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LITTLE ORPHAN EIGHTY 




It is somewhat ironic that ( 
filled the entire 'Little Orphan 
Eighty' column from iast issue 
by addressing the subject of 
piracy in the TRS-80 worid and 
then, because of the ending 
remarks In another article, I 
now find myself in the middle of 
a controversy. The article is 
also from the Mar/Feb issue 
and Is called PDRIVE 
WITHOUT TEARS. I close the 

article by giving the history of the letterset used to draw 

PDM: 

"Before ending this article, I have to give credit to an 
unknown programmer from Holland for creating the font 
used to draw the letters PDM. Peter Plomp submitted a 
disk with a program called AGCAP. This program will be 
featured as soon as I can plow through the code. It is a 
clever utility that will automatically figure out what the 
PDRIVE setting should be for a particular drive. Anyway, 
the programmer used the font to draw the letters AGCAP. 
I was impressed with the style, so I shameslessly stole 
the letter P, modified C to make D, and finally made M 
from two modified A's. Thank you, unknown program- 



men 



n 



Boy, did I ever open up a can of worms. I received a 
letter from the CRAFT-80 group In Holland, informing me 
that the program was written by A.A.W.M. (Bert) Gielen 
and CP.M. (Kees) van dem Assem, and that It is not in the 
public domain. The letter was very civil - actually it was 
very nice - but it did indicate that Peter Plomp was being 
held responsible, being thought of as a possible pirate. As 
this is not true, let me publicly dear up the matter by 
recounting the chain of events. 

Since the inception of TRSTimes, Peter has been acting 
as a sort of intermediary between the magazine and the 
Dutch TRS-80 users, I iiave asl<ed him many times to try 
to get the programmers there to submit articles to us, as 
we, here in the U.S., are very interested in what goes on 
in Europe. Well, a few months ago, Peter responded by 
sending a disk with a great hi-res program written by 
Johan Volgers. As it needed ari article to with it» I turned 
a copy of the program over to Dr Allen Jacobs who 
promised to write the text to go with the program listing. 
That being done, I proceeded to look at the other files on 
the disk, and there I found AGCAP. 

Since I had just written PDM. I was naturally interested 
in another NEWDOS/80 program. I ran it and was imme- 
diately impressed with it; not only with the program itself, 
but also with the font used to draw the tittle letters. As there 
was no source file, just the /CMD file, I disassembled the 
program to see how the letterset was done. Going through 



the disassembly printout, it became apparent that there 
was neither a copyright notice, nor the name of an author. 
Nowhere in the code was there any indication that this 
program belonged to anyone, so I used the letter P (byte 
for byte) and modified other letters to form PDM in my 
program. My sincere apologies to Bert Gielen and Kees 
van dem Assem. They deserve full credit for a very artistic 
font. 

While i take full resposibility for this situation, let me 
make a recommendation to Bert, Kees and all other 
programmers: Be SURE that your name(s) and copyright 
is in the code itself. It only takes up a few more bytes, and 
it will avoid things like this. 

Now let me turn the attention to what i regret most 
Peter Plomp is being blamed for what is my mistake. At 
no time did he ever claim to have written any of the 
programs. He even cautioned me that one of the 
programs on the disk was not for publication in TRSTimes, 
but was only for me to see what Dutch programmers were 
capable of. Unfortunately, he did not call the program by 
name and, as I did not find ownership in the AGCAP code, 
I assumed that this was not the program he was talking 
about. I won't repeat the old saying about the word 
'assume', but it sure applies here. The error was, once 
again, all mine, and I apcrfoglze to Peter Plomp for putting 
him in a situation that was not of his own making. 

To close the matter, I wish to clear up something that 
both the CRAFT-80 group and Peter may have 
misunderstood from the PDM article. It was never the 
intensions of TRSTimes to take the program and sell It in 
disk format. What I meant by 'presenting* was the same 
as we will do with the hi-res program by Johan Volgers: 
present the source code as a type-in listing along with an 
article. Obviously, we will not do that without permission. 
Also, 'piowing through the code* was my term for reading 
the raw disassembly, and then commenting each line of 
the source code for the readers. 

Now, let me point your attention 16 the TRSTimes 
AUCTION, which you can find beginning on page 26. Over 
the last few years we have bought, inherited, or swapped 
all kinds of items from the TRS-80 people going on to other 
computers. Well, the storage bins are overflowing (and my 
wKe is nagging me to make some room), so It is time to 
offer all kinds of goodies to the readers. All software 
contain original disks and/or cassettes, and all manuals 
are originals. Most of the books are totally unavailable 
from any other source at this time, so be sure to send tn 
your bki. This auction might raise the question If I am 
quitting the TRS-80. The answer is NO. I either already own 
the items, or know that Til never get around to using them, 
so better get them to someone that will. I will be around 

for a while. Lance W. 



TRSTimes magazine 

Volume 4. No. 3. - May/Jun 1991 



PUBLISHER EDITOR 

Lance Wolstnip 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Roy T. Beck 

Dr. Allen Jacobs 

Dr. Michael W. Ecker 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 

Members of; 

San Gabriel Tandy Users Group 

Valley TRS-80 Users Group 

Valley Hackers' TRS-80 Users 

Group 

TRSTimes magazine is published 
bi-monthly by TRSTimes Publica- 
tions. 5721 Topanga Canyon Blvd, 
Suite 4. Woodland Hills, CA. 
91367. (818) 716-7154. 
F*ublication months are January, 
March, May, July, September and 
November. 

Entire contents [c] copyright 1991 
by TRSTimes publications. 
No part of this publication may be 
reprinted or reproduced by any 
means without the prior written 
permission from the publishers. 
All programs are published for 
personal use only. All rights 
reserved. 

1991 subscription rates (6 issues): 
UNITED STATES & CANADA: 
$18.00 (U.S, currency) 
EUROPE, CENTRAL & SOUTH, 
AMERICA: $23,00 for surface 
mail or $29.00 for air mail. 
(U.S. currency only) 
ASIA, AUSTRALIA & NEW 
ZEALAND: $25.00 for surface 
mail or $$32.00 for air mail. 
(U.S. currency only) 
Article submissions from readers 
are welcomed and encouraged. 
Anything pertaining to the TRS-80 
will be evaluated for possible pub- 
lication. Please send hardcopy and, 
if at all possible, a disk with the 
material saved in ASCII format. 
Any disk format is acceptable, but 
please note on label which is used. 



LITTLE ORPHAN EIGHTY 2 

Editorial 

THE MAIL ROOM 4 

Reader mail 

SPEEDING UP YOUR HARD DRIVE 7 

Roy T. Beck 

RECi EXACT RATIONAL ARITHMETIC 10 

Michael W, Ecker, Ph.D. 



DOUBLE PRECISION FUNCTION ROUTINES 
Jim E. King 



,12 



HINTS & TIPS , , o . 15 

Volgers, Wolstriipj Goss, King, Welcomb, 
Kowalyshyn, Brennan 

ALL ABOUT ALLWRITE pt. 4 . 19 

Dr. Allen Jacobs 

A FAST SYSTEM DRIVE 22 

Lance Wolstrpp 

MORE FROM 'OLD^ ENGLAND . .23 

Graeme Draper 

ZORLOF WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM 24 

Fred Blechman 

THE TRSTIMES AUCTION 26 




XYAxm.JLJLj 




SOFTWARE UPGRADES 
FROM RADIO SHACK 

First I want to thank you for publishing my ietter con- 
cerning Superscript in the Mail Room column in the 
Nov/Dec issue. I learned a number of things about Super- 
Script that I plan to share with you in the future. 

The main reason for this letter is the enclosed list from 
the new Radio Shack Consumer Mail Center Catalog. In 
case you haven't heard, Radio Shack has issued 
upgrades, not just reissues, for several of their older 
software packages. I don't know what changes were 
made to any of the programs, but I've ordered the Super- 
Script upgrade. As I learn more about these upgrades, I'll 
let you know. The upgrades can be ordered from any 
Radio Shack store. Thanks for TRSTimes. 

Walt Danylak 

Syracuse, NY 

We look forward to the tips on SuperScripsit. See the 
box insert on the next page for the list of available Radio 
Shack program upgrades. 

Ed. 



NETWORK 3 & 4 

I am looking for information about both software and 
hardware relating to Networks and Network 4. They never 
really took off in the United Kingdom, but hold a particular 
interest for me. 

Graeme Draper 

Centre for Computers in Education and Training 

University of Salford 

Salford M5 4WT, 

Great Britain. 



DOS COLLECTOR NEEDS HELP 

I am looking for a copy of SUPERDOS for Model I. Also 
the Logical Systems/Radio Shack Hard Disk drivers that 
were released with LDOS 5.1.4 Hard Disk package that 
will drive the 10 & 15 meg hard disks for Model I. 



I am also looking for Hard Disk drivers will run on 
DOSPLUS 3.4/3.5 on the Model I. 
Art McAninch 
122 Pecan 
Borger, TX 7^07 



A HARD DRIVE TALE 

I bought a 15 meg drive out of the Carolina Trader 
magazine (this is our trading and swapping magazine here 
in Columbia, SC that deals in just about everything that 
you want to buy and sell). I had no idea that I could ever 
get It to do anything, or even that it would work on my 
computer, but as most computer junkies are, I had to have 
it just to see if I could do anything with it. (Blame it on Roy 
Beck and all his articles about Hard Drives in TRSTimes 
magazine). 

I went and looked at this thing (it looked pretty good, 
but I had no idea what I was looking at) and I bought it, 
not knowing if it would ever work. 

Calling Radio Shack in Texas I was told that the drive 
would work on a Model III or 4 computer if I bought a cable 
and a Hard Disk Operating System to go with it. 

I figured out that I could make my own cable and save 
a few dollars in case this thing was junk. Boy, did I jump 
into something that I didn't know anything about. I 
changed the cable every way I could think of to get it to 
work - and couldn't get anything out of it at all. By this time 
I was sure that the drive or controller was bad, and that, 
most likely, I wouldn't be able to anything with it. 

I wrote a letter to Roy Beck, asking all of the questions 
that I could think of to ask, and he wrote back with all the 
information that he could. It was a big help, but I still 
couldn't get It to work. 

I had just started to box up the cable to send it to Roy 
Beck when a fellow hacker here in Columbia called me. 
He told me that he would gladly help me out if he could, 
and that he just happened to have the service manual for 
my hard drive. 

He came over and, sure enough, after all of the cable 
switching that I had done, the cable was still wrong. It only 
took him a few minutes and, presto, my 1 5 meg hard drive 
was up and running. 

Now, I don't know what I am going to put on all of those 
tracks of storage space, but it sure is nice to know that it 
will run. I still have a few problems with it, but I am sure 
that we will get them worked out. The green active light 
won't come on at all to let you know when it is working, 
and sometimes I think it gets too hot and just shuts down. 

William R. Salisbury 

Columbia, SC 

This little story just goes to show why the TRS-80 is still 
alive and well after all these years. Whenever someone 
has a problem, there is always someone else who has the 
answer AND is willing to help. 

Ed. 



Page 4 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 







SOFTWARE UPGRADES 








MODEL I/ill 




700-2005 


MOD 1 


scRiPsrr CASsfci ie to model 3 


3.95 


700-2224 


MOD 3 


SUPER SCRIPSrr to version 1.3 


9.95 


700-2227 


MOD 3 


INVENTORY CONTROL TO DISK/HARD DISK 


14.95 


700-2241 


MOD 1 


ACCOUNTS PAYABLE TO MODEL 3 ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 


14.95 


700-2242 


MOD 1 


PAYROLL TO MODEL 3 PAYROLL 


14.95 


700-2284 


MOD 3 


GENERAL LEDGER TO VERSION 2.1 


10.00 


700-2285 


MOD 3 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE TO VERSION 2.2 


10.00 


700-2286 


MOD 3 


ACCOUNTS PAYABLE TO VERSION 2.2 


10.00 


700-2287 


MOD 3 


PAYROLL TO VERSION 2.1 


13.00 


700-2290 


MOD 3 


GENERAL LEDGER TO VERSION 1.1 


10.00 


700-2291 


MOD 3 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE TO VERSION 1.2 


10.00 


700-2292 


MOD 3 


ACCOUNTS PAYABLE TO VERSION 1.2 


10.00 


700-2293 


MOD 3 


PAYROLL TO VERSION 1.1 


13.00 


700-2294 


MOD 3/4 


SUPER SCRIPSIT PRINTER DRIVERS 


10.95 


700-321 1 


MOD 1 


SCRIPSrr DISKETTE 


24.95 


700-3404 


MOD 1 


REMOTE DISK FOR MODEL 100 


19.95 


700-2150 


MOD 1 


W-2 WRITER TO + 


9.95 


700-2151 


MOD 1 


W-2 WRITER TO MODEL 3 


9.95 


700-2153 


MOD 3 


INVOICE WRITER TO VERSION 1.2 

MODEL 4 


9.95 


700-2019 


MOD 4 


SUPER SCRIPSIT TO VERSION 1.2 


15.95 


700-2125 


MOD 4 


INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEM TO VERSION 1.1 


9.95 


700-2152 


MOD 4 


INVOICE WRITER TO VERSION 2.1 


9.95 


700-2246 


MOD 4 


TRSDOS TO VERSION 06.01.02 


4.95 


700-2297 


MOD 4 


TRSDOS 6.2.1 TO LSDOS 6.3 


39.95 


700-3214 


MOD 4D 


MULTIPLAN TO VERSION 1.07 


24.95 


700-3215 


MOD 3 


SUPERSCRIPSIT DICTIONARY TO MODEL 4 


24.95 


700-3401 


MOD 4 


REMOTE DISK FOR MODEL 100 


19.95 


700-6206 


MOD 4 


GENERAL LEDGER SOURCE CODE 


199.95 


700-6212 


MOD 3 


GRAPHICS BASIC TO MODEL 4 HI-RES GRAPHICS 
MODEL 2/12/16/6000 


34.95 


700-2044 


MOD 2 


ORDER ENTRY/INVENTORY CONTROL TO VERSION 1.1 


19.95 


700-2088 


MOD 2 


MEDICAL OFFICE TO VERSION 2.1 


10.95 


700-2092 


MOD 2 


LEGAL ACCOUNTING TO VERSION 1.2 


10.95 


700-2095 


MOD 2 


PROFILE PLUS TO VERSION 1.2 


7.95 


700-6007 


MOD 2/12 


GENERAL LEDGER TO MODEL 6000 


199.95 


700-6010 


MOD 2/12 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE TO MODEL 6000 


199.95 


700-601 1 


MOD 2/12 


ACCOUNTS PAYABLE TO MODEL 6000 


199.95 


700-6012 


MOD 2/12 


ORDER ENTRY/INVENTORY CONTROL TO MODEL 6000 


199.95 


700-6013 


MOD 2/12 


SALES ANALYSIS TO MODEL 6000 
MODEL 100 


199.95 


700-2245 


MOD 100 


I/O DOCUMENTATION 


.29 


700-2401 


MOD 100 


BAR CODE READER DRIVERS FOR DISKA/IDIO INTERFACE 


10.00 


700-2402 


MOD 100/200 DISK/VIDEO INTERFACE DRIVERS 


6.95 



RAMDISK 

I have a couple of questions that I hope the TRSTimes 
readers can answer for me, also some items that I would 
like to trade. Let's start with the questions. 

1 . How do I copy the system files to a ramdisk, after I 
have created it, so that every time I do a directory of a disk 
(I am trying to sort out what I have) the computer won't 
first start drive :0 to get the directory program, and then 
go to the drive in question to get the directory? I have the 
same problem with FORMAT, but have just about com- 
pleted a mod to it so that it asks you If you would like to 
format another before it finishes. If you say 'Yes', it reloads 



Itself from upper memory and starts over. I am doing it this 
way because FORMAT overwrites part of itself with the 
track and sector information that it Is going to put on the 
disk. Any suggestions would be appreciated and, of 
course. If FORMAT can be put on ramdisk, that would be 
ok too. 

2. 1 have seen references to using an IBM compatible 
memory board as a ram disk. I have a fully populated 
Captain Board for a Model 1 200 that I believe is in working 
order. I would be interested in using it this way, unless 
someone out there is interested in trading for it. 

Now for the good stuff. I would like to trade some 
software for the Model 4. 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 5 



The first is a complete original copy of the disk and 
manual for TRSDOS 6.2 (note: the manual is 6.2., not Disk 
System, as the 6.0 manual is called). 

Also, I have an original copy of PFS:file, manual and 
disk for the Model 4 and/or the III. 

Finally, I have 2 memory boards and a cpu board for 
the Model 16. One memory board is complete, while the 
other has no ram. 

These items are fortrade, not sale. Selling things across 
the border will result in duty, taxes, etc. I am interested in 
something I don't have, and will not accept money. I am 
really not sure how much the stuff is worth (bad business 
sense). I have a couple more items and would answer any 
inquiries. 

A couple of things I am interested in for the Model 4 is 
a reasonable good drawing program to use with my 
graphics board from Micro-Labs, and a program from 
Hyper-Soft that allows a PC compatible to run some Model 
4 software. However, these items may be too costly, I am 
not sure. 

As you may have gathered, I have acquired (dare I even 
think it) an IBM compatible. However, I have no intensions 
of getting rid of my Model 4; the manual I am trading is a 
second copy. 

