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Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

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You read it first here. (Maybe 
It mas in July. 



we should gloat and add "of course".) 

Commercials for the RAINBOW 
aside* the Tandy Disc system is a 
reality. We know, because there is 
one sitting right here newt to our 
Color Computer. (And we didn't pull 
any strings to get it, either. ) By 
now, you can probably see one at 
your local Radio Shack computer 
center or store. 

As we wrote earlier, the Disc 
Operating System is based in ROM — 
a ROM Cart. It plugs into the CART 
port of the Color Computer. Drive 
"0" is the first step for a system. 
There are three more drives 
available. Our earlier information 
on prices was accurate — but we 
were *4 low on drive 0. Drives 1, 2 
and 3 were on target. But you can 
get that information in the new 
catalog. 



A REAL BIG ONE ! 

There are a lot of goodies in 
the November issue of the RAINBOW! 
We hope you enjoy them. 

There is a Videotex downloading 
routine (that can be used with any 
host computer system), our 
basketball stats program, a takeout 
on Tandy's new disc drive, a 
biorhythm program ... and a whole 
lot more. 

Next month . . . some special 
seasonal stuff is comtemplated. 
But. too, there's a great program 
that will allow you to make backup 
copies of your ROM packs, the 
beginning of a series on 
role-Flaying game aids, reviews and 
more tutorials, helps, hints and 
tips. 

We're really gratified by the 
response to the PAINEOW. Our 
subscription list is really growing 
— and we like to think that's 
because you like what you see. 
Thanks for your support! 

We'd also appreciate your help 
in spreading the word about the 
RAINPOW. And, although we know it 
sounds trite, please patronise our 
advertisers. After all, they care 
enough about YOU and YOUR computer 
to advertise in the ONLY monthly 
magazine devoted exclusively to the 
Color Computer. 



For your $599, you get a drive, 
a drive controller (which is, 
actually, a large-siee ROM Cart), a 
ribbon cable that hooks the cart up 
with drives 0 and 1, and manual and 
a free (!) disk. Incidentally, the 
bo;: all this comes in says "custom 
mfg. in Japan. " 

The whole thing is packaged 
very well and comes in two boxes 
inside the shipping box. Obviously, 
Tandy will use the same packaging 
materials for the other drives. The 
manual is in the familiar 
multi-colored format of "Getting 
Started" and "Going Ahead." Its 
called "Color Computer Disc System" 
(Should it be "Spinning Along..."?) 

(Continued on Paqe 2 ) 



Fage 2 



DISC (Continued frompg. 1) 

and features a neu character to go 
uith the drawings of the Color 
Computer — a disc with arms and 
legs. As usual, the documentation 
is excellent. It is, sort of a cross 
between the simple (in the early 
going) to a little complex (when 
sequential and direct access formats 
are discussed). We do wish there 
were a little more detail — sans 
embedded formats — near the end of 
the book. 

As to the drive itself, it has 
worked flawlessly since its arrival 
several days ago. And, because the 
operating system is ROM-based, its 
use is transparent to the user. In 
other words, its there when you want 
it but it doesn't interfere with you 
in any way. And, because your 
cassette port isn't involved in this 
new system, you can CLOAD a program 
from tape and then SAVE it onto disc 
directly. I had two substantial 
tapes full of games — and I 
transferred them one at a time with 
total ease. Now they are on disc, 
and totally accessible in just 
seconds. The longest program I have 
which took two and one-half 
minutes to load from tape — - loaded 
from disc in 12 seconds. 



PROGRAM QUICKIE. . . 

NHERE AM I?? 



You probably know you can make 
multiple saves to tape simply by 
enclosing the CSAVE command in a 
loop. And, its a good idea to do 
this because there is no way to 
verify a tape write and if there is 
a tape problem, your copy can be 
lost. 

Sometimes, though, those saves 
are long and you just sit there 
wondering "where am I?" 

Here's a way to figure it outs 
Just put a counter in your direct 
command. Then, you'll know what 
CSAVE you are on. The direct 
command line looks like this: FOR 
X=l TO 3: PRINT "ON SAVE " X : CSAVE 
"f i lename" sNEXT X 

If you want to save more or 
less than three programs, change the 
three in the X-loop. If you want to 
put space between the individual 
saves, add the following after the 
last colon above: MOTOR ON:FOR Y=l 
TO 750 :NEXT Y: MOTOR OFF: 



We were disappointed there is 
AUTO command to generate 
automatic line numbers in the disc 
utilities. (If this bugs you as 
much as i t does us, check the review 
cn MASTER CONTROL in this issue for 
a solution.) Yet, one of the other 
biq problems from the tape system 
has been solved. Through its VERIFY 
command, the disc will check itself 
J be sure your program was saved 
?.::-iirately . No more triple saves 
and prayers. 

The DOS, which is referred to 
in the documentation as "Disc 
Basic," is pretty much the same as 
that available for the Model III, 
without the utilities. The discs 
are the same as those used by Model 
III. 



And yes, Virginia, it was 
written by Microsoft. 

A disc system won't be for 
everyone. However, there are many 
applications for which a disc is the 
only way to go effectively and this 
system seems to have the features 
necessary for some pretty 

sophisticated programming. There 
are some other disc systems which 
will or are to become available, and 
we will keep you up to date on them 
as is possible. 



BASKETBALL STATSKEEPER Ul I l_L_ HAVE Page 3 
THEM BOUNCING ALONG 



When you gather your friends together for a TV game or two this coming 
basketball season — set up a second TV and keep score for them with 
STATSKEEPER. 

STATSKEEPERi in a larger version, was used last season to keep a full 
set of statistics on some games for the University of Louisville Cardinals. 
Because all statistics are kept up to date as of the time things occur, the 
final stats can be done instantly when the game ends. That program keeps 
track of every possible activity — including minutes played. 

STATSKEEPER is designed to be used at home (unless you want to take 
your Color Computer to the game). Because of that, and in an effort to get 
a prof essional -look bo:: score display, the number of statistics categories 
are limited to field goals attempted and made and free throws attempted and 
made. STATSKEEPER keeps up with total points for each player and team and 
computes free throw and field goal percentages. 

You use the "enter" option when a player comes into the game. This 

controls who is displayed in the bo:: score. Be sure to "enter" the 

starting five. If you forget, the statistics will still accumulate — they 
Just won't be displayed. 

It has been our experience that other statistical categor ies < such as 
rebounds, minutes played and so on) are most difficult to determine 
watching on TV. The field goal attempts might be a little difficult, but 
if you can concentrate on those, your statistics should come out all 

riqht ' (Continued on Page 8) 



. . . FOR UNDER $0.75 (that's SIX BITS] APIECE! 

For the COLOR COMPUTER: 

You just spent your vacation money on the Extended 
BASIC Color Computer, and now you want to buy 
softwarel!!??? 

Don't skip meals — get CHROMASETTE Magazine! Each 
month your computer will get a balanced diet of 6 or 
more programs on cassette dust load and run!). Along 
with the tape comes some notes on the programs, along 
with tidbits on the Color Computer world. 



The Fine Print: 

Issues are sent First Class Mail. 

All issues From July 81 on available — ask for list. 

Programs are for the Extended BASIC model only. 
Calif, residents add 6% to single copies. Overseas — 

add $10 to subscriptions, add $1 to single copies. 
Sent AO rate. 

MasterCard/Visa welcome 1 




Chromasette Masazine 

— for those who relish every byte (that pun even hurt me). 




Chromasette Masazine 

'PO. Box 1087 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 
|(80S) 963- 1066 



The Bottom Line: 

1 year (12 issues) 145.00 

6 months (6 issues) $25.00 

Single copies 15.00 



Paqe -) 
SOFTWARE REVIEW. . . 

