. I6K MIMOH board* Md a 
pretetipin^ boari dEuyiid mtifitHLi IV tht Color Coipoter for tore 
inforiation writ* or r.*u Ut e-jt cjejIqi 




October 1984 THE RAINBOW 157 



Y?, 12 

2318 DATA WHO HAD THE FIRST BATH 
TUB IN- STALLED IN THE WHITE H 
OUSE?, 13, WHO HAD THE FIRST FURNA 
CE IN- STALLED IN THE WHITE HO 
USE?, 14 

2320 DATA WHO WAS THE ONLY BACHE 
LOR PRES I DENT? ,15, WHO WAS 

THE FIRST PRESIDENT TO HAVE HIS 
INAUGURATION PHOTO- GRAPHED? 

2322 DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
I DENT BORNOUTS IDE THE BORDERS OF 
THE ORIGINAL 13 COLONIES?, 

16, WHO WAS THE ONLY PRESIDENT TO 
HAVE A PATENT ISSUED IN HIS 
NAME?, 16, WHO WAS THE FIRST RE 
PUBL I CAN PRES I DENT?, 16 
2324 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT NEVER 
SPENT A DAY IN SCHOOL?, 17, WH I C 
H PRESIDENT ESTABLISHED THE FIRS 
T NATIONAL PARK?, 18, WHO SMOKED T 
WENTY CIGARS A DAY?, 18 
2326 DATA WHO HAD THE FIRST TELE 
PHONE IN- STALLED IN THE WHITE H 
OUSE?, 19, WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES I 
DENT TO VISIT THE WEST COAST?, 1 
9 



2328 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT COULD 
WRITE WITHBOTH HANDS?, 20, WHO WAS 
THE 2ND PRESIDENT TO BE ASS AS IN 
ATED?,20,WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES I 
DENT TO HAVE A VALET?, 21 
2330 DATA WHO WAS THE ONLY PRES I 
DENT THAT SERVED TWO NON-CONSECU 
TIVE TERMS?, 22, WHICH PRESIDENT W 
AS MARRIED IN THE WHITE HOUSE?, 
22, WHOSE DAUGHTER HAD A CANDY BA 
R (BABY RUTH) NAMED AFTER HER?, 
22 

2332 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT HAD EL 
ECTRICITY INSTALLED IN THE WHITE 
HOUSE?, 23, WHO WAS THE LAST CI VI 
L WAR VETERAN TO BECOME PRE 

SIDENT?,25,WH0 WAS PRESIDENT DUR 
ING THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR? 
,25 

2334 DATA WHO WAS THE YOUNGEST M 
AN TO BE- COME PRESIDENT?, 26, WHO 
ESTABLISHED THE FIRST WHITE HOU 
SE PRESS ROOM?, 26 

2336 DATA WHO WAS THE HEAVIEST P 
RESIDENT (OVER 300 POUNDS)?, 27, 
WHICH PRESIDENT WAS THE FIRST TO 
THROW OUT THE FIRST PITCH OF A 
BASEBALL SEASON? , 27 , WHO WAS THE 



\ 




To make theinost of your new Dragon microcomputer from Dragon-Tano, you need Dragon User 
— the international, independent magazine for Dragon owners. 

Each issue of Dragon L/se/- contains: 9 program listings covering games and utilities 

• reviews of the latest software • reviews of Dragon peripherals and add-ons 

• programming advice for beginners • technical advisory service 

• hardware projects • programming articles for users 

The Dragon microcomputer was launched in the UK I Subscription order form. Receive a free book and save money by taking out a 

last vpar SinrP thpn wp havp dpvplonpd a knowlpdnp B ,0Q 9- te,m subscription - a two-year subscription saves 10% f a three-year 

lasi year, bince inen we nave oeveiopea a Knowledge H subscription saves 20% . In addition, long-term subscribers will receive a free M 

and mastery Of the machine S abilities. YOU can <_ copy of either □ The Working Dragon or □ Dragon Games Master. Please send I 

benefit from Our experience by subscribing to I a check, made payable to Dragon User, with this form. 

Dragon User, which is expanding its coverage to include ■ Start my subscription from the following issue 

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Tq make sure that you receive a copy of Dragon User I Address | 

regularly, subscribe direct to us. This costs only $29.95 ^ 

for 12 issues airspeeded to you — or take advantage of ; I 

our special offer to long-term subscribers. Individual I signed Date ,„ I 

copies Of the magazine can be Obtained from your Subscription rates US and Canada airspeeded □ US$29.95 for 12 issues/1 year . 

Dragon dealer. g US$53.90 for 24 issues □ US $71. 90 for 36 issues. Send this form to 

Dragon User, %. Business Press International, 205 E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10017. 1 



158 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



ONLY MAN TO BE PRES- I DENT AND CH 
IEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COUR 
T?,27 

2338 DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
I DENT WITHA PH.D. DEGREE?, 28, WHO 
BESIDES T. ROOSEVELT GOT A NOB 
EL PRIZE?, 28 

2340 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT WON TH 
E FIRST ELECTION IN WHICH WOME 
N COULD VOTE?, 29, WHO FIRST USE 
D A RADIO IN THE WHITE HOUSE?, 
29, WHO WAS PRESIDENT DURING THE 

TEAPOT DOME SCANDAL?, 29 
2342 DATA WHO WAS PRESIDENT WHEN 
J. EDGAR HOOVER WAS APPOINTED H 
EAD OF THEFBI?,30,WHO WAS THE FI 
RST PRESIDENT BORNWEST OF THE MI 
SSISSIPPI RIVER?, 31, WHO WAS PRES 
I DENT WHEN THE STAR SPANGLED BAN 
NER BECAME OUR NATIONAL ANT 

HEM?, 31 

2344 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT SERVED 
MORE THANTWO FULL TERMS?, 32, WHO 
WAS THE FIRST PRESIDENT TO APP 
EAR ON TELEVISION?, 32, WHO WAS TH 
E FIRST PRESIDENT TO FLY IN AN 
AIRPLANE WHILE IN OFFICE?, 32 

2346 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT APPOIN 
TED THE FIRST WOMAN CABINET ME 
MBER?,32,WH0 WAS PRESIDENT DURIN 
G THE ONLY NUCLEAR ATTACK IN 
HISTORY?, 33 

2348 DATA WHO WAS THE FIRST PRES 
IDENT TO APPEAR ON COLOR TV?, 34 
,WHO WAS THE ONLY PRESIDENT TO 
SCORE A HOLE- IN-ONE WHILE PLAY- 
ING GOLF?, 34 
2350 DATA WHO WAS THE YOUNGEST M 
AN TO BE ELECTED PRESIDENT?, 35, 
WHO WAS THE FIRST ROMAN CATHOLIC 
PRESIDENT?, 35 

2352 DATA WHO WAS THE 2ND TALLES 
T PRESIDENT?, 36, WHO WAS 

THE ONLY PRESIDENT TO RESIGN F 
ROM OFFICE?, 37, WHO WAS THE FIRST 
PRESIDENT TO VISIT ALL 50 STAT 
ES?,37 

2354 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT WAS NE 
VER ELEC- TED TO THE OFFICE OF P 
RESIDENT OR VICE PRES. IN AN EL 
ECTION?, 38, WHO WAS THE ONLY MAN 
FROM THE DEEP SOUTH ELECTED PR 
ESI DENT AFTER THE CIVIL WAR?, 
39 

2355 DATA WHO WAS THE ONLY PRES I 
DENT TO BE IN A MOVIE WHICH ST 
ARRED A CHIMPANZEE?, 40, WHO WAS 

THE OLDEST PRESIDENT EVER EL 
ECTED TO OFFICE?, 40 



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see us at U PRINCETON 



Enter the exciting world of graphics for the Color 
Computer. The first monthly graphics disk magazine 
for the Color Computer is here. 

Just insert GRAFX into your disk drive and view the 
pictures with music!! You won't need Graphicom to 
view the pictures but all pix files can easily be trans- 
ferred to a GC disk with our SHRINX 2.0 utility. 

GRAFX gives you a variety of works by the great 
Graphicom masters-humorous pix-seasonal designs- 
technical designs and more . . . 

★★★CHARTER MEMBER OFFER*** 

One year subscription to GRAFX $99.95 
second year's subscription $50.00 
2 year subscription=$149.95 ($ave $$) 
DUBIOUS?? get a trial 3 month subscription for only 
$30 and if we convince you we'll credit $30 to the above 
offer. 

TRY ONE!!! Sample Disk $13.95* 

***SHRINX 2.0*** 

SHRINX-our original utility for shrinking your pix has 
grown into a super utility. This is the only utility you'll 
need to do anything with your GC pix. 
FEATURES: 1 to 4 drives, enlarge or shrink (quad- 
frame), variable shrink (0-100%), get or transfer to a GC 
disk, load or write a binary pix file, directory of any 
drive, user friendly menu!!! 

REQUIRES 32k, 1 disk drive $29.95* 

***MUSX*** 

We've done it!! the first monthly music disk for your 
Color Computer. Plays 4 completely different voices at 
one time-sounds terrific!! 

MUSX DISK #1 (contains 8-10 pop songs) $13.95* 

YOUR ONE STOP FOR ALL GRAPHICOM NEEDS!!!! 

★★★GRAPHICOM*** 

The big hit of every RAINBOWFEST. Graphicom is 
simply stated the best graphics and animation utility 
for the COCO yet. Easy graphic menu. 
REQUIRES 64K, 1 drive, joysticks $24.95* 

★★GRAPHICOM PIX DISKS*** 

ART DISK #1 

ART DISK #2 each $19.95* 

AID DISK #1 all for $39.95* 

FONT DISK #1 

HAM SOFTWARE by John Yurek (K3PGP) 

Software being used world-wide by ham operators. 
CW-turns your TRS-80 4K machine into a CW keyboard 
and CW receive terminal. 

MODEL 1, MODEL 3 or COCO $44.95* (tape only) 

RY-turns a TRS-80 4K machine in]to a 5 level (Baudot 
Code) teletype machine. 

MODEL 1, MODEL 3 or COCO $49.95* (tape only) 

*=add $2.00 for pottage & handling 

To place your order send check or money order to: 
GRAFX 
P.O. Box 254 
West Mifflin, PA 15122-0254 
VOICE LINE-(412) 466-6974 (6-9 pm) 
24 HR BBS-(412)744-2335 (COCONET) 
Send $2.00 for our complete listing of available software 
(deductable on your order). 

ARTISTS 

Send a stamped self-addressed envelope for details on 
how to get your artworks published in GRAFX. 
GRAPHICOM - TM of Cheshire Cat Computer Creations 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER - TM of Tandy Corporation 



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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 159 




tware 



Sugar Software 




RAINBOW 
SCREEN MACHINE 






SUPER 
SCREEN MACHINE 



# The Rolls Royce of graphics/text screen enhancers 
— more screen features than all others combined! 

# Add these features to your computer/program: ML ex- 
tension of Basic toads on top of 1 6, 32, or 64K machines 
to enable easy mixture of hi-res graphics and text in 
your programs. Dense text or large lettering for children, 
visually impaired or VCR title screens with no pro- 
gramming! 

0 User definable 224 character set featuring lower case 
descenders, Greek, cars, tank, planes, etc., completely 
interfaced with all keys, commands, and PMODES. 1 2 
sizes (most colored) from 16 x 8 to 64 x 24. PRINT <§, 
TAB and comma fields are fully supported. 

m 2 distinct character sets automatically switch for 
sharpest lettering featuring underline, subscript, su- 
perscript, reverse video, top and bottom scroll pro- 
tect, double width, colored characters in PMODE 4, 
and help screen. 

# Simple 2-letter abbreviated commands inside your pro- 
gram or control key entry from keyboard, even during 
program execution! 

# Includes demo program, character generator program 
and manual. 16K Ext. Basic required — 32K recom- 
mended $29.95 Tape; $32.95 Disk. 



Screen Machine can be used in games, word processors, 
utilities, etc. In addition, the custom graphics characters can 
be used to develop easy, effective hi-res character-graphics 
programs. The potential is truly unlimited. 

Screen Machine can be used to directly create video recorder 
title screens or large lettering for children or the visually im- 
paired simply by typing. 



• Revolutionary — heralded as the most useful, 
powerful and versatile state-of-the-art utility ever 
developed for the Color Computer! 

• All of the features of Screen Machine and more: 

• Variable SMOOTH Scroll for professional displays, list- 
ings, business use. 

• Variable volume KEY Click (tactile feedback). 

-EDTASM + command for instant compatibility with 

• cartridge EDTASM 

m Superpatch+ command for instant compatibility with 
the Superpatch + Editor-assembler 

• True Break key disable and recognition. 

• 10 User Definable commands used to activate your 
special drivers or subroutine. 

m Dynamic Screen Dump command for use with Custom 
Software Engineering's Graphic Screen Print program 
for simple printer "Snapshots" of your screen even 
during program execution! 

• The new standard — Upgradeable at any time from 
previous Rainbow-Writer or Screen Machine purchase. 
Return old program, manual, plus cost difference and 
$7.00 shipping and handling. 

• Super Screen Machine $44.95 Tape; $47.95 Disk. 



Screen Machine is fully interfaced with all keys and com- 
mands. Although some Basic programming knowledge is rec- 
ommended just a few minutes spent studying and referencing 
your computer's Basic manuals will turn you on to the power of 
computing with Screen Machine. 



Sugar Software \ 

Gift Certificate 



a A complete catalog of other sweet Sugar Software products is available. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 
2153 Leah Lane 
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 43068 
(614) 861-0565 



V7S4 



Add $1 00 pef tape for postage 
and handling Ohtoans add 5.5% 
sales tax. COD orders are wel- 
come. CIS orders EMAIL to 
70405, 1374. Dealer inquiries In- 
vited. 




By Ed Jones, 
Gene Clifton 
and 

Wayne Davis 



If you've ever been concerned 
about the possible course of a 
hurricane, or just have an active 
curiosity about meteorological 
matters, the accompanying pro- 
gram is for you. 



Now you can throw away those tracking charts you got at 
the supermarket the other day, your computer has just 
become an electronic tracking chart. 
This program offers two options; projection and position 
plotting. 

By entering the reported latitude and longitude of the hurri- 
cane, then inputting the direction of travel, the program will plot 
the projected course and display it graphically. 

In option two, position plotting, it is possible to enter the 
reported positions (accumulated daily), so that an overall pic- 
ture can be developed as to the path the hurricane has taken. 

This program allows the plots to be saved to disk or tape. 
These plots can later be reloaded and additional plots can then 
be added. Just remember to rerecord the new plots on disk or 
tape. 

For those with graphic printers desiring hard copy printouts, 
we suggest the use of the GRAFDUMP program as printed in 
the Oct. '83 issue of RAINBOW. 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 161 



Attention Color Computer Owners! 



Radio Shack Has 
and Entertainment 



The CTW Software Group, a division 
of Children's Television Workshop, 
brings you ten game-style educational 
programs. Each one encourages chil- 
dren to experiment, explore and solve 
problems while having fun. 

For TRS-80® Color 
Computers with 
Extended BASIC 




Taxi/ * * Kids earn fares and tips as 
they drive through six cities from New 
York to Shanghai. 
A Cooperative 
Strategy Game for 
ages 7 and up. 
#26-2509. 



Peanut Butter Panic.*** The sky's 
the limit as players cooperate to catch 
stars, make sand- 
wiches, and win. A 
Cooperative Strat- 
egy Game for 
ages 7 and up. 
#26-2523. 



iTifiOi 



Grover's Number Rover.™** 

G rover's rover is ready to blast off! 
Hop aboard and 
help him play with 
Twiddlebugs and 
numbers! A Basic 
Skills Game for 
ages 3-6. 
#26-2522. 

Ernie's Magic Shapes.™** Ernie 
wears the top hat, but you're the magi- 
cian. Help Ernie 
match shapes and 
colors in six differ- 
ent ways. A Basic 
Skills Game for 
ages 3-6. 
#26-2524. 



J 



i 



Big Bird s Special Delivery.™** Help 
Big Bird deliver the mail! Match the 
pictures and bring 
each package to 
the right store. A 
Basic Skills Game 
for ages 
3-6. #26-2525. 



.4 



Grobot. * * * How well will your astro- 
garden grow? Plant, protect and har- 
vest—it's up to 
you and Grobot. A 
Creative Explora- 
tion Game for 
ages 10 and up. 
#26-2527. 



Time Bound.* * * Race through time 
and learn about history, in hot pursuit 
of your hapless 
assistant, Ana- 
cron. Creative 
Exploration Game 
for ages 10 and 
up. #26-2528. 



I 

lI 1 



Flip Side.* * * Stake your claim, sur- 
round the squares, and watch the 
screen flip colors! 
Planning is the 
key. A Creative 
Exploration Game 
for ages 10 and 
up. #26-2529. 




Star Trap.* * * Players must race 
through a maze to trap a slippery star 
before time runs 
out! A Cooperative 
Strategy Game for 
ages 7 and up. 
#26-2510. 





Cookie Monster's Letter Crunch.™ * * ' 

It's Cookie Time! Help Cookie Monster 
match words and 
letters to bake and 
eat cookies! A 
Basic Skills Game 
for ages 3-6. 
#26-2526. 




•Joysticks required. * 'Cassette recorder required. 
* * ' Joysticks and cassette recorder required 



the Educational 
Software You Want. 



Why feed quarters into video game 
machines when you can bring arcade- 
style thrills into your own living room 
with Radio Shack's exciting Color 
Computer games. They can provide 
hours of fun for the whole family. 



Low As 



19 95 




Double Back.* As you "double back" 
to catch your own tail, try to encircle 
the "safe" screen 
objects to gain 
points in this tricky 
game. Challenges 
mount as you play. 
#26-3091. $19.95 




Gomoku and Renju. The classic ori- 
ental game of strategy! Block your op- 
ponent while 
attempting to 
place five of your 
own men in a row 
Hours of fun. 
#26-3069. $19.95 



Star Blaze.* Protect the Milky Way! 
Radar shows menacing vessels 
nearby. Seek, de- 
stroy and check 
radar again. Red 
alert! There's no 
let up in the excite- 
ment. #26-3094. 
$19.95 




;• 4 



Slay the Nerfus.* Defend your sub- 
marines against deadly starfish and 
the ancient 
seaworm— the 
fearsome Nerius, 
a creepy nemesis 
from the Deep. 
#26-3086. $24.95 



Canyon Climber.* An action game 
with a difference. As a cliff hanger, 
you're challenged 
by one test after 
another— kicking 
goats, zinging ar- 
rows and falling 
objects! #26-3089. 
$34.95 




Dungeons of Dag go rath.* You're pit- Baseball. Nine innings of fun! You're ZAXXON.** * The official home ver- 



ted against a succession of awesome 
beasts. Each vic- 
tory brings you 
closer to your ulti- 
mate opponent— 
the evil wizard! 
#26-3093. $29.95 




in full control of this realistic simulation 
of America's Num- 
ber One sport, 
both behind the 
plate and on the 
field. #26-3095. 
$24.95 






sion of the great arcade favorite by 
Sega! Match wits 
with the deadly 
ZAXXON Robot! 
Challenges esca- 
late as you pro- 
gress. 32K re- 
quired. #26-3062. 
$34.95 



Available at over 1100 
Radio Shack Computer Centers and at 
participating Radio Shack stores and dealers 

Radio /haeK 

COMPUTER CENTERS 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 

Find out more about Radio Shack's 
Color Computer— Send for a free catalog. 

Mail To: Radio Shack 

Dept. 85-A 192 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, Texas 76102 



NAME 

ADDRESS _ 
CITY 



. STATE _ 



.ZIP. 



TELEPHONE . 
I 



Prices apply at participating Radio Shack stores and dealers. 
Muppet characters are trademarks of Muppets, Inc. All rights re- 
served. ZAXXON is a registered trademark of Sega licensed to 
Datasofi, Inc. 




If this program is being typed by 
hand, Line 60 should be entered as 
shown, including spaces. Altering the 
spacing will affect the sound. 

In Line 120, option three will reset 
your computer to a cold start. To pre- 
vent the cold start, change POKE113,0: 
EXEC40999 to END. 

As always, save the program to disk 
or tape before running. 



The following wrote and developed 
the "HUR/CANE": Wayne Davis, a 
student at a technical school studying 
radio and TV repair; Gene Clifton, a 
communications specialist with the U.S. 
Coast Guard; and Ed Jones, a retired 
Federal Aviation Administration air 
traffic controller. 



50. 
110. 
160. 
250. 
310. 



.75 380 116 

. 40 430 197 

163 530 32 

. 97 590 128 

247 670 122 

END .... 115 



The listing: 1 

1 0 CLEAR 1 000 : PM0DE3 , 1 : SCREEN 1,1: 
PCLS : DRAW " BM45 , 50C2U 1 4BR8D 1 4BL7B 
U7R7BR6BU7D 1 3F 1 R4E2U 1 2BR7D 1 4U 1 4R 
5F2D3G2L5F7BR7U 1 4R5F 2D3G2L5F7BR 1 
4L8R4U 1 4L4RBBR 1 5BD 1 262L5H2U 1 0E2R 
5F2BR6BU 1 D 1 3U 1 2E2R3F2D 1 2BL6BU4R4 
BD4BR9U 1 4D2F 1 0BD2U 14BD1 4BR5R6L6U 
7R4BL4U7R6BD 1 7L 1 20 ■ 
20 DRAW " BM123, 80U 1 4L4R8BR6D 1 4U 1 4 
R5F2D3G2L5F7BR9U 1 2E2R3F2D 1 2BL6BU 
4R4BD4BR 1 7BU2G2L4H2U 1 0E2R4F2BR4D 
1 2U 1 4D8E8B7D 1 F6BR 1 2L6U7R4L4U7R6B 
R7D 1 4U 1 4R5F2D3G2L5F7BD3L90 " : DRAW 
" BM30 , 1 40C3D6R 1 E2U 1 D 1 F2R 1 U6D6BR4 
U6R3F 1D1G1L2R1D1 F2BR4R4L2U6L2R4B 
R4R4L2D6" 

30 DRAWBM64, 140R4L2D6BR10L4U3R3 
L3U3R4BR4D6U6R 1 D 1 F4D 1 R 1 U6BR 1 5BD6 
U6BL 1 R3F 1D1G1L1R1F1D1G1 L3BR8BU6D 
1 F2D3U3E2U 1 BD6BR5BU 1 U 1 BU2U 1 " : DRA 
W " BM 1 30 , 1 40C4D6R 1 E2U 1 D 1 F2R 1 U6D6B 
R5U 1 BD 1 BR7U4E2R 1 F2D4BL3BU2R2BD2B 
R5U 1 BD 1 BR 1 1 U6R2F 2D2G2L 2BR8U4 E2R 1 



F2D4BL3BU2R2BD2 " 

40 DRAW "BM 184, 140D4F2E2U4BR4R4L2 
D6L2R4BR4R4U3L4U3R4BD 1 4BL69H 1 L2G 
2D3F 1 R3E 1 BD 1 BR3U 1 D 1 BR 1 4L4U3R3L3U 
3R4BD6BR4U 1 BD 1 BR 1 7BU5H 1 L2G2D3F 1 R 
3E 1 BD 1 BR4BU6D6R4BR4R4L2U6L2R4BR8 
L4D3R3L3D3BR9U6L2R4BR8L4D6R4U6BR 
5D6U6R 1D1F4D1R1 U6D6BR3 " 
50 DRAW "BM 135, 173C4L4U6R4BD3BL2L 
1 BD3BR6U 1 BD 1 BR 1 0U6D6R 1 E2U 1 D 1 F2R 1 
U6D6BR4U 1 BD 1 BR 1 0U3D3R4U6BR4D6R4U 
6L4BR8D6U6R2D 1 F4D 1 U6BR4R4L4D3R3L 
3D3R4BR4R4U3L4U3R4" : FORX=1TO200: 
PM0DE3: SCREEN 1 , 0: PM0DE4: SCREEN 1 , 
1 : NE X T : CLS0 : BX= 1 . 8 : S0=653 1 2 : POKE 
653 1 5 , 63 : ST=8 : EN=240 
60 FORX=ST TO EN STEPBX:UU*UU+l: 
IFUU=325THEN70ELSEPOKESO, X : POKES 

o, en-x : next: boto60 

70 pcls:forx=ito500:next:v=i:dim 

H(100) , I (100) 

80 V=l:CLS:PRINTSTRING*(32,252> ; 
: PR I NTSTR I NG* < 8 , 1 28 > ; " path pr o j e 
ction"? : POKE 1068, 128: PR I NTSTR I NG 
*<9, 128) ; :PRINT"ENTER THE STARTI 
NG POINT IN L AT " : PR I NT " AND LON. 
EX: LAT-15.3 LON-75.3. THEN ENTE 
R DIRECTION OF TRAVEL. EX: NW OR 

NWW. PRESS ANY KEY TO" 
90 PR I NT "STOP PROJECTION, THEN A 
NY KEY TOSEE THE LOCATION. ": PR IN 



164 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



TSTRING* (32, 232) ; : PR I NTSTR I NG* (7 
, 128) I "location plotting"; :P0KE1 
327, 128:PRINTSTRING*(8, 128); :PRI 
NT" INDIVIDUAL PLOT LOCATIONS MAY 

BELOADED FROM TAPE OR DISK, OR 
MAYBE ENTER AND THEN SAVED." 
100 PR I NTSTR I NG* < 32, 252) » : PRINTS 
TRING* (9, 128); "select 1 or 2 ";: 
PRINTSTRING*(11, 128); "press 3 to 

end this program" ;: P0KE1516, 128 
: POKE 1 520 , 128:P0KE1525, 128:P0KE1 
533, 128:P0KE1534, 128:P0KE1535, 12 
8:P0KE151 1 , 128: P0KE1512, 51 :P0KE1 
513, 128:P0KE1494, 128 
110 POKE 1493, 50: POKE 1492, 128: POK 
E1489, 128: POKE 1488, 49: POKE 1487, 1 
28:SCREEN0, 1 

1 20 QQ*= I NKEY* : I FQQ*= " " THEN 1 20EL 
SESOUND180, 1 : SOUND220, 1 : IFQQ*< " 1 
" ORQQ* > " 3 " THEN 1 20ELSE I FQQ*= " 2 " TH 
EN 1 90ELSE I FQQ*= " 3 " THENPOKE 113,0: 
EXEC40999 

130 CLS7 : J 88 1 : PR I NT096 , STR I NG* < 32 
,236);" ENTER LATITUDE (FROM 11 
TO 39) ":PRINT9TRING*(32, 143) ; :PR 
INT8192, STRING* (32, 227) ; :PRINTS1 
74, " " ; : INPUT A: SOUND 180, 1 : S0UND22 
0,1: IFA< 1 1ORA>39THEN130 
1 40 PR I NT@224 , STR I NG* ( 32 , 236 ) ; " 
ENTER LONGITUDE (FROM 54 TO 95)" 
; : PR I NTSTR I NG* (32, 143) ; : PR I NTSTR 
ING*(32,227) ; :PRINT8302, ""; : INPU 
TC: SOUND 180, 1 : SOUND220, 1 : IFC<540 
RO95THEN140 

1 50 PR I NTS352 , STR I NG* ( 32 , 236 ) ; " 
WHAT IS THE DIRECTION. EX: WNW.": 
PR I NTSTR I NG* (32, 143) ; :PRINT@448, 
STRING* (32, 227) ; :PRINT@430, ""; : I 
NPUTB* : SOUND 180, 1 : SOUND220, 1 : B= ( 
(42-A) *5. 96875) :D=( (98.5-0*5.54 
37826) 

1 60 I FB*= " N " THENX =0 : Y=- 1 : ELSE I FB 
*» " S " THENX -0 : Y» 1 : ELSE I FB*« " W " THE 
NX=-1 : Y=0: ELSE I FB*= " E " THEN X = 1 : Y= 
0: ELSE I FB* 8 * " NE " THENX 88 1 : Y=-l : ELSE 
IFB*="NW"THENX=-1 : Y=-l : ELSEIFB*= 
" SE" THENX 88 1 : Y=l : ELSEIFB*="SW"THE 
NX=-1 : Y=l 

1 70 I FB*= " ENE " THENX =2 : Y— 1 : ELSE I 
FB*= " ESE " THENX*2 : Y= 1 : ELSE I FB*= " W 
NW " THENX=-2 : Y=- 1 : ELSE I FB*= " WSW " T 
HENX=-2: Y=l: EL SE I F B*= " NNW " THEN X = 
- 1 : Y»-2 : ELSE I FB*= " NNE " THENX* 8 1 : Y» 
-2 : ELSE I FB*= " SSW " THENX=- 1 : Y=2 : EL 
SEIFB*="SSE"THENX=1 : Y=2 
180 GOTO270 

1 90 S0UND5 , 1 : CLS8 : PR I NT632 , STR I N 
G* (32, 147);" ARE YOU ENTERING NE 



W PLOT DATA OR DO YOU WISH TO A 
DD PLOTS TO OLD RECORDS < ENTER 
nEW OR oLD>":PRINTSTRING*(32, 156 
)l 

200 N0*« I NKEY* : I FNO** " " THEN200EL 

SE I FNO*< > " N " ANDNO*< > " O " THEN200EL 

SE I FNO*» " O " THEN680 

210 CLS: IFV>1THENV=V+1 

220 PRINT" PRESS < ENTER > WHEN 

FINSHED" : PRINTSTRING* (32, 34) ; : SO 

UND180, 1 : SOUND220, 1 : TA=48 

230 TA-TA+16: IFTA>448THENTA*448 

240 PRINTSTA+1,V; ". ";: INPUT "L AT 

";H(V) : IFH(V)=0THEN270ELSEIFH(V) 

< 1 10RH (V) >4 1 THENPR I NT9T A , " ":G 

OTO240 

250 TA-TA+16: IFTA>458THENTA«464 
260 PRINT8TA+3, "LON"; : INPUT I (V) : 
IF I (VX540RI (V) >98THENPR I NT6T A , " 

" : GOTO260: ELSEV=V+1 : GOTO230 
270 PRINTS0, " do you want gri 
d over 1 ay? " : PR I NTSTR I NG* ( 32 , 236 ) 
; :SOUND5,5:PRINT@0, " DO YOU W 
ANT GRID OVERLAY?" :SOUND50, 5: R*- 
I NKEY* : I FR**= " N " THEN330ELSE I FR*» " 
Y " THEN2S0ELSE I FR*< > " N " ORR*< > " Y " 0 
RR$=» "THEN270 

280 pm0de4 , 1 : screen 1,1: color0 , 1 : 
pcls:ln=18:forll=ito9:line(Ln,0) 
-(LN, 192) ,pset:ln=ln+28:nextll:l 
N=l 1 : F0RLL=1T07: LINE (0, LN) -(256, 
LN) , PSET: LN=LN+30: NEXTLL 
290 DRAW'BMll, 10R3E1U4H1L2G1D1F1 
R2BD3BR7R3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R4BD6BR 1 4R3E 
1U4H1L2G1D1F1R2BR10BD3E1U4H1L2G1 
D4F1R2BR16H1U1E1R2E1U1H1L2G1D1F1 
R2F 1 D 1 G 1 L2BR9R3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R4BD6BR 
15H1U1E1R2E1U1H1L2G1D1F1R2F1D1G1 
L2BR 1 2E 1 U4H 1 L2G 1D4F1 R2BR 15" 
300 DRAW "BM123, 10E4U2L5BR1 1BD6R 
3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R4BD6BR 1 4E4U2L5BD6BR 1 
4E1U4H1L2G1D4F1R2BR16R2E1U1H1L2G 
1 D 1 F 1 H 1 U4E 1 R2BR7BD6R3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R 
4BD6BR15R2E1U1H1L2G1D1F1H1U4E1R2 
BR 1 0BD6E 1 U4H 1L2G1 D4F 1 R2BR 1 5R3E 1 U 
1 H 1 L3U3R4BD6BR6R3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R4 " 
310 DR AW " BM3 , 20U6L 162D1 R5BD3BR7E 
1 U4H 1 L2G 1 D4F 1 R2BD20BL 1 0R2E 1 U 1 H 1 E 
1U1H1L2G1 BD5BR7R3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R4BD3 
6BL11R3E1U1H1E1U1H1L2G1BR10BD5E1 
U4H 1L2G1 D4F 1 R2BD30BL6L4U 1 E3R 1 U 1 H 
1 L2G 1 BR7BD5R3E 1U1H1L3U3R4" 
320 DRAW "BM6, 130L4U1E3R1UBH1L2G 
1 BR 1 1 BD4U4H 1 L2G 1 D4F 1 R2BD30BL8U6G 
2BD4BR7R3E 1 U 1 H 1 L3U3R4BD36BL8U6G2 
BD4BR9E 1 U4H 1 L2G 1 D4F 1 R2 " : GOTO340 
330 PM0DE4, 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : COLOR0, 1 : 
PCLS : DRAW " BM0 , 0R255D 191 L255U 191" 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 165 



340 DRAW " BM37 , 62U6R 1 F2D 1U1E2R1D6 
BR9E 1 U4H 1L2G1 D4F 1 R2BR5U6L 1 R3F 1 D 1 
01L1R1F1D1G 1L3BR 1 0L4R2U6L2R4BR4D 
6R4BR7L4U6R4BD3BL2L1 " 
350 LINE < 136, 3)-<i35, 6> ,PSET:FOR 
LN=1TO1S0: READLA, LB: LINE- (LA, LB) 

, pset: next: QOTO420 

360 DATA136,0, 130, 16, 128, 13, 127, 
15, 129,20, 124,28, 126,22, 123, 18, 1 
24, 12, 122, 16, 122,28, 125,34, 122,3 
5, 126,36, 124,40, 121,40, 121,42, 11 
4, 47, 1 13, 48, 1 10, 49, 100, 57, 95, 64, 
94,67,95,71,96,75, 100,84, 100,87, 
101,88, 102,92, 101,97,100, 100,98, 
101 , 96, 100, 95, 97, 92, 96, 91 , 93 
370 DATA90,90,87,88,89,85,88,84, 
87,85,87,78,84,76,82,73,80,72,77 
, 73, 74, 75, 72, 74, 69, 71 , 64, 70, 62, 7 
1,58,71,58,67,57,70,48,71,45,71, 
48, 73, 51 , 72, 49, 75, 52, 77, 50, 79, 48 
, 76, 44, 78, 36, 74, 34, 75, 28, 74, 22, 7 
5, 20, 75, 18, 76, 19, 77, 14, 80, 10, 80, 
10,82,5,87,5,91,7,94,6,98 
380 DATA3, 99, 3, 118,8, 128, 12, 134, 
17, 137, 19, 137,22, 139,24, 139,28, 1 
38,34, 137,39, 137,40, 135,42, 135,4 
4, 128,44, 126,45, 124,50, 123,53, 12 
2,58, 121,60, 122,63, 121,64, 124,61 
, 128,58, 140,57, 136,56, 137,57, 140 
,58, 144,56, 148,53, 152, 71 , 152, 77, 
153,82, 156,84, 156,84, 162 
390 DATA82, 164,83, 168,83, 171,81, 
177, 84, 181 , 86, 184, 91 , 188, 94, 189, 
101 , 188, 104, 185, 106, 186, 108, 185, 
110, 187, 112, 187, 119, 191, 126, 185, 
126, 179, 127, 180, 130, 178, 133, 178, 
134, 176, 139, 176, 143, 175, 144, 172, 
148, 170, 150, 171, 151, 173, 147, 175, 
149, 177, 149, 180, 146, 184 
400 DATA 148, 188, 151, 188, 152, 187, 
150, 184, 150, 180, 151, 178, 157, 176, 
155, 174, 156, 172, 158, 172, 159, 174, 
159, 176, 164, 176, 169, 181, 179, 180, 
185, 184, 200, 180, 201 , 181 , 197, 182, 
201 , 185, 208, 187, 208, 190, 214, 191 , 
82, 192,80, 186,71, 184,60, 168,62, 1 
66, 55, 164, 52, 166, 38, 162 
410 DATA22, 150, 18, 150, 12, 152,8, 1 
53,4, 151,0, 149 

420 LINE <75, 119) -(78, 120) , PSET: F 
ORLN= 1 T028 : RE ADM A , MB: LI NE- ( MA , MB 
) , PSET : NEXT : 8OTO440 
430 DAT A81, 118,84, 118,87, 115,92, 
115,90, 117,95, 119,96,118, 100, 118 
, 101, 121, 109, 121, 109, 124, 113, 126 
,118, 126, 115, 131, 119, 130, 128, 131 
, 134, 129, 125, 126, 126, 124, 121, 123 
,119, 121,99, 113,94, 113,90, 112,83 



,113,78, 116,78, 118,75, 119 

440 LINE<123,141)-(117,143),PSET 

: FORLN= 1 T09 : RE ADNA , NB : L I NE- < NA , N 

B) , PSET: NEXT: GOTO460 

450 DATA1 14, 142, 1 14, 141 , 1 12, 141 , 

111, 139, 1 14, 138, 1 18, 139, 120, 138, 

120, 140, 123, 141 

460 LINE (164, 140) -(160, 138) , PSET 
: FORLN" 1 Td2 1 : RE ADO A, OB: LINE- (OA, 
OB) , PSET: NEXT: GOTO480 
470 DATA 155, 139, 153, 139, 149, 142, 
147, 140, 138, 139, 135, 140, 134, 138, 
135, 137, 144, 138, 142, 136, 142, 133, 
138, 132, 143, 129, 148, 131, 153, 130, 
156, 132, 160, 132, 161 , 135, 166, 137, 
167, 139, 164, 140 

480 LINE (180, 141) -(176, 141) ,PSET 
: FORLN= 1 T07 : READQA , QB: LINE— (QA, Q 
B) , PSET: NEXT: GOTO500 
490 DATA 173, 142, 173, 139, 174, 138, 
178, 139, 181, 138, 182, 139, 180, 141 
500 LINE (115, 109) -(114, 106) , PSET 
: FORLN- 1 T07 : RE ADRA , RB : L I NE- ( RA , R 
B) , PSET: NEXT: GOTO520 
510 DATA1 11, 104, 112, 101, 114, 102, 
1 15, 104, 1 15, 106, 1 16, 108, 1 15, 109 
520 LINE (108, 92) -(114, 92) , PSET: L 
INE- (114, 93) , PSET: LINE- (109, 93) , 
PSET: LINE- ( 108, 92) , PSET: LINE ( 1 16 
i 92) -( 1 19, 94) , PSET: LINE- ( 1 17, 97) 
, PSET: LINE- ( 1 16, 96) , PSET: LINE- ( 1 
18, 94) , PSET: LINE- ( 1 16, 92) , PSET: L 
INE ( 120, 99) - ( 123, 101 ) , PSET: LINE- 
(123, 103), PSET 

530 LINE (126, 104) -(128, 107), PSET 
: LINE ( 128, 1 10) - ( 130, 1 13) , PSET: LI 
NE(134, 114)-(136,115),PSET:LINE- 
(134, 117) , PSET: LINE (145, 118)-(14 
7, 1 18) , PSET: LINE- ( 149, 1 19) , PSET: 
LINEU37, 124) -(141, 123) ,PSET:LIN 
E- ( 139, 124) , PSET: LINE- ( 137, 124) , 
PSET 

540 LINE (205, 149) -(206, 151) , PSET 
: LINE- (205, 151) , PSET: LINE- (204, 1 
52) , PSET: LINE- (203, 150) , PSET: LIN 
E-(205, 149) , PSET: LINE (209, 178)-( 
211, 177) ,PSET 

550 LINE (209, 180) -(205, 180) , PSET 
: FORLN= 1 T07 : READSA , SB : L I NE- ( SA , S 
B) , PSET: NEXT: 6OTO570 
560 DAT A209 , 1 82 , 204 , 1 83 , 205 , 1 84 , 
207, 184,208, 185,207, 182,208, 180 
570 F0RLN=1T014:READCR,CS: CIRCLE 
(CR,CS) , l: NEXT: CIRCLE ( 187,59) ,2: 
C I RCLE ( 57 , 67 ) , 2 : GOTO590 
580 DATA143, 121, 140, 121,197, 141, 
197, 144, 199, 146, 203, 143, 203, 146, 
201, 148,206, 155,208, 159,208, 164, 



166 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



207, 167, 216, 167, 204, 173 
590 RESTORE : I FQQ** '« 1 ■ THENC I RCLE < 
D, B) ,6: SOUNDS, 1 : CIRCLE <D, B) ,3: CI 
RCLE <D, B) ,6,5:CIRCLE(D,B) ,3, 5: CI 

rcle<d-<5*x> ,b-<5#y> > ,2: circle (d 
-<7#X),b-<7*y> ), i,5:d=d+x:b=«b+y: 

A*= I NKE Y* : I FA* > " " THEN630ELSE I F I N 
T <D> <20RINT <D> >2S40RINT (BX20RIN 
T <B) >190THEN630ELSE590 
600 P= 1 : I FH < P ) =0THEN630 
610 IFQQ*="2 ,, THENA=H<P) :C«I (P> :B 
■ ( (42-A) #5. 96875) : D= ( <98. 5-C) «5. 
5437826 > : SOUNDS , 1 : FORPP« 1 T04 : C I R 
CLE<D,B> ,3,8:CIRCLE(D,B> ,5,8:CIR 
CLE (D, B) , 3, 5: CIRCLE (D, B> , 5, 5: NEX 
TPP: CIRCLE <D, B> , 3, 8: CIRCLE <D, B> , 
5,8 

620 P=P+ 1 : I FH < P > >0THEN6 1 0 
630 A*= I NKE Y* : I FA«- " " THEN630ELSE 
CLS : SOUND 1 80 , 1 : SOUND220 , 1 : PRINT" 
THE HURRICANE LOCATION IS": PR 
INTSTRING*<32, 156) ; : F= < <B/5. 9687 
5> -42) *-l : G» < <D/5. 5437826) -98. 5) 
*- 1 : FORX= 1 TO500 : NEX T : PR I NT : I FA=0 
THENF»0: IFC=0THENG*0 
640 PRINTSTRIN8*<32,34) t " LA 
TITUDE=" i Z PRINTF: PRINTSTRING* (32 
, 34) ; : SOUND50, 1 : FORX=1TO500: NEXT 
IFORX»1TO500: NEXT: PRINT" LON 
GITUDE «" ; : PRINTS: SOUND50, 1 : PRIN 
TSTR I N8* ( 32 , 34 > ; : FORX= 1 TO500 : NEX 
T 

650 I FQQ*- " 1 " THENA*- I NKE Y* : PR I NT 
Q389, "press any key -For menu": IF 
A*= M " THEN650ELSE80 
660 FOR X= 1 TO200 : NE XT : SOUND50 ,1:1 
FQQ*="2"THENPRINT©256, " DO YOU W 
ISH TO SAVE THE PLOTS? 

