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JUL Y- AUG  '93  VOL  1 1  #4 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


JULY-AUG  '93  VOL  11  #4 


SINC-LINK  IS  A  PUBLICATION  OF 
THE  TORONTO  T I  ME X -SINCLAIR  USERS 
CLUB  AND  IS  ISSUED  6  TIMES  A 
YEAR.  CLUB  MEMBERS  RECEIVE  FREE 
COPIES  AS  PART  OF  THE  $20.00 
ANNUAL  MEMBERSHIP  FEE. 

NEWSLETTERS  ARE  EXCHANGED,  FREE 
OF  CHARGE,  WITH  OTHER 
TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USER  GROUPS. 

PLEASE  CREDIT  THIS  PUBLICATION 
AND  THE  AUTHOR  IF  YOU  COPY 
MATERIAL. 

THE  TS2068  &  ZX-81  GROUP  MEETS 
ON  THE  FIRST  WEDNESDAY  OF  EACH 
MONTH  AT  14  RICHOME  COURT, 
SCARBOROUGH,  ONT.   7PM  START. 

THE  QL  SIG  MILL  MEET  THURSDAY, 
JULY  15TH  AT  586  ONEIDA  DRIVE, 
BURLINGTON,  ONT.  7PM  START. 
AUGUST  DATE  TBA. 

SINC-LINK  IS  PRODUCED  ENTIRELY 
ON  SINCLAIR  AND  TIMEX-SINCLAIR 
COMPUTERS. 

SEND  CORRESPONDANCE  TO: 

SINC-LINK  EDITOR,  TORONTO 
TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB,  14 
RICHOME  COURT,  SCARBOROUGH, 
ONTARIO,   CANADA  M1K  2Y1. 


EXECUTIVE  OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT; 
TREASURER; 
SECRETARY ; 
ACTIVITIES 
QL  CONTACT; 
NEWSLETTER: 
LIAISON  OFFICER: 
{  Out-of-town  members  ) 


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TORONTO  TIHEX-SINCLfllR 


USERS  CLUB 

(  AREA  CODE  416) 
RENE  BRUNEAU  (531-9749) 
BILL  LAWSON  (  444-8772  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS  (  751-7559  ) 
LOU  LAFERRIERE  (  820-3725  ) 
HUGH  HOWIE  (  634-4929  ) 
JEFF  TAYLOR  (  244-8583  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS.   14  RICHOME  COURT. 
SCARBOROUGH.  ONTARIO  M1K  2Y1 
(  416-751-7559  ) 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


SINC-LINK 


HOT  SUMMER  1993 
INDEX  VOLUME  11-4 

page  2  -  Club  Stuff 
page  3  -  Index  &  Editorial 
page  4  -  Interbank  Database 
page  5  -  Newport  Report 
page  8  -  QLips 
page  9  -  Tank  Volume 
page  10  -  Spectrum  Restart 
page  13  -  Mechanical  Affinity  Ad 
page  15  -  Visionmixer-1 
page  16  -  QLips 
page  17  -  Al  Green  Writes 
page  18  -  Stepper  Motor  Driver 
page  19  -  Lastest  Index  of  QL  Articles 
page  20  -  More  on  "SLOWGOLD" 
page  21  -  Auto  Fade 
page  23  -  Read  2068  JLO  Disks  With  QL 
page  25  -  PD  Newsletter 
page  27  -  PRISM  PD  Ad 
page  29  -  Z-88  Parallel/Series  Converter 
page  30  -  Dayton  Computerfest  Info 


EDITORIAL 

Well,  we  got  an  interesting 
package  in  the  mail  this  week.  A 
U.K.  public  domain  software  company 
dedicated  to  the  Spectrum  has  sent 
me  a  sampling  of  their  utility 
programs  on  both  tape  and  a  +D 
format  3.5"  disk. 

