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: PRINTING CHARACTERS 



the RAINBOW 



Monthly Magazine for Co- 



imputer Users 



VOLUME I 




Under the RAINBOW 

E>cam Preparation Program 
Simple Word Processor 
TWO PRP Game Aids 
Big Screen Prints 

Dice Randomizer Illustrated 
Hints, Tips and Tutorials 
Software Reviews 

And. ..MUCH MORE!! 



i i in Titrw v* 1 1:: r 1.1 ih h: i" n in 13 n n 1 1 



MPP ANIMATION 
A WORKING PROGRAM 



And. . . 

Code with JARBCODE! 




Screen Print Proqram 



Editor '5 Notes... 



PRINT *•= — : 



irst of all, I cannot tell the 
isands (yes, thousands) of you who 
jte with kind words about the 
INBOH thank you enough. So many 
of you took advantage of the 
subscription renewal offer and also 
took the time to say kind words to us 
our magazine that we're almost 



willing to extend the offer. 

Seriously, those of us here 
work pretty hard trying to produce 
top-quality magazine you will use an 
enjoy really do appreciate your 
comments and good words. We're her 
to stay and we hope we can show 
(Continued on ftqt J) 



Page 2 



the RR1NBOH 



MAY, 



RAINBOW TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Volume I Number 11 — May, 1982 



A Simple Word Proci 

Oscar Millican 



► or 



20 



Printing Characters on the Graphic Screen 

Mi Hi Endres 

TESTEM Will Help You Prepare For Pinal Exai 

J orge Mir 

SOC Report from West Coast Computer Faire 
Brian James 



27 How To Form SOC User's Groups 
Dick White 

32 The Famous Speedup POKE in Pine Detail 

Alan J i Morgan 

3G Motion Picture Programming A Program to Pun 

Arnold Pouch 

A Double Wide Graphic Screen Print Program in BASIi 

Mark Reeves 

Random Dice Methods Compared and Illustrated 

John Urban 

Por All Your Secrets the Full JARBCODE Prograr 

J oseph Bennett 



1*1 



Calixto Island 35 

CCPilot 14 

Car- Camp Disk System 34 

CMAILIST 21 

Colorf orth 29 

Creatavador 15 

War Kings... 



The Great Word Game 13 

GSPR 14 

Humbug 28 

Labyrinth 29 

Name That Song 42 

Scepter of Kzjrgla 1! 

35 



DEPARTMENTS 

Assembly Corner 47 

Dennis Lenando*ski 

k Issue Information 25 

nt «-2 1 

Editor's Notes 

antasy Barnes 23 

Bill Nolen 

Letters To RAINBOW 4 

Pipeline 40 

Submission Guidelines 33 



the RAINBOW 

PUBLISHED BY FALSOFT, INC. 
5803 Timber Ridge Drive 
Prospect, KY 40059 

Entire Contents e by FALSOFT, INC., 1982 
LAWRENCE C. FALK — Editor 

The RAINBOW is intended for the personal use and pleasure of its subscribers and reproduction by 
any means is forbidden. Use of programs and information herein is for the single end use of purchasers 
and any other use is prohibited. 

TRS-80, Color Computer and Extended Color Basic are trademarks of Tandy Corp. 

All programs herein are distributed on an 'as is' basis, without warranty as to suitability for any 
purpose. 

Subscriptions to the RAINBOW are $16 per year in the United States. Canadian and Mexican rates are 
$22 per year. Surface mail to other countries is $31, air mail to other countries is $49. Non-U. S. rates are 
higher due to postage costs alone. 

Limited back issues are available for $2 each for issues 1-7, $2.50 each for issues 8 and upward. 
Shipping and handling costs of $2.50 per order must be added. 

Payment accepted by cash, check, money order, VISA or MasterCard in U.S. funds. Please include 
account number, expiration date and your signature when using bank cards. 

The RAINBOW is published every month of the year. 



NAY, 1982 the RAINBON 

PRINT #-2, (Froi Page 1) 
appreciation by continuing to produce 
a top— flight magazine every month. 
******* 

Some really good news. Beginning 
next month — rounding out our first 
year — we wi 1 1 begi n a three-part 
series on modeling the National 
Footbal 1 League. These programs have 
been more than 18 months in the 
making and will run in the June, July 
and August issues. They'll end just 
as the regular NFL season starts. 

Written by John Waclo, the NFL 
Modeling series will help you 
determine who will win (or lose) 
Sunday's games. While not intended 
as anything other than entertainment, 
the point spreads can be programmed 
in as well. This is a major series 
which we hope you will enjoy. 

******* 

Also on the good news front, we're 
in the final planning for something 
we are calling the RAINBON SEAL OF 
CERTIFICATION. Simply put, we are 
tired of hearing stories about people 
who get ripped off ordering stuff 
through the mai 1 . 

In order to receive the RAIN BOH 
SEAL OF CERTIFICATION, a vendor 
will be required to submit a copy of 
whatever he or she is selling to us. 
We'll check it only to the extent 
that it is what it purports to be. 
In other words, we'll issue the Seal 
if someone sends in a monitor program 
to be sure it is a monitor 
program. But we won't guarantee its 
suitability to your needs. We hope 
our reviews will do that. 

But, when you see an ad, receive a 
flyer, or whatever, and you see the 
Seal, you'll know that the 
merchandise offered does exist. 
Rest assurred that if anyone uses the 
Seal without our approval you'll see 
more than just casual mention of it 
here, in the RAINBON . 

As someone once said, I want to 
make one thing perfectly clear. 
There is no charge whatsoever to 
vendors for use of the Seal. Neither 
is there any requirement that they 
advertise in this magazine. 

We're starting this program for 
one reason alone — to provide some 
measure of protection for mail order 
sales. And this works both ways: We 
intend that it will protect the 
honest vendors as well as you, the 
buying public. 

We hope the Seal will be helpful 
to you and that you will let people 
know you use it as a guide, if you 
choose to do so. 

******* 

We're running along, we know and 
there are more interesting things in 
the RAINBON besides what we have 
to say. But we hope you will welcome 



Page 3 

Bill Nolan of Prickly-Pear Software 
as our new columnist on Fantasy and 
Role— Playing games. And, too, we 
hope you'll also join us in belatedly 
welcoming Dennis Lewandowski of DSL 
Computer Products as our new 
tutor /columnist on assembly language. 
Dennis' column, by the way, is in 
direct response to your interest in 
understandable information on 

assembly language. Bill takes over 
for John Urban, who is devoting more 



hi< 
Wf 



business 
wish John 



at JARB 



wel 1 and 



time to 
Software, 
thank him. 

******* 

Incidentally, you will be seeing 
more changes (for the better, we 
hope) in the physical appearance of 
the RAINBON. And, the plans for 
those special issues we mentioned 
last month are moving ahead. One of 
the main features of the Adventure 
issue will be a contest — with a 
pretty good first prize. 

******* 
Almost f inal ly. . .we're really 
sorry, but we can't debug programs 
for you. Every one of the listings 
in the RAINBON is run, then 
listed for printing. We'll never 
(never say never) typeset 
there is an error, we'll correct 
them. If you're having trouble with 
some of the listings, we suggest you 
approach each one as a learning 
experience. And, frankly, debugging 
your typos is a good way to learn 
programming. Also, there is 

RAINBON ON TAPE for those who 
want the major listings ready to run. 
It is a good buy. 

******* 
I must admit I had been putting 
off writing this column because I had 
been trying in vain to think of some 
way to explain myself. I can't, so 
I'll just go ahead and say that. . . 

We got a number of letters this 
month from people who just flat 
didn't like the nickname we've given 
to our favorite computer — CoCo. 
"It makes it sound like a toy," one 
reader wrote. Another penned that it 
made it appear "clownlike." 

Heavens to Betsy, Miss Agnes! I 
thought about all that for a couple 
of weeks, and I agree. You'll see a 
change inside the RAINBON this 
month — CoCo is gone. In its place 
is, trumpets please, 80C. 

80C? 80C. I sort of thought this 
up for myself, with a little help 
from some friends (some as far away 
as Australia). And the more I 
thought, the more I came to like 80C. 

I know this isn't of great import. 
But I thought you'd like to know why 
we changed. (It does sound more 
-like. Doesn't it?) 



Page 4 



the ROINBOH 



LETTERS TO 



mm, 1982 



r a IN BO 




ROM SUBROUTINES 



THOSE 

Editor: 

In response to Ralph Coleian's 
letter, asking about 'canned' 
routines, I provide the f ol lotting 
information: 

First of all, I assuie he is 
referring to the RON subroutines 
listed in the bad of "Soing 
Ahead...', as that is what I'll be 
illustrating. 

Before starting, note there are 
three errors in the listing of 
subroutines. BLKOUT is (AM8), 
NRTLDR is A7DB and POLCAT is (AIM). 

Note the following hypothetical 
prograi Me Mi 1 1 be using in our 
illustration: 

AIM = Al 
AMI = CI 
AM2 



A1C1 > 34 
A1C2 - 14 
A1C3 = 8D 

■any addressing lodes 
6819 CPU, two of thee are 
Direct' and 'Extended 



ten = BD 
ICI1 = Al 
KK = CI 
•CI3 = - 

mtt = ad 

§001 = 9F 
0D02 = A« 
«DI3 = II 
IDM * - 

Of the 
within the 
'Extended 
Indirect.* 

Nhen we use Extended Direct, we 
tell the CPU what address to go to 
and begin execution at that address. 
If we tell the CPU to EXEC (CM (in 
the prograi above) it will pick up 
the instruction BD Al CI, which is 
JSR A1C1 (juip to the subroutine 
which starts at A1C1). Nhen the CPU 
encounters this instruction, it saves 
the necessary return address <0C03) 
on the stack and then loads the 
prograi counter with the address 
A1C1. The prograi then begins 
execution at A1C1. 

In this case, the instruction is 
34 14, which is 'push the contents of 
the X and B registers onto the S 
stack.' It then goes onto the next 
instruction until it encounters a RTS 
(return froi subroutine). The CPU 
then pulls the return address (ICI3) 
froi the stack and execution 
continues froi that point. In this 
exaiple, address AIC1 is known as the 
'effective' address. 

To use Extended Indirect 
addressing, we tell the CPU what 
address to go to so it can get the 



effective address. 6ot that? 
Neither did I the first ten tiies 
around. Here's an exaiple like one 
Lance Leventhal used to explain it: 

With Extended Direct, you go to 
rooi A to pick up a clue as to where 
the treasure is. The clue tells you 
the treasure is in rooi C. You go to 
rooi C and get the treasure. Nith 
Extended Indirect, you go to rooi A 
to get a clue as to where the 
treasure is. The clue says to go to 
rooi B to get another clue. You 
go to rooi B, get the next clue, and 
it tells you to go to rooi C to get 
the treasure. You go to rooi C and 
it is there. 

In our hypothetical prograi, if we 
tell the CPU to EXEC IDM it will 
pick up instruction AD 9F Al M, 
which is JSR (AMI). Note the 
parentheses around the address 
(AIM). This is our way of infoning 
the assembler we are using extended 
indirect addressing. The CPU saves 
the necessary return address, 1014 on 
the stack and then goes to AMI to 
pick up the effective address. The 
contents of AIM (and the next byte) 
are A1C1. The CPU loads this into 
the prograi counter and then proceeds 
to execute the prograi at A1C1. Note 
that the CPU did not execute 
instructions froi AMI because there 
were no instructions there. Nhat was 
there was the effective address where 
the CPU was to go to pick up its 
first instruction. 

The prograi at A1C1 is the saie as 
before. Nhen the prograi gets to a 
RTS it will pull the return address 
froi the stack and execution will 
return to 1014. 

Nhat we have here is two ways to 
get the saie subroutine to run. The 
extended direct entry is through ICM 
and the extended indirect is through 
IDM. So, now, what is the point of 
all this? 

Host of the subroutines listed in 
the back of "Going Ahead...' do not 
show the effective address for the 
subroutines. Instead, the address 
listed is the extended indirect entry 
point for the subroutine. If you 
want to call these subroutines, you 
■ust use the extended indirect 
approach. 

JSR POLCAT lust be written as JSR 



(AIM) - (AD 9F II II). If you try 
to enter this subroutine with JSR 
AIM (BD Al M), the CPU will expect 
an instruction there and the prograi 
will crash because what is at that 
location is an effective address and 
not an instruction. The only 
exception I have seen in this is 
NRTLDR. If you want to call it, JSR 
A7 D8 (BD A7 D8) lust be used. If 
you try it with JSR IA7D8) the 
prograi will crash. 

To help prevent soie confusion, 
here is a list of the subroutines 
with their indirect and direct entry 
points. I would recouend using the 
direct points because they are 
faster, easier to keep track of and 
use less prograi space. 
SUBROUTINE 
BLKIN 
BLKOUT 
NRTLDR 
CHROUT 
CSRDON 
JOYIN 
POLCAT 
RESET 
CLRSCR 

In the above subroutines, RESET is 
what is entered when you hit the 
RESET button on the BIC. CLRSCR is 
entered when you hit the CLEAR 
button. 

I hope this clears soie things up 
and I strongly recmend Leventhal' s 
book, 6819 Asseibly Language 
Programing' for anyone interested in 
asseibly language. 

Al Burzynski 

San Antonio, TX 



INDIRECT 


DIRECT 


(AM6) 


A7IB 


IAM8) 


A7F4 




A7DS 


(AII2) 


A282 


(AIM) 


A77C 


(AHA) 


A9DE 


(AIM) 


A1C1 




AI27 




A928 



COLOR SCRIPSIT 

Editor: 

I really enjoy reading the 
mm0». Letters are especially 
enjoyable because iany people share 
clues and hints. 

Here is iy linor contribution: 
BASIC prograis saved on tape can be 
read by COLO* SCRlfSll if they 
have been CSAVEd in ASCII fonat 
(CSAVE 'filenaie',A). Non-extended 
BASIC users can then use the text 
editing features of COLOR 
SCKlfSn to edit prograis. 
Extended Basic users already have an 
editor, but COLOR SCMS11 
provides a global editor which I find 



MAY, 1982 

useful to change all occurrances of a 
prograi variable. 

Jii Mork 

Hidland, HI 



NOTE FROM SNAKE 

Editor: 

The first fen ads run for Stake 
Hotntiin Softmre were of poor 
quality (no fault of the 
MlHtOH. The city Mas hard to 
read, and soie letters written never 
reached us. The true address is P.O. 
Box .5722, Raleigh, NC 27650 (not 
Baleich or Balfigh). If you had 
written us or ordered something and 
not received it, please write us 
again. He are sorry if this has 
caused any probleis. 

Hark D. Reeves, President 
Snake Mountain Software 
Raleigh, NC 



80C CLUB 

Editor: 

I aa interested in getting a 
TRS-B0 Color User's club started in 
the Phoenix, AZ area. If you could, 
please ask anyone interested to call 
■e at (602) B66-16S1 or to write at 
246 E. Voltaire Ave., Phoenix, AZ, 
85022. 

Larry Owen 
Phoenix, AZ 



BIG COMMENT COMMENT 

Editor: 

I at sending a siiple prograi for 
users of 6ary A. Davis' interesting 
Hi C007 prograi in the Harch 
issue. 

Users with southing other than an 
Epson printer will want to use a 
different code, and will probably 
need to introduce a 'return to 
nonal" code at the end of each 
reiark statement. 

If your printer uses a different 
"widen character' code, then the 
nuiber to change 114) appears in 
lines 240, 250 and 0624. The print 
wide character for the Hicroline B2A 
is 31, for exaiple. 

Soae readers way not realize the 
second prograi is loaded to tape in 
the regular way, using (CSAVE 'BIB 
CMNT') or soie other nan. The 
CLOADH advice is for the third 
prograi. 

Readers often contain that 
directions dealing with eachine 
language prograis are not clear ~ 
with soie justification. The be 
specific: 

1. Type in the second tlS £007 
prograi. 

2. Save it to tape as you would 
any other BASIC prograi. 

3. Nhen the tlS C007 prograi 
is in the coaputer, type <RUN>. It 
goes to eeiory but will still show 



the RfilNBOH 

for the couand <LIST>. 

4. You lay now type in <NEN> or 
CLOAD a new prograi without losing 
US mi. It stays in the 
coiputer until you turn it off or put 
another eachine language prograi in 
the sale mory area. 

5. Nhen the prograi to be coded is 
in the coiputer, type <EXEC 1536>. A 
readout will indicate which lines 
were coded. 

6. If a coiient line was not 
enlarged, edit in a space after the 
"*. Host people leave a space after 
'REN', so there should be no problei 
there. 

7. The newly coded prograi can be 
saved to tape in the regular <CSAVE> 
■anner. 

Hy siiple prograi will introduce a 
'return to nonal' code at the end of 
each mark statement — whether 
there is a space there or not. You 
have two choices, (1) Introduce a 
space at the end of each reiark 
statement before running iy prograi 
(using "X' extend to edit), or (2) 
Use iy prograi first and replace any 
last-position characters lost 
(displaced) by the return to nonal 
code later. If you use the second 
•ethod, do not use "X" extend to 
edit, or you will erase the return to 
norial code. Instead, use the 'I' 
insert to restore any lissing 
characters. 

The return to nonal code for the 
Hicroline 82A is 30 or 29. 

Hr. Davis' prograi will print out 
the prograi nuibers which have been 
changed. Nhen you run iy prograi, 
input the prograi nuibers which were 
changed. Press (BREAK) after 
entering the last nuiber. 

The prograi: 
10 'PROGRAM FOR ADDING RETURN TO 

NORMAL CODE 
20 'BY JOSEPH P. LfiRONDA, SOUTHERN 

CONN. STATE COL., NEN HAVEN, CT 

06410 

30 INPUT "FIRST LINE C0DED';C 
40 R*I>EEK(25)I2S6*PEEK(26> 
50 X*PEEK(R*2)t256+PEEK<R*3) 
60 R*PEEK(R)t256+PEEK(Rtl> 
70 IF COX THEN 50 
B0 POKE R-2 30 

90 INPUT 'NEXT LINE C0DED';C 
100 60T0 50 

Joseph P. Laronda 

Cheshire, CT 



LIKES MPP 

Editor: 

The 'Notion Picture Prograning" 

series is going to be a powerful aid 
to graphics prograning. I use 
graphics to illustrate iy biology 
lectures and the HPP approach will 



Page 5 

Lynchburg, VA 

PRINTER HELP 

Editor: 

Help! I have a printer (its 
really a Teletype) that does not 
automatically LF after a carriage 
return and does not CR-LF at the end 
of the line. Does anyone out there 
know how to write a lachine language 
prograi that will do the LF and CR-LF 
for ie when I LLIST a prograi or use 
PRINT 1-2, in a prograi. 

I have been successful in 
■odifying lost BASIC prograis with a 
CHR*<10> after the PRINT0-2, 
statement, but I don't know what to 
do with an LLIST. 

Paul Lee 

Hercules, CA 



WAR TALK 
Editor: 

There's a war going on. 

Nayne Breen said this. Tandy said 
that. Rainbow says such and such. 

No, the Color Coiputer isn't a 
toy. And it looks like we have to 
fight to prove it. 

But we're winning. 

After a long and dark software and 
information shortage, the B0C it 
coiing of age. There is wonderful 
software on the earket, there are 
periodicals to learn froi, there are 
prograis to share. A year ago, this 
was not the case. 

There are only a few Tandy Roipaks 
that I like, but those are good ones. 
Perhaps if we lake enough noise, the 
Corporation will realize that they do 
have a narrow advertising and 
■arketing strategy. Perhaps they 
Hill realize what they've got. 

So let the war rage on. But let 
B0 Hicrocoiputing carry Color 
Coiputer articles and advertisers. 
Let Tandy becoie aware of the 
'underground' software and hardware 
support for the BBC. Its the kind of 
war nobody loses. 

Do we want to 'corner the earket' 
or open it up? Personally, I would 
like to see lots of people go with 
the Color Coiputer. Ne would all 
benefit froi it. 
Bob Safir 
Los Angeles 
LIKES LEWANDOWSK I 
Editor: 

As a new owner of the SBC and one 
who is new to computers, I welcoie 
your publication. It is appreciated 
further that Lewandowski assuies an 
ignorant past and offers an 
enlightened future. I look forward 
to lany learning experiences as a 
result of your lagazine. 
Denis Haurice 
Sault Ste. Harie, Ont. 



1 



Page 6 
Word Processing. 



/if RHINBON 



the 



NHY , 1982 



IMPLE Wrf^Y 
ER YOUR WORDS 

By Oscar Millican 



As a long-time subscriber to tfte 
RAINBOH , I have read all the 
stories on word processors — 
starting with your own "Mini -Word 
Processor" in the August edition. 

At one point I wrote what I call 
my POOR MAN'S NORD PROCESSOR and 
then, later, added the routines in 
your program (Vol. I, No. 2) to 
complete the listing below. I call 
it the F RLK / M1LL1CRN HORD 

PROCESSOR, and it has a number of 
features that I consider important in 
a word processor. 

One of the best features of this 
program is the way in which you can 
change the margins. For instance, 
you can begin a letter by setting a 
margin of 56 for the return address, 
and then going to a margin of 5 for 
the inside address and the body of 
the letter. By using the different 
margins, you can set left— side and 
right— side columns, centered columns, 
or what have you. 

< Editor' s Notes Nr. Millican is 
too kind. fit best, this is the 
"Mill ican/Fal k Nord Processor" , and 
it is really the "Nillican Nord 
Processor ." He has taken some 
general ideas me incorporated into a 
very unsophisticated program Cbefore 
there mas any nord processor on the 
market and me had to have something 
with »hich to do the RH1NBON3 and 
made a nice little program. Ne hope 
you Mill like using it.) 



10 REM FALK/MILICAN WORD PROCESS 
OR 

20 CLS:LINEINPUT" RESERVE BYTES 
FOR STRING* , iS$:S=VAL(S$) 
30 CLS:PRINT' 'S 'BYTES FOR S 
TRIM6$' : CLEARS 

40 PRINTiPRINT 1 SELECT 
FORMAT' 

50 PRINTsPRINT' (1) ONE COLU 
Ifl FORMAT" 

60 PRINT' (2) TWO COLUMN FOR 
NAT'sPRINT 

70 LINEINPUT" ENTER 1 OR 

2 ';F$:F=VAL(F$) 
80 Off GOTO90.328 
90 CLS:PRINT" ONE COLUMN F 
ORMAT':N=0 

100 LINEINPUT' SET MARGI 

N: 'iM*:M=VAL(M$) 

110 CLS:P0KE1329-2«M,68:PRINT' 

MARGINS SET AT'M'SPACES' 
120 IFM>39THENCLS: PRINT' LEFT M 
ARGIN SET AT'M' TYPE BETWEEN 



MARKERS AND <ENTER>':P0KE1329-M 
,60:6OTO140 

130 PRINT'TYPE UP TO'80-2*H'CHAR 
ACTERS BETWEEN MARKERS AND 
<ENTER>' 

140 PRINT' TO JUSTIFY, ENTER SPA 
CES FROM LAST SYMBOL TO RIGHT 
MARKER' 

150 PRINT'ENTER * TO 
N/LINE NO' 
160 PRINT' ENTER 3 TO RE-FO 
RMAT' 

170 X=79-2*M 

180 IFM>39THENX=79-M 

190 N$=' ':L=4:PRINT9353,"i 

200 IFN>0THENPRINT3353, ' «LINE'N 

■PRINTED AS FOLLOWS*' 

210 IFN>0ANDM<=39THENPOKE1519-2* 

Hi 30 

220 IFN>0ANDM>39THENPOKE1519-M,3 
8 

230 IFA$=' A, THENA$=" 
240 PRINTA$:PRINT3224,"; 



250 LINEINPUT'>';A$:IFA*=""THEN 
90 

260 IFA$='3'THEN20 

270 IFRIGHT$(A$,1)=' 'THENA$=LEF 

T$(A$,X):GOTO300 

280 PRINT#-2.TAB(M)A$ 

290 N=N+l:GOTO110 

300 B=INSTR(L,A$,N$>:C$=LEFT«(A$ 

,B):E$=RIGHT$(A$,X-B) 

310 D$=C*+N$:A$=D$+E$:L=LEN(D$)+ 

*:60T027B 

320 CLS:PRINT' TWO COLUMN 
FORMAT' :N=0 

330 PRINT: PRINT' SELECT 
COLUMN' 

340 PRINTiPRINT' (1) LEFT 

COLUMN 

350 PRINT' (2) RIGHT COLU 

ItT 

360 PRINTiLINEINPUT' ENT 
ER 1 OR 2 'iC$:C=VAL(C$) 
370 IFC=1THENY=0:PRINT:PRINT' 

LEFT COLUMN' 
380 IFC=2THENY=42:PRINT:PRINT' 

RIGHT COLUMN' 
390 PRINT:LINEINPUT' SE 
T MARGINS 'iM»:M=VAL(M$) 

400 CLS:POKE1287-2»M,60 

401 IFOITHENPRINT' MARGINS (LE 
FT COL) SET AT'M' 

402 IFC=2THENPRINT' MARGINS (RI6 
HT COL) SET AT'M' 

410 PRINT'TYPE UP T0'38-2*M'CHAR 
ACTERS BETWEEN MARKERS AND 
<ENTER>' 
420 X=37-2*M 

430 PRINT' TO JUSTIFY, ENTER SPA 
CES FROM LAST SYMBOL TO RIGHT 
MARKER' 

440 PRINT'ENTER * TO RESET MARGI 
N/LINE NO' 

450 PRINT' ENTER 3 TO RE-FO 
RMAT' 

460 N$=' ':L=3:PRINT3321,"i 
470 IFN>0THENPRINT3321,' *LINE'N 
■PRINTED AS FOLLOWS*' :P0KE1477-2 
*M,30 

480 IFA$ =, *'THENA$=" 

490 PRINT:PRINTA$:PRINT3224,"; 

500 LINEINPUT' >'iA$:IFA$='*' THEN 

320 

510 IFA«='3'THEN20 

520 IFRIGHT$(A$,1)=' 'THENA$=LEF 

T*(A$,X):GOTO550 

530 PRINTI-2,TAB(M+Y)A$ 

540 N=N+l:GOTO400 

550 B=INSTR(L,A$,N$):C*=LEFT$(A$ 

,B):E$=RI6HT*(A$,X-B) 

560 D$=C$+N»:A$=D$+E$:L=LEN(D$)+ 

3:GOTO520 



MAY, I9S2 



the RAINBOH 



Pag, 7 



PRICKLY - PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR 16K EXTENDED COCO 



Fantasy Gamer's Package 

Two programs: The first will display your choice of 99 
different rooms in Hi-Res graphics at the touch of a key.- 
All standard sizes, plus some with pools, pillars, stairs, 
odd shapes, etc. Saves lots of game time spent describ- 
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super fast dungeon designing system and a completely 
keyed sample dungeon module — ready to play. The 
second program in the package generates COMPLETE 
characters including abilities, race, classes, hit points, 
age, thieving skills, much more, and also generates 
monsters. This package was developed by an active DM, 
and has been tested in his campaign. 20 pages of docu- 
mentation. $1 9.95 

Mathpac I 

Finally! A totally flexible, menu-driven set of elementary 
math programs for the color computer! MATHPAC I, 
developed and tested by an elementary teacher in his 
own classroom, allows the user to chose the operation 
(+—*/), difficulty level, number of problems, and a drill or 
testing format. This program employs sound educational 
principles, and even includes suggestions for classroom 
use. $1 9.95 



The Great Word Game 

Perhaps the best word game ever for Coco. There's great 
graphics, music, and crisp formatting. Plenty of on- 
screen instructions. Two to four players compete. If 
you like Scrabble* and Probe* you'll love this one. 
$19.95 



Household Helper 

This menu driven program will convert to or from metric, 
convert recipes to serve more or fewer people, project 
gasoline cost for trips or around town driving, keep track 
of your bills coming due, more. $14.95 

Vinyl covers 

Clear, super-heavy upholstery vinyl cut and sewn to fit. 
Color computer, specify if disk system, $9.95. Tape 
recorder or disk, fits Radio Shack, $5.95. Printer, specify 
make and model, $9.95. Add $1 .50 shipping, or $2.50 
shipping on a set. These are really nice. 

Notice: 

It Is our policy novor to advortlto an Itom unlets It Is 
already In our Inventory, and ready to bo shipped. 



NEW THIS MONTH 



— 



Viking! 