<yES OR nO>":PRINTSTRING*<32,3 
4) ; : A*-INKEY»: IFA*=""THEN660ELSE 
I FA*< > " Y " ANDA*< > " N " THEN660ELSE I F 
A*»"N"THENV=1 : 6OTO80 
670 IFV>1THENN0*="N" 
680 I FNO«« " O " THENPR I NT8224 , STR I N 
G*<32,147);" <tAPE OR dl 

SK?>" : PRINTSTRING* (32, 156) ; : TD*= 
INKEY*: IFTD*=" " THEN680ELSE I FTD*< 
>"D"ANDTD*< >"T"THEN680 
690 I FNO*« "N " THENPR I NTS356 , " 

<tAPE OR dISK>": PRINTSTRING* (3 
2, 34) ; : TD*= INKEY*: IFTD*=" "THEN69 
0ELSEIFTD*< >"D"ANDTD*< >"T"THEN69 
0 

700 I FNO*= " O " THENPR I NTS352 , STR I N 
G*<32, 147) ; : PRINTSTRING* <32, 143) 
; : PRINTSTRING* (32, 156) ; : SOUND50, 
l:PRINT8392, "FILENAME: "; :LINEINP 
UTFZ*:SOUND50, 1 



710 I FNO*« ■ N " THENPR I NTS44Q , STR I N 
G* <32, 34) ; : SOUND50, 1 : PRINTS424, " 
FILENAME: " ; : LINEINPUTFZ*: SOUND50 

720 I FTD*= " T " THENTD— 1 ELSE I FTD*- 
"D"THENTD=1 

730 I FNO*= " N " THEN760ELSECLS7 : PR I 
NTQ192, STRING* (32, 147) ;: PRINT" 

LOADING * " 5 : PRINTFZ*; : PRIN 
T : PRINTSTRING* (32, 156) ; :OPEN" 
I " , #TD, FZ*+" /DAT" : X=l 
740 I FEOF ( TD ) THEN750ELSE I NPUT#TD 
,H(X) , I (X) :X-X+l:GOTO740 

750 close:v=x-i:cls8:print" thes 
e * "; :printfz*; :print"" plots lo 
aded" : printstrin8* (32, 147) ; : forq 
X=lTov:PRlNT" "; :printqx; :PRINT" 
lat -"; :printh(qx) ;: print" 
long -"; :printi (qx> :forqz=1to40: 
nextqz : sound220, 1 : nextqx : forqv=l 
toi000:next:goto210 

760 V»V-l:CLS8:PRINTai92,STRINS* 
(32, 147);: PRINT" SAVING '";:PRIN 
TFZ*; : PRINT"' — ";':PRINTV; : PRINT 
"PLOTS": PRINTSTRING* (32, 156) ; :OP 
EN"0" , #TD, FZ*: FORX=lTOV: PRINT#TD 

,H(X) , I (X) : next: close#td: goto80 



A<mow Computing 

49 Brookland Ave., Aurora, Ontario Canada L4G 2H6 
FAMILY GAMES 

The popular STOCKBROKER and CR IBB AGE 32K 

$14.95 each. 

ADVENTURE GAMES: Sea Quest and Shenanigans from 
MARK DATA only $24.95(C); $27.95(D) each 

From BRANTEX, PIRATE TREASURE 16K $13.95 

SCAVENGER HUNT 16K $18.95 

EDUCATIONAL GAMES 

COLORMIND, CONCEN - improve your memory and logical 
thinking - 16K $10.95 each 

• • • 
Also from BRANTEX 

EDU-COMBO (Math Derby, Peek 'N' Spell Metric Converter) 
16K only $29.95 

BUSINESS: HOUSEHOLD EXPENSE MANAGER 16K$19.95 

LOAN ANALYSIS 16K $20.95 

• • • 

NEW from MARK DATA 

The amazing TIME FIGHTER 16K $24.95(C) 

32K $27.95(D) 

Also the ever popular GLAXXONS 16K $24.95(C) 

32K $27.95(D) 

• • • 

UTILITIES: ROMDISK: Run your rom pack games from a disk! 
64K $15.95 

MR. COPY - make up to 99 copies of one program at once! 
16K $15.95 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 167 



Learn Something New and Useful! 



1. Modems & Telecommunications 



The Color Connection II for 
RSDOS and Cassette 

• 300 baud 

• Supports auto-dail 

• Full & half duplex 

• Menu driven - easy to use 

• Buffer size (for upload & download) shown 
on the screen. 

• Reads & writes standard ASCII text files. 

• Upload & download protocol is user 
defineable. 

• Single key "macros" allow entry of often 
used passwords & IDs with a single key. 

• AH printable characters available at the 
keyboard & all control characters are 
supported including ESCape, RUB, DEL, 
etc. 

• User selectable anti-truncation features 
will not allow a word to be broken when 
wrapping from one line to the next. 

• User selectable inverted screen - for either 
black letters on a light screen or light 
letters on a black screen. 

• Includes our "Introduction to Data 
Communications" tutorial at no additional 
charge. 

• Requires 16K on cassette or 32K on disk, 
cass $34.95 disk 




The Color Connection II for OS-9 

• XON/XOFF software handshaking is 
supported. 

• A 12 page on-line screen display lets you 
view the last 12 screens even while the 
software is receiving data. 

• The expandable buffer allows you to save 
anything on the screen to memory. 

• The OS-9 shell is accessible - within Color 
Connection II you can invoke any OS-9 
command. 

• Macros allow you to enter often used 
passwords & IDs quickly. 

• Buffer size is shown on the screen. 

• Reads & writes standard ASCII text files. 

• Upload & download protocol is user 
definable. 

• All printable- characters available at the 
keyboard & ail control characters are 
supported. 

• User selectable anti-truncation. 

• 300 baud with full and half duplex. 

• Supports auto dial. 

• Menu driven - easy to use. 

• Glossary of telecommunications terms 
included. 

$49.95 



The Color Connection II for FLEX 

• 300 baud 

• Full & half duplex 

• Supports auto-dial modems 

• Menu driven - easy to use 

• Buffer size (for uploading & downloading) 
is shown on the screen. 

• Single key "macros" allow entry of often 
used passwords & IDs easily. 

• All printable characters available at the 
keyboard & all control characters are 
supported. 

• User selectable anti-truncation. 

• XON/XOFF software handshaking is 
supported. 

$49.95 

SPECIAL PACKAGES 

Volks Modem w/Cofor Connection II 
cassette 
RSDOS disk 
OS-9 disk 
FLEX disk 




$ 99.00 
$104.00 
$114.00 
$114.00 



Smartmodem w/Color Connection II 
cassette $275.00 
RSDOS disk $279.00 
OS-9 disk $289.00 
FLEX disk $289.00 



Don't Forget! 

2. The Personal Time Management System & Event Recorder 

You won't forget with Don't Forget! You'll actually enjoy getting organized with this 
personal time management system. The Macintosh-like icons make entering your 
personal schedule simple and fun. But if you need instructions, there are help screens 
to assist you. 

You'll never miss a birthday or important appointment again! With Don't Forget! you can 
record the entire year's occasions and daily appointments ahead. Each day has 
spaces for 4 Special Occasions, 2 Memos, and hourly notes for 6 am through 9 pm. The 
built-in 51 x 24 upper and lower case h'hres display makes it very easy to read. 

You can display or print any daily schedule - or a whole week at a time - so you 
remember every important event. You can even print a blank monthly calendar page 
with big boxes to scribble notes in! 

So use your CoCo's memory and Don't Forget! as your personal secretary. Designed 
mouse, joystick, or keyboard entry, Don't Forget requires 32K and one disk drive. 



$24.95 




3. Put a MONITOR on your CoCo with Video Plus! 




NAP green screen *109 95 
NAP amber screen $ 119 95 
Color with audio *275 00 

Our monochrome monitors 
have audio— no need to add 
expensive amplifiers or go 
without sound! Our NAP 
monitors are the same as the 
familiar Gorilla— except that 
by special arrangement with 
North American Phillips (Mag- 
navox) ours has the audio 
amplifier built in! 



Yes! You can enjoy the crisp display of a composite video 
monitor using Computerware's Video Plus interface Each is 
fully assembled and tested. Installation is quick, easy, and 
requires no soldering. Your TV output is not disabled Audio 
output available for color monitors. Choose the model right 
for your computer and monitor. 

Video Plus '24" 

Interfaces the original model of Color Computer to any 

composite video monitor (color or monochrome^). 

Video Plus II M '26" 

Interfaces the CoCo II with a monochrome composite video 

monitor. 

Video Plus II C '39" 

Interfaces the CoCo II with any composite video monitor 
(color or monochrome). 



Looking for a New Thrill? 



Tired of shoot 'em up, chase 'em around arcade games? Bored 
with one-line text adventure games? 

You want a new challenge - one that dares the mind & thrills the 
senses with brilliant graphics, sound & a real plot! 

Try our new STRATEGY GAME series! 




MAJOR ISTAR 

Under the Doomed Sea 

SCENARIO: You travel to TRIDEN 
RESEARCH DOME because an urgent 
call for help is received from one of 
the service droids stationed there. 
He said help was urgently needed, 
but before he could say why, his 
transmission was cut off! 

OBJECT: Solve the mystery at 
TRIDENT in as few, moves as 
possible. 

SETTING: In the beginning of the 
21st century undersea cities, inter- 
stellar spaceships, colonies in 
other planets & solar systems, 
worker droids, super computers, 
are all realities. One hero of the 
time is MAJOR ISTAR. In the late 
1990's when space exploration & 
colonies began, it was necessary 
to form a task force to offer help to 
all that needed it in these hostile 
environments. You, Camerion J. 
Istar, are a highly rated member of 
that team and you have never 
failed to solve a mystery! 

cass $24.95 disk $27 95 



STAR TRADER 

As a merchant ship captain in the 
far future you travel in real-time 
between solar systems, trading 
cargo, encountering pirate ships, 
stopping at starports for fuel or 
repairs, & making money! Your 
goal is to earn 1,000 credits to 
retire in luxury! 

Your graphic cockpit shows read- 
outs of your location, damage 
status, credit balance, cargo desti- 
nation & due date, the location of 
nearby starships, fuel & laser 
power levels, & the current date. 
With your joystick you choose 
your next move or transaction. As 
you travel, transport, trade, & 
battle, you develop a reputation 
which effects your future activities 
& rewards. 

With different skill levels & many 
variable factors, this simulation 
offers excitement & the challenge 
of a new game every time you 
play! (Requires 32K on cassette or 
64K on disk, with one joystick or 
mouse, & Ext. Basic.) 
cass $24.95 disk $27.95 



Or get involved with SPORTS! 




Colorbowl y 
Football % 




Begin with our national anthem, 
then race into action in hi-res 
graphics with realistic player & 
puck movement. One or two players 
compete against the real time 
clock. Many skill levels for all 
ages. (Req. 32K) 

cass $24.95 disk $27.95 



Big league graphics start the 
football season! Two players play 
against each other or one can 
sharpen his offense against the 
computer. Use 8 defensive plays, 9 
offensive plays, & many formations 
to win the Colorbowl! (Req. 32K) 

cass $24.95 disk $27.95 





As a detective for Sam Sleuth 
Investigations you are given 3 
cases (of increasing difficulty): 

Case of the Missing Cat 
Mystery at the Museum 
Baffling Bank Robbery 

Using your sleuth skills (& joystick 
or mouse) you search the town 
(displayed in hi-res graphics), 
interviewing townspeople, col- 
lecting evidence, examining the 
grounds, & gathering data to solve 
the mysteries & apprehend the 
culprits. Remember you are working 
against the clock! 

Investigate the bank, museum, 
school, offices & homes, market, 

gas station Talk to Mike, Willy, 

Roy, Sue, Chrissy,. . .And keep 
track of those addresses & clues! 

The unique graphics presentation 
& mouse/joystick control are as 
intriguing as the mysteries! (Req. 
64K & mouse or joystick). 

cass $24.95 disk $27.95 




MIDDLE KINGDOM 

In this real time graphic adventure 
your goat is to become ruler of the 
Middle Kingdom, which can be 
achieved only by returning the 
three magic Rings to the Sanctuary, 
You must search the rooms of the 
Catacombs, Temple, & Pyramid. 

You choose your character of a 
Magician, Merchant, or Warrior, 
each having their own weapons & 
abilities. You will face monsters of 
all types, Lizardmen, Trolls, Goblins, 
& worse. You'll find treasures of all 
kinds too as well as new weapons 
along the way! 

Try this medieval adventure if you 
dare! (Requires 32K) 

cass $24.95 disk $27.95 



Call or Write to: 



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Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in the rainbow's 
Scoreboard column. All entries must be received by the first of the month to be eligible for the following 
month's Scoreboard. They must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, 
your high score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, 

C/O THE RAINBOW. 

★ New Number One • Last Month's Number One 



AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 

27,805 -frJohn Marcoglieae, Eastchester, NY 

18,290 Bill Sain, Charlotte, NC 
ANNIHILATOR (Chromasette) 

I, 000 ^Matthew Kromeke, Albuquerque, NM 
ASSAULT (MichTron) 

5,960 *Kevin Marsh, Bokeelia, FL 
ASTEROID 

4014 *Bobby Rosingana, Danville, CA 
BAG-IT-MAN (Aardvark) 

418,790 ^Cornelius Caesar, Hofheim, 

West Germany 
101,400 Daniel Belisle, Montreal, Quebec 
37,1 10 Stephane Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec, 
BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

460-0 "^Walter Trainlips, Janesville, Wl 
324-0 Michael Rosenberg, Pre9tonsbjrg, KY 
284-0 Seth Louis Newman, Yardley, PA 
223-0 Chris Young, Ft. Worth, TX 
188-0 Andrew Smith, Grimsby, Ontario, 
159-0 Jack Darrah, Philadelphia, PA 
114-0 Brennan Baybeck, Traverse City, Ml 
99-0 Walker Astle, Grimsby, Ontario 
62-0 Eric Poulin, Montreal, Quebec, 
56-0 Charles Yonts, Miami, FL 
48-0 Brendan Smith, Coral Springs, FL 
BATS AND BUGS (THE RAINBOW) 

24,600 *Michael Rosenberg, Prestonburg, KY 
3,600 Apollo Latham, Rich Square, NC 
2,750 •Anthony Schmuck, Wellsville, PA 
BEAM RIDER (Spectral Associates) 

248.150 *Robert Paul, Boynton Beach, FL 
BIRD ATTACK (Tom Mix) 

222,625 WAndrew Smith, Grimsby, Ontario, 
Canada 
BLACKJACK (Radio Shack) 

39,450 *Michael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg, KY 

II, 820 Woody Farmer, Acme, Alberta 
BLACK SANCTUM (Mark Data) 

132 *Jeft Allen, Montrose, CO 
BLOC HEAD (Computerware) 
1,218,325 * Brian Spek, Keswick, Ontario 
1,006.200 Lindi Wolf. Fairbanks, AK 
819,425 Keith Denhoed, Coalhurst, Alberta 
781,350 Joe Golkoaky. Portage, Ml 
395,175 Jeff Roberg, Winfield. KS 
BUSTOUT (Radio Shack) 

42.000 ^Derrick Kardos, Colonia, NJ 
42,000 *Martin Klein, Skokie, IL 
34,700 Sara Hennessey, Golden Valley. MN 
28,720 Parry Denton, New Baden, IL 
27,880 Mike Wells, Pittsburgh. PA 
19,630 Tommy Parker, Talladega. AL 
9,178 Tony Boring, Armagh, PA 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 
6,447,950 *Jon Griffith 
5.488,250 Jim Kennett 
2,902,700 Michael Popovich, Nashua, NH 
2,087,650 Edmund Greene, Nashua, NH 
1.134.600 Richard Buttermore. Grand Rapids, Ml 
1,125,600 Blossom Mayor, East Greenbush, NY 
1,000.000 Donald Hummer. Reynoldsburg, OH 
943,950 Theodore Mayor, East Greenbush, NY 
648,900 Jon Carmichael, Ogden, UT 
253,000 Phill Zarfos, Daliastown, PA 
232.350 Marc Harris, Colorado Springs, CO 
CALIXTO ISLAND (Mark Data) 

136 ikDavid Voerman, Oualicum Beach, 
British Columbia 
CANDY CO. (Intracolor) 

451,362 *Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
99,516 Tiffany Morgan, Lookout Mtn., TN 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
8.990,000 *Glen Giacomelli, Woodbridge. Ontario 
1,603,400 Shen Mansell, Calgary, Alberta 
1,571,300 Jeff Weaver. Gordonville, PA 



1,426,600 Sean Whitley, Arvada, CO 
1.400,200 James Stevenson, Marshall, TX 
760,000 Mike Butenhoff, Minnesota City, MN 
CASHMAN (MichTron) 

$23,320 WJett Allen, Montrose, CO 
$22,310 Pete Olah, Garfield Hts., OH 
$19,650 Perry Denton, New Baden, IL 
$16,000 Scott Oberholtzer, Lexington, MA 
$14,250 Paul Tisdel, Les Saules, Quebec 
CAVERN COPTER (THE RAINBOW; 

1213 *Doug Schwartz, Glendale, AZ 
747 •Susan Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
CHAMELEON (Computorware) 

29,200 *Baiju Shah, Deep River, Ontario 
CHOPPER STRIKE (MichTron) 

72,100 *Lisa Siclari, Staten Island, NY 
67,900 Matt McCann, Louisville, KY 
63,000 Andrew Figel, Sardis, OH 
47,400 David Figel, Sardis, OH 
20,600 Mario Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 
128,210 *Moe Tindell. Sebring, FL 
116,475 Jeffrey Kochs, Grove City, OH 
116,470 •Colin Kerridge, Ladysmith, 

British Columbia 
110,475 •Andrew Truesdale, Ferguson, MO 
104.270 Ken Bird, Delaware, OH 
102,900 Cheryl Pratt, Moab. UT 
COCO TREK (Chromasette) 
2,500,000 *Ted Warren, Morgan, ID 
COLORPEDE (Intracolor) 
10,001,051 *Mark Smith, Santa Ana, CA 
3,355,248 Scott Drake, Pine City, NY 
2.614.230 Jerry Petkash, Warren, Ml 

2.547.299 Rich McGervey, Morgantown, WV 
2,471,342 Vincent Lok, Ontario. Canada 

COSMIC CLONES (Mark Data) 

29,450 *Robert Shaw, Kincardine, Ontario 
6,050 •Stephane Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
COSMIC INVADERS (Dragon Data, Ltd.) 

41,300 T^Waiker Astle, Grimsby, Ontario 
20,450 Andrew Smith, Grimsby, Ontario 
CU*BER (Tom Mix) 

204,575 *Martin C. Klein, Skokie, IL 
201,190 Jay Pribbte. Davenport, IA 
196.090 Randall F. Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
94,940 Martin C. Klein,- Skokie, IL 
49,510 Doug Kleir, Grand Rapids, Ml 
36,960 Blossom Mayor, East Greenbush, NY 
DANGER RANGER (Med Systems Software) 

1,962 *Michael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg, KY 
1,890 Fred Thompson, Saugus, MA 
DEFENSE (Spectral Associates) 

115,335 *Patricia Bostedor, Jackson, Ml 
103,660 Mary A. Brickies, Allen Park, Ml 
DEMON SEED (MichTron) 

13,010 i^Mario Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
DESERT GOLF (Spectral Associates) 

28 *Craig Vodnik, Bensenville, IL 
31 Kenton Fifield, Fort Francis, Ontario 
DESERT PATROL 

310.100 ^Stephane Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1 ,762.980 ^Michael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg, KY 

1.294.300 John Statham, Strathroy, Ontario 
625,000 Simon Dickson, Bangor, N. Ireland 
318,550 Kanti Dinda, Kingston, Ontario 
294,300 Chip Lilley, Finleyville, PA 

DOODLE BUG ( Compute rware) 
4,442,360 *Eiko Cary, National City, CA 
2,577,515 Tim Brown, Clio, Ml 
1,767,630 Perry Denton, New Baden, IL 
448,890 Ellen Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
109,660 Byron Albertson, Williams Lake, 
British Columbia 



DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 
1,125,000 *Mark Hurst, Sheridan, OR 
1 ,080,000 Phillip© Duplanties, St. Jerome, 
Quebec 

639,210 Paul Baker, Pittsburgh. PA 
605.890 Peter Sherburne, Highland, CA 
474,040 Paul Moritz, Butte, MT 
DRACONIAN (Tom Mix) 

190,840 *Kyle Keller, Overland Park, KS 
66,600 •James Toth, Punxsutawney, PA 
71,930 Michael Corman r W. Lafayette, IN 
47,670 Dan Neuman, Wauwatosa, Wl 
DUNKEY MUNKEY (Intellectronics) 
1,244,400 *Jack Baran, Bensatem, PA 
1,015,000 Kyle Keller, Overland Park, KS 
ELECTRON (Tom Mix) 

45,510 *John Sandberg, Concord, CA 
41 ,750 Michael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg, KY 
22,990 Alan Morris, Chicopee, MA 
19,500 Robby Presson, Florissant, MO 
11,020 Alfredo Santos, New York, NY 
FIRE COPTER (Adventure International) 
97,390 wSam Hughes, Colton, CA 
76,860 Woody Farmer, Acme, Alberta 
53,280 Kevin Marsh, Bokeelia, FL 
FLYBY (Chromasette) 

104,980 *David Finberg, Annandale, VA 
28,910 Ron Suedersky, Universal City, TX 
20,110 Rick Mansell, Calgary, Alberta 
16,670 Michael Rhattigan, Cory, NC 
4,880 Shen Mansell, Calgary, Alberta 
FOOTBALL (Radio Shack) 

256-0 'A" Mike Garozzo, Morrisville, PA 
217-0 Giacomelli, Woodbridge, Ontario 
161-0 David Hart, Salt Lake City, UT 
THE FROG (Tom Mix) 

156,000 ^Evelyn Gagnon, North Bay, Ontario 
FROGGIE (Spectral Associates) 

86,010 if David Garozzo, Morrisville, PA 
84,440 Bill Ide, Newark, DE 
74,050 Mike Garozzo, Morrisville, PA 
FURY (Computer Shack) 

78,200 *Jon Jenkins, Milner, GA 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

647.230 *Jack A. Tindle, Soquel, CA 
386,950 Robert Ahlgrim, Hutchinson, KS 
286,741 Rod Moore, Fork Union. VA 
188,130 Daryl Judd, Nampa, ID 
183,180 Lori Heape, Hutchinson, KS 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

48,870 *Tony Boring, Armagh, PA 
48,520 •Paul Sanecki 
GALAX ATT AX (Spectral Associates) 

253,900 *Shawn McAJpin, Louisville, KY 
113,650 Darrin Filand, WA 
104,550 Mitch Hayden, Univ. of Minn. 
82,650 Steve Hargis, Tucson, AZ 
74,550 John Goaselin, Campbell River, 
British Columbia 
GANGBUSTERS (Prickly-Pear) 
18,650.425 *Michael Rosenberg, Prestonburg, KY 
GHOST GOBBLER (Spectral Associates) 
1,007,430 *Todd Brannam, Charleston Hts., SC 
825,250 Randy Gerber, Wilmette, IL 
423,390 Rich McGervey, Morgantown, WV 
255,000 John Osborne, Kincardine, Ontario 
228,290 Patricia Lau, York, PA 
GLAXXONS (Mark Data) 

18,984 *Luc Poiiquin, Montreal, Quebec 
GLOMMER (THE RAINBOW) 

154 * Susan Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
GONE FISHING (The Rainbow) 

12 *Kevin Oberberger, Sparks, NV 
11 Emily Doubt, Deep River, Ontario 
10 Mike Cook, Dixon. IL 
10 Doug Schwartz, Glendale, AZ 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



II 



170 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 

SCOREBOARD 



9 Jeffrey Kochs, Grove City, OH 
9 Mona Young, Sheffield, MA 
GRABBER ( Tom Mix) 

147,600 *Brian Foley, Blackstone, MA 
129,100 •Blossom Mayor, East Greenbush, NY 
70,600 Michael Corman, Lafayette, IN 
27,750 Ellen Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
10,050 Anthony Schmuck, Wellsville, PA 
GREY LADY (Jarb Software) 

58,300 ^Bertha Jeffries, San Bernardino, CA 
HEIST (THE RAINBOW^ 

2,100 ^Sergio Waisser, Mexico City, Mexico 
1,500 Julio Comeilo, Scarborough, Ontario 
1,500 *Andy Dater, Medford, OR 
1,500 Joel Lombard!, Newark, DE 
1,500 *Jeff Roberg, Winfield, KS 
1 ,500 Kevin Speight, Bridgewater, 

Nova Scotia 
1,500 Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
ICE MASTER (Arcade Animation) 

312,150 *Stephane Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE (THE RAINBOW) 
870,333 'ArTony Boring, Armagh, PA 
4,230 Doug Schwartz, Glendale, AZ 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
3,007,000 *Tim Brown, Clio, Ml 
2,154,900 Scott Kubota, Whitby. Ontario 
2,099,300 Shawn McAlpin, Louisville, KY 
1,220,000 Edwin Prather, Oxnard. CA 
1,115,300 Ryan Van Manen, Grand Rapids, Ml 
KATER PILLAR ATTACK (Tom Mix) 

31,672 *Scott Fairfield, Williamstown, MA 
25,949 James A, Latere, Williamstown, MA 
18,949 Vadim Gotovsky, Toronto/Ontario 
15,821 Alex Gotovsky, Toronto, Ontario 
5,426 Russ Rosen, Cardiff, CA 
KEYS OF THE WIZARD (Spectral Associates) 

662 *Susan Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
662 *Pegi Tindle, Soquel, CA 
662 *Ellen Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
KING TUT (Tom Mix) 

130,200 *Alan Higgs, Calgary, Alberta 
THE KING (Tom Mix) 

10,000,100 WMark Smith, Santa Ana, CA 
4,040,300 Andy Truesdale, Ferguson, MO 
3,343,000 Corey Friedman, Minnetonka, MN 
2,410,200 Candy Harden, Birmingham, AL 
2,367,900 Richard Lacharite, Sherbrooke, 

Quebec 
KLENDATHU (Radio Shack) 
1,962,741 *Jay Pribbte, Davenport, IA 
1,245,821 John Sandberg, Concord, CA 
1,193,350 Tommy Parker, Talladega, AL 
1,182,685 David L. Ferris, Shickshinny, PA 
LANCER (Spectral Associates) 
2,797,450 ^Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
2,354,000 Alex State, Las Vegas, NV 
875,150 Larry Capen, Folsom, CA 
736,250 Sharon Cast en, Folsom, CA 
617,500 Donna Wilioughby, Brookfteld, IL 
54,050 Kevin Speight, Bridgewater, 
Nova Scotia 
LASERWORM ft FIREFLY (THE RAINBOW J 

116,622 ^Michael Rosenberg, Prestonburg, KY 
94,748 •Brian Chafin, Weyers Cave, VA 
67,515 Marco Swinkels, Beneluxlaan, 
Netherlands 

45,194 Theodore Latham Jr., Rich Square, NC 
43,420 Eric Morrell, SayreviHe, PA 
LUNAR ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 
162,100 *Sara Aliff, Northeast, MD 
154,650 Tom Aliff Jr., Northeast, MD 
66,900 Wayne Johansen, Rocanville, 

Saskatchewan 
66,850 Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
47,250 Curtis Frazier, Jr., Enterprise, AL 
MARATHON (THE RAINBOW J 

204,630 *T.J. Massey, Montreal, Quebec 
109,330 •Jimmy Morse, St. John, WA 
101,520 David Dean, West Mansfield, OH 
71,550 Larry Evans, Elk Grove Village, IL 
MAZE LAND (Chromasette) 

3,050 *Mark Kromeke, Albuquerque, NM 



MAZE PANIC (New Horizons Group) 

12,080 *Paul Sanecki 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

60,000 *Robin Worthem, Milwaukee, Wl 
18,902 John Tiffany, Washington, DC 
15,999 Ed Mitchell, Ragged Mountain, CO 
14,297 Aleisha Hemphill, Los Angeles, CA 
11,894 Paschal Wilson, Kentwood, LA 
METEORS (Spectral Associates) 

26,580 *Kevin Endlich, Perry Hall, MD 
16,870 Keith Marsh, Bokeelia, FL 
14,200 Craig Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

178,550 *Apollo Latham, Rich Square, NC 
1 44,350 Theodore Latham Jr. , Rich Square, NC 
MISS GOBBLER (Procolour Group) 

59,900 *Cathy Anderson, Carnegie, OK 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

708,460 *Scott Daley, Biloxi, MS 
650,530 •Bruce March, Barrie, Ontario 
533,450 John Hankerd, Gaines, Ml 
495,850 Andrew Mitchell, Melbourne, Australia 
300,000 James Stevenson, Marshall, TX 
67,160 Theodore Latham Jr., Rich Square, NC 
MOON HOPPER (Computerware) 

114,540 *Susan Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
53,570 Robert Harmon, Virginia Beach, VA 
MR DIG (Computerware) 
2,301,000 *Jeff Roberg, Winfield, KS 
1,976,500 Tim Magnusen, Lafayette, TN 
888,700 Thomas Henry, Boca Raton, FL 
784,500 Marc Harris, Colorado Springs, CO 
522,150 Dwight Elliott, Pompton Lakes, NJ 
378,150 Catherine Henry, Boca Raton, FL 
320,400 Rick Crossfield, Harrodsburg, KY 
166,700 Scott Menzies, Novar, Ontario 
MUDPIES (MichTron) 

185,200 *Bertha Jeffries, San Bernardino, CA 
164,000 Paul Baker, Pittsburgh, PA 
156,800 Glenn Wasson, Castleton, NY 
147,400 Chris Hafey, Auburn, CA 
124,400 Bernd Pruetting, Scheibenhardt, 

West Germany 
117,000 Chad Bunovich, Wilmerding, PA 
57,300 Paul Tisdel, Les Saules, Quebec 
NINJA WARRIOR (Programmer's Guild) 

151,100 w Douglas Rodger, Harvard, MA 
106,300 Bud Seibel, Tumbler Ridge, 

British Columbia 
105,200 Martin W. Grimm, Elkview, WV 
102,400 Christopher Gelowitz, Claresholm, 
Alberta 

86,100 Ryan Sambrook, Miami Lake, FL 
OFFENDER (American Business Computers) 
113,000 *Kevin Marsh, Bokeelia, FL 
103,450 Julio Comeilo, Scarborough, Ontario 
OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

530,751 ^Rosalie Siclari, Staten Island, NY 
528,694 Benjamin Hebb, Bridgewater, 

Nova Scotia 
160,200 David Lazar, Englishtown, NJ 
101,650 Davey Devlin, Clyde, NC 
69,848 Phillip Laurell, Lansing, Ml 
PAC 'EM (THE RAINBOW; 

2,080 ^Stephanie Gregory, 

Coco Solo, Panama 
1,999 Kevin R. Hubbard, Huntington, WV 
1,951 Dr. James Peterson, Radcliff, KY 
1,870 Steve Olson, Calgary, Alberta 
1 ,631 Raymond R. Hubbard, Huntington, WV 
495 Cameron Grant. Stettler, Alberta 
256 Brad Dingey, Stettler, Alberta 
PARA-JUMPER (THE RAINBOW J 

822 ^Peter MacLeod, Montague, 
Prince Edward Island 
PHANTOM SLAYER (Med Systems Software) 

2,668 ^Michael Brooks, Glade Spring, VA 
2,488 Troy Messer, Joplin, MO 
1 ,852 Curtis Boyle, Saskatoon, 

Saskatchewan 
1,306 Marc Hassler, Gainesville, FL 
1,126 Gille Giroux, North Bay, Ontario 
PICTURE PUZZLE (DSL Products) 

30,126 *Vicki Ineson, Westland, Ml 



PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

12,000,000 *Gerry Farmer, Calgary, Alberta 
2,800,090 Glen Ewing, Brooklin, Ontario 
PLANET INVASION (Spectral Associates) 
177,900 *Russ Rosen, Cardiff, CA 
POLARIS (Radio Shack) 

261,341 *Nico Swinkels, Beneluxlaan, 

Netherlands 
111,273 Scott Daley, Biloxi, MS 
91,168 Ed Meyer, Vancouver, 

British Columbia 
81,041 Andy Lehtola, Mound, MN 
63,053 Paschal Wilson, Kentwood, LA 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

6,730 'RWalker Astle, Grimsby, Ontario 
6,600 *Ray Suplee 
POOYAN (Datasoft) 
1,511.050 *Jeff Connell. Winona. MN 
1,138.500 •Linda Cote, Montreal, Quebec 
890,850 Jerry Morgan, Independence, MO 
480,450 Bernd Pruetting, Scheibenhardt, 

West Germany 
288,550 Mark B. Rodda, Springfield, VA 
132,850 Jeffrey DuBois, Houma, LA 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

64,380 *Susan Rushing, Tucson, AZ 
57,860 Jeffrey Kochs, Grove City, OH 
48,930 •Paul Baker, Pittsburgh, PA 
47,110 Darin Martin, Oakland, CA 
46,900 Dan Raltenbaugh, Sandy Lake, PA 
38,560 Matthew Foye, Middleboro, MA 
35,420 Jeff Lupish, Grimsby, Ontario 
19,230 Chris Shannon, Lafayette, IN 
PROJECT NEBULA (Radio Shack) 

