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5803 Timber Ridge Drive • Prospect, KY 40059 



VOL. I NUMBERS 





i;ifi!:i!f!ffnii!iSini;!!Hs 



Editor's Not 




11** = 



i i = S 



a 




I IMT 



I think that the best single thing 
about being able to combine the 
computer and publishing business is 
the people He get to "meet." Now. 
understand that we have "met" none of 
them by this writing. and if we 
passed one another on the street we 
wouldn't even know it. but we have 
"met" one another all the same. 

You may notice that we do not 
carry articles about the various 
software houses and the people who 
run them. That's not because we 
don't admire them — one and all — 
but it is simply because we think 
you'd rather we devote our space to 
things you can use — programs, 
reviews, hints and tips — than to 
saying how So-and-So Software came to 
be formed. 

Still. I think there are a lot of 



The Monthly Magazine lor Color Computer Users 



UNDER the RAINBOW 



V— 



Disc 

uild A De 
tucatio 



Ta 
Ani 
Din 



tion 



ctory 



1 Map 

e Aid! 



view 



And. ..MUCH MORE!! 



And».An EXCLUSIVE First Look At: 



1 1 



See Pa9e 42 



great people out there, and I hope 
you'll let me bend your ear for a few 
moments for some observations about 
them.. .and the Color Computer 
business in general. 

Ron Krebs of hark Data Products 
and I were talking just the other day 
about one interesting point 

concerning the Color Computer: That 
is that darn few of the people who 
are writing software for CoCo are the 
same as those who wrote for the Model 
I (or the Apple, for that matter). 
The "big" names in micros — people 
like Scott Adams, Dennis Kistz, Bill 
Bar den — are pretty much missing 
from the CoCo world. 

They've been replaced by people 
like Ron, and Tom Mix, Joe Bennett, 
Howard Cohen, Dennis Lewandowski, 



(Continued on Page 11) 



<K 2 



LETTEKS TO 




▲ 





ELECTRIC NEWS 

Editor: 

I live in a country where the 
current is 220 valts/50 Hz. I have 
no difficulty stepping down to 110, 
but stuck with SO Hz. Before I 
left the U.S., I called Radio Shack 
and asked thee if I could step down 
to SO Hz. Their reply: It couldn't 
be done, I'd have to buy a European 
MChine. 

I thought I'd try it anyway, and 
I'a happy to say iy CC is huaaing 
along with no difficulties, eating up 
its 110/50. (By the nay, I 
force-cool ay CC, I figure all the 
heat can't help it.) 

No* the question: Mould CC discs 
work on 50 Hz? How about Hodel I 
discs with the Eiatron Interface? 

Robert Horris 

AaEabassy Yaounde (USICA) 

Department of State 

Nashington 20520 

ROMPACK HELP 

Editor: 

What a tiaely surprise! After I 
installed ay ECB RON , the Deceaber 
issue of the RAINBOW arrived. Hy 
faaily enjoyed playing "Here Cote The 
Vipers." 

I usually enter AUDIO ON before I 
CSAVE a prograa so that I can "hear" 
the data being written. This alerts 
■e when I don't press the record 
button. 

Re R0HPACK BACKUP: I have found a 
■uch safer way that at least works 
with SPACE ASSAULT. Tape over the 
left HON pin, insert the R0HPAK, then 
power up. You'll be in BASIC and 
then you can run the backup prograa. 

An interesting variation to gaae 
packs is to load the taped-over cart, 
POKE to high-speed the computer, and 
then EXEC 49152. You aay need 200ns 
aetory to do this. 
Cater on Price 
Rockland, Ont. 



RANDOM NUMBERS 

Editor: 

First of all, the RAINB0N is the 
only cotputer publication I read frot 
cover to cover. Congr adulations and 
keep up the good work. 

About the Gate Aids prograa. 
Randoa nuabers are a lot easier to 
get than the tethod Nr. Urban has 
described. 

In the eiatple I*INT(RND(0)I10) to 
get a randoa nutber between 0 and 9, 
use X-RND(10)-1. As tentioned in the 
REH-DE-LEET , 
code there is, the longer it takes to 
process a prograa. 

Douglas El kins 
Portland, HE 



Editor: 

I found the 6aae Aids article very 
interesting, but there is an error in 
the dice-throwing algoritha which I 
would like to correct. You presented 
the sequence for throwing three dice 
as: 

XsRNDUB) 

However, this does not give the 
saae result as throwing three dice. 
Your routine yields a nuaber between 
3 and 18, with any nuaber having 
equal probability (which for the 
purpose it is being used is fine), 
but in a throw of three dice, while a 
nuaber between 3 and 18 is produced, 
all do not have an equal probability 
of occurrance. 

Rather, there is only one 
coabination that will produce a 3 or 
an 18 (three V% or three 6's) but 
there are 27 coabi nations that can 
fori a 10 or 11 (for ten, 3, 1, 6; 4, 
1, 5; 2, 2, 6; etc.). Altogether, 
there are 216 coabinations of three 
dice. Therefore, the probability of 
throwing a 3 or an IB is 1 in 216 
(.00461) whereas the chance for a 10 
or 11 is 27 of 216 (or .1251). This 



■akes a big difference in how the 
gaae runs if one has to throw an 18 
as in Line 505. The easy way to 
correctly throw the dice is: 

X=RND(6)*RND(6)+RND(6) 

Of course, if equal probabilities 
between 3 and 18 are desired, the 
prograa runs fine as published. 

Charles Styer 
Tift on, 6A 

Editor: 

You cannot siaulate the roll of 
three dice by a randoa nuaber 
between 3 and 18. The frequency 
distribution would be way off. 

To siaplify this, take the roll of 
two dice. The average frequency of 
36 rolls would be: 

Nuaber Frequency 

2 1 

3 2 

4 3 



6 5 

7 6 
B 5 

9 4 

10 3 

11 2 

12 1 

A randoa nuaber between 2 through 
12 would five each the saae average 
nuaber. 

Charles C. Norstell 
Auburn, NA 

NEEDS PROGRAMS 

Editor: 

I aa especially interested in 
•ortgage aaoritization and incoae tax 
prograas. Also, do you know of any 
prograas that would allow ae to file 
such things as recipies? 

01 af Johnson 
Otis Orchards, Ml 



tat 3 



DOESN'T LIKE JUMPS 

Editor: 

tfhy do your articles have to skip 
fornrds and backwards at randoa. 
Its like trying to work Rubik'f Cube. 

Reading is usually linear. IYTE 
sets a food exaaple with no juaps in 
any direction. 

Craig Cline 
Caabridge, HA 

(Eds. Note: He think the juaps 
aake the pages look neater and, of 

course, can't fill eapty pages with 
ads because we don't have quite (!) 
as aany as does BYTE, be try to 
elieinate forward juaps, but... how 
aany of you does this bother? He'll 
try to work on it.) 

HIGH SPEED 

Editor: 

I recently asked for soap help in 
getting ay CC to run at high speed. 
You aay recall I had no luck 
installing 2.0 HHz "B" series 6621 
PIAs and 6809 HPU chips — and in 
fact the fast 6B09E aade things 
worse. 

Since then I aanaged to borrow a 
good scope and get Motorola's spec 
sheets on the 6B09E, 6821 and — aost 
iaportant — the 6883 SAN chips. 

The following aay help others who 
have unsuccessfully gone the 
swap-the-chips route. 

The only thing I found with the 
scope was very long and out of spec 
rise and fall tiaes on the clock 
signals. To fix this I reaoved the 
two capacitators I had asked about in 
ay letter. (These are designated C73 
and C75 on the CoCo scheaatic). I 
still would like to know why they 
were put in in the first place. 

With the capacitators reaoved, the 
clock signals squared up nicely and 
the coaputer ran in the high speed 
aode. It does with EITHER the 2.0 
HHz chip or the original 1.0 HHz. 

One reasog for the ability to run 
at l.B HHz 7 with 1.0 HHz rated chips 
is explained in the 6883 spec sheets. 
The coaaand POKE 65495, 'any nuaber" 
puts the SAH in a two-speed aode. 
The speed is address-dependent. When 
addresses $0000 to I7FFF or IFF00 to 
IFF1F are selected, the clock rate is 
switched to the "standard" .89 HHz. 



tfhen other addresses are selected, 
the clock autoaatically switches to 
the faster rate. In this aode, the 
clock is always switching between the 
two speeds, depending on what address 
is put on the address buss. The 
speed increase that we see is due to 
the great aaount of tiae that the 
coaputer is in the high speed address 
areas — where the BASIC ROHs and 
control functions are located. 

The way the CoCo is aeaory aapped, 
all of RAH aeaory and the 
keyboard/joystick 6821 PIA are at 
the slow speed addresses. Changing 
the PIA chips will do no good. The 
saae for RAH chips. 

There are aany possible solutions 
for a particular aachine not working 
at 1.8 HHz, including a "slow" R0H 
but froa what I found, I would try 
reaoving the capacitators first — 
especially if a aachine will run 
internally and only refuse to respond 
to the keyboard and joystick. 
Reaoving the capacitators costs 
nothing -~ in fact, just try 
unsoldering one end of each. 

The next thing would be to try a 
2.0 HHz 68B09E or try swapping 
6809E's with a aachine that works and 
then try capacitator reaoval if 
necessary. 

1 would still like to hear of 
other solutions. 

Rick Krankoski 

Elk Grove Village, IL 



LIKES RAINBOW 
Editor: 

Men I subscribed to the RAINBOW I 
wasn't sure it would be worth the 
aoney. Now, after reading Wayne 
Breen's editorial in the January, 
1982, edition of 80-Hicro about their 
coverage of the Color Coaputer, I aa 
very happy I did. 

Even though 1 didn't know about 
their editorial, when I received the 
RAINBOW and 80-Hicro on the saae day, 
I read RAINBOW first!! 

Another note: Nelson Software has 
finally released their super color 
terainal prograa after aany aonths. 
I don't know how aany coapanies do 
this, but they seea to advertise 
their products and then develop the 
software. I don't know if RAINBOW 
checks their advertisers but I know 
this coapany does this. Their word 



processing prograa with disk 1/0 — 
which has been advertised since 
October — is still being developed. 

Jaaes 6reshae 
Augusta, 6A 

(Ed. Note: He never knowingly 
allow advertising of products which 
are not available for sale and have 
been working on. a prograa to insure 
you that you can be certain of this. 
No advertisaents for this fira have 
appeared in the RAINBOW.) 




Haybe you are aware of yet another 
speedup of the CoCo. 

Running the prograa FOR I s ! to 
10000:NEXT:PRINT *END":END takes 22 
seconds in noraal aode and 16 with 
the "regular" speedup of POKE 
65495.0. 

When you POKE 65497,0 the runtiae 
is reduced to 11 seconds. You POKE 
65496,0 to recover. 

The only drawback to this is that 
you lose coaplete control of the 
keyboard and screen until the second 
POKE, therefore it is good only for 
long calculations where you do not 
need the screen. 

This speedup reduced the tiae it 
took to run CHROHASETTE's ROTATE 
prograa froa about 15 ainutes to 
about seven ainutes. 

By the way, can anyone tell ae how 
you can get an autoaatic wraparound 
at 68 or 72 characters instead of the 
built-in 80 (printer) or 132 (CoCo)? 

Edgar Poulin 
Sherbrooke, Que. 

-CANNED" ROUTINES 

Editor: 

Will soaeone explain (or, better, 
illustrate) how to iapleaent the 
"canned" roputines found in the back 
of "6oing Ahead With Color Basic"? 

I have soae knowledge of asseably 
language principles, but I can't get 
enough together to get these routines 
to work. 

Ralph Coleaan 
Churchville, NY 



Pa9e 4 

Feature Game. • • 

AYEp AYE p AYE . - MY SKY EYE 



That dynamic trio — Illustrated Memory Banks, Drury High School and the 
RAINBOW — bring you another exciting game for fun and frolic this month. 
Its called SKY-EYE and is the creation of Fred B. Scerbo, vice president 
and software author for 1MB and another Drury High student, Robert Dobbert. 

If you recall SNAIL INVADERS from the February issue, then you will 
remember the saga of Dale "Snail" Haggerty, who helped Scerbo with the 
graphics for that game. Not to be outdone, Dobbert, 16, .got busy with 
SKY— EYE. He comments: "Making this was more fun than high school math!" 

Among other things, SKY-EYE features an antimated title card which uses 
the text screen while the graphics screen paints the high-res game field. 
It also has a very rapid joystick control. 



As with all software in the 
RAINBOW, you are authorized to make 
two copies of SKY-EYE for your 
personal use only. No part of this 
program may be reproduced or adapted 
for use with any other program. 

Because it uses a speedup 
routine, do not try to run it until 
all program lines are entered. When 
you save it to tape, type POKE 
65494,0s CSAVE "SKY-EYE" < ENTER >. If 
your computer hangs up on the PLAY 
and SOUND commands, eliminate all the 
POKEs in the program (lines 1, 87, 
89, 91, 94 and 107). Note this 
program also gives four colors in 
PMODE 4,1. 

The plot: SKY-EYE floats above 
the .Big Apple, protecting its people 
from shooting stars which threaten 
the city. Use the right joystick to 
move SKY-EYE back and forth. The 
fire button will cause SKY-EYE to 
detonate. 

If fivt 
city, it 
destroyed 
points. 



shooting stars hit 
will be destroyed . 
shooting star earns 



the 
Each 



«*»»»« 

By the way, are there any other 
students out there writing programs? 
We would like to consider them f 
possible listing in the RAINBOW. 

»»»»»» 

The SKY-EYE Listing: 



1 CLS0 : CLEAR 1 200 : P0KE65495 , 0 : D I M 
A<14), E(13), P$(16) :F0RB=32T022 
4STEP16:A( (B/16)-l )=B:NEXTB 

2 M$<2)="6" :N1=-16:N3=256:F0RK=1 
T016:N1=N1+16:N3=N3-16:M$< 1 )=STR 
$(N1 ) :M$(3)=STR$(N3) 

3 P$<K) = "C0R"+M$< 1 ) + " C5 R " +M$ ( 2 ) + 
■ C0R4C5R" +M$ ( 2 ) +" C0R" +M$ < 3 ) +"UL" 
+M$<3)+"C5L"+M$<2)+"C0L4C5L"+M$< 
2)+"C0L"+M*< 1 ) :NEXTK 

4 SR=3:C=3:P$=CHR$( 128) :F0RI=2T0 
14: FOR J=4T0 1 3 s SET ( J * I, C) :NEXTJ:N 
EXTI 

5 FORK=0TO 1 1 STEP 1 1 : FOR J= 1 8T023 : S 
ET( J+K,2, C) :NEXTJ:F0RJ=17T024:SE 
T( J+K,3, C) :NEXTJ:F0RI=4T014:F0RJ 
=16T025:SET( J+K, I, C) :NEXTJ:NEXTI 
:NEXTK 

6 FORK=0TO7STEP7 : FOR J=39T058 : FOR 
I=2T07:SET( J, I+K,C) : NEXT I :NEXTJ: 
F0RI=3T06:SET(59, I+K,C) :NEXTI :F0 
RI=4T05 : SET (60, I+K, C) sNEXTI sNEXT 
K 

7 PRINT3257, P$; : FOR Y= 1 T028 • READA 
SPRINTCHR$(A) ; sNEXT 

8 DATA105, 108, 108, 117, 115, 116, 11 
4,97, 116, 101, 100, 128, 128, 128, 109 
, 101, 109, 111, 114, 121, 128, 128, 128 
,98,97, 110, 107, 115 

9 PRINT3329,P$; : FOR Y=1T012: READA 
:PRINTCHR$(A) ; :NEXT 

10 DATA98, 111, 110, 117, 115, 128, 12 
8, 128, 103,97, 109, 101 



The lfcK Color 
uith SI or £1 

• 300 or 110 Baud 

• user programmable keys 

• automatic repeat when 
key is held down 

• dump your files to host 

• reverse video 

• partial screen clear 

• 4-way cursor control 



COLORTERM (c) 

Conputer* as an in 
colunns by 21 I ine 

• any data format (commercial 
systems, TSO, bulletins etc.) 

• memory buffer for incoming 
data— save buffer— scroll 
through buffer 

• preserve a "window" of 
any size; new material scrolls 
through remainder of screen. 



telliqent terninal 
s and louer tase! 

• encode data for more secure 
storage 

• macro buffers for often-used 
output 

• patch the 51 or 64 column 
display to your own programs 
running above 9168 (23 DO hex) 

through remainder of screen. 

Cassette and Manual $34. 95 ms.; $40. 95 icm^mj " tUmr mo °* OM 

Martin Consulting, 94 Macalester Bay, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2X5 Canada 

*TM OF TANDY CORP v * 



11 PRINT3399,CHR*(9B)+CHR*(121 ) ; 

12 PRINTS447,P»; : FOR Y«1T032 : READ 
A:PRINTCHR»(A) ; :NEXT:G0T043 

13 DATA102, 114, 101, 100, 128, 115,9 
9,101, 114,98, 111,128,128,97,110, 
100. 128, 128, 114, 111,98. 101, 114, 1 
16, 128. 100. 111,98.98, 101, 114, 116 

14 IFM1 =0THEN26ELSE I Fh 1 = 1 THEN27E 
LSEIFM1 =2THEN2BELSE I Fli 1 =3THEN29E 
LSEIFM1=>4THEN30 

15 L1=M2:G0SUB31 :MC*=LL«: IFM2=>1 
0THENM3=M3+1 

16 IFM2=>10THENM2=0 

1 7 L 1 =M3 : GOSUE3 1 :MD*=LL*: I FM3= > 1 
0THENM4=M4+1 

18 IFM3=>10THENM3=0 

19 L1=M4:G0SUB31 :ME*=LL»: IFM4=>1 
0THENM5=M5+1 

20 IFM4=>10THENM4=0 

21 L 1 =M5 : G0SUE3 1 : MF*=LL* : I FM5= > 1 
0THENM6=M6+1 

22 IFM5=>10THENM5=0 

23 IFM6=>10THENM6=0 

24 L 1 =M6 : G0SUB3 1 : MG*=LL» 

25 RETURN 

26 MA*=J*:MB*=J*:G0T015 

27 MA*=B»:ME*=E*:GOT015 

28 MA$=E*:MB*=J»:G0TO15 

29 MA*=G»:MB*=E»:G0TO15 

30 MA»=J» : MB»= J» : M1=0 : M2-M2+1 : GO 
TO 15 

31 I FL 1 =0THEN32ELSE I FL 1 = 1 THEN33E 
LSEIFL1 =2THEN34ELSE I FL 1 =3THEN35E 
LSEIFL 1 =4THEN36ELSE I FL 1 =5THEN37E 
LSEIFL 1 =6THEN38ELSE I FL 1 =7THEN39E 
LPE I FL 1 =8THEN40EL SE I FL 1 = 9THEN4 1 E 
LSE I FL 1 = > 1 0THEN42 



32 


LL»=J»: 


: RETURN 


33 


LL*=A$i 


: RETURN 


34 


LL*=E$i 


: RETURN 


35 


LL*=C»i 


! RETURN 


36 


LL*=D«: 


: RETURN 


37 


LL$=E$! 


: RETURN 


38 


LL*=F«! 