A simulation for 1 to 4 persons. Each begins as a 
landowner, and by farming their land, buying and selling 
land, expanding their fishing fleet, building on to their 
manufactory, increasing their population, equiping and 
training more soldiers, and regulating their taxes, each 
player tries to increase their economic power and rank 
until one becomes ruler overall. But beware plagues, rats, 
raiders, revolts, bad weather, and other misfortunes 
which may lie along the road to success. As you progress, 
see the map of your holdings increase. Playable in 1 to 2 
hours, and different every time, you may have an addic- 
tion problem. $19.95 

Starflnder 

This astronomical "star" computes the current sidereal 
time, and converts declination and right ascension to 
altitude and azimuth — or the other way around. Just 
enter your latitude and longitude, and the time of day. We 
include instructions to help you equip your dobsonian or 
tripod with setting circles. Quit wasting your time looking, 
and spend more time seeing. $19.95 

Football 

A strategy version of America's game. The offense and 
defense enter their plays, and the results (different each 
time) are calculated and displayed on the scoreboard. 
Will they run up the middle or throw the bomb? Are they 
playing the prevent, or will they blitz? 36 different play 
combinations provide over 200 possible play outcomes, 
not counting the variables for yardage gained or lost. 
Intercept, fumble, blitz, punt, and kick field goals. Even an 
occasional long run or punt return for a touchdown!. Be 
aware, this isn't another arcade wonder to see who's 
faster on the joystick, but all you sideline coaches are 
going to love it. $1 6.95 

Wood Peripheral 

You will truly wonder how you got along without this wood 
(% inch birch veneer) book stand. It straddles your 
computer, and holds your book, magazine, or most any- 
thing else right above Coco, at the perfect angle, where 
you can read it as you type. No more stiff necks with this. It 
won't block the cooling vents, and it looksgreat! Available 
with a lovely and durable hand-rubbed oil finish, or finish it 
yourself and save. Completely finished, specify walnut, 
cherry, or maple stain, $29.95. Unfinished, $19.95. 
Shipped flat; assembly requires putting 4 screws into pre- 
drilled holes. Add $3.50 shipping. 



SEND A LONG S.A.S.E. FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE 

CASSETTE TAPE: Best quality Agfa tape in distinctive 5 screw shells. Stainless steel guide pins. 
C-1 2's - $8.50 Doz. Add $1.50 per dozen shipping. 

EXTRA COPIES OF DOCUMENTATION AVAILABLE - 1.50 each 



Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

3518 S. Randi Place 
Tucson, Arizona 85730 
(602) 886-1505 

Probe* is Reg. T.M. of Parker Bros. Scrabble is Reg. T.M. of the Production & Mkt. Co. 



Your Personal check is welcome - no delay Include 
$1.50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping 
free on $50.00 or larger orders). Az. residents add 6% 
sales tax. Orders shipped within two 



J 



Page 8 



the RfilNBOH 



Mf»Y r 1982 



Tutorial. 



USING « GRAPHIC CHARACTER 
FOR THE COLOR COMPU 



instruction 
start out 

Listing 1. 
listing to 



set in Extended Color Basic, 
by looking (and 
This is your 
get a complete 



We do it "softly! 



1040 DATA 'BUR2DUREHL2HERUDR2BD5 



By M. H. Endres 

One o-f the so-called disadvantages of the TRS-80 Color Computer has been 
the 80C's inability to mix High— Res graphics and text printing on the same 
screen display. I say "so-called" because it is really quite easy — simple 
in fact — to mix high resolution graphics and high quality 5x7 matrix 
characters on the CRT (or printer) at the same time. 

While a number o-f other computers do this by hardware switching, 
character — generating ROMS and complex video timing, we can do the very same 
thing — better and with more flexibility — by using the 80C's very powerful 
graphics 
Let's 
1 oadi ng) 
"basic" 

(less lower case) character set into 
your 80C's memory. You can, of 
course, go right ahead and add the 
lower case letters just by continuing 
the DATA statements with the proper 
strings with which to DRAW the 
characters desired. Change lines 80 
and 90 to reflect the additional data 
strings to be read in and you will 
have both upper and true lower case 
with which to work in a graphics 
screen mode. I have found that 
all— caps is adequate for my graphics 
programs, so I've never bothered to 
generate the lower case. But if you 
want it, be my guest! 

Listing 1 merely contains a 



statement , 
contain the 
character 
assigns ea 
subscri pted 
which X 

accident) to be th 
that represents the 



DATA statements 
strings that DRAW 
and a read loop 
h string a label 



DIM 
that 
each 
that 
in a 



1060 DATA ' BR4B I J2G2LHE3UHLGDF4 " 
1070 DATA •BR2BU6D2BR2BD5' 
1080 DATA , BR4BU6LGD4FR , 
1090 DATA 'REU4HLBR4BD6* 
1100 DATA 'BUE4G2U2D4U2L2R4L2H2F 
4BD' 

1110 DATA •EU3R4L2U2D4ER2BD* 
1120 DATA ' BR3BULURD2GBR2BU" 
1130 DATA ■BRBU3R2BRBD3' 
1140 DATA •BR2LURDBR2" 
1150 DATA ■UE4UBD6" 
1160 DATA ' BUU4ER2FD4GL2HER4BD " 
1170 DATA ■BRBU5ED6LR2BR* 
1180 DATA , Blf5ER2FDG4R4" 



string called L*(X) in 
just happens (not by 
decimal number 
ASCII character 



string will DRAW when called 
There you are! An indexed 
of ASCII characters from <SPACE> 
developed and stuffed into your 
memory much faster than it took 

Beats 
all to 



the 
upon 
list 
to Z 
80C's 

to write this down, 
character — generating ROMS 
heck. 

10 REM BASIC PROGRAM FORMAT 
20 REM GRAPHIC SCREEN CHARACTER 
30 REM SET FOR TRS-80C 
40 REM BY SOLUS CO. 
50 REM BOX 8, SPIRIT LAKE, ID 
60 REM 8386?.. (208! 623-5911 
65 ' 

70 DIML$<90) 

80 REM READ ASCII CHAR 32-90 
90 FOR 2=32 TO 90:READLt(Z):NEXT 

998 G0T0998 

999 END 

1000 DATA 'W\' 
1010 DATA 'BR2U0BU2U4BM+2.6' 
1020 DATA 1 BRBU6D2BR2U2BEBD6" 
1030 DATA ■BRU2LR4LD2BL3BU4RU2D2 
R2U2D2RBD4' 



PROGRAMS FOR KIDS 

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Adventure game on a child's level containing many graphics, 
songs and surprises. Non frustrating, yet still challenging. 

NOME THOT SONG-1 6K-EXT. *1C OO 
This new game contains 72 children's songs to entertain you 
and your children. Two levels of difficulty. Hours of fun. 
NOME THOT SONG II -16-K-EXT. *10. OO 
New fanily version containing 72 all time popular hits. Pop, 
country, movie, and show tunes. 2 levels. Lots of family fun. 

OPORTMENT MYSTERY — A— K *6. OO 
A simple advent ure-«ystery game that familiarizes children 
with using directions. Try to find the secret treasure!!! 

tii iiii i iii n iiii i ii i i i i i ii i ii i ii i i i 
THE OMOZING WIZORD -4-K *6. OO 
Psk the WIZARD any quest ion. He blinks and thinks. Read his 
amusing answers. Is he telling the truth? Who knows??? 

FREE EXTRA PROGRAM ON TAPE WITH ORDERS OF $16.00 OR MORE! 




COMPUTER ISLOND 



T.R., 227 HAMPTON GREEN, STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. 10312 
(other tapes available) 



HfiY, 1982 



the 



RQINBOH 



Page 9 



1190 DATA 
D" 

1200 DATA 
1210 DATA 
1220 DATA 

1230 DATA 
1240 DATA 
2FDGFBD2" 
1250 DATA 



"BU5ER2F D6L RFDGL2HBR4B 



■BR3U6G3R4BD3' 
■BUFR2ELM.3U3R4P.D6" 
■ BU3R3FD6L2HU3E2RBRBD6 



■BU6R463D3BR3' 
■BR4B 



BUFR2EU4HL2GDFR2BRBD3 
1260 DATA ' BRBURULDBU3RULDBR3BD4 

■ 

BR2BULURD2GBRBU5LURDB 



1270 DATA 
R2ED4' 
1280 DATA 
1290 DATA 

1300 DATA 
1310 DATA 
1320 DATA 
1330 DATA 
1340 DATA 

1350 DATA 
1360 DATA 
1370 DATA 
1380 DATA 
1390 DATA 
D5 1 

1400 DATA 
1410 DATA 
1420 DATA 
1430 DATA 
1440 DATA 
1450 DATA 
1460 DATA 
1470 DATA 
1480 DATA 
1490 DATA 
V 

1500 DATA 
1510 DATA 
1520 DATA 
1530 DATA 
1540 DATA 
1550 DATA 
1560 DATA 
1570 DATA 
1580 DATA 



■BR4EU663F3' 
■BRBU4R2BL2BD2R2BR3BD2 

"E3H3BR4BD6" 

■BU5ER2FD62BD2UBR2BD' 

, BU5ER2FD46L2HUER3BD3 , 

, U4E2F2D2L4R4D2■ 

■RU6LR3FD6L2R2FD6L3BR4 

, BR4BU6L2HU4ER2FDBD' 

•RU6LR3FD4SL2BR3 , 

■U3R4L4U3R4BD6L4R4' 

■U3R4L4U3R4BD6" 

'BR2BU3R2D2GL2HU4ER2FB 



"U6D3R4U3D6 1 

■BRR2LU6LR2BRBD6' 

■BU2DFR2EU5BD6" 

■U6BR463F3' 

■R4L4U6BR4BD6" 

■U6F2E2D6' 

■U6DF4U5D6" 

■R4L4U6R4D6" 

■U6R3FD6L3BR4BD3' 

■BUU4ER2FD46L2HBR2BU1F 

■U6R3FD5L3RF3 1 

■BUFR2EUHL2HUER2FBD5■ 

■BU6R4L2D6BR2 1 

■U6D6R4U6D6" 

■BU6D4F2E2U4BD6" 

, U6D6E2F2U6D6" 

■UE2H2UDF2E2UD62F2D" 

, BU6DF2E2UD62D3BR2 , 

' BU6R4DG2LR2LG2DR4 ' 

who 



created characters. Add the lines in 
Listing 2 to the program you have 
already loaded, RUN it, and you will 
display the character set you have 
just developed. You're "writing" in 
high— res graphics mode. 

91 REM ADD THESE LINES 

92 REM TO DISPLAY THE CHARACTER 

93 REM SET. 
95 PM»DE4,1 
100 PCLS 

110 5CREEN1 , 1 
120 X=l:* HORIZ COUNTER 
130 DRAW -BMie, 10':* HOME UP 
140 FOR Z=33 TO 90:* CHAR. CODE 
150 DRAUL$(Z> 

160 DRAML*(32): 'SPACE RIGHT 
170 X=X+1 

180 IF X>30 THEN DRAW 'BM10.30': 
X=l:' SKIP TO NEW LINE 
190 HEXT Z 

998 G0T0998 

But how do we use this new 
ability? How do we keep track of 
what's what? Its tough to look at 
"BR4BU2DBL2HUER2L2HUER2FDBD2" and say 
"Aw shucks, I knew that was an 8 all 
the time!" 

Got a printer? DELETE Lines 91 
through 190 and add the program lines 
in Listing 3. RUN it and you will be 
rewarded with a complete dump of what 
you have available to use in writing 

(Continued on next pige) 



As an aside, for those of you 
are inclined to adventure, it may 
have already occurred to you that 
this method of generating characters 
is not limited to English. How 
about one for Chinese? Arabic? 
Hebrew? Whatever? Further, for you 
logic designers, just a few minutes 
with graph paper will provide you 
with a complete set of logic symbols 
to do layouts "on screen." In fact, 
you can use this for any written or 

drawn character or symbol . 

.et's play a bit with these newly 



If You're Serious About Programming 
Then You Need 



HUMBUG 



HUMBUG — The Ultimate Monjtor that has long been the best in 
the 6800/6809 big system market is now available for the Color 
Computer. This is the monitor you need if you do any machine or 
assembly language programming. 37 commands allow you toenter, 
examine, start, stop, even single-step machine language programs. 
Use the computer as a terminal to another computer, or use an 
external terminal to control your Color Computer. HUMBUG 
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Stop playing with toys and join the professionals with HUMBUG. 
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Once you use HUMBUG you'll never go back to anything else. 
Available on disk or cassette for $39.95 or on ROM pack for $69.95. 

Ask for catalog. NY State residents please add sales tax. 



Star-Kits 



P.O. Box 209 

Mt. Kisco, N.Y. 10549 

(914) 241-0287 



Page 10 



the 



ROINBO* 



MAY , 



2982 



GRAPHIC CHARACTERS (Froi Page 9) 
your new, improved and "character — 
ized" graphics routines. The program 
will print a listing of the ASCII 
decimal number, the character 
generated and the appropriate string 
to generate it. Save this dump for 
future reference when you need to 
"print" in graphics mode. 

91 REM ADD THESE LINES TO DUMP 

92 REM ASCII CODE/CHARACTER 

93 REM AND GRAPHIC STRING 

94 REM COMPOSITION TO LINE 

95 REM PRINTER FOR REFERENCE 

96 REM IN OTHER PROGRAMS 
100 FOR Z=32 TO 90 

110 PRIMTt-2,"ASCII # " ; 2 i ' s CHARA 

CTER <";CHR«<2>;"> «**GRAPHICS S 

TRING( , ;L»<Z)i , >" 

115 PRINTI-2,:' EXTRA SPACE 

120 NEXT Z 

All the characters in this 
particular set are developed as 5x7 
dot matrix characters and would 
normally occupy an 8x12 pixel "zone." 
The extra three pixels to the right 
of each character are used for 
spacing and the extra five pixels 
below each character are used for 
line to line spacing. These figures 
are just for reference, however, and 
are not etched in stone simply 
because by using our new "printing" 
on the graphics screen, we may not 



care about line to line or character 
to character spacing. We may want to 
s-t— r-e— t-c— h out our printing or 
b 1 ow i 

diagonally up and down. 

In fact, we can do anything we 
want to with these characters just by 
specifying a START location. Just 
remember that all the characters in 
this set are drawn beginning at the 
lower left-hand corner of our 5x7 
pixel block. After speficying the 
START location, all that remains is 
to DRAW the appropriate ASCI I -indexed 
string. 

Let's see how it works. First, 
DELETE lines 91 through 120 from your 
"basic" program. Now, add the lines 
in Listing 4. Our specified location 
is X-128, Y-96 — smack dab in the 
middle of the screen. (Please note I 
am assuming that you are a little 
familiar with the 80C's graphic 
commands. If not, this might be a 
good time to review them in the 
Extended Basic book. ) 

95 PMODE 3,1 

100 pas 

110 SCREEN 1,1 

120 DRAW ■EM128,96;XL«(65)5" 

121 GOTO 121: 'LOOP 

What the addition of Listing 4 
does for us is simply to "print" an A 
right in the middle of the graphics 
screen. Simple, huh? 

Let's jive it up a bit. EDIT Line 



NOTHING FANCY — JUST GOOD SOFTWARE 



SPELLING TEACHER 

Designed to providepositive reinforcement for correct spell- 
ing. Provides capability for building, editing, and combining 
spelling lists of up to 200 words which may be stored on tape 
or disk. Four lesson modes, including a scrambled word 
game, provide enough variety so that the repetition needed 
for learning is fun.Uses sound and music to keep things lively. 

$12.95 in BASIC 

GRAPHIC SCREEN PRINT PROGRAM 

For use with TRS-80" Line Printers VII and VIII. Ours is better 
because it works in all PMODES and lets you shift the screen 
image anywhere on the printed page. Load the relocatable 
code where you want it. lets you use all of your 32K machine. 
Eight bit serial interface supported by Color Basic release 
1.1 is required. 

Language 



MATH TUTOR 

Starts with math fact (+, -, x, / ) drill. Then goes on to full 
addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division at four 
levels of difficulty. Requires student to think through process 
step by step and make carry and regroup decisions. Provides 
correction of repeated errors and audio-visual rewards for 
good performance. Includes five programs. 

$13.95 in BASIC 

WE WANT YOUR SUGGESTIONS! Let us know what soft- 
ware you need. We don't promise to develop it. but if we do, 
you will be offered it at one half our retail price. No obligation 
on your part! 

ALL PROGRAMS require Extended Color Basic and are 
delivered on cassette. All are DISK System compatible. 



(TRS-80* is a trademark of Tandy Corp.) 



Custom Software Engineering, Inc. 



807 Minutemen Causeway 
Cocoa Beach, Florida 32931 
(305) 783-1083 



For VISA and Master Card orders: 
Include type, account number, expiration 
date, signature and phone number. 
Sorry! No COD's 



Add $1.00 per order lor shipping. 
Florida residents add sales tax. 
Return within twoweeksif not com- 
pletely satisfied. 



may. 1962 



the 
DRAW 



120 to read: 

"S30;BM128,96; XL* (65) ; " 

Can you do this nifty "blow-up" in 
any standard print 

of? I cannot think of a single one. 
Please note that the blown— up letter 
still starts at the same spot on 
the screen as it did before. In 
order to re-center the letter in its 
larger state, the X— Y coordinates of 
the DRAW statement have to be changed 
to something like 110,100. 

Now, EDIT Line 120 again to readi 
DRAW "S30;C3;BM110, 110; XL* (65) ; " 

Not only have you re— centered the 
A, you have also changed the color. 
That's what the C in Line 120 does. 

Let's get a little more fancy. 
DELETE lines 95 through 121 and add 
the lines in Listing 5. With this 
addition, we have placed squashed 
circles on our graphics screen, 
painted them a pretty color and then, 
with our graphics character set, 
printed a "title" in each of the 
circles we drew. The extra corner 
color is just for fun! 

91 REM ADD THESE LINES FOR A 

92 REM DEMO OF HOW TO USE THE 

93 REM GRAPHICS LETTER SET 

95 PMODE 3,1 

96 pas 

97 SCREEN 1,1 
100 X=64:Y=48 
110 FOR Z=l TO 3 

120 CIRCLE (X,Y>,55,4,.5 
130 PAINT <X,Y),4,4 
140 X=X+64:Y=Y+48 



M4:M + 4B 



150 NEXT 

155 A$=L*(84)+L$(32)+L$(73)+L«(3 
2>+L*(84)+L*(32)+L$(76)+l$(32)+L 
$(69) 

160 DRAW 'S8;C1;IK30,55;XA$;' 
170 DRAW , S8;C2iBM95,103;XA$;' 
180 DRAW , S8;C3;BM159,15l;XA$;' 
190 Y=12 

200 FOR X=224 TO 100 STEP -4 
210 LINE (X,0)-(256,Y),PS£T 
220 Y=Y+4 
230 NEXT 
240 Y=180 

250 FOR X=12 TO 132 STEP 4 
260 LINE <0,YHX,192),PSET 
270 Y=Y-4 



280 NEXT 

290 wTvZ70 



Look at Line j.55. There are 
several ways we can manipulate our 
newly found ability to print words on 
the graphics screen. In Line 155, we 
have created the word TITLE and 
called it A*. We did it this way 
because, as you can see in Lines 160, 
170 and 180, we needed to print TITLE 
three times. This way, I didn't have 
to dublicate Line 155 each time. 



RAINBOH Pmgw u 

Saves memory and typing. 

If you need to print the same word 
than once, by all means build a 
label it, and call on 
ienever you need it. 
Note the L*(32) in every other 
string segment. For each character 
string you print, in order to provide 
a space between characters, you must 
call and DRAW L*(32) which is merely 
"BR4" — our graphics "space." 

Should you knot* in advance that 
you mill need to spell out a number 
of Mords, Just add "BR4" to the 
beginning of each string in the DATA 
statements — thereby automatically 
adding a space to each one. Just 
remember to start printing four pixel 
locations to the left of mhere you 
want the first character to appear in 
order to compensate for the leading 
space. 

One absolutely super ability you 
have with this method of character 
generation is calculation of 
character designation. You can 
actually use a math expression to 
stipulate what character you want to 
print. For example, let's go back to 
our simple letter A printed in the 
middle of the screen. DELETE Lines 
91 through 290 and add those of 
Listing 6. What happens with this 
one? Right smack there in the middle 
of the screen the 80C will print out 
random characters for you — as 
computed by the RND(X) function in 
Line 111. 

111 X=RND<90) 

112 IF X<33 THEN 111 
120 DRAW 'S30;C3;BH110,110;XL$(X 

);• 

122 GOTO1B0 (Cmthui on hgt ID 



lntroducii... Aut i 



Run 



Auto Run is a utility program lor the TRS-80* Extended 
Basic Color Computer. It Is used to add convenience and pro- 
fessionalism to your software. 

Auto Run will create a tape which will consist of a machine 
language loader followed by your basic or machine language 
program. With this tape, a simple CLOAOM command will load 
and start the loader which will then load and start your pro- 
gram. 

You may design a title screen with the graphics editor which 
will display as your program loads. Also, you may record a 
vocal or musical Introduction preceding your program. The 
Auto Run loader will control the audio on/off. 

Basic programs can be set to load anywhere In memory 
above $600 (the PCLEAR 0 page). 

Software authors: The Auto Run prefix may be appended to 
your software products. 

Auto Run is $14.95 and includes complete 
documentation and an assembly source listing. 
Ohioans add 5.5% sales tax. 
Add $1.00 per tape for postage and handling. 
C.O.D. orders are welcome. Dealer Inquiries Invited. 

Sugar Software 
21 53 Leah Lane Reynoldsburg, Oh 43088 
(614) 861-0565 



'TRS-80 It 1 1 



( ot Tandy Carp 



Page 12 



the RMNBOH 



MM, 1982 



ACTION GAMES 

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THE COLOR COMPUTER 



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They set a standard for others to follow. 



— ADVENTURES — 

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Save game in progress 

Adventures on 5% TSC FLEX disc (specify 6800 or 6809) ea. $24.95 

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Adventures for color computer ea. $19.95 

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VISA 



- MORE COMING SOON — 




MARK DATA PRODUCTS 

23802 Barquilla, Mission Viejo, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 



TRS 80 IS A TRADEMARK OF TANDY CORP. 



the RA1NBOM 

(Froa Page 11) 



MAY, 1962 

GRAPHIC CHARACTERS 

Now does that give you ideas? It 
should. You can use it for screen 
scoring for a game by reading the 
graphic characters for the numbers 
into memory at the beginning of the 
program. Then, when the program 
needs them, it can DRAW them by the 
direct index label you've stored them 
under; DRAW L*(X>, where X is the 
score you wish to print. 

For this application, use Listing 
7. Note the space < M BR4") is stored 
as L*(10) for simplicity. 

5 REM INPUTS STRINGS FOR NUMBERS 

6 REM 0 THR0U6H 9 ONLY 
10 DIM L*(1B) 

20 FOR Z=0 TO 10:REASL$<Z):NEXT 

999 END 

1000 DATA " BUU4ER2FD4GL2HER4BD" 
1010 DATA 'BRBU5ED6LR2BR' 

1020 DATA , BU5ER2FD64R4* 

1030 DATA 1 BU5ER2FD6LRFD6L2HBR4B 

D' 

1040 DATA 'BR3U6G3R4BD3' 
1050 DATA 'BUFR2EUHL3U3R4BD6 1 
1060 DATA 1 BU3R3FDGL2HU3E2RBRBD6 

1070 DATA 'BU6R4G3D3BR3' 

1080 DATA •BR4BU2D6L2HUER2L2HUER 

2FDGFBD2" 

1090 DATA "BUFR2EU4HL26DFR2BRBD3 
• 

1100 DATA "BR4" 

Where to go from here? Why, let 
your imagination be your guide. 

(iillOt'S HOW For those of yoo interested in sharing 
graphics character sets — Chinese, Drabic, iebren, Old 
English or nhatever - the KDlHtiH will be pleased to 
receive nil print then. Please include the sets on tape.) 



Page i3 



Software Review. 
GRE 



.£*T WORD 



GAM 
GRE 



THE GREAT HORD GAME is a lot 
of fun and one of those word games 
that really grows on you. If you 
Scrabble or Probe, then you're 
to be really pleased with this 
-ing (from Prickly— Pear Software, 



like 
sure 
of fe 

3518 S. Randi 
85730, *19.95). 

The plot here 
player (up to 
time) makes up 
computer keeps 
other players all 



PI. 



Tucson, AZ, 



is simply 
four can 
a word 
track of 
try to 



that 
play 
and 
it. 

gut 



— letter by letter or the 
and the one who does 



each 
at a 
the 
The 
5 the 
whole 
best 



sounds 
word 

this one 
For 



a lot like a 
games you have 
does it all 
thing, it uses 



word 
word 
wins. 

While this 
many other 
probably seen, 
with style, 
each player's name, hides the mystery 
letters behind color blocks, and 
flashes the score from time to time. 
And, with all the names and so on, 
THE GREAT MORD GAME is one of the 
most friendly games we've seen. The 
program really does appear to have a 
kindly personality all its own. 

This one will let you use spaces 
to confuse your opponents (but not in 
the middle of words) and really makes 
you guess. By that I mean if you're 
using "really" as the mystery word, 
it only gives one "L" at a time. No 
going through the vowels to flesh 
out words quickly with THE GREAT 
MORD game: 

This one is educational and fun. 



TIRED OF" TYPIN 



AINBOW PROGRAMS' 



Now, you can get RAINBOW ON TAPE and stop bruising your fingers each month just to run a great program you want! 
RAINBOW ON TAPE offers all the major listings from the RAINBOW each month. And, you'll be able to simply put the 
cassette in your tape recorder, CLOAD and RUN them! No more typing. And no more debugging your typing mistakes! 

RAINBOW ON TAPE is available for *5 per single issue (please specify month) or for $50 for a year (12 tapes). VISA 
and MasterCard accepted! To start RAINBOW ON TAPE coming by first class mail, just fill in the order form below, 

The~RAINBOW 

5803 Timber Ridge Drive 
R O. Box 209 
Prospect, KY 40059 



YES! Sign me up for RAINBOW ON TAPE! I would like! 
A Full Year For *50 A Month For $5 (Please show month) 



Name 



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□ Payment Enclosed 

□ Charge my VISA account # 
Signature 




- Card EXpira,i ° n 03,6 ' n,erbank * — 



CREEN 

:imt 



Page 14 
Software Review... 

HIGH QUALITY 
PRINT IS EXCI 



6RHPH1C SCREEN PRINT PROBRRN 
(6SPR> is an excellent utility -for 
anyone who wants copies of graphic 
screens on a piece of paper. We're 
talking about high-res graphic 
screens here. 

Available from Custom Software 
Engineering Inc. (807 Minutemen 
Causeway, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931, 
•7.95), this program has many 
advantages over other programs we 
have seen. 

First, and probably most 

important, it will print graphics 
from any of the PMODEs, not just the 
two-color ones. With the other 
program (from Radio Shack), you are 
forced to change a program from a 
four — color mode — if it is using the 
four — color screens — to two— color in 
order to make it work. BSPR also 
distinguishes between colors by 
shifting of dot patterns, so you can 
get a better representation of what a 
four — color screen looks like. This 
is really nice! 

The program is in machine 
language, and is simple to relocate 
anywhere in 32K of memory. The 
instruction sheets, three pages in 
all, are easy to follow and make this 
process easy. 



the RftlNBON 



MAY , 1982 



Being a user with the 1.0 ROM, we 
have one minor problem. 6SPR 
does not have a built-in eight-bit 
driver, so it is necessary to load a 
driver first. For those with the 1.1 
ROM, this is not necessary. We used 
the eight-bit driver printed in last 
month's RAIN BOH and BSPR 

worked like a charm! 

The program allows "normal" 
graphics (exactly like those on the 
screen) or reverse (the opposite). 
It is a good program and well worth 
the smal 1 cost . 



Software Review... 

C _ C _ PILOT IS 
BIT RUDOERLE 

We believe PILOT has many 
possibilities for Computer Aided 
Instruction (CAI). For one thing, it 
is an easy language to learn, is 
oriented to the question and answer 
format, and can be used effectively 
in teaching situations. 

From the standpoint of 

experimenting with PILOT, C.C. 
PILOT (Snake Mountain Software, 
P.O. Box 5722, Raleigh, NC, 27650) is 
a good buy at *5.95. It will run on 
a 4K system and, although in BASIC, 
executes quickly. 

While professionally done as to 
duplication, the manual which comes 
with C.C. PILOT is something less 
than impressive. We do not believe 
you should expect to be taught a 



CO-RESIDENT EDITOR/ASSEMBLER 
(CORES9) 

C0RES9 is a complete lull (unction editor/assembler package that will allow you to create, 
edit and assemble 6809 machine language programs lor the color computer. It features a 
powerful full function text editor and supports the entire 6809 instruction set with ali I 
addressing modes, forward and reverse table references, will output object code directly to 
memory or "CLO A DM" compatible tapes and much more. Price $39. 95 




TEXT EDITOR 

This program is a line/character oriented text editor for the 
color computer, that will enable you to create and edit text 
files for Basic programs, letters, text data files, or almost 
anything you might want to put on paper. It features functions 
for adding, inserting, deleting, moving and copying text lines 
or paragraphs; powerful string search and replace com- 
mands, single and automatic line numbers and line editing 
with 9 sub commands to insert, delete, change, add and 
remove individual or mutlple characters. Tape commands 
allow you to save, load, append, and skip tape files; also it is 
compatible with Basic ASCII tape formats. A MUST HAVE 
PROGRAM!! 

