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JAN  -  FEB  '94  VOL  12-1 


rr 

o 


TORONTO  Tim -SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


•JAN -FEB  '94  VOL  12-1 


SINC-LINK  IS  A  PUBLICATION  OF 
THE  TO/tOfiTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIH  USERS 
CLUB  AND  IS  ISSUED  6  TIMES  A 
YEAR.  CLUB  HEMKRS  RECEIVE  FR^ 
COPIES  AS  PART  OF  THE  920.00 
ANmJAL  MEMBER&IIP  FEE. 

NEUS.ETTERS  ARE  EXCHMBEDt  FREE 
OF  CHARGE,  NITH  OThSR 
Tlf^X^SINCLAIR  USER  BROUPS. 

PLEAX  CREDIT  miS  PUO^ICATION 
AND  THE  AUTHOR  IF  YOU  COPY 
tlATERIAL. 

THE  TS20S8  A  ZX-Bl  GROUP  flEEIS 
ON  THE  FIRST  UEDNESDAY  OF  EACH 
nONTH  AT  J  4  RICHOME  COURT, 
SCARKmJUSH,  ONT.   7Pn  START. 

THE  OL   SIB  UILL  MEET  AT  3B6 
ONEIDA  DRIVE,  BURLINGTON,  ONT. 
7PM  START.  NEXT  HEETINB  TO  BE 
AmKMM^CED. 

SINC-LIf^  IS  PRODL^D  ENTIRELY 
ON  SINCLAIR  AND  TIMEX-SINCLAIR 
COMPUTERS. 

SEND  CORRESPONDANCE  TOt 

SINC-LINK  EDITOR,  TORONTO 
riMEX'SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB,  14 
RICHOME  COURT,  SCARBOROUGH, 
ONTARIO,  CANADA  MtK  2Yi. 


EXECUTIVE  OFFICERS: 

PRESIDENT 
TREASURER 
SECRTTARY 
ACTIVITIES 
QL  CONTACT 
NEWSLETTER 
LIAISON  OFFICER: 
I  Out-of-town  aembers 


o 


mm 


/I 


TORONTO  TIHEX-SINCLfllR 


USERS  CLUB 

(  AREA  CODE  416) 
RENE  BRUNEAU  (531-9749) 
BILL  LAWSON  (  444-8772  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS  (  751-7559  ) 
LOU  LAFERRIERE  (  820-3725  ) 

HUGH  HOWIE  (  634-4929  )   lOTE  tBf  AREA  CODE  905 

JEFF  TAYLOR  <  244-8583  ) 

GEORGE  CHAMBERS.  14  RICHOME  COURT. 

SCARBOROUGH.  ONTARIO  MIK  2Y1 

(  416-751-7559  ) 


TORONTO  TIHEX- SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


2 


SINC-LINK 


TORONTO  TIMEX  SINCLAIR 


USERS  CLUB  STATS 


JAN  TO  DEC  93 


DATE 

NN 

RN 

US 

JAN  14 

21 

S 

21 

FEB  4 

2 

1 

2 

NAR  2/5 

9 

6 

11 

APR  9 

1 

2 

MAY  6/14 

1 

6 

6 

JULY  9 

3 

5 

3 

AUG  S 

2 

5 

6 

SEP  2 

0 

2 

2 

ODT  7/19 

2 

2 

1 

NOV  10 

0 

2 

1 

DEC  30 

1 

0 

1 

8 

1 
4 
9 

1 
5 

1 
O 
3 
1 
O 


TOTALS  42 


43  56 


29 


CODE I  NM«NEW  NEMBER 
RNvRENEW  US«USA 
CAN*  CANADA 


THE  NEW  YEAR  HAS  ARRIVED. 

HERE  ARE  SOME  STATISTICS  ON  OUR 

CLUBS  MEMBERSHIP  FOR  1993. 

RECORDS  ARE  MAINTAINED  BY  SYMBOLS  SUCH  AS 
<US>   FOR  UNITED  STATES  AND   <CAN)  FOR 
CANADA  THESE  ANNUAL  STATS  BEGIN 
JANUARY  AND  END,   THIS  YEAR  ON  DECEMBER  30 
OUR  AMERICAN  MEMBERSHIP  IS  DOUBLE  THAT 
OF  OUR  CANADIAN. 

NEW  MEMBERS  (US)  29. 
NEW  MEMBERS   CCAN)  6. 

RENEWAL  MEMBERSHIPS 
US  21,     CAN  19. 

IN  JANUARY  1993  HUGH  HOWIE,   OUR  GL 
LIBRARIAN  PUT  ON  A  DRIVE  FOR  NEW 
MEMBERS,   PRIMARILY  FOR  QL»rs. 
THE  REPONSE  WAS  TERRIFIC.   HUGH  SAID, 
•THEY'RE  OUT  THERE"  AND  WENT  ON  TO 
PROVE  IT.   HUGH  TAKES  HIS  TASK  VERY 
SERIOUSLY.   HE'S  THE  GUY  WE  LOOK  TO 
FOR  QL  INFORMATION. 
THE  OUT  OF  TOWN»i-»  ARE  VERY  MUCH 
AWARE  OF  GEORGE  CHAMBERS  AND  HIS 
INTEREST  IN  AND  KNOWLEDGE  OF  THE 
2066  MACHIONE.   GEORGE     HAS  GIVEN 
MANY  YEARS  TO  THE  CLUB.   THERE  ARE 
FEW  AREAS  OF  RESPONSIBILITY  THAT 
HAVE  NOT  COME  UNDER  HIS 
*I>^EDED  ASSISTANCE'. 
JEFF  TAYLOR,   NEWS  LETTER  EDITOR, 
TOOK  OVER  THE  DUTIES  OF  PRESIDENT 
WHILE  THE  PRES,   RENE  BRUNEAU  WENT 
BACK  TO  SCHOOL  TO  LEARN 
! !   MORE  COMPUTING   ! ! 

I  HAVE  STRAYED  FROM  JUST  REPORTING 
STATS.   ON  THE  OTHER  HAND,  PEOPLE 
WHO  MAKE  THE  CLUB  WORK  ARE  STATS, 
RIGHT,    INCLUDING  CONTRIBUTORS. 
RIGHT? 

REGARDS  W  K   CBILL)  LAWSON 


SINC-LINK 


3 


DID         I  recently  recieved  a  phone  call  from  Bob  Swoger  to 
YOU         give  me  a  way  to  solve  a  problem  that  I  had  written 
KMOW      about  in  one  of  my  newsletter  articles.     He  helped 
■?  me  with  that  and  sent  me  a  copy  of  his  LogiCall  disk 

for  my  evaluation.     It  is  a  very  interesting  program 
and  includes  several  clever  files  as  a  part  of  the  suite  of 
programs.    One  of  them  is  a  way  to  keep  track  of  where  each  of 
his  disks  are  in  his  disk  files.     (He  says  he  has  over  400 
disks! ) 

Seeing  this  program  made  me  realize  that  I  had  tried  to  solve  a 
similiar  probem  in  a  different  way.     I  was  always  wondering 
where  I  had  disk  space  available.    Cataloging  disk  after  disk  to 
find  enough  space  to  file  something  drove  me  to  the  following 
solution.     I  realize  that  this  could  be  a  database  application, 
but  I  wanted  to  have  a  single  page  with  this  information  on  it! 

I  am  a  MScript  fan  so  I  have  a  MScript  file  loaded  in  my 
RAMdisk  called  freblk.CT.     It  contains  two  columns  with  the 
following  information: 

disk  number 

blocks  free 

description  of  contents 

I  have  used  the  Add  feature  to  bring  in  my  current  file  below  as 
an  example.  The  $  signifies  that  it  is  a  Spectrum  disk.  The 
catalog  to  text  feature  In  MScript  allows  me  to  call  up  the 
freblk.CT  file  and  then  catalog  any  new  disks  or  revised  disks. 
I  often  put  several  catalogs  in  the  text  then  Block  delete  every 
thing  between  the  disk  number  and  the  free  blocks  message.  I 
update  the  appropriate  disks  and  the  delete  the  catalog 
messages . 

I  have  about  100  5  1/4  disks  and  24  3  1/2  disks  and  the  printout 
fits  on  one  page.    This  scheme  would  probed>ly  be  awkward  for 
Bob's  400,  but  it  is  a  simple  solution  for  me. 

It  allows  me  to  find  a  disk  by  description  and  locate  where  I 
have  space  available. 


SAMPLE 


00 

00 

Larken  Utilities 

50 

01 

02 

Chambers  Utilities 

51 

02 

05 

Disk  Index 

52 

03 

03 

Utilities 

53 

04 

22 

Tasword  2+ 

54 

05 

12 

MScript 

55 

06 

01 

Adventure  Programs 

56 

07 

55 

Timachine  work  disk 

57 

08 

07 

Games 

58 

09 

00 

Best  Business/Utilit 

59 

10 

34 

$  Beta  Basic/Utilit 

60 

11 

04 

$  Tape  A  Games 

61 

12 

03 

$  Adventure  games 

62 

13 

02 

$  Tape  copiers /Util 

63 

14 

00 

$  Combat  games 

64 

Les  Co tt re 11 


19 

Ramdisk  RBAKUP 

02 

GFC  Sine-Link 

01 

b/u  of  66 

00 

DSDD  Omnibus 

47 

DB,  cmpres 

56 

77 

16 

Assmbl r/dissmbl rs 

01 

Interbank  Database 

00 

$  Languages 

47 

misc 

77 

15 

Single  drive  disk 

77 

05 

$  misc.  b/u 

Cocoa,  FL 


SING-LINK 


"Tony  EHIzzard 
512    E    Court,    Wei  set-,    Ida.  83672 


My  sozii  Ron»  tells  me  that  the  QL 
supporting  journals  need  articles  on  QL 
use  and  that,  since  I'm  a  heavy  user,  I 
should  write  some*  Okay«  But  most  of 
you  are  computer  buffs;  I'm  not.  The 
QL  is  the  only  computer  iVe  ever  used, 
excepting  a  couple  hours  playing  with  a 
Timex-Sinclair.  When  my  sons  advised 
me  to  get  one  of  those  "super- buy"  QL 
computers  I  asked,  "What  do  I  need 
with  a  computer?"  With  a  little 
argument  they  convinced  me  that  if  I 
only  used  the  word-processor  it  beat 
my  WD-40-soaked  IBM  Selectric  every 
way  imaginable.  Turns  out  they  were 
right.  That  is,  after  I  nearly  beat  the 
thing  to  death  learning  Quill  (old  dog, 
new  tricks  situation).  And  I  went 
through  the  same  trauma  with  Text87. 
(This  is  a  Text87  doc.) 

Materially,  my  mind  works  on 
mechanical  and  electrical  logic;  not 
computer  logic.  Therefore,  after  I  read 
a  new  program's  manual  I  call  Ron  to 
find  out  what  it  means.  He's  developed 
into  quite  a  translator. 

My  present  hardware  amounts  to  a 
Magnavox  RGB  monitor,  896K  Trump 
Card,  dual  5  1/4  Mitsubishi  discs  from 
Sharp,  a  Seikosha  SP  1200- AS  9  pin  and 
an  Epson  LQ-500  24  pin  printer  and  a 
back-up  QL  with  a  monocrome  monitor. 
The  Seikosha  just  prints  mcdling  labels 
these  days;  the  24-pin  doing  the  heavy 
work.  I  picked  up  a  cheap  Tandy  A/IB 
switch  to  put  between  them  and  made 
up  a  cable  from  switch  to  serial  1. 
Both  lights  of  the  *&#!90  disk  drivers 
come  on  every  time  a  floppy  is  called, 
always  have;  Stuber  wasn't  very 
anxious  to  help  fix  it  and  it  still  drives 
me  nuts.  Otherwise,  I*m  happy.  (Ron 
has  about  talked  me  into  networking 
the  backup  QL;  might  be  fun.) 