: RETURN 


39 


LL$=G*i 


: RETURN 


40 


LL*=H$: 


: RETURN 


41 


LL*=I*! 


i RETURN 


42 


LL*=J$: 


: RETURN 



43 PM0DE3, 1 :PCLS(5) :SCREEN0,0 

44 A*="BR3NU4BR2" :B«="BR2U2R3U2N 
L3ED4NL3" : C$="BR2R3U2NL2U2NL3BD4 
" :D«="BR2BU2MU2R3U2D4" :E*="BR2R3 
U2L3U2R3BD4" : F$= " BR2U4NR3D2R3D2N 
L3" :G*="BR2BU3UR3D4" :H$="ER2U4R3 
D2NL3D2NL3" : I«="BR2BU2NR3U2R3D4" 
: J*="ER2U4R3D4NL3" : G($=" C5ERNU4RU 
*RD4RU4RD4RU4RNL4D2NL4D2L6C0 

45 PCLS(5 ) ! PM0DE3, 1 s PCLS (5 ) sSCRE 
EN0 , 0 

46 LINE10, 160)-(256, 192) ,PSET,EF 

47 PM0DE4 , l: SCREEN©. 0: FOR I =2T025 
tSTEP16:LINE( I, 126-RND(30) )-(I+l 
1. 180) , PSET,EF:NEXT:PM0DE3, 1 :SCR 
EEM0.0 

48 DRAWS8BM0, 134 ; C2R4U6R2U4R3D2 



RD2RD2R4U6R6D6R6U13R9D13R3U3R3U3 
R2U2RU2R7D2RD2RD2RD7R8U 1 3E2R6F2D 
1 3R9UBE2R2E2R2F2P2F2D9R5U 1 5 R 1 1 D 1 
5 R3U 1 4 R2E3R2F3R2D 1 4 R2D1 4L 1 80 " 

49 PAINT(20, 136), 2, 2 

50 PM0DE4 , 1 :SCREEN0,0:FORI=2TO25 
6STEP4sLINE( I, 156-RND(30) >-( 1+2, 
1 80 ) , PSET , BF : NEXT : PM0DE3 , 1 : SCREE 
N0,0 

5 1 CLS0 : F0RV=3T09STEP3 : FORH=0TO7 
:SET(H,V,5) :NEXTH,V 

52 FORH=3TO6:SET(0,H,5) :SET( 1,H, 
5) :NEXTH:F0RH=6T09:SET (6,H,5) :SE 
T(7,H,5) :NEXTH 

53 FORH=3TO9:SET(10,H,5) :SET(11, 
H,5) :NEXTH 

54 F0RH=12T017:SET(H,6,5) :NEXT 

55 F0RV=3T06:SET< 18, V,5) :SET( 17, 
V,5) :NEXT 

56 F0RV=7T09:SET(14,V,5) : SET (15, 
V, 5) :NEXT 

57 F0RH=16T018:SET(H,9,5) :NEXT:G 
0T061 

58 F0RV=3T06:SET(22+L,V,5) :SET(2 
3+L,V,5) :NEXT 

59 FORV=3T09:SET(28+L,V,5) :SET(2 
9+L,V,5):NEXT 

60 F0RV=6T09STEP3 : F0RH=22T029 : SE 
T(H+L, V,5 ) :NEXTH,V: RETURN 

61 G0SUB5B :F0RH=33T036 : SET < H, 6, 5 
) :NEXT 

62 G0T064 

63 FOR V=3T09STE P3 : FORH=40TO45 : SE 
T ( H+L , V, 5 ) : NEXTH , V : F0RV=3T09 : SET 
(41+L, V,5) :SET(40+L,V,5) :NEXTV:R 
ETURN 

64 G0SUB63 : L=26 : G0SUB58 : L= 1 8 : GOS 
UE63 

65 FORI=0TO63 : SET ( 1,31,7) :NEXTI : 
FORL=0TO24STEP8 : FOR I =0TO224STEP3 
2 : PRI NT3257+L+ I , STR I NG* (5,1 42+LL 
)+CHR«(138+LL) ; :NEXTI:LL=LL+16:N 
E X TL : G0SUB66 : G0SUB66 : G0T067 

66 FOR X UN 1 T04 : PR I NTS 1 92+EW , CHR* ( 
1 28 ) +CHR« ( 204 ) +CHR$ ( 204 ) +CHR« ( 1 2 
8)+CHR*(204)+CHR$(204) ; :EW=EW+1 : 
NEXT: RETURN 

67 COLOR2,3:LINE(0, 155)-(256, 162 
), PRESET, BF 

68 LINE( 12, 145)-(3B, 162) , PRESET, 
BF:LINE(55, 130)-(86, 162) , PRESET, 
BF:LINE(94, 150) -(106, 162), PRESET 
,EF:LINE( 113, 140) -(120, 162),PRES 
ET,BF:LINE(160, 136)-( 172, 162) , PR 
ESET, BF 

69 G0SUB66:PM0DE4, 1 : SCREEN0, 0 :FO 
RI=2T0256STEP4:LINE( I, 162-RND(6) 
)-(I+3, 1 80), PSET, BF: NEXT :PM0DE3, 
l:SCREEN0,0 

70 LINE(0,0)-(256, 176) , PRESET, B 

71 FORI=0TO256STEP4:LINE(I, 170-R 
ND(8) )-(I+4, 176) , PRESET, B: NEXT 

7 2 G0SUB66 :FORI=70TO176STEP2:LIN 

E(0,I )-(256, I), PRESET: NEXT 

(Continued on Page 6 ) 



Pa9e 6 SKY— EYE (Cont'd fro. Pg. 5 ) 

73 H»0:PMODE4, 1 :SCREEN0,0:FORI=1 
T0BSTEP2:H=H+l:CIRCLE(22-H, 18), I 
,5, .9, .8, .4:NEXT 

74 G0SUB66: FOR I=1T0 150: PSET <RND< 
256),RND<110) > :NEXT:SCREEN0,0 

75 FORI»2TO26STEP4:LINE<200+I,97 
) - ( 200+ 1,164), PSET : NE XT 

76 G0SUB66:F0RI=2T054STEP2:LINE< 
128, 100+1 )-( 146, 100+1 > , PSET:NEXT 

77 FQRI«131T0143STEP3:LINE< I, 102 
)-<I, T154), PSET: NEXT 

78 F0RI-98T0128STEP2:LINE(54, I )- 
(74,I),PSET:NEXT 

79 FORK«0TO150STEP150:FORI=1TO5: 
CIRCLE<64+K,96>, 1,5, .5, KNEXTUN 
EXTK 

80 GOSUB 1 06 : CL50 : SCREEN 1 , 1 

81 COLORS , 0 

82 E=RND(9)+2 

83 H=RND(2):IF H=l THEN BD=(+4) 
ELSE IF H=2THEN BD=(-4) 

84 GOSUB 1 0 1 : D=D+ 1 0 : F=F+BD : SCREEN 
1, 1:IFD=>110THEN91 

85 GOSUB 101 

86 LINE(A<E),0)-(A<E)+F,D),PSET: 
IFW=0THEN90 

87 POKE65494,0:PLAY"V31T255O2GBC 
" x P0KE65495 , 0 : FOR J=5T01 1 STEP3 : C I 
RCLE( (Y*16)-9,75) , J,5, .9:NEXTJ:F 
0RJ=5T012:CIRCLE( ( Y*16 ) -9, 75 ) , J, 
0, .9:NEXTJ:W=0 

88 IFPPOINT(A(E)+F,D)=5THEN90 

89 F0RP=1T03: GOSUB 1 05 :P0KE65494, 
0 : PLAY " V3 1 L25502BC " : POKE65495 , 0 : 
NEXTP:COLOR0,0:LINE(A(E) ,0)-(A(E 
)+F,D) , PRESET : COLORS , 0 : D=0 : F=0 : M 
1 =M 1 + 1 : GOSUB 1 06 : G0T082 

90 G0T084 

91 DRAW"S4BM0,75;C0R255UL255" :CO 
LOR0,0:LINE<A<E) , 0)-( A(E)+F, D) , P 
RESET : COLORS , 0 : D= 1 1 0 : FORYY=6TO30 
STEP8:CIRCLE(A(E)+F,D),YY, 1, .8:N 
EXTYY : FORYY=2TO30 : C I RCLE ( A ( E ) +F , 
D) , YY, 0, .8: NE XTYY : P0KE65494 , 0 : PL 
AY"T255L30V31O1DCDC" : P0KE65495, 0 
t GOSUB 1 0 1 1 D-0 : F=0 

92 EC=EC+i:CIRCLE(100+(25«EC),18 
4) ,5,0, .7: IFEC=5THEN107ELSE82 

93 F0RI=1T0212STEP8 

94 PLAY'V3101L55C" :PUT<219-I,30) 
-(256-1, 44), H, PSET 

95 PSET (63, 90-Q, 0) : PSET (64, 90-Q, 
0 ) : Q=Q+ 13:1 FQ= >82THENQ=0 : PSET ( 64 
, 90-Q, 5 ) : PSET ( 63, 90-Q, 5 ) 

96 PSET (63, 90-Q, 5) : PSET ( 64, 90-Q, 
5) 

97 IFI=>209THEN LINE(219-I,30)-( 
256-1 , 44 ) , PRESET, BF 

98 NEXTI 

99 G0T093 

100 GOTO 100 

101 Z=J0YSTK(0)+4:Y=INT(Z/4) :DRA 
W" S4BM0, 75; "+P*( Y) : C0L0R5 ,0:1 FW= 



1THENRETURN 

1 02 IFPEEK ( 65280 ) = 1 26THEN1 03ELSE 
IFPEEK ( 65280 ) =254THEN103ELSERETU 
RN 

103 I FW= 1 THENRETURN 

104 W=l: RETURN 

105 PM0DE3, 1 : SCREEN 1, 1 :F0RI=1T05 
0 : NE XT I : PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1,1: RETUR 
N 

106 GOSUB14:DRAW"S8BM20, 188; "+Q$ 
+MG$+Q$+MF*+Q* : DRAWME$+Q*+MD$+Q$ 
: DRAWN C*+Q*+MA$+Q$+MB* : RETURN 

107 PM0DE3, 1 :POKE65494,0:SOUND22 
0,5: POKE 65495 , 0 : FOR I =2T0 1 92STEP6 
:SCREEN1, 1: CIRCLE < 126,92) , I, , .7: 
SCREEN1,0:CIRCLE( 126,92) , 1+3, , .7 
: NE XT : P0KE65494 , 0 : FOR I = 1 TO20 : PLA 
Y-O1L10PC" :NEXT:RUN 

108 • "SKY-EYE" BY FRED B.SCERBO 
«e ROBERT DOBBERT, COPYRIGHT 
(C) 1982, ILLUSTRATED MEMORY 
BANKS, 1MB, P.O. BOX 289, 
WILLIAMSTOWN, MA. 01267-0289 



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■♦■("♦■••HP""" ■ ■ 



ii=li*=iiiEiii==ii=iii= =!Un!=iliiiiii=1iii!=i=7h== == == = nh; 



SNAKK MOfKTAlW SOFTWAPE 

P.O. BOX 5722 

FA I/" I CM, HC 27650 



CRAH, UltL - IfiK-KATtlffyP BASIC- f7.yj 

ALU)WS IMF lism TO HJlcr UTTrKS AH I) NllMMS AHYWIfrhf 
ON A GRAPHICS SCRFXN. CAN RE IRttD TU UFf.L HIGH FES- 
OUrriON GRAPHICS. PERMITS HIGH -HIS. GAM^S KJTH T>JT 
ANYVH>:PF. ON THE SCREEN. RILL CURSOR 0«ITR(»L } NffK 
CURSOR («E CHARACTER MACK OR ONE MUX KITH ONE KEY- 
STROKE. EEAHIRES INCIJUI*: EI'IX ASCII CHARACTER Sl^T, 
(5XR DOT MATRIX), SUBSCRIPTS AND StlFERtiCRl ITS. ANI» 
USER DEF1 NED CHARACTERS. i'ROCRAH IS CAUABIE AI> A SUR- 

RmrriNC. or stand alone, works with am tmo color 

GRAPHIC HUES. LOWER CASE CHARACTERS WITH DECfcNbERC. 



Tot >T>rroR - i6k -extfnoed basic ^tjj^y ^ 

FULL EfATURE TEXT EDITOR WITH UPJER CASK AKD U«W>R 
CASE CHAPACTEHS , WITH UP TO k2 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
PI SPIRTED ON THE SCREEN. ADJUSTABLE TAIL, TEXT SEARCH 
AND RETUTOENT, BLOCK HOVE. JUSTIFICATION AM' PRO- 
PORTIONAL SPACING WHEN USED WI H THE LP-VII. 

C.C. PILOT <HC OR I6KULL MSICG) -t^*, 9^ 

JMP1/ W NTAT10N OF PILOT FOR TIE COLOR UHUVfER. 
FEATURES STANDARD PILOT INSTRUCTIONS WITH ADDITIONAL 
EXTENSIONS FOR THE C.C. INCLUDES TEXT EDITOR AND INTER- 
PRET OR IN ONE PACKAGE. CONES WITH DEMO PROGRAMS. 

FAST GRAPHICS PACKAGE— f A, LJ. MARI NES) -13-95 
A HACHINF LANGUAGE PROGRAM THAT EXECUTES WITH TWlCF 
THE SPEED OF EXTfJlDFD BASIC. INCLUDE LINE DRAWING, 
SCREm CLEAR f AND PIXEL SEPT INC ROUTINES. CAN RE USED 
WITH BASIC OB MACHINE LANGUAGE. ENABLES THE fcK MACHINE 
TO HAVE A 120X6* GRAPHICS DISPLAY WITH OVER 2* MX 
1 A BASIC PROGRAM. 

SRIPPINC INCLUDED IN ALL PRICES 



Page 7 



EXCITING NEWS 
FOR COLOR COMPUTER USERS 



FLEX, OS-9 and the Radio Shack Disk System 

ALL on the SAME Color Computer 



Would you believe that you car run FLEX, OS-9 
and Radio Shack disk software on the same Color 
Computer, and all you have to do is change the disk? 
That's right, just change the disk. If you have a 32K 
Color Computer with the Radio Shack disk system, 
all you need to do is make a trivial modification to 

*68 T Micro . You can get FLEX from us right now. 
OS-9 will be ready by summer. Please note that this 
will only work with the Radio Shack disk system and 
32K/64K memory chips that RS calls 32K. Maybe 
they put 64K's in yours, too. If you don't have a 
copy of the article, send a SASE and we'll send it f o 
you. 

TJsing this system to run FLEX and OS-9 has 
many advantages. First, it gives you 48K from zero 
right up to FLEX. This means that ALL FLEX 
compatible software will run with NO 
MODIFICATIONS and NO PATCHES! There are no 
memory conflicts because we moved the screen up 
above FLEX which leaves the lower 48K free for 
user programs. 

What you end up with is 48K for user programs, 
8K for FLEX and another 8K above FLEX for the 
screens and stuff. We are working on a multi screen 
format so you can page backward to see what 
scrolled by and a Hi-Res screen that will enable us 
to have 24 lines by 42 character display. That's 
better than an Apple! 

We also implemented a full function keyboard, 
with a control key and escape key. All ASCII codes 
can now be generated from the Color Computer 
keyboard! 

We also added some bells and whistles to Radio 
Shack's Disk system when you're running FLEX or 
OS-9. We are supporting single or double sided, 
single or double density, 35, 40 and 80 track drives. 
If you use double sided drives, the maximum is three 
drives because we use the drive 3 select for side 
select. When you are running the Radio Shack disk, 
it will work with the double sided drives but it will 
only use one side and only 35 tracks. Using 80 track 
drives is okay, but will not be compatible with 
standard Radio Shack software. You can also set 
each drive's stepping rate and drive type. (SS or DS 
- SD or DD) 



In case you don't understand how this works, I'll 
give you a brief explanation. The Color Computer 
was designed so that the roms in the system could 
be turned off under software control. In a normal 
Color Computer this would only make it go away. 
However, if you put a program in memory to do 
something first (like boot in FLEX or OS-9), when 
you turn off the roms, you will have a full 64K RAM 
System with which to run your program (FLEX or OS- 
9). When the roms are turned off, it is as if you had 
removed them from the computer. They are gone! 

Now, we need the other half of the 64K ram chips 
to work, and this seems to be the case most of the 
time, as the article states. Of course, you could also 
put 64K chips in. 

We decided that this was the best way to run 
FLEX and OS-9 on the Color Computer because it 
does remove the roms from the memory map and 
leaves the full 48K for user programs. If you just 
put in memory for FLEX and use the Basic hooks for 
I/O, all you have is a little over 30K for user 
programs. In addition, very few FLEX programs will 
run without being modified and some won t run very 
well, if at all (our DATAMAN + for example). Let me 
state it again. ALL FLEX COMPATIBLE PROGRAMS 
WILL RUN WITHOUT MODIFICATION!!! and the 
same goes for OS-9! 

It is also the ONLY way OS-9 will run because 
30K is just not enough. 

Some neat utilities are included. 

MOVEROM moves Color Basic from ROM to RAM. 
Because it's moved to RAM you can not only access 
it from FLEX, you can run it and even change it!! 
You can load Color Comuter cassette software and 
save it to FLEX disk. Single Drive Copy, Format 
and Setup commands are also included. 

If you don't have a Color Computer, we can sell 
you one complete with 64K ram, 24K rom, Single RS 
disk drive and FLEX for only $1,490, set up and 
ready to go. 

FLEX with Edit, Asmb and installation disk is $199. 



FRANK HOGG LABORATORY, INC. 

130 MIDTOWN PLAZA • SYRACUSE NEW YORK 13210 • (315)474-7856 



F*qc 8 

fly Own honey #3 



OIM YOUR 



By Lawrence C. Falk 

This is the third and last part of 
our vaunted MOM series (Managing Your 
Money). You'll recall we balanced 
checkbooks in January, showed you how 
to organize your deductions in 
February and now, with tax time 
approaching, we'll present a simple 
way to get a reading on your income 
tax return. 

TAXTAB is basically designed to 
run with last month's program. While 
it does handle the major items in the 
IRS' 1040 and itemized deductions, it 
is not all-inclusive. However, the 
program is, as you will see below, so 
simple that modifications are pretty 
easy to handle. 

The formatting here isn't too 
fancy, because we suspect what is 
really important is the bottom line: 
How much tax you either owe or what 
sort of refund you'll get back. 
There is also a printer routine, 
beginning with Line 700. Its geared 
for the LP VII, but can easily be 
changed with one control code 
adjustment in that line. If you are 
printer less, no need to enter lines 
past 610. The final display fits on 
one screen. 

For those of you with more 
complicated taxes, it is fairly 
simple to add lines to accomodate 
these items. Just follow the 1040 
Form and make adjustments to the 
algorithms for adding and subtracting 
to and from Adjusted Gross Income. 

We used this program to figure 
preliminary taxes a year ago before 
giving the basic information to our 
CPA. It came to within *100 of being 
right, and the CPA cost more than 
that. Of course, we cannot guarantee 
the suitability of it to your needs. 

Minor adjustments have been made 
to take changes in this year's 1040 
into account. 

