Skip to main content

Full text of "T-S Horizons"

See other formats


APRIL 


No. 18 


$ 2.00 



ETCH-AH1-SKETCH 

A Drawing Program for the 2068 
by Richard Watts 

2068 1000 

Computer Security More on Keyboards 
Screen Scroll Partial Pascal 
Greeting Card Designer Z X Disk Drives 


239 16*27 

Rod Humphreys 

2006 Highv.ew P' V3H 1N5 

For t Moody , b . u . , Postal Patron Local 





AI SO AVAIlABi:-- F OR THi^ T/S 2o6 '« 


POWERFUL AND INEXPENSIVE BUSINESS SOFTWARE 
FOR ZX81, T/S1000 and T/S1500 COMPUTERS 


ZX-TEXT ZX-CALC ZX-CALENDAR 



A word processor is lo a computer user 
what a typewriter is to a typist, except that the 
lormer has more advantages than the tatter 
ZX-Text can operate in 16-64K RAM providing 
from 1300 lo 6500 woros per document it 
leatures 6 different options write, read, edit, 
print, save and clear text Text is written on a 
perline basis with quick speed and with 
horizontal back-space and delete capabilities 
being available You can also access the 
editor directly Irom write mode and vice-versa 
Text can be prool-'ead on a per-iine basis 
allowing lor enough lime to determine i< any 
editing is needed The text editor allows a line 
ol text to be deleted, inserted, replaced and 
listed lor editing You may also change a word 
or expression within a line stop or start text 
while n IS scrolling up the screen, begin 
reading text Irom the lira) line ol the life, re- 
can read-edit two Hies simultaneously The 
print option takes text displayed in 30-column 
format on the screen and outputs to Bither the 
ZX/TS printer (With Memolechs Centronics 
Parallel Interlace 80-column and lower/ 
higher - case output is possible I Files may 
be saved on tape cassette with the use ol 
one single command, or by the same token they 
can be erased Irom memory / storage so that 
the lull capacity ol the program can be used 
lor other purposes such as composing letters 

instructions, ads graphs telephone 
directory, lists ol customers, members 
Iriends etc Also copies ot Hies are always 
less expensive and easier lo run than using a 
photocopier Other advantages are savings in 
time, paper, ink correcting mistakes and 
adding afterthoughts more efficiently than 
doing them through either handwriting or 


fundamental basic toot lor summarising, reporting, 

mathematical or scientific manipulation ol nt 
bars ZX-Calc operates in 32-64K RAM and alto us 
a maximum of 3360 characters / spreadsheet The 
entire matrix consists ol 1 5 columns (tetters A-O) 
and 30 rows Inumbers 1 30) with 8 characters/ 
call Unlike otnei popular ESCs, ZX-Calc uses in 
calculations and within cells all 1 4 math functions 
on the ZX-81 /TS1000 It otters a unique ’SUM 
function that totals one or more rows /columns 
simultaneously Parenthesis can be used within 
equations There is no tixed limit on how many 
equations may Be entered Formulas may be 
stored in all 420 cells ol the spreadsheet The 
display affords 1 5 rows/colums Loading ot data 
into more than one call can occur across/down 
one or more row/oolumn simultaneously With 

umns m any order, or practice using tixod-variatXe- 
alignment display lormats The menu oilers 6 
options enter /erase, move, calculate, print, save 
and dear the spreadsheet Enter /erase allows 
tne entering, delelion or data alignment wtlhm a 
cei' through ths use of a mobile cursor With the 
move option you may move around the entire 
sreadsheot lo access any row column or celt 
The calculate option allows youloenier labels 

equations thai will act upon the data already wit hm 
the spreadsheet You can also enter bar graphs 
into a cell in this option Absolute / relative replica- 
tion, down/acrossacol umn/row. is alsoallowod 

malic calculation o' the entire spreadsheet with 
one smgiecommano Pnnl allows youtooutputto 
either the ZX/TS printer the enlirespreadsheel by 
column-sets and row-pages through use ol tne 
COPY command The enltre spreaosheet maybe 
saved on cassette tape or you may clear all data 
Irom it or erase the program trom RAM entirely 
The most salient advantage provided by an ESC 
over specticaiiy vertical applications software is 
that an ESC prov-dosa reusable framework with 
which you can compose any specific financial 
model rather than just be limrledtoonly one stati- 
cally lived formal tor stonng displaying and 
manipulating numerical data 


T tme management is an important aspect ol 
any serious business and personal agenda 
Planning how to spend our time leaves us better 
prepared before and while we are spending it 

spending it ZX-Calendar operates in 16-64K 
RAM affording 25 appointments in 16K, 100 in 
32K or 180 in 48K and 84K Each 
appointment record holds a maximum ol 220 
characters The mein menu includes enter, 
search/cneck/sort. change save, clear and 
print any and all appointments mada on a 
specific date or with any party Output to either 
tne ZX/TS printer is permissible This program 
will permit you lo remember to do something or 
lo be somewhere Important by cataloging your 
answers to six questions mat you must account 
tor in ofdei not lo waste time when it is scarce 

where and what are you going to discuss and 
conclude when you gel together with someone 
else’ The program lets you permanently 
originate record, classity. search, sort, 
calculate, modify summarize, obtain a written 
report and store your answers to the preceding 
questions so that you will not lorgat what you 
decide lo do with your lime This program 
identities your time according lo when you are 
going to spend it and with whom you aia going 
to share it Through these toms ol labeling 
appointments you are able to verity or modlly 
now your time is budgeted without wasting ink. 
paper or more lime trying to remember what you 
saio to yoursel! or what someone else said to 

messages that you now can't find With tms 
program you will know where you can Hnd 
exactly what you naed to know Bbout where you 
want to and nave lo be, O' where you have been, 
before you get and alter you got there Thus, ZX- 
calondar wilt let you plan your lime so that you will 

came before, lor you will always know, by using », 
to never be caught astray By any lime-lrame 


$16.95 $16.95 $16.95 

$3.00 SHIPPING AND HANDLING /PROGRAM 

A.F.R. SOFTWARE - 1605 Pennsylvania Avenue, No. 204 - Miami Beach, Florida 33139 

DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME (305)531-6464 FLORIDIANS ADD SALES TAX 


2 



April 


No 17 


TS HORIZONS 


ENTER 
Try These 

Alpha Strlngs-Letters 
Computers for Convicts 
Leave my Stuff Alone (2068) 
by Will lam Pedersen 
Making 2068 Back Ups on the 
A&J Mlkrodrlve - by EABrown 
Etch-Ah-Sketch (2068) 
by Richard Watts 

Rlght-to-Left Pixel-by-Plxel Screen 
Scroll (2068) by Dick Scovllle 
Filler Up (1000) by W. Coleman 
TextwrlterlOOO Enhancements 
by John Ezlke 

Surplus Keyboard Improvements 
For Extra Shifted Keys (1000) 
by Walter Komlosy 


ZX 81 News and Resources 
by Peter McMulltn 

Part-Way Down the Road With Partial 
Pascal, by Tex Faucette 
Reviews for the NonProgrammer 
by A. Gindin 

Greeting Card Designer (2068) 

Rev. by Bill Ferrebee 
Soft-Aid, Reviewed by Tex 
The “Horace” Saga (2068) 
by Doug'Gangl 
TS News 
Classified Ads 
Computer T erms - Humor 


18 

22 


23 

2 A 

26 

27 

29 

29 

30 



«1 Nov*63 Oti ting /Saving Files 
(Johnson), Repeat Key end Unint- 
erruptible Power Supply Project*, 
Numerical Analysis, Load /Save 
Problems, Reviews, end eiore 1 

•2 Dec'83 Natm/Cursor Jrput 
(Johnson), Uaer-Friendliness, 
Reset Switch Project, Memory 
Reduction, Rule of 78, ZX Cash 
Register, Graphics Tutor ial,etc' 


« 1 1 Jan'85-40 Pages, lowti 
TS 1000, 2048 Word Process 
Bar Graph, Experimenting v 
Modem, BanK Switdiing-7, INDEX 
issuee 1 to 10, Reviews, and 


86 June '84 TslOOO As Church Aid, 
Interfacing Boohs, Num. Analysis, 
Hardware Tips, •WORM"-2, Switch- 
ing-3, Good News From EA Brown, 

Six Reviews, and more 1 

#7 July/Aug'84, Telecommunications 
Issue, 2068 Program Tips, How A 
Compiler Works, Rotating Globe, 

Byte-Back Modem, TC -for Beginner, 
Switching-4, WORM-3, S.I.N., etc. 

88 Sept '8 4 TS 1000 Music Program, 

2048 Plotter, 2068 Character Set 
(Young), Address Program, Nine 
Reviews, Telecommunications 
Column, TS News, and more! 

89 Oct/Nov '84 - ANNIVERSARY ISSUE, 

TS 206E Spirograph, Dave Higgenbottom 
interview, FORTH for T/S Computers, 
Spectrum section, Bank Switching -5, 
Telecommunications, Reviews, etc. 

810 Dec '84 - 40 PAGES, Making Backups 
of 2048 Software, Banner Programs, Ql, 
TS1000 Program Tips, Christmas program, 
RS100vs.TS1000,HTermII/Horuon Awards, 

Switching-6, TSUGs, New Column, more! 

Cas. on the « 12 Feb/Mar 85 - 2048 Mass Storage, 8 13 April 84 - Compute 2048 W.P. 8 14 May/June '83 Special HARDWARE 

X- Eval.-Pt.l, Software iron England, Program Tips listing, TS1000 Simulated READ-DATA Issue, TS1000 Keyboard Add-on, 1X81 
ui. Byte Back (or TS1000, 2048 W.P. Eval.-Pt.2, Worm Enhancements, User Defined Rampacks on the 2048, Surge Suppressor 

Bank Switching Concluded, HTERH Graphics for 2088, "Try These*, Project, User Group Report, W.P, Eval. 

Patches, 2048 Tutorial, Programs. Changing *Fonts"-2048, Reviews. Concluded, QL Report, Cassette Tips. 




8ack issues (? $1 50 e, 


Subscription t P>c 
Name 


le Order form 


*2 *3 *4 

*6 *7 *B 

'10 *11 *12 

*14 *15 *16 

T ctai enclosed $ 


NOTE: RATE CHANGE effective April 30. 1986. 

New rate will be $ 15 for NINE lssue3, 

$21 Canada. $28 Foreign. Back issues $2.00 ea 

3 








I ENTER ~l 


Dear Readers, 

The excitement continues to mount as the 
First Annual Timex/Sinclair Computer Fest 
comes closer to reality. Just over a month 
from now hundreds, if not over a thousand 
Timex and Sinclair computer users will be 
meeting in Cincinnati for two days of 
learning, sharing, and working together. 
From tne point of view of the planning 
committee for the event, it has met all or 
our expectations at this point: enough 
funds have come in to pay for the room and 
other expenses incurred. One interesting 
aspect of the Computer Fest is that ir 
there is any surplus of funds after the Fest 
is over (and it appears there may be), the 
money will be saved for future T/S 
Conventions. This can be to help start an 
event in another area, or for a repeat of 
the Cincinnati Fest. The board will strive 
to see that the" excess funds are used 
wisely. Eventually if the money is not used 
it will either be distributed to various 
user groups or perhaps given to a worthy 
charity. At any rate the money will not 
just be going to line somebody's pockets. 

I have personally heard from people as far 
away as Kansas City and Iowa who will be 
attending the Fest. Reservations have been 
made for people coming in from Atlanta 
GA, Annandale VA, Decatur GA. Pittsburg 
PA, and Toronto, Ontario. 

Some of the companies who will be 
represented there are: 

Zebra Systems, Aerco, E Arthur Brown, 
Knighted Computers, Budget Robotics, RMu 
Enterprises, Budget Computer Services, 
Russell Electronics, Curry Computer, Ham 
Helper, Sync Ware News, JRC Software, 
DAMCO Enterprises and of course TS 



Horizons. If you have ever wanted to meet 
some of these people this may be your only 
chance. 

User groups who will be represented are: 
Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton, 
and Milwaukee. 

The Schedule of Events has yet to be 
finalized but we already have some very 
well-known speakers lined up. Mark 
Fendrick, columnist for Computer Shopper 
will be speaking on Timex Word 
Processing. Jerry Champkis will be 
discussing CP/M for Timex computers. 
Jack Roberts of TS Connection will be 
speaking on basic computer literacy. And 
I'm not sure that it is definite yet, there is 
a good chance that Tom Woods, author of 
the Pro-File programs will be discussing 
filing programs. Other planned events 
include sessions on telecommunications, 
machine language, music programs, disk 
and tape drives, the QL, and Forth. Other 
events that should be very informative are 
three planned round table discussions: one 
each for the ZX/TS family and the 2060 
family and one to discuss general issues of 
concern to TS consumers, such as national 
unity and future prospects for the Timex 
community. 

Another aspect of the Computer Fest is the 
planned swap session. Also valuable door 
prizes will be given away. While several 
people on the commitee for this event have 
been very active, I believe two of these 
people deserve special credit. One is the 
very modest Jack Roberts and the other is 
Frank Davis who conceived the idea to 
begin with. 


If you would like more information about 




On a recent trip to 
England my mother ran 
into one of my favorite 
Englishmen. It was Sir 
Clive Sinclair sitting and 
enjoying his favorite i 
show on his pocket telly. 

Actually this photo was 
taken by my mother at 
Madame Tussaud's Wax 
Museum on Marylebone Rd 
in London. The museum 
was started in the 18th 
Century and contains 
very realistic represent- 
ations of such people as 
Humprey Bogart, Jack the 
Ripper, the Beatles, 
Ronald Reagan, and - Boy 
George, 


this event write to: 

Midwest T/S Computer Fest 
3832 Watterson St. 

Cincinnati, Oh 45227. 