One more thing while I think of it. I am almost finished 
with an assembly language program which converts 
Apparat's DISASSEM/CMD to run on the Model 4 in 4 
mode. So far I have only one minor bug left. If you are 
interested, please let me know. 

John Greenland 

Box 171 

Kelligrews, New Foundland 

Canada AOA 2T0 

TRSTimes would certainly be Interested In your DISAS- 
SEM/CMD conversion. It would be nice to have it run on 
LS-DOS. 

The ramdisk questions are good ones and, in your 
honor, this issue features the article 'A FAST SYSTEM 
DRIVE'. It gives the step by step Instructions to just what 
you want to do. As an addition to the article, let me say 
that if you are not going to use DEBUG, you can REMOVE 
SYS5/SYS and SYS9/SYS from the memdisl<, and copy 
FORMAT/CMD up there instead. This should solve your 
problem. 

Ed. 



DISK DRIVE FOB MODEL 100 

I am looking for a Model 100 disk drive PDD-1 at a 
reasonable price. Ours have stopped working, and we're 
frightened to take it to Radio Shack, feeling that they will 
charge more to repair It than it is worth. 

Please contact: 

James Lewis Lowe 

P.O. Box 8 

Nonfood, PA 19074 



WHAT HAPPENED TO STANTEST? 

I have been given a query concerning TTOD #5 which 
I have not been able to solve. It involves the program 
STANTEST/BAS which is shown on the index, but does 
not appear on the disk. I have two disks and it is on neither. 
Have you an explanation, please? 

On another subject, I have been reading Roy Beck's 
articles with great Interest, especially his latest offering 
detailing the Dishwasher episode! That article caused me 
to have a couple of phone calls from friends who had read 
It and were equally amused. 

Tom Ridge 

England 

/ checl<ed the TTOD #5 master disk and, sure enough, 
STANTEST/BAS is not there. I then spent the next 3 hours 
checking every disk I could get my hands on - with the 
same negative result- bummerll! I will try to talk the author 
Into sending me another copy of the program so we can 
put It on a future TTOD. 

Ed 



PORE NEWDOS 

I found the 'PDRIVE WITHOUT TEARS' article from the 
Mar/Apr 1991 issue of TRSTimes very interesting. Please 
keep my Model III and me happy by publishing more 
articles about NEWDOS/80. There is so much to learn! 

David A. Bernstein 

Provo, UT 



We will keep the NEWDOS/80 articles coming. 



Ed 



9 ^9 



Models I, 
1000, 2 



Low prices » 

Write for what yoii need. 

WIE ship UFS/COD, 



Page 6 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



SPEEDING UP YOUR 
HARD DRIVE 

Roy T. Beck 



With the blazing speed of hard drives, (relative to flop- 
pies) , why even try to speed them up? But then, why climb 
mountains? Essentially the same answer applies to both. 

Whenever a person first installs a hard drive on a Model 
1 , 3 or 4, the usual reaction is WOW, what speed! But even 
hard drives have their limitations, and after a while the urge 
returns to see if we can hot rod this dragster a little more. 

I admit to this mania, and so I began thinking a little 
about the factors which control the overall data transfer 
rate (speed) of a hard drive. The following list Includes 
every factor I can think of over which we have some 
degree of control. 

1. CPU clock speed. 

The Model 4 family has a means of switching clock 
speeds; "SLOW" vs "FAST". This is supposed to yield a 2/1 
speed ratio, with the CPU running at 4 MHz when set for 
FAST, and 2 MHz when set for SLOW. Actually another 
factor enters into the situation. The earlier (Non-Gate 
Array) machines ran at slower clock speeds, and the 2 and 
4 MHz is only true for the Gate Array versions. Further, 
some after-market speedup kits are available, such as 
those by Anitek, which may push the speed even higher. 

Now, changing the CPU clock rate won't of itself 
change the rate of data handling within the hard drive 
subsystem, but since some massaging of data by the CPU 
does occur (loading and unloading memory buffers, for 
instance), then a faster CPU clock will inevitably help a 
little in the push for speed. Not a lot, perhaps, but every 
little bit helps. 

Issue the command DEVICE to see which speed you 
are using. You will probably see the word "Fast" after the 
word "Options", and If so, nothing more is to be done. The 
SYSTEM (FAST) command will set your CPU to the high 
rate if it is not there. Follow this by SYSGEN to be sure 
you get the fast ticker every time you bootup. As far as I 
know, there is never any reason not to use FAST unless 
you are running some game which you need to slow 
down. 

2. Hard drive head stepping rate. 

The heads of a hard drive must step in and out like those 
of a floppy drive so as to access the various tracks 
(cylinders, in HD parlance). Hard drives have two different 
types of stepping hardware. These are stepper motors 
and voice coil drives. The older drives used by Tandy in 



the Models 3 and 4 use a stepper motor mechanism to 
move the heads. This is similar to the two motors in most 
dot matrix printers which move the head and the paper 
roller. Because of their greater Inertia (compared to voice 
coil mechanisms), the stepper motors are inherently 
slower to respond. In fact, stepper motors typically require 
3 milliseconds to move one track. This is because the 
stepper motor must start moving, and then come to rest 
again, the whole cycle taking about 3 ms (0.003 seconds). 
In the days when the Tandon 5 Meg drive was state of the 
art, and there were only 153 cylinders to step, 153 steps 
of 3 ms for a total of 0.459 seconds was pretty good, 
certainly better than the floppies of the time. Would you 
believe 40 ms per track for those old floppies? 

But man must have his speed. At least two techniques 
(that I am aware of) came into existence. One was 
Ramped Seek, which caused the heads to accellerate to 
a high rate of speed, "cruise" for awhile, and then apply 
the retro-rockets to decellerate for a landing on the 
desired cylinder. Some controller and drive combinations 
were designed to work this way, but the hardware and 
software complications were too messy for success in the 
market place. Average access time was better than the 3 
MS per track rate. 

The alternative method is Buffered Seek. In this techni- 
que, the bubble itself took note of the speed at which 
stepping pulses arrived. If they arrived at a very high rate 
of speed, the drive simply counted them in a buffer until a 
3 ms or longer pause occurred. When this happened, the 
bubble logic would then calculate, internally, the 
parameters for a ramped seek, and the heads would zoom 
to the desired cylinder. This technique required only that 
the software send pulses at a high rate of speed, in which 
case the buffered seek occurred, or that the software send 
pulses at 3 ms or longer intervals, in which case the heads 
stepped in synchronism with the 3 ms pulses, slowly but 
surely. The Buffered Seek method is no faster than the 
Ramped Seek, but is almost universally available in 
modern bubbles. Use it if it is available. I believe the widely 
used ST-225 bubble has an average access time of about 
85 MS. 

The voice coil system is so named because the 
hardware is analogous to the mechanism which moves 
the cone of a loudspeaker. The voice coil Is the electrical 
element which causes the cone to move in and out in 
response to voice or music signals. Voice coil drives have 
been used on hard drives for at least 5 years, and are the 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page? 



really fast way to go. Average access speeds of 1 7 MS are 
not unusual, but the price tag is significantly higher. 

Most hard disl< driver installation programs ask a ques- 
tion about the stepping speed to be used. My suggestion 
here is to try the fastest speed (shortest pulse interval) 
which the software offers, and see if the drive will format 
and verify. If the drive is not capable, the verify will fail. If 
this occurs, do it again with slower stepping rates until you 
discover what works. Most drives have buffered seek, and 
will accept the fastest stepping rate you can give them. 
The only ones I know of which won't step at the fastest 
rate are the old 5 Meg Tandy units. These utilize the 
TANDON TM-602S bubble, and the ones I have worked 
with will only step at the 3 ms rate. Every other drive I have 
worked with has buffered seek, and will accept the fastest 
rate the driver will allow. 

By the way, MISOSYS' RSHARD5/6 series asks for a 
speed in the range of to 9. The numerals 1 to 9 cor- 
respond to 0.5 to 4.5 ms. The "0" Value corresponds to 
buffered seek. Try first. If you have to settle for 3 ms 
stepping, the value to be entered is "6". 

3. Partitioning by cylinder offset ¥S. head 
offset 

Three basic choices are available when choosing drive 
partitioning; head offset, cylinder offset, and a combina- 
tion of both. Head offset is probably simplest to under- 
stand, in that it assigns one head to a partition. As files are 
needed in that partition, the head assembly is simply 
stepped along that one platter's surface. The second head 
can be the next partition, etc. The term "offset" refers to 
the fact that the successive partitions are located on 
successive heads, and each partition is offset from the 
previous one by one (or more) heads. Remember all the 
heads move in unison. The software has to keep track of 
the present location of the heads. This is important, be- 
cause the head must be moved within one partition, and 
if access to another partition is required, it must know 
where the DOS left the heads parked the last time it moved 
them. This sounds complicated, but for Soltoff and people 
like him, it is child's play. 

Cylinder offset consists of using all heads in each 
partition, with the first partition assignment beginning at 
the outermost track and consisting of some number of 
cylinders. If the drive has 4 heads and 153 cylinders, it 
could be partitioned by cylinder offset as follows: 

drive heads cylinders 






1-4 


001-038 


1 


1-4 


039-076 


2 


1-4 


077-114 


3 


1-4 


115-153 



In this case, the total head movement within one parti- 
tion is only 38 cylinders, whereas in the head offset case 
mentioned above, the heads must move over the entire 
153 cylinders to access all the files in one partition. Since 
cylinder offset entails less head movement, file access is 
faster. 

Finally, a combination of head and cylinder offset is 
possible, with say, one partition occupying 2 heads and 
76 cylinders of the drive, the next partition occupying the 
other two heads of the 76 cylinders, and the third (and last) 
partition using using all 4 heads and the remaining 77 
cylinders on the drive. If the software is clever enough, 
tricks like this can be done. RSHARD5/6 by MISOSYS 
(Soltoff) allows this type of partitioning. Radio Shack's 
hard driver allows only head offset, and is not very flexible. 

From a pure speed point of view, head offset is the 
fastest way to go. In the extreme case, a large drive can 
have 8 heads and a large number of cylinders. By utilizing 
all 8 heads in each partition, the head movement within 
any one partition is minimized. This is the way to go for 
SPEED! 

4= Cluster system files around directory of 

system drive 

Any time you ask for a system or library file on the 
system partition, the DOS has to send the head to the 
directory cylinder and search for the entry corresponding 
to the file. Then the head has to step to the cylinder where 
the file is located. All of this takes perceptible time. 
Wouldn't it be smart to locate the desired file near the 
directory? I don't know any clever way to do this on the 
non-DOS partitions, but the system partition can be im- 
proved. 

Roy Soltoff of MISOSYS remarks on this (in somewhat 
obscure fashion) in his documentation update for LS-DOS 
6.3.1. The command MEMORY (A = "A",B = n), issued 
prior to FORMATting a disk, (hard or floppy), can be used 
to group the SYSTEM files just above and just below the 
directory, and then a repeat of the command with a 
different value of n will cause the library files to be grouped 
just around the SYSTEM files. The key to properly locating 
the files is to know where the directory is. Since TRSDOS 
locates the directory at half the total number of cylinders, 
this is a known quantity. 

The HD procedure is simple. FORMAT the drive. Then 
issue the MEMORY command with n set about 2 cylinders 
lower than the directory track. Now backup the system 
files (only) to the HD partition. Next, reissue the MEMORY 
command with n set about 5 cylinders below the directory. 
Now backup the remaining files to the partition. Finally, 
issue the MEMORY command again with n = 1 to restore 
normal operation, n = 1 is the normal (default) value. 



Page 8 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



This MEMORY command has been In the DOS since 
6.2, but was not in 5.1 . The values for n given above are 
for hard disk operation. The principle also applies to a 
floppy, but since a cylinder of a floppy holds less than a 
cylinder of a hard drive, the values for n must be set lower 
than for a floppy. Do some arithmetic to determine best 
values for a floppy. 

Art McAnlnch tells me there is an article In TMQ about 
this, but I haven't dug it out to study, yet. LDOS works 
same as LS-DOS. Soltoff has written powerful code, but 
does not always make us aware of its strengths. I only 
learned of this through his question and answer series 
attached to the LS-DOS 6.3 update documentation. 

5. Sector interleaving 

When it comes to sector Interleaving on a hard drive, I 
must plead ignorance. I will discuss it lightly in a theoreti- 
cal fashion, and then abandon the topic when I run out of 
knowledge. 

First, the concept. As the sectors of any disk rotate past 
the head, the data of a cylinder is either read or written. 
But the following sector is coming along at a great rate of 
speed. If the CPU has insufficient time to handle the 
previous sector data and get ready for the next one before 
the next one arrives, then the disk must make a full rotation 
to allow the CPU to be ready for the next sector. This is 
the slowest method, and allows only one sector to be 
handled per revolution of the disk. Since hard drives 
usually turn at 3600 RPM, the time from sector to sector 
is 0.5 MS for each sector and the time BETWEEN succes- 
sive physical sectors Is quite brief. In the days of floppies, 
when this problem was first considered, the speed of 
rotation was 300 RPM or 5 revolutions per sector. At 10 
sectors per track (cylinder), each sector required 20 MS 
to pass by the head. The first designer of TRS DOS 
systems decided that It was appropriate to handle one 
sector, skip the next, handle the next, skip the next, and 
so on. To easily accomplish this, he layed out the sector 
sequence around the cylinder as: 

0-5-1-6-2-7-3-8-4-9 

The read-skip-read etc sequence can now read (or 
write) 1 sectors in correct sequence in two revolutions of 
the disk, allowing 20 MS between sectors for the CPU to 
massage data. There is actually an extra sector between 
#4 and #5 when these are read sequentially, but this 
doesn't hurt anything. 

When hard disks came along, the same problem had 
to be faced. Since everything happens much quicker on 
a hard disk, most CPU's required more time between 
sectors for overhead. A typical interleave pattern for 1 8 
sectors appears below: 

0-6-1 2-1 -7-1 3-2-8-1 4-3-9-1 5-4-1 0-1 6-5-1 1-17 



At this point I am fast running out of knowledge. I do 
know that TRSDOS uses only 16 sectors (of 256 bytes 
each) per cylinder, and I also know that many of the drives 
we use could actually hold 18 such sectors but only 16 
are used. What happens to the remaining space on the 
cylinder? I dunno. They may be formatted as dummy 
sectors. Also, don't assume TRS uses the sequence I just 
showed. This interleave requires the CPU to process every 
third sector, and requires 3 revolutions to handle one 
entire cylinder. The floppy pattern shown before only 
required 2 revolutions. I don't know what our drives are 
doing! This pattern is most likely set in the FORMAT/CMD 
program, and I haven't dug Into it to find out. 

The kleal interleave would be 0-1 -2-3-4 etc, with only 
one revolution to read the entire cylinder. This would give 
the fastest access (if the CPU can keep up), but I strongly 
suspect our TRS-DOS and others are using a slower 
interleave. I'm sure Roy Soltoff knows but I haven't asked 
him. He has enough to do trying to make a living without 
answering all my silly questions. 

In conclusion, I don't know what Interleave we are 
actually using, and it Is set by parameters embedded in 
the FORMATter. Since the HD subsystem has Its own 
clock driving its own CPU and handling its own on-board 
memory, it Is entirely possible that the Interleave for our 
units is set by Western Digital who designed the HDC 
board, and we may not even have any options here! I have 
only discussed Interleave in this cursory fashion to let you 
know it is there, and Is a subject for future study and 
writeup by someone. I won't promise anything, and if 
some one else gets there before I do, more power to him! 

6. MEMDiSK 

The use of a SYSTEM MEMDISK Is still another way to 
speed up access and execution of system and library files. 
I will give it short shrift here, as it does not involve the HD 
at all, and speeds operation by setting up the system files 
in a block of memory, which is faster than any HD we will 
ever see! Another reason for not discussing it here is that 
Lance Wolstrup (Ye Editor-in-Chief) is developing a great 
article along this line, and I don't want to steal his thunder! 
(Stealing thunder from great chief is a risky proposition, 
you know!) 

Having exhausted my knowledge, my allotted space, 
and probably your patience, I will hereby terminate this 
essay and get on to finishing my taxes. (Time, Tide and 
Taxes wait for no man, someone once said). 

-Roy- 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 9 



Recreational & Educational Computing 

Exact Rational Arithmetic and 
Programming Recreation Cliallenge 

By Michael W. Ecker, Ph.D. 



Welcome once again to Recreational & Educational 
Computing. This issue's column is devoted to a program 
sent in by reader Robert Caldwell. The topic: adding 
fractions exactly. 

If there are any users of MSDOS reading, please note 
that I have edited the program in question so that it runs, 
as printed, on either a TRS-80 Model 3 or any PC running 
GWBASIC under any version of MSDOS. I suspect it will 
run on many other machines' BASlCs, including other 
TRS-80S, Macintosh, etc. 

First we need to understand the significance of our little 
arithmetic adventure. Note that programming languages 
such as BASIC and Pascal, as a general rule, do not 
perform exact rational arithmetic. But suppose you want 
to calculate, say, 1/2 + 1/3, which should be 5/6. BASIC 
has a bigger problem than an inability to calculate the sum 
exactly by conventional means. Rather, it will challenge 
you just to input the values 1/2 and 1/3! If you've never 
tried it before, fire up yourTRS-80 (or other PC) and BASIC 
and try to input a fraction without a prior variable assign- 
ment. 