1 ,270 ^Theodore Latham Jr., Rich Square, NC 
1,145 •Barry Logan, Pinckneyville, IL 
1,120 John Hopkins, Greenville, SC 
1,065 William Daley, Biloxi, MS 
1,065 Dan Heater, Cortland, OH 
185 Bobby Rosingana, Danville, CA 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220/113 *John Dupre, Mobile, AL 
220/130 Cornelius Caesar, Gundelhardtstr, 

West Germany 
220/130 George R. Fairfield, Victoria, 

British Columbia 
220/133 Robert Dickau, Sacramento, CA 
220/136 Andy Nelson, Winona, MN 
220/137 •Chris Cope, Central, SC 
220/139 Shawn Williams, Connersville, IN 
220/147 Stephen Su, Niles, Ml 
220/151 Randall Edwards. Dunlap, KS 
220/156 Richard Bourque, Gatineau, Quebec 
220/ Judy Fodness, Mesa, AZ 

Q-NERD (THE RAINBOW) 
6,512,020 *Ray Ravalitera, Bethune. France 
164,780 Ray Suplee 
181,920 Susan Bennington. Pensacola, FL 
130,000 Robert Dickau, Sacramento, CA 
30,900 Kevin Oberberger, Sparks, NV 
29,830 Theodore Latham Jr., Rich Square, NC 
24,900 Nicole Freedman, Wellesley, MA 
4,770 Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 
QUASAR COMMANDER (Radio Shack) 

114 WPaul Sanecki 
QUlX(7omM/xJ 

540,016 "ArWib Merrthew, Oshawa, Ontario 
496,165 Evelyn Gagnon, North Bay, Ontario 
RAAKA-TU (Radio Shack) 

25 if Brian Sobolewski, Orange Park, FL 
40 David Joyner. Raleigh, NC 
RAINBOW ROACH (THE RAINBOW) 

283,500 *Andy Lehtola, Mound, MN 
124,800 •Cheryl Endlich, Perry Hall. MD 
122,700 Peter MacLeod, Montague, 

Prince Edward Island 
113,500 Andrew Smith, Columbia, SC 
102,000 John Statham, Strathroy, Ontario 
REACTOIOS (Radio Shack) 

931,395 *Linda Mobbs. Pt. Huron, Ml 
203,800 Andrew Lehtola, Mound, MN 
88,615 Robbie Anderson, Monrovia, CA 
41,100 Jeff Loeb, Mobile, AL 



'★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 171 



I ■ 1 ■ 




2.329.000 
2.216.950 
1.922,200 
1.512.200 



RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderVision) 
369.453 *Gary Bachtel. Huntsville, AL 
208,602 Robert Buerkle. Conway. PA 
ROBOTTACK (tntracofor) 
2.437.000 *Mike Scharf. Fremont, OH 

Edwin Prather & Cory Soper 
Randy Hankins. Tabor, IA 
Erik Merz, Noblesville, IN 
Robert Kiser, Monticello. MS 
SEA DRAGON (Adventure International) 

538.200 wKevin Oberberger. Sparks, NV 
SCARFMAN (Cornsoft) 

412,050 "^Michael Cerami, Springfield, VA 
357,190 Jeremy Schild, Clinton, UT 
261.850 Kristin McGahee, Pembroke Pines. FL 
253.920 Scott Boulanger, Columbus, OH 
SHOOTING GALLERY ( Radio Shack) 

120,640 *Robert J. Wallace, Waldorf, MD 
Vernell Peterson, Radcliff, KY 
Mark Nichols, Birsay, Saskatchewan 
R. Duguay, St. Bruno, Quebec 
Martin Peterson, Lynchburg, VA 
SKIING (Radio Shack) 

05.85 "frjohn Hokpins, Greenville, SC 
Kelly Kerr, Wentzville, MO 
Janell Stroshane. Ashland, Wl 
Jean-Claude Taliana, Brossard, 
Canada 

Andrew Truesdale, Ferguson, MO 
SLAY THE NEREIS ( Radio Shack) 
344,115 ♦Ed Meyer, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
Peter MacLeod, Montague, 

Prince Edward Island 
Mike Butenhoff, Minnesota City, MN 
Nicole Freedman, Wellesley, MA 
SNAIL'S REVENGE (THE RAINBOW) 

10,860 *Rupert Young, Sheffield, MA 



67,700 
44,870 
44,480 
31,340 



12.08 
13.73 
21.35 

29.52 



116,588 



110.000 
48,226 



SNAKER (THE RAINBOW,) 

1:26 *Dan Sobczak, Mesa, AZ 
1:59 Baiju Shah, Deep River. Ontario 
SPACE SHUTTLE (Tom Mix) 

595 ♦Steve Schweitzer, Sewetl, NJ 
585 David J. Banks, Greendale, 

British Columbia 
585 Kenton Fifield, Fort Francis, Ontario 
585 Randall F. Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
576 David J. Banks, Greendale, 
British Columbia 
SOLO POKER (Datasoft) 

980 w Carol Dawn Staker, Moscow, ID 
850 Granville Bonyata, Tallahasse, FL 
740 Allan Mercurio, Portsmouth, Rl 
450 Kevin Marsh, Bokeelia, FL 
STAR TREK (Adventure International) 

100 ^Stefan Mecay, Austin, TX 
STORM ARROWS (Spectral Associates) 

168,000 *Steven Ohsie, Deer Park, TX 
136,650 Brian Specht, Rochester, NY 
68,400 Jim Irvine, Sudbury, Ontario 
STRATEGY FOOTBALL (THE RAINBOW) 
201-0 *Dan Sobczak, Mesa, A2 
TIME BANDIT (Mich Tron) 

243,620 *Mark Wooge, Omaha, NE 
214,850 Sally Naumann, Hailey, ID 
129,240 Brian Larrson, Fridley, MN 
106,720 Glen Heidebrecht, Topeka, KS 
66,700 Fred Naumann, Hailey, ID 
48.950 Mario Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
TIME FIGHTER (Mark Data) 

72,400 *Robert Shaw, Kincardine, Ontario 
TOUCHSTONE (Tom Mix) 

65,520 if Kevin Marsh, Bokeelia, FL 
TRAILIN' TAIL (THE RAINBOW; 

76.275 WMichael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg, KY 
33,454 Kenneth Bergenham, Lawton, Ml 



26,640 Dr. James Peterson, Radcliff, KY 
24,415 Kenton Fifield, Fort Frances, Ontario 
19,820 Dan Sobczak, Mesa. AZ 
TRAPFALL (Tom Mix) 

120,406 *Keith Marsh, BokeeHa, FL 
David Joyner, Ralejgh, NC 
Rich Trawick, N. Adams, Ml 
Kanti Dinda, Kingston, Ontario 
Russ Rosen, Cardiff. CA 
Gary Bachtel, HuntBvrlle, AL 
TUTS TOMB (Mark Data) 

163,060 ^Michael McCafferty t Oceanside, CA 
•Chris Russo, Miami, FL 
Mickey McCafferty, Oceanside, CA 
Eileen Kaakee, Royal Oak, Ml 
Gary Marshall, Layton, UT 
Alexandre Maggioni, Lausanne, 
Switzerland 
WACKY FOOD (Arcade Animation) 

227,900 WJon Jenkins, Milner, GA 
105,100 Stephane Asselin, Hauterive, Quebec 
WHIRLYBIRD RUN (Spectral Associates) 

516,450 *Dan §hargel, Arroyo Grande, CA 
Nathan Russell, Minco, OK 
Hughens Bien-Aime, Montreal, 

Quebec 
Jeff Conned, Winona, MN 
Dann Fabian, Crestview. FL 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
1,510,000 *James Quadrella, Brooklyn, NY 
Andy Green, Whitehall, PA 
Mike Hughey, King George, VA 
Chris Coyle, Selden, NY 
Roger Buzard, Lima, OH 
Donald Hummer, Reynoidsburg, OH 
Apollo Latham, Rich Square, NC 
Paschal Wilson, Kentwood, LA 
Matthew Foye, Middleboro, MA 



114,322 
113,408 
112,596 
112,404 
105,668 



158,000 
121,240 
106,460 
104,360 
76,200 



283,100 
157,000 



104,000 
103.900 



666,000 
401,900 
370,400 
260,600 
119,000 
108,600 
100,900 
78.500 



— Tomara Solley 



0REB0ARD POINTERS 

I n conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column of 
pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some interest- 
ing hints and tips, we encourage you to share them by sending them to 
the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



ADVENTURE P.I. 

Scoreboard: 

I have solved Sea Quest after a few 
months of agony. The hardest piece of trea- 
sure to find is the diamond ring. It can be 
found by getting the shovel and metal detec- 
tor, then going up the stairs on the beach and 
south. Activate the metal detector and dig; 
there it appears! 

I have also solved many other graphics 
Adventures. If you would like clues, send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope to me at 
1755 King Edward St., R2R 0M3. 

Robert Black 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 



Scoreboard: 

I recently discovered that on Heist (the 
rainbow May '84) if you go down to the 
score (toot) you can score points, and if you 
go to the high score you can also score 
points. There is another trick to this. First of 



all, score with a bag, then touch the score 
and high score. After that, touch another 
bag and again touch the score, and so on 
until you finish all your bags on the screen. 
In the second screen do the same as on the 
first screen (remember to touch the high 
score), and after finishing up this screen do 
the same on the third. Every time I play there 
is plenty of time left. 

Sergio Waisser 
Mexico City, Mexico 



Scoreboard: 

I have recently solved Sea Quest. If anyone 
would like hints or the solution, write to me 
at 2655 Columbia, 48072. 1 also have com- 
pleted Bedlam. 

Has anyone solved The Crown of Merro 
(the rainbow Feb. '84)7 If so, please send 
me the solution. I have gotten to the cave, 
but always die from the poison. 

Laura Conley 
Berkley, MI 



Scoreboard: 

As was suggested in your "Pointers" col- 
umn (THE RAINBOW June *84), I tried to 
FOLLOW different people in Bedlam. After 
I typed "follow so-and-so," it asked me for a 
phrase. What should I do npw? Please write 
to me at Rt. I, Box 45-M, 24486. 

Brian Chafin 
Weyers Cave, VA 



Scoreboard: 

Help! I would greatly appreciate any clues 
and/ or solutions to Pyramid, Madness and 
the Minotaur, and Bedlam. If anyone can 
assist me, please write to me at: COMSU- 
BRON 14, Fleet Post Office, NY 09501. 

David Sharpe 
Dunoon, Scotland 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



172 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



EXTRA POKES 

Scoreboard: 

Spare is a complement to Tom Fagan's tips 
in the July ^4 issue of the rainbow. The 
following is a list of POKEs to aid you by 
increasing the number of allotted players. 
The V represents the number of lives you 
want: 



POKE 13971, x 
POKE 21561, x 
POKE 22369, x 
POKE 29629, x 
POKE 17437, x 



Bag- It- Man 
Mr Dig 

Lunar Rover Patrol 

Mudpies 

Tutankarn 



POKE 8274, x ; 83l8*x Zeus 

Jean Tisdel 
Let Sautes* Quebec 



Scoreboard: 

Ift the July ^4 edition of the rainbow, 
there is a list of POKEs for gaining "everlast- 
ing life.* I know a little about computers, but 
do not know how to use POKE. 1 typed in 
what it said beside The King and the comput 
er responded with a syntax error. Would you 
please advise on how to use the POKE 
command? 

Andrew Smith 
Grimsby, Ontario 

Editor's Note: Refer to yom Sept. H4 
edition of the Rainbow under 
"Scoreboard Pointers" — tfiere k an 
explanation in the "Editor's Note." 



MYSTERY OF THE PYRAMID 

Scoreboard: 

I think that there is more to Pyramid than 
meets the eye. In certain rooms, when you 
are carrying certain objects, hitting enter 
will result in a message. It will be something 
like "lamp here," "plant here,* or "sarco- 
phagus here. ? If you drop the desired object, 
hitting enter will result in an "I don't 
understand" instead of another prompt. 
Could anyone help me find out what rooms 
correspond with what objects, and, finally, 
what the end result is? My address is 14925 
Satanas St, 92129. 

Ja-ft Bhw 
San Dwgo, CA 



Scoreboard: 

Thk is for everybody who has had trouble 
with the maze in Pyramid. After entering the 
mate, use the following sequence: E,S,S,S, 
N,EJS>NW. Next, get everything in the area. 



After that, type SE,N, and D. 

If anybody has hints for Raaka-Tu, please 
send them to me at 1528 40th Street, 95819. 
Also, if you need hints/ answers for Pyramid, 
write to me* 

Robert Dickau 
Sacramento, CA 



&APPING THE ENEMY 

Scoreboard: 

To destroy all the enemy planes in space 
on Zaxxon, use the following procedure; 
Immediately after leaving the fortress, posi- 
ttOH your plane exactly halfway up the 
screen (the height indicator will be exactly in 
the middle of the space between the third 
and fourth lines) and roughly halfway across 
the screen. When the first plane appears, it 
should be directly in your sight; if not, posi- 
tion your plane so that it is, and destroy the 
enemy plane. Then begin firing as fast as you 
can. If your plane is correctly placed on the 
screen, all the enemy planes will fly into your 
fire, without having to move the plane at all. 
If the enemy planes are not destroyed imme- 
diately, don't worry; the enemy planes have 
three flight patterns, and eventually will lead 
into your line of fire. 

This method works well through the first 
three sets of planes, and moderately well 
after that. The planes that come in from 
behind you on levels beyond the first robot 
will be destroyed, also. If anyone has any 
questions on this method, or if they want a 
more detailed explanation, they may write 
i ft me at 607 Avenue K, 70444. 

Paschal Wilson 
Kentwood LA 



OVERCOMING CREATURES 

Scoreboard: 

IVe finally solved Dungeons of Daggo- 
rath, and have. a clue that may help someone. 
When fighting creatures always have trea- 
sure laying in front of you in the same space. 
The creatures will try to get the weapons or 
treasures before they attack you, giving you 
time to attack them. (This doesn't work with 
the Scorpion or the Wizards,) 

I Have also solved Sands of Egypt, Calixto 
Island and Keys of the Wizard. If anyone has 
any questions write to me at 104 Barely Ct., 
20653. 

Kelly Bussell 
(pexington Park, MD 



JUNGLE JINX 

Scoreboard: 

1 found a small flaw in the program Jungle 
(THE rainbow, Aug. '84) that might be help- 
ful. Add Line 2643 which should read 2643 
S—0 because every time you play, your score 
builds from the previous game and it could 
end up being hundreds of thousand! 

Doug Schwartz 
Glendate, AZ 



Scoreboard: 

After your score reaches 10,000 on Pola- 
ris, be careful that it doesn't go over 1,000 
above a bonus island on the multiples of 
10,000. For example: starting a wave on 
49,000 and ending on 51,000 or starting on 
29,000 and ending on 31,000 — this will 
negate your bonus island. 

Andy Lehtola 
Mound. MN 



AWESOME ASSIGNMENT 

Scoreboard: 

Vm having difficulty in solving the Arcon- 
tax Assignment Adventure game (the rain- 
bow July '84), My main problem is getting 
on the country streets. Any help would be 
greatly appreciated. Send information to 6 
Jones Dr., 25560. 

Larry Kinder 
Scott Depot, WV 



Scoreboard: 

I would like to know how to produce Hi- 
Res graphics with all eight CoCo colors, as 
done on such games as Storm and Pac*Tac. 
Can this be done in basic, or does it require 
machine language? If anyone can help, please 
send information to 7719 Pipers Creek, 
7825 L 

Scott Power 
San Antonio, TX 



STUCK IN SPACE 

Scoreboard: 

I recently bought an Adventure game 
from Pal Creations called Space Escape. I 
am having a problem getting out of the ship. 
I cannot get the shuttlecraft door open. 

If anyone knows the solution to my prob- 
lem, please write to me at 11 27 Mountain- 
brook, 7 1H8. 

Robert Aylor 
Shreveport, LA 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 173 




Color LOGO With Printing 



One advantage that Color LOGO has over Extended 
Color BASIC is the ability to print text on the display 
screen along with graphics. The PRINT command 
can be used to add prompts and other information to a 
graphics screen. Since the printed information is displayed 
at the turtle's current location, the turtle must be moved to 
the desired position before the ^command is given. It 
is also desirable to hide the turtle before printing so that the 
information is clearly readable. An alternative is to move the 
turtle away from the printed information when finished. 

The PRINT command can be used in either of the follow- 
ing two forms. 

1) PRINT t 
\ 

The "t" can be a number, a variable, a func- 
tion reference, or a combination of these and 
any arithmetic, logic, or relational operators. 

Examples: 

PRINT 5 — will print the number 5. 

PRINT :ROW — will print the numeric value that has 
been assigned to the variable :ROW. 

PRINT ABS :N — will print the absolute value of the 
numeric quantity of the variable :N. If :N=-5, it would 
print 5. 



By Don Inman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



PRINT :ROW+3 — will print the sum of the numeric 
value of : ROW and 5. 

2) PRINT "text" — will print whatever text is inside the 
quotation marks. 

"text" can be composed of any printable 
keyboard symbols (letters, numbers, punc- 
tuation, etc.). Text must be enclosed in quo- 
tation marks. 

Examples: 

PRINT'RESULTS OF THROWS OF A SINGLE 
DIE" 

PR INT" 1 2 3 4 5 6" 

To demonstrate a typical use of the PRINT command, 
consider the following procedures that allow you to test the 
RANDOM function by repeated throws of a single die. 

Listing 1: 

TO HEXTO&S : TOSSES 
ZERO 

REPEAT : TOSSES 

(MAKE :N RANDOM 6+1 
CHANGE) 
DRAW 
END 



(Don Inman taught in the public school system for 
over 21 years. After a one-year sabbatical to investi- 
gate educational uses of computers, he never went 
back to the classroom.) 



TO ZERO 
MAKE sONE 0 MAKE : TWO 0 



174 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



MAKE 
MAKE 
END 



: THREE O 
:FIVE 0 



MAKE 
MAKE : 



:FOUR 
SIX O 



O 



TO CHANGE 
IF :N=1 

(MAKE :ONE :ONE+l) 
IF :N=2 

(MAKE :TWO :TWO+l> 
IF : N=3 

(MAKE : THREE : THREE+1 ) 
IF :N=4 

(MAKE :FOUR :FOUR+l) 
IF :N=5 

(MAKE :FIVE :FIVE+1) 
IF :N=6 

(MAKE :SIX :SIX+1) 

END 



TO DRAW 
CLEAR HT 



SY 4 PRINT 
PRINT 2 
PRINT 3 
PRINT 4 
PRINT 
PRINT 
SY 10 
:ONE 



SX 30 
SX 70 
SX 110 
SX 150 
SX 190 
SX 230 
SX 25 
REPEAT 

(BLOCK) 
SX 65 SY 10 
REPEAT :TWO 

(BLOCK) 
SX 105 SY 10 
REPEAT : THREE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 145 SY 10 
REPEAT :FOUR 

(BLOCK) 
SX 185 SY 10 
REPEAT :FIVE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 225 SY 10 
REPEAT :SIX 

(BLOCK) 

END 

TO BLOCK 
REPEAT 2(FD 5 



vJ 

SH 90 



FD 
FD 
FD 5 
FD 2 
END 



LT 90 

FD 5 RT 90 



1 LT 90 
1 RT 90) 

PU BK 5 LT 90 

RT 90 PD 



To use these procedures you must have a Color LOGO 
cartridge or diskette in the computer. The RUN mode is 
used to execute the procedures by entering: 



HEXTOSS 50 ENTER 

\ 

* for 50 die throws 
The results of our sample run looked like this. 




The result of each roll of the die is represented by one 
block of a bar of the graph. 



Each block represents 
the result of one roll. 



Throws resulting in a 1; a 2 



The PRINT command was used to number the bars in the 
DRA W subprocedure as follows: 

SX 30 SY 4 PRINT I 
SX 70 PRINT 2 
SX HO PRINT 3 
SX 150 PRINT 4 
SX 190 PRINT 5 
SX 230 PRINT 6 

Notice that the X coordinate is increased 40 units for each 
print command. Since each character occupies eight-column 
positions, the numbers are placed 40/8 or five-character 
spaces apart. Therefore, there are four blank character spa- 
ces between each letter. 



X = 30 
I 



70 
\ 



40 
\ 



120 190 
\ I 

TTTTTTTT 



230 



Using the "text" form of the PRINT statement, the same 
spacing can be achieved by: 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 175 



SX 30 SY 4 

PRINT'1 2 3 4 5 6" 



four spaces between numbers 



The display used for HEXTOSS did not contain much 
information. The bars indicated the frequency distribution 
of the results of throwing a single die. However, the display 
gives no indication of what is being shown. Additional 
/WATstatements can be used to provide additional infor- 
mation. You might want to display a title and show how 
many die rolls have been made. You only need to change the 
DRA W subprocedure to do this. For demonstration pur- 
poses, we will use: 

PRINT :TOSSES 

PRINT"ROLLS OF A SINGLE DIE" 

Since the bars are labeled at the bottom of the screen, the 
title can be placed at the top by: 

SX 30 SY 180 PRINT :TOSSES 

Print number of tosses 
SX 62 m Move to right 



PRINT-ROLLS OF A SINGLE DIE" 



Print text 



These three lines provide the following title which begins 
at the top left of the screen (position 30,180). 



50 ROLLS OF A SINGLE DIE 



The final version of the DRAW subprocedure is as 
follows: 



TO DRAW : TOSSES 
CLEAR HT 
SX30 SY 4 

PRINT" 1 2 3 4 5 6' 
SY 180 PRINT :TOSSES 
SX 62 



PRINT"ROLLS OF A SINGLE DIE r 
SX25 SY 10 SH 90 
REPEAT :ONE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 65 SY 10 
REPEAT TWO 

(BLOCK) 
SX 105 SY 10 
REPEAT :THREE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 145 SY 10 
REPEAT :FOUR 

(BLOCK) 
SX 195 SY 10 



■lines changed 



REPEAT :FIVE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 235 SY 10 
REPEAT :SIX 

(BLOCK) 
END 

The title of the main procedure is changed to HEX 
TOSS2, and the command which calls the DRA W sub- 
procedure is changed to add the variable :TOSSES. This 
passes the value of :TOSSES from the main procedure to the 
DRA W subprocedure so that it can be printed in the title. 
The main procedure is now: 

TO HEXTOSS2 TOSSES 
ZERO 

REPEAT TOSSES 

(MAKE :M RANDOM 64-1 

CHANGE) 
DRAW TOSSES 
END 

All the other subprocedures remain the same. When the 
revised DRA W subprocedure is used with HEXTOSS2, a 
sample run looked like this: 




Listing 2: 

TO HEXT0SS2 s TOSSES 
ZERO 

REPEAT : TOSSES 

(MAKE :N RANDOM 6+1 
CHANGE) 
DRAW s TOSSES 
END 

TO ZERO 
MAKE :ONE 0 MAKE : TWO 0 
MAKE : THREE 0 MAKE : FOUR 
MAKE :FIVE O MAKE sSIX 0 

END 



176 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



ONE :DNE+1) 



THREE : THREE+1 ) 
FOUR :FOUR+l) 



TO CHANGE 
IF :N=1 

(MAKE 
IF :N=2 

(MAKE :!TWO sTWO+l) 
IF sN=3 

(MAKE 
IF :N=4 

(MAKE 
IF :N=5 

(MAKE :FIVE :FIVE+1) 
IF :N=6 

(MAKE :SIX :SIX+1) 

END 

TO DRAW : TOSSES 
CLEAR HT 

SX 30 SY 4 PRINT 1 
PRINT" 1 2 3 4 5 
SY 180 PRINT : TOSSES 
SX 62 

PR I NT "ROLLS OF A SINGLE DIE' 
SX 25 SY 10 SH 90 
REPEAT :ONE 
(BLOCK) 



SX 65 SY 10 
REPEAT :TWO 

(BLOCK) 
SX 105 SY 10 
REPEAT : THREE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 145 SY 10 
REPEAT :FOUR 

(BLOCK) 
SX 185 SY 10 
REPEAT :FIVE 

(BLOCK) 
SX 225 SY 10 
REPEAT :SIX 

(BLOCK) 
END 



TO BLOCK 
REPEAT 2(FD 5 
FD 
FD 
FD 5 
FD 2 
END 



LT 90 

FD 5 RT 90 



1 LT 90 
1 RT 90) 
PU BK 5 LT 90 
RT 90 PD 



□□□□□ 
□□□□□ 

'BBS EraaEmKPQGE 






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Ncwdos/80 - Apparat Inc. 

saAiija xsia ssAiua xsia 




If you were paying close attention last month, you might 
have noticed I included a couple of items in the patch 
listing which were not mentioned in the text of the 
article. These were put in at the last minute due to the 
overwhelming number of reader requests for them. Before 
we get started on this month's feature, I will describe what 
they were. 

DECB LI 

It seems more of you have the new revision of Disk BASIC 
than I imagined, and were frustrated by this series being 
based on the 1 .0 revision. Well fret no more, as the part three 
listing contains patch addresses for both revisions. I have 
used MAC's conditional assembly to select which revision to 
assemble. If the label REV is zero then the 1 .0 version is built 
and if it's one then 1 . 1 is built. The listing each month will be 
assembled for 1.0, but all information will be included 
regarding what to change for 1.1. 

DECB 1 . 1 takes up more room in the ROM than does 1 .0, 
so I have had to leave some features out. First to go is the fix 
to the FILES command. I haven't checked, but would like to 
think that 1 . 1 fixed that bug itself. Second, the fully spelled 
out error messages and return of the error message name in 



( Colin J. Stearman is an electronics engineer educated 
in the U.K. He has worked with all kinds of computers 
and has been a CoCo enthusiast for over two years.) 



This month the chef serves up a tasty 
appetizer to make keyboard entry 
deliciously easy. 



By Colin J. Stearman 



180 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



EN AMES had |o go. These seemed like the least important, 
but if you disagree, leave something else out and include 
them. But whatever you do, don't let the additions go 
beyond $DEFF, The OS-9 boot routine resides at SDFOO 
through SDF4C 

Finally, each month RAINBOW ON TAPE will have the 
machine code file for both revisions of BASIC. The name of 
the file will be built from the initials of the article, the part 
number and then V 1 0 for DECB 1.0 and V II for DECB Li. 
So this month the files will be CWC4V10 and CWC4V11. 

Drive Step Rate 

Many of you have disk drives that can step from track to 
track at a rate faster than the 30 ms (milliseconds) set by 
BASIC. Even my old RS drives can step at 20 ms. 

If you look at last month's listing Lines 225 through 232, 
you will see that I adjusted the rate to 20 ms. That's why your 
drives sounded a little strange. If you had problems maybe 
you should set this back to 30 ms. 

There are four possible settings; 30 ms, 20 ms, 12 ms and 6 
ms. This patch will affect all your drives equally, so set the 
value to that of the slowest drive, if you have a mix. I have 
patched both the RESTORE rate and SEEK rate. The first 
sets the rate at which the drive is restored to track zero; the 
second, the rate at which each track is sought. I toyed with 
making a command to allow BASIC to change the rate "on 
the fly." But that takes up precious ROM space and you 
would always want the fastest rate your drives can handle. If 
you don't know how fast your drives are, keep reducing the 
rate until a LOAD command fails, then go back a notch. 

Back to Business 

Last month we ended the assembly code listing with a 
series of dummy functions. Next month we will add the code 
to make some of them functional. But this month we intro- 
duce FLEX1KEY. 

Hands up all of you CoCo keyboard-pounders who have 
just entered a long direct command to BASIC, only to notice 
a "typo" in the second character. I guess I'm not alone! With 
FLEXIKEY you can instantly save the bad line, recall it for 
editing and re-execute it. You never have to type in the same 
thing twice. I must confess, the idea came from my IBM PC 
at work, which has similar functions. 

FLEXIKEY 

The FLEXIKEY routine completely replaces BASIC'S 
normal keyboard entry routine and places each entered 
BASIC line into a buffer when you press the ENTER key. This 
entry is then recallable for re-execution or modification by a 
set of simple commands. 

The best way to describe how it works is by example. Let's 
say you have just typed in the command 

COPY"OLP.PGM" TO "NEW. PGM" 

and ENTERed it. It returned an ?NE error because you meant 
to type OLD. PGM. Instead of retyping the whole line, use 
the right arrow key to recall each letter from the buffer. 
Pressing it seven times will recall 

COPY"OL 

with the cursor just after the *L\ Now type in the *D\ This 
replaces the incorrect 'P\ You could get the rest of the line 
out by repeatedly pressing the right arrow, but if you press 
SHIFT/ right arrow the remainder of the line appears, with 



the cursor at the end. If you were to press ENTER, then this 
line would be put into the holding buffer and executed also. 

But let's say that just as you were about to press ENTER 
you realized that the proper program name was VERY 
OLD. PGM. You could press ENTER anyway and get 
another error and then edit again, but if you press SHIFT/ @ 
the command line will be stored in the buffer without execu- 
tion, ready for further editing. When you do this a k @' is 
displayed at the end of the line to remind you that the 
command was just stored and not executed. 

So you do this and then press the right arrow five times to 
recall COPT'. To insert the VERY, press the SHIFT/up 
arrow. This puts you into the insert mode and each character 
typed will be inserted in the command line, with the remain- 
ing characters in the buffer not overwritten. The overtype 
mode is returned whenever you press a left, right or down 
arrow key. Once VER Mistyped, the SHIFT/ right arrow key 
will recall the remainder of the line for entry. 

But once again you get an ?NE error because the name of 
the file was really VERY. PGM (will you ever get it right?). 
Press the right arrow key nine times until COPY" VERY \s 
displayed. Now press the down arrow key three times, once 
for each letter in OLD. SHIFT/ right arrow will then spit out 
the rest of the line which now reads 

COPY"VERY.PGM" TO "NEW.PGM" 

If you are editing a line and things get really scrambled, 
don't worry, just hit left arrow to delete the character to the 
left of the cursor. The original character at that position is 
still in the buffer and could be pulled out with right arrow. If 
the whole line is messed up, press SHIFT/Ieft arrow and the 
whole thing will disappear. But the original line is still in the 
buffer so you can start all over. 

Some of the arrow keys now used by FLEXIKEY pre- 
viously created printable characters (square brackets, left 
arrow and the like). To get these now, press SHIFT/CLEAR 
and then the arrow key you want. The normal character will 
appear. To get the back slash which SHIFT/ CLEAR normally 
produces, press SHIFT/CLEAR twice. 

FLEXIKEY does not interfere with the normal operation 
of BASIC'S £X>/rcommand. It works in the command mode 
and also within BASIC programs when entry is via an INPUT 
command. Also, some machine language programs use BAS- 
IC'S entry routine, and therefore FLEXI KE Y is available for 
use within them also. (Computerware's MACRO assembler 
MAC falls into this category, for one.) 

The buffer used by FLEXIKEY is the cassette buffer, so 
correct operation will not occur immediately after cassette 
input/ output operations. It does not interfere with this I/O, 
it's just that they share a common buffer area. 

As 1 said earlier, once you get used to remembering 
FLEXIKEY is there, you'll wonder how you ever managed 
without it. 

Adding The New Functions 

This is a simple process using your editor. Call in last 
month's listing and make the following changes using the 
[REF#] given as a locating guide. fc Uncomment'(remove the 
initial asterisk from) reference Line 1 and delete all lines 
after reference Line 29, as these are in this month's listing. 

Type in the additional code in Listing 1 at the end of the 
existing code. Then reassemble the result and try it as vou 
did last month's listing. You should find that FLEXIKEY 
works as described. If not then it's "hunt the typo" time, 
until it does. 

October 1984 THE RAINBOW 181 



E.T.T. 

ELECTRONIC 
TYPING 
TEACHER 

by 

CHERRYSoft 




Learning to type the right way can save you hours of tedious work when 
entering programs into your CoCo. and this is just what ETT was designed 
to do. Devote a little time every day practicing with ETT and before you 
know it you will be typing with confidence. Entering those programs will 
no longer be the chore it used to be. 

ETT's video keyboard lets you practice with all the keys labeled, all the 
keys blank or only the "home" keys labeled. The visual cues guide you while 
you learn to type without watching your fingers. ETT shows your 
accuracy, response time, and words per minute. You will quickly see that 
you are improving with practice. 

With the sentences provided by ETT learning to type can be fun. Oyer 
1 0OO variations chosen because they include every letter in the alphabet. 
You can also create your own practice sets. This outstanding program 
was written by a certified teacher and professional programmer and 
comes with a ten page student manual-study guide. Requires 16K 
Extended Basic. 

Cassette 

$21.95 

ETT NOW AVAILABLE FOR COMMODORE 64 
CASSETTE S24.95 OISK $29.95 



MASTER 
CONTROL II 



The best doesn't always cost more and MASTER CONTROL H is a good 
example. What would you be willing to pay for a program that would cut 
your typing time by more than 50°/q and eliminate hours of debugging 
because you misspelled a command word? For example the command 
STRINGS (requires nine strokes) with MASTER CONTROL II you only 
require two strokes, just hit the down arrow key twice and it s done, and 
no mistakes. That is just one of the 50 pre-programmed commands 
available to you. If that isn't enough you also have the ability to customize 
your own key to enter a statement or command correctly, automatically 
every time. But that's not all, how about automatic line numbering. Just 
enter the starting number and the increment you want and MASTER 
CONTROL H will do it for you. You also have direct control of MOTOR, 
AUDIO and TRACE plus a direct RUN key. Sounds great? Well, 
thousands of color computer owners have been enjoying these features 
for years. But now the new MASTER CONTROL II also has the following 
features: 

-"-New plastic overlay that can be removed when you are not using 
MASTER CONTROL II. 

-"-New documentation, to help you get the most from the program. 
-K-New repeating keyboard. 



Cassette 



$21.95 



Include S2.S0 Shipping and Handling in U.S. -$5.00 Foreign 



^sbCoCo free 
Warehouse CA ™ lOG 

Where Shopping By Mail is "USER FRIENDLY" DEALER 
500 N. DOBSON - WESTLAND, MI 48185 INQUIRIES 

Phone (313) 722-7957 INVITED 



EDTASM+ Bug 

A bug in EDTASM+ can cause you problems. If your 
assembly creates Multiply Defined Symbol errors when you 
know there aren't any, then the bug bit you! It manifests 
itself when you use arithmetic in the operand field, and the 
math references a label. 

For example, in the program SYSTEM from part one, 
EDTASM+ does not like the line CMPU #BUFFER+256, 
but if you change it to CMPU #256+BU FFER it likes it just 
fine. So look for lines like this before tearing all your hair 
out! 1 

A Gentle Reminder 

When you have transferred BASIC (unmodified or other- 
wise) to a disk or an EPROM using information in this 
series, the result is still copyrighted by RS and Microsoft. 
Giving the disk or EPROM away or selling it to others 
infringes on this and is illegal. 

None of my patch code contains original RS BASIC code 
and is itself copyrighted. However, it may be freely distrib- 
uted as long as my copyright notice remains intact, both in 
the source code and in the start-up banner. My revisions 
may not be sold for profit without my written consent. 

Coming Next Month 

We will add the code to make many of the new BASIC 
commands fully functional, including COLD and AUTO 
and DA TE$. So let's make it a date$! 



If you would like the entire DOSPATCH program 
source, along with binary files with and without the parallel 
port driver for DECB LQandDECB LI Just sendmeadisk 
(no cassettes please) along with $6 and a stamped, addressed 
disk mailer. I will load the disk and return it to you 
promptly. 

Address this request or any questions to: 
Colin Stearman, 143 Ash Street, Hopkinton, MA 01748. 



The listing: 



0718 OPT LIS 

1719 ttttttttttttttfttttttttmtmmmttmtftttft 
9710 t PATCH 12 to RSDOS (01984 Colin Steanan • 
0711 ftttftmttttttmttmmttfttttttttttmttm 
#712 * 

0713 t*tt*»t#t#«t##t*t#ttitt*ttt*t*ttt*tt«#t» 

0714 t FLEXIKEY 

0715 tt BASIC LAST LINE RE-ENTRY AND EDIT ROUTINE 
#716 t This is not a callable couand, but a set of 

0717 * direct coiiands froi the keyboard, to allow access 

0718 * to the last couand entered. It is designed to 



0719 
0720 
0721 
0722 
0723 
0724 
0725 
0726 
0727 
0728 
0729 



work only when called froi BASIC and does not 
interfere with the EDIT coiiands. 



COWHANDS ARE: 

LEFT ARROW - 
SHIFT/LEFT ARROW- 
SHIFT/UP ARROW - 
DOWN ARROW - 
SHIFT/6 - 



output next character of old line 
output rest of old line 
insert, no old line increment 
delete next character in buffer 

store line input so far. 
No interpretation 



182 THE RAINBOW October 1984 





9730 


i 




9892 t 










9731 


mtmtmmtttmttttfttttftfmmtttM 


DA9A BDA1B1 


0803 KYREAD JSR 


6ETKEY 


RETURNS KEY IN A 




9732 


t GENERAL PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION: 




0804 t 










9733 


t 




0805 t 


NOW 


SEE WHAT WE 


SOT 




9734 


t To allow access to special keyboard entries the 




0896 t 










0735 


• RAN hook at *16A is aodified to go to this routine. 


DA9D 8199 


9897 


CHPA 


•*09 


RIGHT ARRON next character 




0736 


t if the device is 0, the keyboard, 


DA9F 2715 


9898 


BEQ 


8ETCHR 


80 DO IT 




9737 


• the key and cursor are obtained and output froa 


MAI 815D 


0809 


CHPA 


•I5D 


8HIFT/RT ARROW rest of lint 




9738 


i here. The special keys interpreted and characters 


DAA3 2605 


0810 


BNE 


Jl 


NOT THIS 




9739 


* are drawn froe this as required. One perianent RAN 


DAA5 7301D9 


9811 


COH 


NHL I HE 


SET WHOLE LINE FLA6 




0740 


* location is used to indicate the need to initialize 


DAA8 209C 


8812 


BRA 


BETCHR 


BET NEXT SUFFER CHARACTER 




0741 


• pointer. 