Registration is $5 per person and $8 per 
family. Hope to see you there. 

RENEWAL RATE EXTENSION 

Mostly because I haven't gotten around to 
sending out new ad copy to magazines like 
Computer Trader that print subscription 
ads for TS Horizons, we are extending the 
deadline for subscribing at our current 
rates to April 30. After that date our 
subscription rate for new and renewal 
subscriptions will be 115 for 9 issues 
Instead of the current $ 1 5 for 12 issues. 

FREE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FOR 
SUBSCRIBERS 

Beginning with this issue of TS Horizons 
we will be running FREE classified ads for 
subscribers. These ads are for individuals 
(i.e., non-commercial) to get rid of 
unwanted equipment, obtain used equip- 
ment, find help from other readers, form 
user groups or whatever. Please feel free 


to send in as many as you want (within 
reason) and we'll get them in as soon as 
possible. 

Well I guess that does it for another issue. 
By the way If you think the advertising in 
this issue is pretty sparce you're right. If 
you don't like It you, the reader, are the 
one who can do something about It. 


Whenever you buy something from someone 
that advertises In TS Horizons tell that 
you saw their ad here. That Is a great help 
to companies that are trying to decide how 
best to spend their advertising funds. 
Perhaps I don't emphasize that enough, but 
It is Important. 

See you in six weeks. Sincerely, 

Rick Duncan 

P.S. If you are in a user group that pub- 
lishes a newsletter, make sure to read 
"COMPUTERS FOR CONVICTS" In the letter 
section. Thanks. 


Cover Date Issue No. Ad Deadline 

May /June 1 9 May 2 

July 20 June 1 3 

August 21 July 25 

September/October 22 September 5 

November 23 October 17 


November 14 


'After having gotten my feet wet writing 
some software, It became a challenge 
Kopresent Introductory or Instructive text 
sequences in an interesting way 

'I spotted the cover screen for an IBM soft- 
ware package which was a real eyecatcher: 
gach line of text appeared to scroll outwards 
Into place from the centre of the screen. The 
Sinclair BASIC string handling features lend 
themselves well to this sort or thing. 


"A trivial routine like this must (and this one 
does) fill 3 requirements: 1) Executes quickly 
enough to achieve a specific effect. 2) Easily 
coded In BASIC. 3) Uses very few bytes. 

“If you use the subroutine In a long Basic 
program, put It near the start of the program, 
where it will execute more quickly. The 
listing should be self-explanatory - the text 
Input string A$ must not be longer than 32 
characters. An additional benefit Is that the 
routine centres all text on the screen. 

"Can you see why line 1000 Is necessary? If 
not, delete line 1000 then run and see what 
happens with odd length strings. Here's the 
listing, have some funl 


10 LET LINE=2 

20 PRINT "> ENTER A TEXT STRING <32 CHRS - 
30 INPUT A* 

40 IF LEN AS >32 THEN LET A*=A* ( TO 32) 

50 GOSUB 1000 

60 LET LINE=LINE+-2* (LINE<20) 

70 GOTO 50 

1000 IF LEN AS/20INT (LEN AS/2) THEN LET AS=A$+" 
1010 LET END=LEN A* 

1020 LET MID=END/2 
1030 FOR N=1 TO MID 
1040 PRINT AT LINE, 16-N 
1050 NEXT N 

1060 RETURN 5 


I: AS ( TO N) +AS (END+l-N TO 





Dear Misters Duncan. 


Thank you for the February /March issue and 
our renewed commitment to TS Horizons. I 
ave very much enjoyed your magazine and 
look forward to continuing to receive it even 
if it's somewhat less frequently. So keep it 
coming. 

Bill Ferrebee's program "Label Maker", that 
appeared in your Feoruary/March issue and, I 
think, every other TS magazine I receive, is 
a handy program. But many printers do not 
respond to LPRINT TAB and some readers 
may have difficulty getting the program to 
work right. The enclosed listing shows my 
modification that works with the Aerco 
interface and the Olivette PR 2300 Printer. 
Maybe it can help some other reader to 
utilize this fine program. 

Thank you again for a very good magazine in 
the past and in the future. 

Sincerely, T. L. McCorkle, Monticello, IL 

Thank you for the program modification, it 
is printed elsewhere in this section R.D. 




Dear Rick: 

I tried some of those goodies by George 
Mockridge that you printed in the middle of 
[issue 17] and some of them worked pretty 
good. Some of them need a little more 
explanation on how to use them. Some of the 
things appear to be usable only with the TS 
2040 printer. If I entered 0PEN*2 as a 
BASIC line the computer would not enter it. 

I recalled that I had come across an article 
of a similar nature. After a search I found it 
in SYNTAX of April 1984, page *3. That 
article showed it had to be entered as 
0PEN*2,"P". Entering it that way enabled it 
to work. The computer would allow no other 
punctuation mark for entry other than the 
comma. The SYNTAX article showed "P" for 

E rinter, "5" for screen, and "K" for the 
ottom of the screen. The "copy screen 
without using the COPY" command would 
work on an 80-column printer but would not 
limit Itself to 32 columns. The way I got 
around that was to place an LPRINT after the 
NEXT X. I also found I could indent the whole 
copy by placing LPRINT TAB 8; after the 
FOR 1-0 TO 21 statement. 

James Brezina, Elmhurst, IL 
Thank you, James, for that clarification For 


more information on OPEN* and CLOSE* see 
Doug Gangi's article in TSH no. 12, page 15. 


Dear Sir, 

Your "Little Goodies’ for the 2068 was 
great. I hope we can get more important 
information like this. I don't understand the 
vertical line in *13 and *14. It doesn't seem 
to make sense as the variable i. 

Keep up the fine work, 

Cordially, Byron DeFries, Bonduel, Wl 

/ can certainly understand why *JJ and *H 
didn't make sense to you and several othei 
readers. Actually the vertical lines in both 
instances should have been the upward- 
pointing arrows that are used to indicate 
exponents in 2069 BASIC. (This arrow is 
identical to the double asterisk **) on the 
TS 1000 and some other computers.) In Mr. 
Mockridge's original article they were 
correct. Also we made additional mistake in 
*U, which should read: 

(13) LET X = INT ( X * 10T y *5)1 lOTy 
Number 14 is correct if the lines are 
replaced with arrows. Here is an example 
which may help to clarify the use of this 
routine, fn conventional algebraic notation, 
the above equiation would read: 

x r = I NT (x* I0 y *.5) t I0 y 
where x r is the rounded number. 
Substituting J. 14159 for x and J for y (i.e., J 
three decimal places): 

x r = INT (3.1 4159* 10 3 + .5) / 10 s 
X r = INT (3141. 59* .5) / 1000 
x r =INT (3142.09)/ 1000= 3142/1000 

|* r = 3.142| 

So there you have it. This is a handy routine ; 
for many financial proorams, for example, to 1 
round off to dollars and cents. NOTE. \ 
Negative values of y can be used, say -J to , 
round off to the nearest thousand. R.D. \ 

One more clarification is in order while we i 
are on the subject. In "goodie “ *17 ("Gives i 
line feed to print statement") the i 
punctuation following PRINT is three i 
apostrophes. This command causes the 'ft 
computer to print one blank line for each i 
apostrophe: J blank lines in this case. The ^ 
same technique works for L PR/ NT - only the p 
blank lines are printed on the 2040 printer, i 
R.D. |i 



it 

Dear Rick, P 

4 

I live in an area that is devoid of a User's t 
Group. That is it was till last Christmas- i 
New Years holidays and I put an ad in the i 
paper. Now we have a User's Group, four i 
people Including myself. Our third meeting 


6 



ts coming up March 23. Last meeting two 
members worked on a machine code program 
for the 2068. Just listening I am picking up 
a little. It is hard to learn when some 
simple thing Is not clear and It takes 
months to rind an answer. Now I have 
several friends to call up and ask. 

Sincerely, Donald Lambert, Cedar Rapids IA 

Dear Donald, as your experience proves even 
a small group of people can create a very 
■ successful user group. Some of the most 
active TS user groups have only a handful of 
members. 

TS Horizons is starting a couple of new 
services that perhaps can help user groups 
like yours. First if you are interested in 
contacting other Timex users in your area 
we can provide you with the names and 
addresses of our subscribers who live 
i within the Zip Codes you request. 

Secondly, with this issue TS Horizons is 
starting a free service to our subscribers. 
FREE classified ads. The classified section 
will be a great place to attract interest in 
your user group. See this issue's ENTER 
section for details. R.D. 


'COMPUTERS FOR CONVICTS’ DEPARTMFNT 

No, this is not some sort of tacky April Fool's joke. A 
Californio user group matte a gift of two Timex computers (a 
1000 and a 1500) and some software to some inmates in a 
Nevada prison. Currently ten inmates are taking turns with 
the two computers and a computer literacy course that was 
also donated. 

The January '86 issue of Timeline? contained a letter from 
one of the inmates . To quote a small part of it: "When I came 
into prison over a decade ago, there were no such things as 
microcomputers and user groups, or nice folks who would 
share such a wonderful thing...This is something I have 
wanted to learn for so many years, but have been unable to, 
because of the rigid fincial restrictions imposed by a prison 
setting.. .You can believe that the gracious gift you supplied to 
us is being used to the fullest extent." 

George Mockridge is the president of the Peninsula User 
Group (263 Gateway, No. 107, Pacifica Ca 94044). He and 
his user group have been co-ordinating this effort and he 
brought it to our attention here at TS Horizons. George has 
asked user groups to provide free newsletter subscriptions to 
the men. In his words “Imagine how much it would mean to 
these computer beginners to receive S to 10 newsletters 
from around the country dealing with their new and 
sometimes confusing T/S endeavors." 

The address to send newsletters to is: 

Robert Kelly *124 15, 

P.O.Box 208-SDCC, Indian Springs NV 89070. 

Their TSH subscription begins with this issue. TSH 


10 CLS : INPUT "Program Tit la:”; a* 

12 IF LEN a* >32 THEN GO TO 10 
14 PRINT TP8 16-CLEN a*x2 3 ; a* 

20 INPUT "Line #2 Inro:";bt 
22 IF LEN fa* >32 THEN GO TO 20 
24 PRINT TPB 1&- CLEN b*x2 3 ; b* 

30 INPUT "Line #3 lnfo:";c* 

32 IF LEN c# >32 THEN GO TO 30 
34 PRINT TPB 16-CLEN c*x23 ; c* 

38 PRINT : PRINT PRINT PRINT : 
f^RINT 

40 INPUT "Bottom Line :";d* 

42 IF LEN d*>32 THEN GO TO 40 
44 PRINT TPB 16-CLEN d*x23 ; d* 

50 PRINT PT 21- S; FLPSH i;"Correct 
Cy-'np " 

52 IF INKEY*="" THEN GO TO 52 
54 IF INKEY*="n" THEN GO TO 10 
100 PRINT PT 21-8;" 

INPUT "Humber of copies. :";x 
110 FOR i=1 TO * 

115 FOR i = 1 TO C32-LEN a*3 STEP 2 
iPRINT " "; : NEXT j 

120 LPRINT a* 

121 FOR 3 = 1 TO C32-LEN b« STEP 2 
iPRINT " "; : NEXT 3 

122 LPRINT b* 

123 FOR 3 = 1 TO C32-LEN c *3 STEP 2 - 
iPRINT " "; : NEXT 3 

124 LPRINT c* 

126 LPRINT LPRINT : LPRINT : LPRI 
IT : LPRINT 

127 FOR 3 = 1 TO C32-LEN d« STEP 2 
‘.PRINT " "; : NEXT i 

123 LPRINT d* 

130 LPRINT : LPRINT 
132 NEXT i 

140 INPUT "Nora? Cy^nD : " ; x* 

142 IF x$="y" THEN GO TO 100 


150 INPUT "Rnother title? Cyyn 3 :";x 

* 

152 IF x*="y" THEN GO TO 10 
160 CLS : PRINT PT 10 - 8 ;"PJork Comp 
lete3": STOP 

9382 REM GOTO Here to save BPSIC P 
rogram and machine code PRINTDRIUER 
on t ape 
9983 REM 

9334 SPUE "PRINT" LINE 9990: SPUE "P 
RCODE 1 'CODE 64256 ,1111 
9385 REM 

9936 REM Jump to start of your BPS I 
C program 
9387 REM 

9988 GO TO 1 

9989 REM 

9938 REM GOTO here to initialize BPS 
IC and load machine code PRINT DRIU 
ER 

9991 REN 

9392 CLEPR 64255: LET PRINTORG=64261 
: POKE 26704- INT CPR I NT ORG72563 : PO 
KE 26703 - PR I NT ORG— C I NT CPRINT0RGx25 
633*256: LET MODE=6425& : LET TRPSH= 
NODE+1: LET POS=TRRSH+ 1 : LET UIDTH= 
POS+1: POKE MODE-1: POKE POS-0: POK 
E TRPSH-0: POKE WIDTH- 79. LORD ""CO 
DE 64256-1111 

3333 BORDER 5: PPPER 6. POKE 23609-2 
0 

9994 REM Jump to start of your BPS I 
C program 
3335 REM 
9936 GO TO 1 

9338 CLS : PRINT PT 8 - 0 ; "Looking tor 
program from tape . "Star 

t Tape Recorder". LORD 


7 




2060 


LEAVE MY STUFF ALONE I 
by William J. Pedersen 
The WIDJUP Co. 

1 120 Merri field S.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49507 


EGAD! This is the world's longest REM 
statementl There Is no limit to the length 
of a statement, except it is impossible to 
EDIT any that create more than 768 
characters on the screen. 


In all of us there is a deep desire to keep our 
property safe from observation, damage, 
theft, and plagiarism. It is human (and 
corporate) nature. As disturbing as it might 
be, our fondest hopes are doomed to failure! 