ONLY $19.95 



SYSTEM MONITOR 
(TRSMON) 

Trsmon is a 2 K system monitor program that will allow you to 
explore the workings of the color computer. It features 9 
debuging comands, tape load and save compatible with Basic 
"CLOADM", up/down load via RS232 port, terminal package 
that allows the color computerto be used as a teminal at baud 
rates up to 9600 baud and a printer driver to direct display 
output to the printer for memory dumps, disassemblys etc. 
The program is position independent so it can be moved 
anywhere within the system memory. A very powerful tool at a 
very reasonable price. 

ONLY $19.95 



5566 RICOCHET AVE. 
Las Vegas, Nv. 89110 



CER-COMP 
(702) 452-0632 



All Orders Shipped From Stock 
Add $1.00 Postage - 
MC/VISA Add 3% 



HOY, 1982 



the RfilNBOM 



Page IS 



language with documentation 

(especially at this price) but we do 
believe each -function of the program 
should be explained clearly and in 
some detail. On the other hand, the 
program examples do help give some 
insight to how things work. 

Me believe CAI is one of the 80C's 
major strengths and for those 
interested in PILOT as a tool in this 
this program can certainly whet 



your interest for more 
explorations into this area. 



extensi ve 



Software Review... 

CREATAVADER €3 I V/l 
OPTIONS GALORE 

Me know, you don't hate little 
creatures from outer space, but 
that's about all the Space Invader 
games give you to blast away at. And 
then there was Snail Invaders. But 
snails are pretty harmless. 

Now, however, whether your dislike 
is Communists, whales, those little 
smiling yellow "Have A Good Day" 
faces, cats or your mother — in— law, 
you can blast away to your heart's 
content • at something that really bugs 
you with C RE M MOVER from 

Illustrated Memory Banks (P.O. Box 

^8:9 5 ). WIlliamstown ' MA ' 01267 ' 

CRE/iTfU'fiDER works on the Space 
Invader principle, but gives you a 
choice of lots of different things to 
shoot at. No matter what is your pet 
hate, you can probably find it here 
with this program. And if you 
can't, you can create your own 
targets with it using a simple 
built— in drawing function. Draw one, 
and there is a whole screen full of 
them to shoot at. 

Mritten in Extended Basic, 
CRE f)Tf)Uf)DER isn't as fast as a 
machine language program, but it more 
than makes up for that in 
creativity. The routines used for 
the Snail Invaders program which was 
listed in the March issue of the 
RAINBOH have been sharpened and the 
works flawlessly, 
is one that definitely should 
your library. 



program 
This 
be i n 



Software Review... 
SCEPTER 
PLJIM 

Mhen last we 
was in this 
al 1 these creat 
doors, walls 
a scepter that 
of the kingdom 

SCEPTER OF 
res graphics 
be a great deal 
real— time acti 
arcade- 1 i ke 



OF KZ JRC3I_*=* 
SEEK 
went adventuring, it 
dungeon and there were 
ures, poison gas, trap 
and we were looking for 
would give us control 



KZ1R6L0 is a low- 
adventure game that can 
of fun and has some 
on that makes it almost 
some respects. Avail- 



able from Rainbow Connection Software 
(3514 6th Place NM, Rochester, MN 
55901, *16.95 tape, *21.95 disk; *2 
discount to all Rainbow subscrib- 
ers), this is of the same ilk as 
QUEST (April issue) in that it 
uses graphic representations for the 
adventurers rather than words alone. 

The story is simple, you have to 
make your way through a 13— level dun- 
geon to get to the scepter. Along 
the way there are all kinds of crea- 
tures, possible treasures and waiting 
traps. Sometimes, you have to hammer 
your way through a wal 1 . Your pos- 
it ion is shown on the screen by a col- 
or block, and all the various other 
things are shown by other blocks. 
You have to make your way through 13 
rooms (one on each level) to get to 
the scepter. 

The fighting is the best. You are 
usually attacked quickly by some sort 
of creature and you have to act fast, 
otherwise he (she or it) gets the 
first — and maybe subsequent — 
blows in. This fighting is in real- 
time and is pretty authentic. 

There is good sound in the program 
and there are a few special things. 
The whole adventure is explained well 
in four pages of documentation. And, 
there is a flying carpet, a couple of 
spells you can cast, and the like. 

SCEPTER OF KZIRGLf) is a good 
buy. 



TRS-80' COLOR COMPUTER 
SPECIALISTS 

COLORFORTH 

A NEW, HIGH LZVZL PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR YOUR 
COLOR COMPUTER. AREN'T YOU TIRED Or THE SLOWNESS Or PROGRAMMING AND 
TEE EXECUTION Or BASIC PROGRAMS? FORTH WILL CUT PROGRAMMING TIKE IN 
HALF AND WILL SPEED THE EXECUTION TIME AS MUCH AS TEN TIKES THAT Or 
BASIC. "COLORFORTH" , (THE VERSION Or FORTH FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER) 
D0E5 NOT REQUIRE EITHER EXTENDED BASIC OR DISK SYSTEM. A MINIMUM OF 
UK Ts'WKESfARV. WHEN YOU PURCHASE "COLORFORTH", YOU RECEIVE BOTH 
CASSETTE AND RS/DISK VERSIONS . THIS MEANS NO EXTRA EXPENSE WHEN~YOU 
UP-GRADE YOUR SYSTEM. "COLORFORTH" ALSO INCLUDES AN EDITOR. CSAVEM 
COMMAND. A PRINTED INSTRUCTION AND OPERATION MANUAL, AND MUCH MORE! 

BOTH VERSIONS AND MANUAL. ALL FOR ONLY 549.95 

ARMADILLO BUG 
MACHINE LANGUAGE MONITOR 

"ARMADILLO BUG" IS AN EXCELLENT SYSTEM FOR BEGINNERS TO LEARN TO 
WRITE AND DEBUG MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAMS. THIS PACKAGE INCLUDES i 
MEMORY EXAMINE AND CHANGE! MOVE; PUNCH AND LOAD; FILL COMMANDS; AND 
MORE! DOES NOT REQUIRE EXTENDED BASIC. RUNS IN 16E. COMES COMPLETE 
WITH PRINTED MANUAL. 

JUST S14.95 

OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST 

"STARTING FORTH", A BOOK BY LEO BRODIE. THE BEST INTRODUCTORY FORTH 
TEXT AVAILABLE. 394 PAGES. SOFT COVER S16.00 

'COMPUTERS PISS HE OFF" . WEAR THE OFFICIAL PROGRAMMERS BADGE. LARGE 
2-1/4 INCH YELLOW BUTTON SAYS IT ALL! S 1. SO 

DEALER & AUTHOR INQUIRIES INVITED 

ALL ITEMS ARE POST PAID IN U.S. TEXAS RESIDENTS ADD 51 

•TRS-80 IS A TM OF RADIO SHACK/TANDY CORP. 

Armadillo Int'l Software 

RO. BOX 7661 PHONE (512) 459- 7325 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 78712 



Page 16 



the RR1NBOM 



Mf)Y, 1982 



QUALITY SOFTWARE FOR TRS-80 COLOR AND OSI 



UUUVULLL 




ADVENTURES! fl 
For TRS-80 COLOR and OSI. These Ad- 
ventures are written in BASIC, are full fea- 
tured, fast action, full plotted adventures 
that take 30-50 hours to play. (Adventures 
are inter-active fantasies. It's like reading 
a book except that you are the main char- 
acter as you give the computer commands 
like "Look in the Coffin" and "Light the 
torch.") 

Adventures require 16K on COLOR-80 and 
TRS-80. They sell for $14.95 each. 

ESCAPE FROM MARS 

(by Rodger Olsen) 
This ADVENTURE takes place on the RED 
PLANET. You'll have to explore a Martian 
city and deal with possibly hostile aliens to 
survive this one . A good first adventure. 

PYRAMID (by Rodger Olsen) 
This is our most challenging ADVENTURE. 
It is a treasure hunt in a pyramid full of 
problems. Exciting and tough! 

TREK ADVENTURE (by Bob Retelle) 
This one takes place aboard a familiar star- 
ship. The crew has left for good reasons — 
but they forgot to take you, and now you 
are in deep trouble. 

NEW!! 

CIRCLE WORLD - We got Kzinti and 
puppeteers and problems. Our newest and 
biggest adventure. Requires 12k on OSI and 
16K on TRS-80 Color. 

NUCLEAR SUB - You are trapped in a 
nuclear sub at the bottom of the ocean. 
Escape and even survival is in doubt. Plotted 
by three of the most sadistic — I mean 
"creative" minds in adventure programming. 



VENTURER!— A fast action all machine code 
Arcade game that feels like an adventure. Go 
berserk as you sneak past the DREADED HALL 
MONSTERS to gather treasure in room after 
room, killing the NASTIES as you go. Great 
color, high res graphics, sound and Joystick game 
for the TRS-80 Color or OSI machines, (black 
and white and silent on OSI.) Tape only. $19.95. 

BASIC THAT ZOOOMMSI! 

AT LAST AN AFFORDABLE COMPILER FOR 
OSI AND TRS-80 COLOR MACHINES!!! The 

compiler allows you to write your programs in 
easy BASIC and then automatically generates a 
machine code equivalent that runs 50 to 150 
times faster. 

It does have some limitations. It takes at least 
8K of RAM to run the compiler and it does only 
support a subset of BASIC— about 20 commands 
including FOR, NEXT, END, GOSUB, GOTO, 
RETURN, END, PRINT, STOP, USR(X), PEEK, 
POKE, # , / , + , - , X , X , = , VARIABLE 
NAMES A-Z, A SUBSCRIPTED VARIABLE, 
and INTEGER NUMBERS FROM 0 - 64K. 
TINY COMPILER is written in BASIC. It gener- 
ates native, relocatable 6502 or 6809 code. It 
comes with a 20 page manual and can be modi- 
fied or augmented by the user. $24.95 on tape 
or disk for OSI or TRS-80 Color. 

LABYRINTH - 16K EXTENDED COLOR 
BASIC — With amazing 3D graphics, you fight 
your way through a maze facing real time mon- 
sters. The graphics are real enough to cause claus- 
trophobia. The most realistic game that I have 
ever seen on either system. $14.95. (8K on OSI) 





QUEST - A NEW IDEA IN ADVENTURE 
GAMES! Different from all the others. 
Quest is played on a computer generated 
map of Alesia. Your job is to gather men 
and supplies by combat, bargaining, explor- 
ation of ruins and temples and outright 
banditry. When your force is strong enough, 
you attack the Citadel of Moorlock in a 
life or death battle to the finish. Playable 
in 2 to 5 hours, this one is different every 
time. 16K COLOR-80 OR TRS-80. ONLY 
$14.95. 




PROGRAMMERS! 

SEE YOUR PROGRAM IN THIS SPACE!! 

Aardvark traditionally pays the highest com- 
missions in the industry and gives programs the 
widest possible coverage. Quality is the keyword. 

is good and you wapt it pre- 
the best, send it to Aardvark. 



SPACE ZAPPER - Protect your central 
Star Base from ships that attack from all 
four sides. Fast reflexes are required as the 
action speeds up. Great for kids or Dads. 
This game has high speed high resolution 
graphics and looks as if it just stepped out 
of the arcades. - 16K extended or 32K 
disk. BASIC TRS-80. Color only. $14.95. 



Please specify system on all orders 
This is only a partial listing of what we have to offer. We have arcade and 
thinking games, utilities and business programs for the OS1 and TRS-80 Color. 
We add new programs every week. Send $1.00 for our complete catalog. 

AARDVARK - 80 
TRS 80 COLOR 2352 S. Commerce, Walled Lake, Ml 48088 

(313) 669-3110 



OSI 



MAY, 1982 



the RdlNBOM 



Education. 



r READY FOR 
WITH TEST EM 



B 



Ran 



tyman 



Its about the time for the school 
year to be ending, and so the 
RftlNBOM Utilityman can think of 
no better utility for this important 
month than a way to help all our 
reader-students do the best they can 
on their final exams. 

So, here's a program called 
TESTEM, which aids in learning 
many different types of data and 
should be quite useful for anyone 
trying to learn or memorize data. 

For that matter, it will probably 
have some useful aspects for 
teachers, too. One of the worst 
tasks we've come up against is 
thinking up "wrong" answers for 
multiple choice tests. This program, 
through one of its applications, will 
do that for you, too. 

To explain how TESTEM works, 
we will assume you want to learn the 
names of the states and their 
capitals. 

When you RUN the program, you are 
presented with a menu of TESTEM* s 
various functions. The first thing 
you must do is select Item 1, which 
allows you to enter the data (states 
and capitals in this case). 

The program then asks you for 
Subject One and Subject Two. You 
can enter the word "States" for 
Subject One and the word "Capitals" 
for Subject Two. 

Next, you are prompted to enter 
the data. As Item 1 under the 
subject "states, " you would enter the 
word "Alabama" and under the subject 
"capitals" you would enter the word 
"Montgomery. " Item 2 could be 
"Alaska" and "Juneau", etcetera, 
until all states and their capitals 
are entered. 

Once you have finished entering 
data, press < ENTER > when prompted for 
additional input. The program will 
return to the main menu. 

It is best to save your data 
before going on. The menu gives you 
a choice as to whether you want to 
save data to disk or tape. If you 
have previously stored data on disk 
or tape, you can select the 
appropriate item number from the menu 
and load that data into memory. 

You have other options before you 
run the program. You can list the 
data to review it before you begin 
the test or you can edit the data for 



ant. If 



Page 17 



any reason you want. If you choose 
to edit, you are asked for a subject 
(a state in our example) and the 
program then searches for that item 
and its related answer. You are then 
requested to reenter the data, 
replacing the old information. 

Once you are satisfied the data is 
correct, you can choose to be 
tested. 

The program gives you a choice as 
to whether you want to be tested on a 
"multiple choice" or "fill in the 
blank" basis. Multiple choice is the 
easiest of the two; with fill in the 
blank, you must spell the proper 
response correctly. 

You are also given the choice of 
being tested on subject one or 
subject two. In other words, do you 
want to be asked the capitals or the 
states? 

This gives you added flexibility 
in how the test is conducted and 
gives you a better opportunity to 
review your knowledge of the 
data. 

You can end the program before all 
questions are asked by entering an 
"S" under fill in the blank or 
< ENTER > in multiple choice. The 
program asks whether you want to end 
the session to allow you to proceed 
£ ^ncorreS V- accidentally pressed 

If you give an incorrect response 
as your answer, TESTEM will 

display the proper answer. And, you 
will see the question again, with a 
reminder that the first time you 
answered it it you answered wrong. 

Once you answer an item correctly, 
it will not be asked again. 

When all items have been answered 
correctly, the program displays the 
number of tries you took to get them 
all right. 

Obviously, this program has 
hundreds of applications. 



119 CIEAR5000SGOSU?. 200 

20 CLS:PRINT TAP. (12)' TESTEM" 

30 PRINT TABU2)' 1 

40 PRINTsPRINT' 1 - ENTER NEW 
DATA' 

2 - LOAD CASSETTE F 



50 PRINT' 
ILE" 

60 PRINT' 
70 PRINT' 
80 PRINT' 
90 PRINT' 
E' 

100 PRINT' 
110 PRINT' 
120 PRINT' 



3 - LOAD DISK FILE' 
A - EDIT DATA' 

5 - REVIEW DATA' 

6 - SAVE TO CASSETT 



7 - SAVE TO DISK' 
9 - EXIT TO BASIC 
0 - START TEST' 
130 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="THEN130 
W0 I=VAL(I$):IF I<0 OR I>9 THEN 

130 (CoDtinud on faqe It) 



Page 18 



the RMNBOH 



MM, 1982 



TESTEM (Froi Page 



17) 



150 IF I=f> THEN 230 
160 ON I SOTO 1550.1700,1750,189 
8,1990,2090,2130 
170 CLS: PRINT* THANKS FOR PLAYIN6 
WITH ME." 

180 PRINT: PRINT* I HOPE YOU ENJOY 
ED LEARNING ABOUT *91»' AND 
■Q2«*.* 
190 END 

200 DIM A(100),C$(100),St<100) 
210 FOR 1=1 TO 10O:A(1)=0:NEXT I 
:G=0:N=0 
220 RETURN 

230 aS:PRINT*YOU HAVE YOUR CHOI 
CE OF FILL-IN OR MULTIPLE CHOICE 
QUESTIONS' 

240 PRINT: INPUT* WOULD YOU LIKE T 
ANSWERS (Y OR N) 



540 PRINT 

550 IF X=l THEN 690 

560 REM **** FILL-IN SECTION 

570 IF Y=2 THEN 620 

580 A$=C*(R) 

590 PRINT'WHAT IS THE ANSWER FOR 



0 FILL-IN THE 
•(It 



250 IF Z$='Y* THEN 300 

260 as : PRINT* «**««***MiJLTIFtE C 

HOICE********** 

270 PR I NT* ANSWER EACH QUESTION W 
ITH A 1, 2, 3, OR 4.* 
ISO X=l SPRINT* TO STOP TYPE 0 (A 
2ERO) FOR YOUR ANSWER.* 
290 GOTO 340 

300 as 

310 PRINT* t*«***«#****FILL-IN*** 
***«*«**«*' 

320 PRINT-YOU MUST SPELL EXACTLY 

t 

330 X=2:PRINT:PRINT*T0 STOP TYPE 
'S' FOR YOUR ANSWER* 
340 REM 

350 PRINT'YOU HAVE YOUR CHOICE A 
S TO WHICH ITEM YOU WANT TO 
BE ASKED AND WHICH ITEM YOU WAN 
T TO ANSWER:' 
360 PRINT TAB(5) 81$'. OR" 
370 PRINT TAEI5) Q2« 
380 PRINT:FRINT'IS '81$* WHAT YO 
U WANT' 

390 INPUT'TOBE ASKED <Y/N)':Z* 
400 Y=2 

410 IF Z«='Y' THEN Y=l 

420 as 

430 REMmPICK A 81$*** 
440 FOR 1=1 TO 10 
450 R=RND(NN) 
460 IF AIR) 02 THEN 520 
470 NEXT I 

480 REM***DON'T WASTE TIME P1CKI 
NG 

490 FOR R=l TO NN 

500 IF AiR)<>2 THEN 520 

510 NEXT RiGOTO 1330 

520 IF A(R)=1 THEN PRINT'YOU MIS 

SED THIS QUESTION BEFORE, LET'S T 

RY IT AGAIN." 

530 IF A(R)=1 THENSOUND 100,2:SO 
UND 150,2:SOUND 200,5 



1070 PRINT MID$(S$(B(H)),1,SP) 
1080 PRINT TAB(3)MID*(S$(B(H)),S 
P+l) 

1090 NEXT H 

1100 PR1NT:PRINT*WHICH OF THE AB 
WE IS THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR:' 
1110 PRINT TAB.(4)*'*C$(R)*" 
1120 I$=B*EY$:IF U=» THEN 112 

e 

1130 Z=VAL<I») 

1140 IF Z<1 OR Z>4 THEN 1290 
1150 IF Z=C THEN 1230 
1160 A(R)=1 

1170 PRINTS PRINT'MRONG ! 1 ! THE CO 
RRECT ANSWER IS:* 
1180 IF Y=l THEN AAI=C$(R) ELSE 
AA<=St(R) 

1190 PRINT: PRINT ■ 'AA$ 
1200 SOUND 50,5 
1210 FOR H=l TO 3000:NEXT H 



600 PRINT S$(R)i 
610 GOTO 650 
620 A$=S*(R> 
630 PRINT*" C»(R)*" 
640 PRINT* IS THE CORRECT ANSWER 
FOR:* 

650 INPUT Z* 

660 IF LEN(Z$)=1 THEN 1290 
670 IF Z$=A» THEN 1230 
630 GOTO 1160 

690 REM«**MULTIPLE CHOICE SECTIO 
700 REM***THE VALUE OF C IS CORR 

ECT ANSWERS 1220 aS:GOTO 1260 

710 C=RND(4) 

720 REM***PICK 4 Ql$ FOR THE CHO 
ICES 

730 FOR 1=1 TO 4 
740 B( 1 )=RND(NN) 
750 NEXT I 
760 E(C)=R 

770 REM***MAKE SURE THEY ARE DIF 
FERENT 

780 IF B(1)=B(2) THEN 730 
790 IF B(1)=B(3) THEN 730 
800 IF B(1)=B(4) THEN 730 
810 IF B(2)=E(3) THEN 730 
820 IF B(2)=B(4) THEN 730 
830 IF B(3)=B(4) THEN 730 
840 IF Y=2 THEN 990 
850 REM ***PRINT 82$ CHOICES 
860 FOR H=l TO 4 
B 7 0 PRINT Hi 
880 IF LEN(C$(B(H)))>29 
890 FRINT C$(B(H!)iGOTO 950 
900 SP=28 

?10 IF MIDt(C$(EiH)),SP,l)=' * T 
HEN 930 

920 SP=SP-l:GOTO 910 
930 PRINT M1D$(C$(E(H)),1,SP) 
940 PRINTTAB(3) M1D$(C«(B(H) ),SP 
+1) 

950 NEXT H 

960 PRINT:PRINT*WHICH OF THE ABO 
VE IS THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR:" 
970 PRINT*"S$(R)"?' 
980 GOTO 1120 

990 REN***PRINT Ql$ CHOICES*** 
1000 FOR H=l TO 4 
1010 PRINT Hi 

1020 IF LEN(S$(B(H)))>29 THEN 10 
40 

1030 PRINT S«(B(H)):GOTO 1090 
1040 SP=28 

1050 IF MID»(S$(B(H)),SP,1)=* * 
THEN 1070 

1060 SP=SP-I :GOTO 105? 



1230 A(R)=2:N=N+1 
1240 CL£:PRINT*RIGHT! YOU HAVE'N 
"CORRECT* 
1250 SOUND 200,1 
1260 PRINT:G=G+1 
1270 IF N<50 THEN GOTO 430 
1280 GOTO 1330 

1290 INPUT'DO YOU WANT TO STOP": 
Z$ 

1300 IF LEFT*!Zt,l)='Y' THEN 133 
0 

1310 PRINT 'ANSWER THE LAST SUES 
TION AGAIN' 

1320 ON X GOTO 1120,650 
1330 PRINT 

1340 PRINT'YOU ANSWERED'N' RIGHT 
IN ONLY' 

1350 PRINT G'GUESSES' 
1360 INPUT'WOULD YOU LIKE TO TRY 

1370 IF LEFT$(Z$,1)='Y' THEN GOS 
UE. 210:GOTO 230 
1380 GOTO 213 
1390 CLSiFOR XX=1 TO NN 
1400 PRINT S$(XX)* = *C$(XX) 
1410 IF XX/14<>INT(XX/14)T*N 14 



50 

1420 PRINT 9480. * <P 
TO CONTINUE)* i 
1430 IF INKEY*="THEN1430 
1440 CLS 
1450 NEXT XX 

1460 PRINT : PRINT* *****END OF LIS 
T TO TEST******* 
1470 IF INKEY$=" THEN 1470 
1480 aS:PRINT'DO YOU WANT TO RE 
VIEW DATA AGAIN?' 
1490 H=1NKEY*:IF I»=" THEN 149 
t 

1500 IF I$=*Y* GOTO 1390 
1510 GOTO 20 

1520 DIM A(100),B(4),C$(1O0),S*( 



100) 



MRY, 1982 



the RMNBOH 



Page 19 



1530 FOR 1=1 TO 10B:A(I)=0:NEXT 
1540 RETURN 

1558 as '***ENTER DATA*** 
1560 PRINT' ENTER SUBJECT ONE: 
1570 INPUT 81* 
1580 PRINT'ENTER SUBJECT TU0:' 
1590 INPUT 82$ 
1600 NN=1 

1610 aS:F0R X=l TO 2 

1620 PRINT" ITEM NO.'NN 

1630 PRINTsPRINT 81$':' 

1640 INPUT S$(NN> 

1650 IF S$(NN)=" THEN l«=NN-l:G 

OTO20 

1660 PRINT: PRINT 82$':' 
1670 INPUT C$(NN) 
1680 NN=NN+l:GOT0 1610 
1690 GOTO 20 

1695 REM*** FILE STORAGE AREA t* 

1700 CLS:INPUT'FILE NANE'iNN* 

1710 NN$=NN$+'/TST' 

1720 PRINT:PRINT'PRESS ANY KEY U 

HEN RECORDER IS READY.' 

1730 IF INKEY$="THEN1730 

1740 DV=-i:GOT0 1800 

1750 CLSMNPUT'FILE NANE' iNN$ 

1760 NN$=NN$+'/TST' 

1770 PRINT: PRINT' PRESS ANY KEY U 

HEN DISK IS READY' 

1780 IF INKEY$="THEN1780 

1790 DV=1 

1800 OPEN'I',DV,NN$ 
1810 INPUTIDV,NN 
1820 INPUTiDV.ei* 



1830 INPUTiDV,82$ 
1840 X=0 

1850 X=X+l:INPJT#DV,S$(X) 

1860 INPUTiDV, C$(X) 

1870 IF EOF(DV)=0 THEN 1850 

1880 aOSE DV:GOTO20 

1890 CLS:PRINT TAB(10)'EDIT NODE 



SR$ 



1900 PRINT: PRINT 81$; 
1910 FOR X=l TO NN 
1920 IF SR$=S$(X) THEN 1940 
1930 NEXT X:GOTO20 
1940 PRINT: PRINT 82$': 'C$(X) 
1950 PRINT: PRINT' REENTER DATA:' 
1960 PRINT 81$;: INPUT S$(X) 
1970 PRINT 82$;: INPUT C$(X) 
1980 X=NN:GOTO 20 
1990 CLS:PRINT 81$' AND '62$ 
2000 FOR X= 1 TO NN 
2010 PRINT S$(X)' = 'C$(X) 
2020 IF X/14<>INS(X/14) THEN 205 

2030 PRINT 3480.' <PRESS ANY KEY 
TO CONTINUE)'; 

2040 IF INKEY$="THEN 2030 ELSE 
CLS:PRINT 81$' AND '82$ 
2050 NEXT 

2060 PRINT 3480,' < END OF L 
1ST >'; 

2070 IF INKEY$="THEN 2070 
2080 GOTO 20 

2090 CLS:INPUT'FILE NAHE';NN$ 
2100 PRINT:PRINT' PRESS ANY KEY U 
HEN RECORDER IS READY.' 



2110 IF INKEY$=' , THEN 2110 

2120 DV=-l:GOTO 2170 

2130 CLSUNPUT'FILE NAHE';NN$ 

2140 PRINT: PRINT'PRESS ANY KEY 

HEN DISK IS READY' 

2150 IF INKEY$="THEN 2150 

2160 DV=1 

2170 NN$=NN$+'/TST' 

2180 OPEN'0',DV,NN$ 

2190 PRINTIDV,NN:PRINT IDV,81$: 

RINTIDV,82$ 

2200 FOR X=l TO NN 

2210 PRINTtDV,S$(X) 

2220 PRINTIDV,C$(X) 

2230 NEXT X 

2240 CLOSE DV:6OTO20 



LAP— CRADLERS UNITE! 

Editor: 

Enjoyed your article on a 'Desk 
For CoCo,' but what about us lap 
cradlers — Me folk who like to lay 
back in a coifortable rediner with 
that Lil Die Console in the lap and 
the left eye on the basketball gate 
on the other TV set 16 feet away? 
Surely Me wst be a substantial 
■inority. 

Paul Sieoal, Ph.D. 

University, AL 
(Ed's Hote: Jr. Siegil tttichei a 
smishot ot i snll console he tses. 
Its in color, ltd »e're sorrf thit »e 
do tot fet owe the uiibilitf of 
reproducing it.) 