Mind you, I'm not saying it cannot bedone. Infact, there 
are probably several clever approaches possible. You 
might enjoy writing to send your own to me at the address 
to follow. 

Bob Caldwell's program allows input of two or more 
fractions. Given this, it then outputs the sum. As I implied 
before, he wrote It explicitly for the Model 3. However, 
merely by adding a few spaces, I've edited it to run on 
several other machines with virtually no adjustment. 

If you wish to type in the listing faster, you can omit all 
the remark lines (those with the apostrophe). If you prefer 
not to type in the listing, I'll send it free to you as a service. 
I do ask for $2 to cover my costs of disk, postage, copying, 
and handling. Please specify your computer model (s) 
owned and preferred format. 



FRADDER/BAS 



10 CLS 'NAME IS FRADDER (FRACTION ADDER) 

11 'THE SUM OF FRACTIONS IS GIVEN IN FRACTION 
FORM WITH THE 



12 'NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR RELATIVELY 
PRIME. 

13 'GIVEN NUMERATORS AND DENOMINATORS 
MUST BE INTEGERS. 

14 'NUMERATORS MAY BE POSITIVE, NEGATIVE OR 
ZERO. 

15 'DENOMINATORS MUST BE MORE THAN ZERO. 

16 'EXAMPLE: A/B + C/D + E/F = 
(ADF + CFB + EBD)/BDF = NU/DE 

17 'BY ROBERT B. CALDWELL, JAN. 19, 1991 

18 'INSPIRED by Dr. Ecker's REC Newsletters, issues 
#7 and #15/16. 

20 CLEAR: 

DEFDBLA,D,N: 

INPUP'HOW MANY FRACTIONS TO BE ADDED";F 

30IFF<2ORF<> INT(F) THEN 20 

40 DIM N(F),D(F),P(F,F),Q(F*F),DP(F) 

50 DE = 1 : 

F0RX = 1T0F 

60 PRINP'ENTER NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR 

OF FRACTION #"X":"; 

7© INPUT N(X),D(X) 

80 IF N(X)<>INT(N(X)) OR D(X)<>INT(D(X)) OR 

D(X)<1THEN50 

90IFN(X)=0THEND(X) = 1 

100 'CALCULATE BDF AND THE FIRST NUMBER OF 

THE PRODUCTS 

110 'ADF, CFB AND EBD. 

120 DP(X) = N(X):DE = DE*D(X):NEXT X 

130 'CALCULATE ADF, CFB AND EBD. 

140FORS = 1TOF: 

F0RJ = 1T0F: 

Z = Z + 1: 

K = S + J-1 

150 'P(S,J) = K MODULO F; IF ZERO, CHANGE TO F. 

160P(S,J) = K-F*INT(K/F): 

IFP(S,J)=OTHENP(S,J) = F 

170Q(Z) = P(S,J): 

NEXT J,S 

180 'FIND WHICH DENOMINATORS TO USE TO 

COMPLETE PRODUCTS 

190 'ADF. CFB AND EBD. 

200FORX = 1TOF: 

Y = F*X-F + 1: 

F0RC = 1T0F-1 

210Y=Y + 1: 

DP(X) = DP(X)*D(Q(Y)): 

NEXTC 



Page 10 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



220 'CALCULATE NU. 

230NU = NU + DP(X): 

NEXTX: 

D = 2 

240 'MAKE NU AND DE RELATIVELY PRIME. FIRST 

DIVISOR IS 2. 

250 PRINT'SUM OF FRACTIONS";:GOSUB 340 

260 IF NU/D = INT(NU/D) AND DE/D = INT(DE/D) 

THEN 270 ELSE 280 

270 NU = NU/D:DE = DE/D:GOTO 260 

280 D = D + 2 + (D = 2) 'USE AS DIVISORS ALL ODD 

NUMBERS. 

290 'AVOID DIVISORS THAT ARE MORE THAN THE 

SQUARE ROOT OF THE 

300 'LARGER OF NU AND DE. 

310 IF ABS(NU) > DE THEN A = ABS(NU) 

ELSEA = DE 

320 IF D>SQR(A) THEN 330 ELSE 260 

330 GOSUB 340:END 

340 NU$ = STR$(NU):DE$ = STR$(DE): 

DE$ = MID$(DE$,2):PRINT" = "NU$'7"DE$;:RETURN 



Recreations Collection 

Last year or so I acquired some terrific TRS-80 recrea- 
tions, such as MaxIt, plus various logic puzzles, teasers, 
math-type games, and much more. In the interests of the 
TRS-80 community, I will offer the disk(s) to any reader of 
this publication for the grand total of $6 plus $2 ship- 
ping/handling. 

In the alternative, to any reader who subscribes to my 
newsletter, Recreational & Educational Computing, I will 
offer the disk absolutely free. You must identify yourself 
as a reader of this publication, subscription must be for at 
least one year ($27 ~ see below), and this offer expires 
Sept. 30, 1991. 



Recreational and Programming 
Challenge 

All but one of one thousand Roman slaves are about to 
be executed. They stand in a circle, numbered 1 through 
1000. The brutal guards shoot #2, #4, #6, etc., always 
alternating. Each fallen slave is pulled away. This process 
continues as the executions continue in alternate fashion 
around the circle. Whoever survives last is allowed to live. 
Which one is It? 

For instance, if there were only n = 6 slaves, they would 
be eliminated in this order: 2, 4, 6, 3, 1. Thus, number 5 
survives. 

This is the Josephus problem. You might enjoy solving 
it for various values of n (n = number of slaves) besides 
1000, writing a program, generalizing, and otherwise ex- 
ploring. 



Please send your comments, questions, solutions, im- 
provements, programs (on disk as well as paper!), and 
your orders for the special disk offer and/or Recreational 
& Educational Computing. Write to: 

Dr. Michael W. Ecker 

TRSTimes' "Recreational Computing" 

909 Violet Terrace 

Clarks Summit, PA 18411 

Until next time.... 

Happy Recreational TRS-80 computing! 



Dr. Michael W. Ecker is a Penn State University matli 
professor as well as a computer writer-reviewer and 
columnist with 300 publication credits. Mike is also 
Editor/Publisher of Recreational & Educational Comput- 
ing and the TRS-80 columnist for Vulcan's Computer 
Monthly. 

REC, from which these articles have been adapted, is 
in its sixth year and is available for $27 per calendar-year 
of 8 issues, prepaid. It focuses on "mathemagic" and 
computer recreations. Readers are invited to try a trial 
subscription of three issues for $10, creditable toward 
subscription. 



PUBLIC DOMAIN GOOD GA! 
FOR MODEL I/IIL 



lES 



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or get all 4 disks for $16.00 (U.S.) 

TRSTimes - PD GAMES 

5721 Topanga Canyon Blvd. #4 

Woodland Hills, CA. 91367 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 11 



DOUBL 

FUNCTION 
ROUTINES 

for Model I/III and 

Model 4 (Multidos) 

By Jim E. King 

Did you know that SQR, LOG, EXP and the trig func- 
tions still give single precision results when you DEFDBL? 
The result looks like double precision, but the last 1 digits 
are garbage. 

When I discovered this I decided to write subroutines 
that would calculate these functions, even though Radio 
Shack sold a program that does it. I got out my old Math 
Tables from the Handbook of Chemistry & Physics, and 
on pages 243 & 244 are all of the series expansions except 
square root. 

The subroutines are 14 lines, beginning at ^00, of 6 
subroutines (825 bytes) that perform these calculations. 
They are all modular, stand-alone and do not call other 
routines. Use only the routine that you need. The Radio 
Shack program calls parts of itself, so you must load all of 
it. 

The main program is set up as a calculator. Choose the 
function you want from the menu, key in the argument, 
and press < ENTER >. First a single precision ROM 
answer is displayed, then the double precision answer, 
and then the complementary routine is called to obtain the 
original argument for checking. 

The number of Iterations Is shown on the left to count 
how many times the routine looped. Note that the angular 
arguments (WA) are all in radians. If you require degrees, 
multiply radians by 180/pi. A to the X power is included 
using LOG and EXP, but checked only by the ROM 
routines. All but the square root loop until the difference 
between two successive answers = 0. 

SQuare Root is found by Newton's method: 

W1 = (WO + W/W0)/2. 

W is the input; WO is the first estimate, and W1 is the 
next closer approximation. Newton's algorithm conver- 
ges so fast that If you let WO = the result from the ROM 
routine, the algorithm need be repeated only twice to 
achieve 16 digits of accuracy. See line ^00. 

The series expansion of the natural LOGarithm is im- 
plemented in lines 901 and 901 1 . 

The expansion of E to the X Power (EXP) is imple- 
mented in lines 9020 and 9021 



SINe and COSine were done together because each 
series requires that the input angle be within 2pi radians. 
This Is done in line ^30. Line 9031 Implements the SINe 
expansion, and line 9032 the COSIne expansion. 

TANgent Is calculated by calling the Sine-Cosine 
routine and then dividing (SIN/COS). 

ArcTANgent was difficult because different series are 
required for X> 1 and X< 1 . Line 9042 implements X< 1 , 
and9043X>1. 

Not knowing when to stop, I added ArcSINe, lines 9050 
& 9051 . Besides, now it was easy. 

Table I shows how to call the subroutines, and the 
additional variables used. 

I picked the variable 'W' because I seldom use it in 
general programming. 

Pi (WP) = 3.1415926535897932 (page 4/21 of the 2nd. 
Edition of the Level II Handbook). 

WA is an angle variable. 

'I' is used as a counter. You can use 'I' elsewhere 
because it is redefined in each of these routines. If T is 
holding a value in your program, either save your value in 
another variable, or change 'I' in the routines to a different 
integer. (That is the inconvenience of writing in a language 
that has does not have local variables.) 



Functions, 



Table 1 

Other Variables 



GOSUB 



WY= SQuare Root(W) 
Error code if W<=0 

WY= Natural LOG(W) 
Error code if W<=0 



None 



l,W1,W2,W3 



WY=EXP(W) (E to the W power) l,W1,W2,W3 
Overflow if ABS(W)>87.33 

WY=SINe(WA), W = COSine(WA) l,W1 ,W3,W8,W9 

WA=ArcTANgent(W) l,W3,W5 

WA= ArcSINe(W) I, W1 ,W2, W4 
Error code if W>=1 



9000 

9010 

9020 

9030 
9040 
9050 



The main advantage of these subroutines is that they 
are free, take less space, and you can include in your 
program only the ones that you need. 

Unfortunately some of them take quite a while to con- 
verge to a solution, such as LOG and EXP for arguments 
far from 1, and ARCTAN and ARCSIN near 1. There are 
only a few ways that I can think of for increasing the speed : 
compile them, write them in assembly language, or adapt 
them to use the ROM solutions as a seed, or use quicker 
converging algorithms. If any. If you discover a way, 
please publish and let me know. Also, please inform me 
of any errors. 



Page 12 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



These routines are copyrighted with permission to use, 
copy, give away, and you may include them in programs 
that you sell, free of royalty provided credit to me is 
included with their usage. 

Jim King, 20784 Medley Lane, Topanga, CA 90290 
(213)455-2777 

DBLPREC/BAS 

CLS:H$ = "DOUBLE PRECISION ROUTINES": 
GOSUB 3:H$ = "(C) (P) Jim E. King, 1980 (Angles in 
Radians)":GOSUB 3:H$ = "Public Domain, Permission 
to use and copy.":GOSUB 3:G0T0 96'-DBLPREC 
3 PRINT TAB(30-LEN(H$)/2)H$:RETURN 
7 IF LEN(Z) THEN FOR L9 = 1 TO LEN(Z): 
K9 = ASC(MID$(Z,L9,1)):IFK9>96THEN 
MID$(Z,L9,1) = CHR$(K9-32):NEXT:RETURN 
ELSE NEXT:RETURN 
8Z = INKEY$:IFZ = "'THEN 8 ELSE 
IFZ = CHR$(31)THENEND 
ELSE G0SUB7:RETURN 

9PRINTCHR$(29)STRING$(JU + 1,27)GHR$(31);: 
JU = 0:RETURN 

11 INPUT' For DSquareRoot(W>0), R =";W: 
U = SQR(W): 

PRINT" SqrRoot("W") ="U TAB(45)"R[2 = "U*U: 
RETURN 

12 INPUT" For DLn(X>0), X = ";W:U = LOG(W): 
PRINT" Ln("W") ="UTAB(37)"e[("U") ="EXP(U): 
RETURN 

13 INPUT" For De[(X<87.337), X = ";W:U = EXP(W): 
PRINT' e[("W") ="UTAB(37)"Ln("U") ="LOG(U): 
RETURN 

14 INPUT' For DSin(A) & DCos(A), A (Radians) =";WA: 

V = SIN(WA):U = COS(WA): 

PRINT' SinC'WA') ="V;TAB(30)"Cos ="UTAB(48) 

"Tan ="V/U: 

RETURN 

15 INPUT" For DArcTan(X), X =";W:U=ATN(W): 
PRINT' ATnC'W") ="U" Sin/Cos("U") =" 
SIN(U)/(C0S(U) + 1E-8): 

RETURN 

16 INPUT" For DArcSin(-1 <X< 1), X =";W: 

V = ATN(W/SQR(1-W*W)): 

PRINT" ASinC'W") ="V" Sin("V") ="SIN(V): 

RETURN 

17INPUT"A[X:A =";W: 

PRINT TAB(30)CHR$(27);: 

INPUP'X =";W5:W = ABS(W): 

PRINP'A[X ="W[W5;: 

GOSUB 901 0:W=WY*W5: 

GOSUB 9020:PRINTTAB(30)"DA[X ="WY: 

GOTO 99 

21 PRINT'DSqrRootC'W") ="WY;:RETURN 

22 PRINT(l-3)/2"DLn("W") ="WY:RETURN 

23 PRINTr'De[("W") ="WY:RETURN 



24 PRINT l/2"DSin("WA') = "WY TAB(38)" DCos = "W 
" DSin[2 + DCos[2-1 ="W*W+WY*WY-1: 
W=WY/W:PRINT' DTan("WA') ="W: 

RETURN 

25 PRINT (ABS(l)-1)/2"DATn("W") ="WA;X 
" = "FNWD(WA)"Degrees": 

RETURN 

26 PRINT (l-3)/2"DASin("W") ="WA;X 
" = "FNWD(WA)"Degrees": 
RETURN 

90 PRINT ERR"ERROR-Line"ERL CHR$(24)"; ";: 
IF ERR =20 THEN PRINT'/O: Divide By 0": 
RESUME 99 

91 IF ERR = 8 THEN PRINT'FC: Illegal Function Call" 

92 IF ERR = 10 THEN 
PRINT'OV: Overflow or Underflow" 

93 PRINT'See DOS manual, or page B/1 Level 2 
manual": 

RESUME 99 

96 DEFINT l-L:DEFSTR X-Z:DEFDBL W: 
WP = 3.1 41 5926535897932: 

C$ = "Close": D$ = " DiskDrive Door":X = "Radians": 
ON ERROR GOTO 90 

97 DEF FN WD(W) = W*1 80/WP: 

DEF FN WR(W) = W*WP/1 80 'Rad-- > Deg;Deg-- > Rad 

99 PRINT" Sq<r>oot <L>n <e>[XSin&<C>os 

Arc<T>anArc<S>inA<[>X":G0SUB8 

1 1 IF Z = "R" THEN GOSUB 1 1 :GOSUB 9000: 

GOSUB 21 :PRINT TAB(45)"R[2 ="WY*WY 

120 IF Z = "L" THEN GOSUB 12:G0SUB ^10: 

GOSUB 22:W=WY:GOSUB 9020:GOSUB 23 

130 IF Z = "E" THEN GOSUB 13:G0SUB 9020: 

GOSUB 23:W = WY:GOSUB 9010:GOSUB 22 

140 IF Z = "C" THEN GOSUB 14:G0SUB 9030: 

GOSUB 24:GOSUB 9040:GOSUB 25:W = WY: 

GOSUB 9050:GOSUB 26 

1 50 IF Z = "T" THEN GOSUB 1 5:G0SUB 9040: 

GOSUB 25:GOSUB 9030: 

PRINT l/2"DSin/Cos("WA") ="WY/W 

160 IF Z = "S" THEN GOSUB 1 6:G0SUB 9050: 

GOSUB 26:GOSUB 9030: 

PRINT l"DSin("WA') =^"WY 

170IFZ = "["THEN17 

199 GOTO 99 

9000 WY = SQR(W):WY=WY/2 + W/WY/2: 

WY = WY/2 + W/WY/2: 

RETURN '-WY = Sqr(W) 

9010 W2 = (W-1)/(W + 1):W3 = W2: 
WY=W2:I =3 ' WY = Log(W) 

901 1 W1 = WY:W3 = W3*W2*W2: 
WY = WY + W3/l:l = i+2: 

IF ABS(WY-W1) >0 THEN 901 1 ELSE 
WY = 2*WY:RETURN 

9020 W2=W:W = ABS(W):W3 = 1: 
WY = 1:I=0' WY = Exp(W) 

9021 W1 = WY:I = 1 + 1 :W3 = W3/I*W:WY = WY + W3: 
IF WYoWl THEN 9021 ELSE IF W2<0 THEN 
WY = 1/WY:RETURN ELSE RETURN 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 13 



9030 WA=WA/2/WP:WA = WA-FIX(WA) + 1: 

WA = (WA-FIX(WA))*2*WP: WY = WA: W = 1 :W8 = 1 : 

W9=WA:I = 1:12 = 1 

' WY = Sin(WA) W = Cos(WA) 

9031 W1 =WY: 
FOR 11=1 TO 2: 

l = l + 1:W9=W9*WA/l: 

NEXT: 

12 = -1 *I2:WY = WY + I2*W9: 

IFWYoWl THEN 9031 

ELSE 1=0:12 = 1 

9032 W3 = W: 
FOR 11=1 TO 2: 

l = l + 1:W8 = W8*WA/l: 

NEXT: 

12 = -1*12: 

W=W + I2*W8: 

IF W< > W3 THEN 9032 ELSE RETURN 

9040 IFW = OTHENWA = 0:RETURN 
ELSEW2 = 1/W:W3=W:I=3: 

IFW = 1 0RW = -1 THENWA = SGN(W)*WP/4: 
RETURN 

9041 WA = W: 

IF ABS(W) > 1THEN WA = SGN(W)*WP/2: 
I = 1 :GOTO9043 '- WA= Atn(W) 

9042 W5 = WA: W3 = W3*W*W: WA = WA-W3/I : 
l = -1*SGN(l)*(ABS(l)+2): 

IF WA< > W5 THEN ^42 ELSE RETURN 

9043 W5 = WA: WA = WA-W2/i : W2 = W2/W/W: 
l = -1*SGN(l)*(ABS(l)+2): 

IF WAo W5 THEN 9043 ELSE RETURN 

9050 W4 = .5:I = 3:W1 =W*W*W:WA = W + W4*W1/I 
' WA=ArcSin(W) 

9051 W2 = WA:W1 =W1*W*W:W4 = W4*I/(I + 1): 
l = l+2:WA = WA + W4*W1/l: 

IF WA< > W2 THEN 9051 ELSE RETURN 




*** Premise: Y©y enjoy the game of Blackjack.. 

*** Conclusion: You'll love CASINO 21, 

a superb implementation. 