MASTER CONTROL 



MASTER CONTROL is the best 
thing that's happened to tired 
fingers since molded keyboards. 

One of the things that has 
bugged us about the Extended Color 
Easic cemmand set is that there is 
no AUTO function included for ease 
of line numbering? especially when 
doing long lists of DATA statements. 
MASTER CONTROL gives us a line 
numbering function that works with 
esse — and that's ..just one of some 
half a hundred things it does to 
male life easier for anyone who is 
writing programs. 

This little gem (available from 
SOFT SECTOR MARKETING, 6250 
Middle-belt, Garden City, MI 48135 
for *Z'4.95) automatically enters 50 
commands at the touch of a finger. 
All you have to do is press the down 
arrow and any of the keys, which are 
marled with BASIC statements, and 
the statement you want appears on 
the screen. For example, if you 
have the automatic numbering in 
c-ffect, you can write a line number 
snc) the DATA statement by pressing 
tha "ENTER" i down arrow and "D" keys 
on 1 y . 

For those of us who frequently 
•.hps "IF" as "OF" and who seem to 
always hit the instead of the 

in CURS, this is a real plus 
th.it kills those synta:; errors. The 
iornmands which need them (such as 
MIL'S) that have opening parentheses 
in therm have the parentheses opening 
ss part of the assigned statement. 

In addition, the MOTOR. TRACE, 
AUDIO and RUN commands execute 
directly — without your having to 
press the ENTER key. This really 
saves a lot of time. 

Finally, there is what SOFT 
SECTOR describes as a "custom key", 
which "joli can program to be anything 
you want. This is a major bonus! 
If, for instance, you are running 
though a long series of IF 
statements which a couple of 
parameters, you can program the 



custom key for that whole list of 

parameters — and save literally 

hours of typing. This is an 
excellent feature. 

How do you keep track of what 
all the keys stand for? SOFT SECTOR 
supplies a template to overlay on 
the keyboard. That also means you 
can take it off if you want. While 
the template itself has a sticky 
backing, you can stick it on some 
cardboard and just cut holes for the 
keys. We did this and it worked 
very wel 1 . 

MASTER CONTROL is written in 
machine code, so it is very fast. 
It only takes up 1100 bytes and can 
be relocated — especially important 
if you have or anticipate upgrading 
to 32K. It does require 16K to 
operate, but does not require 
E:; tended 

However a number of the 
commands are Extended commands. 
They, obviously, won't work without 
Extended. 

MASTER CONTROL is a workmanlike 
program that does everything well. 
If you are doing any amount of your 
own programming, it is well worth 
the moderate cost in terms of typing 
hours saved alone. 



MAIL IMG MOT I CE 



From time to time, the RAINBOW 
may make its mailing list available 
to highly qualified firms which 
produce products for the Color 
Computer. 

While we believe this 
information will be helpful to you, 
we respect your right to privacy and 
will not disclose your name or 
address to anyone if you will merely 
inform us that this is your 
desire. 

Thank you. 



Hardware Review... 

SERIAL/ PARALLEL 
CONVERTER 



O.K.? you're Just not satisfied 
with either of the 'printers Radio 
Shack has out for the Color Computer 
— either the Line Printer VII or 
tho newest one, the Line Printer 
VIII. 

Or, maybe, you Just want to be 
able to switch printers at some time 
in the future and keep your present 
LP VII or VIII for now. 

The choice is yours, but you 
can gain some real flexibility with 
the PIBOC SERIAL/ PARALLEL CONVERTER 
from THE MICRO UORKS (P.O. Bo>: 1110, 
Del Mar, CA, 92014). 

For S69.95. the PIBOC will 
allow you to use the serial port of 
your Color Computer for your 
printer, but will convert the 
signals for use on the many parallel 
printers no»t on the market. That, 
by the way, includes virtually every 
major printer manufacturer. You can 
purchase conversion kits for a 
number of printers, but the cost is 
much mere than is this little "black 
bo::" (which really 15 a black 
bo:: 

We've had the PI80C uf and 
running with an Epson printer for 
two months now. It has worked 
perfectly. Not a single hitch. 

The PIBOC comes with a four pin 
DIN plug which fits into the Color 
Computer's Serial port and a power 
cord which plugs into a standard 
socket. The other end is an edge 
card which has the "standard" 
Centronics configuration. You plug 
one end of a printer ribbon cable 
into the? PI30C and the other into 
your printer. That's all! 

Since the LP VII and LP VIII 
both have parallel connections, you 
can use your PI3QC with one of those 
printers ... as well as with any 
other printer Radio Shack sells. 
You can also plug into an Epson, 
Centronics, Okidata, etc., etc. 



Program uuickie... 

Paqe 5 

T I MES SQUARE 
HEADER 



So, you've written a neat 
program but you don't really have a 
good way to introduce it ... and 
you're tired, anyway. 

Here's a quick way to use some 
of the more interesting capabilities 
of the Color Computer to produce a 
"header" for a program that's. as 
they say, fast and dirty. 

This little gem will give you a 
Times Square-like message center on 
your screen. The words will Just 
scroll along. And, from the code 
below, you'll see that it's easy to 
produce. You might even want to use 
it to leave messages for other 
members of the family! * 

For those without Extended 
Color Basic, change the STRING* 
(16,32) in line 3 to 16 blank 
spaces. Line 11 can be deleted, its 
just there to keep the display neat 
in this example. 

Here's the RPQ (RAINBOW Program 
Quickie) — with thanks to Joe 
Bennett — s 

). 

I CLSO 

3 A*=" THIS PROGRAM IS 

BROUGHT TO YOU THROUGH THE 
RAINBOW. . .THE MONTHLY MAGAZ 
INE FOR COLOR COMPUTER USER 
S. YOU CAN PUT YOUR OWN MES 

SAGE HERE. "+STRINGS 

(16,32) 

5 FOR A=l TO LEM(A*)-15:E1=E1 
+l:IF El>4 THEM El=l:E=1125 
!EE=1 140 

7 PRINT3328. MIPS (A$, A, 15) ; 

9 SOUND R'ND ( 240 ) , 1 s NEXT A 

I I GOTO 1 1 



In short, this fine piece of 
hardware gives ypu complete 
flexibility to buy whatever printer 
you wish without costing an arm and 
a leg for spec 

features. 

This is a good buy. 



Page 6 



MOWS YOUR DAY? 
METED 3?- I O RHYTHM HELP? 



Here's another program from JARB Software that will help you out in 
dealing with everyday, life. 

Its called JAREIORHYTHM and it will generate a complete chart for you. 
The chart can be as short as a day, or as long as a year. And, the chart 
will graphically display just how your biorhythms fluctuate over their 
different cycles. 

You do need a printer for this program. But it comes out with a 
handsome display. We've heard that programs such as this can be a big hit 
at flea markets! 

For those of you with tired fingers, JAREIORHYTHM can be obtained on a 
tape with PSYCHIC APTITUDE TEST (from RAINBOW Vol. I, No. 3) for $14.95 by 
writing JARE at 1169 Florida St., Imperial Beach, CA 92032. Please include 
*1 for postage and handling. 



The Listing: 



10 CLS:PRINT3)196,TAB(11> "BIORHYT 
HM" : PR I NTT AB ( 15) "BY" : PRINTTAB (9) 
"J ARB SOFTWARE" : PRINT: PRINT: PRIN 
TTAB(4)"(C) JARB SOFTWARE 1981": 
F0RI=i T02500: NEXTI 

20 CLS: FR I NTS 160, "THIS PROGRAM I 
S DESIGNED TO WORK" : : PRINT"WI TH 
THE LINE PRINTER VII.": PRINT"WHI 
LE IT WILL WORK WITH OTHER": PR IN 
T" FP; INTERS, IT MAY NOT FORMAT ON 
" : PRINT "THE PRINTER AS DESIGNED. 