Students of cryptography are well aware 
that few approaches meet the needs for 
secrecy. All codes can be broken in time. 
That is quite all right if it takes longer than 
you need to keep the secret. 

Computer programs are code. Anything you 
write Is therefore a form of cryptography. 
How about that? 


Let's take a case in point. Issue *14 of TS 
Horizons had on Scott's cluttered desk the 
ubiquitous: 

10 ON ERR CONTINUE 
Is It breakable? No sweat. 

Under the conditions assumed It works very 
well, but suppose we change the conditions? 
Don't load it as a program. Load it as 
machine code instead. 

HOW? You might groan. Well, take it from 
someone who made a lot of mistakes, 
Including erasing parts of tape records — 
make a new header. It should specify that 
machine code Is expected, where to load it, 
and how much. Put it ahead of the old 
header. When loading, skip the portion of 
tape for the old header and continue. You 
will get a tape error message, but the data 
has most assuredly been loaded. Now you 
can look at it, change It, and even print It 
using appropriate utilities. 

Why not read the header? It Is "protected", 
I will not bore you with the how and why of 
this, nor the way around It. You can say 
bye-bye to concealment from observation. 
Unless you can hide the computer from 
itself, nothing can be hidden. It wouldn't be 
a computer any more, would it? 


For those of you who have damaged your 
precious and only tape records, there is 
some hope. 

If you have been paying attention, you have 
learned that you can write tape headers 
separately. Ail you need to do is stop the 
recorder at the one second gap between 
header and data record. 


So far so good. . .but what kind of header do 
we write? Assuming that if you're still 
with me, you have the smarts to figure out 
the others — here is an immediate instruc- 
tion set which will almost always work for 
programs. 


R % I' 300 00 :• 


POKE 5e?ie 


: POKE 267 




KE S6712.4S:POKE 26713,50: 

- - -714. , 234. . 


POKE S671S,13_ 


Remember that control characters don't 
show on the screen and tokens generate 
more than one character, CriR$(234) 
generates "R", "E", "M", and “ ". 

The REM statement has completely replaced 
A$(30000). VARS now points to an empty 
variable list. 

SAVE "Flxlt" 

This will write the new header, and a very 
long REM if you let it. We'll settle for just 
the neader. 

This header expects a program from PROG to 1 

VARS- 1, and variables from VARS to E LINE 

(but there are none). We have extablished 
these with our long REM statement and by 
poking VARS. 

This header gives an error when it fails to 
find CHR$( 128) at VARS- 1, EJJNE-I, a valid 
CHECKSUM byte, or finds an erased sectfon. 
Any program smaller than the REM state- 
ment will load. This Includes programs with 
damage due to accidental POKE'S which 
destroy the line structure. These don't run, 
but can be mixed using methods similar to 
the one used here, immediate commands 
usually work, even when programs don't. 

Programs with erasure gaps and intact 
headers already load up to the point of the 
gap. You can save this much by finding the 
CHRK13) at the end of the last intact line, 
and poking a pair of CHR$(l2B)'a after it. 
Then poke VARS to point to the first 
CHR$(l28)and enter CLEAR. (Examine it as 
machine code. You have already seen how.) 

Rescuing the part of the program following 
an erasure gap can sometimes be done by 
splicing. A machine code program borrowing 
routines from the EXROM can read anything. 
If you had it, you wouldn't need any other 
technique. 

Now you have diagnostic, and surgical tools 
for fixing damage. 

About plagiarism --. Nobody in their right 
mind cares to copy GARBAGE It must have 
SOME meaning. 

If you really want and need security, there 
is one reliable way. Encrypt your code using 
a "public key” scheme. This is a method 
based on a longer Integer which is the 
product of two prime numbers. The "public 



P Rt-'T CF- I 


l 

t 

s 

e 

1“ 

L 

8 

u 

s 

rr 

to 

m 

ci 

w 

ol 

U 

fr 

Ir 

m 

te 

cc 

cc 

up 

lo 

th 

ac 

lo 

yc 

fr 

co 


5 « 



key' Is the long product. The "private key" Is 
either of the primes. The largest binary 
integer usable with the 2068 Is 32 bits. A 
CRA computer might break a 32 bit code In a 
few minutes, but why would anyone try? 

Theft (or loss if you can't prove It) hurts 
just as much when the stolen item Is 
useless to the thief as If it were jewels. 
Always . . . ALWAYS . . . keep backup copies, 
stored away from the cleaning lady, the 
jelly fingers, the compulsive button pushers. 

What has been presented here is not in- 
tended to let you penetrate deep secrets for 
criminal purposes. It is for self-help when 
things get sticky. 

What bugs me is that computer manufac- 
turers have advertised and sold security 


systems that my dog could open. Then they 
try to prosecute the poor guys who pene- 
trate them. It Is hard to see who Is the 
bigger thief. TSH 


PD BOX 1 13, MAYVILLE, NY 14757 

TSHG8D-I5GD-ZX8I 

SOFTWARE 


Making 2068 Back-Ups 
on the A & J Mikrodrive 

By E. Arthur Brown 

Using Thomas Woods' 2068 Profile has proven 
to be the most convenient data base for our 
supplier and media contacts. (I've found it 
even better than Microsoft's FILE for the 
Macintosh... a $200 fiasco software package.) 
Using it with our 2068 Mikrodrive (same as A 
& J Mikrodrive), nas further enhanced it's 
utility with extra speed and reliability in 
saving and loading. I did, initially, have some 
misgivings about the Mikrodrive versions 
because there were no easy instructrions for 
making back-ups. I've since figured a 
convenient method myself and thought it 
would be a good idea to share my method with 
others. 

LOAD the Mikrodrive version of 2068 Profile 
from cassette and configure it as per 
instructions. (If you plan Lo use the internal 
mikrodrive printer port, you'll need a patch 
tape from us which we'll supply for $5 to 
cover coots.) This will give you one blank 
copy of Mikrodrive profile. Now, to make back- 
ups, you'll need to configure a re-usable 
loader With no wafer in the Mikrodrive, LOAD 
the Mikrodrive version from cassette once 
again. You should get an error report after the 
loader has loaded. LIST the Loader program to 
your screen. Now, DELETE lines 1000-2000 
from the Loader program. Next, FORMAT a 
couple of 5-10 foot wafers using the SAVE 
"@l, + " command. NOw, insert one of these 
wafers and SAVE >, pfile" Save the same 
thing on the other formatted wafer You have 


just made a Loader which you'll use to prepare 
other wafers to save Profile and its data 
Now, Format as many 35ft or longer wafers as 
you want to have for Profile back-ups. Then, 
LOAD "@pfi)e" LINE I : VERIFY "@pfile". This 
saves and verifies an auto-run version of the 
loader to file I of each wafer. You now have a 
set of wafers that are ready to back-up 
Profile and it's data 

To use these back-ups, you start a file with 
your original empty Mikrodrive version of 
Profile. When it's time to SAVE your work, 
you remove the original wafer and insert one 
of your prepared wafers. Since the SAVE goes 
to files 2 and 3, your Profile and data will be 
readily saved and verified. To make a back- 
up copy, just SAVE again onto another 
prepared wafer. 

NOTE: Besides speed, the 2068 Mikrodrive 

should be consistantly reliable. If you have 
frequent tape errors, there is something 
wrong. After a year of no problems, mine 
started having frequent tape errors. I used a 
swab and the cleaning solvent from our 
computer maintenance kit to clean the head 
and rollers and the drive returned to its 
previous reliability. 

I hope this back-up procedure is helpful to 
your readers. If any are confused or have 
questions, they're welcome to call or write 
for help 

Sincerely, Eben Brown, E. Arthur Brown Co. 
3404 Pawnee Dr, Alexandria, MN 56308 
(612)762-8847. 





ETCH-AH-SKETCH 

For the TS-2068 
by: Richard E. Watts 


It's hard to come by a good drawing program 
with the capabilities represented In this 
one. 

This program was originally written for my 
uncle's Atari 400 but, arter many 
modifications, I converted It for the 206s 
and thought I would share It with other 
users. I worked on this program two years 
off and on. so I hope you like it. 

Type It In Just as Is and when you type in 
the last line, type in RUN 9988. Once this Is 
done compare the output to the output at the 
end of this article. If they are not the same, 
find which line or lines the errorts) are In 
and fix them. (For more information on the 
"Llnecheck" program, see TS Horizons no. 12, 
page 10.) 

Once this is done DELETE lines 9988 through 
9999 and then CLEAR and SAVE "etcher’ LINE 
0. At this point it would be wise to VERIFY 
the program as well. 

HOW the program WORKS: Put a Joystick in 
the left port of your computer and RUN the 
program. After a STOP THE TAPE intro 
followed by a fanfare with credits on a 
yellow screen (for color TV) For 
black-and-white TV's, change state- ment 4 
to "BORDER 7: PAPER 7" ;it cuts down on 
glare. You will see a flashing dot in the 
center’ of the screen with a Xj coordinate 
at the bottom. 

The numbers at the bottom of the screen 
represents the location of the cursor 
(flashing dot) on the screen. The number 
after the "TO:" represents how long the 
cursor Is set by the W key. 

Move the joystick in the direction you wish 
to go and If you wish to leave a dot or line 
behind, press the button on your joystick. 
To erase a line, retrace It without pressing 
the button. 

The INKEYS letters are decribed below: 

A->Draws an ellipse on the screen. 

This may take a while depending on 
how small the ellipse is. 

B->This copies the picture to the 
printer, if one is attached. 

C->This clears the screen but don't 
worry if you accidently hit it 
because it asks if you're sure you 
want to do It. 

D->Thls draws a vertlcle or horizontal 
or an angled line and places the 
cursor at the end of it. 

F->Thls fills in a certain area but make 
sure that the cursor Is at the lower 
left or upper left of the area to be 
filled. 

l->Th1s changes the Ink color. 


M->Thts pauses the cursor so it can't be 
moved unless another key Is hit. 

0->Thls draws a circle using the circle 
command built Into the computer. 

P->This enables you to print something 
to the screen. Anything, anywhere. 
Flashing or not. 

Q->Thts quits the program. *(See note 
below). 

R->Thls loads a picture from a tape. 

S->Thls saves a picture to a tape. 

W->Thls changes the width of the cursor. 

Z->This "Centers’ the cursor l.e. X»128, 
Y-88. 

4->Th1s sets the increments of the arrow 
keys. This Is set at 8 at the 
beginning of the program. 

ARROW KEYS->Go In respective directions 
incremented by the four key. 


* NOTE: After hitting the Q key the 
program Is still in the memory of the 
computer and a poke 23635,86 Is 
needed to restore the program 
followed by an INK 0. You will see 
only a "2>" at the top of the screen. 
You need to edit the line. 


66 26 

63 4-55 

70 372 

72 188 


-303 

318 

-151 

136 

102 

56 

293 

262 

114. 


254- 

273 

154 

94 

343 

-320 

-323 

-326 

-325 

340 

-264 

164 

286 

80 

-522 

158 

262 


180 

102 

104 

106 

103 

110 

112 

114 

116 

113 

119 

120 
122 
124 
126 
128 
130 
132 


186 

137 

-17 

222 

200 

241 

198 

251 

231 
119 
126 
-64 
293 
76 
-10 

232 
241 
175 
101 
1804 
96 
41 

7 

202 

116 

241 

740 

-232 


134 399 

136 363 

138 -318 

140 -57 

142 3 

144 2 

146 551 

143 36 

150 -736 

152 159 

154 241 

156 214 

153 2 

160 85 

163 67 

164 217 

166 245 

167 204 

168 121 

169 -51 

170 173 

130 241 

190 -172 

200 -536 

9933 210 

9989 236 

9990 188 

9991 -71 

9992 176 

9993 322 

9994 29 

9995 146 

9996 111 

9997 113 

9998 178 

9999 169 


mo wsGS 

1 REM 

CREATED BY R.E. 

2 ON ERR 60 TO 4 


URTTS 


4 POKE 23561,20: POKE 23609,1 
8- POKE 23562,1: POKE 23658,8: F 
OR 0=0 TO 2: CLS : BORDER 6: POP 
ER 6: NEXT O 

6 PRINT RT 11,9; FLRSH 1; "STO 
P THE TAPE : " : FOR X=0 TO 100: BE 
EP .005,32: NEXT X: PRUSE 60: CL 
S 

8 GO SUB 118 

10 LET H=0: LET 1=8: LET X=128 
: LET Y =88 : LET U=0 


10 







134. INPUT "SPUE OS ? ";N*: PRIN 

T ttl; AT O,0;"SRUIN6 PS ";N*. SPU 
E NS SCREEN* : RETURN 
136 INPUT "LORD UHPT PICTURE ? 