Why? Well, for starters, the game allows all the 

things you expect; 

multiple players, or just one, against the computer 

random deal of cards 

hitting, standing, doubling, splitting, insurance 

betting with predetermined stakes 

Offered EXCLUSIVELY by Recreational Mathemagl- 
cal Software, CASINO 21 was written expressly for the 
TRS-80 and solely for It. It Is available for TRS-80 Model 
3 (tape or disk), Model 1 (cassette tape), Model 4, 4P, 4D 
(disk format.Model III mode). (If not specified on order 
form, disk is assumed.) 

As a special FREE extra, all disk versions come com- 
plete on a self-booting disk with a licensed DOS that is 
TRSDOS 1 .3-compatible. So. all you need do Is insert the 
disk. The rest is completely automatic as the enjoyment 
beginsl 

There are no commands to memorize, special keys to 
press, or special computer things to know - except the 
basics of the game of 21 itself (blackjack). 

CASINO 21 's first version was written by New Direc- 
tions Consulting in the heyday of TRS-80 computing 
(around 1983-4 or so), and we're thrilled to promote the 
improved version now for the benefit of fellow TRS-80ers 
who have been left stranded by all the publishers who 
have made the migration to MSDOS. 

Personally, I've had the game myself for many years, 
and it Is still one of the 10 of the hundreds of games that I 
still play. CASINO 21 always stays fresh, never be- 
coming boring. And, it's not copy-protected so you can 
have peace of mind backups (unlike the copy-protecting 
by most game publishers that leaves you helpless)! 

If you wish, you can even study the listings to see how 

the graphical effects are achieved! - So, don't miss out. 

Pleas© order nowl 
ft************************************************ 

ORDER FORM 

Casino 21 sounds great for my TRS-SO (Model ). 

i enclose I I6.i5(ia,®s + 1.0@ shipping). 

Full Name: 

Full Address: 



(Optional: Do you have special needs - tape vs. disk?) 



09 VIOLET TERl 
KS SUiyifyilT, i 
(?17) S86=2?l 



Page 14 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



HINTS & TIPS 



A PERFECT CIRCLE 

HI-REZ - BASICG 

Model 4 - TRSDOS 6.x. or 

Model III -TRSDOS 1.3 

By Johan Volgers 

Here is a hi-rez program that will draw an exact circle 
on the screen. It can be used to check the adjustment of 
the video screen. 

CIRCLE/BAS 

100 'CIRCLE/BAS door Johan Volgers, September 1989 

102 'Freely translated from Dutch: 

104 'A High Resolution excercise for 

106 'BASICG v6. (TRSDOS 6.x Model 4 mode) or 

108 'BASICG V1.01 (TRSDOS 1.3 Model 3 mode). 

110' 

134 ' — center, cirkel param, paint param — 

136' 

138XM = 320:YM = 120 

140 Dl = 239:KL = 1 :SH = 0:EH = 6.2831 5:XY = . 5 

142P1$ = CHR$(15) + CHR$(240): 

REM 0000.1 1 1 1 B en 1 1 1 1 .OOOOB 

144P2$ = CHR$(51) + CHR$(244): 

REM0011,0011Ben1100.1100B 

1 46 P3$ = CHR$(85) + CHR$(1 70) : 

REM 0101.0101B en 1010.1010B 

148' 

150 ' — clear schermen (clear screen) — 

152' 

154 SCREEN 1 :CLS:SCREEN 0:CLR 

156' 

158 ' — maximale rechthoek (rectangle) — 

160' 

162 LINE(0,0)-(639,0),1 :UNE(639,0)-(639,239),1 

164LINE(639,239)-(0,239),1:LINE(0,239)-(0,0),1 

166' 

168 ' — maximaal vierkant (square) — 

170' 

172 LINE(80,0)-(560,0),1 :LINE(560,0)-(560,239),1 

174 LINE(560,239)-(80,239),1 :LINE(80,239)-(80,0),1 

176' 

178 ' — maximale cirkel — 

180' 

182 CIRCLE(XM,YM),DI,KL,SH,EH,XY 

184' 

186 ' — inkleuren (coloring) — 

188' 

190PAINT(1,1),P1$,1:PAINT(638,238),P1$,1 



192PAINT(81,1).P2$,1:PAINT(559,1),P2$,1 

194 PAINT(81 ,238),P2$,1 :PAINT(559,238),P2$,1 

196PAINTP(M,YM),P3$,1 

198' 

200' 

202' 

204 SOUND 7,0 

206' 

208 GOTO 208 



ANOTHER 

HIDDEN MESSAGE 

FROM RADIO SHACK 

By Lance Wolstrup 

Yes, indeed! Someone at Tandy did it again. A 
programmer on the Tandy staff, obviously a Star Trek fan, 
managed to bypass quality control and get a hidden 
message out to the rest of the TRS-80 trekkies. 

The message is on the Model 4 TRSDOS UPGRADE 
ver. 06.02.00 to 06.02.01 disk. It is located on cylinder 0, 
sector 4, and you can read It with ZAP program (Super 
Utility Utility 4, or other). 

Below is a short assembly language program that will 
read cylinder 0, sector 4 of the disk in drive :1, and then 
display the text found. 





SCOTTY/ASM for Model 4 




ORG 


3000H 




START 


LD 


HL,MSG 


point to msg 


START1 


LD 


A,(HL) 


;get chr 




OR 


A 


;is it end chr? 




JR 


Z,START2 


;if yes - jump 




LD 


C,A 


;transfer to C 




CALL 


DSP 


;display chr 




INC 


HL 


;next chr 




JR 


START1 


; repeat 


START2 


LD 


A,1 


;svc #1 




RST 


40 


;wait for keystroke 




CP 


13 


;isit < ENTER > 




JR 


NZ,START2 


; no - go back 


I 


CALL 


CLS 


; erase screen 




CALL 


RDSEC 


;read sector 




CALL 


DSPSEC 


;display it 




LD 


C,10 


;send linefeed 




CALL 


DSP 


;to screen and 



TRSTimes magazine - May/Jun 1991 



Page 15 





RET 




; return to dos 


CLS 


LD 


C,28 


;home cursor 




CALL 


DSP 






LD 


C,31 


; erase screen 


DSP 


LD 


A,2 


;svc #2 




RST 


40 


;display chr 




RET 






RDSEC 


LD 


A,49 


;svc #49 




LD 


HUBUFFER 


; sector contents go here 




LD 


D,0 


;cylinder 




LD 


E,4 


; sector 4 




LD 


C,1 


;drive :1 




RST 


40 


;read sector 




RET 






bsPSEC LD 


HL,BUFFER 


;point to sector info 




LD 


B,0 


;read all 256 bytes 


DSPSE1 


LD 


A,(HL) 


;get byte 




CP 


32 


;if smaller than 32 




JR 


C,DSPSE2 


;then skip it 




LD 


C,A 


;transfer byte to C 




CALL 


DSP 


;display it 


DSPSE2 


INC 


HL 


;get next byte 




DJNZ 


DSPSE1 


; repeat 




RET 






MSG 


DB 


28 






DB 


31 






DB 


To see the hidden message -' 




DB 


13 






DB 


'insert your" 


FRSDOS UPGRADE' 




DB 


' disk ver 06.02.00 to 06.02.01 ' 




DB 


13 






DB 


'in drive :1 and press < ENTER > ' 




DB 







BUFFER 


DS 


256 






END 


START 





By Donald R. Goss 



Since Scripsit does not allow for control codes to be 
sent to the printer, it is necessary for the user to send those 
codes before Scripsit is loaded. The program, 
PRINTER/BAS, will send control cedes to change the 
pitch to either 5, 6, 8 1/4, 10, 12, or 16 1/2 characters per 
inch. It will also put the printer into the bold type mode for 
darker print if desired. It was written for use with the C.ltoh 
Prowriter, but should work with most of the dot matrix 
printers by substituting the proper control ccxies. 



One word of warning: If the printer is not turned on 
before a menu selection is made, it may cause the pro- 
gram to hang up. 

The program can be set to load automatically whenever 
the Scripsit disk is booted. Assuming that the program is 
saved under the name PRINTER/BAS:0, the following JCL 
(Job Control Language) file can be entered using the 
BUILD command: 

SET*PDTOCLICK/FLT 

FILTER *KI *PD 

BASIC 

LOAD"PRINTER/BAS:0" 

RUN 

//STOP 

As a bonus, I've included the commands to set the 
keyclick on. I find it makes word processing easier since 
you get positive audible feedback on each keystroke. If 
you have named this JCL file STARTUP/JCL, you can 
enter AUTO DO STARTUP/JCL from theTRSDOS prompt 
and it will automatically execute each time the disk is 
booted. 

You can create another JCL file (named SCRIP/JCL) 
that says simply: 

SCRIPSIT 
//STOP 

If you choose to use this JCL you should change line 
800 in the Basic program to read: 

800 CLS:SYSTEM"SCRIP/JCL' 

This will cause Scripsit to load automatically when you 
choose item 8 on the program menu. 



PRINTER/BAS 



10 C$ = CHR$(15):E$ = CHR$(27) 

15 CLS:PRINT@103,"P RINTER CONTROLS" 

20 PRINT@345,"1) 10 characters per inch" 

25 PRINT@505,"2) 12 characters per inch" 

30 PRINT@665,"3) 16.5 characters per inch" 

35 PRINT@825,"4) 5 characters per inch" 

40 PRINT@985,"5) 6 characters per inch" 

45 PRINT@1 145,"6) 8.25 characters per inch" 

50 PRINT@1305,"7) Bold type" 

55 PRINT@1465,"8) Exit to TRSDOS" 

60 PRINT@1788,"Enter your choice(s) "; 

65 M$ = INPUT$(1):M = VAL(M$): 

IFM<1 ORM>8THEN65 

70 ON M GOSUB 100,200,300,400,500,600,700,800 

75 GOTO 15 



100LPRINTC$ 
200 LPRINT C$ 
300 LPRINT C$ 



LPRINT E$ 
LPRINT E$ 
LPRINT E$ 



"N";:RETURN 
"E";:RETURN 
"Q";:RETURN 



Page 16 



TRSTimes magazine - May/Jun 1991 



400 LPRINT E$ 
500 LPRINT E$ 
600 LPRINT E$ 
700 LPRINT E$ 



"N";:LPRINT CHR$(14);:RETURN 
"E";:LPRINT CHR$(14);:RETURN 
"Q";:LPRINT CHR$(14);:RETURN 
"!";:RETURN 



800 CLS:SYSTEM 



CONVERTING 

ELECTRIC PENCIL FILES 
TO ALLWRITE 

By Jim E. King 



Electric pencil files (/PCL) are not directly compatible 
with AllWrite. Unfortunately, Electric Pencil adds format- 
ting information at the end of the ASCII text and Allwrite 
chokes on this. The /PCL file does initially load into 
Allwrite, but it then balks, issuing an error message. 

I wanted to move my longer PCL files (10 grans and 
larger) over for the better formatting available in AllWrite, 
so I had to work around the above problem. Here is what 
I came up with. 

Move the /PCL file over to a destination data disk, and 
then modify the end with a ZAP program (I use MultiDOS 
ZAP because it is the program with which I am the most 
familiar). 

Use the File option and go to the end of the file. 

Look at the END of the ASCII text and note that the 
NEXT byte is OD hex. 

Using the modify command, change all bytes AFTER 
OD to 00, then < Enter > and you are done. 

Now reformat the text with Allwrite. 



Mai 



Frustrations... 

(and Loving It!) 
by Carol L Welcomb 



I became the lucky 
ownerof aTRS-80 Model 
12 this summer. While it 
didn't have the Arcnet 
board or the other extra 
goodies available, it did 
come complete with two 
double sided 1.2 Meg 
drives. No matter, I am 
satisified in just trying to 
cross over the stuff and 
junk from the Model 4 to 
the Model 1 2. 1 even got 
the LS-DOS 6.3.1 version for the Model 1 2, so I could have 
a common language. Sounds pretty fair so far, right? Well, 
I'm no big expert on assembly language, or for that matter. 




debugging, so the many, many continuing frustrations 
began. 

I constructed a null modem connector (which, for the 
parts involved cost me all of a $1 .23) and began to learn 
the COMM way of doing things. This was fun. BASIC 
programs were easily transferred between machines, and 
except for a few of the special character differences be- 
tween the Model 12 and the Model 4, everything in the 
BASIC category was simple. 

Next I wanted to be able to run the many /CMD files 
I've collected through the years I've owned TRS-80 com- 
puters. I was not certain on how to go about this, but after 
attempts at transferring them via the null modem, I knew 
that wouldn't work. (Probably why the manual says ASCII 
only files, right?) So, I disassembled the /CMD files with 
the Misosys DSMBLR (which is quite handy, and simple 
to use) and, after storing that information on a disk, I then 
transferred the /SRC files to the Model 1 2, and used a copy 
of EDTASM (in the original Model II language, TRSDOS 
2.a) to reassemble. 

It is important to note that Model II EDTASM will NOT 
work when it is CONVERTED from TRSDOS 2.a to LS-DOS 
6.3.1. This is the part where I learned debugging (a little 
bit of debugging anyway). I knew the EDTASM4/CMD 
allowed Model III EDTASM to work on a Model 4, so I 
thought that if I used it on the Model 12, it might work. 
Unfortunately the entire structure of EDTASM for the 
McKlel 12 loaded into an entirely different area of RAM. 
Even moving it to the location of the Model 4 
(START = 567F, END = 6FE3, TRA = 5867) didn't work. 
Upon very close inspection of the EDTASM (for Model 
2/12) I noticed many differences. 

I then transferred a /SRC file from the EDTASM which, 
when used with the EDTASM4/CMD, runs well in Model 4 
mode. Guess What? The EDTASM screen appears, but 
there is no keyboard input. Very frustrating! However, I 
know I'm getting closer, and I won't give up. There is so 
little written about the Model 2/12 TRS-80 computers, I 
thought I'd toss this in to see what you thought. 

Now, I need to share the fact I've finally acquired an 
Orchestra-90. This was a big deal to me as I've always 
enjoyed the musical potential of computers. We have a 
small boom box, which is quite capable of irritating 
everyone else in the house when the Orch-90 is playing 
stereo music. I love it, but I'm not good at it yet. 

Now that summer is over, I find myself returning to the 
computers more and more, it's like a hibernation period 
for me. I don't mind snow, but the bitter cold of winter is 
something I try to avoid. My eldest, who made use of an 
Amiga 500 while his friend was in Germany, has had to 
resume using a TRS. A bit of a letdown for him, but he isn't 
complaining. I believe I live in a home of potential Mac 
users, and that makes it difficult for them to understand 
me. I like a computer you can really get into, on all levels, 



TRSTimes magazine - May/Jun 1991 



Page 17 



and they would vastly prefer a computer they could easily 
use. From what I've heard, Macs are easy to use, but I 
need more than that. 

I would love to read an article by someone who has 
made use of a scanner for a Model 4. Like the hardware 
changes Involved, the software development and Interest- 
ing things. Are there any of you who have figured this out 
yet? So often I've wanted something I could stick in the 
TRS by simply scanning a page. The advantage to me is 
obvious, and especially since the prices of scanners have 
come down. 

I haven't been ignoring BASIC programming on pur- 
pose, as it is a treat to create something that actually works 
the way I meant It to work. I have been preoccupied with 
the Model 1 2, and once I figure out all the techno stuff 
involved with that, and have things the way I want them, I 
can get back into the BASIC. 