II 

30 PR I NT "YOU MUST HAVE A PRINTER 

ON-LINE" :PRINT"T0 OPERATE THIS 
PROGRAM !!!!!!!!" 

40 FRINT: LINE INPUT "TO BEGIN, PRE 
5S <ENTER> KEY. "; RD* 
ZO ************** 
60 ' * JARBEIORHYTH * 

SO ' * BY * 

90 ' * JARB SOFTWARE * 

100 '* WRITTEN BY * 

110 '* J. E. BENNETT * 

113 '* AND * 

115 ' * JOHN L. UREAN * 

120 '* (C) JARB SOFTWARE * 
130 r * 1981 * 

140 

150 P5=PEEK (65314) : IFF3=40RPS=6T 
HEN20C ELSE 160 

160 CLS: PR I NT3224, "PRINTER NOT 0 

N— LIME ":PRINT"D0 YOU 

HAVE A PRINTER" ; : INPUTX* 
170 IFLEFT* (X*. 1 ) <>"Y"THEN200 
ISO CLS: PRINT5>224, "YES?" : PR INT" P 
LEASE PLACE PRINTER ON-LINE. " : LI 
NEINPUT"PRESS ENTER WHEN ON-LINE 
. "; X* 



1 90 PS=PEEK ( 653 1 4 ) : I FPS=40RPS=6T 
HEN200ELSE 1 60 
200 CLEAR200 

210 CLS: PRINT3224, "PRINTING TITL 

E PLEASE WAIT. " 

220 L=0 :T=25:P=3.141 5926535 
230 PR I NT#-2 , CHR* ( 3 1 ) : PR I NT#-2 , T 
AB ( 1 6 ) " B I ORH YTHM " : PR I NT4*-2 . T AB ( 1 
9) "BY":PRINT#-2, TAB ( 14) "JARB SOF 
TWARE" 

240 PRINT#-2,CHR* (30) : TAB (32) " (C 
) JARB SOFTWARE 1981 " ; CHR* (10) ; C 
HR*(10) ; CHR* (10) 

250 B*="YES" : CLS: PRINT3224, " I AM 
NOW READY FOR FURTHER INPUT"; :F 
0RI=1T01000:NEXTI 
257 L=0 :T=25:P=3.141 5926535 
260 CLS : PR I NT-3224 , " " : LINE INPUT" 
WHAT IS YOUR NAME?" : N* 
270 CLS:PRINT3224. " " : INFUT"THIS 
CHART IS FOR HOW MANY DAYS"; El 
275 GOSUS 1650 
280 ZZ=0 

300 CLS: PRINT5224, "ENTER BIRTH D 

ATE " 

310 G05UB 550 
313 GOSUB 1700 
320 G05UB720 
330 JB=JD 

340 CLS: PRINT3>224, "ENTER START D 

ATE FOR CHART " 

350 ZZ=1 
360 G0SUB550 
363 GOSUB 1750 
370 GCSUB720 
380 JC=JD 

390 IF JO=JB THEN 410 

(Continued on Page 14 ) 



SOFTWARE REVIEW... 

COLOR METEOROIDS 



Page 7 



The second program in SPECTRAL 
ASSOCIATES' Space Trilogy is called 
COLOR METEOROIDS, and it is — like 
its brothers COLOR SPACE INVADERS 
and SPACE WAR — a fast-action, 
machine lanquaqe game that mill 
bring hours of delight to 
devotees. 

Although you need joysticks to 
play, you do not need Extended Color 
Fasic. This can be a real plus for 
some, and it also shows just what 
you can do with machine language. 

The game is like the arcade 
version, with a number of 
enhancsmeiits and plenty of action. 
Fasica 1 ly , ycu are the pilot of a 
ship navigating though the middle of 
a meteor swarm. You have to fire at 
the? meteors, breaking them apart. 
They blast apart, but, then, you 
have to hit them again (and again!) 
to make them finally 90 away. Since 
there are 16 different levels of 
difficulty, this is a g ame i n wh i c h 
the whole family can compete. 

Onr? of the- things you can do 
with COLOR METEOROIDS that you can't 



do in the arcades is control the 
position of your gun. Here, you 
have full control — as well as 
control of the ship itself. And for 
the really adept, you get a tonus 
ship for every 10,000 Foints. 
There's also a demonstration mode 
for cocktail party conversation. 

Finally, there is an option 
that will allow your ship to move 
into hyperspace. Here, you just 
blip out of one location and into 
another. Put, you must e::cerci=e 
caution — sometimes various meanies 
in hyperspace can destroy your 
ship. 

The graphics of COLOR 
METEOROIDS are excellent and the 
action is fast-paced. The sound 
effects, despite a disclaimer from 
SPECTRAL, are good, as well. 

That, combined with special 
added effects such as difficulty 
levels, hyperspace, and an alien 
space ship, make COLOR METEOROIDS 
<*21.95 from SPECTRAL, 141 Harvard 
Ave.. Tacoma, WA 98466) an 
excel lent buy. 




Editor: 

I recently purchased a copy of 
the RAIIIEOU (12) and uas quite 
pleased uith the article; and 
especially with LASER STAR. 



Editor: 

Ue enjoyed the PAHIEOW very 
such, l'n into «ys the Color 
CsiFtiter can help sreund the house 
and »y husband is really into 

q?.SEE. 

Ds yoj I now of a PACHAN 3ai,e 
U=t is available? 

kATHf HEIlltfN 
C-.erlfnd Park, Kansas 



Editor: 

I si a first tiw coiputer user 
and fed frustrated by the sagarines 
as all the information is written 
for othEr ccs.puters. 

What I uould really like is a 
list of functions for Model I and 
III and the sane set of contands for 
ey color co»puter. 

JAMES EAUHER 
Spokane. HA 



Just one content about the last 
issue: In line 10 of the Graphics 
Printer, shouldn't '127' be '1V1 
Also, your choice of K for the 
vertical and Y for the hcri:anal 
coordinates is confusing. Normally. 
X is the horironal. 

KATHY GCCFEL 
Detroit 

(Ed. Ilote: '31' norks. too. 
Thanks for the irfcraation. As to 
the X and Y. you're right. It nust 
have been a late night when that cne 
was written!) 



Paqs 8 



STATS iContinued from pg. 3) 



Don't worry about length of names in the box score* as they will be 
chopped off to fit. We have made provision for games in which more than 
100 points are scored, however, to satisfy you NBA fans. 

All pregame entries (such as players names and numbers) are done 
through regular input statements. However, in order to speed execution of 
the program, all statistics are entered via INKEY*. The exception to this 
is the "Continue?" input when a bo:: is being displayed. This allows you to 
retain the box on the screen for study while things are slow. 

The only restriction in the program is that you can use only 12 
players. This is simply in an effort to retain all players on the screen 
— and we have left "room" in the DIM statements for 16 if you want more 
people and less heading information. It you opt for the 12 players, simply 
use 11 and label the 12th "others." 

Two hints! If you hit the wrong letter or number while in the 
statistics collecting part of the prcgram, just keep hitting the RETURN key 
until you get back to the " ENTER PLAYER'S TEAM" prompt. Once you have 
initialized the program, you can get back to that prompt by EREAKing and 
entering GOTO 210. 



This program is written for Extended Color Basic, but the few things 
it uses from that instruction set are simple to convert. The 
STRINGt<32, "=" ) is simply a line of 32 equals marks. LIME INPUT can be 
replaced by INPUT, but we used it for display purposes. 



