Skip to main content

Full text of "Softline 1984 03 04"

See other formats


Flight 

Simulator n 




Put yourself In the pilot's seat of a Piper 181 Cherokee Archer for an awe-inspiring flight over realistic scenery 
from New York to Los Angeles. High speed color-filled 3D graphics will give you a beautiful panoramic view 
as you practice takeoffs, landings, and aerobatics. Complete documentation will get you airborne quickly I 
even ft you've never flown before. When you think you're ready, you can play the World War I Ace aerial battle 
game. Flight Simulator II features Include ■ animated color 3D graphics ■ day, dusk, and night flying model 
m over 80 airports In tour scenery areas: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle, with additional scenery * 
areas available ■ user-variable weather, from cfeer blue skies to grey cloudy conditions ■ complete flight 
i nst rumentat ion ■ VOR, ILS, ADF, and DM E radio equipped ■ navigation facilities and course plotting ■ World : 
War i Ace aerial battle game ■ complete Information manual and flight handbook. 



See your dealer . . . 

or wrrto or call (or more inlormaiion. For direct orders please add Si .SO for 
shipping and specify UPS or first class mail do'ivory . American Express. Ofnor°s 
Club, MasterCard, and Visa accepted. 

Order Line: 800/637-4983 








LOGIC 

Corporation 

713 Edgebrook Drive 
Champaign IL 61820 

(217) 359-8482 Telex: 206995 



CONTENTS 



I 

■ ri. 



Game Library/2 

l : ar hghl biowwr. and heavy player, 

Editorial/5 

In which we are formally introduced. 

How To Make People Buy 
Your Software/8 

Make it good. 

by Philip Chien 
No Tipping/ 1 1 

A hill,- triiJu lejqr a dangerous thirty, hut thill 's what 
"vivr ijBww" u for 

Adventures in Adventuring: 
The Ultimate Full-Color 
No-Res Adventure #1 /H 

list .1 turtle. ao to prison. 

by Ken Rose 

Atari Graphics, Part 
Two/ 16 

A shameless display. 

by Matt Loveless 



Anatomy of a Game, Part 
Four/ 18 

A moving chronicle of naughty columnists and fine 
details. Someday, al! the degrees of freedom shall he 
ours. 

by Brian Fitzyerald 

Contest: A Gathering of 
Games/20 

Many are called, hut jew are coded. Is the real world 
ready for your game? 

Dungeon Fun, Level 
Four/22 

Wearied and sickened hy constant fighting and treasure 
hunting, our hero creates a home to go humi- In. 

by Jock Root 

Programs in Pulp/27 

Spicy subroutines and thrilling wonder programs. 

Fair Game/35 

Bagging the big ones, throwing bach the little ones. 
(James can't shoot back. 

From Board to Screen/40 

The tactics of strategy: yesterday, today, and tomorrow. 

by William Harrington and Steve 
Jackson 



No Contest/44 

Sharpen pencils, attune mind, What's an eight-letter 
word for a burrowing South African mammal? 



lnfomania/46 

Art American art form millets the move to muffhhips. 
"-■inthi -■!;!!. blast you! Whump! Thockf Ka-whtimmm! 
uqhhf.. Attacking out!.,. Plus: ihe most and least popular 
programs ; 



Programmer Profile: Eric 
Hammond/54 



He's going in . . . he jumps . 
Heck, It's great! 

by Mate Yuen 



shoots . . . itsaood! 



No Comment/57 

Reader's writing*, religiously tend and reported. 

High Scores/58 

/ see you know an awful hi about computers; hut 
what's your best score on Missile Command? 

End Game/58 

h which everyone is kept honest, or nearly so. 



St Words; Margot Corns lock Tommervik, editus maximus; Andrew Christie, edit us 
real us; Carol Ray. editus manayum; Matt Yuen. Anstotlean editus; David Durkee. 
Pythagorean techmcus; Todd Zilbert. Forum discussion directus: Cord Cooper, gram- 
Alike correct urn; Judith Pferler, assistant grammatike correct urns; Marry McNeil and 
Steve Thomsen. Phoenicians checkum: Betsy Barnes, goddess of order: Hartley G. Les- 
ser, Sophoclean game judge; Roc R, Adams. Herculean infomainman; Al Tommervik. an' 
cient grease, 

Si.An: 1 rici Ventila, Venus in htue jeans; Nancy Baldwin. Musi" of aesthetes; Lucas 
"Lamia" McClure. Ruth "Sprue" Seid. papyrus pasteup; Michael Pender, advertus 
placius; Weldon Q r Lew in, Dan Winkler, daepaintedes pictures; Kurt Wahlner, photi 
shootum. 

St. Bureaucrats: Mary Sue Rennells, Athenian ruler. Marjorie Kaufman, goddess nf 
petty decisions; David Stockman, budger deficits; Cathy Stewart, advertus vendum; Partie 
Lesser, goddess of retailers; Michelle V igne aul t- Kirschenbaum , circulum subscribia. 

Si, Ad Sales; East Coast sales. Paul McGmnis Company. 690 Broadway. Massape- 
qua, NY I I 75ft. (2 I 2) 490- 1 02 1 ; Midwest and Rocky Mountain sales, Ted Rickard, Kevin 
Sullivan. Christopher Kaspar. Market/Media Associates. 435 l^ocust Road, Wilmettc,, IL 
70CWL (312) 251-2541; West Coast sales. Mike Antich. St.Uame. 7250 Laurel Canyon 
Boulevard. North Hollywood, CA 91605, (818) 980-5074. 

St, Game. Volume 3. Number 3. Copyright © 1984 hy Softalk Publishing Inc. All 
rights reserved, whatever that means, ISSN: 074 5 =-4 988, whatever that is. StAiame is 

Cover df sign I 



published around the fifteenth afternoon of every other month by Softalk Publishing Inc.. 
7250 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. North Hollywood. California; (818) 980-5074, 

Composition by the demigods at Photographies. Hollywood. California, Printing by 
the semigods at Volkmuth Printers, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. 

Here we go again: Apple is a Trademark of Apple Computer Inc.. Cuptertino. Califor- 
nia. Atari is a trademark of Atari Inc., Sunnyvale, California, Commodore 64 and VIC-20 
are trademarks of Commodore Business Machines. West Chester. Pennsylvania, Zork is a 
trademark of Infocoin Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, Stt.Ctame, Sot talk, and Infomunia 
are trademarks of Sofctalk Publishing Inc. We could go on forever, but you get the idea. 

Subscriptions: Write to the snarling mythical beasts and furry creatures at St, Game 
Circulation. Box 60. North Hollywood, CA 91603. For a sacrificial offering of $12 a 
year, you get six mind-blowing issues delivered to your door hy an actual government civil 
servant. Be sure to include your name (and what you're the god/goddess of), address, and 
the make, model, and serial number of your computer. Tell us anything else you'd like us 
to know. 

Moving? Pur the good of the neighborhood, hopefully. Just send your old mailing labvl 
and new address to St,Game Circulation, Box 60. North Hollywood. CA 91603. or call 
us at (818) 980-5074. 

Post matter: How's it feel to have your own department m this mag? In return, we ask 
that you send address changes {readers', not yours — unless you art' onvf \v> Si. ■Claim - C'n- 
culation. Box 60, North Hollywood, CA 91601 Thanks, babe-- 



ADVERTISERS 



Broken Timher Press . 

Electronic Arts 

Infocom 



-25, 



53 

Cover 4 
. . . .6-7 



MTR Enterprises 9 

Sierra On-Line 13, Cover 3 

SubLogic Corp Cover 2 



/J 



GAME LIBRARY 

Like a bastion of computer culture before the onslaught of micro mediocrity, u shimrti) btacon of gamma uuudncsh tailing through the murky miasma of just 
so-so software, the Game Library deals only wilh iht right stuff. It lives to sent. All Recammrndrd programs are the best of the current releases and carry the 
very highest recommendation. The programs tn the Stacks were once worthy enough to he so ealled and have since graciously stepped aside to make room for 
new blood. In neither of iW categories would you be risking wasting your money. New Releases includes any damn fool thing that meets the single criterion 
of its category, and the items are largely unseen except where obviously otherwise. Please line up on the left, have your I/O open and your RAM ready 




Bruce Lee. Forrier. Atari. Hii-yaah! An obvious labor of love, and a fit- 
ting tribute to the late, great chop-socky cinema star. He's even wearing 
his little black gloves. Twenty gorgeous screens; best full-contact karate 
action available on a home computer. 
Datasoft, 1980S Nordhoff Place. Chatsworth. CA 91111. $14 .9 5. 
International Soccer. Commodore 64. Best of its type. Players cast shad- 
ows and always appear in correct proportion relative to their position on 
the field. 

Commodore Software, 1 200 Wilson Drive. West Chester, PA 1 9350. $34.95. 

One-on-One. Hammond. Apple. Dr, J and Larry Bird jump, dribble, re- 
bound, slam dunk, and occasionally shatter the backboard in this highly 
impressive basketball simulation. 

Electronic Arts. 2755 Campus Drive. San Mateo, CA 94403. $40. 
Seven Cities of Gold. Ozark Softscape. Atari. Outfit a voyage to the 
New World, circa I492. Watch for shallows, ration your food supply, 
travel overland, get gold, establish missions, interact with five levels of 
natives. Play in historical mode or use random continent generator. 
That's right, bunky: It's all done in full-screen animated graphics, find- 
less joy; a genuine kick in the head. 

Electronic Arts, 2755 Campus Drive. San Mateo, CA 94403. $40. 

Sorcerer. Meretzky. Most computers. Instant Infocom classic. Loads of 

magic, a 3-D transparent glass cube maze, and a truly wicked ending 

puzzle. Pirating it will do you no good at all. 

Infocom. 55 Wheeler Street. Cambridge. MA 02 1 38, $49.95. 



| NEW ARRIVALS 

Fiction 

Boulder Dash. Liepa, Gray. Atari, Commodore 64, PCjr. Grab the jewels 
while undermining the boulders, ever mindful of their position vis-a-vis 
you. This game displays a masterful grasp of gravity and kinetics; may 
start its own genre. Hirst Star, 22 East Forty-First Street, New York. 
NY I0017. $29.95. 

C'est La Vie. Eastman, Apple, Atari. Commodore 64. The streets are lined 
with moola, but thieves and the IRS are all over the place. A loan from 
the neighborhood shark may help, but pay off on time. Adventure Inter- 
national. Box 3435, Longwood. FL 32750. $19.95. 
Code Breaker. Barker. IBM PC. Play against the computer to break a 
secret code, Four skill levels. Requires color/graphics adapter. Sylvan 
Glen Software. Box 31053. Des Peres, MO 63131. $39.95. 
Computer Title Bout. Atari. A statistical smorgasbord, based on the 
Sports Illustrated board game. Over five hundred boxers on a double-sided 
disk, rated for defense, endurance, killer instinct, ability to take a punch, 
and so on. Match up real boxers or roll your own. Microcomputer 
Games/Avalon Hill. 4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214. $30. 
1'he Dallas Quest, Garon. Commodore 64. A missing map gives the loca- 
tion of a South American oil field. To get it. you have to go up against 
).R. Ewtng. A sure-'nuff adventure, on a considerably higher intellectual 
plane than its source material. Meticulous, impressive hi-res graphics. 
Datasoft. 19808 Nordhoff Place. Chatsworth. CA 91311, $34.95. 
Dawn of Civilization. Schwenk. Atari. Family strategy game for one to 
four players. Build legions, cultivate food, and manage land to ensure 
the future of mankind. Superware, 2028 Kingshouse Road. Silver 



Spring. MD 20904, $10.95, 

Dreadnoughts. Do well. Apple. Lively action in the North Atlantic. 
1939-194 I, Virtually every warship of the Allied and Axis navies that 
was involved in the real thing puts in an appearance, in minute strategic 
detail. Microcomputer Games/Avalon Hill, 4517 Harford Road, 
Baltimore, MD 21214. $30. 

Kncounter. Woakes. Atari. Very fluid 3-D Battlezone-ish action. You just 
tootle around a barren landscape shooting at fast-moving abstract ob- 
jects. What big-screen teevee systems were made for. Synapse, 5221 
Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804. $34.95. 

Free Trader. Bell. Chung. Apple. Atari. A long time from now in a gal- 
axy, far, far away . . . you'll still have to take an option on a hot com- 
modities deal and ensure that your products achieve their market share 
while maintaining .in ,iu:i:pt,ilih- profit iiiurym. And raiders from the 
Thoth Empire want you for the lead in Death of a Salesman. Microcom- 
puter Games/Avalon Hill. 4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214, 
$30. 

Genesis. Furry, Alvarez, Brodie. Apple, Atari, Commodore 64. Spiders 
crawl up the walls of a pit toward your plucky scorpion perched on the 
edge. Tempest in a teapot; lukewarm. Datasoft. 1980S Nordhoff Place, 
Chatsworth. CA 91311. $29.95. 

Gulf Strike. Chung. Atari. A what-if brigade-level simulation in the Per- 
sian Gulf. Featuring U.S. vs. U.S.S.R vs. Iraq vs. Iran, Microcomputer 
Games/Avalon Hill. 4517 Harford Road. Baltimore, MD 21214. $25. 
Gumhy. Atari, Commodore 64. The licensing agreement with Art Clokey 
Productions solemnly stipulates that this program be "for educational 
purposes only." but those of us who have long known and loved the lit- 
tle clay guy will probably have fun anyway. Datasoft, 19808 Nordhoff 
Place, Chatsworth, CA 9)311. $34.95. 

Juno First. Hiscott. Commodore 64. The Konami arcade hit lands on the 
home computer. Another lone spaceship pilot gets jumped by endless 
waves of hostile aliens. Eight-way joystick action. Datasoft, 19808 
Nordhoff Place, Chatsworth. CA 9131 1. $29.95. 

Jupiter Mission 1999. Lamb. Atari. Now you can get there two years 
before HAL and all those monoliths. Promising-looking four-disk graphic 
adventure with arcade sequences. Microcomputer Games/Avalon Hill. 
4517 Harford Road. Baltimore. MD 21214. $50. 

Minnesota Fats' Pool Challenge. Bubble Bus. Commodore 64, IBM PC 
One or two players, six game options, HesWare, 1 50 North Hill Drive, 
Brisbane. CA 94005. $29.95. 

Music Box. Holland. Commodore 64. Gather up the pieces of a magical 
music box while dodging a wizard on a flying dragon playing a 
dangerous tune. Get the box together and its magical song will cleanse 
the universe of evil, it says here. HesWare, 150 North Hill Drive, 
Brisbane, CA 94005. $29.95. 

Quasimodo. Atock. Bigelow. Alan, Commodore 64. The famous bell- 
ringer must get past the palace guards, swing through the bell towers, 
and scale the castle wall, overcoming obstacles like bats, archers, a 
wizard, and his own lack of coordination m llus multiscreen arcader. 
Synapse, 5221 Central Avenue. Richmond. CA 94804. $34,95. 
Quick Step. Johnson. Atari. Catch burgers, cakes, and sundaes before 
they roll off the screen. Then bounce the check over to your opponent. 
Not unlike life itself. This is available only via the electronic distribution 
system of Xante Corporation. Imagic. 98 I University Avenue, Los 
Gatos, CA 95030. $24.95. 

Rainbow Quest. Ramella. CoCo. Commodore 64. A book/software 
package. The reader/player helps Molly and Sam survive on the planet 
Rainbow, enduring a pirate's privations and other hazards via the twen- 
ty-five arcade, adventure, and word and logic puzzle programs on the 



2 



accompanying cassette. WGBooks, Peterborough. NH 03485. $24.97. 
Regatta. DeMuth. Peterson. Apple. Sharpen your sailing skills in four 
lake races, mindful of buoys and running aground, whilst running, reach- 
ing, tacking, and yarning. One or two players. Howard W. Sams, 4300 
West Sixty-Second Street. Indianapolis. IN 46268. $29.95. 
Rootin' Tootin'. Nesbitt, Atari. Commodore 64. Your French horn travels 
a maze of scales, blasting notes at pursuing instruments. Anybody re- 
member thit old Disney lartoon that looked like this? lies Ware. 150 
North Hill Drive, Brisbane, CA 94005. $34.95. 

Space Cowboy. Lamb. Atari. Take a stroll down a narrow. sixteen-sec- 
tor walkway to freedom. Tip yer hat to them ranny owl-hoot robot 
lasers and pitfalls. Microcomputer Games/Avalon Hill, 4517 Harford 
Road, Baltimore, MD 21214. $21. 

Who-Dun-lt? Commodore 64, VIC 20, Not to mention how-dun-it? and 
where-is-it? The lights go out; a woman screams: a necklace is missing. 
Gather your clues, question twenty-odd suspects, make your arrest. VIC 
20 requires !6K expansion. Ramiak, 3133 Nucla Street, Aurora, CO 
80013. $19.95. 

Nonaction 

BBS Directory. Listing of more than seven hundred North American 
computer bulletin boards by state, area code, and number, plus info on 
type of system, password requirement, program downloading. Includes 
overview of how to use a BBS and available software. BBS Directory. 
Box 4215. Beach Station. Vero Beach. FL 32964. $5.95. 
The First Artificial Intelligence Coloring Book. Cohen. Computer 
artist Harold Cohen chats with kids about decision making, coloring, 
and art in general. With thirty-five computer drawings, ready to color. 
William Kaufmann, 95 First Street. Los Altos CA 94022. $13.95. 
Relax. Apple. Atari. Commodore, IBM. Let your computer calm you down. 
Disk, headband, control unit, and audiotape combine techniques of bio- 
ki'tlUn k and .iu[iH)cmc rramimj in one stress-reduction system. Includes 
mandala program and balloon game. Available June. Synapse, 5221 
Central Avenue, Richmond. C A 94804. $ 139.95. 
Sing a Song of Software. Soltzberg. Computer-illustrated poems about 
computers, software, and the meaning of it all. Micro-chic moves ahead. 
William Kaufmann, 95 First Street. Los Altos, CA 94022. $8.95. 

Reference 

Basic Magic. Atari. A series of little pamphlets consisting of program- 
ming tricks for stuff like speeding up your joysticks and listing your disk 
directory without loading DOS. You can't beat the price. Superware, 
2028 Kingshouse Road. Silver Spring, MD 20904. Free. 
Basic Tricks for the Apple. Wyatt. Thirty-five subroutine shortcuts to 
more efficient programming so your code can load easier, run faster, 
jump higher, and live longer. Howard W, Sams. 4300 West Sixty-Sec- 
ond Street, Indianapolis, IN 46268. $8.95. 

Game Designer 64. Commodore 64. Programming utility lets you design 
and animate gome characters and background screens. Entech, 8224 
Sunland Boulevard. Sun Valley. CA 91352. $35. 
Graph-Art System 1. Apple. Graphic utility includes a coloring pro- 
gram, eraser, inverse pix, tracing sheet, graphic/text mix mode. more. 
Apollo Software, Box 34057, Houston. TX 77234. $34. 



[ THE STACKS 




Cluck marts denote games recently translated to other Computers, 

Fiction 
Adventure 

The Coveted Mirror. Berns. Thomason. Apple. Warm-hearted, well- 
puzzled, pretty hi-res graphics adventure, interspersed with minigames 
and a couple of simple arcade-type sequences. Talk to everyone in a me- 



dieval village to find missing piece of magic mirror, all on borrowed 
time. Penguin Software, 830 Fourth Avenue, Geneva, 1L 60134. 
$19.95. 

Deadline and Witness. Blank, Lebling, Most computers. The first Inter- 
logic Mystery. Deadline has player as detective search for clues, interro- 
gate suspects, show clues and findings to suspects to get revealing reac- 
tions. Complete interaction, real-time. Witness does the same, but on an 
introductory level. All text, but who cares? Infocom, 55 Wheeler Street, 
Cambridge. MA 02138. $49.95 each. 

Enchanter I. Blank, Lehling. Most computers. The first of a planned tril- 
ogy that will succeed the Zorks. Above-ground exploration of castle and 
its environs in search of lords of darkness. Enchanters use magic logical- 
ly to solve puzzles, which are great. A delight to play and read. Infocom, 
55 Wheeler Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. $49.95. 
Exodus: Ultima III. British. Apple, Atari. By far the best in the Ultima 
{so far) trilogy. Role-playing fantasy with good plot, everything inte- 
grated, clues everywhere — and there's a lot more to everywhere than 
meets the eye. Multiple heroes. Many hours of colorful, animated, solid 
role-playing fantasy in Lord British's inimitable style. Origin Systems, 
Box 58009. Houston, TX 77058. Atari. 48K. $54.95. 
Infidel. Berlyn. Most computers. Infocom 's Egyptological adventure: Find 
pyramid, uncover pyramid, find entrance to pyramid . . . then it gets 
tough. A November release, kicking off the company's Tales of Adven- 
ture series. Infocom, 55 Wheeler Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. 
$49.95. 

Masquerade. Johnson. Apple, Illustrated adventure with diabolical puz- 
zles, wonderful graphics in minor plot. But the puzzles are all hard but 
satisfying. Last one's a dog. Shaggy. Phoenix Software, 64 Lake Zurich 
Drive, Lake Zurich, 1L 60047. $34.95. 

Planetfall. Meretzky. Most computers. A lighthearted and strongly involv- 
ing sci-fi text adventure with characters who care. Was Steve Meretzky 
an adventurer or a writer first? It's hard to tell-— that's how rich the text 
is. Fascinating exploring, good puzzles, well- written text. Infocom, 55 
Wheeler Street. Cambridge. MA 02 138. $49,95. 
Zork I, II, III. Blank, Lebling. Most computers. Classic trilogy of bv 
credihly graphic text adventures by the masters of the genre. Pure logic, 
intelligent rapport, wit. A complete Underground Empire, at your serv- 
ice. J and // are archetypical: /// is unique, with highly challenging puz- 
zles. Infocom. 55 Wheeler Street, Cambridge. MA 02 138. $39.95 each. 

Arcade 

Astro Chase. Herrera. Atari, Commodore 64. Flashy style and attention 
to dp tail in this new variation on an old theme. The game is standard op- 
erating procedure (save Earth, or else), but alien variety, really tremen- 
dous graphics, and rich sound push this one past the point of being "just 
another computer game." Parker Brothers, 50 Dunham Road. Beverly, 
MA 01915. $36. 

Bandits. Ngo. Bertoni. Apple. V1C-20. Just about the only differences 
between the VIC cart and the 48K original are fewer, simpler colors 
and a limited repeat-shot function. Also, incredibly, the animation is ac- 
tually smoother at the highest levels. Sirius. 10364 Rockingham Drive. 
Sacramento. CA 95827. $39.95. 

Beach-Head. Carver. Commodore 64. A one- or two-player, joystick- 
controlled, six-sequence WW II naval engagement, the equivalent of six 
different (yes, different!) games. Action, sound, design, all tops. Truly 
fine arcading. Access Software. 925 East 900 South. Salt Lake City, 
UT 84105. $34.95. 

Chnplifter. Gorlin. Apple, Atari, Commodore 64, VIC-20. The most 
awarded computer game in history has virtually no variety in repeat 
play, but it's a grabber nonetheless, B rode r bund. 1 7 Paul Drive. San 
Rafael. CA 94903. $34.95. 

Crossfire. Sullivan, Apple, Commodore 64, IBM, VIC-20. There's just one 
level, but only a masochist would want more: no game is the same. 
Smoothly programmed classic challenges some of today's bests. Sierra 
On-Line. Sierra On-Line Building, Coarsegold, CA 93614. $29.95. 
Dino Eggs. Schroeder. Adam. Apple. Atari. IBM. The ultimate in 
prehistoric wildlife preservation. A dense, ineffable arcading experience 



STGAME 



that reveals its pleasures gradually and allows the development of myri- 
ad individual strategies. Micro Fun, 2699 Skokie Valley Road, Highland 
Park. 1L 60035. $40. 

Drol. Beng, Apple, Atari, Commodore 64. Very cute, but not foo cute; very 
hard, but it just makes you try harder. At the moment, it is unquestion- 
ably the most graphically delightful, impressively animated arcade ac- 
tion around. Broderbund, 17 Paul Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. 
$34.95. 

Frogger. Harris, Benton. Atari, Commodore 64. What would any com- 
puter be without this classic conversion of the arcade hit? Disk or car- 
tridge, it doesn't matter; both versions do full justice to the original. 
Sierra On-Line. Sierra On-Line Building. Coarsegold. CA 93614. 
$34.95. Parker Brothers. 50 Dunham Road, Beverly, MA 01915. $36. 
Hard Hat Mack. Abbott, Alexander. Apple, Commodore 64. Despite the 
competition, Mack holds its own. Fast and smooth animation coupled 
with a stiff challenge make up for its three-screen limit. One original 
concept in the area of nonviolence; You can't kill those who hound you; 
you can only try to avoid them. Electronic Arts, 2755 Campus Drive. 
San Mateo, CA 94403. $35. 

Lode Runner. Smith. Apple. Atari, Commodore 64, IBM. Here's a game 
that brings a new meaning to the word variety. One hundred fifty levels. 
If there are any reasons to be addicted to a game, Doug Smith has found 
them all and included them in this baby. Play the game; cheat if you 
want; construct your own levels. The Apple never looked so good. 
Broderbund, 17 Paul Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. $34.95. 
Miner 2049er. 1 login; . Most computers. The game that even software 
pirates decided to buy. Ignore the plot: it doesn't make too much sense 
anyway. Boot it up {or plug it in) and have a ball. Three levels even on 
the lowest-end machines, ten on the high ones. Bill Hogue broke new 
ground when this one debuted; it's subsequently become the most 
translated game in microdom. Big Five. Box 9078-185. Van Nuys. CA 
91409. $49.95. Micro Fun. 2699 Skokie Valley Road. Highland Park, 
IL 60035. $39.95. 

Night Mission Pinball. Artwick. Apple, Commodore 64. IBM. User- 
adjustable classic; ten play modes and forty parameters, for your cus- 
tomizing pleasure. Twenty-page manual. SubLogic, 713 Edgebrook 
Drive, Champaign, IL 61820. Disk or cassette, $29.95, 
Shamus: Case 2, Mataga. Atari, The movie industry could learn some- 
thing from this game — a sequel that surpasses the original. Shamus is 
back in the same survival game, facing the Shadow and aquatic 
mutants. Several dozen screens means you'll have something to do on 
rainy days. Synapse, 5221 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804. 
$34.95. 

/Spare Change, /.cller. Zeller. Apple, Atari. Slapstick comedy in an ar- 
cade setting. Not Broderbund's most timeless work, but thoroughly en- 
joyable. Whimsical theme and multiple cartoon intermissions. Broder- 
bund. 1 7 Paul Drive. San Rafael. CA 94903. $34.95. 
Zaxxon. Fortier, Garcia. Apple. Atari. Commodore 64. TRS-80. Here's one 
of the best computer adaptations of a coin-op game ever. Extraordinary 
special effects for a computer game; never has such an impossible effect 
been simulated so well. Datasofr, 1980S Nordhoff Place, Chatsworth, 
CA 913 H. Synapse (C-64), 5221 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 
94804. $39.95. 

Fantasy 

Knight of Diamonds. Greenberg, Woodhead. Apple. Second scenario in 
the Wizardry series has more puzzles to solve. Requires strong characters 
developed in Proving Grounds. Sir-tech. 6 Main Street, Ogdensburg, NY 

13669. $39.95, 

Legacy oF Llylgamyn. Greenherg. Woodhead. Apple. Topnotch epi- 
sode of a topnotch game features super atmosphere, neat puzzles, and 
an eerie transformation of Wizardry characters to their own progeny. 
Sir-tech, 6 Main Street, Ogdensburg. NY 13669. $39.95. 
Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord. Greenberg, 
Woodhead. Apple. IBM. Original of the Wizardry series. Proving Grounds 
is essential for creating characters for all other scenarios. Most involving 
of all role-playing games. Wizardry characters are very personal and 



traverse the dungeon in groups of six, interacting and supporting each 
other under player's guidance. Sir-tech. 6 Main Street. Ogdensburg. NY 
1 3669. $49.95. 

Strategy 

Archon, Reiche, Freeman. Westfall. Atari, Commodore 64. Arcade games 
too fast? Strategy games too slow? This Atari masterpiece combines the 
best of both worlds. As someone who found chess to be boring hcyond 
belief, author Paul Reiche did something about it, Jong with LmUisy 
game pros )on Freeman and Anne Westfall. If you want to take an oppo- 
nent's square, you fight for it — in hi-res. Skilled spell-casters will have 
the upper hand in this thoroughly enjoyable battle between light and 
dark forces. Electronic Arts. 2755 Campus Drive, San Mateo, CA 
94403. $40. 

Geopolitique 1990. Ketchledge. Apple. As the chief executive, you call 
the shots. In the diplomatic first part of this two-phase game, the United 
States and Soviet Union struggle for economic and political world domi- 
nance. In phase two, you play "what if" in a conventional war situation. 
Seven scenarios ranging from today's global situation to the hypotheti- 
cal 1990s are yours for the choosing. Strategic Simulations, 883 Stierlm 
Road, A-200, Mountain View, CA 94043. $39.95. 
Gnosis VII. Apple. Unique logic game. No graphics, doesn't need 'em. 
Determine the secret names of seven gods who move between seven 
towns. Player must make a living, worship, learn skills, earn sanctuary 
by figuring out which god rules what and which towns that god is cur- 
rently influencing. Mind-stretching. Program is totally open, with line 
guide to key routines printed in manual. Magnetic Harvest, Box 255, 
Hopkins, SC 29061. $19.95. 

l.Q. Baseball. Apple. Beautifully executed, amusing baseball trivia 
game. Major and minor league levels— minor is still about the majors 
but fine for duffers; major league's only for superbuffs. Answering cor- 
rectly moves players around the diamond — singles, doubles, and triples, 
depending on difficulty of question. Rain delays and a relief pitcher, too. 
Davka. 845 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 6061 I. $24.95. Sup- 
plementary disks by team (American and National leagues and World 
Series). $14.95. 

North Atlantic '86. Grigsby. Apple. Be either the Soviet aggressor or 
the commander of NATO forces in this hypothetical hattle. The Soviets 
have taken control of Germany and Norway and now plan to swallow 
Great Britain and the North Atlantic. Possible, realistic, and wiry are the 
words to describe the scenario. The Soviets' attempt to take Iceland and 
NATO's efforts to keep England supplied make for some interesting 
parallels between this confrontation and World War II. Strategic Simu- 
lations, 883 Stierlm Road, A-200, Mountain View. CA 94043. $59.95. 
Pensate. Besnard, Apple. Computer-age abstract strategy game is fast 
moving and fun for those to whom thinking is good entertainment. Pen- 
guin Software, 830 Fourth Avenue, Geneva, IL 60134. $19.95. 
Sargon [[[. Spracklen, Spracklen. Apple. Manages to play chess both 
fast and well. Far and away the most powerful -chess program for the 
microcomputer. Hayden, 600 Suffolk Street. Lowell. MA 01853. 
$49.95. 

TAC. Bosson. Apple, Atari. Commodore 64. IBM. It stands for Tactical Ar- 
mor Command. Detail is what sets this strategy game apart from the 
rest. This is no hoard game on screen; tanks and turrets actually move 
and turn! Distinguished by its quick execution of commands (no more fix- 
ing sandwiches while the computer deploys forces) and variables so 
numerous that the game could be played only on a computer. Micro- 
computer Games/ Avalon Hill, 4517 Harford Road. Baltimore, MD 
21214. $40. 

Nonfiction 

Music Construction Set. Harvey. Apple. In the same vein as its pinball 
predecessor, this gem puts two-voice music through the Apple's speaker, 
or up to six voices through Mockingboard-equipped machines. No 
knowledge of music is required to write, edit, or transpose music. Also 
lets you use music from within your own programs. Bravo. Klei tmnic 
Arts, 2755 Campus Drive, San Mateo, CA 94403. $35. 



ST.CAME 



NEW NAME, 
SAME GAME 





not under new management. We didn't file Chapter I 1 and 
. We didn't have to get out of the country in a hurry and 

of angry subscribers holding the bag ... no, no, no. 

lave a new name. 

old-timers, this is Softlint you're reading, 
new people, just ignore all this. St. Game is the name of the 
magazine. We like it. We think it swings. We think it goes a bit farther 
toward saying what we're all about — a computer game magazine pub- 
lished by Softalk Publishing Inc. 

As many of you are indeed seeing us for the first time, that probahly 
doesn't explain it all. For you, then, this is a computer game magazine 
that takes computer games seriously (but not much else). We don't do 
VCS stuff. We don't tell you how to dress for the arcades. We don't use 
three picture-soaked pages to review one 8K cartridge. We just get 
down to the business of high-grade computer fun — how to have it. how 
to get better at it, how to make your own, and how much you can ex- 
pect co have in the future. We've been doing that for a while; now 
we're moving into high gear add making lots of new friends, and 
figured we should have a new name for the occasion. 
• It was a very emotional decision. We still haven't changed the 
jtap'onery, Softlme was a great old name and ii will live in our hearts 
forever. It is not truly gone, because it's still here. And this is still it. 
Only different. ' 
bless you. 



WE UNLEASH TH 
POWERFUL GRAP 





WORLD'S MOST 
ICS TECHNOLOGY. 




You'll never sec Infoconi's graphics 
on any computer screen. Because 
there's never been a euniputi'i built 
by man that could handle the images 
we produce. And, there never will be. 
We draw our graphics from the 
limitless imagery of your imagi- 
nation—a technology so power- 
ful, it makes any picture 
that's ever come out of a 
screen look like graffiti 
by comparison. And 
nobody knows how 
^ to unleash your 
imagination like 
Infocom. 

Through our 
prose, your 
imagination 
makes you part 
of our stories, 
in control of 
what you do 
and where you 
go— yet unable 
to predict or con- 
trul the course of 
events. You're con- 
fronted with situa- 
tions and logical puz- 
zles the like of which you won't 
find elsewhere. And you're immersed 
in rich environments alive with per- 
sonalities as real as any you'll meet 
in the flesh— yet all the more vivid 
because they're perceived directly by 
your mind s eye, not through your 
external senses. The method to this 
magic? We've found the way to plug 
our prose right into your psyche, and 
catapult you into a whole new 
dimension. 

Take some tough critics' words 
about our words. SOFIA LK, for 
example, called ZORK® Ill's prose 
"far more graphic than any depiction 
yet achieved by an adventure with 
graphics." And the NEW YORK 



TIMES saw fit to print that our 
DEADLINE 1 M is "an amazing feat 
of programming." Even a journal as 
video-oriented as ELECTRONIC 
GAMES found Infocom prose to be 
such an eye-opener, they named one 
of our games their Rest Adventure 
of 1983. 

IVtler still, bring an Infocom game 
home with you. Discover firsthand 
why thousands upon thousands of 
discriminating game players keep 
turning everything we write into 
instantaneous bestsellers. 

Step up to Infocom. All words. No 
graffiti. The secret reaches of your 
mind are beckoning. A whole new 
dimension is in there waiting for you. 

(For more information on Infocom 
games contact: Infocom, Inc., PO. 
Box 855, Garden City, NY 11530.) 




inFOCOIR 

The next dimension. 

riir yiHjr: Apuk- II, Ai;in.Cummu<lori'ri-l. CIVM H." DEC Kambiw. 
DEC RT II. IBM, MS-DOS 2.0, NEC A PC NEC PC -8000. Osborne. 

Tl Profeukml, Ti 'BiAA. TRS-mt Model I.TRS40 Model III 



A GAMES LIFE 

Secrets of Seffmg Software 

by Pf^ify cfcen 



You've written the most Fantastic game for your computer and you 
want to sell a million copies. What should you do to make sure that 
everyone who sees your program will want to buy it? 

First, make a flashy demo for your program — something to catch the 
eye. Color graphics and animated displays are always appreciated. 
Design your disk so that when it is booted it will go straight into demo 
mode, without the user even hitting a keystroke. Make sure that the title 
page seen upon hoot-up is a flashy display containing the name of the 
program, the copyright notice, your name and/or company name and/or 
hi -res company logo, and how to get out of the demo (for example, "Hit 
escape to start game"). Don't overdo the title page, though; it shouldn't 
be an advertisement. Let the demo and program do that. The demo 
should work on every system possible, even systems that don't have 
enough memory or accessories (like paddles or joysticks) to use the full 
program. 

If it's within your budget, send a free dealer copy to each authorized 
dealer. Dealers love free copies! Then, about two weeks later, call each 
dealer and see what they like and don't like (for future revisions), and 
solicit sales. Offer good dealer margins; offer better margins for large 
orders. When you send dealer demos, make them in as normal an 
operating system as possible. Some dealers may want to put their copy 
of your program on a hard disk drive or give copies to all of their 
salespeople. This won't be easy if you've put the program in a modified 
version of the operating system and made it uncopyable. Don't worry- 
about copies of your demo getting out; this only makes more advertising 
for you. 

When advertising, whether through direct mail or magazine ads. 
remember: attract attention! Make sure your ad is concise, lists all the 
features of your program, describes the system requirements (memory, 
media, accessories, languages, and so on), and tells iWw/i computers tht pro- 
gram works on! (One recent ad in a major computer magazine failed to 
mention that the program would only work on a TRS-80.) )ust because 
you're advertising in an Apple-only magazine doesn't mean that readers 
will know your product is for the Apple (among other things, you may 
wish to run the ad in other, non-Apple magazines). Don't just say that 
the program is "Apple lie-compatible." Does Ne-compatible mean that 
the program won't work with a 64K Apple II? Does it mean that the 
eighty-column version won't work on an Apple 11 with a Videoterm 
card, or on a lie with a Videoterm card (because it only works with the 
■\ppk- II.' ughr\ .nliiitin cud)? Will ir tvork nn .1 48K \pplf II:' 

And don't forget the most important thing to put in the ad: the retail 
price and ordering information. Don't include a dealer price in your ads 
or anywhere on the product itself. That is information that should only 
be revealed to a legitimate dealer. 

As far as design is concerned, whether to save money and use a dot- 
matrix printer or to spend money for a graphics artist to design an ad is 
something you must let your budget decide. A slick, four-color full-page 
ad will definitely attract more attention and thereby get more sales, but 



it can also bankrupt you before your first items make it to the dealer's 
slu- Ives. Don't forget to include your business address and phone 
number, and make sure that the person answering the phone knows 
something about the program and your pricing policies. If possible, have 
someone else available who knows the technical aspects of the program. 

It's a good idea to prepare two separate letters for people asking for 
information on the program — one for retail customers, and one for 
dealers (including dealer prices and discounts). Include technical 
specifications and figures stating the limits of the program {such as re- 
quires 48K, color monitor, paddles, and/or joystick). Customers want to 
know whether your program will do what they want it to do. 

Use high-quality stationery for your mailings, and if you use your 
computer's word processor, use a good letter-quality printer. Most peo- 
ple realize they are getting a form letter, but a fifth carbon will turn a 
person off no matter how good your program is. It's worth the money 
for a good offset printing job. If your ad in a magazine has a "bingo 
number," you can also use it for mailings. Look into presorted first-class 
mail rates. With the presorted mail rate and elimination of the envelope 
(folding the information sheet and putting the address on the outside), al- 
most any company can afford advertising mailings. If your program is 
designed for the "adult only" market, use an envelope (plain brown 
wrappers come to mind); you do not want to aggravate the "Post Aw- 
ful" inspectors. You may even wish to put a disclaimer on the envelope 
stating that the enclosed materials are designed for the adult audience 
only and may offend certain people. 

Include a warranty card with your product. It is an excellent way to 
set up a mailing list for future products and to determine proof of pur- 
chase. (Do not. under any circumstances, give out the names and ad- 
dresses on the mailing list. It is tacky, illegal in many states, and a good 
way to lose respect.) Give a reasonable warranty policy, in writing, 
specifying length of warranty, what to do if the media is dead on ar- 
rival, what to do if the media is dead in warranty, what to do if it goes 
dead out of warranty, and what to do if the user finds a bug in the pro- 
gram. Set up a return policy with reasonable replacement and upgrade 
charges. Set up an upgrade policy: that is, what the end user should do 
to get the upgrade when a new version comes out. 

If you must copy-protect your media, make sure you offer backup 
media at a reasonable price (perhaps free with the package or free upon 
return of the warranty card). This cannot be overstressed. Many users 
will not buy copy-protected software without backups. There is no rea- 
son to charge more than five dollars for a backup disk. If you charge a 
large amount (such as $30 or more), the end user will probably resent 
you enough to make his own backup or obtain a "broken copy" for a 
backup. Dealers will also he resentful that they are not getting their 
"cut" when you make your backup sale. Make the copy protection as 
transparent to the user as possible. (Your adventure generator should 
make normal user-accessible files that users can read from their own 
programs, not just yours.) If possible, put in the capability for a user to 



back up a disk without copying it — for example, a master that creates 
three slave disks which all work but will nut make any more slaves. 

Make sure that your program will work on all versions of the com- 
puter's operating system, drives, languages, and so forth. Make it possi- 
ble for the end user to copy the program over to a hard disk drive or, 
upon request, provide a copy that can be copied over. People who have 
spent more than $1,000 for hard disk drives are not really interested in 
giving out copies of your program, if you're really worried, make the 
program such that, if copied down from the hard drive to a floppy, it no 
longer works or will work in demo mode only without the program itself 
working (an excellent way 10 yet prospective users interested in your 
program). Tell the dealers they are free to give out copies of the demo 
disk to their customers. 

As part of your "dealer support program" (convincing dealers why 
they should buy your products, as opposed to your competitors'), provide 
your dealer with a "Lazarus program." When run, this program asks 
the dealer to insert a dead (either DOA or accidentally erased) user disk. 
It then determines whether or not the disk is a legitimate copy by check- 
ing various sectors for formatting information. If it is a legit copy, it re- 
copies over any dead sectors. Naturally, this program won't work if the 
disk has been introduced to the "peanut butter syndrome" or has been 
totally erased. In those cases the user is instructed to return the disk to 
your headquarters. Having a Lazarus program gives you three advan- 
tages: 

1) Customers have less time to wait to replace a dead disk. 

2) You have fewer headaches replacing dead disks. 

3) Dealers get fewer complaints from customers, and better sales 
support; this indirectly helps sales and encourages people to buy your 
programs rather than those of company X, which may not have a 
Lazarus program. 

Remember rule number one of copy protection: A copy protection 
method should work at least as well as the normal operating system! 

Only copy-protect what must be protected. There is no good reason 
for copy-protecting an entire disk. If people can copy one track, they can 
copy the entire disk. If you do protect the entire disk, you will have prob- 
lems with foreign disk drives, new operating systems, and the like. If 
your program is too large for one disk, make only the boot disk copy- 
protected; encourage the user to make backups of the data disks. People 
tend to refuse to support a company that charges more than a nominal 
fee (say ten dollars) to replace an uncopyable disk. 

Rule number two: Accept the fact that sooner or later someone will 
find a way around your protection system. Don't panic. Not everyone 
who owns a microcomputer is out to get you by making copies of your 
program. A copy protection system should only be used to prevent the 
casual user from giving out copies to friends. Protection that causes the 
program to work improperly on end user systems will cause you no end 
of headaches, and possibly a lawsuit. If someone wants to break into 
your system badly enough, there are always ways. 