PLEASE, oh please, one of you hackers, write an article 
on scanners. 



VIDEO CURE 

By Orest Kowalyshyn 



I would like to pass a hint along to the readers of 
TRSTimes concerning the Model 4. I have had video 
trouble with my computer; it would constantly blink on and 
off, and very often all types of characters (garbage) would 
fill the screen. I noticed that the voltage to the CRT would 
go on and off very quickly. To make a long story short, I 
used a pencil solder iron to resolder all the connections 
on the Model 4 power supply, as well as the connections 
to the CRT. Believe it or not, this cured the problem. I 
would recommend that a three-prong cord type solder 
iron be used in this type of procedure. 



By Stacy A. Brennan 

On a night when you have trouble going to sleep, turn 
on your Model I or III and type in the program listing below. 
I call it Z/BAS because when you RUN the program and 
study the screen display intensely, it has a hynotic effect 
and is bound to put you to sleep within a few minutes. 



10CLS 

20A = RND(3) 

30X = RND(124)-1 

40Y = RND(48)-1 

50 IF X>62 THEN X1 =62-(X-62)-1 

ELSEX1=62 + (62-X)-1 



60 IF Y > 24 THEN Y1 = 24-(Y-24)-1 

ELSEY1=24 + (24-Y)-1 

70 ON A GOTO 80,130,130 

80 SET (X,Y) 

90SET(X1,Y1) 

100SET(X,Y1) 

110SETP(1,Y) 

120 GOTO 20 

130 RESET (X,Y) 

140 RESET (XI ,Y1) 

150 RESET (X,Y1) 

160 RESET (XI ,Y) 

170 GOTO 20 



RECREi 
EDUCATIONAL COMPUTIMG 




REC is the only publication devoted to the 
playful interaction of computers and 
'mathemagiC ° from digital delights to 
strange attractors, from special number 
classes to computer graphics and fractals. 
Edited amd published by computer colum- 
nist and math professor Dr. Michael W. 
Ecker, REC features programs, challenges, 
puzzles, program teasers, art, editorial, 
humor, and much more, all laser-printed. 
REC supports many computer brands as it 
has done since inception Jan. 1986. Back 
Issues are available. 

To subscribe for one year of 8 Issues, send 
$27 US or $36 outside North America to REC, 
Att: Dr. f^. Ecker, 909 Violet Terrace, Clarks 
Summit, PA 18411, USA or send $10 ($13 
non-US) for 3 sample issues, creditable. 



Page 18 



TRSTimes magazine - May/Jun 1991 



ll^ almost) 

By Dr. Allen W. Jacobs 




are usually not perfect but they are readable. If they are 
important, they are now editable. Don't you sense that 
some soft keys are forming? Yes, but I don't encounter 
enough of these files to have a well organized template to 
present to you. How about sending me one of yours? 

Have you ever tried to find the "end of paragraph" 
markers in a search or find command only to be 
frustrated? That used to happen to me. Every time I tried 
to find the carriage return character (ASCII "13"), I couldn't 
enter it as the search argument because its use ENDS a 
search argument. The way to do it is to enter it as character 
number "013". The keystroke sequence is: 



Although I have Electric Webster with grammar check- 
ing, I often like to check for proper spacings on my own. 
The technique I use is applicable to other tasks. It general- 
izes to some uses in the editing of many ASCII files 
containing some non-ASCII characters. Strictly defined, 
all characters with values less than "128" decimal are 
considered ASCII. Those with values greater than this are 
non-ASCII or more properly called, binary. DO NOT TRY 
TO EDIT A PROGRAM FILE! 

What I do is to search for a pericKJ and three spaces 
and replace them with a pericxJ and two spaces. I then 
search for a period and two spaces and replace it with a 
highly visible graphics character. The biggest is ASCII 
"191". I then use the SR* command to do a global search 
and replace. All the periods and one space can likewise 
be searched and replaced with, say ASCII "190's"^ In most 
documents, the occurrences of these can be inspected 
visually to see if they are correct. Periods and carriage 
returns can likewise be searched. Double spaces can be 
substituted in a like manner. Then, the file can be restored 
with the reverse substitutions. Once you have successfully 
used this technique, you will find other uses for it. Thus, 
our tool belt grows. 

I have found that some documentation files, assembler 
source files, non-ASCII containing word processor files, 
and some printer files sent to a disk file are editable in a 
similar manner. Since I have encountered a number of 
them, I made a list of what every ASCII and non-ASCII 
character looks like when it's in the Allwrite editor. I then 
find out what character It is and usually either remove it, if 
it is line numbering, or substitute six to eight spaces or so 
for it. Experience has taught me that printers use ASCII "8" 
and "9" as tab characters. Files "cleaned up" in this manner 



<BREAK><F> < SPACE >< CLEAR ><:><0> 
<1 ><3> < ENTER > 

I use this technique on the "data base" I use the most. 
You guessed it. This is another use I have for Allwrite. Think 
of it as the most disorganized and yet most used in- 
memory free form data base filing system I have. It used 
to consist of one file that has since grown to three. I call 
the file POKTNOTS. That stands for pocket notes. 

I am always in the habit of putting notes on little pieces 
of paper and placing them into my pocket. Eventually, my 
pocket becomes quite full. To clean it out, I remove each 
of the notes and transcribe them into a sloppy looking text 
file. I use all upper case letters for clarity and so I don't 
have to worry about capitalization. Each subject is 
described using punctuation freely, with the exception of 
carriage returns. Only one carriage return is entered at the 
end of each subject The file can be searched in the "find" 
mcxie or the "browse" mcxie. 

To find an entry, I issue a find command with some 
word that I hope I remembered was in the entry. Within 1 
or 2 seconds, the mess of information is searched and the 
cursor is placed where it first encounters an occurrence 
of the search argument. I have a telephone number file I 
use this way. 

The second method I use is the "browse" method. I use 
the find ASCII "013" command as described above. I then 
replace it with ASCII "013" "013" "013". I then issue a 
<BREAK><S><R><*>< ENTER > command, if 
soft key has been reprogrammed. Every carriage return 
is replaced with itself and two more. The net effect is to 
expand the file while adding a minimal number of charac- 
ters. As long as the file does not exceed memory, it is very 
readable. I then "browse" through it for what I want. I do 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 19 



not save the file in tliis condition. I eitiier "QUit" ttie file 
without saving it or I reverse the above search and re- 
placement arguments if I have edited the file. This im- 
provised filing system works so well, I don't need any other 
free form database; and it is "100% compatible" with my 
word processor. It IS my word processor! 

The rest of the things I currently have to share with you 
are smaller miscellaneous Items and suggestions. 

If you can't preserve a double space when a line is 
being justified at the end of a sentence, try adding a space 
to the left hand column of the next line so that it justifies 
correctly. That is not a bug. It just took me a long time to 
discover that THAT is how Alwrite determines whether to 
place one or two spaces after a sentence, if the line was 
split at the period. 

Try editing the last command or finding out what it was 
with the < BREAK > < ? > keys. It saves a lot of typing. It 
is also helpful in trying to figure out what a soft key is doing. 
But remember that more than one command may have 
been issued. The <BREAK><?> command only 
reveals the LAST command line. 

Here finally, is a soft key 7. I use it to enter tabular 
information to a column of entries, on a regular basis. 
What it does is duplicate a line so that a new entry can be 
made by altering a previous line. Place the cursor on the 
last line in the list and issue the soft key sequence. You 
will be on the new line you wish to alter. Another helpful 
technique is to set the tab line at the prospective columns 
you wish to alter. If the setup is involved, each time, 
consider saving both this soft key and the tab line settings. 
Both can be saved and later recalled at another session. 

If you use Allwrite with Dostamer or Shell 2.0, you can 
eliminate having to type in the name of an existing file. 
Dostamer even appends the drive number to the end of 
the file specifier. With a hard disk or-^arge ram disk, it's fun 
to edit multiple files without ever typing (or mistyping) a 
single one. Fast access drives, (ie. hard drives or ram 
drives) approach video game action. 

To save "losing" a file on an unknown drive (usually the 
first available non-write protected drive), remember to 
cultivate the drive designation habit when entering any file 
specification associated with Allwrite. You will be happier 
for it. Fortunately, Dostamer does this for you. 

If you are impatient with the slow cursor speed of 
Allwrite, you have two choices. If you are using 
TRSDOS6/LSDOS6, use SETKI to increase the repeat rate 
as fast as it will go. For text input and heavy editing, I use 
the D0SPLUS4 installation and set the Allwrite keyboard 
driver installation as fast as IT will go, which is a pretty 
good velocity. With that advice, you would think that I am 
a fast typist. On the contrary, I am so slow that if I had to 



wait for the cursor, I would only be on line four of this article 
by now. 

Here is another bit of advice you may already use. I 
include it here just in case you don't. The fact is that I 
include and write portions of text out of order. I also 
include files that I will later remove, after I have copied or 
moved items out of them. I like to separate these items 
visually so that I can find them and delete them relatively 
safely from the text I want to keep. My two favorites are 
horizontal lines made of the underline character and the 
large block graphic character. The underline isthe easiest, 
and you probably use it. Just hold the < CLEAR > and 
<_> keys down on a new line and let them repeat until 
they almost cross the screen. Then, hit enter. My other 
favorite is: 

<CLEAR><:><1><9><1><F1 ><Q>. 

Hold ^ CLEAR > and <K> as you did for the under- 
line. THAT line should serve as an adequate separator for 
just about anything! The ASCII characters "131" or "140" 
are a happy medium. If you are doing a lot of this, program 
it into a soft key, even if you don't save it. If "ASCI1 191" is 
too "intense" for you, add a space to the soft key and hold 
it down when you use it. 

<CLEAR>< : >< 1 ><9>< 1 ><SPACE> < F1 > 
<Q>. 

If you don't want these lines to print, use the soft key # 
(the one that places a ;cm in front of the line). 

Vertical lines are somewhat less useful. If you want 
them, however, put the following keystrokes into a soft 
key: 

< CLEAR >< >< CLEAR ><:><1><9><1> 

< DOWN ARROW > < LEFT ARROW > < CLEAR > 
<Q>. 

Remember, however, that these lines will not look like 
that on virtually ANY printout, including Tandy DMP 
printers. THAT is why they are not too useful. My advice 
is to remove all vertical lines. You can remove or comment 
all horizontal lines, at your choice, to prevent them from 
printing. However, if you are Andy Levinson, you can 
make your printer do anything. Only in this last case, can 
you leave the lines in the text if it is mono spaced, your 
screen width equals your printer width, formatting is off, 
and they will print. My advice is don't waste your time. 
Chances are, you are not Andy. 

I almost forgot a warning to you regarding "pushing the 
limit" during text entry. This entire article does not fit into 
memory. Rather, it resides in two files. While I was typing 
in "just one more screenful", I decided to justify the text 
with the screen about 3/4 full. Suddenly, Error 251 , "No 



Page 20 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



more room in memory" appeared and I lost about 1 .5K of 
text. 

It occurs when the screen buffer of the editor writes to 
text memory. Basically, the screen can hold 1920 charac- 
ters of information that will never make it to your file. Add 
to this any reserved high memory modules you may not 
know you have Installed and I would get worried and just 
check. I would stop before I have 2K left. It's easy to advise 
you to take this precaution, after the fact, even though I 
forgot my own "rule of thumb". Please forgive me, I don't 
top out THAT often! 

Use the status screen (type <BREAK><S> 
<T>< ENTER >) often when you know you are getting 
close. I suggest the above command only in case you 
have reassigned < CLEAR >< 9 > to something else. 
That is almost what the soft key was originally 
programmed to type. It actually spelled out STATUS. 
When I type it myself, however, I just use the first two 
letters of the command. Of course, it works just fine. 

I still have a couple of wishes for Allwrite such as a case 
change command, a previous word command, a kill to the 
next character command as in basic, and Unix like condi- 
tional searches such as, "search for this and NOT that". 



I don't want to belabor such points, however, unless I have 
the time and ability to "fix" them. 

As a final thought, after reading Gary Shanafelt's up- 
date on the capabilities of Allwrite with a laser printer, I can 
only say that I would be privileged to review the driver he 
wrote about. As it comes to pass, I have recently been 
placed in the vicinity of both a Laser Jet and a Desk Jet 
Printer. I do not own either of these types of printers 

myself (YET). However, I did get an advanced look at 

the original sample page that Gary Shanafelt sent to 
TRSTimes, thanks to our fearless editor. My preliminary 
review of the printout is WOW! 

Anyway, since I am running out of steam and subjects, 
I would like to say that although I have voiced some 
criticisms about Allwrite I think that it is a spectacular 
program. It was well ahead of its time and it does an 
amazing amount of things in a small amount of memory 
(by today's standards): If I didn't like it, it wouldn't be the 
program I use, by far, the most on myTRS-80. If anything, 
Allwrite alone has saved me from needing a larger system. 
If I didn't use it, I wouldn't have been able to say as much 
as I have about it. I guarantee you that I am not the only 
user out there who feels this way. In fact, if you have read 
this far, you probably feel that way too. 



Geinfltne Madio Sli^ck Brlve Boxes witli Controller, P- 



9 rower supply 5 
S 635 tnstaUatloii JCL indudede 



DociimeiitatloE and new copy of MISOSYS RSHARD5/6 Included. 




10 Meg $225 ^ 15 Meg $275 ■ -- 35 Meg $475 
Shipping costs add to all prices 



:oy T. Beck 



IS Angeles. 




TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 21 



A FAST SYSTEM DRIVE 

128K MODEL 4 MEMDISK 

By Lance Wolstmp 



If someone offered to install an extra disk drive in your 
128K Model 4, would you turn it down? Of course you 
wouldn't. Well, that extra disk drive has already been 
installed and, while it does not offer an abundance of data 
storage, it is very fast - much faster than than the 
speediest hard drive. 

Except for LeScript, Visicalc and a handful of others, 
most Model 4 application programs will completely ignore 
the upper 64K of memory in your machine. This means 
that, most of the time, it is wasted. Now, since you paid 
for this memory, why not take advantage of it and speed 
up your machine? 

Your LS-DOS system disk contains a file called MEM- 
DISK/DCT. This file allows the unused upper memory 
banks to be configured as a high speed disk drive, known 
as a memdisk. When the memdisk is active you can copy 
files to and from it, just like a normal drive. The only thing 
to keep in mind is that when the machine is turned off or, 
heaven forbid, the electricity is discontinued for any 
reason, all files in the memdisk are lost. Be sure to copy 
important data from the memdisk to a real disk on a 
frequent basis. 

To set up the memdisk, type the following directly from 
the DOS prompt: 
SYSTEM (DRIVE = 6,DRIVER = "MEMDISK") 

Because I have 3 floppy drives and a hard disk con- 
figured with 3 partitions, I use the next available drive slot 
for my memdisk -- drive :6 -- but you can use any unused 
drive number for your setup. 

The above command executes the MEMDISK/DCT 
program and on the screen you will see: 
<A> Bank (Primary Memory) 
<B> Bank 1 
<C> Bank 2 
< D > Bank 1 and 2 
<E> Disable MemDISK 

Which type of allocation - A, B, C, D, or E 

If you want the largest possible memdisk, choose Bank 
1 and 2 by pressing: D 

You will now be prompted: 
Single or Double Density <S, D> ? 

Choose double density by pressing: D 



Next you will be asked: 
Do you wish to Format it < Y/N > ? 

Press: Y. Fourteen cylinders of memdisk (0 through 1 3) 
will be formatted, verified and. If everything went correctly, 
a message will appear telling you: 
MemDISK Successfully Installed. 

This means that Memdisk is active and can now be 
treated as a regular drive. For example, typing DIR :6 will 
display the directory of memdisk. Since no files reside 
here yet (pther than the invisible BOOT/SYS and DIR/SYS 
files), the directory will be empty. Note that you have 57K 
of storage space. 

Now, what can a memdisk be used for? The answer, of 
course, is that it can be used for just about anything your 
imagination will allow. Personally, I use memdisk to speed 
up DOS by reducing the system disk access. 

Each time you issue a DOS library command, the 
appropriate overlay file must be loaded from the system 
disk in drive :0. As physical disk access is relatively slow, 
this takes time. To avoid this, I copy all my system files up 
to the memdisk with: BACKUP /SYS:0 :6 (S) 

To finish, I now switch memdisk from drive :6 to drive 
:0, thus making DOS think it is the system drive. At the 
same time the normal drive :0 becomes drive :6. Issue the 
command: SYSTEM (SYSTEM = 6) 

If it is too much trouble to issue these commands each 
time you boot, you can write a /JCL file to automate the 
process. The one I use is called STARTUP/JCL, and it lists 
as follows: 

SYSTEM (DRIVE = 6,DRIVER = "MEMDISK") 

D 

D 

Y 

BACKUP /SYS:0 :6 (S) 

SYSTEM (SYSTEM = 6) 

Now, whenever you want a memdisk, you simply type: 
DO STARTUP from the DOS prompt or, if you want the 
memdisk active each time you boot, use the AUTO com- 
mand by typing: AUTO DO STARTUP 

That is all there is to it. Not overly difficult, and very 
much worth the effort. 



Page 22 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 




By Graeme Draper 



I read with great interest Ted Barnes article from 'old' 
England in the Jan/Feb issue of the TRSTimes. As the 
person kindly referred to as a 'very knowiedgable chap' I 
felt it appropriate to write with a slightly different perspec- 
tive on TRS80 in the UK. 

