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SEPT-  OCT  *93  VOL  1 1  #5 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


SEPT-  OCT  '93  VOL  1 1  #S 


SINC-LINK  IS  A  PUBLICATION  OF 
THE  TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS 
CLUB  AND  IS  ISSUED  6  TIMES  A 
YEAR,  CLUB  MEMBERS  RECEIVE  FREE 
COPIES  AS  PART  OF  THE  *20.00 
ANNUAL  MEMBERSHIP  FEE. 

NEMSLETTERS  ARE  EXCHANGED,  FREE 
OF  CHARGE,  MITH  OTHER 
TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USER  GROUPS. 

PLEASE  CREDIT  THIS  PUBLICATION 
AND  THE  AUTHOR  IF  YOU  COPY 
MATERIAL. 

THE  TS206B  &  ZX-Bl  GROUP  MEETS 
ON  THE  FIRST  MEDNESDAY  OF  EACH 
MONTH  AT  14  RICHOME  COURT, 
SCARBOROUGH,  ONT,   7PM  START. 

THE   OL    SIG   MILL    MEET  AT  596 
ONEIDA  DRI\/E,  BURLINGTON,  ONT. 
7PM  START.   NEXT  MEETING  TO  BE 
ANNOUNCED. 

SINC-LINK  IS  PRODUCED  ENTIRELY 
ON  SINCLAIR  AND  TIMEX-SINCLAIR 
COMPUTERS. 

SEND  CORRESPONDANCE  TO: 

SINC'LINK  EDITOR,  TORONTO 
TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB,  14 
RICHOME  COURT,  SCARBOROUGH, 
ONTARIO,   CANADA  MIK  2Y1. 


EXECUTIVE  OFFICERS 


PRESIDEKT 

TREASURER 

SECRETARY 

ACTIVITIES 

QL  CONTACT 

NEWSLETTER 


mm  }m  7dM~l 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLfllR 


LIAISON  OFFICER: 

I  Out-of-town  members  ) 


USERS  CLUB 

(  AREA  CODE  416) 
RENE  BRUNEAU  (531-9749) 
BILL  LAWSON  (  444-8772  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS  (  751-7559  ) 
LOU  LAFERRIERE  (  820-3725  ) 

HUGH  HOWIE  (  634-4929  )    NOTE  NEW  AREA  GCXK  905 

JEFF  TAYLOR  (  244-8583  ) 

GEORGE  CHAMBERS.  14  RICHOME  COURT, 

SCARBOROUGH.  ONTARIO  MIK  2Y1 

(  416-751-7559  ) 


TORONTO  TIHEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


SINC-LINK 


TORONTO   TIMEX-5INCLAIR   USERS  CLUB 


INDEX  VOLUME  11-5 


Page  2  - 
Page  3  - 
Page  4  - 
Page  5  - 
Page  6  - 
Page  10  - 

Page  13  - 

Page  14  - 


Club  Stuff 
IndeXy  Editorial 
Kill  the  Newsletter  ? 
Ql  ips 

Spectrum  Emulator  Review 

QL  Woes  -  Fixits  for 
errant  QLs 

ZXSl  Resources 
1MB  SRAM  board 

QL  Library  Report 


Page  16  -      Super BASIC  Routines  -QL 

Page  19  -      Beware  of  GST+ 

Page  20  -      I    Visited  Dayton 
Hugh  Howie 

Page  22  -      Important  Notice 
Toronto  Fest  1994 

Page  23  -      John    Juergens  writes 
Gold  Card,  PC  Conqueror 

Page  25  -     LKDOS  Disassembly 
Continued 

Page  28  -      Toronto     Fest  1994 
Questionnaire 


GUEST  EDITORIAL 

Once  again  the  newsletter  is  late.  In  part,  the  delay  has  been  caused  by  the 
fact  that  we  have  received  very  few  articles  from  the  TSIOOO  and  2068 
membership  and  we  felt  that  we  could  not  put  together  an  issue  representative 
of  the  overall  membership  of  the  club.  If  you  look  at  the  composition  of  this 
issue,  17  pages  were  written  by  QL  users  C8  by  Hugh  Howie),  7  pages  from  2068 
users  (two  articles),  and  1  page  from  TSIOOO  users  Cme).  I  think  we  can  all 
agree  that  of  the  three  computers  used  in  the  club,  the  QL  continues  to 
generate  the  most  activity  and  interest  among  its  owners.  However,  there  are 
still  a  lot  of  TSIOOO  and  2068  owners  out  there,  and  we  would  really  like  to 
hear  from  you.  To  be  a  bit  melodramatic,  the  life  of  this  newsletter  depends 
on  YOU. 

With  the  exception  of  Hugh  Howie  and  Bill  Lawson,  the  executive  members  use 
2068s  or  TslOOOs.  We  are  finding  it  very  difficult  to  maintain  our  enthusiasm 
when  the  majority  of  the  members  of  the  club  are  not  participating  in  the 
continued  well  being  of  the  club.  Paying  your  dues  is  not  enough.  This  club 
will  NOT  fold  because  of  lack  of  funds,  but  it  will  not  continue  in  its 
present  form  for  very  long  if  you  do  not  respond.  Active  participation  from 
all  members  in  maintaining  the  standard  of  excellence  that  we  have  attained  in 
the  newsletter  would  be  a  welcome  boost. 

Our  editor,  Jeff  Taylor,  and  the  rest  of  the  Executive  thank  those  writers, 
both  members  and  nonmembers,  who  have  submitted  articles,  and  look  forward  to 
seeing  more  of  your  efforts  published  in  future  issues  of  SINC-LINK. 

Rene  Bruneau,  President  1993 


SINC-LINK 


3 


KILL  THE  NEWLETTER?    -    KILL  SINC-LINK? 

by  Hugh  Howie . 


On  receiving  the  July/August  issue  of 
SINC-LINK,  (on  August  6th  no  less),  I 
was  astounded  to  read  the  comments  of  our 
secretary  that  our  prestigious  and  most 
looked  for  newsletter  was  perhaps  going 
to  be  discontinued. 

I  am  very  sorry  to  see  this  in  print.  I 
am  sorry  that  the  newsletter  is  so  late 
in  coming  out  those  days .  I  am  sorry 
there  is  such  a  lack  of  contributers  that 
makes  those  statements  possible.  I  am 
sorry  to  see  the  club  in  such  straights 
that  it  is  on  the  verge  of  folding,  and 
that  is  what  our  secretary  means;  the 
club  is  on  the  verge  of  folding  if  we  do 
not  get  more  contributers!  We  must 
remember  that  it  is  SINC-LINK  that  links 
this  club  together.  It  is  the  newsletter 
that  links  any  club  together.  I  do  not 
know  any  widespread  organisation  that 
does  not  rely  on  some  sort  of  paper 
communication  to  keep  its  members  happy 
and  interested. 

In  a  club  as  strong  in  members  as  we  are, 
it  is  unbelievable  that  we  can  not  get 
enough  material  to  fill  30  pages  once 
every  two  months. 

The  reason  that  the  newsletter  is  a  bit 
late  at  times  is  because  our  editor  keeps 
hoping  for  more  material  to  fill  out  the 
pages  -  he  waits  and  waits  -  but  nothing 
comes  in.  Now  how  is  an  editor  to  build 
a  newsletter  if  he  has  nothing  to  work 
with?  I  have  said  in  this  publication, 
as  also  in  others,  that  more  material  is 
required.  We  need  more  input,  and  on  a 
regular  basis  also. 

I  am  unhappy  that  our  secretary  is  able 
to  say  that  he  is  going  to  fold  the 
newsletter.  Kill  one,  kill  all!  George 
Chambers  was  the  instigator  in  the  birth 
of  the  club  many  years  ago,  and  it  would 
be  a  pity  if  he  were  to  kill  it. 

Since  becoming  a  member,  I  have  seen  many 
others  clubs  fall  by  the  wayside,  and  in 
each  and  every  case  the  folding  was 
preceded  by  an  urgent  plea  for  more 
INPLT  from  the  members.  I  guess  the  plea 
fell  on  deaf  ears  as  it  was  soon 
announced  that  those  clubs  were  folding. 
Do  you  want  that  to  happen  here? 


I  once  was  proud  to  say  that  I  belonged 
to  the  biggest  and  best  in  North  America. 
Can  that  still  be  said? 

I  have  done  my  bit  to  keep  this  club  and 
its  newsletter  in  action.  I  have  done 
all  I  can  -  and  so  have  many  others  - 
officers  and  members  have  all  done  a  good 
job,  and  are  still  willing  to  do  a  good 
job,  but  we  need  something  to  work  with. 

In  all  our  membership  it  is  hard  to 
believe  that  no  one  anywhere,  has  nothing 
to  write  about.  We  can  tell  of  our 
successes  and  our  failures.  What  we  do 
for  this  that  or  the  next  thing. 
Solutions  -  problems  -  questions  - 
information  -  what  is  good  equipment  and 
what  is  bad.     Good  programs  and  bad. 

Many  years  ago  the  QL  was  pronounced 
dead,  today  the  QL  is  more  active  than  it 
ever  was.  There  is  more  action  in  the 
provision  of  good  hardware,  and  more 
really  good  software  available  than  at 
any  time  in  the  QL '  s  history.  A  machine 
which  had  such  a  poor  start  has  developed 
into  a  machine  which  is  second  to  none  in 
its  ability.  So  why  do  we  not  take  more 
interest  in  it? 

Do  you  not  like  what  you  see  in  our 
newsletter?  If  so,  why  not  write  and 
tell  us  so  that  we  can  improve  the 
content.  If  you  don't  like  what  you  are 
getting  then  write  something  of  what  you 
would  like  and  we  will  be  only  too  glad 
to  print  it. 

Finally,  I  have  heard  no  mention  other 
than  the  comment  of  our  secretary,  that 
the  newsletter  is  going  to  fold.  If 
anyone  has  the  power  to  say  that,  it 
should  be  the  Editor.  I  know  that  our 
editor  has  problems  in  filling  space,  but 
he  has  not  as  yet  said  anything  like 
that,  not  to  me  at  any  rate.  And 
although  he  may  be  a  bit  frustrated  on 
occasion,  I  do  not  think  he  is  going  to 
say  "lets  fold". 

You  folks  out  there,  if  you  want  a 
newsletter  then  it  is  up  to  you  and  only 
you  to  provide  your  own  newsletter. 

Send  something  in. 

930807 


4 


SINC-LINK 


Q    L    I    P  S 

hj  Bosh  Howie 


Recently  I  had  occasion  to  be  writing  to 
one  of  our  members,  sending  him  some 
library  disks  he  had  requested. 
Unfortunately  he  had  been  using  a 
catalogue  which  was  long  out  of  date.  I 
was  still  able  to  give  him  what  he 
requested,  but  he  was  asking  for 
individual  programs,  and  this  creates  a 
bit  of  a  headache  to  me. 

Last  year  I  decided  that  I  could  only 
(for  the  sake  of  ray  own  sanity)  provide 
complete  disks  and  not  individual 
programs.  And  this  I  attempted  to  do  for 
my  friend,  but  as  he  had  only  sent  a 
small  number  of  disks,  I  had  a  problem; 
not  insurmountable,  but  still  there,  so  I 
added  some  prefixes  to  the  titles  and 
managed  to  get  two  disks  onto  one,  and  I 
told  him  how  to  remove  them  to  make  disks 
of  his  own  which  would  still  conform  to 
the  TorQLib  Library  disks  without  the 
prefixes.  (Are  you  still  with  me?) 

In  my  letter  T  explained  how  by  using 
TK2  he  would  have   no  problems  re-naming 
when     copying     the     programs     to  their 
proper  disks. 

I  was  not  sure  as  to  the  expertise  of  the 
person  I  was  writing  to,  and  I  made  the 
comment  that  "I  was  probably  teaching  my 
granny  how  to  suck  eggs" 

My  friend  replied  humorously,  saying  that 
I  had  the  gender  wrong,  and  that  he  was  a 
grandfather,  and  that  he  was  unaware  he 
was  related  to  me. 

This  gave  me  some  thought,  as  I  believed 
everyone  knew  what  I  was  saying  or  trying 
to  say;  so  I  got  out  various  books  of 
learning  (so-called)  and  was  unable  to 
find  any  reference  to  my  statement.  There 
was  no  reference  to  "teaching  my  granny 
how  to  suck  eggs ! " 

My  interpretation  of  this  statement  is 
that  it  alludes  to  trying  to  instruct  the 
expert  in  the  basics.  And  what  is  more 
basic  than  sucking  eggs?  A  wonderful 
source  of  food,  and  not  only  that,  it  is 
a  country  boys  dream  of  yore,  to  build  a 
collection  of  birds  eggs,  and  to  do  that 
you  had  to  have  a  knowledge  of  how  to 
suck  eggs  to  get  the  innards  come  out  and 
leave  the  outards  to  be  saved  as  part  of 


the  collection.  So  you  just  had  to  know 
the  gentle  art  of  sucking  (or  blowing) 
eggs .     Even  my  granny  knew  how ! 

But  in  my  books  of  knowledge  there  were 
plenty  other  references  to  eggs  and  as  I 
read  I  got  interested  in  the  subject. 

I  found  that  Shakespeare  had  written 
about  the  weasel  and  the  ease  with  which 
a     weasel     sucks     eggs.  So  perhaps 

somewhere  along  the  line  'granny'  had 
been  substituted  for  'weasel ' . 

Further  on  in  my  research  I  came  across  a 
probable  answer  to  the  question  "What 
came  first  the  hen  or  the  egg?" 

Well,  Samuel  Butler  once  stated  "A  hen  is 
only  an  egg's  way  of  making  another  egg 
So  that  takes  care  of  the  question  as  to 
which  (what?)  came  first;  it  was  the  egg. 
No? 

As  one  cartoonist  put  it  in  a  caption 
under  a  picture  of  a  dejected  rooster 
bemoaning  lifes  caprices,  "Yesterday  an 
egg  -  tomorrow  a  feather  duster 

Christopher  Isherwood  had  this  to  say:- 

The  common  cormorant  or  shag 

Lays  eggs  inside  a  paper  bag 

The  reason  you  will  see  no  doubt 

It  is  to  keep  the  lightning  out. 

But  what  those  unobservant  birds 

Have  never  noticed  is  that  herds 

Of  wandering  bears  may  come  with  buns 

And  steal  the  bags  to  hold  the  crumbs. 

Now  that  still  does  not  really  answer  my 
original  statement  about  my  granny.  I 
can  only  rationalise  that  it  is  some  kind 
of  colloquialism  I  picked  up  somewhere  on 
my  travels.  As  to  whether  it  is  well 
known  I  have  no  idea. 

I  still  maintain  that  it  is  very  apt  in 
certain  circiimstances  especially  when 
trying  teach  the  expert  how  to  do 
something. 