DAAA 815F 


9813 Jl 


CHPA 


M5F 


SHIFT/UP ARROW insert toggle 




0742 


t 


DAAC 261F 


9814 


BNE 


J2 


NOT THIS 




0743 


t At the end the old return is reeoved froa the stack 


DAAE 7391D8 


9815 


CON 


INSERT 


TOGGLE INSERT FLAB 




0744 


• so it is not taken. This allows the input 




9816 t 










0745 


* handling routine to handle the character as noraal. 




9817 t 


SEE 


IF 8HIFT/RT 


ARRON PREVIOUSLY PRESSED 




0746 


t 


DAB1 7D91D9 


0818 TESTWH TST 


WHLINE 


OUTPUT WHOLE LINE IF SET 




0747 


t Because SHIFT/UP ARROW I SHIFT/RIBHT ARROW are also 


DAB4 27E4 


0819 


BEQ 


KYREAD 


NO SO READ KEYBOARD 




0748 


t used to create the left arrow and 1, these are 




0820 eeeeeeeeeeeeeteemeeeeeeettteetteetM 




0749 


t now obtained by pressing SHI FT /CLEAR first. 




0821 « 


8ET 


CHARACTER FROH HOLDING BUFFER 




0750 


* As this is the backslash this can be obtained by 


DAB6 7F01D8 


0822 8ETCHR CLR 


INSERT 


RESET INSERT FLA8 




0751 


» pressing SHIFT/CLEAR twice. 


DAB9 F601D7 


0823 


LD8 


HLDPTR 


BET POINTER 




0752 


t 


DABC 8E91DA 


9824 


LDX 


•HLDBFR 


POINT X TO HOLDING BUFFER 




0753 


t FLAGS: 














0754 


t INTFL6 0 « line in BASIC buffer just stored 


DABF A685 


9825 


LDA 


III 


SET CHARACTER 




0755 


• FF * line in hold buffer in use 


DAC1 2615 


9926 


BNE 


800DCH 


9756 


t HLDPTR zero-based pointer into hold buffer 




9827 1 


ALL 


BUFFER 18 OUT 




0737 


t INSERT 0 » Insert aode off 


DAC3 7F91D9 


9828 


CLR 


WHLINE 


RESET POINTER 




0758 


* FF - Insert aode on 


DAC6 29D2 


9029 


BRA 


KYREAD 


IGNORE 




0759 


t MHLINE 0 ■ SHIFT/RIGHT ARRON not previously pressed 




9839 e 


SOT 


800D CHARACTER 




0760 


t FF » SHIFT/RIGHT ARRON previously pressed 


DAC8 7C91D7 


9831 800DCH INC 


HLDPTR 


HOVE PAST CHARACTER 




0761 
0762 
0763 


» 


DACB 294A 


0832 


BRA 


EXIT 


AND RETURN WITH IT 








0833 eeeeeemeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 


DA60 966F 


* 


DACD 8113 


0834 J2 


CHPA 


•113 


SHIFT/I doit lint 


0764 


KEYBRD LDA DEVNUN 


DACF 2759 


9835 


BEQ 


LIHCLS 


80 TO LINE CLOSE 


DA62 27IC 
— 


0765 


BEG KEY DEVICE IS KEYBOARD 


DADl 8|0D 
DAD3 276E 
DAD5 6198 


9836 
9837 
9838 


CHPA 

BEQ 

CHPA 


Iff 


RETURN inter 

BACKSPACE delete last char 




0766 


* SEE IF CASSETTE I/O GDIN6 ON 


DAD7 2799 


9039 


BEQ 


J4 




DA64 81FF 


0767 


CNPA 1-1 CASSETTE DEVICE CODE 


DAD9 819A 


9849 


CHPA 


•«0A 


DONN ARROW delete next char 


DA66 2615 


0768 


BNE JHPOUT NOT CASETTE SO DO NOTHING 


DADB 2617 


9841 


BNE 


11 




DA68 8601 


0769 


LDA il 


DADD BDDB1C 


9842 


JSR 


INCPTR 


INCREASE HOLD POINTER 


DA6A B7IMA 


0770 


STA INTFL6 NAKE FLA6 POSITIVE 


DAE9 29B8 


9843 


BRA 


KYREAD 


JUHP BACK TO KEY READIN6 


DA6D 7EC38F 


0771 


JHPOUT JNP CHRVCT CONTINUE OLD CODE 




9844 1 










0772 






8845 t 


HANDLE BACKSPACE IF INSERT OFF 




0773 


« 




9846 * 


DECREASE HLDPTR 




DA70 3414 


0774 


KEY PSHS B,X PRESERVE RE6 VALUES 


DAE2 7D91D8 


9847 J4 


TST 


INSERT 




DA72 AE67 


0775 


LDX 7,S SEE IF CALLED FROM IDLE LOOP 


DAE5 2625 


0848 


BNE 


CONXIT 


ON SO DON'T DECREMENT 


DA74 BCA39D 


0776 


CNPX MA39D IDLE LOOP CALL RETURN ADDRESS 


DAE7 8D92 


0849 


BSR 


DECPNT 


CONDITIONAL DECREMENT HLDPTR 


DA77 27«4 


0777 


BEG INIDLE IN THE IDLE LOOP 


DAE9 2921 


0859 


BRA 


CONXIT 


80 TO CONDITIONAL EXIT 


DA79 3314 


0778 


PULS B,X FLAGS NOT AFFECTED 




9851 tttttt 








DA7B 20F0 


0779 


BRA JHPOUT IS NOT IDLE LOOP 


DAEB 7D91D7 


9852 DECPNT 


TBT 


HLDPTR 






0780 


§ THIS ENTRY LINE RECALL HILL ONLY FUNCTION 


DAEE 2793 


9853 


BEQ 


ATZERO 


ALREADY ZERO 




0781 


t WHEN IN THE BASIC IDLE LOOP 


DAF9 7A91D7 


9854 


DEC 


HLDPTR 


REDUCE HLDPTR BY ONE 




0782 


t 


DAF3 39 


9853 AT ZERO 


RTB 






DA7D 0F70 


0783 


INIDLE CLR «70 FLAG BUFFER FLUSHED 




9836 etf tee 








DA7F 7DI14A 


0784 


TST INTFL6 HAVE WE BEEN HERE SINCE 


DAF4 8113 


9857 J3 


CNPA 


•415 


SH1FT/BCKSP clear to start 




0785 


• LAST <CR>? 


DAF6 2711 


9858 


BEQ 


CLRPNT 


80 CLEAR HLDPTR 


DA82 270A 


0786 


BEG 8ETTKN NO CLEAR THE FLA8S 


DAF8 819C 


9859 


CHPA 


•I0C 


CLEAR 




0787 


t YES SEE IF CASSETTE I/O JUST DONE 


DAFA 279D 


9869 


BEQ 


CLRPNT 


DITTO 


DAB4 2B2B 


0788 


BNI TESTWH NO SO CONTINUE 


0AFC 8193 


9861 


CNPA 


•103 


BREAK 


DA86 7F91DA 


0789 


CLR HLDBFR SET FIRST BYTE IN HOLD-0 


DAFE 2799 


9862 


BEQ 


CLRPNT 


YES 80 RESET HLDPTR AND EXIT 


DA89 7F014A 


0790 


CLR INTFL6 READY FOR C0HPLEHENTIN6 


DB99 B15C 


9863 


CNPA 


II3C 


SHIFT/CLEAR special insert 


DA8C 2991 


0791 


BRA 6ETTKN GO CLEAR FLA8S 


DB02 2698 


9864 


BNE 


CONXIT 


NO 80 CONDITIONALLY EXIT 




0792 


t 


DB04 BDA1B1 


9865 


JSR 


8ITKEY 


GET ANQTHIR KEY 




0793 


t 


DB07 2993 


9866 


BRA 


CONXIT 


AND CONDITIONALLY EXIT 




0794 


t FIRST TINE THR0U6H SINCE <CR> SO SET UP 




9867 ttttettie 






DA8E 73914A 


0795 
0796 


8ETTKN CON INTFL8 SET FLA8 TO IFF 
• CLEAR FLAGS 


DB99 7F91D7 


9868 CLRPNT CLR 

9869 tttteette 


HLDPTR 


CLEAR HLDPTR 


DA91 7FI1D7 


0797 


RENTER CLR HLDPTR 


DB9C 8120 


9879 CONXIT CHPA 


•120 


CHECK FOR CONTROL CHARACTER 


DA94 7F91D8 


0798 


CLR INSERT 


DB9E 2597 


9871 


BLO 


EXIT 


EXIT FROH ROUTINE 


DA97 7F91D9 


0799 


ftB UU| TUT 




9872 t 


PRINTABLE CHARACTER SO SEE IF INSERT ON 




0800 


t 


DB19 7D91D8 


9873 


TST 


INSERT 






0891 


t READ CHARACTER FROH KEYBOARD 


DB13 2602 


9874 


BNE 


EXIT 





October 1984 THE RAINBOW 183 



DB13 


8M5 


•873 


BSR 


INCPTR 


INCREMENT HLDPTR 


OBI 7 


3314 


#876 El IT 


PULS 


B.X 


RECOVER INCOMING VALUES 


DB19 


3262 


1877 


LEAS 


2.S 


CLEAN OLD RETURN OFF 


DB18 


39 


1876 


RTS 




RETURN TO BASIC CALL 






1879 ttitttffttf 






DBIC 


BEI1M 


•681 XNCPTR LDI 


•HLDBFR 


POINT TO HOLDIN8 BUFFER 


DBIF 


F6I1D7 


•661 


LDB 


HLDPTR 




DB22 


6065 


•682 


T8T 


B.X 


BET CHARACTER IN HOLD 


DB24 


2703 


•883 


BEQ 


ZEROBT 


ZERO BYTE SO AT AT END 


DB26 


7CB1D7 


•884 


INC 


HLDPTR 




DB29 


39 


•883 ZEROBT RT8 






















•887 ff 


DO SHIFT/I LINE CL09E 


DB2A 


6FFBI1 


•688 LINCLS CLR 


U,S] 


ZERO OUT LAST BYTE 






•889 t 


1,3 19 I, THE PNTR IN THE BASIC INPUT BFR 






•896 # 








DB2D 


8641 


•891 


LDA 


ft 


LOAD 1 SI8N 


DB2F 


BPA282 


•892 


JSR 


CHROUT 


OUTPUT IT 


DB32 


8DB938 


•893 


J9R 


RETURN 


OUTPUT CARRIA8E RETURN 


DB35 


C6#l 


•694 


LDB 


11 


RESET BASICS CHARACTER COUNT 


DB37 


E7E4 


•893 


STB 


>s 


ON STACK 


DB39 


6EI2DD 


1896 


LDX 


•BASBFR 


ALSO BUFFER POINTER 


DB3C 


AF61 


•897 


9TI 


i»s 


ALSO ON STACK 


DB3E 


8ME 


0898 


BSR 


HOVBLK 


TRANSFER INPUT BUFFER TO HOLD 


DB4I 


7EDA91 


•899 


JNP 


RENTER 


RESET AND START OVER 


















1981 i 


DO ENTER 




DB43 


7F#MA 


•9K ENTER 


CLR 


INTFLB 


INDICATE BASIC BUFFER CHAN6ED 






•9U t 












•9M # 


CLEAR LAST BYTE IN BASIC INPUT BUFFER 






•9H t 


FOR HOVE CODE TO DETECT IT 


DB46 


6FF8I1 


•966 


CLR 


[1,83 




DB49 


8QB3 


•917 


BSR 


NOVBLK 


TRANSFER INPUT BUFFER TO HOLD 



DB4B 7EDB17 


•908 
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Educational Programs 
for the TRS-80 Color Computer 



Avftlatile tor both lape and disk 

Used successfully in classrooms across the 
country on a daily basis, B-5 programs make 
learning fun! Each program can be geared to the 
individual needs of each student. 

Instructive programs on: 
-&MATH FUNCTIONS 
LANGUAGE ARTS 
^LEARNING TO COUNT MONEY 
LEARNING TO TELL TIME 
and more! 

Priced from 
$9.95 to $26.95 

Graphics 
^Sound/Color 

Individualized Lessons 
tVPositive Feedback 

Write today for a free catalog, 
or ask for a dealer demonstration. 




B-5 Software Co, 

1024 Bainbridge Place 
Columbus, Ohio 43228 
Phone (614) 276-2752 



Teachers: Have you written the ' ultimate" pro- 
gram? We'd like to take a look . . . 




SorabuRst SoftuoauG 

233 S.E. ROGUE RIVER HWY. 

GRANTS PASS, OR 97527 1-503-476-5977 



The very best utilities for the 64K Disk Color 
Computer, featuring . . . 

• Full use of 64K RAM • 100% Machine Language 

• Parameters easily changeable in basic loader 

• No ROM calls • "Cold start" exit to basic 

• Easy-ta -read, informative documentation • Keyklit 

• Selectable drive stepping rate * Supports 1-4 drives 



EOT — Professional programmers! Why struggle to make a 
word processor handle your Assembly files when you can let 
EDT's built-in features make life easy? Imagine tracking 
sub-routines 10 deep and then returning with a single key 
press! ! Imagine 4 scroll speeds ... all the way from a slow 
slide to the fastest hi-res text scroll ever on a CoCo — bar 
none! Imagine reviewing a disk file without disturbing the 
file in memory and then appending a line (or a block!) at 
the exact point you need it . . . not just at the end of the 
file! Plus a 51x24 screen, 2-way cursor, easy disk access, 
text files to 48K+, copy /save/move /delete blocks, optional 
type-ahead and more yet! Just remember this: If you're NOT 
using EOT — you're WORKING TOO HARD! ! Special . $35.95 

The Sector Inspector — "VERY user friendly" — the Rainbow 
(Aug '84). 212 sectors in memory! Still the best $29.95 

3. The Deputy Inspector — unique and still only $21.95 

4. The Archivist — tape backup of your disks $14.95 

5. The Chief Inspector — $AVE ! All 3 disk utilities .... $59.95 

• Please add $1.50 for shipping, $2.50 for C.O.D. • 



2. 



184 THE RAINBOW October 1984 




Battle the 
of Disk Drives 



Un-DISK Drives $49.95? 



You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



• Un-DISK uses your computer's extra 
memory like a fast disk drive. 

• Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs. 

• Un-DISK is INVISIBLE. Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

• Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VpOS. 

• Un-DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

• Un-DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

• Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

• Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all . . . 

• Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

• Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

• Un-DISK shquld be in the library of every 
serious CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J. £sser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 



OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited, the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if you already own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk. 

EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . EXTRA . . . 
Additional Power For $14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK! 

• VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5, 10, 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DISKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• VDUMP can allow you to save a whole lot 
of rainbow on tape in a SINGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK. 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally! Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $49.95 

The Preble VDUMP $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U.S. and Canada $1.50 

or $5.00 to other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 

SINCKC M$\ >1983 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 
Canadians may order from Kelly Software 



CONNECT WITH CONFIDENCE 




COMPLETE 
SYSTEM 

NOTHING MORE TO BUY 



GEMINI-10X 

COMPLETE SYSTEM 



PRINT SPEED— 120 cps, Bidirectional Logic Seeking 
PRINT SIZE-10, 12, 17, 5, 6, 8.5 cpi 
NUMBER OF COLUMNS-80, 96, 136, (40, 48, 68 in 
Double Wide) 

CHARACTER MATRIX-9 x 9 Standard, with True 
Descenders • 18 x 9 Emphasized • 18 X 18 Double 
Strike • 6 x 6 Block Graphics • 60 x 72 Low Resolu- 
tion, Bit Image Graphics • 120 x 144 Hi Resolution, 
Bit Image Graphics • 240 x 144 Ultra Hi Resolution, 
Bit Image Graphics 

CHARACTER SETS-96 Standard ASCII Charac- 
ters • 96 Italics • 64 Special Characters • 32 Block 
Graphic Characters • 96 Downloadable Charac- 
ters • Super and Sub Script 
LINE SPACING-Programmable by n/144" 

PAPER HANDLING— Roll Paper • Cut Sheet • 
Tractor Fanfold • Copies: 3 Carbonless Sheets 



• 180 DAY WARRANTY 

• BLUE STREAK INTERFACE 

• SCREEN DUMP SOFTWARE 



^10 95+ $1 ° shi PP in s 

-I- and Insurance 



and Insurance 
15X System 439 95 



BLUE STREAK 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 



RUN COCO I or II to PARALLEL PRINTER 

300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 SWITCHABLE BAUD RATES 

AC POWER OPTIONAL-NOT NEEDED WITH GEMINI OR OLIVETTI PRINTER 

COMPLETE WITH ALL CABLES AND CONNECTORS 

180 DAY WARRANTY 



/^V ff 495 SHIPPING 
PAID! 





COMPLETE DATA 
COMMUNICATIONS PACKAGE 



VOLKSMODEM™— Connects Directly to Wall Phone Jack • Telephone Jack 
with Voice/Data Switch • 300 Baud (bits per second) • Originate/Answer 
Mode Automatically Selected • Battery Powered, Low Drain for Long Life 
(batteries included) • Lifetime Warranty • Includes All Cables for COCO 

YOUR CHOICE OF SOFTWARE! 
TSP (Terminal Software Package)— 51 x 24 Hi-Res Display • Buffer Auto 
Adjusts for 16K to 64K • Permits Communication to Virtually All BBS and 
Networks 

AUTOTERM™— World's Smartest Terminal Program 



TOTHK hrt. 
UHatMD TIME OFFER 
MAY NO I V**\t Mil. I. 



$TQ95+ $2.00 Shipping 
/ y with TSP 



$0095+ $2.00 Shipping 
S^with AUTOTERM™ 

Free Limited Time Offer 

Over $100 In 
Discount Coupons 
On Software 
And Supplies 

With Purchase Of Complete System 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES, INC. 

OHIO CHARTER CORPORATION • DI N & BRADSTRKKT LISTED 

7201 CLAIRCREST BLDG. C • DAY TON, OHIO 45424 
t$l3) 236-1454 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD b r /< SALES TAX 
C O D. ADD S2.00 



The Adventurer's Handbook 

A Journey Into Imagination/flesfon Publishing Company . , . . , . . , ........ 202 

Aldaron 

A Good AdventureA/ade Products . . . . , , 207 

Automatic Money Tracer (AMT) 

A Well-Documented Amortization Program/7*H£ OTHER GUY'S SOETware 199 

Bjork Blocks 

Gets An 'F For Fun/Morefor? Bay Software , . . 228 

CoCo Coupler CP/M Cartridge 

Makes Your CoCo More Flexible/Wayne Technology ... * , . 232 

Color Math Practice 

Affords Better SkillsA/arb Software Products .... , . . . 215 

Crlbbage 

Cribs, Nobs, Turnups and Heels — tn Color/4 urora Computing 226 

Dapper 

An Affordable Snazzy Zapper/Sadare Software 212 

Disk-O-Tier 

An Unusual Filing Device/Evans Enterprises . . 233 

Disk Utility 

Very handy/Spectrum Projects ............... . ...... 220 

EDT 

An Excellent Editor For Assembly Language Programmlng/Sonburs/ Software 225 

Johnson Utility Packages 

For Hackers And OS-9/D.P, Johnson - 21 7 

King Author's Tales 

Tutors Kids In Language Skills/Computer Island 200 

NEWBASIC 

Experience Versatitity/Va/fey Micro Software .221 

OS-9 Disk Fix And Utilities 

Disk Utilities And Then Sowe/Computerware ....».*.,......,..,..,.« 218 

PoChek & Poker 

A Casino Player's Sure Bet/S YE George . . * . . * ............................ ♦ 204 

The Printer's Devil 

Printer Interface A Helpful 'DeviP/Af CSt Inc. 203 

Pro-Loc 

For Password Protection/Dor/son House Publishers, Inc. ..>..,...,....>. — ....... , .... 21 1 

RAM Checker 

Very Reassuri ng/Spectrum Projects ................ , 203 

Skeet 

Provides Keyboard Practice/ Cancoco Software 202 

Storm Arrows 

Will Hit The Spot/Spectra/ Associates ...... ... , . . „ 209 

Stylo III 

What You See Is What You Get/ Great Plains Computer Co., inc ^ 192 

TRS-80 User's Encyclopedia 

Gives You The ABCs/The Book Company , . , . . 9l 201 

TS6821 Centronics 

A Reliable fnterface/T&S Electronic^^^^^^^^^^^^^ .......... ... 208 

A Numeric Keypad For Yp«f OaCa/Cafcif Connection Software ^227 

3-Game Pack #3 ... 

Scripture Quiz P§d^p 'Helpful 1 To Youth/Ot/a//fy Chnsthstfi S&Uwm 226 

Timebound |^ 

Action GampSbmpwm Historical Perspective/Ratf/o Shack ..... ..^[^^^^L. 213 

The Touchstone 

A High Iwel, Mflptca! Game/ Tom Mix Software . . , ... £10 

Universal VKteo Driver ^tfMH^^. 

GoodBtlt IjWrerfect/Marfc Data Products 205 

Utility I 

Cr^at0TS^6r-Made Disk Jackets/ YQS ♦ 

Willy s Warehouse 

A Full-FilNng Experience//A/7fMCOLOfl 



M 




October 1984 THE RAINBOW 187 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products recently have been received 
by the rainbow, examined by our magazine staff and 
approved for the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your 
assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 
This month the Seal of Certification has been 
issued to: 



TaxAid, a tax preparation program that 
prints the federal schedules A, B, C, E, F, G, 
and child and dependent eare. No special 
forms are needed. TaxAid also calculates 
data for the Form 1040 and prints by line 
number, AlphaByte, 1008 Alton Circle, 
Florence, SC 29501, cassette $19.95, disk 
$24.95 plus $1.50 S/H 

STOMP, a 32fc ECB board game that uses 
one or two joysticks ajKl/or the keyboard, 
Players move around the board, according 
to the roll of the dice, Unloading a pre* 
specified amount of chips as they go. The 
object of the game is to get fid of all the chips 
at the game's end with the easiest disposal 
being the stomping through opponents' 
positions, Cancoco Software, P.O. Box 
2914, Medley, Alberta TO A 2MO, cassette, 
$24.95 

Cassette Box Insert Maker, a program that 
enables the user to produce professional 
looking inserts for cassette rt*rd boxes. Ajj 
printer & required. Different versions are 
availatrfe for various systejh types. CoCoJ 
users can obtain a copy of the program by 
forwarding a blank tape ^formatted disk- 
along with a self-addressed po^age^paid 
returrtmailer. (CoCo users outside the U.S. 
Postal Service should forward an addressed 
mailer and at least two International Postal 
Reply Coupons to cover postage.) All re- 
quests should mention program number 
801 A (the documentation program). Disk 
users should request program number 80 1 B, 
Extended B/v$ic users 80l C and ColorBASiC 
users 80 ID. There is no; purchase price but 
contributions In any amount are accepted. 
CoCo Freeware Clearinghouse, P.O. Box 
1084, Morgantown, WV 26507 

BASIC Searcher, a machine code utility 
program that requires 16/32K which 
searches your basic programs for any 
desired phrase and displays the lines con- 
taining that phrase. Color Computer Utili- 
ties Unlimited, 3907 Bethel Rd., Boothwyn, 
PA 19061, cassette $19.95 plus $2 S/H 

DATALIST, a 32K ECB database utility 
program that is completely redefinable, and 
provides a sort and selective print routine. 
Computer Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 683, 
West Fargo, ND 58078, cassette $24.95 

Textools, 17 utility programs for the OS-9 
user involving catalogs, file copy and other 



handy functions. Computerware, PvQ. Box 
668, 4403 Manchester Avenue, Suite 102, 
Encinitas, CA 92024, disk $29.95 plus $2 
S/H 

SUPER GEMPRINT, is a ML program 
supplied on cassette tape, transferable to 
disk that requires 16K ECB. It will copy the 
image of any Hi-Res screen(PMODEQ, 2> 3 
or 4) to a Gemini printer. In order to fill an 
eitttre page, the image is printed sideways 
(starting from the left edge of the screen). 
Printing of the four-color modes is imple-^ 
mented with gray-level shading. Dayton 
Associates, Inc., 7201 Claircrest Bldg. C, 
Dayton, OH 45424, cassette $24.95, plus $2 
S/H. Ohio residents include 6% sales tax. 

WIZARD, a 16K to 64 K utility program 
that offers a new character set for the 
Telewriter-64 with true descenders. 
WIZARD can give visible carriage return 
marks at the end of text lines and is installed 
by modification of the program WIZ. Full 
instructions are supplied for both disk and 
cassette in any size system. D. Dean Rector, 
2601 Bridalwood Dr. #4, Knoxville, TN 
37917, cassette $16.95 

3-D Maze, a 16K FCB arcade jime that 
includes clue options and two mnies with 
degrees of difficulty. Success depends on 
your use of all the directional arrows. Draco 
Software, 22 Lassell St., Portland, ME 
€410?, cassette $p5 

E-ZArt,al6K ECB graphics utility program 
thatincludes: basic geometric designs, paint, 
saveon tfpe, and two and four color modes. 
Complete instruction program included. 
Draco Software, 22 Lassell St., Portland, 
ME 04102, cassette $5.95 

Domes-Day, a 16K ECB arcade game which 
require?, a joystick. You must defend the city 
from falling bombs that increase in number 
with each new wave of offense. Defense con- 
sists of a protective dome and your skill in 
blasting the bombs out of the sky. Draco 
Software, 22 Lassell St., Portland, ME 
04102, Cassette $5.95 

Intercept, a 16K ECB arcade game that 
requires a joystick. Your mission is to inter- 
cept the aliens trying to make planetfall. The 
quicker you are, the more points you score. 
Draco Software, 22 Lassell St.. Portland, 
ME 04102, cassette $4.95 



Elite*FHe t a 12K ML database manager that 
vhas these capabilities: up to 255 fields per 
record, up to 2,000 characters per record, up 
to 4,000 records per filename, up to 16 file- 
names open at the same time, sort, scan, edit 
and record select features, production of 
tabular record reports, calculator math 
between fields. Elite Software, P.O. Box 
11224, Pittsburg, PA 15238, disk $74.50 
$us $2.50 S/H 

K-BASIC Compiler* for FLEX and OS-9 
users generates assembly language source 
code files for assembly by the assembler. It is 
a two stage compilation. You write a basic 
program, compile it and then assemble' it to 
the final executable machine code form. The 
compiler and assembler do the rest. OSM is 
and eight-bit macro assembler. It can sup- 
port structured constructs like WHILE and FOR, 
etc. These constructs can define macros with 
suitable parameters, conditional assembly 
directives, the ability to change the value of a 
label or symbol and source co<fe may be 
assembled in modular Form. Lloyd I/O, 
19535 NEGIisan, Portland, OR 97230, both 
disks $199. 

Easy-Filet a 32 K database management sys- 
tem wWch features up to 30 fields in a 
reetjrrl, password protection, search and edit 
functions, tab stops, horizontal and vertical 
reports. Requires a printer with 80 columns 
or greater and at least one disk drive. Comes 
with complete instructions. Mark Data 
Products, 24001 Alicia Part way, #207, Mis- 
sion; Viejo, CA 92691, disk;$59.95 

UniversaF Video Driver, a hardware device 
to enable your CoCo (and CoCo 2) to oper- 
ate with a video monitor instead of a televi- 
sion set. It comes with an audio connector. 
No soldering required. Mark Data Pro- 
ducts, 24001 Alicia Parkway, #207, Mission 
Viejo CA 92691, $29.95 

Trivia and Some Signifies, a 16 K ECB game 
for two to four players or teams that capital- 
izes on the trivia fad. It contains two modes: 
Trivia, a question and answer format with 
suggested answers subject to vote on their 
veracity; MakeTriv, whicfr allows you to 
add / enter questions, find, delete, print, save, 
or view questions. Moreton Bay Software, 
316 Castillo St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, 
cassette $19.95, disk $21.95 



1 88 THE RAINBOW October 1 984 



MasterFile, a 32K ECB utility program that 
requires at least one disk drive. This is a file 
management system designed to organize all 
programs, files, data sets. etc. The main 
function of MasterFile is cataloging disk 
files and it provides other peripheral func- 
tions. Sofge Enterprises, P.O. Box 309, HiW 
Hard, FL 32046, disk $19.95 

Disk Utility 2.1, a program incorporating 
several useful functions lor disk user*. Fea- 
tures include directory sorting, fttst format- 
ting and backups, examining files and some 
disk repair functions. Spectrum Projects, 
PX). Box 21272, Woodhaven, NY 1 1421 OP 
P.O. Box 986% Ssia Jfow, CA 951574)866. 
$24.95 plus $3.$/H 

Musica 2, a 32K ECB music program that 
requires cither a disk drive or cassette re- 
corder a1|^|^#ipatible with all disk ROM/ 
versions. Features include: easy entry aj$£f 
editing of music, chords in four-part har- 
mony, vibrato effect possible and wave- 
shapes may be switched as music plays and 
music jnay be dumped to any graphics prim- 
er. Systems, 38W255 Dcerpath 
Road, Batavia. IL 60510, cassette IMS, 
disk $39.95 

Music Library 100, an Extended Color 
basic music program with over 100 four 
voice songs giving three hours of music. 
Among the categories included are: classi- 
cal, stage, cinema, patriotic, and music from 
the 58s, 60s, and 70s. Sp«^pl3ystems, 
38W2|^eerparti*©ad, BataVra, ft 605 1 0, 
cassette 134.95, disk $39.95 

TIMSUTfLlTY, a 32K ECB supplement 
and complement toVMSmd Tf MS MAIL 
that contains the following databaife^tili-^ 
ties: if 'global cfiahge 2) global defetc 3) ' ' 
add/ delete fields in the original record 4) 
split file, enabling user to create new files 
based on range search criteria or using Boo- 
lean Logical operators j»|dli-sejtrsjh gjode; 
Sugar Software, 2tfS3 bbih Lane, Re> nolds- 
burg, OH 4#8, cassepfetli*.95 

AutoRun64, a f£K ECB eissttte utility that 
builds a ML loader which when combined 
with basic or your own ML programs, is 
self-starting and loads and starts your pro- 
gram. It enables 64K mode and moves ECB 
higher in memory, freeing an additional 8K 
for larger programs. Sugar Software, 2153 
Leah Lane, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068, cas- 
sette $24.95 plus $ I S/H 

Talking Shiphunt, a 32K ECB electronic 
version of "Battleship" which requires a 
Voice Pak using the Votrax SC-01 Voice 
synthesizer Chip and Del Software's Trans- 
late program. The computer places its fleet 
at random and you must find the fleet before 
your ammunition runs out. Supplied on 
cassette, the program can be transferred to 
disk. Cobra Software, 10203 Arapahoe 
Road, Lafayette, CO 80026, cassette $10.95 



Floppiclene, a cleaning product for your 
disk drive(s). It is available for 3.5-inch, 
5.25-inch and 8-inch drives and comes with 
aerosol cleaning solution, disk jacket, 20 
cleaning disks, plus two anti-static screen 
wipes for your monitor. Refill kits available. 
Automation Facilities Corp., 5740 Thorn- 
wood Drive, Goleta, CA 93 117, $34.95 

Counting Things, an educational mathemat- 
ics program designed for ages three to eight 
and requiring 16K ECB. The youngster 
sclecis a target aiid then counts to the target. 
Word, numeral, a changing quantity and an 
abacus reflect each entry. The second pro- 
■jgram in the package presents the situation 
and asks for the correct total. Hi-Res gra- 
phics and upper- and lowercase jitters are 
used. Thompson House, P.O. Box 58, Kam- 
ioops, British Columbia, Canada V2C 5K3, 
cassette $14.95 

file Enhancer, an ML utility program re- 
quiring 64K ECB that adds nine commands 
and one function to Extended Color basic 
or Disk Extended basic. Included among 
the commands are: RECOVER, which will 
recover a program that has been erased by a 
NEW command; REPEAT, which turns on 
and off the keyboard repeat feature; BREAK, 
which enables or disables the break key; 
HIPR1NT, which controls the computer 
display mode; SCROLL, which controls 
sectional scrolling of the screen; and DE- 
SPACE, which removes all unnecessary 
spaces from basic programs. H.D.R. Soft- 
ware, 21 Doyle Street, St. John's, New*: 
foundland, Canada A IE 2N9, cassette $25 
Can., disk $29 Can., postage paid 

Addition, an educational math program 
requiring 16K ECB and designed especially 
for use in elementary and special education 
settings. The program consists of eight levels 
of increasing difficulty and it adjusts auto- 
matically in accordance with the student's 
performance. Wish Software, 242 Water- 
raan Ave., Apt. #20, North Providence, RI 
029 H, cassette $24.95 plus $ I S/H 

Coins, an educational package requiring 
16K ECB that consists of three separate 
activities: Counting Coins, which requires 
the student to count varying numbers of 
pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters and 
enter the answer using the dollar sign and 
dejprnai format; Adding Coins, which re- 
qrafeft tjtie student to associate the correct 
coins With n given amount; and Making 



Change, which requires the student to sub- 
tract a cost from a given amount and then 
produce the correct coins for the change. 
Wish Software, 242 Waterman Ave., Apt. 
#20, North Providence, RI 02911, cassette 
$24.95 plus$l S/H 

Text, an educational program requiring 16K 
ECB and designed to help children become 
comfortable with typing on a video display. 
The letters are large and easy to read and the 
arrow keys are used to position the cursor 
for editing; Wish Software, 242 Waterman 
Ave., Apt. #20, North Providence, RI 05911, 
cassette $24.95 plus $1 S/H 

Tk-Tac Math, an educational program re- 
quiring 16K ECB. The program combines 
the game of tic-tac-toe with math exercises. 
Addition, subtraction or multiplication are 
selected by the student, along with the level 
of difficulty. Wish Software, M% Waterman 
A^e , Apt. #20, North Providence, RI0291 1, 
cassette $24.95 plus $1 S/ H 

Pac-Panic, an ML Hi-Res graphics artjade- 
type game requiring 32 K of RAM add at 
least one joystick. This "Pac" game features 
two screens with invisible mazes. After seven 
monsters are eate^their ghosts join to form 
a single ghost or centipede that cannot be 
destroyed — only avoided. Tom Mix Soft- 
ware, 4285 Bradford N.E., Grand Rapids, 
MI 49506, cassette $24.95, disk $27.95, plus 
$2 S/H 

Quix, an ML Hi- Res graphics arcade-type 
game requiring 3 2 It of RAM and at least 
one joystick. Based on the arcade game of 
similar name, the object is to draw boxes 
until you hav£ filled in 75 percent of the 
screen while avoiding the Quixes and spark- 
lers. Tom Mix Software, 4285 Bradford 
N.E., Grand Rapids, Ml 49506, cassette 
$24.95, disk $27.95, plus $2 S/H 

Warehouse Mutants, an ML Hi-Res graph- 
ics arcade-tvpe game requiring 32K of RAM 
and at least tfnc joystick. Your goal is to 
secure the warehouse by killing the Mutants 
who threaten to destroy you. You can either 
zap them before they eifterge from their 
crates or crush them by pushing crates on 
top of them. But watch out — they push 
crates too! Tom Mix Software, 4285 Brad- 
ford N.E., Grand Rapids, Ml 49506, cassette 
$24.95, disk $27.95, plus $2 S/H 



The Seal of Certification program is open to 
all manufacturers of products for the TRS-80 
Color Computer, the TDP-100, or the Dragon-32 f 
regardless of whether they advertise in the rainbow. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the 
program does exist, but this does not constitute any 
guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these 
hardware or software items will be forwarded to 
the rainbow's reviewers for evaluation. 

— Monica Dorth 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 189 



HI-RES GRAPHIC 

ADVENTURES 

DISC NOT REQUIRED 

Cassettes— $24.95/Disc— $27.95 




You are inside * snail pub. 

Obvious exits *re Hest. 

You see- « siQn on the bar, 
b*rl:eep, sa*1i groups of 
customers, * 9 lass of beer. 

OK, 



(he 




SHENANIGANS 

Countless legends tell of a magnificent 
Pot of Gold hidden at the end of the 
rainbow. Many have attempted to find 
the marvelous treasure but success has 
eluded them and it remains hidden to this 
day. You, as a dedicated adventurer, have 
determined to search for the fabled gold 
arid succeed where others have failed, 
one is great fun! 32K required. 




the Professor's secret 
lory filled with complex 
ery and test equipment 

an unusual look ins 
, a passageway, a pair of 
boo t s » 



CALIXTO ISLAND 

A valuable museum treasure has been 
stolen, can you recover it??? This is a 
challenging puzzle with an occasional 
twist of humor. You'll visit a secret labora- 
tory, a Mayan pyramid and you'll meet 
crazy Trader Jack—all in living color and 
exciting detail. You will really love this 
hi-res graphic version of the classic Calixto 
Island Adventure. 32K required. 

Rainbow— Apfil, '84 "It was enough to keep my wife and 8 year 
old son glued to the computer for an entire weekend and two 
wee* nights. . ." 



SEA SEARCH 



Get your shark repellant and scuba tanks 
ready! The graphics in this adventure are 
truly outstanding and the under water 
scenes are unforgettable. You'll run into a 
pirate, a mermaid and some hungry sharks 
in this colorful and unique treasure hunt. 
32K required. 



Hot CoCo— April, 
imagination. . 



"The fine graphics accent your 




Encounter the forces of black magic as 
you roam around an old 18th century 
monastery. You'll see all the evil locations 
in this spooky adventure, you'll love search- 
ing out and destroying the evil in this 
classic tale. A MUST for every adventure 
game fanl 32K required. 

Rainbow— May. '84— "It's the graphic screens that are the 
shining stars . ." "Some of the best I've seen." 




FREE - Send for our NEW 24 page catalog! 



Mark Data Products 



24001 ALICIA PKWY., NO. 207 • MISSION VIEJO, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 



SHIPPING: All order* under $100 please add $2 regular, $5 air. All orders over $100 please add 2% regular, 5% air. California residents please add 6% sales tax Orders outside 
the continental U.S., check with us for shipping amount; please remit U.S. funds. Software authors— contact us for exciting program marketing details We accept MasterCard 
and VI$A. Distributed in Canada by Kelly Software 



IB 

ii 



REVEWNG FEMEWS 



SKEET 

Editor: 

With reference to "Letters To Rainbow," 
August 1983, Page 8, it is a pleasure to read 
that my own words were taken seriously. 