The Listing: 

1 9 ##*###*########**##**#** 

2 '##» TAXTAB 

3 '##♦ (c) FALS0FT 1980 

4 f ##*##*##***#*###****♦*♦♦ 
10 INPUT "WAGES" ;W 

20 INPUT "INTEREST EARNED" ;EA 

30 INPUT "DIVIDENDS" ;D 

40 INPUT "OTHER INCOME" ;0I 



C0L0RS0FT 



TM 



" Quality Software At Affordable Prices For the TRS-80* Color Computer ' 

• Games * Home/Personal 

• Educational * Financial 

We AISO Offer: •Custom Programming * Royalties For Software 

***0vtr SO Software ttotns Currently Available*** 
Documentation and a limited Guarantee with ai COLOR SOFT™ Software. 



•••4K Color BASIC. Programs*" 

INVADERS: 10 Skill levels phaser sound and eiplodmg bombs $13 95 

DUMP Explore the memory oi (he color computer -output to screen or printer I 95 

NANGIT. Guess the word or the creature loses' 7 95 

TAG: 2 player game of chase Fast action and fun 10.95 

• ## 16K Color BASIC Programs*" 

CASINO One-armed bandit blackjack and dice games Si? 95 
BLACKB0X: Find the hidden points py probing the btacfcboi with a proiecwea 

challenging game ot deductive reasoning 9 95 

METRIC CONVERTER. Menu driven metric to English/English to metric conversions 9 95 

DISASSEMBLER: Disassemble machine language programs (screen or printer) 13 95 
AUTO MINDER Keep track ot fuel usage tune ups oil changes etc creates and 

maintains cassette data files for muttpie autos 10 95 

•••16K Ext. Color BASIC Programs*" 

FURLONG DERBY: A horse of a different color racing game for 1 to 3 players 5 9 95 
ESCAPE intermediate adventure with GRAPHICS The player must tmd and decipher 
various dues to escape Graphics qive player the tee' ot being mere 15 95 

SASPUS. Beginner s adventure game - the piayc must find and destroy me deadly 
mutant m a genetic nuclear research center tacn u^me is '.moo-m/ed B 95 

PIRATE TREASURE Advanced neqtnner s adventure -the piayc must img the 
pirate s treasure which is hidden m a cave of over JO rooms 11 95 

ADVENTURE COMBO Combination ot .SASPUS and PiRATE TREASURE 16 95 

FLIPUM Co»0' computer version of the OTHEll 0* * type qa f "es 9 95 

FLIGHT SIMULATOR: F iy to the airpon with instruments only qoysficks rea di The 
player can set difficulty to challenge his flight experience 11 95 

PEEK N SPELL Flashes woroor letter on screen for children s speiimq drill- Mew 
word files can be created and stored on cassette tape 10 95 

CAPITALS COMBO Name the capitals dnii tor me United States Americas Africa 
Europe Asia and Mid East -Asia 25 95 

MATH 0ERBY Math omi »n a hrj'se race qame tor l to 3 piayers vanab'e difficulty 11 95 
LOAN Amortization schedules with preakoown of monthly payments 1 avail m 4k i ^ 95 
STOCK ANALYZER. Keeps track of stock prices and maintains portfolio data base 
includes acditionai program for protecting price trends 16 95 

COLOR CURE: C0C0 version ct tne popular cube pushes Features include solution 
by computer and savmq partially solved pui/ie-on tape 17 95 

Handling charge ts S2 25 on software orders under S25. Visa and Mastercard accepted (in- 
clude expiration date) Orders paid by cashier s chock, money order, or bankcard are ship- 
pod within 48 hours. Personal checks require 1 to 2 weeks to clear No COD orders 
SOFTWARE SOLO IN THE U.S.. CANADA. AUSTRALIA. MEXICO. AND PUERTO RICO ONLY 

PAYABLE IN U S OOLLARS 
Send Si tor catalog containing full descriptions of all available software and receive a S2 dis- 
count coupon good on first order. Free catalog with an ardor from this ad 



BLANK CASSETTE TAPES 



1 Doz C-10 length SO 00 1 Doz C-30 length $11.00 
Shipping Charge S2 00 per Doz UPS/S3 50 per Doz. First Class Mail 
Individual Storage Boies (sold onty with cassettes) 2 40 per doz. 
!!• NEW »• CASSETTE CADDY «? hew •!• 

Put an end to misplaced tapes and a cluttered work area by using our hinged top, smoked- 
plastic storage containers which hold 12 tapes in one easy to lind location 

each onty S5. 49 plus S 1.50 shipping 
or S3. 95 with purchase of one dozen cassettes (no shipping charge on caddy) 



UPS cannot ship to P.O. Boioa 
Texas residents add 5% to cassetta and storage unit orders 

Foreign orders include shipping at IS oz. for tapes I 9 oz. for caddy / 13 oz for boxes 



SEND ORDERS TO: 



COLOR SOFTWARE SERVICES 
P.O. BOX 1723 
GREENVILLE. TX 75401 



QUANTITY 0ISC0UNTS AVAILABLE 
•TM of Tandy Corp 



DEALER INOUIRIES INVITED 
-TM of Gabriel Ind. 



1 



50 TI=W+EA+D+OI 

60 PRINT "TOTAL INCOME" TI 

70 INPUT "TAX REFUNDS" ;TR , 

80 INPUT "EMPLOYEE BUSINESS EXPE 

NSE" ;ee 

90 AG=TI+TR-EB 

100 PRINT "ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME 
"AG 

105 OP=AG*.01 :TP=AG*.03 

107 OP=INT( (OP+.005)«100)/100:TP 

■INT( CTP+.005>»100)/100 

110 INPUT "HALF (BUT NOT MORE TH 

AN *150) OF MEDICAL INSURANC 

E PREMIUMS YOU PAID";MI 

120 INPUT "COST OF MEDICINE AND 

DRUGS" ;me 

130 MA=ME-OP 

135 IF MA<0 THEN MA=0 

140 INPUT "BALANCE OF MEDICAL IN 

SURANCE PREMIUMS" ;BI 

150 INPUT "OTHER MEDICAL EXPENSE 

S" ;om 

160 MZ=MA+BI+OM:MY=MZ-TP 
170 IF MY<0 THEN MY=0 
180 MD=MY+MI 

190 INPUT "STATE TAXES" ;ST 

"LOCAL TAXES" ;LT 
"REAL ESTATE TAXES"; RE 
"SALES TAXES (FROM TAB 



200 INPUT 
210 INPUT 
220 INPUT 

LE" ;ut 

230 INPUT 



R ) " ; 



"EXTRA SALES TAXES ( CA 



Page 9 

250 INPUT "HOME MORTGAGE" ;IH 
260 INPUT "CONSUMER CREDIT INTER 



"; IC 



270 INPUT "AUTO INTEREST" ;AI 

280 ID=IH+IOAI 

290 INPUT "CASH CONTRIBUTIONS" ;C 

C 

300 INPUT "NON-CASH CONTRIBUTION 

S" ;nc 

310 CD=CONC 

350 INPUT "MISC. DEDUCTIONS" ;VD 

360 FD=MD+TD+ID+CD+VD 

370 INPUT "NUMBER OF EXEMPTIONS" 

380 SY=SB»1000 
390 Q«S=AG-FD-SY 

430 PRINT " NOW, GO TO THE TAX 
TABLE AND FIND THE TAX ON"QG 
432 INPUT " ENTER IT HERE"; IT 
440 INPUT " AMOUNT WITHHELD" ; AW 
450 JJ=IT-AW 



460 PRINT! PRINT 

UND OF"JJ 

470 PRINT: INPUT 

HIT <enter>";bb 

480 CLS 
490 PRINT 
G 

500 PRINT 
510 PRINT 
520 PRINT 
530 PRINT 
540 PRINT 



" YOU GET A REF 
"FOR A RUNDOWN, 



" YOUR I NCOME " ; T AB ( 22 ) A 



"LESS DEDUCTIONS OF:" 
" MEDICAL" ;TAB( 14)MD 
" TAXES" ; TAB (14) TD 
" INTEREST" ;TAB( 14) ID 
" CONTRIBS" ;TAB( 14) CD 



240 TD=ST+LT+RE+UT+ES 



(Continued on Page 10 > 



CO-RESIDENT EDITOR/ASSEMBLER 

(CORES9) 

C0RES9 is i complete full function editor/assembler package that will allow you to create, 
adit and assemble 6809 machine language programs for the color computer. It features a 
powerful full function text editor and supports the entire 6809 instruction set with all 
addressing modes, forward and reverse (able references, will output object code directly to 
memory or "CLOADM" compatible tapes and much more. price $39.95 



& IS 



TEXT EDITOR 

This program is a line/character oriented text editor for the 
color computer, that will enable you to create and edit text 
files for Basic programs, letters, text data files, or almost 
anything you might want to put on paper. It features functions 
for adding, inserting, deleting, moving and copying text lines 
or paragraphs; powerful string search and replace com- 
mands, single and automatic line numbers and line editing 
with 9r?ub commands to insert, delete, change, add and 
remove individual or mutiple characters. Tape commands 
allow you to save, load, append, and skip tape files; also it is 
compatible with Basic ASCII tape formats. A MUST HAVE 
PROGRAM!! 

ONLY $19.95 



SYSTEM MONITOR 
(TRSMON) 

Trsmon is a 2K system monitor program that will allow you to 
explore the workings of the color computer. It features 9 
debuging comands, tape load and save compatible with Basic 
"CLOADM", up/down load via RS232 port, terminal package 
that allows the color computerto be used as a teminal at baud 
rates up to 9600 baud and a printer driver to direct display 
output to the printer for memory dumps, disassembly* etc. 
The program is position independent so it can be moved 
anywhere within the system memory. A very powerful tool at a 
very reasonable price. 

ONLY $19.95 



5566 RICOCHET AVE. 
Las Vegas, Nv. 89110 



CER-COMP 
(702)452-0632 



All Orders Shipped From Stock 
Add $1.00 Postage - 
MC/VISA Add 3% 



** TAX (Cont'd frm Pa. 9 ) 

550 PRINT " MISC. ";TAB( 14)VD 

560 PRINT "TOTAL DEDUCTS" ; TAB ( 22 
)FD 

570 PRINT "LESS EXEMPTIONS" ; TAB ( 

22) ;sy 

5B0 PRINT "TAXABLE AMOUNT" X TAB ( 2 

2)QQ 

590 PRINT " TAX OWED " ; TAB ( 22 ) I T 
600 PRINT " LESS WITHHOLDING" ;TA 
B(22)AW 

610 PRINT "R E F U N D";TAB(22); 
JJ 

690 INPUT "PRINT THIS OUT";YN« 
695 IF YN»="N" OR YN»="NO" THEN 
END 

700 PRINT#-2,CHR«<15>" TAX SUMM 
ARY" 

710 PRINT#-2, "YOUR INCOME" ;TAB(2 
2) AG 

720 PRINT#-2," — LESS DEDUCTIONS 
OF:" 

730 PRINT#-2," MEDICAL" ;TAB( 14)M 
D 

740 PRINT#-2," TAXES" ; TAB < 14) TD 
750 PRINT#-2," INTEREST" ;TAB( 14) 
ID 

760 PRINT#-2," CONTRIBS" ;TAB( 14) 
CD 

770 PRINTM-2," MISC. " ;TAB( 14) VD 
780 PRINT#-2, "TOTAL DEDUCTS" ;TAB 
(22)FD 

790 PRINTM-2, "EXEMPTIONS" ;TAB(22 
)SY 

800 PRINT#-2, "TAXABLE AMOUNT" ;TA 

B ( 22 ) QG 

810 PRINT#-2," TAX OWED" ; TAB (22) 
IT 



820 PRINT#-2," 
; TAB (22) AW 
830 PRINT#-2, " 
22)JJ 
840 END 



LESS WITHHOLDING" 
REFUND" ;TAB( 



-fc hie? RA i NBOU 

FUBLISHED BY FALSCFT, INC. 
5803 Timber Eidoe Drive 
Frcspe:t, KY 40059 

Entire Contents €> Bv FALEOFT Inc., 1331 



;rence C. Falk — Editor 



The RAIHFOW is intended for the personal use and Flea- 
sure of its subscribers and reproduction by any Beans is 
forbidden. Use of prwa»s and information herein is for 
the single end use of subscribers and any ether use is 
prohibited. 

TRS-B0* Color Computer and Extended Color Basic are 
trademarks of Tandy Corp. 

All programs herein are distributed on an J as is' 
basis* without warranty. 

Subscriptions to the RAIMBOW are 112 per year in the 
United States. Canadian and Mexican rates are %\t Fer 
year. Surface tail to other countries is $26« air tail 
to other countries is $44* due to postage costs alone. 

Liaited back issues available for $2 each. fIus $2.50 
for shipping and handling. 

Payaent accepted by cash, check, toney order, VISA or 
MASTERCARD. Please include account mifcber, expiraticn 
date and your signature when using bank cards. 

The RAINBOW is published every ionth of the year. 



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PRINT t-2, (Frot Page 1) 

Dave Hooper , Kathy Goebel , John 
Waclo, Bill Dye, Wayne Diercks, Gary 
Davis, Tom Rosenbaum and Fred Seer bo. 
Add a dash of the people Mho have 
been active in 6609 before CoCo Made 
it really popular, like Sue Searby, 
Frank Hogg and Bill Vergona, and you 
have a whole new breed of people 
whose names you will come to know in 
the near future. 

Those 'people, and some who have 
led the conversion to CoCo like Bob 
Rosen, Frank Brandon, Syd Kahn, Dave 
Lager quist and Roger 01 sen, make up 
the Color Computer world right now. 
These people, and a bunch of others 
space doesn't permit me to name, are 
the new Adams* and Bar dens of Color 
Computing. A year from now, their 
names on a program will sell it to 
you just as surely as Adams* does on 
a Model III Adventure today. 

I was thinking about this just the 
other day when I received a letter 
from Steve Blyn, who has just started 
a software business. He has some 
nice programs for children and I 
was mentioning them to a friend here 
in Kentucky. The friend replied, 
"Who's this? Is that Dor sett 
Educational?" Dor sett, of course, 
supplies a great deal of Apple 
educati onal software. 

As I replied to the friend, I 
couldn't help but think there is no 
real good reason why Steve and Cheryl 
Blyn won't be bigger than Dor sett 
some day. After all, they have a 
better computer to use in programming 
their talents. 

We've been fortunate enough to 
meet a lot of fine people so far in 
this enterprise. Not just the people 
who write programs, but the people 
who sell them, and the people who buy 
them — and the RAINBOW. We really 
enjoy hearing from you and we hope 
you'll call on us for help, 
information or advice whenever you 
think we might be of assistance. 

****** 

-~ 

You may notice an adverti sment in 
this month's issue for Color Computer 
News. Its the only other publication 
devoted exclusively to the Color 
Computer. Frankly, we feel there is 
adequate room in the CoCo world for 
both the RAINBOW and for CCN. And we 
know Bill Si as, the editor, agrees. 
An ad. for the RAINBOW will also 
appear in CCN. Its my opinion that 
both of us are trying to put out a 



Page 11 

good product that merits your support 
and will be helpful to you. 

* t t * $ $ 

Credit where credit is due 
department this month appropriately 
goes to intrepid Dave Lagerquist of 
Chromasette for the name CoCo. 
You'll notice we use it pretty 
liberally in the RAINBOW. For one 
thing, it seems to fit. And for 
another, it saves us some space. 

****** 

You'll notice we're even fatter 

and a little fancier again this 
month. We hope you enjoy the 
additional information we are now 
able to provide — thanks to 
advertising which holds the cost of 
printing and mailing down. 

Speaking of mailing, we DO mail 
the RAINBOW each month on or a little 
after the first of the month that is 
printed on page one. It may take a 
couple of weeks for bulk mail to get 
your issue to you. If you've not 
received your copy by the 20th, send 
us a card and we'll hustle another 
out to you by first class mail. 

Until Apr i 1 •• .Geoff ery Chaucer's 
favorite month. Would anyone like to 
submit a program called "Canterbury 
Adventure?" 



I 

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EDUCATIONAL TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER™ 
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• Alphabet • Physics 

• Planetary Positions 

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• Featuring — Computerized Encyclopedia 

48 cassettes ('200 with case) 
Vol. 1- M 

Many morel From Kindergarten through graduate 
courses. All cassettes f 4» each. Write for free list . 

. MOSES ENGINEERING COMPANY 

Route 7, Regent Drive 
Greenville. SC. 29609 
(803) 634-7974 



Page 12 

Utility/Tutorial.. 



By Gary A. Davis 

In order to Maintain and enhance 
programs, it is important for them to 
be well commented and documented. 
This is especially true for long or 
complex programs. In BASIC, comments 
may be deleted from "execute" 
versions if necessary for speed and 
memory efficiency. 

Here we Mill show you a method we 
at Sugar Software use to add emphasis 
to CoCo comments (REM statements) 
when they are printed on an Epson 
printer. The REMs are modified so 
that they print in the w± de font. 

Wide REMs are useful for the start 
of your subroutines. Other printers 
which have a double-wide font for 
additional emphasis may be used with 
this program with the proper 
mod ification. 

The program described here scans 
the BASIC lines, looking for those 
which begin with REM or the 
apostrophe (another version of the 
REM which I call the comment). If 
the character following the REM or 
comment is a space , the space is 
replaced by a CHR*<14). In the 
Epson's character set, this is the 



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this May 
ed.>, th 
character 
have to 



signal to "begin enlongation. " The 
remainder of the line Mill be printed 
in double-wide characters. At the 
end of the line, the Epson turns off 
enlongation without requiring any 
other control character. 

If your printer does not behave 

(LP VII and VIII do not — 
required printer control 
to turn off enlongation may 
placed at the end of the 
REM statement or at the start of a 
following REM statement. 

In order for this utility to be 
the most effective, it is written in 
three ways. All three programs do 
the same thing in the same way. If 
you are trying to get "into" Machine 
Language, I hope this format will 
help you understand some of the 
things which are being done. 

The first program is written in 
BASIC and can be typed in at the end 
of your own BASIC program, executed 

and then deleted. The second is 
written in 6809 Assembly Language and 



same 



thing. Th< 
to 

Assembly version, 
match with the 
Statements are 



does exactly the 
BASIC version 
compared with the 
Variable names 
registers used, 
simple so that they c 
with the Assembly Language version. 

There are a few reasons to 
the Assembly Language version. 
First, it is extremely fast — almost 
instantaneous. Second, when you are 
ready to use it, you must only CLOADM 
and EXEC it. The Assembly version is 
position independent. This means 
that it can be loaded into any memory 
location and will execute without 
modification. 

The version here is assembled at 
address Hex 0600, which is convenient 
for Extended BASIC since these 
programs generally exist at Hex COO 
(PCLEAR 1) or higher. 

For Color BASIC or Disk BASIC, Hex 
0600 should not be used, so load at 
the high end of memory. To do this, 
protect the area using a CLEAR 
200, k*1024-54. The 200 is for string 
space; use whatever you require. The 
"k" is the amount of memory you have 
(4, 16 or 32). The 54 is the number 
of bytes in the object code. The 
code can be POKEd into memory 
starting at k* 1024-54. To CLOADM the 
object that was originally CSAVEMed 
at Hex 0600, issue a CLOADM 
"programname", ikt 1024-54) -1536. 

The algorithm the program uses 
locates the first statement of the 
BASIC program. Locations 25 and 



contain this address. The foraat of 
a BASIC statement is: 

Bytes 0-1 - Address of the next 
statement (or zero if there 
are no more statements) • 

Bytes 2-3 - Statement number. 

Bytes 4-n - Statement itself , 
ending in a zero byte. 

After : locating a statement , the 
program checks to see whether it is a 
REM or comment. A REM token is 
CHR*(130> in byte 4, a comment is a 
two-byte token, CHR*(58) followed by 
a CHR*<131> in bytes 4 and 5. If the 
following byte (5 if REM, 6 if 
comment) is a space, it is replaced 
by a CHR*(14), the Epson double-wide 
control code. 

When the replacement is made, the 
statement number (bytes 2 and 3) is 
displayed. The next statement is 
then addressed and processing 
continues until a statement with a 
link field of zero is encountered. 
In both versions, X contains the 
address of the BASIC statement, A 
contains the statement token and B 
contains the offset from X to store 
the replacement byte. This value 
will be 5 for REM and 6 for comment. 
The D is used to contain the 
statement number to print. 



ML Rabbit 

Protect your software investment with ML 
Rabbit. Software for the Color Computer is too 
expensive to have only the original tape. ML 
Rabbit can make Backups of any Color 
Computer program. No knowledge of the 
program to be copied is required. ML Rabbit 
does all the WORK. 

$14.95 

4K ft UP 



TUBE CUBE 

The Multi-colored cube invades the Color 
Computer. You can even substitute letters if 
your color set is busy. Cube Save feature if you 
can't solve it all. 

$9.95 

4K ft UP 



This prograa employs three useful 
subroutines in the Color Basic ROM. 
They are: 

Hex A928 - To clear the screen 
Hex BDCC - Displays the decimal 

value in the D register 
Hex B9AC - Displays a space 

The final program is a BASIC 
loader to create the assembly 
(machine language) version. You can 
change the load point from Hex 0600 
to some other if necessary. Another 
alternative is to "offset 9 " load using 
the second operand of the CLOADIi 
command as mentioned above. Don't 
forget to protect the area first with 
the CLEAR command when loading to 
high memory. After POKEing the 
program into memory with the loader, 
you can then save it with the 
Extended Basic CSAVEIi command. 

There are many modifications you 
could make to this program. One of 
the most practical — especially for 
those who do not have a printer — 
would be to replace the printer 
control code with one of the color 
graphic symbols (for example, a 2S5 
for the orange rectangle). This 
would be useful when scrolling 
through a listing to find a "marked" 

(Continued on Paqe 14 ) 



WORD CC7 

Word Processing for the Color Computer. 
W0RDCC7 coupled with your Color 
Computer & printer turns your machine into a 
typewriter. Modify and review letters before 
any ink touches paper. 

$19.95 (Ext. Basic) 



i — 



ULTRA-MIND 

MASTERMIND ( TM ) must be a very 
popular game, we redeved six 
versions for the Color Computer 
only one could be the best. 
Hence the name "ULTRA-MIND" 

4K k up * 9 95 



Ml Res. add 4% sales tax. Always looking for Great Color Programs. TOP royalties PAID. 