If  you  have  read  this  far  you  are 
probably  wondering  just  what  this  is  all 
about.  I  really  don't  know!  I  guess  you 
could  say  something  just  egged  me  on. 

930728 


SINC-LINK 


5 


Copied  from  the  Sept  1993  issue  of  the  LISTing  Newsletter  from  the  Long  Island 
Sinclair/Timex  Users  Group. 


THE"  KTLiER  EMULATOR  FROM  HELL  by  John  Pazmino 


By  now  tne  supplies  and  sources  tor  Sinclair  hardware  are  quite 
dwindling.  It  is  tough  to  introduce  newcomers  to  Sinclair  for  the 
general  lack  of  apparatus  to  outfit  them  with.  On  top  of  this  is  the 
pervasion  of  the  IBM  type  of  computer  among  the  vulgate  which  works 
fieicely  against  adopting  Sinclair  as  a  new  platform. 

What  to  do?  In  the  UK,  where  Sinclair  still  rules  m  the  B-bit 
computer  world,  there  were  efforts  to  work  a  software  solution:  Turn 
the  IBM  into  a  Sinclair.   In  principle  this  is  easy  because  the  ZBO  CPU 
architecture  has  been  emulated  on  the  8088   (and  higher)   chips  thru 
software.  Many  readers  will  remember,  and  perhaps  still  have,  the  CP/M 
emulators  on  the  early  IBM  rigs. 

However,  emulators  for  the  Sinclair  have  been,  well,  ech! .  Why? 
Mainly  they  are  written  by  Sinclair  folk  who  on  the  whole  are  unversed 
in  IBM.   In  deed,  some  Sinclair  emulators  are  nothing  but  the  Z80  code 
of  the  Sinclair  ROM  shoved  into  a  Z80  CPU  emulator.  This  was  for  many 
years  not  cricket  becasue  the  code  was  the  propcty  of  Sinclair  and 
uhcn  Am trad. 

There's  a  physical  barrier,  too.  Except  for  the  very  first  IBM  PC, 
issuing  simulataneoulsy  with  the  Sinclair  ZX-81,  the  IBM  has  no  innate 
means  of  receiving  input  from  a  cassette.  Some  emulators  simply  gave 
up  at  this  obstacle  and  work  only  with  type-in  programs. 

Well,  now  in  this  merry  year  of  1993  comes  the  Killer  Emulator 
from  Hell,  a  Sinclair  emulator  for  the  IBM  that  does  everything  a 
Sinclair  emulator  should  do  and  does  it  right.  This  new  emulator,  Z80, 
is  a  shareware  creation  from  Europe. 

Shareware,  not  lucreware. 

This  point  is  crucial.  For  in  early  1993  Amstrad,  who  holds  the 
rights  for  the  Spectrum  and  QL,  formally  threw  the  code  for  the  ROMs 
into  public  use.  That  is,  anyone  may  now  copy  and  distribute  the 
original  ROM  code  in  their  own  products  PROVIDED  that  these  products 
are  noncommercial.  Commercial  use  of  the  ROM  code  is  still  prohibited. 
Ergo,  altho  Z80  does  have  woven  into  it  native  Sinclair  code  it  is 
copasetic  and  quite  kosher. 

Z80  dissolves  the  above  —  and  many  many  other       problems  in 
bringing  the  Sinclair  to  the  IBM.  It  comes  on  an  IBM  stiffy  with  720K 
of  files.  They  rehydrate  to  about  2M  on  your  harddisc.  Two  megabytes! 
That's,  um,  more  than  thirty  Spectrumsf ul !  What  ARE  all  these  crazy 
files  1?  Relax,  already.  Most  of  the  files  are  sourcecode  and 
iitt^rature.  You  can  shLv  them,  after  printing  or  copying  them  o£t , 
leaving  'just'   330K  of  working  files.  That's  STILL  about  five 
Spectrumsf ul  of  stuff.  For  emulating  a  Spectrum? 

They  toto  in  uno  are  a  symphony  of  several  Sinclair  systems:  the 
Spectr'om  48K  model,  128K  model  (with  pixel  graphics  and  multichannel 
sound),  Interface  1  (with  serial  ports),  Sinclair  and  Kempston 
joysticks,  Multiface  1  (with  memory  capture)-,  tape  loading  indicator, 
Z80  dissembler  and  monitor,  header-reader,  screen  editor,  RAMdisc, 
swoppable  ROMs,  Microdrives,  Disciple  discs,  and  (of  course!) 
tapedrive.  All  of  these  are  provided  via  software  in  quite  perfect 
replication  of  the  original  hardware  gadgets.  Thus,  the  complete 
inability  to  attach  native  Sinclair  accessories  to  the  IBM  is  much 
overcome  by  building  the  most  crucial  ones  right  into  the  emulator. 

The  emulator  receives  its  original  input  from  cassette  only.  This 
requires  a  cable  connecting  the  IBM  parallel  port  to  the  cassette 
deck,  with  some  circuit  bits  along  the  way.  The  emulator  has  clear 
instructions  for  making  this  cable  and  it  took  me  an  afternoon  to 
build  it,  including  a  stopoff  on  Canal  Street  to  get  the  parts. 

If  you  in  giddy  delirium  shoved  Z80's  disc  into  your  IBM  without 


6 


SINC-LINK 


between  Sinclair's  CR-only  and  IBM's  CR/LF  line  tQrminar.ions .  All 
these  conversion  use  the  IBM  file  as  the  working  medium. 

The  Microdrives  are  mimick.ed  on  IBM  file.  There  are  eight 
' microdrives '   in  the  emulator,  the  maximum  capacity  of  the  original 
Interface,   and  each  'cartridge'   is  an  IBM  file.  You  'slot'  a 
microdrive  by  allocating  a  file  to  a  drive.  Ah!,  to  use  a  new 
cartridge  you  must   'format'   it  ("FORMAT  "m" ; 3 ; <name>" ;  hey!,  .those 
extra  IBM  keys  ARE  cooll).  This  creates  a  new  IBM  file  137K  long  with 
126K  of   'tape'.  Two  of  these  fit  on  a  360K  floppy  or  five  on  a  720K 
stiffy.  Once  you  format  a  emulated  cartridge  you  can  work  with  it 
exactly  as  you  would  a  physical  cartridge.  You  even  pull  a  'catalog' 
of  the  file  and  'erase'   stuff  from  it! 

The  Disciple  disc  is,  too,  cloned  in  Z80,  altho  the  United  States 
never  enjoyed  this  system.  Again,  the  IBM  file  is  the  working  medium. 
Being  that  on  stateside  we  deal  with  many  minor  disc  systems,   can  Z80 
handle,  say  the  Zebra  system?  Now  comes  the  freako  part.  The  coae  for 
the  Disciple  system  is  excisible  from  the  primum  corpus  of  the 
emulator.  YOU  CAN  REPLACE  IT  WITH  THE  OPERATIONS  OF  YOUR  PECULIAR  DISC 
SYSTEM.  Yes!,  you  may  ultimately  junk  the  hardware  of  the  Zebra  system 
and  run  everything  from  the  Zebra  code  you  wrote  into  Z80. 

The  total  supplantation  of  Sinclair '  s  physical  media  with  IBM 
files  lets  you  jettison  just  about  every  disc  and  cartridge  utility  in 
sight.  With  your  stuff  in  IBM  files  you  can  apply  any  and  all  of  the 
IBM  file  utilities  on  it.  Farewell,  Cartridge  Doctor!  Vale,  KopyKat! 

Wait  a  minute!!!  What  happens  to  all  those  luscious  Sinclair 
cartridges  and  discs  in  those  milkcrates?  Since  you  simply  can  not 
feed  them  to  the  IBM  you  must  revert  to  the  original  tapes.  Load  the 
files  into  Z80  from  the  tapes  and  save  them  onto  the  emulated  disc  or 
cartridge.  Without  such  prime  tapes  you  may  have  one  revolting  job 
before  you!  You  must  transfer  the  disc  or  cartridge  files  back  to 
cassettes  and  then  procede  as  just  described. 

Communications  thru  the  emulator  use  the  cloned  serial  ports  of 
the  Interface  1.  Remember  my  series  a  year  back  on  PostScript  on  the 
Sinclair?   (Yesyesyes,  I  know,  LISTings  missed  out  the  fourth  and  final 
part.)  Now  you  can  actualize  this  by  running  Z80  on  an  IBM  fitted  with 
a  PostScript  printer.  But  there's  a  weirder  prospect,  attainable  with 
Z80:  Pass  data  from  the  Spectrum  to  an  other  IBM  program.  You  in  this 
case  do  not  need  a  PostScript  printer;  use  your  existing  printer!  You 
run  a  PostScript  software  emulator  like  Emulaser  or  GhostScript  on  the 
IBM  and  send  Spectrum  generated  PostScript  files  to  it.  Ugh!  such 
disgustingly  gorgeous  output.  From  a  Spectrum.  FROM  A  SPECTRUM! 

Eecuase  the  emulator  is  European  the  presumption  is  that  you  use 
the  serial  port  for  printing  and  the  instructions  detail  conversing 
with  a  printer  thru  it.  In  the  US  printers  are  routinely  hung  from  the 
parallel  port  and  the  serial  port  is  the  avenue  to  a  modem.  Hence,  in 
making  the  cassette  cable,  include  a  'Y'  connector  or  A-B  switch  so 
the  printer  and  cassette  can  coexist.  To  accommodate  the  possibility 
of  a  parallel  printer,   Z80  allows  a  redirection  of  output  to  LPTx. 

However,  there  is  a  clumsiness  in  using  the  printer,  one  of  the 
[very]  few  downpoints  of  Z80.  The  LPRINT,  LLIST,  and  COPY  commands  do 
not  f-ire  characters  directly  to  the  attached  printer.  You  have  to 
first'open  a  channel  to  the  printer  ("OPEN  t3,"t"")  and  then  send 
output  to  that  channel.   I  already  wrote,  via  Internet,   to  tho  author 
about  this  and  suggested  that  he  make  LPRINT,  LLIST,   and  COPY  send 
output  to  a  DOS  printer  driver  of  the  sort  included  with  word 
processors.  If  he  can  work  this  into  a  future  edition  of  Z80  you'll  be 
printing  to  whatever  device  you  got  attached  to  the  IBM. 

What  the  deal  about  other  ROMs?  You  recall  that  the  American 
flavor  of  spectrum,  the  Timex  2000,  has  a  dockport  into  which  an 
external  ROM  plugged  to  override  the  onboard  ROM.  Also,  when  the  Zebra 


SINC-LINK 


making  the  connector,  chill  out!   Z80  comes  with  seven  ready-to-run 
Spectrum  programs.  Nothing  fancy,  some  games  and  utilities. 

I  can' not  here  elaborate  on  the  very  many  details  of  this 
emulator.  That  would  amount  to  describing  the  entire  Spectrxam  world!  I 
here  highlight  a  few  major  features.  This  emulator,  for  starts,^ in 
fact  does  what  every  Sinclair  fan  sweats  in  sleep  for:  IT  BODILY 
TRANSFERS  TAPES  TO  DISC.  Yes,   it  takes  the  files  from  tape  and  mirrors 
them  on  a  regular  IBM  file.  And  this  file  to  the  emulated  Spectrum 
quacks  and  flies  and  waddles  exactly  like  the  original  tape.  The  major 
positive!!)  difference  is  that  you  never  'spot'   or  'rewind'.  This 
feature  alone  virtually  eliminates  the   'tape  loading  error'   from  a 
tapefile  that  failed  to  catch.  It'll  pass  around  again  in,  oh,  a 
millisecond  for  another  go.  Each  360K  disc  holds  several,  depending  on 
length,  cassettes  of  programs. 

With  Z80  you  may  choose  between  a  replica  of  a  cassette  OR  AN 
ORDINARY  IBM  FILE.  That  is,  you  may  load  from  EITHER  the  emulated  tape 
OR  from  an  IBM  file  that  contains  the  program  in  DOS  form!  Hand  up? 
Yes?  Sure,  Z80  converts  the  one  kind  into  the  other! 

You  over  there?  Voce  alta,  de  favore.  OK,  you  have  several  short 
tapes  or  programs  and  you  want  to  combine  them  on  one  cassette.  What  a 
magilla  on  the  real  Sinclair!  Load  from  one  tape;   swop  tapes;  spot  it; 
save  to  it.  Swop  for  the  next  tape  ...    .  With  Z80  you  merely  knit 
together  the  separate  'tapes'   in  any  order  you  want  and  get  one 
consolidated  new  'tape'.  Yes,  that  right.  Uh,  let's  continue,  please? 

These  grand  goodies  so  far  are  alone  enough  to  justify  the 
nuisance  of  reaching  overseas  for  this  emulator.  In  one  weekend  you 
can  put  your*  entire  Spectrum  collection  onto  disc  WITH  ABSOLUTELY  NO 
MODIFICATION  OF  THE  ORIGINAL  CODE.  You  'bung  the  tape'  by  specifying 
the  tape's  IBM  file,  do  a  LOAD  and  the  'tape'  goes  ahead  and  loads. 

Please  do  understand  that  this  is  utterly  NOT  a  'RAMdump' ,  'memory 
capture'  or  'snapshot'.  Z80  does  this,  too,  as  an  altogether  separate 
function.  In  the  tape  mirror  each  file  of  the  tape  is  actually  in  the 
IBM  file  and  you  even  use  the  (included!)  header-reader  to  see  them. 
What's  more,  the  header-reader  browses  the  tape  and  loads  ANY  tape 
file  you  want.  You  don't  have  to  let  the  tape  run  thru  to  load  the 
program  way  off  at  the  tail  end.  Hmmm,  a  random-access  cassette  tape. 

The  Spectrum  keyboard  is  exactly  mapped  to  the  IBM  keyboard.  You 
use  all  the  keywords  and  tokens.  Being  that  the  IBM  has  no  Sinclair 
keytops,  you  popup  a  Sinclair  keyboard  diagram.  It's  really  a  rather 
faithful  depiction  of  the  chicklet  Spectrum  with  the  corner  colorband 
and  all  that.  There  is  no  such  mapping  for  the  Spectrum  128K  becuase 
this  model  does  not  use  keywords  and  tokens.  You  type  in  everything 
litteratim  with  all  the  regular  IBM  keys. 

Besides  the  replicated  Spectrum  keys,  the  extra  IBM  keys  are 
energized.  You,  for  instance,  get  the  <=>  symbol  by  <sym<L>>  or  by 
just  punching  the  <=>  key.  Either  the  IBM  <alt>  or  <ctl>  keys  stands 
for  the  Sinclair  <sym>  key.  I  do  see  a  danger  in  this  convenience! 
Play  with  the  Spectrum-in-IBM  for  a  while.  Then  go  back  to  the  real 
Spectrum.  Where  the  eff  is  that  <[>  symbol!? 