My love of Tandy equipment starts 2 or 3 years before 
Ted does, in about 1977, with one explanation as to the 
computer sales figures that Tandy was able to report at 
this time. As a teacher of Physics in a very large secon- 
dary school (11-18 year old pupils) I was always looking 
for ways to spice up the extensive practical work that we 
undertook. I know that many of my colleges around this 
rather small country were trying to do the same thing, and 
the arrival of the nearly affordable microcomputer looked 
like this would be possible. 

Some of us had been teaching BASIC for a number of 
years, often begging time on a mainframe or minicom- 
puter at the local college, town hall or a friendly parents 
company. We had persuaded the examination boards to 
produce examination to test the new subject of Computer 
Studies which, although somewhat narrow, gave 
credibility to a new subject in the curriculum. At this time 
there were a few machines in the race, but it was the 
Commodore Pet series that was being pushed towards 
the education market. Towards the end of one financial 
year my education authority had some money to spend 
and there was no doubt that the microcomputer had to be 
bought - one machine between 19 secondary and 120 
primary schools! 

Investigating all of the Commodore agents revealed a 
minimum of 3 months waiting, and then you were often 
made to feel that they were doing you a favour. As a 
passing thought a local Tandy shop was approached who 
offered a Model 1 with a monitor, cassette recorder, a set 
of well written manuals AND a copy of Dancing Demon. 
This was too good to be true, but what closed the deal 
was the fact that it could go in the back of the car straight 
away. 

This was the beginning and over the next 3 years mine 
became a 'Tandy' local education authority with every 
secondary and a number of primary schools buying 
Model 1 and then McMJel 3's. This pattern was obviously 
repeated in a number of the other 104 educational 



authorities where little clusters of educational experts 
gathered after school to write software which by our 
standards in schools today was rather crude, but which 
often gave hours of pleasure and excitement as well as 
valuable educational experiences. 

What happened to computers and information technol- 
ogy in British schools throughout the 80's is the subject 
of an article in itself, especially why Tandy lost a poten- 
tially massive educational market by ignoring a piece of 
design advice which they implemented a few years too 
late. What happen to me is that I got hooked. I now own 
a Model 1, three Model 3's, three Model 4's, 2 Model 16's, 
a Model 102 and 2 Buses, one double decker and one 
single decker. I have moved on from teaching children to 
training adults in Word Processing, Desk top Publishing 
and Computer Aided Design. 




Although I spend many hours each day with 386 
machines with Super VGA and 320 Meg hard disc, I still 
get the greatest thrill from making one of my old machines 
do what they were never intended for. As to being a very 
knowiedgable chap, that is all relative, there are many 
members of NATGUG in the UK who know much more 
than me and I am sure that your readers in the States have 
a much greater breadth of knowledge about the TRS80 
world, especially hardware from third party vendors which 
never made a great Impact upon this country. 

Oh yes, why the buses? I design and convert buses 
into fully equipped mobile computer classrooms and ex- 
hibition vehicles that can travel around the country teach- 
ing in areas were a suitable classroom is not usually 
available. 



Graeme Draper is a consultant for Centre for Com- 
puters in Education and Training, and can be readied at 
University of Salford, Salford, M5 4WT, Great Britain. 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 23 



Zorlof Word 
Processing System 

by Fred Blechman 



ZORLOF The Magnificent Word Processing System 

Anitek Software Products 

P.O. Box 361 136 

Melbourne, PL 32936 

(407)259-9397 

(See UPDATE at end. IMPORTANT!!!) 

"Zorlof The Magnificent Word Processing System" is 
the unlikely name for an incredibly versatile, easy to use, 
inexpensive word processor. It seems to have most of the 
features of much more expensive and complex word 
processors, yet few of the disadvantages. Although, as 
with all sophisticated microcomputer programs, it will take 
some time and effort to learn to use all the features, you 
can have Zorlof up and running in a short time (AFTER 
you read through the manual) doing the most common 
things. From then on you add more and more features as 
you need them. I suppose there are some esoteric func- 
tions it won't perform, but I haven't found any yet that I 
need! 

The first section of the manual, "Getting Started", is 
included on the Zorlof disk as sample text. This allows you 
to compare the text and formatting commands with the 
actual printed results - a very nice touch. You actually 
learn by example and use rather than just reading the 
manual. You can modify the sample text at will, trying out 
all kinds of variations, just to see what happens. 

Over 50 Printers Supported 

Word processing has developed a vocabulary of its 
own, but bear with me as I try to cover some of Zorlof's 
features. For one thing, many word processors are blind 
to the printer you're using, not allowing you to use many 
of the printer features. Zorlof supports over fifty popular 
printers - parallel or serial - and most of their features. 

For example, on those printers that offer proportional 
character spacing, underlining, holding, subscripts or su- 
perscripts, by simply specifying your printer designation 
at the beginning of your text Zorlof will send the proper 
character codes to your printer. The same applies to 
condensed and wide lettering, or even Graftrax italics. You 
can specify alignment of left margin, right nnargin, both 
margins or centering of any line or group of lines. You can 
set tabs or indent text on both the left and right side, and 
you can specify different margins for odd and even pages! 
If you've ever produced a manual or book, you can 



appreciate how nice it is to be able to have the left and 
right pages formatted so the center margin is generous. 

Page numbering is supported, of course, but you can 
also put titles and page numbers at the top or bottom (or 
both) of each sheet, and they can be different for odd and 
even pages. Each header or footer can run up to three 
lines. You can pause printing between pages when using 
single sheets, and you can merge a mailing list and data 
file with the text file to produce personalized documents. 
You can print all or any part or parts of a text with printer 
on-off commands in the text. Page lengths and line spac- 
ing are specified, as well as the placement of the first line 
on a page. 

Although it may seem very complex to the casual 
reader, because of the large number of print formatting 
options, the built-in defaults give you plain-vanilla output 
without any commands at all! It's only when you wish 
something different than the normal default that you must 
specify. That's why it's so easy to get started with Zorlof. 

Text Editing Functions 

While the formatting capabilities of Zorlof are extensive, 
the majority of your effort will be in actually generating text 
on the screen. I'm happyto report that Zorlof is fast, logical 
and crash-proof. After using some other word processors 
that lost all text without warning, or dropped letters while 
word-wrapping to the next line, I was delighted to find 
neither of these problems with Zorlof. The key combina- 
tions used to delete characters, words or lines - or even 
blocks of text - were logical and simple. Inserting text or 
moving blocks of text is a breeze, and the cursor controls 
are rapid and efficient. 

Some of the features available during text entry are 
outstanding. For example, you can get a disk directory - 
of any disk - at any time. By placing the cursor on any 
filename you can load that file at the text cursor position, 
making text merging a pleasure. 

I use various letterheads as files, and load one in at the 
beginning of the text. If I'm writing a personal letter, a 
magazine article, correspondence regarding my Amway 
business, or a letter to a software customer, I use one of 
the four letterheads I've put on the Zorlof disk as separate 
files, and then go from there. The directory feature also 
allows me to kill obsolete files on any disk to make room 
for the current text file. 

And, critically important if you have been using another 
word processor and already have a bunch of disk files in 
the "other" format, Zorlof loads any ASCII file into text! 
Boy, this was really important to me, since I had been 
using the Electric Pencil 2.0 for about a year and had 
numerous files I occasionally needed to update. They 
loaded perfectly into Zorlof and required virtually no 



Page 24 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - Apr/May 1991 



change to use with Zoriof. I now save them all as Zoriof 
files. 

Actually, Zoriof can accommcdate five different types 
of files - Zoriof, Apparat EDTASM, Radio Shack EDTASM, 
BASIC and ASCII. This means you should be able to use 
files from most other word processors, since most save 
theirfiies in ASCII. Also, you can edit BASIC programs with 
word-processing convenience (If the file was saved in 
ASCII), and even have limited renumbering capability. 
Furthermore, you can save a Zoriof file in ASCII for use on 
other word processors! You can even display and edit any 
type of data or program file in "ZAP" (byte-hexidecimal) 
format. The possibilities are enormous. 

I had serious problems with Electric Pencil keeping up 
with my hunt-and-peck typing during inserts or at the 
beginning of word-wrapped lines. I have yet to "outrun" 
Zoriof, even with bursts of high speed entry, and even in 
the insert mode, since it is written entirely in Z80 machine 
language with type-ahead key-stroke buffering. 

Justification and word wrapping (moving a partial word 
to the next line when in won't fit on the current line) occur 
in real time on the screen. Reverse word-wrapping fills an 
incomplete line above the current line. At anytime you can 
scroll the screen up or down, or you can go to the top or 
end screen of text without scrolling. You can dump the 
contents of the screen to the printer anytime. You can 
search text anytime for a string of up to 28 characters 
(including "wild-card" characters), or you can both search 
and replace a string with another string. Not only can you 
move blocks of text, but you can also copy blocks, or 
delete them. 

Printer Preview 

Perhaps one of the most convenient and frustration- 
saving features of Zoriof is its print-preview function. In- 
stead of printing out the text only to find out* halfway 
through that you omitted some kind of formatting com- 
mand, you can preview the text on the screen. This will 
show headers, footers, page breaks. Justification, line 
spacing and just about everything but type fonts, under- 
lining, subscripting and superscripting (since the display 
can't show those). If you spot a problem, you can correct 
the text or printer commands BEFORE taking the time to 
print it out first. 

Zoriof even allows access to special characters and 
printer codes that you may wish to use. Line width can be 
set from 5 to 1 28; If you specify more than the 64 charac- 
ters the display can show on a single line, then two display 
lines will be used. 

Two lines continuously resident at the top of the screen 
tell you the filename (which you can save to disk anytime), 
the line width (I use 62, for compatibility with my Electric 



Pencil files), the number of words (right now this reads 
1 250, more than the editor wanted!), number of lines, and 
the free memory size. (Free memory with a 48K Model III 
is 25708 before any text is entered). There are also spaces 
to enter a "search" and "replace" string. Having these at 
the top of the screen is not at all distracting, as one might 
expect. 

I was surprised that multiple printer copies could not 
be commanded directly. A print queue allows up to 13 files 
to be printed one after another, and you could make 
multiple copies of a single file that way. Also, if you have 
a hardware spooler that allows multiple copies, you could 
pre-program any number of copies. Also, the version of 
Zoriof I have (2.1 9D) does not allow you to exit Zoriof and 
return to the text; the only exit is pressing the computer 
RESET button. Exit/return, I understand, may be provided 
in a forthcoming release. 

The ^-page detailed manual is excellent! It's bound in 
a three-ring binder that has pockets front and back for the 
disk and any notes of your own. A cardboard card acts as 
both an index and command summary. It lists 59 editing 
functions and 39 printer commands, with summary of use 
and manual page number for detailed explanation. Fur- 
thermore, in preparation for this article, I had occasion to 
call Anitek to verify some facts. Peter Ray, Zoriof 's creator, 
was extremely helpful, and schedules appointment times 
for registered customers to call with questions. It appears 
that Anitex not only has a great product, but they provide 
the necessary support as well. 

If you have the impression that I like Zoriof, you are 
close. Actually, I love It! 



UPDATE 12/1 1/90: Although the foregoing article was 
originally written in 1983, 1 STILL USE ZORLOF for all my 
writing. I've written almost 500 magazine articles and five 
books about microcomputers using Zoriof on my TRS-80 
M(xieilllor4! 

I'm over here at TRSTimes as I write this on Lance's 
Model 4P, updating this and writing a special story for the 
magazine about using TRS-80s with an HP LaserJet II 
printer. 

Unfortunately, ZORLOF is no longer being sold by 
Anitek. It was superseded years ago with "LeScript" for 
both the TRS-80 and IBM PC. LeScript has all the features 
of Zoriof and more - but takes up memory in my Model III 
and 4 that I don't want to lose - so I've stayed with Zoriof. 
If you are not committed to a word processor, try LeScript. 
Call the above phone number for the latest information 
and prices. 

Best Wishes!.... Fred Blechman 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - Apr/May 1991 



Page 25 



THE 
TRSTimes 
AUCTION 



It is time to make some space In the 
TRSTimes storage room, so we are of- 
fering the following Model I, ill, 4 Bl 
Color Computer Items for sale in an 
auction format. We will accept bids by 
mail for any or all of the items listed up 
until June 25, 1991. The bidders with 
the best offers will at that time be 
notified by mail and arrangements for 
payment and shipping will be made 
(note that shipping cost will be extra). 

Send your bid to: 

TRSTimes AUCTION 

5721 TOPANGA CANYOW BLVD. #4 

WOODLAMD HILLS, CA 91367 



Model I 

® TRSDOS 2.3 (disk & manual) RS 26-031 

® TRSDOS 2.3 (disk & manual) RS 26-031 

® TRSDOS 2.3 (disk only) RS 26-031 

® TRSDOS DOUBLE-DENSITY DISK SYSTEM 
(manual only) RS 26-1143 

® LDOS 5. 1 .4 (disks & manual) from LOGICAL SYS- 
TEMS, INC. 

® THE LDOS FIX DISK (disk only) from LOGICAL 
SYSTEMS, INC. 

® MULTIDOS 1 .7DD (disk & manual) from ALPHABIT 
COMMUNICATIONS, LTD. 

® TRS-80 INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEM (disk - 
no manual) RS 26-1553 

® SCRIPSIT WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM TRAIN- 
ING PROGRAM (5 cassettes & manual) RS 26-1 505 

« DISK SCRIPSIT & WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM 
TRAINING PROGRAM (disk, 3 cassettes & manual) 
RS 26-1563 

® INVENTORY + (Eduware - manual & disk) from 
EDUWARE 



• INVENTORY + (Eduware - manual & disk) from 
EDUWARE 

® SUPER SCRIPSIT & PROFFREAD PROGRAM 
(disks - no manual) RS 26-1590 

• VISICALC (disk only) RS 26-1 566 

® ADVENTURE - THE SYSTEM (disk & manual) 
fromTHE ALTERNATE SOURCE 

• THE PRODUCER - the professional program writer 
(manual & disk) from SOTFI 

® SOLE (disk & manual) from LSI & GALACTIC 
SOFTWARE 

® PROFILE (manual only) RS 26-1562 

® COBOL (Model I & III disks & manual) RS 26-2203 

® BUSINESS MAILING LIST (Model I & III disks and 
manual) RS 26-1558 

® IN-MEMORY INFORMATION SYSTEM (3 casset- 
tes & manual) RS 26-1502 

• IN-MEMORY INFORMATION SYSTEM (3 casset- 
tes & manual) RS 26-1502 

• ECJiTOR/ASSEMBLER and TBUG (cassettes & 
manual ) RS 26-2002 

• TRS-80 VIDEOTEX (cassette & manual) RS 26- 
2220 

® TRS-80 VIDEOTEX (manual only) RS 26-2220 

• MICROSOFT'S DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER (disks 
& manual) RS 26-2202 

• GENERAL LEDGER (manual only) RS 26-1 552 

• NEWSCRIPT (disks & manual) from PROSOFT 

• FIND IT QUICK (disk & manual) from INSTANT 
SOFTWARE 

• NEWCLOCK-80 (disk only) from ALPHA 
PRODUCTS 

• OMNITERM (disk only) from LINDBERGH SYS- 
TEMS 

• NEWDOS/80 V.2 (disk & manual) from APPARAT 

• CHECKBOOK FOR NEWDOS/80 (2 disks) from 
JERRY LATHAM 

• STOCKS & BONDS (tape & manual) from AVALON 
HILL 

® SKY WARRIOR (disk) from ADVENTURE INTER- 
NATIONAL 

® MISSILE ATTACK (disk) from ADVENTURE INTER- 
NATIONAL 

® SUPER SCRIPT (disk only) from ACORN 
SOFTWARE PRODUCTS 

® INVENTORY "S" (disk & manual) from THE 
SOFTWARE EXCHANGE 

@ ARCADE-80 (disk & manual) from DATASOFT, INC 

® ADVANCED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (8 cassettes 
& manual) RS 26-1705 

® TEMPLE OF APSHAI (disk & manual) from 
AUTOMATED SIMULATIONS 

® RESCUE AT RIEGEL (disk only) from 
AUTOMATED SIMULATIONS 

® TUESDAY MORNING QUARTERBACK (disk only) 
from AUTOMATED SIMULATIONS 

• MICROSOFT ADVENTURE (disk & manual) from 
MICROSOFT 



Page 26 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - Apr/May 1991 



ADVENTURE 9 (disk only) from ADVENTURE IN- 
TERNATIONAL 

SAVAGE ISLAND (disk only) from ADVENTURE 
INTERNATIONAL 

THE COUNT & STRANGE ODYSSEY (disk only) 
from ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 



Model III 



CHECKWRITER-80 (manual only) RS 26-1584 
LDOS 5.1.4 (disk & manual) RS 26-2214 
LDOS 5.1.4 (disk & manual) from LOGICAL SYS- 
TEMS, INC. 

LDOS 5.1.3 HARD DISK OPERATING SYSTEM 
(disks only) RS 26-1130 

LDOS 5.1.3 HARD DISK OPERATING SYSTEM 
(disks only) RS 26-1 130 

DOS PLUS 3.4 (disk only) from MICRO SYSTEMS 
SOFTWARE 

MEMDISK (disk only) from LOGICAL SYSTEMS, 
INC. 