The listing: 

9 ' ************************** 

10 '************************** 

11 '** STATSKEEPER PROGRAM ** 

12 ** 

13 '** Cc) 1981 ** 

14 '** ** 
15'** FALSOFT ** 

16 ' ************************** 

17 'ft************************* 
25 DIM HN*<16> ,HN(16> , VN*<16> ,VN 
(16) ,HB(16> ,HS(16> ,HF(16> ,HL(16> 
,:-;P<16) ,HT(16) ,VT(16) ,VG(16) ,VS( 
16) ,VF<16) ,VL<16> ,VEU6> 

30 BS*= :, 7. V. ## -## *»# 
-*% 

31 BZt=" PLAYER FGM-FGA FTM 
-FT A PTS" 

32 B7*=" TOTALS #tt ft* 
-»« n«»" 

33 ?C*=" »##.«*-/. ## 
n. n*Y." 

35 CL3: PR I NT: LINE INPUT " NAME THE 

HOME TEAM " ; H*: L I NE INPUT "NAME 
THE VISIT INS TEAM ";V* 
40 CLE : PRINTTAB ( G) " HOME TEAM 



41 FRINT 

45 INPUT " HOW MANY PLAYERS ARE E 
LIGIELE TO PARTICIPATE FOR TH 
E HOME TEAM";SS 
50 FCR X=l TO SS 

55 IL*=STRING*(32, "=") :PRINTIL»; 



60 PR I NTH*" PLAYER'S NAME" : PRINT 

TAB (4) ; : INPUTHN* (X) 

70 PRINTHN* ( X ) " ' S NUMBER" ; : INPUT 

HN(X) 

80 NEXT X 

90 CLS:PRINTTAB(6) " VISITING 

TEAM " 

95 INPUT "HOW MANY PLAYERS ARE E 
LIGIBLE TO PLAY FOR THE VISIT 
ORS"; VV 

100 FOR X=l TO VV 

103 PRINTTAB (10) " (E)NTERED GAME 



105 PRINTIL*: 

110 PRINTV*" PLAYER'S NAME": PR IN 

TTAB (4) ; : INPUTVN*(X) 

1 20 PR I NTVNS ( X ) "' S NUMBER " ; : I NPU 

TVN ( X ) 

130 NEXT X 

140 CLS: PR I NT* 163, "STATSKEEPER I 
NIT I AL I ZATION" : PR I NT " 
COMPLETE" 

150 PRINT5>3B9. "PRESS < ENTER > TO 
BEGIN"; : PRINT" SCO 
REKEEPINS"; :PRINT3462, " " ; : LINE I 
NPUTCN»:CLS 

210 PRINT" > ENTER PLAYER'S TE 

AM < ": PRINT" (H)0[-E OR (V 

) ISITOR" 

211 Tf=INKEY$ : IF T*="" THEN 211 

212 CLS: IF Tt="V" THEN 400ELSE P 
RINTH*" STATISTIC" 



DOWNLOADING F=" ROM 
V I DEOTEX 

By Jorge Mir 

VIDEOAID is an en h an eminent to 
the VIDFRINT program which was 
published in last month's RAINBOW. 
It clears up some bugs, but it also 
allows uou to download programs from 
CompuServe and BBS systems. 

This Froaram revises Radio 
Shack's VIDEOTEX. You need the 
VIDEOTEX proqram to make it work. 
But« by following the instructions, 
you will be able to view pages 
stored in memory, select any one 
paqe for viewing, copy any or a 1 1 
P^qes to tape , load pages previously 
srered to tape, obtain hard copy and 
download program s tang save them to 
T&Fe). 

Vou must first modify VIDEOTEX. 
If you have 16K, just load VIDEOTEX, 
type FOKE2103.255 and <EHTER>. Then 
sa.'C the revision to tape by using 
CSAVEM "VIDEOTEX" , 1 723,283'?, 1728. 
Use the new tape from now on. 

These with C52l\) can do a little 
more. First load VIDEOTEX. Then 
type PCLEAR1, load the VIDFIX 
prciqrairi beloui, and run it. Then 
reload the corrected VIDEOTEX (the 
ons generated to tape by VIDFIX). 

Both systems can now run the 
rovisod VIDEOTEX. After you 

disconnect, RESET the computer to 
return to EA5IC. 

Now, load VIDEOAIO (below). 
First tMFe P0KE25 . b : P0KE26, 1 

CENTER). Then load VIDEOAID with 
the ncrmel CLOAD. 

You can now type single letters 
to do the: following: <p ; Go back to 
previous page; <SPACE> Next page; 
<'S:> Srve page beinq viewed to tape; 
;L> load previously saved Faqe, <C> 
Ohanqe to sFc-cific page! <P> Print 
Faoo bving viewed; '-'D> Download. 
Hake sure: tha printer is on before 
using ! F! , the recorder before using 
f'L> cr <"3>. 

llh<rn you download, a white 
cursor will appear at the top 
loft-hand corner of the screen. Use 
the arrow ke^s to move. If you move 



FagE 3 

the cursor off the screen down, the 
ne;:t page will come up, and 
vise-versa. 

Mark the proqram you wish to 
download by: 

Press <E> for beginning. Move 

the cursor to the top of the first 

character and press the "£'". You 

won't notice any change in the 
screen, however. 

Mark the end of each line with 
an <L>. Place the cursor on top of 
the last character. Press " L " . 

Nark the end of the program. 
Use an <E> instead of an <L> as in 
the previous step. The proqram will 
then get ready to load onto tape. 
You will be prompted to assign a 
program name, and there will be a 
delay while the program reformats 
information for the tape recorder. 

You can then RUM the proqram 

aqain or, if you wish to liaise a 

second copy, simply G0T01D, advance 

to the last page, type <D>, mark the 

last character with the <E> and it 
will be done again. 

(Continued cn Page 16 ) 



C _ C _ WRITER 

WORD PROCESSING 
for thi 

TRS-BO* Color Computer 

Written in uier eodiflable Exttndid BASIC and ftiturti Pigt 
Formatting, Block Kovi, Tibi, Silitlon, Initrtlon, Global 
Search ind Replace, Ctnttring, Indenting, Pigi Piuii, ASCII 
Cadi Triniiiiiion, Justification, ind Flit Chaining. 

16 or J2K viriion selectable it run tin. The unr iiy iovt 
tht reputing cursor anywhere in i itntenci to imtrt, 
delete, or change teit. The ASCII code future coibined 
Mith powerful editing eikei C. C. WRITER ideal for print 
graphics. C. C. WRITER will drive any printer that can be 
connected to the Color Computer. C. C. WRITER it liiple to 
learn but hat powerful features. 

Send for free information or 130.00 for the prograi and 
documentation if you can't Kilt. 

TRANS/TECH 
194 Lockwood Lain* 
Bl oomi ngdal at, IL 60108 

t TRS-BO it a Tradnark of Tandy Corp. 



Fage 10 



GET AMD RUT 

High-Res Graphic Movement 



Ey J. E. Eennett 

Houj would you like to be able to move an image around the screen in 
BASIC. Sure, there are several ways to accomplish this. One way is to 
draw a picture, erase iti and then draw it in a new location. 

The Frnblsm with this method is that it is very slow and creates a 
flickering effect. Tandy came to our rescue with the Color Computer 
graFhic commands GET and PUT. These commands help you avoid the problems 
of speed and flicker, and still use just BASIC to write your programs. The 
manual for Extended Color Basic 

but doen't explain their use to the average programmer. This article will 
explain how you can use these commands in your own programs. 

First, there are sevral other things that must be done before you can 
call up GET and PUT. In order to illustrate these things, we will write a 
Froqram to help us. 

The first item on our list is to define the size array we will need 
for our picture. This array will be used each time we either GET a picture 
or PUT a picture. Its size is limited to how much memory we wish to 
dedicate to the picture. On a ItK RAM Color Computer, you have about 1400 
elements of array storage. This is because each element uses 5 bytes of 
memory. At 1400 elements, you will use 7000 bytes (1400 elements ♦ 5 bytes 
= 7K). In the highest mode of resolution, this leaves little for program 
use. To figure out the size array needed, just draw your picture, to 
scale, on paper. Then count how many pixels across it is (width) and how 
many pixels high it is (length). 