Skeet requires 32K ECB, not 16K, and 
uses PMODE3, not high resolution, graph- 
ics. 

Changes will be made (have been made 
when this is read), the structured /modular 
program format makes this easy to do. 

The duration of the explosion will be 
shortened slightly. From the beginning, the 
high speed poke was included to reduce the 
time of the explosion. Although the number 
of CoCo's which cannot accept this feature is 
a very small percentage of those in use, it will 
be made conditional upon selection of the 
already existant option for high speed. 

There are 13 levels, of which ten are dedi- 
cated to presenting different and increas- 
ingly difficult sets of ten keys. Only three 
(random keysets) will exhibit duplicate keys, 
and this was intentional in an effort to 
ensure that a typist thinks about the charac- 
ters he/she is typing. Nonethless, 1 will pro- 
vide a duplicate no-duplicate option. 

In summary, the review was accurate, and 
changes will be made. Although I cannot 
support her judgment call — based upon my 
adult and child testing (and my own bias) 
—she may be correct. Bear in mind that 
Skeet is not primarily a game, it is an educa- 
tional program presented in a game format. 

John Plaxton 
Cancoco Software 



10KEY 

Editor: 

First I would like to thank the rainbow 
and Mr. Weaver for reviewing our new util- 
ity program, JO KEY. 

At the time JOKEY was written and Mr. 
Weaver was reviewing the program, it was to 
be marketed by Harmonycs of Salt Lake 
City, Utah. Darren Croft of Color Connec- 
tion Software and I have since formed a 
partnership. JOKEYmW now be marketed 
by Color Connection Software. 

In his review, Mr. Weaver stated that a 
major problem ^as uncovered in the GEN 
program, which is part of the JOKEY pack- 
age. 

The problem has been solved and has been 
incorporated into the program. I could have 
simply changed the instruction booklet to 
cure the problem. However, my philosophy 
is that anything that can be in the program 
rather than in the instructions should be! 
After awhile any ordinary person like myself 
tends to lose instructions for programs. 
Then, if there is some critical piece of infor- 
mation on using the program that needs 
to be remembered, the program could be 



rendered useless. Therefore, the CLEAR 
command that cured the problem with the 
GEN program is in the program, not in the 
instructions, and is transparent to the user. 

I spoke to Mr. Weaver on the phone when 
he was reviewing the program. He had sev- 
eral interesting suggestions concerning 
JOKEY. 1 have since incorporated a couple 
of changes. One is that the start, end and 
execute addresses of the JOKEY program 
are displayed after the GEN program has 
generated your custom version of JOKEY. 
Another is that if you choose to put your 
copy of the machine language JOKEY on 
tape instead of disk, the program allows you 
to record as many as three copies without 
having to rerun the GEN program. 

Again, I appreciate the work that Mr. 
Weaver and the rainbow put into product 
reviews. In the unique marketing situation 
that third party vendors find themselves in 
with Radio Shack products, magazines like 
THE rainbow and product reviewers are 
indispensable. As Jim Reed said in his 
"Building August's rainbow," reviews can 
cause feast or famine for the producer of 
third party products. Hats off to the rain- 
bow and its fleet of reviewers for doing a fine 
job. 

Jay R. Hoggins 
Color Connection Software 



THE SECTOR INSPECTOR 

Editor: 

When I read the review of our Sector 
Inspector by Mr. Downard (rainbow, 
August *84, Page 220), 1 quickly pulled a 
copy of our documentation to be sure that 
we had not left out an important function. 
Mr. Downard is entirely correct, the ability 
to read in or write to 40 tracks is a must in 
this type of program and we did indeed 
include this capability in The Sector Inspec- 
tor. 1 checked the documentation and found 
that we had mentioned this feature, and so I 
must assume that our wording is vague and 
consider ways to improve it. We do appre- 
ciate his bringing this to our, attention. 

One other point which we feel obligated to 
correct: The Sector Inspector's basic loader 
will not allow the user to send linefeeds to 
his/her printer. I wonder if Mr. Downard 
was looking at the documentation for EDT 
(our assembly language editor — which has 
an expanded list of user pre-setable parame- 
ters) when he was making his review notes. 

We had hoped that your reviewer would 
mention The Sector Inspector's ability to 
read in and edit 212 sectors at a time (as 
opposed to one at a time with some others), 
copy files or programs from disk to disk with 
ease even between drives, load a program 
from the menu for examination or edit, 
name a disk when copying the directory, or 
its ability to help the machine language pro- 



grammer search for a hexadecimal (or 
ASCII) string and then edit it to allow test- 
ing without reassembling a text file; but 
we're not complaining! We found Mr. Dow- 
nard 's review to be entirely adequate. And 
we appreciate his effort. 

In closing, we congratulate you on a fine 
publication and a rare forum for product 
review and "reviewing reviews." 

John Erickson 
Sonburst Software 

SUBTRACTION DRILL 

Editor: 

After reading Mr. Burnette's comments, I 
must agree the review was "incomplete" and 
should have explained in greater detail some 
of the statements I made. I have tried several 
programs of this type, and Subtraction Drill 
was dry, dull, and very unlikely to generate a 
lot of interest with a child using it. 

My three school-aged children assisted me 
in the review. The concept of using a com- 
puter for a training or drill program, is by no 
means an easy task, however, it requires a 
great deal of creativity, something I saw 
missing from this software. The author must 
generate material that will make a child want 
to keep coming back for more drills, not 
only a tool to be used by a teacher — typical 
of a teacher or parent telling the student 
do/ try a few practice probelms. There are 1 3 
drill routines and with a few different levels 
of drill — not 13 levels of instruction. The 
"rewards" and graphics are an integral part 
of the software, so much so that the return to 
the program subsequent use and popularity 
depends on it. 

Selection of music is not easy, but some 
music can be uninspiring, or inappropriate. 
How can The Star Spangled Banner, written 
and devoted to a time of American conflict, 
be compared to getting a subtraction prob- 
lem correct? And for the song America, writ- 
ten to praise our country, how can this com- 
pare to a correct subtraction problem? My 
daughter is in the fourth grade, and is 
dyslexic. Dyslexic children experience diffi- 
culty in mastering math skills. Her difficulty, 
together with the program's slow speed, 
uninspiring music and graphics, diminished 
her interest. Perhaps this type of student was 
overlooked in planning this program. 

A "plastic card" with instruction was sug- 
gested because the "drill screen" is not "user 
friendly," and the menu screen access could 
be forgotten. Also the enclosed instruction 
sheet is not written in a level of English for 
the young user. Even I was stumped and had 
to think twice about what "s. bar" meant in 
the instructions. 

The software could be used for school use, 
but the cost and content would not be a good 
buy for home use. 

Stephan A. Brown 
Poughkeepsie, NY 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 191 



Software R e vie w ^ 

Stylo III For OS-9 — What 
You See Is What You Get 

By Dale L. Puckett 

When I first started writing, my only word processor was 
an IBM Selectric I. It was 1966 and we published a 32- to 
40-page newspaper for recruits and permanent personnel at 
the Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May, N.J. 

Since we wanted to put out a professonal looking pro- 
duct, we needed to justify all the copy in the magazine. What 
a process! First, we wrote the story. That's one pass through 
the Selectric. Then, we rewrote it. That's two passes — or 
maybe more. 

Finally, after the lieutenant approved the copy, we typed 
the copy a third time. This time we filled each line with X's. 
The pass looked something like this. 

Finally ? after the Lieutenant XX 
approved the copy, we typed theXXX 
copy a third time- This time weXX 

Then, we went back and made one mark in a space 
between words for each one of the X's that appeared on the 
line. After doing this we typed the copy again, adding an 
extra space each time we came upon an X. The final copy 
came out looking like this — assuming we didn't hit any of 
the wrong keys. 

Finally «, after the Lieutenant 
approved the copy, we typed the 
copy a third time- This time we 

We've come a long way. Now with Stylo III you simply 
type, ",ju" in the first column of the first line of your text and 
the magic of justification will take place before your eyes. 
And, this is only one of many features you'll find in Stylo III 
Let's look at the additions to this third generation writing 
tool first. 

Stylo HI Features A New Overwrite Mode 

Many of my complaints with earlier versions of Stylo 
have been resolved. For example, with Stylo II it was a real 
hassle when you wanted to type over a word. You had to 
strike the ' 1 ' key and then hit the letter you wanted. Now you 
have a continuous overwrite mode. You simply move your 
cursor to the beginning of the word you want to type over, 
strike the T key and start typing. You can now type in this 
mode as long as you want. 

There is a problem with the overwrite mode when you get 
to the end of your existing text. In the copy I reviewed, if you 
type past the last character, it is possible to send the program 
and crash the system. However, 1 mentioned this problem to 
the people at Great Plains Computer and they identified the 
cause immediately and promised to have the problem fixed 
before this review is ever published. 

A Word Tab Key Speeds Editing 

Another problem with earlier versions was the fact that 



you could only move the cursor along a line one character at 
a time. Now, you can use two additional keys to move your 
cursor a word at a time in either direction. This is a great 
improvement that makes a lot of sense because it makes the 
computer work like a writer — editing words. 

Before Stylo III you had to be content with an even left 
margin on both odd and even numbered pages — unless you 
wanted to manually change the left margin each time you 
entered a new page. Now, you can tell Stylo III to print each 
even numbered page — they usually appear on the left-hand 
side of a book — with a 10-character left margin and each 
odd numbered page with a 1 5-character margin. This means 
that the copy on the odd numbered page will not be half 
buried in the gutter created by the staples that hold it 
together. 

The Tab Key Is Now Where It Belongs 

The old Stylo Tab key used to drive me crazy, too. Every- 
one who types, automatically hits the key marked "TAB" 
when they want to move the cursor across a line, don't they? 
Everyone but the early Stylo users it seems. Back in the "old 
guard" you had to hold down the control key and strike the 
"T"key. "T"for tab, get it? This insanity has been cured and 
you can now hit the "TAB" key to your heart's content. 

It is now easy to set Tab stops. The people at Great Plains 
have added a ruler command. For example: 

,ru 60,0,5,10,15,50 

This line, typed with the comma in column one of a Stylo 
document would give you a line width of 60 characters. 
Additionally, the first character would be printed in the first 
column on your printer — the zero tells Stylo that you want 
an indent of zero spaces from the left margin — and you 
would have Tab stops set five, 10, 15 and 50 spaces from the 
left margin. Now, that's easy. And, better yet, you can 
change your formatting on the fly by simply inserting a new 
ruler line anywhere in your document. 

A Programmers Mode Has Been Added 

Several years ago you couldn't find too many pro- 
grammers who used Stylo to edit their source files. This, too, 
will change with Stylo III Stylo now has a "Programmers 
Mode." 

When you get ready to edit the source code of a program 
written in a structured language like PASCAL or BASIC09, 
you simply hold down the CLEAR Key — remember that's 
how you get a control character with CoCo OS-9 — and 
strike the 4 E\ Then, as you type your program Stylo will 
return the cursor to the latest Tab used each time you type 
"RETURN." When you have finished typing at a specific 
level of indentation, you get back to the first column by 
typing "RETURN" twice. Typing "Control E" again gets 
you out of the "Programmers Mode." 

Great Plains has fixed Styfix. Older versions tended to be 
confusing and overbearing. The new Styfix utility is a snap. 

Styfix lets you set up Stylo to work with almost any 
terminal or printer you can afford. It also lets you tell Stylo 
the characteristics of the terminal used by each user on a 
multi-user system. If you are only using Stylo on the CoCo, 
you won't need Styfix because Great Plains has already set 
Stylo up to work when you load it off the disk. 

Stylo ///features its own built-in H i-Res screen driver for 
Color Computer OS-9. This will save you the cost of buying 
another. It also will free up some memory, giving you a 
larger work space for your text files. 



192 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Weeamunk 

32StipeS21.9S 32IdiskJ23.85 

100?* machrne language fast action game As a sol- 
dier monkey you must save the forest of Ledonta from 
the evil mammoth spiders, avoid the tailing coconuts, 
save the sacred birds and recover Ledoma s treasure 
Megamunk has 11 different screens with multiple col- 
ors and /lostf voice ' music A REAL challenge (Joy- 
stick required) 



III H7.8S 



A numeric keypad tor your COCO for only $17.95^ Im- 
possible 7 1 0KEY is 1.00% position independent machine 
language software that turns a portion of your keyboard 
into a numeric keypad. 10KEY is useful when typing in 
those long DATA statements with lots of lumbers or when 
entering numeric data with any BASIC program (Note 
10KEY does not function with INKEYS statements) The 
10KEY package contains the following 1-10KEY a ma- 
chine language program that loads at the top of 16K 
2-GEN a program to generate your own custom version 
of 10KEY 3-DEMO a simple graphing program with 
which to practice with the 10KEY program 



MATCH ft SPELL turns spelling drudgery into spelling fun. 

16K Extended Basic . . $11.95 

MATHWAR |s a 1st and 2nd grade math drill game. 

16K Extended Basic . . $11.95 
FLASHCARD8 assists in studying anything from Mythology 
to Medicine. 1 6K Extended Basic . . $11.95 

TIC-TAC-T06 MATH* Plenty of color and sound. Different 
age players can compete against each other with their 
own skill level. 16K Extended Basic . . $11,95 

WE -SCHOOL PAH, Alphabet recognition and counting 
drills. Hi-res graphics and sound. 

16K Extended Basic $14.95 

QUIZ ALL. A versatile quiz program. Has study and test for- 
mats and allows printing of quiz. Even includes an option 
for CoCo to generate multiple choice answers. 

1 6K Extended Basic - , - $18.95 
16KDisk . $20.95 

4M?K)fjffiZ^^ the most complete, most versatile 

amortisation program available for the CoCo. 

16K Extended Basic $1 1 .95 



r 



1 



ORDERING IN* 0 

• Ada $2 lor shipping and nanciitny 

• Utah restdenft add 6 75 % sate* ta» 

• We accept cnetKa money orders VfSA and 
MASTER CHARGE dder toy phone #01 S?l 5023 
(can 6 30 lo t0 pro MOT (or iechn*cat tnfo ) 

a We carry many other lme programs pfeaae can O' 
write tor Our Uyei } 





DIET-AID will help you track your calo- 
rie intake, tell you how many calories 
you need to maintain your weight & 
suggest how much exercise you need 
to burn up any extra calories you've 
consumed. 

32K Cassette 



ratte $19.95 



THE PUZZLER will create cross- 
word puzzles, wordsearch puz- 
zles and wordscramble puzzles. 
Will print the puzzle with any 
dot addressable printer (printer 
optional). 100% machine lang- 
uage. Incredible! 

16K Cassette $21.95 
32KDisk . . $23.95 



Gilir Designer 

The ultimate Hi-Res Graphics Pro* 
cessorU! Great for doodling, sketching, 
and most of all, creating entire. graphics 
screens. Options include; 8 key cursor 
control with key repeat, Draw command 
that follows your cursor, FILL command 
that "PAINTS" the screen with more than 
1000 different color/texture combinations, 
and much much more I ! 

16V32K cas $26.95 disk $28.95. 



OKI DUMP 

Eight bit screen dump from CoCo to 
an OKidata 82A printer without dot 
addressable graphics? 100% machine 
language. Includes hints on printing 
pictures of Hi-res game screens. 

1 6K cas $8.95 1 6K disk $1 0.95 






RAINBOW 

CWIUCATIO* 



S0L0I iOilEiTIOI SQFTWA1E 



1060 Buddies Drive-Sandy, Utah 84070 -801 -57 1-3023 



4) 




HARDWARE & PROGRAMS 



MONITORS 

C MEDIUM-RES COLOR 

i 3" BMC w/ sound , , $303.95 

14** US! w/ sound . , , . 324.95 

12" Taxon Composite & RGB. , , 335.95 

COM REX Hl-REft 
MONOCHROME 

12" Amber or Green 140.95 

9 H Amber or Green. .... t . 125.95 

Sorry, no C.O.D. on monitors. 
COMPOSITE MONITOR 
INTERFACE* 

Double Driver. . . 24.95 

Video Plus 24.95 

Both work great with color 
or monochrome on CoCo I: 

Coco Double Driver. 28.95 

Video Plus II M ,26.95 

Video Plus II C 39.95 

For CoCo II Only 



J ARE DISK DOUBLE* 

Why spend twice as much as. you need to 
for double sided diskettes? With our 
doubler, you can make your own and pay 
for it with the first box you double. A 
must for disk drive users. 
3»/4 H size only 12.95 

BASF DATA CAWETTEtt 
COS C-l* 

1-10 .60 ea. .65 ca. 

11-20 .55 ea. .60 ca. 

Soft Poly Cases , Ea. $.20 

Hard Shelled Cases Ea. $.22 

Cassette Labels (12). Sh. $.36 

Cassette Labels Tractor ( 1000) . . , $21 .95 

MEMORY UPGRADE 
KJTS 



IftK HAM CHIPS. 
fV T C*C*ni*K .. 



...I.50ea. - 
..-•1.95 ca. 



**4ft RAM CHIM 

Eight 200 NS Factory Prime 64K RAM 
Chips. Allows you to upgrade 'all' board 
easily. No soldering needed $52.50 

' l*K 120L 

Eight 200 NS Factory Prime Chips with 
Piggy Backed Sockets, Sam Socket, Bus 
Wire. Comprehensive Instructions. 
Recommended for W D M or earlier, but may 
be used on M E*\ Only 9 simple solder con- 
nections to kit. None to computer. $25.95 
NOT FOR CoCo 2 




THE GUNFIGHTER 

BY Tcm A. Steen 

An excellent hi-jres, arcade quality game 
program tor two player*. Joysticks and 
32K are required in this ail machine 
language program. 

Cassette $19.95 Disk/Amdisk .$24.95 

JUNGLE TREK 

Lost in a jungle with wild animals lurking; 
your Only survival is to find a safe com- 
pound before you are lunch for lions; 
high resolution; multi-color. 
I6K EXT ,$14.95 

RIORMYTHM / PSYCHIC AFT, 

1) Prints biorhythm charts of nearly 
unlimited length; attractively formatted 
for use on most printers. 1 6K 

2) Your psychic ability is determined 
through questions evaluating your psychic 
experiences 

1 6K Ext ............. Bot h for $ 1 5 .95 



PROGRAMS FOR THE 
SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
VOICE-PAK 
OR 

SPEECH SYSTEMS VOICE 

TALKING 
FINAL COUNTDOWN 

(by Bill Cook) 

For32K EXT...., .,$19.95 

Standard cassette 

HNAI. COUNTDOWN , . . $14.95 



TALKING 
SPELL- A-TRON 

The program allows the user to build a 
dictionary of words. During testing, the 
words arc spoken. If an incorrect 
response iy given, the word is spoken 
again and spelled. Tape(32K EXT) $22.95 



TALKING 
SCORE E-Z 

A yahuec type program. Up to six players 
can compete. AH scoring and record keep- 
ing is done by the computer. Tape (32K 

EXT)., , .$19.95 

Standard SCORE E-Z .... $15.95 



TALKING 
COLOR MATH 

The perfect educational game to aid thje 
student in learning addition, subtraction;, 
multiplication and division. Allows one to 
specify difficulty level. 
Tape (32K EXT) : ,..$22.95 



TALKING 
SHIP HUNT 

by Cobra So/ware 
Play Battleship against your computer. 
32K w/ joystick needed. Graphics and 
sound. Can be played without voice. 
Cassette v.. ..$10.95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR 
(disk) can draw large scale schematics in 
hi-rcs (has six overlapping screens) and 
then print them out to any of several 
popular primers, fast!! A must for serious 
hardware computertst. 
Now only. . ■ $49.95 

CoCo Chip* 

Sam, Pia, CPU, Ext, Basic 

We carry products 
from many manufacturers. 
If you don't see it, ask. 




J ARB 



1636 D Avenue, Suite C 
NttaAii City, CA 92050 



HARDWARE 



Order Line 

COD orders accepted, no charge cards please. (619) 474-8982 
Shipping and handling $3.00 Aff H one 

California residents please add 6% sales tax (619) 474 8981 



Standard Features 

We live in a strange world today. Millions of letters, 
reports and books have been written with word processors 
that took two passes to complete the job. You edited your 
copy with an editor. Then, you processed your prose with a 
text processor as you sent it to the printer. 

Today, we're spoiled and you can't convince any of the 
"consumers" who buy IBM PCs that a word processor 
works unless it shows them exactly what they are going to 
see on the printed page on the screen while they are typing it. 
Stylo is the only word processor that brings this feature to 
the Color Computer. Others feature screen editing, but they 
do the final text processing while you print. 

The problem with processing your text while you print it 
is that you do not know where the page breaks are going to 
fall. Often, this leaves you with widows or orphans — terms 
printers use to define one line of text left stranded on the 
bottom or top of a page. With Stylo you'll spot these prob- 
lems as you enter your text and correct them by forcing a 
page break or shortening a sentence, etc., before you print 
your document. If you are a perfectionist, this feature can 
save you a lot of time. 

The easy way to use Stylo with the Color Computer is to 
leave it set up for its default screen width of 51 characters. 
This will let you edit your copy without being bothered by a 
lot of horizontal scrolling. Then, when you have finished 
your writing and editing, you can set the line width of your 
final document by using the " //"command at the beginning 
of your text. At this point you can scroll through the copy 
and make sure all the margins appear the way you want 
them and check the page breaks to make sure everything is 
going to print the way you want it to. Once you're satisfied 
you simply move to Stylo s main menu, move the cursor to 
PRINT and type ENTER. It's a piece of cake. 

How Stylo III Works 

Stylo ///has three operating modes. You enter the first, a 
''Supervisor" or command mode by typing: 

OS9: Stylo <CR> 
OS9: Stylo myfile <CR> 

As soon as you type the Carriage Return (enter), OS-9 
will load Stylo and within a few seconds the main menu will 
appear on a Hl-Res screen. It looks like this: 



EDIT 

PRINT 



SAVE/ RETURN - 

SAVE 

SAVE TO MARK — 

RETURN 

LOAD 

ERASE f 

SPECIAL 

TTY ». 

PASS- h 



SPOOL 

WHEEL 

NEW 



go edit text 
print the text 

save text and return to DOS 
save all text 

save text from cursor to marker 
return to disk operating system 
insert a file at cursor 
erase present text 
use a specialty printer 
use a TTY printer 
pass command to DOS 
output text for later printing 
change proportional print wheel 
text from input file 



Stylograph Word Processing System V3.0 (c) 1984 

When you see this menu, you simply move the pointer up 
by typing the 4 1 key or down by typing the comma key until 
you have selected the function you want. Then, type ENTER. 
That's all there is to it. If you need more information, Stylo 
will ask you for it with prompts at the top of the screen. 



Usually, you'll want to begin typing a new document or 
editing an old one as soon as you bring Stylo to life. Because 
of this, Stylo comes up with the pointer in front of the word 
EDIT and you merely have to hit ENTER to go to work. 

After you type ENTER , you'll be in the ESCAPE mode. To 
begin inserting text you hit the semicolon, which takes you 
into the INSERT mode where you can begin typing. After 
you have typed for a while and want to look back through 
the text, you simply type the ESCAPE key which will take 
you to Stylo's ESCAPE mode. 

The ESCAPE mode is used to move around in your 
document. Once in this mode you use a group of keys shaped 
like a diamond to move the cursor. If you are a touch typist, 
you know that your middle finger rests on the 'K.' Strike this 
key and the cursor will jump back and forth from one end of 
the line to the other. 

Hit the \F key and the cursor will move one position to the 
left. Hit the l L' key and the cursor moves to the right. If you 
want to move one line up, you move your middle finger up 
and strike the T. To move down, you move your middle 
finger down and type a comma. Around this diamond are 
keys you reach with your index and ring fingers to scroll 
through your document. 

Reach up with your index finger and strike the 'IT and 
you'll see all text on the screen move up one line. Reach 
down with the same finger to the *M ' and you'll see the entire 
screen scroll down. 

If you really like to move, reach up and strike the 4 0' with 
your ring finger to scroll up a full page. Or, move the same 
linger down to the period to scroll down a page at a time. 
With just a little practice, you're touch typing your way 
around your document. 

The keys reached by your left hand are mnemonic in 
nature. You hold down the "ControL" key and strike the k D 5 
to delete a character, type "Control A" to get assistance from 
the help menus, "Control W" to delete a word, etc. 

Moving Things Around 

Stylo gives you several commands that operate on blocks 
of text. Mark a block by putting two of the squiggly braces 
at the end of the block. Then, move the cursor to the begin- 
ning of the block. At this point you can copy the block, move 
it, save it to a disk file, or delete it. 

Global Search and Replace functions are also built into 
this full feature word processor. Type an 4 F'for "find" while 
in the ESCAPE mode and Stylo will ask you to type the 
string you are searching for. Naturally, if you wanted to do a 
replace, you simply type fc R' for "replace from the same 
mode." 

Formatting 

You tell Stylo how you want to format your text by typing 
special formatting commands that begin with a comma iri 
the first column of any line. You are free to change the 
format of your document on the fly as you enter your text. 
Here are some of the major formatting commands available 
with Stylo: 

s pi n set page length to n lines 

, pg begin new page 

, pn n set page number to n 

, tf send form feed to printer 

, hd define header 

, ft define footer 

, , end header or footer definition 

, sp n space n lines while printing 

, ss n set spacing to n spaces per line while printing 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 195 



The best in software for kids! 




MATH 



THE MONET SERIES 

IT STIVE ItVN 

DOU1HS* SCNSC 1 1K ECS 

Play* toys familiar items usmg dofUrs 
end own to practice using money correctly. 

MeCOCO'i MEMO IIKFCI H4.S5 
Learn to buy and add up your pur- 
chases from a typical fast food 
restaurant menu. 

MQNEY-PAK 32K ECS I22.M 

A combined and menu driven version 
of the above programs. fodedts play 
money. Reviewed * Rainbow 7/33 



EQUATIONS TUTOR 

Ed Guy 



32K 
$19.95 



Elementary Algebra - A step fry 
step tutorial for learning to solve 
linear equations. 3 levels of dif- 
ficulty, 

GRAPH-IT $14.95 16K EB, 

Graph algebraic equations on a hi- 
res screen, linear, quadratic, e|c; 
By 0. Steele 

DISTANCE PROBLEMS $19.95 

Moving graphics and text com* 
bines on a hi-res screen. Rate x 
Tims ~ Distance in all its forms. 
Taps only, 32K E J. 

MATH INVADERS by David Steele 
1BKEB. 117.95 

A multi-level 'Space Invaders' 
type game to reinforce the 4 basic 
math operations (addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication and divi- 
sion). Problems become more dif- 
ficult as you progress. Hi-res. 
graphics, joystick required, 
TAPE ONLY 




BETOffO WORDS 32* ECB SI 9.85 Eton 

These Language Arts programs cover 
common misspellings, and synonyms/ 
Mtyms on tacit level AdmtioaeMy, 
Level 1 tests contractions and abbrevia- 
tions, Level 2 tests homonyms, and Level 
3 tests analogies. Each program has 3 
ports and contains over 400 questions 
and uses over 800 words. AH tests are 
grade appropriate. User modifiable 
{drrectwm included). Printer option. 
Level ! Grades 3-5 
Level 2 Grades 64 
Level 1 Grades 912 
DISK VERSION Etch $23.95 



WilTilttWIWiS l ttto 
Those tutorials take the child through 
tec* stop of the fiiamplt. AH eregr ams 
Include HELP Mot, cursor and 
graphic aids. AH otto* user to croatt 
the eitmplt, or tot Iho computer 
choose. MwftHtseL Great teacWngef* 
gramt. By id Guy. 
LONG DIVISION TUTOfl 
MULTiPUWION TUTOR $1495 
PACKNtSnfTO SIM* 
ENACTIONS TUTOR (Addiliea} $19.15 
FAACf KW S TUTOI fSuotraetioni $£» 

mctms Tvmi iiMfr*mmx> 

Any 2 FRACTIONS programs $21.15 



TilBONOMETRY TUTOR 

By Ed Guy 



32K 
$24.95 

A step by step tutorial for learning 
to compute the sides and angles of 
right triangles. AH examples have 
graphic representation : ; ^ 




6WiT9T9H 12RECB S1SJ9 

Met, bar. pit and ptclographs art 
demonstrated. Utrn to read and est 
those graphs. Test moot, Mires 
graphics throughout By Chris Phillips. 

CROCODILE MATH IIKIit. 
By Aft Provost St7.99 
An animated math game using hi* 
res graphics. A fish containing a 
problem moves toward a crocodile 
containing a possible answer. H 
the answer is true, open the 
crocodile's mouth with the joystick 
to eat the fish, if false, keep his 
mouth closed. Addition, subtrac- 
tion, and multiplication examples 
on 3 levels, 3 speeds. Tape only. 



PRESCHOOL 

PRESCHOOL SERIES $11.95 EA. 

Pre. 1 * 2 programs for number 
recognition and counting. 
Pre. 2 - 2 programs for simple ad- 
dition, number g«$,''.X 
Pre. 3 - Alphabet recognition. 
AH15K E B. lyJ. Koiar 





FIRST GAMES try Penny Bryan 
32K EB. tape $24.95 dish $27.95 

First Games contains 6 menu- 
driven programs to delight and 
teach your early learners (ages 
3-6) These games enrich the tear* 
ning ol colors, numbers, lower- 
case letters. ' shapes, memory, 
visual discrimination and coun- 
ting. / 



ARROW BAMES bf Penny Bryan 
32K EB. tape $21 .99 mtUM 

Six menu driven cjames for young 
children (ages 3-6) to teach direc- 
tions. Air games involve using the 
arrow keys Games Include 
1*8YltJ& f UTTBtaV* l^8H» 
MATCH, KALEIDOSCOPE, RAB- 
BIT, and DOODLE. Colorful 
graphics. 



SOCIAL STUDIES 





STATES * CAPITALS $19.95 

Multiple choice quiz on a hi- res 
screen. Tepe only. 32K E J. 

EXPLORE or SETTLERS $19 S5 

Hi-res screen. Multiple choice 
qui? on explorers and senior* ol 
the new world Tape only. 32KEJ. 



KN^rV YOUR STATES $19.95 32K 

Shims each state to identify on hi- 
res screen. Help command and 
scoring. By J. Keeling 

THE HISTORY GAME 32KE9B *t4WI 
"Jeopardy" type game by James 
Reeling. 5 categories and $ p^eestroet 
in etch category, Ont or two player 
game checks yen? knowledge of 
American History. Different questions 
each round. Hi-res graphics. 



LAN6UAGEAR1f y ! 3 - 

(AU PROGIAMS IR i$* EXTENOEO EXCEPT WHERE NOTED) 

CONTEXT GLUES • by Steve Blyn • Multiple choice reading 

programs. Specify grade 4,5,6 or 7. each $179* 

VOCABULARY SUILOENS - 32* Grtal for tost preparations. 
290 questions, multiple choke, modifiable, printer option. 
I (grades 35). II M or III &*ffl t*f>$4995 

REIOINO AIDS 4»{*AK - ChHd creaks own reading material. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE J; 

FRENCH ON SPANISH BASEBALL - By 1 Siyn each$U95 
Vocabulary practice. 200 words. Modifiable Specify language 
AH* in 32ft (500 wor« 
HEBREW BULLETIN SOAROttf !.ftoUr*ttlity to print words. $15.95 
HE8BEW ALPHABET • Learn the letters of this alphabet. $11.9$ 



K1N0 AUTHOR 1 1 TALES by **** 
Si1(a.wtekwr1feKa.l899t^.wf 
An exciting new program Dial 
allows users to create and save 
original stories on flies. Saves op- 
tional questions end answers for 
etch me, and title page picture, 
too. Kids can write compositions, 
teachers/parents can create 
reading comprehension matertai. 
Rewrite, correction, review, and 
printer features, includes a setec* 
lion of stores and pictures. 



Learning*Leisure 



TEA CHER/ STUDENT AIDS 

the q mi mmui tota $m\* f 

32KB lip* 174.05 dLik HT 9* 
A program ma; flfiatnes a teacher 
to crwle testSi h si utff m i.o 
si udy ter lesls b jr.y object an;a 
four njuaslwns a no answars may 
In smd tor, tulur* use Srrarr 
answer, true-laise, fill-in .and 
oiher qui; torm*lt a/a $upponed 
Printer option ror nand copy last 
g#niratK3fi Program randomlies 
Questions, keeps it&zk of score 
and prowls* a variary ol felting 

lMnif< 

AftFTHMETEC TUTOR DIAGDflTIC 
FRACTIONS TUTOR DIAGNOSTIC 

mom $41,11 itch 

Mora of ;ne MATH TUTOR SCRIES. 
A diagnosis twlyra perrcuis 
Esacnera to keep matte or 
students' progress on iha disk us- 
ing a password, printer opi^n 
ganaram hard copy ol progress 
reports. ARITHMETIC TUTOR 
cover* muiilprlwtion, division, 
radoil ng. and prdsr or operations. 
FRACTIONS TUTOfl covers add' 
lion suDtraclion. fnurtlplicatlqn, 
and division or f ract'ons. Easy la 
Operate. Disk only, By Ed Guy. 

CfiLalHIOE HtfCt I21JA 
% frill ltd lft lucht*, ftttoufi mo 
ui Ltfljlti fridn For irp to I tl mw «f 
fcn W H^ui ta rah. IJm ftitfthr 
ftr tttl|P fi*4cu njffl+d «r riynutnuj 
p*ri«H jn-d |™ * •dftllftd i¥riri[i. 

E**t io «*. full iirtctiifiL cru 

DNir. I; Di*d Ifngril. 



COMPLETER LITERACY 
tsy Slsvi Bjyn 
3ZKE.B Jig$5 

A computer Merecy quiz ex- 
clusively lor the Color Computer. 
Toils and scores tram over gu 
qirtsflons an a HI-flES upper and 
lower ta» stieen. Renews com- 
puter Msracy antf oegmning pro- 
grajnmrng knowledge. Ages 10 
and up. 




GAMES A ACTIVITY 



theA SUAE HUNT tj* ArlPro*o*t 
loKE.R.TtpeQnJy 119-3! 
Find you way lo 1h« Iroasure 
through a maze ruled wlih objects 
lo railed. warriors, theirs. sacrel 
passages, dffc caves, ruddarr 
dues, lis ail there lor you. la an|oy 
Includes graphic Hluslalion, 
animal ion. *anous lov^s ol play 
lor age J 6- 12 Joysl^k re-quired 




i*. J TP HJTH HHP TWJlH *r-KT BLUf. k«0 



rmrflT fQLlftbEuF CM P f rtitiufl T£s It 

GREAT GIFT. C^L L US FWl D£Ti31l* 

ON SOtOtik. 'CJ_Lnr nrND nfli^A^i 



MUSIC 

MUSIC DRILL if GtrtdSltitt 

L&lt Ed Uf .H 

Lfjrn 1a tdiffttllj n&tfl el the wriP» cl ,m»t 
papulji niijor pnd mirwr ken DrH| on iliarpi fn£ 
rijLs, hut ln T netn «F Ihi scili and werk i||[n*,l I fit 
rifntr A mwit lor ill munc ilnlenti, 



NAUE THAT SONG gLMH 



11115 



HUilindid 1J *Kh 

I. 72 tMlirin'i pnpuin utifL 2 linli af dpHfcully. 
TiiVir. Minj timjii ut Fu n-. 

L 4ll Trr.f d^P L^unlfi jnd mt^rif meEadin horn 
lhi In1 Uiitt -df CldH. 

I. IC flraidv-ir tufHl Is inl i&u fln ptil 

mulrcili. fun 1cn ill Irtni hafh. 



The Factory: ™* su«*st 
Strategies In Problem Solving 

Grades 4-adult. Winner 1983 Uarning 
SoMwa« Award. Recommended in 
Crassroom Computer learning, 
Courseware fleport Card and Electronic 
Learning Uniqu# three-level program 
challenges studonis to create geometric 
praducis" on a simulated machine 
assemoiy iin^wnfch the student designs. 

•D^itte for 32K TRS-80 Color 
Corr.puier tended Color BASIC 

The Pond! ran iumurst 
Stritsgloi In Problem Solving 

G r aaos 2-adult, Winner 1983 Learning 
£!)'iwara Award Recommended in 
Classroom Computer Leartng. A small 
green frog, lost in a pond of lily pads, 
new students recognize and articulate 
patterns generalize from raw data and 
trunk logicaliy, Diskette 
'or 32K TRS-80 Color Computer with Ex- 
ran oed Color BASIC $39.95 

LIGHT PIN 16K E.fi. $19.95 

Enjoy thfs interesting piece of 
hardware. Control screen action 
with the lightpen. Includes 6 pro- 
grams 



meeoma mice 11195 

Ctttte enr 10,000 finny facts with 
thb nciting fact maker program, 
facial ftahirti wmtjoilibli through 
Itjfotni Surpi iw commands for mn 
more ditail, »ba tnjojrmtnt 




RAINBOW 

CER71RCAT10N 
SEAL 

Dealers inquiries invited. 



Comipi^ 



FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 

Blank Cassettes with Labels 3 For $ 2.00 

Popular Brand Diskettes 3 For $10.00 

Disk Head Cleaner Kit each $25.00 

Looseleaf Diskette File (hold 4) 2 For $ 3.00 



(212) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 
Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 
Please add $1.00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with orders of 2 or more items 
Authors: We are seeking quality children's software for leisure or learning. Write for details. Top Royalties. 
TRS-80 Color Computer. TD pSystem 100. 



• vt 


n 


vertical tab to nth line 


, vs 


n 


set vertical spacing to n lines/ inch 


, nl 


n 


insure n lines left on current page 


, ce 


n 


center n lines 


t rj 


n 


right justify n lines 


Ju 




justify text 


• n J 




don't justify text 


,11 


n 


set line length to n 


, n 


n 


indent n spaces 


, si 


n 


indent one line n spaces 


, lm 


n 


set left margin to n spaces 


, cs 


n 


set character spacing for printer 


, ps 




start proportional spacing 


, nps 




use normal, or non-proportional spacing 


* PP 




start a new paragraph 



When you reach the end of a page, you'll see the footer for 
the old page and the header for the new page appear on your 
screen in the proper place. This is a nice feature. 