FED II (disk & manual) from LOGICAL SYSTEMS, 
INC. 

UTILITY PACKAGE #1 (disk only) from LOGICAL 
SYSTEMS, INC. 

POWERTOOL (disk only) RS 26-2022 
LAZY WRITER & LAZY FONT (disks & manual) 
from ALPHABIT COMMINICATIONS 
VERSALEDGER II (disk only) from COM- 
PUTRONICS 

VERSARECEIVABLES (disk only) from COM- 
PUTRONICS 

TASMON (Model I/Ill disk only) from THE ALTER- 
NATE SOURCE 

ALPHAKEY (disk, cassette & manual) RS 26-1718 
BUSINESS CHECKWRITER (disks & manual) RS 
26-1585 

PROFILE (Mcxiel I & III disks & manual) RSD 26- 
1562 

COBOL (McxJel I & III disks & manual) RS 26-2203 
BUSINESS MAILING LIST (Model I & III disks and 
manual) RS 26-1558 

SUPER UTILITY PLUS (disk & manual) from 
BREEZE/QSD, INC. 

SUPER UTILITY PLUS 3.0 (disk & manual) from 
BREEZE/QSD, INC. 

EHNBAS (disk & manual) from THE CORNSOFT 
GROUP 

QWERTY DAISY (disk & manual) from MED SYS- 
TEMS SOFTWARE 

CYBORG/SUPER DIRECTORY (disk & manual) 
from COMPUTER SHACK 
MODEM 80 (Model I/Ill disk & manual) from THE 
ALTERNATE SOURCE 
VISICALC (disk & manual) RS 26-1566 



• NEWSCRIPT (Model I & III disks & manual) from 
PROSOFT 

• AIDS PLUS II (disks & manual) from SOFT 
TRENDS 

• BASIC FASTER AND BETTER LIBRARY (disk) from 
IJG 

• BASIC FASTER AND BETTER DEMONSTRATION 
(disk) from IJG 

• HIGH MOTIVATION READING SERIES: DRACULA 
(disk, cassette & manual) RS 26-2515 

• HIGH MOTIVATION READING SERIES: MOBY 
DICK (disk, cassette & manual) RS 26-2516 

@ HIGH MOTIVATION READING SERIES: THE 
HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES (disk, tape & 
manual) RS 26-2514 

• ZAXXON (Model I/Ill tape) RS 26-1 960 

© WITNESS (disk & manual) from INFOCOM 
® ZORK I (disk & manual) RS 26-1 951 

• ZORK I (disk & manual) RS 26-1951 

9 MONTE PLAYS' SCRABBLE (disk & manual) RS 
26-1954 

• MONTE PLAYS SCRABBLE (manual only) RS 26- 
1954 

• MONTE PLAYS MONOPOLY (disk & manual) RS 
26-1 952 

• EMPIRE OF THE OVERMIND (disk & manual) from 
AVALON HILL 

• TIMETABLE (disk & manual) from THE 
SOFTWARE GUILD 

© SPACE CHASE (disk & manual) from THE 

SOFTWARE GUILD 
® LASER BLAZER (disk & manual) from THE 

SOFTWARE GUILD 

• REGILLIAN WORM (disk) from THE SOFTWARE 
GUILD 

• REGILLIAN WORM (disk & manual) from THE 
SOFTWARE GUILD 

• EUREKA (disk & manual) from THE SOFTWARE 
GUILD 

© MONITOR 5 (disk only) from THE SOFTWARE 
GUILD 

• SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS 3 (disk & manual) from 
THE SOFTWARE GUILD 

• FROGGER (disk & manual) RS 26-1 959 

• DEFENSE COMMAND/STELLAR ESCORT (disk & 
manual) RS 26-1926 

• COSMIC FIGHTER/METEOR MISSION II (disk & 
manual) RS 26-1924 

• TEMPLE OF THE SUN (disk) from THE 
PROGRAMMER'S GUILD 

• METEOR MISSION 2 (disk) from BIG 5 

• METEOR MISSION 2 (disk) from BIG 5 

• GALAXY INVASION (disk) from BIG 5 

@ DEFENSE COMMAND (disk) from BIG 5 
® STELLAR ESCORT (disk) from BIG 5 
® ATTACK FORCE (disk) from BIG 5 

• SEA DRAGON (disk) from ADVENTURE INTERNA- 
TIONAL 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - Apr/May 1991 



Page 27 



• VOODOO CASTLE/THE COUNT/STRANGE 
ODESSEY (disk) from THE SOFTWARE EX- 
CHANGE 



Model 4 



• MODEL 4/4P DISK SYSTEM OWNER'S MANUAL 
(6.1 disk & manual) RS 26-0313 

• TRSDOS VERSION 6 (6.2 disk & manual) RS 26- 
0316 

• MODEL 4/4P DISK SYSTEM OWNER'S MANUAL 
(6.2 disk, 6.2 HARD DISK OPERATING SYSTEM 
INITIALIZATION disk & manual) RS 26-0316 

o LS-DOS 6.3.0 (disk only - no manual) from LSI 

• VISICALC (disk & manual) RS 26-1 520 
« DESK MATE (disks only) RS 26-1 608 

® MULTI BASIC (3 disks - no manual) from ALCOR 

SYSTEMS 
9 ALLWRITE (disk - no manual) FROM prosoft 
« THE CREATOR (disk - no manual) from TNT 

SOFTWARE 
® LONG & LOUD (disk - manual) from SPECTRE 

TECHNOLOGIES, INC 
» REMBRANDT (2 disks - no manual) from SPECTRE 

TECHNOLOGIES, INC 



COLOR COMPUTER 



COLOR COMPUTER 3 & MANUALS 

COLOR MONITOR CM-8 

MULTI PAK INTERFACE RS 26-3024 

COCO DISK CONTROLLER RS 26-3029 

DISK CONTROLLER from HARD DRIVE 

SPECIALISTS 

2 DISK DRIVES 

DELUXE JOYSTICK RS 26-301 2A 

PLAY WITH LANGUAGE (disks & manual) RS 26- 

2538 

COLOR DISK EDTASM (disk & manual) RS 26- 

3254 

18 MONTHLY RAINBOW DISKS from RAINBOW 

MAGAZINE 

DESKMATE 3 (disks & manual) RS 26-3262 

TRIVIA FEVER (disk & manual) RS 26-3295 

COLOR SCRIPSIT (rom cartridge & manual) RS 

26-3105 

EDTASM -H (rom cartridge & manual) RS 26-3250 

BRIDGE TUTOR (rom cartridge & manual) RS 26- 

3158 

CARD GAMES (cassettes & manual) RS 26-3320 

GIN CHAMPION (rom cartridge & manual) RS 26- 

3083 

PINBALL (rom cartridge & manual) RS 26-3052 

MUSIC (rom cartridge & manual) RS 26-3151 

ROMAN CHECKERES (rom cartridge & manual) 

RS 26-3071 



® DUNGEONS OF DAGGORATH (rom cartridge & 
manual) RS 26-3083 

« TYPING TUTOR (rom cartrWge & manual) RS 26- 
3152 

® CLOWNS & BALLOONS (rom cartridge & manual) 
RS 26-3087 

® MATH BINGO (rom cartridge & manual) RS 26- 
3150 

e MARS 80 (disk) from AAEDVARK 

® ICE CASTLES (disk) from SPECTRAL AS- 
SOCIATES 

® ADVENTURE PAK (disk) from SPECTRAL AS- 
SOCIATES 

® SYZYGY (disk) from SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 

® LUNAR ROVER (disk) from SPECTRAL AS- 
SOCIATES 

® SPECTRUM DOS 1.0 (disk) 

® 64K UTILITY DISK 

® DECATHLON (disk) from SPECTRAL AS- 
SOCIATES 

® SPIT-N-IMAGE (disk) from COMPUTIZE, INC. 

® TRSCOPY (disk & manual) RS 26-3263 

• OS-9 (disks & manuals) RS 26-3030 

• GHANA BWANA (disk & manual) RS 26-3293 

# THE SANDS OF EGYPT (disk) RS 26-32^ 
© SHAMUS (disk) RS 26-3289 

® BEDLAM (cassette) from Radio Shack 
® ADVENTURE TRILOGY (cassette) from SOFTLAW 
CORP. 

# MS. GOBBLER (cassette) from SPECTRAL AS- 
SOCIATES 

# PAC-DROIDS (cassette) from THE PROGRAM- 
MERS GUILD 

• POOYAN (cassette) RS 26-3048 

• SCREEN PRINT PROGRAM (cassette) from 
RADIO SHACK 

# TAPE OMNI CLONE (cassette) from PRICKLY- 
PEAR SOFTWARE 

® TOWER OF FEAR (cassette) from THE PROGRAM- 
MERS GUILD 
® ZAXXON (cassette) RS 26-3062 
® MADNESS AND THE MINOTAUR (cassette) from 

RADIO SHACK 
® RAAKA-TU (cassette) from RADIO SHACK 
® KLENDATHU (cassette) from RADIO SHACK 
® TREK COLOR 80 (cassette) from AARDVARK 
® CLONE MASTER (cassette) from PRICKLY-PEAR 

SOFTWARE 
® SCARFMAN (cassette) from THE CORNSOFT 

GROUP 
® PLANET INVASION (cassette) from SPECTRAL 

ASSOCIATES 
® PYRAMID (cassette) from RADIO SHACK 
® BLACK SANCTUM (cassette) from MARK DATA 

PRODUCTS 
® CALIXTO ISLAND (cassette) from MARK DATA 

PRODUCTS 



Page 28 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - Apr/May 1991 



SHENANIGANS (cassette) from MARK DATA 
PRODUCTS 

COOKIE MONSTER'S LETTER CRUNCH (cas- 
sette) from CCW 

PENGON (cassette) from SPECTRAL AS- 
SOCIATES 

RADIO BALL (cassette) RS 26-3319 
RAINBOW ADVENTURES ON TAPE (cassette) 
from RAINBOW MAGAZINE 
THE SECOND RAINBOW ADVENTURES TAPE 
(CASSETTE) FROM RAINBOW MAGAZINE 
CHROMASETTE (entire set) 






r,i*j^S^k^'"^^!*'^^^^^^'^'^^'*fe^%^>p^^ 



BOOKS 



BASIC COMPUTER PROGRAMS FOR BUSINESS 
VOL. 1 from HAYDEN BOOK CO. 
THE SOFTSIDE SAMPLER from SOFTSIDE PUB- 
LICATIONS 

PROGRAMS FOR BEGINNERS ON THE TRS-80 
from HAYDEN BOOK CO. 
1001 THINGS TO DO WITH YOUR TRS-80 from 
TAB BOOKS, INC. 

INSIDE LEVEL II from MUMFORD MICRO SYS- 
TEMS 

INSIDE LEVEL II from MUMFORD MICRO SYS- 
TEMS 

INSIDE SUPER UTILITY PLUS from POWERSOFT 
THE TRS-80 MICRO COMPUTER TECHNICAL 
REFERENCE HANDBOOK RS 26-2103 
TRSDOS 2.1 & DISK BASIC REFERENCE 
MANUAL RS 26-2104 
SUPERMAP + from FULLER SOFTWARE 
DISK INTERFACING GUIDE from WILLIAM BAR- 
DEN 

DISK INTERFACING GUIDE from WILLIAM BAR- 
DEN 

FAST BASIC - BEYOND TRS-80 BASIC from JOHN 
WILEY & SONS, INC. 

GETTING STARTED WITH CP/M from HAYDEN 
BOOK CO. 

80 PROGRAMS FOR THE TRS-80 from 80 MICRO 
COMPUTER GRAPHICS WITH 29 READY TO RUN 
PROGRAMS from TAB BOOKS, INC. 
TEACH YOUR TRS-80 TO PROGRAM ITSELF from 
TAB BOOKS, INC. 

LEARNING LEVEL II from DAVID LIEN 
TRS-80 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE from HUBERT S. 
HOWE JR. 

TRS-80 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 
RS 62-2006 

Z-80 PROGRAMMING & INTERFACING BOOK 1 
from BLACKBURG CONTINUING EDUCATION 
SERIES 

TRS-80 INTERFACING BOOK 2 from BLACK- 
SBURG CONTINUOUS EDUCATION SERIES 



HOW TO PROGRAM THE Z-80 from RODNEY 
ZAKS 

THE BASIC CONVERSIONS HANDBOOK FOR 
APPLE, TRS-80, AND PET USERS from HAYDEN 
BOOKS 

INTRODUCTION TO TRS-80 LEVEL II BASIC 
PROGRAMMING RS 26-21 16 
80 MICRO'S REVIEW GUIDE from 80 MICRO 
ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO THE TRS-80 from IN- 
FOWORLD 

INTRODUCTION TO T-BUG from DON & KURT 
INMAN 

THE MCWILLIAMS II WORD PROCESSOR IN- 
STRUCTION MANUAL from PETER A. MCWIL- 
LIAMS 

INTRODUCTION TO TRS-80 DATA FILES (book & 
disk) from JOHN D. ADAMS 
TRS-80 DATA FILE PROGRAMMING RS 62-2085 
TRS-80 ADVANCED LEVEL II BASIC RS 62-2072 
101 PROGRAMMING SURPRISES & TRICKS FOR 
YOUR TRS-80 COMPUTER from TAB BOOKS, 
INC. 

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE GRAPHICS FOR THE 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER from DON & KURT 
INMAN 

CP/M USER GUIDE from OSBORNE/MCGRAW- 
HILL 

OSBORNE CP/M USER GUIDE from OS- 
BORNE/MCGRAW-HILL 

CP/M ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 
from PRENTICE-HALL 

THE RAINBOW BOOK OF SIMULATIONS from 
RAINBOW MAGAZINE 

THE RAINBOW BOOK OF ADVENTURES from 
RAINBOW MAGAZINE 

THE SECOND RAINBOW BOOK OF ADVEN- 
TURES from RAINBOW MAGAZINE 
PROGRAMMING THE 6809 from SYBEK 
6809 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 
from LANCE A. LEVENTHAL 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER ASSEMBLY LAN- 
GUAGE PROGRAMMING RS 62-2077 
THE COMPLETE RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 RS 
26-31^ 

500 POKES, PEEKS 'N EXECS FOR THE TRS-80 
COLOR COMPUTER from MICROCOM 
SOFTWARE 

RAINBOW MAGAZINE (from # 1) 
COLOR COMPUTER NEWS 
HOT COCO (all Issues) 



TRSTiiUcs 
niagazina 


rasn- 


hEB 


Don't IfiflvA 


3mS (^ 


voi.r l-HX-HO 




wltlioul It! 


WI>.HI 


bcA 




TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - Apr/May 1991 



Page 29 



We have bought collections of software from people leaving the TRS-80 world. As fast as we can, we are 
weeding out the good Public Domain and Shareware from the Commercial programs and the junk. So far, 

we have come up with 28 disks for the Model I & III, and 10 disks for the Model 4, 

PD#16: amchase/bas, constell/bas, filemastr/bas, 



Model I & III 

PD#1: binclock/cmd, binclock/doc, checker/bas, check- 
er/doc, chomper/bas, cis/cmd, dduty3/cmd, driver/cmd, 
driver/doc, drivtime/cmd, mazeswp/bas, minibase/bas, 
minitest/dat, mx/cmd, piazza/bas, spdup/cmd, 
spdwn/cmd, vici/bas, vidSO/cmd, words/die. 
PD#2: creator/bas, editor/cmd, maze3d/cmd, 
miner/cmd, note/cmd, poker/bas, psycho/cmd, 
supdraw/cmd, vader/cmd 

PD#3: d/cmd, trsvoice/cmd, xmodem/cmd, xtS/cmd, 
xt3/txt, xthelp/dat 

PD#4: cobra/cmd, disklog/cmd, flight/bas, flight/doc, 
narzabur/bas, narzabur/dat, narzabur/his, narzabur/bct, 
othello/bas, vid80x24/cmd, vid80x24/txt 
PD#5: eliza/cmd, Iu31/cmd, sq31/cmd, usq31/cmd 
PD#6: clawdos/cmd, clawdos/doc, cocoxf40/cmd, 
dskrnam/bas, menu/cmd, ripper3/bas, sky2/bas, 
sky2/his, space/cmd, stocks/bas, trs13pat/bas, vid- 
sheet/bas 

PD#7: cards/bas, cities/bas, coder/bas, eye/bas, 
heataudt/bas, hicalc/bas, life/bas, moustrap/bas, 
ohare/bas, slots/bas, stars/cmd, taped it/bas 
PD#8: craps/bas, fighter/bas, float/bas, hangman/bas, 
jewels/cmd, lifespan/bas, varidump/bas, xindex/bas, 
xor/bas 

PD#9: bublsort/bas, chess/bas, finratio/bas, 
homebudg/bas, inflat/bas, mathdril/bas, midway/bas, 
nitefly/bas, pokrpete/bas, teaser/bas 
PD#10: Itc21/bas, Itc21/ins, lynched/bas, match/bas, 
math/bas, message/bas, message/ins, portfol/bas, 
portfol/ins, spellegg/bas, storybld/bas 
PD#11: alpha/bas, caterpil/cmd, cointoss/bas, 
crolon/bas, cube/cmd, dragon/cmd, fastgraf/bas, 
fastgraf/ins, lunarexp/bas, music/bas, music/ins, 
planets/bas, volcano/cmd 

