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^C^DQ^ INUKDER* 



■ry 1862 




5803 Timber Ridge Drive • Prospect. KY 40059 



VOL. I NUMBER 8 



Editor's Notts... 

PRI NT «*— 2* 

Those? of you Mho are long-tine 
readers of the RAINBOW will observe 
that this issue is fatter than any we 
have ever published. That means 
there is nore information exclusively 
for Color Computer owners here than 
ever before. 

There's a reason for it, frankly. 
You may also observe that there are 
more advertisments this month than 
ever before. First of all* we 
believe advertisments can be helpful 
to you in expanding/augmenting your 
Color Computer system. Butt second, 
the ads help bring you the RAINBOW at 
a reasonable cost. 

Have you priced a good printer 
lately? If you have, you know that 
it is expensive printing the RAINBOW 
and that paper and labor costs 
increase all the time. And, even 
with bulk rate mail, it costs in 
excess of 60 cents to prepare, print 
and mail the RAINBOW to each of you. 
Without the ads, we would be cuttting 
costs by producing smaller issues. 
And that would mean less information. 
With the ads, we can bring you more 
information each month. 

That's one of the main reasons we 
ask you to patronize our advertisers. 
And, it is also one of the reasons 
we ask you to mention the RAINBOW 
when you do. 

But* we will never become an 
ad-heavy publication. We aim at 
about 33 percent advertising, which 
means if we get 100 pages of ads, 

(Continued on Past 4 



The Monthly Magazine for Color Computer Users 



UNDER th» RAINBOW 

Videotex To Disc... 
Income Tlx Helper... 

Fantasy Game Aid 4*3... 
Flowcharting Help... 
Disc Index! 

FrettyprintinQ... 

Software Reviews... 
And MUCH MORE! 



Tutorial 



PIL 
LOW 



RING IN 
MEMORY 



By Wayne A. Diercks 

There comes a time in the life of 
every midnight programmer when 4K of 
RAM (2343 bytes for CoCo), or even 
16K (14,631 bytes using POKE 25:NEW 
in Extended Color Basic) are Just not 
enough for the elaborate application. 

You've already compacted your 
program statements as much as 
possbile and you may have unreserved 
some of the 200 bytes of string 
storage allocated on power-up by use 
of the CLEAR statement. 

Don't give up yet. There's one 
more trick to try — pilfer some 
lower memory! 

On power-up the computer, being a 
bit greedy, automatically "grabs" the 
first 1536 bytes of Random Access 
Memory (RAM) for itself. The top 312 
bytes from address 1024 to 1535 are 
used to store and display the 

(Continued on Pas 22 ) 



llLtaJtaaJiz 

R RE RARE ROR TA X 
T I ME - . .EASILY 

By Lawrence C. Falk 

Last month we made aura that your 
checkbook was in balance* and now 
we're ready to take that balanced 
checkbook and start work on your 
income tax return for 1981. 

TAXTAB will categorize all your 
checks and wake it pretty easy to see 
where to put those deductions. At 
the same tine, it will also total up 
all your income so you can tell how 
much money you've made during the 
year. 

when next month's RAINBOW arrives, 
there will be a program that plugs in 
this month's information to a tax 
form (104(9) so you can do your own 
taxes. 

In order to make TAXTAB as 
universally useful as possible, we've 
set it up so youu enter your 
information as DATA statements, 
beginning with line 361. You can put 
in one entry for each line (or a 
number of them on a line if you'd 
like) through line number 998. If 
you need more lines, (you also need a 
CPA) you can move line 999 to 1999 
and use the additional space. 

Obviously, you can change the 
input structure and save the data to 
tape or disc. We're leaving it as a 
DATA statement program to insure 
speed. 

Data lines are structured into 
three .strings and one numeric 
variable. The first string, R$, 
tells what sort of an entry you are 
making, Income or Expense. The 
second string, TTS, refers to the 
TYPE of entry — Interest Income, 
MDs, Local Taxes, etcetera. Refer to 
lines 82, 91 and 92 for the proper 
codes. 

Next we have IDS, which is an 
actual description of the item. This 
might be "1981 Property Taxes" or the 
like. Finally, AM is the dollar 
amount. A typical input line would 
look like thist 

361 D,MD,Dr. Smith, 45 

The "D" is for deduction, MD means 
Physicians, Dr. Smith is the 
physician's name, and 45 is the 
amount of money paid. If you imbed 



commas in these data statements, be 
certain to enclose that part of the 
statement in quotes, because commas 
are data field terminators. 

This program is written with an 
optional hard copy printout for 
the LP VII. Note the "IF PR- 
statements before all the PRINT 
i-2,*s. If you do | not have • 
printer, you can still key this 
program in as written and Just answer 
"N" or "NO" to the question of 
whether to use the printer. This is 
a handy technique to use to allow 
either dual or single output. 

Finally, since tax information is 
confidential, we've added a 

"password" to this program. If you 
don't answer the password correctly 
in line 4, the program Jumps to line 
2(900 and erases itself. You might 
wish to change the password from my 
first name to something else. 

To use this program, merely go 
through your checkbook and write a 
DATA line for each deductible item 
and for all the income items you 
have. Run it for a printout either 
to the screen or a printer. 

You don't have to do all the 
entering at once, but you will have 
to resave the entire program (with 
the newly added DATA lines) after 
each session. 

The listing: 

(Continued on Page 5 ) 



the RAINBOW 

PUBLISHED BY FALSOFT 
5803 Timber Ridge Drive 
Prospect, KY 40059 

Lawrence & Falk — Editor 

The RAINBOW if intended for the personal use and plea- 
sure of its subscribers and reproduction by any teans is 
forbidden, use of programs and infor nation herein is for 
the single end use of subscribers and any other use is 
prohibited. 

TRS-W, Color Cotputer and Extended Color Basic are 
trademarks of Tandy Corp. 

AH programs herein are distributed on an 'as is' 
basis, without warranty. 

Subscriptions to the RAINBOW are 112 per year in the 
United States. Canadian and Mexican rates are $16 per 
year. Surface sail to other countries is $26, air tail 
to other countries is f*4, due to postage costs alone. 

United bade issues available for 12 each* plus 12.51 
for shipping and handling. 

Paynent accepted by cash, check, aoney order, VISA or 
MASTERCARD. Please include account nuiber, expiration 
date and your signature when using bank cards. 

The RAINBOW is published every tenth of the year. 



TO RAINBOW 



TO RAINBOW 



TO RAINBOW 



Editor: 

I found Jar* Hir't tochine tope 
finder/saver to If very woeful, 
fewever, I famd tone tapes ahidi 
returned i 84 ERROR when I tried to 
UN the utility. 

I discovered • staple way to get 



ttitt aOMII'MHH. Hnen 
the start, end, entry lift Am on 
the term. aubtract tit offset frot 
ttosdwd ntry values, rtload tic 
two ii tuestion, end CSAVB1 with 
your OMfound values. 

Franklin, Teon. 



Editor t 

I subscribe to irvcral cooputer 
publications and there is one tling 
tlat is disturbing to oe. Here 
seas to be a tendency for experts to 
write to each other — to shoo off 
their skills. 

Host Color Cooputer oners ore not 
at chine language experts and need 
explanations of loo to actually 
run tone of tie prograos. I typed in 
a progran fron (another publication) 
and couldn't get past the first 
entry. Tie occonpanying article 
didn't actually get into using tie 
prograoi but told box the progran oas 
developed, ho need tore 'what to do 
M's...' 



Ton Nee 

Pittsburgh, 



Pa. 



Editor: 

I have just received ay first copy 
of the RAINBOW and I an very pleased. 
I read an article by a University 
professor and decided to share tone 
of oy experiences oith you. 

I teach seventh grade biology and 
oe have about 388 students ot our 
school. I bought a TIE -91 Color 
Cooputer and 61 

15 for neobership. The school also 
donated 1388. I then contacted a 
fierald lerg, a cooputer prograaoer. 
Re ude oany use'ul prograos for the 
students and I would like to describe 
too of then for the benefit of any 
teacher oho owns a Color Cooputer. 
The first presents nev notorial to 



students in the foro of a oultiple 
choice and trill told 41 ours tiers. 
There are various responses and 
secret, attending another the student 
gets the Question right or orong on 
the first or o tubseouent attonpt. 
The progran also keeps a score for 
the student. 

The second is a grade averager 
ohich I find excellent for averaging 
oy grades. It has the added feature 
of allowing oo to add or subtract 
tutbers oithout clanging the divisor 
and tolls ae the nutter of grades as 
toll as the nuober of extra credit 
grades. 

The cotputer progratoor oho erote 
these can be contacted through Tie 
■erg Works, lox 742, Jenesville, HI 
53547. 

Congratulations on a very fine 
eagazine! 

Thou J. Vogt 
Clinton, Wis. 



Editor: 

We're interested in getting a 
Special Interest Color Cooputer 
User's group going in the Bellas 
area. Would you please ask all Color 
Cooputer users in this area to five 
ae a call about Joining? 

I can be reached at (214) 464-6999 
between 8 a.o. and 5 p.o. and at 
(214) 224-4444 at other tioes. 

He'd like to get together tor 
outual benefit and assistance. 

R.V. Scott 
DeSoto, n 



Editor: 

I Just received oy first issue of 
the RAINBOW and oas very inpressed 
oith it. Keep up the good work. 

The article by John L Urban oas 
very good. I would like to add tlat 
for a correct siaulation of dice 
rolling is the combination (sue) of 
the randon matters produced. For 
exaople, tie roll of too six-tided 



die would be: 

3(6) 
)(6) 
PRINT M 

This km Id give you the correct 
of rolling I certain nutters. 
Also, the nunccrs produced would be 
bottom 2 and 12, tot 1 and 12 if you 
toe only one M) function. 
Joseph A. Haseostaub 
OH 



Editor: 

I really enjoyed the ET and PUT 
article. 

I'o especially interested in 
inforoation on running the CoCo at 
1.8 ahz. It looks like the hardware 
design can't handle it. except by 
luck. 

Hy standard 16K Extended Basic 
ot chine can run prograos, but oill 
tot perron the 1/0. I installed 2.1 
ahz oB21's, but could input only for 
a while oith a fan cooling the 6889. 
At soon as the 6889 got earo, I oas 
back where I was. I then bought a 
2.8 ahz 6889 and then nothing worked 
at 1.8 ahz. It looks like the buses 
need buffers. 

Richard Krankoski 

Elk Grove Village, IL 



Editor: 

One great interest I lave is 
finding tie POKE to reverse tie 
lower-case blocks. I realize that 



tic final answer was given by a 
Brnnis Kitsz in 88-Nicroconputing, 
hit I on toping tlat soteone oill 
cone out oith a conplete systeo to go 
■ coluons or 64 col ions for word 
processing. 

Hilliaa Sanford 

Juneau, M 



f«9C 4 



? #-2 Froi P9. 1 

we'll print another 200 pages of 
copy. Enough said. 

You may also notice this column 
has a new title. Well, we think its 
better than Just 'Editor's Notes." 
And* you may also notice there are no 
more spaces between paragraphs — 
because we would rather fill that 
space with information than . with 
space. 

Me are giving thought to listing 
out programs in a type size similar 
to that of our letters column. We 
know it will make it somewhat more 
difficult to readi butt again* it 
would mean more information. We 
welcome your input. As you know, all 
listings are set to the 32-character 
Color Computer screen size. To make 
it easier to check your typing. 

And to the many who Join us this 
month for the first time, greetings. 
We appreciate your willingness to 
wait — but we can't "start" a 
subscription when we get an order 
(who does?) because of the high cost 
of mailing individual copies. If you 
want back issues, we do have a 
limited supply of Nos. 1-5. No 



UPDATE ON 
PROCESSORS 

Last month our feature story was 
on four word processing programs. We 
promised at the time to keep you up 
to date on them. 

Both C.C. WRITER by. Transformation 
Technologies and WORD PROCESSOR/TEXT 
EDITOR by John Waclo have now been 
converted for use by the CoCo disc. 
Disc versions of both programs have 
been received by the RAINBOW this 
month and both have been checked out. 
Both work well. 

We also understand that 

TELEWRITER'S disc version is in its 
final stages of testing. 



copies of No. 7 are available, and. 
only a few of No. 6. 

We also encourage you all to tell 
your friends and local computer 
stores about us. The more copies we 
sell, the lower our per-copy cost. 
And the more money we will have to 
spend on editorial content. 

We want to be the best 
computer magazine you receive. We 
welcome your input, contributions and 
suggestions. 




CO-RESIDENT EDITOR/ASSEMBLER 

(CORES9) 

C0RES9 is a complete hiH function editor/assembler package that wiH allow you to create, 
edit and assemble 6809 machine language programs (or the color computer. It features a 
powerful full function text editor and supports the entire 6809 instruction set with aH 
addressing modes, forward and reverse (able references, wM output object code directly to 
memory or "CL0A0M" compatible tapes and much more. price $39.95 



TEXT EDITOR 

This program is a Bne/charicter oriented text editor for the 
color computer, that win enable you to create and edit text 
files for Basic programs, letters, text data files, or almost 
anything you might want to put on paper. It features functions 
for adding, Inserting, deleting, moving and copying text lines 
or paragraphs; powerful string search and replace com- 
mands, single and automatic One numbers and line editing 
with 9 sub commands to Insert, delete, change, add and 
remove Individual or mutipla characters. Tape commands 
allow you to save, load, append, and skip tape files; also It Is 
compatible with Basic ASCII tape formats. A MUST HAVE 
PROGRAM!! 

ONLY $19.95 



SYSTEM MONITOR 
(TRSMON) 

Trsmon is a 2K system monitor program that will allow you to 
explore the workings of the color computer. It features 9 
debuging comands, tape load and save compatible with Basic 
"CLOADM", up/down load via RS232 port, terminal package 
that allows the color computerto be used as a teminal at baud 
rates up to 9600 baud and a printer driver to direct display 
output to the printer for memory dumps, disassembn/s etc. 
The program is position Independent so H can be moved 
anywhere within the system memory. A very powerful tool at a 
very reasonable price. 

