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TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. Ml 49506 



•ADO $1.50 POSTAGE & HANDLING*TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 
•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX* 
LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE ^ 

mm ARCADE ACTION GAMES Hil 

TO ORDER CALL 616/9S7 0444 



From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 
PLUS after PLUS after PLUS 4 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Model 4 Portable 

64K w/2 Drives 1525 

Model 2000 2Dr 2299 

Model 12 1 Drive 2360 

Model 16B IDr 256K 3965 
MODEMS 

Hayes Smartmodem II 225 

AC-3 129 

DC Modem I 89 

DC Modem II 160 

PRINTERS 

Silver Reed EXP500 D.W. Ser. 455 
Silver Reed EXP550 D.W. Par. 525 

CGP115 159 

CGP220 \r\k Jet 545 

DMP110 305 

DMP420 735 
Toshiba 1340 (24 wire head) 779 

Gemini 10X 289 

Gemini 15X 409 

CITOH Prowrlter 359 

Okidata CALL 

Epson CALL 



ETC. 

Disi< Drive Controller 139 

Extended Basic Kit 39.95 

PBH Ser/Par Conv. 69 

64K Ram Chips 62.95 

Deluxe Keyboard 35.95 

Superpro Keyboard 69.95 

HJL Keyboard 79.95 

CCR-81 Recorder 52 

Deluxe Joystick (each) 35.95 

Joysticks (pair) 22 

Video Plus (monitor adapter) 24.95 

Video Pius lie 39.95 

Amdek Color 1 + Monitor 299 

BMC Color Monitor 255 
BMC Green Monochrome Monitor 99 

Taxan Green Mono. Monitor 130 

Taxam Amber Mono. Monitor 139 



SOFTWARE 

Zaxxon 
The King 
Trap Fall 
Buzzard Bait 
Devil Assault 



(Tape Version] 
34.95 
26.95 
27.95 
27.95 
27.95 



Colorpede 29.95 

Juniors Revenge 28.95 

Pac Attack 24.95 

Block Head 26.95 

Froggle 24.95 

Lunar Rover Patrol 24.95 

Lancer 24.95 

Typing Tutor 23.95 

Galagon ' 24.95 

Scott Adams Adventures 19.95 

Sea Dragon 34.95 

Colorcome 49.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 

O-Pak (disk) 34.95 

Key-264K 39.95 

Eiite-Calc 59.95 

VIP Writer 59.95 

VIP Calc 59.95 

VIP Terminal 49.95 

VIP Database (disk) 59.95 

Order any 2 software pieces listed 
and take 10% off their listed price. 
All Radio Shack software 10% off list. 
Send for complete list. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



com 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton. MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS>80 Is a r«oltt«r»d trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under the Rainbow 



FEATURE ARTICLES 





Make Your Own Kind Of M^pc/ Dennis H, Weide 18 

Printer Utility Showing off your printer's capabilities 
Two Jobs In Out I Damon Swanson 23 

Printer Utility An enhanced spooler program 
A Three-Ring Circus At CoCo Beach/y/m Reed 26 

RAINBOWfest Report An eventful weekend in Long Beach 
Software Piracy: The Great Debate/ A7/ Nolan 29 

Special Report A seminar on software thievery 
Changing Addresses/ Dennis Derringer 38 

Disk Utility Quickly relocate ML programs 
Multicolored Mod Messages/ Doiig Lindsay 41 

Printer Utility Creating colorful banners 
CoCo Grows Up/ Ed Eliers 49 

Tutorial An updated, uplifting upgrade 
Scrubba Dub Duh/ Barry E. Becker 54 

Printer Utility Cleaning your printer's head — without shampoo 
Stylish Types From The Past To The Future/ Mike Fahy 67 

Printer Utility Using dot graphics 
The Best Looking Envelope/ C/jflr/e5 M. Thonen .74 

Printer Utility Creating a useful mailing label 
Wish You Were Here/ Don Hughes and Jessie James 84 

Printer Utility Printing personalized postcards 
Rockin' Round The CoCo/ Fred B. Scerbo 89 

Rainbow Wishing Well A printout of your favorite rock group 
And Now There Are CoCo Widows/ Swjfl/i P. Davis 119 

Commentary A look at women in the CoCo Community 
Women In The Computer Revolution/ S'ara Nolan 121 

Special Report A seminar at RAINBOWfest 
3 ... 2 ... 1 . BlastolT!/y?y//^flWfl 131 

Graphics A close-up of the CoCo Columbia 
Colorful Correspondence/ Thomas Sziucha 135 

Printer Utility Custom labels drawn in colors 
Pretty As A Printout/ Thomas Sziucha 137 

Printer Utility Creating pictures with the CGP-1 15 
Print It, Print \X\/ James Provost 149 

Utility Synchronous output to screen and printer 
It's A Bargain!/ ^^hW R, Carson 156 

Home Help A sell-sational garage sale program 
Playing The Monies/ Leonard Hyre 166 

Derby Special Weighing the odds 
Nerdy, But Kice/ Jerry D. Forsha 177 

Game Fun with Q* Bert's nerdy little friends 
Run For The Roses/ M, J. Himowitz and J, Nelson 180 

Printer Mystery A Derby printout 
Let's Blow This Joint/ Doug Thorsvik 195 

Game An alarmingly fun bank heist 



COVER art © by Fred Crawford 



DEPARTMENTS 

Advertiser Index i 321 

Back Issue Information . . i : . ; 311 

Basic Training/ Joseph Kolar » 116 

A full-baked debugging session 
Bits And Bytes Of BASIC/ Richard White 31 

A lesson on memory maps and machine language 
Building May's Rainbow/ J/m Reed ; 16 

A ihany-hued preview to this month's issue 

CoCo Clubs , 282 

CoCo Counsel/ Tom Nelson 288 

A guide to buying yOur printer 
CoCo Graphics/ Don Inman ; . . . * ; 125 

Examining LOGO through the eyes of BASIC 

The Dragon's Byte/ Bill Nolan 142 

A filing system for your fantasy role-playing characters 
Education J^otes/ Steve Blyn 190 

A "home ruri" lesson on list manipulation 
Education Overview/ Dr. Michael Flog 52 

Curriculum questions on computer education 
GameMaster's Apprentice/ ^o^> Albrecht i ; . . 113 

Creating a random name file 
Greetings From Uncle Bert/ Dale Peterson 185 

Springtime and the turtles are hatching 

Letters To Rainbow/ Our Readers 7 

The PipeVme/ Staff. 152 

PRINT »'1J Lawrence C. Falk 14 

Editor's Notes 

RAINBOW Info 48 

Rainbow Scoreboard i i 210 

Received And Certified 202 

Reviewing Reviews i 206 

School Is In The Heart Of A ChM/Ftan Saito, Bob Albrecht ; . ; . .60 

Children's evaluations of programs 

Submitting Material To Rainbow 189 

Subscription Information ^ 39 

These Fine Stores ■. 318 

turn Of The ScrtYi/Tony DiStefano ; 188 

Designing your own video nrionitor adapter 

(No corrections are listed in this month s issue.) 



RAINBOWTECH 

Downloads/ Dan Downard 293 

Answers to your technical questions 
hogg-wash/iv-flwAc Hogg * 314 

Comparing FLEX and OS-9 
KISSable 0S-9/Z)flfe L. Puckett 297 

Some technical potpourri 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Product Review Contents ; 201 



NEXT MONTH: June is our music issue, featuring a number of noteworthy routines to show off your CoCo. We'll 
have lessons oh guitar chords, a method for finding chords on your computer and a CoCb coticert from the 
classics to a little ragtime. And, keeping in tune with our usual harmonious blend, we'll have business programs as 
well as dnes for home impi'ovement, a database program and more. 

Plus, dozehs of articles, features and hardware and software reviews ~ more information on the CoCo than is 
available anywhere else! 




May 1984 



Vol, III No. 10 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing £dlt6r James E. Reed 

Senior Editor Courlhey Noe 

Technical Editor Dan pownard 

Copy Editor Susan Renr>ini 

Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammei' 

Editorial Assistants Vatarte Edwards. 
Wendy ^allt, Suzanne KuroWsiiy, 
Lynn Miller, Shirley Morgan, 
Noreen Morrison. Kevin Nickots 

Technical Assistant Ed Ellers 

Cdntributing edHors Bob Albrecht, Stevd Blyn. 
Tony DiStefano* Frank Hbgg, Don InmSin. Joseph 
Koiar, Dennis Lewandowski, Tom Nelson, Bill 
Nolan, Dale Peterson, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett 
Fran Saito, Paul Searby. Fred Scerbo, Richard 
White 

Art Director Salty Nichols 
Assistant Art Director Jerry McKiernan 
Designers Peggy Henry, Neal C. Lauron 
Advertising Manager Charlotte Ford 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 
Qenerai IManager Patricia H. i-iirsch 
Asst. General Manager for Rhanoe Donna Shuck 
Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Doris Taytbr 
Dealer Accounts Judy Ouashnock 
Administrative Assistant to the Publisher 

Marianne Booth 
Rainbowfest Site Management Witio Fatk 
Director of Futf (lament Services Bonnie Shepard 
AssL Customer Service Manager Defdra Henry 
Customer Service Representative Sandy Apjpie 
Wbrd Processor Manager Lynda WilsOn 
Rainbow On Tape Subscriptions Monica Wheat 
Research Assistants Laurie Fatk. 

Wanda Perry, Loretta Varda, Kara Voit 
Dispatch Mark tHerndon 
Production Assistant Meiba Sriiith 



Advcrti»ing and Marketing 0(f(€« for the VrMtom itMn and 

provtnees: CM>dy Sli»eiil«ford, dir«^or, 12110 INaridiaft South. 
Sultv B. P.O. Box 73-97a, PuyflHup, WA 963734578, pftont (206) 
84S>7766. 



Qartand AMM>ci«i«s, Ine., I* the «d¥«rtislf»0 rtprMwnMMi flor 
The RAINBOW in the ba«t«rn United SWts. A«lv«rt!Mf»Mi*lol«i» 

MiMiMtppt may contact them for further JlHomutioR. GiHtSM 
Ai»oci«te», Inc., P.O. Box 314, Dinbury, MA (HMt, ftflf} 

934-64S4or934-654B. 



The RAINBOW is published every month of the year 
by FALSbFT, Inc., 9529 U.S. Highway 42, R.O. Box 209, 
Prospect, kY 40059 Phone (502) 228-4492. TheRAIM-. 
GiOW and The RAINBOW logotypes are ® trademarics of 
FALSOFT, Inc. 

Second ciass postage paid Prospect, KY and atidi- 
tional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. t)746-4797), 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The RAIN- 
BOW. P C. Box 209, Prospect, KY «059. Fomvarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class post- 
age paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, 
Ottawa, Ontario. Canada. 

. Entii-e contents © by FALSOin", Inc.. 19&4.TtwllAiN> 
BOW is intended for the private use and pleasure of its. 
subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any' 
means is prohibited Use of information herein is for ti^ 
single end uise of purchasers and any other use is 
expressly prohibited. Ail programs herein a^e distrib- 
uted in an ' as is" basts, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. 

TFiS-80. Color BAStC, Extended Color BASIC, Scripsit 
and Program Pak are ® trademarics of the Tandy Corp. 
CompuServe is a trade mar l( of CorhpuServe inc. 

Subscriptions to TYto RAINBOW are $28 per year in 

the United States. Canadian and Mexican rates are U.S. 
'$35. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $65, air m&l 
U.S. $100. All subscnptions begin with next available 
issue. 

Limited back issues are available. Please iee rK>tice 
for issues which are in print and costs. Payrtient 
accepted by VISA, H^asterCard, American ^xprete. 
Cash, CheCK or Money Order in U.S. curfancy only. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 5 



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MEMORY MAPPED INTO 
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auto answr, auto dial, re-dial, search, 
full audio line monitoring 
full duplex, 300 baud ^IQQ 



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MICRO R.G.S. INC. 

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05823. USA 
US Toll free line 800-361-4970 



CANADA 
MICRO R.G.S. INC. 

751, CARRE VICTORIA, SUITE 403 
MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, H2Y 2J3 

Regular leL (514)287-1563 
Canadian Toll Free 800-361-5155 



CANADA 
New! TORONTO OFFICE 
696 Yonge St., #704 
Tel: (416) 967-1730 

Canadian Toll Free 800-361-5155 



letters to 

RAINBOW 



ARTS AND LETTERS 




Envelope Of The Month 



George Mueller 
W. Bloomfield. Ml 



A COMPUFAIR 

Editor: 

tlie Northern t^ennsylvania Amateur 
Computer Club and the Hazletbn Campus 
of Penn State U niversity will hold their third 
anilual Computer Fair May 19, 1984. Com- 
pufair ^4 will be held on the Hazleton Cam- 
pus at Penn State in Hazleton, Penn. 

The fair will feature seminars, workshops, 
vehdbr displays and demonstrations by the 
club's user groups. For more inforniatiori 
call (717) 454-8731. 

George Lee 
Hazleton, PA 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

^itor: 

I purchased a Gorilla Banana Printer for 
my CoCo and would like to know if anyone 
knows of a screen dump program I can use 
with it. By the way, anyone interested in 
buying a Banand Printer should make sure 
the printer is sent with a serial interface 
unless you have a parallel/ serial converter. 
The Banana is a fine printer but if you don't 
specify a serial interface when ordering you 
may be disappointed when it arrives and end 
up spending at least $60 for an interface 
cable, like me. Write: 167 18 Polo Road, 
61081. 

Marty A. Mapson 
Sterling, IL 

Editor: 

1 have some questions about the machine 
language listings in your Rainbow On Tapes. 

How do you load the listing so that it can 
be displayed on the screen? How do you 
make changes to the listing? How can you 
print out the listing to a printer? 

I have EDTASM+ from Radio Shack. 

Les Dunni 
Milton, FL 

Editor's Note: 

You must use a disassembler such 
as the one available in ZBUG, 



AUTOSTART ACTION 

Editor: 

Is there a way to make a program RUN 
automatically once it is loaded from tape? 

Harry A, Thayer 
Ravena. NY 

Editor's Note: 
See Steve Abrams' tetter. 

Editor: 

1 would like you or your readers help! 1 
would like to know how to autostart Extend- 
ed BASIC or machine language programs 
loaded from tape or disk. 

There is so much information gnd helpful 
tips in your publication that I thought you or 
your readers might solve this problem for 
me? 

Richard A. Thomas 
Ferndale, WA 

Editor's Note: 
See the follolving letter. 

Editor: 

Recently there have been a rash of new 
programs on disk which when LOADMed^ 
perform their own start without having to 
type in EXEC. Also some of these programs 
start again at the beginning when the R ESET 
button is pushed. 

How can this be accomplished before the 
program even starts? 

Steve Abrams 
San Francisco, CA 

Editor's Note: 

By loading a small program into 
low memory you can force a program 
to autostart by modifying certain 
memory locations. You can also force 
a program to restart upon [RESET] 
by the same method. See theRainbow 
"^Memory Map" and see if you can 
identify these addresses. You may 
start at $9F. 



Editor: 

I am a recent proud owner of a CoCo 2 
Extended basic computer. At the time of 
purchase your magazine was recommended 
to me. 1 have a copy of the January 1984 
issue and it is better than I had anticipated. 

One of the things ( wanted to do with my 
new CoCo is to place on tape 7 generations 
of my family tree with all the data about each 
generation. At present I have about 90 to 96 
direct ancestors and others to record, 

1 am having problems finding a program 
for genealogy. Would you know of any pro- 



gram that would handle this much informa- 
tion and where 1 could obtain it? 

La Verne Ashabranner 
Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Editor's Note: 

See All in the Family Tree^ February 
1984, Page 78. Also WeSt Bay Com- 
pany has a genealogy program called 
Roots* 



SOME DO'S AND DONTS 

Editor: 

I am 13 and have a 64K CoCo. I enjoy 
your magazine a lot and espegially enjoy 
"Letters to Rainbow." Tm in a computer 
club at school and recently several cOmpu* 
ters have broken down. They have blamed 
this on the peeks and pokes of our programs. 
So, we have three angry teachers and some 
poor kids who are being punished for it. I 
told them that it was impossible for the pro- 
gram to hurt the computer. (So I live dan- 
gerously.) But being that Vm a kid, I guess 
they started telling me how wrong 1 was. 

1 have read a statement somewhere about 
software hurting hardware but cant find 
that particular issue to prove my story is 
true. Who s right? 

Can I use peeks and pokes safely from 
now on without worrying aboiit hurting the 
computer? 

Dylan Krider 
Houston, TX 

Editor's Note: 

Dylan, the computer will not be 
damaged by any command you type 
in or by any program you run, eveh if 
there are errors. One thing that will 
wreck a CoCo is plugging or unplug- 
ging cartridges or disk controllers 
(anything that goes into the cartridge 
slot) with the CoCo turned on. Always 
switch the CoCo off before changing 
cartridges. 



Editor: 

I have a 1.0"D" board, upgraded to 32K. 1 
recently bought a Radio Shack DWP-210. 
To get it to work, I needed to install a new 
Color Basic I.I chip, #8040364 A. It takes 
about 1 0 minutes to pop out the original and 
put in the new chip. 

Does anyone know how to get the DWP- 
210 to underline using the Telewriter word 
processor? 

Write me: Route 2, Box 577A, 56367. 

Eugene J. Berilek 
Rice, MN 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 7 



LOST AND FOUND 

Editor: 

Over the paSt couple of years, 1 Ve gairied 
quite a large stockpile of information about 
CoCo products — more information than I 
can afford to take advantage of. Tm on the 
mailing lists of several large CdCo software 
companies, so I have a lot of new product 
inforrnation coming in at regular intervals. 
Td like to extend an invitation to kainbow 
readers, especially those who may be new to 
the CoCo Community. If anyone is looking 
for a certain type of program and theyVe 
had no success finding it so far, they can 
write me at 1801 I7th Avenue, 49858. Til try 
lo answer any letters as quickly as possible. 1 
feel that CoCo is a great machine arid there 
are a lot of great prod ucts available — hope- 
fully I can help people find some of them. 

Dale Dobson 
Menominee, MI 



GAMES, GAMES, GAMES 

Editor: 

I recently typed in an Adventure game 
from the February 1984 issue The Amazing 
Adventures of Karrak. I cannot get past the 
pit and 1 don*t know what goes in the slot on 
the first game. If anyone knows the solution 
to my problem, please send it to me: 1 1 
Walnut Dr., 06248. 

Mark McConnell 
HebroH, CT 



Editor: 

I'm only 1 1 but 1 think your magazine is 
great! 

If someone in CoCo Land has some answers 
to El Diablero, 1 would appreciate it. Please 
send all clues and solutions to me at: Box 
473, POJ lEO. 

Marc Brissvn 
Ear It on, Ontario 

EditoK- 

I need answers to the Adventures Raaka- 
Tu and Pyramid, Please help! 

If anybody has the answers to the above 
questions, write me at P.O. Box 555, 78040. 

Fred Turner 
Laredo, tX 



OH, MUMMY 

Editor: 

Foi- all of you Adventure buffs who are 
still having trouble in Pyramid ditid Raaka- 
Tu, I have a few major tips for you. In 
Pyramid, no one can seem to find the Pha- 
roah's chest. It is deep within the maze, past 
the pit. This information has been printed 
before, yet the person always would leave 
oiit one vital piece of information. When 
you get to the pit in the maze, go east one 
more time, and then go northwest, then you 
should see the words "Dead End." This is 
where the chest is. In order to get it, the 
mummy has to have previously takeh some 
of your treasures. If he has, you will see your 
treasures, and the chest. If you do not know 



how to get the mummy to take yoiir trea- 
sures, or you cannot get to the pit, write the, 
and I will tell you. 

In Raaka-Tu^^hen you leavfe the temple, 
you only have 25 points, yet you have all of 
the treasures. To Solve this, when you leave 
the temple, go west twice, and then north 
three times, then press "Score," and yoii 
have 50 points. If you can't find any of the 
treasures; or just need to find one rtiore, just 
Write me at: 1 10 Ashley Drive, 29631. 

John Ailen 
Clemson, SC 

Editor: 

1 have reached the 220 points for PyrarHid 
which was quite a challenge. I can see why 
some people are running into a lot of prob- 
lem3. Any questions you have, I would be 
glad to answer, 1058 E. 9th Avenue, 85204. 

Judy Fodness 
Mesa, AZ 



Editor: 

I have helpful hints to solving Stdlarh. I 
have answers to cjuestions such as! How do 
you get the red key? How dp you get. the 
green kfey? How do you stop wandering? 
How do you get out? If yoii need any help on 
Bedlam, send a self-addressed stampecj enve- 
lope to: 1450 Picadilly Street, 23513^ t)ne 
dollar handling appreciated. I will also in- 
clude a map of Bedlam. 

Harry L Perkins, III 
Norfolk, VA 




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Match nilmbers 
Cdunt Colorful 
Blocks 

• Add Stacks of 
Blocks 

• Subtract Stacks 
of Blocks 

Draw and 
Save 
Colorful 
Pictures 



• Match Letters 
' Learn the Alphabet 

• Spell their Mames 

• Compare Shapes 




8 the RAINBOW May 1984 



Color Povrerll 

Expands Your CoCo to CP/M 



t I t ACTUAL COLOR POVER 11 BISPLAY t t t 



W COLOR POWER II GIVES YOU WORE — INCLUDING! 
94 POWERFUL FOUR HHz Z-8eA 
9S 

86 MOTOROLA 6845 yHICH GENERATES A HIGH QUALITY 80 COLUNN BY 24 LINE BISPLAY 
§7 DITH UPPER and I oyer case characters on uour coiposite video •onUor, 
88 INSTRUCTIONS IHCLUBEB ON USING 6845 BIRECTLY FRON YOUR CoCo 
89 

11 USES CoCo CONIIAHIS; NO NEU OPERATING SYSTEM TO LEARN SUCH AS OS-9 OR FLEX 

la AISOLUTELY NO 64K CoCo or CoCo II HARDWARE NODIFICATIONS NEE8EB 
13 

14 RUNS THOUSANIS AND THOUSANDS OF CP/N PROGRAMS 
15 

16 SUPPORTS DOUILE-BENSITY CoCo DISK FORMAT FOR MAXIHUH STORAGE CAPACITY 
17 

18 INCLUDES POWER SUPPLY 
19 

ai mm^ set includes upper case, \o»er case with descenders (gjpqy)' 
a MMBHl )<>'HZl! M/ =□ -rv Ul (total of 128) 

•••••••••UllltllU2eaaaH22t213333313334tM444+445555555555W 

U345C7tMl23«678Sll234567fl981234567fi9iU3456789«l234567B9§l23456785IU3456785l 



Plug Color Power II Into the expansion port of your 64K 
CoCo or CoCo 2, plug your disk controller into Color Power 
II, and insert our disk into your drive. You are now ready 
to run thousands of CP/M programs such as WordStar® , 
MallMerge® , SpellStarJ^ and StarlndexJ"^ lt*s that simple! 

You now have have a fully professional CP/M compatible 
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Introductory Prices: 

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Add SpellStar^'^ and Starlndex^w for only $ 79.00 



Call or send check, money order. Visa or MasterCard 
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N.J. residents add 6% sales tax. 



Color Power Unlimitecl# Inc. 

1260 Springfield Ave., P.O. Box 606-D, New Providence, NJ. 07974 (201) 665-9646 



CP/M is a trademark of Digital Research, Inc., WordStar, Mail Merge, S pel IS tar, and Starlndex are trademarks of MicroPro tntemational Corp. 



TWO FOR THE TICKLE 

Editor: 

Have you heard these two? 

Wife of Computer Enthusiast: **Why did 
the computer see a chiropractor?'' 

Computer Enthusiast: **1 don't know. 
Why?" 

Wife: Because it had a slipped disk." 



Computer Enthusiast: "Why did the com- 
puter see the dentist?" 

Son: "I dont know. Dad. Why?" 

Computer Enthusiast: "To straighten out 
its byte." 

Mrs. A.E. Fuller 
Montrose, CO 

Editor: Why does Mrs. Fuller write 
computer jokes? 

Computer Enthusiast: Dont ASCU! 1 
haven*t array of an idea. We ought to 
delimiter to basic statements. 



KUDOS 

Editor- 
Add my name to the list of people around 
the reading area in saying, ^"7 hanks, for a 
great magazine!" You and your staff have 
convinced my friends and me that the Color 
Computer is not only the best computer, but 
also the one with the best information 
source, the Rainbow\ 

We are growing by the years with software 
and hardware additions and are looking 
forward to growing with your magazine in 
knowledge and understanding of this fasci- 
nating world of computers! 
May life be one BIG Rainbow for us all! 

John H. Boehnlein 
South Bend, IN 

Editor: 

I really enjoy your magazine. I have com- 
pared the three major magazines available 
for the CoCo and yours is tops. 

1 would like to point out that I've had no 
problems obtaining these programs, but I 
consider your magazine of such high quality 
and low price that 1 feel obligated to "pay " 
for the convenience of having the programs 
sent to my door. 1 hope others (pirates) will 
recognize the true value of this service and 
aid you in being able to continue providing 
such quality to the CoCo Community at 
such a great price. All those programs plus a 
great magazine complete with documenta- 
tion. Your efforts are appreciated! 

Gerald A, Mills 
Topeka, KS 

Editor: 

1 would like to compliment you on a fine 
magazine. In fact, my subscription to one of 
your competitors is being replaced with a 
subscription to Rainbow this year. It was a 
pleasant surprise to find so much support 
available for the CoCo after purchasing 
what was going to be '^just something to play 
with." 



Again, thanks for an excellent magazine 
and all the help it has given me. 

David B. Lamon 
Yuba City, CA 

Editor: 

I would like to thank you for an out- 
standing magazine. To me, this is the only 
magazine for the CoCo. Thanks! 

Keep up the great work and thanks for a 
great magazine. The CoCo deserves it! 

Jeff D. Sauer 
Ferkiomenville, PA 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

1 am writing this letter to you because I 
want to praise this fine publication that you 
have. This is the second year that I have 
subscribed to your excellent magazine. 1 also 
want to say that 1 like this fine computer that 
1 am writing this letter on. The TRS-80 
Color Computer is a machine that is not as 
well praised as it should be. The 6809 
microprocessor is a very powerful little beast 
that should not be underestimated. My sys- 
tem consists of a 64K Color Computer and a 
disk drive. I have a lot of excitement for the 
future of this computer since OS-9 was 
released by Radio Shack. It shows that 
Radio Shack cares a lot for the future of the 
Color Computer. Since 1 bought the com- 
puter back in 1982 I have seen it expand and 
grow to a very well-supported computer. 
Even Radio Shack has begun to expand its 
support for its little computer. 

I would like to share a couple of peeks and 
pokes I have discovered. 

Decimal Description 
Location 

25 8l 26 Beginning of BASIC program 
27 & 28 End of basic program 
39 & 40 Top of cleared space 
113 Warm start flag (If 85 Then 

warm start) 
116 Top of RAM 

157 & 158 Jump address for EA'^'C com- 
mand 

Dale Robertson 
Rush Lake, Saskatchewan 

Editor: 

We have encountered a situation you 
might want to pass along to your readers. At 
least two brands of wireless telephones will 
cause the Amdek disk drives to speed up and 
crash. If you have portable phones in your 
house you might want to avoid their use 
when your Amdek drive is being used. Evi- 
dently the R.F. signal being generated by the 
phones can affect the speed of the drives. 

Norman R. Shelton 
Owls Nest Software 

Editor: 

With the 64K question so frequently dis- 
cussed, I would like to share a short program 
that will let 32K users know if they have 
"half good'' or "full" 64K chips. 

20 FOR X= 16000 TO 16013 



30 READ Y:POKEX,Y: NEXT X 
40 DEF USRO= 16000 
50 A = USRO (0) 

60 IF A THEN PRINT "32K"ELSE 
PRINT "64K" 
70 END 

80 DATA 198, 191, 247, 255, 2, 246, 
255,34. 196,4,79, 126. 180, 244 RUN 

Bruce Sumner 
Windsor, OH 



Editor: 

To make a stand for holding roll paper for 
the printer, we used Tinkertoys. 




Long roll — sits on top of printer 




For heavier rolls, sits on floor 

Juli Koch 
Margaret Hettinger 
Lebanon Junction, KY 



INTERESTING INDEX 

Editor- 
May 1 make a suggestion to your readers? 
Tape an index card on each issue of the 
Rainbow and write on it the tips, hints, 
ideas, and articles of interest to you and note 
the page numbers as well. As your collection 
grows, it will be vastly valuable and easy to 
find any item you wish to recall. But be 
smart — if you read an article about a disk 
drive or for a printer and you think it would 
be great, except you don't have a disk drive 
or a printer, note it anyway. Someday you 
will, and you'll wonder where (what month 
and year) was that article about banner 
headlines or "Gosh, wasn't there a POKE to 
prevent headcrashes?" 

Larry Arnold Lansberry 
Phoenix, AZ 

Editor: 

How would you like a disk file to appear 
on the directory, but nobody except you can 
load it? To do this, save your file as follows: 
SA VE "FILE"-¥CHR$(I43). The file will 
appear normally on the directory, but at- 
tempts to LOAD "FILE" will give you a?NE 
ERROR . To load the file, use LOA D "FILE'' 
+CHR$(143). I'm sure you can find varia- 
tions on this process. 

Craig M. Arnold 
Dallas, TX 



10 th«RAINdOW May 1964 



PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL 
P P 

^ REAL EIGHTY-COLUMN DISPLAY! J 

\ULTRATERM+\ 



A # mi 

PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL 



This program is the ultimate in coco 
communicating!! Ultra Term + is used 
with a plug-in 80 column board* that 
gives you True 80 columns, not the 
graphics display that is unreadable at 80 
columns. This is truly a Profeaaional 
Package that is so easy to use that once 
you have used it, you'll wonder why 
Other packages are so difficult to use, (ex- 
cept for Color Term + Plus + that is!) 
After using a terminal program that can- 
not give you True mainframe terminal 
emulation, you will find Ultra Term + 
indispensable! Ultra Term + even has a 
host mode that allows you to echo 
characters like full duplex mainframes 
do! There are also 10 macro keys which 
will allow you to save passwords, phone 
numbers, modem programming informa- 
tion, etc. + PLUS + you can save them to 
tape (Rom Pack, Tape Versions) or disk 
(Disk Version). Also, like &\\ Prt^fensional 
terminal programs you can save your cur- 
rent parameters. This saves you set up 
time when moving from one system to 
another. + Plus 4- when u.sed with the 
parallel printer port** you can print 
either what is coming in, or print what 
you saved in your space buffer (fi4K 
systems only support the space buffer op- 
tion) if you like. And what about 
documentation? Every feature is ex- 
plained in detail and indexed for fast look 
up! There is also a comprehensive help 
section to aid those unfamiliar with 
telecommunications. Although this pro- 
gram was designed for the Professional a 
total novice can u.se it with ease. Check 
all the features listed below and then you 
decide who has the world's smartest 
terminal! 

Baud Rates: 1 10-4800 (communicate) 
600-9600 (printer). 

Screen Format: 80 x 25 w/true upper & 
lower case. 

Select half, full duplex or echo. 



Select odd, even, mark, space or no parity. 

Send all 128 characters from keyboard. 

Select 7 or 8 bit words. 

Select 1 or 2 stop bits. 

Send a true line break. 

Select all caps if needed. 

Automatic capture of incoming files. 

X on/X off capabilities. 

Merge text or programs in buffer. 

53,(HH) character buffer (64K). 

Split buffer option (64K), 

10 macro keys. 

Four buffer send modes (dump, 

prompted, manual & time delay). 
Buffer size indicators (bytes used & 

bytes remaining). 
Buffer editor w/auto key repeat. 
Scroll forward & reverse to view buffer 

& print viewed screen option. 
Selectable printer formats (line feeds, 

etc.). 

Selectable trapping of incoming 

characters. 
Print while receiving data*. 
Spool received data while receiving 

more (64K). 
Buffer editor has the.se features: 
Move forward and reverse through 
buffer. In.sert, type over, delete lines 
or characters. 

Block deletion or start to end of buffer 

delete. 
Save and load macros. 
Save and load parameters. 
Use 1-4 disk drive (w/SAVE, LOAD, DIR. 

& granule display). 
Easy to use MENU driven format. 
Comprehensive users manual. 
Works with ALL Radio Shack^M Disk 

Systems and all models of color 

computers. 

Still not convinced? How about a 15 
day, money back guarantee? If you don't 
like the package for any reason, we will 
refund your money upon return of a like- 
new package, t Who out there is offering 



you this kind of deal? And customer sup- 
port was never better. Simply fill out your 
registration card and send it back to us 
and you will be notified when new 
features, improvements, etc. become 
available because all registered owners 
will receive Free upgrades for a $5.00 
shipping and handling fee). 

As with all good Professional programs, 
Ultra Term + is all machine code. This 
program has been tested by those both 
familiar and unfamiliar with communica- 
tions programs. And when you call for 
some technical support, you won*t get an 
answering machine during our business 
hours (10-5 CST M-Sat.) under normal cir- 
cumstances. Technical help is usually 
available all day. 

Note: Color Term + PLUS + should have 
all of the same capabilities described 
above by the time you read this ad, but 
call first to make sure. Ultra Term + is 
ready to ship now. 
PRICE: Ultra Term + - $55.95 

(Disk/Tape) 
Color Term + Plus + (V5.0) 

$45.95 (Disk/Tape) 
Word'Pak (Includes a software 

driver so you can use your basic 

programs with no modification 

in most cases!)... $139.95 + 

$3.00 S&H 
Y-Cable.. .$29.95 (Required if 

expansion port not used with 

disk drives) 
Complete Package Ultra Term + , 
Word Pak & Y Cable [subtract $20.00 if 
not needed] is only S2 10.00 

* Ultra Term + supports the 80 column 
board made by PBJ, Inc. If you already 
have the board, simply order the pro- 
gram, but those of you who don't can get 
a good deal. 

* 'Parallel Printer Port from PBJ, Inc. 
fLess $10.00 restocking charge. 



* Canadians* 

Kelly Software Difltributors Ltd. 
P.O. Box 11932 
Edmonton, Alberta. 
(403) 421.8(K)3 




Double Den/fti| Sef^wore 

920 Baldwin Street 
Denton, Texas 76201 
Phone 817/566-2004, 



T 



Give up on Word Processors for 
Fosf Letter Writ ino & Moilino Lxibels 



Instead use the 



Reg. 



$59.95 



DATABASE/MAILER 2.0 

& 

LETTER WRITER 2.0 



for FAST single page letters or 
1 GOG'S of form letters and labels 




See excellent reviews in " Rainbov/' magazine 1 2/83 and "Things to do 
with your Color Computer," In paperback t>y Dilithium Press. 



SALE ENDS! 

June 15, 1984 



NO WORD PROCESSING EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 



— CC-DBM2/LW2 USES - 



Accounts 
Insurance 
Proposals 
Bulk Mail 



Dental Recall 
Lost Card Reporting 
Change of Address 
Christmas Lists/Labels 



• Churches 

• Club Membership 

• Realtor Listings 

• Sales Records 



6i 



- BIG SYSTEM FEATURES — 



• Active menus guide you to valid operations. 

• 32K system allows 66 to 454 records per file 

• 1 6K system allows 1 3 to 95 records per file. 

• 4*10 fields, 5 - 27 field widths, 20 - 270 char/record 

• All user definable with default values - simple. 

• Memory sense adjusts flies to system size. 

• FAST key index sort by any field you choose 

• Adjusts for emp>ty address lines - no gaps. 



> Up to 9 line labels with up to 500 copies each. 
I Master two column printout with field names. 

I Master printout includes date, paging & filename 
I Selective printing by any field or field range. 

> Accepts alpha or numeric zip codes up to 9 digits. 
I Partial or whole item search by any chosen field 

» Single screen 10 record display by any field 
I Single key entry for hard copy of screen data 



• Fast single page letter writing with wordwrap. 

• Embedded commands center, tab and line skip 

• Fuii screen edit allows delete, insert & change. 

• Headings and closings are tabt»ed, spaced and printed - alt automatically. 

• No "Database Adventure" - over 40 page manual 

• Manual includes program operation flowcharts 

• Not needed but included is user modification section. 

• And many more features • too numerous to list. 



We ship 1 St Class Mail within 24 hours 



When ordering please provide: 
NAME 
ADDRESS 
CITY/STATE 
ZIP CODE 
PHONE 
TAPE or DISK 
CREDIT CARD NO. 
EXP. DATE 

Master Card holders — 
include interbank no. 



Call our 24 hour orderllne 

619-69S-1385 



or 61 9-566-601 3, 9 — 5 p.m. PST weekdays 
or send check or money order to: 

9528 Suite 35, Miramar Road 
San Diego, CA 921 26 

**Serving the Defense and Space Industry since 1979** 



Please include the following: 
$3 postage and handling 
U.S. funds only 
CA residents add 6% tax 
COD orders .add $2 
AnfKjek disk add $2 

Dealer inquiries invited 

Personal checks - OK 
we wont make you wait. 




Editor: 

1 Would like to pass on t)iis information to 
the people who have been having problems 
with their coniputers shutting off on them. 

The current sensing resistor R66 in the 
"D" board J3 OHM should be replaced 
with a high quality resistor. This particujar 
type of resistor has the leads primped to the 
resistive wire and is prone to open. 1 was 
experiencing problems with my computer 
quitting. Turning it off and on would sopie- 
tini^s correct it for a while. After 1 replaced it 
with a welcj-l?onded type of resistor ail rny 
problems went away. 

Dfan Broadbent 
Howell. Ml 



BOUQUETS AND BRICKBATS 

ptfitor: 

I want to say some kind words about a few 
of your advertisers. In December 1 ordered 
from both Computer Plus and MichTron. 
All 1 can say is that if ?very advertiser con- 
ducts business like them, there are some 
mighty satisfied CoCo users out here. Like- 
wise, for a non-mail order company. The 
Program Store in Eatontown, N.J. is out- 
standing. The managers are super nice and 
gladly let customers try the programs before 
buying. Even though I normally pay full list 
for what I buy and have to drive 65 miles tp 
get there, 1 Ve saved fnyself that "ripped-ofP 
feeling many times by trying before buying, 
if all the Program Stores operate this way 
theyVe well worth the visit. 

Thanks again for an excellent magazine. 

Gene Gillam 
Bayonne, NJ 

Editor: 

1 have recently purchased Complete Per- 
sonal Accountant software by Futu rehouse 
on the recommendation of Rainbow and 1 
am reasonably happy with the product even 
tliough the cost is quite high gonnp^red to 
other similar utilities. 

The reason for writing this letter is to 
point out tp others, that to receive any soft- 
ware support for this product you must send 
in an additional $20. In fact, if you call the 
company they will speak to you if you giv? 
them your VISA number. 

I personally have not tried to call them but 
their literature statps that it is so. 

This $20 fee is supposed to cover any 
future updates or additions to the product 
which is purported to be sent free pf charge. 

I doubt that a company that charges for 
software support is about to send an update 
free from any further charges. 

I would be interested in hearirig of any 
other experiences with this company. 

Lawrence B. Snyder 
Norristown, PA 

Editor: 

We would like to address our policy of 
charging $20 for technical phone support to 
the end users of pur Complete Personal 
Accountant, First, it is important to note 
that not everyone who buys a home finance 
package needs technical support. As a mat- 



ter of fact, less that 25 percent of our custo- 
mers inquire about our program. Keeping 
this in mind, we thought it would be unfair 
to incorporate the cost of technical support 
in the price of thp package. Our technical 
support staff are all full-time, paid employees 
who do nothing but ciistomer support work 
all day. There are many companies which 
charge for their technical s\ipport programs. 

If we were to include the cost of technical 
support into the price of the CPA, the pack- 
age would cost $99.95! Instead, we thought 
it would be much more fair to charge $79.95 
and let the end user decid? if he or she 
wanted tp pay for technical support. 

John K Watkin 
Futurehouse 



JURIS CORRESPONDENCE 

Editor: 

I use my computer primarily in support of 
my law practice and find that the programs I 
locate with your assistance are very useful. I 
also correspond occasionally with Mr. Robert 
P. Wilkens, an attorney in Lexington, S.C. 
Mr. Wilkeps is the president of R. P. W, Pub- 
lishing, Inc., which publishes r% iMwyer*^ 
Microcomputer, ^ journal dediqgjed to the 
use of Radio Shack computers ^pd related 
equipment in the practice pf la^,' You may 
reach Mr. Wilkens at P.O. Bo3$'^!046, Lex- 
ington, S.C, 29072, The telephone number 
is (8P3) 359-9941. 

I would also like to put in a good word for 
John Boals, president of PCLEAR 80, 494 
Cline Avenue, Mansfield, Ohio, 44907, John 
has been most helpful in gathering and 
investigating, not to mention marketing, 
business applications for the CoCo. 1 have 
fourid his advice to be most helpful. 

I am interested in corresponding with 
other attorneys whp are using the CoCo in 
the practice of law. 'My CompuServe ID 
number is 71615,151 1; although I rarely use 
it except for research (mainly security data). 
My address is 732 South Court St., 44256. 

J(imes M Brown III 
Medina, OH 



A FIRST CLASS TACKl^ER 
Editor: 

I enjoy yopr great rnagazinc and was glad 
to hear that it is now sent second class mail. 1 
was afraid sometimes that our mail per- 
sonnel found it so dynamite that they were 
not going to give it up. 

It would be really great if electronics 
stores would start to advertise in your maga- 
zine. Tm in a Computer Club' and we are 
presently making our own modems. Some of 
the parts are not carried by Radio Shack and 
are hard to get. Also, some of the hardvyare 
projects in your magazine, like the "Cheap- 
stick" (Feb. 1984, Page 186), are great tod, 
and would be even greater if fmding all the 
right parts was not so difficult. 

After the '^Letters to Rainbow"" built up 
my confidence, 1 upgraded my CoCo to 64K. 
Between building the mo^iem and "Cheap- 
stick," a wpnrian like myself, with two left 



feet, is now ready to tackle the world. If only 
I can find all the parts! 

Willa Stokes 
Philadelphia, PA 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 

Editor: 

1 am very pleaded to announce the begin- 
ning of an all new Canadian Bulletin Board 
Service based in Port Mouton, Nova Scotia. 
The system fully supports tip* and down- 
loading, E-Mail, on-line games, and many 
other features. The Great White North BBS 
is on-line 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 
There is no charge to use this BBS and all 
callers are welcome, (902) 683-2086. 

Jeff Pyrte, SYSOP 
Port Mouton, Nova Scotia 

Editor: 

We are a software and hardware company 
mainly supporting the CoCo. We are closely 
associated with the Color America Users 
Group in Southern California, but are not a 
specific entity of that group. For efficiency 
and expansion of services available to C.A. 
U.G„ E.p.C, we started a new BBS chilled 
the Musashi Network. The niimber is: (213) 
258-0640. 

Felix P. Edwards 
Los Angeles. CA 

Editor: 

Elkins Institute in Dallas, Inc. would like 
you to know about our new Bulletin Board, 
called CAREERS, that is now on-line 24 
hours a day in Dallas, Texas. This is a Color 
Computer BBS, but all others are welcome. 

In addition to the electronic mail section, 
we al^o have a bulletins section that covers 
various aspects of current career training. 
The merchandise section is very well pro- 
vided for by RAM Electronics. Comments 
and suggestions would be welcome on the 
BBS, and we hope to hearfrpni your readers 
soon, the CAREERS BBS number is (2 14) 
692-0513. 

John Novocilsky Jr, 
Dallas, TX 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are always 
welcome. Please keep them short if possible 
and we will try to answer some of the ques- 
tions in this polumn. Others m^y be left open 
for solutions by other users. In order to 
make space for as many letters as possible, 
we reserve the right to edit submission^. 

Letters can be sent to the RAINBOW^ 
P.O. Box 209, Prospect, KY 40059. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 13 



PRINT #-2, 



Thanks to the installation of some new equipment at 
our printer's, last month's issue of the Rainbow was a 
little later than usual. That was good and bad. 
The good part was that I was able to fill the first couple of 
paragraphs of this space with some news from R AlNBOWfest- 
Long Beach; something 1 would not have been able to do 
had the printer handled the Rainbow on time as is usually 
the case. 

The bad part of it all is that we were a tad late with last 
month's issue and this one arrives a couple of days less than 
the full month between issues. What happened? We can all 
sympathize with our printer: They bought a new piece of 
computer equipment that would make things "lots easier" 
for them — but there were a few interfacing problems. 

How jnany timeis have we all heard that one? Oh well, the 
problems seem to h^ve been licked as of this writing and we 
are back on schedule again. 

And, yes, you did get a chance to read a little bit about 
Long Beach last month, but this month ] get the opportunity 
to tell you even more about the show. It was really a great 
one! 1 think everyone, just about, had a fine time and the 
spirit of CoCo Community was very much in evidence. 

My special thanks to Bob Albrecht, who was our keynote speaker at the CoCo Community 
Breakfast Saturday morning. And what a surprise — it was also Bob*s birthday. How did 1 find out? 
Well, Don Inman told me. Bob was trying to keep it a deep secret. That didn't last long, either. Nor 
did the special cheesecake (for the big cheese) we had whipped up for Bob at the last minute. 

1 think the greatest thing about R AIN BO Wfest is that it is a lot of fun for all. By the time you read 
this, our R AINBOWfest-New Brunswick will be history, too, ahd if you havp not been to one of our 
shows, there's only one chance left — the Chicago show June 22-24 at the Hyatt-Regpncy Woodfield. 
That was the site of CoCo*s Very First Show a year ago. So, do plan to join us then if you have not 
been with us already. Or, as we say here in the South, "Do come again!" 

By the way, the question 1 get asked most often at R AlNBOWfests is whether we will be back next 
year. Although at this writing the dates are not 100 percent firm, we dp plan to do another series of 
RAINBOWfests in the 1984-85 "season." 

Tentative pl^ns call for a show in the Eastern part of the United States in the fall; a show in 
California during the winter and a return to Chicago in the spring — somewhat earlier than this 
year's Chicago show. There will be details (we hope) about sites and dates next month. 

One of the things 1 like the most about RAlNBOWfest is the opportunity to talk at some length 
with other members of the CoCo Community who attend each show. Long Beach was np exception; 
and one of the questions 1 was asked is one 1 would like to share with you for your input. 

The issue was arcade-type games and the subject was whether 1 believed "winning" was an 
important issue that might be lacking from these games. Here's the thesis: 

With most traditional games (board games, card games, simulation games and the like, whether 
written for a computer or not) the player has an opportunity to win the game. With most arcade 
games this is not the case — all you can do is lose. 

Think about it for a minute. You can play a game for hours and hours, mount up scores that are 
higher and higher (as our "Scoreboard" feature will attest), but, in the end, you always "lose" — you 
are always destroyed by the game. 

The discussion I had in Long Beach centered around the fact that it might be better that the player 
should, at some point, be able to "win" the game — that the game would, at some point, say "I lose 
and you win." 

My point was that this would certainly decrease the playability of a game. Once the player won, all 
the challenge would be gone. The response was that there could be levels of play — as there are now 
— and that once someone won at a certain level, he or she could go on to the next one. 

Some of you might consider this to be a fairly trivial issue, but the more I think about it, the more 
significant it becomes. Do we want our children (and ourselves, who play these games, too) to always 
be "losers," no matter how proficient we become? Should we encourage "winning'*? Is it that 
important to be able to win all the time — or at least, have the chance to win? Or possibly, do we teach 
more about life by encouraging our youngsters (and ourselves) to always strive for something better, 

(continued on Page 285) 




14 the RAINBOW May 1964 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns X 24 lines 
True lower case characters 
User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 
Easy hyphenation 
Drives any printer 
Embedded format and 
control codes 
Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 
Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORU^INAL 



Simply stated. Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 
The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give yoU 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Tblewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with tnte 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good churik of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model 111, 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fun. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Iblewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 
Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen. . . 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
donU need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 X 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact Isiyout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at onk 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
^'windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width pf your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get.'' This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



'FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVn/vni, DMP-lOO/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable /disable justification. 
Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature settds typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs. Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sure saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 
Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and /or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block mpve, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabsj choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywheie on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form** editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screeit in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR; 



truly a state of the art word processor., 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have youf writing with 
TelewFiter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check qr money order to: 

Cognitec 
704 Nob Street 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa of 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 
(weekdays, 8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries 
invited. 

(Add $2 for shipping. Calirornians add state tax. Allow 2 
weeks for persona) checks. $end self-addreued stamped 
envelope for Telewriter reviews frdm CCN, RAINBOW, 
80-Micro, 80-U.S. Telewriter owners: send SASE or call for 
information on Upgrading to Telewnter-64. Telewriter- 
compatible spelling checker (Spdl *n Fix) and Smart Terminal 
prtTgram (Colprcom/E) also available. Call or write for more 
information.) 

Apple U is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a 
tradanark of Atari, Inc.', TRS-80 it a tradeniark of Tandy 
Cbrp; MX-flO is a trademark of Epson America. Inc. 




CONNECTION 
SOFTWARE 

1000 BuddlM Dr.. Sandy, Utah 84070 (801) 571-5023 
★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

MEGAMUNK '^ZT 

A fantastic new Hl-res strategic ar- 
cade ganfie with animated movenr>ent! 
As 9 soldier/monkey of fortune, you 
have been corrimissioned by the king 
to save the forest from its enemies. 
Fulfill the assignment and be knighted 
a monkey of the round table. 
32k cas $21.95 32k disk $23.95 

COLOR DESIGNER 

Th^ ultimate Hi-Res Graphics Pro- 
cessor!!! Gr^at for doodling, sketching, 
and most of all, creating entire graphics 
screens. Options include; 8 key cursor 
control with key repeat. Draw connmand 
that follQws your cursor, FILL command 
that "PAINTS" the screen with more than 
1000 (different color/texture combinations, 
and much much rTX)reM 

16/32K cas $26.95 disk $28.95. 

QUIZ ALL " -^r 

A versatile quiz program. Has study and 
test formats and allows printing of quiz. 
Even includes an option for the computer 
to generate multiple choice answers \ 
cas $18.95 disk $20.95 

COMPU SCRIBE B.S.A. 

Need some help with scout records? 
Compu Scribe keeps tabs on the whole 
troop and creates printouts by scout, 
by rank, or alphabetically. Requires a 
printer with 132 character mode, 
availabe on disk only • $26.95 

OKI DUMP 

Eight bit screen dump from CoCo to an 
Okidata printer without dpt addressable 
graphics! Includes hints on printing pic- 
tures of game screens, etc. ("The King" 
by Tom Mix, is the example) a steal at 

16K cas $8.95 16K disk $1 0.95 
Cmlt or writ9 for our froo nowiottor. 



All cassette orders include dIsK version on cassette 
with instructions to trftnsfer to disk. Unless other- 
wise specified, programs require 16K extended for 
csssette or 32K extended for (^isk. Add S2.00 shipp- 
ing and handling. Utah residents add 5>^% sales 
tax. Orders paid by personal check allow 1-2 weeks: 
all others shipped within 46 hours. No COD. 

To order, call 24 hours a day or write 
COLOR CONNECTION SOFTWARE 
1060 Buddlea Drive, Sandy, Utah 84070 
For information: 

Call Weekdays between 6:30 pm and 10 pm MST 

(801)571-5023 




BUILDING MAY^ RAINBOW 

Our Printer Issue . . . 
Heading For New Brunswick Edition . . . 
Plus, A CoCo Rock Festival . . . 

In his review of Jarb Software's "talking'' Spell- A-Tron this month, Bruce 
Rotherrnel hit a responsive chord with me. In explaining that many words 
need to be spelled phonetically in order to sound right when the Vptrax voice 
synthesizer "speaks" them, he onders if the same word will be spelled variously 
according to the region of the country the program user lives in. That observa- 
tion brought back memories. 

As sometimes happens when you live in a very small town, my third gracje 
teacher was also my mother. On occasion, she was also the spelling bee judge as 
well as enunciator. One particular time, now indelibly etched in my memory, all 
that stood between me and victory was the final word. She pronounced it twice 
as I strained to listen: "whey-air," she ^aid, "whey-air." My heart pounded; I had 
never, ever heard of this word.' 

Valiantly, 1 gave it a shot, "Whey-air," 1 $aid, "W-H-A-I-R.'^ "Wrong," she 
said, "WJiey-air is spelled W-H-E-R-E." What? Where?? 1 was robbed, 1 
thought. "But Mom, why didn't you just say *whurr,' " 1 protested — for weeks 
on end . If only she had said " whurr," 1 'd have aced out the little girl with the long 
blond hair and won the spelling beje and lived happily ever after. As it was, for 
years, I thought 1 was right and she was wrong and held a secret grudge against 
my third grade teacher — my own mother, yet — for "doing me in." 

Thanks to the advent of microprocessor technology, now every parent can 
blame it on the computer if Johnny can't spell. Actually, 1 like the "analog 
dimension," the shades of gray, that phonetic spelling brings to the otherwise 
"either/ or" digital device we call a Color Computer, it adds a personal touch to 
our CoCo that it can not only "talk" but do so with a regional accent. 

But this is our printer issue isn't it? And the impact of computer printers is 
definitely toward standardization of the printed word. Right? Only at first 
glance. On closer examination, with printers as well, the premium is on personal- 
ization. The ultimate printer, it would seem, would be one that writes illumi- 
nated script with a q^ijl pen, albeit at 9600 Baud. While the technology is tiere for 
scanners to **read" an entire printed page at a glance, the rush is to make one's 
Qwn printer as distinctive and different as comput^rly possible. Rainbow can 
help. 

In this printer issue, we have everything from a "postcard whacker" to a 
banner program for the Color Graphics Printer 220. Diepnis Weide delves into 
"Printer Magic" while Mike Himowitz provides another "Printer Mystery." 
Damon Swanson makes our good spoojer even better and Tom Szlucha pro- 
vides not only a graphics screen dump, but also a label-making program for the 
little CGP-1 15. bot matrix printer owners, don't despair, Charles M. Thonen 
has a mailing label program for you, too. 

Fred Scerbo has a printer's delight pumping out of our "Wishing Well" this 
month with his "CoCo Rock Festival" and coloring book programs. Tom 
Nelson digresses from his legal advice to provide counsel on selecting a printer 
and Mike Fahy shows us how to create Old English, Italics and Futuristic 
typefaces on the L.P. Vll or DMP-100 in his tutorial on dot graphics. 

Our "CoCo Clubs" quarterly roundup of user groups appears in this issue, and 
that's all the transition 1 need to issue my monthly invitation to you to join the 
growing club of y?flr/>iZ?oH' readers. For $28, you get about 15 pounds of Rainbow 
club materials in the form of a 340-plus page monthly magazine and we share our 
vast library with you by printing a couple of dozen program listings in every issue 
for you to key in and use. As clearly as I can say it, without spelling it out aloud, 
we hope youll consider a "sub-skrip-shun." 

Jim Reed 



16 the RAINBOW May 1984 




Explore the ancient, mystical tomb of the great Pharoah. Find the magical keys which lead you to unbelievable 
treasures as you out maneuver the creatures that slither and swarm about you. Super fast arcade action— this one 
will knock your socks off with 16 screens of Incredible color and sound. $24.95 cassette. $27.i5 disc. Requires 32K, 



TIME FIGHTER 

Pilot your MD-64 fighter through a hazardous time tunnel. Your mission is to destroy 
the dreaded Time Guardian who th reatens the natural order of the universe. In order 
to reach this menace you must fight aerial dangers from strange and different time 
zones. $24.95 cassette, $27.95 disc. Requires 1 6K. 





Mark Data Products 



24001 Alicia Pkwy., #207, Mission Viejo, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 

ORDERING INFORMATION: Phone your order for speedy delivery. Use your MasterCard or Visa. We also accept checks and money orders. ALL ORDERS: Please add $2.00 shippir^g and 
tiandling in the continental U.S. All others, add air shipping and $3,00 handling. California residents add 6% sales tax. Foreign orders please remit U.S. funds. Distributed in Canada by K«lly 
Software Distributors. SOFTWARE AUTHORS: Contact us for exciting marketing details, 



CONTENTS OP ADDftEST" 



1539 



, 4 
1S40 



10 



lis? 



■ 8 



1546 



J1 
1547 



12 



13 



1549 



2^- 



14 



1512. 







17 


159? 










0 



DISASSEMBLED LINE 

10 pmNT«-2. "Mr 




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PIGURE I 



^AHIABLE FIELD <2M BVTES MAXIMUM LENGTH)- 



■< 



If < ia«. TREATED AS AtSCH CHARACTER IF«> 128^ TREATED AS BASIC OPCODE 



locations and their contents. Figure 2 
represents a printout of the disassembled 
line. In Figure 2, the program line 
number is printed followed by the start 
address of this line and the next line. 



(Dennis Weide is a communications 
technician with a large telecommunica- 
tions company. He teaches basic in the 
evenings and writes articles and pro- 
grams in his spare time,) 



Beneath this, each memory location has 
its contents displayed as a number or 
character. Memory values from 33 to 
1 27 are printed as ASCI 1 characters. All 
other values are printed as decimal 
numbers. This allows you to recognize 
characters easily. 

To find the first address of a basic 
program, look at the start of basic 
pointer (addresses 25 and 26). Use the 
following command to compute the 



start address: 
PRINT PEEK(25r256+PEEK{26). 

The first two bytes of a BASIC pro- 
gram line point to the start address of 
the next program line. The next two 
bytes contain the current line number. 
Figure I shows how to compute start 
address and line number. 

The fifth byte is the start of the varia- 
ble field. If the contents of any of these 



10 EfiM?t^2. " HI 






FIGURE 2 






HmT ADDRESS* 


7697 


m t7 e 10 tm # i72 


" m HI 32 '* 0 






Try tWs- POKE 7691^1 .POKE 7694,30 








10 PRI WT«-2> "MJ 








tIHE WUMBER i0 tHIS 


ftmmss« 76BI 


HEXT flDDRESSa 


7697 




" m HI 30 " 0 







May 1964 the RAINBOW 19 

L 



' ' ' 



addresses is greater than 127, the BASIC 
interpreter will treat it as a BASIC opcode 
or mathematical function. Throughout 
the entire variable field, any address 
that holds a value greater than 127 is 
treated as an opcode. Values of 127 or 
less are treated as ASCII characters. If a 
byte contains 255, the opcode is consid- 
ered a two-byte opcode and the next 
byte is the second half of the command. 
In Figure 1, the first two bytes point to 
1553 for the start of the next line. If line 
10 is the only line in the program, 
addresses 1553 and 1554 will both con- 
tain zeros to indicate the end of the 
BASIC program. Addresses 1541 to 1552 
make up the variable field. The last 
address, 1552, contains a zero and marks 
the end of the current program line. 
Disassemble more lines to familiarize 
yourself with the program and how it's 
stored in memory. Tables 1 , 2 and 3 are 
provided to help you break down the 
codes. Press [BREAK] when you are 
finished to exit the program. 

To see how you can use this informa- 
tion to enhance your programs and list- 
ings, look at the Line Printer VII con- 
trol codes (Table 4). There are more 
codes than listed, but for the purpose of 
this article, these are enough. The fol- 
lowing ideas will work with any stand- 
ard printer if you substitute the proper 
control codes for the ones listed. 

Back in Figure 1, address 1547 stores 
a value of 32. Since this is a character 
code (ASCI I), it will print a blank space 
when sent to the printer. If you POKEa 
value of 3 1 into that address, the printer 
will be set to large font when this line is 
listed to the printer. If you POKE 
address 1550, which also stores a 32, to 
ASCII code 30, the printer will be reset 
to small font at the end of the line. When 
you run or list the program to the print- 
er, the word "HI" will be printed in large 
block letters. When printing or listing to 
the screen, the control codes are trans- 
parent to the computer. Figure 2 shows 
the line as listed before embedding 
codes, then shows the disassembled 
line. You can use the /*C>/l£ commands 
in the figure and then disassemble the 
line again. When you LLIST the pro- 
gram line, the "HI" is in large letters and 
the rest of the line is in small letters. 
Now run line 10. Again, the word "HI" 
is printed in large letters. 

It is too time consuming to PEEK 
and POKE addresses to embed your 
codes in a program. But Printer Magic 
does the job quickly and easily. It uses 
special characters (see Table 5) which 
you type in your program. Look at List- 
ing 2. In line 5, the program looks at the 



start of BASIC pointer to compute the 
start address of your BASIC program. 
Line 6 looks at the second two bytes of 
the program line to calculate the line 
number. Line 7 calculates the start 
address of the next line and saves it as a 
variable. Line 8 checks to see if the cur- 



'7/ is too time consuming to 
PEEK and POKE addresses 
to embed your codes in a 
program. But Printer Magic 
does the job quickly and 
easily. " 



rent line number matches the one you 
requested. If not, the program goes 
back to line 6 with a new address and 
starts looking again. If it is, lines 9 
through 14 read the variable field and 
change any of the special symbols to the 



proper control codes. Lines 15 and 16 
allow another line selection and line 17 
checks to see if your last line number is 
lower than the previous one. If lower, 
the program returns to the start of 
BASIC pointer; otherwise it will continue 
down the line. 

I have included examples 1 , 2 and 3 to 
show what Printer Magic can do. Each 
example lists the line with the special 
symbols before running Printer Magic 
and with the control codes after running 
it. 

The best way to utilize embedded 
codes is in string variables, DATA 
statements and REMark statements. 

When writing a program, save a final 
copy before running Printer Magic to 
insure that you do not accidently poke a 
control code where it can cause prob- 
lems. You can load Printer Magic before 
writing your program or load it back- 
to-back with your program when ready 
to embed codes. 

Since both programs are written in 
BASIC, you can modify them easily. And 
I'm sure you can find more interesting 
ways to utilize both programs. In the 
meantime, you can enhance your favor- 
ite program listings and printouts for 
eye appeal and easier reading. 



TABLE 1 
BASIC OPCODES 



KEY 
CODE WORD 



KEY 
CODE WORD 



KEY 
CODE WORD 



128 


FOR 


1S4 


CLOSE 


180 


< 


129 


GO 


1S5 


LLIST 


181 


DEL 


130 


REM 


156 


SET 


182 


EDIT 


131 




157 


RESET 


183 


TRON 


132 


ELSE 


158 


CLS 


184 


TROFF 


133 


IF 


159 


MOTOR 


185 


DEF 


134 


DATA 


160 


SOUND 


186 


LET 


135 


PRINT 


161 


AUDIO 


187 


LINE 


136 


ON 


162 


EXEC 


188 


PCLS 


137 


INPUT 


163 


SKIPF 


189 


PSET 


138 


END 


164 


TAB( 


190 


PRESET 


139 


NEXT 


165 


TO 


191 


SCREEN 


140 


DIM 


166 


SUB 


192 


PCLEAR 


141 


READ 


167 


THEN 


193 


COLOR 


142 


RUN 


168 


NOT 


194 


cmcLE 


143 


RESTORE 


169 


STEP 


195 


PAINT 


144 


RETURN 


170 


OFF 


196 


GET 


145 


STOP 


171 


+ 


197 


PUT 


146 


POKE 


172 




198 


DRAW 


147 


CONT 


173 


* 


199 


PCOPV 


148 


LIST 


174 


/ 


200 


PMODE 


149 


CLEAR 


175 


A 


201 


PLAY 


150 


NEW 


176 


AND 


202 


DLOAD 


151 


CLOAD 


177 


OR 


203 


RENUM 


152 


CSAVE 


178 


> 


204 


FN 


153 


OPEN 


179 




205 


USING 



20 the RAINBOW May 1984 



4 



TWO BYTE gASlC;fS'<d^^ 

CODES KfYwoRD eoi>|s KElh<^^ 





19ft 




<99 




IH9 


DOIMT 




19Q 


IMT 


^99 


T 




IMI^PV<^ 
|I>IVVCLT«|> 




1 ou 


MDO 




4- 


■ I' 




£99 T 


1H 
I9 1 




9^< 
£99 


4- 


i Aft 
1*10 


ATM 


^99 




dun 


£99 








a99 Tt 


1 00 




£99 




I9U 


TAM 


a99 


10*1 




9c;i; 

£99 


4, 


19 1 


PVD 
CAK 


+ 


135 


LEN 


i255 


+ 


152 


FIX 


255 + 


136 


8TR$ 


255 




153 


LOG 


255 + 


137 


VAL 


255 




154 


POS 


255 + 


138 


ASC 


255 




155 


SQR 


255 + 


139 


CHR$ 


255 


+ 


156 


HEX$ 


255 + 


14P 


EOF 


255 




157 


VARPTR 


255 4r 


141 


JOYSTK 


255 




158 


INSTR 


255 ^ 


142 


LEFT$ 


255 




1$9 


TIMER 


255 + 


143 


RIGHT$ 


255 


+ 


160 


PPOINT 


255 + 


144 


MID$ 


255 


+ 


161 


STRING$ 



TAIU.E4 
CONTROL CODE? FOiR tPVlI 



FUNCTION 



CODEtASCll} 



LINE FEED/CARRIAGE RETURN 10 

CARRIAGE RETURN ONLY 26 

LARGE FONT 31 

SMALL FONT 30 



TAPLE3 
ASCII CHARACTER CODES 



A8CH ASCII ASCII 

CODE SYMBOL CODE SYMBOL CODE SYMBdt: 



32 


SPACE 


64 


@ 


96 




33 


1 


65 


A 


97 


a 


34 




66 


B 


98 


b 


35 


# 


67 


C 


99 




36 


$ 


68 


D 


ipo 




37 


% 


69 


E 


101 


e 


38 




70 


F 


102 


f 


39 




71 


G 


103 


g 


40 


( 


72 


H 


104 


h 


41 


) 


73 


1 


105 


1 


42 




74 


J 


106 


1 

k 


43 




75 


K 


107 


44 




76 


L 


108 


1 


45 




77 


M 


109 


m 


46 


- 


78 


N 


110 


n 


47 


/ 


79 


0 


111 


0 


48 


0 


80 


P 


112 


P 


49 


1 


81 


Q 


113 


q 


50 


2 


82 


R 


114 


r 


151 


* 3 


83 


S 


115 


9 


52 


4 


84 


T 


116 


t 


53 


5 


85 


U 


117 


u 


54 


6 


86 


V 


118 


V 


55 


7 


87 


W 


119 


w 


56 


8 


88 


X 


120 


X 


57 


9 


89 


Y 


121 


y 


58 




90 


Z 


122 


z 


59 




91 


I 


123 


i 


60 


< 


92 


\ 


124 


1 


61 




93 


] 


125 


( 


62 


> 


94 


A 


126 




63 


? 


95 




127 





TABLE 5 

SYMBOLS USED FOR PRINTER MAGIC PROGRAM 



MEMORY 
VALUE SYMBOL NAME 



CODE CONTROL 
(CHR$) FUNCTION 



91 
93 
94 
95 



LEFT BRACKET 31 

RIGHT BRACKET 30 

UP ARROW 10 

LEFT ARROW 26 



SET LARGE FONT 
SET SMALL FONT 
LF/CR 
Lf W/O CR 



May 1964 the RAINBOW 21 



f ' ' ' 



7 



SAMPLES 1,2& 3 



Example #1 Large Fofit 

Before Embedding Qodes 

100 REM CEXflrtPLE #}3 

After Embedding Code9 
100 REM exfimrue: 



4* 1 



Example #2 Line Peed With Highlight 
Before Embedding Codes 

100 REM ^-^EXflMPLE #2^EXRMPt£ «E-EXflMPLE #2 
After Embedding Codes 

100 REM 

EXRMPLE #2 

Example #3 Large Font Highlighted 
Before Embedding Codes 

100 REM ^-^CEXWtPLE #3^EXflMPtE #3_EXnriPLE *33 
After Embedding Codes 

100 REM 



RETIREMENT PLANNING 
MODEL 

★★★★★★★★★★★ 

PENSrON? ^ SAVINGS? 
INCOME TAXES? ■ ,NFlA 



After first helping you organize your present 
assets, the model projects these assets to their 
value at the retirement age you select. Using 
your assets at retirement as a base, a detailed 
cash flow analysis is conducted for each year 
of your retirement. 

The variables shown above are considered 
in all calculations. Each analysis stops when 
you either run out of funds or reach the age of 
100. The model is designed for "what if" 
analysis and optional printer output. A vital tool 
for comprehensive retirement planning. Fully 
documented. 



Requires 16K ext. 
basic. Specify if 
for 32K CoCo. II. 
♦ • t 
III. residents 
add 8% sales tax 



Tape $34.95 
Disc $39.95 

A&P SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box 202 
Glenview, IL 
60025 



Listing 1: 



20 ' BASIC DISASSEMBLER 

21 ' BY DENNIS H. WEIDE 

22 ' COPYRIGHT <C) 1983 

23 POKE 153,24 

24 CLS: INPUT "ENTER LINE NUMBER"! 
LN 

25 PRlNT#-2, "LINE NUMBER" I LN, 

26 ADDRESS-PEEK < 25 ) *256-i-PEEK < 26 ) 

27 NUMBER-PEEK ( ADDRESS+2 ) *256+PE 
EK (ADDRESS-i-3) 

28 NADDRESS-PEEK ( ADDRESS ) *256-i-PE 
EK(ADDRES8-t-l) 

29 IF LNsNUMBER THEN 30 ELSE ADD 
RESS-NADDRESS: GOTO 27 

30 PRINT»-2, "THIS ADDRESS- "ADDRE 
SS, 

31 PRINT#-2, "NEXT ADDRESS- "NADDR 
ESS 

32 PRINT#-2 

33 FOR X -ADDRESS TO ADDRESS-i-3 

34 PRINT#-2,PEEK(X)?:NEXT X 

35 FOR X-ADDRESS-f4 TO NADDRESS-1 

36 IF PEEK(X)>127 OR PEEK<X)<33 
THEN PRINT«-2,PEEK(X)| ELSE PR IN 
T#-2 , CHR« ( PEEK ( X ) ) ; 

37 NEXT X 

38 PRINT#-2,STRING«(3, 10) 

39 PN-LN 

40 INPUT "ENTER LINE NUMBER" I LN 

41 PRINT#-2,"LINE NUMBER";LN, 

42 IF LN<PN THEN 26 ELSE 27 



Listing 2: 



PRINTER MAGIC 
' BY DENNIS H. MEIDE 

' COPYRIGHT 1983 

CLS: INPUT "ENTER LINE NUMBER" I L 



ADDRESS=PEEK (25) «256+PEEK (26) 
NUMBER-PEEK (ADDRESS+2) »256+PEE 
K(ADDRESS+3) 

7 NADDRESS-PEEK (ADDRESS) »256+PEE 
K(ADDRESS-i-l) 

8 IF LN-NUMBER THEN 9 ELSE ADDRE 
SS-NADDRESS:OOTO 6 

9 FOR X-ADDRESS+5 TO NADORESS-2 

10 IF PEEK (X) -91 THEN POKE X,31 

11 IF PEEK(X)-93 THEN POKE X,30 

12 IF PEEK (X) -94 THEN PCM<E X,10 

13 IF PEEK (X) -95 THEN POKE X,26 

14 NEXT X 

15 ADDRESS-NADORESS:PL-LN 

16 INPUT"ENTER LINE NUMBER" ;LN 

17 IF LN=<PL THEN 5 ELSE 6 



22 the RAINBOW May 1984 




Make The Good 
Spooler Better 

By Damon Swanson 



Steve Good's Spooler ((he Rainbow, June '83) is an 
excellent example of using the Color Computer in a 
multitasking mode. This means that your CoCo can 
do two jobs at one time. (We'll be hearing a lot more about 
that as people start using the OS-9 operating system.) There 
were, however, two things that limited the program for my 
use. First, it stole graphic memory, and second , it would not 
work with I^adio Shack's Screen Print program. 

With a working 64K system, it is a simple matter to move 
the spool buffer from graphic memory to the 32K of hidden 
RAM and in the process create a buffer large enough for 
almost any need. The first program provides ^ patch to Mr. 
Good's spooler to do just that. 

The modification of Radio Shack's SC/^/^/^T routine to 
work with the Good Spooler and provide full compatibility 
with the disk operating system is a little more complex. The 
second part of this article shows how to append SCRPRTio 
the Spooler and patch it for full disk operations. 

32K Spooler 

If you have a good 64K CoCo, you can easily modify the 
Good Spooler to use the 32K of RAM not accessed by BASIC 
as the print buffer. Load Good's source listing in your 
assembler then make the following changes referenced to its 
current line numbers. ♦ 

First, change the origin from screen memory to the top of 
BASIC RAM: 

00020 ORG $7F65 

This means, of course, that you must reserve meniory for 
the program by a CLEAR &H7F65 before RUNning the 
program. Change the end of buffer previously in low RAM 



(Damon Swanson manages 130 engineers and technicians in 
the engineering test department of a major high-tech com- 
pany. His computer hobby keeps him from meddling in the 
work of his staff which includes programming M6809 and 
M6800 ihicroprocesSors to solve special measurement and 
test problems.) 



tp the top of the 32K RAM page: 
00200 LDX #$FEFF 

Also change the beginning of buffer to the start of the 
upper RAM page: 

00220 LDX #$8000 
00790 LDX #$8000 

1 have made buffer references absolute so that the driver 
can be relocated anywhere in low memory. 

Now we are ready to add the code that switches from the 
ROM (Type 0) to the RAM (Type I) memory map before 
each load or store to the buffer and to switch back after- 
ward. Do this by adding lines: 

00405 CLR $FFDF 
00415 CLR SFFDE 
00745 CLR $FFDF 
00755 CLR $FFDE 

Finally, delete line 00880 (we don't need this reference 
anymore) and Sooper Spooler is ready to assemble. 

You now have a print buffer considerably larger than the 
memory available for BASIC programs, and a direct way to 
use that extra memory. Since our new buffer is located 
nicely out of graphic space, one thing we might use it for is to 
speed up the Screen Print routine. 

Compatible Screen Print 

Before we can use Spooler with Radio Shack's SCRPRT 
program there are two problems to solve. SCRPRTtnusi be 
relocated and then patched so that it uses BASIC 1 . 1's regular 
8-bit print driver. Otherwise, its print routine will not com- 
municate with Spooler. SCRPRT\s one of the worst exam- 
ples of 6809 code I've ever seen. It is completely position 
dependent and almost defies relocation. 

Fortunately, Tom Goodrick came to the rescue with a 
program to do this relocation. 

Tom's trick uses the fact that the Hex values 3D, 3E and 
3F, representing the most significant byte of every absolute 
address in the 5C/?/'/?r program, appear nowhere in the 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 23 



program except as absolute addresses. As a result, we can 
simply run through the listing with a short basic program 
that adds $40 olTset each time it encounters one of the 
olTending Hex values. 

The BASK* program ol Listing I uses Mr. Goodrick'^ 
scheme in a dillerenl and simpler program. Enter the BASK 

f urogram, then put the SC RPRTiixpi: in the recorder. Press 
PLAY] and run the program. When the [OK] prompt 
appears, CSAVEM to tape or SAVEM on (Jisk using 
&H7D80,&H7FFF,&H7D80 as the START, END and 
EXECUTE parameters. Our Spooler patch will correct 
some other deficiencies. 

Mod jfy the revised Spooler source to locate it in front of 
the screen print roytine overwriting SCRPRTs initializa- 
tion which is no longer used. 



0()()2() 



ORG $7CF4 



Add to Spoolers initialization section the lines from 
SCRPRT's code that sets up to look for and respond to the 
up arrow: 



0026 1 
00262 
00263 
00264 



LDX 
STX 
LDA 
STA 



#$7D98 
$16B 
#S7F 
$16A 



Delete line 00710. This line changes a carriage return tq a 
line fcpd, but the RS Line Printer VII and DMP-IOOs 
require a distinction for the two passes required to print a 
full screen of graphics. 



See Page 145 




a lot of software for a little silver 



Delete the END statement in line 00890, then add the 
source of Listing 2 to your assembly. Note that this code 
changes the command key from the up arrow to the down 
arrow as suggested by Qoodrick to free the up arrow for 
normal line editing. 

Assemble this code. From BASIC, CLEA R 200,&H7CF4. 
C LP4 DM or LQA DM the rdoc'dicdi SCRPRnoWov^Gd by 
the patched Spooler, Then type EXEC. Draw sprnething on 
the graphic screen, then hit the [S H IFT] and [i] to try it out. 
The machine returns to your use a few seconds after the [i] 
command for a screen dump that" normally takes several 
rniputes to print. 

Before turning off the computer, CSA VEM or SA VEM 
your patched program using &H7CF4,SlH7 FFF and 
&H7CF4iisihi: START ENDand EA^EC^^y^E parameters. 

With these programs and the substantial 32K buffer, you 
may never need to wait on your slow printer again. 

Listing 1: 

BASIC program to relocate Radio Shack's SCRPRTpro- 
gram to reside 4t the top of a 32K memory. 

10 'RELOCATE SCRPRT TO TOP OF 32 
K 

20 CLEAR 200,&H7D80 

30 CL0ADM"SCRPRT",«cH4000: ' RELOC 

ATE TO &H7D80 

40 FOR I=«eH7DaO TO «cH7FAE 

50 V=PEEK(I) 

60 IF V>8cH3C AND V<«cH40 THEN POK 
E I,V+&H40 
70 NEXT I 
80 END 



Listing 2: 

An EDTASM-^ patch for Radio Shack's Screen Print 
program allowing it to be used with Sieve Good's Spooler. 



7WC 7E 



7DA1 
7DAi 8D 



7QA4 
7DA4 Bl 



7F6A 
7F6A C6 

IHZ D7 



C38F 



A179 



FE 
6F 



00680 
00890 
00900 
00910 
00920 
00930 
00950 
00960 
00970 
00980 
00990 
01000 

Oioio 

01020 
01030 
01040 
OlOSO 
01060 
01070 

oloeo 

01090 

ouoo 

OHIO 
01170 
01130 



9F A002 0U40 
7CF4 0M50 



tPATCH FOR RELOCATED SCPRT TO U3E BASIC \A DRIVER 
tBY D. SMNSON 3 AU6. 1983 
Httitfftttttttitttllllfll 

« CNAN6E CHARACTER INPUT TO DISK REFERENCE {LEAVE OUT 
»THESE LINES IF YOU HAV^ NO DISK) 

0R6 t7D9C 
JKP tC58F 

t CHAWE KEY-SCAN TO CLEAR BUFFER FLAB 

0R8 I7PA1 
JSR tA179 

ff CHANBE CONTROL KEY TO DOHN ARROW (PER BOPDRICK) 

ORB t7DA4 
CNPA MSB 

t CHANBE PRINT OUT TO l.TS B-BIT DRIVER 
0R6 t7F6A 
LD9 ttFE 
STB t6F 
m ItA002] 

END ENTRY ^ 



24 the RAINBOW May 1984 




The Joystick that sets you free! 



The one-hand operation of this fantastic new 
joysticlc will truly set you free and increase the 
pleasure of playing your favorite video games. 
The smoothness and responsiveness of this 
unique joystick that operates completely 



without a base is something to be experienc- 
ed. Available direct from us or from your inde- 
pendent computer retail store. (See below) 



$49.95 



suggested retail 



STOP Changing Printer and Modem Cables! Our 
Parallel Printer interface provides Switch Sel- 
ectable Printer or Modem operations for both 
Coco and MC10. It features switchable baud rates 
from 300 to 9600. It comes complete with power 
supply, modem cable and "Centronics" type print- 
er cable. For Basic 1,1 and later revisions. 

Available direct from us or from your independent 
computer retail store. (See below) 




only $89.95 



suggested retail 



SP'^'IP^^. 0- Drawer 55868 

|i#VI I Products, lnc« Houston, Texas 77055 

713/956-0207 
When ordering direct from pbh please enclose 
S3.00 per Item for shipping. 



CoCo 
Seriol/Porollel 
Interfoce 



8 c? 



MODEM OFF PRINTER 



Compukit 
Houston, TX. 77059 



Stocking Distributors 



Spectrum Projects 
Woodhaven,N.Y. 11421 



Authorized Dealers 



Endicott Computer 
Software & Accessories 
Huntsville, AL. 35801 
The Computer Store 
Jasoer, IN. 47456 
The Software Connection 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33319 

Colorware, Inc. 
Woodhaven, N.Y. 11421 



TRSTECH 
Computer Services 
Houston, TX. 77033 
Computers & More 
Huntsville, TX. 77340 
The Photo Shop Radio Shack 
Wilmar, MN. 56201 
Patterson Electronics 
Mountain View, AR. 72560 



Computers, Etc. 
Austin, TX. 78745 



Cinsoft 
Cincinnati, OH. 45237 

EDC Industries 
Los Angeles, CA. 90042 
Sound Center Radio Shack 
WhiterocK N.M. 87644 
& Los Alamos, N.M. 87544 



Chips, incorporated 
Atlanta, GA 30340 

Computer Associates 
West Fargo, N.Dak. 58076 
Computer Plus, Inc. 
Littleton. MA. 01460 
Turtle Micro Ware 
East Lime, CT. 06333 



RAINBOWfest 
Report: 



Even without corn dogs, it was a three- 
ring circus weekend for thousands at 
Long Beach 




Breakfatt keynoter Bob AlbrecM (above) celebrated his birthday at RAINBOWfest. The crush 
ot people In the main ballroom exhibit hall (below) gave the three-day event a carnival flavor. 



A A 





Sharry Zuahike, praaldant of the South Bay Color 
Computar Club, sarvad on the woman's program 
panel. 




The crowd at Computerware (above) wanted pro- 
grams while books were the thing at the Dymax 
booth (below). 



For a fleeting weekend, Feb. 17-19, 
Long Beach, Calif., became CoCo 
Beach as more than 8,000 Color Com- 
puter users flocked to the Hyatt Regency 
and packed the exhibit hall and seminar 
rooms to learn about the latest devel- 
opments for our favorite personal com- 
puter. 

Our second RAlNBOWfest of the 
season drew people from as far away as 
Canada, Panama and even England. 
Those of us from the colder regions 
enjoyed the palm trees and sunshine 
even if the weather was a bit brisk for 
the beach. Content to stay inside, we 
followed the crowd headed for the main 
ballroom exhibit hall. 

It was like a three-ring circus at times 
with seminars competing with Radio 
Shack*s CoCo Classroom, and both 
running during exhibition hall hours. 
The litany of CoCo Community per- 
sonalities attending is too long to recite 
here, but it ranged from CoCo estab- 
lishment types like Bob Albrecht and 
Don Inman to real comers like Roger 
Schrag and controversial mavericks like 
Dr, Marty Goodman. 

RAlNBOWfest CoCo Beach provided 
a chance for in-depth, one-on-one ex- 
planations when time permitted as well 
as aisle-blocker, crowd-stopper demos 
that reminded one of the state fair mid- 
way barkers hawking vegetable slicer- 
dicers. Most of those attending were so 
engrossed in examining the newest in 
software and hardware that when the 
Rainbows Jim Reed mistakenly an- 
nounced that the Radio Shack booth 
was closing out its 64K ECB machines 
for just S 1 49, it caused no stir at all. No, 
there were no corn dogs, but an elabo- 
rate Hyatt sandwich station just outside 
the ballroom drew a lot of takers. 

By the end of each day, most people 
had plenty to fill their shopping bags: 
souvenir tee-shirts to arcade games, 
database programs to hard disk drives. 

Will we be back next year? You bet! 
And, in the meantime, well visit New 
Brunswick (March 30-April 1 ) and Chi- 
cago (June 22-24). The CoCo Commun- 
ity and RAlNBOWfest are too big to 
stay in one place. 




Richard Party otSpeach Syttemt tf/tcuttet vo/ce tyrtthealn artd mutic whlla Roger Schrag follow up hit 
aamlnar on machine language with an Impromptu chalk talk. 



Electronioi 
Company 



r= R 1 N Q L.-^ iM- K. fsL"^ 



Progrsmmer Steve Bfork (left) talks shop with Gordon Monnler of MIchTron while Saturn'a Amie Shiftman 
greeta two of the more than 8,000 people attending. 




Ron Kreba (left) of Mark Data chats with Alex Webater of Sott¥ffare Plua. Sue and Paul Searby get ready for 
the CoCo Community Breakfast. The Radio Shack exhibit (below) was one of the hubs of activity. 




27 



, ' 1 I I 1 i 




• TANKS • SPIDERS • BLOCKS • CYCLES 

Battle spiders! Blast your way through the descending wall 
of blocks! Defeat the enemy tanks! Trap the menacing 
cycles! Increasing levels of difficulty make each a real chal- 
lenge! Each screen is totally different from the rest and pro- 
vides state-of-the-art, fast-paced action! 

KRON is 100% machine language and has high resolution 
multi-color graphics. It has many great sounds, maintains 
the top scores, plus has a pause feature and display mode. 
See the review in the February '84 Rainbow: "well-conceived," 
"rates with the best." 

32K EXTENDED-JOYSTICK TAPE-DISK $26.95-$29.95 




THE ULTIMATE PEDE GAME 



We believe this to be the best pede game available for the 
Color Computer! You'll do battle with spiders, worms, poison 
mushroom plants, the mushroom replenishing snails, arrows, 
beetles, the pedes, and swarms of wasps! The action Is fast 
and challenging with three difficulty levels to choose from. 

KINGPEDE has high resolution machine language graphics 
and a huge variety of sounds. The joystick control is smooth 
and positive with the option of using analogue or eight-direc- 
tional type of joysticks! 

32K EXTENDED-JOYSTICK TAPE-DISK $24.95-$27.95 



Color Tape Manager 



• copies tape based software (even most 
auto starts) 

• handles programs with varying block 
lengths 

• deals with missing end of file blocks 

• loads and saves data with or without a file- 
name block 

• displays memory in hex (or decimal) and 
ascil 

• allows the changing of memory in decimal 
or hex 

• rapidly scans memory using the arrow 
keys with auto-key repeat 

• converts numbers from hex to decimal or 
decimal to hex 



• allows input in hex or decimal 

• merges multiple basic programs into one 

• appends machine language to basic 
(example included) 

• appends multiple machine language 
programs into one 

• displays the start, end, and execute 
addresses of ML programs 

• displays the buffer start, end, and top 
addresses 

• converts ML programs into basic data 
statements which can be loaded as, or 
merged with, a basic program 

• turns the audio and cassette motor on and 
off with one key commands 



• finds the end of programs on tape even 
from within a program with a skip file 
command 

• allows the transferring of control to other 
programs with a go command 

• moves blocks of memory from start 
through end address to new start address 

• allows the changing of the origin (start 
adds) of ML programs 

• has inverted displays which lessen eye 
fatigue 

• has an 8,380 byte loading buffer with 16K 
systems and 24,760 byte loading buffer 
with 32K systems 



16K EXTENDED-MINIMUM 



TAPE DISK $19.95-$22.95 



Color Disk Manager 

Finally, a disk utility which will handle virtually all of your disk related needs! COLOR DISK MANAGER will do selective initializa- 
tions, verifies, bacltups, repairs and much more! 



• will Initialize single tracks, a range of 
tracks, or the entire disk to more than 35 
tracks 

• allows you to make a backup of the 
directory out of reach of basic and put It 
back If a directory crash occurs 

• has a recover file command which will 
load entire files off the disk if the directory 
crashes and the allocation table is good 

• will repair or salvage crashed disks several 
ways 

• is 64K compatable allowing a 64K backup 

• does backups by track, a range of tracks, 
or the whole disk (will do more than 35 
tracks) 

• gives an allocation table map with gran- 
ules x-referenced to tracks and sectors, 
and showing which granules are used 



32K-64K EXTENDED 



• displays a file granule map showing which 
granules, tracks, and sectors the file uses, 
and the length 

• will do a directory displaying file names In 
two columns, the numt>er of free granules, 
and the free bytes if t>elow 65535 

• loads and saves, sectors, tracks, or files 

• loads files two ways, as done by basic, or 
with header bytes left in, which helps in 
studying how files are saved on disk 

• has a kill file command 

• verifies tracks or the entire disk showing 
the track and sector if an error occurs, 
with the option to continue or stop 

• is multiple drive compatible 

• has an append sector command 

• allows you to save a block of memory to 
disk 

• transfers programs from tape to disk 



• has a rapid scan feature which allows you 
to scan the disk by tracks and sectors 
using the arrow keys 

• will dump memory to the screen In ascii, 
good for listing basic programs or source 
files 

• has a move memory block command, and 
a transfer control command 

• converts decimal to hex or hex to decimal 

• allows you to examine memory using the 
arrow keys with displays In hex (or 
decimal) and ascii 

• will load and execute rompoc's saved on 
disk 

• has a move rom to rom command 

• allows you to change in origin (start addr.) 
of ML programs 

• displays the start, end, and execute 
addresses of ML programs 



DISK $34.95 



PLEASE ADD $2.00 
POSTAGE/HANDLING 
SEND ORDERS TO: 
OREGON COLOR COMPUTER SYSTEMS 
P.O. BOX 11468, EUGENE, OR 97440 



Oregon Color Computer Systems 

-DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED- 



SPECIAL REPORT 



Mi' J? 



In Pursuit Of 
Captain 'Hook' 

A report on the 
piracy seminar at 
RAINBOWfest-Long Beach 

By Bill Nolan 

Rainbow^ Contributing Editor 



One of the best attended and most controversial 
seminars at the recent RAINBOWfest in Long 
Bedch, Calif, (which was an absolutely outstanding 
event), was the panel discussion held on the subject of soft- 
Ware piracy. 

The merribers of the panel were Martiri Goodman, M.D., 
a gehefal pJ-actitioner arid anesthesiologist, owner of Che- 
shire Cat Software, ^nd a CoCo enthusiast; Paiil Searby, 
owner of ComputerWare; and Bob Rosen, owner of Spec- 
trum ^Projects, and SYSOP of the Rainbow Connection 
Bulletin Board. Each of these gentlemen made a short open- 
ing comment, and then questions from the audience were 
fielded. Jim Reed, managing editor of the Rainbow, moder- 
ated the discussion. 

Goodman, who has becoine Well known to CoCb users 
because of his skill at '^bheaking" protected software, spoke 
out strongly in his opening remarks foi* more comrhurtica- 
tion between software vendors and Customers. He also 
pointed toward what he believed to be a strong need for 
more accountability from vendors as to advertising claims, 
warranty, and providing of backup media in a reasonable 
way. 

Searby is an outspoken believer who has taken the lead in 
anti-piracy campaigns. His opening comments reflected his 
convictibn that piracy (he always says "theft'\ not "piracy") 
is the biggest problem facing software vendors and software 
users alik6. He feels that software theft is causing vendors of 
good software to leave the field, and he cautioned that the 
currently rampant sbftware theft problem has, and will, 
result ill higher prices and less software being available. 

Searby provided a quick overview of the rather extensive 
costs involved in bringing a new program to the marketplace 



(Bill Nolan and his wife Sara operate Prickly-Pear 
Software, Bill also teaches computer science at a local 
collegia and is DM at U regular weekly fantasy game,) 




— costs that often reach $ 10,000 according to Searby — and 
he reminded people that these costs must be recovered by the 
sales of the program. If fewer copies are sold because of 
piracy, then each copy that is sold has to bring a higher price 
in order for the vendbr to recover his costs, and (hopefully) 
make a profit. He mentioned also that publishers sell most 
df their programs to dealers and distributors at about half of 
the Suggested retail price, and that the price has to be set 
accoi*dingly. Searby also said that some vendors who had 
previously been a problem from the standpoint of warranty 
and backup have made great improvements in these areas, 
due to efforts within the industry to police itself. 

During the question period, it was asked why some com- 
panies put so much protection onto their tapes and disks 
that loading becomes a problem. Datasoft, in particular, 
took a lot of "heat" ori this subject, with one dealer in the 
audience indicating a return rate of 90 percent on Zaxxon 
tapes. A representative of Datasoft responded by saying that 
Datasoft had not manufactured the tapes. He also provided 
soine numbers to indicate the size of the piracy problem that 
led them to institute the protection to begin with. Appar- 
ently, thei'e were about 5,000 copies of Zaxxon sold, (Searby 
indicated that, with most programs, 3,000 copies sold over a 
one-year period is considered outstanding), yet there are an 
estimated 300^000 copies in existence, fora ratio of 60 stolen 
cOfjies to every legitimate copy of Zaxxon. A member of the 
audience remarked that when Radio Shack began selling 
ZaxxOn, they sold it without the protection on the tape. 

It was asked what was "public domain," and whether or 
not programs typed in frotn magazines were okay to pass 
arourtd. Reed, from the Rainbow fielded this one, and he 
said that every issue of the Rainbow, and almost every other 
magazine as well. Was copyrighted in its entirety, and that in 
addition, the authors of the various programs retained their 
own copyright, so these were not "public domain," and 
could not be legally distributed or placed on bulletin boards. 

(continued on Page 286) 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 29 



Compare It with tli# l^iii, 
Then, buy the best . 



If you've been thinking about 
spending good money on a new 
keyboard for your Color Computer, 
why not get a good keyboard for 
your money? 

Designed from scratch* the 
HJL-57 Professional Keyboard 
Is built to unlock ALL the 
potential performance of your 
Color Computer. Now, you can 
do real word processing and sail 
through lengthy llstlngs.^wlth 
maximum speed; minimum errors. 

At $79.95, the HJL>57 Is reason* 
ably priced, but you can f IrKl 
other CoCo keyboards for a few 
dollars less. So, before you buy, 
we suggest that you compare. 

Compare Design. 

The ergonomlcally-superlor 
HJL-57 has sculptured, low 
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Compare Conetruetlon. 

TheHaL-57ha8arlgldized 
aluminum baseplate forsoltd, 
no-flex mounting. Switch contacts 
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minimum, and covered by a s^ill- 
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Offering more than tult-tri^vel, 
bounce-proof fceys^witoh€*i Iti* 
HJL-57 has RFI/EMI sWeWIng that 
0timinatea irritatlnglk^^^ 
dfspiayiiiincl four MtiNM^ 
function keys (one latoh^t^MK 
specially-positioned to avoid 
Inadvertont actuation. 



Free Function K6y ProomA 

Your HJL-57 Kit Inciudes usage 
instructions ami declmat o^^es 
produced by the function keys, 
plus a free sample pn:>gram 
that defines the function 
keys as follows: Ft 5= Screen 
dump to printer. F2 ftej3Nlat 
key (latching). F3 = Lower case 
upper case flip (If you have 
lower case capability). F4 « 
Control key; subtracts 64 from 
the ASCII value of any key 
pressed. Runs on disc or tape; 
extended or standard Sasto. 



Compem Inetellation. 

Carefully engineered for easy 
Installation, the HJL-57 requires 
no soldering, drilling or gluing. 
Simply plug it In and drop It 
right on the original CoCo 



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«17-6e6-7B14, Advanced Oomputsr Seii^ldietf^iMi^^ t4 1^1^^ 



BITS RnO ffJTES OF BRSIC 



Marrying Machine 
Language To BASIC 



By Richard A- White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



James H, DeStafenoof Swedesboro, 
New Jersey wrote the Rainbow 
askinga numberof questions which 
might occur to you if you have becotne 
conversant with BASIC and start looking 
at machine language for the first time. 
He notes that ROM and memory maps 
are being printed without instruction on 
how to use them. Other foggy BASIC 
commands include CLEAR xxx.yvy^ 
USR. DEFUSR and offset loading, 
PEEK. POKEsLXid VAR FT Rhawc been 
recently covered in the Rainbow, but 
belong with the above commands in 
that they deal directly with CoCo*s 
memory. 

The 6809 microprocessor can directly 
address 65535 bytes of fnemory. A mem- 
ory map describes in a table, diagram or 
listing where and what is in the rhemory. 
The memory map depends on the oper- 
ating system in the machine at the time- 
Color BASIC is an operating system that 
defines a basic memory map for the 
CoCo. Extended Color BASIC changes 
this map in detail as it allocates space 



(Richard White has a long background 
with microcomputers and specialize^ in 
BASIC programming. Along with Don 
Dallberg, he is the author of the TIMS 
database management program.) 



for the new functions it provides, but 
does not change its basic structure. Disk 
BASIC needs room to operate too, so it 
grabs off some more of the memory ahd 
the memory map changes again, if you 
do a PRINT MEM in a Color BASIC 
machine and then in a Disk basic 
machine, you get a much smaller num- 
ber in the Disk machine. The memory is 
still there, but Extended BASIC and Disk 
Basic are using it. 



Extended Color basic 
Computer Memory Map 



Decimal 
Address 
0-1023 



1024-1535 



Hex 

Contents Address 

System Use 0-3 FF 



Text Screen 
Memory 



400-5FF 



Graphic Screen Memory 

1 536^307 1 Page 1 600-BFF 

3072-4607 Page 2 COO- 1 IFF 

4608-6143 Page 3 1200-I7FF 

6144^7679 Page 4 1800-1 DFF 

7680-9215 Page 5 IE00-23FF 

92 1 6- 1 074 1 Page 6 2400-29FF 

10742-12287 Page 7 2A00-2FFF 

12288-13823 Page 8 3000-35 FF 



Program and Variable 

1 3824- 1 6383 Storage 3600-3 FFF 
16IC Machine 

Program and Variable 

16384-32767 Storage 4000-7FFF 
32IC Machine 

32768-40959 Extended 8000-9FFF 
basic ROM 

40960-49151 Color AOOO-BFFF 
BASIC ROM 



49152-65279 



65280-65535 



Cartridge 
Memory 

Input/ 
Output 



COOO-FEFF 



FFOO-FFFF 



Let's examine the above memory map 
in some detail. In the first 1,023 bytes, 
BASIC keeps its notes that it needs to 
run. These are things like the address of 
the start of BASIC (25 and 26), the end of 
BASIC (27 and 28), variable table ad- 
dresses, the end of memory and a myriad 
of other details. Ever wonder how BASIC 
keeps track of where the cursor is on the 
text screen? That's in 136 and 137. 
When you type on the keyboard, things 
generally don't happen other than char- 
acters appearing on the screen until you 
press [ENTER]. That's because the 
characters are saved in a memory area 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 31 



called a buffer until a carriage return 
character is sent by the [ENTEjR] key. 
This BASIC line input buffer starts at 
decimal 832 and is 255 bytefe long. 

Another important buffer is the cas- 
sette file data buffer Which starts at 
decimal 47 1 and is 256 bytes long. When 
you output data to a cassette file, data is 
temporarily stored here until the buffer 
is full and then dumped to tape. Upon 
loading a cassette file,\data is stored 
here for basic to read and pfocess. 
Other earlier comjjuters didn't have 
slich a buffer and each piece of data was 
individilally sent lo tape along with a 
time consuming header. Ldading or sav- 
ing a file can be an all hight chore with 
these machines. 

It is well beyond the scope of this 
column to deal individually with each 
item in BASIC'^ scratchpad; most you 
will hever need to Use directly. Some 
you set using basic commands, but 
BASIC does the work for you. In any 
case, this 1 K chunk of nlemory is one of 
the mcisi used in your machine. While it 
is not included in tKe number you get 
when you PRINT MEM, it is working 
hard for you nonetheless. 

Next comes the vital screen memory; 
It extends from decimal 1024 to 1535 
and has one byte for each possible char- 
acter location on your text screen. When 
you print to the screen, BASIC stores the 
characters here. Your video display gen- 
erator chip (6847) reads this data and 
converts it into the picture it sends to 
your TV or monitor. Your video display 
generator chip deals with graphics in 
much the same way when you use the 
graphics modes. It reads the assigned 
memory area and generates a picture. 
Motorola devised this method years ago 
for use with the 6800 miCfoprocessor. In 
a recent article in BYTE magiazine, 
Apple people were making a big thing 
about using the technique in the new 
Macintosh. The only thing different is 
that the Mac uses a 68000 instead of a 
6809 and has a 22K graphics memory 
space i-ather than the 6K used for high 
resolution graphics in the CoCo. The 
8088 microprocessor in the IBM PC 
works differently from the 6809 or 68000 
and a whole board of chips are neces- 
sary to do what one or two chips do in 
CoCo or Mac. This is one of those 
details that explain why a $260 machine 
can do so much of what a $3,000 
machine will do. 

Next come the graphics pages. Color 
BASIC does not have graphics cap- 
ability from Basic, so the basic pro- 
gram default start address is 1536. On a 



cold start. Extended basic reserves foiir 
pages for memory, so the start of a 
basic program is at 7680, but you can 
use PCLEARio change this. 

For example, if you enter PC LEA Rl , 
only the first graphics page is reserved, 
and the basic program will load start- 
ing at 3072. This allows 12,71 1 bytes for 
basic program and variables in a 16K 
machine. On the other hand, a 
PCLEAR8 moves the start of BASIC all 
the way up to 13824 leaving a trifling 
2,559 bytes for basic and variables. 

In a 32IC or 64K machine, the RAM 
between i 6384 and 32767 is all available 
fOr program and variables. In a Color 
basic machine, this is a large 31,231 
bytes. With Extended Coloi* basic, 



PCLEARl allows 29,6<35 bytes, there 
are 25,087 bytes available with 
PCLEAR4 and 18,933 available with 
PCLEAR8, 

If you do a PRINT MEM under one 
of the combinations described above 
after a Cold start, the number returned 
will be 200 bytes smallet" than 1 show. If 
you have an Extended BASIC machine 
and enter PRINT MEM Immediately 
after turning it on and getting the Ex- 
tended BASIC message, you will read 
24,887 rather than 25,087. The differ- 
ence is the 200 bytes that BASIC auto- 
matically reserved for strings. You 
change this by lising CLEAR 100 to 
reduce it to lOO.bytes. Maybe your pro- 
gram is going to store a lot of string data 
so you CLEAR 5000 or even CLEAR 
wood. This reserved space is no longer 
available for a BASIC program and most 
variables. Only string data can be placed 
there. It's not lost since you have to put 
string data soniewhere. The trick is to 
size your string storage to meet your 
program's needs without unduly limit- 
ing your program's size. 



CLEAR can carry two arguments, 
for example CLEAR 200.27000. This 
says that BASIC may not use any memory 
above 27000 in a 32K machine, and that 
the 200 bytes just below 27000 in mem- 
ory are reserved for string storage. 
Machine language programs may be 
loaded above 27000 and EXECuted 
without fear of being "walked-on" by 
BASIC. Prickly Pear's Colorkit is a 
machine language set of editing tools 
that 1 always have running when 1 do 
any serious BASIC prograrnming work. 
It starts at 27000 in my 32K machine so 1 
have to type CLEAR 200,27000 from 
the keyboard before loading it. Other- 
wise, CoCo goes west and 1 have to turn 
it off and back on to recover. You want 



to reserve only the amount of memory 
for machine language that you need. I 
used CLEAR 200,27000 since that is 
what is required to use Colorkit. If you 
had a 1,000-byte machine language 
program thert CLEAR 200 J 1767, 

We have slid into the dual operation 
of BASIC and machine language pro- 
grams at the same time. In the example 
above, Colorkit can be running while 
you run the BASIC program you are 
working on. Actually there are three 
programs working simultaneously since 
your BASIC interpreter is a machine lan- 
guage program. Really, each is taking 
Its own turn and then handing control 
back to another. Overall control of this 
rests with addresses or "hooks" stored 
in the system portion of memory belo\y 
1023. We are getting deep fast here, and 
disengagement is preferable to total 
confusion. Perhaps this leaves you with 
some flavor of what can be going on 
that we do not see clearly. 

A simpler exercise is to store a ma- 
chine language routine in memory 
and call it from a basic program when 



''The trick is to size your string storage to meet 
your program 's needs without unduly limiting your 
program size. " 



32 the RAINBOW May 1964 



you want to use it. Starting with Color 
BASIC, you need to POKEihc execution 
address of the machine language into 
memory locations 275 and 276. Then 
when you need to call the routine from 
inside a BASIC program, you use the 
statement A-USR(0). You can write 
your machine language routine to use 
the ROM call INTCNV to get the 
argument with USR, 0 in this case and 
put it in the D register of the micropro- 
cessor. Generally you won't want to 
bother with this. You can also transfer 
data to the machine language routine by 
POKEing values to some reserved area 
of memory. The routine then can get the 
values, work on them and then store 
new values for BASIC to get by peeking. 
Now you are really down at the machine 
level, dealing with memory on a byte- 
by-byte basis. 

Some have been trying to get a handle 
on assembly or machine language pro- 
gramming by trying to understand how 
to interface it with BASIC. A better way 
is to learn assembly language, at least 
the simpler aspects, and then work back 
to the interface with BASIC. When you 
understand what simple machine lan- 
guage programs are and how they work, 
you will understand more clearly what 
the BASIC interface tools are doing. 
TRS-80 Color Computer Assembly 
Language Programming by William 
Harden, Jr., Radio Shack cat. no. 62- 
2077, is a good starter reference. 

Extended Color basic broadens the 
machine language interface, allowing a 
BASIC program to call any of 10 machine 
language routines (numbered 0 to 9). 
First the execution address of each rou- 
tine to be used must be defined to BASIC, 
not POKEd into memory as with Color 
BASIC. The format is — DEFUSRn = 
address. Say 1 had three routines whose 
execution addresses were 31000, 31500 
and 32000, each address being also the 
first byte of each routine. Before load- 
ing these into the computer, either the 
program or the operator would need to 
do CLEAR xxxJlOOO to protect the 
machine language area. Next the BASIC 
program would need to define the exe- 
cution addresses as follows — 2000 
DEFUSR0=3I000 : DEFUSRI=3I500 
: DEFVSR2 = 32000, A machine lan- 
guage routine is then called with a 
USRn statement — A=USRn(B). To 
call routine one, use 100 A=USRI(0), 
When the routine completes its work, 
control is returned to either the next 
statement in the line or to the next line 
in the BASIC program. 

While it is desirable to put machine 
language routines either below BASIC in 



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We, at Michtron want to celebrate our moving into our new building. To 
share our festive spirit with you we are making these special package 
offers for the next 60 days. 

Disk Drive and Controller only $329.95. This may not be the lowest 
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outdated full size drives. We are offering you the newest design, Slim 
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1 TEAC 40 Track Slim Line Disk Drive and Controller - $329.95 

2 TEAC 40 Track Slim Line Disk Drives and Controller - $479.95 

We buy approximately 5,000 disks a month for resale to our customers 
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10 Disks witli Tyvek Sleeves — $19.95 
10 Disks witli Vinyl Sleeves - $21.95 



7 Games At Fantastic Prices! 



CATALYST (32 K) a great game reviewed in the MARCH issue of 
RAINBOW . . . CHOPPER STRIKE (16K or 32K) fly your helicopter 
over the most varied terrain ever found in a color computer, rescue 
your army and destroy the enemy . . . DEMON SEED (32K) Rated #1 
in our top ten for months a great arcade game, with bats and demons 

swooping down on you FURY (1 6K or 32 K) A great aerial classic, 

shoot down enemy planes and helicopters . . . IIIIUDPIES(32K)oneof 

my favorite games! Received rave reviews in HOT COCO 

PACDROIDS (32K) If you haven't got a PACMAN type game here is a 
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Pacman"^ . . . STRONGHOLD(16Kor32K)youmustprotectyourcity 
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Each additional game is only $10.00 

6655 Highland Road, Pontiac Ml 48054 
(313) 066-4800 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add 
$3.00 for shipping in the U.SA - $5.00 
for Canada. Dealers Inquires Invited. 




May 1984 the RAINBOW 33 




EXTRA 



$44.44 

MORE 




CONTROLLERS 



DC-1 
$134 



VC-1 
$24.45 



VC-2 
$26.45 

VC-3 
$39.45 



ROM disk controller reads & 
writes to 35 and 40 track single 
and double sided drives with all 
models of the color computer 
(J&M) 

Video interface mounts inside 
color computer by piggybacking 
IC on top of interface-no solder- 
ing and no trace cuts 

for color computer 2 - 
monochrome only 

for color computer 2 - color and 
monochrome 





DISKS 


DD-1 
$269 


y2 height 5V4" 40 Track SSDD 
179,712 bytes available 


DD-2 
$319 


V2 height 574" 40 Track DSDD 
359,424 bytes available 


DD-3 
$449 


Dual 3" 40 Track SSDD 
359,424 bytes available (Amdek) 


CA-1 
$24.44 


Cable to connect disk to con- 
troller 


Drive 0 needs controller DG1 above 



*The Howard drive 0 package gives 
359,424 bytes of available storage for 
$444.39 using our double sided, double 
density disk and 40 track controller. The 
regular 35 track drive 0 gives 1 56,672 
bytes for $399.95, The Howard package 
gives an extra 202,752 bytes for $44.44 
more. 



MEMORY 

64K Upgrades 
64-E1 for E Boards. Remove old Chips 
68.45 and replace with this preassem- 

bled package - No soldering or 

trace cuts 
64-F1 for F Board Preassembled with 
64.45 no soldering. Capacitor leads 

must be cut 
64-2 for cotor computer 2. Kit requires 
69.45 soldering, no traces to cut. 

PRINTER 

RX-80 Epson pin feed 
$333 

8148 Serial board with 2K buffer 
$89.95 



Any product may be returned within 
30 days for refund if not satisfied. 

We handle all warranty & repair work 
thru our direct contact with the manu- 
facturer. 




Howard Medical 

Box 2, Chicago, 60690 

312 944-2444 



MONITORS 

122 Zenith 12" Amber gives excel- 
$1 34 lent resolution and is easy on the 

eyes 

123 New Zenith green screen for 
$114 serious programmers and word 

processing 

131 13" Color monitor with 
$334 speaker, composite, and RBG 
jack (Zenith) 

AH Monitors need video controller 



TV STANDS 







COCO 2 


TS-1 


15Wx 11Dx4H 


TS-2 


$29.50 


for 13" screen 


$29.50 


TS-4 


24W X 1 1 D X 4H 


TS-3 


$39.50 


for 19" screen 


$39.50 


PS-1 


18Wx 15Dx 2y^H 




$19.95 


for all popular printers 






add $5 for bottom feed slot 



TV stands come w'rth ROM pack cut-out. 
Specify ivory or smoked grey. 



please send me the following 



Name 

Address 

City, State Zip 

Cat. # Description 



Cost 



Shipping 
. residents add tax 

Total 



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C — CD 



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Get Your Very Own Pot O' Gold! 

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Each month all the lengthy programs (over 20 lines) in the Rainbow can come to you ready-to- 
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CASH MAN 

By Doug Ftayer and Bill Dunlevy 



The screen is exploding witfi colorful, fast 
moving aninnation \\ke youVe never seen. The 
speaker is alive with every kind of sound 
imaginable! Best of all, the player's eyes are 
glowing with fascination and wonder of this 
classic creation. THE GAME??? CASHMAN! 
So colorful, so imaginative, so all out fun, that 
you'll wonder why you ever settled for any- 
thing less! 



^ THHH* 7H?TO> inrtHf . . 



s o & 

Ss aML- ' - '' - ' - ' - ' - ' -'- ' - '' :ja>L±^ 



Dozens of levels and screens (more than 
FORTY!) let anyone from beginner to expert 
have as much excitement, challenge, and 
good clean fun as they can standi Eveh the 
least adept player can have the time of their 
life with CASHMAN, yet with the increased 
excitement of special Mystery Pieces and 
Expert Puzzle Screens, the most experienced 
arcade addict is guaranteed to never stop 
playing!!! 



Play by yourself or invite the ultimate chal- 
lenge of simultaneous two player competi- 
tion! Run along the colorful girders, jump 
across the tremendous chasms, climb the 
wobbly ladders, or grab a BYRD and fly to get 
the loot before your opponent does! Be care- 
ful though, KATS are on the prowl and wres- 
tling with them can be a challenge. 



CASHMAN's classical play is so original and 
so much fun that no arcader whether a veter- 
an or a rookie, can afford to pass it up. 



So run, jump, climb, or fly to the nearest Color 
Computer and play the ultimate , , . CASH- 
MAN! (P.S. CASHMAN lets you play against 
the computer or play 2 players simultan- 
eously.) 



32K COLOR COMPUTER TAPE $27.95 DISK $29.95 



TIME BANDIT 

This month is the first month that the entire 
top ten panel had copies of TIME BANDIT 
and they overwhelmingly voted it Into first 
place. Never before has a game received so 
many first place votes. At the Dallas RAIN- 
BOWfest and at the Pasadena Color Expo, 
arcade phayers were unanimous in the praise 
of TIME BANDIT. "The best original game 
ever written for the COCO". . ."My dad said I 
could buy only one game and this is the best 
game here" . . . "Best game at the show" . . . 
"Best game I've ever seen on a home comput- 
er" . . . "Great Game" . . . "Only game I 
bought at the show" . , .These are comments 
we heard about TIME BANDIT at these two 
shows, . . I can say without a doubt that TIME 
BANDIT is the best game on the market for 
the COCO. 




WESTERN WORLD: Visit the Lost Maverick 
Mine, Dead Man's Pass, (Visit? Escape!) 
Tombstone Jail, and many more! A variety of 
screens. 



FANTASTIC ADVENTURES AND UNLIMITED RICHES ABOUND 
WHEN ONE TRAVELS THROUGH TIME — YOU ARE THE TIME BANDIT! 



Thanks, to Bill Dunlevy and Harry Lafnear, 
you can transform your Color Computer into 
the ultimate arcade experience. 32K has never 
looked or played better! 

Tired of games that have only a few screens 
or force you to follow a strict order of levels? 
In TIME BANDIT, you virtually create your 
own game! You can choose from more than 
TWENTY places during the entire game, and 
each place has more than 15 distinct varia- 
tions and levels of difficulty; this means over 
300 variations in all! 

You can use the TIMEGATES to travel to 
three different Worlds of Ti me, each one con- 
taining a multitude of colorful and unique 
adventuring areas. Visit FANTASY WORLD, 



WESTERN WORLD, or SPACE WORLD. A- 
void or destroy the Evil Guardians: the Watch- 
ing Lurker, Angry Elmo, Killer Smurphs, and 
lots more! Find the keys which remove var- 
ious locks preventing your escape. But hurry 
Bandit— your power is dwindling and time is 
fleeting! This new machine language game is 
so exciting, challenging, and fun that you 
need never leave your home to find an arcade 
again! Ultra crisp Supergraphics that include 
colorful scrolling landscapes and full anima- 
tion of a multitude of characters, amazing 
sound, and literally HUNDREDS of screens 
-it's all here! The conquest of time and space 
awaits you. 

32K COLOR COMPUTER TAPE $27.95 

DISK $29.95 




SPACE WORLD: Explore Hy-perspace, the 
bizarre Light Barriers, the insidious Grid, 
Gamma Station the Enterprise and others! 
Bright, Clear graphics! 



fllME 1^740 93 




FANTASY WORLD: Conquer the halls of 
Doom, the Mystic Maze, the Underworld 
Arena, and other medieval places. Pictured 
are the three different time gates. 




6655 Highland Road, Pontiac. Ml 48054 
(313)660-4800 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add $3.00 for shipping in the U.S A - 
for Canada. Dealers Inquires Invited. 



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the graphics pages if you are not using 
graphics or in a protected space at the 
top of memory, it is not necessary that 
they be assembled in jihe final memory 
location. In other words, routines that 
are written in relocatable code can be 
moved around in memory and still 
work. If you upgrade to a 32K Or 64IC 
machine, you would like to take advan- 
tage of that memory and you cannot if 
you continue to load machine language 
routine in protected memory below 
16383. Yet your routines on cassette or 
disk are made to load into the lower 
memory area. Offset loading to the 
rescue. In a simple move from I6K top- 
of-mcmory to 32K top-of-memory, do 
CLOADM "PROGNAME'\ 16384 or 
LOADM "PROGNAME'\ 16384. The 
program will load 16384 bytes higher in 
memory. To make it easy later, C- 
SA VEM or SA VEM the program from 
higher memory using the new start, end 
and execute addresses* It will now be on 
your tape or disk with these new ad- 
dresses and can be loaded directly with- 
out offset. 

One of the neater tricks around is to 
hang your machine language rou- 
tines onto your BASIC programs so they 
load and save with the BASIC program. 



Metric Industries 



To understand this, we need to know 
what the end of a BASIC program looks 
like and to what address the end of 
BASIC pointer at locations 27 and 28 
points. Each line of basic ih memory 
ends with a zero. There are three zeros 
in a row at the end of a BASIC program. 
The end of BASIC pointer carries the 
address of the memory location follow- 
ing the third zero. Load a machine lan- 
guage routine starting at the second 
zero marking the end of BASIC, then add 
three zeros after the machine language 
and change end of basic to hold the 
address following the new three zeros. 
At minimum, you will need a machine 
language monitor program that can 
read and change individual memory 
locations. Colorkit includes both the 
monitor and a utility to attach the 
machine language routine automatic- 
ally to a BASIC program. Now when you 
save and load the BASIC program, the 
machine language loads and saves with 
it. If you edit the BASIC program, its 
length changes and the machine lan- 
guage is moved up or down in memory 
with the program. 

The next problem is to call the ma- 
chine language whose execution address 
changes from time to time as you edit 



For the color computer and TDP100 
Model 101 Interface $54.^5 



• Serial to Paraliet Interface 

• Works with any Centronics Compatible 
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Gemini, Epson, Gorillia and 
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• Six switch selectable baud rates (300 
to 9600) 

• 90 day warranty 

• Power Supply Included 



Model 102 RS-232-C Switcher 

• Switches all three data iines 

• Indicator lights let you know computer 
is on 

• 3 posit k}n switch has silver plated 
contacts for high reliability 

• Cotor coded lights indicate switch "Ji'-JiS? 
position 

• Cotor coded labels for your printer, 
fTKxjem etc.. supplied 

Cassette Label Program $6>®^ 





BASIC, Since the end of BASIC pointer 
changes the same amount and direction 
as the location of the machine language, 
we can use it for a reference. In Extend- 
ed BASIC, this will do the job: 100 
DEFUSRO = 256*PEEK(27) + PEEK 
(28)- X where X is the number of bytes 
from end of BASIC to the execution 
address of your routine. 

N ow why would one want to play silly 
games like we have been talking aboiit? 
Program speed is one good reason. A 
sorting routine in BASIC is slow, even if 
you use the fastest type of sort. In com- 
parison, even the slowest sorting meth- 
od in machine code is 10 to 100 times 
faster. Writing a whole program in 
machine code woiild be a real drag. 
Writing Just a sort and hooking it to a 
BASIC program that does as well as the 
rest of the things you want done is much 
less painful. Games are another area 
that benefit from the use of key machine 
language routines doing only things 
that BASIC is slow at. 

My, how far we have strayed from 
our memory map discussion. Thus far 
our adventures have been confined to 
the lower 32 K of memory. At first 
blush, the memory space from 32768 to 
65280 seems pretty simple. In order 




• Prints five lines of information on pin- 
feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven — easy to use 



• Uses special features of your printer for 
standard, expanded and condensed 
characters 

• 24 free labels included with program 

• Auto centering features for each line of 
text 

• 16K ECB required 

General Items 

• Gemini 10X Printer $319.00 

• Special Save — Printer & Interface 
$360.00 

• C-10 Cassettes $7.50/dozen 

• Hard plastic boxes $2.50/dozen 

• Pin-feed Cassette labels $3.00 per 100 

• Free shipping on all orders over $50.00 

• Add $3.00 tor shipping on orders under 
$50.00 

• Ohio residents add 5.5% sales tax 

• Phone order line for VISA and 
MASTERCARD, orders accepted 24 
hrs. a day, call 513-677-0796 

or send check or money order to: 

Metric Industries 
Depdrtment R 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



36 the RAINBOW M&y 1984 



there is the Extended BASIC ROM, the 
Color BASIC ROM, cartridge memory 
and input/ output. The Disk BASIC 
ROM occupies the lower 6K of the car- 
tridge memory space in a disk system. 
At minimum. Color BASIC and input 
/output, our beloved SAM chip (6883), 
must be present to provide a minimum 
operating system. Using either cassette 
or disk, machine language routines can 
be loaded that cause drastic memory 
map changes to occur. Some of these 
have been published in recent back 
issues of the Rainbow. A first step is to 
copy the ROMs to low memory, switch 
CoCo to 64IC RAM and copy the ROM 
code back into upper memory in the 
same locations that it occupied in ROM, 
Next it was discovered that Extended 
Color BASIC is entirely relocatable, and 
that if it is moved above Color basic or 
Disk BASIC, that BASIC could use RAM 
up to 40959, This is the so called 401C 
move and a number of commercial and 
published programs are available. An- 
other interesting approach is the one 
developed by Jorge Mir to modify a 
BASIC program and load it above Disk 
BASIC. This is in the October 1983 
Rainbow. 

Another tact is to switch the upper 
32K RAM in and out under con- 
trol of a machine language program and 
use the upper RAM for data storage. 
BASIC is operational whenever the ma- 
chine is in the ROM mode. Under these 
conditions, 96K of memory space is in 
use. In any case, the memory map is one 
thing at one time and something else at 
another. These are enhancements to the 
BASIC operating environment and do 
not cause major changes to BASIC. 
Properly written, a BASIC program that 
runs in the normal ROM-RAM map 
should run in an all RAM or switched 
mode as well. Changes required should 
be restricted to those necessary for the 
program to take advantage of its new 
environment. 

At this point there is much that 1 have 
not covered and some that 1 have 
touched only lightly. The disk system 
memory map is one that is not dis- 
cussed. One reason is that it varies 
depending on how many disk buffers 
are in use. Another is that there are 
many more non-disk readers than those 
with disks. The whole area of switching 
from ROM to RAM in the upper 32K 
space could well be the subject of a 
separate article apart from this column. 
For now, let's get the basics in place, 
even when they seem rather complex 
themselves. 



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•Belt 103 compatible 

• Automatically selects originate/answer 

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• Requires 9 volt battery (not included) 

• Lifetime Limited Warranty 

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Color Graphics Editor (SSM) Tape 1 9.95 9.95 

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Ninja Warrior (Programmers Guild) Tape 29.95 14.95 

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6655 Highland Road, Ponliac. Ml 48054 
(313)666-4800 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add 
$3.00 for shipping in the U.S A - $5.00 
for Canada. Dealers Inquires Invited. 