The  numberpad  is  the  cursorpad,  the  Sinclair  joystick,  or  the 
Kempston  joystick  —  as  you  wish  by  selection.  The  cursor  keys  work, 
too,  for  editing  the  command  line.  <esc>  is  the  EDIT  key,  as  is 
<sft<l>>;  <bsp>  and  <del>  do  DELETE  along  with  <sft<0>>. 

The  IBM  functiuakeys  are  the  adit  to  the  emulator's  foiest  of 
functions,  with  <F1>  being  the  general  'help'   feature  and  <alt<Fl>> 
pooping  up  the  Spectrum  keyboard  layout. 

When  you  do  a  screensave  ("SAVE  <name>  SCREENS"),  THE  SCREENS  FILE 
CAN  BE  SHARED  WITH  OTHER  IBM  PROGRAMS.  What?!   Uh,  you  see,  this 
emulator  converts  a  Spectrum  SCREENS  file  into  a  GIF  or  PCX  file! 
You  share  textfiles,  too,  with  other  IBM  programs  by  a  conversion 


8 


SINC-LINK 


disc  system  is  fitted  to  the  Timex,  its  own  ROM  is  paged  m  when  a 
disc  command  is  issued.  Well,  you  can  set  up  a  battery  of  ROM  files 
and  let  the  emulator  bank  off  of  them  (one  at  a  time). 

how?  There  are  two  methods.  The  first  is  to  get  the  ROM  code  into 
an  IBM  file  and  then  point  Z80  at  it  when  igniting  the  emulator.  This 
bypasses  the  default  ROM  file.  The  other  is  to  patch  [a  copy  of]  the 
default  ROM  file -with  code  for  the  new  ROM  and  let  Z80  go  and. think 
it's  drinking  up  the  same  old  code. 

By  now  your  throat  is  dry,  your  glands  are  leaking,  your  hairs  are 
dropping  out.  TELL  ME,  UNCLE!,  UNCLE!,  V7HERE  IS  THIS  Z80  THINGIE!  ! 
Send  off  15  British  pounds  to  B  G  Services,   64  Roebuck  Road, 
Chessington,  Surrey  KT9-iJX,   England  and  ask  for  the  Z80  Spectrum 
emulator  for  IBM  computers.   I  did  this  and  got  my  emulator  in  12  days 
flat.  To  pay  from  the  US  I  just  took  my  ordinary  check  and  wrote  it 
out  for  "fifteen  British  pounds"  payable  to  "B  G  Services";  it  went 
thru  smoothly.  Plastic  is  not  [yet?]  accepted.  B  G  Services  is  a 
Spectrum  outlet  and  it'll  enclose  a  sheet  for  its  other  items,  too. 


Thanks  for  the  memories. 


SINC-LINK 


QL  Woes 
by 

N.A.  Pasbtoon 

In  Vol.     10-6  (Nov. -Dec. '92),     and  Vol.  11-3  (Mar. -Apr. 

'93)  issues  of  SINC-LINK  mention  is  made  of  problems  some  of 
the    QL  users  are  experiencing.   In  the  paragraphs  to  follow  I 

will  relate  my  experience  in  solving  similar  problems. 

I)  In  the  Nov. -Dec.  '92  issue  Bill  Lawson  has  mentioned  a 
myriad  of  sjmiptoms  of  his  malf uctioning  QL  system.  Let  me 
hope  that  he  has  resolved  and  sorted  out  the  problems  he  was 
facing.  The  symptoms  he  has  mentioned,  and  a  few  more, 
applies  to  approximately  a  dozen  QLs  in  my  user  group  (CATUG) 
and  my  own.  These  problems  invariably  surfaced  when  a 
daughter  board  with  Minerva  or  an  alternative  QDOS  EPROM  was 
installed  on  the  QL.  To  solve  these  problems,  proceed  as 
follows: 

a)  All  the  important  integrated  ciruits.  on  the  QL  are 
socketed.  Computers  from  LISA  to  first  shipments  of  ATARI  ST 
and  other  computers  were  plagued  by  unreliable  operation 
because  of  this.  The  same  is  true  of  QL.  Many  times  the 
microdrive  problems  and  blanking  unreliable  video  is  directly 
traceable  to  the  ZX8302  and  ZX8301  chips.  Note  that  these  two 
ICs  are  CMOS,  and  static-sensitive.  At  least  touch  a  metal 
object  with  your  fingers  before  you  touch  the  ICs.  When  you 
open  your  QL,  it  is  advisable  to  spray  the  pins  and  sockets 
of  these  ICs,  as  well  as  the  other  socketed  ICs  with  a  "tuner 
cleaner",  such  as  Radio  Shack  #64-3320,  or  equivalent.  After 
spraying,  use  a  flat-bit  screw  driver,  or  a  butter  knife  to 
displace  slightly  upwards,  from  both  ends,  the  ICs  in  their 
sockets.  Spray  again,  and  press  the  integrated  circuits  back 
in  place.  This  cleaning  should  be  good  for  at  least  a  year. 

b)  As  mentioned  earlier,  many  users  who  had  fully  functional 
machines,  started  having  problems  when  they  installed  a  small 
EPROM  daughter-board  inside  the  QL.  So  what  happens  under 
these  circumstances?  After  carefully  studying  the  problem  in 
about  a  dozen  cases,  I  concluded  that  the  problem  is  caused 
by  hairline  cracks  in  the  copper  traces  of  the  daughter 
board.  How  are  these  hairline  cracks  caused? 

After  watching  my  user  group  members,  and  my  own 
practice  of  how  do  I  normally  install  the  daughter-board  on 
the  QL  mother-board,  it  became  obvious  that  we  were 
responsible  for  causing  the  problem.  To  explain,  normally  we 
would  first  install  the  daughter-board  by  pressing  on  the 
corner  of  the  board,  and  then  press-in  the  EPROM.  Here  both 
the  procedure  as  well  as  the  order  in  which  the  task  is 
performed  is  wrong.  Why? 

The  daughter-boards  we  were  using,  (to  keep  costs  down, 
this  is  true  of  all  peripheral  boards,  and  the  QL  mother 
board),  are  of  a  very  flimsy  construction,  with  very  thin 
copper  traces.  As  the  figure  shows,  two  sockets  are  installed 
side-by-side,  with  approximately  0.2"  spacing,  one  socket 
used  for  the  EPROM  is  an  ordinary  dual-leaf  socket,  and  the 
other  one  a  machined    socket.  The  pins  of  the  machined  socket 


SINC-LINK 


protrude,  and  is  fitted  in  the  ROM  socket  on  the  QL 
mother-board.  In  order  to  install  two  sockets  side-by-side 
one  has  to  saw-off  the  stabilizing  plastic  bridges  (two  or 
three)  which  every  socket  has.  The  consequence  of  this  is 
that  when  you  want  to  install  an  EPROM  in  the  normal  socket, 
it  flexes  the  socket  rows  sideways,  so  much  so,  that  some 
times  it  is  not  possible  to  install  the  EPROM.  This  flexing 
causes  the  hairline  cracks  in  the  copper  traces  on  the  back 
of  the  daughter-board.  Belatedly  one  discovers  that  in  order 
to  install  the  EPROM,  one  has  to  hold  the  two  rows  of  the 
socket  pins  of  the  normal  socket  vertically  by  one  hand,  and 
then  fit  the  EPROM  in  the  socket.  We  discover  this  after  we 
have  already  caused  damage  to  probably  more  than  one  trace. 

The  second  mechanism  causing  the  cracks,  is  the  way  we 
normally  install  the  flimsily  made  daughter-board,  by  pushing 
on  the  corners  of  the  board.  This  method  of  installation 
causes  too  much  pressure  on  the  corner  pins  of  the  machined 
socket,  and  possible  hairline  cracks. 

As  such,  the  suggested  procedure  for  installation  is  to 
first  install  the  EPROM  on  the  daughter-board,  while  holding 
the  normal  socket  in  a  vertical  positiion  in  one  hand,  thus 
avoiding  the  flexing  of  the  pins  of  the  normal  socket. 
Second,  install  the  daughter-board  on  the  mother-board  by 
pressing  on  the  top  of  EPROM,  thus  causing  the  pressure  to  be 
equally  distributed  on  all  the  pins  of  the  machined  socket. 

All  these  hassles  could  have  been  avoided  if  the  boards 
were  properly  manufactured.  For  example,  metalization  both  on 
top  and  bottom  of  the  daughter-board  would  have  helped.  Most 
importantly,  instead  of  using  a  low  cost  machined  socket,  the 
use  of  DIP  socket  carrier  (say  Digt-Key  #ED6028,  $3.26)  would 
have  totally  solved  the  problem.  In  this  case  you  will  have 
the  benefit  of  machined  pins,  with  the  pins  flush  on  top, 
thus  allowing  the  normal  socket  straddle  the  socket  carrier 
pins  on  top,  without  the  stabilizing  plastic  bridges  being 
sawed-off.  But-  as  you  can  see,  this  will  almost  double  the 
price  of  the  daughter  board. 

o  T-  cv  -sf 

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socket 


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Normal 
—  socket 
for  EPROM 


FIGURE:Partial  back  view  of  the  daughter-board.   The  decoder 
IC,  which  on  my  board  is  a  74.HCT00,  is  not  shown. 


SINC-LINK 


11 


The  hairline  cracks  that  I  mentioned,  are  hard  to  see, 
even  under  a  magnifying  glass.  Static  testing  by  continuity 
measurements  (using  a  VOM)  could  also  be  misleading.  One  can 
dynamically  test  by  say,  using  a  logic  probe.  One  may  even  be 
tempted  to  cure  the  problem  by  putting  solder  globs  on  the 
affected  traces.  I  recommend  against  it.  The  only  sure  method 
of  solving  the  problem  is,  to  do  point-by-point  wiring 
between  the  pins  of  the  two  sockets.  This  is  much  easier  than 
it  sounds.  As  shown  in  the  figure,  the  two  sockets  are 
separated  by  a  distance  of  0.2",  with  all  the  respective  pins 
connected  by  copper  traces,  excepts  pins  1,  20,  and  22.  I  use 
bare  wire-wrapping  (28  gauge)  wire.  Make  a  tiny  hook  on  one 
end  of  the  wire,  solder  it  to  the  pin,  wrap  the  wire  on  the 
corresponding  pin  of  the  other  socket  for  half  a  loop,  solder 
and  cut  the  wire  with  a  razor  blade  or  Xacto  knife  at  the 
base  of  the  pin.  Do  all  the  25  pins  shown  in  the  diagram. 
This  will,  with  high  probability,  solve  your  problem.  In  the 
worst  case  you  may  have  to  duplicate  all  the  traces  on  the 
back  of  the  daughter-board  using  wire-wrap  wire.  Do  not  use  a 
soldering  iron  rated  higher  than  15  watts. 

c)  A  third  source  of  the  cracks,  is  the  protrusion  of  the 
daughter-board  on  top  of  the  QL  mother-borad,  and  being 
pressed  by  the  back  of  the  keyborad.  On  the  Samsung  QLs, 
there  is  a  screw  on  the  back  of  the  keyboard,  which 
interferes  with  the  top  of  the  new  EPROM  that  you  install. 
One  must  remove  this  screw.  Even  the  removal  of  this  screw 
does  not  solve  the  problem,  always.  It  is  suggested  that  of 
the  eight  screws  holding  the  keyboard  and  the  base  of  the  QL 
together,  two  screws,  one  in  back  and  one  in  front,  not  be 
installed.  These  are  the  screws  which  are  left  of  center, 
roughly  in  alignment  with  the  ROM  sockets.  It  is  worth 
mentioning,  that  depending  on  the  height  of  the 
daughter-board  ,  even  the  mother-board  can  be  flexed  by  the 
pressure  exerted  through  the  daughter-board  from  the 
keyboard. 

II)     In  The  Mar. -Apr.    '93  issue  of  Sink-Link  in  an  article  by 
Hugh  Howie,   "NOTES  ON  QL  LOCK-UPS",  Hugh  says,  and  I  quote: 
"I    know  of    one  person    who  has    four  QL's    and  is    only  now 
starting  to    have    some    success    with    one    of    them.  Power 
Surges?" 

Some  QLs  have  exhibited  this  problem  since  its  introduction 
into  the  market  place.  I  have  analysed  the  problem,  and  I 
believe  I  have  a  low  cost  solution.  I  suggest  that  Hugh 
inform  his  friend  to  contact  me,  and  send  me  a  self-addressed 
Jiffy  bag  with  an  IRC,  and  I  will  mail  his  friend  my 
solution  in  return  mail.     My  address  follows: 

N.A.  PASHTOON 

940  BEAU  DR. ,  #204 

DES  PLAINES,    IL  60016 

U.S.A. 


SINC-LINK 


1  RESOURCES 

Rene  Bruneau  17  September  1992 


One  of  our  iseiufaers,  Leo  Moll,  who  lives  in  Holland,  has  sent 
U5  several  copies  of  projects  published  in  newsletters  on 
his  Side  of  the  Atlantic.  One  that  fiiay  interest  the 
ZX82/T31000  group,  is  a  I  Megabyte  bank-switched  nonvolatile 
ifteoiory  board.  A  rough  translation  of  the  text  an  german) 
indicates  that  it  occupies  the  48k  to  64k  block  in  8xl6k 
segments  that  can  be  accessed  by  poking  the  ban,  i  into 
address  9.  For  exarapie:  POKE  9,  1.  Just  think...  After  all 
these  v^ars,  a  Raw-Disk  for  the  ZXBl'r  who  thought  he  had 
everything 


Mr.  holl  indicated  that  printed  circuit  boards  were 
available  and  we  are  currently  following  up  on  this.  We  hope 
to  obtain  isore  stuff  fro»  Mr.  Moil  and  will  present  it  as  it 
becoies  available. 

Planned  for  our  Nov/Dec  issue  is  a  construction  article  for 
a  si»ple  robot  control  interface  in  response  to  a  request 
froB  one  of  our  aeabers.  I  located  it  in  an  iiagazine  written 
for  the  SpectruB. 


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SINC-LINK 


13 


QL  LIBRARY  REPORT 

By  Hugh  Howie 


Pagei 


I  have  spent  too  much  time  on  too  many 
other  things,  I  have  neglected  my 
library,  my  library  -  your  library,  so  I 
will  now  try  to  bring  you  up  to  date  on 
what  has  been  developing  this  last  few 
months . 

It  is  just  about  a  year  since  I  last 
reported  on  the  library,  so  I  think  it 
timely  to  say  something  about  it. 

As  a  result  of  our  QL  membership  drive 
last  year,  we  were  fortunate  in  that  we 
had  quite  a  few  new  members  join  our 
ranks.  This  might  result  in  some  more 
contributions  to  the  library,  and  more 
use  made  of  it  also. 