ONLY $19.95 



5566 RICOCHET AVE. 
Las Vegas, Nv. 89110 



CER-COMP 
(702)452-0632 



All Orders Shipped From Stock 
Add $1.00 Postage- 
MC/VISA Add 3% 



TAX Fn» P|. 2 



B *****«****TAXTAB»«******** 

1 •*#» (c) FALSOFT 1982«««»« 

2 • 

3 CLSiPRINTiPRINTiPRINT 

4 PRINT " THIS IS AN INCOME TA 
X LIST PROGRAM. TO 6AIN ENTRY 

TO IT, YOU MUST ENTER AN ACCES 

5 CODE. PLEASE ENTER THE COD 
E AT THE QUESTION MARK." 

3 PRINTUNPUT " <ENTER> CODE H 
ERE" | CDS I IF CD»O"L0NNIE" THEN 2 
000 

10 CLS 

20 REM TRS-80 LOCATOR 
30 REM •••DATA INITIALIZATION** 
33 PRINT l INPUT" DO YOU WANT YOU 
R OUTPUT TO GO TO THE PRINTER" I G 
FftIF LEFT«(GF$, 1)«"Y" THEN PR=1 

1 CLS 

40 M-1000 

30 PR I NT « INPUT "SHALL I PRINT AL 
L ENTRIES (Y/N)"|At 
60 PRINT 

70 IF A»-"Y" THEN 3600 

72 CLSl PRINT864,"D0 YOU WISH. . 
." * PR I NT 

73-PRINT" 1-INCOME TABLES" 
74 PRINT" 2-DEDUCTION TABLES" 

73 PRINT" 3-TAX SUMMARY" l PRINT " 
4 -END PROGRAM" l PR I NT 

76 INPUT " <ENTER> APPROPRIATE 
NUMBER" |Z 

77 IF Z«3 GOTO 2999 

78 IF Z-4 THEN END 

79 IF Z«2 GOTO90 

00 CLS: PRINT iPRINTaB, "INCOME SEL 
ECTOR" t PRINT 

02 PRINT" (W) WAGES",, "(II) INTE 
REST INCOME", "(D) DIVIDENDS" ,, " 
(01) OTHER INCOME" I PRINT 

04 INPUT " <ENTER> APPROPRIA 
TE CODE'lX* 

65 GOTO100 

90 CLS « PRINTt PRINTS6, "DEDUCTION 
SELECTOR" l PRINT 

91 PRINT "(MD) DOCTORS",, "(M) M 
EDI CINE AND DRUGS", "(MI) MEDICAL 

INSURANCE", "(ST) STATE TAXES PA 
ID",MLT) LOCAL TAXES PAID", "(RE 
) REAL ESTATE TAXES", "(BT) SALES 

TAXES PAID" 

92 PRINT "(PT) PERSONAL PROPERTY 
TAX", "(HI) MORTGAGE INTEREST"," 

(CI) CHARGE AND CREDIT INTEREST" 
,"(AI> AUTOMOBILE INTEREST" 

93 PRINT" (nf) NEXT FRAME FOR MOR 
E INFOi? 

94 INPUT " <ENTER> SELECTIO 
N"»X*«IF X*«"" OR X»="NF" THEN 9 

3 ELSE 100 

93 CLS:PRINTa5,"M0RE DEDUCTION S 
ELECTOR" tPRINTiPRINT" (CO CASH C 



ONTRIBUTIONS" , " (NO NON-CASH CON 
TRIBUTIONS","(TF) CASUALTY & THE 
FT LOSS","(EB) EMPLOYEE BUSINESS 
EXPENSE"," (MS) MISCELLANEOUS DE 
DUCTIONS" 

96 PRINT" (RP) RETURN TO PREVIOUS 
","(RM) RETURN TO MASTER FRAME" 

97 PRINTl INPUT •* <ENTER> SEL 
ECTION'lXt 

90 IF Xf«"RP" THEN 90 

99 IF X»«"RM" THEN 72 

100 CLSl PRINT 

101 IF PR THEN PRINT#-2,CHR»(31) 
l GOTO 102 ELSE 122 

102 IF X»«"W" THEN PRINT#-2," 

WAGES" 

103 IF Xt«"II" THEN PRINT#-2," 
INTEREST INCOME" 

104 IF X««"D" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
DIVIDENDS" 

105 IF X»«"OI" THEN PRINT#-2," 
OTHER INCOME" 

106 IF X»«"MD" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
DOCTORS" 

107 IF X»«"M" THEN PRINT#-2, " ME 
DICINE ft DRUGS' 

108 IF X»«"MI" THEN PRINT#-2, " M 
EDICAL INSURANCE" 

109 IF X»«"ST" THEN PRINT#-2," 
STATE TAX PAID" 

110 IF X»«"LT" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
LOCAL TAX PAID" 

111 IF Xf«"RE" THEN PRINT#-2,"RE 
AL ESTATE TAXES PAID" 

112 IF X»«"BT" THEN PRINT#-2," 
SALES TAXES PAID" 

113 IF X»«"PT" THEN PRINT#-2,"PE 
RSONAL PROPERTY TAX PAID" 

114 IF X»«"HI" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
MORTGAGE INTEREST" 

113 IF X»«"CI" THEN PRINT#-2,"CH 
ARGE AND CREDIT INTEREST" 

116 IF X»-"AI" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
AUTOMOBILE INTEREST" 

117 IF X»-"CC" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
CASH CONTRIBUTIONS" 

110 IF X»«"NC" THEN PRINT#-2, " 
NON-CASH CONTRIBUTIONS" 

119 IF X»«"TF" THEN PRINT#-2,"TH 
EFT AND CASUALTY LOSSES" 

120 IF Xt="EB" THEN PRINT#-2,"EM 
PLOYEE BUSINESS EXPENSES" 

121 IF X»="MS" THEN PRINT#-2," 
MISCELLANEOUS DEDUCTIONS" 

122 PRINTt IF PR THEN PRINT#-2,CH 
R»(30)"" 

130 PRINT 

140 PRINT-TYPE" |TAB(7 ) " DESCRIPTI 
ON" I TAB (24) "AMOUNT" I IF PR THEN P 
RINT#-2, "DESCRIPTION" $ TAB ( 37 ) " AM 
OUNT" 
130 REM 

(Continued on Pa* 6 > 



Page 6 

TAX Fn» Pg. 5 



330 PRINT: IF PR THEN PRINT #-2, 



335 PRINT " TOTAL >"<TAB(2 

0)AT:IF PR THEN PRINT#-2, CHR* ( 31 
)- TOTAL "CHR* (30) I «PRINT#-2,T 
AB(25) ; :PRINT#-2, USING" *###,###. 
##" ;at 

337 PRINT STRING* ( 32, "*") ;:IF PR 
THEN PRINT#-2, STRING* (80, "-■ ) 

339 IF PR THEN PRINT#-2,"" 

340 INPUT" PRESS <ENTER> TO CON 
TINUE" »Z*:CD*="LONNIE" :CLS:RUN30 
360 REM *»»DATA ENTRIES FOLLOW** 
999 DATA END 

2000 PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT 

2001 CLS:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT 
TAB(13)"";CD*;"*":PRINT " IS 

not THE PROPER CODE" : PRINT: PRIN 
T " THE PROGRAM HAS BEEN ERAS 
ED FROM COMPUTER MEMORY. ■ :NEW 

2999 CLS: PRINT: PRINTTAB( ID'TAX 
SUMMARY": IF PR THEN PRINT#-2,CHR 
♦ ( 31 ) TAB ( 14) "TAX SUMMARY" CHR* ( 30 
) :PRINT#-2, " " 

3000 FOR Q=l TO 1000: READ R* 
3005 IF R*="END" THEN 3050 
3010 IF R*="I" THEN 3500 
3020 READ TT*, ID*, AM 

3030 DD=DD+AM 
3040 NEXT Q 

3050 PRINT-TOTAL DEDUCTIONS: ■ ;TA 
B(22)DD:IF PR THEN PRINT #-2» " TO 

(Continued on Pi* B ) 



©@ll©(f*©©(fifil/© 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer Smart Terminal Program 
LOOK AT THESE FEATURES « 

1. FULL ONLINE AND OFFLINE SCROLLING, 1 OR 12 LINES AT A TIME. 

2. SELECTABLE BAUD RATE (300, 600, 1200) AND PARITY. FULL OR HALF DUPLEX, 

TOO! 

3. OUTPUTS ALL OR ANY PART OF RECEIVED TEXT TO PRINTER OR CASSETTE. 

4. SUPPORTS ANY SERIAL PRINTER. 

5. BUFFER AUTOMATICALLY OPENED ON START CHARACTER (12 HEX). 

6. BUFFER AUTOMATICALLY CLOSED ON STOP CHARACTER (14 HEX). 

7. READ MULTIPLE DOWNLOAD FILES FROM TRANSMISSION. 

8. WORD MODE ELIMINATES SPLIT WORDS. 



TO ORDER YOUR ROM-PAK, SEND CHECK OR M.O. FOR *49.95 TO CONNECTI ON-80, BOB ROSEN, 
93-15 86 DRIVE, WOODHAVEN, NY 1 1421. OR, YOU CAN CALL IN YOUR ORDER TO OUR BBS AT (212) 441-3755. 

CONNECTION— 80 
OF WOODHAVEN 
BOB ROSEN 
93-13 B6> DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 



160 PRINT"««=" ; TAB (7) 

; TAB (24) ■»«==■ : IF PR THEN PRINT* 

-2, ■««==««===«■ ; TAB (37 )"■«««»= ■ 

iPRINT#-2,"" 

180 REM **PROCESSING AREA** 
190 FOR I«l TO M 
200 READ R* 

210 IF R*«"END- THEN 320 

220 READ TT*, ID*, AM 

230 IF A*<> -Y- THEN 260 

245 PRINTTT*«TAB(3)ID*«TAB(21 ) AM 

ILN-LN+HIF PR THEN PRINT#-2,TT* 

|TAB(5)ID»; :PRINT#-2,TAB(37) I : PR 

INT#-2, USING- *###,###.##" | AM 

247 AT-AM+AT 

260 IF TT*OX* THEN 310 

270 S-S+l 

280 IF S=l THEN 300 
290 TT*«" " 

300 PRINTTT* ; TAB (3) ID* ; TAB ( 2 1 ) AM 
ILN»LN+1:IF PR THEN PRINT#-2,ID* 
« :PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ; :PRINT#-2,USI 
NG"*###, ;am 
305 AT=AM+AT 

310 IF PR=0 AND LN=12 THEN PRINT 
PRESS <ENTER> TO CONTINUE": I 
NPUTZ*:LN=0:CLS: GOTO 140 ELSE GOT 
0315 

315 NEXT I 

320 REM ***TERMINATION*** 



0€CX OUT OUR COLOR IIS AT (212) 441-3755 



24 HOURS EVERY DAY 



h«e 7 



COMPUTERWARE 

!f products for 











TT. 
















1™ 










* 


< 





SOFTWARE 

Color Invaders • Color Pac Attack • Monitor • 
Adventure Games • Text Editors • Assemblers • 
PASCAL • Magikube • Finance Programs • Color 
Data Organizer • Graphic Games • Disassembler 

HARDWARE 

32 K RAM Expansion Board • 16 K RAM Set • 
Cables • Interfaces • Power Pack ROM Cartridge 

• Printers 

ACCESSORIES 

Books • Cassettes • Supplies • Service Manuals 

Shipping from stock 
Call or Write: 

COMPUTERWARE 

Dept. C • Box 668 
6809 Specialists Encinitas, CA 92024 • (714) 436-3512 

Computerware is a trademark of Computerware. 



fane 8 



»f twe tela 

GATOR ZONE 



Where else but up East in the 
heart of Preppyland could there be a 
game that lets you get back at all 
the alligator people? 

From 1MB (P.O. Box 289, 
Williamstown, MA, 01267, $18.95) 
comes GATOR ZONE, where you can do 
battle against IZOD-looking 

alligators before they eat up your 
sh irts. 

As always with 1MB, the graphics 
are sensational. This one takes 
place on a 3D-looking landscape with 
mountains in the background. The 
gators scuttle across a GATOR ZONE 
looking for shirts to eat, and you 
have to blast them before they do. 

The shirts appear at random, and 
you get a little advance warning with 



I 

a "shirt alert!" Then, its up to you 
to get the gator before the gator 
gets the shirt! 

If this all sounds a little silly, 
I suppose it is. But GATOR ZONE is 
a blast to play. The only one around 
here who doesn't like it is our 
"veddy preppy" 13-year-old who -- as 
those of the age will — cannot see 
the humor in it all. If you're tired 
of alligator shirts, penny loafers, 
Mummy and Muffy, GATOR ZONE will do 
you a world of good. And, if your 
nickname happens to be. Muffy, 
this game is different enough for you 
to enjoy it. 

Button down your col lar. .. grab 
your Joystick. . .and head for the 
GATOR ZONE. You'll be pleased. 



C. C. Writer 
[ Word Processing for the TRS-BOt Color Coaputir ] 
Features Page Formatting, Block Roves, Tabs, Sentence De- 
letion and Insertion, Global Search and Replace, Centering, 
Indenting, Page Pause, ASCII Code Transmission, Justifi- 
cation, Scrolling Revieu, Keyboard Stops, and File Chaining. 
U-32K cassette-«35. 32K Disk -MO (Shipping late Feb.) 



NEW! — > Check Rec Plus 

Reconciles your Checkbook AND allows you to keep Hew 
Entries of cash and credit card expenses uithout affecting 
your Checkbook balance. The History Files may be Listed and 
Totaled by Income or Expense Category for Budgeting or Tax 
Preparation. On screen Trial Balancing and printed Trial 
Balances, Audit Trails, and Summaries (REQUIRES PRINTER). 
Current balance is displayed on the Screen Menu and Reports. 
Save yourself frustration and perhaps some money too. 

-> Prices until April 15th: <- 
16K Version-125, 32K ejith extensive prompts-130 
U-32K Disk System nith Prompts-135 
All versions include System Binder, Cassettes or Disk nth 
storage pockets, and documentation. (Shipping late Feb.) 

For information or orders urite: 

TrantTik BSC 2-3 
194 Lockwood 
Bl oomi ngdal e, IL 6010B 
I TRS-80 is a Trademark of Tandy Corporation 



TAX Frts Pi. 6 

TAL DEDUCTIONS: " i :PRINT#-2,TAB(3 
2)| IPRINT#-2,USING"»###, ###.##" I 
DD 

3500 IF R*="END" THEN 3530 
3505 READ TT*,ID*,AM 
3510 HH=HH+AM 
3520 GOTO 3040 

3530 PRINT-TOTAL INCOME: ■ ;TAB( 22 
)HH:IF PR THEN PRINT #-2, "TOTAL 
INCOME l " « IPRINT#-2,TAB(32) ; :PRIN 
T#-2,USING"*###, ###.##" ;HH 
3540 VV-HH-DD 

3550 PRINTTAB(23 ) " "UF P 

R THEN PRINT #-2,TAB<32> " 



3560 PRINT "ADJ. GROSS INCOME" ;T 
AB(22)W«IF PR THEN PRINT #-2, "A 
DJ. GROSS INCOME" ; :PRINT#-2,TAB( 
32) ; :PRINT#-2,USING"*###, ###.##" 
IVV 

3570 G0T0337 

3600 PRINTHF PR THENPRINT #-2," 
■ 

3601 PRINT "ALL ENTRIES": IF PR T 
HEN PRINT #-2,CHR*<31>" ALL ENT 
RIES"CHRS(30) iPRINT#-2, " " 

3602 PRINT-TYPE" »TAB < 7 ) " DESCRIPT 
ION" » TAB (24) "AMOUNT" : IF PR THEN 
PRINT#-2,"TYPE"TAB(5)"DESCRIPTI0 
N "TAB (37) "AMOUNT " 

3603 PRINT"===="TAB(7) "========= 

=»"TAB(24 )"======" l IF PR THEN PR 

I NT#-2 , " ==== " TAB ( 5 ) " ===========■ 

TAB (37 )"======" :PRINT#-2, " " 

3604 GOTO 180 



Mraure win... 