Rule number three: When a new disk drive or operating system 
comes out, make sure your program works with it, and if it doesn't, fix ill 

Rule number four: The copy protection system used should be effi- 
cient. It should produce the media quickly, inexpensively, and reliably. A 
system that requires three hours and fifty dollars of labor probably 
won't work too well for games in the mass market. 

Rule number five: Test your system thoroughly; remember that not 
everyone using your system will know as much as you do. 

Most users, especially business users (yes, Virginia, business users do 
play games! A gentleman who works for a large New York banking 
firm is known to have a set of paddles and a copy of Alien Typhoon hid- 
den in his bottom drawer), don't have too much computer knowledge. 
Many haven't even turned on a computer before. Your manual should 
do everything but tell the person how to plug in the computer (and in 
some cases even that). If your program requires data disks, the program 
should prompt the user and initialize or format the disk. Before format- 
ting a blank disk, try to have your program read the disk to see if it al- 
ready has data on it (and if it does, print some prompt like "Warning, 
this disk already has data on it," print a directory, and ask if the user 



wants to continue). Many users can't even initialize their own disks (sad 
but true). A copy utility should also be included for the data disks. If pos- 
sible, make your data disk such that, if a user tries to look at the direc- 
tory, the directory will indicate that this is being used by your program 
and that a user shouldn't even try to save programs, or data, onto it. If 
you can, fill the index of available disk sectors such that even if a user 
does try to save a program, the operating system will respond with a 
"DISK FULL ERROR". Assume only that your user can read the man- 
ual, but try not to talk down to the reader. An experienced user 
shouldn't fall asleep reading the manual. You may even wish to produce 
it in two parts — a beginner's tutorial and a technical information section 
for advanced users. 

When your program is being loaded, have it check itself out, making 
sure everything has been loaded properly. If possible, include two copies 
on the disk so that if the primary copy doesn't work, the backup is 
loaded automatically. If neither copy works, the system should print a 
message on the screen telling the user what to do. 

When you make your production master (the disk that will he copied 
and solo), do so by copying your object files from your master source 
disk over to the production disk. Do not just make a copy of your master 
disk and delete your source files (files can easily be undeleted by a com- 
petent user). When producing end user disks, the best method usually is 
to use a 128K RAM card and two disk drives. With a proper generator 
program, you just load the program once and dump copies out to each 
drive in turn. Copies can be made as fast as fifteen seconds per copy us- 
ing this method. Make the generator program as dummy-proof as possi- 
ble: then you can hire a three-fifty-an-hour employee to make the copies, 
rather than tie up a programmer. Before making copies, make sure that 
there is no proprietary data on the production disk. Check with all man- 
ufacturers of software that you use within your package for distribution 
rights. Make sure that you don't put anything into your program that 
someone else wrote unless you get their written permission. 



B M MICRO- 

Medium 



THE MICRO-MEDIUM cuts through the veil of 
mystery surrounding your ATARI, and lets you enter 
the mist-shrouded world of Hex deep inside. 

With THE MICRO-MEDIUM, you can: 

• Dump memory (from one address to the whole 
thing.). 

• Alter any or all addresses in Ram, 

• Assemble programs. 

• Disassemble Rom or Ram. 

• Save and load machine language flies to and from 
tape . . . AND MORE! 

THE MICRO-MEDIUM requires an ATARI 400 or 
800, ATARI basic cartridge, a program recorder, and 
16 to 48k of Ram. 

THE MICRO-MEDIUM is only $19.95. 



Send check or money order to: 
MTR Enterprises 

P.O. Box 2308, Bridgeview. I L 60455 
(3121 599-6622 
Allow 4 wks, for delivery. 
Illinois residents add 7% sales tax. 
Atari is reg. trade mark of Atari, Inc. 
The Micro-Medium Is totally unprotected. 



.**r*i/wtfw/ SBQ2H 9 



Send free copies of the program For review as far in advance as pos- 
sible. Remember that it takes several weeks or even months for an arti- 
cle to get printed. Don't send out an untested original version. You don't 
want a review stating that you release programs before they are prop- 
erly tested. 

Don't rush an unfinished program out onto the market; similarly, 
don't advertise a date for release that you can't make in time. 

Don't put the "other company" down in your ads. Most people get 
turned off by this. Wait for the magazines to do a comparison, and let 
them compare! 

Price your program properly. See what similar programs are selling 
for and price accordingly. If your 3-D graphics package goes for $55 and 
theirs sells at $39,95, you're probably going to lose sales. Conversely, if 
theirs goes for $55 and you price yours at $49.95 and they price theirs 
at $15 and you price yours at $39.95 . . . well, you get the idea. 

Support your programs. Have a good manual with the program, and 
an address {preferably not your home address) and phone number that 
customers can use if they need help. Yes, folks, there are people out 
there who want you to tell them how to yet by the large green snake 
that is blocking their way, even if it does mean ruining the game. 

When you come out with future programs, make them compatible 
with older programs but able to run separately also. For example: First 
you come out with a text editor, then an adventure program generator. 
If your adventure generator comes with a rudimentary editor but can 
use your more advanced editor, you'll sell more editors. Make sure that 
all of your programs use the same keystrokes for similar functions. All 
you have to do is plan in advance, and each program will help to sell the 
other ones. 

Be original. Broderbund's Chopiifter was a hot seller because it was 
the only one of its kind. It was a unique, original game not found in any 
arcade; fast, action-packed, and most important— fun! 

If your program is a utility, it is best to include a sample program full 
of remarks as well as a tutorial. Suggest extra books or manuals that 
users can read to understand how to use your system better. If someone 
wants to write a book about how to use your program, don't discourage 
them: help them! As long as the book doesn't include your entire manual, 
and does contain information to help someone learn how your program 
works, it will give you fewer headaches and help you sell more pro- 
grams. 

Offer the manuals for sale separately from the complete package. 
Many users, especially educational institutions, will buy the manual sep- 
arately from the system, read and evaluate it. and then buy the system 
itself. Decide on a policy for what to do if a person wants to buy a man- 
ual, buys the system, and then wants a refund on the manual. And stick 
by that decision! 

Make your program as compatible as possible with all brands of ac- 
cessories. If you come out with a program to print graphs on a graphics 
printer, support as many as possible, including options such as color, 
sheet feeders, and plotters, and using numerous interfacing combinations 
(parallel eight-bit. serial half duplex, serial TTL serial 20 mA loop, 
brainwaves, and all the rest). 

Accept the fact that many people are paranoid about modifying their 
system and making hardware changes. You won't sell as many word 
processors if you require an XYZ keyboard as you will if you allow an 
XYZ brand keyboard, an ABC hrand keyboard, or a plain vanilla 
keyboard. 

For example: The following Apple graphics utility doesn't exist. 
Maybe someone would like to write it. 

I he disk will boot on either a sixteen-sector or thirteen- sector sys- 
tem. It will automatically determine which version it is in and load the 
correct version of DOS. It will look to see if an eighty-column terminal 
is attached (either an external terminal or any of a dozen or so different 
eighty-column cards available), and if so it will use it. A system con- 
figuration file (menu-driven, of course) will include this and other infor- 
mation. The menu will ask whether an upper/lower-case character 
generator is installed, what type of printer is in use, its special features, 
and the control sequences to get those features. Several popular printers 



are already predefined and can be loaded. Most plotters are also sup- 
ported. All major color printers are supported. (When one company was 
asked why their graphics utility supported more than twenty different 
black-and-white printers but supported color printers in black-and-white 
mode only, they said that there wasn't a market for color output,} The 
user is asked whether input should be from joystick, keyboard, graphics 
tablet, or a user-written driver. If the user has a I6K RAM card in the 
system, it will be used for extra memory storage. Several different con- 
figuration files can be stored for a user who has several different sys- 
tems or different printers. The program can be transferred over to a 
hard disk drive. The master disk will, upwn demand, produce three back- 
up disks. Each time it creates a slave, it writes out a pointer on the mas- 
ter. After three slaves have been created, the portion of the master that 
creates the slaves is destroyed. If a person copies any of the slaves or the 
master, or tries to download the hard drive copy to a floppy, a demo 
copy will be created. The demo will be identical to the original but will 
only store 2K of data— not enough to make it worth stealing, but 
enough to show the capabilities of the program. The data is stored on 
normal Apple DOS - compatible disks that a user program can read. 
(This automatically makes the program compatible with several popular 
word processors.) Files can also be read/written to disks in Pascal. 
CP/M, and SOS. 

All Apple Computer and most other brands of printer interface cards 
are supported. If a user wishes, a custom -written assembly language 
printer driver can be attached, although in most circumstances it isn't 
necessary. Minimum system requirements are 4fiK RAM and at least 
one disk drive. The same disks will work on an Apple ll, Apple He. Ap- 
ple 111 (emulation mode), or Apple-lookalike, although the latter is not 
supported. (If you support the imitation Apple, you will have problems 
with schlocky companies, schlocky construction, weird keyboards, and 
the rest of it. Better leave such users on their own, or let them goto the 
manufacturer.) Optional but highly recommended hardware enhance- 
ments for the program include extra memory, printer and interface, hard 
disk drives, RAM disk drives, eighty-column terminals, a modem, or an 
external user program. 

The warranty period is ninety days. If the program fails within the 
warranty period, return the disk to the company and a replacement will 
be sent. Out of warranty, there is a ten-dollar replacement charge. War- 
ranty is proven by a copy of the sales slip and a warranty card on file. 
If the original disk is dead on arrival, return it to the dealer for replace- 
ment. (The dealer will receive a replacement copy when the dead disk is 
received.) The dealer will also be given a copyable demo and is encour- 
aged to distribute that copy. Upon buying at least ten copies of the pro- 
gram for sale and signing a nonrelease contract in which he/she agrees 
to make no changes or modifications, the dealer will be provided with a 
Lazarus program for free. Manuals will be sold separately for $15. 
They will include a demo copy. The cost of the manual is not refundable 
upon purchase of the package, and the demo will not be upgraded to a 
full copy. The suggested retail price is $100. Dealer cost is $60 for five 
or more copies at a tune, with demo copies for $10. If an order is paid in 
advance, shipment is free: otherwise. C.O.D. Terms are available for 
qualified customers. The dealer price is $40 for orders of greater than 
fifty pieces at a time. 

Please note that the above description does not say how the program 
should work. That is the decision of the programmer. Every feature 
noted above is physically possible and compatible with every other fea- 
ture (including keeping the program copy-protected and hard disk drive- 
compatible), but not one of the thousands of programs available for the 
Apple 11 has even half of the above features. 

Not all of the above recommendations will apply in every case (in 
fact, it would be hard to make a totally original program that is "better" 
than an existing program, as there would be nothing comparable), but 
they could help to improve the sales and usability of any program, M 



Over the last six years, Philip Chien has had occasion to be an end user, a retail 
dealer, a programmer, and technical manager for United Software of America, and 
is currently president of Earth News, an OEM firm. 



10 



ST.CAME 



NO TIPPING 

0k 



1 




Adventurers are invited to respond to the pleas of the stumped listed herein and 
to solicit aid in return. In addition to this reader-supplied public service, any tip sub- 
mitted in response to a Typified that the editors judge to he extraordinarily trenchant, 
to the point, and terrific will he rewarded with a $lQO bounty. Include your idea of 
the straightforward solution along with each masterpiece of literary or cryptographic 
subtlety. This is not optional. 

Iry to limit yourself to a maximum of jive questions and jive lips apiece, or mix 
and match for a total of no more than ten. We ask this favor of you, gentle reader, 
because the volume of mail is now such that we couldn 't print all requests/assists if 
No Tipping were twice its current size. Therefore, we strive instead to give something 
like equal representation to all who write. (A single tip that takes up a full page or 
more is likely to he neither prized nor printed.) 

Remember to state the name of the qame and the question to which you are 
responding. 

Certain questions regarding certain adventures have a high rate of recurrence and 
will be recirculated in the Typificds from time to time. By all means, keep answering 
them. The classic adventures are like busy turnstiles. They art always new to new 
adventurers, and certain areas of high frustration will always produce the same re- 
quests. If your tip didn't make it to print or to riches when the question was first 
asked, hang on to it. rework it, and improve it. The question may come up again. 

Final note: Poems win bounties when they have some bearing, in their entirety, 
on the clue being given — not because they make pretty rhymes. 

Address all tips/questions to St. Gametip, Box 60. North Hollywood. 
CA 91603. 

Postmark deadline: April 9. 19H4. 

March bounty winners: 
Adventure — How do I open the north door of the giant room? 
And the winner is: 
The sunrise puddle 
Will solve your muddle. 
— Keith Amman, Evanston, IL 
Cranston Manor — How do you get rid of the suit of armor? 
And the winner is; 

You're trying to scare the armor. Think of elephants. 
— Charles Follmer. Silsbee, TX 
Ultima I] — How do you get the items needed for traveling in the 
rocket/raise character attribute points? 



And the winner is: 
10 GOTO HOTEL 

20 [F CLERK THEN GET G: - GOLD - (G* 1 00): ATTRIBUTES - 

ATTRIBUTES + INT (G'RNDfl)) 
30 IF ST> - 30 THEN PLATE - I: POWER - I 
10 IF PLATE OR POWER THEN GOSUB ROCKET: GOTO SPACE 
—Theodore Chen, Potomac. MD 



TYPIFIEDS 



Adventure 

q. ] low do I yr[ across the reservoir? — Shawn Smith, Greendalc, 



ft I 



Castles of Darkness 

q I have the how. .mow., .md .i>,lvi,.,- hut , lL n"r | . j - - r rlu clr^jon-— Tfocodon 

Chen. Potomac. MD 

The Coveted Mirror 

q. Where do I find a 'guide? — Mike Brown, New Carlisle. OH 
Cranston Manor 

a- To deactivate the computer. Think opposite the question* that's, the clue; think of liquids 
■itsd what they do. — lames Marcolesco, Villa Park, CA 
Deadline 

q. Can the second murder be prevenred?— Sarah Murdoch, Toronto, Ontario 
q. Where is the fragment?— Greg ThrcadgiH. Cantonment. FL 

lint llajiUi 

a. Getting ikr Kultad spell fram the machine room: Roger Carlson wants haiku, Roger 
Carlson can have haiku: Multicolored friend/trudges, slowly up the stairs; /escaping 
answers, — Judith Lucero Turchin. San Francisco* CA 

q. How dn you get back mil of the machine room? What about the nasty door/ 
translucent rooms/silver spoon? — Riva Bickel, Lake Worth, Ft. 

q. Shnuld I use the Kulcad on the guarded door or the stairs? I can kill the dragon and 
the guy with the axe, but no Krill: I think I need Guncho, but if I get chat, then I can't get 
Co KrilU— T.K. Almroth IN. Huntington Beach. CA 
Escape from RunqiMan 

q, How do I get our of the por in rhe jungle the native keeps purring me in? — Juan 
Fernando Serra, Miami, FL 
Legacy of LlyLgamyn 

q. How do yuu get to the island* or otherwise get to level* 4, 5, and 6? — John Hagen, 
Saint [.ouis, MO 
Mask of the Sun 

a, What to do m the talking statue scene: A stone jaguar knows the word of truth.— 
John Kight, Dallas, TX 

a, Gttting by the snake: Illumination means elimination. — Theodore Chen, Poto- 
mac. MD 
Mystery House 

q. How is the trunk in the storeroum opened?— Sharon Werner, Chicago. IL 
Planetfail 

q. I've made it all the way through, but I've never gotten pasr Blather, walked on the 
catwalks, or explored the reactor access stairs and transportation supply, boch dark and 
grue-some. Can one? — Judith Luce.ru Turchm, San Erunusco, CA 

q. How dn you dispute of the amoeba/get safely mm and out of the radiation 
room? — Hiva Bickel, I,ake Work. FL 
SAGA "3: Mission Impossible 

a, Cettmg through the large metal doors; Don't oe too shy to get your picture taken by 
the apparatus above the table. . . . Find the colored key, unlock the culured button, and 
soon you will be on your way to showing your authority,— Pat Nash, Enid, OK 

a. Getting the yellow hey without blowing the place up- The saboteur is good for other rhings 
besides lying around.— Steve Moody. Houston, TX 
SAGA Hi Voodoo Castle 

a- What is meant by "mming hag": What dn oceans and long good-hyes have in com- 
mon? — Matthew Rockloff, Belmont, CA 
SAGA fl5: The Count 

a. Makmg it though the night With the stake. Where the Count hasn't been m a long time 
is where he isn't going to go now. — Riva Bickel, I^ike Worth, FL 
SAGA ftt*'. Strange Odyssey 

q. How do I gee out of che room with crushing gravity?— Jr. Anderson. Glen view. IL 
SAGA *7: Mystery Fun House 



11 



a. Hm- to ,jtt pm th< tulti/tpe: Do you need glasses? Look at a mirror! The i 
be (he pits, but with some bounce you'll get through, even with a kid turn. —Robbie flam. 
Momstown, NJ 
SAGA *8: Pyramid of Doom 

a. K>l\m$ tht «bra; If you look at the matter first, you will not need to.— Clint Wheeler, 
Dallas. TX 

q. Where do you slash the treasures? Whai is in the mirror-lined room?— Rohbie Bam, 
Momstown, NJ 
Serpent's Star 

a. How lo itl /ufl iht deer willi lis itali in if njttr lilt nw«: Gee! Explored Maic. Steele?— 
Theodure Chen. Potomat. MD 
Stnrrross 

q. How do I get into the bubbte at the top of the tree?— David Epncr. Barbcrton. OH 
Ultima II 

a, Aftft fitidwv the quitkswerd and nnewuiq bh-^inu fwtn Aith>^ The s|mlc ,il iv.id is sure j lot. 
yet when you see Mars reverse the Beast .and follow his p.irh. — George Booras. Miami, FL 

q. Where exactly on planet X is A ntos?— Charles Follmer, Silsbee. TX 
Ultima 111 



a. U 'httt ;,i find txotii urmii One wizard in Dawn must die. — Bill Scligm.m, Brooklyn, 

NY 

q. Does anyone know in what dungeon one finds the mark of the snake?— David W. 
Nelson. Lindstrom, MN 

q. Where are the four hidden shrines? I low do I get them?— Bill Sehgman, Brooklyn. 

NY 

Ulysses and (he Golden Fleet c 

q. Where is (he potion on (he island of storms?— Randy Mot*. Gary. MN 
Witness 

4. I kilo^ (he LUnk was [iggcd. I'm; ; .in" r scern IP lind .im lmIh'I .In,'-. I s<iki'd 
DeaJHru. Gould it he I'm missing a big elite?- Nancy E. Hong, San Francisco. CA 
Witard and the Princess 

q. How do you get past the rickety old bridge?— Barry Spencer. Brighton. Ml 
Wizardry 

a. Raising iharacter irveh I'ilhnitt fhratinp. First-level solitaire gains the most, and there is 
always Murphy's ghnsr. Fight, and be bold: forget the gold. — Kevin 5coles, Minot, ND 

q. How do you get past the large sliding wall with the image of the bear? What arc 
the bronze and silver keys for? Where is Rent-A-Stairs Corp?— Mike Parks. Amery, Wl 




First off, let's award one gold-plated kudos to an anonymous phone caller 
to these offices for his assistance in teching us all an object lesson. The 
conversation went something like this: 
(ring) 

"Hello. I have a problem villi /,ork. " 

"What kind of problem?" 

"Well. I went to save il to disk. " 

"Yeah?" 

"And it saved, " 

"So?" 

"Oh: I left the program disk in the drive. " 
"And?" 

"And $0 now when I try to run the protjram. it just spits out call statements. " 
"Well, on our copy o/Zork. if tells you to take the program disk and put the save 
disk in before you save." 
"Oh." 

"Do you have the original or a copy?" 
"A copy." 

"You should have gotten the original." 

"Ok" 

"Bye." 

"Bye." 

(dick) 

Best tip you'll get all week. 
March bounty winner; 

Zork III— How to get out of the royal puzzle without losing the 
book. And the winner is (finally!): 

The way you came in 

Is the exit to choose; 

The walls that move provide the clues. 

You just have to find 

The Right ladder to use. 

—Doug |acobson, Nassau Bay, TX 

GENERAL PLEAS 
AND ASSISTANCE 

1 

Help wanted. A gentleman known only as Clark (Duluth, MN) is 
trying to load a lot of stuff on the boat, but he keeps dropping the 
candles. 



Help granted. How to get the slag? "You don't want it." opines 
Richard Todd (Cocoa. FL), "Think of where it's at. and use some." 
Some sound songbird advice from Mike Levy (Dallas, TX): "The 
songbird you seek cannot be caught, but holds a treasure which you 
have sought. A bauble which shines from end to end can be gained with 
the songbird's clockwork friend." A tip from Harry Page and company 
(Sunnyvale. CA): "Write to Infocom for map and hints. They sell for 
$7.95 and were a great help to us." 
II 

Help wanted: Mike Levy (Dallas, TX) has freed the demon, given 
him all the treasures, and gotten the wand, and now he's standing there 
waving it, trying to move the menhir. Chris Lee (Foster City. CA) was 
waiting for Keith Amman (Evanston. IL) to ask. but now he just has to 
know: What is the answer to the riddle in the riddle room? How can 
Doug [acobson (Nassau Bay, TX) get by the three -headed dog? And the 
poetic Bruce Kleinman (Mill Valley, CA) wonders, "How in the hell do 
I get up the well?" 

Help granted: Currently, in the ever-popular Ways To Get Fast the 
Dragon department, one of our favorites is that of Sarah Murdoch 
(Toronto, Ontario): "You can lead a dragon to water (or something like 
water) but you can't make him think," Murdoch also notes that James B. 
O'Neill, in wanting to know what to do with the place mat and how to 
get into the dreary room, has almost answered his own ouestion: "All 
you have to do now is push the key," Speaking of keys, if you want to 
get one from the unicorn, Stephen Jensen (Provo. UT) intones, "The 
princess doesn't have much to say/but 1 wouldn't let her get away." To 
get the portrait out of the bank, Richard Todd (Cocoa. FL) says. "You 
have to pay for it." 
Ill 

Help wanted: Robbie Bain (Morristown, NJ) speaks for many when 
he says: "What do you do .with the golden amulet, strange key, golden 
machine, grue repellant, and iron door, not to mention the royal puzzle 
and heavy vial?" (Partial replies are okay.) Sarah Murdoch (Toronto. 
Ontario) is stuck in the mirror room. What is the wooden staff used for, 
Nancy Fong (San Francisco. CA) would like to know. She's gotten to 
the dungeon master and is stuck. 

Help granted: To get a light source to the south shore. Sarah 
Murdoch (Toronto, Ontario) suggests you circumvent the problem. 
"You don't need a light source if you travel early. Also, the bugs are 
ferocious, so take a little something." To get the chest open. Boh 
Dickson (Foster City, CA) recommends: "Upon first sighting the chest, 
take it and be patient. The answer over your head? Why not wait and 
see?" # 



★ *** 



A FOUR STAR WINNER" 

'Computers & Electronics Magazine 





f k 



uniim 



i 



This is a high-speed, high- 
skill game, and certainly one of 
the better that we've seen 
recently," 

Computers & Electronics Magazine 



YY 



A SON-UNE 



The big Bumblebee Airline jet rocked and rolled in the overcast 
April sky as it awaited clearance to land at O'Hare Airport. O'Hare be- 
ing Chicago's answer to the Los Angeles freeways, it was anyone's 
guess as to when we would finally set down. 

Normally I wouldn't mind, as the limousine from the Text Adventure 
Writers Guild would wait until the flight's arrival to take me to the 
Lakeshore Drive home of the Guild. But on this particular afternoon, 
somehow or other I had wound up on the same L.A.-ta-Chicago flight 
with one Latimer Eutheria, a fellow member of the Guild. Eutheria was 
known to one and all as "Rodent," due to his amazing resemblance to ei- 
ther a mouse or a guinea pig. In fact, there are approximately 2,400 liv- 
ing species of Rodentia and, depending on the light, Latimer could con- 
ceivably resemble any one of them. 

In any case, he had come wandering back from his first-class seat to 
the peon section to stretch his legs and had noticed me sitting there re- 
reading Fritz Leiber's Fafhrd and Gray Mouser series. 

"Gracious! My, my . . . bless me. If it isn't Ken Rose. 1 must, simply 
must talk to you . . . simply must." 

"Latimer," 1 replied, "how nice to see you. Look, it's awfully crowd- 
ed back here — why don't we wait until we get back to Chicago?" 

"Simply can't, simply can't, Kenneth — it's very important, you see. 
very important. And there's all sorts of space up front." 

"Latimer, the airline frowns on moving around without appropriate 
recompense, which I would rather not expend," 

Latimer looked at me quizzically. 

"Oh, no problem at all. I own twenty or thirty percent of Bumblebee 
and they are very accommodating. Please, be my guest." 

And so, there we were. First class is all right, but first class next to 
Eutheria makes for a long three-and-a-half-hour ride. 

"Rose, 1 want to thank you for mentioning me and all that in your 
last article, but I have some serious criticism of the latest effort you have 
produced," 

It is traditional at the Text Adventure Writers Guild to pass one's 
work around for debugging and comments before releasing it. One tries 
one's best to see that Eutheria either doesn't get a copy (which he often 
doesn't, as he travels extensively to visit his Rock Hare holdings) or, if 
he does, to avoid him if at all possible. 

1 began pouring down the first-class Scotch as fast as they supplied 
it, attempting to drown out Eutheria' s comments. 

It didn't do any good. 

"You'll recall that when I told you that there should be a way to 
write an adventure to run on any machine, you took my comments to 
heart. In fact, you wrote a splendid example that fit neatly on my 
Timex." 

He continued, "However, this latest effort, which expands on the 
earlier, is much too complex. Even though my Timex is expanded to 
16K. it wouldn't fit. 

"I finally borrowed Muffy's C-64 and got it to run there, but I had to 
change the parser. See what I mean?" 



LINKS 100 TO 190 STAY THE SAME 



l 



195 IF MIDStAVA.I) - " "THEN X - A ■ 
200 IF MID«A$.A,l) - *' "THF.N A - 
210 IF A -0 THEN GOTO 250 
220 NEXT A 
230 VIS - AS 

240 IF V IS - AS THEN GOTO 280 
250 Vl$ -LEFTS(AS.X) 

260 IF RIGHTMA$.LEN{AS) - X) - " " THEN N IS - "" 
265 IF Rl GHTSI AS .LENiAS) - X) -THEN GOTO 280 
270 N IS - HIGHTS(AS.I.EN(A$) • (X + l» 
280 X-0 

1 nodded. "That'll work with most extended Basics, such as Ap- 
plesoft and IBM and Commodore. If you can't do that, you may need to 
set up separate strings for Vl$ and N IS, as I outlined last issue. 

"But Latimer," I groaned, "What's the point?" 

"The object is to make the program easy, not complicated. And you 



have managed to take a grand design and make it difficult," Eutheria 
squeaked. 

"No," I said, "the object is to take Basic programming commands 
and build a full-fledged adventure. And that's what the 'Full-Color No- 
Res Adventure* does. 

"The program is 23,743 bytes long and should fit on any computer 
with 24K of usable memory. It can be made considerably shorter by cut- 
ting out REM lines and shortening room definitions. And, of course, you 
can put multiple statements on the same line. To make the game univer- 
sal, 1 put each statement on a separate line. You can save memory by 
combining lines, but watch line numbers. 

"The structure of the game is very straightforward." 

1 handed him a piece of paper out of my briefcase showing the fol- 
lowing structure: 

LINES 0000-0080 Introduction 
0100-0320 Parser 

0400-1 170 General Verb Handling Routines 
1200-1780 Moving Around Routines 
1800-1890 Listing of Objects Routines 
1900-4000 Room Descriptions 
4100-4350 Look, Describe Routines 
4400-4580 Getting Routines 
4600-4740 Dropping Routines 
4800-4880 Inventory Routines 
4900-4980 Quitting Routine 
5000-5170 Saving Game (For Apple) 
5200-5290 Restoring Game (For Apple) 
5300-5440 Assigning Object Numbers 
5500-5710 Object Listing for Rooms 
5800-7440 Start Up Routines 
7500-7770 General Hint Sections 
7900-8020 Turtle Routines 
8100-8380 Puzzle Handling 
8400-8660 Switches and Some Buttons 
8700-8810 Climbing 
8900-8810 Opening 
9100-9390 Inserting 
9400-9850 Turning 
9900-9970 Magic 

Eutheria glanced at it momentarily and handed it back. 

"No, no, you have precisely missed the point." 

At that moment, the jet took an unexpected and particularly nasty 
bounce, and Eutheria poured his tea in my lap. He didn't notice. 

"You see," he said, "after I got it to fit, 1 couldn't solve it. It was 
much too complex. It didn't have any colors in it at all, and I couldn't do 
anything. In fact, I was tempted to (he looked around) cheat. 

"After all, what is the object besides carrying around a turtle? 1 
found six rooms that were in last issue's example, found one more, got 
killed once, and that's all 1 could do. Is that right for all that typing?" 

"Of course not," 1 said. "It's a very large, deliberately complex ad- 
venture to show what can be done with very few programming tools. I 
did choose to muddy up the waters so you couldn't solve it easily by fol- 
lowing the program listing, but you should be able to do that. You 
should have peeked, or as you put it, cheated a wee bit." 

The color drained from Eutheria's face. 

His squeak, while remaining the same in volume, rose an octave: 
"How dare you! Cheat? In a text adventure?! Leave me! Go away! 
You . . . you tempter . . . you . . . you cheat maker!" 

In fact, I was a bit harsh. But insulting him was the only way 1 could 
find to exit gracefully. 1 made a brief apology and returned to Fafhrd 
and the Gray Mouser. 

(Oh. incidentally, dear readers, many of you have inquired about a 
multiple statement parser, one that allows you to say "Go North. Get 
Chicken. Throw Chicken Off Cliff" on the same line. That's what we'll 
look at next time.) 



ward,/ Oftrf 



7f 



Part 2 : Hot Just for Display 

The Atari screen display is controlled by two dedicated chips: the 
ANTIC and the TIA. While (he TIA maintains a display by sending col- 
or/luminance data to the television, the ANTIC's job is to create an in- 
terface by retrieving from memory data that determines how the screen 
will look and translating it into signals that a television will understand. 
The ANTIC chip allows us to custom-design the display with an over- 
whelming amount of variation, so fire up the brain cells and read on. 

If you look closely at a television display, you'll notice that it is not a 
smooth and unbroken image, but instead comprises many tightly packed 
dots which, when examined together, form a complete picture. One of 
these small dots is called a color clock. Color clocks are grouped into 
horizontal scan lines that stretch across the screen. There are 262 scan 
lines from the top of the screen to the bottom, but only about 200 scan 
lines are visible on a standard television. Since about 60 lines lie out of 
view of the user, most programs only utilize 192 scan lines. When 
designing the screen, this fact must be taken into account. Horizontally, 
the situation is similar. There are 228 color clocks in a single scan line, 
but only about 1 60 can be seen. Fortunately, the user is only required to 
adjust the image vertically; the Atari defaults to 160 color clocks 
horizontally. 

Antic a la Mode. The ANTIC chip derives the fundamental screen 
iroaflf from two sources: the display lisl and the display memory (both nl 
which can reside virtually anywhere in memory). In general, the display 
list is composed of a set of instructions that describe to ANTIC the ac- 
tual architecture of the screen — an outline, if you will — and the display 
memory is the actual data that will be shown. In other words, the 
display list is no more than a list that the ANTIC chip references in 
order to discover how to interpret and display the information in the 
display memory. 

Vertically, the screen display is broken up into various groupings 
called mode lines. Mode lines are a series of scan lines that are united for 
one particular display function. For example, one row of a graphics 
character screen is actually only one mode line, even though it is eight 
scan lines high. Those eight scan lines are treated as one homogenous 
unit devoted to displaying graphics type text. Hence, a Basic mode 
line is represented in the display list by one instruction. 

Mode lines come in three types: blank lines, bit-mapped mode lines, 
and character mode lines. Blank line instructions, as the name implies, 
instruct the ANTIC to display from one to eight scan lines that retain 
the background color bur contain no data whatsoever. 

Bit-mapped modes are sometimes referred to as point-plotting 
modes, because the data in the display memory addresses individual 
points within the chosen mode line. These points, which vary in size ac- 
cording to the mode chosen, are commonly referred to as pixels. Note 
that a pixel is not identical to a color clock; a pixel is the smallest-sized 
dot that can be displayed in a particular mode. For example, a Basic 
mode three pixel would be represented by four color clocks horizontally 
and eight scan lines vertically. There are eight different bit-mapped 
modes that vary in the number of usable colors and the size of the in- 
dividual pixels. The third type, character modes, are the most powerful 
and versatile type of mode line available on the Atari. There are six 
character display modes accessible from the display list. 

Character modes such as Basic modes zero through two differ from 
bit-mapped modes in that instead of simply displaying a pattern of pixels 
(squares) according to information in the display memory, they display 

16 BEECB (prntu^aam^/hr^iffiMtmi'^ 



by TTlatt Loueless 

the whole character. In other words, the display memory does not hold 
the data that describes what the character looks like; rather, it only tells 
ANTIC which character to display. The display memory might contain 
the data to display a row of A's. bur would not contain the data describ- 
ing the actual shape of an A. The actual data for the character is held in 
the character set. which is redefinable. We will discuss character sets in 
a future article. 

In addition, there are several options that were designed into the 
various mode line instructions; display list interrupts, load memory scan, 
vertical scroll enable, and horizontal scroll enable. These further en- 
hance the power of the display list by allowing certain options to be used 
selectively on desired mode lines. The only option of any importance to 
us at this point is the load memory scan. The load memory scan or LMS 
of a mode line instruction tells ANTIC that the next two byres point to 
the memory address that marks the beginning of the display memory. 

Finally, there is the jump instruction, which appears in two forms. 
The first form is the straight jump or )MP. The )MP instruction is analo- 
gous ro the Basic goto statement. It instructs ANTIC to continue the 
display list at a different location in memory. The new address should 
follow the JMP instruction (low, high). The second type of JMP instruc- 
tion, which is more common, is the JVB (jump to vertical blank). Essen- 
tially, the JVB tells ANTIC that it has reached the end of the display list 
and feeds ANTIC the address of the beginning of the display list. The 
[VB instruction is also followed by an address (low. high). All display 
lists should end with a JVB. 

The first step in creating a custom display list is to design, on paper, 
exactly how you would like the screen to appear. In order to do this, you 
must reference table I to decide what you want and how many scan 
lines it will take. You should keep a running total of the number of scan 
lines used so that you do not exceed the maximum. If you use too many 
scan lines, the screen will begin to roll as if your vertical hold were 
maladjusted. Every display list should begin with three blank-eight-line 
instructions ($70). This brings the display down twenty-four lines into 
the viewable portion of the screen. After that, you have 192 scan lines 
to play with without the worry of losing data off the bottom. 

The three blank-eight-line instructions should be followed by the first 
mode line with the LMS option invoked. As we mentioned, the LMS is 
used to tell ANTIC where the display memory resides. The LMS must 
be followed by the address of the display memory. The low byte of the 
address comes first, followed by the high byte (for additional explana- 
tion, see the program). Then come any additional mode lines you desire. 
Note, however, that it is not necessary to use all 192 available lines. In 
fact, the fewer mode lines used, the faster your Atari will run. 

Now let's step through the creation of a display list. This sample dis- 
play list will be rather simple. It will consist of one of everything. The 
first step is to put down the three blank-eight-line instructions. By look- 
ing at the table, we see the instruction to blank eight lines is a $70, so 
the first three entries in our display list will be $70s. Second, we want 
ANTIC mode two, which is the first mode line, with the LMS option in- 
voked. We take the two and add $40 to it for the LMS, which gives us 
$42. Next, we need to put the low and high bytes of the display memory 
into the display list. Since we don't have any data, let's just point it 
somewhere in memory where we know there is a lot of arbitrary data. 
SE4Q0 is a good choice. The low byre will be $00 and the high byte will 
be $E4. Next, we need modes three, four, and so on until mode $0F, the 



last mode Notice that we only used 89 of the 192 usable scan lines. Fi- 
nally, we need the )VB (jump to vertical blank) instruction, which tells 
ANTIC to stop displaying and shows where the beginning of the display 
list can be found. Since in the example program the display list is on 
page 6 ($600, decimal 1 536), the low byte will be $00 and the high byte 
$06. Table 2 shows the completed display list. 

The next step is to incorporate the new display list into a program. 
After creating the display list, you must first decide where to place the 
display list in memory. Since display lists are stationary and seldom con- 
sist of more than 200 bytes, they are usually assemhled directly into the 
program. There is one constraint concerning the location of the display 
list, however; it must not cross a IK boundary— that is, any two-byte 
address ending m $00. If it is absolutely essential for a display list to 
cross one of these boundaries, you may do so with a [MP instruction, but 
this is not recommended. 

Deciding where to place the display memory is the next task. This is 
a bit trickier. First of all. a mixture of mode lines might require a strange 
arrangement of memory, because the amount of memory needed per 
mode line varies greatly. Second, the display memory must not cross a 
4K boundary {an address divisible by $1000). But if the situation does 
arise, you may use a second LMS instruction to bridge a 4K boundary in 
order to remedy the prohlem. 

Once the memory situation has been resolved, only one step remains: 
informing ANTIC as to the whereabouts of your display list. The first 
step is to place ANTIC on hold while you modify its display list pointers. 
This is done by storing a zero m the register called SDMCTL at location 
$22F. Now store the low byte of your display list into SDLSTL ($230) 
and store the high byte into SDLSTH ($23 1). Finally, turn ANTIC back 
on by storing a $22 in $22F. Now our new display list should be 
in action. 

The example program uses the sample display list from table 2. The 
run address is $620, and the source code is in MAC/65 format. To run 
with Atari's ASM/fiD, make two line changes: 

480 LDA *DUST6$FF 

500 IDA *DUST/256 

The comments should make the program self-explanatory. In the 
next issue, we'll take a look at using the display memory with custom 
display lists. Until then, happy assembling. 

ANTIC BASIC 



MODE 


MOD* 




a OF 


COLOR 


SCAN 


PIXELS/ BYTES/ 


» (HEX) . 


TYPE 


COLORS 


CLOCKS 


LINES 


LINE 


LINE 


2 





CHAR 


2H 


4 


S 


40 


40 


3 




CHAR 


2Vi 


4 


10 


40 


40 


4 




l I I AH 


5 


4 


a 


40 


40 


5 




CHAR 


5 


4 


Id 


40 


40 


6 


1 


CHAR 


5 


8 


8 


20 


20 


7 


2 


CHAR 


5 


S 


16 


20 


20 


8 


i 


BIT 


4 


4 


8 


40 


10 


<4 


1 


BIT 


2 


2 


4 


80 


10 


A 


5 


BIT 


4 


2 


4 


80 


20 





6 


BIT 


2 


I 


2 


160 


20 


C 




BIT 


2 


[ 


1 


160 


20 


D 


7 


BIT 


4 


I 


2 


160 


40 


E 




BIT 


1 


I 


I 


160 


40 


F 


8 


BIT 


2Vi 


W 


1 


320 


40 



Note: The ANTIC mode numbers and the Basic mode numb* 



nut identical. 



DM 
LMS 

VERT. SCROLL 
HORIZ. SCROLL 



A DD TO ANTIC MODE * 

$80 
$40 
$20 
$10 



BLANK I LINE - 100 
BLANK 2 LINE - $10 
BLANK 3 LINE - $20 
BLANK 4 LINE - $30 
BLANK 5 LINE - $40 
BLANK 6 UNE - $50 



BLANK 7 
BLANK 8 ■ 

IMP - $01 
JVB - $41 



$60 
170 



oioo 

0110 
0120 
0130 
0140 
0150 
0160 
0170 
0180 

o i yo 

0200 
0210 
0220 
0230 
0240 
0250 
0260 
0270 
0280 
0290 
0300 
0310 
0320 
0330 
0340 
0350 
0360 
0370 

0380 
0390 
0400 
0410 
0420 
0430 
0440 
0450 
0460 
0470 
0480 
0490 
0500 
0510 
0520 
0530 
0540 



DISPLAY LIST EXAMPLE 
MAR/ A PR ST. GAME 
By Matt Loveless 



.OPT OB| generate object code 
:< < < < SYSTEM EQUATES >>>> 

SDMCTL - $022F :DMA control ($00 - screen off: $22 - normal) [OS] 
SDLSTL - $0230 display list pointer (low byte) [OS] 
SDLSTH - $0231 ;dlapjay list painter (hioh byte)[OS] 

! < < < < PROGRAM EQUATES > > > > 

DM AON - $22 ;value to store in SDMCTL for norm, display 
DISMEM - $E400 .'arbitrary sample display memory address [see text) 

< < < DISPLAY LIST > > > 

■ - $0600 ;staxt at beginning of page si* for convenience 



DLIST .BYTE $70.$70.$70 ; three blank-eight -line i 
.BYTE $42 :mode two with LMS option 
.WORD IJISMEM : follow LMS with display memory address 
.BYTE $03.$04.$05.$06.$07.$08.$09.$OA.$OB.$OC.$OD.$OE.$OF 
jone of everything 

.BYTE $4 1 ;]VB (jump to vertical blank) signify end 
.WORD DLIST ipoini ANTIC back to the top 



< < < < MAIN PROGRAM >>>> 

* - $0620 ;start program a little bit From display list 

START LDA fltOO : turn the serpen off 
ST A SDMCTL 

LDA » < DLIST iset display list pointer (low byte) 
STA SDLSTL 

LDA tt >DL1ST ;(highbyle) 
STA SDLSTH 

LDA flDMAON ;turn screen back on 
STA SDMCTL 

RTS : return 



SAMPLE DISPLAY LIST 

VALUE SCAN LINES 



$70 
$70 
$70 
$42 
$00 

SE4 

$03 
$04 
$05 
$06 
$07 
$08 
$09 
$0A 
$0B 
$0C 
SOD 
$0E 
$0F 
$41 
$00 
$06 



10 
8 
16 
S 
16 
8 
4 
4 
2 
I 
2 



DISPLAY LIST ADDR - $0600 
DISPLAY MEMBER ADDR . $E4O0 

FUNCTION 
BLANK 8 LINES 
BLANK 8 LINES 
BLANK 8 LINES 
ANTIC MODE 2 WITH LMS 
DISPLAY MEMORY AUDH 
(LOW BYTE) 
(HIGH BYTE) 
ANTIC MODE 3 
ANTIC MODE 4 
ANTIC MODE 5 
ANTIC MODE 6 
ANTIC MODE 7 
ANTIC MODE 8 
ANTIC MODE 9 
ANTIC MODE $A 
ANTIC MODE $B 
ANTIC MODE $C 
ANTIC MODE $D 
ANTIC MODE $E 
AH TIC MODE $F 
JVB 

DISPLAY UST ADDR (LOW) 
(HIGH) 



Table I. 