There  are  so  many  new  things  happening  in 
the  QL  world,  it  is  hard  to  believe  that 
so  few  have  anything  to  say,  or  have  so 
few  questions  to  ask.  I  also  realise 
that  many  who  ask  questions  do  not  wish 
to  have  their  letters  published  because 
of  one  reason  or  another. 

When  you  write  to  us,  would  you  mind  if 
we  published  your  comments?  In  many 
cases  the  comments  and  questions  asked 
are  of  very  valid  import  to  the 
newsletter.  The  question  you  ask  may  be 
of  interest  to  others.  I  for  one  have 
had  many  interesting  and  learning  hours 
trying  to  track  down  someone  elses 
problem.     Think  about  it. 

Anyway,  I  have  got  away  from  the  main 
topic  -  The  Library  -  so  back  to  it. 

One  of  our  new  members  submitted  a  disk 
with  some  very  interesting  stuff,  and  it 
was  some  time  before  I  got  around  to 
looking  in  close  detail  at  the  disk  he 
sent  me.  John  Impellizzeri  sent  me  this 
disk  with  a  lot  of  ZIP/L^'ZIP  stuff  on  it, 
and  I  had  no  idea  what  it  was  all  about, 
which  just  goes  to  show  how  little  I  know 
about  computing.  Anyway  I  eventually  got 
around  to  doing  some  serious  work  with 
this  disk,  and  a  whole  new  vista  was 
opened  up  for  me! 

It  would  appear  that  ZIP  is  a  method  of 
compressing  long  files  into  short  files 
for  the  purposes  of  transmitting  them 
them  from  you  to  me  or  me   to  you  in  the 


shortest  period  of  time  and  taking  up  the 
smallest  amount  of  space  on  a  disk. 
iJNZIP  puts  them  back  into  normal  format . 

When  working  the  various  BBS's  etc.,  it 
is  essential  to  get  the  info  across  as 
quickly  as  possible,  costs  rise  with 
length  of  time  on  the  phone. 

This  disk  also  has  QED,  QEX,  Qterm  (in 
German)  also  a  Spectrum  and  ZX81 
emulator  so  that  you  can  run  those 
programs  on  the  QL .  Nice  with  the  Gold 
Card,  but  slow  otherwise.  Once  again  I 
have  not  done  much  with  this,  but  as  soon 
as  I  can  get  some  programs  I  will  see 
what  can  be  done.  I  will  be  breaking 
this  up  into  the  Comms  and  Utilities 
sections . 

I  found  that  with  ZIPPED  files  they  took 
up  less  than  half  the  original  space  on  a 
disk.  The  zipping/unzipping  takes  only  a 
very  short  time  to  accomplish  -  amazing 
in  what  it  does.  Thanks  John  for  the 
disk,  I  am  only  too  pleased  to  place  it 
in  the  library,  and  hope  that  many  more 
can  take  advantage  of  it.  If  you  have 
anything  more  we  would  be  glad  to  accept 
it.  Perhaps  you  will  get  someone  calling 
you  on  the  BBS  sometime. 

I  should  mention  that  ZIP.L"N'ZIP  is  a 
shareware  program. 

Another  interesting  thing  was  that  Ron 
Blizzard  sent  me  a  disk  with  stuff  on  it 
for  converting  (for  sake  of  a  better 
word)  a  yAC  pic  file  to  the  QL .  He 
enclosed  a  few  XAC  files  and  it  really 
was  astounding  what  it  does.  I  would 
suggest  that  anyone  with  access  to  Xac- 
Print  files  should  have  a  look  at  this. 

Ron  Blizzard  has  also  contributed  a 
number  of  articles  on  his  QL  experiences 
and  promises  many  more. 

Before  I  forget,  Ron  is  now  the  Happy 
Pappy  of  Adriana,  born  on  the  4th  of 
July.  As  also  was  her  mother,  (chat  was 
another  year  of  course!)  Some  folks  take 
independance  too  far.  Congratulations  to 
all  concerned. 

Away  back   long  ago  when   I   first  started 


14 


SINC-LINK 


QL  LIBRARY  REPORT 

By  Hugh  Howie 


Page2 


the  QL  library,  I  was  sent  a  program 
called  XCHANGE,  and  as  it  was  a 
commercial  program  at  that  time,  I  could 
not  do  anything  with  it.  As  time  passed 
I  was  given  other  versions  of  the  same 
program  and  still  had  to  abide  with  my 
original  decision.  Now  I  am  pleased  to 
say  that  XCHANGE  has  been  released  to  the 
Public  Domain,  although  Psion  still 
retain  the  copyright  to  it,  but  I  have 
not  yet  placed  it  in  the  library.  I  do 
not  know  which  version  to  use  but  Ron 
Blizzard  has  come  to  my  rescue.  Ron  has 
in  the  past  shown  considerable  interest 
in  Xchange,  so  I  sent  him  all  the 
versions  I  had,  and  he  has  promised  to 
let  me  have  a  really  good  working  copy, 
incorporating  all  the  various  features  in 
the  various  submissions.  He  says  he  will 
have  time  to  do  this.  Even  with  a  new 
daughter? 

I  was  under  the  impression  XCHANGE  was  a 
multitasking  program,  and  as  I  used 
Taskmaster,  I  never  did  investigate 
XCHANGE  too  much.  It  must  be  remembered 
that  I  had  not  bought  it,  I  just  fell 
heir  to  it,  and  such  being  the  case  I  did 
not  try  to  do  very  much  with  it.  But  now 
someone  tells  me  it  is  not  a  true 
multitasking  program;  yet  it  does  look 
like  one  to  me.  Perhaps  someone  could 
tell  me  the  difference. 

I  went  to  Newport.  Rhode  Island,  and  came 
back  with  three  disks  that  looked  like  a 
complete  set-up  to  start  off  a  BBS  for 
anyone  so  inclined.  I  am  not  interested 
in  running  a  BBS,  that  is  not  for  me. 
This  is  the  BBS  Tony  Firshman  uses  I 
unders  tand . 

I  do  know  Tony  was  running  a  pseudo  BBS 
demo  in  his  motel  room,  and  that  it  was 
well  attended.  But  I  was  not  in  at  the 
beginning,  and  by  the  time  I  got  there, 
there  was  no  room  at  the  inn,  I  just 
could  not  get  in.  He  was  running  his  BBS 
on  two  QL's  connected  by  the  serial 
ports.  T  will  be  placing  this  in  the 
library  for  anyone  interested.  I  imagine 
therre  are  going  to  a  lot  of  Comms_  disks 
before  I  am  finshed  with  this  lot. 

I  would  like  to  get  into  the  BBS 
somewhere,     but    the    phone    bill     for  me 


would  be  prohibitive,  much  to  my  regret. 
Being     on     a     fixed     income     does  place 
limitations  on  ones  activities. 

As  I  said  earlier,  I  also  have  the  QEX 
shareware  program  which  is  a  versatile 
communications  program,  and  has  been  well 
recommended.  Once  again  I  have  not  spent 
much  time  on  it,  but  it  has  been  placed 
in  the  library  for  those  interested. 

I  have  just  received  a  disk  from  Howard 
Clase  with  a  collection  of  routines  which 
he  has  donated  to  the  library.  I  will 
get  to  this  as  soon  as  possible  as  most 
of  his  stuff  is  good. 

I  have  been  so  very  busy  of  late  I  have 
not  had  time  to  do  more  than  just  glance 
at  much  of  the  stuff  coming  in,  but  as 
soon  as  I  catch  up  with  the  back-log  I 
will  let  you  know  in  greater  detail 
what's  new. 

Other  interesting  material  has  been 
coming  in  all  the  time  and  I  must  admit  I 
have  not  kept  up  to  date  with  it.  Not 
only  that,  but  I  have  been  inclined  to 
forget  about  things.  I  guess  that  is  one 
of  the  privileges  of  old  age,  but  I 
really  should  not  make  that  an  excuse. 
There  is  no  excuse  for  inefficiency,  so 
if  I  have  not  mentioned  your  own 
submission,  please  remind  me. 

This  is  not  a  review  of  those  programs  it 
is  just  to  show  that  there  are  still 
things  coming  in,  and  to  ask  you  to  send 
more.  I  hope  to  be  able  to  spend  more 
time  on  submissions  in  the  future,  and  I 
just  ask  you  to  send  things  in,  and  if 
there  is  anything  you  want,  please  ask. 

I  am  going  to  try  and  review  some  of  this 
stuff  each  month  to  keep  you  up  to  date. 
As 

I  say,  I  have  all  this  stuff  and  have 
not  done  much  with  it,  I  will  have  to 
change  my  attitude  and  get  down  to  work. 

Finally,  I  have  an  idea  that  someone  far 
away  did  not  get  their  order  fulfilled. 
That  being  the  case  would  that  someone 
contact  me?  Plese? 

930831 


SINC-LINK 


15 


SuperBASIC  Routines  from  Psion  Solutions 
Howard  Clase  1993.08.09 


Page  1 


The  public  domain  SuperBASIC  routines  supplied  along  with  this  disk  in  directory 
QLW_  were  recently  published  in  QL  World.  For  copyright  reasons  I  cannot 
supply  copies  of  the  text  of  the  articles  themselves,  but  I  am  allowed  to  give  a 
brief     stimmary     of     their     functions.  The     programs     are     organised  into 

sub-directories  whose  names  correspond  to  the  relevant  issue  of  QL  World. 
Programs  in  these  notes  followed  by  *  are  supplementary  material  that  did  not 
appear  in  QL  World.  I  hope  to  find  time  to  add  routines  from  my  earlier 
articles  later. 

If  you  are  not  familiar  with  the  use  of  directories  on  the  QL  the  following 
notes  should  help  you  save  a  bit  of  typing.  To  access  files  in  Flpl_QLW_Jun93_ 
for  example,  type  DATAJJSE  f lpl_QLW_Jun93_.  After  this  all  file  names  are 
assumed  to  be  in  this  sub-directory  unless  they  begin  with  a  recognised  device 
name;  so  entering  LOAD  Epson_driver  will  find  f lpl_QLW_Jun93_Epson_driver 
without  your  having  to  type  in  the  device  and  directory  names  every  time.  You 
can  also  use  Ftidy  (if  you  have  it  -  if  not,  why  not  it's  free!)  or  WCOPY  to 
copy  all  files  in  a  directory  to  e.g.  raml_  without  all  the  directory  names  and 
access  them  from  there.  You  will  have  to  do  this  to  read  _docs  into  quill  or 
if  you  have  a  Gold  Card  learn  how  to  use  DEVJJSE  -  but  that  will  have  to  be  the 
subject  of  a  future  article  sometime. 

At  the  time  of  writing,  back  issues  of  Sinclair  QL  World  are  obtainable  from: 
Arcwind  Ltd.,  The  Blue  Barn,  Tew  Lane,  Wootton,  Woodstock,  Oxon.,  U.K.  0X7  IHA, 
Price  £2.50  (UK),  £2.99  (Europe). 

Oct92_  (p38) 

String  fisher 

This  was  originally  designed  to  find  all  lines  in  the  Psion  BASIC  programs 
conf ig  has  and  install_bas  that  contain  references  to  microdrives  so  that  they 
could  be  replaced  with  "flpl_",  "diskdrive",  etc.  to  run  on  a  disk  system 
without  the  use  of  the  cumbersome  mdv_use  command.  (It  will  not  actually  make 
the  changes;  you  have  to  do  this  yourself,  but  it  tells  you  which  lines  to 
change.)  It  can  be  easily  adapted  to  search  out  any  strings  (words)  from  any 
other  listing,  or  indeed  any  ASCII  QL  file;  change  line  150.  N.B.  it  will  not 
work  on  compiled  or  assembled  programs. 

If  you  want  output  directly  on  your  printer  instead  of  in  a  file  type 
"serl"  -  or  whatever  your  printer  desires  when  asked  for  "Device  and  filename 
for  output". 

I  have  made  a  minor  correction  to  line  230. 

N.B.  You  can  compile  both  configL_bas  and  install_bas  after  you've  raodfied 

them  with  QLiberator,  and  probably  with  DP's  compilers  too.  The  compiled 
versions  run  much  faster  of  course. 


16 


SINC-LINK 


SuperBASIC  Routines  from  Psion  Solutions 
Howard  Clase  1993.08.09 


Page  2 


Nov92_  (p29) 

Code  revealer 

This  was  designed  to  explore  a  word  processor  internal^^  file  such  as  a 
Quill_doc  file,  to  find  out  what  the  codes  for  things  like  "superscript  on  , 
"new  paragraph"  etc  are.  (They  are  not  the  same  as  those  you  put  in  using 
install_bas,    which    are    intended    for    the    printer    only).  It    prints  text 

normally,  but  control  characters  appear  highlighted  as  their  ASCII  code  values. 
It  can,  of  course,  be  used  on  any  other  type  of  file.  If  you  have  Minerva  and 
can  remember  all  the  special  characters  you  won't  need  this!  As  supplied,  the 
QL's  second  character  set  characters  are  also  highlighted;  if  you  would  rather 
see  their  ASCII  values  omit  line  240.  A  line  feed  appears  both  as  it  s  ASCII 
value  (10)  and  as  a  new  line  on  the  screen  (line  235). 

Filter  ctrls 

This   was   designed   to   filter   out   all    control    characters    from  an  internal 
format   file  from  another  word  processor  -  even  an  MS-DOS  one,    leaving  just  an 
ASCII  file  that  can  be  imported  into  Quill.       It  also  removes  multiple  spaces^ 
and  gives  a  file  name  acceptable  to  Quill,    ending  with  the  extension  _Psi 
which  you  must  type  in  when  importing. 

You  could  also  use  it  on  a  corrupted  _doc  file  or  a  def_tmp  file  in  an 
emergency.  It  will  extract  the  text  characters  from  any  file.  In  any  event 
you  will  probably  find  that  a  bit  of  formatting  of  the  imported  document  will  be 
required  to  set  margins,  justification  etc. 

Change  serial  port 

This  is  an  "install_bas"  bypass  to  change  the  designated  serial  ports  on 
printer_dat  files.  I  need  a  lot  of  different  printer_dat  files,  and  I  have 
solved  this  by  configuring  Quill,  Abacus  etc  to  look  for  "printer_dat "  on  ram8_. 