— 



— An/-»s» ± ) ab ) e .J i_i i~» e- 

True Lower Cai 
the TRS — QOC Co 1 oi 



, J_«5>©2 

Compu f&m- 



Now you can have true lower case letters on your Color Computer 
rather than reverse video. The Lower Case Adapter (LCA-47) provides 
an enhanced character set plus lower case with true two-dot 
descending tails for characters such as q,j>p,q and y. Plus; you 
have your choice of either the normal blacK characters on a green 
background or green characters on a black background at the touch of 
a switch! Your CRT screen will still display 16 rows of 32 
characters. The lower case characters are available to Basic 
programs and machine language programs alike. Text editors and word 
processors never looked better! The LCA-47 is compatible with all 
software written for the TRS-80C. It has no affect on any of the 
semi -graphics or fu I I -graphics modes. Custom designed character 
sets are available as an option. The LCA-47 is a small printed 
circuit board that simply plugs into the computer's main printed 
circuit board under the RF shield. No cutting or soldering is 
required. The LCA-47 comes assembled/ tested/ and guaranteed for 1 
full year. Note: installation is simgle but does require openinc 



your computer which wi 1 1 void the 
will NOT fit inside your computer 
board is already installed. P.S. 
with the Micro-Chroma 68 kits! 



warranty. 
Computerware' s "16 



Price: $75.00 



Avai 1 ab I e: June 



M i 

814 W. Keating Ave. 
Mesa/ AZ 8520? 



Techn ± cz 
Phone: 602-839-8902 



Radio Shack 
if 

The LCA-47 also 

1 / 1982 from: 

Produc t s » 



ting 

The LCA-47 
Plus" memory 
works great 



Dea 1 er 



Add 5% shipping. Overseas add 
10%, Arizona residents add 5% 
for tax. MC and Visa welcome. 

inquiries invited. 







Page 20 



the RfilNBOH 



HOY, 1 982 



Report... 



COLORSOFT" 

■ Qutltty Software At Affordable Prices For the TRS-SO* Color Computer" 
* Educational * Home/Personal 



E30C HAS A R-l— ACE 
COMPUTER F"A I Rl 



By Brian James 



We AISO 0ff6r: * Custom Programming *Royalities For Soft ware 
* * * Over 50 Software Items Currently Available * * * 
Documentation and a Limited Guarantee with all C0L0RS0FT™ Software. 



* ★ ★ 4K Color BASIC Programs ★ * * 

INVADERS: 10 Skill levels, phaser sound and exploding bombs 

DUMP: Explore the memory of the color computer-output to screen or printer 

TAG: 2 player game of chase. Fast action and fun 

★ 16K Color BASIC Programs 

CASINO: One-armed bandit, blackjack, and dice games 
DISASSEMBLER: Disassemble machine language programs (screen or printer) 
AUTO MINDER: Keep track of fuel usage, tune-ups, oil changes, etc., creates and 
maintains cassette datatilesformultipleautos 

ESCAPE: Intermediate advent, with GRAPHICS. Player must find and decipher various 
clues to escape. Graphics give player the teel of being there (mach. lang. tor fast 
action) 

★ ★★ 16K Ext. Color BASIC Programs 

SASPUS: Beginner's adventure game. Player must lind and destroy the deadly mutant 
in a genetic nuclear research center Each game randomized 

PIRATE TREASURE: Advanced beginner's ad venture- the player must find the pirate's 
treasure which is hidden in a cave ol over 40 rooms 
ADVENTURE COMBO: Combination of SASPUS and PIRATE TREASURE 
FLIPUM: Color computer version ol the OTHELLO type games 
MAILING LIST: Cassette or disk files for names and address with comments Cross 
referencing ot information and name seaches are featured 

PEEK 'N' SPELL: Flashes word or letter on screen for children's spelling drill-New 
word files can be created and stored on cassette tape 

MATH DERBY: Math drill in a horserace gametor 1 to 3 players-variable difficulty 
LOAN: Amortization schedules with breakdown of monthly payments (avail in 4K) 
STOCK ANALYZER: Keeps track of stock prices and maintains portfolio data base includes 
additional program for projecting price trends 

COLOR CUBE: CoCo version of the popular cube puzzles. Features include solution 
by computer and saving partially solved puzzle on tape 

DISK BACKUP: Saves Diskette based programs onto cassette and checks for disk errors 



$12.95 
8.95 
10.95 

$12.95 
13.95 



D.95 



11.95 
16.95 
12.95 

20.95 

10.95 
11.95 
10.95 



17.95 
14.95 



Send $1 tor catalog containing full descriptions of all available software and receive $2 discount 
coupon. Free catalog with an order from this ad. 



,TM 



GOLDLABEL BLANK CASSETTES 



♦PREMIUM 5 SCREW SHELL 



★ DIGITAL DATA QUALITY 
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1 DOZEN C-10 LENGTH $8,00 + $2.00 shpg. 1 DOZEN C-30 LENGTH $11 0 

2 DOZEN C-10 LENGTH $15.00 + $3.50 Shpg. 2 DOZEN C-30 LENGTH $20.0 



$2.00 shpg. 
$3.50 shpg. 



Individual storage boxes (sold only with cassettes) $2.40 per dozen. 

CASSETTE CADDY $5.49 + $1.50 shpg /2 far $10.00 + $2.50 shpg./$3.95 with cassette pur- 
chase (no shpg. chg. on caddy) 

Foreign orders include shipping at 16 oz. per dozen tapes/9 oz. per caddy/13 oz. per doz. boxes 
Shipments in U.S. are by UPS (no delivery to PO boxes) Add $1.50 per doz. tapes for First Class Mail. 



!!! NEW !!! CASSETTE CADDY !!! NEW !!! 

TIRED OF MISPLACED TAPES AND A CLUTTERED WORK AREA? TRY OUR HINGED TOP SMOKED 
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Visa and Mastercard accepted (Include expiration data) Orders paid by cashier's check, money order 
or bankcard are shipped within 48 hours. Personal check tikes 1-2 wks. No COO. Some foreign sales 
are restricted. Texas residents add 5% tax on blank cassettes and storage units. 

SEND ORDER TO: COLOR SOFTWARE SERVICES 
PO BOX 1723 
GREENVILLE, TEXAS 75401 

★ DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED ^QUANTITY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE 



Can a Color Computer owner find 
happiness (and software) at the giant 
West Coast Computer Faire held in San 
Fransisco (March 19-21)? 

As I walked into the Civic Center 
I expected a lot of Apples and IBMs, 
and in this respect I wasn't 
disappointed. However, there were 
some 80CC s here and there among the 
600— plus exhibits and some of the new 
software and hardware looked very 
useful . 

The award for the most sneaky use 
of the 80CC goes to an exclusive 
IBM software dealer. On his front 
table between two new IBM PC's sat a 
Radio Shack color TV with an 
outstanding display about IBM 
software. The display, of course, 
was being run by Tandy's ftRT 
GRLLERY software package and an 
80CC hidden under the table! 

I spoke with Tim Hayes of 
Seebree's Computing. He apparently 
did not know that his speedup POKES 
do not work on all versions of the 
80CC (does he read the Rf)lNB0M7> , 
and he promised to make some 
conversions to his software. 
Seebrees sells a flight simulator and 
a number of other games for the 60CC. 

Kraft Systems was displaying a 
heavy duty joystick with selectable 
spring return centering, 

free— floating operation and more. 
Kraft said their 80C joysticks will 
be available in one or two months 
for *65. 

The TELEMR1 TER program was on 
prominent display by Berkeley 
Microcomputer and the "Word 

Processing Lower kit" was being sold 
by two other vendors. Dennis Kitsz 
was around to answer questions about 
the Lowerkit. 

Ron Levine Software was selling 
BHINDO, a smart disassembler and 
cross— referencer with many unique 
features. Votrax was using an B0C to 
show off Type-'N'-Talk, a *375 
speech synthesizer that was very 
understandable. 

Scott Adams' Adventure 

International had a very large 
display, including two new 80C games 
and "Star Trek." The AI price list 
had two other 80C games — SPACE 
INTRUDERS and COLOR CRQPS. 

It appears Albrecht's TRS-80 
COLOR BfiSIC book is just about to 
become available. John Wiley and 
Sons displayed the cover of the 



the 

hould be 



MAY, 1 982 
book, but no book. It 
ready by now. 

No doubt the most interesting 
80C display was found at George 
Associates. On display was an 
expansion unit that used a Z-80A 
software base and could run CP/M, 
FLEX and OS-9 software. The 
dual -density floppy disk controller 
supports up to B00K per diskette. 
The 80C was running an 80x25 display 
on a nine-inch monitor. The 
expansion unit plugs into the 80C 
without modification. It had a 

special show price of $1,268 with 
deliveries expected to begin in 
mid— July. 

There were a number of other 80C 
displays — including Exatron, Radio 
Shack with Color Scri psit , Cube 
Puzzle and Radio Spectrum 

final yzer and I am sure some that I 
missed. At least one vendor was 
selling software from Computerware 
and others had memory upgrades. 

A word should be said for the 
keynote address by Seymour 
author of the LOGO language, 
said the major reason 
language is to teach young 
and that — although there have been 
high hardware costs — it can run on 
a system in the $500 price range. 
Someone should look into it for the 
80C. 

SofUare Review. . 



MANY 



RAINBOH 

Because 
ability to 
you can 



Papert, 
Papert 
for the 
persons 



Page 21 
CHOI LIST has the 

search any of its fields, 
'hunt" for people you 



remember from a list. Are you going 
on a visit to Detroit and want to 
call up those nice people from the 
Motor City you met when you were both 
vacationing in Indianapolis last 
year? Just ask the program to find 
all the people who live in "Detroit", 
their names — and address — will 
come back to you quickly. 

The program has an automatic save 
to tape feature, which means it is 
really difficult to lose your 
records. And, it will print out both 
mailing and return address labels — 
one beside or right after the other 
for easy application to envelopes. 

Alan Morgan, who authored the 
program, is also to be complimented 
for the written documentation. It 
leads the user through the many 
functions of this mini-data base and 
does it easily. 

Subscribers and readers of the 
RfUNBOH can claim a 20 percent 
discount on the retail price. 




the RAINBOW 

HASAPOTOF OOLOFULLOT . . 

• Programs 

• Hints snd Tips 



• Soltwsrs Discounts 



For anyone who has a club 
membership list, wants to send 
Christmas or other kinds of cards, a 
mail list program is a good way to 
make your 80C a very useful tool. 

And, with software like 

CMH1L 1ST, the creation and 

maintenance of a mailing list is 
easy and effective. 

For *19.95 (from Peacock Ent., 
Pheasant Run Box 494, RD#3, 
Canastota, NY, 13032) you can not 
only create and maintain medium— sized 
mailing lists, but — in the 32K 
version — set up a tickler file that 
will allow you to always "remember" 
Uncle Donald's birthday is in 
October. 

C MM LIST lets you enter and 
print out files of names, addresses 
and (in 32K) telephone numbers. It 
also has search features which allow 
you to extract specific records of a 
certain type and, also in 32K, has 
that "tickler" system which will let 
you enter in the month of the 
birthday of anyone and have a label 
printed out for everyone whose 
birthday falls in the month you 
select! 



ExIBMer (NOW RETIRED) 
For the FIRST TIME — Makes available to the PUBLIC 
His personal collection of superior programs for the 

TRS-80 COLOR 

SEE HOW THE PROFESSIONALS DO IT' 1 
ALL PROGRAMSAREOVER 14K LONG!! 

12 MINUTE TALKING GRAPHIC DEMONSTRATION 

SHOWS & TELLS What's inside the TRS-BOC and how it works'' PLUS 12 self- 
contained, auto-start, artistic, hi res, lull color graphic demonstrations in lantastic 
motion - all tram 1 "CLOAD' A must it you want to showotl your computer at its best 
toyourtnendsandAMUSTFORANY RS SALESMAN ALL GRAPHICS 

CRAP TABLE up to 4 players can bet the full field before every roll 
ofthedice - LASVEGASpayoltoddsgivenonall I2tablebets MPPGRAPHICS 

BLACK JACK 4 suits - 52 cards - card counter displays all remaining 
cardsand % odds to HIT 2) - call for new deck before any BET or HITS 

SLOT MACHINE Looks sounds, teels and operates as good as 

anyBIG CASINO machine Watch and listen to comsandarm drop MPPGRAPHICS 

EL CASINO A1_l3 GAMES 

Ideallor Rumpas Room Clubs. Partiesand Social Events MPP GRAPHICS 

MPP TUTORIAL Course include* Cht-omaseite* B81 caiMM* 

MPP DRAWER r.r. .. MPP Picture* and MMs to WaM worfcrnt >»• ■*" n*ce**a»|r 
•rtttructiom completed MP:* action packed program* 100 tot rxaf*«rn hints 

CHECK-BOOK t fo 3 banks and o> ctdil card account) Auto 

mafic Bank Reconctlulion Aulomalic IRS eipente ittimf* and tabulations by major 
0> minor MpfJMI account number 

STOCK PORTFOLIO MGMT. 

P & L to IRS 1040D - Charts 
19 82 a re worth this price alone 



$24.95 

T 

$24.95 

TID 

$24.95 

T/D 

$24.95 

T/D 

$49.95 

T'D 

$34.95 

T'D 

$39.95 
$69.95 

D 

* T. 16K EXTENDED * D> 32K DOS * POSTAGE PAID * Al LOW 2 TO 3 WEEKS 

SI 'PES I OS GR*miC SOFTWME 

406 LITTLE MOUNTAIN ROAD WAYNESVILLE. N C 28786 



from daily 

P & L to IRS 1040D - Charts all your stocks DOW JONFS CHARTS Irom 1900 to 

MPP GRAPHICS 



Page 22 



the RftlNBOH 



MfiY, 1962 



*.* 



ML Rabbit 

A tape backup program 
for the C.G. Completely 



automatic 



$14.95 



ULTRA-MIND 

THREE game pack - Freatures ULTRA- 
KIND also includes EVADER, HA.'\GIvAN 
All three for 4K & up $9.95 

FROM Great X-P-T 
BCXCAR3 (Craps) - High resolution 

dice game Ext.l6K $14.95 

SEA BATTLE - Battleship for the C.C 
Two player, 16k 3td $14.95 



BRAND NEW by Dave Hooper (Vipers! 

Geo-Studies 



WORD CC7 

rtord processing for the 
C.C. Many features that 
are found in dedicated 
systems. $19.95 





, DSL- 




V 



V---V 




computer askes for press the 
missed. Great fun uses all 
Joystick required, 



Combines the Tun of arcade games 
with the learning of geography. 
Find the State, Country, or Capitol the 
fire button, TA-DA you got it, or OH-OH 
the power of the C.C. Extended Basic & 

Four different studies USA CANADA EUROPE AUSTRALIA $19.95 each 
TWIN PACKS USA/ CANADA EUROPE/ AUSTRALIA $35.95 each package 
ALL FOUR GEO-STUDIES $ 68.00 

HARDWARE 



RAM SLAM -ALL the soldering has been done for you. Just plug in the 
upgrade kit you need. 15 min. instalation, ONE year wnty. 
4-16K $25.00 16-32K $49.95 4-32K $74.95 



Blank tape-CIO cassette tapes w/leader .75 each 10 for $6.00 



Ml Res. add 4% sales tax. Always looking for Great Color Programs. TOP royalties PAID. 

Dealer inquiries invited. 
DSL Computer Products • P.O. Box 1113 • Dearborn, Ml 48121 - (313) 582-3406 



HftY, 1982 
FRP 6aies Aids. . . 

HERE 
FRP 



the RftlNBOH 



Page 23 



**RE SDMI 
ROUT I ivlE! 



NEW 



By Bill Nolan 
R ft 1MB OH Columnist 

MUM'S HOW Hill Holm joins the WHSOH's stiff 
of nriters is the ne» Fiotisf-Role Hifiog Sue colonist. 
As experieicei progrmer mo" fkf fitter — there's » rotor 
he chioges into » looqeoo Ulster on » neeklf bis is — he 
Hill shire i Miber of oe» directions in this series.) 

Hello, -fantesy game fans. This is 
the -first o-f what I hope Mill be a 
long series o-f columns about using 
the 80C as an aid in -fantasy gaming. 

Who am I? Well, my name is Bill 
Nolan, I live in Tucson, AZ, and I DM 
a game o-f Dungeons & Dragons every 
Friday night. I also write software 
for Prickly-Pear Software here in 
Tucson, and some of the ideas I 
present here have been used in some 
of my programs available for sale. 

Each month I will try to present 
one good routine for you to type into 
your 80C dealing with a different 
aspect of the game. Since the only 
fantasy game with which I can claim 
familiarity is D&D, I am sure my bias 
will show. If there is enough 
interest in the idea, I'll write a 
menu to drive these routines and 
devote a column to that, so you could 
end up with a pretty complete 
program. Kind of a patchwork quilt. 

This month you get two programs; 
one short, and one longer. The first 
short one is addressed to a need I 
have seen expressed in letters to 
the RA1NBOH about a good way to 
roll the basic six characteristics of 
a D&D character. 

The program below (Listing 1) does 
it by using Method I from Page 11 of 
the DM's Guide. It rolls four 

six-sided dice, throws out the 
lowest, and records the total of the 
three others in a small array. After 
doing this six times, the program 
returns to the array and prints out 
the six values. 



119 CLS: CLEAR: DIM DAI 17,7) 
20 FOR X=l TO 17:F0R Y=0 TO 7:RE 
AD DA<X,Y):NEXT YiNEXT X 
38 aS:PRINTa65,";:lNPUT 'ENTER 
TIC LEVEL" 5L 

35 PP=DA(L,B):0L=DA(L,1):FT=DA(L 
,2):HS=DA<L,3):HS=DA<L,4):HN=DA< 
L,5):OH)A(L,6)iRL=DA(L,7) 
40 PRINT897,"?! INPUT "ENTER THE 
DEXERITY (9-18)" !D 
45 D=D-8:0N D GOSUB 200,210,220, 
230,240,240,240,250,260,270 
50 aS:PRINT367,"HIT THE NUMBER 
OF THE RACE."?:PRINTa99,"l. DUAR 



F*:PRINT3131,"2. ELF" : PRINT3I63, 
"3. 9«0(€ , :PRINTai95, , 4. HALF-EL 
F , :PRINT3227. , 5. HALFLING": PRINT 
8259,-6. HALF-0RC , :PRINT8291, , 7. 
HUMAN 1 

60 K*=INKEY$ 

70 K$=INKEY$:IF K$=" THEN 70 
80 K=VAL(K*):IF K(l OR K>7 THEN 
70 

90 ON K 50SUB 100,110,120,130,14 

0,150,160:GOTO 500 

100 OL=OL+10:FT=FT+15:CH=CH-10!R 

L=RL-5!RETURN 

110 PP=PP+5:0L=0L-5:MS=MS+5iHS=H 

S+10:HN=HN+5:RETURN 

120 OL=OL+5:FT=FT+10:MS=MS+5:HS= 

HS+5:HN=HN+10:CU=CH-15:RETURN 

130 PP=PP+10:HS=HS+5:RETURN 

140 PP=PP+5:0L=0L+5:FT=FT+5:I1S=M 

S+10:HS=HS+15:HN=HN+5:CW=CM-15:R 

L=RL-5: RETURN 

150 PP=PP-5:0L=0L+5:FT=FT+5:HN=H 
N+5:CH=CW+5:RL=RL-10:RETURN 
160 RETURN 

200 PP=PP-15:OL=OL-10:FT=FT-10:M 

S=MS-20:HS=HS-10:RETURN 

210 PP=PP-10:OL=QL-5:FT=FT-10:MS 

=MS-15:HS=HS-5:RETURN 

220 PP=PP-5:FT=FT-5:MS=MS-10:RET 

URN 

230 K3=MS-5:RETURN 
240 RETURN 

(tootiooed on fige 14) 



TEXT EDITOR 

by John Waclo 

WORD PROCESSOR FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 
^Reviewed in RAINBOW AND CCNtt 

With the TEXT EDITOR, letters, mailing lists, 
articles, and reports are a snap. Even form letters, 
with inserts, are easy using the exclusive Variable 
Text feature. This software has all the features 
you want. . . 

• Excellent Text Display 

• Block— Text Moves 

• Global Word Exchange 

• Auto Line Centering 

• Text Justification 

• Variable Text Inserts 

• ...and much more! 



Requires 32K/ Extended Basic 
$49.35 Tape - S59.95 Disk 
with Manual 



Box 11 224 



from ELITE Software 

Pittsburgh, PA 15238 



Page 24 
ROLE-PLAY I NG GAMES 



the RBINBOH 



Mf)Y r 1982 



(Frot Page 23) 

250 0L=OL+5:RETURN 

260 PP=PP+5:OL=OL+10:MS=NS+5:HS= 

HS+5s RETURN 

270 PP=PP+ 1 0 :0L=«)L+ 1 5 : FT=FT+5 :ME 
=HS+10."HS=HS+10:RETURN 

500 PRINTS67,'PICK POCKETS 

•;PP 

510 PRINTS99,'0PEN LOCKS 

■;0L 

520 ppint8131/find traps 

■;ft 

530 prints^.'move silently — 
■;ms 

540 PRINT3195/HIDE IN SHADOWS - 
'iHS 

550 PRINT3227/HEAR NOISE 

* »HN 

560 PRINT825VCLIMF HALLS 

■;cw 

570 PRINT8291,'READ LANGUAGES - 
MRL 

580 PRIffra355,"WAMT TO GO AGAIN? 
iY.WS 
590 M=INKEY$ 

600 K$=INKEY<:IF Kt=" THEN 600 
610 IF K^'Y 1 THEN 30 ELSE END 
S00 DATA 30,25,20,15,10,10.85,0, 
35, 29, 25.21, 15, 10,86,0, 40, 33,30, 
27,20,15.87,0,45,37,35.33,25,15. 
83,20.50.42,40,40,31,20,90.25,55 
, 47, 45 , 47, 37 , 20 , 92, 30, 60, 52, 50, 5 
5,43,25,94,35 



810 DATA 65,57,55,62,49,25,96,40 

,70,62,60,70,56,30,98,45,80,67,6 

5,78,63,30.99,50,90,72,70,86,70, 

35 , 99, 1 , 55 , 100, 77, 75, 94, 77, 35, 99 

,2,60,105,82,80,99,85,40,99.3,65 

,110,87,85,99,93,40,99.4,70,115, 

92,90,99,99,50,99.5,75 

820 DATA 125,97,95,99,99,50,99.6 

,80,125,99,99,99,99,55,99.7,80 

As stated in the DM' s Guide, the 
player should be allowed to arrange 
the resulting list o-f six scores in 
whatever order desired. Like most o-f 
the programs I will present here, 
this one does the job intended — but 
without a lot o-f fancy graphics or 
error — trapping. (We have to save 

something for our commercial 
products ! ) 

You will notice that three of the 
lines in this program consist of 
multiple IFs, connected by ANDs 
(Example: IF the first die is equal 
to OR smaller than the second die AND 
equal to OR smaller than. .. etc. ) . 
Following the IF statement, your 80C 
will test the condition you give (IS 
the first die equal to or smaller 
than the second?). If the condition 
is true, it returns a 1, if false a 
0. When there are two conditions or 
more connected by AND statements, the 
80C compares the value returned, and 
FILL must be l's in order for the 
final result to be 1. 

With the OR statement, however, 



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Retrieval SysTem. Create and maintain files according 
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Generate and maintain mailing label records. Selective- 
ly print desired quantities. Can keep several label files if 
desired. Designed for Printer VII, easily modified. $20 



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LI sed in conjunction with FURST to selectively format 
reports on your printer. Includes headings and total 
capabilities $15 



-EXERCISE PLANNER- 

Build and maintain complete exercise schedule for 
regular and/or weight programs. Display guides you 
through daily-calculated routines. Print complete 
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'TRS-80 and COLOR COMPUTER 
are Trademarks of Tandy Corp. 



M/iY, 1982 



the RMNBOH 



Page 25 



any one of 
a 1 and the 
this: 



AND t 



the values returned 
result will be a 1 



Lt will be 



can be 
Like 



I 

AND 1 



equal 1 
1 

OR 1 
equal 1 




equal 1 



This is called Boolean Alegbra and 
there is an excellent discussion of 
it in the back of the Betting 
Started manual that came with your 
computer. To handle the more complex 
if -then-and-or — else sets used to 
create good D&D programs requires 
some understanding of these concepts. 

The second program (Listing 2) 
computes the thieving ability scores 
for any thief from 1st to 17th level 
(17th level is the highest shown in 
the Player's Handbook table on 
thieving abilities, page 28). After 
checking the level, the program 
figures in any dexterity and racial 
adjustments needed before printing 
out the results. 



9999 X=RND(TIrtER) 

10000 aS:F0R C=1T06:D1=RND(6):D 
2=RND(6):D3=RND(6):M=RND<6) 
10010 IF (D1=<D2) AND (D1=<D3) A 
ND <D1=<M) THEN C(C)=D2+D3+M:G 
0T0 10050 

10020 IF (D2=<D1 ) AND (D2=<D3) A 
ND (D2=<D4) THEN C(C)=D1+D3+DA:G 
0T0 10050 

10030 IF (D3=<D1) AND (D3=<D2) A 
ND (D3=<D4) THEN C(C)=D1+D2+DA:G 
0T0 10050 

10040 C(C)=D1+D2+D3 

10050 NEXT C:PRINTC(1):PRINTC(2) 

:PRINTC(3) :PRINTC(4! :PRINTC(5) :P 

RINTC(6) 

10060 PRINT'S) A6AIN (Y/N) 1 
10070 K$=IM£Y* 

10080 K$=INKEY$: IF K$=" THEN 10 
080 

10090 IF K*= , Y 1 THEN 10000 ELSE 
END 

This program will give exactly the 
same results you could have had if 
you wanted to take paper and penci 1 
(ugh!) and figure the abilities using 
the Player's Handbook (or other 
official source). I think that 

consistancy from campaign to campaign 
is important to the game, so I will 
try to take no liberties with 
numbers. If I do, I know that 
there will be 



let me know. 

If you do have complaints, write 
me at P.O. Box 4577, Mecca, Saudi 
Arabia. However, if you have 
comments or suggestions, send a note 
to me at Prickly-Pear Software, 3518 
S. Randi Place, Tucson, AZ, 85730. 
If you want a reply, please enclose a 
S. A.S.E. 

Till next month... May all your 
dragons be still in the egg. 



of 



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Commands, Operators, and Edit Subcommands. 

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Pmode Information Summary. 

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MM, 1982 



the RfilNBOM 



Page 27 



=:t-tiimc3 -rooE=:-r 
a&c user =■ s o 

By Dick White 



The single most pressing need that 
any serious computer owner has is for 
information. Possibly next is 
encouragement and the comfort that 
comes with working with others who 
are doing similar things. 

For most readers of the 
RfilNBOM, the 80C is a hobby and the 
association with others can make it 
all the more rewarding. For those 
who hope to profit from their 
machines, information gained from 
others can be invaluable. These are 
all reasons why people get together 
to form User or Special Interest 
Groups. 

In the computer area, there are a 
variety of these groups with diverse 
interests. Some have interest in 
computers in general, others serve a 
single brand, such as TRS-80's or 
Apples. Still others focus on a 
specific machine. 

In the Cincinnati area, where I 
live, we have all these groups and 
are actively developing a COSIG 
(Color Computer Special Interest 
Group) as a part of CINTUG 
(Cincinnati TRS-80 User's Group). 
Here, we see very satisfying results 
from both the CCSIG and CINTUG in 
terms of member interest and 
membership growth. My comments 
reflect, in part, some of the things 
we have learned. 

First, remember Pogo, who said "We 
have met the enemy and they are us. " 
Indeed, if you are wondering why 
they don't get something going in 
your area for 80C owners, remember 
that "they" includes you. 

Start out by going to some User's 
Group meetings. Sure, you may be the 
only 80Cist among them now, but you 
will learn a lot of things that apply 
to you, too. Bring 80C to the 
meetings and show fellow members what 
it can do! Seeing some 

TEL EMR ITER text on the screen 
after a rousing game of PRC 
UTTUCK will convince the other 
members you belong. 

Even though you may be the only 
80C owner there, you've already taken 
the first step. Then, get some 
letters off to magazines like the 
RfilNBOM. They'll publish them along 
with your name and address. 

(£</. Notes Its the RfilNBOM' s 
policy to help SBC Clubs in any may 
He can/) 

You should also make yourself 
known to the Radio Shack store 



managers and Computer Center people 
in your area and be sure they get 
meeting notices when your group 
starts to function. While they 
cannot tel 1 you who has purchased a 
80C in your area, they can and 
generally will pass on your name and 
telephone number to others. 

This is especially true if you do 
a good job of selling yourself and 
your intentions and make the Radio 
Shack people feel welcome to become a 
part of the group on a personal 
basis. Don't expect Radio Shack to 
provide official blessing for the 
group or to come up with any 
financial support. That is against 
company policy, which is theirs — 
and not ours — to make. Don't put a 
Radio Shack employee in the position 
of having to turn down a request that 
you knew they probably could not 
honor going in. No one likes to say 
no. 

□nee you get some people 
interested, you need to make the 
group become a functioning 

organization. That doesn't mean a 
lot of bylaws and Rules of Order, but 
it does mean members should have some 
agreement on what the group is about. 

A big sticking point early on can 
be program trading — or stealing, 
according to some software publishers 
and vendors. My rule is that if a 
program is for sale commercially, I 
don't want to find it being copied at 
the CCSIG meeting. 