Dealer inquiries invited. 
DSL Computer Products • P.O. Box 1113 - Dearborn, Ml 48121 - (313) 582-3406 



toe 14 

REMS (Cont'd frm Pq. 12 ) 
section or sections. 

For your convenience, • tape is 
available from Sugar Software (2153 
Leah Lane, Reynoldsburg, OH, 43068) 
for %7 containing: 1) A CLOADH image, 
2) the BASIC progran, 3) the BASIC 
loader and, 4) Assembly source. 

The listings: 

10 • BIG CMNT 
20 * ~ - 

30 * Gary A. Davis 

40 MO 1981 By Sugar Software 
50 ' 2153 Leah Lane 

60 ' Reynoldsburg, Oh. 43068 
70 ' 
80 CLS 
90 X=25 

100 * Main Loop 
110 X=PEEK(X )*256+PEEK(X+l ) 
120 IF XO0 GOTO 140 
13td END 

140 A=PEEK<X+4) 
150 B=5 

160 IF A=130 GOTO 220 
170 IF A05B GOTO 110 
180 A=PEEK(X+5) 
190 IF AO 131 GOTO 110 
200 B=B+1 
210 ' REM Found 
220 IF PEEK(B+X)<>32 GOTO 110 
230 * Replace 
240 POKE B+X, 14 
250 D=PEEK(X+2)«256+PEEK(X+3) 
260 PRINT D! 
270 GOTO 110 



10 ' 

20 ' BIG CMNT 

30 ' LOADER 

40 * 

50 * Gary A. Davis 

60 MC) 1982 By Sugar Software 

100 LD=1536:' Load=&H600 
110 FOR X=LD TO LD+53:' For each 
120 READ BYTE:' Get a byte 
130 POKE X,BYTE:' Store byte 
140 NEXT X 
150 ' 

160 'Object code 
170 ' 

180 DATA 189,169,40,142,0 
190 DATA .25, 174,0,38, 1 
200 D AT A :-57 , 1 66 , 4 , 1 98 , 5 
210 DATA 129, 130,39, 11, 129 
220 DATA 58,38,239,166,5 
230 DATA 129,131,38,233,92 
240 DATA 166,133,129,32,38 
250 DATA 226,134,14,167,133 
260 DATA 236,2,52,16,189 
270 DATA 189,204,189,185,172 
280 DATA 53,16,32,208 



* 

*t**ttttt::tt:t:ttt:ttttttttttt 

• * 

• BI6 CMNT t 

• t 

• Gary A. Davis % 
t (C) 1982 by Sugar Software t 

• % 
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% 

% 



« 


ORG 


•600 


Assent origin 




JSR 


•A928 


Clear screen 




LDX 


•25 


X-Mst stmt 


% Main Loop 




LINUO 


LDX 


,x 


X->Next stmt 




BNE 


LIN140 


St i 1 1 more 




RTS 




End 


» 








LIN140 


LDA 


4,X 


Get token 




LDB 


•5 


B-Offset 




CMPA 


• 130 


Is it REM? 




BEQ 


LIN220 


BR if yes 




CMPA 


•58 


Is it ":"? 




BNE 


LINUO 


BR if no 




LDA 


5,X 


A«Code 




CMPA 


• 131 


Is is » 9m 7 




BMP 


1 TM1 1 ft 


BR if no 




INCB 




Off set+1 


LIN220 


LDA 


B,X 


A- 1st char 




CMPA 


•32 


Is it space? 




BNE 


LINUO 


BR if no 




LDA 


• 14 


H"Dtrt Nl OC 




STA 


B,X 


Replace 




LDD 


2,X 


D-Line* 




PSHS 


X 


Save X 




JSR 


SBDCC 


Print line* 




JSR 


SB9AC 


Print M M 




PULS 


X 


Restore X 




BRA 


LINUO 


Continue 


-K — K 


— K- 


-K I l_ 


obyte: 


t received a 


couple 


of letters 



and notes asking for information 
about the meaning of 4K (and 16K) 
program designations. 

In short, some of you have asked 
whether you can run a 4K program on a 
16K CoCo. The answer is "yes." 

As far as program length is 
concerned, you can run any program 
which is LESS or EQUAL to the memory 
limit of your own Color Computer. 
All CoCo's can run 4K programs. Any 
CoCo with 16K can .run programs 16K 
and below. A 32K machine will run 
any program which is 32K or smaller 
(even a 4K program). 

CoCo must have Extended Color 
Basic to run Extended Basic programs, 
but an Extended machine CAN run plain 
old Color Basic as well as Extended. 

Hope this helps. 



0600 
0600 

0600 BDA928 
0603 8E0019 
0606 

0606 AEOO 
0608 2601 
060A 39 
060B 

060B A604 
060D C605 
060F 8182 
0611 270B 
0613 813A 
0615 26EF 
0617 A605 

0619 8183 
06 IB 26E9 
061D 5C 
06 IE A685 

0620 8120 
0622 26E2 
0624 860E 
0626 A785 
0628 EC02 
062 A 3410 
062C BDBDCC 
062F BDB9AC 
0632 3510 
0634 20D0 



COMPUTERWARE 



products for 





* GAMES * 

* Arcade Graphics • 
Strategy Adventure* Invaders* 

Pac Attack • Storm • Magikube 

• Cave Hunter • Berserk • Maze Race* 
Calixto Island • Black Sanctum ^ 
HOME & WORK Checkbook* Finance* 
Word Processing • Color Data Organizer 

• 3D Drawing Board • Mailing List ^ 

PROGRAMMER AIDS ^ PASCAL • Editor* 

Diagnostics • Monitor • Assembler 
^16K+ Memory Expansion to 32K^ 
• Supplies • Printers • Modems* 

Books Accessories ^ 




J 




CASSETTE AND DISKETTE 




COMPUTERWARE 



6809 Specialists 



Dept. C • Box 668 
Encinitas, CA 92024 
(714) 436-3512 



Computerware is a trademark of Computerware. 




Paqe 16 

Construction 

LJI 



A DESK 



By Joseph E. Bennett 
you are. You've spent 



Here 

couple thousand dollars or so on your 
CoCo, disc drives, a line printer and 
a modem and set the whole thing up on 
the dining room table. Or, worse 
yet, you've got all this advanced 
gadgetry resting on a precarious 
perch with little room to spare. 

Well, what CAN you do? 

One solution is to go out and 
spend even more money for a custom 
desk for your equipment. But, if you 
are like me, you'd rather spend that 
money on more peripherals. 

A solution to your problem may be 
to build the desk yourself. It isn't 
as difficult as you might think. The 
total cost should be less than *40, 
depending on how you choose to finish 
the top and legs. 

If you're still with us, the first 
step is to gather the materials you 
need. The following list of tools is 
only a suggested minimum needed for 
the job: 

t A crosscut hand saw or power jigsaw 

t A flathead screwdriver 

t A coarse wood rasp 

t A drill and drill bits for screws 



Plus, you 
materials: 



will 



1 Small container Elmer's Glue 

1 Box of #8x2 1/2" flathead slotted 

wood screws 

4 #10x3/4" flathead slotted wood 

screws or nuts and bolts as needed 
for braces 
1 Pack assorted grades of sandpaper 
1 8'x4' sheet of 5/8" particle board 

3 2x4' s 66" long for bracing and 

support 

4 2x4 's 46 3/4" long for bracing and 

support 
4 2x4' s 30" long for legs 
1 Quart 7 Latex paint (optional if you 

wish: another finish) 
1 Can clear Acrylic laquer spray 
1 2" (or larger) Paint brush 
1 18" Angle braces 



Now, 



how 



mak< 



thi 



STEP 1 

Cut particle board to dimension 



shown in figure 
the layout. 



1. Be sure to follow 



MONITOR 




COMR i 




4' 



66 



FIG. 1 

STEP 2 

Construct frame and leg assembly 
by using two of the 66" long braces 
and the two 46 3/4 " long braces. 
Assemble into a rectangular frame, 
using drill to drill screw holes. 
Glue each joint (before assembly) for 
added strength. Refer to figure 2 
for detail. 

STEP 3 

Mount four 30" legs to frame, as 
shown in figure 2, using glue and 



STEP 4 

Mount 66" rear brace across rear 
legs at a height of 8" from bottom of 
legs, using screws and glue. 



STEP 5 

Mount two 46 3/4" side br 
rear legs to front legs at 
of 8" from bottom of legs 
screws and glue. 

STEP 6 

Check for stability and 
for one hour if glue is used. 



from 
height 
using 



1 et set 



STEP 7 

Place desk top on frame assembly 
so that rear of desk and rear of 
frame are flush and sides are even. 
Using screws, mount desk top to frame 
at 16 locations as per figure 2. 

STEP 8 

Mount angle braces beneath side 
wings of desktop. You will need to 



Paqe T 



bend the braces to fit flush on the 
desk top and legs. Use short screws 
or bolt to desk top. 

STEP 9 

Using sawdust and white glue, Mix 
a paste and fill screwtops to flush 
with the surface. Let dry. 



STEP 10 
ng wood r 
corners of d 
surfaces smooth. 



round 
top. 



►dg< 
Sand 



md 
11 



STEP 11 
Paint with two coat 
dry between coats. 

dry, spray top with cle 



s Latex . Let 
When completely 

Acrylic. 



The desk dimensions can be altered 
to fit your own needs, as can your 
choice of finishes. A friend of mine 
went so far as to put a Formica top 
on his desk. 

An added feature you might wish to 
consider is to mark all cable 
locations from your equipment and to 
cut holes in the desk. This will add 
a lot to a clutter — free top. You can 




FIG, 2 



even cut 
printer and 



i paper feed hole for th< 
store the paper below thi 



Good luck with this pr 
send any questions to me ca 
RAINBOW. 



, and 

of the 



I OIM 



Programs listed in the RAINBOW 
carefully checked for accuracy. Each 
program is run on CoCo before it is 
listed out to the printer, and then 
the program is immediately listed. 
We do this in an effort to be as 
certain as possible the program runs 
as described. 

Some errors may creep in during 
the layout and printing process. We 
will correct any as soon as possible 
after they are called to our 
attention. 

t t t » * 

In DISC INDEX, exclamation points 
show up in lines 130, 242 and 365. 
The first "!" should be DSKI*, the 
second FREE and the third KILL. 

Incidentally, somehow CoCo changed 
these commands to M ! N *s while running 
the program, but before listing. 
The program ran correctly when the 
commands were substituted in running 
toy the program. 

If anyone knows how this might 
have happened, we would be interested 
in hearing about it. 



I 



In SNAIL INVADERS, Line 303, the 
end of the line should read M +GB$ M 



i 

s 



Programs For KidsS 

I 



CIRCUS ADVENTURE -16-K $10. □□ 

firfventire case on a child's level containing aany oraohics, 
songs and surprises. Kon frustrating, yet still challenging. 

MUSIC MARVEL- 16-K or 16-K ext. SID. DO 
Learn to play 2 songs with the aid of your computer. Many 
graphics. Designed especially for young non-reading child. 

READING TWO-PPCK -4-K SID. DO 

POETRY AND SILLY SEKTEMZS : Rny child can create his cwn 
orioinal reading paterial about faniliar oeoole and thinos 

mm m 

RPORTMENT MYSTERY -4-K *&. DO 
A simple adventure-Mystery gaae that familiarizes children 
with using directions. Try to find the secret treasure!!! 



THE OMfiZINB WIZARD — A— K *6. OO 

Ask the WIZARD any Question. He blinks and thinks. Read his 
Musing answers. Is he telling the truth? Who knots??? 

FREE EXTRA PROGRAM ON TAPE KITH ORDERS OF $16.00 OR TORE! 



COMPUTER ISLAND 
~ IDEPT.R., 227 HAMPTON GREEN, STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. 10312 



(other taoes available) 



Page 18 

Software Review... 

COLOR DEMO "TELLS 
w EM l*JMAT" COCO IS 

How Many tiaes have you had some 
friend walk up to your favorite 
•a chine and ask you "just what DOES 
this thing do? M 

Arnold Pouch of Superior Graphic 
Software (406 Little Mountain Road, 
Waynesville, NC, 28786, *24.95> has 
the answer. And, frankly, its quite 
a show. 

TALKING GRAPHIC DEMO doesn't pit 
games nor does it perform any special 
helpful tasks (like balancing a 
checkbook). But, from its Wizard of 
Oz-like talking opening, it keeps 
everyone interested for 12 minutes 
while it explains just what the CoCo 
can do and how it works. 

Anyone who has ever tried to show 
his CoCo off to a friend, neighbor, 
spouse or child has experienced the 
frustration of looking through 
tapes, CLOADing them, rewinding and 
the like. This one program allows 
you to sit back, relax and listen as 
CoCo starts off in a deep voice 
explaining. M I AM A COLOR COMPUTER! 19 

By the time its over, with random 



lines drawn, colors moving all over 
the screen and songs being played, 
you've done a good job of explaining 
it all. Without any work. 

This is, frankly, better than 
anything the people who sell the 
machines have. Pouch says that your 
CoCo "deserves 9 " this program. 

We agree. 



Software Review. •• 

F="L V TMEI C3«LJInJTI_ET- 

GAUNTLET is a fast-moving arcade 
game in Machine Language which has a 
great deal of potential. 

In fact, if you can overcome your 
initial disappointment in its block 
(low-res) graphics, it is a good game 
to play and a difficult game to win. 

Available from Britt Monk, CDP 
(P.O. Box 802, Elyria, OH, 44036 for 
*10> GAUNTLET really does have a lot 
to offer. 

You start out on one side of the 
Universe and have a given amount of 
time to penetrate as far as you can, 
zapping aliens and avoiding meteors 
as you go. Not only can you control 




Color Compuf* 




did you mail your hard earned cash only to receive a 
turkey because the magazine the ad appeared in doesn't 
review Color Computer Software? If you have any of 
these symptoms you're suffering from Color Computer 
Blues! 



Are you tired of searching the latest magazine for 
articles about your new Color Computer? When was the 
last time you saw a great sounding program listing only 
to discover that it's for the Model I and it's too complex 
to translate? Do you feel that you are all alone in a sea of 
Z-80's? On finding on ad for a Color Computer program 

But take heart there Is a cure! 
It's COLOR COMPUTER NEWS. 

The monthly magazine for Color Computer owners and only Color Computer owners. CCN contains the full range of 
essential elements for relief of CC Blues. Ingredients include: comments to the ROMS, games, program listings, product 
reviews, and general interest articles on such goodies as games, personal finances, a Kid's page and other subjects. 

The price for 12 monthly treatments is only $21.00 and is available from: 

& REMarkable Software 




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NAME 



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Allow 8-10 weeks for 1st issue. 



where the ship Mill go horizonally on 
the screen, but you can also control 
how quickly it Mill move by using the 
« joystick. The responses are side 
instantly, giving excellent control. 

A readout at the bottom of the 
screen gives time left in the 
mission, amount of distance traveled 
and the score. You get points for 
zapping aliens and for transversing 
the screen. In other words, the 
faster you go, the more points you 
score. But as you go faster, it is 
more difficult to avoid the aliens 
and meteors. There's a score 
analysis at the end of each game. 

Our main complaint is the low-res 
graphics. This could be a much 
better game Mere the space ship, 
aliens (which are kind of cute, if 
dangerous-looking), stars and meteors 
more finely detailed. Still, once 
you accept the graphics, BAUNTLET can 
be a challenging game to play. 



Software Review. •• 

BR I CKOUT/WORD GUESS 

BRICKOUT and WORD GUESS are 
offered on one cassette Twinpack by 
Rainbow Connection Software (3514 6th 
Place NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, for 
♦11.95). 

Both programs are written for the 
4K CoCo and both are not only very 
fast but excellent examples of what 
can be done with limited memory. 

WORD GUESS is a word guessing game 
which allows you to select the words 
that will be used. Author Wayne 
Diercks gives simple instructions on 
how to modify the program to include 
your own list of words. 

Each letter is represented by a 
star, and you must guess the letters 
that make up the word. The computer 
fills in the letters you guess cor- 
rectly in the proper place, and dis- 
plays the incorrect letters at the 
top of the screen. The quicker you 
guess the right word, the higher your 
total score. 

BRICKOUT is in the popular BREAK- 
AWAY tradition and, while in low-res 
as is necessary with 4K, gives all 
the necessary bells and whistles that 
make this game a good one. You can 
put "English" on the ball with the 
paddle, freeze action for a respite, 
decide when to "start" one of the 
balls and select both paddle size and 



Page 19 

speed of play. There is also an 
autopilot feature that will allow you 
to sit back and watch the game play 
itself. 

BRICKOUT can be played with 
joysticks or from the keyboard. 

As a special offer to RAINBOW 
subscribers, Diercks will make this 
(and all other twinpacks) available 
at a %1 discount. her el y mention 
RAINBOW when ordering. 



NHEREZ I T^T~P~P~P 

Below, through the good offices of 
Bob Rosen of Connection-GO of 
Woodhaven, N.Y. , are some start, end 
and execute addresses for several 
Machine Language programs. 

These addresses can be used to 
relocate the Machine Language 
programs to other portions of the 
memory. 

Say, for instance, you have a 32K 
system and want the M.L. programs 
"out of the way" of BASIC. By 
relocating the program, you free up a 
great deal of RAM for program use. 

Generally speaking, you can add 
16,000 to the addresses and they will 
relocate. This, however, is not 
always so... it depends on what area 
of RAM you end up in after the 
relocation. If your CoCo hangs up, 
try another address. 

You cannot relocate M.L. programs 
without knowing the start, end and 
execute addresses, since they are a 
part of the command you need to use 
to save a M.L. program to tape. 

The most simple procedure to 
relocate is to load the program in, 
but do not type EXEC. Then save the 
program back to tape, using the new 
addresses. However, you can also 
offset load these programs, and then 
save them back to tape with the new 
addresses — which you can determine 
from this list by adding the offset. 
Programs shown are in the order 
necessary to the command: start 
address, end address and execute 
address. 

VIDEOTEX &H1149, &H1986, &HU49 
8-BIT DRIVER &H3FB0, &H3FEA, 
&H3F60 

SCREEN PRINT &H3060, &H3FF6, 
&H3600 

MASTER CONTROL *H3600, &H3FFC, 
&H3600 

CBUG &H0600, &HHDFF, &H0609 



Page 28 
Tutorial 



TWO — T IMIN 



By Wayne A. Diercks 



S1,0 * Before all sound 
commands and before leaving the 
subroutine or high speed part of the 
program. This slows down to normal 
speed no matter what speed is 
selected. 



— how to 

First, an 
doub 1 e-speed 



Lately, a great deal of attention 
has been given to the double-speed 
command (POKE 65495,0) available with 
the CoCo. Little has been said, 
however, * about how it works, its 

and — most importantly 
it correctly. 

explaination of how 
works is in order. The 
gned to run at a 
microprocessor (CPU) rate of 895 KHz 
(commonly called 1 Meg), which makes 
it an average speed personal 
computer. However, by simply typing 
POKE 65495,0 (or placing this as a 
command within a program), the CPU 
will run at double the clock rate (2 
Meg) during most of its cycle. This 
effectively doubles the computer's 
speed. The command POKE 65494,0 will 
restore the clock rate to normal 
again. 

This, then, brings us to the most 
important aspect of the double-speed 
command: How to use it in a program. 
One common method is to declare 
double-speed in the first line such 



10 POKE 65495,0 

Then, if double-speed will not 
work on your particular machine, 
simply delete the line and the 
program will operate at normal speed. 
This is, however, a much better way 
to make the program work as written 
on all computers with up to three 
user selectable speeds. This can 
best be shown by the following code, 
asking the user for the speed 
desired. 

100 S1=65494:S2=S1:S3=S1: • SET ALL 
THREE SPEEDS TO NORMAL 

110 INPUT -SPEED (1-3)"; SP: * ASK 
USER TO SET SPEED DESIRED 

120 IF SP>1 THEN S2=S1«-S1: * SET 

52 TO D0UBLESPEED POKE ADDRESS 
130 IF SP>2 THEN S3=S1«-1: * SET 

53 TO POKE D0UBLESPEED POKE 
ADDRESS IF 3 IS SELECTED 

You now have speed 1 , 2 and 3 
represented in the form of normal and 
double-speed address locations. Now 
in the high-speed mode subroutine or 
portion of your program, insert the 
command: 



POKE S2,0 - At the beginning of 
the subroutine or high speed part of 
the program and after all sound, 
keyboard and joystick reads in order 
to speed up for calculations, 
comparisons and screen prints if 
speed 2 or 3 was sel 



POKE S3,0 
and joystick 
at double- 
selected. 