Software?  More  than  I  use.  Taught 
myself  Quill  and  Archive  out  of  the 
originals.  Ron  bought  me  Taskmaster; 
so  far  it's  mastered  me*  (But  I  hope  to 
write  its  "screen  saver"  into  every  boot 
I  have!)  Bought  Stuber's  early  version 
of  Xchange  and  have  had  to  learn  to 


use  it  for  its  mail-merge  feature,  which 
use  I  will  describe  herein.  Also  have 
Bill  Cable's  Archive  enhancements  and 
like  what  I've  used  very  much  but  for 
the  awfully  slow  screen  changes. 

Following  is  one  layman's  use  of  the 

QL: 

As  mentioned,  I  was  interested  in  a 
good  typewriter  -  QuilL  It  soon  made 
the  old  way  comparable  to  chiselling 
stone.  And,  until  someone  writes  a 
mail-merge  for  Text87,  I'll  continue  to 
use  it  for  special  purposes.  Being 
politically  oriented,  if  I'd  had  Quill  25 
years  ago,  a  lot  more  politicians  would 
have  had  to  make  a  lot  more  excuses 
concerning  their  actions. 

Being,  at  the  time  of  my  QL 
purchase,  maintenance  manager  of  a 
good-sized  vending  machine  business,  I 
soon  saw  the  advantage  of  a  machine 
data-base  for  the  whole  operation  and 
began  spending  my  evenings  typing  in 
data  for  every  machine  in  the  business. 
My  crew  groaned  when  I  first  exposed 
them  to  the  print-outs,  but  soon  they 
were  looking  for  updates  of  equipment 
on  locations  to  help  their  preparations 
for  repairs,  etc. 

Next,  two  of  my  sons  turned  their 
correspondence  into  a  magazine  and  I 
got  elected  to  keep  the  address  data- 
base -  now  up  to  about  1400  names. 

Have  also  developed  my  own  six- 
page  or  so  monthly  (?)  medl-out  sheet 
(Texts?  produced)  and  regularly  update 
its  address  data- base. 

Lastly,  I  run  an  irrigation-ditch 
lateral  in  our  part  of  town  7  months  of 
the  year  and  my  wife  has  now  become 
secretary-treasurer.  A  tax  bill  must  be 
sent  to  each  address  on  the  ditch-hne 
each  year.  In  the  past  the  secretary 
had  triplicate  legal  forms  printed, 
crash-numbered  and  bound  at 
considerable  cost.  Then  she  had  to 
laboriously  hand-enter  all  the 
information  for  each  address. 

Last  year  I  used  Xchange's  mail- 
merge  feature  and  set  up  the  whole  bill 
on  an  8  1/2  X  11  sheet  in  Quill;  then 


SINC-LINK 


created  an  Archive  data- base  to  hold 
each  lot*s  detailed  info*  This  entailed 
lcx>king  back  through  years  of  dusty 
records  and  making  trips  to  the  county 
assessor*s  office  to  find  the  answers  to 
riddles  caused  mainly  by  individualistic 
penmanship* 

To  create  a  form  including  all  the 
necessary  legalisms  on  one  sheet  really 
challenged  QuilPs  versatility,  (Samples 
are  provided  if  the  publisher  has 
display  space, )  I  could  never  have 
managed  it  without  Quill's  ability  to  u$e 
custom  translates  in  the  printer_dat. 
Happily,  I  had  made  drivers  beforehand 
using  translate  codes  (as  shown  by 
Mike  de  Sosa  in  an  article  from  an  old 
Time  Designs)  to  take  advantage  of  the 
LQ-500's  founts* 

When  it  came  time  to  merge  the  data 
into  the  form  most  everything  had  to 
be  jockeyed  around  some  more. 
Through  frustrating  trial  and  error  I 
discovered  that  the  Xchange  mail-merge 
only  worked  so  many  lines  down  the 
page.  Because  the  tax-payer  tear-off 
payment  stubs  had  to  be  at  the  bottom 
of  the  sheet  and  had  to  carry  the  same 
number  as  the  main  bill,  this  meant  that 
I  couldn't  merge  bill  numbers  I  had  set 
up  in  the  data-base.  Finally  I  used  a 
manual  numbering  machine.  However, 
Ron  recently  brought  his  new  public 
domain,  updated,  Xchange  and  we 
discovered  (just  before  my  QL's  original 
membrane,  as  well  as  that  of  the  back- 
up, decided  to  quit)  that  that  problem 
has  been  corrected.  This  year's  bills 
went  out  with  the  numbering  merged 
perfectly. 

To  have  everything  align  properly 
on  the  merged  sheet  I  discovered  that  I 
had  to  allot  the  proper  number  of 
spaces  on  the  doc  (even  though  it 
pushed  things  out  of  place  in  the  Quill 
template)  and  then  be  sure  to  fill  every 
space  of  every  field  in  the  database. 
That  meant  a  lot  of  spaces  run  into  the 
31  fields  on  the  Archive  screen  I  had 
created. 

During  the  course  of  €J1  this 
research  and  set-up  I  discovered  that 
through  the  passage  of  time,  selling  off 


of  parcels,  etc.,  the  ditch  tax  had  lost 
much  of  its  equity.  So  before  the  1993 
billing  this  cantankerous  old  dog 
attacked  Abacus  hoping  to  equalize  the 
tax- base  per  square  foot.  But  after 
learning  its  basics,  I  found  it  easier  to 
use  a  calculator.  Seems  that,  given 
length  &  width,  Abacus  could  figure 
square  fcx>tage  of  each  lot,  but  I  know 
zilch  about  math  formulas  and 
programing.  Maybe  someone  can  explain 
to  me  how  to  set  up  Abacus  to  do  that 
job  in  the  future. 

Last  year  I  printed  the  bills  on 
continuous  feed  paper.  This  time  I 
used  a  cut-sheet  feeder.  One  seems  to 
work  about  as  well  as  the  other 
although  the  cut-sheet  eliminates  the 
extra  time  needed  to  tear  all  the 
perforations. 

By  the  way,  a  local  programer  wrote 
a  special  PC  program  for  another  ditch- 
lateral  company  in  town  which  went  on 
computer  a  year  before  us.  They  still 
have  a  glitchy  situation  with  botched 
bills  while,  except  for  the  manual 
numbering  -  now  corrected  -  our  bills 
printed  out  without  a  hitch  first  time 
out. 

Don't  know  if  this  is  what  QL 
publications  need,  but  this  is  how  I  use 
my  QL.  As  for  the  technicalities  of  how 
some  of  the  objectives  are  accomplished 
-  I  tend  to  forget  the  details  until  I 
have  to  do  it  again.  Then  re-reading 
the  manual  usually  refreshes  my 
memory. 

Again,    I'm    not    a    computer  buff, 

tool  when  I  see  it  operate.  Now  when 
the  grandkids  play  the  simple  Quanta 
library  games  on  my  QL,  I  get  nervous. 
And  when  the  membrane  gave  up  I 
W€usn't  sure  how  life  would  progress. 
Luckily,  Frank  Davis  of  Mechanical 
Affinity  had  me  fixed  up  with  new- 
production  membranes  in  just  two  days. 
Real  service! 

Hey,  when  the  QL  "died"  I  was  too 
busy  using  mine  to  attend  the  funeral. 

-  end  - 


SINC-LINK 


MIDDLE    WEISER    IRRiaATION  LATERAL 

NOTICE  OF  TAXES 


DI STRI CT 


TAX  LEVY  FOE  1993 


Weiser,  Idaho,       November  ,1993 


♦firstname*  *lastname* 
^street* 

*city*,  *state*  *2ip* 
*careof* 


Please  take  notice  that  your  taxes  for  the 
year  1993  on  the  below  described  property 

amount  to  the  sum  of 

*writtenamnt*    DOLLARS  $*amnt* 


DESCRIPTION  OF  LANDS 


*descriptionl* 
*description2* 
♦descriptions* 


*lotl*  *b* 
*lot222**b2* 
*lot3*  *b3* 


Lot      !  Blk  ! Apportionment } 
Total  Tax  $*amnt* 

!      1/2  Pd.  1993   

!        Balance  Due 


! AMOUNT  AND  DISTRIBUTION 


!  Penalty 

I  Advertising 

\        Total  Paid  t 

Year 


*yr* 

1993, 

*y2* 

on  or  before 
said 

*y3* 

11  becoBe 

ilinquent 


ON  ABOVE  PROPERTY 
Tax    ! Interest!  Amount 


♦tax* 


*tx2* 


*tx3* 


!  *in* 


!  *i2* 


!  *i3* 


IMPORTANT  -  Notice  is  hereby  given  that  the  assessments  above  indicated 
are  due  and  payable  at  the  office  of  the  District,  sane  being  the  hone 
of  Bart»i^  Blizzard  in  Weiser,  Idaho.    Said  assesaMent  will  becoM  de- 

li^ient  at  6:00  o'clock  p.a.  on  the  third  ffooday  of 


{  *tot* 


!  *to2* 


I  *to3* 


provided  that  if  one-half  of  the  sase  shall  be  paid 


date,  the  reaainder  say  run  without  interest  but  wi 


if  not  paid  on  or  before  6:00  o'clock  p. a.  on  the  third  Monday  of  June, 
1994.    A  penalty  of  two  percoit  will  be  added  to  all  delinquent  assess-- 
aents  and  an  interest  diarge  of  ten  <10)  percent  per  annia  fro«  January 
lat  will  accrue  until  settlsMnt.    THXSX  AiKHniTS  ASE  SIT  BT  LAW. 
Make  renittance  payable  to:      AA£BARA  BLXZZABD,  Secretary 

 512  Bast  Court.  W«i«er.  Idaho  83672 


//  the  owner's  name  is  not  correct 
please  indicate  below: 


Present  Owner 
Address 


MEMO: 


Secretary 


Your  cancelled  check  is  your  receipt 


FOR  PROPER  CRBDIT  CUT  AND  RBTURN  THIS  PORTION  WITH  PAYMBNTJFOR  PROPER  CREDIT  CUT  AND  RETURN  THIS  PORTION  WITH  PATMENT 

No.*niii*  1993 1  »o.*niii*  1993 


FULL  OR  FINAL  PAYMENT 


.  19 


Barbara  Blizzard,  Secretary 
12  East  Court,  Weiser,  Idaho 


FIRST  INSTALLMENT 


,  19 


Barbara  Blizzard,  Secretary 
512  East  Court,  Weiser,  Idaho 


SINC-LINK 


7 


MIDDLE    WEISER    IRRIGATION    LATERAL  DISTRICT 

NOTICE  OF  TAXES 

TAX  LEVY  FOR  1993 


No,  105 


Mary  Anderson 
434  E  Court 

Weiser,  ID  83672 


Weiser,  Idaho,        November  ,1991 

Please  take  notice  that  your  taxes  for  the 
year  1993  on  the  below  described  property 
amount  to  the  sum  of 


Thirty-five- 


DOLLARS      $  35.00 


DESCRI PTION  OF  LANDS 


AMOUNT  AND  DISTRIBUTION 


Hanthorn  Add*n. 