You  may  recall  that  I  ran  a  copy 
of  PRISM  PD's  advertisement  a 
couple  of  issues  ago  and  after  a 
long  delay  on  my  part,  I  decided  to 
try  them  out.  I  was  particularly 
interested  to  see  if  the  Larken 
system  would  be  able  to  read  the  +D 
disk.  More  on  that  next  issue. 

Also  included  in  the  package  was 
another  ad,  this  time  aimed  at 
North  American  users,  and  a  well- 
assembled  newsletter.  If  this 
newsletter  is  any  indication  of 
their  commitment  then  it  looks  like 
PRISM  PD  will  be  around  for  a 
whi le . 

See  their  new  ad  and  the  first 
couple  of  pages  of  the  newsletter 
near  the  back  of  this  issue.  They 
certainly  offer  a  lot  of  selection. 

NEWS  ON  NEWPORT 

In  early  June,  Hugh  Howie 
attended  the  QL  Fest  in  Newport, 
Rhode  Island.  Hugh  manned  a  table, 
handed  out  info  on  our  club  and  met 
lots  of  fellow  QLers.  See  his 
report  this  issue  and  pay 
particular  attention  to  his  request 
for  comments.  Who  knows? 

BYE  BYE,  YOUR  SINCLAIR 

Also  included  in  the  above- 
mentioned  package  from  the  U.K.  is 
the  sad  news  that  YOUR  SINCLAIR  is 
preparing  to  fold.  With  it  goes  the 
last  commercial  publication  in  the 
U.K.,  so  if  you  want  to  continue 
seeing  products  for  your  Timex  and 
Sinclair  computers  you're  going  to 
have  support  the  few  remaining 
dealers,  clubs  and  magazines  still 
around  on  either  side  of  the 
Atlantic . 

That's  all  for  now... 


J.T 


SINC-LINK 


AN  INTERBANK  DATABASE  FOR   THE  TS2068 
Larken  Library  Disk  #30 
by  G,  Chambers 

The  Larken  2068  library  has  a  disk  #30  ,   called  INTERBANK 
DATABASE.    This  disk  has  a  suite  of  programs  that  make  use  of  the 
bank-switching  capability  of  the  TS2068,   when  used  in  conjunction  with 
the  Larken  RAMDISK,    These  programs  were  deve I  oped  by  Larry  Crawford ,  a 
longtime  club  member  from  London,  Ont . 

We  think  of  the  Larken  RAMdisk  as  a  sol  id-state  disk  drive  which  has 
as  48  "tracks"  on  it,   when  eight  32K  memory  chips  are   instal I ed . 

However,   through  a  little-used  capability  of  the  TS2068,   each  of 
these  memory  chips  can  be  sel ect  ivel y  interchanged  with  the  upper  32K  of 
computer  memory,   using  OUT  commands.       Larry  Crawford  has  written  a 
program  which  makes  use  of  this  feature  to  provide  us  with  a  very  useful 
database  program.    The  most  s  ignif  icant  feature  of  this  database   is  it's 
size.    It's  bank-sw itch ing  capability  means  that  a  single  database  can 
expand  to  eight  times  the  usual  computer  memory.   Our  disk  #30  has  an 
example  of  a  database  using  3  banks  of  RAMdisk,   plus  the  computer 
memory. 

Not  too  much  use  has  been  made  of  the  suite  of  programs  on  this 
disk.  When  I  look  through  the  material  in  our  news  I etter  I  see  very 
little  written  up  about   it.    I  must  take  some  responsibility  for  this. 

I  always  had  some  difficulty  in  comprehend  i  ng  the  make-up  of  Larry's 
disk.   About  a  year  ago  I  decided  to  rework   it  to  make   it  more 
understandabl e.    In  the  process  I  encountered  problems  (of  my  own  making, 
I  have  to  admit),   and  I  had  to  ask  Larry  Crawford  to  help  me  out  of 
them.     He  has  done  so  recently  and  this  article  is  to   invite  Larken 
RAMdisk  owners  to  sample  this  disk. 