Table 2. 



STGAME 



frm&fqunt BB33B3 & 



True Confessions- We could do that. We could use Lisa. But it 
would be wrong. 

And it was. We cheated. You see, it's easier to develop software on 
the Apple than on the Commodore, mainly because the Apple drives are 
much Faster and more reliable. And, as your genial host has his Apple 
and Commodore connected together via a parallel port, it's easy to load 
stuff back and forth. Thus, those Commodore assembly listings have so 
far been created with an Apple assembler. 

Starting with our next issue. Commodore listings will be in the 
proper MAE assembler format. 

Red Pencil Time. And now. on to business. How many of you did 
your homework? Wharl? Only three? Out of how many millions? Unbe- 
lievable. And it's for your own good. Well, forget it then. No article this 
month, until everyone else does their homework. 

Excuse me a moment. 

WRITER; What's up, oh noble ED? 

EDITOR: THOU HAST AN ARTICLE TO DOETH. SO 
DOETH IT!! OR FACETH THE PENALTY!! 
WRITER: {gasp) You mean— ? 

EDITOR; YES! THOU SHALT BE CAST DOWN INTO 
COMPUTER WRITER'S HELL. NE'ER MORE TO BE SEEN 
IN THE HALLOWED HALLS OF ST.GAME. 
WRITER: (panicked) No, no! I'll do it! 

For the benefit of those three who did work on last issue's problems, 
and for the one hundred thirty-five thousand who were going to but 
never got around to it. let us unfold the veil and examine the untold mys- 
teries of time, space, and game programming. 

Check, Please. Take a look at listing 1; this is code for the 
XMOVE routine discussed last issue. A short explanation is in order. 



1 


XMOVE 


inc 


CYCLE 


2 




Ida 


CYCLE 


3 




and 


#$07 


4 




Ka 


i:vci h 


5 




Ida 


XOLD 


6 




cmp 


XNEW 


7 




beq 


NOXMOVE 


3 




i>r 


XMAGFNC 


9 




sta 


DELTA 


to 




Id* 


#$02 


1 1 


XLPI 


Idy 


#$00 


IJ 


XLP2 


Ida 


DIX.Y 


13 




crap 


LINEX.X 


14 




btri 


XSKP 


IS 




Isr 


MOVXLINE 


id 


XSKP 


Ida 


POWER2 + 1.Y 


17 




«c 




IS 




sbc 


#$01 


19 




and 


CYCLE 


20 




bne 


XOUT 


21 




n»y 




22 




cpy 


#$04 


-M 




hue 


XLP2 


24 


XOUT 


dex 




25 




bpl 


XPLP1 


26 


NOXMOVE 


rti 




.'/ 








25 








29 


PGWER2 


byt 


$01. $02,504 .$08 


30 




byt 


S10.S20.S40.SS0 


31 








32 








33 


MOVXLINE 


)*r 


CLRXL1NE 


54 




clc 




35 




Ida 


UNEX.X 


36 




adc 


DELTA 


37 




sea 


LINhX.X 


38 




jsr 


CHECKX 


39 




imp 


PLTXLINE 



First, the 

INC CYCLE 
LDA CYCLE 
AND #$07 
STA CYCLE 

sequence does the 

CYCLE**- CYCLED I 

IF CYCLE > 7 THEN CYCLE - 

shtick. See? We're only interested in the low-order three bits (0-7), and 
8--0 if the high-order bits don't count (the — means "equivalent 
to"). The next five instructions should be obvious. Study your 6502 
books and read the Tarot if you're still confused. 

For the loops: The NUM loop will go backward, to save a compare, 
and the DEPTH loop will go forward because it can't go backward (for 
a very good reason). The X register is the NUM loop, and the Y register 
is the DEPTH loop. Since we ace keeping loop counters in registers, we 
must remember to save the register contents when we go to plot a line 
or something. The lines 

LDA DIS.Y 
CMP LINEX.X 

are backward from the way we stated them last time because we can 
save a branch that way; do plot on LINEX(NUM) > DIS(DEPTH) is the 
same as don't plot on DIS(DEPTH) > - LINEX(NUM). which is a BCS 
(the Other would need a BEQ and a BCC). 

Now we're at the LDA POWER2 + 1,Y sequence. What we're after 
here is to compute CYCLE mod 2A(DEPTH + 1). So we do LDA 
POWER2 + 1 ,Y to get 2 A(DEPTH + 1), then subtract I and AND with 
CYCLE to do the MOD. Then we branch if these bits we're checking 
(that's what we're after) are not all zero. If they are all zero, then we 
can keep going by incrementing, comparing, and branching. If not, we 
skip to do the next line. The reason we do a MOD 2A(DEPTH +■ \), in- 
stead of MOD 2A(DEPTH). is that we're checking for the possibility of 
moving the next lines; we've already moved this line (if necessary), 

MOVXLINE should be obvious in function (ignore the JSR 
CHECKX for now), and that hrings us to the end of XMOVE. So, what 
about YMOVE? Well, it's pretty much the same, as witness listing 2, 
except that we have no CYCLE and thus no DEPTI I loop to worry 
about. So, what about the hard stuff? 



44 


YMOVE 


Ida 


YOLD 


45 




cmp 


YNEW 


46 




beq 


NO YMOVE 


47 




r* 


YMAGFNC 


48 




sta 


DELTA 


49 




ldx 


#$05 


50 


YLP 


!» 


MOVYLINE 


51 




dex 




52 




bpl 


YLP 


53 


NO YMOVE 


rts 




54 








55 








56 


MOVYLINE 


jsr 


CLRYLINE 


57 




etc 




58 




Ida 


LINEY.X 


59 




adc 


DELTA 


60 




sta 


LINEY.X 


61 




jsr 


CHECKY 


62 




imp 


PLTYLINE 




Listing 2, 





Listing 



GOTO page 26 



WHAT FQOLS D€ 

The Diooesf fcUmes in Soft 



€ MORTALS ? 

nt To See Your Stuff 




nee there was a race of happy, clever, 
and nimble- Fingered people called Gamers 
who lived in a large valley. Ir was called 
Happy Valley, because it rang with happy 
shouts and glad cries all the day and night. 
The Gamers were happy because they got 
to play their Favorite games all the time. 
In the north valley, there was much zapping and beeping, and all the 
Gamers who lived there always had their joysticks with them. 

In the south valley, there were a lot of caves and old castles with 
dungeons that the Gamers were constantly exploring, hoping to accumu- 
late charisma, strength, wisdom, and other good things. 

The Gamers in the west vailey would go adventuring whenever 
anyone shouted their rallying cry, "Hi Res!" They liked to push buttons, 
put things inside other things, take things, examine them, drop them, and 
apply their clever brains to figuring out what to do next. 

The Gamers of the east valley liked to do much the same thing, but 
less graphically. 

And in the central valley, the Gamers would sit motionless for days 



on end. contemplating their grids and thinking up strategies that would 
gain them victory in possible future conflicts or that would have done so 
in past conflicts. 

The gods of gaming looked down on all this from their high moun- 
tain, and they smiled, for it was good for business. They were glad the 
Gamers so enjoyed the bountiful fruits of computing that the gods had 
provided. They were much impressed by the cleverness and stamina of 
the Gamers, and thought that perhaps there were some among them 
who could qualify for demigodhood. 

They decided to hold a contest among all the Gamers to discover 
who among them might possess the powers of creation that would mark 
them as good game-god material, and to this end they posted a decree in 
each of the five parts of Happy Valley. This is what it said: 

Gamers! This is your chance to design, write, and program an 
original game. You can compete in any of five categories. Should your 
program win in its category, you shall receive $500. All category win- 
ners will be eligible for publishing contracts with software publishers. 
The grand-prize winner, chosen from the five category winners, wilt re- 
ceive special goodies and favors above and beyond those mentioned. 



10 




^Y^f- £f>*^)<M^ AMnsyt- m4 
imfefajtd int/tyjfa Jjioffljfr 



The Judges 

Arcade 

Doug Carlscon. Broderbund 
Sue Currier. SoftSync 
Elliot Dahan, Creative Software 
Trip Hawkins, Electronic Arts 
Fernando Hcrrera. First Star 
Jerry Jewell, Sirius 
Patrick Ketchum, Datasoft 
Mark Pelczarski, Penguin 
Ihor Wolosenkn, Synapse 

Adventure (graphic) 

Scott Adams, Adventure International 
Mark Pelczarski, Penguin 
Ron Unrath, Phoenix 

Ken Williams. Roberta Williams. Sierra On-Lne 
Programming Staff, Ultrasoft 

Adventure (text) 

Michael Berlyn. Marc Blank, Infocom 
Doug Carlston, Broderbund 
Ken Rose. Omega 

Fantasy Role-Playing 

Richard Garriott. Origin Systems 
Trip Hawkins. Electronic Arcs 
Michael Katz. Epyx 
Robert Sirotek. Sir-tech 

Strategy, War Games 

Joel Billings, Strategic Simulations 
Jackson Dott, Avalon Hill 

Miscellaneous 

|oel Billings, Strategic Simulations 
Sue Currier, SoftSync 
Elliot Dahan, Creative Software 
|erry |ewell, Sirius 
Trip Hawkins, Electronic Arts 
Mark Pelczarski, Penguin 
Ken Williams, Sierra On-Line 



The Rules: 

f. Design and program an original game for your computer in one of 
these five categories: Adventure, Arcade, Role-Playing Fantasy, Strat- 
egy, or Miscellaneous. 

I. The program must be totally original: games based on or resem- 
bling already existing programs will not be accepted. 

3- The program must be a finished product, with title page and all 
parts working, 

tf . Programs with bugs that interfere with playing will be dis- 
qualified. Make sure your game is thoroughly debugged. 

Programs must be submitted on a 5 W -inch floppy disk (or disks, if 
necessary), using the normal operating system for your computer. It may 
be programmed in any language that will run on your computer, with no 
modifications other than those widely available. 

Entries in the Arcade and Fantasy categories must include hi-res 
graphics if they are available on your computer. Adventures may con- 
tain graphics or be text-only. Entries in the miscellaneous category must 
include miscellany. 

Programs will be judged by a board consisting of software 
publishers and programmers from the top companies in the world of 



computer gaming. Judging will be based on originality of concept, game 
development, payability, and execution of program. 

Anyone who has had any kind of program published is not eligible 
to enter. 

^. Deadline is February 1. 1985. Programs i 
arrive on disk with documentation at St.Game i 
later than this date. Send your entry with your 
name and address, your computer brand and 
the configuration of your system to: 



St.Game-a-Thon 
Box 60 

North Hollywood, CA 91603 



' 00 



W€ IW€ SPOKEN! 



w&rck/ofni yg</ E03SG9 M 



ST.GAME 




[oe is about to graduate — or, as we dungeon people say, move up a 
level. The program where he lives has been growing nicely these last 
few months, but it's a long way from full-grown. With the material in 
this issue, our dungeon machine program is going to graduate into a 
game system (more than one program) and is going to learn to behave 
like a young adult. 

In computer programming, it's considered kid stuff or hacker's work 
when you have to end a program by turning it off; "professional" pro- 
grams are supposed to be more graceful than that. However, when 
you're first developing a program, you're more concerned with what 
comes in between than you are with the beginning or the ending. 

We're past that point now; we have quite a lot of middle in our pro- 
gram. The dungeon machine can simulate a complex of rooms, with se- 
cret compartments in the wails and other "special effects," and it can 
provide [oe, our wandering hero, with several nasty opponents. It's time 
to start thinking about refinements — like giving )oe a way to get out of 
there before he gets killed. 

That means, of course, that we will have to provide a safe place for 
Joe to escape to and rest in. And that means we need to create another 
imaginary universe (What? You mean one wasn't enough?), since the ac- 
tivities that go on in this resting place will he completely different from 
what happens in the dungeon area. For example, this is where Joe gets 
stored on disk, so he can keep any treasures he found (in the earlier ver- 
sion, he lost everything at the end of each trip, and he hated that!). In a 
future version, this will also be the place where he buys new equipment 
before a trip, and where he finds traveling companions. 

In other words, we need a whole new program. This program will 
take care of all the activities that go on when you're not in the dungeon 
itself — creating and equipping new characters, gathering a patty for an 
expedition, even (very far future) selecting which dungeon (or whatever) 
you want to visit. But that's for later. For now. it will be enough if we 
can teach Joe to jump from one universe to another without getting 
mangled in the process. 

Teleporttng between Worlds. When the Apple or the Atari loads 
a new program from disk, it erases certain areas in memory to give the 
new program a clear space to work in. One of the areas that gets erased 



is the space where variables are stored. This protects the new program 
from being confused by the old program's variables. In most cases this is 
a good thing, but it creates a problem when you want to transfer vari- 
ables from one program to another. If we want to transfer joe (who is 
really only a set of variables, like Automan) from one program to an- 
other, we have to find a special way to do it. 

We will take advantage of one of the loopholes in the erasing proc- 
ess mentioned above. When the computer loads a new program, it 
erases certain parts of memory, but it also preserves certain areas since 
it needs the information stored there in order to run the new program 
(the areas containing DOS and the Basic interpreter, for example). One 
of the protected areas is an "experimenter's workspace" of about two 
hundred bytes, starting at address $300 in the Apple, $400 in the Atari. 
If we poke Joe's values into that space, they remain intact. 

It works like this: When you are getting ready to call the other pro- 
gram, transporting Joe from one universe to another in game terms, sim- 
ply poke the variables you want to transfer into the protected area. 
Then call the new program and have it peek those same variables. From 
that information, the new program can reconstruct Joe just as he was. 
You can use this technique to transfer information between any two pro- 
grams; just make sure that the two agree on what information is to be 
stored m which memory locations. 

We will call this protected area the "shuttle," since it can travel 
safely between worlds, in the Apple, it begins at the hexadecimal ad- 
dress $300 (that's 768 in decimal, which is the form we'll need it in for 
peeks and pokes) and extends for 230 bytes. In the Atari, the shuttle 
area begins at $600. 

Joe in the Shuttle. We will have to establish a data format for the 
shuttle so that both programs will know where to find the information 
they need. In a later version of these programs, we will store the whole 
party here during an expedition, but for the moment we want to keep 
things very simple. At this point, all we know about (oe is his name, how 
much gold he has, and whether he's found the magic amulet, so that's 
the information we will put in the shuttle. 

The first problem we run into is in storing Joe's name. You can't 
store a letter of the alphabet, as such, in a memory location; you can 



22 



ST.CAME 



only store a number from to 255. However, that's an easy one: We 
simply cqnvert the letter into an ASCII value {a number between and 
255) and store that. Then we instruct the receiving program to interpret 
those values as ASCII characters (that is. letters) when it reads them. 

That sounds simple enough, but it points up something else we will 
have to do — namely, breaking the shuttle area into separate sections, or 
Fields, so we can tell the receiving program to interpret one field as 
ASCII characters and the other fields as numbers. We'll designate five 
locations in the shuttle area, those with decimal addresses 770 through 
774, as the name field. 

Next, we want to record the amount of gold Joe has. We can store 
any number up to 255 in a memory location, so we can just record |oc's 
gold as a numher. But what if he has more than 255 in gold? Just in case, 
we had better use two successive locations. The first will hold the in- 
teger value of Joe's gold divided by 256, and the second will hold the re- 
mainder from that division. To put that in Basic, we simply poke 775, 
lnt(gold/256) and then poke 776, gold - 256 * lnt{gold/256). 

To untangle that and reconstitute Joe's gold, the receiving program 
makes gold - 256 * peek (775) + peek (776). That way we can 
store Joe's gold up to the limit of 65,536 gold pieces, which should be 
enough. 

Finally, we need to record whether Joe has found the magic amulet. 
Within the dungeon program, this is indicated by the variable Tl . If it is 
anything but zero, he has found the amulet. Thus, all we have to do is 
poke 777, Tl. The receiving program can then reverse the process by 
setting Tl - peek (777). 

Is Anybody There? You may be wondering what is going on in 
memory locations 768 and 769. We said that the shuttle area begins at 
768. but we started the name field at 770. That was partly because 770 
is an easier number to remember than 768, but we also have an impor- 
tant use for those first two locations. 

When our program reads the shuttle area to reconstitute a 
character, it must have a way of telling whether the data in the shuttle 
is valid or not. ft must be able to determine whether the information is 
garbage left over from some unrelated program, or a character stored 
there to be recovered. Otherwise, you might find yourself taking some 
very peculiar characters into the dungeon. 

We solve this problem by reserving the first two spaces in the shuttle 
for an identification code. If this code is present, the program will as- 
sume that the rest of the data in the shuttle is correct; if the code is not 
there, the program will ignore the shuttle data and load Joe from disk. 

The numbers we have used for a recognition code are 25 at address 
768 and 250 at 769. These are easy to remember and very unlikely to 
occur by accident, 

Joe's resting place— now very primitive, but someday to become the 
meeting place for adventurers from many worlds and cultures — is the 
Home Base program. This program starts the expedition by recalling Joe 
from disk (which loads him into the shuttle) and sending him on his way 
{by calling the dungeon program). When he has had enough adventuring, 
he simply walks out through the secret exit, which updates the values in 
the shuttle and calls the Home Base program again. Thus our dungeon 
machine becomes a professional-type program system; it now has a 
proper beginning and ending. 

The Home Base program (Programs in Pulp, page 34) starts by jump- 
ing out to line 5000 to pick up some variables and print a title, then re- 
turns to line 30 for its first serious decision. This is where it checks the 
identity code to determine whether the shuttle area contains valid data. 
If the numbers aren't right, it jumps to 1 000 and reloads Joe from disk. 
Someday, this part of the program will offer you a choice; at the mo- 
ment Joe is the only character we have, though, so we've written him in. 

If the identity code checks, the shuttle data is good, so (line 40) the 
program jumps to line 2000 to interpret it. Lines 2010 to 2070 pick up 
the name, and line 2050 gets rid of any trailing spaces (in case the name 
is less than five letters). Then line 21 10 picks up the amount of gold 
your character is carrying, and line 2120 tells whether he or she has 
found the magic amulet. Lines 2200-2250 report this information, and 
line 2260 sends you back to the main menu at line 100. Someday, this 



will be where you choose to create a character, form a party for an ex- 
pedition, or set out on an adventure, bur for now it's the place where 
your character can decide whether to descend into the dungeon or knock 
off for a while. 

If the character decides to rest, the shuttle data is recorded on disk 
(line 230) to be ready for next time. If the character wants to go adven- 
turing, line 260 runs the dungeon program. 

There is also a separate section of the program, starting at line 
1 0000. which creates a file named Joe on the disk. This stores the recog- 
nition code in the shuttle area (line 10020), adds the name "Joe" (with 
two trailing spaces, to make five characters in all) in lines 10050 to 
10090, Joe's gold (we'll start him with only ten) in lines 10 100 and 
101 10, and the magic amulet (he doesn't have it yet) in line 10120. 
Finally, line 10130 stores the whole thing on disk. 

You only need to use this section once, when you start a new disk. 
Once the disk record has been set up. the other programs will maintain 
and update it, but there has to be a disk file there for them to work with. 
To create the file, load the i lome Base program and type "goto 
1000" — the disk drive will whir for a moment, and Joe's file will appear 
on the disk. 

This Isn't Joe! But suppose you've been following this series for 
some time, and have created your own hero — let's say her name is 
Diana. Can the new program deal with that? 

Of course it can, or we wouldn't have brought it up. The original 
dungeon program has Joe's name written into it in several places, and it 
will be your responsibility to change those (but you have presumably 
done that already, for Diana's sake). The Home Base program can han- 
dle any name of five characters or less; we chose that limit because the 
dungeon program only provides space for five-character names in its 
display. 

The first part of the Debriefing section (line 2010 and after) reads 
the name that's stored in the disk file you asked for. as described earlier. 
From then on, the program will address your character by his or her 
proper name$. 

There are a couple of things you will have to change: first, the name 
of the disk file the program asks for. This program was written with, 
only Joe in mind, so that's the only disk file it knows how to ask for. You 
will have to write Diana (or anyone else) into lines 1 020 and 1 040. Sec- 
ond, if you want to convert the section starting at line 10000 to fit your 
character, change the letters between the quotes in lines 10050 to 
10090. and the name in line 10130. 

The Dungeon Universe. Now that we've got a resting place for Joe 
(or whoever) to escape to, we will have to go back to the dungeon pro- 
gram and install that secret exit we mentioned. That will be easy 
enough — if you have the program. The complete listing was last 
puhlished in the January-February Softline. If you can't get one locally 
(some computer stores carry back issues), send three dollars to our back 
issues department with a request. 

Now that you have the listing in front of you, make the following 
changes: first, line 4730, It's a RFM statement that is saving a place for 
a "special event" hook. We described special events last issue; they hap- 
pen when the character steps on a certain square, examines a certain 
wall, or the like. We are now ready to install the hook that the RF.M 
was saving a place for, so change that line to 

4730 IF SQ9MVS.HS.3J - AND D - 3 THEN 21 000 

Note to faithful followers of this series: IF you've already used the two 
hooks we left space For (lines 4730 and 4740) to create special events of 
your own, it will be your responsibility to find room for this one. That's 
the price you pay for freedom. . . . 

Next, line 5030: this is in the section where the program introduces 
Joe and describes him, If Joe is on disk, we don't need that part; we've 
met him already. In fact, if someone is on disk, it might not even be Joe! 
We'll put in a test here to see if anyone is in the shuttle; if so, we'll by- 
pass the introduction. Change the line to 

5030 IF PEEK (768) - 25 AND PEEK (769) - 250 THEN WM - 1: GOTO 5)00 



SICAME 



Then add "5040 HOME" to replace the Home command in the origi- 
nal 5030. 

The variable Wm tells the program whether there is anybody in the 
shuttle: If WM - 0, the shuttle is not loaded properly, so the program 
uses the built-in version of Joe. Wm is short for warm, as in warm-start 
(a computer term that means, approximately, "use what you have, don't 
start over"). We use this variable to select whether to read someone in 
from the shuttle, in the lines following 5500 (see listing 1). You will 
have to substitute the lines in this listing for lines 5510-5590 of the old 
version, 

5510 GOSUB 1220: REM PAUSE 

5520 GOSUB 9100: REM COMBAT CHT 

5530 PRINT IS" (ANY KEY TO CONTINUE)"; PRINT 

5540 HTAB 20: GET QS: PRINT 

5550 REM ** WHO IS IT? ** 
5555 IF NOT WM THEN 5600 
5560 NAMES - ""; FOR X - TO 4 
5565 QS - CHRS ( PEEK [770 + X)) 
5570 IF q$ - " " THEN 5580 
5575 NAMES - NAMES + QS 
5580 NEXT X 

5585 GOLD - 256 * PEEK (775) + PEEK (776) 
5590 IF PEEK (777) THEN Tl - 1 

lining I. 

Finally, add the lines in listing 2 to the end of the old program. This 
is the secret exit pointed to by the hook you installed at line 4730. It 
loads joe into the shuttle (lines 21250-21270) and sends him home 
(line 21280). 

Now your hero has two worlds to play in. Sure, one of them is so 
primitive that it hardly counts, but now that we have it we can start 



adding to it. Next issue, for example, we will probably add an armory, 
where [oe (or Diana) ran buy weapons and equipment. And for the more 
distant future, an advanced version of the dungeon machine will support 
powerful spells and exotic monsters. Yes. the business of creating imag- 
inary worlds is positively addictive — 
To be continued. . . , 



2)000 REM ♦ ♦ ♦ TO THE EGRESS + * + 

21020 REM "WHAT YOU SEE ♦« 

21030 PRINT IS'THE WALL SEEMS TO BE COATED" 

21010 PRINT IS" WITH A SHIMMERING, TRANSPARENT" 

21050 PRINT IS" FILM, WITH NO SOLIDITY TO IT," 

21060 PRINT 

21070 C.OSUB 1210 

21 100 REM " WHAT YOU FEEL •* 

21 1 10 PRINT IS TOUCI IING IT. YOU CAN FEEL NO" 

21 120 PRINT IS" SOI XI SURFACE. ONLY A STRANGE" 

21 130 PRINT IS" HUMMING VIBRATION IN YOUR" 

21 HQ PRINT 11" FINGERTIPS. IT FEELS AS IF" 

21 150 PRINT IS" YOU COULD WALK RIGHT THROUGH" 

21 160 PRINT IS" THE WALL." 

21170 PRrNT : GOSUB 1220 

2 1 200 REM «* WHAT YOU DO *• 

21210 PRINT IS" WANT TO TRY IT? (Y/N) "; 

21220 GET Q$: PRINT QS: PRINT 

2 1 230 IF QS < > "Y" THEN 4500 

21240 PRINT IS" HERE WE GOT 

21250 GH - INT (GOLD / 256): POKE 775.GH 

21270 POKE 777.TI 

21280 PRINT CHR$(4)"RUN HOME BASE" 
Listing 2. 



Atari in Chains/Bill Beyermann 

The Atari uses page six ($600) instead of page three, so the ad- 
dresses for the currently used part of the shuttle area are 1 536 to 1 545 
(Apple 768 to 777), See Programs in Pulp, page 34, 

To store Joe or some other character on the disk, we add the name to 
FILES (line 230), which was initialized to contain the D: required for disk 
operations (line 5015). Lines 234 to 238 then put the information to 
the disk byte by byte. Lines 1 040 through 1 049 read |oe back in. The in- 
put is terminated by trapping for an end-of-file error, and line 1045 
checks to see if it was terminated for the proper reason. The trap is 
turned off in 1049 (by trapping to a nonexistent line number) so that if 
an error should occur somewhere else in the program, a jump won't be 
made to line 1045. 

To read from the shuttle: 

1400 REM « ADVANCE VIEWPOINT •• 

4730 IF SQ(12*VS + 4*HS + 3)-0 AND D-3 THEN 21000 

4740 REM (MATCH SEND *4) 

5015 OPEN #),4,0,"K:"DIM AZi(356).BLS(37),l$(3).QS(35).WHOS(4) 
5020 IS - " ":REM 3 SPACES 

5025 POKE 752. 1 :BLS - " ":REM 752 TURNS THE CURSOR OFF, BLS IS 
37 SPACES 

5030 7" IMPOSITION 2.4:REM * IS SHIFT CLEAR 

5040 IF PEFJM 1 536) - 25 AND PF.F,K( 1 537) - 250 THEN WM - !:GOTO 5100 

5208 DIM NAMES(5),PROES(l),Z$(l).E$(18).PS(2l),STS(38) 

5210 NAMES - "|OE":PROFS - "F" 

5530 PRINT IS;" (ANY KEY TO CONTINUE)":PRlNT 

5540 POKE 752.0:POSITION 18,23:PRINT " ";:GET *I.Q:POKE 752.1:PRINT 

5550 REM WHO IS IT? " 

5555 IF NOT WM THEN 5600 

5560 NAMES - "":FOR X - I TO 5 

5565 QS-CHRS(PEEK(1537 + X)) 

5570 IF Q$." " THEN 5580 

5575 NAMES(X.X)-Q$ 

5580 NEXT X 

5585 GOLD - 256*PEEK(1 543) * PEEK(1 544) 
5590 IF PEEK(1545) THEN Tl - 1 
5625 REM DELETE 5625 

Listing 1. 



By the way, the room descriptions come up rather slowly (especially 
for the large room) because they are stored in a single large string of 
356 bytes. !t takes Basic a while to search through all those characters 
looking for the delimiters. In the future we may add a machine language 
routine to do the search faster, or we may do a little redesigning. The 
redesign could require more variables (with a space limit of 128 vari- 
ables), or we could make the storage area for each description the same 
size, which will use up more memory. Expansion cartridges, anyone? 

Add to end of Atari Dungeon 3: 

2 1000 REM + + * TO THE EGRESS 
21005 REM CUT 

21020 REM •• WHAT YOU SEE *+ 

2 1030 PRINT 1$:"THE WALL SEEMS TO BE COATED" 

2 1 040 PRIM' IS:" WITH A SHIMMERING. TRANSPARENT" 

21050 PRINT IS:" FILM. WITH NO SOLIDITY TO IT." 

21060 PRINT 

21070 GOSUB 1210 

21095 REM CUT 

21 100 REM " WHAT YOU FEEL ** 

21 1 10 PRINT IS;"TOUCI IING IT, YOU FEEL NO" 

21 120 PRINT 1$:" SOLID SURFACE, ONLY A STRANGE" 

21 130 PRINT 1$:" HUMMING VIBRATION IN YOUR" 

21 140 PRINT IS:" FINGERTIPS. IT FEELS AS IF" 

21 150 PRINT 1$:" YOU COULD WALK RIGHT THROUGH" 

21 160 PRINT 1$:" THE WALL." 

21170 PRINT ( GOSUB 1220 

21 195 REM CUT 

21200 REM " WHAT YOU DO *• 

21210 PRINT l$i"WA!MT TO TRY IT? <Y/N) "; 

21220 POKE 752.0:GET sl.Q:POKE 752.1:PRINT" ";:Q$ - CHRS(Q);PRINT 

Q$:PRINT 
2 1230 IF QSO"Y" THEN 4500 
2 1240 PRINT l$:"HERE WE GO!" 
21250 GH - INT(GOLD/256|:POKE 1543.GH 
21260 POKE I544,G0LD-256*GH 
21270 POKE I545.T1 
21290 RUN "D:HOMEBASE" 

Listing 2. 



Software artists? 



How we got this years hottest sports game out of 



TO MAKE THE FIRST BASKET- 
BALL PROGRAM that feels like the 

real thing, it helps to stan with two guys two rather inexperienced designers. 

who know what the real tiling tee-Is like. 

Enter Larry Bird and Julius Erving. 
Bird — the hustler, the strong man, 
deadly from outside. Erving —The 
Doctor, maybe the niosi explosive 
player in the history of the game. 

We talked to them, photographed 
them in action, studied their moves and 
their stats and their styles. Then we 
set out to create on computer disc an 
event which may never happen in real 
life. We put the two of them together 
on a dream court of lighr, for an elec- 
tronic afternoon of one -on-one. 

It wasn't easy. When 
they talked, we listened, 
When they criticized, 
we made big changes. 

When lhe\ e.ave sue. 
gestions, we look them. 

And it shows. This 
thing is absolutely un- 
canny. You actually 
take on all the skills and 
characteristics of Bird 
or The Doctor - their 
own particular moves, 
shooting abilities, even 
strength and speed. 

You'll meet with 
fatigue factors, hot and 
cold streaks, turn- 
around jump shots, 
and 360- degree slam 
dunks. But there's some whimsy in 
here, too — a funny referee, a shattering 
backboard, even instant replay. 

It's called Julius Erving and Larry Bird 
Go One- on-One." You Ye Bird. Or you Ye 
The Doctor. And that's the last deci- 
sion you'll have plenty of time to maki 

Juliu* Ervinjj and Larry Hird Gti Om-un-Oni' h .iwul.thk- ,m Jt-,lHM[e for Apple IL1I i . nnd Itr t nmpuim. Applr is a rrpstrfr,! 
rr.-tA-rii.tiV i ,[ Apple ( i 'Ulster Ti> firnj out mine .itmul Lie ln>nit Arts .11 kI ils prixliirtv write .11 11^ CaniptJ' Drive, San Millw.CA **440] nr 
CM1(41S) 571*7171 Fur * ficv I4l,il(iu, scnJ 1 kUmprd, trlf jtMreucJ 1 10 envelope. 




NOW AVAILABLE FOR 
THE COMMODGRE-64 




Electronic arts 



continued Irom page 18 

Well, what is CHECKX? As we said last time, it's pretty simple. 
]ust do bounds checking on the top and bottom; if the LINEX value is 
greater than BOTTOM OF SCREEN, set UNEX to HORIZON + 1 . 
And. if the LINEX value is less than HORIZON, set LINEX to BOT- 
TOM - I. See listing 3. 

CHECKY is just a little harder (listing 4). If the line reaches some 
terminal point CENTER + TERM or CENTER - TERM (we have sym- 
metry here), we kill it and add it on the other side, slightly advanced; if 
at CENTER + TERM, we put it at CENTER - TERM + 1 ; and if at 
CENTER - TERM, it goes at CENTER + TERM - 1 (the hard part is 
coming up). 

At this point, if reading the Tarot isn't helping, try 1 Ching. It's 
more binary. 



67 


CHECKX 


cmp 


Y5CRNMAX 


85 


CHECKY 


1 Tip 


LTERM 


68 




bra 


MAX.X 


86 




beq 


LFTY 


69 




cmp 


YSCRNMIN 


87 




bec 


LFTY 


70 




beq 


MIN.X 


88 




cmp 


H 1 I'liM 


71 




bcs 


NOCHKX 


89 




bec 


NOCHKY 


72 


MIN.X 


Ida 


VSCRNMAX 


90 


RTY 


Ida 


LTERM 


73 




sec 




91 




clc 




74 




•be 


#$01 


92 




adc 


#$01 


75 




sea 


LINEX.X 


93 




>ta 


UNEY.X 


76 




ru 




94 




rts 




77 


MAX.X 


Ida 


YSCRNMIN 


95 


LFTY 


Ida 


RTFRM 


78 




ck 




96 




sec 




79 




adc 


#$01 


97 




sbc 


#(01 


80 




sta 


LINEX.X 


98 




sta 


UNEY.X 


81 




ru 




99 


NOCHKY 


rts 






Listing 3. 








Listing 4. 





You've Got To Sink Before You Can Swim. Now. I know that 
some of you are saying, "But what about the real stuff, like 
CLRXLINE/PLTXLINE and C LR YLIN E/PLT YLIN E ? Isn't this guy ever 
going to get anywhere?" Well, we've all heard the saying about how 
you can't see the forest for the trees. That's a real problem when attack- 
ing a large game. The low-level routines are the backbone of the game, 
and are where a large part of the effort is expended for speed and effi- 
ciency, but they have to connect to the rest of the game; and. thus, the 
game has to he defined first. So, since we've defined some of the high- 
level stuff and can at least see what we need, let's attack line eras- 
ing/plotting. 

First, the easy stuff: CLRXLINE and PLTXLINE (see listing 5). As 
you can tell, these are little more than calls to LINE, with proper 
parameters set up. Of course. LINE isn't fully defined yet. (next issue), 
but let it slide for now. Tricky stuff explained: Notice that BYT $2C in- 
struction. That creates BIT absolute op-code; what that does is to hide 
the next instruction from CLRXLINE, since LDA #$01 is two bytes 
long, and a BIT absolute is three bytes long (in other words, when the 
entry point is CLRXLINE. the 6502 thinks that LDA #$01 is just the 
operand to the BIT instruction, so it doesn't execute it). So. when we 
call CLRXLINE, we get 

LDA #$00 
BIT $01A9 
STA LINECOL 

which stores #$00 in LINECOL. When we call PLTXLINE. we get 

LDA 0$O1 
STA LINECOL 

We save a byte at the cost of a cycle, but one microsecond won't kill us 
(not here, but there are places). And one more note: Even though we 
called the XL1NE line table LINEX. we are storing Y coordinates. Since 
we know these are horizontal lines (for now), we know the X co- 

lb 



ordinates, so why store them ? And the converse is true for the YL1NE 
table L1NEY. 

Now. CLRYLTNE/PI.TYLINE. The information we have on the line 
is its starting X and Y value — the Y value is fixed (the horizon line), and 
the X coordinate is from the LINEY table. Now, the line we want to 
draw can be determined from that position (and by Z coordinate, yaw. 
pitch, and roll; but let's not go in over our heads for now. eh?) by one of 
those magical functions. Let's think about it. The closer to the center the 
line is, the more vertical it is: the further from the center, the more 
horizontal it gets. It's not a straight linear function; we need to do clip- 
ping, and there aren't that many positions (HO, to be exact). What does 
that suggest? A table! We'll compute that next time; for now, let's do 
the routine (listing 6). As you can see. it's pretty straightforward; the 
table hides the hairy stuff (that's what tables are for). We get starting 
coordinates, then use BX as an index into two tables to get EX and EY, 
and draw that line. Simple, elegant, fast, but with a problem rehting to 
the other four degrees of freedom. That's for next time. 











126 


CLRYLINE 


Ida 


#$00 










127 




hex 


2C 


104 


CLRXLINE 


Ida 


*$00 


128 


PLTYLINE 


Ida 


#$0l 


105 




byt 


S2C 


129 








106 


PLTXLINE 


Ida 


#$01 


1 10 




sta 


LINECOL 


107 








1)1 




stx 


PLTXTMP 


108 




sta 


LINECOL 


132 




«y 


PLTYTMP 


109 




stx 


PLTXTMP 


133 




Ida 


IJNF.Y.X 


1 10 




sty 


PLTYTMP 


134 




sta 


BX 


1 1 1 




Ida 


UNFXX 


135 




tay 




1 12 




sta 


BY 


136 




Ida 


PYENDX.Y 


113 




sta 


EY 


137 




sta 


EX 


1 H 




Ida 


XSCRNMIN 


138 




Ida 


HOHIZY 


115 




sta 


BX 


134 




sta 


BY 


116 




Ida 


XSCRNMAX 


HO 




Ida 


PYENDY.Y 


117 




sta 


EX 


HI 




sta 


EY 


118 




jsr 


LINE 


142 




|*r 


tJNE 


119 




Idx 


PLTXTMP 


143 




Idx 


PLTXTMP 


120 




Idy 


PLTYTMP 


144 




Idy 


I'l IV I MP 


12! 




rts 




115 




rts 














Listing 6. 





What's next? Well, what about those degrees of freedom? And, 
more important, when will something work? Next issue we'll wrap up 
the simple stuff and present a working X.Y movement program with 
joystick interface so you can zoom over the surface of our world. And 
with that, a real line plotter, fast and not elegant. But hey, you usually 
pay heavy for elegance. And there is much to be said for something that 
works (a phrase borrowed from FNE of Digital Acoustics). 

So. your assignment. Mr. Phelps, should you decide to accept it, and 
even if you don't, is to find the problems in our approach when extended 
to Include all six degrees of freedom. And next time, we won't be so le- 
nient on the slackers. 

So, as they say in Chermany, ourfeetarestained. Oh reservoir. 
Chow. Speaking of Food ... 