We don't do ourselves any favors 
by discouraging those who are willing 
to provide good programs at 
reasonable prices, nor do we help 
ourselves if copying induces local 
computer stores not to carry 80C 
products. Right now, 80C software is 
inexpensive compared to that which is 
available for other systems. If we 
are willing to buy reasonably priced 
programs so that authors get a 
satisfactory return for their 
investment, they will not be forced 
to jack up prices of future 
offerings. 

□n the other hand, trading of 
programs written by group members 
should be strongly encouraged and, if 
the programs are good enough, their 
authors should be encouraged to 
publish them. For anyone so 
interested, group members are good 
testers. 

Programs such as these should 
constitute a CCSIG library, and be 
one good reason to join. These 
public domain programs can also be 
grouped together on cassettes and 
sold to raise money for the group. 

(Continued on next page) 



Page 28 th* 

USER'S GROUPS (Froi Page 27) 

Initially, meetings can be held in 
members' homes until the group gets 
too large. Then, -free meeting space 
is available in places like schools, 
banks, public buildings and the like. 
Basic requirements are tables, chairs 
and power outlets. 

We have been quite successful in 
asking members to bring their 
computers and we leave plenty of 
meeting time -for people to talk in 
small groups around the computers. 
Obviously, comparing, sharing and 
discussing is a big part of the 
reason for having a CCSI6. 

As the group grows, there will be 
a need for. short business meetings. 
These can be short and wel 1 
organized. Formal programs can be 
held as well. Radio Shack people are 



RfilNBOH 



MAY, J 982 



good 



source 



for programs, as are 



members of the group itself with 
particular topic in which they have 
special expertise. Always be on the 
lookout for outsiders who can give 
presentations on microcomputer 

topics. 

Communication is the key to 
success. Being part of a larger 
group is helpful if the group's 
newsletter can carry 80C material and 
announcements. This also enriches 
the total program. Here, CINTLM3 
meets one weekend and CCSI8 another 
— providing two good meetings a 
month. We also separately mail CCSI8 
meeting notices, since some CCSI6 
members do not belong to CINTUG. No 
problem here, since CINTUG must sell 
itself just as CCSIG must. 

Mailings are funded by sale of 
C— 10 cassettes. There can also be 
dues if necessary. In any case, be 
sure to welcome anyone who comes to 
at least a couple of meetings so they 
can see whether your organization is 
for them. 

I could go on but I won't. I have 
tried to share some ideas and 
experiences and to show that a User's 
Group is fun and not a horror to 
start. Have some patience. You may 
not have 10 at the first meeting — 
or the second or third — but if you 
make everyone feel comfortable and a 
part of the group with a 
responsibility to recruit others, you 
stand a good chance of having an 
ctive and successful operation. 



', R ft I H B □ U 



Sofdmre Revieo... 



NO BAH 
FOR "TH I S HUMBUG 

A monitor is a program which 
allows you to change various memory 
locations directly, "write" machine 
language using hex numbers, check and 
manipulate the 80C's registers and 
the like. 

There are a number of monitors on 
the mnarket, several of which have 
been reviewed in the RftlHBOH. We 
would, however, have to say that the 
documentation for HUMBUG 

<Star-Kits, P.O. Box. 209, Mt. Kisco, 
NY, 10S49, *39.95 tape and disk, 
•69.95 ROM pack) surpasses them all. 
Now the program isn't too shabby 
either — but you will find the 
explai nations of how this program 
works to be very good. 

We do not wish to lead you astray 
— any monitor is a fairly 
sophisticated affair and no one's 
documentation is going to approach a 
tutorial in programming on the 
machine language level. But we have 
seen a pretty substantial number of 
these programs, and this one has a 
very good explai nation of what 
happens when you do thus— and— so. 

As to the program, HUMBUG does 
all those things most monitors do, 



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(513)631-4555 



MQY, 1982 



the RfilNBOM 



Page 29 



and then adds some bonuses. For 
example, you can single— step through 
a program (we are talking machine 
language programs here) and have I/O 
control of the keyboard. Then, it 
has some rather unusual functions, 
such as being able to run the 80C 
from a remote terminal ! There are 
also commands which allow you to use 
the CSAVEM function even if you do 
not have Extended Basic. 

HUMBUG is fast, uses up just 
4K of memory and can be easily 
relocated. All its commands are two 
letter combinations, and — when more 
information is required — it prompts 
the user for that infomation. 

In short, HUMBUG is a 

well-done professional program that 
takes itself seriously and is capable 
of serious work. 




Software Review. . . 
COLORFORTH IS QOOD 

We admit to some prejudice here. 
Our first really serious programmable 
calculator was a Hewlett-Packard 
model that introduced us to something 
entirely new — a mysterious way of 
calculating called RPN, Reverse 
Polish Notation. 

RPN uses a stack of numbers and 
what you do is enter numbers you want 
to manipulate onto the stack. So, if 
you wish to add two and three, you 
first enter the two, then enter the 
three, and tell the calculator to add 
the two numbers together. (By 
contrast, other systems have you 
enter the two, tell the calculator 
you are going to add, and then tell 
it to add the three.) 

So, with the arrival of 
COLORFORTH from Armadillo 

International Software (P.O. Box 
7661, Austin, TX, 78712, »49.95 for 
tape and disk versions), we were 
able to greet old friend RPN again. 
That is the system FORTH uses. 

Personal preference again, but it 
would seem to us that, besides BASIC, 
the languages to learn would be 
FORTH, PILOT and PASCAL. PASCAL 
seems to be the "in" thing right now, 
PILOT is well suited to Computer 
Aided Instruction and FORTH is, well, 
a very powerful language. 

One reason is that RPN is a very 
fast means of manipulating numbers. 
Another is that FORTH is a compiled, 
as well as interpreted, language. 
That means you can make it become 



machine code pretty easily and that 
runs fast. 

As for COLORFORTH, the 

16K program works very well and is 
easy to operate. It comes with 
extensive documentation, although it 
doesn't teach you the language. 
Armadillo sells an inexpensive book 
which will do that. If you are not 
acquainted with FORTH, spend the 
extra *16 for the book, "Starting 
FORTH. " 

Our first brush with FORTH was a 
very positive experience. This was 
no doubt helped a great deal by the 
program, which behaved flawlessly and 
made our preliminary ventures into 
the language easy. Our programs did 
run faster and it was easy to get the 
"hang" of the language. 

If you're interested in a second 
language, FORTH and COLORFORTH 
would be a good bet. 

Software Review.." 

LABYRINTH MAS ITS 
TWISTS & TLJFtlMS 

Here is an extensive maze game 
with a couple of added features to 
help your playing enjoyment and speed 
that is highly acceptable. 

In fact, when I first started 
playing LABYRINTH (Aardvark-80, 

2352 S. Commerce, Walled Lake, MI 
48088, *14.95) I checked again to be 
sure it wasn't in machine language. 
Its not — the program is written in 
16K Extended — but it is fast. 

The basics of the program are 
quite simple, you are placed 
somewhere in a maze and have to find 
your way out. That, alone, can make 
things enjoyable. But, there is 
more. You can also look at the maze 
from the "top" to find out just where 
you are and where the way out is. 

If that makes it seem like 
cheating, it may be in a way. But, 
because you are not the only one in 
the maze, it sometimes helps to 
restore confidence. 

See, there are these maze 
creatures that pop out from around 
corners and such. If you don't shoot 
them before they shoot you, there's 
trouble. 

This is a good game, well done and 
enjoyable to play. 

, ---------------- 

0Dlor 

(gomputer 
Glub 

Tim McFadden- 786-4218 PO. Box 478 

Mart Komara - 726-8005 CanfieW, OH 44406-0478 







Page 30 



the RfilNBOH 



MAY , 1982 



Color Computer 



40 of the world's 
best-known 
songs, scored for 
easy playing on 
the TRS-80 Color 
Computer, 
including favorite 
popular, classical, 
folk and seasonal 
music selections. 



$7.95 



Color Computer 
Songbook 

»r Baa Clark 




The Color Computer 
Songbook 



Color Computer 



The must-have 
handbook, loaded 
with tips, tricks, 
secrets, short- 
cuts, hints and 
scores of 
complete ready- 
to-run graphics 
programs. 



$9.95 



Color 
Computer 
Graphics 




Color Computer 
Graphics 



_ 



Color Computer 



The must-have 
software 
Ideabook, 
overflowing with 
hints, secrets, 
shortcuts, and 
color techniques 
...with 101 ready- 
to-run programs. 



$7.95 

♦1^^^ Color 
IU I Computer 

Programming 
Tips & Tricks 







101 Color Computer 
Programming 
Tips & Tricks 



Color Computer 







An all-new and 
different 
collection of 
tested, ready-to- 
run software for 
businessmen, 
teachers, 
students and 
hobbyists. 



$9.95 

55 MORE 

Color Computer Programs 
For Home, School £ Office 



55 MORE Color Computer 
Programs for the Home, 
School & Office 



Order direct from this ad. Send check or money order. In- 
clude $1 snipping lor each Hem ordered up to ■ maximum 
ol S3. Or write for our free catalog. Mail orders to: 




COMPUTERS 
VIDEO 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 



93-15 86th DRIVE 



(212)441-2807 (VOICE) 



WOODHAVEN. N.Y. 11421 (212) 441-3755 (DATA) 
CHECK OUT OUR "COLOR" BBS AT (212) 441-3755 24 HOURS EVERY DAY 

New York Residents Add 8.257. Tax 



1982 



the RftlNBOH 



Page 31 



Tired of plugging and unplugging devices 
from the RS232 port of your Color 
Computer'? Make your life easier. Buy 
our RS232 expansion cable and connect 
two devices at the same time. Just 
right for printers, modems, etc. 
Anything that plugs .into the Color 
Computer will plug into this high 
quality cable. 

RS232 Cable *20.00 



C 



EXPANS I OIM 



COLORCOM/E BONUS ! Order COLORCOM/E and 
get the RS232 cable for only S15.00. 
Save *5.00! 



NEW 

(Adc 




Extended Basic ROM Kit — * 85.00 Four-Pin DIN Plugs — * 6.96/Pair 

RS Disk Interface *149.95 Five-Pin DIN Plugs — * 7.95/Pair 

Shipping /Hand ling) (Joysticks) 

Lower kit — S79.95 

i 

SMART TERMINAL PACKAGE 



ME DIDN'T WAIT for the competition to catch up with us! We've added 
even MORE features to COLORCOM/E, our superb Smart Terminal program for 
the Color Computer. Compare before you buy. NOBODY offers you more! 



- COMPLETE UPLOAD AND DOWNLOAD SUPPORT 

- ONLINE CASSETTE READS AND NRITES 

- 110, 300,600 OR 1200 BAUD 

- FULL OR HALF DUPLEX 

- PRE-ENTER DATA BEFORE CALLING (SAVES it) 

- OFFLINE AND ONLINE SCR0LLIN6 



AUTOMATIC CAPTURE OF FILES 
SEND ALL 127 ASCII CHARACTERS FROM KEYBOARD 
7 OR 8 DATA BITS (INCLUDING GRAPHICS SUPPORT) 
NORD NODE ELIMINATES SPLIT NOR OS 
- EFFICIENT DATA STORAGE STRETCHES YOUR NEHORY 
• CONVENIENT PLU6-IN CARTRIDGE 



COLORCOM/E *49.95 (Plus *1 S/H) 

AND our efficient storage and easy editting of received data makes 
printing to your printer offline a snap. Select any portion of the 



received data for printing, no need to print everything. 



COMPUTERS 
VIDEO 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 



93-15 86th DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN, N.Y. 11 421 



(212) 441-2807 (VOICE) 
(212) 441-3755 (DATA) 



New York Residents Add 8. 25X Tax 



32 



Reply. 



the RdlNBOH 



I NFO OIM THI 



nay, 1982 



:dljf=- poki 



By Alan J. Morgan 



The 6883 SAM chip is a 
programmable synchronous address 
multiplexer and as such can be 
ordered to perform a multitude of 
tasks. These -functions can be set 
with the POKE command directly from 
the screen or by a Basic or machine 
language program. The following, in 
response to several questions which 
have been asked in the Letters To 
RA1NB0H column, will give some 
insight to the speedup command and 
its function. 

The addresses that control the 
speed are located at decimal 65494 
through 65497. Addresses 65494 and 
65496 are used to toggle OFF, while 
65495 and 65497 toggle ON the higher 
speed. The use of 65495 does not 
really change the speed of operation, 
but increases the speed of the 
REFRESH cycles to 1.8 MHz. The speed 
remains the basic .9 MHz for all I/O 
operation (REFRESH must always be 



equal to or greater than operation 
time). This causes inconsistancies 
in the operation and, although you 
can output or input, the CPU does not 
recognize what is going on and I/O 
errors wi 1 1 occur . 

Changing the 6821 PIA chips to a 
faster speed type will do nothing to 
rectify the situation by itself. 
This is where the address 65497 comes 
into play. With the high speed PIAs 
and POKEing 65497, all operation is 
now at the higher frequency rate. 
But two problems still remain. 

The first one is that the synch to 
the normal TV set hookup is not 
equipped to operate at this speed. 
To see what happens, type in POKE 
65497,0. Strange looking, isn't it? 
Well, this is because the signals 
cannot synch up at this speed, but 
this can be overcome in some 
instances by an internal adjustment 
of the synch circuits within the 80C. 












"Color Compuip 




Are you tired of searching the latest magazine for 
articles about your new Color Computer? When was the 
last time you saw a great sounding program listing only 
to discover that it's for the Model I and it's too complex 
to translate? Do you feel that you are all alone in a sea of 
Z-80's? On finding on ad for a Color Computer program 

But take heart there is a cure! 



did you mail your hard earned cash only to receive a 
turkey because the magazine the ad appeared in doesn't 
review Color Computer Software? If you have any of 
these symptoms you're suffering from Color Computer 
Blues! 



It's COLOR COMPUTER NEWS. 



The monthly magazine for Color Computer owners and only Color Computer owners. CCN contains the full range of 
essential elements for relief of CC Blues. Ingredients include: comments to the ROMS, games, program listings, product 
reviews, and general interest articles on such goodies as games, personal finances, a Kid's page and other subjects. 




The price for 12 monthly treatments is only $21.00 and is available from: 



REMarkable Software 

P.O. Box 1192 
Muskegon, Ml 49443 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 
CITY 



State. 



-Zip- 



Allow 8-10 weeks for 1st issue. 



MHY, 1982 



the 



ROINBOH 



BE FORE M URN £ D s Wot all 80C's can 
be adjusted due to the component 
val ues used.' 

The second is the keyboard. At 
the higher speed, the bounce is so 
bad that very little is recognized 
unless you deliberately force each 
key entry. The only alternative here 

would be to replace the keyboard with 
one which can operate at 2 MHz . 

I conclude that operating at a 
higher CPU speed is possible, 
although internal changes are 
necessary. For the hobbyist this 
would not be much challenge, but an 
interesting undertaking. For the 
normal programmer or user, my opinion 
is that he should be happy with the 
.9 MHz and the option to increase the 
REFRESH to 1.8. 

If speed seems that important to 
you, ask the question: "What will I 
gain?" The answer, which may be 
surprising, is "Nothing." Look at 
specs for the IBM — they're no 
faster than the TRS-80 Model III and 
the 80C is faster than a Mod III. 

The answer to speed is not in the 
hardware, but the software, 

specifically machine language. 

For those interested, a good 
rundown on the SAM chip is in the May 
27, 1981 issue of Engineering Design 
News. It is available at many 

1 ibraries. 



M I 
TO 



I 1MB 
Ft« I NBOUI 



Pmg* 33 



Contributions to the RAINBOW are 
welcome from everyone. We like to 
run a variety of programs which would 
be useful /fun/helpful to other 80C 
owners. 

Program submissions should be on 
tape or disc. We're sorry, but we do 
not have the time to key in programs. 
Al 1 programs shoul d be supported by 
some editorial commentary, explaining 
the program and how it works. We're 
more interested in how it works than 
how you developed it. Programs 
should be learning experiences. 

■ If you wish, editorial material 
can be written with any of the word 
processors currently available for 
the 80C, or for Scripsit 2.0 running 
TRSDOS 2.0a for the Model II. Typed 
(or printed out) copy double spaced 
is fine, however. Please do not 
imbed control codes for any 
particular printer. 

We do pay for substantati ve 
submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration 
should so state when making 
submissi ons. 

Please do not submit programs or 
articles currently submitted to 
another publication. 




OLOR COMPUTE 



COMPUVOICE 

Give your computer a voice of its own - build 
speech into your BASIC programs. This machine 
language program is a must for your library 



TRS-80 



$44.95 



RAMCHARGER 
32K UPGRADE 

Space Invaders 

Space War 



• The Best Games Available 

• High Resolution Graphics 

• Fast, Machine Language 

• Ext. Basic Mot Required 

• $21.95 each, cassette 

• $25.95 each, disk 

EXTENDED BASIC GAMES 

• LOTHAR'S LABYRINTH) 
Word Search Puzzle 

• BATTLEFLEET 
Battleship Search Game (one or 
two players) 

• SPACE TRADERS 
Galactic trading game 

$14.95/ea. 



MADNESS & THE 
MINOTAUR 

The best adventure game available for the color 
computer. Over 200 rooms. 6 creatures. 8 magic 
spells, loads of treasures. Written in machine 
language, extended Basic not required. $ 1 9.95 

NEW EXTENDED 
BASIC GAMES! 

• SOB HUNT $14.95 

• LASER ATTACK $10.95 

• ALCATRAZ II $ 8.95 

Complete with high resolution graphics and 
- sound, 

• CROID $12.95 

Eliza type artificial intelligence game. 
SOUNDSOURCE 

Store music or voice from a cassette tape in the 
At last, a complete description of computer and display it on the TV screen, 
the "guts" of the Color Computer. Shorten it. lengthen it. modify it and replay it 
Specs on all the ICs. complete through the TV's sound system. Build and test 
schematics, theory of operation your own sounds for games. No hardware mods 



hardware modification needed. 

• FXTEND MFMORY 
FROM I6K to 32K 

• 100% Compatible With 
Fxlended Basic 

• Mo Soldering Or Modification 

• Fits Inside Computer 

• $79.95 




THE FACTS 



and programming examples. 
SI 4.95 



needed. 

UTILITIES 



$24.95 




• EDITOR/ ASSEMBLER $34.95 

• SUPER MONITOR 19.95 

• EPROM PROGRAMMER 89.95 

(Program your own ROMs f or the ROM-PAC port) 

• MAGIC BOX 24.95 

Load MOD l/lll Tapes into the color computer 

• TYPING TUTOR 19.95 

• TEXT EDITOR 

DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



SPECTRAL 
ASSOCIATES 

P.O. BOX 99715 
Tacoma. Washington 98499 

WRITE FOR COMPLETE CATALOG 

ADO 3* FOR SHIPPING S 1 .00 minimum 
Allow 2-3 wks. for delivery 

(206) 565-8483 

VISA OR MASTERCARD ACCEPTED 



Page 34 



the RA1NBOM 



MM, 1982 



Hardmrt Rtviw... 



CER — COMF* DISK H«! 



GOOD OPTION) 



Perhaps it is because we never 
seen to have enough of it, but we've 
always been very interested in time. 
So, when skimming through the 
utilities manual for Cer-Comp's 
CCMD+9 disk operating system, we 
were instantly impressed that it had 
a real-time clock available for 
display on the screen. 

That is probably an unfair way to 
look at a system as complete and 
complex as this one available from 
Cer-Comp (5566 Ricochet Ave., Las 
Vegas, NV 89110, prices at the end of 
the review), but the fact is that 
there is a real-time clock and it 
is a real joy for us to be able to 
sit and work with the 80C and know 
what time it is at all times. So 
complete is the clock function, that 
you are able to control the "ticks." 
Since a clock loses time with 
keyboard scans and other types of 
input /output operations, this is an 
important feature if you want an 
accurate time. 

There are really several parts to 
the Cer — Camp system. One is an 
interface board itself — which plugs 
into the 80C's ROM port just like 
Radio Shack's disc controller. 
Another is the Disk Operating System, 
or DOS, which is different from Radio 
Shack's. Then, there are disk 
utilities, an assembler, a text 
editor and a text processor. There 
is also a disassembler, but we have 
not seen i t . 

The parts, one at a time: 

The controller plugs into the slot 
easily, although you may have to 
break off a piece of plastic in the 
disk cable plug if you are using the 
Radio Shack cable supplied with 
thwir disk system. That's easy 
to do and no problem at all. 

Its a bare controller — using the 
Tall Grass Technology system. This 
al 1 ows you to have al most any k i nd of 
drive, including double sided drives. 
With double sides and double density, 
you have a possible storage capacity 
of 3.2 million bits! A hefty amount 
— some four times what's available 
on the 80C. This solves one of the 
problems we had with Exatron's disk 
system, which used only single sides 
and sinale densitv. 

As we said, the board is bare, it 
isn't in a case. But, there is no 
problem plugging it in and it stays 
in the port securely. 

The DOS is more like most DOS's in 
that, unlike Radio Shack's, it can be 



"seen" by the user. What that means 
is you enter the system in the DOS, 
can transfer to Basic, go back to 
DOS, etcetera. You can, however, 
give DOS commands from Basic. 

Personally, I like to know the 
DOS is there. And, since this system 
is more like most, it gives you 
experience with a "traditional" 
system. While I view this as a plus, 
I am sure others will consider it not 
to be so. Its a personal preference. 

The CCMD+9 uses hard sectored 
disks. This isn't a problem, except 
you have to buy hard — rather than 
soft — sectored diskettes. 

I found CCMD+9 easy to use. I 
also appreciated a "wild card" 
function that enabled me to operate 
on groups of files. By using the 
wild card, I was able to look at all 
programs which were utilities, simply 
by so specifying. That's handy. 

As with anything of this sort, you 
have to take time with the manuals. 
I will say the manuals are good, 
although I wished they had a few more 
ex amples. 

Cer— Comp says its disk system is 
really three systems in one. The 
first is a free— standing system with 
some 11 commands that allow you to 
load, save and otherwise operate on 
files. The second, with 10 

functions, lets you do all the things 
you need to do with disks to use them 
effectively — such as reading and 
writing data in either sequential or 
random access files. Random files, 
by the way, can allow for very fast 
access to any particular piece of 
information. 

Finally, there is a Basic 
interface that allows you to use the 
DOS from Basic. This can be done 
either directly (from the keyboard) 
or by your program. 

There are nine utilities, 
including the aforementioned CLOCK. 
Other utilities allow for backup, 
copy, dump of a file and so on. The 
utilities are good and the structure 
of having utilities on a disk 
(rather than in the ROM) allows the 
addition of a utility. 

In addition, a disk editor and 
assembler are available. And, the 
TEXT PRO word processing program 
iRAINBOM, April) is also supplied 
in a disk version. 

We liked the disk editor. The 
program allows you to do just about 
anything you want with a Basic 
program (which must be saved in 



° 



MAY, 1982 



ASCII, as opposed to binary form). 
Of particular note is the ability to 
move program lines throughout the 
program at will. This can be 
extremely useful. 

The edit or /assembler is a 
full -function program which uses all 
the 6809 op codes. You can use it to 
write machine language tapes, save 
the tapes and then load them back in 
at some future time. Needless to 
say, .if written well, an assembler is 
a joy to have in programming in 
assembly language — provided the 
program is a good one. Cer — Comp's 
is. 

All in all, we were very pleased 
with this system and found it to be 
highly professional and easy to use. 
— understanding that you don't just 
plug in a disk operating system and 
start telling it to do things, of 
course. 

It will be well worth your time to 
look into this system when 
considering a disk. It is 

impressive. 

Disk Controller 1159.95; Controller alone $99; DOS on 
an EPRON $69. Assembler $34.95; Editor $24.95; Utilities 
$19.95; Editor/Asseebler $39.95; Disassembler $29.95. 



RA1NSOM 

Software Review. 



Page 35 



WARKINGS HAS 
ARCADE — I I KE ACTION 

MARKINGS is a two-player game 
in which the action can get fast and 
furious. Its in machine language and 
runs on the 16K 80C. 

In this game (available from Tom 
Mix Software, 3424 College N.E., 
Grand Rapids, MI, 49505, S19.95), 
there are two kings behind two 
castles fighting with each other. 

Al 1 that stands between each 
king's castle's walls and a bouncing 
arrow (cannon ball, guided missile?) 
is a shield. Using the joysticks, 
the players must shield their castles 
from the arrow or risk damage to the 
walls. Too many hits and the arrow 
can break through the walls and kill 
the king. 

There are three levels of play in 
this fine game. The layout is 
colorful, the sound is good and its 
fun to play. The joysticks respond 
very well to the program and, in sum, 
MARKINGS will give you hours of 
good fun and 



Software Review... 

CAL I X TO ISLAND IS 
BOOD ADVENTURE 

OK, people. We're in this room, 
see. And there's this treasure, 
understand? And we've got to find it 
but there's no door to the room (that 
we could find) and . ■ • 

Well, really. This is what 
CAL1XT0 ISLAND (Mark Data 

Products, 23802 Barquilla, Mission 
Vie jo, CA, 92691, *19.95) is all 
about . 

It is an Adventure in the classic 
sense. Written in machine language 
and designed to run in 16K, CfiLlXTO 
ISLAND is fun, challenging and a 
ball to play. There are enough 
twists and turns of the plot to keep 
anyone happy as a clam for hours. 

When we say an Adventure in the 
classic sense, we are talking about 
words on the screen and commands you 
have to type in. This does require 
some imagination — but since the 
first Adventure was written to take 
place in a Cave somewhere, there's no 
adventurer worth his salt who doesn't 
have a. lot of imagination. 

CfiLlXTO ISLAND is a fitting 
heir to the Colossial Cave. Its more 
fun, too. You'll really enjoy this 
one! 



FREE GRME BREAK OUT 

KNO R S.R.S.E. FOR R FREE LISTING OF THIS PROGRAM. WRITTEN IN 
HMCHIHE LANGUAGE. VERY FRST, HAS ON SCREEN SCORING, ETC. NEEDS 
JOYSTICKS. COfES WITH COMPLETE INSTRUCTIONS ON HON TO ENTER IT 
AND RUN THE GAME. 



THE 8QLUT I ON 



THE SOLUTION SOLVES THE PROBLEM OF THE COLOR COMPUTER'S SMALL 
SCREEN SIZE. FEATURES INCLUDE < 

1- FULL ASCII CHARACTER SET 

2- LOWER CASE CHARACTERS WITH DECENDERS 

3- 42 CHARACTERS X 21 LINES DISPLAYED 

4- USER MAY HAVE TEXT AND GRAPHICS AT THE SAME TIME 
3- INTERFACES DIRECTLY WITH BASIC 

5- FAST-PRINTS AT OVER SOB CHARACTERS PER SECOND 
WRITTEN IN MACHINE LANGUAGE. CAN BE SETUP ANYWHERE IN MEMORY. 
THE PROGRAM CAN BE SETUP TO PROVIDE 4 LINES OF TEXT AT THE BOTTOM 
OF A GRAPHIC SCREEN. 



GRAPH LABEL 



ALLOWS THE USER TO PLACE CHARACTERS ANY ON A GRAPHIC SCREEN. CAN 
BE USED TO LABEL HIGH RES. GRAPHICS. FULL CURSOR CONTROL, MOVE 
CURSOR ONE CHARACTER BLOCK OR ONE PIXEL AT A TIME. HAS FULL ASCII 
CHARACTER SETtSXB DOT MATRIX), SUBSCRIPTS AND SUPERSCRIPTS. AND 
USER DEFINED CHARACTERS. CAN BE USED AS A SUBROUTINE OR STAND ALONE, 
WORKS WITH ALL 2 COLOR GRAPHIC MODES. 



PILOT 



IMPLEMENTATION OF PILOT FOR C.C. HAS STANDARD PILOT INSTRUTION WITH 
EXTENSIONS FOR C.C. INCLUDES TEXT EDITOR AND INTERPRETOR IN ONE 
PACHRGE. COMES WITH MANUAL AND DEMO PROCRRMS. * ll- 1 >K- ALL »«US 

SUPER R I LOT *9.9S 

PILOT FOR EXTENDED BASIC. MANY NEW FEATURES FOR GRAPHICS AND SOUND. 
PSEUDO COMPLIED FOR FASTER PROGRAM EXECUTION. MANUAL t DEMO PROGRAMS 

ART .EDITOR- S9.9S —POOR MAN'S VERSION OF SHACK'S "ART GALLEY". 

S CREEN PRINT- S3.93 —CREATES A SCREEH PRINT 6.4 X 8.1 

Inches. nVch HltW THSR" 



RADIO SHACK'S PROGRAMS LP-VI I OR VIII REQ. > 

;- »4.93 —A MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAM THAT 
IASIC. HAS LINE DRAW1I 
RUNS ON ALL MACHIHES. 



