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Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

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Dicimb.r 1981 
Bingl* Coplaa * 




5803 Timber Ridge Drive • Prospect. KY 40059 



:di TOR * E 
We're) lurt 



NOT 



notice i 
di f f erent 
•bout the 
this month. 



you 
few 
things 
RAINBOW 
The eiein 



one being the format. 
From now on, your 
favorite Color 
Computer magazine 
will look like a 
magazine. We hope 
you will find it 
easier to use and 
enjoy. Frankly, 
we're very proud of it. 

Inside, you'll find the usual 
collection of programs, hints, tips, 
games and other information devoted 
exclusively to the Color Computer 
that have caused so many of you to 
write or call with your good 
comments. We've yet to get a 
complaint ... which must be some 
kind of record (of course, now we 
will Just because we mention it)! 
That's OK, we want to know what you 
want. 

For all those (and there are 
hundreds) who have written about 
back issues, please pardon us for 
not responding individually. There 
Just simply hasn't been the time. 
There's a notice inside about them, 
and if you're interested, please 

it a 
print 

back issues, we'll probably only do 
enough so that we can handle the 
paid-up requests on hand. 




Vol. 



The Monthly Magazine tor Color Computer Users 
A LATE BULLETIN' 

DISC SAVEM 



Despite what it 
says in some parts of 
the Color Computer 
Disc manual, the SAVEM 
command which is used 
to save machine 
language programs will 
NOT work if you use 
hexidecimal numbers. 



Tandy's "Color Computer Disc 
System' manual, on page 61, says 
that, Just as in the tape versions, 
you must specify starting, ending 
and execute addresses in order to 
save machine language programs. It 
then adds i "Use the hexidecimal 
numbers for all these addresses." 

Don't do it that way. It Just 
won't work. Nor will it work if you 
use the *»H" prefix to decimal 
numbers, either. Just use the 
addresses in plain old, ordinary, 
run-of-the-mill decimal numbers 
(base IB for the 

technically-minded). 

This tidbit should save you 
quite of a bit of time and a lot of 
frustration. 



read it and try to consider 
personal letter. When we do 



Also, if the RAINBOW is a 
little later than usual, its because 

(faltlMrf DiFWil 



Inside. 



Color Dissc Systems Compered. 
Fantasy Game Aids... 
Two Great Games... 
Hints and Tips... 
Product Reviews... 
Much More. . . 



h*2 



ZELDA AND 



R BATS 



What does • Mitch need aori 
than anything tlH? Other than her 
brooast 1 ck i its got to be a bat. 
And there arc a lot of them in this 
program from Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 

ZELDA ' S BAT BOTTLE la brought 
to you courtesy of Fred Scerbo of 
1MB and we think you'll find it a 
lot of fun to play. 



Aa moat of you 
undoubtedly know, 
witches need all 
kinds of special 
things to make their 
magic potions. Bats 
happen to be one of 
them andi in the 
instant situation, 
Zelda needs 10 of 
them. You need to 
help her zap them, 
fill up the bottle, 
and do i t as quickly 
as possible. ZELDA'S 
BAT BOTTLE will tell 
you how long it 
takes! 




From Zelda't Bat Bottle 
by F. Sctrbo, 1 1981 



ZELDA'S BAT BOTTLE is 
copyrighted by Illustrated Memory 
Banks and may not be dublicated. 
You are authorized to make two 
copies for your single end use. For 
permission to make additional 
copies, contact 1MB at P. 0. Box 
269, Uilliamatown, MA, 01267. 

Incidentally, you might pay 
special attention to the graphics. 
You will notice they are a little 
different than those which have been 
presented in the RAINBOW in the past 
but are extremely attractive! We 
think you'll like this one ... and 
will have some fun helping Zelda 
out. 

The Listings 



10 CLEARS00iCLS(0)iPMODE3,HCOLO 
R3, HPCLS(0> i SCREENS, 1 ILINE (20, B 
) - (234 , 92 ) , PSET , B I DRAW' BMS , 20UBR 
3D6U4L3' IDRAW'BMS,32UBF9D3UB* 



20 C0L0R4,2iLINE(28, 16>-(60,84>, 
PRESET, BF 

30 LINE ( 66, 32)- ( 104,64) , PRESET, B 
Ft CIRCLE (66, 32), 20, 2,. 9, .32, .981 
PAINT(66, 19>,2,2iPSET(B6, IS) 
40 LINE(10B,32)-(144, 64), PRESET, 
BF I CIRCLE (126, 32), 20, 2, .9,.S2, .9 
BiPAINT(126, 17 ), 2, 2 i PSET ( 126, IS) 
50 LINEU32, 16)-(212, 48), PRESET, 
BFiCIRCLE(212,32), 16,2, 1, .77, .23 
IPAINT(21S, 17>,2,2iPSET(230,32) l 
LINE( 1S2,S2)-(212,B4) , PRESET, BF: 
CIRCLE(212,6B), 18,2, 1, .77, .231 PA 
I NT (217, 53), 2, 2t PSET (230, 68) i SCR 
EEN1, 1 

60 PM0DE4,1«SCREEN1,1«F0RI«1T046 
STEP2t CIRCLE (60, 144) ,1,8, .9INEXT 
70 DRAWBM140. 104 1 C0L2BD60R2BU34 
LI 2' I DRAW' BM1 44 , 184 ; C0U60R2BDB0U 
34L2B' 

60 DRAWBM176, 1B4JUB0R1BND46R1BD 
80' i DRAW" BM244, 104L26D46R26L28D3 
4R26' ISOUND200.1 ISOUND200, 1 tSCRE 
EN1 , 1 IFORI-1TO1000INEXT 
90 CLS(0)IPRINTS172,'ZELDA'S'|IP 
RINT8238, 'BAT ■ « t PRINT3300, ' BOTTL 
E! ' »IFORI«1TO1300«NEXT 

(Contiaued on Page 18 ) 



the RA I MBO W 

PUBU SHED B Y FALSOFT 
3803 Timber Ridge Drive 
Prospect, IT 40039 

Lawrence C. Falk — Editor 

Tie MnBW is intended for tte person*! use tad Plea- 
sin of its subscribers end reproduction by any acini ii 
forbidden. Ik* of prograas and inforaation herein it for 
ttt tingle tad ta* of subscribers and any other tat it 
prohibited. 

TFS-eB, Color Ctmputer and Extended Color lasic art 
traikmarks of Taou Corp. 

Ml progress btrcin are dlttributed oa m it' 
basil, eittait tarraaty. 

Subscriptions to the MINKM are M2 per year ia ttt 
(sited States. Canadian and lexical rates art tit per 
star. Surface sail to other countries is t2o, air sail 
to otter CDuatries is *M, tm to postage costs alone. 

Llaited back issues available for 12 tack, alia 12.31 
for shipping and band] in. ► 

Parent accepted by cask, deck, aonty order, VISA or 
fASTDKAfO. Please iKlude acmat mater, expiration 
date and your signature wen using bank cards. 

Tat MDBdM is published every aontk of tie year. 



A TALE OF TWO DISCS 



By Lawrence C. Falk 

A couple of Months ago there were no disc systems available for "the 
Color Computer. Now there are two. One, as was mentioned in the RAINBOW'S 
November issue in a brief overview* is from Tandy and the other, also 
fairly recent in plans and announcement, is from Exatron — the stakes of 
the "Stringy-Floppy* system they advertise as the 'poor man's disc' 

We have yet to physically see an actual copy of the Exatron system 
(we've asked), although we have a pretty good understanding of its 
operation from a number who have. Frankly, we tried to get a review copy 
from them, but they were close-to-the-vest about it. 

That doesn't color this review, however, and we provide that 
information only so you can Judge the comments we make. Although the 
RAINBOW'S policy is pretty strict about not reviewing unseen software or 
hardware (for your protection), we felt our information to be excellent on 
the Exatron — we basically trust our sources — and we do have the Tandy 
system in hand. In view of the interest in discs, we present this 
information here. 

We hope it will guide you if you are in the market for a disc system, 
now or in the future. 

(tetiuttf ■ hut 4 J 




, ^OLOR COMPUTEI 

COMPUVOICE TRS-80 MADNESS C THE 

o- r° " ™w • «*« « »"*> MINOTAUR 

My* t"<V*'» wtfw bo> ooVtnrurt yne ■ itiMi to 0* n*> 

try* w»i » ■ im to yo* —on, no Dmnr O«i00iam.t(i<«nln4( g | 11 V 

aoniaM U493 «o*lv fca* of ra>» Witnm to n«m 

• EXTEND MCMQftV h no>J^ . ufcorf B— * not wn>*»d. 119 95 y 

RAMrUADRFB ntw NEW EXTENDED 

^? TTC^rrS ' i^ll 0 ^** w * BASIC GAMESI I f w y, X ] /I 

32K UPGRADE . £sX!& .sub hunt «i4S» If J%]'A 

• F«,n«drC»w • LASER ATTACK 110.95 "**~^> B IH^' 

Space Invaders " n ti • alcatrazii • b.9s 

Space War ^^S ^ p--<Scrs«»*^"~ ^ctchd^ m.95 iJ^pT^s. 