Converting USA listings to other assemblers- 
Apple Toolkit 



Lisa 


SC-Aaacmblcr 


Marlin/Big Mac 


Assembler 


•label 


alabel 


»< label 


#< label 


/label 


/label 


#>lahcl 


» > label 


EPZ 


•EQ 


EQU 


EQU 


EQU 


.to 


EQU 


EQU 


ORG 


.OR 


ORG 


ORG 


OB] 


TA 


OB] 


OBI 


END 


.EN 


END 


END 


LST 


.UST ON 


LST ON 


LST ON 


NLS 


.LIST OFF 


LST OFF 


LST OFF 


ASC 


.AS 


ASC 


ASC 


ADR 


.DA 


DA 


DW 


HEX 


.HS 


HEX 


DFB 


DFS 


.BS 


RMB 


DS 



SIC A ME 



MARCH-APRIL 1984 




PROGRAMS IN PULP 

[£3^ Special Throwaway Section for Nonprogrammers 

ADVIENTURIE5 IN ADVENTURING 



10 CALL - 936: HEM CLEARS THE SCREEN 

20 PRINT "ULTIMATE FULL COLOR NO-RES ADVENTURE II" 

30 PRINT " BY" 

40 PRINT " KEN ROSE" 

50 FOR A - ! TO 1000 

60 NEXT A 

70 CALL -956 

80 GOTO 5800 

100 REM PARSER STARTS HERE 

110 Y-0 

120 X-0 

HO VII-"" 

HO N1S-"" 

150 PRINT 

160 PRINT "WHAT NOW? ": 
170 INPUT A* 

110 IF L£N(A5> - THEN GOTO 100 

190 FOR A- I TO LENIASI 

200 IFASIA.A)-" "THEN VIS- A&l,A-» 

210 IF A.ii A.Ai - " " THEN X - I 

220 " THEN X - I 

230 !FX-ITHENNlI-AS<A*l. LENIASI) 

240 IF X . 1 THEN A - 

250 IFX.1THENGOTO2S0 

260 NEXT A 

270 VIS-AS 

280 X-0 

290 REM NEXT TWO UNKS GET RID OF DIRECTION PREFIX 
300 IF V II - XDS THEN GOTO +00 

310 tP NIS- WIS OR Nl$- W2S OR NII-W3S OR NIS- W4! OR 

Nil- W5I OR NIS- W6I OR NIS - W7S OR Nil- Wit OR 

N1I-W9S THEN VIS-NII 
320 IFNIS-WAIOR N1S-WBIOR NlS-WCI THEN VIS -Nil 
400 REM VERB HANDLING ROUTINES 
■HO REM NEXT TWO UNES CHECK FOR MOVEMENT 
420 IF VIS - WIS OR V IS - W2I OR V IS - W3I OR V II - W4S OH 

VIS- W5S OR V1S-W6I OR VlS- W7I OR VIS- WBS THEN 

GOTO 1200 

430 IF VIS-W9SOR VII -WAS OH V1S-WBIOH VIS- WCI THEN 

GOTO 1200 
440 REM LOOKING AND READING 
450 IF VIS-WNSOR VIS- WO! OR Vl$- WRS THEN PRINT 
460 IF VIS-WNSOR V15-WOSOR VIS - WRS THEN GOTO 4 100 
470 REM GETTING THINGS 
4S0 IFVII-W]! OR VII- WKS THEN PRINT 
490 IF VIS- WJS OR VIS- WKS THEN GOTO 4400 
500 REM DROPPING THINGS 
510 IF VIS -WIS THEN GOTO 4600 
520 REM INVENTORY ROUTINES 

530 IF VIS- WG! OR VIS- WHS OR V I S - WIS THEN GOTO 4800 

540 REM QUITTING 

550 IF VII -WES THEN GOTO 4900 

560 REM SAVING GAME 

570 IF VIS- WOS THEN GOTO 5000 

580 REM CLIMBING 



590 IF Vlt-WTt AND R- 6 THEN R-7 

600 IF VIS- WTS AND H - 7 THEN GOTO 1200 

610 IF VIS - WTS THEN GOTO 8700 

620 REM SAYING THINGS 

630 IF Nlt-WWt AND R-7 THEN GOTO 7600 

640 IF V1I-WWS AND R-7 THEN GOTO 7600 

650 IF VIS - WXS AND H - 7 THEN GOTO 7670 

660 IF N IS - WXS AND R-7 THEN GOTO 7670 

670 REM LONG/SHORT DESCRIPTIONS 

680 IF V IS - WYS THEN PRINT 

690 IF VIS - WZS THEN PRINT 

700 IF VIS -WY! THEN WO -I 

710 IF VII - WZS THEN WO - 

720 IF VIS - WYS THEN PRINT "LONG DESCRIPTIONS WILL ALWAYS 
BE SHOWN." 

730 IF VI! - WZS THEN PRINT "SHORT DESCRIPTIONS WILL ALWAYS 

BE SHOWN ": 
740 IF V IS - WYS THEN GOTO 100 
750 REM EATING 
760 IP V II- X3S THEN GOTO 7800 
770 REM PUZZLE SOLVING 
780 IF VIS-X7I A NO N 1 S - X 2S THKN GOTO 8180 
790 REM PUSHING AND THROWING 
800 IFVII-XDIANDR-29THENGOTO84I0 
8)0 IF V 1 1 - XFI AND H - 30 THEN GOTO 8570 
820 IF VIS-XFI AND H- 19 THEN GOTO 8910 
830 IF VIS-XFI AND Nil-XG! AND R-36 THEN GOTO 9900 
840 IF VII -XDS OR VIS-XFI THEN PRINT 

850 IF VII -XDS OH VII- XFI THEN PRINT "GRUNT . . , NOTHING 

SEEMS TO HAPPEN I" 
860 IF VII-XDSOR VII- XFI THEN GOTO 100 
870 REM IUMPING 
88D IF WVI- VIS THEN PRINT 
890 IF WVI -VIS AND R-7 THEN PRINT "YlllllL,.lir 

IF WVS- VIS AND R-7 THEN PRINT 
910 IF WVS - VIS AND R-7 THEN GOTO 4960 

920 IF WVS - V 1 1 AND H - 22 THEN PRINT "THERE'S SOMETHING UP 
THERE BUT I CANT QUITE MAKE IT OUT." 

930 IF WVS - V IS AND R - 22 THEN GOTO 100 

940 IF WVI - VII THEN PRINT "THERE'S NO REASON TO DO 
THAT HERE." 

950 IF WVS- VII THEN GOTO 100 

960 REM OPENING THINGS 

970 IF VIS - XHS AND R - 19 THEN GOTO 8910 

980 REM INSERTING THINGS 

990 IF VIS- XK$ THEN GOTO 9100 
1000 REM TURNING THINGS 
1010 IF V IS - XJI THEN GOTO 9400 
1020 REM SMACKING THINGS 
1030 W WT - THEN GOTO 1120 

1040 IFH-10 ANDVIS-XOSANDWUS-NISANDWT-I THEN 
OB(l)-91 

1050 IF R- 1 AND V IS - XOS AND WUS - Nil AND WT - I THEN WT - 
1060 IF R- 10 AND Vlt- XOS AND WLU- Nil AND WT-0 THEN 
CALL -936 



1070 IF R- 10 AND VIS - XOS AND WU$ - Nil AND WT - THEN PRINT 
"POOR POOF!" 

1080 IF R - 10 AND VIS - XOS AND WUS - N1S AND WT - THEN FOR 
A-l TO 75 

1090 IF R- 10 AND VIS -XOS AND WUS -N IS AND WT-0 THEN 
NEXT A 

1100 IF R - 10 AND VIS -XOS AND WUS-NiS AND WT-0 THEN R-7 
1110 IF H - 7 AND VIS -XOS AND WUS-NIS AND WT-0 THEN 

GOTO 1320 
1120 IF VlS- XOS THEN PRINT 
1130 IFV1S-XOSTHEN PRINT "YUCKI" 
1 140 IF VIS - XOS THEN GOTO 100 
1150 PRINT 

1 160 PRINT "I DON'T UNDERSTAND" 
1170 GOTO 100 

1Z00 REM MOVING AROUND ROUTINES 
1210 X-R 

1220 IF VIS- W5S AND R-3 THEN GOTO 7510 
1230 IF VIS- WB$ AND R- 3 THEN GOTO 7510 
1240 IF VIS- W6S AND R-7 THEN GOTO 7550 
1250 IF VIS - WCS AND R - 7 THEN GOTO 7550 
1260 IF VIS- WIS OR VIS- W7$ THEN R-N(R) 
1270 IF VIS- W2$ OR VIS- WW THEN R- SIR) 
1280 IF Vl$- W3S OR VIS-W9S THEN R -E(R) 
1290 IF V1S-W4SOR VIS-WAS THEN R- W{R> 
1300 IFV]S-W5SOSVl$-WBSTHENR-U{R) 
1310 IF V1S-W6SOR VIS- WCS THEN R-D(R) 
1320 IF R>0 THEN X-R 
1330 IF R>0 THEN CALL -936 
1340 IF R > THEN GOTO 1410 
1350 IFR-0THENV-1 
1360 IF Y - I THEN PRINT 

1 370 IF Y - 1 THEN PRINT "YOU CAN'T MOVE THAT WAY . 
1380 IF Y - I THEN fi - X 
1390 IF Y- I THEN X-0 
1400 IF Y- I THEN GOTO 100 
1410 IF WO- 1 THEN RD(R)-0; BEM 
1420 IFR-I THEN GOSUB 1910 
1430 IF R - 2 THEN GOSUB 1 970 
1440 IF R - 3 THEN GOSUB 203O 
1450 IF R - 4 THEN GOSUB 2 1 10 
1460 IF R- 5 THEN GOSUB 2190 
1470 IF R - 6 THEN GOSUB 2250 
1480 IF R - 7 THEN GOSUB 23 10 
1490 IF R - 8 THEN GOSUB 2390 
1500 IF R - 9 THEN GOSUB 2450 



. NOW!!!" 



RESET LONG DESCRIPTION 



1510 


IF R- 


10 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2510 


1520 


IFR- 


i i 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2550 


1530 


IFR- 


12 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2570 


15-10 


IFR- 


13 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2590 


1550 


IFR- 


H 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2650 


1560 


IF R- 


15 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2710 


1570 


IFR- 


16 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2770 


1530 


IFB- 


17 


THEN 


GOSU8 


2790 


1590 


IFB- 


IS 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2850 


1600 


IFR- 


19 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2970 


1610 


IFR- 


20 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3090 


1620 


IFR- 


21 


THEN 


GOSUB 


2850 


1630 


IF R- 


22 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3170 


1640 


IFR- 


23 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3110 


1650 


IFR- 


24 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3210 


1660 


IFR- 


25 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3270 


1670 


1FR- 


26 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3330 


1680 


1FR- 


27 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3350 


1690 


IFR- 


28 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3410 


1700 


IF R- 


29 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3480 


1710 


1FR- 


K 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3570 


1720 


IFR- 


31 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3670 


1730 


1FR- 


32 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3690 


1740 


IFR- 


33 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3760 


1750 


IF R- 


14 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3780 


1760 


IFR- 


35 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3800 


1770 


IFR- 


w 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3840 


1780 


ir h - 


37 


THEN 


GOSUB 


3930 



1800 REM USTTNG OF OBJECTS ROUTINE 
1810 PRINT 

1820 PRINT "OBIECTS HERE ARE- " 
1830 PRINT 



1840 X-R 

1850 GOSUB 5500 
1860 X-0 

1870 IF R - 10 AND PP> 1 THEN GOTO 8000 
1880 GOTO 100 

1890 REM END OF USTING OB[ECTS ROUTINE 

1900 REM ROOM DESCRIPTIONS 

1910 PRINT "YOU ARE AT THE BASE OF HIGH CUFF" 

1920 IF RD(fi)- I THEN BETUBN 

1930 PRINT 

1940 PRINT "THERE IS A SIGN CARVED IN THE CLIFF." 
1950 RD(H)-1 
I960 RETURN 

1970 PRINT "YOU ARE AT THE BASE OF A CUFF" 
1980 IF RD(R) - I THEN RETURN 
1990 PRINT 

2000 PRINT "THERE IS A WEB HERE THAT WEIGHS A TON. IT IS A 

CUFF-TON WEB." 
2010 RD<R)- I 
2020 RETURN 

2030 PRINT "YOU ARE OVERLOOKING A BAY" 
2040 IF RD<R) - I THEN RETURN 
2050 PRINT 

2060 PRINT "YOU ARE HIGH ABOVE A COVE. PERCHED ON A VERY 

STEEP LEDGE SMALL YELLOW-COLORED" 
2070 PRINT "BIVULETS (THE COLORING A TRICK OF THE UGHT. 

PERHAPS?) TUMBLE INTO A LARGE" 
2080 PRINT "BAY. FAR IN THE DISTANCE. YOU CAN SEE A SEQUENCE 

OF CAYS CURVE GENTLY TOWARDS THE LEFT." 
2090 RD(R)-1 
2100 RETURN 

2110 PRINT "YOU ARE AT THE BASE OF A CUFF" 
2120 PRINT 

2130 PRINT "THE BOCKS ABOVE ARE PRECARIOUSLY BALANCED." 
2140 PRINT 

2150 IF R - 4 AND CL - I THEN GOTO 7730 

2 160 PRINT "1 WOULD TIPTOE OUT AND NOT BETURN" 

2170 CL-1 

21S0 BETUBN 

2190 PRINT "YOU ARE AT THE BASE OF A CUFF" 
2200 IF RD(R) - I THEN RETURN 
2210 PRINT 

2220 PRINT "AT ONE TIME THEY THREW A BALL HERE IT WAS A 

BASE-BALL" 
2230 RD(R)- I 
2240 RETURN 

22SO PRINT "YOU ARE AT THE BASE OF A CUFF" 
2260 IF RD(R). 1 THEN RETURN 
2270 PRINT 

2280 PRINT "YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO START CUMBING HERE." 
2290 RD(R)-1 
2300 RETURN 

2310 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST" 
2320 PRINT 

2330 PRINT "YOU ARE VERY PRECARIOUSLY PERCHED IN THE NEST. 

YOU SEE BITS OF FLOTSAM AND IETSAM LITTERING THE NEST." 
2340 PRINT 

2350 PRINT "YOU ALSO SEE THE BONES OF EABUEfi ADVENTURERS 

UTTERING THE NEST." 
2360 PRINT "ALL IN ALL IT IS A MESSY NEST." 
2370 PRINT "AND TO TOP IT ALL OFF, AN EAGLE IS CIRCLING 

OVERHEAD." 
2380 GOTO 1800 

2390 PRINT "YOU ARE AT THE YFJXOW BRICK CROSSROADS" 
2400 IF RD(H) - 1 THEN RETURN 
2410 PRINT 

2420 PRINT "THE ROAD WAS MADE BY MUNCHKINS FROM OZ 

LEFTOVERS. IT WAVERS AND WANDERS IN ALL DIRECTIONS. 
NORTH LOOKS PROMISING." 

2430 RD(B)- 1 

2440 RETURN 

2450 PRINT "YOU ARE STANDING ON YELLOW HUMMOCK #1" 
2460 IF RD(fi)- I THEN RETURN 
2470 PRINT 

2480 PRINT " THE GROUND SHAKES AND SHIVERS BENEATH YOUR 

FEET." 
2490 RD[R| - 1 
2500 BETURN 



22 



STCAME 



2510 PRINT "YOU ARE WADING THROUGH YELLOW M!RE" 
2520 PRINT 

2530 PRINT "YELLOW MIRE IS VERY STICKY, IT SHOULD ALSO NEVER. 

BUT NEVER, BE EATEN." 
2540 RETURN 

2550 PRINT "YOU ARE STANDING ON YEILOW HUMMOCK »2" 
2560 RETURN 

2570 PRINT "YOU ARE STANDING ON YELLOW HUMMOCK »3" 
2580 RETURN 

2590 PRINT "YOU ARE ON A YELLOW BRICK ROAD" 
2600 IP RD(R) - I THEN RE TURN 
2610 PRINT 

2620 PRINT "YOU ARE NOT OFF TO SEE THE WIZARD. HE DOESN'T 
WANT TO SEE YOU AND BESIDES, HE ISN'T IN THIS 
ADVENTURE/' 

2630 RD(R) - I 

2640 RETURN 

2650 PRINT "YOU ARE WADING THROUGH YET LOW MUCK" 
2660 IF RD(R>- t THEN RETURN 
2670 PRINT 

2660 PRINT "THERE IS A YELLOW BRICK ROAD TO THE EAST. NORTH, 

AND SOUTH OF YOU." 
2690 RD(R) - 1 
2700 RETURN 

2710 PRINT "YOU ARE ON A YELLOW BRICK ROAD" 
2720 IF RDfR)- I THEN RETURN 
2730 PRINT 

2740 PRINT "YOU HEAR MUNCH KINS SOFTLY SINGING IN THE 

DISTANCE, A LOUD MUNCHING SOUND . . . THEN SILENCE!" 
2750 RD(R) - I 
2760 RETURN 

2770 PRINT "YOU ARE ON A YELLOW BRICK ROAD" 
2780 RETURN 

2790 PRINT "YELLOW BRICK FORK IN THE ROAD" 
2800 IF RDfR) - I THEN RETURN 
2810 PRINT 

2820 PRINT "A ROAD SIGN IS HERE WITH ARROWS POINTING IN ALL 
DIRECTIONS, THE DIRECTIONS ARE FADED AND UNREADABLE." 
2830 RD[R>- 1 
2840 RETURN 

2850 PRINT "YOU ARE IN A YELLOW GROVE" 
2860 PRINT 

2870 PRINT "THERE IS A HUGE YELLOW TREE HERE." 
2880 IF RD(R) - 1 THEN RETURN 
2890 PRINT 

2900 PRINT "YOU HEAR A YELLOW BIRD HIGH UP IN THE TREE. . , 

SINGING. THERE IS A LOUD MUNCHING SOUND. THEN SILENCE." 
29 10 RD(R) - I 
2920 RETURN 

2930 PRINT "YOU ARE IN A PURPLE GREENHOUSE" 
2940 PRINT 

2950 PRINT "THERE IS A SHELF ABOVE YOUR HEAD." 
2960 RETURN 

2970 PRINT "YOU ARE STANDING ON YELLOW HUMMOCK #4" 
2980 PRINT 

2990 IF RDfR) - I THEN GOTO 3030 

3000 PRINT "I AM VERY FRIGHTENED AND WOULD ADVISE YOU NOT 

TO MOVE IN ANY DIRECTION." 
3010 PRINT "IF I COULD ONLY REMEMBER HOW TO GET OUT OF 

HERE. BUT 1 FORGOT." 
3020 PRINT 
3030 RD(R) - I 

3040 IF HB - THEN PRINT "OH. . , THERE IS A CLOSED METAL BOX 
BUILT INTO THE WALL WHICH SEEMS TO BE DOING THE 
HUMMING." 

3050 IF HB - I THEN PRINT "THERE IS A METAL BOX BUILT INTO THE 
WALL" 

3060 IF BO - I THEN PRINT "THE BOX IS OPEN EXPOSING A KEYHOLE." 
3070 IF OBIS) -90 THEN PRINT "A KEY IS IN THE KEYHOLE." 
3080 RETURN 

3090 PRINT "YOU ARE ON THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD" 
3100 RETURN 

3110 PRINT "YOU ARE ON THE PURPLE BRICK ROAD" 
3120 IF RD(R) - 1 THEN RETURN 
3130 PRINT 

3140 PRINT "THEY RAN OUT OF YELLOW BRICKS HERE AND TO THE 

EAST." 
3 1 50 RDfR) - I 



3160 RETURN 

3170 PRINT "YOU ARE IN A PURPLE GREENHOUSE. " 
3180 PRINT 

3190 PRINT "THERE IS A SHELF ABOVE YOUR HEAD." 
3200 RETURN 

32 10 PRINT "YOU ARE ON THE PURPLE BRICK ROAD" 
3220 IF RDfR) - I THEN RETURN 
3230 PRINT 

3240 PRINT "AS YOU'LL SOON FIND OUT, THERE IS A DOOR TO THE 

EAST. WE CALL THAT THE EAST DOOR.": 
3250 RD(R) - I 
3260 RETURN 

3270 PRINT "YOU ARE BEHIND THE YELLOW DOOR." 
3280 IF RDlR) - I THEN RETURN 
3290 PRINT 

3300 PRINT "YOU ARE IN A YELLOW CHAMBER." 
3310 RDfR) - 1 
3320 RETURN 

3330 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE YELLOW ENTRYWAY" 
3340 RETURN 

3350 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE YELLOW LABORATORY" 
3360 IF RDfR) - 1 THEN RETURN 
3370 PRINT 

3380 PRINT "NOTE: THIS IS PRONOUNCED LA-BOR-A-TORY, NOT 

LA.BRA-TORY. THIS IS A HIGH-CLASS ADVENTURE." 
3390 RDfR) - I 
3400 RETURN 

34 10 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE YELLOW ATTIC" 
3420 IF RDfR) - I THEN RETURN 
3430 PRINT 

3440 PRINT "IF THIS WERE A HIGH-RESOLUTION ADVENTURE AND 

YOU HAD A COLOR MONITOR, YOU COULD SEE THIS IS REALLY 
MORE" 

3450 PRINT "PALE YELLOW THAN THE DEEP YELLOW YOU IMAGINE 

IT TO BE." 
3460 RDfR) - I 
3470 RETURN 

3480 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE YELLOW POWER ROOM" 
3490 PRINT 

3500 PRINT "NOTE; THIS IS THE 'POWER' ROOM, NOT THE 'POWDER' 

ROOM. PLEASE ACT APPROPRIATELY.": 
3510 PRINT 

3520 PRINT "THERE IS A HUGE KNIFE SWITCH ON THE WALL THAT 

CAN BE THROWN UP OR DOWN." 
3530 PRINT 

3540 IF SW - I THEN PRINT "THE SWITCH IS IN THE 'ON' (UP) 
POSITION,"; 

3550 IF SW - THEN PRINT "THE SWITCH IS IN THE 'OFF' (DOWN) 

POSITION." 
3560 RETURN 

3570 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE YELLOW SAFETY ROOM" 
3580 PRINT 

3590 PRINT "THERE IS A LARGE YELLOW BUT I "ON ON THI: WAN " 
3600 PRINT 

3610 PRINT "A SIGN ABOVE THE BUTTON READS;" 
3620 PRINT 

3630 PRINT " 'DUB TO TEMPORARY WIRING PROBLEMS WE ARE NOT 
RESPONSIBLE FOR PUSHING THE Dl SCUM BOBULATOR AT THIS 
TIME.' " 

3640 PRINT 

3650 " '{IN FACT WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR PUSHING IT AT ANY 

TIME)' " 
3660 RETURN 

3670 PRINT "YOU ARE IN A COBWEBBY ANNEX" 
3680 RETURN 

3690 PRINT "YOU STAND BEFORE A YELLOW WALL" 
3700 PRINT 

3710 IF OD- 1 THEN PRINT "A YELLOW HOLE PIERCES THE YELLOW 

WALL TO THE NORTH," 
3720 IP OB{6)-90 THEN PRINT "A STRANGE OBJECT PROTRUDES FROM 

THE KEYHOLE," 
3730 IF OD - I OR OB(6) - 90 THEN RETURN 
3740 PRINT "A STRANGELY SHAPED KEYHOLE IS IN THE WALL" 
37S0 RETURN 

3760 PRINT "YOU ARE UP IN A TREE" 
3770 RETURN 

3780 PRINT "YOU ARE HIGH UP IN THE YELLOW TREE" 
3790 RETURN 



3800 PRINT "YOU ARE PERCHED ON THE TURTLE'S BACK" 
38 10 PRINT 

3820 PRINT "YOU CAN NOW SEE THE TOP OF THE SHELF VERY 

CLEARLY." 
3830 RETURN 

3840 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE MAINTENANCE ROOM" 
3850 PRINT 

3860 PRINT "IN THE CORNER LIES A KEESHOND. SOUND ASLEEP. ON 

THE WALL IS A RED BUTTON." 
3870 PRINT 

3880 PRINT "A LARGE SIGN UNDER THE BUTTON READS: " 
3890 PRINT 

3900 PRINT " " RESET BUTTON" " 

3910 PRINT " FOR EMERGENCY USE ONLY" 

3920 RETURN 

3930 PRINT "YOU ARE IN THE TREASURE CAVE" 
3940 PRINT "YOU HAVE FABULOUS RICHES BEYOND YOUR WILDEST 
DREAMS. TO THE EAST IS AN EXIT LEADING TO PITTSBURGH. " 
3950 PRINT 

3%0 IF OB(l)-9I THEN PRINT "THE ";WJSv" TURNS INTO A 
BEAUTIFUL " 

3970 IF OB(l)-9l THEN PRINT "PRINCESS (OR PRINCE) AND YOU 
SCORE 123.5 OUT OF 123.5 POINTS ... A PERFECT SCORE." 
3980 IF OB<l)-9l THEN END 

3990 PRINT "YOU HAVE SCORED I OUT OF A POSSIBLE 123.5 POINTS. 

NOT BAD," 
4000 END 

4 1 00 REM LOOK. DESCRIBE, READ ROUTINES 
41 10 IF Nl$-"" THEN GOTO 4330 

4120 IF R - I AND NIS- WSS THEN PRINT "IT READS, 'HI, CUFF!' " 

4130 IF R- 1 AND NIS-WSS THEN GOTO 4350 

4140 IF NIS-WUS AND OBU1-9I THEN PRINT "SOMEONE HAS 

WRITTEN ON THE TURTLE'S BACK THE VERSE;" 
4150 IFNIS-WUSAND0B<1)-91 THEN PRINT 
4160 IF NIS-WUS AND OB(l)-91 THEN PRINT " WHERE EAGLES 

SOAR. THESE MAGICKS BE." 
4170 IF NIS-WUS AND OB(l)- 91 THEN PRINT" BE CERTAIN THAT I'M 

THERE WITH THEE." 
4180 IF NIS-WUS AND OB(l)-91 THEN PRINT " JUST SAYEST THAT IT 

MAY BE RED" 

4190 IF N 1 $ - WUS AND OBI I ) - 9 1 THEN PRINT " THOUGH YELLOW 

MAY DO IN ITS STEAD." 
4200 IF Nil- WUS AND OB(l)-9! THEN PRINT 

4210 IF NIS-WUS AND OB(l)-9l THEN PRINT "INCIDENTALLY, THE 

TURTLE HAS A PURPLE STRIFE ON ITS BACK." 
4220 IF NIS-WUS AND OB(l)- 91 THEN PRINT 

4230 IF NIS-WUS AND OB(l>-9l THEN PRINT "A FINAL NOTE; THIS IS 

A MUD TURTLE." 
4240 F N IS - WUS AND OB( 1 ) . 9 1 THEN GOTO 4350 
4250 IF N1S-X6S OR Nl$ - XIS THEN GOTO SI 20 
4260 IF N1S-X2S AND OB<6)-91 THEN GOTO 83 10 
4270 IF NIS-XCS AND OB(7)-91 THEN PRINT "iSNT THAT - 

INTERESTTNG. THE LEAF STRETCHES LIKE A RUBBER BAND. 

BOING . . , BOING." 
4280 IF NIS-XCS AND OB(7)-91 THEN GOTO 100 
4290 IF R - 22 AND N 1$ - XIS THEN PRINT "YOU CANT SEE WHAT'S UP 

THERE AS IT'S TOO HIGH." 
4300 IF R . 22 AND NIS - Xl$ THEN GOTO 100 

4310 IF R . 32 AND OD - AND NIS-XNS THEN PRINT "AS I SAID. IT IS 

SHAPED VERY QUEER! Y. THIS IS EXTREMELY PUZZLING." 
4320 IF R - 32 AND OD - AND NIS - XN$ THEN GOTO 100 
4330 PRINT "I GUESS YOU |UST WANT A GENERAL PEEK." 
4340 PRINT 
4350 GOTO 1410 

4400 REM GETTING ROUTINES 

4410 IF NIS-"" THEN PRINT "YOU FORGOT TO ENTER A NOUN" 
4420 IF NIS-"" THEN GOTO 100 

4430 REM NOW GO TO CHECK IF NOUN MEANS ANYTHING 
4440 GOSUB 5300 

4450 IF X - 1 AND WT- 1 THEN GOTO 7980 

4460 IF OB(X}-9l THEN PRINT "YOU'VE ALREADY GOT THE ";Nl$"." 

4470 IF OB(X) -91 THEN GOTO 100 

4480 IF OB{X) - R THEN OB(X)-9! 

4490 IF OB(8) - 90 AND NIS- XAS THEN OB(8) - 9 1 

4500 IFOB(8)-9l AND N l$- XAS THEN X - 8 

4510 IF OB(6) -90 AND NIS- X2S THEN OB(6) - 91 

4520 IF OB(6) - 91 AND NIS - X2S THEN X - 6 

4 530 IF OB(X) -91 THEN PRINT "OKAY. YOU HAVE THE "NIS 



4540 IFX-2 0RX-3 0RX-4 0RX-5 THEN PP-PP + 1 

4550 IFOB(X)-9l THEN GOTO 100 

4560 PRINT "THERE IS NO ";N IS:" HERE." 

4570 GOTO 100 

4580 REM END OF GETTING ROUTINE 
4600 REM DROPPING ROUTINES 

4610 IF NIS- "" THEN PRINT "YOU FORGOT TO ENTER A NOUN" 
4620 IF NIS - "" THEN GOTO 100 
4630 GOSUB 5300 

4640 IFOB(X)-9] THEN GOTO 4680 
4650 PRINT 

4660 PRINT "YOU'RE NOT CARRYING THE "NIS;"." 
4670 GOTO 100 
4680 OBPQ-R 
4690 PRINT 

4700 IF WT - I THEN GOTO 4720 

4710 IF R- 10 AND OB(D- 10 THEN GOTO 7900 

4720 PRINT "YOU'VE DROPPED THE "iNIS;"." 

4730 IFX-2 0RX-3 OR X - 4 OR X - 5 THEN PP - PP - I 

4740 GOTO 100 

4800 REM INVENTORY ROUTINES 
4810 X-91 
4830 PRINT 

4840 PRINT "YOU ARE CARRYING:" 

4850 PRINT 

4860 GOSUB 5500 

4880 GOTO 100 

4900 REM QUITTING 

4910 PRINT 

4920 PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO SAVE THIS GAME? "i 
4930 INPUT AS 

4940 IF AS - "YES" THEN GOTO 5000 
4950 CALL -936 
4960 PRINT 

4970 PRINT "FARE THEE WELL" 
49S0 END 

5000 REM SAVING GAMES ROUTINE 

5010 REM THIS IS FOR THE APPLE 

5020 REM BUT ALL YOU HAVE TO DO 

5030 REM IS SAVE THE VARIABLE SHOWN 

5040 REM IN LINES 6180 TO 6190 

5050 REM WITHIN QUOTES IS A CONTROL-D 

5060 PRINT "■'VOPEN EASY FILE" 

5070 PRINT "■""WRITE EASYFILE" 

5080 PRINT R 

5090 FOR A - I TO 10: PRINT OB(A>: NEXT A 

5 1O0 PRINT BO: PRINT BT: PRINT CL: PRINT ET: PRINT FL PRINT HB: 
PRINT OD: PRINT PC: PRINT PP: PRINT R; PRINT SO: PRINT SW: 
PRINT TK: PRINT WO: PRINT WT 

5105 FOR A - 1 TO 9: PRINT OB(A); NEXT A 

5110 PRINT "■":"CLOSE EASYFILE" 

5120 PRINT 

5130 PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO CONTINUE PLAYTNG? "; 

5140 INPUT AS • 

5150 IF AS - "YES" THEN CALL -936 

5160 IF AS - "YES" THEN GOTO 1200 

5170 GOTO 4960 

520O REM RESTORING GAMES ROUTINE 
52 10 REM THIS IS FOR THE APPLE 

5220 REM THE QUOTES BELOW CONTAIN A CONTROL-D 
5230 PRINT "■'Y'OPEN EASYFILE" 
5240 PRINT "■'Y'READ EASYFILE" 
5250 INPUT R 

5260 FOR A - 1 TO 10: INPUT OB(A): NEXT A 

5270 INPUT BO: INPUT BT: INPUT CL: INPUT ET: INPUT FL: INPUT HB: 
INPUT OD: INPUT PC: INPUT PP: INPUT R: INPUT SO; INPUT SW: 
INPUT TK: INPUT WO: INPUT WT 

5275 FOR A - 1 TO 9; INPUT OB(A): NEXT A 

5280 PRINT "■'Y'CLOSE EASYFILE" 

5290 GOTO 1200 

5300 REM SUBROUTINE TO CHECK NOUNS 
5310 IF NIS-WUS THEN X-l 
5320 IF NIS-X1S AND OB{2J-9l THEN X-2 
5330 IFN1S-X1S ANDOB{3)-9l THEN X - 3 
5340 lFNl$-XlSANDOB(4)-9l THEN X-4 
5350 IFNlS-XlSANDOB(5>-9l THENX-5 

5360 IF V 1 S - WLS THEN GOTO 54 1 0; REM SKIP NEXT SECTION IF 
DROPPING PUZZLE 



30 



STCAME 



5570 IF NlS- Xl£ AND OBf2l-f! THFN X - 1 


6220 W(6> - 5 


6230 N(fi) - 14 


S100 IK \ 1 _ V 1 OHM I - H THFN Y _l 4 


j-i ?4 Qrfti _ io 

utiv iv 


S400 IF N 1* - X l£ AND ORttt - P THFN XpS 


6250 E(9) - 10 


54 10 IF N IS - XC£ THFN X - 7 


6260 Wf 1 11- 10 

VAW TT \t II IV 




\J£ f U 1*41, Ii/ ■ |U 


■Uin if Nit. yyc thfn v o 


A7A0 N/ 1 11. IrS 

UfOv -l^, 1 JJ IU 


*544f> BFTT TRN 
JITv t\I_ L UHfr 


A7Q0 h' ll - ', -r 
u £7U i - 1 1 JJ " n 


5500 REM SUBROUTINE TO PRINT OUT INVENTORY OH OBIECT 


rUiVi N/ Mi - 17 


IN ROOM 

111 *>^^^f*T4 


Si' I'll - H 


5510 TS-PP 


V J iv \J\ 1 n/ 1 J 




Allfl WlUt _ 1 1 

qjjv wi_nj " u 


4410 IF Y - ORfiV THFN POINT "A Tl 10TT F" 


Wfl 5i - 14 


5540 IF X-OBfll THEN Y - I 


fi Wi S' 1 ill - 11 


5550 FOR A - 2 TO 5 

J J JV 1 \-/L\ Ifc t 1 \J J 


VJVV L.1^ 1 Of m \ f 


5560 IF OBlAI ■» X THFN PP - PP + 1 

41 v-u^nj 1 1 +i*lt rr r r t i 


r\170 NM 71 . 70 
v J 'v 1 t i 1 1 1 m tv 


5570 NEXT A 


ftlftO 71 - 14 


55&0 IF PP> THEN PRrNT PP " PIFCFfSI OF A flGSAW PUZZLE"* 


UJ7V 1,1 1 r 1 ID 


5590 IF PP>0 THFN Ym 1 

J J7v 11 rr V 11 iL_. L T i — L 


A400 WM 71 • Ifi 


5600 IF X ^nftffc! THFN PRINT "A fflMPI FTF nfi^AW PII771F" 

JWUU 11 /» • 1 J IL*LV mill 1 AA V^V/IVirlJj 1 fj JJVJJri « rUbLiLC 


ft4 ifl 1 li 1 Mi IT, 


5610 IF X - fjftffil THFN Y - 1 

JU If It j\ • VJUIV^ 1 I HW-lT 1 ™ 1 


M30 WM HI - 1 7 


5620 IF X - OBI71 THEN PRINT "A LARGE LEAF" 

JVtV 11 A J 1 1 1U4^ E lull 1 Jfc 1^I\V^ 


n4^0 Nf30.»21 


5630 IF X - OBI71 THEN Y - 1 

JVJV 11 t\ wly|, f J t J N p i t A i 


1*44-0 ^1201 - 1 7 

U j j U ij|£V| 1 i 


5640 IF X - OB(8) THEN PRINT "A METAL KEY" 


fr4Sn F/70V ■ 71 

Ul JV C\£ Vj £ 1 


5650 IF X - OB(8) THEN Y - 1 


MAO Nf71t-?4 


5660 IF X - OBI91 THEN PRINT "A LUMP OF TWISTED AND 


A470 U/711 _ %4 


SMOLDERING CARDBOARD" 


U itju Tflf \£ 11 £V 


5670 IF X - OBf9t THEN Y - 1 




5680 IF Y - THEN PRINT "NOTHING" 

^vyv ii t — v i f itwti i rvn ^ i nv> 1 1 ill ^vj 


A5fV\ ^^li - 70 


5690 Y-0 


« irt F_mi - 74 


5700 PP-TS 


A570 - 77 


5710 RETURN 




5800 RFJvl SFT UP ROUTINFS 


A540 Ff741 - 75 


10 HIM NfQO^ SiQOi KfQOl W/QOi \ UQCVi H/QOi XMi YMl Rfi/QO 1 ! ORf?fli 


ft550 W/74^«71 


5820 DIM AK20I V1SI20) N ISi20l W ISiSl W2SI5) W3SI4) W4SI41 W5SI2) 


fi5ft0 Ff75>*?A 

UJUU I..14 JJ £U 


W6$(4).W7$< l).W8$( 1). W9*( l).WAS( 1 J.WBW I) 


6570 W(25)**24 


5830 DIM WCSMLWDSH) WE&41 WFK41 WGSVII WHSIll WISI9) WT&3) 


ASRO NI17ftl » 7M 


WK$(4)i WL$(4). WM)(4). WN$(4). D$( 5 1 


A500 W/7fi P -75 

UJ7U TV 1.£UJ ™ X J 


5840 DIM WOSI8) WPSI71 WOfiS) WRII41 WSSI4I WTK51 WUSI61 WVK41 


fi^OO [ Jf77V > 20 

WW 1 1 ■ i T 


WW1I31 WXS(6) WYt(4t WZi(51 XIS(5I X2S(61 X3S(31 


no i u * ^ * *o 


5850 DIM X4S(41 X5SI4) X6SI6I X7i(S) XASI3I X8SI8I X9$(4t XB$(3) XCU4) 


AA70 ^/7M1 m 7fi 


XD&51 XFAifil XFSHi XGSffSi XHSM- XlSfS/ 


AAHO WI7A\ - 77 


5860 DIM XISI4) XKS(6I XLS(8I XMII41 X0SI4) W0SI5) XNH7) XOSI41 XPS/81 


AMO ri(7Ql - 1 1 


5870 OBIIi-2 


Art 50 F/2Q1 . 10 


5880 OB(2|-9 


ArSfSO wnm . 70 

OUUU » ^ JU| • 4 TJr 


5890 OB(3). 1 1 


AA7n ^i^OI _ 


5900 OBI41- 12 


ODOU J 1 ) 1 1 - ) 


5910 OBI5V- 19 


AA00 Wf17V - 1 1 


5920 OB(7)-34 


fi7nn m - m 


5930 OBIS! -35 


A7in n/^4i 7i 


5940 OBI6I-0 


A770 rVVO - 7? 


5950 OBI 101-0 


A7io rfm wnfln T I^T 

III JU C\ L _,LV J VKVJnJj LJlJ 1 


5960 FOR A - 1 TO 50 


U i T \.' TT J .fl ~ _N\Jnlll 


5470 RrMAi -0 


AT^fi WJtT "trtl ITH" 


«qbq NFXT A 


O'OV W J* ~ L.'iiD 1 


JWV J TT 1 


Of /u W1# ™ W L_«J 1 


6000 REM DIRECTION LOADING 


fi7ft(] U/^V _ "1 IP" 


60 1 FOR A - 1 TO 40 


VI TV TT 17*P ™ Lllj Wll 


6020 N(A)-0 


fiftOO W7H«"N" 

VOW 11 1 -p ■ 1^ 


6030 SIAl -0 


vO IV W 0«P ^ •} 


6040 E(A)-0 


VOX V vi 7ip V L j 


6050 W(A) - 


OO JV W * TT 


6060 IKA1-0 

www V4^r*/ — v 


AA40 WR4 _ "1 1" 


6070 DIA1-0 


OO JU TT >w< U 


6080 NEXT A 


uuuv vi ■ niui 1 1 


6090 Nil)- 4 

»T,lf ™ > 


fiR7C\ WTl*t«"*sAVF" 

UO r V V* LJ-fT ™ kli/i V Lj 


6100 Elll-2 


ASRO WFl_"fjt[IT" 
DOOV W 1_aP — 1 -l 1 1 1 1 


61 10 N(21- 5 


007V nD" (mJALi 


6120 E(2) - 3 


U7 W TT VJ |9 1 


6I30 W{2)- I 


6910 WHS - "INV" 

vj 1 V T» 1 l-P l|T V 


6S40 N(3)-6 


AQ70 Wit - "INVKNTORY" 


6 1 50 W(3) - Z 


O7JV W 1 J ~ J 


6I60 SI4)- I 


»VI\#" 1 /VfM ■ 


6170 E141 - 5 


Ojiy V> l-p ■ LJBUr 


6180 S(5)-2 


ftQftO WM^ _ "WAIT" 

U7UV " ITJbp " TT |T\| 1 


6190 E(5)-6 


6970 WNS - "LOOK" 

V7I V Tf It* ljVV|"i 


6200 W(5)-4 


6980 WO$ - "DESCRIBE" 


6210 S<«-3 


6990 WP$ - "RESTORE" 



7000" WQS- "CUFF" 

7010 WRS - "HEAD" 

7020 WSJ - "SIGN" 

7030 WT$-"CUMB" 

7040 WU$ - "TURTLE" 

7050 WV$-")UMP" 

7060 WWS - "RED" 

7070 WX$- "YELLOW" 

7080 WYS-"LONG" 

7090 WZ$ -"SHORT" 

7100 XOS - "LEFT" 

7110 X IS - "PIECE" 

7120 X2S- "PUZZLE" 

7130 X3S-"EAT" 

7 MO X4S-"MIRE" 

7150 XSS - "MUCK" 

7160 X6S - "PIECES" 

7170 X 7$. "SOLVE" 

7180 XA$-"KEY" 

7190 X&S - "EUTHERIA" 

7200 X9$- "OPEN" 

7210 XB$-"BOX" 

7220 XCS - "LEAF" 

7230 XDS - "THROW" 

7240 XES - "SWITCH" 

7250 XFS - "PUSH" 

7260 XGS - "BUTTON" 

7270 XHS - "OPEN" 

7280 XIS - "SHELF" 

7290 Xf$."TURN" 

7300 XK5- "INSERT" 

7310 XLS - "ASSEMBLE" 

7320 XMS - "LUMP" 

7330 XOS - "KISS" 

7340 XPS.-KEESHOND" 

7350 REM SETTING FLAGS 

7360 R-l 

7370 Y-0 

7380 X-0 

7390 PRINT "RESTORE PREVIOUS GAMEF ('YES' OR 'NO') ": 
7400 INPUT AS 
7410 CALL -936 

7420 IF AS -"YES" THEN GOTO 5200 
7430 GOSUB 1900 
7440 GOTO 1800 

7500 REM SPECIAL HANDLING SECTION 
7510 IF R - 3 THEN PRINT 

7520 IF V 1$ - W5S AND R - 3 THEN PRINT "THAT'S THE RIGHT IDEA, 

BUT THE WRONG WORD." 
7530 IF V1S-WBS AND R - 3 THEN PRINT "THAT'S THE RIGHT IDEA. 

BUT THE WRONG WORD." 
7540 IF R. 3 THEN GOTO 100 
7550 IF R- 7 THEN PRINT 

7560 IF VIS - W6S AND R - 7 THEN PRINT "Yimilll " 

7570 IF V IS - WCS AND R - 7 THEN PRINT "YIHI1II " 

7580 IF R- 7 THEN PRINT 

7590 IF R - 7 THEN GOTO 4960 

7600 IF SO - I THEN FOR A - 1 TO 100 

7610 IF SO -I THEN NEXT A 

7620 IF SO - I THEN R - 37 

7630 IF SO- I THEN GOTO 1120 

7640 PRINT 

7650 IF R - 7 THEN PRINT "A VOICE WHISPERS IN YOUR EAR . . . THAT 

SECTION IS UNDER REPAIR . . . NOT OPEN YET.' " 
7660 IF R - 7 THEN GOTO 100 
7670 IF R- 7 THEN PRINT 
76S0 IF R - 7 THEN PRINT "POOF . . . POOF!!!" 
7690 IF R- 7 THEN FOR A - I TO 100 
7700 IF R - 7 THEN NEXT A 
7710 IF R - 7 THEN R - 8 
7720 GOTO 1320 

7730 PRINT "THERE IS A MIGHTY TREMBLING. SHIVERING. SHAKING. 

AND SHUDDERING AS THE WALLS COME TUMBLING DOWN." 
7740 PRINT 

7750 PRINT "YOUR LAST THOUGHT IS THAT SOME OF THE SIGNS ARE 

FOR REAL" 
7760 PRINT 



7770 GOTO 4960 

7800 REM RESULTS OF EATING 
7810 PRINT 

7820 IF R - 10 AND NIS-X4S THEN PRINT "YUM. YUM, THAT WAS 
GOOD . . . YOU'RE STRONGER ... BUT IT WASN'T QUITE 
ENOUGH." 

7830 IFR. 10 AND N I S - X4S THEN ET - ET ♦ 1 
7840 IF ET - 4 THEN PRINT 

7850 IF ET - 4 THEN PRINT "NO, THAT WAS ENOUGHI YOU SLOWLY 

SINK OUT OF SIGHT . . . NEVER TO BE SEEN AGAIN." 
7860 IF ET - 4 THEN GOTO 4960 
7870 IF R- 10 AND N1S-X4S THEN GOTO 100 
7880 PRINT "DONT BE SILLY. YOU SIMPLY CAN'T EAT " : Nl$y'S." 
7890 GOTO 100 
7900 REM WU HANDLING 
7910 WT-I 

7920 PRINT "THE "iWUS," LANDS WITH A PLOP IN THE "; 

X4S "PERMITTING YOU TO CROSS." 
7930 N(10)-8 
7940 SI 10)- 12 
7950 EU0)-11 
7960 W(IO)-9 
7970 GOTO 100 

7980 PRINT "THE ":WUS:" IS PEFECTLY HAPPY WHERE HE IS AND 

REFUSES TO COME WITH YOU." 
7990 GOTO 100 
8000 PRINT 

8010 PRINT "THE WEIGHT OF THE ":XIS;"S. CAUSES YOU. THE "; 

WUS:" AND THE w tXl$i"S TO SINK SLOWLY OUT OF SIGHT." 
8020 GOTO 4960 
8 1 00 REM PUZZLE HANDUNG 
8110 PRINT 

8120 IF PP-0 THEN PRINT "YOU AREN'T CARRYING ANY PIECES." 
8130 IF PP-0 THEN GOTO 100 

8140 IFR-9ORR-10ORR- 11 OR R - 1 2 THEN PRINT "THE LIGHT 
ISN'T VERY GOOD HERE AND I CAN'T MAKE IT OUT," 

8150 IFR-9 0RR-1QORR- II ORR- 12 THEN GOTO 100 

8160 PRINT "THE PUZZLE PIECES ARE VERY CONFUSING. PERHAPS IF 
YOU SOLVED THE PUZZLE," 

8170 GOTO 100 

8180 PRINT 

8190 IF PP-0 THEN PRINT "YOU HAVE NO PUZZLE PIECES." 

8200 IF PP-0 THEN GOTO 100 

8210 IFPP-4THENOB<2)-0 

8220 IFPP-4THENOB(3)-0 

8230 IFPP-4THENOB(4).0 

8240 IF PP- 4 THEN OB(5)-0 

8250 IFPP-4THENOB{6)-91 

8260 IF PP - 4 THEN PRINT "BY GOLLY ... I'VE SUCCESSFULLY FDTED 

TOGETHER THE PUZZLE PIECES." 
8270 IF PP. 4 THEN PP-0 
8280 IF PP-0 THEN GOTO 100 
8290 PRINT "YOU DON'T HAVE ALL THE PIECES." 
8300 GOTO 100 
8310 IF PC - 3 THEN PC - 
8320 PC - PC + 1 

8330 IF PC- 1 THEN PRINT "THE PUZZLE WAVERS AND SHIFTS. IT 

SHOWS A GREAT TREASURE IN A RED CAVE." 
8340 IF PC - I THEN GOTO 100 

8350 IF PC - 2 THEN PRINT "THE PUZZLE WAVERS AND SHIFTS. THE 

WORD 'EUTHERIA' FORMS ON ITS SURFACE." 
8360 IF PC -2 THEN GOTO 100 

8370 PRINT "YOU SEE THE "XZh" IS SHAPED LIKE A ";XAS;"." 
8380 GOTO 100 

8400 REM SWITCHES AND BUTTONS 

8410 IF N IS- XES AND BT-0 THEN PRINT 

8420 IF N IS -XES AND BT - THEN PRINT "80 ZILUON FURFLES 

OF ELECTRICITY SURGE THROUGH WHAT USED TO BE 

YOUI" 

8430 IF N IS - XES AND BT - THEN GOTO 4960 

8440 EF N1S-XES AND BT - 1 THEN PRINT 

8450 IF N L$- XES AND BT - I THEN PRINT "THERE IS A LOUD 

'KERCHUNK' AS A RELAY OPENS SOMEWHERE AND THE 

UGHTS DIM." 