" ; N * : PRINT »l;OT 0 , 0 ; "LORDING P 
ICTURE ";N*: LORD N$ SCREEN* : R 
ETURN 

138 OUER 0: INPUT "X DIRLRTION 

FACTOR ";R: INPUT "Y DIRLRTION 

FRCTOR " ; B 

14.0 FOR T=0 TO 6.3 STEP .01 
142 LET 0=R*C0S (T) 

144 LET R=B*SIN (TJ 
146 LET 0=1.1040 
148 PLOT G+X,R*Y 

150 PRINT ttl; RT 0,0; "X="; PBS (( 
INT (O) +X) ) ; TRB 10;RT 1,0;"Y=";A 
BS ((INT (R) +Y) ) ; TPB 10;" - 
152 NEXT T 
154 RETURN 

156 INPUT "UHAT COLUMN (0-31) ? 

“;c 

158 PRINT RT L,C;AS: FLASH 0 
160 GO TO 103 

163 INPUT "FILL HOU MANY SPACES 

TO THE (+) RIGHT ?";LR 

164 INPUT "FILL HOU MANY SPACES 

(+)UP/ (-)DOUN UD 

166 IF LR<0 THEN LET INC=-1 

167 LET INC=1 

168 FOR A=X TO X+ (LR*INC) STEP 
INC 

169 PLOT A.Y: DRAU 0,UD 

170 NEXT A 
180 RETURN 

190 ON ERR RESET : STOP 
200 ON ERR RESET : FOR X=0 TO 2 
. CLS : BORDER 7; PAPER 7: NEXT 
X: PAUSE 30: OUT 2SS,1: PAUSE 60 
: OUT 255,0: PRINT ttl; AT 0,0; "© 
1983 Sinclair Research Ltd";flT 2 
,0;”© 1982 Timex Computer Corp”: 
POKE 23635,0: INK 7: PAUSE 0: C 

LEAR 

9988 REH 

9989 REH by John Bell 

9990 LET IOC =26710 

9991 LET total=0; LET linum=PEEK 
10C4256+PEEK (loc+1) 

9992 LET length=PEEK (lOC+2)+PEE 
K (lOC+3)*256 


Smart Text TS-2068 

and the new 

Smart Text OS— G4 
( For the Zebra OS-64 Cartridge ) 

With Universal Intfc/Printer Patch 
For all Corif igurat ions 

Three Integrated softwares that does 
■ost all administrative functions 
Word proc - Data files agt - Nailing 
List - Fora Letters - Nailing Labels 
Repeat printing - fluto Letter Heads. 

Supports all Printers, plus TS-2343. 

29.95 ♦ 43.33 sailing to: Bill Jones 
Gulf Nicro, 1317 Stratford five, 

Panama City, FL 32434 


hfl? STEp a | tlOC+4> T ° tloc+len ’ t 

9994 LET tota l =tOta l +PEEK (a) -PE 
EK (a + 1) 

9995 NEXT a 

9996 L PR INT linum;TAB 6; total 


9997 LET lo c =loc ♦ leng th+4 

9998 IF linum=9999 THEN STOP 

9999 GO TO 9991 


Remember The Babies 


Each cross-mark represents 50,000 people killec 
The war casualties represent all American combi 
and combat-related deaths. 


Revolutionary War (25,324) . . 1 

Civil War (498,332) . . . t+tt+t+t+t 

World War I (116,516). . t + 1 

World War II (545,108) .. ... ++++++++++1 

Korean War (54,246) + 

Vietnam War (56,555) + 


WAR OF ANOTHER KIND - WAR 


++++++++++ 


killed by legalized abortion, 


The U.S Supreme Court legallzedtttttttttt 
abortion on 22 January 1973, for all i r i i • i , , . , 
nine months of pregnancy. ; ■ ' 


++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

+t+++++t++++t+++++++++++ 

tttttt+ttttttttttttttttt’ 

tttttttttttttttttttttttt 

++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

tttttttttttttttttttttttt 

++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

tttttttttttttttttttttttt 

tttttt+ttttttttttttttttt 

++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

tttttttttttttttttttttttt 

ttttt 


Statistics from 1982 World Book. 

Updated by Ohio Right to Life 1986 

Distributed by: 

Ohio Right to Life Education Foundation 
718 South High Street 
Columbus, Ohio 43206 
(614) 445-8369 


12 


A RIGHT-TO-LEFT 

PIXEL-BY-PIXEL 

SCREEN SCROLL by Dick Scovllle 

As you can see, the following machine code 
program can be located anywhere you wish. 
The ideas involved won’t be new to readers 
of my earlier articles in the Triangle 
Sinclair Users' Group newsletter. (I only 
hope I haven't given you exactly the same 
thing already!) 

It is very easy to double a number that is 
given in binary, Just as It Is very easy to 
multiply a number by 10 if it Is given in 
decimal— in each case, you Just ado a 0 on 
the right. That is, twice the number 


x 7 x 6 x 5 *"4 x 3 X 2 X 1 x 0 
is the number 

x 7 *6 x 5 X 4 X 3 X 2 X 1 x 0°* 
where the variables x 7 through x 0 represent 
ones or zeroes. 


Since our object is to shirt bits to the left, 
this is a quick way to do it. If our number 
were In the A register, the instruction 

ADD A, A 

would "double" it by adding A to itseir. or 
course if the result is too Dig, that is. If X7 
is I the new contents of the A register will 
be 

x 6 x 5 x 4 x 3 x 2 x I x 0 °- 


and the carry flag would be set (reset if X 7 
were 0). 

ADC A, A 

This instruction is similar to ADD A, A— it 
will add A to itself but also add one more to 
the answer if the carry flag was set 
previously. It will then adjust the carry 
flag depending on overflow. Here are some 
examples showing what happens to A and the 
carry flag after an ADC A, A instruction: 

old old new new 

A carry A carry 


00000001 0 

00000010 

0 

01001001 1 

1001001 1 

0 

01001001 0 

10010010 

0 

101 10000 1 

01 100001 

1 

xabcdefg y 

abcdefgy 

X 

Here is the program: 


DDOO LD HL.FF57 

' 2IFF57 

1 

DD03 LD B,20 

0620 

2 

DD05 AND A 

A7 

3 

DD06 LD A, (HL) 

7E 

4 

DD07 ADC A, A 

8F 

5 

DD08 LD (HL) , A 

77 

6 

DD09 DEC HL 

2B 

7 

DDOA DJNZ FA 

IOFA 

8 

DDOC LD A, 40 

3E40 

9 

DDOE ANDH 

A4 

10 


DDOF LD B, 20 
DDI1 JRNZ, F3 
DDI3 RET 


0620 1 1 

20F3 12 

C9 13 


Line I loads HL with the last byte of the 
display file (which runs from 4000 to 57FF). 
We will poerate on each pixel row of the 
screen by looping through Its 20 (32 
decimal) bytes, we use register B as an 
index since that is the register that DJNZ 
uses. Line 3 has the important purpose of 
making the carry zero. (All the logic 
operators— AND, OR and XOR— do this.) 

Lines 4 to 8 form the actual loop. When we 
enter the loop, HL will point to the 
right-most byte of a pixel row, and the 
carry will be 0. Keeping in mind how ADC 
A,A shifts bits to the left, you can see how 
we have entered a 0 on the right and moved 
all the other bits to the left. When we 
leave the loop, that is, when B has finally 
been decremented to zero, HL will point to 
the right-most byte of another pixel row, 
and tne carry flag will contain the 
(unwanted) value of the pixel that has been 
shoved off the left margin. Of course at this 
point we might be done, having gone through 
all the pixel rows. Lines 9 and 10 decide 
that for us— we will be done only if HL holds 
a number less than 4000, 

4 0 0 0 

0100 0000 0000 0000 

..H L 


that is, only if the bit in H indicated has 
become 0, that is, only if (H AND 40) is 00. 

Line 10 has the further happy effect of 
resetting the carry flag, which Line 1 1 does 
not ruin. Thus in Line 12, if the result of 
the AND was not zero, we jump back to Line 
4, the beginning of the loop, with the carry 
flag reset. 

If you would like to have a 
Scroll-to-the-Right routine, not very much 
has to be done— you will want to start at 
4000, and increment HL. The lest for the 
end of the screen is a bit messier, but recall 
that RRA (whose code is IF) is the perfect 
analog of ADC A, A. Only the direction of the 
shift changes. I'll end the article with a 
simple illustration of the routine in use 
(DD00-56576dec) : 

10> LET y- 1 00 

20 LET y=y+2*INT (2*RND)-I 
30 PLOT 255,y 
40 LET abc=USR 56576 
50 GO TO 20 

If you think about how RANDOMIZE and USER 
work, you will understand why replacing 
LINE 40 with 

40 RANDOMIZE USR 56576 

is not such a good idea. TSH 


13 


STEP 3 : Enter and run this tistinq to demon- 
strate FILLER UP 



For the TS 1000 / ZX 61 


by Walt Coleman 

Have you ever had a use for a partial screen 
clear or a rapid screen fill with a specific 
character? Then FILLER UP is for you It's a 
short (24 byte) machine code routine that 
can be stored in an opening REM statement 
or relocated to any of your favorite M/C 
storage spots (no absolute addresses are 
used). 


To use this routine from a basic program 
two lines are required. First a PRINT AT 
row, column; This will set the point on the 
screen we wish to clear from (HM with 
spaces). Then a RAND USR 16514 or LET 
X=USR 16514 call will execute FILLER UP. 


Using the PRINT AT statement allows us to 
use two Sinclair System Variables in our 
program. The variable DF.CC at 16398 
contains the address that the next byte of 
the display file will be written to. Likewise 
variable S.POSN at 16442 contains the line 
number for the PRINT position. This line 
number, however, does not correspond to our 
usual convention (top line being 0, bottom 
line being 24) but instead numbers the top 
line as 24 to the bottom line at I 


For M/C lovers: 


1 PcM E; RNDFUURNDCHfi$ ■- T 
RUN ' PRINT TAN 
10 FOR TO 21 

20 PRINT 1,1,-flT 1 ,30; I 


SO NEXT I 
10 FOR 1=1 TO 30 
50 NEXT I 
60 PRINT OT 3 o, 
re RAND USR 1*514 


Line I contains M/C program from steps 
1 and 2 

Lines 10 to 30 fill the screen. 

Lines 40 to 50 provide a delay 
Line 60 sets the exact screen position 
from which we wish to fill 
Line 70 calls FILLER UP 

To change the fill character POKE 1 6524, — 
with a number between 0 and 63 or 
betweenl28 and 191 consulting your manual 
for the desired character code To chanqe 
the fill point change the PRINT AT 
statement, but be sure to end it with the , 

Isn't it amazing what such a "little toy" can 
do The only 7/5 1000 limitation is our 
ingenuity and imagination If you have any 
comments or problems, I'm always glad to 
hear from you. 

Walt Coleman 
728 Seville Avenue 

Wilmington, DE 19809 TSH 


MNEMONICS COMMENTS 


LD HL,( 1 6398) 
DEC HL 
LD A,( 1 6442) 
SUB A, 2 
LD D, 128 

LD B.A 
INC HL 
LD A,(HL) 

CP 118 
JR Z+3 

LD(HL),D 
JR-9 
DJNZ-I I 
RET 


Load HL w/ PRINT AT pos'n 

Load A w/ number of I ines 
to be filled 

Load D w/ character to be 

used for fill 

Set up loop counter 

Is next character an end of 
line marker 

If yes skip it and decre- 
ment counter 

If no load w/ our character 
And go to next display char 
Have all lines been done 
If so return to BASIC 


So much for explanations. Lets get to the 
keyboard and see how it works. 


STEP 1 : Enter and run the following llscmg 


1 REN 12345673901234.567390123 
10_LET A $ = ' 2A0E402B3A3 A40P502 1 


'237EFE762303- 


20 LET fl*=AS. 

T 7 10^509 “ 

30 FOR 1=1 TO 24 
40 POKE ( 16513 + 1? , 16 



"...received my moneys worth with just one 
issue..." 

—J. Trenbick 

.always stop to read CTM. even though 
most other , magazines I receive (and write tor ) 
only get cursory examination..." 

—Fred Blechman. K6UGT 


515 00 lor 1 year 
" \ $25.00 

S35.00(land) ■ $55.00(air) 


Mexico. Canada 
Foreign 


Permanent (U.S. Subscription) $100.00 

Sample Copy S3.50 

CHET LAMBERT, W4W0R 

1704 Sam Orive • Birmingham. AL 35235 
(205)854 0271 


STEP 2 : Delete lines 10 to 60 being careful 
not to delete line ), which now contains 
FILLER UP, 


14 


TEXTWRITER 1000 ENHANCEMENTS 
By John Ezike 

One of the best word processors around for the 
ZX/TS computers is TEXTWRITER 1000 by 
Robert Fingerle (see review In Sync Jan/FeD 
84). However, there are a few enhancements 
that I found which make it even easier to use. 


In type mode, screen flicker can be a bit of a 
problem. If you have a video inverter board (see 
Popular Electronics 5/63) it is not so bad. The 
following lines will eliminate screen flicker, 
enable auto repeat when any key is held down, 
without affecting the normal operation of the 
program. Deleting characters will be slightly 
slower. LOAD and after the menu comes up 
enter STOP (5HIFT-A) to break out of the 
program. Enter LIST 135 then type and enter 
160 to delete the line. Add the following lines. 

140 SLOW 

173 IF AS-” THEN GOTO 170 

The following lines simplify the task of 
printing multiple copies of your file. If you 
enter option 4 or 5 from the main menu a 
prompt will require that you enter the number 
of copies you want. The familiar prompts 
requesting the start and final lines will then be 
displayed. Enter LIST 80 and using the down 
cursor (SHIFT-6) and edit key (SHIFT- 1 ), 
renumber line 97 so it is now line 98. Also 
renumber line 95 so it is now line 97. Add the 
following lines: 

86 IF LN-4 OR LN-5 THEN GOTO 95 
95 PRINT 9 AT I6,0;"ENTER NUMBER OF COPIES' ILAISRlSSf 

mm mm r 

CONTROLLER BOARD FOR TS 2068 
SPECTRUM EMUL A TOR COMP A T/BLE 

- High speed loads 32k bytes in 7 5 seconds 
-commands are LOAD SAVE DIRECTORY DELETE 

FORMAT COPY MOVE and BAD0LOCKS 

- Uses iBM PC compatible 5 1/4 “ double sided 
diik drives (SHUGART 3A455 or compatible) 

- Disk capacity 160 k bytes 

- Dos is on a bank switched 2K eprom 

- Only 1 USR call is required 

- Assembled and tested ,all cables and connectors 
supplied 

- Single drive version is available now out a second 
drive can be easily added (tms mod will be available 
before FEB 36) 

- 60 day money back guarantee 

- Made in CANADA , many already in use 
Price 

$95.00(US) + 56 00 shipping 

From LARKEN ELECTRONICS 
RR*2 NAVAN ONTARIO 
CANADA K4B-IH9 


yo iinkui ini* 

5535 FOR 0=1 TO NC 
5595 NEXTO 

In lines 5535 and 5595 the "0" used 
as a variable is the letter and not zero. 
Enter GOTO 35 and select option 3 from 
the menu to save. DO NOT USE RUN !! 
Happy computing! 