• The Ben Games Available THE FACTS SOUNDSCKIRCE 
i ne DCs uames nvaiiaDie „ ^ , „ „ 

• Huh Resolution Graphics *' ** • compim oscnpoon of ™"<w m ow«j « or. «* tv «n 

ii^n noaugon fc ^ „, Color j^^*. Shone* II kngrf** >. noo», a ond no* 

• Fast Machine Language s>*a on ■■ m ici. o>t*m< swox it* tv. uni »»» Bund on< m 

• Ext. Basic Not Required I^T^^J^.^J!!!?' 0 " HZZT * " 

one progromnvng taompfta 

: £5:2: ST cmuTiEs spectral 

EXTENDED BASIC GAMES • EDITOR/ ASSEMBLER »J4.95 ACC/VM ATF^ 

Word Search Puzzle V/ • EPROM PROGRAMMER 89.95 P.O. BOX 99715 

• BATTLEFLEET <rtogrwr,^owRO^tort^p»^»«po«) Tacoma. Washington 984991 
Battleship Search Game (one or * T^S^t^I Uo' ai^'r^Hf 5 WRITE FOR COMPLETE CATALOcJ 

l^rWrs) .i^n^T^^T ADD I* r-OP. SHIPPING ,1.00 n 

• u>t(T ininrvc • TYPING TUTOR 19.99 a*» 2 3 «to fc» *«w? 

gTl^c 7 ^^.™ * TEXT EDITOR (206) 565-B4B3 

•14 95/ea. DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED VISA OR MASTERCARD ACCEP 




™* DISCS ICBt'irmMI 

Ac previously reported* the 
Tandy disc system is based In ROM, 
except for about 2K for system RAM, 
file buffer allocation and file 
control blocks for the file buffers. 
This stakes the 'bottom of user RAM- 
start at about Hex DD4 rather than 
the familiar Hex 0600 ( decimal 3340 
Instead of decimal 2441). The 
•cmory locations are allocated 
dynamical ly, depending on the number 
of file buffers you specify, so the 
available user memory could be 
less. 

By contrast, Exatron uses that 
16K above the user area (so does 
Tandy for is Disc Operating System 
(DOS). Apparently the buffers for 
Exetron are up there, too. 

Hopwever, Exatron allows the 
use of only 11 file buffers rather 
than Tandy's 13. While file buffers 
■ay seem to be something very 
■extra,* we can certainly anticipate 
a number of applications when the 
extra ones Tandy provides would be 
extremely helpful. 

Again as to file buffers, Tandy 
automatically defaults to three — 
Exatron requires you to set them. 
It seems Just another thing to worry 
about. 

To us, however, the biggest 
concern is the Exatron system 
supports single-density discs only. 
That's something like 67,000 bytes 
per disc. The Tandy system holds 
•ore than 137,000 bytes. A most 
significant difference! Perhaps 
Exatron — which has a feature that 
allows conversion of Model I discs 
to Color Computer — did it for this 
reason. However, It is, to our 
mind, a great waste of storage 
space. 

Ue must say the DOS for both 
seems about the sane. There are the 
•SAVE', 'RIM, * 'FORMAT, • 'BACKUP, ' 
'DIR (or) CAT,' 'COPY,' 'RENAME' , 
'KILL' and other similar commands. 
As we reported last month, the DOS 
for Tandy Is pretty much the same as 
for Model I-III. So is Exatron. 
Vou can 'VERIFY' saves, load in 
either machine language or ASCII 
formats. Exatron does allow for 



downloading ROM Carts. Tandy 
doesn'«t (but, since they sell them, 

you wouldn't expect them to). 

v 

Tandy does allow you to set the 
record length while record lengths 
for Exatron are set at 253. Thus, 
you can "pack* more records in the 
Tandy system - and this is treated 
rather extensively in the excellent 
(as always) Tandy documentation. • 

In conversations with Exatron, 
I have been told they feel their 
RAM-based system superior, because 
it makes for easier updates. But, 
the Tandy system can be upgraded by 
a new ROM chip. Given Tandy's 
support for its systems, we would 
expect there will be upgrades 
available as (and if) necessary. 

Both directory listings leave a 
bit to be desired, without the full 
information you get with Model III 
or II. Also, neither system has 
password protection, disc names, 
invisible/noninvisible files nor 
search through all drives (in a 
multi-drive system) for a specific 
file name. You have to specify the 
drive. However, you can designate 
the drive out of which you wish to 
operate. 

Both systems are basically 
transparent to the user, which means 
you can pretty much run BASIC and 
not worry about the DOS until you 
want It. I think this is an 
advantage. If you have been saving 
data on tape, its a fairly simple 
edit to change tape I/O to the disc 
I/O. Needless to say, the file 
transfer beats tape hands down! 

As to price, the Tandy system 
is really less expensive — and you 
can get the whole package in one 
box. Exatron sells the DOS system, 
but you need to order your drives 
elsewhere. 

Documentation! We've only seen 
the premi Unary Exatron version, and 
it seems to be good. As to Tandy, 
It Is in the usual attractive Color 
Computer format. There are some 
gaps, particularly in the examples 
which have heavy emphasis on 
embedded data. The sample programs 

(tatimed m Past 17 J 



MERE COME THI 
Hare's on* we think wou'll 
•njoy. 

Dave Hooper submits this 
proirM. called VIPER ATTACK, which 
is, ha admits, • first effort in 
game programming. I as sure most of 
you Mill agree that it certainly 

a first effort 



doesn't appear to be 
and that it is a lot 
Play. 



of fun to 



Ther 



•re are still a few 
refinements coming for VIPER ATTACK. 
When available, Dave plans to market 
this program. Because some of the 
special niceties, like on-screen 
scoring, are not included, you can 
type it in and run it, courtesy of 
Dave and the RAINBOW. 

Pay careful attention to the 
nasties! There are a number of 
different kinds, and we think wou'll 
appreciate the graphic detail with 
which Dave has concerned himself. 
As he wrote the other day, it can be 
a frustrating experience trying to 
get Just what you want. 

If you want a tape version 
(tired fingers?) Dave will be able 
to supply same for »9.95 plus SI. 30 
postage and handling. The address 
is 4490 N. Humford Dr. , Hoffman 
Estates, IL, 6019S. 



Vatch out for 
Here's the listing: 



the Vipers! 



10 Y«32iX«2iU«62iV«2 

12 Z»«CHR»( 133+80) 

14 PRINTa0,STRING»(32,Z«> 

16 PRINT8Y,STRING«(X,Z») iY-Y+32 

IB PRINTaU,STRING*(V,Zt)lU-U+32 

20 PRINTaY,STRING»(X,Z«)lY-Y*32l 

X-X+2 

22 PRINTaU,STRING*(V,Z«>lU-u>30l 
V-V+2 

24 IFY<416THEN16 

26 PRINTa416,STRINGt(32,Z«> 

2B FORH-0TO63 

30 F0RV-2BT031 

32 8ET(H,V,3) 

34 HEX TV, H 

36 PRINTa73,"VIPER'| 

38 PRINT810B, 'ATTACK' ■ | 

40 PRINTai74,'BY , | 

42 PRINT8234, 'DAVE HOOPER* I 

44 AS* " T253 I L2S3 I 03B AGFEDC04BA6F 

EDC03BAGFEDC02BAGFEDC01BAGFEDCPS 



VI RE RS 3 
46 PLAYA»+A»IPLAYA»+A»IF0RT«1T01 
000 1 NE X TT I CLS 

4B PRINTa224,'D0 YOU REQUIRE A B 
RIEFING BEFORE' 

30 PRINT82S6, 'YOU ASSUME COMMAND 

OF THE BASE * 
32 INPUT 'DEFENSE PATROL (ENTER Y 

OR N)'|B» 
34 IFBt" " N " THEN1 00ELSE I FB* Y" TH 
ENGOSUB6000 
100 PCLEAR4IPM0DE3, 1 
103 PCLS(3)tC0L0R2,3 
110 SCREEN 1,0 

113 DIMA(13),B(9),C(3),D(7),E(14 

),F(6),G(6),H(11),J(20) 

130 DRAU"S4|BM1BB, 6BR4F4DBG4L4E4 

U3NL 13U1NL1 3U4NH4BD3L 12G1D1BR2D3 

F3L3H3UBE3R3G3D3' 

133 GET(17B,6B)-(196,B4),B,G 

140 LINE(17B,6B)-(196,B4), PRESET 

iBF 

143 DR AM' S4 1 BM0 , BF3NG 1R5NF1E3R1F 
3G1NL3BE1RSNF1E3' IPAINT( 1 1 , 10) ,2 
.2 

130 GET(0,B)-(23,12),C,G 

133 LINE(0,B)-(23, 12), PRESET, BF 

160 DRAWS4»BM222,6ND1RUD1L3NLB 

ND3B R 1 D3L3G 1 F 1 R 1 2E 1 H 1 L2NE3L2NL6E 

3R4E1H1LBG1F1R1"iPAINT(232, 11), 2 

,2 

170 GET(222,3)-(246,12),D,G 

173 LINE(222,3)-(246, 12), PRESET, 

BF 

1B0 DRAW S2 1 BM2 1 6 , B0FBNE4D4NGBF4 

E4NFBU4NEBH4' 