KM™ 1 SPEED OF EXTENDED BASIC. HAS LINE DRAWING 
PIXEL SETTING. AND SCREEN CLEAR ROUTINES. RUNS ON ALL MACHIHES. 
GIVES 4K USERS A 128X64 GRAPHIC DISPLAY. 

FOR 1SK -EXTENDED BASIC UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED! 



SNAKE MOUNTAIN SOFTWARE 
P.O. BOX 5722 
RALEIGH, NC 27630 

ICK OR MONEY ORDER ONLY. INCLUDE SI. 88 FOR ONE 
FOR MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM FOR SHIPPINC. 











Page 36 



the RH1NBOM 



MHY r 1982 



Utility... 



E^SY ANIMATION 



OR 



YOU 



By Arnold Pouch 



Even if you have not read the two previous articles on Motion Picture 
Programming ( the RFUNBOH, March and April, 1982), or had an opportunity 
to see an MPP runnong on an 80C, you will be able to type in the two programs 
below, combine them, and produce a complete MPP which will demonstrate the 
power of this new animation technique. 

This program will display a full— color, hires, all— graphic action picture 
and give it full animation with only 14 short BASIC program steps. 

For those of you who have read the two previous articles oi 
purchased the MPP TUTORIAL package, the two listings will 
"picture" tape and a "MPPBasic" tape as a sample of how combining 
work. 

To produce the finished tape, follow these simple instructions: 
1. Key in Listing 1 and CSAVE 
"PICTURE" to tape. 



who 
give 
them 



have 
you a 
will 



1 

2 ' 

3 ' 

4 ' 

5 * 

6 ' 

7 ' 

8 ' 

9 ' 

ie 

u 



SUPERIOR GRAPHIC SOFTWARE 

THE GLOBE 

A DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 
TO BE USED AS A BASE TO 
LEARN MPP PROGRAMING 



12 'AFTER USING MOTION PICTURE 
PROGRAMING - - GOING BACK TO 

SET THIS PROGRAM THE OLD 
FASHIONED HAY HAS A REAL BIG 
PAIN IN THE NECK! ! 

13 * USE THIS PR06RAM ONLY TO 
PRODUCE A PICTURE IN GRAPHIC 

MEMORY 1536 THRU 9215 (PCLEAR 5) 
THEN CAPTURE THE PICTURE HITH 

THE MPP PR06RAM WHICH IS 
PROVIDED IN THE SECOND PROGRAM. 




From GREAT X P T 

for TRS 80 Color Computer 



. 



CRAPS. 



Color Sound 
High Res. Graphics 
Req. 16k Ext Basic 




FOR THE 
GAMBLER 
16k Ext Basic 
High Res. Graphics 

Play Alone 
or Against 
Your Friends 

$14.95 ea. 



BOTTLE 



Mich. Res. odd 4'X Sates fa x 
C O D. odd $1 OO 




GREAT X-P-T 

RO. Box 9212 
Livonia, Ml. 48150 



SPECIAL BUY... ALL THREE FOR 39.95 



Sound 
Graphics 

$14.95ea. 



FREE CATALOG AVAILABLE 



HOY, 1982 



the RftlHBOH 



Page 37 



15 REM MAKE THE GLOBE******"*** 

16 PCLS:PN0DE4,2:PCLS:PM0DE4,1:S 
CREENl,l:N=16:DIM A(N),B(N):PI=3 
.14159 

17 FOR R = 1 TO 2:Z=0 

18 FOR T = 0 TO 2*PI-.001 STEP 2 
*PI/N:Z=Z+1 

19 A(Z>=COS(T)*110+112 :B(Z)=SIN 
(T)»95+97:NEXT T 

20 PCLSsFOR S=1T0 N-HFOR D=S+1 
TO N 

21 X1=FIX(A(S)>+15:Y1=FIX<B'S!) 

22 )C=FIX(A(D))+15:Y2=FIX(E(D)) 

23 LINE (X1,Y1)-(X2,Y2),PSET 

24 NEXT D.S 

25 REM GLOBE SUPPORT********** 

26 PM0DE3, 1 sSCREEN 1.0 

27 C0LOR2.1 

28 FOR X=0 TO 36 STEP 

29 Y=X/2 

30 LINE(40-X.163+Y!-(46+X,163+Y) 
,PSET 

31 LINE(206-X,163+Y)-(212+X,163+ 
YI.PSET 

32 NEXT X 

33 REM TOP BOX***************** 

34 COLORM 

35 LINE(96,162)-(152,181),PSET,B 
F 

36 COLOR 4,1 

37 LINE!96,162)-(152,181),PSET,B 

38 REM BOTTOM LONG BOX*******« 

39 COLORM 

40 LINE (22< IBI ) -(238, 191 ) , PSET, B 
F 

41 COLOR 4, 1 

42 LINE(22,181)-(230,191),PSET,B 

43 REM END FILLERS************* 

44 C0LOR2.1 

45 LINE(0,181)-(20,191),PSET,BF 

46 LINE<232,181)-(254,191),PSET, 
BF 

47 REM MPP CAP LETTERS********* 

48 DRAW"BM102,166;C3;D11R2U11R2D 
3R2U1D3R2U2D4U2R2U3R2D1U3R2D1 1 R2 
Ul 1BR4D 1 1 R2U1 1 R8D6L2U6D6L6BR14R6 
U6D6R2U6L8D11L2U11' 

49 REM LETTERS IN BAMMER******* 

50 DRAH , BM28,186;C2;R4BR4C3D2U4D 
1 R4U1 D4BR4U4R4D4L4BR 1 0U4L2R4BR4R 
4L2D4L2R4BR4U4R4D4L4BR8U4D1 R2D2R 
2D1U4BR12R4D2L4U2D4BR8R4L2U4L2R4 
BR4D4R4L4U4R4BR4R4L2D4BR6U4D4R4U 
4' 

51 DRAW'BM132,184;C3;R4D2L4U1D3U 
1 R2BR2BD 1 R 1 BR3R4L4U2R2L2U2R4BR12 
R4D2L4U1 D3BRBU4R4D2L2D1 BR2BD 1 R 1 B 
R3U4R4D4L2BR1 0NU2L4U4R4BR4R4D2L4 
U 1 D3U 1 R2BR2BD1 R 1 BR3U4R4D2NL2D2BR 



52 ' SUPERIOR GRAPHIC SOFTWARE 

53 PN0DE3.2 

54 DRAH , BM44,168iC2;R4U2L4U2R4B 
R4D4R4U4BR4ND4R4D2L2BR6NR2U2NR4D 
4R4BR4U4R4D2L2D 1BR2BD 1 R 1 BR3U4BR4 
NR4D4R4NU4BR4U4R4D2L2D1BR2BD1 Rl ' 

55 DRAWBM154,172iD2L4U4R4BR4ND4 
R4D2L2D1 BR2BD1 R 1 BR3U4R4D2NL2D2BR 
4U4R4D2L2BR6NU2ND2R4NU2D2BR4U4BR 
4NR4D4R4' 

56 DRAWBM140,180;R4U2L4U2R4BR4N 
D4R4D4NL4BR4U2NR2U2R4BR4R4L2D4BR 
6BU1NU3R2ND 1 R4ND1 R2U3BR4ND4R4D2N 
L2D2BR4U4R4D2L2D1 BR2BD 1 R 1 BR3NR4U 
2NR2U2R4 1 

57 'REGISTERED TRADE MARK ****** 

58 DRAWBH214,109;R4L2D4BR6U4D1R 
2BR4U1D4' 

59 PHODE3.1 

60 PM0DE4.1 

61 G0TO61 

2. Key in Listing 2 and CSAVE 
"MPPBASIC" to tape. Type in Listing 
2 exactly as shown. Don't add 
any blank spaces or program steps of 
your own . 

1 ' SUPERIOR GRAPHIC SOFTWARE 




2 ' 



3 ' 



TRADEMARK 



COPYRIGHT 
12/81 

4 ' WAYNESVILLE, N. C. 
(Continued on Page 31) 



2R4 1 



JARB 

1169 
IMPERIAL 



SOFTWARE 

FLORIDA ST. 
BEACH, CA 92032 



LASER STAR & HELO BATTLE *14.95 

JARBCODE *14.95 

PSYCHIC APTITUDE TEST & 

JARB BIORHYTHM *14.95 

JARB PRINTER UTILITY KIT *14.95 

Programs on quality data Cassette 
with complete documentation. 

COD orders accepted. For regular 
mail, please add $1 for shipping 
and handling. California residents 
aff 6V. state sales tax. 

Call or write for free catalog of 
available programs. No collect calls 
Please. (714) 429-5516. 

All RAINBOW subscribers are eli- 
gible to deduct *2 from cost of 
each program. 



Page 38 



the RAIN BOH 



MAY, 1982 



TELEWRITER 



the Color Computer Word Processor 



the only one with all these features for your TRS-80 Color: 

51 column x 24 line screen display ■ Sophisticated full-screen editor 
Real lower case characters m Powerful text formatter 
Works with any printer m Special MX-80 driver 

Runs in 16K or 32K m Disk & cassette I/O 
requires absolutely no hardware modifications I 




TELEWRITER 

Telewriter is the powerful word processor 
designed specifically for the Color 
Computer. It can handle almost any 
serious writing job and it is extremely easy 
to use. It has all the advanced features you 
need to create, edit, store, format and 
print any kind of text. With Telewriter you 
can quickly produce perfect, finished copy 
for letters, reports, term papers, articles, 
technical documentation, stories, novels, 
screenplays, newsletters. It is also a 
flexible and efficient way to take notes or 
organize ideas and plans. 

51x24 DISPLAY 

The Color Computer is an incredibly 
powerful and versatile computer, but for 
text editing it has some major drawbacks. 
The small 32 character by 16 line screen 
format shows you too little of the text and, 
combined with its lack of lowercase 
letters, bears little resemblance to the way 
text really looks on the page. Reverse 
video in place of lower case just adds 
confusion. 

Telewriter eliminates these shortcomings 
with no hardware modifications required. 
By using software alone, Telewriter 
creates a new character set that has real 
lower case letters, and puts 24 lines of 5 1 
characters on the screen. That's more 
on-screen characters than Apple II, Atari 
orTRS-80 Model III. That's more than 
double the Color Computer's standard 
display. 



FULLSCREEN EDITOR 

The Telewriter editor is designed for 
maximum ease of use. The commands are 
single key (or single key plus control key), 
fast, and easy to remember. There is no 
need to switch between insert modes and 
delete modes and cursor movement 
modes. You simply type. What you type is 
inserted into the text at the cursor, o n the 
screen. What you see on the screen is 
always the current state of your text. You 



can move quickly through the text with 
one key cursor movement in all 4 
directions, or press the shift key 
simultaneously for fast, auto-repeat. You 
can jump to the top or bottom of the text, 
the beginning or end of a line, move 
forward or backward a page at a time, or 
scroll quickly up or down. When you type 
past the end of the line, the wordwrap 
feature moves you cleanly to the next. 



. . .<meofthehe.it programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen . . . 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



You can copy, move or delete any size 
block of text, search repeatedly for any 
pattern of characters, then instantly delete 
it or replace it with another. Telewriter 
gives you a tab key, tells you how much 
space you have left in memory, and warns 
you when the buffer is full. 

FORMAT FEATURES 

When it comes time to print out the 
finished manuscript. Telewriter lets you 
specify: left, right, top, and bottom 
margins; line spacing and lines per page. 
These parameters can be set before 
printing or they can be dynamically 
modified during printing with simple 
format codes in the text. 



. . . truly a state of the art word processor . . . 
outstanding in every respect. % 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



Telewriter will automatically number 
pages (if you want) and automatically 
center lines. It can chain print any number 
of text files from cassette or disk without 
user intervention. You can tell it to start a 
new page anywhere in the text, pause at 
the bottom of the page, and set the Baud 
rate to any value (so you can run your 
printer at top speed). 



You can print all or any part of the text 
buffer, abort the printing at any point, and 
there is a "Typewriter" feature which 
allows you to type straight to your printer. 
Because Telewriter lets you output 
numeric control codes directly (either 
from the menu or during printing), it works 
with any printer. There's even a special 
driverforthe Epson MX-80 that lets you 
simply select any of its 12 fonts and do 
underlining with a single underline 
character. 

CASSETTE AND DISK I/O 

Because Telewriter makes using cassette 
almost painless, you can still have a 
powerful word processor without the 
major additional cost of a disk. The 
advanced cassette handler will search in 
the forward direction till it finds the first 
valid file, so there's no need to keep 
retyping a load command when you are 
lost in your tape. The Verify command 
checks your cassette saves to make sure 
they're good. You can save all or any part 
of the text buffer to disk or cassette and 
you can append pre-existing files from 
either medium to what you have in the 
buffer already. 

AVAILABLE NOW 

Telewriter turns your Color Computer into 
the lowest cost hi-power word processor 
in the world today. It runs in 16K or 32K 
(32K recommended) and is so simple you 
can be writing with it almost immediately. 
It comes with 63 pages of documentation 
and is fully supported by Cognitec. 
Telewriter costs $49.95 including shipping 
(California residents add 6% tax). To 
order, specify disk or cassette and send 
check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Ave. 

Del Mar,Ca. 92014 

Or call (714) 755-1258 weekdays 7 AM- 
4PM PST. We will gladly answer your 
questions. 



Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer. Inc.: Atari is a trademark of Atari. Inc.. TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp.; MX-80 is a trademark of Epson America. Inc. 



May, 1982 

MPPIFnw Page 37) 



the RfilNBOH 



Page 39 



5 POKE27,44:POKE28,190:POKE29,44 
:POKE30, 190:POKE31 ,44:P0KE32, 190 

6 ' P0KE65495 , a : ' HI -SPEED POKE 

7 PaEAR5:PM0DE4,l:SCREENl,l 

8 DIM A(12),B(100),N1(100),N2<10 
0) 

9 PMODE3,2:6ET(140,163)-(204,181 
),N1,G 

10 PH0DE3, l:SET( 94, 87)-(158.10 
5),N2,G 

11 GET! 28,184)-( 35, 188), A, G 

12 6ET( 35,184)-(225,188),B,6 

13 PUT(218,184)-(225,188),A,PSET 

14 PUT( 28,184)-(218,188),B,PSET 

15 IF T=08 T)£N PUT( 94, 87)-(15 
8,105), Nl, OR 

16 IF T=10 TfCN PUT( 94, 87) -(15 
8,105),N1,PSET 

17 IF T=22 TON PUT( 94, 871-05 
8,105), N2.0R 

18 IF T=24 TfCN PUT( 94, 87)-(15 
8,105),N2,PSET:T=0 

19 T=T+l:G0T011 




Then CLOAD 
program to si 
y locations 



"PICTURE" 
;t up your 
1536 to 



when the picture 



3. PCLEAR5. 
and RUN the 
picture in memc 
9215. 

4. Press BREAK 
is completed. 

5. PCLEAR5. CLOAD "MPPBASIC". 
Do not RUN or EXEC this program.' 

6. LIST and check the program. 
Check the MPP POKEs at Line 5. You 
can tell if they are correct by 
following this simple MPP routine 
from the keyboard: 

— PRINT PEEK (27) provides the 
POKE value for POKE 27, 29 and 31. 

— PRINT PEEK (28) provides the 
POKE value for POKE 28, 30 and 32. 

— The values in Line 5 can be 
higher than your PEEKs but they 
cannot be lower. If you typed 
Listing 2 carefully, the values will 
be the same or higher. If they are 
lower, simply delete one of the REM 



lines (1, 2, 3 or 4). That will make 
your PEEK values lower. (You MPP 
programmers already know how to set 
the POKE values properly, don't you?) 

7. Save both "Picture" and 
"MPPBasic" to tape as a finished 
program (now stored between 1536 and 
11451) to tape by typing: CSAVEM 
" MPP— PROG ",1536,11451, 4466 1 < ENTER > . 

8. Now, rewind the tape you have 
just made, type PCLEAR5: CLOADM: EXEC 
and <ENTER> it. Your program will 
load and auto— start for you. See 
what just 14 lines can do! 

9. For those of you who are 
already MPP programmers, you can now 
load your MPP Drawer program right 
over your picture in memory and go to 
work modifying it as you wish. 



The l&K 
Uith 51 



Color 
or 



• 300 or 110 Baud 

• user programmable keys 

• automatic repeat when 
key is held down 

• dump your files to host 

• reverse video 

• partial screen clear 

• 4-way cursor control 

Cassette and Manual $34.95 msj $40.95 



COLORTERM (c) 

Conputer* as an in 
colunns by 2 1 line 

• any data format (commercial 
systems, TSO, bulletins etc.) 

• memory buffer for incoming 
data— save buffer— scroll 
through buffer 

• preserve a "window" of 

any size; new material scrolls 
through remainder of screen. 



felliqent tern i na I 
s and louer case'. 

• encode data for more secure 
' storage 

• macro buffers for often-used 
output 

• patch the 51 or 64 column 
display to your own programs 
running above 9168 (23 DO hex) 



tn) Mm, MtsterCharve, Money Order 

Martin Consulting, 94 Macalester Bay, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2X5 Canada 



•TM. OF TANDY CORP 



Page 40 



the RMNBOH 



may , 1982 



«PEL(«<E 



Do you love your Color Computer? 
Host of us do, you know, and if you 
do, too, now there's a tee shirt 
available for you. HARHONYCS carries 
a line of shirts (and software) and 
you can get a catalog froi thea at 
P.O. Box 1573, Salt Lake City, UT, 
841IM573. 

Speaking of such iteas, som are 
also available froa Araadillo 
International SoftMare in Austin, TX, 
and froi Superior Graphic SoftMare, 
Haynesville, NC. He have not seen 
their offerings yet but they are 
adve 

And speaking of advertisers, 
several offer discounts to 
subscribers of the MHiM. You 
should read advertisaents carefully 
to note these special offers when 
they occur, 

The MBMLtl prograa froa 
Britt Honk, CDP, is no longer 
available froa hia. Honk says that 
he sees this as an encouraging sign, 
since the prograa -- in an 'enhanced* 
version — has been purchased by the 
Aval on Hill 6aae Co. and Mill be 
re-released shortly. Honk says he is 
still developing prograas and that 
his mumr gaae is still 
available. 

Thanks to you, Me've received 
several reports that Seebree's 
Coaputing has shipped the HI 
SAflflK prograa they advertised 
previously. 



He believe the flHLlU is an 
appropriate place to coaaend Arnold 
Pouch of Superior Sraphic SoftMare 
for his sharing of his Hotion Picture 
Prograaiing techniques. This fora of 
aniaation — details of which ran in 
a three-part series which concludes 
this aonth — is unique and fun to 
use. Pouch could well have kept the 
'secret' to hiaself. He has opened 
soae real vistas for 80C users and Me 
say 'thanks' on behalf of a lot of 
us. 

Electronic Specialists of Natik, 
HA, is out with a 40-page catalog of 
coaputer interference control 
products. He have not seen any of 

the products, but have looked through 
the rather extensive catalog. 

Tandy has foraally announced Mhat 
Mas reported here earlier, that 
Children's Television Horkshop 
(Sesaae Street) Mill develop two 
'serious, coaprehensive series of 
prograas for dassrooa use at the 
grade 1-4 level' designed expressly 
for the 80C. They Mill use the 
popular Sesaae Street characters and 
deal with English language and 
coaputer literacy. Children's 
Television Horkshop is also doing 80C 
prograas for hoae use. 



If you need an extra $100, try 
entering a contest in which all you 
have to do is identify the aost 
practical May an individual can 
justify purchase of a personal 



coaputer. The rules are a page long, 
so we Mon't try to duplicate thea 
here, but you can get details by 
writing to OCEAN, P.O. Box 2331, 
Springfield, VA, 22152. 



This seeas an appropriate place to 
aention that we really want to help 
B0C clubs and user's groups in any 
May we can. Let us know about 
aeeting tiaes and places and Me' 11 
sake sure that we get thea in the 
mm». There aay be a whole lot 
of people out there who are looking 
for you. 

Don Inaan, the author, tells us a 
new book on 80C graphics Mill soon be 
available froa the Reston (VA) 
Publishing Co. He'll have a review 
when a copy is aade available to us. 

For all of you Mho have been 
asking about soaething that aight be 
able to convert tape prograas to disk 
— without aessing up the disk 
operating systea -- there aay be a 
solution at hand. Toa Nix SoftMare 
reports it is about to aarket a 
prograa that will handle the transfer 
without any probleas. Should be 
ready soon, we understand. 

Cognitec inforas us that 
UUmitR on disk should be 
available by the tiae you read this. 



■ 

f~" *"~ r " -3L r~ ■ ■ — |*c* |sr y~j m 

WE'RE PROUD PROUD TO PRESENT 

CMP ILI 3T < ■= > 
WHAT'S a PHONE BOOK > an ADDRESS BOOK, a MRIL LABEL GENERATOR and MORE! 
CMAILIST <c)! The cassette mini -data base for business or home. 
THESE ARE JUST SOME OF OUR FEATURES 
************************************* 
1. SELECTIVE PRINTING 2. BATCH PRINTING 3. SEARCH ANY OF 6 FIELDS. 

4. MAIL LABELS'' 1-2WIDE) 5. AUTO SAVE 6. CREATES BACK-UP FILES 

7. 1YEAR WARRANTY < FREE UPDATES AS RELEASED) 
****************************************************************************** 

PRICE $19.95 for 16K & 32K PROGRAMS or. SAME TAPE. Special Offer- 20* OFF 
bjith this AD, That's *15.95. Also avail' 4116 200ns DYNAMIC RAMS * 15. §9^8 
CHECK OR MONEY ORDER < shipping Prepaid) COD < shipping added) 
PEACOCK ENT. PHEASANT RUN BOX 494 RD#3 CANASTOTA, NY. 13032 315-697-7147 



Page 42 



the RfilNBON 



MM, 1982 



Software Review... 

F^I—rtY IT AGAIN 
COMPUTER ISLAND 

I just loved the old "Name That 
Tune" program on TV, and that is 
probably one of the reasons why I am 
so pleased with Nf)NE THAT SONS. 

This 16K Extended program from 
Computer Island (Dept. R, 227 Hampton 
Green, Staten Island, NY 10312, *10) 
features 72 songs that you can get 
your 80C to play and for you to 
guess. 

The songs range from the easy to 
the somewhat difficult and all are 
true renderings of the tunes. I got 
some and missed some, but had an 
absolute ball playing the game. 

Computer Island calls it a game 
for kids, and my kids (as well as the 
kids in the neighborhood) enjoyed it 
a lot. But so did the kids* parents. 
All of them! And, to make things 
better, there is a "grownup version" 
available as well. 

You (and your kids) will like 
NAME THAT S0N6 too! Its a 

winner. 



Utility... 

80C ' S OWN 
C I NERAMA 



Remember Cinerama? That was the 
super — duper development in the movies 
that had a real wide screen that made 
you feel like you were "in" the 
picture. 

Mark Reeves of Snake Mountain 
Software contributed this CINERAMA 
SCREEN PRINT that lets you print 
out a double— size of the graphic 
screens. Being in Basic, the program 
is a bit slow, but it will get you 
there. It was written for the Line 
Printer VII. 

Me hope you like big pictures! 



10 'DOUBLE SIZE SCREEN PRINT 

20 'SNAKE MOUNTAIN SOFTWARE 

30 'P.O. BOX 5722 

40 'RALEIGH, NC 27650 

50 'JAN. 1982 

60 ' 

70 ' 9=C0L0R VARIABLE 
80 ' 9=1 FOR NORMAL PRINT 
90 ' 9=0 FOR REVERSE PRINT 
100 9=1 



COLOR COMPUTER DISK SYSTEM 

A complete disk drive system for the color computer, featuring the Tall Grass Technology 
Double density, buffered disk controller. This system will support up to 4 51/4 in. disk 
drives with a maximum capacity of 3.2 Mega bytes of storage using double sided 80 track 
drives. This is a minimum of 4 times the capacity of the "Standard" color computer disk 
drive system. 

DISK OPERATING SYSTEM (CCMD + 9) 

This is a full featured "Basic" compatible disk operating system which does "NOT" require extended Basic and will even run on a 4K 
color computer. It includes a complete dynamic allocation system that leaves no wasted or unused space on the disk. It will 
automatically repack disk space when files are deleted to reduce file fragmentation and increaseaccess time. 

This system features three operating systems In one, the first is a free standing system which has 11 commands for loading, saving, 
removing, changing, checking, analyzing and executing files on disk. It can be configured to allow any mixed combinations of 35, 40 
and 80 track drives. 

The second system is a completely supported external access system for interfacing with virtually any program requiring the use of 
the disk system. It includes 10 functions for opening, closing, reading, writing sequencial and random access files. There are also 13 
subroutine functions and 7 I/O subroutines accessable to the programmer. 

The third system is a Basic interface system which includes 6 direct execute Basic commands and 6 indirect commands which 
conform to the standard Basic tape & printer I/O commands and allow use of string and numeric variables for disk parameters. Up to 9 
files can be active at once, all disk file memory allocation is done automatically at run time. Also, Basic has access to all the free 
standing DOS commands either directly or under program control. 



i ■ PRICES: 1 

Controller W/CCMD + 9 Eprom $159.95 
Disk Controller only $99.00 
CCMD+9 Dos on 2732 Eprom $69.00 
CCASM9 disk assembler $34.95 
CCEDT9 disk text editor $24.95 
CCDISS disk disassembler $29.95 
CCUTLY disk utilities $19.95 
CDTPRO Text processor $39 .95 


Games from Spec 

CGAME1 HI-RES Graphic Game 
includes 

Space Invaders 
Meteroids 

Space Wars $49.95 


tral Associates 

CGAME2 mixed game disk 
includes 
Battle Fleet 
Space Traders 
Adventure $39.95 


5566 RICOCHET AVE. r^ED TAUD f 7fl 91 A *\ O-O A 1 0 All Orders Shipped From Slock 
' LasVegas.Nv. 89110 WEK-WUIVIK 13* ,u OO* Add J1. 00 Postage • NIC/VISA Add 3% 




MM, 1982 



the ROINBOH 

■ 



Page 43 



110 PRINT#-2,CHR$U8); 
120 FORX=0TO251STEP7 
130 F0RY=191 TO 0 STEP-1 
140 H=0 

150 IF PPOINT(X,Y)=Q THEN fttl OR 

3 

160 IF PP0INT(X+1,Y)=Q THEN N=M 
OR 12 

170 IF PP0INT(X+2.Y)=« THEN N=H 
OR 48 

180 IF PP0INT(X+3,Y)=Q THEN H=fl 
OR 64 

190 H=M+128 

200 PRINTI-2,CHR$(M);CHR$(M)i 
210 NEXTY 
220 PRINTI-2,CHR$(13)i 
230 F0RY=191 TO 0 STEP-1 
240 11=0 

250 IF PP0INT(X+3,Y)=Q THErtHI 0 
R 1 

260 IF PPOINT(X+4,Y)=<5 THEN N=M 
OR 6 

270 IF PP0INT(X+5.Y)=ti THEN N=H 
OR 24 

280 IF PP0INT(X+6,Y)=Q THEN H=fl 
OR 96 

290 tt=M+128 

30B PRINTI-2,CHR$(M):CHR$(M)i 
310 NEXTY 

320 PRINTI-2,CHR$(13); 
330 NEXTX 

340 F0RY=191 TO 0 STEP-1 
350 M=0 

360 IF PP0INT(252,Y)=« THEN N=N 
OR 3 

370 IF PP0INT(253,Y)=9 THEN fWI 
OR 12 

380 IF PP0INT(254.Y)=« THEN H=M 
OR 48 

390 IF PPOINT(255,Y)=Q THEN N=M 
OR 64 

400 N=M+128 

410 PRINT#-2,CHR$(M);CHR$«M)i 
420 NEXTY 

430 PRINT#-2,CHRJ(13)i 
440 F0RY=191 TO 0 STEP-1 
450 lt=0 

460 IF PP0INT(255,Y)=« THEN N=M 
OR 1 

470 H=M+128 

480 PRINTI-2,CHR$(M);CHR$(M>; 
490 NEXTY 

500 PRINTI-2,CHR$(13)iCHR*<3B)i 
510 END 



R rt I N E □ U 



PREMIUM 

CASSETTES 

COMPUTER GRADE 
100% ERROR-FREE 
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• High Frequency Response • Wide Dynamic Range • 

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• Choice of School Districts Nationwide • 



LENGTH 

C-05 

C-10 

C-20 

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C-90 

•CASES 



12PAK 

$ .69 

79 

99 

1.19 

1.49 

1.79 

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24-PAK 
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.69 
.89 
1.09 
1.39 
1.69 
.20 



*ases recommended to protecl sensitive casseiv 



—UPS SHIPPING— 
(No P.O. Boxes please) 
$2.00 (12-pak) $3.00 (24-pak) 
—Canadian shipping multiply by 2— 

#1 COMPUTER TAPE 
IN THE USA! 