Each  printer  driver  is  stored  on  my  setup  disk  with  a  distinctive  name  e.g. 
FX85_dat,  FX85Ger_dat,  LX86_dat  etc.  and  I  copy  the  appropriate^^  one  to 
ram8_printer_dat  as  required  (you  can  also  do  this  using  the  "backup  command 
from  within  Quill.)  One  of  my  QLs  prints  through  serl  and  the  other  through 
ser2,  this  routine  will  change  the  port  flag  in  all  _dat  files  on  a  disk  (except 
install_dat,  the  master  list)  a  darned  sight  quicker  thaan  doing  it  through 
install_bas I 

Jun93_  (Vol.  II  Issue  6  p38) 
niY  Printer  driver 


The  first  listing  in  this  article  was  an  example  of  how,  in  principle,  to 
write  a  SuperBASIC  printer  driver  that  allows  you  to  print  most  of  the 
characters  from  the  QL's  second  (or  foreign)  character  set  from  a  quill_doc  - 
depending  upon  what's  available  in  your  printer  and  your  ingenuity  m  creative 
overprinting.  You  should  first  "print"  your  _doc  to  a  file  using  your  normal 
printer  driver,  then  process  this  _lis  file  using  the  routine,  which  will  send 
it  to  the  printer  substituting  codes  as  required.       Pay  particular  attention  to 


SINC-LINK 


17 


SuperBASIC  Routines  from  Psion  Solutions 
Howard  Clase  1993.08.09 


Page  3 


line  145  making  sure  that  it  is  where  your  printer  is  and  that  the  flags  are 
correct  -  if  in  doubt  start  with  the  default  "serl_". 

Briefly,  the  second  character  codes  (128  -  191)  are  intercepted  and 
substituted  by  a  string  of  up  to  nine  codes  which  put  the  printer  in  the  right 
mood,  print  the  character  and  then  return  the  printer  to  normal. 

The  next  two  programs  are  "full"  versions  of  this  using  slightly  different 
approaches;  they  did  not  appear  in  QL  World. 

Epson  driver  * 

This  is  as  full  an  implementation  for  my  Epson  FX85  as  I  could  manage,  it 
should  work  with  other  Epsons,  and  may  work  with  Epson  compatibles.  For  the 
few  characters  I  could  not  manage  you  will  have  to  make  additions  by  hand. 

CGP  220  driver  * 

In  this  case  all  the  characters  are  available  in  the  printer,  but  with 
different  codes  from  those  used  by  the  QL.  All  that  is  required  is  a  one  for 
one  substitution,  and  a  simpler  array  is  used;  the  codes  are  read  in  from  a 
series  of  DATA  statements.  I  have  not  actually  been  able  to  test  this  one,  I 
found  the  problem  in  a  US  newsletter,  which  printed  my  solution  -  but  I  never 
heard  whether  or  not  it  actually  worked!  If  your  printer  is  in  IBM  mode  you 
will  find  that  most  of  the  characters  are  there  whatever  the  brand,  if  so  this 
approach  is  the  one  to  use. 

Second  set  * 

This  is  a  test  set  of  ASCII  code  followed  by  the  corresponding  character  in 


lines 

of  eight  as 

follows 

128  a 

129 

a 

130 

o 

a 

131 

e 

132 

6 

133 

o 

134 

0 

135 

ii 

136  ? 

137 

n 

138 

ae 

139 

o 

140 

a 

141 

a 

142 

a 

143 

e 

144  e 

145 

e 

146 

i 

147 

i 

148 

i 

149 

i 

150 

6 

151 

6 

152  6 

153 

u 

154 

u 

155 

u 

156 

3 

157 

C 

158 

¥ 

159 

160  A 

161 

A 

162 

A 

163 

t 

164 

5 

165 

0 

166 

0 

167 

U 

168  g 

169 

r? 

170 

171 

0 

172 

a 

173 

6 

174 

e 

175 

1 

2 

176  p 

177 

n 

178 

0 

179 

i 

180 

i 

181 

1 

4 

182 

§ 

183 

184  « 

185 

» 

186 

187 

188  ^  189  -^190  T 

191 

I 

Use  it  to  test  your  printer  driver. 


Exp  Paras 

For  budding  QL  World  contributors,  this  program  arose  in  response  to  a 
statement  by  QL  World's  editor  that  noone  had  been  able  to  produce  from  Quill  a 
file  in  the  right  format  for  her  to  import  into  her  DTP  program.  It  should 
have  no  end-of-line  markers  within  paragraphs,  no  extra  spaces,  and  MSDOS  EOLs 
(CR,LF)  at  the  end  of  each  paragraph. 


18 


SINC-LINK 


SuperBASIC  Routines  from  Psion  Solutions 
Howard  Clase  1993.08.09 


Page  4 


The    _doc    should    be    "def ormatted"    first.  This    involves    setting  left 

justification,  removing  the  left  margin  completely,  but  leave  at  least  one 
indent  space  at  the  start  of  each  paragraph,  remove  all  footers  and  headers  and 
set  the  page  length  to  zero  (effectively  infinite!)  Then  "print"  the  file  to  a 
_lis  file  using  a  special  printer_dat  file  with  every  thing  set  to  NONE  except 
EOL  and  postamble,  which  should  both  be  the  QL's  standard  LF.  Process  this 
_lis  file  with  Exp_Paras. 

The  article  also  describes  another  way  of  achieving  the  same  result 
directly  from  Quill,  using  a  translation  and  a  special  printer_dat  file,  but  a 
little  more  massaging  of  the  original  file  is  required. 


END  OF  _doc  FILE 


The  above  is  the  _doc  file  from  a  disk  of  routines  which  I  have  just  received 
from  Howard.  I  have  placed  this  on  the  HJC_1  disk  which  contains  a  lot  of  other 
goodies  from  him,  including  the  "Ftidy"  he  mentions  in  paragraph  2  above.  If 
you  would  like  your  own  copy  of  those  routines,  please  send  a  formatted  disk  and 
return  Post  &  Packing  to:- 

Hugh  Howie,  586  Oneida  Dr.,  Burlington,  Ont.,  L7T  3V3. 

HHH930902 


BEHftRE  OF  GST  + 

Soie  tiae  ago  I  ordered  troi  a  supplier  in 
the  U.S.A.,  3  software  and  the  price  plus  the 
shipping  cost  was  satisfactory  even  though  it 
was  in  U.S.  Dollars. 

As  expected  when  the  parcel  arrived  at 
Custoffis  the  GST  was  added  to  the  cost  of  the 
prografli.  To  add  insult  to  injury,  the  Post 
Office  added  another  $5.m'^  for  collecting  the 
GST. 

It  kind  of  got  isy  goat  ■ ' ' ! ' 
Louis  Laferriere 


SINC-LINK 


19 


I  VISITED  DAYTON 

by  Hugh  Bowie 


I  went  on  a  short  vacation  trip  a  couple  of  weeks  ago,  visiting  some 
friends  and  having  a  good  time,  finishing  up  at  Dayton,  Ohio,  and  their 
annual  Computer  Fest . 

This  is  held  in  the  Kara  Arena  which  is  a  huge  sports  and  entertainment 
centre.  The  Hara  Arena  in  size  is  about  the  size  of  perhaps  four  or  five 
hockey  arenas.  This  place  is  absolutely  huge.  It  has  a  banquet  room 
nearly  the  size  of  a  hockey  rink. 

At  the  computer  fest  last  year  they  had  about  27000  visitors  for  the  two 
day  show,  and  this  year  they  were  hoping  for  more  than  that.  From  what  I 
saw,  I  would  say  they  reached  their  objective  with  bodies  to  spare.  I  was 
going  to  say  room  to  spare  but  there  was  no  room  to  spare  anywhere,  the 
place  was  packed. 

The  main  arena  was  called  a  Showcase  display,  where  all  the  manufacturers 
had  their  latest  and  best  on  show.  As  I  lost  my  notes,  and  I  gave  away  my 
Show  Catalogue,  it  is  better  not  to  name  names  in  case  I  miss  an  important 
one,  but  I  can  assure  you  that  just  about  all  the  world  giants  were  there 
with  there  glittering  showcases  and  contents.  Being  strictly  a  QL  man,  and 
not  having  an  interest  in  any  other  computer  I  did  not  pause  long  in  this 
section.  If  I  had  had  a  desire  to,  I  could  have  grown  roots  there  the 
crush  was  so  massive.  In  moving  it  was  a  matter  of  push  and  shove  - 
everyone  was  doing  the  shuffle  in  slow  time. 

I  must  mention  that  many  of  the  various  section  of  this  complex  are  on 
different  levels,  but  there  are  no  stairs,  no  elevators,  just  plain  old 
common  ramps.  result  is  that  you  just  sort  of  glide  from  one  section  to 
another.  In  fact  it  comes  as  a  relief  to  reach  a  down  ramp  and  sort  of 
just  coast  along  before  starting  to  walk  again. 

There  were  about  three  hundred  traders  there  from  all  over  the  mid-west, 
some  even  from  more  distant  parts.  The  traders  were  grouped  in  various 
sections,  as  also  were  the  flea  markets  and  that  was  something  else  again, 
If  there  was  something  you  wanted  you  could  get  it  in  the  flea  market. 

The  Sinclair  section  was  wpII  represented,  and  I  was  surprised  by  the 
amount  of  attention  this  area  was  getting.  The  Sinclair  user  may  be 
declining,  but  From  the  number  of  people  stopping,  looking,  talking  and 
buying  was  really  surprising.     We  may  be  dying  but  we  are  not  dead  -  yet. 

I  arrived  in  Dayton  on  Thursday,  and  on  Friday  many  other  Sinclair  folks 
arrived  and  we  all  met  and  got  started  talking.  Paul  Holmgren  of 
Mechanical  Affinity  was  there  with  a  wagon  load  of  stuff,  and  he  had  more 
to  pick  up  from  Tim  Swenson  and  as  I  had  my  station  wagon  there  I  was  roped 
into  picking  this  stuff  up  and  taking  it  over  to  the  arena.  Therefore  I  saw 
a  small  part  of  the  show  on  the  Friday  night. 

When  we  returned  from  the  arena,  we  had  a  little  get-together  in  my  room. 
Paul  Holmgren,  Frank  Davis,  Don  Lambert  of  ZXir  Olive  Alive,  Charlie  Reise 
from  St  Louis,  Wei  LaVerne  (another  member)  from  Oak  ridge,  Tennessee  was 
there  with  his  son.  I  may  have  missed  someone,  as  I  say  I  lost  my  notes. 
Anyway  we  had  a  good  time.  I  had  some  cocktail  style  sausages,  and  some 
spare"  ribs  I  had  saved  from  dinner  in  a  little  box,  some  beer,  some  pop, 
and  plenty  of  gab. 


20 


SINC-LINK 


Many  things  were  discussed  and  generally  nattered  about.  One  topic  was  our 
proposed  Sinclair  Fest  in  Toronto  in  1994.  most  appeared  to  be  in 
agreement  it  would  be  a  good  idea,  I  don't  think  there  were  any 
dissentions,  and  this  is  one  of  the  reasons  we  are  asking  every  member  and 
no-member  also,  to  write  and  let  us  know  whether  or  not,  they  would  come  to 
Toronto  for  Fest  next  year,  so  please  fill  out  the  form  in  this  issue  and 
mail  it  to  us  whether  you  are  coming  or  not.  We  need  to  know  to  make  our 
decision.     Decision  day  is  October  21st  1993. 

On  Saturday  morning  I  was  again  giving  a  hand,  and  was  able  to  see  most  of 

the  show  before  the  crowd  gathered,  and  from  this  was  able  to  see  how  the 
tables  were  loaded.  On  Saturday  afternoon  I  made  a  quick  circuit  of  the 
show,  and  noted  that  most  of  the  tables  were  looking  rather  bare  and 
bedraggled,  and  from  this  observation  I  concluded  that  the  traders  had  to 
be  a  happy  bunch,  and  that  they  had  to  be  loaded  with  green. 

On  Saturday  evening  after  the  show  closed  for  the  day,  Tim  Swenson  had  a 
little  picnic  at  his  home.  I  did  not  go  as  I  had  had  enough  that  day,  I 
was  a  wee  bit  tired  with  all  my  walking  and  toting  stuff  around,  so  I 
stayed  at  home.  Tim,  a  Captain  in  the  Air  Force,  is  Project  Officer, 
Communications,  working  at  the  nearby  Wright  Patterson  Air  Force  base. 
He  is  also  the  author/editor  of  The  QL  Hackers  Journal,  m  interesting 
booklet  issued  every  couple  months  or  so  for  the  QL  Programmer.  My 
understanding  was  that  a  good  time  was  had  by  all  at  the  picnic.  Sorry  I 
missed  it,  but  a  picnic  i s  no  place  for  a  tired  old  man! 

This  was  my  second  visit  to  Dayton,  I  was  there  two  years  ago,  and  Jeff 
Taylor  our  Editor,  and  Rene  Bruneau  our  President  were  there  last  year. 
Jeff  paid  another  visit  this  year,  so  you  will  see  that  there  is  a  certain 
amount  of  attraction  at  this  event  for  us  Sinclairi  tes .  I  guess  it  is 
because  we  meet  so  many  folks  from  other  parts  whom  we  never  met  before. 

One  thing  which  was  noticed,  and  that  is  that  there  was  nothing  I  could  buy 
in  Dayton  that  I  could  not  get  in  Toronto  at  the  same  or  even  better  price! 
The  Canadian  Dollar  is  running  about  1.30  or  thereabouts,  with  the  result 
that  if  something  costs  $3  in  Dayton,  it  cost  $4  Canadian.  Toronto  has 
even  better  prices  in  many  respects  than  anywhere  T  have  been  in  the 
States.  As  well  as  being  on  a  swing  through  Ohio,  I  also  paid  a  visit  to 
the  fest  at  Rhode  Island  a  couple  months  ago,  so  have  had  an  opportunity  to 
observe  prices  in  a  large  area.  Toronto  is  as  good  as  anywhere  for 
prices,  and  better  than  most.  For  example,  Disk  drives  in  Dayton  were  $38 
US,   T  can  get  them  here  for  $40/45  Canadian! 

No  Matter'  Tf  you  want  to  have  a  holiday  and  look  at  computers,  and  see 
the  latest  in  anything  associated  with  computers,  Dayton  is  the  place  to 
go.  And  if  you  want  to  meet  Sinclair  users  you  will  find  plenty  of  them  at 
Dayton . 

I  have  not  mentioned  many  names  whom  I  met  and  spoke  to,  as  T  did  not  make 
a  back-up  of  my  notes,  just  goes  to  prove  that  we  never  learn,  we  just  go 
on  in  our  own  sweet  way  and  never  listen  to  advice.  Anyway,  who  ever  heard 
of  anyone  making  back-ups  of  notes? 

I  had  a  good  time.  Jeff  had  a  good  time.  We  all  had  a  good  time.  Hooray! 

930901 


SINC-LINK 


21 


IMPORTANT  NOTICE 
ALL      SINCLAIR  USERS 
PLEASE  READ  THIS 

At  a  time  when  the  Sinclair  User  is  becoming  a  rare  species  of  animal,  when  our 
fraternity  is  dwindling  in  numbers,  when  so  many  are  changing  to  other  methods  of 
fetishism,  it  is  becoming  abundantly  clear  that  there  are  not  going  to  be  too  many 
opportunities  or  reasons  for  aH  Sinclairites  to  get  together  and  worship  their  objects 
of  adoration.  This  is  why  we  in  Toronto  are  making  what  may  be  the  last  effort  in 
North  America  for  us  all  to  get  together  for  one  last  bash. 