Actually  #30  consists  of  several  disks,   each  with  a  different  database 
application.    The  idea  being  to  give  you  some   idea  of  how  you  could  make 
use  of  this  program.     One  disk  contains  a  database  of  the  titles  of  2200 
movie  films.   Another  has  a  music  col  I ect  ion  database.    There's  one  that 
holds  a  database  of  the  complete  SINC-LINK  index  of    articles.   And  still 
another  that  contains  a  record  of  a  co 1 1 ect i on  of  Spectrum  games 
programs,   and  an   index  of  games  tips  from  Spectrum  magaz ines. 

You  may  wonder  how  this  program  can  make  use  of  the  RAMdisk,  when 
your  RAMdisk   is  already  full  of  your  programs.    The  answer   is  really 
quite  simple.   During  the  process  of  loading  the  database  the  program 
places  a  copy  of  the  original  RAMdisk  contents  onto  the  database  disk. 
Then  when  you  are  finished   it  re-saves  the  database  from  the  RAMdisk, 
and  restores  the  original  RAMdisk  contents . 

Now,    it   is  not  sufficient  that  a  database  program  be  able  to  store 
large  amounts  of  data.    It  must  have  other  capabilities  as  well.    The  IBDB 
program  can  SEARCH,   SORT,   ADD,   EDIT,   DELETE,    LIST,   and  PRINT  out  to  a 
2040  or  large  printer.    You  can  set  up  the  database  so  that   it  stores 
files  of  up  to  a  maximum  1 27-character  length.    It  will  SORT  on  any 
selected  column,   and  can  SEARCH  for  any  desired  character  string. 

Do  give  this  very  interesting  library  aisk  a  try  I 


4 


SINC-LINK 


NEWPORT 

by  Hugh 

The  Newport  Miracle  which  was  sponsored 
by  IQLR  is  now  part  of  QL  history. 

On  Friday  June  4th,  at  the  Carlton  Motel 
in  Newport,  we  had  a  busy  time  meeting 
and  getting  to  know  each  other  and 
general  gabbing.  Many  visitors  from  all 
over  the  country  were  staying  there,  with 
some  at  other  motels  nearby.  Central 
point  being  the  Carlton. 

The  UK  contingent  consisting  of  Stuart 
Honeyball,  Tony  Firshman,  and  Bill 
Richardson  were  all  busy  on  this  day  just 
talking  about  things  in  general,  and 
there  was  a  fair  amount  of  swapping  of 
wares  and  information. 

I  was  able  to  meet  many  members  of  our 
club,  and  to  discuss  our  club  with  them. 
I  was  also  able  at  this  time  to  show  them 
a  program  I  have  just  completed  called 
QUANDEX,  which  is  an  index/cross 
reference  type  of  thing  for  the  QUANTA 
Magazine  from  the  time  it  first  started. 
This  program  is  being  sent  to  QUANTA  for 
inclusion  in  their  library.  (I  hope)  It 
already  is  in  our  own  QL  Library. 

On  Saturday,  I  had  a  table  on  behalf  of 
our  club  at  the  Salvation  Army  Building 
where  the  convention  was  held,  and  again 
meeting  many  of  our  members,  and  also 
many  who  were  not  members .  I  met  many 
who  had  heard  of  us,  and  many  who  had  not 
heard  of  us .  Now  I  can  say  that  many 
more  know  who  we  are,  where  we  are,  and 
what  we  are  at. 

I  had  my  trusty  QL  with  me,  and  all  the 
stuff  that  goes  with  it,  and  also  a  few 
demo  programs  to  keep  interest  alive  in 
my  little  corner  of  the  area.  But 
shortly  into  the  demo  my  trusty  QL 
decided  it  was  a  bit  shy  and  embarrassed 
in  that  hoard  of  milling  bodies,  and 
decided  that  it  did  not  like  the  "1"  key. 
So  I  replaced  the  membrane  hoping  that  my 
troubles  were  solved,  but  my  trusty  QL 
was  still  not  up  to  appearing  in  the 
public  eye,  and  decided  the  only  way  to 
get  seclusion  was  to  stop  accepting  power 
at  the  power  input  socket.  Woe  is  me,  a 
lot  of  demo  stuff  to  run,  and  a  table 
loaded  with  literature,  and  my  trusty  QL 
goes  all  bashful  on  me. 