» all keyboard 
reads so they are read 
only when speed 3 



This is THE most efficient way of 
doing the most double-speed on all 
machines and should become the 
standard of double-speed programming 
for CoCo. 

So, you may ask, "Why not always 
run at double speed?" As always, 
there are complications to overcome. 
Most early models (serial numbers 
below 20,000) contained slower 
MC6809E microprocessors and 6821 
peripheral interface adaptors (PIAs). 
These will rarely run reliably (if at 
all) at double-speed. Later models 



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contain the faster HC68B09E and 
MC68B21 chips. 

Although most of the 
Mi 1 1 run most of the 
faster rate, they Mill 
"lock up" that requires a reset. 
They My also dump the prograe. Me 
recommend you save your program to 
tape -frequently Mhen running 
doubl e— speed. 

The PI A chips are used in all 
Input/Output operations except for 
screen display. Hence, the slower 
PIAs Mill not work reliably on any 
operation involving the cassette, 
RS232 (printer, modem), expansion 
(program packs, disc drives), 
joystick or keyboard ports and all 
sound to the speaker. Although they 
may function intermi ttantly at 
double-speed while reading the 
keyboard or joystick, they nearly 
always "bomb" in the other 
operations. 

Fortunately, there is little need 
for double-speed sound and it is best 



to avoid them 

just 



altogether. However, 
presence of the disc 



control 1 
(even 



in the expansion slot 
>n idle) will automatically 

execute a read of this port, 
restricting the use of double-speed 
on disc software. 

It is also worth noting that each 
time a speed change is executed, the 
computer POKEs an 88 into address 
135. This is the address read by the 
INKEY* command to determine the last 
key pressed and it will return an "X" 
upon its next appearance in the 
program. 

Employing the double-speed 

technique along with other memory— 
and time-saving aids enabled us to 
make Rainbow Connection Software's 
three-speed BRICK OUT game, written 
entirely in 4K Color BASIC, one of 
the fastest and most complete 
available. It is but another tribute 
to the power and advanced design of 
the amazing CoCo. 



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Page 22 



Color Computer 



40 of the world's 
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Including favorite 
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Color Computer 



The must-have 
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The Color Computer 
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Page 23 



Word Processing Lowerkit 

It converts your screen from an illegible checkerboard to this: 



is photograph was taken of an 
dinar y television screen, being 
W by a Color Computer urwnodi- 
led except for the fnstallatior 
the . lowerk i t . Characters: i- 



J. 



4 " 



— - 



QflJMJtCFQRSTlMKVZeTJ 
abcdefghi ft Iimopqrst twcuzJ* __ 

.78981= ttJaTC ) : *- -i < . ><t 

• Complete and ready to install — no software needed 

• Nothing to solder— fully assembled, tested, guaranteed 

• Compatible with all Color Computer software 

• Absolutely no loss of hi-resolution graphics modes 

• Optional cut-off switch restores original reverse-caps display 

• European, Kata Kana flapanese) and Greek characters optional 

$79.95 complete 

CONNECTION— SO 
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LOOK AT THESE FEATURES* 

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3. OUTPUTS ALL OR ANY PART OF RECEIVED TEXT TO PRINTER OR CASSETTE. 
A. SUPPORTS ANY SERIAL PRINTER. 

5. BUFFER AUTOMATICALLY OPENED ON START CHARACTER (12 HEX). 

6. BUFFER AUTOMATICALLY CLOSED ON STOP CHARACTER (14 HEX). 

7. READ MULTIPLE DOWNLOAD FILES FROM TRANSMISSION. 

8. WORD MODE ELIMINATES SPLIT WORDS. 



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rage ±* 
Tutorial 

MOTION F> I CTURE PROGRAMMING < MPP > 



A completely new Method for 
programming superior graphic programs 
has come from the mountains of North 
Carol ina. 

It may well be the best thing to 
come out of the hills since 
moonshine, because Hot ion Picture 
Programming (MPP) — as developed by 
Arnold Pouch of Superior Graphic 
Software — does away with the long 
tedious hours we all know are 
required to produce detailed graphic 
pictures from a program using the 
standard commands such as DRAW, LINE, 
CIRCLE, COLOR, SCREEN, PSET, PCLS, 
PAINT and the like. 

Seldom will any of these commands 
be found in a program developed by 
the new MPP method. Instead, hPP 
uses a new way to divide the graphic 
programming process into three 
di stinct operations. 

The first operation uses a 
modified "drawer" program from 
CHROMASETTE's August, 1981, issue to 
produce a graphic picture. If you 
don't already subscribe, single issue 
cassette tapes are $5 from 
CMROMASETTE (P.O. Box 1087, Santa 
Barbara, CA, 93102). 

The "drawer" will take a little 
practice before you become skilled in 
its use. But soon, you will be able 
to produce graphics in as much detail 
as you want. And, if you have any 
artistic talents, the results can be 
very satisfying. 

When your graphic picture is drawn 
to your satisfaction, your picture 
will be in memory locations 1536 
through 7679 (or graphic pages 1-4). 
Still using your "drawer, M you now 
switch to graphics page five, or five 
and six combined on a 16K machine (up 
to page eight if you have 32K) • It 
is on these pages that you draw what 
are termed graphic motion modifiers, 
such as moving parts for your 
picture, graphic letters and numbers, 
flashing lights, moving hands — 
anything that your imagination can 
come up with that you will want to 
use later to enhance your graphic 
picture and give it motion. 

As an example, suppose you wished 
to draw a face, and have one eye 
blink. You would draw the face with 
the eye fully open on pages 1-4 and 
then go to page 5 and draw a series 



of eyes, the first with the lid a 
quarter way shut, the second with the 
lid half shut, the third with the lid 
three-quarters shut and the fourth 
with it fully shut. These additional 
"eyes" are graphic motion modifiers, 
and you can call them to the main 
screen as you wish through GETs and 
PUTs in your BASIC program. 

In addition, you can "pack" as 
many graphic motion modifiers as you 
wish on a page. Merely by 

referencing their coordinates (an 
easy process with CHROMASETTE's 
"drawer" program) you can do all 
sorts of animation. 

Using CHROMASETTE's "drawer," you 
find the X— Y locations of each item 
on your screen and make a list of 
where to GET them and where to PUT 
them when your program calls for it. 

You still have not written a 
program, but all of your detailed 
graphic work is finished — and it 
was fun doing it. 

Before we leave step one, you will 
need to CSAVEM "picture", 1536, 




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10751 , 44553. (If your aotion 
Modifiers used only five pages, 
change the 10751 to 9215.) That 
produces a Machine language binary 
tape of your picture. 

Now, in step two, you can write 
your program in BASIC language to BET 
and PUT your Motion Modifiers into 
your graphic picture as Much as you 
want. 

Since the Modifier will always 
exist on graphic page five (or More), 
you need not waste Memory by 
DIMensioning each and every 6ET and 
PUT item. 

One DIM for your largest block 
will serve all blocks since you can 
use only one at a time. 

In order to see what you are doing 
while writing and debugging your 
basic program, try using these tools: 

PCLEAR 6: CLOADM "picture" 

<ENTER> (Loads your picture and 
Motion Modifiers. Don't try to 
EXECute or RUN it. You will have a 
wi peout . ) 

### PMODE 3,1: SCREEN 1,0 

(This will start off your BASIC 
program and make your picture 
visible. Never use a PCLS in any of 
your MPP programs. Here, ### refers 
to your BASIC program line number.) 

10000 PMODE 3,1: SCREEN 1,0: 

60T0 10000 <RUN 10000> (To see your 
picture) . 

20000 PMODE 3,3: SCREEN 1,0: 

GOTO 20000 <RUN 20000 > (To see your 
motion modifiers). 

The graphics page numbers will 
change depending on how many graphic 
pages your picture and motion 
modifiers used. 

When your BASIC program is to your 
liking, CSAVE "program" to tape. 

Step three now combines your 
machine language picture tape with 
your BASIC program tape to produce a 
single MPP tape which, when 
completed, will CLOADM: EXEC and 
automatically load your binary 
picture into its proper pages, 
automatically load your BASIC program 
to its proper place in memory and 
<AUT0 START > RUN it. In case you 
have forgotten how to combine machine 
Language and BASIC on one tape, we 
will list details next month — with 
other necessary programming to 
complete MPP. 

The following month we will give 
you a simple graphic picture which 
you can copy with your "drawer" and a 



Page 25 

basic program to give it action. 

Meanwhile, plan out your own 
action graphic ideas and practice 
producing MPP pictures and their 
motion modifiers with your "drawer." 

Superior Graphic Software has 
available an excellent example of MPP 
in its "Craps 6ame" program. See 
advertisment this issue which you 
might want to look at if you want 
good ideas of MPP in action. 



Software Review 

TIH X S * I I OR I VE 

YOU BERSERK 

BERSERK is a first class arcade 
game that, if you even like this sort 
of thing a little bit, will HAVE to 
be included in your library. 

Authored by Ron Krebs of Mark Data 
Products <*24.95, 23B02 Barquilla, 
Mission Viejo, CA, 92691), BERSERK 
proves what we've been saying all 
along — that CoCo is one heck of a 
machine, especially when put in the 
hands of an exceptional programmer. 

This is something different in the 
game world. In BERSERK, you operate 
a person who can move about in a 
series of rooms, defending himself 
against some ape-like creatures. 
He's armed with a laser pistol for 
defense — but the ape-men also have 
the ability to fire. 

If all this wasn't difficult 
enough, the walls of the rooms are 
electrified. Touch one and its 
curtains! Fortunately, there are 
three men available for each game. 

Ah. There's also a bouncing thing 
that looks very much like a refugee 
from PacMan. Except you can't kill 
him. Better run away. • .but watch out 
for the walls and the ape-men. 

Actually, the ape-men are said to 
be robots, but it doesn't look that 
way to us. No matter. This game is 
first class. As you flee from one 
room to another, the rooms "scroll", 
and each one is different. The 
colors are different, too, and the 
sounds are great. 

So are the figures. Your hero 
looks like a man and when he moves, 
his legs move just like he's 
walking. He raises his arm to shoot 
the laser pistol. The robots, too, 
are finely detailed. And the same 
goes for Evil Orvi lie's substiture. 

This one rates an A-*-! 



26 




Frankly, there is tore software 
and hardware appearing lor our good 
friend CoCo than you can shake a 
stick at. There are even tote books 
cooing to oarket, now, lor those of 
you aho tint to be able to type in a 
large variety of prograas. 

Sooe of the nous includes... 

He understand that a couple of the 
"established* bigger software folks 
are hard at work producing new 
software for CoCo under contract to 
Tandy. That could be one of the 
reasons a few firas have oot 
announced anything new in recent 
eonths. Its not that they've quit 
working, its just that they're under 
contract. 

He got a letter the other day 
asking about disc software, and why 
wore isn't available. Its ooving to 
•arket — we hear that alaost 
everyone has sooe sort of disc 
prograa going. If you plan to get a 
disc, better order it. Deliveries 
are running a bit slow at last 
report. 

Speaking of deliveries, things are 
a bit slow on CoCo itself. The 
reason is siaple: Unprecedented 
deaand at Christaas tioe! Ne have 
it on excellent authority that work 
on wore is going on apace. 

Could soaeone have oisread the 
signs on Tandy's new Hodel 16 and 
interpreted it as a replaceaent for 
CoCo? Perhaps. It will use 
Motorola's 16/32-bit cousin to our 
favorite 6809. 

Tandy's Color Scripsit is now 
available in soae area — on a RON 
Pak. He hear it uses the noraal 
32-character screen, but "flips' to 
an eopty screen to give a 
64-character "display. 1 Expect to 
see a review next aonth. 

One of those things a bunch of 
people say they want: A graphic 
flight si aula tor. lie hear Toa Nix 
Software will have one soon. Natch 
our ads! 



Here's one for you drawing 
enthuiasts: Cooputerware's new 3-D 
•rawing Board. The Encinitas, CA 
fin also has two other new offerings 
- NAZERACE and STORM. The latter is 
said to have 135 levels of play. 

Another disc systea is available 
frot CER-CQKP of Las Vegas. It will 
run with any type drive. It is said 
to include three systeas in one 
package — a free-standing disc 
systeo, a fully supported external 
access systeo and a systea which 
interfaces with BASIC and Extended 
Color Basic. It takes up less than 
IK of RAM and can even be used in a 
4K aachine. Match for the review. 

ELECTRONIC SPECIALISTS is 
■arketing a "Super Isolator' which 
will protect CoCo, disc drives and 
the like frot electrical noise, hash 
and spikes. The Natick, NA, fire's 
product has three electrical outlets. 

Sooe of the first books to be 
written especially for CoCo users are 
now available froa CONNECTION-BO of 
Noodhaven, NY. The lower case kit 
for the CoCo is also available froo 
C0NNECT10N-80. 



Newest CoCo software fira? Naybe 
its COMPUTER ISLAND of Staten Island, 
NY y which is featuring gates for 
children and sot* learning prograas 
as well. All is tested on actual 
kids, we understand. 



CCMRITER of TRANSFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGIES is now officially 
available on disc. Tape owners can 
upgrade for $5 froa the Blootingdale, 
IL, cotpany. TRANS TECH is also 
expending its line with sote data 
base, tailing list and checkbook 
reconcilation software — all on disc 
or tape. 

Ne hear NARK DATA PRODUCTS has a 
new, super gate in the works. It'll 
be hard to beat BERSERK, but we'll 
wait and see. 

Has anyone received any order froa 
SEEBREE'S COHPUTINB? Ne'd like to 
know. 



JARB SOFTWARE 

1169 FLORIDA ST. 
IMPERIAL BEACH, CA 92032 

LASER STAR & HELO BATTLE $14.95 

JARBCODE $14.95 

PSYCHIC APTITUDE TEST & 

JARB BIORHYTHM $14.95 

JARB PRINTER UTILITY KIT $14.95 

Programs on quality data Cassette 
with complete documentation. 

COD orders accepted. For regular 
rriaili please add $1 for shipping 
and handling. California residents 
aff 6 m A state sales tax. 

Call or write for free catalog of 
available programs. No collect calls 
please. (714) 429-5516. 

All RAINBOW subscribers are eli- 
gible to deduct $2 from cost of 
each program. 



Software Review. •• 



(really, 
programs 



The "Lunar Lander" program seems 
to be a staple of every software 
library and the quickly growing 
volume of software for CoCo seems to 
be no exception. 

Here we look at two 
three) lunar lander 

available from Tom Mix Software, 3424 
College N.E., Grand Rapids, MI, 49505 
for +15.95 and American Small 
Business Computers, 118 S. hill St., 
Pryor, OK, 74361 for +14.95. 

The Tom Mix package actually 
contains two programs, MOON LANDER 
and MOON LANDER 2. LANDER 2 operates 
very similarly to the "plain" 
version, except it has attitude 
controls and a tougher terrain. With 
those exceptions — and a turning 
lander on the display — the programs 
are essentially the same, although 
having two gives you a whole lot of 
options and should easily satisfy 
even the most enthuastic of lunar 
lander players. 

We like the fine detail in the Mix 
LUNAR LANDER. The landscapes are 
good, there are graphic on-screen 
fuel and speed readouts and a warning 
when the fuel is low. Best of all, 
there is both long-range and 
short-range display — which means 
when you get close to touchdown the 
screen switches to a close-up version 
that makes it a little easier to see 
what you're doing. And makes it 
realistic, too. 



Page 27 

The sound is also good in the Mix 
versions and the final readout gives 
you all the vital information on what 
you did. Its a challenging game (in 
both versions) and a lot of fun to 
play. Each program gives you a 
choice of three landing sites, and 
lets up to four players participate 
in each "game" — with a display of 
how each player did at the end. 
Gravity ratio is also 

user — sel ectabl e. 

The American version, on the other 
hand, is a bit more static — with 
only one possible landing site and no 
on-screen display to tell you how you 
are doing. It was, frankly, much 
easier to "win" this game, although 
losing was more frustrating, too, 
because with no on-screen readouts it 
can appear that you make a soft 
touchdown when, in fact, you are 

going too fast. This final part of 
the program is pretty much a matter 
of guess wor k . 

While the American program does 
provide something the Mix does not — 
random meteors you have to avoid in 
your descent — it lacks the 
short-range radar which is, to our 
mind, an essential to the game. 

Neither program is a bad buy and 
both are vastly superior to the 
"scrolling readout" kind of lander 
program you can type in from a book. 
Still, for our money, we prefer the 
Mix program, although the lunar 
lander addict will probably want to 
purchase both. 




H.U. FUEL 



Lunar Landscape By Tom Mix Software 



1961 INCOME TAX 
DO IT THE EASY WAY! 

Directly follows form 1040, and 
Schedules A and G. Does virtually 
all the work. User-oriented and 
has surprise lights and music to 
match your results. 

Will do an entire return or one 
section at a time. Cassette, 16K 9 
only *9.95. 

WARREN NAPIER 
R.D. 1 
hars, PA 16046 
(412) 776-3368 



I 



faqe 28 




your COLOR COMPUTER with: 



REAL LOWER CASE CHARACTERS 
SI COLUMN x 24 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY 
ADVANCED CASSETTE HANDLING FEATURES 



A POWERFUL TEXT FORMATTER 

SPECIAL DRIVER FOR EPSON MX-80 

A SOPHISTICATED FULL-SCREEN TEXT EDITOR 



and requires absolutely no hardware modifications 



TELEWRITER 

Telewriter is a powerful word 
processor designed specifically for the 
Color Computer. It can handle almost 
any serious writing job and it is 
extremely easy to use It has all the 
advanced features you need to create, 
edit, store, format and print any kind 
of text. With Telewriter you can 
quickly produce perfect, finished 
copy for letters, reports, term papers, 
articles, technical documentation, 
stories, novels, screenplays, 
newsletters. It is also a flexible and 
efficient way to take notes or organize 
ideas and plans. 

51 x 24 DISPLAY 

The Color Computer is an incredibly 
powerful and versatile computer, but 
for text editing it has some major 
drawbacks. The small 32 character by 
16 line screen format shows you too 
little of the text and, combined with its 
lack of lower case letters, bears little 
resemblance to the way text really 
looks on the page. Reverse video in 
place of lower case just adds 
confusion. 

Telewriter eliminates these 
shortcomings with no hardware 
modifications required. By using 
software alone. Telewriter creates a 
new character set that has real lower 
case letters, and puts 24 lines of 51 
characters on the screen. That's more 
on-screen characters than Apple II, 
Atari or TRS-80 Model III. That's 
more than double the Color 
Computer's standard display. 

FULLSCREEN EDITOR 

The Telewriter editor is designed for 
maximum ease of use. The commands 
are single key (or single key plus 
control key), fast, and easy to 
remember. There is no need to switch 
between insert modes and delete 
modes and cursor movement modes. 

Appk II * rtfmtrtd rr«k*i»rt of tppk Compter, toe - Ann ■ rgfitJtrtd unJtm*/* ef Aun. lac TlS-aft * iegj*ie«dtr*iemirm 



You simply type. What you type is 
inserted into the text at the cursor, on 
the screen. What you see on the 
screen is always the current state of 
your text. You can move quickly 
through the text with one key cursor 
movement in all 4 directions, or press 
the shift key simultaneously for fast, 
auto-repeat. You can jump to the top 
or bottom of the text, the beginning or 
end of a line, move forward or 
backward a page at a time, or scroll 
quickly up or down. When you type 
past the end of a line, the wordwrap 
feature moves you cleanly to the next. 

You can copy, move or delete any size 
block of text, search repeatedly for 
any pattern of characters, then 
instantly delete it or replace it with 
another. Telewriter gives you a tab 
key, tells you how much space you 
have left in memory, and warns you 
when the buffer is full. 

FORMAT FEATURES 

When it comes time to print out the 
finished manuscript. Telewriter lets 
you specify: left, right, top, and 
bottom margins: line spacing and lines 
per page. These parameters can be set 
before printing or they can be 
dynamically modified during printing 
with simple format codes in the text. 