We  have  decided  to  ask  you  all,  each  and  every  one  of  you,  if  you  would  like  one 
last  chance  to  meet  your  favourite  guru  in  the  Sinclair  world  of  computing.  We 
enclose  a  form  which  we  ask  you  to  take  a  minute  to  complete,  and  mail  to  us,  letting 
us  know  what  you  think  about  a  get-to-gether  next  year,  here  in  Canada,  the  target 
of  all  those  storms  that  start  out  somewhere  in  Texas. 

It  would  be  foolish  to  run  something  lil^e  this  if  there  were  going  to  be  no  one  come, 
so  the  decision  to  go  ahead  with  this  affair  depends  on  your  answer  before  October 
21st  1993.    From  the  response  we  will  make  our  decision. 

Should  we  get  a  good  response  we  are  going  to  advertise  this  around  the  world.  We 
are  going  to  ask  traders  and  interested  parties  from  Britain  and  continental  Europe 
and  anywhere  they  may  be,  to  come  visit  Canada  and  all  the  North  American  Sinclair 
fraternity.  We  are  going  to  ask  our  own  North  American  cohorts  do  come  visit  us 
here,  in  Toronto,  in  1994.    Probable  date  around  the  middle  of  July. 

The  convention  will  be  held  in  Burlington  on  the  shores  of  Lake  Ontario,  just  a  few 
miles  west  of  Toronto,  where  accomodation  is  reasonable.  Where  there  is  easy  access 
from  all  regions,  and  where  we  can  have  accomodation  and  venue  in  close  proximity 
thus  eliminating  a  lot  of  cross-city  travelling.    Good  shopping  centres  also. 

The  roads  to  Burlington  are  all  four  lane  divided  highway,  no  matter  from  where  you 
come,  sometimes  six  lane.  Burlington  is  near  Toronto  with  a  six  lane+,  divided 
highway  right  into  the  downtown  area,  such  as  the  Skydome  which  is  the  home  of 
the  Blue  Jays.  And  the  Skylon  Tower,  the  tallest  free-standing  structure  in  the 
world.    You  might  even  see  a  Blue  Jays  game  on  their  home  turf. 

If  you  wish  to  travel  to  Toronto  by  rail  or  bus  there  is  a  regular  service.  There  is 
an  airport  bus  service  from  Pearson  Airport,  and  you  can  be  in  BurHngton,  in  your 
motel  within  half  an  hour  of  leaving  the  airport. 

In  other  words,  we  have  a  venue  that  is  of  easy  access,  and  easy  to  move  around  in. 

Please  take  a  few  moments  to  fill  out  and  mail  this  little  form.  Arrange  for  next 
years  vacation  to  be  spent  in  Canada.  Visit  us  here  -  where  we  have  the  world 
^-enowned  Royal  Botanical  Gardens  in  Burlington  and  Hamilton.  Visit  Hamilton  where 
you  may  see  one  of  the  only  two  World  War  2,  Lancaster  Bombers  in  the  world  still 
flying  Visit  downtown  Toronto  where  we  have  the  Eaton  Centre,  a  huge  shopping 
centre  covering  blocks,  and  in  height  to  the  heavens,  where  full  size  trees  grow 
under  the  glass  dome  a  city  block  long.    Visit  the  Toronto  Zoo. 

Visit  the  Sinclair  Zoo  where  there  are  all  sorts  of  animal  from  the  ZX80  to  the  QL, 
and  bring  enthusiasm  to  what  could  be  the  best  (and  probably  the  last) 
ALL  SINCLAIR  SHOW  in  North  America. 


Come  one  -  Come  all  -  fill  out  the  form  saying  you  will  come  -  then  come. 


22 


SINC-LINK 


July  28,  1993 


John  E.  Juergens 
18  Bryce  Canyon  Way 
Pacifica    CA  94044-3723 


Hugh  H.  Howie 
QL  Contact 
586  Oneida  Drive 
BURLINGTON  ONT. 
CANADA     L7T  3V3 


Dear  Hugh, 

This  is  a  follow-up  to  our  letter  of  Jan  9th,  reprinted  in  SINC-LINK's  Jan-Feb 
'93  issue. 

First,  our  continuing  Gold  Card  experience(s) :  Around  the  beginning  of  this 
month  MDV  1  on  our  main  QL  went  to  MDV  heaven,  requiring:  1.  Sending  the  QL 
off  to  Dan  Elliot,  COMPUTER  CLASSICS,  RT  1,  BOX  117,  CABOOL  MO  65689,  and, 
2.  switching  over  to  our  standby  QL  for  interim  use. 

Over  the  years,  Dan  has  kept  our  QLs  running  with  his  excellent  service  and 
modest  prices;  I  unhesitatingly  recommend  his  work.  Our  standby  QL  has  always 
been  a  bit  flakey,  originally  overheating  until  Dan  put  in  a  Coleco  power 
supply  connector.  Even  then,  it  seemed  to  draw  a  noticeable  amount  more 
current  than  our  main  machine  but  did  function  acceptably. 

This  last  is  mentioned  only  because,  after  removal  of  the  Gold  Card  from  the 
main  machine  to  send  to  Dan  and  installing  it  in  the  standby  machine,  the 
Gold  Card  screen  corruption  problem  intensified.  It  got  to  the  point  where  we 
were  averaging  2  to  3  turn-on-of f-on  sequences  per  startup  just  to  get  a 
useable  screen. 

This  frustration  led  me,  again,  to  write  Miracle  and  ask  if  they  had  yet 
solved  the  problem.  Within  10  days  we  received  a  second  chip,  an  Ingot  5  (new 
version)  replacing  the  Ingot  3  which  came  with  our  Gold  Card.  Hiracle's  first 
replacement  was  an  Eprom  which  did  not  solve  the  problem. 

The  bottom  line  is  that  Miracle  has  solved  the  problem!  No  more  screen 
corruptions,  period,  even  on  our  backup  QL.  The  Gold  Card  is  now  an 
unmitigated  pleasure  to  use. 

Secondly,  PC  Conqueror:  Had  we  not  acquired  recently  an  old  PC  compatible,  I 
would  not  have  known  how  slow  PC  Conqueror  Gold  really  is.  From  the  beginning 
it  appeared  "somewhat"  slow  but  without  the  ability  to  compare,  ignorance  is 
blissful.  For  anyone  considering  adding  PC  compatibility  to  their  lives,  the 
rock  bottom  prices  on  used  machines  and  DOS  applications  presents  a  rare 
economic  opportunity  and,  in  my  opinion,  overwhelming  competition  to  PC 
Conqueror. 

In  our  case,  US$200  bought    a  used    286-16  with    a  20M    hard  disk,    2  floppies 


-1- 


SINC-LINK 


23 


(360K  and  1.44M)  and  CGA,  printer  and  COM  port  cards  in  a  package  that  weighs 
only  slightly  less  than  our  refrigerator. 

My  intial  objection  to  buying  a  PC  was  space  and  clutter  considerations. 
Although  that  still  is  valid,  the  machine  itself  stands  on  edge  out  of  the  way 
and  the  cable-clutter  is  not  as  bad  as  I  had  initially  envisioned. 

Our  QL  has  been  running  since  1986  with  a  Magnavox  amber  monitor.  The 
challenge  presented  by  the  PC  acquistion  was  to  use  the  same  monitor  for  both 
machines. 

A  coax  cable  was  run  from  the  PC's  CGA-RCA  jack  to  a  QL  TV  game  switcher  to 
which  I  had  added  two  RCA  jacks  -  one  for  the  CGA  input  and  the  other  for 
monitor  output  -  having  unsoldered  the  twin-lead  TV  pigtail.  It  works 
acceptably  on  most  applications  and  switching  between  the  QL  and  PC,  even  when 
each  is  on,  seems  to  do  no  harm. 

The  PC's  CGA  output  and  the  QL's  composite  monochrome  output  are  similar. 
However,  the  term  "similar"  is  emphasized.  There  is  an  intensity  difference 
between  the  QL  and  PC  outputs  -  CGA  is  much  brighter,  requiring  Contrast  &/or 
Brightness  adjustment  when  switching  from  one  to  the  other.  Further,  some  PC 
applications  -  pixel  based  screens  -  require  a  slight  adjustment  to  the 
Vertical  Hold  to  stop  rolling.  However,  all  adjustments  are  less  difficult 
than  the  above  would  make  it  appear. 

Most  of  the  post-1986  software  I've  tried  provide  adjustment  for  the  type  of 
card  and  monitor  being  used  in  the  applications  themselves.  However,  older 
applications  do  not  provide  for  adjustments,  eg.  with  the  1984  Psion  PC-4 
suite,  the  prompt  and  command  screens  are  almost  impossible  to  read  due  to 
Psion's  arty  use  of  multi  "colours"  within  letters. 

Some  PC  software  will  change  from  being  barely  readable  to  readable  by  simply 
switching  from  MODE  C080  to  MODE  BW80  at  the  DOS  prompt  command  line  or  via  a 
line  in  the  AUTOEXEC.BAT  file. 

PC-Conqueror  Gold  produces  a  good  screen  once  software  adjustments,  if 
allowed,  are  made;  the  PC-4  suite  give  readable  screens.  However,  when  a 
screen  difficulty  does  arise,  it's  a  real  challenge  to  get  into  an 
application's  utility  section  and  adjust  the  screen  when  the  screen  is 
unreadable  in  the  first  place.  One  must  proceed  with  a  finger  and  one  eye  on 
the  documentation  and  a  remaining  one  of  each  on  the  screen  searching  for 
something  remotely  recognizable.  Of  course,  a  color  monitor  would  probably 
solve  all  of  the  PC  screen  problems. 

Lastly,  was  it  all  worth  it?  Probably  not  if  one  puts  no  value  on  challenges 
or  learning.    But,  otherwise,  a  resounding  maybe! 

I've  yet  to  come  across  anything  in  the  PC  world  that  I  would  regularly  use  or 
couldn't  be  without.  The  experience  has  made  it  clear  to  me  what  a  real  value 
the  QL-bundled  Psion  group  truly  is  for  the  home  user. 


24 


SINC-LINK 


LKDOS  Disassembly  by  Les  Cottrell  C  continued  from  last  issue) 


Dec 

Hex 

Instr-Dec 

nsine 

Dec 

Ufs  V 

riex 

R6ID3r*iCS 

4575 

IIFF 

SBC  HL,  Uh 

A  7  1 A 

1  7  7H 

r AT  T     1  Q 

»  e 

4577 

1  lEl 

LD  A ,  L 

4  /  J  / 

1  1 

POP  DE 

4578 

1 1E2 

CP  3 

A  7TJI 
4  /  J  0 

1282 

in    HT  A7QA 

4580 

11E4 

y.  7  A  1 
4/41 

1  751  s 

4582 

11E6 

LD  A,  4 

A  7  A  A 
4/44 

1  7  ftQ 

4584 

1 1E8 

LD    (lj4Joj,  A 

4  /  4  0 

A  Z  0/^ 

•  chsns 

4587 

22EB 

rUon  tJL. 

4  7  49 

128D 

LD  BC     A  5 

4588 

1  lEC 

POP  HL 

4  752 

1290 

ADD  HT  RC 

4589 

1  lED 

OALL     y  /  y 

4  753 

1291 

EX  DE ,  HL 

4592 

1 IFO 

JP  4665 

4754 

1292 

LD  HL,  (23631) 

•  chsns 

4  595 

11F3 

C.A   Uc. ,  HL 

A  7  s  7 

1295 

LD  BC,  12 

4596 

11F4 

LD  A,  [tiL) 

4760 

1298 

ADD  HL  BC 

4597 

1 1F5 

RES   5 ,  A 

4761 

1299 

LD  C ,    ( HL ) 

4599 

1 1F7 

CP  87 

»  w 

4762 

129A 

INC  HL 

4601 

1 1F9 

T  D     7          /i  A  /.  Q 

4  763 

129B 

LD  B,  (HL) 

4  603 

1 1 FB 

rv    7  A 
L.r    /  0 

.  L 

4764 

1 29C 

PUSH  BC 

4605 

1 IFD 

4  765 

129D 

LD  BC,  7 

4607 

I  IFF 

CP  68 

rv 

4  768 

12  AO 

ADD  HL,  BC 

4609 

1201 

JR   NZ,  Ao^O 

4769 

1 2A1 

POP  BC 

4611 

1203 

INC  HL 

4770 

12A2 

LD  A  5 

4612 

1204 

LD  A,  InL; 

4  772 

12A4 

T n  f  HL \  E 

4613 

1205 

RES  5 ,  A 

4  773 

1 2A5 

INC  HL 

4615 

1207 

CP  68 

4774 

1 2A6 

LD   (HL) ,  D 

4617 

1209 

JR  N/i ,  40^0 

4  7  7  5 

12A7 

INC  HL 

4  619 

1 20B 

INC  HL 

4  776 

12A8 

LD   ( HL ) ,  C 

4620 

1 20C 

T  n     A         f  UT  \ 

LU   A ,    (  nil  J 

kill 

1 2A9 

INC  HL 

4621 

120D 

CP  34 

4  778 

1 2AA 

in  r HI  1  R 

4  6  23 

1  20F 

J  P   Z ,  171 

4779 

12AB 

INC  HL 

4626 

1212 

noT    o    trot)  TO 
RST   0   hKK  ly 

,       inValXU    L / U 

4  780 

1 2  AC 

INC  HL 

4628 

1214 

IN'C  HL 

4  781 

1 2AD 

INC  DE 

4629 

1215 

T             A             i  UT  ^ 

LD  A,    ( HL ; 

4  782 

1 2AE 

INC  DE 

4  630 

1216 

RES   5  ,  A 

4783 

1 2AF 

INC  DE 

4632 

1218 

CP  80 

4  784 

1 2B0 

INC  DE 

4  634 

1 2  lA 

TO      M*?  /A'^A 
J  K     NZ  ,      4  0^0 

4  785 

1 2B 1 

DEC  A 

4636 

1 2 1 C 

LD  A ,  3 

4  7  86 

1 2B2 

JR  NZ  4772 

4o  Jo 

1 2  IE 

LU    lij'tJOJ,  A 

4  788 

12B4 

DEC  HL 

4641 

1221 

T  Mr*  UT 

4789 

12B5 

DEC  HL 

4642 

1222 

T  r»     A        /  UT  \ 
LU   A  ,     ( tiL,  ) 