Additional Printing Controls 

Stylo also accepts several control keys while you are 
inserting text to let you request special printing. For exam- 
ple, you can type "Control B" — remember that's CLEAR 4 B' 
on CoCo — to make a word appear in Boldface. Likewise 
you can use CLEAR 'LP to underline a word. These com- 
mands work perfectly on my Epson MX-80 right out of the 
package. If you have a new printer with a lot of functions, 
you can configure Stylo to recognize four additional 
sequences after setting them up with Styjix. 

You can print a document directly from Stylo without 
saving it to a disk file. This is a handy plus for those short 
letters you need to send out, but don't need to save. 



The major disadvantage of Stylo when it comes to print- 
ing is the fact that you can only print or spool the text that is 
in memory at the time of printing. This means that you must 
use the accompanying Mail Merge package when you want 
to print a long document continuously. From an ease of use 
standpoint, it is much easier to work with shorter documents 
and print them with the Mail Merge package than it is to 
work with a giant document. However, from a cost stand- 
point, it means you must also buy the $75 Mail Merge 
package. 

This review would not be complete without mentioning 
that Great Plains has also married Stylograph to the Word- 
Pak from PBJ. Running Stylo with this 80-column card 
makes all the difference in the world. You'll feel like you're 
working with a dedicated word processor. The combination 
is highly recommended. 

Ease Of Use 

Perhaps Stylo's ease of use can best be described by a sea 
story. Stylo was available first on the FLEX operating sys- 
tem. OS-9 did not exist. With FLEX, only one person could 
work on the same computer at the same time. With a teen- 
aged daughter taking journalism and enriched English 
courses every year, we had a problem. 

Then came OS-9. 1 started to use another word processor 
so that both of us could work at the same time. It made a lot 
of sense to me. It didn't make sense to her. She thought the 
other word processor was too hard to learn. She had taught 
herself Stylo in those early years and would rather fight than 
switch. 

(Great Plains Computer Co., Inc., P.O. Box 916, Idaho 
Falls, ID 83402 ) 



inuL-T- SCREEN) 

^ COLOR CHARACTER GENERATOR ^ 

RAINBOW RAINBOW 

A NEW DIMENSION IN COLOR COMPUTING °7,r°* 



•Now includes a character generator and sample graphic space 
game at no extra cost. 

•Full 224 text and graphic characters. Underline in all PMODES. 
Prints vertically. 

•All machine language, user transparent. Supports all SASICt 
EXTENDED BASIC and DISK commands. 

•Automatic loader recognizes 16K, 32K & S4K computers. 

•Mix up to 5 character si2es in 4 colors all on one screen. A 
total of 10 sizes available from 8»4 to 42*24 or 32*32 *n 
vertical mode. 

• Use up to 4 defineable window screens of any size. Also 
includes horizontally scrolling (crawling) one line screens. 

• Includes positive & negative screen dumps in 2 sizes for R/S, 
Epson & Gemini printers. ( Please specify) 

• Special Trace Oelay can be used to debug programs one line at 
a time ( even graphics ). 

•A special printer control can output characters to the screen 
& printer simultaneously. 

•A must for all color computer owners. Once you try it you 
won't write another program without it. 



INCENTIVE SOFTWARE 
(519) 681-0133 



P.O. BOX 323 
STATION B 
LONDON ONTARIO 
CANADA N6A ^Wl 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENT 
TAPE - 2^.95 US or 
DISK - 27.95 US or 



VISA 



P.O. BOX 7281 
PORT HURON 
MICHIGAN ^8301 
U.S.A. 

16K BASIC 
29.95 CDN 
32.95 CDN 



Tape to Disk upgrade available for *8US or *10CDN. We pay 
postage within US & CANADA on orders over *20. otherwise 
please add *1. Other countries please add $2. Charge orders 
Please add $1. 



198 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software Review£^^^~^^^^^^^Sl7^ 



AMT: A Well-Documented 
Amortization Program 



Have you ever wondered how much interest you are pay- 
ing on a loan, or have you ever wondered how much of a 
loan you could afford without going too deeply into debt? 
Are you looking for a new house in the $600 a month bracket 
but are not sure what you can get for that kind of payment? 
Then do yourself a favor and read on. If you answered yes to 
any of the above questions, then THE OTHER GUY'S 
SOFTware has a program for you called AMT (Automatic 
Money Tracer). 

THE OTHER GUY'S SOFTware is a somewhat new 
establishment in the Color Computer field, but don't let that 
fool you. AMTis one of their first programs and as long as 
they keep making such quality software available, 1 think we 
can look forward to seeing a lot more fine software being 
offered by them. 

AMT is an amortization program for the 16K Color 
Computer with a full-featured amortization schedule. 

The people at THE OTH ER GUY'S SOFTware deserve a 
big hand for the outstanding documentation included with 
the program. The documentation is very clearly written and 
includes step by step instructions on how to use the program 
to its fullest, along with detailed examples to follow. 

AMTcan be backed up, but cannot be executed, meaning 
you can backup the program on a standard formatted disk 
and store it in a safe place. If for some reason you are not 
able to load your original copy, you can then rebuild the 
backed-up copy onto the original disk (as long as the origi- 
nal disk is not damaged). However, if someone tried to use 
the original disk as a doormat or the baby wanted to see 
what flavor a d iskette is and it is damaged , then you can send 
the original d isk, along with $3 plus $ 1 .50 for shipping and 
handling for a replacement disk. Now, what could be easier 
than that? 

After loading AMT you will be greeted with a menu 
consisting of: 

1) Compute payment required 

2) Compute number of payments 

3) Compute rate of interest 

4) Compute amount to be borrowed 

5) Print amortization schedule 

6) Set printer Baud rate 

7) Quit calculating 

Option 1 will compute the payment required to purchase 
an item on credit or to open a new loan account. An example 



would be as follows: 

Amount Of Loan 5001.10 

Interest Rate 18.650% 

Number Of Years 5 

Payments Per Year 12 



Payment Number Of Balloon? 0 
The result is $128.77 per month. 

Option 2 is for calculating the number of payments 
needed to pay off a loan. By following the prompts and 
entering the required information (a total of four entries), 



the computer will tell you in months and years how long it 
will take to pay off a loan. 

Option 3 will calculate the rate of interest on a loan. This 
is helpful in figuring what you are paying in interest on a 
total loan balance. 

Option 4 will calculate loan payments to fit into the 
borrower's budget. If you want to buy a new car or a new 
house, you can input the monthly payment that will fit your 
budget and the computer will tell you what price bracket you 
should shop for. (If you are like me, you probably start high, 
then work down). 

Option 5 is for printing the amortization schedule. The 
user is given the choice of viewing the schedule on the screen 
or dumping it to a printer. If you choose the screen, the 
schedule will be printed showing the payment number, 
interest total, principal total and the balance, giving you a 
total breakdown of all monthly payments. If a hardcopy is 
chosen, you will be prompted for a title so you will know 
what the listing is for future use; example: car payment. This 
is where the program really shows off. Not only does it list a 
total breakdown of all monthly payments but it breaks them 
down into fine detail such as number of payment, principal, 
balance, interest to date, principal to date and payment total 
to date. Normally about the only people to see this much 
information at one time are those at the bank or the loan 
company that is holding the account, but now it is available 
to everybody. 

AMTwi\\ also calculate balloon accounts and negative 
amortization, which adds another big plus to the entire 
program, 

I feel AMT is a must and could be an invaluable tool to 
real estate brokers, loan officers and individuals who would 
like to keep detailed track of loans and investment dollars. 

(THE OTHER GUY'S SOFTware, 875 South Main, Logan, 
UT 84321, $29.95) 

— Bob Brown 



Hint . . . 

Video Animation 

If you are using your CoCo and a video cassette recorder 
to make tapes of your graphics, here's a way to let your 
computer control the recorder. 

Most VCRs, both Beta and VHS units, have a jack for a 
remote pause control. If your recorder has a single round 
jack marked "pause," "remote pause" or "camera pause," 
usually placed near the video and audio jacks, this trick will 
work. The "camera pause" jack, if any, should be used 
instead of the "remote" jack. 

Simply plug the smaller gray plug from the CoCo's 
cassette cable into the pause control jack. You may need a 
submini jack-to-mini plug adapter (like Radio Shack's 274- 
328) to match the plug to your VCR's jack. 

When you want the VCR to pause (for example, while you 
draw another frame), simply insert MOTOR ON in your 
program; when you want to start recording again, simply do 
MOTOR OFF. (This is exactly the reverse of the way it 
works with an audio recorder.) 

Be sure that the recorder isn't left in the pause mode for 
more than a few minutes, to prevent damage to the tape or 
heads. Many recorders are designed to stop automatically 
after a few minutes in pause. 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 199 



Software p ~" ; "" / — —— »m— >rx 

King 'Author 5 Tutors 
Kids In Language Skills 

Reading and writing are important life skills and King 
Author's Tales is a program designed to help children 
improve in these two areas. It lets kids create and save 
original stories on files, create and save optional questions 
and answers for each story page, create a title page picture, 
and print both the story and related questions. 

The program comes on disk or tape for 16K or 32K with 
Extended BASIC. It is designed mainly as a creative writing 
tool, but is not a word processor. Mastering the commands 
of this well-written, menu-driven program is so easy that the 
accompanying written directions are almost unnecessary. 
Most options are self-explanatory. 

One option in the menu allows the drawing of a title page 
picture for each story. Drawing is done in SET, RESET 
graphics on the text screen using the arrow keys. The direc- 
tions are easy to follow but drawing in this mode can be 
awkward. Everything must be done in blocks. There can be 
no curves or circles. The picture produced is rather crude 
compared to ones done in Hi-Res graphics. Once com- 
pleted, the picture can then be saved to disk or cassette. 

When writing an original story, the user first types in a 
title. The program then switches to page one and the story 
typing begins. Each page contains dotted lines signifying 
available space and the directions remind the user not to 
type beyond the dotted green area. The directions also 
instruct the user to avoid breaking up words at the end of 
lines. This creates a more pleasing appearance. The finished 
page may be corrected only by wiping out the entire page 
and starting over. If the page is correct as it stands, the 
program next permits writing an optional question. Ques- 
tions usually pertain to the text currently on the screen. The 
writer supplies the answer. Pressing ENTER moves the pro- 
gram on to the next page. With 1 6K of memory, eight pages 
of text are available and with 32/64K, 15 pages. 

Type END as the last page of text to signal completion of 
the story. Then either save, erase, or review the story. As 



before, to make a change, the entire page on which the 
change occurs must be retyped. The letters on the screen 
appear just as they do in BASIC, all capitals, or capitals 
appearing on a reverse background to signify lowercase. 

Another menu option loads in a previously saved file 
— either a title page picture or a story. The user must 
remember which the file name designates, a picture or a 
story. When a story is read in, it is displayed one page at a 
time. Pushing ENTER displays the question, which appears 
near the bottom of the screen. Space is provided below the 
question for insertion of the answer from the keyboard . The 
computer beeps if the answer is correct. If incorrect, it 
signals with a lower tone and displays the correct response. 

Stories may also be sent to the printer. With this option 
the story is printed in its entirety first, followed by all the 
questions. 

The approach taken by the author of this program is a 
good one. The title page drawings are somewhat stilted but 
they are colorful and do add interest. The two stories 
included in the program to get the beginner started, demon- 
strate good question writing techniques and are worth study- 
ing for ideas. 

The strength of this program lies in its ability to test 
reading comprehension. With the on-screen option, the 
questions are written so that the text containing the answer 
appears on the same screen as the question. This keeps a 
student's attention focused on the relevant text. With the 
printer option, the questions may be placed in any order. 
Mixing up the question order permits testing total compre- 
hension, and it avoids letting the sequence of the questions 
reveal clues to the location of the answers. 

The writing segment of the program is its weaker feature. 
It is a chore to split words, add spaces, or omit spaces in 
order for the text to appear with an even left margin. Some- 
times it would be easier to write or print the story in long 
hand. Having to retype an entire page to correct one mistake 
is tedious, especially since children are not usually accomp- 
lished typists. Inclusion of just a few of the basic editing 
features found in word processors would make this program 
really terrific. 

(Computer Island, 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, NY 
10312, Extended basic, 16K tape or 32K disk, $29.95) 

— Marty Sheldon 



"Plug in Kits" for CoCos* Including the new CoCo n from. . . t A(efoo3(if tiRe/toftf 

1. EYE-BALL SAVER. Flip easily from NORMAL VIDEO when using games, to REVERSE VIDEO when you write text. Ready to plug in. 

Price $19.95 . . . Order # MK 1233 

2. COCO SOUND. Did you buy one of those video things to drive a monitor and now can't hear the sweet sounds of CoCo? No TV or 
external amp required. Price $24.95 . . . Order # MK 1235, for COCO lis, Order # MK 1235A 

3. COCO DRIVE. Monochrome video driver. Make that text really readable. An improvement really worth plugging in. 

Price $19.95 . . . Order # MK 1236 

4. DELUXE VERSIONS for # 1 and # 3 combination. Price $29.95 . . . Order # MK 1239 

We now have a "front panel reset" switch for the CoCo II. Price $9.95 . . . Order # MK 1242 

We also have a "color driver" with video reverse for all CoCos from F board and later. Price $40.88 . . . Order # MK 1240 

METRO ELECTRONICS, 5131 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94112 (415) 333-1917 Established 1963 

Terms: Check, Money Order, Visa/Master. Add $2.00 for shipping and handling. 

• D A E Board will require soldering. [ California residents add sales tax] 

^+.^-*F or COCO /Is, add "A" to part number. 



200 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Book ReviewSSSSSSS^SS^SSSSS7^\ 



The TRS-80 User's 
Encyclopedia Gives 
You The ABCs 

By David Finkel 

It's very gratifying to see "mainstream" software and 
book publishers finally giving the Color Computer the 
attention it deserves. The Book Company, publisher of 
encyclopedias for most popular brands of microcomputers, 
has just released a version for the CoCo and the MC-10: The 
TRS-80 Userb Encyclopedia (Color Computer and MC- 
10), by Gray Phillips and Guier S. Wright 111. And while it 
has some shortcomings, it is a useful and worthwhile book, 
especially for the beginning to intermediate Color Compu- 
ter user. 

This encyclopedia has almost 250 large-size pages, and the 
entries are arranged alphabetically. The entries fall mainly 
into three categories: general computer terms, Color Com- 
puter BASIC and assembly language instructions, and pro- 
duct descriptions. 

The articles on general computer terms cover the areas 
you'd expect: RAM and ROM, parallel and serial I/O, and 
so forth. The ejntries give a brief description of the term, and 
in some cases discuss the term in relation to the Color 
Computer, 

The articles on Color Computer BASIC are probably the 
ones you'll find most useful. Each BASIC instruction is first 
identified as Color, Extended Color, Disk, or MC-10 BASIC. 
The overall purpose of the instruction is described in 
general, and then in great detail, often going far beyond the 
information presented in the Radio Shack manuals. For 
example, the article on the graphics instruction GET gives a 
much more efficient formula for the array size needed than 
the Radio Shack manual does. The Encyclopedia describes 
the undocumented edit commands fc K', 4 Q' and fc A\ which 
you may have read about in THE RAINBOW. Also, the 
DLOAD command, not described in the manuals at all, is 
completely explained here. There are many more examples 
of very informative articles on Color Computer BASIC, and 
these articles alone might convince you to buy the Encyclope- 
dia. 

Most of the BASIC articles end with a section on "pitfalls," 
describing common errors and how to avoid them. For 
example, the article on FOR . . . NEXT reminds you never 
touseaGOrOtojumpintothemiddleofaFO/?. . .NEXT 
loop. 

The assembly language articles aren't nearly so informa- 
tive. They're mainly two or three sentence descriptions of the 
instruction. These articles certainly aren't detailed enough 
to teach you how to use assembly language, but they would 
help you remember the details of an instruction. By the way, 
the assembly language articles are just for the Color Compu- 
ter, not the MC-10, and there is no information on assembly 
language graphics. 

In addition to the articles on the individual instructions, 
there are also useful articles summarizing all the BASIC and 
assembly language instructions. 

The third type of article describes products available for 
the Color Computer and the MC-10. There's lots here: 
games, business software, printers, disk drive systems, and 



everything in between. There are survey articles listing all 
the products in a given category, like all the word proces- 
sors, and then articles about each specific product. The 
product entries are usually quite brief, identifying the pro- 
duct, listing its major features, and giving the name of the 
manufacturer. The coverage is extensive, although there are 
some omissions: there's no mention of the Radio Shack 
LOGO program, for example, a very important software 
package. While no attempt is made to review these products, 
the authors have certainly performed a useful service by 
bringing all these product descriptions together in one place. 

It's inevitable that any work of this scope will contain 
some mistakes, especially in its first edition. I trust they'll be 
corrected in the next edition. 

In several places, the edit commands are mis-stated. 
Pressing a character does not advance the cursor to the first 
occurrence of that character; you have to use the command 
'S'first. The entry on SKIPFis also wrong; you do not get an 
I/O Error if the program you named is not on the tape. The 
sound article is also in error; program execution stops until 
the sound is completed. 

A very unfortunate error occurs in the article on FOR- 
TRAN; the sample FORTRAN program given is actually in 
BASIC! There's also a typographical error in the article on 
random numbers; RND(-TIME) should be RND(- TIMER). 
Finally, a number of LPRINTS have slipped in instead of 
the Color Computer's PRINT#-2. All in all, it's not too long 
a list of errors. 

One question you might have: Does the Encyclopedia 
have a lot of inside information on the Color Computer, the 
sort of things you couldn't learn by reading the manuals that 
came with the computer? The answer is yes and no. As I've 
mentioned, many of the entries on BASIC instructions go far 
beyond the information in the manuals. There are some of 
those "secret" PEEKs and POKEs, too, like instructions for 
merging programs from cassette, and POKEs to accomplish 
the "impossible" PCLEARO. There are also useful tables 
showing how to change the Color Computer's Baud rate, 
how to produce different notes and tempos with SOUND, 
and a list of Color Computer error messages and their 
meanings. There's also a very good list of Color Computer 
users groups, and a list of magazines supporting the Color 
Computer. 

On the other hand, some information that would be very 
useful isn't included. For example, the high speed POKEs 
aren't mentioned, and there's no discussion of how to use 
64K or how to use the machine language routines in the 
basic ROM. A detailed memory map, and a list of Color 
Computer oriented bulletin boards would also have been 
very helpful. 

Most of the articles are very informative. However, some 
are highly repetitious and really waste space. For example, 1 
found the instructions for producing a blank line on a print- 
er in at least 10 places. And several articles are repeated in 
their entirety under different headings, like instructions for 
hooking up a tape player under "cassette tape" and "tape 
cassette. "Surely a cross reference would have been sufficient. 

The Book Company has produced a high quality book for 
the Color Computer. While there are certainly some flaws, 
on the whole it is a worthwhile effort that deserves your 
consideration. 

(The Book Company, 1 1 223 South Hindy Ave., Los Angeles, 
CA 90045, $14.95) 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 201 



The Adventurer's Handbook 
— A Journey Into Imagination 

Have you ever daydreamed about traveling twisting 
mountain trails armed with a shield in one hand and a 
mighty sword in the other searching for the ever-elusive 
dragon folk? Perhaps you would prefer to journey into dark, 
dimly lit passages beneath ancient forgotten castles or 
maybe become a modern day spy, a la 007. If so, you may be 
on the verge of becoming one of the legion of role-playing 
Adventurers currently journeying into the limitless realm of 
the imagination. 

If you ever thought it might be interesting but were 
stopped cold or confused by the awesome complexity of the 
standard rulebooks, then (RAINBOW columnist) Bob 
Albrecht and Greg Stafford's latest book may be the answer 
to your prayers. The Adventurer's Handbook, A Guide To 
Role-Playing Games contains, as the old saying goes, every- 
thing you always wanted to know but were afraid to ask. 

First, 1 must mention, lest you be misled, that this book is 
not directly computer related. The Adventurers Handbook 
will help you decide whether role-playing games are your 
cup-of-tea and, if so, how to go about getting started. The 
book is made up of two distinct parts. Part 1 is titled "How 
To Play" and provides the introduction into role-playing 
games while part 2, titled "Known Games And Sources," 
details what is commercially available at the present time. 

Each chapter contains exercises and questions concerning 
that chapter with answers thoughtfully provided at the end. 
I must say the book is, in my opinion, extremely well writ- 
ten. The authors take you through all the phases of role- 
playing games from the initial creation of characters through 
step by step scenarios in which the characters interact with 
each other and the imaginary world around them. It is a 
fantastic excursion into the imagination and really gives you 
a feel for what role-playing is all about. 

Once you have made up your mind to become an Adven- 
turer, the second part of the book will provide you with 
detailed information on the major role playing systems cur- 
rently available, their good points and their shortcomings. 
Also provided is an extensive listing of companies dealing in 
related products. The amount of information contained in 
this book is amazing; however, unlike most rule books 
currently available, this book presents the information in a 
straightforward and simple to comprehend manner. 

Well, for a final opinion and evaluation on the book I 
turned to my son Chris, a veteran Dungeons and Dragons 
campaigner. All I can say is "like father, like son." Chris' 
review exactly paralleled mine and his final comment says it 
all, "I would recommend this book to anyone into fantasy 
games." 

(Reston Publishing Company, 11480 Sunset Hills Rd., Res- 
ton, VA 22090, Order #R0167-8, soft cover, 8V4 x 11, 204 
pages, $14.95) 

— Ken & Chris Boyle 



Skeet Provides 
Keyboard Practice 

Computer literacy has, with good reason, become a major 
goal in schools. Effective use of computers requires familiar- 
ity with the keyboard, so one way we can all help our 
children at home is to find ways to assist them in learning to 
type. Skeet is intended to provide keyboard practice in a 
game format. 

The game starts by asking for the player's name, provid- 
ing instructions, and asking for the skill level. The chosen 
level determines how many of the keys can be used, and to a 
lesser extent, the speed of play. The lowest level is the home 
row of keys, while at the higher levels symbols, numbers and 
letters can all be included. High resolution graphics charac- 
ters are used to display the letters at the bottom of the screen, 
and either one or two clay pigeons move about on the screen. 
The object is to shoot the pigeon by using the key corres- 
ponding to the letter located directly beneath it. When a shot 
is fired, a line comes out from the letter at the bottom, and if 
the shot hits the pigeon, it explodes (complete with sound 
effects). After this explosion, a new pigeon appears. A run- 
ning score is kept in the upper-left of the screen. 

Skeet is written in BASIC. The inherent lack of speed for 
moving the pigeons and shooting does not matter to the 
child who is learning proper use of the keyboard, but the 
explosions and their sound effects seem to take a very long 
time. After only a few successful shots, most children 
become bored with the long wait before new pigeons appear. 

The end of the time allotted for play is signaled only by a 
change in screen color and the fact that no more pigeons 
appear. After a brief wait with that display you are asked if 
you wish to play again. There is no master scoreboard 
display with high scores, which we have all come to expect 
from similar games, and which serves as an incentive to beat 
previous scores. 

Technically, the program itself has several flaws. A person 
whose computer cannot handle the high speed POKE needs 
to edit Lines 450 and 665 after loading the game and before 
running it to eliminate the POKE. In addition, the ability to 
achieve a high score in the game is seriously hampered by the 
fact that at the higher levels, where keys other than the home 
row are used, the bottom display line may show duplicates. 
The instructions correctly point out that if this happens only 
the key on the left can be used for shooting. In practice that 
means the player must wait until the pigeon moves to a key 
on the left before he can shoot and, of course, time is lost 
while waiting. 

In summary, Skeet is a good idea, but lacks the features 
needed to make it sufficiently interesting and challenging for 
frequent use. 1 do not think that most children would use it 
enough to attain even rudimentary knowledge of the 
keyboard. 

(Cancoco Software, P.O. Box 2914, Medley, Alberta, Can- 
ada, tape $19.95) 

— Carol Kueppers 



202 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



Hardware ReviewSSSSSSSI^SSSSSSZr^\ 

MCSI Printer Interface 
A Helpful 'Devil' 

If you are in the market for a printer, there are several 
things that you will have to consider before making your 
decision. Aside from price and features, you also have to 
consider how you will hook up the printer to your CoCo. 
Several Radio Shack printers have a serial interface that 
connects directly to CoCo's RS-232 port using a $5 cable. 
Most other printers, including some of Radio Shack's, have 
a Centronics parallel interface. In order to hook up one of 
these printers, you will need a serial-to-parallel converter, 
which is more costly. 

According to Webster, a printer's devil is an apprentice in 
a printing office. The Printer's Devil is a serial to parallel 
converter that will allow you to hook up any Centronics type 
printer. This is done by hooking up one end of this device to 
your RS-232 port, and the other end to the printer's Cen- 
tronics port. Since the RS-232 port on the CoCo is also used 
for connecting a modem, the Printer's Devil also has a 
connection for your modem, or other serial device. This 
extra connection, along with the accompanying switch, 
eliminates the need for any extra k Y' cables or switching 
devices to clutter things up. 

Hooking up this device is relatively easy. There are only 
two connections that you have to make, and there is no way 
that they can be improperly connected. There are also sev- 
eral Dl P switch settings that you can choose from in order to 
control the Baud rate and the word length. 

The word length can be either 7-bits or 8-bits. If you have 
an old CoCo with the Color BASIC 1.0 ROM, then you 
would select the 7-bit word length. Otherwise, the 8-bit word 
length would be your choice. The Baud rate determines at 
what speed data is sent from your computer to your printer. 
The choices you have here are 9600, 4800, 1200, 600, and 
300. Normally, you would choose the 9600 Baud rate for the 
fastest printing speed. 

But this is one of the problems with this device. If you are 
using OS-9, you know that the maximum Baud rate is 2400. 
Unfortunately, the 2400 Baud rate is not one of the choices 
that you have, so you must use the slower 1200 Baud rate 
setting. Another problem lies in the fact that these changes 
are all made using a DIP switch which is located inside of 
this device. In other words, you have to open it up every time 
you want to make any of these changes. It's very easy to do 
this, but I couldn't help wondering why it wasn't designed 
with a rotary switch or some other such device in or^er to 
make it a little easier. 

The Printer's Devil does in fact work. I had rjo problems 
at all using it with my printer, and it also worked fine with a 
modem at a friend's house. It's not complicated to use, and 
having to open it up to change the Baud rate was more of an 
inconvenience than a problem. If you feel that you could live 
with this, then the Printer's Devil is a good choice. 

(MCSI Inc., 1800 West 91st Place, Suite 400, Kansas City, 
MO 64114, $79.95) 

— Gerry Schechter 



Software p — ; — ■— — y-y 

RAM Checker Is Very 
Reassuring 

If you've ever wondered if those new RAM chips you 
installed were all good or if a flaky chip is causing the system 
to crash, the RAM Checker is for you. 

The RAM Checker is a ROM cartridge that automatic- 
ally tests your computer's memory. Unlike Radio Shack's 
Diagnostics cartridge, RAM Checker tests all 64K (if you 
have that much) and tests continuously. You just switch on 
the computer, select the I6K, 32K or 64K test and away it 
goes. The program doesn't stop when an error is found; it 
simply notes the error and keeps looking for more. At any 
point, you can press BREAK to see if any bad chips were 
found; you can then press another key to continue. If any 
bad chips are found, RAM Checker simply tells you which 
bit was bad. The three basic versions of the CoCo use 
different numbers for the RAM chips, but they all use the 
lowest number for bit 0 and highest for bit 7. 

I ran the check on my machine overnight; it came up with 
no errors found, which is not surprising since the machine is 
only a few months old and came with 64K factory-installed. 

If you need to test your CoCo's memory, I can't think of a 
better way to do it than RAM Checker. 

(Spectrum Projects, Box 21272, Woodhaven, NY 11421 or 
Box 9866, San Jose, CA 95157-0866, $24.95 plus $3 S/H; 
manufactured by Saturn Electronics) 

- Ed Ellers 



Submitting Material 
To the Rainbow 

Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from every- 
one. We like to run a variety of programs which will be 
useful/ helpful/ fun for other CoCo owners* 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and it is best 
to make several saves, at least one of them in ASCII format. 
We Ye sorry, but we do not have time to key in programs. AH 
prograrns should be supported by some editorial commen- 
tary* explaining how the program works* We Ye much more 
interested in how your submission works and runs than how 
you developed it Programs should be learning experiences* 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of criteria. 
Those wishing remuneration should so state when making 
submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed infor- 
mation on making submissions, please send a SASE to: 
Submissions Editor, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you some more comprehensive 

guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently sub- 
mitted to another publication. 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 203 



Software Review! 



Poker A nd Po-Chek — 
A Casino Player's Sure Bet 



Here are two poker playing programs from a company 
named Bye George that are intended to entertain and edu- 
cate you to play better poker and hopefully win lots of 
money. These programs are sold separately but both are 
geared toward simulating casino poker slot machines. 

The first program, simply named Poker allows one to nine 
players to play in turn while CoCo keeps track of all win- 
nings and losings. However, multiple players are playing 
against themselves rather than against each and every other 
player's hand, like solitaire poker with more than one 
player. A selectable timer function lets you play as many 
"hands" of poker as you can within specified time limits and 
whoever has the most winnings is the victor of that round of 

p la y- 

Casino poker machines come in two varieties: one deals 
the player and dealer a hand and shows them on the screen; 
the other just deals the player's hand and the object of the 
game is for you to get three of a kind, two pair or better. This 
last variation is what these two programs simulate. 

Within this framework Poker works well with no obvious 
bugs. Sound effects are used sparingly but effectively to 
prompt user input or indicate incorrect response. The card 
faces for both programs use the same set generated from a 



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Directly compatible with EPROMs 2508, 2716, 2532, 2732. 68732-0-1, 68764 & 
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Functions include: 1) ERASURE VERIFICATION; 2) COMPARE EPROM TO 
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Other features: 1) Error detection & location; 2) Intelligent algorithm reduces 
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in on-board EPROM. 

Comes with complete documentation. 

Price it $129.95 



A/D-80C ANALOG TO DIGITAL 
CONVERTER 



16 A/D channels, 
i 8 or 10 bit resolution. 
» 9K conversions/second. 

> Auto-ranging or sample/hold. 

1 Large wire wrap area for custom 
signal conditioning & growth. 

> On-board PIA provides user control 
of stimulus. 

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software. 

' Documentation includes: data 
sheets, on key parts, BASIC and 
machine language programming 
examples, and signal conditioning 
circuit diagrams. 



Price Is $149.95 



2-PORT EXPANSION INTERFACE 

• Buffered expansion interface. 

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Make checks/money orders payable to 
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low but colorful resolution mode. The four suits are large 
and rather block-like and do not approach the resolution 
used in the casino machines. They are recognizable and 
serve the purpose. 

The other program, Po-Chek, allows you to play a hand 
one way and then go back and play that same hand another 
way to see what the result would have been. You can pro- 
gram the five-card hand with any cards of any suit and then 
keep or draw on any of them in any combination. This 
process is then repeated a specified number of times. Watch 
the rapid hands being played and when the loops are com- 
pleted the results are printed on the screen with the option to 
send it to your printer. 

Both programs do what they claim: to simulate casino 
poker machines, and in particular, the ones in the Atlantic 
City casinos. The documentation for each program consists 
of three typed pages with enough information to easily run 
the program. Each requires 1 6K and will run on tape or disk 
systems. 

Both programs work well, but I must argue with the 
premise of their end use — to beat the casino machines at 
their own game, or in other words, to use a computer to beat 
a computer. Each state has its own regulatory agency to 
make sure that commercial gambling devices are not fixed in 
any way, but how many inspectors can read and interpret 
machine code or even assembly source code for these games? 
A clever gambling software programmer could easily slip 
something in the code to monkey with the odds and blow 
your winning system to shreds. Video slots are not the same 
breed as their clunky mechanical parents and most dedi- 
cated slot players don't trust them. These were complex 
moving mechanisms that could be more easily checked and 
verified for honesty but even these can be fixed. 

Now don't get me wrong, I have no objection to using 
computers for beating the casinos. After all, 1 wrote Black- 
jack Royal for the CoCo, simulating human dealer casino 
play at a game that does in theory and sometimes in practice 
give you a fighting chance if you count cards, stagger your 
bets and do not drink any of that free casino booze. These 
two Simulations don't mention if the deck is reshuffled after 
every hand or not, however, since you don't know if the 
casino machines shuffle every game you are on even footing. 
Rules and software/ hardware mechanisms vary depending 
upon the company which makes the gambling equipment. 
One company that has machines in dozens of casinos in 
Nevada seems to have one model rigged to pay off the first 
time if the machine sits cold for five minutes. With these 
kinds of unpredictable odds, other games with human 
dealers offer better odds and even a pro dealer's eyes can't 
help but bulge a little with a flush. Compters can't be "read" 
in this manner. 

Every personal gambling system with its own precise 
number juggling system has an equal dose of personal super- 
stition, intuition and game preferences. If poker slot ma- 
chines are your preference for scientific gambling then 
Poker and Po-Chek are for you. The cost of these programs 
is less than three minutes of sustained play on the $1 video 
slots and who knows, you just might get lucky. 

(Bye George, 14 Dawson Road, Kendall Park, NJ 08824, 
$6.95 each) 

— J. Michael Nowicki 



204 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Hardware Prt ^ , ''"^" — stn 



Universal Video Driver: 
Good But Not Perfect 



The CoCo is probably the only home computer left on the 
market that doesn't have a video output. By the time you 
read this, Radio Shack will be selling the CoCo 2 with a 
color video output for monitor/ receivers and other home 
video gear. If you want to use a high-resolution mono- 
chrome monitor for text applications, you're still better off 
with one of the video driver adapters on the market. While 
many of these also provide color video on the original 
CoCo, the CoCo 2's video circuitry makes picking up color 
composite video very difficult. Mark Data's Universal 
Video Driver is designed for all CoCo versions and either 
color or monochrome video (selected when installing the 
device; a switch is not provided, though it wouldn't be too 
hard to install one). 

Installing the U VD is easy. Five clips pick up black-and- 
white video, chroma, sound, +5 volts and the ground bus 
from easily located points on the CoCo's main board. On the 
original CoCo and TDP System 100 (C/D/E or F series 
boards) you must pry up the two video chips slightly to clip 
onto the thin parts of the IC pins; on the CoCo 2 the 
corresponding points are exposed and easy to get to. If you 
are installing the board for a monochrome monitor, the 
green clip (which usually picks up chroma) is connected to a 
marked point on the driver board. In some cases where the 
video output is too strong for the monitor, they tell you to 
connect that clip to ground instead. On the C/D/E boards, 
they tell you to leave the CPU shield cover off. Instead, I 
strongly recommend that you position the clips out of the 
way and put the shield back on, as the shield keeps RFI to a 
minimum and not using them could cause interference to 
other TV and FM sets in your house or even your neighbors' 
sets. (Remember that the FCC can, if trouble occurs, order 
you to either fix the computer or stop using it under threat of 
fines.) 

My first trial was with an F board CoCo and a Philips 
amber-screen 1 3" monitor. 1 first tried the board in the color 
configuration to judge the UVD's color output, which 
looked okay. I then went to monochrome for a more normal 
operating check. The 64-column Hi-Res text displays look a 
whole lot better than they do on my top-of-the-line color 
TV; 85-column displays are still hard to read simply because 
the CoCo doesn't have the horizontal resolution such dense 
lines require. 1 later tried the driver in a CoCo 2 with a 
Panasonic 13" color monitor. It worked well except in 
PMQDE4 (buff/ black); the artifact colors usually present 
in this mode were gone. I don't know if this was the fault of 
the computer, the driver or the monitor; 1 do know that the 
same monitor and driver worked fine on another F board 
machine. Color monitors, while an improvement over ordi- 
nary TV sets, usually don't have the clarity of a good 
monochrome monitor, but this is changing as dual-purpose 
video/ RGB models with better picture tubes (designed for 
systems like IBM's PCjr that provide 80-column text) 



become more common. Many people are using mono- 
chrome monitors for text and going back to their color TV 
for more colorful applications. 

One problem is that the UVD's audio circuit loads down 
the CoCo's sound generator so much that the usual TV 
sound is quite weak. I've heard that this is more common 
with the F board than on others, so this may not be a 
problem; if you don't need audio output (such as on a 
monochrome monitor), just ground the black clip. There 
didn't seem to be any ill effect on the TV picture, though my 
set may have been compensating for a change in modulation 
level. If the U VD does affect your picture on a regular TV, 
adjust the video level control in the CoCo (R2 I on a C, D or 
E board and R47 on the F board) to return the TV picture to 
its former state. Unlike at least one other kit, the Mark Data 
board doesn't include a video output cable; if you are really 
desperate, the TV output cable that came with the CoCo will 
work fine if your monitor uses the usual RCA-type phono 
jack input. 

The Mark Data Universal Video Driver should work 
quite well with any color or monochrome video monitor; it's 
a well-designed and well-made product and shouldn't cause 
any problems. 

(Mark Data Products, 24001 Alicia Pkwy No. 207, Mission 
Viejo, CA 92691; $29.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Ed Ellers 



FIVE NEW 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS! 

FROM 

CREATIVE TECHNICAL CONSULTANTS 
AN ESTABLISHED LEADER IN 

• EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND GAMES 

• PROGRAMMING AND CLASSROOM UTOJTTES 

• CABLES AND JOYSTICK HARDWARE 



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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 205 



Software Review! 



Willis Warehouse — A 
Full-Filling Experience 



Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to fill as 
many orders and collect as many points as you can while 
avoiding confrontations by your mortal enemies Whirly 
Bug, Kamakaze, and Stretch. These were the orders given to 
Willy as he was being hired by the owner of a large ware- 
house. 