PRINT 

8470 IF N 1$ - XE$ AND BT - I AND SW - THEN FL - 1 
8480 IF Nil- XES AND BT- I AND SW- 1 THEN FL-0 



32 



STCAME 



8490 IF NIS-XES AND BT- I THEN SW-FL 

9500 IF NIS-XES AND BT - I AND SW- I THEN PRINT "THE SWITCH 
IS ON." 

8510 IF Nl$- XES AND BT - I AND SW -0 THEN PRINT "THE SWITCH 

IS OFF." 
8520 IF SW - 1 THEN HB-0 
8530 IF SW - THEN HB - I 
8540 IF NIS-XES THEN GOTO 100 
8550 PRINT "YOU DON'T HAVE ANY ":NIS:"S." 
8560 GOTO 100 
8570 PRINT 

8580 IF OB(7) - 30 AND NIS - XGS THEN PRINT "STANDING ON THE *j 
XCS;", YOU PUSH THE BUTTON. THERE IS A LOUD KLUNK 
SOMEWHERE."; 

8590 IF OB<7) - 30 AND NIS -XGS AND BT - THEN FL- 1 

8600 IF OB(7)- 30 AND NIS- XGS AND BT - I THEN FL-0 

8610 IF OB(7) - 30 AND N IS - XGS THEN BT - FL 

8620 IF OB<7| - 30 AND N IS - XGS THEN GOTO 100 

8630 IF NIS -XGS THEN PRINT "80 ZtLUON FURFLES OF ELECTRICITY 
SURGE THROUGH WHAT USED TO BE YOU!" 

8640 IF NIS - XGS THEN GOTO 4960 

8650 PRINT "PUSHING THE " ; Nl$ ; " DOESN'T WORK. TRY PUSHING THE 

BUTTON." 
8660 GOTO 100 

8700 REM CLIMBING SPECIAL ROUTINES 
8710 PRINT 

8720 IFR-22 AND NIS - WUS AND OB(l) - 9 1 THEN PRINT "HOW 
CAN YOU CUMB ON SOMETHING YOU'RE CRADLING IN 
YOUR ARMS?" 

8730 IF R - 22 AND N1S-WUS AND OB(l)-9l THEN GOTO 100 

8740 IF R - 22 AND NIS- WUS AND OB(l)-22 THEN R-35 

8750 IF R-35 THEN GOTO 1200 

8760 IFR-2I THEN R - 34 

8770 IF R - 34 THEN GOTO 1200 

8780 IF R- 18 THEN R- 33 

8790 IF R - 33 THEN GOTO 1200 

8800 PRINT "I SIMPLY CANT DO THAT HERE" 

8810 GOTO 100 

8900 REM SPECIAL OPENING ROUTINES 
8910 PRINT 

8920 IF N IS - XBS AND R - 19 AND HB - THEN PRINT "YOU PULL AND 

TUG BUT IT IS CLOSED BY AN ELECTROMAGNETIC FORCE." 
8930 IF NIS - XBS AND R -19 and HB-0 THEN GOTO 100 
8940 IF BO - 1 THEN PRINT "THE BOX IS OPEN." 
8950 IF BO - 1 THEN GOTO 100 

8960 IF -NIS- XBS AND R - 19 AND HB - 1 THEN PRINT "THE COVER 

COMES OFF EASILY EXPOSING A KEYHOLE." 
8970 IF Nl$- XBS AND R- 19 AND HB- I THEN BO- 1 ■ 
8980 IF NIS - XBS AND R - 1 9 AND HB - 1 THEN GOTO 100 
8990 PRINT "WHAT DO YOU WANT ME TO OPENf" 
9000 GOTO 100 

9100 REM SPECIAL INSERTING ROUTINES 
9110 IF R- 19 OR R- 32 THEN GOTO 9150 
9120 PRINT 

9130 PRINT "THAT WONT WORK HERE" 
9140 GOTO 100 

9150 IF R-32 THEN GOTO 9290 

9 160 IF N IS - X AS AND OBlS) - 9 1 THEN OB<8) - 90 

9170 IF 08*81-90 THEN PRINT 

9180 IF 08(81-90 THEN PRINT "THE KEY IS IN THE KEYHOLE." 

9190 IF OB(8) -90 THEN GOTO 100 

9200 IF NIS- X2S AND OB(6)-9l THEN PRINT 

9210 IF NIS-X2S AND OB(6) - 9 1 THEN PRINT "THERE IS A SIZZLING 

SOUND AS SOMETHING FALLS PROM THE KEYHOLE." 
9220 IF N1S-X2S AND OB<6) - 9 1 THEN OB(9> - 1 9 
92 30 IF N IS - X2S AND OB(6) - 9 1 THEN OB(6> - 
9240 IF NIS - X2S AND OB(9) - 19 THEN PRINT 
92 50 IF N I S - X2S AND OB(9| - 1 9 THEN GOTO 1410 
9260 PRINT 

9270 PRINT "THAT'S THE RIGHT IDEA BUT SOMETHING IS MISSING." 
9280 GOTO 100 

9290 IF OBI6) - 9 1 AND N I $ - X2$ THEN OB(6) - 90 
9300 IF OB<6) - 90 THEN PRINT 

93 10 IF OB(6) - 90 THEN PRINT "THE ";X2V IS IN THE KEYHOLE. PART 

OF IT PROTRUDES FROM THE KEYHOLE." 
9320 IF OB(6) - 90 THEN GOTO 100 
9330 IF OBIS) - 91 AND NIS-XAS THEN PRINT 



9340 r OB(8) - 91 AND Nl$ - XAS THEN PRINT "OH NO!!l SOMETHING 

ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WALL" 
9350 IF OBIS) -91 AND NIS-XAS THEN PRINT "HAS GRABBED YOU 

AND IS EATING THE KEY. IT EATS YOU FOR DESSERT." 
9360 IF OB(8) - 91 AND NIS-XAS THEN GOTO 4960 
9370 PRINT 

9380 PRINT "THAT'S THE RIGHT IDEA BUT SOMETHING IS MISSING." 
9390 GOTO 100 

9400 REM TURNING THINGS 

9410 IFR- 19 OR R-32 THEN GOTO 9450 

9420 PRINT 

9430 PRINT "ALL 1 CAN DO IS TURN AROUND HERE. I'LL DO IT. 

WHOOPEE!!!" 
9440 GOTO 100 
9450 IF R- 32 THEN GOTO 9680 
9460 IF BO- THEN PRINT 

9470 IF BO - THEN PRINT "I SEE NO KEYHOLE HERE." 
9480 IF BO - THEN GOTO 100 
9490 IF OB(8) - 90 THEN GOTO 9530 
9500 PRINT 

95 10 PRINT "THERE'S NOTHING IN THE KEYHOLE." 

9520 GOTO 100 

9530 IF N1S-W0S THEN PRINT 

9540 IF NIS- W0S THEN PRINT "THE HUMMOCK'S GARBAGE CHUTE 

OPENS AND YOU SLIDE RIGHT OUT OF THE GAME." 
9550 IF N IS- W0S THEN GOTO 4960 
9560 IF TK- I THEN PRINT 

9570 IF TK - I THEN PRINT "THE MACHINERY IS JAMMED." 
9580 IF TK- I THEN GOTO 100 
9590 IF N 1$ - XD$ THEN PRINT 

9600 IF N1S-X0S THEN PRINT "HIDDEN MACHINERY RAISES THE 

HUMMOCK UP TO THE LEVEL OF THE REST OF THE GAME." 
9610 IF NIS-XOS THEN 5(221- 19 
9620 IF S(22) - 19 THEN TK- I 
9630 IF N1S-X0S THEN N(19I- 22 
9640 IF N1S-X0S THEN GOTO 100 
9650 PRINT 

9660 PRINT "YOU HAVE TO TELL ME TO TURN THE ";XA$;" RIGHT 

OR LEFT." 
9670 GOTO 100 
9680 REM ROOM 32 
9690 IF OB(6) - 90 THEN GOTO 9730 
9700 PRINT 

9710 PRINT "THERE'S NOTHING IN THE KEYHOLE." 

9720 GOTO 100 

9730 IF NIS - W0S THEN PRINT 

9740 IF N IS - W0$ THEN PRINT "THE WALLS BEGIN TO MOVE IN ON 

YOU. YOU STRUGGLE FRANTICALLY. BUT ITS TOO LATE" 
9750 IF N1S-W0S THEN GOTO 4960 
9760 IF N1S-X0S THEN PRINT 

9770 IF NIS-XOS THEN PRINT "A WELL-OILED OPENING APPEARS IN 

THE WALL" 
9780 IF N IS - X0$ THEN N(32> - 36 
9790 IF Nl$ - X05 THEN S136) - 32 
9800 IF NIS-XOS THEN OB(6) - 
9810 IF N1S-X0S THEN OD-l 
9820 IF N IS - X0S THEN GOTO 100 
9830 PRINT 

9840 PRINT "YOU HAVE TO TELL ME TO TURN THE ":X2$ ; " RIGHT OR 

LEFT." 
9850 GOTO 100 
9900 REM MAGIC 
9910 SO- 1 
9920 CALL -936 
9930 PRINT "POOF1 POOF1" 
9940 FOR A - I TO 200 
9950 NEXT A 
9960 R-7 
9970 GOTO 1320 




DUNGIEON l=UN I.IEVIEI. I=CUR 



Ami- 



2 HEM 

3 REM 

4 REM 
6 REM 



HOME BASE 



20 GOTO 5000; REM INITIALIZE 

50 IF PEEK (768) < > 25 OR PEEK (769) < > 

250 THEN 1000: REM NOBODY HERE YET, 

GET [OE 

60 GOTO 2000: REM ELSE A PARTY HAS 
JUST RETURNED. SO DEBRIEF THEM 

100 REM + + + MAJN MENU +■ + + 

110 PRINT: PRINT 

120 PRINT "YOU MAY ENTER THE 

130 INVERSE : PRINT "C";: NORMAL 

HO PRINT "AVERNS,": PRINT 

150 PRINT " OR TAKE A"; 

160 INVERSE : PRINT "R";: NORMAL 

170 PRINT "EST:": PRINT 

180 PRINT "WHAT IS YOUR CHOICE? "; 

190 GET QS: PRINT QS: PRINT 

200 REM M DECODE & SEND " 
210 PRINT : IF QS - "C" THEN 250 
220 PRINT "SO BE IT. REST WELL " 

NAMES", , ," 
230 PRINT DS"BSAVE "NAME$",AS30Q.L$A" 
210 END 

250 PRINT "MOVING OUT . . ." 
260 PRINT D$"RUN DM 4" 
290 END 

1000 REM * + ♦ PERSONNEL + + * 
1010 PRINT "THE ONLY FIGHTER 

AVAILABLE TODAY IS" 
1020 PRINT : PRINT " JOE." 
1030 PRINT : PRINT "HE WILL BE WITH YOU 

IN A MOMENT." 
1040 PRINT DS"BLOAD JOE" 
1050 PRINT 

1060 REM THEN FALL INTO 
2000 REM + + + 



2010 REM DEBRIEF WHOM? " 

2020 NAMES - 

2030 FOR X - TO 4 

2040 Q$ - CHRS ( PEEK (770 + X)) 

2050 IF QS - " " THEN 2070 

2060 NAMES - NAMES « QJ 

2070 NEXT X 

2100 REM " CARRYING WHAT? ♦* 

21 10 GOLD - 256 * PEEK (775) + PEEK (776) 

2120 ANKH - PEEK (777) 

2200 REM ** REPORT " 
2210 PRINT i PRINT "WELCOME BACK, " 
NAMES"!" 

2220 PRINT : PRINT "YOU NOW HAVE " 

GOLD" IN GOLD"; 
2230 IF ANKH - THEN PRINT ".": GOTO 

2260 
2210 PRINT "," 

2250 PRINT " AND A GOLDEN ANKH." 
2260 PRINT 



2310 PRINT D$"BSAVE "NAMES".A$300.LSA" 

2350 GOTO 100 

5000 REM t INITIALIZE + + + 

5010 REM " VARIABLES ETC. " 
5020 DS - CHRS (4): REM CTRL-D 

5100 REM "TITLE" 

5110 HOME 

SI20 VTAB 5: HTAB 11 

5130 PRINT "THE DUNGEON MACHINE" 

5140 VTAB 8: HTAB 13 

5150 PRINT "(PRACTICE AREA)" 

5180 VTAB 15 

5190 GOTO 50 

10000 REM + + + TO INSTALL JOE + + + 
10020 POKE 768,25: POKE 769,250 
10050 POKE 770. ASC ("|") 
10060 POKE 771. ASC ("O'T 
10070 POKE 772. ASC ("E'l 
10080 POKE 773. ASC (" ") 
10090 POKE 774, ASC f ' ") 
10100 POKE 775,0 
10! 10 POKE 776,10 
10120 POKE 777.0 
10130 PRINT CHRS (4)"BSAVE JOE. 
AS300.LSA" 



ATARI 



2300 REM RECORD " 



2 REM 

3 REM HOME BASE 

4 REM 
6 REM 

20 GOTO SOOOtREM IN1TIAU2E 

30 IF PEEK! 1 536) <> 25 OR 

PEEK(I537)< >250 THEN 1000;REM 
NOBODY HERE YET, GET JOE 

40 GOTO 20O0:REM ELSE A PARTY HAS 
JUST RETURNED. SO DEBRIEF THEM 

100 REM + + + MAIN MENU + ♦ + 
110 PRINT :PR1NT 

120 PRINT "YOU MAY ENTER THE "i 
130 PRINT "■";:REM THE CHARACTER IN 

QUOTES IS AN INVERSE C 
140 PRINT " A VERNS,' ':PRINT 
1 50 PRINT " OR TAKE A"; 

160 PRINT "■"; :REM THE CHARACTER IN 

QUOTES IS AN INVERSE R 
170 PRINT "EST:":PRINT 
ISO PRINT "WHAT IS YOUR CHOICE! "i 
190 POKE 752.0:PRINT " "::GET *l.Q:POKE 

752. l:QS - CHR$(Q):PRINT QS:PRINT 

200 REM " DECODE 6 SEND »« 
210 PRINT :IF QS - "C" THEN 250 
220 PRINT "SO BE IT. REST WELL. "; 

NAMES:". . ." 
210 Flt£$(3) - NAMES 
232 OPEN »2,8,0,F!LE$ 
234 FORX- 1536 TO 1545 
236 PUT #2.PEEK(X! 
238 NEXT X:PUT *2.l55:CLOSE ml 
240 END 

250 PRINT "MOVING OUT. . ." 
260 RUN "D:DM4" 
290 END 

1000 REM + + + PERSONNEL + + + 
1010 PRINT "THE ONLY FIGHTER 



AVAILABLE TODAY IS" 
1020 PRINT :PRINT " JOE." 
1030 PRINT :PRINT "HE WILL BE WITH YOU 

IN A MOMENT." 

1040 1- 1536:TRAP I041:OPEN #2.4.0."D:JOE" 

1 04 1 GET *2.Q 

1042 POKEI,Q:l-UI 

1 043 GOTO 104 1 

1044 ERR-PEEK(I95) 

1045 IF ERR - 136 THEN 1049 

1046 PRINT "ERROR NUMBER ";ERR;" HAS 
OCCURRED I" 

1049 CLOSE *2:TRAP 40000 

1050 PRINT 

1060 REM THEN FALL INTO 

2000 REM + ♦ + DEBRIEFING + + + 

2010 REM " DEBRIEF WHOM7 •* 

2020 NAMES-"" 

2030 FOR X - I TO 5 

2040 Q$-CHRS(PEEK(1537 + X)) 

2050 IF QS - " " THEN 2070 

2060 NAMES(X.X)-Q$ 

2070 NEXT X 

2100 REM *• CARRYING WHAT? •• 
2110 GOLD-256'PEEK[IS43) + PEEK(IS44) 
2120 ANKH -PEEK! 1545) 

2200 REM REPORT " 

2210 PRINT :PRINT "WELCOME BACK, "; 

NAMES;"!" 
2220 PRINT :PRINT "YOU NOW HAVE "; 

GOLD:" IN GOLD"; 
2230 IF ANKH - THEN PRINT ".":GOTO 

2260 
2240 PRINT "," 

2250 PRINT " AND A GOLDEN ANKH." 
2260 PRINT :GOTO 100 

5000 REM + + + INniALIZE + + * 

5010 REM VARIABLES ETC. *• 
5015 POKE 752.1:OPEN *l.4.0."K:":DIM 
NAME$(5}.F1LES(7),Q$(1) ! FILE$ - "D:" 

5100 REM "TITLE" 

51 10 PRINT "\" REM THE \ IS SHIFT 

CLEAR 
5120 POSITION 10.4 

5130 PRINT "THE DUNGEON MACHINE" 

5140 POSITION 12.7 

5150 PRINT "(PRACTICE AREA)" 

5180 POSITION PEEK(85),14 

5190 GOTO 30 

10000 REM + + + TO INSTALL JOE + + + 

10020 POKE l536.25:POKE 1537,250 

10050 POKE l538,ASCm 

10060 POKE 1539,ASC("0"). 

10070 POKE 1540.ASC("E") 

10080 POKE !54I,ASC(""> 

10090 POKE I542.ASC(" "> 

10100 POKE 1543,0 

101 10 POKE 1544.10 

10120 POKE 1545,0 

10110 OPEN #2,8.0."D:|OE" 

10140 FORX-1536TO 1545 

10150 PUT *2.PEEK(X) 

10160 NEXT X 

10170 PUT »2. 1 5S:REM END OF FILE 

CHARACTER 
10180 CLOSE #2 



# 



ST.GAME 



Do You Believe in Magic? 

Sorcerer 

By Steve Meretzky. 

Mm! computers. 

Sorcerer is the second part of lnfocom 's magical trilogy (no, not Zorfc 
V!), Much like the first program of the series. Enchanter. Sorcerer requires 
the player to become conversant in matters arcane. Magic is every- 
where. Quick wits are rarely as useful as the casting of an appropriate 
spell. Before long, mere mortals are quite at case blasting open doors 
with Rezrov spells, floating in the air courtesy of Izyuk. and eavesdrop- 
ping on minds through Yomin. (After all, what kind of dreams do 
gnomes really have?) Even the future may be pierced via the Vezza 
oracle spell. 

The plot: Guildmaster Belboz has been abducted by a powerful 
demon and must he rescued. The player must first determine how to 
magically leave the building within a certain time limit, or else suffer 
eternal torture at the hands of the demon. 

The game is divided into a series of unconnected modules. Once you 
go from one setting to another, the doorway slams shut behind you for- 
ever. Save the game often, or you will be constantly restarting it to seek 
out something you did not find in a previous module and now need. Also, 
pay strict attention to subtleties of descriptions and events. Some puz- 
zles are only solvable if these nuances are observed and their import cor- 
rectly interpreted. 

The world of the Sorcerer is rich in detail and wonderment. The 
magical experiences resemble the exotic adventures of Carlos 
Castaneda. Steve Meretzky. who also wrote the hilarious sci-fi adven- 
ture comedy. Pfonetfalt. has crafted several diabolical traps and puzzles. 
Marvel at the three-dimensional, transparent, glass cube maze! Commit 
hara-kiri for points and profit! Make extra money parting the Red Sea 
and waxing floors! Speaking of red, red herrings abound in every puz- 
zle. Often the false trails appear more logical than the actual solution 
path. Meretzky has really achieved considerable design suhtlety. 

One very clever new addition to the lnfocom parser is the ability of 
the program to remember exactly the manner in which you performed 
an act. Later, the program will give you a replay of certain acts, hut 
from a different perspective. This feat brings the concept of true interac- 
tive fiction one more step toward reality. "Interlogic Marches On!" in- 
tones the Movietone newsreel. 

Plan on spending many delightful evenings and weekends playing 
Sorcerer. The final solution is like a delicate orchid achieving full bloom. 
Long after the game is over, the heady fragrance stays with you. RRA 
Apple. Atari. Commodore 64. DEC. IBM. NEC, Osborne. TRS-80. $49.95 
from lnfocom. 55 Wheeler Street. Cambridge. MA 02138: (617) 492-1031. 

Looting the Louvre 
The Heist 

By Mike Livesay and Mike Mooney. 
Adam, Apple, Commodore 64. 

Now wait a minute. Aren't games supposed to make us feel good? 
Aren't they supposed to provide a socially acceptable way to release 
pent-up tension? Aren't they supposed to let us heave a satisfying "Oh. 
yeah!" after we're done playing them? They are? Thought so. 

If that's what games are supposed to be, then The Heist is the an- 
tithesis of what the game gods had in mind, the Heist is a fine game. Pro- 
grammers Livesay and Mooney worked diligently on the game, and it 
shows. Animation is smooth: colors are as bright as they are plentiful; 
sound effects are kept to an undistracting minimum. In other words, 
everything works. Everything except for flow. 



Graham Crackers is The Heist's do-good hero. His job is to pick up 
every piece of artwork displayed in a museum, in a search for — are you 
ready? — a micro dot to save the world. Fortunately, the milquetoast plot 
isn't reflected in the game itself (thumbs down to the Micro Fun em- 
ployee whose idea it was). The game was designed before the story was 
imposed, and it's more fun than the plot sounds. 

The museum consists of three levels, each of which contains sixteen 
different screens, and each screen shows three rooms. Math vrhizzes 
will say the game has one hundred forty- four rooms, which it does, but 
some rooms are just slight variations of rooms on other levels. However, 
all sixteen screens are completely different. How can anyone complain 
about a game with "just" sixteen screens? There's no getting bored in 
The Heist. 

Livesay 's last two works were the Apple and Coleco versions of the 
1983 runaway hit. Miner 2049er. The Heisi is different, but it's obvious 
that there's still a little Miner blood in Livesay's veins. It's a passive 
game: no one is chasing or attacking you. If Graham meets his demise, it 
will be his (the player's) own fault. Thematically, it's not too different 
from Miner (collect things, avoid things, and do it before time runs out), 
but they aren't by any means the same game. 

The Heist is big. Three rooms take up the space where twelve would 
have fit in Lode Runner or Hard Hat Mini proportions. The plus is that 
conveyor belts, paintings, sculptures, plants, and dinette sets contain 
much more visual detail than would have been possible on a smaller 
scale. Paintings look just as weird as anything you'd find in a gallery of 
modern art. Even the furniture 1ms that "museum" look. 

The minus is that the game goes to the disk to change screens every 
time Graham Crackers gets to the end of a room, which takes about 
seven seconds from one side to the other. 

Escalators, elevators, and gaps between floors are in strategic loca- 
tions. To go from one room to the one above might require running sev- 
eral rooms across, two flights up, and one flight down. A map of the mu- 
seum sure helps. 

An aspect of Miner that had some players grumbling was that if they 
blew it they'd have to start the level over again, covering the same 
ground that had been covered before. The Heist doesn't do that: objects 
that have been collected don't have to be collected again after you lose 
a Graham i low ever, he doe* have to start over from the firs; room of 
the museum, which means he'll encounter the same hazards he managed 
to squeak by the last time around. 




Components of the game are executed very well — animation, color, 
layout, and point schemes. What's missing from the game is a feeling of 
continuity. You know that the game takes place inside a museum consist- 

3$ 



ing of sixteen three-room screens, but it feels more like sixteen different 
three-room museums. What a difference a few seconds between screens 
makes! 

Nonetheless, TJir Heist is fun, captivating, challenging, and quite 
playable. Don't be fooled by how simple it looks. A lot of strategy and 
concentration is required to do even moderately well. MY 
Adam, Apple, $40; Commodore 64, $35. Joystick required. Micro Fun. 2699 
Skok.e Valley Road, f-hghland Park, IL 60035; (312) 433-7550. 

Lights! Camera! Action! 
Movie Maker 

By Eric Podietz and Guy Nouri. 
Atari. 

The screen darkens, a leader counts down from ten to one, and Movie 
Maker's demo disk is off and running. Several short cartoons, each last- 
ing about twenty seconds, exploit the utility's capabilities. By far the 
best sequence is a Chaplinesque saga with The Little Tramp gathering 
flowers for his ladylove. 

Impressive stuff — even more so after examining the program itself. 
A microscopic, five-frame "movie" of a log falling down — accompanied 
by the descending pitch of a single sound track — took an hour to pro- 
duce. An unbelievable amount of painstaking work must have gone into 
the creation of that demo. 

Motif Maker — available later this spring for the Apple, IBM PC. and 
Commodore 64 — is an enormously clever package that is. alas, com- 
pletely impractical for the average user on two counts: (I) Most home 
systems have one disk drive, and while it's possible to manipulate the 
program with just one, the necessary disk swaps are tedious and will 
quickly wear out ihe hatchway springs. (2) Most users don't possess the 
artistic skills needed to produce smooth animated action. 

Animation with Movie Maker works as it does in the Disney studios. 
Pages of drawn image;,, each slightly different from the last, are rapidly 
flipped (in this case, by the computer) to produce an illusion of move- 
ment. The user must first create the image and then modify it to produce 
a series of composite pictures. Even a simple goldfish is hard to animate 
cleanly; fin and tail movement must be coordinated with the ripple of 
the body. 

Movie Maker does nothing to help build those intermediate images. 
Design is accomplished with a joystick in graphics 7, and smooth curves 
are particularly difficult to draw. Once the shapes are complete, they 
are put together into a sequence. At this point, special effects may be 
added; slow motion, zoom (image enlargement), or sound effects, A 
background is added. A final smoothing process removes the flicker, and 
the finished film is stored for subsequent viewing. 

Movies can only be watched, however, with the Movie Maker disk. 
To add finished sequences to a program in progress, you'll need the pro- 
fessional version from Interactive Picture Systems. 

The package comes with several shape pages, all of which were 
used in the creation of the demo programs. Practice sequences can be 
made with these shapes, hut very little reward will come from close du- 
plicates nf preexisting cartoons. I'.venl ually. users will wish to design 
their own shapes; that will be difficult without extensive knowledge of 
perspective, scaling, and anatomy. 

A further limitation is the sound library. Movie Maker has four voices, 
each with eight noises; those thirty-two pops and whistles represent the 
total spectrum of available sound. As the instructions state. "It is not 
possible to make new (sound) files." Sixteen of the thirty-two are two 
eight-tone scales of differing pitch; the others are primitive explosions 
and putt-putt-putts. 

Nor is color used with much cleverness. Because of the graphics 7 
mode, each finished film is limited to four colors. The colors can be 
changed easily, which allows for shading effects thiit give the illusion of 
added colors, assuming that one understands the principles of shading. 

The ninety-page instruction manual, though logically constructed 
and easy to read, occasionally omits important steps. Sound effects can't 
be used {or previewed) without first putting a shape file in memory, and 
the introductory example ignores a critical menu command. A left-hand- 

36 



ed adjustment is made by pressing escape, rather than select, as the book 
instructs. 

Difficult as it is to dislike the idea behind Movie Maker, it's just as dif- 
ficult to use the program, DB 
Atari. 48K: disk. $60 from Interactive Picture Systems, Reston Publishing. 
1 1480 Sunset Hills Road. Reston, VA 22090; (703) 437-8900. 

Play Ball! A Preview 

Digit-Ball 

Apple, IBM. 

Anyone who has played video games in the local arcade has prob- 
ably noticed that the track ball used in games like Centipede and Missile 
Command gives more accurate control than the various buttons, levers, 
and joysticks used by other games. Even the Apple II 's hi-res joystick 
can't really match a track ball for control. Rut while the industry biggies 
have yet to overcome the problems of putting a track ball in an Apple II, 
a newcomer already has. 

Interfirm Systems Corporation of San Jose. California, has un- 
leashed the Digit-Ball on an unsuspecting market, pulling off tricks 
that TG Products and Wico have so far been unable to perform. Wico's 
effort is a good solid track ball that works with no existing games. It 
only gives the Apple input through a peripheral slot, and without game 
I/O port support you might as well try to use your printer as a game con- 
troller. The TG track ball is — well, has anybody ever really seen a TG 
track ball? 

In fact, technical experts and other arcade junkies at Sl.Game have 
seen a prototype of the Digit-Ball, and we are impressed. Rumor has it 
that representatives of Wico saw it in action at a computer show and 
were afflicted with white faces and shaky knees. But that's just rumor, 
and we deal in facts at St. Game, pretty much. 




The fact is that the Digit-Ball is one impressive product. It plugs into 
a slot in the Apple, making it at least superficially similar to the Wico 
ball — similar in all the right ways. Wico uses the advantage of the slot 
to make the track ball moderately intelligent. That is. it offers a few dif- 
ferent resolutions, electronic positioning, and other goodies. Digit-Bull 
uses its interface in similar ways. Where the two balls differ is the game 
I/O port question. The Digit-Ball has a strap from its interface card to 
the game port, so it will work with all present and future joystick-based 
games. 

Anyone at all electronically oriented will appreciate this: A joystick 
takes the analog signal created by your hand moving the stick and sends 
it to the game I/O port, where the computer must translate it into digital 
terms before it cun deal with it. The Digit-Ball interface card takes the 
analog signal from the ball, translates it into digital form, acts on it (per- 
forming autocentering, resolution, and wraparound transformations), 

and then ron verts it hark to a pseiidoan.ilog signal ln-hire sending it tu 

the game I/O port. In other words, this track ball seems to operate on an 
ana log- to-d ig i ta I -t o-a n a log - to-d ig i ta I cone ep t . 

This might sound inefficient, hut that's the price of joystick compati- 
bility. Actually, it's no less efficient than regulur joystick input, because 
all of the preprocessing is performed by the interface card, not the Ap- 



pie's 6502. The Apple uses a delay timer to read the joystick, which in- 
evitably slows the game down. 

If a program is written specifically for the Digit-Ball, it can bypass 
the delay timer and read the hall considerably faster hy looking directly 
at the interface card instead of the game I/O port. It's so simple to read 
the ball directly, in fact, that publishers of joystick games would be well 
advised to provide it as an option, the way they support the Mocking- 
board sound and speech synthesizers. The time saved could be used to 
speed up the game or give it fancier sound effects. 

The main advantages of the Digit-Ball are the various custom set- 
tings it allows. A joystick can have selectahle autocentering and slide- 
wheels to control where the center is, but that's about it. Further, the 
more features of that kind it has, the more moving parts are involved, 
and the more moving parts, the greater the likelihood of a breakdown. 
The Digit-Ball has those abilities and more, hut as they are controlled 
electronically rather than mechanically, they are likely to be more re- 
liable in the long run. 

Default settings for all features are set by DIP switches on the inter- 
face card. These settings determine how the ball will behave when the 
machine is first booted. For instance, the recommended setting makes 
the ball behave like a joystick with centering. This setting is useful for 
g.imes jikr !'ih-Mir, (li.it nnlv respond lu movements ni the stick away 
from the center. Autocentering mode is practically useless for programs 
in which a cursor on the screen follows the movements of the ball pre- 
cisely; unless the ball is actually rolling, the position it returns is always 
the one defined as center (in order for the hall to he compatible with as 
many games as possible, the center can be set to any point in the 
256-by-256 range). 

With autocentering, the ball position is always "springing" back to 
the center. The Digit-Ball also offers software centering, in which the 
position only centers when a program tells it to. For situations where 
autocentering is inappropriate, it can be turned off entirely. 

I here are .1 lot ol other options available for customizing the Digit- 
Ball's behavior. Some may hi used frequently; others you may never use 
at all. For instance, it has seven different "resolutions." with ratios 
ranging from 1:1 to 6-4: 1 . This means that you can have each turn of the 
ball translate to either a small motion on the screen, or to a larger one. 
The lower-resolution setting simulates very fast spinning of the ball, 
which is good for some arcade games. The higher resolution allows the 
fine control that is useful for graphics design or mouse-type applications. 
Resolution is set with a combination of switches and jumpers on the in- 
terface card. 

Since the screen has a finite number of positions, there is a way to 
have the ball react intelligently when the tracking position reaches an 
"edge." There are two options; It can stick to the edge position, or it can 
wrap around — that is, jump to the opposite position. However, since 
there are four edges, the Digit-Ball has independent settings for each 
edge. This is an example of an option you may never use. but if you ever 
want to. you'll be glad it's there. 

Another option is freezing an axis. This allows you to draw perfect 
horizontal or vertical lines if you're using a drawing program. A related 
option will be appreciated by left-handers. Normally, the buttons are on 
the side of the ball that would be most comfortable for a right-handed 
person. Turn it around and a left-hander is comfortable with it, except 
that it moves the ship/cursor/whatever in the wrong direction. Change a 
jumper on the interface card and it's a true left-handed track ball. 

The Digit-Ball is a sturdy device. It seems to be well put together 
and capable of surviving normally violent game-playing activity. (How- 
ever, bashing it on the table when you miss the high score by five points 
is considered to be abnormally violent, in case there was any doubt.) DD 
Apple, IBM. $99 from Interfirm Systems, 1899 Montford Court, San lose. CA 
95132: (108) 923-3338. 

Dragons 3, Threads 
Dragonridcrs of Pern 

By The Connally Group. 
Atari, Commodort 64. 



As in the series of novels by Anne McCaffrey on which it is based, 
Draqonridm of Ptm re-creates a climactic encounter between Man and 
Nature. 

For two generations, the people of the planet Pern have paid little 
attention to Red Star, a planet with an irregular orbit — an orbit that oc- 
casionally enters Pern's own. Now. however, the life forms on Red Star 
have come to desire the more hospitable climate of Pern and are seeking 
to bridge the gap that separates the two planets. Whenever Red Star 
comes close, silver Threads rain down through Pern's atmosphere upon 
the unsuspecting population. 

These aren't ordinary threads. They're Threads. Threads devour all 
organic matter that gets in their way. That includes plants, animals, and 
people. In Draqonriders. the object is to assure the people of Pern that you 
can effectively battle the deadly Threads. 

This game reveals itself not only as a faithful rendition of Anne Mc- 
Caffrey's trilogy, but also as a marvelous strategy and arcade game. As 
many as four people can play, each responsible for a different Weyr 
(battlestation), which protects the colonies. 

As Weyrleader. you must forge alliances with Hold (colony) leaders 
and craftmasters who can aid you in battling the Threads. Here's where 
good judgment of character comes in handy. Delicate negotiation with a 
Hold leader may work, but sometimes a direct approach is a better bet. 
Sometimes inviting a leader to a dragon hatching will put you in the 
leader's favor; sometimes inviting one to a wedding will score points. 
Politics is involved, and playing the social game is important. 

The ultimate threat of falling Threads is impossible to ignore. The 
name of the Hold and the Weyr sworn to protect it are revealed on- 
screen, and the first player to push the fire button becomes committed to 
that Hold's defense. Now it's fightin" time. Thread fighting is executed 
in arcade fashion, with dragons responding to players' joysticks. The ar- 
cade action is engrossing and adds much to the richness of what is other- 
wise a strategy game. 

Thread fighting is vital to your success as a Weyrmaster. The 
Thread attack adjusts automatically to your expertise as the game pro- 
gresses, becoming more challenging each time. 

Dragonridcrs of Pern is much more than entertainment — it's an experi- 
ence. Once play is under way, hours pass with little notice. Outstanding 
programming skills have brought the excitement of McCaffrey's fantasy 
adventures to the computer. This one's destined for fame, as are those 
who become successful Wcyrleaders. HGL 
Atari, 32K, Commodore 64 disk. $40 from Epyx, 1043 Kiel Court, Sunnyvale. 
CA 94089; (408) 745 0700. 

Call Him Dr. Joystick 

Julius Erving and Larry Bird Go One-on-One 

By Eric Hammond. |ulius Erving. and Larry Bird. 

Apple. Commodore 64. 

This is the sports game of 1984. 

Apples have seen their share of computerized bowling, race car driv- 
ing, football, baseball, horse racing, skiiing. decathlon, and who-knows- 
how-many golf simulations. Some were good, some were bad. Trouble 
is, most of them looked and felt like computer games. 

Put 'em away. Here's One-on~One. a game that feels like the real 
thing. 

It's Julius Erving against Larry Bird — two of basketball's Finest. One 
person can play against a computer-controlled Julius Erving or Larry 
Bird, or two people can play, each controlling a different player. Big 
deal, right? Right. 

The big deal is all the stuff Eric Hammond put into One-on-Om, with 
some advice from the game's title characters. Slam dunks, finger rolls, 
fade-away jumpers, instant replay, fouls, shattered backboards. They're 
all there. 

Erving 's and Bird's respective strengths and weaknesses arc what 
take an already fantastic game and turn it into something excitingly real. 
For example, Bird, the more powerful of the two, is able to bully Erving 
under the net more, while Erving's slick moves often leave Bird in the 
dust. Bird's a better outside shooter than Ervmg, but it's hard to tell un- 

toonh/afifii *&/ EGBEGB 31 



less you're playing against a human opponent. Fatigue, hot streaks, and 
cold spells also enter nun i he game. 

' Although each player's shooting percentages are included in One-on- 
One. the program also checks out a number of things when calculating if 
the shot should go in; How close is the defensive player? Are you releas- 
ing the ball at the apex of your jump? Were you shooting on the run? 

Four levels of play (park and rec, varsity, college, and pro) make it 
easy to learn the subtleties of the game gradually while enjoying victory. 
Or defeat. Play the pro level for a challenge: go back to park and rec if 
you feel like wiping out a computer opponent. 

Even nonathlctes have a fair chance at heating the computer or art' 
iithcr pl.iver. Km knowing a little about real-life basketball doesn't hurt 
Remember, the computer knows almost as much about basketball as 
does Hammond, a formidable player himself. 

Playing against another person produces a fairer game than playing 
against the computer. For one thing, the computer knows the optimal 
time to release the ball: on defense, it moves when you move: and at the 
college and pro levels it steals the ball easily, leaving you disgruntled 
after having made a great defensive rebound. 

On the other hand, it's not too hard to screen the computer's player 
after it shoots, leaving the loose ball yours for the taking. Running out 
the clock (if you're leading or if you want to reduce your player's fa- 
tigue) is a cinch; the computer doesn't know enough to come after you 
and make you play, 

A sorely missed feature is the real-life ability to stop dribbling and 
hold the ball; the only time you can stop dribbling is when you're jump- 
ing to take a shot. Because of this, it's not possible to fake the opponent 
into going the wrong way while you drive for the hoop. 

But we'll let Hammond off the hook for that. It would be like criticiz- 
ing George Lucas for not filming Return oj the Jedi on location in outer 
space. 

The weird thing is that after a few rounds with One-on-One. you'll 
forget about the computer and really feel like you're on the court with 
Dr. ) of Mr. Bird. Don't be surprised if you get the urge tq go out and 
shoot some jumpers in the driveway after you've finished playing. 
No lie. ■ , 

Highly addictive, thrilling, sometimes frustrating, and always involv- 
ing are ways to describe Qne-on-One. It's a winner, MY 
Apple. Commodore 6*. disk. One or two joysticks required. $40 from Electronic 
Arts. 2755 Campus Drive. San Mateo. CA 94403: (4 15) 571-71 71. 

No Restaurant at the End 

U n ive rse 

By Thomas R. Carbone and William G.M. Leslie HI 
Atari. 

16.000.000.000 years ago ... the universe begins 
4,000,000 years ago . . . man emerges 
380 years ago ... the USSC Gerardus enters hyperspace 
320 years ago . . . the hyperspace booster is discovered 
221 years ago . . . Axia is colonized 

4 months ago . . . communication with Earth is mysteriously hroken 
1 5 days ago . . . evidence of a second hyperspace booster is found 
Now ... the need for a hero has never been greater 

That dramatic introduction scrolling up a darkened screen, accon 
panied by Brian D. Swan's pulsating electronic prelude, sets the stage 
for Omnitrend's Universe. 

This four-disk package is a complex space simulation with more 
detail than most players could imagine. Every facet of space exploration 
is covered thoroughly, from asteroid mining to orbital piracy. The game 
does not (ust provide methods for space captains to earn their first 
million credits: additional intrigue comes with the unexpected loss of 
contact with home-planet Earth. 

Nowhere is it written, however, that a simulation should take the 
same time expected of its real-life counterpart. (Who would want to 
play an eight-hour game that simulated the process of sleeping?) Al- 
though Universe is fascinating for its intricacy, a lethargic running speed 
and endless disk swaps make it very, very slow going. 

3t llEEKB c^fyba^a-a^^ ^^^[f^/^ u t_ 



Universe is packaged in a big three-ring binder that contains an 
eighty-page instruction manual and several reference charts. The in- 
structions are clearly written and intelligently organized, but the volume 
of information makes quick comprehension a feat of truly superhuman 
understanding. Neophyte captains should plan on several false starts and 
at least one wasted evening. 

The hero-to-be begins in the Central Bank of Axia, in search of a 
loan (this game doesn't omit anything). After establishing a payback 
schedule, the player receives a standard "merchant's loan package." 
which includes the bare essentials necessary to buy and operate a star- 
ship. The ship itself may be one of ten styles, each uniquely fast, large, 
or expensive. 

The next step is to load all that new equipment. Each section of the 
ship must be stuffed with hulls; the player starts with thirty-one hulls, 
exactly enough to contain the initial supply of parts. More hulls must be 
purchased to make room for additional equipment. 