140'  X  100*    14000  sq' 


Lot 


Blk! Apportionment 


14-15  4 


Total  Tax      $  35.00 

1/2  Pd.  1993   

Balance  Due 
Penalty 

Advertising   

Total  Paid  t 


THE  FOLLOWING  TAXES  ARE  DELIQUENT 

ON  ABOVE  PROPERTY 
Year    1    Tax    ! Interest !  Amount 


It  the  owner *s  name  is  not  correct 
please  indicate  below: 

Present  Owner  


IMPORTANT  -  Notice  is  hereby  given  that  the  assessaents  above  indicated 
are  due  and  i^ayable  at  the  office  of  the  District,  saae  being  the  hose 
of  Barbara  Blizzard  in  Weiser,  IiUOio.    Said  assesflneiit  trill  bccoae  de- 
li^^t  at  6:00  o'clock  p.B.  on  tlie  tblrd  Hoaday  of  Peceaber^  1093, 
provided  that  if  one-half  of  the  saae  shall  be  paid  on  or  before  said 
date,  the  reaainder  say  run  without  interest  but  will  becoae  delinquent 
if  not  paid  on  or  before  6:00  o'clock  p*B.  on  the  third  Honday  of  June, 
1994*    A  penalty  of  two  percsest  vill  be  added  to  all  delinquent  assess- 
■ents  and  an  interest  charge  of  ten  (10)  percent  per  ann»  trtm  January 
1st  will  accrue  tmtil  settlsMnt.    TOSE  AMDOIITS  AU  SBT  BY  LAV. 

Make  resittance  payable  to:      BARBARA  BLIZZARD,  Secretary 
 512  last  Court.  Weiser.  Idaho  83672  


Address 


NEMO: 


Secretary 


Your  cancelled  check  is  your  receiut 


FOR  PROPER  CREDIT  CUT  AMD  RETURN  TBIS  PORTION  WITH  PAYMENT 

No. 105  1993 

FULL  OR  FINAL  PAYMENT 

,  19  1 

;POR  PTOPER  CREDIT  CUT  AND  RETURN  TBIS  PORTION  WITH  PAYMENT 

No. 105  1993 

FIRST  INSTALLMENT 

.  19 

Barbara  Blizzard,  Secretary 

512  East  Court,  Weiser,  Idaho  ] 
Enclosed  find  S                      in  Final  and  Full  ! 

Barbara  Blizzard,  Secretary 
512  East  Court,  Weiser,  Idaho 

Enclosed  find  t                        in  navment  of 

payment  of  taxes  levied  for  the  year  1993  on  | 
the  property  described  in  the  Tax  Notice  bear-  1 
ing  the  same  number  and  year  as  this  stub  and  1 
from  which  this  stub  has  been  detached.  | 
Respectfully,  j 

the  First  Installment  of  taxes  levied  for  the 
year  1993  on  the  property  described  in  the 
Tax  Notice  bearing  the  same  number  and  year 
as  this  stub  and  from  which  this  stub  has 
been  detached.  Respectfully, 

SINC-LINK 


-TURBO     SWITCH     p-ot^      TKi«^  ZXQl 

Transcribed  from  the  Winter   1993  issue  of  ZXir  QLive  Alive 


Th*  vhole  idea  of  experiwnting  vith  a  'TURBO 
--ach»  cate  froi  reading  thf  book  "EXPLORER'S  8UIDE  TO  THE 
T/S  1000'  by  Nike  Lord.  On  page  58(1)  of  the  book  under  the 
heading  'Keyboard  Scanning'  he  tells  how  the  systei  variable 
NAR6IN  lay  be  changed  froi  55  to  31  by  taking  pin  22  of  the 
ULA  chip  HI6H  or  LOH.   This  is  supposed  to  be  of  use  to  the 
coiputer  ianufacturer  to  enable  the  T/S  1000  to  be  used  in 
either  the  USA  which  uses  31  blank  lines  at  the  top  and 
bottot  of  the  screen,  or  in  the  UK  which  uses  55  blank 
lines.   The  book  also  states  on  page  52(2)  under  the  heading 
•NHI  Handler'  that  'Hhen  in  the  SLOW  lode  the  UBl  uses  the 
tiie  occupied  by  these  blank  lin#s  to  carry  on  with  your 
prograi". 

So  I  thought  if  I  increased  the  nutber  of  lines  on 
•y  T/S  1000,  I  light  increase  the  speed  of  prograi 
execution.  And  it  works  well.  I  use  direct  video  and  have 
not  tried  it  using  the  RF  lodulator,  but  if  you  use  direct 
vidM  I  think  you  will  have  success  froa  the  lodification. 

To  test  the  speed  of  prograi  execution  I  use  the 
following  BASIC  prograi: 

10  FOR  H  «  1  TO  500 
20  leXT  N 

30  PRItIT  •FINISHED' 

With  pin  22  HI6H  the  coiputer  takes  20  seconds, 
!  the  pin  LOH,  the  prograi  takes  28  seconds,  (About  a  28Z 
incffise  in  speed.  Don).  This  is  a  considerable  increase  in 
speed.  One  light  ask  •»iy  have  a  TIKBO  Switch?"  Well,  when  I 
use  ly  UORDt  prograi  (word  processor)  at  the  •TURBO'  spe#d 
the  cursor  pi  inks  at  about  twice  the  norial  rate  and  do#s 
not  s#ei  to  liss  keys  as  it  did  in  the  past,  and  when 
playing  gaies  I  use  the  slower  speed  so  that  I  can  get  a 
higher  score! 


When  using  the  higher   speed  I   find  the  lonitor 
screen  is  filled  with  lines  froi  top  to  bottoi,   when  using 
the  slow  speed  I  find  a  blank  screen  at  the  top  and  bottoi 
1/2  inch  of  the  screen.  I  can  switch  froi  'TURBO'  to  norial 
at  any  tiie  without  any  crashes. 

Lastly,   how  is  the  lodification  carried  out?  You 
have  to  take  the  T/S  1000  circuit  board  out  of  it's  case  and 
locate  resistor  R30  which  is  located  between  the  ULA  chip 
and  the  regulator  heat  sink.  It  should  have  the  colors  Brown 
Black  Brown. 

Using  a  soldering  iron,  lift  the  left  hand  end  of 
the  resistor  clear  froi  the  circuit  board  hole.  Also  locate 
resistor  R38  which  is  four  resistors  down  froi  R30,  and 
solder  one  end  of  soie  two  core  cable  to  the  left  hand  end 
of  R38,  which  should  be  a  5V  rail.  To  the  raised  left  hand 
end  of  R30,  solder  one  end  of  a  IK  1/4H  resistor.  Bend  the 
resistor  upwards  and  solder  the  other  end  to  the  right  hand 
end  of  R34,  which  is  a  OV  rail.  To  the  junction  of  R30  and 
the  added  IK  resistor  solder  the  other  core  of  the  two  core 
cable,  toe  the  other  end  of  the  cable  solder  a  switch  of  the 
single  throw  single  pole  type. 

That  coipUtes  the  circuit  board  lodification.  Try 
connecting  a  lultiieter  to  the  solder  connection  between  R30 
and  the  IK  resistor,  and  ground.  Hhen  the  T/S  1000  is 
powered  up,  the  'TURBO'  switch  should  change  the  voltage 
fros  nearly  0  volts  to  if^g^iy  §  volts,  flnd  if  you  have  your 
lonitor  connected  you  should  see  the  screw  flicker. 

The  switch  should  be  lounted  soiewhere  convenient, 
accessible  froi  outside  the  T/S  1000.  I  have  ly  T/S  1000 
lOunted  inside  a  steel  chassis  and  so  I  lounted  the  'TURBO' 
switch  on  the  front  panel  with  the  words  'TURBO'  and 
'NORHAL'  along  side  the  switch.  Try  EMTERing  and  running  the 
prograi  that  I  LISTed  earlier  and  see  the  difference  the 
switch  lakes.  ENJOY! 


SINC-LINK 


732068" LARKEN  TIDBIT 
by  6.  Chambers 

Here  is  an  interest  ing  thing  I  did  with  my  system  in  recent  days.  It 
may  prove  useful  to  some  of  our  member Sm 

I  had  typed  up  a  letter,  using  the  word  processor  MSCRIPT.  While 
attempt  ing  to  print  out  the  letter  I  inadvertent  I y  did  something  to  the 
computer  which  caused  it  to  lock  up.   I  was  not  able  to  release  it.  The 
NMl^A  key  function  did  nothing.  What  a  quandary.   I  was  not  looking 
forward  to  re^typing  the  letter. 

I  was  sure  that  the  material  I  had  typed  was  still   in  the  computer. 
So  when  all  else  had  failed  I  saved  the  whole  of  the  computer  RAM 
memory,  starting  at  the  screen,   to  a  Larken  disk,  using  an  NMI^type 
save.   This  gave  me  ten  tracks  on  a  disk. 

I  then  loaded  the  ^doctor. BV*  program  (on  TTSUC  library  disk  HI),  and 
used  two  of  it's  options  to  find  the  tracks  that  contained  my  typing. 
First  I  used  the  option  which  told  me  what  programs  were  on  each  of  the 
tracks  of  the  disk.  Then  using  option  "0"  /  loaded  the  tracks  likeliest 
to  hold  my  data.   I  found  the  letter  on  tracks  7  and  8  of  the  NMI-^  Save. 
Though  actually  on  tracks  3U  and  35  of  the  disk.  Do  you  follow  me? 

Now,  the  option  "D"  told  me  that  the  first  track  with  text  was  loaded 
into  the  computer,  starting  at  address  50000,  and  was  5090  bytes  long. 
I  ^ broke  out  of  the  ''doctor''  program  and  did  a  save  of  that  part  of 
memory  holding  the  track.  Although  the  track  was  loaded  into  memry 
starting  at  50000,   I  knew  that  the  first  2^4^  bytes  were  concerned  with 
informat  ion  about  the  file;  that  the  actual  data  started  at  5002H^  So  I 
did  a  save  of  code;  PRINT  USR  100s  SAVE  "lostl.CM"  CODE  5002^^,5090.  The 
".CM"  suffix  was  used  since  my  version  of  MSCRIPT  uses  this  suffix. 

I  did  the  same  thing  for  the  second  track.  Loading  the  second  track 
containing  text  and  saving  it,  this  time  using  the  command  PRINT  USR 
100:  SAVE  "lost 2. CM"  CODE  50021,5090. 

I  then  installed  MCRIPT  in  the  2068,   loaded  the  first  track,  and  then 
merged  the  second  track.  Note  that  with  MSCRIPT  (Dohany's  version)  you 
use  the  Add  option  to  merge  a  file. 

Everything  was  back  in  MSCRIPT,  except  for  a  missing  word  between  the 
two  f i les.  There  were  a  few  lines  of  superfluous  garbage  which  were 
easily  removed.   I  was  struck  with  how  easy  it  was.     The  seventh  track  of 
a  lO^track  Larken  NMI^type  save  starts  at  address  U692H,  while  MSCRIPT 
stores  text  starting  at  address  H692U7.   That's  called  serendipity. 

And^  if  you  are  curious  as  to  the  the  meaning  of  "serend i pity" ,  the 
d  ict  ionary  describes  it  as  'the  faculty  of  finding  valuable  or  agreeable 
things  not  sought  for'.  How  apt! 