PD#12: baccarat/bas, backpack/bas, backpack/ins, 
doodle/bas, dragons/bas, dragons/ins, king/bas, 
sinewave/bas, snoopy/bas, wallst/bas, wallst/ins 
PD#13: atomtabl/bas, boa/bas, chekbook/bas, con- 
quer/cmd, dominos/bas, morse/bas, mountain/bas, 
quiz/bas, signbord/bas, sketcher/bas 
PD#14: autoscan/bas, checkers/bas, craps/bas, 
ducks/bas, isleadv/bas, nim/bas, rtriangl/bas, 
sammy/cmd, typing/bas, wordpuzl/bas 
PD#15: budget/bas, corp/bas, corp/ins, fourcolr/bas, 
fullback/bas, grapher/bas, illusion/bas, jukebox/bas, 
ledger/bas, maze/cmd, reactest/bas, shpspree/bas, 
states/bas, tapecntr/bas, tiar/bas, tiar/ins 



foneword/bas, geometry/bas, heartalk/bas, hid- 

numbr/bas, Igame/bas, marvello/bas, powers/bas, 

scramble/bas, speed/bas, subs/bas 

PD#17: conundrm/bas, eclipse/bas, esp/bas, esp/ins, 

hustle/bas, jacklant/bas, mindblow/bas, othello/bas, 

pleng/bas, rubik/bas, t?end/bas, ufo/bas, veggies/bas 

PD#18: backgam/bas, chess/cmd, cosmip/cmd, dis- 

tance/bas, hexpawn/bas, music/cmd, stokpage/bas, 

texted/bas, texted/ins, trex/bas, twodates/bas, 

wanderer/bas 

PD#19: banner/bas, cresta/cmd, lander/bas, medi- 

cal/bas, moons/bas, par/bas, parchut/bas, pillbox/bas, 

readtrn/bas, replace/bas, ship/cmd, solomadv/bas, 

space/cmd, survival/bas 

PD#20: bomber/bas, bumbee/cmd, ciaadv/bas, 

dice31/bas, dice31/ins, diskcat1/bas, firesafe/bas, 

flashcrd/bas, hitnmiss/bas, mazegen/bas, mazes- 

cap/cmd, roulette/bas, seasonal/bas 

PD#21: aprfool/bas, catmouse/bas, d/cmd, escape/bas, 

header/bas, kalah/bas, mathwrld/bas, nameit/bas, 

note/cmd, photo/bas, read/cmd, syzygy/bas, 

timeshar/cmd, timeshar/doc, trace80/cmd, trsdir/cmd, 

worm/bas, yatz80/bas 

PD#22: arcade/bas, cube/cmd, eclipse/bas, Icd/bas, 

leastsqr/bas, medical/bas, million/bas, pwrplant/bas, 

round/bas, subway/bas, tapeid/bas 

PD#23: artil/bas, artil/ins, baseconv/bas, crushman/bas, 

dissert/bas, huntpeck/bas, jungle/bas, jungle/ins, mes- 

sages/bas, monitor/bas, monster/bas, moons/bas, 

ohmlaw/bas, stockpage/bas, tictacto/bas 

PD#24: baslist/asm, baslist/cmd, basiist/doc, 

cleaner3/cmd, cleaner3/doc, difkit1/bas, difkitl/doc, dir- 

patch/asm, dirpatch/cmd, e/cmd, ei/doc, i/cmd, new- 

map/bas, newmap/doc, varlst/asm, varlst/cmd, varlst/doc 

PD#25: copy/bas, copy/doc, dirpw/asm, dirpw/cmd, 

dirpw/doc, dskfmt/bas, dskfmt/doc, himap/asm, 

himap/cmd, huricane/bas, hv/bas, hv/doc, keydemo/bas, 

keyin/bas, keyin/doc, lazyptch/asm, lazyptch/doc, sal- 

vage/bas, salvage/doc,wpflt/asm, wpflt/fit 

PD#26: constell/bas, divisor/bas, frame/bas, heatfus/bas, 

heatfus/doc, hicalc/bas, mathlprt/bas, mathquiz/bas, 

molecule/bas, morscode/bas, phyalpha/bas, phyal- 

pha/doc, remaindr/bas, usa/bas, wiring/bas 

PD#27: engine/bas, fraction/bas, geosat/bas, 

grades/bas, julian/bas, lunarcal/bas, mailist/bas, metabo- 

li/bas,musictrn/bas, perindex/bas, potrack/bas 

PD#28: chainfil/bas, citoset/bas, convnum/bas, cur- 

sors/bas, cursors/doc, datamkr/bas, deprec/bas. 



Page 30 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 




s, leageriiJ/Das, 
ves/bas, ninteres/bas, 
bal/bas, rndbordr/bas 







, rem- 



Model 4 



M4G00DIES#1: day/cmd, day/txt. gomuku/cmd, 

llife/cmd. Ilife/doc, writer/cmd. writer/doc. writer/hip, 

yahtzee/bas 

M4G00DiES#2: arc4/cmd, arc4/doc, cia/bas, 

etimer/cmd, index/cmd, (ndex/dat, maif/bas, mail/txt, 

trscat/cmd, trscat/txt, util4/cmd, xt4/cmd. xt4/dat, 




M4GOODIES#3: convbase/bas, dates/bas, dctdsp/cmd, 
dmu/cmd, dmu/doc, dskcat5/cmd, dskcatS/doc, 
edftor/cmd, edrtor/doc, fedit/cmd, fkey/asm, fkey/cmd. 
fkey/doc, hangman/cmd, m/cmd» m/src, membrane/bas, 
nniniop2/cmd, miniop2/src, move/cmd, move/doc, othel- 
lo4/bas, scroiI4/cmd, scroll4/src, setdate6/cmd, set- 
date6/doc, setdate6/fix, spaceadv/bas, taxman/bas, 
utilbill/bas, utilbill/doc 
M4GOODIES#4: word wizard - disk 1 
M4GOODIES#5: word wizard - disk 2 
M4GOODIES#6: word wizard - disk 3 
M4GOODIES#7; cAlendar/cmd» castfadv/bas, civil- 
war/bas, crimeadv/bas, dctdsp/cmd, ed6/cmd, ed6/doc, 
edittext/bas, fedit/cmd, mail/bas, mail/txt, scramble/bas, 
states/bas, textpro/cmd, time4/bas, wizard/bas. 
wizard/doc, worldcap/bas 

M4GOODIES#8: books/bas, books/doc, dmu/cmd, 
dmu/doc, hamcalc/bas, hamhelp/bas. network/bas, net- 
work/doc, pirate/bas, pirate/doc, vmap/bas, vmap/doc, 
vmap2/bas, vmap2/doc, zork1/doc, zork2/doc, zork3/doc 
M4GOODIES#9: ft/cmd, ft/doc, pterm/cmd. pterm/doc. 
r/cmd, r/doc, scrconv/bas, scrconv/doc, video4/asm, 




checker/cmd, crossref/cmd, 
crossref/doc, ddlr/cmd, diskcat/cmd, diskcat/doc, 
division/bas, division/doc. getput/bas, getput/doc, 
host/cmd. hv/bas. hv/doc. maszap4/cmd, maszap4/doc, 
park/cmd, profile4/doc, protect/bas, protect/doc, 
rename/bas, replace/bas, restore/bas, rm/bas, 
scrndump/bas, scrndump/doc, super/hip, vers/cmd 



Each disk is $5.00 (U.S.) 

or get any 3 disks for $12.00 (U.S.) 

please specify the exact disks wanted. 

TRSTimes PD-DISKS 

5721 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 4 

Woodland Hills, CA. 91367 



MORE GOODIES 
FOR ^KQUR 'TRS-SO 



G4^ the latest k^lie of TRSLINK 




TRSLIJ^ IS the di$k-based magazine 
dedicated to providing continuing 

information for the TRS-80. 
;;;: A new iMM is published monthly, 
Piiblic Domain programs, "Sharewate**, articles, 
hints & tips^ nationwide ads, letters/ and more. 
THS|,lgC:pn bf obtained from your local 
TiflS'Sd BBS, or download it directly from: 

S/n/l #4 

(215) 848-5728 
(Philadelphia, PA.) 

Sysop: Luis Garcia-Barrio 

Believed it or not: 

TRSLINK tSfftEE 



^t? 



RADIO SHACK 
TANDY OWNERS! 

Find the computer 

equipment that TANDY 

no longer sells. 

PACIFIC COMPUTER EXCHANGE 

buys and sells used TANDY 

TRSDOS 
XENIX 




COMPUTERS & 
PERIPHERALS 

We sell ovorything from Modef 3's and 4's 
to Tandy 6000's. 1000's to 5000's. Laptops, 
and all the printers and hard disks to go with 
them. If w© don't have it in stock, we will do 
our best to find it for you. We have the 
largest data base of used Radio Shack 
equipment to draw from. AH equipment 
comes with warranty, 

PACIFIC 
COMPUTER 
EXCHANGE 

The One Source For 
Used Tandy Computers 

1031 S.E. Mill, Suits S 
Portland, Oregon 97214 

(503) 236-2949 



TRSTimes magazine 4.3 - May/Jun 1991 



Page 31 



PRICE LIST effective March 1, 1991 

Prices subject to change without notice 



Product Nomendature 

AFM: Auto File Manager data base 

BacKRest for hard drives 

BAS1C/S Compiler System 

BSORT / BSORT4 

CON80Z / PRO-CON80Z. 

diskDISK / LS-diskDISK 

DISK NOTES from TfwtQ (per issue) 

DoubleDuty 

DSM51 /DSM4 

DSMBLR / PRODUCE 

EDAS i PRO-CREATE 

EnhComp / PRO-EnhComp 

Filters: Combined I & II 

GO :fw1ainte nance 

GO:System Enhancement 

GO: Utility 

Hardware Interface Kit 

HartFORTH/PRO-HartFORTH 

LB Maintenance Utjltty-M4 

LDOS 5.1.4 User Manual 

LDOS 5.3 Mod3 Upgrade Kit 

LED/LS-LED 

Uttle Brother-M4 (Ver 1,0) 

LS-DOS 6.3.1 Upgrade Kit - M4 

LS-DOS 6.3. 1 Diskette - M4 

LS-DOS 6.3.1 Upgrade kit - M2/12/16 

LS- Host/Term 

LS'UTILITY 

MC / PRO-MC 

Mister ED 

MRAS/PRO-MRAS 

PowerDol (Epson or Tandy) 

Power Df aw 

PowerDriver Plus (Epson). 

PowerMail Plus 

Power Mail Plus Textfyterge 

PowerSaipt 

PRO-WAM 

PRO-WAM Toolkit 

Programmer's Guide DOS 6. 

QuizMaster 

RATF0R-M4 

RSHARD - R/S HO driver 

ST80'1II 

SuperUtJIityPlus 

SuperUtilityPtus CMD file diskette 

Supreme HD Driver (PowerSoft-RS) 

TBA / LS-TBA 

THE SOURCE 3- Volume Set 

Tootbox/Toolbeit 

UNREL-T80 

UTILITY-I 



Software 

Modni 

P-50-310 
P- 12-244 
P-20-010 
L-32-200 
M- 30-033 

L-35-211 



L-35^204 

M-30-053 

M^2o-oe2 

M-20^72 

L-32-053 

n/a 

rVa 

n/a 

n/a 

M'20O71 

n/a 

L-40-O20 

f^l 0-033 

L-30-020 



n/a 

n/a 
n/a 

M- 20-064 

n/a 

M- 20-083 

P-32-21? 

P-32-220 

P-50-200 

P-50-003 

P-50- 1 00 

P'50-142 

n/a 
n/a 
n/a 
L-5 1 -500 

M-t2-013 

P-35-300 

P-32-132 

P-32-B32 

P-12-113 

L-21-010 

n/a 

P-32-203 

same 

L-3 2-070 



Mod4 

n/a 

P-1 2-244 

n/a 

L-32-210 

M-3 1-033 

1-35-212 



L-35-205 

M-3 1-053 

M-21-0e2 

M-21-072 

n/a 

M^ 33-100 

M- 33-200 

M-33-300 

M-12-110 

M-21-071 

L-50-515 

n/a 

same 

L-30-021 

L-50-510 

M- 1 1 -043 

M- 11-243 

M- 11-002 

L-35-281 

L-32-150 

M-21-064 

M- 5 1-028 

M-2 1-083 

n/a 

n/a 

P-5C^200 

P-50-004 

P-50- 100 

P-5ai42 

M-5 1-025 

M-51-225 

M-60-060 

n/a 

M-2 1-073 

sa/ne 

n/a 

P-32-104 

P-32-804 

P-12-113 

L-21-011 

L-60-020 

P-32-245 

M-30-054 

n/a 



$4g.95 
$34.95 
$29.95 
$14.95 
$19.95 

$10.00 
$49.95 
$49.95 
$29,95 

$19.95 
$49.95 

$49.95 
$24.95 
$49.95 
$19.95 
$15.00 
$34.95 
$19.95 
$74.95 
$39.95 
$15.00 
$39.95 
$39.95 
$24.95 
$79.95 
$39.95 

$19.95 
$19.95 

$17.95 
$39.95 
$15.00 
$24.95 
$74.95 
$29.95 
$20.00 
$19.95 
$59.95 
$29.95 
$39.95 
$44.95 
$20.00 
$34.95 
$19.95 
$40.00 
$24.95 
$29.95 
$19.95 







B 



D 
D 

B 
B 
B 

B 

D 



D 



B 



D 
B 
D 



D 



D 



B 



D 



D 
D 



TRS-80 Game Programs 



BouncezoJds (M3) 

Crazy Painter (M3) 

Frogger (M3) 

Kim Watt's Hits (M3) 

Lair of the Dragon (M3/M4) 

Lance Mlklus' Hits (M3) 

Leo Cristopherson's (M3) 

Scarfman (M3) 

Space Castle (M3) 



M-55-GCB 
M-55-GCP 



P-55-GKW 

M-65-021 

P-65-GLM 

P-55-GLC 

M-55-GCS 

M-55-GCC 



$14,95 
$14.95 
$14.95 
$9.95 
$19.95 
$19.95 
$14.95 
$14.95 
$14.95 



Hardware 

TeleTrendsTT512P modem (M4P) 

XLRSer e/w 256K RAM {M4) 

Fio(jpy drives (5.25* 360K 1/2 ht) 

Floppy drives (3.5' 720K 1/2 ht) 

Floppy Drive Case (2-1/2 ht drives) 

Hard drive kit e/w dock, 20 Meg M3/M4 

Hard drive kit e/w clock, 40 Meg M3/fvW 

Hard drive joystick port option 

Hard drive: KaJok KL320 

Hard drive: Seagate ST251 -1 

Hard drive: Seagate ST157A (168 IDE) 

Hard drive: Seagate ST-157N (SCSI) 

Cable: dual floppy extender 

Cable: 4 Ft floppy (1 34EDC each end) 

Cable: 4FtM3/M4 printer 

Cable; 4Ft Radio Shack hard drive 

Cable: 4Ft MISOSYS hard drive 

Cable: 26-1069 interna] floppy 

Cable: 26- 1 089 A/26- 1 080 interna] floppy 

Cable: 26-1080/A internal floppy 

Cable: drive power Y 

Cable: XT hard drive set 

Cable: Custom IDC ribbon (M3/M4/M2) 

Standby Power System: 200VA 

Standby Power System: 450VA 

HD Controller: Adaptec 401 OA 

HD Controller: Xebec S 1 42 1 A 

T80 to SCSI host adaptor 

Zoltrix ZOFAX 96/24 (PC XT/AT) 



H-4P-512 

R-MB-004 

H-FD-360 

H-FD-720 
H-FD-2SV 

H-HD-020 

H-HD-040 

H-HD-JSO 

R-HD-020 

R-HD-040 

R-HD-A40 

R-HD-S40 

H-F[>2EX 

H-FD-C04 

H-RC-PM4 

H-HD-CT4 

H-HD-C04 

H^FD-2NG 

H-FD-2GA 

H-FD-24P 

H-HD-CPY 

H-HD-CXT 

?-??-??? 

R- PS- 200 

R-PS-450 

H-HD-CA4 

H-HD^CX2 

H-HD-MHA 

R-21-FAX 



$74.95 E 
$182.00 F 

$75.00 D 

$85.00 B 

$60.00 F 
$475,00 7 
$595.00 ? 

$20.00 
$200.00 F 
$320.00 F 
$320.00 F 
$350.00 F 

$18.00 

$12.50 

$20.00 

$20.00 

$22.50 

$20.00 

$20.00 

$20.00 

$5.00 

$5.00 

varies 

$250.00 ? 

$399.00 ? 

$95.00 D 

$95.00 D 

$75.00 D 

$225.00 F 



The Fine Print 

Freight codes: A = $3.50; B -$4.00; C - $4.50; D - $5.00; E -$5.50; 
F » $6.00; G =* $8.50; H » $1 2.00; ? - varies; All unmarked are $3.00 
each; Canada/Mexico add $1 per order; Foreign use US rates times 
3 tor air shipment. Virginia residents add 4.5% sales tax. 

Virginia residents add 4.5% saJes tax. We accept MasterCard and 
VISA; Checks must be drawn on a US bank. COD's are cash, 
money order, or certified check; add $4 for COO. 



MISOSYS, Inc. 

P.O. Box 239 

Sterling, VA 22170-0239 

703-450-4181; Orders only: 800-MISOSYS (800-647-6797)