Telewriter will automatically number 
pages (if you want) and automatically 
center lines. It can chain print any 
number of text files from cassette 
without user intervention. You can 
tell it to start a new page anywhere in 
the text, pause at the bottom of the 
page, and set the Baud rate to any 
value (so you can run your printer at 
top speed). 

You can print all or any part of the 
text buffer, abort the printing at any 
point, and there is a "Typewriter" 
feature which allows you to type 
straight to your printer. Because 



Telewriter lets you output numeric 
control codes directly (either from the 
menu or during printing), it works 
with any printer. There's even a 
special driver for the Epson MX-80 
that lets you simply select any of its 12 
fonts and do underlining with a single 
underline character. 

CASSETTE HANDLER 

Telewriter makes cassette as simple to 
use as possible. It will search in the 
forward direction til it finds the first 
valid file, so there's no need to keep 
retyping a load command when you 
are lost in your tape. You can save all 
or any part of the text buffer, and you 
can append pre-existing files to what 
you have in the buffer already . You 
can abort an append or filesearch 
without harming the program or the 
text in the buffer. 



'iter will maintain compatihi 
with popular Color Computer disk 
systems, but. since it makes using 
cassette almost painless, you can still 
have a powerful word processor 
without the major additional cost of a 
disk. 

AVAILABLE NOW 

Telewriter turns your Color Computer 
into the lowest cost hi-power word 
processor in the world today. It runs 
in I6K or 32K (32K recommended) 
and is so simple you can be writing 
with it almost immediately. It comes 
with complete documentation and is 
fully supported by Cognitec. 
Telewriter costs $49.95 (California 
residents add 6^7 tax). To order or 
request more information write: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Ave. 

Del Mar, Ca. 92014 

Orcall (714) 755-1258 (weekdays. 
Saturdays, and early morning). We 
will gladly answer y our questions. 



Software Review... 



GOOD D I 



The Major feature of COL OR TERM is 
its screen display. It will show 21 
lines of upper and lower case each of 
which is either 51 or 64 characters 
long. 

The program (from Hart in 

Consulting Ltd., 94 Macal ester Bay, 
Winnipeg,. Han., Canada, R3T 2X5 for 
♦34. 95 U.S.) runs, for all practical 
purposes, in two modes — either as a 
dumb terminal (like VIDEOTEX) or as a 
smart terminal such as COLORCOM-E. 
The only difference is whether you 
call the advanced features into play 
or not. 

As to the display, it performs as 
advertised. And, for those who 
regularly use BBS's and the like 
which do not format to the 32 
character screen, this can be a real 
bonus. However, we feel the letters 
— formed through the graphic screen 
of the CoCo — are not quite as fine 
as those in the TELEWRITER word 
processing program. This may cause 
some problems in reading, but its not 
a big problem. 

As to the other features, there 
are many and COLORTERM is a 
workmanlike program with several 
unique characteristics. As with many 
smart terminal programs, you can 
print out the contents of the memory 
buffer, set the parameters of each of 
the communications options (Baud 
Rate, Stop Bits, Parity, Etc.) and 
you can flip back and forth between 
BASIC and the program. 

You can also save the memory 
buffer to tape for a later printout, 
flip the colors and, a very nice 
feature, ask for assistance from the 
program with the syntax of the 
commands. You also have full screen 
control of the cursor. 

In addition, you are able to 
generate what author David Martin 
calls a "Macro Message. M This would 
be any message that you use often, 
such as a logon procedure. Typing 
only a couple of keys allows you to 
complete the logon sequence. 

You can also M jumble M your output 
to start sending in code if, for 
instance, you wished to store 
confidential files on a mainframe. 
Another code "un jumbles" the code 
when you want to use the files. 

There is also a window command, 



Paqe 29 

that allows you to protect part of 
the screen from scrolling. 

Autorepeat of keys is also available. 

COLORTERM is in Machine Language 
and full instructions are given for 
saving it after options have been 
added. Since it also allows user 
definition of several function 
this is very helpful. 

Ne have been very impressed 
the two terminal programs 
seen so 'far, COLORTERM 
COLORCOM-E. We believe you will be, 
too. 



The Uti 1 i tyman. . . 

POKING MEMORY 
l*J I HTM A D I 



keys, 

with 
have 
and 



By Jorge Mir 
RAINBOW Uti li tyman 



If you own a CoCo disc system, you 
have undoubtedly found that poking a 
6 into memory location 25 to make 
additional RAM available for programs 
and data no longer works. 

This is because the disc system 
RAM areas in Hex 0600 to 0988. 
(Continued on Paqe 3€ ) 




"V ****** 



.<Y~T~~~ MOON LANDER 

2 Programs 



) 
1 



Wo Z Programs • A real treat' 
Train on "Moon Lender' then move up to "Lander II" An outstanding 
flying experience Vrsrt the moon on your CC Em Basic 

ML RABBIT 

No serious programmer can afford to pass this up' 
Make copies of any machine or basic program effortlessly Even copies 
programs thai automatically enecute Completely automatic 
(Caution intended to make back up tapes only) 





$15.95 



only 
$14.95 



^ C *23 p» C **3 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

(16K Ext Basic) 
* Math Drill • Designed for teaching addition, subtraction 
multiplication and division to the student of any age 

Recommended by teachers as an outstanding learning aid. 

* Spelling Teal • Hear your CC talk to you' An outstanding learning 
tool Students love to learn with this program For any age 

CCN-SAMPLER SERIES 
CONNECT FOUR 

Challenging game played either with two players 
or against the computer 4K 

3 GAME PAKS - 4K 

Battleship. Othello. Life or Mastermind. Pig. Spidersweb 

Add SI 00 Pouogt it Handling 

* LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE * 
- TOP ROYALTIES PAID - 

Money Order's sent same day Person* I checks must clear your bank before shipment. 

Michigan residents add 4% Sales Tan 



$19 95 
each 

$19.95 
each 



$7.95 ea. 

$12.95 

$19.95 
ea. pak 



B 

- 



\ 



- 



I 



\ 
t 



f 
\ 



POKE 26 P *H1: 
BASIC programs 



to hav< 
IcHOEOl 



BASIC 
is to 



Pa*? 31 

DISK POKE (Cont'd froa H. 29 5 
In addition, attempting to use RAM 
at Hex 0999 to ODFF also can create 
some problems. 

To make additional RAH available 
with the disc system installed, type 
in the following: 

POKE 25,fcH0Ex 
POKEfcHOEOOpO 

You can then load 
that start at IcHOEOl • 

A more pimple way 
programs start at 
incorporate a short routine in each 
of your programs that make the 
programs relocate themselves to 
IcHOEOl • The routine is listed below: 

1 GOTO 5000 

2 DATA BD,B3,ED, IF, 02 f 7E, 96, A7 

10 ******* ************************ 

20 * THIS AREA FOR YOUR PROGRAM 
30 9 ****************************** 

5000 CLEAR200: FOR 1*0 TO 7: READ E* 
5010 POKEfcHEOH-IjVALC-lcH-i-E*) : NEXT 
5020 DEF(JSR0=8cHE0 1 : X*USR0 ( lcHE09 ) 
5030 60T0 10 



Of course, you can relocate 
program lines anywhere you wish, 
so long as the GOTO in Line 1 and 
GOTO in Line 5030 match the 
numbers. 



thi 



the 
new 



I 
B X 



i ssues 



1-5 
are 

the 
In 



Please note that if your program 
contains DATA statements, you should 
read data in step two first by adding 
the following step before you read 
data in the regular program: 

** RESTORE: FOR X«0 TO 7: READ E*: NEXT 



\c i ssues of 
currently available for 
and for issue 8. No back issues 
available for numbers 6 and 7. 

Back issues sell for $2 each, 
single copy cover price, 
addition, there is a $2.50 per order 
charge for postage and handling. 
This charge applies whether you order 
one back issue or all six now 
avai lable. 

For ease of reference, issues 1-5 
are stapled together as one packet, 
all on white paper. These are a 
special reprint. However, we will 
break the packets and ship whichever 
ones you wish. All back issues now 
available would be $12, plus $2.50 
postage and handling — 
$14.50. VISA and 

accepted. 

All back issues are 
Class Hail. 



a total of 
HasterCard 

sent First 



— 



— 



TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER* 

1SK Extended Basic, Menu-Driven, Well-Documented, Easily-Modified. 
For either cassette or diskette systems (Be sure to specify). 
Place an order of at least $40 and get one extra of your choice free. 
Orders shipped on cassette - Add $5 for shipment on diskette. 



-FURST- 

Date Element Dictionary driven File Update and 
Retrieval SysTem. Create and maintain files according 
to your specifications. Ideas for applications in- 
cluded $25 

-MAILING LABELS- 

Generate and maintain mailing label records. Selective- 
ly print desired quantities. Can keep several label files if 
desired. Designed for Printer VII. easily modified. $20 



-REPORT WRITER- 

Used in conjunction with FURST to selectively format 
reports on your printer. Includes headings and total 
capabilities $15 



-EXERCISE PLANNER- 

Build and maintain complete exercise schedule for 
regular and/or weight programs. Display guides you 
through daily-calculated routines. Print complete 
schedule if desired $15 



-DISK DIRECTORY PRINT- 

For diskette users only. Get hard copy of disk directories on your printer for easy use and reference. Only $5 

■ 

Send check or money order to: 

LAND SYSTEMS 

P.O. BOX 232 -TRS-80 and COLOR COMPUTER 

BellbrOOk, OhiO 45305 ar* Trademarks ot Tandy Corp. 



Utility... 



DISK 



I 



By Charles J. Roslund 

This BASIC program provides 
directory listing on a print 
connected to CoCo. It Mill operate 
on any disk inserted in Drive 0. 

Besi'des providing hard copy, this 
utility gives a little 
information than does the i 
display of the disc directory under 
the CoCo's DOS. A major feature is 
addition of the start, end and 
execute addresses of all Machine 
Language programs. Another, which is 
very handy, is the display of the 
number of free granules available. 
This, of course, is available with 
the FREE command, but it is nice to 
have it on the directory — sort of 
two commands for the price of one! 

The directory listing includes: 

File name and Extension 

Type File 

Format 

Granules Used 

Start, End and Execute Addresses 
Free Granules Remaining 

The printer must be on before 
running the program. When you run 
it, you are prompted for a DISK NAME 
which will print above the directory 
listing. 

The Listing: 

10 ' **♦ DIRECTORY LISTER *«* 

15 ' ♦** BY C ROSLUND 

20 CLEAP1500:DIM GR<68> 

20 FT* < 0 > = "BASI C PROGRAM" :FT*<1) 

*" BASIC DATA" 

40 FTt<2>="MACHTNE LANGUAGE" sFTt 
< 3 >=" SOURCE CODE" 

50 AFt ( 0 ) = " E I NARY" : AFt < 1 ) =" ASC 1 1 

60 PRIMT#-2: INPUT "DISK NAME" ?D*s 

PR INT#-2 , TAP < 30 > D* : PR INT#-2 

70 PPINT#-2.TAP(5)"NAME" ; TAP (21 ) 

■TYPE" ;TAP (28) "FORMAT" ; TAP (47) "G 

PANULES" ; TAP < 59 ) " START, END , EXEC" 

80 FBI NT#-2 , TAP ( 3 ) STRING* (12,"=" 

) ; TAP ( IB ) STRING* (16, " = " ) ; TAP. (38) 

STPING*(6, "=" ) ;TAP(47)STRING*(B, 

"=" ); TAP( 58 > STRING* ( 17, ■■" ) 

90 DSKI* 0, 17,2, A*. P*:FP*=LEFT*( 

A* , 68 ) 

100 F0RI=1T063:GR( 1-1 )-ASC(MID*( 
FE* , I . 1) >:NEXTI 
110 F0RX=3T0U 



Page 31 

120 DSKI* 0, 17, X, AA*,BP* 
130 AA*=AA*+LEFT*(PP*, 120) 
140 F0RN=0T07 

150 NA*=MID*(AA*,N«32+1,8) :EX*=M 
ID* ( AA*, N*32+9, 3 ) s GR=ASC (MID* ( AA 
*,N»32+14, 1 > ) 
160 FG=GR 

170 FT*=MID*(AA*,N»32+12, 1 ) :AF*= 

MID*(AA*,N*32+13, 1 ) 

180 IF LEFT* ( NA*» 1 )«CHR* (0 ) THEN 

270 

190 IF LEFT* ( NA«, 1 )=CHR*( 255) THE 
N280 

200 AF= ASC ( AF* ) AND 1 
210 F0RI=1T068 

220 IF GR(GR) <128THEN GR=GR(GR): 
NEXTI 

230 IF ASC (FT*) =2 THEN300 
240 P R I NT#-2 , TAP ( 3 ) NA*+ " . " +E X * ! T 
AP ( 1 8 ) FT* ( ASC ( FT* ) ) ; TAP ( 38 ) AF* ( A 
F) ; TAP ( 49 ) I ; 

250 IF ASC (FT*) =2 THEN PRINT#-2, 

TAP(5B)"«" ;pp*;",*" ;ep*;",»" ;ea* 

260 PRINT#-2 
270 NEXTN, X 

280 P R I NT#-2 : PR I NT#-2 , TAB (15) "FR 
EE GRANULES: " , ! (0) 
290 GOTO60 

300 LG=GR(GR) :LS=LG AND 3l:LL=GR 
210 LB=ASC(MIDt<AAt,N«32+16, 1 ) ) 
320 IF FG<34 THEN TN=INT<FG/2) E 
LSE TN=INT<FG/2)+l 
330 SN=1+<FG AND 1)»9 
340 DSr It0,TN,SN, At,Bt 
350 BP=ASC(MIDt<At,4, 1 ) >»256+ASC 
<MIDt<At,5, 1 ) > 

360 BPt=HEXt(BP) :BPt=STRINGt(4-L 
EN<BPt),"0")+BPt 

370 EP=EP+ASC<MIDt< At, 2, 1 ) >»256+ 
ASC(MIDf ( At, 3, 1 ) )-l 
380 EPt=HEXt<EP) :EPt=STRINGt(4-L 
EN(EPt ), "0" )+EPt 

390 IF LL<34 THEN TN=INT(LL/2) E 

LSE TN=INT(LL/2)+l 

400 SN=(LL AND 1)»9+LS 

4 1 0 DSK 1 10 , TN , SN , At , B t : At =At +LEF 

Tt <Bt, 127) 

420 EA=ASC(MIDt<At,LB-l, 1) )»256+ 

ASC(MIDt( At, LB, 1 ) ) 

430 EAt=HEXt(EA) :EAt=STRINGt < 4-L 

EN<EAt),"0" )+EAt 

440 G0T0240 



Page 32 
Game 



ds *4. .. 



MAK I IMC3 
AS AN 



By John L. Urban 

most Fantasy Role-Playing 
Games, the referee must spend quite a 
bit of time both while the game is in 
progress - and during his free time 
looking for Nays to keep one step 
ahead of the players. That Means 
that, usually, too much time is spent 
creating the scenario, researching 
and developing ideas and the like. 

Meanwhile, the players meet once a 
week (or whatever) and flight, slash, 
destroy and plunder the referee's 
hard work — usually taking an almost 
sadistic pleasure in doing so. 

For most FRP games, modules can be 
purchased which aid the referee by 
cutting research time. But, the 
modules can be expensive, espcially 
considering they can be used only 
once per group to retain "freshness." 

When I first played as a referee, 
I knew there had to be a simple 
solution. One is obviously to get a 
computer. And a program. 

One of the first things that must 
be done in a FRP is to create a 



o 

\Y2 




[ 



]|7t jut (4jKB rrncrr. CJvCUMl. 0*10 **<ii. u. 



r 



— OOOD KM FOR — RADIO 

COLOR CONPVTER OWNERS — CMDCSE ANT ONE CAKE PRO* THE LIST SELON 
> POR 17.00 OR ANY THREE POR $15-00 mm WHAT A RARGAIN Mil 

I ALL GAM REQUIRE ONLY A BIND** OP •*€' TO ROT. CASSETTE -»LAIER AND • 
I JOYSTICKS ARE REQUIRED. THIS IS AN INTRODUCTORY 0PPER PRO* "PRO -CANES" J 
I DON'T MISS THIS GREAT SALE •• SAVE SSSS — SEND ORDER(S) TO DAT • 

>M M mm i i «m «m » inM « n»«n >MM 

: 
s 



i) 

S) 

3) 
») 
3) 
«> 



7) BREAK -THE -CODE 

I) IX0RKTT1QV 

f) POKER -DICE (TAJfRES LID) 

10) LOTA-LANDER 

11) TIC -T AC -DRAGON 

12) RUSSlAN-ROOLmS 



X 

♦ 



im nm < 



>« n m«>m i i miim »M m i« 

• 

Ml ALSO. RAVE "RRICKAMAT" (GREAT CRALLE1CE) POR 97.00 EACH. AND f 

"GAUNTLET* (SPACE CANS) POR $10.00 EACH. RTfl! IS LINITSD !!J! • 
>M m i »» «« MM« «« m« » M« m*tm>mM»mM*m»«t 

: 

LOTS OP P9R I M I • 



SEND OROER(S) TO i VEX CO INTERNATIONAL (DEPT.lt. ) 

— JS70 NEST L*)RD STREET 
CLEVELAND. 0N10 **1U 



» mm i mi ••••wmw»mm»»m>»m» 



f 
i 

I 



character. This is done in many 
different Nays. Why not let the 
computer do it for you? In so doing, 
time spent in actually playing the 
game will increase. Also, any 
updates could be done after playing 
the game, saving more time, and the 
data could be stored to- tape or disc 
— or a printout could be made for 
each player. All told, the time 
savings could be tremendous. 

So, this month, I present a 
program which will do all these 
things. The program itself is 7190 
bytes long, which will run easily on 
a 16K Extended machine. You may wish 
to PCLEAR 1 on power up to be safe. 
It will run as is, but, not knowing 
the requirements of individual games, 
I have used only 25 variables — 
whi ch will create a bare minimum 
character for Advanced Dungeons and 
Dragons. To conserve memory, REM 
statements can be deleted without 
editing the INKEY* associated with 
the menu. 

One word of caution: If you have 
no plans to get a disk (or a printer) 
then delete the disk and printer 
routines. If these are used without 
the particular devices connected, the 
program will hang up. Since CoCo has 
no error-trapping, the hang-up will 
result in loss of data. 

As I stated, this is a bare 
minimum program. Variables used are 
NAM* (Name), ST (strength), PER* 
(percentile), ITEL (intelligence), 
MIS (wisdom), DEX (dexterity), CON 
(constitution) , CHA 
(level), CLA* 
(experience points) , 
POP (polymorph) ROD 
wand), BW (breath 
(spell), AC (armor class), SEX* (sex 
of character), AGE (age of 
character), FT, IN (height in feet, 
inches), RAC* (race), DI* (hit dice), 
TI* (Title of character). 

If you do any adding or deleting 
of variables in the program, make 
sure you adjust the data statements 
in line 6500. These are the data 
variables for the files. If they are 
changed in any way or order, it could 
have disasterous results. 

I must confess to an oversight on 
my part. The routines in lines 30000 
to 30001 are more in the line of true 
dice rolls rather than an accum- 
ulation of the total dice. I want to 
thank all of you who pointed out this 



(charisma), LEV 
(class), EP 
PPD (paralyze), 
(rod, staff 
weapon ) , 



ror in my previous articles. 
The eenu is self-explanatory. The 
Computer Created Stats (Option 1) is 
used to create character abilities. 
If a player chooses to roll his own 
character, or brings a character from 
another campaign, then skip this 



The Player /Update/Review (Option 
2) is the main part of the program. 
This must be used before any of the 
other options, except Option 1. 
Otherwise, empty files will be 
created. 

This routine checks to see if any 

data is left unfilled. If the 

variables are empty, then you will be 

prompted for the data. These 

variables can be set to null by 

pressing <ENTER> at any time, but the 

program will ask for data to be input 

each time the routine is run. If any 

data is not entered correctly, or the 

character is to be updated, then any 

answer to the prompt "IS THIS 

INFORMATION CORRECT?" other than 

"yes" will clear all variables and 

display the first player update 

screen. With a little work, you can 

adjust this routine to update only 

those variables which you want 
changed. 