COMPUTERWARE' S 
32K UPGRADE 

By Rick Smith 

The 16K to 32K RAM Memory 
expansion kit from COMPUTERWARE 
(Dept. C, Box 66B, Encinitas, CA 
92024, •84.95) claims to be unique 
because It requires only a simple 
snap-in* solder less installation and 
it allows full graphics capability 
throughout the 32K of memory. I 
certainly do not dispute either of 
these contentions, even though they 
remain un proven to me — largely due 
to the fault of Radio Shack, not 
COMPUTERWARE. And, that in no way 
diminishes my favorable impression of 
this upgrade. 

The kit, as delivered, contains a 
logic board with eight 16K RAM chips 
and one Quad NOR Gate, a 32K 
diagnostics cassette, a set of clear, 
well-written instructions and a 
useless little tool called an Olfa 
Touch Knife. Throw the knife away or 
use it as a letter opener. Keep the 
board — it is first rate and of high 
quality both in materials and 
appearance ! 

Before you do anything, you will 
need a Phillips screwdriver, some 
masking tape, an IC extractor and a 
good utility knife. The IC extractor 
is recommended. Then, after reading 
the instructions, the installation 
can be performed in an hour — 
working at a leisurely pace (and I'm 
no "hardware hacker"). 

Although no soldering is required, 
you do have to cut a trace in order 
to get the graphics capability 
throughout the 32K. This should be 
done with a good utility knife. Note 
that is not necessary in order to get 
the additional memory — and you 
might wish to pass. When the 
installation is complete, it all fits 
neatly under the RP shield. 

There are, however, some problems 
that may be encountered, as they were 
by this reviewer. The faults, 
however, were Radio Shack's, not 
COPMPUTERWARE'B. 

Unless the chip sockets on the 
CoCo's motherboard are properly 
aligned and level — and the 
motherboard is unwarped — the kit 
simply will not snap in. On my 16K 
Extenmded Color Basic with a serial 
number in the low 13000' s, the socket 
for the 40-pin SAM chip had a 



pronounced list to port. My problem 
was further complicated by my klutzy 
removal with thumb and forefinger of 
the 20-pin flip-flop. This bent some 
of the pins. On straightening them, 
one broke off. 

All these difficulties were solved 
with the generous assistance of a 
technically competent^ friend (who, 
incidentally, owns a Computer land 
store). He removed the old 40-pin 
socket and soldered in a new one, 
this time flat on the motherboard. 
The broken chip was replaced easily. 

I then carefully cut the trace 
itself and, voila!, the kit fit and 
worked. 

If you are one of the very few 
unlucky who finds his Color Computer 
motherboard too warped or its sockets 
too tilted to enable installation of 
the COMPUTERWARE kit and can't find 
help to correct the problem, 
COMPUTERWARE will accept return of 
the kit and refund the purchase price 
in full. 

Now that the kit is installed and 
my system is back up, I am trying to 
figure out how to utilize its 
expanded capabilities. The dreaded 
OM ERROR seems to be a creature of 
the past. The extra graphics memory 
isn't accessable through the BASIC 
commands P CLEAR and PMODE (e.g., 
PCLEAR 12, PMODE 3,11), but then it 
isn't available at all on any other 
conversion, as far as I know. As 
these new capabilities are explored 
and discovered, I will share them 
with you. 

In summation, COMPUTERWARE' s kit 
is a good buy which most owners will 
find easy to install. This reviewer 
would like to state that, despite 
innuendo from Tandy's "Microcomputer 
News," the COMPUTERWARE 16+ kit IS 
compatible with 1.0 version of 
Extended Basic ROM. 



DISABLE THE 
B REAK KEY 7 

Here's a "hardware" solution to 
disabling the BREAK key on your CoCo. 

Put a top from Neo-Synepherine 
over the key. It fits real tight and 
will keep fingers from hitting BREAK 
accidental ly. 

Be sure the inside of the top is 
dry, so no liquid leaks down into the 
keyboard — or who "nose" what 
trouble you might have. 



PMC II 



I O RHYTHM fie 
MINE 1= I ELD 



Where was Rainbow Connection 
Software when I really needed them? 
Thinking up ingenious things, no 
doubt. 

One of the first programs I Just 
had to have after I got my CoCo 
was a Biorhythm plotter. Now* I 
don't believe in them, but I think 
they are really neat and love the 
way the little markers curve around 
the screen. Hunting and hunting, I 
finally found one on the DEC-10 at 
the University of Louisville. I 
spent three days converting it ... 
and S200. The reason for the latter 
was simple, I needed 16K to run it. 

Rainbow Connection's Biorhythm 
program runs in 4K and displays the 
charts in full detail on the screen. 



There's a printer option but it isn't 
necessary. And, it is* as complete a 
Biorhytm program as I've seen. Also, 
very easy to use. 

As part of the same Twinpack tape 
is a game called MINEFIELD. I like 
it. In MINEFIELD, the computer 
creates an unseen minefield and you 
have to plot your ship through it. 
You get a warning when a mine is 
near. Frankly, its a lot of fun to 
play and requires some logic and 
patience. I DID win. Once. 

Both of these programs are 
available from Rainbow Connection, 
3514 6th Place NW, Rochester, MN 
55901 for «9.95. Both run in 4K! 
And, frankly, they're an excellent 
buy. 



ML Rabbit 

Protect your software investment with ML 
Rabbit. Software for the Color Computer is too 
expensive to have only the original tape. ML 
Rabbit can make Backups of any Color 
Computer program. No knowledge of the 
program to be copied is required. ML Rabbit 
does all the WORK. 

Only $14.95 



TUBE CUBE 

The Multi-colored cube invades the Color 
Computer. You can even substitute letters if 
your color set is busy. Cube Save feature if you 
can't solve it all. 

Only $9.95 



WORD CC7 

Word Processing for the Color Computer. 
W0RDCC7 coupled with your Color 
Computer & printer turns your machine into a 
typewriter. Modify and review letters before 
any ink touches paper. 

Only $19.95 (Ext. Basic) 




MEMORY 

16K RAM $25.00 

16-32K Solderless Kit $49.95 

4-32K Solderless Kit $74.95 



Ml Res. add 4% sales tax. Always looking for Great Color Programs. TOP royalties PAID. 

Dealer inquiries invited. 
DSL Computer Products - P.O. Box 1113 - Dearborn, Ml 48121 • (313) 582-3406 



rayr ji 



V I DEOTI 



TO DISC 



POLYGON *SG/\ I N 



By Jin & Michael Dudgeon 

The following procedure Mill allow 
you to eake a disc copy of the 
VIDEOTEX program. It was developed 
as a Joint effort of my 14-year-old 
•on, Michael* and myself. 

The major difficulty in this 
procedure occurs because the cassette 
VIDEOTEX is written to overrun and 
destroy many of the low RAM locations 

"Jump to program" vector. 

Thus, the ties to BASIC and the 
DOS are lost, which prevent the user 
from transferring VIDEOTEX to disc. 

This technique relies on the 
CLOADM offset feature, which will 
allow you to load VIDEOTEX into the 
upper part of RAM. Because you do 
this, you also replace the 
instructions in VIDEOTEX which 
redefine the reset pointer vector 
with NOP's (No Operations in machine 
language). Then, after saving 
VIDEOTEX on disc, you will always 
execute it at its high memory entry 
point. 

The steps below, for a 16K system, 
preserve entry back into BASIC using 
the reset key (for access such as 
VIDPRINT from the October issue of 
the RAINBOW) I 

1. Load VIDEOTEX from cassette 
using CLOADM "VIDEOTEX", 11000 

2. Alter the shifted program with 
the following POKES* POKE 
13104, 1BIP0KE 13105, 1BIP0KE 
13109, 1BIP0KE 13110,18 

3. Save VIDEOTEX on disc using 
SAVEM "VIDEOTEX", 12700, 14850,12728 

Note that the SAVEM addresses are 
decimal and not hexidecimal as stated 
in our version of the DOS manual. 

4. Execute the program using EXEC 
12728. 

If this procedure is followed, 
pushing the reset key returns the 
system to BASIC. VIDEOTEX can always 
be reentered using EXEC 12728, 
provided none of its addresses in 
high memory have been disturbed. 

A final comment is that for 32K 
systems, more pages of VIDEOTEX are 
possible if larger offset values are 
used to shift the program to the top 
of the 32K memory space. 



we've sure received a lot of great 
comments about R. Foulke's POLYGON 
program from the December issue. 
Some people, in fact, think a certain 
computer manufacturing and marketing 
corporation may have | adapted it for 
their latest in-store demo of the 
Color Computer's capabilities. 

Ah, well. Oscar Millican sent in 
the following program which modifies 
POLYGON a little bit to allow 
keyboard control. 

The listing i 
10 REM POLYGON 

20 REM BY R. FOULKE - MODIFIED BY 
OSCAR MILLICAN 

21 CLS 

22 INPUT "RND<N>",N 

23 INPUT "TIMER" |Z 
25 PMODE 4,HPCLSISCREEN 1,1 
30 PI-3.14159iM-RND(N) 
35 FOR T-0 TO 2«PI STEP PI/75 
40 R-C0S(M*T)«95 

45 Xl"C0S(T)«R+12B«Yl-SIN(T)«R+96 
50 A-T+PI/3 
53 R2-C0S<M«A)»95 

55 X2-C0S ( A ) «R2+ 1 28 * Y2-S IN < A ) «R2+96 
60 LINE(X1,Y1)-(X2,Y2),PSET 
70 NEXT T 

75 FOR T-0 TO Z l NEXT T 
80 GOTO 25 



2 




P.O. MX J7Z 
BALTIC*. K «*J0 

on a ctapnios son*. can m \txt> to url kick pjb- 
<urrioM crawics. permits high -res. caws nith tot 
mtmkre o* tw scbtxn. ruu, amr.au ocwtkol , mm 

CURSOR ONE CHARACTER PLUCK OR ONE TUO, KITH IMF EFT- 

STRort. rwrwKL ipclwt rvu. ascii character sit, 

(SIR DOT RATRII), BUr-CRHTS AND StPfVPSCRl ITS , ART) 
VSn DEFINED CHARACTERS. PROGRAM IS CALM BIX AS A SUP- 
KVTIW. CP STARS ALONE. PORKS PITH AIL TNO COLOR 

auraic pxeb. la** cask charactue nitn dku«i*je. 



text rprrop 



I6K-CXTTNDP BA31C--1I».9S 



Fuii nATwr. rrn editor pith uria cask and ism* 

CASE CHARACTERS. PITH UP TO kt CHARACTERS IW LINE 
OISFLAIFD ON TW BCSrm. A&nSTABLK TAR,. TEXT SEARCH 
AND PETLAroCNT .BLOCI NOTE. JUSTIFICATION AMi PNO- 
POPTIORAL SPACING WHEN USES PITH TNE LP-f |1. 

fiovwNTATicp or PiLorTcp^HE^Ln'coniwrpr 
peatures standard pilot instructions wttn additional 
extensions pop the cc. includes tut editor and inter- 
in CP* PACtACE. CCHS NITN DEMO rpOCRANS. 



fiST GRAPHICS PACP.AGE— ( tV , V CNINB)-«V^ 
• RA CHINE UNCUACE PPOCMN THAT EXECUTES PITH TV ICE 
THE SPEED OP EXTENDED RRSIC. INCLUDE LINE DRAVINC, 
SCREW CLEAN, AND PIXEL SETT INC ROUTINES. CAR PX USED 
■ITR RASIC OR MACHINE LANGUAGE. ENABLES THE « HAdllNE 
TO HAVE A 128X6* GRAPHICS DISPLAY PITH OTCP 2X I 
PON A BASIC PROGRAM. 

SHIPPING INCLUDED IN ALL PRICES 



TELEWRITER 

Provides your COLOR COMPUTER with: 

REAL LOWER CASE CHARACTERS ■ A POWERFUL TEXT FORMATTER 
51 COLUMN x 24 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY ■ SPECIAL DRIVER FOR EPSON MX-80 
ADVANCED CASSETTE HANDLING FEATURES ■ A SOPHISTICATED FULL SCREEN TEXT EDITOR 
—and requires absolutely no hardware modifications 



TELEWRITER 

Telewriter is a powerful word 
processor designed specifically for the 
Color Computer. It can handle almost 
any serious writing job and it is 
extremely easy to use. It has all the 
advanced features you need to create, 
edit, store, format and print any kind 
of text. With Telewriter you can 
quickly produce perfect, finished 
copy for letters, reports, term papers, 
articles, technical documentation, 
stories, novels, screenplays, 
newsletters. It is also a flexible and 
efficient way to take notes or organize 
ideas and plans. 

51 x 24 DISPLAY 

The Color Computer is an incredibly 
powerful and versatile computer, but 
for text editing it has some major 
drawbacks. The small 32 character by 
16 line screen format shows you too 
little of the text and. combined with its 
lack of lower case letters, bears little 
resemblance to the way text really 
looks on the page. Reverse video in 
place of lower case just adds 
confusion. 

Telewriter eliminates these 
shortcomings with no hardware 
modifications required. By using 
software alone. Telewriter creates a 
new character set that has real lower 
case letters, and puts 24 lines of 51 
characters on the screen. That's more 
on-screen characters than Apple II, 
Atari orTRS-80 Model III. That's 
more than double the Color 
Computer's standard display. 

FULL SCREEN EDITOR 

The Telewriter editor is designed for 
maximum ease of use. The commands 
are single key (or single key plus 
control key), fast, and easy to 
remember. There is no need to switch 
between insert modes and delete 
modes and cursor movement modes. 

Appk II ■ rrpucrtd itxkauii of Appk Cuaapvlrr. tot . AJ»n 



You simply type. What you type is 
inserted into the text at the cursor, on 
the screen. What you see on the 
screen is always the current state of 
your text. You can move quickly 
through the text with one key cursor 
movement in all 4 directions, or press 
the shift kev simultaneously for fast, 
auto-rcpcal. You can jump to the top 
or bottom of the text, the beginning or 
end of a line, move forward or 
backward a page at a time, or scroll 
quickly up or down. When you type 
past the end of a line, the wordwrap 
feature moves you cleanly to the next. 

You can copy, move or delete any si/c 
block of text, search repeatedly for 
any pattern of characters, then 
instantly delete it or replace it with 
another. Telewriter gives you a tab 
key. tells you how much space you 
have left in memory, and warns you 
when the buffer is full. 

FORMAT FEATURES 

When it comes time to print out the 
finished manuscript. Telewriter lets 
you specify: left, right, top. and 
bottom margins: line spacing and lines 
per page. These parameters can be set 
before printing or they can be 
dynamically modified during printing 
with simple format codes in the text. 