As an example, enter this program and run it: 

10 PMOrF. 4, 1 sPCLSs SCREEN 1,1 
20 CIRCLE (123. 96), 5 
30 GOTO 30 

This program displays a circle in the center of ths screen, 10 pixels 
across. The array sine needed to cover this circle is 10 wide by 10 long. 
This gives us an array of 100 elements in size, and uses 500 bytes of 
memory. Using this size, add the following line to the example program 
ycu've typed in: 

5 DIM A(9,9) 

Th=? GET command lias a format that you must follow to insure accurate 

co'-nrane of the picture you wish to store. This format is: GET 

'STARTP0INT) - < ENDF0INT ) , DESTINATION, G 

The STARTP0IMT is the upp>sr left corner coordinates of your display. 
The ENDP0INT is the lower right corner coordinates of your display. The 
DESTINATION refers to the array name you have DIMensioned in Line 5, in 
this case, array A. The "G" will tell the computer that you wish to have 
the array stored with full graphics detail. This is optional, but we'll 
use it here and you should, too, for best results. 

Mow bad- to the program. Make the following changes: 



10 A=l 28: P=96: CIRCLE (A.E),5 ,„ _ ,,, 

(Continued on Page 1 1 ) 



GET (Continued f rem pg. 1 0> Page 11 

What we've done is change the center Foint of the circle to be stated 
in terms of variables instead of fi:;ed numeric points. Our circle mill 
still be in the center of the screen, but we can now use the variables 
later without redefining their value. 

Now, add the following line: 

25 GET (A-5,B-5)-(A+5,P+5) ,A,G 

As you can see? we have used the variables to allow us to set our 
start and end points more easily. The numeric equivalents of the variables 
would show we are now defining a square that is 10 pixels on a side. This 
will allow us to GET the complete circle we have previously drawn. 

When the program is runi the circle will be stored in array A. Now 
that it is storedi what do we do with it? Weill how about drawing it in 
another location to prove it is stored in memory? We can do this by using 
the PUT command to place our circle anywhere we want on the screen. 

The PUT command has the format: PUT (STARTPOINT) - (ENDFOINT) i 
SOURCE, ACTION 

The STARTPOINT and ENDPOINT are the new locations of the corners of 
our array. These can be any values that are within screen limits AMD that 
hold the array to the sine that was defined earlier in the program. In our 
example, the size is 10;:1Q. The SOURCE is the name of the array we have 
stored earlier, array A. The ACTION is one of five options — PSET, 
PRESET, AND, MOT and OP. 

PSET is the action command we will use. This will allow all points 
(pi-els) that are set in the original array to be set in the target 
locat i on. 

PRESET will reset any Fixels in the target location that were 
originally set. 

AMD will compare the points in the original array with the points in 
the target location. If both are set, the new point will remain set. If 
one or the other is not set, the point will be reset. 

NOT will reverse the state of every point in the target location. 
That is, if the point is set, it will be reset; if it is reset, it will be 
set. 

OR will compare the points in the array with the points in the target 
location and if either is set, the screen will be set. 

With all this in mind, add the following lines ho your program: 

70 A= A+ 1 NT ( JOYSTK ( 0 ) / £ . 3 i -5 

:E=B+INT< JOYSTK< 1 >/6.3)-5 
40 PUT <A-5,B-5)-(A+5,P+5),A 

PSET 
50 GOTO 30 

Line 30 will now allow the right joystick to control movement in any 
direction at a ma::irt,um speed of up to five pi;;els at a time. This movement 
can be stopped by bringing the Joystick to the e:act center. The farther 
you move from the center, the faster the circle will move. Line 40 will 
PUT the circle at the location you have defined with the joystick. Line 50 
will branch the program back to Line 30 for an update of the joystick 
location. (Cintiriued on Faae 12) 



Page 12 GET (Continued from pg. 1 1. 1 

Run the program and you will 
see that there are several problems 
with the operation. First* if you 
allow the circle to get too close to 
the screen edge, you will get a 
function call error. Let's take 
care of this problem 'by limiting the 
screen movement of the circle. We 
do this by adding: 

31 IF A<=5 THEN A=5 

32 IF A>=250 THEN A=250 

33 IF B<=5 THEN B=5 

34 IF E>=1B6 THEN E=1B6 

After adding these lines* we 
can move the circle anywhere on the 
screen and it will stop or move 
along the edge if it gets close. 
The other problem we have is that 
the circle leaves a trail as it 
moves. While this can be used to 
create some pretty patterns, that 
isn't what we want to do. 

We can eliminate the problem in 
two ways. Either we must enlarge 
the array to allow for the five 
pi::el maximum movement of the 
circle, or i'ie must decrease the sire 
of the drawing to allow for a blank 
border around the drawing. 

Both methods have drawbacks, 
but either can be used. If you 
increase the array size, you will 
use more memory and chance running 
into the nefarious OM error if your 
program is long. If you decrease 
the drawing size, you lose 
resolution, possibly affecting the 
effect you wanted. Since we have 
plenty of memory in this small 
program, we will use the first 
method. Make the following 

changes: 

Change Line 5 tc: 
5 DIMA(20,20> 

Change Line 25 to: 
25 GET (A-10,E-10>-(A+10,E+10> , 
A, G 

Change Lines 31-34 to: 
3.1 IF A<=10 THEN A=10 
32 IF A>=245 THEN A=245 
33 'IF E<=10 THEN I!=10 
34 IF E>=181 

Change Line 40 to: 
40 PUT (A-10,E-10)-(A+10,E+10), 
A, PSET 



Now we have a circle that will 
move under direction of the joystick 
and does not flicker. The speed of 
movement can be altered by changing 
the values in line 30, but you must 
also change the sire of your array 
if you wish a faster movement. 
Otherwise, you will again leave a 
trail of picture parts on the 
screen . 

Experiment with the other 
action command options. You might 
be pleasantly surprised with them. 

Now that you have a better 
understanding of GET and PUT, look 
back through the last several issues 
of the RAINEOW and see how I used 
them in LASER STAR and HELO BATTLE. 
Remember, you have to use the same 
PMODE to PUT that you used to GET, 
or you may not obtain the results 
you tried to achieve. 

Have fun with these and be sure 
to let me know via the RAINEOW how 
you are doing or if you have any 
questions or problems with which I 
can help. 



■fc h ♦= R A I M 0 1-4 

PUBLISHED BY FALECFT 
5803 Timber F.idge Drive 
Prospect, KV 40059 

Lawcnce C, Falk — Editor 

The RMIIEOU is intended for tie personal use and plea- 
sure of its subscribers and reprcducticn by any iticsns is 
forbidden. Use of prcsrans and intcneation herein is for 
the single end use of subscribers and any other use is 
prohibited. 

TRS-50. Cobr CoiiFuter and Extended Color Issic are 
tradsjiarhs of Tandy Corp. 

All proqrans herein are distributed on an 'as-is' 
basis, without warranty. 

EutscriFtions to the RAINIOtJ are »12 rer sear. 

CORRECT I OIM 



On page 6 of RAINBOW l -'ol. I, 

No. 4, in the continuation of Al 
Monan's VIDEO PRINT proqram, under 

the instructions, substitute the 

direct command POKE 25,6 for the 
PCLEAPl. 

Al says this will make the 
program work correctly. 