JOHN EZIKE 

1619 GRANT ST. APT. 6 

BERKELEY, CA. 94703 TSH 




\ % < 
‘ \ 


w 



15 


Surplus Keyboard Improvements 
for Extra Shifted Keys I by waiter 

Komlosy 


The Tl 99-4A keyboards, still widely For other keyboards with many extra keys, 

available, are an Ideal unit for the you can use as many 40)6 I.C.5 as you need 

ZX8l/Timex 1000 computers. Recent and to wire up other shifted keys you want 

not so recent articles have shown how the Each 4016 will handle three shifted keys, 

shifted keys on the KB-0 line can be since one CMOS switch of each I.C. used 

connected using two diodes. This method must control the shift line from D6 to KB-0. 

can give you four useful and often used 
shifted keys: EDIT, DELETE, quotation 

marksO, and FUNCTION. It can also give you What to do with your TI99-4A key tops. 

STOP and '* , which are not of so much use. 

Revising the above keyboard for the ZX8 1 / 
However there are other shifted keys, that Timex 1000 has been well documented in the 

are very often used, which can be hooked up past; however, not much has been written 

using the diagram shown in figure I. As you about what to do about the key tops. This 

will see one CMOS 4016 I.C. can provide you article Is about my solution to the above 

with any 3 shifted keys you want by proper problem, 

connections. For the T I 99 keyboard only one 

4016 is used and I have connected my own Years ago, when I received my first ZX0I kit 

keyboard as per the diagram to give me from Sinclair, it arrived with a bad stick-on 

graphics and the move left and move right keyboard, which was promptly replaced and I 

arrows on keys 5 and 8: these three ended up with two. I kept the bad unit in a 

additional keys make program entry much sealed poastic bag and years later used it to 

easier and faster. cover my first full size keyboard from Tl 

surplus. 

Since the Tl keyboard has a 15 pin connector 

attached and only 13 pins are used for the That tells you the where; now here is the 

keyboard on the computer, the two how: 

additional pins can be wired to carry the 

needed +5V and ground to power the 4016 

from the computer. 

i used double-sided foam tape to WlR£ AND "t" to thftwo onused Ddnictj 

mount the 4016 at the top corner OF 15 DoNoT CONNfctoR ARRAY- ToP o F KEY&oARb. 
of the Tl P.C. board, behind the 0 
key. Before mounting, bend all 
14 leads straight out from the 
body of the 4016 so it looks like 
a fiatpack I.C. This will make 
the mounted assembly less than 
1/4“ high, and should not inter- 
fere with your own method of 
mounting your keyboard. Connec- 
tions and the six diodes and four 
I OK resistors are now wired as 
per the diagram. Finally wire up 
the two unused pins on your 
keyboard (first isolating them by 
cutting any traces to the pin 
donuts at the 15 donut connector 
array at the top of the Tl board). 

Run two wires of appropriate 
length to the computer +5V and 
ground traces (you will have to 
trace them out first) and the 
revision will be complete. 

Should you find that your 
keyboard works erratically on 
some shifted keys (mostly on the 
A-S-D-F-G line), then the fix is 
to connect a 27K 1/4W resistor 
from the +5V pin 14 to the KB-0 
pin II of the 40 1 6. It might be a 
good idea to include this resistor 
as part of the revision, since it 
will do no harm and may avoid 
shift problems. 



16 





Assuming you have a bad keybaord due to the 
mylar connection strips and your computer 
Is apart for repair. 

First you must assemble what you will need 
for the job. Get a piece of slippery backing 
paper from self stick labels, etc. large 
enough to cover the membrane keyboard. You 
also need a metal straight edge ruler, a new 
blade in your exacto knife, a clean, sharp 
scissors, a sharp miniature flush cut pliers, 
small thin screwdriver, small pliers with 
serrated jaws and some cleaning solvert 
that leaves no residue. 

Take the screwdriver and pry up the two 
lower edges of the membrane keyboard. 
With the serrated pliers grasp those edges 
and slowly pull the membrane from the case. 
Do not allow the pliers to touch any areas 
with keys and do not touch the stlcfcy back 
of the keyboard. When it is free of the case 
place it carefully, sticky side down, onto 
the slippery side of tne backing paper. 
Press it firmly to the backing paper all 
around so that dust can not get to the sticky 
surface. Now you can cut off the mylar 
connecting strips at the top. 

Get a piece of cardboard (not corrugated) 
and lay It on a flat, stable surface; then 
place the membrane keyboard with its 
backing, printed keys face up and using the 
metal edge ruler, held very firmly in place, 
cut the bottom edge off the membrane about 
1/64" below the white function legends at 
the bottom of the lowest line of keys. In a 
straight, clean cut. 

Now you must cut off the top edge of the 
membrane. Here you have no printing to use 
as a guide. Mark off 3/32’ above the white 
portions of the top row of keys and use 
those marks as a guide to cut tne top edge 
off. You should end up with 3/32' of black 
membrane above the top row of keys and the 
same black area should be left on the bottom 
row of keys where no legends exist below 
the white part of the keys. 

Next you must make three cuts, very , very, 
carefully; cut between each row of 10 keys, 
making sure not to cut Into the small white 
printing above and below each key. You 
should end up with four strips of 10 keys, 
three of which will have small printing 
above and below in white and the top strip, 
which should have a black border along the 
top and bottom of the strip. 

Now, with sharp scissors, separate the keys 
in each strip by cutting them apart exactly 
in the center of the black space between 
each key. Do this for all four strips and you 
will end up with 40 key tips with backing 
paper on each key. Set them up in rows as 
they were on the Timex and take your Tl 
keyboard and clean off all the Tl key tops 
with the solvent cleaner. When they are 
clean and dry, take out each membrane key 
top, peel off the backing and press It in 
place onto the Tl keys. Line them up 
carefully before pressing them firmly into 
the curved contour of each key. Start with 


the lowest line of keys at shift, work 
across, then start the second line at the 
left. Caution: do not touch any of the Tl keys 
with your fingers after cleaning them. 

Depending on how you configured your Tl 
keyboard, certain right side keys will be 
moved around. Space and enter will have 
been moved to the large space bar and the 
one large space bar will make those changes 
to fit your format. 

Once you have all your membrane tops 
aligned and firmly pressed ot the Tl keys 
you must remove each key from the keyboard 
by prying them off gently with a 
screwdriver; begin with tne top row and 
work your way down. No need to remove the 
lowest row or four keys. 

With your sharp flush cutting pliers, flush 
cutting edge against the keys, trim off any 
excess membrane along both sides of each 
key and round off all four key corners. You 
should end up with an easily readable 
keytop, with all the Timex legends Intact, 
that will not abrade or deteriorate with 
constant use. 

After trimming push the keys back on the 
key switches and admire your new keyboard. 

For my own extra keys 1 used self stick 
white labels with 1/8 Datak red lettering 
coated with Datakoat protective coating. 
Much use tends to wear off the coating and I 
now cover those keys with transparent 
yellow mylar tape which has a tough and 
durable surface and makes the shifted keys 
prominent. 

My two Tl keyboards have functioned 
beautifully and have stood the test of time 
well. None of the membrane tops have fallen 
off or lost any legibility after years of 
constant use. TSH 


* * Aerco FD-68 Software * * 
Disk File Manager'- Lists detailed directory and 
occupied tracks. Checks disk. Copies single or all 
flies on 'disk, even it you have only ONE disk drive. 
Optional printer output. S.25 DO disk or tape. $16.00 
Omni Disk- Conversion prograa for Omnicalc (v. 640001. 
Customize al I colors and keyboard buz2. Supports both 
tape and disk save/ioad. 5. 25 OD disk or tape. $9.00 


MSDIsk: Conversion program for MScripl 
paper/ink and various default values, 
tape and disk save/load. 5.25 OD disk 



tape. $9.00 


TSIOOO and 2068 Program 
Vocabui Ider: Vocabulary learning program. Requir 
16K* RAM. Tape only. VB-1000, $12,00 VB-206B, 


Uord Teister- Design your ovn word-search puzzle. 

16K* RAM. Tape only. VT-1000, $10.00 VT-2068, $13.00 


Prices include shipping. Specify tape or disk. 

Please send SASE for Information or check/eoney order 
to: Chia-Chi Chao, 73 Sullivan Dr., Moraga, Ca. 94556 


17 



ZX 8 1 NEWS 
AND RESOURCES 

BY PKTER McMULLIN 

This column is, once again, devoted to a 
lengthy product review. I'm planning a 
catch-up on resource/supplier listings next 
issue, but a couple of items deserve 
immediate mention: 

HARDCORE HARDWARE HOBBYIST HANDBOOK 

ZX8I hardware expert Bruce Taylor, of 
Budget Robotics & Computing, Box 18616, 
Tuscon, AZ 85731, has announced the 
release of his book, BUILD A MICRO- 
COMPUTER CONTROLLED ROBOT AND OTHER 
COMPUTER CONTROL PROJECTS. (QUITE A 
MOUTHFUL). 

TAB Books had owned the rights for over a 
year, then decided not to publish. After this 
runaround, Mr. Taylor's company bought back 
the rights and is now publishing the book. 
This Dook presents the design of an 
award-winning robot in thoroughly 
documented project form, and promises to 
be a valuable reference on interfacing just 
about anything. Printed circuit boards will 
be available from Budget Robotics for every 
project in the book. Chapter topics include 
Adjustable Power Supply, 8255 PIO Board, 
Digitalker Voice Synthy, Stepper Motor 
Drivers, Optical Encoders, Polaroid 
Ultrasonic Ranging kit, and others. Over 200 
8.5"x! I" pages, 80+ illustrations, 60+ 
tables, loosebound. Price: US $13 ppd. 

For a sample of previously published work, 
see "Robotics on a Budget, p. 18, SYNC Vol. 
3 No. 4; Also "Home Control on a Budget," p. 
31, SYNC Vol. 4 No. I ; both by Bruce C. 
Taylor. 

Budget Robotics holds rights to an improved 
version of the Computer Continuum buffered 
expansion board, as well as the Zodex RX8), 
an inexpensive general purpose parallel I/O 
board. Write for details - Bruce replies 
promptly. 

HOLY MODEM, BATMAN 

Westridge 2050 Modems, tested, with phone 
cables but no case or power supply are 
available form Dave Clifford, 13910 
Halldale Av., Gardena CA 90249, 213-516- 
6648. The price? $25.00 for one, three or 
more for $22.50 each, ten or more for 
$20.00 each. Including delivery. At time of 
writing Dave indicated that ne had about 
1500 left. However, he also has an undis- 
closed number of untested boards which are 
missing a couple of minor parts (an LED and 
resistor). Plans are to sell these as-is at an 
even cheaper price, including a complete 
schematic and parts ID for the hacker 

Needless to say I ordered my modem the 
same day I heard about Mr. Clifford, as well 


as a copy of MlNI-XMOD 1.7, at $20.00 from 
WEYMIL corp., Box 5904, Bellingham WA 
98227-5904. 3 

MINI-XMOD is terminal software which is 
said to be the best available for the 
ZX8I/TSI000 (or the 2068). Dave Clifford 
indicated that he would be working on a 
version of MtNI-XMOD for the 2068, first a 
32-column version, then a 64-column 
version. It would be an interesting challenge 
to work up a 64 column version for the JLO 
Video TS 1000! 

HARDWARE REVIEW 

Subject: Aerco FD-ZX Floppy Disk System 
Source: Aerco, 7606 Robalo Rd, 

Austin TX 78757 

FD-ZX Floppy Disk Controller Board and DOS : 
$179.00 

Auto Boot ROM Board: $ 59.00 

Auto Boot ROM Board with Centronics l/F: 

$99.00 

Complete packages are also available. 

NOTE: See "Bug Alert", last issue for a 
discussion of the Boot ROM/ Centronics 
board. 

BASIC TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS 

Drive type: Shugart compatible 3", S' or 

8" drives, I or 2 side.SD or DD, 

35 or 40 tracks per side. 

* of drives: up to 4. 

DS/DD Capacity: 400K bytes. 

Disk Format: IBM readable, 10 sectors per track, 

5 12 bytes per sector. 

*Flles per disk: up to 20 (as 4-track pages) 
up to 6 (as 1 2-track pages) 

Memory use: 2K DOS in EPROM , and FDC all 2- 1 4K 

FDC I/O is memory- mapped. 

F ormat DSDD: approx. 35 seconds. 

CopyDSDD-DSDD: approx. 1 minute, 5 seconds. 

Avg. LOAD/SAYE: 3 sec. (20K page) 

5 sec. (60K page) 

Error Reports: WRITE PROTECTED; INSUFF. RAM; 

DISK ERROR. 

Physical size: Circuit board is approx. 4.5 x 6", gold 

finger extensions. 

Special ICs: 1797 FDC (Siemens): 9216 Data 

separator. 

What do you see when you open the box 
containing your newly arrived AERCO FD-ZX? 
One uncased controller board, a computer 
bus ribbon cable, one floppy disk, and a 16 
page manual. What else do you need? Disk 
drive(s), drive cables, cases and power 
supply. Aerco's manual gives reasonably 
easy- to-follow instructions for hooking up 
your system, and has several useful 
illustrations. The power supply must provide 
+ I2V at 2-3 amps and +5 at 3 amps. The 
drive cable required is a standard IBM/ 
Shugart 34 conductor pc-edge type. If you 
follow Aerco's instructions to the letter, I 
you will likely void any warrentee on your 
new drives. The FDC board gets its +5V and 
+ I2V supplies via pins 2 and 34 on the disk 
drive edge connector. Pin 34 is normally 
unused, but pin 2 is connected on some 
drives. Aerco recommends you cut any 
traces going to pins 2 or 34 on the drive and 


18 



jumper these over to the power supply pins. 
This way you connect the power supply only 
to one drive, and the FDC board and other 
drives get powered through the ribbon cable. 
The result is tidy but I hate to hack up a new 
drivel The alternative would be to cut wires 
2 and 34 adjacent to the contoller card, and 
run separate power lea^s to everything. I did 
It Aerco's way. 