Telewriter will automatically number 
pages (if you want) and automatically 
center lines. It can chain print any 
number of text files from cassette 
without user intervention. You can 
tell it to start a new page anywhere in 
the text, pause at the bottom of the 
page, and set the Baud rate to any 
value (so you can run your printer at 
lop speed). 

You can print all or any part of the 
text buffer, abort the printing at any 
point, and there is a "Typewriter" 
feature which allows you to type 
straight to your printer. Because 

rCfiacmlli^Jmufk at Alan. Inc.. IKS HO * .rf.ttmlif-JMifl.4 



Telewriter lets you output numeric 
control codes directly (either from the 
menu or during printing), it works 
with any printer. There's even a 
special driver for the Epson MX-HO 
that lets you simply select any of its 12 
fonts and do underlining with a single 
underline character. 

CASSETTE HANDLER 

Telewriter makes cassette as simple to 
use as possible. It will search in the 
forward direction til it finds the first 
valid file, so there's no need to keep 
retyping a load command when you 
are lost in your tape. You can save all 
or any pari of the text buffer, and you 
can append pre-existing files to what 
you have in the buffer already. You 
can abort an append or filesearch 
without harming the program or the 
text in the buffer. 

Telewriter will maintain compatibility 
with popular Color Computer disk 
systems, but. since it makes using 
cassette almost painless, you can still 
have a powerful word processor 
without the major additional cost of a 
disk. 

AVAILABLE NOW 

Telewriter turns your Color Computer 
into the lowest cost hi-power word 
processor in the world today. It runs 
in I6K or?2K (32K recommended) 
and is so simple you can be writing 
with it almost immediately. It comes 
with complete documentation and is 
fully supported by Cognitec. 
Telewriter costs $49.95 (California 
residents add 6Cf tax). To order or 
request more information write: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Ave. 

Del Mar. Ca. 92014 
Or call (714) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
Saturdays, and early morning). We 
will gladly answer your questions. 

NaJ>l'«p MXW.rtgmcrcJ K*»«""tk of bpsu. AO-net. tot 



KffELCfCC 



The Pipeline takes a slightly 
different form this issue because of 
a slightly unique situation. For 
those of you who read or have heard 
about a publication called 
Bo-Microcomputing* the news in the 
publisher's column this month may 
have been a bit shocking. 

Wayne Green, the publisher of 
B0-Micro, led off his monthly 
dissertation in January with a 
prediction* quoting only "dealers," 
that the Color Computer will soon be 
phased out by Tandy. 

Green added he had not called 
anyone in Ft. Worth to ask about this 
rumor, simply because he believed he 
would Just get a denial* anyway. We 
might suggest that even though a 
Journalist may believe he knows the 
answer to a question, its his duty to 
ask it of the most reliable source 
anyway. 

The RAINBOW did call Ft. Worth and 
spoke with Jon Shirley, vice 
president of computer merchandising. 
Shirley had not seen the story yet, 
but termed the report "absolutely 
ridiculous! " 

"Wayne is wrong," Shirley said. 

Shirley also confirmed for the 
RAINBOW what we had heard 
unofficially, the CoCo was the 
"hottest item for Radio Shack all 
through the Christmas season." Color 
Computers, Shirley added, "sold to 
the bare walls. We didn't even have 
any left in the warehouse." 

It is not the RAINBOW'S intention 
to go to war with Wayne Green, but we 
do feel a few notes might place this 
"news" item in perspective. 

SB-Microcomputing has tried very 
hard to win a share of the CoCo 



market, with little success. Green 
has asked, editorially, for several 
months for CoCo submissions. He 
admits they have not been 
forthcoming. He also says few 
programs have been received by his 
in-house software marketing firm. 

We believe there is a good reason 
for this — and the reason is not 
that CoCo owners are treating this 
computer as a "toy," as Green 
implies. Rather, a substantial 
support market has grown up for CoCo 
through sources other than Green's. 
The RAINBOW is but an example. And 
this month, we have more advertising 
for Color Computer products than does 
60 -Micro. 

One of the reasons for this is 
simply — as our advertising says — 
we carry more programs and 
information on CoCo than all the 
"big" computer magazines combined. 

One of the reasons the 
RAINBOW was established in the first 
place was that we were tired of 
wading through all the Model I, II 
and III, Apple, Atari and so forth 
programs in every magazine under the 
sun, hoping someone would toss us a 
program for "our" computer now and 
then. We feel we — and our 
advertisers — are meeting your 
needs. We're not going to kiss off 
CoCo, and we don't believe Tandy 
will, either. From a pure profit 
standpoint, that would be a pretty 
silly thing to do. 

Back to what The PIPELINE is 
for. . . 

The special investment analysis 
program from Radio Shack is expected 
to be available by mid-March. And 

(Continued on P*e 22 1 



CHEAP THRILLS! 

2 Fast-action machine language arcade 
games. 4K minimum system. Joysticks 
requi red, sold on cassette. 

<B RICK A WAY $7.00\ 
GAUNTLET $10.00 7 
both only $14.00/ 

Br itt Monk, CDP-P.0.B. 802-Elyria, OH-44036 



••••• SOFTWARE FOB CHILDREN ••••• 

Circus Adventure -many graphics, 
non-frust rat ing , only 10 min,16-k 
Music Marvel -learn to play 2 songs 
no reading, hi-res. graph, 16-k ext. 
Poetry and Silly Sentences - a two 
program pak of fun reading a ids, 4k 

EACH JUST $10.00 

send to 8.Blyn 227 Hampton Green 
Stat en Island, Hew York , 10512 



p*» 1* 



CHART YOUR FLOW - . . AND WATCH 



:m go 



By Joe E. Bennett 



The symbols shown on this page* numbered one to ten* may seem like 
nothing more than a mass a geometric shapes. But* when y£u put them in a 
group* these symbols may help make you a better programmer. 

With proper use* you can plot the course of a program from start to 
finish — and all of the sidesteps and subroutines you may take in between. 

Flowcharting may not be the ultimate solution to your programming needs* 
but it may be one very positive solution to the debugging blues. 

To many neophyte programmers and a of 
few hard-core hackers* flowcharting needed 



is a tool of mainframe computer users 
and of not much use to us CoCo 
people. Why waste time putting your 
program on paper with all those silly 
symbols when you could be adding that 
great new algorhythm to your latest 
version of Star Trek* 
it at the same time? 



and debugging 




To answer this question* we must 
take a trip back in time (complete 
with Rod Serling narrative) to those 
mysterious days of yore before there 
were microcomputers. In those days* 
when computer time was measured in 
terms of hundreds of dollars an hour* 
a programmer had to have his work 
ready to run the first time it was 
entered into the computer. More than 
90 percent of a programmer's time was 
spent debugging a program before 
it ever ran on a computer. Logic 
flow errors are the hardest to 
detect* and could cause anything from 
a minor program slowdown to a full 
system crash. 




To help detect the logic flow 
errors* a system was devised to allow 
a program to run off-line. This 
system was* as you've probably 
guessed by this time* called 
flowcharting. 



course* 
in all 
writing short 
branches* don't 



flowcharting isn't 
programs. If you're 
programs with few 
do it. But, if your 



programs are medium-length or longer, 
and you do a lot of branching to 
subroutines* then a flowchart may be 
Just what you need to aid the tedious 
chore of debugging and determining 
logic flow. Trying to keep up with 
all the variables* gosubs and gotos 
can be difficult at best. 

Some of the advantages to 
flowcharting are: 

— Standard symbols are readily 
understood and recognized. 

— Flowcharts can be read by 
someone without programming 





experience. 

-- Flowcharts can be divided into 
smaller sections. The chart can then 
be examined for overall progress. 

— Flowcharts can be an invaluable 
aid in tracking program errors. 

— Many aids exist in 
flowcharting* such as templates and 
drawing packages. 

Of course* there are disadvantages 
as well. Among them are: 

— Flowcharts are difficult to 
design and draw. 

— It is not easy to debug a 
flowchart. 

— Flowcharts tend to become 
cluttered. 

(Continued on P«e 15 ) 



They only show program 
organization. 

Flowcharts allow for 
unstructured programming techniques. 

With all of these disadvantages to 
consider i why take the time to 
flowchart? 

The answer lies in program logic. 
If you can think in terms of computer 
logic* then this may help your 
program run smoother • more 
efficiently and, perhaps* faster. 

Let's take an everyday situation 
and flowchart it. Turning on a light 
is* in itself* a very simple task 
requiring little personal energy and 
less thought. It can be flowcharted 
this ways 





rot* 

OFF 



As you can see from the 
illustration* we can flowchart many 
decision programs* as well as many 
aspects of logic flow* to produce the 
main sub-logic flow of any program. 



tow 15 

Each flowchart symbol has a 
distinct function and meaning. There 
are others* but space will not allow 
for explaination of all the 
variations. The ones we're dealing 
with here should be adequate for most 
needs and enough to get you started 
on your own flowcharts. 

One way to became familiar with 
these symbols and with flowcharting 
in general is to make a flowchart of 
an everyday suitation — like our 
light turning-on example. Some 
suggestions would be cooking a 
specific meal* calling a friend, 
driving to work or getting ready for 
bed. These may be simple examples, 
but they should help you become 
familiar with techniques. 

The meanings of the symbols used 
in this article are: 



10 



9 



Shows the 
a program or 



1. PROCESS/ANNOTATION - Describes 
the process* instructions and/or 

d#t 2." START /END - 
beginning or end of 
logic flow. 

3. DISPLAY - Display of the 
television or CRT. 

4. PREPARATION - Initialization 
or preparation of data. 

5. CONNECTOR - Connects sections 
of the flowchart to other pages or 
other sections of the chart. 

6. ARROW - Indicates the 
direction the program moves. 

7. DECISION - Indicates yes/no or 
if /then questions. A line will trace 
the next step on the logic design. 

6. AUXILIARY OPERATION - For 
subroutines. 

9. MANUAL OPERATION - Can be used 
to indicate instructions to the user* 
manual input/output* and so forth. 

10. CONNUNICATIONS LINK - Usually 
a modem connection. 

This should give you some insight 
to what is involved in flowcharting. 
Hopefully* it will be a valuable aid 
to you in program design. With some 
practice* you should be able to use a 
flowchart with a minimum of 
concentration on the techniques of 
the process itself. 



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4S2r 48ilir 42Sir <2Slr «Siiir 17 



INUKDER* 



Snail Invaders is a RAINBOW exclusive, brought to you through the good 
offices of Illustrated Memory Banks (1MB). 

SNAIL INVADERS is a Joint effort of Fred B. Scerbo, vice President and 
software author for 1MB, and Dale Haggerty, a.k.a. "Snail," a 16-year-old 
student at Drury High School in North Adams, MA. 

Scerbo writes that "Dale served as the inspiration for "SNAIL INVADERS" 
and helped out by designing the title card and snail graphics for the 
game." The body of the program and working mechanisms were designed by 
Scerbo. 

"Dale is very talented in art," Scerbo adds. "Using the Color Computer 
for graphics is a new tool for him, and he has proudly displayed this game 
to many high school friends who want the chance to play SNAIL INVADERS. " 

Scerbo also notes you should not try to run the program until you have 
entered all the lines. Because it uses a speedup routine, you could hang 
up the computer and have to switch it off to regain control. If that 
happens, you'll lose everything you've typed. 

To save, type POKE 65494, 0f CSAVE "SNAIL" <ENTER> 

No part of this game may be reproduced or adapted for use in other 
games or programs. If you wish to use the 1MB screen scoring routine, you 
must contact 1MB. Fred promises us an article on the routine for a future 
issue. 

As with all software printed in the RAINBOW, SNAIL INVADERS is provided 
for your personal use only. You are authorized to make two (2) tape copies 
for your own use. For information on additional copies or reproduction 
arrangements, contact 1MB at P.O. Box 289, Wi 1 1 i am » town, MA, 01267. 

The directions: You can move your cannon by pressing the left and right 
arrow keys. Fire by using the space bar. A sneaky snail will shoot back 
at you at random. You only have three cannons. When the snails reach the 
end of the screen, they will reset. To replay the game, press BREAK and 
RUN. 

And remember. . .snai Is are slow, but sneaky. 

let's go. - - <S2ir «Sr iffiar 4®* escargot ! • 



I POKE65495,0:CLEAR500:CLS0 

3 SR«3iC«3iP$=CHR*(128)iF0RI-2T0 
14tF0RJ>4T013iSET(J,I,C)iNEXTJiN 
EXTI 

5 FORK-0TO11STEP1HFORJ«18TO23IS 
ET<J+K,2,C) INEXTJIF0RJ-17T024ISE 
T( J+K,3,C)iNEXTJiF0RI«4T014iF0RJ 
•1 6T025 l SET ( J+K , I , C ) i NEXT J i NEXT I 
INEXTK 

7 FORK-0TO7STEP7 I FOR J-39T05B I FOR 
I«2T07iSET( J, I-t-K, C> INEXTI INEXTJI 
F0RI-3T06iSET(59, I+K, C> INEXTI iFO 
RI«4TO5iSET(60, I+K, C) i NEXT I iNEXT 
K 

9 PRINT8257,P«; IF0RY«1T028IREADA 
I PRINTCHRt ( A) I iNEXT 

II DATA105, 108, 108, 117, 115, 116, 1 
14,97, 116, 101, 100, 128, 128, 128, 10 
9, 101, 109, 111, 114,121, 128, 128, 12 
8,98,97, 110, 107, 115 

13 PRINT3329,P$| i FOR Y«lT012i READ 
A»PRINTCHRS< A) \ INEXT 



15 DATA98, lilt 110, 117, 115, 128, 12 

8, 128, 103, 97, 109, 101 

17 PRINTa399,CHR»(98)+CHR$(121M 

19 PRINTa448,P»| :F0RY«1T031 l READ 

AtPRINTCHR»(A> I INEXT 

21 DA TA102, 114, 101, 100, 128, 115,9 

9, 101, 114,98, 111, 128, 128,97, 110, 

100, 128, 128, 100,97, 108, 101, 128, 1 

04,97, 103, 103, 101, 114, 116, 121 

23 FORI-1TO2000INEXTI6OTO43 

25 PM0DE3, 1 « PCLSt SCREENS, 0 1 DRAW" 

S24BM20, 721 C4E4L3E4R363R365NL3BR 

2E5R2F2E2R265L2H262L2BR10E5R3D5L 

2UBUL2ERDBDL36L2BR 1 0U5 R3D5L3BR5U 

5R2D3RF2L5" 

27 DRAW" S16BMB, 110| C3U2R2U4L2U2R 
6D2L2D4R2D2L6BR7UBR2F3U3R2D8L2H3 
D3L2BR8BU2U6R2DSFEU5R2D6G2L2NH2B 
R5U8R2F8L3H3BUH2D2R2BDL2D3NL2BR9 
U3H5R9F2D4G2L4BE2U4RFD2GLBD2BR5U 
8R5D2L3DR2D2L2DR3D2L5BR6U8R4F2D6 
2F3L2H3BUU2RFGLBDD3L2BRB " 

(Continued on Pig* 27 ) 



IB 



Aids 13 



INERATING A 
R R CHARACTI 



By John L. Urban 

Here, as I promised in the 
January issue of the RAINBOW, is the 
Character Generator program. 