1691 Eason • Pontiac. Michigan 48054 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 37 



A Change Of Address 

By Dennis Derringer 



Recently, quite a few programs have been popping up 
that show an effective means of relocating machine 
language programs in memory. Of course, to have a 
machine language program load at a higher address only 
requires an offset value placed after the filename when it's 
LOADMed, Unfortunately, Microsoft didn't include a syn- 
tax for negative offsets to load programs lower in memory. 
This spurred the challenge to offer a means of relocating 
programs after they're loaded in memory. Most of these 
programs dealt with a technique using PEEK and POKE, 
either in BASIC or a machine language version, to move an 
area of memory from one location to another. Effective, yes, 
but it still required you to calculate the new LOAD, EXEC 
and END addresses so that it can be SA VEMed. 

Being one who likes things nice and simple, I proceeded 
to find a quick method to relocate machine language pro- 
grams and at the same time, have the addresses changed. 
Studying the method by which a machine language program 
is stored on disk revealed that the three magic numbers are 
right there on the disk with the program. All that was needed 
was a routine that could read these numbers and then have 
new ones put in their place. This is where the flexibility of 
RS'DOS really proved outstanding. 

Regardless of how a file is stored, you can OPEN it for 
direct (random) access with a record length of one and then, 
by checking the length of the file (LOF), obtain the exact 
number of bytes that it contains. For machine language 
programs, the second and third byte in the file represent the 
M S B and LS B values for the LEN GT H of the program . The 
fourth and fifth bytes represent the MSB and LSB values for 
the LOAD address. The last two bytes in the file represent 
the MSB and LSB values for the £A'£'C address. The actual 
numbers for the MSB and LSB values are the ASCII value 
of the character. The number which they represent is calcu- 
lated by the formula MSB*256+LSB. 

The utility program will obtain these values and let you 
indicate a new LO/iZ) address. The LENGTH and EXEC 
values are automatically recalculated and then the new 
values are stored back on the disk. This is how the program 
breaks down: 



(Dennis Derringer, president of Derringer Software, Inc., is 
a self-taught programmer and has been marketing software 
for the color computer since 1982,) 



Line 

90- 1 80 Receive input for filename and get values from 

disk (include extension). 
200-250 Display values and receive input for new LOA D 
address. 

270-390 Calculate new values, display values and store 
result back on disk. 

This routine works with any program that has been 
SAVEMed using the standard syntax. Exercise caution 
when using with commercially purchased software, they 
don't always use standard techniques. 



<^ 1 

I 250 151 

END Ill 

The listing: ^ 
10 

20 CHANOE ML ADDRESS ON * 
30 '* DISK. 32K EXT. DISK ♦ 
40 '« BY DENNIS DERRINGER » 
50 '* DERRINGER SOFTWARE, INC* 
60 •* JANUARY - 1984 * 
70 ' *♦*♦»♦•»»»»»»»»»»♦»**»♦##« 
80 CLS: CLEAR 1000 

90 PRINT-FILENAME: "JILINE INPUT 
FI« 

100 IF FI«""" THEN END 

110 OPEN"D",#l,FI«, l: IF LOF(1)=0 

THEN a_aSE:KILL FI«:RUN 
120 FIELDttl,l AS F«:LF-L0F<1> 
130 FaRQ«lTa5:GETttl,Q:BY<Q)«°ASC( 

F«> :nextq 

140 B-0:FORQ-LF-4 TO LF:B"B+1 
150 OETttl,Q:BE(B>«ASC(F«) :NEXTQ 
160 LD«"HEX«<BY<4)«256-i-BY(S) ) 



38 ttw RAINBOW May 1984 



I 



170 E«-HEX« (BE (4) «256-i-BE (5> ) 
180 LN«-HEX« (BY (2) »256-<-BY (3) ) 
190 PRINT 

200 PR I NT "LOAD ADDRESS - "ILD* 
210 PRINT"END ADDRESS - "|HEX*( 
VAL ( "StH"+LD») +VAL ( "«cH"+LN*) ) 
220 PR I NT "EXEC ADDRESS - "lE* 
230 PR I NT" LENGTH - "|LN* 

240 PRINT 

250 PR I NT "NEW LOAD ADDRESS ■ "j: 

LINE INPUT HL* 

260 IF NL««"" THEN CLOSE: RUN 

270 OF-VAL ( " StH " +E« ) -VAL ( " «cH " +LD» 

) 

280 NL-VAL("«cH"+NL*) 

290 NE-NL+OF 

300 BY(4)-INT(NL/256) 

310 BY(5)-NL-(256»(INT(NL/256))) 

320 BE(4)-INT(NE/256> 

330 BE(5>-NE-(256*(INT(NE/256))) 

340 PR I NT "NEW END ADDRESS « "!H 

EX* (NL+VAL ( "«tH"+LN«> > 

350 PRINT"NEW EXEC ADDRESS - "»H 

EX«(BE(4)*256-t-BE(5) ) 

360 F0RQ-1T05:LSET F«=CHR» (BY <Q) 

):PUT»1,Q:NEXTQ 

370 B«0: FORQ-LF-4 TO LF:B-B+1 
380 LSET F«-'CHR«(BE(B) ) :PUT«1,Q: 
NEXT Q 
390 CLOSE 

400 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS enter TO R 

UN AGAIN "CLINE INPUT X« 

410 RUN 4 



About Your Subscription 

Your copy of the RAINBOW is sent second class 
mail and, for subscribers in the United States, the date 
of mailing is printed on the label. If you do not receive 
your copy by the 25th of any month, send us a card and 
we will mail another immediately via first class mail. 
: You must notify us of a new address when you 
move. Notification should reach us no later than the 
ISth of the month prior to the month in which you 
change your address. Sorry, we cannot be responsible 
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Your mailing label also shows an "account number" 
and the subscription expiration date. Please indicate 
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may be a mailing address shown that is different from 
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pondence to that mailing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at P.O. Box 209, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose subscrip- 
tions are through our distributor in Australia. 



E.T.T. 

ELECTRONIC 
TYPING 
TEACHER 

by 

CHERRYSoft 




Learning to type the right way can save you hours of tedious work when 
entering programs into your CoCo, and this is just whet ETT was designed 
to do. Devote a little time every day practicing with ETT and before you 
know it you will be typing with confidence. Entering those programs will 
no longer be the chore it used to be. 

ETT's video keyboard lets you practice with all the keys labeled, ait the 
keys blank or only the "home" keys labeled. The visual cues guide you while 
you learn to type without watching your fingers. ETT shows your 
accuracy, response time, and words per minute. You will quickly see that 
you are improving with practice. 

With the sentences provided by ETT learning to type can be fun. Over 
1000 variations chosen because they include every lettenn the alphabet. 
You can also create your own practice sets. This outstanding program 
was written by a certified teacher and professional programmer and 
comes with a ten page student manual-study guide. Requires 16K 
Extended Basic. 



C«8S«tt« 



$21,95 



ETT NOW AVAILABLE FOn COMIVtODORE 64 
CASSETTE DISK SS9.9S 




MASTER 
CONTROL II 



The best doesn't always cost more and MASTER CONTROL 11 is a good 
example. What would you be willing to pay for a program that would cut 
your typing time by more than 50% and eliminate hours of debugging 
because you misspelled a command word? For example the command 
STRINGS (requires nine strokes) with MASTER CONTROL II you only 
require two strokes, just hit the down arrow key twice and it's done, and 
no mistakes. That is just one of the 50 pre-programmed commands 
available to you. If that isn't enough you also have the ability to customize 
your own key to enter a statement or command correctly, automatccally 
every time. But that's not all, how about automatic line numbering. Just 
enter the starting number and the increment you want and MASTER 
CONTROL II will do it for you. You also have direct control of MOTOR, 
AUDIO and TRACE plus a direct RUN key. Sounds great? Well, 
thousands of color computer owners have been enjoying these features 
for years. But now the new MASTER CONTROL II also has the following 
features: 

-/'-New plastic overlay that can be removed when you are not using 
MASTER CONTROL II. 

■>rNew documentation, to help you get the most from the program. 
-vcNew repeating keyboard. 



CaBsette 



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Where Shopping By Mail is **USER FRIENDLY" DEALER 
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May 1984 the RAINBOW 39 




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- - - • 1 7/13 



THE QUIZ MAKER by OwM tootey 
32KEB. tip«S24.9S tfltkS27.^ 

A program that enables a laa^ 
to croata tests or a student to 
study for tests in any subject area. 
Your questions and answers may 
be saved iv future use. Short 
answer, mw-talse. M-ln and 
other quiz fonnats are supported. 
Prtmer option for hard copy test 
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and provides a variety ot teeffng 



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Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

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N.y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY 3ICE, including VuR diractions. «rtth orders of d or more Items 
lity children's softwara for toisure or teaming. Wrt 
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Create messages in bright color graphics with . 




By Doug Lindsay 



This article describes, in detail, modifications that 1 
have added to a fine program by Mr. David Steyer 
{seethe Rainbow, Janu'dvy 1983, Page i90)* The mod- 
ifications are designed to take advantage of some of the 
capabilities of Radio Shack's CGP-220 and produce "solid" 
color or inverse graphic characters using the CGP's **bit- 
image'' mode. If you liked this program running in the 
non-graphics mode, as 1 did, then Pm sure you will enjoy the 
colorful result of this modification running your CGP-220. 
The printer control code additions/ modifications, which 
represent the primary alterations, are documented within 
the BASIC program lines and, although they are for the 
CGP-220, probably are easily adaptable to codes for other 
printers capable of "bit-image" graphics. 

Color Graphic Banner utilizes the ability of the CGP-220 
printer to switch back and forth between the text and bit- 
image modes. The text mode is the mode the printer is in 
when it is switched on and is primarily utilized to print 
alpha-numeric characters. By using special printer control 
codes, the CGP can alter the color of text characters and can 
be set to the bit-image mode, in which it "assumes" that it 
will receive instructions for printing a dot or column of dots 
(up to seven dots high) in one or more of up to 640 such 
columns across in one row. In addition, upon entering the 
bit-image mode the printer "assumes" that any such rows of 
dot-columns will be adjacent to one another vertically and, 
thus, a line-feed in this mode leaves no space between rows. 
When exiting the bit-irnagc mode, the color, and other 
conditions, which existed prior to entry, are restored. 

With this information in mind, 1 shall discuss all the 
changes In the listing that follows. 



(Doug Lindsay is a personnel analyst for the City of 
Everett (Wash.) He possesses a bachelor's degree in psy- 
chology and a master's in public administration, Doug 
finds satisfaction in both serious and not-so-serious 
Color Computer programming.) 



The first modification occurs in line 60 which clears twice 
as much string space, since 1 chose to add strings in which to 
build graphics information and store control codes while 
retaining the original string variables. The poke in line 60 is 
optional and allows data to be sent at the highest rate at 
which the CGP-220 can operate. You must, however, make 
sure that the Baud rate select switch (located on the rear 
panel of the printer) is placed next to the proper setting. 
That is, if you elect not to use the poke, set the switch next to 
the number 600. If you leave the poke in, set the switch next 
to the number 2400. 

Line 100 contains a change in the input to variable "LG" 
and, thus, allows for selection of the CGP's 91 text-column 
line width. 

Line 120 prompts for a wider (seven instead of five) sug- 
gested character width because the bit-image line-feed com- 
pacts rows of graphics which makes the Color Graphic 
Banner characters narrower than the non-graphic ones. 

Line 145 adds a brand new input statement which 
prompts the user to select a character color and stores the 
numerical code for the selection in the variable "CL." The 
color codes are listed in the CGP-220 manual, but please 
note that I have chosen to modify two of the designations. 
Pm sorry, but what the book calls violet looks like blue to me 
and vice versa. 

Line 275 directs storage of a series of control codes in 
variable "LF$." CHR$( 18) places the CGP in the bit-image 
mode, CHR$(I3) does a line-feed (remember, it's compact 
because of the bit-image mode) and CHR$(30) causes an 
exit from the bit-image mode, as well as restoration of all 
prior text mode conditions. This allows using simpler basic 
commands to send blank spaces to the printer rather than 
utilizing a more complex print-head positioning routine. 

Line 485 simply sends the CGP's color change control 
code CHR$(27) "T" followed by the numerical color code 
stored in variable "CL." 

Line 510 retains the original program's string variable 
"B$" to control centering of graphic characters on the 
banner. Lines of characters are built in a new variable 
"GF$." This variable builds a line of "solid" color and/ or 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 41 



spaces of a particular height (as specified in variable "H H''). 
The actual color graphic portion of the line consists of the 
following: CHR$(I8), for bit-image initiation; CHR$(28), 
signals repetitions of a graphics dot-column; CH R$(H H*7), 
sends the number of repetitions; CHR$(255), defines the 
dot-column pattern to be repeated (in this case it is a 7-dot 
column). This sequence of codes causes printing of HH*7 
dot-columns in a row. Each column, in turn, is 7 dots high. 
CHR$(30), as you may recall, causes exit to the text mode. 
The "solid" color graphic effect, of course, results from the 
density of the lines of color dot columns "packed" together 
by means of the bit-image line-feed. The banners produced 
are colorful and easily read even from quite a distance. 

Line 540 clears the graphic line-building strings before 
looping to set up the next line of graphic information to be 
sent. 

Line 555 sends a line-feed code merely to empty the prin- 
ter buffer and, thus, avoid incidental printing of garbage. 
This line also clears the screen and prompts for an easy 
restart. I have found that mixing various colors of letters, 
words and/ or symbols by creating them one at a time can 
yeild eye-catching banners, nametags, labels etc. 

Line 560 restarts or prints sorne colorful credits, prior to 
setting the print color to black and ending the program. 

As Mr. Steyer stated in the article that was published with 
the original version, the program supports all ASCII char- 
acters (though the lowercase letters are sans descenders) and 
I Ve found that attractive name lags can be generated in the 
inverse mode. For example, try a character height setting of 
one and width of two. These settings yield elongated graphic 
characters such as those in the sample output. 

I hope you have fun creating your messages in bright color 



graphics. Kids of all ages seem to take great pleasure in 
seeing their name in a Color Graphic Banner and, if youVe 
not too shy, you can drop hints that CGP ink packs (as well 
as paper) make really nice gifts! 




The listing: 

60 CLEAR 500: POKE 150,18 ' MOD T 
O CLEAR EXTRA STRINO SPACE AND P 
OKE C8P'8 HI8HE8T (2400) BAUD RA 

TE 

70 DIM A«(3) ,D«<4) ,E«<6) 

80 60SUB 580 

90 CLS: PRINT"* C. 8- BANNER 
*":PRINT"BY DAVID STEYER":PRINT 
"WITH C8P MODS BY D0U8 LINDSAY": 
PRINT 

100 INPUT "91 OR 132 COLUMN PRINT 
ER (9/13)";L8:IF Le«9 THEN L8«91 

ELSE IF L8>13 THEN L6-132 ELSE 
'C8P MOD FOR 91 COL. CAPABILITY 
110 PR I NT "CHARACTER HEI8HT <1-"J 



HARDWARE 
PRODUCTS FOR THE 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER " 



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Installs In 15 minutes without removing SAM chip Includes tully- 
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unconditional warranty. Please specify board series. 
These upgrades are not compatible with the Color Computer 2. 

4K-16K *20" • 16K-*32K *40»° • 4K-32K *50" 



SERIAL SWITCHER 

Bi-directional switcher allows you to expxand your serial port to 
two Of three peripherols or to connect one peripheral to two or 

three computers. 2 Port» *25»» • 3 Ports •30»" 

Available with rDounted Pilot Light— A«ld 



I.C.S 




Basic ROM 1.2. . 


•35«o 


E.C.B.ROM1.1... 


•60*" 


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Price includes expert installation, 
a 64K RAM Button, 64K Software 
(specify disk or cass.], a 64K User 
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9aDAY UNCONDITIONAL WARRANTY. 
Requires 1.1 or newer Basic ROM, 
Send your operating 285 (F) Series 
Color Computer. TDP100, or Color 

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or Money Order for fastest return. 

For D. or E Series boards, add »20". 

If necessary, add *35" for new ROM. 



UMAS: Cashier's checks and money orders for immediate 
delivery • Personal checks allow 2 weeks • Orders SI 00 to SI 99 
save 10% • $200 and over save 15% • California residents add 
6% • Orders under S25 Odd S2 shipping • COD. odd S4 

441S i. Chapman Av«., $uit« 2S4 



VIDTRON 



the RAINBOW May 1984 



* RADIO SHACKr, COLOR COMPUTER 

ADVANCED IVIATH PROGRAMS 
for 

ENGINEERS • PHYSICISTS • STUDENTS 

FUNCTION GRAPHING MODULE 16K EXT-$19.95 

* HIGH RESOLUTION GRAPHS 

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* PARAMETERS EASY TO CHANGE 

* AUTO-SCALING OPTIMIZES GRAPH SIZE 

* COMPUTE FUNCTION VALUES & ZEROS 

* INTERSECTION OF FUNCTIONS 

* COMPLETE MANUAL — PROGRAM ON TAPE 

CALCULUS MATH MODULE 3ZK EXT-$37.95 

* INCLUDES THE GRAPHING MODULE ABOVE 

* LOAD UP 9 FUNCTIONS AT ONCE 

* FIND AND COMPUTE MAXIMA & MINIMA 

* NUMERIC INTEGRATION & DIFFERENTIATION 

* COMPOSITE AREAS 

* HANDLES PIECEWISE CONTINUOUS FUNCTIONS 

* HARD COPIES OF DATA AND/OR GRAPH 

* COMPLETE MANUAL — ON TAPE OR DISK 

RAINBOW A / ' RAINBOW 

{:tRr.F.c.i.oN V ST. ANN, MO 63074 «RT.nc*TioN 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY OftDEft 
Add $2.00 for shipping 



INT<Le/10)")"i:INPUTHH:IF HH<1 O 
R HH>INT(LG/10) THEN 110 
120 PR I NT "CHARACTER WIDTH <1-10) 
":IFLe-91 THEN PRINT" (7 OR LESS 
RECOMMENDED)" ' CSP MOD FOR SLIS 
HTLY WIDER CHARACTERS KCAUSE OF 

COMPACT BIT-IMAGE LINE FEED 
130 INPUTWD:IF WD<1 OR WD>10 THE 
N 120 

140 INPUT»INVERSE (Y/N)"!Y«:IF Y 
♦-"Y" THEN Y«-" " ELSE Y»-"l" 
145 INPUT"COLOR <BK/R/G/Y/V/M/BL 
) " ; CL* : I FCL«» " BK " THENCL«48 ELSE I 
FCL*= " R " THENCL=49 ELSE I FCL1»« "G "T 
HENCL-50 ELSEIFCL«-"Y"THENCL-51 
ELSEIFCL*="V"THENCL-=52 ELSEIFCL* 
- " M " THENCL-53 ELSE I FCL«- "BL " THEN 
CL=54 ELSE 145 ' CGP mO LOADS PR 
INTER COLOR CODE INTO CL 
150 PRINT"ENTER BANNER TEXT <32 
CHARACTER LIMIT)" 
160 LINEINPUT TX* 
170 IF TX*-"" OR LEN<TX«)>32 THE 
N 150 

180 A«»A«(RY) 

1 as LF«-CHR* (18) +CHR* (13) +CHR» < 3 
0) ' CGP MOD LOADS PRINTER CONTR 
OL CODES FOR BIT- I MAGE LINE FEED 

INTO LF» 
190 PM0DE4,l;PCL31; SCREEN 1,0 



200 IF Y««» " THEN PCLS0 

210 FOR 1=1 TO LEN<TX«) 

220 AbASC(MID«(TX«,I,1))-32 

230 IF A<24 THEN RY-0 ELSE IF A< 

47 THEN RY»1 ELSE IF A<70 THEN R 

Y-2 ELSE RY-3 

240 A=A-<RY*23) 

250 FOR X»0 TO 4 

260 IF A»0 THEN Y->0:GOTO280 

270 Y=VAL("fcH"+MID*(A«(RY) , < <A-1 

)»10)-KX»2)-H,2) ) 

280 D«(X)»»" " 

290 IF Y>127 THEN Y-Y-12e:D« (X)- 

300 IF Y>63 THEN Y-Y-64:D«<X)-LE 
FT«<D«<X), 1)+"1 

310 IF Y>31 THEN Y-Y-32:D«<X)-LE 
FT«(D*(X),2)+"1 

320 IF Y>15 THEN Y-Y-16: D«<X) -LE 
FT«<D*(X),3)+"1 

330 IF Y>7 THEN Y-Y-8: D« (X)-LEFT 
«<D«(X>,4)+»1 

340 IF Y>3 THEN Y«Y-4:D»<X)-LEFT 
♦ <D*<X),5)■^"1 " 

350 IF Y>1 THEN Y«Y-2:D«(X)-LEFT 
♦(D*<X),6)+"1 " 

360 IF Y>0 THEN D«<X)-LEFT«(D«(X 

),7)+"l" 
370 NEXT X 

380 E«(0)-LEFT«<D«(0),5) 



Co Co - Cooler 




• Brings operating 
temperature 
to ambient, 
regardless 
of 

accessory 
load 



• Reduces temperature 
of ENTIRE computer . . . 
not Just the SAM chip 

• Easy l-minute installation 



SOFTWARE 
PRODUCTS FOR THE 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 



• $39.95 



Companion Ke^^board Cover $7.95 
Co Co Software 

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• Add $2.00 Shipping For Continental U.S. 
• Add $4.00 Shipping For Alaska, Hawaii & Canada 
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• Add $3.00 For 220-250 Volt Model 
• Co/1/. Residents Add 6^% Sales Tax 
• Will Ship C.O.D. On U.S.A. Shipments Only 
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REM Industries, Inc. 

9420 'B^LurlineAve.. Chatswotth, CA 9131 1 

(213)341-3719 



EDITTRON TM 

Full-Screen BASIC Program Editor 
SAVES YOU TIMEI 



Let EDITTRON cut your programming time In half! 
Yoo will appreciate the absolute ease at which this 
Rjll-Screen Editor allows you to INPUT, EDIT, and DEBUG 
your BASIC programs. EDiTTRON performs these functions: 



CURSOR-CONTIK>L 

Directional Movement 
Screen Scrolling 
Home the Cursor 
Limit tf\e Cursor 
Down Page 
Up Page 
Search a Une 
Call a Une 
Find a String 
Repeat Find 



SCREEN-EDITING 

Change Characters 
Extend a Une 
Kill a Une 
Insert Characters 
Delete Characters 
Move a Une 
Split a Une 
Copy a Une 
Merge Two Unes 
Auto-Numbering 



Other fecrtures Include: Aufo-Repeohng key^. Key Tone, 
user-friendlv Prompts arKi Error Messoges. and 24 pages 
of compreherwive, easy-to-reod Documenlalion. 



EDITTRON is a 3K, ful»y positaon-independent :MacNne 
Language program final requires a mininKim 16K c4 RAM: 
and Extended Color BASIC 

CASSEHE $ 35 DISKETTE 40 




4418 E. Chapmon Ave., Suite 294 
Orange, CA 92669 
(714) 639-4070 



VIDTRON 




390 E«<l>-RieHT«(I>«(0>,3)-*-LEFT«< 
D«(l>,2) 

400 E«(2)>HID«<D«(1) ,3,5> 

410 E«<3) -RIGHT* (D«(1>,1>+UEFT«< 

D«<2> ,4) 

420 E*<4)-RIQHT*<D*<2) ,4)-H_EFT«< 
D«(3> ,1) 

430 E«(5)=MID«(D«(3) ,2,5) 

440 E« <6> -RIGHT* (D« (3> p2>+LEFT«( 

I>*(4>,3> 

450 FORX-0 TO 6: FOR Y-1 TO 9 
460 IF MID*<E*<X),Y, D-Y* THEN P 
RESET <Y+(I-1)»G,3+X) ELSE PSET<Y 
+ <I-'1)»8,3+X) 
470 NEXTYpX 
480 NEXT I 

485 PRINT#-2,CHR*<27> "T" CHR»<C 
L) * CGP MOD SENDS CONTROL CODE 
FOR COLOR <CL> SELECTED IN LINE 
145 TO PRINTER 

490 FOR I-LEN<TX*)»8 TO 0 STEP-1 
500 FOR Y-1 TO 10 

510 IF PPOINT<I,Y)-0 THEN B*»P*+ 
9TRIN0«<HH, "♦») :GF»«GF*+CHR*<18) 
+CHR* <28> +CHR* <HH»7) +CHR« (255) +C 
HR*(30> ELSE B«-B*+STRING«(HH, " 
") :GF*-QF*+STRING*<HH, " ") 'CGP 
MOD IN THIS LINE BUILDS LINES OF 
"SOLID" COLOR AND/OR SPACES IN 



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tel 203/6if4-l81? 



Mr Hi 



68 KELLY ROAD 
SO WINDSOR CT 
06074 



GF« 

520 NEXTY 

530 FOR R-1 TO WD:PRINT«-2, STRIN 
G« < INT (LG-LEN (B«> ) /2, 32) ; GF«| : PR 
INT#-2,LF»5:NEXT R ' CGP MOD IN 
THIS LINE SENDS COLOR/SPACES <GF 
«) AND BIT-IMAGE LINE FEED <LF«) 

TO PRINTER. NOTE THAT B« IS RET 
AINED TO GOVERN THE CENTERING OF 

CHARACTERS ON THE PAPER 
540 B»="":GF«="" CGP MOD HERE 
CLEARS GRAPHICS STRING (GF«> 
550 NEXT I 

555 CLS:PRINT»-2,LF«:PRINTa203, " 
AGAIN Y/N?"| ' CGP MOD HERE SEND 
S A LINE FEED TO CLEAR THE PRINT 
ER BUFFER. REMAINDER OF THIS LI 
NE ALLOWS EASY RE-ENTRY WHEN CHA 
NGING LETTER OR WORD COLOR 
560 A«- I NKE Y« : I FA*- " " THEN560ELSE 
IFA«<>"Y"THENPRINT#-2, " * C. G. 
BANNER* BY DAVID STEYER 19 
82 RAINBOW MAGAZINE": PR I NTtt-2,C 
HR*<27)"T"CHR*<54);»with CQP-220 
mods by Doug Lindsay 1984":PRIN 
T#-2 , CHR« < 27 ) " T " CHR* < 48 > ( STR I NG« 
(10, 10) :ENDELSE90 

580 A« ( 0 ) - " 63 1 8C03 1 8052800000000 
2B60DA8007568E2D5C0C644444C60452 
88AC9A01 1 10000000088842082082084 
222000 1 1 DF7 1 0000 1 09F2 1 0000000C6 1 
1 00000 1 F000000000003 1 80004444400 
074675CC5C0230842 1 1 C074426443E07 
44260C5C01 195F10840FC21E0C5C0746 
1 E8C5C0FC44442 1 00 " 
590 A«<l>-"7462EeC5C07462F0C5C00 
3180630006300C61 1000888820820003 
E0F8000820e22220074444200807442D 
AD98022A3 1 FC620F463E8C7C0746 1 084 
5C0F463 1 8C7C0FC2 1 E843E0FC2 1 £8420 
0746 1 0BC5C08C63F8C6207 1 0842 1 1 C03 
8842 1 49808CA98A4A20842 1 0843E08EE 
B58C6208C73S9C620 " 
600 A« ( 2 > - " 7463 1 8C5C0F463E842007 
463 1 ACDE0F463EA4A207460E0C5C0F90 
842 1 0808C63 1 8C5C08C63 1 8A8808C635 
AEE208C544546208C54421080F844E44 
3E0390842 1 0E004 1 04 1 0400E 1 0842 138 
023AA42 108001 1 1F4 100000000000000 
0 1 C 1 7C5E0843D 1 8C5C000 1 F084 1 E0085 
F 1 8C5C000 1 D 1 F4 1 C0 " 
610 A«(3>-»0191E42100001F1785C08 
43D1 8C62020 1 842 1 1 C0 1 0042 1 4980842 
32E4 A206 1 0842 1 1 C0003D5AD6A0003D 1 
8C62000 1 D 1 8C5C0003D 1 F420000 1 F 1 78 
420003D 1 8420000 1 F0707C0023C8420C 
0002318C5C0002318A880002B5AD5C00 
022A22A200023 1 784C0003E2223E0 " 
620 RETURN 



44 Ihe RAINBOW May 1984 



i 



VIE 



The Library Concept 

State of Ihe Art, Quality, Integrity, 
Compdlibility and Affordability. Five 
things good software must possess. 
Five things fhal epitomize the VIP 
Library"*. Each program is the 
diamond of its class, true excellence. 
These programs are first in features, 
first in power, first in memory, and 
all are affordabiy priced. And for 
your convenience all disk programs 
can be bdcked up. 

Stale Of The Att 

All Librafy programs are written in 
machine code specifically for the 
Color Computer, to work without 
the inierference of a separate 
operating syslem such as FLEX. From 
this come^^ speed and more work- 
space for you. Unlike other programs 
for the Color Computer which are 
said to be 64K compatible, VIP 
Library"* programs are not limited to 
between 24 and 30K of workspace in 
64K. library programs have Memory 
Sense wilh BANK SWITCHING to 
fully use all 64K, thus giving up to 
51 K with a disk version and up to 
53K with a tape version. 

Easv To Use 

Each library program was carefully 
d<»signed to be extremely easy to 
use. Built-in on-screen help tables 
are at your fingertips, as are menus 
of all kinds. Every effort is made to 
use logical, intuitive and easy-to- 
remember commands. The manuals 
have been thoughtfully prepared to 
cover every aspect of the program, 
and they have complete tutorials to 
get you goin^ right away. We set the 
Fitandardf 



Productivity 
Tools for 



Modern 
Times 



Lowercase Displays 

5tate-of-ihe-Art graphics allow 
instant use of four display colors, and 
eight lowercase displays featuring 
descending lowercase letters. You 
can select from 51, 64 or 85 columns 
by 21 or 24 lines per screen, with 
wide or narrow characters in the 64 
display. These screttns provide a 
pleasant and rclaxinR way to perform 
your tasks, with a*i much text on the 



. , PICTURE getting your 
instantaneous investment report 
over the phone, using it in your 
spreadsheet anlculation, 
generating a report, and writing 
a memo including that report 
and data from your database with 
your word processor, and all this 
with VIP Library^ programs . . /' 




screen as is possible. Each program is 
easy to learn and a joy to use. We 
take pride in the stringent testing 
done to make these programs per- 
form flawlessly. Every feature, every 
convenience, sleek, simple and 
elegant. 

All library programs are 
compatible. Transfer and use of files 
between programs is easy and 
carefree. What's better, when you 
have learned one program the others 
will come easy. And every program is 
the best of its kind available. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATfON 
S£AL 

The Library Prograif*% 

For your writing needs is the VIP 
Writer'", and its spelling checker, the 
VIP Speller'". For financial planning 
and mathematical calculations you 
can use the VIP Calc'". To manage 
your information and send multiple 
mailings there is the VIP Database'". 
For sending all these files to and 
from home or the office and for 
talking to your friends you can have 
the VIP Terminar". Finally, to fix 
disks to keep all your library files in 
good repair we offer the VIP Disk- 
ZAP'-. 

mnl Oiik Operating System 

The Disk versions each have a Mini 
Disk Operating System which will 
masterfully handle from 1 to 4 drives. 
It offers smooth operation for such 
features as the ability to. read a 
directory, display free space on the 
disk, kill files, save and automatically 
verify files, and load, rename and 
append files, library programs simply 
do not have the limitations of BASIC. 

Professionalism 

The library will grace your work 
area with the professionalism it 
deserves. Welcome the VIP library'" 
into your home and office. 



A description of each of the 
Library programs, with the 
special sale price, is contained 
in the following pages. Please 
indulge! 

©1983 by Softlaw Corporation 



VIP Writer™/^ 

(Formerly Super "Color" Writer II) V MgJuP^ 

By Tim Nelson V ^'^'Oi 

Tf: f . RAiNBOVV, HOI COCO, COL ><5££Ji 

nm 1 COLOR COMPUTER M . i 

The most powerful and easy-to-use word processor is available in the 
showpiece and workhorse of the Library: The VIP Writer^*. Because of its 
undisputed superiority over all Color Computer word processors, it was 
selected by Dragon Dat3 Ltd. of England and TANO In the U.S., to be the 
Official Word Processor for their line of Dragon microcomputers. 

The result of two years of research, the VIP Writer"" offers every 
feature you could desire from a word processor. It is the most 
powerful, fastest, most dependable and most versatile. With the hi-res 
display, workspace and compatibility features built into the Library the 
Writer is also the most usable. 

. Nearly every feature and opOon possible to implement on the 
Color Computer. The design of the program is excellent; the 
programming is flawless . . . Features for the professional, yet it is easy 
enough for newcomers to master . . . Certainly one of the best word 
processors available for any computer . . " October 1983 "Rainbow" 

"Wordprocess/ng with VIP Writer is like driying a high-performance 
\/ehicle . . This Ferarri of a package has more features than Telewriter, 
Easywriter (for the IBM PC), or Applewriter/' October 1983 "Hot CoCo" 

The Writer will work with you and your printer to do things you 
always wanted to do. Every feature of your printer can be put to use, 
every character set, every graphics capability at any baud rate, EVEN 
PROPORTIONAL SPACING. All this with simplicity and elegance. You 
can even automatically print multiple copies. 

Although all versions feature tape save and load, the disk version 
provides the Mini Disk Operating System common to the whole 
Library, plus disk file linking for conttnous printing. 

Professional features of particular note: 

■ Memory-Sense with BANK SWITCHING to fully utilize 64K, giving 
not Just 24 or 30K, but up to 61 K of workspace with the rompak version 
and 50K with the disk version. 

• TRUE FORMAT WINDOW allowing you to preview the printed page 
ON THESCREEN BEFORE PRINTING,showing centered lines, headers, 
FOOTNOTES, page breaks, page numbers, & margins in line lengths of 
up to 240 characters. It makes HYPHENATION a snap. 

» A TRUE EDITING WINDOW in all 9 display modes for those extra 
wide reports and graphs (up to 240 columns!). 

» FREEDOM to imbed any number of PRINTER CONTROL CODES 
anywhere, EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT. 

■ Full 4-way cursor control, sophisticated edit commands, the ability 
to edit any BASIC program or ASCII textfile. SEVEN DELETE 
FUNCTIONS, LINE INSERT, LOCATE AND CHANGE, wild card locate, 
up to TEN SIMULTANEOUS block manipulations, word wrap around, 
programmable tabs, display memory used and left, non-breakable 
space, and headers, footers and FOOTNOTES. 

• Automatic justification, automatic pagination, automatic centering, 
automatic flush right, underlining, superscripts, subscripts, pause 
print, single-sheet pause, and print comments. 

■ Type-ahead, typamatic key repeat and key beep for the pros, ERROR 
DETECTION and UNDO MISTAKE features, 3 PROGRAMMABLE func- 
tions, auto column creation, and an instant on-screen HELP TABLE. 

^ . it- 



(Includes VIP < 



VIP. 



I 



/f^^^ (Includes VIP Speller) 

HAINBOW - ^ 

^VIP Speller'^ 

fcVnu • .ii^iifTiii k*.o«fi i^,r»r un if^r lurr. a¥V' rainbow 
By Bill Argyros ' ' .i- 

Gone are the eyestrain, boredom and fatigue from endless proof- 
reading. VIP Speller'" is the fastest and most user-friendly speller for 
your CoCo. It can be used to correct any ASCII file — including VIP 
Library'" files and files from Scripsif" and Telewriter'" It automatically ( 
checks files for words to be corrected, marked for special attention or 
even added to the dictionary. You can even view the word in context, 
with upper and lowercase. VIP Speller'" comes with a specially edited 
50,000 word dictionary which, unlike other spellers for the CoCo, is 
indexed for the greatest speed. The shorter your file, the quicker the 
checking time. And words can be added to or deleted from the 
dictionary or you can create one of your own. VIP Speller'" also comes 
with the Library's mini disk operating system for easy disk 
manipulation. 

f ^. ^.1 

Lowercase displays nOf available with this program. 



VIP Calc^'* - 

(Formerly Super "Color" Calc) RAINBOW 

CfHllKCAIiON 

By Kevin Herrboldt "-t^^ 

You can forget the other toy calcs — The real thing is here! No other 
spreadsheet for the Color Computer gives you: 

• 20 ROWS BY 9 COLUMNS ON THE SCREEN AT ONCE 

• LOWERCASE LETTERS WITH DESCENDERS 

• UP TO 16 CONCURRENT DISPLAY WINDOWS 

• FLOATING-POINT MATH 

• CHOICE OF SINGLE AND DOUBLE PRECISION 

• WORKS WITH BASE 2, 10, AND 16 NUMBERS 

• UP TO 512 COLUMNS BY 1024 ROWS 

• USER DEFINABLE WORKSHEET SIZE FOR MORE MEMORY 

• LOCATE FUNCTION TO FIND CHECK NUMBERS, NAMES, ETC. 

• COLUMN/ROW MULTIPLE SORTS 

• PROGRAMMABLE FUNCTIONS 

• IMBEDDABLE PRINTER CONTROL CODES 

• 21 ALTERABLE PRINT FORMAT PARAMETERS 

• ON-LINE HELP TABLES 

• DOES NOT REQUIRE FLEX OR BASIC 

VIP Calc'" is truly the finest and easily the most powerful electronic 
WorkihecM and financial modeling program dvaildble for the Color 
Computer. Now every Color Computer owner has jccesb to a 
ralculoting and planning tool better than VisiCalc'", Gorrwining all its 
features and commands and then some, WITH USABLE DISPLAYS. Use 
VisiCdk templates with VIP Calc'"! 

There's nothing left out of VIP Calc". Every feature you've come to 
rely on with VisiCalc'" is there, and then some. You get up to 5 TIMES 
the screen display area of other spreadsheets for the Color Computer 
and Memory-Sense with BANK SWITCHING to give not fusi 24, or 30, 
but UP TO 33KOF WORKSPACE IN 64K!!! This display and memory 
dilow you the FULL SIZE, USABLE WORKSHEETS you require- You also 
get: User definable worksheet size, up to 512 columns by 1024 rows! * 
Up to SIXTEEN VIDEO DISPLAY WINDOWS to compjre and contrast 
resulli of changes ♦ 16 DIGIT PRECISION ♦ Sine, Cosine and other 
ingnnomtnric functions. Averaging, Exponents, Algebraic functions, 
.ind BASE 2, 8, 10 or 16 entry * Column and Row, Ascending and 
Dfstcndin^ SORTS for comparison of results * LOCATE FORMULAS 
OR TillES IN CELLS * Easy entry, replication and block moving of 
frames * Global or Local column width control up to 76 characters 
width per cell * Create titles of up to 255 characters per cell * Limitless 
programmable functions * Typamatic Key Repeat * Key Beep * 
rypeahead * Print up to 255 column worksheet* Prints at any baud rate 
ffonri 110 to 9600 * Print formats savable along with workbheet * Enter 
PRINTER CONTROL CODES for customized printing with letter quality 
or dot matrix printer * Combine spreadsheet tables with VIP Writer'" 
doruments to create ledgers, projections, statistical Jrid financial 
reports and budgets. 

Both versions feature Tape save and load, but the disk version also 
has the Mini Disk Operating System of the entire Library. 

(Comes t;ine » t 
32K has no hl-res displays, sort or edit. 



Check These VIP Database 

^ ^ 1^ (Formerly Super "Color" Database) 

I !l«.M'^Mm# D»>I^A^« INCLUDES MAIL MERGE CAPABILITIES TCM3i 

LIDiaiy rilC«« ByTlmNelsor, 



■ Fully CoCo 2 Compatible 

■ Nine Display Formats: 32 by 16 
51,64,85 by 21 or 24 

■ True Lowercase & Descenders 

■ Four Different Display Colors 
» 32 & 64K Compatible 

■ Memory Sense - Bank Switching 

■ Up to 51 K Disk, 53K Tape 

■ Mini Disk Operating System 
• Compatible With All Printers 

VIP Terminar;^, 

(Formerly Super "Color" Terminal) Ifr 111 

RATED BEST IN JANUARY 1984 "RAINBOW" ftAfNBOW 

By Dan Nelson 

From your home or office you can join the itimmunkiilltin 
revolution. The VIP TerminaP* opens the world to you. You cjn 
monitor your mvestments with the Dow jones Information Service, Or 
broaden your horizons with The Source or Compuserve, huHeiirl 
boards, other computers, even the mainframe at work. 

For your important communication needs you've got to |!d 
beyond software that only lets you chat. You need a smart If^rmntl .o 
that you can send and receive programs, messages, even other V%W 
Library^" files. VIP Terminar" has "more features than ( □iTrrti um c a ricin^ 
software for CP/M, IBM and CP/M 86 computers." Herb hi^dmiti, 
Radio Electronics, February 1984. 

FEATURES: Choice of 8 hi-res lowercase diplays * Memory-Sen^e w(ih 
BANK SWITCHING for full use of workspace * Selectively prml ^dU at 
baud rates from 110 to 9600 * Full 128 character ASCII k'ybtsird * 
Automatic graphic mode * VVord mode (word wrap) for urtlirok<?Fi 
words * Send and receive Library files. Machine Language & fiA^^C 
programs * Set communications baud rate from HO to 9600, Dupftiv! 
Half/Full/Echo, Word length: 7 or 8, Parity: Odd/Even or None, Sttip 
Bits: 1-9 * Local linefeeds to screen * Save and load ASCII files, M,it hinr 
Code & BASIC programs ♦ Lowercase masking * 10 huy*lruki< 
Multiplier (MACRO) buffers to perform repetitive |ifp-rri(rv log^?n 
tasks and send short messages * Programmable prompt or d^lay f«r 
send next line * Selectable character trapping * Send up to ten Nhoft 
messages (KSMs), each up to 255 characters long, automatically, toliVf 
money when calling long distance. ' 

All versions allow tape load and save of files and KSMs, but the iihk 
version also has the Mini Disk Operating System common to {hi? 
Library. 

(Tape comes in 16K but without hi-res displays) 



^^^^ ^g^^^^^^m Lyndale Avenue 

^^^■^I^H^^HB Minnesota 

TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. VisiCalc is a trademark of VisiCorp. 

AUTHOR'S SUBMISSIONS 
ARE ENCOURAGED. 



(Formerly Super "Color" Database) 
INCLUDES MAIL MERGE CAPABILITIES Tr>0^ 
By Tim Nelson 

This high speed MACHINE LANGUAGE program fills all your 
Information management needs, be they for your business or home. 
And it does so better than any other database program for the Color 
Computer, featuring machine code, lowercase screens and mailmerge 
capabilities. Inventory, accounts, mailing lists, family histories, you 
name it, the VIP Database^" will keep track of all your data, and it will 
merge VIP Writer" files. 

The VIP Database'" features the Library Memory Sense with BANK 
SWITCHING and selectable lowercase displays for maximum utility. It 
will handle as many recordsasfit on your disk or disks. It is structured in 
a simple and easy to understand menu system with full prompting for 
easy operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All 
files are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. Full sort of records is 
provided for easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending 
or descending alphabetic or numeric order. Records can be searched 
for specific entries, using multiple search criteria. With database form 
merge you may also combine files, sort and print mailing lists, print 
"boiler plate" documents, address envelopes - the list is endless. The 
math package even performs arithmetic operations and updates other 
fields. Create files compatible with the VIP Writer'*and VIP Terminal'". 
Unlimited print format and report generation with the ability to imbed 
control codes for use with all printers. 

As with ail other Library programs, the Database features the 
powerful Mini Disk Operating System. _ 

64K Required for math package & mail merge rainbOW 

CERIlHCAIiUN 
SEAi 

VIP Disk-ZAP^" 

(Formerly Super "Color" Disk-ZAP) 
By Tim Nelson 

Your database file disk, form letter disk, or BASIC program disk 
goes bad. An I/O error stops loading, or even backing up of the disk. 
Weeks, even months of work sit on the disk, irretrievable. Now 
catastrophic disk errors are repairable, quickly and with confidence, 
using the VIP Disk-ZAP'". It lis the ultimate repair utility for simple and 
quick repair of all disk errors. Designed with the non-programmer in 
mind, the VIP Disk-ZAP"* will let you retrieve all types of bashed files, 
BASIC and Machine Code programs. 

This high-speed machine code disk utility has a special dual cursor 
screen display to look at the data on your disk. You are able to: Verify or 
modify disk sectors at will * Type right onto the disk to change 
unwanted program names or prompts * Send sector contents to the 
printer ♦ Search the entire disk for any grouping of characters * Copy 
sectors * Backup tracks or entire disks * Repair directory tracks and 
smashed disks ♦ Full prompting to help you every step of the way ♦ 50- 
plus page Operators Manual which teaches disk structure and repair. 

Lowercase displays not available with this program. 



SFor Orders ONLY 
— Call Ton Free — W 

1-800-328-2737 

Order Status and Software Support call (612) 881-2777 
Available at Dealers everywhere. 
H your Dealer is out of stock ORDER DIRECT! 

In Canada distributed by Kelly Software Distributors, LTD. 
P.O. Box 11932, Edmonton. Alberta T5J 3L1 (403) 421-8003 
MAIL ORDERS: $3.00 U.S. Shipping ($5.00 CANADA; $10.00 OVER- 
SEAS). Personal checks allow 3 weeks. 

All Disk Programs are also available on 3'' Diskettes for the 
Amdek Color AMDISK-III Micro-Floppy Disk System for an 
additional $3.00 each. ccjisbs by Softlaw Corporation 



RAINBOW Info 



How To Read Rainbow 

Please note that all the BASIC 
program listings you will find in the 
Rainbow are formatted for a 32- 
character screen — so they will show up 
just as they do on your CoCo screen. 
One easy way to check on the accuracy 
of your typing is to compare what 
character "goes under" what. If the 
characters match — and your line 
endings come out the same — you have 
a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But. do read the text before you start 
typing. 

Finally, the little cassette symbol on 
listings indicates that program Is 
available through our Rainbow On Tape 
service. An order form for this service Is 
on the Insert card bound In the 
magazine. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Seal 

The Rainbow Certification Seal Is our 
way of helping you, the consumer. The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product which carries the Seal 
has been physically seen by us and that 
It does. Indeed, exist. 

Manufacturers of products — 
hardware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their 
products to the Rainbow for 
certification. We ascertain that their 
products are, in actuality, what they 
purport to be and. upon such 
determination, award a Seal. This lets 
you know that we have seen the product 
and that it does, indeed, exist. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction." The certification 
process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read 
our reviews to determine whether the 
product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the Rainbow an6 
the certification process. Certification is 
open and available to any product 
pertaining to CoCo. A Seal will be 
awarded to any commercial product, 
regardless of whether the firm 
advertises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of 
instances of violation of Seal use. 



Using Machine Language 

Machine Language programs are one 
of the f eatu res of the Rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these 
programs into memory so that you can 
operate them. 

The easiest way Is by using an Editor- 
Assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor<assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into your CoCo and 
then have the editor-assembler 
assemble them into specific instructions 
that are understood by the 6809 chip 
that controls your computer. 

When you usean editor-assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the Rainbow's 
listing Into CoCo. 

Another method of getting an 
assembly language listing into CoCo is 
called "hand assembly." As the name 
implies, you do the assembly by hand. 
This can sometimes cause problems 
when you have to set up an ORIGIN 
statement or an EQUATE. In short, you 
have to know something about 
assembly to hand assemble some 
programs. 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS:";HEX$(I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE l,VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 M+lrGOTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 1 6K 
CoCo. If you have 32K, change the 
&H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00. 



What's A CoCo 

CoCo is an affectionate name which 
was first given to the TRS-80 Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. As such, it is almost a generic 
term for three computers, all of which 
are very much alike. 

When we use the term CoCo, we refer 
to the TRS-80 Color Computer, the TDP 
System-100 Computer and the Dragon- 
32 Computer, It is easier than using the 
three "given" names throughout the 
Rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific 
computer is mentioned, the application 
is for that specific computer. However, 
since the TDP System-100 and TRS-80 
Color are, for all purposes, the same 
computer in a different case, these terms 
are almost always Interchangable. 



Rainbow Check PLUS 

The small boxes that you see accom- 
panying programs In the Rainbow 
"Check system," which is designed to 
help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Checl< PLUS will count the 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the num- 
bers you get to those printed in the 
Rainbow, On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given. When you 
reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Checl< PLUS, type in 
the program and CSAVE it for later use, 
then type in the command RUN and 
press [ENTER]. Once the program has 
run, type NEW [ENTER] to remove it 
from the area where the program you're 
typing in will go. 

Now, whenever you press the down 
arrow key, your CoCo will give you a 
checksum based on the length and con- 
tent of the program in memory. This is to 
check against the numbers printed in 
the Rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure that 
you typed In the correct basic program 
code. For more details on this helpful 
utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
page 21 of the February 1984 Rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
In the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 

10 CLS.X=256*PEEK(35)+178 

20 CLEAR25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEK(35)+178 

40 FOR Z=X TOX+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THEN80ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERROR":STOP 
80 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182,1,106,167,140.60,134 
100 DATA 126,183,1,106,190,1,107 
110 DATA 175,140,50.48,140,4,191 
120 DATA 1,107,57,129,10.38,38 
130 DATA 52,22,79,158,25,230,129 
140 DATA 39. 12, 171,128,171,128 
150 DATA 230,132,38,250,48,1,32 
160 DATA 240,183,2,222.48,140,14 
170 DATA 159,166,166,132,28,254 
180 DATA 189,173,198,53.22,126,0 
190 DATA 0,135,255,134,40.55 
200 DATA 51,52,41,0 



48 the RAINBOW May 1984 



TUTORIAL 



RAM/ ROM 
Upgrade Roundup 

By Ed Ellers 
Rainbow Technical Assistant 



There have been many words written on how to 
upgrade the various models of the Color Computer 
and TDP System 100 to get more memory and 
Extended Color BASIC. With the presence of at least four 
different versions of the CoCo's main circuit board (each 
changing various aspects of memory expansion), it's easy to 
get confused trying to find out how to do the job. At the 
Rainbow editorial office, we ve kept a two-page sheet 
around that tells how to do a number of different mods. 
When 1 found out how different the Color Computer 2 was 
from the earlier models, 1 decided it was time for an update 
to put all the upgrade information together in one place. 



What's The Difference? 

When Radio Shack first introduced the Color Computer 
in 1980, it started not with version A, as one rnight expect, 
but with a board identified as version D. This circuit board 
was designed to accept either 4Korl6KofRAM and either 
8K or 16K of ROM. The first 8K was for Color BASIC with 
the second 8K reserved for future use, but by the time the 
CoCo was actually announced Radio Shack had decided to 
offer Extended Color BASiC. (Fortunjitely, they did not 
repeat the earlier mistake on the Model I where they set up 
the unit for 4K of ROM and had to go to an extender board 
for the 12K Level II BASIC.) In 1981 Radio Shack decided to 
offer the CoCo with 32K R AM ; to do it Tandy modified the 
board to use half of the capacity of a set of 64K RAM chips. 
Since the modification was rather complex and hard to do in 
production, they went to the version E board which could 
accept 4K, 16K or 64K RAMs. 

In 1982, as the TDP Electronics division prepared to enter 
the personal computer market with the System 100, Tandy 
developed what it calls the NC board (which is often referred 
to as the 285 or F board). This board was designed to meet 
slightly relaxed FCC specifications, and used either 16K or 
64K RAM chips. The NC board was designed to make 
available the all-RAM mode that all CqCos had the poten- 
tial for, but which had not been implemented in the earlier 
designs. The NC board went into all TDP System 100 units; 
when Radio Shack dropped the 4K CoCo, the NC board 
began to appear in their units late that year. 



''When I found out how different the 
Color Computer 2 was from the earlier 
models, I decided it was time for an 
update to put all the upgrade informa- 
tion together in one place. 



Because the CoCo was priced quite a bit higher than its 
close competition, Tandy decided to redesign the entire 
machine into a unit that would cost much less to manufac- 
ture. The assignment, making a computer that was much 
cheaper than the existing CoCo but did exactly the same 
things, would appear difficult to anyone who is familiar with 
the CoCo's already efficient design. But the engineers in 
Fort Worth were able to do it, partly by getting rid of the 
regulated + 1 2V, - 1 2 V and -5 V power supplies with the use 
of new single-supply RAM chips in the I6K models of the 
new Color Computer 2. This was i^t about the same time that 
Radio Shack decided to offer OS-9 and an improved key- 
board for the CoCo; the CoCo 2 was initially sold in 16K 
versions only and the regular CoCo (which was equipped for 
64K, but advertised as 32K) was given the new keyboard and 
a white case and renamed the 64K Color Computer. 

If you have a Color Computer with a black border around 
the keyboard and a RAM size button on top, you have either 
a D or E board. If you have a CoCo with a gray border 
around the keyboard and a model number ending in A (or if 
you have a TDP System 100), you have an NC board; if it 
has Radio Shack's **32K" RAM then you already have 64K. 
If you have the Color Computer 2, it's a whole new 
ballgame. 



A Few Precautions 

1) Unplug the computer before you start making ^ny of 
these modifications. Even though the machine is turned off. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 49 



there may still be a small current flowing in the Cocoa's 
circuitry, which could cause damage when you start plug- 
ging and unplugging chips; there will definitely be 1 20 volts 
present on the power transformer, and you could get a very 
nasty (not to mention dangerous) shock if you make contact 
with it! 



heat needed for soldering, but the heat of the bigger irons 
and guns (designed for radio, TV repair work) can easily 
damage them. A grounded iron (with a three-prong plug) is 
helpful, but not really necessary; if you have a cordless 
soldering iron, it would be ideally suited for this work. 



4K to 16K 



"The D and E board upgrades take a 
bit of wiring to get 64K . . . the NC 
board is not particularly difficult, and 
the Color Computer 2 is the easiest of 
all " 



2) The RAM chips (and, to a lesser extent, the other 
integrated circuits in the computer) can be damaged by 
static electricity. The new chips you will be installing will 
usually be on a black conductive foam pad. Just before you 
install them, touch the pad to either the shield (if any) over 
the circuit board or to the RF modulator unit's metal case. 
(Use the pad to hold the old RAM chips you took out, so 
thpy will be protected until you install them in something 
else.) 

3) Use a soldering iron (not a gun) rated at around 40 
watts or less. The components and circuit board can take the 




OUR 

PROGRAMS AREN'T 
JUST FOR KIDS 

pmtfom iom mm iwmmmm m iifsmss MtpnMMS 

■ QOLF to grmt fun with our golf gaw. Onv to four plMyor$ c«n 
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and dalhm-a a acoraeanl at tfw and al aach round, Uaa on Radio Shack 
Color Compu^ flBK Cxtandad Color Baale^ 

m FOfKSET'MC'NOT MAIL MYNDER Navar forgot a friand. With Mall 
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print a ralum addraaa with aach antry. Mall Myndar printa on two wtda 
dry gum, or adftaahr^backad maillr^g labala, DIak Syatam allows maxi- 
mum atorago capacity: Caaaatta Syatam atoraa up to 75 addraaaaa. Uaa 
on Radio Shack Color Computar (16K Cxtandod Color Baalc), i 

□ YE8'<S•ndm•lh•prog^•mslh•w•c^«cMdt>•low ihiveencloMd ■ chack or mon«y ordsr 
Q S«nd mo turthar informilion itxxit great businatt ind entartlinment progrims 

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EACH 


EXTENDED 

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FORGET MC NOT MAIL MYNCMER 

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Disk (No REMt3100) 


$12 95 




YOUR ADDRESS 


SuO Total 
(Sntppinfl 
InctuM) 




Address 




Tax (NC 
R«s add 
4%) 






State Zip 


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U 


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Accm* Prolan 

PO Bom 23275 
Ctmlott: NO 28212 




To install I6K RAM in a 4K CoCo (D or E board), you 
need only a set of eight 41 16 RAM chips. These should be 
rated at 200 nanoseconds or faster (which most are these 
days). When you open the case and remove the shield, you 
will find the 4K chips in sockets U20-U27. Remove them one 
at a time by gently prying them out with a small screwdriver 
or nail file; insert a 16K chip in place of each one, with the 
notch on one end in the same direction. Now locate two 
jumpers marked 4K on one side and 1 6K on the other; one is 
next to the 6883 SAM chip (U 10) and the other is between 
the two 6821 PI A chips. Change each of them to the 16K 
position. With Color BASIC, you should now get a response 
of 14631 to PR/NT MEM. 



All The Way to 64K 

To upgrade a 4K or 16K CoCo to64K, you will need a set 
of eight 4164 64K RAM chips, as well as a few feet of thin 
insulated wire (wire-wrap wire is normally used, but you can 
also use wire taken out of telephone cable). The D and E 
board upgrades take a bit of wiring to get 64K (the D version 
has to be rewired even to get 32K); the NC board is not 
particularly difficult, and the Color Computer 2 is the easi- 
est of all. On a D or E board, I would first install the chips 
and get the computer going as a 32K unit before doing the 
64K modification. (If you have the D or E board, check the 
Color BASIC ROM's copyright date; if it's marked (C) 'SO 
you will need to replace it. See basic ROM Upgrades 
below.) 

D Board: This board has only the two jumpers that I 
mentioned in the I6K upgrade instructions. After removing 
the shield cover, check to see that the jumper next to the 
6883 SAM chip (marked UIO) is in the 16K position and 
remove the jumper between the two PI A chips. To change 
the power connections to the RAM chips, bend up pins 1,8 
and 9 of each chip. (With the notched end of the chip facing 
away from you, pin 1 is at the upper left, pin 8 is at the lower 
left and pin 9 is on the lower right.) After inserting the R A M 
chips in place of the old 16K chips, wire pins 1 and 8 of each 
RAM chip to pin 9 of that chip's socket. Wire the pin 9s on 
all the chips together and connect them to pin 35 (the sixth 
pin from the top on the right side) of the S A M chip. Connect 
pin 1 2 of U4 to pin 1 6 of U8. Check to make sure that none of 
the bent-up pins are touching anything, and that all the pins 
are well below the edge of the shield wall. (Skip the next 
paragraph.) 

E Board: There are five jumpers in this board and two 
more jumper locations that don't have jumper plugs on 
them. Move the jumper located between U8 and U4 and the 
three jumpers next to the keyboard connector to the 32K 
position, and check to see that the jumper just below C44 is 
set to the 1 6K 32K position. Solder the two pins next to C44 
together; find the three pins (marked LOW and HIGH) next 
to U29 and solder the LOW pin to the center pin. Cut off one 



50 the RAINBOW May 1964 



side of each of the capacitors C6 1 , C3 1 , C64, C35, C67, C45, 
C70and C48. Replace each of the 16K RAMs with the64K 
chips. 

With 32K RAM, you should get a response of 3IOI5 to 
PRINT MEM {24^11 with Extended Color BASIC). If all is 
well, unplug the computer again. Pull U29 (74LS02) and 
U 1 1 (74LS 1 38) from their sockets, bend up pins 4, 5 and 6 of 
U29 and pin 5 of U 1 1 and reinsert them. Connect pins 6 and 
8 of U29 together (pin 8 was not bent up), connect pin 4 of 
U29 to pin 5 of U 11, and connect pin 5 of U29 to the pin 
marked TPl on the board, The computer should work the 
same under BASIC as it did before you took out the two 
chips, (To try the other half of the RAM, you will need to 
run some program that uses 64K, such as OS-9 or Tele- 
wnter-64, and see if it works qs expected.) 

Radio Shack 32K: If your D or E board CoCo was 
purchased with 32K RAM (or upgraded by Radio Shack), 
you most likely have a good set of 64K RAMs in place and 
you will only need to perform the 64K addressing modifica- 
tionabove. If the LOW-HIGH jumper (on an E board) is set 
to HIGH, or if the connections to U4, U8 and/ or U 10 (on a 
D board) are different from those given here, you will prob- 
ably have to put in new 64K chips because the ones you have 
are good in the high half only. If you put in new RAMs, 
move the jumper to LOW (on an E board) or change the 
wiring (on D). 

NC Board: The RFI shield is held in place by lugs under 
the board. Pry down the two lugs near the left edge of the 
board, then pry the shield loose from the top of the board. 
Clip out capacitors C58, C60, C62, C64, C66, C68, C70 and 
C72 (these are the nearest of the two capacitors next to each 
RAM socket). Change the two jumpers next to U21 and one 



above U28 to the 64K position. Solder the two jumper pins 
next to U 17 together. Replace the I6K RAMs with the 64K 
chips. When you put the shield back on, bend those tabs you 
can reach back into place. 

Color Computer 2: U nplug the keyboard cable and set the 
keyboard aside. Replace the I6K RAMs with the new 64K 
chips. Locate the two adjacent holes at Wl next to the HA 
chip (MC6822P) and connect them together. Plug the key- 
board back in. 

With 64K RAM, you should get a response of 31015 to 
PRINT MEM {24S1\ with Extended Color BASIC). Unless 
something very odd is wrong with your machine, the 64K 
mode should now work. Color Computer 2 users should 
note that the 1 6K chips that came out of the CoCo 2 are not 
41 16s; they are 21 IBs, which use a single +5V power supply 
and wiiinot work in earlier CoCos (either as replacements or 
for "piggyback'' RAM expansion). In the same way, the 
41 16 RAMs cannot be used in the CoCo 2. 



BASIC ROM Upgrades 

Extended Color BASIC: The upgrade kit (Radio Shack 
catalog number 26-30 1 8) consists of the ECB ROM chip and 
the Going Ahead with Extended Color BASIC manual. Any 
Radio Shack store or dealer can get it for you, though some 
sales people may not know that they can sell it without 
installation or may be unwilling to do it. The only thing you 
have to do is insert the ROM chip in the empty socket next 
to the Color BASIC ROM. (ECB does require at least 1 6K of 
RAM to operate.) 

Color BASIC Revisions: Tandy has released three different 
versions of the Color basic ROM, all of which carry the 
part number 8040364. Version 1.0 s major characteristics 
were that it used a 7-bit format for printer output (and 
therefore could not use bit-image graphics on Radio Shack 
printers) and that it worked only with 4K and I6K RAMs 
(not64ICs). Version I.I (8040364A) allowed theuseof64K 
RAM chips and used an 8-bit printer format. Version 1.2 
(8040364B) cleaned up a few bugs in the Color basic math 
functions, and the extensively rewritten interpreter runs 
faster than earlier versions did. As with Extended Color 
BASIC, installing the new ROM only involves putting it in its 
socket (in this case, replacing the old ROM chip). Socket 
numbers vary, but the Color BASIC ROM will always be in 
the lower-numbered position of the two 24-pin sockets 
(Extended Color BASIC will be in the higher-numbered 
socket). 



Color Computer 2 Cartridge Port 

The Color Computer 2, as mentioned above, uses single- 
supply 16K and 64K RAMs. Because of this, Tandy left out 
the regulated -f I2V supply, which the disk controller and 
X-Pad depended on for power, so the CoCo 2 normally can't 
use them (unless you have the Multi-Pak Interface). An 
unregulated +I2V source is available, and it's easy enough 
to put it on the edge connector where it can do some good. 
Locate the four diodes (CRM) next to the power trans- 
former. Run a wire from the cathode (banded end) of either 
of the two larger diodes (CR3 or CR4) to pin 2 of the edge 
connector. This pin is clearly marked, and is on the end at 
the back of the unit. ^ 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 51 



CY-BURNET-ICS 

Specializing In Educational Software 

For TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER & TOP SYSTEM 100 

SUBTRACTION DRILL— an all inclusive subtraction /f^S 
program for KINDERGARTEN THROUGH FIFTH rainbow 
GRADE. Large colorful letters presented in VERTICAL °- 
COLUMNS with RIGHT to LEFT PROGRESSION. Computer displays 
correct answer after two misses. ERASE, QUIT, and TUTOR options 
provided. GRAPHIC and MUSICAL REWARDS. AUTO RUN, MENU 
DRIVEN- 13 LEVELS: 1) sequential facts 0-0 thru 5-5; 2) sequential 
facts 6-6 thru 1 0-10; 3) random facts 0-0 thru 5-5; 4) random facts 6-6 
thru 10-10; 5) minuends to 99 with no regrouping; 6) random facts 10 
thru 18; 7) minuends to 999 with no regrouping; 8) minuends to 99 
borrowing a 10; 9) minuends to 999 borrowing a 10; 10) minuends to 
989 borrowing a 100; 11) minuends to 990 borrowing lO's & 100's; 12 & 
13) auto flash for levels 1 & 2 with remainder shown. TUTOR provided 
for levels 8, 9, 10, & 11. 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS 32KEB (C) $24.95 (D) $2d.95 

PRIMARY NUMBER SKILLS— for PRESCHOOL through FIRST 
GRADE. AUTO RUN. MENU DRIVEN early number skills drill with 
TWELVE PROGRAM OPTIONS on an easy to read menu. SIDE ONE 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZED whereas opposite side contains machine 
language musical rewards. Levels included are: E) matching numbersO 
to 9 with speech; 0) matching numbers 0 to 9 without speech; 1) 
matching numbers 1 0 to 99; 2) next number 10 to 99; 3) missing number 
1 to 20; 4) missing number 20 to 99; 5) missing number 100 to 999; 8) 
count by TWOS 1 to 20; 7) count by TWOS 20 to 99; 8) count by FIVES 1 
to 95; 9) count by TENS 10 to 90; and T) count by JENS up to 990. 
Numbers are displayed in LARGE BLOCK NUMERALS with contrast- 
ing yellow on blue. QUIT KEY returns to menu. HELP KEY gives correct 
number and activates SPEECH SYNTHESIZER for Levels E and 0. 
GRAPHIC REWARD for each correct answer and musical reward after 
completing 10 problems. 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS 32KEB (C) $24.95 (D) $29.95 

Send self-addressed stamped envelope for free catalog. 

• Add $1.00 per program for shipping and handling. Tennessee resi- 
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Phone 615-688-4865 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 



Out Of Diversity, 
An Evolving Curriculum 

By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



From time to time, there are little "guideposts" or signs 
about progress in educational use of computers. One 
such guidepost is an annual poll of new college 
freshmen. The survey is conducted jointly by the University 
of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and the American 
Council on Education. Results are based on a statistically 
adjusted sample of 254,3 1 7 freshmen who entered two- and 
four-year colleges in the fall of 1983. 

Among the many topics covered in the poll is one question 
of interest to us. It seems that 37.5 percent of college fresh- 
men have written a computer program. More males than 
females have written computer programs, but not as many 
more as expected: 43,6 percent males compared with 31«6 
percent females. Students attending universities tend to 
have more computer experience than students attending 
colleges; and those in private colleges and universities tend 
to have more experience than students in public institutions. 

There were many findings contained in the survey. If any 
of you want to examine the entire survey, you can purchase 
the results ($8.25 prepaid) from the Cooperative Institu- 
tiondl Research Program, Graduate School of Education, 
University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., 90024. The 
question for this month relates less to the number of fresh- 
men programming computers than to what it is they have 
learned during their high school experience. 

Because computer education is relatively new in schools, 
there is no standard list of educational experiences for stu- 
dents. The curriculum for computer education is still evolv- 
ing, unlike the curriculum for other subjects in schools. 

Most fields of study have a defined area of knowledge that 
is more or less agreed upon by scholars within the specialty. 
For example, if students have taken a course in biology, it is 
reasonable to expect they know about digestion and repro- 
duction. Eating is something common to animals, as is 
procreation. It is likewise reasonable to expect students 
completing a course in mathematics to know addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication, and division. A study of arithmetic 



(Michael Plog received his Ph.D. degree from the 
University of Illinois, the MS^from Memphis State 
University, and the B.S.from the University of Ten- 
nessee. For his foreign j research language option 
required for the doctorate, he naturally selected com- 
puter language. Michael currently works for the Illi- 
nois State Board of Education as a research and eva- 
luation specialist.) 



is simply not complete without such knowledge, and more 
advanced courses in mathematics have to begin with 
arithmetic. 

In a similar thought, any student who has taken a course 
in government should know the differences between the 
Senate and the House of Representatives. Any student who 
has taken a course in auto repair should know what a spark 
plug is. 

Some fields of study are less well-defined than others. 
Math and science are traditionally the "hard" sciences, and 
as such have a more commonly agreed uppn set of facts for 
students to learn. Even in the less well-defined subjects, 
however, there are some commonalities. I used to be a social 
studies teacher. Students in my world history classes might 
have walked away with a different set of facts than those in a 
class of some other teacher. It is reasonable to expect, how- 
ever, that a world history or world culture class should 
contain something on Europe. 

Ah, but computer education; that is different from other 
fields of study. Consider those college and university fresh- 
men who have written a computer program during their 
high school career. We can make no assumptions about 
what they learned. It might be fair to assume that ipost of the 
students wrote a program on a microcomputer, not a main- 
frame. Beyond that, there is little that is expected to be 
common in their educational experiences. We do not even 
know what a "program" is. My first thought (and possibly 
yours) is a program in BASIC. However, we might be wrong 
in that assumption. Some people consider a set of com- 
mands for a spreadsheet or data management software to be 
a "program." It is even conceivable that a student and 
teacher could consider commanding a word processing sys- 
tem to prepare a set of mailing labels and a personalized 
form letter as a program. 

What we are talking about here is an accepted curriculum 
for computer education. Not an entire guide to a course, nor 
lesson plans for teachers, but a commonly approved set of 
experiences expected of students who have completed a 
course of study in microcomputers. In all probability, the 
accepted curriculum will not be available in the near future. 

The problem is one of leadership. True, many people and 
groups are willing to offer leadership to the community of 
computer educators. There are few educators willing to 
follow each of the self-appointed leaders. It is hard to be a 
leader with no followers. 

In other fields of education, there are traditional areas of 
leadership for curriculum development; not so in computer 



52 th« RAINBOW May 1984 



education. And it appears that some of the traditional places 
for curriculum leadership are not possible to use for compu- 
ter education. 

First, let's quickly dismiss a few organizations for leader- 
ship. The United States Department of Education will be of 
almost no help in determining curriculum. This organiza- 
tion (and indeed, the rest of the federal government) pro- 
vides leadership in areas other than curriculum. By targeting 
funds for specified activities, policy is determined. The fed- 
eral government can determine that computer education is 
something important for schools, but cannot provide cur- 
riculum suggestions. 

The reasons for this are many. The federal people are very 
careful about local control. After all, those local people vote 
for the members of Congress. Local control in education is a 
powerful argument; one which is not easily attacked by 
federal elected officials. The Department of Education does 
not provide curriculum leadership in other areas, even man- 
dated fields, such as special education. 

State education agencies are probably not the place to 
look for leadership in curriculum, either. The argument for 
local control is just as powerful at the state level as it is at the 



''At some time in the future, we 
will have an accepted curriculum 
for computer education. Until 
then, let us enjoy the diversity of 
creativity that exists now. 



federal level. Also, many state governments do not have 
people with the expertise to plan curriculum. Leadership 
from state agencies is generally in areas other than curricu- 
lum. 

Traditionally, curriculum is determined by a combination 
of public school teachers, university professors in the field of 
study, and textbook authors (who tend to be teachers in 
public schools or universities). The forum for these people to 
share ideas is typically professional organizations. There are 
national organizations for teachers in mathematics, science, 
social studies, and many more narrow fields or disciplines. 
These organizations have periodicals where experts in the 
field present views and ideas, sometimes even entire course 
outlines. The organizations also provide materials to teach- 
ers and provide reviews on textbooks. 

In all the mainstream disciplines, professional organiza- 
tions have developed over time, and gradually evolved into 
positions of leadership for the respective disciplines. Of 
course, they also had several decades (in some cases, centur- 
ies) of past tradition to draw upon. Computer education 
lacks both the national accepted organization of profession- 
als and the long tradition of what constitutes the field of 
study. 

It is unreasonable to expect educators to agree on the 
curriculum of computer education quickly. In time, a few 
authority figures may emerge, and some universities will 
offer degrees in computer education. National organiza- 



tions will develop and grow, and eventually one or two will 
assume the leadership position for curriculum. 

Until that happens, however, the subject of teaching 
about computers will remain a topic somewhat unique to 
each school. This situation has positive as well as negative 
points. The negative side is that we, as the public, will not be 
sure of what knowledge a student has upon completing a 
course in computers. The positive feature is that experimen- 
tation produces possibilities of quality, which can be shared 
with other educators. After a while, the best of what has 
been developed can be used by many people, thus sharing 
good ideas. 

There may be no way to speed the process; we may have to 
let the natural course of events happen, then observe the 
results. At some time in the future, we will have an accepted 
curriculum for computer education. Until then, let us enjoy 
the diversity of creativity that exists n<iw, 

I have one additional task this month. I must apologize to 
you, the reader. In a past article I said that a disk drive in a 
mainframe establishment contained a googol byte of stor- 
age. That is incorrect. The drive has a giga byte, not a googol 
byte of storage. A giga byte is the number I followed by 9 
zeros; a googol is the number 1 followed by 100 zeros. 
Some of you wrote in explaining that it would be impossible 
to build a machine with a googol byte of storage* So, I have 
mixed feelings. It is never pleasant to state something in 
writing that is simply wrong. On the other hand, I do appre- 
ciate people reading this column and communicating with 
me about it. So, thanks for writing to point out the mistake. 
I am sorry I gave wrong information. I am pleased, however, 
that you helped me learn something new. 



kEIURM 



OF 
THE 



JEW 



If you liked the forest chase 
scene, you'll love RETURN OF 
THE JET- 1 from ThunderVision. 

Possibly the best game you have ever 
played on your color computer! 

Reviewed in the April 1984 issue 
of RAINBOW. 

16K cassette, one or two players . . . $24b95 
Available only from ThunderVision, makers of JOWST 



thunderX/ision 

P.O. Box 30012 W 



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May 1984 the RAINBOW S3 



PRINTER MAINTENANCE 



REVIVAL 



By Barry E.Becker 



The salvation of a gang of dirty old characters 
is accomplished by virtue of cleanliness. 



^V'had been experiencing a definilel) disturbing difference in the 
I definition of the descenders on the lowercase letters on my 
^M^Gemini 10 printer. The effect was inconsistent, however, and 
had not been noticeable when the unit was new. So I suspected that 
something suspicious was afoot with the head, 

A call to the local authorized service center confirmed that the 
condition could certainly be caused by a collection of dirt on the 
print head, and could be cured by lareful!) cleaning it. 

The recommended remedy for removal of the residue is iso- 
propyl alcohol, followed by application of a very, very light 
lubricant. 

It is necessary to remove the head from the printer first, in the 
case of the Gemini 1 0, it is a simple task. Only two screw s secure the 
head in its resting place. After they are removed, the head lifts 
straight up out of its mount. A flevible, printed circuit cable goes to 
a connector on a small phenolic board below. A plastic tab on the 
flexible cable provides a means of grasping the cable and gently 
pulling it free with a wiggling motion to the right. 

I went through the cleaning process twice. After the first time, 
the problem persisted, so I persevered and promptly performed the 
procedure again. Before the second round, I looked at the business 
end of the print head with a microscope* Apparently transferring 
the ink from the ribbon to the head is very tough stuff! A gentle 
rinse with the alcohol is not sufficient to remove all of the offending 
material. 



54 the RAINBOW May 1984 



SPELL BOMBER 



In the ABC program, all 26 letters spring up in 
color to the familiar ABC tune. Then, colorful 
detailed pictures depicting each individuaj letter 
of the alphabet appear one by one. Your child's 
fascination will mount as he or she correctly 
presses the letter on the keyboard and is 
rewarded with a musical tune before the next 
detailed picture is drawn line by line onto the 
screen: AIRPLANE for A, BUS for B, CLOWN 
for C and so on to ZEBRA for Z. Truly a must 
program for the preschool to first grade age 
group! 

C0C0I6K ECB Tape: $19.95 Disk: $25.95 



CRISS-CROSS MATH 




As the program begins, your child is presented with a nine square 
playing board. It is your choice as to which square you choose. After a 
choice is made, a MATH PROBLEM appears in the square. You score 
your first X by answering the problem correctly. If your answer is 
incorrect the square clears and your opponent is allowed his choice of 
squares. The game is over when three squares vertically^ horizontally, or 
diagonally are won by the same player. When playing against the 
computer, every answer you get wrong is won by the computer. Multi- 
level ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION program. 
C0C0I6K Tape: $12.95 



FRACTIONS 



SIDE ONE: Fraction Lessons, explains fractions with the aid of graphics. 
Child studies the different ways fractions can be represented. Lessons 
include: 

IMPROPER FRACTIONS 

MIXED FRACTIONS 

PROPER FRACTIONS 
Many educators have praised the use of motion and color to display the 
fractional equivalents. 

SIDE TWO: Fraction practice, offers a random computer generated quiz. 

Atari 16k Tape: $19.95 

CoCo16k Tape: $19.95 



JOYSTICK DRAW 



Joystick Draw is the simple way to explore your artistic talents! Program 
operation is easy enough for a child to use, but effective enough that 
TCE uses it to design many sophisticated high-resolution graphic 
screens. Joystick Draw's design allows you or your child to save those 
masterpieces for future revisions or for use in other programs 
(instructions included). Your child will spend many hours enjoying this 
program and at the same time improving his or her eye hand 
coordination! You will find Joystick Draw to be an easy way to design 
those more sophisticated graphics for your own programs! 
C0C0I6ECB Tape: $16.95 



As captain of your ship, you must destroy the enemy bomber by spelling 
the mystery word. In this exciting and educational game the bomber gets 
closer with each inaccurate letter. You have only EIGHT tries to guess 
the mystery word or your ship will be bombed! If you guess the word 
correctly, GENERAL QUARTERS will sound and your ship will fire a 
missile to destroy the bomber. Three levels are available: EASY, 
MEDIUM, and HARD. Challenging for all agesl ' 

Atari16K Tape: $18.95 

CoCo 1 6k ECB Tape: $1 8.95 Disk: $22.95 

Vic 20 13k Tape: $18.95 



SPELLING BEE 



The word is pronounced vocally and it is up to you to type In the correct 
spelling. If wrong, the computer will be your friend and flash the word on 
the screen for just an instant. OK! Try typing the word in again. STILL 
WRONG! The computer wants success and allov^s you to see the word 
again this time a little longer. If you just can't spell the word, the 
computer realizes you need to learn to spell the word and leaves the 
word on the screen for you to copy. Try your best and the computer has 
a surprise for your reward! 

SPELLING BEE I . , , GRADE 1 & 2 SPELLING BEE III . . . GRADE 5 & 6 
SPELLING BEE II . . GRADE 3 & 4 SPELLING BEE IV . , .GRADE 7 & 8 
CoCo 16k ECB TAPE: $16.95 Each 



TC INVENTORY 



Many insurance companies offer a discount for policy holders which 
have complete inventories on file. TC — Inventory is designed to help 
you organize, maintain, and compile the personal belongings of your 
home. Program is user friendly and menu driven. TC — Inventory allows 
input for location of item, price of item, serial number of item, date of 
purchase, and a text written description of the item. Don't put off 
recording your personal belongings until its too late. Requires printer for 
hard copy. 

CoCo 32k ECB Tape: $16.95 



TEACHING CLOCK 



Torn between teaching time on a digital or a 
conventional (face and hands) clock? Well, this 
program combines the two using high 
resolution graphics and prompts! Your child will 
learn to tell time with the aid of a specially 
designed CLOCK! Child enters the time, if 
wrong, the center of the clock displays a 
graphic aid. If the child is correct a musical 
reward Is heard. Program offers three levels: 
hours, quarter hours, and five minute intervals. 

Apple 48k Disk: $19.95 

Atari 32k Tape: $16.95 

CoCo 16k ECB ... . Disk: $19.95 Tape: $16.95 




Additional Educational Software available 

for Color Computer, TDP 100, Atari ®, 
Apple ® , Commodore 64 ® , and VIC 20 ® . 



P.O. Box 2477 Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 (301)963 3848 



MASTER DESIGN 

fC> 1984 By Ocrriofier Software, inc. 



DOES MORE THAN JUST DRAW PICTURES 
IT*S A TEXT DESIGNER 

Master Dcsif n has Hit ability to cencratc ietterini In the sr&phlcs mode from 
sizes 2 to 32 and In a wide ran«e of styles. Size 2 offers a 42 x 22 line format 
while size 32 creates letters tttat take up over half the screen. Lenerlni can be 
skinny, bold, textured, tall, drop shadow, raised shadow and In different 
thickness. There's nine different settines for thickness and nine different set- 
tines for creatine open lenerine. 

IT*S A GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Take foO advantage of hi-res commands includlne GET. PUT. CIRCLE. PCOPV. 
PMOOE. LINE. BOX. BOX FILL. PAINT and Other special features available only 
with Master OesUn. Master Desien utilizes a "two cursor" concept to allow 
mtkk formattine of boxes, lines and special patterns such as dot patterns for 
shadins and diaeonal. vertical or horizontal lines for creative backerounds. Vou 
can create designs and use the TEXT designer to label sreas or Place titles. Vou 
can also create mhror images of the display. 

COMES WITH A SCREEN PRINT ROUTINE 
Master Design comes with a 7 bit and 8 bit version of a hl-res screen Print 
routine so no matter what your printer Is. we have it covered. Works In any 
pmode and cin print normal or reversed images. 

DISK and CASSETTE I/O 

Save and load your creations to and from disk or cassette. Vou can even load 
hi res displsvs created by other programs to make changes. 

INTERFACES WITH TELEWRITER-64 

Wouldn't it be nice If you could design your own letter head in hi-res graphics 
and men print It out while using Tetewritcr-64? Master Design offers Just that 
capability! The Lencr Head Utility will let you convert any hi-res display so that 
If can be Kcessed while using Telewriter-64! The BASIC program modules are 
provided wWi step by step Instructions. These BASIC modules can also be used 
in your own BASIC programs for printing displays without having to use the 
graphic pages. Vou can have upto 8S pases of graphics linked together for 
printing! 

THIS IS A 
SMALL EXAMPLE 
OF WHAT YOU 
GET FOR JUST: 




Send Check or Money Order to: 
Derringer Software. Inc.. 
P. 0. Box 5300 
Florence. S. C. 29502-2300 

Ulea/MC customers can call: (803) 665-5676 - 9:00 - 5:00 edt 

Requires 32K with at least one disk drive 
rinciude S2.00 for shipping and handling) 

Teiewriter-64 fC) 1963 by Cognitec 



The gunk can be removed by applying the alcohol 
with some force or pressure. A rubber syringe or some 
similar device should suffice. 1 used a rubber bulb and 
teflon tube intended for desoldering. I filled the bulb 
with alcohol, much like using a huge medicine dropper, 
and forced it (as briskly as I could) over the face of the 
print head and into the cavity just behind the face of 
the head. An ear wash syringe will do just as well. 

Make sure that the alcohol does not attack the 
syringe material! Apply a small amount to the surface 
of the syringe and wipe it with a white cloth or swab. If 
any of the color comes off, do not use it. You must only 
'use materials that are not attacked by the solvent, 
otherwise you could really gum-up the works. 

Several strong, sloshing rinses are necessary to 
remove all the gunk. A jeweler's loupe, magnifying 
glass, or low powered microscope will reveal the con- 
dition of the wires directly behind the face of the head. 
If you can see any globs of ink on the wires inside the 
cavity behind the head surface, then more washing is 
necessary. Do not touch or push on the wires. Let the 
alcohol do the work. Force applied to the wires would 
probably cause irreparable damage to the print head. 

After you are satisfied that the head is really clean, 
apply a very small amount of a very, very light lubri- 
cant. I used something called LPS 1, which comes in a 
spray can. Rather than spraying the head, 1 recom- 
mend collecting a bit of the spray in the cap or a small 
cup, and applying it to the outer surface and behind 
the face with a toothpick, very gently. You may spray 
it if you'd rather, but don't saturate it. A little dab'll do 
ya. Products like WD-40 or CRC 5-56 will probably 
work just as well. Wipe off the excess from the outside 
with a clean soft cloth or swab. 

Replacing the head on the Gemini is fairly easy. The 
only caution to observe is in tightening the screws. Do 
no/ apply a lot of force or you may strip the threads in 
the mounting holes. Just slightly snug is sufficient. A 
dab of clear nail polish applied to the screw heads will 
prevent them from coming loose. Reconnecting the 
flexible printed circuit cable requires remembering the 
way it came out, and slipping it back in the connector 
the sanie way. A little wiggling and jiggling may be 
necessary. Be gentle. 

The procedure described here is specifically for the 
Gemini printer. 1 suspect that most printer heads could 
be cleaned the same way, but don't take anything for 
granted. If you think your head could use a cleaning, 
call the manufacturer or local authorized service cen- 
ter'and find put whether it's advisable to clean it your- 
self, what solvents are acceptable, what lubricants, if 
any, are acceptable, and what cautions to observe. 

Having stated the preceding disclaimers, let me say 
that the joy is not really in the cleaning, but in the 
resulting clear, crisp letters that once again pour forth 
from the print head, 



(Barry Becker, an electrical engineer, has been 
designing solid-state electronic circuits for more 
than 20 years. Of his wife and three children,' 
only his youngest son Rob [also a Rainbow 
author] shares his enthusiasm for the CoCo,) 



56 the RAINBOW May 1984 



Custom Software Engineering, Inc 



(A 

<!! 

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* ui 



C9 

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807 Minutemen Causeway (D-2), Cocoa Beach, Florida 32931 

/0/^c\ VQQ -l/^QO For information or technical support, please 
\0\J0) / OO" I UOO call between 5:30 and 8:30 P.M. Eastern time. 



DISK DOUBLE ENTRY - If you have spent hours 
trying to balance your Debits and Credits, this program Is 
for you! Designed for small business, club, and personal 
use. Enter transactions in a journal type format. Program 
will maintain current account balances, produce Trial Bal- 
ance, Income, and Balance Sheet reports and complete 
Account Ledgers. Will handle up to 300 accounts including 
report headings and totals. Up to 1 400 average transactions 
on a diskette. Summary reports and four levels of subtotals 
available. REQUIRES 32K and a user understanding of 
standard double entry accounting concepts. - $44.95 in 
BASIC with Machine Language subroutines. 

STATEMENT WRITER - For use with (and re 
quires) Disk Double Entry. Produces statements suitable 
for billing from your Receivable accounts. Provides mailing 
labels to use with your statements and account sumrparies. 
Designed and documented to allow you to change formats 
to accommodate your own special needs. $34.95. 

DISK DATA HANDLER - 64K - Designed to use 
the full 64K RAM, but may also be configured for 32 K. Uses 
standard ROM's - No special operating system required! 
Allows you to design disk data files for your specific needs. 
Yqu define a basic record of up to 14 fields and 246 
characters. Provides fast selection and sorting based on 
any field or combination of fields in this record. Powerful on 
screen input and update. User defined output of reports to 
screen, printer, or disk files which may be read by your 
BASIC programs for any computational or special format- 
ting requirements. Printer reports allow headings, page 
breaks, and page numbering, and let you pass control 
codes to drive your printer's special features. Maximum 
number of records you may work with at one time will 
depend on RAM configuration and record size - 64K (32K) 
1 850 (500) - 21 char records, 1 79 (49) • 246 char records. 
An optional Extended record linked to the basic record may 
also be defined. The s|ze of this Extended record is not a 
factor in determining maxinium number of records. Will 
provide the growth capability needed for your increasingly 
sophisticated applications. NOW - also includes a listing of 
a short program to read directory information from your 
disks and produce a combined file index. $54.95 in BASIC 
with Machine Language subroutines. 

DATE-O-BASE CALENDAR - Puts you in charge 
of your schedule! Graphically displays any monthly calendar 
between 1700 and 2099. You put in up to twelve 28 
character memos per day - calendar shows where the 
memos are -call up of day shows details. Use for appoint- 
ments and a log of past activity. Study the chronology of the 
American Revolution or note the day your mortgage will be 
paid off. Search capability allows you to list or print all 
memos between two specified dates or only ones meeting 
key word criteria. Date computation shows elapsed time 
between two dates in days, weeks, months, and years. 
REQUIRES 32K in BASIC. 

TAPE PATE^O-BASE CALENDAR - $16.95 - (max. 400 
memos/tape file). 

DISK DATE-O-BASE CALENDAR - $1 9.95 - (over 4.000 
memos/disk - max. 300 memos/month). 



COMMAND STREAM PROCESSOR - Adds a 
new dimension to the power of your Color Computer! A 
program to run your other programs. Will allow you to 
prepackage a stream of direct systerp commands as well as 
INPUT and LINE INPUT to your BASIC program. This 
results in a totally automated stream of activity. If you 
understand your computer and the flow of activity required 
for your total operation, you are ready for the power of 
Command Stream Programming, in completely relocatable 
Machine Language - $19.95. 

That's INTEREST-ing- Time to let your computer 
do some real computation! This program will helpyou solve 
problems dealing with time, money, and INTEREST. Calcu- 
lates present value, future value, and capital recovery for 
any combination of payments you specify. Rate of Return 
com putation to predict how hard your money will be working. 
Special section to compute bond yields (current and to 
redemption). Amortization schedules about any way you 
want them - even allows you to change terms in mid 
schedule! All answers available on screen or printer. $29.95 
in BASIC. 

MATH TUTOR ^ Five programs that go from math fact 
(+» X, /) drill to full addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
and division at four levels of difficulty. Provides a step by 
step approach with error correction and rewards for good 
performance. - $13 95 in BASIC. 

SPELLING TEACHER - Up to 200 of their spelling 
words stored on tape or disk are presented In four lively 
study modes including a scrambled word game. - $ 1 2.95 in 
BASIC. 

ALPHA-DRAW - A subroutine designed to let you 
easilyaddcharactersto your graphic displays. You define X 
and Y coordinates and a $tring variable of one or more 
characters an/d Alpha-Draw will do the rest. Includes all 
keyboard characters. Comes with instructions for a true 
line numbered merge of tape fijes. Works great with the 
Screen Print program! - $8.95 In BASIC. 

GRAPHIC SCREEN PRINT PROGRAM - 

Works in ALL PMODES and lets you shift screen image 
anywhere on the printed page. Relocatable code lets you 
use all of your 16K or 32K machine. Available for Color 
Basic 1.0 and 1.1/1.2, Use EXEC 41 175 to see which you 
have and SPECIFY with order. In Machine Language. 

SPECIFY PRINTER TYPE 

$7.95 - For TRS-80® LP^VII/V1I| & DMP 100/200/400/420. 

$9.95 - For Epson GRAFTRAX®. NEC® PC 8023 A-C, 
lDS-440/445, Paper Tiger® 460/560, Micro Prism® 480, 
Prism® 80/1 32 (with dot plotting), TRS-80® DM P- 1 20, TDP- 1 . 
Micro Peripherals, Inc 88G/99G, PROWRITER®, Centronics 739, 
Mircoline® 82A/83A (with OKIGRAPH I) /84/92/93, 
Star Micronics, Inc. GEM IN1 1 0/1 OX/1 5 and Gorilla Banana. 
(Trademarks of Tandy Corp., Epson America, Inc., C-ltoh, 
NEC America, Okidata Corp., Integral Data Systems, Inc.) 



73 



o 
< 

CD 
CI 



m 

CD 
M 



ffl 

CD 
M 



> 

C 
0 

CD 
M 



s 
> 

< 

CD 
M 



ALL PROGRAMS require Extended Color Basic and are 
delivered on cassette. All, except Tape Date-O-Base Calen- 
dar, are DISK System compatible. 



For VISA and Master Card orders: 
Include type, account number, expiration 
date, signature and phone number. 
Sorry! No COD's. 



U.S. and CANADA add $1 .00 per order for shipping. 
Overseas $2.50 per order. AH prices in U.S. dollars. 
Florida residents add 5% sales tax. Return within two 
weeks if not completely satisfied. 



RAINBOW 

CCRTmcATION 



ALL LISTED 
PROGRAMS 



COMPUTERWARE'S OS-9 EXPERTS 

We have three years of experience and expertise with OS-9! 
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RANDOM BASIC 



All OS-9 commands are directly accessible, making 
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Random BASIC has 9 or 11 digits of precision 
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Extraordinary file handling capabilities include 
ISAM, random, and sequential file structures. File 
access is fast and file design is very efficient. 
Existing programs are transportable between 
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Flexible user input commands make "conversa- 
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Programming is fast. The interpreter provides fast 
program development and debugging. It is self- 
documenting with extended variable names. 
Special CoCo graphic & joystick functions 
Also available on FLEX 



ADVANCED EDITOR 



Comprehensive programming editor that is easy to 
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• Auto loads your O-PAK hires for full screen display. 

• 41 powerful, yet easy-to-use, commands PLUS 21 
line editing commands including character or word 
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• Powerful global search and change. 

• User defined macros for easy entry. 

^ Also available on FLEX and RSDOS 

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DISK FIX & UTILITIES! 



Use your drives to the fullest and unleash the real 
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40 tracks, & step rates of up to 6 ms. (That means 
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• DMODE allows super easy modification of drive 
descriptors. 

• DIRCOPY Is the most powerful of OS-9 copy 
utilities! Copy complete disks with one command, 
copy any subdirectory, automatically overwrite 
exiting files, sort directories in alphanumeric order 
while copying, replace outdated files with current 
ones, etc., etc 

• PATCH is a very user-friendty program for inspect- 
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of the file's CRC & header, powerful Find/String 
search capabilities, Relative Address calculation, 
automatic module identification & location, and 
memory examine and change are just a few of the 
capabilities! 

• FILELOOK displays file modules 

• COMPARE compares a disk file to memory 



THE SOURCERER 



The Sourcerer is a menu driven symbolic 6809 
disassembler that produces symbolic source code 
that can be assembled. 

• Symbolic mode provides three modes of operation; 
Zap, Extended, and Full Symbolic. 

• Automatic equate generation for labels and 
symbols outside of disassembly range. 

• FCC, FCB, and FDB generation (multiple or single 
FOB and FDB). 

• Add or change your FCC, or FDB table entries 
between passes. 

• Written entirely in 6809 machine language for 
extreme speed. Disassembles any size program In 
seconds. 

• Position independent code is relocatable to any 
area of memory. 

• User defined symbol/label buffer area for maximum 
flexibility. 

• Produces files with or without line numbers. 

• Can produce symbolic labels for all extended 
addresses. 

• Disassemble to disk, printer, or screen. 

• Special version included for Hi-Res OS-9 

• Also available on FLEX & RSDOS 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 



have hardware & Largest selection of CoCo Products from One Company* 

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DISK SYSTEMS 

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supports double-sided drives and 40 tracks 
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PRINTERS 




Gemini 10x 

w/interface 
C. Itoh 8510 

w/interface *459®® 
Letter Quality JUkI Printer 

w/interface »595°" 
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(parallel to serial interface) 



KRAFT JOYSTICK 

high performance with 
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S369« 
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WICO joystick adapter ^^s^' 

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BUMPER STICKERS! ! each 



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$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ ^ ^ ^ $ $ ^ ^ ^ 

ATTRACTIVE AUTHORSHIP PROGRAM 

for independent programmers who want to turn 
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VIDEO PLUS 

inlertace for original CoCo and efther a 
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Interface for CoC^ h and a monochronie 
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MONITORS 



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Gorilla green screen ^104** 
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DISKETTES Name brand — double density 
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SCHOOL IS IN THE HEART OF A CHILD 



Watching Important 
Program Evaluators — 
The Children 

By Fran Saito & Bob Albrecht 
Rainbow Contributing Editors 



••School Is in the Heart of a Child*' is for parents of qpite yoiing 
children. We want to help you work and play with your thrCe- to 
eight-year-old child and learn to usp computers as a joyful family 
experience. We want to suggest ways to incorporate the home 
computer as another means to encourage your child's independ- 
ence, growth, and control over his own life. See the pride on her 
face as she directs the computer to do what she with deliberation 
selects. See her head gears switch to **on^'as she progresses step-by- 
step with your presence and caring direction. 

We will explore (we hope, With your help) the following: 

• Specific ''teaching** techniques so that the discovery can be 
the child's own. 

• Critical evaluation of software based on e?(tensive ptaytesting 
in family and related environments. 

• Additional resources to consult: books, magazines, software 
publishers, networks, etc, 

• Suggestions for interludes and fun times away froip the 
computer (a must!): call the librarian for specific infor- 
mation; watch a TV program together and discuss it; 
work together as volunteers in a community project; take 
a fall (or spring or winter or summer) awareness walk < . * 

• Whatever we team from families we work with in Menlo Park 
or from you, oiir ireaders. Let's pool our knowledge, Let*s 
share our experiences as we alt learn from our children. 

We will also provide many small programs you can type in and 
use right tiow. 



Copyright (c) 1984 by DragonQuest, P.O. Box 310, 
Menlo Park, CA 94026. 

60 the RAINBOW May 1964 



Learning is more than just what goes on in a 
school classroom nine months out of a year. 
Learning covers all the knowledge and under- 
standing we gain through reading or observing or 
experiencing. Learning is discovery; learning 
occurs everywhere. All of us are learning all the 
time, 

— Laran Stardrake 



Long Live RAINBOWfest! 

We have just returned from RAINBOWfest in Long 
Beach. Eleven members of the Dymax family (The Dragons 
of Menlo Park) made the pilgrimage and revelled in meeting 
and talking with people, cruising the exhibit area, learning 
new stuff. Kudos to Lonnie and everyone for a great conven- 
tion — it reminded us of the first days of the West Coast 
Computer Faire when things were still new and brightly 
shining. Long Live RAINBOWfest! We'll be back. 



(Fran Saito holds a degree in education from the Ufti- 
versity of Hawaii and has taught preschool and ele- 
mentary students. She feels her inspiration comes 
from Mariko, her five-yeat-old daughter . Well-known 
author Bob Albrecht also writes the "GameMaster's 
Apprentice" feature for the Rainbow each month.) 




DragonSmoke 

We suggest you read "Intelligent Schoolhouse: Readings 
on Computers & Learning," edited by Dale Peterson, From 
Reston Publishing Company, 11480 Sunset Hills Road, 
Reston, V A 44090. A rich compendium of essays written by 
people in schools and outside of schools. Here is a small * 
selection of contents pertinent to "School Is in the Heart of a 
Child/' 

"Computer as Mudpie" — Seymour Papert . 
"The World's Most Expensive Flash Card'* — Herbert 
Kohl 

"The Pedagogy of Games'" — Ramon Zamora 
"Computer Literacy: The What, Why, and How" — 

Arthur Luehrmann 
"What Makes Computer Games Fun? Guidelines for 

Designing Educational Computer Programs" — 

Thomas W. Malone 
"Computers in Public Places" — Ann White Lewin 
"A Computer in the Nursery School" — Ann McCor- 

mick Piestrup 

"Special Help for Special Children: Carl, Mrs. Brown, 
and the Computer" — Mary M. Humphrey & Glenn 
M. Kleiman 

"Computers and the Autistic Child"^ Richard E: Frost 

Lots of folks believe LOGO is better than basic as a kid's 
first computer language, especially for younger kids. We 
agree. Next time, we will include some introductory material 
on "CoCo LOGO," or "Color LOGO" as Radio Shack calls 
it. In the meantime, we suggest you hurry on down to your 
friendly Radio Shack store and get a copy of Color LOGO 
(Program Pak or disk) and the following,booklets. 

"Cplor LOGO Guide for Teachers: Book One"(Cat. No. 

26-2761) by Don Inman & Bob Albrecht. 
"Color LOGO Guide for Parents: Book One" (Cat. No. 

26-2763) by Ramon Zamora & Bob Albrecht. 



If you join the LOGO revolution, also join the Young 
People's LOGO Association, 1208 Hillsdale Drive, 
Richardson, TX 75081. 

We have a small rolNaround bookcase containing books, 
magazines, and other resources we frequently consult for 
information and inspiration when we write for parents and 
kids. For a current list of things we like, send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to DragonSmoke, P.O. Box 
310, Menlo Park, CA 94026. 

Join The Koala Krusade! 

We have been playing with Koala Pads on ATARI com- 
puters and watching kids become entranced with this 
delightful touch pad. We are convinced that touch pads such 
as the Koala Pad are a major break through in using compu- 
ters —especially for younger kids. Alas — you can buy 

/ Koala Pads for Apple, ATARI, Commodore 64, and IBM 
PC — butnotfortheCoCo. Hmmm, . .suppose multitudes 
of us implored Koala Technology to make a CoCo version? 

' We volunteer to be a clearing house and collect entreaties for 
a CoCo Koala Pad. If you would like to have a Koala Pad 
for your CoCo, please send us your requests. We will collect 
and send or deliver them to the people at Koala. Send your 
entreaty to: 

■ Koala Krusade, P.O. Box 3 10, Menlo Park, CA 94026 
If you want to contact Koala directly, write to: 

■ Koala Technologies Corporation, 3100 Patrick Henry 
Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95050 

Playtesting^ First Impressions 

ComputerKid, USA! puts computers in the hands of kids 
in youth organizations, alternative schools, and at home in 
order to play test and evaluate educational software in places 
that are learner*centered^ instead of teacher-centered. We 
now have the following sites. 

— Herbert Hoover Boys' Club in East Menlo Park, 
California. Boys and girls of many ages. 

— Greenoaks Montessori School in Menlo Park. Kids 
from three to six years old. 

— Our own playtest room. Kids and their parents come 
after school to try out educational software. 

— Greene Community School, Greene, Iowa. A CoCo in 
the elementary school library can be checked out for 
home use. Greene is a rural community of about 1300 
people. 

— Roving CoCos on loan to Menlo Park families who 
will playtest software and report on their experiences. 

— Roving software on loan to Menlo Park families who 
have their own CoCos. 

Tim Finger is Director of ComputerKid, USA! He has 
been doing this full-time for two years. He begins by trying 
programs himself to get the "feel" of the software. Then, he 
uses the programs with a bunch of kids and learns more by 
watching them. Finally, the software goes to other playtest 
supervisors who work with kids and fill out formal evalua- 
tion forms. Below is the story of Tim's first playtest of some 
items from Radio Shack. 

. m Star Trap (RS Cat. No. 26-2510 . . . $19.95) 
m Grobot (RS Cat. No. 26-2527 . . . $19.95) 
m Ernie's Magic Shapes (RS Cat. No. 26-2524 . . . 
$19.95) 

■ X'PAD (RS Cat. No. 26-1 196 . $99.95) 



May 1984 th« RAINBOW 61 



Jan. 30, 1984. Greenoaks Montessori School. Age: five. 

The room is buzzing today when Tim walks in. There are 
two nursesdressed in their white uniforms, circulating in the 
classroom and asking questions of the children. The child- 
ren think it's pretty neat and are very excited. So excited that 
it's difficult to calm down when Tim is ready for his first 
group and his first game, Star Trap. The object is to trap a 
shooting star that is speeding through a maze. The game is 
directed to ages seven and older, but part of Tim's purpose is 
to see what games can be effectively used by parent and 
young child together. Can the age level be brought down 
because parent is working with child? The game depends on 
manipulation of the joystick. This group of five-year-olds 
likes the idea of the game, to capture the evasive star, but 
they have little control over the joystick. The right and left 
movements they have practiced become totally confused 
when the game requires that they be quick and automatic. 
The movement goes too quickly for them. 

Tim: There is too much play in this joystick and the 
responses are slow, sluggish. Another thing I look at are 
the color graphics. Is there variation in color? Is it pleas- 
ing to the eye? For this game, I would say no. 

1 see possibilities for this game, though. For the child 
who has more control over the joystick there could be 
some benefits: he/she could learn to anticipate move- 
ments, to think ahead and could become quite creative in 
setting up blocks. 

Grobot is the second game Tim sets up. This time he has 
two small helpers who have learned to put the cassette in the 
tape recorder and to rewind. They all are slowly on their way 
to being in control of setting up the computer; Tim is pleased 
with their progress. 

Grobot is directed to children 10 and older and is about 
growing plants in different climates. 

Here again the children like the idea of the game and 
seeing the plants grow and flower, but for them there are too 
many things to watch for and control: pests from above and 
below, flowers to be plucked quickly, decisions to be made 
by choosing from too many selections. 

The names for the plants look and sound strange to Tim. 
Bagalabra. Twiskis. Kalidobean. "Why," wonders Tim, 
"aren't real plants used with their real names and character- 
istics?" Like tulip. Maple. Coconut tree. Would the children 
relate more to those names and the concept of ideal habitats 
for different plants? 

Feb. 7, 1984. Greenoaks. Age: three. 

Tim and his helper, Sheri, have been frustrated in the 
preparation of this game. Directions in the manual for the 
set-up are not precise and they learn, after much effort has 
been expended to no avail, that this drawing pad works only 
on the older model CoCo. (This is the X-Pad. It does not 
work on the CoCo2 unless you add the multipak interface or 
slightly modify the CoCo 2. We expect the X-Pad will be 
discontinued in favor of a touch pad more like the Koala 
Pad.) 

this drawing pad, has tobe very accurate. Lots of picture- 
perfect graphics would be very welcome. 
Tim: Who can type in the letter R? 

David quickly seeks and presses. The letter R appears 
on the screen. David is almost four years old and is the 
hotshot of the group. He understands the directions eas- 
ily and responds accurately. He finds U, then N and the 
[ENTER] key. 

Ready to go, the drawing pad only awaits a drawer. 
Tim: Would you like to try? 



He asks the three-year-old on the side of him. The child 
declines. The child on the other side also declines. 
Tim: Alright. Who wants to try this? 

David's hand shoots up and he comes over. Carefully 
he prints his name on the clean white sheet of paper 
covering the grey metal drawing pad. 




Tim: Look at the TV screen, David. 

A smile of satisfaction crosses David's face as he sees 
his name, in rainbow colors, on the screen. 

Now Tim draws a circle and straight lines emanating 
from it. 

"What is this?" he asks, 

"A sun!" chorus the children. 

He draws what looks like a building within the sun. 

"And what is this?" he asks again. 

"A house," they say. 

"Have you ever seen a house in the sun?" 
One child nods with surety. That's David. Most do not 
respond. One or two look questioningly at Tim. Tim only 

grins. 

He erases the screen and then draws four circles one on 
top of each other, the largest circle on the bottom, the 
smallest at the top. 
Tim: "What is this?" 
Children: "A snowman." 

Tim: "That's a funny-looking snowman. Is he missing 
something?" 

Children: "A hat. Arms. Hands." 

Together he and the children complete their snowman 
and while Tim laughs at the lopsided figure, the children 
don't find it lopsided at all. That's the way Frosty is 
supposed to look, their expressions say. 

In like manner, the little group goes through filling in 
parts of a car. It ends up finally a fire engine, Tim now 
asks, waving the pen, "Who would like to try this?" 

He asks Ria. She says that she would, but that she'll 
need some help. Tim nods and hands her the pen. Ria 
discovers that unless she presses down with the pen hard 
enough, her mark doesn't appear on the screen, although 
it does appear on the paper. So she concentrates on 
pressing down harder and sure enough, her name, too, 
appears on the screen. She is pleased at her name in 
rainbow colors. 

Everyone, teachers and children, likes this drawing pad 
concept. Join the Koala Krusade! The possibilities are infi- 
nite for young child and parent to create a picture together. 
The patterns lend themselves toward beautiful abstract 
designs and the rainbow colors are very pleasing to the eye. 
No one needs to be an artist, as everything looks good. 

In short, this is a creative, fun activity. It is something that 
can be used repeatedly with new inspiration. It encourages 
development of another level of perceiving — what 1 draw 
on this paper appears simultaneously on the screen. While 



62 th«AAINBOW May 1984 



the RAINBOW'S 




Enter your Adventure program in the Rainbow's Adventure Contest! 
You will have the chance to win valuable prizes and to shareyour Adventure with thousands of 
Color Computer, TDP-100 and Dragon-32 owners worldwide. 

Just look at all these prizes . . . 
For our winner: 

An Amdisk-1 1 1 3" microfloppy dual drive valued at $499 and a J&M controller worth $1 50, from Amdek. 
Plus, any five programs (tape or disk), a $95 value from Shell Software. 

Plus, a WICO adapter and two Red Ball joysticks, an $89.95 package from S & 8 Arcade Supplies. 
For our runner-up: 

The US1 1 400/c 14" color monitor with sound and one double driver interface, a $425 package from 
JARB Software. 

Plus, a WICO adapter and two Quick Shot joysticks, a $59.85 package from S & S Arcade Supplies. 
Plus, any three programs, a $57 value from Shell Software. 

For third place: 

A Color 1+ 13" color monitor with nonglare screen and audio headphone jack, worth $399 from 
Amdek. 

Plus, any two programs, a $40 value from Shell Software. 
Plus, a WICO adapter worth $19.95 from S & S Arcade Supplies. 



And these special awards: 

A Disk Drive and Controller the Rainbow 

$400 gift certificate toward the purchase of 

software and two T-shirts Microware 

Complete VIP Library worth $320 Softlaw Corporation 

Banana Printer with cable worth $269.95 Delker Electronics 

$250 gift certificate toward the purchase of software Prickly-Pear Software 

PBH Computer 

Surprise Package, $149.95 Products, Inc. 

BCM 12" Monochrome Monitor, $105 Computer Plus 

$100 gift certificate toward the purchase of software Computerware 

Color Computer FLEX with DBASIC Software, $99.95 Frank Hogg Laboratory 

$75 gift certificate toward the purchase of software Computer Island 

One complete copy of the Homebase 

Computer System, $75 Homebase Systems 

Super Pro Keyboard, $69.95 Mark Data Products 

Real Talker, $59.95 Colorware Inc. 

$50 software certificate Spectrum Projects 

Super Backup Utilities, $49.95 Computize Inc. 

Hayes Computer Controller Joystick, $44.95 MichTron 

Disk or cassette version of Revolution, $19.95 Inter+Action 



RULES: AH programs must be original works, no "conversions." Entries must be postmarked by May 1 and become 
the property of Falsoft, Inc.. publisher of the Rainbow. Decision of the judges is final. Duplicate prizes will be 
awarded in the case of ties. Winning programs to be featured in a special Rainbow Adventure issue. Mark entries 
"Adventure Contest Editor" and send to the Rainbow, P.O. Box 209, Prospect, KY 40059. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 63 



T 



initially the concentration is wholly on the paper image, 
soon the child, while drawing, looks to the screen for direct 
feedback. (Excellent preparation for Apple's Macintosh 
and other ICON/ WINDOW computers of the future.) 

Drawbacks: Cost is high — $ 1 99. Putting in this program 
is not that simple for beginners. While our three-year-old 
needed practice in holding the pen and pressing down hard 
enough, we note that the pad, according to directions, can be 
programmed so that only movement of the pen is sufficient 
to produce effect. 

Feb. 13. Greenoaks. Ages: five through six. 

Much to his dismay, CoCohead by Computer Island does 
not work with the equipment on hand today, so Tim dregs 
up Ernie's Magic Shapes again. (We will try CoCohead 
another time.) 

The testing with a giggly group of four young lads brought 
up the reality of black and white TVs. Not only was it less 
vivid and beautiful but the games involving color percep- 
tion, of course, do not work (in this case, more than half of 
the game choices). For how many people, schools, or centers 
out there is this a problem? Is it something that should be 
brought to the attention of software people? 

The four boys do the game very well. In fact, the challenge 
and excitement seem to be lacking. Have they tired of this 
game? At this age level, has it no more appeal after they have 
done it a couple of times? 

Florence, in the second group of children, says, "IVe seen 
enough of Ernie, Tim. Let's play something else." 

For some of these children, then, the game has already 
lost its appeal. For home use, a program must have "staying 
power" in order to justify its purchase. Does Ernie's Magic 
Shapes have staying power? We don't know yet — what do 
you think? 

Help! 

Help us playtest and evaluate CoCo software. Send us a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope and we will send you a 
bunch of playtest evaluation forms and directions on how to 
use them. Fran & Bob, P.O. Box 310, Menlo Park, CA 
94026. 

Wordsworth 

Assign a number score (LS) to each letter of the alphabet, 
A through Z, as follows: 



A=l 


H=8 


0=15 


V=22 


B=2 


1=9 


P=16 


W=23 


C=3 


J=IO 


Q=17 


X=24 


D=4 


K=ll 


R=18 


Y=25 


E=5 


L=12 


S=19 


Z=26 


F=6 


M=I3 


T=20 




G=7 


N=14 


U=21 





A word's worth (Wordsworth) is its numerical value, 
obtained by adding the values of the letters in the word. For 
example: 

HOBBIT is worth 8+ 1 5+2+2+9+20 = 56 points 
DRAGON is worth 4+18+1+7+15+14 - 59 points 
TROLL is worth 20+18+15+12+12 = 77 points 

From now on, for quite some time, we will suggest 
Wordsworth activities for you and your child. So ... we 
must select a dictionary. We choose the following: 



■ 'THE SESAME STREET DICTIONARY." Ran- 
dom House/ Children's Television Workshop. 

Get it at your friendly local book store. If they don't have 
it, call Random House toll free: 800-638-6480. Ask for Cus- 
tomer Service. 

We will send a small stuffed dragon to the first child 
(earliest postmark), age three to eight, who sends us the 
answers to the following questions. All answers must be 
bold face words in ''THE SESAME STREET 
DICTIONARY/' 

1) What three-letter word has the smallest Wordsworth? 



2) What three-letter word has the largest Wordsworth? 



3) What four-letter word has the smallest Wordsworth? 



4) What four letter word has the largest Wordsworth? 



5) What is the first word (alphabetically) to have a Words- 
worth of exactly 100? 

6) In the entire dictionary, what word has the largest Words- 
worth? 

7) What is the longest word (most letters) having a Words- 
worth of exactly 100? 

We hope that parents and children have a wonderful time 
browsing through '*THE SESAME STREET 
DICTIONARY." 

Most of the work and play in answering our Wordsworth 
challenge is people work: browsing a dictionary, thinking 
about the questions, creating strategies — most enjoyable! 
People are well equipped to do this kind of work/ play. 

Some of the work is grungy stuff: looking up letter scores, 
adding numbers. 

Hmmm . . . why not let CoCo do some of the grungy 
stuff? Here is our first Wordsworth program. 




100 REM»#WORI}SWORTH #1 8CH 4-1 
110 CLS 

200 REH«#A8K FOR A WORD 
210 PRINT 

220 INPUT "YOUR WORD"S mm 
300 REM»#WL IS LENGTH OF l«3RD 
310 WU - LEN<MRI>«> 
400 REH»#START WORDSWORTH AT 0 
410 WW « 0 

500 REM««COMPUTE WORDSWORTH 
S10 FOR L-l TO WL 

(com.) 



64 the RAINBOW May 1984 



I 



300 REH»»TELL HOW TO DO AGAIN 
310 PRINT S480, "FOR MORE LETTERS 
, PRESS SPACE "I 

320 K««INKEY«:IF K*-**" THEN 320 
330 IF K«-" " THEN 210 ELSE 320 
900 REn*»PICK A LETTER 8UBR. 
910 R - RND<100> 
920 IF R<«PV THEN 930 ELSE 9S0 
930 L - RND(5> 

940 L« • niD«<V«.L,l>: RETURN 

950 L - RND<21> 

960 L« - MID«<C«,L, 1>: RETURN 



520 : L« - riID«(WRD«,L,l) 
530 : IF ASC(L«><65 THEN &70 
540 : IF ASC<L«)>90 THEN 570 
550 : LS - ASC<L«> - 64 
560 WW • WW •*• LS 
570 NEXT L 

600 REM»»PRINT THE WORDSWORTH 
610 PRINT "THE WORDSWORTH IS" WW 
700 REM«»00 FOR ANOTHER WORD 
710 BOTO 210 



Look For Words 

This program fills the screen with randonrt letters. Can you 
find words on the screen? Write down any words you find. 
When in doubt, consult a dictionary. 



The subroutine in block 900 picks a letter (L$). Lines 910 
and 920 decide whether to pick a vowel or a consonant. In 
line 130, Nye set the probability of pickinga vowel(PV)at30 
percent. In line 9 10. the value of R can be any number from I 
to 100. if R is less than or equal to PV (line 920), the CoCo 
will pick a voWel in lines 930 and 940. However, if R is 
greater than PV, the CoCo will pick a consonant in lines 950 
and 960. You can change the probability of getting a vowel 
by changing the value of PV in line 130. Happy word 
hunting! 

Help! 

If your home has a kid, three to eight years old, and a 
CoCo, please share your experiences in using your CoCo 
with your child. If you write to us, please tell us if it is OK to 
print all or part of your letter in this column. Fran and Bob, 
P.O. Box 310, Menlo Park, CA 94026. 



100 REM**RANDOn LETTERS SCH 4>2 
110 C«-"BCDF8HJKLMNPQRSTVWXYZ" 
120 V»-"AEIOU" 
130 PV-30 

200 REM**PUT LiTTii» ON SCREEN 
210 CL6 

220 FOR SP«0 TO 447 

230 : GOSUB 910 'PICK A LETTER 

240 : PRINT asp« L«| 



COLOR CHflRflCTER GENERRTOR 



HAS ALL STflhDflRD FERTURES 

Total of 10 character sizesv from 8*4 
to 42*24. 

- Mix text & graphics in any PMODE. 

- Mix UP to 5 character sizes in 4 colors 
on one screen. 

- Recognizes all coTnrnands & keys. 

- Full underline in all PMODES. 

- Recognizes CLS, PRI^4TTAB, PRINTS, as 
well as its own cursor controls. 

- Includes 2 satnple BASIC programs. 



INCENTIVE SOFTWARE 
P.O. BOX 7281 
Port Huron til 48301 U.S.A. 
or 

P.O. BOX 323 5tation-B 
London Ont. Canada N6A 4W1 
(519) 681-0133 



RAINBOW 

CCHtificatiom 

SEAL 



HfiS nONY nORE FERTURES 
THAN HIGHER PRICED PROGRRHS 

- Prints vertically. 

- Pos- & neg. screen dumps in 2 si2es- 

- 4 defineable limited text screens can 
limit the text anywhere from a single 
character to the entire screen. 

- Regular and graphic scroll types. 

- Horizontally scrolling one line screens. 
Up to 4 can be used at the same time. 

- Special trace delay for debugging. 

- Printer control outputs characters to 
screen & printer simultaneously. 

MIN. 16K (EXT. BASIC NOT REQUIRED) 
TAPE - 24.95 US or 29.95 CDN 
DISK - 27.95 US or 32.95 CDN 
7X SALES TAX - ONTARIO ONLY 
OUTSIDE U.S. & CANADA ADD %2 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 65 



t 



SELECTED SOFTWARE 

FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 



HARDWARE DISCOUNTS: 
TAKE 10% OFF THE PRICE OF TWO OR 15% OFF THE PRICE OF 5 OR MORE! 



UPGRADE YOUR COLOR COMPUTER! 

Complete solderless kits with easy-to-follow instructions. 

4K-16K For All Boards $19.95 
4K-32K For AU Boards $54.95 
16K'32K For All Boards $39.95 
64K For E&FBoards& Color Computer 2 $59.95 
^IP POSSIBLE. PLEASE SPEaPY BOARD REVISION WITH ORDER. 

Not6: All ICs used ih our kits are first quality 
200NS Prime Chips and carry one full year warranty. 



'REAL TALKER' 

HARDWARE VOICE SYNTHESIZER 

by COLORWARE 
with Votrax Chip ready to plug ih and talk. 
Comes with software on cassette & user's manual. 



VIDEO PLUS by COMPUTERWARE 
This fine unit will allow you to connect your color computer to 
a monochrome or color video monitor. No soldering required. 
Corries with easy installation instructions. $24.95 



BOOK: Color Basic Unravelled by Spectr^ Associates 



$19.95 



SOFTWARE DISCOUNTS 
TAKE 15% OFF THE PRICE OF ONE, 20% OFF THE PRICE OF TWO OR MORE! 

AH programs are in 1 6K machine language unless noted. 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

* TOUCHSTONE (32K) ExceHent Tut Type arcade 
game. 

* BUZZARD BAIT (32K) Just outstmdmg! 

* DONKEY KING (32K) Just outstaiifing! 

* KATERPILLAR Excelem graphics. 

* TRAP FALL Jusl like Pitfals. 

* PROTECTORS (32K) Excellent graphics. 

SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 

* CUBIX (32K1 Outstanding with 16 skill levels. 
FROGGIE (32K) The best of its type. 

* LUNAR-ROVER PATROL {32K) Just outstaiding. 
GEOGRAPHY PAC Excellent learning tdol with 4 
cdor hi^s. maps. Extended Basic requred. 

* LANCER (32K) Excelent Joust-type game. 

* ANDROID ATTACK Comes wHh 16K and 32k. 32K 
veram wi tilk> 

* MS. GOBBLER (32K) Outstarabig witfi 4 drfferent 
mazes and 16 ski levels. 

* WHIRLYBIRD RUN Drop bomtu & fire missiles to 
destroy enemy bases, ships & missiles over a varying 
terrain. 

* GALAX ATTAX Protect ydur base by shooting alien 
fighter in formation. 

* PLANET INVASION Excellent Defender game. 

* DEFENSE Strikingly good. 

* SPACE WAR You must break through the enemy 
fighters and the defenses of Death Star. 

* GHOST GOBBLER Hqhiy rated Pac Man-type with 
18 ski levels and bts of action. 

INTRACOLOR 

* CANDY CO. (32KI Coming SoonI 
** COLORPEDE Just like the arcade. 

* ROBOTTACK Just like the arcade. 

THE PROGRAMMER'S GUILD 
** NINJA WARRIOR The ultimate arcade challenge. $29.95 
PACORDIDS The most challenging Pac Man-type. $19.95 

RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE 
RAINBOW SCREEN MACHINE 
TAPE $29.95 Ext. Base Reqived 

SUPER SCREEN MACHINE 



TAPE 


DISK 


$27.95 


$30.95 


$27.95 


$30.95 


$26.95 




$21.95 




$27.95 


$30.95 


$24.95 




$24.95 


$28.95 


$24.95 


$28.95 


$24.95 


$28.95 


$32.95 




$24.95 


$28.95 


$24.95 




$24.95 


$28.95 


$24.95 


$28.95 


$24.95 




$24.95 




$24.95 




$24.95 




$21.95 





$29.95 $34.95 
$24.95 $27.95 



CMSK $32.95 



TAPE $44.95 



Ext. Basic Reqived 



DISK $47.95 



DISK 

$29.95 



$3a95 



DATA SOFT 

TAPE 

** POOYAM (32K) Glide up & down in your tram car $29.95 
while shooting arrows at vicnus, hungry wolves jump- 
ing down the valley with air filled balloons. Tape & 
disk included. 