Faoe 13 



EDITOR, 



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• Move the video display page throughout 
RAM 

• Send or receive RS-232 at up to 9600 
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The monitor has 19 commands in all, and is 
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Paqe M BIO (Continued from pg. 6) 

400 PR I NT "CHART DATE IS EARLIER 
THAN BIRTH"; :PRINT"DATE. PLEASE 
TRY AGAIN. " : FORI= 1T0600: NEXT I : GO 
T0280 

410 F0RK=1 T0100: NEXTK 
420 G0SUB790 
430 N=JC-JB 

440 V=23 : GOSUBBBO : G0SUB900 
450 V=28: GOSUBBBO : G0SUB900 
460 V=33 : G0SUB8B0 : G0SUB900 
470 G0SUB1070 
480 G0SUB1540 

490 Zl=Zl+l:PRINT#-2, "* "+C*;TAB 

< 15>L*;TAB(75)DW*+" *" 

500 DW1=DW1+1 

510 IF DW1>7 THEN DW1=1 

520 JC=JC+1 : L=L+1 : IF L<E1 THEN 4 

30 

530 IF Z1>=E1 THEN 1220 
540 L=0:G0T0420 
550 S4=S4+1:PRINT 
560 INPUT "MONTH <1 TO 12) " ; M 
570 IF S4<=1 THEN L1=M 
580 M=INT(M):IF M< 1 OR M>12 THEN 
560 

590 INPUT"DAY (1 TO 31) ";D 

600 IF S4<=1 THEN L2=D 

610 IF ZZ=1 THEN 620 ELSE 640 

620 CLS: PRINT396, "PLEASE ENTER T 

HE DAY OF THE WEEK" ; :PRINT" 1=M0N 

D AY " : PR I NT " 2=TUESDAY " : PRI NT " 3=WE 

DNESDAY " : PR I NT "4=THURSDAY " : PR I NT 

" 5=FR I DA Y " : PR I NT " 6=S ATURDA Y " : PR I 

NT"7=SUNDAY" 

630 INPUTDW1 

640 D=INT(D):IF D<1 OR D>31 THE 
N 590 

650 INPUT "YEAR (ENTER ONLY LAST 
TWO DIGITS OF THE YEAR) " ; Y* 
654 IF LEN(Y*)>=3 THEN GOTO 650 
ELSE GOTO 660 

660 Y=VAL(Y*):IF S4<=1 THEN L3=Y 

670 IF S4<=1 THEN D4=M+D+Y 

680 Y=INT(Y):IF Y<0 THEN 650 

690 IF Y>99 THEN 710 

700 Y= Y+ 1 900 : PR I NTY ; " ASSUMED . " : F 

OR I = 1 T0500 : NEXT I : CLS 

710 RETURN 

720 W=FIX ( (11-14) /12) 

730 JD=INT (1461* (Y+48X)+W> /4> 

740 B=FIX (367* (M-2-W*12> /12> 

750 JD=JD+B 

760 B=INT ( INT (3* ( Y+4900+W > / 100) / 
4) 

770 JD=JD+D-32075-B 
780 RETURN 

790 IFB*=" YES" AND Z>=1 THEN RETU 
RN ELSE 800 
EOO Z=Z+1:CLS 

810 PR I NT #-2, TAB (36) "BIORHYTHM" 
820 PRINT#-2, TAB (39) "FOR" 
830 Xl=(40-(INT(LEN(N*>/2) ) > 



840 PRINT#-2,TAB(X1)N*;CHR*(10> ; 

CHR* ( 10) :PRINT#-2, "THIS CHART IS 
F0R"E1 "DAYS. ";TAB(55) "BIRTHDATE 
IS"L1; "/";L2; " / " ; L3; CHR* (10) 

850 PRINT#-2," DATE ";TAB(17>; 

860 PRINT#-2,"L O W" ; TAB (40) "O" ; 

TAB (55) "H I G H"; TAB (73)" DAY 

II 

870 PRINTK-2, STRING* (80, 95): RETU 
RN 

880 W=INT (N/V) :R=N-(W*V> 
890 RETURN 

900 IF V<>23 THEN 950 

910 L*=CHR*(32) : FOR K=l TO 5:L*= 

L*+L*:NEXT 

920 L*=L*+LEFT*(L», 19) 

930 L*=LEFT*(L*,T)+CHR*(48)+RIGH 

T*(L*,T) 

940 IF V=23 THEN C*="P" 

950 IF V=28 THEN C*="E" 

960 IF V=33 THEN C*="I" 

970 W=R/V:W=W*2*P 

980 W=T*SIN(W> : W=W+T+1.5 

990 W=INT(W):A*=MID*(L*.W. 1) 

1000 IF A*="P" OR A*="E" OR A*=" 

*" THEN C*="*" 

1010 IF W=l THEN 1050 

1020 IF W=T+T+1 THEN 1060 

1030 L*=LEFT*(L*,W-1>+C*+RIGHT*( 

LS, T+T+l-W) 

1040 RETURN 

1C50 L*=C*+RIGHT*(L*.T+T> : RETURN 
1060 L*=LEFT* (Lt, T+T > +Ct: RETURN 
1070 W=JC+68569:R=INT (4*W/ 146097 
) 

1080 W=W-INT( (146097*R+3> /4> 
1090 Y=INT(4000* (W+ 1 )/ 1461001 > 
1100 W=W-INT (1461*Y/4)+31 
1110 M=INT (B0*W/2447> 
1120 D=W-INT (2447*M/80> 
1130 W=INT(M/ll):M=M+2-12*W 
1140 Y=100* (R-49) +Y+W 
1150 A*=STR*(M> :W=LEN(A*>-1 
1160 C*=MIDS (A*.2.W>+"/" 
1170 A*=STR*(D> :W=LEN(A*>-1 
1180 C*=C*+MIDS(A*.2,W>+"/" 
1190 A*=STR$ (Y) : W=LEN (At) — 1 
1200 C*=C*-^MIDS. (A*,W.2> 
1210 RETURN 

1220 PR INT TAB ( 1 1 ) "END OF RUN" : PR 
INT#-2, STRING* (80, 95) : PR INTtt— 2, T 
AB (36) "END OF RUN" 

1230 PRINTa-2.CHRS(31) ;TAB(17> "T 
HANK YDU";CHR*(10> ;CHR*(30) 
1240 CLS : PRINT-9224 , "ANOTHER RUN 
(Y/N) ?" 

1250 AR*=INKEY»: IFAR4=" "THEN1250 
1 260 I FAR*< > " Y " THEN 1 270ELSE50 
1270 CLS: PRINT-3224, "THANKS ANYWA 
Y, BYE FOR NOW . " : F OR I = 1 TO 1 000 : NE 
XT I: CLS: END 

(Continued on Page 17 



BTATS (Continued from pq. 3) 