Aside from the machinery necessary to operate the ship, other parts 
include an orbital shuttle (for hops between the ship and various 
planets), a cryogenic vault (for the transport of passengers), crew quar- 
ters, and a supply of fuel. Immediately after stocking the ship, the player 
must purchase provisions and find a crew (a minimum of fifteen is sug- 
gested, ten to man the ship and five to control the shuttle). Attempting 
to do anything without a crew immediately terminates the game. 

Preparation time can take up to an hour. If anything is done out of 
sequence, the player must start all over and suffer through another 
round of lengthy introduction. 

Some of the remaining credits should be spent on Ore IV, which is 
used as fuel. The fifteen thousand units of ore included in the loan pack- 
age will not suffice for even one warp jump to the nearest star. 

Having stocked his ship, the new captain will find himself in a stan- 
dard orbit around the planet Axia of the star system Hope, As in real 
life, everything revolves around the mighty buck (or in this case, credit), 
so the first requirement is a source of income. 

There are several such sources, although only two are practical for 
new captainsr passenger transport and trading. The former is performed 
"easily: emigrants are ferried from a planet with surplus population to 
one that needs folks. Potential travelers must, however, have a sophisti- 
cation level (rated on a scale from 1 to 1 00) of at least I but no more 
than 1 higher than the planet to which they are taken, 

By a happy coincidence, the nearest star (Prisa) has a planet. Zeath. 
which is four sophistication points lower than Axia. Each emigrant from 
Axia to Zeath is worth roughly two thousand credits. It doesn't work 
the other way around, though: passengers may not be taken from Zeath 
to Axia. Another planet, one with an even lower sophistication level, 
must he found for Zeath 's eager travelers. 

Although the ship's cryogenic vault can store up to one hundred peo- 
ple, the shuttle only holds three at a time. (Due to a programming glitch, 
however, that same shuttle can take more than three down from the ship 
to a planet surface.) "No problem," thinks the fledgling captain. 
"Thirty-three quick shuttle trips from starport to ship will have that 
vault filled in no time." 

The operative word, alas, is "quick," and a shuttle trip is anything 
but. A one-way journey takes between three and five minutes (real 
time), during which the only action on the screen is the boring altitude 

indicator: "315 KM 307 . . . 298 . . . 297. . . ." Ten-minute round 

trips make the notion of thirty-three hops rather unsettling. Some shut- 
tles have larger capacities, but (of course) they cost more. 

Trading is also accomplished at a starport. This is the game's best — 
and fastest — feature. The "Buyer's Board" resembles a huge stock ex- 
change: Hundreds of weirdly named commodities zip in and out of ten 
slots while the captain blinks in confusion. Selections are made by hit- 
ting the corresponding keyboard number, but be sharp: While the eyes 
drop from the screen to the keyboard, that 500-credit lot of Indrusegg 
may have been replaced with a 200,000-credit lot of Qui-hieh Kiff-dro. 

Commodities are not identified at the time of purchase and can be 
classified only if the ship computer possesses the Marketing Program 
(not included in the basic package). At 1 ,500 credits it's a wise invest- 



merit, because all commodities have unusual names; it would be difficult 
to guess whether haefiscz is food, medicine, or an alien life form. 

Other forms of income include mining and piracy. Both require con- 
siderable equipment not included in the loan package, so they ace not im- 
mediately practical. Mining is accomplished on any suitable planet, al- 
though hostile natives first must be "persuaded" to move. Ore obtained 
from the mining operation can be taken to a starport and converted into 
credits. Piracy involves boarding and taking control of another space- 
ship. If the skirmish is successful, the ship's contents are awarded to the 
marauder. 

Journeying to another star system involves several time-consuming 
steps, all of which must be performed in the proper order. After shut- 
tling from a starport back to the ship, the captain must return to a Stan- 
dard orbit of at least 20,000 km. (Trying to warp out in a lower orbit 
will damage the warp engines.) The computer then sets a course and dis- 
plays the energy needed for the trip. (That fuel requirement is given in 
Energy Units rather than Ore IV; the instructions do not explain the cor- 
respondence between the two, and it's not one to one.) 

If the computer finds enough Ore IV for the trip, the ship enters 
hyperspace and zooms to the chosen star system. After leaving warp 
space, a solar scan finds the desired planet and charts a course for it 
(more energy required). Warp travel is not precise, so this portion of the 
trip varies; you might land directly adjacent to the target, or halfway 
across the solar system. After establishing a standard orbit, descent to a 
lower orbit for shuttle access completes the trip. 

Total time required here is about half an hour. Much of that is 
wasted while slow graphics routines tediously draw pictures that have 
no hearing on the game. Also aggravating are the numerous disk swaps 
needed to perform any operation. Every individual command involves 
transferring information from a game disk to the player disk. The 
instructions contain no reference to using a second disk drive; that op- 
tion should be first on Omnitrend's list of improvements. 

Universe can be saved and reloaded at a later date. Since the entire 
player disk is filled with information, a game cannot be saved more than 
once per disk, A backup copy (which would eliminate the need to start 
from scratch in case of a disaster) can be made at the same time, but the 
process takes more than five disk swaps. The DOS function "Dup Disk" 
performs the job much faster. 

The only other drawback is the rather capricious manner in which 
death can strike. A routine shuttle flight might end in tragedy when the 
craft is destroyed; this random element is uncontrollable and results in 
much anguish, considering the time invested. It is therefore advisable to 
copy that player disk every day or so. 

The concept, imagination, and detail behind Universe are superb. 
Were it not for the slow speed, it would be a perfect game. As it is, the 
time factor might make it inaccessible to those with mundane require- 
ments in their lives — such as working, eating, and sleeping. DB 
Atari. 48K: disk. $89.95 from Omnitrend Software, Box 3, West Simsbury, CT 
06092: (203) 658-29<H. 

Snug in Dt Rug 

D-Bug 

By Child Ware. 
Atari. 

Bia fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite 'em: 
And little fleas have little}: fleas, and so on infinitum. 

—Robert A. Heinlein 

Definition of the word "feature": a bug as described by the marketing 
department. 

— Apple II Reference Manual 
A game within a game, D~Bug begms on a page representing the var- 
ious parts of a computer with RAM, graphics, sound, and CPU modules 
neatly compartmentalized. Even the I/O port and power supply (com- 
plete with rotating fan) are represented. 

Here you may select your player options: one or two players, bug or 
no-bug mode, skill level, and your animated game character— Moc Dem, 
Dot Matrix, or M.A.X. the Mechanized Antibug eXpert. 



Once you've made your selections, you may either take a tour of the 
system or go straight to the game — Gotcha! 

Gotcha is a deceptively simple-looking strategy game composed of a 
screen that displays rows of two distinctly different shapes, butterflies 
and sailboats, randomly scrambled. The object of the game is to "col- 
lect" more of your objects than your opponent can of his. 

By selectively collecting only those pieces that force the cursor into 
an area surrounded by your men. you can force your opponent into pick- 
ing up your pieces, thus giving you the points. 

When no more pieces can be picked up within the cursor range, the 
game is finished and the player with the most points wins. 

Simple, right? 

That's not why they call it D-Htta. 

[ust when you really get into it and think you've mastered the 
strategy, all hell breaks loose! 

The screen breaks up. or flashes, or fills with random garbage. The 
musical game accompaniment crackles with static. Boot errors occur. 
Glitches of all description crash the system. Just like the real thing 1 

So it's back to the system page, climb out onto the screen, and try to 
hunt down those pesky bugs. 

Running your man across the screen to the prohlem module causes 
him to flash brightly— on the lower skill levels only; after that you're on 
your own. Press the fire button and. like Tron. you enter the nerve com- 
plexes of the "computer." 




Each uniquely individual module logically depicts its true function, in 
both graphics and symbols. 

The graphics module has that distinctive Atari rainbow rippling 
down across its background. Game pieces can be selected here and will 
later appear in Gotcha. 

Scrolling smoothly in and out, l/O's background of arrows visually 
represents the flow of information through the computer. The sound 
module has musical notes that will alter the game sounds when selected. 
RAM's got binary bits updating at high speeds in symbolic bytes. The 
power supply has a fuse and the occasional wiring short. 

Perhaps the most interesting and informative module in the system is 
the CPU itself, with its active logic gates switching away in their own 
logical fashion. 

Now to find the bug. 

The modules usually have chips (power supply notwithstanding)— ei- 
ther RAM. ROM. or specialized ones that often go "flaky," producing 
the glitch. Again your little man goes running around the module looking 
for the bug, and once again — on the lower two skill levels — he flashes 
when he is standing over the fault. 

Often simply "stomping" on the chip will be enough to fix it. If the 
chip does need replacing, for a nominal price (paid in points), there is a 
computer store at the bottom of the screen where parts and services (in- 
cluding those of a costly repairman) are readily available. 

Of course, time to find and debug the problem costs you points, and 
there is a time limit. 



GO 10 page 51 



39 



THE STRATEGY SCENE 

Then S Mow... by William Harringioii 



Nowhere has the personal computer had a greater impact than in the 
way we play games. When the books are balanced, the financial 
statements made, and the reports written, the computer is ready to play 
another role, every bit as important, as an imagination machine. For 
centuries, games of chance and strategy have provided entertainment 
for both kings and paupers. Yet while our games may have changed 
over the years from the Sennet of the ancient Egyptians to Monopoly, 
the style and comem of uaiTiiny have changed little— until now. In the 
last few years, the introduction of personal computers into our homes, 
schools, and businesses has created a true revolution. This is the first 
machine that expands not only our strength or our senses, but our minds 
as well. 

But You Can't Fold Them Up. Unlike their board game ancestors, 
many computer games provide significant extras. Games can often he 
saved in progress, without the worry of finding a place secure from 
curious pets and the like. Some games can "kibitz" on occasion and 
suggest a move to a perplexed player, while the more forgiving variety 
will even allow you to take back an injudicious move — something Uncle 
Harry would never have allowed! And last but not least, the personal 
computer is programmable, unlike dedicated game machines that play 
only one game. Personal computers can play anything that the will and 
whim of their owners dictate. And they promise to remain as current as 
the best efforts of a legion of talented programming types can ensure. 

The ability to provide a ready opponent, and a challenging one at 
that, would be reason enough for many avid gamers to buy a computer. 
Beyond this, however, the continuing quest to give computerized oppo- 
nents enhanced capabilities places the game player at the very forefront 
of the quest for "artificial intelligence," that Holy Grail of computer 
scientists. Some computers, it seems, take their games very seriously. 

The man-machine battle is already over in that centuries-old game of 
chance and strategy, backgammon. A few years ago, the reigning 
human backgammon champion unceremoniously lost his crown to a com- 
puter. From all accounts, the gentleman took the loss pretty hard; the 
computer was unavailable for comment. 

It is m the ancient and venerable game of chess where the battle 
rages on. Since the very beginning of the modern computer age in the 
late 1940s, the creation of a competitive chess-playing machine has been 
a dream shared by computer scientists and chess players alike. This mod- 
ern "John Henry" match-up of human versus machine intellect goes on to 
this day. 

You might think that only supercomputers such as the dual processor 
Cray, running state-of-the-art chess programs, would be competitive in 
this rarefied world. After all. no machine or program has yet closed m 
on the Grand Master level of chess. Indeed, the universe probably won't 
be around long enough for even the fastest computer to fully exhaust all 
the possibilities in one chess game. Somehow, the human mind seems 
to analyze a chess game spatially, rapidly discounting certain possibil- 
ities while pursuing a promising line of attack to great depth. While 
| some chess programs attempt to emulate this "intuitive" style of play, 
; the brute-force approach has been the most prevalent — and the most 
5 successful. 

j The level of chess played on today's personal computers is rapidly 

J approaching tournament class. The Sargon family of chess programs by 
= Kathy and Dan Spracklin. culminating in Sanjon ///. has been joined by 

■* Larry Atkins's Chess 7.0 as the premier microcomputer-based chess pro- 

2 grams available. Recently, playing on an accelerated Apple 11, Sargon III 
» was entered in a chess tournament, and for the first time a microcom- 

'g, puter chess program defeated a rated Chess Master in tournament play, 
s At this writing, another chess master, with equally strong programming 
g credentials, ts developing a microcomputer -based chess program that he 

a believes will finally go on to beat a Grand Master. Who knows, the 
| reigning Russian chess champions may soon face a tougher American 
I competitor then Bobby Fischer for the world championship; the next 

s American challenger may be a computer! 



Old Players Never Die. Just as personal computers have brought 
new and exciting capabilities to ancient board games, so modern twen- 
tieth century games of strategy and tactics have found a place in the 
new medium. 

Modern board gaming began in the 1950s with the introduction of 
Tactics, a classic game of contemporary land army tactics, now twenty- 
five years old. These early games by a young, upstart company, Avalon 
Hill, and a growing host of competitors, soon created a considerable in- 
dustry and not a few sleepless nights for those who eventually became 
hooked. Modeled after the professional games long used by military 
planners, Avalon Hill's games had three key distinctions; They were 
based initially on historical battles or campaigns, were rigorously ac- 
curate, and, due to the economies of mass production, were easily af- 
fordable. (Why should the Joint Chiefs of Staff have all the fun?) Essen- 
tially, games of conflict resolution (war games) are mathematical models 
of all the variables inherent in a particular conflict. While the outcome 
of any particular game may vary greatly from the original battle or con- 
flict, the result must be valid— that is, based on all known facts, it could 
have happened that way. 

I listorical board games offer the unique ability to play and replay 
the great conflicts and battles of history. The haunting what-ifs of 
history serve as a dramatic backdrop for games that suspend the present 
and transport the player to other places and other times. These 
sometimes highly sophisticated simulations combine chance and skill in a 
demanding mental contest that often consumes entire weekends. Rang- 
ing from simulated military conflicts to games of political and economic 
competition, such as Diplomacy, they provide players with mind- 
stretching excitement and rare insight into the personalities and conflicts 
that have shaped the past and may well shape our future. However, a 
particularly warlike disposition isn't necessary to appreciate the excite- 
ment and intellectual challenge of tactical and strategic command. 

Games that attempt to model or simulate actual conflicts have long 
been used by strategic planners after gaining wide acceptance in the 
German state of Prussia during the Napoleonic Era. Perhaps the most 
famous example of modern war gaming occurred in 1942 when the |ap- 
anese navy commissioned a game to evaluate the outcome of a proposed 
attack on the American naval forces guarding the vital American base 
at Midway Island. To the mounting shock of the admiral assigned to ref- 
eree the game, three of the emperor's aircraft carriers were quickly sunk 
by the "American' side. The referee promptly disallowed the dis- 
quieting results, but a few months and four Japanese carriers later, the 
game was vindicated; the Japanese navy had suffered a humiliating 
defeat. 

The Postwar Game World. With the creation of affordable, highly 
detailed hiNtnnt board y.im,-s in the 1950s, a whole new class of 
challenging and popular board games entered the entertainment market. 
In these manual game systems, a hexagonal map board was usually sup- 
plied depicting things like variable terrain, roads, towns, and key areas. 
(The virtue of the hexagon, by the way, is that it can conveniently pro- 
vide a reference system while allowing the maximum degree of move- 
ment and positioning of individual units.) In addition, the number of 
variables concerned with unit movement and tactical positioning is 
manageable and understandable by the player or players. Precut card- 
board counters were used to record individual units, their location, 
movement, and status. To further add to the realism of the simulation, 
"nature" or "chance" was represented by a pair of dice. This basic form 
of the modern recreational war game has remained unchanged since the 
1 950s. Today, conflict simulations enjoy wide appeal, with a score of 
manufacturers supporting tens of thousands of historical board gamers. 

In exchange for all this realism and excitement, players must Face 
considerable complexity and have more than a little patience. Needless 
to say, the rules and regulations for this kind of gaming are both detailed 
and extensive. Becoming familiar with the rules of a game can be a ma- 
jor undertaking, and of course the rules vary from game to game. Fur- 

wmL/{Wi£ tQg*/ EEEEGEi *h 



thermore, the opportunity For an unintentional error is great. More than 
9 few friendships have suffered undue strain due to an innocent error on 
someone's part. Suspending the play of a manual board game presents 
its own set of problems. Having discovered that your spouse has just 
vacuumed under the bed where your game board was "safely" hidden 
can reduce even the strongest among us to tears! 

Look! Up on the Screen! What was needed, of course, was an elec- 
tronic Moses to lead us out of the wilderness of manual board gaming. 
Enter the microcomputer. The first microcomputer war game, which 
adhered to traditional board game conventions, was Computer Bis- 
marck, from a then-unknown company called Strategic Simulations, or 
SSI, as it came to be known. Computer Bismarck was based on the classic 
hunt for the World War II German battleship Bismarck by the British 
navy. This new computer-based game was a revelation. Gone was the 
traditional map board. In its place was a hi-res color screen of the North 
Atlantic. The computer served as the perfect game administrator; only 
"legal" moves were allowed, making game play infinitely more en- 
joyable. In addition, a save-game feature allowed a game to be saved in 
progress and reconstructed in a matter of seconds. And perhaps most 
revolutionary of all, provision was made for solitaire play, with the com- 
puter taking the role of opponent. The personal computer had discov- 
ered the personal war game. The most innovative feature of this and 
subsequent computer war games was the implementation of that most 
elusive concept, the fog of war. 

Long before the advent of computers (or war games, for that mat- 
ter), military strategists had recognized that war and the practice there- 
of constituted something less than an exact science. The unknown fac- 
tors that prey on the mind of every commander are sometimes referred 
to as "the fog of war." The leader of any military force, whether com- 
manding a naval task force, an army, or a simple Infantry squad, faces 
imponderable dilemmas that no amount of training or planning can re- 
solve. Not only are the true intentions and capabilities of the opponent 
frequently unknown, but the commander's knowledge of the state of his 
own forces may be imperfect. At any one time the disposition of friendly 
forces, their status and condition are known only in some vague, often 
dated sense. Communications, when available, may be garbled, intelli- 
gence estimates wildly inaccurate, and the command and control of dis- 
persed forces less than perfect. And beyond the human element lies blind 
chance. The vagaries of weather or a stray bullet killing a key com- 
mander represent factors that can make hash of even the most intricate 
batrleplan. 

Until recently, war game systems, both the professional and recrea- 
tional varieties, could only simulate in the most crude fashion the fog of 
war. As we pointed out earlier, the use of dice to simulate the random 
nature of chance in combat has long been a part of military-type games. 
Traditional manual systems usually imply a map board with all partici- 
pating units readily visible to participants — hardly a likely condition in a 
real battle. With the introduction of the computer, the missing elements 
of confusion and chance could be simulated without burdening game 



play or administration. The computer could easily conceal enemy 
dispositions, calculate weather, cloud cover, and so on, and in general 
simulate the feel of actual command. It may be that the computer has at 
last emerged as the medium of choice for historical board games. 

The Never-Ending Battle. The development of sophisticated soli- 
taire play with the computer as opponent has not ceased. One serious 
impediment, however, is the lack of a simple means to evaluate the so- 
phistication of computer players. Unlike chess or backgammon, which 
have a consistent set of rules and a game board, historical board games 
vary wildly. There simply is no good way to compare or evaluate the 
play of two computer opponents using different game systems. Here, 
extensive play testing by human players of proven capability is the only 
means of establishing and judging the capability of a computer opponent. 

Today, historical board gaming is dominated by Avalon Hill and SSI. 
Game systems have become generally more sophisticated, and computer 
game authors have attained some of the popular acclaim that formerly 
belonged to manual game designers. The settings of these modern com- 
puter simulations range from Avalon Hill's Legionnaire, a real-time 
simulation of ancient tactics in Gallic-Roman times, to SSI's Cosmic Bal- 
ance, a game of far-future intergalactic empire building. While SSI has. 
with some exceptions, stayed true to its all-computer game format. 
Avalon Hill has experimented with both all-computer and hybrid for- 
mats. For instance, Avalon Hill's Close Assault, a computerized version of 
the popular Squad Leader, employs a sophisticated computer opponent and 
administrator with a manual map board and counters — the best, per- 
haps, of both worlds. 

The latest development in computer war gaming is the introduction 
of so-called "monster" games, such as SSI's acclaimed Guadalcanal Cam- 
paign, that take anywhere from eighty hours or more to play and include 
every ship, plane, and unit known to have engaged in an entire cam- 
paign. Even the )omt Chiefs of Staff don't put in those kinds of hours! 

The present state of both traditional and modern board games is 
dynamic, to say the least. The continuing competition among game 
manufacturers ensures that the personal computer will have at least as 
significant an impact on our leisure time as on our professional lives. 
And for the future, the new sixteen- and thirty-two-hit computers from 
IBM and Apple offer some exciting possibilities. With faster processors 
and more memory, graphics should improve considerably. The mouse, 
that captivating little pointing device, seems an ideal game instrument. 
And of course anyone who has tried the user interface of Apple's Lisa 
and Macintosh can only wonder what games with "windows" would 
be like. 

All us Walter Mitty types, our imaginations running wild while star- 
ing from our office windows, have finally found what we've been look- 
ing for— an imagination machine. At last! 

Willutm tiamnaton has been, at various times, a war correspondent, a social worker, and manager 
nj a rtlait computer store. Prior to his current employment as Alienor oj product tiainint} with rlayden Soft- 
ware . lie was employed by a research and development firm in CAimbridae, Massachusetts, whett, among 
othti things, he worked with strattgn war dame systems. 



-And Later On by Sicuc Jackson 



Twenty years ago, if you had discussed the idea of computer games 
with a programmer (or anyone else knowledgeable in the field), you 
would have gotten a discussion of chess — and some speculations about 
the highly advanced strategy games that computers might offer by the 
1980s. 

That hypothetical 1 960s programmer would no doubt have been ut- 
terly amazed by a few of the developments we've seen since then. Some 
would have delighted him — the personal computer, for instance. Who 
could have dreamed, twenty years ago, that devices with this much 
speed and power would be common in homes? Today we take them for 
granted. In 1 960, they would have been science fiction. 

But our '60s programmer, if we brought him to 1984 and showed 



him the sights, would probably be crushed to see some of the things we 
do with our wonderful computers. 

Granted, arcade games are fun. But they use the computer's process- 
ing capacity, not to challenge our intellects, but to show us pretty pic- 
tures. That's why a lot of us are so pleased to see that, at long last, 
strategy games are getting the attention they deserve from program- 
mers and buyers. 

Generally speaking, a strategy game is any game in which the player 
controls forces in opposition to those controlled by another player, and 
where the player's intelligence is more important than his reflexes. A 
strategy game may be ahstract, like chess, or a simulation of reality, like 
most war games. Or, like many fantasy and science- fiction games, it 







may be somewhere in between. A strategy game is not a "puzzle," 
though it will usually include elements of problem solving. This article 
will draw its examples primarily from the war game field, but its predic- 
tions apply to games on any subject. 

The Computer as Referee. This is a function common to all game 
programs. By definition, the computer "knows" the rules of the game 
and applies them impartially. Whether your opponent is another human 
being or the computer program itself, part of any game program keeps 
track of the situation. It tells you where the units are (assuming you are 
entitled to know); informs you of each unit's current status; prompts you 
for orders for each unit; assesses each order given to determine whether 
it is legal {accepting only legal orders and correcting you when you at- 
tempt an illegal action): allocates new resources (raw materials, rein- 
forcements, or whatever); refers to charts and tables to determine the 
correct outcome of some actions and randomizes the results of others; 
and determines the final interactive outcome of all moves by both play- 
ers before displaying the status for the next move. Perhaps you've never 
given much thought to just how much referee work a good game pro- 
gram must do, but you've almost certainly cursed the failings of a poor 
program. 

So what can we expect from the next generation of robotic referees? 
Quite a bit, really. For instance: 

Mare complexity. That is, more variety in every phase of the game. 
The future should bring us faster hardware with more memory. That 
will free designers from the awful tradeoff decisions. More speed? Bet- 
ter graphics? Smarter strategies? More hard data? They can have 
them all. 

For one thing, more facts can be presented. Whereas today a mili- 
tary unit might be described by three or four factors, tomorrow's games 
will involve a dozen. Of course, some players don't want to deal with 
rations, ammunition supply, and the quality of leadership; they would 
rather stick with the tried- and- true factors — strength, unit type, and mo- 
rale. Fine. For them, we have a variety of results. There are dozens of 
things that can happen when a unit is attacked. We won't have to limit 
ourselves to forced retreats and numerical losses. We can have berserk 
counterattacks; lost leaders who force a healthy unit to hold in place un- 
til command can be reestablished; surrenders (with the administrative 
problems that all those prisoners will cause the enemy); abandonment of 
equipment during retreat; improvement of unit quality due to combat ex- 
perience . . . and much more. All in one game. And the beauty of it is 
that the player doesn't need to worry about it. The referee, his faithful 
computer, is rolling all the dice and looking at all the tables for him. 

Likewise, players will be permitted a much greater variety of op- 
tions. These may take the form of bargaining strategies in a political 
game, physical actions in an adventure, or unit orders in a war game. In- 
stead of "Move up two hexes and attack." a typical order might be 
"Move cautiously north, sending out scouts. Dig in and hold if light re- 
sistance is met, but withdraw immediately if confronted by a clearly su- 
perior force. If you travel three miles without meeting resistance, dig in 
and hold at the next stream crossing you encounter," 

More simplicity. No, this isn't a contradiction. As hardware changes to 
allow for more game complexity, it is to be expected (and devoutly 
hoped) that designers will learn more about user-friendliness. Of course, 
hardware can help here: The mouse is a perfect example. But creative 
programming, with icons, windows, and whatnot, will take gaming far- 
ther than the hardware will. Again, the object is transparency. The 
game may be complex, but players won't have to worry about the 
details. They just play. 

More speed. Already, some strategy games allow only a limited time 
for decision, blurring the distinction between "strategy" and "arcade" 
formats. Legionnaire comes to mind. This trend will continue, and in time 
we will see games that are true real-time simulations of battlefield or 
diplomatic situations. Using the information they would have in a real- 
life situation, players will have only as much time to make a decision as 
the real situation would allow. In fact, "game" may be the wrong word 
for these programs: they will be used for training and competency tests 
by businesses and the military. 



The Computer as Opponent. Most modern strategy programs al- 
low the user to "play against the computer." Different levels of diffi- 
culty are frequently offered, usually controlled by changing play bal- 
ance: At higher difficulty levels the computer has more units, "fires" to 
greater effect, and so on. Only in chess programs is the user likely to 
find an opponent that plays more or less skillfully as the difficulty of the 
game changes. This is because chess algorithms are highly developed, al- 
lowing the computer to "look ahead" a greater or lesser number of 
moves. The more you allow the computer to look ahead, the more 
skillfully it plays. The future should see similar developments for other 
games. Imagine a game of Eastern Front where, using the exact same 
setup and rules, you have your choice of facing a brilliant, good, 
average, or incompetent Russian general. 

A further development would allow players to shape their own op- 
ponent by modifying the decision algorithms that the computer uses to 
determine its moves. Can you teach a program to play so well that you 
can't beat it? We have already seen one small step toward this idea in 
Robotwar, which allows players to design their own combat robot pro- 
grams and set them on one another. 

The Computer as Mapboard. it almost goes without saying that 
increased speed and memory will lead to bigger and better map displays. 
The day is not far off when a designer will be able to spread his game 
map over as many screens as he likes and jump back and forth between 
them at will. Players will be able to see the whole of Europe at once, 
with points of light picking out the front lines; zero in on the Fifth 
Army's section of that front; and then pick out a single sector of a few 
square miles. 

Graphics will also be improved, the better to serve players. Here is 
where the years of arcade -gaming zaps and flashes will pay off. Never 
again will computer map displays look like copies of paper gameboards, 
with smudgy counters moved by an invisible hand. Shells will zip across 
the battlefield and explode on their targets; armies will march across the 
desert, raising clouds of dust; stricken ships will catch fire, list, and 
finally sink in a cloud of steam. It will all seem real. 

The Computer as Facilitator. A facilitator is someone who makes 
things happen. By itself, a computer can be a good opponent. Add a 
modem, and the computer becomes a window to a world full of op- 
ponents (or allies), all waiting for a game. And it remains the perfect 
referee — error-free and utterly fair — for all those games. 

Today, some services let users phone in to a mainframe and pick a 
variety of game services. Using Delphi, Plato, GameMaster, or InfoNet. 
a player can challenge the computer at a variety of games or play 
against one of the other "live" users. Systems like this are sure to 
become more numerous and more sophisticated with each passing year. 
In time, groups of players from all over the country will be able to get 
together — taking the parts of World War I doughboys. World War II 
fighter pilots, World War HI generals, or present-day negotiators in a 
geopolitical simulation — against similar groups of foes or against a very 
smart mainframe. 

And just as some play-by-modem services currently sponsor competi- 
tions for high arcade scores, the services of the future will allow players 
to compete for the best performance in Ogre. Eastern Front, or Midway. In 
fact, there will be two types of tournaments — those against computers 
and live ones involving human opponents. Faee-to-face game tourna- 
ments are likely to be largely replaced by modem tourneys in which 
players will challenge opponents thousands of miles away — without 
leaving home. 

Summing Up. One last prediction, The developments outlined 
above seem logical, so they're probably very conservative. Remember 
how surprised our 1960s computerman was to see home computers, la- 
ser disk animation, and arcade games? The computer scene in the year 
2000 is likely to be just as surprising. Hang on; it's going to be an in- 
teresting ride. $ 

Sttvt Jackson works, perhaps inevitably, at Stew Jackson Garnet in Austin. Texas, where he publishes 
Space Gamer. Fantasy Gamer, and Fire and Movement. W loirs Fridays off whenever he feels 
like it. ijittiy. he's been working with Andy Grrrafcrrg and L)rd Bntish on bringing his games Ogre 
and Car Wars to the home computer. 



STCAME 



NO CONTEST 




You love 'em: you hate "em: but now you can get paid for 'em. We 
warned you. We told you they were coming. And now they're here. It's 
time for Krosswotd Kapers, featuring John Redfield's winning Apple 
puzzle stylings from last July's Playtime contest, plus our very own 
Atari version for the rest of you. Can you puzzle out the game names 
from the clues provided? Apple people play Apple; Atari people play 
Aran; Commodore, Tl, TRS-80. IBM, and Adam folks play whichever 
you want. That's just our advice, of course: you can choose the system 
you're least familiar with for extra challenge. 

Send in a facsimile of your results; we'll worm out the infirm {some 
of you might get a perfect score), then draw from the highest scorers for 
the two winners — each receiving $100 cash or the equivalent value in 
software from advertisers in this magazine. 

Send your puzzles to: 



Generic Jitters, We've been getting some . . . interesting entries to 
the Plain Wrap contest. Eventually, we may have to open them. If you 
sEill haven't entered, you have until April I, In case you missed it the first 
time around, the idea is that you're supposed to send us something indi- 
cating your desire to enter a contest. If we think your entry is worthy of 
entering, you win first prize in the contest ($500). without there ever 
having actually been a contest. Nifty, no? Explaining it to the IRS is 
your problem. 

In Other News. The interestingly titled "Live Your Game" sweep- 
stakes has been announced by Micro Lab as a promotion for its game. 
Dim Egp. The sweepstakes winner and two guests will get a trip to 
Chicago to tour the Field Museum dinosaur exhibit. This includes air 
fare, a snazzy hotel room, pocket money, guided sightseeing, a visit to 
Micro Lab hq, and one certified genuine fossil. See your neighborhood 
software dealers for entry blanks. 



St.Krossword (Apple, Atari) 
Box 60 

North Hollywood, CA 91603 
Postmark deadline: April 10. 1984, 



Apple Softgames 



ACROSS CLUES 




Punkl (fctltd WKh i v j VUi ,. eopyrighr by I. ft S CdafaMnMm 



1 

4. 
7. 
10 

11 

13 

' 16. 
1/ 



SUCCESSFUL BOWLING BY PLANE. 
SHAKELIKE. 

THE HAY TO SPRAY A GOBLIN. 
THE THING TO DO AT THE VULCAN'S 
ISLE. 

JAMES F. COOPER MIGHT HAVE 
WRITTEN A GAME LIKE THIS 
SEEKING SUNKEN TRFASURF. AN 
ABLE SONG TO SING. 
IN WARS AND BATTLES THEY ATTACK 
NEVER TO BORE IF THEY GET BACK 
FIGHT THE EVIL BAD GUYS RAVEIN' 
BUT THE NOISE MAY CAUSE A 
CAVE IN. 

YOU PLAY . . ON YOUR CRT BUT 
WATCH IT KILL ON YOUR T V 
THE CODED CLUES RANGE NEAR AND 
FAR BUT THAT'S THE WAY THEM BEZ 
FOLKS ARE. 

THE ATTACK WAVE OF THE SPACE 
EGGS FUZZBALLS 
IF SAGEBRUSH DON'T CAUSE 
SCREAMING FITS ... THE HOLES ARE 
WHAT YOU'LL FIND THAT IT S 
UP THE CLIFF, IT GETS YOUR GOAT 
BUT PLACE THIS ON EACH SIDE OF 
MOAT 

THE KOMMRAOS NEED A LOT OF 
LUCK WHEN CHASING THIS CRIMSON 
OUCK. 

WHEN FIGHTING HARD WITHOUT A 
FEAR, THE PLACE TO GUARD BEHIND 
IS HERE. 

THIS IS THE PLACE WHERE ALL 
GAMES STOP 

NO KNOCK AS YOU JUMP UPON 
WHAT YOU CAN ALWAYS GET BACK 
ON. 

DE VOTE WAS TOOK DE NAYS TOO 
FEW DIS VOTE PASSED DE SPY'S RE- 
VIEW 

32 CHESS AND CHECKERS, OTHELLO, 
TOO, ARE PLAYED HERE, SO WHAT 
ELSE IS NEW7?7 
ITS MISSION IS AFTER IT FALLS. 
FEMALE HORSE PICTURES ADORN 
ALL ITS WALLS. 

TO SOME IT'S A JOYSTICK. A BALL OR 
A PADOLE . . . BUT ALL NEED SOME 
WAY FOR A GAME TO STRADDLE 
SHOOT EM OR JUMP "EM I'LL GRANT 
YOU THIS BUT YOU'LL DIE LIKE A 

DOG IF YOU CONTINUALLY 

THERE'S ONE ON OCTOS WITH MANY 
A BEAST, AND THERE MUST BE 3,000 
AT LEAST. 

A GAME LIMITATION: KEEPS 
EVERYTHING FROM HAPPENING AT 
ONCE 



21 



23 



H 



31 



.33 



3!) 



3,' 



3a. 



39 WHAT YOU DO TO THE GAME PADDLE 
POTENTIOMETERS TO CONTROL 
YOUR PLAYER. SHIP, OR PIECE. 

41. THE FINAL LIMITATION TO ANY PLAY 
NO MATTER THE SCORE 

42. ASK VENUS AT DAYBREAK IF HER 
DEMON IS THIS COLO. 

43. A GREAT PLACE FOR A CRISIS 

DOWN CLUES 

1 THEY DESCEND LIKE THE RAIN. 
AMBUSH AND DEFEND THEMSELVES 

PASSPORTS OR GREEN CARDS 
NOTWITHSTANDING. 

2 THE CHIEF REQUIREMENT OF 
TOURISTS ON RIGEl 

3 THE BOSS, GRASSHOPPER, ir YOU 
HAVE A YEN TO GO TO SEA 

4 A CRACK SHOT FOR AN 
INTERGALACTIC SWAT 

i A DEVICE USED TO SHOOT PIXELS 
6 DAS POLAR BIRO'S EAR SCHPLITTEN- 
LOU DEN. BOOMER 

8 A SINNER JUST HAS TO ESCAPE 
FROM HERE. 

9 DATS-A-MOST-AMAZEY TING I EBBER 
FELT. 

12. THE LAST STAND FOR A REVELATION. 

14 WHAT YOU HAVE TO BE TO EVEN 
BEGIN TO PLAY A GAME. 

15 AN AERODYNAMIC EOUINE; CLUE: 
WING IT. 

17 AM NOT TREE. AM SMALLER 

16 FAST FELLER, TRAVELS LIGHT, AND 
PACKS ON THE RUN 

19. NOT PER SE A CLUE. SO SACK 
TOWARD YOU 

25 MACK'S OCCUPATION ft APPAREL 
FROM SHOCKING DFSIGNS 

27. STRATEGICALLY SPREAD TO 
GARGANTUAN PROPORTIONS 

26 RIDER OF THE STARGATES. 
RETURNER OF HOSTAGES 

29. ONE WHO HAS BEEN FREITAGED, 
FIRE BUGGED. AND FRAZZLED. 

30 GEE MY BELLY COMES TO A POINT 
IN THE STRANGEST PLACE. 

31 THEY COME AS SEEDS OR ICED BUT 
THEY'RE EVIL AND SPICED 

32 MEDUSA WAS ONF, A PROTFCTOR TO 
DREAD, TILL PERSEUS CAME AND 
CUT OFF HER HEAD 

34 A CONDITION WHERE THERE ARE 

GOALS. OPPONENTS, BARRIERS. AND 
HULLS ALL IOCE1HEHON A 
PLAYING FIFI a 

40 WHEN YOU AHfc OUT OF AMMO OH 
YOUR GUNS HAVE HEATED UP A NO 
THE BAD GUYS ARE AFTER YOU S TO 
I .,, 



w 



Atari Attack 

ACROSS CLUES 

2 HORRIBLY SCARE ATHOS WHILE 
WELLINGTON BEATS QUAKERS 
MELODIOUSLY IN SPACE. 
5 REVERSE SOUNDS LIKE MALE. LEAP 
THROUGH BIG CIRCLE RANDOMLY 
REMEMBERING THE MINES. 
7, SHHH. CUB 1ST IC THREE-FIFTHS 

REBEL SURROUNDED ON THE OT 
9. EFFORTLESSLY BUT BADLY FLUB 

EXAM IN 3-0 BIPLANE INCIDENT 
I S. ROMANS FIGHT BARBARIANS ON HILL: 
IN SANTA CATALINA'S CAPITAL. TOO 
MANY FRENCH. FOREIGN. GROUP 
16 ALICE'S NEMESIS IS CONSIDERABLY 
FASTER THAN TIGERS IN THE SNOW. 
PIN BALL TO ROYAL SYMPATHY 
18 OK. KOZ. MfcSSY BUT LOGICALLY 

ADVENTURESOME: PARTLY. WITHOUT 
HESITATING, COME IN FOR TEA. 

19, SLOPPY PINE NESTER IS BESET BY 
SNAKELY CRITTERS. 

20. SAND BIT MALICIOUSLY BY THIEVES IN 
SHOOT -OUT, 

22. LEAD PIPE CINCH TO BESET MAC 
MOVERS. 

21 MONTGOMERY'S LAST MINGLES WITH 
DREAMER SOUNDING LIKE RAZOR ON 
LEG OF LAMB. 



DOWN CLUES 

1 TAKE HATCHET TO RETARDED OX 
ULTWttN HRIH SNOHfc ANU NO 
ANSWER 



3. CLEOPATRA S FLOOR NEEDS 
SWEEPING Rf CAUSE OF SINATRA'S 
HOTEL IN CAIRO: QUITE AN 
ADVENTURE 

4. FILMY SUCCESS BUT MONITORED 
WORTHLESSLY: ANO CAESAR, 

6. LISTEN TO ROYAL HILL WITHOUT 
CATCHING FIRE. MING CIRCA UN 
AMONG POOR NATO WITH HALF A 
KICK. 

8 VRAI. DERRIERE ET MAL ON SEINE 

INSECT REPELLENT USER. 
10 HALF THE ASSETS MAKE GAME ILLUME 

NASTILY LIKE HAMMURABI. 
1 I DEAOHEAOS BOMB THREE-QUARTERS 

SIZE. TERRIBLE CROSSES AND 

CROWNS. 

12 BO SHOPS CONFUSEDLY IN THE BEST 
STORES, BLASTING EVERYTHING IN 
SIGHT. 

13 GOOD YEAR'S OMEGA PEP LINE 
FLOATS THROUGH PSYCHEDELIA WITH 
SHAMUS'S MAKER. 

14 EVIL CHARON PITS CHESS AGAINST 
ARCADE. 

16, LISTEN TO FOOTBALL PLAYS WITHOUT 
YOU. DIVIDE riELD AND AVOID 
SHOCKING PLAYS AND FLYING STUFF 

17 BACK WATCH WARNS OF VESUVIUS: 
SHOOT THEM FIRST, 

21. SHORTLY FUNNY GAME IS LORD OF 
REVERSALS. DESPITE FAMILY THEME 

23. AMERICAN EXPRESS CARD PAYS 
INITIALLY FOR PROGRESS INTO FAR 
SPACE. 



■Vy 
P 


m 


m 






$ 


m 

v.y 


ffi 
m 








■ 


















































- B - P -;— 


SB 








if 


a;? 

■if 


■■■■^ 

ii* 




VjV 


::>!; 
"iv!" 


vlv 




ra 


-: : : : : 
















St 


■'■'■!■ 


-'■!-!■ 




t> 








lr 






+4+ 


w 




'}(? 




ri : >t 






i 


■!■■!■ 

Si" 


1 1 






sS 


+w 




i;-:-;; 














;!;!;'- 
St 


u 








w£ 












¥^ 




m 








¥S 


■>;"." 










Wf 




S^ 


S¥ 




n 


Of 


-v-'. 











S5 




as 


- -» 

- . 4, ,-.H 










4^ 





+^+ 










i s 






■ 


T-l- 

■ ■ - - 


*V*'- 

".---■< 

V.V 


+iS 








ViV 




AM 




— 




■yvi 




Si 














. 1 




























7-1 










w. 




9U 








.'.v. 

ffi 




si 






ss 


n 




M 


m 
M 
















.■- . . 

ViV 






ii 
















IS 




















''' 
















m 
f+++ 


Sv 




Mi 
M 




Si 




| 


aw 






£!£ 










IB 








iV: 
S¥ 


:■: : : 

Si 








! xs 






Si 




+*+ 


■ : : : 

v-i- 




-X- ■ 






-.v.- 




i 


i 


as: 


•m 


£& 
m 


m 




v.- L - 

+4+ 






























• 


+++ 


i 


m 




i 




<-:-> 
m 








-.-!-,- 
















'.".-:" 






H 






21 






























H 


H 




aa 








. ... ■ 












i- V « 

VW1 


—TT 

-,- 
V • « - 












as: 


.,■1 


















ffi 


■■->.- 

Si 


S¥ 


---S 






-H+ 


i 


.'.'J J 

I 


— : 
oiyi 


f i-ii 


: ".'l . 




l-iV 






"■•■•■1 




Aid 




iilii 






Eiiiu 






■.* 




a?> 



^CIRCLE^ 



Disk Don'ts. Someone once said, "Experience is the best teacher. 
She gives the test first and then the lesson afterwards." If that's true, 
then some contestants in the Symbolism contest have sure had some 
strange lessons. 

We refer, of course, to what not to do with a disk. Most disk sleeves 





warn you against the obvious: don't fold disks; don't magnetize them: 
don't leave them in the hot sun; don't use them to pick the spinach of a 
spinach quiche from between your incisors. It's the less obvious ones and 
more imaginative ones that catch our eye, tickle our fancy, make us 
smile, and prompt us to throw $200 into some reader's face. 