REPORT  Page  1 

Bowie 

However  all  was  not  lost.  I  was  able  to 
borrow  from  Bill  Cable  a  spare  unit  to 
help  me  out,  but  I  was  not  out  of  the 
woods  yet! 

When  I  started  to  install  my  Gold  Card  in 
Bill's  machine  I  bent  the  pins  in  the 
port.  But  I  was  fortunate  that  I  had  a 
pair  of  long  nosed  do-dads  and  was  able 
to  get  deep  into  the  port  and  straighten 
out  the  pins. 

I  was  back  in  business,  many  thanks  to 
Bill  Cable,  and  the  demos  were  running 
again. 

Those  demos  were  mainly  run  using  a 
program  called  Vision  Mixer,  utilising 
many  of  my  EYE-Q  pictures,  plus  some  I 
had  made  with  PictureMaster .  I  tried  to 
make  the  demos  interesting  as  well  as 
amusing. 

Vision  Mixer  is  a  program  that  allows  you 
to  change  screens  in  a  nice  easy 
automatic  manner,  and  the  screens  are 
changed  in  many  different  ways,  just  like 
on  the  TV  for  example . 

While  I  was  getting  all  this  sorted  out 
other  parties  were  going  full  steam  ahead 
with  their  own  interests  giving  demos  and 
selling  stuff.  There  did  not  appear  to 
be  a  great  lack  of  the  green  stuff  as 
many  were  in  a  buying  mood. 

Stuart  Honeyball  from  Miracle  Systems  was 
there  pushing  his  latest  addition  to  the 
QL  world,  the  QXL  card,  and  doing  good 
business  which  was  evidenced  by  the 
number  of  bodies  gathered  around  his 
table.  The  QXL  card  is  a  card  that  turns 
the  PC  into  a  QL  compatible.  I  don't  have 
a  PC  and  don't  imagine  I  will  be  getting 
one,  so  I  was  not  too  involved  with  being 
one  of  the  many  gawkers  at  his  stand. 
And  don't  ask  me  how  much  as  I  can  t 
remember  the  price. 

Bill  Richardson  representing  his  own 
company,  W.N.Richardson,  was  having  no 
problems  with  empty  space  around  his 
table.  Plenty*  of  goodies  for  all  to  buy. 
Bill  was  also  selling  subscriptions  to 
QUANTA  and  seemed  to  be  doing  good 
business  all  around. 


SINC-LINK 


5 


NEWPORT 

bj  Hugh 

Tony  Firshman  of  TF  Services  was  there 
giving  demos  and  passing  stuff  around. 
He  was  at  the  next  table  to  our  own,  but 
I  did  not  get  much  time  to  see  what  he 
was  up  to.  All  I  knew  was  that  when  I 
wanted  to  leave  my  table  to  get  a  breath 
of  air,  I  had  to  push  my  way  past  his 
adoring  mob.  He  is  very  strong  on 
HERMES  which  is  the  new  processor  to 
replace  the  8049.  HERMES  is  reputed  to 
get  rid  of  that  key  bounce,  and  also  to 
operate  at  higher  baud  rates  which  is 
what  is  required  for  the  modem 
operations,  plus  a  whole  lot  of  other 
improvements.  I  think  I  will  get  one 
myself.  I  believe  Mechanical  Affinity 
also  have  them. 

Tim  Swenson  was  in  attendance  with  his  QL 
Hackers  Journal.  (QHJ) .  For  those  who 
don't  know  what  this  is,  it  is  a  journal 
put  out  by  Tim  for  the  advanced 
programmer,  and  it  deals  with  many 
languages  in  depth.  It  is  available  in 
booklet  form,  and  also  on  disk.  He  puts 
out  a  new  issue  about  every  couple  of 
months.  If  you  are  interested  I  can  let 
you  have  his  address.  I  also  have  most 
of  QHJ  on  disk  in  our  library. 