213 PRINT "ENTER FLAYER'S NUMBER 
" : PR I NTT AB < 4 ) " ( OR '99' FOR BOX)" 
: PR I NT 

214 2AS=INKEY*: IFZA*="" THEN 214 

215 ZB*=INKEY*: IFZB*="" THEN 215 

216 ZC*=ZA*+ZB* 

217 PN=VAL(ZC*> 



220 IF FN=HN ( 1 ) THEN 300 

221 IF 



IF FN=HN (2) THEN 311 

222 IF PN=HN(3) THEN 312 

223 IF PN=HN(4> THEN 313 

224 IF PN=HN<5) THEN 314 

225 IF FN=HN(6) THEN 315 

226 IF PN=HN<7) THEN 316 

227 IF FN=HN (B) THEN 317 

228 IF PN=HN(9) THEN 318 

229 IF PN=HN(10) THEN 319 

230 IF PN=HN(11) THEN 320 

231 IF PN=KN<12) THEN 321 
240 IF PN=99 THEN 4000 
250 STOP 

300 PH=1 : PR I NT "PLAYER: "HN* < 1 ) : G 
CT01000 

311 PH=2:PRINT "PLAYER: "HN* (2) : 
SOTO 1000 

312 PH=3: PRINT "PLAYER: "HN* <3) : 

G0TC1C00 

3 1 3 PH=4 : PR I NT "PLAYER: " HN* (4) : 
GOTO 1000 

314 FH=5: FRINT "PLAYER: "HN* (5) : 
GOTQIOOO 

315 FH=6:PRINT "FLAYER: "HN*(6): 

eOTOiOOO 

3 1 6 PH=7 : PR I NT " PLAYE R : "HN* (7) : G 

0TO1000 

317 F'H=3 : PR I NT " PLAYER : "HN*(8):G 
□TO 1000 

318 FH=9: FRINT"PLAYER: "HN4(9):G 
CT01000 

T 1 9 PH= 1 0 : F'R I NT " PLAYER : "HN* < 10) 
: GOTO 1000 

320 PH= 1 1 : PR INT" PLAYER : " HN* (11) 
: EOTOIOOO 

321 PH=12: PRI NT "PLAYER: "HN*(12) 
: GOT 01 000 

400 PRINTV*" STATISTIC" 
410 PRINT" ENTER PLAYER'S NUMBE 
- PRINTTAB < 4 )" (OR '99' FOR BOX) 

420 F'R I NT 

430 ZA*=INKEY*: IF ZA'*=" "THEN430 

433 ZB*=INfcEY*: IF ZB*=" "THEN433 

435 ZC* = ZA-5*ZB* 

440 FN=VAL(ZC«) 

ZOO IF PN»VN«1> THEN 600 

501 IF FN=VN(2) THEN 601 

302 IF FN=VN<3) THEN 603 

503 IF PN=VN(4) THEN 604 

504 IF FN=VN(5) THEN 605 

505 IF FN=VN(6> THEN 606 

506 I F PN=VN ( 7 ) THEN 607 

507 IF FN=VN(8) THEN 608 
5f>P IP FM-."Miq\ Tl:?»l A'">P 



509 IF PN=VN(10) THEN 610 Fa 5 e 15 

510 IF FN=VN(11) THEN 611 

511 IF FN=VN(12) THEN 612 

512 IF FN=99 THEN 5000 

600 FV=1 : FRI NT"FLAYER: "VN*(1):G 
0T01900 

601 PV=2 : FR I NT " FLAYER : "VN*(2):G 
0T01900 

603 PV=3 : PR I NT " FLAYER : "VN* (3) : G 
0T01900 

604 P V=4 : FR I NT " FLAYER : "VN* (4) : G 
0T019C0 

605 F'V=5: PR I NT "FLAYER: "VN*(5):G 
0T01900 

606 F'V=6: F'RI NT"F'LAYER: "VN*(6):G 
0T01900 

607 FV=7 : FR I NT "PLAYER: "VN*(7):G 
0T01900 

60E5 F V=8 : PR I NT " PLAYER : "VN*<8):G 
0T01900 

609 F'V=9 : PR I NT " FLAYER: "VN*(9):G 
0T01900 

610 FV=10:PRINT"PLAYER: "VN*(10) 
: GOTO 1900 

611 PV=1 1: PRINT "PLAYER: "VW(ll) 
:G0T01900 

612 PV=12: PRINT "PLAYER: "VN*(12) 
: GOTO 1900 

1 000 PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NTT AB (12) " <E 
NTER>" 

1001 PR I NTT AB (3) " (G) OAL" ; TAB ( 17) 
" (N) O GOAL" 

1002 PRINTTAB (3) " (F)REE THROW" ; T 
AB (17) " (L? INE MISS" 

1003 PRINTTAB ( 10) " CE/NTERED GAME 

1010 HC*=INKEY*: IF HC*="" THEN 1 
010 ELSE PRINT HC* 
1015 CLS 

102O IF HC*="D" THEN HG(PH)=H3<P 
H)*lsHS( PH ! =HS (PH) + 1: PA=F'A+1 : PM= 
PM+1 

1030 IF HC*="N" THEN HS(FH)=HS(P 
H)+1:PA=PA+1 

1040 IF HC*="F" THEN HF(PH)=HF(P 
H ) *-l : HL <PH) =HL (PH) +1 : FF=FF+1 : LT= 
LT+1 

1045 iF HCS="L" THEN HL(PH)=HL(P 
li) * 1 : LT=LT+1 

1047 IF HCi="E" THEM MP ( PH ) =MP ( P 

li)-. 1 

1030 GCT0210 

1 900 print: print: printtab ( 12) "<e 

nter: " 

1910 printtab (3) " ( g ) oal " ; tab (17) 

" (N)0 EOAL" 

1920 PRINTTAB (3) " (F)REE THROW" ; T 

AB (17)" (L) INE MISS" 

1 930 F R I NTT AB (10) "(E) NTERED GAI'iE 

ll 

1950 VC4.= INH:EY*: IP VC4="" THEN 1 
950 ELSE PRINT VC* 

I960 CLS (Continued or. Fage !7) 



Face 16 

DOWNLOAD (Continued from pg. 

I am sure this combination will 
open all kinds of different 
opportunities for you. It has for 
me. 

The listinqs: 

1 REM **VIDFIX BY JORGE MIR** 

2 REM ** (c) 1931 
10 A=30208 

£0 POKE 2103,255 

30 POKE 2112,53 

40 FOR X=1728 TO 3839 

50 POKE A.PEEK(X) 

55 PRINT CHR*(PEEK(X) > ; 

tO A=A+1:NEXT X 

70 PRINT: PRItIT" READY RECORDER" 

80 IF INKEY*=" "THEN 80 

90 FOR X=l TO 5 

100 CSAOEM" VIDEOTEX" , 30203, 

32319, 30208 
1 1 0 MOTOR ON 

120 FOR Z=l TO 500: NEXT Z 
130 MOTOR OFF 
140 END 



7 **<..'IDE0AID«* 

8 **(c> By JORGE MIR, 1981** 

10 CLEAR512:PAGE=6: G0SUB120 

15 DEFFNA (L) =INT (L/32) *32 

20 A*=INKEY*: I F I NKE Y*= " " THEN20 

30 IFA*=" " THENPAGE=PABE + 1 

40 IFA*="B"THENPA6E=PAGE-1 

50 IFA*= ,, D"THEN340 

60 IFA*="S"THEN290 

70 IFft*="P"THEN240 

80 IFA*="L"THEN300 

90 IFA*="C"THENG0SUB310 

100 G0SUB110:G0T020 

110 I FFAGE >62THENPAGE=0 : G0T020 

120 FOR F=0T01:F0R E=0T01:F0R D= 

0T01:F0RC=0T01:F0R B=0T01:F0R A= 

0TQ1 

130 IFPAGE=A*32*B*16+C*8+D*4+E*2 

+F THEN150 

140 NEXT A. B.C.D,E,F 

150 FOR X=65478 TO 65488 STEP2 

160 POKEX, 200: NEXT X 

170 IFF=1TKENP0KE65479, 100 

180 I FE= 1 THENP0KE6548 1 , 1 00 

190 IFD=1THENF0KE654S3, 100 

200 IFC=1THENP0KE654S5, 100 

210 IFB=1THENFQKE65487. 100 

220 IFA=1THENP0KE65489. 100 

230 P=FAGE * 5 1 2 : RETURN 

240 L=0: A*="":FOR X=PT0P+51 1 

250 A=PEEK(X) : IFA=>96ANDA<=127TH 

ENA=A-64 

260 A*=A*+CHR* (A) : L=L+ 1 : I FL< >32T 
HEN280 



270 PRINT#-2,A*:L=0: A*="" 
280 NEXTX:G0T020 

290 CSAVEM"P"+MID* (STR* (PAGE) , 2) 
,P,P+511.P:G0T020 

300 G0SUB530: CLOADMSR*: PAGE= (PEE 
K(&H01E7) *256+PEEK(&H01E8> )/512: 
G0SUB120:G0T020 

310 CLS:PRINT"YOU ARE VIEWING PA 
GE#"PAGE 

320 PRINT-LOCATED AT"P" ( "HEX* (P) 
" ) " 

330 PRINT: INPUT"ENTER NEW PAGE *» 
" ; PAGE : RETURN 

340 A 1 =PEEK ( P ) : POKEP, 207: A3=P 
350 I*=INKEY*: I F I *= " " THEN350 
360 I=ASC(I*> 

370 IFI*="B"THENBE=P ELSE IF I*= 
"E" THENPOKEP+ 1.255 ELSE IF I*=" 
L" THEN POKEP+1,13 ELSE IF I*="C 
" THEN POKEP+1,96 ELSE IF I*="a" 