A few of these were sent in by Bob Martin (Rochester, NY), whose 
four best disk don'ts appear here. (By the way. the January- February 
issue was the first one Martin had seen. It's nice to see that he's getting 
into the St.Game spirit already.) 

As promised, Martin will receive a box of ten disks and $200 worth 
of games for his Atari 800, along with some warnings about what not 
to do with them. 

This Isn't the Plain Wrap Contest. There seemed to be some con- 
fusion regarding the rules of the Symbolism contest. The Plain Wrap 
contest let readers make up their own rules. Symbolism did not. "Send 
in four of your best." That's what we said, and that's what we meant. 
Four does not equal six. Four does not equal twelve. And recently we 
verified that four does not equal fifteen. But that didn't stop people from 
sending in more than four disk don'ts. In the cases where contestants 
sent in more than four, sometimes we picked the four we liked best: 
other times we just picked the first four, throwing away the others that 
might have been better. Guess we'll never know, huh? 

Then there was Rosalie Meyers (Schenectady, NY), who sent four of 
the same symbol. "Enclosed are 'four of my best' ideas." she wrote. "It 
seemed like a strange request, but no stranger than your contests." 
What is this, a semantics lesson? We still can't tell if her symbol was a 
picture of a flower pot or a popcorn popper. Whatever it is, we have 
four of them if anyone wants some. 

Okay, so we have four copies of Meyers 's idea. But we have a heck 
of a lot more copies of other, less original ideas. It didn't take lony be- 
fore the contest staff got pretty sick of seeing warnings against using 
disks in or as the following: coasters, dart boards, eyeglasses, sundials, 
sandwiches, earrings, anything to do with magnets (those are real warn- 
ings!), anything to do with extreme heat (those are real warnings, too!), 
fly swatters, cassette recorders, phonographs (most popular), fish bait, 
or place mats. Yes, originality counted. 

Let'B Hear It For, . . . Just so they know: You winners of the Score 
Cleaning shindig announced last issue can say a special thank-you to the 
folks at Broderbund and Micro Lab — who contributed generously to the 
general merriment by donating the merchandise you now enjoy — and an 
especially special thank-you to the folks at Infocom, whose generosity is 
marked by an especially special Specialness, as the games most winners 
wanted were Infocom games. Fine companies, indeed. ^ 



if 



feS^^^^^reaccned w«h — ent extm. 



ti0 n by anotr*raU«n race, there* 

superheroes in «■ hurry. ef does ,„ Qfiestprohc, ther* 

And that's just what Ch>et U his May> accompany 

attack senes debutmg from MarvdM Co ^ ^ Th 
; t he graphic £^ of each of twelve cor£ 

Z** of twelve comics wfl over the next four V***'™? 
soondmg adventure games, to he released ^ comlc book 

S Examiner, as em^sary rfta < ^ throlig h a cm* 
tracking down and catchmg a hero the ^ ^ ^ ^ 

"opt to make a computer temptet of h, £ ^ ^ , serlCS o{ 
STof game. You play a MarveUu^o , that thc game 



OVER 1H£ V£AR$ t 
COMPUTERS ANP COMICS 

HM MAP£$MRflL£ffO/ir$ 
TO 6£T foe£MR, 
WM VARYING mRtti i 

of success, 



f name. You piay - • ■ The kickcr ls mat ww w> 

1 Ulak in a world you ^ d tL^ of all the superheroes 
, u e cumulate: If you re .„ the gcand finale, where- 

Sr^^UBen,^-. - 
—Andrew Christie 





Tke Jla5Qt Connection 



The Shaq downs Dexter in a xene from Maakom 's Spate Ate. 



Cine mat ronics blasted open the sagging ar- 
cade coin-op last year with the innovative 
hlockhuster. Dragon's Ijiir. What made Dragon's 
h)ir so spectacular was its use of a video laser 
disk connected to the coin-op box. The disk 
displayed beautiful animated pictures worthy of 
the Disney studios. In fact, many of the people 
at Don ttluth's studio (Sm-p! of NIMH) are ex- 
Disney artists. Although the games sold for a 
very high $4,300 each, ten thousand of the 
machines were sold in the first three months. 
This will make quite an impact on an industry 
that saw kids' quarters drop off almost 50 per- 
cent during 1983! 

Coleco, looking to boost sagging en- 
thusiasm for its much delayed and plagued 
Adam computer, has announced that it will 
have Dirk the Daring available on the Adam by 
the end of 1984. Coleco signed an estimated 
$2-million deal with Bluth for the computer 
rights to Dragon's Lair, as well as future options 
on all of Qluth's laser disk games. 

To pull this off. Coleco will need a laser 
disk player. While rumors link both the Dutch 
electronic giant Philips and the [apanese 
Pioneer with Coleco, Coleco is denying all. The 
hot rumor is that the evolving laser disk will 
cost only $ 1 50! That is quite a breakthrough 
from the standard $400-$700 range of most 
laser disk machines on the market today. If Co- 
leco can in fact achieve this coup, it will out- 
shine the original, highly touted technology of 
the Adam computer itself. 

If this comes to pass, there are several cur- 
rent titles we may be fairly sure of seeing move 
into the home. Bluth's second game. Space Ate. 
features much faster action without the black 



screen pauses between sections. Space Ace stars 
a superhero named Dexter, who is reduced 
at the beginning of the game to an infant by 
the dreaded "Infanto Hay." Occasionally, he 
gets to change back momentarily to Space Ace 
Mylstar Electronics has M.A.C.H. 3. which 
stands for Military Air Command Hunter and is 
a bomber game. Sega's Astron Bell actually in 
eludes footage from Star Trek and a couple of 
other movies. Williams's Star Rider features a 
very unusual space motorcycle racing game. 

The biggest challenge to Coleeo's dreams 
may be coming from the grandfather of arcade 
games, Nolan Bushnell. Bushnell's new com 
pany, Sente, is planning a series of arcade par 
lor game boxes called SAC (Sente Arcade 
Computer). Into each SAC box would go a dif- 
ferent game cartridge. When a game gets old 
only the cartridge will have to be changed. Of 
course. Bushnell's old company. Atari, has 
snapped up all the home computer rights to his 
new games. The SAC model III will be a laser 
disk machine. 

Whether Coleco can actually hit its 
marketing target of Christmas 1984 with the 
first home computer laser disk game remains a 
matter of serious doubt. Coleco seems to thrive 
on climbing apparently insurmountable moun- 
tains, so the company may make it yet in spite 
of the competition. Competitive problems may 
also arise. The laser disk fever has taken hold 
in many segments of the home computer 
market, and Coleco may even find itself beaten 
to the store shelves by other companies. The 
end of 1984 could see a cluster of computer- 
controlled laser disk games For the home. — Roe 
Adams 



Starfire 
We Hardly 
Knew Ye 

They looked like such good games: Global 
Thermonuclear War, Casino Master. You almost 
would have thought they were real. A lot of 
you did. And they almost were. 

This story was repeated with depressing 
frequency late last year: You saw the ad by 
Starfire Games, "Division of Ommsoft," sent 
in your check for $34.95. waited a while, 
called, were told orders were backed 
up/delayed/it was being shipped/reshipped. 
You waited another while, called again, and 
the phone had been disconnected. No com- 
pany, no money, no game. 

We agree that this ain't fun, Starfire took 
in a lot of people, including certain magazines 
who let them run big ads without paying for 
them. Their address turned out to be that of a 
condominium, in which none of the known 
company principals ever resided. We know 
you'd like to find them. Many people would 
like to find them. If and when we find them, 
you'll be the first to know. — Andrew Chris- 
tie 




Who stz xiilvurr publuhrn, don '1 know hot to party? It wm birth- 
day time at Hroderbund \ot marltt'lina. ttkitianh Cjtthy Carhton. 
Boogying on tht dam floor mth Mia (.'. is some unnamed grrrn 
monstrr who Jenin Iving the kmo- lost father of SirtaV Grud (R.I.P.) 



ft 



1 HE Ht!i9l ATMH 1HIS 



THE MOST 

POPULAR 

PROGRAM 

OF 1983 



The Votes are in. The will of the people is served. The most and 
least popular programs of 1983 are now known. 

The voting point system worked thus: Ten points were awarded to a 
program for each first place vote, nine points for second place, and so 
on, down to one point for each tenth place vote. 

The non- Apple/Atari voting contingent is still too scattered to 
count; about one-tenth of one percent. Next year, though, it looks like 
Commodore, at leas!, will be represented strongly enough to Make both 
Best and Worst into three-way events (which means Zaxxon could get on 



Six times). 






Most Popular Program: Apple 


Place 


Points 


Program, privgrammer, company 


1. 


1.786 


Loiie Runner. Doug Smith. Broderbund 


2. 


1.254 


Ugaey of Ltylgamyn, Andrew Greenberg and 






Robei i Wimdhead, Sir-tech 


3. 


1,096 


Ultima III. Lord British, Origin Systems 


4. 


723 


Miner 2049er, Mike Livesay. Micro Lab 


5. 


717 


Zaxxon, |ohn Garcia, Datasoft 


(.. 


669 


Hard Hat Mad. Michael Abbot and Matthew 






Alexander. Electronic Arts 


7. 


478 


Drvt, Benny Ngo. Broderbund 


H. 


448 


( >>„■ ,nr 1 Irr, . 1 \r u 1 1, iniiiumd. Kk-i tmnie Al l -. 


9. 


428 


Pinball Const. Set. Bill Budge, Electronic Arts 


10. 


339 


IHanttfaSI, Steve Meretzky, Infocom 




Most popular program of all time: Wizardry, 
Andrew Greenberg and Robert Woodhead, Sir-tech 



Most Popular Program; Atari 



Place 


rofnts 


Program, programmer, company 


I. 


506 


Archon. Free Fall, Electronic Arts 


2. 


497 


Blue Max. Bob Polin. Synapse 


3. 


\KS 


MAI.I..!.. Ozark Softscape. Electronic Arts 


4. 


■ 347 


Pole Pviition. Atari 


5. 


266 


Lode Runner, Doug Smith. Broderbund 


6. 


261 


Miner lOAQer, Bill Hogue. Big Five 


7. 


252 


Jumpman, Randy Glover, Epyx 


N. 


227 


Ultima III, Lord British, Origin Systems 


9. 


174 


Pinball Const. Set. Bill Budge, Electronic Arts 


10. 


165 


Skamm, William Mataga, Synapse 



[ 



Most popular program of all time: Star Raiders, Atari 



] 



It's still the same old story. . . . Just as Frogger walked away with the 
contest in 1982, once again another arcade hit was translated for the 
home computer, upsetting folks because it didn't look like the original. 
Maybe if they'd called it Zaxxon Jr. . . . 

Here, the game in the #1 spot received the most votes, meaning #10 
was only one-tenth as unpleasant. Names of companies and program- 
mers are tactfully unmentioned. 

Obviously, few were able to restrict themselves to 1983 releases. 
We must how to the will of the majority — except in those instances 
where some troublemakers insisted on including the wonderful new 
name of this magazine on their ballots. 

The technically lucky winners of the random drawing from all 
ballots received are C.V. Fields, who will get The Missing Ring for his 
Apple, and Steve Koppke, who will get Alien Garden for his Atari — used, 
of course. 



Apple 






Pfact 


Points 


Program 


i. 


183 


Zaxxon 


2. 


144 


Cubit 


3. 


143 


lump Jet 


4. 


108 


Frogger 


5. 


90 


Canyon Climber 


6. 


83 


Tubeway 


7. 


81 


Plasmama 


8. 


77 


The Missing Ring 


9. 


74 


limmeing Kamungas 


10. 


73 


Dig Dug 


Atari 






Place 




Proflram 


1. 


136 


Conga Bongo 


2. 


124 


F..T. 


3. 


117 


Zaxxon 


4. 


88 


Dig Duq 


5. 


66 


Q*Berl 


6. 


55 


Star Trek 


7. 


49 


Floyd of the lungle 


8. 


48 


Spy's Demise 




48 


Gwendolyn 


10. 


39 


Wall War 



Dubious I lonorablc Mention: 

IBM: Paratrooper 

C-64: Robber of the Lost Tomb 

Worth /dfti$ t$&/ 



STCAME 



i9 



mr.mA"l" 




When the sound of the fearful clashing of 
program against program finally subsided, 
only one construct remained sufficiently func- 
tional to be acclaimed the National Robotwar 
Grand Champion, Doug Hogg's Dragon4A is 
currently the robot to heat and the first ever 
to be ranked grand champion, I logg pulled off 
his achievement at the Postal Robotwar 
Championship Tournament of December 
18th last — one of the convocations for 
disciples of Muse Software's strategic pro- 
gramming game, in which participants bring 
in their disks or mail them in to do battle with 
each other, Hogg's Dragon beat out Tom 
Schai's Bucweal: two points in front of Richard 
Powell's Norden + . and six points in front of 
Stanley Chen's Indian2. 

Frank Krogh, founder and scribe of the 
Robotwar Club, estimates that "in four or 
five years there will be enough Grand Cham- 
pion robots to hold a Grand Champion tour- 
nament." Til) then, Hogg's achievement 
stands alone — and secure. 

Meanwhile. Novice. Master, and Cham- 
pion tournaments go on. Info can be had by 
writing to Frank Krogh, Box 5337, North 
Hollywood. CA 91616, — Andrew Christie 




61 ■ Nil, 

Ear '«t.'5S!i<ita»fliaS!a -I 

«V7* <>■■ 7 •<<"::. «?/2« 



jrf«i 



•iii AV- '•"'.V.'.'"' 

- -,lr. , *'f ' ,r .. " „, ' "., 



; '. «« 

■ «J& ■• . ..„. ... "*•""" Mr*"" 



a ••• . uJ ••■» '• ' 

- ^^^"wSS^^Va 



',ni- )!uJ , • »*rr l« • 



What does the Shadow know? Whatever he knows, he'd like to let us all know how he feels 
about IBM in general and the PCjr in particular. To that end. he has organized AIBMUGO. the 
Anti IBM Underground Guerrilla Organization, pronounced l-B-M you go. {Has this company no 
end of disgruntled former employees?) "Push hack the IBM harbarian hordes," he exhorts in his 
manifesto of November 1 1; "Did you know that the PCjr has rubber springs underneath the 
chicklet keyboard?" and so on. A window sticker with the ted international "stop" symbol over 
the blue IBM logo is available for $5, and a ten-issue subscription to the AIBMUGO newsletter 
for $15. from DTack Grounded, 1415 East McFadden, Suite F, Santa Ana, Ca 92705. 

Meanwhile, congratulations to PCjr on the premiere of their new mag. It looks very original 
and unique, One of the uniquely original parts of it is the feature that invites you to "Name That 
Dog" among the current crop of software. What can we say? We're flattered, honored, and en- 
nobled by this example of the sincerest form of flattery. 

In all fairness, they also invite you to suggest some other name they could call it— like "Dog 
of the Month." By all means, —Andrew Christie 



MA BELL GETS A 




American Telephone and Telegraph {the 
main long-distance-line national company) 
recently announced a joint venture between its 
ATST Consumer Products division and Coleco 
Industries of Hartford, Connecticut. The new 
venture will provide interactive games and oth- 
er forms of entertainment over existing phone 
lines. To facilitate computer owners' use of this 
new service, low-cost (under $100) modems 
will be sold to subscribers. 

Early reports concerning this venture initial- 
ly caused widespread confusion in the industry. 
Many thought the announcement signaled the 
entrance of the two large companies into the 
emerging field of direct downloading of com- 
puter software to either retailers or residential 
users. {Xante is one company working directly 
with retailers, while Control Video Corpora- 
tion's Gameline caters to the home user.) In- 
stead, it appears that the venture is taking a 
page from Scott Adams's modem game of War. 

All the games will be for two players. A 
player in New York inserts a special cartridge 



or disk into his or her game machine or com- 
puter. The player can then call a 900 number 
(flat rate charge) and enter his/her name via 
joystick selection. The telephone's computer 
will connect the player with another aspiring 
player on-line somewhere else in the United 
States. The two players fight it out for the top 
score, and the scores will be recorded. Some 
type of nationwide competition may evolve 
from this, although that has not been formally 
announced. 

The Yankee Group, a Boston-based think 
tank, has predicted that the modem will be built 
by Bell Labs and that it will be a slow, 300- 
baud modem. Gameline currently uses a modem 
rated at 1800 baud, hut apparently ATST/Co- 
leco believe that the 300-baud modem will be 
fast enough. The Yankee Group notes that ac- 
cording to "knowledgeable sources," no one 
can operate a joystick faster than fifty bits per 
second. They also project that, with "2 1 million 
video-game consoles and 8.4 million home com- 
puters" in residential use by the end of 1983, 



this new form of interactive gaming will gener- 
ate $1 billion in revenues by early 1986. 

To date, only three other forms of interac- 
tive modem gaming exist. One is Adventure In- 
ternational's War, a two-player strategic game. 
Another is CompuServe's text-only game, Mecja- 
wars. The most ambitious, though, is Harlow 
Stevens's Gamemaster in Chicago, where, via 
graphic drivers, a five-player game of Star Trek 
may he played. All players see the events of the 
game displayed on their own separate consoles. 

The biggest obstacle to the success of any 
of these approaches is the incredible cost of 
long-distance rates. (Imagine the bill for an 
average two or three hours of playing; whole 
games can be bought outright for a lot less.) 
Also, at the 300-baud mode, game play will 
proceed like molasses in winter. 

Still, the concept is intriguing. Lots of peo- 
ple are rooting for this new AT&T/Co leco ven- 
ture to succeed. And if anyone can pull off 
lowering the telephone costs to a tolerable 
level, it's ATGT. — Roe Adams 



So 



conljnued from paga 39 

'Making matters worse is a flashy little static charge who chases 
your man around the screen. If he catches you enough times, you get 
"charged up" and will "fry "any chip you touch, requiring a quick trip to 
the power supply, where you can ground your static. 

But the bugs are consistent with their symptoms, and so, with a little 
persistence and some really close scrutiny, you can debug the system, re- 
turn to Gotcha, and perhaps find yourself learning a lot more about how 
a computer works than you might expect. 

D-Bug is a slightly masochistic, wholly fascinating game of skill, 
strategy, and knowledge that turns program bugs into educational game 
features. HAS 
Atari, disk. $10 from Electronic Arts, 2755 Campus Drive. San Mateo. CA 
91103; (115) 571-7171. 

Unite or Die 

Chancellor of the Exchequer 

By R.C. Chiofolo. 

Atari, 

Here's a game that's a prime example of the strategy genre. Detail 
and depth that few other Atari games can meet are part and parcel of 
this game. More than a decade of British history is yours to command as 
the nation's chief financial officer — the Chancellor of the Exchequer. 

As this game starts, you are faced with a loosely knit organisation of 
eight geographical regions encompassed by Great Britain. Your object is 
to industrialize Great Britain by merging these separate regions into a 
nation. This can only be done by employing machines and people in a 
manner that supports growth. 

1 <■> merge regions successfully, people art- needed — healthy people to 
work the mines, harvest the crops, man the steam engines, run the 
trains, and navigate the ships. Population figures are one type of statis- 
tic you must constantly be aware of for each region. There must be 
enough food to maintain a healthy workforce. Mechanization of the 
farms is of some help, but in order to build tractors, tools must be made 
from the raw materials dug from the mines. Everything is interdepen- 
dent, making each region quite a responsibility. And there are eight re- 
gions, in addition to the nation as a whole. 

Regions can trade anything with one another, from crops and coal to 
money itself (at a 10 percent discount rate). Should unemployment rise in 
a particular region, or a call he received for men-at-arms, the population 
may be redistributed to better meet specific circumstances. Say. for ex- 
ample, your coal mine in Northumberland possesses three drills, yet only 
has one population worker toiling in the mines. This means that most of 
the drills are left unused. Waste! During the allocation sequence, a good 
idea might be to take surplus workers from transportation and move 
them into the coal mines to increase productivity, since coal is one of the 
resources needed to manufacture tools. Tools may then be converted 
into tractors for the farm, drills for the mines, or steam engines for the 
factories. As the object of the game is to industrialize, the importance of 
tool production cannot be stressed enough. 

At any time during nonstage play, an analysis program may be run. 
This program analyzes your moves up to that point and offers handy 
hints for improving a specific region's statistics. A graph offers visual 
representation of how well you're playing. 

Thoroughly enjoyable. Don't expect to sit down and master this 
game in half an hour. Involvement could last as long as a day, depending 
on the level of difficulty you choose. All regional and national infor- 
mation is presented spreadsheet style, with certain graphic characters 
representing specific items. A brief musical interlude at the beginning of 
the game only hints at what you might attain — rule Britannia. HGL 
Atari. 18K: disk. $29.95 from Mach-ina. 16 1 Aragon Avenue, Coral Gables. 
FL 33131: (305) 443-0027. 

Thinkless Tasks 

Space Knights 

Text by David Heller. Programs by Robert Kurcina. 



Atari. 

Infocom coined the term interactive prote to describe its text adventure 
games. The image suggests a story in which the events are controlled by 
the "reader." 

lieMon Publishing wenl a step further with SfKXX KnifkHi it's an ac- 
tual novel (although a short one) accompanied by a disk of games that 
relate vaguely to the events of the story. Great idea; woefully inade- 
quate execution. Infocom doesn't have much to worry about. 

Space Knights exploits every cliche known to science fiction. Our hero, 
young Jake, is a typical space nerd anxious to complete his training and 
graduate into the ranks of the Space Knights. This desire is incompre- 
hensible; no Spate Knight has ever returned to Earth, and the peculiari- 
ties of faster-than-light travel result in family and friends being four hun- 
dred years dead when he waits for his first mission. This career provides 
an adrenaline rush for young folks? Not too likely. 

Jake and his haughty female companion. Lisa, embark on a series of 
adventures that bear no relation to each other or to any higher purpose. 
One ludicrous escapade involves refugees from Marin County who have 
worked three generations to create "the perfect wine." The chapter is 
crammed with embarrassing "space hippies." Other adventures art- 
variations on the basic "idiot plot": Things happen only because every 
character acts like a total idiot at all times. 

One narrow escape from space pirates, for example, results in a 
crash-landing on the planet Weomby. After deciding that repairs are 
needed — for the shuttle's helicopter, among other things — |ake and Lisa 
begin a ten-kilometer journey, on foot, to the nearest city. After many 
tedious, dangerous hours, they arrive just in time to greet the repaired 
shuttle helicopter, which the computer sent to help them. 

Why take all that trouble when they could have waited aboard the 
ship in safety while the helicopter was repaired, and then flown to the 
city just as quickly? 

The conclusion involves a twist stolen from P/«»irt of the Apes and 
countless other post-holocaust stories. Spare me, the reader sighs: an- 
other irradiated planet that turns out to be Earth? 

The games, all in Basic, have clunky graphics and poor player con- 
trol. Several require paddles, which offer even less control. Weomby 
and Impact are routine lunar lander programs, although the former be- 
comes intriguing with an option for stronger gravity. Find Demons, Bug 
Buster, and Gamelon Encounter pit the player against various nasties in 
arcade-style action. 

Navigate is the best of the lot. The player uses coordinate algebra to 
chart and execute courses from any one of twelve planets to another. 
There is an unexplained glitch, though, which prohibits travel from 
planet three to planet four. 

One game has nothing to do with the novel. It's called the Mystery 
Game, and that's a perfect description. Because it has no instructions, its 
function or purpose is a total mystery. 

Both book and games seem like rushed first drafts. Even young boys 
(no yirl could stand the sexism) will be frustrated by the novel's lack of 
direction. Since the games do nothing to advance weak plot lines, they 
are too simple to be interesting by themselves. DB 
Atari; disk. $24,95 from Reston Publishing. 1 1180 Sunset Hills Road. Rtston. 
VA 22090; (703) 437-8900. 

Schweigen Sie! Ich jage die Panzer. 
Panzer-Jagd 

By Richard W. Seorupski. 
Atari, Commodore 64. 

This is a game of strategy and nerves that re-creates the Russian 
Front. 1913, albeit on a more limited scale than the real thing. The play- 
er commands several German units. This combination of tanks, infantry, 
and artillery must support the main German offensive by creating a di- 
version through a flanking action. Such a maneuver, it is hoped, will ne- 
gate some of the offensive fire that would have been brought to bear on 
the main German thrust. 

The goal is to win the field of battle and capture as many enemy sec- 
tors as possible. This may be accomplished by either capturing the town 



found in each sector or by eliminating all enemy units in that particular 
sector. Total enemy elimination is highly advised. Otherwise, after the 
town has been captured, enemy forces that have successfully retreated 
will strengthen units in the succeeding sector. The computer-controlled 
enemy consists of infantry. T-34/85 battle tanks with 85mm cannon, 
and several 45min antitank guns. 

A hi-res display reveals a battlefield composed of symbols represent- 
ing heavily wooded areas, streams, open areas, and the town itself. 
Only your infantry can move through thick forests. Enemy units become 
visible after they have fired at one of your units, when they have moved 
into open terrain, or when a German unit becomes positioned adjacent 
to a concealed Russian position. 

A turn sequence consists of five phases. Your joystick controls all of 
the action. First comes the artillery barrage. A word to the wise: Re- 
member where you've directed such attacks, A foolish commander is one 
who moves forces onto an area targeted for a friendly shell hurst. The 
location of the artillery attack is determined by the position of an on- 
screen cross hair controlled by your joystick. 

The direct fire order phase is the second element of the turn. The 
enemy target and your firing unit must lie in an unobstructed line of 
sight in order for the computer to allow any exchange of hostilities to oc- 
cur. The movement phase follows, with the cross hair designating the 
unit to be moved and its intended location. 

Once this has been accomplished, the fire execution phase is begun, 
with the sounds of both incoming and friendly artillery shells roaring 
across the battlefield. Bright explosions indicate the firing zone on the 
screen. Staccato bursts of machine-gun fire and the explosion of tank 
shells announce that the direct fire orders are being carried out. Once 
the resolution of combat has been completed, movement of all remaining 
units (German and Russian) is undertaken. You'll spot enemy units that 
suddenly become visihle as positions are changed, and suddenly they'll 
vanish from sight. Make note of the terrain surrounding the area where 
you last observed the Russian force; there's a good chance that an ar- 
tillery barrage into that particular section of woods could produce a for- 
tuitous hit on an enemy unit. 

Each of your units has a certain combat strength (defensive/offensive 
capabilities), range of fire (effective fire on target unit), and movement 
factor (distance unit may travel in a single turn). These statistics are re- 
vealed to you at the start of the game and when you access a unit during 
play, A message window beneath the battlefield screen displays tins in- 
formation when you place a cross hair over a specific unit and press the 
fire button. Additionally, panzer units require fuel to operate. Keeping 
track of the fuel remaining for each tank is critical to your success. Once 
the fuel is gone, all movement orders to that unit will be ignored. Also, 
remember that moving tanks through more difficult terrain, such as 
streams or woods, expends more fuel. 

Those playing the Atari disk version have an additional, shorter 
game to play. Management of fewer units with less opposition makes 
this a good introductory scenario. 

Despite what seem to be some slow computational factors by the 
computer, this is a sound war strategy game. May you beat the panzers 
off the computer! HGL 

Atari, Cnmmndore 64: 32K cassette $2 5. 48K disk $30 from Microcom purer 
Games/Avalon Hill, 4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214; (301) 254-9200. 

Let's Be Careful in There 
Murder by the Dozen 

By The BrainBank. 

Apple, Atari, Commodore 64. IBM PC, PCjr. 

For the sleuths among us. here's a game of crime and puzzlement. 
Imagine yourself as one of four detectives arriving at the department 
some Monday morning and finding twelve unsolved cases awaiting in- 
vestigation. Each is an alleged homicide, some rather gruesome in de- 
scription. As Gilbert and Sullivan put it. "a policeman's lot is not a 
happy one." 

Once you've decided on a particular case as your assignment, the 
computer manages your activities. For example, one homicide might in- 

55 



volve an apparent robbery. Before leaving the police department to 
check various leads, a good idea might he to call the lieutenant in charge 
of your department's robbery division. Perhaps a concurrent investiga- 
tion is already under way. due to the robbery angle, and it may have 
produced some viable suspects. 

Your duty is to find the perpetrator and present your case for prose- 
cution. Should you happen to miss vital facts en rovite to your conclu- 
sion, the case is lost. Lab and autopsy reports are crucial reading, while 
examination of physical evidence at numerous locations may or may not 
offer clues to help you solve the crime. Questioning the various indi- 
viduals within your jurisdiction may prove fruitful, or it may produce 
nothing more than a red herring to misdirect the investigation. You must 
be clever enough to recognize the truth based on the facts you learn dur- 
ing your detective work. 

Notes are critical. As each stone is overturned, numbered clues are 
offered and must he matched to the appropriate clue in the clue hook. 
Here lies one of the game's problems, especially if it is being played by 
more than one detective. Some clues consist of six numbers, which re- 
quires a lot of page-flipping through the clue hook, occasionally reveal- 
ing a "no clue" statement. This can be annoying, especially if other play- 
ers are waiting to read the clue manual. Ihghly recommended is team 
play in which each of the participating detectives works together to 
solve a case. 

Players receive the final rating of "sleuth" based on the accuracy of 
their conclusions and the amount of time taken to reach the case's final 
presentation. Your case work is matched against the answer in the solu- 
tion booklet. 

Enjoyable, frustrating at times, thought-provoking . . . this software 
should provide hours of entertainment. A policeman's lot is sometimes a 
happy one. HGL 
Apple, Atari, Commodore 61. IBM PC, and PCjr.; disk. $34.95 from CBS Soft- 
ware, One Fawcett Place. Greenwich. CT 06836; (203) 622-2500. 

What's Hot, Hilly, and Wriggles? 
Earthquake: San Francisco 1906 
By Jy ym Pearson and Norman Sailer. 
Apple. Atari. CoCo. TRS-80. 

The earth shook, the sky burned. It is San Francisco. 1906. and the 
City by the Bay has just suffered one of the most devastating earth- 
quakes of our time. Unfortunately, this disaster has occurred on the very 
day you arrived in the Bay Area, You even got a room with a view of 
Telegraph Hill. What luck. Only minutes later, the San Andreas Fault 
slipped and the hotel collapsed around you, pinning your legs in the 
rubble. 

Fires burn everywhere, and martial law is in effect throughout the 
city. Surviving the initial quake is one thing; living through its aftermath 
is another. Count your blessings; you are alive. Now you must find a 
way to free yourself and make your way through the ruins of a once- 
proud city. 

Earthquake is a typical game from Adventure International, having 
many of the same strengths and weaknesses as the rest of the hi-res ad- 
ventures in the Other Venture series. The graphics are nicely drawn and 
colored, adding a lot to the game in terms of visual appeal, while the vo- 
cabulary and text descriptions are just adequate for moving the game 
along at the pace expected by intermediate to experienced adventurers. 
The puzzles are great. Some are hard, some are harder. Most of them 
are fun. A few of them irritate before yielding solutions, Earthquake 
might not be one of Al's easier games; that's all right, though, because 
those who look for games offering good dollar -per-hour value are sure to 
get their money's worth. 

Graphically, the game is pretty good. However, its small vocabulary 
and limited parser detract as much from the game as the graphics add. 
The result is that, in a few cases, guessing which words the computer 
wants you to use is just as hard as solving the puzzle. While it does not 
take long to get an idea as to what simple verb commands the program 
does and does not understand ("get the apple" rather than "take the ap- 
ple," and "look at" the paper rather than "read it"), there are instances 



STGAME 



where the program logic comes up short and the pUiy becomes confus- 
ing. This is especially true when attempting to deal with objects found in 
the course of adventure {an iron box in the rubble of an opera house was 
certainly identifiable, but the programmer refused to classify it as 
"visible"). 

Still, the story behind Earthquake is fascinating enough to put this 
game ahead of most other current releases. By taking an event like the 
San Francisco earthquake and dramatizing it in an adventure game, au- 
thors Pearson and Sailer have expanded the story potential for adven- 
ture games into areas previously unused. In this sense, despite its rough 
edges. Lartiiijuake is an interesting and important program. MS 
Alan. CoCo, TRS-80. I6K. tape: $24.95. Apple. Atari, 48K, disk; $39.95 from 
Adventure International, Box 3435, Longwood. FL 32750: (305) 862-69 I 7. 

On Disk, No One Can Hear You Scream 

Crypt of Medea 

By Allan Lamb and Arthur Britto. 
Apple, 

They're creepy and they're kooky, mysterious and spooky, they're 
altogether ooky, the adventures in the Crypt of Medea. Da da da dum 

(Mliip, Ml.ip). 

Crypt of Medea is something of an Addanis Family on disk. It is maca- 
bre and witty and stupid and inventive and repetitious and altogether 
kooky. While driving along a deserted road one rainy night, you lose 
control of your car and spin out. You awake in a vault of the Crypt of 
Medea. The objects in the room are a glass case that is too dirty to see 
through, an unlit candle, and several tombs. No exits, no entrances, no 
doors, no windows. Go to it. 

Stuck? Time to consult the manual. Crypt's manual acts as an adven- 
turing tutorial: it takes the novice adventurer through the first three 
rooms, showing how objects are manipulated and which command 
words are effective. The first three rooms are something of a detour: the 
manual leaves you back in the original vault, only now your candle is lit 
and von have a '.have! m your possession, ['he manual also provides a 
list of words recognized by the computer and a list of hints to help you 
out of particularly obscure situations. Okay, now. . . . 

Dead, eh? Did you drown in the room of blood, or was it the spikes 
through the brain? Time for a generalization. The Crypt of Medea is a 
dangerous place in n> Karloitiaii wav. I ut« .»: movie gore. 1 [its and lots. 

The graphics are colorful hut lack detail. The jellied mass containing 
human heads looks like a mound of orange sand, the decapitated dog 
looks like God-knows-what. Also, this is one adventure that definitely 
i, ill? for animation bill provide.' little. II game; featuring lots ol blood 
and monsters excite you, imagine how much better they would be 
animated. Instead of telling you about bubbling blisters or melting flesh, 
why not show you? You're going to have nightmares anyway. 

The graphics don't remain on the screen while commands are typed 
in; you have to toggle back and forth between the graphics and the com- 
mand level. Crypt has some funny sound effects that soon become annoy- 
ing. Both the graphics and the sound can he turned off for faster, less an- 
noying play. 

Many of the solutions to the problems that present themselves while 
you try to get out of the crypt are rather . . . cryptic. For instance, to get 
to the room after the jellied mass, you have to play a tape you've 
found— hut it must be played in the correct room to yield any result. If 
you play it in the wrong room, there is nothing to indicate that you've 
screwed up, And because there is no alternate solution, you could wan- 
der around that dank, dark crypt for the rest of your short life. It gets to 
be irritating, and eventually the hints provided in the manual are your 
only recourse. Because the game is too hard, it is simultaneously too 
easy: once you've looked up the hint for any particular problem, you've 
solved it. Your alternatives are to get out with a lot of help or not to get 
out at all. 

Whereas Gomez Addams was a marvel of eloquence, the Crypt has 
trouble communicating. When presented with a hutterknife that you try 
to take ("take butterknife"), you are promptly rewarded with nonsense. 
I he program does not recognize the existence of a butterknife. A knife. 




yes; a butterknife, no. Bothersome. The evident tendency of software 
companies to scrimp on the services of proofreaders when producing 
computer adventures is also on view here. 

The Crypt is full of funny surprises. The animation that it does have, 
though rare, occurs unexpectedly to tickle the weary adventurer back 
into good humor. When the sequences arise, they generally signal the 
end of the current round and the end of your current life: you die 
laughing. 

Crypt of Medea is a program for the beginning adventurer in the fami- 
ly. Sophisticates like Gomez won't get much out of it, nor will the 
squeamish. This is for the Pugsleys and Wednesdays in your family— or 
better yet, the Festers and Lurches. TZ 
Apple, 48K. $34.95 from Sir-tech. 6 Mam Street, Ogdensburg, NY 13669: 
(315) 393-6633. M 



Guest reviewers this issue are Dtrriek Bamj, Monte Sehulz, ami Howard A. Shore. 



mards/aflii 1 EB3ECH $ 



ZORK 

Master the worlds Of ZORK, INFIDEL, WITNESS, 
DEADLINE, SUSPENDED, ENCHANTER, STAR- 
CROSS, PLANETFALL, ADVENTURE with our 
maps and hint books. We won't spoil your fun. 
Also, the ADVENTURER'S TUTORIAL (tips and 
strategies for playing any Adventure game). 
Each book comes with multi-level hints and a 
game map. All 3 ZORKS including ADVENTURE 
for $18, or send $6.95 for individual games, or 
get two games for $10.95. 
HINTS ON DISKETTE coming in July' 

Check, Money Order, Visa or MasterCard 

BROKEN TIMBER PRESS 

Department L 
1625 W. 39th Avenue 
Kansas City, KS 66103 
913/722-2464 



Profiles in 
Programming 

ERIC 

HAMMOND! 



by Matt 
Yuen 




name.- ^c£l r,'r JJ 

— ^ — ^L^y-^oy\ 

GOALS.. PJ) * '^^^^^LA'sA 
FAV0 ^T E A SSEMflt , ER: ■ _ 

****** r^f^^-^^j) 




You just want to hit a guy like Eric Hammond, but you can't. 

Remember that classmate who finished his homework in seconds flat 
and spent the better part of his spare time not doing much of anything? 
Remember the kid who go: backstage passes to the concert of the year 
but didn't go because the stage door was too far from the parking lot? 
Grrr. It's not that line Hammond is spoiled, or that he doesn't give a 
hoot about things. He just takes them in stride. 

Right now he's taking in stride the runaway success of his latest 
game, ]ulius Erving and Larry Bird Go Om-on-One. Hammond is quite a 
talented person academically, athletically, and musically. He's also a 
pretty good programmer, though his previous releases enjoyed only 
modest success. This time, however. Hammond found the daylight, got a 
lead pass from Electronic Arts, and is slamming it through the hoop — 
right into the faces of people who want to hit him. 

University of Nitchals. Hammond was introduced to Electronic 
Arts through fellow programmer )im Nitchals. "We have this running 
joke at Electronic Arts about the School of Jim Nitchals," says Ont-on- 
Ont producer Joe Ybarra. "There's a whole wealth of programming tal- 
ent in the San Diego area, and it seems like they all learned under Jim." 

Electronic Arts asked Hammond in late 1982 if he'd like to do a 
game for them. In those days, the company was about as well known as 
Buddy Dunn (who?), so it was no wonder that Hammond felt wary 
about collaborating. 

He finally decided to at least meet these people who called their pro- 
grammers "artists" and see what they were all about. 

"At first, they wanted me to do a football game, but I didn't think 



that was too cool; I told them I was more interested in basketball," says 
Hammond. 

"When he mentioned that, our eyes lit up and everything clicked." 
says Ybarra, an avid basketball fan. "Later [Electronic Arts's president]. 
Trip Hawkins came up with the idea of getting Julius 'Dr. J' Erving and 
Larry Bird to spice it up and endorse the game." 

Hammond is very casual when he talks about the game-design ses- 
sions with the two basketball stars ("Julius was really great. , . . Larry's 
a bit more laid back ..."). Maybe it's because he spent three hours with 
Erving talking about what special effects the game should have. Maybe 
it's because of the hours Hammond and Erving spent shooting baskets at 
a local YMCA. Or maybe it's the feeling of brotherhood that game 
makers share with each other — after all, Erving and Bird share coauthor 
billing with Hammond on One-on-One's package. 

I iaimnuiid doesn't mind having them listed as coauthors, because the 
kinds of things Erving and Bird added to One-on-One made it great. Er- 
ving came out to Electronic Arts during the summer of 1983. At that 
point, Ont-on-Ont was little more than two players running around on 
the screen and shooting baskets. 

"Julius thought it was pretty neat because the players were so big 
and animated. He had some ideas about turning and spinning to face the 
basket, and a lot of ideas about how the defensive player should be able 
to block and steal the ball." 

Scouting Reports. Not all the subtle nuances of One-on-()»t came 
from Erving and Bird. Hammond already knew some of the things he 
wanted to include in the game. He had been watching The Doctor on 

5T 




television long enough to know a lot of little things about him. 

Like what? "I basically knew this guy could hang in the air forever: 
he has a lot of cool moves," Hammond says. 

I k- wanted to include as much "cool" stuff in One-on-One as he 
could, but computers have their limits. As a result, he ended up "cram- 
ming as much as I could into the game until the memory was full." Cram 
lie said, and tram lu- did. Wlkil hey.m ,is .1 tun ruii'ipnti-r game was t'uni- 
ing into a programming nightmare. 

Shattered backboards, instant replay, hacking fouls ... all these 
features were added as extras, usually due to Hammond's big mouth. 
"One day 1 mentioned that maybe we could have the backboard shatter 
after a vicious slam dunk, and everyone became really enthusiastic. But 
then I thought. 'Wait a sec. wh.il am I gemna mvscd into*' " I lowover. 
the special effects certainly add to the game, and he's glad he included 
them. In this case, the pleasure evened out the pain. 

Getting to meet two of basketball's greatest forwards was really 
only part of the thrill Hammond experienced during the game's develop- 
ment. A different kind of thrill happened in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
when Electronic Arts's ad agency went to shoot pictures of Erving and 
Bird in action for the game's package, 

Amateurism is part of the fee! of true-life one on one, so Electronic 
Arts those a public school playground as the set for photos. "All the 
camera stuff was set up. but Dr. ) and Bird weren't there yet. About 
fifty to a hundred kids were standing around wondering what was going 
to happen, and then Bird and The Doctor pull up and get out of the car. 
I swear. I never saw so many big eyes in my life." 

Despite what the package for Ont-OH-One says, designing the game 
wasn't just a ploy by Hammond to meet his idols. Nor were there hours 
and hours of game films to study. Actually, Hammond had a videotape 
of the 1 982 all-star game that had lots of Erving-Bird footage on it. 
Apple hobbyists who have contacts in the public domain software 
market may soon run across one of Hammond's disks that resulted from 
that tape. 

Digitized Dunk. The tapes were used mostly so Hammond could 
study animation. He took one sequence of an Erving dunk, digitized each 

[Vaint, and put 1! on the <\pple. I lirn. with .1 RAM disk, he winked the 
sequence to go through five frames a second, resulting in a full-screen, 
slow-motion hi-res animated dunk. Now that's a basketball fan. 

These days, you can find Hammond practicing jumpers and dunks in 
his yard or playing pick-up games in his community men's league. Ironi- 
cally, he never played a minute of high school ball. Certainly talented 
enough (he's playing college basketball now) and tall enough (a respect- 
able six feet, two inches), Hammond didn't feel it was the thing for him 
in those days. 

"All the guys got on my case for not playing," says Hammond. In- 

5$ fcSjSuLJjl a^c^a^^f^^tffe^d' 



stead, he played tennis, a sport that's "not as exhausting as basketball. 
Besides, I didn't have to go to as many practices; team sports take too 
much time." 