To  my  right  was  Mechanical  Affinity  with 
Paul  Holmgren  and  Frank  Davis  in 
attendance,  and  every  time  I  looked  at 
Paul  I  got  the  impression  of  a  bundle  of 
$$$  in  his  fist.  More  like  a  bookie  than 
a  trader.     Lucky  Paul! 

John  Impellizzeri  and  his  partner  were 
there  showing  off  their  tower  assembly 
where  the  QL  and  all  its  whatevers  are 
enclosed  in  one  neat  little  stack.  Looks 
mighty  impressive  to  me.  I  could  not  get 
a  price  out  of  him  for  the  conversion 
etc.,  but  it  would  appear  to  be  quite  a 
bit  less  than  what  I  had  heard  rumour  say 
initially.  We  will  have  to  wait  and  see 
what  the  future  produces,  and  just  keep 
your  fingers  crossed  -  a  one  unit  affair 
for  the  QL  may  not  be  too  far  away! 

Then  of  course  we  had  Bill  Cable  of  Wood 
and  Wind  Computing,  he  it  was  who  loaned 
me  his  spare  QL.  He  was  demonstrating  his 
new  program  called  QLerk,  which  he  has 
been  working  on  for  a  couple  years  or  so 
-  a   program  which   is   suitable   to   run  a 


REPORT  Page  2 

Bowie 

small  business,  or  even  your  household 
finances.  I  have  been  privileged  in 
having  the  opportunity  to  have  a  ver 
close  look  at  this  program,  and  while 
admitting  there  is  going  to  be  a  period 
of  getting  to  know  QLerk,  it  is  also  a 
very  comprehensive  book-keeping  system. 

QLerk  will  write  your  cheques  for  you  and 
keep  the  bank  account  in  balance,  (have 
you  managed  to  do  that  yourself  yet?) 
Looks  after  deductions,  wages,  accounts 
payable  and  receivable,  prints  purchase 
orders,  balances  up  to  five  bank 
accounts,  your  wifes  (wives?)  petty(?) 
cash  outputs,  and  also  to  the  main  thing, 
which  is  what  is  left  for  yourself  at  the 
end  of  the  day.  Not  much  these  days  I 
have  to  admit.  Just  be  thankful  for 
small  mercies,  egad  -  how  small! 

Bob  Dyl  was  pushing  IQLR  which  was  the 
sponsor  of  the  whole  show.     Thanks  Bob. 

NESQLUG  utilised  the  serving  hatch  to  the 
kitchen  and  provided  us  with  donuts  and 
soft  drinks,  just  help  yourself,  and  it 
was  all  for  FREE.  A  very  grateful  thank 
to  NESQLUG,  and  thank  you  for  a  wonderfu 
idea.  That  was  also  a  very  popular 
section  of  the  show. 

Who  else  was  there?  A  whole  bunch  of 
dedicated  QL  users  from  a  young  man  not 
yet  in  his  teens,  to  old  fogies  like 
myself . 

I  have  probably  missed  someone  out,  and 
if  so,  please  accept  my  apologies,  and 
the  wet  noodle  treatment  would  be 
appropriate ! 

After  the  show  closed  many  of  us  attended 
a  dinner  at  the  Newport  Beach  Hotel, 
where  we  enjoyed  an  excellent  meal,  and 
many  the  tale  was  told  at  the  many 
tables . 

On  Sunday,  there  were  little  meetings 
going  on  the  rooms  of  the  Carlton  Motel. 
Lots  of  coming  and  going  and  interesting 
chatter  about  programs  and  what  was  in 
the  future  and  all  that  jazz. 