4  /  ^  u 

12B6 

in  f HI  1  n 

4643 

1223 

CP  34 

• 

479 1 

12B7 

DTT  HI 
Ly  c>  w 

4645 

1225 

i  7  Q  ^ 
4  /  y  ^ 

12B8 

464  7 

122  7 

JK    'too  J 

4  793 

1 2B9 

RET 

4  64  9 

1229 

INC  HL 

4  794 

1 2BA 

NOP 

4650 

1 2  2  A 

T  ri    A        f  UT  \ 

4795 

12BB 

NOP 

M  0  J  i 

4796 

12BC 

NOP 

4653 

122D 

A  7Q7 

12BD 

NOP 

4655 

122F 

CP  4 

A  7Qfi 

12BE 

LD  D  A 

4657 

1231 

TO    Kf^        A  A  O  A 

A  7QQ 

4  /  7  y 

-  4802 

NOP 

4659 

T  0  T  T 
1  2  J  J 

AND  A 

4  0  V  •> 

1 2C3 

LD  E  B 

4660 

1234 

TO     V        A  A  O  A 

Aftn  A 

40U4 

ARn7 

—   4  0  u  y 

NOP 

4  662 

1236 

DEC  A 

4808 

1 2C8 

LD  E  C 

4663 

1237 

JR  4638 

4  0  u  y 

-   4  812 

NOP 

4  665 

1238 

LU   nJL  ,    (  ZjOJl  ) 

f  Cndns 

4  0  u 

12CE 

LD  C  H 

4  668 

1 23C 

LU  , 

4814 

1 2CF 

NOP 

4671 

1 23F 

AUU  nL.,  tsu 

A  R 1 

4  010 

—  4817 

NOP 

4672 

1240 

T           A          t  UT  A 
LU     A ,       [ HL ) 

AR 1  n 
4  0 1 0 

1 2D2 

T  n   R  HI 

4673 

124 1 

CP  128 

4819 

1 2D3 

LD    D  0 

4675 

1243 

tjALL   Z. ,    4  /  JU 

4821 

12D5 

IR  ARA1 

4678 

1 246 

TTN     UT  OTCLTA 

A 

A  H  ■?  T 
4  0  A  0 

1 2D7 

LD  D  1 

4  681 

1249 

LU   A,  il->**J**^ 

4825 

12D9 

JR  4841 

4  684 

1  2  4  C 

P  T  A 
KL.A 

4827 

12DB 

LD  D,  2 

4685 

1 2  4D 

D  T7  C     n  A 

4829 

12DD 

JR  4841 

MOO  / 

J.  <:  4  r 

L>U    ^9  A 

4831 

12DF 

LD  D ,  3 

1  O  c:  rt 

LiU    Of  U 

4833 

12E1 

JR  4841 

4  690 

1252 

Anr\   UT  Rr* 
AUU    rti< ,  DO 

4835 

12E3 

LD  D  4 

4691 

1253 

LU   A,  (1J4J0J 

AST? 

12E5 

TR    A8  A  I 

4694 

1256 

AND  A 

4  8  39 

1 2E7 

LD  D  5 

4  695 

1257 

TO     7        A  7  1  7 
JK     A.,  4/1/ 

4841 

12E9 

JP  106 

4697 

1259 

CP  1 

4844 

12EC 

ADD   A  R 

4699 

1 25B 

TO     7        A  7  0  1 
JK     Alt  4/^1 

4845 

12ED 

NOP 

4  701 

1 25D 

4846 

12EE 

RST  32 

•  nGxt  c 

4  703 

125F 

TO     7        A  7  9  ^ 
JK    A*  f     4  /  ZO 

4847 

12EF 

CALL  144 

•  GVfllU 

4  705 

1261 

CP  3 

4850 

12F2 

LD  A  B 

4707 

1263 

T  D      7          A  7  1  1 

4851 

1 2F3 

AND  A 

4709 

1265 

T  Vi      fUT\  A1 

LU    { tiL ;  ,  41 

s 

4  852 

12F4 

JP  NZ  4554 

;  err  11 

4  711 

1267 

T  D     /.  7  7  7 
J  K     M  /  Z  / 

4855 

12F7 

LD  A,  C 

4  713 

1269 

T  rs     <  UT  ^        "3  A 
LU     I  tlL.  )  y  JO 

• 

4856 

12F8 

CP  17 

4  715 

1 26B 

T  rj     A  7  7  7 
J  K     *4  /  Z  / 

4858 

12FA 

JP  NC  4554 

;   err  11 

4  717 

1 26D 

T  r\     f  UT  ^        0  T 

4861 

12FD 

CP  2 

4  719 

126F 

J  K    4  /  Z  / 

4863 

12FF 

JP  C  4554 

;  err  11 

4721 

1271 

LD   ( HL ) ,  26 

4866 

1302 

LD  D,  A 

4723 

1273 

JP  4727' 

4867 

1303 

ADD  A,  A 

4725 

1275 

LD   (HL),  31 

4868 

1304 

LD  HL,  23574 

;  scrms 

4727 

1277 

JP  4499 

4871 

1307 

LD  C,  A 

4730 

127A 

PUSH  HL 

4872 

1308 

LD  B,  0 

4731 

127B 

LD  EC,  50 

4874 

130A 

ADD  HL,  BC 

SINC-LINK 


25 


name      Dec     Hex  Instr-Dec 


Remarks 


(14) 


name     Dec     Hex     Instr-Dec  Remarks 


4875 

130B 

LD  E,  (ML) 

4876 

130C 

LD  A,  D 

4877 

130D 

LD  D,  0 

4879 

130F 

CP  2 

4881 

1311 

JR  NZ,  4885 

4883 

1313 

LD  0,  6 

4885 

1315 

CP  3 

4887 

1317 

JR  NZ,  4891 

4889 

1319 

LD  D,  16 

4891 

131B 

LD  (HL) ,  D 

4892 

131C 

UD  A,  E 

4893 

131D 

CP  41 

) 

4895 

131F 

JP  NZ,  4499 

4898 

1322 

LD  A,  (8207) 

4901 

1325 

BIT  7,  A 

4903 

1327 

JR  Z,  4972 

4905 

1329 

LD  EC,   (8318)  ; 

lenth 

4909 

132D 

LD  HL,  5090 

4912 

1330 

OR  A 

4913 

1331 

SBC  HL,  BC 

4915 

1333 

LD  (8318),  HL  ; 

lenth 

4916 

1336 

LD  A,  H 

4919 

1337 

OR  L 

4920 

1338 

JK  Z,  4936 

4922 

133A 

LD  HL,  (8236) 

4925 

133D 

LD  A,  (HL) 

4926 

133E 

INC  HL 

4927 

133F 

LD  (8236),  HL 

4930 

1342 

LD  (8221),  A  ; 

curtrk 

4933 

1345 

CALL  5169 

4336 

1348 

LD  HL,  (8236) 

4939 

134B 

DEC  HL 

4940 

134C 

LD  (8245),  HL  ; 

tanp6 

4943 

134F 

LD  A,  11 

4945 

1351 

LD  (8194),  A  ; 

nmiflag 

4948 

1354 

CALL  168 

4951 

1357 

LD  A,  (13440) 

4954 

135A 

LD  (8221), A  ; 

curtrk 

4957 

135D 

CALL  126 

track 

4960 

1360 

CALL  123  ; 

loadbf 

4963 

1363 

LD  HL,  (13438) 

4966 

1366 

LD  (8326),  HL  ; 

totlen 

4969 

1369 

CALL  120  ; 

savebf 

4972 

136C 

XOR  A 

4973 

1360 

LD  (8207) ,  A 

4976 

1370 

JP  4499 

4979 

1373 

LD  HL,  32 

4981 

1375 

DEC  HL 

4982 

1376 

LD  A,  (HL) 

4983 

1377 

LD  (HL) ,  32 

4985 

1379 

CP  191 

4987 

137B 

JP  Z,  5194 

4990 

137E 

CP  223 

4992 

1380 

JP  NZ,  6583 

parameter  error 

4995 

1383 

LD  A,  11 

4997 

1385 

LD  (8194),  A 

nmiflag 

5000 

1388 

CALL  204 

svtl 

5003 

138B 

XOR  A 

5004 

138C 

LD  (8194),  A 

nmiflag 

5007 

138F 

LD  HL,  8207 

5010 

1392 

SET  7,  (HL) 

5012 

1394 

LD  HL,  8328 

•  datablock 

5015 

1397 

LD  (8316),  HL 

■  destin 

5018 

139A 

LD  HL,  5090 

5021 

139D 

LD  (8318),  HL 

;  lenth 

5024 

13A0 

LD  HL,  0 

5027 

13A3 

LD  (13438) ,  HL 

5030 

13A6 

LD  HL,  8261 

5033 

13A9 

LD  A,  249 

;  name  end 

5035 

13AB 

CP  (HL) 

5036 

13  AC 

JP  Z,  5047 

;  'Disk  Full" 

5039 

13AF 

LD  (8236),  HL 

;  steurt 

5042 

13B2 

LD  A,  (HL) 

5043 

13B3 

LD  (13440),  A 

5046 

13B6 

RET 

5047 

13B7 

LD  HL,  5053 

;  'Disk  Full" 

5050 

13BA 

JP  174 

;  print  message 

5053 

•U  Disk  Full* 

;  pointer  65047 

5066 

13CA 

LD  A,  (16098) 

5069 

13CD 

BIT  1,  A 

5071 

13CF 

JR  Z,  5076 

5073 

13D1 

POP  AF 

5074 

13D2 

JR  5082 

5076 

13D4 

POP  AF 

5077 

1305 

CP  165 

5079 

1307 

JP  NC,  8075 

5082 

13DA 

LD  D,  A 

5083 

130B 

LD  A,  (8207) 

5086 

13DE 

BIT  7,  A 

5088 

13E0 

JP  NZ,  5092 

5090 

13E2 

RST  8  ERR  24 

5052 

13E4 

LD  HL,  (8318) 

;  lenth 

5095 

13E7 

LD  A,  H 

5096 

13E8 

OR  L 

5097 

13E9 

JR  Z,  5123 

5099 

13eb 

DEC  HL 

5100 

13EC 

LD  (8318),  HL 

;  lenth 

5103 

13EF 

LD  HL,  (8316) 

;  destin 

5106 

13F2 

LD  (HL)  ,  D 

5107 

13F3 

INC  HL 

5108 

13F4 

LD  (8316),  HL 

,-  destin 

5111 

13F7 

LD  HL,  (13438) 

5114 

13FA 

INC  HL 

5115 

13FB 

LD  (13438),  HL 

5118 

13FE 

POP  BC 

5119 

13FF 

POP  HL 

5120 

1400 

JP  186 

jpout 

5123 

1403 

LD  A,  D 

5124 

1404 

LD  (8240) ,  A 

tempi 

5127 

1407 

LD  HL,  5090 

5130 

140A 

LD  (8318) ,  HL  ; 

lenth 

5133 

140D 

LD  HL,    (8236)  ; 

start 

5136 

1410 

LO  A,  (HL) 

5137 

1411 

INC  HL 

5138 

1412 

LD  (8236),  HL  ; 

start 

5141 

1415 

CP  249 

name  end 

5143 

1417 

JP  Z,  5047 

disk  full 

5146 

141A 

LD  (8221) ,  A 

curtrk 

5149 

141D 

CALL  5169 

5152 

1420 

LD  HL,  8328 

data  block 

5155 

1423 

LD  (8316) ,  HL  ; 

destin 

5158 

1426 

LD  HL,  5090 

5161 

1429 

LD  (8318) ,  HL  ; 

lenth 

5164 

142C 

LD  A,  (8240) 

tempi 

5167 

142F 

JR  5082 

5169 

1431 

LD  HL,  8304 

buffer 

5172 

1434 

LD  (HL) ,  255 

end  of  track 

5174 

1436 

INC  HL 

5175 

1437 

LD  (HL),  A 

5176 

1438 

INC  HL 

5177 

1439 

PUSH  HL 

5178 

143A 

POP  OE 

5179 

143B 

LD  HL,  8226 

prognm 

5182 

143E 

LD  BC,  9 

5185 

1441 

LDIR 

5187 

1443 

CALL  126 

track 

5190 

1446 

CALL  120 

savebf 

5193 

1449 

RET 

5194 

144A 

CALL  132 

indir 

5197 

144D 

LD  A,  (8224) 

•  ermu 

5200 

1450 

CP  10 

5202 

1452 

JP  Z,  147 

•  nofil 

5205 

1455 

CALL  135 

;  movdr 

5208 

1458 

LD  HL,  8260 

5211 

145B 

LD  (8236) 

;  Start 

5214 

145E 

CALL  5223 

5217 

1461 

LD  A,  64 

;  e 

5219 

1463 

LD  (8207),  A 

5222 

1466 

RET 

5223 

1467 

LD  HL,  (8236) 

;  start 

5226 

146A 

INC  HL 

5227 

146B 

LD  (8236) ,  hi 

;  start 

5230 

146E 

LD  A,  (HL) 

5231 

146F 

CP  249 

;  name  end 

5233 

1471 

RET  Z 

5234 

1472 

LD  (8221) ,  A 

;  curtrk 

5237 

1475 

CALL  126 

;  track 

5240 

1478 

CALL  123 

;  loadbf 

5243 

147B 

LD  HL,  8328 

;  datablock 

5246 

147E 

LD  (8316) ,  HL 

;  destin 

5252 

1481 

LD  HL,  (8318) 

;  lenth 

5252 

1484 

XOR  A 

5253 

1485 

RHT 

5254 

1486 

LD  A,  (8207) 

5257 

1489 

BIT  6,  A 

5259 

148B 

JR  NZ,  5263 

5261 

1480 

RST  8  ERR  8 

;  end  of  file 

5263 

148FLO  HL,  (8318) 

;  l«lth 

5266 

1492 

LD  A,  H 

5267 

1493 

OR  L 

5268 

1494 

CALL  Z  5284 

5271 

1497 

DEC  HL 

5272 

1498 

LD  (8318) ,  HL 

;  lenth 

5275 

149B 

LD  HL,  (8316) 

;  destin 

5278 

149E 

LD  D,  (HL) 

5379 

149F 

INC  HL 

5280 

14A0 

LD  (8316) ,  HL 

;  destin 

5283 

14A3 

RET 

5284 

14A4 

CALL  5223 

5287 

14A7 

CP  249 

;  name  end 

5289 

14A9 

RET  NZ 

5290 

14AA 

XOR  A 

5291 

14AB 

LD  (8207) ,  A 

5294 

14AE 

POP  BC 

5295 

14AF 

LD  D,  255 

;end  of  track 

5297 

14B1 

RET 

5298 

14B2 

CALL  5254 

5301 

14B5 

POP  AF 

5302 

14B6 

POP  BC 

5303 

14B7 

POP  HL 

5304 

14B8 

LD  A,  0 

5305 

14B9 

JP  186 

;  j  pout 

PRINT  5308 

14BC 

CALL  156 

;  gtfil 

5311 

14BF 

LD  A,  32 

5313 

14C1 

LD  (DE),  A 

5314 

14C2 

CALL  5194 

5317 

14C5 

LD  A,  64 

;  e 

5319 

14C7 

LD  (8207) ,  A 

5322 

14CA 

CALL  5254 

5325 

14C0 

LD  A,  (8207) 