10 'CHARACTER GENERATOR PROGRAM 

20 • PROTOTYPE 1.0 

30 '(c) JARB SOFTWARE 

40 ST$«"" 

100 CLS: INPUT "WHAT IS THY NAME" 
(NAME* 

450 CLS:PRINTTAB(4M CHARACTER 

GENERATOR «": PRINT 
500 GOSUB30000:ST=X 
510 IF ST=18 THEN GOSUB30010:GOT 
0520 

515 PRINTUSING" STRENGTH = *#" 
|ST:ST»=STR«(ST) :IF LEN(ST«)<3 T 
HEN ST«=" "♦ST* 
—520 GOSUB30000:IN=X:IF IN<3 THEN 
520 

525 PRINTUSING" I NTELL I GENCE= ##" 
(IN 

530 GOSUB30000:WI«XtIF WK3 THEN 
530 



535 PRINTUSING'WISDOM = ##" 

IWI 

540 GOSUB30000:DE-X:IF DE<3 THEN 
540 

545 PRINTUSING" DEXTERITY = ##" 
IDE 

550 GOSUB30000:CO=X:IF C0<3 THEN 

550 I 
555 PRINTUSING"CONSTITUTION= ##" 
t CO 

560 GOSUB30000tCH=XtIF CH<3 THEN 
560 

565 PRINTUSING" CHARISMA = ##" 
ICH 

568 PRINT :PRINTNAME$; " , " 
570 PRINT-ART THOU SATISFIED WIT 
H THIS CHARACTER?" rLINEINP 

UT "<<Y>ES, <N>0, <E>ND)?";A* 
575 IF A«<>"Y" THEN 450 
580 PRINT: INPUT" WOULDST 
E A PRINTOUT OF THIS 
R" (A* 

585 IF A«<>"Y" THEN 605 

590 PRINT#-2, "CHARACTER FOR "NAM 

E«;-l " «CHR*( 10) 

595 PRINT#-2, "STRENGTH ="ST»: 
PRINT#-2, USING" INTELLIGENCE= ##* 
« IN:PRINT#-2,USING"WISD0M 
##" |WI:PRINT#-2,USING"DEXTERITY 
« ##" <DE 

(Continued on Page 19 ) 



THOU LIK 
CHARACTE 




COLOR COMPUTER DISK SYSTEM 

A complete disk drive system tor the color computer, featuring the Tall Grass Technology 
Double density, buffered disk controller. This system will support up to 4 51/4 in. disk 
drives with a maximum capacity of 3.2 Mega bytes of storage using double sided 80 track 
drives. This is a minimum of 4 times the capacity of the "Standard" color computer disk 
drive system. 

DISK OPERATING SYSTEM (CCMD + 9) 

This is a full featured "Basic" compatible disk operating system which does "NOT" require extended Basic and will even run on a 4K 
color computer. It includes a complete dynamic allocation system that leaves no wasted or unused space on the disk. It will 
automatically repack disk space when files are deleted to reduce file fragmentation and increase access time. 

This system features three operating systems in one, the first is a free standing system which has 11 commands for loading, saving, 
removing, changing, checking, analyzing and executing files on disk. It can be configured to allow any mixed combinations of 35, 40 
and 80 track drives. 

The second system is a completely supported external access system for interfacing with virtually any program requiring the use of 
the disk system. It includes 10 functions tor opening, closing, reading, writing sequencial and random access files. There are also 13 
subroutine functions and 7 I/O subroutines accessable to the programmer. 

The third system is a Basic interface system which includes 6 direct execute Basic commands and 6 indirect commands which 
conform to the standard Basic tape ft printer I/O commands and allow use of string and numeric variables for disk parameters. Up to 9 
tiles can be active at once, all disk tile memory allocation is done automatically at run time. Also, Basic has access to all the free 
standing DOS commands either directly or under program control. 



■PRICES: 

Controller w/CCMO + 9 Eprom S1 59.95 

Disk Controller only S99.00 

CCMD + 9 Dos on 2732 Eprom S69.00 

CCASM9 disk assembler $34.95 

CCE0T9 disk text editor $24.95 

CCDISS disk disassembler $29.95 

CCUTLY disk utilities $19.95 

CDTPRO Text processor $39.95 



Games from Spectral Associates 



CGAME1 HI-RES Graphic Game 
includes 

Space Invaders 
Meteroids 

Space Wars $49.95 



CGAME2 mixed game disk 
includes 

Battle Fleet 
Space Traders 
Adventure 



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Add Si. 00 Postage - MC/VISA Add 3% 



GAME AIDS FrtB P|. 18 

600 PRINTi-2, USING" CONSTITUTION- 
I CO t PR I NT4I-2, USING "CHARISMA 
• «t"|CH 
603 INPUT "ANOTHER CHARACTER" I At 
l IF AsO"Y" THEN CLStEND 
610 RUN 
1000 END 

30000 X-RND( IB) t RETURN 

30010 Y-INT(RND(0)»101 ) 

30015 6T»«STRs(ST)*"/"+STR*<Y) 

loua'wa oo r mtctkmctu <m • t ct« ■ oc 



Now* here's a breakdown 
lines in the program above « 



of the 



40 Clears ST* 

100 Asks for person (or 
character) name 

450 Clears screen* print heading 

500-515 Strength generator. If 
strength equals 18* then we GOTO 
30010 to get a percentile. 

330-565 Repeat process (except 
for percentile routine if X»18). 
Variables are IN=intel 1 igence, 

WI*uisdom, DE«dexter i ty , 

CO«constitution, CH*charisma. 

568-575 Ask player if the 
character is OK. If not, do the 
routine again. 

580-585 Asks if you would like a 
printout. If not* then GOTO 605 for 
another character. 

590-600 Printout character on the 
printer. 

605 Asks if you want to create 
another character. If not, then END. 
If yes, then run the program again. 

1000 Catch-all. If we missed any 
chance of the program going past 610, 
then we must prevent an error from 
happening. 

30000 Random routine to choose the 
char* cter i st i cs. 

30010-30020 If ST-1B then make 
ST»«ST* " / " ♦per cen t i 1 e 

EXAMPLE RUN No. 1 

CHARACTER FOR JOHN 

Strength -16 
Intelligence* 8 
Wisdom -16 
Dexterity ■ 6 
Const i tut ion» 18 
Charisma ■ 6 

EXAMPLE RUN No. 2 

CHARACTER FOR JOHN 
Strength -18/ 83 



Intel ligence-16 Page 19 

Wisdom - 8 

Dexterity - 7 
Const itution-16 
Charisma - 4 



Above are two examples of a run of 
the program. j 

I always think of an average (or 
median) for these characteristics as 
being 9-12. Anything above or below 
this median starts to add or detract 
from your rolls in combat and other 
situations. 

Example ftl shows a fairly average 
character, except for charisma and 
wisdom. The charisma being 6, our 
hero is Just a little bit less than 
handsome (or beautiful if the 
character is female). Charisma is 
not always how beautiful or handsome 
the character is. It is mainly used 
in determining how your character 
might influence others. So, I would 
not use this character in a 
popularity contest. 

But the wisdom is a 16, which 
means the character will normally be 
able to detect any suspicious 
activity when his or her curiosity is 
aroused. However, with his 

intelligence being only an 8, he 
would probably overlook the more 
subtle clues. 

(Continued an Page 21 ) 



811 ly Syn^aiM 

By Sugar Software 

A hilarious end outrageous story |ut for ont to 
ton players. This (tot fill Ikon mo of your 
favorite to play and sho« off. Create your m 
otorin «ith thi suilt-in screen editor or order 
etory tapes froe tho selection beloa. lilly lyntu 
futures lecludi creating, eodifying. printing, 
saving end loading of otorin. Included is tho 
lilly lyntai gano, too stories and tho oser fuido. 

•If.fS - Reauiros Eitendod tooic. 

lilly lyntai stories • Ton stories per cassotts. 

18-001 -> Fairy Tales IS -004 -) Current Events 
IS-002 -) lino Along tl-OOS -) tothic ftooanco 
K-003 -) I-ratod B-004 -> Mventuro/ki-f i 

W. n • 101 off for 3 v eoro otory cassettes. 



Ml products art available sea. 

Ohio rtsidtnts add 5.51 sales tei. 

Add 11.00 per cassatta for postagi and handling. 

Sugar Software 
2153 Leah Lane 

dsburgp Oh 43066 
(614) B61-OS6S 



Pa9e 2t GAME AIDS Fn» Pa. 19 

As you can see* in creating a 
character — and in determining his 
or her personality — you must look 
at the characteristics as a whole. I 
would say that example #1 is a pretty 
ordinary person. 

Character «2, on the other hand, 
is not so average. 

Personally* I prefer a character 
who isn't a superman in strength. 
This character could be compared to 
Conan in strength. He is very close 
to being supei — human. A rating of 
IB/100 would be interpreted as 19, 
which is to say, super-human. So, he 
will look something like Lou 
Ferrigno. His intelligence, being 
16, will also make him extra-smart. 
This will come in handy, should the 
situation warrant brains over brawn. 
His wisdom, being what it is, is more 
than a slight disadvantage, although 
he would not be totally oblivious to 
all clues in search for adventure. 

Unfortunately, his dexterity would 
make him prone to fall over his feet 
in combat. But not too many people 
will laugh at him. Luckily, he has a 
constitution of 16, which means he 



will be extraordinarily brave. 

All in all, he will be very close 
to being super-human, if a bit 
clumsy. 

You, as a referee, have the final 
say in who does what to their 
character. I would not recommend 
that the group youl referee be all 
Conan-types. Neither should they all 
be supei — scholars, or whatever. 

By no means is this character 
generator program complete. As a 
variation, you could create a routine 
to ask for input of information if 
the player prefers to bring in an 
already-created character. Or, you 
could create files on cassette or 
disc to update the characters as the 
game is played, as a reference to you 
and for the other players. 

This will be the subject of my 
next article in the series. Please 
feel free to make any adjustments to 
the program to suit your needs — and 
share them with me if you would like. 
You can write in care of the 
RAINBOW. 

Till then, may you be rich in your 
ventures. 



ADVENTURES! 1 1 
For TRS-BO and COLOR-SO. These Ad 
ventures are written in BASIC, are full fea- 
tured, fait action, full plotted adventures 
that take 30-50 hours to play. (Adventures 
are interactive fantasies. It's like reading a 
book except that you are the main char- 
acter as you give the computer commands 
like "Look in the Coffin" and "Light the 
torch.") 

Adventures require 16K. They Mil for 
$14.95 each. 

ESCAPE FROM MARS (by Rodger Oletn) 
This ADVENTURE takes place on the 
RED PLANET. You'll have to explore a 
Martian city and deal with possibly hostile 
aliens to survive this one. A good first 
adventure. 

PYRAMID (by Rodger Olsen) 
This is our most challenging ADVEN- 
TURE. It is a treasure hunt in a pyramid 
full of problems. Exciting and tough I 
TREK ADVENTURE (by Bob Retellel 
This one takes place aboard a familiar 
t tarship. The crew has left for good reasons • 
but they forgot to take you, and now you 
are in deep trouble. 

DEATH SHIP (by Rodger Olsen) 
Our first and original ADVENTURE, 
this one takes place aboard a cruise ship • 
but it ain't the Love Boat. 
VAMPIRE CASTLE (by Mike Batsman) 
This is a contest between you and old 
Dree - and it's getting a little dark outside. 
Si 4 .95 each 



QUEST 



QUEST - A NEW IDEA IN ADVEN- 
TURE GAM ESI Different from all the 
others. Quest is played on a computer 
generated map of Alesia. Your job is to 
gather men and supplies by combat, bargain- 
ing, exploration of ruins and templet and 
outright banditry. When your force is strong 
enough, you attack the Citadel of Moorlock 
in a life or deeth battle to the finish. Play- 
able in 2 to 5 hours, this one is different 
every time. 

16K COLOR-BOOR TRS-BO ONLY. $1435 




ARCADE AND THINKING GAMES 
16 K andtxtindtd or hvl II BASIC 

TIME TREK. REAL TIME REAL 
GRAPHICS TREK. See the torpedoes fly 
and Klingons explode. No more seoll- 
ing displayt, no more tum taking. - Thit 
one hat real time and reel displayt. In 
BASIC - .for 16K level II or extended color 
BASIC. $14.95. 

STARFIGHTER - This one man apace 
war game pits you against apacecruitert, 
battlewagont, and one man fighters. You 
have the view from your cockpit window, a 
working instrument panel, and your wits. 
Another real time goody. $9.95. 

BATTLEFLEET — This grown-up ver- 
sion of Bettleship is the toughest thinking 
game available on 80 computers. There it 
no luck involved as you seek out the 80't 
hidden fleet. Thit is a topographical toughie. 
$9.95. 

8LASHBALL - A two player game of 
strategy and skill, this is like nothing you 
have ever teen before. This takes fast 
fingert, quick wits and concentration. Play- 
able from agt 6 to 65, it it a good family 
game. $9.95. 

MINOS • BK - Features amazing 3D 
graphics. You tee a maze from the top. the 
screen blankt, and when it clears, you are in 
the maze at ground level finding your way 
through on foot. Realittic enough to cau» 
clauttrophobia. $12.95. ICOLOR-80ONLY) 



TRS-80 



Please specify system on all orders flajaw. 
This ii only ■ partial listing of what we have to offer. Send for free catalog to: (a^E 

AARDVARK-80 ^T' 



2352 S. Commerce. Walled Lake, Ml 48088 
(313) 669-3110 



COLOR-80 



rage a 



tof tart fcviw 

SILLY SYNTAX 

Just when you think you've seen 
about everything anyone can do with 
the CoCot along comes something 
totally unique which is really a Joy 
to load in. Such a program is SILLY 
SYNTAX (from Sugar Software, 2153 
Leah Lane* Reynoldsburg* OH 43068* 
for •19.93). 

My hat's off to Gary Davis* the 
author and his wife* Susan* who had a 
lot of input into the idea for SILLY 
SYNTAX. The program is based on the 
ever-popular party game where people 
take turns supplying some name* part 
of speech or whatever and end up with 
oddball sentences and stories 
guaranteed to produce a bunch of 
laughs. 

For the youngsters — and there 
are several "story tapes" available 
including fairy tales — this can be 
a real educational process as well. 
When the program asks for a noun* 
that's a pretty easy way of getting a 
kid interested in knowing a noun is a 
"person* place or thing." 

One person can play* or a whole 
group. The computer asks for certain 
words to fill in blanks* and then 
writes out a whole story using those 
words. The results are* in a word* 
fun. 