Tony  Firshman  was  running  a  BBS  on  two 
QL's    connected    by    the    serial    ports,  I 


SINC-LINK 


NEWPORT  REPORT 


Page  3 


by  Hugh  Bowie 


could  not  get  near  it  as  there  were  so 
many  crowded  into  a  small  bedroom,  but 
from  what  I  did  see  it  was  a  most 
interesting  couple  of  hours. 

Miracle  are  still  working  on  their 
graphics  card  which  should  be  coming 
out  fairly  soon.  Not  too  much  was  said 
about  it  or  its  price,  but  it  is  going  give 
a  very  high  resolution  to  the  QL.  A 
great  deal  of  interest  was  evidenced  by 
the  questions  being  asked. 

I  came  home  on  the  Monday,  but  many 
stayed  on  to  have  a  look  around  at  Cape 
Cod  and  the  surrounding  country  in 
general . 

From  what  I  gather  the  UK  people  are 
willing  and  keen  to  come  back  again  next 
year,  and  since  I  have  arrived  home,  I 
have  been  told  that  the  German  and  some 
other  continental  suppliers  of  QL  ware 
are  interested  in  coming  if  there  should 
be  another  convention  over  here,  but  I 
have  heard  that  they  would  like  to  see  it 
further  inland  the  next  time. 

I  have  also  heard  the  comment  that  there 
should  have  been  more  lead  time  to 
enable  a  more  comprehensive  advertising 
campaign,  to  generate  a  greater  interest. 

In  discussion  with  an  interested  party, 
(trader)  I  asked  what  they  thought  of 
Toronto  and  was  told  that  would  be  an 
ideal  place  for  a  convention.  I  said 
that  I  would  like  to  see  a  Sinclair 
convention  covering  ALL  the  Sinclair 
computers,  and  this  was  thought  to  be 
possible . 

My  thinking,  and  let  me  say  this  right 
here  and  now,  my  thinking  is  not  that  of 
the  other  club  officers,  it  is  just  my 
own  solitary  single  idea  off  the  top  of 
my  head.  I  am  tossing  this  out  for 
comment,  and  I  hope  to  get  plenty  of 
comment . 

Owing  to  the  cost  of  accommodation  and 
meeting  places  in  Toronto,  I  feel  that  an 
ideal  area  would  be  in  the  Hamilton  - 
Toronto  corridor.  In  this  area  it  is 
easier  to  move  around  than  in  Toronto 
itself.      Accommodation  is   cheaper.  And 


for  anyone  wishing  to  visit  Toronto, 
there  is  the  Queen  Elizabeth  Way  (QEW) 
for  fast  commuting  right  into  the  heart 
of  the  downtown  entertainment  and 
shopping  of  centres  of  Toronto.  There  is 
also  a  bus  service  and  a  train  service. 
The  distance  by  QEW  from  Burlington  to 
Toronto  downtown  is  32  miles. 

This  Hamilton-Toronto  corridor  is  of  easy 
access  to  travellers  from  all  over. 
Those  from  the  Eastern  States  would 
travel  on  the  QEW,  and  for  those  from  the 
South,  it  is  only  a  few  miles  from  the 
401  on  easy  access  highways. 

As  I  have  said  earlier,  lots  of  lead  time 
is  required  for  organisation  and  advert- 
ising. So  if  you  would  like  to  see  this 
thing,  I  would  like  to  know  by  reply 
exactly  what  your  thoughts  are. 

Only  if  a  certain  level  of  support  was 
indicated,  would  it  be  possible  to  start 
the  ball  rolling.  So  if  you  want  to  see 
this  come  off,  write  to  me  today  and  give 
me  your  views  and  comments.  I  am  adding 
my  address  at  the  end  of  this  so  that  you 
may  write  right  away. 

Remember  if  you  want  to  see  a  Sinclair 
convention  in  the  Toronto  area,  please 
write . 

And  when  you  write,  please  let  us  know 
what  traders  you  would  like  to  see  there. 
Not  all  asked  would  come  or  be  able  to 
come,  but  at  least  we  could  ask  them. 