* ZAXXON (32K) Maneuver your ship through a battle- $39.95 

held of state-of-the-art missiles, anti-aircraft tanks and 
enemy planes. Survive all that and you'll meet the 
deadly ZAXXON Robot! 
** MOON SHUTTLE Pilot your moon shuttle through $2a95 $2^95 
outerspace avoiding man-o-wars, meteors, bomb 
launchers and expandos to meet the prince of 
darkness. But watch out for his darkest side. 

COMPUTERWARE 

* JUNIOR'S REVENGE (32K) Climb vines avoid ob- $28.95 $31.95 

stacles & creatures to save your Father from Luigi. 

* GRAN PRIX (32K) Race against the dock and $21.95 $24.95 
challenge the Mario Andretti in your soul. 

* DOODLE BUG Just like Ladybug. $28.95 29.95 

ELITE SOFTWARE 

* ZAKSUNO (32K) Fly your spaceship through enemy $26.95 
star bases. Avoid gukJed missiles, lasers and firing 

turrets. Can you reach their leader? 

ANTECO SOFTWARE 
ROMPAK ONLY 

* 8-BALL For the pool-table lover. $29.95 

* GHOST GOBBLER by Spectral Associates $26.95 

* WHIRLYBIRD RUN by Spectral Associates $26.95 

ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 

SAIGON: THE FINAL DAYS The most truly $24.95 
unique adventure ever. 

ADVENTURELAND Wander through an enchanted $19.95 
reakn and try to recover the 13 tost treasures. 

EARTHQUAKE You will fear for more thw your $24.95 
own life. 

** TRIAD (32K) Excellent new type arcade game. $34.95 

** SEA DRAGON (32K) Outstanding underwater thrills $34.95 
and chills. 

SUGAR SOFTWARE 

TIMS Excellent personal database management $24.96 - 
system. Extended Basic Required. 

PIsase note: Software and hardware cannot be mixed for discount. 
* Requires Joystick •♦Joysiit.k Opiianal 



WE PAY POSTAGE on all orders in the United States & Canada. Overseas please add $3.00. (MN Res. add 6% sales tax.) 

We accept Visa, Mastercard, check or money order. U.S. funds only for foreign orders. C.O.D. please add $2.00 
Send to: SELECTED SOFTWARE, P.O. Box 32228. Fridlev. MN 55432 



By Mike Fahy 



A tutorial on the use of dot graphics 



^Sd very interesting feature of most printers is their abil- 
ity to use dot graphics. Unfortunately, this capabil- 
ity is not used or understood by most owners of 
printers, such as the Line Printer Vll or DMP-100. Sure, 
there are a few graphic screen dump programs around, but it 
seems that we should be able to do more than just copy what 
is already on our screen. 1 suppose the main reason for the 
lack of this type of program is the fact that it is difficult to 
find anything that discusses dot graphics in a way that a 
person who is unfamiliar with the subject can understand. 

BOLTYPEis a 32K Extended Color basic program that 
allows your Line Printer Vll or equivalent to print with 
three new styles: Old English, Italics, and the Futuristic 
type. To use BOLTYPE, simply type or load it in and RUN, 
For those wishing to modify the program to their own tastes, 
1 have supplied a detailed line description. If, for some 
reason, you don't want to type in the tedious DA TA state- 
ments, you may send a blank cassette, self-addressed 
double-stamped envelope, and $4 to Mike Fahy, P.O. Box 
943, Havelock, NC 28532. 

Before running, make sure the printer is turned on, or the 
program will "hang-up" in line 60 until it is. Also, make sure 
the switch on the rear right-hand side of your printer is set to 
8BS if you are using a Line Printer Vll. This allows the 
printer to receive eight bits rather than the usual seven. The 
eighth bit is essential in order for the printer to recognize 
graphics characters (more on this later). 

After all of the data in lines 220-1250 have been read by 
lines 110-190, the program will display the menu page, 
which begins at 1450. By selecting A, B, or C, you may 
choose which type style you desire. Then you will be asked 



(Mike Fahy is a student at West Carteret High School 
in Morehead City, N, C, and has been interested in 
computing for three years. He hopes to meet more 
people his age who are also serious about 
programming.) 



what you would like to have printed. After entering your 
message, the program will print your message to the primer 
in the style which you requested. 



THE OUTER LimiTS 



While in the Italic or Futuristic mode, the program will 
use the standard characters for any punctuation or numerals 
you enter. By using the lowercase mode, you can combine 
standard characters with the new style. For instance, by 
entering BOLTYPEby mike fahy, the printer will type BOL- 
TYPE in the desired type and "BY MIKE FAHY" in stand- 
ard uppercase letters. This does not work while using Old 
English, however. In this mode, there is no support of any 
special characters or numerals. 

Exactly how does this program work? On Page 15 of the 
Line Printer Vll reference manual, it is explained that in 
order to use the graphics mode of the printer, you must first 
enter the mode by typing PRINW'2, CHR$(18), which is 
done in line 100 of this program. 

The codes for the graphics patterns are stored in decimal 
128 to 255. In other words, printing any characters less than 
128 while in the graphics mode will not show any results 
except for the control codes described on Page 1 1 of the 
reference manual. The reason for this is because the most 
significant bit (MSB), which is the first bit in a graphics 
character, has to be 1. The remaining seven bits correspond 
to the s^ven dots which form one column. The least signifi- 



May 1964 the RAINBOW 67 



PROGRAMMER'S 





^ Saves Time & is Easy to Use 
H Durable & Attractive 



^ Have Fun & Learn 



Would You Like To Design: 

a) BUDGETS ' 

b) INVENTORY LISTS 

c) GAMES, GRAPHICS 



The Kit includes: Two thick mylar coated graphs of the color computer's 
screen; step by step instructions for the beginner; two demo programs, and easy 
to follow "how to personalize" budgets that^'ow write. 



Each Sketch Pad has print locations 
on one side and set screen locations 
on the other, along with their cor- 
responding commands and color 
codes. I 



Don V delay, order yours today. . . 



ONLY $ 

fcANADA— $13.50"1 

I EUROPE— $14.50 I 
I I 



1 



TO ORDER: 

CALL (707) 722-4280 
or WRITE TO: 




Calif, residents 
add 6% sales tax. 
(Postage paid.) 




REDCREST, CALIFORNIA 95569 



Now you can take the screen with 
you wherever you go; school, work, 
or play. If you get a good idea, 
simply pull it out and draw or write 
down what you thought directly on 
the screen. When you >e done with 
it, just wipe it off! 

ORDER FORM SPi 

Quantity I I 

Name 



Address. 
City _ 
Country. 
Charge 



.State. 



Zip 



□ 



WS4 



□ 



Acct. No. 



Expiration Date 
Signature 



cant bit (LSB) is the top dot, followed by the next-to-least 
significant bit . . . until you reach the second-most signifi- 
cant bit, which controls the bottom dot. If the correspond- 
ing bit is a I, the dot is printed. 

Lost? Well, if you look on Page 184 of the Going Ahead 
With Extended Color basic manual, you will find a table 
titled "Base Conversions.'^ It*s probably the one you can't 
figure out what to do with. In the second column^ labeled 
"Binary," you will find what seems to be a mad jumble of 
ones and zeros. Actually, these "numbers" represent how the 
computer counts. For instance, the decimal value of 128 is 
also the binary value of lOOOOOOO, The decimal of 223 is 
binary llOIIIII. 

So, what does that have to do with anything? Actually, it 
has everything to do with it. Okay, let's take a look at a 
tiroken down byte c6de. 

Decimal 171 equals lOlOlOll. the first or most signifi- 
cant bit is I, so we know that it is a graphics character. The 
last or least significant bit is also I , which means the topmost 
dot is printed. The next to least significant bit is I too, 
meaning the next to the top dot is printed. But the next bit is 
a 0, so the third dot is not pririted. This process is repeated 
until it gets to the next to most significant bit, which is a 0. 
Therefore, 171 would look something like this: 



LSB 


1 


• 


7th 


1 


• 


6th 


0 


o 


5th 


1 


• 


4th 


0 


o 


3rd 


1 


• 


2nd 


0 


o 


MSB 


1 


• 



So, while in the graphics mode, if you told the printer to 
print character 171, it would print something like "i". 

Note; The MSB will not be printed since it is merely to 
determine whether or not the character is a graphics charac- 
ter or not. 

Fine. So now that I know how to get a certain graphics 
character, how do I make my own characters? This is the 
simple part. Well, at least it's easier than the rest of our 
procedure. To make your own characters, simply combine 
the characters yoii already have. For instance, to make an A, 
you could conibine decimal 255, which is binary 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1, 
with three 1 37s, which have binary values of 1000 1 00 1 , and a 
second 255, to make something like: 



• 


o 


o 


o 




• 


o 


o 


o 




• 


o 


o 


6 




• 


o 


o 


o 




• 


o 


o 


o 
































CM 



90 - Clear string space and set up arrays 

100 - Enter dot graphics mode 

110-169 - Read Old English data 

170-190 - Read Italics data 

200-210 - Read Futuristic data 

220-136 - Data for Old English 

740-990 . - Data for Italics 

1000-1250 - Data for Futuristic 

1 280 - Clear screen and ask for message (Italics) 

1290-1400 - Convert characters to graphics, cfieck for 

special characters and print 
1410-1420 - Carriage return and skip one line 
1460-1520 - Menu 

1530-1560 - Clear screen and ask for message (Old 
English) 

1570-1660 - Convert characters to graphics and print 
one at a time 

1 680- 1 700 - Clear screen and ask for message (Futur- 
istic) 

1710-1830 - Convert characters, print and check for 

special characters 
1840 - Carriage return and skip one line, return 

to menu 

If there is still some confusion about using dot graphics or 
the program, please feel free to call me at (919) 247-3037 
after 5 p.m. EST, or write to me at the aforementioned 
address. Good luck! 



220 


... 144 


1050 


. . . 150 


390 . . . 


.... 75 


1200 . . 


. . . . 61 


540 ... . 


...125 


1460 . . . 


...188 


720 


. . . 12 


1620 


. . 249 


860 


29 


END. 


. . . 164 



The listing: 



BOLTYPE 1.0 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1983 
BY MIKE FAHY 



10 ' 

20 ' 
30 • 
40 • 

50 CLS: PR I NT "BOLTYPE 1.0": PRINT" 
COPYRIGHT <C> 19G3 BY M. FAMY"* 
60 IF PEEK<ScHFF22)<>4THENPRINT02 
30, "PRINTER NOT READY ...": GOTO60 
70 PRINTa230, "ONE MOMENT PLEASE. 

■ ■ 

90 CL^AR1000:H-0:DIMOE«<26,2},C( 

26, 9), P (26, 9) 

100 PRINT«-2,CHR«<18> 

110 F0RFI-1T026 

120 FaRSL"lT02 

130 REAOA: IFA—1THEN160 

140 OE«<FI,SL)«C£«<FI,SL)+CHR«(A 



Arid that just about wraps it up for the development of the 
characters. Now, let's take a look at the litte descriptions I 
mentioned earlier: 

Line # Description 

50 - Displays title 

60 - Checks to see if printer is ready 



150 GOTO 130 

160 NEXT8L,FI 

170 FORX=1T026:FORY«1T09 

180 READC(X,Y) 

190 NEXTY,X 

200 F0RX-1T08:F0RY-1T09:READF<X, 



May 1964 the RAINBOW 69 



Y):NEXTY, 


X : F0RY-1T04: READF (9p 


Y): 


. 138. 138. 

p A p A W^p p 


241. 


«-l 










NEXTY 












350 DATA 

wiifF ■ I n 


128- 

A Aw| 


128 

A Awp 


129 

A A7p 


132 

A wAp 


139 

A wAp 


1 39 

AOa 


210 FORX- 


10TO26:FORY- 


1T09: READF ( 


. 132. 129. 

P * W^p A p 


129 p 


— 1 
A 










x,y):nexty,x 










360 DATA 


130. 


149. 

A ^W , 


293. 

Awwp 


130 

A wVp 


2S4 

A w^ p 


IAS 
A "rw 


220 DATA 


128p 128p 


128. 

A AWp 


130. 

♦ WMF p 


129. 


229 


. 137. 144. 


224. 


A 










. IBS. 


191p240p 


128. 


128. 


128. 


-1 


370 DATA 


128. 

A Aw I 


130 

A wVp 


129 

A A7p 


129 

*A^P 


130 

A p 


1 30 

A wV 


230 DATA 


130p 129p 


129. 


129. 


131. 

* W A p 


130 


. 161. 144. 

P **** P *^-rp 


143. 

A ^^W 1 












m 128a 128a 


128p 129p 


131. 

AW A p 


130. 

* wa^p 


129. 


-1 


380 DATA 


130. 

A WV 1 


129. 

A A7p 


149- 

A ^V%^ p 


294. 


128. 

A Aw p 


294 

A w~ 


240 DATA 


130p 129p 


14S, 


294. 


128, 
^ p 


254 


. 129*129. 


130. 












a 137- 137. 
p p p 


142p240p 


-1 








390 DATA 


129 

A A7 1 


130 

A wSFp 


130 

A wVp 


1 99 


1 9C1 

A AOp 


1 90 

A A7 


250 DATA 


128p 130p 


129, 


129, 


129, 


130 


. 130« 130 

p A W V p A w V p 


A A7 1 












. 130. 130. 


129p 128p 


-1 








400 DATA 


128 

A AWa 


130 


129 

AA7p 


IAS 

A f Wp 


9'U 

AW^p 


4 99 

A A7 


260 DATA 


144p2S2p 


130. 


253. 

Awwp 


129. 
* * ' p 


129 


.294. 129. 

p A^np A A7p 


«1 
A 












. 130. 130. 


192p-l 










410 DATA 


130, 


129. 

A A7, 


129. 

A A7, 


131. 

A W A p 


130 

A wV p 


130 

A wKF 


270 DATA 


128p 128p 


129. 


130. 

* wwp 


130. 

* wwp 


130 


. 129. 128a 

P * ^ r p A p 


.-1 












a 130. 129. 


128p-l 










420 DATA 


130 


149 

A ^w p 


189 

A w7 , 


130 

A wVp 


9BA 

Aw^ , 


1 AB 

A 


200 DATA 


128p 130p 


146. 


250, 

™^ p 


133, 


249 


. 177. 178- 

p A r r p A r W p 


208. 

AVw a 


A 










a 129. 130, 


232,-1 










430 DATA 


130 

A WV| 


129 
A^7p 


199 
A^^p 


131 

A^A p 


4 3A 
A ^9Vp 


4 3 A 

A 


290 DATA 


130p 129p 


129, 


129, 


131, 


130 


- 128- 129 

p A Aw , A A 7 p 


130 

A wV ] 


— 1 

A 










a 130. 129. 

p A WVp A A 7 p 


128p-l 










440 DATA 


130, 


149p 


189. 

A \m W p 


130. 

A WV p 


294- 

Aw^ , 


129 

A A7 


300 DATA 


144p2S2p 


130. 


253, 


145, 

A ^wp 


145 


• 129. 130. 


128, 


—1 










p 162p 130p 


192p-l 










490 DATA 


128, 


130. 


129. 

A A7p 


129- 

A A7p 


129- 

A A 7 p 


131 

A w A 


3 1 A DATA 


A p A Aw p 


129, 


130, 


130p 


130 


• 130. 130 

p A WSF p A ^'■rF p 


129 

A A 7 f 


— 1 
A 










pl30pl29p 


126,-1 










4^0 DATA 


130 

A WVJ 


IAS 

A *^wp 


Afc#^p 


1 90 


4 

A^Sp 


a9^ 


320 DATA 


128, 128, 


130, 


129, 


145p 


254 


p A w p A9>> p 


19Q 

A A 7 , 


1 99 

lA7p 


9"SA 

AW^p 


4 9Q 
A AOp 


4 9Q 
A AOy 


A 


pl28p254p 


149,130, 


130, 


129, 


-1 




470 DATA 


128, 


130, 


129, 


128, 


130, 


129 


330 DATA 


130, 129, 


129, 


129, 


131p 


130 


4 oca 1 oo 

p lACSp lA7p 




A ACSp 


1Z9, 


lO0p 


IZTp 


— l 


p 130, 128p 


128, 128, 


128, 


128, 


-I 




480 DATA 


130, 


,149p 


299, 


130, 


293p 


129 


340 DATA 


144,252, 


130, 


192, 


190, 


145 


,129,294, 


149, 


128p 


-1 









SOFTWARE FOR THE TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER! 




REVOLUTION! 

You accelerate hard down a long straightaway, braking heavily at the end 
for a sharp comer. You slice smoothly through the esses, and then boldly 
keep the power on for a fast sweeper. The Ferrari drifts dangerously near 
the edge, but you make a tiny correction in the steering, and you are 
through. 

The finish line flashes by, and suddenly you are in the pits. The car falls 
silent. You see your lap times being held up. Your fmal lap was a new Lap 
record! At last, you permit yourself a small smile. 

You have mastered this powerful car on a difficult track, driving with the 
assurance and precision that comes only from long hours of practice. 

You are driving an authentic race car. You arc playing REVOLUTION! 




MATHMENU 



MATHMENU is a powerful menu-driven system to turn your Color 
Computer into an intelligent, flexible tool for mathematics aiid engineer- 
ing. MATHMENU takes the tedium out of math, leaving your full brain 
power to attack the "meat" of your problems. By rapidly performing 
integration and differentiation, solving quadratic equations, plotting user 
defined functions and much more, MATHMENU can help simplify the 
most complex problems. Whether you are a student or a professional, if 
you use math, you need MATHMENU. 



REVOLUTION! 



Requires Joysticks 
A Extended Basic 



For 32K Disk $24.95 

For 16/32K Cassette $21.95 

Or write for more ifffi). 

NOTE: gnpUa od 16K vmkn ire ili^iily difiereit. ItiL md 32K versions included oo all cauettes. 



MATHMENU 


For 32K Disk 


. . . $49.95 


Plotting Requires 




For 16K Cassette 


. . . $44,95 


Extended Basic 




DocumentatioDonly . . . . 


.... $5.00 






Or write for free brochure. 





SOFTWARE AUTHORS! 

Inter -f Action is looking for nex^ software to market. We are 
especially interested in disk-based software for the TR&W 
Color Computer. 

For more information, contact Inter-^ Action's Software 
Review Manager. 



New York residents add 7% sates tax. 

Allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. 

*TRS^ is a trademark of l>ndy Corporation. 




RAINBOVIf 



Inter <i-Pc^ction 



31 Rose Court 



Amherst, NY 14226 



(716) 839-0943 



70 th« RAINBOW May 1984 



490 DATA 
, 128, 129, 
900 DATA 
,253, 130, 
S10 DATA 
,130, 129, 
520 DATA 
, 129,254, 
530 DATA 
, 130, 139, 
540 DATA 
,253, 130, 
550 DATA 
,130,129, 
560 DATA 
, 145,238, 
570 DATA 
,128,129, 
580 DATA 
,145,224, 
590 DATA 
, 129, 128, 
600 DATA 
,130,254, 
610 DATA 
,130,130, 
620 DATA 
,254, 129, 
630 DATA 



128, 130, 129, 

130.129, -1 
144,252, 130, 
252,-1 
128,128,129, 
128,-1 

130,145,254, 

-1 

130,129,191, 
-1 

144,252, 130, 
252,128,-1 
128, 128, 129, 

130. 130, -1 
130,145,254, 

128. 128, -1 
128, 130, 129, 

130. 129, -1 
128, 150, 169, 
-1 

130,129,129, 
-1 

130,145,249, 
129,192,-1 
128, 128, 128, 
129,128,-1 
145,254, 128, 
128,-1 

130, 129, 130, 



128, 129, 130 
160, 158, 129 
130,130,130 
130,253,129 
129, 130,130 
160,198,129 
130, 130, 130 
130,253,145 
128,129,130 
169, 169, 170 
129, 130, 130 
133, 129, 190 
129,130,130 
128,254,129 
130,130,129 



,131,130, 
640 DATA 
,129,254, 
650 DATA 
, 129, 129, 
660 DATA 
,145,254, 
670 DATA 
, 129, 129, 
680 DATA 
, 149, 129, 
690 DATA 
,130,130, 
700 DATA 
, 129,254, 
710 DATA 
,147,140, 
720 DATA 
, 134, 162, 
730 DATA 
, 130, 130, 
740 DATA 
,138,134, 
750 DATA 
, 178, 138, 
760 DATA 
, 130, 130, 
770 DATA 
, 146, 140, 



129, 

130, 

129, 

128, 

128, 

130, 

144, 

128, 

130, 

194, 

194, 

129, 

129, 

130, 

129, 

162, 

128, 

130, 

145, 

130, 

130, 

192, 

130 

192, 

132 

192, 

130 

192, 

128 



-1 

145,254, 

-1 

128,129, 
-1 

145,254, 
128, 129, 
128, 129, 
130,129, 
129, 145, 
-1 

130,130, 
-1 

145,254, 
-1 

145, 146, 
-1 

129, 193, 
144,224, 
129, 129, 
129, 128, 
160, 144, 



128,254,128 

130,130, 130 

128, 128,254 

255,-1 

130, 130, 130 

12B,-1 

146,252,146 

129,128,129 

128,128,254 

162, 162, 161 

161,149,138 
-1 

129, 129, 130 
-1 

216,180, 146 



224, 208, 216, 212, 210 
224,208,200, 196, 130 
224,208,200, 164, 162 




^ / / JFD ■ COCO DISC SYSTEM - 

J & M Sv^teims, Ltd. is a leader in the Model III 
marketplace with our JFD-lil Disc Controller. With 
thousands in operation, we have set new standards 
in controller performance and reliability. We bring 
these same high standards to the COCO, resulting 
in the highest quality disc controller system on the 
market. Compare these functions before you buy: 
/ / / 

• Price. $449 includes controller, first drive, disc 
basic m ROM, and manuals. Just plug it in. 

• Never needs adjusting. Our exclusive Digital 
Phase Lock Loop Data Separator and Digital Pre- 
comp Circuit eliminates the 3 adjustments found 
on other controllers. / 

• High quality standard production disc drives. For '^mfli fflHll 
improved service and reliability. Tandon & Teac — - 

drives provide twice the read sensitivity that the 
drives found in other disc systems do, and hold 
their alignment far longer. / 

• Gold-plated card edge connectors throughout. 

• Software compatible with Radio Shack Disc 

Basic, Flex, and OS/9. j I 

J & M Systems, Ltd., 137 Utah NE, Albuquerque, N.M. 87108 
(505) 265-1501 / | 



$449 





J&M SYSTEMS, LTOl 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 71 



780 DATA 192,224,206,200,140,138 
, 130, 130, 130 

790 DATA 192,160,144,136,140,138 
, 130, 130, 130 

800 DATA 192,224,208,200,164,146 
, 146, 130, 130 

810 DATA 192,160,144,200,172,194 
, 136, 132, 130 

820 DATA 192,192,224,208,138,134 
, 130, 130, 128 

830 DATA 192,224,208,192,160,1^4 
, 136, 132, 130 

840 DATA 192,160,144,184,212,146 
,136,132,130 

850 DATA 192,224,208,200,196,194 
, 126, 128, 128 

860 DATA 192,160,144,136,132,222 
,168,148,142 

870 DATA 160,144,136,244,174,144 
, 136, 132, 130 

880 DATA 192,224,208,200,196,162 
, 146, 138, 134 

890 DATA 192,160,144,136,140,138 
, 138, 138, 132 

900 DATA 192,224,208,200,162,178 
,202,134,130 

910 DATA 192,160,144,136,156,170 
,202, 138,132 

920 DATA 192,192,192,200,172,154 



CONCORDANCE (Bo$lcXRef9i»nc») 



by EchoSoft 



MACHINE LANGUAGE 
operates In memory 
Does not require ASC It Input from Tape or Disk 

Processes >70 Statements/Second 
AN EXCELLENT DEVELOPMENT TOOL 
Options include — 

- BASIC LISTINGS IN TWO FORMATS: 

• Normal Basic Listing 

• Pretty Print Listing 

— CROSS REFERENCE FOR: 

• GOTO • GOSUB 

• PEEK ♦ POKE 

• VARIABLES 

- LOCATES ALL SUBROUTINES AND REFERENCES 

- CONTROL OF ALL PRINTERS - 

• ComrriandSequenceOutput • Header Spacing 

• Page Control • Footer Spacing 

• Page Length • Printer Speed 

• Page Width • On Line Forms Control 

• Margin Spacing 

- CONFIGURATION ALLOWS EASY SET UP OF ALL 

PARAMETERS 

- ALLOWS INPUT FROM DISK OR TAPE 

- WILL OPERATE IN 32K OR 64K SYSTEMS 

- IN 64K MODE ALLOWS ALL OF NORMALLY AVAILABLE 

LOWER 32K FOR BASIC PROGRAM. 

- CAN PROVIDE A PRECONhGURED LINKAGE TO 

OtHER MACHINE LANGUAGE PROQftAMS 



CONCORDANCE Media Provided 

32K-64K TAPE $19.95 

Exlended/Prinier OlSK $24.95 

CHECK or MONEY ORDER {U S. Funds) 
For U.S. & Canadian Delivery ADD $2.00 Postage & Handling 
For Non U.S. Delivery ADD $3 50 Postage & Handling 
For CO D. Orders ADD $1 .50+ Postage & Handling 

EchoSoft 17SKYLINEDRIVE, CHALFONT. PA 18914 



, 138, 130, 130 

930 DATA 128,192,162,146,136,134 
, 130, 130, 130 

940 DATA 192,224,206,200,164,146 
, 136, 132, 130 

950 DATA 192,176,172,162,144,136 
,132,130,128 
N960 DATA 192,224,206,200,210,200 
, 160, 144, 142 

970 DATA 192,160,160,156,176,144 
,132,130,126 

980 DATA 200,172,154,136,136,132 
, 130,5,5 

990 DATA 192,224,208,210,202,138 
, 134, 130, 126 

1000 DATA 246,255,137,137,137,25 
5,248,128,126 

1010 DATA 255,201,201,201,201,25 
5,248, 128, 128 

1020 DATA 255,193,193,193,193,19 
5,227, 126, 128 

1030 DATA 255,249,193,193,193,19 
3, 190, 126, 126 

1040 DATA 255,249,201,201,201,20 
1,201, 128, 126 

1050 DATA 255,249,137,137,137,13 
7,137,126,126 

1060 DATA 255,249,193,193,201,20 
1,251, 126, 128 

1070 DATA 248,255,136,136,136,25 

5,248, 128, 128 

1080 DATA 255,248^126,126 

1090 DATA 248,248,192,192,192,19 

2,255, 128, 126 

1100 DATA 255,248,140,136,136,13 
7,249,126,126 

1110 DATA 255,246,192,192,192,19 
2, 192, 128, 126 

1120 DATA 255,249,129,255,129,12 
9,255, 128, 128 

1130 DATA 255,250,132,136,144,16 
0,255, 126, 128 

1140 DATA 255,193,193*193,193,24 
9,255, 128, 128 

1150 DATA 255,249,137,137,137,13 
7,143,126,128 

1160 DATA 255,249,193,208,255,16 
0, 192, 128, 128 

1170 DATA 255,249,137,137,137,14 
3» 248, 128, 128 

1180 DATA 207,201,201,201,201,20 
1,249, 126, 128 

1190 DATA 129,129,129,255,131,13 
1, 131, 126, 128 

1200 DATA 255,248,192,192,192,19 
2,255, 126, 128 

1210 DATA 143,159,160,192,160,14 
4, 143, 128, 128 

1220 DATA 255,246,192,255,192,19 
2,255,126,128 



72 Um RAINBOW May 1984 



MODEM 



1230 DATA 247,248,136,136,136,13 
6,247,128,128 

1240 DATA 143,136,136,248,248,13 
6, 143, 128, 128 

1290 DATA 193,225,209,201,197,19 
5, 193, 126, 128 
1270 eOTO14S0 

1280 PRINT«-2, CHR« ( 18) | : CL80: PRI 

NT«491, " italic*" I :PRINT80, ••"l :LI 

NEINPUT"messag»'' | A« 

1290 L-LEN(A«> 

1300 FORLL-ITO L 

1320 M«->MID«(A«,LL, 1) 

1330 OASC(n«>:A-0-64 

1340 IF 0>96 AND 0<123 THEN PRIN 

T«-2, CHR« (30) I CHR« (0-32) I CHR« ( 18 

) I ;hh-hh-i-i: ifll>-l theni840elsen 

EXTLL 

1350 IF0<69 OR O>90 THEN PRINT#- 

2, CHR« ( 128) I CHR« ( 128) i CHR« (30) |C 

HR« (0)1 CHR« (18)1 CHR« ( 128) I CHR« ( 1 

28)i:HH-HH-i-l:IFLL>-L THEN 1410EL 

SENEXTLL 

1360 F0RY-1T09 

1370 PRINT«-2,CHR«(C(A,Y))| 

1380 NEXTY 

1400 NEXTLL 

1410 PRINT»-2 

1420 PRINT#-2 

1430 QO8UB1490 

1440 6OTO1280 

1450 ' 

1460 CLazPRINT^eOLTYPE 1.0": PRIN 
T"C0PYRI6HT (C) 1983 BY M. FAHY" 
: PRINT 

1470 PRINT: PRINT" A. OLD 

ENGLISH": PRINT: PRINT" B. 
ITALICS": PRINT: PRINT" C. 
FUTURISTIC": PRINT: PRINT 
1480 LINEINPUT" SELECT MO 

DE :"|CV« 

1490 IF CV«-"A»THEN1530 
1S00 IF CV«-"B"THEN1280 
1S10 IF CV«'-"C"Tf£N1680 
1S20 GOTO 1450 
1530 ' OLDE ENGLISH 
1540 PRINT«-2,C^ff%«(18) I 

1 550 CLS0 : PR I NTe490 , " oi d " -^cm* ( 1 

28)+"*nglish"| :PRINTa0, ""| 

1560 LINEINPUT"iii»«sag*"|A« 

1570 F0RFI-1T02 

1580 FORSL»=lTOLEN(A«) 

1590 PS-A8C(MID«(A«,8L,1)) 

1600 IFPS<45 OR PS>90Tfr«:NPRINT#- 

2, STRING* (7, 128)|:GOTO1650 

1610 F0RTL=1T0 LEN(OE«(PS-64,FI) 

) 

1620 PRINTtt-2,CHR«(ASC(riID«(0E«( 
P8-64,FI),TL, 1)))| 
1630 NEXTTL 




LOWEST PRICE 
EVER FOR A 
FULL DUPLEX 
ORIGJANS. 
MODEM 



INCLUDES CABLE AND 2 FREE 
HOURS ON COMPUSERVE 

SAVE-A-BYTE BATTERY BACK-UP $59.»» 
See Review in Rainbow December '83 

GORILLA/BANANA PRINTER $199.»» 

"p'rVc^ * 64K RAMS 8 for $43.»5 

ALL MODULES CA^^ 

TRY BYTE-BACK MODULES FOR 10 DAYS WITH 
NO OBLIGATION 



CHECKS 
MONEY ORDERS 



ASK ABOUT DEALER DISCOUNTS 

Mail To: 

BYTE-BACK CO. Shipping and Handling $4.9S 
Department R 

Rt. 3, Box 147 • Brodie Rd. eo-«o 
Leesville, S.C. 29070 Ph. o03-032-5o I 2 




1640 PRINTtt-2,CHR«<12e)fCHR«(128 
)l 

1650 NEXTSL 

1660 PRINT«-2:NEXTFI 

1670 GOTO1450 

1680 ' FUTURISTIC 

1690 PRINT#-2,C^«^«(18)} 

1700 CLS0:PRINT«490, "futurimtic" 

I :PRINTa0, ""; : LINEINPUT "Msmagv" 

;a« 

1710 L»LEN(A«) 

1720 FORLL-ITOL 

1740 ri«-'MID«(A«,LL, 1) 

1750 0-'ASC(M«) :A"0-64 

1760 IF 0>96 AND 0<123 THENPRINT 

tt-2, CHR« (30) I CHR« (0-32) | CHR« ( 18) 

i:HH-HH-i-l: IFLL>-L THEN1840 ELSE 

NEXTLL 

1770 IF 0<65 OR O>90 THEN PRINT* 

-2, CHR« (30) I CHR« (O) ( CHR« ( IB) I CHR 

% ( 128) ; Cm« ( 128) I : HH-HH+1 : IFLL>'- 

L T^£N1840ELSENEXTLL 

1780 IF A-9THENa-4EL8EQ-9 

1790 FORY-ITOQ 

1800 PRINT«-2,Cm«(F(A,Y))t 

1810 NEXTY 

1830 NEXTLL 

1840 PRINT«-2:PRINT*-2:6OTOi450 



May 1984 lh« RAINBOW 73 



PRINTER UTILITY 



So you have a large mailing to do? Too many envelopes 
to address? Don't stamp your foot! Cancel your frustra- 
tions with ... 





By Charles M. Thonen 




After getting the Line Printer VII for my CoCo, I 
wanted a label program that would print addresses 
on the two-up dry gum labels that this printer uses. 
All of the programs in the magazines took the easy way out 
and just printed the same address on the second label. If only 
one label is needed, it is a waste of good labels. I wanted a 
program that didn't duplicate labels and had a good looking 
screen format Mailabel does both of these and also has the 
usual edit, add, delete, search, and functions. 

The program is written for a 32K machine and is for a 
tape-based system. A PCLEAR 1 has to be entered due to 
the size of the CLEAR and D/Af statements in line 120. The 
program can easily be changed to disk by the following line 
changes. 

Change the word TAPE to DISK in line 5020 

Delete lines 5020 through 5120 

Delete the negative sign in lines 5140 and 5180 

Change the PRINW-1 to WRITER in line 5160 

Change the word TAPE to DISK in line 6020 

Delete lines 6040 through 6120 

Delete the negative signs in lines 6160, 6170 and 6200 

Mailabel is written with subroutines to help follow the 
program logic. The sort routine is a fast machine language 
sort from Radio Shack's Microcomputer News (Vol. 4, 
Issue 6). 

Mailabel comes up with the main menu page on the 
screen. There are nine options to choose from. Data can be 



input to the program from tape or key- 
board. Data can also be added to an existing 
file. Records can be edited or deleted. Provisions 
are made to save a file to tape. Records can be printed 
to the screen and/or printer. This is an unformatted 
dump to the printer. Labels, either one-up or two-up, can 
be printed. There is also a search and sort feature. 

Both Input Record and Add To List will bring up the 
Input Record Screen. If a file has already been loaded, the 
Input Record Option will not operate. This will stop you 
from wiping out the file already in memory. After entering 
either a 1 or 3, the Input Record Screen will be up showing 
the number of the record tobeentered. Press [ENTER] after 
inputting the lines information and the cursor will jump to 
the next line. If a particular item is not known just press 
[ENTER]. After inputting the last line, hit [ENTER] and a 
fresh screen will come up for the next record. Now you can 
enter another record, or by pressing the down arrow return 
to the menu. 

The Edit option will ask for the record number to edit. If 
no record number is entered, you will return to the menu by 
hitting [ENTER], After entering a record number, that 
record will be displayed and an orange cursor will come up 
just to the left of the last name in the record. To go to the 
next line just press [ENTER]. The cursor will move down to 
the next line. By pressing [ENTE R] when the cursor is on the 
bottom line the program will recycle to a new Edit screen. 
Here you can either edit another record or return to the 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 75 



i 



SUPER PRO KEYBOARD 




• Only S69.95 

• Original key layout. 

• No special software required. 

• Fast, simple installation— no soldering. 

• Individually boxed with full instructions. 

• Professional, low profile, finished appearance. 

• U.S. made— high quality, quad gold contacts. 

• Smooth "Touch Typist" feel— no sagging. 



Rainbow, April '83 

A fine piece of hardware from Mark Data Products. . .It is 
super and it is professional too. . .If you are searching 
for a replacement keytxDard, it is an excellent buy. . . 

Hot CoCo, August '83 

Uke putting leather upholstery in your Volkswagen. . .Very 
impressed with the appearance and performance. . .Could 
easily pass as original equipment. . .Installation is very 
simple. . . 

Color Computer Magazine, June '83 

The Installation procedure is well detailed and quite 
simple. . .Has a professional feel, reacts well to the touch. . . 
has held up to some purposeful pounding. . . 

Color Computer News, June '83 

Mark Data Products is well known to us ''longtimers". . , 
Every bit as finished as if Tandy had done it... The 
Mark Data Super-Pro is your best buy... The one that 
is in rny CoCo to stay. . . 



Great Computer Software Also 

• Adventure Games • Arcade Games and Utility Software 



Mark Data Products 



24001 ALICIA PKWY., NO. 207 • MISSION VIEJO, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 

All Orders: Please add $2.00 shipping and handling in the continental U.S. All others, add air shipping and $3.00 hanfJIing. California 
residents add 6% sales tax. Foreign orders please remit U.S. funds. Software authors— contact us for exciting program marketing details. 




menu. If you want to change any line, just position the 
orange cursor on that line and press the down arrow. That 
line will be removed and a flashing cursor will appear wait- 
ing for new input. Hit [ENTER] when the new information 
is on the line and the orange cursor will reappear on the top 
line, y^fter all corrections are made to the record, you can 
bring up a new Edit screen by continuously hitting [ENTER] 
until the new Edit screen comes up. 

The Delete option will delete any recorcj from the file. If 
no recprd number is entered, you will return to the menu. 
Enter a record number and the record will appear on the 
spreen. If you then decide not to delete the record jtist press 
[ENTER] and the program will recycle to a new Delete 
screen. If you want to delete the record, hit the up arrow. At 
this time you will be given one last chance to change your 
mind by answering a sure (Y/N) prompt. By ahswering N 
you will be returned to the menu. A Y answer will cause the 
record to be deleted from the file and the file updated. The 
program ^t this point jumps to the ML Sort, line 1 3000. This 
sort will place null strings At the end of the array. It then goes 
to the Y pointer reset at line 1 3050 and resets the next record 
available to the first mill string that it fin4s. Option 5 allocs 
you to print all records to the screen and/ of the printer. This 
is an unformatted output to the printer, showing all infor- 
mation in each string to ihclude the delimiters required for 
program operation. THe down arroNv will i*eturn you to the 
menu. Options 6 and 7 save and load the file to and from 
tape. Needed prompts are displayed to allow for proper 
positioning of the tape. These two subroutines can easily be 
changed to tape by making the changes detailed earlier. 

Option 7 is the main purpose of Mailabel. It allows print- 
ing of either one-up or two-up labels. The first record and 
last record prompt have default values built in to someone 
just pressing [ENTER]. 1 1 will then ask if you have one-up or 
two-up labels. The subroutine at 7000 formats the records 
correctly. After the records are printed the program will 
return to the menu. 

Option 9 brings up a Sort and Search menu. The sort by 
last name is the fastest. It goes directly to the ML sort 
routine. The other three sorts take longer because they have 
to reconfigure the strings before and after the ML sort. The 
Search will search the file for any combination of letters and 
numbers. If you answer the search prompt With nothing the 
program will start at reeord 1 and progress through the 
records. 

This program has accomplished everything that I set out 
to do. At the same time it taught me a lot about string 
handling and the use of subroutines. 

One last thing, if you can afford a disk, by all means get 
one. Being released from the tape system is like moving from 
a bicycle to a motorcycle. 



260 202 7340 11 

1185 151 8130 164 

2190 110 8540 112 

3110 128 8900 138 

4200 1S2 10040 128 

6030 42 11080 1d1 



7060 239 END 



> . . 34 



The listing: 

10 > *«« MAILING LABELS *** 
2« ' »•*#»»♦»♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
30 ' »«« CHARLES M. THONEN «»« 
40 ' ««« PO BOX 666 ««« 
50 ' FT. GREELY AK 98733 

60 ' ♦#♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦««♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦ 
120 CLS: CLEAR 13000, 8eH7E6F:0IMS« 
(500) ZQOSUB 12000 

130 LL-0: ST«-STRINe« (32, ) ; 8» ( 
0).»0" 

140 CLS 

150 PRINTST*! 

160 PRINTTAB(9)"riAILINQ LABELS" 
170 PRINTSTtJ 

160 'PRINTTAB(1)"MEM LEFT--MEM 
190 PRINT 

200 PRINTTAB(5)«(1) INPUT RECOR 
D" 

210 PRINTTAB(5)"(2) EDIT RECORD 
220 PRINTTAB(S)''(3) ADD TO LIST 

■I 

230 PRINTTAB(5) "(4) DELETE RECO 
RD" 

240 PRINTTAB(5)"(5) PRINT ALL R 
ECORDS" 

250 PRINTTAB(5)*'(6) SAVE FILE" 
260 PRINTTAB(5)''(7) LOAD FILE" 
270 PRINTTAB(5) " (8) ADDRESS LAB 
ELS" 

280 PRINTTAB(S) " (9) SEARCH & SO 
RT" 

290 PRINT 

300 INPUT"ENTER CHOICE (1>9) "fM 

310 IF M<0ORM>9THEN130 

320 ON M 60SUB 1000,2000,1030,30 

00, 4000, 5000, 6000, 7000, 8000 

330 POKE65494,0 'LOWSPEED 

340 GOTO 140 

1000 '♦«««»•♦♦ II«>UT/ADD«««*«*«« 
1010 IF Y>1 THEN RETURN 
1020 Y=l 

1030 B-l£C-0:QOSUB11000 
1040 PRINTfiS, "»••* INPUT RECORD 
«««*" 

1050 PRINT«70, "INPUT RECORD • "Y 
1060 C»0:P-173 
1070 S«(Y)-"" 

1080 AK-INKEYt: IF A«'-""THEN 1080 
1090 IF A«>-CHR«(13) THEN A*-",": 
C-C+1 : B-L+2: IF C<7 THENPR1NT«P+ 
32,CHR«(62)| 
1100 IF C-ITHEN P<-205 
1110 IF C-2 THEN P-237 
1120 IF C-3 THEN P-269 
1130 IF C«4 THEN P«301 
1140 IF C«-5 THEN A*-"«":P-333:C- 
6 



May 1984 th« RAINBOW 



1130 IF C"7 THEN 1270 

1160 IF PEEK (343)0247 THEN 1200 

1170 L-L-l:IF L<0 THEN 1030 

1180 9*(Y)-LEFT»(9«<Y),L) 

1185 PRINT«P+POS(0)-14,"."| 

1190 eOTO1220 

1200 IF A««CHR«(10) THEN 1260 

1210 S«(Y)«S«(Y)+A« 

1220 L-LEN(S«(Y)> 

1230 PRINT<P,MID«(S«<Y),B,L)| 

1240 IF L-0 THEN 1030 

1250 GOTO 1080 

1260 IF S»(Y)-""THEN RETURN 
1270 Y-Y+1 

1280 LL-LL-H-: BOTO1030 
2000 '♦«♦♦♦♦«♦» REPLACE ♦♦»♦*»» 
2010 N-0:L«0 
2020 CLS:8OSUB11020 
2030 PRINT«173, CHR* <46) I 
2040 PRINT17, "♦»*»* EDIT »*»♦«" 
2050 PRINT«405, "TO CHANGE" 
2060 PRINTa68, "INPUT RECORD tt TO 
EDIT"! 

2070 PR I NTC92 , " " I : L I NE I NPUTN* : N- 
VAL(N«) 

2080 PRINT«64," »»OLD RECORD T 
O REPLACE««" 
2090 IF N«0 THEN RETURN 
2100 GOSUB 10000 
2110 ' ♦♦♦*♦ CHANGE «»»♦» 
2120 C»l:P-172 
2130 PRINT«P,CHR«(255) I 
2140 At-INKEY*:IF A*-""THEN 2140 
ELSE IF A«»CHR«(10)THEN 2150ELS 
E 2240 

2150 PRINTfiP, STRING* (19," ")» 

2160 PRINTeP+l,"";:LINEINPUTN« 

2170 Z-L(C-l) 

2180 L«-LEFT«(S«(N>,Z) 

2190 R«=RIGHT«(S*(N) ,LEN(S«(N) )- 

L(C>+1) 

2200 IF C«l THEN S« (N) -N»+R«: GOT 
O 2230 

2210 IF C«6 THEN S« (N> -L«-*-N«: GOT 
02230 



16K EXT 

SLOT MACHINE 

POKER 

SIMILAR TO GAMES IN 
ATLANTIC CITY 
SEND $6.95 TO 

BYE GEORGE 

14 DAWSON ROAD 

KENDALL PARK 
NEW JERSEY 08824 



2220 S«(N>«L«-i-N«-t-R« 

2230 IF C<6 THEN 2100 

2240 PRINT«P," "I :C-C-H :P-P't-32 

2250 IF C>6 THEN 2010 

2260 GOTO2130 

3000 '»♦«♦»♦* DELETE RECORD ♦»*» 
* 

3010 CLS: GOSUB 11030 

3020 PRINTa393, " UP ARROW 3 TO D 

elete:* 

3030 printe3, "**»** delete recor 

D »♦»*»" 

3040 PRINTe67, "ENTER RECORD # TO 

DELETE "MLINEINPUTD* 
3050 N>>VAL(D«) : IF N-0 THEN RETUR 
N 

3060 GOSUB 10000 

3070 A««INKEY«:IF A««""THEN 3070 

ELSE IF A*-"'^" THEN 3085 
3080 GOTO3000 

3085 PRINTa427,""i:LINEINPUT"SUR 
E (Y/N) "JCK* 

3090 IF CK*-"Y" THEN S«(N)-""ELS 
E 3150 

3100 FOR Z=173 TO 333 STEP 32 
3110 PRINTaZ, STRING* ( 14, ••♦") 
3120 I^XTZ 

3130 FORDL-'1TO700:NEXT 
3140 eoSUB 13010 
3150 RETURN 

4000 '»»»♦ PRINT ALL RECORDS »«♦ 

4010 CLS 

4020 PRINTST*) 

4030 PR I NTTAB ( 1 2 > " PR I NT " 

4040 PRINTST* I 

4050 PRINTai66, " (1) SCREEN ONLY" 
4060 PRINTei98, " (2) PRINTER tt SC 
REEN" 

4070 PRINT8290, ""; 

4080 LINE INPUT "ENTER CHOICE (1-2 

) "iri*:M-VAL(ii*) 

4090 IF M>0 THEN RETURN 

4100 IF n <1 OR M >2 THEN RETURN 

4110 CLS: GOSUB 11030 

4120 FOR N«l TO Y-1 

4130 GOSUB 11030 

4140 PRINT«„ "♦»»« PRINT OUT ♦*♦ 
♦•' 

4150 IF Y«0 THEN PRINTe70, "NO RE 

CORDS IN FILE" :0aT04 190 

4160 PRINTa70, "RECORD NUMBER "N 

4170 GOSUB 10000 

41S0 IF MOl THEN 4200 

4190 A*«INKEY*:IF A*-CHR* ( 10) THE 

N 4220 ELSE IF A*»""THEN 4190 

4200 IF Mb2 then GOSUB 4230 

4210 NEXTN 

4220 RETURN 

4230 IF S*(N)<>""THEN PRINT#-2,N 
$S«(N) 



78 the RAINBOW May 1984 



4240 RETURN 

5000 »**»* save to tape •»»* 
5010 cls:printst«i 

5020 PRINTTAB<7) "SAVE FILE ON TA 
PE" 

5030 PRINTST* 

5040 audioon:motoron 

5050 PRINTTAB<9) "POSITION TAPE." 
5060 PRINTTAB<3>""| :LINEINPUT"PR 
ESS CENTER] WHEN DONE. "|R« 
5070 MOTOROFF 
5080 PRINT: PRINT 

5090 PRINTTAB<5) "PRESS PLAY AND 
RECORD. " 

5100 PRINTTAB<3) "PRESS CENTER! W 
HEN READY."* 
5110 LINEINPUTR* 
5120 PRINT 

5130 PRINTTAB(3)""|:LINEINPUT"IN 

PUT FILE NAME... "fFF» 

5140 OPEN "0",»-l,FF« 

5150 FORX-ITO Y-1 

5160 PRINT«-1,S«<X) 

5170 NEXTX 

5180 CLOSE«-l 

5190 FOR DL«1 TO 50:PRINTTAB<8) " 
FILE SAVED": NEXT 
5200 RETURN 

6000 >»«**»* LOAD FROM TAPE **** 

6010 CLSlPRINTST*; 

6020 PRINTTAB<6) "LOAD FILE FROM 

TAPE" 

6030 PRINTST* 

6040 motoron:audioon 

6050 PRINTTAB<9) "POSITION TAPE." 

6060 PRINTTAB <3) " " f : LINEINPUT"PR 

ESS CENTER] WHEN DONE. "|R« 

6070 MOTOROFF 

6080 PRINT: PRINT 

6090 PRINTTAB < 10) "PRESS PLAY." 

6100 PRINTTAB<3)"PRESS CENTER] W 

HEN READY. "I 

6110 LINEINPUT R* 

6120 PRINT 

6130 PRINTTAB(3)"";:LINEINPUT"IN 
PUT FILE NAME... ";FF* 
6140 0PEN"I",#-1,FF« 
6150 Y-1 

6160 IF EOF(-l) THEN 6200 
6170 INPUT#-1,S*(Y) 
6180 Y-Y+1 
6190 GOTO 6160 
6200 CLOSE «-l 

6210 FOR DL»lTOS0:reiNTTAB<8) "FI 
LE LOADED": NEXT 
6220 RETURN 

7000 '♦*»♦»»* LABEL PRINT ♦♦♦♦♦ 
7010 CLS:PRINTST«» 
7020 PRINTTAB* 10) "LABEL MAKER" 
7030 PRINTST* 



7040 U«2:Z"1'** U SETS DEVICE TO 

PRINT TO 
7050 INPUT" FIRST RECORD TO P 
RINT "fIl:IFIl'-0 THEN I1-1:PRIN 
TC156,I1 

7060 PRXNT«160,""i:lNPUT" LAS 
T RECORD TO PRINT "1 12: IF I2»^ 

THEN I2«105 :PRINTtie8, 12 
7070 PRINTe230, "INSERT LABEL PAP 
ER" 

7080 PRINTe263,""i:INPUT" 1 OR 2 
UP "ICC 

7090 IF CC<1 OR CC>2 THEN 7080 

7100 '*•»•*» END OF HEADER «*** 

7110 FOR N-Il TO 12 

7120 IF S«(N)-""THEN RETURN 

7130 CLS0:QOSUB10020 

7140 IF CC«1 THEN SOSUB 7190 

7150 IF CC«2 THEN GOSUB 7260 

7160 NEXTN 

7170 A«-INKEY«:IF A»-""THEN 7170 
7180 RETURN 

7190 '»««♦ 1 UP PRINT ♦«♦♦ 
7200 PRINT#-U,"" 

7210 PRINT#-U,TAB<1)SS«<2)+" "I 
7220 PRINTtt-U,TAB<l)SS«<l) 
7230 PRI NTtt-U, TAB < 1 ) SS« <3) 
7240 PRINT«~U,TAB<1)SS»<4)+" "I 
7250 PRINT«-U,TAB(1)SS«<5) 




May 1984 the RAINBOW 79 



7260 PRINT«-U, : PRINT#-U, " " 
7270 RETURN 

7280 •*#♦♦ 2 UP PRINT ♦•♦» 

7290 IF Z»2 eOTO7340 

7300 LS«(l}-S8«(2>-i-" "-t-SSXl) 

7310 LS«<2>-S8«<3> 

7320 L8*(3)-88*<4)-«-" "■•-98»<5) 

7330 Z-2: RETURN 

7340 R8«<l>«98«<2>-i-" *'-(-8S«(l) 

73S0 RS«<2>-88«<3> 

7360 R8«<3>-88«<4>-(-" "•(-88«<5> 

7370 PRINT#-U, "•' 

7380 PRINT«-U,TAB<1>LS«<1>|TAB<4 
1>RS«<1> 

7390 PRINT*-U,TAB(l>L8«<2>fTAB(4 
1)RS«(2> 

7400 PRINT#-U, TAB < 1 ) L8* <3) I TAB (4 
1)R8«(3> 

7410 PRINT«-U, ""rPRINTW-U,"" 
7420 Z"0: RETURN 

8000 '*♦♦♦» SORT & 8EARCH ♦♦♦♦ 
8010 '**««« MAIN MENU *«*« 
8020 P0KE65495, 1 ' HI SPEED 

8030 cls:printst«i 

8040 PRINTTAB<09) "SORT & SEARCH 

» 

8050 PRINTSTf 

8060 PRINTTAB<S)''(1) SORT BY LA 
ST NAME" 

8070 PRINTTAB(5)"(2) SORT BY ST 
ATE" 

8080 PRINTTABO) " (3) SORT BY ZI 
P CODE" 

8090 PRINTTAB(5)'*<4) SORT BY AR 
EA CODE" 

8100 PRINTTAB(5>"(5) SEARCH" 
8110 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" PRESS C 
ENTER] FOR MAIN MENU" 
8120 INPUT" ENTER CHOISE (1 

-3) "»MM 

8130 ON Vm eOSUB 8200,8300,8500, 
8700, 8900 

8140 IF MM<10RMM>STHENRETURN 
8150 eOTO 8030 

8200 '»♦♦♦♦ SORT BY NAME ♦♦»♦♦ 
8210 CLS:IF S«<1)=""THEN PRINTa2 
01, "FILE IS EMPTY": FOR DL"1TO500 
:NEXTDL: RETURN 

8220 CLS;PRINTa204, "SORTING" 
8230 GOSUB 13010 
8240 PRINTa201, "SORT COMPLETE" 
8250 FOR DLt*lTO500:NEXTDL 
8260 RETURN 

8300 '»*♦»♦ SORT BY STATE 

83 1 0 CC«3 : CLS : PR I NT«205 , " SORT I NO 

8320 FOR N-lTOY-l 
8330 GOSUB 10020 

8335 IF LEN<SS«(5)><2 THEN SS« (5 
)-"22" 



8340 St(N>-LEFT«<S8«(5>,2)-i««(N) 

8350 NEXTN 

8360 GOSUB 13010 

8370 FORN-lTOY-1 

8380 S«<N>«RIOHT«(S«<N>,LEN(S«<N 

))-2) 

8390 NEXTN 
8400 GOTO 8620 
8410 RETURN 

8500 SORT BY 2 IP ♦♦♦♦♦ 

85 1 0 CC-3 : CLS : PR I NTa205 , " SORT I NG 

•I 

8520 60SUB 13010 
8530 FORN-lTOY-1 
8540 GOSUB 10020 

8545 IF LEN<8S«(5>><5 THEN SS«(5 
>«SS*(5)-«-"99999" 

8550 S«(N> -RIGHT* (SS«<5>,S>-t-S«(N 
) 

8560 NEXTN 

8570 GOSUB 13010 

8580 FORN-lTOY-1 

8590 IF LEN(S*(N))<S THEN 8610 

8600 S«(N> -RIGHT* (S«(N),LEN(S«(N 

))-5) 

8610 NEXT N 

8620 PR I NTa200 , " SORT COMPLETE " { F 
ORDL= 1 TO400 : NE X TDL 
8630 RETURN 

8700 '#♦♦»♦ SORT BY A/C *♦♦♦♦ 
87 1 0 CC-3 : CLS : PR I NT«209 , " SORT I NG 

U 

8720 GOSUB 13010 
8730 FOR N-lTOY-1 
8740 GOSUB 10020 

8745 IF LEN(SS«(6>)<3 THEN SS*(6 
)="999" 

8750 S«(N)«LEFT«(SS«(6>,3)+S«(N> 

8760 NEXTN 

8770 GOSUB 13010 

8780 F0RN=1T0Y-1 

8790 S«(N) "RIGHT* (S«(N>,LEN(S«(N 

) )-3) 

8600 NEXT N 

8810 GOTO 8620 

8820 RETURN 

8900 '♦«♦»» SEARCH 

8910 CLS:PRINTST«$ 

8920 PRINTTAB < 12) "SEARCH" 

8930 PRINTST* 

8940 IF Y<1 THEN PRINT8260, "»>N 
O RECORDS IN FILE<<<":FOR DL-ITO 
500: NEXTDL: RETURN 

8950 INPUT" INPUT SEARCH WORD"|SW 
« 

8960 FOR N=1T0 Y-1 
8970 IF S«(N)-"»THEN 9090 
8980 TQ-INSTR<1,S«<N),8W*) 
8990 IF TG>0 THEN 9020 
9000 NEXTN 



80 Nw RAINBOW May 1984 



9010 OOTO9090 

9020 CL8:0OSUB 11030 

9030 PRINTtT, "»»»♦ SEARCH »♦♦»•• 

9040 PRINT«&9, "THIS IS RECORD tt 

"SN 

9050 PRINT8419,"PRESS CENTER] TO 

CONTINUE. " 
9060 60SUB 10000 

9070 A«-INKEY«:IF A««CHR«(10) TH 
EN RETURN ELSE IF A*-" "THEN 9070 
9080 NEXTN 

9090 CLS:PRINTa201, "END OF FILE" 
9100 FOR DL-lTOS00:NEXTDL:8OTOe9 
00 

10000 PRINTS STRING TO ♦♦♦ 

♦*♦ FORMATED SCREEN ♦♦♦ 
10010 CC'0 

10020 c<-i:o-i:p«173:l-0:ln-0:li- 
0:l(0)«i 

10030 l-instr(0,s«(n) , ", ") :l<c)« 

L:IF L-0 THEN RETURN 

10040 SS«(C)- mD«(S«(N),0,L-LN> 

1):IF CC THEN 10060 

10050 PRINT8P,8S«(C) 

1 0060 C-C+ 1 : 0-L+ 1 : P-P+32 : ln-l 

10070 IF C-5 THEN 10090 
10080 GOTO10030 

10090 L1*INSTR(L,S«(N) , "•") :L(C> 
=L1 

10100 SS«(C)«MID«(S«(N) ,OpLl-L-l 

):IF CC THEN 10120 

10110 PRINT6IP,8S«(C) 

10120 8S«(C+1) -RIGHT* <S«(N),LEN( 

S«(N))-L1) 

10130 IF CC THEN 10150 
10140 PRINTaP-t-32,SS«(C-M) 
10150 RETURN 

11000 '«««*• SCREEN FROMAT *••«« 
11010 L-0 

11020 CLS:PRINTa34, "HIT CENTER] 

AFTER EACH ITEM "| 

11030 PRINTS (96) ,ST« 

11040 PRINTai60, "LAST NAME : ") 

:PRINTCHR«(62) ) :PRINTSTRING«(13, 

".") 

11050 PRINT9192, "FIRST NAME : "J 

: PR I NTSTR I NG« ( 1 4 , " . " > 

11060 PRINT«224, "STREET : "j 

: PRINTSTRING* < 14, " . " ) 

11070 PRINT«256, "CITY : "| 

:PRINT8TRING«(14, ". ") 

11080 PRINTa288, "STATE ZIP : "I 

: PRINTSTRING* ( 14, » . " ) 

11090 PRINTa320, "AC/PHONE : "| 

: PR I NTSTR I NG« (14,".") 

11100 PRINT: PRINTTAB (2) "PRESS CD 

OWN ARROW] WHEN DONE" 

11110 RETURN 

12000 •♦»♦♦ ML SORT DATA »♦♦»» 
12010 DATA 190,127,011,52,16,238 



, 228, 174, 94, 48, 31 , 79, S2, 18, 166, 1 
96,39,42, 166, 196,230,69, 160,69,3 

6, 2, 230, 196, 52, 1 , 174, 66, 16, 174, 7 
1 

12020 DATA 109,69,38,4,50,97,32, 
41, 166, 128, 160, 160,39,4,50,97,32 
,5, 90, 38, 243, 53, 1 , 35, 24, 174, 66, 1 
6, 174,71, 175,71, 16, 175,66, 166 
12030 DATA 196,230,69,231,196,16 

7, 69, 234, 69, 234, 228, 231 , 228, 51 , 6 
9, 174,97,48,31, 175,97,38, 176, 166 
, 228, 50, 99, 38, 161 , 50, 98, 57 
12040 FOR I-8cH7E70 TO <(H7ED6 
12050 READ a: POKE I, A 

12060 NEXT! 

12070 DEFU8R0-«eH7E70 

12080 RETURN 

13000 SORT ROUTINE ♦♦♦♦♦ 

13010 NO-VARPTR(S«(0) ) 

13020 POKE ScH7F0B,INT(Na/256) 

13030 POKE <(H7F0C, NO-INT (N0/2S6) 

«256 

13040 A-USR0(0) 

13050 Y POINTER RESET ♦*♦ 

13060 FORN=Y TO lSTEP-1 
13070 IF S«(N)<>""THEN13090 
13080 NEXT N 
13090 Y-N+1 

13100 RETURN _ 



Him . . . 



Data Finder 



Have you ever gone through your tapes or disks and 
found a data file that you couldn't identify? Well, 1 have, and 
it's a pain when you can't load it without the program and 
you can't find out what program it came from. Here is a 
program to solve your problems. Simply type in and run the 
program, and when it finds the file it will put it on the screen 
or on paper if you have a printer. 

20 CLS:INPUT*WHAT IS THE NAME OF THE 

DATA FILE";DF$ 

30OPEN"I",#l,DF$ 

40 1NPUT#I,D$ 

50 PRINT D$ 

60 IF D$="EOF"OR D$=""THEN 80 
70 GOTO 40 
80 CLOSE #1 

If you want to load a data file from tape, change #/ to tf-1 
in lines 30, 40 and 80. If you want to print our the data, 
change line 50 to PRINW-2. DS. 



Chris Stevenson 
Crocker, Mo. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 81 



DRIVES DISK DRIVES DISK DRIVES DISK DRIVES DISK DRIVES DISK DRIVES DISK DRIVES O 

a 

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(0 

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a 

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UJ 

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5 

(/) 

UJ 

> 

£ 
o 

5 

UJ 

> 
£ 
o 

o 

(/) 

UJ 

> 
£ 

(0 

5 

UJ 

> 
£ 

CO 

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> 
£ 
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£ 



PRICE BREAKTHROUGH 

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• Introducing 

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Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9:30 am to 5:30 (E.S.T.) Sat. 10 am to 4:30 pm 

. Service! 

DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. 



TERMS: 

M.C./Visa/Amex and personal 
checks accepted at no extra charge. 
C.O.D., please add $3.00. 
Shipping: Please call for amount. 
Not responsible for typographical errors. 



CANADA 
MICRO R.G.S. INC. 

751, CARRE VICTORIA, SUITE 403 
MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, H2Y 2J3 

Regular Tel. (514) 845-1534 
Canadian Toll Free 800-361-5155 



Service! 



Ail in stock products are shipped 
within 24 hours of order. 
Repair/ Warranty service is perform- 
ed within 24 hours of receipt unless 
otherwise noted. We accept C.O.D,, 
foreign and APO orders. School 
and D&B corporate P.O.s accepted. 



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RAINBOW 





When we last saw Fred, he had just finished a face-saving program for 
addressing his wife's envelopes, this month he's at it again . . . 




Fred's Postcard Whacker 

By Don Hughes and Jessie James 






(Don Hughes, a writer and consul- 
tant, holds two master's degrees, one 
in education and the other in counsel- 
ing. Jessie James has been engaged for 
the past 10 years in the electronic 
repair field. He is a bio-medical 
equipment technician at Kaiser 
Foundation Hospital in Forlana, 
Calif.) 



Fred slipped past the 

screen door and waltzed into the 
kitchen, where his wife was 

giving the poodle a permanent. 

"It's late," she said. "Why have you 
been out so late?" 



84 the RAINBOW May 1984 





Macrotron** 

Proudly Introduces Our New 

'Tremium'' Keyboard — 
The Best For Your 
Color Computer 

The Best Keyboard 

All the features of our popular PROFESSIONAL KEYBOARD: 
L No gluing, soldering, or cutting— plugs right in. 

High quality construction assures years of trouble-free operation. 

B PLUS 

j Attractive low profile 

Extended Radio Shack layout 
I Silk-Smboth feel 

The Best Software 

Our Versakey Software enhances 
the keyboard's utility: 
.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ -^^^^ * Auto-repeat, n-key rollover and type-ahead 
^"^^^^■■iHI^ ^ * becomes DEFINE, 

T II ^ F-4 becomes CTRL 

* May define up to 128 keys 

^ \ { \ i t^ ^ '^*^i4^^fff (including SHIFT, CTRL, and 
^^^b^ # III ^ \ I^^^H I SHIFT-CTRL combinations) as 
^^"l" ^^^^m- 1 strings of up to 80 characters each, 

* Supplied on cassette, may be copied to disk. 

The Best Manual 

^Have Josie ship yours todayr * V^^y complete documentation (including 

plenty of figures to illustrate the keyboard s 
installation and versatility). 

The Best Prices 

The *Tremium'' Keyboard (including software) , , , $79.95 

The *Trofessionar' Keyboard (including software) $59.95 

The "Versakey Software^' , $ ^.95 

Please specify your computer'^ PC board type if known. Otherwise, specify the complete catalog 
number and serial number. 

♦♦Micronix Systems is a subdivision of Macrotron Systems Corporation. 

MACROTRON SYSTEMS CORP. 

8147 Delmar Blvd. 
St. Louis, MO 63130 
(314) 721-3356 
Telex 704523 Answer Back-MACANITA STL UD 






Terms: Prepaid check or money order, Mastercard or Visa. 
Shipping Charges: U.S. $3.00, Canada $6.00, COD $5.00 (No CCD's to Canada). 



"The most fantastic thing happened to jne," said Fred as 
he danced around the room. 

His wife looked at him with a jaundiced eye, "What have 
you been up to Fred?" she demanded. 

"1 was just elected corresponding secretary of the Inland 
Empire Color Computer Club." 

^'Have you got into something that's going to make extra 
work for me?" she asked warily. 

"No. Absolutely npt! I have to write an occasional letter, 
but my main job is to send postcards to the members every 
month to remind them of the meetings." ^ 

"Then you expect me to write dozens of cards out in 
longhand every month?" Fred's wife cackled. 

Fred scratched his beard. "1 figured you Could do my 
postcards along with the ones you send out to your bridgp 
club." 

Fred's wife reached for the curling iron, still hot from the 
dog\ permanent. She waved it under his nose. "You and 
that fancy computer. You keep telling me it saves work, but 
as far as 1 can tel), it only makes work for me." 

Fred retreated to his computer haven. As he sat down in 
front of the keyboard, his mind drifted to possible solutions 
to his dilemma. He loved his wife in spite of the poodle and 
everything, and he really did want to put his CoCo to work 
in useful ways. 

Absentmindedly, Fred spun his chair around and began 
flipping through his back issues of the Rainbow. As he 
leafed through the well-worn pages, he could not remember 
seeing an article or ad which offered a program that 
addressed postcards, but , . . maybe he had overlooked 



The listing; 









. . . .12 


55 


. . .16? 


84 , . . , , 


....62 


115. . 


.,.170 


END . 


...145 



1 ' "POSTCARD WHACKER" 

2 ' BY JESSIE JAMES AND 

3 ' DON HUSHES 

4 ' P.O. BOX 6363 

5 ' SAN BERNARDINO, CA. 92412 

6 ' COPYRIGHT 1983, JESSIE 

7 ' JAMES AND DON HUGHES 

8 CLEAR5000 

9 CLS 

10 GOSUB 72 

12 A»0 

13 A«-:INKEY« 

14 IF PEEK (341) -247 THEN A-4 

15 IF PEEK < 342) -247 THEN A-3 

16 IF PEEK (343) «247 THEN A-2 

17 IF PEEK (344) =247 THEN A-1 

18 ON A GOTO 92,43,33,27 

19 IF A«-CHR«(12) THEN 84 

20 IF A*-"" THEN 24 ELSE A«ASC(A 
«):IF A-8 OR A«9 OR A-10 OR A«94 

THEN 12 

21 PRINT A«f 

22 GOSUB 67 

23 IF B>1S03 THEN POKE 137, PEEK < 



something. 

When the clock struck midnight, Fred was suddenly awak- 
ened from the hypnotic concentration that had engulfed 
him. Knowing of no other avenue, he got up to make sure 
the door to his study was locked, pulled down the blinds, 
then removed his thinking cap from the special hiding place. 
He put it upon his head and suddenly the room was abla;.e 
with creativity. In an instant he hdd the answer! He would 
write a program which would meet the need! 

The program Fred created that night is listed below. It 
allows you to input a salutation and a closing line (40 
characters each). At that point, a blue field appears on the 
screen. Both Fred and his wife, and ypu as well, can type 
your message within the confines of the field. There's no 
need to worry about formatting on the screen because the 
program takes care of this while the "One Moment Please 
. , prompt appears on the screen. 

Once yotj answer the "print" prompt that appears on the 
screen, the program automatically prints your message, 
properly formatted, pn a standard USPS postcard. 

Need to print the same message to everyone in your group 
like Fred? Simply answer the prompt in a positive way, and 
the same message can be printed over and over. 

This program is for a 16K Extended CoCo as listed. If you 
don't have an extended machine, just change the "Line 
Inputs" in lines 74 and 76 to "Inputs." A friction feed printer 
is recommended. 

After Fred showed this program to his wife, she gave him 
a big hug. "You're my hero," she said. 

137) -1 

24 GOSUB 60 

25 GOTO 12 

27 GOSUB 67 

28 IF PEEK (B-32) -207 THEN 12 

29 D«PEEK(137): IF D<32 THEN POK 
E 136, PEEK ( 136) -l: POKE 137, (D-32 
)+256 ELSE POKE 137, PEEK (137) -32 

30 GOSUB 67 

31 IF B<1024 THEN POKE 136,5 

32 GOSUB 60 

33 GOTO 12 

35 GOSUB 67 

36 IF PEEK (B+32) -207 THEN 12 

37 D-PEEK<137):IF D>223 THEN POK 
E 136, PEEK (136^+1: POKE 137, <D+32 
)-2S6 ELSE POKE 137, PEEK < 137) +32 

38 GOSUB 67 

39 IF B>1535 THEN POKE 136«4 

40 GOSUB 60 

41 GOTO 12 

43 GOSUB 67 

44 IF PEEK (B-1) "207 THEN 12 

45 IF PEEK < 137) -0 THEN POKE 137, 
255: POKE 136, PEEK < 136) -1 ELSE PO 
KE 137, PEEK ( 137) -1 

46 GOSUB 67 

47 IF PEEK <B-1) -207 THEN 12 

48 IF B<1024 THEN POKE 136, 5: POK 
E 137,255 

49 GOSUB 60 

50 GOTO 12 



86 the RAINBOW May 1984 






NEW 

for your 
COLOR 
COMPUTER 



Switchable Expansion Is Here 



CoCo HAS A COMPANION!! 

GOOD NEWS Switch over to more versatility with the new 
BT-200() COMPANION. Save CoCo's connector with the best 
COMPANION it will ever have. 

• Load 5 airtridges into the COMPANION and avoid the hassles 
while enjtiying the benefits of push-button selection. 

• Push a Button or select from your keyboard to turn on one of your 
5 selectiDiis. Handy indicator lights let you know at a glance which 
cartridge is connected, 

• No More Turn -Of fs. Ju.m switch to the next cartridge in your 
COMPANION. Push a burton to Restart without turning off the 
power, 

• Plug-in. Fill one to five slots for flexible programming, game 
playing or both. Chixjse ROM Packs, serial ports, parallel ports, or 
disk drives. Then do what you like to do best. The most powerful 
and cost effective expansion you will find for just $225.00 

FOR THE ADVANCED USER OR 
EXPERIMENTER 

• The utmost in expansion power and versatility is the BT-1000 
Expansion Interface Unit. $230.00 

• Large Built-in power supply /^^\ 
to power your peripherals 
and experimenter circuits, 

• Space for your ML utilities with optional 8K of RAM. $275.00 



ALSO NEW FROM BASIC TECHNOLOGY!! 

• BT-IOIO PPI Parallel Printer Interface, Free-up CoCo's serial 
port. Run your printer at top speed. Five foot cable with Centronics 
compatible connector and machine language printer driver are 

included. $79.95. 

• BT-1020 Real Time Clock/Calendar. Let CoCo keep the time and 
date for your programs and files. Day-light savings time and leap 
year keep you on time. Save data or program memory even when 
power is off with 50 bytes of battery backed memory. Alarm 
capability to turn on the coffee pot. All for only $109 00. 



RAINBOW 



b 



BSIC Dept. Q P.O. Box 511 Ortonville, Ml 48462 



Technology 



(313) 627-6146 



• BT-1030 VIP Versatile Interface Port. Connect CoCo to the 
outside world with two 8-bit parallel ports, two l6-bit 
timer /counters and a serial shift register. All user programmable. 

S69.95. 

• WRITE FOR FREE BROCHURE. 

l\)r years of trouble-free enjoyment all Basic Technology products use 
top quality components and are backed by a full 180 day parts and 
labor warranty. We service what we sell!!! 

Add S3 shipping & handling for BT-IOOO, $2.50 for BT-102P. 
Michigan residents add 49? sales tax. Shipping & handlit^ for 
residents of Canada, Hawaii, Alaska is $10. Overseas orders add 15%. 
Check, money order, VISA, MC (give account no., expiration 4ate, 
phone no,). Personal checks allow 2-3 weeks to dear. COD charge 12 
(requires certified check or money order). 

"Watch for more peripherals from 
Basic Technology," 



52 60SUB 67 

53 IF PEEK (B-i-l) -207 THEN 12 

54 IF PEEK (137) -255 THEN POKE 13 
7,0: POKE 136, PEEK (136) -1-1 ELSE PO 
KE 137, PEEK ( 137) +1 

55 60SUB 67 

56 IF B>1535 THEN POKE 136,4:P0K 
E 137,0 

57 GOSUB 60 

58 eOTO 12 

60 QOSUB 67 

61 T-PEEK(B) 

62 POKE B,159 

63 FOR Y-1 TO 5: NEXT Y 

64 POKE B,T 

65 RETURN 

67 B-PEEK ( 1 36 ) : C-PEEK ( 1 37) 

68 POKE 136, B: POKE 137, C 

69 B-B*2S6-i-C 

70 RETURN 

72 CLS 

73 PRINT-PLEASE INPUT YOUR 

SALUTATION "J 

74 LINE INPUT S« 

75 PR I NT "PLEASE INPUT YOUR 

CLOSING "t 

76 LINE INPUT C« 

77 CLS5 

78 PRINT a 0, "INPUT MESSAGE, HIT 



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CLEAR TO END "I 
79 PRINT a 64, STRING* (2SS, 179) I 

50 PRINT STRINB«(t61, 179)» 

51 POKE 136, 4: POKE 137,64 
62 RETURN 

64 SOUND 200, l:PRINTa0, "ONE HOME 
NT PLEASE..." 

65 FOR X-'1066 TO 1300 

86 A-PEEK(X> 

87 eOSUB 97 

88 A«(l)«A«(l)-i-CHR«<A) 

89 NEXT X 

90 FOR X- tZ01 TO 1503 

91 A-PEEK<X> 

92 GOSUB 97 

93 A«(2)*A«(2)-^CHR«(A> 

94 NEXT X 

95 A««A«(1>:B««A*(2) 

96 GOTO 102 

97 IF A>127 THEN A-32: RETURN 

98 IF A<32 THEN A-A+96: RETURN 

99 IF A>90 AND A<128 THEN A-A^64 

100 IF A- 16 OR A»30 OR A*31 THEN 
A-32 

101 RETURN 

102 CLS 

103 INPUT "PREPARE PRINTER 

PRESS < ENTER > WHEN REA 

DY"IQ« 

104 P»40:FLAG«0 

105 PRINT#-2,S«:PRINT«-2 

106 S»l:E»8-H> 

107 L=LEN<A«) 

108 FOR X»E TO S STEP -1 

109 IF mD»(A«,X-l, 1)» CHR«<32) 
THEN 111 

110 NEXT X 

111 PRINT #-2, MID«(A«,S,X-S) 

112 S=X:E»S+P 

113 IF E<L THEN 108 

114 IF FLAO-1 THEN PRINT #-2, RI 
GHT«(A«,L-S-i-1);G0T0 119 

115 A«>iRIBHT«(A«,L-S-^l>-i-" "+B* 

116 FLAG-l:L»LEN(A«) 

117 S=l:E=S+P 

118 GOTO 108 

119 PRINT#-2 

120 L"LEN(C«) 

121 PRINT#-2, TAB(40>L)|C« 

122 CLS 

123 INPUT "DO YOU WISH TO PRINT 

THE SAME CARD AGAIN ( 

Y/N)"|Q« 

124 IF Q**."Y" THEN 95 

125 PRINT: PRINT 

126 INPUT "DO YOU WISH TO PRINT 

A DIFFERENT MESSAGE ( 

Y/N)";Q* 

127 IF Qt«"Y" THEN RUN ELSE END 



88 th« RAINBOW May 1984 




The First 

CoCo 

Rockfest 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




Editor's Note: The "Rainbow Wishing Well" is a new regu- 
lar feature q/'the Rainbow />! which contributing editor Fred 
B. Scerbo will share with our readers various programs he 
has developed for the Co Co. 

If you would like to submit a suggestion for a program 
you would like for your CoCo, submit it to Fred, cfo the 
Rainbow. We aren*t promising any specific wish will be 
granted^ but if the challenge looks good, Fred may list a 
program to accomplish your task. Please remember that any 
programs resulting from these suggestions become the 
property of the author. 

Here we are with our third installment of our "Rain- 
bow Wishing WelP'and already the wishes are start- 
ing to roll in. It will still take several months before 
some of these wishes are granted due to the delay time in 
publishing, so don't get discouraged. Keep your ideas com- 
ing, but please, keep your requests reasonable. (Remember, 
this is basic!) While 1 have received nothing but positive 
feedback so far, 1 have a feeling that this month's article and 
programs will generate more suggestions and requests from 
middle school and high school-aged programmers than any 
to date. Read ahead and youll see why. 

The Initial Inspiration 

By now, most of you are aware that I am a high school 
teacher of special needs students. While most of my day is 
spent with the handicapped, many times 1 will welcome 
students from the "mainstream" into my resource room to 
work with my students or to give them a chance to try our 
Color Computers. Even students who have not had much 



background in programming like to type in short programs 
which give instant results or feedback, and every day, 1 find 
that more and more of these students have CoCos at home. 

One such visitor is a freshman named Aaron. Aaron has 
had his 64K CoCo for several months now and stops by my 
resouce room at least once each day to get new ideas or get 
some new insights into what his CoCo can do. 

Unfortunately, Aaron still has a bit of an inferiority com- 
plex regarding his CoCo. If someone he knows with a 
Commodore 64 or an Apple computer shows him a **com' 
mercially available" program on his or her machine, he goes 
into a tailspin worrying about whether or not his CoCo can 
do the same. (Oh, ye of little faith!) Consequently, 1 often 
have to show him that many programs that can be written in 
our CoCo's Extended Color BASIC can sometimes match or 
even surpass what others have to buy for their computers. 

One day recently, he came in upset over the fact that he 
saw a rival computer's program which would draw a piano 
and play "The Entertainer" while the player's hands danced 
around the screen. Could the Color Computer do the same 
was what he wanted to know. 

My reaction, naturally, was, "Of course . . . but who 
cares! All the programs Pve been writing and showing you 
have been practical. They do something!" 



( Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor for the North 
Adams Public Schools. He holds a master *s in educa- 
tion and published some of the first software available 
for the Color Computer through his software firm. 
Illustrated Memory Banks.) 



May 1984 tha RAINBOW 89 



From Sesame Street to Outer Space. . . 

Radio Shack Has 
and Entertainment 



The CTW Software Group, a division 
of Children's Television Workshop, 
brings you ten game-style educational 
programs. Each one encourages chil- 
dren to experiment, explore and solve 
problems while having fun. 

For TRS-BO® Color 
Computers with 
Extended BASIC 




Taxi.* * * Kids earn fares and tips as 
they drive through six cities from New 
York to Shanghai. 
A Cooperative 
Strategy Game for 
ages 7 and up, 
#26-2509. 



Peanut Butter Panic* * * The sky's 
the limit as players cooperate to catch 
stars, make sand- 
wiches, and win. A 
Cooperative Strat- 
egy Game for 
ages 7 and up. 
#26-2523. 




Grover's Number Rover."*** 

Grover's rover is ready to blast off! 
Hop aboard and 
help him play with 
Twiddlebugs and 
numbers! A Basic 
Skills Game for 
ages 3-6. 
#26-2522. 



Ernie's IMagic Shapes.'**** Ernie 
wears the top hat, but youVe the magi- 
cian. Help Ernie 

match shapes and 



colors in six differ- 
ent ways. A Basic 
Skills Game for 
ages 3-6. 
#26-2524 



1 



•I 



Grobot.* * * How well will your astro- 
garden grow? Plant, protect and har- 
vest—it's up to 
you and Grobot. A 
Creative Explora- 
tion Game for 
ages 10 and up. 
#26-2527. 



Time Bound.* * * Race through time 
and learn about history, in hot pursuit 
of your hapless 
assistant, Ana- 
cron. Creative 
Exploration Game 
for ages 10 and 
up. #26-2528. 




Big Bird's Special Delivery.''** Help Flip Side.*** Stake your claim, sur 
Big Bird deliver the mail! Match the round the squares, and watch the 

nirf 1 iroc anri hrtnn e/«rAAn flin n/^lnrel 



Big Bird deliver the mail! Match the 
pictures and bring 
each package to 
the right store. A 
Basic Skills Game 
for ages 
3-6. #26-2525. 




round the squares, and watch the 
screen flip colors! 
Planning is the 
key A Creative 
Exploration Game 
for ages 10 and 
up. #26-2529. 





Star Trap.* •* Players must race 
through a maze to trap a slippery star 
before time runs 
out! A Cooperative 
Strategy Game for 
ages 7 and up. 
#26-2510. 



Coolde Monster's Letter Crunch.'^** 

It's Cookie Time! Help Cookie Monster 
match words and 
letters to bake and 
eat cookies! A 
Basic Skills Game 
for ages 3-6. 
#26-2526. 

'Joysticks requirod. "Cassette recorder required. 
***Joystickt and cassette recorder required. 





1 

the Educational 
Software You Want. 



Why feed quarters into video game 
machines when you can bring arcade- 
style thrills into your own living room 
with Radio Shack's exciting Color 
Computer games. They can provide 
hours of fun for the whole family. 



Low As 



Double Back.* As you "double back" 
to catch your own tail, try to encircle 
the "safe" screen 
objects to gain 
points in this tricky 
game. Challenges 
mount as you play. 
#26-3091 . $19.95 \ &' ^^.^ 




Dungeons of Daggorath.* YouVe pit- 
ted against a succession of awesome 
beasts. Each vic- 
tory brings you 
closer to your ulti- 
mate opponent— 
the evil wizard! 
#2fr<B093. $29.95 



J 




Gomoku and Renju. The classic ori- 
ental game of strategy! Block your op- 
ponent while 
attempting to 
place five of your 
own men in a row 
Hours of fun, 
#26-3069. $19.95 



Star Blaze.* Protect the Milky Way! 
Radar shows menacing vessels 
nearby. Seek, de- 
stroy and check 
radar again. Red 
alert! There's no 
let up in the excite- 
ment. #26-3094. 
$19.95 

Baseball. Nine innings of fun! You're 
in full control of this realistic simulation 
of America's Num- 
ber One sport, 
both behind the 
plate and on the 
field. #26-3095. 
$24.95 








Slay the Nerius.* Defend your sub- 
marines against deadly starfish and 
the ancient 
seaworm— the 
fearsome Nerius, 
a creepy nemesis 
from the Deep. 
#26-3086. $24.95 



Canyon Climber,* An action game 
with a difference. As a cliff hanger, 
you're challenged 
by one test after 
another— kicking 
goats, zinging ar- 
rows and falling 
objects! #26-3089. 
$34.95 

ZAXXON.* ** The official home ver- 
sion of the great arcade favorite by 
Sega! Match wits 
with the deadly 
ZAXXON Robot! 
Challenges esca- 
late as you pro- 
gress. 32K re- 
quired. #26-3062. 
$34.95 



Av9Uable 9t over 1100 
Radio Shack Compuiar Canters and at 
participating Radio Shack stores and dealers 

Radio /haeK 

COMPUTER CENTERS 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



NEW 1984 TRS-80 CATALOG RSC-11. 
Send me a free copy today. 

Mail To: Radio Shack 

Dept. 84-A-627 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, Texas 76102 




NAME. 



ADDRESS . 
CITY 



. STATE . 



^LEPHONE . 



Prices apply at participating Radio Shack stores and dealers. 
Muppet characters are trademarks of Muppets, Inc. All rights re- 
served. ZAXXON is a registered trademark of Sega licensed to 
Detasoft, inc. 



I I I I 



Still Aaron was not convinced about the superiority of his 
computer. It was time to pull another gem out of the wishing 
well. If he wanted "impressive" programming that did abso- 
lutely nothing productive, then that's what I would give him! 
(Do you see where the rock 'n Voll fits in yet?) 



THE 
ROLLING 
STDNEB J 





Inspiration Number Two 

Aaron isn't the only one who comes knocking on my door 
asking for ideas or help. Quite often, students will come and 
ask me to help them sketch out the symbol for one of their 
favorite rock groups. (Usually the request is for AC-DC or 
Van Halen, while just a few short years ago, everyone 



wanted KISS.) These students will sometimes want these 
symbols to use in their graphic arts class where they can 
make note pads, letterheads or even silk screened T-shirts. 
After having been AC-DCed to death, I figured that there 
must be a way I could do this with my CoCo. 

As I have mentioned, some of the students 1 have fall into 
the ''mildly mentally handicapped'' category. Believe it or 
not, they actually do enjoy coloring, much like one would in 
a coloring book, but they are too old for such things. Many 
times, I would help them draw rock posters which they 
would carefully decorate. Maybe this effort on the CoCo 
could also help me keep on top of this demand for coloring 
materials for some of my students. 

One Final Inspiration 

Several weeks ago 1 had the chanceto view a video broad- 
cast of the US Festival, which was put together by Apple 
wizard Steve Wozniak. If the Apple computer could have a 
rock festival, why not have one for the Color Computer? 
Since we couldn't have a real one right away, I figured we 
could hold one inside the guts of the CoCo. 

The Wish 

With all of this input, what kind of wish would I be 
granting? To put it simply, I would have to come up with the 
first real rock 'n' roll Color Computer program. The wish 
would be granted in two parts. The first would display some 
of the most colorful graphics I could generate on the CoCo 
which would be the logo or symbol for some of the most 
popular rock groups around today. This program could be 
used simply to impress your friends as to what your CoCo 



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92 



the RAINBOW May 1984 



can do. (Okay, Aaron. Ask your friends if their computers 
can do that!) The program could also have a "party value" 
which we will discuss later. 

The second part of the wish would be a program that 
would take these same graphics and generate a black and 
white graphic, which could be dumped to a line printer when 
used in conjunction with a graphic screen dump program 
(not includecj here). Thus, by using my Okidata 82 A printer, 
I could generate the pages of a rock *n' roll coloring book 
and have coloring sheets for my students at the flip of a 
switch. 

So, h^rc they are! 

As I promised, the first program does nothing productive. 
It just draws some very impressive rock 'n' roll graphics and 
sits there. The second listing, the Rockfest Coloring Book, is 
slightly more productive, if you consider coloring pro- 
ductive. 

If nothing else, the programs are fun\ 

Inside The CoCo Rockfest 

Imagine a rock festival with some the biggest names in the 
business. Who would you include? For the First CoCo 
Rockfest (you mean there will be others?) I selected eight 
rock acts with attractive symbols that would not drive me 
crazy as they were drawn out in basic. The groups suggested 
by the high school students 1 sppke with included the Rol- 
ling Stones, Asia, Quiet Riot, Z Z Top, Van Halen, Yes, 38 
Special, and, of course, AC-DC. While Listing I is for 32K, 
fear not. I have designed this program so it can be broken 
into smaller programs for each group. Therefore, those of 
you with 16K Extended can go to the part of the listing and 
just type in the line for the group you wish to draW. The main 
program has a menu and a title card which actually lowers 
the curtain on our stage which is fun to watch in and of itself. 

A WORD OF WARNING! 

If you do try typing in just parts of the listing, be sure to 
include: 5 PCLEAR8 or the program may crash. Those of 
you who have typed in some of my other programs will be 
familiar With the fact that I like to DRA Won a graphic page 
out of view and then PCOPY the results to the screen you 
are viewing. Rockfest incorporates thistechniquealthough 1 
have kept the screen turned on part of the time so ybu can see 
How the images are formed. Since PC LEA R reserves extra 
graphic pages, you can take advantage of this hidden draw- 
ing technique. If you were to l^ave out the PCLEAR8, 
normally, yoii would just get an?FC Error. However, some 
parts of the program use PCOPY io pages not yet displayed, 
so if you were to leave out the PC LEAR statement by 
mistake, the PCOPY commdnd would try to write the gra- 
phic^ on top of yoiii" basic program, causing it to crash in a 
non-retrievable way. 

Therefore, if you are going to try to use parts of these 
graphics, be sure to include 5 PC LEA R8 as your first line. I 
Hdv^ included it at the end of the listing accessed by a GOTO 
to keep you fi-oril running the program before it is all keyed 
in. (Now would be a good time for Rainbow On Tape!) 

If you just use parts, you will also have to include; 6 
ft=3:R$="C3*\ so as to insure the use of red in PMODE4. 
You may have to press [RESET] to get thfe right color. (For 
example: On the ftolling Stones, who wants a blue tongue?) 
You could also change both thi-ees to twos in this new line 6 
to get the same result. 

The completed prograrri actually solves this problem for 
you by printing a row of A's and B's at the bottom of the 
screen. You may activate the program from the title card by 



pressing the red-colored letter (A or B). Lines 80 and 82 
solve the color shift problem without having to press the 
[RESET]. This helps get around your color TV's inability to 
control the display of red and blue. 

In the 32K version of Rockfest as listed, after pressing the 
A or B key, a menu will appear. You need only press the 
letter which corresponds to the group you wish to display. 
The graphic will then be drawn before your eyes in a fashion 
which will convince even the most obstinate doubting 
Aaroris, 1 mean Thomases about the powerful graphics 
onboard ydur CoCo. 

Want to really blow their minds? Add this line: 7 A UDIO 
ON: MOTOR O/Vand then RUN the program with a prere- 
corded cassette tape of one of the groups listed. Press 
[PLAY], and the music should come ripping out of your TV 
speaker with these rock 'n' roll graphics. (Van Helen's 
"Jump" will beat "The Entertainer" any day.) Yod can even 
have these graphics displayed on your TV while playing 
your stereo at a party with friends. Sure, it's not MTV, but 
it's the next best thing. 

You may be wondering why 1 haven't suggested that you 
simply use the Rockfest for graphic output to your line 
printer. 

There are several reasons for this. First, some machine 
language drivers might crash with the PC LEA Red graphic 
pages. You will have to try theitl to see if they will work for 
you. There are many screen dumps available in ads here in 
the Rainbow, and some have even been listed. The one I use 
iisually crashes with the extra pages. 

Secondly, I wanted a graphic screen dump which would 
not be solid print as these displays would. Don't get me 
wrong.These images will look great even with a line/dot 
matrix display of the colors. Since I was looking for graphics 
which could be colored in with felt tipped markers, I decided 
to make a second version called The Rockfest Coloring 
Book (Listing 2). 

The Coloring Book 

This program recreates the saipe graphics, but in a strict 
black a nd white representation suitable for screen dumping. 
The program should fit in your 16K machine, but if you have 
trouble with memory, delete some of the few remaining (') 
remarks. 

This listing does not have the stage title card, but it does 
have a menu. When you select a graphic, you may return to 
the nienu by pressing[ENTER], just like on Rockfest. If yoU 
wish to screen dump the contents with a machine language 
program, then press [BREAK] and load in your screen 
dump program. Don't worry! Your graphic will remain 
intact. 

The screen dump I use creates an image on a full 8 by 1 1 
sheet of paper which makes it ideal for coloring. The screen 
dump you use may allow different sizes so you can be the 
judge of its uses (pasting on book covers, lockers, framing, 
etc.). I think you will find youngsters of all ages enjoying the 
results, regardless of what they do with the paper graphics. 

Other Uses? 

Remember last month's screen quiz programs. I men- 
tioned that the Extended BASIC version could include a 
graphic reward starting in line 900. If you wish to use any of 
these graphics as a reward, then simply delete all lines before 
and after each labeled section for a given group. If you use 
the Rockfest versions, be sure to PCL£AR as I warned 
earlier. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 93 



Once you have the lines you want to use isolated (that is, 
all the lines before and after are gone from memory), type: 
RENUM 900 JO J and press [ENTER]. The program lines 
will now correspond to the required location in the screen 
quiz program. You may now MERGEihe two programs as 
one, either using the disk command MERGE, or a cassette 
merge program such as those listed in previous Rainbow 
issues. The IN KEYS line at the end of each graphic should 
be changed so that the line number after the word THEN is 
changed to RETURN. Voila! 

You may even use the Coloring Book versions for merg- 
ing, which do not require a PCLEAR. This would be advis- 
able if you only have 16K. 

Feedback 

So far, judging from the reactions of the middle and high 
school students who got a sneak preview of Rockfest and the 
Coloring Book, both are a smashing success. (The word 
awesome is usually used!) 

Already, plans are underway for Rockfest 11. A few of the 
graphics are already half done. (My younger cousin David 
and his best friend Eric have been hinting at using groups 
like OzzyOsbourne, Motley Crue, Iron Maiden, Black Sab- 
bath and a host of other "heavy metal" groups. My own 
personal choices would include the Beach Boys or Elvis 
Costello, while my dear friend Zelda will probably force me 
to include her friends. Village People, under threat of never 
giving me any more of her famous lasagna.) Pm sure many 
of our high school-aged readers will also have some 
suggestions. 

In the meantime, keep those ideas coming and enjoy your 
rock 'n' rolling Color Computer. 







524 


182 


52 


. . . 57 


606 


173 


96 


. . , 24 


642 . 


43 


212 


7 


720 


186 


246 


105 


776 


244 


280 


200 


828 ... . 


95 


338 


189 


856 


41 


420 


.112 


880. . . 


...50 


458 


224 


END 


230 



Listing 1: 

12 '» THE coco ROCK-FEST #1 » 

14 '» BY FRED B. SCERBO » 

16 '* COPYRIGHT <C) 1984 * 

20 GOTO950 

22 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS0 : SCREEN 1 , 1 
24 LINE (0, 170) -(255, 174) ,PSET,B 
26 LINE (0, 174)- (255, 192) ,PSET,BF 
28 PM0DE3, 1 

30 POKE178,50:PAINT(128,2) , ,4 
32 FOR I - 1 TO40STEP4 : I K-RND < 3 ) + 1 : C 
OLOR K,K: :LINE(I,0)-(I, 170) ,PSET 
: LINE (254-1 , 0) - (254-1 , 170) , PSET: 
NEXT 



34 FORI-2TO1208TEP2:K-RND(3)-H:C 

IRCLE (0, 0) , I , K, . 4, 0, . 25: CIRCLE (2 

S5,0),I,K,.4, .25, .5:NEXT 

36 LINE (70, 48) -(182, 100) , PSET, BF 

38 DRAW"BM108, 52C3R4ND6R4BR6D6U3 

R6D3U6BR6NR6D3NR6D3NR6 " 

40 PM0DE4,1 

42 FORI-96TO140STEP44 

44 FOR Y-6TO10 

46 CIRCLE(I,70) ,Y,0, .9, . 15, .9 

48 CIRCLE(I+11,78),Y,0,.9,.6,.8 

50 NEXT Y 

52 FOR Y-6TO10 

54 IF 1-96 THEN 56 ELSE 58 

56 CIRCLE(I-<-33,78) , Y,0, .9, .6, .8 

58 CIRCLE (1+20, 70), Y,0, .9 

60 NEXTY 

62 NEXTI 

64 PH0DE3, 1 

66 DRAW " BH76 , 94C2U 1 2R4F2D2e2L4R4 
F2D4BR8H2U8E2R4F2D8G2L4BR 1 4R4NE2 
L4H2U8E2R4NF2BR8D 1 2U6R2E4NU264F4 
D2BR4BU6R6BD6BR6U6NR4U6R6BR6 " 
68 DRAW " NR6D6NR4D6R6BR6R8U6L8U6R 
8BR4R4ND12R4" 

70 FOR I «6T0 1 20STEP 16:1 ♦-STR* ( I > Z 
Y«-STR«(2S6-I) 

72 DRAW"BH"-l-I«+", 188C3U4NR4U4R4D 
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d4 the RAINBOW May 1984 



74 DRAW "BH" ••-¥«••-", ieeC2NL6U4NL4U4 

L6R2D8" 

76 NEXT I 

78 X«>INKEY«: IFX«-*'A"THENe0ELSEI 

FX «« " B THEN82ELSE78 

80 R-3:R»»"C3": 007084 

82 R-2:R«-"C2":80T084 

84 CLS3:PRINTeil32, " A) THE ROLL I 

NO STONES 

86 PRINTai64,» B) ASIA"-t-STRINe« ( 
15,32) I 

88 PRINTai9&, C) QUIET RIOT"+ST 
RING* <9, 32) ( 

90 PRINTa228," D) Z Z TOP"+STRIN 
0*<12,32)| 

92 PRINTC260," E) VAN HALEN"-t-8TR 
ING«(10,32>| 

94 PRINTa292, " F) YES"-»-STRIN8« ( 1 
6,32)1 

96 PRINT9324," Q) 38 SPECIAL"+8T 
RING* (9, 32) I 

98 PRINT«356," H) AC-DC"+8TRINQ« 
< 14, 32) I 

100 X««INKEY«: IFX««*"'THEN100 
102 X«A8C(X*)-64:IF X<1 THEN 100 

ELSE IF X>8 THEN 100 
104 ON X SOTO 200,300,400,500,60 
0,700,800,900 
106 GOTO 106 



200 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLSl : SCREENl , 1 : PMO 
t>E3, 1 

202 CIRCLE<110, 110),66,1,1.2, .07 
,.45 

204 CIRCLE<122, 140),72, 1,1.1,.5, 
.73 

206 CIRCLE < 152, 150) , 60, 1 , 1 . 5, . 53 
,.7 

208 CIRCLE<154,152),5e, 1,1.4, .53 
, .76 

210 DRAW"S4C1BM96, 14BI>LDLU6Bril54 
, 70R4E4R2F2R4F2R10E4n200, 74" 
212 FORI-0TO2: CIRCLE (23e-<-I, 150) , 
72, 1, 1.3, .5, .67:NEXT I 
214 DRAW"BM130,6eL4HLHLHLLIHUL662 
BD 1 0BL6622D2Q2DODQDLDLD2LD4L2D 1 6 
F2R2FR2E2U2E2U16EUEUEU2EU2ni06, 7 
4" 

216 DRAW"BM164,82NL4O20" 

218 CIRCLE (198, 180) ,88, 1, 1.3, .57 

,.68 

220 DRAW " BM 1 1 8 , 1 38D6F2R8E2U4E2U4 

E2U4E2U6E2U6E2U4E4 " 

222 DRAW " BM86 , 74H 1 0L2H4L2U6E4R2E 

4R2E2R2E2R2E2R2E4 " 

224 CIRCLE (134, 72) ,44, 1, 1.8, .58, 

.86 

226 CIRCLE(180,20),24,1,.9, .6, .9 






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T 



6 

228 CIRCLE (240,0), 40, 1,1.1,. 3,. 4 
4 

230 CIRCLE (230,96), 22, 1,^7^.75, . 

2 . 

232 CIRCLE (255, 1S2), 60, 1.1. 9,. 99 
,.72 

234 CIRCLE ( 170, 104), 34, 1,1.4,. 1, 
.25 

236 CIRCLE(130,60),32,1,.7,.6, .9 
238 CIRCLE (182, 98), 24, 1,. 7,. 69, . 
99 

240 DRAW BM 1 66 , 46e3L4H2BL!$0G8L2e 

2L262L2F8BR 1 22BH 1 6F2R2F2R2F2R2F2 

D2F2Q4L2e2L282L286 " 

2Ai CIRCLE (180, 20), 16,1,. 6, .4,. 1 

244 CIRCLE (134, 18), 19,1,. 6,. 4,. 1 

246 DRAW " BH 1 24 , 24R4E2R2E2R4F2R2F 

2R2BR24BD2R2E2R2E2R6F2R6 " 

248 CIRCLE (170, 44), 24,1,. 9, .12, . 

4 

250 CIRCLE(132,44),29, 1,.9, .12,. 
4 

292 CIRCLE (104, 94), 10,1,. 9,.!,. 4 
9 

294 CIRCLE(200,44),20, 1,1.3, .13, 
.4 

296 f^AINT(130,66),l,l 

258 PAINT (140, 4), R,l 

260 PAINT (118, 76), R,l 

262 PH0DE4 , 1 : DRAW " C0BM 181,1 52NL3 

NR3D6BR8U6F4E4D6 " : PM0DE3 , 1 

264 DRAW"BM22,2ClR4NDeR4BR4D8U4R 

6U4ND6BR6NR6D4NR4D4R6BL60BD6 " 

266 DRAW"NDeR6D4L6R2F4BR6U8R6D8N 

L6BR6NU8R6BR6NU8R6BR6NU8BR6U8F8N 

UeBR6UeR8ND2L6D8ReU4L4 " 

268 DRAW " BD 1 8BL66R6U4L6U4R6BR4R4 

ND8R4BR4D8R6U8NL6BR6ND8F8U8BR6NR 

6D4NR4D4R6BR6R6U4L6U4R6 " 

270 X«-I NKEY«: IFX«-CHR« (13) THEN 

84 ELSE 270 



300 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCL8 1 : PM0DE4 , 3 : PCL8 

1 : 8CREEN1 , 1 : PM0DE3, 1 

302 FOR I-l TO 299 

304 DRAW"S4C3BM30,70E48F48L16H12 

L388 1 2L 1 6M24 , 72E94ND4F94L2UL3UDR 

3DR2L24ER2E8L28H 1 2NE2L34NH28 1 2NH 

2L24BR46NR40E 1 2F3R 1 1 F2L 1 4H287R28 

II 

306 DRAW"BF2BR10R19H8NR14H2R12H4 
4R34E4F 1 4L22F44NL30L2UL2UL2NL26H 
44FR2FNR2HL2HR22FR2FHL2H9NU482L3 
0HLRF49LHLHL 1 4E6D4N02U4BE 1 0E8D4N 
e5ND 1 1 U22E 1 0F 1 0D52H4U48NR2H6NU48 
6NL2D38" 

308 DRAW"U22BE16E3D4N83U4F55L22H 

1 2L24U2R26N82F 1 2N82R 1 3NH48RFR " 

310 P0KE178,I 

312 PAINT (46, 65),, 3 

314 PAINT (120, 24),, 3 

316 PAINT(156,24) , ,3 

318 PAINT ( 176,40) , ,3 

320 PAINT (83, 68), t 3 

322 PC0PY1T04:PC0PY2T05 

324 Y>RND(4)SIF Y-3 THEN 324 

326 PMODE 1,1: PCLS ( Y) : PM0DE3, 1 

328 IF Y<4 THEN 332 

330 LINE (0,0) -(256, 92) , PRESET, B 

332 X«-INKEY«: IFX«»CHR« (13) THEN 

84 ELSE NEXT I 

334 eOTO300 





400 J-0 

402 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS ( J ) : SCREEN 1 , 1 : P 
M0DE3, 1 
404 DRAW R« 

406 DRAW"84BM20, 10G8D40F8R22F8R2 
0H 1 6U40H8NL26BL8BD 1 4D28L 1 0U28R 1 0 
BU14BR26" 

408 DRAW"D48F8R30E8U48L18D40L10U 
40L 1 8BR56D56R 1 8U56NL 1 8BR 1 0D56R40 
U 1 4L20U8R20U 1 2L20U8R20U 1 4L40 " 
410 DRAW"BR46D14R16D42R20U42R16U 



96 tlw RAINBOW May 1984 



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day carry in warranty. 

TRS-80 Trademark Tandy Corporation. 
Prices subject to change without notice. 

Write for our FREE newsletter! 



FACTORY DIRECT 
PURE RADIO SHACK EQUIPMENT 
'THE COCO PROFESSIONALS" 




DELKER ELECTRONICS, INC. 
P.O. BOX 897 DEPT D 
SMYRNA, TN 37167 
800-251-5008 
800-545-2502 (TENNESSEE) 
615-459-2636 (TENNESSEE) 
615-254-0088 (NASHVILLE) 



HARDWARE & PROGRAMS 



MONITORS 

BMC MEDIUM-RES COLOR 

13** BMC w/ sound $303.95 

I4'*USI w/ sound 324.95 

12" Taxon Composite & RGB. , . 335,95 

COMREX HI.RES 
MONOCHROME 

12" Amber or Green. . . , 140.95 

9^* Amber or Green 125.95 

Sorry, no C.O.D, on monitors, 

COMPOSITE MONITOR 
INTERFACES 

Double Driver, 24.95 

Video Plus .24,95 

Both work great with color 
or monochrome on CoCo I. 

Coco Double Driver 28.95 

Video Plus 11 M ...,.26.95 

Video Plus 11 C , . 39.95 

For CoCo II Only 



JARB DISK DOURLER 

Why spend twice as much as. you need to 
for double sided diskettes? With our 
doub!er» you can make your ow n and pay 
for it with the first box you double. A 
must for disk drive users. 
5 1^** size only 12.95 

BASF DATA CASSETTES 
C-OS C-10 

1-10 .60 ea. .65 ea. 

11*20 .55 ea. .60 ea. 

Soft Poly Cases . ^ Ea. $.20 

Hard Shelled Cases , Ea. $.22 

Cassette Labels (12) » Sh. $.36 

Cassette Labels Tractor (1000) . > $21.95 

MEMORY UPGRADE 
KITS 

1*K RAM CHIPS 1 .50 ca. 

SV,CoCoIIl6K 1.95 ea. 

*64K RAM CHIPS 

Eight 200 NS Factory Prime 64K RAM 
Chips. Allows you to upgrade *air board 
easily. No soldering needed , . $52.50 

Eight 200 NS Factory Prime Chips with 
Piggy Backed Sockets, Sam Socket, Bus 
Wire. Comprehensive Instructions. 
Recommended for **D** or earlier^ but may 
be used on **E". Only 9 simple soldtr con- 
nections to kit« None to computer. $25.95 
NOT FOR CoCo 2 




THE GUNFIGHTER 

BY Terry A, Sfeen 

An excellent hi-rcs, arcade quality game 
program For two players. Joysticks and 
32K arc required in this all machine 
language program. 

Cassette .$19.95 Disk/Amdisk $24.95 

JUNGLE TREK 

Lost in a jungle with wild animals lurlnng; 
your only xurvival i.s to find a safe com- 
pound before you are lunch for lions: 
high resolution: multi-color. 
16KEXT ...... .$14,95 

BIORHYTHM/PSYCHIC APT> 

1) Prims biorhythm charts of nearly 
unlimited length; attractively formatted 
for use on most printers. 1 6K 

2) Your psychic ability is determined 
through questions evaluating your psychic 
experiences 

16K Ext , Both for $15.95 



PROGRAMS FOR THE 
SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
VOICE-PAK 
OR 

SPEECH SYSTEMS VOICE 

TALKING 
PINAL COUNTDOWN 

fby But Cookj 

For 32K EXT $ 19.95 

Standard cassette 

FINAL COUNTDOWN $14,95 



TALKING 
$PELL-A«TRON 

The program allows the user to build a 
dictionary of words. During testing^ the 
words are spoken. If an incorrect 
response is given, the word is spoken 
again and spelled. Tape (32K EXT) $22,95 



TALKING 
SCORE E«Z 

A yahtzee type program. Up to six players 
can compete. All scoring and record keep- 
ing is done by the computer. Tape (32K 

EXT) . ,. $19.95 

Standard SCORE E-Z. .$15.95 



TALKING 
COLOR MATH 

The perfect educational game to iid the 
student in learning addition^ subtraction, 
multiplication and division. Allows one to 
specify difficulty level. 
Tape (32K EXT) . ... . , ,$22.95 



TALKING 
SHIP HUNT 

by Cobra Software 

Play Battleship against your computer, 
32K w/ joystick needed. Graphics and 
sound. Can be played without voice. 
Cassette . , - * .$10.95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR 
(disk) can draw large scale schematics In 
hi>res (has six overlapping screens) and 
then prim them out to any of several 
popular printers, fa&t!! A must for serious 
hardware computerist. 
Now only..,.. $49.95 

C0CO Chlpti 

Sam, Pia, CPU, Ext, Basic 

IVe carry products 
from many manufacturers. 
If you don't see it, ask. 



JARB I 

1636 D Avenue, Suite C 
National City, CA 92050 



SOrrWARE 



I HARDWARE 



COO orders accepted, no charge cards please. 
Shipping and handling $3.00 
California residents please add 6% sales tax 



Order Line 
(619) 474-8982 

After Hours BBS 
(619) 474-8981 



14L52" 

412 DRAW»BO72BL156D56R18U22F10D1 
2R 1 8U22H8E8U 1 0H8L38R 1 8BD 1 4D8R8U8 
L8BU 1 4BR38DS6R 1 8U56NL 1 8BR20O8D40 
F8R30E8U40H8L30R 1 0BD42R 1 0U28L 1 0D 
28BU42" 

414 DRAW"BR36D14R16D42R20U42R16U 
14L52" 

416 PAINT(20, 14) pR,R:PAINT(70, 14 
R,R: PAINT < 130, 14>,R,R:PAINT<19 
2, 14) ,R,R: PAINT (200, 14) ,R,R 
418 PAINT (40, 86) ,R,R: PAINT (100, 8 
6) , R, R: PAINT ( 140, 86) , R, R: PAINT (2 
00,86>,R,R 
420 PM0DE4, 1 

422 FOR I B2TO200STEP4 : C I RCLE ( 1 28 , 
72),I,J,.9:NEXT 

424 PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : PM0DE3, 1 
426 DR AW " BM26 , 1 70C2U 1 3F8E8ND 1 3BR 
SNR 1 0DNR 1 0D5NReDNReD5NR 1 0DR 1 0BU 1 
3BR6R 1 4DL7ND 1 2L7 " 

428 DRAW"BD12BR20U13R10DNL10DSNL 
1 0DNL 1 0D6BR8NU 1 3UNR 1 0DR 10" 
430 DRAW " BR 1 6U 1 3D6NR8DR 1 0U7D 1 3BR 
8U 1 3NR 1 0DNR 1 0DSNR8DNR8D5NR 1 0DR 1 0 

II 

432 DRAW"BR8U13NR8DNR8D5NR10DR10 
U7D 1 3BR8NU 1 3UNR 1 0DR 1 0BR2BU 1 3R 1 4D 
L7ND1 2L7BR20UD 1 3U7NR 1 0DR 1 0U7D 13" 
434 DRAW"Bri26, 152R200DL200BD22R2 
00DL200" 

436 IF^J-1 THEN 440 

438 FOK U-1 TO 4:PC0PY U TO U+4: 

NEXT U?^>l:OOTO402 

440 PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1,1: FORI • 1 T02 

00: NEXT I 

442 pmode4,5:screeni,i:fori-i to 

200: NEXT I 

444 X«<-INKEY«: IF X«»CHR«(13) THE 
N 84 ELSE 440 




500 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN 1,1: PHO 
DE3,1 



502 DRAW " S4C 1 BM0 , 0R 1 00G36L22E30e 

4L50NU4R50E4L90U 1 0R 1 00G44R200U6N 

L 1 66U6L 1 60NG6E26L24 " 

504 DRAW"BR30BDaO6R10G8R10EaR8E6 

NL26BR8R28G 1 4L28E 1 4R 1 0BG4R8G6L8E 

6BH4BR34R280 1 0L 1 604L 1 0E 1 4BF4R802 

L8E2QR8" 

506 PAINT (168, 20) , 1, 1 

508 FORI -0TO20STEP4 : L INE ( 1 28-1 , 1 

00) - ( 128-1 , 170-1/2) , P8ET: LINE ( 12 

a-*-! , 100) - ( 128-t-1 , 170-1/2) , PSET: NE 

XT 

510 CIRCLE (128, 102), 30, 1,. 3,. 57, 
.92 

512 CIRCLE (128, 140) , 32, 1 , 1 . 1 , . 1 , 
.42 

514 DRAW"Bni02, 1 00D96BR92U58 
516 P0KE178,43:PAINT(128,98) , , 1 
518 PM0DE3 , 1 : FOR Y-0TO88STEP88 : FO 
RI-0TO2: CIRCLE (e4-i-Y, 120) , 18-1, 1, 

.9:nexti,y 

520 PM0DE3,1 

522 DRAW"C1BM88, 106U22E6R66F6D22 
BL4BU 1 2U8H6L58Q6D8E4R60F4H4L20E4 
L30G4" 

524 CIRCLE (44, 148), 36,1,. 9,. 4,. 9 
: CIRCLE (212, 148) , 36, 1 , . 9, . 62, 1.1 
526 CIRCLE(60, 192),54,1,.5, .67,. 
9 

528 CIRCLE (194, 192), 54,1,. 5, .62, 
.87 

530 DRAW"BH20,168F2R6BD4BR74F4R4 

4E4BU4BR70R 1 2E4 *' 

532 PAINT (128, 176) ,R, 1 

534 PAINT (128, 79), R,l 

536 PAINT (128, 82), 1,1 

538 PAINT (128, 190) ,1, 1 

540 PAINT (250, 2), 1,1 

542 POKE178,30:PAINT(40,8),,l:PA 

INT (90, 30),, 1 

544 PAINT(130, 18),, l: PAINT (160, 1 

8) , , 1 : PAINT (200, 18) , , 1 

546 POKE178,0:PAINT(20,4) ,R,1 

548 PAINT (250, 34), R,l 

550 DRAW"BM20, 126C4U90R40BR170BD 

8D80" 

552 PM0DE4, l:FORI-lT012: CIRCLE (7 

0,0),56-«-I,l,1.9, .25, ((38+I)/100) 

: CIRCLE (186,0), 56+1, 1, 1.9, ( (50- ( 

38-I-I) )/100) , .25: NEXT 

554 FOR I ■22T03 1 STEP3 : C I RCLE ( 44 , 1 

48) , I , 0, . 9, . 2, . 9: CIRCLE (214, 146) 

, 1,0, .9, .62, .35:NEXTI 

556 PM0DE4 , 1 : SR«« "CI NE20NH20NU5N 

R5NL5ND5NG20NF20 " 

558 DRAW"BM150, 160"-«-SR« 

560 DRAWBM75, 108"+SR» 

562 FORI»1TO350:W-RND(190)+30:U- 

RND (110) •t-45: PMODE3, 1 

564 IF PP0INT(W+l,U)»R+4 THEN 56 



May 1984 th* RAINBOW 99 



8 

966 PriODE4,l:PSET(W,U) 

566 NEXT I:PM0DE4, 1 

970 8R«*"ClNU9ND5NL9NR9NE2hF2N02 

hlH2" 

972 DRAW » BM 1 1 0 , 90 " -t-SR* 

974 DRAW''BM190p60"+SR« 

976 DRAW"Bn60,70"-«-SR« 

978 DRAW"BM190,69"-«-SR« 

980 DRAW " BM 1 28 , 1 30C 1 NH22NE22BD 1 6 

NH20NE20" 

982 X*-INKEY«:IF X*-CHR«<13> THE 
N 84 ELSE 582 




600 PH0DE4, 1 : PCLS0: SCREEN 1 , 1 : PMO 
DE3,l:PCL82 

602 DRAW''C1BH112,66M90,32H8»32H1 
4, 40M78, 40M82, 46H20, 46M26, 54M86, 
94M90, 60H32, 60t138, 68ri94 , 68111 12,9 
4M150, 32M104, 32M1 10, 40M128, 40H1 1 
2,66- 

604 DRAW " BM230 , 60H 1 82 , 60M 1 86 , S4H 
236, 54M242, 46M190, 46M194, 40M248, 
40M2S4, 32M184, 32ni66, 60rilS4, 60H1 
66, 4011172, 40H177, 32M198, 32M1 16, 1 
00M124, ll0ni50,68M162, 6811132, 118 
11140, 128M176,68M224, 6811230, 60" 
606 DRAW " BM 1 4 , 40M30 , 46BM26 , 54M42 
, 60BM38, 681194, 74M96, 74BI11 12, 93111 
1 6 , 96BM90 , 3211 1 04 , 40H 116, 58BI1 1 90 , 
32M194,39" 

608 DRAW "BM 177,3211 182, 366111 72, 40 
M177, 44BH166, 40M172, 44NR4M161 , 60 
BM236, 54ri220, 60BM248, 40M232, 46BM 
224 , 68M208 , 74M 1 84 , 7411 1 76 , 68M 1 84 , 
74M1S0, 132M140, 128" 
610 DRAW"BM124, 110M130, 112M194,7 
4NR4M 1 49 , 68BM 1 86 , 54M 1 94 , 60BI1 1 94 , 
40M202 , 46BM 110, 40M 1 20 , 44R4 " 
612 PAINT<30,38) ,3, 1 
614 PAINT (220, 38), 3,1 
616 PAINT (128, 118) ,2, 1 
618 PAINT (172, 50) ,4, 1 



620 PAINT (168, 92), 4,1 

622 PAINT (2, 22), 4,1 

624 FOR U-IT04:PC0PY U TO U•^4:NE 

XT U 

626 PriODE3,9 

628 PAINT (172, 50), 1,1 

630 PAINT (168, 52) , 1, 1 

632 PAINT (2, 22), 1,1 

634 PMODE3,5:SCREEN1,0:FORI-1TO9 

00:NEXTI 

636 X«- I NKEY* : I FX«-CHR« (13) THEN 
84 

638 PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1,1: FOR 1-1 T09 
00: NEXT I 

640 X«-INKEY*: IFX*-CHR« ( 13) THEN 
84 

642 PM0DE3 , 5 : SCREEN 1,1: FOR I - 1 T09 
00:NEXTI 

644 X«-INKEY«: IFX«-CHR» ( 13) THEN 
84 

646 60T0634 




700 IF R-3 THEN RC-2 ELSE IF R»2 

THEN RC-3 
702 PH0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 
704 DRAW " BM86 , 30C0U 1 0H 1 0R8F6E6R8 
6 1 0D 1 0L8BR30U20R20D4L 1 4D4R 1 4D4L 1 
4D4R 1 4D4NL20BR 1 8R20U 1 2L 1 6U4R 1 6U4 
L20D 1 2R 1 6D4L 1 6D4 » 
706 PAINT (90, 27), 0,0 
708 PAINT (120, 27) ,0,0 
710 PAINT (160, 27), 0,0 
712 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,60,0, .6 
714 DRAW"Bril28,96C0ND34M169,71BM 
128,96M87,71" 

716 CIRCLE (128, 96), 82,0, .6,. 85, . 
67 

718 DRAW"BI1128,96BH30H10L4F10BM1 
28 , 96BE30E 1 0R46 10" 

720 LINE (116, 144) -(140, 176) ,PSET 
,B 

722 COLOR 1,0 

724 LINE(117, 143)-(139, 146),PSET 



100 the RAINBOW May 1984 



COMPUTERIZE YOUR BUSINESS 

Save Time In Tax Preparation with ^^^^uterware^ 
Business Software for OS-9 and FLEX 



May Special — 
Prices Reduced 25°/c 




WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW 
ABOUT COMPUTERWARE® 
BUSINESS APPLICATIONS: 





• They have been in use for over 4 years on many 6809 
sytems, This means they are well tested. 

• Complete manuals accompany the systems. 

• User-friendly menus make them easy to use. 

• They are not accounting tutorials. They assume you 
know and use sound accounting principles. 



System Requirements 

• FLEX or OS-9 operating system 

• 64K memory 

• Computerware® Random BASIC 

• Duaf Disk Drives (Payroll requires double-sided drives) 

• O-PAK for OS-9 systems 



GENERAL LEDGER S>l$ S 1 85 

This is a comprehensive double entry accounting system with 
complete audit trails, closing procedures, and full reporting. The 
chart of accounts is flexible and the system easy to use. Reports 
include the General Ledger, Trial Balance, Balance Sheet, Income 
Statement, and Transaction Register. Your financial information is 
at your fingertips! 

CHECK LEDGER $ 1 50 

This is a single entry bookkeeping system which allows the 
users to define a chart of income and expense accounts. Year-to- 
date totals are maintained for each account as well as complete 
checking account history. By just entering your checking account 
information, you can have alway5<urrent visibility over your 
income and expense ledgers. Financial statements and taxes are 
a snap! 

CORRESPOINJDEINJCE SYSTEM $ 11 5 

We call this the People Manager. It is a very sophisticated 
people data base system. The system collects name and address 
information, provides mailing labels or reports of the entire list or 
any subset upon request. The power of the system lies in the 
1 7 character special code field that is used to identify special 
characteristics of each person and then can be used to selea 
subgroups for reports and labels used in special marketing or con- 
traas. Tested with data bases of 1 5 to 9,000 entries this system 
has been in use with retailers, clubs, churches and professionals 
for years. 

(Sa/e prices good through May 31, 1 984) 



COMPUTERWARE® 




P.O. Box 668 • Encinitas, OA 92024 • (619) 436-3512 
Computerware is a federally registered trademark of Computerware. 



PAYROLL $225 

This is the most comprehensive payroll you'll find on a micro- 
computer. Besides collecting key employee information. It allows 
entry of pay rates for standard hours, overtime, and salary. 
Hourly, salary, and commissioned employees may be paid 
weekly, bi-weekly, semi-monthly, and monthly. Two types of 
special monthly deductions are also accommodated. Year-to-date, 
quarterly, monthly and current totals are maintained. All federal 
reporting is done automatically and your state computations are 
also included. 