I found the program* for 16K 
Extended Basic* easy to use. There 
is a very complete instruction book* 
and two stories included with the 
basic program. Other tapes are the 
aforementioned fairy tales* 

advernture* science fiction* gothic 



HOW RRETTY I T IS 
TO PRINT PRETTY 

One of the things most of the 
preliminary books on BASIC tell us is 
that "prettypr inting" can help debug 
programs. But* alas* the Color 
Computer doesn't seem to want to 
prettyprint. 

Prettypr inting is* basically* Just 
using indentations to make things 
look like they go together. The best 
example is in a FOR/NEXT loop* where 
all the material which stays inside 
the loop is indented a number of 
spaces so that its easy to spot the 
material that is enclosed in the 
loop. 

There is a whole range of other 
"rules" for prettypr inting* but most 
of them make use of spaces. And* if 
you have ever tried to tab over after 
the line number with CoCo* you know 
that* on listing the program again* 
CoCo Just takes up the spaces and 
puts your first BASIC word or 
variable after the line number. 

But you can prettyprint. The 
way to do it is simply to make the 
first character after the line number 
a colon (i). Once that's there* you 
can prettyprint to your heart's 
content. 



romance* current events* sing-along 
and X-rated. Output is to the screen 
or a printer. I can't wait to see 
more of the tapes (99.93 each* 10 
percent discount for an order of 
three or more). 

I really like this fine effort in 
creative programming! 



COLORTERM (c) 

Ihe UK Color Conputer* as an in 
uith SI or fc«J colunns by 21 line 



• 300 or 110 Baud 

• user programmable keys 

• automatic repeat when 
key is held down 

• dump your files to host 

• reverse video 

• partial screen clear 

• 4-way cursor control 

Cassette end Manual 934.95 rnti 540.95 

Martin Consulting, 94 Macalester Bay, Winnipeg, 

1U OF TWO CO*. 



• any data format (commercial 
systems, TSO. bulletins etc.) 

• memory buffer for incoming 
data— save buffer— scroll 
through buffer 

• preserve a "window" of 

any size; new material scrolls 
through remainder of screen. 



telliqenf ferninal 
s and loner case! 

• encode data for more secure 
storage 

• macro buffers for often-used 
output 

• patch the 51 or 64 column 
display to your own programs 
running above 9168 (23 DO hex) 

m*m otvpa. Mmt 

Manitoba, R3T 2X5 Canada 



Page 22 



LOU MEMORY Fn» Pg. 1 



low-resolution or text screen 
information — which is absolutely 
necessary unless your program uses 
onlw the high-res pages in higher 
memory. 

Most of the bottom 429 bytes from 
address 0 to 428 are used as 
pointers* buffers* interrupt vectors 
and other necessary functions and are 
not to be tampered with. This area 
is of extreme importance* however* 
for advanced programming techniques 
although it is not useful as 
additional storage. 

At RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE* we 
have found this situation leaves us 
with RAM addresses 420 to 1023 and* 
yes, these may all be "pilfered" 
from the Color Computer for your use 
under most circumstances. 

That's 595 bytes of additional 
emergency memory that you never knew 
you had! 

Through experimentation* we have 
found that only addresses 729 to 753 
and 981 to 996 are used often and may 
impair some operations such as 
program editing and subsequent 
loading of programs or data. It is 
recommended that you always turn off 
CoCo* wait 15 seconds* and turn it on 
again (cold start) after using any 
program that "pilfers" in lower 
memory . 

Just how can this additional 

memory be used? 

Well* unfortunately* it cannot be 
turned into additional BASIC program 
storage* but it can be accessed to 
replace variables* arrays* tables or 
an entire "hidden screen" of memory 
by POKEing in any value from 0 to 255 
in each byte to be used and later 
PEEKing those values back out. 
Usually* after getting the value from 
low. memory storage* each is converted 
to an ASCII character (letter* number 
or low-res graphics block) using the 
CHRS function. An even better use of 
this memory is to POKE in a machine 
language subroutine to be executed 
from either the BASIC program or from 
the command mode outside the program. 
This subroutine will then remain in 
low memory until the machine is 
turned off. 

In the original version of RAINBOW 
CONNECTION SOFTWARE'S Minefield game* 
we successfully "pilfered" an entire 



"hidden screen" of memory (512 bytes) 
to store our minefield map. During 
the run of the game* the map was 
frequently called to the screen 
display by PEEKing each byte of the 
hidden map (stored at 429 to 940) and 
POKEing it into low-res screen memory 
(1024 through 1535) | — minus the 
mines* of course. This technique 
made it possible for us to fit this 
memory-consuming game easily into 4K. 



PIPELINE Fro Pg. 13 

the RS editor-assembler is scheduled 
for the end of February. 

Incidentally* the CoCo with 32K is 
expected to take some 30 days to 
obtain. The wait for drive 0 (that's 
the one you have to have first) is 
estimated at 60 days. 

There is some undocumented 
speculation afoot that some of the 
newer software that will be available 
from Tandy will be disc-based. And* 
if you havn't seen the documentation 
on the new ART GALLERY ROM PAC, take 
a look. We believe you'll be 
pleased at its completeness (at least 
compared to some of the other ROM 
PACs) . 



JARB SOFTWARE 
1169 FLORIDA ST. 
IMPERIAL BEACH, CA 92032 

LASER STAR & HELO BATTLE SI 4. 95 

JARBCODE S14.95 

PSYCHIC APTITUDE TEST & 

JARB BIORHYTHM »14.95 

JARB PRINTER UTILITY KIT »14.95 

Programs on quality data diskette 
with complete documentation. 

COD orders accepted. For regular 
mail* please add $1 for shipping 
and handling. California residents 
aff 67. state sales tax. 

Call or write for free catalog of 
available programs. No collect calls 
Please. (714) 429-5516. 



are eli- 
cost of 



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gible to deduct $2 from 
each program. 



FOR 



YOUR 



Die 



By Jorge Mir 



This program* called DSKMNDX 
creates another BASIC program which, 
when runt provides a menu of programs 
on your disc. Programs can then be 
selected from the menu by simply 
typing the applicable program number. 
The selected program is then 
automatically loaded and run. 

The newly-created program* called 
INDEX T eliminates the need to type in 
the programs the user wants to run. 
Young children are relieved of the 
need to determine whether the 
programs to be run are written in 
BASIC or in machine language. It 
also eliminates the problem of 
mis-typing the name of .a program you 
wish to load and run. 

DSK«INDX, which is a copyrighted 
program* performs the following 
functions! 



— — — — — — 

4Z Programs With 16K Punch!!!! 




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aaf tlatl aallavu MM) m> «iaii 



*tl-i1i-ii "ka.Ha> auli 
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Mala* ara* 1 aw aaalaal, aaa- ^ 
llaal. mm kWaUaraal aala. aa» 
aa m m* af aa, aaa. ariual a aai 



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fajaa ara a af K55 w? 
ai ta tkra alara* a. •< 
aiilat , mi aak. a a" a I 



»l*rla*J arala aT l» faaT 
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aktlTa a 11 nil 



/law la uni t iaw fra .la* 
a»n»<. au»j«. mlatlaa. 
•kill laala. Iifklj auiuni 



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•TH-tO ia a tnlaul a Taaa> Car. 

Hot affiliated with THE RAINBOW oagasine 
COMING SOON 



Li 

— It reads the disc directory 
(track 17) and stores in memory the 
program names and their related 
extensions. 

It sorts the names 

alphabetically (this can take some 
time if there are many programs on a 
disc). 

— It creates a neu| BASIC program. 
This is done through the development 
of program lines as strings, and then 
copying them to the disc. 

— It kills a previously-created 
INDEX program before storing the new 
one. This function is added in case 
a new program is added to the disc so 
that the old program can be updated. 

Before DSKMNDX starts its work, 
it checks to see whether there is 
room on the disc for the new program. 
It also checks to see if there is 
already an INDEX program on the disc. 

It should be noted the INDEX 
program will only contain programs 
with extensions "BAS" or "BIN." This 
feature was incorporated to allow the 
user to store programs which could be 
excluded from the menu printed by 
INDEX. 

A sound is produced by the program 
when a machine language file is 
selected from the menu. The sound is 
long enough to allow the disc motor 
to stop before the program begins 
execution. This is because, in most 
instances, if you attempt to execute 
a machine language program before the 

disc stops, the disc will hang up and 
continue to run. If the location of 
the machine language program 
conflicts with the location of INDEX, 
the machine language program will be 
loaded but not executed. If this 
occurs, you must type EXEC to run the 
program. 

If BASIC programs containing 
graphics produce a syntax error, you 
should include a P CLEAR 4 statement 
as the first step in your BASIC 
program. In order to avoid coinflict 
with many machine language programs, 
INDEX relocates itself to location 
HEX BE03. With the BASIC pointer at 
this location, the programs 

containing graphic statements will 
produce syntax errors which are then 
avoided by the PCLEAR 4 statement. 

The listingi 



(Continued on P*r 24 ) 



Sceptor of Tzirgle. 



to* 24 



DISC INDEX Fro Pg. 23 



e '••••••••••••••••••••••••«•**• 

1 • 

2 ' DSK«INDX 

3 • 

4 ' BY: JORGE MIR 
3 • 

6 ' (C) 1981 

7 • 

8 *•••*••••••••••••••*•*•••••••• 

9 • 

18 CLEAR 18000:DIM N*<68> 
28 Y«BtFl«B:F2«B 
38 CLS 

48 PRINT" BASIC PROGRAM GENERA 
TOR" 

58 PRINT: PRINT" THIS PROGRAM W 

ILL GENERATE A BASIC PROGRAM THA 

T WILL PRINT A FILE DIRECTORY AN 

D AUTOMAT I CALLYRUN ANY PROGRAM S 

ELECTED FROM THE PRINTED MENU. 
■ 

78 PRINT l PRINT" PLACE THE DISK 
FOR WHICH YOU WANT TO DEVELOP A 
N INDEX IN DRIVE '8' BEFORE 

PROCEEDING. ■ 

88 PRINT 8488," <PRESS ANY KEY 

TO START>"» 
98 IF INKEY*=" " THEN 98 
188 S0UND2BB,5:CLS:PRINT 82B0,"R 
EADING DISK" 
118 FOR X«l TO 9 
128 N«0 

138 ! 0, 17,X+2, A*,B$ 

14B C*=A*+LEFT*(B*, 127) 

158 NAM*(N)«LEFT*<C*,B> 

168 EXT*(N)«MID*<C*,9,3) 

178 IF LEFT* ( NAM* ( N ) , 1 ) =CHR* ( B ) 

THEN 19B 
188 IF EXT*(N)«"BAS" OR EXT*<N)= 
"BIN" THEN GOSUB 798 
19B FOR N=l TO 7 
288 NAM*<N)«MID*<C*,N*32-H,B> 
218 IF LEFT* ( NAM* ( N ) , 1 ) « CHR* ( 8 ) 

THEN 248 
22B EXT*(N)=MID*(C*,9+N*32,3> 
238 IF EXT*(N)="BAS" OR EXT*(N)« 
"BIN" THEN GOSUB 798 
24B NEXT N:NEXT X 
242 IF F2«l OR !(B)>1 THEN 25B 

244 CLSl PRINT" THERE IS NO ROOM I 
N THE DISK TO SAVE THE NEW BASIC 

PROGRAM. " 

245 PRINT:PRINT"YOU MUST 'KILL' 



PROGRAMS CURRENT 
DISK BEFORE PROC 



ONE OF THE 
LY STORED IN 
EEDING. " 
246 END 
258 N=Y+1 

268 CLS:SOUND 200, 5 : PRINT3199, " D 
ATA BEING SORTED" 



27B GOSUPB20 

280 CLS: PR I NT" THESE ARE THE PROG 

RAMS STORED IN THE DISK:" 

290 PRINT:FOR X=l TO Y 

300 PRINT" "LEFT*(N*(X),8)" "MID 

*(N*(X),9,3), 

310 IF Y<22 THEN 330 

320 FOR S-l TO f00:NEXT S 

330 NEXT X 

340 IF POS(0)>1 THEN PRINT 

350 PRINT: PRINT" PLEASE STANDBY W 

HILE THE NEW BASIC PROGRAM IS 

BEING CREATED." 
360 ****PROGRAM GENERATOR*** 
365 IF F2=l THEN ! " INDEX/BAS* 
370 LX*«"ON I GOTO " 
388 OPEN "0",1,"INDEX/BAS" 
398 LN=B:LN*="" 
488 LN*="GOTO 6000" : GOSUB 1080 
410 LN*="DATA BD, B3, ED, IF, 02, 7E, 
96, A7": GOSUB 1088 
428 LN*=" CLS" : GOSUB 1880 
430 LN*=" CLEAR 2000: DIM N*(60)": 
GOSUB 1080 
440 LN*=" PRINT 
INDEX "+CHR*( 
450 LN*=" PRINT 
460 
470 

480 LN*="FOR 
" I GOSUB 1088 



AB ( 1 2 ) " +CHR* ( 34 ) 
GOSUB 1080 
: GOSUB 1080 
LN$= " X«0 : Z= 1 " : GOSUB 1 080 
LN*=" RESTORE" : GOSUB 1080 

«0TO7:READ E*:NEXT 

(Continued cm Pige 25 ) 



COMPUTER x0 AUDIO 
CASSETTES ^ CASSETTES 




-C.0.D. HOTLINE 1-206-675-6143 

MICRO-80" INC. 