SINC-LINK 


SPORTS  GAMING  AND  THE  T/S  2068 


I*m  sure  many  of  us  utilize  our  computers  as  an  aid  in 
pursuing  another  hobby.    Perhaps  you  have  an  astronomy  program 
to  plot  star  and  planet  positions  for  your  sky  viewing.  Or 
maybe  you  have  an  interest  in  stamps  or  coins  and  use  a  database 
in  cataloging  your  collections.  My  "other"  hobby  is  collecting 
sports  games  -  the  table-top,  board  games  that  generally  use 
dice,  charts  and  cards  to  represent  real  or  imaginary  athletes 
and  teaEis.     Probably  all  of  us  have  seen  games  of  this  nature, 
football  or  baseball  most  likely,  but  there  actually  are  games 
representing  nearly  every  sport: 

My  own  collection  has  grown  to  over  200  games,  starting 
with  the  classic  Cadaco  All-Star  Baseball  game  when  I  was  about 
ten  or  so.    Over  the  decades  since,  I've  accummulated  games  in 
just  about  every  sport,  with  a  special  emphasis  on  obscure, 
limited  production  games.    With  a  collection  that  grows  with 
every  new  game  that  I  can  find,  I've  found  it  convenient  to 
catalog  them,  but  rather  than  use  a  database  such  as  Pro/File  or 
Vu-File,  I  just  list  them  by  sport  in  an  MSCRIPT  file.    For  my 
purposes,  at  least,  a  word-processor  makes  a  superior  database, 
especially  with  respect  to  ease  of  typing,  editing  and  hard  copy 
formatting. 

"Merging"  ray  two  hobbies  goes  beyond  just  cataloging  my 
collection,  however.     From  the  time  I  got  that  first  T/S  1000 
back  in  the  early  'BOs,  I  realized  that  a  computer  could 
actually  help  me  play  the  games.    Like  many  computer  users,  game 
players  tend  to  "tinker  with  the  hardware",  modifying  the 
original,  perhaps  adding  features  that  are  either  missing  or  not 
handled  to  the  owner's  satisfaction.    As  a  matter  of  fact,  quite 
a  few  games  have  originated  from  this  feeling  of  "I  can  do  it 
better".    Many  of  these  were  one  shot  efforts,  produced  with 
great  expectations  of  challenging  the  long-dominant  leaders  in 
the  sports  game  field,  such  as  APBA  and  Strat-O-Matic,  but  then 
burning  out  rather  quickly  when  confronted  with  the  harsh 
reality  of  high  production  costs  and  expensive  advertising.  In 
spite  of  their  defunct  status,  however,  these  "one-man  show" 
games  are  among  ray  favorites. 

Several  times  I've  also  tried  my  hand  at  creating  games 
from  scratch,  once  even  with  a  vague  idea  of  actually  producing 
a  hockey  game  for  sale.    Looking  back  on  that  '70s  idea  seems  a 
little  amusii^  now,  since  I  knew  only  a  little  about  hockey  and 
even  less  about  the  mechanics  of  game  production  and  marketing. 

When  I  got  the  T/S  1000,  however,  the  idea  of  creating  my  own 
games  was  replaced  almost  immediately  by  the  realization  that 
the  machine  could  help  me  play  the  game  that  I  was  focusing  on 
at  that  time,  a  boxing  game  produced  by  Aval on  Hill  called 
"Title  Bout".     It  might  sound  odd,  but  I've  actually  played  the 
games  in  my  collection  very  little,  many  not  at  all,  content 
just  to  look  at  them  occasionally.    Many  gamers,  on  the  other 
hand,  conduct  solitaire  season  replays  for  their  favorite 
baseball  team,  for  example,  compiling  comprehensive  statistics. 

For  myself,  the  time  investment  in  such  a  project  always  seemed 
prohibitive,  so  the  appeal  of  a  game  representing  boxing  might 
seem  understandable:    only  two  fighters  to  deal  with  at  a  time, 
few  statistics  and  a  short  contest.    Added  to  that  was  the  fact 


SINC-LINK 


that  "Title  Bout"  was  extremely  well  done  -  very  playable, 
realistic  and  accurate,  and  most  importantly,  a  lot  of  fun.'  I 
spent  hours  playing  hundreds  of  fights,  mostly  the  great 
heavyweights  of  boxing  history. 

The  computer  was  a  natural  for  this  game.    Unlike  many 
other  sports  games,  the  necessary  random  number  generator  was 
not  dice,  but  rather  "action  cards"  from  which  one  took  a 
reading  to  determine  what  was  occuring  in  the  ring.    The  deck  of 
80  cards  represented  two  rounds,  each  card  being  used  once  then 
discarded.    Even  though  I  felt  that  action  cards  had  an 
advantage  over  dice  in  terms  of  speed  and  play  flow,  it  was 
still  somewhat  of  a  hassle  shuffling  the  deck  after  every  two 
rounds,  especially  to  make  sure  that  cards  didn't  stick  together 
thereby  compromising  randomness.    Enter  the  computer  and  a 
rudimentary  grasp  of  Basic.    My  first  program  was  simply  to 
display  a  "card"  on  the  screen,  mimicking  the  deck.    Read  a 
"card",  press  enter  for  the  next  one,  and  repeat  40  times  per 
round.    My  first  departure  from  this  literal  reproduction  of  the 
deck  was  to  realize  that  more  than  one  reading  could  be  taken 
from  the  screen  "card".    The  physical  deck  had  several 
categories  on  each  card  -  different  random  numbers  that  might  be 
used  for  determining  who  was  in  control  of  the  action  or  if  a 
punch  had  been  landed,  for  example,  but  only  one  reading  could 
be  used  from  each  card,  for  randomness*  sake.    Each  "reading"  on 
the  computer  card,  however,  was  independent  of  the  others  on  the 
same  card.    By  taking  several  readings  at  a  time,  I  was  able  to 
cut  down  the  number  of  <ENTER>*s  from  40  to  about  15  per  round- 
But  what  the  computer  giveth  it  also  taketh  away:  the  machine 
needed  to  know  when  exactly  40  readings  had  been  used  in  order 
to  end  the  round  and  I  was  required  to  tell  it! 

As  the  months  passed  and  my  programming  knowledge 
increased,  I  was  able  to  go  beyond  this  very  elementary 
presentation  of  one  aspect  of  the  game,  the  action  card  deck, 
and  incorporate  other  elements.    A  few  lines  to  display  the 
fighters*  names  and  scores,  for  example,  were  added  to  the 
program  to  eliminate  the  need  to  move  markers  on  the  actual 
gameboard.    Again,  however,  I  had  to  input  this  information,  so 
the  net  work/time  saving  was  minimal .    The  fact  that  more  and 
more  of  the  game  was  going  onto  the  screen  did  please  me, 
though . 

At  about  this  time  I  was  corresponding  with  a  man  in  Iowa 
concerning  an  article  I  had  written  for  a  game  magazine  on  Title 
Bout  boxer  ratings.    I  mentioned  that  I  had  a  new  little 
computer  arul  that  I  was  attempting  to  program  the  game.    He  was 
intrigued  to  the  point  of  wanting  to  purchase  a  T/S  1000  just  to 
see  my  effort.    Unfortunately  he  couldn't  find  a  1000  and 
instead  bought  a  Commodore  64  and  immediately  typed  in  my 
program  (from  a  2040  printout  -  that  takes  both  patience  and 
good  vision!)  and  began  making  suggestions  for  improvements. 

One  idea  he  expressed  struck  me  as  both  desirable  and  naive  - 
he  saw  no  reason  the  entire  game  couldn't  be  computerized.  I, 
on  the  other  hand,  saw  plenty  of  difficulty  in  achieving  such  a 
goal  -  the  number  and  complexity  of  charts  in  the  game  depicting 
events  such  as  cuts,  knockdowns  and  so  on  as  well  as  our  amateur 
status  as  programmers  discouraged  me  from  seeing  the  idea  as 
viable. 


SINC-LINK 


Our  correspondence  eventually  ended  as  did  a  lot  of  my 
interest  in  programming  Title  Bout.     Over  the  next  few  years,  I 
was  constantly  working  on  some  game  or  another  with  respect  to 
the  computer  but  I  had  pretty  much  taken  TB  as  far  as  I  thought 
I  could  -  the  game  was  probably  95*  autoplay  at  that  point, 
requiring  only  an  occasional  input.     I  couldn't  just  choose  two 
boxers,  start  the  program  and  come  back  10  minutes  later  for  a 
decision  because,  sure  enough,  about  the  fifth  round  some 
obscure  condition  would  require  human  input.     Since  I  was 
playing  the  game  so  little,  this  situation  didn*t  really  bother 
me  much. 

About  this  time,  my  brother  in  Arizona  bought  his  first 
computer,  a  286  clone.     Doug  doesn't  share  my  interest  in  games 
but  thought  it  might  be  fun  to  translate  the  TB  program  to  GW 
Basic  as  a  project  we  could  work  on  during  one  of  my  semi-annual 
visits.     I  mailed  him  the  2040  printout  of  the  program  a  couple 
of  days  before  I  flew  in,  assuming  we  would  spend  most  of  the 
time  just  re-typing  it,  but  was  astonished  to  find  he*d  entered 
the  whole  thing,  even  going  so  far  as  to  figure  out  how  to 
correctly  translate  Sinclair  basic  in  many  cases.    With  the 
drudgery  out  of  the  way,  we  worked  on  things  like  screen 
presentation  and  the  use  of  color  graphics.    But  Doug's  real 
contribution  was  to  encourage  us  to  go  ahead  and  try  to 
incorporate  the  last  few  elements  of  the  game  that  would  make  it 
truly  an  autoplay  game.    He  had  a  lot  of  good  ideas,  especially 
considering  the  fact  that  he'd  never  even  seen  the  board  game, 
relying  on  my  description  of  it.     It  took  us  all  of  my  vacation, 
two  weeks,  but  we  did  finish  it.     I  came  home  with  the  completed 
program  on  a  Citizen  200-'GX  printout,  ready  to  type  the  new 
changes  back  to  my  TS  and  even  more  ready  to  go  out  and  buy  an 
80  column  printer!     I  did  both  I'm  happy  to  report  and  not  long 
after  added  a  disk  drive  to  complete  my  system. 

I  don't  see  much  being  added  to  the  program  in  the  future 
and  I  doubt  that  I'll  play  the  game  very  often,  but  I  would 
certainly  be  glad  to  share  the  Title  Bout  program  with  anyone 
interested  enough  to  send  a  cassette  or  disk  (Larken)  to:  Mike 
Stephens,  312  Newton  Avenue,  Oakland  CA  94606-1320. 


SINC-LINK 


INSTRUCTIONS  FOR  BOXING: 


My  attempt  to  translate  Avalon-Hill 's  boxing  board  game. 
Title  Bout,  into  Sinclair  Basic  consists  of  two  versions  of  the 
program:    BOX08.BH  is  the  regular  program  while  QBOX.BH 
eliminates  ail  screen  display  to  provide  a  faster,  result-only 
outc<^e.  A  ten  round  bout  that  normally  takes  11  minutes  or  so 
can  be  run  off  in  about  six  with  QBOX* 

The  game  has  four  screens  in  addition  to  the  opening  credit 
screen.    They  are: 

1.  "Boxer  Choice  Screen":  20  all-time  heavyweight  boxers 
may  be  chosen  by  letter.    <AUTOPLAY>  allows  you  to  watch  or  walk 
away.    The  bout  proceeds  to  conclusion  with  no  input  necessary. 