INVENTORY CONTROL S'pi^ S 1 50 

This system is designed to help the retailer, distributor, or 
businessman to keep control of this important factor. It stores 
your cost and quantity information, updates it immediately, and 
offers you key management reports with useful summaries at any 
time. With four costs, four locations, selling history, and vendor 
information for each item, you will always have the facts! 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE S^^^C $ 1 50 

This system can give you the tools to plan your business 
growth by controlling expenditures and forecasting cash require- 
ments. It helps a small business manage and track its cash liabil- 
ities by collecting vendor invoice information and reporting the 
business' cash commitments and payment history. Along with 
standard payables reports it also includes a check writer and 
payment forecast reports. 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE $><^ $ 11 5 

All businesses need to know who owes them money! This 
system provides reliable and timely information regarding the 
status of all customer accounts. You can know instantly which 
accounts are past due, forecast how much money to expea to 
receive for cash flow planning, and keep on top of your cus- 
tomers' credit positions. Customer name, address, credit limit, 
invoice, and payment information is recorded and reports of all 
information including customer statements are available upon 
your request. 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



T 



726 PAINT (140, 140) ,0,0 

728 LINE (126, 131)- (130, 188) ,PRES 

ET,B 

730 LINE (127, 132) -(129, 187) ,PSET 
.BF 

732 LINE (26, 99) -(68, 97), PRESET, B 
734 LINE (28, 96) -(66, 96), PSET 
736 LINE (230, 95) - ( 188, 97) , PRESET 
.B 

738 LINE(228,96)-(190,96) ,P8ET 

740 PnODE3,l 

742 PAINT (140, 140), RC, 4 

744 PM0DE4, 1 

746 CIRCLE (128, 96), 60,0, .6 
748 PriODE3,l 

750 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,60, 1, .6 

752 DRAW"ClBni28,96ND34M169,71BI1 

128,96M87,71" 

754 PC0PY2T07:PC0PY3T08 

756 FOR I->1 TO 240 

758 PC0PY7T05:PC0PY8T06:PM0DE3,4 

760 PAINT (128, 92), 1,1 

762 P0KE178, I 

764 PAINT (84, 78) ,, 1 

766 POKE 178, I-i-2 

768 PAINT (172, 78),, 1 

770 PC0PY5T02:PC0PY6T03 

772 X««INKEY«:IF X*"CHR»(13) THE 



N 84 ELSE NEXT 
774 eOT0756 



•"'11 *"l 



j,l •"'111 I. 



''I], 



. I I 

"«M|„„,l"H'"H<||<l"""«iH,il';,l 







Illl'" NU| 

.11.1' .. .l''.. 



'')r iiiii'lltil 



■""l'llMpm.„rt4IMMllH^*'" 



iniNllllllllH lilllMUfHIIIIIiiitlliifM ■■iPM4ll»ri4l»N<tlrl lliri » nil I imUW Kill nil 



600 PMODEA p 1 : PCLS0 : SCREEN 1 , 1 

802 CIRCLE (128p 96), 94,1 p. 85 

804 CIRCLE(128p96>p90plp.85 

806 PAINT (128, 18) plpl 

808 DRAW"C0BH40,120NF14DNF14DNF1 

4DNF14DNF14C1BU10F14U10F4D16H14" 

810 PAINT (90, 126), 1,1 

812 FORI-64TO140:LINE(200, I)-(23 

0, 1+12) , PRESET: NEXT 




112 W. WISCONSIN AV. 
KAUKAUNA, Wl 54130 
(414) 766-1851 
STOCK ITEMS SHIPPED SAME DAY! 



THE COSMOS 
CONNECTION IS 
A COMPLETE SERIAL 
TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 
FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER TO 
THE GEMINI — 10and15 
PRINTERS. 



WARNING: 
Make iure the 
inttrface you buy 
dkHtOQ/ VOt(j 
any factory 
warrantiM or 
an«r th« star>dar<j 
oparation of your printar! 
Tha Coamos Cor>naction 
maats thaaa requiramanta. 



. NO AC REQUIRED 
. SWITCHABLE 
BAUD RATE 
AT: 600 

1200 

2400 

. HJGH QUALITY 
CONSTRUCTION 

• COMPACT 

• 90 DAY 
WARRANTY 

• WORD SELECT 




THE COMPLETE TRS-80® LINE 

• COLOR COMPUTER 

• MODEL 100 

• MODEL 4 

• MODEL 16 

• MODEL 12 

• ACCESSORIES 



THE 
GEMINI— 10X 
PRINTER 
AND 
THE 
COSMOS 
CONNECTION, 
IT'S A 
WINNING 
PRINTING 
COMBINATION. 



CALL FOR THE BEST DISCOUNT PRICE 
ON TRS-80® FULLY WARRANTEED 
MICROCOMPUTER EQUIPMENT. 

*ptua 110.00 Shipping and Handling 

mS-BO IS A TRADEMAf^K OF TANDY CORP. PRICES AND SPECiFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 



PACKAGE 
READY TO PLUG IN 
TO YOUR COLOR COMPUTER 
ONLY* ^-^^/^^ 

^ $339.00 % 

^ GEMINI-10X ^^_|L 

^ PACKAGE - 




m I c r • w I c f • i w < 

THE POWER BEHINDTHE PRMTEO WORD. 



102 th«RAIN60W May 1984 



1 



814 LINE (10, 24) -(110, 80), PRESET, 
BF 

816 PM0DE3, l: FOR I-0TO3: CIRCLE (12 
e, 96-1 > , 94+I , 3, . 85, . 6, . 67: NEXT 
818 DRAW"C4m50,50E16LE10D2Nei0D 
NO 1 0DNO 1 0DNO 1 0U4NR8I>NR8I>NReDNReD 
ReNE8UNE8UNE8BM50, 50ND8L2D8BD4BR 
4E6D6LNU6LNU4LNU2D2 " 
820 DRAW " BR8BU4E4RNe4RD3R4NE6RE6 
U3» 

822 F0RI-1T0S:PM0DE4, l: CIRCLE (12 
8,96>,66-i-I, 1, .85, .53, .6:CIRCLE(1 
28,96>,76-i-1, 1, .85, .54, .55: NEXT 
824 M«> " R4DNL6R6DDNL4R 1 2UR6UR4 
826 DRAW"BM90, 30»+H«+"BM90, 31 ••+M 
« 

828 DRAW " BM96 , 40 " +««+ " BH96 , 4 1 " +M 
« 

830 DRAW'BMl 10, 50"-ii1«+"BHl 10, 51 " 
+H« 

832 DRAW'BMl 1 4 , 60" +M«+"BM1 14,61" 
+M« 

834 DRAW"BM1 12, 70"+M«+"BMl 12,71" 



836 DRAW " BM 1 06 , 82U4RD4RU4ED4EU4 " 
838 DRAW " BM72 , 40E2RO2RE2D2" 
840 DRAW " BM48 , 94NF 1 6RNF 1 6RNF 1 6RN 
F 1 6RF 1 6NL4DNL3R4DNL5R2NU6RNU6RNU 
6" 



842 FORI-93TO95:CIRCLE(106, I>,40 
,1,.5, .2, .4:NEXTI 

844 FORI-103TO106:CIRCLE(148, I>, 

20, 1,1.1,. 2, .48:NEXTI 

846 F0RI-128T0131:CIRCLE (170,1), 

20, 1 , . 4, . 6, . 95: NEXTI 

848 F0RI-122T0124: CIRCLE (199, I), 

20,1,.4,.1,.38:NEXTI 

850 DRAW"BM204,134NF10RNF10RNF10 

RF 1 0NR 1 0UNR 1 0UR 1 0NH8RNH8RNH8RH8B 

L6BU4NR8UNR8UNRdUR8NH5UNH5UNH5" 

852 F0RI-92T094:CIRCLE(127, I>,30 

,1,.4,.6, .9:CIRCLE(164,I-i-8>,26, 1 

,.e, .65, .85: CIRCLE (190, I-^4>,28, 1 

854 CIRCLE(190, I-i-14>,30,l,.6,.7, 
. 9 : C I RCLE ( 1 78 , 1 -1-50 > , 30 , 1 , 1 . 8 , . 75 
, . 9: C I RCLE ( 1 80 , 1 ■i-53> , 30, 1 , 1 . 8, . 7 
5, .9: NEXTI 

856 DRAW"BM204, 118NR6DR6DL4R6DL4 
R6BM204 , 84NE5RNE5RNE5RNE5BR4BD2N 
E5RNE5RNE5RNE5BD2BL4F4R4E4D04L4H 
4DF4R4E4" 

858 F0RI-1T03: CIRCLE ( 170, 72-t>I),l 
7, 1 , . 6, . 5, .99: CIRCLE (150, 48+1 ) , 1 
7, 1,. 6,. 6,1. l:CIRCLE( 177,58+1),! 
7,1,. 6,-7,. 99:NEXT 
860 PM0DE4, 1 

862 FORY-0TO 1 76STEP 1 76 : FOR I -0TO 1 



SOUTHERN SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 



THE SPREADSHEET ZAPPER NEW POWER FOR YOUR COCO 



THE SPREADSHEET ZAPPER bridges the gap between the great computational power of Radio Shacic's Spectacuiator and high quality graphical 
displays. A picture is worth more than 1000 numbers! 

Imagine being able to easily display all your carefully created Spectacuiator data in the form of outstanding bar graphs, pie charts, and line graphs. 

The SPREADSHEET ZAPPER converts those nasty Spectacuiator data files (ROM PAK or Disk) to data files that are 100% compatible with Southern 

Software Systems' graphical display programs-The BAR ZAPPER, THE PIE ZAPPER, and THE GRAPH ZAPPER. 

Now you can have the best of both - The complete flexibility of a spreadsheet program to do your computations and the use of high resolution graphing 
for display of your data. 

Compute your Income and expenses; perform statistical computations; analyze the stock market; all using Spectacuiator, then display the results using a 

bar graph, pie chart, or a tine graph - very Impressive!! 
* Don't limit yourself to endless rows and columns of confusing numbers— forget special purpose plotting programs, get total flexibility. 
> ''Authors of commerically oriented pmgrams should beg, borrow, or steal one of the Instructl^^ RIGHT WAY TO DO IT." 

The Rainbow, Oct. 1983. 

Features of The DISPLAY ZAPPERS (The Bar Zapper, The Pie Zapper, The Graph Zapper) 



BAR ZAPPER allows for 26 bars. 
THE GRAPH ZAPPER plots line graphs of data and equations. 
High resolution graphics with on screen numbers and labels, 
with or without grids. 
Save data for later graphing or editing. 
Hard copies with readily available screen print programs for 
nearly any brand of printer. 



PIE ZAPPER has up 18 sectors. 

Thorough error prevention. 

User friendly, easy backup procedures. 

Detailed user's guide for all features. 

Low cost upgrade from tape to disk. 

Low res, building block graphs can't compare. 

Read the outstanding reviews In the Rainbow (Dec. 82, Apr 83, Oct. 83) 



14 day money back guarantee 

SpsctKuMor ii I rioMsrtd 
hot TANDY Corp. 



32-64Ktape: 
32-64K disk: 



The Display ZAPPERS— Bar, Pie, Graph 

• 16'64Ktape: $15.95 + $1.00 shipping each— $44.95 + $3.00 shipping for all 3 

• 32-64K disk; $19.95 + $1.00 shipping each— $56.95 + $3.00 shipping for all 3 

The SPREADSHEET ZAPPER 
$17.95 + $1.00 shipping-with all 3 tape Display Zappers: $59.95 + $3.00 shipping 
$25.95 + $1.00 shipping— with all 3 disk Display Zappers: $79.95 + $3.00 shipping 
Sand Ch$ek,miiaf Order or WSA/MuM^nlmmbwrtn^ 
M pmgmni nqtHn EitBMM Bask aad vt compatlbk with mmrwy. 



Flortda n sidentt tdd 9% utes tax. 



SOUTHERN SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 

485 South Tropical Trail, Suite 109 • Merritt Island, Florida 32952 • 



(305) 452-2217 



May 1964 the RAINBOW 103 



Setting The Standards 




Graphics and sound effects like never before on 
the Color Computer. An exciting original arcade 
action game. Control your hero through a maze of 
moving conveyor belts. Outsmart bad guys and 
save Q.P. Doll. Over 1,000 frames of increasing 
difficulty 



100% ML, original title screen music, 1 or 2 
players, colorful high resolution graphics, exciting 
sound effects, joystick or keyboard input, pause 
feature, eight digit scores and high score name 
entry For 32 K Color Computer and TDP-100. 

Cassette-$34.95 Disk-$34.95 
TO ORDER: 

VISA, MASTERCARD, Money Order. 
Please allow 2 weeks for checks. Add 
$1.50 for shipping, $3.00 outside U.S. 
4% tax in Mich. 



P.O. Box 1035, East Lansing, Ml 48823 (517) 351-8537 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



QUALITY PROGRAMS SOLICITED 



Setting The Standards 





-1 





f< 








n 










t 






-J 








' — ^ 
















1 r 








































=> 







Another exciting original arcade action 
game Help Willy stock the warehouse while 
keeping up with incoming orders. Watch out 
for the antagonists who intend to make your 
day long. 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 




QUALITY PROGRAMS SOLICITED 



0STEP 1 0 : L I NE ( 1 0-1- 1 , Y-i-7- 1 / 1 0 ) - < 245 

-I,Y+7+I/10>,P8ET,BF:NEXTI,Y 

864 FORI-1TO2S6STEP2:LINE(I,0)-< 

I , 192) , PRESET: NEXT 

866 FOR I -84T087 : I «-STR« ( I > 

868 DRAW"BH''-i-I«-<-", 146S5U4H3U3BR6 

BDU3H2BD1 6BR 1 0U4H2U4E4BR6BD6F2De 

BU 1 2U4E3BU2BR4F402Q2BD2BR404D2BD 

4BR3ND4E7U4BR6NE3D3BR8ND6BR6E4U2 

BR4BD60402D4BL 1 8BD4U6S4 " 

870 NEXT I 

872 FORI-80TO1778TEP2:LINE(I, 128 

> - ( I , 158) , PRESET: NEXT 

674 LINE(10,96>-(28,96> pPSET:LIN 

E <20, 9S) - (28, 97) , PSET, BF 

876 LINE(245,96) -(225,96) ,P8ET:L 

INE (225, 95) -(235, 97) ,PSET,BF 

878 LINE (68, 18) -(185,0) , PRESET, B 

F 

880 Pn00E3, 1 

882 0RAW''Bn74, 1 2C4R6U4NL4U4NL6BR 
6D8R6U4NL6U4NL6BR 1 4NR604R6D4NL6B 
R6U8R6D4L6D4BR 1 2NR6U4NR6U4R6BR6N 
R6D8R6BR6NU8BR6U8R6D4NL6D4BR6NUe 
R6» 

884 PH0DE4 , 1 : FOR I -68T0 1 84STEP2 C L 
INE ( I , 0) - ( I , 18) , PRESET: NEXT 
886 FOR I -0TO308TEP2 : L I NE ( I , 93 ) - ( 
I , 97) , PRESET: LINE ( 1+224, 93) -( 1+2 
24 , 97 ) , PRESET : NE XT 
888 X«-INKEY«: IFX«->CHR«(13) THEN 
84 ELSE 888 




900 PM0DE3,1 

902 PCLSl: SCREEN 1,0 

904 FOR Y"l TO 255 

906 W»RND(2)+2:Q-RND(2)-1 

908 PM0DE3,5:PCLS1 

910 A«-"LeD12F408H8E4U36E12F12D3 

6F4G8H8E4U 1 2BUeU 1 0H8O 1 SRS " 

912 C*- " H 1 2U36E 1 2F 1 2e8H6D32E6F8G 

12" 

914 D»- " H8E4U36H4EeR 1 4FeD44G8L 1 4 



BU9BR4U42R5F4D3484L5" 

916 DRAW "02" 

918 ORAW"S8Bri42,90"+A« 

920 DRAW"BM90, 138"+C« 

922 DRAW"BH150, 138'*+D« 

924 DRAW "BM226, 138" +C« 

926 DRAW''Bni36,50L10O6R466R4G6Hl 

22 , 70L3M 1 30 , 60L3n 1 36 , 50S4 " 

928 POKE 1 78, Y 

930 PAINT (30,30) , ,2 

932 PAINT (90,24) , ,2 

934 PAINT (120, 54),, 2 

936 PAINT (150, 24),, 2 

938 PAINT (230, 24),, 2 

940 FOR U-1 TO 4:PC0PY U+4 TO U: 

NEXT U 

942 PMODE 3, l: SCREEN 1,Q 

944 X4-INKEY*: IF X««CHR*(13) THE 

N 84 

946 NEXT Y 

948 QOTO900 

950 PCLEAR8:G0T022 




126 109 618 190 

162 178 720 136 

306 249 754 122 

330 188 776 30 

428 50 END 23 



Listing 2: 

10 '»»»»»»»♦♦»»#•»»»»»»»»»♦»»»#» 
12 THE ROCK-FEST COLORING • 

14 »« BOOK VERSION 1.0 « 

16 '« BY FRED B. SCERBO * 

18 COPYRIGHT (C) 1984 » 

20 • ♦»»»»*»»»♦»»»»**»♦»»•»»**»»♦ 
22 CLS3 

24 PR I NTa66, "ROCK-FEST COLORING 
BOOK"! 

26 PRINT«132," A) THE ROLLING ST 
ONES "I 

28 PRINT«164," B) ASIA"+STRING«( 
15,32); 

30 PRINT«196," C) QUIET RIOT"+ST 
RING* (9, 32) I 

32 PRINTe22B, " D) Z Z TOP"+STRIN 
G«(12,32>$ 

34 PRINTa260," E) VAN HALEN"+STR 
ING«(10,32)| 

36 PRINT*292," F) YES"+STRING«(1 
6,32)1 

38 PRINT9324," G) 38 SPECIAL"+8T 
RING«(9,32} { 

40 PRINTa3S6," H) AC-DC"+STRING« 
(14,32)1 



106 III* RAINBOW May 1984 



* COLOR COMPUTER WORD PROCESSOR * 



EliteWord 

Also Available On OS-9 



THE SECOND GENERATION WORD PROCESSOR 
IS NOW . . . ELITE^WORD has many new features 
not found in other word processors for the Color 
Computer. ELITE^WORD is an all machine 
language, high performance, Full Screen Editor 

MAJOR Features include: 

• ALL Machine Language for speed • 

• Handsome Vinyl Binder • 

• Comprehensive Manual Included 

• User Friendly (really) 

• Top screen line reserved for • 
command prompts, HELP 
messages, and status information • 

• Two text entry modes: Insert and 
Exchange 

■ Edit 2 files simultaneously (OS-Q Only) • 

■ Delete character under cursor • 

■ Backspace and delete one 
character 

■ Delete entire screen line 

■ Rewrite entire screen • 

• Page Forward through text 

■ Page Backward through text 

■ Mark present line for automatic 
centering on output 

■ Insert new text (Insert mode) * 

■ Type over old text (Exchange mode) 

■ Screen Display is 32x19 in normal 
text editing modes 

■ Screen Display is High-Res 64x19 
when used to display final text; 
Including page breaks and 
justification 

■ Screen Display in all modes is true 
Upper/Lower case characters with 
descenders 

■ Over 13.5K file size in 32K 
machines 

■ Continuous memory display 

■ Save text file (disk or tape) 

■ Load text file (disk or tape) 

■ All I/O errors trapped and 
recoverable 

■ Jump to beginning or end of text 

■ Find any string of characters in text 

■ Global replacement of one string in 
text for another 



which offers an ease of use that is simply incredi- 
ble. ELITES WORD also offers a printed output flex- 
ibility that can handle your sophisticated home 
and business applications. ELITE^WORD is wait- 
ing to work for you. 



True block-text Move command 
Smooth cursor movement over 
text in any direction (including 
vertical) 

Smooth screen scroll for easier 
proof reading 

Auto Key-Repeat will auto- 
matically repeat any key that is 
held down 

Easy generation of ASCII files 
VIEW function permits high-res 
screen display of final text before 
it's printed; including right-side 
justification and page breaks 
VARIABLE TEXT MERGE allows 
for generation of standard form 
type letters that appear to be 
personally prepared for each 
reader 

INCLUDE feature (disk only) 
permits the inclusion of many 
other files within one large 
document. Total document will 
have sequential page numbering 

EXCELLENT FOR PROGRAM EDITING 
A ND WORD PROCESSING. 

THE BEST FOR ONLY 

Specify 

Tape $59.95 
RS Disk $59.95 
OS-9 Disk $79.95 
OS 9 & RS Disk $109.95 

- Shipping from stock NOW 

- Dealer Inquiries Invited. 
Add $2 Postage & Handling 
PA residents add 6% sales tax 



• Type ahead keyboard buffer 
NEVER misses a character 

• Optional screen display of all 
carriage returns <cr> 

• Fast Disk I/O . . . No loading of 
overlay files to slow program 
operation 

• User HELP display available 

• Automatic screen Word-Wrap; 
even while inserting new text 

■ Block-text move, copy or delete 

■ Display/Change default disk drive 
number (disk only) 

■ Display disk directory (disk only) 

• Display-Free disk space available 

■ Software remembers last file name 
Saved or Loaded and will write to 
that file by default if desired 

■ Dynamic margin changes within text 

■ Select Top margin, Bottom margin, 
and Page length 

■ Choose number of duplicate copies 

■ Page Pause, for single sheet users, 
if desired 

■ Optional page numbering begins 
with any selected page number 

■ Printer Font codes are user 
definable 

■ All printer format options may be 
changed dynamically within text 

■ Any string of HEX characters may 
be Imbedded within text to send any 
special control codes to your 
printer 

■ An Eject (top of form) command 
may be Inserted within text 

■ Variable Text Merge symbols may 
be inserted anywhere within text 

■ All machine language; 32K and 
Extended Basic required for ROM- ' 
call routines 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola. 



Box 1 1 224 • Pitt^Gijrqti. PA 1b^3e • (4^ 2} 79&-a492 



"I was more than satisfied with Elite«Word. Before I started the review, I thought that it would be just another 
program that would copy most of what others had done and add a few whistles and bells. After the review, I 
would not hesitate to compare it with the two best selling CoCo word processors. And my comparison places It 
at the top of the list." - A. Buddy Hogan, Rainbow 



42 X«-INKEY*:IFX*-''"THEN42 

44 X-A8C<X«)-64:IF X<1 THEN 42 E 

L8E IF X>e THEN42 

46 ON X OOTO 98,200,300,396,500, 

598,700,600 

48 ' 

50 • 

66 ' THE ROLLING STONES 

96 PH0DE4 , 1 : PCL8 1 : SCREEN 1,1: PNOO 

E3,l 

100 CIRCLE(110, 110),66,1,1.2,.07 
,.45 

102 CIRCLE < 122, 140), 72, 1,1.1,. 5, 
.73 

104 CIRCLE < 152, 150), 60, 1,1. 5,. 53 
,.7 

106 CIRCLE(154,152),5e, 1,1.4, .53 
,.76 

106 0RAW84C1BH96, 146DLDLU6BM154 
, 70R4E4R2F2R4F2R10E4H200, 74" 
110 FORI-0TO2: CIRCLE <236+I, 150), 
72, 1,1.3, .5,.67:NEXT I 
1 12 DRAW"BM130, 66L4HLHLHLUHUL602 
BD 1 0BL6e22D2Q2DQDQDLDLD2LD4L2D 1 6 
F2R2FR2E2U2E2U16EUEUEU2EU2M106, 7 
4" 

114 DRAW"BM164,62NL4820" 

116 CIRCLE(198, 160),66, 1,1.3, .57 

p ■ 68 

lie DRAW " BM 1 1 8 , 1 36D6F2R8E2U4E2U4 

E2U4E2U6E2U6E2U4E4 " 

120 ORAW"Blie6,74H10L2H4L2U6E4R2E 

4R2E2R2E2R2E2R2E4 " 

122 CIRCLE (134, 72), 44, 1,1. 8,. 58, 

.86 

124 CIRCLE(160,20),24, 1,.9, .6,.9 
6 

126 CIRCLE<240,0),40, 1,1.1,.3,.4 
4 

128 CIRCLE (230, 56), 22, 1,. 7,. 75, . 

2 

130 CIRCLE (255, 152) ,60, 1, 1.5,. 55 
,.72 

132 CIRCLE(170,104),34,l,1.4,.l, 
.25 

134 CIRCLE(130,60),32, 1,.7,.6, .9 
136 CIRCLE (162, 56) ,24, 1, .7, .65, . 
95 

1 36 DRAW " BM 1 66 , 4663L4H2BL50Q8L2e 

2L2Q2L2F6BR 1 22BH 1 6F2R2F2R2F2R2F2 

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140 CIRCLE ( 160, 20) , 16, 1 , . 6, . 4, . 1 

142 CIRCLE(134,16),19, 1,.6, .4,.l 

144 DRAW " BM 1 24 , 24R4E2R2E2R4F2R2F 

2R2BR24BD2R2E2R2E2R6F2R6 

146 CIRCLE(170,44),24, 1,.9, .12,. 

4 

148 CIRCLE(132,44),2S, 1,.9,.12,. 
4 

150 CIRCLE(104,54),10, 1,.9, .1,.4 



5 

152 CIRCLE(200,44),20, 1,1.3, .13, 
.4 

154 PAINT (130, 66), 1,1 

156 PM0DE4, 1 : DRAW"C0BM161 , 152NL3 

NR3D6BR6U6F4E4D6" : PM0DE3, 1 

1 56 DRAW " BM22 , 2C 1 R4ND6R4BR4D6U4R 

6U4NDeBR6NR6D4NR4D4R6BL60BD6 '* 

160 DRAW"ND6R6D4L6R2F4BR6U6R6D6N 

L6BR6NU6R6BR6NU6R6BR6NU6BR6U6F6N 

U6BR6U6R6ND2L6D6R6U4L4 " 

162 DRAW"BD16BL66R6U4L6U4R6BR4R4 

ND6R4BR4D6R6U6NL6BR6ND6F6U6BR6NR 

6D4NR4D4R6BR6R6U4L6U4R6 " 

164 X«-INKEY«:IFX«-CHR«(13)THEN 

26 ELSE 164 

166 ' 

166 ' 

198 'A8IA 

200 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCL81 : 8CREEN1 , 1 : PHO 
DE3, 1 

202 DRAW"S4C1BM30, 120E48F46L16H1 
2L3eQ12L16M24, 122E54ND4F54L2UL3U 
DR3DR2L24ER2E6L26H 1 2NE2L34NH28 1 2 
NH2L24BR46NR40E 1 2F3R 1 1 F2L 1 4H207R 
26" 204 DRAW"BF2BR10R15H6NR14H2R 
12H44R34E4F 14L22F44NL30L2UL2UL2N 
L26H44FR2FNR2HL2HR22FR2FHL2H9NU4 
62L30HLRF45LHLHL 1 4E6D4NG2U4BE 1 0E 
8D4NQ5ND 1 1 U22E 1 0F 1 0D52H4U46NR2H6 
NU4G6NL2D36" 

206 DRAW"U22BE16E3D4NG3U4F55L22H 
1 2L24U2R26Ne2F 1 2Ne2R 1 3NH46RFR " 
206 LINE (0,46) -(256, 146), PRESET, 
B 

210 X««INKEY«: IFX«-CHR« ( 13) THEN 
26 ELSE 210 
212 ' 
214 ' 

300 ' QUIET RIOT 

302 PM0DE4, 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREENl , 1 : PMO 
DE3, 1 

304 DRAW "CI" 

306 DRAW"S4BM20, 1066D40F6R22F6R2 
0H 1 6U40H6NL26BL6BD 1 4D26L 1 0U28R 1 0 
BU14BR26" 

306 DRAW"D46FeR30E6U48L16D40L10U 
40L 1 8BR56D56R 1 6U56NL 1 6BR 1 0D56R40 
U 1 4L20U6R20U 1 2L20U6R20U 1 4L40 " 
310 DRAW"BR46D14R16D42R20U42R16U 
14L52" 

312 DRAW"BD72BL156D56R18U22F10D1 
2R 1 8U22H6EeU 1 0H6L38R 1 6BD 1 4DeR6Ue 
L6BU 1 4BR3eD56R 1 6U56NL 1 6BR2088D40 
F8R30E6U40H8L30R 1 0BD42R 1 0U26L 1 0D 
28BU42" 

314 DRAW"BR36D14R16D42R20U42R16U 
14L52" 

316 PM0DE4, 1 : SCREENl , 1 : PM0DE3, 1 
316 DRAW"BM26, 170C1U13F6E6ND13BR 



lli' the RAINBOW May 1964 



* COLOR COMPUTER WORKSHEET * 



EliteCalc 



M 



NOW . . . The worksheet calculator program you've 
been waiting for is waiting Jo work for you. 
ELITE9CALC is a powerful, full featured worksheet 
calculator designed especially for the Color Com- 
puter. Answer "what if" questions, prepare reports. 



maintain records and perform other tasks that, until 
now. required sophisticated business computers, 
ELITE*CALC ' is a serious tool for those who want to 
do more than play games with their Color Computer, 



Features include: 

■ Single character commands 

■ Help Displays 

• Enter text or formulas to 255 
characters long 

■ Repeat text entries 

■ 255 maximum rows 

■ 255 maximum columns 

■ Available memory always displayed 

■ Rapid Entry modes for text and 
data 

• Selectable Automatic Cursor 
movement 

■ Insert, Delete, Move entire rows of 
columns 

■ Replicate one cell to fill a row or 
column with selectable formula 
adjustment 

• All machine language for speed 

■ Extended BASIC required for ROM 
routine calls 

■ Automatic memory size detection 
for 16K. 32K or 64K 

• > 20K bytes, storage available in 
32K systems 

• BASIC style formulas 

■ Math Operators: +,-.X./, !.(,).« 

■ Relation Operators: 
= > <,< =,> > 

■ Logic Operations: AND, OR, NOT 

■ Conditional Formula: IF . . . 
THEN ELSE 

■ Trig Functions: SIN. COS. TAN. 
ATN 



EASY TO USE 

INDIVIDUAL CELL FORMULAS 
COPY BLOCKS OF CELLS 
FULL CELL-EDIT CAPABI LITY 
COMPATIBLE WITH ALL PRINTERS 
EASY 132 COLUMN PAGE WIDTH 
CHANGEABLE BAUD RATES 
GRAPH FORMAT FOR BAR CHARTS 
SORT IN ASCENDING OR DESCENDING 
ORDER 

COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL INCLUDED 
NATIONWIDE USER GROUP 
HANDSOME VINYL BINDER 

THE BEST FOR ONLY 

$5995 

Specify: Disk Of Tape 

— Shipping from stock NOW 

— Dealer Inquiries Invited. 
Add $2 Postage & Handling 
PA residents add 6% sales tax 



Log Functions: LOG, EXP, SQR. 
Misc, Functions: INT, FX, ABS. 
SGN. 

Range Functions: SUM, AVERAGE. 
COUNT, MIN. MAX. LOOKUP 
Nine digit precision 
Definable constant table 
User definable printer set-up 
commands 

Individual column width settings 
Adjustable row height to insert 
blank lines without wasting 
memory 

Hide columns or rows 

Alternate print font selectable on 

cell by cell basis 

Display/Print formats set by cell. 

row, or column 

Dollar format, comma grouping; 

prefix or postfix sign 

Scientific notation, fixed point and 

integer formats 

Left and Right cell contents 

justification 

Full page formatting 

All formats stored with worksheet 

on disk(tape) 

Save & Load Disk(tape) files in 
compact memory form 
Scan disk directories 
Output ASCtt file for word 
processor input compatibility 
Memory resident code ... no 
repeated disk calls 

Sample worksheets included 



Box 11 224 • Pittsburgh, PA 15238 • (412)795-8492 



''Effte * Cafe /s a gre^t spread- 
i/rutf f program I Tfjfs profes- 
siona/ quafity program has the 
performance r^uir^ for seri- 
ous home appfications as well 
as small tnisine^ss^s. " 

Sttmt Hawkinson, Rainbow 



"Truly ofte of the best 
programs I have seen. " 

John Steiner, Micro 



"Elite* Calc is an ex- 
tremely powerful work- 
sheet ..." 

Jack Lane, Color Micro Journaf 



"Sraee Cook's Elitie ' Cat 
is a very fim p/*£j^r.ifri m- 
deed; potentialiy of 
tf»e f?fi?jf Color Cofftf^umr 
Rrogratns. " . , . a wry 
imppessive prmtuct " 

Scott !\lornm^,. Not CoCo 



8NR 1 0DNR 1 0D5NReDNR8DSNR 1 0DR 1 0BU 1 
3BR6R 1 4DL7ND 1 2L7 " 

320 DRAW"BD12BR20U13R10DNL10DSNL 
1 0ONL 1 0D6BR8NU 1 3UNR 1 0DR 1 0 
322 DRAW*'BR16U13D6NR8DR10U7D13BR 
8U 1 3NR 1 0DNR 1 0DSNR8DNR8DSNR 1 0DR 1 0 

•I 

324 DRAW " BR8U 1 3NR8DNR8DSNR 1 0DR 1 0 
U7D 1 3BR8NU 1 3UNR 1 0DR 1 0BR2BU 1 3R 1 4D 
L7ND 1 2L7BR20UD 1 3U7NR 1 0DR 1 0U7D 1 3 
326 DRAW''BM26, 192R200DL200BD22R2 
00DL200" 

328 X»-INKEY»:IF X*-CHR»<13> THE 

N 26 ELSE 328 
330 ' 
332 * 

398 'ZZTOP 

400 PM0DE4, 1 : PCL81 : SCREEN 1 , 1 : PMO 
DE3, 1 

402 DRAW " S4C 1 BM0 , 0R 1 00G36L22E30G 

4L90NU4R90E4L90U 1 0R 1 00644R200U6N 

L 1 66U6L 1 60NG6E26L24 " 

404 DRAW » BR30BD8e6R 1 068R 1 0E8R8E6 

NL26BR8R28Q 1 4L28E 1 4R 1 0BG4R8G6L8E 

6BH4BR34R28G 1 0L 1 6G4L 1 0E 1 4BF4R8Q2 

L8E2'' 

406 FOR I -0TO20STEP4 : L I NE ( 1 28- I , 1 
00) -< 128-1, 170-1 /2>,PSET: LINE < 12 
8-t-I,100)-(128-i-I, 170-1 /2),PSET:NE 
XT 

408 CIRCLE < 128, 102), 30,1,. 3,. S7, 
.92 

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.42 

412 DRAW "Bill 02, 100DS6BR52U58 
414 P0KE178,43:PAINT<128,98),,1 
416 PH0DE3 , 1 : FORY-0TO88STEP88 : FO 
RI-0TO2:CIRCLE(84-i-Y, 120), 18-1, 1, 

.9:nexti,y 

418 PriODE3, 1 

420 DRAW"C1BM88, 106U22E6R66F6D22 
BL4BU 1 2U8H6L58G6D8E4R60F4H4L20E4 
L30G4 

422 CIRCLE (44, 148), 36, 1,. 9,. 4,. 9 
:CIRCLE <212, 148) , 36, 1 , . 9, . 62, 1 . 1 
424 CIRCLE <60, 192), 34, 1,.S, .67,. 
9 

426 CIRCLE ( 194, 192) , S4, 1 , . S, . 62, 
.87 

428 DRAW''BM20, 168F2R6BD4BR74F4R4 
4E4BU4BR70R 1 2E4 " 

430 DRAW"BM20, 126C1U90R40BR170BD 
8D80" 

432 PH0DE4, 1:F0RI-1T012: CIRCLE (7 

0,0),S6-«-I,0,1.9, .23, ( <38-i-I)/100) 

: CIRCLE (186,0), 36-1-1,0, 1.9, ( (30- ( 

38-i-I ) ) / 100) , . 23: NEXT 

434 SR«-"C0NE20NH20NU5NR5NL3ND5N 

Q20NF20" 

436 DRAW"BM150, 160"-i^R« 



438 DRAW " BM7S, 108" -(-SR* 

440 LINE (0,0) -(233, 192), P8ET,B 

442 DRAW"BM128, 130C1NH22NE22BD16 

NH20NE20" 

444 X«-INKEY«:IF X««CHR«(13) THE 
N 26 ELSE 444 
446 ' 
448 ' 

498 ' VAN HALEN 
300 PM0DE4, 1 : PCLSl : SCREEN 1 , 1 
302 DRAW"C0BH1 1 2, 66M90, 32M8, 32M1 
4, 40M78, 40M82, 46M20, 46M26, 34M86, 
34M90, 60M32, 60M38, 68M94, 68M1 12,9 
4H150, 32M104, 32ni 10, 40ni26, 40M1 1 
2 66" 

304 DRAW " BM230 , 60M 1 82 , 60M 1 86 , 34M 
236, 34M242, 46M190, 46M194, 40M248, 
40H234, 32ni84, 32M166, 60M134, 60ril 
66,40H172,40H177,32H13e,32H116, 1 
00M124, 110H130,68M162,68M132, 118 
M140, 128M176,68M224,68M230,60" 
306 DRAW " BHl 4 , 40M30 , 46BM26 , 34H42 
, 60BM38 , 68M54 , 74M96 , 74BM 112, 93M 1 
16, 96BM90, 32M104, 40M1 16, 38BH130, 
32M134,33" 

308 DRAW"BM177,32M182,36BM172,40 
M177, 44BM166, 40M172, 44NR4M161 , 60 
BM236, 34M220, 60BM248, 40M232, 46BM 
224, 68M208, 74M184, 74M176p68H184, 
74M150, 132M140, 128" 
310 DRAW"BM124,110ril30, 112M134,7 
4NR4M 1 49 , 68BM 1 86 , 54H 1 94 , 60BM 1 94 , 
40M202, 46BM1 10, 40M120, 44R4" 
512 X»-INKEY«: IFX«»CHR* ( 13)THEN 
26 ELSE 512 
314 ' 
516 ' 
598 ' YES 

600 PM0DE4, 1 : PCLSl : SCREEN 1 , 1 

602 DRAW " S4BHe6 , 30C0U 1 0H 1 0R8F6E6 

R8e 1 0D 1 0L8BR30U20R20D4L 1 4D4R 1 4D4 

L 1 4D4R 1 4D4NL20BR 1 8R20U 1 2L 1 6U4R 1 6 

U4L20D 1 2R 1 6D4L 1 6D4 " 

604 CIRCLE (128,96) ,60,0, .6 

606 DRAW " BM 1 28 , 96C0ND34M 1 69 , 7 1 BM 

128,96M87,71" 

608 CIRCLE (128, 96), 82,0, .6,. 85,. 
67 

610 DRAW"BM128,96BH30Hlfn-4F10BMl 
26, 96BE30E10R4Q10" 

612 LINE (116, 144) -(140, 176) ,PSET 
,B 

614 COLOR 1,0 

616 LINE (117, 143) -(139, 146) ,PSET 
,BF 

618 LINE(126, 131)-(130, 188),PRES 
ET,B 

620 LINE(127,132)-<129, 187),PSET 
,BF 

622 LINE (26, 93) -(68, 97), PRESET, B 



110 lh« RAINBOW May 1984 



★ COLOR COMPUTER DATA BASE MANAGER ★ 



Elite-File 




THIS IS IT! ELITE^FILE is the full- featured, all machine 
language. Data Base Manager, that Color Computer 
usersi have been waiting for From the same author that 
brought you ELITE*CALC, ELITE^FILE is for everyone who 
needs to store and recall information. You specify what to 
store.' and what to retrieve. ELITE*FILE gives you total 
flexibility. ELITE*FILE is a relational Data Base Manager 



with all the editing and repeat formatting features that 
are typically found only on much larger computer 
systems, but priced for Color Computer users. It's "user 
friendly" command structure makes it simple to use even 
for those who don't write computer programs, ELITE^FILE 
is waiting to work for you 



Features include: 

■ Compatible with ELITE»CALC and 
ELITE^WORD ASCII files 

■ User friendly combination of Menu 
driven input and single key commands 

■ Up to 255 named fields per record 

■ Up to 255 characters per field 

■ Up to 2000 characters per record 

■ Up to 4000 records per file 

■ Sijjpports multiple drives 

■ Nested subfield definitions 

■ Up to eight fields in primary key 

• Copy record definition from file to file 

■ View record definition 

■ Input records with easy to use field 
. |name format display 

• Edit records with full screen "type over" 
editor 

■ Copy records to repeat identical data 

■ Scan mode for quick data retrieval 

■ Locate any record by field contents 

■ Load ELITE»CALC spread sheets into 
random access data files 

■ User setable print formats 

■ TAB. VTAB. CR. PAGE, text, hex print 
controls 

■ Join up to four subfile records to extend 
Idata record for print 

■ 'Create "Variable Text Insert" files for 
ELITE^WORD 

■ Produce repetitive reports with Retrieval 
Programs written on ELI !£• WORD 

■ Refile data into new record structures 



★ ALL MACHINE LANGUAGE 

★ FLEXIBLE, USER DEFINED DATA 
RECORD STRUCTURES 

★ 1 6 FILES CAN BE HANDLED AT THE 
SAME TIME FOR 64K RECORD 
CAPACITY! 

★ EDIT, SCAN, SORT. SELECT 
RECORDS 

★ OUTPUT REPORTS TO SCREEN, 
PRINTER. OR ASCII DISK FILE 

★ PLACE DATA BY FIELD NAME, WITH 
CUSTOM TEXT, ANYWHERE ON THE 
PRINTED PAGE 

★ COMPATIBLE WITH ALL PRINTERS 

★ COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL 

★ HANDSOME VINYL BINDER 

THE BEST FOR ONLY 



so 



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I Thousands of applications: 
—Mailing List 
— Inventory 

—Record Collection Index 
—Phone Number Reference 
—Order Entry/Invoice 
—Expense Records 
—Recipe Files 
—Study Note Retrieval 
—Customer Files 
—Check Book Register 
—Library Catalog 
—Appointment Calendar 
—Yours 

I Data, field definitions, indices stored on 
a single file 

I List disk directories, change default 
drive and "kill" files without leaving 
ELITE^FILE 

I Memory resident, no program overlays 
from disk 

Minimum 32K. Disk Basic required 
Single program performs all features 
Data files accessible from BASIC 
programs 

I Project any subset of fields in any order 
for the printed output 

> Select specific records by field content 
with full logic combination capabilities 

I Sort records in ascending or descending 
order by any field 

> Calculate values from combinations of 
field contents 

I Math operators: — , *, /, (. ) 
I Display or print column totals 



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624 LINE(28,96)-<66,96) fPSET 
626 LINE <230,9S)-< 188, 97), PRESET 
,B 

628 LINE(228,96)-(190,96) ,PSET 
630 X««INKEY«:IF X«-CHR«(13) THE 
N 26 ELSE 630 
632 ' 
634 ' 

698 '38 SPECIAL 

700 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 

702 CIRCLE (128,96) ,94,0, .85 

704 CIRCLE (128, 96), 90,0, .85 

706 PAINT (128, 18), 0,0 

708 DRAW " C 1 BM40 , 1 20NF 1 4DNF 1 4DNF 1 

4DNF 1 4DNF 1 4C0BU 1 0F 1 4U 1 0F4D 1 6H 1 4 " 

710 PAINT (50, 126) ,0,0 

712 COLOR0, 1:FORI-64TO140:LINE(2 

00, I) -(230, 1+12) , PRESET: NEXT 

714 LINE ( 10,24) -(1 10,80) , PRESET, 

BF 

716 PM0DE3, 1 : FORI-0TO3: CIRCLE ( 12 
8,96-1) ,94+1,1,. 85, .6, .67: NEXT 
718 DRAW "CI BM50 , 50E 1 6LE 1 0D2NG 1 0D 
NO 1 0DNO 1 0DNG 1 0U4NReDNReDNR8DNR8D 
R8NE8UNE8UNE8Bn50 , 50NDeL2D8BD4BR 
4E6D6LNU6LNU4LNU2D2 " 
720 DRAW " BR8BU4E4RNG4RD3R4NE6RE6 
U3" 

722 F0RI-1T05:PM0DE3, l: CIRCLE (12 
e, 96) , 66+1 , 1 , . 85, . 53, . 6: CIRCLE ( 1 
28,96) ,76+1, 1, .85, .54, .55: NEXT 
724 M«""C1R4DNL6R6DDNL4R12UR6UR4 
726 DRAW"BH90, 30»+M«+"BM90, 31 "+M 
« 

728 DRAW " BM96 , 40 " +M»+ " BM96 , 4 1 " +M 
« 

730 DRAW'Sm 10, 50"+M«+"BMl 10, 51 " 
+M» 

732 DRAW " BM 1 1 4 , 60 " +M*+ " BM 1 1 4 , 6 I " 
+M» 

734 DRAW " BM 1 1 2 , 70 +M»+ " BM 1 1 2 , 7 1 " 
+M« 

736 DRAW " BM 1 06 , 82U4RD4RU4ED4EU4 " 
738 DRAW " BM72 , 40E2RG2RE2D2 " 
740 DRAW " BM4B , 94NF 1 6RNF 1 6RNF 1 6RN 
F 1 6RF 1 6NL4DNL3R4DNL5R2NU6RNU6RNU 
6" 

742 FORI=93TO95:CIRCLE(106, I) ,40 
, 1, .5, .2, .4:nexti 

744 FORI«103TO106:CIRCLE(148, I) , 

20, 1, 1. 1, .2, .48:NEXTI 

746 FORI-128TO131:CIRCLE(170,I) , 

20, 1, .4, .6, .95:NEXTI 

748 FGRI«122T0124:CIRCLE(199, I) , 

20, 1, .4, . 1, .38:NEXTI 

750 DRAW"BM204, 134NF10RNF10RNF10 

RF 1 0NR 1 0UNR 1 0UR 1 0NH8RNH8RNH8RH8B 

L6BU4NR8UNR8UNR8UR8NH5UNH5UNH5 " 

752 FOR I -92T094 : C I RCLE ( 1 27 , I ) , 30 

, 1, .4, .6, .9: CIRCLE (164, 1+8) ,26, 1 



, .8, .65, .65: CIRCLE (190, 1+4) ,26, 1 
I ■ 6p ■ 67 y • 85 

754 CIRCLE(190, I+14),30, 1,.6, .7, 
.9: CIRCLE (178, 1+50) , 30, 1 , 1 . 8, . 75 
, .9: CIRCLE (180, 1+53) ,30, 1, 1.8, .7 
5, .9:NEXTI 

756 DRAW " BM204 , 1 1 8NR6DR6DL4R6DL4 
R6BM204 , 84NESRNE5RNE5RNE5BR4BD2N 
E5RNE5RNE5RNE5BD2BL4F4R4E4DG4L4H 
4DF4R4E4" 

758 F0RI-1T03: CIRCLE (170, 72+1 ),1 
7, 1, .6, .5, .99: CIRCLE (150, 48+1) , 1 
7, 1,.6,.6, 1. 1:CIRCLE(177,58+I),1 
7, 1, .6, .7, .99:NEXT 
760 PM0DE3, 1 

762 FORY-0TO 1 76STEP 1 76 : FOR I »0TO 1 
0STEP10: LINE ( 10+1 , Y+7-I/10) - (245 
- I , Y+7+ 1/10), PRESET , BF : NEXT I , Y 
764 FOR I -84T087 : I ♦■STR» ( I ) 
766 DRAW " BM " + I ♦+ " , 1 46S5C 1 U4H3U3B 
R6BDU3H2BD 1 6BR 1 0U4H2U4E4BR6BD6F2 
D8BU 1 2U4E3BU2BR4F4D2G2BD2BR4G4D2 
BD4BR3ND4E7U4BR6NE3D3BR8ND6BR6E4 
U2BR4BD6D4G2D4BL 1 8BD4U6S4 » 
768 NEXT I 

770 PM0DE4, 1 : COLOR0, 1 

772 LINE (10, 96) -(28, 96) ,PSET: LIN 

E(20,95)-(28,97) ,PSET,BF 

774 LINE(245,96)-(225,96) ,PSET:L 

INE (225, 95) -(235, 97) ,PSET,BF 

776 LINE(68, 18) -(185,0), PRESET, B 

F 

778 PM0DE3,1 

780 DRAW"BM74, 12C1R6U4NL4U4NL6BR 
6D8R6U4NL6U4NL6BR 1 4NR6D4R6D4NL6B 
R6U8R6D4L6D4BR 1 2NR6U4NR6U4R6BR6N 
R6D8R6BR6NU8BR6U8R6D4NL6D4BR6NU8 
R6" 

782 X«»»INKEY«: IFX«"CHR«(13) THEN 

26 ELSE 782 
784 ' 
786 ' 

798 ' AC-DC 

800 PM0DE4, 1 : PCLSl : SCREEN 1 , 1 
802 PM0DE3,1 

804 A««"L8D12F408H8E4U36E12F12D3 
6F408H8E4U 1 2BUeU 1 0H8D 1 8R8 " 

806 C«»"H12U36E12F12G8H6D32E6F8G 
12" 

805 D«« H8E4U36H4E8R 1 4F8D44G8L 1 4 
BU9BR4U42R5F4D34G4L5" | 
810 DRAW "CI S8BM42 , 90 " +A« 

812 DRAW"BM90, 138"+C* 

814 DRAW"BM150, 138"+D« 

816 DRAW"BM226, 138"+C« 

818 DRAW » BM 1 36 , 50L 1 0O6R4G6R4G6M 1 

22 , 70L3M 1 30 , 60L3M 1 36 , 50S4 " 

820 X«»INKEY*:1F X«<«CHR«(13) THE 

N 26 ELSE 820 





112 the RAINBOW May 1984 




Creating Random 
Name Files 



By Bob Albrecht & George Firedrake 
Rainbow Contributing Editors 



This time, we present a program you can use to make a 
file of random names, using any consonant-vowel 
structure you choose. When you run the program, 
first you see briefly: 



r 



NAMES TO TAPE 



This is on-screen momentarily while the CoCo is opening 
a cassette file for output. Of course, you first position a 
cassette in the tape recorder and press the [PLAY] and 
[RECORD] buttons — before typing RUN. Next you see: 



r 



NAME STRUCTURE? I 



Typea C-V (consonant-vowel) structureand press [ENTER]. 
Here is what happened when we did it. 




NAME STRUCTURE? CVCVC 
GODAK 



TO SAVE NAME, PRESS "S'' 
FOR ANOTHER NAME, PRESS SPACE 
FOR NEW STRUCTURE, PRESS "N" 
TO CLOSE FILE, PRESS "C^ 



You now have four options. Do you want to save the 
name GODAK on tape? If so, press the "S" key. Want 
another name using the same C-V structure? Press the 
[SPACE BAR]. Want to try a new name structure siich as 



(Bob Albrecht and George Firedrake are two of the 
most prolijic authors in the microcomputer world 
today. Specialists in writing for beginners, they are 
authors of numerous books, including TRS-SO Color 
BASIC.) 



CVCV or VCCVCV? Press the "N" key, then enter the new 
name structure. When you have all the names you want to 
save, press the "C" key and the CoCo will close the file. 



Y — 

1500. 


241 


END, 


4 



The listing: 

1000 REn**NAMES TO TAPE GMA 17-1 
1010 CLS: PRINT "NAMES TO TAPE" 
1020 OPEN "O", -1, "NAMES" 
1100 REM**6ET NAME STRUCTURE NS« 
1110 CLS 

1120 INPUT "NAME STRUCTURE"! N9» 

1200 REM»»MAKE « PRINT NAME« 

1210 GOSUB 1710 

1220 PRINT 064, NAME« 

1300 REM«»REM»»TELL OPTIONS 

1310 PRINT 8384, "TO SAVE NAME, 

PRESS 'S'" 

1320 PRINT "FOR ANOTHER NAME, PR 
ESS SPACE" 
1330 PRINT 
RESS 'N'" 
1340 PRINT 
'C "J 

1400 REM»QET RESPONSE & DO IT 
1410 KY«-INKEY«: IF KY*-"" THEN 1 
410 

1420 IF KY«="S" THEN 1510 

1430 IF KY«-" " THEN 1210 

1440 IF KY*-"N" THEN 1110 

1450 IF KY1>«"C» THEN 1610 ELSE 1 

310 

1500 REM**PUT IN CASSETTE BUFFER 
1510 PRINT #-1, NAME* 



•FOR NEW STRUCTURE, P 
'TO CLOSE FILE, PRESS 



May 1984 th« RAINBOW 113 



1520 PRINT ei28, "SAVING " NAME* 

1S30 FOR KK-1 TO 2000: NEXT KK 

1540 PRINT ai28, CHR«(30) 

1550 80T0 1310 

1600 REM*»CL08E THE FILE 

1610 CLOSE -1 

1620 CL8 

1630 PRINT "THE FILE IS CLOSED" 
1640 STOP 

1700 REM«*MAKE A NAME SUBR. 

1710 NAME* - »" 

1720 FOR KK-1 TO LEN(NS«> 

1730 : CV« « MID«(NS«, KK, 1> 

1740 : IF CV»-"C" THEN QOSUB 181 

0 

1750 : IF CV»-"V» THEN QOSUB 191 
0 

1760 NEXT KK 
1770 RETURN 

1800 REM** ADD A CONSONANT SUBR. 

1810 Cf«"BCDFeHJKLMNPQRSTVWXYZ" 

1820 RC - RND(21> 

1830 RC« - MID«(C«, RC, 1> 

1840 NAME* « NAME« -i- RC« 

1850 RETURN 

1900 REM** ADD A VOWEL SUBR. 

1910 V«»"AEIOUY" 

1920 RV - RND(6) 

1930 RV« « MID«(V«, RV, 1) 



1940 NAME* ' 
1950 RETURN 
1999 END 



NAME« RV« 



Here is a block-by-block description of the program. 

Block 1000 briefly prints NAMES TO TAPE on the 
screen and opens a cassette file for output. The file is 
called NAM ES. If you are using Color basic, change line 
1020 to: 

1020 OPEN "O", "NAMES" 

You may wish to rewrite block 1 000 to include directions 
telling the user to position a cassette and press the 
[RECORD] and [PLAY] buttons on the tape recorder. 
See our SCAN CHARACTER FILE program in the 
March 1984 issue of the Rainbow. 
Block 1100 asks for the NAME STRUCTURE (conson- 
ant-vowel structure) and assigns it to the variable NS$. 
Block 1200 calls a subroutine to make one name and 
prints the name at screen position 64. 
Block 1300 prints the four options on the bottom four 
lines of the screen. Rememberto include the semicolonat 
the end of line 1340. Without it, the screen will scroll. 
Block 1400 looks for a single key response (S, space, N or 
C). All other keys are ignored. If you press one of the four 
keys, the CoCo moves on to the appropriate block; if you 
press any other key (except [BREAK]), it simply repeats 
its request because of the ELSE 1310 in line 1450. 
Block 1500 writes the value of NAMES to the cassette 
buffer. It also puts a message on the screen at screen 



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Speeding your reading takes dedicated effort. With this 
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All programs on cassette tape for 16K Color Computer. 
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(502) 228-4492 

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114 the RAINBOW May 1984 



position 128 telling you it is saving the name. Line 1540 
clears this message from the screen. CHR$(30) means 
''Clear to the end of this line." After saving the name, 
block 1500 sends the CoCo back to block 1300 to get 
another user response. 

Block 1600 closes the cassette file. If you are using Color 
BASIC, change line 1610 to: 1610 CLOSE #-1. 
Block 1700 is a subroutine to make a name and assign it 
as the value of NAMES. First, NAMES is set equal to the 
empty string Then, the FOR , , . yV£A^rioop scans 
the name structure (NS$) letter by letter, looking for the 
letters C or V. Each time it finds the letter C, it calls the 
ADD A CONSONANT subroutine. Whenever it finds 
the letter V, it calls the ADD A VOWEL subroutine. 
Letters other than C or V are ignored. 
Block 1800 is a subroutine to add a consonant to 
NAMES. Lines 1820 and 1830 select a random consonant 
from the string C$. Line 1 840 appends the new consonant 
to the right end of NAMES. 

Block 1900 is a subroutine to add a vowel to NAMES. 
Lines 1920 and 1930 select a random vowel from the 
string VS. Line 1940 appends the new vowel to the right 
end of NAMES. Note that we include the letter Y as a 
vowel. Thus, names such as KOMYN or DYMAX are 
possibk. 

We leave to you the task of writing a program to read and 
display names from the cassette file of random names — 
well, "selected" random names — selected by you. You can 
do this in many ways. 

• Read one name and display it. Press [SPACE BAR] to 
get another name. 

• Read and display several names. Press [SPACE BAR] 
to get another bunch of names. 

• Read only names having a specified name structure. 
For example, read only names with the structure 

cvcvc. 

Since we have no reader response to our cassette file 
tutorials and programs, we assume you people out there are 
not much interested in cassette files. So, next time we will 
move on and begin a slow tutorial sequence on disk files. 

TAIPAN: Your Own Contextual Computer Game 

In the early days of the TRS-80 Model 1, we were privi- 
leged to play a simulation game called Taipan, written by 
Art Canfil. Taipan easily makes the top ten of all computer 
games we have played in the last 29 years. 

So, a few months ago, we begged, implored, and down- 
right coerced Art to write a book showing people how to 
write contextual computer games, using Taipan as the 
model. Art agreed and began writing the book, with the help 
of two high school students, Jim McClenahan (Dragon- 
Kong)'dx\6 Karl Albrecht (DragonNewt). As Art puts it, "To 
the Dragon, who dragged us and dragooned us until we 
wrote this book. And to Elder Brother Wu, as a representa- 
tive of financial realities. If the Dragon was the carrot, Wu 
was the stick . . 

What is a contextual computer game? The authors say, 
"Home computers make possible a type of electronic game 
which is less based on exercising the reflexive speed of a 
person's brain stem than upon exercising the wonderful gray 
matter with which humans think. Some of the best of such 
games are those in which a complex environment is simu- 
lated by the program, and the player interacts in a 'lifelike' 



manner with that game environment. We call these complex 
environmental computer simulation games contextual com- 
puter games.'' 

The first book will be our favorite computer, the CoCo. It 
will then be paraphrased for other computers: Commodore 
64, IBM PC/r, possibly the Apple. TAIPAN: Your Own 
Contextual Computer Game is intended to give the CoCo 
user three things: 

1) an understanding of some fundamental principles of 
game design; 

2) an historical understanding of a particular game con- 
text (in this case, the turbulent China trade of the 
1800s); 

3) a step-by-step approach to actually writing a game in 
BASIC using points 1 and 2 above, including the actual 
program lines needed to provide a complete contex- 
tual computer game. 

The authors hope that this book will provide the reader, 
not only with an enjoyable game providing many hours of 
entertainment, but that the reader will become interested in 
the game's historical background as well. And hopefully, the 
reader will be inspired to design original games based upon 
other historical or fantasy contexts. 

Next time. Art Canfil will join "GameMaster's Appren- 
tice"and we will include excerpts from his book-in-progress. 
May you live in interesting times. 




FANTASY ROLE PLAYING GAMES 

IkfHiitmk of young peopfe. and many mft'So-yoimg. ate playing fantasy rote pbtying 
games, A role playing game is a game in which one or more phytrx trrate and ixm^wi 
<iHiratfers(a(/l\vniufieh}wHo ih*efheiriHwginory Hves inaspetiaily made game wotid. 
The gani<e M^orid k created, imnoged, mid operated hy a GameMaster (GMX ^dMo 
caHfd a rejieree, adx'eniure master, or dungeon master (DMy. 

Mostpeofrle whopiay rote phyhg gumek uxea formal ruir system. Sitme <ff the hm 
kaowntire sho^i*ti helow^ 

Champions. From Hero Games, 92 A 21^* Avenue, San Maieo, CA 

Dungeons A Drajgons (DAD). From TSR, P.O. Box 756, Lake Geneva, Wl 
^5147. 

RuneQuest (RQ). From OwMtum, P,0, Box 6302, Albany, CA 94706. 

Tunnels & Trolls (T&T), From Biade, BtKX 1467, Siotisdale, AZiiS252. 

Worlds of Wonder (WOW). From Chaosium, P.O. Bo.x6J02, AHnmy, CA 
94706. 

Most programs in "Oitme Meter's Apprentice "are based on the game system used 
in HuneQuesit Worlds of Wander, and Adventurer 's Handbook. If you are a beginner^ 
we suggest you try ihe foffowHig hook.i. 

Advemurer*s Handbook: A Guide to Roie Playing Games hy Boh Alhreiht A 
Greg Stafford. 

Thrmigh Dungeons Deep hy Robert Plauwndon. 

B{}th are available from Reston Publishing Company, 11480 Sun.set Hills Road, 
ke.\ion, VA 22090. 

Copyright^ 1984 hy DrogonQuesu P,0, BoxSiO, Menio Park, CA 94026. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 115 



T 




This One's 
A Piece Of Cake 

By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The family that computes together, stays together. Let 
this be the thought for today. 
Two months ago, my daughter joined the ranks of 
CoCo owners. To create her very first program, she used the 
theme of her husband's upcoming birthday. Curious to see 
how she was progressing and eager to see her creation, I 
suggested that she mail me a copy. I would critique it. 

Copy LISTING! exactly. Look it over. Then, without 
elaborating or expanding it, correct any errors. Center it to 
give it a pleasing appearance. Alter and adjust the program 
to enhance it. This is your chance to show off your own 
progress in programming. 

Do this before you read any further or before you key in 
USTING2. See if you can find all the things that could 
stand a little modification. 

Before keying in LISTING2, follow along with me and see 
one way to approach the problem. After making each 
change in LISTING!, you may RUN the program to see 
what you have done. 

CLOAD^'LISTINGr* diXid RUN. The first thing that 
comes to mind is that the first panel needs to be pushed 
down for vertical centering. Since PRINT@ was used in 
lines 2, 3, and 4, it does no good to add :PRINT:PRINTto 
line 1. 

Without disturbing the contents of the three line heading, 
it was simpler to add -f 64 to the line locations in each of the 
three lines. 

It looks neater if the space after W A in line 4 was changed 
to a period. 

"iPRINT" was added to line 5 to insert another blank row. 

You may have made the change differently. You may have 
dropped the heading down another row; pushed up line 8 to 
center it tightly in the middle of the screen. The important 
thing is to make the display visually attractive. 

A sentence or paragraph looks neater if it is indented. 



(Joseph Kolar is a free-lance writer and programmer 
dedicated to proselytizing for computers in general, 
and the CoCo specifically,) 

116 the RAINBOW May 1964 



Two spaces were inserted after the first quote mark of line 6 
to move the line to the right. Two spaces were deleted after 
the word "BY" to realign the sentence. If this step wasn't 
taken, a word would split and carry over to the next row. 

A space was inserted after *TRESS" in line 8. The line of 
text was centered by inserting nine spaces after the first 
quote mark. 

The next panel required a little work. The text is all 
bunched up in the upper-left corner. All that blank area is 
crying out to be utilized. 

Either after CLS in line 9 or at the very beginning of line 
10, add PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT Use a beginning 
if using line 9 or an ending if inserting it in line 10. 

It is not good practice to begin a line of text at the left 
margin. Allowing for a long name to be input, indent one 
space after the opening quote mark of line 10. 

The W/'C/r statement will print a question mark. Thus, 
"?"at the end of the sentence is redundant. Delete it. Insert 
your first name and press [ENTER]. 

Indent line 20 about nine spaces by inserting them after 
the first quote mark. This line must be left of center to allow 
for the possibility of a long name. Since this is a surprise 
theme, add at the end of line 20. 

Indent line 30 one space as you did in line 10. Delete the 
redundant question mark at the end of the sentence. Enter 
your age and press [ENTER]. 

Looking over the resultant panel, we see that the text 
could be pushed down one more row for better vertical 
centering. Being lazy, rather than relocating each of the 
three lines, I decided to add a line of text. What suggested 
itself was "Well, 1 have news for you." This leads more 
smoothly into the following panel. 

At this point, common sense would say RENIJM40J!, 10, 
but to keep the same line numbers in both listings, common 
sense will not prevail. Don't renumber! 

Instead, open up line 3 1 . DELS! and insert "CLS" at the 
beginning of line 32. Insert a new line 31 — 31 PRINT- 
PRINT nVELL I HA VE NEWS FOR YOU!'' Did you 
remember to leave blank space after the first quote mark? 
Three spaces were used so that the line would be horizon- 
tally centered. 



Rather than jumping to the next panel, we will catch our 
breath and use a time wasting routine to give us time to read 
and digest the text. Add :FORZ= I TO 2000: NEXTio the 
end of line 31. 

The next panel looks very good. It must be oriented to left 
of center to allow for a possible long name. 

Change the comma to a space in line 36. Add an exclama- 
tion mark at the end of the line so that it will appear after the 
name. 1 think a comma would be appropriate following 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, but to save an extra space for a long 
name, leave it out. 

The song flops right into the "cake" panel. Insert 40 FOR 
Z = 1 TO 1 000: NEXT for a less abrupt transition. 

It bothered me that we called for an input in line 30, but 
failed to use it. What use could we have for the variable A 
that indicated the age? Determined to use that variable, it 
was envisioned to label the cake with the age neatly centered 
under the candle. 

Studying the cake panel, the candle might look better if it 
were on top of the cake instead of being embedded in it. It 
also appeared to be a wee bit off-center. 

A little trial and error was used to alter the cake and 
candle. Changing the 47 to 48 in line 50 made the cake wider. 
Changing 15 to lj6 made it lower. The candle, line 70, was 
moved to the left and pulled out of the cake by changing (3 1 
TO 34) to (30 TO 33). 

Now, the age variable. A, could be moved under the 
candle. More trial and error work was involved until the 
correct PRINT@ location was found. Insert 60 PR/NT@ 
302,A;. 

The location 302 was a compromise. A one-digit age made 
it slightly off-center. A two-digit age was properly centered. 
You can't have everything. Working on the assumption the 
kids, nine and under, would not be critical, 1 opted for the 
two-digit location. 

The cake is well-centered and nicely proportioned. The 
candle flame could use a little work. It could be lengthened 
to become more prominent. 

To lengthen the flame, add :SET(32A8)\o line 220. Add 
:RESET(32,8) to line 230. That isn't bad! To give it even 
more realism (as if a slight draft was causing the candle to 
flicker), add :SET(31A8) to line 220 and :RESET(3l,9) to 
line 230. 

Finally, inserting a time-wasting pause, 235 FOR Z = I 
TO 1 00: NEXT slaves down the flicker. 

If you haven't done so, key in LISTING2 and RUN. It is 
substantially a carbon copy of LISTING L The integrity of 
the program wasn't altered; only the presentation. 

The next time somebody in your family, or a friend, has a 
birthday, just CL0AD"LISTING2*\ sit the birthday boy/ 
girl at the keyboard and let him/her RUN it. I am sure they 
will get the message. Anyway, you have a little program, 
with the permission of newcomer, Betty Ann White, to add 
to your repertoire. 

You may have gotten a few ideas of your own from 
following this half-baked debugging session. Work your will 
on LISTING2 and alter it to your heart's content. Jazz up 
the cake. Put more pizzazz into the text. Add color. Modify 
or add sound. You are the boss! 

If you come up with something interesting (1 am sure you 
will), and are inclined to share it, send me a listing of your 
creation. 

You saw one way to finalize a program. You did a little 
debugging. You saw the creative process in action. It is 
hoped that you got some ideas of your own as you systemat- 



ically worked over LISTING!, It should have been a fun 
time. You need not be afraid to fool around with a program. 
Make sure you keep a backup copy of your listing so that, in 
case it gets zapped, you can start again. 

What was the thought for today again? Oh, yes! The 
family that computes together stays together . . . and has 
more fun. .-.<«<S» 



Listing 1: 











33 


57 




END . 


. . 130 


t 







0 '<LISTING1> 

1 CLS 

2 PRINT • 8, "BETTY ANN WHITE" 

3 PRINT 942, "1303 3RD ST" 

4 PRINT a 70, "KIRKLAND, WA 980 

33" 

5 PRINT 

6 PRINT "HAPPY BIRTHDAY WAS CREA 
TED BY BETTY ANN MHITE ON JANU 
ARY 2, 1984 AND REVISED ON JAN 
UARY 6." 

7 PRINT 

8 INPUT "PRESS<ENTER>"» E« 

9 CLS 

10 INPUT"WHAT IS YOUR NAriE?"|N« 
15 PRINT 

20 PR I NT" HELLO, "N« 
25 PRINT 

30 INPUT "HOW OLD ARE YOU?" I A 

31 CLS 

32 PRINT* 131, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO 
YOU! 

33 PLAY"01(8|6;A;8;02;C«01|B" 

34 PRINTS 195, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY T 
O YOU ! " 

35 PLAY "01|0|6|A;6$02|D|C" 

36 PRINTa259, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEA 
R, " N* 

37 PLAY "01|6|6|02|6|E;C;02{B|A'* 



38 PRINTa323, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO 
YOU ! " 

39 PLAY "02|F|F|E;C;DJC" 
45 CLS(0) 

50 FOR H-15 TO 47: FOR V=15 TO 23 

:SET(H,V,7) INEXT V,H 

70 FOR H-31 TO 34: FOR V- 10TO 15 

:SET(H,V,2):NEXT V,H 

120 FOR H>10 TO 53 

130 SET(H,23, 1> 

140 NEXT H 

217 PLAY"02fF|F|E|C;DjC" 
220 SET (32,7,8) 
230 RESET (32, 7) 
240 GOTO 220 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 117 



Listing 2: 




'<LISTING2> 
CLS 

PRINT «72, "BETTY ANN WHITE" 
PRINT ei06, "1303 3RD ST" 



0 
1 

2 

3 

4 PRINT «134, "KIRKLAND, WA. 980 

33" 

5 PRINT: PRINT 

6 PRINT " HAPPY BIRTHDAY WAS CR 
EATED BY BETTY ANN WHITE ON JANU 
ARY 2, 1984 AND REVISED ON JAN 
UARY 6." 

7 PRINT 

8 PRINT: INPUT " PRESS <E 
NTER>"» E» 

9 CLS 

10 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT:PRINT: INPUT 
•* WHAT IS YOUR NAME"|N« 

15 PRINT 

20 PRINT" HELLO "N«" ! " 

25 PRINT 

30 INPUT " HOW OLD ARE YOU"|A 

31 PRINT: PRINT" WELL, I HAVE N 
EWS FOR YOU!":FOR Z-1 TO 2000 :NE 
XT 

32 CLS: PRINTS 131, "HAPPY BIRTHDA 
Y TO YOU! 



33 PLAY"01|B|G|A|G|02|CtOl96'' 

34 PRINTe 195, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY T 
O YOU!" 

35 PLAY "01|G;8|A|e|02|D|C" 

36 PRINTe259, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY OEA 
R " N«"!" 

37 PLAY "01|G|B|02|G|E|C|02|B|A" 



38 PRINTe323, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO 
YOU!" 

39 PLAY "02»F|F»E»C|D|C" 

40 FOR Z»l TO 1000: NEXT 
45 CLS<0) 

50 FOR H*15 TO 48: FOR V-16 TO 23 
:SET<H,V,7):NEXT V,H 
60 PRINTe302,A| 

70 for h-30 to 33: for v- 10to 15 
:set(h,v,2):next v,h 

120 FOR H-10 TO 53 
130 SET (H, 23,1) 
140 NEXT H 

217 PLAY"02|F;F;E|C;D|C" 

220 SET <32,7,8):SET<32,8,8):SET 

(31,9,8) 

230 RESET (32, 7) : RESET (32, 8) : RESE 
T(31,9) 

235 FOR Z«-l TO 100: NEXT 

240 GOTO 220 ^ 



In Texas, Orders, 
Questions & Answers 
1-713-392-0747 



Ihiymit INDUSTRIES, INC. 

2251 1 Katy Freeway 
Katy (Houston), Texas 77450 



To Order 
1-800-231-3680 
800-231-3681 



SAVE BIG DOLLARS ON ALL TRS 8(J^ HARDWARE & SOFTWARE 

TR&-80® by Radio Shack. Brand new in cartons delivered. Save stjate saies tax. Texas residents, 
add only 5% sales tax. Open Mon. - Fri., 9 - 6, Sat., 9-1. We pay freight and insurance. Come by 
and see us. ^ reference in or near your city. Ref: Farmers State Bank, Brookshire, 

Texas. 

WE ALWAYS 



WE OFFER OIM 
REQUEST 

Fgderat Express (overnight delivery) 

Houston Intercontinental Airport 
Delivery, Same Day Service 

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ReferencBt from people who hive 
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B Our Oipability to go to the giant TR&80® 
Oomputar warehouse 5 hours away, in 
Ft Worth, Texas, to keep )w in stodc 



JOE McMANUS 



I 



TELEX: 77-4132 (FLEXS HOU) ^ 



118 the RAINBOW May 1984 




CoCo Widows 

By Susan P. Davis 



Anew term has cropped up: "CoCo Widow/' We all 
know about football widows and golf widows. Now, 
it seems, countless women are sitting alone due to 
the amount of time their men are spending with the Color 
Computer. One Rainbow advertiser has very cleverly capi- 
talized on this pathetic situation by offering **CoCo Widow" 
needlework. 

My favorite anecdote comes from a member of the 
Columbus and Central Ohio Color Computer Users Group. 
This man was working relentlessly on a program. He 
designed it, wrote it and debugged endlessly. Finally, at 2 
a.m., it worked. Eureka! He dashed upstairs to share the 
sweetness of this victory with his wife. He shook her awake 
and babbled excitedly and proudly. She opened one eye, 
gave him an icy stare, grumbled "Who cares?" and indig- 
nantly turned over and went back to sleep. He was crushed. 
When 1 spoke with her later about the incident, she told me 
that she bitterly resented the computer and that it takes her 
husband's time away from her and the children. When I 
asked her if her husband couldn't show her what the compu- 
ter could do and how it could help her, she retorted, '^Unless 
it can run the sweeper, there is no way it could help me at 
all." 

Another fellow bought a Color Computer and set it up in 
his bedroom because that's where the television was. To do 
this, he shoved all of his wife's knickknacks off the double 
dresser and replaced them with the computer, tape recorder, 
a few cassettes and some note pads. After a while, the tape 
collection grew. It no longer fit on the dresser and it looked 
just awful. So, this guy emptied all of his wife's clothes out of 
one drawer and filled the drawer with tapes. He then stuffed 



(Susan Davis has a masters degree in linguistics and 
has taught Spanish on the high school and college 
levels. She is also a C. L U. with seven years experience 
in the life and health insurance fields. In addition, she 
designs educational programs for Sugar Software, 
which she own with her husband, Gary,) 



her clothes into other drawers and almost succeeded in 
closing them. The next day, that couple bought a new televi- 
sion for the bedroom, allocated the old set for computer use 
and gave the husband his own space — the former sewing 
room! 

No wonder there's resentment! Even from women who 
are gradually learning to use the CoCo for word processing 
or to help the kids in school. They told me that the difference 
is that football, baseball, golf, etc., all have a season that is 
eventually over. The Color Computer can be turned on any 
hour of the day or night — and frequently is. 

Another reason for the resentment is that many women 
feel that they don't *'understand" the computer. It makes 
them feel dumb and uncomfortable. A simple analogy might 
help here. Just as one does not need to understand how 
electricity works in order to flick on a light switch, one does 
not need to understand the Color Computer's circuitry in 
order to have a good time with it. Just view the CoCo as 
another household appliance, as a tool which makes ^ task 
easier to perform. That task could be producing mjailing 
labels, finally organizing that record or stamp collection, 
printing off 10 originals of the same resume or keeping the 
children occupied. Really, all you have to understand ijs how 
to turn the computer (and other hardware devices) oh and 
off, how to insert the appropriate tape or disk ancj hbw to 
load the software. This is not as complicated as pressing all 
the appropriate buttons on the latest model Lady Kenmore 
washing machine just to do a load of laundry. 

Lots of the women I speak with seem to be turned 6ff by 
"games." They use "games" as an?excuse not to u$e the 
computer. They do recognize the educational value pf the 
Color Computer, and we'll discuss this next mont^. 

I have asked some women if they would consider using the 
CoCo to perform a small, practical task; balancing their 
checkbook, for example. Some told me that they prefer to 
balance the checkbook with a calculator. Another simple 
task is paying the monthly bills. Several of these wonlep use 
their push button phones to use th^ pay-by-phone feature 
offered by their banks. They said they might be interested iii 
havingme show them how to use the Color Computer to pafy 

May 1964 the RAINBOW 119 



I 



COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND ACCESSORIES 



PRINTERS 



h PRICES" 



<S£E PRINTER INTERFACE BELOW) 

SPIRIT (SAME AS MXBO) . S33900 

OKIOATA 8 2A $329.00 

GORILLA /BANANA $235 00 

-(SERIAL WITH CABLE) $255 00 

-(PARALLEL WITH INTERFACE) $299 00 



|"NEW**| 



MONITORS 

aVAMOEK 



'PRICES'"! 



(SEE MONITOR INTERFACE BELOW) 
ALL WITH NONGLARE SCREEN 

COLOR 1+ $315.00 

VIDEO 300(G) $150.00 

VIDEO 300(A) $185.00 



ENDICOTT JOYSTICK 

• 19 96 EACH $37.98 FOR TWO 

In UBB. we foi«id «w ENDICOTT JOYSTICK to b« vnocMh 
and roBponsive. ...built to ISBt. the Endicott model it a 
solid buy' ttm RAINBOW, October 1962 

...provided the best feel of all the joysticks tested 
.(•) rugged unit at an affordable price." 
-eo micro, Mmtch 1983 



PRINTER INTERFACE 

pM SERIAL/ PARALLEL 

SWITCHABLE 300 TO 9600 BAUD. 
PRINTER AND MODEM CONNECTIONS. 
NOTHING ELSE REQUIRED 



$7995 

PURCHASED WITH PRINTER . 



$64 00 



MONITOR INTERFACE 

VIDEO PLUS $24.96 

(COLOR OR MONOCHROME) 
PURCHASED WITH MONITOR . . $20 95 

VIDEO PLUS IIM $28 95 

(MONOCHROME FOR COLOR II 
COMPUTER) 

PURCHASED WITH MONITOR $22.96 

VIDEO PLUS HC (AVAILABLE SOON) 
(COLOR FOR COLOR II COMPUTER) 



BLANK MEDIA 

ELEPHANT SSSD $20 95 

E LEPHANT SSOD $23 95 

ELEPHANT DSDD $28 95 

C-10 CASSETTES (10 FOR) $ 7.50 



MEDIA STORAGE 
TAPE 

TAPE CAROUSEL (HOLDS 25) . . .$13 00 



DISKETT 

FLIP N FILE 10 $ 5.45 

FLIP'NFILE25 $24 96 

FLIP-N-FILE 50 $3396 



SUPER-PRO KEYBOARD 

By. MARK DATA 

ADAPTER REQUIRED ON 
COMPUTER BOUGHT AFTER 10/82. 
KEYBOARD ^M9.9r $59 95 ADPT $4 95 



VOLKSMODEM 

BY ANCHOR AUTOMATION 
300 BAUD. DIRECT CONNECT 
MANUAL ANSWER. 
MANUAL DIAL 
INCLUDES CABLE $74.96 



SURGE/SPIKE SUPPRESSOR ft EMI/RFI FILTER 

By. KALGLO 



DELUX: 8 SWITCHED SOCKETS. FUSE. LK3HT. 8* CORD ja»^ $79 96 

MINI 2 SOCKETS. LIGHT, PLUG IN M^iM' $40 96 



Look at These Discounts and Comr}are...Rememl)er WE PAY SHIPPING! 

SOFTWARE PRICES SHOWN ARE 20% OFF LIST PRICE! 



CUSTOM SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 



DISK DATA HANDLER (Dita E 



9) $43 96 

(Supplied On Tape) 



SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 

T D 

>CUBIX $19 95 $23 15 

> LANCER $19 95 $23 15 

> MS GOBBLER $19 95 $23 15 

WHIRLYBIRD RUN $19 96 $23 15 

STORM ARROWS $19 96 $23 15 

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SPACE RACE. $19.96 $23.15 

SPACE SENTRY $15.15 $18 36 

PLANET INVASION $19 96 $23 15 

ALPHA SEARCH $19 95 $23.15 

COMPUTERWARE 

T D 

> JUNIOR'S REVENGE $23. 1 5 $25.55 

> TIME PATROL $19.96 $22.36 

> HYPER ZONE $21.56 $23.96 

> COLOR BASIC COMPILER $31 96 

64K SCREEN EXPANDER (64K) $19.96 $22 36 

♦ THE SOURCERER $27 95 $31.96 

> DISK MACRO ASSEMBLER & XREF $39.96 

> COLOR EDITOR $1996 $23.96 

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DOODLEBUG $19.95 $22.36 

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SOFT LAW 

TAD INCLUDED 

□ VIP WRITER $47 96 

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□ VIPCALC $47 96 

a VIP TERMINAL ^$3996 

□ VIP DATA BASE $47 05 (DISK) 

QVIPDISK-ZAP $31.95 (DISK) 



ELITE SOFTWARE 

T D 

□ ELITE-WORD $47.96 $47 96 

□ ELITE-CAtC $47 96 $47 96 

□ ELITE-FILE $59.60 

PROGRAMMERS INSTITUTE 

> COMPLETE PERSONAL ^ ^ 

ACCOUNTANT - ( 1 .2.& 3) $59 96 $63.96 

COGNITEC 

T O 

□ TELEWRITER 64 $3996 $47 96 

PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

T D 

ADVENTURE IN WONDERLAND . . . .$19.95 $23 95 

THE DISK MANAGER $2396 

THE DISK MASTER $19.96 

♦ VIKING $15.96 $19.95 

«GANQBUSTERS $15.96 $19.95 

COLORKIT $27 96 $31.96 

SHAFT $19.96 $2396 

JUNGLE $15.96 $19 96 

FLKsHT $1596 $19 96 



TOM MIX 



D 

$25 55 
$24 75 
$24 75 



> SR-71 . $23.15 

> CU*BER $22 35 

> BUZZARD BAIT $22 35 

> AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER $23 1 5 $25 55 

THE FROG $22 35 $24.75 

> SPACE SHUTTLE $23. 1 5 $25 55 

> THE KING $21.55 $23.95 

> COLOR GOLF $14 35 

TRAP FALL $22 35 $24.75 

TAPE TO DISK $14 35 

DISK TO TAPE $14.35 



ANTECO SOFTWARE 

T ROMPK 

ftBALL(POOL) $23.96 

RNBALL $19.96 $23 95 

DATASOFT 

T O 

ZAXXON..... $31.96 

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T O 

♦ FIRE COPTER $19.96 

« SAK30N THE FINAL DAYS $19 96 

♦ EARTHQUAKE $19.96 

♦ AIRLINE $19.96 

> SEA DRAGON $27.96 

> TRIAD $27.96 

> DISKEY (Dirii Acoen & Repeir Kit end 

Computer Diagnoetict) $39.96 

ARCADE ANIMATION 

T D 

FOOD WAR $20.75 $22.35 

CEMASTER $19.96 $21.66 



MARK DATA 

T 

GLAXXONS $19.95 

EL BANDITO $19.95 

COSMIC CLONES $19 95 $23 96 

HAYWIRE $19.96 $23,96 



D 

$23 96 
$23 95 



B5 SOFTWARE 

T D 

MONEY $15.96 

BORROW $15.95 

CARRY $15.95 

MATH FACT $13.55 

ABC'S $ 7.95 



NOTE: ALL SALES FINAL NO RETURNS UNLESS DEFECTIVE ADDITIONAL LISTINGS IN OUR FREE CATALOG - CALL OR WRITE. 

♦Requires 18K Ext. Basic Minimum. ^Requires 32K Ext. Basic Minimum, DWe Recommend 32K or 64K. Others ISK Ext. Std, Basic Minimum. 



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CO D. ADO $2 00 (U SA ONLY) ALLOW 2 WEEKS FOR 
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PRICES IN AD ARE MAIL ORDER ONLY. 



PHONE ORDERS 
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(PHONE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK) 
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their bills for them. So the program listing at the end of this 
article shows how you can use the Color Computer to help 
you bank at home. 

We got the idea for this program from CompuServe. They 
had a similar program for use with another computer and 
modem. 

Our BA NKER program requires a 1 6K ECB Color Com- 
puter, Hayes SmartModem and a Huntington Bank Pay- 
By-Phone account. The program is easily modified for other 
modems and other banks with the pay-by-phone feature. It 
allows easy and convenient use of the Pay-By-Phone service. 
The computer transmits yoyr account and code information 
using touch tones. A menu of accounts is displayed to allow 
you to choose who to pay, how much and the desired pay- 
ment date. This is a very practical use of the Color Compu- 
ter. I hope that some of your CoCo widows will give it a try. 

Load and run BANKER. The SmartModem must be 
powered on. At the first prompt, enter your secret password. 
To practice, just hit [ENTER]. The primary menu will be 
displayed. 

The up and down arrow keys are used to position the 
cursor block to the desired menu item. Generally, the cursor 
will be positioned for you following the execution of a menu 
item. 

Hit [ENTER] when the cursor is on the menu item you 
want to select. 

If the [CLEAR] key is hit, is sent to the bank's 
computer to cancel the previously completed message. 

If the [?] key is hit, is sent to have the bank's computer 
repeat the last message. 



10 ' 

20 ' 

30 ' 

40 ' 

50 • 

60 ' 

70 ' 

80 ' 

90 ' 

100 

110 

120 

130 

140 

1S0 

160 

170 

180 

190 

200 

210 



Bankvr 





c 


530 . . 


. * . 246 


AAA 




1000 . . . 


. . . 108 


1300 . . . 


. . , 191 


1540 . . . 


. . . 176 


END . . . 


. . . 224 



Ban k -by-phonw 

(C) 1984 By SuQar Softwar* 
Written by Oary Davis 
2153 Luh Lan» 
Rttynoldsburg, Ohio 43066 
(614) 861-0565 

'Bankvr is sst up for th« 

'Huntington Banks <Columbus) 
'Pay-By-Phone systsm. It 
'requires a Hayes Smartmodem 
'but may be modified for 
'other banks and other auto 
'dial (tone) modems. 

9 

POKE150,180:' 300 BAUD 

DV— 2:' TO MODEM 

'Allow output to serial line 



J| jtlfce R AINBOWfest m Long Beach, 
^jppt^d the privitege to participate in 
Wjp^l dl^ussion 0n Women and Com- 
a partner in More- 
otgan- 

42^^i^ itiscii»$ion. She brought to- 
;p^feMEien-A^ variety of compliUjr 

v^^l^gll^^tn^^ represented dif- 

pi^|tei^s ^tnd u^e& of the computer. 

'f l^^ th^t xjverall we had a very iat- 

.^n^^pHiel. The iri^mbers were as fol- 
lihaeklcford, Rainbow's 
W^IC^^C iadvertising and marketing 
dfftc^ort Caroline Webster, owner of 
Soft^ri? iplus,^^^ store in Cit^ 

rtis JftfigMs^Calif ; Mary N fclsenv Linda 
with a: teenager's 
vli^ipil^^^^ a local teach- 

v.e(:^|S||s|^^ SoUthBay Color 

Cort^ief Cliife; is^ancy Davis, a com- 
p»ter progmmmer; and myself, Sara 
Nblaii, a partner in Priekly-Pear Soft- 

: Waw. i persona Hy use the computer as a 
t<yol, but do not program very much, 

^ The 

ifi# a $hort syiiogsi^^ each panel 



member on how they came into the 
computer field, an open discussion was 
held with the audience. 

Out of the discussion came some yery 
important point$. More women are Jii^: 
terested in computers today but few 
belong to a club. A woman whose hus- 
band has a computer feels fodli&h %iVr 
ingabout programming techniques from 
him. Alsb, women get little time to gain 
the same knowledge their spouse has, as 
he is always using the computer. It was 
strongly recommended that women get 
their own computers and learn for thm- 
$ejves that they can't break qr hurt a 
computer by touching the wrong key. 

There was a fraction who were defin* 
itely afraid of the computer. They 
thought they might break it by typing 
the wrong key^ that you had to know 
math to use it, and Ihey weren't sure 
they could learn to program* Computer- 
ization threatens them in their jobs, they 
said* because if they didn't learn about 
computers they would be left out. At 
home, their husbands or children are 
spending all th&ir tiine with the eom- 
puter. 



It was pointed out that the great thing 
about computers is that you don't need 
to know anything about them to use 
them. They are a tool, like the micro- 
wave in the kitchen or the TV in the 
living room. As with any new tool, you 
need to learn a few things. You need to 
learn to. turn them on and load a 
program. 

' Software companies around the coun« 
try are producing quality, user-friendly 
programs for many applications. Prob- 
ably the one most used by everyone is a 
good word processor. It can be used for 
letters or bulletins or writing articles or 
children's term papers , , . the list can go 
on forever. 

My feeling from the imput of the 
panel and audience was that women can 
bring much to the computer revolution, 
but they will need to get involved and 
learn to use their computer just like any 
other tool. 

— Sara Nolan 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 121 



220 'Mithout M«iting for READY. 
230 A-65314:P0KE A-«-1,48:P0KE A, 2 
49: POKE A+1,52:P0KE A,0 
240 ' 

250 RETS-CHR* ( 13) : BKSP«»CHR« (8) 
260 UP««CHR« ( 94 ) : DN«»CHR« (10) 
270 ' 

280 DIM VEND0RNUn«(15),SEL«(15) 
290 ' 

300 'Coflimands to init modsm 
310 BUFFER1»="S11=50E0M2TQ1" 
320 60SUB 1340 ' Init modmi 
330 PHONENUM«="TD 555-3291;" ' 
Inssrt your bank's number h»r»! 
340 SEL-1 
350 60T0 530 
360 ' 

370 SEL«(1)="DIAL BANK COMPUTER" 
380 SEL«(2)="TRANSMIT ACCOUNT NU 
MBER" 

390 SEL«( 3)= "TRANSMIT SECURITY N 
UMBER" 

400 SEL«(4)»"PAY BILLS" 

410 SEL« (5) -"REPEAT" 

420 SEL« (6) REQUEST OPERATOR AS 

SI STANCE" 

430 SEL«(7)="HANQ UP PHONE" 
440 SEL«<8) -"SETUP FOR PRACTICE 
SESSION" 



AUTOHATIC TELEPHONE DIALER PROGRftMl 



IMiliiiiiiP!^^ 



iijiiiiii Access MCI and 




^ names & numbers" In each directory 1111 
*|| Store directbries on tape ' or disk w^"'"' 



NO HOOKUP REQUIRED ! 





1.9 5 on cassette I 

iiSind check or .«on«y order to: 
iiliiliii Chris Conpiiters iilijiiiiiiiiiiir*' 
iiijiiiii 6299 fttderwood Laneriii 
iillii Delta, B.C. Canada y4E 3E7 

||il6K JEx^^^ 

llilllll^^^^r^^tf^^^^^e^^^ 




450 IF PRACTICE-1 THEN SELtiG)-" 

SETUP FOR REAL SESSION" 

460 SEL«( 9) -"RETURN TO BASIC" 

470 NUMSEL-9:80SUB 1390 ' GET S 

ELECTION 

480 ON 8EL GOTO 620,700,760,820, 
1110, 1170, 1230,530, 1290 
490 SOTO 470 
500 ' 

510 'Setup session 

520 ' 

530 CL8: PRINT "ENTER SECURITY CO 
DE, OR entsr FOR PRACTICE SESS 
ION "; 

540 PRINT "( )"» 

550 BL-1:MAXDG-4:G0SUB 1600: BL-0 

560 IF LEN(FLI>«)>0 GOTO 580 

570 PRACTICE-1 : ACCT«-»D1 11111111 

# ; " : P I N«- " D2222« % " : GOTO 370 

580 PRACT I CE-0: ACCT«- " D028932067 

21«J " : PIN«»"D"+FLD»+"#J " : GOTO 37 

0 

590 ' 

600 'Dial bank 
610 ' 

620 PRINT 9464, "DIALING BANK COM 
PUTER" ; 

630 BUFFER«-PHONENUM« 
640 GOSUB 1340 
650 FOR X-1 TO 2000: NEXT X 
660 SEL-SEL-i-l:GOTO 470 
670 ' 

680 'Send acct# 
690 ' 

700 BUFFER«-ACCT« 
710 GOSUB 1340 
720 GOTO 660 
730 ' 

740 'Send ID# 

750 ' 

760 BUFFER»-PIN» 
770 GOSUB 1340 
780 GOTO 660 
790 ' 

800 'Select 
810 ' 

820 SEL«(l)-"0900 TRNSFR SVNGS T 
O CHKNG " : VENDORNUM* ( 1 ) - " 0900 " 
630 SEL«(2)-"1000 TRNSFR CHKNG T 
0 SVNGS " : VENDERNUM* ( 2 ) - " 1 000 " 
840 SEL«(3)-"1033 TRNSFR TO CHKN 
G RESERV " : VENDERNUM* ( 3 > - " 1 033 " 
850 SEL«(4)-"1600 VISA":VENDORhHJ 
M«(4)-"1600" 

860 SEL«(5)-"3000 OHIO BELL":VEN 
DORNUM* ( 5 > - " 3000 " 

870 SEL«(6)-"3010 CkSOE (ELECTRI 

C) ":VENDERNUM«(6)-"3010" 

880 SEL«(7)-"4000 PENNYS": VENDOR 

NUM«(7)-"4000" 



122 the RAINBOW May 1984 



890 SEL«<8)-"4100 SEARS ":VENOORN 
UM*t8>=-"4100» 

900 SEL«(9>«"4300 LAZARUS" :VENDO 
RNUM*<9>-»4300" 

910 SEL«(10>-" NO MORE BILLS 

TO PAY»:VENDORNUM»(10)-"02" 
920 SEL-1 
930 NUMSEL»10 
940 GOSUB 1390 

930 BUFFER*- " D " -i-VENOORNUM* < SEL ) * 
"#| •' 

960 GOSUB 1340 

970 IF VENDORNUM*<SEL)-"02" THEN 

SEL«7:G0T0 370 
980 PRINT 8460, "ENTER AMT (EX: 9 
0.00) "I 

990 PRINT "( )"» 

1000 nAXDG-6: GOSUB 1600 

1010 BUFFER»»"D"+FLD» 

1020 PRINT 6480, "DATE TO PAY <EX 

• 22>22ND)"! 

1030 PRINT "< )"! 

1040 MAXDG»2: GOSUB 1600 

1050 IF FLD«-"" THEN BUFFER«»BUF 

FER»+"#!" ELSE BUFFER**BUFFERt+ " 

»"+FLD»-»-"#; " 

1060 GOSUB 1340 

1070 GOTO 930 

1080 ' 

1090 'Repeat 
1100 ' 

1110 BUFFER«-"D«J " 
1120 GOSUB 1340 
1130 GOTO 470 
1140 ' 

1150 'Rqst operator 
1160 ' 

1170 BUFFER«-"D0tt} " 
1180 GOSUB 1340 
1190 GOTO 470 
1200 ' 

1210 'Hang up 
1220 ' 

1230 BUFFER»-"H" 
1240 GOSUB 1340 
1250 SEL-9:OOTO470 
1260 ' 

1270 'Return 
1280 ' 
1290 CLS 
1300 END 
1310 ' 

1320 'Send bu-F-Fer 
1330 ' 

1340 BUFFER*-" AT "+BUFFER«+RET* 
1350 PRINT#DV,BUFFER« 
1360 RETmN 
1370 ' 

1380 'Menu display 
1390 CLS 



1400 PRINT " PAY-BY-MICRO TE 

RMINAL" 

1410 PRINT "MAKE YOUR SELECTION 
BY USING THEUP AND DOWN ARROW KE 
YS AND THEN HIT THE enter KEY." 
1420 PRINT STRING* <32, 243) I 
1430 FOR X-1 TO NUMSEL 
1440 PRINT "< ) ";SEL«(X) 
1450 NEXT X 

1460 IF SEL-0 THEN SEL-NUMSEL 
1470 IF SEL>NUMSEL THEN SEL-1 
1480 PRINT Q (SEL-1 >*32-(-l -•-5*32, CH 
R*(182){ 

1490 C*-INKEY*:IF C*-"" GOTO 149 
0 

1500 IF C*-CHR*(12> THEN BUFFER* 
-"D**| ": GOSUB 1340 
1510 IF C*-"?" THEN BUFFER*-"D#| 
": GOSUB 1340 

1520 IF C*-RET* AND SEL>0 THEN R 
ETURN 

1530 IF C*<>UP* AND C*<>DN* GOTO 
1490 

1540 PRINT •(8EL-l)»32+l+5»32, " 

"? 

1550 IF C*«UP* THEN SEL-SEL-1 EL 
SE SEL-SEL-M 
1560 GOTO 1460 
1570 ' 

1580 'Enter -field 
1590 ' 

1600 fld*-"":do-i 

1610 A-PEEK ( 8tH88 ) «256-K>EEK ( 8tH89 ) 
-&H400 

1620 A-A-2-MAXD0 
1630 PRINTSA, $ 

1 640 PR I NTCHR* ( 1 75 ) ; : D*- I NKE Y* : P 
RINTBKSP*; : IF D*="" GOTO 1640 
1650 IF D*-BKSP* AND DG>1 THEN D 
G-DG- 1 : FLD*«LEFT* ( FLD* , DG ) : PR I NT 

d*;:goto 1640 

1660 IF DG>MAXDG AND D*<>RET* GO 
TO 1640 

1670 IF D*«RET* THEN RETURN 
1680 IF D*-"." OR D*«="»" GOTO 17 
10 

1690 IF D*<"0" OR D*>"9" GOTO 16 
40 

1700 IF BL-1 THEN PRINTCHR* (214) 

; :GOTO1720 

1710 PRINT D*J 

1720 IF D*-"." THEN D*-"»" 

1 730 FLD*=FLD*-t-D* : DG=DG-i- 1 

1740 GOTO 1640 



: 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 123 



T 



NEW GOOD STUFF 
FOR EVERY COLOR COMPUTER 




Turn your Color Computer into a graphic design center with the ease of a 
keystroke! MaglGraph makes it simple to create highly detailed figures up to 
and including an entire high-resolution screen. Designed for those with some 
experience in Basic and Assembly Language programming, MagiGraph 
includes lots of special features: 

• A full sat of logical and pixel manipulation functions simplifies the 
development of complex figures. 

• An editor lets you zoom in and work on every detail of your design. 
Toggle Iwtween the "macro" and •'micro" screens for perspective on 
your creations. 

• Nine animation buffers allow you to preview each sequence to ensure 
continuity and smooth flow. 

• Versatile I/O routines store a graphic screen on cassette or floppy disk; 
recall it later for use by another program or revise It with MaglGraph. 

If you're looking for the finest graphic development utility available for your 
Color Computer, JH\S IS IT. Maximize your machine's potential, while you 
push your imagination to the limit — with MagiGraph! 

By Kevin Dooley. Cassette $34.95 (16K required); Disk $39.95 (d^K Ex- 
tended Color BASIC required); Amdisk cartridge $44.95. 



CSPOOL 
Color Computer Print Spooler 

stop Waiting Around for the Printer! CSPOOL allows you to use your printer 
and computer concurrently, takes only 26 bytes of Color Basic's rnemory, and 
gives you 32K of print buffer, it's like tiaving two computers in one! By 
intercepting ctiaracters sent to the printer and storing them in the upper 32K of 
RAM, CSPOOL allows you to run other programs white your printer Is doing its 
job. CSPOOL is FREE with the purchase of a 64K RAM UPGRADE KIT from The 
Micro Works, or it may be purchased separately on cassette or diskette for 
$19.95. Requires 64K; not for FtEX or 0S9. 

64K MEMORY UPGRADE KIT: For Rev. levels E, ET, NO, TDP-100s, and Color 
Computer II. Eight prime 64K RAM chips, instructions, and CSPOOL: $64,95. 



SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 



MACR0-80C: DISK*BASED EDITOR, 
ASSEMBLER AND MONITOR-With all the 

features the serious programmer wants, this 
package includes a powerful 2-pass macro 
assembler with conditional assembly, local labels, 
include files and cross referenced symbol tables. 
MACR0-80C supports the complete Motorola 6809 
instruction set in standard source format, incorpo- 
rating all the features of our Rom pack -based 
assembler (SDS-80C), MACR0-80C contains many 
more useful instructions and pseudo-ops which aid 
the programmer and add power and flexibility. The 
screen -oriented editor is designed for efficient and 
easy editing of assembly language programs. 
MACR0-80C allows global changes and moving/ 
copying blocks of text. You can edit lines of 
assembly source which exceed 32 characters. 
DCBUG is a machine language monitor which allows 
examining and altering of memory, setting break 
points, etc. 

Editor, assembler and monitor— along with 
sample programs— come on one Radio Shack com- 
patible disk. Extensive documentation included. By 
Artdy Phelps. $99.95 

SDS-80C: SOmVAHE DEVELOPMENT 
SYSTEM— Our famous editor, assembler and 
monitor in Rompack. Like MACR0-80C, it allows 
the user to write, assemble and debug assembly 
language programs with no reloading, object patch- 
ing or other hassles. Supports full 6809 Instruction 
set. Complete manual included. $89.95 

MICROTEXT: COMMUNICATIONS VIA 
YOUR MODEM! Now you can use your printer 
with your modem! Your computer can be an intelli- 
gent printing terminal. Talk to timeshare services or 
to other personal computers; print simultaneously 
through a second printer port; and re-display text 
stored in memory. Download text to Basic pro- 
grams; dump to a cassette tape, or printer, or both. 
Microtext can be used with any printer or no printer 
at all. it features user-configurable duplex/parity 
for special applications, and can send any ASCII 
character. You'll find many uses for this general 
purpose module! ROMPACK includes additional 
serial port for printer. $59.95 



MICRO WORKS COLOR FORTH 

• Faster to program in than Basic 

• Easier to learn than Assembly Language 
« Executes in less time than Basic 

The MICRO WORKS COLOR FORTH is a Rompack 
containing everything you need to run Forth on your 
Color Computer. COLOR FORTH consists of the 
standard Forth Interest Group (FIG) implementation 
of the language plus most of FORTH-79. It has a 
$uper screen editor with split screen display. Mass 
storage is on cassette. COLOR FORTH also contains 
a decompiler and other aids for learning the inner 
workings of this fascinating language. It will run on 
4K, 16K, and 32K computers. And COLOR FORTH 
contains 10K of ROM, leaving your RAM for your 
programs! There are simple words to effectively use 
the Hi-Res Color Computer graphics, joysticks, and 
sound. 

Includes a 112-page manual with a glossary of 
the system -specific words, a full standard FIG 
glossary and complete source listing. 

MICRO WORKS COLOR FORTH ... THE BEST! 
From the leader In FORTH, Talbot Microsystems. 
$109.95 

MACHINE UNGUAGE 

MONITOR TAPE: A cassette tape which allows 
you to directly access memory, I/O and registers 
with a formatted hex display. Great for machine lan- 
guage programming, debugging and learning. It 
can also send /receive RS232 at up to 9600 baud, 
including host system download /upload. 19 com- 
mands in all. Relocatable and reentrant. CBUG 
TAPE: $29.95 

MONITOR ROM: The same program as above, 
supplied in 2716 EPROM, This allows you to use 
the entire RAM space. And you don't need to re- 
load the monitor each time you use it. The EPROM 
plugs into the Extended Basic ROM Socket or the 
Romless Pack I. CBUG ROM: $39.95 

SOURCE GENERATOR: This package Is a disas- 
sembler which runs on the Color Computer and 
generates your own source listing of the BASIC 
interpreter ROM. Also included is a documentation 
package which gives useful ROM entry points, 
complete memory map, I/O hardware details and 
more. A 16K system is required for the use of this 
cassette. 800 Disassembler: $49.95 



HARDWARE 



PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE— Serial to parallel 
converter allows use of all standard parallel 
printers. PI80C plugs into the serial output port, 
leaving your Rompack slot free. You supply the 
printer cable. PI80C: $59.95 
SUPER-PRO KEYB0ARD-$69.95 (For computers 
manufactured after Oct. 1982, add $4.95) 
ROMLESS PACKS for your custom EPROMS — call 
or write for information. 



BOOKS 



6809 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING, by 

Lance Leventhal, $16.95 

TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER GRAPHICS, by Don 
Inman, $14.95 

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE GRAPHICS FOR THE 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER, by Don Inman, $14.95 
STARTING FORTH, by L. Brodie, $17.95 



GAMES 



ZAXXON— The real thing. Excellent. What more can 
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STAR BLASTER— Blast your way through an 
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PAC ATTACK— Try your hand at this challenging 
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HAYWIRE— Have fun zapping robots with this Hi- 
Res game by Mark Data Products. Cassette 
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ADVENTURE— fi/ac/c Sanctum and Calixto Island by 
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CAVE HUNTER— Experience vivid colors, bizarre 
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coco GRAPHICS 



Looking At LOGO 
From BASIC 

By Don Inman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



You may have noticed that the title of this department 
has changed from Using Graphics to CoCo Graph- 
ics. All previous articles in the series have been con- 
cerned with creating graphics through Extended Color 
BASIC. In the next few issues, I will be presenting some 
material on Color LOGO, a language that may be new to you. 
Due to the change in content, I felt a change of title would be 
appropriate. 

Dale Peterson's friend. Uncle Bert, has been greeting you 
for several past issues of the Rainbow with his discoveries of 
Color LOGO. Many of you may have attended one of the 
LOGO seminars at the Fort Worth or Long Beach RAIN- 
BOWfests. Whatever your degree of interest in LOGO may 
be, I hope you enjoy this series containing a look at Color 
LOGO through the eyes of BASIC. 

There are many differences between creating graphics 
through Color logo and through basic There are also 
many similarities. Color LOGO programs are made up of one 
or more blocks (or modules) called procedures. The first 
examples will consist of only one procedure. LOGO pro- 
grams can be made very readable through indentation and 
grouping of lines into logical functions. There is no need for 
line numbers as the lines are executed in the order of appear- 
ance. Hence, the dreaded, much-abused, and often confus- 
ing GOTO statement is unneeded and non-existent in the 
language. 

Graphics in basic are created by drawing between spe- 
cific X, Y coordinates on the screen. Color LOGO differs in 
this respect by creating graphics by movements that are 
relative with respect to the current position and heading of 
the image of a "turtle'' on the screen. The turtle is moved by 
the commands FORWARD and BACK. Its heading is 
changed by turning to the RIGHT of LEFT. The following 
examples demonstrate and explain some of the differences 
between Color LOGO and BASIC. 

Suppose you wish to draw an equilateral triangle (all sides 
equal) at the center of the screen. Equilateral triangles have 
interior angles of 60 degrees. 

(Don Inman is the acknowledged master of micro- 
computer graphics and the author of a large number of 
books. He has been working with Color LOGO since it 
was introduced. With this issue, his column now 
becomes a blend of graphics produced by both Color 
LOGO and Extended Color basicJ 



i> 



Figure 1 
EquHateral Triangle 
(alt sides equal; all angles - 60 degrees) 



Let's look at BASIC first. Suppose we wish the sides of the 
triangles to be 20 units in length. The center of the screen, for 
both languages, has an X coordinate of 128 and a Y coordi- 
nate of 96. Since Basic's DRA W command is limited to 
drawing lines at multiples of 45 degrees, we must turn to the 
LINE command and draw from one end-point of a line to a 
second end-point. The vertical line is easily calculated by 
subtracting 20 from the original Y coordinate. This gives: 

LINE( 1 28,96)-( 1 28,76),PSET 



(128J6) 



(?,?) 



(t2a,96) 



Figure 2 
First Line 



May 1964 the RAINBOW 125 



r 



The second line is harder. Some geometry or trigonome- 
try must be used. If you look at Figure 3, you can see that a 
30-60 degree right triangle can be formed to aid the 
calculatidns. 



line performs the same function as lines 40, 50 and 60 in the 
BASIC program. There is no need to calculate where the end 
points of the sides lie in Color LOGO since the lines are drawn 
by relative movements shown in Figure 4. 




The side opposite the 30 degree angle (the change in Y 
coordinate) is equal to one-half the hypotenuse (one-half of 
20 = 10). Therefore, the Y coordinate must change by 10 
units. The side opposite the 60 degree angle (the change in X 
coordinate) is equal to three times the change in the Y 
coordinate. This equals approximately 1.732 times 10, or 
approximately 17.32. Therefore, you must add 10 to the Y 
coordinate and 17 to the X coordinate of the point forming 
the end of the first line: 

56+ 10 for Y and 128+ 17 for X 

The BASIC statement is: 

LINE-(145,86),PSET 

The final line goes back to the original point ( 1 28,96) by the 
BASIC Statement: 

LINE-(I28,96),PSET 

You can see that drawing the triangle with BASIC is quite a 
mathematical chore because the end points of the lines must 
be specifically defined. Color logo avoids this point-to- 
point construction by using its relative commands FOR- 
WARD 20 and RIGHT 120, repeated three times. These 
commands can beabbreviated FD20and RT 120. Let's now 
take a look at comparable programs in Color LOGO and 

BASIC. i 



Color. LOGO 

TO TRIANGLE 
COLORSET 1 
CLEAR 

REPEAT M¥D 20 RT 
END 



BASIC 

10 PMODE 3 
20 PCLS 
30 SCREEN 1,1 
120) 40 LINE(128,96H128,76),PSET 
50 LINE -(I45,86).PSET 
60 LINE -<128,96),PSET 
70 GOTO 70 
80 END 

The LOGO procedure must have a name (ours is TRIAN- 
GLE). The LOGO statements COLORSET 1 and CLEAR 
perform similar functions to the basic statements PMODE 
i; PCLS; and SCREEN I,L The REPEAT statement of 
Color l6go performs a similar function as a FOR . . . 
NEXTloop in BASIC. All statements in parentheses follow- 
ing REPEAT 3 are performed, in order, three times. This 



FD20 



r FD 20 



RT120 Jf 




FD20 



Figure 4 
two Triangle Movements 



Now let's move on to a regular polygon with more sides. 
Take a regular pentagon (five equal sides). Once again, 
BASIC requires some detailed calculations. Since there are 
five sides, the exterior angles of the pentagon are found by 
dividing 360 by five. This equals 72 degrees. The interior 
angles of the regular pentagon are 180-72 or 108 degrees. 



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126 



the RAINBOW May 1984 





72" 
















Figure 5 






Regular Pentagon 





Now suppose that you want to draw a regular polygon 
with 12 sides. Take a look at this: 



Color LOGO 

TO TWELVE 
COLORSET 1 
CLEAR 

REPEAT I2(FD 20 RT 30) 
END 



BASIC 

1 leave the basic program to you. 
Remember, there arc twelve sides 
— lots of points. 



1 won't go into the calculations necessary to find the end 
points of the sides for the BASIC prl^gram. I'll leave that to 
you. You can use some of the trigonOnt^try shown in earlier 
Using Graphics articles. However, letfs take a look at the 
comparison of Color LOGO and BASIC programs. 



Color LOGO 

lO PENTAGON 
COLORSET 1 
CLEAR 

REPEAT 5(FD 20 RT 72) 
END 



BASIC 

10 PMODE 3 
20 PCLS 
30 SCREEN IJ 
40 LINE(I28,96)-(128,76),PSET 
50 LINE -(?,?),PSET 
60 Lll^E -(?,?),PSET 
70 LINE -{?,?),PSET 
80 LINE -(I28,96),PSET 
90 GOTO 90 
100 ESID 

Notice that the Color LOGO program for PENTAGON is 
the same size as the TRIANGLE program, but the BASIC 
program has grown. 



Notice that the change in the Color LOGO procedures 
merely reflect a change in the number of sides: 

REPEAT N{FD 20 RT M) 

t t 
N = number of sides M = 360 number of sides 

This means that you can very easily write one general proce- 
dure that will draw a regular polygon of any desired number 
of sides. This will be demonstrated in the next issue. 

Many people call Color LOGO a children's programming 
language. 1 would rather think of it in other ways. It could be 
considered a non-mathematician's programming language 
as you have seen from the examples in this article. It could 
also be thought of as a beginner's language since it is so 
straightforward and easy to use. I like to think of it as a 
fun-language because I have fun whenever I use it. 

♦ Color LOGO is available at your Radio Shack stores in 
either cartridge or diskette formats. 

♦ Also available: 

Color LOGO Guide For Parents by Zamora and Albrccht 
Color LOGO Guide For Teachers by Inman and Albrecht 




TRS-80 COMPUTER DISCOUNTS 

COLOR COMPUTERS 

26-3026 16k color II 139.95 

26-3027 16k ext color II 189.95 

26-31 27 64k color comp 210.00 

26-3022 1 st disk drive 329.95 

26-3023 2nd disk drive 229.95 

PRINTERS 

26-1271 DMP-110 299.95 

26-1254 DMP- 200 510.00 

26-1255 DMP- 120 395.00 

26-1257DWP-210 629.95 

MODEL 4 and lOO's 

26-1067 mod 4 16k 829.95 

26-1069 mod 4 64k 2 dr. 1695.00 

26-3801 mod 1 00 8 k 699.95 

26-3802 mod 1 00 24k 839.95 

We Carry the Complete Line of TRS-SO 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N J. 08098 




May 1984 the RAINBOW 127 



L I I I I 




THE VOICE 

You get CoCo's best hardware speech synthesizer using 
the VOIR AX SC-01, THE VOICE (was $119.95). 

Included is a text to speech ML program FREE to allow 
any BASIC program to speak in minutes (was 
$29.95). 

You also get 6 education and fun programs FREE (a 
$34.95 value). 

You will have access to an ever growing library of 
software. 

Disk owners don't despair, THE VOICE works in all 
multi-pac units including our own Y-CABLE. 

You can find speech units for less and a lot for more, but 

you won't find any better. 
All hardware and software (tape or disk) $79.95 




Speech thru TV speaker 
Speech thru external speaker 
Volume control 
Pitch control adjustment 
Demo Programs 
Phoneme Editor 
Text-to-Speech program 
Documentation 
Software 
10 count 
Case material 
Case size 
CoCo 2 version 

Expansion Unit Compatibility 

RS Multi-pak 
BT-1000 

Spectrum Switcher 
Y-Pak 
Y-Cable 

NOTE: All software (except Termtalk) will work on either unit, so you can buy our software and 
their hardware or vice versa. 



Speech Systems 
The Original 
VOICE 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Outside 
5 
Yes 
Yes 
30 pages 
2 tapes 
6 

Aluminum 

15/i6 X 5V2 X 41/4 

Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 




(Actual 

^^^^^^^^^^^ Photo) 

MUSICA 

4 Notes produced simultaneously. 
Input notes from keyboard or joystick. 
Develop your own unique sounding instruments. 
Vary tempo as music plays. 
Save or load music from tape or disk. 
Call music from your own BASIC program. 
Music produced in stereo when used with the STEREO 
COMPOSER. 

All features are fast because it's all machine language. 

It doesn't get any better than this. 

Tape $34.95 (16K) (32K) Disk $39.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

Play these 4 part music selections without any 
additional software, or use as source for Muslca. Over 
1 00 tunes. Comes on tape, may be copied to disk. Ten or 
more tunes on each tape. 
32K Ext 

• Music from Stage, Screen and 
Television 

• Pop Songs of the 70's 

• Pop Songs of the 60's 

• Pop Songs of the 50's 

STEREO COMPOSER 

CoCo's one and only stereo music synthesizer. Plug it 
into the cartridge slot, connect to external speakers or 
your home stereo and you're ready for music realism. 
Comes with the COMPOSER 4 voice software. Separate 
left and right channel volume controls. Two 8 bit D to A's 
— for perfect reproduction. May be used with our best 
software "MUSICA. " Disk owners may use any expan- 
sion unit or our Y-CABLE. 
Tape or Disk $69.95 



Each $9.95 

• Old Time Favorites 

• Classical 

•Christmas Music (Sacred) 

• Christmas Music (Popular) 

• Patriotic 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



If your dealer doesn't stock 
our products, ask for them. 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD. VISA, and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $2.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

lllinoisresidentsadd 6V4% sales tax for the STEREO COMPOSER or THE VOICE. 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (24 HR. VOICE) 
(312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY, ANYTIME TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 
WE SHIP FROM STOCK WITHIN 48 HOURS. 



$100 awarded for the best talking program for education, the handicapped, 
home security or other serious application. 

Another $100 for the best entertainment talking program. 

Contest winners and other program authors will be offered a contract with 
generous royalties. Contest ends 5/31 /S4. 

SPECIAL INVITATION 

To our friends who purchased the Spectrum Projects Voice-Pak, please be 
advised that your programs will work with our speech synthesizer and we will 
gladly accept your contest entry. 




c/f-CC ^J\o^xamx fox iAe, oiC^inaC <Sfis£c^ <Sij&i£.mi n/oica or <Sfiecixum ^Ptojeais^ Q^oice-^PaH^ 



TERMTALK 
(Smart) 

The first smart talking ter- 
minal program. All the 
features of an intelligent 
telecommunications pro- 
gram plus what appears on 
the TV is spoken just like in 
the movie WAR GAMES. 



Features 

• Upload and Download programs 

• Full or Split Screen 

• Normal or Reverse Video 
•Control Xmit Protocols 

• Buffer Editing 

• When used with VOICE it talks (The Voice is only 
necessary if you want talking capability). 




Tape $39.95 



Disk $49.95 



speech Systems believes Termtalk can be of particular use to those with a sighting impair- 
ment. We are currently trying to develop a nationwide network to allow such handicapped 
persons to telecommunicate. Anyone purchasing Termtalk for this application will receive a 
$5.00 discount. 

COLOR MATH 

The perfect educational game to aid the student in 
learning addition, subtraction, multiplication and divi- 
sion. Allows one to specify difficulty level. 
Tape (32K Ext) $28.95 

SPELL-A-TRON 

The program allows the user to build a dictionary of 
words. During testing, the words are spoken. If an iricor- 
rect response is given, the word is spoken again and 
spelled. 

Tape (32K Ext) $28.95 

SCORE E-Z 

A yahtzee type program. Up 
to six players can compete. 
All scoring and record- 
keeping is done by the 
computer. 

Tape (32K Ext) $24,95 

*Termtalk requires the Speech Systems Voice 





FINAL COUNTDOWN 

You must stop the mad 
general from launching a 
missile at Moscow and 
causing WW III. Has multi- 
ple voices for added 
realism. 

Tape (32K Ext) $24.95 



ESTHER 

Meet Esther the talking 
psychoanalyst. An excel- 
lent example of artificial 
intelligence. She may not 
solve all your problems, but 
her insight will amaze you. 
(32K) Tape $24.95 
Disk $28.95 

STAR TALK 



You're the Star 
Fleet Captain. 
Your mission . . . 
destroy the 
enemies' 
Dragon Star 
Ships. All status 
reports are 
spoken! 



(32K) Tape $24.95 Disk $28.95 



More Talking Software 

PRESIDENTS (32K Ext Know your U.S. Presidents) $9.95 

CAPITALS (32K Ext What's the capital of New Hampshire) . . . .$9.95 

STATES (32K Ext Makes learning the states fun) $9.95 

HANGMAN (32K Ext Guess the word before you hang) $9.95 

MATH DRILL (16K Ext Arithmetic was never so much fun) $9.95 

SPELLING TESTER (16K Ext Win your next spelling bee) $9.95 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES (16K Ext Learn a foreign language) . .$9.95 
POETRY CREATOR (16K Ext Robert Frost was never like this) $9.95 
SHORT STORY MAKER (16K Ext You've got to hear this one) $9.95 
And much more to come. Don't forget the contest. 

THE Y-CABLE 

Disk owners why pay $100 to $300 for a multi-pac unit. 
With our Y-CABLE you can connect your disk in one 
connector and the VOICE or STEREO COMPOSER in 
the other. All gold connectors. $29.95 




T 



T 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

DOUBLE DRIVER 



The BEST monitor driver available, unlike some monitor 
drivers the Double Driver provides TRUE monochrome 
and color composite output. Audio Output. Solderless 
installation. $24.95 




RESET YOUR COMPUTER 

A REAL Improvement 
Move the power switch and reset where they belong. An 
LED power on light too! High quality parts. Totally 
solderless kit. 

CoCo I $24.95 
CoCo II $27.95 





64K UPGRADES 

Instantly access 64K via M/L Totally solderless kit to 
upgrade E Boards. Kit includes eight 4164 prime chips 
and chips U29 and U11 already soldered. E Board Kit 
$69.95 

Color Computer II kit requires soldering. $64.95 



GRAPHiCOM 



The Ultimate Graphic Utility 
You must see this program to believe it! Create pictures 
and text on the same screen. Now you can create pictures 
as good as any graphic you have seen on the color com- 
puter. Write graphic adventures or educational programs. 
Requires 64K EXB, Disk Drive and Joy Sticks $29^95 

MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division of Moreton Bay Laboratory 



316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA, 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 



Ordering Information 

Add $2.00 shipping and handling per order. We ship within 
24 hours on receipt of order. Blue Label Service available. 
California residents add 6% sales tax. 




BUSINESS UTILITIES 

MORE BUSINESS -Ver 3.12 The preferred business 
package. Connpletely interactive. General Ledger. 
Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable. Customer 
Statements. Mailing Labels. Profit/Loss. Balance Sheet 
Statements. Our most powerful business package. Buy 
the best! 

32K Disk R/S DOS $99,95 

UTILITIES FOR EVERYONE 

MORE INVENTORY - Maintain an inventory of more than 
1000 items. Know when to order, what has been ordered, 
quantity and value Of any item. Calculate inventory value 
with single keystroke. 

32K Disk R/S DOS $44.95 

COCOWRITER II — Powerful and full featured. An 
excellent word processor at an affordable price. 32, 51 , 
64 or 85 characters per line, justify right, left, center, insert, 
delete, move blocks. Menu driven printing and formatting. 
Tabs, etc. One of the best values in word processing 
today! 

16 K EXB Cassette $34.95, 16K EXB Disk $44.95 

FILE CABINET — Data base, alphabetizes, sorts numeric 
entries, searches for key words or numbers, computes 
totals & averages by categories, saves records, changes 
or deletes them. Up to 20 entries for each record, up to 
256 characters for each entry. Mailing list included. Out- 
put to screen printer or tape. Print all or selected records, 
+ , X, -r Numeric entries. 

16K EXB Cassette $29.95 

THINKING GAMES 

TRIVIA — THE EINSTEIN EDITION - A one to four player 
trivia game. More than 1900 challenging questions. Great 
for parties or family fun. 