- E-2665 BUSBY ROAD • OAK HARBOR. WA 98277 < 



DISC INDEX frm 2* 

490 LN»«"READ Nt(Z)UF N$(Z)«"*C 
HR»<34)«-"END"«-CHR»<34>«-" TVEN a +S 
TR$(LN+30) l GOSUB 1080 
300 LN»«"Z-Z-HlGOTO"+STR»(LN)iGO 
BUB 1060 

310 LN»>"A>INT((Z-l)/2)+l a iG0SUB 
10B0 

520 LN6-"F0R X«l TO A" i GOSUB 10B0 
330 LN*""PRINT USING'+CHR»(34 >♦ ■ 
#«• • ♦CHR» ( 34 ) ♦ ■ | X 1 1 PR I NT ■ «-CHR« ( 3 
4>«." - *CHR»(34)*"N»(X),'»GOSUB10 
B0 

340 LN6«"IF N6(X*AK>"«-CHR6<34>«- 
CHR»(34)*'THEN PRINT USING"+CHR» 
< 34 )♦••##■ *CHR»( 34 »X*A» IPRINT 
•♦CHR6<34>*' •♦CHR6<34>*"N6<X*A> 
l NEXT" t GOSUB 10B0 

330 LN««'PRINTa480,"«-CHR«<34)*CH 
R»<34)+- ; t INPUT" +CHRt( 34 )+ a 

YOUR CH0ICE"«-CHR6<34)*"iI"iG0S 
UB 1 0B0 

360 LN6-MF Kl OR I>Z THEN-+STR 

•(LN) IGOSUB10B0 

370 LN»«"GOTO 3000" l GOSUB1 080 

380 Fl-HFOR X-l TO Y 

390 IF MID»(N»(X) t 9,3)»"BIN" THE 

N 630 

600 LN*> a RUN"+CHR*<34)+LEFT»(N*< 
X),B)+"/BAS"+CHR«(34)*"iDATA •«■!_ 

EFTf(N»(X),B) 
610 GOSUB 10B0 
620 GOTO 650 

630 LN»»"L0ADM"*CHR»<34)+LEFTf(N 
»(X).B)+"/BIN"*CHR»(34)+"lS0UND 
200,50>EXECtDATA " +LEFT6 < N» < X > , B 
) 

640 GOSUB 1080 
650 NEXT X 
660 Fl-0 

670 LN*«"DATA END" I GOSUB 1 060 

6B0 LN=4990:LN*=LEFT*(LX*,LEN(LX 

t)-l>lGOSUB1080 

690 LN«="CLS « END "» GOSUB 1080 

700 LN=5990iLN»="CLEAR200tFORI«0 

T07IREAD Eft GOSUB 1080 

710 LN$«"POKE&HE03«-I,VAL('«-CHR6< 

34 ) ♦ • fcH ■ «■ CHRt ( 34 ) ♦ ■ «-E6 ) I NE X T " 1 60 

SUB 1080 

720 LN»- " DEFUSR0=4HE03 l X-USR0 ( &H 
E1B)" IGOSUB10B0 
730 LN»«"G0T0 30" > GOSUB 1080 
740 CLOSE 1 

730 CLSt PRINT9160* " THE NEW BASIC 
PROGRAM HAS BEEN GENERATED AND 
STORED IN YOUR DISK." 

760 SOUND 200,25 

770 PRINT 

780 END 

790 Y-Y+l 

800 Nt(Y)=NAMt(N)+EXT»(N> 

805 IF N»(Y)«" INDEX /BAS" THEN 

F2-1 
810 RETURN 



PageZ 

B20 REM«««««SORTING R0UTINE««## 

830 FOR Sl«l TO N-l STEP 2 

B40 62-61*1 

650 NEXT SI 

660 S3-0 

670 S4-N 

660 S4>INT(S4/2) 

690 IF 64-0 G<*TO 1070 

900 S3«S3*1 

910 FOR S3«l TO 64-1 

920 SI -S3 

930 S2-S5+S4 

940 S6-0 

950 IF N«<S1KN6<S2>G0T0 1000 

960 66-1 

970 SSt«N»(Sl> 

960 N»(S1)-N»(S2) 

990 N$(S2)«SS$ 

1000 S1-S2 

1010 S2-S2+S4 

1020 IF S2<N GOTO 950 

1030 IF S6-0 GOTO 1050 

1040 GOTO 920 

1050 NEXT S5 

1060 GOTO 680 

101701 RFTURN 

1080 LN-LN+10 

1090 A»«STR6<LN>*' '*LN6 

1100 PRINT«1,A* 

1110 IF Fl«l THEN LX6«LX6+STR6<L 
N)*CHR»(B)+", ■ 
1120 RETURN 




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Please kention the RAINBOW vten order in? j 




Fa* 26 



GIVE US 
MORE VIRERS! 



» 



By Richard White 



VIPERS nay be Dave Hooper's first 
cut at game programming, but he has 
been keeping his light under the 
barrel regarding other phases of CoCo 
programming. 

Of course, I typed VIPERS in from 
the December RAINBOW. I came to the 
DIM statements in line 115 and 
proceeded to enter only those with 
(IB) or larger since CoCo defaults to 
(10) if no other number is specified. 
After all, I'm running 32K and don't 
like to type. 

Now, when I enter a program, I 
like to test it as I go by running it 
if this is reasonable. With VIPERS, 
it was reasonable to RUN100 after 
each set of DRAW and GET lines after 
adding a 1000 GOTO 1000 to hold the 
graphics screen. Line 135 is GET 
(17B,68)-(196,B4),B,G. I ran 100 and 
got a FC ERROR IN LINE 135. That 



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told me that I had to have a DIM (X) 
statement for any GET command. 

Now, the Extended | Basic Manual 
tells us that a two dimension array 
must be dimensioned for a GET, and 
that the form for the one above mould 
be (DIM (22,16). I put this in and 
it worked. I proceeded to put in the 
rest of VIPERS, "correcting" Dave's 
DIM statements as I went. I ran it 
and checked MEM to find I was using 
nearly 25K bytes. 

Now, at this point in the CoCo's 
development, it is reasonable to 
expect the typical owner has a 16K 
machine and any program that would 
not fit in 16K would be so labeled. 
Dave's original DIM statements 
worked, though they are totally 
different from those in the manual. 
A quick check proved this out. 

So what is the right, and least 
memory-consuming way to DIM for use 
of GET's. D-ve read the September 
Radio Shack "Microcomputer News" 
closer than I did. There Thomas 
Rokicki provides the following 
formula, which obviously works: 

Array Size=(<H x V) -1)/N 

Where H=hori zonal width; 

V=vertical length; N=40 for PMODE 3 
and A, or 80 for PMODE 1 and 2, or 
160 for PMODE 0. 

The lengths and widths are the 
largest coordinate minus the smallest 
coordinate for each direction. Most 

of the time you will get an answer in 
decimal form, i.e., 7.7896. Round 
down (in this case, DIM X(7). 

This is important if you have 
stayed away from GET's and PUT's 
because of the memory consumption of 
a two dimensional array. I certainly 
had not given them much thought until 
I entered Dave's program. 

The other neat bit of programming 
is Dave's use of the PLAY command 
with tempo T255, note length L255 to 
generate sound effects. These 
effects appear in commercial machine 
language programs — now we find we 
can do them from BASIC. 

Perhaps Dave will put some words 
around on how he chooses notes and 
octaves to get what he wants. 



SNAIL ftm *. 17 

29 DRAW" HUR3EL4U2E3R4G3R3DG4L2" • 
PAINT(24,70>,4,4 

31 FORI«lTO3«READAlPAINT<A,70>,4 
, 4INEXT 

33 DATA32, 63, 118,178,220 

33 FORI-lTOBtREADAiPAINT<A,90>,3 

,3iNEXT 

37 DATA22,46,72, 102, 136, 170, 193, 
234 

39 FORK-6TO206STEP40IFORKK-0TO4B 
STEP 16> PUT <0*K, 120+KK)-<32+K, 128 
♦KK ) , S , PSET I NE X TKK INEXTK 
41 POKE6S494,0(FORK»lTOStSCREENl 

,0iSOUND20, HFORI-lTO500tNEXTHS 

CREEN 1 , 1 1 SOUND 1 , 1 1 FOR I > 1 TO300 1 NE 

XTI INEXTK l POKE65495.0 t RETURN 

43 Z-4IPM0DE3, 1 i PCLSi SCREEN0, 01 Q 

* « ' C 1BRNU4RU4 RD4 RU4RD4 RU4 RNL4D2N 

L4D2L6C3' 

45 DIMT<24) 

47 AS«"BR4NU4BR-lBS«"BR2U2R3U2NL 

3BD4NL3" « CS« " BR2R3U2NL2U2NL3BD4 " 

I D»« ■ BR2BU2NU2R3U2D4 " « Et« ■ BR2R3U 

2L3U2R3E04 ■ I F»= " BR2U4NR3D2R302NL 

3" !G*-"BR2BU3UR3D4' lH*«"BR2U4R3D 

2NL3D2NL3" I IS--BR2BU2NR3U2R3D4- i 

JS«"BR2U4R3D4NL3" 

49 QQS--V31L25502BB01CC 

51 GBf « " ULUL2UR7DL2DLD" 

53 SNS*" REHLG2FR3E2H2L3G2DFR6U2" 



55 SAS--C5REHLG2FR3E2H2L362C2DFU 
NHDR5 C4NUNMNE2RNH " 
57 DRAW"S11BM12B,92|C3'+SN» 
59 PAINT(128,89),2,3 
61 DRAWS1 1 BM 128,92 J" 4-SAS 
63 DIMS(7) 

65 GET(111,86)-(143,94),S,G 

67 FORI-1TO90«PSET(RNIV43),RND(1 

9),RND(5))tNEXT 

69 DIME(21)tGET(0,0)-(43,19),E,G 

71 GG*-"U2R4U2R2U2RD2R2D2R4D2L13 
■ 

73 DRAWS4BM12, 192|C3"+GG» 

75 PAINT<17,190),3,3 

77 DIMF(7)iGET(0,185)-(37, 192), F 

,G«G0SUB25i GOTO 137 

79 I FM 1 "0THEN 1 03ELSE I FM 1 « 1 THEN 1 0 

5 ELSE I FM 1 -2THEN 1 07ELSE I FM 1 "3THEN 

109ELSEIFM1«>4THEN1U 

81 L 1 -M2 1 GOSUB 1 1 3 1 M C*=LL« 1 1 FM2- > 

10THENM3-M3+1 

83 IFM2-M0THENM2-0 

85 Ll-M3tG0SUB113iMDS«LL*UFM3«> 

1 0THENM4»M4 ♦ 1 

87 IFM3-M0THENM3-0 

89 Ll-M4iG0SUB113tMES«LL*»IFM4«> 

10THENM5-M5+1 

91 IFM4«>10THENM4«0 

93 Ll-M5tG0SUB113iMF*-LLStIFM5«> 

10THENM6-M6+1 

(Continued on Paw 28 ) 



tat 27 



TRS-80' COLOR COMPUTER' 

- 16K Extended Basic/ Mem-Driven* Well-Documented, Easi ly-Modif led. 

- For either cassette or diskette systems <Be sure to specify >. 
•'.Place an order of at least f40 and 9et one extra of your choice free. 

- Order* shipped on cassette - Add *5 for shipment on diskette. 



-FURST- 

Data Clement Dictionary driven 
File Update find Retrieval SysTem. 
Create and maintain files according 
to your specifications. Ideas for 
applications included. #23 

-MAILING LRBELS- 
Cenerate and maintain mailing label 
records. Selectively Print desired 
quantities. Can keeP several label 
files If desired. Designed for 
Printer VII/ easily modified. #13 



-REPORT WRITER- 
Used in conjunction with FURST to 
selectively format reports on your 
printer. Includes headings and 
total capabilities. 

*13 

-EXERCISE PLRNNER- 
Build and maintain complete exercise 
schedule for regular and^or weight 
Programs. Display guides you through 
daily-calculated routines. Print 
complete schedule if desired. tlS 



-DISK DIRECTORY PRINT- 
For diskette users only. Get hard coPy of disk directories on your 
Printer for easy use and reference. Only *3. 

Send check or money order to* 
LAND SYSTEMS 
' TRS-80 and COLOR COMPUTER P.O. Box 232 

are Trademarks of Tandy Corp. Bellbrook/ OH 43305 



28 



SNAIL Frta Pg. 27 



95 IFM5«>10THENM5«0 

97 IFM6*>10THENr16«0 

99 L1»M6:G0SUB113»MG»=LL* 

101 RETURN 

103 MA»=J»:MEt=J«:G0T081 

105 MAt=B»:hE»=Et:G0T081 

107 MAt«Et:hE««J»:G0T081 

109 MAt«G*tMB*«E*:G0T081 

1 1 1 MA«« J« t ME»= J» : Ml «0 : M2-M2+ 1 : G 

0T081 

113 IFL1-0THEN115ELSEIFL1-1THEN1 

1 7ELSE IFL 1 -2THEN 1 1 9ELSE I FL 1 -3THE 

N 1 2 1 ELSE I FL 1 -4THE N 1 23ELSE I FL 1 «5 T 

HEN 1 25ELSE I FL 1 -6THEN 1 27ELSE I FL 1 « 

7THEN 1 29ELSE I FL 1 =BTHEN1 3 1 ELSE I FL 

1 -9THEN 1 33ELSE I FL 1 «> 1 0THEN 1 35 

115 LL»-J«t RETURN 

117 LL*=A* : RETURN 

119 LL«=B«: RETURN 

121 LL*=C«: RETURN 

123 LL«=D»« RETURN 

125 LL*«E*i RETURN 

127 LL««F«« RETURN 

129 LL*=G* : RETURN 

131 LL*«H* « RETURN 

133 LL*« I • i RETURN 

135 LL»« J» : RETURN 

137 PCLS 

139 CLS0:SCREEN0,0 
141 G0SUB295 
143 G0SUB281 



145 FORI=0TO176STEP48:FORY«=2BTO1 
2BSTEP20 1 PUT ( I , Y ) - ( I +32 , Y+8 ) , S , P 
SETiNEXTYiNEXTI 

147 FORI«0TO180STEP60:BI*=STR*(I 

+20) :DRAWS8BM"+BI«+", 165;C8U2E3 

R 1 2F3D2L4H2L6G2L4" « PA I NT ( I +24 , 1 6 

3),8,8:NEXTI:SCREEN1 ,0 

149 F0RI«1T0SR:DRAW"S4BM"+STR*( 1 

26+(34*I ) )+" , 18;C3"+GG«+"U2R13" : 

NEXTI . 