IBS PAINT(222,B6),2,2 

190 GET(216,B0)-(240,100),E,G 

193 LINE(216,B0)-(240,100),PRESE 

T.BF 

200 DRAM' S3 1 EM5B , B6E2F4NR 1 6E6R4F 

6E4F2* IPAINT(69,B3),2,2 

203 6ET(SB,B1)-(B6,BB),F,G 

210 LINE(3B,B1)-(B6,BB), PRESET, B 

F 

213 DRAM"S4(BM36, 104G2FBEBH2BD12 
E2HBGBF2BR4BU4R4BU4L4" I PAINT (62, 
110), 2, 2 

220 GET(S4,104)-(70,U6),G,G 

225 LINE(S4, 104)-(70, 116), PRESET 
.BF 

226 FORI -1TO30:X«=RND( 236 >-HY-RN 
D(130)-1IPSET(X,Y,2)«PLAY'T233L2 
3S04GE'INEXTI 

230 DR AW • S4 » C 11 BM 1 48 , 1 B2NH4L6G2D 
2F2R20E2U2H2L6NLBE4U2G2L 1 2H2ND2E 
4RBF4" 

233 CIRCLE(132, 173), 1, HCIRCLEO 
43,1B3),1, li CIRCLE (139, IBS), 1,1 1 
PAINTU32, 1B0), 1, 1 
240 6ET(140, 172)-(164,1BB),H,G 

(Ctetlned aPitttl 



SAME AIDS • 



RANDOM NUMBERS MAKE EASY FUN ! 



By JOHN L. URBAN 

When I first started my data processing classes in college* the 
subject of computers and Fantasy Role-Playing (FRP) games came up when each 
student was asked to state his or her goals in learning to program. 

Each of us« in turn, explained our ambitions until* in the back of the 
room, a married couple said they wanted to incorporate use of their 
computer into a FRP game. The instructor* not being familiar with 
micro-computers in the home* proclaimed this to be an interesting thought, 
but he did not see how that would be possible. 

One of the unwritten rules of the hobbyist programmer is: DON'T TELL 
ME IT CAN'T BE DONE! This series of articles, explaining how the Color 
Computer can be used as an aid to the referee of a FRP game, is dedicated 
to those people who say 'It can't be done.' 

The Color Computer has a very powerful BASIC, one of the best written 
and most popular on the personal computer market today. I refer, of 
course, to the Microsoft BASIC, used in all TRS-BB computers, including the 
Color Computer. 

One of the best functions included in Microsoft BASIC for the Color 
Computer is the RND (Random) statement. Why is the Color Computer's RND 
any different from that of other BASICS? I'm glad you asked. 

(Continued on P*9t II ) 



For the COLOR COMPUTER: 

Vfau just spent your vacation money on the Extended 
BASIC Color Computer, and now you want to buy 
software!!!??? 

Don't skip meals — get CHCOMASETTE Magazine! Each 
month your computer will get a balanced diet of 6 or 
more programs on cassette (just load and run!). Along 
with the tape comes some notes on the programs, along 
with tidbits on the Color Computer world. 



The Rm frith 

Issues are sent First Class Mail. 

All sues from Jury Bt on available — ask for 1st. 

Programs are for trie Extended BASIC model only 
CaM. residents add 6% to single cop^s. Oerseas — 

add J 10 to subscriptions, add Jl to single copies 
Sent AO rate. 

MasterCard/Visa welcome! 





Chromasette Masazine 

— for those who relish every byte (that pun even hurt me). 




Chromasette Masazine 

PO Box 1087 Santa Barbara. CA 93108 
(805)0631066 



Tfct ftottea Unci 

1 year (12 issues) $45.00 

6 months (6 issues) $25.00 

Single copies $5 00 



Editor: 

I Mt to extend m 
congratulations an th* fine sort you 
art (fain. I'«t km Hitit9 far 
suite • ohile for • aagazine tilt 
truly it helpful mi covert the 
Color Cawuttr. 

Bivid Shim 
Hississavge, Out. 



Editor: 

l'» • nathesatician oho, 
initial lu, tented to pronott ayself 
— ticroccaputereise — to higher 
thins after learning MS1C end 
Assatcly. For the foreseeable 
future I'll stick eith the TB-BeXC. 
It could or tkc hottest itea on the 
nicroaaputrr airket and I'm turf 
you'll frov aith it. 

Tilt ibaut Tandy hiving • 
•tiger by thr tail!' I really don't 
think they hn what they lid Often 
thru introduced it. Let's tore tan 
support it like they should. 

Mm Hi Ik i tton 
Santa Barbara, CA 



Editor! 

I Just received ay first ittue 
and think your aaguine it great! 
Color Coaputer omeri are finally 
getting sane food quality 

ft 091 — . 

Tfcak you. 

LaDell renan 
Montrose, CO 



Editor: 

First of allt congratulations 
on amtituing to publish a first 
class aetuint. I really look 
fomard to rack issue since tkey are 
aoTMlly full of food tips tad 
excellent prograts. 

Let te take a couple of 
suggestions: 

1. Alio* sufficient aargin an 
the left for punching holes for 
individuals like ayself can keep 



letters to.. 

copies neatly filed it a fJree-riag 
Bitter. 

2. Encourage the eevelopaent 
of UZFU. progress in addition to 
leas, ftu aty eaat to indicate a 
need for sane in future issues. 

3. aon't forget as aaaal 
issue ehick eill iKludr an index. 

Thank you again for a very fine 
eagaiine. I eitk mi continued 
success. 

*rge«ir 
Ikn Berlin, HI 

(Ed. note: The printer 
Billing, it'll have apace for 
hole-punching this tenth. And h>. 
Hir is righti te nould like acre 
son-gane progrtss (although ne don't 
sent to aowngrade gases and fun, 
either). If you have soatthing 
you've been uting ( send it it for 
consideration! He'd enjoy having 
the opportunity to look at and share 
it.) 



Editor: 

I's inpressed sith the MlhBOU! 
I purchased the Color Cotputer to 
develop educational aaterials for 
language teaching, linguistics and 
teaching various subjects to sour 
children. I chose the Color 
Coaputer because it can control the 
tape recorder eith ease and tost of 
the eicercites I as developing 
rewire OML listening 
e n sprehension. 

I tried the Apple II 
gUPOTMUDI, and although it can 
access oral data raaobnly, it is not 
cost effective and the auality of 
the oral data it poor. 

I'd like to tee tore 
educational applications and I alto 
have a question. In Apple ee can 
initialize the disc eith a ftUO 
progran natch it run as a turnkey 
•hen the sachine it turned on. Can 
anyone help ae eith this for the 
Color disci 

I'd alto like to he able Is 
control the REMM) and H7EAT and 
tell the ttuoents to press FLAY on 
the recorder. Can anyone help? 

Br. Kamo So a asrao 
Ohio university 



Fage7 




Editor: 

I rwd your revise of IMStER 
CONTROL and agree in principle that 
itt a handy utility. I can't figure 
out he* to tor it sell sites the 
documentation aas not clear (saybt 1 
didn't get any) and suite 
inctaplete. Alto, a fair FnOWt it 
available fron Soft Sector Marketing 
and a superior one fron 
Conputeraare, Encinitas, CA. 

I suggest nr. laarr (hbv. 
•Letters') obtain HA61C MI fron 
Spectral Associates, Tacona, HA. 
Not only eill he he able to 
translate Hadel MM BASIC tapes, 
hut further inforsation is in the 
dooae n tition. 

Hichael Potts, B.D. 
hataville, TN 



Editor: 

CIKTU6, the Cincinnati T6-8B 
Users firoup, neett on the second 
Saturday aonthly and its nestletter 
(112 a year) contains considerable 
useful inforsation about the Color 
Coaputer. 

Those interested can contact se 
at M bo* Court, Fairfield, W 
ASM*. 

Wet knits 
Fairfield, W 

1 1 1 1 1 

Editor: 

Flease enter ay subscription. 
I eith you the greatest success. 

njTis nun 
Australia 



tat s 



RANDOM GRAPH I C FUN 



Here's a nice short program 
that will bite the Apple right down 
to the core! 

Robert Foulke contributes this 
little gem that will generate 
random-type graphic images that are 
beautifully geometric. If you have 
a screen print programn, you can get 
some super-fantastic printouts! 

In the fourth program line* 
where you have the option of 
changing the RND number , try 3 or .30 
first. These can produce some 
exceptionally fine graphics. But, 
as Robert says* any number will 
do. 