5328 

1400 

AND  A 

5329 

14D1 

JR  Z,  4499 

26 


SINC-LINK 


name     Dec     Hex      Instr-Oec  Remarks 


(15) 


name     Dec     Hex     Instr-Dec  Remarks 


5332 
5335 
5337 
5339 
5340 
5342 
5344 
5346 
5348 
5349 
5352 
5352 
5354 


INPUT  5356 
53  57 
5360 
5361 
5363 
5366 

 5367 

5369 
5372 
5373 
5374 
5377 
5378 
5380 

 5383 

5384 
5387 
5389 
5392 
5395 
5396 
5399 
5401 
5404 

 5407 

5409 
5410 
5411 
5412 
5413 
5415 
1516 
5417 

 5419 

5420 

5423 

5426 

5429 

5430 

5433 

5435 

5438 

5439 

5440 

5441 

5444 

5447 

5448 

5451 

5452 

5453 

5454 

5455 

5456 

5457 

5460 

5462 

5463 

5465 

5466 

5469 

5470 

5473 

5476 

5477 

5480 

5482 

5483 

5485 

5486 

5489 

5491 

5494 

5497 

5500 

5503 

5506 

 5509 

 5512 


PAPEK  5514 
 5515 


INK 


5517 
5519 
5522 
5523 
5526 
5530 
5531 


14D4 

LD  A,  (16098) 

1407 

BIT  0,  A 

14D9 

JR  NZ,  5348 

14DB 

LD  A,  D 

14DC 

CP  13 

14DE 

JR  Z,  5348 

14E0 

CP  32 

14F2 

JR  Z,  5317 

14E4 

XOR  A 

14E5 

LD  (8207),  A 

14E8 

LD  A,  D 

14E9 

RST  16 

14EA 

JR  5317 

14EC 

RST  32 

14ED 

LD  HL,  (23645) 

14F0 

LD  A,  (HL) 

14F1 

CP  35 

14F3 

JR  NZ,  4474 

14F6 

RST  32 

14F7 

JR  5384 

14F9 

CALL  144 

14FC 

LD  A,  B 

14FD 

AND  A 

14FE 

JR  NZ,  4554 

1501 

LD  A,  C 

1502 

CP  32 

1504 

JP  NC,  4554 

1507 

RET 

1508 

CALL  5369 

1508 

CP  3 

150D 

JP  NC,  4554 

1510 

LD  (8329),  A 

1513 

RST  32 

1514 

CALL  5369 

1517 

CP  22 

1519 

JP  NC,  4554 

151C 

LD  (8240),  A 

151F 

JR  5420 

1521 

ADD  A,  A 

1522 

ADD  A,  A 

1523 

ADD  A,  A 

1524 

LD  B,  A 

1525 

LD  A,  168 

1527 

SUB  B 

1523 

LD  C,  A 

1529 

LD  B,  0 

152B 

RET 

152C 

CALL  5409 

152F 

LD  (16061),  A 

1532 

LD  (16066),  A 

1535 

RST  32 

1536 

CALL  5369 

1539 

CP  30 

153B 

JP  NC,  4554 

153E 

ADD  A,  A 

153F 

ADD  A,  A 

1540 

ADD  A,  A 

1541 

LD  (16060) ,  A 

1544 

LD  (16065) ,  A 

1547 

RST  32 

1548 

CALL  5369 

154B 

INC  A 

154C 

ADD  A,  A 

154D 

ADD  A,  A 

154E 

ADD  A,  A 

154F 

DEC  A 

1550 

LD  D,  A 

1551 

LD  A,  (16065) 

1554 

ADD  A,  8 

1556 

CP  D 

1557 

JR  NC,  5512 

1559 

LD  A,  D 

155A 

LD  (16062) ,  A 

155D 

RST  32 

155E 

CALL  5369 

1561 

CALL  5409 

1564 

LD  D,  A 

1565 

LD  A,  (16066) 

1568 

SUB  8 

156A 

CP  D 

156B 

JR  C,  5512 

156D 

LD  A,  D 

156E 

LD  (16063) ,  A 

1571 

LD  A,  1 

1573 

LD  (16064), A 

1576 

LD  A,  (23693) 

1579 

LD  (16074) ,  A 

157C 

LD  A,  (8239) 

157F 

LD  (16071) ,  A 

1582 

CALL  6442 

1585 

JP  4499 

1586 

RST  8  ERR  26 

158A 

XOR  A 

158B 

JR  5519 

158D 

LD  A,  1 

158F 

LD  (8239),  A 

1592 

RST  32 

1593 

CALL  144 

1596 

LD  IX,  8239 

159A 

LD  A,  B 

159B 

AND  A 

5532 

159C 

JR  NZ,  4554 

5535 

159F 

LD  A,  C 

5536 

15  AO 

CP  8 

5538 

15A2 

JR  NC,  4554 

5541 

15A5 

BIT  0,  (IX+0) 

5545 

15A9 

JR  NZ,  5556 

5547 

15AB 

SCF 

5548 

15AC 

CCF 

5549 

15  AD 

RLA 

5550 

15AE 

RLA 

5551 

15AF 

RLA 

5552 

15B0 

LD  E,  199 

5554 

15B2 

JR  5558 

next  char 

5556 

15B4 

LD  E,  248 

chadd 

5558 

15B6 

LD  (8240) ,  A 

5561 

15B9 

LD  HL,  22527 

t 

5564 

15BC 

LD  BC,  768 

5567 

15BF 

INC  HL 

next  char 

5568 

15C0 

LD  A,  (HL) 

5569 

15C1 

AND  E 

evalu 

5570 

15C2 

LD  D,  A 

5571 

15C3 

LD  A,  (8240) 

5574 

15C6 

OR  D 

5575 

15C7 

LD  (HL),  A 

5576 

15C8 

DEC  BC 

5577 

15C9 

LD  A,  B 

5578 

15CA 

OR  C 

5579 

15CB 

JR  NZ,  5567 

5581 

15CD 

LD  HL,  23693 

5584 

15D0 

LD  A,  (HL) 

5585 

15D1 

AND  E 

5586 

15D2 

LD  D,  A 

next  char 

5587 

15D3 

LD  A,  (8240) 

5590 

15D6 

OR  D 

5591 

15D7 

LD  (HL),  A 

5592 

15D8 

JR  5607 

POKE  5594 

15DA 

RST  32 

5595 

15IB 

CALL  114 

5598 

15DE 

PUSH  BC 

5599 

15DF 

RST  32 

5600 

15E0 

CALL  114 

5603 

15E3 

POP  HL 

5604 

15E4 

LD  (HL),  C 

5605 

15E5 

INC  HL 

5606 

15E6 

LD  (HL),  B 

5607 

15E7 

JP  4499 

GO  TO  5610 

15EA 

RST  32 

5611 

15EB 

CALL  114 

left 

5614 

15EE 

LD  A,  B 

Y 

5615 

15EF 

AND  A 

next  char 

5616 

15F0 

JR  NZ,  4554 

5619 

15F3 

LD  A,  C 

5620 

15F4 

CP  5 

5622 

15F6 

JR  NC,  4554 

5625 

15F9 

CP  4 

5627 

15FB 

JR  NZ,  5633 

5629 

15FD 

LD  A,  128 

left 

5631 

15FF 

JR  5645 

X 

5633 

1601 

LD  B,  A 

next  char 

5634 

1602 

INC  B 

5635 

1603 

LD  A,  1 

5637 

1605 

ADD  A,  A 

5638 

1606 

DJNZ  5637 

5640 

1608 

PUSH  AF 

5641 

1609 

RRCA 

5642 

160A 

OUT  183,  A 

5644 

160C 

POP  AF 

X 

5645 

160D 

LD  (8195),  A 

5648 

1610 

JR  5607 

5650 

1612 

PUSH  HL 

5651 

1613 

PUSH  DE 

5652 

1614 

PUSH  BC 

right 

5653 

1615 

PUSH  AF 

next  char 

5654 

1616 

CALL  5667 

5657 

1619 

CALL  6442 

5660 

161C 

POP  AF 

5661 

161D 

POP  BC 

Y 

5662 

161E 

POP  DE 

5663 

161F 

POP  HL 

5664 

1620 

JP  186 

parameter  error 

5667 

1623 

CP  13 

5669 

1625 

JR  NZ,  5696 

bottom 

5671 

1627 

CALL  5890 

5674 

162A 

RET 

scroll  count 

5675 

162B 

LD  A,  (16065) 

attr  p 

5678' 

162E 

LD  B,  A 

5679 

162F 

LD  A,  (16062) 

wind  attr 

5682 

1632 

SUB  B 

wind  t 

5683 

1633 

CP  34 

5685 

1635 

JR  C,  5671 

5687 

1637 

LD  A,  (16065) 

peurameter  error 

5690 

163A 

ADD  A,  32 

5692 

163C 

LD  (16065),  A 

5695 

163F 

RET 

5696 

1640 

CP  6 

5698 

1642 

JR  Z,  5675 

next  char 

5700 

1644 

CP  8 

5702 

1646 

JP  Z,  5917 

5705 

1649 

CP  32 

5707 

164B 

RET  C 

5708 

164C 

CP  128 

tempi 

end  of  d/f 


tempi 


attr  p 


tempi 


next  char 
evalu 


next  char 
evalu 


next  char 
evalu 


dvsel 


jpout 
X 

right 

X 
X 


SINC-LINK 


27 


TORONTO 
1994  FEST 

Would  all  members  and  traders  please  take  a  few  moments  to  answer 
those  few  questions.  It  would  be  of  assistance  to  us  m  deciding 
whether  to  ,20  ahead  with  the  propo-s  ed  ALL  SINCLAIR  FEST  m  1994. 

Do  vou  like  the  idea  of  an  ALL  SINCLAIR  FEST  in  Toronto?  Yes  Mo 

Would  you  come?  Yes  No 

Do  you  think  the  fest  should  be  of  1  or  2  days?  1  2 

How  did  you  learn  of  this  proposal?  

What  traders/'iurus  would  you  like  to  see/meet?  


\'our  C'cmments? 


Name  (k  Address  

If  there  is  anyone  you  know  who  might  be  interested,  please  pass  a 
copy  of  this  form  to  them,  and  mvite  them  to  send  it  m  to  us. 

PLEASE  NOTE  THAT  THE  DEADLINE  FOR  MAKING  A  DECISION  IS 
OCTOBER  31ST 1993.  IF  NOT  SUFFICIENT  INTEREST  IS  SHOWN  BY 
THAT  DATE  -  THERE  WILL  BE  NO  FEST  IN  TORONTO  IN  1994. 

Send  reply  to:- 

Hugh  H.  Howie.  586  Oneida  Dr.  Burlmiton.  Ont.  Canada.  L7T  3V3. 
We  w'ant  to  hear  from  all  members,  non-members  and  traders  -  ALL  REPLY  please. 


October   13,  1993 


Sept/Oct  1993 


Dear  Out-of-Town  Members, 

This  summer   I  went  out  to  British  Columbia  for  a  couple  of  weeks, 
and  met  a  couple  of  our  club  members.   Ken  Gamey  and  Marie  Kendall.    It  was 
an   interesting  thing  to  meet  two  of  our  members.    I  helped  Ken  a  bit  ( I 
think!)  with  his  TS2068. 

The  rest  of  the  summer   I  have  been  working  on  an  early  vintage  PC,  a 
sort  of  a  -286  machine.   Except  that    it  has  an  6088  chip  in   it.    It  uses  a 
DOS  version  3.3,    I  think.   Anyway  I  have  been  working  on  a  database  program 
for  our  Scarborough  Neighbourhood  Watch  program.    The  database   is  a 
shareware  called  WAMPUM,   a  variation  of  Dbase.    It  has  been  an  interesting 
experience.   Anyone  else  used  it? 

In  fact  the  experience  has  been  so   interest  ing  that   I  am  seriously 

considering  the  purchase  of  a  more  up-to-date  PC  for  myself.  A  -386  or  a 
-1^86,    probabi y.   does  that  sound  ominous? 

I  have  not  seen  this  current  newsletter  yet.   But   I  think   it    is  going  to 

contain  an  article  from  the  LIST(?)  newsletter,   about  a  Spectrum  Emulator 
that  works  on  an  MSDOS  machine. 

At  one  of  our  club  meetings  we   installed   it  on  this  PC  I  speak  of,  and 
it  does   look   intereting.    It    is  a  serious  piece  of  work,   and  the  deve I oper 
has   included  60  pages  of  documentation  (on  the  disk)  to  go  with   it.  We 
loaded  it   into  the  8088  machine  I  mention.    Though  the  8088  pc  was  too  slow 
to  be  worthwhile,    I  think  with  a  -386   it  would  be  a  marvel. 

I  really  did  not  give   it  much  of  an  exercise,   so   I  cannot  give  a  truly 

critical   comment   on    it,    but    ii   does  seem  to  be  a  well    thought  out 
emulation.    It  has  a  shareware  price  of  $30.    The  remarkable  thing  about  it 

is  that  you  can  load  Spectrum  tapes   into  the  emulated  Spectrum  (MSDOS 
machine)  using  a  very  simple   i nterface  assembly.  Now,    the  hooker   is  that 
the  tape  loading  software   is  not  on  the  shareware  copy  of  the  emu  I  at  or ; 
you  get   it  when  you  send   in  the  money.      You  also  get  the  benefit  of  any 
improvement  or  documentation  done  since   it's  release.   Not  a  bad  deal,  I'd 
say. 

I  can  send  you  a  copy  of  this  disk,    if  you  are   interested,    and  wish  to 
try  it  out.    There   is  also  an  emulator  for  the  MSDOS  machine,   which  makes 
it  behave   like  a  ZX-81 / TS1 000 .    It   is  called  XTR ICATOR .   Ask  for  a  copy  of 
this  disk   if  you  are   i nt crested .   Both  disks,    of  course,    will    load  only 
into  an  MSDOS  type  machine. 

A  couple  of  members  took  exception  to  my  comments   in  the  last 

news  I etter ,   about  what  would  happen  to  the  news  I etter   if  no  one  wrote 

articles  for   it.   Sorry  about  that,    but   I  think  you  miss  my  point.    I'm  not 

closing  the  news  I etter ,    it's  simply  dying  off  by  itself,   as  most  Timex 
news  I etter s  have  already. 

One  of  our  members,   Robert  Shade,    has  sent  me  a  copy  of  a  current  U—page 
catalog  from  a  firm  in  England,    The  Computer  Games  Shop.     The  catalog  is 
for  Spectrum  games  tapes.   Prices  range  from  2  Pounds  and  up.  Anyone 
i nt er est ed   in  a  copy,    let  me  know. 

Sincerely, 

George  Chamber s