151 FORI-0TO76STEP4 

153 G0SUB297 : I FPPO I NT ( 20+ I , 32+Q ) 

-1 THEN 157 

155 PUT<0+I,2B+Q)-(32+I,36+G),S, 
PSET 

157 IFPPOINT(20+I,52+Q)«1THEN161 
159 PUT(0+I,48+Q)-<32+I,56+G),S, 
PSET 

161 IFPPOINT(20+I,72+Q)=1THEN165 
163 PUT(0+I,6B+Q)-(32+I,76+G),S, 
PSET 

165 IFPPOINT(20+I,92+Q)=1THEN169 
167 PUT<0+I,B8+<S)-<32+I,96+G>,S, 
PSET 

169 IFPPOINT(20+I, 112+Q)=1THEN17 
3 

171 PUT<0+I, 108+Q)-(32+I, 116+G), 
S,PSET 

173 IFPPOINT(20+I, 132+Q)=1THEN17 
7 

175 PUT ( 0+1, 128+Q>-< 32+1, 136+G), 
S,PSET 

(Continued on Page 29 ) 



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I RAMCHARGER FRO * IW< 10 " K new extended 

I ' l C ?lSrZ* ,t *'"" h BASIC GAMES! . m < v *1 Ji 

32K UPGRADE .S,,^^ .subhunt $u.95 IfJK ««l 

• F^m** Compute, • LASER ATTACK $10.95 ■ /W * 

Space Invaders tn9> *™ z " _ * e !i 4^1 

■ ^ _ ffl g> . CompMe «*fi high mo-utton graphics and Jf^jL A\ 

Space War • croid $12.95 Jt _. ^ 

^»T»»<^^ Eku type artificial Hi«tpm game 

„ _ _ .. . . THF FACTS SOUND SOURCE 

I • The Best Games Available int-rnv-io a<« ^ « ™™ iron, . c«,t,e upe m it* i av jaw -7 

I • High Resolution Graphics *"•« • *^p"o" <x *• ™ •™« n 

D r the gul> of the Color Computer. Shorten it. lengthen «. modrly H end replay it 

I • Fast Machine Language Speci on ad the IC» complete l»»ough the TV» sound »y*lem. BuM and te«l 
I . r., o_i w_ D ■„.! »ct»m«ICT theory of oprrllort your «• •owndi lor gwnet No IWHdwwe mods / 

I • tiasic not Required ^ p , oflI . mm)nB tunv i„ needed 

kSSSr tmUT]E8 spectral 

I EXTENDED BASIC GAMES • EDITOR/ ASSEMBLER *34.95 A^QTiriATF^ 

• LOTHAR'S LABYRINTH! *CT^ • SUPER MONITOR 19.95 MO^UUIM I C<0 

Wo^archrS X/ » EPROM PROGRAMMER 69.95 P.O. BOX 997 1 5 

I • BATT^v££T (Piogram yoot cum romi lot tr« rohpac port) Tacomi. Washington 984 99l 

Battleship Search Game (oneor * ^^^^^c^^ » R 'I|™ S G ET ,^ ci* 7 * 100 

two nbtvaakrO ADO 3S FOR SHIPPING S t .00 minimum I 

• colriT>D*r k cDc •TYPING TUTOR 19.95 mi.. 23 -k. i» dei„e, v 

SSc^r^ime .TEXTEDITOR (206)565-8483 

*14.95/ea. DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED yiSA OR MASTERCARD ACCEPTED | 




1 77 60SUB297 1 G0SUB25 3 1 1 FPPO I NT ( 6 

B+I,32+Q>«1THEN181 

179 PUT(4B+I,28+Q)-(B0+I,36+Q),S 

,PSET 

181 IFPP0INT(6B+I,52+Q)-1THEN1B5 
1B3 PUT(4B+I,4B+Q)-(B0+I,56+Q),S 
tPSET 

163 IFPP0INT(6B+I,72+Q)-1THEN189 
167 PUT(4B+I,6B+Q)-(B0+I,76+Q>,S 
« PSET 

169 IFPP0INT(6B+I,92+Q)"1THEN193 
191 PUT(4B+I,BB+Q)-(B0+I,96+Q),S 
,P8ET 

193 IFPP0INT(6B+I,112+Q)-1THEN19 
7 

193 PUT(4B+I,10B+Q)-(B0+I,116+Q> 
t S« PSET 

197 IFPPOINT (6B+I, 132+Q)«1THEN20 
1 

199 PUT(4B+I,128+Q)-(B0+I,136+Q) 
,S,PSET 

201 G0SUB297tG0SUB253UFPP0INT(l 
16+1. 32+Q ) - 1 THEN205 
203 PUT(96+I,2B+Q)-(12B+I,36+Q), 
6, PSET 

205 IFPPOINT(116+I,52+Q)«1THEN20 
9 

207 put(96+i,48+q)-(12b+i,36+q), 
sTpset 

209 ifpp0int(116+i,72+q)«1then21 

3 

211 PUT(96+I,6B+Q)-(12B+I,76+Q>, 
S, PSET 

213 IFPPOINT( 116+1, 92+Q)«lTHEN21 
7 

213 PUT(96+I,BB+Q)-(12B+I,96+Q>, 
S,PSET 

217 IFPP0INT(U6+I,112+Q)-1THEN2 
21 

219 PUT(96+I,108+Q)-(12B+I,116+Q 
) , S, PSET 

221 IFPPOINT( 116+1, 134+Q)»1THEN2 
23 

223 PUT (96+1, 12B+Q)-( 12B+I, 136+Q 
),S,PSET 

225 60SUB297IG0SUB253J I FPPO I NT ( 1 

64+1 , 32+Q ) -1 THEN229 

227 PUT(144+I,2B+Q)-(176+I,36+Q) 

,S,PSET 

229 IFPPOINT (164+1, 32+Q )-lTHEN23 
3 

231 PUT<144+I,4B+Q)-(176+I,36+Q) 
,S,PSET 

233 IFPPOINT( 164+1, 72+Q)-lTHEN23 
7 

235 PUT(144+I,6B+Q)-(176+I,76+Q) 
,S,PSET 

237 IFPPOINT ( 164+1, 92+Q ) « 1 THEN24 
1 

239 PUT( 144+1, B8+Q)-< 176+1, 96+Q) 
,8, PSET 

241 IFPPOINT( 164+1, 1 12+Q)-1THEN2 
43 

243 PUT( 144+1, 10B+Q)-( 176+1, 116+ 



Q),S,PSET 

243 IFPPOINT ( 164+1, 132+Q)-1THEN2 
49 

247 PUT( 144+1, 12B+Q)-< 176+1, 136+ 

Q),S,PSET 

249 G0SUB25 3 1 NE X T I 

231 GOTO 137 

23 3 I FPPO I NT ( Z+ 1 4 , 1 90 > « 1 THEN307E 
LSE I FPPO I NT ( Z+.1F , 1 90 ) ■ 1 THEN307EL 
SEIFPPOINTCZ+24, 190>-1THEN307 
255 FORB-1T01 1 1 IFC«1THENG0SUB2B3 
257 I FW» 1 THENG0SUB2B7 
259 NEXTBl I FW« 1 THENRETURN 
261 FORT-1TO10 
263 W»«INKEY* 

265 IFW««CHR» ( B ) THENG0SUB273ELSE 

IFW»=CHR» ( 9 ) THENG0SUB277ELSEIFW» 

«CHR» ( 32 ) THENG0SUB2B7 

267 NEXTT 

269 RETURN 

271 PCLStGOT0151 

273 Z«Z-12HFZ<"4THENZ«4 

275 G0SUB2B1 1 RETURN 

277 Z-Z+12tIFZ->216THENZ«216 

279 G0SUB2B1 » RETURN 

281 PUT(0+Z,185)-(37+Z,192),F,PS 

ETt RETURN 

2B3 PUT(Z+B, 179-K)-(Z+24,177-K), 
E , PSET t PUT < Z-4 , 1 85-K ) - < Z +39 , 1 75 - 
K),E,PSETlLINE(Z-4, 1BB-K ) - < Z+39, 
1 74-K ) , PRESET , BF i SCREEN 1 , 1 i P0KE6 
5494, 0tFORV«lTO2t PLAY" V3105L255B 
C03B C " t NE X T V t POKE 65495 i 0: SCREEN 1 
,0JW-0:C"0:PSET<Z+19, 1B3-K, 1 ) »K= 
BxMl-Ml+l 

265 G0SUB295 « RETURN 
287 W-HPSET(Z+19, 1B3-K, 1 ) :K«K+6 
l IFPP0INT(Z+19, 1B3-K)«2THENC=1EL 
SE IFPPO I NT ( Z+ 1 8 , 1 83-K ) =2THENC« 1 E 
LSEIFPP0INT(Z+17, 1B3-K)«2THENC«1 
289 PSET(Z+19, 1B3-K,3) i IFK«>156T 
HEN293 
291 RETURN 

293 PSETCZ+19, 1B3-K, 1 ) :W-0tK»0J R 
ETURN 

295 GOSUB79tDRAW'SBBM13,20?'+Q»+ 
MG»+Q*+MFt+Q« t DRAWME»+Q»+MD*+Qt « 
DRAWMC«+Q»+MA«+Q»+MB» « RETURN 
297 IFSB=1THEN302 

299 XB-RND(3)»IFXB»3THEN301ELSER 
ETURN 

301 SB«ltSC>RND( 180) +35: RETURN 

302 IFPPOINT (SC, 160)-1THENBL-192 
ELSEBL-165 

303 SB=0:DRAWS4BM"+STR«(SC)+',1 
44 1 C2" +GB» t P0KE65 A 94 , 0 : PLAYQQ* t P 
OKE65495,0tLINE(SC, 146)-(SC,BL), 
PSET i PUT ( SC-1 1 , BL-1B) - ( SC+1 1 , BL ) 
,E,PSETiLINE(SC-ll,BL-18)-<SC+ll 
, BL) , PRESET, BF l SCREEN1 , 1 1 SCREEN1 
,0tLINE(SC, 146) -(SC, BL) , PRESET ID 
RAWBM"+STR»(SC)+-, 144;C1"+GB 
305 RETURN 

(Continued on Page > > 



Pwe 31 



— •■ »— t • — — 



OR. . . 



THAT 



So you want to turn the motor of 
your tape recorder on and off a lot, 
but really don't like to hassle with 
the MOTOR ON and MOTOR OFF sequence 
from the keyboard. 

And, for gosh sakes, 
far too much trouble 
plugging and unplugging 
mini-plug all the time. 



it sure is 
to keep on 
that remote 
..like when 
you want to rewind, move fast forward 
or whatever. 

Sorry, we really can't help you 
turn the motor on any more quickly 
than a simple MOTOR ON. Oh yes, you 
can POKE into the MOTOR ON location, 
but, frankly, its easier to remember 
MOTOR ON than a POKE address. 

But, to turn the motor off once 
its on, there is a super-simple way. 
Just create a syntax error. This can 
be done by pressing any key and then 
ENTER. You'll get a ?SN ERROR 
message on the screen, but the motor 
will "turn off, too. 

Try it, you'll like it! 



r 



BAKER'S DOZEN SALE 

UNTIL FEBRUARY 28, 1982 
TO INTRODUCE OUR 



CHEAP BLANK j& 
COMPUTER TAPES 



Specifically Designed for the Higher Baud 
Rales of the Color and Mod III Computers 

• Premium Tape 
• 100% Error Free 
• Short Rewind 
• Mu Metal Shield 
• Superior Five Screw 
Construction 



C-10 
C-20 



12 + 1 FREE 

75Cea. 
85C ea. 



24 +2 FREE 

65Cea. 
75C ea. 



POSTAGE AND HANDLING $1.50 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 5.5% TAX 



the little computer store 

of Cincinnati 

77B5 ELBROOK 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 45237 
(513)631-4555 



BR I CKAWAY 

Here is an inexpensive <*7, from 
Britt Monk, CDP, P.O. Box 802, 
Elyria, OH 44036) "Breakaway"-type 
game that can provide some enjoyment. 

At the price, its a nice game. 
BR I CKAWAY isn't as sophisticated as 
the games you'll find in the arcades, 
but it does have a number of the 
features necessary to keep the whole 
thing interesting. 

What you have, essentially, is a 
across the top of the 
three rows of bricks. As 
them down, your score 
And, if you make it 
get your "ball" between 



brick wall 
screen with 
you break 
increases, 
through and 



the wall and the top of the screen, 
the ball bounces up and down very 
quickly, with the score mounting. 

The paddle you use to hit the ball 
is controlled by the right Joystick 
and you can put some "English" on 
your shots, sending the ball off in a 
different direction. The ball can 
take a strange bounce, too, when it 
hits the edge of a brick, 
there is some skill 
playing. 

Author Monk has 
displayed his own high 
you something to shoot 
do, though, you can't 
high score with yours. 



This means 
involved in 

thoughtful ly 
score, giving 
at. If you 

replace his 



SNAIL Fra Pg. 29 

307 F0RDS=lT04:PUT(Z+8, 184)-(Z+3 
0, 192),E,PSET:LINE(Z+8, 184)-(Z+3 
0, 192), PRESET, BF:NEXTDS 
309 SR=SR-1 

31 1 C0L0R3, 1 :DRAW"S4BM"+STR*( 126 
♦<34«<1+SR> ) )♦", IB; CI" +6G*+"U2R1 
3" : P0KE65494 , 0 : S0UND1 , 4 : P0KE6549 
5,0(GOSUB281 : IFSR=0THEN313ELSE25 
5 

313 SCREENl,l:POKE65494,0:FORI«2 
00TO20STEP-20 : SOUNDI , 1 : NEXT 
315 FORI=1TO1000:NEXT«RUN 
317 ' "SNAIL INVADERS" BY FRED 
B. SCERBO AND DALE "SNAIL" 
HA66ERTY, COPYRIGHT (C) 1982 
1MB, ILLUSTRATED MEMORY 
BANKS, BOX 289, WILLI AMSTOWN, 
MA. 01267 



COLORCOM/E 

It seems like it qets easier and 
taticr to hook up with data banks 
like CompuServe and BBS* like the 
Color Connection. And now* with 
COLORCOM/E < Conne ct ion-Be, +3-15 86 
flrive, MoodnaVW, NV, 11421. »49.W ) 
its even easier than ever Before. 

We recall when "they" told us 
there was no way to print out from 
the Videotex program. A couple of 
RAINBOW'S authors solved that one 
months ago. Then we figured out how 
to download from a host computer to 
tape* saving programs without having 
to type them in all over again. 

Now, another step. COLORCOM/E 
gives you the super convenience of a 
ROM Cart to load the program and a 
very versatile program that can do a 
lot of excellent things. 

For example* you can print out the 
entire dialog between your 
computer/terminal and a host 
computer* or you can "mark" certain 
areas to be printed* ignoring the 
rest. Or* you can use the same 
"marking" situation to save to tape. 
And all of this is done offline* when 
it doesn't cost any money in connect 
time. 

COLORCOM/E also has true 
scrolling* either 12 or one lines at 
a time. That really makes it easy 
not only to find what you want* but 
to mark it for printing or saving. 

There's also a word wrap mode* 
which eliminates split words if you 
like* and easily-changed baud rates 
to accomodate any host. And* there's 



NO tape to fool with, the ROM Cart 
makes this a very easy system with 
which to work. 

Although there are a lot of 
features available with COLORCOM/E. 
the program is extremely easy to 
operate. And this is helped by the 
documentation, which if really good. 
X had COLORCOM/E up and running in 
five minutes, and was saving to tape 
and printer Just as soon as I got off 
the phone. 

If you're interested in 

communication. COLORCOM/E will be a 
valuable addition to your Color 
Computer. 



Put 

Wanna real GOOD DEAL 
On A. COLOR COMPUTER?? 



Due to a Special Purchase, 
we offers 

* 16K 

* Extended Color Basic 

* Full Radio Shack Warranty 

* Neuif In Carton 

$499 

T RS-Q0* 
COLOR COMPUTER 

Send check, Money Orderi Visa or MasterCard Number to! 

CUFF'f COLOR CORNER 
Rt. 4, Box 246 

Floyd's Knobs, IN 47119 »Tr»*eark, Tan* Corp. 



The RAINBOW 

5803 Timber Ridge Dr. 
Prospect. KY 40059 

Gentlemen: 

YES! Sign me up for a one-year (12 issues) subscription to the RAINBOW. My $12 
is enclosed. 

Name 



Address 

City _ 




VISA 



(Canadian and foreign subscribers please add 
additional mailing charge). 



State 



Zip 



Check enclosed S_ 
Charge my 



CARD* 

SIGNATURE 



. VISA account 

. Mastercard account 

EXP. DATE 

_ INTERBANK •