Willy's Warehouse is an exciting game from Intracolor 
written by George Beskangy, with sound effects by Bob 
Miller. It is distributed on tape or diskette and is written in 
machine language. After giving the appropriate load com- 
mand for your version, the program will run automatically. 
The disk version is copy protected so you cannot make a 
backup disk. 1 would recommend removing the original disk 
from the drive after the game has loaded. The documenta- 
tion gives no information on how to obtain another diskette 
should the original be destroyed. 

When the game begins, a black screen will appear display- 
ing either a red or blue box. If the box is red, press Reset 
until the box is blue before beginning the game. I have never 
been able to obtain a blue box, only a red or green one. 
Adjusting the tint on my television was to no avail so I 
proceeded using the green box. Although not displeasing to 
the eye, I was a little disappointed I could not view the game 
in the intended colors. 

Once past the color boxes, you enter the title screen and a 
demonstration mode. Pressing the CLEAR key at any time 
places you in the options screen. Pressing a one or two 
determines the number of players, pressing CLEAR again 
increments the difficulty level and pressing a \) 1 or deter- 
mines joystick or keyboard control. The ENTER key or fire 
button starts play. The options initially loaded are one 
player, lowest level (one) and joystick control. You may 
pause the game by pressing the Space Bar and restart it by 
pressing space again. Pressing BREAK aborts the game, while 
pressing CLEAR aborts the game and returns you to the 
options screen. 

The screen layout consists of a scaffold on which Willy 
stands, a large set of shelving divided into cubicles and two 
conveyor belts, one on the left moving downward and one 
on the right moving upward. The top left of the screen 
contains the player number, score and number of lives re- 
maining while the top right contains the number of orders 
filled and the number of incoming boxes not picked up. 

The object of the game is simple — fill as many orders as 
you can, reaching the highest score and level possible. Willy 
must raise and lower his scaffold, pick up the incoming 
boxes and either store them in the cubicles or fill an order by 
placing his box on an outgoing box of the same number. He 
may move left or right across the scaffold in order to do this. 
The fire button or enter key will pick up or drop a box. 
When Willy moves left or right he may pick up a box from 
the incoming belt or place a box on the outgoing belt. He can 



also drop a box on his scaffold when facing left or right. (The 
only way to kill Whirly Bug is to drop a box on him.) When 
the scaffold moves down, Willy faces away from the shelf. 
Dropping a box now will send it crashing to the floor. When 
moving upward Willy faces the shelving and may now store 
a box in a cubicle or pick one up. Placing a box in a cubicle 
with a question mark will award you various bonus points. 
Orders may be filled using boxes from the incoming con- 
veyor belt, or from the shelving. If these boxes fall off the 
incoming conveyor belt, Willy will lose one life. For every 
20,000 points, Willy gains one life. 

During working hours Willy must always watch his step. 
Kamakaze sits on top of the shelf and whenever an unfilled 
order falls off the right conveyor belt he will jump to his 
death taking Willy with him if he can. Whirly Bug roams the 
scaffolding trying to knock Willy off before Willy squashes 
him with a box and wins 500 points. Stretch enjoys pushing 
boxes off the shelving on top of Willy, killing him. If Willy 
places a box in the cubicle with Stretch, Stretch will fall to 
his death and Willy wins 1,000 points. 

Playing the game is enjoyable and could become habit 
forming. Each time you succeed in filling your required 
number of orders you advance to another level (not to be 
confused with difficulty level) where you must fill a larger 
number of orders. 

Every five levels you are given a shelf full of boxes and a 
time limit to fill as many orders as possible, gaining 500 
points for each order filled. I do not know how high the 
levels go but I reached level 12 with very little practice. The 
challenge comes in using strategy to score points by filling 
the surprise squares (cubicles), and killing Stretch. You can 
always put a box on the shelf to score points and then 
immediately pick it up again to fill an order. My greatest 
challenge however, came when my wife commented "Let me 
see Stretch push that box on you." I knew immediately that 
my time was up — I had played long enough. 

The game is well done and the three-page documentation 
is complete. Except for the fact that I could never obtain the 
intended screen colors, the graphics are nicely done. All 
screen movements respond well to joystick control using the 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick. This game would be a nice 
addition to your library. 



(Intracolor, P.O. Box 1035, East Lansing, MI 48823, $34.95) 

— Larry Birkenfeld 



TWO GREAT UTILITIES FROM DERBY CITY SOFTWARE 



1PP COLOR DUMP 
All Machine Language 
Fastest and Highest Quality 
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Many Powerful & User Friendly Features 
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In Pmodes 1 and 3 - Change any color 
In Pmodes 0. 2 and 4 - Reverse Colors 
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- Changes Graphic Pages 

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Allows Exit to Basic and Return 
Compatible with Graphicom $1 9.95 
51 50 for Shipping & Handling 



2 EPSON - RX-80 
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$51 3141 Doreen Way 
"™ Louisville, KY 40220 
(502) 458-6690 



206 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software Review— M ^ MM ~S7^ 

Aldaron, A Good 
Adventure 

Aldaron is a text Adventure set in a 'time not so long ago, 
in a land as far away as never (and as near as tomorrow)/ 
You must rescue a young prince named Aldaron. In a world 
of elves, trolls, unicorns and bewitching creatures, you are 
the prince's only chance. The evil necromancer has pro- 
tected the Black Fortress against all "elfinkind." He did not 
count on the king getting a human to rescue his son. But it 
will be very difficult. There are seven different sections of the 
Adventure. The first objective is to find the Black Fortress, 
because the prince is hidden somewhere inside. Once found, 
there are many obstacles to overcome before you find Prince 
Aldaron. A witch wanders around the castle and frequently 
casts spells on you which vary from reversing all your move 
commands to making you so weak that you can't carry 
anything. Or she might freeze your feet so you can't move. 
Aldaron has a HELP function which will give you a very 
limited amount of help. The game's author occasionally 
throws in a little humor when you do things at the wrong 
time. 



Once you have located the young prince, you must wake 
him from his enchanted sleep and get him back to safety. 
The evil necromancer will not let you leave the fortress 
easily. If you get past the necromancer, your task is still not 
finished. This is where 1 have been stumped so far. I cannot 
seem to get the prince back alive. You can find out how well 
you are doing, as compared with other adventurers, at any- 
time by typing "SCORE." A score of 300 is a perfect score. 
You are awarded points by how many portable items you 
find and return. Added to this score are points determined 
by how many obstacles you overcome. Also, anytime you 
type "SCORE" you will be informed of your current rank, 
i.e., amateur, apprentice, adventurer, etc., and how many 
times you have been killed. Expect to be killed a lot when 
you first start. The instructions state that it is extremely 
difficult to obtain a perfect score of 300, and I agree 
strongly, but if it was easy, it wouldn't be any fun, right? 

The game requires 32K and is written entirely in machine 
language. It is a mid-range Adventure. The experienced 
Adventurer will not get bored and it will present a very good 
challenge to any beginner. The game comes on cassette and 
you must unplug any cartridges, including your disk con- 
troller. Overall, I would recommend this Adventure highly. 

(Jade Products, 519 N. Scott Street, Wheaton, IL 60187, 
cassette $25.95) 

- Dale E. Shell 



A QUICK COURSE 
IN ECONOMICS. 



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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 207 



Hardware Review— ST^N 

The TS6821 Centronics: 
A Reliable Printer Interface 

One of the biggest compatibility problems facing the 
CoCo has always been the printer interface. There are two 
basic methods of conveying information from the computer 
to the printer: serial transmission, in which the data to be 
printed is sent one bit at a time; and parallel transmission, in 
which the data is sent an entire byte at a time. When using 
serial transmission, the printer must be exactly synchron- 
ized with the computer in order to receive the data reliably, 
and in order to keep a high degree of accuracy, the transmis- 
sion speed must be relatively slow (usually less than 4,800 
bits per second). However, with parallel transmission the 
data can be sent much faster and more reliably. 

Most serial printers use the RS-232C standard and have a 
25-pin DB25 connector, while most parallel printers use the 
Centronics parallel standard with a 36-pin Amphenol con- 
nector. However, when Radio Shack designed the CoCo, 



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PROTECTOR II 




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they decided to use a 4-pin DIN socket that supplied RS- 
232C signals at the serial port, and because of this many 
people have trouble interfacing non-Radio Shack printers. 
The common solution is to wire a cable to convert the 4-pin 
DIN to a DB25, which usually works, assuming your printer 
has a serial port. T & S Electronics provides another solu- 
tion: the TS6821 printer interface. 

The TS6821 comes in a small, black, unmarked cartridge 
that plugs into the CoCo's cartridge slot. Within the car- 
tridge is a PC board that contains a Motorola 6821 PI A 
(Parallel Interface Adapter). A 3 l /£-foot ribbon cable comes 
out of the back of the cartridge and terminates in the 36-pin 
Amphenol plug. Included with the TS6821 is a five-page 
manual in a cardboard folder, and a disk or cassette contain- 
ing the driver programs. 

The manual is quite short (there are only 1 X A pages of text, 
with the rest being listings of the driver programs), but is 
sufficient to get most people started. There is not a lot of 
technical information, but any information required to pro- 
gram the interface yourself can be derived from the assembly 
language listing of the driver program. 

There are three programs on the disk. PRINTD VR/BAS 
will POKE a 11 8-byte position-independent machine lan- 
guage program into memory. This driver replaces the nor- 
mal routine used by BASIC so that PRINTti-2 and LLIST 
work as expected. However, when you press the Reset but- 
ton, the driver is disabled and must be re-enabled to use the 
interface. The procedure T & S recommends for doing this is 
to "cold boot" the computer (which is equivalent to turning 
it off and back on) and RUN the driver again (the included 
program COLD/ BAS will accomplish a cold boot without 
wearing out the on/ off button). Unfortunately, this will, of 
course, erase any program you had in memory, requiring 
you to reload it. 

The third program is PRINTDIR/ BAS, which will 
POKE into memory a 94-byte program that prints a copy of 
the disk directory on the printer. Running this program will 
also erase any program that you had in memory. 

Although the TS6821 worked perfectly the first time 1 
tried it and has performed reliably ever since, there are a 
couple of potential problems. First, and foremost, is the 
problem of compatibility with existing programs. BASIC 
programs should work as expected, but some terminal pro- 
grams and word processors using their own printer routines 
will need to be patched to work with the TS6821. Second, 
because it is in a cartridge, the TS682 1 cannot be used with a 
disk drive unless you have the Multi-Pak interface (the 
TS6821 is designed to go in slot 2). 

Is this interface for you? It depends on what type of 
printer you need (or already have), what type of interface it 
has, and at what speed it can accept data. It also depends 
upon whether or not you have a disk drive and a Multi-Pak 
interface. The TS6821 is definitely not for everybody. My 
advice to you is pick out the printer you want and then 
compare the price of the serial version to that of the parallel 
version combined with the $49.95 TS6821 interface. 



(T & S Electronics, 6111 Romany Drive, San Diego, CA 
92120, tape/disk $49.95) 

— Robert S. French 



208 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software RevlewEESSSEESSSSSSSE^ 

Storm Arrows Will 
Hit The Spot With You 

Don't let the name Storm Arrows ruffle your feathers 
— it's the name of a new arcade-style game from Spectral 
Associates. Written in machine language, a 16K non- 
Extended BASIC machine (plus a pair of joysticks) is all that 
is required. The documentation included says it will work on 
the TRS-80 Color, TDP System 100, as well as the Dragon 
Data 32. It worked very well on my D-board "self-revised" 
64K. 

The documentation is on both sides of a folded 814 x 11 
colored paper, and is quite detailed, despite its size. There is 
a slight discrepancy, however, in the screen display section, 
in that the screen sides are referenced backwards (i.e., what 
is said to be on the right side of the screen is on the left and 
vice versa). 

Instructions on the method of play are included, as well as 
scoring, screen display, bonus points, new game starting, 
difficulty levels, loading instructions, trouble (possible 
causes and solutions), and a brief description of six other 
Spectral Associates machine language games. 

When you CLOADM the cassette (it's also available on 
disk), you are greeted with an auto-executing display, and 
an initialization screen, which allows you to input your three 
initials for top score record keeping — then you're off! An 
excerpt from the documentation is justified here: you "use 
the right joystick to maneuver your 'land skimmer' through 
the treacherous streets of Talon Alpha in an effort to evade 
and destroy the Imperial Storm Arrows which pursue you 
relentlessly." This is true. Although no novice at arcade- 
style games, I was unable to get a score above 9,000 points 
beyond the third screen. Once beginning the game, it is quite 
apparent how the name Storm Arrows came into being. 
Little arrows swarm all over the place in an effort to run into 
you (although they don't shoot), as well as the deadly Impe- 
rial Pursuit Cruiser, leaving contact mines in its wake. Your 
mission, should you choose to accept it (as if you had a 
choice once you loaded the game) is to shoot the Storm 
Arrows with your limited number of torpedoes before they 
run into you. You are awarded an additional land skimmer 
for completing each six rounds. Additional torpedoes, not 
to exceed 1 5 per round on the meter, can be had by destroy- 
ing the Pursuit Cruiser (two) or capturing the torpedo 
refueling station (three). In addition, bonus points are 
awarded for completing each round, which you can see and 
hear between rounds, and you can press any key while bonus 
points are being shown to get into a standby mode for a rest. 

Packaging is good. You get documentation, a good qual- 
ity tape with several saves, and a good hard plastic cassette 
box. If the tape (or disk) is bad, or you want a backup, the 
documentation has instructions on how to obtain them at a 
nominal fee. Storm Arrows, as well as most (if not all) of 
Spectral Associates' programs, is copy protected, but with 
the backup policy, that shouldn't be a problem. 

I don't have a lot of games in my library (except what 
comes on rainbow on tape and most of my work is aimed 
at word processing, spreadsheet work, etc., so when I 
received Storm Arrows to review, I read the instructions, set 
it up for the kids, and let them play it. Their ages are four, 
six and eight. I soon found them clammering over who was 
to play the next game, and asking me questions on what to 



do. I demonstrated, and 20 minutes later, they were wonder- 
ing when thay would get their turn again! 

Storm Arrows has that fun, addicting quality that most 
arcade games have. The sound was pretty good in the begin- 
ning, but got boring after a long session. The playing field 
and ships changed colors every round, and I only wish I 
could progress a few more rounds in the game to see if the 
sound and graphics change more. That's the best thing 
about Storm Arrows — it isn't one of those games I could 
figure out and master in a couple of minutes and let sit on the 
shelf. It challenged me to keep playing, just to beat my old 
score. 

Is there anything I would change? Of course, we all have 
our little "idios." I would first correct the slight flaw in 
reversing the screen descriptions in the documentation. 1 
could go for a little more "in-depth" sound, especially 
between rounds. 1 would probably change the land skimmer 
to resemble something more than a stick figure. A drop in 
price would help make it even more appealing. 

Would I buy it now, after seeing it? Yes, but more for my 
kids, seeing how much they enjoyed it. 1 liked the initial 
challenge, but prefer a little more overall pizzazz. It's not 
one of the best graphics-arcade games of the year, so $24.95 
(tape) is a bit high compared to others on the market, 
however, I have paid more for programs not as good or 
packaged as well. Storm Arrows is an above average game 
for an average price. 

(Spectral Associates, 3416 South 90th St., Tacoma, WA 
98409, tape $24.95, disk $28.95) 

— Dennis Hoshield 



***** HARVARD DESIGN PRESENTS : ***** 



The Disk File Duplicator ; This disk utility will nake 
copying files from one disk to any nunber of other disks 
a snap. 16K. ....... S17.95 disk 

The Disk Utility ; This package contains three 
utilities - Disk Repair, Disk* (text novenent), and Disk 
Inventory. 14K. .......... $24.95 disk 

The Directory Alphabet izer ; Alphabetize disks which 
have hard- to-fol low directories. 1<SK $15.95 disk 

Lettering Services ; This banner generator allows 
stretching of letters, printing both across and down the 
paper. Any printer. 32K... $17.95 cass / $20.95 disk 

Shandria and Pendicadia : This adventure is for one who 
appreciates real challenges, not useless frustration. 
First in a trilogy. 32K........ $14.95 cass / $17.95 disk 

The Waxen Furnace ; A multi-scene, high-res graphics 
adventure based on underground prison escapes. Available 
July 30, 1984. 32K.. $24.95 disk 



Ue accept personal checks and noney orders. Foreign 
orders nust be in US funds. Dealer and author inquiries 
invited. Catalog for $1.50, deductible fron next 
purchase. Send orders to HARVARD DESIGN, P.O. Box 40, 
Harvard, MA, 01451 

************************ * ****** * * ** ****** 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 209 



Software Review! 



Touchstone — A High Level, 
Magical Game 

The object of Touchstone is to get to the touchstone in the 
Temple of Ra, but don't expect a description of the magical 
stone in this review because I never quite made it. 

I think overconfidence probably had something to do 
with my inability to get there because the slow pace of the 
game does lend itself to a lackadaisical approach. Or maybe 
it's the fact that Touchstone moves so much less slowly than 
Time Bandit, a game that this faintly resembles. 

While movement is comparatively slow for a computer 
game, there is no lack of creativity and the challenge is 
constant. 

You are one of the many priests of Ra who has accepted 
the challenge of the touchstone. The challenge is a way for 
any of Ra's followers to become a favored high priest. 

You begin at the first plateau of an 1 1 -level trek to the 
touchstone. While on your quest, you seek to obtain a high 
score, to collect the varied treasures throughout the maze, 
and to obtain keys to the doors located between the levels. 
Various monsters appear at various levels in hopes of stop- 
ping you with their touch. But you have the power to elimi- 
nate them with a ray that shoots from both eyes in two 
different directions. In tight spots, you can use the space bar 
function to paralyze them. You should be selective in its use 
because it is good once for every 50,000 points. 

You also receive an extra man and another freeze for 



No Disk? No Printer? 

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DISK & PRINTER ARE OPTIONAL IN THE SUPER-FRIENDLY 
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ALL WORK DONE IN MEMORY. NO PROGRAMMING REQUIRED 
TO BUILD HOUSEHOLD INVENTORY, WINE LIST, ANY LIST. 
YOU DESIGN YOUR OWN RECORDS. AND - YOU DON'T HAVE 
TO GET IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME . EXPAND ANY FIELD, 
ADD NEW FIELDS ~ WITHOUT LOSING ANY EXISTING DATA. 
CREATE , REMOVE AND CHANGE RECORDS - SEARCH . SORT , 
LIST AND TOTAL THEM - LOAD AND SAVE FILES USING 
CASSETTE OR DISK (OR BOTH). DISPLAY YOUR RECORDS 
ON THE SCREEN AND/OR PRINTER IN ORIGINAL OR SORTED 
SEQUENCE (OR BOTH). SELECT AND SORT (ASCENDING OR 
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CAN BE AS BIG AS 16, £00 CHARACTERS. DO-FILE HAS 
EASY, ONE-KEY COMMANDS AND A HELP MENU, TOO. IT IS 
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DO-FILE IS EDUCATIONAL - YOU LEARN FILE MANAGEMENT 
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every 50,000 points. You can accumulate a total of five men 
and three freezes. 

The freeze is not to be confused with the pause function, 
which is available by pressing the ENTER key, stopping all 
action until you wish to resume play. 

You will receive a designated time period for each level of 
play, increasing in length as you climb new levels. When 
time expires, you lose your ability to eliminate opponents, 
virtually assuring your fate is sealed. 

There are five monsters, including a squirming snake, a 
creeping spider, a rolling ball (which resembles a cannon 
ball), a fluttering butterfly, and a "spastic spark.'" You won't 
see some of them until you reach the higher levels. They also 
gain speed, moving faster than you do. 

Likely to cause frustration are the "poof chambers" that 
are scattered throughout the mazes at, unfortunately, stra- 
tegic points. You never know when a monster is going to pop 
out, or how many are coming out at that time. 

Like most of the latest Tom Mix creations, the graphics 
and sound effects in Touchstone are exceptional in quality. 
The use of color, while satisfactory, does not match some of 
the company's previous efforts. As far as level of action, I 
would give Touchstone a seven on a scale of one to 10. 
Overall, this is a good game that any company would be 
proud to claim as its product. However, it is not quite the 
caliber of some of the other programs in the Tom Mix 
library. 

(Tom Mix Software, 4285 Bradford N.E., Grand Rapids, 
MI 49506, $27.95 tape, $30.95 disk) 

— Charles Springer 



BASEBALL 
FANS !! 

COLOR-STAT 
STRATEGY 
BASEBALL GAME 

27.95 



32 K DISK 
EXT BASIC 
COLOR COMPUTER 



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YOU ARE THE MANAGER 

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210 THE RAINBOW October 1964 



Software Review! 



Pro-Loc: For 
Password Protection 

Pro-Loc® is a password protection utility for the Radio 
Shack disk operating system. The program is supplied on a 
non-protected disk, and is accompanied by a five-page 
manual. 

The objective of the program is to limit access to pro- 
grams, data files, or text files to only those individuals who 
have the correct password. The user has the option of creat- 
ing the six-character password made up of any characters 
from the keyboard. The protected program cannot be RUN, 
LOADed, COPYed, or RENAMEd using the commands 
from the disk operating system. The password owner, how- 
ever, has complete control over the program including run- 
ning it, or if desired, the program can be unprotected, or 
assigned a new password. 

The program author notes that there is a range of 27,000 
possible passwords, which should minimize the chances of a 
random selection of the unique password installed on the 
program. However, the author warns that given enough 
time and the right tools the code may be broken. 

While the program works as designed with the disk oper- 
ating system, it is easily bypassed by some "auto loading" 
programs on the market. 

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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 211 



Software ReviewSZ ""^^^ 

Affordable Dapper 
A Snazzy Zapper 

Soon after Radio Shack introduced the disk system for 
the Color Computer one began to see ads for 'disk zap' 
programs. These ads have continued up to the latest entry, 
Dapper. Before we get into a discussion of this program, just 
what is a disk zap program? Most of these programs are 
designed to provide the ability to directly read/ write, move, 
and patch data on a disk. Now why would you ever want to 
do this? Well, how many of you have experienced an I/O 
Error when trying to load that only copy of a particular 
program? Or, worse yet, received that infamous message, FS 
Error (File structure) which is the computer's way of telling 
you that it can't locate a file? From the letters to RAINBOW 
and other magazines it appears that many of you have these 
problems and hence the need for a program like Dapper. 
Personally, in the year and a half that 1 have owned the disk 
system, such problems have been extremely small. Of 
course, 1 do keep backup copies of important programs, 
plus 1 keep an extra copy of the directory in track 36 cour- 
tesy of a recent RAINBOW article. 

So, if you keep backups and extra copies of the directory, 
do you really need a disk zap program? Two of my reasons 
for not buying such a program were need and cost. But along 
comes a little gem at $14.95 called Dapper which makes it 
possible for every disk user to own a zap program. 

Unless you are really into the nuts and bolts of disk 
operation, Dapper will handle most ordinary disk needs. 
However, before you use Dapper or any other disk zap 
program, you had better understand what you are doing, 
i.e., read the disk manual and articles on the disk system 
before you attempt to do any work with a zap program. In 
other words, if terms such as directory, GAT or FAT (gra- 
nule allocation or file allocation table), tracks, sectors, and 
granules put you to sleep, don't do any zapping! 

Dapper comes on a disk (of course!) with a 21 -page man- 
ual. It is written in BASIC with machine language subrou- 
tines. Now, before you get all "bent out of shape" that 
Dapper is not a 100 percent ML program, remember, speed 
is not important here — although I found no problem with 
Dapper's response. Dapper provides the following capabil- 
ities: I ) ability to backup a complete disk to tape 2) examine 
a new disk for read /write quality of each sector and if 
necessary deallocate bad sectors 3) provide a map of all files 
and the granules associated with each file 4) dump the 
contents of a sector to either screen or printer 5) move a 
defective granule to an empty granule where repairs can be 
made 6) list a directory 7) verify the readability of each 
sector within a file or files 8) review and correct a sector. 

Dapper loads with the usual RUN"DAPPER" whereupon 
the screen clears and the Dapper prompt, =>, appears. All 
Dapper commands have the syntax: 

COMMAND parameters >P 

With a standard syntax, it is easy to issue Dapper com- 
mands (no complicated gymnastic exercise such as shift/ 
clear/down arrow). For example, MAP filename >P will 
send a list of the granules associated with the file "filename" 
and print this list on the printer. Note that the >P redirects a 
Dapper command's output to the printer. If you want the 
output on the screen, simply omit the >P. The MAP com- 



mand without a filename lists the granule allocations for all 
files on the disk. The default drive for Dapper is Drive 0; 
however, if you have additional drives simply enter MAP,1 
"filename" for a file on drive I. The MAP command pro- 
vides not only the granule list but also the track/ sectors 
associated with each granule. With this list you can then use 
the DUMP command to look at each sector that belongs to 
the file. 

Once you find the sector of interest you can then make 
corrections using the ZAP command. Both DUMP and 
ZAP list 64 bytes at a time to the screen. With DUMP you 
simply examine the contents of a sector; wit|i ZAP you edit 
the contents of the sector using the arrow keys and inserting 
the appropriate ASCII or Hex values. In the case of an 1/ O 
Error, the cause may actually be an imperfection in the disk, 
so it would be futile to make any corrections to a bad sector. 
The MOVE command permits you to copy an entire granule 
to a free granule and then you can use ZAP to make the 
necessary corrections. Repairing or editing a disk is not as 
simple as the above few lines imply. The ability to perform 
these operations is not necessarily a function of the disk zap 
program. Dapper provides the capability; you have to pro- 
vide the knowledge. 

The DIRECTORY, BACKUP, CERTIFY, and VERIFY 
commands provide the capabilities that the command 
implies. The DIRECTORY (which can be abbreviated 
D1R) command provides an expanded directory which 
pauses when the screen is full. This command also has a 
"wild card" option: DIR xyz will list all files which begin 
with xyz. The display will list, in addition to the full file 
name, the file type, data type, first granule, and the number 
of bytes in the last sector of the file. The BACKUP/ RE- 
STORE commands provide tape backup and retrieval for 
an entire disk. As the manual notes, these commands are 
slow because of the tape I / O. It took me about 1 0 minutes to 
save an entire disk. Although 1 didn't examine the file struc- 
ture of the tape copy, it appeared that the disk files were 
saved as one complete tape file. Thus, you cannot access a 
distinct file on the tape; but, this is not the purpose of the 
BACKUP command. If you have a good tape system, this 
could be a cost saver instead of backing up to disk. Person- 
ally, 1 would rather backup to a second disk than run the risk 
of an I/O Error in the middle of the large tape backup file. 

As noted earlier, the CERTIFY command is used to 
determine the good sectors on a freshly formatted disk. If 
any bad sectors are found the associated granule is deallo- 
cated. The VERIFY command verifies the readability of 
each sector within a file or files. 

The documentation for Dapper is exceptionally well 
done. Each command is discussed on a separate page for 
easy reference. The discussion covers the definition of the 
command, format, syntax rules, general rulp, and notes. A 
command summary is also provided as well as several pages 
of tutorial. Dapper also contains on-line documentation. 
All you need to do is type HELP and a list of commands is 
printed to the screen; if you type HELP COMMAND, e.g., 
HELP MAP, a brief synopsis of the command is presented. 

In conclusion, 1 highly recommend Dapper. The program 
performed flawlessly, is easy to use (assunting you under- 
stand the disk operating system) and has excellent supporting 
documentation. All of this for $14.95 — it's a winner! 

(Sadare Software, P.O. Box 3891, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, 
disk $14.95) 

— Donald D. Dollherg 

> 1 — ^ 1 1 1 



212 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software Revie w 

Timebound: Action Game 
Sharpens Historical 
Perspective 

By Carol Kueppers 

It isn't often that a program comes along which is so 
excellent that 1 call my friends and tell them to buy it for 
their children, but when Timebound appeared, that is just 
what I did. This game, written by Children's Computer 
Workshop for Radio Shack, combines arcade action with 
learning the historical time line. Although children learn 
history in school, it takes some time before they achieve any 
real sense of when events occurred, or of simultaneous 
developments in different fields. 

Play Timebound with your family and the whole family 
will have a much better idea of where events belong on a time 
line. Play the game long enough and you will also know 
precise dates! 

The game is loaded from tape following the detailed 
instructions in the easy-to-read booklet. You'll find you 
have entered a time machine, where history passes before 
your eyes. The character Anacron is tumbling through time, 
from zero to the year 2000, moving out of control from event 
to event and your mission is to catch him. You are provided 
with a scanner, represented as a box on the outer edge of the 
screen, which is controlled by the joystick, and as play 



progresses, you obtain the information you need to locate 
him. 

Play starts by pressing the fire button, and as you move 
forward through time, historical events shoot out from the 
center in 1 1 directions. At first you see them as small dots, 
becoming colored ellipses as they reach the outer band in 
which you can catch them. The scanner moves clockwise 
when the joystick is moved to the right, counterclockwise 
when the joystick is moved left and it remains in place when 
the joystick is centered. 

As you catch something in your scanner, time freezes 
while you analyze your position. At the top of the screen the 
captured event is named, the year, and at the bottom you are 
told the event where the elusive Anacron is currently posi- 
tioned. If the time period is one in which many events 
occurred in various fields you also see several other colored 
ellipses, at other screen locations, representing events in 
other categories which occurred at about the time of the one 
you caught. You must decide into which of the 1 1 categories 
the event belongs, and remember that category's location. 

Although you are shown Anacron's present event, you 
must decide on its category and whether this event came 
before or after the one you caught. If you decide his event 
came before your current year, you start moving through 
time again by pressing the fire button and then pressing the 
space bar to move backward in time. As you do this, events 
will start at the periphery and move to the center, so that at 
any time you know if you are moving forward or backward 
in time, not only from the rapidly changing date display, but 
also from the direction in which events move. 

During the play of one game the categories remain in the 
same place, but this changes with each new game. At first 



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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 213 



you try to catch events in different screen locations, so that 
each category's screen location becomes known. Then, when 
you approach the correct time period you have only to 
position your scanner in the proper location to trap Ana- 
cron. It isn't that simple though, for as time speeds by, 
Anacron shifts position, indicated by a beep, and the closer 
you are to him, the more he moves, adding to the fun and 
challenge of the game. 

Obviously, the more you know about when events 
occurred, the quicker you can zero in on Anacron. If, like 
me, you search for the pressure cooker in the 20th Century, 
it will take you a long time to find Anacron, but, fortunately, 
the more games you play, the more familiar you become 
with the events covered. 

Timebound provides 1 1 different categories: scientific 
tools, sports, household items, political leaders, water 
transportation, fun and games, architecture, land transpor- 
tation, communication, time, and air and space. These top- 
ics are well selected to interest the broadest possible group 
and keep them involved in playing the game. There are 1 1 
different skill levels, ranging in difficulty from Level one, 
where Anacron shifts infrequently from event to event 
within the same category. Once the screen location for that 
category is found all events can be trapped until the correct 
one is found. In Level 11, where Anacron shifts rapidly 
through all 1 1 categories as well as from event to event, the 
player must quickly determine the screen locations for 1 1 of 
the categories, and know whether he should move forward 
or backward in time. 

You are given 15 minutes to find Anacron, and as the 
years whiz by, your elapsed time is shown on the screen. 
When time freezes as an event is caught, so does the elapsed 



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time counter, so that you can, for example, make notes as to 
where each category is located on the screen. When Anacron 
is found, the screen flashes, sounds play and the time taken 
to find him is given, so that you can try to improve in the 
next game. At all skill levels, players quickly develop strate- 
gies, and the more they play and become familiar with the 
events used in the game, the faster they can find Anacron. 
The allotted time is adequate, and encourages thinking 
while playing, rather than reliance on chance. 

As the years rush by, there are time periods with few 
events, or events in only a few categories. As one child 
exclaimed to another as 800 to 1000 zipped by on the screen, 
"No events are coming out!" The reply he got was, "That's 
the Dark Ages, nothing much happened then, anyway." 
Thus, without ever catching a single event, the player gets 
some idea of which historical periods are extremely active in 
development of all fields (in the 1900's, events come thick 
and fast!), and other time periods where considerable time 
elapsed between discoveries. 

This is a terrific program. Since the play of the game 
incorporates the historical time line, everyone has fun while 
learning. The categories and events selected are a delightful 
combination of the serious and the whimsical, and very 
appealing to children. Prepare yourself for a series of 
quizzes on, for example, when roller skates were invented, 
or Indian Chess. Many players will want to check out what 
some of the things are — Til be visiting the library to read up 
on carracks. 

Timebound 'is intended forages 10 and older, but don't be 
surprised if younger ones join in the fun. Although only one 
person plays each game, a group likes to gather behind the 
player and give advice as to which category is where, what 
event came first and so on. Thus, if your family includes 
children 1 0 and older as well as younger ones, the children as 
young as eight will soon start playing, even though initially 
they are not familiar with the events mentioned. If you have 
a child over 10, you will want this program. 

1, for one, hope this is only the first in a series, and that 
another version of Timebound will be produced using more 
categories, or extending the time line back to include ancient 
events, combining events everyone should know with events 
everyone will enjoy knowing. If you want to see what com- 
puter education can be, I urge you to try this program. 

(Radio Shack, requires Extended Color basic and joysticks, 
tape, $19.95) 




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Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33319 
(305) 484-7547 



214 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software Revlewi 



Color Math Practice 
Affords Better Skill 

By Bruce Rothermel 



One of the most asked questions from non-computer 
owners is "What can a personal computer do for me?" My 
stock answer for inquirers who are also parents is, "Make 
your kids smarter than you are." 

The educational capabilities of home computers have 
received the greatest amount of press. This has been rein- 
forced by the "guilt" series of advertisements from Atari, 
Commodore and Texas Instruments. (Remember them?) 
This series of advertisements inferred that if you did not buy 

your kids a r brand home computer, they would not be 

prepared to function in this Brave New World. 

It's a shame that the educational capabilities of home 
computers have been treated with so much hype. Poor 
advertising tends to create a negative response to the subject. 
Certain areas of a child's education can be very effectively 
reinforced by having the student interact with a computer. 

One of these areas where the computer is quite effective as 
a learning aid is where repetitious drills are used. As a parent 
of a 10-year-old girl and a seven-year-old boy, 1 know 1 
should be reviewing their spelling words and math quizzes 
with them, but after a full day of fun and frolic at the office 
followed by the drive home, I often don't take the time to 
work with the kids. 

Fortunately, there have been many outstanding educa- 
tional programs written for the Color Computer. The differ- 
ence between good programs and bad programs seems to 
boil down to a single question: "Do the kids want to use 
them?" If the programs hold their interest and are fun, they 
will be used; if not, they don't do much good sitting in the 
cassette holder. 

The CoCo has a lot going for it regarding its capabilities 
to run interesting programs. The color, graphics and sound 
capabilities are outstanding. Recently another capability 
was added to its inventory of interest holders — speech. Yep, 
now your Color Computer can talk to you. 

Voice packs using the Votrax SC-01 synthesizer allow 
your Color Computer to speak words, phrases and numbers 
contained in or generated by BASIC programs. 

Jarb Software has released a program which uses the 
capabilities of the talking CoCo to improve the basic math 
skills of the user. Called Color Math Practice, it offers the 
choice of doing addition, subtraction, multiplication or div- 
ision problems. 

The addition/ subtraction problem sets consist of 1 8 prob- 
lems appearing in different formats. Sometimes the prob- 
lems are presented in a vertical format: 

23 
+11 



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October 1', 34 THE RAINBOW 215 



Sometimes the formats are varied: 
23+ = 34 

All numbers and answers are positive whole numbers. An 
automatic difficulty level has been incorporated in the pro- 
gram which increases the level of difficulty as problems are 
properly answered and decreases the difficulty as a conse- 
quence of wrong answers. At the end of the program, the 
student is given a level number which the computer asks for 
when the program is run. 

This varying difficulty level makes the program appro- 
priate for a wider range of grade levels. Both my second and 
fifth graders were challenged as the computer raised the level 
of difficulty to their working level. At the lowest level, the 
numbers will be between one and 1 5 while at the highest level 
they will be between one and 1 472. The number (level factor) 
between 1.0 and 4.9 does not relate to any grade level. 

The multiplication/ division problem set consists of 16 
problems also appearing in different formats. You specify 
the largest multiplication table (up to 99) you want used in 
the problems. 

Another nice feature of the program is the ability to 
choose how you enter your answers. The choices are: 

Right To Left — like you would do the problems on paper 
or, Left To Right — like you would write the answer if you 
already knew it. 

The Right To Left method is recommended for addition/ - 
subtraction problems as it allows you to work with one 
column at a time. When using this method of answer entry, 




o\ <^ oV 
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the right arrow key functions as a backspace key. The Left 
To Right method is recommended for multiplication /div- 
ision problems as it is the normal way of inputting a known 
answer. In both methods the CLEAR key will clear the answer 
line and let you start to enter your answer again. 

Well, that's how it works mechanically, but how does it 
perform? Does it hold the students' attention and challenge 
them enough so that they use the program? 

Since this is an educational program, I'll give it a grade of 
B+. On the positive side, the mechanics of the quiz are 
excellent. The challenge of Color Math Practice caused by 
raising the difficulty level keeps the program interesting to 
the user. It also makes it a versatile teaching reviewer since it 
can be used with children of different grade levels. The use of 
speech is unique. Voice rewards are given for the correct 
answers. The slightly electronic, Swedish East Coast voice 
says one of a series of rewarding phrases "Yes, that is cor- 
rect" ; "Super, that is perfect" ; "OK, nice going" and other 
rewarding praises when the correct answers are given. When 
the answers are incorrect, Uncle Sven says "That is wrong" ; 
"Sorry, you are wrong" ; "No, practice makes perfect", etc. 
The varying presentation format adds another challenge to 
the exercise. 

On the negative side, the introduction to Color Math 
Practice is spectacular. It uses the full range of capabilities of 
the CoCo to present the program title. Unfortunately, in the 
program there is little such "flash" to hold the students' 
interest. No color, no sound. The number: character set 
shown on the screen is the standard Color Computer's black 
numbers on the green background. 