Having hooked up drives and power supply, 
the FD-ZX plugs into the supplied ribbon 
cable; then the RAM pack, etc. onto the 
ribbon cable's male edge extender, and we're 
ready to see what's on Aerco's ‘master" disk. 

On application of power, the K cursor 
appears. Following Aerco's instructions, the 
master disk is placed in drive A. The 
command RAND USR 13303 initialises the 
DOS, and loads "page I" from the disk. The 
following menu appears on the screen in 
about 3 seconds: 


RAND USR (12720 ♦ PAGE) to SAVE a spec- 
ified page or RAND USR (12290 ♦ PAGE) to 
LOAD from a specified page. After loading 
the program from tape, the DOS must be 
Initialised by the command RAND USR 
12865. This command initialises the FDC 
and loads certain DOS parameters into bytes 
16507/16508. Thus the lines: 

9900 SAVE "PROGRAm" 

99I0CLS 
9920 RUN 

...would be replaced by the lines: 

9900 RAND USR 12865 
9905 RAND USR 12722 
9910 CLS 
9920 RUN 

In this example, a GOTO 9900 would save the 
program to page 2 on the disk, and autorun. 
When the program is reloaded, It will come 
up in the same mode (SLOW/FAST) as when 
it as saved. To save the program on, say, page 
6 instead of page 2, line 9905 would read 
"RAND USR 12726.- 


WELCOME TO SADOS+ I6K 8/83 

C COPY DISK (REQUIRES 2 DRIVES) 

D DISK UTILITIES 
E ENTER NAMES IN DIRECTORY 
F FORMAT DISK IN DRIVE A 
H HEX MONITOR 
L LOAD MEMORY FROM DISK 
0 QUIT 

S SAVE MEMORY ON DISK 

Nothing too surprising here. Some further 
explortion of the manual reveals some 
interesting facts. All DOS functions are 
accessed via RAND USR commands. The “DOS" 
program supplied on page I of the master 
disk serves two purposes: I) It is a 
"user-friendly interface" (oh cliche, cliche!) 
to the DOS USR routines, and 2) It contains 
the Disk Directory. 

Two different DOS control programs are 
supplied: a “I6K" version and a "64K" 
version. (All capacities specified here are 
for a 40 track, DSDD drive.) 

The 16K DOS permits 20 programs or data 
files to be saved on a disk. The disk is 
divided into 20 4-track pages. Any program 
saved occupies one page, regardless of 
whether it is a IK program or a full I6K 
program. Each "I6K" disk page will actually 
hold up to 20K full of data. Thus it is 
extremely unlikely that you will ever use 
the full potential storage capacity of the 
disk. The 64K DOS assigns 6 pages per disk, 
each page having a capacity of 60K bytes. It 
is otherwise rdentical to the I6K DOS 
program. 


Having saved a program, it must be entered 
in the directory. So, entering RAND USR 
1 3303 brings up the SADOS menu. Pressing E 
gets a prompt asking which page you want to 
name, followed by tne entry of tne program 
name. Having done this, you must re-save 
the updated directory to page I. This Is 
offered as a Y/N option when you finish 
making directory entries, or it can be done 
by pressing the S at the main menu. Now if 
you hit L at the menu, the directory 
appears, listing pages I through 20 and their 
contents. Any program may be loaded by 



The Aerco D05 does not record a filename 
with each program, nor does it 

automatically maintain a directory. 

Programs are loaded and saved by page 
number. It is the user's responsibility to 
keep the directory on page I updated. 



_ . ,, , * The price Is just *10.95 + *2.05 shipping CS13.00 * 

Converting a breakable program to a disk * total), send yoU r check or n on ey order t D; budget * 

version is quite easy. Aerco uses sequential * robotics & computing, box ie6i6 , tucsoh. kz 85731 * 

USR calls for SAVE and LOAD commands: ^*,***,„**„,„,*„„,******«»**»***»»*»********»*i 


19 




TS 1 0OP Pro grams from HCS SERVICES. P.O.Box 1754. Portsmouth. OH 45662 
Price (add $ 1 .'-^-P&H per order). Money back guarantee. 

Quantities limited. Please specify second and third choices as alternates. 


Games 

Mixed Game Bag 
Supermaze-"pacman" 

Hangman- just like the childrens' game 
TS Destroyer / Space Raider* 

Space Commando*-adventure game 
Strategy Football 
Fortress of Zorlac 
Meteorites*-! ike the arcade game 


Finance 

Stock Market Technical Analyzer 

Stock Option Analyzer 

Real Estate Investment Analyzer 

Stock Market Calculator* 

Statistics 

Money Analyzer I 

Money Analyzer II 

Critical Path Analysis 

Manufacturing Control 

Inventory Control 


Education 

College Cost Analyzer 
Teachers Grade Book 
Punctuation Master 

Quiz Kit**- create your own computerized multiple choice quizzes 
Alpha Vowel Tutor*-for younger school-aged children 


Miscellaneous NOTE: Most programs require 1 6K RAM 

Home Asset Manager Stamp Col lector 

Coupon Manager Biorhythms* All programs by Timex-Sinclair except. 

Guitar for Beginners Carpooler *bySoftsync, inc.**by Time Works, Inc. 


Timex / Sinclair Owners.. 

TAKE A LOOK! 


TiMeH 

»eSijhS 


Hr 

COMPUTED CREATIVITY 

ONLY 
$15 year 
SIX ISSUES 



’ Readers nationwide 
(and Canada too!) 

‘ 36 Illustrated Pages 

• Published "On Time" 

’ Interesting Articles / Programs 

• Current Information 

• Exclusive "T/S Shopper " 
Guide 

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 


i SAVE S3 00 Oil Newstand Price Send Coupon (or a copy) i 

I wild Check or Money Order lor $15 (U.S. Funds Only) lo | 

address posted below We will slarl your subscription right 
I away upon receipt of your order 

I'M! (X SIGNS MAGAiINf COMPANY 
wrilNurioo •Couon.O-.gonWOi? 


Address: 

Oly I Stale Zip . 


20 


s 

U 

M 





The Sinclair/Timex 


User’s Magazine 

Hardware Projects • Hardware Reviews 
Software Reviews • Product Comparisons 
Published Monthly • Back Issues Available 
Free Personal Ads (or Subscribers 

SUM Magazine is aimed at Sinclair and Timex users who 
want to learn what is available for their computers, how to 
do things no one else is doing, and what is just over the 
horizon. Examples of recent articles include: Reviewing 
the Portuguese Disk Drive System; Rotronics Wafadrive 
Review; Hi-Res Graphics (or TS-1000; Build Your Own 
Printer Interface; & a series on Beginner’s Programming. 

SUM Magazine invites articles, reviews, and projects for 
possible publication. We pay lor articles publlshedl 
Hardware and software producers are invited to submit 
their products for review. 

Annual Subscription/12 Issues (U.S.) $15 

Sample Copy— $1.00 

SUM Magazine 

3224 NW 30 Avenue — Gainesville, Florida 32605 
904/378-9000 or 462-1086 




entering its page number, or you may copy 
the directory to your printer. 

D, for DISK UTILITIES, provides selection of 
PROGRAM or DATA mode, of Disk Drive A, B, 
C, or D; Single or Double Density, and also a 
Clear Directory command. In Data mode all 
variables are saved and loaded, without the 
Basic program.When re-loading data, no test 
is made for variables space. Variables must 
already have been dimensioned or declared 
so there is enough room between VARS and 
E-LINE for the disk file to load into. With an 
understanding of these limitations, the Data 
mode can be very useful. I've successfully 
programmed a version of WSII.5 which loads 
and saves data files ONLY; up to 20 16,000 
byte text files, each saved with a filename 
string. The program will sequentially search 
a disk for any named file, and print an 
automatically maintained directory. I'm sure 
that versions of ZX PRO-FILE(or other file 
handling programs) could be modified to 
sequentially search a whole disk, if 
necessary to find a entry. 

CPUs and BUS LOADING: I had lust gotten a 
few programs saved to disk, and was 
marveling at the speed of program access, 
when I realized l had problems- random load 
errors galore. Bytes were simply dropping 
out of programs. Suspecting bus 
speed/loading problems, I singled out 2 
possible culprits: my CPU, and the ribbon 
cable provided by Aerco. The NEC D760C 
CPU in my computer is a notoriously 
substandard Z80 chip, so I replaced it with a 
new Zilog Z80B. The Z80B is designed for 
operation at up to 6MHz., thus has lower 
intrinsic capacitance, and "stiffer" bus 
drivers than the slower versions. At the 
same time, I nixed the ribbon cable, and 
plugged everything into my new JLO 6-slot 
motherboard. A ribbon cable can have 5-10 
times the capacitive crosstalk as a 
motherbvoard the same length, so I figured 
this would help. Not so simple, though. The 
male edge connector on the FD-ZX is a 
mirror-image of that needed by the JLO 
motherboardl Thus, I had to fashion a 
"side-swapper" adapter to plug everything 
together. Having sone all this, the problems 
completely disappeared, and the disk system 
has been 100% reliable ever since. I don't 
know whether the CPU or the motherboard 
was the significant factor, but the 
combination licked the problem. 

IN CONCLUSION, the AERCO FD-ZX system has 
made a “disk convert" out of this ZX81 
hobbyist. The hardware is of good quality 
and is well assembled. The DOS control 
program is certainly utilitarian, although 
some resourceful programming can make it 
do many impressive things. The existing 
DOS control software simply doesn't take 
advantage of the FD-ZX hardware's potential. 
Aerco's documentation is quite thorough, and 
provides a few clues to accessing more 
sophisticated DOS commands thru machine 
code. The incredible speed of reliable 
access to a large number of programs or 
files makes it easy to overlook the short- 


comings of the DOS.’ 

FROM ACROSS THE POND 

Thanks to colleague Larry Chavarie of 
Ottawa, (who subscribes to even more 
publications than I do), I will be listing a 
number of British concerns which continue 
to support the ZX8I aftermarket. MAPLIN 
ELECTRONIC SUPPLIES LTD., P.O. Box 3, Ray- 
leigh, Essex, England SS6 8LR, tel. (0702) 
554155, is the U.K. dealer for Heathkit. but 
that's only part of the picture. Maplin offers 
no fewer than 9 hardware project kits for 
the ZX8I, including a full-sized keyboard, 
sound and speech generators, a TV sound/ 
inverse video kit, modem interface, extendi- 
RAM, and hi -res graphics module. Prices are 
very reasonable. Most of these are male-only 
cards which are also compatible witn 
motherboards available in the U.5. from John 
Oliger and Budget Robotics and Computing. 
Maplin still offers over 15 books about the 
ZX8I (with something for everyone), and 
publish their own electronics project 
magazine, 12 issues are currently available, 
and almost every one has a ZXBI projectl 
(How about a ZX8I navigation/autopilot 
system for your yacht?l) 

Larry tells me Maplin gives prompt, reliable 
service. 450 page catalog is LI. 35. If you 
wish to exercise the plastic, Maplin accepts 
Visa and Mastercard (called BarclayCard and 
Access in the U.K.). Check this company out. 

TSH 


curry 

computer 


P.O. Box 5607 

Glendale, Arizona 85312-5607, U.5.A. 

Telephone: 1-602-978-2902 
Telex (Via WUI): 6501267701 

"We have had a QL for about one week now 
and are just beginning to appreciate the power 
and versatility it contains. Keep in mind thatfor 
the price . . . There is nothing that compares 
with it." 

The QL Report 

published by Curry Computer 
February 1, 1985 

We know the QL . . . we've been appreciating it 
longer. 

Write for our free catalog. 


21 



Part-WayDown the Road With 
Partial Pascal 
by Tex Faucette 

Partial Pascal from Semper Software (585 
Glenn Ellyn Place, Glenn Ellyn, Illinois 60137) 
was the subject of an earlier review. This Is a 
follow-up which Includes a book review plus 
other "adventures' with Partial Pascal. 

First, the book: 

“FROM BASIC TO PASCAL" by Ronald W. 
Anderson. Copyright 1982 by Tab Books, Inc., 
Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214. ISBN 0-&306- 
1 466-4 Cpbk). 

Ronald W. Anderson Is “my kind" of writer, and 
FROM BASIC TO PASCAL- Is "my kind" of book! 
Read on. 

In the authors own words the book, "..has been 


PROGRAM PRIMESIU l INPUT, OUTPUT) ; 
URR 
MAX, 

PRIMPTR, 

J ,N, 

INTER Uh- 
COUNT , 

HALFMAX, 

5EARCHLIM INTEGER, 

PRIME -ARRAY ( .1. ,0000.) 

OF BOOLEAN, 

FUNCTION SORT (NUMBER : INTEGER > 
INTEGER , 

CONST 
IN IT =4. ; 

MAR 

RESULT 

GUESS; INTEGER, 

BEGIN 

RESULT *XNIT 
GUESS . 

UHILE ABS (.GUESS-RESULT) >1 DO 
BEGIN 

GUESS. = (RE5ULT+GUE5S' DIU 2 
RESULT =NUMSER DIU GUESS. 