10 ' R. FOULKE - 1981 

20 • 'POLYGON' 

30 RHODE 4. 1 tPCLS i SCREEN 1 • 1 

40 PI-3. 14159tr1-RND(90> 

50 FOR T-0 TO 2«PI STEP PI/73 

60 R-C0S(M«T)«93 

70 Xl«C0S<T)«R+128:Yl"SIN<T)«R+9 
6 

80 A-T+PI/3 

90 R2=C0S(M»A>»95 

100 X2«C0S(A)»R2+128: Y2«SIN<A)*R 

2+96 

110 LINE (X1,Y1)-<X2.Y2),PSET 
120 NEXT T 

130 FOR T-l TO 800SNEXTT 
140 GOTO30 



He believe you'll really like 
this one. It can be extremely 
entertaining. 



ED'S NOTES (Cnrt'd fr» Pi. 1 > 



The Listing: 




TRS-WT** 

COLOR GAME 

LIMITED OFFER! 



FREE 



WE'LL SEND TOO OUR BONUS GAME Of THE MONTH 
WHEN YOU SEND US » SELF- ADDRESSED. STAMPED 
ENVELOPE FOR OUR FREE. COLOR PROGRAM LIST. 



16Ki°t°"oEDHI-RESOLUTlON GAMES" 

STARBASE ATTACK 1,295 

HIGH SPEED ARCADE GAME _ 

KQ5N1C KftWKftZE 18.95 

JOYSTICKS REQ'D " 

CERTIFIED CHECKS OR MONET ORDERS OHLT 

fffff. illustrated memory banks 

P.O.BOX 289 

■^■W WILLIAMSTOWN. MA. 01267-0289 

••CASSETTE 
Pleas* mtion the MIWOU aKm ordrrim > 



we have been forced to go to bulk 

mail. Frankly, we've grown so fast 

we just cannot afford to use first 

class postage (and we want to keep 

our subscription rate at 912 a year 

for 12 issues). Actually, the 

RAINBOW was MAILED earlier this 
month than ever before. 

Next month: A new game or two, 
some plans for building a desk/table 
to put all this equipment you're 
collecting on, a very useful article 
on flowcharting (it can be 
important), a neat card-shuffling 
routine that works in 4K(!) easily, 
some machine language tidbits, more 
reviews and at least one 'practical' 
program we think you'd like to 
have. 



Thanks, 
support. We' 
that we ever 
we have even 
And, again, t 
us, patronize 
— if you hav 
store — you 
them. We've 
retailers on 



again, for your 
ve grown more quickly 
thought we would, and 
bigger expansion plans, 
ell your friends about 
our advertisers, and 
a favorite computer 
might mention us to 
got a good deal for 
single copy sales. 



Until 1982! 



Software Review. . . 

CHROMA8ETTE 

MAGAZ I NE 
Chromasette isn't reallw • 
magazine in the traditional sense, 
but it is • tremendous a»ount of fun 
•nd something to anticipate oach 
month (Just like wou do with the 
RAINBOW) ! 

Chromasette (P.O. Box 1BB7, 
Santa Barbarai CA 93102, »A3 a wear, 
•23 for half a wear) comb to wou on 
a cassette tape with six or sore 
programs every ■onth, ranging from 
games to interesting fun things that 
will amuse and delight wou. 

In addition, wou get a little 
Insight into how the programs work 
and some good Information about the 
Color Computer. And Dave's (the 
intrepid editor) graphics — 
•specially the monthly cover — will 
reallw set any Color Computer 
doubter on his ear. 

Chromasette la from the same 
genere of Cload, and, admittedly, 
some of the programs are 
adaptations. That's no problem, 
because, frankly, adapting even 
non-graphic programs is 

time-consuming. If wou figure what 
your time is worth, the subscription 
is a bargain. 

Some of the programs which have 
been offered thus far test the fancy 
of almost everyone. Of particular 
note is DRAWER, which really lets 
you control drawing on the hires 
graphic screen. My favorite, 
however, is NCJUMP, where wou try to 
work your way up to a Jump over 20 
barrels. The graphics are really 
good. 

JERUSALEM ADVENTURE tests wour 
wits against several problems, 
including murderous arabs (fiendish 
Dave is not prone to hints, even if 
wou beg!), and I reallw enjoyed TWO 
DATES, a days-between-dates program 
with a creative twist and format. 
There have been a "Simon'-llke 
HUSICPAT game, a frustrating but 
enjoyable NERVES maze game and, for 
wou going into business, PHONEWD — 
a program that lists all the 
possible letter combinations of wour 
telephone number. 



Ph»9 

A FORM OF "CSAVE7" 



For those who are most 
concerned that there is no 'CSAVE?' 
command available with the Color 
Computer, there is a way to almost 
duplicate this process. 

CSAVE? is a Model I/I II command 
which allows wou to, after loading a 
program to tape, rewind the tape and 
run the program back through to 
compare what's on the tape 
byte-for-bwte with that which is in 
memory* It does not erase memory. 
So, if wou have a problem with the 
tape version, wou can Just CSAVE 
again. 

Remember, this works for Model 
I/III, but it Is not supported for 
the Color Computer. That's one of 
the reasons many of us have to clog 
up our tapes with multiple saves. 
For the Color Computer, once you 
CLOAD, the program in memory is 
erased. 

However, there is the SKIPF 
command. SKIPF only compares 
by te-f or-byte on the tape leader, 
not the program itself. On the 
surace, it seems this doesn't do a 
whole lot of good for the program 
Itself. 

But, as Dick White of 
Fairfield, Ohio, points out. 
the errors wou get when loading to 
tape are I/O errors. And SKIPF does 
react to those! Further, SKIPF, 
like CLOAD?, does not erase memory. 
So try SKIPF to verify saves, 
although wou could still get garble 
because there is no actual 
comparison of the program Itself. 
Still, it is better to have to fix 
the garble than to sit there with a 
tape that won't load, period! 



This reallw Just touches on the 
programs which have been available 
in the first four Issues, with many 
more to come. In short, Chromasette 
is a real treasure chest of fun and 
help for Color Computer owners and 
would be an ideal Christmas present 
to give yourself. 



'** " AIDS iCat'd trm P». 6 I 

Run the following program! 

10 PRINT RND(B) 

After running the program, you 
should ■•• a number on the screen 
with * decimal point to the left. 
The number Mill look something like 
.3323 1307V. Type NEW, press <ENTER> 
and run this program nexti 

IB FOR 1-1 TO 3f PRINT RND<0>| 
■ "I INEXT I 

You should see ' five different 
numbers, between 0 and 1. What the 
RND(0> does is compute a number 
between 0 and 1. This is a common 
feature on most personal computers 
in generating random numbers. 

But what good is a random 
number between 0 and 1? Not much, 
actually. Not many programs require 
a random number that is less than 1. 
In reality, a computer is a 
glamorized calculator. It can add, 
subtract, multiply and divide. A 
decimal number is nothing more than 
a number in base 10 (1, 10, 100, 
1000, etc). The same is true of 
numbers less than 1, (.1, .01, .001, 
etc). 

Run the following program: 
10 X-RND(0) 

20 PRINT X, 10»X, 100«X 

What you should see are three 
numbers with the decimal point in 
three different places! The first 
to the left of the number, the 
second after the first number, and 
the third after the second number. 

Run the program a few more 
times. Each time there will be a 
different number with the same 
decimal format. 

In programming, these numbers 
are referred to as 'real' numbers. 
But even a number like 67.7321187 It 
is not very useful if we needed only 
the number 67. Add this line to the 
program i 

30 PRINT (INT X*100> 

Now run the program. There 
should be four numbers on your 



screen, all the same except for the 
position of the decimal point, and 
... the first two numbers without 
the decimal point and all numbers to 
the left of the decimal point. The 
INT in Line 30 tells the computer to 
print only the 'whole' numbers, or 
numbers to the left of the decimal 
point. So now we have a more 
functional use for the RND 
statement. But what if you need 
only a number from 1 to 20, or 1 to 
4, or 1 to 10? 

Add this to your program! 

40 PRINT INT(X«20) 

Run the program a few times. 
What you should see is that the new 
number is not the same as the other 
numbers. Why is this number so 
different from the others? Let's 
say the computer chooses .2996931 as 
the real number. By multiplying by 
20, the result will be 3.993902. 
Adding INT will print only the 
number to the left of the decimal 
point. So now, the answer will be 
3. Line 40 will create a number 
from 0 to 19. But wait. We wanted 
a number from 0 to 20, not 0 to 19! 
By changing Line 40 to! 



40 PRINT INT(X«20)fl 

we can generate a number from 
20. 



to 



Okay. So now we have any 
number we want randomly selected by 
using RND(O). But the Color 
Computer manual has numbers like 
RND(IO) and RNDU00). What about 
them? 



Well, finally we come to the 
reason why the Color Computer's RND 
function is different (and in most 
cases, vastly superior) from other 
BASIC'S. 

Even though the Color Computer 
has the capability of creating a 
random number using RND<0>, we can 
use the highest number needed as the 
argument. NEW the program and type 
this ini 

10 PRINT RND<20) 

20 FOR 1-1 TO 300 1 NEXT H6OTO10 

(tetiMtf n fm U ) 



Hardware Review.. 