<CONTINUE>  requires  a  keypress  at  various  times «  such  as  the 
end  of  the  round*  after  a  knockdown,  etc. 

2.  "Round  Screen":  shows  each  boxer's  style.   (S) lugger  or 
(B)oxer.     Important  ratings  are  displayed: 

CF:     control  factor;  ability  to  control  the  fight 
PL:    punches  landed;  punching  accuracy  modified  by 

opponent's  defense 
HP:    hitting  power 
KDRi  tendency  to  be  knocked  down 
HV:    hit  value;  ability  to  land  stronger  punches 

Higher  ratings  are  better  except  for  KDR.    When  a  fighter 
becomes  tired  a  "t"  shows  before  his  name  and  his  HP  and  PL 
ratings  are  decreased  by  one  each  round. 

3.  "Action  Screen":  shows  punches  landed  &  missed,  fouls, 
clinches,  knockdowns,  etc.    Cuts  are  described  when  they  happen 
then  coded  by  letter  (A-I)  and  round  number.    To  see  a 
description  of  all  cuts,  break  into  the  program  and  check  lines 
6720-6600.    Total  points  from  punches  landed  in  the  round  appear 
to  the  right  of  the  name.     (AGG)  gives  1  point  to  the  higher 
aggressiveness  rating  (if  any) .    On  a  Knockdown  or  5  point 
punch.  Killer  Instinct  CKI)  will  be  shown  at  the  top  -  the  boxer 
landing  the  big  punch  will  retain  control  until  KI  disappears. 

The  timer  showing  the  round  and  count  is  at  the  bottom  right; 
the  count  decreases  from  40  (this  could  be  converted  to  a 
digital  clock  if  anyone  is  interested.     In  the  board  game  40 
cards  constitute  one  round).    The  length  of  a  bout  is  set  at  10 
rounds  but  that  too  could  be  altered. 

4.  "Score  Screen":  displays  controls  won.  punches  landed 
and  missed,  and  points  frcm  punches  landed  for  the  round 
completed  and  the  fight.    Judges'  and  referee*s  scoring  is  not 
shown  until  the  bout  is  over  but  "My"  score  provides  an 
objective  (though  unofficial)  analysis  based  strictly  on  who 
scored  the  most  points  in  the  round.    The  officials'  cards  may 
not  agree!  Scoring  is  on  the  1  point  must  system.  Knockdowns 
for  are  shown  under  "K*s"  and  cuts  (if  any)  are  shown  in  coded 
form.    TKO/condition  information  is  displayed  if  pertinent. 

I  would  be  happy  to  correspond  with  anyone  regarding  this 
program,  including  adding  other  fighters  and  providing  options 
for  a  clock,  bout  length  and  other  scoring  systems.    A  64  column 
version  utilizing  Taswide  is  also  available.  For  those  with  IM 
compatible  computers  I  highly  recommend  the  game  "TKO  Pro 
Boxing"  by  the  creator  of  Title  Bout  and  a  professional 
programmer.    Hundreds  of  boxers  are  included  and  a  running 
commentary  adds  a  great  deal  to  the  gome,  available  from  Lance 
Haffner  Games. 

Please  send  questions  and  conments  to:    Mike  Stephens.  312 
Newton  Avenue.  Oakland  CA  94606-1320. 


The  Larken  disk  version  of  this  gaune  is  available 
in  the  TTSUC  disk  library.  Ed. 


SINC-LINK 


name 


Dec  Hex 


Instr-Dec 


Reaarks     ( 9 } 


name 


Dec 


Hex 


Instr-Dec 


Remarks 


tranok 


3011 
3014 
3017 
3019 
3022 
3025 
3028 
3031 
3032 
3034 
3037 
3038 
3041 
3042 
3044 
3047 
3049 
3050 
3053 
3054 
3056 
3059 
_3062 
3064 
3067 
3070 
3072 
3074 
3075 
3078 
3079 
3081 
3084 
3087 
3090 
3093 
3094 
3096 
3099 
3102 
3104 
3107 
3110 
3113 
3114 
3116 
3119 
3123 
3124 
3127 
3128 
3129 
3131 
3133 
3135 
3137 
3138 
3139 
3140 
3141 
3143 
3144 
3147 
3148 
3150 
3151 
3153 
3154 
3157 
3158 
3160 
3162 
3164 
3166 
3169 
3170 
3171 
3173 
3175 
3178 
3180 
3183 
3186 
3187 
3188 


0BC3 

0BC6 

0BC9 

OBCB 

OBCE 

OBDl 

0BD4 

0BD7 

0BD8 

OBDA 

OBDO 

OBDE 

OBEl 

0BE2 

0BE4 

0BE7 

0BE9 

OBEA 

OBBD 

OBEE 

OBFO 

0Br3 

0BF6 

0BF8 

OBFB 

OBFE 

OCOO 

0C02 

0C03 

0C06 

0C07 

0C09 

OCOC 

OCOP 

0C12 

0C15 

0C16 

0C18 

OCIB 

OCIE 

0C20 

0C23 

0C26 

0C29 

0C2A 

0C2C 

0C2F 

0C30 

0C34 

0C37 

0C38 

0C39 

0C3B 

0C3D 

0C3F 

0C41 

0C42 

QC43 

0C44 

0C45 

0C4  7 

0C48 

0C4B 

0C4C 

0C4E 

0C4F 

0C51 

0C52 

0C55 

0C56 

0C58 

0C5A 

0C5C 

0C5E 

0C61 

0C62 

0C63 

0C65 

0C67 

0C6A 

0C6C 

0C6F 

0C72 

0C73 

0C74 


LD  HL,  (8236) 
LD  DE,  8329 
LDIR 

CALL  1135 

GALL  3651 

CALL  1084 

LD  A,  (8224) 

AND  A 

JR  Z,  3064 

LD  A,  (8223) 

DEC  A 

LD  (8223) 

AND  A 

JR  NZ,  3001 
LD  HL,  (8245) 
LD  (HL),  245 
INC  HL 

LD  (8245),  HL 

LD  A,  (HL) 

CP  249 

JP  Z,  2424 

LD  (8221).  A 

JR  2996 

LD  HLt  (8245) 

LD  A,  (8247) 

CP  100 

JR  3110 

INC  HL 

LD  (8245),  HL 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  249 
JP  Z,  2424 
LD  (8249).  A 
LD  HL.  8249 
LD  A,  (8221} 
CP  (HL) 
JR  Z,  3104 
CALL  3807 
LD  HL,  8249 
JR  3090 
CALL  2860 
JP  2981 
LD  HL,  (8245) 
INC  HL 

LD   (HL),  249 
CALL  2307 
LD  DE,  (8245) 
INC  DE 
LD  HL,  8260 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  (HL) 
249 

Z,  3143 
245 

Z.  3127 
A,  (HL) 
A 


CP 
JR 
CP 
JR 
LD 

LD  (DE) 
INC  DE 
INC  HL 
JR  3128 
LD  (DE),  A 
LD  HL,  8250 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  253 
CP  (HL) 
JR  NZ,  3147 
INC  HL 

LD  (8241),  HL 

LD  A,  (HL) 

CP  249 

JR  Z,  3180 

CP  245 

JR  Z,  3153 

LD  HL,  8328 

INC  HL 

CP  (HL) 

JR  NZ,  3169 

LD  (HL),  245 

LD  HL,  (8241) 

JR  3153 

CALL  3651 

LD  A,  (8194) 

AND  A 

BET  NZ 

JP  1596 


encdbf 
savebf 
Idbuf 
errnu 


attempts  counter 
attempts  counter 

temp  6 

block  in  use 

temp6 

name  end 

curtrk 

temp  6 

d 

temp6 
name  end 


curtrk 


nextrk 


PRINT 
LPRINT 


CAT 


temp6 

name  end 

indir 

temp6 


name  end 

block  in  use 


directory 
1st  block 

temp2 
name  end 
block  in  use 


block  in  use 
temp  2 

savebf 
nmif lag 


3191     0C77     LD  C,  9 

3193  0C79     LD  A,  (HL) 

3194  0C7A     RST  16 

3195  0C7B     INC  HL 

3196  0C7C     DEC  C 

3197  0C7D     JR  NZ,  3193 

3199  0C7F     INC  D 

3200  0C80     INC  HL 

3201  0C81     LD  C,  0 

3203  0C83     LD  A,  (HL) 

3204  0C84     CP  249 
3206     0C86     JR  Z,  3216 
3208     0C88     CP  255 
3210     0C8A     JR  Z,  3216 

3212  0C8C     INC  C 

3213  0C8D     INC  HL 

3214  0C8E  JR  3203 
3216  0C90  LD  B,  3 
3218  0C92     LD  A,  32 

3220  0C94  RST  16 

3221  0C95  DJNZ  3219 

3223  0C97  LD  A,  C 

3224  0C98  PUSH  HL 

3225  0C9A  PUSH  BC 

3226  0C9A  CALL  1781 

3229  0C9D  POP  BC 

3230  0C9E  POP  HL 

3231  0C9F  DEC  HL 

3232  OCAO  DEC  HL 

3233  OGAl  LD  A,  32 
3235  0CA3  RST  16 

_3236  0CA4  RET 

3237  "Disk  Contents" 

3253  "Disk  Name 

3266  0CC2  LD  A,  2 

3268  0CC4  LD  HL,  4656 

3271  0CC7  LD  DE,  5633 

3274  OCCA  CALL  1046 

3277  OCCD  LD  A,  245 

3279  OCCF  RET 

3280  OCDO  CALL  3266 
3283  0CD3  LD  HL,  3253 
3286  0CD6  CALL  1925 
3289  0CD9  CALL  1212 
3292  OCDC  CALL  1084 
3295  OCDF  LD  HL,  23611 
3298  0CE2  SET  4.  (HL) 
3300  0CE4  LD  HL,  12804 

3303  0CE7  LD  A,  (HL) 

3304  0CE9  AND  A 

3305  0CE9  JR  Z,  3311 

3307  OCEB  RST  16 

3308  OCEC  INC  HL 

3309  OCED  JR  3303 
3311  OCEF  LD  A,  13 

3313  OCFl  RST  16 

3314  0CF2  LD  A,  13 

3316  0CF4  RST  16 

3317  0CF5  CALL  1063 
3320  0CF8  CP  244 
3322  OCFA  JR  Z,  3334 
3324  OCFC  CALL  2156 
3327  OCFF  CALL  1013 

3330  0D02  LD  A,  C 

3331  0D03  AND  A 

3332  0D04  JR  NZ,  3342 
3334  0D06  LD  HL,  8226 
3337  0D09  LD  (HL),  34 

3339  ODOB  INC  HL 

3340  ODOC  LD  (HL),  34 

3342  ODOE  XOR  A 

3343  ODOF  LD  (8243),  A 
3346  0D12  LD  HL,  8328 

3349  0D15  INC  HL 

3350  0D16  INC  HL 

3351  0D17  LD  A,  (HL) 

3352  0D18  CP  250 
3354  ODIA  JR  Z,  3423 
3356  ODIC  CP  255 
3358  ODIE  JR  NZ,  3350 

3360  0D20  INC  HL 

3361  0D21  LD  A,  (HL) 

3362  0D22  CP  254 
3364  0D24  JR  Z,  3350 
3366  0D26  LD  (8245),  HL 


i  end  of  block 

;  end  of  track  map 


;  decdmp 


;  <pointer  @ 

;  <pointer  #  3283 

;  2068 

;  Spectrum 

;  roms 

;  block  used 

;  print 

;  "Disk  Name 

;  print  to 

;  drvO 

;  Idbuf 

;  flags 

;  prleft 

;  start  of  disk  name 


;  1st  byte  in  chnls 

;  spec 

;  gtfil 

;  endoln 


;  prognm 
* 

* 

;  temp  4 

;  directory  end 

;  end  of  track  map 

;  cell  not  used 

;  temp 6 


Oops  I  These  are  the  missing  pages  from  Les  Cottrell's  excellent 
Larken  ROM  Disassembly.  See  also  vols.   11 --2,  11-^3.   11-5  &  11-6. 