Hammond doesn't like to spend more time than necessary to do 
things. It took him only ahout two days to learn Basic — the class moved 
too slowly for him. He realized then that computers might he an area he 
could excel in — not that he stunk in anything else (quite the contrary). 
An honor student, he graduated twentieth in his class. He received the 
Bank of America award for proficiency in math. He was good in 
physics. And English. And everything else. Unfortunately, the suhject of 
computers wasn't taught as well as he would have liked. 

Everything he learned ahout 6502 assembly language was self- 
taught. Classes were too slow: reading allowed him to move at a faster 
pace. His first programming project was a collaboration with friend 
Rorke Weigandt, whose Apple they worked on. 

"It took us forever to do anything on the Apple because we didn't 
know anything about it. First we wrote a game in Basic and tried to 
convert it to machine language. With all the things 1 know now. it seems 
weird to think that at one time I didn't know assembly language; it's 
almost second nature now." 

Rookies of the Year. Today, when Hammond looks at the code of 
Marauder (his first published program), he's embarrassed. "I'm surprised 
the game worked, it was so badly written." iVtnrii user's documentation 
says that "it took the full power of the 48K Apple II to make it a real- 
ity." Translation: At the time. Weigandt and Hammond were such inex- 
perienced programmers that they needed 48K to write a program that 
should have taken a lot less. "When we rewrote it for the Atari, it took 
only 20K." says Hammond with a chuckle. 

Finding a software publisher has been a game of island- hopping for 
Hammond. Marauder was published by On-Line Systems (now Sierra On- 
Line); Maze Craze Construction Set, an eight-week project, was published 
through Data Trek: Night flight was published by the pirate market and 
has been given to Sweet Micro Systems to use as a demo vehicle for its 
Mocking boa rd. But now Hammond seems to have found his niche. 

This guy is in love with Electronic Arts. "The people there are real 
professionals who know what they're doing. Joe Ybarru is really a great 
guy to work with. I know what he expects from me, and 1 know what 1 
can do. Even if 1 don't want to do something, he'll demand it of me 
for the good of the project. It's the first high-quality company that's 
come out of the software era: they're reviving the industry." 

Kemal Atatiirk Had a Whole Menagerie Called Simon. Beyond 
the work relations Hammond has with Ybarra, Trip Hawkins, and 
others, there are other reasons for his deep satisfaction. He likes the 
way everybody at Electronic Arts, from president to receptionist, is in- 
terested in him as Eric the person as well as Eric the programmer. Dur- 
ing the weeks that he was working at Electronic Arts's office, he and 
Ybarra would occasionally shoot baskets together, for no other reason 
than pure recreation. 

And recreation is something Hammond can't get enough of. "Some- 
times after being cramped up for a whole day working on a routine, it's 
good to get out and run your butt off." Basketball is his passion, but re- 
cently he's heen turning into more of a southern California beach bum, 
going on scuba excursions with friend Michael Abbot {Hard Hat Mack). 

Even in San Diego, the sun doesn't last forever. Indoors, Hammond 
is quite an accomplished musician: he's studied piano for twelve years 
and also plays the bass, drums, and just about every other instrument 
used for vocal accompaniment ("Dad's a choral director; he taught me 
how to play so I could help him out in rehearsals. That was pretty smart. 
1 thought"). 

So now he's off to college, all ready to nurture his career in com- 
puters, right? Wrong, Ten years down the road he sees himself in the 
computer biz, but as for the immediate future he plans to major in music. 

Blocked Shots and Rebounds. Hammond has had a lot of chances 
to capitalize on his talents, but for various reasons he hasn't. With col- 
lege ahead of him. he now has a second chance and is going for it. 

You just can't hit a guy like that. And even if you did, he'd get a 
free throw. 



A/o Comment 



Adam Antics 

Where did you get Benjamin Balsam — Atari or Commodore? That 
was a very misleading review (Infomania, lanuary-Hebruary); 1 should 
know. I have an Adam. He was correct about the printer noise, and 
anyone who leaves a digital tape (or disk, for that matter) in a drive 
when turning the machine on or off deserves what he gets. Now to the 
incorrect statements: A six-sentence file may take forty-five seconds to 
save, but so does a six-jwtff file. The time is spent in positioning, not data 
transfer. 1 don't know where you got the idea that Coleco's version of 
Applesoft is slow, but in the last couple of issues of Creative Computing 
they have had a benchmark program, so I ran it on my Adam. Results: 
forty-eight seconds. Apple He and Apple II Plus both rate at one minute 
fifty-three seconds! I sure would like to find out how you did your 
timings. 

Last but not least, the major untruth that caught my eye and prompt- 
ed this letter: "There seems to be no way to access assembly language 
through Basic." Sure, the manual is terrible, but you could at least take 
the time to look at it. Ever heard of usr. brun. or call'? Try looking in the 
Basic manual before making airhead statements like that. 

Send Ben back to Atari or Commodore (or Apple or wherever). 
Your magazine deserves better reviews than that! 

Russel P. Neal. Tempe, AZ 

Benjamin Balsam replies: 

Where did you get this guy, Coleco? Mr. Neal, I can't alter the fact that you 
shelled out $ 700 for an Adam. No need to he defensive about it. In some of my more 
human moments, I have been known to turn a computer on or off with disk in drive. 
Thanks, but I'd rather not be punished for it. My assertion that "Smart Basic" runs 
slower than Applesoft was based on running the following program: 

10 HGR 

20 HCOLOR-3 
30 FOR 1-0 to 191 
40 HPLOT 0, I to 200. I 
50 NEXT 

It took the Adam twenty seconds to draw 192 horizontal lines; it 
took five seconds on an Apple II. As for assembly language, my Adam 
"Smart Basic" manual makes absolutely no mention of usr, brun. or tall. 
Perhaps you have a different manual. Even if the call statement does ex- 
ist as an undocumented feature, there is no documentation explaining 
which memory (if any) is available for use by an assembly language pro- 
gram. 

Whether the reason the Adam took forty-five seconds to save a six- 
sentence file was because of positioning or any other element is irrele- 
vant: the fact stands. 

Qua Maze? 

Regarding the ongoing Apple versus Atari graphics capability argu- 
ment, I'd like to see the Atari do Stickybear graphics. On the other hand, 
I doubt the Apple could support a decent Pole Position like the Atari's. Ap- 
p^rc-ntly, neither computer has an edge in graphics capability. They are 
just two different types of excellent game machines. 

To Ultrasoft, in case they are reading this: If you people dare put an- 
other idiotic animated maze in Mac Steele in Outer Space, I will personally 
autodial your adventure hot line with the Apple-Cat voice synthesizer, 
which will be programmed to ask how to get out of the plane in Mask of 
the Sun. Seriously, though, these mazes are a royal waste of time. They 
prove nothing other than endurance and luck. Were it not for the mazes, 
your series of animated adventures would surpass those of Sirius in 
quality: as they stand, they are a distant third, behind both Phoenix and 
Sirius. 



By the way, what's with the National Defense Mechanism number? 
Oh well, enough rambling. Happy gaming. 

Theodore Chen. Potomac, MD 

Teacher Gets Suspended 

I wish to express my appreciation for your No Tipping contest and to 
thank you for the prize for my tips. With this unplanned windfall, I will 
get the game Suspended. I'll be looking for your hints on playing it. 

With the help of your hints. I reached the 350th point and was car- 
ried out of the Adventurer's Repository on the elves' shoulders, and I 
hope my hints can help someone else through Zork and open the Stone 
Barrow southwest of the mailbox. 

I've been teaching computer courses since 1966 and I get implicit and 
explicit criticism for allowing my students to play computer games. 
Now, those who cannot see the slightly abstract benefit of games as a 
way to learn problem-solving methods will see the direct benefit of a 
prize check. 

David Dunmire, Linwood, N) 

OF Scams and Stowaways 

Let's be blunt. Where's the filthy lucre? I sent in some hints, they got 
published, and they made volume four hugely successful. I want my cut. 
I've been good. Honest. I had nothing to do with the lost satellites. I 
suspect it was Lord British, jettisoning weight equal to his own so the or- 
biting vectors would work out. Anyway, happy trails. 

Roger Carlson, New Britain. CT 

While Mr. Carlson's contributions to the Zorktalk section of last issue's No 
Tipping were indeed swell, they were not that swell. They appeared under "general 
pleas and assistance," not "bounties." You licks your stamp and you takes your 
chances. Everyone clear on that? 

The Paying Elite 

First, after reading your publisher's statement, I found out that (at 
most) eight thousand people pay for your magazine, while about forty- 
two thousand get it free. I'm glad to be one of those eight thousand, as 
your mag is worth it, but how the hell do forty-two thousand get it free 
and 1 don't know about it? 

Second, I was playing Lode Runner yesterday when I discovered that I 
could have unlimited men by pushing control-shift-P and go to any level 
with control-shift-N. Therefore. I respectfully submit my high score of at 
least twenty million. 

Third. I generally get Softline about four days before the high-score 
deadline. This fact is overwhelmingly disturbing to me. Maybe you can 
do something about it. 

Doug Kremer, Rochester, NY 

First, the days of those subseril>ers still living off their subscriptions from the time 
when this august journal was a freebie are numbered. Second, the control-shift stuff 
in Lode Runner, along with instructions on how to create your own levels, is in the 
documentation. Lose your copy? Third, the post office has all at their mercy; the high 
score deadlines are just the times when we pull in the nets with all the accumulated 
scores wriggling around in them. Send them in any old time. 

8 to 12 

Here's a little tidbit you might wish to pass along to readers who 
own an Atari 1 200XL and have problems with some disks for the 800 
not running on the 1 200s. Atari has produced a disk that loads the 800 
operating system in the I200XL. which allows 1200 owners to run 800 
software. They have to call Atari at (800) 672- M04 to obtain this disk 
. . . and, by crackee. it's free! 

Hartley lesser, Hayward, CA "jffr 



ST.GAME 




Like a young Dick Nixon on the trail of Alger 
Hiss, Tireless Tim Toenjes continues to seek to 
bring Eric Gustafson to ground for his Night Mis- 
sion Pinbal! score. We were just as concerned when 
that unbeatable score came in. but Gustafson and 
family swear it was made in mode 0, the only one 
acceptable for these listings. Tim, you're welcome 
to call Eugene. Oregon, information, give Eric a 
call, and try to get to the bottom of this. 

Theodore Chen reports that those three cheat 
keys on Cannonball Blitz. AE, and Alien Ambush that 
we refrained from printing last issue were taken 
from a list of 1 53 cheat keys that he had generous- 
ly contributed to the ASCII Networks Bulletin 
Board, and were printed in the Washington Apple 
Pi newsletter without his permission. Mike Pal- 
mieri wants to know "who the — - does Theo- 
dore Chen think he is, sending in that low score" 
on Rebctrcn 2084. Thomas E. Burns wants to 
know how Theodore Chen got a score of 120. 100 
on wave 10 of Robotron, while he. Burns, went 
through 1 7 waves and scored only 30,800, We'll 
soon find out, as asking Mr. Chen to write to us is 
like asking the sun to rise. 

Kudos for Best Verification to "computer 
mom" Kit Snider for her Gumboil and Lxk Runner 
scores, witnessed by her son, David "Midnight 
Magic" Snider. Go ahead — challenge it. 

Muted kudos to Bud Foltyn, who made us stay 
up late on deadline night so he could call in his 
ever-increasing score on Ditto Eggs every hour on 
the half hour, beating the high score held by the 
esteemed editor of this very journal by as wide a 
margin as humanly possible. Brian Walter just 
mailed his in, and questioned said editor's extreme- 
ly high score on such a low level, noting that its 
achievement would seem possible only by "killing 
all the spiders, who score only menial points." 
Some people happen to like menial points. 

Wouldn't you know — after months of nothing, 
the minute we try to unobtrusively get rid of Peoplt 
Pong, we get a high score for it. Well, as San Fran- 
cisco remarked about Oakland after the earth- 
quake, "there are some things even the earth 
won't swallow." If you feel you must play this 
game, you'd be better off keeping that fact to 
yourself, n'est-ce pas? 

Then there's Reginald Greene of Carson. Cali- 
fornia, as well as Michael Paci of Trenton, New 
(ersey, who got scores of 44,090 and 1 12,000 (veri- 
fied), respectively, on the games that they played. 
There's just one more thing you need to let us 
know, guys, . , . 



(Apple), Broderbund 
(Atari |, Broderbund 
Bo Quest. |V Software 
l Ambush, Peter Fokos 
i Defense, Soft Sector Marketing 
i Invasion. Coraputermat 
i Munehies, Gentry 
Alien Ruin, ftrnderhund 
Alien Swarm, In-Home 
Alien Typhoon, Broderbund 

AllU-.kU'C k.,ML,l\ 

Apple Cider Spider, Sierra On .Line 
Apventure to Atlantis, Synergistic 
Ardy the Aardvark, Data most 
Arena UH11X Med Systems 
Argos, Da tarn oit 
Artesians, Rena-Soft 

Bandits (Apple). Sinus 
Bandits (Atari), Sinus 
Bat* in the Belfry, Phoenix 
Battlcsight, Versa 
Bezare. Southwestern Data 
Blackout. MK Systems 
Blister Bull, Creative Computing 
Blue Max, Synapse 
Bolo, Synergistic 



•77.700 
'20/95 
•105.380 
•1.115.320 
•10,880 
• 1 3.008 
♦2,781,900 
• 1 ,055,000 
•886,180 
•301,855 
♦Level 6/1,253,000 
2,446 
•37,860 
♦1.758.250 
•79,050 
•13.178 

•1.689,890 
♦202.680 
♦3,098 
Level 5/1,260,500 
♦164.602 
224.630 
Player) Level 11/1.271 
♦Nr.vicenO.180 
•Level 9/10.017 



Bouncing Kamungns, Penguin *88.99^ 
Bristles, Hirst Srnr 'Level 4/M.I30 

Bug Attack (Atari). Cavalier ♦54.335 

BugAttack(Apple),Cavalier ♦1.000.924 

Bug Battle. USA '26,6« 
Buried Bucks, Analog Level 27/274,231 

Buiiard Bait. Sinus ♦38.360 

Canyon Climber (Apple), Datasoft '480,800 

Caverns uf Callisto. Origin '44.950 
Caverns of Freitng. Muse *Leve! 9/158,142 

Centipede, Atari '5,445,080 

Chicken (Atari!. Synapse '312.010 

Computer War. LMI M.721 

Cosmic Fighter. Big Five '5 32,1 10 

Crisis Mountain (Apple), Synergistic '367.596 

Crisis Mountain (Atari), Synergistic '186,403 

Crush. Crumble, and Chomp, Epyx '2,393,410 
Cytrqn Masters (Apple), Strategic 
Simulations 

David's Midnighl Magic (Atari). Broderbund 
Defender, Atari 
Defense Command. Big Five 
Demon Attack. Imagic 
Demon Seed, Trend 
Dig Dug, Atari 
Dino Kggs, Micro Lib 
Donkey Kong. Atari 
Double Trouble. Eiei 
Dragon lure. [J.ikin'i l.i'Vi'l 10 
D re lbs. Synapse 
Dm I. Broderbund 



•Level 3/27,200 
•2,924,610 
•19.620,725 
♦178,390 
♦154,475 
•32,330 
"797.110 
Level 9/916 
Level 47/2.285,700 
•130.340 
'Level 5/972.000 
•51,730 

•Wave 3, Level 3/23,0)0 



Epidemic, Strategic 

ET, Atari 

Evolution, Sydney 

El terminator. Winner's Circle 

Firebug. Mum; 

Flight Simulator (British Ace), Microsoft 
Elip and Flop, First Star 
Flying Saucers, Radio Shack 
Formula I Racer. Gentry 



*7S3 
* 182,000 
•17,284 
•Level 4/28,521 
•Level 37/ 1 0.060 
85 

*L*wl 14/16,775 
*I,210 
Intermediate/53, 1 30 



lames Feinherg, Chapel Hill, NC 
Bob Albright, York, PA 
Michael Luric, Lincolnshire, EL 
Mikv I kuHNii , i . Gjithuisbury, Ml 1 
Chris A:j;aii.i ,. Ponies villi:, MD 
Arturo Rivera, Coamo, Puerto Rico 
Wayne R. Hendecr, |r.. Will lamsvi lie. NY 
Lamonte Gates. Chapel Hill. NC 
Stephen Pitt H Sunnymead, CA 
dark Alyea, Bloommgton, IN 
Edouard D. Cournoyer. Atlanta, GA 
Doug Zavodny. Bloomingdale. IL 
Brad Puliyn, Newtun. NJ 
Jan Bossing. Poway. CA 
fames Feinberg, Chapel Hill. NC 
Klaus Lie bold. Poway, CA 
Thomas Kirk Almrath HE, Huntington Beach* 
CA 

lames Feinberg, Chapel Hill NC 
Jonathan Hop wood, Glastonbury, CT 
Mark Hessman, Andover. MA 
Michael Susor. San Francisco* CA 
Car! Webb, Vista, CA 
Theodore Chen, Potomac. MD 
Bruce Mah, Fresno. CA 
Wade Tweitinann* Hawthorne, FL 
Thomas KLrk Almroth 111. Huntington Beach. 
CA 

David Bird. Thousand Oaks, CA 
David Zeve. Dallas. TX 
|ohn Thorning. Bayonne, N] 
James Feinberg. Chapel Hill, NC 
Klaus Liebold, Poway. CA 
Mike Kerekes. Colorado Springs, CO 
|im Surine. Saint Paul, MN 
Mike Berry, Santa Ana, CA 
Greg iieade. Phoenix. AZ 
Donald Stevenson. Shreveport. LA 
John Mellon. Orlando. FL 
Karen Sowell, larkson, MS 
Toby Crew. Sourhhury, CT 
Chris At lianas, Poole sville. MU 
Wei-How Chung. Seal Beach, CA 
Frank Pennlsi Jr., Walnut Creek. CA 
Chris Athanas. Poolesvllle, MD 

Ken Mutk, Walnut Creek. CA 
lames Feinberg, Chapel Hit], NC 
Michael Smart. Annandale, VA 
Chris Athanas. Poolesville. MD 
Barry Landgarten. Douglaston. NY 
Chris Athanas. Poolesville, MD 
Paul Cunningham. Oklahoma Ciry, OK 
Bud Fultyn. Newton, N| 
Mike lioscfield, Pleasantun, CA 
Mark Hessman, Andover, MA 
Brian Service, fix ton. PA 
Brad Lalnne. Concord. MA 
Thomas Kirk Almrnth III. 1 luiitinyton Beach. 
CA 

Alan Chang, Honolulu, HI 
Warner Young, Fresno, CA 
Mark I k'ssinan, Andover. MA 
Klaus Liebold, Poway, CA 
Steven Kahn, [amaica. NY 
loey Rurasey, Princeton, Nl 
Kevin Moore. Dallas. TX 
Rajendra Singh, Chapel Hill. NC 
"Theodore Chen. Pot n mac. MD 



5?! 





Frenzy. Softape 

PrOfiger (Apple I, Sierr,i On-l,me 

Gumball, Broderbund 

Handy Dandy. Gentry 

Hard Hat Mack, like ironic Arts 

Hiyhrise. MicroLab 

Human Fly. CPU 

Ice Cave. Winner's Circle 

lawbreaker II (Apple), Sierra On-Line 

Jellyfish. Sirius 

Joust. Atarisoft 

Jovian, Computer Shack 

Juice, Tronix 

Jump Jet. Avant'Garde 

Jumpman. Epyx 

Jumpman jr., kpyx 

Jupiter Lander, Commodore 

K-Raiy Krittcn. CBS 

K-S(ar Patrol. CBS 

Labyrinth. Uroderbund 

Lady Tut. Progame 

Lai Pak; Mine Sweep, Sierra On -Lint 

Lancaster. Siliron Valley 

Lemmings. Sinus 

Livewtre, Analog 

Lode Runner, Broderbund 

Lunar Lccpcr, Sierra On-Linc 

Mad Netter. Computer Magic 

Marauder. Sierra On-Line 

Mars Cars, I ),Lr,,iiuv,r 

Match Racer, Gebelh 

Mating Zone. Da tamos t 

Megaleys. Meoasoft 

Meteor Mission Two, tii^] l',\.v 

Microbe, Synergistic 

Ming's Challenge, Micro Pun 

Missile Command, Atari 

Mountain King, CBS 

Mr. Cool. Sierra On-Line Level 

Mr. Rohtit and his Robot Factory, 

Daramosr 
Ms. Pa c -Man, Atari 
Nautilus. Synapse 
Necromancer. Synapse 
Ni-ijii imv J iaknTJ 
Night Crawler, Softape 
Night Mission Pinball, SubLooic 
Night Stalker. Mattel 
Nightfall. Omega 
Nightmare Gallery, Synergistic 
Norad, Southwestern Data 
Odystty, Synergistic 
Oil's Well, Sierra On-Line 
O'Riley's Mine, Datasoft 
Uutworld, Tensor Technology 
Pac-Man. Atarisoft 
Pandora's Box, Datamnst 
Pathfinder, Gi*hrl]i 
Pen Patrol. Sierra On-Line 
Phaser Fire, Data most 
Pillhux. [.Old of the G.liilc;, 
Plasmania, Sinus 
Pole Position. Atari 
Pollywog. Top Notch 
Pooyan, Datasoft 
Pope ye, Parker Brothers 
Potholes, Computer Gazette 
Preppie. Adventure lnt'1 
Preppie II. Adventure lnt'1 



* H0.W2 
•55.450 
'■/].7 10 
•20.050 

•971.300 
•Level 79/104, 895 
•225 

Level 5/39,300 
* 1, 318.0 10 
•448.100 
Novice/1,333.050 
•29.720 
•24,210 
•74.730 
Loop/Level 25/67.900 
Speed 2/405.000 
47,300 
•368.200 
'VI.UV 
•210,500 
•Level 28/72.310 
•9.533 
•12.560 
•143.435 
•Level 16768,400 
•Level 512/5.297.750 
•184.620 
•61.746 
•Level 21/501,600 
•Level 30/64,670 
•86.7 Miles 
Round 5/1.520 
•I9.DOT 

• 1 20,680 

17.016 
•45.250 
•10,985,275 
Level 6/78.730 
!. Round 12/749.337 

•Screen 0072,670 
•66.240 
•(1 Player) 168.800 
♦204,651 
•Uvel 10/15.000 
289.407 
•749,653.240 
7.100 
•Level 1/14 
•878.850 
•Level 2/14.840 
•1,173.400 
•Level 2/15,860 
$74,000 
•102.930 
•Board 5/42.860 
•33,750 
•26.271,422 
•Level 29/14,275 
•9.305 
30,700 
•Expcrr/72.523 
•Level 1/101.650 
•294,765 
•1,007.750 
•I 18,560 
•1,060,710 
•140.120 
•Level 5/69,850 



Klaus Liebold. Poway. CA 
Lamonte Cates, Chapel Hill. NC 
Kit Snider. Franklin. MI 
Clark Alyea, Blooming ton, IN 
Chris Amendola. Huntington Beach. CA 
Clark Alyen, Bloomington. IN 
James Handy. West Chester. PA 
Bud Holtyn, Newton, NJ 
Rohcrt Clark. Clayton, MO 
Clark Alyea. Bloomington, IN 
Hartley Lesser. Hayward, CA 
Chris Arhnnas. Pnolesville, MP 
David ieve, Dallas, I \ 
Grey Reade, Phoenix, AZ 
Ben Cohn. Saint limn. MO 
|. Ralph Sowel], |r., Jackson, MS 
Chris Chekel, Granada Hills, CA 
Tom Buchmann, New Brighton, MN 
Aim Andersson, San Jose. CA 
Darcy Higden, Livonia, Ml 
Hank Johnstone, Fountain Valley, CA 
Chris MacChesney, Fresno, CA 
Buell Hollister III. Shelburne. VT 
Jerry Ingram, Drayton Plains, Ml 
Mike Jelarcic, Citrus Heights. CA 
James Feinberg, Chapel Hill, NC 
Chris Amendola. Huntington Beach. CA 
William Chiang, New York, NY 
Clark Alyea, Bloomington, IN 
lli,„„ lUl.irJ. ».,-*. Nil 
Mike Kerekes. Colorado Springs. CO 
Theodore Chen, Putomac. MD 
Barry Lindgarfen, Douglaston, NY 
Chris Athanas, Poolesville, MD 
Bob Enna, Huntington Beach. CA 
Buell Hollister 111. Shelburne, VT 
John Mellon, Orlando, PL 
Dean Rekich. Prospect. PA 
Derrick Bang, Davis, CA 

Mike Kerekes. Coloradu Springs, CO 
Reginald Greene, Carson. CA 
Dan Perngan, Nor walk. CA 
Ron White, Gt. Bnrringmn, MA 
Theodore Chen, Potomac. MD 
Michael Tjao. Watsonville. CA 
Eric Gustafson, Eugene, OR 
1 heodore Chen, Potomac, MD 
Craig Morris, Menlo Park, CA 
James Feinberg. Chapel Hill. NC 
Wayne Karolow, Daiwers, MA 
Casey Lamson, "I ucson, AZ 
Kevin Moore. Dallas, TX 
Theodore Chen. Potomac, MD 
Steve Gazis, Queens, NY 
Theodore Chen, Potomac, Ml} 
Colin DtiPlanns, Bloomington, IN 
Mike Buchmann, New Brighton. MN 
Lamonte Cates. Chapel Hill, NC 
Mike Kerekes. Colorado Springs. CO 
Neal Naydo, Montery Park, CA 
Tim Tant, Norrhridge. CA 
Toby Crew, Southbury, CT 
Matt Yuen. Van Nuys. CA 
Rob Maretsky. West Lafayette. IN 
Barry l^indgarten, Douglasron, NY 
Arturo Rivera, Coamo, Puerto Rico 
Kermit Carter, Boise. ID 
Mike Kerekes. Colorado Springs. CO 



Yes. there are cheaters, crackers, and rogues 
among us. But there is also another kind of gamer. 
There are the game heroes, those who go when 1 
none before them has dared to tread, and bnny 
back those vital discoveries that make the world a 
little hit warmer, a little bit safer for us all. One 
such is foan I laller. 1 ler game is Lale Runner. She 
played it to level 286 and a score of nearly three 
million, only to discover that the disk had rolled 
over and recorded her score at level thirty because 
designer Doug Smith "didn't think anyone would 
get that high." Undaunted. Mailer went right back 
to it, coolly noting the rollover at level 255 and 
keeping track of her true position. This is what she 
found: At level 357 (256 + 101) there are no 
possible alternative strategies: the guard always 
reaches the ladder before the player. She escaped 
with 132 men. Level 392: It's impossible to dig a 
hole fast enough to get past the guard in the lower 
right-hand corner. She got out with sixty-one men 
and continued on to level 428 (256 + 172). Un- 
.ible tt) dig a hole last enough to get past the guard 
in the center-right cube, and with only sixteen men 
left, she met her end at level 441, with a score ap- 
proaching five million. Rest well. Ms. Mailer. We'll 
not soon forget. 

And before we do. let's see who won the high 
score sweepstakes this month. $34.95 goes to each 
member of the randomly selected trio, and they are: 

Apple: ] I. A, I )n kM,ii. \apmtim 
Atari: Tom Buchmann, K-Razy Kritttrs 
Overall; Michael Susor, Bailtrsitjhl 

Send your full address to St, Gains, Box 60. 
North Hollywood, CA 91603, and the cash is 
yours. ^rjl£ 

h Hall of Fame n 



Airscrike. Dean Rekich. 23,730 
Astro Chase. Bob Albright. 448,947 
fiaja Bufjfjies. )iiei Gurkhard> 67.40 MPH 
ftcll Hnp, Curtis Wchcr, 56/51 
Bei Off. Brtanford, 160.844 
Boa. Steven Schwartz. Level 9/43,330 
Breakout. Fred Di Cesare. Double/2.656 
Brefiknut. Hred Di Cesaru. Prou i ressive.r l 4 H 580 
Bug Attack (Aran), |ohn 1 ham my, 54,38*) 
Cosmo Mission, Kaveh Ghazi, 8,540 
Crickeieer. Brian Git ler, 55,360 
Crime Wave. Buell I lolliiter III, 10.600 
Crolon Diversion, Chris Athanas, 7,300 
Cycled (Apple), Rich Dellintjer, 966,513 
Dawn Patrol, Marry Burns. 13.207 
Deluxe Invaders. Bnbby Moy, 26,850 
tiscapc from, Vulcan's Isle. 

Roe R> Adams 111, 13.580 
Falcons. Joel Frickhoeffcr. 301.750 
Fly Wars, Russell Willis, 93,190 
Fern Apocalypse, Darryl May. 190,809 



59 



Frazil t. Gory Penaeho, 56,850 

Free Fall. Alan Chang. 23.432 

Guluttit Attack. Joseph Rossi, 6,320 

Guryon, Clark Alyea, 85,220 

Grnople. Morf Goodman, 215,500 

Guadalcanal Campaign. Greg Munsell, 2.655 

Guardian. Tom McDonald. 128. ISO 

Hill f,hW Chris Athanas. 31.895 

High Orbit. Gilbert Huang, 28,860 

let Demons (1 player). Steve Williams. 48.990 

Ice Demons {2 player). Dan Knight and 

Steve Williams, 612,290 
Joueney to the Planets, lion Stanley, 4,205 
Juggler, |ohn Osborne. 961.460 
Kid Grid. Bobby Moy. 33.860 
Laf Pak: Creepy Corridors, 

Wilbur Luo, 9.740 
Laf Pak: Space Race. 

Steve Rot henberg 14,500 
Laser Defense, Chris Athanas, 44.960 
Laser Silk, Gilbert Huang. 896,550 
Leaper. Travis Beauboin. 12.400 
Microwave. Richard Olscn. 53.499 
Miner 2049er (Apple). Gary Schmitt, 615,310 
Miner 2049er (Atari), Robert Rendahl. 

Zone S. Station 10/582.205 
Money Muncher. Tom Luhrs. 705 
Moon Landing, Kaveh Gazi, 1 ,0 I 7 
Mutant. |ohn Osborne, 2,500,266 
Paddle Pinball, Chris Athanas. 215.010 
Penetrator. Chris Athanas. 15.810 
People Pong. Klaus Lisbold. 18.925 
Phohos. Bnbhy May. 172.200 
Picnic Paranoia, jonathan Hopwood, 144,360 
Pie Man, Kevin Rehak. 425 
Pogoman. Jim Mahoney. 673,430 
Pollywog, Matt Yuen. 294,765 
Haiders of the Lost Ring. |eff lames, 191.210 
Rescue at Rigcl. Bruce Schhckbernd. 1,557 
Rocket Command, Pepe Candad. 1.028.385 
Russki Duck. Brian Schneider. 375,000 
Shark Trap, Matt Yuen. 10,705 
Shuttle Intercept, Clark Alyea. 13,900 
Sigma 7. Blanc Sibille. Jr.. 1 .800 
Snake (IBM), Peter Quinn. 468 
Snake, Jnhn Picken, Progressive/282,550 
Snnkebyte. Barry Landgarfen, 

Level 1 10/320.670 

Snapper. Jean-Michael Deeomhe, 144,759 
Space Avenger, Chris Athanas, 10,350 
Space Invasion, Chris Athanas, 6 Racks/74 
Space Warp. Chris Athanas. Level 8/255 
Star Island. Tim Caldwell. 87,370 
Star Maze. David Sneid, [jvel 16/172,925 
Stellar Escort. Chris Attune. 19.300 
Strike Force, Chris Athanas and 

Neil Kincaid, 433.900 
Succession. Htll hlvey. 10,100 
Survivor player). David Schlater, 31 1.920. 
Tharolian Tunnels. Steven Gazis, 134,607 
Thief, Dennis Heaton. 303.600 
Tubeway. jinl Stockla, 90.801 
Tumblebugs (Atari), Tad Hamilton, 38.785 
Turmoil. Bobby Moy. 83.540 
U-Boat Command. Peter T, Clark. 2.189 
Wavy Navy, |ohn Osborne. 88.780 
Zargs, Christopher Chan, 3,715 
Zero Gravity Pinball, 

M Fttckhoeffer. 19.100 



I 
I 
I 



I 



I 
I 



I 





Protector 11, Synapse 


♦236.050 


Brynn Osrin, San lose. CA 


Q-Bert, Parker Brother* 


• 1 30.940 


Barry Landgarten, Douglaston. NY 


Qix. Atari 


•727.794 


Paul Cunningham. Oklahoma City. OK 


Quadrant hi I2 r Sensible 


•300.100 


Clark Alyea. Uloommyton, IN 


Queen oF Hearts, SSI 


•824.800 


Mike Keek, l,a Palma, CA 


Randamn. Mayeuim 


•13.154 


Wayne Karolow. Danvcrs. MA 


Rear Guard (Apple). Adventure Int'l 


•321.475 


Peter Alyea. Bloomingron, IN 


Rep ton, Sirius 


•9.874.650 


Keith Armonaitis. Rochelle Park, N| 


Rings c+f Saturn. Dakin5/LeveL 10 


Level 4/636.968 


Pat Vnlk, Pittsburgh. PA 


River Raid, Act .Vision 


•46.750 


Barry Dindgarten, Douglaston. NY 


Roadblock, SubfaogiL" 


374 


Theodore Chen, Potomoc. MD 


Robot Attack, Big Hive 


•27.380 


Chris Athanas. Poolesvilte, MD 


Robot Battle, Universal 


•11.325.500 


fanes Pcjnbera, Chapel Hill. Nt ! 


Robot ron: 205 4. AtansofL 


♦Wave 99/1,718.250 


David Brown. San Mateo. CA 


Roundabuut, Data must 


•Level 11/10.260 


Mark Hess man. Andover. MA 


Sammy Lightfoot, Sierra On -Line 


•281.080 


Al.in Clung. Honolulu. HA 


Santtron, Winner** Circle 


13.390 


1 heudore Chen. Potomac, MD 


Scarf man. Cornsof l 


♦453,400 


James Feinhcrg, Chapel Hill. NC 


Sea Dragon. Adventure Int'l 


•463,200 


Doug Zavodny. Bloomingd.tlc. II. 


Seafnu. Brodcrbund 


•202.850 


Elizabeth Crowe. Saginaw, Ml 


Sentinel, Med Systems 


•64.450 


Tom Myers. San jose. CA 


Serpentine, Broderbund 


•Level 275/75.433.900 


H.A. Dickson. Dallas. TX 


Shadow Wurld. Synapse 


• 1 1 1 .200 


Robert Proudfoot. l.ong Beach. CA 


Sham us: Case 2, Synapse 


•400,805 


Mike Kerekes, Colorado Springs CO 


Sheila, h,A.L. Labs 


•155.917 


Scott Brown. Riverside. CA 


Shooting. Gallery (Atari), Analog 


•28.620 


Parnel.i Duke, Dimpoc, CA 


Snapper. Silicon Valley 


•297.946 


Alan Chang. Honolulu. HA 


Sneakers (Atari), Sinus 


'Level 5/76.402 


Frank Pennisi |r.. Walnut Creek. CA 


Space Album: Asteroids. California Pacific 7,212 


Kyle Naydo. Monterey Park. CA 


Space Eggs (Atari), Sinus 


•4,740 


Michael Zenner. Portland. < >R 


Space Kadette. Fantastic 


♦7.552 


lames Feinbcrg, Chapel Hill. NC 


Space Station Zulu, Avalon Hill 


Level 1/786 


Hoc Adams III. Hyde Park. MA 


Spare Change, Hroderbund 


•Level 81/2.876,700 


Tun Tant, Northtidge. CA 


Spectre, Data most 


Level 6/23.230 


Doug Zavodny, Bloominydale, LL 


Spider Raid. Insoft 


6,700 


Michael Siisor. Sim Francisco, CA 


Spy Strikes Back. Penguin 


•5.321 


Buell Holl.ster IV. Shelburnc. VT 


Star Cruiser, Nastr 


•34.280 


Tom McDonald. Huntsvillc. AL 


Stargate, Atarisoft 


Wave 3/28.150 


1 lieodure Chen. Putumac, MD 


Star Trek, Sega 


•Sector 2.4/98.750 


Theodore Chen, Pntnmar, MD 


Stellar 7. Software fintertainment 


•38,490 


Patrick Michael Hunter, Eugene, Oil 


Stickybear Bop, Xerox Kducational 


Level 5/265,300 


Michael Susor, San Francisco. CA 


Stratum Adventure Int'l 


•tispert/91.100 


Mike Kcrekes. Colorado Springs, CO 


Super Bunny, Datamost 


89.980 


Steve Gazis, Queens, NY 


Super Puckman. ADO Software 


•80.010 


Stanley Chen, Potomac, MD 


Survivor, Synapse 


•(1 Player) 742.430 


Bill FcJ.ik. Union Lakes. Ml 


Survivor, Synapse 


•13 Player) 375.240 


Aliii Aink-isson. W.mcn Ik-iiMiri. .uid Bryrin 






Ostin. San jnse, CA 


Swashbuckler, Datamosi 


•6.702 


Frank Pennisi |r.. Walnut Creek, CA 


Sword of Kargoal. Hpyx 


■Level 11/116,226 


Bill Brown and Barry Spencer, Brighton, Ml 


Tail of Beta Lyre. Datamost 


•Sector 5/12.622 


David Zeve. Dallas. TX 


Talon, SE Software 


•1 14.500 


Mark Hessman. Andover, MA 


Target Command. Computermat 


•28.860 


Arturo Rivera, Coamo, Puerto Rico 


Taxman, 1 LA. I.. I^ibs 


•1,217,350 


Eric Morson and Phillip Morion. Stamford, 






CI 


Tele port. Cavalier 


•Level 109/127,800 


James Weinberg, Chapel Hill, NC 


Tharolian Tunnels. Datamust 


•137.385 


Uimonre Gates, Chapel Hill, NC 


Thunder Bomhs. Penguin 


•55,910 


( hardin Wil.son, Kr^mtm, VI 1 


Thunder-bird, Urban Software 


•1.000.800 


Brian Hazard, Huntington Beach, CA 


Triad, Adventure Int'l 


•Level 9/102.870 


Auand Ka Lit her la. Suyarlaud. 1 X 


Tube way II. Data most 


•97.730 


lames Feiitbera;, Chapel Hill, NC 


Tunnel Terror. Adventure Int'l 


•751.790 


lames heinherg. Chapel Hill, NC 


Vindicator, HAL Labs 


•Level 43/461.425 


l-rady Shiang, Rancho Palos Vcrdes. CA 


Viper. RDA Systems 


•7.917 


Doug Zavondy. North Hollywood* CA 


Vortex, DaEartitiM 


•48.2 50 


Lv Stafford, Phoenix, AZ 


Wall War, Sierra On-Line 


•68,940 


Wdl.am Chiang, New York. NY 


Warp Destroyer, Piccadilly 


•96,540 


David Levmc, Potomac, MD 


Wayout. Sinus 


•7 


Rod Bonios, Van Nuyr.. CA 


Wizard of Wor. Roklan 


•1,456,200 


jarnef, I'emlnrry, Chapel Hill, NC 


Zaxxon. Datasoft 


•785,400 


fames Weinberg, Chapel Hill, NC 


Zenith, Gehelti 


•69.650 


|im Stockla, Shclton, CT 


Zombies, Bram 


•1 1 Player) Easy/4.674 


Michael Jelarcic. Citrus Heights, CA 


Zombies. Bram 


•(2 Player) 1.113 


Kevin Moore and David Zeve, Dallas, 1 X 


Zoo Master. Earth ware 


•15,113 


iluell l l.ille.ter 111. Shelhurne. VT 



60 



dniflL 



A FOUR STAR WINNER 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

-The Video Game Update 
- Computers & Electronics 



"QUEST FOR TIRES Is a 
delightfully original 
game with very well 
animated, cartoon- 1 Ike 
graphics and excellent 
play action." 
^ - The Video Game Update 




TM designates a trademark of Sierra On-Lina, Inc. I 1 983 Sierra Qn-Line, Inc. or Sydney Development Corp. S C. characters Field 
Enterprises. Inc. 1983. Manufactured under license Irom Coleco Industries. Inc. 



ONLINE 



TTie END o/ DINKETY- 
DINK-DINK. 




.nnouncing 
the first computer 
music program that 
actually sounds like 
musk. 

LET'S FACE IT. Up rill now, music 
programs for your home computer 
have all sounded, well, pretty lame, 
rhere w viv the ones that resembled 
little electronic music boxes, remem- 
ber? And then there were those that 
sounded like so many burps. 

Enter Music Construction Set. It's 
the first music program that really 
makes use of the power of that ma- 
chine you've got. If you're a serious 
student, this means you 11 be able to 
work with an intricacy and range of 
sound quality you've never heard be- 
fore on a computer. And if you know 
nothing about music, you'll find some- 
thing even more important. Namely, 
that this thing is simple enough to 
be a lot of fun. 

Take a good look at this screen 
because it, you, and a joystick are the 
whole story here. 

That's you at the right end of the 
staff of notes — the little hand. Move 
the joystick, and you move the hand. 
Use it to carry notes up to the staff. 
Lay in rests, signatures, clefs, then point 



NOW AVAILABLE FOR 
ATARI HOME COMPUTERS 




ijj j: 



X. Key B 
v 4 HOh 



SpSoSoVoMo 





1* 






ft 


23 




1 J. 

i ■> 





to the little piano in the lower right 
and listen, because you'll hear the 
whole thing played back. 

Move those little scales in the mid- 
dle up and down to vary the music's 
speed, sound quality, and volume. Use 



Construction seT 



W 



9 



the scissors to cut out whole measures, 
then use the glue pot to paste them 
in somewhere else. Got a printer? 
Great. Print the score out and show it 
off to your friends. 

But what if you're not up to writing 
your own stuff yet .' No problem. 
There are twelve pieces of music al- 
ready in here, from rock n roll to 
baroque. They're fun to listen to, and 
even more fun to change. (Apologies 
to Mozart.) 

The point is, the possibilities are 
endless. But if you're still skeptical, 
visit your nearest Electronic Arts dealer 
and do die one thingguaranteed to 
scnfTyou home with I Music Con- 
struction Set in tow. 

Boot one up. Poirrffco the piano. 
And listen. 




ELECTRONIC ARTS ' 



MUSIC CONSTRUCTION SET a now «viiiUNe lor Apple II. II +. lie. ml Commodore M canmnn The Apple mwn. wrlh .1 Mutkm!l»Mi.l*pU ■ a»tj. m up «' •« norcicxtl The Commodore WHUl pLv-i ehnrd« 
of up to three note* each Apple u a registered trjdenurk of Ajsple Computer Coumtodore 1* j registered tr.*Jeiiuik of Csvmmodore Business Mjthine*. tnt Tv.r more ,n[..r,o,>t,. .0 .»kmt r.[e,-irorue Arts wnie us ti 
Cumpui llrtve. Sad MftWO.CA "44s. 1 * Oral HIS) $71*7171 Fur i free tuition. kmJ j lumped, *elf jddreweJ #10 envelop*