Software Review.. 



to* U 



C RR I NT 



If you want things formatted to 
your printer simply and easily — 
things like line length* page length 
and skip-over perforation — then 
CPRINT from Micro-Labs, Inc.* is 
probably for you. 

CPRINT is a ROM Pack which 
plugs into the Cart slot on the side 
of your Color Computer and allows 
you to control many of the functions 
you could not control before 
(without complicated line counting 
software that you had to write 
yourself) . 

Even more important* CPRINT 
(Continued on fm 12 ) 



AIDS (Cmt'd frm h. 11 ) 

Let the program run for a 
while. You should see random whole 
numbers from 1 to 20 printed on your 
screen. With this function, you can 
change the number to fit Into your 
PRP game any way your wish. This 
means you can have a number from 0 
to 20, 1 to 20, 0 to 100, or 
whatever. 

One final note. The RND 
function is not actually a 
completely randomized number. It is 
actually what is referred to as a 
"pseudo-random* number. The 

computer, in some mysterious way, 
plucks a number from its memory and 
computes a number via a routine in 
Its ROM, returning the new number. 
In this way, the computer appears to 
be choosing a new random number each 
time one is called for. 

While this month's opening of 
the series on FRPs is more in the 
nature of a tutorial on random 
numbers and their generation, next 
month's issue of the RAINBOW will 
explain how I use this function to 
generate a character, and, also, how 
PRINT USING can be used to format 
the screen so that it will be 
right-Justified. 

Till then, may Odin show favor 
upon your quests! 



KOQMXC KAMIKAZE 



KOSMIC KAMIKAZE has one of the 
best spaceship graphics we have seen 
In non-machine language hires 
graphics. It also has an 
interesting format, a good signature 
and is pretty challenging to play. 

Available from Illustrated 
Memory Banks (1MB, P. 0. Box 289, 
Uilliamstown, MA 01267 for S1B.95), 
it has plenty of options that 
require a quick finger on the old 
Joystick. 

The game pits your spaceship in 
an uncharted area of the universe 
amid a whole raft of alien-type 
Pirate ships. Each of the ships 
looks different, and that is part of 
the charm of the game. Depending on 
the difficulty level you select, you 
get seven, four or two shots to wipe 
out the pirate vessel before it zaps 
into hyperspace and shows up in a 
new location. To make things 
somewhat easier for you, the pirates 
warn you before they shoot back, but 
you need to be extremely quick to 
activate a defensive shield in time. 
You start out with five shields, but 
can earn more. 

There's also a comet that can't 
be defended against by shields. It 
moves very fast, but you get a big 
bonus for hitting it. 

COSMIC KAMAKAZE takes a little 
getting used to. You have to hit 
the pirates (and the comet) Just 
right in order to destroy them. 

1MB has employed the now-famous 
POKE command to speed up the action. 
However, on some versions of the 
Color Computer, that will hang 
things up when the PLAY command is 
used. This caused us a few problems 
until Me eliminated the POKE and, 
frankly, the action is fast enough 
without it. 

Yet, these are but minor 
annoyances in a game that is fun to 
play and requires some real skill to 
score well, even at the beginner's 
level. Its more than a plain old 
shoot-em-up and it certainly 
demonstrates what a little patient 
programming can do in creating 
non-machine language graphics. 



12 MACHINE TA RE 
• F 7 INDER/BAVER 

By JORGE MIR 

The short* simple program 
listed below will allow you to copy 
machine language programs onto a 
cassette tape. 

10 REM ••• FINDER ••• 
20 CLS 

30 PRINT "PROGRAM:' 

40 FOR X-474 TO 481 

50 Y«PEEK(X)UF Y-32 THEN Y-143 

60 POKE X+339.Y 

70 NEXT X 

B0 A-PEEKC4B7)«236+PEEK<4BB> 
90 B«PEEK(126)«236+PEEK(127)-1 
100 OPEEK(137>«256+PEEK<13B> 
110 PRINT' DECIMAL', 

" HEX" 
120 PRINT" ", 

■ ■ 

130 PRINT'STARTi "A," "HEX»(A) 

140 PRINT" END l "B, " 'HEX»(B) 

130 PRINT'ENTRYt "C," "HEX«(C) 

160 PRINTi INPUT "HOW MANY 

COPIES OF THIS PROGRAM 
DO YOU WISH TO MAKE "IN 

170 IF N«0 THEN END 

1B0 PRINT I INPUT "UHAT IS THE 

TITLE YOU WISH TO USE 
FOR THIS PROGRAM" J A* 

190 A»"LEFT»(AS,B> 

200 FOR X-l TO N 

210 CSAVEM A*,A,E,C 

220 PRINT3416, "COPY"X" COMPLETE" 

230 MOTOR ON 

240 FOR Y"l TO 1000INEXT Y 
230 MOTOR OFF 
260 NEXT X 

270 END 

CPHINT (Cosfd fra n. 11 ) 

holds on to control even during the 
LLIST command* which means you can 
have format control for your line 
listings. We hope all you readers 
of the RAINBOW appreciate that, 
since we try to format our listings 
to the 32-character screen to make 
it easier for you to enter programs. 
CPRINT makes this possible. 

CPRINT (available for »49.93 
from Micro-Labs, Inc., 902 
Plnecrest, Richardson, TX, 73080) 
also converts your serial output to 
parallel, which means — especially 
in the case of the LP VII — the 
throughput is faster because you are 
not tied to the 600 BAUD rate. It 
can also be used with other printers 
which use a parallel Interface. 



BACK ISSO 



Many of you have asked about 
back issues of the RAINBOW. So 
■any, in fact, we simply haven't 
been able to respond Individually. 
We're sorry. We have had a great 
deal of difficulty keeping back 
issues in stock because of the 
overwhelming demand for them. 

However, we plan to print a 
special "back issue' edition of all 
copies to date, and these special 
issues will be available in the next 
month. They will sell for *2 each 
(or the regular single-copy price), 
plus a special »2.30 mailing charge 
per order. Payment must be made in 
advance. 

We're sorry, but due to 
problems with postage and mailing, 
we cannot 'start' a subscription 
with back-dated issues. You must 
order the back-dated issues at »2 
each, plus the mailing charge. 
Please place your order, including 
payment, as soon as possible. You 
■ay now use VISA or Mastercard. 

We hope this causes you no 
problem and we thank you for your 
understanding. 



It comes in an attractive 
plastic cover. And, because it plugs 
into the ROM Cart port, you still 
have your serial port free for, say, 
a modem which could — with a little 
software — give real-time printout 
of VIDEOTEX, especially with the 
CPRINT Screen Print function 
(another plus!). 

Of course, using the ROM Cart 
port can be a disadvantage for those 
who must dedicate this port to a 
disc drive system. We've spoken to 
Micro-Labs and they are considering 
a solution to this problem. 

Since the CPRINT operation is 
in ROM, there is no overhead and for 
those who need some forms control, 
this is an extremely worthwhile 
purchase, especially if no disc 
system is Involved. 



EDITOR, 




TIRED OF WHITING FOR SOFTWARE DELIVERY? 



WE SHIP FROM STOCK! 




NEW! 



SOFTWRRE 
DEVELOPMENT 



The Micro Works Software Development 
System (SOS8DC) it ■ complete 6609 
editor, assembler end monitor package 
contained in one Color Computer program 
pack! Vastly superior to RAM-based 
assemblers/editors, the SDS80C is non- 
volatile, meaning that If your application 
program bombs, K can't destroy your 
sdHonassembier. Plus it leaves almost ail 
of 16K or SK RAM free for your program. 
Since all three programs, editor, assembler 
and monitor are coresident, we eliminate 
tedious program loading when going back 
and forth from editing to assembly and 
debugging! 

The powerful screen-oriented Editor 
features finds, changes, moves, copys and 
much mora. All keys have convenient auto 
repeat (typamalic). and since no line 
numbers are required, the full width of the 
screen may be used to generate well com- 



The Assembler features aff of the 

following: complete 6609 instruction set; 
complete 6800 sat supported for cross- 
assembly; conditional assembly; local 
labels; assembly to cassette tape or to 
memory; listing to screen or printer; end 
mnemonic error codes instead of numbers. 

The versatile A BUG monitor is s compact 
version of CBUG. tailored for debugging 
programs generated by the Assembler and 
Editor, ft features examine/change of 
memory or registers, cassette toad and 
save, breakpoints and more. 
SOSSDC Prkc M JS 



CRHCK.^fe 
THOSE ROMS! 



SOURCE GENERATOR: This package Is s 
disassembler which runs on the color 
computer and enables you to generate 
your own eource Dating of the BASIC 
interpreter ROM. Also Included fs a 
documentation package which gives 
useful ROM entry points, complete mem- 
ory map, I/O hardware details and mora. 
Disassembler features Include cross- 
referencing of variables and labels; output 
code which can be reassembled; output to 
an 60-column printer, email printer or 
screen; and a data table ares specification 
which defaults to the table boundaries in 
the Interpreter ROM. A 16K system is 
required for the use of this cassette. 
80C Dis**»mbi»c Price: M»*5 



LERRN 6809! 