SINC-.LINK 


name      Dec      Hex      Instr-Dec         Resarks     (10)  naiie      Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


trac 


3369 
3371 
3374 
3375 
3377 
3379 
3381 
3383 
3384 
3386 
3387 
_3389 
3391 
_3392 
3394 
3395 
3397 
3399 
3400 
3402 
3404 
3405 
3407 
3408 
_3409 
3411 
3414 
3415 
3418 
_3421 
3423 
3426 
3429 
3432 
3435 
3437 
3438 
3441 
3444 
3447 
3450 
3453 
3456 
3459 
3462 
3465 
3466 
3468 
3469 
3471 
3473 
3475 
3478 
3479 
3481 
3482 
3483 
3484 
3487 
3489 
3490 
3493 
3512 
3525 
3539 
3552 
3555 
3558 
3571 
3574 
3576 
3577 
3579 
3582 
3584 
3586 
3588 
3590 
3592 
3594 
3596 
3598 
3600 
3601 
3603 
3606 
3609 
3610 


0D29 
0D2B 
0D2E 
0D2F 
0D31 
0D33 
OD35 
OD37 
0D38 
0D3A 
0D3B 
0D3D 
0D3F 
0D40 
0D42 
0D43 
0D45 
0D47 
0D48 
0D4A 
0D4C 
0D4D 
0D4F 
0D50 
0D51 
0D53 
0D56 
0D57 
0D5A 
0D5D 
005F 
0D62 
0D65 
0D68 
0D6B 
0D6D 
0D6E 
0D71 
0D74 
0D77 
0D7A 
0D7D 
0080 
0D83 
0D85 
0D89 
0D8A 
0D8C 
0P8D 
QD8F 
0D91 
0D93 
0D96 
0D97 
0D99 
0D9A 
0D9B 
0D9C 
0D9F 
ODAl 
0DA2 


LD  B,  9 
LD  DE,  8226 
LD  A,  (DE) 
CP  34 

JR  Z,  3394 
CP  94 

JR  Z,  3391 
CP  (HL) 
JR  Z,  3394 
INC  HL 
DJNZ  3374 
JR  3350 
INC  DE 
JR  3374 
LD  A,  (DE) 
CP  94 


progns 


vildcard 


;  *  vildcard 


JR  Z,  3407 
LD  A,  (0£) 
CP  34 

JR  Z,  3411 
CP  (HL) 
JR  NZ,  3350 
INC  DE 
INC  HL 
JR  3394 
LD  HL,  8243 
INC  HL 

LD  HL,  (8245) 
CALL  3191 
JR  3350 
LD  HL,  3493 
CALL  1922 
LD  A,  (8325) 
CALL  1781 
LD  A,  47 
RST  16 
LD  A,  (8324) 
CALL  1781 
LD  HL,  3526 
CALL  1922 
LD  A,  (8243) 
CALL  1781 
LD  HL.  3539 
CALL  1922 
LD  HL,  8328 
INC  HL 
LD  C,  0 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  255 
JR  Z,  3483 
CP  245 

CALL  NZ»  3481 
INC  HL 
JR  3468 
INC  C 
RET 

LD  A,  C 
CALL  1781 
LD  A,  13 
RST  16 
JP  1596 
*«LARKEN  LRDOS  1986" 
"Track/Side" 
"Total  Files" 
"Free  Blocks" 
ODEO    LB  HL,  3558 
0DE3    JP  1822 
"Y  File  Open" 
DDF3    LD  A,  (8195) 
0DF6    a»  128 
0FD8    RET  Z 
0FD9     OUT  8,  A 
OfDB    LD  A,  (8203) 
ODFE    SET  2,  A 
OEOO    OUT  16,  A 
0E02    LD  B,  20 
0B04     DJNZ  3588 
0E06     IN  A,  16 
0E08     BIT  0,  A 
OEOA    JR  Z,  3598 
OEOC    JR  3590 
OEOE     IN  A,  16 
OEIO  RRA 
OEll    JR  C,  3598 
0EI3     CALL  3631 
0E16     LD  A,  (8221) 
0E19  RRA 
OEIA    RES  7,  A 


crcsv 


;  temp 4 

;  tesp6 

;  LARKEN  LiCDOS 

;  print  to 


1986 


decdmp 


vars  offset 
decdmp 
total  files 
print  to  . 
teBp4 
decdi^> 
free  blocks 
print  to  . 


;  end  of  track  aap 
;  block  used 


;  decdmp 


<pointer  §  3423 
<pointer  # 
<pointer  #  3444 
<pointer  §  3456 

doserr 

<pointer  #  3552 

drvsel 

EAMdisk 


;  delay 


track 


3612 
3614 
3617 
3619 
3621 
3623 
3625 
3627 
3628 
___3630 
3631 
3634 
3637 
3639 
3641 
3643 
_3645 
3646 
3648 
_3650 
3651 
3652 
3655 
3657 
3660 
3663 
3666 
3669 
3670 
3671 
3672 
_3674 
3675 
3677 
3679 
3681 
3684 
3686 
3687 
3689 
3691 
3693 
3695 
3697 
3699 
3701 
3702 
3703 
3705 
3706 
3707 
3708 
3710 
3712 
3714 
3715 
3717 
3719 
3721 
3723 
3725 
3727 
3729 
3730 
3732 
3734 
3736 
3738 
3740 
3742 
3743 
3745 
3746 
3747 
3748 
3750 
3752 
3753 
3755 
3758 
3760 
3761 
3763 
3765 
3767 
3769 
3771 
3773 


OEIC 

OEIE 

0E21 

0E23 

0E25 

0E27 

DE29 

0E2B 

0E2C 

0E2E 

0E2F 

0E32 

0E35 

0E37 

0E39 

0E3B 

0E3D 

0E3E 

0E40 

0E42 

0E43 

0E44 

0E47 

0E49 

0E4C 

0E4F 

0E52 

0E55 

0E56 

0E57 

0E58 

0E5A 

0E5B 

0E5D 

0E5F 

0E61 

0E64 

0E66 

0E67 

0S69 

0B6B 

0E6D 

0E6F 

0K71 

0E73 

0E75 

0E76 

0E77 

0B79 

0E7A 

0E7B 

0E7C 

0E7E 

0E80 

0B82 

0E83 

0E85 

0E87 

0E89 

0E8B 

0E8D 

0E8F 

0E91 

0E93 

0B94 

0E96 

0E98 

0E9A 

0E9C 

0E9E 

0E9F 

OEAl 

0EA2 

0EA3 

0EA4 

0EA6 

0EA8 

0EA9 

OEAB 

OEAE 

OEBO 

OEBl 

0EB3 

0EB5 

0EB7 

0EB9 

OEBB 

OEBD 


OUT  22,  A 
LD  A,  (8202) 
OR  20 
OUT  16,  A 
LD  B,  10 
DJNZ  3623 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 

JR  C,  3625 
RET 

LD  A,  (8195) 
LD  HL,  8221 
BIT  0,  (HL) 
JR  NZ,  3646 
RES  0,  A 
OUT  8,  A 
RET 

SET  0,  A 
OUT  8,  A 
RET 
DI 

LD  A,  (8195) 
CP  128 
JP  Z,  4066 
CALL  3666 
CALL  3675 
LD  BC,  4500 
DEC  BC 
LD  A,  B 
OR  C 

JR  NZ,  3669 
RET 

LD  E,  20 
LD  B,  1 
LD  C,  20 
LD  HL,  8304 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 

JR  C,  3684 
OUT  (C).  B 
LD  A,  180 
OUT  16,  A 
LD  B,  6 
LD  C,  22 
DJNZ  3699 
LD  D,  (HL) 
INC  HL 
IN  A,  16 
RHA 
RET  NO 
RRA 

JR  NC,  3703 
OUT  (C),  D 
DJNZ  3701 
DEC  £ 

JR  NZ,  3701 
LD  C,  16 
208 
20 


;  hspd 


3734 
16 

3721 


B 


LD  B, 
IN  A, 
CP  11 
JR  Z, 
IN  A, 
RRA 
JR  C, 
JR  3743 
OUT  (C), 
LD  B,  8 
DJNZ  3738 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 
AND  46 
RET  NZ 
SCF 
RET 

LD  E,  20 
LD  B,  1 
DI 

LD  C,  20 
LD  HL,  8304 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 

JR  G,  3758 
OUT  (C),  B 
LD  A,  148 
OUT  16,  A 
LD  B,  7 
LD  C,  32 
DJNZ  3773 


;  dvsel 
;  curtrk 


;  dvsel 
;  RAMdisk? 


;  delay 


;  delay 


;  delay 


16 


SINC-LINK 


name 


Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


Remarks  (II) 


name      Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


Remarks 


3775  OEBF 

3777  OECl 

3778  0EC2 

3779  0EC3 

3780  0EC4 
3782  OECE 
3784  0EC8 

3786  OEGA 

3787  DECB 
3789  OECD 
3791  OECF 
3793  OEDl 
3795  0ED3 
3797  0ED5 

3799  0ED7 

3800  0ED8 
3802  OEDA 

3804  OEDC 

3805  OEDD 

 3806  OEDE 

nextrk  3807  OEDF 

3810  0EE2 
3813  0EE5 
3815  0EE7 

3817  0EE9 

3818  OEEA 
3820  OEEC 
3822  OEEF 

3824  OEFO 

3825  OEFl 
3827  0EF3 
3830  0SF6 
3832  0EF8 
3834  OEFA 

3836  OEFC 

3837  OBFD 

3839  OEFF 

3840  OFOO 
 3843  0F03 

3844  DF04 

 3845  0F05 

 3846  0F06 

3848  0F08 

3849  0F09 

3852  OFOC 

3853  OFOD 

3854  OFOE 
3856  OFIO 
3658  0F12 
3660  0F14 
3662  0F16 
3664  0F18 

3865  0F19 

3866  OFIA 

3868  OFIC 

3869  OF10 

3870  OFIE 

3872  0F20 

3873  0F21 

3876  0F24 

3877  0F25 

3878  0F26 
3880  0F28 
3883  0F2B 

3885  0F2D 

3886  0F2E 

3887  0F2F 
3890  0F32 

3892  0F34 

3893  0F35 

3895  0F37 

3896  0F38 

3897  0F39 

3898  0F3A 
3900  0F3C 
3902  0F3E 

3904  0F40 

3905  0P41 

3906  0F42 

3908  0F44 

3909  0F45 
3911  0F47 
3914  0F4A 
3917  0F4D 


IN  A,  16 
RRA 
RET  NC 
RRA 

JR  NC,  3775 
INI 

JR  NZ,  3775 
DEC  E 

JR  NZ,  3775 
LD  A,  208 
GOT  16,  A 
LD  B,  7 
DJNZ  3795 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 