The printer routine is formatted 
for 80-columns and the LP VII. You 
will have to make a few control code 
changes if your printer is different. 

All routines are self -prompting 
and will return to the main menu when 
completed. 

This program is still undergoing 
modification and updating. A 
finished program is expected to be 
available in June. A copy of this 
program can be obtained on a quality 
tape for $10. Those who wish to 
upgrade to the finished program will 
be able to do so with proof of 
purchase and a nominal fee. 

You can order the game from me at 
1117 25th Street, San Diego, CA, 
92154. I'll also welcome comments 
and suggestions about the series at 
the same address. 

Until -next month. And watch out 
for devlish dungeons. 

The Listing: 

1 PEN ************************* 

2 REM * CHARACTER GENERATOR * 

3 REM * VER. 3.0 ♦ 

6 REM * WRITTEN FEB* 1982 ♦ 

7 REM * BY ♦ 

8 REM * JOHN L. URBAN ♦ 

9 REM ************************* 



20 CLEAR500 Pi9e33 
991 REM * MAIN MENU ROUTINE * 
1000 CLS s PRINTTAB ( 12 ) "main menu" 
:'PRINT:PRINT"1. COMPUTER CREATED 

STATS" :PRINT"2. PLAYER CREATE/U 
PDATE/REVIEW" :PRINT M 3. SAVE DATA 

TO CASSETTE" 8 PRINT" 4. RETRIEVE 
DATA FROM CASSETTE" 
1010 PRINT"5. SAVE DATA TO DISK" 
:PRINT"6. RETRIEVE DATA FROM DIS 
K":PRINT"7. PRINTOUT CHARACTER D 
ATA" :PRINT"8. RUN ANOTHER CHARAC 
TER" s PRINT" 9. END PROGRAM" 
1020 PR I NT: PR I NT" PRESS NUMBER 
OF YOUR CHOICE" 
1940 REM * GET NUMBER * 
2000 A$= I NKE Y$ : I F A$= " " THEN2000 : E 
LSE : I FA$ < " 0 " 0RA$ > " 9 " THEN 1 000 
2010 ON VAL(A$) GOSUB 30004,3009 
9 , 20999 , 2 1 999 , 5 000 , 6000 , 24000 

2012 IF VAL(A$)=8 THEN 23000 

2013 IF VAL(A$)=9 THENCLS ' PRINTS) 
236, "THANK YOU" : FORI = 1T0 1 000 :NEX 
T:END 

2020 GOTO 1000 

4991 REM * SAVE DATA TO DISK * 
5000 CLS s PR I NTS64 , " PLEASE ENTER 
FILE NAME:";:INPUTFIL$:FIL$=MID* 
<FIL$, 1,8) :PRJNTa224, "DISK OUTPU 

T IN PROGRESS ":0PEN"0",# 

1,FIL$ 

(Continued on Paoe 34 ) 



C. C. Writer 

[ Nord Processing for the TRS-BOt Color Computer ] 
Features Page Formatting, Block Moves, Tabs, Sinttnci De- 
lttion and Insertion, Global Starch and Replace, Cintiring, 
Indenting, Pagi Paust, ASCII Code Translation, Justifi- 
cation, Scrolling RfvitM, Keyboard Stops, and Fill Chaining. 



U-32K cmtttt-t35. 



NEW! — > Check Rec Plus 

Rtconcilis your Checkbook AND allows you to kttp Htio 
Entries of cash and credit card expenses nithout affecting 
your Checkbook balance. The History Files eay be Listed and 
Totaled by Incoee or Expense Category for Budgeting or Tax 
Preparation. On screen Trial Balancing and printed Trial 
Balances, Audit Trails, and Suaaaries (REQUIRES PRINTER). 
Current balance is displayed on the Screen Menu and Reports. 
Save yourself frustration and perhaps soie loney too. 

— > Prices until April 15th: <— 
16K Version-125, 32K with extensive proipts-130 
16-32K Disk Systea with Proepts-135 
All versions include Systee Binder, Cassettes or Disk with 
storage pockets, and docuaentation. 

For inforaation, catalog, or orders urite: 



TrinsTek BSC 2-4 
194 Lockwood 
Bl oomi ngdal m , IL 6010B 
I TRS-80 is a Trademark of Tandy Corporation 



■ 



FRP (Cont'd fro* Pq. 23 ) 

5010 FOR I = 1 T025 : READA* : PR I NT# 1 , A 
*: NEXT: RESTORE 

5020 CLOSE#l :FORI=lTO500:NEXTiCL 
S s PR I NT3224 < * TASK COMPLETE. . RETU 
RNING TO MAIN MENU FOR FURTHER R 
E<SUESTS"»FORI = 1TO1000:NEXT:RETUR 
N 

5992 REM * RETRIEVE DATA FROM « 
5994 REM « DISK * 

6000 CLS 8 PR I NT3224 , " PLEASE INPUT 
FILE NAME TO BE RE-TRIEVED FROM 
DISK"|«INPUTFIL* 

6001 IF LEN<FIL*)>8 THEN FIL*=(M 
ID*(FIL*, 1,8) 

6010 OPEN"I",#l,FIL* 

6020 CLS : PRINT3224, " INPUT FROM D 

ISK IN PROGRESS. ..." :PRINT:PRINT 

"FILE NAME=" +FIL* 

6030 F0RI = 1T025:READA*: INPUT#1, A 

*: NEXT: RESTORE 

6040 GOTO5020 

6500 DATA NAM*, ST, PER* ,_I TEL, WIS, 

DEX , CON, CHA, LEV, CLA*, EP, PPD, POP, 
ROD, BW, SPE, AC, SEX*, AGE, WOC , FT, IN 
,RAC*,DI*,TI* 

20993 REM « SAVE TO CASSETTE « 

20999 CLS 

21000 PRINTS224, "SET UP CASSETTE 
TO RECORD DATA, THEN PRESS ANY 

KEY" : AN*=INKEY*: IF AN*=" "THEN 21 
000 

21030 CLS:PRINT364, "PLEASE ENTER 
FILE NAME:" ; : INPUTFIL*:FIL*=MID 
*(FIL*, 1,8) :PRINTS224, "CASSETTE 
OUTPUT IN PROGRESS...." :OPEN"0", 
#-l,FIL* 

21040 FOR I = 1 T025 : READ A* : PR I NT#- 1 
, A* ".NEXT: RESTORE 

21045 CLOSE#-1:FORI=1TO500:NEXT: 
CLS: PR I NT 3224, "TASK COMPLETE. .RE 
TURNING TO MAIN MENU FOR FURTHER 
REQUESTS" : FORI = 1 TOl 000 : NEXT : RET 
URN 

21993 REM * RETRIEVE DATA # 

21994 REM # FROM CASSETTE.... * 

21999 CLS 

22000 PRINT3224, "SET UP CASSETTE 
TO RETRIEVE" :PRINT"DATA, THEN P 

RESS ANY KEY" :AN*=INKEY»: IF AN*= 
"" THEN 22000 

22010 CLS : PR I NT3224 , " PLEASE INPU 
T FILE NAME TO BE RE-TRIEVED FRO 
M CASSETTE" ; :INPUTFIL* 
22020 IF LEN(FIL*)>8 THEN FIL*=( 
MID*(FIL«, 1,8) 

22040 CLS :PRINT3224, "INPUT FROM 

CASSETTE IN PROGRESS. .." '.PRINT :P 

R I NT "FILE NAME=" +FIL* 

22045 OPEN"I",#-l,FIL* 

22050 FORI =1T025: READA*: INPUT*- 1 

, A*: NEXT: RESTORE 



22992 REM « HERE WE CLEAR OUT « 

22993 REM * ALL VARIABLES TO * 

22994 REM « RUN ANOTHER CHAR- « 

22995 REM « ACTER- * 
23000 CLS:PRINT3224, "CLEARING VA 
RIABLES, STAND BY ..." : CLEAR : FORI 
= 1 TO 1 000 : NEXT : PR I NT3224 , " VAR I ABL 
ES CLEARED, RETURNING. .." :FORI = l 
TO500:NEXTI:GOTO100B 

23993 REM « -PRINTER ROUTINE- # 
24000 CLS 

24005 PRINT3224, "MAKE SURE PRINT 
ER IS ON-LINE" : PRINT" PRESS ANY K 

EY TO WHEN READY ":A*=INKEY* 

:IF A*="" THEN24005 

24010 CLS:PRINT3224, "OUTPUTTING 

DATA TO PRINTER ":PRINT#-2,C 

HR»( 10) ; "NAME: " ;NAM*;CHR*( 10) : PR 
I NT#-2 , " T I TLE : " T I * ; TAB ( 40 ) " LEVEL 
: "LEV:PRINT#-2, "EXPERIENCE POINT 
S:";EP;TAE(40)"HIT DICE:" ;DI*:PR 
I NT#-2 , " CLASS : " ; CLA* ; TAB ( 40 ) ■ AGE 
:" ;AGE 

24020 PRINT#-2, "WEIGHT: "; WOC; TAB 
( 40 ) " RACE : " ; RAC* : PR IMT#-2 , " ARMOR 
CLASS : " AC ; TAB < 40 ) " SEX : " ; SEX* : PR 
INT#-2, "WEIGHT:" ;WOC;TAB(40) "HEI 

ght:";FT;"'";in;""" 

24030 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10); U CH ARA CT 
ER ABILITIES: " ;TAB(40) "SAVING T 
HR0WS:":IF PER*<>" "THEN PRINT#-2 
,USING"STR: ##" ;ST; :PRINT#-2, PER 
♦; :PRINT#-2,TAB(40)" PARALYZE: " ; 
PPD ELSE PRINT#-2,USING"STR: ##" 
; ST ; : PR INT#-2 , TAB ( 45 ) " PARALYZE : 
•PPD 

24040 PRINT#-2,USING "INT: ##• ; 
ITEL ; : PR INT#-2, TAB ( 45 ) " POLYMORPH 
: "P0P:PRINT#-2,USING"WIS: ##" ;W 
IS; :PRINT#-2,TAB(45)"R0D, STAFF 
OR WAND" ; ROD: PRINT#-2, USING "DEX 
## " ; DE X ; : PR I NT#-2, TAB ( 45 ) " BREATH 

WEAPON : " ; BW 
24050 PRINT#-2,USING"C0N: ##";C0 
N; :PRINT#-2,TAB(45) "SPELL: ■ ;SPE 
:PRINT#-2,USING"CHA: ##";CHA 
24500 RETURN 

29993 REM * COMPUTER STATS * 

30000 X=0:FOR R=l TO 3:X=RND(6)+ 
X:NEXTR: RETURN 

30001 X=RND( 10) -1 : RETURN 

30004 CLS:LEV=1 : PRINT: PRINT : PRIN 
T" WHAT IS THE CHARACTER' S" : INPUT 
" NAME " ; NAM* 

30005 CLS :PRINTTAB(5)" COMPUTER C 
REATED STATS": PRINT 

30010 GOSUB30000 : ST=X : PER=0 : GOSU 
B30000 : 1 TEL=X : GOSUB30000 : W I S= X : G 
OSUB30000 : DEX=X : GOSUB30000 : CON=X 
:GOSUB30000:CHA-X 

30015 IF ST=18 THEN GOSUB30001:P 
ER*=STR*(X) :GOSUB30001 :PER*=" ("+ 
PER*+STR*(X)+" )" 



30020 IF STOIB THENPRINTUSIN5"S 
TR ##" ;ST:ELSE:PRINTUSING"STR ## 
" ;st; :PER» 

30021 PRINTUSING" INT ##" ;ITEL:PR 
INTUSING-WIS ##" ;WIS: PRINTUSING" 
DEX ##" ;DEX: PRINTUSING" CON ##";C 
ON: PRINTUSING" CHA ##";CHA 

30025 PRINT: INPUT" IS THIS OK";AN 
♦ : IF LEFT* ( AN* , 1 >"<>■ Y" THEN30005 : 
ELSE: CLS: PRINTS1&0. " THANK YOU, "N 
AM*: PR I NT3224, "RETURNING TO MAIN 

MENU F.OR FUR-" :PRINT"THER INPUT 
":FOR 1=1 TO 1000:NEXTI 

30026 RETURN 

30093 REM « PLAYER STATS * 

30099 CLS 

30100 PRINT" PLAYER CREATED/UPDA 
TED/REVIEW" :PRINTTAE( 14) "STATS" : 
PRINT 

30110 IF NAM*<>"" THEN PR I NT "NAM 
E: " ;NAM*: ELSE: PR I NT "WHAT IS THE 
CHARACTER'S" : INPUT "NAME" ;NAM* 
30120 IF AGE <>0 THEN PR I NT "AGE:" 
;AGE: ELSE: INPUT" AGE" ; AGE 
30130 IF RAC*<>"" THENPR INT" RACE 
: " ;RACt:ELSE: INPUT"RACE" ;RAC* 
30140 IF CLA*<>"" THENPR I NT " CLAS 
S: " ;CL A*: : ELSE: INPUT "CLASS " ;CLA* 
30145 IF LEVO0 THENPRINT"LEVEL : 
"; LEV: ELSE: INPUT "LEVEL" ;LEV 
30147 IF EPO0 THENPR I NT " EX PERI E 
NCE POINTS" ;EP:ELSE: INPUT"EXPERI 



Pane 35 

ENCE POINTS" ;EP 

30150 IF STO0 THEN PR I NT " STRENGT 
H: " :ST; :ELSE: INPUT "STRENGTH" ;ST 
30155 IF ST<=17 THEN PRINTCHR*(3 
2) i GOTO 30170 

30160 IF ST=18 AND PER*<>"" THEN 
PRINT PER*:ELSE:IF ST=18 AND PE 
R*="" THEN INPUT PER*"; PER* 
30170 IF ITELO0 THEN PR I NT "INTEL 
L I GENCE : " ; I TEL : ELSE : I NPUT " I NTELL 
IGENCE" ; ITEL 

30180 PRINT:PRINT: INPUT" IS THIS 
INFORMATION CORRECT" ; AN*: IF LEFT 
* ( AN* , 1 ) <> " Y " THEN CLEAR : GOTO300 
99 

30190 CLS: PRINT" PLAYER CREATED/ 
UPDATED/REVIEW" :PRINTTAB( 11 ) "STA 
TS(CONT)" : PRINT 

30200 IF WISO0 THENPR I NT" WISDOM 
:" ;WIS:ELSE: INPUT"WISDOM" ;WIS 
30210 IF DEXO0 THENPRINT" DEXTER 



ITY:" ;DEX:ELSE: INPUT"DEXTERITY" ; 
DEX 

30220 IF CONO0 THENPR I NT "CONST I 
TUT ION: "; CON :ELSE: I NPUT "CONST ITU 
TION" ; CON 

30230 IF CHAO0 THENPRINT" CHARIS 
MA:" ; CHA : ELSE: I NPUT "CHARISMA" ;CH 
A 

30240 PR I NT: PR I NT "SAVING THROWS: 

■ 

( Continued on Page 36 ) 




COLOR COMPUTER DISK SYSTEM 

A complete disk drive system for the color computer, featuring the Tall Grass Technology 
Double density, buffered disk controller. This system will support up to 4 51/4 in. disk 
drives with a maximum capacity of 3.2 Mega bytes of storage using double sided 80 track 
drives. This is a minimum of 4 times the capacity of the "Standard" color computer disk 
drive system. 

DISK OPERATING SYSTEM (CCMD + 9) 

This is a full featured "Basic" compatible disk operating system which does "NOT" require extended Basic and will even run on a 4K 
color computer. It includes a complete dynamic allocation system that leaves no wasted or unused space on the disk. It will 
automatically repack disk space when files are deleted to reduce file fragmentation and increase access time. 

This system features three operating systems in one, the first is a free standing system which has 11 commands for loading, saving, 
removing, changing, checking, analyzing and executing files on disk. It can be configured to allow any mixed combinations of 35, 40 
and 80 track drives. 

The second system is a completely supported external access system for interfacing with virtually any program requiring the use of 
the disk system. It includes 10 functions for opening, closing, reading, writing sequencial and random access files. There are also 13 
subroutine functions and 7 I/O subroutines accessable to the programmer. 

The third system is a Basic interface system which includes 6 direct execute Basic commands and 6 indirect commands which 
conform to the standard Basic tape & printer I/O commands and allow use of string and numeric variables for disk parameters. Up to 9 
files can be active at once, all disk file memory allocation is done automatically at run time. Also, Basic has access to all the free 
standing DOS commands either directly or under program control. 

PRICES: 



Controller W/CCM0 + 9 Eprom $159.95 

Disk Controller only S99.00 

CCMff + 9 Oos on 2732 Eprom S69.00 

CCASM9 disk assembler $34.95 

CCEDT9 disk text editor $24.95 

CCOISS disk disassembler $29.95 

CCUTLY disk utilities $19.95 

CDTPRO Text processor $39.95 



Games from Spectral Associates 



CGAME1 HI-RES Graphic Game 
includes 



Space Invaders 
Meteroids 
Space Wars 



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CGAME2 mixed game disk 
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Battle Fleet 

Space Traders 
Adventure 



$39.95 



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Add S1 00 Postage - MC/VISA Add 3% 



Page 36 

FRP ?Cart'd frw P9. 35 ) 

30250 IF PPDO0 THENPRINT" PARALY 
ZE"." »PPD:ELSE: INPUT" PARALYZE" ; PP 
D 

30260 IF POPO0 THENPRINT"POLYMO 
RPH : " ; POP : ELSE : INPUT" POLYMORPH" ; 
POP 

30270 IF RODO0 THENPRINT"ROD, ST 
AFF OR WAND:" ; ROD: ELSE: INPUT" ROD 
.STAFF OR WAND"; ROD 
30280 IF EWO0 THENPRINT "BREATH 
WEAPON : "*; EW : ELSE : I NPUT " BREATH WE 
APON" ;BW 

30290 IF SPEO0 THENPR I NT "SPELL : 
" ;SPE: ELSE: INPUT" SPELL" ;SPE 
30300 PRINT: INPUT" IS THIS INFORM 
AT I ON CORRECT" ; AN*: IF LEFT* ( AN*i 
1)<>"Y" THEN CLEAR : GOTO30099 
30310 CLS:PRINT" PALAYER CREATED 
/UPDATED/ REVIEW" :PRINTTAB( 1 1 ) "ST 
ATS(CONT)" :PRINT 

30320 IF ACO0 THENPRINT" ARMOR C 
LASS:" ;ACELSE: I NPUT "ARMOR CLASS 
" ;AC 

30330 IF SEX*<>"" THENPR I NT "CHAR 
ACTER'S SEX:" ;SEX*:ELSE: INPUT"CH 
ARACTER'S SEX";SEX* 
30340 IF WOCO0 THENPR I NT "WEIGHT 
OF CHARACTER: " ;WOC:ELSE: INPUT'W 
EIGHT OF CHARACTER" ;WOC 
30350 IF HTO0 AND INOO THENPRI 
NT "HEIGHT (FT, IN) : " ?FT; " ' " ; IN; " " 
" :ELSE: INPUT"HEIGHT(HT, IN)" ;FT, I 

N 

30360 IF DIC*<>"" THENPRINT" HIT 
DICE:" ;DI*:ELSE: INPUT"HIT DICE(E 
X. D8)";DI* 

30370 IF TI*<>"" THENPRINT "TITLE 
: " ;TI*:ELSE: INPUT" TITLE OF CHARA 
CTEP" ;TI* 

30380 PRINT : PRINT : INPUT" IS THIS 
INFORMATION CORRECT" ; AN* : IF LEFT 
* ( AN* , 1 X > " Y " THEN CLEAR : GOTO300 
99 

30390 PR INT "THANK YOU, "; NAM* : FOR 
1 = 1 TO 500 : NEXT I : RETURN 

Software Review... 



I RCUS 
I 



LJIM "■ 



By Tracy Hirsch 

■ » 

This game was fun? I liked the 
places it took me to and if you 
pushed the wrong button, you went 
home. 

The first time I used 110 turns 
and ate 23 hot dogs. The second time 
123 turns and 36 hot dogs. Its 
pretty tricky. 