6909 Assembry Languag* Prvgmmming, 
by Lance Laventhal, contains the most 
comprehensive reference material avail- 
able for programming your Color 
Computer. 

PttocSHJS 



PRRRLLEL D! 



USE A PARALLEL PRINTER with your 
Color Computer! Adaptor box plugs Into 
the serial port and allows use of 
Centronics/Rsdio Shsck compstible 
printers with parallel interface. Assembled 
and tested. 



CBUG IS HERE! 



MONITOR TAPE; A cassette tape which 
allows you to: 

• Examine or change memory using s 
formatted hex display 

• Save areas of memory to cassette in 
binary (a "CSAVEM") 

• Download/upload data or programs to a 
host system 

• Move the video display page throughout 
RAM 

• Send or receive RS-232 at up to 9600 
baud 

• Investigate and activate features of your 
computer, such as hi-res graphics or 
machine-language music 

• Use your color computer as an intelli- 
gent peripheral tor another computer, e 
color display or a 6609 program develop 
mem tool 

The monitor has 19 commands in all, and is 
relocatable and re-entrant. 
CBUG Tape Prior tS.ti 

MONITOR ROM: The same program as 
above, supplied in 2716 EPROM. This 
allows you to use the entire RAM space 
And you don't need to re-load the monitor 
each time you use H. The EPROM plugs 
into the Extended Basic ROM Socket or s 
modified ROM PACK. 

CBUG ROM Price: S39JS 



32K RRM! 



MEMORY UPGRADE KITS: Consisting of 
4116 200ns. integrsted circuits, with 
Instructions for installation. 4K-16K Kfl 
Price: 136 95 16K-32K KK (requires solder- 
ing experience) Price: S39JS 



THE 



TOW P.O. BOX 1110. DEL MAR, CA 92D14 [714] 942-2400 



MasterCharge/Visa Accepted 
California residents add 6% tax. 



tat* M 



Software Review. . . 



THE PIPELINE 



(Here's a new feature* in which 
we will have some information on a 
monthly basis about your Color 
Computer. Ue can't reveal the 
source for most of this info ... but 
be assurred its the latest 
•official' from some ■official' 
sources! ) 

-B- 

ROM 1.1 i There is a new ROM, 
numbered 1 . 1 < available for the 
Color Computer. If you buy Radio 
Shack's 32K upgrade, you will get 
it. Some of the later Models will 
also have it. We've yet to 
determine whether you can actually 
purchase it separately. 

The major thing is that it 
supports B-bits to printers without 
having to load the B-bit driver 
program (which Tandy will give you 
for free). On the video display » 
when loading from cassette* the 
video displays an 'F' and the file 
name when the selected file is 
located. The 'F' continues to flash 
until the file is finished loading, 
even if its ungapped. 

There are some minor 
differences when running the Chess 
and Bustout ROM packs. 

NEW ROM PACKS i Despite earlier 
projections of mid-December for the 
Spectaculator and Scripsit ROM carts 
of Dec. 15, Tandy now does not 
expect them to be available until 
somewhat later. Spectaculator is a 
Color Computer version of VISICALC. 
Mere speculation! They'll either be 
available or compatable with disc 
systems (somehow). 

MULTIPEN PLOTTER i That fancy 
looking multipen plotter will have 
Color Computer support. The 
software should be on disc and the 
Color Computer disc should be ready 
by the end of the year (make that 
January). 

ED I TOR /ASSEMBLER • The date for 
availability of this ROM pack has 
been shoved back to January or 
February. Reason i Tandy wants to 
add a DEBUG, so you won't have to 
load it on from tape. Hope they're^JT 



8PACE WAR 



The general idea of SPACE WAR, 
the third of the 'Space Trilogy' 
series from Spectral Associates, 
Involves piloting your space ship 
through a dangerous area between the 
stars and attacking a death star 
fortress which occupies that area. 

All is not as simple as it 
seems. For one thing, there is a 
revolving shield which protects the 
death star. While you can get some 
points for hitting the shield, you 
really rack 'em up for shooting 
through the shield's hole and 
scoring a hit on the star itself. 

But... there are four invisible 
mines defending the star. They pop 
into visibility if you get too close 
to them — but then you have to 
quickly get out of the way or they 
will explode. You can 'cloak' your 
ship ... but then you can't attack 
... and once you use up your 
cloaking energy, it is gone for 
good. 

There are other problems for 
the intrepid explorer, too. Things 
like a black hole which has gravity 
that can suck you in, an enemy ship, 
and so forth. Its not an easy game 
to win and requires practice and 
skill. 

As always, this machine 
language game from Spectral has a 
great deal going for it. The 
graphics are great, the action fast 
and the Interaction a lot of fun. 
You can spend hours at it without 
getting bored. 

We know of no arcade game like 
SPACE WAR, which makes it all the 
more enjoyable. And you will enjoy 
playing it. 

SPACE WAR is available from 
Spectral, 141 Harvard Ave., Tacoma, 
MA, 98466 for 921 .95. 



not too late on this, there are a 
number of other good ones currently 
available! 



ROKPACK BACKUP 

Now Just what would you do if 
your ROM Pack blew up? 

Well, if you had a backup on 
tap*, you aight be able to relax a 
little, anyway. The following 
routine, from Al Morgan (who, for 
those of you who follow his 
endeavors, has changed his base of 
operation from Massachusetts to New 
York) will allow you to copy your 
ROM Pack into eemory and then 
transfer it to tape. 

That does not necessarily mean 
that you can then Just load it back 
in and run it from RAM, but you 
could do some dissambly and examine. 
Also, with a little knowledge of 
■•chine language, some of the 
routines will be pretty obvious to 
you, 

A word of extreme caution: 
This program requires plugging ROM 
Carts in and out with the power ON! 
It should be used ONLY with 
Tandy/Radio Shack carts, since it is 
safe to plug them in without 
removing the power. Otherwise some 
of your chips — including the CPU 
— could get zapped. 



So, here's a listing of 
Pack insurance from Al Morgan i 
10 CLS:PRINT'THIS PROGRAM MILL A 
LLOW YOU TO SAVE A ROMPAC TO TA 
PE." 

20 PRINTiPRINTMNSERT ROMPACK. 
YOU WILL NOT CONTROL." 
30 PRINTiPRINT'PRESS ANY KEY UHE 
N YOU HAVE INSERTED ROMPAC 

33 P0KE&HFF23.36 

40 IF INKEYt»«""THEN40 

43 PR I NT i PR I NT ■ PROGRAM IS NOW BE 

ING DUMPED. PLEASE STANDBY. 

• 

30 IF MEM>20000 THEN N=&H4000 EL 
SE N=tVH2000 
S3 A«=N 

60 FOR X-&HC000 TO &HCFFF 
70 POKE N,PEEK(X)tN=N+l 
75 PRINT CHR«<PEEK<X) M 
B0 NEXT X 

90 CLS: PRINT' ROMPAC HAS BEEN DUM 
PED TO RAM." 

92 PRINT: INPUT "ENTER NEW FILE N 
AME' INS 



ROM 



100 PR INT i PR I NT 'NEW REMOVE ROM PA 
C AND PREPARE TAPE RECORDER. 

■ 

110 PRINTiPRINT'PRESS ANY KEY TO 

CONTINUE" 
120 IF INKEY»*""THEN120 
130 CSAVEM Nt.A,A+4096,A 
140 CLSIPRINT'FILE NOW COPIED" 
160 IF INKEY*-""THEN160 
170 POKE &HFF23.37 
1B0 END 




Software Stocking-Stuff ere from RCSJ1I 

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I I 



FB/' anaon (m»> am) \ •»-- 
(» nawwu •]'-«* 



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flrtaa l«tr 0 i. 1 1 BU.'iLuJvj 
[■i m a. Fm mtar mr» arln 

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fa-em* w A— to -a.mlatta» m gfmm\ 




■ ■ — - trM !>*MlLaahf»i rj'*»» •»*» 
lie mi af fM*. M, »rti-l«*J MM 

Z' KOfaTT-M (»r»at»r •A r *£. ' 



IMttfc IT"""" - ■ 



V«f«a varelaa ef iM*w aa*« 
CtM *• ttWve pUjm ••. taeq " 
leftist, rail «**xk, trvptuUe 



-.Wri-J iw». .1 U. I 



""til «c»w U— I.— Uait aeia K tie i^ilr i-all 

aMlla B jj Mia. La.*-— *■ | I ear— ta. — n>.» n»< m 



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/(mm tM Mini «•*»*-' tr*m 
mella*. MUM.. eea-taMis**, 
«iu Utf.Lt. aMiiU«*l 



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Xhl.t BS .raft >. • S9R l«4i»l 

- iw aam'. r~u ~r<— • - 
r«w imp* *r J».'ll tiaaai 



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fMawJw RSULS TTooi ton ruu t- ~:» a m»/mm. 