JR  C,  3797 
AND  14 
RET  NZ 
SCF 
RET 

tV  HL,  8221 
LD  A,  (8195) 
CP  128 
JR  Z,  3844 
LD  A,  (HL) 
BIT  0,  A 
JR  Z,  3839 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 

JR  C,  3807 
LD  A,  (8202) 
OR  80 
OUT  16,  A 
IN  A,  16 
RRA 

JR  C,  3834 
INC  (HL) 
CALL  3631 
RET 

INC  (HL) 
RET 

RST  8,  ERR  11 


delay 


curtrk 
nmif lag 


RST  32 
LD  HL, 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  (HL) 

CP  57 

JR  NC,  3846 
CP  49 

OR  C,  3846 
LD  B,  48 
SUB  B 
LD  B,  A 
LD  C,  6 
XOR  A 
ADD  A,  C 
DJNZ  3869 
DEC  A 

LD  (8205),  A 
LD  B,  A 
INC  A 
SRL  A 

LD  HL,  8324 
LD  (HL),  2 
INC  HL 
LD  (HL),  A 
LO  HL,  8328 
LD  A,  245 
LD  (HL),  A 
LD  A,  1 
INC  HL 
LD  (HL),  A 
INC  A 
DJNZ  3895 
LD  B,  100 
LD  A,  245 
INC  HL 
LD  (HL),  A 
DJNZ  3904 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  55 
LD  BC,  9 
LD  DE,  23 
LD  (HL),  255 


;  integer  out 
;  next  char 
(23645);  chadd 


integer  out 
integer  out 


var  of set 


block  used 


block  used 


end  of  track  nap 


3919  0F4F 

3920  0F50 

3922  0F52 

3923  0F53 

3925  0F55 

3926  0F56 

3928  0F58 

3929  0F59 

3931  0F5B 

3932  0F5C 
3934  DF5E 

 3936  0F60 

3937  0F61 

3938  0F62 

3941  0F65 

3942  0F66 
3945  0F69 

3948  0F6C 

3949  0F6D 

3950  0F6E 

3951  0F6F 

3952  0F70 

3953  0F71 

3954  0F72 

3955  0F73 

3957  0F75 

3958  0F76 

 3961  0F79 

FORMAT  3962  0F7A 

3965  0F7D 
3968  0F80 
3970  0F82 

3972  0F84 

3973  0F85 

3975  0F87 

3976  0F88 
3979  0F8B 
3982  0F8E 
3985  0F91 
3988  0F94 
3991  0F97 

of  range  3994  0F9A 
3997  0F9D 
3999  0F9F 
..  4002  0FA2 
4005  0FA5 
4008  0FA8 

of  range  4011  OFAB 
4014  OFAE 

of  range  4016  OFBO 
4017  OFBl 

4020  0FB4 

4021  0FB5 
4024  0FB8 
4027  OFBB 
4030  OFBE 

4033  OFCl 

4034  0FC2 
 4036  0FC4 

4039     "  RAM- 
4051  0rD3 
4054  0FD6 

4057  0FD9 

4058  OFDA 

4061  OFDC 

4062  OFDE 

4063  OFDF 
 4064  OFEO 

4066  0FB2 
4069  0FE5 
4072  0FE8 
4075  OFEB 
4078  OFEE 
4080  OFFO 
4082  0FF2 
4085  0FF5 

4087  0FF7 

4088  0FF8 
4090  OFFA 
4092  OFFC 

4095  OFFF 

4096  1000 

4098  1002 

4099  1003 


INC  HL 

LD   (HL),  254 
ADD  HL,  BC 
LD  (HL),  253 
INC  HL 

LD  (HL),  249 
ADD  HL,  DE 
LD  (HL),  255 
DEC  A 

JR  NZ,  3917 
LD  (HL),  250 
RET 
XOR  A 

LD  (8320),  A 

LD  E,  A 

LD  HL,  8304 

LD  BC,  5120 

LD  A,  E 

ADD  A,  (HL) 

LD  E,  A 

INC  HL 

DEC  BC 

LD  A,  B 

OR  C 

JR  NZ,  3948 

LD  A,  E 

LD  (8225),  A 

RET 

CALL  2444 
LD  HL,  8226 
LD  B,  10 
LD  (HL),  0 
INC  HL 
DJNZ  3970 
XOR  A 

LD  (8221),  A 
LD  (8224),  A 
CALL  1121 
CALL  3848 
LD  DE,  12804 
LD  HL,  4039 
LD  BC,  16 
LDIR 

CALL  3651 
CALL  1084 
CALL  3807 
CALL  1121 
LD  HL,  8304 
LD  (HL),  255 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  (8221) 
LD  (HL),  A 
GALL  3651 
CALL  1084 
LD  A,  (8221) 
LD  HL,  8205 
CP  (HL) 
JR  NZ,  4005 
JP  1596 
-DISK" 

LD  HL,  32768 
LD  A,  (8024) 
INC  A 

LD  BC,  5120 
DEC  A 
RET  Z 

ADD  HL,  BC 

JR  4061 
CALL  3937 
LD  A,  (8225) 
LD  (8320),  A 
CALL  4147 
SET  6,  A 
OUT  7,  A 
CALL  4051 
IN  A,  244 
EX  AF,  AF' 
LD  A,  240 
OUT  244,  A 
LD  DE,  8304 
EX  DE,  HL 
LDIR 

EX  AF,  AF' 
OUT  244,  A 


;  cell  not  used 

;  1st  block 

;  name  end 

;  end  of  track 

;  directory  end 


;  wprot 
;  prognm 


;  curtrk 

;  errnu 

;  clrbf 

;  start  of  disk  name 

;  "RAM-DISK" 


savebf 
Idbuf 
nextrk 
clrbf 


curtrk 

savbf 
Idbuf 
curtrk 


;  >pointer  §  3961 
;  raddr 


;  write  protect  off 


;  hor  sel  reg 

enable  upper  32K 

of  dock  bank 
start  of  a  block 


;  hor  sel  reg 


SINC-LINK 


drv4 


MOVE 


Dec 

Hex 

Instr-Dec 

4101 

1005 

XOR  A 

4102 

1006 

OUT  7,  A 

4104 

1008 

RET 

4105 

1009 

CALL  4147 

4108 

lOOC 

OUT  7,  A 

4110 

lOOE 

CALL  4051 

4113 

1011 

IN  A,  244 

4115 

1013 

EX  AF,  AF' 

4116 

1014 

LD  A,  240 

4118 

1016 

OUT  244,  A 

4120 

1018 

LD  D£»  8304 

4123 

IDIB 

LDIR 

4125 

lOlD 

EX  AF,  AF» 

4126 

lOlE 

OUT  244,  A 

4128 

1020 

XOR  A 

4129 

1021 

OUT  7,  A 

4131 

1023 

LD  A,  (8320) 

4134 

1026 

PUSH  AF 

4135 

1027 

CALL  3937 

4138 

102A 

LD  HL,  8225 

4141 

102D 

POP  AF 

4142 

102E 

CP  (HL) 

4143 

102F 

RET  Z 

4144 

1030 

JP  1100 

4147 

1033 

LD  A,  (8221) 

4150 

1036 

LD  C,  A 

4151 

1037 

LD  B,  0 

4153 

1039 

LD  HL,  4175 

4156 

103C 

ADD  HL,  BC 

4157 

103D 

LD  A,  (HL) 

4158 

103E 

LD  C,  A 

4159 

103F 

AND  7 

4161 

1042 

LD  (8204),  A 

4164 

1044 

LD  A,  C 

4165 

1045 

RRA 

4166 

1046 

RRA 

4167 

1047 

RRA 

4168 

1048 

RRA 

4169 

1049 

AND  7 

4171 

104B 

LD  (8203),  A 

4174 

104E 

RET 

4175 

70  71  72  73  74  75 

50.  . 

10. .   60. .  20. 

4223 

107F 

CALL  2444 

4226 

1082 

CALL  156 

4229 

1085 

LD  A,  32 

4231 

1087 

LD  (DE),  A 

4232 

1088 

CALL  132 

4235 

108B 

LD  A,  (8234) 

4238 

108E 

CP  10 

4240 

1090 

JP  Z,  2127 

4243 

1093 

CALL  156 

4246 

1096 

LD  A,  32 

4248 

1098 

LD  (DE),  A 

4249 

1099 

LD  DE,  (8241) 

4253 

109D 

INC  DE 

4254 

109E 

PUSH  DE 

4255 

109F 

CALL  2343 

4258 

10A2 

LD  A,  (8224) 

4261 

10A5 

CP  10 

4263 

10A7 

JR  NZ,  4341 

4265 

10A9 

POP  DE 

4266 

lOAA 

LD  HL,  8226 

4269 

lOAD 

LD  BC,  9 

4272 

lOBO 

LDIR 

4274 

10B2 

EX  DE,  HL 

4275 

10B3 

LD  DE,  13430 

4278 

10B6 

FUSE  DE 

4279 

10B7 

UD  BC,  50 

4282 

lOBA 

LDIR 

4284 

lOBC 

CALL  120 

4287 

lOBF 

POP  DE 

4288 

lOCO 

INC  DE 

4289 

lOCl 

EX  DE,  HL 

4290 

10C2 

LD  A,  (HL) 

4291 

10C3 

CP  249 

4293 

10C5 

JP  Z,  1596 

4296 

IOCS 

PUSH  HL 

4297 

10C9 

LD  (8240),  A 

4300 

lOCC 

CALL  129 

4303 

lOCF 

LD  A,  (8221) 

4306 

10D2 

LD  HL,  8240 

4309 

10D5 

CP  (HL) 

4310 

10D6 

JR  NZ,  4300 

4312 

10D8 

CALL  123 

4315 

lODB 

LD  A,  (8224) 

4318 

lODE 

CP  25 

4320 

lOEC 

JP  Z,  2320 

Reiaarks  (12) 


name 


enable  upper  32K 

of  dock  bank 
track  buffer 


;  curtrk 


;  chip  select  table 


;  raddr 


;  rbank 

30  31  32  33  34  35 
.  40..  00  05 

;  wprot 

;  gtfil 


;  indir 

;  errnu 

;  gtfil 

;  teflip2 

;  errnu 

;  "Z  Hmme  Exists" 


OP£N# 


;  savebf 


;  name  end 


tempi 
nextr 
curtrk 
tempi 


loadbf 
errnu 


Dec 

Hex 

Instr-Dec 

4323 

I0E3 

LD  HL,  8226 

;  prognm 

4326 

10E6 

LD  DE,  8306 

;  name  track 

buffer 

4329 

10E9 

LD  BC,  9 

4332 

lOEC 

LDIR 

4334 

lOEE 

CALL  120 

;  savebf 

4337 

lOFl 

POP  HL 

4338 

10F2 

INC  HL 

4339 

10F3 

JR  4290 

4341 

10F5 

LD  HL,  4307 

;  "Z  Name  Exists" 

4344 

10F8 

JP  1822 

;  doserr 

4347 

"Z  Name  Exists" 

4362 

llOA 

NOP 

to 

;  all  NOP»s 

4399 

112F 

NOP 

4400 

1130 

JR  4409 

4402 

1132 

JP  4474 

4405 

1135 

POP  AF 

4406 

1136 

POP  HL 

4407 

1137 

JR  4509 

4409 

1139 

CP  211 

;  OPEN  # 

4411 

113B 

JP  Z,  4537 

4414 

113E 

CP  212 

;  CLOSE  » 