16K Non Extended $19.95 Cassette, $21.95 Disk 

ADVENTURE IN TOWER CASTLE - Accept the challenge 
of Tower Castle! A classical word adventure with a graphic 
introduction and added features. Not just words on a green 
screen. Color and music stimulate your imagination. 
32K EXB $17.95 

SCIENCE 

PLANETARIUM — See the Heavens from the Earth. See 
the Earth from the Heavens. You command a computer- 
ized Planetarium. Five celestial programs on one cassette. 
A star chart to delight you. Accent 33 constellations and/or 
21 first magnitude stars. Read the phases of the moon 
at a glance. View the stars in the Northern and Southern 
Hemispheres. Select any day or night from A.D. 101 to 
thousands of years in the future. See the location of the 
Sun, Moon, Mars, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn as they 
appear in your sky. A planet chart which locates the posi- 
tions of the nine major planets. See the locations of the 
planets for any date A.D. 0 to thousands of years in the 
future. Watch the planets revolve around the Sun by days, 
months or years. Find the Zodiac sign of your birth and 
the location of every planet at that time. Includes charts 
of the Zodiac constellations. 

16K Extended Basic Required, $19.95 cassette 



S huttle 
Graphic 



ByJeff Kawa 




A realistic Illustration of the space shuttle Columbia 



F 



I or all j^ou amateur a&trcM 
11^; Ii^re is the picture 
you have been waiting for. 
Piety rt the space shuttle C^luiiif*^ 
bia after blasting off the launch 
pad md rlsi^ to ih4 hi^^ 
exteni. This computer picture 
will addejcdtementanidil^^ 
your space dle^nl|^ Before ymp 
very eyes you be able to see 
the space shtittle uttfold; fhit 
detailed illustrations are aitthen- 
tic ait4 realistic. 

Lmes 5 through 20 use Ihl highest gir^pi^i mode available 
spate shttttle will unfold in the following lines: 
Line 25 draws the nose and front of the space shuttle. 




Clearing the screen in a buff color, the^ 



yhe Jtt di^ws the top of the shuttle. 

Lines 35 through 70 draw the tail ^singa FOR . . mXTlo^ (fimmpi^i FOR n^l to W:NEXTp 
Liilc^s 75 and 80 draw the rudder. 

Line 85 draws the orbital maneuvering engines and fuel tanks. 

Lines 90 and 95 draw one of the main engines, th^ wing, and the linderbody of the shuttle. 
Lines 100 through 1 15 draw the shuttle's cargo bjSy doors. 
Lines 120 through 155 draw and paint the heat resistant tiles. 



(Jeff Kawa, a U-year-old eighth grade student, v^orks with 
computers primarily as a hobby. He has taken summer 
computer courses where he studied BASIC programming and 
is presently in a computer science class. His career plans 
include becoming a computer engineer. 




May 1964 the RAINBOW 131 




PRICKLY- PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-100 

PROGRAMS REOUIRE 16K EXnNDED lASIC FOR TAPE. AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



COLOR DISK TRIVIA 

WITH DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM FOR EDUCATIONAL USE 



Here it is! The first new program offered by the author of 
the famed VIKINGI in nearly two years, and worth the wait. 

Color Disk TrMa 

is simply a very good, and very fun to play game. It has 
everything going for it: The challenge of trivia, ease of use, 
a good social game encouraging conversation, and you 
may even learn something! The development system 
(included) even lets you easily create your own custom 
question disks. 

The play of the game is easy to understand, because the 
computer does all the work for you. It even looks up and 
presents the proper question! 

On each question disk there are five categories, and there 
are an amazing 1 100 questions on each disk. No, that's 
not a misprint, we said 1 1 00 questions per question disk! 
Yes, that is a pretty full disk. Because the questions are 
stored on the disk, instead of In memory, you can play 
COLOR DISK TRIVIA on any size Color Computer system 
with one disk drive — 1 6K, 32K, or 64K. 
There are already five question disks available, and you 
get the GENERAL disk when you purchase the game. 
That* s correct, there are already FIVE question disks with a 
total of 5500 questions available for shipment RIGHT 
NOW, with more on the way shortly. 
All question disks have five categories and 1100 ques- 
tions. The disks available now are: 
GENERAL: (Included with the game) The categories for 
this disk are history, the written word, movies & television, 
science & the world, and sports. 

ENTERTAINMENT: These categories are movies, the 
stage, television, music, and literature. 
BIBLE: 1 1 00 questions in five categories on the Old and 
New Testaments. 

SPORTS: This disk will challenge even the very know- 
ledgeable sports fan. All major sports (and some minor 
ones) are represented. 

CHILDREN: No, this isn't questions ABOUT children, it's 
questions FOR children. 1 100 fun questions just for the 
younger set. 

The game of COLOR DISK TRIVIA can be played by from 
1 to 4 people (orteams), and you set the length of the game 
at the start when you decide how many questions must be 
answered in each category to win. The computer chooses 
the categories randomly, though sometimes it will let you 
choose the category for yourself (or let your opponents 
choose for you). Because of this category selection by the 
computer, a single category can often hold you up while 
one of your opponents slips by to win. The outcome is 
always in doubt, and no player is ever eliminated. 
Trivia lovers will enjoy the fact that you can play without 
other people if you desire, because the computer will 
provide plenty of challenge. We want to emphasize that 
this is, first and foremost, a fun game. 

Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include 
$1.50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping free 
on $50.00 or larger orders). AZ residents add 7% sales 
tax Orders shipped within two days. 



The Development System 

Naturally, in order for our programmers to type in thou- 
sands of questions easily and accurately, a good develop- 
ment program to create the question disks had to be 
written, and we include this program with the game at no 
additional charge! 

The prog ram is all menu-driven and very user-friendly. That 
means that no knowledge of programming is needed to 
use it. If you can turn on your computer and type, you're all 
set! Now sit back and imagine the educational possibilities. 
Yes, our question disks have 1100 questions, but the 
game program will handle question disks having any 
number of questions from 5 up to a full disk of 1 1 00, so a 
teacher can type in 50 or 1 00 questions and answers (the 
questions are multiple choice), and then the students can 
ptay the "game" and have a great time, while accidently 
picking up the lesson. Let the natural spirit of competition 
fuel the learning proces& 

The development program is very easy to use, and gives 
you options to add questions, change or delete a question, 
and print the questions and answers on the screen (or a 
printer, if you have one). You can develop a question disk 
and easily add questions to it any time you wish. 
This program finally gives parents and teachers the op- 
portunity to easily create a custom learning program for 
any level student, and if we keep it a secret, no-one need 
know it's more than a game. 

TECHNICAL INFORMATION: COLOR DISK TRIVIA is a 

mixture of Machine Language and BASIC. It uses Fielded 
Direct Access Disk Files. COLOR DISK TRIVIA requires 
16K and at least one disk drive. 
ORDERING INFORMATION: 

COLOR DISK TRIVIA GAME with QUESTION DEVELOP- 
MENT SYSTEM and GENERAL question disk containing 
1 1 00 QUESTIONS: $29.95 
ADDITIONAL QUESTION DISKS: 
THE BIBLE: 1 1 00 questions on the Bible. $1 9.95 
ENTERTAINMENT: 1 100 quest ion son movies, TV, stage, 
music, and literature. $19.95 
SPORTS: 1 1 00 questions for the sports fan. $1 9.95 
CH I LDREN: 1 1 00 questions for the younger set. $1 9.95 
FOR A LIMITED TIME, buy the game for $29.95 and 
select an additional disk of your choice for price! That's a 
$49.90 value for Just $39.95. You save $10, and we will 
pay the shipping. 



Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. 
Canadian dealers should contact Kelly Software 
Distributors, Ltd., P. O. Box 1 1 932, Edmonton, Alberta 
T6J-3L1 (403) 421-8003 



Stocked by Quality Dealers, or 

Send Order To PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

8532 E. 24th Street 

Tucson, Arizona 85710 
(602) 886-1505 



Line 160 draws the USA insignia. 

Lines 165 through 185 draw the American flag. 



y/ 

70 


.... 63 


110... 


. . . 220 


END , , 


. , , , 25 



The listing: 



1 REM /SPACE SHUTTLE/ 

5 PHODE 4,1 

10 PCL8 9 

IS SCREEN 1,1 

20 COLOR 0,5 

23 DRAW''BM244,125|U3L1U2L1U1L3R1 
U1L1U1L2U1L2U1L3U1L2U1L2D2L1D1L7 
U2L2U4R1U1R2D1R3D1R3D1R1D1U1L1U1 
L3U1L3U1L3R1U1L2U1L3U1C5L1C0L1U1 
C5L1C0L1U1C5L1C0L1U1C9L1C0L2U2C9 
L 1 C0U 1 C5L 1 C0U 1 C5L 1 C0U 1 CSL 1 C0 I 
30 DRAW"L2D1L7D2L1D1R2D1R5D1R1U1 
L3U3R 1 D2R 1 D 1 R3U 1 C5R 1 C0R2L2U 1 CSL 1 
C0U 1 CSL 1 C0U 1 CSL 1 C0U2R 1 L2U 1 R 1 L2U 1 
L20D 1 CSL 1 C0L 1 SD 1 CSL 1 C0L 1 7D 1 CSL 1 C 
0L18D1CSL1C0L16D1CSL1C0L16D1CSL1 
C0L20U 1 CSL 1 C0L2D2R2LSR2U4R 1 D4R 1 U 
4L3U1R2U1I 

3S A«-"L3U1L1R3L1U1" 
40 FOR A - I TO 7 
4S DRAW A*-!-**!" 

50 NEXT A 

SS DRAWL2U1R1L2U1R1L2U1L1R3L1U1 
I 

60 FOR A « 1 TO 10 
65 DRAW A*-!-"!** 

70 NEXT A 

75 DRAW"BM29,S8|L1U1L12D1L2R13D1 

L13D1R6D1R1L7R1D1R6D2R1D1R1D2R1D 

2R1D2R1D1R1D2R1D2R1D2R1D1R1D2R1D 

2R1D1R1D2R1D2R1D2L1D1LSD1L2U1L1U 

2L 1 U2L 1 U3L 1 U2L 1 U2L 1 U3L 1 U2L 1 U3L 1 U 

2L 1 U2L 1 U2L 1 U2L 1 U2R6D 1 R 1 | 

80 DRAW"D1R1D2R1D1R1D2R1D1R1D2R1 

D1R1D2R1D1R1D1L1R1D1R1D5U4R1D5U3 

R1D2R1D2U1R1D3U1R1D1R1D2R1D1R1L1 

D 1 L2D 1 L 1 D 1 U2R 1 U3D2R 1 D 1 L2D2L8U 1 R7 

D 1 L6D2R3C5D 1 C0R 1 7C5D 1 C0R6C5D 1 C0R 

3C5D 1 C0R2C5D 1 C0R 1 CSD 1 C0R2CSD 1 C0D 

1CSL1C0I 

85 DRAW"D2C5L1C0L1D3CSL1C0D2C5L1 

C0DSL3C5D 1 C0L29U 1 LSR 1 U2C5L 1 C0L2C 

5U1C0L1U5C5R1C0R1C5U1C0U1R1U3R1U 

2D 1 R2D 1 R2D4U2L5U 1 RSU 1 L5R2U 1 R 1 D 1 R 

3U 1 R 1 U2C5R 1 C0U2C5R 1 C0R3U 1 " 

90 DRAW"BM20, 131|R10UeRlU6L5UlLS 

D1L2D1L1D1L1D2L1D7R1D1R1D1R2D2LS 



D1L4D1L3D1L2D1L2R2D1R4D1R7D2L1R3 
D1R3D1R13D1R29U1R21U1R20U1R25U1R 
22U1R20U1R17U1R15U1R9U1R6U1R6U1R 
5U1R4U1R2U1R3U12D12R2U1R1U1R1U1R 
lUl" 

95 DRAW"BM218, 110IL1D2L1D4L7U1L7 
U1L1D1L7D13L97C5D1C0L2CSD1C0L30R 
S0D 1 R2D 1 R 1 8D2L4SC5D 1 C0L 1 0C5U 1 C0L 
25C5U1C0L1 1C9U1C0L4U1R44L44D1L1D 
3R4D1R10D1R19D1R36U1R12U1R19U4'' 
100 DRAW"BH181,96|D3C5L1C0D2CSL1 
C0D7C5L1C0D2L1 1C8D1C0L19C5D1C0L1 
7R 1 6U9C5R 1 C0U2CSR 1 C0U2C5R 1 C0U 1 » 
105 DRAW''BM130, 113IL20R6U6C5R1C0 
U3C5R1C0U1C5R1C0U2C5R1C0R1U1 " 
110 DRAW"BH109, 114IL19C5D1C0L18R 
1 4U7CSR 1 C0U2C5R 1 C0U 1 C5R 1 C0U2CSR 1 
C0U1C5R1C0R1U1" 

1 15 DRAW"BM72, 1 16| L9U7C5R1C0U3C5 

R1C0U1C5R1C0U1CSR1C0U1 " 

120 DRAW"BH144, 117ID2R4U1L4U1R4" 

125 DRAW"Bril22, 119tR2" 

130 DRAW"BH120, 124ID1L3U1R3** 

135 DRAW"BH107, 120R2'' 

140 DRAW"BM34,120|R5DSL5USR5'* 

145 PAINT <210, 125), 0,0 

150 PAINT <36, 122), 0,0 

155 PAINT <24, 121), 0,0 

160 DRAW"BM70, 121ID4R3U4R1C5R2C0 

R3L3D2R3D2L3R4C5R2C0U4R3D4U2L3'' 

165 PMODE 3, IICOLOR 7,8:LINE<96, 

121) >< 100, 121) ,P8ET 

170 LINE(93, 123>-<100, 123),P8ET 

175 LINE(93,125)-<100,12S),P8ET 

180 PMODE 4,1 

185 COLOR 0,S:DRAW"BM93, 121ID2R2 

U2L2D1R2" 

190 GOTO 190 




PLAY 

COMPUTER MONOPOLY 

ON YOUR COCO 



Full color playing board and 
cards display. 32K extended 
Basic. $21.00 cassette 
postage paid in U.S. 



Key Programs 
6728 Mackey 
Overland Park, KS 66204 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 133 



PETROCCI FREELANCE ASSOCIATES 




Maintains data on 255 people in first eight genera- 
tions of your family tree. Prints 3 charts; 5 generation 
pedigree - graphic display of lineage; Family group 
charts; ancestors by reference number. Easy to use. 
32KEXT 14.95 



ALPHABET SONG 

An excellent companion to preschool package. 



A B C D 



What better way to teach the alphabet than with a 
familiar tune accompanied by full size screen display 
of the letters. This one has been kid tested and loved! 

Level 1 - sequences through entire alphabet with song. 
Level 2 - -steps at random letters, child must press next letter in 
sequence 

Level 3 - Child must enter each letter in order. 

All levels accompanied by Alphabet Song. 

16KEXT 11.95 



See Special SPRING 

Prices Below ALL GAMES R 


SPECIAL Good Through 
EDUCED 30% May 30 1984 


• INSPECTOR CLUESEAU 

The No. 1 Murder Mystery for the CoCo! 
(Every game is different.) 32K EXT 13.95 

• PATTI-PAK 

"The Best" - Highest Quality Graphics 

16K 15.95 

• STAGECOACH 

Wild Wtest Adventure! 16K EXT 13.95 


• FLASHER 

Can Your Memory Save You From The Sharks? 
32KEXT 13.95 

• TYCOON 

CoCo Monopoly. 32K Tape Only 13.95 

• BOWLER 

Sports Action Fun! 16K EXT 13.95 

• DUNKA DUCK 

Arcade Action For All Ages. 16K EXT 13.95 


BOWLING SECRETARY 

(New Super Second Edition) 

Now includes handicap routines for both men and 
women, pin spotting, selection of up to 15 players 
per team, plus the standard team standings, indivi- 
dual average, high and total pins, team won/lost, 
high series, cumulative total team points. 

Printer Output & Screen Display 
32K EXT - 24.95 Std. 16K Version Still Available 


LITTLE LEAGUER 

Jf3 fTj Doe$ all the record keeping for you. Excel- 
^^T^f^ lent printout. Allows mid season entry. 
(P^C"^ Keeps 19 different statistics and individual 

\ as well as team statistics, 
jy Easy screen editing features - allows edit- 
// lL ''^Q single player data. Saves to tape or 
^ disk.. 

32K EXT 24,95 



Sli1lilk]il Anidyili 
32K EXT 2 Programs ft)r 34.95 
Stress Evaluator 

16K EXT 24.95 

Medical Terminology 

32K EXT 19.95 

Heart Lung Circulatory 

32K EXT 34.95 

Weather Forecaster 

32K EXT DISK 19.95 

Weather Watch 

16K EXT 24.95 

Hurricane Traclcer 

16KEXT 15.95 

Print Spooler 
64K 11.95 



WMl4^r Clr^p^liCt TMl Nil 
32K EXT 39.95 



T«3$t Master Gf aphi^ft 
32KEXT 19.95 



All Programs 16K Tape 
Unless Otherwise Specified 
All Programs Available on Disk - Add $5.00 
Special Sale Prices - Retail Only 



Include $1 .50 for handling for each program 
Arizoru residents add 7% sales lax. 
Quantity Discounts to Dealers 




ROCCI FREELANCE ASSOeUTES 

jS. 651 N. Hoi 
l^v^TucSOn. / 

— > RO?-?Q 



I. Houghton Rd 
. AZ 8574817" 
602-296-1041 I 



32K EXT DISK , , 44.95 

Real Estate Investment 

16K EXT 24.95 

Homeowner Selling 
Analysis 

16KEXT 24.96 

Owner Financed 
Real Estate 

16K EXT 24.95 

KIDS KORNER 
Preschool Package. ABCs, 
123s, Shapes. Big-Bigger 

AH Four 24.95 

Ggillottne Spelling 

Game 16K EXT 9.95 

Alphabet Song 

16KEXT 1 rafr _ 



Color labels from your CGP-115 



Special Delivery 

By Thomas Szlucha 



Do you want to really impress someone receiving mail 
correspondence from you? Try using a custom label 
drawn in colors with the CGP-1 15 printer/ plotter. 
CGPLABEL is a program designed to draw such a label 
allowing the selection of one color for the text and another 
for a neat border drawn around the address. Figure 1 shows 
an example of such a label addressed to our favorite Color 
Computer magazine. 

In developing this simple program 1 discovered a couple 
of interesting things about the CGP-1 15 printer that are 
worth passing on to other users. In the instruction manual, 
the "S*' command used to set the text scale in the graphics 



The other interesting discovery worth noting is that, 
although the documentation states that text mode character 
sizes are limited to 40 and 80 cpl, there is a technique that 
allows any of the graphics mode character sizes to be availa- 
ble in the normal text mode. When the printer is turned on, it 
cycles up in the text mode with the character size determined 
by the positon of dip switch 2 on the back panel. To change 
the character size, simply enter the graphics mode, PRINTS- 
2XHR$(18) and [ENTER] the scale desired, PRINTS- 
2/'Sx" Then switch back to the text mode, PRINn-2, 
CHR$(17). The printer will stay at that character size until 
switched off or a new size is selected. 



TABLE I 



8 


cpl 


5 


cpl 


0 


80 


8-9 


8 


1 


40 


10 


7 


2 


26 


11.12 


6 


3 


20 


13-15 


5 


4 


16 


16-19 


4 


5 


13 


20-25 


3 


ft 


11 


26-39 


2 


r 


10 


40^63 


1 



the RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 209 
Prospect, K>l. 40059 



mode allows values of zero through 63 to produce character 
sizes between 80 and one characters per line (cpl). This could 
obviously be interpreted as providing 64 unique character 
sizes. Unfortunately, this is not true. There are only 16 
different character sizes because the formula to calculate 
cpl, shown beloWi is rounded off by the computer to the next 
lowest whole number. 

cpl = 80/ l+S where S is the scale parameter 

Table 1 shows the relationship between values of S and the 
resulting characters per line. 



(Thomas Szlucha, a frequent contributor to the Rain- 
bow, enjoys free-lance writing. Home computing is a 
hobby enjoyed by his whole family,) 



CGPLABEL is designed to work with the MC-iO, as well 
as the 4K Color Computer. It produces labels that are 
center-justified, using the largest character size that will fit 
the width of the paper. The label will fit in the sending 
address area of a business envelope and is large enough for 
packages. Being written for MC-IO and Color BASIC, com- 
mas are not allowed in the address. If you have Extended 
Color BASIC, change lines 20, 30 and 40 from INPUT to 
LINEIN PUT to accept this punctuation. If you would like 
the address left instead of center-justified, change variables 
LI, L2, and L3 in lines 190, 210 and 230 to LM. 

Unfortunately, real label stock is not available for the 
CGP-1 15. 1 find a glue stick handy for attaching the finished 
labels. The program provides dashed lines above and below 
the label to aid in trimming. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 135 




The listing: 



1 'CeP-115 LABEL PRINTER 

2 'BY T.8ZLUCHA 

3 'TO LEFT JUSTIFY CHANGE L1,L2 
AND L3 IN LINES 190,210 AND 230 
TO LH 

4 ' 

5 ' 

10 CLS:PRINT»6eP-115 LABEL PRINT 
ER 

15 pr i nt "check your plotter pens 
!":for t-1 toi500:next:cl8 
20 input"name "|n«:l1«len(n«) 
30 input"str address » « sa« : l2«le 

N(8A«) 

40 INPUT "CITY 8( STATE "»CS*:L3= 
LEN(C8«) 

50 CLS : PR I NTN« : PR I NTSA« : PR I NTCS« 
: PRINT 

60 INPUT "CORRECT <Y>/<N>» } R«: IF 

R«.»Y" THEN 60 
70 IF R«="N" THEN CLS:60T0 20 



Af WIf S END 

(C) 1984 by Derringer Software, /nc. 

You may lose your sanity while playing this new game from Derringer 
Software! As the resident caretaker at the local 'Home for burned- 
Qut programmers", your job is to keep the public safe by keeping the 
patients within the confines of the central compound. But. every now 
and then the somewhat erratic patients start running about and you find 
yourself having to open and close doors to get them to safety. Of 
course as one gets in, another may jump out! Three separate display 
screens with nine levels of play for each. Play against the clock for the 
best time. Score kept for each game and level. 




CRAZY MAZE 



SPIRALMANIA BEGINNER'S BOX 



The CRAZY MAZE Is completely different each time you play, 
SPIRALMANIA will be a true test of mental strength. 
The BEGINNER'S BOX Is for those short on patience! 



Requires joysticks and can be played on I6K Extended upe or disk 
systems! Please Indicate tape or disk when you order. Send check or 
money order to: Derringer Software, Inc. P. O. Box 5300, Florence, 
S.C. 29502-2300. Visa or Master Card customers can call (803) 
665-5676 9:00am to 5:00pm Mon-Fri. Please include $2.00 for ship- 
ping and handling No COD's. 

if See the ad for Double Buster also 4r 



75 GOTO 60 

80 IF Ll>-L2 THEN LM-Ll :6OTO90 
85 LM-L2 

90 IF LM<L3 THEN LH-L3 

100 CC«-"0>BLACK 1-BLUE 2-8REEN 

3-RED" 

110 CLS: PR I NT "COLOR OF LETTERS": 
PRINTCC*: INPUT Cl:IF CK0 OR Cl> 
3 THEN 110 

120 CLS: PR I NT "COLOR OF BORDER" :P 
RINTCC*: INPUT C2:IF C2<0 OR C2>3 

THEN 120 
130 PRINT*-2,CHR«(18) 
140 PRINT#-2, "C"C1 
150 PRINT#-2, "M 0,-100" 
160 PRINT#-2, "I" 
170 8>INT(80/(Ln-^4))-l 
180 CL-INT(80/(S-M)) 
190 B»INT(CL-L1)/2:G08UB 500 
200 Tl«-BL«-i-N« 

210 B«INT(CL-L2)/2:G0SUB 500 

220 T2«"BL«-i-SA« 

230 B-INT(CL-L3)/2:808UB 500 

240 T3««BL«-<-CS« 

250 PRINT#-2, "S";S 

260 PRINT#-2, "P"|T1« 

270 PRINT#-2, "«"0", "480/CL»7/5»( 

-1) 

280 PRINT#-2, •'P"|T2« 

290 PRINT#-2, "M"0","4B0/CL*7/5«( 

-2) 

300 PRINT#-2, »P"»T3« 

310 PRINT»-2, "H" 

320 PRINT#-2, "C"C2 

330 PRINT#-2, »L0" 

340 YI>i480/CL»7/5 

350 X-0 : Y-Y I *2: GO8UB480 

360 X»480 :G0SUB 480 

370 X-480 :Y«(-3)»YI:OOSUB 480 

380 X«0:eOSUB 480 

390 X"0 :Y-(2)»YI:G0SUB 480 

400 PRINT»-2, "L7" 

410 PRINT«-2, "R"0", ••YI»1.5 

420 PRINT#-2, "J480,0" 

430 PRINT«-2, "R"0", "YI»<-8) 

440 PRINT#-2, "J -480,0" 

450 PRINT#-2, "A" 

460 CLS: INPUT "ANOTHER OF SAME LA 
BEL <Y>/<N>"JR«: IF R*-"Y" THEN C 
LS: SOTO 130 

470 input "a different label <y>/ 
<n>"|r*:if r»«"y" then 10 
475 c:ls:end 
480 print«-2, "d"x","y 

490 RETURN 

500 BL»-"" 

510 FOR 1-0 TO B 

520 BL«>BL«+" " 

530 NEXT I 

540 RETURN _ 



136 the RAINBOW May 1984 




A colorful program to make your work look as,.. 




Pretty As A Picture 
With CGP-115 

By Thomas Szlucha 



I would like to share this program with the many CoCo 
artists who like to have a permanent copy of their work. 
The program entitled GPDUMP is designed to take a 
picture drawn on the screen and reproduce it with the CGP- 
1 15 printer/ plotter. If you have not seen one of these print- 
ers — or have ignored it thinking because of its small size 
that it must be a toy — it is really worth examining. 
Although it is small, it packs a lot of capability in a minia- 
ture scale, but this is not meant to be a Radio Shack adver- 
tisement, so on with the discussion of a very practical appli- 
cation for this printer. 

The concept employed to create a screen dump is quite 
simple. The "screen" is scanned, interrogating each pixel 
encountered with Extended Basic's P POINT command, 
Dependingon whether the pixel is "on" or "off," the instruc- 
tion to write to the equivalent area on the plotter paper with 
either a space or a line is given. In actual practice, to speed 
up the plotting routine, the length of a continuous string of 
on oroff pixels are accumulated in variables A and B,and a 
string variable PS$ is built containing the appropriate print 
commands needed to recreate the scanned line. After the 
complete line is scanned on the screen, the command to 
draw the line is sent to the plotter. Speed was an important 
consideration in developing this program. Several tech- 
niques were employed to achieve maximum efficiency. 
These include placing the main scanning routine in a tight 
loop at the front of the program, and utilizing the famed 
CPU speed-up poke. Plotting a screen dump is still time 
consuming, influenced by the inherent speed of the printer 
and the large number of lines needed to recreate the screen, 
as well as the use of basic instead of machine language. A 



(Thomas Szlucha, a technical specialist / project man- 
ager of Xerox Corporation, is a frequent contributor 
to the Rainbow. He enjoys writing software as a 
hobby,) 



machine language version of this program is under devel- 
opment. 

The screen dump was designed to produce either a 1 or2x 
scale enlargement with the 2x mode drawing a line twice as 
long for each pixel encountered on the screen. To take 
maximum advantage of the width of the printer, the scan- 
ning takes place vertically on the screen and is transposed 
horizontally to the plotter. This allows 384 (2 x 192) of the 
480 possible plotting positions to be utilized in the 2x mode. 
GPD(/A/P works in either PMODE3 or 4, You are allowed 
to choose the color to be "sensed" by the PPOINT com- 
mand, as well as the color to draw with. In addition, you can 
overlay several colors (one per pass) but be prepared to 
spend some time at it — a single color pass in the fx mode 
takes about 15 minutes. Since the program takes considera- 
ble time to complete a pass, a "finished" buzzer has been < 
incorporated so that the computer can be left unattended. 
Perhaps you can spend the time catching up on your Rain- 
bow reading. If you are like me. Rainbow has gotten so large i 
it is hard to find time to finish one issue before the next 
arrives. 

In order to test the plotting routine, a simple argyle-like 
mosaic is d ra wn as a "test pattern." Selecting the test pattern 
option draws the picture to the screen, then dumps it to the i 
plotter. There are two different ways to plot a picture of your f 
own choice. You can append a picture drawing routine of 
your own, taking the place of the "test pattern" which starts | 
on line 500 in the program. An alternate technique requires I 
that you draw your own picture on the screen and in 
memory using another program or graphics drawing utility. 
Then load in GPDUMP and set the PMODEand SCREEN \ 
parameters in lines 120 and 300 to the appropriate value. i 

If your CoCo can't handle the higher speed from the I 
speed-up poke, delete lines 13, 240 and 250. If you do use the 
speed-up poke, exercise some caution — remember that if 
you exit the program with the [BREAK] key you should hit 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 137 



THE TOP 4 COCO GAMES... 



QDCiD] 




CUBIX 

By Spectral Associates. Very 
much like the arcade smash! 
Jump little Cubix around the 3D 
maze trying to change the color 
of all the squares. With Death 
Globes, Discs, Snakes, etc. 32K 



ZAKSUND 

From Elite Software comes this 
fantastic arcade style space 
action game with 3 different 
stages of moving 3-D graphics. 
You've never seen anything like 
this on your CoCo! Great sound 
too! 32K Tape: $24.95 





THE KING 

Previously called 'Donkey King', 
you simply cannot buy a more 
impressive game for your CoCo. 
With 4 different screens and 
loads of fun! From Tom Mix Soft- 
ware. 32KTape; $25.95 



GHOST GOBBLER 



From Spectral Assoc. This 
"PAC" theme game has been 
improved several times. It is 
definitely the best of its type. Bril- 
liant color, action and sound, 
iLisl like an arcade. 16K Tape: 
% H H5 



ZD-LI' "|4J-c: 



COLORCADE 

SUPER JOYSTICK MODULE 




NLY $19.95 



IOY5TICIC INTERFACE/RAPID FIRE/6 FT. EXTENDER ALL IN ONE! The 

Coforcade allows connection of any Atari type joystick to your CoCo 
(including the Wico Red Ball). These switch type sticks are extremely 
rugged and have a taster and more positive response. They will improve the 
play of almost any action game. 

An adjustable speed rapid tire circuit is built in. Press your tire button and 
Ket a great burst of fire instead of just a single shot! You get a real advantage 
in shooting games that do not have repeat fire. 



COLORWARE 
LIGH T PEN 

ONLY $19.95 

WITH SIX FREE 
PROGRAMS ON 
CASSETTE! 

The Colorware Light Pen plugs directly into your joystick port and 
comes with six fun & useful programs on cassette. Easy instruc- 
tions show how to use it with Basic and it's compatible with light 
pen software such as Computer Island's "Fun Pack." Order yours 
today. Only $1 9.95 complete. 




ATARI JOYSTICK 
ONLY ^ I 



ROM/ PROJECT/ 
PRODUCT CASE 




THE BEST YOU 

CAN BUY 
WICO #15-9730 




$29.95 

WICO FAMOUS 
''RED BALL'' 



CiVe a professioMi look to your pro/ect 
or product! High quality 3 piece injection 
molded plastic with spring loaded door. 
Designed especially for the CoCo ROM 

slot. 

2 -4 pes $5.50 Ea. 

5-9 pes $3.50 Ea. 

10 -99 pes $2,75 Ea. 

100 & UP Call Us. 

P.C. board for 27XX EPROMS, . . $4.00 Ea. 



TELEWRITER-64 



TMi ii ft mtm\ un^hpd r^h 



Id fhoto I 

ilmr tMt not ttw rfWM 

C»r5?«.T*!L_ 



iM< {tiwKttrs in otRr Color CoMnrtcr m 
^*'*itti«tf3 lorS™" "uTKi for «ur 



AKICFfiHIJKLNHOrtttSIUVHXV 
It e 9 4Si7l90 I 'Itll • ( >H -t II 
ibc4flf«M Jkt«ii«f^ritv»«iv 

ii.''l<>1*l»im'<>««»-l 



J 



DISK $59.95 

CASSETTE.., $49.95 



Colorware researched the word 
processors available for the Color 
Computer. This is the best. Tele- 
writer-64 is a truly sophisticated sys- 
tem that is marvelously easy to use. 
It works with any 16K, 32K or 64K 
system and any CoCo compatible 
printer. 



TOP-RATED COCO 
WORD PROCESSOR 



[COLORWARE 



TOLL FREE ORDERING 

800-221 '091 6 




'REAL TALKER' 

HARDWARE Voice Synthesizer 

NEWfrom 
COLORWARE.. 
only.., $59.95 

THINKING OF BUYING A 
COCO VOICE SYNTHESIZER? 

READ THIS..,. 

Making your computer talk couldn't be any easier! 
'Real Talker' is a full featured, ready to use, HARDWARE 
voice synthesizer systenn in a cartridge pak. It uses the 
Votrax SC-01 phoneme synthesizer chip to produce a 
clear, crisp voice. 

FREE TEXT-TO-SPEECH 

Included free with 'Real Talker' is Colorware's 
remarkable Text-to-Speech program. This is a truly 
powerful machine language utility. What it does is 
automatically convert plain English to speech. And it has 
an unlimited vocabulary! For example, use it in the direct 
mode: Type in a sentence or a paragraph, even mix in 
numbers, dollar signs, etc, then press enter. The text is 
spoken. At the same time a phoneme string is generated 
which can be saved to cassette or disk, modified or used 
in a Basic program. 

We originally planned to sell this major piece of 
programming for about $40.00 but decided it was so 
useful that no 'Real Talker' user should be without it. 
Besides, it really shows off the capability of 'Real Talker'. 

Also included with 'Real Talker' is our unique Phoneme 
Editor program. It allows you to explore and create 
artificial speech at the phoneme level. Phenomes are the 
fundimental sounds or building blocks of word 
pronunciation. There are 64 different phenomes, as well 
as 4 inflection levels at your disposal. Creating and 
modifyirrg speech at the phenome level is both fascinating 
and educational. The Phenome Editor may also be used to 
customize the pronunciation of speech produced by the 
Text-to-Speech program. 



You don't have to use any of our utility programs 
though. If you write your own Basic Programs, you will 
find the pocket sized Votrax Dictionary (included free) is 
all you need to make your own Basic programs talk. This 
dictionary gives you quick access to the phenome 
sequences used to create approximately 1400 of the most 
used words in the English language. 

How about compatibility? 'Real Talker' is compatible 
with any 16K, 32K, 64K, Extended or non-extended Color 
Computer. It works with any cassette or disk based 
system, with or without the Radio Shack Multi-slot 
expander. No other synthesizer under $100 can make this 
claim. Most other CoCo voice synthesizers require an 
expensive Multi-slot expander in order to work with the 
disk system. 'Real Talker' requires only an inexpensive Y- 
adapter. This is an important consideration if you plan on 
adding a disk or have one already. 

'Real Talker' comes completely assembled, tested and 
ready to use. It is powered by the CoCo and talks through 
yourT.V. speaker so there is nothing else to add. Price 
includes Text-to-Speech and other programs on cassette 
(may be transferred to disk), User Manual and Votrax 
Dictionary. ONLY , $59.95 

'Y-BRANCHING CABLE' For disk systems. This 40-pin, 3 
connector cable allows 'Real Talker' to be used with any 
disk system $29.95 



YOU DECIDE.... 

Order yours today on our Toil-Free Order Line. If you are 
not delighted with your 'Real Talker' system, simply 
return it within 30 days for a prompt, courteous refund. 



[C010f?IIMI?£ 



COLORWARE INC 
78-03F Jamaica Ave. 
Wcxjdhaven, NY 11421 
(212)647-2864 



★ ★ ★ ORDERING INFORMATION ★ ★ ★ 



ADD S2;00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING A HANDLING. 
C.O.D. 'S: ADD $3.00 EXTRA. 
SHIPPING S, HANDLING FOR CANADA IS $4.00 
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTER CARD, M.O. % CHECKS. 
N. Y. RESIDENTS MUST ADD SALES TAX. 



[RESET] to slow down to normal speed. Note in line 250 the 
computer is instructed to set the printer output to 300 Baud. 
In actuality, this is 600 Baud in the speed-up mode. This is a 
factor to keep track of if you exit the program by other than 
normal means. 

After keying in the program, be sure that fresh pens are 
installed on the CGP-1 15. Dumps with this program will 
stress them. Try the test pattern or load your favorite gra- 
phics picture for a demo. A four-color dump is well worth 
the time spent. There is something exciting about a "hard" 
copy that cannot be achieved on the CRT. You should see all 
the miniature screen dumps that I have framed and are 
hanging in my office. 




The listing: 

0 CLEAR S00:AR-0:GOTO260 

5 AR-1 : PI-INT <PS/S+. 5) :F0RX«255T 

00 STEP-PS : P— s» < 256-x ) : A-0 : B-0 : 

PS«= .. » . FORY- 191 TO0STEP- 1 
20 IFPPOINT<X,Y)<xa_ THEN IF A«0 
THEN B-B+S: GOTO 100: ELSE PS«-PS» 
+" jx+STR* (A) , "-i-CHR* < 13) : A-0: B« 
S:6OTO100 

30 IFB-0 THEN A-A-i-S: 60T0 100: ELSE 
PS«-PS»+ " R " +STR* < B ) + " , " +CHR« < 1 3 

) :B«0:A-s 

100 NEXTY 

110 IF B>0 THEN PS«»PS«+"R"+STR« 
<B)+", "+CHR«<13) 

120 IF B-192*S THEN PS«-"":80T01 
40 

130 IF A>0 THEN PS«»PS«+" J"+STR« 
<A)+", "■H:HR«<13) 

140 for 1=1 to pi:print#-2, "m"bd 

"p:print#-2,ps»:p=p-i:nexti,x 
200 cls:print"another pass with 
other colors y/n ":r« 

« inkey«:if r«»"y" then goto 300 
else sound 10,10 
210 if r«-"n" then 220 else 200 

220 PRINT#-2,"M0,-100":PRINT#-2, 
"A" 

230 POKE 150,87:POKE63494,0 
240 CLS:PRINT"FINISHED":END 
260 CLS: PR I NT "CGP-1 15 SCREEN DUM 
P":PRINT: INPUT"DRAW TEST PATTERN 
Y/N"|R« 

270 IF R««"Y" THEN GOSUB 480 

280 PS>S-PEEK<8cHB6) 

290 CLS: INPUT"PLOTTIN8 SCALE IX 

OR 2X"fS:IF S<1 OR S>2 Jt^N 290 

295 S«INT(S) 

300 CLS 



310 IF PS»2 THEN PRINT"PMODE 3 C 
0L0R8 0-BLACK 

1 -GREEN 

5- BUFF 2-YELLOW 

6- CYAN 3-BLUE 

7- MAGENTA 4-RED 

8- ORANGE" 

320 IF PS-1 THEN PRINT"PMODE 4 C 
OLORS 0-BLACK 

5-BUFF 1 -GREEN" 

330 PRINT: INPUT "COLOR TO SENSE"! 
CL:IF CL<0 OR CL>8 THEN 330 
340 CLS: PR I NT "0-BLACK 
1-BLUE 2-GREEN 
3-RED" 

350 PRINT: INPUT"DRAW WITH WHICH 
COLOR PEN"|CP:IF CP<0 OR CP>3 TH 
EN 350 

360 IF AR-1 THEN PRINT#-2, "H" : GO 
TO440 

370 BD-<480-192»S)/2 
390 POKE 65495,1 
400 POKE 150,180 
410 PRINT#-2,CHR«<18) 
420 PRINT#-2, "ri0,-300»S" 
430 PRINT#-2, I " 
440 PRINT#-2, "C"CP 
445 SCREEN 1, l:PH0DE3, 1 
450 G0T05 

470 'ARGYLE TEST PATTERN 

475 'PLACE GRAPHICS HERE 

476 'OR LOAD PICTURE INTO MEMORY 
480 PMODE 3, 1:PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
490 COLOR 8,5 

500 LINE <0,0)-<255, 192), PSET 
510 LINE ( 128, 0)-<255, 96), PSET 
520 LINE (0,96) -(128, 192), PSET 
530 LINE ( 128, 0)-(0, 96) , PSET 
540 LINE (255,0) -(0,192), PSET 
550 LINE (255, 96) -(128, 192), PSET 
560 PAINT (32, 48) ,6, 8: PAINT (128, 4 
8) ,6, 8: PAINT (224, 48) ,6, 8: PAINT (3 
2, 144) , 6, 8: PAINT ( 128, 144) , 6, 8: PA 
INT (224, 144) ,6,8 

570 PAINT (64, 96), 5, 8: PAINT (192, 9 
6) ,5,8 

580 PAINT (64, 20), 7, 8: PAINT (192, 2 
0) , 7, 8: PAINT (64, 164) ,7,8: PAINT ( 1 
92, 164), 7, 8 

590 LIh£ (64,0) -(255, 144) , PSET 
600 LINE (192,0) -(255,48), PSET 
610 LINE (0,48) -(192, 192), PSET 
620 LINE (0, 144) -(64, 192) , PSET 
630 LINE (192,0) -(0,144), PSET 
640 LINE(64,0)-(0,48) ,PSET 
650 LINE(255,48)-(64, 192) , PSET 
660 LINE(255,144)-(192, 192), PSET 
665 FORT-1TO750:NEXTT 
670 RETURN 



1^ 



140 the RAINBOW May 1984 




Making & Saving iUloney 
jSHiHome Computers 



1 



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By Bill Nolan 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



A Database 
Manager 
For Dragons 



This column is written for people who play fantasy 
role playing games like Dungeons & Dragons, Rune- 
quest, Tunnels & Trolls, apd Superheroes. In this 
column we explore ways for players of these extremely 
complex games to use their computers to aid them in their 
enjoyment of the gartie. The programs we present here are 
not games, but rather game aids, and the games we consider 
are not computer games, although computers have many 
uses to the players and referees. 

Previously, we have looked at ways to use the computer to 
keep some of the records which are necessary in these games, 
and this month we will look at that concept again, taking a 
more "dii-ect" approach. 

This column is aimed at users of disk systems, but some of 
the programrping methods used are applicable regardless of 
the size of your system. The program below will run on any 
size disk system, because it uses direct access disk files. 

In a sequential access filing system, the computer must 
start at the beginning of the file and look until it finds the 
desired item. Also, it is not easy to change one item in this 
type of file. Direct access is called that because you can go 
directly to any point in the file, but before we get into that, 
let's look at a few terms we will be using. 

The three basic terms of any record-keeping system on the 
computer are file, record, and field. 1 will be using all three 
words repeatedly, so let's get the definitions agreed upon 
now. The analogy is usually made to a standard record 
system kept in a filing cabinet. The entire cabinet, or the 
whole group of file folders taken as a whole, is called the file. 
Each individual file fdlder is called a record, and each piece 
of itiformation inside that folder is called a field. 



(Bill Nolan is a principal in Prickly-Pear Software, 
DMs a weekly game of Dungeons & Dragons, and 
teaches Programming In BASIC at a local college.) 



In a mailing list, then, the name, address, city, state, ZIP 
code, and phone number are each fields, while all of the 
information about one person is a record, and the entire 
mailing list is called a file. Wh^t we are going to learn to do is 
create a direct access file to store information about fantasy 
role playing characters. 

With any filing system, whether or not it is on a computer, 
you must decide what kind of information you will need to 
store, how much of it there is, and how it is to be accessed. 
Only when these things are decided can the organization of 
the filing system proceed. By the way, a bunch of informa- 
tion like this is called a "database" by computer people, and 
a program like the one we are about to write is called a 
Database Manager. 

As anyone who has played fantasy games will testify, the 
information on a single character will often occupy many 
pagesi For the purpose of this program we want to keep 
thingis simple, so we are going to consider only the really 
basic information about a character. The items 1 have 
chosen to use are Name, Race, Sex, Class or Classes, 
Strength, Intelligence, Wisdom, Dexterity, Constitution, 
Charisma, Hit Points, Armor Class, and Level. Each of 
these items of information is called a field, and all of them 
together are referred to as a record. 

When you are dealing with direct access disk files it is 
necessary for each record to be the same length as every 
other record, because the computer will be pulling them out 
of and inserting them into the middle of the file. Because of 
this, you must first decide on the length of the record, and to 
do this, you must decide on the length of each individual 
field inside the record. 

Deciding how long each field will be is simply a matter of 
deciding how many characters you expect the longest item 
of that type will have, including spaces between words. For 
the purpose of this program I decided to allow 20 characters 
for the name; 10 for the race; one for the sex; 20 for the class 



142 the RAINBOW May 1984 



(allowing for multi-classed); five for strength (allowing for 
exceptional strength); two each for intelligence, wisdom, 
dexterity, constitution, and charisma; three each for hit 
points and armor class; and five for level. If you add all these 
up, you will find that they total 77, and this is the number of 
characters in each record. All of the records created by this 
program will be 77 characters long, and if any field is too 
short, it will be filled out with blank spaces to make it the 
right length. As you will see, this is done easily by the 
computer, using a special command just for the purpose. 

Before we get into the actual program, we need to decide 
where we are going to do what. To make that a little more 
clear, any program breaks down into sections, and it's a 
good idea to decide ahead of time what sections you will 
need and what line numbers you want to allocate for each 
section. Then, instead of working on the entire program at 
once, you can work on each section, and you will find the 
task to be much easier. This is called block programming, 
and in addition to making the program easier to write, it also 
makes it easier to change later if you need to do that. 

In this program I decided that 1 would use lines from 10 to 
999 to do any initial setup needed. You will notice that I 
actually needed only a few of those lines, but it was nice to 
know the others were there if I had to use them. Besides, you 
can use line numbers as high as into the 60,000s, so why cram 
everything together? 

1 used the lines from 1000 to 1 100 to print out the menu 
and get the user's response. There are four items on the menu 
— print characters, add characters, change characters, and 
end the program — so 1 knew 1 would need four additional 
sections, or blocks, to handle the four choices. 1 put the print 
characters section in line 1500, the add characters section in 
line 4000, the change characters section in 6000, and the end 
program section at the end of the program, line 12000. The 
line numbers from 10000 to 1 1000 1 reserved for subroutines 
that would be called from other places in the program. Nqw 
that we h^ve a map of what we are going to do, we can 
proceed to examine the program. 

In lines 10 to 25, 1 DIMension the two arrays 1 will use, 
print the title screen, and read the names of the fields into 
one of the arrays, NFS. The NF stands for Name of Fields, 
and whenever possible you should use variable names that 
mean something to you. The array D$ will be used to hold 
the DA TA about each character. The reason for the periods 
in the DATA is to make each field name the same length, so 
the printout will line up. 

Line 1000 simply prints the menu, 1005 gets the user's 
choice and checks it to make sure it is a valid entry, and 1010 
branches to the four main sections of the program. Line 
1 2000 is easy, as it clears the screen, does an unload (which 
closes all open files), and ENDs the program. 

I will look at the routine located at 4000 first, as this is the 
add a character section, and you can't do anything else until 
you have put a few characters on the disk. Line 4000 is a 
GOSVBXo 10200, where we remind the user that there must 
be a DATA disk in the drive (the subroutine at 1 1000), and 
then open our file. Line 10210 tells the computer to open 
buffer 1 for direct access to a disk file name "CHAR/ DAT," 
with a record length of 77 characters. Line 10220 tells the 
computer how long each field will be, and which variable 
name will refer to which field. Line 10230 RETURNS to 
4020, where the screen is cleared. Line 4030 finds out how 
many characters are presently in the file, and adds one to 
that number, so that we will create the next record number. 
Line 4040 tells the user which record number he is inputting, 
and line 4050 gets 13 iNPUTs^ one for each field, storing this 



information in the array D$. Line 4060 prints the informa- 
tion out so the user can cheek it, and if they approve, line 
4 1 50 d oes a GOSUB to 1 0 1 00. This subroutine is a group of 
L5'£T statements. These not only transfer the information 
in the array D$ to the variables specified by the FIELD 



"Any program breaks down into sec- 
tions, and it 's a good idea to decide 
ahead of time what sections you will 
need and what line numbers you want 
to allocate for each section . . . [50,] 
work on each section, and you will find 
the task to be much easier. This is 
called block programming, 



command, they also make everything the right length. If it is 
too short, it will have spaces added to the end of it, and if it is 
too long, it will be chopped off to fit. This command also 
transfers the information into buffer I, and then the pro- 
gram RETURNS to 4 1 60, where the contents of buffer 1 are 
put on the disk as record #N . Lines 4 1 79 and 4 1 80 find out if 
the user has more characters to add. If they do, it returns 
them to 4020, and if not, it sends them back to 1000, which is 
the menu. 

Once you have a few records in the file, you may want to 
print them out. The program allows you to print on the 
screen or printer, and to print all records or to search for and 
print only those records that meet certain search criteria. 
You can search on any field in the record. The printout 
routine is located starting at line 1500. 

The first things the program does in this section is to set 
SF (the search flag) to zero, and ask the user whether they 
want to print all records or only specific records. If the 
person chooses to print all records, the variable SF stays at 
zero, and in line 1520 the program jumps to line 2000, 
skipping the search setup lines. If the person wants a search, 
then the program continues on line 1530 by setting the 
variable SF to one, indicating that a search is in progress, 
and printing a numbered list of the field names on the screen, 
so the user can choose which field is to be searched . Once the 
search field is entered, it is checked to be sure it is an integer 
from one to 13, and then the search target is prompted for. 
The target is the word, number, or phrase that the computer 
will try to match, and it must be character for character the 
same as what you typed in when you were adding tHe charac- 
ter. Once the target is obtained, the program goes to 2000, 
where the actual printout routine is located. 

At line 2000, the first thing asked is whether the user wants 
the output printed on the screen or printer. Most of you are 
aware that the printer is device #-2, and that to print to it 
you use the form PRINT ^-2/'message*\ Less known is the 
fact that the screen is device #0, and that you can print to it 
with the command PRINTS,** message ". Since you can use 
a variable instead of the 0 and-2, it is only necessary to 
assign a variable as the device number, and then set its value 
to be either 0 or -2. 1 use the variable DN for this purpose. 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 143 



If the person chooses to print on the printer they are given 
a choice of printing continuously, or of having to press a key 
after each record is printed. If you have a tractor feed 
printer, you will want to choose continuous, but if you have 
a single sheet printer, you will want to choose to have the 
printing pause after each record so you can change the 
paper. 

The actual printing routine starts in 2050, with the 
G OS UB to 10200 to open the buffer to the file. After finding 
out how many records there are in the file in line 2070, the 
program establishes a FOR . . . NEXT loop to look at each 
record in turn. Line 2090 GETs record #X, and then the 
program GOSUBs to 10000, where the F/ELDe^/ variables 
are stored in an array. This not only makes them easier to 
access, it is also necessary because of something which is 
never explained in the disk manual. You must do something 
with the FIELDed variables, which you GET before you 
close the file, because if you don't, they will go away when 
the file buffer is closed. By transferring them into an array, 
we make them less ephemeral. 

Line 2097 first checks the value of SF to see if a search is in 
progress, and if it is, then the remainder of the line checks for 
a match between the target and the field previously indicated 
by the user, if a search is in progress, but no match is found, 
the line directs the program to jump past the print line, so 
only those recdrds fitting the search are printed. The reason 
for the LEFTS command in line 2097 is to eliminate the 
spaces which may have been added to the field by the LSET 
command. If you would prefer that the program find partial 
matches within the field, instead of requiring an exact letter 
by letter match, line 2097 can be changed to read: 

2097 IF SF=1 THEN IF INSTR(1,DS(X),TG$)<1 
THEN 2120 

The disadvantage of this is that you can get some odd 
matches. For instance, if you are searching for an eight in 
intelligence, it will also find 18, because it has an eight in it. 

Line 2100 prints out the record, including the record 
number, which you will tieed to have in order to change the 
record, and when all of the records have been examined, the 
file is closed in line 2140 and the program returns to the 
menu at 1000. 

The last section remaining is the change a character sec- 
tion at line 6000. First, the file buffer is opened, and the 
fields are specified. Then, in 6030, the user is asked which 
record number they want to change, and in 6045 this record 
is obtained from the disk and the program GOSUBs to 
10000 to transfer the information into the array D$. In 6050 
a numbered list of all the field names and their current 
contents is printed on the screen, and the user is asked which 
field they want to change. Then in 6060, the new information 
for the field specified is input, and in 6070 the list of field 
names and contents is printed on the screen again, so the 
user can check it. If the change was not made correctly, or if 
there are more fields to change, the user can indicate "not 
correct" in lines 6140 and 6150, and they will get a chance to 
make additional changes. 

Once the user indicates that all is well, the program in line 
6\60 GOSUBsto lOlOO, where the L5£rcommands get the 
buffer set, and then in 6 1 70 the new record is put back into 
its proper place in the disk file. In lines 6180 and 6190 you 
can specify more changes, and you will be returned to 6020 
to pick a record number. If you say you have no more 
changes, the file buffer will be closed in line 6200, and line 
6210 returns you to the menu. 



That's about it for the line by line commentary on the 
program. If you do any programming at all, you will be able 
to fairly easily modify this filing system to be a pretty good 
mailing list. I did it in less than one hour. Also, if you are 
curious, you will be able to store about 2000 character 
records on a disk before it will be full. I hope you find this 
very basic Database Manager to be useful, and 1 hope it 
inspires some of you to expand it into a really complete 
character filing system, if you do that, be sure to send me a 
copy so I can see it. So, until next time, keep your swords 
sharp and your maces heavy, or do what I do — practice the 
100-yard dash. Remember my immortal battle cry, "Run 
Away! Run Away!" 



The listing: 



^ 1510 


.. 184 


2050 .. 


.. 228 






6200 , 


...71 


END .. 


244 



10 CLEAR 1 000 :CLS 

IS DIM D«(13> ,NF«(13) 

17 PR I NT "CHARACTER DISK FILING 9 

YSTEM":PRINT"FOR USE WITH FANTAS 

Y GAMES": PR I NT "COPYRIGHT 1984 BY 

" : PR I NT B I LL NOLAN » : PR I NT " TUCSON 

, ARIZONA": PRINT" ALL RIGHTS RESE 

RVED" 

20 FOR X-1 TO 13: READ NF«(X):NEX 
T X 

2S DATA NAME. RACE. SEX..., CLA 
SS. , 8TR. . . , INT. . . , WIS. . . , DEX. . . , 
CON. . . , CHA. . . , HP. . . . , AC. . . . , LEVE 
L. 

35 PRINT:PRINT:G0SUB 11000 
1000 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" 1. PRINT CH 
ARACTERS":PRINT"2. add CHARACTER 
S": PR I NT" 3. CHANGE CHARACTERS" :P 
RINT"4. END PROGRAM" :K»-INKEY» 
1005 K«"INKEY«:K-VAL(K«):IF K<1 
OR K>4 THEN 1005 ELSE SOUND 150, 
1 

1010 ON K GOTO 1500,4000,6000,12 
000 

1500 CLS: PRINT: PRINT"DO YOU WANT 
: " : SF-0 

1510 PRINT: PRINT" 1. ALL RECORD 
S PRINTED": PRINT: PRINT" 2. PRIN 
T SPECIFIC RECORDS": PR I NT: PR I NT" 
KEY YOUR CHOICE ( 1-2) " : K«»INKEY« 
1520 K«-INKEY«:K-VAL(K«):IF K< 1 
OR K>2 THEN 1520 ELSE SOUND 150, 
l:IF K-1 THEN 2000 
1530 SF-l:CLS:FOR X-1 TO 13: PRIN 
TXJ". "INF»<X>:NEXT X:INPUT"SEAR 
CH FIELD # (1 TO 13) " J TF: SOUND 1 
50, 1 

1540 IF TF<1 OR TF>13 OR TFOINT 
(TF) THEN 1530 



144 the RAINBOW May 1984 



ANY PACKAGE ^8.95 

($21.95 on Disk) 




1. EDUCATIONAL #1 

These even run on Non- Extended CoCos 
- Words (unscramble the words), Spel- 
llt (speifing helper), LMm Notes 
(with graphic piano keys). Sorts (ex- 
plained and demonstrated). Base 
Guess (game to iearn other number 
bases), Morse Quiz (learn Morse 
Code), and Equations (solves systems 
of equations). 

2. EDUCATIONAL #2 

Only for Extended Basic - Mathvaders 
(shoot the right answer). Scrambler 
(put lists in order). Language Drill 

(help with foreign word lists), Factors 
(factoring game), Typing lUtor 
Manybody (demostrates gravitational 
forces). Maximum (pick the largest 
number game), Chemlab (simulated 
experiments), and How Far (places and 
distances). 

3. UTILITIES #1 

Programming is simpler when you use 
Lister, Ustmod, Newtrace (a bener 
IRON), Lazkey (define keys as phrases). 
Append (easily combine two BASIC 
programs], BASIC Map, V^rmap, De- 
leter, and CK Monitor (look at and 
modify memory). 

4. DISK UTILITIES #1 

Harness the hidden powers of your disk 
system with Disk Edit (change things 
on disk directly), Disk Aid, Offset 
(EXECs most tape-only programs), 
Tk-ack Lock, DIR Save/Get {foil I/O 
errors), Cataloger, Master Catalog 
(keep track of your program library), and 
File Copy (a better BACKUP). 



5. GAMES #1 

Action-packed, logical, and colorful 
ones! Flyby (shoot ducks, planes, and | 
faces). BlacKfacfc, Motorcycle, 
Germ (stop the waves of nasties). 
Blockade, Ufe, DIggem, Robot 
Run, Stellar Empire (control the , 
heavens - 1 to 4 players), and Zero G for 
your fun and pleasure! ! 

6. ADVENTURES #1 

Trips to far-off and dangerous places. On 
the agenda are Jerusalem Adven- 
ture, Ultimate Adventure, Wil- 
liamsburg Adventure, House 
Adventure, Andrea Doria Ad- 
venture, Blackard's Castle (1500 
rooms), and Realm off Nauga (in real- | 
time) I 

7. PRACTICALS #1 

Our most popular package with prog- 
rams for text editing, maillists, budgeting, 
filing, etc. including Keeptext (simple 
text editor). Keep Address, Keepllst 
(shopping list database), Keepcheck 
(checkbook balancer). Keep Budget 
(reports from Keepcheck), Files (disk- 
based database), and l>ipe Inven- 
tory 

8. GRAPHS & CHARTS #1 

For data manipulation and display! Do it 
with Pie Chart, Bar Ctuirt, XY 
Graph, Curve Fit (predict trends), and 
IWo Dates (see monthly calendars for 
any two dates). 



9. GRAPHICS #1 

Displays and text delightfully manipu- 
lated! Watch and use First Cover, 
Drawer (often called the best). 
Graphtext (puts text on the graphics 
screen), Smalltext, Rotate (create 
and spin 3D objects in real time), Vtforld 
Map, 3D World, Star Map, String 
Art, Kaleidoscope, and Display 
Demo (text screen wizardry)! 

10. NON-EXTENDED #1 

Five Standard BASIC programs including 
House Adventure (find twenty ob- 
jects or die), Stellar Empire (a 2 to 4 
person strategy game), Tqie Inven- 
tory (keep track of your tapes). Space 
Ace (shoot'em-up), and Laakey (de- 
fine keys as words or phrases). 

11. NON-EXTENDED #2 

Five more Standard BASIC programs in- 
cluding VMIIIamsburg Adventure 

(a humorous one), TWo Dates (show 
monthly calendars). Box Shoot (two- 
player face-off), Flyby (shoot ducks, 
faces, and planes), and Deleter (delete 
needless REM's and spaces from prog- 
rams). 



- a lot of softwarf for a little silver 

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1SS0 PR I NT "SEARCH TARGET?" ! INPUT 
TO* 

2000 CL8: PR I NT: PR I NT "DO YOU WANT 
THIS PRINTED TO THE":PRINT"SCRE 
EN, OR THE PRINTER? (S/P)":K«-IN 
KEY* 

2010 K«-INKEY«:IF K«<>"S" AND K« 
<>"P" THEN 2010 ELSE SOUND 150,1 
:IF K»-"P" THEN DN— 2 ELSE DN-0 
2015 IF DN-0 THEN PP-1 
2020 IF DN— 2 THEN PRINT: PR INT" D 

0 YOU WANT THE ACTION TO BE":PRI 
NT "CONTINUOUS, OR DO YOU WANT A" 
:PRINT"PAUSE AFTER EACH QUESTION 
? (C/P>":K«-INKEY» 

2030 IF DN— 2 THEN K«»INKEY»: IF 
K«<>"C"AND K«<>"P" THEN 2030 ELS 
E SOUND 150,1: IF K»-"P" THEN PP- 

1 ELSE PP"0 

2040 IF DN— 2 THEN CLS:PRINT"YOU 
SELECTED THE PRINTER. ":PRINT"MA 

KE SURE IT'S ON LINE NOW. ":e08UB 
10500 

2050 80SUB 10200 

2070 N-L0F<1) 

2080 FOR X«l TO N 

2090 SET ttl,X 

2095 GOSUB 10000 

2097 IF SF-1 THEN IF TQ«<> LEFT* 
(D«(TF),LEN(TO«)) THEN 2120 
2100 CL8:PRINTttDN, "RECORD tt"fX:F 
OR Y-1 TO 13:PRINT#DN,NF«(Y)|D*( 
Y):NEXT Y 

2110 IF PP>0 THEN GOSUB 10500: CL 
S 

2120 NEXT 

2130 CLOSE* 1 

2140 GOTO 1000 

4000 GOSUB 10200 

4020 CLS 

4030 N»L0F(1)+1 

4040 PR I NT "YOU ARE ON RECORD #"| 
N 

4050 FOR X-1 TO 13:PRINTNF«(X)|: 
INPUT D«(X}: SOUND 150, 1: NEXT X 
4060 CLS: FOR X-1 TO 13:PRINTNF«( 

x)f:PRiNT d«(X):next x:print"I8 

THIS CORRECT? (Y/N) " : K«->INKEY« 
4140 K«-INKEY«:IF K*<>"Y"AND K«< 
>"N" THEN 4140 ELSE SOUND 150,1: 
IF K«»"N" THEN 4020 
4150 GOSUB 10100 
4160 PUT ttl,N:CLS 

4170 PRINT "DO YOU HAVE MORE? (Y/ 
N) ":K«-INKEY« 

4180 K«BlNKEY«:IF K«<>"Y" AND K* 
<>"N" THEN 4180 ELSE SOUND 150,1 
:IF K«-"Y" THEN 4020 
4190 CLOSE #1 
4200 GOTO 1000 



6000 GOSUB 10200 
6020 CLS 

6030 INPUT "CHANGE WHAT RECORD 
IN 

6040 IF N<1 OR N>L0F<1) THEN PRI 

NT" INVALID NUMBER": FOR X-1 TO 20 

00: NEXT: GOTO 6020 

6045 GET#1,N: GOSUB 10000 

6050 CLS:F0R x-1 to 13:PRINT XI" 

. ";:printnf»(X)i:print d«(X):ne 

XT X: INPUT"FIELD # TO CHANGE (1- 

13>"itf:sound 150,1 

6060 if tf<1 or tf>13 or tfoint 

(TF) THEN 6050 ELSE PRINT"NEW IN 
FORMAT I ON? " : I NPUT D» ( TF ) 
6070 CLS:FOR X-1 TO 13:PRINT X|" 
. "|:PRINTNF«(X)»:PRINT D»(X):NE 
XT X 

6140 PRINT" IS THIS CORRECT (Y/N) 
":K«-INKEY» 

6150 K«-INKEY«:IF K»<>"Y"AND K«< 
>"N" THEN 6150 ELSE SOUND 150,1: 
IF K«-"N" THEN 6050 
6160 GOSUB 10100 
6170 PUT »^,N:CLS 

6180 PR I NT "DO YOU HAVE MORE? (Y/ 
• N)":K«-INKEY* 

6190 K»-INKEY«:IF K«<>"Y" AND K* 
<>"N" THEN 6190 ELSE IF K«""Y" T 
HEN 6020 
6200 CLOSE #1 
6210 SOTO 1000 

10000 d«(1)-n«:d«<2)-r«:d«(3)-s« 

: D« (4) -c«: D« (5) -ST«: D« (6) -IN«: D« 
(7) «WI«: D« (8) -DE«: D« (9) «C0«: D« ( 1 
0) -CH«: D« ( 1 I ) -HP«: D« ( 12) -AC«: D« ( 

13) =L«: RETURN 

10100 L8ET N«-D« ( 1 ) : LSET R«-D«(2 
):LSET S««D«(3):LSET C»-D«(4):L8 
ET ST«-D«<5):LSET IN«-D«(6):L8ET 

WI«-D«(7) :LSET DE«=D«(8) :LSET C 
0*-D«<9):LSET CH«-D«(10) :lset »p 
«-D« < 1 1 ) : LSET AC«-D«<12):LSET L« 
-D«( 13): RETURN 
10200 CLS : GOSUB 11000 
10210 0PEN"D",#1, "CHAR/DAT", 77 
10220 FIELD #1,20 AS N«, 10 AS R« 
,1 AS S«,20 AS C«,5 AS 8T«,2 AS 
IN«,2 AS WI«,2 AS DE«,2 AS C0«,2 

AS CH«,3 AS HP«,3 AS AC«,5 AS L 

« 

10230 RETURN 

10500 PR I NT "PRESS ANY KEY TO CON 
TINUE" 

10510 IF INKEY*-"" THEN 10510 EL 
SE SOUND 150, l: RETURN 
11000 PR I NT "MAKE SURE THE DATA D 
ISK IS IN":PR1NT"THE DRIVE. ":00S 
UB 10500: RETURN 

12000 CLS: UNLOAD: END ^ 



146 the Rainbow May i984 



vs. 

the other guy 



We were the first people to offer you and your Color Computer a tape or 
disk full of quality software on a subscription bas\s, and we are still the best I 
And to prove it, we make the following offers: 

Free trial - Buy a subscription to Chromasette. If you are notsatisfied with 
the software on first tape or disk you receive, just return it for a FULL refund. 

With your newsubscription to Chromasette (tape or disk), we'll sendyou a 
free copy of 'the other guy' (on tape - he does not offer his on disk). 
Compare us to him. Even if you decide to cancel your subscription, keep his as 
a consolation prize. 

Chromasette delivers 6 to 8 educational, fun, practical, and utilitarian 
programs to your mailbox every month by First Class Mail. We have supplied 
over 700 programs for the Radio Shack* computers, so our editors know how 
to select and groom programs to teach, entertain, and help you. And these 
programs can cost less than a dollar eachi Such a deal! 

•Trademark of Tandy Corp. 




Single issues 
4 month subscription 
8 month subscription 
I year subscription 



Tape Disk 

9.95 12.95 

29.95 38.95 

53.95 69.95 

74.95 96.95 (Save $581) 



Some of our past programs include (Practical) Keep Address, 
Keep Budget, Files, (Educational) Spell It, Language Drill, Fac- 
tors, (Games) Stellar Empire, Radiation Run, Blockade, 
(Utilities) Disk to Disk, Deleter, and Lazkey. 



For brochures or 

orders call 1-800-621-6240 or In Calif 1-805-963-1066 

Extended BASIC and occasionally Disk BASIC required. Overseas add S2 to single issues and S 1 5 dollars to subscriptions. Calif, add 6% to single issue orders. Money Orders, checks in U.S. Funds. 
MasterCard/Visa accepted. CCD. add $2.50. Back issues available from Jufy 1 98 1 on. 




PO Box 1087 

Santa Barbara, CA 93102 



A division of CLOAD Publications Inc. 




But true! There is a disk 
drive In your Color Compu- 
ter . and it is faster and 
more efficient than any 
"hardware" drive you can 
buy, for any price. This new 
"disk drive" is called VDOS— 
for Virtual Disk Operating 
System— and it will absolutely 
revolutionize the way you 
operate your CoCo. 

VDOS lets you use the 
"extra" memory inside your 
CoCo as a virtual disk, with 
programs (any programs) 
stored out of the way. You 
can "save" and "load" pro- 
grams from your In-memory 



disk Into working memory, 
and then run them. When 
you're done, you can simply 
access your in-memory disk 
again . . . and save or load 
another, and another. 

And VDOS is fast. 
Because you are using 
memory rather than a 
mechanical device (like a 
disk drive or cassette 
player), programs load 
Instantly. Yes, VDOS is fas- 
ter than a disk! 

VDOS works with ali 
Color Computers— from 
16K non-extended to 64K 
extended. Obviously, the 



more memory you have, the 
greater number (and 
length) of programs you 
can store. For a 64K sys- 
tem, VDOS also uses the 
"unused" part of memory, 
providing up to 50,000 
bytes of storage! Now, 
that's some disk! 

We call It VDOS because 
in the future there will be 
utilities for your VDOS 
UNDISK that wiii give even 
greater capabjiities— such 
as a full one-pass memory 
dump to cassette. Other 
utilities are planned, too. 

We believe VDOS Is the 



greatest advancement for 
CoCo since the introduc- 
tion of the disk drive itself. 
And, at less than $100, it is 
so inexpensive you can*t 
afford to be without it. If 
you have the "cassette 
blues." VDOS Is the answer! 

Finally, VDOS is simple to 
operate. It is entirely self- 
prompting and comes with 
a complete manual. But you 
almost don't even need the 
instructions— it requires 
absolutely no technical 
expertise. 

VDOS. The answer to 
your prayers. 



Cassette: $49.95 Add $1.50 shipping 
and handling; Canadians add $5 for 
shipping; Foreign points add $9. 
VISA and Master Card accepted. 
All Kentucky residents add 5% sales 
tax. Payments accepted in United 
States currency only. 




Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville. KY 40228 
(502) 241-6474 
Dealer inquiries Invited 



UTILITY 



4K 



Synchronous Output 
Can Be Useful 



By James Provost 



Here is a very useful program 
for Adventures and other text 
programs where a hard copy of 
what is on the screen is needed. SYNC is 
designed to produce a syncronous out- 
put to both screen and printer. 

The user should make sure that 
his/her printer is on-line before RUN- 
ning the program or else the computer 
will "hang. "The syncronous output will 
be in effect until the computer is powered 
down. 

For users with 64K — while in the 
64K mode, POKE &HA1A5,&H12 to 
achieve a solid cursor. This places a 
NOP into the address which formerly 
held the instruction for the cursor to 
change to another color. 



Description 

3E8 34 54 

3EA BD A2BF 



3ED 
3EF 



35 54 
39 



PSHS U,X,B 
JSR $A2BF 

PULS B,X,U 
RTS 



save registers 
output character in A 
register to printer 
restore registers 
return 



The following memory locations must 
also be true: 

$0168 = 503 



$0169 = $E8 



The listing: 

1 REM SYNC 

2 REM BY JAMES PROVOST 
10 FOR X=1000 TO 1007 
20 READ a: POKE X,A 

30 NEXT 

40 POKE 360, 3: POKE 361,232 
50 DATA 52, 84, 189, 162, 191 
60 DATA 53, 84, 57 



(James Provost holds an associate's degree in compu- 
ter electronic technology and free-lances iri educa- 
tional software programming. He resides in Stone- 
ham, MA.) 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 149 




SUPER STATS - The most powerful statistics program avail- 
able for the CoCo/TDP. Multiple linear regression, forecast- 
ing, mean, standard deviation, correlation coefficients, co- 
variance, F and t tests. Powerful data editing and manipu^ 
tation abilities. Data plotting. Student t tail areas, Gaussian 
cumulative probability distributions, and more. Flexible 
I/O Ucreen or printer, tape or disk). Very good documen- 
tation. 16K extended BASIC. Cassette $29.95. 

STRUCTURED MACROS - An assembly language program- 
ming tool for users of the Macro-80C assembler, by the Micro 
Works. Structured macros come close to transforming your 
assembler into a high-level language. Your programs become 
more understandable and debugging is simplified. Commands 
include IF, ELS, ENDIF, IFTST, IFCC, WHILE, ENDWH, 
REPEAT, and UNTIL. Disk $19.95. 

PAGE PLUS - Attention BASIC programmers! Up to 56K 
available from your BASIC programs. This utility, written 
by Chris Hawks, does the menriory management necessary to 
utilize the two 32K banks of memory. Easy enough for any 
"intermediate" level BASIC programmer to use. Works with 
64K systems. Cassett $27.95. Disk $29.95. 




MYSTIC MANSION - New!! You'll be hearing lots about 
this incredible ALL GRAPHIC adventure. Explore the 
mansion and escape from the island, if you can! This one is 
tough to solve, but you'll have fun trying. For 32K Disk 
only. Disk $29.95. 



C.C. Three 

A powerful 'electronic spreadsheet', a full-featured word 
processor, and a flexible database - for an unheard of low 
price! This may be the ONLY SOFTWARE PACKAGE 
YOU'LL EVER NEED TO BUY for your computer. 

BOTH DISK AND TAPE VERSIONS OF ALL THREE 
PROGRAMS ARE INCLUDED (on tape) for the bargain 
price of $49,951 No need to pay for upgrades to disk later! 
Over 40 pages of documentation In an attractive vinyl binder. 
C. C. Writer and C. C. File require 16K, C. C. Calc needs 32K. 
All require Extended Color BASIC. Order yours NOW! 



MDISK - Hal Snyder's latest breakthrough for the 64 Colpr 
Computer! MDISK lets you use the upper 32K of memory 
for rapid storage and retrieval of programs and data. Whether 
you own an actual disk drive or not, MDISK puts the 
"hidden" 32K to work for you as a "virtual disk," with 
capability to save and load up to 15 programs, view a dir- 
ectory of files stored in"page 1/' kill unwanted page 1 files, 
execute BASIC or machine language directly from MDISK, 
chain to a BASIC program while preserving data already 
created, and more. MDISK is written m position independent 
code, and will work on disk or tape based 64K systems. 
Cassette $27.95. Disk $29.95. 

ROMBACK - Why pay more? The easiest to use ROM-pak 
dumping utility available! At the best price, too! Comes with 
full documentation, including detailed patching iinstructions 
to allow several popular "problem" cartridges to run from 
tape or disk. 64K Extended BASIC. Cassette $16.95. 

QUICKSORT — A machine language sort routine specifically 
designed to be used by BASIC programmers. Written in 
position independent code, works on tape or disk systems. 
16K required. Cassette $12.95. 

64K BOOT/PAGER - The 64K Boot allows you to modify 
BASIC by moving it from ROM to RAM, The PAGER is 
a menu-driven utility allowing you to manually page between 
the 32K banks of memory. Source code for both programs is 
included. Both run on 64 K tape or disk systems. 
Cassette $19.95 

WIZARD 64 - If you've got 64K, then this one's for you! 
Uses both 32K pages of memory for graphics and action. 
Challenging enough for adults, yet entertaining for younger 
players too. 64K Extended BASIC. Cassette $21.95 
Disk $23.95. 

SIMPLEX — Linear programming by the "simplex" method 
now available for the Color Computer. This powerful de- 
cision making tool finds the optimum "mix" for a given set 
of constraints. Disk compatible. 16 page manual included. 
16K Extended BASIC. Cassett $29.95. 



We Love Canadian Orders! 

ORDERING INFORMATION Innuirp For Forpian Shionina Skyline Marketing Corp. 

*$10 shipping, handling, & Insurance on printers. Inq"»re For Foreign bhippmg ^^j^ ^ p 

Amdisk, and monitors. $5 on modems. $2 on all other orders. rhl/^a^rk ii Aoc^l 

All prices U.S. funds. STsTmB 0762 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 286-0762 



QUALITY SOFTWARE AND PERIPHERALS FOR YOUR COMPUTER 



AN ASTRONOMICAL ARRAY 
OF FEATURES 
FOR A DOWN-TO-EARTH PRICE 



THE GEMINI-10 X 



MORE QUALITY: 120 cps • thruput time of 58 Ipm • high resolution 
(120x144) bit image & block (6x6) graphics • extra fast forms feed 
MORE FLEXIBILITY: super/sUb script • underlining • backspacing 

• double strike mode • emphasized print mode • 816 character 
buffer • compatible with most software supporting leading printers 

• 10" carriage • 15" carriage Gemini-15 available 
MORE RELIABILITY: 180 day warranty (90 days for head & ribbon) 

• mtbf rate of more than 5 million lines • print head life of more than 
100 million characters 

SAVE $100.^0!!! 

Our incredible Gemini-10 package— a PRINTING SYSTEM ready to plug in to 
your Color Computer. NOTHING MORE TO BUY. Includes serial to parallel converter, 
graphic screen print software, deluxe user manual, and 5 minute setup instructions! A $479.00 value. Complete package 




NEW 
LOW PRICES! 



Wide carriage Gemini— 15 also available: 
Package ONLY $579* 
Printer only $499* 



ONLY $379* 

Order yours today! 
Parallel printer only, $299 




GET THE MOST FROM YOUR SYSTEM WITH AN NEC MONITOR PACKAGE! 

Without a monitor, you'll never know just how good your graphics are. Word processing 

becomes less fatiguing, programming more enjoyable. NEC is famous for excellent 

color reproduction and tack-sharp resolution. We take the work out of adding the monitor 

to your system by including a custom plug-in monitor driver (with color, monochrome, 

dnd audio outputs), any required cables, and easy setup instructions. Buy with 

confidence— we'v6 done the "homework" for you! 

NEC 12" Color monitor (JC1212M) package ONLY $389* 

NEC 12" Green^screen (JB1260M) package ONLY $169* 

NEC 12" Amber screen (JB1205MA) package ONLY $219* 

True lower-case and inverse video— just plug in the LCA-47. Special price with 

monitor purchase $66. (pot available for Color Computer 2) 



GET SMART!! GREAT DEAL ON HAYES SMARTMODEMS 

Hayes 300 baud Smartmodem— the amazing programmable auto-dial, auto-answer modem, now in a 
special package deal for your Color Computer. Buy the Hayes for list price, and at NO EXTRA 
CHARGE receive the Colorcom/E smart terminal program (cartridge or disk), an RS232 cable, and 
setup instructions! Act now! 

Hayes 300 baud Smartmodem package ONLY $289* 
Hayes modem with CC cable only, $249* 

Signalman Mark I modem, 300 baud direct connect, list $98, our price $86* 




The revolutionary 3" disk system! Two compatible 156K drives In a 
compact enclosure. Uses the rigid, protected 2-sided cartridge that 
ha made others obsolete. Our package includes the Amdisk III, 
cable, disk controller, Disk BASIC manual, 12 cartridges, setup 
instructions, and a ML tape to disk program to help transfer your 
software! Everything you need, plus you save $50! 

Package price ONLY $689* Amdisk ill plus cable only $479* 
Order Now!! (available for Color Computer 2, please specify) 




SALE ON 
AMDISK III 
DISK SYSTEM!! 




MottorCard 



UPS C.O.D. orders gladly accepted, 
$2.00 additional. 



SKYLINE 64K Memory Upgrade Kits 

8 guaranteed 200 n.s. 64K memory chips, solderless Installation instructions, 
Skyline's 64K BOOT and PAGER programs (a $19.95 value). All for the super 
low price of $59.00! Order yours today! 
<soideri-ng required on Color Computer 2) 




RADIO SHACK has released several 
new products this month. Among the 
best is the C-Compiler, a versatile and 
efficient programming language for the 
64K Color Computer and the OS-9 disk 
operating system. The C-Compiler can 
easily handle tasks that previously would 
have required complex assembly lan- 
guage programming. Programs written 
in C are more portable between radically 
different computer systems than other 
standardized languages such as BASIC 
COBOL, and PASCAL, and it works par- 
ticularly well with the 64K CoCo because 
the 6809 microprocessor was designed 
specifically to run high-level languages. 
(For more information, see Dale Puck- 
ett's "KISSable OS-9" column on Page 
297.) The C-Compiler is available for 
$99.95 at Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide. 

Also introduced for the 1 6K or greater 
CoCo is Personal Finance II, a program 
that aids the user in setting up a budget, 
tracking bank accounts, and evaluating 
expenditures. It can keep track of nine 
bank accounts and 25 budget catego- 
ries, store 1,818 checks on tape, and is 
available on cassette for $34.95. 

For the MC-IO, Radio Shack has 
introduced Math Design and Lost 
World Pinball. The Math Design pack- 
age contains two packages: MiniCalc, 
which functions as a hand-held calcula- 
tor, and Spirals, a fun geometric exer- 
cise that makes it possible to design and 
plot a large variety of polygonal spirals 
in four colors. Both are available on 
cassette for $9.95 each at all participat- 
ing Radio Shack stores. 

* * * 

A $10,000 SCHOLARSHIP has been 
announced by Ray Jacobs, president of 
Software City. It will be awarded to the 
student who produces the most market- 
able computer program. In addition, 
four $1,000 scholarships are offered to 
the runners-up. 

Applicants must have been graduated 
from high school after Jan. 1, 1984, and 
entries must be submitted by Dec, 31, 
1984. 

Categories in which entries will be 
judged are: Business Applications, Ed- 
ucation, Home Applications, Recrea- 
tion and Systems Software. 




Requests for complete information 
and scholarship applications should be 
directed to: Software City Corporate 
Headquarters, 1415 Queen Anne Road, 
Teaneck, NJ 07666, Attention: Schol- 
arship Director. 

* * * 

THE PRICE OF SECURITY, ADM 

Concepts has announced the introduc- 
tion of a new low-cost data system 
security link called the COM M LOCK 
Model-96A. It has been designed to be 
compatible with all standard asynchron- 
ous data communication systems. 

COM M LOCK'S design provides for 
a virtual secured communication link to 
corporate, military and private compu- 
ter data banks. The COM M LOCK link 
must, however, be installed between the 
computer and modem at both the trans- 
mission and reception sites. 

Using this dual encryption method, 
though, is far more secure than the more 
common single encryption. Also, COMM- 
LOCK is programmable by the user for 
creation of up to 1,024 unique encryp- 
tion codes. It is programmable for data 
rates (300 to 9600 bits per second), word 
length (5 to 8 bits), and parity and 
number of stop bits — which makes it 
compatible with all asynchronous com- 
munications. 

At $600 in single-piece quantities, 
COMMLOCK provides a low cost sol- 
ution to the data security needs of large 
corporations and the military, but for 
personal computer networks, putting 
your trust in the gods for security is, let's 
face it, a heck-of-a-lot cheaper. 

* * * 

COCO CELEBRITY Bob Rosen says 
that he liked California so well when he 
attended the RAlNBOWfest in Long 
Beach, he has decided to pack his bags 
and go west. And that means that Spec- 
trum Projects will be expanding. In 
April, Bob will be opening the West 
Coast Division of Spectrum Projects 
and, in conjunction with that, he will be 
warming up four more of his popular 
Rainbow Connection bulletin board 
systems. The new West Coast address is 
#9866, 4285 Payne Ave., San Jose, CA 
95117. 

Not to worry. Easterners — Bob's 



brother, Paul, will continue to operate 

their East Coast offices in Woodhaven, 
NY. 

* * * 

KEEPIN' AN EYE ON COCO. M icron 
Technology, Inc., a western memory 
chip manufacturer, has introduced two 
new products that give the gift of sight 
to your favorite computer. Both the 
MicrortEye Bullet and the MicronEye 
Camera make use of a revolutionary 
image-sensing chip — the 1S32 Optic- 
RAM. This chip is composed of 65,536 
individual pixels and is capable of send- 
ing remarkably high resolution images 
to the screen of most computers. 

Uses for the MicronEye are virtually 
unlimited and include: character recog- 
nition, signature verification, graphics 
input, automated monitoring, surveil- 
lance and motion detection, barcode 
reading, robot vision, and the list goes 
on. What does seem somewhat limited, 
however, are the MicronEye 's capabili- 
ties with the CoCo in comparison to 
other computers. These seem to include 
the inability to store and recall pictures 
from disk and the inability to dump to a 
printer — two pretty important features. 

The entire package for the Bullet, 
including camera, lens, tripod, interface 
card and software, is priced at $295 — it 
might have cost $30,000 two years ago. 
You can write to M icron Technology at 
2805 East Columbia Rd., Boise, ID 
83706. 

* * * 

AT LAST, VIP CALC has arrived at 

the Rainbow's editorial offices and this 
long-awaited spreadsheet program ap- 
pears to be powerful. It is completely 
compatible with all the other programs 
in the VIP Library and features memory 
sense-bank switching, true lowercase, 
16 video display windows, 15-digit pre- 
cision, and other features of the VIP 
Library. We understand that Softlaw 
has been shipping VIP Calc for several 
weeks now. 

VIP Calc comes packaged in a hand- 
some, 5V2 X %V2 inch, three-ring binder; 
somewhat smaller than the old Super 
"Color" binders, but just as attractive 
and functional. The package contains 
both disk and cassette versions of the 
program and 178 pages of documenta- 
tion. Both the disk and tape contain 
separate 32K and 64 K versions of the 
program; the 32K version does not have 
Hi-Res displays or the sort and edit 
functions featured on the 64K version. 

V!P Calc is available for $59.95 from 
Softlaw, 9072 Lyndale Avenue So., Min- 
neapolis, MN 55420. 



1S2 the RAINBOW May 1964 



To better service the CoCo community M 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
EXPANDS WEST ! 



SAN 

JOSE 



NEW 
YORK 




WEST DIVISION 



4885 PAYNE AVE/#S866 
SAN JOSE, CA 95117 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 
COLORFUL COMPUTING 

COMMUNICATION WORD PROCESSING 




SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 
COLORFUL COMPUTING 



SPREADSHEET 



ELITE CALC - 255 Rows, 255 
Cplumns, Help Displays, Repeat 
Text Entries, Insert, Delete, 
Moue Entire Rows, Selectable 
Auto Cursor rViwement, Formulas 
255 chars. Disk/Tape $59.95 



Biy 
bitklor 

$99.95 
SinS40l 



DATA BASE MANAGER 



PRO-COLOR FILE - 60 Data 
Fields, 8 fleport Formats, 1020 
bytes/record. Sorts 3 Fields, 
Screen and Summary Reports, 
Duplicate Records and Fields, 
Page Titles - Disk $79.95 



DISK DRIVES 



DRIVE 0 System - 40 trks. Gold 
Platted Connectors - $349.95 
AMDEK System - 624K Bytes with 
3" Disk Cartridge - $599.00 
DISK CONTROLLER - $139.95 
(Systems include controller) 



UTILITIES IDISKI 



1. FHL 0-PAK $34.95 

2. Disk Doctor $39.95 

3. Super Forth $39.95 

4. Super Screen P'lachine.$49,95 

5. OS-9 $69.95 

6. FHL Flex $69.95 

7. Hicroii/orks EDTASM ..$99.95 



WEST DIVISION 



Spectrum Projects 

4286 Payne Aye/*9Q66 
San Jose, CA 95117 




2 
3 
4 



Sin 
10% 
15\ 
20% 



Add $3.00 S/H 
NY Res Add Tax 



GAME CONTROLLERS 



I 



I 



U/ICO Command Adaptor - Hookup 
2 Atari type joysticks- $19.95 
With 2 Atari joysticks- $39.95 
WICO Analog Joystick - Self 
Centering and Free Floating ! ! 
Red arcade size handle^ $39.95 



QAMES ITAPEI 



1. Cubix $24.95 

2. Calixto Island $24.95 

3. The King $26.95 

4. Guardian $27.95 

5. Junior's Revenge •..,$28.95 

6. Colorpede $29.95 

7. Zaxxon $39.95 



EAST DIVISION 



Spectrum Projects 

PO Box 21272 
Woodhaven,NY 11421 




I I I I 1 



T 



HOME HELP 



The Most Professional 
Garage Sale In The 
Neighborhood 

By Edward R. Carson 



1 16K I 


r the 1 


J ECB U 


RAINBOW 


J.. ..\^ 



c 




Here is a garage sale program that will do it all for 
you. No more scribbling on a scratch pad, trying to 
keep track of everyone's money. Just CLOAD Gar- 
sale and you have a cash register that will ask for: Sellers, 
Price Of Item, and Quantity, It will give you the Total 
Amount Of Sale, then ask for the Amount Tendered and tell 
you the Amount Of Change. 

As an added attraction you can put any message you want 
on the screen. Do you have a special item you want to 
advertise? Well, just put it on the screen where everyone can 
see it. This is sure to be an eye-catcher. 

You can change the message any time. All instructions are 
documented on the screen except while the message is there. 
You must hit [CLEAR] to return to the sellers list. 

At the end of the day just ask and you will receive the total 
amount sold for the day and the amount each person should 
receive. 

If you don't have enough memory for the entire program 
you can delete the message portion as follows: 

Delete lines 5-775 

Delete lines 885-895 

Delete lines 1535-1555 

Change line 1575 to — "GOTO 935" 



(Edward Carson is a senior majoring in finance at 
Ohio State University.) 



The listing: 
1 PRINT"- 





. .117 


255 


. . .132 


405 


. . .149 


555 . . . 


....90 


705 


. . .217 


985 


. . .207 


1215 


78 


1465 


. . 21 


END 


. . .173 



-GARAGE SALE 



2 
) 

R 
3 
4 
j-5 



PRINT: PRINT: PRINT-COPYRIGHT (C 
SEPT. 20, 1983 BY EDWARD 

CARSON" 

PRINT" CENTERBURG,OHIO" 
FOR T=l TO 900: NEXT T 
CLS:DIM A«<95):G0SUB 145:G0SUB 
/ 785 

! 15 CLS: PRINT "DO YOU WANT (l)SHA 

i ll (2) medium (3) large" : input ch 
25 if ch =1 then y=-16: yy=16: xx= 
12:s=1 else if ch=2 then y=-32:y 
y=32:xx=24:s=2 else if ch=3 then 
y=-64:yy=64:xx=48:s=4 else 15 

35 IF CH-1 THEN CLS: PRINT "ENTER 
NEXT LINE < 21 CHARACTERS)" ELSE 



1S6 the RAINBOW May 1984 



THE SPECTRUM VOICE PAK 



$49.95 



Price good with purchase of 

^^^^^^ J - - any Talking Software below ! 

SPECIAL I I Offer expires May 25, 1984 



$79.95 





I 



I I New Features ! Single key 
echo and phoneme printouts * 



CoCo I I I ^^^^^ w/$29.95 Disk"Y" cable! 



Includes adapter to work on 
16K-64K CoCo IPs, Same 
^Q^Q ¥¥ I I features as CoCo I. In stock! 



TALKING SOFTWARE 




Talking Final Countdown - You must stop the mad general from 
launching a missle at the Russians and causing WW III ! Has multiple 
voices for added realism, 32K EXT $24.95 

Educational Software - Computer Island's educational programs turn 
your CoCo into a true teaching machine. Reinforce basic lessions with 
the aid of voice. Three/pak special includes Math Drill, Spelling Tester 
and Foreign Languages. 16K EXT $24.95 

Talking Score E-Z - An excellent adaptation of a Yahtzee type program 
with added speech. Up to 6 players can compete at a time, and all 
scoring and record keeping is done by the computer. 32K EXT $24.95 

Term Talk - A speaking smart terminal program for your CoCo. It 
contains all the features of an intelligent communications package, plus 
it talks! (Shades of War Games) 16K EXT Tape $39.95 Disk $49.95 



All orders plus $3.00 S/H - NY Residents add sales tax 
SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

WEST DIVISION : EAST DIVISION : 

4285 PAYNE AVE/#9866 PO BOX 21272 

SAN JOSE, OA 95117 WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 

(212) 441-2807 



OLORFUL UTILITIES 

DOUBLE DOS - Now access 10 more granules from your 40 track drive arid still be 
compatible with RS DOS! Also works With double-sided and 80 track drives! DISK $24.95 



MULTI-PAK CRAK - Save ROMPAKs to your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak 
Interface. Eliminate constant plugging w of ROMPAKs now i0 keeping all your PAK 
software on disk. DISK $24.95 



TAPE OMNI CLONE - Easily handles programs with aut0 loaders, no headers, no EOF 
markers, unusual Size blocks and more i Now is the tfine to get your t«ijSe software 
collection protected against loss, TAPE $24,95 



DISK OMNI CLONE - Back everything up! This amazing program handles "non standard'' 
disks with ease. We haven't found any disk yet that it can't handle. Lowest fir-Uce 
too! 32K DISK $29.95 



DISK MANAGER - Rescue crashed disks, date files on the disk dtrectorj^ pHnt a Sujjer 
directory with ML addresses, maintain and sort a catalog of up to 300 fiTeS from a 
collection of disks? l^K DISK $29.95 



BASIC AID - Speed program entry by single key Input of 43 cortmon BASK commands. 
Redefine any or all keys. Merge, move and renumber any pf^rt of yowr program. SPECTRUM 
SUPER SPECIAL! ROMPAK ^gt^ $29.9S/DISK jJjk^s $39.95 



MASTER DESIGN - Attention Telewriter 64 owners. Now you can create stunning block 
letter heads while t^xt frrocesstng with Master Design, full range of character sizes 
and graphic commands! DISK $34.95 



BASIC COMPILER - Convert your BASIC programs into fast e^FflGlent jnacBlne language. 
Produces code more compact and up to 50 )fs faster than original, BASIC. Integer 
compiler with no Extended BASIC needed. 16K-64K versions Included. TAPE $39,95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING - Save Wburs pf work and design pfofe?ss1onal looking eTeclronic 
diagrams using a 480X540 pixel worksheet VfitH 6 Sflewlog findows. DVef 30 electronic 
symbols with 10 user definable syrtbol-s are provided. 0um{> hard copy to the printer 
and save the created schematics to disk. 64K DISK $49.95 



PRITTY PRINTER - An excellent uti 1 itS^. . . This breakdown of, lines Is much neater and 
easier to read than an LtXST printout... Allows for notes, comments and corrections 
to be easily and prbminently placed. TAPE/DISK $19.95 March'84 Rainbow 



MASTER MAIL - Quite easy to use... Capable ibf handling 1000 addresses on a single 
disk... FORM LETTER allows youf to ^rijifpce multiple letters from the ftd^resit 
database... A program for serious applications*. 32K DISK $49.95 Jai'B4 Rainbow 

<£sr c5r 

In Canada Call MICRO R.G.S. Toll Free 800-361-5155 



COLORFUL UTILITIES 



ilfilltilfitt**************** ******* ********** 



FAST DUPE - ^Fhe fastiest Disk copier ever? Win format and backup a diskette in only 
one pass and can make up to 4 Difk copies at once? The must utility for every Disk 
owner. 64K DISK $19.95 



HIDDEN BASIC - A protection feature for your BASIC programs. Modify your code so 
CLOA0, CSAVE, mSt, EDIf. DEL and fctfSt wii^ not fiinct ion. TAPE $19.95 



64 COLUMN MOD I/I II EMULATOR - Give your CoCa a 64X16 screen. >fiun Model I/III BASIC 
graphic routines without retyping tfte grapftics statements. 64K DISK $19.95 



64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE - Take advantage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an 
additional SK of RAM available. Copy ROM cartridges to disk and create a 32K SPOOL 
buffer Ifor pointing. DISK $21.95 



TAPE UTILITY - A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape 
autoraatlcally. Does an automatic copy of an entire disk p# programs and data to tape. 
TAPE^DISK $24.95 



E-X-T-E-N-D-E-D DISK BASIC - Add new powerful commands to your 64K Disk system. 
Inverse Video (GREAT for monilops!|. Wild Cai^d Directory, Double POKE and PEEK, 
NSAVE, NiOAD, idiR, OLD and TYPf. 'til SiC $24.95 



GRAPHICOM - The ultimate GoGo grapthics development system with sophisticated graphics 
editing, preview antmation, t-elecommunlcations and printer support. Hi-resolutton 
grai^lCs for only $24.95. W^|pef^trum's Menu foot S«^iiafei $34.95. 64K DISK 



COLORFUL UTILITY CHECK LIST: 



( ) 

n 



DOUBLE DOS 
MULTI-PAK CRAK 
TAPE OMNI CLONE 
DISK OMNI CLONE 
DISK MANAGER 
BASIC AID 
MASTER DESIGN 
BASIC COMPILER 
SCHEMATIC DRAFTING 



i 

C 
< 
( 
( 
( 



) PRITTY PRINTER 

) MASTER MAIL 

) FAST DUPE 

) HIDDEN BASIC 

) 64 COL MOD I/III EMUUTOR 

) 64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 

) TAPE UTILITY 

) E-X-T'-E-N-D-E-D DISK BASIC 

) GRAPHICOM 




SHIPPING S3.00 - NY RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 



WEST DIVISION 
4S8S PAYNE AVe/#S866 
SAN JOSE, C A S5117 

212- 



EA8T DIVISION 
PO BOX 21272 
WOODHAVEN, NY ii 
441-2807 



421 



if ch=2 then cls: print "enter ne 
xt line <10 characters)" else if 
ch«3 then cls: print "enter next 
line <5 characters) " 
45 a*="":line input a»:cls 

55 IF A*-"" GOTO 35 

65 rhode 4,1: screen 1 , o 

75 color 0,1: if y—yy then pcls 

85 y=y+yy:p-o:for x=o to (len(a« 

i-l)*XX STEP XX 

95 X Y«= " S " +STR* < S ) + " BM " +STR* < X > + 
", "+STR*<Y) 

105 P=P+l:N=ASC<MID«(A«,P, 1) ) 
115 DRAM XY«-«-A«<N) 
125 NEXT 

135 A*=INKEY«:IF A*=CHR*<13> THE 
N 35 ELSE IF A*=CHR*<12) THEN 93 
5 ELSE 135 

145 A« ( 33 > " " BR 1 6R8D40L8U40BD48R8 
D8L8U8" 

1 55 A* ( 34 ) = " BR8R8D24L8U24BR 1 6R8D 
24L8U24 

1 65 A* < 35 ) « " BR8R8D 1 6R8U 1 6R8D 1 6R8 
D8L8D8R8D8L8D 1 6L8U 1 6L8D 1 6L8U 1 6L8 
U8R8U8L8U8R8U 1 6BD246R8R8D8L8U8 " 
175 A* < 36 ) " » BR 1 6R8D8R 1 6D8L 1 6D8R8 
F8D8G8L8D8L8U8L 1 6U8R 1 6U8L8H8U8E8 
R8U8BD 1 6D8H4E4BD 1 6BR8F4B4U8 " 
1 85 A« ( 37 ) a " R 1 6D 1 6L 1 6U 1 66D4BR40G 



CMJ-IF 

MULTI-FUNCTION 
PLUG-IN CARTRIDGE 

FOR 

TRS 80C & TDP 100 

COMPUTERS 

PROVIDES 

* « « 

AN EXTENDER 
2 PARALLEL PORTS 
2 COUNTER/TIMERS 
1 SERIAL COMM. LINE 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
4 OR 8K EPROM/ROM SPACE 
SPEECH FROM TEXT, BASIC, RTTY 
INTERFACE FOR 'CMJ-TU 
•(CW.RTTY.SSTV.FAX) 

MAGNUM DISTRIBUTORS INC. 

1000 S. DIXIE HWY. W. #3 

POMPANO BEACH, FLORIDA 33060 
TLX. 51436S 305-78S-2002 



49D8E49USBD36BL 1 6R 1 6D 1 6L 1 6U 1 6 " 
1 95 A* < 38 ) = " BR8R8F8D 1 6G4F8E4R8D8 
G4F4D8L8H4G4L 1 6H8U 1 6E4H4U 1 6E8BD8 
BR4F4D8G4H4U8E4BD24F 1 264L8H4U8E4 

■I 

205 A* < 39 ) = " BR 1 6R8D24L8U24 " 

215 A*<40)»"BR1 6R8G 1 6D24F 1 6L8H 1 6 

U24E16" 

225 A« ( 4 1 ) s BR 1 6R8F 16D24G16L8E16 
U24H16" 

235 A« ( 42 ) - " BR 1 6R8D 1 6E8R8D8G 1 2F 1 
2D8L8H8D 1 6L8U 1 6G8L8U8E 1 2H 1 2U8R8F 
8U16" 

245 A« < 43 ) » " BD24R 1 6U 1 6R8D 1 6R 1 6D8 
L16D16L8U16L16U8" 

255 A« ( 44 ) » " BD32BR 1 6R8D 1 6G8L8E8U 
16" 

265 A» < 45 > « " BD24R40D8L40U8 " 
275 A* < 46 > » " BD48BR 1 6R8D8L8U8 " 
285 A* < 47 ) » " BD4BR40D8B40U8E40 " 
295 A* < 48 ) = " BR8R24F8D40e8L24H8U4 
0E8BD8BR4R 1 6F4G24U24E4BD 1 2BR20D2 
4G4L16H4E24" 

305 A* < 49 ) = " BR 1 6R8D48R8D8L24U8R8 
U32L8U8E8" 

315 A* < 50 ) » " BRSR24F8D8G32R32D8L4 
0U8E32U4H4L 1 6G4D4LSU8E8 " 
325 A« ( 5 1 ) = " BR8R24F8D 1 6G4F4D 1 6G8 
L24H8U8R8D4F4R 1 6E4U8H4L8U8R8E4U8 
H4L 1 664D4L8U8E8 " 

335 A* ( 52 ) = " BR24R8D32R8D8L8D 1 6L8 
U 1 6L24U 1 6E24BD8D24L 1 6U8E 1 6 " 
345 A* < 53 ) = " R40D8L32D8R24F8D24G8 
L24H8U8R8D4F4R 1 6E4U 1 6H4L28U24 " 
355 A* ( 54 ) = " BR8R24F8D8L8U4H4L 1 6G 
4D 1 2R24F8D 1 6G8L24H8U40E8BD32R20F 
4D8B4L16H4U12" 

365 A* < 55 ) = " R40D8G32D 1 6L8U 1 6E32L 
32U8" 

375 A» ( 56 ) = " BR8R24F8D 1 6G4F4D 1 6G8 
L24H8U 1 6E4H4U 1 6E8BD8BR4R 16F4D8G4 
L 1 6H4U8E4BD24R 1 6F4D8G4L 1 6H4U8E4 " 
385 A« ( 57 ) = " BR8R24F8D40G8L24H8U8 
R8D4F4R 1 6E4U 1 2L24H8U 1 6E8BD8BER4R 
1 6F4D 1 2L20H4U8E4 " 

395 A« ( 58 ) » " BD 1 6BR 1 6R8D8L8U8BD 1 6 
R8D8LBU8" 

405 A* < 59 ) = " BD 1 6BR 1 6R8D8L8U8BD 1 6 
R8D16B8L8E8U16" 

415 A* < 60 ) - " BR34D8G20F20D8H28E28 

II 

425 A* ( 6 1 ) = " BD 1 6R40D8L40U8BD 1 6R4 
0D8L40U8" 

435 A* <62) = "BR7F28G28U8E20H20U8" 
445 A« < 63 ) = " BR8R24F8D8G 1 6D8L8U8E 
1 6U4H4L 1 6G4D4L8U8E8BD48BR8R8D8L8 
U8" 

455 A* < 64 ) = " BR8R24F8D24G8L 1 6U24R 
8D8R8U12H4L16G4D32F4R28D8L32H8U4 
0E8" 



160 th« RAINBOW May 1984 



A . 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
SHOPPING LIST 



A Chip Off The Old„. CoCo Cables And... 



6821 Standard PIA .$9.95 

6822 Industrial Grade PIA $14.95 

6847 VDG Chip $17.95 

68764 (Fits Ext Basic Skt) Epronv .$24.95 

64K RAM Checker (ROMPAK) $24.95 

16K-32K Upgrade Kit* $25.95 

6883 SAM Chip w/heat sink $29.95 

6809E CPU Chip $29.95 

Basic ROM 1.2 Chip $39.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 (New DOS Command) ..$39.95 
64K RAM Chips (Spectrum Special ) .$49.95 

Extended Basic 1.1 RW $69.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit (Be Prepared) 

(2 6821 's, 6809E & 6883) $69.95 

Intronics Eprom Programmer- 15 seconds 
for a 68764 ! All popular EPROM* s $139.95 
* NOT compatible with CoCo II 

CoCo Library,-. 

Color Gomputer lech Manual $7.95 

The World Connection - All about 
Bulletin Boards, Modems and the World's 
Most Famous Sysop (Bob Rosen) ! . . . ^ . $9. 95 

CoCo Memory Map $12.00 

Your Color Computer (Mosher) .$12.95 

Color Computer GriSphTCs (Inman) .,$12,95 

CoCo Secrets Revealed $14,95 

Color Computer Interfacing $14.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide .$18.95 

More Good Stuff... 

PBH Parallel Infceyfaee - Beats Botek ! 
30G*r9600 baud ii^/ptr-ydew switch .$69.95 
The Spectrum Switcher - Have your Disk & 
Cartridge tool Dual Slot System $69.95 
Colorama - The BEST CoCo BBS! ....$99.95 
Disk Interface ( Spectrum Spe<ria1 )$T39.95 
PBO 80X24 Video Board ...........$139.95 

64 KToCo II (NO DISCOUNTS ) $239.95 

Banana Printer w/CoCo Interface .$259.95 
5 Meg CoCo HARD Disk System $1295.00 



All orders plus $3.00 S/H 
NY Residents add sales tax 



Four Pin Male to Four Pin female 
Extension - 15 feet. Move your printer or 
modem to another location. . ii . . . . . .$14.95 

Tired of plugging and unplugging devices 
from the Rb23z port? Make your life 
easier. Try our RS232 "Y" cable ..$19.95 
0$-9 f}ul| Modem Cable - Now timeshare 

with another CoCo or MC-10 $19.95 

Spectrum Light Pen ......$19.95 

Disk Interface/fioiw Pak Extender - Move 
your disks and ROM Paks where you want 

them (3 feet) $29.95 

Tri pi e RS2 32 Swi tcher - Now select one 
of any three RS232 peripherals . . . $29. 95 
40 Pin Dual "Y" edible $29.95 

Other Good Stuff... 

C-IO tapes in any quantity 49 cents 

5 1/4 Diskettes in any quantity ...$1.99 

Joystick plug $3.99 

64K RAM Button $4.99 

GEMINI lOX Ribbon $4.99 

Epson MX/RX 80 Cartridge $6.99 

Roropak w/81ank PC Board $9.95 

RS Disk Controller Case $9.95 

The Disk Doubler - Doubleside your 5 1/4 

diskettes $14.95 

Video Clear - Cleanup TVI H $14.95 

Cassette Recorder Stand- Put your CTR80 

CCR81 at a 45 degree angle $19.95 

The Data Defender- Store 75 diskettes in 

a hard plastic case w/key lock $29.95 

CoCb Cooler (D & E Rev. boards) ..$49.95 
New! CoCo Cooler II (CoCo II) ....$49.95 
CbCo Stereo Music Synthesizer ....$69.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

EAST DIVISION : 

PO BOX 21272 
WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 

WEST DIVISION : 

4285 PAYNE AVE/#9866 
SAN JOSE. CA 95117 

(212) 441-2807 



Five Easy Ways 
To Clean Up Your Finances 





actual screen display 'Indicates function being shown 



Chart of Accounts 
'Checkbook Maintenance 
Check Search 
Prints Checks 



"Detail Budget Analysis 
Summary Budget 

Analysis 
Income/Expense 

Statements 
Net Worth Statement 



Appointments Calendar 
Payments Calendar 
*Color Chart Package 
Mailing List 



"Spreadsheet 
Compatible with 
Finance 1, 2 and 5 



•Income Tax 
Prints forms 
Most schedules 
Uses Finance 1, 2 and 4 



Complete Personal Accountant 




Whether you're cleaning up at home or around the office, 
there's NOW a COMPLETE line of money management soft- 
ware that will attend to all the details, while letting you see the 
whole financial picture. The Complete Personal Accountant's 
exclusive combination of easy to use programs give the wise 
investor a quick and dependable way to control finances and 
plan for the future. 

FINANCE 1 gets you organized with a standard chart of ac- 
counts adaptable to any situation. The Checkbook 
Maintenance program with full screen editing and 
special 'Help' commands let you find any check by 
any field. You can flag tax deductibles, reconcile 
your bank statement, print checks and more. 

FINANCE 2 tells you where your^ 
money is, where It's going and whons 
It's coming from. The Detail and Sum- 
mary Budget programs show exactly 
where you're spending your money. The 
Income/ Expense and Net Worth pro- 
grams provide professional-looking 
statements that can be printed with any 80 
column printer. 





Com 64 


Atari* Color* 


VIC 20 


Price 


FInanc* 1 


• 


• • 


• 


39.95 


Finance 2 


• 


• • 


• 


29.95 


Financa 3 


• 


• * 


• 


29.95 


Finance 4 


• 






29.95 


Financa S 


• 


• • 




59.95 


Comolata Sat (1-3) 


• 


• • 


• 


79.95 


ComDiata Sat (1-5) 


• 


• e 




149.95 




FINANCE 3 separates the CPA from the competition. No other 
finance package for the home or small business gives you 
Appointments and Payments Calendars for scheduling your 
time and money. Few packages offer the ability to chart each 
account in color. And only the CPA includes a mailing list with 
1200 name capacity*. All reports are printable with most 80 
column printers. 

FINANCE 4 lets you determine the "what if's" of your financial 
future. With this easy to learn spreadsheet you'll spend 
more time making decisions and less time crunching 
numbers. 

FINANCE 5, The Tax Handler^M ^ges your 
files from Finance 1, 2 and 4 to complete 
your taxes in a fraction of the normal time. 

The Complete Personal Accountant^i^ line 
money management software is simply 
ths most comprehensive, easy to use 
financial software available anywhere. 

*Varlaa according to computer. 




P.O. Box 3470 Department R, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



* Atari veraion diak only * Financa 5 on TRS-80 color requirea 32K 



Prices subject to change without notice. Add $3.00 for postage and handling. Please specify computer, format, and memory capacity when ordering. 

See your local dealer or order direct 1-800 334-SOFT. 



Atari. Commodore 64/Vic20. TRS 80 Color are trademarks of Atari, Inc.; Commodore Electronics. Ltd.: and Tandy Corp. respectively. 



465 A* < 65 ) = BR 1 6R8F 1 6D40L8U24L24 
D24L8U40E 1 6BD8BR4F 1 2D4L24U4E 1 2 
475 A* ( 66 ) » " R32F8D 1 6G4F4D 1 66aL32 
U56BF8R20F4D8G4L20U 1 6BD24R20F4D8 
G4L20U16" 

485 A* < 67 ) « " BR8R24F8D8L8U4H4L 1 6G 
4D32F4R 1 6E4U4R8D8G8L24H8U40E8 " 
495 A* ( 68 ) = " R32F8D40B8L32U56BF8R 
20F4D32G4L20U40 " 

505 A* ( 69 ) = " R40D8L32D 1 6R24D8L24D 
16R32D8L40U56" 

515 A* ( 70 ) = " R40D8L32D 1 6R24D8L24D 
24L8U56" 

525 A* < 7 1 ) = " BR8R24F8D8L8U4H4L 1 6G 
4D32F4R 1 6E4U4L8U8R 1 6D 1 6G8L24H8U4 
OE8" 

535 A* ( 72 ) « " R8D24R24U24R8D56L8U2 
4L24D24LaU56" 

545 A* ( 73 ) = " BR8R24D8L8D40R8D8L24 
U8R8U40L8U8" 

555 A« ( 74 ) » " BR32R8D48G8L24H8U8R8 
D4F4R16E4U44" 

565 A* ( 75 ) = " R8D24E24R8G28F28L8H2 
4D24L8U56" 

575 A* ( 76 ) = " R8D48R32D8L40U56 " 

585 A* ( 77 ) = *• R8D 1 2F 1 2E 1 2U 1 2R8D56L 

8U36G 1 2H 1 2D36L8U56 " 

595 A* ( 78 > = " R8D 1 2F24U36R8D56L8U 1 

2H24D36L8US6" 

605 A* ( 79 > = " BR8R24F8D40G8L24H8U4 

0E8BD8BR4R 1 6F4D32G4L 1 6H4U32E4 " 

615 A* ( 80 ) = ■' R32F8D 1 6G8L24D24L8U5 

6BF8R20F4D8G4L20U16" 

625 A* < 8 1 ) = " BR8R24F8D36G4F4G4H4G 

4L20H8U40E8BD8BR4R 1 6F4D32H4G4F4L 

16H4U32E4" 

635 A* < 82 ) = " R32F8D 1 6G8L 1 6F24L8H2 
4D24L8U56BF8R20F4D8G4L20U 16" 
645 A* ( 83 ) " BR8R24F8D8L8U4H4L 1 6G 
4D8F4R20F8D 1 6G8L24H8U8R8D4F4R 1 6E 
4U8H4L20H8U 1 6E8 " 

655 A* ( 84 ) = " R40D8L 1 6D48L8U48L 1 6U 
8" 

665 A* ( 85 ) = " R8D44F4R 1 6E4U44R8D48 
G8L24H8U48" 

675 A* ( 86 ) = " R8D36F 1 2E 1 2U36R8D40B 
16L8H16U40" 

685 A* ( 87 ) «= " R8D36E 1 2F 1 2U36R8D56L 

8U 1 2H 1 2G 1 2D 1 2L8U56 " 

695 A* (88) ="R8D12F12E12U12R8D16G 

12F12D16L8Ui2H^2G12D12L8U16E12Hl 

2U16" 

70S A* ( 89 ) = " R8D 1 2F 1 2E 1 2U 1 2R8D 1 6G 
1 6D24L8U24H 1 6U 1 6 " 

715 A* < 90 ) = " R40D 1 2G32D4R32D8L40U 
12E32U4L32U8" 

725 A* ( 9 1 ) = " R40D8L24D40R24D8L40U 

56" 

735 A* ( 92 > - " BD4F40D8H40U8 " 

745 A* ( 93 ) = " R40D56L40U8R24U40L24 



U8" 

755 A* < 94 ) = " BD34E20F20D8H20G20U8 

II 

765 A* ( 95 ) = " BD48R40D8L40U8 " 
ZTS^TURN 
785 CLS ^ 

795 Z *=STR I NG* < 32 , " * " ) 
805 PRINT Z* 

815 PRINTe42, "GARAGE SALE" 
825 PRINT Z* 

835 PRINT "HOW MANY ARE SELLING" 

845 INPUT S 

855 FOR Y=l TO S 

865 PR I NT "NAME OF SELLER #" (Y) 

875 INPUT N*<Y) 
^85 IF (Y)»S THEN895 ELSE 925 
/C;895 CLS: PR I NT "DO YOU HAVE A MESS 
LaGE? CY/N3"; 

905 INPUT M« 

915 IFM«»"Y" THEN 15 ELSE 935 
925 Y-Y+l:GOTO 865 
935 Y=Y+l:CLS:PRINTZ« 
945 FOR X«l TO S-1 STEP 6 
955 FOR Z«X TO X+6 
965 PRINT Z;N«(Z) 
975 NEXT Z 
985 NEXT X 

995 PRINT" INPUT SELLERS NO." 
1005 PRINT 0417, "TYPE C99D TO TO 



TRS-80+ MOD I. Ill, COCO, TI99/4a 
TIMEX 1000. OSBORNE, others 

GOLD PLUG - 80 

Eliminate disk reboots and data loss due to oxi- 
dized cxMitacts at the card edge connectors. 
GOLD PLUG 80 solders to the board edge con- 
nector. Use your existing cables, (if gold plated) 




$16.95 
INCL 
$7.95 
29.95 
39.95 



COCO Disk Module (2) 
Ground tab extensions 
Disk Drives (all R.S.) 
Gokj Disk Cable 2 Drive 

Four Drive Cable 

USA shipping $1.45 Can/Mex$4. 
Foreign $7 dm i wan wy longer TEXAS 5% TAX 

Available at your favorite dealer or order direct trom 

E.A.P.CO. 

P.O. BOX 14 
KELLER. TEXAS 76248 
(817)498-4242 MC/VISA 
+ trademark Tandy Corp 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 163 



TAL DAYS SALES TYPE C91D TO RU 
N MESSAGE " 
1015 INPUT N 

1025 IF N=99 THEN 1425 ELSE IF N= 

91 THEN 65 ELSE 1035 

1035 CLS: PRINT 

1045 PR I NT "SALES FOR " N«(N) 

1055 PRINT Z» 

1065 PRINT"PRICE OF ITEM"?: INPUT 
PR 

1075 PRINT"QUANTITY"; : INPUT Q 
1085 PRINT 

1095 ON N GOTO 1105,1115,1125,11 

35, 1145, 1155, 1165 

1105 S1"S1+PR#Q: GOTO 1175 

1115 S2»S2+PR»Q : GOTO 1 1 75 

1 1 25 S3«S3+PR»Q : goto 1 1 75 

1135 S4«S4+PR»Q: GOTO 1175 

1 1 45 S5=S5+PR»Q : GOTO 1 1 75 

1 1 55 S6«S6+PR#Q : GOTO 1 1 75 

1 1 65 S7=S7+PR»Q : GOTO 1 1 75 

1175 PRINT 1* 

1185 PR I NT "PRESS CENTER 3 TO CONT 
INUE"; : INPUT C 
1195 GOTO 1205 

1 205 CLS : TS=S 1 +S2+S3+S4+S5+S6+S7 

1206 PRINTeiO, "HIT CENTER3" 

1207 PRINTe37,"IF SALE IS NOT CO 
MPLETE" 



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TWO TO FOUR PLAYERS CONTROL SIXTEEN ARMIES LED BY LORDS, 
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A SUPERB GAME FOR dNLY $24.95. 



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COLONIAL WARS; ONE PLAYER COMMANDS THE COLONIAL 
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LEADS THE INVADING ZYRON EMPIRE THE ULTIMATE IN TWO 
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RAINBOW 



164 



1215 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"TOTAL THI 
S SALE" TS 

1225 PR I NT "AMOUNT TENDERED" ;: INP 
UT AT: IF AT«=0THEN935 
1235 CLS 

1245 PRINTe34, "TOTAL THIS SALE" 
1255 PRINTa9B, "AMOUNT TENDERED" 
1265 AC=AT-TS 

1275 PR I NTS 161, "AMOUNT OF CHANGE 

II 

1 285 PR I NTe52 , US I NG " «»« . «» " ; TS 
1 295 PR I NTfi 1 1 6 , US I NG " *«* . ## " | AT 
1305 PRINTei49, STRING* <6, "-") 

1315 PRINTei81,USING"##.#«";AC 

1316 GOTO 1355 

1325 S1=0:S2=0:S3«0:S4=0:S5»0:S6 

=o:S7=o 

1335 PR I NT: PR I NT: PR I NT "PRESS ENT 

ER TO CONTINUE"; : INPUT F 

1345 GOTO 935 

1355 L1=L1+S1 

1365 L2=L2+S2 

1375 L3=L3+S3 

1385 L4-L4+S4 

1395 L5=L5+S5 

1405 L6=L6+S6 

1415 L7=L7+S7:G0T0 1325 

1425 CLS: PR I NT "TOTALS FOR THE DA 

Y" 

1435 PRINT 

1445 PRINTNtKD" s="; :PRiNTe81,US 
ING"##«.««"iLl 

1455 PRINTN»<2)" =" ; : PRINTSl 13, U 
SING"##«.#«";L2 

1465 PRINTN«<3)" =" S : PRINTei45i, U 
SING"#««.tt*";L3 

1475 PRINTN»<4)" «" ; : PRINTei77, U 
SING"»#«.*tt"$L4 

1485 PRINTN«<5)" =" ; : PRINTe209, U 
SING"«##.*#";L5 

1495 PRINTN*<6>" =" ; : PRINTQ241 , U 
SlNG"tttt#.#»";L6 

1505 PRINTN»<7)" ="J :PRINTe273,U 
SING"###.##";L7 

1514 TS=L1+L2+L3+L4+L5+L6+L7 

1515 PRINT: PR I NT "TODAYS TOTAL SA 
LES ="; :PRINTUSING"»»##.##";TS 
1525 PR I NT "PRESS ENTER TO CONT IN 
UE"J : INPUT C 

1535 CLS: PR I NT "DO YOU WANT fo~CH 
ANGE MESSAGE? CY/N3" 
i 1545 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"TYPe C R 
3 TO RERUN OLD MESSAGE" : INPUT MZ 
« 

1555 IF MZ«='!15i:^*THEN 15ELSEIFMZ*=_^ 
" R" THEN65ELSE935 

1565 SlasO:S2»0:S3»0:S4»0:S5»0:S6 
=0:S7=0 f. 
1S75 GOTO 



the RAINBOW May 1964 



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¥xi Can Bet On 





MASTER 



By Leonard Hyre 



Some things just go together: Love and marriage, milk 
and cookies, apple pie and mom, and of course, horse 
racing and CoCo! Horse racing and CoCo? Well, 
maybe you think this is a bit of an exaggeration. 1 will admit 
though, that from the day 1 brought home my CoCo, the 
pair were on my mind. 1 had to believe that my unrelenting 
love of racing and the unwavering logic of the CoCo were 
just intended to get together. The results were Harness Han- 
dicapper and Thoroughbred Handicapper. But the CoCo 
has other possibilities also. Thus Wager Master came about. 

Competent handicapping is only one-half of the formula 
for successful wagering at the races. It has been my expe- 
tired from really trying to win, this can be difficult. Several 
of the features of Wager Master are designed to assist in 
setting up prerace selections of these types of bets, using the 
probable winner as the key ingredient. 

(Leonard Hyre, author of Thoroughbred Handi- 
capper and Harness Handicapper, both marketed 
through Federal Hill Software, is also the author of 
several programs which have appeared previously in 
the Rainbow. As well as being a CoCo enthusiast, Mr, 
Hyre is a claims representative for the Social Security 
Administration.) 



Upon running Wager Master, the user is prompted with a 
menu from which one of eight options can be selected. Seven 
of the eight offer printer options and six require user input. 
To maximize user audience, I have kept Wager Master to 
rience to know several incredibly knowledgeable handi- 
cappers who never seem to make a reasonable profit. The 
reason — money management! A little planning, especially 
before you even arrive at the track, Is a big start on financial 
success to go with the handicapping. 

Wager Master is a tool to aid in that money management 
need. By carefully weighing the probable odds on your 
selections and experimenting with them, you can better 
determine the chances of a reasonable return on an invest- 
ment. It also satisfies that "tinkering" nature of racing fans 
who like to doodle around with odds and the like. 