TOLL-FREE 
(orders only) p. 
r~"~^i 1-800-426-4747 Aw**^ 
ext. 480 V^>T 
— In Washington State ^^j^ 
1-800-562-4555 
ext. 480 

MICRO-80 ™INC. 



2665 Busby Rural Road 
Oak Harbor, WA 98277 
— Distributors Wanted — 



Page 44 



the RfilNBOH 



Hf)Y, 1982 



RANDOM NUMBI 
ONCE AGAIN 



By John L. Urban 

{[IVOR'S HOW »r. Urban is leaving the RDlHBOH's 
coltnist staff this tenth to devote tore tite to his 
sofUare fin. lhe folloning is a replf to the taut letters 
He have received concerning the randot nuber generator in 
sote of his previous colttns. FRF gaters Mill, »e ire sure, 
Dish John Hell and Hill nant to read till Holan's colutn on 
FRF, Hhich begins »ith this issue.) 

Due to the response I have 
had on RND rolls prompted by the 
computer, I want to explain exactly 
why I choose the RND (15) +3 (or 
RND(18)> methods over the RND (3d6) 
method. 

Basically, RND ( 15) +3 will give a 
wider span of numbers than adding 
three six-sided dies together. A 
bell— curve of 20 rolls of three 
six— sided die will show a median of 
eight or nine, while a bell— curve of 
20 rolls of an 18-sided die will show 
a median of about 12 or 13. Also, 
the number 18 actually appears quite 
a bit more using the RND(15)+3 method 
than the 3d6 method. 

If you don't know what a bell 
curve is, just make a graph with the 





COMPUTER GAMES 
TRS-80 MODEL 1/3 16K LEVEL II 
TRS-80 16K COLOR AND 8K PET 

DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM "FROG RACE" COMES 
ON CASSETTE WITH A FULL REFUND COUPON 
TO USE ON YOUR NEXT ORDER. 
FROG RACE CASSETTE $3. WITH CATALOG 

DUO-PAK'S ARE $10 DOLLARS EACH. 
NO. PGM SIDE 1 PGM SIDE 2 

1 GONE FISHING CONCENTRATION 

2 CRAPS SLOT-MACHINE 

3 STARSHIP SHERLOCK HOLMES 

4 TANK ATTACK ASSOCIATION 

5 NUMBER GUESS DICE ROLL 

6 IN-BETWEEN SHELL GAME 

7 SAFARI STARSHIP-2 

8 MORTAR BATTLE PUZZLE 

9 TEASER MOUSE 

10 PT BOAT TURTLE RACE 

11 CHEK-CHES STARSHIP-3 

12 THINK LUCK & LOGIC 

13 TREASURE ISLAND RESCUE 

SHIPPED 1ST CLASS MAIL PPD. - NO COD'S. 

SPECIFY WHAT COMPUTER YOU HAVE. 
B. ERICKSON P.O. BOX 11099 
CHICAGO, IL 60611 



to 13 on thi 
numbers 3 
Then rol 1 
times 
Plot 



numbers 1 
and the 
hori zonal 
dice 20 
results, 
graph. 

This will 
Probabil ity and 
bel 1 -shaped — 1 
ends and more in 

I asked Joe 
Software to 
program for 



» vertical side 
to 18 on the 
three six-sided 



and 
the 



write down 
answers on 



show the 

the curve 
>ss numbers 
the middle. 
Bennett 
write the 
me. Although 



La» 
will 
at 

of 



the 
the 

of 
look 
both 

JARB 



f ol lowing 
it is 



short, it requires Extended Basic. 
It will illustrate the differences 
between rolls of dice using RND (15) +3 



and 



3d6. 



0 REM #***«*«*««**«***«***#*** 

1 REM * RND(18) AND RND(3d6» * 

2 REM * PROGRAM - * 

3 REM * WRITTEN MAR. 1982 * 

4 REM * BY * 

5 REM * JOHN L. URBAN * 

i REM * AND t 

7 REM » J. E. BENNETT « 

8 REM * (c) 1982 JARB SOFTWARE * 

9 REM *******«****♦*«**«♦#«♦ 

10 PMODE l,l:PCLS(2):SCREENl,l 

ii gosub inn 

30 FORI=0TO255 

A0 R=8:F0RII=1T02:R=R+RND(6):NEX 
TII:R=R*5 

50 LINE(I,176)-U,176-R),PSET 

60 NEXTI 

61 PMCiDE 1,3: PCLS( 3 ) : SCREEN1 , 1 

62 GOSUB1000 
70 FORI=0TO255 

B0 R=(RND(15)+3)*5 

90 LINE(I,176)-!I,176-R),PEET 

100 NEXTI 



nay, 1982 



the RMNBOH 



Page 45 



110 PM0DE1 , 1 :SCREEN1, 1 :F0RI=1T01 

(»:NEXTI:PM0DE1 , 3:SCREEN1, 1 :F0R1 

=1TO100:I€XTI:6OTO110 

1000 LINEi0,86)-<255.86),PSET:RE 

TURN 



The first thing that will happen 
when you run the program is that the 
screen will change to green. You'll 
see an orange line about halfway up. 
This is the number's maximum (18) and 
is for reference. The lines which 
form from left to right with varied 
lengths are the graphic 

representations of the 3d6 rolls — 
256 of them. Once this simulation is 
completed, the screen will change to 
blue and vertical lines will appear 
again. This is the RND<15)+3 
simulation. To compare the two, the 

screen will flash back and forth. 

By running this program a few 
times you will see that: 

— The number 18 appears more 
frequently in the RND(15)+3 
simulation. 

— The span of numbers seems wider 
in the RND(15)+3 simulation. 

You, as the programmer or referee, 
wi 1 1 have 1 



decide which method to 



use. I favor RND(15)+3 because it 
gives a slight advantage to the 
pi ayers. 

I hope this clears up any 
controversy and I wish to thank all 
of you who have written and responded 
to my articles. Thanks, too, to all 
who have supported this series and 
read the FRP Column with interest. 



AIM EL CHEAPO 
PRINTER STAND 

An inexpensive printer stand can 
be yours. 

Bo into any stationary or of 
supply store and buy a metal susp 
file support. Your printer should 
able to rest on top of it 
easily and you can store the p 
under it. 



f ice 
ense 
be 
very 
per 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 



3424 COLLEGE N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. MI 49505 
PHONE (616) 364-4791 




*NEW*NEW* 
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REMEilBER WARLORDS? YOU'LL LOVE THIS ONE. 
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MATH DRILL- DESIGNED TO TEACH ADDITION. SUBTRA- 
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SPELLING TEST- HEAR YOUR CC TALK TO YOU. 
AN OUTSTANDING LEARNING TOOL. STUDENTS LOVE 
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WORD DRILL- COMPLETE PACKAGE DESIGNED BY A 
TEACHER AS A VOCABULARY TEACHING AID. 



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HERES A DEMON OF A DEAL. WATCH HIM DANCE TO 
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DENTS ADD 41! SALES TAX 



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LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 



Pege 46 



he RQINBOH 



HOY, 1982 



RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE presents... 



I 




At last... a real-time graphics adventure game with 
If you are bored with silent screens of text but en 
adventure games then SCEPTER OF KZIRGLA is for you. 

ALSO ANNOUNCING . . 
$26.95 each cassette - 2 New KULTIPAKS - $31 
Combo #1 - following h Twinpaks: 
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$11.95 B-17 Bomber/Metric Kagic 
$11.95 Blackjak/Kath Tutor 
$11.95 Compumind/Jackpot 

Include $2.00 shipping per order. 
Minn, resedents add 5?» tax. 
Dealer inquiries invited. 



arcade sound for your Color Computer! 
joy the challenge and complexity of 
16K Ext $16.95 cass - $21.95 disk 

• 

.95 each menu-driven disk 

Combo #2 - following k Twinpaks: 
$11.95 Starfighter-VTic-Tac-Toe 
$11.95 Biorhythm/Minefield 
$11.95 Computration/Chuck-A-Luck 
$11.95 Lunar Lander/Math Drill 

RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE 
351^ 6th Place N.W. 
Rochester, MN 55901 



Not affiliated with THE RAINBOW. $2.00 per item discount to all subscribers. 



19B2 



the RdlNBOM 



At 

ISM III II 



By Dennis S. Lewandowski 
RR1NBOH Columnist 

(Nr. Lewandowski, president of DSL Computer Products, 
is an experienced teacher and prograiier in asseibly 
language.) 

Did you enjoy last month's 
program? I hope so, because assembly 
language can be fun. 

This month we are going to discuss 
the Central Processing Unit (the CPU 
for short) itself. First of all, the 
main question has to be how does it 
work? 

In a nutshel 1 , when any CPU i s 
created, the design engineers make an 
instruction set of control codes. 
The CPU wi 1 1 react to any one code i n 
only one way. Normally, an 

instruction is two bytes long, 
however, they may be any length the 
designer chooses. The 6809 has a few 
instructions which are four bytes 
long (47 to be exact) and the 
remainder are two bytes in length. 

The CPU contains all the logic, 
arithmatic and address processing 
information needed to interact with 
it. Me will use the CPU's registers 
to handle these things. 

Registers? Plural? Humm, 

just how many of these registers are 
there? 

Well, there are either eight or 
nine, depending on how we look at it. 
Look at Figure 1 on this page, and 
you'll see a programmers model of the 
6809 CPU. It has X and Y index 
registers; U and S stack pointers, 
the PC— program counter and the 
accumulators. The accumulator can be 
used as two eight-bit registers 
called A and B, or as one 16-bit 
register called simply D. The last 
two parts of the CPU are the 
DP— direct page register and the 
CC-condition code register. 

Now, let's look at each of these 
things one at a time: 

The X and Y index registers are 
called that because they conveniently 
lend themselves to the indexed 
addressing mode. This mode is where 
a register is set up as a pointer to 
a location in memory. The X and Y 
registers can be set up so they 
automatically increase to the next 
location. (Yes, they can be set up 



we're into the basics right now.) 
The name, "index" or "pointer" refers 
to the fact that these registers are 
meant primarily for the purpose of 
indexing or pointing to memory 
1 ocations. 

The U and S stack pointers could 
also be used as index registers, 
however, their primary function is to 
point at a memory location where a 
stack of data will be found. The 
stack itself consists of the contents 
of the CPUs registers. Now, why 
would we want to duplicate the CPUs 
registers anywhere? 

Let's just say we're running our 
program and we want to use the D 
register for a 16 bit add, but our 
program is already using A or B — or 
both (remember, the D register is a 
combination of A and B) . Well, we 
can just "push" A on the stack, do 
our 16— bit add with the D register, 
store the information if we need to 
keep it, and "pull" A off the stack 
and continue on with our program. 
Handy, huh? 

Also, the CPU automatically stacks 
some registers if it performs a jump 
or branchs to a subroutine. The U 
stack pointer — also called the user 
stack — is for the programmer who 
wishes to set his own stack. 

The PC or program counter does 
just what the name implies. It 
counts the memory locations of the 
program the CPU is running. That 
way, the CPU knows what has already 
been done and what needs to still be 
done. 

Now for the accumulators. Are 
there one, two or three of them? 
Really, there is only one, a 16-bit 
accumulator referred to as D. 

If a program does an add, subtract 
or any other math function, the CPU 
will always store the result in the D 
register. Now, let's assume we only 
need an eight— bit math function 
(numbers 0-255) . Rather than waste 
space in the CPU, we can split the 
16— bit D register into two eight-bit 
registers — A or B. Both can be 
independent of one another. 

The DP register is an eight-bit 
register. Direct page refers to the 
addressing mode in which a two byte 
address is given for a memory 
location in most CPUs. The direct 
page is 00xx where the two leading 
bytes are always 00 — but that is 
where other CPUs leave direct 
addressing. The 80C's 6809 will 
allow us to place a direct page 
anywhere in memory. All we have to 
do is put any two hex i decimal numbers 
in the direct page register and 
(Cntinui oi next piqe) 



Page 48 



the RA1NB0M 



MAY, 1982 



ASSEMBLY CORNER (Froa Page 47) 

voil a that is where all the 
direct addresses are. 

Finally for this month, there is 
the flag or condition code register. 
This is an eight bit register and 
each bit has a special meaning to the 
CPU. In order the bits are: 

Entire flag — this flag is 
set if the CPU has stored the 
"entire" register set on the stack 
during a push. If only a partial set 
is stored, the flag would be reset. 

F1RQ Mask (Fast Interrupt 
Request Mask) - If this flag is 
set, it tells the CPU to ignore fast 
interrupt requests until it is reset. 

Half Carry flag — This flag is 
set if, while doing eight— bit math, 
there is a carry from the second 
nibble to the first. 

IRQ Mask (Interrupt Request 
Mask) - If this mask is set, the 
CPU will ignore any standard 
interrupt requests (except 

non-maskable interrupts). 

Negative flag — If the first 
bit of any math operation puts a one 
into the involved register, this flag 
will be set, noting this is a 
negative number in signed math. 

Zero flag — If any 

instruction, except a load or store, 
makes a register all zeroes, this 
flag will be set. 

Overflow flag - If a math 
operation causes a number larger than 
the register being used can handle, 
this flag will be set. 

Carry flag — If a carry is 
caused by a math function, this flag 
will be set also. Arithmatic shifts 
(believe me for now) use the carry 
flag. 

The key word in all these 
descriptions is "if." The flags we 
just discussed are the basis of any 
program logic. At this point, I 
think we'll stop and let you digest 
this material. 

Next month: The addressing modes 
and a 6809 emulator program. 



RAINBOUJ PROGRAMS 
AVA I LABLE OIM 



A new service, RfUNBOM ON 
TOPE i is now available. The 
service will provide listings of 
programs appearing in the RfilNBOM 
on cassette tape, ready to CLOAD into 
your 80C. 

All programs longer than 25 lines 
— and some that are shorter — wi 1 1 
be offered through RAINBOM ON 
TAPE. The tape is designed to 



facilitate the loading of programs 
and will go hand— in— hand with 
editorial copy in the particular 
issue of the RH1NBON in which the 
programs appear. No documentation 
will accompany the tapes. 

RA1NBOM ON TdPE is available 
from the RdlNBOM, 5803 Timber 
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although plans will be announced 
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All tapes are guaranteed to load. 

RdlNBOM ON TfiPE will be sent 
first class mail to avoid Postal 
Service delays. 



V 



R A I N B 0 W 



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SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
84110-1573 

GAME SET I (4K) $7.95 

Three games on one cassette. FRENZY a vocabulary building word 
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is a dice game of skill and chance. 
MONEY MINDER II (18K) $6.95 

Money Minder 1 1 is a cassette based personal finance program. Up 
to 56 user definable budget categories. Printout capability. Menu 
drlven-easy to use. (4K version available - $7.95) 
PRESCHOOL PAK (1SK EXTENDED BASIC) $8.95 
Two preschooler learning games on one cassette. Makes use of hi- 
resolution graphics and sound. The kids think it's a fun game. ( it 1st) 

COLORHYTHM (1SK EXTENDED BASIC) $9.95 

Biorhythms for the Color Computer. Excellent use of hi-res 
graphics. Plots your 15 day biorhythms. 

SISI (16K EXTENDED BASIC) $9.95 

Sisi-the fortune telling computer uses data that you input to deter- 
mine a character reading for you. You might be surprised I 

TEE-SHIRT $7.<?5 

Sizes S.M.L. XL. Please specify. (Allow 3 to 6 weeks for delivery) 
Also specify red or blue on white tee-shirt. 

All programs supplied on 
cassette and shipped post- 
paid. Foreign orders please 
adjust prices for exchange 
rate to U.S. dollars. Sorry. 



, no COD. 




MAY , J 982 the R01NB0M 



Page 49 



THE ULTIMATE IN COLORCOMPUTING 



WORD PROCESSING 

THE SUPER COLOR" WRITER II 

The Word Processor thai re- wrote (he book on Word Processing 
I Super Color Writer >s a FAS1 FMfitWM tuJt- tun h-.tiuted 
character ,$cret?n r on en led word processing system tor th»* TRS-flUt fM, 
CoKK Computer and ANY punter The video display is styled ntlei a 
professional phosphor igreen characters on biacr* background) display 
tor hour sot use without eye fatigue i optional orange on black i 1 he unique 
punt WINDOW trees you from 32 & t or 64 character lines FOREVER' This 
window tan be moved anywhere in the loxt tile up down lett or nghl tu 
display the text as it will be printed without wasting paper You can create 
or edit Super Color Terminal tiles. ASCII tiles BASIC programs Of 
Editor Assembler source listings It s simple enough lor beginnerswilh 4K 
and tor the professional writer with a 32K disk system and a lot to say 
there s plenty ot room lo say it' 

COMPARISON CHART SUPER COLOR WRITER THE COMPETITION 

5^St#ffl Si/* 4K 16K 4K ifjK J?K 

'A. t »■< spat* NA 8K <4K MA «?K IflX 

NUM^AK I w. I fpac« 2 SK t&K 3IK NA NA NA 

CIS* r*M vpaLv N A fi 22 iK N A tl M M 

M,qr>| Justify V£S NO 

vd»u A.ndo* YES NO 

Edit am ASCn F i*e VES NO 

The figures speak for tnemseives and with professional features n*e 
PROGRAMMABLE function string commends to peffoflrl up lo 28 
commands automatically PROGRAMMABLE text tile chaining 
PROGRAMMABLE column insert & delete and ngni hand 
JUSTIFICATION with punctuation precedence the choice is clear but 
there s llill more' 

The Super Color Writer lakes lull advantage of the new breed of smarl 
printers wilh Control codes 1-31 20 Programmable control codes 0-2S6 
tor special needs and built in Epson MX-80. Centronics 737, 739 and R S 
Line Printer IV VII VIII drivers 

CHECK THESE FEATURES!! 
MIGH SPEED A normal operations *32K Compatible • Window • Key beep 

• HELP table • 128 character ASCII & graphics • Memory left • Lower case 

• Full cursor control • Uuit* paging* Scrolling* Word wraparound* Tabs 

• Repeal all functions • Repeat last command • insert character & line • 
Delete character delete to end of line line to cursor, tine & block • Block 
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a'ter CH • Soft & hard formfeed • Works with 6 bit printer to • and more' 

SUPER "COLOR" WRITER DISK 

The Disk version ot tfti Super Color Writer work:, with the 1 RS-60C Disk 
System and has all the features listed above plus many more' Use with up 
to tour Disk Drives Includes an extended HELP table you can access at 
any ttme Can a directory print FREE space Kill disk tiles and SAVE and 
LOAD lex! hies you ve created all from the Super Color Writer. Pnnl 
merge or append any Super Color Terminal hie ASL U hie BASIC 
program or Editor Assembler source listing stored on me Disk ot tape 1 he 
Super Color Writer Disk tehMOfl has additional formatting and print 
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Includes comprehensive operators manual 
TAPE $49.95 ROM PAK $74.95 DISK $99.95 

Manual only. $7 00 Refundable with purchase 



Ahlj* .' . *rK) lur person*' check* COD uratr'S add 
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DEALER INQUIRES ARE INVITED. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

THE SUPER COLOR TERMINAL 

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The Disk version otters an ttieleatures listed above ptui Host ability in tun 
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Put your programs in a ROMPAK ui eaccule tape based piugrams in a 
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IIELSQn 
SOFTUrW 




TR&-80 '• • registered trademarli ol \hm Tandy Corp 



PO Bob 19096 Minneapolis MN 55419 612 827-4703 



Page 50 



the RH1HB0M 



MHY, 1962 



MANT 
HERI 



Kl 



EP I 
WAY 



TO DO 



If you are into secrets... or just 
want to do some experimenting with 
code, JftRBCODE from J ARB Software 
is a great way to go. 

This program comes to readers of 
the RQ1NB0H courtesy of Joe 
Bennett of J ARB Software. While 
offered for sale by J ARB, it is 
reproduced here with permission of 
the owners. You are authorized to 
make copies necessary for your own 
use, but you may not make copies for 
anyone else. 

A full manual, 27 pages in length, 
is available from JARB Software, 
which will explain all the details of 
using this program. The manual may 
be ordered for 47 from JARB at 1169 
Florida St., Imperial Beach, CA, 
92032. California residents should 
add tax. All orders should include 
*1 shipping charge. 

JQRBCOBE is the only program 
printed in this month's issue of 
the RB1NB0H which is not included 
on the RMNBOM ON TAPE for May. 

JORBCODE is an easy-to-use 
program designed to encode and/or 
decode any alphanumeric message you 
wish to send or receive. While no 
code is totally unbreakable, it will 
be somewhat difficult for anyone not 
knowing the key to break the code. 

The program's main menu offers you 
several choices. The first you will 
probably wish to use is "Code 
Choices." Here, you will get another 
menu which gives several options. 
Choose the one you wish. This 
discussion, however, will deal only 
with the straight numerical code. 

You need to remember which code 
choice you use. That is the only way 
the person who receives the message 
will be able to decode it (unless he 



works for the CIA, KGB or so forth) . 

You must also note the code key. 
For straight numerical code, you 
enter any positive number and the 
computer will then assign the 
following 25 consecutive numbers as 
its coding sequence. 

When you type in your start 
number, press < ENTER > and the 
complete sequence will be displayed. 
If the sequence is satisfactory to 
you, press "Y" and you will be 
returned to the Main Menu. If you 
don't like the sequence, press "N". 
Then , you wi 1 1 be returned to the 
start of the straight numerical code 
section to select a new start number 
for a different sequence. 

Once you have assigned a start 
sequence, you can begin encoding 
messages. The computer will first 
ask whether a code choice has been 
made. Since you have made a choice, 
press "Y". The B0C will then tell 
you to "ENTER MESSAGE". 

The computer will accept any 
alphanumeric character, including 
punctuation and spaces, 
message entry may not 
characters. Punctuation 
count toward the 225 
1 imit. 

Type the message in 
allow the 80C time to 
input. When the complete message has 
been typed in (or an error occurs) 
press the up arrow key. The computer 
will then display the entered message 
and ask if it is correct. 

If the message is not correct, 
enter a "N" or "NO". Then the 
message input procedure will begin 
anew. 

If the message is correct, press 

(Cottitted on Page 52) 



A single 
exceed 225 
and spaces 
character 

slowly to 
process the 



An Amazing Off 



Now Available! 
* 32K 



»r. . . 

TRS-80* COLO R 
* Extended Color Basic 



COMPUTI 

* 1.1 ROM 



R 

* 'E' Board 



* Full SO— Day Warranty 
For. ONLY... ^g<3^ 



8»nd chock. Money Ord«r, Vim or 



CLIFF'* COLOR CORNER 
Rt. 4, Box 248 
Floyd's Knobs, IN 47119 
oTradfcNrk. Tin* Corp. 



HOY, 1982 



the RA1NBOM 



Page 51 



EXCITING NE 
FOR COLOR COMPUT 

FLEX, OS-9 and the Radio Shack Disk System 
ALL on the SAME Color Computer 

In case you don't understand how this works, I'll 
give you a brief explanation. The Color Computer 



Would you believe that you can run FLEX, OS-9 
and Radio Shack disk software on the same Color 
Computer, and all you have to do is change the disk? 
That's right, just change the disk. If you have a 32K 
Color Computer with the Radio Shack disk system, 
all you need to do is make a trivial modification to 
access the hidden 32K, as described in the Feb. issue 
of COLOR COMPUTER NEWS and the April issue of 
'68' Micro. You can get FLEX from us right now. 
OS-9 will be ready by summer. Please note that this 
will only work with the Radio Shack disk system and 
32K/64K memory chips that RS calls 32K. Maybe 
they put 64K's in yours, too. If you don't have a 
copy of the article, send a legal size SASE (40$ 
stamps) and we'll send it to you. 

Using this system to run FLEX and OS-9 has 
many advantages. First, it gives you 48K from zero 
right up to FLEX. This means that ALL FLEX 
compatible software will run with NO 
MODIFICATIONS and NO PATCHES! There are no 
memory conflicts because we moved the screen up 
above FLEX which leaves the lower 48K free for 
user programs. 

What you end up with is 48K for user programs, 
8K for FLEX and another 8K above FLEX for the 
screens and stuff. We have a multi screen 
format so you can page backward to see what 
scrolled by and a Hi-Res screen that will enable us 
to have 24 lines by 42 character display is on the 
way. That's better than an Apple! 

We also implemented a full function keyboard, 
with a control key and escape key. All ASCII codes 
can now be generated from the Color Computer 
keyboard! 

We also added some bells and whistles to Radio 
Shack's Disk system when you're running FLEX or 
OS-9. We are supporting single or double sided, 
single or double density, 35, 40 and 80 track drives. 
If you use double sided drives, the maximum is three 
drives because we use the drive 3 select for side 
select. When you are running the Radio Shack disk, 
it will work with the double sided drives but it will 
only use one side and only 35 tracks. Using 80 track 
drives is okay, but will not be compatible with 
standard Radio Shack software. You can also set 
each drive's stepping rate and drive type. (SS or DS 
- SD or DD) 



was designed so that the roms in the system could 
be turned off under software control. In a normal 
Color Computer this would only make it go away. 
However, if you put a program in memory to do 
something first (like boot in FLEX or OS-9), when 
you turn off the roms, you will have a full 64K RAM 
System with which to run your program (FLEX or OS- 
9). When the roms are turned off, it is as if you had 
removed them from the computer. They are gone! 

Now, we need the other half of the 64K ram chips 
to work, and this seems to be the case most of the 
time, as the article states. Of course, you could also 
put 64K chips in. 

Some neat utilities are included. 

MOVEROM moves Color Basic from ROM to RAM. 
Because it's moved to RAM you can not only access 
it from FLEX, you can run it and even change it!! 
You can load Color Computer cassette software and 
save it to FLEX disk. Single Drive Copy, Format 
and Setup commands are also included. 

Installing FLEX is simple. Insert the disk and type: 

RUN "FLEX" 

That's all there is to it! You are now up and running 
in the most popular operating system for the 6809. 
There are hundreds of software packages now runn- 
ing under the FLEX system. Open your Color Com- 
puter to a whole new world of software with FLEX. 

FLEX $99.00 

NEW LOW PRICE INCLUDES OVER 25 UTILITIES! 

FLEX Editor $ 50.00 

FLEX Assembler $ 50.00 

FLEX Standard BASIC $ 65.00 

FLEX Extended Business BASIC $100.00 
Other languages available include; FORTH, Pascal, 
Fortran77, 'C,' plus more. 

Application packages include; A/R, G/L, A/P, Inven- 
tory, Electronic Spreadsheets, Accounting, 
Database programs and more. SEND FOR LIST. 

TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER COMPLETE WITH 64K 
RAM, 24K ROM, SINGLE DISK DRIVE AND FLEX, 
SET UP AND READY TO RUN FOR ONLY $1,375. In- 
cludes 60 day extended warranty. If you have a Com- 
puter, call about RS disk controllers and drives. 



FRANK HOGG LABORATORY, INC. 

130 MIDTOWN PLAZA • SYRACUSE NEW YORK 13210 • (315)474-7856 



Page 



the ROINBO* 



HOY, 1982 



JARBCODE (Froi Page W) 



"Y" or "YES." The computer will then 
encode the message and present the 
code on the screen. If the coded 
version is too large to be handled on 
the screen, the computer will pause 
so you can copy that portion of the 
code down. Press < ENTER > to 

continue. 

When you have copied the code to a 
piece of paper, press <ENTER>. You 
will be returned to the Main Menu. 

The format for coded messages is: 

1. The first quote mark shows 
the beginning of a coded character. 

2. The number is the number 
component of a coded character. 

3. The dash is a separator. 

4. The letter is the 
character portion of the coded 
character. 

5. The next quote is the end 
of a coded character. Quote marks do 
not have to be written down. 

Codes will look like this: 25-B 
20-; 2-F etcetera. 

The Decoding process is also 
selected from the Main Menu. Again, 
you must select the type message you 
are receiving. In this case, we are 
using straight numerical code. 

Once you tell the 80C that you are 
using straight numerical code, it 



will ask for the code key. The 
computer wi 1 1 set up an array -far 
decoding and will display a message 



for entering the 
have read this 
< ENTER >. 

Now you enter ei 
time. You type 
comma, and the 



message, 



□nee you 
press 



ch code pair at t 
in the number, c 
letter. If th« 



"letter" is a punctuation mark, it 
must be enclosed in quotes. Each 
letter will show as it is decoded. 
When you have finished, type "00, ZZ" 
and the entire message will be 
displayed. 

There is no limit to the length of 
a message to be decoded. However, 
take care that it does not scroll off 
the screen before you copy it down. 

We hope you enjoy JfiRBCODE. 
And we hope you have lots of secrets 
to keep you busy coding! 