Jg jjJj.xL n 1 1 writ! iuu fctuit- Mm t^tK 



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.rcs i. not a** iuTS* 



tot 16 

VIPERS (tet'4 frm H. 5 ) 

243 LINE(140,172)-<164,1BB),PRES 
ET,BF 

253 LINE<0,190)-(236,190J,PSET 
260 TINER-0iG-12«Z-HVF-0iYS-0 
263 ON Z GOSUE 2000,2100,2200,23 
00,2400,2300 

270 FORX - XI TO X2 STEP X3IF0RT 
-1TO100INEXTT 

273 GET(X-1B,0)-<X+1B,20), J,G 
273 ON Z GOSUB 1000,1100,1200,13 
00,1400,1300 

277 I F RND < 3 ) > 3THENG0SUB3 000 
2B0 H-JOYSTK(0) 

283 IF H <3 THEN H-3 ELSE IF H > 
SB THEN H — 5B 

290 IF G <> H#4 THEN LINE(6-12,1 
72)-<G+12, IBB > , PRESET , BF I G-H«4 
293 PUT<G-12,172)-<G+12,1BB),H,P 
SET 

303 P< 1 )-126:P(2)-234 

310 F-0«P-PEEK(632B0> 

313 IFF-0AND<P-PU)ORP-P<2>>THEN 

GOTO400 

320 F-l 

323 PUT(X-1B,0)-(X+1B,20>,J,PSET 

327 IFRND<3)>4THENGOTO270 

32B IF TIMER -> 14400 THEN 6OTO60 

0 

330 NEXTX I G0T026S 

400 REM SHOOT ROUTINE 

403 GET(G-1, 13)-<G+1, 170) , A, G 

410 LINE(G, 13)-<G, 170), PSET 

413 PLAY * T 1 00LS0O3BBBB' 

420 PUT<G-1,13)-<G+1,170),A,PSET 

423 M»-'T253»L233»03CBAGFEDC04CB 

AGFEDC03CBAGFEDC02CBAGFEDC 

430 ON Z GOSUB 3000,3100,3200,33 

00,3400,3300 

433 IFYS-230ORYS-11230THENZ-2 
440 IFYS-730ORYS-11750THENZ-3 
443 IFYS-1750ORYS-12750THENZ-4 
430 IFYS-3000ORYS-14000THENZ-3 
433 IFYS-3000ORYS=16000THENZ-6 
460 IFYS-10000ORYS-21000THENGOSU 
B4000IZ-1 
463 GOTO320 

300 PUT<X,0)-<X+44, 16), J, PSET 

303 XI -20 :X2-2 101X3-33 

310 FOR X - XI TO X2 STEP X3 

SIS PUT(X,0)-(X+44,6),C,PSET 

520 PUT<X,0)-<X+44, 16), J, PSET 

325 NEXTX • GOTO503 

600 SCREEN0, 1 

60S CLS 

610 TS-YS-VF 

613 PRINTSTRING»<9,'«' > «PRINTa9, 

■DAMAGE REPORT' 

620 PRINTS23, STRING* < 9, ••" ) 

623 C-0 

627 1-1 

630 T*-' ....YOUR 



TOTAL SCORE IS * 

63S PRINTa224,MID*(T»,I,32) 
640 FORJ-1TO90INEXTJ 
643 I-I + HOC+1 

6S0 IFC-lSTHENPRINTa336,TSiF0RX- 

1TO600: NEXTX 

63S IFC-3BTHEN665 

660 IF1>LEN(T«) THEN627ELSE63S 

663 CLSiPRINT'NEXT SHOOTER PLEAS 

E" 

670 PRINT844B, 'PRESS <ENTER> TO 
CONTINUE' I INPUTD* 
673 IFDt-'Y'THEN673 
6B0 GOTO100 

1000 PUT(X-9,0)-(X+9, 16), B, PSET 
1003 RETURN 

1100 PUT(X-12,B)-<X+11, 12),C,PSE 
T 

1 10S RETURN 

1200 PUT<X-12,3)-<X+12, 12),D,PSE 
T 

1203 RETURN 

1300 PUT<X-B,3)-<X+B,13),G,PSET 
1303 RETURN 

1400 PUT(X-14,3)-<X+14, 12),F,PSE 
T 

1403 RETURN 

1300 PUT(X-12,2)-(X+12,22),E,PSE 
T 

1S0S RETURN 

2000 Xl-RND(12)+17iX2«200«X3-RND 
( 10) +24 « RETURN 

2100 Xl-RND(12)+17iX2-230:X3-RND 
<20)+14iRETURN 

2200 XI -RND <20> + 17«X2-220 i X3-RND 
<20>+14:RETURN 

2300 XI -RND ( 20 ) +30 I X2-200 : X3-RND 
<20)+14iRETURN 

2400 Xl-RND(12)+20iX2-210iX3-RND 
(10) +24 1 RETURN 

2500 Xl-RND(15)+17(X2-24SiX3-RND 
(20>+14iRETURN 

■»■"• IFPPOI NT ( G, B > -2THENPLAYM* « Y 

S-YS+S0 

3010 RETURN 

3100 IFPPOINT<G, ll)-2THENPLAYM»l 

YS-YS+100 

3110 RETURN 

vi-? s l2SS 0INT * G ' 1 1 > " 2THENPLAVM * * 

3210 RETURN 

3300 IFPPOINT(G,B> -2THENPLAYM* » Y 

S-YS+230 

3310 RETURN 

3400 IFPPOINT<G,10)-2THENPLAYM»i 

YS-YS+300 

3410 RETURN 

3300 IFPP0INT(6,B)-2THENPLAYM»IY 

S-YS+1000 

3310 RETURN 

4000 A«-'V31|T30;O4CL2DEL1CP1CL2 
DEL1CP1L2CDECDECDEL1CP2* 

(tatiMd oi Pa* 17 ) 



VIPERS (Cat'd fna P|. U ) 

4005 B»« * V31 1 T30 1 04FL2GAL 1FP1FL2 

6AL 1FP1 L2F6AFGAFG AL 1 FP2 ' 

4010 PLAYAS+B* « PLAY A* 

4013 CS-'V31»T255«L255101CDEFGAB 

02CDEFGAB03CDEFGAF04CDEFGAB0SCDE 

FGAB" 

4020 PLAYC»+Cs:PLAYC»+C» 
4025 YS" YS+ 1 000 i RETURN 
3000 LINE(X,17)-<X, 171),PSET,B 
300S PLAY'T100L3O2CCCCCCCC 
S010 S S« * 0 1 T200L64 AEBB AEBB AEB B " 
901S IFPPOINTtX, 1B2)«1THENPLAYS» 
+S*+S»+S« i GO5UB7000 1 VF-VF+1 000 
S020 LINE(X, 17>-<X, 171), PRESET, B 
F 

3025 RETURN 
6000 CLSi 

6005 PRINT-ALIEN VIPER FIGHTERS 
ARE" 

6010 PRINT "ORBITING YOUR BASE ST 
ATI ON. " 
6015 PRINT 

6020 PRINT'YOUR MISSION, SHOULD 
YOU CHOOSE" 

6025 PRINT'TO ACCEPT IT, WILL BE 

TO DEFEND" 
6030 PRINT-BASE STATION 'OMEGA' 
MITH YOUR" 

6035 PRINT'LASER BLASTER." 
6040 PRINT 

6045 PRINT'YOUR RIGHT JOYSTICK W 
ILL MOVE" 

6050 PRINT'THE LASER BLASTER AND 

YOUR RED" 
6055 PRINT" BUTTON WILL FIRE THE 
LASER' 

6060 PRINT i PRINT I PRINT 

6065 INPUT" TO CONTINUE PRESS <EN 

TER>" |C» 

6070 CLS 

6075 PRINT332, "FIRST 5 HITS - 50 

POINTS EACH" 
6080 PRINT'SECOND 5 HITS - 100 P 
OINTS EACH" 

60B5 PRINT'THIRD 5 HITS - 200 PO 
INTS EACH" 

6090 PRINT'FOURTH 5 HITS - 250 P 
OINTS EACH" 

6095 PRINT'FIFTH 5 HITS - 500 PO 
INTS EACH" 

6100 PRINT'SIXTH 5 HITS - 1000 P 
OINTS EACH" » PR I NT 

6105 PRINTiPRINT'IF YOU GET THIS 

FAR YOU'LL 6ET" 
6110 PRINT'A BONUS OF 1000 POINT 
S AND THE" 

6115 PRINT'POINT SYSTEM WILL STA 
RT OVER'iPRINTiPRINT 
6120 INPUT "TO CONTINUE PRESS <EN 
TER>" |C» 

6125 CLS«PRINT879,"BE" 
6130 PR INTS 109, * CAREFUL ! ! ! " 
6135 PRINTa227,"IF YOU GET HIT B 



DISCS ICmVt trm N. 4 ) 17 

in the back work — but, to get to 

something more sophisticated, you 

need to do • little programming on 
your own. 

We're throughly satisfied with 
the Tandy disc. The Exatron — from 
what we been told and seen 
appears a little More difficult to 
operate. Exatron does offer a 
couple of added features at added 
cost, but we don't really have good 
information on them, yet. If we get 
it, we'll pass it along. 