While 1 personally prefer win or win/place wagering, 1 
will admit to that occasional weakness of a double, exacta or 
triple bet. Though not the soundest of ideas in even the best 
of conditions, the urge to drop a bit on these "exotic" bets is 
virtually impossible to resist. 1 believe the weakness of this 
type of wager is that the handicapper must pick not only the 
winner, but also is betting on who will lose and by how 
much! Since second- and third-place finishers are sometimes 
horses who got there simply by passing horses that were 



166 the RAINBOW May 1984 



within 1 6K parameters and all print routines are done using 
TA Band PRINTUSING commands so as to be compatible 
with all printers. Also, the printouts are limited to a 40- 
column printer width. For those with no printer, all infor- 
mation is displayed on the screen first. 

Lines 190-320: 

Standard Payoffs (option 1) requires no user input and is 
simply a table of payoffs at various odds. The win table is, of 
course, easy to determine. The figures used for place and 
show columns are estimates based on average payoffs for the 
odds shown and should not be considered as necessarily 
accurate. The betting public can do strange things. The table 
may be printed out for handy reference at the track. 



mm 

.■6-5:; 

■■■.■?2HS. 
4-1 

20^1 



WIN 

4.00 

4.40 



Ilj^^iliiililli 





Lines 330-600: 

A Return Per Specific Wager (option 2) section is pre- 
sented for the fun of the "what if" in uSi Just input antici- 
pated odds, the amounts to bet on win, place and show, and 
instantly be presented with the fortune you anticipate will 
come rolling in. Print it out if you wish. 

Lines 610-810: 

Option 3 is Wagering Record Keeper, a truly handy way 
of keeping your racing records. 1 find this infinitely better 
than a huge stack of accumulating Racing Forms and har- 
ness programs. With place, date, name and results for the 
entire day on a handy sheet, you can quickly see how you 
have done, now and in the past, and make adjustments 
accordingly to your style. 

Lines 820-1050: 

Play around with Return Per Specific Odds (option 4), 
requiring limited user input and returning the amount a 
variety of different size win wagers would return at given 
odds. Printer option available here also. 

Lines 1060-1540: 

Options 5, 6 and 7 offer the most likely combinations to 
win an '^exotic'' wager based on your best handicapping 
information. All three offer "hedge'* bets as well and can be 
routed to the printer. 

Lines 1550-1580: 

A general statement is offered as an Overview (option 8). 
This is to remind would-be users of the fact that the program 
does not do the handicapping and that the place and show 
charts are strictly estimates! 



If M iff iM Hi M It M iM It" M 1 
' H' K 'N 'N W H 'H W W II m"' 

mmztiM 3, 1984 




^ wmi^im^ - - • • ... SHOW. . . . 

^J^^ -PAYOTF 

*.;s^iikL&rki^j^^ — .i^h^^^ 



''t|fi|p!i^Spl^«|WfS^ Show* . • * • < 

■sj$if^0te^^0^SS^:-^'^^:-^ -PAYOFF^'. 

'^^^^;ij0:0iim^ mcM 

'0 "m: *'.Plj^^£»- 41 • SHOW* ■ • • a I 

'^•^i^sm^^i^'^^^i^''^ — - • • • 



■^|||||^6^f||ilS,P^«»V^^^^ * *.* ' SHOW* . • . 
,.:;jl^ii||ME|ipS^ . 



.l»L<(«:iE..^.i .- •SHOW 

... . ,J*^i!-^-*- ^ 'PAYOFF^*.;* 

^iV |J I 1^ lll t) il Vtll i t i ft i TjjS li .'^MJN' i N i l^^ ^ I I T i ; ii|l>«)iii i ii t ii| f l| [ ||ii r iiiili i i L iii>ij i .in. n .i i . n i.iii. tm mtm 

, ^^^^%v■.*;-»■»^*.f?K|^Ew SHOW. • • • • . 

w^^jiiim^ei^t^^'i:^. PAYOFF , 

Wi0^:^Mmi<titii: <wwE. 




* *i .;^*l(,»flCE*'* p ♦ • • . SHOW* 
?i|jill«e^'j^^ • . PAYOFF* 

'^lir':^ ;i^m^e. • * . 



^W^l^i^i^^^:.:.. ^ .mjiiM * .SHOW* 

^liii^^yfei^ . FAYOFF- . . • * , 



Wager Master is both serious and fun for the casual or 
regular horse racing fan alike. 1 hope you will agree. 

Programming structure is kept relatively simple. If you 
haven't been making much use of the powerful PRINT 
USING command, a review of the program might be useful. 
The program is broken down into eight distinct subroutines, 
one for each option, accessed by a single ON-x- GOTOWnQ. 
DA TA statements are read in as four strings representing 
odds, win payoff, place payoff and show payoff. These are 
then manipulated as needed by each of the subroutines to 
obtain desired results. 

If you don't want to type in the program, I will be glad to 
send you a copy of tape for $4.50. Just send check to: L. 
Hyre, P.O. Box 403, Cambridge, MD 21613. 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 167 



140. 
280. 
440. 
620. 
760. 
910. 



174 


1020 . . . 


. . 141 


237 


1160... 


.. 25 


130 


1260 . . . 


. . 126 


6 


1370 . . , 


.136 


. 35 


1470 . . , 


. . 143 


223 


END 


. . , 29 



The listing: ' - 

10 »*««««*«««»*««*«*«« 

20 ** WAGER MASTER « 
30 <C>L-HYRE ♦ 

40 '* CAMBRIDGE MD * 
50 1/Q4 ♦ 

60 •♦*♦**♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦*♦* 
70 CLS: CLEAR 1000 

60 DIM 0«<15),W«(1S),P«(15),S*<1 
5) 

90 OOSUB 1600 

100 DATA 1-1,4.00,2.60,2.20,6-5, 
4.40,3.00,2.20,7-5,4.60,3.20,2.6 
0, 6-5, 5. 20, 3. 20, 2. 60, 9-5, 5. 60, 3. 
20,2.60,2-1,6.00,3.40,2.60,5-2,7 
.00,3.60,3.00,3-1,8.00,4.00,3.00 
, 4-1 , 10. 00, 5. 20, 3. 40, 5-1 , 12. 00, 6 
. 00, 4. 00,6-1 , 12. 00, 7.00, 4. 40, 6-1 
, 16.00,6.00,5.20 

110 DATA 10-1,22.00,6.00,5.20,20 
-1,42.00, 18.00, 10.00 
120 Z-0:CLS:SOUND125, 1:PRINT8TRI 
NG«<33, 159)1 :PRINTS42," WAGER MAS 
TER'*:PRINTa63,STRING«(33, 159) I 
130 PRINT" THE MENU: PRINT* 1> 
STANDARD PAYOFFS": PR I NT" 2> RETU 
RN PER SPECIFIC WAGER" : PRINT" 3> 

WAGERING RECORD KEEPER": PR I NT" 
4> RETURN PER SPECIFIC ODDS":PRI 
NT" 5> DAILY DOUBLE WAGERS": PR IN 
T- 6> PERFECTA,EXACTA TYPE WAGER 
8" 

140 PRINT" 7> TRIFECTA, TRIPLE TY 
PE WAGERS": PRINT" 8> ov«rvi«M" 
150 SOUND 100,l:PRINTSTRING«<32, 
159); 

160 PRINT" < TYPE NO. OF 8ELEC 
TION >":PRINTSTRING«(32, 159) I 
170 AN«-INKEY«:IFAN««""THEN 170 
180 ON VAL(AN«) GOTO 190,330,610 
,620, 1060, 1210, 1360, 1550 
190 CLS: SOUND 125, l: IF 2*2 THEN 
PRINT«-Z, STRING* (40, "♦") :PRINT«- 
Z, "*ESTIMATED PAYOFF ON A TWO DO 
LLAR WAGER* 

200 PRINT«-Z, "ODDS WIN PL 

ACE SHOW" 

210 F0RX-1T014: IF LEN(0«(X))*3 T 
HEN 0*<X)-" "+0»(X) 
220 IF LEN(W«<X))-4 THEN W«<X)-" 
"+W«<X) 

230 IF LEN<P*<X))"4 THEN P«<X)»" 



"+P*(X) 

240 IF LEN<S«<X))>^ THEN S«<X)*" 
"+S«<X) 

250 PLAY " T255V3 1 04D " : PR I NT«-Z , TA 
B(0) |0«<X) |TAB(8)|W«(X) |TAB<16) | 
P«(X)«TAB(25)|S«(X) 
260 NEXT 

270 IF Z«2 THEN PRINTtt-Z,STRING« 
<40, "«") :print«-2:print«-2:qotoi 

20 

260 PRINT"<m>ENU <p>RINTER"| 

290 AN«- I NKEY« : I FAN«- " " THEN290 

300 IF AN«>"M"THEN 120 

310 IF AN«»"P"THEN Z>2:60T0 190 

320 SOUND1,4:OOTO290 

330 CLS : SOUND 125,1 

340 PRINTSTRIN0«(32, 175) I :PRINTC 

HR«(175)+" RETURN/SPECIFIC WA 

GER "+CHR* (175) I :PRINTSTRINO 

«(32,175)| 

350 IF Z-2 THEN PRINT«-2,STRIN6« 
(40, "-") :PRINTtt-2,TAB(10) f "♦RETU 
RN/SPECIFIC WAGER*": GOTO 410 
360 PR I NT "SELECT ANTICIPATED ODD 
S:":PRINT"(1) 1-1 (2) 6-5 <3 
) 7-5" : PRINT" <4) 6-5 <5) 9-5 

(6) 2-1": PRINT" (7) 5-2 (8) 3- 
1 (9) 4-1 

370 PRINT" (10)5-1 (11)6-1 (1 

2)6-1":PRINT"(13)10-1 (14)20-1" 

360 INPUT OD«:IF VAL(0D«)>14 THE 

N 360 ELSE XaVAL(OD«) 

390 PLAY"V31T100O4EO5E": PRINT "O 

DDS<-"|0«(X) 

400 INPUT"HOW MUCH TO WIN "|WM 

:IW>UT"HOW MUCH TO PLACE "JPM:IN 

PUT "HOW MUCH TO SHOW "JSM 

410 CLS: PRINT" RETURN FOR W 

AGER" 

420 IFZ«1THENPRINTSTRING«(32,159 

); 

430 PRINT«-Z,"FOR A HORSE AT "| 
0«(X)f" ODDS" 

440 PRINT«-Z, "TOTAL WAGER 0F"|:P 
R I NT«-Z , US I NG " ««««««« . «« " I WM+PM-i- 
SM 

450 PRINT«-Z,"YOUR PAYOFF WOULD 
BE: " 

460 W-VAL(W«(X))/2:P-VAL(P«(X))/ 
2:S-VAL(S«(X) )/2 

470 PRINT*-Z,U8IN6"WIN ««««««« 

. «#" \ WM*W: PLAY"V31T100O4EO5E" 

480 PRINT#-Z,USING"PLACE ««##«#« 

. «#" » PM*P: PLAY*'04E05E" 

490 PRINT#-Z,USING"SHOW ««««««« 

. ## " ; SM*S : PLAY " 04E05E " 

500 PRINT#-Z,STRING*(16, "-") 

510 PRINT#-Z,USING"TOTAL «#«#««# 

.##"»( WM*W ) + ( PM*P ) + ( SM*S ) : PLAY "O 

4EOSE" 



168 Ih* RAINBOW May 1984 



INVESTIGATE THE HIDDEN REALMS 
OF THE HUMAN MIND!! 



S/O- PSYCHOME TER 



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Machine Language, high speed 

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Requires 32K & Ext. BASIC 

With manual, only..,.? 39.95 




IF YOU*^HAVE EVER HAD TROUBLE 
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100 CHARACTER DAISYWHEEL, 10/12/15 PITCH 
CODE COMPATIBLE WtTH DIABLO 620/630 
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P.O. BOX 7661 
AUSTIN.TEXAS 78712 




PHONE (612)835-1088 



920 PRXNT«-Z,U8INe''LE88 «•••««« 
. •« " I UM+PH-l-SH : PLAY " 04E0Se " 
330 PRINT»-Z»8TRINB«(1A,--");PRI 
NT«-Z,USINe»PMlFIT ••••••.«• "I (( 

m*Hy + (PH»P) + (SH»S> ) - <WM+PM+SH) : 
PLAY"T1»0SCQ" 

540 IFZ-2THENPRINT«-2,8TRINe«(40 
,"-•»> :Z-0 

330 PRINT«-Z::PRINT"<«>NOTHER < 
«>ENU <p>RINTER''| 
360 AN«-IM<EY«:IFAN«*""TMEN 360 
370 IFAN«-"A''THEN 330 
360 IFAN«-"H''THEN 120 
390 I FAN*- "P" THEN Z-2:OOTO350 
600 80UNDl,4:e0T0 360 
610 CL8:PRINT8TRIN0«(33,139>i:PR 
INT«3e, "WAGERING RECORD KEEPER": 
PRINTa63,8TRIN0«(33, 139) I 
620 PRINT" 18 PRINTER 0N?":80UND1 
25,l:8CNJND133, 1 
630 A*-INKEY«:IFA«-''"THEN 630 
640 IFA«<>"Y"THEN 80UND 1,1: GOTO 
630 

630 PLAY"V31T30O3OO4DO5D" 

660 PRINT"HAKE 8URE PAPER 18 ADV 

ANCED TO PRINT HEAD!" 

670 PRINT: INPUT "RACECOURSE NAME" 

I RC« : PLAY " T 1 00V3 1 04E05E " 

680 INPUT"T0DAY8 DATE: "I DT«: PLAY 

"04E03E" 

690 INPUT"YOUR NAME: "I NW*: PLAY "O 
4E03E" 

700 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"»»»»*»»»#» 
now" +CHR* ( 1 28 ) +"pr 1 nt 1 ng-»*»»»»*» 
*♦" 

710 PRINT«-2,8TRINO«(40,"*"):PRI 
NT#-2, "TRACK: " I RC*» TAB <20) I "DATE 
: "DT*:PRINT#-2,NM«:PRINT#-2,3TRI 
NG«(40,*»") 
720 FORR-1TO10 

730 PRINT#-2, STRING* (40, "-" ) : PRI 
NT«-2, "RACE NO."|R 

740 PRINT«-2, "WAGER: WIN PL 

ACE SHOW... " 

730 PRINT«-2, "HORSE PLACED: 

, . " < TAB (21 ) I "PAYOFF 

M 

760 PRINT#-2, "PROFIT OR LOSS ON 

RACE " 

770 NEXT R 

780 PRINT#-2, STRING* <40, "-" ) : PRI 
NT"DONE-" 

790 PRINT"PRE8S <1>AN0THER <2>M 
ENU 

800 A«>-INKEY«:IFA««""THEN 800 
810 IF A«-"1"THEN 610 ELSE IF M 
""2"THEN 120 ELSE SOUNDl, l:GOTO 
800 

820 CL8: SOUND 123,1 

830 PRINTSTRING«(32pl73)|:PRINTC 



HR«<173)+" RETURN / SPECIFIC 
ODDS "-^CHR* ( 173) I : PRINTSTRING 
«(32, 173) |STRING«(32, 193) f 
840 PRINT"8ELECT ODDS: ": PRINT" ( 1 
) 1-1 (2) 6-3 <3) 7-3":PRINT 
"(4) 8-3 (3) 9-3 (6> 2-1": PR 
INT" (7) 3-2 (8) 3-1 (9) 4-1" 
830 PRINT" (10)3-1 (11)6-1 (1 
2)8-l":PRINT"(13)10-l (14)20-1 

860 INPUTOD«: IFVALJ(0D«) >14 THEN 

860 ELSE X-VAL(OD«) 

870 PLAY"V31T100O4EO3E":lFZ-0 TH 

EN PRINT"ODDS« "fO«(X) 

880 80UND123,l:S0UND133,l:F0RTI- 

1TO500:NEXTTI 

890 CL8:IF Z-2 THEN PRINT«-Z,STR 
ING«(40, "-"):PRINT#-Z," *R 
ETURN PER SPECIFIC ODDS*": GOTO 9 
10 

900 CLS:PRINTSTRING«(33,159)f :PR 
INT"««*RETURN PER SPECIFIC 0DD8» 
♦♦" f : PRINTSTRING* (33, 139) f STRING 
«(32, 193) f 

910 PRINT«-Z,"<0DD8*"f0«(X)|"> 

•WIN ONLY* 
920 MU-VAL(W«(X))/2 
930 PRI NT#-Z: PLAY "T100V31O4EO3E" 
: PRI NTtt-Z, "WAGER • 2^00 PAYOFF 
: "I :PRINTtt-Z*USING"«tt«««.tttt"|2«M 
U 

940 PLAY"04E03E":PRINTtt-Z, "WAGER 
i 4.00 PAYOFF: "I :PRINTtt-Z,USI 
!<«"••«««.««" 1 4«MU 

930 PLAY"04E03E":PRINTtt-Z, "WAGER 
« 3.00 PAYOFF: "I :PRINTtt-Z,U8I 
NG"«tt«tt«. «#" I 3»MU 

960 PLAY"04E03E":PRINT#-Z, "WAGER 
« 6.00 PAYOFF:"! :PRINT«-Z,USI 
NG"*tttt#«. «•" I 6«MU 

970 PLAY " 04E0SE " : PR I NT#-Z , " WAGER 
«10.00 PAYOFF: "t:PRINT«-Z,USI 

NG"«tt«««.#«"« 10WMU 

9G0 PLAY"04E03E" : PRINT«-Z , "WAGER 
♦20. 00 PAYOFF: " I i PRINTtt-Z , USI 

NO " ««««« . «• " I 20*MU 

990 PLAY"04E05E":PRINT«-Z, "WAGER 
«30. 00 PAYOFF: " I : PRINTtt-Z, USI 

NO " «tttttttt . tttt " I 50*MU 

1000 IF Z-2 THEN PRINTtt-Z, STRING 

♦(40, "-"):PRINTtt-Z:PRINT*-Z:GOTO 

120 

1010 PRINT:PRINT"<a>NOTHER <p>R 
INTER <«>ENU"| 

1020 AN«-INKEY«:IFAN««""THEN 102 
0 

1030 IFAN*-"A"THEN 620 

1040 IFAN»-»P"THEN Z"2:OOTO870 

1030 IF AN«-"M"THEN 120 

1060 S0UND1,4:00T0 1020 



170 tiM RAINBOW May 1984 



1070 GOTO 1070 

1080 CL8:PRXNT«44,"printing":PLA 
Y''T100S,^1O3CO4DO5E" : PRINT8TRINe« 
<33,159>|'*« THE DAILY DOUBLE 8EL 
ECTION *"|8TRINe«<33,159)|:PRZNT 
8TRIN6«(32,19S)| 

1090 PRINT:PLAY"T100V31O4EOSE":I 
NPUT" TOP CH0ICE-18T RACE:"|T1:P 
LAY"04E05E": INPUT" 2ND CHOZCE-18 
T RACE: " I T2:PLAY"04E03E": INPUT" 
TOP CH0ICE-2ND RACE: "I T3: PLAY" 04 
E05E": INPUT" 2ND CH0ICE-2ND RACE 
:"|T4 

1100 CL8:PLAY"03C04D09E":PRINT8T 
RIN6«<33,159)|:PRINT"* THE DAILY 
DOUBLE 8ELECTI0N •" I STRING* <33, 
159) I STRING* (32, 195) 
1110 PRINT: PRINT"KEY BET: "Til"-" 
IT3 

1120 PRINT"ALSO: "|T1| "-"|T4| " 

"|T2|"-"|T3 
1130 PRINT:PRINTSTRING*<32, 175)( 
: PLAY " 03E04E03E " : PR I NT " POSS 
IBLE HEDQE:»T2|"-"|T4:PRINT8TRIN 
G« (32, 175) I : PRINT: PRINT 
1140 PRINT"<<it>ENU <p>RINTER" 
I 

1150 AN«^INKEY«:IFAN««""THEN 115 
0 



1160 IF ANt-"H"THEN 120 

1170 IFAN«-"P"THEN 1180 ELSE SOU 

NDl,l:OOTO 1150 

1180 CL8:PRINT«44, "PRINTING" :PRI 
NT*-2:PRINT«-2,STRING«(40, "-") :P 
RINT#-2,TAB(6)|"»DAILY DOUBLE 8E 
LECTION*" :PRINT»-2, "KEY BET:"T1| 
"-"IT3I" Al«o:"|Tl|"-"|T4|"«n 
d"|T2|"-"|T3 

1190 PRINT«-2, "POSSIBLE HEDGE BE 
T:"|T2|"-"|T3:PRINT»-2,STRINQ«(4 
0, "-" ) : PRI«T»-2, STRING* (40, "-" ) : 
PRINT»-2 

1200 PRINT«37, "PRINT ACTION FINI 
SHED" : S0UND125, 1 : S0UND175, 1 : FORT 
I-1TO300: NEXT: OOTO120 
1210 CL8:PLAY"T100V31O3CO4DO5E": 
PRINTSTRING* <33, 159) ■»•" PERFECTA- 
EXACTA COMBINATIONS "I -i-STRINB* (3 
3, 159) I :PRINTSTRING« (32, 195) I 
1220 PLAY"04E05E": INPUT" ENTER T 
OP CHOICE NO. "ITI 
1230 PLAY"04E05E": INPUT" SECOND 
CHOICE" I T2:PLAY"04E05E": INPUT" T 
HIRD CHOICE" I T3 

1 240 CLS: PLAY"03C04D05E" : PRINTST 
RING* (33, 175)-i-STRIN6«(9, 128) -(-"co 
mblnatlonB"-*-STRING«(9, 12S)-t-STRIN 
G« (33, 175) I 



*B-5 Software^ 



Bg believes CofPouipr ig a unique leaching tool. Otif programs have ftsffii 

*9 created &v teaching p^D««aiocAi4 to give your cfiM^ the heip they need. B5 

inOTrporaies fun with basic learning skills. 

************************ 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

************************ 



4*CL0CK 

Grades 1-4 
16K Cass. $24.95: 32K Disk $26.95 

4*B0RR0W 

Grades 2-4 
16K Cass. $19.95; 32K Disk $21.95 

4*M0NEY 

Grades 2*4 
16K Cas$. $19.95: 16K Disk $21.95 

4*CARRY 

Grades 2-4 
16K Cass. $19.95: 32K Disk $21.95 

4*MATHFACT 

Grades 1-5 
I^K Cass. $16.95: 32K Disk $18.95 

SKIP COUNTING 

Grades 1-4 
16K Cass. $16.95; 32K Disk $18.95 



QUESTION 

Grades 1-8 
ISK Cass. $19.95; 32K Disk $21.95 
HANGWORD & SCRAMBLE 

Grades 1-8 
16K Cass. $14.95; 32K Disk $16.95 

SPELLING 

Grades 1-8 
16K Ca9S. $16.95; 32K Disk $18.95 

KEYBOARD 

Grades 1-8 16K Cass. $19.95; 
32K Cass. $24.95: 32K Disk $26.95 

ABC'S 

Grades K-1 
16K Cass. $9.95: 16K Disk $11.95 

All 0-5 programs require 
Extended Basic. 



BROCHURES UPON REQUEST 
Ask your Dealer for a Demonstration today! 

H unavailable locally, send check or money order to; 



DATA TAPE LISTINGS 

Data Tapes may be used with o^her 65 programs. 
Ttmy cannor 60 u$9<! afpne 

Urn WMh Kmbo§rd Program 
KEYBOARD PHONIC ORILl ■ ietterrWord and serrience 
tinger drills using common vowsf and consonant com> 
binations. $0 95 

U— WHh Kmpoartt, Sp9nirtg or Hangwofd Programa 
DOLCH WORDS • 273 words used most often in beginninQ 
readers. S8.95 

GRADE LEVEL SPELLING - over 300 worxto on eactY t^M; 

eacti lesson follows a pfionic nite. Avaiiabto ior grades 2, 3, 

4, 5, and 6. $8.95 per grade fval. 

SPACE WORDS - over 30Q wofds to ctiallenge and molival^ 

(he superior speller. Grades 441. $8.95 

ADULT WORDS • most often misspelled words Highly 

challenging. $8.95 

Um With QuoatkMW Program 
NOUNS AND VERBS - 4 lessons on nmins and 4 on vertM. 

Grades 3-5. $8.95 

READING COMPREHENSION • lessons build from sinvia 
to complex. Grades 2-4. 

Main Idea $10.95 

Saqoencing ,.$10.95 

Fact 4 Opinion $10.95 

Caqse & Effect $10.95 

Complete Senes or 4. 139.95 

B5 Software 

1024 Bambridge Place 
Columbus, Ohio 43228 
(614) 276-2752 

Free Shipping in U.S.A. A CwMda 

(Ohio restdents add 5.5% Sales Tax) 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 171 



1290 PRINTSTRIN8«(32,195>i:PRINT 
" PLAY: "|T1|'''--|T2|" "ITII'' 
--IT3 

1260 PRINT" "|T2|"--|T1|- 

"|T3|"-'*|T1" 
1270 PRINT: PRINT8TRING«(32« 159)1 
: PRINT" IF TOP CHOICE 18 5*1 OR 6 
REATER CONSIDER PLAYINO "|T1|"- 
•11": PRINTSTRINO* (32, 199) I 
1280 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" <«i>ENU 

<p>RINTER" 
1290 AN«-INKEY«:IFAN«-""THEN 129 
0 

1300 IF AN*«"M"THEN 120 ELSE IF 
AN«-"P"THEN 1310 ELSE S0UND1,4:6 
OTO 1290 

1310 SOUND 125, l:S0UND129, l:INPU 
T" INPUT RACE NO. "|RN:PLAY"04E05E 
t " : PRINT#-2, STRING* (40, "-" ) :PRIN 
T«-2," *PERFECTA/EXACTA WAGE 

RING*" 

1320 CLS: PRINTG44, "PRINTING" : SOU 
ND15S, 1 : S0UND125, 1 : PRINT«-2, TAB ( 
12) I "RACE N0."|RN:PRINT«-2,"CcM»b 
inationm To Play: "|T1| "-"|T2l " ♦ 
♦ "|T1|"-"|T3:PRINT#-2,STRINQ»(2 
1," ")|T2l"-"|Tl|" "|T3l"-"|T 
1 

1330 PRINT*-2, "IF CHOICE IS 5-1 
OR UP CONSIDER" I Til "-All" 



1340 PRINT«-2, STRING* (40, "-"): PR 
INT#-2:PRINT#-2 

1350 PRINT«40, "printing co«pl«t« 
":80UND 125,|:S0UND1S5,1:F0RTI-1 
TO600: NEXT: GOTO 120 
1360 CL8:PLAY"T100V31O3CO4OO5E": 
PRINTSTRIN0«(33, 159) | :PRINTt36, " 
BIG TRIPLE SELECTIONS "|:PRINTG 
63, STRING* (33, 159) I :PRINTSTRING« 
(32, 128) I 

1370 PRINT" ENTER HORSE NUMBERS" 
: INPUT" TOP selection:" I Tl: PLAY" 
04E05E" 

1360 INPUT"SECOND SELECTION" |T2; 
PLAY"04E05E" 

1390 INPUT"THIRD SELECTION" I T3: 
PLAY"04E05E" 

1400 INPUT"FOURTH SELECTION" I T4: 
PLAY"04E05E" 

1410 CL8:PLAY"03C04D05E":PRINT8T 
RING«(3G,255)-«>" TRIPLE SELECTIO 
N8 "•«^TRING«(3G,255)-^8TRING«(32, 
195) I : PRINT: PLAY"04E05E" : PRINT"P 
LAY "|Tl|"-"|T2|"-»|T3i:PLAY"04E 
05E": PRINT" "|T1|"-"|T2|"-"| 
T4I 

1420 PLAY"04E05E": PRINT" "|T 
1 1 "-* I T3I "-•• I T2| : PLAY"04E05E" : PR 
INT" "|Tl|"-"|T3l"-"|T4|:PLA 
Y"04E05E»: PRINT" "»T1|"-"|T4 



DSKMON 



Examine and fix sector data, 
also includes disk read, write, file in- 
formation display, and selective disk backup. 
(ML, 16k or 32k) ffk 
Disk (With Source). ~. $24.95 



PUN LOCK 

Color Computer Disk Fix Pro- 
ram. Complete disk fix utility. Features 
included are initialize any track (up to track 
255), copy any track (up to track 255), verifica- 
tion of any track, and copy of any track fixing 1/ 
0 errors, fl^ 

Disk $24.95^ 




EUCHRE 



-CCADS- 



A full 6609 machine language monitor with 
line assembler and disassembler All you 
need to debug machine language programs. 
(ML, 1 6k or 32k) Cassette $19.95 
or Disk (With Source) ^ $23.95 

•CHROMA-KEYS- 



Define function keys and save them to disk or 



CLOCK- 



(ML, 16k or 32k) Cassette $9.95 ~ 
or Disk (With Source) $13.95 



A software real-time clock program for the 
CoCo. Warning: The clock will stop during 
tape I/O, 

(ML, 1 6k or 32k) Cassette $9 .95 

or Disk (With Source) $13 .95^ 

^DARKROOM DATABASE >^ 

Throw away your Photo-Lab index. Let CoCo 
look up the facts. Darkroom Data-Base with 
timer. 

\^6k or 32k) Disk $1 9.95^ 



A Hi-Res version of the card 
game. Your partner is the computer, the oppo- 
nent team is played by the computer Allows 
any of the four players to "GO" alone. 
(ECB.32k) ^ 
Cassette $19.95 



^ BULLETIN BOARD . 

SOFTWARE 

Run a Bulletin Board from your color com- 
puter. Includes upload and download of Ascil 
files. Requires 1 disk drive, 32k of memory 
and an auto answer modem. 
Includes schematics to make 
modem I auto-answer $19.95 



X GRADES >^ 

A data base program designed to aid in keep- 
ing records of students' test scores. Also 
calculates final grade, test averages, and 
other statistics. 
(32k) Cassette $19.95 
or Disk (With Source) .$24.95 



SPOOLER- 



I Print ASCII files from disk without waiting. 
I (ML, 64k only) ^ 
^isk(WHh Source) ~ $15.95 



-COMMAND 



Add machine language programs as com- 
mands to BASIC. 

(ML, 16kor32k)Cassette$15.95 

or Disk (With Source) $1 9.95 



CHROMA-SYSTEMS GROUP 

P.O. BOX 366 • DAYTDN, OHIO • 45420 

Please include $1 for shipping & handling per item Ohio residents please add 6% sales tax. 



172 



Um RAINBOW May 1984 



I I T2| : PLAY"04E0SE" : PRINT" 

"|T1|"-"|T4| »-"|T3 
1430 PRINT: PRINT8TRINe« (33, 126) 
" THE HEDGE BOX "|T1| "--|T2| " 
-■|T3|" "|8TRINB«(33,128)| 
1440 IF Z>2 THEN 120 
1450 PRINT»<M>ENU <p>RINTER" 
I 

1460 AN«-INKEY«: IFAN«-*"'THEN 146 
0 

1470 IF AN«-"H''THEN 120 ELSE IF 
AN^-^P'^THEN 1480 ELSE S0UN01,4:8 
OTO 1460 

1480 CLS:S0UND1 25,1: SOUND 155,1: 

PRINT044, "PRINTING" :PRINTtt-2,8TR 

ING« (40, ) : PRINT4-2, STRINSt ( 1 1 

," ") I "TRIPLE SELECTION" 

1490 PRINT»-2,TAB(9)"PLAY: "|T1 

|"-"|T2| "-"|T3:PRINT»-2,TAB(16)| 

T1|"-"|T2|"-"|T4 

1500 PRINT«-2,TAB(16)|T1|"-"|T3| 
"-" I T2: PRINT«-2, tab < 16) I Tl I "-" I T 
3|"-"fT4 

1510 PRINT«-2,TAB(16)|T1|"-"|T4| 
"-" I T2: PRINT#-2, TAB ( 16) | Tl | "-" | T 
4|"--|T3 

1520 PRINT«-2:PRINT»-2,"»»Th» 
do« Bok:"|T1»"-"|T2|"-"|T3 
1530 PRINTtt--2, STRING* (40, "-") 



1540 GOTO 120 

1590 (X8:PRINTCHR«(193)-(«TRINB«< 
30, 195) •H:HR« ( 194) I : PRINTCHR« ( 197 
)■!■••»»• WAGER HASTER OVERVIEW »* 
*"-»O1R«(202) I :PRINTCHR«(196)-»STR 
IN8* (30, 204) -tCHM (200) I : PRINTSTR 
IN6«(32, 147) I :PLAY"T100V31O4CO4D 
05E" 

1560 PRINT"THI8 PROGRAM IS PRE8E 
NTED AS ANAID FOR YOUR HANDICAP 
PINB. IT ISNOT DESIGNED TO DO H 
ANDICAPPINQFOR YOU! THIS IS FOR 
THE BETTOR."! 

1570 PRINT8TRINB«(32,255)|:PRINT 
"NOTE** ALL 'PLACE' <c 'SHOW' ODD 
S"|:PRINT"ARE strictly ESTIMATES 
AND OFTENFLUCTUATE WITH THE MUT 
UAL POOL. "|:PRINTSTRING«(32,255 

)i:print:print"< press any key f 

OR MENU >"| 

1580 AN«'"INKEY«:IFAN««""THEN 158 
0 ELSE 120 
1590 GOTO 1590 

FORX-1 TO 14 

READ 0«(X),W*(X),P«(X),S«(X 



1600 
1610 
) 

1620 
1630 
1640 



NEXT X 

RESTORE: RETURN 
RETURN 



iThe Original FLEX™ for Color Computers 



* Upgrade to 64K 

* RS to FLEX. FI^X to RS file transfer ability 

* Create your own character set 

* Automatic recognition of single or double density and single or 
doubled sided 

* All features available for eittier single or multiple drive systems 

* Settable Disk Drive Seek Rates 

* Faster High Resolution Video Display with 5 different formats 

* Save RS Basic from RAM to Disk 

* Move RS Basic to RAM 

* Load and save function on FLEX disk 

* 24 Support Commands 1 2 with Source Text 

* External Terminal Program 

Languages Available 
Pascal, Fortran, RS Basic, RS Assembler, TSC Base, TSC Assemb- 
ler, Rek)cating Assembler. Macro Assembler. Mumps 

II you are tired of pfaying games on your TRS B(X^ Color Computer or find that you are 
handicapped by the limitations ol the RS BASIC in trying to write a Program that will allow you to 
actually USE the Colot Computer as a COMPUTER. YOU ARE READY TO MOVE UP TO THE 
FLEX9 ' Operating System If you want to have REAL PROGRAMMING POWER using an 
Extrer?iety f^owerful Business BASIC. PASCALS. C Compilers, a full-blown Macro Assembler 
with a Lilxary capability so you are not continuously reinventing the wheel . YOU ARE READY 
TO MOVE UP TO THE FLEX9 Operating System It you would like to see if YOU REALLY 
COULD USE A COMPUTER IN YOUR BUSINESS, or begin to make your Computer start 
PAYING IT S OWN WAY by doing some Computer Work for the millions of small businesses 
around you. such as Wordprocesstng. Payroll, Accounting. Inventory, etc . then YOU ARE 
READY TO MOVE UP TO THE FLCX9 Operating System How'^'^DATA-COMPhastheway' 



DATA-COMP has •vmylMng yoM nMd to II 



■ your TRS-tOC Color Compultr WORK 



for YOU; from Pwts and PtMM to FiiM, RMdv To Uw SYSTEMS. DATA^OMP daalnna. 
aoOm, wvicM, and SUPPORTS Compulor SYSTEMS, not iiMt Soflwaro. CALL DATA- 
COMP TODAY to maho your Con^Milar WORK FOR YOU! 



FLEX9 Special General Version n Editor & Assembler fwtvch normaHy sell for SSO.OO 

SI 50.00 



i) 

F-MATE<RS) FLEX9 Conversion Rout, for ttie RS Disk Controller 
when purchased with Speciai General FLEX9 Sys. 
when purchased without the General FLEX9 Sys. 
Set of Eight 64K RAM Cttlpa w Mod. Instructions 

Color Computer with 64K RAM and EXT. BASIC 



S49.95 
$59.95 
$59.95 

S399 95 



DATA-COMP s FLEX9 Conversion for the TRS-80C Color Computer was designed for the 
SERIOUS COMPUTER USER: with features tike greatly increased Display Screens. WITH 
Lower Case Letters, so you can put a FULL Menu on ONE Screen or see SEVERAL Para- 
graphs at the same time; with features Ime providing a FULL Keyboard so you have FULL 
Corrtrolofyour Computer AND it s Programs NATURALLY, without needing a chart to see what 
Key Combination wiH give you wfiat function witti USER ORIENTED functions to make using 
ttie Operating System natural, hke having the Computer AUTOMATICALLY determine what 
type of Dish is tiemg used m what type of Disk Drive and working accordingly, rather that you 
have to specify each and every thing for it. or like having the Computer work with the Printer you 
have been usmg all along witfKHjt you living to tell the new Operating System what is there etc 

""FLEX is a trademark of Technical Systems Consultants 

^a*^^ ^O. BOX 794 HIXSONf TN 37343 

DATA-COMP 161 5-842^1 



SPECIAL SYSTEM PACKAGES 

64K Radw Shack COLOR COMPUTER. Radio Shack COLOR DISK CONTROLLER, a Dfak 
Driva Systom. SpacM Ganaral Vara*on of FLEX9 , F-MATE<RS| " and a Box M 10 
Doubte Dantfty DIakatlaa: a COMPLETE, raady to run SYSTEM on your Color TV Sol. 

S1079.9S 

DISK DRIVE PACKAGES ale. 

These PacKages irwluda the Radio Shack Disk Controller. Disk Drives with Power Supply and 

Cabinet, and Disk Dnve C^le; 

PAK #1 — 1 Single Sided. Double Density Sys. $489.95 

PAK #2-2 Single Sided. Double Density Sys. $749.95 

PAK #3 - 1 Double Srded. Double Density Sys $569.95 

PAK #4 - 2 Double Sided. Double Density Sys. $919.95 

PAK #5 — 2 Qume Thinline Double Sided Double Density Sys. $749.95 
PARTS AND PIECES 

Radio Shack Disk Controller $1 79.95 

1 Single Sided. Double Density Disk Drive Tandon S249.95 

1 Double Sided. Double Density Disk Dnve Oume S349 95 

1 Oume Thmline Double Sided. Double Density $279 95 



Screen Clean — Clears Up Video Distortion On Your Cotor Compuier 
Single Drive Cabinet with Power Supply 
Dout)le Dnve Cabinet with Power Supply 
Single Drive Disk Cable for RS Controller 
Double Drive Disk Cable for RS Controller 
Micro Tech Prods . Inc LOWER CASE ROM Adapter 
Radio Shack BASIC Version 1.1 ROM 
Radio Shack Extended Base ROM 



S3995 
S69 95 
S109 95 
$24 95 
S34 95 
574.95 
S34 95 
189.95 



May 19B4 tlw RAINBOW 173 



1 

i 




ALL GAMESDfS? 
COUNTED 20%, 



COMPUTERWARE 
tape 

•MISTER DIG 22.35 

*ICEHOCKY 19.95 

•SYNTHER 77 22.35 

SORCER 0S>9 NA 

*COCO COOKBOOK ... NA 

BASIC PROG UTIL.... 16.95 

'32K 
TOM MIX 

tape 

'TOUCHSTONE 22.35 

SKRAMBLE 19.95 

KING TUT 22.35 

•CRASH 19.95 

XUTHBERT ' 16.75 

-BUZZAR0 BAIT 22.35 

•32K 



MICHTRON 

tape 

•TIME BANDIT 22.35 

CASHMAN 22.35 

DEMON SEED 22.35 

MUDPIES 22.35 

INTERCEPT! 22.35 

.OUTHOUSE 22.35 



SWfET 
BARGAINS!! 



disk 

23.95 
23.95 
23.9$ 
23.95 
23.95 
23.95. 




PRICKLY PEAR 
tape 

ERLAND 19.95 

COLORCAL 19.95 

•TRAVELIN TOAD 19.95 

LIGHT RUNNER 19.95 

BASEBALL 19.95 

OCKYWOCKY. ......... 19.95 



•32K 



COLORQUEST 

tape disk 
23.95^ 19.95 
19.95 
15.95 



*FYR DRACA 23.95 

XYGOID 19.95 

'BEYOND THE 
CIMEEON MOON ... 23.95 
. *FEMBOT'S REVENGE 23.95 
SOUTHERN SOFTWARE \ ADVENTURE TRILOGY 23.95 
tape disk " 

"^GRAF ZAPPER 13.55 16.95 

PIEZAPPER 13.55 16.95 \ *32K 

BAR ZAPPER 13.55 16.95 

CHESHIRE CAT SOFTWARE 
tape disk 

GRAPHICOM NA 25 45 

VIDEO MONITOR 
INTERFACE 25.95 



19.95 
19.95 

19 as. 



DEALERS!! For complete CoCo support 

nOAuRUNNER compuuh ppooucjs 

3808 E W.Mo« Phfjeni». M i 602 97l.9tai 



IME KING 
fLiGHT 
S fl 71 

WHIRL' 8lHD RUN 
LAND ROVffl PATHOl 



BUSINESS 

tUTfCAlC i0 9b 50 95 

INCLUDES MAll MERGE 
EUre-fia NA 64.95 

ALlJPflOGflAMS 150 00 



a4 HOUR ORDKR LINK 

800-221-9280 
EXT. 988 

{ORDERS ONLY PLEASE) 



prices and availability subject to 
change without notice 
THESE PRICES GOOD THROUGH MAY 15, 1984 



CLONE MflbfES 
OMNI lAHt CLONE 
COLORKII 
MAILING IISI 
DISK /APPEH 
DfSK MASTER 
DISK MANAGER 



INQUIRIES. ARIZONA ORDERS 

(802) 827-0823 

PHOME ANSWERED PERSONALLY 
1:00 P.W. TO S:00 P.W. WIST 



sot fLAW COflP 
p Progiams die Oisl. Only 

P WRIIEH 
P CAH; 
P OAfABASf 
P TERMiNAi 
P SPELLER 
PO(SH ZAP 

IE WMOIE HBRAHY (Ot$m 

IE BUi^lMtbS KfiNANf 

'(Iter Caic Oataii*$« Spelte' < 



TO ORDER: We accept VISA and MASTERCHARGE Money orders 
and personal checKs welcome. No delay Contmental U S orders in- 
clude $? 00 postage and handling (except ViP wtuch is $2 00 per 
peice) AH internauonal orders add 10% shippinu and handling tee. 
Arizona residence arirl 6% sales tax. 



I 



16K 
ECB 



RAINBOW 



By Jerry D. Forsha 




e'Nerd is my version of Q-Bert for I6K Extended 
Color BASIC. To load Q-Nerd turn the computer off 
and on or POKE II3J [ENTER] and press the 
[RESET] button. Load Q-Nerd and RUN, 
Q-Nerd uses the right joystick for movement. To move 
Q-Nerd dov^n to the left, move joystick down and to the left. 
Right, up and down directions, also move appropriately 
with the joystick. 

As Q-Nerd n\o\cs, the blocks change color from green to 
blue, but you must change all blocks to the same color 
before the colors change. You start with three men. As you 
move on the blocks, points are scored. On the first color 
each block is worth 10 points and each time you change 
colors the points increase by 10. Extra men are given points 
of 4,000 for the first one, 8,000 for the next one, 16,000 for 
the next one, etc., to a total of five extra men. If you fall off 
or the snake and/ or ball catches you then your points will be 
updated. 

Line Description 

Line 0 sets up dims and variables. 

Line 1 disables [BREAK] key, (BASIC runs 30 percent 
faster). 

Lines 2-17 set up game: draw men, blocks, wait to start 
game. 

(Jerry Forsha is a retail sales auditor and free-lance 
computer programmer specializing in business pro- 
grams. This is his first computer game.) 



Lines 18-25 read joysticks; check each block to see if all arc 
set to the same color; put ball on screen; check platforms; 
check score for extra men: put snake on screen; go back to 
read joysticks. 

Lines 26-27 put ball on screen; check to see if ball and man 

are in same position. 
Lines 28-29 move man down to the left; check to sec if man 

falls off of the edge. 
Lines 30-31 move man down to the right; check to sec if 

man falls off. 

Lines 32-33 move man up to the right; check to sec if man 
falls off. 

Lines 34-35 move man up to the left; check to see if man 
falls off. 

Lines 36-37 check to sec if platform is there; move man and 

platform; move snake (if on board). 
Lines 38-39 check to see if right platform is there; move man 

and platform; move snake (if on board). 
Lines 40-49 check to sec if snake is on board; make the 

snake chase the man; if man on platform, kill snake over 

the edge: check to see if snake and man are in the same 

position. 

Lines 50-51 draw man going over the edge; update and 
draw the score: check to see if this was the last man. 

Line 52 if ball or snake landed on man, draw saying and play 
*^rats.'' 

Lines 53-55 end of game: draw score: set up variables for a 
new game. 



May 1984 the AAINBOW 175 




The listing: 

0 CLS : PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS : CLE AR0 : CLEAR 
1500:DIMRA(1) pLA<l) ,R<1),RX(1),B 
(12) ,P<2) ,MR(6) ,ML(6>,S<3) ,8X(3) 
, SA <24) , N« <9) : Y2«56: C-3: CS-1 : SS« 

4000:m«i:q«2 

1 P0KE248, 50: P0KE249, 98: POKE2S0, 
28: POKE251 , 175: P0KE252, 126: P0KE2 
53p 173;P0KE254, 165:POKE410, 126: P 
OKE411,0:POKE412,248 

2 CIRCLE<10,4) p 10,3p .50, . 15, .85: 
COLOR3:LINE<14,0)-(14,6)pPSET:PA 
INT(10p6)p2,3:PSET<7p2,4):PSET<l 
lp2,4) :COLOR4:LINE<10p4)-(20,4) , 
PSET:LINE(7p6)-(li,6) ,PSET:DRAW" 
BM4 p 8D4R2BR4NU2R2 " : GET ( 0 , 0 ) - ( 20 p 
12)pMR,6 

3 CIRCLE (50, 4) p 10, 3p. 50, .70,. 40: 
C0L0R3: LINE (46, 0) - (46, 6) , PSET: PA 
INT (50, 6), 2, 3: PSET (54 ,2, 4) :PSET( 
50, 2, 4> : C0L0R4: LINE (50, 6) - (54, 6) 
p PSET: LINE (40, 4) - (50, 4) , P8ET: DRA 
W"BM56, eD4L2BL4NU2L2'' : GET (40, 0) - 
(60, 12) ,ML,G:LINE(40,0)-(60p 12) p 
PRESET, BF 

4 CIRCLE (180, 20), 5, 4,. 6: PSET (180 
,20,4): GET (176, 18)-(ie6,22) ,R,G: 
LINE(176, 18) -(186, 22), PRESET, BF 

5 DRAW"C4BM200,4NE2R12NH2":PSET( 

200. 5) : PSET (202, 6) : PSET (212, 5) : P 
SET (210, 6) : PSET ( 198, 4) : PSET (214, 
4) : GET (204, 2) - (214, 6) , RA, 6: GET ( 1 
98,2)-(20G,6),LA,O:LINE(19G,2)-( 

214.6) , PRESET pBF 

6 DRAW " C4BM200 , 6RFDGLHRFDOLHRFD8 
LHRFDGLHR4F2DL4 " : GET ( 1 94 , 6 ) - ( 204 
,18), 8,8: LINE (194, 6) -(204, 18), PR 
ESETpBF 

7 CIRCLE(128,20),30,4,.30:DRAM"S 
6BM106, 17ND4R4D2L2F2BR4E4F2NL2F2 
BR4U4NL2R2BR4NR2D2R2D2L2" : GET ( 10 
0, 12)-(156,2e) pSApO:LINE(98, 12)- 
( 158, 28) , PRESET, BF 

8 FaRR«0TO9 : RE ADN« ( R ) : NEX T : DATAB 
R2DeR4U8NL4BR2 , BR4N82D8NR2L2BU8B 
R6, BR3R2FlDG4D2R4BUeBR2, BR2R4D4N 
L2D4NL4BU8BR2, BR2D4R4NU4D4BU6BR2 



, BR2NR4D4R4D4NL4BU8BR2, BR2NR4I>eR 
4U4NL4BU4BR2 

9 DATABR2R4D264D2BUeBR6,BR2NR4D4 
NR4D4R4U8BR2, BR2NR4D4R4NU4D4BU8B 
R2 

1 0 PMODE 1 p 1 : PCLS : DRAW " S4C2BM 1 28 , 
20R20F 1 2L20H 1 2D 1 6F 1 2NU 1 6R20U 1 6C3 
BM66 , 42R 1 0F6L 1 0H6D4F6NU4R 1 0U4 " : P 
AINT (72, 46) , 2, 3: PSET (68, 46, 2) : PS 
ET (70, 48, 2): PAINT (74, 50), 2, 3: SET 
(66, 42) - (84, 52) , P, G: PUT ( 192, 88) - 
(210, 98) , P, OR: PR=0: PL«0 

11 PI10DE3, l:PAINT(130, 14)p2p2:PA 
INT ( 158, 20) p 2p 2: GET( 12G, 10) -( 160 
,24) ,B,G: Y-18:FORX-108TO22STEP-2 

0:put(x,y)-(x+32,y+14),b,or:y«y+ 

8: NEXT 

12 Y-24:FORX-140TO50STEP-20:PUT( 
X p Y) - ( X+32, Y+14) , B, OR: Y-Y+8: NEXT 
: Y-38 : FORX- 1 52TO92STEP-20: PUT ( X , 
Y) - ( X+32, Y-H4) , Bp OR: Y-Y+8: NEXT: Y 
-52: FORX-164TO1228TEP-20: PUT ( X , Y 
) - ( X+32, Y+14) , B, OR: Y-Y+S: NEXT 

1 3 Y-66 : FORX- 1 76T0 1 42STEP-20 : PUT 
( X, Y)- (X+32, Y+14), B, OR: Y-Y+8: NEX 
T: PUT ( 188, 80) - (220, 94) , B, OR: FORY 
-0TO28STEP14: PUT (0, Y) - (20, Y+12) , 
MR, OR: NEXT 

14 PHODEl , H: DRAW''S12BM46, "+STR« ( 



STYLOGRAPH 



and 

COLOR OS/9 

are a Perfect Match 

By combining OS/9 and the dynamic 
features of Stylograph, you attain the 
ultimate in a Word Processing System. 

• Proportional Spacing & Right Justification 

• Horizontal Scrolling 

• Search & Replace 

• What you see on the screen 

is what you get on the printer. 

• Uses FHL O^PAK for 51 x 24 screen 



Buy any 2, Save ^25 
■ Buy all 3, Save *50 



Stylograph M50 
Spell Checker ^95 
Mail Merge '75 

See your Local Dealer or contact us direct 



Color Flex Versions also available 

Great Plains Computer Company 



P.O. Box 916 

Idaho Falls, ID 83402 



• 208-529-3210 



176 the RAINBOW May 1984 



YP ) " ND4R202NL2BR2ND2U2R2D2L2F2B 
R2NR2U2NRU2R2BR2NR2D2R2D2NL2BR2R 
2U2L2U2R2BR6ND4R2D2NL2D2BR2U4F2N 
D2U2BR2F2ND2E2BR6D2NE2NF2D2BR4NR 
2U2NRU2R2BR2F2ND2E2": IFYP-0THEN8 
CREEN1,0 

15 IFINKEY«-'*"THEN15EL8EPnODEl,3 
:PCL8:PM0DE1, l: LINE (45,0) -(21 1,1 
2) , PRESET, BF: PHODEl , 3: PC0PY1T03: 
PC0PY2T04 : C0L0R2 :LINE(218,0>-(23 
8, 12) , P8ET, B: paint (222, 2) , 3, 2 

16 PMODE1,3:LINE(X2,Y2)-(X2+20,Y 
2+24) , PRE8ET, BF: Y2-Y2-28: PC0PY3T 
01 : PC0PY4T02: PMODEl , 1 : PUT ( 138, 4) 
-(158,28) , HR, OR: X 1-138: Yl-4: PLAY 
"T255V31 » : SCREENl , 0 

17 8ET(140,22)-(150,30),RX,O:8ET 
(82, 124) - (92, 148) , 8X, 0: PB-0: X3"8 
2 : Y3- 1 24 : X4- 1 40 : Y4-22 : T I MER«0 

18 X-JOYSTK (0) : Y-J0Y8TK ( 1 ) : IFX< 1 
0ANDY >50OOSUB28ELSE I FX >50ANDY >50 
BO8UB30EL8EI FX >50ANDY< 1 0eO8UB32E 
L8EIFX< 10ANDY< 10GO8UB34 

19 IFB-1THEN20ELSEIFPPOINT(136,2 
2)-C ANDPP0INT(116,38)>C ANDPPOI 
NT (96, 54) -C ANDPPOINT(76,70)-C A 
NDPP0INT(56,86)-C ANDPP0INT(36, 1 
02) -C ANDPPOINT(148,50)«C ANDPPO 
INT (128, 66) -C ANDPPOINT(108,82)- 



C ANDPP0INT(88,98)*C ANDPP0INT(6 
8,114)-C THENA-l:B-l 

20 IFA*1THENIFPPOINT(160,78)-C A 
NDPPOINT(140,94)-C ANDPPOINT(120 
,110)-C ANDPPOINT(100, 126)«C AND 
PPOINT(172,106)-C ANDPPO I NT (152, 
122)»C ANDPP0INT(132, 138)-C ANDP 
POINT (184, 134) -C ANDPPO I NT ( 164, 1 
50) -C ANDPP0INT(196, 162)-C THEND 
«1 

21 I FD- 1 THENCS-CS+ 1 : C-C+ 1 : PMODE 1 
, 3: PAINT (222, 2) , C+l , 2: PHODEl , 1 : A 
-0: B-0: D-0: IFC-4THENC-1ELSEC-3 

22 IFTIHER>1006OSUB26 

23 PUT(204,2)-(214, 10),RA,OR:PUT 
(^40,2)-(250, 10) ,LA,0R: IFPL-3AND 
PR-3THENPH0DE 1 , 3: PL-0: PR-0: PUT (6 
6, 42) -(84, 52), P, OR: PUT (192, 88) -( 
210,98) ,P, OR: PMODEl, 1 

24 IF8C->88 THEN8S-S8*2:Y2-Y2-i-2e 
: PMODEl , 3: PUT ( X2, Y2) - ( X2+20, Y2+2 
4) , MR, OR: PMODEl , 1 : IFY2->140THENY 
2-112 

25 IFTIMER>210THENSP-l:OO8UB40:O 
OTOlBELSEie 

26 PUT(X4,Y4)-(X4-*-10,Y4-*-8),RX,AN 
D: IFPB-6THENX4-140: Y4-22: PB-0: OE 
T(X4,Y4)-(X4+10,Y4+e) ,RX,Q:RETUR 
NELSEIFRND (2) -1THENX4-X4-20: Y4-Y 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 



EASY TO USE 

ON-SCREEN EDITING via cursor. 
Full prompting and error checking. 
Key Beep and Error Beebop. Scroll 
bkwd/fwd while op line. Save/load 
files while on line. Maintain a disk 
copy of session. Automatic graph- 
ics. True lower case. Screen widths 
of 32, 40, 42, 50, 64. No split words 
on screen/printer. Print all or part of 
text. Search for strings. Well written 
manual goes step>by-step and has 
many KSM examples. Back cover is 
a cheat sheet. 

RECOMMEND 32K to 64K 
EASY UPGRADE 
Price Differanc* +$13 



PLEASANTLY POWERFUL 

Total communications ability, 128 
ASCII chars, 1200 baud, etc. Send 
text, graphics, BASIC, ML. Scan/ 
Edit current data while receiving 
more data. Any modem. Fully 
supports O.C. Hayes and others. 
Any printer, page size, margins, 
etc. Override narrow text width of 
received data. Examine/change 
parameters, KSMs and disk direc- 
tories at any time. Handles files 
which are larger than memory. 

CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/CO.O. 



TRULY AUTOMATIC 

Create, edit, print, save and load 
Keystroke Multipliers (KSMs), 
KSMs automate almost any activ- 
ity. Dial via modem, sign-on, 
interact, sign-off. Perform entire 
session. Act as a message taker. 
KSM may include parameter 
changes, disk operations, editing, 
time delays, looping, execution of 
other KSMs, waiting for part- 
specified responses, branching 
based upon responses. 

PXE Computing 
11 Vickaburg Lane 
Richardaon, Texaa 75080 
214/699-7273 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 177 



r 



4-(-16EL8EX4*X4+12: Y4-Y4+28 

27 0ET(X4,Y4)-(X4+1«,Y4+8),RX,Q: 
PUT(X4, Y4)-(X4+l»,Y4-^B) ,R,aR:PLA 
Y"03C" : PB-PB+1 : IF80N ( X 1 +2-X4) -0A 
NDSeN < Y 1 + 1 8-Y4 > -0THENPB*0 : 007052 
EL8ERETURN 

28 Xl-Xl-20:Yl«Yl-i-16:lFXl«18ORXl 
-S0ORX1-82ORX1-114ORX1-146ORX1-1 
78THEN50EL8EPMODE1 , 3: PAINT < X 1 , Yl 
•i-22),C,2 

29 PC0PY3T01 : PC0PY4T02: PHODE 1,1: 
PUT(X1-4,Y1)-(XI+16,Y1+24),ML,0R 
: PLAY-OIBB" : SC-SC+ < 10*CS> ! OET < X4 
, Y4) - < X4-I-10, Y4+8) , RX , e: RETURN 

30 Xl-Xl+12:Yl*Yl'i-2e:IFXl-210ORX 
1-1780RX1-1460RX1-1140RX1-820RX1 
-S0THEN90EL8EPHODE1 , 3; PAINT ( X 1 , Y 
l-i-22>,C,2 

31 PC0PY3T01 : PC0PY4T02: PHODEl , 1 : 
PUT ( X I , Yl ) - ( X 1+20, Yl+24) , HR, OR: P 
LAY"01BB'' : 8C-8C+ ( 10*CS) : OET ( X4, Y 
4) - < X4-I-10, Y4-i-8) , RX , 6: RETURN 

32 X1-X1+20:Y1-Y1-1&:IFY1<0THENY 
1-0: OOTO50: ELSEIFX 1-194THEN38EL8 
EIFX1-170ORX1-182ORX1-206ORX1-21 
8THENS0EL8EPI1ODE1 , 3: PAINT < XI , Yl-i- 
22) C 2 

33 PC0PY3T01 : PC0PY4T02: PMPDEl , 1 : 
PUT<Xl,Yl)-(Xl+20,Yl+24),riR,OR:P 
LAY " 0 1 BB " : SC-SC-t- ( 1 0*C8 > : OET ( X4 , Y 
4) - < X4+10, WA*B> , RX , 6: RETURN 

34 Xl-Xl-12:Yl-Yl-28; IFYK0THENY 
1-0: GOTaS0: ELSEIFX 1-66THEN36EL8E 
IFX 1-860RX 1-460RX 1-26THEN90ELSEP 
MODEl , 3: PAINT < XI , Yl+22> , C, 2 

33 PC0PY3T01 : PC0PY4T02: PHODEl , 1 : 
PIIT<X1^, Yl)-<Xl+l&,Yl+24) ,I1L,0R 
: PLAY"01BB'' : 8C-8C-i- ( 10»C8) : OET (X4 
, Y4) -< X4+ 10, Y4+8) , RX , 0: RETURN 

36 I FPL-3THENS0ELSEPL- 1 : PMODE 1 , 3 
:LINE<66,42)-<84,S2> , PRESET, BF:P 
HODEl , 1 : FORYl-Yl T04STEP-4: X 1-X 1 
+4 : PC0PY3T0 1 : PC0PY4T02 : PUT < X 1 -4 , 
Y1-'4)-<XI+16,Y1+20),MR,OR:PUT<X1 
-4,Y1+18)-<X1+14,Y1+2B),P,0R:PLA 
Y " OSABCDCBABCDCBABCDCBA " 

37 ONPL OOSUB40,47:NEXT:PCOPY3TO 
1 : PC0PY4T02: PUT < 1 18, 20) - < 138, 44) 

, MR, OR: xi-1 18: Yl-20: PL-3: 8P-0: 00 

T017 

38 IFPR-3THENS0EL8EPR-l:PMODEl,3 
: LINE (192, 88) -<210, 98), PRESET, BF 
: PHODEl, l:FORYl-Yl T012STEP-8: XI 
-X 1 -2: PC0PY3T01 : PC0PY4T02: PUT < X 1 
-4,Y1-4)-<X1+16,Y1+20),«L,OR:PUT 
(Xl,Yl-i-18)-<Xl+ie,Yl+28),P,0R 

39 PLAY " OSABCDCBABCDCBABCDCBA " : O 
NPR 8O8UB40,46:NEXT:PCOPY3TO1:PC 
0PY4T02: PUT ( 146, 32) - ( 166, 56) , ML, 
OR: X 1-150: Y1-32:PR-3: SP-0:8OTO17 



40 I FSP-0THENRETURNELSEPUT < X3+2 , 
Y3'i-2) ~ ( X3+12, Y3+26) , SX, AND 

41 IFS0N(X1-X3)-1ANDS8N(Y1-Y3) — 
1THENX3-X3+20: Y3-Y3-16: 60T043ELS 
EIFS6N < X 1 -X3) — 1 ANDSeN < Yl -Y3) — 1 
THENX3-X3-12: Y3-Y3-28: eOT043ELSE 
IFS0N(Xl-X3)-lANDSeN(Yl-Y3)-lTHE 
NX3-X3'i-12: Y3-Y3+28: 80T043 

42 IF8eN<Xl-X3)— lANDSeN(Yl-Y3)- 
1THENX3-X3-20: Y3-Y3+16 

43 IFX3-e2GRX3-940RX3-1140RX3-14 
60RX3-17STHENX3-X3-i>8: Y3-Y3-44 

44 IFX3-86THENX3-X3-8: Y3-Y3+44 

45 8ET(X3+2,Y3+2)-<X3-M2,Y3+26), 
SX,6 

46 IFX3«1620RX3-194THENX3-X3:Y3- 

Y3'^20S PR*2 

47 IFX3-66THENX3-X3:Y3-Y3+25:PL- 
2: EL8EIFPL-1 AND < X3-9B0RX3-78) THE 
NPL-2: X3-66 

48 PUT ( X3+2, Y3+2) - ( X3-I-12, Y3+26) , 
8,0R:PLAY"030ft" 

49 IFSeN<Xl-X3)-0AND88N<Yl-Y3)-0 
THEN52ELSERETURN 

50 SCREENl, l:FORYl-Yl TO190STEP1 
0: PC0PY3T01 : PC0PY4T02: PUT ( X 1 , Yl ) 
-<Xl+20, Yl+24) ,MR,0R:PLAY"04A6eA 
DEV-" : NEXT: PLAY" V31 " : PC0PY4T02: S 
CREEN1,0 

51 SC««STR« (SC) : IFY2—26THEN53EL 
8EY9-12: F0RR-2T0LEN (SC«) : 8«-N« (V 
AL <MID« <SC«, R, 1 ) ) ) : DRAW"S4BH"-t-ST 
R»<Y9)+", 17B"+S«:Y9»Y9+10:NEXT:F 
0RR-1T026:C0L0RQ:LINE(6, 174) -< (L 
EN(SC«)*12) , 192) ,PSET,B:PLAY'*01T 
SA*" : Q-GH-1 : IFa-3THENQ-l : NEXTELSE 
NEXT: SOTO 16 

52 PUT<Xl~18,Yl-4)-<Xl+3B,Yl+2B) 
, SA, PSET: FORR-0TO1 : PLAY"T10O1BO4 
DP 1 0O2EP20O48P 1 503APS0AP50 1 CT255 
'•:NEXT:00T051 

53 Y9-116:PH0DE1,3:PCLS:DRAW"S16 
BH54, 10OD4FR4EU4HNL4BD4F2BU3R4BR 
ND3U3F6U6BRNR6D3NR3D3R6BRU6R6D3L 
6F3BR4U6R4FD4QL4S8C2BH76, 50HL48D 
4FR4EUHNL2BD3BR3U3E3F3NL5D3BR2U6 
F3E3D6BR2l«t4U3NR2U3R4BR8BDD4FR4E 
U4HL4BR7D3F3E3U3BR2NR4D3NR2D3R4B 
R2U6R4D3L4F3S8 

54 DRAW'*C3BH96,74F3ND3E3BR2BDD4F 
R4EU4HL4BR7D5FR4EU5BR2ND6R4D3L4F 
3BM92, 150FR4EUHL4HUER4FBR2D4FR4B 
U6NL4BR2BDD4FR4EU4HL4BR7ND6R4D3L 
4F3BR3NR4U3NR2U3R4C4" : F0RR-2T0LE 
N (SC«) : S««N« < VAL <MID« (8C«, R, 1 ) ) ) 
: DRAW"BH"+STR« < INT < Y9-LEN <SC«) »4 
) ) + " , 1 05 " +S* : Y9=Y9+ 1 4 : NEX T 

55 SCREENl, 0:SC-0:Y2-56:M-3:YP-1 

70: c-3; C8-1 : ss-4000: QOTO10 



178 Hw RAINBOW May 1984 




PRICKLY- PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-100 

PROGRAMS RMUIRE 16K EXTINDED iASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOHD. 




Travelin' Toad 

TRAVELIN' TOAD is a fully 32K 
arcade quality high resolution 
action game. You control the toad 
with your four arrow keys, and you 
must guide the toad across a multi- 
lane super highway, and then help him hop across the 
canal from log to log and turtle back to turtle back. The 
object is to bring the TRAVELIN' TOAD to safety in his 
homQ hole. Along the way you may have the chance to 
rescue his friend, Tulip Toad, and you may be threatened 
by some nasty reptiles, too. To make it worse, you can only 
stay out in the sun for a little while or you die. You'll like this 
one, 'cause it's the best game of its type available for your 
Color Computer. Of course ifs 100% machine language! 
Tape - $24.95; Disk - $20.95 



Adventure in Wonderland 

Simply the best adventure ever written for the color com- 
puter. This adventure puts you in the character of Alice as 
you roam through the many puzzles and perils of Wonder- 
land. To win you must become a queen on the chess- 
board, eliminate the menace of the Snark, and escape 
from Wonderland. The program uses a full intelligence 
simulator so you can enter commands and questions as 
whole sentences, not a stingy word or twoAlso, there are 
at least three ways out of every trap. (You may think there 
is no way out at all, but there are always three ways!) Some 
people have so much fun talking to the various inhabi- 
tants of Wonderland that they forget at>out solving the 
adventure completely. With a vocabulary of hundreds and 
hundreds of words you will never run out of topics of 
conversation. If you want to try your hand at the best of 
adventures, this is it. 100% ML. Needs 32K of memory. 
Tape - $24.95; Disk - $29.95 



Colorkit 

What can we say about the absolute best state-of-the-art 
programmer's utility. This program adds 35 commands to 
BASIC that should have been there all along and no short 
description will do it justice. Summary — light or dark 
screen, keyclick, screen editor, programmable keys, a 
super memory tool, variable listing echo to printer, BREAK 
disable, convert machine language to DATA, global search, 
single step thru program run, double space printouts of 
program listings — that's less than half of what it will do. It 
takes about 6K of space, and If you have 64K you can put It 
up high and lose no BASIC space at all. 100% ML. Fully 
relocatable. See the great reviews in Nov. '83 issues of hot 
Cocoa and Color Computer magazine. Tape ^ $34.95; 
Disk - $39.95 



Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome. 
Canadian dealers should contact Kelly Software 
Distributors, Ltd, P. O. Box 1 1 932, Edmonton, Alberta 
T5J-3L1 (403)421-8003 




Your personal check is welcome - no delay. Include 
$1.50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping free 
on $50.00 or larger orders). AZ residents add 7% sales 
tax. Orders shipped within two days. 



Rom Free 

Another great utility from the clear leader in Color Com- 
puter Utilities! This program will free you from your Rom 
packs by easily and automatically moving them to tape or 
disk. Unlike other programs of this type, the files created 
can be loaded and EXECuted just tike any other program. 
No boot loader is needed! Once your Rom packs are in 
memory, you can examine and modify them using standard 
ML routines. Disk drive owners will particularly want to 
take note, as ROM FREE will free you from ever having to 
unplug your controller. Information needed to create work- 
ing backups of virtually all knqwn Rom packs is included. 
Get those Rom packs onto disk or tape. 100% Machine 
Language. Requires a 64K color computer, any BASIC, 
disk or tape. $24.95 

Colorcal 

is a very different calendar program. 
You enter all the dates that are 
Important to you, like birthdays, 
anniversaries, or any other event in 
your life that falls on the same 
day each year, and then you save 
the program. It actually 
modifies itself as you enter your 
events, so they become a 
part of the program, and 
all the holidays are already 
programmed in. Now, anytime you want, you can load the 
program, specify any year or month you like, and a correct 
calendar for that month or year will be printed on either the 
screen or a printer. The calendars it prints make a great 
gift, and you won't miss those Important days anymore. 
Requires 16K and Extended BASIC. Tape $24.95; 
Disk - $29.95 

Clone Master 

This is the ultimate disk backup utility, and who else but 
Prickly-Pear, originators of Omni-Clone, could bring It to 
you. If you are tired of waiting for your BACKUP command 
to finish, youMI like the speed of CLONE MASTER. This 
program checks the computer memory size, and if you 
have a 64K machine it will do a backup on a full disk in 
at>out 7 minutes — including formatting the destination 
disk — with only TM RE E swaps, not the seven you are used 
to, and if you are running multiple drives, CLONE MASTER 
will handle up to 4 double-sided drives. In addition, al- 
though we can't guarantee that CLONE MASTER will back 
up any disk, it can handle backups of most non-standard 
(protected) disks we have seen — not only on the Color 
Computer, but on Model III and IV, IBM PC, Kaypro, and 
Osborne. It handles up to 256 tracks, single and double 
density ^ even on the same track, CRC errors, and lots 
more. It even checks th^ speed of your drives for you! If you 
are using a disk drive, you know how disks will crash, so 
don't leave your valuat)le software unprotected any longer. 
Back it up or lose it! CLONE MASTER will adjust to any 
memory size and works with any version of the ROM's — 
including the JVC controller. $39.95 

Stocked by Quality Dealers, or 

Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

3532 E. 24th Street 
Tucson, Arizona 8571 0 ~mr 
(602)886-1505 




By Michael J. Himowitz 
and 
Julius Nelson 



This is the sixth installment in a continuing series of short 'Printer Mysteries' which 
began in November. 



Kentucky is known for beautiful, rolling bluegrass 
hills, the Rainbow, fast horses and especially to the 
sports-minded, "the most exciting two minutes in 
I sports" — The Kentucky Derby. The first Saturday in May 
is a long*awaited day filled with celebration and excitement 
[so thick you can cut it with a knife ... or a racing ticket. 

For those of you who have the Printer Artist program 
I from the November Rainbow, here's a printer mystery sym- 



bolizing that special day and the beauty of Kentucky. RUN 
the program and enter the characters below, line by line. For 
example, 2X means strike the '*X'* key two times; Ssp means 
hit the space bar five times, etc. Consult the instructions in 
the November issue. 

If you are interested in sophisticated printer art de- 
velopment, a complete "Printer Artist" system is available 
from Federal Hill Software, 825 William St., Baltimore, 
Md., 21230. 



I 



Line 










1 


69: 




20 


6;, 14X, 2sp, lOX, Isp, 5X, Isp, 12X, 5sp, IX, 12: 


2 


69: 




21 


7:, 12X, 2sp, IIX, Isp, 4X, 3sp, 12X, 5sp, IX, 11: 


3 


45:, 2X, 10:, IX, 11: 




22 


8:, lOX, 2sp, 12X, Isp, 6X, 3sp, IIX, 4sp, IX, 11: 


4 


43:, 3X, 9:,2X, 12: 




23 


9:, 8X, 2sp, 13X, Isp, 8X, 2sp, IIX, 4sp, IX, 10: 


5 


41:, 4X, 7:,4X, 13: 

27:, IIX, Isp, 5X, 2sp, 3X, 2:, 4X, 14: 




24 


10:, 6X, 2sp, 13X, 2:, 9X, 3sp, lOX, 4sp, IX, 9: 


6 




25 


11:, 4X, 2sp, 13X, 4:, lOX, 2sp, lOX, 4sp, IX, 8: 


7 


22:, 14X, 2sp, 5X, 2sp, IX, Isp, IX, Isp, 5X, 15: 




26 


12:, 2X, 2sp, 14X, 5:, lOX, 3sp, lOX, 3sp, IX, 7: 


8 


18:, 14X, 4sp, 6X, 2sp, 3X, 2sp, 4X, 16: 




27 


15:, 15X, 7:, lOX, 2sp, lOX, 3sp, IX, 6: 


9 


15:, IIX, 4sp, IIX, 2sp, 5X, 2sp, IX, 18: 




28 


16:, 13X, 10:, 9X, 3sp, 9X, 3sp, IX, 5: 


10 


12:, 9X, 3sp, 15X, 3sp, 8X, 19: 




29 


17:, 12X, 12;, 5X, 2sp, 3X, Isp, 8X, 4sp, IX, 4: 


11 


9:, 8X, 3sp, 17X, 3sp, IIX, 18: 




30 


18:, lOX, 18:, 14X, 5sp, IX, 3: 


12 


7:, 7X, 2sp, 23X, 2sp, 11 X, 17: 




31 


19:, 9X, 20:, 4X, 2sp, 6X, Isp, 2X, 2sp, IX, 3: 


13 


5:, 6X, 2sp, 28X, 2sp, lOX, 16: 




32 


21:, 7X, 22:, 3X, 2sp, 4X, 2sp, 2X, Isp, IX, 4: 


14 


3:, 6X, 28P, 31X, 3sp, 8X, 16: 




33 


22:, 6X, 24:, 3X, 2sp, 3X, 2sp, IX, Isp, IX, 4: 


15 


3:, 4X, 2sp, 35X, 3sp, 6X, 16: 




34 


25:, 3X, 25:, 3X, 2sp, 2X, 4sp, IX, 4: 


16 


3:, 2X, 2sp, 21X, Isp, 18X, 4sp, 2X, 16: 




35 


54:, 3X, Isp, 2X, 2sp, 2X, 5: 


17 


5:, 21X, 2sp, 4X, Isp, 17X, 4sp, IX, 14: 


m 


36 


56:, 2X, 11: 


18 


5:, 19X, 2sp, 6X, Isp, IIX, 3sp, 4X, 3sp, IX, 14: 


37 


69: 


19 


6:, 16X, 2sp, 8X, Isp, IIX, 3sp, 4X, 4sp, IX, 13: 




38 


69: ^ 





(Michael Himowitz is a Washington correspondent 
for the Baltimore Evening Sun and proprietor of Fed- 
eral Hill Software. He uses his computer extensively 
and has written several programs including "CoCo 
Accountant, *' He is interested in meeting people who 
use their computers in journalism,) 




the RAINBOW May 1984 




....... .......Mmt ... 




DRACONIAN 

You brace yourself as your ship matermlizes in the enemy 
^Dctor. Your er^jirte roars to Mfe, and you consult the ion^ 
range scan her for the position of the naarest e/ienrty base. As 
you head for the base, blasting asteroids and space-mines In 
your path, you suddenly notice a monstrous space-dragon 
K»>mfng ttQfom you. Roacling quickly, you dodge his deadly 
ftf^-breath etxl biast i>rm out of existence. 

Finally, the enemy base comes into view. Avoiding the 
enemy Hre, you destroy tiie §un turrets one by one with your 
rapid-fire torpedoes. Then, with the expiosions still echoing 
around you, you reStCua the astronaut who was being held 
prisoner by the anemy. Your mission is far from over^ however, 
as there are more t>ases to destroy and more astronauts to 
rescue before the sector will be secured. And ail must be done 
qulcWy, if you are too siow, the invincible DRACONIAN will 
atir^y seek you out as Its next victim. 

This ia It — tba single most rmpressive, awe-inspMng arcade 
game you earr buy for your Color Computer. High-resolution 
graphics, awesome sound effects, four-voice music, and quail- 

you have to see to believe! Experience the realism of 
aflACONIAN today! 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 






CHAMBERS 

Exciting high resolution graphics game. Multiple 
screens. Outstanding sound, Chambers is ioosefy 
based t9it Cosmic Chasm. The object in each level 
is to destroy all of the evil creatures In each room 
and then go into the main reactor room and blow 
up the base. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 





WAREHOUSE 
MUTANTS 

Journey through the warehouse seek- 
ing out the Mutants who are out to 
destroy Kpu. WATCH OUTI They will 
push crates trying to crush you! 
Outstanding realism-— high resolu- 
tion graphics— multiple screens. 
JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 

16K MACH. LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 
DISK $27.95 



QUIX 

Ttitu one is after a popuJac air- 
cade game with a similar ftiame. 
Simply frustrating— you*li love 
it. Done In high resolution 
graphics with Super Sound. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACH, LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.95 
DISK $27.95 





CRASH 

This game la ^ high resolution 
Machine Language program with 
outstanding Arcade type graphics. 
The game consists of 4 screens. Fly 
ttie airplane over and through 
obstacles. Piloted by "Mario" who 
also appeared In *The King", Th^ 
object is to qom^er one screois after anott>ef but don't "Crash". Great furt for the wfio^e family Fof t or 

Uses joyatlcks. ^^^^ ^^^^ MACHINE LANGUAGE DISK $27-95 



2 plaiyfi'ra. 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. Ml 49506 



•ADD $1.50 POSTAGE ft HANDL1NG*T0P ROYALTlCS PAID 

•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX* 

LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE _- 

9 ARCADE ACTION GAMES WM 



I TO ORDEftCALL 616/957,0444 




SR-71 

SR-71 Is a fast action game in wMch you are the pfiot on a mission to take 
photographs of missile sites in Russia and deliver them to our processing 
laboratory in Japan. So real you will feel as If you are In the cocKpit on a real spy 
mission. Elude Russian missiles as well as their detection devices. Another 
Tom Mix exclusive. A must for the adventurous. Fantastic graphics, color and 
sound. 32K Ext. Basic TAPE $28.95 DfSK $31.05 



SKRAMBLE 

Your mission is to penetrate 
the enemy skramble system and 
destroy their headquarters. You 
wiii start with three of our latest 
spacefighters equipped with 
repeating cannon and twin 
bomb launcher. If you succeed 
in evading the eiatx>rate ground 
defenses, you will arrive at the 
Cave where flying becomes 
more difficult. In the cave are 
UFOs, after which you must avoid a hall of meteorites. Very few pilots 
succeed this far, but if you do, then you must enter the Fortress, follow- 
ed by the Maze. One or two player game. Machine t-anguage, high speed, 
Arcade action. Full color graphics with sound. Keyboard or joystick con- 
trol. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 



.! 




I GRABBER 

A pac type game. Two complete mazes 
jump from one to the other. Probably the 
most outstanding sound you have ever 
heard. Arcade Action. Method of play, you 
are the Grabber. The object is to grab the 8 
treasures and store them in the center 
boxes. You start with 3 Grabbers and qet 
extra ones at 20,000 points. Watch out for 
the googiles! Super high resolution 
graphics. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




CUMBER 

Approaches the excitement and challenges 
of any Video Arcade. The hazards of 
CU*BER are many. Help CU*BER 
change the colors on the pyramid while 
avoiding many of the danoers always pre- 
sent. Vipers, the Nurd, the Dork, bonus 
points all add up to another exciting 
release from Tom Mix Software. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




AIR TRAFFIC 
CONTROLLER 

Air Traffic Controller is a computer 
model of an air traffic control situation 
for the TRS-80 Color Computer. Remote- 
ly Rioted Vehicles (RPV's) are operated 
by the controller in a situation similar to 
that of a commercial airline in that you 
must regulate landings and takeoffs of 
the vehicles. 

32K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $26.95 DISK $31.95 



KATERPILLAR II 

The color computer has needed a 
perfect centipede type game since 
day one. You will throw ail Imita- 
tions aside when you see this. So 
close to the arcade you will start 
digging for quarters. Grapic to equal 
"The King" and "Buzzard Bait." 
Joysticks required. 

18K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24.96 DISK $27.95 




TRAPFALL 

The "Pitfalls" in this game are 
many. Hidden treasures, jump over 
the pits, swina on the vine, watch 
out for alligators, beware of the 
scorpion. Another game for the Col- 
or Computer with the same high 
resolution graphics as "The King." 
18K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




OTHER GREAT GAMES 

MAZE RACE Is a one or two player game. Play either against the built In 
timer or against your favorite opponent. 18K Machine Language $17.95 
PROTECTORS Exciting fast paced arcade game that looks and plays 
like the popular arcade game "Defender." Wave after wave of enemy 
fighters drop bombs on your city. 32K Ext. Baste 

TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 

SOLO POOL Now play pool with your color computer. Two players. 
Plays like machine language. Super Color, high resolution graphics. 16K 
Ext. Basic $17.95 
CUTHBERT Run your man on the outline of the squares. When you conv 
plete a square It flits in. Fill in all the squares before the bugs get you, 
and you win. Uses joysticks, one or two players. 16K Machine Language 
TAPE $20.95 DISK $23.95 

BIRD ATTACK A fast paced machine language arcade game. Shoot the 
birdmen before they descend upon you. Watch out for their bombs! 16K 
Machine Language $214)5 



UTILITIES 

SCREEN PRINT ROUTINE Prints contents of your graphic screen to an 
Epson, Microline or Radio Shack DMP Printers. Prints positive or reverse 
format. Horizontal or vertical, small and large printout. Print left, right or 
center of page. Specify printer when ordering. TAPE $19.95 DISK $21.95 
PROGRAM PRINTER This program will list basic programs to your 
printer in two column format. Saves paper and makes your listing look 
professional. Disk based. iltJS 
TAPE TO DISK New version worlds on both 1.0 and 1.1 DOS. Load the 
contents of most tape to disk automatically. Machine Language 
DISK i 



TAPE $17.95 



: $21.95 



MAIL LIST Maintain a complete mailing fist with phone numbers, etc. 
Ext. Basic DISK ONLY $17.95 

COLOR MONITOR Written in position independent code. (May be 
located in any free memory). Very compact. Only occupies 1174 bytes of 
memory. Full featured, Includes Break-Pointing of machine language 
programs, register display and modify, memory display and modify, and 
block memory move commands. Displays memory In hex and ascii for- 
mat on one line 8 bytes long. Machine Language 
TAPE $24.95 DISK $27.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWAPE 

42B5 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



ADD $1.50 POSTAGE & HANDLINQ*TOP ROYALTIES PAID- 
•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX* 
LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 

3 ARCADE ACTION GAMES 



TO ORDER CALL B16ffl5T^>M< 





THE KING 

This game contains all 4 full 
graphic screens like the 
popular arcade game. Ex- 
citing sound and realistic 
graphics. Never before has 
the color computer seen a 
game like this. Early 
reviews say simply out- 
standing. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 

TAPE $26.95 

DISK $29.95 







ELECTRON joysticks required 

Electron Is composed of four subgames. You must complete one level in order to advance t<xthe ^^i^ MACHINE LANGUAGE 
next. Supplied with four men, you are subjected to more difficult games as you move ahead. Beam tadp «oa ac nieir cot oe 
Buggy, Prachnlds, Force Fields and a Maze! ' ""^"^ Wf.^b 




THE FROG 

This one will give you hours of exciting piay. 
Cross the busy highway to the safety of the 
median and rest awhile before you set out 
across the swollen river teaming with hidden 
hazards. Outstanding sound and graphics. Play 
from keytx>ard or joysticks. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




KING TUT 

4wney through the caverns of King Tut*B 
iomt>. You ere on a quest to find treasures hid- 

\r\ th^ cevrns beiow. You light your way 
with only a smalt candle that grows dimmer as 
time passes. Watch out for the snai^es and the 
ghost of King Tut himself. Five screens 
challenge your abilities every step of the way. 
Joysticks required. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




THE TOUCHSTONE 

You are one of many priests of Ra who has ac- 
cepted the challenge of the touchstone. The 
challenge is a way for any of Ra's foiiowers to 
become a favored high priest. Given limited 
use of Ra's powers, you will battle hidden 
dangers. Entering the mazes, you must be 
ready foi anything. 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 




SPACE SHUTTLE 

This program gives you the real feel- 
ing of flight. Full instrumentation 
complete to the max. Radar, 
altimeter, air speed, artificial 
horizon, fuel gauge, a mission 
status panel and much more. Actual 
Simulation of space flight, weather 
conditions must be considered. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 

32K EXTENDED BASIC 

TAPE $28.95 DISK $31 .95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. Ml 49506 



•ADO $1.50 POSTAGE & HANDLING'TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 

•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX* 

LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE , . 

S ARCADE ACTION GAMES WSm 



EDUCATIONAL 
VOCABULARY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 
16K Extended ba8tc/32K for printer output TAPE $39.95 



DISK $42.95 



The Vocabulary Management System (VMS) is a series of programs designed to aid a parent or teacher \x\ help- 
ing children to learn and practice using vocabulary and spelling words. The 9 programs that comprise the VMS in- 
clude a full feature data entry/edit program, three printer output programs and 5 vocabulary/spelling game pro- 
grams. The system's many outstanding features Include: 



-As many as 300 vocabulary words 

and definitions may be In 

the computer's memory at one time. 
-Words and definitions may be 

saved on disk or tape. 
-Remarks and/or comments can 

be saved with word tiles. 
-A disk loading menu allows 

students to load disk flies without 

typing file names. 



-Word lists may be quickly alphabetized 
-The three printer segments allow 
you to create and print individualized 
tests, puzzles, word-searches and 
worksheets. 

-Answer keys may be printed 
for all worksheets and puzzles. 



—The printer segments allow 
full use of your prlnter^s 
special features. 

-*The 5 game programs are based 
on sound educational ptmc:ipi6^ 
and provide practice in tdennf^ing 
words and matching them with 
their definitions In a fast-paced 
set of activities. 



STORY PROBLEMS 

STORY PROBLEMS Is a program that is designed to give practice \n 
solving story problems (sometimes called statement tnougnt or word 
problems) on the Color Computer. It Is suitable for use In either a home 
or school environment. It Is also a toot that will allow you to create new 
story problems to sutt your children's needs and ability levels. \X has 



many features that make It particularly attractive: 

• story problems involving addition, subtraction, muftlpUcatlon, dWI^ 
sion or a combination of the tour are presented to the student by 
slowly scrolling each letter of each problem onto the screen. 

• Up to 5 students may use the proaram at the same time. 

• Tnere are 4. user modifiable, slclil levels. 

16K EXT. BASIC TAPE $19.95 DISK $22.9$ 



MATH DRILL 

MATH DRtlt Is a program designed to help children to practice addi- 
tion, subtraction, multiplication and division slcills on the Color Com- 
puter, it has several features that make Its use particularly attractive: 

• Up to 6 students may use the program at the same time. 

• Answers for addition, subtraction and multiplication are entered 
from right to left, just as they are written on paper. 

• Commas may be included In the answers. 

• Partial products for the multiplication problems may be computed 
on the screen. 

• Division answers that have a remainder are entered as a'whdf^ 
number followed by the letter "R" and the remainder. 

• The are ten, user modifiable, skill levels. 

• A "SMILEY FACE" is used for motivation and reward. Its •\iB In- 
creases relative to the skill level. 

• Skill levels automatically adjust to the student's abHIty. 

• A timer measures the time used to answer each probtom and the 
total time used for a series of problems. 

• After a problem has been answered incorrectiy the aof rept *oawer 
appears under (above in division) the incorrect answer. 

REQUIRES 16K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $19.95 DISK $22.95 

ESTIMATE 

ESTIMATE Is a program desioned to help children to practice estimating 
the answers to addition, subtraction, multiplication and division pro- 
blems on the Color Computer. It has many features that make Its use 
particularly attractive: 

• Up to 5 students may use the program at the same Hem, 

• Tnere are 5, user modifiable, skill levels. ' ^ 

• The acceptable percent error may be changed as a student's skill ^ 
proves. 

• A timer measures the numt^er of seconds used to answer each pro- 
blem and the total time used for a series of problems. 

• If a problem has been answered incorrectly, the student is told the 
percent error and asked to try again. 

• If a problem is answered incorrectly a second time, the student le 
told the correct answer and the range of acceptable answers Is 
displayed. 

• A report is given at the end of each set of problems that includes the 
numt)er of problems done, the numt)er of problems answered cor- 
rectly on the first try and the average percent error. 

• The (BREAK) key has been disabled so that a child will not 1?^, 
advertently stop the program from running. 

REQUmeS 16K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $19.95 DISK $22.95 



TEACHER'S DATABASE 

TEACHER'S DATABASE is a program designed to allow a teacher to 
keep a computerized file of information about his/her students- There 
are many features that make this program particularly attractive: 

• Information on as many as 100 students (or more) may be In the com- 
puter at one time. 

• Each student may have as many as 20 (or more) individual Items of 
data In his/her record. 

• The program will run from cassette or disk. 

• Cassette and disk files are completely compatible. 

• The program is menu driven. 

• Records may be easily changed, deleted, combined or added. 

• Information about students may be numerical or text. 

• Records may be quickly alphabetized. 

• Records may be sorted by various criteria. 

• Records may be reordered (ranked) based on test scores or other 
data. 

• Data dispiayed during a sort may be pr4nted on a printer or saved on 
disk or cassette as a new file. 

• A full statistical analysis of data may be done and sent totheprlftler. 

• Student test scores may be weighted. 

REQURES Z2K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $39.95 DISK $42.95 

PRE-ALGEBRA I INTEGERS 

INTEGERS is a series of four programs designed to give students prac- 
tice in working with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and 
the comparison of integers. It has many features that make a very 
valuable tool for introducing and/or maintaining skills: 

• Up to 4 students may use the program at the same time. 

• There are 9, user modiflabie, skillleveis. 

• Students are given two opportunities to answer a problem. 

• A detailed report of student performance, including number correct 
on first try, number wrong, total time used and percentage score, Is 

Presented at the end of a series of problems, 
he programs will run on a 16K TRS-60 Color Computer with or 
without disk drive. 

Four distinct problem formats are presented. The first presents pro- 
blems in this format: ^ 12 -f -9^7. The second program presents a 
problem with missing numerals In this format: -7 -? = 18. The third 
program presents a problem with a missing sign: 8 ~ ?6 a 14. The last 
program asks the student to determine the relationship ( s , or ) bet* 
ween two statments 3 9 (??) ^ 4 ■ - 5. 



TAPE $29.95 



DISK $32.95 



SPECIAL 
EDUCATIONAL PACKAGE 

SPELLING TEST - WORD DRILL 
MATH DRILL - ESTIMATE 
STORY PROBL^S 

ALL won 

TAPE $79.95 DISK $82.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

4285 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. Ml 49506 



•ADD $1.50 POSTAGE & HANOLINO*TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 

•MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX^ 

LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE , , 

S ARCADE ACTION GAMES 




Greetings! 

Spring has sprung at last, at least out here in Ypsilanti. 
The snail is on the leaf. The worm is on the bud. The corn is 
planted. The pigs are enchanted. And Ben, having cast off 
his winter fur, prances about in sleek abandon. 

Ben and I took a walk down to the pond the day before 
yesterday. Ben scampered on ahead, scattering out occa- 
sional rabbits and quail, yapping and barking for joy. Upon 
reaching the pond, Ben suddenly froze. Slowly he lowered 
down on his haunches like a sphinx, narrowed his nose, and 
began softly whining as if he had just been kissed by a rabbit 
in a dream. In a minute, 1 saw what all the commotion was 
about. Do you remember that turtle 1 saw swimming in 
circles on the pond last summer? Well, now that very turtle 
was swimming around in the pond, followed by seven little 
tiny turtles. The turtle had replicated. 

Gosh, those little turtles were cute. They werejust exactly 
like the mother turtle, only miniature. The mother turtle 
turned one way, and they followed right along. The mother 
turtle turned another way, and along they followed. First I 
considered taking them all home with me to try turtle gra- 
phics on paper, just as 1 had done with the \>ig turtle last 
summer. But then 1 didn't want to disturb an idyllic scene on 
the pond. Also, it's not nice to disturb a mother ancj her 
babes. 

Luckily, there is a way to have my own turtle on my Color 
Computer produce its own baby turtles. The statement to do 
this is called HATCH, and I'll see if I can show you hqw it 
works. First, think of a procedure — any procedure. For 
example, the procedure for drawing a circle: 

TO CIRCLE :N 

Repeat 20 (FD :N RT 18) 

END 

(W, Bert Woofensburger [*'Uncie Bert**] manages a 
hog and corn farm near Ypsilanti, Mich, He has 
recently acquired a Color Computer and is learning 
LOGO. Woofensburger 's editor and assistant. Dale 
Peterson, writes for a living. His recent books include 
"Genesis H: Creation qnd Recreation With Comput- 
ers" and "Intelligent Schoolhouse: Readings On 
Computers and Learning. "He is currently working on 
a book about Color LOGO with Don Inman and 
Ramon Zamora, to be published in 1984,) 



Next, tell the turtle to go through the procedure, and have 
a hatched tyrtje, or two or three of them, do the same. Like 

so: 

TO CIRCLES 
SX 90 SY 80 
HATCH 1 CIRCLE 8 
SX 20 SY 170 
HATCH 2 CIRCLE 3 
SX 100 SY 100 
HATCH 3 CIRCLE 5 
SX 140 SY 120 
CIRCLE 4 
END 

An even smarter way to do the procedure would be like 

this: 

TO CIRCLE :N :X :Y 
SX :X SY :Y 

REPEAT 20 (FD :N RT 18) 
END 

TO CIRCLES 

HATCH 1 CIRCLE 8 90 80 
HATCH 2 CIRCLE 3 20 170 
HATCH 3 CIRCLE 5 100 100 
CIRCLE 4 140 120 

The last CIRCLE procedure doesn't need to be hatched 
because that is being run by the mother turtle. 1 could have 
called the last CIRCLE procedure 

HATCH 0 CIRCLE 4 140 120 

bepause HATCH 0 means the same as "no hatch,"and really 
refers to the mother turtle. 

Why did I put the mother turtle's procedure last? I asked 
myself that — but I remembered my own mother, bless her. 
When there was a bowl of potatoes on the table, who always 
waited until the little darlings had their potatoes? Mother! 
When there was spinach on the table, who always waited 
until we had been served our spinach (even though we hated 
spinach)? Mother! So it shouldn't be surprising that the 
mother f urtle comes last here. Just for the sake of scientific 
experimentation, I tried putting the mother turtle first in the 
CIRCLES procedure. What happened? You try it, and see 
for yourself. 

TO CIRCLES2 
CIRCLE 4 140 120 
HATCH 1 CIRCLE 8 90 80 
HATCH 2 CIRCLE 3 20 170 
HATCH 3 CIRCLE 5 100 100 
END 

What I discovered was that once the mother turtle fin- 
ishes, the whole procedure just stops — which means that 
the hatching in CIRCLES2 never does happen. Now, if the 
whole procedure stops when the mother turtle fmis;)i6s, we 
may have another problem. Even though the mother turtle's 
subprocedure is last in a procedure, what happens if her 
subprocedure is simpler than the others, and she still finishes 
early? I tried it: 

TO SQUARE 
SX 200 SY 40 
REPEAT 4 (FD 20 RT 90) 
END 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 185 



TO SHAPES 

HATCH I CIRCLE 8 90 80 
HATCH 2 CIRCLE 3 20 170 
SQUARE 
END 

Again, even though the mother turtle may look (on the 
screen) like all the hatched turtles, she is different. NV hen the 
mother turtle finishes, the entire procedure stops, even if the 
hatched turtles have not finished with their subprocedures. 
Apparently, they "dehatch." Since it is simpler (takes fpwer 
REPEATS) to do a SQUARE, the mother turtle finishes 
first and all the hatched turtles stop working on their circles, 
even though they haven't finished. It is most sensible, there- 
fore, to give the mother turtle the most complex subproce- 
dureand to place her last in a hatching procedure. Neverthe- 
less, if for any weird and peculiar reasons you still wish to 
give the mother turtle a simpler subprocedure than a 
l^atched turtle has, you can tell her to VANISH — and she 
vanishes once she has finished her subprocedure, while the 
little hatched turtles are left to carry out their subprocedures 
without maternal interruption. For instance: 

TOSHAPES2 

HATCH 1 CIRCLE 8 90 80 

HATCH 2 CIRCLE 3 20 170 

SQUARE 

VANISH 

END 

Well, those were some of the things I learned about hatch- 
ing. Then I began to wonder, "How many baby turtles can a 
mother turtle hatch at once?" Like a hero, I was determined 
to find out. 

TO WORM 

REPEAT 10(FD4RT 18) 
REPEAT 10(FD4LT 18) 

TO WORMY :X :Y 
• SX :X SY :Y 

REPEAT 5 (WORM) 

END 

TO CANOWORMS 
HT PC 2 

HATCH 1 WORMY 10 10 
HATCH 2 WORMY 10 20 
HATCH 3 WORMY 10 30 
HATCH 4 WORMY 10 40 
HATCH 3 WORMY 10 30 



HATCH 6 WORMY 10 60 
HATCH 7 WORMY 10 70 
HATCH 8 WORMY 10 80 
HATCH 9 WORMY 10 90 
HATCH 10 WORMY 10 100 
HATCH 11 WORMY 10 110 
HATCH 12 WORMY io 120 
HATCH 13 WORMY 10 130 
HATCH 14 WORMY 10 140 
HATCH 15 WORMY 10 150 
HATCH 16 WORMY 10 160 
HATCH 17 WORMY 10 170 
WORMY 10 180 
END 

I discovered some interesting things. First of all, it seems 
that all the hatched turtles ignored my PC command. Only 
the mother turtle changed the pen color. Second, all the 
hatched turtles ignored my HT command. Strange! I 
thought perhaps the H ATCH statement itself was cancelling 
the PC and HT. I figured, and then thought maybe Pd try to 
place the PC and HT within WORMY — that way they ^ be 
called up right after eveiry HATCH. So I changed WORMY, 
like so: 

TO WORMY :X :Y 
HT PC 2 
SX :X SY :Y 
REPEAT 5 (WORM) 
END 

I also discovered th^t the worms weren't moving all at 
once. Clearly they were moving in a sequence. To get a closer 
loqk at what was really going on, I slowed the whplc thing 
down by placing a SLOW 100 command at the start of the 
CANOWORMS procedure. You try it. What I discovered, 
by running the whole thing very slowly, w^s that (correct me 
if my eyes are deceiving m^) the way the Color Computer 
draws when hatching is to move quickly from the one little 
element of the subprocedure of one hatched turtle to one 
little element of the subprocedure of the next hatched turtle, 
drawing only a little at each stop. In other words, when the 
computer is running at top speed, it may appear as if all 
those hatched turtles are moving at the same time — but they 
aren*t. That is an optical illusion. In reality, one hatched 
turtle moves a little bit, then the next hatched turtle moves a 
little bit, and so on, down the line. 

Anyhow, I still hadn't found out exactly how many turtles 
could be hatched for one procedure. It seemed clear from my 
CANOWORMS procedure that at least 17 hatched turtles 
could work together, but how many more were possible? My 
little fingers were tired and so I decided not to test this any 
further. Lucky 1 didn't, top, because about a day later one of 
my spies told me I could have up to 254 hatched turtles! 
Wow! Just imagine the CANOWORMS I could have done, 
if I could have stood the typing! 

^ But what really began to excite me was thinking about all 
the fancy procedures I had done in the past, and then think- 
ing I could have niy Color Computer do them wjth hatched 
turtles. One for instance will do: 

TO FROST :N 
IF :N<2 (STOP) 
FD:N 
RT 45 

FROST (3*:N/4) 
LT90 



the MEMO MINDER 

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memos, phone. numbers, dates, reference notes, anything. 
Enter a phrase, keyword, even a few letters and locate a 
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186 the RAINBOW May 1984 



FROST (3*:N/4 

RT45 

BK:N 

END 

TO SNOWFLAKE :N 
HATCH 1 FROST :N 
HATCH 2 FROST :N 
HATCH 3 FROST :N 
HATCH 4 FROST :N 
HATCH 5 FROST :N 
HATCH 6 FROST :N 
HATCH 7 FROST :N 
FROST :N 
END 



RT 45 
RT 45 
RT45 
RT 45 
RT 45 
RT 45 
RT 45 



That was great, if I do say so myself. Watching all those 
turtles moving at once made me think of be^s, though. So 1 
decided just for the sake of it to try a honeycomb. 

to HEXAGON 

REPEAT 6 (FD 10 RT 60) 
END 

TO MORE 

REPEAT 6 (HEXAGON FD 10 LT 60) 
END 

To MOREMORE 
REPEAT 5 (MORE 
REPEAT 2 (FD 10 RT 60) 
Fb 10 LT 180) 
END 

TO HONEYCOMB 

HATCH 1 MOREMORE FD 10 LT 60 
HATCH 2 MOREMORE FD 10 LT 60 
HATCri 3 MOREMORE FD 10 LT 60 
HATCH 4 MOREMORE FD 10 LT 60 
HATCH 5 MOREMORE FD 10 LT 60 
PC 2 

MOREMORE 
END 

I should confess immediately that I made a mistake when 
I first typed this up, and put a LT 120 at the bottom of 
MOREMORE, instead qf LT 180, You might try that one, 
when you have a chance. It's not a honeycomb, but it sure is 
interesting. 

Anyhow, I put the PC 2 in there just so we could know 
where the queen bee is at alltimes. Unfortunately, the cjiiebn 
kept being crowded out by her drones. That didn't seem 
realistic to me. After all, the queen is the boss. 1 wanted to 
say to the computer, "If any of the hatched turtles are near 
the mother turtle, make them turn and move in a different 
direction.^' In ttirtle talk, the instruction looked like this: 

IFNEAR0<20(RT 120) 

And I placed that instruction right in the earliest 
subprocedUre: 

TO HEXAGON 

1FNEARO<20(RT 120) 
REPEAT 6 (FD 10 RT60) 
END 

You might be slightly familiar with the conditional IF 
statement because we used it before. The NEAR function 
refers to the distance between whatever hatched turtle is 



moving at the moment (the current turtle) and any design 
nated turtle. In this case, the distance is 20 units (the added 
value of X and Y distances), between the current turtle iemd 
the designated tiirtle (turtle 0, the mother turtle). So I tried 
that one out with my honeycomb. The results were . . . 
interesting, and maybe they show you shouldn't fool with 
Mother Nature. But, I kept right on fooling. First, I tried 
reversing the less than sign (<) into a greater than sign (>). 
Next, I tried increasing the distance value in N EAR, to see if 
I could get the bees to spread out their honeycomb any 
further. Finally, I tried adding more hatched turtles, and 
changing some of the turn instructions. 

Well, I know this is a shorter letter than usual, but to be 
truthful, rm so excited about this hatch business 1 can't 
stand it. I'm going to go back and try everything with 
hatching! Maybe at last I'll produce some art that Sen 
approves of. In the meantime, I remain. 

Uncle Bert 



P.S. You can send your cards and letters to me in care of my 
good friend Dale Peterson. Just address them like this: 

Uncle Bert Woofensburger 

c/0 bale Peterson 

ihe Rainbow 

9529 U.S. Highway 42 

P.O. Box 209 

Prospect, KY 40059 



FILEBOX/16 HOME FILING SYSTEM 

ENTER THE INFORMATION AGE WITH FILeBOX/16. 

NOW Available for the trs-6016k, 32k, or 64K color 
COMPUTER With one disk drive. 

Create, change, update, delete, search, sort and list flies you 
define. You don't have to be a programmer to use this system. 
Now includes corrections and features suggested in the review 
of FILEBOX/16 in the March 1984 RAINBOW magazine. 

Applications are virtually unlimited. Use for address lists, car 
repair records, household inventories, book and record 
collections, tax records, etc. You can use PlLEBOX/16 to print 
mailing labels. This u^e alone is worth your purchase price. 

tach file you create can contain any number of records. Each 
record can contain up to 10 fields and 256 Characters. Print 
records to screen or printer. Control report formats. 

FILEBOX/16 IS EASY t6 USE. This is NOT a system which 
requires that you learn special Keys and operations. It is 
completely menu-driven. Has built-in lessons to supplement the 
20 page loose-leaf User Guide, rated excellent in review. 

FILEBOX/16 is written in BASIC with a inachine language sort. 
It uses efficient formatted direct access file logic contained in 6 
programs you control from a menu. 

SPECIAL PRICE— Now only $29.90 Diskette 

was $39.90 ^lus $2.00 shipping Only 

Please specify 16K ot 32K version. 

^^ew Jersey residents please add $1.80 for sales tax. 
Matt checic ot money order to: 
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P.O. Box I2l8 
Freehold, N.J. 07728 
Phone: (201) 431-3660 dfter 6 p.m. 
Call our BBS 10 pm - 7 am Eastern Time 

FlLEbOX/16 e 1983 by Luke Watson 
TftS-80 is a trademark of the Tandy Corp. 



RAINBOW 

CEHTtFtC*TlO« 
SCAl 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 187 



TURN OF THE SCREW 



Designing 
A Video 
Monitor 
Output 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



(Tony l)iStefano is well known as an early specialist in 
Color ^Computer hardware projects. He is one of the 
acknowledged experts on the "insides**of CoCo.) 



A few months ago, when I wrote the article on how to 
add a speaker to your CoCo, 1 mentioned that I was 
not going to do an article on a video monitor output 
for the CoCo. Well, 1 got a lot of letters arid phone calls 
asking me to do one. The major complaint is that most of the 
monochrome (black and white) video outputs do not have 
enough gain to drive certain monitors. I thought this was 
quite strange because 1 had made one from a schematic in 
the Rainbow and did not have any trouble with gain. I 
always had fjlenty of brightness and good contrast with my 
Electrohome monitor. Well, just this week, I bought ah 
Amdek 300A amber monitor, and guess what? My video 
monitor adapter did not have enough gain to drive this 
monitor properly. I thought there was something wrong 
with the monitor. 1 brought it back to the place I bought it 
and aired my complaint. They checked it out and told me 
that the monitor was okay and that my computer was not 
strong enough to drive this type monitor. It didnt take long 
before 1 took my video monitor adapter and threw it out the 
window. Now what was 1 to do? Humm! 1 guess I'll have to 
design my own. 

What follows is what I designed as a video monitor output 
for the Color Computer. Following the schematic in Figure 
1, you see a three stage amplifier. The first transistor is used 
as an impedence amplifier. The second transistor is an 
inverting voltage gain amplifier. The last transistor is lised as 
an emitter follower. This adds the current gain necessary to 
drive monitors that are terminated with a 75 ohm load, just 
like the Amdek. It is not hard to construct this circuit. Yoii 
will need all of the usual project tools like a soldering iron, 
pliers, cutters, screwdrivers and the like. Get all the parts in 
the parts list, though I think that most of you will have all of 
these parts in your junk bin. There is nothing hard to get, but 
do get all the right resistor values, close is not good enough. 
You can mount it on a piece of perf board like in the list, or 
you can mount it on just about anything. The output con- 
nection can be made in many ways. You can drill a hole in 
the back of your CoCo and install a chassis mount RCA 
connector — Radio Shack #274-346, If you don't want to 
drill a hole in your CoCo, just use a long wire with an RCA 
jack on the end, or whatever type terminator your monitor 
has. Most monitors have RCA terminators. You can mount 
the board inside the computer with double-sided tape on top 
of the RF adapter. 

The . 1 uf capacitor in the parts list does not show up on 
the schematic. This is a decoupling capacitor and goes from 
the +5 volt line to ground. This is only to eliminate noise 
generated from the power supply. This video monitor out- 
put will work on any CoCo version, it will even work on the 
CoCo 2. 

Like usual, if you have some problems with my projects or 
modification, or if you have a good idea you would like to 
share with me, give me a call on any Monday night after 7 
p.m. My telephone number is (5 14) 473-4910. If you want to 
write to me, do so. If you need a reply to a question, include a 
SASE. Till next time. 



188 the RAINBOW May 1984 










Number 


Description 


RS# 


Ql 


MPS2907 PNP 


276-2023 


Q2,3 


MPS3904 NPN 


276-2016 


Rl 


470 OHMS !4W 


27I-I3J7 


R2 


100 OHMS ^ 


27t<l3)l 


R3 


27 OHMS WW 


N/A 


R4 


220 OHMS 


271-1313 


R5 


10 OHMS 


271-1301 


CI 


.1 UF 25V 


272-1069 


PI 


PERF BOARD 


276-162 









Submitting Material 
To the Rainbow 



Contributions to the RAINBOW are welcome from eve- 
ryone. We like to run a variety of programs which will be 
useful/ helpful/ fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and it is best 
to make several saves, at least one of them in ASCII format. 
WeVe sorry^ but we do not have time to key in programs. All 
programs should be supported by some editorial commen- 
tary, explaining how the program works. We're much more 
interested in how your submission works and runs than how 
you developed it. Programs should be learning experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of criteria. 
Those wishing remuneration should so state when making 
submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed infor- 
mation on making submissions, please send a SASE to: 
Submissions Editor, the RAINBOW, P.O. Box 209, Pros- 
pect, K Y 40059. We will send you some more comprehensive 
guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently sub- 
mitted to anptherpuls^HiitMm, 



Tax 
Relief 



With Coco-Accountant 11 



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receipts and payroll stubs. When you're through, Coco- 
Accountant II will list and total expenditures and income by 
month, account or payee, provide a year-to-date summary by 
account and figure your net cash flow. Better yet, it provides a 
printed spreadsheet showing your year at a glance. 

The program sorts entries by date, lists most functions to 
screen or printer and saves files to tape or disk. A special 
feature flags tax deductible expenses and expenses subject 
to state sales tax. It even computes the sales tax you paid! In 
addition, COCO- ACCOUNTANT II will balance your check- 
book and print a reconciliation statement. Up to 450 entries 
per file on 32K tape version, 500 on 32K disk and 1,000 on 64K 
tape or disk. All this for only $24.95 on tape, $27.95 on disk. 



The Handicapper 



Now available for all Color Computers, MC-10's and 
Model IOC's! Use the power of your computer to impr- 
ove your performance at the track! The Handicapper Is 
two separate programs for thoroughbred and harness 
horses that apply sound handicapping techniques to 
rank the horses in each race. Factors include speed, 
distance, class, track condition, post position, past 
performance, jockey or driver ability and other attri- 
butes. Handicap a race in just a few minutes or a whole 
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Add $1.50 for shipping and send orders to: 



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825 Ulilliom SI. 
Bollimore, MD 21230 

301 685-6254 



Vise 



May 1964 the RAINBOW 189 




EDUCATION NOTES 



Swinging With Baseball 
Interest Can Aid Educators 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Computers beware! The baseball season is upon us. 
Many a child's interest has turned once again to 
America's other popular pastime. 
What happened to all of the snow and ice? It seems like 
just yesterday all of the students were throwing snowballs 
and talking about the Winter Olympics. Now spring has 
suddenly arrived and the talk has changed to baseball once 
again. 

As always, it is best to swing with the interests of the kids if 
you want to introduce something new to them. This is 
another good opportunity to learn or review a simple read- 
data program. Baseball, of course, has teams and this leads 
us to lists. List manipulation is a great introduction to data 
processing for beginners. 

Fortunately, baseball lists change often during spring 
training and at the beginning of the season. This gives us a 
perfect time to show the students how learning about the 
computer can help them to keep their lists current. 

At this point, we must confess that the staff of Computer 
Island consists overwhelmingly of New York Met fans. It is 
certainly hard for us to keep our baseball list current. We 
still cannot recover from or even understand the loss of Tom 
Seaver. 

We will naturally illustrate this month's program using 
the New York Mets as our example. You may alter the data 
to any ball team you like. If you kids are on a Little League 
or school team, their list will certainly be more appropriate 
to your needs. 

Let's start by first clearing some memory. Line 30 will 
CLEAR 1000. This will most likely be enough for our pur- 
poses and will also easily keep this program in the realm of 
I6K. A higher CLEAR number can be used if your lists are 
very extensive. 



(Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional and gifted child- 
ren, holds two master's degrees and has won awards 
for the design of programs to aid the handicapped. He 
and his wife, Cheryl, own Computer Island.) 



Next we will dimension our list. We can use any number 
that is greater than the possible total of players. This will free 
us from worrying later on about keeping count of the 
number of data entries. DIM A$(50) and B$(50) mllkecp us 
well beyond the limit of players, even on the Mets spring 
training roster. You may, of course, resort to a higher DIM 
number if you require it. 

The players' names and their positions will be entered in 
DATA lines. The B$ represents the position. Familiar 
abbreviations were used. For example, 28 stands for second 
base and LF stands for left field. The A$ is the player's name. 

The DATA is entered as A$,B$. You may put several 
pairs on any DA TA line. A common mistake I have often 
observed is putting a comma at the end of a DA TA line. This 
indicates to the computer that there is an extra entry on the 
line that you did not intend to create. A comma at the end of 
a line will therefore cause an unintended entry of a blank 
data statement. 

The DA TA lines are read on lines 60-100. Notice that the 
DA TA need only be read once in this program. Many 
beginners feel that the DA TA must be read each time a new 
search for players is made. Our computer is smart enough to 
remember what it read once and use the information over 
and over again for endless information-seeking purposes. 

The very last DA TA entry is END, END. This is done so 
that you do not have to keep track of the number of DA TA 
entries. Line 60 tells the computer to look for 50 entries, but 
line 80 tells the computer to stop read ing when it encounters 
the name EN D. If you wish to add additional players to your 
list, place new DA TA lines before the line that says DA TA 
END, END, 

Line 1 50 asks for a baseball position. Line 200 will search 
out and print all of the players that play that position. If 
none are found, the counter "NN" will be zero and a "Sorry, 
None Found" message will be displayed. 

There are many additions or options that could be 
included in this program. We allowed for an End or Escape 
key and an All players key. If *E' is pressed for the position, 
the program will end. If *A' is pressed, all of the players will 
be listed. If you have a printer, PRINTff'2 can be added to 
lines 200 and 330 to get hard copies of your lists. 



190 



the RAINBOW May 1964 



federal Hill Sofluiore 

FINE PRODUCTS FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER, DRAGON AND MC-10 



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Play Blackjaq! 



This is as close as you can come to the real thing without losing your 
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Baseball Statpack! 



Whether you're in Little League, Pony League, high school 
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Programmer's Helper 



Here are 34 useful subroutinees, ready to access from your 
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New From 




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Disk Drives $179.95 



These high-quality SS/DD drives from Owl Ware are ready 
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E 



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Disassembler-9 



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Federal Hill Softuiore 

825 lUiliicim SI. 
llolUmere, MD 21230 



We accept checks (no delays), money orders or VISA/ 
MC with card number, exp. date and signature. Add 
$1.50 for shipping and send orders to FEDERAL HILL 
SOFTWARE, 825 William St., Baltimore, Md. 21230 



The main purpose of our program, of course, is to 
encourage the children to experiment and learn. It is fun for 
them to plan other options or ways of printing out the 
DATA. By manipulating the DATA in various ways, we 
hope that the kids begin to have a better understanding of 
databased programs. 




The listing: 

10 REM "BASEBALL TEAM DATA BASE" 
20 REM "STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 
D,NY, 1984 
30 CLEAR 1000 

40 REM "WE CAN DIMENSION THE STRI 
NQS WITH ANY AMOUNT GREATER THAN 
THE POSSIBLE NUMBER OF PLAYERS" 
30 DIMA«(50) ,B«(50) 
60 FOR T-1 TO 50 
70 READ A«(T),B«(T) 
80 IF A*<T)«"END" THEN 120 
90 REM" IF THE PLAYERS NAME IS RE 
AD AS 'END* THEN THE COMPUTER ST 
OPS READINQ THE DATA." 
100 NEXT T 

110 REM"SET THE COUNTER TO ZERO" 
1 20 NN»0 : CLS7 : PR I NTSS , " BASEBALL 
POSITIONS"} 
130 S0UND175,2 



TRS-80 COLOR BASIC 

bvBOBALBRECHT 

This sntertaining lelf-instructional book it paclced vvith 
games, exparimentt, scores of intriguing challenges, and 
activities related to fantasy role-playing games. The 
ideal introductory aid for kids, parents and teachers 
udng tfn Color Computer. 

Jotin Wiley & Sons $9j9S 
eOS Third Ave., New York, NY 10158 



TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER GRAPHICS.. 

by DON INMAN lffylll(OlO»i^ 

Explore the creative and imaginative blending of computers 
and color. This exciting boolc will enable you to explore 
all the graphics capabilities of Extended Color BASIC. 

Reston Publishing Company $14.95 
11480 Sunset Hills Rd., Reston, VA 22090 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE GRAPHICS 
FOR THE TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 
by DON INMAN and KURT INMAN 

This book is specific to the TRS-80 Color Computer with 
applications using sound and graphics to illustrate how an 
assembler can be used to perform feats that would be quite 
difficult, if not impossible in the BASIC language. 

Reston Publishing Company $14.95 



DYMAX. P.O. 310, MENLO PARK.CA 94025 

Dymax orders must be prepaid via check, money order, Visa 
or Mastercard. Sorry, no Purchase Orders or COD orders. 
Please add $2.00 shipping and handling. California residents 
add 6% sales tax. 



140 PRINT«484,"'A' FOR ALL & 'E* 
TO END "J 

150 PRINTa96, "WHAT POSITION DO Y 
OU WANT TO SEETHIS TIME. . . »| : INP 
UT PS* 

160 IF PS«-"E" THEN CLSZEND 
170 IF PS«-"A" THEN 270 
180 PRINT 

190 FOR T- 1 TO 50 

200 IF B«(T)»PS« THEN PRINTA«(T) 

,B«(T) :nn»nn-<-i 

210 NEXT 

220 PRINT 

230 IF NN-0 THEN PRINT"SORRY,NON 
E FOUND." 

240 PRINTe483, "PRESS ANY KEY TO 
80 ON. .."I 
250 AN««INKEY« 

260 IF AN«»"" THEN 250 ELSE 110 
270 REM»PRINTOUT OF ALL PLAYERS 
ON THE TEAM" 
280 CLS8 

290 PRINTa6, "THE ENTIRE TEAM"| 

300 PRINTe64, "PRESS PH^ KEY FOR 

NEXT PLAYER" 

310 PRINT 

320 FOR T-1 TO 50 

330 PRINT T;B«(T),A«(T) 

340 EN«-INKEY«: IF EN«»""THEN 340 

350 IF A«(T)-"END" THEN 240 

360 SOUND200,2 

370 NEXTT 

380 REM "THE DATA IS ENTERED AS P 
LAYER'S NAME, PLAYERS POSITION." 
390 REM" YOU MAY USE OUR MET PLA 
YERS FOR PRACTICE OR ENTER YOUR 
OWN FAVORITE TEAM'S MEMBERS." 
400 DATA TOM SEAVER, P, DOUG SISK, 
P, RUSTY STAUB,RF,JOHN STEARNS, C, 
CRAIG SWAN, P, WALT TERRELL, P 
410 DATA WALLY BACKMAN, SS, BOB BA 
IL0R,2B,HUBIE BROOKS, 3B, CARLOS D 
IAZ,P, GEORGE FOSTER, LF, RON GARDE 
NHIRE,SS 

420 DATA BRIAN GILES, 2B, TOM GORM 
AN, P, DANNY HEAP, RF, RON HODGES, C, 
SCOTT HOLMAN,P,MOOKIE WILSON, CF 
430 DATA MIKE HOWARD, CF, DAVE KIN 
OMAN, IB, TERRY LEACH, P, TIM LEARY, 
P,ED LYNCH, P, JESSE OROSCO,P 
440 DATA RICK OWNBEY,P,OARY RAJS 
ICH,RF,RONN REYNOLDS, C 
450 DATA JOSE OQUENDO, SS, KEITH H 
ERNANDEZ, IB, JUNIOR ORTIZ, C, MARK 
BRADLEY , RT , DARRYL STRAWBERRY , RF , 
RON DARLING, P 

460 REM "THE NEXT LINE IS DUMMY 
DATA TO END THE READING OF THE D 
ATA" 

470 DATA END, END 



192 



the RAINBOW May 1984 





Hat 



WOW! WHAT A PROGRAM! 



Nowadays, when you go to the theatre, you first pay 
your money and then go to the show ... and hope you 
enjoy it. But it wasn't always like that. Centuries ago it 
was the other way around. First you saw the show. 
Then the performers passed their hats around. If you 
enjoyed the show, you put money in the hat. The more 
you enjoyed it, the more you put in. 

We're going to try the same approach with 
software. 

INTRODUCING 
PASS-THE-HAT 
SOFTWARE 

It works like this. Send us a formatted disk along With a 
stamped, self-addressed mailer. We will use it to send you a 
copy of SPELL'N FIX IL We also give you permission to 
copy the disk as much as you want and give copies to all 
your friends. 

After you ve had a chance to use it, that's where the hat 
comes in. We want you to decide for yourself what the 
program is worth to you, and send us a contribution, (Hint: 
send a LOT if you really like it!) 



SPELL 'N FIX li is not just for 
spelling mistakes — it catches 
typos too. It really makes sure 
that your word processing output 
is perfect. Easy to use too. Reads 
your text, fixes your mistakes, 
lets you look up the spelling Of 
bad words in its dictionary file, 
even lets you add words to the 
dictionary. Color Computer 
Magazine called the original 
SPELL FIX "a top-drawer 
piece of software" ... and SPELL 
'N FIX II is even better! Originally 
advertised for $69.29, it beats the 
$200— $300 dictionary programs 
for other computers — hands 
down! 




COMPARISON CHART 




-m 


Radio Shack 


Onginal 


New 




Color 


SPELL "N 


SPELL N 




Dictionary 


FIX 


FIX II 




26-3265 






Checks SCRIPSIT (R) files 


YES 


YES 


YES 


Checks other text processor files 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Checks Basic data files 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Checks files larger than memory 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Full upper and lower case display 


NO 


NO 


YES 


Add words from dictionary 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Delete words from dictionary 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Custom dictionaries ix)ssible 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Comes with error-free dictionary 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Usable for foreign languages 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Checks and fixed in one pass 


NO 


NO 


YES 


Shows suspect words in context 


YES 


YES 


YES 


Usable with just one diskette 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Looks up words in dictionary 


YES 


NO 


YES 


Looks up words while correcting 


NO 


NO 


YES 


DIR command allowed during run 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Uses standard Basic file formal 


NO 


YES 


YES 


Price 


S59.95 


S49.39 


FREE 


(Note: SCRIPSIT is a trademark of Tandy Corporation) 





tarKit^ 

SOFTWARE SYSTEMS CORPORATION 



PO BOX 209 R MT. KtSCO. NY 10549 (914) 241-0287 



SHELL 

saftwane 



LARGEST 
SUPPLIER 
IN THE 
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LUNAR LANDER t6K EXT Its up to you commander, your space craft is damag 
ed and your losing oxygen You rr^ust land to repair You have a choice of 4 dit 
ferent planets to land on. 