The listing: 



1 CLS8 

2 DATA 10,1.18,2,3,15.4,5,2,25,1 
8,1,18,2,32,19,15.6,20,23,1,18,5 

3 F0RI=1T08:READA:P0KE1164+I,A:N 
EXTl:F0RI=lT02:READA:P0lffl231+I, 
A:ICXTI:F0R1=1T013:READA:P0KE129 
»+I,A:NEXTI 



™TRS80 color 



From the January 1961 issue ol the CSRA Computer 
Club newsletter: 

There was some amusement at the Novem- 
ber meeting when the Radio Shack repre- 
sentatives stated that the software in the 
ROM cartridges could not be copied. This 
month's 68 Micro Journal reported they had 
disassembled the programs on ROM by 
covering some ol the connector pins with 
tape. They promise details next month. Never 
tell a hobbyist something can't be done! This 
magazine seems to be the only source so tar 
of technical informations on the TRS-80 color 
computer ". Devoted to SS-50 6800 and 
6809 machines up to now. 68 Micro Journal 
plans to include the TRS-80 6809 unit in 
future issues. 

NOTE: This and other interesting and needed articles 
for the Radio Shack TRS-80 color computer 9 are being 
included monthly in 68 Micro Journal— The Largest 
specialty computer magazine in the world! 

68 MICRO JOURNAL 

5900 Cassandra Smith Road 
Hixson, Tennessee 37343 
615 842-4600 





Subscription Rates 



USA: 1-year $24.50; 
CANADA and MEXICO: 
Foreign Surf sea: 
Foreign AIRMAIL: 



2-year $42.50; 3-year $64.50 
Add $5.50 per year to USA Price 
Add $12.00 per year to USA Price 
Add $36.00 per year to USA Price 



68 Micro Journal* was established with one objective in 
mind; to provide a Magazine FOR 68xx Users BY 68xx 
Users. Because of a strict advertiser policy, 68 Micro 
Journal" has gained a strong following WORLDWIDE 
because the reader KNOWS what he is getting when 
purchasing from a 68 Micro Journal" Advertiser. It has 
gained a strong User fol lowing because most of the 
material published is contributed BY USERS, and, 
therefore. Is relevant to the Users needs. 

Currently, and even before the Color Computer - hit the 
stores, 68 Micro Journal" was devoting more space to 
the TRS-80C Color Computer" and information concerning 
the Motorola 6809 (which is the CPU in the Color 
Computer") than ANY OTHER Computer Maga/lne . Examples 
include: 

REVIEWS of the three major Disk Control Systems for 
the Color Computer", most of the Monitors, 
Assemblers, and Disassemblers, Word Processors and 
Editors, "Terminal" Programs (for use with Modems, 
Communications with other Computers, etc.), and of 
course. Games. 

HINTS for Expanding Memory, Power Supply Cooling, re- 
pairing sticky keyboards, disabling the ROM PAK "Take 
Over 1 ', hooking up to Printers, etc. 
DISCUSSIONS of the 6883 Synchronous Address 
Multiplexer, using the Color Computer" with 64K and 
96K memory (which it is ALREADY capable of handling), 
thoughts on Programming, etc. 

I suggest that you subscribe to 68 Micro Journal", SOON, 
as many back issues are sold-out. 

We still, and will continue to, lead in the type 
information you need to FULLY UTILIZE the POWER of the 
6809 In tne Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer". 




Sob Nay i 
Color Computer Editor 



** Sample issue - $3.50 



MHY, 1982 



the RAINBOH 



Page 53 



4 F0RI=1 T0255STEP5 : SOUNDI , 1 : NEXT 
I:FORI=1TO200:NEXTI:FORI=255TO1S 
TEP-5:S0UNDI.l:NEXTI 

5 FORI=0TO3(W:NEXTI :SOUND100, 2:S 
0UHD1 16, 2 : SOUND 130, 2 :S0UND1 40, 4: 
SOUND100. 2 sSOUNDl 40, 6 :F0RI= I TO20 
0:NEXTI 

S CLEAR25ft:DIMA$<59).A<26>,B<25 
) : R 1 =0 : RM«= ' ■ : FOR I = I T 023: READ'S : N 
EXTI:CLS0 

7 FORH=0TO63:SET(H,0,8)sSETfH,31 
,8):NEXTH:FOR'.'=1TO30:SET'0,V,8): 
ST(63.,V,8):SET(l,V,8i:SET(62,V, 
8):HEXTV 

8 FORH=11TO20:SET(H.8,2):NEXTH:F 
ORH=41TO50:SET(H,8,2!:NEXTH 

? E=1I25:EE=1140 

10 'HHHmimHHHIHIHH 

11 '* JARBCODE * 
12 '» ORIGINALLY WRITTEN * 

13 '* EY * 

14 '* JOSEPH EARL BENNETT * 

15 '* ADAPTED FOR THIS USE * 

16 '* ON JAN. 10,1981 » 

17 '* WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF * 

18 HARRY DAVID STOW * 
1<? '» FOR JARE. SOFTWARE * 

20 ' mm********************* 

21 PRINT3238," " ! :PRINTS269, ■ 
* * "! 

22 F0RH=14T047:SET(H,19,2):SET(H 
,22,3):NEXTHsF0RV=19T022:SET!14, 
, . I ,3):SET(15,V,3):SET(46,V,3):SET 
<47,V,3):NEXTV 

23 F0RH= 1 1 TO20: SET ( H , 5 , 2 ) : NEXT : F 
0RH=41 TO50: SET <H , 5 . 2 ) :NEXT : FORV= 
6T07:SET( 1 1 ,V, 2) :SET(20, 7.2) :S£T 
(41.V,2!:SET!50,V,2):NEXT:AI=" 

24 A*=At+" WRITTEN BY JOSEPH E. ! 
ENNETT— COPYRIGHT 1981 JARB SOF 
TWARE— ADAPTED WITH THE ABLE AS 
SISTANCE OF HARRY D. STOW— THIS 

PROGRAM DEDICATED TO COMPUTER W 
IDOWS EVERYWHERE — *+" 

■ 

25 FORA=1TOLEN(A«)-15:E1=E1+1MF 
ED4THENSOSUB60 

16 PRINT3328,MID$(A*,A,15!i 

27 POKEE+E 1 , 239 : P0KEEE+E1 , 239 : SO 
UNDRND ( 240 ) , 1 : P0KEE+E1 , 123: POKEE 
E+E1.I28 

28 NEXTA:S0UND1,4:S0UND255,1:S0U 
ND1.4 

29 A$= ,, :A=0:A1»=CHR*(128)+CHR»( 
128)+CHR»(128)+CHR»(128)+CHRt(12 
8)+CHR$(128) 

30 PRINT369,Al«i:PRINT384,Al«;:P 
RINT3101,Alt;:PRINT3U6.Alt;:Alt 
=" " :FORI=lTO150e:NEXT:CLS0 



31 DATA 16,18,5,45,9,14,9,20,9,1 
,12,9,24,9,14.7,32,22,1.18,9,1,2 
,12,5,19,2,5,32,23,9,20,8,32,25, 
15,21,32,9,14,32,1,32,13,15,13,5 
,14,20 

32 FORI=0TO25:READZ:POKE1251+I.Z 
:NEXTI:FORI=0TO22:READZ:POKE1284 
+I,Z:NEXTI 

33 gosue.62 

34 a= : PRINT :PRINT : PRINTTAB< 11)' 
MAIN MENU" 

35 L1$= ,, :C«= , ":C1*=":M1$=":M« 
=■■ 

36 Z$='*:PL=0 

37 PRINT: PRINT 

38 PRINTTAB(5)"1. CODE CHOICES" 

39 PRINTTAB(5)"2. ENCODING MES3A 
GES* 

40 PRINTTAB(5i'3. DECODING MESSA 
GES' 

41 PRINTTAE(5S*4. RECALL LAST ME 
SSAGE" 

42 PRINTTAB(5)'5. END PROGRAM" 

43 PRINT: PRINT : PRINTTAE ( 5 ) ' PRESS 
YOUR CHOICE" 

44 FORH=0TO63STEP2:SET(H,0,8) :SE 
TiH,31.8!:NEXTH 

45 FORVMTO30STEP2:SET(0,y,8) :SE 
T(63,V,8):NEXTV 

46 POKE1431. 127:D$=INKEY*:S0UND1 
80. 1 :FORI=0TO30:NEXTI :P0KE1431 , 1 
43:FORI=0TO40:NEXTI ' 

47 IFD«=""THEN46 

48 D=VAL(DI) 

49 IFD=1THEN162 

50 IFD=2THEN122 

51 IFD=3THEN70 

52 IFD=4THEN219 

53 IFD=5THEN61ELSE54 

54 PRINT3456." *; 

55 FORA9=0TO50:NEXTA9 

56 PRINT3456, "INVALID RESPONSE"; 

57 SOUND225,l:FORA9=0TO40:NEXTA9 

58 Z 1 = 2 1 + 1 : 1 F2 1 > =1 0THEN59ELSE54 

59 Z1=0:PRINT3456. " 
" i :60T046 

60 El=l:E=1125:EE=1140:RETURN 

61 as: END 

62 FORA=32TO90:A»=A*+CHR»(A):NEX 
TA 

63 A$(E)=A*:B=E+1 

64 B$=MID»(A$,2.58)-HEFTt(A»,l) 

65 SOUNDRND(200),1 

66 SET(RND(63),RND(12),RND(8!):S 
ET(RND(63),RND(13)+18,RND(8)) 

67 IFB>25THEN69ELSE68 

68 A»=B$:GOT063 

69 FORI=0TO10B0 :NEX T : RETURN 

70 CLS: PRINTTAE (7!" DECODING A ME 
SSAGE" 

71 Mlt="" 

(Continued on next page) 



Page 54 the RfilHBOH 

JARBCODE (Froi Page 53) 

72 mmmm mm =0:nexta? : pr 

INT ! PR I NT* PLEASE ENTER YOUR CHOI 
CE:' 

73 PRINT' 1.- STRAIGHT NUMERICAL S 
EQUENCE" 

74 PRINT'2. ADDITIVE NUMERICAL S 
EQUENCE" 

75 PRINT'3. USER CHOSEN SEQUENCE 

76 PRINT 1 *. RETURN TO MENU' 

77 PRINT:PRINT"PRESS NUMBER OF Y 
OUR CHOICE. "S 

78 Z«=IIKEY*:SOiJNDI8B, 1 :FORI=OT0 
J»:NEXTI:IFZ»="'THEN78 

79 IFZ*< ' 1 mm ' 4" THEN80ELSE84 
30 as :FCRA9=aTO10: SGUND1 99, 1 : PR 
INT8226." INVALID ENTRY. TRY A6AI 
N. ' 

81 FORA7=0TO28!NEXTA7 

82 mmMAMm^m^. i • 

' :FORA7=0TO20: 

NEXTAr«OWHSBl. J 

S3 NEXTA?:60TO?8 

8* TC=VAL(H5:0N TC GOTO 35,109, 

115,51 

85- IS :Mlt=" ' : PRINTTAE HW DECOD 
E:" 

84 PRINTTAE' 2 ! * STRAIGHT NUMERICA 
L SEQUENCE" 

r PRIilT:PR»IT'PLEASE ENTER THE 

■HE mm KEY* ; 

38 PRINT" (YOU MUST HAVE THE COR 

FECT I EY" spRINT'TO DECODE YOUR M 

ESSASE V: PRINT: INPUTM 

89 FORA9=0TO25 : K2=K 1 +A°: A ( A9 ) =K2 

'•MEXTA9 

°3 CIS : PRINTTAE* 4 ) ' ARRAY ASSIGNM 
EMT COMPLETE" : PRINT PRINT'ENTER 
CODE AS WRITTEN ? MUM, CHAR)*; 
51 PRINT'SEPAPATE EACH NUMBER FR 
OM EACH" 

°2 RRI NT" CHARACTER WITH A COMMA. 

=3 PRINT: PFINT'EXAMPLE: 214,2" :P 
RINT 

5'i PRINT'ENTER ONLY ONE NUMBER. C 
HARACTEP" : PRINT'PAIR AT A TIME." 
3 5 PRINTJPRINT'MHEH READY, PRESS 
'ENTER) KEY' i : INPUTZ* 

97 as 

98 PRINT: PRINT'ENTER NUMBER, CHAP 
ACTER" 

99 PRINT" IF CHARACTER IS A PUNCT 
UATIQN" :PRINT"KARK< ENCLOSE IT I 
N QUOTES. ' 

100 PRINT-EXAMPLE: 21,'+CHRt(34) 
+ " . * +CHR$ i 2 * ) : PR I NT ■ UHEN MESSAGE 

IS DONE, ENTER' '.PRINT' (00, ZZ) T 
0 SIGNIFY COMPLETION. ' ; 

101 INPUTN1.L1* 



MM, 1982 

102 IFL1$="ZZ"THEN107 

103 FORA9=0TO25:IF A<A9)=N1 THEN 
104 ELSE NEXTA9 

104 F0RA8= 1 T058 : L2*=MID$ ( A$ < A9) . 
A8, 1 5 : IFL2$=L1*THEN105ELS£NEXTA8 

105 Mlt=Ml$+MID$(A$(0),A8.l) 

106 aS:PRINT3B,Ml*:S0T098 

107 CLS:PRINT30,Mlt 

10S PPINT'HHEN READY TO RETURN T 
0 MENU' : INPUT" PRESS <ENTER>' >!%'■ 
G0T034 

m aS:PRINTTAB.(13) , DEC0DE:':PR 
INTTAB<2!"ADDITIVE NUMERICAL SEQ 
UENCE" :MH=" 

1 10 FORA9=0TO25:A(A9>=0:WEXTA9 

111 PRINT: INPiJT'PLEASE ENTER STA 
RT HEY NUMBER' ;SK 

112 INPUT" NOU ENTER ADDITIVE KEY 
NUMBER' :AK 

1 1 3 FOR A9=0TO25 : A ( A9 ) =SK : SK=SK+ A 
K:NEXTA9 

114 SOTO90 

115 CLS:M1$= ,, :PRINTTAB(12)'DEC0 
DE:':PRINTTAB(1)'U=ER CHOSEN NUM 
ERICAL SEQUENCE' 

116 PRINT:PR1NT"Y0U MUST HAVE TH 
E COMPLETE KEY" :PRINT" (26 NUMBER 
S! TO DECODE A MESSAGE";: PR I NT' I 
H THIS SECTION" 

117 PRINT'DO YOU HAVE THE COMPLE 
TE KEY": INPUT" ( YES/NO) ";Z$ 

113 IFLEFT$(Z«.1X>"Y'THEN34 
11<? CLS: PRINT "OKAY. NOW UE CAN B 
EG IN." 

1 20 F0RA9=8T025 :0=0+l '.PRINT ' ENTE 
R KEY NUMBER #"0; : INPUTN1 :A<A9)= 
Nl:aS:NEXTA9 

121 SOTO90 

122 PL=0:Z*="":aS:Ml$="':PRINTT 
ABOi'ENCODE MESSA6ES':PRINT:PRI 
NT'HAVE YOU CHOSEN A CODE YET (Y 
,N)'i 

123 Z*=INKEY»:SOUND180. 1 :FORI=0T 
O30:NEXTI:IFZ*=""THEH123 

124 IFZ$=*Y"0RZ$="N"THEN126 

125 aS:PRINT3224, "INVALID RESPO 

NSE, TRY AGAIN * :FORI=8TO30s 

SOUND170tI,l:NEXTI:GOT0122 

126 IFZ«="N"THEM162 

127 IFRKMTHEN128ELSE129 

128 PRINT'THAT IS INCORRECT. YOU 
HAVE NOT':PPINT"CHOSEN YOUR COD 
E YET!!':FORA9=1TO8:SOUND180.2:S 
OUND190, 1 :SOUND200,2:NEXTA9:FORI 
=1TO960:NEXTI:GOTO162 

129 PRINT:PRINT"ENTER MESSAGE iN 
UMBERS. LETTERS, ";:PRINT" AND PUN 
CTUATION ARE OKAY)" :PRINT"ENTER 
A ( A ) TO END MESSAGE. ' 

130 PRIHT:PRINT 

131 Ml*="*" 

(CovtitaH on P*}« i6) 



1962 



the RdlNBOM 



Page 55 



XF YOU OOM* T E-3«V 
TIME TO CREfiTE 
V O LI R O W N C O L_ O R 
COMPUTER GQME 
THEM TRY 




FEATURES SEVEN 

PREDESIGNED TARGETS 

INCLUDING: 

Coram uri ist flags 
Television sets 
Wha 1 es 

K i 1 ler tomatoes 
Smiley faces 

and 
CATS! ! ! ! ! 



OR 

Design your own 
' invade) — like' 
targets with just 
a few strokes of 
the keyboard. 
Get even with the 
things which bug 
you the most by 
blasting marching 
rows of t hern with 

CREOTOVODER. 



18.95 





THIS IS THE GOME EVERY COLOR 
COMPUTER OWNER WILL WONT OS 
PORT OF HIS OR HER SOFTWORE 
COLLECTION. 

OVOILOBLE ON! Y E ROM 



illustrated memory banks 

P.O.BOX 289 

WILLIAMSTOWN, MA. 01267-0289 



TEL413-663-9648 



leKif^oHI-RESOLUTION GAMES 

GATOR ZONE 



THE FIRST ANTI-PREPPY COMPUTER GAME 
WHERE YOU'LL FIGHT OR LOSE YOUR SHIRT? 



18.95 

**SOFTWORE OUTHORS WELCOMED** 



Page 56 

JARBCODE (Fro* Page 56) 

132 H$=INKEY$ 

133 PRINT: 



13* IFM«="THEN132 

135 IFM*='*'THEN143 

136 IFASCi Mt i <32THEN132 

137 M1*=M1«+N$ 

133 RM=1 :Rf»=MI«:PL=PL+l : IFPL>=2 
25HCN129ELSE142 

139 as: PRINT 'SORRY, BUT YOUR ME 
SSAGE IS TOO': PRINT' LONG. PLEASE ' 

IT EACH SECTION" sFRINT'OF ME 
TO APPROXIMATELY 225":PRIN 
T" CHARACTERS OR LESS.":PRINT"PRE . 
SS ANY KEY TO BEGIN AGAIN." 

140 Z«=INKEY«: IFZ*=' 'THEN! 40 
HI Nlt=":PL=0:aS:SOTOi:° 

142 PRINT3256 . HI « : G0TO1 32 

143 PRINT" IE THIS CORRECT?* s PRIM 
TM1«:IMPUT"YES/N0';Z$ 

144 IFLEFTtdt.UO'Y'THENHSELS 
El 46 

145 PRINT'SORRY. LET'S TRY AGAIN 
." :FORA9=0TO60B:NEXTA9:GOTO122 

146 PRINT'GOOD, LET'S G>) ON THEN 
.':FORA9=0TO6B0:NEXTA9 

147 as 

146 F0RA9=1T0LEM(MU! :C$=MIB$(M1 
».A9,1! 

149 C1=ASC!C«)-31 

150 A8=fiND(25! 

151 C2t=A$(A8) 

152 C1«=NID$(A»(A8!.C1.1) 

153 C2=A(A9) 

154 IFC1$=CHR*'34!THEH150 

155 IFC1$=CHR$!22)THEN150 

156 SOUNDRND(250<,1 

157 PRINTCHR* ( 34 ) +RIGHT* (STR* ! C2 
}.LEH<:STR$!C2>!-l!+"-"+Clt+CHR$! 
34!+' "! 

158 PL=PEEK f 1 408) : PL 1 =PEEK( 1 409 ) 
:PL2=PEEK( 1410) : IFPL=9*AMDPL1=96 
AHDPL2= <3 6THEH 1 60EL3E 1 59 

159 PRINT SPRINT" TO CONTINUE. PRES 
3 'ENTER) KEY * ; : I HP"JTI t : CLS : PR I N 
T" ENCODING CONTINUES " 

160 NEXTA9 

161 PRINT: PRINT'ENCODING COMPLET 
E'ilWJT'WCN READY PRESS (ENTER 
>"iI«:50T034 

162 CLS:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINTT 
AB(10)"CODE CHOICES' :PRINTTAB(14 
("MENU" 

163 Z1=0 

164 PRINT s PRINTTAI ( 2 > * 1 . STRAIGH 
T NUMERICAL CODE" 

165 PRINTTAB(2)'2. ADDITIVE NUNE 
RICAL CODE" 

166 PRINTTABi2)"3. USER ASSIGNED 
CODE" 

167 PRINTTAE(2)"4. RETURN TO HEN 
IT 



the RfilNBOH 

16 8 PR I NT : PRINTTAB ( 5 ) * PRESS YOUR 
CHOICE" i 

169 FORH=0TO63STEP2:SET!H,0,8):S 
ET ( H, 31 , 8) :NEXTH:F0RV=1 TO30STEP2 
:SET(0,V,9):SET(63,V,8):NEXTV ' 

170 Z$=INKEY$:P0KE1399,127 

171 IFZ$=""THEN173 

172 IFZ «< ' 1 ' ORZ $> " 4 ' TFEN 1 74ELSE1 
. 76- 

173 FORI=0TO40:NEXTI:POKE1399,14 
• : 3:FORI=0TO40:NEXTI : EOUND32, 1 :GOT 

0170: 

174 PRINTS422." 

! :FORA9=0TO40:NEXTA9:SOUND200, 1 : 
SOUND205,l:PRINTa422." INVALID RE 
SPONSE" ; :FORA9=0TO40:NEXTA9: Z1=Z 
1 + 1 : IF Z 1 > 1 0THEN 1 75ELSE 1 74 

175 PRINTJ422." 
'i:Zl=fl:GGTO170 

176 A1=VAL(Z*):0N Al GOTO177.190 
.204,34 

177 CLS ! PR INTTAB ( 3 i ' STRAIGHT NUM 
ERICAL SEQUENCE" : PRINT :PRINT"ENT 
ER THE START NUMBER OF YOUR":PRI 
NT" CODE SEO'JENCE (ANY NUMBER)';: 
INPUTS 1 

178 Rl=l 

T9 CLS : PRIMT'DETERMINING SEQUEN 

CE ":FORA9=0TO25!A(A9)= 

B1+A9:S0UNDRMD(25B) . 1 :NEXTA9 
130 FORA9=0TO480:NEXTA9:CLS 

181 PRINT" IS THIS SEQUENCE SATIS 
FACTORY'" 

182 FORA9=0TO25 : PRINT A ( A9 ) i sNEXT 
A9 I 

183 PRINTsPRINT'PRESS (Y/N) TO C 
ONTINUE"; 

164 Z»=IHKEY*IFZ«=""THEN184 

185 IFZ$="N"THEN188 

186 IFZ«="Y"THEN189 

187 FORI=1TO10:SOUND17O.2:SOUND1 
<?0. 1SSOUND200,2:NEXTI:GOTO194 

188 as: PRINT'SORRY, LET'S TRY A 

GAIN' :FORA9=0TO5B0:NEXTA9:GOTO17 
7 

189 aSsPRINT'RETURNING TO MAIN 
MENU. 1 :FORI=0TO20:SOUNDRND( 100) , 
l:rEXTI:G0T034 

190 aS:PRINTTAB(3)"ADDITIVE NUM 
ERICAL SEQUENCE ': PR INT : PRINT' ENT 
ER THE START NUMBER OF YOUR' :PRI 
NT" SEQUENCE (ANY NUMBER) ';: INPUT 
Bl 

191 INPUT'NOU ENTER THE ADDITIVE 
VALUE' iB2 

192 Rl=l 

193 as SPRINT' DETERMINING SEQUEN 

CE ':FORA9=0TO25:A(A9)= 

El :B1=B1+B2:SOUNDRND(250) , 1 :NEXT 
A9 

194 FORA9=0TO4B0:NEXTA9 

195 as SPRINT' IS THIS SEQUENCE S 
ATISFACTORY?" 



1962 



196 FORA9=0TO25:PRINTA(A9)S sNEXT 
A9 

197 PRINTsPRINT'PRESS (Y/N)' TO C 
ONTINUE' ! 

198 Zt=INKEY*:IFZ$="THEN198 - 

199 IFZ*="N"THEN203 

200 IFZ«="Y"THEN189 

201 FORI=ITO10:SOUND170,2:S(iUNDl 
90, I:SOUND200,2:NEXTI:GOTO198 

202 IFLEFT«(Z*,1)O"Y"THEN203ELS 
E204 

203 as SPRINT" SORRY, LET'S TRY A 
GAIN. " : FORA9=0TO500: NEXTA9: G0T01 
90 ■ 

204 aS:PRINTTAB(5)"USER ASSIGNE 
D SEQUENCE" : PR INT: PRINT "ENTER TH 
E REQUIRED SET OF" : PRINT'NUMBERS 

(26 OF THEM) ON REQUEST' 

205 PRINT'URITE THEM DOWN FOR FU 
TURE USE' 

206 FORA9=0TO25:PRINT'NUMBER'A9+ 
l'='i:INPiJTEl:SOUND200,l:A(A9)=B 
l:B(A9)=Bl 

207 IFA9>0THEN208ELS£209 

208 FORI=0TOA9-l:IF A(A9)=B(I) T 
HEN 217 aSE NEXTI 

209 NEXTA9: PRINT: PRINT' INPUT OF 
KEY NUMBERS COMPLETE' 

210 FORA9=0TO500:NEXTA9:aS:PRIN 
T"IS THIS SEQUENCE SATISFACTORY? 
' :F0RA9=8T025:PRINTA( A9) ; :NEXTA9 
: PRINTsPRINT'PRESS (Y/N) TO CONT 
INUE'; 

211 Rl=l 

212 Z$=IMKEY$:IFZ$='"THEN212 

213 IFZ$='N'THEN216 

214 IFZ«='Y'THEN189 

215 FORI=1TO10:SOUND170,2:SOUND1 
90, 1 :SOUND200,2:NEXTI:GOTO212 

216 aSsPRINT'SORRY, LET'S TRY A 
GAIN. ' :FORA9=0TO500:NEXTA9:GCTO2 
64 

217 aS:PRINT' YOU HAVE REPEATED 
A NUMBER THAT' i: PRINT'HAS ALREA 

DY BEEN ENTERED. PLEASE"!: PRINT' 

PRESS ANY KEY TO START RE-ENTRY. 
■ ■ 

218 Z»=INKEY*:SOUND150,l:FORI=0T 
033SNEXTI: IFZ*="THEN218ELSE204 

219 aS:IFRM=lTHEN223 

220 PRINT3230. "NO MESSAGE IN MEM 
ORY. * : PRINT : PRINTT AB ( 4 ) ■ PRESS AN 
Y KEY TO RETURN." 

221 Z!=INKEY«:SOUND150,2:SOUND17 
5, 1 :SOUND200,2:FORI=1TO30: NEXTI : 
IFZ»="THEN221 

222 60T034 

223 PRINTT AB(3)"LAST MESSAGE IS 
AS FOLLOWS: ":PRINT:PRINTRM$ 

224 PRINT:PRINT"PRESS ANY KEY TO 
RETURN. ' 

225 Z«=INKEY$:IFZ$= ,, THEN225 

226 601034 



MM, 1982 



the R til HBO M 



Page 57 



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924 MODEMS 

Lynx Direct Connect Ml/Mill 
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HOY, 1982 



the ROINBOH 



CORRECT" I OIM! 



Nothing worse t 
correction. . .but her 
The correction on 
April issue should 
Page 20, Column 1, 
have been started 
than with " 0". 

Some of you wi 1 1 
1 ast Q* statement 
March SKY-EYE pr 
beginning of Line 
quote at the end 
Also in Line 44, 
■P" in the B* to a 
Alexander Ornstein 
Hills, MI, for this 



han correcting a 
e one is: 

Page 2 of the 
have said that 
Line 500 should 
with "500" rather 

have to put the 
of Line 44 in the 
□gram at the 
45 and add a close 
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change the letter 
"B". Thanks to 
of Farmington 
catch. 



WATCH OUT FOR 
FAUI — TV DISK OR I VI 

Radio Shack reports that some 80C 
disk drives have experienced som 
problems. 

Check the serial number of yo 
drive. If the number is below 

004751, and it does not have a 
marking of "6" or "D" on it, return 
the drive to your local service 
department . 

We are advised that there is no 
cost for this repair. 

There have been some rumors about 
different colored dots on the bottom 
of the drives. Radio Shack says, 
however, that this should be the way 
to check. 



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Aardvark 80 16 

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B. Erickson 44 

Cer-Coip 14, 42 

Chroiasette BC 

Cliff 5 Color Corner 50 

Cognitec 38 

Color Computer News 32 

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Coiputer Island 8 

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80-U.S. Journal 58 

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Hanonycs 48 

Hogg, Frank Laboratory 51 

Illustrated Meiory Banks 55 

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Micro-80 43 

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