While Color Math Practice greets the student with his 
name after it is entered, it is not used in the program. It 
would be easy to add the user's name in the response after 
the question is answered. "Sorry, Bonnie, that is wrong" 
would be better than the impersonal verbal response given. 

Another addition I would like to see is the giving of a score 
at the end of a group of problems. While this may be difficult 
with the program varying the difficulty of the problems, a 
score at the end of each session would give the pupil a 
"target" to beat on the next round. 

Overall, the pluses of Color Math Practice greatly out- 
weigh the deficiencies. It makes the tedious task of reviewing 
math problems fun. 

(Jarb Computer Products, 1636 D Avenue, Suite C, Nation- 
al City, C A 92050, requires 32K Extended and Votrax Voice 
Pak, $32.95) 



16K ADVENTURE GENERATOR TAPE $19.95 

Create your own adventure with this program. Should be 
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Three graduated adventure games designed to guide 
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P.O. BOX 3330 
Cheyenne, WY 82003 



216 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software Review* 



ities (more on this later). Very briefly, these programs are as 
follows: 



Hack Away With 
Johnson Utility Packages 

By Gerry Schechter 



To say that the OS-9 operating system is a sophisticated 
and powerful one would be an understatement. Despite this, 
no software is perfect or complete so there is always room 
for improvement. Usually these improvements fall into the 
"wouldn't that be handy" category of utility-type functions. 
Sometimes, though, they fall into the "how could they have 
left that out" category. 

Such is the case with a new set of OS-9 utility packages 
recently introduced by D.P.Johnson. These new packages, 
known as SDISK, BOOTFIX, Filter Kitttl, and Hacker's 
Kit#l, run the gamut from nice-to-have, to have-to-have 
utilities. Together, they will allow you to do just about 
anything you can think of with your OS-9 system. Since we 
have a great deal to cover here, I will not be giving you all the 
details of each of these packages. Instead, I will give you just 
enough of a description to whet your appetite and give you 
the general flavor of them. 

The SDISK package will allow you to access any type of 
OS-9 disk format. This includes 35-, 40-, and 80-track 
drives, single- or double-sided drives, single- or double- 
density formats, all with your choice of six, 12, 20, or 30 
millisecond stepping rates. In order to accomplish this, there 
are several other programs included. The DESCGEN pro- 
gram is the one that you will use to generate your new disk 
device descriptors. These descriptors tell OS-9 what type of 
disk drives you have, and all you have to do to generate them 
is to answer a few simple questions. By combining this 
program with the OS-9 SAVE and OS9GEN commands, it 
is a simple matter to create a new OS-9 Boot disk with your 
new device descriptors in place. The other program included 
here is SFORMAT, which is a replacement for the OS-9 
FORMAT command, that will allow you to format a disk in 
any of the above-mentioned configurations. Even if you 
have standard RS disk drives, you can get them to step at 20 
milliseconds. This not only allows them to run faster, but 
also quieter. In fact, you will not believe that they are the 
same old drives you are used to. 

The BOOTFIX package, actually only one program, will 
allow you to create a bootable double-sided OS-9 disk. It 
does this by rearranging the OS-9 Bootfile to where the 
bootstrap program expects it to be. I was unable to verify 
this, since 1 do not have double-sided drives, but if the 
performance of the other programs is any indication, I'm 
sure that it works. 

The Filter Kit#l consists of 12 different programs. Most 
of them can be used by themselves, but their real power is 
exploited by using OS-9's I/O redirection and pipes capabil- 



LS — lists filenames, one per line, with several 

selection criteria 
BUF — reads standard input until EOF and then 

writes to standard output 
CP — copies files from one directory to another 

DL — deletes files 

FUST — lists files 

INFO — displays information about files, such as 

date, bytecount, and attributes 
MV — moves filenames, but not the files, from 

one directory to another 
PAG — lists files with formatted output, including 

page numbers, margins, and heading lines 
REMOVE — removes filenames, but not the files, from 

a directory 

SELL — changes the owner number of files 
SETAT — changes the file attributes of files 
SORT — sorts a list of filenames 

No big deal, you say. How about a few examples of using 
them along with I/O redirection and pipes? Let's copy all of 
the files in the current directory to another directory: 

LS ! CP /Dl/NEWDIR 

Now, let's print an alphabetical listing of all of the files in 
the current directory. 

LS ! SORT >/P 

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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 217 



Software Review* 



Now how about printing all of the files in the current 
directory in a neatly formatted listing? 

LS ! FLIST! PAG >/P 

Are you getting the idea behind all of this? The combina- 
tions and permutations are almost limitless and boggle the 
mind. 

The Hacker's Kit#I, as its name implies, is for the 
advanced (and/ or brave) OS-9 user. There are several pro- 
grams in this package and, as the documentation mentions, 
you will need a fair knowledge of assembly language and the 
inner workings of OS-9 to fully utilize them without crash- 
ing your system. DISINP is a disassembler, which you can 
use to find out how things work in OS-9, For example, to 
disassemble the DIR command, you would enter LIST 
fDO/CMDS/DIR ! DISINP. Filter filters out all occur- 
rences of a given Hex value from a file. For example, to 
remove all carriage return characters from a file and create a 
new file, you would enter FIL TER OD <OLDFILE>NEW 
FILE. Memlist, will list the contents of any memory address 
in unformatted binary. Normally, you would pipe the out- 
put from this into the OS-9 DUMP command, so that 
MEMLIST 0 200 ! DUMP will give you a Hex dump of the 
first 200 Hex bytes of memory. MEM LOAD will load from 
standard input (the keyboard) into memory at the absolute 
address you specify until an EOF is encountered or your 
system crashes, whichever comes first. Usually, you would 
redirect the standard input to a file so that MEMLOAD 
2000 </ D0/OS9BOOT would load the OS9BOOT file into 
memory starting at Hex location 2000. Rewrite will write to 
a file starting at the Hex offset that you specify. In other 
words, you can replace only a portion of a file with this 
command. You could use this, for example, to patch your 
OS9BOOT file if you really know what you are doing. Split, 
the final program in this package, will split (what else?) a file 
into multiple files. Here you specify how many bytes or lines 
from the input file are to be copied into each of the output 
files. This can be very handy when you want to split up a 
large file for easier editing. 

I have only scratched the surface of what you can do with 
these marvelous programs. During the time I had them for 
review, I had no problems at all with any of them. The 
documentation provided does an adequate job of describing 
the uses of the various programs but, as is often the case, I 
thought that there should have been a few more examples of 
their use in some cases. To be fair though, the documenta- 
tion does suggest that you re-read your OS-9 manuals in 
order to fully understand what's going on. 

SDISK and BOOTFIX are a must if you have non- 
standard disk drives. Filter Kit#l will give you a lot of handy 
capabilities, and should be considered by all. Hackers 
Kii#I, on the other hand, is not for the uninitiated, and will 
be of little or no value to you unless you really have a firm 
grip on the inner workings of OS-9. Of course, if hacking is 
your thing, then by all means buy it and have fun. 

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OS -9 Disk Fix AndU tilities — 
Disk Utilities And Then Some 

By Gerry Schechter 

As with any new operating system, in this case OS-9, there 
is always a shortage of good utility programs at first. With 
the ever increasing number of CoCo owners today, it is 
usually only a matter of time before new programs become 
available. Utility programs, in general, fall into one of two 
categories. They either add features that were left out of the 
operating system or they greatly enhance existing ones. 

OS-9 Disk Fix and Utilities is a set of programs that falls 
into both of the above mentioned categories. It consists of 
six utility programs and several other files that make it easy 
to change your disk device descriptors (more on this later). I 
will first describe the various utility programs and then the 
procedure for changing the disk device descriptors, so here 
goes. . . . 

The DIRCOPY program is a disk-to-disk copying pro- 
gram that will really simplify the copying of files from one 
disk to another. This program has many options which are 
as follows: The Confirm Copy will first display the filename 
to be copied, and then wait for a "yes" or "no" response to 
see if you want to copy the file or not. The Enable Automatic 
Rewrite will automatically delete and then copy any file that 
already exists on the output disk. If you do not choose to use 
this option, you will be prompted to see if you want to 
rewrite the file. The Enable Sub-Directory Copying will 
automatically copy files from the input disk that are found 
to be part of a sub-directory. If you do not specify this 
option, these files will be excluded from the copying process. 
The Sort Directory will first sort the filenames on the input 
disk into alphabetical order before any copying takes place. 
The Copy Only Outdated Files will only copy those files 
from the input disk that are newer than existing ones on the 
output disk. This can be very useful in making up a master 
backup disk since only those files that were updated since 
the last backup will be copied, thus saving time. 

DIRCOPY also has an interactive mode of operation. In 
this mode you can decide which files you want copied, and 
the order in which they will be copied, before the actual 
copying takes place. The important thing here is that with 
the exception of the Confirm Copy option, the use of the 
interactive mode does not in any way preclude the use of any 
of the other options. 

The PATCH program will allow you to inspect and/ or 
modify any file on disk. It, too, has many options. These 
include a Find command to locate a hexadecimal or ASCII 
string in the file, commands to move back and forth through 
the file, and a Help command. It also includes a Verify 
command which will restore the header phecksum and 
module CRC bytes in the file. This is a necessary feature, 
since OS-9 has these checks for a reason and you would get 
an error trying to load a file with a bad checksum. 

The FILELOOK program is an easy-to-use program that 
will simply display the size, type, revision member, and name 
of any modules contained in a disk file. I 'm not sure why you 
would want to know this information, but 1 guess it's nice to 
know that you could find it out. 



218 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



The COMPARE program will compare (what else?) any 
memory resident module against a disk file on a byte-for- 
byte basis. This can be Useful to make sure that you have 
loaded or saved a file without any errors. You could also use 
it to make sure that you have modified a file properly by 
making sure that they do not compare at the appropriate 
location. 

The NEWFMT program is an updated version of the 
FORMA T program supplied with OS-9. The difference 
here is that you can format disks with up to 40 tracks, as well 
as double-sided ones. 

The final program is DMODE. This is the one that you 
would use to change your disk device descriptors. It will 
allow you to d isplay and / or change the number of sides on 
the disk, the number of tracks, the stepping rate of the drive, 
and whether or not the write verify function should be 
turned on. 

The other files on the disk are included to help you create 
a new OS-9 BOO Tdisk with the changes that you made with 
the DMODE program. One of these files is a new CCDISK 
module, which will accept non-standard values for the disk 
device descriptors (unlike the one provided by Radio 
Shack). The other files are just OS-9 procedure files which 
help automate the process. Creating a new OS-9 BOOTdisk 
is a relatively easy process, although it does take about 20 
minutes on a two-drive system. If you have a single drive 
system, you could probably figure on about 45 minutes 
because of all the disk swaps required. 

Since 1 have a standard Radio Shack disk system, I was 
only able to change the stepping rate, from 30 m.s. to 20 
m.s., when 1 created my new OS-9 BOOT disk. However, 



when 1 finally booted up my new disk, 1 was pleasantly 
surprised. Not only were my disk drives running faster, but 
they were also running quieter. 

OS-9 Disk Fix and Utilities is a fine example of a "pack- 
age" of useful utility programs. Since they are the only 
utilities of their type that 1 have ever used, I cannot comment 
as to whether they are better or worse than others. I can say, 
however, that I had no problems at all in using any of them. 
The documentation provided clearly explains how to use 
each of the programs, although it does assume that you are 
familiar with your OS-9 system. The disk it comes on can be 
easily backed up and, in fact, after you have created your 
new OS-9 BOOT disk, you will already have three extra 
copies of the programs. If you are looking to start up your 
collection of OS-9 utilities, this package deserves careful 
consideration. 

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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 219 



Software Review! 



Disk Utility \§ 
Very Handy 



If you're like me, you Ve got lots of files on your disks and 
they've ended up in no particular order. When you find that 
a disk is full, you save to another disk. Pretty soon you end 
up with lots of files that you don't need and you have to go 
from disk to disk to find one you do need. A lot of my files 
are text, and to see what they are I've had to load a word 
processor and examine them. Then there's the slow backup 
and disk formatting operations. When you see what Spec- 
trum's Disk Utility can do, you'll know why it has proven 
itself very quickly at my house. 

Disk Utility reads the directory on a disk and then gives 
you many options in handling the files. You don't even have 
to type filenames; just move the list up and down with the 
arrows until you find the right file. You can examine files 
(great for text, not so hot for BASIC programs, nearly useless 
for machine language files), change filenames, kill files, and 
even rearrange the directory to put the files in any order. (If 
copying disks to tape, this will let you specify the order the 



files should be in on the resulting tape.) Another function 
gives information on the size of files, what type they are and 
the loading addresses. When finding a program you want to 
run, simply press two keys and Disk Utility loads and exe- 
cutes it for you. 

Disk Utility can also format and backup disks faster than 
Disk BASIC'S own BACKUP and DSKINI routines. You 
may have noticed that when you do a DSKINI, the system 
starts at track zero, works its way up to track 34, then runs 
the head back to zero and verifies the new tracks. Disk 
Utility simply goes up to 34 on the first pass and then works 
backward to zero on the second. Backups are that much 
faster as well; Disk Utility switches between disks much less 
often, so on a single drive system you only have to swap 
disks four times instead of eight. 

There's also a set of "super utilities;" a copy program that 
makes it easier to move files around, a kill routine that lets 
you delete old files very quickly, and a user information 
routine that lists the details on all the files on a disk and does 
it to either the screen or the printer. 

If you do any serious work with disks, get Disk Utility. 

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220 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software ReviewJS — i^— y^, 



Experience Versatility With 
NEWBASIC 



"What's wrong with old BASIC?" I asked myself as 1 pro- 
ceeded to boot up the latest review candidate. 1 LOAD Med 
NEWBASIC and, as I reached for the instruction manual, I 
noticed the screen flash as the program self-executed and 
self-inversed video. It looks like we are off to a good start. 

"That's all very nice," I said to myself, "but what does it do 
for me (and all other users)?" To find out, 1 had to read the 
instruction manual. While reading the clear, concise instruc- 
tions, 1 realized what a versatile and useful program 1 had 
just loaded into my CoCo. 

The program name is NEWBASIC, I would call it "DOS 
SUPPLEMENT." The program gives you the commands 
for Disk BASIC that M icrosoft left out for CoCo. You could 
say it is like a "tool kit," but a lot less confusing and easier to 
use. 

After one evening with NEWBASIC, I wanted to see if it 
could not be made part of resident DOS by changing the 
chip. Later, 1 discovered the program is not compatible with 
all other M / L programs. 

After loading NEWBASIC, you will find that all of your 
traditional commands still function as expected. First, let's 
examine the additional command words or toggles. 

INVERSE ON or OFF, the default is ON so that you have 

a black screen at start up. 
CLICK ON or OFF, the default is ON so you will hear a 

speaker click for each key pressed. 
BREAK ON or OFF, the default is ON but if you wish to 

disable the BREAK key then BREAK OFF is the direct 

command. 

UNDERLINE <COLOR> or OFF, the default is 
OFF but you may select colored underlines on the text 
screen with the UNDERLINE 6 direct command. 

WRAP ON or OFF, the default is ON. This command is 
similar to word wrap of many other programs. 

ECHO ON or OFF, the default is OFF because every- 
thing displayed on the screen is ECHOED to the print- 
er. (Faster than POKEI 1I,254:DIR to get a quick 
directory hard copy.) 

PAGE ON or OFF, the default is OFF but if on, it 
prevents the screen from flying by if your display is 
longer than 1 5 lines. The PAGE ON function requires a 
key press to advance to the next screen full of text. 

LOWER ON or OFF, will control the printing of lower- 
case letters on the screen. 

That concludes the list of ON/ OFF command toggles, 
but leads us into the good stuff. 

Type in RAINBOW from the command line and it will 
give you the byte count of a program in memory. 



The HIDED1R and FETCHD1R commands followed by 
the drive number will write and retrieve a duplicate directory 
on your disk. It's a lot easier than repairing your directory 
the long way. 

SPEED = <N UMBER> allows you to specify the screen 
printing speed within a range of 100 (slow) at 250 (the 
fastest). The default value is set at 250. 

If you are using communication files, word processor files 
or need to see something in a BASIC program, just type 
F1LELIST (FILENAME) to see the file displayed on the 
screen. Add ECHO ON, and finish with a quick hard copy, 
all without leaving your current tasks. 

If you have ever wondered what the addresses were on 
those M/L programs, just enter the command F1LE1NFO 
(FILENAME), and you will be treated with the starting, 
ending and executing addresses and the length. 

If you want to know what is in memory, type DUMP 
(Hex ADDRESS) and the memory contents are displayed 
on the screen from that address on up. The screen scrolls in 
this mode but any key will pause and pressing the BREAK key 
will abort. 

If you ever need to get out of NEWBASIC, (Reset won't 
do it) just enter the command BASIC. 

For those of you who want to use graphics, try SSET and 
SPOINT. They behave like set and point but in the semigra- 
phics mode. (That's how they do the underlining). 

NAME and COMMENT are some of my favorite com- 
mands. Those commands allow you to put a volume name 
on each disk and a 14-character comment line behind each 
filename on the directory display. 

Even the serious programmers can use error trapping 
routines such as: ON ERROR, GOTO, (LINE NUMBER), 
PRINT ERR, PRINT ERL, ERROR (NUMBER) or 
RESUME. 

Last but not least, 10 programmable keys with various 
default values, i.e., DIR, SPEED, UNDERLINE, RUN, 
F1LEINFO, etc. These values can be changed at any time 
from the keyboard and are invoked by pressing the down 
arrow and a number key zero through nine. This is my only 
problem with NEWBASIC. I don't know how to change the 
key defaults permanently, or at least save them to a file that 
can be appended to NEWBASIC. 

After reviewing NEWBASIC, I now have a list of four 
programs that 1 consider outstanding. All disk users should 
consider the purchase of this versatile utility. 



(Valley Micro Software, 801 W. Roseburg Ave., Suite 200, 
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October 1984 THE RAINBOW 221 



Software Review*— 117/7^ 



Create Tailor-Made Disk 
Jackets With UTILITY 1 

Lost some disk jackets lately? How about creating your 
own with your own printer and printer paper? UTILITY 1 is 
a disk utility that uses any printer capable of condensed 
print (132 or more columns) to print a file allocation table 
(FAT) and directory on a sheet of 8!/ 2 x 1 1-inch paper. The 
idea is to fold and glue the sheet of paper into a disk jacket 
with all the disk's appropriate information already printed 
on the jacket. The process is really quite simple. After load- 
ing the program, entering your supplied password and a title 
for the disk, the program continues to print the FAT in 
decimal and hexadecimal numbers, the directory, and a 
whole lot of advertising. The paper is then removed and 
folded at the pre-printed dots on the paper and glued 
together at the folds to form a disk jacket that is capable of 
holding up to four disks if need be. 

The printout is a little hard to read at first. The FAT 
entries are printed vertically, i.e., if granule 0 contains a 255, 
the 255 is printed one digit on top of the other, all the way 
across the page for all 68 granules, with reference markers 
showing which granule number you are looking at printed 
underneath. The hexadecimal version is done the same way 
just underneath the reference markers. Rounding out the 
• remainder of the front side of the disk jacket, taking up the 



OS-9 ™ SOFTWARE 
FOR COCO 

SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the use 
of 35, 40, or 80 track single and double sided drives 
with CoCo OS-9 plus you gain the ability to 
read/write/format the standard OS-9 single and 
double density disk formats used on other OS-9 
systems. $29.95 

BOOTFIX— To make bootable double-sided disks 
$9.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— when ordered together $35.95 

FILTER KIT #1— Eleven utilities used as filters (with 
pipes) to give you "wild card" directory lists, copies, 
deletes, moves, lists, pagination, etc. $29.95 

FILTER KIT #2— Command Macro Generator to build 
new commands by combining old ones,and 9 other 
utilities. $29.95 

HACKER'S KIT #1— Disassembler and memory 
dump/fill utilities allow you to disassemble OS-9 
assembly code from disk or memory. $24.95 

Send SASE for current catalog. 

Terms: Prepaid check, MO, Visa, Mastercard or COD. 

Add $1 S&H, (COD $3 extra). 

D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(We appreciate your calling between 9-11 AM Pacific Time.) 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc. 



top half, is some of YGS's advertising, along with an order 
form to mail. Pretty sneaky, and it makes for a cluttered 
looking jacket cover. On the other side, the directory entries 
start with the disk name at the top and two columns of 
listings. The listing is well done, showing the program name 
and extension, type (BASIC, ML, etc.), ASCI 1 or binary, the 
start granule number of the program in Hqx and decimal, 
and the number of granules used by the program also in Hex 
and decimal. Each side of the listing contains titles with the 
columns explained in detail at the end of the directory 
listing. Also listed are any killed files still remaining as 
directory entries with a number sign in the first position of 
the program name, indicating the program has been KILLed 
and is possibly recoverable. At the end of this side of the 
jacket YGS has printed their name and address as well as a 
short advertisement. 

The program disk comes supplied with UTILITY1.BIN 
and PRINTER.NEW. One note here. My disk for review 
also included MAPI. BIN, which was not mentioned in the 
manual at all. The manual stated that a password is supplied 
with the manual, but there was none to be found. It also 
states to L OA DM" U TILITY1 . BIN " enter the password 
and continue. Since I had no password, the program would 
crash every time. Onward to more bold things. Try loading 
MAPI. MINI It worked but had a different screen when it 
started than UTILITYl did. 

PRINTER.NEW is a BASIC program saved in ASCII 
which contains all of the printer lines to be merged into a 
program in memory created out of UTILITYl (or MAPI in 
my case). The codes are initially set up for Epson printers, 
but can be changed to any printer by simply loading PRINT- 
ER.NEW and rewriting all of the printer codes. It's not that 
difficult, as almost all of the lines that use special CHR$ 
codes are commented to indicate which codes perform 
which functions. The program line numbers cannot be 
changed and must be resaved in ASCII as PRINTER.NEW 
{SAVE ,f PRINTER.NEW, A *) in order that it can be 
MERGEd into memory later. 

The manual is very brief and to the point. YGS seems to 
care about its customers, and includes notes on their service 
policy, user registration, warranty, testing, telephone inquir- 
ies, and of course, more advertising. Backups can be made, 
but not executed. The original disk must always be used to 
run the program, although it can be restored from a backup 
and run again if the original disk becomes non-usable. 

YGS is offering UTILITYl free with any other purchase 
of the software they market, or a $4 U.S. charge for shipping 
and handling that is required if the program is ordered on its 
own — well worth the price and a good original idea. 

(YGS, P.O. Box 208, Brechin, Ontario, Canada LOK 1B0, 
disk $4 U.S., $5 Can.) 

— Eldon Doucet 



SEE YOU AT 

RAINBOWfest 

Princeton 

Sept. 28-30 



222 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



1983 unit sales Jin Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Total Average Best Worst 



Bach 

Chalone 

DoUn 

Feagan 

Grahan 

Harpel 

Jordan 

Latour 

Luc i do 

Phelps 

Prats 

Schaeferle 

Taylor 

Torres 

Turner 

Uehlen 



Jan 


Feb 


Mar 


Aor 


136 


139 


119 


Ml 


120 


170 


152 


170 


188 


157 


103 


112 


105 


94 


127 


115 


135 


135 


183 


1M 


134 


102 


190 


Ml 


105 


109 


188 


171 


112 


128 


124 


1?» 


158 


110 







130 104 



97 
104 
85 



84 121 95 115 

8? 157 142 129 

99 145 145 

41 132 H3 

84 149 



75 141 
44 1S8 




75 

193 78 
145 190 88 
135 177 105 
134 190 75 
125 154 40 



2312 2144 2387 2321 2401 1499 1439 2274 2242 2011 1318 2431 25203 2100 



THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS! 



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800-361-5338 
WESTERN CANADA 800-361-5155 




BUT...CHECKERBOARDS 
ARE FOR TABLECLOTHS! 



THE LOWER KIT III FROM 
GREEN MOUNTAIN MICRO 

Still cloaking your Color 
Computer in a checkerboard 
tablecloth? Since 1981, 
thousands of Color Computer 
users have uncovered their computer by 
discovering the Lowerkit — the first and 
best full-time lowercase and special 
symbols generation system for your 
Color Computer. 

Why a Lowerkit? Because uppercase- 
only display is a relic of the user- 
unfriendly past. And because you can t 
really read a checkerboard excuse for 
lowercase display. Sure, software 
lowercase comes with a handful of 
commercial programs. But software 
lowercase gobbles up over 6,000 bytes of 
your precious memory. Even if you have 
64K, you'll give up 10% of it for a 
simple lowercase display. And software 
lowercase vanishes when you change 
programs or turn off your computer. 

Take 15 minutes. Put the Lowerkit in. 
A Lowerkit is simple, reliable — and its 
always there. You flip on your machine, 
and Lowerkit s bold lettering greets you. 



No tapes, disks or cartridges to load 
first. No compatibility problems; when 
you don't want it, you switch it off. 

And now, the new Lowerkit III 
includes a reverse screen switch as well. 
Big, bright green letters on a black 
background. 

i i 



3ABCDEFGHIJKLHHQPQRSTUVMXYZI" \ lt<- 
! " f < -. /0 123456789; ; <*>? 




Original Color Computer Display 



LOWERKIT DIS 
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LOWERKIT III Display (reverse video, too) 



Three years ago, the Lowerkit made 
history and set the standard in Color 
Computer lowercase. For example, game 
and education programs from Sugar 
Software have Lowerkit display options. 
Spectrosystems' ADOS supports the 
Lowerkit; so does Cer-Comp's TextPro. 
Cartridge Scripsit looks beautiful with a 
Lowerkit. Spectrum Projects, Cheshire Cat 
and many others have developed 
beautiful alternate character sets which 
you can download from Micronet, burn 
into an EPROM, and snap into your 
Lowerkit. 

Pull the checkerboard tablecloth off 
your Color Computer with a Lowerkit. 
The original. The standard. 

Set New Standards with 
the New Lowerkit Hi 

• Lowerkit III, assembled and tested, $79 95 

• Lowerkit HI, complete kit of parts, $49.95 

• Lowerkit III, printed circuit board, $20.00 
Be sure to specify Color Computer or 
Color Computer 2. 

ALSO AVAILABLE FROM 
GREEN MOUNTAIN MICRO 

Color Burner with software, $69-95 / 
$56.95 kit 

1 

Micro language Lab 'Learning the 

6809" $99 (plus $3.50 shipping 
and handling) 

CoCoPort interface, $49.95 / $39-95 kit 

RAM/ROM pack, $29.95 / $19-95 kit 

64K Color memory upgrade kit, $49. 95 
with AWMemory Tester, $54.95 

Color Quaver, Software Music 
Synthesizer, $19-95 

Scroll-A-Roll software video text 
display, $24.95 

TV Buff IP, improved to handle virtually 

all monitors, $14.95 
1 

(Add S2.50 shipping and handling) 
^Specify Color Computer or CoCo II 




Green 
Mountain 
Micro 

Bathory Road, Box R 
Roxbury, Vermont 05669 
802 485-6112 

Hours: 9am-5pm, Monday-Friday 

COD/VISA/MASTERCARD 

TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corporation 



Software Review ZS^^^^^~ m ~ m ~ m TE!!'fi2\ 



EDT — An Excellent Editor 
For Assembly Language 
Programming 

Most editors and word processors are designed for 
general purpose use. Few are tailored for a particular job. 
EDT is an editor specifically designed for assembly lan- 
guage programming on the Color Computer. It features 
many useful aids for the programmer who is composing 
code at the terminal (hacking away). It won't function as a 
general purpose editor, so it might not suit the style of all 
programmers. But for straight code typing, it can't be beat. 

EDT is supplied on disk with several copies of the pro- 
gram, which can easily be backed up to another disk. You 
can customize the loader to select a number of options, 
including printer page formatting and Baud rate, default 
editor options, disk track access rate, and default edit file 
name. The 51 -page manual provides a comprehensive dis- 
cussion of each option, and gives you a short introduction to 
using the system by working with sample text file. The 
manual concludes with a single page summary of the editor 
options, with page numbers of the full description serving as 
an index. The only problem with the manual is the attempt 
at a clever style of writing, which ends up being childish at 
times. 

EDTofters most of the normal text editing functions. It is 
a full-screen editor and displays text on a high-resolution 
51 -character by 24-line screen. You can mark blocks of text 
and move, copy, or delete the blocks. You can search for 
strings (even using matching patterns) and replace selected 
strings. 

In addition to these normal editor functions, EDT 
includes features for assembly language programming. 
Foremost is the screen format. EDT's normal mode keeps 
the cursor on the center line of the screen. This allows you to 
see 10 lines above and below the line you are working on. If 
you would rather have traditional scrolling from the top or 
bottom of the page, a single key stroke toggles the scroll 
mode. You can also easily switch between insert and 
exchange modes for text entry or editing. 

isDriimits you to a fixed assembly language format. The 
space bar is transformed into a tab key to keep the program 
formatted in four columns for labels, opcodes, operands, 
and comments. Files are saved in a compressed format 
which uses the space character to represent the tab, rather 
than storing the displayed blanks. 

Many of EDT's options assist you directly in working 
with assembly language programs. You can get a list of 
labels used in the program, or check to see if a particular 
label has been used. You can also find a particular label 
(jump to subroutine) and return from up to 10 levels of 
subroutines. This allows you to trace through complicated 
subroutine calls while editing the program. Normally you 
only find such capability in a symbolic debugger, while 
running the assembled code. A built-in Hex/decimal calcu- 
lator does arithmetic in either base, and converts from one 
base to the other. 

EDThas a number of features not usually found in inex- 
pensive software. The program runs on a 64K CoCo and 
gives you every possible byte available for editing your 



program. Even with the high-resolution screen, you have 
over 48K for your program. In addition, you can handle text 
files up to 2 1 grans long (almost 1 / 3 of a disk)! The program 
also checks to see that your printer is ready before trying to 
send data. This relieves the annoying "hang up" when you 
try to access a dead device. In addition, £X>rallows you to 
type brackets, braces and backslashes, giving you the com- 
plete character set for Motorola 6809 assemblers. 

£Drfeatures load and save commands which allow you 
to work effectively with a library of subroutines stored in a 
single file. The save command allows you to append a por- 
tion of your current edit buffer to another file on disk. The 
append/ load command will search a library for a particular 
subroutine. When it finds a specified label, it appends the 
text until encountering a blank line (used to separate sub- 
routine blocks). 

Sonburst Software has done an excellent job in producing 
an editor for assembly language programming. It offers a 
good level of user interaction, and provides the features 
most often needed for assembly language composition. You 
might choose to continue programming with an ordinary 
text editor, or with one of the limited line editors supplied 
with many popular assemblers. However, £7) /"represents a 
total approach to customized tools for the serious pro- 
grammer. Combined with one of the many fine assemblers 
and debuggers on the market, you will have a winning 
combination for your battle with machine language. 

(Sonburst Software, 233 S.E. Rogue River Highway, Grants 
Pass, OR 97527, 64K disk $39.95) 

— Stuart Hawkinson 



STOCK & FUND INVESTING 

with the 

TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER 

USE FUNDGRAF AND FUNDFILE 

FUNDGRAF is a stock market analysis program that not only graphs and 
analyzes funds or stocks, but also makes decisions on when to BUY and SELL. 
Improve market timing using your COCO. 

GRAPHS fund's progress (up to 200 f 
weeks). SUPERIMPOSES for comparison: 
a line of constant percent growth or a 
graph of any other fund (or stock). 
CALCULATES over any time span: the 
percent price change and the moving 
average (any span). INDICATES BUY 
and SELL signals. FUNDGRAF requires 
16 K ECB min. 

16/32 K Tape $49.95 

16/32 K 5 in. Disk $69.95 

ADD $2 handling on all orders. 



■ I ' f ' I 1 I ' 

FUNDGRAF-A STOCK 

MARKET ANALYSIS 
PROGRAM FOR 16K EX 
TRS-80 COLOR rOMFL'TER ^ 




TRS~eO CfttQft. CCn^uTlPi . tm TANDY CORP 



FUNDFILE is a portfolio and account management program for securities. 
Manage single or multiple portfolios of stocks, mutual funds, bonds, money 
marketfunds, etc. FUNDFILE allows easy maintenance of all your records for 
accurate portfolio evaluation. NEW 32 K VERSION of FUNDFILE summarizes 
all transactions (dividends, interest, purchases and sales) between any two 
dates of your choice - weekly, yearly, etc. Categorizes interest and dividends paid 
as to tax liability (tax free, etc.) and capital gains as long or short term. Great for 
tax reports. 

FUNDFILE REQUIRES 16 K ECB min. and 80-COL PRINTER 

5-in. Diskette only for 16 K ECB $27.96 

5-in. Diskette only for 32 K ECB $37.95 

ADD $2 handling on all orders. 



Write for free brochure for details. Dealer inquiries invited. 

PARSONS SOFTWARE, DEPT. C 
118 WOODSHIRE DRIVE 
PARKERSBURG, WV 26101 



October 1984 THE RAINBOW 225 



Software Review! 



TfZS Software Review, 



7r7Z\ 



Cribs, Nobs, Turnups 
And Heels — In Color 



Scripture Quiz Package 
'Helpful' To Youth 



Mechanically, Cribbage by Aurora Computing is superb. 
It takes my $ 1 ,000 computer and turns it into a deck of cards 
and a cribbage board. 

Actually it does quite a bit more — it keeps score of the 
hand and of each player's "peg" during most of the game. It 
would seem that this program is more difficult to use than a 
deck of cards. 

At the start of the game you are asked if you want to play 
another player or in two teams. You are then asked for the 
names of the players, which the program uses to keep track 
of the game. The next request is for your choice of having the 
cards printed to the screen or the printer. The screen option 
displays your cards for a time and then clears — you either 
have to write them down or have a much better memory 
than mine. 

The game is conducted "by the book" and players indicate 
their play with card numbers. The computer does the 
during-play counting. After the hand, the more complex 
post-play counting must be done by the players. (If you have 
never played cribbage, look up the rules in an encyclopedia 
or a Hoyle's Book of Rules — the complexity will amaze 
you.) 

The skill of the person who wrote this program is evident 
in the screen displays and the impressive graphics. But, the 
documentation is poor, at best. 

If you are a serious cribbage player and you would like a 
new approach to the game, it may be worth the price and the 
aggravation of the documentation — but it will never 
replace a deck of Bicycle playing cards and a peg-board. 

(Aurora Computing, 49 Brookland Ave., Aurora, Ontario, 
Canada L4G 2H6, $14.95 tape) 

— Glenn B. Knight 



Quality Christian Software has continued issuing excel- 
lent Bible-oriented software with the latest offering being 
3- Game Pack #3. 

This program's games are based on Bible study and they 
are well thought out, and nicely put together. 

They would be excellent tools for the Bible class or a 
Sunday school. They also constitute a good drill for the 
Bible quiz members, if you have that activity in your church. 
At any rate, it is an opportunity to learn about the Scriptures 
in an easy and familiar way — the multiple choice quiz. 

The Sword Drill program is a good way to sharpen your 
wits. CoCo picks out the Bible quotation and you must pick 
out the chapter and verse. It is a memory challenger. If you 
were wondering why it is called a Sword Drill, it is because 
St. Paul referred to the Bible as the "Sword of the spirit." 
(Eph. 6:17). 

As with the other programs in this series, you set your own 
time limits — from a very brief instant to a longer period. 
This is what opens these programs to a wide range of ages. 
Even very young children can play with help, because there 
is ample time to think. 

The second game on the tape is called Who Did That? 
Again, you get to choose the time limits but this time you are 
also asked to tell CoCo your name. All of these games give 
you the right answer and a beep if you miss or if time expires 
while you are still cogitating. You will get a congratulation 
message when you make a good score on the third game 
which is called Bible Quotes #2* The comments given after 
the game offer a goal for which the student may strive. This 
is a help to young people. 

(Quality Christian Software, P.O. Box 1899, Duncan, OK 
73533, 16K ECB tape $10.99) 

— Howard Lee Ball 



♦CANADIAN PAYROLL* 



OPTIONS 1—*. 

«. m *. UTILITY 1 

< r: > 19H b»y vol 



ft DH»t Ml TP *PR«T TO ANY COMPANY ! 



OPTION 4 



.11 FUR YOU NO CHANCE OF UMKNOWINOLV 

LOO 1MB DATA.. IB * RPBCIALIZIB FBOOUCT. . 

MANUAL NOLL OMOAN 1 2KB BABY TO POLLOM i ! 

• RLL PRBVINCM S. TERP) I TDR I EOP AUTO . OS . I - M VALIDATION 
•FOAMATTED BCREEMBfFULL FORMAT TRAPPINOtANY PNINTBR 

• ANY F»AY P«fNltID»»ATCH«D CHEQUES (DBTAILKD PAY ETUBO 
•TOTAL CdOT/DUTY ALLOC AT I DMS* YEARL Y UBER UP — DATABLE 

•All pwdia tranbf p:m« rack-ufpable bpaebUOrd paotbcted 

DISK 

9 cur* 

EBIDSMTB ABB 7X P.B.T) 



CALCULAIEB 

• IX OA flULTIF»«_ 



•SROBBEB 



YGS 



A at ALL BUI X NEMB 
VISA l-70a-AE4~S**l 
•M-^PM BET ONLY FLBABE 



r»o vox 2oM 

BRECHIN, ONTARIO 
LOK 1 SO 



SO. CALIFORNIA SHINES 



RESIDENTS & VISITORS-WE ARE THE 
COLOR COMPUTER SPECIALISTS IN 

LOS ANGELES. SOFTWARE, 
MODEMS, BOOKS, PRINTERS, 

MONITORS, ACCESSORIES 




POLYGON CO. 



1316 Wilshire Blvd. 



» Suite 206 • Los Angeles, CA 90017 
(213) 483-8388 



226 THE RAINBOW October 1984 



Software ReviewJSEmSSEEESSSSSS^SS?7^ The GEN program gives you the options of having key- 

clicks on: all the time, only when 10KEY is engaged, or 
never. Using the GEN program, you can relocate the cus- 
tomized keypad to four areas of memory: 



10KEY: A Numeric Keypad 
For Your CoCo 



1) &H0600 (first graphics page for n