32K LUNAR LANDER works with SPECTRUM PROJECT S Voice Pak $15.95 



SONAR SEARCH 16K EXT - OK. Captain you have a fleet of enemy ships to find 
and destroy Your battleship is equipped with depth charges and sonar. TWO 
PLAYER GAME 

32K SONAR SEARCH You mu*» oefend your fleet from the relentless strategy of 
the computer controlled fleet (JOYSTICK) $18 95 




bTAH r^AID IbK bxr DoCK wuh one 
of two base station to fuel up and 
tight the attarKing aliens 
3?K STAR HAiD Now you can land 
on earth and fuel up. but its not that 
simple (JOYSTICK) $18 9*j 



SNOOPY & THE RED BARRON 16K 
EXT A hi res graphic DOG' fight for 
TWO players See review m January s 
issue of RAINBOW 
32K SNOOPY & THE RED BARRON 
A t')taMv advanced version with 
unlimited options (JOYSTICK) S18 95 



M/L AUTHORS^ 

TOP ROYALTIES J 
PAID! 




EXTERMINATOR 16K EXT - You ve had it. BUGS are everywhere and its time to 
fight back With a can of RAID" m hand and a JOYSTICK in the other, you begin 
fighting the marching trisects 32K 

EXTERMINATOR Now there are two action packed screens of fun $18 95 



FEDERATION BOOT CAMP 16K EXT 
You ve been drafted for 16 weeks. 
Four complete tasks, which after 
completed you advance to the next 
screen Can you hack (JOYSTICK) 
$18 95 « 



DEATH STAR 32K EXT You are pit- 
ted against the EMPIRE, using your 
gut feelings and the force you can 
save the princess. Battle guards, buy 
weapons, and armor. $19.95 



• ALL SHELL 16K GAMES HAVE 32K VERSIONS INCLUDED 

• FREE 16K ADVENTURE WITH $50.00 ORDER. 

• YES! SHELL GAMES ARE AVAILABLE ON DISK. ADD 
$2,50. 



USA Onlers under $90 - Add $2.50 
I OTHER Orders Add $5.00 shtp/hnd 
Fla. Residents add 5% sales tax. 
Visa/MC Add 5% 

NO C.O.D. ORDERS 



8301 Sarnovy Dr./Orlando, FL 32807 



GAME 



1 1 


the 


J ECB [] 


RAINBOW 

-7- -v. 



c 



Case Of Th6 
'Overblown Heist 





Scenario: YouVe a bank robber and you Ve just blown 
your way into an underground vault. Unfortunately, 
you overestimated the amount of dynamite required; 
not only did you trap yourself in the vault, but the blast 
triggered the external alarm (the police are on their way). It 
did considerable structural damage. All but 15 moneybags 
are buried in the rubble and they scattered intact. The inter- 
nal alarms (immediate detection and capture on contact) 
were also triggered. However, all is not lost; you have 
enough dynamite to easily blast your way free to the open 
exit, and since you're an enterprising soul (greedy), you're 
going to make the most of it and grab some moneybags as 
you blast your way through, hustling to get out before the 
police arrive. 

Objective: Get out in time with as many moneybags as you 
can. You'll have to avoid the alarms as you blast your way, 
nonstop, through three screens to do it. 

Instructions: Enter PCLEAR6 before running the game. 
To move your player, use the four arrow keys. Diagonal 



(Doug Thorsvik is a captain in the U.S. Air Force. He 
is presently an AFROTC instructor and teaches leader- 
ship and management at Washington State University 
and the University of Idaho.) 



moves are possible and so is continuous movement by hold- 
ing down the arrow keys. To pick up the moneybags, run 
over them and avoid hitting the alarms. Use the space bar to 
blast. Be careful not to blow away any moneybags (or 
alarms for that matter). Pay attention to the yellow bar 
timer on the left — when it's gone, you are too! Hitting or 
blasting an alarm will get the same results. Exit each game 
screen through the opening in the bottom right-hand corner; 
you'll have to travel across three of them to get out. It will 
take some practice and considerable skill to get all IS 
moneybags, but it can be done. When prompted for your 
initials, type in three letters only and they'll be displayed in 
the lower right-hand corner with the high score. 

This game uses the speed-up poke when drawing the three 
game screens. If you don't want to use this poke, delete it 
from lines 1, 33 and 65. If you want more time to get out, 
change the ".6" in line 17 to a smaller number. 

Line Descriptions 

2 Move game player 

3-7 Blast routine 

8 Hi-Res numbers routine 

9 Hi-Res letters routine 

10 Flip to a new screen and update score 
12 Space bar pressed? 

13-16 Poll keyboard for arrow keys 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 195 



T 



T 



THE COLORSOFr" BUSINESS SYSTEM 

INTEGRATED BUSINESS SOFTWARE DESIGNED FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 
WRITTEN FOR USE BY THE NON-ACCOUNTING ORIENTED BUSINESSMAN 
CONCISE USERS MANUAL WITH SAMPLE TRANSACTIONS TUTORIAL 
PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN AND FULLY TESTED 
HIGHLY USER FRIENDLY AND MENU DRIVEN 
AFTER THE SALE SUPPORT 



SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING (Version 2.0) tm. ,.ie..ba.ed 

accounting package Is designed for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It also contains the flexibility for 
the accounting oriented user to set up a double entry Journal with an almost unlimited chart of accounts. This 
package Includes Sales Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, 
Payroll Disbursement, and Record Maintenance programs. Screen and hardcopy system outputs include 
Balance Sheet, Income Statement, Customer and Vendor Status Reports, Accounts Receivable and Payable 
Aging Reports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List The number of 
accounts is limited only by the number of disk drives. $89.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE (Version 2.O) This package isdesigned to meet 
the requirements of most small business users. The system Includes detailed audit trails and history reports for 
each customer, prepares invoices and monthly statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alphabetized 
customer listing. The user can define net terms for commercial accounts or finance charges for revolving 
accounts. This package functions as a standalone A/R system or Integrates with the Small Business Accounting 
package to build a complete accounting/receivables system $59.95 



PAYROLL (Version 2.0) Thlslntegratable package isdesigned formalntalnlngpersonnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees with 8 deductions each. This system calculates payroll 
and tax amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date totals. These amounts can be automatically trans- 
ferred to the SBA package for financial reporting. It computes each pay period's totals for straight time, overtime, 
and bonus pay and determines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs Include mailing list, listing of employees, 
year-to-date federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of current misc. deductions. This system Is suited for use 
In all states except Oklahoma and Delaware $69.95 



All programs require a minimum of 32K and 1 disk drive but will take advantage of 64K and 
multiple drives. Each package features a hl-res 51 x 24 black on green screen. 16K versions 
available without hl-res screen. Specify 16K or 32K versions when ordering. Future inte- 
grated packages will include: Inventory Control, Sales Analysis, Accounts Payable. 



INCLUDE $5.00 Shipping/Handling Per Order 



Write for Free Catalog 



BRANTEX, INC. 

COLOR SOFTWARE SERVICES DIV. 

BUSINESS SOFTWARE GROUP 
P.O. BOX 1708 

GREENVILLE, TEXAS 76401 



TELEPHONE ORDERS 
(214) 454-3674 
COD/VISA/MASTERCARD 



ATTENTION DEALERS: WE OFFER THE BEST DEALER PLANS AVAILABLE 



17 


Increment timer, time out? 


19 


Test to flip to a new screen, erase game player 


20 


Test and branch on detected color 


21 


Move game player 


22 


Get riioneybag, increment score 


23-24 


Trip alarm 


25 


Successful completion prompt 


26-31 


High score routine 


32-33 


Play again routine 


34 


Erase text prompts 


35 


Titje screen 


36 


Game sounds 


37-42 


Hi-Res letters and numbers 


43-49 


Game characters 


50-65 


Draw three game screens 



A Brief Guide To Using The Hi-Res Letters/ Numbers 

IVe designed the graphic letters/ numbers routines to be 
flexible and easy to use. If you want to use the graphics 
routines in your own programs, here's hoW to do it. 

Lines 37-42 have to be ruh to initialize the graphics before 
the brief subroutines put them on the screen. Line 8 puts 
numbers on the screen and line 9 puts letters on. 

Before using the subroutines you'll have to indicate some 
specifics: 

Numbers: Presub info 

ZN=number:ZI=x-coord:Z2=y-coord:Z5$=background 
color :Z6$=color of number:G0SUB8 

(Z 1 and Z2 must be odd numbers for the numbers to look 
right. The routine draws from right to left, thus, Z1,Z2 
specifies the lower right corner of the number to be dis- 
played. The width of the screen is the only limit of the size of 
the number. For an example, see line 22 in the listing.) 

Letters: Presub info 

ZL$=text (capital letters only) :Zl=x-coord :Z2=y-coord: 
ZC=color of text:GOSUB9 

(Zl must be even and 72 must be odd for letter to look 
right. The routine draws from left to right, thus ZI,Z2 
specifies the lower left corner of the text to be displayed. For 
an example, see line 27 in the listing.) 

The explanation is brief, so you'll have to figure out the 
finer points on your own. This should give you a good start. 



25 47 

35 147 

42 37 

52 55 

END 23 



The listing: ' ' 

0 'HEIST 

1 P0KE6549S,0:B0SUB35:e0T010 

2 PUT<X,Y)--<X+13,Y+13),AStPSET:X 
»Xl:V-Yl:PUT<X,Y)-<X+13iY+13),AO 
,PSET: RETURN 

3 IFX>18THENT-PP0INT<X-9,Y):IFT> 
ITHENPUT (X-14, Y) ^ <X-1 , Y+13) , A4,P 
SET : I FT-4THEN23EL9EPLAYB* : PUT < X- 
14,Y)-<X-l,Y-f'13),A5,PSET 



4 IFY>14THENT-PP0INT<XpY-l):IFT> 
ITHENPUT ( X , Y~14) - ( X+13, Y-1 ) , A4, P 
SET: IFT-4THEN23ELSEPLAYB«:PUT(X, 
Y-14> - < X+13, Y-» ) , A5, P8ET 

5 IFX<22BTHENT-PPaiNT<X'i-ie,Y>:IF 
T>1THENPUT<X+14,Y)-(X+27,Y+13>,A 
4,P8ET: IFT«4THEN23EL8EPLAYB«:PUT 
<X+14, Y> - <X+27, Y-H3) , A5, P8ET 

6 IFY<154THENT-PP0INT<X,Y-t-18):IF 
T>1THENPUT <X, Y'H4) - <X+13, Y+27) , A 
4,PSET: IFT-4THEN23EL8EPLAYB«:PUT 
<X , Y+14> - <X'H3, Y-»-27> , A5, P8ET 

7 QOT013 

8 ZA«>STR«(ZN>:P0KEZ3,Z1:PC1KEZ4, 
Z2: FORZB-LEN ( ZA«> T02STEP-1 ; DRAWZ 
3t-»-Z7*+"BR7"-»-Z6t-»-Z» (A8C <HIM < ZA« 
, ZB, 1 > > ) •^'•BLS" : NEXT: RETURN 

9 P0KEZ3,Zl:P0KEZ4,Z2:C0L0RZC:F0 
RZB-tTOLEN ( ZL«> : DRAWZ* ( A8C (HID* < 
ZLt, ZB, 1) > >-i-"BR3>': NEXT: RETURN 

10 PnODEl,PP:SCREENl,0:ZN-8:Zl-7 
9: Z2«191 :130SUB8: xl-18: Yl«o; X*18: 
Y-0: 608UB2: G0T012 

11 yi-y:xi-x 

12 ifinkey«-chr«(32>then3 

13 IFPEEK(341)-247THENY1-Y-14:80 
TOIS 

14 IFPEEK(342)-247THENY1-Y+14 

15 IFPEEK<343)«247THENX1-X-14:B0 
T017 

16 IFPEEK<344)-247THENX1-Xfl4 

17 QQ-QQ+.6:LINE(0,0)-<2,QQ),PRE 
SET , BF : I FQQ- > 1 78THEN23 

18 IFYKOTHENII 

19 I FX >228TJ«NPP-PP-»-2 : I FPP< 7THEN 
1 0ELSEQ08UB2 : PUT ( X , Y > - ( X+ 1 3 , Y-l-1 3 
),A9,PSET:80T025 

20 T-PPOINT<X1+7,Y1+7):ON T SOTO 
21,22, llp23 

21 80SUB2:aOT012 

22 eOSUB2: PLAYMB«: S-8-i-lOO: ZN-8; Z 
1-79: Z2-191 : Z6«-"C2'' : G0SUB8: eOTO 
12 

23 PUT<X,Y)-<X+13,Y+13),AS,PSET: 
X-Xl:Y-Yl;PUT<X,Y)-<X+13,Y+13),A 
O, PSET: F0RX«1T010: 80UND180, 2: SCR 

eeni, i:soundi80,2:screeni,o:next 

X 

24 eOSUB34:ZL«-"YOU QOT CAUOHT": 
Z1«66: Z2-'81 :B08UB9: ZL«-»WITH" : Zl 
-1 16: Z2-93: Q0SUB9: ZN-S: Z 1«10S: Z2 

1 05 : Z6«" C2 " : GOSUB8: ZL«« " DOLLAR 
S": Z 1-122: Z2-10S:B0SUB9:F0RD-1T0 
1000: NEXTD: 80T032 

25 e0SUB34:ZL«-"Y0U HADE IT OUT" 
: Z 1-66: Z2-81 : 008UB9: ZL«-"MITH'' : Z 

1- 1 16: Z2-93: OOSUB9: ZN-S: Z 1-lOS: Z 

2- 105: Z6««"C2'' : Q0SUB8: ZL«-"DOLLA 
RS" : Zl-122: Z2-105: eOSUB9: FORB-IT 
01000:NEXTB 

May 1984 the RAINBOW 197 



T 



26 IFS<-HS THEN32EL8EHS-S: ZN-HS: 
Z 1 ■■22 1 : Z2- 1 9 1 : Q08UB8 : ZL«-W« : Z 1 -2 

22: Z2-191 : zc»i : qosub9: w«>" " : oosu 

B34 

27 ZU«-"NEW HZQH SCORE": Zl"66: Z2 
■i83:ZC-2:00SUB9:ZL«*"TYPE YOUR I 
NITIAL8'*: Zl-50: Z2^^97:Q0SUB9 

28 F0RB-1T03 

29 Q«-INKEY»: IFQ»»""THEN29 

30 W«-W«-Ha«:NEXTB 

31 ZL«»W«:Z 1-222: Z2- 191 :zc>^3: 808 
UB9 

32 008UB34:ZL«*"T0 PLAY A0AIN":Z 
1"70: Z2-83: ZC>4: 808UB9: ZLt-^PRES 
8 8PACE BAR'':Z1>60:Z2-97:808UB9 

33 I F I NKEY«< >CHR« < 32 > THEN33ELSE8 
08UB34 : P0KE65495 , O : 008UBS0 : 80T0 1 
O 

34 LINE <46, 71 )-<226, 110), PRESET, 
BF: RETURN 

33 CLS: PRINTai40, "»HEIST»" : PRINT 
8197, "COLOR COMPUTER VERSION": PR 
INT«264,"BY D0U8 THORSVIK": PRINT 
8388, "20 SECONDS ARE REQUIRED" :P 
RINTa420, "TO SET UP 3 8AME SCREE 
NS" 

36 D»13:E«14:HS-500:B«>"V30L8T56 
;0l; 1|4|7| 10'':MB«-"L8T2240S| If 5» 
9|03»1|S|9»011 1|S!9":W«-"DRT":Z5 



•-"CI" 

37 DIMZ« (90) : Z3-200: Z4-202: FORZB 
-48T057:READZ«(ZB) :NEXT:F0RZB-69 
T090:READZ«<ZB) :NEXT 

38 DATA"U8L5D4L2USD9NR4","H3U9L3 
RD8NR3L2" , "L7E6UHNLSD09D2" , "U2H2 
UEU2NL603DF4L7" , "U9D4L7UNE3DR4DS 
BL4" , "BU2H6NR6D3RF3D2L5", "BU2U2H 
2UEL2B4DR2UD4NR2BL2" , "BL4U3E4UNL 
7LB6D2", "UeL5D3R2DSL4NU9" , "BLSE5 
UH3ND5L63DF2D82 

39 DATA"NU9R3U2NR2U6R4D8","NU9R3 
U8R4D82DF2D2NL3" , "NU9R3U9R4D3BD3 
D3NL3", "NU9R3U9RF3D383BR3", "U9R3 
NR4D4NRD5R4", "U9R3NR4D4NRD5BR4", 
"U9R7BD4NL2DSNL4" , "U9R3D9U4R4U5D 
9", "R2U8NLR4LD8R2", "NUSR4U9R3D9" 
, "NU9R3U9D6E3NU38DP2D2" , "U9R3D9R 
4", "U9F5D2NH3UE4U2N83D9 

40 DATA"U9F7NU7D2NH5", "U9R2NDSR5 
D9NL5" , "U8R6D3L3UD6BR4" , "U9R7D48 
4ERF2" , "NU9R3U8R4De2DF2D2" , "R4U5 
LNUL3U4R7BD4D5", "BR2U8LRSLD8BR2" 
, ■'U8R3D8R4NU8", "BU2U7R3D9RU3R3NU 
6BD3", "NU8E5U2NG3LNF3D2F5NU8", »N 
U3NR3E6NU3QLH4ND3NR3F7D2" , "BU4US 
R3D9R2U4R2NUSBD4 

41 DATA"E7UNL7L66D2R7 

42 Z7«- " U8L3D8L2U8L2D8 " : Z * < 32 ) - » 



FREE PROGRAMMING GUIDE * 

With €Tery order placed before July 1« 1904^ we will Include a copy of THE GUIDE TO STRING 
VARIABLES t»y J.D. German, absolutely free! This valuable booklet tells you how to unlock the 
full power of your Color Computer by using the many string variable commands available In Ex- 
tended Color Basic. It's written In dear, easy-to-understand language and Includes plenty of ex- 
amples and review exercises to lead you through the subfect at your own pace. 
THE GUIDE TO STRING VARIABLES (When ordered separately) $3.95 

JOYSTICK PLUGS! Deluxe, heavy duty f pin DIN connectors to fit the foystlck Input ports of your 
Color Computer. Includes instructions and wiring diagram S4^5/each or $8.00/pai r 



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snaclal 



ir MUSICAL mUNCa, An entartalaing tutorial tliat stimnlatos mMclal eroatlTlty and teaches 
basic computer string varUble ooncopta. lo»year-oida to adults S17*9S 

^ CUSTOM FLASHC ARDS. Thto groat study aid lots you quickly croate and save your own sets of 
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if ALPHABET SOUP - A word recognition and spoiling game for the whole family SlS,9S 

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programs featuring five tlUU levels, multiple choice answer formatSi, and entertaining music and 
graphics to koop a^ es 4 (witli help) to 16 lUterofted , . . . each %X5*93 or ail three for $42.9S 

For mora laf ormatioa , writs for a f roo oatalog, 

ALL PROGRAMS ARE ON CASSETTE FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER OR TDP-lOO WITH A 
MINIMUM OF 16 K OF MEMORY AND EXTENDED BASIC. 



SEND CHECK, MONEY ORDER 

OR PURCHASE ORDER, PLUS 

$2.00 SHIPPING AND HANDLING TO; 



Creative Technical Consultants 

P.O. Box 652 Cedar Crest. NM 87008 



198 



the RAINBOW May 1984 



BRS" 

43 DIHA0<2),A1(2),A2<2),A3<2),A4 
(2),A5<2) ,N(1S> 

44 PMODE 1,1: PCLS : SCREENO , O : QET ( O 
,0)-<13,13>,A5pG 

45 DRAW " BMO , 0C3BR2R9G3L4G2R9F2L 1 
3D2R 1 262L7F2R4BL2C2H3R4U4L3U3R4H 
3" : QET (O, 0> - ( 13, 13) , Al , 0: PCLS 

46 DRAW " BMO, 0C4BDSRFHLE4UND7F4NL 
6D66NR5GR8E4U6":GET(0,0>-(13, 13) 
,A2,G:PCLS 

47 DRAW " BMO , 0C3BR4R5e4L2Ne3R8NE8 
9R2U7NR2F7L3U7 " : GET <0,0)-(13,13> 
, AO, 6: PCLS 

4S DRAW " C3BM0 , OND 1 3R6ND 1 3R7D6NL 1 
1D7L11":GET(0,0>-(13, 13), A3, G: PC 
LS 

49 DRAW " C4BM0 , 0BD6R3EUNHRERNU3FR 
NEDFDNR36DNFLGLND3HLNG" : GET (O, 0) 
-<13, 13) ,A4,G:PCLS 

50 L"l5:BB»o:PP-l:QQ«0:8-o:XX'-l: 
Xl=18: Y1»0: X=18: Y«18: F0RB-1T059T 
EP2: PMODEl , B: SCREENO, O: PCLS: NEXT 
B 

5 1 PMODE 1,1: SCREENO, O: F0RB-60T02 
42STEP14:PUT(B,0>-(B+13, 13),A3,P 
SET : NE XT : F0RB-4T0242STEP 1 4 : PUT < B 
, 168)-<B-M3, 181) ,A3,PSET:NEXT 

52 F0RB«*0T0154STEP14:PUT(4,B)-<1 



7 , b-m 3 ) , a3 , pset : ne x t : forb- 1 4t0 1 1 
2step14: put (242, b) - <255, b+13) , a3 
,pset:next 

53 zl*-''high score": z1-b4:z2-191 
: zc«4:go8UB9: zn-hs: zi-221 : Z2-191 

:Z6«s''C2":G0SUB8 

54 ZL*«w«:z 1*222: Z2-1 91 :zc-3:qos 
UB9: ZL*-"L00T" : Z1"0: Z2-191 : zc-4: 
00SUB9 : C0L0R2 :LINE<0,0)-(2,178), 
PSET,BF 

55 PCOPY 1 T03 : PC0PY2T04 : PCOP Y3T05 
:PC0PY4T0A 

56 F0RX-1T015:N(X)«X:NEXTX 

57 F0RP-1T05STEP2 

58 BBBBB-t-5:XX-XX-*-2 

59 PMODEl, P: SCREENO, O 

60 F0RB2«14T0154STEP14:F0RB-18T0 
228STEP 1 4 : B3-RND ( 2 ) - 1 : I FB3- 1 THEN 
PUT <B, B2) - (8+13, B2+13) , A3, P8ET 

61 NEXTB,B2 

62 FORB- 1 TOBB : C-RND ( 1 5 ) * 1 4 : C2>RN 
D ( 10) #14: PUT ( 18-i-C, 14+C2) - (31+C, 2 
7+C2) , A2, pset: NEXTB 

63 forx-itoxx:r«rnd(L):t-n<R):n< 

R)"N<L):L»L-l:C«T»14:C2-RND(10)» 
1 4 : PUT < 1 8+C , 1 4+C2 ) - < 3 1 fC , 27+C2 ) , 

ai,pset:nextx 

64 NEXTP 

65 P0KE65494,0: RETURN 



The Kgy-Ze^K i* 
DO YOU mVE A 32K SYSTEM HITH 64K MEMORY CHIPS ?? ARE YOU STILL BEING TOLD YOU MN CM.Y USE 32K FROM BASIC ?? 



DON'T BELIEVE IT !! - KEY COLOR SOFTWARE brings you the Kl 
any STANDARD 32K COLOR COMPUTER TO ACCESS €4K RAH FRf 

*** Works with CASSETTE based svsteiis! *** 



-264K. An exciting NEW SOFTWARE utility that allows 
and wi th >I0 tMROHARE MODIFICATIONS REQUIRED! ! ! 

*** Works with DISK based systems! *** 

The KEY-264K divides the 64K ran memry into two 32K banks or sides, each of which can be utilized independently 
by the. BASIC interpreter, with the ability to switch instantly from one side to the other. IT'S LIKE WWING TWO 
COMPUTERS IN GNE!! Have your ^SIC prosran on one side and keep your variables on the other side, or have your 
nain prosran on one side and your subroutines on the other side, or have your prograi on one side and use the 
other side for 4 additional HI-RES pages, or any conbination you like. The possibilities are endless because the 
KEY-264K allows full comwnication between sides plus the ability to switch back and forth at will, all fron 
within BASIC. You could also have different progrAs in each side and switch back and forth between then using 
simple keystrokes, even while the prograns are running!! Or run them both at the sane tine in the 
FOREGROUNO/BACKGROONO MULTI -TASKING node. Don't buy that printer buffer yet! With the KEYi264K you can be 

Printing in the background side while utilizing your coa4)uter normally in the foreground side AT THE SAME TIME!!! 
ebugging a program? Use either a BASIC coimand or single keystrokes to instantly duplicate your program, in it's 
present status, on the opposite side. Switch to the opposite side later and pick up exactly where you were before! 

For DISK users, the KEY-264K allows you to alternate between DISK and EXTENDED BASIC on the same si<te with 
simple keystrokes. No need to pull your controller or power down. You can be in EXTENDED BASIC on one side and in 
DISK BASIC on the other side and still switch back and forth and have full comunications between the two Sides, 

The KEY-264K does this and MORE thru extensions to BASIC. No need to learn a new language! The KEY-264K adds 
15 NEin^WIDS and 1 function to BASIC, including powerful new BLOCK MEMORY HOVE and GRAPHICS VIEWING commands. 

The KEY-264K works on 32K systems with 'E", 'F', or even modified 'D' boards and requires EXTENDED or DISK BASIC 
with GOOD e4K MEMORY CHIPS! Systems with piggy-back 32K or half-good 64K memory chips WILL NOT WORK! ! 



ORDER YOUR KEY-264K CASSETTE TODAY by sending check or money order for $39.95 plus i2.00 postage U.S.A. 
(iS.OO outside U.S.A.) Mass. residents add 5X sales tax. 

KEY COLOR SOFTWARE ^™ THE NEW 64K 
P.O. BOX 360 RAiNeJJr COLOR COMPUTER TOO! ! 
HARVARD, MA. 01451 



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May 1984 the RAINBOW 199 



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CHARACTER MATRIX-9 x 9 Standard, with True 
Descenders •18x9 Emphasized • 18 x 18 Double 
Strike •6x6 Block Graphics • 60 x 72 Low Resolu> 
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Bit Image Graphics • 240 x 144 Ultra Hi Resolution, 
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CHARACTER SETS— 96 Standard ASCII Charac- 
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LINE SPACING-Programmable by n/I44" 

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OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
C^J)._APD$2,Q0 



RAINBOW REVIEWSi 



Atlantis Adventure 

A Shipshape Undersea Adventure/Ow^ Nest Software ^ ^ ^ . ^ . 251 

Atom 

Fast Action Vyith A New Tm^V Radio Sh^ . . , • v > + > ^ * 239 

Beam Rider 

A Colorful Energizing Chase Game/Spectra/ A$aoc/afes . . , . * * * ► , . , > • ^ - . . 234 

Before, Between, And After 

Je Quick. Fun And Easy /CY-BURNET-ICS . . ♦ + < ^. . *. » , * ,254 

Business Accounting System 

To Th6 Rescue/Mar/t Data Products ^ .y. . i** i,, , ♦ .230 

CoCo Bingo 

Cards, Markers MS$ Good Pfay/Co/orfec/i Systam9 , ♦ * 278 

Color Dictionary 

Let Your CoCo Spe\y Radio , w . , 4 ..... * ^ * ^> ♦ * 



DRB 



.221 
.222 
.213 



A Rea$ondt>ty Prtmti \M\\ffy/imf&hif^ .... 
Decimals 

Handy Aid For Teachers/S/wmrocir Softvmra 
Demon ^»ed 

Cultivates A^^n^ fun/MiCh Tron * , ^ ♦ * * 4..^ . . , . ^ . * ^ 224 

Dislcutil 

A l^ulti-featured Disk Er\h^r\c0r/ Silicon Rainbow Proi^ucta - ♦ - ^ 1^ • * > * • ^ * . h, , , , 268 

DSKiMOH 

A Multi-pucpose Utillty/C/f/ome $y6mi$ 0/pup i . - 1. 276 

Execcart 

Does ft RIght/T/w Oataman ^ ^ ^ » . * + * , * .250 

Factors Tutor 

Great With Home Computer/Compt/fer hlari^i * , , , . . . , ♦ ♦ ♦ . . * # . , . , ^ . . ^ > . * w . , 1 . . , * . 248 

Fastdupe 

A Plus For 64K Disk Owners/Specfrum Pro/ecfa ^ Li> » - >;f . - - . * * ♦ . . 263 

Flight From Grimdar 

Is An Exciting trlp/T/)eCdC0Frewafe Ctaaring HdWse . .r>.vp . * ,*> . - ,^ .260 

Foodwar 

Gobbling Good Fun/Arca«^ Aaimations ^ ^ * v ^ • 265 

4 Mile Island 

Good For The Beginning Advenlurer/Oii'& Nest Software • . . , ^ . * * . 280 

Galactic Taipan 

Blasts Out Of The DoWrums/Ar^r /?6ya/ Games - # . ^ * - * > * + ^ ... * 264 

Gral)t>er 

This Action Game Witt Grab YoU/Tom h/lin Software, ^ ^ ...... . ,1 . s ^ ^ 251 

A Guide To Foo4 Coittmts 

Gives Nutritional Informatlon/Cowpytrns Si Fitrms . . ♦ . t ♦ . ^ ■ . - . * * ^ . - »^ - » * » * . * > «^ . . . . . , 228 

Thelnvester 

A Good Idea, But A Good investm«ni?/*^M Efiierpriaes . - . - . 1. * .214 

IMDiSK 

A Good No-Di^ ^fjisk* S^ten^Si^ftrtS fA0k^ir\^ ^ 274 

Math immldii 

AddsUp/Cfyaf#Sowiw . , . . . . ^.ij-^-^u*.*^.-^^ ^ . ^. , , , .>.y. ... . .246 

iMusic Raadir - 

Is A Competent Juior/Prickiy^Pear Software , 252 

Number-Krun^er ^^y'^^ 

Good For Basic lyiattVWoons/Jof Acres Software 232 

Paper Tractor 

A New FricjUdh Option For Printers/Paper Tractor LCife * , ^ - 238 

Question ApaAnsvwer 

ResppfWs To Oueries/Morefo/1 Ba^^jS^ff^im » . . Trrrr>»^, ^ 244 

^citement, Realism Marl$..^i|s Text Game/Pa/ Creations ^ ...... ^ , .216 

$ea<t)uest / 

Adventure At 20,0C«aijaaai^ Oafa Pf^odyoia . . v. . ^ >v - » * 247 

Column Model umKmmm 

A Reasonable,miltattO«^55pecfrum Profects ♦ * ^ , 208 

The Sourcerer / 

Bares AH/pomptrteware . * ^ 240 

Speed Read 

The Fasf, ftn Way/B&0 Software , 247 

Spell-A-1^ 

Get Tlte Real Sound/ Jerb Softwarm^ . 
TV Oraim^ Editor 

MaJbsCcOo A Van Gogh//nferfjff(^o»/'Sof/ware, /Wi 
Taxi 

Ri(EiasF«^rlySmooth/«ad/pS/)ac^(......*,...*.^*** -..242 

Test Aid 

HrtSS Some HaU ef For Teachers//fitoroo/s * * * t - ■ ^ • • 258 i 

Whdbfi^rs \ 
Mlin^Ald ForTeachersySrtamfo<?A So^are * ^.213 j 



RECBVED & CERTinED 

The following products recently have been received by the Rainbow, ^ — — 

examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 

Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 

ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been Issued to: 



The Adventure Generator, a 32/64K ECB 
full-featured Adventure game generating 
program. Write a ready-to-run Adventure 
game by entering your own inputs. All you 
need to do is map out the Adventure you 
wish to generate and enter the room descrip- 
tions, commands, objects and artMiftiq^ 
flags as you want them to be i^d^ cf'arb 
Software, 1636 D Av4f.,J Suite C>fational 
City, C A 92050, tape $34,95 

Address One, a |6K ECB program which 
maintains addi?m files and related informa- 
tion. The menu includes: Opening a new fife; 
adding a record; completing label sets; se- 
lecting labd scta,e<(^ting a record^ exiting to 
BASIC, and help ftfld informattoii. %est Bay 
Co., Route K B6x 666, WJfUe Slbne, VA 
22578^520 

Alphft-Dur,a t6K ECBprogram which helpjj 
arrange yourtiisk dire^:tOty(ies) in an atphft- 
beticftl ©filter. It ke$fte yo4»r disks itt-pr^t 
and alJ^ easy acCe** to ^our programs. 
ThS program autoqiiticslly arrangeigran- 
ulc^ files type and ASCll flag for all your 
programs. Microcom S<rftware, P.O. Box 
214.FaSrport. NY I445(),cassette$*.#,<«sk 
$14.95 

Calixto Island, a Hi-Res 32K graphic Ad- 
venture game. Visit the recreation of rhe 
classic CfilfaUo "Wi^nd. Travel tjhrough 
secret iabor^tory* a Mayan fj^^r^ id and| 
meet c««(y Trader Jack. Mari^^ta Pro-f 
ducts. 24001 Aitcia t^cwy.. No. 20t;l«issior| 
Viejo,jCA 92691, tape $19.^5 * 

Candy Go., a 32K ML afdide aefiOfiiftme.| 
You coairol the htto. Ca»dy Dan, ttfound? 
the Candy Co. on moving conveyor belts. In^ 
this maze game, you must pick up all the! 
candy on the conveyor belts in each frame 
while successful!;^ outsmarting the^bad guys 
and saving QJ^J'tl^il. Ov«^ f ;00{f frames of 
increasing di|Rculty. H i*Res graphics, sound 
effects, joys^k or keyhOard input, pause 
feature, eightjtij^ store and high ^ore 
name entry. lntracolor,l^'0. Box 1035, East 
Lansing, Ml 48823, tape and disk $34.95 

Car Manager, a 16K ECB program which 
will compute your vehicle miles per gallon 
and the cost of operating your car per mile, 
along with total costs for gasoline, mainten- 
ance and repairs. All data can be saved to 
tape or disk to be updated for more recent 
computations. Records printed to the screen 
or optional printer, 80 Custom Software, 
5720 Brooke Lane, Sylvania, OH 43560, 
tape $12.95, disk $15,95 



Castle Ragoona, a 16K non-ECB Adven- 
ture, Expiore the c«|§tte by making your way 
through a dark and mysterious tiuize of jpa»^ 
sagcways, conquering evil monsters in your 
path, and finally dimb the tower and raise 
your flag to signify victory. Tape al^o in- 
cludes Enchanted Village, a 16K non-ECB 
beginner's Adventure. Walk through town 
and collect objecti but watch out for Jhe 
pirate who will try to steal them away from 
you. Included i^ra^ graphic display of your 
location in the village and a compaiJs show- 
ing directions. Family Computers, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd,^^s^#,f^^^^ 

CGP-IISScreen Dump, prints screen images 
on the Radio Shack CGP-1 15 Of TOPColor 
Graphic Printer L Derby City Software, 
3141 Doreen Way, Louisville, KV 40220, 
$19.95 

CoCo Cookbook, a 32K, one disk drive pro- 
gram designed to store and retrieve recipes. 
Generally, it is a free-form database man- 
ager that has been optimized for the storage 
of any type information. Store up to 269 
recipes and each can be recalled by storage 
number or keyword search. Computerware, 
P.O. Box 668, Encinitas, CA 92024, $27.95 

CoCo Serial/ Parallel Interface, an interlace 
whi<^h provides switch sclcfjtable i^rinter or 
jno(f(^ operations. It f^itiiie^es sviilchable 
^Baiti^^lill^s from 300 to ^600 and comes 
complete with power suppjy, modem cahie 
and Centronics-type printer c^ble. Pfitt 
Computer Products, Irtc., P.O. Drawer 
55868, Houston, TX 770S5, $89,95 

Disk Dump/ Patch Uttftty, a program that 
manipulates disk data. Data can be read 
from any track/ sector or granule/ offset. 
The limit is in the number of tracks on your 
disk^35,40^?6,ej€. Dat^iif viewedJ28 bym 
at iilinil tri botjl he^^jtc^^ and ASCTr 
foriUfCfts;ITh^dalil from a disk sector can be! 
scrofled (up or jdown by eight bytes or; 
scaMied forwa rd and blackward hy 1 28 by tes. 
Silicon Rainbow Products. 1111 W. El Ca- 
mino Real, Suite 109, Sunnyvale, CA 94087, 
disk $22 

Disk Editor/ Assembler. |L dis||:Wersion of 
EDTASM-^ with a n»inlicr of itdded com- 
mands, includes both 1 6i^;«nd versions. 
Radio Shack stares ha tion^e^cafJiio. 26- 
3254, $59.95 



Disk Fix and OS-9 Utilities, supports dou- 
ble sided/double density, 40 tracks and step 
rates of up to six ms. (over 368,000 bytes per 
drive). Each drive is separately configured, 
allowing any drive combination. Comput- 
erware, Box 668, Encinitas, CA 92024, $29.95 

tkwijf To Understand Guide To Home Cotii- 
puters>a complete source for personal com- 
puter buying infonnation. It cuts through 
the technical talk to tcil you clearly what 
computers are, how they work, and why they 
are so Itseful. Thkbook teHsiyou about the 
many waysyou can use a computer as a tool 
to plan your budget, amlyze Investments, 
type letters, keep recoi'tjisv play games, etc. 
Consumer Guide, 3841 OaktotiSt., Sko- 
l^ie, I L 60076, $3,98 

Education #1, a I6K educatiOhal |>^ckagc 
C<>titaining seven programs aime^^^hy 
group from the very young throti^h college- 
bound students, it includes: lin- 
scfaihble up to nLx*lcttcr worda^ Jfi^ the lime 
allotted; $pellit Oiit of randorrt lists of 
five words, pick out and spell theinMspeiled 
wordf i^Ai Not^:^ l^arn the t^t«^ on a 
piii#i^oard; Lists and4e*iion- 

strates tour common sorts; Base Guess — 
You pick the base the computer picks the 
number and guess it; Morse Quiz — Learn 
Mqtsc Code by the alphabet, then words, 
and finally sentences; $nd S^m^iom — 
Solves simultaneous equations iasfng matrix 
inversions, SUverWar^, P.O^/tox 21101, 
Santa Barbara, CA 93l2iaape $18,95, disk 
$21.95 

Educations #2, a 16.K, nineHprogram educa- 
tioniftljsackage for the yourt^brough college- 
bound students. It includes: Math voders — 
Shoot the correct answer; Scrambler — Put 
lists of items in order and create your own 
[ists^ Language Drill — Learn foreign words; 
'Pac§iirs ii^ Pkk high fl^umbers with no or low 
fac^s ^beat your opponent; Typing Tutor 
— ik'dtp or improve your typing skills; 
Man^'bo4y~ Givp up to nine bodies mass, 
direction and velocity to see, graphically, 
how gravity affects them; Maximum — Pick 
the largest number in your column to give 
your opponent the lowest picks in his row; 
Chemlab — Simulates five different chemis- 
try experiments; and How Far — Shows the 
distance and direction of any points on 
earth. Use coordinates of the predefined cit- 
ies. Silverware, P.O. Box 21 101 , Santa Bar- 
bara, CA 93121, tape $18.95, disk $21.95 



202 the RAINBOW May 1984 



E.T.T, (Electronic Typing Teacher), a 16K 

ECB program which helps you learn to type 
the right way, saving you hours of tedious 
work when entering programs into the CoCo. 
ET.T/s video keyboard lets you practice 
with all the keys labeled, all the keys blank or 
only the "home" keys labeled. There are over 
1 ,000 sentence variations which include every 
letter of the alphabet. CoCo Warehouse, 500 
N, Dobson, Westland, M 1 48 1 85, tape $2 1 .95 

Everyone's Guide To basic, an easy-to> 
understand book which explains the uses of 
the essential commands in the basic 
guage. Easy exercises give you practic&iij»i)^ 
commands. And you'll see how BA$|C com- 
mands work together in simpl^, practical 
computer programs. Consumer Guide, 384 1 
W. Oakton St., Skokic,,p 60076, $4.98 

Fastdupe, a 64K ECB^ utility requiring 
one or more disk dtfV^* it will read your 
master diskette (standard ft6rmat) canlftrn^ 
ing up to 20 granules <46,080 byiesj of 
information; format the blank di$ks; make 
up to four backups(depending on how rtiany 
drives are available) in a single pass, and 
repeat the duplication process as many times 
as requested. Spectrum Projects, 93-15 86th 
Dr., P.O. Box 21272, Woodhftven, N.Y 
11421, disk $19.95 

Finanal^a I6K ECB finattcial analysis pro- 
gram for constructioa contractors. It pro* 
vides tjic eqmractor with a ^point in time 
finan^jjjul snapshot ol^j^H ^current jobs »nd a 
view j^^ibverall results.; The program pro* 
vides a detailed analysis on a 19-c<>lumn 
spreadsheet. The results may be plugged into 
the contractors balance sheet. Requires a 
line printer. David Sligar Software, 7091 
Pickway Dr., CiJBCinnati, OH 45238, tape 
$49.95 

Gold Plug*80. a pliijg which eliminates disk 
reboots and data loss due to oxidized con- 
tacts at the card edge connectors. It solders 
to the boird edge connector. E.A.F. IEo., 
P.O. Bo^ Keller, TX 762A9:X^t'&m^ 
module |2) 516.95, disk drives (all R,Si,) 
$7.95, gold disk cable 2 drive $29.95, four 
drive cable $39.95 

Graphic Math Adventure, a 32K ECB Ad> 

venture (an enhartc^ veniionK7FuitJyp***ycr 
selectable with;^p to 300 Jfppms. Search for 
treasure on lanif^riverand in the labyrinthiof 
caves. Your s^cii^is blocked by mj^iy 
obstacles which tan be overcome by cor- 
rectly answering math problems. Any one or 
all four functions (addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division) can be selected 
to add variety. Also has 24 skill levels. Soft- 
ware Factory, 1333 Morgan Rd,, Bremer- 
ton, W A 98312, tape $21.95 



The Gunflghter, a 32K Hi-Res arcade game 
requiring two players and joysticks. You are 
the top gun in the territory, and life is just 
great, until the kid rides into town. Who will 
prevail in the western drama? Only you and 
your opponent can decide that issue. Can 
you not only outdraw your challenger, but 
shoot straighter than he can? Will you be 
able to dodge the blazing bullets aimed at 
your heart? Jarb Software, 1636 D Ave., 
Suite C, Natiomil. €i$f, CA 92050, tape 
$24,95 

Hide-A*Basic, a 16K ECB program used to 
protect y<>ur cWfi BASIC prograttts: It win 
create up to four machine language routines^ 
which can be called from your own basic 
programs to disable the [BREAK] key, 
USTcommmd and [RESET] button. Hiis 
program will also create a special error-skip 
routine which can be used to tf«fp err<>rs^ 
addinga double protection to the program; 
Microcom Software, P.O. Box 214, Fair- 
port, NY 14450, tape s l*.^>Vr 

Ice Bird* a 16K ittrategy arcade game in 
which a player assumes the i^ole af a penguin 
in a ma/.q of ice blocks. It has the ability to 
push 0F shatter these frozen blocks with 
case, Vour goal is to connect three diamond 
blocks without getting stung and defend 
yourself from stinging pursuers by crum- 
bling their hatching blocks or by sliding ice 
blocks at them as they move about the maze. 
Crystal Software, 6591 Dawsey Rd., Rock 
Creek, OH 44084, $24,95 

Ice Hockey, a 32K Hi-Res ice hockey game. 
Race against the computer or an opponent 
in this Hi-Res game. Includes a real time 
clock similar to the NHL Many skill levels 
igp. Also requires a joystick for each player. 
Computcrwarc, Box 668, 4403 Manchester 
i|Ve., Suite ^02, Encinitas, CA 95034,^ <iisk 
$57.95 

Instructional Computing With The TRS-80 

l^y Herbert Nickles and George Culp^ a text 
consisting of nine chapters that describe an 
approach to usir^g a common j^ampl^ lan- 
guage — BASIC. It discusses certain funda- 
mentals of the language and the design and 
development processes that provide a foun- 
dation for the production of instructional 
comparing programs. Brooks/ Cole Publi*li- 
|j|ig Co., Monterey,! CA 93940, $ 1 6.95 

l^st World Pinbalt ia pinb^H game rbr|he 
t6K Micro Color Computer. Mancuvcrtbc 
ball around the volcano, dinosaurs, a prehis- 
toric fly, etc., and try to hit any red objects 
such as bumpers^ plungers, red marks and 
red power»trip$. Radio Shack stores nation- 
wid^m, no.^2M463, $9,95 

Matiipe|%n wo-pri^^m :llialfe>^ c kage 
for thi? Wcrd C6\or Compiiter.' MinfCak 
functions like a hand-held calculator. You 
can perform a wide range of mathematical 
functions with this program. Spirals is a 
geometric exercise which lets you design and 
plot a large variety of polygonal spirals in 



four colors. Use your imagination to plot 
shapes and designs. Radio Shack stores 
nationwide, cat. no. 26-3362, $9.95 

MENUWRTR, a program designed to assist 
the programmer in the development of menu- 
driven screens (or other alphanumeric and/ 
or semi-graphic screens).The programmer 
can design up to nine screens which can be 
called via Basic's USR function. The ML 
screen driver routine can be saved to tape 
along with the programmer's own screens to 
be used later with the basic program for 
which the screens were designed. Glasby 
Software, P,0. Box 977, Easley, SC 29640, 
$24.95 

Morse Code Teacher, a 16K ECB program 
that teaches Morse code letters and numbers. 
||,^gives practice of up to five words per min- 
ute, Cynwyn, 479! Broadway, Suite 2F, 
New y^rk, NY 10034, tape $15 

Morse Code Tutor, a 16K ECB program 
that ^ive^ code practice up to 27 words per 
minute, i^ynwyn, 479 1 Broadway, Suite 2F, 
New York. NY 10034, tape $15 

Mr. Dig, a ganpie in which you must dig 
through cherry gfoves while avoiding ene- 
mies such as "meanies.^'Score points by eat- 
ing cherries, capturing a diamond and 
squashing meanies with apples and the power 
orb. CdltiputerwarCi Box 668, 4403 Man- 
chester Ave., Suite 102, Encinitas, CA 92024, 
tape $27.95, disk $30.95 

MSI Cofor Calendar, a 32K disk pit)i^ 
that enables you to maintain special dates', 
appointments, payments, etc. Program al- 
lows for recurring payments with only one 
entry. Monthly calendars can be printed or 
diyi^yeHj with $peeial date reminders. Dclker 
ElcttrcH)ic$ Jnd,, Sam Davis Rd«« Smyrna, 
TN 37167, $i9.9jj 

Mul-T-Screen, a high*resolutton screen pro- 
gram, provides character display modes 
ranginglfrohi 8-by-4 to 42-by-24and 32-by- 
32, Includes sample programs. Incentive 
Software, Box 323, Station B, London, 
Ontario N6A 4W 1 , $24.95 tape, $27.95 disk 

Option II, a payroll journal requiring 64K. It 
totalsali expenite^i by category, sort/ view by 
checks/ pivyce, tdtals ^kpeniHt^ selection, 
letc. Y<jS, P.O. Box 20fc B^chin, Ontario 
LOK 180,549.95 

Personal Computing basic Programming 
on the TRS-80, a book designed primarily 
for readers who have had little or no expe- 
rience in programming computers and who 
wish to acquire a good working knowledge 
of computer programming in the basic lan- 
guage. Brooks/ Cole Publishing Co., Mon- 
terey, CA 93940, $15.95 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 203 



Piratector, a 32K program designed to pro- 
tect disk-based software written for the 
CoCo and compatible systems from piracy. 
In addition, it has many other features to 
enhance the software you develop and will 
aid in duplicating your software if you have 
more than one disk drive. To make a title 
screen you should have Semigraj\ which is 
included. Sugar Software, 2153 Leah Lane, 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068, $99.95 

SCRIPT+, a 32K ECB spelling program 
with PMODE3 "handwriting" in three dis- 
play modes of eight- or 16-character words 
withdiagraphs. Words, containing up to 16, 
can be entered from the keyboard or from a 
cassette recorder. Lesson duration, two 
computer speeds and two display sizes are 
selectable and with results of a lesson can be 
printed or saved to cassette, Cancoco Sofi^ 
ware, P.O. Box 2914, Medley AB, C^iia^ 
TOA 2M0, tape Can. U.S. $17,50 

Sea Quest, a 32K Hi-Res Adventure game 
which takes you on an underwater i^easure 
hunt. Get your shark repellant and scuba 
tanks ready! Mark Data Products, 24001 
Alicia Pkwy., No« 207, Mission Viejo^ CA 
9269 1 , tape $24.95, disk $27.95 

The Sourcerer, a source generator for the 
6809 microprocessor. It is written in position 
independent code and isjus|over6.5K bytes 
long, it requires the OS-9 operating system 
and at least one disk drivifi It produces symJ 
bolic source codes that can be assembled. 
Also features automatic equate generation 
for labels and ^mbols outside of disassetn- 
biy range. Computerware, Box 668, Encini- 
tas, CA 92624, tape $34.^5, disk $39^95 

Speed Math, a I6K ECQ program for gam- 
ing and practicing with the simpte mathe- 
matics of addition, subtraction, muftipttca- 
tion and division. You can have 10 to 100 
problems and pick the difficulty level. West 
Bay Co., Route I, Box 666, White Stone, 
VA 22578, $8 

Spit-N^Image, a machine language disk 
backup utility program for the 32K. or 64K 
CoCo. \V$ purpose is to allow backups of 
most CoCo disks that will not respond to 
normal backup or copy operations, Com- 
putize inc., P.O. Box 207, Langhornc, PA 
19047, tape $24.95 

Subtraction Drill, a 32K ECB program for 
kindergarten through fourth grade designed 
to be used individually or with large groups, 
auto run and menu driven in 10 levels of 
sequential facts and random factSv Compu- 
ter displays correct answ^ after two misses. 
Erase and quiet options, rewards provided. 
CY-BURNET-ICS, 5705 Chesswood Dr., 
Knoxville, TN 37912, $24.95 



Super Color Biorythms, a I6K ECB Hi-Res 
graphics program that graphs the biorythms 
physical, emotional, and intellectual cycles 
of any person, place, or thing. Armadillo 
International Software, P.O. Box 7661, Aus« 
tin, TX 78712, tape $19.95 plus $2.50 S/H 

Super Edit, a line oriented editor for use in 
editing BASIC programs on the CoCo. It is 
more powerful than the editor supplied with 
Extended Color basic and is written in 
assembly language. It resides in memory 
with the BASIC program and is transparent to 
the operating system. The Dataman, Box 
431, Sta. B, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 
L8L 7W2, U.S. $16.95, Canadian $19.95 

Teacher's Pet, a 32K Mt d|Mt program 
which features 40 students per fil^, four 
terms with up to nin^ tests per term* alphii- 
betical order, letter grades, numeric gmdes, 
y^-end reports, search, delete, add, screen 
and printer output, enter classes and grades 
any time # the ye^ Aut^ Software, 49 
BrooklAnd AW. Aurora. Oiitdrio, L4G2H6, 
disk $34.95 

Things To Do With Your TRS-80 Color 
Computer, by Jerry Willis, Merl Miller and 
D. LaMont John^KOf , a guide to currently 
available Harclware ^nd iM^ftwari? ^^^^ the 
TRS-80 Color Computer. It includes |>ri<J€S 
and ratings on: video games; music and art 
programs: the computer as a teacher; pro- 
gramming and computer languages; tcfc* 
communications and networking; business 
applications; and much more. This book 
covers both the 16K and 64K models. The 
New American Library, Inc., 1633 Broad- 
way, New York, NY 10019, U.S. $3.95, Can- 
adian $4.95 

Time Fighter, a 16K machine language 
game. Pilot your MD-64 space fighter 
through a hazardous time tunnel to destroy 
the dreaded Time Guardian who threatens 
the natural order of the universe. You must 
overcome aerial dangers, time zones, navi- 
gate invisible mine fields and refuel from a 
moving supply ihip. Mark Data Products, 
24001 Alicia Pkwy., No. 207, Mission Vicjo, 
CA 92691, tape $24.95.4{^k $27,95 

Tripte Transfer Utility, a machine language 
backup utility program for the 32IC or 64K 
CoCo with one or more disk drives. Its pur- 
pose is to allow the transfer of most CoCo 
ML, BASIC, and DATA files from tape to 
disk and disk to tape with relocation of most 
ML programs thiit interfere with^Jie disk 
operatingsystem.Coiriputize Inc., P;b. Box 
207, Langhome, PA 19047, tape $19:95 

The TRS-80 User^ &icyelopedia, a com- 
plete ready reference book for the TRS-80 
CoCo owner» This book will answer your 



questions, give you ^inside"' information, 
and greatly increase your use and enjoyment 
of your computer. It explains programming 
languages, including BASiC; guides you 
through DOS, ASCII, FLEX; simplifies 
operating procedures; describes hundreds of 
software and hardware packages and acces- 
sories; lists publications, users* groups, and 
other information sources. Continental Soft- 
ware, 5251 W. Imperial Highway, Los An- 
geles, CA 90045, $14.95 

TS6551 RS-232 Serial Interface, a program- 
mable RS-232-type serial interface for con- 
necting the CoCo to modems, printers, ter- 
minals, etc. This device frees your printer 
while providing a second serial port with 
extended features. It provides eight signals 
Commonly used in RS-232 communications 
with a modem: GND, RND, DTR, DSR, 
RtS,r CT^ and DCD. It can also generate 
interrupts on either a received character or a 
data carrier detection. T & S Electronics, 
61 1 1 Romany pr,, San Diego, CA 92120, 
$59.95 intr6<hlCfOl^ offer ($ 10 off advertised 

TS6t21 Centronics Interface, a parallel 
printer interface pack which provides a Cen- 
tronics compatible interface for connecting 
your CoCo of <:oCo2 to a parilllel printer. 
Unlike other parallel interfaces which oper- 
ate through the serial port, the1'i682 1 plugs 
cbfiPCtly into the CoCo expansiQiipprt or the 
tnulti-pak interface. T & S Electronics, 6111 
Romany Dr., S#« Diego, CA 9212D, $49.95 

T.UTIL, a tape utility designed for use the 
home computer hobbyist. It provides tape 
management functions which help organize 
the home tape library. The INDEX com- 
mand provides a complete record 0f the file 
content of a tape. Additionally, there ire 
commands for appending, reading, writing, 
and copying tape files. Sadre Software, P.O. 
Box 389l,Gaithersburg, MD 20878, $12.95 

29 Mcmsters, a text^ly 16K. ^Extended 
BASIC Adventure program. You are trapped 
in the evil wizard's castle. To gain your free- 
dom, you must pass through 29 rooms, each 
one guarded bya hideous monster who will 
only let you pass if yoy can devise the correct 
password based on whether >y<iur answer is 
right or wrong, and if you are wrong, you 
will be set back along with your escape 
route. B&B Software, P.O. Box210Jenkin- 
town, PA 19046, tape $14.95 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the TRS-80 Color Computer, the TDP-100, or the Dragon-32, regardless 
of whether they advertise in ffte Rainbow. By awarding a Sea/, the magazine 
certifies the program does exist, but this does nof constitute any guarantee 
of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or software items will 
be forwarded to the Rainbow's reviewers for evaluation. 

— Susan Remini 



2D4 the RAINBOW May 1964 



Quality Software is the Number One Priority at 

K & K Computors 



TRS-80 Color , ^ Commodore 64 




LASER TANK,- Pit yourself in a game of strategy and 
excitement against the computer. You must defend your 
flag from attacking tanks and destroy them before they 
destroy your flag or you!!! Only $1 S^^. 

FAST FIRE-for those of you that think fire spreads fast, you haven't 
seen anything 'til you've seen Fast Fire! Arcade games some are 
good, this should be one of them. This machine language game re- 
quires 32K extended basic and sells for ONLY $1 9^^ on cassette. 

BIORHYTHM-Start your day off right with a predictiqn from the all 
knowing CoCo, With the Biorhythm charts of the ages as the CoCo's 
guide to telling you th6 secrets of hpw youf day will turn put. This pro- 
gram sells for ONLY $1 5" on cass. 

SHOOT TO SPELL AND FLASH MATH • An educational 
package that help$ kids learn to speil and educate them 
on elementary math. An absolute must for adults with 
school aged children. Only $1 5^5 

^PACE HARVEST - Pilot your spacecraft above the 
Planetoid Voltdr stealing ^pac6fruit arid trying to avoid 
alien guards. Machine language Only $1 995 

GRAVILINK-This high-strategy game may look fairly easy, but the 
force may be against you. Qravilink is a two player game that requires 
joysticks. The object of this game Is to connect four squares together. 
ONLY $19". 




BLACKJACK - A casino game that puts two players 
against the beady eyed dealer of the house. This dealer 
deals the cards as good or even better than Intellivision. If 
you hav6 any gambling biood at all this game is a must! 
Same rules as any Las Vegas casino. Only $ 1 5^5. 

All new K&K hacker's T-SHIRTS with our famous Super Zap Iggo, as 
seen in this ad. Only $6" plus $1" shipping and handling. 



Sinclair/Timex Apple HE 



GOLF LEAGUE - The most versatile Golf League program 
anywhere. Here are just a few features: handicaps, three flights, 
averages, etc. Requires 32K Extended Disk. Only $49.95 

Golf League Scheduler 



only $25.95 




SUPER ZAP - Enemy spaceships are attacking from alt 
sides and your mission to defend your starbase from the 
deadly Armada of Pyruss.Thiswill be a dangerous mission 
since the Pyruss Armada has never been defeated by any 
humanoid. Only $1 595. 

SKY DESTROY - Planes and helicopters are coming from 
all directions, they must be stopped! Thisgame is similar to 
Atari's and now available to color computer users, 
f^achine language. Only $1995. 

BOWLING SCORED FQR DOLLARS - Do your leagues 
bowling averages. This program will keep individual 
scores, team totals, individual averages, team standings, 
and print all this information to your line printer. On 
cassette and disk, specify on order. Only $1996. 

INVENTORY CONTROL-This jsrogram contains all the necessary 
features required for all types of inventories: sort inventory by stock 
number, list stock number, description, amount in stock, cost, 
wholesale, profits, and holds up to 1000 stock items. ONLY $49»». 

CHECK LEDGER - This bookkeeping system allows the 
user to have current information on your expenses by any 
category you wish. Year end tax statements made easy. 
Disk required. Only $4996. 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE-Small businessmen, control your business 
growth by keeping track of all your cash liabilities and payment 
history, ana holds 100 accounts. ONLY $49". 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE-This system keeps trdck on the status of 
all customer accounts, all payment histories included, prints billings 
and holds 100 accounts. ONLY $49»5. 



DISKS AND CASSETTES-DISKS ONLY $25.00 FOR 10. C-10 CASS. 12 FOR $12.00 INCL. SHIPPING. 

ALL GAME PROGRAMS ■ require 1 6K extended(prices are set for cassette, add $4oo for disk, except business.) 

PROGRAMMERS!!! -K&K pays the highest royalities for your programs. If your program Is good, send it to K & K 

TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER USERS-New programs are added each week. SEND $100 poR OUR COMPLETE CATALOG 

K&KCOMPUTORS 
P.O. BOX 833 • STERLING HEIGHTS, MICHIGAN IMm 
48077 

TftlflphQn^: (313) 73^6936 



reviewing. 



REVIEWS 



MANSION OF DOOM 

Editor: 

As a co-author of Mansion of Doom, \ 
would like to respond to Mr. Paul Gani's 
review of our Adventure program on Page 
230 of the February 1984 Rainbow. 

Overall, his review was a fair (although 
muddled) appraisal of this fine Adventure 
program. However, some points need clarifi- 
cation: 

All Pal Creations Adventures have the 
verb vocabulary built into the program to 
make it easier for the Adventurer to get used 
to the verbs used in that particular program. 
If Mr. Gani kept using TAKE instead of the 
accepted word GET, then Td say he has a 
personal semantic flexibility problem. Other 
Adventurers have had no problem getting 
used to the verb vocabulary, especially since 
the program tells you all the allowed verbs if 
you use a wrong one* 

All Pal Creations Adventures have the 
instructions built into the program in order 
to minimize constant referring back-and- 
forth between the program and a piece of 
paper. Also, with the instructions in the pro- 
gram itself, it gives the player a better sense 
of "being there," a very important part of 
good Adventures. If this feature makes the 
program unplayable on a 16K machine, so 
what? Mansion of Doom has always been 
billed and advertised as a 32K cassette 
Adventure. 

We appreciate Mr. Gani's PCLEAR tip 
for disk users, but personally no one at Pal 
Creations owns or uses a disk drive since we 
specialize in 32K Adventures and simula- 
tions on cassette. 

We also decided against having a save 
feature in our Adventures since most people 
would rather try to solve an Adventure from 
start to finish. If they can't solve it in one 
night, then all they have to do is turn the 
computer off, and they can try to solve it 
another day. Then the next time they reload 
it, they will know a little more of what to do 
and what not to do. All of our cassettes are 
of extremely high quality and can be reload- 
ed time after time with no degradation in 
tape quality. 

But worst of all was Mr. Gani's reference 
to a "bug" in the program. Pal Creations* 
programs do not have bugs! If he had spent 
more time reviewing the program, he would 
have found clues telling him that "YOREL'' 
was the magic word to get out of the shack- 
les, not "YORL"as he misprinted. And this 
feature is not a bug, it was designed into the 
program to provide a more magic-enhanced 
Adventure environment. An Adventurer 
needs all the help he or she can get when 
battling against werewolves and vampires, 
etc. 

We at Pal Creations think that Mansion 
Of Doom is an exciting, high quality 32K 



Adventure and stand by its meager $14.95 
purchase price 100 percent. We were amazed 
that Mr. Gani thought it was overpriced 
since marketing experts throughout the coun- 
try keep urging us to raise the prices on all 
our fine 32K Adventures to $24.95 and 
$29.95 to be in the same price range as 
Adventures that are inferior to ours. We will 
continue to offer most our Adventures at 
$14.95 in order to give TRS-80 Color Com- 
puter owners extremely high-quality pro- 
gramming at reasonable prices, 

Leroy C. Smith 
Pal Creations 



VIP TERMINAL 

Editor: 

One of the reasons that French food is so 
good is that the French are merciless critics. 
Thus, your often "goody goody** reviews, 
obviously intended not to offend your ad- 
vertisers, are a disservice both to your read- 
ers and to improving the products. 

The Color Computer is now maturing to 
the point wher? there is some excellent soft- 
ware atid worthy of such withering review. 
But what do we get? Let's take the January 
1984 review of the VIP Terminal program. 
This program is certainly one of the best, if 
not the best available for the CoCo ^nd eas- 
ily worth twice the price. However, my copy 
has some interesting features that did not 
seem to be covered by Mr. Reed. 

My use of this program has been strictly to 
a host CDC Cyber computers (730 and now 
835/855), Thus, my first annoyance is that 
there is no way to reset the default parame- 
ters along with autoloading the keystroke 
multipliers (KSM ). My startup then involves 
the program load, the ICSM load, and then 
resetting the parameters. All this boring 
detail could be avoided by simply allowing 
the user to tailor his disk. The load itself 
seems unnecessarily long since they seem to 
have the initialization include reading a bad 
track, and if it is faulty continuing the load. 
They have the disk rigged so you cannot 
write on it even though it appears (with the 
help of their excellent ZAP program) that 
very little is used of the total disk. 

The next point is that the x-on/x-off does 
not seem to work consistently in receiving 
data. In the tests that 1 ran to the Cyber last 
spring, 1 asked for my I/O to be recorded at 
the host. The result was that in 51 -column 
mode and 300 Baud, niy terminal would 
send an X-off about half the time to suspend 
host transmission; the rest of the time a 
chunk of text would not be recorded. 

If 1 get back into 32-column mode to make 
sure 1 got all the text from the host, there is 
no way to get back into 51 without getting 
out of the terminal program. Even though 
the documentation says that the parameter 



table will always allow this, once you clear 
the buffer and answer the prompt that you 
waiit to get out of Hi-Res, the resolution 
part of the parameter table never comes up 
again. 

Mr. Reed is correct that there are some 
nice features in the disk handling part of the 
program. One peculiarity 1 have encoun- 
tered in the disk directory program is that 
unlike the basic directory, the VIP Terminal 
directory appears to scan every sector on 
Track 1 7 beginning with the third. 1 am pres- 
ently using a disk management program to 
catalog and secure my disk dat^ which 
duplicates the directory and granule tables 
on Track 1 7. The granule table is duplicated 
to Sector 1 and the Directory from three to 
10 is copied from 12 to 17. Thus, the Termi- 
nal directory gets two copies, and, if 1 have 
killed a file without recataloging, then 1 get 
the name of the killed file as well! (The disk 
management program has a method of using 
the backup copies to recover a file. 

One feature which would be a nice addi- 
tion would be to be able to change the print- 
er mode without coming out of Terminal. 
Thus some data you want to print out in 80 
column and others, like FORTRAN compi- 
lations, in 1 20-character mode. 

1 mentioned in an earlier letter that I had a 
problem with the printing of anything with 
VfP Terminal (which also happened with 
ZAP), The frustration was that 1 had no 
problem printing using the POKE 150,18 for 
my 2400 Baud interface with any other soft- 
ware than Nelson's. The solution was a 
retuning of the interface, but left me with the 
implication that Nelson's was somehow 
either more finely tuned or differently tuned 
than that for the usual basic. Thus, 1 think 
that those with slightly skewed Baud rates 
would be better off if there was some mecha- 
nism in the software that would let them 
tailor their Baud rate to what works with 
their equipment. 

Joe Cain 
Golden. CO 



Editor: 

1 must take exception with Jim Reed's 
review of V/P Super Color Terminal, in the 
January issue. There are some problems 
with the disk commands in version 3.0 dated 
June 1983. liTyoii have a disk with more than 
28 entries, it is impossible to see the re- 
mainder of the directory. This is contrary to 
the instructions on Page 18 of the operators 
manual, and apparently was not a problem 
in version 2,0. 

1 don't believe this is a major problem and 
I'm sure Mr. Nelson, who obviously is a top 
rate programmer, could correct this prob- 
lem. However, I have written to Softlaw 



206 the RAINBOW May 1964 



Corp. detailing the problem, received a note 
asking that 1 telephone their customer ser- 
vice, which 1 did. 1 was then told that they 
would check on this problem, and never 
heard from them again. As a matter of fact, 
the customer service representative didn't 
even want my name or address, which 
obviously indicated there was no intention 
of giving me a reply. 

I think the VIP Terminal is a fine pro- 
gram. However, the support after the pur- 
chase is completely lacking. If the other pro- 
grams use the same minimi isk operating 
system, Til have to be assured that 1 will not 
encounter the same problem. 

It seems that Mr. Reed is a friend of Tom 
Nelson, who is a contributing editor to 
Rainbow as well as general council for Soft- 
law Corp. I feel sure that there is no way Mr. 
Reed or Rainbow would publish a bad 
review of any Softlaw product. 

It should be pointed out that the disk is 
copy protected which makes it very difficult 
to try and fix it yourself. 

John Spataro 
Lynn Haven, Ft 

Editors Note: The Softlaw Corpora- 
tion (formerly Nelson Software Sys- 
tems) ho longer copy protects its pro- 
grams. This means that VIP Library 
programs now can be backed up. This 
should alleviate several of the afore- 
mentioned problems. 



OWLS EYE LIGHT 

Editor: 

In reference to the review on the Owls Eye 
Light in your March issue, I installed an 
Owls Eye on my computer and it looks like 
original equipment. It is one of the best 
investments I made for my CoCo. Yes, you 
have to Unplug it to use the joysticks — big 
deal. It fit my computer fine. Looks good 
and works great. 

Did your reviewer really hook it up or did 
he gue^s at how it worked? 

Mark Widuch 
Princeton, IL 



Editor: 

1 felt 1 must reply to the review in your 
March issue on the Owls Eye Light. 

First, the ad states it plugs into the joy- 
stick port so 1 had anticipated the joysticks 
would not work with it. Some of us conipu- 
ter nuts use our computers for more serious 
things then playing "Pac Man'* games any- 
way. 

Second, 1 have the old style computer with 
the RAM button and it fit fine. 

Third, 1 don't think the reviewer even 
installed the light. In the package it doesn't 
look like a lot but when installed, per the 
instructions, it looks like a part of the 
computer. 

1 have a light kit that mounts in the joy- 
sticks. If you have a candle lit in the room 



you can't tell If it is on. The Owls Eye can be 
seen in bright sunlight. 

You are giving a good product a bum rap 
with your review. 

Ron Von Holt 
Marrietta, GA 



PHONICS II 

tditor: 

This letter is directed toward the March 
1984, Page 242, review of Phonics II. a 
sound-letter association program which uses 
the unique ability of the Color Computer to 
direct audio instructions and prompts from 
a cassette tape recorder through the speaker 
of the TV to the user, in this case, students 
just learning to read. 

The review was subtitled, *'Only Phair," 
presumably for two reasons which the re- 
viewer mentions. First, he states that the 
tutorial mode of the program does not 
require any student participation, after 
which he mentions that the program "does 
expect the studeht to repeat aloud the di- 
graph sound with the narrator. "That sounds 
like student participation to me. In addition, 
the current release of Phonics II (version 2.0) 
also requires that the student type the con- 
sonant digraph before going to the next 
audio prompt. More student participation. 

The second "disappointment" the reviewer 
mentiohs is with the single sheet of instruc- 
tions. If he had taken the time, he might have 
noticed that the program was well docu- 
mented within itself. For instance, points at 
which decisions are to be made within the 
setting up of the program parameters have 
the option "NEED MORE INFO." Select- 
ing this option brings forth screens of infor- 
mation useful in making parameter choices 
(a nice touch, 1 thought, siqce many people 
misplace or won't read the documentation 
which comes packaged with the software). 
Perhaps the reviewer would have preferred a 
"user-hostile" program with reams of docu- 
mentation necessary to render it under- 
standable. 

On to more important criticisms, The 
reviewer states that the instructions were 
confusing because the program description 
follows brief loading instructions and a very 
short warranty statement. He says that he 
likes to know about something before he 
attempts to use it. By the way, the instruc- 
tions he talks about are on the inside of the 
package. If he had bothered to read the 
information, which we conveniently placed 
on the outside of the package (so people 
wouldn't have to guess about what's on the 
inside), he would have seen a similar pro- 
gram description! 

As the coordinator of software evaluation 
and computer-delivered instruction of an 
elcinentary school of over 500 children and 
the author of a courseware evaluation in- 
strument used by at least two school districts 
in Tucson, 1 attempt to evaluate software on 
the basis of its educational merit and useful- 
ness with children (witness my review of 
LOGO in the December 1982 edition of the 
Rainbow). 



I would limply ask that all software (mine 
included) reviewed by the Rainbow be 
judged on that basis, rather than the degree 
to which its packaging conforms to the per- 
sonal tastes of the reviewer. 

Incidently, anyone desiring a copy of my 
software evaluation form should send a 
S.A.S.E. to 8370 E. Lee, 85715 

David Hunt 
Tucson, AZ 



GRAPHICOM 

Editor: 

My thanks to Paul Hoffman for a very 
kind review of Graphicom. There was one 
technical error in his review that must be 
corrected. In his advice to readers on what 
parts to get to make your own custom joy- 
stick or foot pedal for Graphicom, the 
author directed the readers to use a "five-pin 
DIN connector" for the joystick port» This is 
wrong. The joystick port requires a six-pin 
DIN connector. Radio Shack, on its joy- 
sticks, uses a six-pin DIN plug that has been 
altered by having its center pin removed. 
Though the resulting plug has only five pins, 
they ar^ spaced quite differently from the 
spacing of the pins in a true five-pin DIN 
connector. Worse yet, while true ftve-pin 
DIN connectors are readily available at 
Radio Shack, the necessary six-pin DIN 
connector is not available. 

The required six-pin joystick plug should 
be available from local electronic supply 
houses. If you have trouble finding a source 
of six-pin DIN connectors, you can pur- 
chase two (used but in excelletit condition) 
of them for $5 from us at Cheshire Cat. 

I personally highly recommend that pur- 
chasers of Graphicom make their own cus- 
tom joysticks. We have come to prefer a 
joystick made Using a Radio Shack joystick 
mechanism (Cat. No. 271-1705) mounted in 
a small chassis box (3!4 x 2 x 1 in.) with 
two buttons mounted along the 3 14 by I J4 
inch side. Such a box is not available from 
Radio Shack, but is available from supply 
houses handling LMB chassis boxes. The 
alternative of using a footswitch for the 
menu button is not quite as good, but it does 
work reasonably well and is much simpler to 
construct. 

My one overall criticism of the review was 
that it made Graphicom sourrd a lot more 
complicated to use than it really is. While it 
does take a bit of getting used to, once you 
learn how to control the program, drawing 
proceeds extremely quickly and simply. 1 
invite any sort of comparison of how long it 
takes to draw a given artistic picture and a 
given technical illustration to be made be- 
tween Graphicom and any other existing 
CoCo graphics drawing program. I'll eat my 
hat if any other program allows general pur- 
pose drawing that is even a quarter as fast as 
Graphicom i. 

Martin H Goodman, MD 
San Pablo, CA 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 207 



MASTER DIRECTORY V2 

Can you find that program you saved last month? 
Do you have many diskettes with multiple copies 
and need to organize your life? MASTER 
DIRECTORY V2 to the rescue! In only seconds 
add each diskette to MASTER DIRECTORY V2. 
Now ask MASTER DIRECTORY to find that lost 
program. Can't remember the filename? Ask for 
all the files that begin with the letter "C" or ask for 
all files with an extension of BAS, 

What! Two files with the name CATS? Drats! Wait! 
The file on disk #5 was added on Oct 5 and the 
file on disk #9 was added on Nov. 10. Hey 
fantastic! 

Now lef s get back to work. Let's see DIR. Hey! 
How did the filenames get in sequence? Yes, 
MASTER DIRECTORY V2 will sort the directory 
and remove the null directory entries. It also saves 
a copy of the allocator and the directory to protect 
against those nasty disk errors. Listing may be 
directed to the TV or the printer. Over 100 
diskettes and 3000 filenames can be contained in 
one master directory. 

Buy MASTER DIRECTORY V2 for only $29 pp. 
Requires 32K DOS (l.Q or 1.1) 

DUAL CASSETTE COPY SYSTEM 

Allows the use of two cassette recorders. Only $49 pp. 

DISPLAY NOISE ELIMINATOR 

Easy to Install. Docs not violate COCO weuranty, $14pp. 

SCRUNCH 

Removes spaces from basic programs. Saves 
memory and inproves speed. Only $3.00pp or 
FREE with any order. 

FREE CATALOG with order or send self addressed 
stamped envelope. 

Send check or money-order to: 
COCOPRO 
P.O. BOX 37022 
ST. LOUIS, MO 63141 

Postage paid on all pre-paid orders in U.S. 
Missouri residents add 5.625 percent sales tax. 

DEALER INQUIRES INVITED. 



Software RevlewSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS77i\ 



Model I I III Emulator 
Should Be Quite Useful 

When the Color Conlputer first came out, a lot of people 
were asking if it could run Model 1 software. Theanswer, of 
course. Was no; the CoCo is far too different from the M ode! 
1 and 111. The Microsoft Extended BASIC languages are 
quite similar, though, so the only thin^ stopping many 
BASIC programs from running on the CoCo is the very 
different screen display and character set. 

Spectrum Projects' 64 Column Model Ijlll Emulator 
produces a 64 by 16 text displijy using the P MODE 4 high- 
resolution graphics mode. The screen memory is placed in 
the upper 32K of RAM, so 64K memory is required. The 
character set (in the range 32 to 191 decimal) is almost 
identical to the Model lll*s, though the actual character 
shapes are very different. The block graphic characters are 
available, both for PRINTing and normal point graphics 
(using S'fr, /?£5'£rand POINT). A Model l/lll BASIC 
program will run on the CoCo with the emulator if: 

— it is written entirely in BASIC ahd does not use PEEKs, 
POKES or USR calls (all the locations are different); 

— it does not use basic commands or functions that are not 
available in Extended Color BASIC (such as DEFDBL, 
DEFSNG and DEFINT); and 

— it can be loaded into tlie CoCo (if you are willing to type it 
in). Since the CoCo's cassette and disk file formats are 
different from those of the Model I or III, you will have to 
have some special program on one machine or the other 
to bridge the gap. Another way would be to send the 
program over the RS-232 serial I/O ports (if you have 
RS-232 in the I or III) as an ASCII file; you'll need 
RS-232 cables on each machine, a "gender-changer" 
adapter to connect the two male DB-25 plugs and (on the 
Model III) a null modem adapter, (What I have to say 
about the Model 111 gbes for the Model 4 as well, assum- 
ing you are using it in Model III mode.) 

The display is rather hard to read, as 64-cblumn Hi-Res 
displays usually are. The characters are only three pixels 
wide, and are plagued with the notorious false cqlors of 
PMODE4, (Of course, you can almost always turn the color 
level down to get rid of the color fringes.) The PR/NT ^ 
command now has a range from 0 to 1023 to match the 
Model 1/ Ill's screen locations; SET, RESET and POINT 
now run from 0 to 127 horizontally and 0 to 47 vertically. If 
you want an expanded text display simply for your own 
programming, the emulator will serve reasonably well as 
none of the CoCq's BASIC commands have been removed. 

The 64 Column Model Ij III Emulator should be quite 
useful to those who have been running BASIC programs on 
the Model I and III, although the text display has its 
problems. 

(Spectrum Projects, 95-15 86th Drive, Woqdhaven, NY 
11421; $19.95 + $3 S/H) 

Ed Ellers 



208 the RAINBOW May 1984 




\ 



COLOR TERM + PLUS + 



If you're looking for the finest terminal software you can buy, look no further! And now we*ve added a high- 
res screen display that gives you 32 by 16, 42, 51, or 64 by 24 lines.* And you can switch between the high- 
res screen and the normal screen without destroying what you have in the buffer! + PLUS + we have a 
buffer editor, complete up and down load support, on-line cassette or disk reads and writes, off-line and on- 
line scrolling, pre-entry of data before calling, word wrap, buffer printing, selective printing, change any 
parameter so you can communicate with any other computer. You can send and receive Basic programs, 
ASCII file, as well as machine code, + PLUS + you can save your buffer to tape (Tape or Rom version) or 
disk (Disk version). You can communicate with the local BBS, Compuserve'™, The Source™, the main 
frame at work or school, other color computers, Apples, IBM PC's, TRS-80 Model I, II, III, IV, 12, 16, 100, or 
any other computer via RS-232. 

Compare these features with any other terminal program: 




32 X 16, 42, 51, 64 x 24 Screen 
Communications BAUD Rate: 110-19200 
Printer Baud Rate: 600-9600 
Select Half or Full Duplex. 
^Select Odd, Even, or No Parity. 
Select 7 or 8 Bit Words. 
Send Control Characters. 
Send a True Line Break. 
Separate Keys for Escape and Rubout 
Select All Caps If Needed. 
Word Wrap — Eliminate Split Words. 

(32 Character Mode) 
Selectable Reverse or Normal Video. 

(32 Character Mode) 

*Disk and Rom Pack only (not on tape) 

DOUBLE SPOOLER % 

Tired of waiting for your listings? printouts? etc.? This is THE Spooling 
Program!! No need to save your programs in ASCII. You can also spool 
your files and you can sp(M>l ANYTHING you print on the screen while a 
program Is running!! Requires a minimum of 32K AND the 64K computer 
can spool really LARGE files!! Plus more!! 
PRICE: $19.95 (Tape) $21.95 (Disk) 



Scroll Protect Up to 9 Lines. 

Automatic Capture of Incoming Files, Send One 

Line At a Time From Your Buffer. 
Has Programmable Prompt for **Send Next Line!! 
Buffer Size Indicator. 
Complete Up and Down Load Support- 
Improved Buffer Editor. 
On/Off Line Scrolling of Buffer. 
On/Off Cassette or Disk Reads and Writes. 
Pre-Enter Data Before Going On-Line. 
Save/Load Machine Code, Basic Programs or Files. 
Select Printer Line Feeds If Needed or Ignore All 

Line Feeds in Buffer. 



PRICE: $29.95 (TAPE) $39.95 (ROM PACK) $39.95 (DISK) 

DOUBLE SWITCH % 

Now you can switch between two different devices AND you get 
an on/off indicator at the same time. Switch your Modem & 
Printer or two printers, etc. 
PRICE: $29.95 



DOUBLE MEM-DISK 



Use that 32K of untwt»d m(Mnnry in your 64K computer for something 
useful! Store programs in memory and recall them anytime you need 
them!! Here is a list of the new c<Hiimand« you can enter right from the 
keyboard: 

MSAVE — Save the program in memory, 
MLOAD — Load a named program. 
MKILL — Kill a program stored in memory. 
MDIR — List all programs stored in memory. 

MFILE ~ Merge a program in high mem with current program in low 
memory. 

Those of you with tape systems will have several programs in memory at 
once so you don't have to wait on that SLOW tape system AND those of 
you with disk systems will be able to use that extra space that is going to 
waste!! 

PRICE: $24.95 (Tape) $26.95 (Disk) 

DOUBLE CABLE 

Tired of switching cables everytime you use your modem and printer? 
This is the fix!! Hook your modem and printer up at the same time! No 
more switching. 
PRICE: $14.95 

$2.00 shipping and handling on all orders, $3.(X) charge on C.O.D. orders, 
Mastercard and VISA accepted. Texas residents add 5% sales tax. Allow 
two weeks for personal checks. 

Devble Deii/i^i| Softuiore 

920 Baldwin Street 
Denton, Texas 76201 
Phone 811^66-2004. 





DOUBLE DOS BASIC 

364,000 BYTES! 

That's right! Using your 64K Color Computer, and an 80 
track drive, you too can have more than TWICE as much 
storage on your disk drive system. DOUBLE DOS BASIC 
allows you to use 35, 40 or 80 track (double or single sid- 
ed) drives all on one system, all at the same time! Your 
system could consist of a 35 track drive, a two drive 
AMDEK system, and an 80 track drive, all working, and 
hooked up to your system! (The AMDEK drives are 40 
track drives.) ALL commands are supported in DOUBLE 
DOS BASIC. The DOS is totally transparent to your 
BASIC programs! If your system selection is 80 tracks, a 
PRINT FREE command will return 158 granules! Com- 
pare this to the 68 granules your system now returns! The 
40 track drives would return 78 granules, 10 more than 
the 35 track system. EVERY command in BASIC is sup- 
ported by DOUBLE DOS BASIC. If you haven't already 
upgraded to 64K, now is the time! Use your system to its 
FULLEST! DOUBLE DOS BASIC also gives you RESET 
PROTECTION, unlike most of the other 64K programs. 
AND, used with our ROM MOVE program, you can also 
get another 8000 bytes of BASIC addressable memory! 
DOUBLE DOS BASIC - $24.96 
DOUBLE DOS & ROM MOVE - $24.96 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

RAINBOW 

Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world 
your high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in the Rainbow's 
Scoreboard column. All entries must be received by the first of the month to be eligible for the following 
month's Scoreboard. They must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, 
your high score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Score- 



board, c/o the Rainbow. 



New Number One 



• Last Month's Number One 



ALCATRAZ if { Spectral Associat9S) 

9,620 'PTSteve Manderschied, Cincinnati, OH 
ASSAULT (MichTron) 

2,520 'Ariaura Sandman, LouisviMe, KY 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Data) 

158,000 WLarry Plaxton, Medley, Alberta 
157,0CK) Scoit Drake, Pine City, NY 
104,464 Jim Baiter, Florissant. MO 
98.000 Tim Warr, Bedingham, WA 
97,000 Bernard Parent, Ste-Foy, Quebec 
BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

33-0 'A'Dan Bovey. Wheaton. IL 
19-0 Chris Oberholtzer 
BERSERK (Mark Data) 

8.500 *Mark Wooge, Omaha, NE 
7,650 David Garozzo, Morrisville, PA 
3.100 SEdward Liroff 
BIRO ATTACK r Tom Mix) 

460,275 WKevin Boyle, Saskatoon, 

Saskatchewan 
133.825 Etten Bellinger, Uxbridge. Ontario 
BLOC HEAD (Computarware) 
1,006,200 iTLtndi Wolf, Fairbanks, AK 
819.425 Keith Denhoed, Coalhurst. Alberta 
781,350 Joe Qolkosky, Portage, Ml 
444.525 Brian Spek, Keswick, Ontario 
366.700 Richard Vehlow, Bayslde, NY 
BUSTOUT (Radio Shack) 

42.000 derrick Kardos. Colonia. NJ 
34,700 Sara Hennessey, Golden Valley, MN 
28,720 Perry Denton, New Baden, IL 
27,880 Mike Wells, Pittsburgh, PA 
18,403 Brad Widdup, Dundas, Ontario 
8.579 Jeff Bitterling, Bowling Qreen, KY 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 

686,550 i^David Casterson, Livermore, CA 
489,600 Paul Rumrilf, Gales Ferry, CT 
484.400 Nic Witschi. Oak Ridge, TN 
450.150 Chris Elliott. Salisbury. NO 
444.200 Kristopher Stalfer, Ft. Wayne, IN 
412,600 SMichael Lynn, Chicago, IL 
373.450 Laurence Witschi, Oak Ridge, TN 
322,350 Michael Popovich. Nashua. NH 
304.550 Kevin Kordane, Poughkeepsie, NY 
280.950 Bruce Tenison, Bay Minette, AL 
217,300 Brian Manderschied. Cincinnati, OH 
207.100 Steve Manderschied, Cincinnati, OH 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
1.400.200 ^James Stevenson, Marshall, TX 
999.900 Andre Wagner, Bangor, PA 
615,500 Randy Hankins, Tabor, FL 
251.100 Beverly Herbers, Placentia, CA 
230,500 William Daley. Biloxi, MS 
186.700 Denise Mprissette, Sherbrooke, 
Quebec 

165,900 Kevin Stephens, Boyle, Alberta 
145,100 Dennis Rodenkirch, Janesvilie. Wl 
134,900 Doug Rodenkirch, Janesvilie, Wl 
101.400 Ronnie Volans, Ogdensburg. NY 
CA8HMAN (MichTron) 

19.650 wPerry Denton, New Baden, (L 
16.000 Scott Oberholtzer 
11,130 Ricky Susfalk, Grand Island, NY 
5,690 Rob Acurto, Baliston Lake, NY 
CATCH-EM (Aardvark) 

79,773 *Marsha Smith. North Vernon, IN 
CHOPPER STRIKE (MichTron) 

63,000 "ArAndrew Figel, Sardis, OH 
47,400 David Figel, Sardis. OH 
42,100 Brian Peterson, Muskegon, Ml 
29.900 Bobby Figei, Sardis. OH 



CLOWNS a BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 

89,430 XPerry Denton, New Baden, IL 
85,680 Teresa Stutsman, N. Little Rock, AR 
83,710 Don Fraser, Shakope. MN 
62,730 Jeffrey A. Groves, Hooksett, NH 
79,920 Tim Wiechmann, Marblehead. MA 
COLOR CUBES fRad/o Shack) 

4:10 TChrls Cope, Central, SO 
COLOR OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

160,200 WDavid Lazar, Engiishtown, NJ 
101,650 Davey Devlin, Clyde, NC 
42.276 SPerek Mali, Long Grove. IL 
COLORPEDE (Intracolor) 
10,001,051 ^Mark Smith, Santa Ana. CA 
3,355,248 SScott Drake, Pine City, NY 
2,547,299 Rich McGervey, Morgantown, WV 
2,471,342 Vincent Lok, Ontario, Canada 
1,317,729 Michel Henganner, Ste-Foy, Quebec 
847,356 John Bondeller, Perrysburg, OH 
373,342 Anthony Ruiz. Toledo, OH 
132,125 Doug Rodenkirch, Janesvilie, Wl 
65.990 Dan Sobczak, Mesa, AZ 
55,550 Shawn Chirrey, Mississauga, 
Ontario 

46.503 Lisa Bellinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
COLOR ZAP (Spectral Asaociates) 

146.510 WBernard Parent, Ste-Foy, Quebec 
1 39,630 Pierre Rousseau, Cap-Rouge. Quebec 
CU'BERfTomM/x^ 

196,090 Randall F. Edwards, Duntap, KS 
49.510 Doug Kleir, Grand Rapids, Ml 
12,430 William Wirsig. Dunlap, KS 
CUBIX (Spectral Associates) 

28,500 Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
26,240 SPerry Denton, New Baden, IL 
21 ,500 Michael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg, KY 
19,719 Philip Daulton, Louisville, KY 
14,950 Dave Garozzo, Morrisville. PA 
14,320 D. Seibel, Tumbler Ridge, 

British Columbia 
13,590 Aaron Peelle, Bennington, VT 
DANGER RANGER (Med Systems Software) 

1,266 *Rick Arthur, Baliston Lake, NY 
DEVIL ASSAULT from Mix) 

269,300 lirMichael Rosenberg, Prestonsburg. KY 
271,106 Peter Niessen, Carlisle, MA 
96,000 Rick Arthur, Baliston Lake, NY 
69,600 Gregory Rhinehart, St. Charles, MO 
DOODLE BUG (Computerware) 
1.767.630 wPerry Denton, New Baden. IL 
427,570 Elko Gary, National City, CA 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 
1,125,000 'A'Mark Hurst, Sheridan, OR 
1 ,080.000 Phillipe Duplanties, St. Jerome, 
Quebec 

605,890 Peter Sherburne, Highland, CA 
474,040 Paul Moritz. Butte, MT 
435,570 Phtllippe Morsan, St. Jerome, Quelle 
52.750 Christopher Porter. Naranja Lakes. FL 
ELECTRON (Tom Mix) 

41,750 'ArMichael Rosenberg, PrestonsbL g, KY 
22,990 Alan Morris, Chicopee, MA 
19,500 Robby Presson, Florissant. MO 
4,515 Mark Raphael, Engiishtown, NJ 
FLYBY (Chromasette) 

104.980 wDavid Finberg. Annandale, VA 
28,910 Ron Suedersky, Universal City, TX 
20,110 Rick Mansell, Calgary, Alberta 
16,670 Michael Rhattigan, Cory, NC 
2.805 Dan Sobczak, Mesa, AZ 



FOOD WAR (Arcade Animation) 
208.000 -ArChris Oberholtzer 
178,910 Kevin Boyle. Saskatoon, 
Saskatchewan 

THE FROG from Mix) 

109.500 -KPat Craddick, Janesvilie. Wl 
95,790 Eileen Kaakee, Royal Oak, Ml 
89,910 Sjames Baker, Salt Lake City, UT 
79.240 Jeanne Hawkins, Deitona, FL 
73,350 Evelyn Gagnon, Ontario, Canada 
48.500 Terry Sheridan, Janesvilie, Wl 
19,922 Elizabeth Pierce, Exeter, NH 

FROG TREK (Oelrich Publications) 

16,460 Sara Aliff. Northeast, MD 

FROGGER (TheCornsoft Qroup) 
63,800 wCarmen Thew, Surrey, 

British Columbia 
53,965 Ian Clark, Albion, Ml 
32,010 Laura Schooley, Richmond, VA 
27,940 Perry Denton, New Baden, IL 
25,425 Kanti Dinda, Kingston, Ontario 
22,325 Ric Rice. Crystal River. FL 

FROGGIE (Spectral Associates) 

74,050 "ArMIke Garozzo, Morrisville, PA 
68,680 •Carmen Thew, Surrey, 
British Columbia 

GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

67,750 'A'Chuck Qaudette, Monroe, CT 
58,000 Terry Steen, San Bernadino," CA 
55,360 Donald Thompson, Lubbock, TX 
54,200 Mike Hughey, King George, VA 
54.000 Craig Edelheit, W. Bloomfield. Ml 
41.290 Sean Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 

GALAX ATTAX/SpecfraMssoc/afes) 

253.900 *Shawn McAlpin. Louisville, KY 
113,650 Darrin Flland, WA 
104.550 Mitch Hayden. Univ. of MN 
82,650 Steve Hargis, Tucson, AZ 
75,950 Richard Lacharite, Sherbrooke, 
Quebec 

41,800 Sean Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
OHOST GOBBLER (Spectral Associates) 
1,007,430 *Todd Bran nam, Charleston Hts., SC 
825,250 Randy Gerber, Wilmette, IL 
423,390 Rich McGervey. Morgantown, WV 
255,000 John Osborne, Kincardine. Ontario 
226,290 Patricia Lau, York. PA 
65,320 Craig Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
GLAXXONS (Mark Data) 

9.892 ^Ellen Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
GUARDIAN (Quasar Animations) 

24.105 *Bill Pollack, Sherburne, NY 
3,090 Davey Devlin, Clyde, NC 
INTEROALACTIC FORCE (Microdeai) 

113.600 "ArAlex Taylor, Manchester, England 
INVASION (Spectral Associates) 

52,350 *Tlna Pihl, Guilford, CT 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,099.300 'ArShawn McAlpin, Louisville, KY 
1,115,300 Ryan Van Manen, Grand Rapida. Ml 
658,000 Pat Craddick. Janesvilie, Wl 
354,300 Shawn Chirrey, Mississauga, Ontario 
243,800 Dan Ralston, Janesvilie. Wl 
229,100 Doug Kleir, Grand Rapids. M! 
161,600 Gary Hansen, Deerwood. MN 
156.200 Robert Conyer, Willingboro, NJ 
KATERPILLAR ATTACK (Tom Mix) 

18,949 M'adim Gotovsky, Toronto. Ontario 
15,821 Alex Gotovsky, Toronto, Ontario 
8.659 Sean Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
5,279 Lisa Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★l 



210 the RAINBOW May 1984 




KEYS OF THE WIZARD (Spectral Associates) 

662 *Susan Bellinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
THE KING Tom Mix) 

10,000.100 *Mark Smith, Santa Ana, CA 
4,040,300 •Andy Truesdaie, Ferguson, MO 
3,343.000 Corey Friedman, Minnetonka, MN 
2,410.200 Candy Harden. Birmingham, AL 
2,367,900 Richard Lacharite. Sherbrooke, 
Quebec 

2,213,000 James Quadarella. Brooklyn, NY 
1 .595,000 Christopher Porter. Naranja Lakes. FL 
1,300,000 Richard Apollo, Farmingdale, NY 
173,000 Davey Devlin, Clyde. NC 
157.700 Blaine Willick, Hlnton, Alberta 
144.850 Todd Mtrich. Baltimore. MD 
107.000 Chris Cope, Central, SC 
100,300 Anthony Ruiz. Toledo. OH 
KLENDATHU {Radio Shttck) 
1,182,885 *David L, Ferris, Shickahinny, PA 
561,893 Ellen Bellinger, Uxbridge. Ontario 
KRON (Oregon Color Computers} 

73,530 *Christopher Porter, Naranja Lakes, FL 
LANCER (Spectral Associates) 
2.354.000 *Alex State. Las Vegas, NV 
636,500 Larry Capen, Folsom, CA 
617,500 Donna Willoughby. Brookfidid, IL 
583.200 Sharon Casten, Folsom, CA 
474,250 Mike Rausch, Denver, CO 
469,400 Jeff Jackson. Littleton. CO 
462.100 Scott Jackson, Littleton, CO 
185,650 William Wirsig. Dunlap, KS 
LASERWORM & FIREFLY (the Rainbow) 

54,672 *Michael Rosenberg, Preatonsburg, KY 
19.402 D. Seibel. Tumbler Ridge. 

British Columbia 
16,750 Jim Partridge. Clinton, CT 
LUNAR ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 
162,100 *Sara Aliff, Northeast. MD 
154,650 Tom Alitf, Jr„ Northeast, MD 
68,900 Wayne Johansen, Rocanville, 

Saskatchewan 
65.350 Gary Jones. Dale. TX 
82,850 Randall Edwards. Dunlap, KS 
61,150 William Wirsig. Dunlap, KS 
56.000 Richard Apollo, Farmingdale, NY 
40,700 Ricky Susfalk, Grand Island. NY 
26,650 Todd Ulrich, Baltimore, MD 
21.300 Tom Alascia, Baltimore, MD 
MARATHON (the Rainbow) 

101,520 *David Dean, West Mansfield, OH 
55,110 Michael Rhattigan, Cory, NC 
15,750 Grayson Yeargin. Richmond, VA 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

60,000 ^Robin Worthem, Milwaukee, Wt 
18.902 John Tiffany, Washington, DC 
15,999 Ed Mitchell. Ragged Mountain, CO 
14,297 Aleisha Hemphill, Los Angeles, CA 
9,070 Brad Gaucher, Hinton, Alberta 
7.542 Dick Volans, Ogdensburg, NY 
6.128 Denise Morissette. Sherbrooke, 
Quebec 

6.039 Gordon Kilbreath, Hinton, Alberta 
3.436 Tina Plhl, Guilford. CT 
METEORS 

14,200 'A'Craig Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

408,350 'A'Greg C. Strother, Madison, Wl 
134,630 Patrick Daley, Biloxi, MS 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

533,450 'A'John Hankerd, Gaines, Ml 
300,000 James Stevenson, Marshall, TX 
60.120 Steve Thomas, Ogdensburg, NY 
50,570 Craig Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
MOON HOPPER (Computerware) 

956,470 ^Shawn McAlpin, Louisville, KY 



THE NEMESIS (Sorcerer Software) 
1 1 ,946,000 wMark Smith. Santa Ana. CA 
NINJA WARRIOR f Programmer's Guild) 
106,300 *Bud Seibel. Tumbler Ridge, 

British Columbia 
102,400 Christopher Gelowitz, Claresholm, 
Alberta 

75,300 Brad Gaucher, Hinton, Alberta 
46.400 •Daniel Milbrath, Ann Arbor, Ml 
36,800 Greg Lowry, Davisburg. Ml 
34,700 Jefi Weeks. Hinton, Alberta 
26.300 Blaine Willick, Hinton, Alberta 
PAC-ATTACK II (Computerware) 

56,014 *Li8a Welte, Baxter, TN 
PAC DROIDS (Programmer's Guild) 
1,958.500 "^Stefan Lapointe, Chateauguay, 
Quebec 
PAC 'EM (the Rainbow) 

301 *David Dean, West Mansfield. OH 
PAC-TACr7"om Mix) 

100,630 -^David Dean, West Mansfield. OH 
PHANTOM SLAYER (Med S/stems SoftwarB) 
2.488 '^roy Messer, Joplin. MO 
1.852 Curtis Boyle, Saskatoon, 

Saskatchewan 
1,306 Marc Hassler 
652 Michael Brooks, Qiade Spring, VA 
604 J. Powell. Bournemouth, England 
342 Susan Batlinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 



13,565 wMichael Rhattigan, Cory, NC 
6,455 •Rich Van Manen, Grand Rapids, 



Ml 



4,995 Ken Mahaffey, Erie, IL 
4,970 Tim Warr. Bellingham, WA 
4,980 Doug Schwartz, Glendale, AZ 
4790 Brad Gaucher, Hinton, Alberta 
POOYAN (Datafoft) 

273,450 WDavey Devlin, Clyde, NC 
185,150 •Wib Merrithew, Oshawa. Ontario 
164,950 Ronny Ong, Arlington, TX 
156,300 Daniel Beliaie, Montreal. Quebec 
105.100 Frederic Daoud, St-Jean. Quebec 
79.000 D. Seibel. Tumbler Ridge, 

British Columbia 
73,650 Michael Rosenburg, Prestonsburg, KY 
62,700 Allison Germaneso, Ringwood, NJ 
57,400 Rick Arthur, Ballston Lake, NY 
55,000 David Lazar, Englishtown, NJ 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

32,000 "A-Lisa Welte, Baxter, TN 
16,180 David Kennedy, Denham Springs, LA 
PROJECT NEBULA (Radio Shack) 

1,065 'M/Villiam Daley, Biloxi, MS 
995 •Dan Bovey, Wheaton IL 
960 Ian Clark, Albion, Ml 
885 John Oliver. Wllliamstown, WV 
760 Patrick Daley, Biloxi, MS 
PROTECTORS /fom Mix) 

594,614 wMark Smith, Santa Ana, CA 
594,610 •Roland Hendel, Mississauga, Ontario 
356,514 Cameron Amick, Reisterstown, MO 
347,673 Derek Mall, Long Grove. IL 
275,810 Julian Bond, Berkeley, CA 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 *Harry L. Perkins III, Norfolk, VA 
220 *Chris Cope, Central, SC 
220 ik'CorneliuS Caesar, West Germany 
220 ^Brian Boehnlein, South Bend, IN 
220 *John Allen, Clemson. SC 
200 Greg Burke, Kenora, Ontario 
200 Kenton G. Fifield. Fort Francis, Ontario 
200 Sue Knobloch, Oshkosh. Wi 
180 Mark Bitterling, Bowling Green, KY 
RAINBOW ROACH (f^e Rainbow) 

10,500 'A^Michael Rhattigan, Cory, NC 



REACTOIDS (Radio Shack) 

88,615 *Robb}e Anderson, Monrovia, CA 
36,320 Roger Rothove, Warrenaburg, MO 
26,275 Jeff Loeb, Mobile, AL 
RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderViaion) 
365,934 WRoger Buzard, Lima. OH 
148,112 Matt Griffiths, Stilwell, KS 
135.306 Peter Niessen, Carlisle, MA 
ROBOTTACK (Intracolor) 
2.216.950 *nandy Hankini, Tabor. lA 
1,512,200 Robert Kiser, Monticello, MS 
1,424,300 John Osborne, Kincardine. Ontario 
1,219,810 Steve Skrzyniarz, Tacoma, WA 
815,000 Philip Perry, Edmonton, Alberta 
394.650 Tina PihI. Guilford, CT 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

82 *John Allocca, Yonken, NY 
87 •Kim Van Camp, State Center. lA 
SEA DRAGON (Adventure international) 
137,500 'W'Peter Nie-jsen, Carlisle. MA 
75,750 •Steve Schweitzer. Sewell, NJ 
60,430 Steve Skrzyniarz, Tacoma. WA 
56,760 Alan Morris. Chicopee, MA 
50.300 Remi Riess, Val Caron. Ontario 
SEA QUEST (Mark Data) 

230 wCasey Stein, BInghamton, NY 
SHARK TREASURE (Computerware) 

245.000 ^Manon Berlrand, Hauterive, Quebec 
175.000 Maurice Boyle, Saskatoon, 
Saskatchewan 
SHENANIGANS (Mark Data) 

164 WRi chard Booth, Weatervllle, OH 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

120,640 *Robert J, Wallace, Waldorf. MD 
59.520 Vernelt Peterton. Radcliff, KY 
44,870 Mark Nichola, Birsay, Saskatchewan 
44,480 R. Duguay. St. Bruno, Quebec 
SKIING (Radio Shack) 

12:08 -^Kelly Kerr, Wentzville, MO 
21:35 Jean-Claude Taliana. Broaaard, 
Canada 

44:02 Brad Gaucher. Hinton. Alberta 
SNAIL'S REVENGE (the Rainbow) 

34,860 "Aitiichael Rosenburg, Preatonsburg, KY 
1 1 ,380 Varunee Turner, Kamloops, 

British Columbia 
6,150 Alan Sadler, Northwood, ND 
5,690 Clayton Martin, Ontario, Canada 
5.320 David Holland. Tofino. 

British Columbia 
3,120 Dan Ralston, Janesville, Wi 
2,250 Bob Howard, Ontario, Canada 
1,340 Dan Sobczak, Mesa, AZ 
SOLO POKER (Radio Shack) 

850 '^Granville Bonyata, Tatlahasse. FL 
740 Allan Mercurio, Portsmouth. Rl 
SPACE ACE (Spectral Associates) 

1,364 WPerry Denton, New Baden, IL 
SPACE AMBUSH (Computerware) 
1.035.680 VCurtis Boyle, Saskatoon, 
Saskatchewan 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 
1 ,632,450 Walter Brokx, Gfanisle. 

British Columbia 
358,660 Mike Snelgrove, Oshawa, Ontario 
354,860 Bruce Madariaga, College Park. MD 
238,580 John Cole. King City. Ontario 
224.130 Derrick Kardos, Colonia. NJ 
SPACE INVADERS (Spectral Associates) 
4,862,040 *F,U. Ingham. Clyde, WI 

36,960 Sean Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 



^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★* 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 211 




SPACE SHUTTLE (Tom Mix) 

595 "A-Steve Schweitzer, SeweM, NJ 
585 Randall F, Edwards. Dunlap. KS 
575 Fred WeiSBman, BrookHne. MA 
571 Ted McDonald, Summervilje. SC 
566 Tim Smith, San Rafael, CA 
547 Mike Forman, Topeka. KS 
SPACE WAR (Spectral Associates} 

400.190 *Mark Felps. Bedford, TX 
365.550 Randal! Edwards, Dunlap. KS 
116.000 Peter Niessen, Carlisle, MA 
52.360 Jim Baker, Florissant, MO 
13,000 Susan Ballinger, Uxbridge. Ontario 
STARBLAZE (Radio Shack) 

9.050 'A'judith Simon, Warrendale. PA 
6.250 •Mark Welte. Baxter, TN 
5.500 Beverly Herbers, Placentia, CA 
5.350 Nancy Hertwrs. Placentia. CA 
5,100 Tom Che^, Cranston. Ri 
STARFIRE (tnteffectronics} 

10.000.050 ^David Tittery. University of Minnesota 
3.444.500 John DeMuth, Prairie de Chien, Wl 
2.102.450 Dean Bouchard, Kingston, 

Nova Scotia 
1,420,000 Steve Schweitzer, Seweit. NJ 
1.000,050 Chuck Ladig, Suisun City. CA 
STARSHIP CHAMELEON 

95,900 ^Craig Dutton, Goose Bay, Labrador 
STORM ARROWS (Spectral Associates ^ 

66.400 "kstm Irvine, Sudbury, Ontario 



TIME BANDIT (MichTron) 

109,170 "A-Mark Wooge, Omaha, NE 

106,720 Glen Heidebrecht. Topeka, KS 

78,270 David Lazar, Englishtown, NJ 

74,800 •Daniel Milbrath, Ann Arbor, Ml 

48,800 Scott Oberhoitzer 

19,200 Chris Smith, Cincinnati. OH 
TRAILIN' TAIL (fhe Rainbow) 

24.415 WKentong Fifield, Fort Frances. Ontario 

TfiAPFALl (Tom Mix) 

113.408 *Rich Trawick. N. Adams, Ml 

104,456 Robert Cattral. Ottawa. Ontario 

104,424 Brennan Baybeck. Traverse City. Ml 

104,368 John Osborne, Kincardine. Ontario 

98,588 Dan Burch, Louisville, KY 

50.160 Mike Sengstock, Meriden. CT 

46,326 Adam Jensen. Racine. Wl 

48.188 Elizabeth Peirce, Exeter, NH 
TUBE mnnzyt/Aardvark) 

544.560 wPerry Denton. New Baden, IL 

240,060 Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 

230,000 Ken Felix, Crystal Lake, IL 

98.640 David Hogue. Mercer, PA 
TUTS TOMB (Mark Data) 

31,740 "A'George Kaakee, Royal Oak. Ml 

27,500 Eileen Kaakee, Royal Oak. Ml 
VENTURER (Aardvark) 

6,716,200 -A-Kyle Keller, Overland Park, KS 

4,126,200 Greg Scott, Orlando. FL 

2,291,100 Mike Sitzer, Roslyn, NY 

2.657.350 Brian Panepinto, Spencerport, NY 

1.769.400 Todd Hauschildt, Red Wing. MN 

1.292.500 Richard Vehlow. Bayside. NY 



WHIRLYBIRD RUN (Spectral Associates) 

516.450 'A'Dan Shargel, Arroyo Grande, CA 
103,900 Dann Fabian, Crestview, FL 
98,400 Dave Lubnow, Sussex, NJ 
87,350 Philip Daulton. Louisville, KY 
73.950 Pat Craddick, Janesville, Wl 
52,000 Chris Cope. Central, SC 
41,000 Rich Apollo, Farmingdale, NY 
WfLDCATTING (Radio Shack) 

63.723 "A'Michael Rosenberg. Prestonsburg, KY 
48.682 David Rodgers. Carbondale. IL 
38.318 Ellen Ballinger, Uxbridge, Ontario 
34,826 Kerri Dutton. Qoose Bay. Labrador 
29,953 Lisa Ballinger, Uxbridge. Ontario 
ZAKSUNO (Elite Software) 

1.236,000 ^Robert Conyer, Willingboro, NJ 
1,128.050 Richard Minton, West Frankfort. IL 
1,008.100 Andy Mickelson, Granville, OH 
950.500 Michael Rothman, Solon, OH 
910,000 Steve Schweitzer. Sewell, NJ 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 

1,510,000 ^James Quadrella, Brooklyn, NY 
401,900 Mike Hughey, King George, VA 
370.400 Chris Coyle, Selden, NY 
235,200 Rich McGervey, Morgantown, WV 
196,500 F.U. Ingham. Clyde. Wl 
126,200 Jon Laustsen, Scotia, NY 
118,700 Eric Laustsen, Scotia, NY 
110,600 Dan Ralston, Janesville. Wl 
105,900 Tina Pi hi. Guilford, CT 
104.800 Jeff Weeks, Hinton, Alberta 
83.400 Kelly Stiner, Kingsley. Ml 
80.300 Darren Green wait, Livermore. KY 
73.600 Shawn Chirrey. Mississauga, Ontario 
ZERO O (Chromasette) 

52.235 -^Mark Smith. Santa Ana, CA 



— Kevin Nichols 




212 the RAINBOW May 1984 



Software Revlewm 



Whole Numbers And Decimals 
Handy Aids For Teachers 

Whole Numbers and Decimals are education software 
programs designed to prepare printed worksheets for any 
number and variety of mathematical problems. Designed 
and distributed by Shamrock Software of Radnor, Ohio, 
these programs provide welcorned m^iterial for the class- 
room teacher- The programs are designed to give practice on 
addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole 
numbers or decimal numbers. Please note that these pro- 
grams are sold separately. 

The program contains a series of subroutines used to 
formulate each problem type. The programs are written in 
BASIC language and instructions are given for ways to alter 
the programs for varied use. This is a welcomed feature and 
not provided by many software distributors. The changes 
need to be made prior to running the program because the 
[PREAK] key and the list command will be disabled when 
the program is run. You can restore the list function by 
POKEing 383,0 as mentioned many times in this magazine. 

The programs are printer-oriented and the math prob- 
lems generated by the programs are not listed on the video 
screen. Thus, if you do not have access to a printer, you will 
find this program rather frustrating. 



The programs print an actual worksheet of mathematical 
problems. You have the options regarding the number of 
problems generated, the range of numbers used (up to 9999), 
and the number of worksheets printed (each one is differ- 
ent). If you want multiple copies af the same worksheet, you 
would need td use a copier. The answers are given on the 
worksheet and designed to be left on the sheet as an aid to 
the students, or they can be cut off and used as a checklist for 
grading. 

The programs can be used for any age group because any 
limitations can be utilized. For example, for first graders, 
simply use numbers less than 10, and adjust the program for 
addition ohly. For high school seniors, use numbers in the 
thousands and mix subtraction with (Jivision. Working with 
decimal numbers is always a little more complicated than 
working with whole numbers. 

The programs are Very basic in nature and are cut and dry. 
There is no title screen, no mUsic, and no bells and whistles. 
The programs should run on a 4K machine with standard 
Color BASIC. This program could be used by teachers or 
parents who waqt to help their children brush up their 
arithmetic skills. The documentation is short, but adequate 
for the operation of the software. 



(Shamrock Software, 4382 Norton 
43066, tape $9.95 for each program) 



Road, Radnor, OH 



— J.D. Ray 



Computer Servo Controlled Robot Arm 




Odil or Write for Free Catalog 

nnakog micrn Sysiems 

6660 Valmont Road . Boulder, Colorado 80301 . Tel:X303) 444-6809 



Keyboard or Joystick Cohtrol 

Remembers Everything It Did 
ft does it again 

Typical System Includes: 

. Robot-1 & Cables 

. 6 Channel Servo Controller 

. Pow^r Supply 

• All Software with source code 
Modular Robotic Accessories: 

. Mobile Cart for Traveling 
Robot 

. Radio Links between all 

Functions 
. Robot-mounted MicronEye 
. Ultrasonic Range Finder 

Robot- 1C for Color Computfrt- $395.00 
Robot-is for SS50 Systemf- $395.00 
Robot MicronEye-$295.0p 

Additional Systems Available 

Robot- 1G for Gonoral Purposs Computers 
Robot- 1R tor Radio Control Systems 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 213 



Software RevlewJSSSSSS^SSSSSSSI^ 

The Investor — A Good Idea, 
But A Good Investment? 

How would you like a program that will analyze your 
stock portfolio? Just enter your purchases and sales of 
shares, dividends taken in cash or reinvested, commissions 
paid, and splits. You can enter up to 175 transactions 
divided among 24 different investments. In return, you'll get 
an up-to-date display showing your current cost basis and 
market ' value, realized and unrealized gains and losses, 
shares purchased and sold, shares purchased with reinvested 
dividends^ annualized rate of return, and other goodies for 
each stock. YouH also get grand totals for your entire port- 
folio, and weighted averages and comparative bar graphs so 
you can compare your holdings and see how each one con- 
tributes to your overall position. That's what The Investor 
will do for you — but with some difficulty. 

The program actually comes in two parts. The first pro- 
gram on the tape, INVUPDT, is used solely to enter your 
dat4 into a file and write the file to a cassette. Then you 
CLOAD the second program, INVESTOR, and input the 
file from the data cassette. This second program is the one 
that gives you all the answers. 

That can be a bit of a nuisance when you have several 
transactions to enter, and some of them happen to be sales of 
mutual fund shares, for whiph, unlike other securities, the 
cost basis is generally figured on an average cost rather than 
on the first-in-first-out method. So you have to stop and 



write your file to tape, read it into the second program, 
calculate your cost basis, and then read the file back into the 
first program and enter the sale. 

I dont know why J & A Enterprises chose to do it that 
way. Neither the cassette label nor the instruction manual 
has an address or a phone number, so 1 couldn't call theqi to 
ask, I can only guess that it was the only way they could fit 
the program into 16K and have enough memory to handle a 
reasonably large number of records. I'd rather have a single 
self-contained program that requires 32K. 

The instruction manual — three 814 by 1 1 sheets folded in 
half to make six pages — carefully illustrates each screen, and 
describes the various menu options. Most of the essential 
information is in there somewhere, biit youVe got to go 
through it carefully several times before starting to enter any 
data or youll waste a lot of time and effort doing it wrong. 
The manual could be greatly improved by the addition of a 
summary section and some mention of defaults. 

After you enter each record, you are asked "IS DATA 
CORRECT (Y/N)." Guess which one is the default condi- 
tion. I found out the hard way after keying in several records 
that didn't get into the file. 

If you change your mind while keying in a record, there's 
no exit key to return to the main menu. Either you finish 
keying it in and then go through the delete process, or you 
[BREAK], if you [BREAK], where do you get back in 
without losing your data? 1 figured out the right line by 
listing the program, but a business application of this type 
should be usable by someone with zero programming 
knowledge. If you must [BREAK], then at least the manual 
should tell you where to GOTO. 

To enter a purchase or a dividend reinvestment, you nlust 
put in the dollar amount, the cost per share, and the number 
of shares. If the number of shares is not correct, based on the 
first two variables, the entry will not be accepted, and the "$ 
AMOUNT" prompt will come up again. This may be a silly 
question, but if the program has already calculated the 
number of shares, why in the world does it have to be 
entered? 

Changing or deleting a record is more difficult than it 
needs to be. All fields must be reentered even if only one is 
incorrect. The record to be changed is located first by 
account number and then by date. If you have more than 
one transaction in the same stock on the same date, there 
seems to be no way to change the second one without 
deleting the first one. 

If your portfolio includes mutual funds, as mine does, you 
may occasionally receive a capital gain distribution (either 
cash or reinvested in shares) along with your annual divi- 
dend. TJie Investor makes no provision for these. 

Error trapping should have been better. I read a file full of 
incorrect data into the Second part of the program, and 
when I selected one of the comparative graph options, it 
crashed oh an FC Error. I believe that a well-written pro- 
gram should never b^ crashed by bad data. It should either 
give an answer of some kind, however wrong it may be 
("Garbage in, garbage out"), or display a "data out of range" 
message as a signal to the user that there may be some fault 
in the entry of records. 

There's no doubt that TJie Investor is a very good idea for 
a program, but 1 wouldn't buy it in its present form. 



LINE PRINTERS 




CE;!TRONICS 588 (used) serial 600 
Baud, 8C CPS with 4 pin DIN plug 

All prices F.O.B. Headerson, Tx. 
Terms: Cash, check or COD 
Tx. residents add 4% s^tles tax 

4. 

LEADER SALES CORPORATION 

P.O. Box 1220, Henderson, Tx. 75652 

214/657-7800 after 6:00 P.M. 

* • ^wm^ mm 

Discounts available to CO ?.lubs 
and volume buyers, i 



(J & A Enterprises, 74 South Meadow Rd., Plymouth, MA 
02360, 16K Extended basic cassette $39.95) 

■—Neil Edward Parks 



214 the RAINBOW May 1964 




Saguaro Software 

FDUnATlON 



NEW 



Travel In' Toad 


32K 


18.75 


Ocky\AADky 


32K 


18.75 


Light Runner 




16.75 


Colcxcol 




18.75 


Master Graphics Tool Kit 


32K 


29.75 


Guillotine 




7.75 


Flasher 




14.75 


SR'71 


32K 


22.75 


The King 


32K 


20.75 


Touchstone 


32K 


21.75 


Junior's Revenge 


32k: 


22.75 



Amdek Color I Plus 

$299 

iWtfeo Driver - $20 W/ Purchase 




Amdisk 3 
Amdek Dual 3 ' Disk Drive 



M75 



Includes 5 Diskettes 

And 2 Drive Cables 
(One ArDdek. One ^Va") 

First Box Of Diskettes - M5<» 

R.S. Controller - $135 With Amdisk 3 



GAMES 



PRICKLY PEAR 






Adverture In Wonderland 


32K 


18.75 


Decipher 




18.75 


FPLAND 


32K 


18.75 


Flight 




14.75 


Foot bn II 




14.75 


(^onnbusters 




14.75 


Great Word Game 




14.75 


Jungle 




14.75 


Monsters & Magic 


32K 


14.75 


Naked Gamer 




16.75 


Shaft 




18.75 


Teeeofff 




15. 75^ 


Topsy Turvy 




14.75 


Viking! 




14./0 


TOM MIX 






Air Traffic Controller • 


Tape-32K 


21.75 


Buzzard Bait 




21. /o 


Cu*ber 




21.75 


Journey to Mt. Doom (disk) 


32K 


21.75 


Space Shuttle 




21.75 


PrA 






Dunk-o-Duck 


Tape 


14.75 


Inspector Clueseau 




14.75 


rarri rOK 




16.75 


Stagecoach 




14.75 


TYCOON 


Tape-32K 


14.75 


SUGAR 






Silly Stories 




8.75 


Silly Syntax 




16.75 


3" Diskettes 


10 for <55 


Paper - 3,000 Sheets 




32.75 


Paper - 500 Sheets 




5.75 


Blank C-15 Tapes 




.75 


100% Tested Disk d d sv4- 


Box of 10 $20 


R.S. Disk Manual 




$t7 



EDUCATION 

PRICKLY-PEAR 

Math Pac 

Music Reader 

Phonics 1 or 2 (tape only) 

Phonics 1&2 (disk only) 

Prereader 1Z&3 

Spelling 

PFA 

Ed, Pack 123's, ABC's, Big-Bigger 
Biggest, Shapes 
Heart-Lung-Circulatory 
Medicat Ternnrnoiogy 

SUGAR 

Bible Stories 
Galactic Hangman 
Great U.S.A. 
Prereader 

APPLICATIONS 

PRICKLY-PEAR 

Ancient Wisdom Tritogy 
Eight-bit Bartender 
Fantasy GoTTier's 32k Package 
Fantasy Gamer's Package 
Fantasy Master's Secretary 
Music Box 
Satellite Tracker 
Super Astrology 

PFA 

Astrology (Screen PrintEpson. LP7) 
Bowling Secretary 
Hurricane Tracker 
Stress Evaluator 

UTILITY 

Filmastr 

PRICKLY-^PEAR 

Clone Master 
Color Kit 

Disk Manager (tape) 
Disk Master (tape) 
Disk Zapperl! (tope) 
Tape Omni Clone (tape) 

PFA 

Super Disk Utility (disk) 

SAGUARO 

Move-it! 

SUGAR 

Auto Run 15.75 Tim's 

Semigrof 32K 15.75 Tim's Mail 



32K 



Tape 
32K 



Tape-32K 

32K 
32K 
32K 



14.75 
26.75 
18.75 
21.75 
18.75 
37.75 



18.75 
26.75 
14.75 

21.75 
14.75 
15.75 
15.75 



29.75 
14.75 
18.75 
14.75 
14.75 
16.75 
59.75 
18.75 

17.75 
19.75 
11.75 
18.75 



23.75 

29.75 
26.75 
16.75 
16.75 
26.75 
22.75 

35.75 

15.95 

20.75 
15.76 



New From 
Saguaro Software 

Co-Co Receivables 



Keep track of all those accounts 
with current list of accounts, 
statement printing, last activity 
dote, and current month's trans- 
actions, <jeblts & credits. Disk 
storage of data. 32K disk. $29.95 



ULTIMATE 
BINGO 

Do you want the ultimate in bingo? Use 
your 1_P7 or 8 to print the number of 
cards you desire. You can choose from 
3 speeds & even pause the garrie to 
check the winner. 