4416 

1140 

JP  Z,  4846 

4419 

1143 

CP  213 

;  MERGE 

4421 

1145 

JP  Z,  7565 

4424 

1148 

CP  214 

;  VERIFY 

4426 

114A 

JP  Z,  6491 

4429 

li4D 

CP  216 

;  CIRCLE 

4431 

114F 

JP  Z,  6952 

4434 

1152 

CP  217 

;  INK 

4436 

1154 

JP  Z,  5517 

4439 

1157 

CP  218 

;  PAPER 

4441 

1159 

JP  Z,  5514 

4444 

115C 

CP  236 

;  GO  TO 

4446 

115E 

JP  Z,  5610 

4449 

1161 

CP  238 

,  INPUT 

4451 

1163 

JP  Z,  5356 

4454 

1166 

CP  244 

,  POKE 

4456 

1168 

JP  Z,  5594 

4459 

116B 

CP  245 

PRINT 

4461 

116D 

JP  Z,  5308 

4464 

1170 

CP  252 

DRA¥ 

4466 

1172 

JP  Z,  6667 

4469 

1175 

CP  253 

CLEAR 

4471 

1177 

JP  Z,  6285 

4474 

117A 

LD  HL,  4480 

"W  Invalid 

Coffisand 

4477 

117D 

JP  174 

print  message 

4480 

"V  Invalid  Command*' 

>pointer  § 

4474 

4499 

1193 

LD  HL,  23623 

subppc 

4502 

1196 

INC  (HL) 

4503 

1197 

GALL  141 

end  In 

4506 

119A 

JP  186 

jpout 

4509 

119D 

PUSH  HL 

4510 

119E 

PUSH  BC 

4511 

119F 

PUSH  AF 

4512 

ilAO 

LD  A,  D 

4513 

llAl 

CP  3 

4515 

11  A3 

JP  Z,  7854 

4518 

11A6 

CP  4 

4520 

11A8 

JP  Z,  5066 

4523 

llAB 

CP  5 

4525 

llAD 

JP  Z,  5298 

4528 

IIBO 

CALL  6251 

4531 

11B3 

POP  AF 

4532 

11B4 

POP  BC 

4533 

11B6 

POP  HL 

4534 

11B6 

JP  5650 

4537 

11B9 

RST  32 

♦ 

next  char 

4538 

IIBA 

GALL  144 

* 

9 

evalu 

4541 

IIBD 

LD  A,  B 

4542 

IIBE 

AND  A 

4543 

IIBF 

JR  NZ,  4554 

* 
* 

err  11 

4545 

llCl 

LD  A,  C 

4546 

11C2 

CP  2 

4548 

11C4 

JR  C,  4554 

• 

♦ 

err  11 

4550 

HC6 

CP  16 

4552 

11C8 

JR  C,  4556 

4554 

IIGA 

RST  8  ERR  ll 

> 

integer  out 

range 

4556 

IICC 

LD  (13434),  A 

4559 

IICF 

LD  (8240),  A 

tempi 

4562 

11D2 

CALL  156 

4565 

11D5 

LD  A,  34 

4567 

11D7 

LD  (DE),  A 

4568 

11D8 

PUSH  DE 

4569 

11D9 

POP  BC 

4570 

IIDA 

LD  HL,  8226 

» 

prognm 

4573 

HDD 

EX  DE,  HL 

4574 

IIDE 

OR  A 

18 


SINC-LINK 


Mond^,  17  January  1994 
22  2nd  Ave.N. 
St  MaAuea,  Que. 
JOL  2H0 


G.  Oiambeis 
Toronto  TSUG 
14  Richome  Court 
Scarborough  Ont. 
MIK  2Y1 


Dear  George 


I  did  not  original^  intend  to  set  prices  as  it  is  difiQcult  to  estaUish  the  real  valw.  However,  many 
peofde  have  asked  for  prices  so  I  set  some  with  the  understanding  fliat  I  would  comkier  the  best 
offer.  Prices  do  not  include  shaping  for  obvious  reasons.  I  am  smdingyou  a  copy  in  case  anyone 
in  Toronto  area  is  intei^ested. 

I  would  not  object  to  selbig  items  such  as  tfie  modem ,  monitor,  mi^odrive  or  software  gcovps 
sepaiatd^  but  would  like  to  keep  die  basic  system  intact  as  a  q>ectrum  without  tfie  disk  system  is 
fcffi  attraclive.  However,  I  am  not  adamant  about  that. 

I  have  moved  19  to  a  386  DX  40  running  windows  and  do  not  have     time  to  devote  to  two 
op^atii^  systems  evm  flimigli  I  am  retired ,  also  at  my  age  it  is  harder  switching  between  the  two 
different  systems. 

PS  :  You  must  have  two  different  computer  lists  for  members  as  you  miss^ 
the  last  issue  of  SINC-IJONKalfliou^  it  ^>pearsconiw  labds. 


Yours  Tmfy 


Keith  Worrell 


SINC-LINK 


PRCX3RAM 

FIGHTER  PILOT  (Spectrum) 


PRIG  COST  PRICE 
$  16.95  US  $  6.00 


NOERM  n  (Tenmnal  sofhvare)  vvitfa  $  24.95  US)  $  15.00 

LOADER  V  (add-on  forMTem)  ?  } 

B.  Carter  Smart  n  mamiai)  $   6.95  US} 

SPECTERM64  (Tennmal  software)  $  30.00  US  $  10.00 

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CASBOARD  2068  (flexible  BBS) 

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PIXEL  SKETCH  &  CHIAPHICS  EDITOR 

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TIMEGATE  (game) 

$  16.99  US 

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$  16.95  US 

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$  23.95  US 

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TASWORD  n  (WORDPROCESSOR)  with 

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S    5.95  US  } 

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9 

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PROGRAM 


PRIG.  COST  PRICE 


ZEUS  ASSEMBLER  $  19.95  US  $  6.00 

ZEAL   DISASSEMBLER                                                   ?  $  6.00 

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ZIP  COMPILER  $  16.96  US  $  5.00 

COMPLETE  MACHINE  CODE  TUTOR  S  19.95  US  $  6.00 

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PQOKg  ORIG.  COST  EBKS 


TIMEX  SINCLAIR  TECHNICAL  MANUAL 
TS  2068  BASICS  AND  BEYOND 

POWERFUL  PROJECTS  WITH  YOUR  TIMEX  SINCLAIR 
ESSENTIAL  GUIDE  TO  TS  HOME  COMPUTING 
INSIDE  THE  TIMEX  SINCLAIR  2000 
TS  2068  BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE  GUIDE  (SAMS) 
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TS  USER  GROUP  GUIDE  TO  TELECCM^IMUNICAllONS 


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TIMEX  SINCLAIR  TS-2068  COMPUTER 


HARDWARE 

TS-2068  COMPUTER  with 

SPECTRUM  ROM  SWITCH  (instaned) 


ORIG.  COST 
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PRICE 
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AERCO  PRINTER  INTERFACE  CP  2068 


$  54.95  US 


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$  206.88  US 


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LARKEN  DOS  SYSTEM  W/RAMDISK  and 

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$  331.00  CAN  } 
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$  125.00 


TS-2050  MODEM  (comitL  w/numual) 

WC  2050  MODEM  BOARD  AND  EXPER.  GUIDE 

A&J  MICRODRIVE  MODEL  2000  with 

PRINTER  INTERFACE  &  14  CASSETTES) 


9 

t 


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$  30.00 
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WINKY  2000  (tape  loadmg  aid) 


$  22.95  US 


$  5.00 


MORSE  CODE  TRANSLATOR  (THOMAS  WOODS) 
(CASSETTE  &  HARDWARE  INCL.  I/O  PORT  ) 


$  16.95  US  > 
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PROGRAMS 

PRICE 

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S  12.95  US 

$  5.00 

TIMEX  FLIGHT  SIMULATOR 

$  11.00  US 

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$  24.95  US 

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$  18.95  US 

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$  15.95  US 

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$  15.99  US 

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9 

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SINC-LINK 


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3  QL  Computers  with  power  supplies  (one  needs  keyboard  membrane) 
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2  joysticks 


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Word  Processing  with  the  Sincliar  QL 
Making  the  Most  of  the  Sinclair  QL 

Blueprint 

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CO 

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James  V.  Hageman 
8868  Cayuga  Drive 
Niagara  Fails,  NY  14304 
(716)  297-5685 


Jeff  Taylor 

75  Lemonwood  Drive, 

Unit  335 

Islingtori;^  Ontario 
CANADA  M9A  4L3 

2  8  January  1994 

Mr.  Les  Cottrell 

108  River  Heights  Drive, 

Cocoa,  Florida 

U.S.A.  32922-6630 

Dear  Les, 

First  of  all,  allow  me  to  apologize  for  taking  so  long  to  respond 
to  your  letter.  I've  been  carrying  it  around  in  my  briefcase  for 
almost  three  months,  always  intending  to  get-around-to-it  but  never 
actually  sitting  down  to  type  this.  Anyway,   sorry  for  the  delay. 

Second,  I  would  like  to  thank  you  for  making  the  effort  to 
continue  producing  excellent  articles  for  all  the  newsletters  you 
write  for.  I  know  your  articles  are  appreciated  and  I  thought  you 
ought  to  know. 

Third,  despite  what  George  has  written  in  his  out-of-town  letters, 
the  club  and  newsletter  are  not  about  to  fold.  George  has  been 
involved  in  the  club  since  its  inception  and  all  the  phone  calls, 
writing  and  mailings  are  starting  to  take  their  toll  (He's  in  his 
seventies)  .  This  and  the  feeling  that  there  isn't  that  much  more  to 
write  about  the  2068  and  Larken  system  and  his  recent  exposure  to 
DOS  machines  have  all  contributed  to  a  dwindling  interest  on  his 
part.  Nobody  blames  him,  after  all,  he  has  pretty  much  run  this 
club  by  himself  for  a  long  time  and  now  he  wants  to  move  on. 

The  trouble  is,  there's  no  one  to  replace  him!  The  other  club 
movers  are  Bill  Lawson,  Rene  Bruneau,  Hugh  Howie  and  myself.  Bill 
is  practically  and  legally  blind  and  Rene  and  I  have  young  families 


and  careers  to  occupy  most  of  our  time.  Hugh  is  a  QLer  exclusively 
and  has  no  interest  in  the  smaller  Sinclair  computers.  So^  what  to 
do?  We  need  a  retiree  to  devote  all  his  time  to  minding  the  day-to- 
day operations.  Want  to  move  to  Toronto?  Anyway Rene  and  I  have 
decided  to  continue  as  best  we  can  when  George  finally  says  he'^s 
had  enough. 

Fourth^  by  now  you  have  seen  the  November-December  ' 93  issue  and 
realized  that  we  (oops^.  I  mean  I)  have  missed  issuing  a  section  of 
your  LKDOS  disassembly.  My  fault  and  I^m  embarrassed  to  admit  that 
the  missing  section  cannot  be  located.  So^  with  head  hung  low^  I'm 
going  to  ask  if  you  would  send  another  copy  of  your  complete 
disassembly.  I  will  publish  the  part  left  out  and  ensure  that  the 
complete  document  goes  into  a  binder  for  our  paper  library. 

Thafs  about  it  other  than  to  say  thanks  for  your  support  and  keep 
up  the  good  work 

That's  all  for  now... 


Regards  r