Obviously, Exatron is a 
different system than Tandy. Our 
sources tell us most disc-based 
software will probably use the Tandy 
system, so there may be problems 
down the line if you go with 
something else. 

There are a couple of things we 
do wish Tandy had included — like 
an AUTO function, a few more 
utilities (perhaps using that upper 
16K of RAM?) and we wish the 
controller itself was physically a 
little smaller. However, the system 
works flawlessly Use of the 2K of 
low RAM for some of the Tandy DOS 
does create some problems using 
their Machine Language programs, 
but, given Tandy's excellent 
support* we feel those will soon be 
solved, one way or the other. 

From our extensive discussions, 
the Exatron system seems to work 
well, too. Single density discs and 
incompatabllity may be a problem in 
the future, but time will tell. 

As we recieve more information 
on these systems — and others — 
RAINBOW readers will be kept UP to 
date. 

Y AN ALIEN" 

6140 PRINT3301,'YOU LOSE" 
6145 PRINT3361, "1,000 POINTS" 
6150 PRINT3395, "EACH TIME!" 
6155 PRINTIPRINT 

6160 INPUT 'TO CONTINUE PRESS <EN 

TER>" t Ct 

6165 RETURN 

7000 F0RC-1T013 

7005 CIRCLE(G, 175), C, 4 

7007 CIRCLE(G, 1 75),C,2 tNEXTC 

7010 F0RD-1T013 

7015 CIRCLECG, 175 ) ,D,3iNEXTD 

7020 RETURN 



tat* IB 



ZELDA (Cat'tf trm Pi. 2 ) 



100 BB*«* NUHG2DEDEDEDRUFUFUFUH2G 
NUL* iBF»«*NUHL2F2RNDRNDRE2L2GNUL 
■•DIMA(13), B(4)iG-0iFORI-32TO22 
4STEP16iG-G+HA(G>-IiNEXTIiG-0iF 
OR I -26T074STE P 1 6 1 G-G+ 1 1 B ( G > - 1 1 NE 
XTI 

110 PRINT896, • ZELDA NEEDS YOUR H 
ELP. SHE HAS* t PR I NT* TO ZAP 10 BA 
TS INTO HER GLASS* I PRINT* BOTTLE 
SO SHE CAN HAKE HER BREW. ' | 1 PRIN 
T*YOU CAN DIRECT HER MAGIC BLAST 
■IPRINT'BY PRESSING 1 WHEN THE B 
ATS ARE* IPRINT'ON THE LEFT, 2 
WHEN THEY ARE* 

120 PRINTMN THE MIDDLE, ft 3 W 
HEN THEY* IPRINT* ARE ON THE RIGHT 
. * I IFORI-1TO600I NEXT 
130 DB«0iPMODE3,HPCLS(4)iSCREEN 
0, 0iLINE(0, 162) -(236, 192 ), PRESET 
,B«PAINT< 10, 186) ,3, 1 I CIRCLE < 126, 
160), A3, S,.SSi PAINT (126, 160), 2,3 
140 LINE(S2,134)-(171,144),PSET, 
BFILINE(S2,134)-(171, 144), PRESET 
,BiPAINT(126, 135), 3, HLINE(92, 12 
0)-(104, 134), PRESET 
130 PM0DE4, 1 ISCREEN0, HDRAWS16B 
H126, 160;C«*+BBt 

160 DRAWS10BM13, 1 10 ; C0E9G4H2L7G 
2R3F4D6ENU6ENU6EU6END3END2NR2FDF 
2LDM.2GFGHL2RDFR3EBDGFG2DNH2FD6G 
L3GD 1 BHNU 1 BL2FNU 1 7L 2FU1 6NE6D1 6L7 
U16H2L4U4EB* 

170 PAINT(24,9B),0,0iPAINT(24, 14 
■>,0,0 

160 LINE( 10, 17B)-<42, 181), PRESET 
,BFiLINE(200, 161 )-(246, 120),PRES 
ET,Bi LINE (210, 120 )- (238, 110) , PRE 
SET, BF l LINE (203, 1 10 )-(243, 103 ) , P 
RESET , B i L I NE ( 80 , 178 )-( 172, 166) , P 
RESET, BF «GOSUB370 i SCREEN 1 , 1 l TIME 
R-0 

190 GOSUB260 

200 GOSUB350 1 GOSUB260 « DRAW 'SI 2BM 

■ +X»+* , * +Yt+* t C3 * +BB»+* C0* +BF»+* 

C3 * +BF«+* C0* ♦BB»+* C3 * +BB» I DRAW'B 

M* +A»+ * , * +B»+* I C8* *BB« 

210 IF DB-M0THEN330 

22C F0RI-lT02iPLAY*V31|01|L19eiE 

■iNEXT 

230 Q«-INKEY« 

240 IFGt«*l*THEN270ELSEIFQ«« , 2*T 
HEN280ELSE I FQ«- * 3* THEN290 
230 GOTO200 



260 X*-A«iY»«B*iC«RND(13)iD-RND( 
4) IA»-STR»(A(C) ) IB»«STR»(B(D) ) IR 
ETURN 

270 W-RND(4)ILINE(S5,97)-(A(W),B 

( D )), PRESET I COLOR5 , 0 i L INE- ( 35 , 97 

) , PSET I GOSUB300 i GOTO200 

260 W«RND(3)+4iLINE(35,97)-(A(W) 

, B ( D ) ) , PRESET I COLORS . 0 : L INE- (55 , 

97 ) , PSET I GOSUB300 : GOTO200 

290 W«RND(4)+9iLINE(55,97)-(A(W) 

, B ( D ) ) , PRESET i COLOR5 . 0 « L INE- (55, 

97 ) , PSET I GOSUB300 : GOTO200 

300 PLAY*VBi05»L255?CiOHE* HF A 

(W)-A(C) THEN320 

310 RETURN 

320 DB«DB+HDRAW*BM*+A»+*,*+B»+* 
(.CS * +BB* > PM0DE4 , 1 1 SCREEN1 , 0 1 FORK 
-1T03IPLAY*05|L25S;GCGC<01 iDD* IN 
EXTK l PM0DE4 , 1 1 SCREEN 1 , 1 « GOSUB360 
I RETURN 

330 K»T I MER : PM0DE4 , 1 « SCREEN1 , 0 i S 
OUND220, 16iCLS(0) IPRINT3130, *YOU 
TOOK* | « PRINT USING'#####.#* iK/6 
0t IPRINT* SECONDS. '< 
340 FORI-1TO4000INEXTIGOTO130 
330 FORJ«lTO2iF«RND<40)+110:FORH 
-0TOSSTEPSiCIRCLE(F, 133), 3, H, .7, 
.3, HNEXTHINEXTJIRETURN 
360 BH- ( 1 76- ( DB*5 > > I BH»»=STR» ( BH ) 
I DRAW* BM224 , * +BH»+* « C0 ■ +BB» I RETU 
RN 

370 FORJ-10TO250STEP40iM-RND(10) 

♦ 1 0 I FORI -4T032STEP2 i C I RCLE ( J , M ) , 

1,0, . 71 NEXTI I NEXT Ji RETURN 

380 REM ' ZELDA' S BAT BOTTLE!' BY 

FRED B. SCERBO, 1MB, COPYRIGHT 
1961, ILLUSTRATED MEMORY BANKS, 
P.O.BOX 289, WILLI AMSTOWN, MA., 
01267-0289. 




Fran ZelaVt B*t Bottle 



Software Review. • • 
ANT I MATED HANGMAN 



tot 19 



There Bust be a hundred 
"Hangman* game* on the Mrktti but 
ANT I MATED HANGMAN from Boft Sector 
Marketing la (1) About the beat 
we've ittn and, (2) Uaa written to 
uae all the excellent functlona of 
the Color Computer. 

You can have houra of enjoyable 
fun by aending 914.95 to Soft Sector 
(6230 Middlebelt, Garden City, MI, 
4B135). The whole thing la in color 
and it will run on a non-extended 
Color Computer. 

The worda are variable length, 
aome eaay and othera difficult. 
While the miaaed gueaaea built the 
acaffold for the poor hangman, he 
■takes noiaea, movea hia head about 
and lifta hia arma in fruatratlon. 
When you miaa a gueaa, you get a 



not-ao-complementary reaponae. When 
you gueaa right, there'a praise. 

We must say it la a 1 moat worth 
it to lose. Poor hangman falls 
through the acaffold trap door, and 
comes out with a pltful Bound. It 
really la a game that can be played 
for quite some time. 

Because lta written in BASIC, 
you can change the word liat to your 
liking. That's helpful for teaching 
the kida spelling words and ao on. 

We auppoae no hangman game la 
very deep, but Soft Sector' a 
ANT I MATEO HANGMAN la a real good 
game and it haa enough Bound and 
graphic action to keep on amusing 
the player for quite aome time. 



The RAINBOW 

5803 Timber Ridge Dr. 
Prospect. KY 40059 

Gentlemen: 

YES! Sign me up for a one-year (12 issues) subscription to the RAINBOW. My $12 
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