BINGO! 

Plus Th& Bonus Of 

JACKPOT 

Pull the one arm bandit's arm & see If 
you can beat the odds. 

Both Only: 
Tape -19.96 Disk -24.95 
Amdek - 29.96 



NNFUSICOO 
CONFUSION 

3 modes of piay. 3-4/5-6/7 letter words. 
You select time togoMem how long (30 
or 60 seconds) to unscramble the 
words. First person with ten correct wins. 
1-4 can play. Tape - 19.95 Disk - 
24.95 Amdek -29.95. 




^_ Add $3.00 For Disk, $6.00 For Amdisk . 

Arizona Residents Add 7% Tax • Add $100 Per Program For Sh^ppi^»g (S4.00 Maximum) 
Dealer Inquiries Welconne • Some Quantities Limited • Ask About Royolties 

7331 E. Beverly - Tucson, AZ 85710 - (602) 885-6508 



ViSA 



Software Review! 



Excitement, Realism 
Mark SAC Text Game 



A wargjimer once said, on being accused of being a war- 
monger, that "the study of war no more made him a war- 
monger than the study of cancer made a research physician a 
cancer monger. "The recent revulsion for all things military 
has been partly to blame for a void in one of the most 
stimulating areas of simulation and gaming, human war- 
fare. This void has been partially filled by SAC, a real-time 
nuclear flight mis$ion simulation. 

SAC requires a 32K Extended CoCo. Its premise places 
you in the cockpit of ydur B-52 on the ready pad at Ramstein 
Air Base, Germany. Suddenly, the tower orders you to 
scramble and gives you take-off information. Your fingers 
fly as you start the big ship's eight engines, advance them to 
full power, release brakes and begin your take-off roll. After 
lift-off, you receive information about your assigned target 
and a fail safe code which must be used to arm your plane's 
single nuclear bpmb. From this point you use your naviga- 
tional computer to fly to your target, bomb it, return to 
Ramstein and land. Sound easy? It's anything but. 

In the immortal words of one M^jor ^'King" Kong (pilot 
of a B-52 in the movie "Dr. Strangelove"), "Well boys, it 
looks like this is it . . . noocleeeur combat, toe to toe with the 
roooosskies." All the way to and from the target yoii will be 
hounded by MlGs and SAMs bent on turning you into a 



49 Brbokland Aye., Aurora. Ontario Canada L4G 2H6 

FAMILY GAMES 

The popular STOCKBROKER and CRIBBAGE 32K 

$14.95 each. 

ADVENTURE GAMES: Sea Quest and Shenanigans from 

MARK DATA only $24.95(C); $27 .95(D) each 

From BRANTEX. PIRATE TREASURE 16K $13.95 

SCAVENGER HUNT 16K $18.95 

EDUCATIONAL GAMES 

COLORMIND, CONC£N - imprqve your memory and logical 
thinking - 16K $10.95 each 

• • • 

Also from BRANTEX 

EDU-COMBO (Math Derby. Pieek 'N' Spell Metric Converter) 

16K....; only $29.95 

BUSINESS: HOUSEHOLD EXPENSE MANAGER 1$K$19 95 

LOAN ANALYSIS 16K $20 95 

• • • 

NEW from MARK DATA 
The amazing TIME FIGHTER 1$K $24.95(0) 

i2K $27.95(D) 

Also the ever popular GLAXXONS 16K $24.95(0) 

32K $27.95(D) 

• • • 

UTILITIES: ROMDISK: Run your rom pack games from a disk! 

16K $15.95 

MR. COPY - make up to 99 copies of one program at oncfe! 
16K $15.95 



charred scar on the Russian landscape. You are far from 
defenseless, however, for your B-52 is equipped with nine 
sophisticated navigational and weapons systems including 
missiles and a chaff dispenser for thwarting MIGs and elec- 
tronic counter measures to avoid the radar of Soviet SAM 
bases. Some of these systems may become damaged due ,to 
enemy action and must be repaired by the flight engineer, 
which takes a varying aniount of time. You haven't felt 
excitement until yoUVe screamed in on a target at 600 KTS, 
rapidly approaching the drop point, while the F/E tries to 
repair the bomb ragk in time to drop the bomb. The last 
thing you want to do is to maKe a second run ori the target. 
Dropping the bomb within five miles df ground zero results 
in the target being destroyed. 

This is a text style game, not an arcade. All aircraft 
conditions and combat reports are in text (a la Star Trek) 
but it is still real-time and the action is fast. 1 feel that more 
realism is possible in this $tyle of simulation. There is one 
very nice graphics feature, however. It is a PMODE4 map of 
Russia which you can toggle anytime you want it. It is very 
nicely done and it shows the position of your B-52, all 36 
possible targets and Ramstein. 

Primary aircraft control can be selected prior to starting. 
You can select keyboard only or combinations of keyboard 
and joystick. I preferred the keyboard only mode as 1 felt it 
provided better control. Difficulty is selectable also and 
ranges fron) "A piece of cake" (the easiest) to "Orte way trip" 
(the hardest). If you are in a vengeful mood yOu can even go 
after Tehran. 

Documentation is good and completely covers all asj)ects 
of the simulation, from take-off to touchdown, 

I liked this one a lot, it is exciting and realistic. It also has a 
sobering aspect that makes one hope that this never really 
happens — at the same time, you gain a new respect for 
those men who are faced with the task if it ever does. 

(Pal Creations, 10456 AmanthH Ave., San piego, CA 92126, 
tape $19.95) 

— David Johnson 



Him . . . 

Small Letters On CGP-115 

This may be of interest to anyone who ahs the CGP-1 15 
printer. It changes the size of the print from 40 columns to 80 
by using the printer's built-in C//7?5f/<5j command instead 
of by using the DIP switches in the back. Also, it seems to 
speed things up a bit. 

To place the printer in the srinall letter mode, one must 
first type in PRINn-2XHR$(18) and [ENTER]. Then 
type in PRINTU-2rit^C and [ENTER], No\v type in 
PRlNn-2,CHR$(l7)[^mEK\ and then type in PRINT 
#-2, "test" [ENTER] again. This should place the printer in 
the 80-column mode and print the word "test" in small 
letters. 

Jerome Bigge 
Muskegon, Mich. 



216 the RAINBOW May 1984 



THE 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
has been approved for use 
to create entries In the 
Rainbow Magazine 
Adventure Contest. 



WHERE'S-IT 

by C.E. Laldlaw 

What programs are on this disk? Which 
diskc is my WIDGET program? 
WHERE S-IT Witt answer these questions 
for you and maintain disl< directory index 
files with up to 972 programs in each. 
Completely user-friendly, just run 
WHERE 'S-IT and follow the prompts to: 
Create index files holding up to 972 
programs 
Load or save existing index fHes 
Add. delete or update index files tor a 

specific disk 
Sort index files alphabetically with a 
machine language sort 
List index files to screen 
Print index out with 162 programs to the 
page 

Disk only..... $19,95 
(32K Extended Color BASIC) 



We are also a dealer for 
the following companies: 

Moreton Bay Software 
Computerware 
Spectrum Projects 
Mark Data, Amdek, Epson 
Pal Creations, Tom Mix 
PBH Computer, Inc, 
Spectral Associates. 
Cognitec, Elite Software 
Prickly Pear. Botek 
Cobra Software 
and many more fine companies 



JARB 

I SOFTWARE I 
I HARDWARE | 

1636 O Avenue, Suite C 
National City, CA 92050 
After hours: 
BBS 619-474*8961 
Ofderllne: 
619*474-8982 



T.A.G 

THE 
ADVENTURE 
GENERATOR 




Cassette...... $34. 95 

Disk/Amdisk $39.95 



FEATURES 

Creates stand-atone programs 
Up to 1 00 rooms. 60 objects, 30 command words, and 9 conditional flags 

Supports tape and disk output 
Optional printer output of important sections during creation of ADVENTURE 
Complete documentation 
Includes sample ADVENTURE 
Works with all models of the CoCo except MC-10 
Requires 32K Extended Color BASIC 



GRAY LADY 

by Terry A. Steen 

Control your submarine in its efforts to destroy the enemy fleet. You 
nnust launch your sub to surface missiles while avoiding the depth 
Charges. Five different types, hi-res graphics and spectacular 
sounds. Also a talking version included at no extra charge for those 
who have an SC01 based voice pack. Four screens and progressive 
difficulty make this all machine language program a real bargain. 

Cassette: $1 9.95 Disk/Amdisk: $24.95 



U.S. COD orders accepted, no charge cards please. 
Shipping and handlir\g $3.00 
California residents please add 6% sales tax 



S T RET C H 




The Rolls Royce of hl-res text utilities. 
— mdre features than all others com- 
bined! Adds a whole new dimension to 
your programs. 

• Replace that ugly 32 x 16 screen with a 
professional display of upto 24 lines of 
64 lowercase characters. Combine with 
graphics for 3 times the inlormation on 
one screen! 

• Adds underline, subscript, superscript, 
reverse video, top and bottom scroll 
protect, double-width bold and colored 
lettering with easy to use commands 
from within your program or control 
Icey Input direct from keyboard. Even a 
built fh help screen of commands/ sta- 
tus. 

• Machine language extension of BASIC 
fully interfaced with ALL keys, com- 
mands and PMODES including PRINT, 
PRINT @. TAB and comma fields. 

• 12 swttchable character sizes (most 
colored) of crisp, clear, true lowercase 
letters from 64 x 24 to 1:2 x 8 for VCR title 
screens, education^ and visually 
Impaired, An additional 128 useful fig- 
ures of Greek, cars, tanks, planes, etc. 

Includes character editor and demo pro- 
gram. 16K Ext BASIC required -32K/64K 
Uupported. 



"Wow I automatically reac/? fpt Screen 
Machine when i power up . . * Screen 
Machine is what Radio Sh0ck should 
have put in the computer in the first place 

^ G. Cummings • Concord, CA 

Screen Machine enables YOU to do tasks 
which were never before possible due to 
limited screen capacity. Now YOU can 
label your hl-res pictures and graphs with gB| 
ease. Now YOU can write professional " 
programs that feature high density text 
and lowercase displays. Now YOU can 
easily create large, colored lettering for 
VCR title screens and educational uses. 
And Screen Machine is so easy to use it 
quickly becomes second nature. 

Screen Machine) is excellent, ( am 
highly impressed with what you, have 
accomplished , , , " 

— t,. Bass - Traverse City, Ml 

You can find dozens of uses for the addi- 
tional 128 useful graphic figures built 
right in. And because you can modify 
Screen Machine's character set using the 
supplied character editor program you 
can easily customize Screen Machine to 
your needs. And with the free Demo pro- 
gram you see and learn all of Screen 
Machine's powerful features quiclcly. 

"(Screen Machine) is certainly the finest 
and the most frequently used program in 
my software library. 

— N. Cuong - N. Palm Beach, FL 



YOUR SCREEN ! 



SUPER 
SCREEN 
MACHINE 




Revolutionary — herafded as the most 
useful, powerful and versatile state-of- 
the-art utility ever developed for the Color 
Computer! 

All the features of Screen Machine and more: 

• Variabfe SMOOTH Scroll, Key Click 
and Break Key Disable for professional 
displays, listings, business use. 

• EDTASM+ Command tor instant com- 
patibility with R.S editor-assembler 
cartridge. Superpatch+ Command for 
disk users. 

• Dynamic Screen Dump Command for 

use with Custom Software Engineer- 
ing's Graphic Screen Print program for 
simple printer '^Snapshots*' of your 
screen. 

• The New Standard ^ Upgradeable at 
any time from previous Rainbow-Writer 
or Screen Machine purchase. Return 
old program, manual, plus cost differ- 
ence and $7.00 shipping and handling. 

Publishers/Authors: contact the hl-res text 
experts for custom displays in your software. 





RAINBOW 
CONNECTION 
SOFTWARE 



RAINBOW CONNECTION 
SOFTWARE 

3514 6th Place NW. Suite D 
Rochester, MN 55901 
507-288*4424 



YES, I want to easily create dazzling displays with the best 
SCREEN Enhancer for my Color Computer, Please RUSH 
me the incredible SCREEN MACHINE at the affordable 
price of: 

Rainbow S.M. $29.95 Tape - $32.95 Disk 

Super S.M. $44.95 Cass - $47.95 Disk 

Shipping 

Minnesota residents add 6% Sales Tax 
Visa & Mastercard add 3% 
# Exp 

TOTAL 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



S2.00 



STATE 

Personal checks welcome - no delay. 
Send SASE for catalog, 
Not affiliated with 
THE RAINBOW 



ZIP 



Available in fine stores everywhere, the Dataman and Kelly Software in Canada. 



SENSATIONAL^ 
GRAPHIC ADVENTURESS 

DISC NOT REQUIRED ^ - 

Cassettes $24.95 ea. 

Discs $27.95 ea. 

32K Required 



SHENANIGANS 

From the heart of the city to lonefy 
wilderness. An action tilted journey to 
find the fabled pot of gold at the end of 
the rainbow. The first of our sensa- 
tional new W-res graphic adventures. 
You'H lovft itl 





f> M U hilltop 
lift ■ to«Mh lt«U<t 

#^l#iy«. dir«clitH«: North 






«J»r liDt EM« ' n Si*! mt 



SEA QUEST 

Get your shark repetiant and scu)?^ 
tanks ready to search for treasur^^ 
under the s^k YouH run into a pirate, a- 
mermaid and hungry sharks in this 
colorful and unique adventure. 
Outstanding! 



jdVphot^fipi>9^ taken from Calixto Island screen. 




CALIXTO ISLAND 

New Hi-Res Version 

A challenging puzzle with an 
occasional twist of humor. You'll visit a 
secret latKJratory, a Mayan pyramid 
and you'll meet crazy Trader Jack— all 
in Irving color and exciting detail. 
A classic! 



BLACK SANCTUM 

New Hi-Res Version 

Encounter the forces of black magic 
as you roam around ah old 1dth 
century monastery. You'll see all the 
evil locations in this spooky adventure 
in full hi-res d^ail. If you er^oy 
suspense, this one's for ypu. 



OTHER GREAT GAMES FROM MARK DATA 

BUMPERS 

Tension mounts as you wildly race through a hidden obstacle course. Barrier walls are invisible until you bump into them and you must proceed 
cautiously as each dead end has a hidden booby trap. Especially exciting when two players compete simultaneously. 

COSMIC CLONES 

Clonial Warriors, Super-Klones, Double Bombs and '1he Death Layer" relentlessly challe^ge the most skillful pjayer in this unique, fast action game. This 
is one of our favorites. 

GLAXXONS 

Pit your playing skill against squadrons of swooping, diving spacecraft. Fast and furious with seven selectable skill levels and automatic game 
acceleration. . .guaranteed to blister your joystick finger. 

EL BANDITO 

El Bandito has to be a crafty little hombreto stay alive as he loots the local countryside. Escape into a tunnel to avoid that angry spider. . .race around the 
corner towards your lair. Two players may compete simultaneously in this unusual game. 

All games: Cassettes . . . $24 95 ea. Discs . . . $27.95 ea. 16K Required 




Mark Data Products 



24001 Alicia Pkwy.. #207, Mission Viejo, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 

ORDERING INFORMATION: Phone your order for speedy delivery, use your MasterCard or Visa. We also accept checks and money orders. ALL ORDERS: Please add $2.00 shipping and 
handling in the continental U.S. All others, add air shipping and $3.00 handling. California residents add 6% sales tax. Foreign orders please remit U.S. funds. Distributed in Canada by Kelly 
Software Distributors. SOFTWARE AUTHORS: Contact us for exciting marketing details. 



Software Revlew^SSSSSS^SSSSSISr^ 

Let Your CoCo Spell 
With Color Dictionary 

It's nice to see Radio Shack increasing their Color Disk 
library. Their newest edition which 1 received to review is 
Color Dictionary. It comes in their familiar thrQe-ring 
binder, as do Disk Scrip$it and Disk Spectaculator. Upon 
inspecting the binder, something surprised me — an insert in 
the beginning o\ the book. This insert is also the same one I 
found jn my copy of OS-9, It is entitled "Read Me First'' and 
continues: 

All Computer software is subject to change, correction, 
or improvement as the manufacturer receives tustom^ 
er comments and experiences. Radio Shack has estab- 
lished a system to keep you immediately informed pf 
any reported problems with this software, and the 
solutions. We have a customer service network, in- 
cluding representatives in many Radio Shack Compu- 
ter Centers, and a [a rge group in Fort Worth, Texas^ to 
help with any specific errors you may find in your use 
of the programs. We will also furnish information on 
any improvements or changes that are "cut in" on later 
production versions. 

The reason for quoting this notice is that 1 can finally give 
credit to Radio Sh^ck for offering quality after-market sup- 
port for the Color Computer. They are finally recognizing 
the importance of their product and (hopefully) see it as a 
long-term investment. With this sheet comes a registration 
card that is filled out and mailed to Fort Worth. The sheet 
also contains a space for a Version Log and the version 
purchased is listed already. Both the versions of Color Die- 
tionaryand OS-9 are 01. 00.00. 1 like this idea and 1 hope that 
Radio Shack has made this their policy indefinitely. 

The manual is laid out in the same format as Disk Scripsit 
or Spectaculator leaves none or very few questions to ]>t 
asked if the manual is thoroughly read. The program cpmes 
with two diskettes. Ohe is the dictionary and the other the 
system disk. Although much easier to use with two drives, 
the program will work with only one. Color Dictionary is 
written by Robert G. kilgus, the same author who wrote 
Disk Scripsit, so it wasn't unusual to see the same type of 
operating system implemented. In fact, the first menu that 
appears after typing' RUN** DOS*' is the same menu that 
appears irt Disk Scripsit if selection 8 i^ chosen to "Return to 
BAS|C."There are five choices: 1) Return to BASIC; 2) Run a 
Program; 3) St^rt Clock Display; 4) Display Free Space 
Map; and 5) Copy a File, These all work the same way as in 
Disk Scripsit. At this point the manual informs you to make 
a copy of Disk Scripsit onto the diskette you are using for 
Color Dictionary. (Note: A backup copy of the system disk 
and the dictionary disk should have been made by now, and 
the originals stored away!) This is done by choosing option 5 
and copying the file "SCRIP/ BIN." What Kilgus has done is 
incorporate Disk Scripsit with Color Dictionary to be able 
to switch back and forth between each other. Vm not sure 
how he accomplished this, but when ip the main menu for 
Disk Scripsit, the program will no\y allow you to press the 



number 9, which will send you back to Color Dictionaryl It 
onjy works if they are on the same diskette. Now all of your 
Scripsit files can be transferred to the Color Dictionary disk 
and you can go from Scripsit to Dictionary and back by 
using menu selections. Note that menu selection 9 does not 
appear on the Scripsit menu, but it is there. 

Option 2 at the main menu allows yog to run a program. 
To get to the next menu of Color Dictionary, select optiort 2, 
then type "CHECK" [ENTER] and the second menu will 
appear. Us choices are: I) Lookup; 2) Check Spelling; 3) 
Correct Spelling; 4) Go To Scripsit\ and 5) Return to DOS. 
Lookup i$ a great feature. With it, you can search the 
dictionary for any word, words, group of letters, words 
beginning with certain letters, ending with pertain letters, 
and so on. For example, if you wanted to see all the Wor(ls 
that begin with the letter "z,"ybu would enter **z*," the 
being a wild-card character giving the whole z section of the 
Dictionary. You could also type "zoo*" or any amount of 
letters. The other wild character the program uses is the 
question mark "?." While the stands for any amount of 
letters, the "?" stands for only one, although more than one 
can be used in a search. A good example is if you fprget 
the spelling of a word. Let's use the word "receive." You 
can't remember if the "i" is before or after the •*€," You 
simply enter "rec??ve" and all the words in the Dictionary 
that have "rec"at the beginning and "ve"at the end and are 
seven letters long will appear. You cpuld have also typed 
"rec??ve*" and words that match that are seven letters or 
longer would appear on the screen. If the question mark is 
used as the first letter, the entire Dictionary is searched for 



■••SiSS '^1^ 't^lJ ■■'^3 ^i^^ 
^4oN a i^OGG Tor the 



TINY TURTLE i s an af^^ordable, 
"fully compatible LOGO language 
with high resoultion t^trtle 
graphics, music, ^ast pro- 
cessor operation, and re- 
trieval Q'f user procedures. 
TINY TURTLE comes complete 
with so-ft copy reference user 
manual . 

32K/EXTD BASIC 

CASSETTE or DISK SJS.^S 
HARD-COPY MANUAL «4.95 

ALSO 

GAS MILEAGE MONITOR 

DI9K »9.95 

SDS COMPUTERS BOGOTA, N J 

POB 450 07A03 
NJ ADD 57. TAX 

'^M^i) '-^J^® '*?J^ry 'i^ilJ .'^li' ■•^iJJ •'S^.I'J --^lii 



May 1964 theRAIN&OW 221 



matches. (The process can be stopped at any time by hitting 
[BREAK].) After the list has appeared on the screen, you 
have the option of printing it or hitting [ENTER] to con- 
tinue. One note. Color Dictionary does not have a section to 
set the Baud rate of your printer. There are two options here. 
One, insert a line at the beginning of the "DOS/BAS" 
program to POKEyour Baud rate, or go to Scripsit from the 
Color Dictionary and set the Baud rate from Scripsit and 
return to Dictionary. This lookup feature will be a joy to 
anyone who does any kind of word puzzles. With a 60,000 
word dictionary at your fingertips, finding the right word to 
fit should be a breeze. 

Of course, there is another powerful feature of this pro- 
gram to check and/ or correct your spelling from a Scripsit 
document. These are options 2 and 3. After pressing 2 at the 
menu, the program asks for a filename which should be on 
the disk you are using or you will need to switch disks before 
you enter a filename. The filename is assumed to be in 
Scripsit format with "/TXT*" as an extension (default). After 
entering the filename and placing the Dictionary disk in the 
appropriate drive, the program proceeds to search through 
your Scripsit file and check each word against its dictionary. 
The "suspect" words (words that are not in its dictionary) 
are displayed and can also be printed. When this is com- 
pleted, selection 3 from the main menu corrects the spelling. 
Each suspect word is shown and you are asked to enter the 
correct spelling, skip to the next incorrect word or return to 
the main menu of the "CrtECK" program. If a mistake is 
made when correcting, you are given a chance to change it 
again, making this part of the program very easy to work 
with. Upon completion of all the changes, you can resave the 
file using the same filename or by entering a new one. 

Color Dictionary will prove to be a great asset to any 
Color Disk Scripsit user, as well as anyone who just wants 
the program for finding words using the wild card character 
searches. Among its drawbacks are that words cannot be 
added or changed in the Dictionary, meaning it cah't be 
customized. For us Canadians (Canuks!), the Canadian 
spelling of certain words has been left out. For example, 
"colour" as opposed to "color." It does have quite an exten- 
sive list of words, and most forms of words are included, 
including most plurals, which are always listed directly 
below the root word, although it may not be in alphabetical 
order. 

(Radio Shack Stores nationwide, 32K tape $59.95) 

— Eldon Doucet 



Software WeWeiv^T— 

DRB Utility 
Is Reasonably Priced 

If you own a disk system, you have probably discovered 
by now that the DIR command leaves a lot to be desired. 
Not only does it scrpll the file names off of the screen, but it 
also does not give you all that much information about your 
files. 

The latest offering to tackle some of these shortcomings is 
DRB (Directory with Bytes). DRB is written in BASIC and 
will work on a 16 or 32K machine. 

When you RUN DRB, it asks you if you would like your 
directory displayed on the screen or printer. If you choose 
the printer option, the program checks to make sure that it is 
ready. If it is not, it will let you know and then END itself. 

The directory display produced by DRB includes the 
information you are used to, plus it will show you how many 
bytes long each of the files are. If the screen should fill up 
while displaying the directory, the program will pause and 
wait for you to hit the space bar. Once all of your directory is 
displayed, the program will also display the number of free 
and used files, granules and bytes on the disk. 

When 1 first ran DRB, I thought to myself, "Oh, that's 
nice,"and decided to try it out on another of niy disks. When 
1 typed in /?C/A^ again, all 1 got was an OK. It was only after 
loading the program again that I discovered that it does a 
A^£W^ after it is done. Why, I don't know. 

DRB comes with another program called "DSKNAM." 
What this program does is allow you to put a name on your 
disks, which will then be displayed along with the directory. 
It does this by storing your name in the last eight bytes of 
track 17, sector 18, which is not used by RS DOS. 

All things considered, DRB is, at best, an interesting 
utility program. Despite the fact that it is very reasonably 
priced, most of you could probably write it yourself in an 
hour or so. If you have never written a basic program, and 
have never read your disk system owner's manual, then you 
might want to consider buying it. Otherwise, a "do-it- 
yourself" project would be yoUr best bet. 

(Micrologic, Box 193, First Ave, East Brady, PA 16028, 
16/32K cassette, $7,95) 

y — Gerry Schechter 



mug in Kits" for CoCos* Including the new CoCoH from, . . ^MekoCHU ^tei^fU 

1. EYE-BALL SAVER. Flip easily from NORMAL VIDEO when using games, to H£V£RS£ VfD£0 
when you write text. Ready to plug in. Price $19.95 Order # MK 1233 

2. COCO SOUND. Did you buy one pf those video things to drive a monitor and now can*t hear 
the sweet sounds of CoCo? No TV or external amp required. Price $24.95 Order #MK 1235, 

for COCO JIs, order HMK 1235A 

3. COCO DRIVE. Monochrome video driver. Make that text really readable. An improvement 
really worth plugging in. Price $19.95. .. .Order #MK 1236 

4. DELUXE VERSIONS for #1 and #3 combination. Price $29.95 #MK 1239 

METRO ELECTRONICS, 5131 Mission St., San Francisco, CA 94112 (415) 333-1917 Established 1963 

rerms; Check. Money order, Visa/Master. Add $2,00 for Shipping and handling, 
* D 4 £ Board will require soldering, (California residents add sales tax] 

^^^r^-^for COCO lis, add "A" to part number. -^^-i-i-*. 



222 the RAINBOW May 1964 




THE 
INTRONICS 
EPROM 
PROGRAMMER 

Price: S140. 



Newly Designed Unit 

NEW VERSION 2.4 

□ Plugs into ROM pack port. 

□ Now programs 8K X 8 EPROM in 15 Seconds, 

□ On board firmware included. 

□ No personality modules required. 

□ Will program most EPROM's. 

□ High quality zero insertion force EPROM socket. 

Enclosed in 
Molded Plastic Case 




FULLY ASSEMBLED. TESTED 
& GUARANTEED FOR 90 DAYS 



$59.95 



SPLC-1 Lower Case 

FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER & TDP-100 

□ TRUE LOWER CASE CHARACTERS □ NO CUTTING OR SOLDERING □ FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH 
ALL TRS-80C (SPECIFY REVISION BOARD) [NOT COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 2] □ INVERTED VIDEO 
AT A FLIP OF A SWITCH 



YOUR SOURCE FOR THE 

COLOR 
COMPUTER 

• DRIVE 0 FOR CCXO $329 

• DRIVE 1 FOR COCO $229 

*GUARANTEEDFOR ONE FULL YEAR 

• DISK CONTROLLER FOR COCO $139 

•SATURN RS-232 PORT EXPANDER $ 30 

•POWER-ON LE.D. KIT $ 6 

•FRONT RESET SWITCH KIT $ 7 

• LIBRARY CASE HOLDS 70 DISKS $ 23 

•NEW MULTI-COLOR RAINBOW DISKS . .$ 25 

•ELEPHANT DISKS SSDD $ 23 

•8 PRIME 64K RAM-CHIPS $ 50 

•GEMINI lOX PRINTER $299 

• HAYES SMART MCOEM 300 $199 

F A S T- UPGRADE SEmCES $CALLf 



NEW SOFTWARE 



0S-9BBS $89.95 

□ MULTI-USER CAPACITY □ FASTER THAN MOST BBS's 

□ MULTNTASKING (NO LONGER COMPLETELY TIES UP 
YOUR COCO) □ REQUIRES OS-9 AND BASIC 09 

OS'9 40-11:301^ 
Program $24.95 

□ NOW OPERATE 35/40/80 DOUBLE SIDE. DOUBLE DENSITY 
DRIVES UNDER OS-9 



64K Terminal 
Package 



$24.95 






(Dealer Inquiries Invited) 

• MINIMUM $2.00 SHIPPING S HANDLING 

• NYS RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX. 
» ALL OTHER ORDERS ADD 4% SHIPPING. 



•OS-9 IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF MICROWARE. INC. 



□ AFFORDABLE □ REQUIRES 64K MEMORY □ GIVES YOU 
52-58K BUFFER □ WRITES TO DISC □ READS IN FROM 
DISC □ STANDARD DISPLAY 



Electronics 

Company 

Inc. 



62 COMMERCE DRIVE 
FARMINGDALE. NY 11735 

(516) 249-3388 



Software Revlewm 



Cultivate Action, Fun 
With Demon Seed 



With such a large amount of software available for the 
Color Computer and so many variations of each, it is some- 
times difficult to decide on what to purchase. In the area of 
popular arcade games, there can be as many as six or eight 
different versions from assorted companies, so you can flip a 
coin to decide what to purchase or, instead, pick up the 
Rainbow and go through the reviews to help you make up 
your mind. So pull up a chair right next to me and we'll boot 
up this program together and take a look. 

Confiputer Shack has released a new arcade game called 
Demon Seed. The object is to protect the world from the 
demonic forces that want to take over the universe, or 
something like that. You, brave warrior, must (as usual) 
save the (pick on^ of the following): world, cosmos, earth or 
your pel hamster from this evil. Do you have what it takes? 
Are you ready? Can you handle it? Do you want to turn the 
page? 

When the program appears on your magic tube, the first 
thing you will see is the title screen of Demon Seed. If you 
would like to watch the demo mode for awhile, jUst leave it 
alone. Otherwise, hit the [ENTER] key to begin the game. 
As the game unravels the first wave of bats will swoop down 
on you against a black background. You may fire upon them 

f d^mlitp €t)rigtian ^ofttoare^ 



MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



If for any reason you ar6 not fully satisfied with any program you 
purchase from Quality Christian Software just return the origirKil 
progrom (Cqisette ot DiSKette) and we will refund thepurchtase price 
of the DTogram. 



***** 4 NEW PROGRAMS ***** 



PILGRIM'S PROGRESS: An interactive adaptation of Pilgrim's Progress 
in \he form of on adventure gome. Your progress Is directed away 
from the city of destruction and towards the Celestial City. 
Important Biblical Doctrines ar6 grasped as th>e player proceeds, 
(Requires 16k E.C.B. - $17.99 Cossett e.^ 

CNURol TtME: A light hearted noh-thedoglcat aclveriture for the 
whole family. You're almost late for church and to top it off you 
forgot your Bible, Rushir^ back into your tx)use you find ttyjt th>6 
sticky front door has bolted behind you. The object Is to find your 
Biblp arKj get outside so that you won't be late for church. 32k 
E.C.B.-$1p.99 Cassette. 

MILE REFOENCE PROGRAM: Topographkxsl Bibte Reference Pro- 
gfbm coweHr»g 2 7 Topics with 60 Biblical Ref^nces. 1 6k E.CB: not 
required— Si 0.99 Cdssette. 

3-GAME PACK #3: Reversed Sword Drill game #2. "Who Did Thof ' 
Game #2 & "Who Said Thdt" Bible Quote game #2, - 16k tC.^. - 

$10.99 Cassette 



JUDE: A full \exf commentary and reference study on the Epistle of St. 

Jude. S6e the review in the December 1983 Issue of RAINBOW. Pag© 

286. Requires 32k E.CB. Cassette $13,99 Disk 316.99 
3-GAME PACK #1: Books of the Bible Game, Bible Character Word 

Scramble gome & "Who Sold Thar Bible quote game. Requires 1 6k ' 

E.C.a - Cassette $10.99 
3-GAME PACK *2: Reversed Sword Drill game, '"Who Did Thor game d( 

Bible Places Word Scramble gome. Req. 16k E.C.B.— Cassette Verskin 

$10.99. 

P,O.Box189P 24 Hour ffT^ 
Duncan, OK 73634 phone rainbow 
40S/2SSM96 SeFvicG 



neose Add S2 00 

C.O.D.'i cxJd $4.00 
Cveneos odd $6.00 



by pressing the button on your joystick, or defend yourself 
with the available shields by moving the stick forward. 
When you bring up a shield you become immobile for awhile 
until the energy of the shield wears off. The shields last about 
six seconds, so be ready to move again. You can fire through 
your shields if you want. Also, the amount qf shields given to 
you are unlimited and you don't have to "s^ve'Uhem for the 
harder rounds. 

During this first waVe you may only have two shots on the 
screen at any given tittle. The second found is identical to the 
first pile with the bats, but only one shot on the screen is 
allowed. Each Screen will end once you have killed off every 
intruder in sight. 

The graphics and game play improve considerably when 
you reach the next level. Here, the visual effects are colorful 
and very smooth. Small eggs forni on the screen and swarm 
left and right, back and forth, growing right before your 
eyes. Whoosh, swoosh, lik0 a slithering snake. Then they 
hatch. The Demon Seed. Wicked wings flapping furiously, 
blue 4nd red and yellow. They fire upon yoti randomly, 
quickly, sometimes machine gun-like. 

They swoop down at yoii, on you, past you, and return 
again at the top of your screen. You need quick reflexes now. 
Shoot a wing off. Wl^ichever one you hit grows back in a 
short time. If you shbot both wings off, the demon turns 
back to an egg.* Tuff stuff, eh? If ydu hit the demon squarely 
nght between the eyes you finish him off. The sound of the 
shots and hi^s are electronic, These third and fourth rounds 
use the s^^me firing principle. Two shots on the screen the 
first time around and one for the second, 

If you have survived this far, you have the privilege of 
blowing away (pick one): the mother ship, the flagship, your 
landlord or your citizenship to save face and the world. 

There it sits, waiting silently, suspended in the darkness of 
space and your living room. Our old friends, the bats, arrive 
for a return engagement to hassle you. You fire at the 
bulkhead of the ship, putting a dent in it at best. The ship 
slowly starts to descend, giving you less time to avoid the 
shots beiilg fired from the ship. The middle portion serves as 
a rotating protection device to disperse the damage you 
inflict, so you must continue to aim for the same spot when it 
comes around a couple of times to finally open up a channel 
and lay waste to the king baddie hiniself. Get in one clean 
shot and whappl The ship explodes all across your screen 
and you can start all over again. 

Another feature of the game is a display of the high scores 
of the evening. You can also pause for some fresh air or 
restart the game anytime ypu want, 

I should like to point out at this time that the disk 1 
received for review was copy^prptected. When you purchase 
Demon Seed^ yo\x will not be able to make a copy for your 
backup files. Neither the backup nor copy commands \yill 
work. Also, as the program loads, the disk head travels back 
and forth at least eight times to achieve a load ^vhich I feel 
brings about unnecessary wear and tear on the disk drive 
unit. I also think the disk would wear out sooner than 
normal because of this. 

All in all, Demon Seed is a good arcade gailfie that will 
grow on you. It is available in 16K and 32K versions. 

(Michtron, 1691 Eason, Pontiae, Ml 48054, $27.95 tape, 
$29.95 disk) 

— Steve Schechter 



224 the RAINBOW May 1984 




If you like color . . . you re going 
to love HOT CoCo magazine. 

The exciting new monthly devoted exclusively to the 
TRS-80 Color Computer.* It's from the publisher of 80 
Micro. 

Let HOT CoCo color your system with: 

•Feature articles on color graphic techniques 

•Computer art 

•Games 

•Specific color applications in home, education, 

business and hobbies 
PLUS 

•Ideas on patching, aiding and trouble shooting 

•Buyer's guides 

•Product and book reviews 

•Hardware interfacing and enhancing 

•Programming techniques and tutorials 

Best of all, HOT CoCo is written by users just like you. 




The material is always up-to-date and useful. Hardware, 
software, books ... what's new. . .what's best... what 
works. And you get one year for only $24.97. A 13th issue is 
yours FREE with pre-payment (check or credit card). Use 
the attached order form, the coupon, or call toll free 
1-800-258-5473. Subscribe Todayl 



'\T M O I please sign me up for one year of HOT CoCo at 
JL l3 • $24.97. * * I understand that with payment enclosed or 
credit card order I will receive a free issue making a total of 13 issues for 
$24.97. 

□MC DVISA DAE DCHECK/MO DRILL ME 
Card# Exp. Date 



Signature. 
Name 



.Interbank #_ 



Address 
City 



State_ 



Canada 6- Mexico $27.97/1 yr. only, US Funds 

Foreign surface $44.97/1 yr. only, US Funds drawn on US bank. 745 FRB 

Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. 

HOT CoCo»PO Box 975»Farmingdale NY 11737 

'TRS-80 Color Computer is a trademark of Radio Shack, a division of Tandy Corp. 
* "This price voids all previous offers. 




CHICAGO 



The fun and excitement of RAINBOW- 
fest is coming your way . . . and now 
there will be a RAINBOWfest near youi 

For the 1983-84 season, we scheduled 
four RAINBOWfests in four parts of the 
country. If you missed the RAINBOW- 
fests in Fort Worth on Oct. 14-16, Long 
Beach on Feb. 17*19, and New 
Brunswick on March 30-Aprli 1, you stlH 
have time to make plans now to attend 
our Chicago show. It will offer fun> 
excitement, new products, seminars and 
information for your CoCol 

Our Chicago show wlH be held at the 
Hyatt Regency, Woodf teld, which offers 
special rates for RAINBOWfest. The 
show will open at 7 pvm,*tO p.m. Friday, 
run 10 a.m.-6 p.m* Saturday and close 
with an 1 1 a.m.-4p.m. session Sunday, It 
will have a CoCo Community Breakfast 
featuring an outstanding national 
speaker from the Color Computer 
World. And the exhibition will be inter- 
spaced with a number of seminiar s^* 
sions on ail aspects of CoCo — from 
writing in machine language td tiiakln^ 
your BASIC work better. 



But most of all, there will be exhibi- 
tors. Lots of them, AH ready to demon- 
strate products of every kind. Some with 
special programs and hardware itenis to 
introduce. Others with show specials. 

Tickets can be secured directly from 
th^ Rainbow. We'fl also send you a spe- 
cial reservation form so you can get your 
special room rate 

Come to RAINBOWrest . . help us afl 
celebrate CoCo Community at its finest 



Come to RAINBOWf^t — the site pt, 
CoCo's vary first show. And right next to 
the world's largest indoor shopping 
malt. 

RAINBOWfett-Chicago 
&AT6S: June 22*24 
HOTiL: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
fto^t: $46 per n^ht sirigte/doubl$ 
KEYNOTE: Ed Juge, director of market 
olanning forthe Tandy Corporation 

atin0 18, 1984 



^UniT6D 

United Airlines and the Rainbow have 
joined togetihtr to offer a special dis- 
counted fare to attendees of RAIN- 
BOVirNNil, Chicago. Simpiy by catttng 
United at the toll tree number listed 
below and identifying our meeting, iiylth 
account number2426, ydu wilt be eligi- 
ble for a sp^lni "super saver** fare. This 
could mean as rrvuch m 9 50 percent 
discount off that roguiar coach fare. 
(800)621-4041 
Account Number 2428 



QWfes# 



f4't«iMin«i to fil«eo*W«»i in , 





.bif#sKfasttick0l8at$1i^i<^» ixA0. 



FREE RAINBOW 
poster for 

first 500 tickets ordered. 
FREE T-ahlrt to first 5 people 
from each etate who 
buy tickets. 

Make chscks paysbls Ha 
thB Rainbow 

MAIL TO: 

RAINBOWfest 
P.O. BOX 209 
Prospect, KY 40059 



jarr4«?'ATt — n.,„; — ^ 



Orders received l^ss th^n two w^eks prior to <how ii^nln^ wW be h^d^fdr you istt the dpjbr. 



RAIN BO Wf est 
Chicago 

Seminar Program And Speakers 

Ed Juge Keynote Speaker 

Ed, director of market planning for the Tandy Corporation, will be our keynote speaker at 
RAINBOWfesfs "CoCo Community Breakfast." 

Frank Hogg Advanced Operating Systems 

Frank is the president of Frank Hogg Laboratory and a forerunner in FLEX and OS-9 systems. 

Richard Parry IVIusic Synthesis 

Richard is the founder and owner of Speech Systems and is the designer of music and speech 
synthesizers. 

Linda Nielsen Women And Computers: 

How And Why 

Linda, of Moreton Bay Laboratory, and several others active in the CoCo area, will lead a 
discussion on women's involvement in computing in general and the Color Computer in 
particular. 

Jim Reed Writing For Rainbow 

Jim, Managing Editor of the Rainbow, will talk about how you can submit programs and 
articles to magazines for fun and profit. 

Charles Santee and Improving 
Michael Plog Educational Software 

Michael Plog is an education writer for the Rainbow and an educational researcher in addition 
to being a major partner in the Center for Opinion Research. 

Dr. Santee is an education writer for Hot CoCo and has published poetry and curriculum as 
well as statistical and educational software (including CCM^3 for JARB Software). He is a 
♦ recipient of several grants and awards for educational technology. 

CoCo Classroom 

Sharpen your programming skills and learn about logo. Introduce your computer illiterate 
friends to the wonderful world of CoCo. Classes will be conducted by trained Radio Shack 
instructors. 

PLUS . . . Additional seminars are planned as well. 

Admission to all seminars is at no charge. See registration form for admission prices to exhibit 
area and breakfast. 



Software RevlewS^^^'^^^^^^^t^ 

A Guide To Food Contents 
Gives Nutritional Information 

For those trying to lose weight, or for others looking to 
eat a balanced diet, the search for proper nutritional infor- 
mation often leads to piles of magazines and stacks of 
books. A Guide To Food Contents is the first attempt by a 
programmer to cover this area for the CoCo. 

Available on tape or disk, the program requires 32K 
minimum for use. A one-page instruction sheet details con- 
cisely the program's operation, which is simple and direct. 
The program loads in three parts. The first section puts up a 
screen listing the abbreviations used in the program and 
loads "Part 1." Parts 1 and 2 run in an identical manner, 
showing a menu listing the food categories covered in that 
parti and giving the option to load the other part. Part 1 
covers vegetables, fruits, meat and poultry, and fish and 
seafood. Part 2 gives information on milk, cereal products, 
cakes and puddings, spreads, etc., beverages and alcoholic 
drinks. 

After choosing the desired food category, a listing of 
individual foods is given, each prefaced by a number. It is a 
good idea at this point to have a paper and pencil to jot down 
the numbers of the foods you intend to look up, as this can 
save a lot of frustration going back and forth from the listing 
to the menu to the listing and then to the screen searching for 
your particular food item. The listings are for the most part 
alphabetical, but this varies with each food category. 



After you have compiled the list of reference numbers tor 
the particular foods in your chosen category, you will be 
asked to enter a number, or to press [ENTER] to return to 
the main menu. When the number is entered, the name of the 
food is listed, often with a qualifying remark (boiled, fried, 
raw, etc). Below that is the listing of contents, as below: 

BEEF, HAMBURGER (2.6 oz.) 

cal,195 

wat.l37gr 

pro,l 1.3gr 

fat,15.8gr 

carb,1.5gr 

vit. A, folic acid, Bl, B12, niacin 
min, iron, phosphorus 

Sometimes there is some minor confusion, caused by 
slight differences in food description (i.e., "beef, chipped," 
chosen from the food category becomes "beef, chopped" in 
the listing). The greatest problem, though, is not due to what 
is in the program, but what is missing. 

It is possible to use this program to find information on a 
number of individual food items, but a number of very 
important items, both individual food items and even cate- 
gories, are missing. In individual foods, there was no listing 
for skim milk, french fries or baked potatos. No mixed 
foods, such as pizza are given, no soups, and no breads and 
very little in starches. The lack of these common foods 
would seem to make diet planning somewhat difficult. 

In testing both tape and disk versions, the tape proved 
easy to use, running with no problem and to my full satisfac- 
tion. The disk did cause a problem, though. The first section 
loaded with no problem, but when Part 1 would begin to 
load the disk drive would just light up and do an imitation of 
a Mazda (instead of going "click, click, click," it just sat 
there and "Hmmmmmm"ed). As 1 could not load it, I could 
not LIST to find the error. A friend found that by using a 
well-known processor (Nelson Software Color Writer II) it 
was possible to "read" the disk, and so found the problem. 
There was a "speed-up" POKE in the second line of both 
Parts I and 2. Two computers, a stock 32K "E" board and a 
home upgraded 32K "E" board, each had this problem, but 
removing the POKEs allowed the program to load and run. 
Even without the "speed-up," the program was, in effect, 
instantaneous, so its removal was not a detriment. 

A Guide To Food Contents lives up to its name, providing 
a useful quick reference to many food items. A little more 
polish and perhaps the addition of some foods not included 
in the guide would raise this from an interesting guide to a 
real tool, to be used in diet planning. 

(Computing and Fitness, 35080 Chandler Ave., #80, Cala- 
nesa, CA 92320, tape or disk versions $39.95) 

— Nevin J. Templin 



CANADIANS! 




AVOID CUSTOMS DELAYS & CHARGES 


ORDER YOUR SOFTWARE IN CANADA 




WE HANDLE THE FOLLOWING PRODUCTS. ALL ON TAPE EXCEPT FLEXI-FILER 


COMPUTERWARE 


SPECTRAL ASSOC. 


ADDRESS FACTORY 


24.95 


ALPHA SEARCH 


17.95 


BLOCKHEAD 


36.95 


ANDROID ATTACK 


29.95 


COLOR CONNECTION 


39.95 


INVADERS 


24.95 


DOODLE BUG 


36.95 


CUBIX 


29.95 


ELDIABLERO 


26.95 


DEFENSE 


29.95 


FLEXI-FILER (DISC) 


87.95 


GALAX ATTACK 


29.95 


HOME MONEY MANAGER 26.95 


GHOST GOBBLER 


26.95 


MEGAPEDE 


29.95 


KEYS OF THE WIZARD 


26,95 


MOON HOPPER 


33.95 


LANCER 


29 95 


NERBLE FORCE 


33.95 


MAGIC BOX 


31.95 


PAC ATTACK 


33.95 


MS. GOBBLER 


29.95 


RAIL RUNNER 


33.95 


PLANET INVASION 


29.95 


SEMI-DRAW 


29.95 


SPACE RACE 


29.95 


SHARK TREASURE 


29.95 


SPACE WAR 


29.95 


SPACE AMBUSH 


29.95 


STORM ARROWS 


29.95 


SYNTHER 7 


29.95 


TRILOGY 

WHIRLYBIRDRUN 


67.95 
29.95 


TOM MIX 




PRICKLY PEAR 




PROTECTORS 


33 95 






SPACE SHUTTLE 


39.95 


ANCIENT WISDOM TRILOGY 


53.95 


TAPE DUPE 


29.95 


ASTROLOGY 


47.95 


TAPE TO DISK 


24.95 


8 BIT BARTENDER 


26.95 


THE FROG 


37.95 


FLIGHT 


26,95 


THE KING 


34.95 


GANGBUSTERS 


26.95 


TRAPFALL 


37 95 


TEEEOFF 


33,95 


MARK DATA 




HOUSEHOLD HELPER 
JUNGLE 


26.95 
26.95 


COSMIC CLONES 


33.95 


MONSTERS & MAGIC 


26,95 


GLAXXONS 


33.95 


SHAFT 


33,95 


ELBANDITO 


33.96 


SONGBOOK 


39.95 


SUPER SCREEN 


37.96 


VIKINGS 


26 95 


ALL ITEMS INCLUDE SHIPPING AND HANDLING ~ ALL PRICES 






IN CANADIAN DOLLARS 




10% DISC 


ON 2 ITEMS - 


15% ON 3 OR MORE ITEMS 






ONT. RESIDENTS ADD 7% TAX 




WS>!1 - 


MASTERCARD ACCEPTED 




FOR CATALOG SEND $2 (REFUNDED FIRST ORDER) TO: 




T & S SOFTWARE 


P.O. BOX 583 ORLEANS. ONT. KIC 1S9 




SOME ITEMS ALSO AVAILABLE AT COTS MICROSYSTEMS, 






1396 STARTOP ROAD. OTTAWA 





See You At 

RAINBOWfest 

Chicago 
June 22-24 



228 the RAINBOW May 1984 



One Stop Shopping For The Color Computer 



TRANSTAR - 120 
Daisywheel 
Printer 

13 inch carriage 
14 CPS 
Parallel Port 
6 mo. warranty 

Reg. *599.9« 
SALE 
$589.«5 

including S/P Converter 

while supply lasts 











iiiiiif 


il 


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MORE QUALITY: 120 cps - thruput time of 55 Ipm • resolution 
(120x144) bit image &block{6x6)graphics»extra fast forms feed 
MORE FLEXIBILITY: super/sub script • underlining • back- 
spacing • double strike mode • emphasized print mode • com- 
patible with most software supporting leading printers • 10* car- 
riage • 15 carrage Gemini 15 available 

MORE RELIABILITY: 180-day warranty (90 days for head & rib- 
bon) • mtbl rate of more than 5 million lines • print head life of 
more than 100 million characters. 

Gemini 10X *319-^^ 




Fup m 

Punch Your 
DISKS 
For Double the 
STORAGE 
$g 95 



Cass. Disk 

VIP DATAbase *59.95 

VIP Writer Botli for ^59. 95 

VIP Terminal Both for M9.95 

CerComp Hi-Res Screen M9.95 

Double Density ColorTerm + *29.95 *39.95 

Elite Calc *59.95 ^59.95 

Compuserve Sign Up Kit *39.95 

Key Color Software Key 264K *39.95 

UUCU Battery Backup System '99.95 



Money Manager 

from 

80 Custom Software 

28 ACCOUNTS See January 

300 Transactions Rainbow for 

Checkbool< Balance Review! 

32 K • Cassette ^24.95 • Disk ^29.95 




REITZ™ 

Serial To Parallel Converter 

Transfer Data to your Printer 
At Up to 9600 BAUD! 

»59.95 



Please include phone number witii all orders. Also add $5.00 s/H for all printer and computer orders. 
$2.00 for all software orders. Ohio residents please add 6% state sales tax. 

1(800)-242-COCO (outside Ohio) 1-419-537-8937 computer order Une 



DISCOVER THE WORLD OF COMPUTING WITH 



REITl 



COMPUTER CENTER 




3170 W. Central 
Westgate Meadows Shopping Center 
Toledo, Ohio 43606 
Phone (419) 537-1432 (in Ohio) 
Fort Wayne Area call (219) 493-7251 
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. EST 




Software RevlewSS^SSS^S^^SSSSSi^ 

Business A ccounting System 
To The Rescue 

By Bruce Rothermel 



From early morn' to setting sun, this humble reviewer is 
the Director of Marketing for a manufacturer of power 
tools. The accounting functions for the company are per- 
formed by a group of bean counters and number crunchers 
affectionately (?) referred to as the Sales Prevention De- 
partment. They magically feed numbers into our HP-3000 
Computer which spews endless reports on reams of greenbar 
paper. With corporate sales of over $200 million dollars, this 
immense accounting group is necessary. 

However, after the pinstripe suit is returned to the closet, 1 
become the President, Chief Executive, Head Honcho, 
Boss, and entire staff of a small home-based business called 
Cobra Softwear. No, that's not a misspelling. 1 have a mail- 
order business which sells Mustang and Cobra emblem La 
Coste golf shirts to owners of these exceptional vehicles. 

What started out as a very small operation has progressed 
into a real business. And my previous methods of account- 
ing — shoving bills into one drawer and checks into another 
— has become woefully inadequate. To my rescue has come 
the Business Accounting System (BAS) from Mark Data 



Products. 

The BAS is a family of programs which operate interac- 
tively. They require a CoCo with at least 32K RAM, and 
80-column printer and at least one (two preferred) disk 
drives. 

On loading BAS, the Mark Data Super Screen program is 
executed converting the TV screen to a 51 character by 24 
line display, a great improvement over the standard screen. 
The operator is presented the program menu, which lists the 
options available to the user. When a task is selected, the 
CoCo loads the program to handle that task from the system 
disk. This modular system reduces the amount of memory 
required. When a transaction is completed any pertinent 
data is automatically transferred to the data files of the other 
programs in the BAS. 

Using BAS, you can create, update and maintain data 
files and prepare the necessary accounting reports including 
transaction journal, a P&L or income report, and an interim 
or trial balance and a balance sheet. 

Operation is similar to standard manual accounting 
procedures with the CoCo providing assistance during each 
step. An understanding of accounting fundamentals is help- 
ful; however, the documentation and self-prompting screens 
walk the user through the basics of getting the system going. 

The system is shipped with dummy data loaded on the 
disk. The first part of the 3 1-page instruction manual takes 
you through the basics of starting the system, entering trans- 
actions and printing reports. After getting familiar with the 
system by working with dummy data, you get into the meat 
of the program by customizing the supplied Chart of 
Accounts for your business. 

The Chart of Accounts then becomes the heart of the 
accounting system. A Chart of Accounts is supplied which is 
so complete that it could be used by many businesses with- 
out change. 

I found that is was too complete for my needs. I didn't 
need all the accounts furnished so 1 deleted many of them 
and added a few to meet my specific use. 

The Accounts are grouped into the following classifi- 
cations: 

Assets 
Liabilities 
Equity 
Sales 

Cost of Sales 
Operating Expenses 
Other Expenses 

This accounting system observes the rule — the sum of all 
assets must equal the sum of all liabilities plus the sum of all 
equities. Each transaction must affect two accounts. The 
computer insists on it. In fact, the message "Assets = Liabili- 
ties -{- Equity'' is displayed at the top of the screen as each 
data record is reviewed. 

While the 10 programs included in BASmitv^ci with each 
other to create one system, an explanation of each program 
may help you to understand the capabilities of the total 
system. 

1 ) START — reserves the required disk buffer space and 
calls the SETUP. 

2) SETUP — program which sets up proper printer 
operation and loads and executes the Super Screen pro- 
gram. SETUP then requests the "workdrive" number 0 



J'^t wait for wour- printer anuMor*! Tapeol 

■ llDM wou to typ« th« ftvKt docuMfit at th« samv 
I WCMJT printer is printing th» first ona. 
tnc I f ical ly dasignad for Talawr i tar-64 uaars. 
Optional daacvndara Includad for DMP-IBB printara 
32/6^, dlak coaipatibla •2A.^ ■•■ gLSB S&H 




#W# timmhfmr 



pla^tf in January 1964 Rainbowi thla program 

im tha Ri«ht Stuff!" Bpacifu or 32/64 K« dlract 
pav* to disk •19.93 BftH 



TSPOOL 



BACK »Y POPW_AR DEMAND! Usar transparent graphic 
lowwrcasa daacandara for LPVI I /DMP-iefl prlntara. 
For uma vith Basic (iA/32/&4K) or Talawr i tar-64 
f32/64K) onlyi disk coMpatiblo. SIS. 93 * tLOB 6«cH 



TeLBWItlTER-64 



For your convanivncsi mm of for Tolawr i tar-64 at 
•49.99 tapo or •99.93 disk -^ttl.ee BftH. In our 
opinion, this is tha BEST tford procassor you can 
buy. Saw 13X on our T8POOL or Doscandors if you 
ordor in cowblnation with TaloMr 1 tsr'-64. 

Talayritar'64 is « tradaaark of Cognitac 



COD ordar-s gladly acc»ptod, call <B13> 321-2840 
bottaaon 9a« & 3p« E6T 

Sorry mm cannot accapt cradit card ordars 



R O Bom -«i>13«y5 
St: R«'fc«r< »bur< a 1 



230 the RAINBOW May 1984 



AARDUARK LTD. 




VIDEO ADVENTURES 



TM 



DUNGEONS OF MAGDARR - Serious 
D of D for up to 8 players. 
Features full 3d GRAPHICS! 
You get a choice of several 
characters that grow from 
game to game and are 
interchangeable with char- 
acters from our famous 
Dungeons of Death game. A 
real dungeon with level after 
level of monsters to conquer 
and treasures to find - all In 
hl-res 3d graphics. 

Available On: TRSaOt IBM PC, CMD64 



TAPE $ia95 



DISK $24.95 



BAG-IT-MAN ■ The ultimate 
arcade game for TRS80C or 
CMD64. This one has three 
screens full of BAGS OF 
GOLD, CARTS & ELE- 
VATORS TO RIDE IN. MINE 
SHAFTS, and TWO NASTY 
GUARDS. Great sound and 
color and continuous 
excitement. 

Available On: TRSaOC 32IC CMD64 

TAPE $19.95 DISK $24.95 






QUEST - A different kind of 
Graphic Adventure. It is 
played on a computer 
generated mape of Alesia. 
You'll have to build an army 
and feed them through 
combat, bargaining, explo- 
ration oif ruins and temples, 
and outright banditry! Takes 
2-5 hours to play and is 
different each time. 

Available On: TRS80C 16K, CMD64. VIC20 13K, MC10 
16K. TI99 (EXT. BASIC), IBMPC 

TAPE $14.95 DISK $18.95 



MARS - Your ship crashed on 
the Red Plane and you have 
to get home. You will have to 
explore a Martian City, 
repair your ship, and deal 
with possibly hostile aliens to 
get home again. This is 
recommended as a first 
Adventure. It is In no way 
simple - playing tihne 
normally runs from 30 to 50 
hours, but it lets you try out 
Adventuring before you 
battle the really tough ones. 
Full Graphics Adventure. 



- Available On: TRS8QC. CMC 64. IBM PC 



^ TAPE $iag6 DISK $2495 

NEWI GRAPHIC 



AAROVARK offers over 120 original high quality programs. 
Send one dollar for a current catalog and receive a $1 .00 
gift certificate good towards your next purchase. 



STARFIRE - If you enjoyed 
StarRaiders or StarWars. 
you will love Starfire. It is not 
a copy, but the best shoot- 
em-up, see them In the 
window space game on the 
CMD64 or TRS80C. The 
fantastic graphics will put 
you right in the control room 
as you hyperspace from 
quadrant to quadrant 
fighting the aliens and 
protecting your bases. 

Available On: TRS60G t6K, CMD64 



TAPE $19.95 



DISK $24.95 



PYRAMID • ONE OF THE TOUGHEST 
ADVENTURES. Average time 
through the pyramid is 50 - 
70 hours. Clues are 
everywhere and some 
ingenious problems make 
this popular around the 
world. FULL GRAPHIC 
ADVENTURE. 

Available On: TRS80C 16K, CMD64, MCtO 16K. IBM PC 
TAPE Sia95 OISK $24.95 



ADVENTURES 




Authors ^ AARDVARK pays top dollar for high quality 
programs. Send a copy today for a personal review and 
editorial help. 



TO ORDER: Send amount Indicated plus $2.00 shipping, per order. Include quantity desired and your preference of tape or disk 
Be sure to Indicate type of system and amount of memory. When using charge card to order by mall, be sure to Include expiration date. 



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AARDVARK /ieCion. SoftetMVtc 23S2 S. COMMERCE • WALLED LAKE, Ml 48088 • (313) 669-31 



10 



CMD64 / TRS80C / IBMPC / VIC20 / TI99 



for single systems, I for dual disks. The workdrive is 
defined as the disk drive to which all accounting data is 
stored. 

3) DATES ET enters the current date. 

4) MENU — ties all parts of the accounting system 
together giving you a choice of: 

5) TRANSACT — The transaction program. 
Here you can: 

a) Post a transaction 

b) Post a check 

c) Reviews a posted transaction 

d) Return to main menu 

6) PJOURNAL — prints out a listing of every transac- 
tion stored in the file. Each page is numbered and you 
have the option of clearing the Journal file at the end of 
an accounting period. 

7) PINCOME& 

8) PBA LANCE print a formatted balance sheet. They 
compare to see if Assets = Liabilities & Equity. If not, the 

9) CH ARTFIX program is called so you can catch the 
error. 

10) NEWFILES will probably be used only once to set 
up your company name, address, etc., and to set up your 
custom Chart of Accounts. 

The actual operation of the BAS program is easier to do 
than explain. 

My little shirt business is now set up on BAS and a 
biweekly run of the system will help me keep one of my New 
Year's resolutions — to get organized. It will also be of great 
value at the end of the year when tax time rolls around. My 
accountant will love the printed reports and a running audit 
trail for all sales and expenses. 

The only difficulty I encountered was that the Super 
Screen program included in BAS is not documented. Error 
messages are given in numerical code rather than in the 
two-letter alpha code the CoCo usually uses. Mark Data has 
stated that a Hsting of the error codes will be included in 
future shipments. 1 would prefer full documentation, but an 
explanation of the unique error codes is a help. 

The Business Accounting System is not inexpensive, but 
considering what it can do to organize a small business, it is 
quite a value. 

(Mark Data Products, 24001 Alicia Parkway, No. 207, Mis- 
sion Viejo, CA 92691, 32K & one disk drive, $99.95) 



Software Re¥lewi 



Number-Kruncher 
Good For Basic Math 

When 1 first unpacked my Color Computer, I typed in a 
program called "Drawing Board" from the Radio Shack 
manual. This program makes colored lines on the screen 
when you press the arrow keys. My wife's unappreciative 
comment was: "Wonderful, now we own a $500 Etch-A- 
Sketch." 

The program Number- Kruncher, from Moonshot Acres 
Software, is sort of like that. It gives your several hundred 
dollar computer system all the power of a $10 pocket calcu- 
lator. Number- Kruncher allows you to key in a number, 
select an operation, and then key in a second number. The 
two numbers and the answer are all displayed simultane- 
ously in a box in the center of the screen. It requires 16K of 
memory and Extended Color BASIC. 

While you might sometimes want to use your computer 
like a calculator, this program is too limited to be useful. 
First of all, it has only the four basic functions: addition, 
subtraction, multiplication and division. No square roots, 
trig functions, or other advanced features. Second, the for- 
mat of numbers used is very restrictive. Numbers may have, 
at most, six digits to the left of the decimal point and, at 
most, two digits to the right of the decimal point. The 
program does permit chaining of operations and can hold 
one number in memory. The program provides several 
screens of instruction and help screens to remind you how to 
use the program. 

The documentation suggests that you might want to 
incorporate this program into your own software. One sug- 
gestion is to use it as an on-screen calculator for a financial 
application, like an income tax program. But Number- 
Kruncher is too limited to do even the simple calculations 
you'd want in an income tax program. For example, the 
income tax rate in my state is 2.2 percent. Since you're only 
allowed two digits to the right of the decimal point, you can't 
multiply by .022, and so you can't calculate the state income 
tax. 

All in all, I can't imagine any reason to buy this program. 
Editor's Note: Moonshot Acres Software advises us 
that a percent function has been added to Number- 
Kruncher and that present owners are being mailed 
patch instructions. 

(Moonshot Acres Software, Route 1, Box 423, Rockfield, 
KY 42274, $7.95 on cassette, postage paid) 

— David Finkel 



— i^J^jrtQnt^*^^^^^^^ can compe'^^ 

_ Send check or money order to: 

CoCo Chips, 92 Acorn Circle. Oxfor<5 OH ^5056^ 




FLORIDA 
SEARCH NO LONGER! 

The Software Connection of 

Fort Lauderdale is your one stop source 
for your Color Computer Software, 
Peripherals, Books, Magazines & Repairs 



THE SQFTUUflBE 
CQIXECTOIil. OL 

5460 Ma State Rd. 7. Suite 106 
Fort Lauderdale. FLOR I DA 3331 9 
(305) 484-7547 



232 the RAINBOW May 1984 



"TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER PRODUCTS" 



" ElUHAmCED 1g48-EP EPROIVI PROGRAMMER " 

The list of directly compatible EPROMs increases by one, now 
including: 2508's. 2758-0/rs. 2516 s, 2716*s. 2532*s, 2732*s. 
68732-0/ 1's. 6B764*s. and 68766's. 



NEWJEATURES INCLUDE: 

1) Intelligent algorithm that reduces programming time to as little 
as 1 /6 that of fixed cycle programmers, 

2) Diagnostic routines to isolate defective EPROMs, or locate 
differences- 

3) A feature that guards against EPROM type entry errors. 

4) Diagnostic routines that prevent keyboard entry errors from 
causing disastrous consequences. 



1 ) EPROM ERASED! 4) BYTE PROGRAMMING! 

2) COMPARE EPROM TO RAM!5} DUMP EPROM TO RAM! 

3) BLOCK PROGRAMMING! 6} JUMP! 

Firmware is "stack-oriented", "position independent", and "menu 
driven". Supplied in an EPROM, it can also be stored on disc or tape 
for execution from RAM if desired. 



STANDARD HARDWARE^FEATljRE^ 

1) It has tts own "on-board" 25 volt programming supply. 

2) A quality textool "zero insertion force" (ZIF) socket. 

3) Socket for firmware on-board. 

A PI A port is also available on the programmer. This 8 bit parallel 
I/O port with handshake lines, can be used for many applications, 
such as a parallel printer port. Details on how to use this port as a 
printer interface are included in the instruction manual. 

The instruction manual describes how to take full advantage of the 
power of this versatile programmer. We think you'll agree, that 
never before was an EPROM programmer so easy to use, and 
feature packed as is the 1248-EP. 

The enhanced i248-EP costs only $129.95. 

Firmware upgrades are available to our previous 1 248-EP custom- 
ers, in EPROM. for just $29.95. 




rr TRS-80 is a trademark of TANDY CORP. 
rr-iJ- SDSaOC is a trademark of the MICRO WORKS. 



" THE CK4 SERIES PWOM/RAM CARPS" 

The CK4 cards work with 2K. 4K. and 8K ROMs or EPROMs of the 
5 volt only variety in 24 pin packages. The CK4 can also work with 
static RAMs. and increase your available <nemory by as much as 
1iB,128 bytes. 

The CK4-1 is specifically designed for use in computers with "F" 
series boards, or those machines that are 'write protected" in the 
address range of SCOOO through SFEFF. The CK4-1. therefore, 
does not incorporate features designed in the CK4 for use with 
RAM. 

The CK4-2 is the unpopulated version of the CK4 series board. Buy 
this version and cohfigure to meet your specific requirements, and 
stretch the value of your dollar. 

FEAUIRESSUMMARY 

1 1 MIX RdM AND HAM! 4] EXTReMEL Y FLEXIBLE DECODING? 

2) EXPAND RAM FROM 2-16K! 5) PROVIDES FOR BATTERY BACKUP! 

3) YOU WRITE PROTECT HAM! 6) LOW COST! 

PRICES 

CK-4 $29.95 ea. CK4-1 $27.95 ea. CK-2 $1 5.95 ea. 

NEW PRODUCT OFFgRH M G 
A/0-80C ANALOG TO DIGITAL CONVERTER BOARD 

The A/D-80C is a 1 5+ channel analog to digital converter with two 
8 bit PI A ports plus handshake lines. 

•{^-Implement closed-loop control of analog processes! 
■}fUse it to control your homes environment! 
■IrComputenze your laboratory or darkroom! 
■Ji-Build a multi-channel voltmeter! 
-JcUse it for waveform generation! 
-vrFor robotics! 

The A/D-BOC is software programmable up to a maximum of 10 
bits of resolution. The number of channels can be expanded beyond 
the 1 6 channel capability supplied, and the channels are software 
selectable. 

The A/0-80C performs nearly 9K A/D conversions per second. 
A generous area of the board is designated for wirewrapping to 
permit customization of analog signal processing circuitry. 
Extensive documentation is provided to assist the user in the 
development of his application. Software listings are provided as an 
aid to software development, and a socket is provided for an 
EPROM for user developed software drivers. 

CONSULT FACTORY FOR AVAILABILITY ANO PRICE INFORMA- 
TION ON NEW PRODUCTS 



FACTORY FRESH COMPOWEMTS : 

ITEM DESCRIPTION PRICE 

2716 EPROM 2K by 8 Bit. $4.50 ea 

2532 EPROM 4K by 8 btt. $6.50 ea. 

682 1P P.LA. $3.50 ea. 

74LS1 56 Open collector decoder $1 .70 ea. 

Socket Textool "Zero Insertion Force" $9.00 ea. 
Minimum component order: $25.00 



ORDERIMG IWFORMATiOM : 

Add $3.00 to all orders to cover shipping and handling. Canadian 
residents add 5% to cover special handling. Arizona residents add 
5°/o sates tax. All items shipped UPS. Please allow 2-3 weeks for 
delivery. Prices subject to change without notice. 

Make checks payable to: 



COMPUTER ACCESSORIES OF ARIZONA 
5801 E. VOLTAIRE DRIVE 
SCOTTSDALE. ARIZONA 85254 

{602) 896-7568 



Software RevfewJSSSISSSSS^^^SSS'/^ 

Beam Rider — A Colorful, 
Energizing Chase Game 

Spectral Associates has done it once again folks. Beam 
Rider is not only pleasing to the eye, but is also a lot of fun to 
play. Because of the many different ways that one can play 
the game, young and old alike will find it hard to stop trying 
to find new screens, gain higher bonus scores or to just see 
how long they may be able to survive. 

As is the case with all of Spectral Associates programs, the 
loading instructions are very Clear and easily understood. 
You will need at least 16K RAM (Extended BASIC is not 
required) and one joystick. If you are using a cassette sys- 
tem, type CLOADM and [ENTER]. With a disk system 
type LOADM and [ENTER]. When you receive the OK 
prompt type £'A'£'C and you will be presented with the title 
screen, which is also the high score screen. To begin play, 
push the fire button on the right joystick and you will be 
jumped to the first screen. 

Each screen or board contains blocks (blue) arranged in 
different patterns that must all be cleared off before one can 
proceed to the next board. Each board also has three 
characters: 

1 ) The bea mer (white solid circle) which you control with 
the joystick. 

2) The red chasers, which follow your beamer around the 
board attempting to get in your way whenever possi- 



ble. Coming into contact with one of the chasers when 
your beamer is not energized will destroy the beamer. 
On the first board there is one chaser, while all of the 
rest have two. The chasers start off slowly, but as you 
clear the blocks from the board, they get faster. 
3) The spinner (white spinning circle) which moves about 
the board at random, if your beamer or the beamer's 
energy beatn contacts the spinner in any way it will 
destroy your beamer. Whenever the spinner touches 
one of the blue blocks, the block becomes multicol- 
ored and for a few seconds (while it is still multicol- 
ored), it will be art energizer. 

Clearing an energizer causes your beamer to become 
energized. While you are energized all point values are 
doubled and the chasers cannot destroy your beamer. While 
energized a bar will appear at the top of the screen. This 
gives you about seven seconds of energy. When this is gone, 
the bar will disappear and yoiir beamer will be vulnerable 
again until you are able to clear another energizer. If you are 
able to beam through a chaser while your beamer is ener- 
gized, you will be awarded 1000 points and the chaser will be 
immobilized for about 1 .5 seconds. Each time an energizer is 
cleared the bonus counter will increase by one and when the 
current board is cleared of all the blocks, you will receive a 
bonus of 1000 times the tiumber of energizers cleared. An 
additional beamer is given for each 50,000 points scored. 

There are three basic ways to approach this game. The 
first is to go for only as many points as possible, not worry- 
ing about clearing boards. (1 was able to score over 160,000 
on the first board this way.) The second way is to clear as 
many boards as possible, not worrying about the amount of 
points scored. (A friend was able to get to the sixth board 
this way.) The third method of play is the obvious combina- 
tion of the first and second methods. Score as many points 
as possible early in the play of a board and then trying to 
clear the rest of the board before the chasers can get too fast 
aiid trap your beamer. There is a fourth method that 1 have 
discovered, but I will nbt reveal it here. I am, at this writing, 
in a bet with my brother-in-law for the championship of the 
family and 1 don't want to give him any advantage in the 
final playoff! 

Each board is differertt. 1 don't know how many different 
boards or screens there are, but I wouldn't be surprised if 
there were about ten. Some of the boards are good for 
scoring points, while others are better for just running and 
trying to get to the next board without dying. All of the 
boards have a very pleasing symmetery or design. 

1 particularly like the way the red chasers have a blurring 
effect when they become very fast. The destruction of your 
beamer is an event that has to been seen and heard to be 
believed! The sound of your destruction is like a tomato 
hitting the wall and as if that isn't enough insult, when your 
beamer is destroyed it goes to pieces, bouncing all over the 
bottom of the screen! 

Overall, this game is easy to play and learn, but offers 
enough of a challenge to make any dedicated gamer an 
addict in one short evening. The graphics are well done and 
the sound effects are functional without being a nuisance. 
(Just don't go to pieces!) 

(Spectral Associates, 3418 South 90th Street, Tacoma, WA 
98409, tape $24.95, disk $28.95) 



COMPUT€R FORMS 

Continuous forms, labels, paper, 
checks, Invoices, statements— uith 
your imprint. Continuous letterhead 
uilth a perf so fine that vou need a 
magnifying glass to tell it's a fan 
fold sheet. Matching envelopes. 

Regular letterhead, business forms 
and cards also. 

Send sample for quote. 

Computer/Printer supplies and 
furniture. 

Send $3.00 (refundable on first 
order) for our 76 page full color 
catalog. 

D€S€ftT PR€SS, INC. 

P. O.Sox 15128 
Lqs Vegas, Nevada 89114 



— Mike Standefer 



234 th« RAINBOW May 1984 



DSL COMPUTER PRODUCTS IIVC 



TRACONTESTER 

DUk and Tape I/O , Anfo 
Sort, works In 16, 32, or 

64 K compntcrs. 
Over 30,000 calls possible. 
Writtsn by WPX rscord 
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21.95 (C) 


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^P?YP 



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FOR ALL COCOS 



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DSL COMPUTER PRODUCTS INC. 

313-582-8930 
313-582-3406 (Data) 
P.O. BOX 1176 
DEARBORN. MI 48121 

Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax to Order. 
Please inclade $2.00 for S. & H. 





Software RevleWi 



the following options: 



Get The Real Sound 
mth Spell-A-Tron 

As voice packs for the Color Computer gain popularity 
and additional users, (see November '83 Rainbow), more 
programs are being released which take advantage of its 
speech capabilities. 

For those not familiar with CoCo voice packs, a quick 
review. The voice pack is a ROM-type cartridge which plugs 
into the ROM pack slot. When a machine language program 
containing a text processor and a dictionary are loaded into 
memory, your Color Computer can then speak words and 
phrases contained in basic language programs. 

The resulting speech is slightly electronic with a Swedish 
east-coast accent (to my west-coast ear). 1 refer to the result- 
ing voice as Uncle Sven. 

An ideal application of speech capability is spelling test- 
ing programs. Since the computer can pronounce the word, 
it is unnecessary to "flash" the word on the screen or use 
audio tapes which make it difficult to change the test words 
or the order of the test words. 

Jarb Software has released their Spell-A^Tron program, 
designed to assist children in mastering their spelling words 
with the assistance of a 32K minimum Extended BASIC 
CoCo, a voice pack using a Votrax SC-01 synthesizer chip 
and DEI Software's Translate program. (For this review 1 
used Spectrum Projects Voice Pak and included software.) 

Spell-A'Trpn consists of two separate programs. Spelling 
and Wordmaker. Spelling is the spelling quiz maker. After 
loading the program and a user specified word file, the 
following options are offered : 

1) Hear and see all words 

2) Hear and computer will speak all words 

3) You spell the words you hear 

4) Load a new wqrd file 



In the "Hear and see all words" mode, the computer will 
pronounce the word, display it on the screen, and pronounce 
the word again. 

In the "Hear and computer will speak all words" mode, 
the computer will pronounce the word, then display and 
pronounce each letter, and then pronounce the word again. 

In the "You spell the words you hear" mode, the computer 
will pronounce the word to be spelled twice and then accept 
the student's response. Pressing the [/] key repeats the word. 
If the correct spelling is given, the student is congratulated 
and given the next word to spell. If the incorrect spelling is 
given, the student is asked to try again. After three incorrect 
tries the correct spelling is given. After all words are pre- 
sented, all incorrectly spelled words are displayed for 
review. 

The second program, Wordmaker, is used to create cus- 
tom word files used in the first program. Spelling, The word 
file contains each word in two forms, the word correctly 
spelled and the word in phonetic form. Wordmaker offers 



1) Enter spelling word 

2) Find a word 

3) List word file 

4) Sort word file 

5) Create word subfile 

6) Load word file 

7) Save word file 



The enter spelling word mode is the main workhorse of 
wordmaker and offers the options of: 

1) Enter pword 

2) Save pword 

3) Speak pword 

4) Delete pword 

5) Main menu 



Pword means phonetic word, the string that is passed to 
the voice synthesizer. In most cases, the spelling word and 
pword will be spelled the same, however some words have to 
be misspelled for them to sound right when spoken. Televi- 
sion is tell-a-vision phonetically. Using Wordmaker, the 
word is pronounced and you just change it until it sounds 
right and then save it. 

Spelling and Wordmaker can hold up to 200 word? in 
each file. 

A textfile called Tronlist is included on a separate tape. It 
contains about 200 words in the sixth grade to adult cate- 
gory. 

In use, the program works fine. The student is asked to 
spell the test word which is pronounced twice. The ability to 
repeat the word by pressing the [/] key is very helpful. On 
some words in the Tronlist file, 1 had difficulty determining 
the pronounced quiz word. Vowel sounded a lot like foul. 
To eliminate these sound-alikes, 1 used Wordmaker to 
change the pword to overemphasize the accents and add 
spacing. Submarine became sub-m^-rine. It is very easy to 
play with the pwords until they $ound right to you. 

1 just returned from a trip to many cities across the coun- 
try. After sampling speech patterns in Boston, Dallas, New 
York and Los Angeles, I am sure different pwords will be 
used in different areas of the country for the same spelling 
word. 1 found the different speech patterns to be delightful. 
Here in California, a "Yawl" is a fore-and-aft rigged sail- 
boat, in Texas the same pword is used as a greeting, i.e., 
"Y'awl have a good day!" What 1 am trying to get to is that 
you can have your CoCo pronounce the word the way you 
say it. 

In summary, Spell-A-Tron does a good job of giving a 
spelling quiz. It does not keep score; proper spellings are 
rewarded with "Right," "Correct" and "Super" responses 
being said to the user. The only improvement I would sug- 
gest would be adding some interesting graphics to the screen 
to hold the interest of younger students. 

(Jarb Software, 1636 D Avenue, Suite C, National City, CA 
90250, $28.95 compatible w/disk or tape, Votrax Pak & 32K 
Extended basic required) 

— Bruce Rothermel 



236 the RAINBOW May 1984 



THE PEEPER 

A Unique Interrupt-Based Program Tracer 
From Spectro Systems 

Imaging being able to monitor the operatioii of a macNne-ianguage program Wtiile it Is Running. 
To display any portion d memory in any of Coco's 26 documented display modes, and to move 
ttirough memory using the arrow keyi To slow the action to a crawl, or freeze it at witt. Instantly 
switcti between watching the output of your program and watching Peeper dynamically display 
(on screen or printer) the contents of the 6809's registers and stack, showing changes as they 
are happening In the slowest speed mode. Peeper provides continuous singl^stepping; faster 
modes give a coarser trace. Or, halt the action and single-step by repeatedly pressing the space 
bar Peeper supports breakpoints, memory examine/change, and more. Tliink how much easier it 
wouid be to modify someone else's ML software if you could determine what routines were being 
executed at any given point! 

For tun, (and this requires no ML experience), use Peeper with arcade games, watching the fine 
details of the animation effects in slow motion. See how the game looks and plays in other 
graphics modes. Or watch what is happening on "hidden screens" you never see, (Makes a 
superb demonstration.) 

REQUIRES 16K COCO 
ON CASSETTE (COPYABLE TO DISK) $24 . 95 

WITH ASSEMBLER LISTING 



FASTAPE 

TTie Next Best Thing To A Disk Drive 
From Spectfo Systems 

Fastape gives you cassette I/O at 3000 baud- Twice Normal Speed It uses the high-speed 
(POKE 65495,0) mode, and makes it convenient to stay in this mode throughout. Features 
automatic adjustment of cassette and printer parameters when speed mode is changed. Control- 
key functions tor many Basic commands and tor changing speed modes. Compatible with all tape 
file types. Can be used with Telewriter-64 and many other utilities. 

"I strongly racommand this fine utility*' Rainbow, 7/83 
"A traat for thoM witliout disk systems" Hot Coco, 1 0/83 



REQUIRES 16K COCO 



CASSETTE $21 .95 



TAPE-DIR® 

Tape-Dir is a basic program used for displaying and/or printing information about cassette files. 
In addition to listing file name, Tape-Dir will list and/or print the folkiwing information: 

1. Type of file - Machine Language. Data. Basic. 

2. Format - Binary or ASCII. 

3. M/L Start End, and Execute addresses. 

4. For Basic & Data Files - will show number of bytes used! Useful for sorting out your tape files 
by those that will run on your 16K. 32K machine! 

5. Will bypass tape I/O errors - no aggravation! 

REQUIRES 1 eK EXTENDED COCO, CASSETTE PLAYER. 
(PRINTER OPTIONAL) 



CASSETTE $11 .99 



TAPE SPOOLER® 

Re-direct printer output to cassette for latei printing or archival 

Uses 310 byte machine language driver which is appended to basic programs. 

After 1 call, all print#-2 basic statements redirect all printer output to cassette. 

Can be turned on and off while your basic program is running. 

Can write to cassette and printer at same time. 

Absolutely no change to printer formats. 

All control codes normally sent to printer will be captured to the cassette with printed data 
Supplied utility will print from tape, convert the tape to a disk file, print the converted disk file, 
and print multiple copies of either the tape or disk (multiple copy function cannot process tiles 
greater than 14.790 characters) 

' Great for generating 2 seperate reports from the same file on a singie pass 
' Use as a "printing press" for generating multiple copies of meeting notices, ads, circulars, 
you name iti 

' Share a printerll! Take your "Saved Printout" on tape to a friend that has a primer! 

REQUIRES 32 K EXT. COCO A CASSETTE 
(DISK - PRINTER OPTIONAL) 



CASSETTE $21.95 



TREK-TRIV 

TTie Star Trek Almost Impossible Super Trivia Quiz 
For serious "Trekies" onlyt All others need not apply! 

Four programs on one cassette 
Trek. Trek II. Ouiz and Quiz II 
Sound Effiects 

Advance through various sections and receive promotions up to fleet admiral! But If you miss 
. well, you'll find out! 

Receive a print-out of your rating, rank and intelligence description (sometimes a bit harsh - 
but only if you deserve it) 
Fun • but V-E-R-Y Challenging. 

REQUIRES 32K COCO, CASSETTE RECORDER 

SUPPLIED ON CAS SETTE ^AL L FOH $1 9-95 



★★★★★★ 



os-g 

"CONVERT 



★★★★★★ 



New - From Computize . . 

TTiis high quality M/L Utility will CONVERT Standard OS-9 Formatted Files/Disks (5Vi") to 
Radn Shack OS-9 to njn on your COCO. Will also convert 40 Uack to 35 track if you require. 
Runs under COCO OS-9. 

REQUIRES e4K COCO AND 2 DRIVES 
SUPPLIED ON DISK ONLY $49.95 



SUPER BACK-UP UTILITY® 

...WITH S.B.U. FROM COMPUTIZE - YOU'LL NEVER NEED 
ANOTHER BACK-UP UTILITY FOR YOUR COCO!!! 
SUPER BACK-UP UTILITY WILL PERFORM ALL 
OF THE FOLLOWING FUNCTIONS: 

1 . TAPE TO TAPE (Regardless of most protection schemes!) 

2. TAPE TO DISK (Move Cassette programs to Disk!) 

3. AUTO RE LOCATE (For those Cassette programs that conflict 

WITH Disk operating systems.) 

4. DISK TO TAPE (Place Disk programs onto Cassette) 

5. DISK TO DISK (Our powerful Spit-N-lmage Program. 

* Regardless of protection schemes!) 

* MENU DRIVEN! 

* REQUIRES 32K EXTENDED COCO 

* REQUIRES 1 OR 2 DRIVES (For Disk Functions) 

* ALL MACHINE LANGUAGE!!! 

I COMPARE WITH OTHER INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMS ' 
COSTING IN EXCESS OF $100.00 OR MOREIIl i 



★ ★★ONLY $49.95!^^^ 

(SUPPLIED ON DISK) 



T.T.U. - TRIPLE TRANSFER UTiLITY (C) 

M/L For Cassette A Disk Program Transfer 

Transfer contents of disk to tape * Transfer content of tape to disk - "Seiecf or "All" Option • Will 
automatically rekicate those cassette programs tfiat conflict with the disk operating system? • 
Will display machine language program address ' Copies ASCII, Basic, A Machine I ;tnnitage 
Programs * All contained in 1 menu driven program! I ! i^^^W 

REQUIRES 32K CC EXT. rV»]tow 

Cassette $19.95 Disk $24.95 



SPIT-N-IMAGE(C) 



M/L Disk Back-up utility RAINBOW 
TiKre is no need to suffer the hearttxBak of crashed disks any longer. Spit-N-lmage wil create a 
mirror image of your valuable disk programs which do not respond to normal back-up lunctions. 
Will also initialize and back-up in one pass. Data processing experts always insist on havlang a 
back-up - irs good practtte - Don't wait! 

REQUIRES 32K CC AND 1 OR MORE DRIVES 

CASSETTE $29.95 DISKETTE$34.95 



GRAPHICOM 

Simply stated - the finest graphics program 
written for the COCO (or any other computer)! 

FEATURES 

' U S E R F-R-l-E-N-D-L-Y I RAINeoW 

* 4 Mode (Including Hi-Res Artifact) ' •* ' ' " 

* Animate Mode 

* Color Palate with over 1 5 color patterns for use with Hi- Res Artifact 

* Send/Receive pictures over standard modem at 300, 600 or 1200 baud 

* Supplied utility allows capturing Hi- Res Screens from most COCO arcade type games 
(Even protected ones) 

* Multiple Hi-Res character fonts (user changable & definable) 

* Supplied utility for transferring graphicom screens to basic or other M/L Programs 

* Supplied utility for loading screens from basic or other sources 

* Built in Screen print (Pre-defined for Epson, C-ltoh, RS LP VII, LP VIII. DMP 100 0MP200 
DMP 120, GCP 115, GEMINI 10, and OKI) 110 to 9600 baud 

* Stow scan television send/receive options 

* Many additional features, operating hints, hardware mods and suggestions, etc, etc.? 

-k EASY TO LEARN GRAPHIC MENU * 

REQUIRES 64K COCO - 1 DRIVE - JOYSTICKS 
SUPPLIED WITH 2 EXTRA PICTURE DISKS FOR 
MORE CHARACTER FONTS, PICTURES & GRAPHICS! 

ON DISKS $24.95 



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miTE fii TOUi mi cinr qf our new spring i9S4 wubb! 



Hardware Review S^^SSSSSSSSS^St^ 

New Friction Option 
For Printers 

When I was deciding to buy a printer, one of the most 
important aspects that I had to consider was whether 1 
wanted the "Friction" option. All printers have the usual 
"Tractor" mechanism, and if you desire the added conven- 
ience of using single sheets of paper, such as stationery, your 
personal letterhead or whatever, the cost is usually around 
$100 extra. 

Now, for those of you who have bitten your fingernails 
away completely because you now wish you paid the extra 
scratch for the friction feature, a cheaper (but sturdy) way to 
get the same results is available for any printer. It's called the 
Paper Tractor. 

The Paper Tractor is a flexible plastic device that is 
inserted into your tractor mechanism and will carry your 
single sheets of paper through without any hassle. 

To use this handy device, you just place the paper you 
would like to use in and under the half-inch folds provided 
on the top, right and left hand sides of the "tractor."The fit is 
snug and the paper will stay firmly in place. Then just thread 
it over your printer sprockets as though it was your usual 
tractor-feed paper. 

You may align it at this point, checking to make sure that 
your print head is at the desired height on the paper. Then 
just print as normal. 



One precaution you should take while printing is to make 
sure that you do not go past the end of the paper and onto 
the device itself, or worse, onto the platen of your printer. If 
your printer has a "paper out" detector, it will still function 
as usual. 

Even though my printer has friction feed as a standard 
feature, I tried the Paper Tractor as described and it worked 
beautifully. The samples I ran were at 9600 Baud and bi- 
directional, which I thought might have had a negative effect 
because of the speed and irritation to the Paper Tractor, but 
it came out beautifully. 

After using the tractor a couple of times, 1 found that I 
could even print on the very last line of my samples since the 
Paper Tractor itself extends into the paper-out switch 
because of its length. 

The only inconvenience 1 can imagine is that if you intend 
to print an awful lot, the time needed to withdraw the Paper 
Tractor and insert new sheets of paper will slow things up a 
bit. 

The Paper Tractor is a handy complement for you non- 
friction printer owners. It handles up to 1 1 x 14 paper, will 
work with any printer, and can be used instantly by anyone. 
The documentation provided does not actually explain how 
to use it, but if after looking at the photos provided you can't 
figure it out, you shouldn't be near a computer, anyway. 

(Paper Tractor Ltd., I South Fairview, Goleta, CA 93117, 
$11.95) 

— Steve Schechter 




txm 



Buy 1 Program Get 10% Off 
Buy 2 or More Programs Get 1 5% Off 

Except PricWy-Pear Software (15% Off As Shown) \ 



*SUPER SPECIALS* 
NEW 




Early Games 
Preschool Learning Games 
Tape or Disk 
$25.45 



Pricklcy-PMr Softwnira 
20% OFF 

Disk Omni Clone t31.95 
Tape Omni Clone S23.9S 

1S% OFF M Shown 
(32K} Disk Master $21^ 
(32K) Disk Manager $25.45 
Disk Zapper $29.70 

(32K. 64K) 
*Vikings. 'Right (32K) 
$16^ M. 
CokXkitr^ $29.70 Disk $3335 
Mailing List (32K) Disk $42.45 

Tee Off, Ertand, (32K EB) 
Adventure In Wonderland (32K} 
rape $21.20 M. D/5>r $25.45 ea. 

Adventure Int'l 
Arex16K $34.95 
Fire Copter (16K} $24.95 
Airiine $24.95 



ComputerwMre 

Mf Mr Video Plus 
Connect CoCo to composite video monitor 
$24.95 
NEW Color Connectkjn 11 
Tape $29.95 Disk $39.95 
'Junior's Revenge (32K) $28.95 
Bloc Head. Doodle Bug $26.95 ea. 
Grand Prix (32K), Shark Treasure 
$21.95aa. 



'Glaxxons, 'Bumpers, 
'El Bandfto & 'Cosmic Ctones 

$24.95 ea. 
Super Pro Keyboard $87.95 

Datasoft, tnc. 

Zaxxon (32K) Tape orO/5^$31.50 
Moon Shuttle (32K) $29.95 
(Tape & Disk) 
Pooyan(32K) $29.96 
(Tapes disk) 



NEW 

"Prognsmmer's Inatttuta" 

Complete Personal Accountant 
3 Finance packages in one (32K EB) 
Tape $74.95 Disk $79.95 

MEMfColorwaro 

Real Talker.Disk Compatible, 
Hardware Voce, Synthesizer 
$59.96 ea. 

Text to Speech Program included (16K, 32K, 64K) 
NEWlntn Color 
Colorpede $28.25 
Robottack $23.45 



Candy Co. (32K) 
Introductory Special 

No Other Discourits Apply 

Spectral Aaaociates 
Geography Pac $32.95 
Ms Gobbler (32K) 
Storm ArroMT, Lancer (32K) 
Gallax Attax, ljunar Rover (32K) 
Ghost Gobbler, Whiiy Bird Run 
$21.96 oa. 



Tom Mb( Software 

*Donkey King (32K) $28.95 
Soace Shuttle (32K} $28.96 
Cumber (32K) 
Grabber, Frog, Buzzard Bait (32K) 
$27.95 ea. 



Kraft Joystick 
Tt)eBest $39.95 ea. 

1 Year Warranty 
MEtV Gold Connectors 

for Disk controller $t6.96 



SHverware 

Disk Utilities 
Practteai8#1 
Utilities #1 
Graphs & Charts 
$18.95 



Ask About Our Unclaimed Freight! 

'Also available on disk (32K) at extra charge. All Programs (16K) on cassette unless 
otherwise staled. Send for free complete listings! TN resklents add 6.25% sales tax, C.O.D. 
orders add $2.00. 

(615) 875-8656 • P.O. Box 1 5892 • Chattanooga, TN 37415 



Anteco Software 
Home Epense Manager $19.95 
Stock Ana^sis & Trend $21 .95 
Pir^l $24.96 
AvaifsMs in Rom Pac 
Pinball, 8 Ball $29.96 ea. 
Ghost Gobbler, Katerpiilar $25.95 ea. 
Whirty Bird Run, $27.95 



1100 



23d the RAINBOW May 1964 



Software ReviewSSSSISSSSSSISSfT^ 

Atom — Fast Action 
With A New Twist 

When 1 took chemistry in college a few years ago, the 
worst part was trying to memorize the periodic table of 
elements. It would have been bad enough just to memorize 
the abbreviations of 103 different elements, but some of 
them (like "Pb" for lead) are based on Latin names and have 
no apparent connection to the common name. (My mother 
told me a cute way to remember the symbol for one element; 
when you think of antimony, think of alimony and then 
remember the ''Sb" who's paying it.) Depending on the field 
youVe in, you might remember a few from the names of 
various combinations that you come across (like NiCd for 
nickel-cadmium batteries or HCl for hydrochloric acid), but 
remembering the whole list would take a lot of work and, by 
the time you get all 1 03 down pat, a few more may well have 
been discovered! 

Radio Shack's Atom is actually an educational tool dis- 
guised as a fast-action arcade game. The object is to 
maneuver a gravitron around a nucleus, pick up orbiting 
electrons and fire them into the "electron holes'' on the inner 
ring surrounding the nucleus. By doing this, you build up 
atoms of different elements, starting with hydrogen and 



working up through the table. (For various reasons, the 
game uses only the first 54 elements.) 

The only controls you have over the gravitron are moving 
it in a circle around the nucleus, moving inward and out- 
ward and picking up and firing electrons. The game's great- 
est problem is that the directions of movement are those seen 
from the gravitron 's point of view and not the directions that 
you see on the TV screen. This makes it very difficult to 
move around, as the direction of movement on the screen 
doesn't match the direction in which you point the joystick. 
(Yes, 1 know that this method is scientifically correct; it 
works well if you are able to see the field from the point of 
view of the gravitron, but you can't.) 

The manual uses something akin to a split screen; 
throughout the book, the top half of each page is devoted to 
a lesson about the structure of atoms while the bottom half 
contains the game instructions. Another nice touch is the 
large wall chart of the periodic table, done in a science- 
fiction style with the symbols placed in a picture of an atom 
complete with a gravitron "gunship" carrying an electron. 

Atom would be a terrific game if the controls were easier 
to handle, but as it stands it takes a lot of practice just to 
keep from crashing. 

(Radio Shack stores nationwide, cat. no. 26-3149, $19.95 
ROM Pak) 

" Ed Ellers 



PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 



FOR THE RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 

* Runs any parallel printer from the Color Computer serial I/O port. 

* No hardware modifications or software patches needed. Works 
with all standard Color Computer commonds including graphics. 

* Switch selectable baud rates from 300 to 9600. 

* All cables and connector? Included, 

* Most printers supply power at fhe parallel port. With these 
printers you may order your interface without the power module. 
Printers that require the power module are: Epson, PorKisonic, 
Smith-Corona TPI^ Centronics, and Mannesman Tally. 

* Modem users 1 You may order your Botek interface with a mod em 
cable and switch to select between your printer and modem. 
Several modem connectors are available, so please tell us what 
modem you have. 

* Price: Model CCP-1 $ 69. 

Model CCP-2 - with modem coble and switch — $ 84. 
Either model without power module deduct $ 3. 



Shipping costs included in price. 
Michigan residents odd 4% soles tax. 




We carry the finest disk drive system that you con 
use with your Color Computer, The system includes: 
TEAC double sided disk drive, drive enclosure and 
power supply, J & M disk controller, and coble. 
We configure the TEAC drive so that it con be used 
OS two single sided drives or as a double sided 
drive. The J & M disk controller is Radio Shack 
compatible — — $ 425. 



* C-ltoh Prowriter Printer $ 339 



Order from: 



BOTEK INSTRUMENTS 



313 739-2910 



4949 HAMPSHIRE, UTICA, MICH. 48087 



Dealer inquiries invited 



May 1984 the RAINBOW 239 



Software Revlewm 



The Sourcerer 
Bares All 

A lot of the more advanced hackers have a great interest in 
finding out how a particular program works. With machine 
language programs, the only way to find out is to disassem- 
ble the program (unless you have the extremely rare talent of 
being able to decipher code in your head). One guy 1 know 
has file drawers packed with disassembled listings of every 
program he has in his library. (Td hate to have his bill for 
printer paper!) 

The Sourcerer, from Computerware, is billed as "proba- 
bly the most powerful disassembler" for the CoCo. It is 
capable of sending its source code to the screen, printer or 
tape or disk files. In the most basic operation, you simply 
specify the starting and ending addresses and let it rip. The 
resulting source listing can be entered into an assembler to 
regenerate the program that you are dealing with. If (and it's 
a big if) you can figure out the workings of the program, you 
can modify it to suit you and then reassemble it. 

One flaw common to all disassemblers is that they can't 
tell whether a particular section of a program is actually 
machine code or if it's a table of messages, values or what- 
ever. The Sourcerer has a Zap mode that finds those areas 
that are not valid 6809 machine code and displays them; you 
will still need to figure out what they are (and which "valid" 
instructions really are not) yourself. The Long mode gives 
you a. listing of the machine code together with the corres- 
ponding assembly instructions, while the Symbolic mode 
gives you the assembly statements only (which is the way 
that you would enter them into an assembler). 

The cassette version (which 1 tested) comes with a pro- 
gram called the Apprentice, which simply finds the loading 
and execution addresses of a binary file from tape or disk. 
The disk version has a FIND program which does the same 
thing as Apprentice 'and a COM PA RE program that checks 
to see that two files are identical and prints a table showing 
where they differ. 

The Sourcerer is a very effective disassembler for the 
CoCo and should be a great help to any assembly language 
fanatics. Those of you who use OS-9 will be happy to hear 
that an OS-9 Sourcerer is also available. 

(Computerware, Box 668, Encinitas, CA 92024, S34.95 tape, 
S39.95 disk) 

— Ed Ellers 



COLOR CABLES 

RS-232 Printer Cables 10 ft $15.00 

3 ft Disk cables 
1 -drive $27.95 2-drives $35.00 

3-drives $40.95 4-drives $45.95 

Disk or Game Cartridge Ext., 3 ft $27.95 
Gold Plated Disk l/F solder plug $1 1 .95 

Custom Cables upon request 
Extra length of any cables at $1 .00/ft 

Add $1 .75 for shipping and handling 
Kansas residents add 3% tax 
C & C Engineering 
P.O. Box 8320 . .Wichita, Ks 67208 



CoCo 
Cookbook 




• Can be used lor 
ANY free-fofTTifit 
filing system 
<not Just recipes). 
Try it for periodicals 
and article synopsis, 
product reviews, real 
estate de^cftpt^ons, ( 

• Store & retrieve a large number of r^cipes- 

• Up \o 270 recipes on a smgJe disk ustn^ a special 
compression tectiniQue. 

• Up to 3040 characters per recipe includirtg title, 
ingred^ls, & Instructions — all In easy to use 
"free form" format. 

• Access each recipe by title, number or with 
special Keyword search {like all the recces using 
"chicken"!). Ust on the screen or printer 

• 50 recipes included FREE! 

• Requires 32K and a disk drive. 

32K disk *27*' 



HOME 

MONEY 

MANAGER 



Now you can tell in a nutshell how much money 
you spent and on what and where your income 
came from. Just record all of your checkbook 
activities ~ each deposit, check, and bank charge. 
Assign each to any of your account codes and the 
computer can summarize all of your expenses, 
income, and cash flow. (Records up to 480 transac- 
tions.) Yes, it helps balance the checkbook, but also 
provides such reports as: Summary of Expenses, 
Summary of Income Sources, list of all checkbook 
transactions. These make tax time a snap! The disk 
version includes a program to convert a cassette 
HMM file to disk and the number of checks is 
limited only to the available disk storage! 
(Requires 32K & a printer.) (Req. Ext BASIC) 




32K cass 
32K disk 



S|995 

s29« 



Mail to: COMPUTERWARE 

P.O. Box 68 • Dept. E01 
Encinlti^s, CA 92025 • (619) 436-3512 



DESCRIPTION 


OUANT. 


PRICE 


TOTAL 


























•SHIP. A TAX 
TOTAL 







VISA n 

CARD # 



MASTERCARD 



□ 



□ 



NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



*Shtpping: Under $100 — add $2 surface, $5 air/Canada 
Over $100 ^ add 2% surface, 5% air/Canada 



Calif, residents add 6% sales tax. 



240 the RAINBOW May 1984 



The most 
comprehensive 
& flexible 
data management 
system available! 



FLEXI FILER 



Easy to Learn • Easy to Use 




•„the 



S?^ S«s per record, with up to ^fOchar^te^ 
o^t nccrO. you deeignote the name o< each fteld. its 
its fofi^at. (alphanumerki numeric 
date, OT exponential) The s.jb o( you aa^ 
b^els ^Zited - only your disk space w.II 
your tilas. 

?o?dSne hov. the ^rtonflalion f ^e^^^**^ 
^InrBil bv (fes/on»fto your own ewtry screens Your 
S can De changed ar^y time- Eaey screen de tni 

makes ^at^entiy sin^pie. The quIcK assembly 
iZu'TJ^^rd lune ireure. lha. you can't type 
taster than Wexl t==i'arl 

uSfl Sl<cal operators (lees Ihan, O'**'*^^ 
and wyTou can setecJ an/ subss » of your data »»se 
*ith UD to 36 r*/ffe«fltcriwr/a. A jj^nwic search 
Sure S any occurrence of a fliven str.n« n- a Held 
throughout the data basel 

MoJmy selected sabeetof rw^ords can be sorted m 
aiSS* descending orde, .,y yotn » «.«i<t' 

^SS^^omiied reports and '^^^^^^^'^^^ 
mdtvidual needs, includmg page headings -hM titles 



automatic pagenumbew. '"^ S^nte^ 
uo to 10 often-uaed formats Numeric %t«!scai> 
totted aut^atically for summaries. Pr«*nr«our 
n o matlon in the tomcat most uj^M»» W^is^fP^- 
And S can «er trte bautf rare for faster ^JfltetStoo, 
, ,^H^ Heporte print lo the printet or #tie#^ 

^^i^SSiJSJfffte manipulation m m 0* a 
^ dSaiSs?UnagerWlthFle.i2«|^^ 

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Taxi Ride 
Fairly Smooth 



Children's Computer Workshop has developed a series of 
programs for Radio Shack with a goal "... to create 
software that is wholesome and engaging, encouraging 
children to play constructively and learn actively.'* Taxi is 
one of the games in the seven- to 1 0-year age group focusing 
on cooperation and strategy. The three- to six-year-old ser- 
ies is for " Basic Pre-School Skills" and the 1 0 and over scries 
stresses '*creative exploration." 

Taxi is designed to allow one or two players to drive 
around various cities while picking up fares, earning pay- 
ment and getting tips. 

The game is suited to one player but is designed for two 
children to develop an understanding of cooperation and 
strategy in picking up their fares and thus earn more money 
and higher tips. The two-player "company" works towards a 
higher score through cooperation — helping each other with 
spotting fares, dividing up the city into sections and driving 
carefully without running red lights and getting fined or 
getting into accidents. 

Trying out the game with two sets of youngsters (David, 
10 with M ike, 1 2 and Jennifer, eight with Sarah, eight) gave 



me insight as to whether Tq^i does what it claims. It does. 
Both sets of children truly enjoyed the game and did start 
developing a system to make more money. Cooperation was 
evident from explaining the introductory instructions to 
each other to playing the game. The first time around, an 
adult was needed for suggestions. But after that the children 
were on their own. 

The game design, with high resolution graphics and 
sounds, is excellent. The children were enthusiastic in play- 
ing and kept at it to improve their scores. 

The program, as good as it is, has some problems. These 
problems deal not with the game, but with the execution. 
The worst of the problems is the loading time. The introduc- 
tion loads in a respectable 28 seconds. When RUNy a poem 
and then a high resolution taxi picture are put on the screen 
while CLOADing another 28 seconds. The directions ask if 
you want instructions. If you answer yes, it takes almost a 
full five minutes to load. The children had a hard time 
controlling themselves waiting this length of time. Remarks 
such as, "This tape is too long" and "1 don't believe it" were 
made. In a classroom setting a teacher had better have 
something for the children to do during this load. At the end 
of the load (providing there are no I/O Errors), the screen 
asks a series of questions. How many players? Do you want 
to practice? We practiced and the program gave a sample 
screen of city blocks, taxi, and fares to pick up and where to 
drop them off. The practice is almost a game by itself. The 
child also learns how to position the joystick to drive and 
pick up passengers by centering it (the new self-centering 
joystick by Radio Shack would be good in this game). When 
the practice is completed, you have the choice of practicing 
again or continuing with the game. We continued and it 



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Documentation For A Bare Breadboard . . .?? 



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2NI2 the RAINBOW May 1984 



took 32 seconds to load the game introduction. You are then 
asked a series of questions, including how many players, taxi 
speed, what kind of traffic, long or short game. You have 
choice of three cities, Dallas, New York, and San Francisco. 
Since this is on tape, it is wise to go in numerical order, 
otherwise yo\x are instructed to rewind the tape and start 
over. The city loaded in at 23 seconds and then the high 
resolution graphics loaded in at about 45 seconds. We could 
then start the game. 

The screen shows the city on the top five-sixths of the 
CRT and the bottom one-sixth includes a game time (about 
three minutes), plus a separate fare and tip total for each 
player. When the game is over, a chart shows how well each 
player did and shows gross total minus fines, for net total of 
the company. You can also get a chart of the individual 
player's totals. 

The next fault with Taxi is the instruction booklet. The 
authors did a superb job of drawing high resolution graphics 
of the cities. Being an ex-New Yorker, I spotted the Empire 
State Building, Kennedy Center, the Twin Towers and St. 
Patrick's Cathedral. IVe been to San Francisco and recog- 
nized landmarks there, though I cannot name them. Dallas, 
well, I can tell you J. R. is not included. And this is the flaw. 
Nowhere in the instruction booklet is there an explanation 
of the city graphics. What a shame! Even the streets are 
modeled after the street designs of each city. 

The booklet, while going into excellent detail about load- 
ing and playing the g^me, and even activities, does not 
mention how muqh RAM is needed. My CoCo is 64K but I 
do not know if this game will work on a 16K machine. 
Extended BASIC is required. But do not have your disk 
plugged in or the game will not work. The game uses auto- 



start and will cause problems with a classroom networking 
system. With such a long loading time this would cause 
difficulties for a teacher having to load computers individu- 
ally from a recorder. 

My general overall feeling towards Taxi is positive. My 
recommendation is that it is worth the money. However, 1 
hope the authors develop future programs that will be disk 
driven, and include complete explanations for directing and 
graphic screens. 

(Radio Shack Stores nationwide, tape $19.95) 

--Michael F. Garozzo 



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May 1984 the RAINBOW 243 




WLS NEST 



SOFTWARE 

WE GIVE A HOOT ' 

FILE CABINET - Data Management System 
With FILE CABINET you can create and maintain re- 
^S^' cords on anything you choose. Recipes, coupons, house- 
hold inventory, financial records - you name it. You create 
records containing up to five fields you define. You can 
search, sort, modify, delete, save on tape and display on 
the screen or send to the printer. The program is user 
friendly and user proof. Error trapping and prompting 
are extensive. A comparable program would cost you much 
more. Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $19.95 

LABELIII (Reviewed in Nov. 83 Rainbow) 
With LABELIII you can develop and maintain a mailing 
MAtNsow ijjt^ Display on screen or printer. Print lists or labels in 
your choice of 1, 2, or 3 wide. Supports 3 or 4 line ad- 
dresses with phone optional. Fast machine language sort 
on last name, first name, or zip code. 
Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $19.95 

ATLANTIS ADVENTURE 
This one is tough! We challenge you to complete this in 
30 days. If you can we will send you any cassette program 
we sell at no charge. (We will even pay the postage.) You 
start on a disabled sub, near the lost city of Atlantis. Your 
object is to get the sub and yourself safety to the surface. 
Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $21.95 

ADVENTURE STARTER (Reviewed in Feb. 84 Rainbow) 
//^^ Learn to play those adventures the painless way. You start 
B*iNBw y^j^^ g simple adventure and then move into an intermediate. 
We also include hints and tips on adventuring. Your 16K 
EXT cassette includes both "MYHQUSE" and "PIRATES" 
adventures. Finish this and you are ready for "ATLANTIS." 
Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $17.95 

FOUR MILE ISLAND ADVENTURE 
/A^W You are trapped inside a disabled nuclear Power Plant. The 
reactor is running away. You must bring the reactor to a 
cold shutdown and prevent the "China Syndrome." Can 
you save the plant (and yourself)? It's not easyl 
Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $17.95 

ESPIONAGE ISLAND ADVENTURE 
/jy^W You have been dropped off on a deserted island by a sub- 
MAiNsow marine. You must recover a top secret microfilm and signal 
the sub to pick you up. Problems abound in this 32K text 
adventure. 

Cassette 32K EXT • Postpaid $17.95 

PROGRAM FILE (Reviewed in Oct. 83 Rainbow) 
Organize your cassette programs. Let your computer find 
that program for you. Create and maintain a four field file. 
You can search, sort, modify, delete and display on screen 
or printer. Sorting may be done by name, type or location. 
Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $14.95 

OWLS EYE INDICATOR LIGHT 
/{^^ Don't leave your coco on and fry your chipsi The OWLS 
EYE plugs into either joystick port and may be mounted 
beside the keyboard where it is easily visible. Simple 10 
second installation! 

OWLS EYE -Postpaid $ 8.95 



SPORTS CAR ADVENTURE 
|\\ An easy to intermediate text adventure that requires you 
to fix that "old Junker" in the garage. You don't have 
tQ be a mechanic but you are going to have to "fine tune" 
your wits. 

Cassette 16K EXT - Postpaid $12.95 

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Software Reviewm 



Responses To Queries 
In Question And A nswer 



There are many programs on the market that drill chil- 
dren in addition and subtraction. Question And Answer, 
from Moreton Bay, not only acts as a drill, but an actual 
teaching tool. It works with the concepts of numbers that are 
equal, greater than and less than, as well as providing prac- 
tice in addition and subtraction. There is also instruction in 
the computer techniques needed to answer the questions. 
Question And Answer is actually a series of programs, each 
dependent on the skills learned in the preceding program. It 
is written for a 16K CoCo with Extended BASIC. 

The first program in the series is called Step 1. In this 
program the child learns how to use the program and also 
the kinds of responses that he will need. Practice is provided 
in completing simple numerical equations like X + Y = ?, in 
which the child enters a number, or in deciding if a number is 
equal to another number or greater than a second number. 
This is done through the keying in of True [T] or False [F]. 
Step 2, the next program, is like Step I except the concept of 
"less than" is introduced. 

Step 3 introduces more complicated problems in which 
the numbers before the equal sign are to be entered, e.g., ?+ 
Y = Z. 

Step 4 instructs the child on how to enter the symbols =, > 
and <. The problems can now take on the form X + Y ? Z or 
X - Y ? Z. 

The last program is called QAA. It is a summary program 
which incorporates all the instructions and practices all the 
skills used in the first four steps. In Steps 1 through 4, the 
numbers are all one digit. In QAA, the numbers can be up to 
four digits long, depending on the skill level. 

After CLOA Ding Bind RUNning the chosen program, the 
user is asked to wait while the rest of the program loads, 
after which he is asked to [ENTER] his name. He then has 
the choice of being instructed on the skills ^nd keys needed 
to use the program or proceeding to the mathematical prob- 
lems. The skills are taught in a clear and concise manner and 
the child cannot go on until the questions are answered in a 
way that shows conceptual understanding. 1 find the exam- 
ple used to teach a child what "True" means, unfair to many 
children. If the child using the program is named Johnny, 
the statement "Johnny loves Santa" is displayed. The child is 
expected to respond with "True" [T]. If he does, a screen 
appears that says, "Santa loves Johnny, too!" There are 
many children for whom Santa Claus is not a part of their 
life. A response of "False" [F] to this statement produces a 
screen which displays, "I'm so sad Johnny doesn't love 
Santa." I feel that this kind of statement produces feelings of 
being an outsider for the child who does not believe in Santa 
Claus. I think a more appropriate and universal statement 
should have been used. 

When the user gets to the part of the program in which he 
has to solve problems, after the problem is displayed on the 
screen, he is told what kind of answer he needs to input. For 
example, if the problem is 3 +4 =?, he is told to respond with 
a number. If he answers correctly, a screen appears which 
graphically displays "RIGHT!" or a happy face. An incor- 



244 the RAINBOW May 1964 



[ The OS-9 experts have ] 
I developed something new. | 



C Compiler Version 2 for color computer 
OS-9 DOS for color computer 
Relocatable Assembler for Flex and CoCo DOS 



C Compiler 

Dagger's Growing Systems C is the original C Compiler 
for the 6809 and is the proven leader in the field. It is a grow- 
ing subset of the C programming language. It runs in 20K, 
has assembly language output, position independent code, 
an extensive library in assembly language source, and code 
optimizer. 

The Color Computer and Flex (which will run on the 
Color Computer) are now both available with full floating 
point package (float, long, for, goto, etc.) in addition to 
the basic C commands. CoCo Dos also contains features 
which use the BASIC ROM functions (els, polcat, partial 
floating point, etc.). 

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for OS-9. It contains all the necessary C commands (while, 
if, if else, int., char, etc.) which may be linked, loaded, 
and used in a multi-user, multi-tasking environment. 

Relocatable Assembler 

The relocatable assembler package includes assembler, 
linker, and manager. May be used with the Color Computer 
or Flex. 

Symbols up to 32 characters □ Many special characters 
allowed in symbols ($, %, etc.) □ Multiple files assembled 
without exiting the assembler □ Direct output to printer at 
any time □ Generates either absolute or relocatable mod- 
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Linker 

Use text-like files which are generated by RASMB or any 
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rect answer produces a graphic "NO!" (rather harsh) or an 
unhappy face. After every five problems, a scoreboard 
appears. To end the use of the program, "S" is inputted when 
a problem appears. This causes a final scoreboard to be 
displayed. 

The documentation recommends that if the child is a 
beginning reader, an older child or aduh will be needed in 
getting the young child started. After the child has mastered 
the concepts being taught, he should have no trouble using 
the program by himself. 

There is no limit on the time needed to work out a prob- 
lem. A child should be encouraged to use paper and pencil or 
any other tools he may need in order to find the answers. In 
the last program, Q A A, the child or the adult can choose an 
appropriate skill level. A number between 1 and 1000 is 
entered. This is a bit much. It is difficult to distinguish the 
difference between skill level 250 and 25 1 . However, it's nice 
to see a program that allows a child to work at his own pace 
and at his own level. 

According to the documentation, the correct answer will 
be displayed after an incorrect answer has been given. 
Unfortunately, this is not the case. Learning is definitely lost 
when a child cannot find out what his mistake was. 

Another flaw in Question And Answer is that when the 
answer requires a number and characters other than numbers 
are entered, the answer is considered incorrect. I would 
much rather see an error message displayed and the problem 
repeated. It is just too easy for little fingers to hit the wrong 
keys by mistake. 

I especially like the fact that teaching a child how to use 
the computer is incorporated into the program. There is so 
much learning going on in these programs that I found 
myself overlooking most of the things that are wrong with 
them and concentrating on all the things that are right. 

(Moreton Bay, 316 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 
93101, tape S17.95) 

— Stephanie Snyder 



Software Review ^SSSSSSSS^SSSSSY^ 

Math Invasion 
Adds Up 

Having three grade schoolers, I can appreciate the value 
of a good educational program, and that is definitely the 
category for this program. 

Math Invasion is loaded by an auto-load, auto-start pro- 
gram. Anyone who has bought much software has seen this 
loader. The title screen is d isplayed while the program loads, 
and from the title page the computer starts a demonstration 
of how the game is played. 

Once you have seen the computer play the game, you can 
try yourself by touching any key. This leads you to a menu to 
select the home galaxy of the invaders: Addition, Subtrac- 
tion, Multiplication or Division. Once this is done, you must 
select one of three skill levels. Now you can start to blast the 
invaders, but unlike other invader games, you must load the 
gun with an answer to one of the invading problems. Using 
the numbers on the keyboard, the answer must be fired at 
the proper invader using the right and left arrows and the 
spacebar. There are four invaders on the screen at all times 
trying to get to the surface of your planet. As the game 
progresses, they come faster and faster. One point is given 
for each right answer and one subtracted for each wrong 
answer. 

Although this game uses low resolution graphics, it is an 
extremely fast, clean program that gets and holds the atten- 
tion of the child playing the game. This simple-to-operate 
program gets the job done. Math Invasion is worth its 
weight in gold to anyone with children learning math. 

(Crystal Software, 6591 Dawsey Road, Rock Creek, OH 
44084, S19.95) 

— James McCracken 




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246 Ihe RAINBOW May 1964 



I 



Software ReviewSI^SSSSSSS^Si^ Software ReviewSS^^SS^^^SS^ 



Adventure At 
20,000 Leagues 

Have you ever wanted to go deep-sea diving in search of 
treasures lost centuries ago; the cargoes of hapless ships, who 
set sail and were never heard from again? It's a fantasy that 
has infected each of us at one time or another. But the 
practicalities of life forbid all but a few from ever becoming 
deep-sea treasure hunters. 

Now, however, every owner of a CoCo can become an 
underwater treasure hunter without ever donning a wetsuit. 
With the introduction of Sea Quest, a 32K Extended Color 
BASIC graphic Adventure, the armchair Adventurer can 
comb the beaches, explore the hurricane-sacked houses, and 
scour the ocean floor in search of clues to treasures that 
would ransom a king. 

As in most Adventures, the object of the game is to find 
several treasures — in this case five — and return with them 
to a central location. Now, this is not the toughest Adven- 
ture Pvc ever embarked upon, but it's guaranteed to occupy 
several hours. To dale, Tve managed to find four of the 
treasures, but the fifth eludes me completely; I haven't a 
clue. IVc been aggravated, puzzled, perplexed and dis- 
gusted, which, as bad as it sounds, is exactly what puzzle 
solving is all about. It's the quest, the mental stimulation and 
the sweet taste of victory that make all the aggravation 
worthwhile. 

Besides, in this particular game 1 was surprised to meet up 
with this knife-brandishing character that, each time 1 tried 
to pass him, kept saying, "Dis be my island, mate, and 1 
don't be liking strangers." I would almost swear that I ran 
into this guy in Miami one summer. 

Both the cassette and disk versions of Sea Quest come in 
stylish packages with short, but ample, documentation 
printed on the backs of the packages. After all, you don't 
need a textbook accompanying an Adventure that even 
EXECutes automatically. The thrill of these games is in 
discovering what works not being told. Right? 

But, after all else has been said, it's the graphic screens 
that are the shining stars of this game. They're some of the 
best that I've seen. The fantastic strides that have been made 
in this genre of games in such a short time display clearly 
that their potential is only now beginning to be realized — 
potential limited only by the imaginations of the pro- 
grammers. What's more, Mark Data appears to be on the 
cutting edge of the new graphic Adventure technologies. I've 
spent some time scratching my head over each of their 
releases, and I've been more than impressed with them all. 

All things considered, you simply can't go wrong with Sea 
Quest. The worst thing that I could say about it is that I'm 
going crazy trying to find that last treasure. As for the price 
of $24.95 lor cassette and $27.95 lor disk, 1 figure that the 
time I've spent playing the game converts to around $3 an 
hour and I'm by no means finished solving it yet. 

If only all of life's little pleasures were as cheap! 

(Mark Data Products, 2400 Alicia PRwy., #207, Mission 
Viejo, CA 92691, 32K EC B cassette $24.95, disk $27.95) 

— Kevin Nickbis 



Speed Reading 
The Fast, Fun Way 

Speed Reading by B & B Software, consists of six text 
programs. Side one includes /4 Service of Love by Henry, 
The Adventures of Hercules, and Life on the Mississippi by 
Mark Twain. Side two has ne Teii-Taie Heart by Edgar 
Allen Poe, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakes- 
peare, and The Hollow of the Three Hills by Nathaniel 
Hawthorne. At the beginning of each side of the tape is a 
number drill which is designed to improve peripheral vision, 
a necessary skill for speed reading. 

Speed Reading was written for either 16K BASIC or 16K 
Extended BASIC. However, in the latter case a POKE 
25,6:NEWis required. 

After the user RUNs one of the text programs, he is asked 
to choose a reading speed. The parameters are between 100 
and 3000 words per minute. The documentation states that 
the average reading speed is 250 words per minute and I 
found this a good place to start. The user is then asked to 
/NPUTa starting page. Each page is a text screen, 13 screen 
lines in length. The stories range from 27 to 36 pages long. 
The user can start reading at any point in the story. If he 
enters a page number that is past the end of the story, the 
text begins with Page 1. 

If, while reading a story, the user finds the text too slow, 
he can speed it up by keying [F]. This will increase the speed 
by five percent. Conversely, if the speed is too fast, it can be 
slowed down by keying [S] and this will decrease the speed 
by five percent. This can be done as many times as the reader 
finds necessary. B & B recommends choosing a speed that is 
faster than you can comfortably read. 

When you wish to stop, depress [E] and the screen will 
clear. The program will then display the final reading speed. 

It is necessary to understand that this is a training pro- 
gram. We all know that "practice makes perfect." 

There is no testing at the end of the text, and the reader 
should be careful to monitor his comprehension as he pro- 
gresses. If the story doesn't make sense, he needs to slow 
down. 

This is not a program for young children. The stories arc 
quite involved and very different writing styles are employed. 
I would estimate that a person should be at least in junior 
high school in order to use these programs effectively. How- 
ever, the text is brought to the screen through use of DA TA 
statements and the user could include new .stories by doing a 
lot of typing and changing the DA TA statements. Although 
a fair knowledge of programming is necessary, this makes 
the scop