THEN G0SUB600 ELSE IF 1=9 THEN 
P=P+1 

380 IFI=93THENP=INT(P/32) *32+31 
ELSE IF 1=21 THEN P=INT (P/32) *32 
ELSE IF 1=94 THENP=P-32 ELSE IF 
1=10 THEN P=P+32 ELSE IF 1=8 TH 
EN P=P-1:ELSE IF 1=9 THENP=P+1 
390 POKE A3 , A 1 : I F I *= " E " THEN430 
400 IFP>PAGE*512+51 1THENPAGE=PAG 
E+1:P1=P-FNA(P): GOSUB 110: P=P+P 1 
410 IFP<PAGE*512THENPAGE*PAGE-1 : 
GOSUB 1 10 
420 G0T0340 

430 CLS : PR I NT "GET RECORDER READY 

": INPUT"PROGRAM NAME"; I* 

440 0PEN"0".-1, I* 

450 V=PEEK (BE) : IFV=255 THEN480 

460 IFV=>96 AND V<=127 THEN V=V- 

64 

470 IFV=13THEN480 ELSE IF V'=S TH 
EN 490 ELSE L*=L*+CHR* ( V) : G0T049 

O 

480 PRINTL*:PRINT#-1,L*: IFV=255T 
HEN510ELEEL*=" " 

490 IFV=32 THEN S=32 ELSE S=96 
500 BE=BE+1:G0T0450 
510 CLOSE- 1: CLS: PR I NT "DOWNLOAD H 
AS BEEN COMPLETED" 

520 END 

530 INPUT "PAGE" ; PG: IFPG=OTHENSR 
*=" "ELSESR*="P"+MID* (STR* (PG) . 2) 
535 RETURN 
600 FOKEP. 175 

610 I*=INKEY*: IFI*=" "THEN610 
620 A1=ASC(I*> : IFA1=>32ANDA1<=63 
THENA 1 =A 1 +64 : P=P+ 1 : RETURN 
630 RETURN 

640 P0KEA3,Al:P=INT(P/32) *32+63: 
FOR P=P TO P-32 STEP— 1: IFFEEK(P) 
=96TI(ENNEXT 

641 RETURN 



STATS (Continued from pg. 15) 

1970 IF VC*="G" THEN VG(PV)=VG(P 
V) +1 : VS (PV) =VS (PV) +1 : JP=JP+1 : JM= 
JM+1 

1975 IF VC*="N" THEN VS(PV)=VS(P 
V)+1:JP=JP+1 

1980 IF VC*="F" THEN VF(PV)=VF(P 
V) + 1 : VL (PV) =VL (PV) +1 : KT=KT+1 : KF= 
KF+1 

1985 IF VC*="L" THEN VL ( P V ) =VL ( P 
V)+l :KT=KT+1 

1990 IF VC*="E" THEN VE(PV)=VE(P 
V) + l 

1995 G0T0210 
1997 STOP 
2020 G0T0210 

4000 .CLS:PRINTH* " BOX SCORE" 

4010 PRINTSTRING*(32, "-") ; 

4015 PRINTBZ*; 

4020 FOR X=l TO SS 

4025 HT(X)=(HG(X) *2)+HF(X) 

4030 IF MP(X)>0 THEN PRINTUSINGB 

S*;HN*(X) ,HG(X) ,HS(X) .HF(X) ,HL(X 

) ,HT(X) 

4035 GH=GH+HG ( X ) : SH=SH+HS ( X ) : FH= 
FH+HF ( X ) : LH=LH+HL ( X) : TH=TH+HT ( X ) 
4040 NEXT X 

4045 PRINTUSINGBT*; GH, SH, FH, LH, T 
H 

4047 IF SH>0 THEN GP= (GH/SH) * 100 

4048 IF LH>0 THEN FP= (FH/LH) * 100 

4049 PRINTUSINGFC*;GP,FP 

4050 PRINTS)480, " ";: INPUT "CONTI 
NUE";CN* 

4060 CLS:GH=0:SH=0:FH=0:LH=0:TH= 
0:G0T0210 

5000 CLS:PRINTV*" BOX SCORE" 

5010 PRINTSTRING*(32, "-") ; 

5015 PRINTBZ*; 

5020 FOR X=l TO VV 

5025 VT(X)=(VG(X) *2)+VF(X) 

5030 IF VE(X>>0 THEN PRINTUSINGB 

S*;VN*(X) ,VG(X) ,VS(X) . VF ( X ) . VL ( X 

) , VT ( X ) 

5035 GV=GV+VG ( X ) : SV=SV+VS ( X ) : FV= 
FV+VF ( X ) : LV=LV+VL ( X ) : TV=TV+VT ( X ) 
5040 NEXT X 

5045 PRINTUSINGBT*;GV,SV,FV,LV,T 
V 

5047 IF SV>0 THEN BP= (GV/SV) * 1 00 

5048 IF LV:0 THEN CP= (FV/LV) *100 

5049 PRINTUSINGPC*; BP, CP 

5050 PRINT.D4B0, " ";: INPUT "CONTI 
N'JE";CN* 

5060 CLS : GV=0 : SV=0 : FV=0: LV=0: TV= 
0:G0T0210 



Page 17 

BIO (Continued from pg. 14) 

1520 FOR 1=1 TO 5:PRINT#-2,CHR*( 
10): NEXT I: RETURN 
1530 GOTO 10 

1540 ON DW1 GOTO 1550,1560,1570, 

1580. 1590, 1600, 1610 

1550 DW*="MON" : RETURN 

1560 DW*= " TUE " : RETURN 

1570 DW* = " WED " : RETURN 

1580 DW*="THU": RETURN 

1590 DW*="FRI": RETURN 

1600 DW*="SAT" : RETURN 

1610 DW*="SUN": RETURN 

1650 CLS:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT 

"NAME : ";N* 

1660 PRINT: PRINT"CHART IS FOR "; 
El;" DAYS. " 

1665 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT" IS THIS I 
NFORMATI ON CORRECT (Y/N)";X» 

1666 IF LEFT* (X*, 1 ) <>" Y" THEN GO 
TO 260 

1670 RETURN 

1 700 CLS : PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT " MONTH 
:";M 

1710 PRINT: PRINT"DAY :";D 
1720 PRINT: PRINT" YEAR :";Y 
1730 PRINT: INPUVIS THIS INFORMA 
T I ON CORRECT (Y/N) : " ; X* 

1735 IF LEFT* (X*, IX >" Y" THEN GO 
TO 300 ELSE RETURN 

1 750 CLS : PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT " MONTH 
: " ; M 

1760 FR I NT : PR I NT " DAY :";D 
1770 PRINT: PRINT"YEAR :";Y 
1780 PRINT: INPUT" IS THIS INFORMA 
TION CORRECT (Y/N) : " ; X* 

1790 IF LEFT* (X*, 1 ) <>" Y" THEN GO 
TO 340 ELSE RETURN 



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