— 



CIRCUS ADVENTURE (by Computi 
Island, Dept. R f 227 Hampton Green, 
Staten Island, NY 10312, *10> is 
advertised as a "program for kids" so 
we let eight-year — old Tracy play it. 
She liked it a lot. 

For the 16K CoCo, Circus Adventure 
lets kids wander around a circus lot 
looking for the popcorn man. When 
they find him, they win. On the way, 
they visit tigers, high-wire artists 
and the like. Its in low-res 
graphics, but very cute and keeps the 
attention of younger ones. There is 
lots of music and color. 

Another thing you can do is visit 
the hot dog stand — as you can see, 
Tracy did several times. 

A real nice feature is the 
inclusion of a cardboard "ticket" 
with the documentation. The kids can 
hand it to you when they want to play 
the game. 

A nice program. 



— 




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Tandy Corp. 



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CERTIFIED CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS ONLY 
PHONE ORDERS - CALL MON FRI 9 5 EST 



Software Review. 

A F^^CK DF FUN 
I have a complaint about PAC 
ATTACK from Computerware (Dept. R» 
Box 668, Encinitas, CA, 92024, 
$19. 95) • And, if you acquire it, you 
will probably have the same one. 

Shortly after its arrival, I 
installed PAC ATTACK in CoCo for a 
look-see. Two minutes of enjoyment 
passed -•. before one of the other people 
who lives here noticed it and wanted 
to play. Lost time: Several hours 
when I really should be doing 
something else with the CoCo. 

I have come into the house only to 
find the computer in use, with PAC 
ATTACK. Its an addictive game, and 
this version is so fine that all of 
its powers of addiction are at full 
force. 

If you wish to see what PAC ATTACK 
is like, go to the local arcade. Its 
every bit as good as the "big" 
version, a lot less expensive and all 
sorts of fun. 

Yes, those little creatures are 
there. ..and there are "energy dots." 
Then there is the PAC ATTACKer, who 
gobbles things up quite rapidly. The 
joystick control is excellent and 
very easy to use. There is on-screen 
scoring, too. 

PAC ATTACK is first class in every 
way. Its a perfect version of this 
popular program and I can recommend 
it to you most highly. 

Software Review. • • 

RABB I T MAKEIS ML 
BACKUPS POSSIBLE 

OK. We know its complicated to 
make backups of your Machine Language 
programs. • .but you say someone just 
gave your five-year-old a "Magnet 
Fun" game for his birthday and he's 
been getting dangerously close to 
your tape collection? 

ML RABBIT (DSL Computer Products, 
P.O. Box 1113, Deanborn, MI 9 48121, 
SI 4. 95) may be the salvation you hope 
for. t£ 

Painlessly, effortlessly and 
easily, ML RABBIT does what rabbits 
are known for best. • .making more 
rabbits. In this case, ML RABBIT 
will make more Machine Language 
programs than you can shake a carrot 
at. 

The process is "automatic," in 



Paie 37 



that all you need do is load in ML 
RABBIT, load in the Machine Language 

program you wish to backup, and then 
load in a blank tape on which to make 
the copy. ML RABBIT prompts you to 
do what when. 

ML RABBIT comes with the 
admonition that it - is designed to 
backup your own tapes. At the risk 
of harping on a subject, let us add 
that this is what you should buy it 
to do. It answers a very real need 
— to have a backup in case something 
happens to the original — and should 
not be abused. 

There's nothing fancy about this 
program. But it does do what it 
says and that's a real plus. 

SUBM I TT I IMC3 MATER I AL- 
TO RAINBOW 

Contributions to the RAINBOW are 
welcome from everyone. We like to 
run a variety of programs which would 
be useful /fun/helpful to other CoCo 
owners. 

Program submissions should be on 
tape or disc. We're sorry, but we do 
not have the time to key in programs. 
All programs should be supported by 
some editorial commentary, explaining 
the program and how it works. 

Please do not submit programs or 
articles currently submitted to 
another pub 1 i cat i on . 



Psst 

Wanna real GOOD DEAL 
On A COLOR COMPUTER?? 



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■ 

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Page 38 



QUALITY SOFTWARE FOR TRS-80 COLOR! 




ADVENTURES!! I! 
For TRS-80. and COLOR-80. These Ad- 
ventures are written in BASIC, are full 
featured, fast action, full plotted adven- 
tures that take 30-50 hours to play. 
(Adventures are inter-active fantasies. 
It's like reading a book except that you 
are the main character as you give the 
computer commands like "Look in the 
Coffin" and "Light the torch.") 

Adventures require 16K on COLOR- 
80 and TRS-80. They sell for $14.95 
each. 

ESCAPE FROM MARS 

(by Rodger Olsen) 
This ADVENTURE takes place on the 
RED PLANET. You'll have to explore a 
Martian city and deal with possibly 
hostile aliens to survive this one. A good 
first aoVenture. 

PYRAMID (by Rodger Olsen) 
This is our most challenging ADVEN- 
TURE. It is a treasure hunt in a pyramid 
full of problems. Exciting and tough I 

TREK ADVENTURE (by Bob Retelle) 
This one takes place aboard a familiar 
starship. The crew has left for good 
reasons - but they forgot to take you, 
and now you are in deep trouble. 

DEATH SHIP (by Rodger Olsen) 
Our first and original ADVENTURE, 
this one takes place aboard a cruise ship • 
but it ain't the Love Boat. 

VAMPIRE CASTLE (by Mike Bassman) 
This is a contest between you and old 
Drac • and it's getting a little dark 
outside. $14.95 each. 



SPACE SHUTTLE 
ONE OR TWO PLAYER HIGH RES GAME - 
Your mission is to dock with an orbiting space 
platform — but you may have to land on the 
planetary surface for refueling first. A real value 
in a high res real time game. $635. 

KILLERBOT - (Available In 4K) - Real time 
action at 20 levels of difficulty as you run, 
sneak, and dodge your way through a bloody 
field of Killer Robots. Get across or die! Joy- 
sticks or Keyboard controls. TRS-80 COLOR 
(ANY BASIC 4K or more.). $9.95. 

SLASHBALL (Available in 4K) - This one is 
best described as a thinkers arcade game. It 
rewards fast reflexes and clear thinking — like 
nothing you have ever seen before. It is one of 
our best family games for one or two players. 
$835. 

TIMETREK - A REAL TIME, REAL GRAPHICS 
STARTRECK. See your torpedoes hit and watch 
your instruments work in real time. No more un- 
realistic scrolling displays! $14.95. 

STAR FIGHTER • This one man space war game 
pits you against spacecruisers, battlewagons. and 
one man fighters, you have the view from your 
cockpit window, a real time working instrument 
panel, and your wits. Another real time goody. 
$9.95 

BATTLEFLEET • This grown up version of Bat- 
tleship is the toughest thinking game available on 
OSI or BO computers. There is no luck involved 
as you seek out the computers hidden fleet. A 
topographical toughie. $9.95 

LABYRINTH - 16K EXTENDED COLOR 
BASIC - With amazing 3D graphics, you fight 
your way through a maze facing real time mon- 
sters. The graphics are real enogh to cause claus- 
trophobia. The most realistic game that I have 
ever seen on either system. $14.95. 





QUEST • A NEW IDEA IN ADVEN- 
TURE GAMES! Different from alt the 
others. Quest is played on a computer 
generated map of Alesia. Your Job is to 
gather men and supplies by combat, 
bargaining, exploration of ruins and 
temples and outright banditry. When 
your force is strong enough, you attack 
the Citadel of Moorlock in a life or 
death battle to the finish. Playable in 2 
to 5 hours, this one is different every 
time. 16K COLOR-BO OR TRS-80 
ONLY $14.95. 




SPACE ZAPPER - Protect your central 
Star Base from ships that attack from 
all four sides. Fast reflexes are required 
as the action speeds up. Great for kids 
or Dads. This game has high speed high 
resolution graphics and looks as if it just 
stepped out of the arcades. — 16K ex- 
tended or 32K disk. BASIC TRS-80 
Color only. $14.95. 





TRS80 



Please specify system on all orders 

This is only a partial listing of what we have to offer. We have arcade and 
thinking games, utilities and business programs for the OS1 and TRS-80 Color. 
We add new programs every week. Send $1.00 for our complete catalog. 

AARDVARK-80 
2352 S. Commerce, Walled Lake, Ml 48088 

(313) 669-3110 




TRS 80 COLOR 



Education. • • 

AIM EDUCATIONAL U.S. 

By Dave Hooper 

The CoCo is a very sophisticated 
piece of equipment that CAN do more 
than just display games. 

To prove this point, I am 
developing a new series of 
educational programs entitles 

GEO /STUDIES. These programs are 
being developed to teach the basic 
geography of several countries. 

I hope you will think of them as a 
new series of games, as well. That 
is so you can enjoy them while 
improving your mind. 

Part I, titled "Continental 
U.S.A." and Part II, "Australia," are 
completed. Europe is designated for 
Part III and Canada Part IV. These 
are on the (pardon the pun) drawing 
board. 

A demonstration of Part I is 
listed below. This will draw maps of 
the continental United States used in 
the "Continental U.S.A." program. 

The actual program displays a 
cursor which is controlled by the 
right joystick. A two-letter 

abbreviation of a state is then 
displayed on the screen. You 
position the cursor within the 
state's boundaries and press the fire 
button to score. Correct and 
incorrect answers are displayed at 
the end of the program. 

Part II, "Australia," is a bit 
different om that after you complete 
the state identifications, you move 
on to the capital cities, where there 
is an audio suppliment. 

The GEO STUDIES series is a new 
dimension in education, combining the 
senses of touch, vision and hearing 
— but most important, it is fun, 
too! This series requires 16K, 
Extended Basic and one joystick. 

The listing: 

5 REM' DEMO PROGRAM :GEO/STUDIES 

7 REM'U.S.A. 

8 REM' COPYRIGHT 1981 
10 REM' BY DAVE HOOPER 
33 PCLS 

100 PM0DE3 v li SCREEN 1,0 

133 PCLS 

135 READXt Y 

140 IFX=999THEN160 

145 IFX=222THEN300 

150 I F X <0THENX 1 =-X : Y 1 =Y : RE ADX , Y : 

LINE<X1,Y1 >-<X,Y>, PSET 

155 IFX>0THENLINE-(X,Y), PSET:G0T 

0135 



Faqe 39 

160 PAINT (76, 28) ,2, 4: PAINT (76, 64 
), 4, 4: PAINT (76, 96) ,2, 4: PAINT (88, 
156), 2,4 

165 PAINT(108,80),3,4:PAINT(108, 
140),4,4:PAINT( 117,30) ,2, 4: PAINT 
(132, 48), 2, 4 

170 PAINT( 132,80) ,4, 4: PAINT (132, 
104 ), 2, 4: PAINT ( 132, 116) ,3, 4: PAIN 
T( 132, 140), 2, 4 

175 PAINT( 168,88) ,3, 4:PAINT( 168, 
112),2,4:PAINT( 168, 144 ) , 4, 4 :PAIN 
T(192,64),4,4 

180 PAINT ( 192,92) ,4, 4: PAINT ( 192, 
108), 2, 4: PAINT (205, 79) ,4, 4: PAINT 
(207,64) ,2,4 

185 PAINT (228, 12) ,4, 4: PAINT (218, 
44 ), 2, 4 : PAINT (216, 52) ,4, 4: PAINT ( 
210,28), 4, 4 

190 PAINT(28, 190) , 3, 4 : C0L0R2, 3 : F 

ORT=1TO1000:NEXT:PCLS(3) :G0T0135 

300 CIRCLE (220, 185), 25, 2, 1, .5, .7 

2: CIRCLE (136, 20), 44, 2, 1, .37, .498 

305 PAINT (72, 20) ,4, 2: PAINT (68, 48 

), 1,2: PAINT (60, 108) ,2,2 

310 PAINT (96, 56) , 2, 2: PAINT ( 128,3 

2), 1,2: PAINT (108, 92) ,1,2 

315 PAINT (108, 128), 4, 2: PAINT (144 

,96), 4, 2 :PAINT (140, 132), 1,2 

320 PA I NT ( 1 74 , 40 ) , 2 , 2 : P A I NT ( 1 76 , 

60), 4, 2 

325 PAINT(180,80),2,2 

330 PA I NT ( 1 84 , 1 04 ), 1 , 2 : PA I NT ( 1 92 

, 124), 4, 2: PAINT (188, 152), 2, 2 

(Continued on Page 48 ) 



Silly Syntax 

By Sugar Software 

A hilarious and outrageous story game for one to 
ten players. This game will become one of your 
favorites to play and show off. Create your own 
stories with the built-in screen editor or order 
story tapes from the selection below. Silly Syntax 
features include creating, modifying, printing, 
saving and loading of stories. Included is the Silly 
Syntax game, two stories and the user guide. 

$19.95 - Requires Extended Basic. 

Silly Syntax stories - Ten stories per cassette. 

SS-001 -Fairy Tales SS-004-Current Events 

SS-002-Sing Along SS-005-Gothic Romance 

SS-003-X-rated SS-006-Adventure/Sci-Fi 

$9.95 • 10% off for 3^r more story cassettes. 

All products are available now. 

Ohio residents add 5.5% sales tax. 

Add $1.00 per cassette for postage and handling. 

Sugar Software 

2153 Leah Lane 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 
(614) 861-0563 





TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER 

SPECIALISTS 



COLORFORTH 




A HEV. 



■ZCC LEVEL PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE ZS NO* AVAILABLE FOR TOUR 

ajid't roc ?ius or the slowness or programming and 

TO EXECUTION OF 1AJZC PROGRAMS? FORTH WILL CUT PROGRAMMING TIMS ZN 
■ALT AND VZLL SPEED TH EXXCCTION TZME AS MUCH AS TEN TIKES THAT OF 

basic. -eoLoxrom", tnz version or roin roi tie color computer) 

„ES WOT SaCigt EI TUT I EXTENDED 1AJZC OR DZfl SYSTEM. A MINIMUM OF 
6X II HZCIS5AJLT. MIEN TOO PURCHASE "COLOR* ORTH " . TOO R1CIIVT BOTH 
CASSETTE AND AS/DISK VZRJZONS. T1IS MEANS NO EXTRA EXPENSE WREN "750" 
UP-GRADE TOUR SYSTEM. "COLORPORTl" ALSO INCLUDES AN EDITOR, CSAVEM 
A PRINTED ZMSTROCTZON AND OPERATION MANUAL* AND MUCH 1*0 RE.' 



» 



rots versions and manual, all fob 



$41 .tS 



ARMADILLO BUG 
MACHINE LANGUAGE MONITOR 

"ARMADILLO 106" ZS AN DCEU17T SYSTEM FOR BECZNMZRS TO LEARN TO 
WRITE AND 9ESU6 MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAMS. TVIS PACKAGE INCLUDES: 
MEMORY EXAMINE AND CHANGE; MOVE; PUNCH AND LOADl PILL COMMANDS ; AND 
MORE: DOES NOT REQUIRE EXTENDED BASIC. RUNS ZN lfX. COMES COMPLETE 



JUST Si«.f5 

OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST 

"STARTING PORTS" , A ROOK ST LEO SRODIE. THE REST ZNTROOUCTORY TO NTH 
TEXT AVAILABLE. 104 PAGES. SOFT COVER Sit. 00 

"COMPUTERS PZSS Mt OPT". NEAR THE OFTICZAL PROGRAMMERS BADGE. LARGE 
2*1/4 INCH Y ELLON BUTTON SATS ZT ALL! I I SO 

DEALER & AUTHOR INQUIRIES INVITED 

ALL ITEMS AM POST PAID ZN U.S. TEXAS HtSIDENTl ADO 5i 

•TRS-iO IS A TM OP RADZO SRACX /TANDY CONN. 

Armadillo Int'l Software 

RO. BOX 7661 PHONE (512 )459 -7325 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 78712 ^5? 




Paqe 41 





If you own a TRS-80® Model I, Model II, 
Model III, the Color Computer, or the new 
Pocket Computer, YOU NEED 80-U.S.! 



The 80-U.S. Journal has 

programs for your enjoyment and enlightenment. 
Every issue contains several Basic or machine 
language program listings. It contains Business 
articles and program listings. No matter where you 
are, there is something for YOU in the Journal! 



and... 



The Journal contains reviews of hardware and software. Our "Evaluation 
Reports" will help you make the best choice in selecting additions to your 
system. 



Save Over 50% 



You can save over 50% off the cover price of 80-U.S. Journal. For the 
remarkably low price of only $16.00, a savings of $20.00 (cover price), you 
will receive a wealth of useful information every month. As a special 
BONUS, if you enclose payment with your order, you will receive an 
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Page 42 




ACTION GAM 

The fastest growing producer of computer games for 
your 6809 has the products you have wafted for!! 



-i — - ■ V . A ^ft Ah ^m. BA JH^fa J^^H t 



mm 



■ ■ M 



THE: COLOR COMPUTER 






. ■ » 



-\ Fast paced action • Super HI-Res Graphlcsu^^ 
-■fc;S^^f^" Dynamite sound effects* Runs in 16K of memory^ 

;".TOft^r These games will astonish you with their Detail and Quali 




ADVENTURES 

Calixto Island • She Slack Sanctum 

Highly acclaimed by reviewers • Challenging situations 
Fast, efficient machine language • Runs in 16K of memory 

Save game in progress 



Adventures on 5% TSC FLEX disc (specify 6800 or 6809) ea. $24.95 

Both adventures on single disc $39.95 

Adventures for color computer ea. $19.95 

Color Berserk for color computer ea. $24.95 

Cave Hunter for color computer ea. $24.95 

Shipped prepaid in continental U S. California residents, please add 6% tax 



MORE COMING SOON 




Special Software Preview.. 



Pa?E « 



A game machine with VisiCalc? 



not. 



But. 



Ne' ve 



Of 
»en 



long time now, the Color 
much more than a qt 



course 
saying 
Computer 
machine. 

There is something about the 
number — crunching ability of VisiCalc 
that seems to separate the Computer 
grownups from the Computer kids. 
And. while SPECTACULATOR (soon to be 
available for *39.95 at all Radio 
Shack stores and dealers) isn't quite 
VisiCalc. its an excellent version of 
the original "electronic spreadsheet 9 * 
program that will do wonders for your 
budgeting and forecasting needs. 

Tandy's SPECTACULATOR comes in a 
handsome package and includes a ROM 
Pak and a 43-page instruction manual. 
The manual is excellent and shows how 
to set things up, what equipment you 
will need. how to make SPECTACULATOR 
strut its stuff and gives two levels 
of "sample sessions 9 * that make 
practical use of all the features. 
There is also a summary for 
reference. 

who have seen or used 
the one thing that is 
missing right away is the 
c ommand . Rather , SPECT ACU- 
two-letter commands to 
all the directions. Since 
we're familiar with VisiCalc. it took 
about 10 minutes to get used to the 
command structure. From there on, we 
think it was easier to use (and 
remember) than its older brother. 



For th 
VisiCalc. 
seen to be 
slash (/) 
LATOR 
enter in 



SPECTACULATOR is designed to do 
anything that may need to handle or 
compare numbers. It sets up a 

an 
that 



up 



row 



"spreadsheet , * 1 i ke those 

accountant uses, and will carry 
sheet out 99 columns by 99 
host important. you * can set 
formulas for each position 
referencing it by its column and 
designation ~ and then have 
TACULATOR calculate the relative 
value if you only give it a starting 
set of values. 

SPECTACULATOR* s method of 

operation is a little different than 
is VisiCalc. but it accomplishes much 
of the same thing. One of the things 
we particularly like is that it lets 
you tell it when to calculate. 
VisiCalc just does its calculations 
— sometimes before you really want 
it to. 

There is also a sophisticated HELP 
system available for all the commands 
so that, while the documentation is 
excellent. you do not have to page 
through the manual looking for the 
exact syntax for this or that. 

There is full screen cursor 
control and a number of excellent 
features such as delete and insert 
rows and columns, save on tape, list 
to printer and display free memory. 
You can even change the size of a 
"window 99 — to accomodate larger 
numbers. Alphanumeric labels can be 
entered, too. 

All in all. we are very impressed 
with SPECTACULATOR. Its a winner! 



The RAINBOW 

5803 Timber Ridge Dr. 
Prospect, KY 40059 

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YES! Sign me up for a one-year (12 issues) subscription tothe RAINBOW. My $12 
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