END; 

SORT- =GUE55, 

END ; • 

BEGIN 
URITELN , 

WRITE ( "MAXIMUM NUMBER?”; ; 

READ (MAX'); 

URITELN ( "PRIMES TO" , MAX : 6) , 
URITELN; 

HALFMA.X: =MAX DIU 2, 

5EARCMLIM =30RT (MAX) +1, 
INTERUAL : =3 ; 

PRIMPTR: =2; 

“'OR N : =1 TO HALFMAX DO 
PRIME f ,N . ) , =TRU£; 

WHILE INTERUAL < SEARCHLIM DO 
BEGIN 

J = INTERUAL + i IMTERUAL+1! DIU 2 

WHILE U < sHALFMAX DO 

BEGIN 

PRIME ( , J . ) =FALSE; 

J; =j+interual; 

END: 

PRIMPTR: =PRIMPTR+l; 

WHILE PRIME ( .PRIMPTR. j =FALSE DO 
PRIMPTR. =PRIMPTR+l; 

INTEP.UAL : =PRIMPTR*2-1 ; 

END: 

COUNT: =2, 

WRITE l" 1 2"), 

FOR N =2 TO HALFHRX DO 
BEGIN 

IF PRIME UN.) THEM 
BEGIN 

WRITE (N *2—1 7) , 

COUNT aCOUNT+l; 

IF COUNT MOD 10 =0 THEN 

URITELN 

END . 

END 

URITELN, 

URITELN, 

URITELN (COUNT S . "PRIMES 1 ■ 


prepared primarily for those with a knowledge 
of Basic and little or no formal training in 
Computer Science. " That fits. Later on he 
states, "[you] may be annoyed by the compiler 
being so picky *. On the subject of compilers he 
also notes that, "..by the time you have gotten 
your Pascal Program to compile without any 
detected errors. It Is pretty close to running 
(though not necessarily correctly)." 

AMEN, Brother, tell It like It Is! 

Heeding those and other warnings, I proceded to 
aPP Y ,Mr. Andersons text and programs to 
Partial Pascal... or was it vice-versa? 
Whatever, the results of my excursions were 
Interesting, Informative, frustrating educa- 
tional, and Just plain fun. Successful? Well, 
maybe. 

Since the book had made some mention of the 
variety of compilers available, and variety of 
results they sometimes yielded. It as not really 
a surprise to me when Partial Pascal detected 
errors where none were visible. Or that 
supposedly error-free object code occasionally 
behaved In a strange manner. The biq surprise, 

MAXIMUM NUMBER7PRIMES TO 50 


16PRIME3 

MAXIMUM NUMSER?PRIME3 TO 1000 


229 233 239 241 

251 25? 2B3 269 271 

277 

231 233 293 307 

31.1 313 317 331 337 

’349 353 359 36? 

373 3T9 333 339 39- 

401 

409 419 421 431 

433 439 443 449 457 

461 

463 467 479 437 

491 499 503 509 521 

523 

541 547- 55? 563 

569 571 577 '537 593 

”601 607 613 617 

619 631 841 643 64? 

' 653 

659 661 673 677 

633 691 701 709 719' 


727 

'33 


751 


761 769 773 

797 

309 Sll 321 , 323 

62? 329 339 353 357 

359 

863 377 331 333 

337 907 911 919 929 

937 

941 947 953 967 

971 977 933 991 997 

169PRIME5 


22 


B 

^e 

?r 

le 

sn 


"y 


"9 


to 

to 

1? 

re 


and a pleasant one, was when one of the sample 
programs actually worked. J think. 

Bear In mind that I am a bottom-of-the-ladder 
novice In Pascal Bear also In mind that I have 
avoided higher mathematics, like a plague for 
more years than I care to remember. Now, 
Imagine my elation when I obtained both a 
compilation and an execution of a prime seive 
program! Sure, I got It out of the back of the 
book, so what? I still had to translate It to 
Partial Pascal! Listing and Prlnt-out are 
submitted with this review. 

The ‘source code" compiled rapidly, once I got 


It right. Sorry. I was too excited to time it 
exactly. Execution of the 'object code' was 
timed fairly accurately. Primes to 1000 was 
done (on screen) In 30 seconds. Same operation 
to Timex 2040 printer took 4 seconds. Going for 
primes to 2000, 1 had It on screen (304 primes) 
In 55 seconds and I learned that I need a better 
understanding of proper formatting when l 
ported the same to the printer. OH well, back to 
the drawing board. 

All Jokes aside, PARTIAL PASCAL remains 
Interesting, and FROM BASIC TO PASCAL is the 
best tutorial I have found to date. Thanks guys, 
I have enjoyed the experience. T5H 


REVIEWS 

of for the Non-Programmer 

iy (TS 1 000) 

?d 

at 

ly by Art Glndln 

Expensive computers have a built-in 
procedure to check the system when 
starting, whereas we have only a "K*. To 
remedy this situation 1 am supplying the 
following program. Don't panic, I did not 
write a program. The 16 K test Is from the 
directions that come with the Sinclair RAM 
and the Joke used to fill out the program is 
suitably referenced. 

Notes on the program: 


Line 130 and 140: These call up the 

ZXLR8 program to load the next part of 
the tape. 

Some alterations would have to be made for 
a 64K RAM but I have never been able to get 
one to work on my system. 

Something of more use Is a zapper. This Is a 
device to remove electrical spikes from 
your telephone line. 1 didn't think they were 
necessary either until we were struck by 
lightning and It took me a year to get my 
system back together, zappers are avaiiame 
from Spaceport Products, Box 927, Sharpes, 
FL 32959 and were about $ 1 1 each a year or 
so ago. Unless I were renting my telephone I 
would have one there too. 


Line l: SLOW Is needed at the beginning 
of all programs loaded with ZXLR8. 


Line 25: CLS removes the ZXLR8 mess- 
age. 


Line 1 1 0:1 r the 16K Isn't all there, 1 
suspect the program will crash anyway. 

1 SLOW 

10 REM OOOOFFICEOOO 

20 REM <><><> I NTRQOOO 

21 REM A. KOHLENBERG-SYNTRX 5/32 
25 CLS 

30 COSUB 160 

90 REM OOOMEMORY TEST O'.: : > 

100 REM 00016K TESTOOO 
161 POKE 19090,33 

102 POKE 19001,11 

103 POKE 19082,0 

104 POKE 19003,5? 

105 POKE 19004,63 
166 POKE 19005,7? 

19? POKE 19006,201 

,108 LET L=< U3R Cl 9000 >-16373 VI 024 
169 PRINT Li "K" 

(110 IF L< 15. 9 THEM STOP 
■120 PRUSE 150 
1125 CLS 

.130 PRINT RT 4, li "ENTER ""OFFICE"" P 


140 PRINT USR 14336 
150 GOTO 0 

160 PRINT RT 10,5;"*** HI I RM 2X31 'ft" 

165 PRUSE ISO 

170 PRINT RT 12,3, "I RM R PERSONAL COMPUTER" 
130 PAUSE 150 

190 PRINT RT 14, 3; " I CRN DO MANY THINGS AND" 
195 PRINT RT 15,7; "THE BEST IS TTY" 

200 PAUSE 150 
210 CLS 

220 PRINT ,,"I NEVE MAKE MISTAKES" 

230 PAUSE 100 

240 PRINT RT 2, 7; "WHOOPS" 

245 PAUSE 100 

250 FOR Y=25 TO 7 STEF: -l 

260 PRINT RT 2,Y,"r" 

270 PRINT RT 2, Vi" " 

230 NEXT Y 

290 PRINT RT 1,6; "r" 

303 FOR R=13- TO 1 STEP -1 
310 PRINT RT R,6; "R" 

328 PRINT RT fi,6, " " 

338 NEXT R 

340 PRINT RT 1,6; "R" 

345 PAUSE 100 

356 PRINT RT 10,3; "WELL, ALMOST NEVER" 

360 PAUSE 150 
378 CLS 
33Q RETURN 

r THE PROMPT" 23 




2068 REVIEW: GREETING CARD DESIGNER 
Reviewed By Bill Ferrebee 
MOUNTAINEER SOFTWARE 


PROGRAM: GREETING CARD DESIGNER 
COMPUTER: TS2068 (80-col. printer required) 
PRICE: $19.95 

AVAILABLE FROM: E. ARTHUR BROWN COMPANY 
3404 Pawnee Drive 
Alexandria. MN 56308 

One of the most popular software programs to 
emerge In the past few years is PRINT SHOP. 
PRINT SHOP is a graphics program that lets you 
design banners, letterheads, and greeting cards 
with your computer and print them out with a 
dot-matrix printer. Almost everyone has 
received at least one greeting card or 
Invitation produced with this program. 

But, PRINT SHOP is only available for the 
so-called "real" computers... IBM, Apple, and 
Commodore. Does this mean that we T5 2068 
owners have to do without again? 

No! Thanks to Zebra Systems (the same great 
folks that brought us Tech-Draw... ZPRINT80... 
and many other fine products), we now have... 
GREETING CARD DESIGNER! 


GREETING CARD DE5INGER works with any of the 
more popular TS2068 parallel printer 
interfaces (AERCO, Tasman, A &J), and any of 
the following dot-matrix printers... 

Epson RX/FX 
Gemini I0X/SG10 
Memotech DMX80 
Panasonic 1090/1091 
Prowriter 8510 



GREETING CARD DESINGER comes with a 16- 
page manual, and a cassette tape with 2 
programs on one side, and a library of 23 
graphics on the other. 

The two programs are the greeting card design 
program itself, and a graphic design program 
This program enables you to design and save 
your own graphics for later use. 

I found out how well the graphic design 
program works by necessity. The graphic 
library side of my review copy would not load (I 
tried 3 tape players!), so I had to design my own 
graphics. 

Putting the program (and my lack of artistic 
ability) to this test proves how well this 
program is put together. I was printing my 
first card in minutes. 


GREETING CARD DESIGNER gives you a variety of 
options to choose from. There is a menu of 8 
different borders (you can use any 2 in one 
card), 2 type fonts and 2 type sizes. Also, 
using the graphic design program , you have an 
unlimited choice of designs. You are only 
limited by your imagination! 

I believe in this program so much, I will be 
providinga new graphic for you to use in each 
issue of T-S HORfZONS. The first one is in this 
issue! 



24 





SOFTWARE REVIEW 
by Tex Faucette 
BAND-AID TRUST 
c/o Stoy Hayward 
8 Baker St. 

London, Wi. 


Reviews 
b V ^ 


Available from CURRY COMPUTER, 5344 West 
Banff Lane, Glendale, Arizona 85306 ($9.95) 


I would assume that all readers are aware of 
the famine in Ethiopia, and of various 
cooperative efforts to provide relief to the 
victims. 


The 50FTAID tape is one such cooperative 
effort, and provides a rather painless method 
for one to make a small contribution by way 
of its purchase. 

The SOFTAID tape contains an audio segment 
at the beginning of each side (unplug the ■'ear” 
connector if you want to hear it), followed by 
five different game progarms. Documetation 
with the SOFTAID tape includes an index count 
for each game and playing instructions. There 
is also a listing of numerous persons and 
companies involved in its production. 

SPECTRUM ROM IS REQUIRED! 


All of the 10 games included on the SOFTAID 
tape are excellent examples of British 
Spectrum programming. The graphics are 
imaginative, tne action thrilling! All games 
may be executed by keyboard input only but 
several contain menu selections for utilizing 
various joysticks and interfaces. Listen to 
me now, Vern, these are some of the 
top-rated games from across the Pond! Here's 
the lineup: 


SPELLBOUND (Beyond) 

5T ARB IKE (The Edge) 

KOKOTONI WILF (Elite) 

THE PYRAMID (Fantasy) 

HORACE GOES SKI ING (Melbourne 
House/Psion) 

GILLIGAN'5 GOLD (Ocean) 

ANT ATTACK (Quicksilva) 

3D TANK DUEL (Real-Time) 

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK (Thor) 
SORCERY (Virgin) 


Being somewhat less than a "Dedicated 
Gamester" ( a polite term for "arcade freak"), 
l hesitate to apply comparative ratings to 




games. I consider all of these ten to be 
excellent, but must confess to slight 
addiction to KOKOTONI WILF and JACK AND 
THE BEANSTALK. 


At only a buck per game, this is an amazing 
bargain. It could become a "Collectors Item 
All proceeds go to aid Ethiopian Relief. 

BUY IT! 

#############################$ 


# the: * 

* KRUNCHER $ 

* IS * 

$ ! ! HERE ! ! * 

# $ 

# HAVE YOU EVER RUN INTO $ 

# THAT BRICK WALL CALLED * 

# "OUT OF MEMORY”? * 

# $ 


# HAVE WE GOT THE ANSWER FOR * 

# YOU! A PROGRAM THAT WILL * 

# “BYTE” INTO YOUR BASIC % 

# PROGRAM, CHEW ON IT FOR A $ 

# FEW SECONDS, AND SPIT IT $ 

# BACK OUT WITH FROM 10 TO * 

# 407. OF THE MEMORY EMPTY! * 

# . $ 

# SOUND GOOD' SURE IT DOES!! $ 

# WE HAVE TESTED IT, AND IN * 

# ONE CASE, WE WENT FROM 239 * 

# BYTES FREE, TO 12400 FREE! $ 

# $ 

# 2068/SPECTRUM - #9.95+1 * 

# 1000 VERSION COMING SOON! * 
$ $ 

# JUST CALL OR WRITE: * 

$ $ 

# RMG $ 

# ENTERPRISES $ 

# 1419 1/2 7TH STREET $ 

# OREGON CITY, OR 97045 $ 

# <503) 655-7484 $ 

# S.A.S.E. * 

# FOR FREE CATALOG * 

# SEND THIS AD OR COPY WITH $ 

# ORDER-GET COUPON GOOD FOR $ 

S #5 OFF NEXT ORDER FOR #25 # 

# OR MORE! * 

**#**$$#$*****$#############** 




TS 2068 REVIEW 
The "HORACE" Saga 

there are 3 programs in Che Horace saga: 
HORACE AND THE SPIDERS, HORACE GOES SKIING, 
and HUNGRY HORACE. Having all three, I think 
they are quite entertaining. 

First let me tell you about Horace. He looks 
like a little ghost and he is easy to get 
hooked on because he is so cute. Even the 
cassette covers will make you chuckle. 

HORACE AND THE SPIDERS is a game in which you 
have to guide Horace through 3 scenarios. 
You can either use the joystick or the 
keyboard. You must keep Horace away from 
those spiders because he has only 5 lives! 

The first scenario is just one where you have 
to jump over the spiders at the right time. 
The second one is a little harder! 

In the second scenario, you must get Horace 
across a pit. But you must jump onto the 
rope that each spider holds onto. When you 
are on the rope, the spider will then start 
pulling it up so you must be quick. 

The third scenario is like Space Panic (or 
Apple Panic). You must make holes in the web 
so the spiders get stuck in them. Then you 
have to jump up and down on one until he 
falls through and dies. 


HORACE GOES SKIING is another good game. In 
this one, Horace must cross a road with heavy 
traffic in order to rent his skis. Then he 
must cross back again. Some of those drivers 
are maniacs!!! 

Once across, Horace can start skiing. He 
must ski between five flags (it's a slalom 
course) to get points. There are trees in 
the course which you must avoid. If you hit 
a tree three times with the same pair of 
skis, you break them and you must go back 
across the street for another pair. 

Horace has $40 in the game. It costs him $10 
to rent skis each time and $10 for the 
ambulance fee (if he is hit by a car). 

And finally, HUNGRY HORACE is another PAC-MAN 
type game. It is much harder though. In 
each maze there is an exit where Horace can 
exit into another maze (3 in all). It is a 
fun game. 

In all three Horace games you can use a 
joystick. My favorite is probably HORACE 
GOES SKIING. 

Doug Gangi 

Editor's Note: All three programs are 
available from "Games To Learn By", P.0. Box 
78, 28 Clairhill Road, Collinsville, CT 06022 
(203) 673-7089. TSH 


The "Horace Trilogy" : Hungry Horace, Horace and the 
Spiders, and Horace Goes Skiing. 


27 







28 






T-S NEWS 


ITEM: "Zebra Systems, Inc, announced that 
the price on their Zebra-Talker has been 
reduced and the software Is compatable 
with their disk drive. My notes say $35.00, 1 
hope I got It right. They are now ready to 
market t/PM for the disk drive system. They 
will have WORDSTAR and Microsoft BASIC 
available. They currently have M-SCRIPT and 
UTILITY PGM 5 available on disk for the 
built-in T-DOS system. Both Letterwrlter/ 
Bufferwrlter and M-Scrlpt are available on 
tape for use with OS-64. For anyone who has 
their Greeting Card designer program they 
have announced that they are going to be 
releasing data tapes with many cut-and- 
paste designs. If you submit (on tape) a 
design that they can use you will receive the 
tape that yours Is on. (From Mile High 
Chapter TSUG newsletter, 914 S. Victor 
Way, Aurora CO 800 1 2) 


Classified Ads 

INDIANA TS/ZX USERS; Let’s start a users 
group. Write to Frank Davis, 513 E. Main St., 
Peru, IN 46970. Open to beginners as well as 
pros. ZX80, ZX8I, TS 1000, TS 1500, Spectrum, 
and TS 2068 users. 

Aerco FD-68 w/b - 150. Aerco C/P IF w/s - 50. 
Timex 2068 (no RGB) - 50. Timex 1000-20. 
TS 2050 w/MTII - 50. All ♦ S/H. (M/0 only). D. 
Gustafson, Old Corry '1501, Pens., FL 32507. 

FOR SALE; Portuguese 2068. Never used. Make 
offer. H.C.S. POBox 1 754, Portsmouth, OH 45662. 


ITEM; A new book of over 200 hundred 
programs for Timex and Sinclair 
computers. That's rightl The author Is Joe 
C. Smith, jr., a current writer for 
Computer Trader Magazine, and soon to be 
a writer for TS Horizons. The cost of the 
book is just $7.95 (plus $1.50 P&H) and 
contains all kinds of programs from a Word 
Processor, to an NFL Prediction program. 
Other programs include "Sundial", 
"Couponing", 'Supergraph," and much more. 
Order from BIT/S Software, 3202 W. 
Fillmore, Phoenix AZ 85009. Plus free 
mechanical drafting pencil while supplies 
last. 

ITEM; Howard Sams Co., 4300 W. 62nd St., 
Indianapolis IN 46268, has just published a 
new reference book for TS 1000/ ZX8I 
maintenance and repair. It is part of their 
series of "Computerfacts” manuals that 
cover a wide range of microcomputers. The 
cost is $19.95. Call 1 -800-428-SAMS for 
more information. 

ITEM: The Timex 2068 Technical Manual is 
now available in its second edition. The 
book is said to contain many improvements 
over the original poorly produced version 
including spiral binding, professionslly 
printed text, and a full color cover. Over 
300 Pages. $25 postpaid from Time 
Designs, 29722 Hult Rd, Colton, OR 97017. 
Tell'em TS Horizons sent you. 


ATTENTION: 2068 owners. If you don't have a 
ZX/81 or TS 1000. Then you probably didn't 
read Pete McMullln’s news about the 
Westrldge 2050 Modems (without power 
supply or cases, but with phone cables) for 
only $25 each from Dave Cllford, 13910 
Halldale Av., Gardena CA 90249. 


And If you didn't read that, you probably 
didn't read about Weymll Corps MINl-XMOD 
modem software for the 2068 and the ZX81. 
Only $20. Maybe now's the time to get into 
telecommunications. See Peter's article, 
"ZX8I News and Resources." 


C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C5C 5C5C5C5C5C5C5C 50405 


ITEM: The Sinclair C-5 electric vehicle 
is now available for sale in the United 
States. Newpower, Inc., 64 Foundry St., 
Keene, NH 03431 Is the exclusive U.S. 
Importer. The price is $595 assembled 
or $395 in kit form (plus $95 shipping). 
The Sinclair C-5 is battery-powered, 
inexpensive to operate, and cruises at up 
to 15 mph. You can order by calling 



1-800-543-8000, operator 865. You can 
return it in ten days if not satisfied (you 
still pay shipping charge.) 


Length 

5'9” 

Width 

2'5" 

Height 

2'7” 

Weight (without battery) 

66 lbs. 

Luggage capacity 

leu ft 

Max. speed 

15 mph 


Tires pneumotic 


Range Up to 15 miles 



29 





ITEM: "Thomas Woods has developed a 32K 
Bank-Switched programmable Memory cart- 
ridge for the TS 2068. It Is battery- 
protected to retain Its programs when the 
computer Is switched off. A wrlte-protect 
switch lets you use memory like an EPROM. 
Therefore you can run your own plug In 
programs, or extend your memory by 32 K. 
with detailed Instructions for bank 
switching and data transfers. SI 10.00. 
Inquire to T. B. Woods, P.O. Box 64, Jefferson 
NH 03583. 603-586-V734." (From RAMTOP, 
Cleveland TS Newsleter, .) 

COMPUTER TERMS 

The following computer terms appeared in ZX 
Computing (Feb/Mar '85, page 40). The author 
Is Jim Lock of Surry, Great Britain. Larrv 
Chavarie sent a copy of the list to TS 
Horizons and we picked out our favorites. 

Array - what you shout when your program 
works first time. 

Artificial Intelligence - what you think your 
com- puter has and it thinks you have. 

BASIC - a standard language most suitable for 
newcomers to computing as it uses simple 
words and Instructions such as ABS, OPEN *, 
L PR I NT, USR, DEF FN and CHR$. 

Computer tape - used to attach a Sinclair 
RAMpack to a ZX8I. 

Cursor key - what you often do when you 
accidentally move your laser base In the 
wrong direction. 


DIM - how you feel when you see programs 
written by you seven year old daughter. 

FOR...NEXT - short extract from conjuror’s 
patter, "For my Next trick". 

IF.. THEN - conditional statement, as in “IF you 
try to copy this program THEN your computer 
will explode." 

LEN and VAL - the married couple who live 
around the corner. 

Listing - what your computer Is doing to one 
side, having lost one of It’s rubber feet. 

Microdrive - car-racing arcade game for your 
computer. 

NOT - used to tie two STRINGS together. 

RAMpack - device you plug in to the back of 
your computer so that It can unplug itself 
whilst you are typing in the last line or a very 
long program. 

REM - put at the beginning of a line to REMind 
ou to remember it and the computer ignore 


Screwdriver - instrument for invalidating 
guarantees. 

Sound chip - good golf shot 

STRING - used to attach a Sinclair RAMpack to 
a ZX8I. 

Uncopiable cassette - blank cassette. TSH 


SHARP'S INC. 

Rt 10 Box 459 
Meehan i c&vi lie, Va. 23111 
<804) 746-1 £64 9am to 5 pm 
<904 ) 730—9697 5pm to 11pm 

SOFTWARE FOR T/S 2068: 

WAR IN THE EAST EACH *19.95 

FALL OF THE 3rd REICH 2 FOR 34.90 
ARDENNES 3 FOR 49.85 

BRITAIN INVADED! 

FALL OF ROME 
REDCOATS 

These are military strategic wargames. 
Write or call tor more information. 

QL COMPUTER *289.00 Includes shipping 
Software ?/. Hardware available for QL, 
Write for catalog. 

VISA & MASTER CARD accepted 


AFR 


Beaver Computer Prod. 26 

Budget Robotics 

19 

Byte Back 

31 

Chla-Chl Chao 

17 

CTM 

IT 

Curry Computer 

2$ 

Gulf Micro 

12* 

Haltronlcs 

15 

HCS 

20,28 

Larken 

15! 

RMG Enterprises 

26: 

Sharp's 

30 

Slmulslon 

15 

Softgems 

9 

SUM 

20 

Time Designs 

20 

Weymll 

32 1 


30 






Controls 1-4 drives 

3 inch to 8 inch drives 
Shugart compatible 

Single or double sided 


$199 FD-68 Interface 


$99 Drive 40T/DS/DD 
5 inch/400 kilobyte 


40/80 tracks per side 


64K RAM (256K opt.) 
& 8K ROM on board 


VISA/MasterCard add 5X 


RGB monitor output 


Enhance the performance of your TS 2068 with the AERCO Disc System. All of the 
speed and convienience of a full-out floppy disc system. Save, load and copy programs 
at the industry standard of 250,000 bits/sec. Fully compatible with all Shugait type 
drives, including those already in use with the AERCO 1000 Disc System. The 64K of 
on-board RAM can be used as a second bank of system memory or for a full-blown 
CP/M System (version 2.2). The RGB output is crystal clear and rock steady. The 
power supply is a 5-amp high efficiency switcher. We offer a variety of other hardware 


NOW AVAILABLE: 256K UPGRADE $50(2-dm 

TS/2068 

Floppy Disc Interface $199 

Disc Drives from 79 

Power Supplies 99 . 

Centronics Printer I/O 69 . . . . 

Dual RS-232C Serial 1/0 99 

C IT0H 8510 Printer 375 

C IT0H 7500 Printer 275 

ROM Bd. with Auto Disc Boot n/a 

RGB Cable (specify monitor) 30 

CP/M (V. 2.2) 25 


0 $80 (4-drive max) 
TS/ 1 OOP- 1 500 

$179 

from 79 


Box 18093 Austin TX 78760 
Ph (512) 451-5874 


31 


WEYMIL CORPORATION 


. . .makes a serious commitment to the Timex user in the development of high-quality, innovative, 
and user-friendly software, complete with layman-oriented documentation, and all at affordable 
prices. We are proud to offer you: 

* THRUST • 

Finally, real graphics power for your TS 
10001 THRUST, the last word in 
cursor-controlled hi -res graphics for screen 
or printer output, is a software package 
composed of SincArtist HR and SincArtist 
1.3. Examine this sample for an idea of the 
powerful versitility of THRUST. 

SINCARTIST 1.3 - The original! Fantastic 

hi-res graphics delivered to the 2040 
printer. SincArtist 1.3 boasts excellent 
user-group reviews and is simply the best 
non-hardware system available. Note these 

features: 1 ■ 

- 192 X 256 high-resolution file displayed in a 48 X 64 screen window 

- Circles, triangles, rectangles, quadrilaterals, rays, inversing, and more 

- 40 rede finable patterns and a variety of draw and fill nodes 

- Cursor or joystick control 

- No system modifications required 

SINCARTIST HR - The last word in cursor-controlled high-resolution screen graphics. Copy artwork, 
to the 2040 printer and save to tape. SincArtist HR requires a TS 1000 with a socketed 2K RAH, 
less than $10.00 in parts, and a few minutes with a soldering iron. Super user-friendly 
documentation and instructions included. All modifications are fully transparent to other 
peripherals. HUNTER BOARD OWNERS: All you need is the FREE hardware upgrade that we provide!!!!! 

THRUST includes SincArtist HR and Sine-Artist 1.3 (these programs are not sold separately). Die 
Ultimate Hi -Res Tape is available exclusively from Weymil Corporation far only $20. 

* MINI XMOD * 

MINI XM3Q - Allows your Wes bridge or Byte-Back modem to up and download Timex programs to any 
XModem protocol BBS. 

- Fully documented with easy-to-follow instructions for the layman 

- 16K and 64K versions included 

- Ideal for storage in Hunter Board 

- Produced on high-quality casette for the ZX 81, TS 1000, and TS 1500 

MINI XMOD is available from Weymil Corporation for only $20. Please specify Westridge or 
Byte-Back version. 





WEYMIL CORPORATION 
BOX 5904 
BELLINGHAM WA 
98227-5904 


i 


(Write for a free catalogue of other TS 2068 and TS 1000 products) 

32