Was  the  Newport  Miracle  a  success?  I 
would  say  so,  and  so  also  would  many 
others.  Apart  from  the  traders  who 
appeared  to  be  happy,  the  general 
consensus  would  be  that  everyone  was 
happy  to  have  attended  and  to  have  met  so 
many  old  friends,  and  made  so  many  new 
ones.  Is  that  not  what  a  convention  is 
all  about? 

Hugh  H.  Howie, 
QL  Contact, 
586  Oneida  Dr. 
Burlington,  Ont. 
Canada,  L7T  3V3 
(416)  634  -  4929 


SINC-LINK 


Q  L  I  P  S 

by  Hugh  Bowie 


Sometimes  I  sit  down  and  have  no  idea  in 
the  world  just  exactly  what  I  am  going  to 
see  on  the  paper  as  it  comes  out  of  the 
printer.  Today,  you  fortunate  folks  out 
there  are  going  to  get  a  sample  of  what 
comes  out  at  one  end  after  I  have  put 
nothing  in  at  the  other.  So  just  sit 
back  and  relax,  this  is  going  to  be  one 
of  those  days  you  don't  need,  but  that 
still  seem  to  pop  up  at  odd  times,  only 
too  frequently. 

Tother  day  I  was  trying  to  copy  a 
Cartridge  to  Disk  and  that  darn  thing 
just  would  not  go  over  -  kept  getting 
that  old  QL  story  "Bad  or  Changed  Medium" 
which  we  have  all  had  with  various 
degress  of  teadiom  (I  told  you  it  was 
going  to  be  one  of  those  days) 

Anyway  I  got  that  message  and  do  what  I 
might  I  could  not  get  that  copied  over, 
and  I  badly  wanted  the  transfer  made. 

A  thought  came  to  my  mind,  at  least  what 
is  left  of  it,  mind  that  is,  and  I  copied 
from  Cart  to  RAM  just  to  see  if  I  could 
operate  from  RAM.  After  doing  so  for  a 
while  I  decided  to  copy  RAM  to  Disk  just 
for  kicks  and  to  see  what  happened.  An' 
by  golly  that  stuff  went  from  ram  to  disk 
just  like  that,  (snap-o-da-thum) 

So  I  again  tried  to  get  a  copy  from 
Cartridge  to  Disk  -  No  Go.  I  then  tried 
Cartridge  to  RAM  and  RAM  to  Disk  and 
again  by  golly  you  should  have  seen  that 
thing  go  over  just  like  that.  (Snap-o-da- 
thum) 

Now  why  will  it  go  from  Cart  to  Ram  to 
Disk,  and  yet  will  not  go  from  Cart  to 
Disk  direct? 

Network  Prover. 

Every  time  I  say  this  is  it  -  no  more 
money  to  be  spent  on  this  QL,  I  see 
something  that  tickles  my  fancy,  and 
recently  I  saw  that  there  was  a  Network 
Prover.  A  gadget  to  indicate  that  the 
Network  system  was  aworkin .  So  I  spent  a 
few  bucks  and  got  this  thing  from  Dilwyn 
Jones,  and  by  golly  that  thing  really 
does  work! 

Often    I    have    wondered    if    the    Net  was 


working  or  just  making  look  like,  but 
this  Network  Prover  really  does  send  out 
a  flashing  light  to  show  that  data  is 
being  transferred.     Cost?  £3.50. 

Now  I   can  sit  and  watch  the  light  flash 
as  I  wait  for  the  transfer  to  be  made. 
I  never  stop  being  amazed  at  the  wonders 
of  science! 

I  just  looked  at  my  little  list  of  things 
to  write  about,  and  I  see  the  word  CARDS, 
now  what  the  heck  is  that?  It  should 
remind  me  of  something,  but  what?  I  just 
don't  have  a  QLue. 

Oh  Yes!  now  I  remember.  In  the  past  I 
have  made  up  some  "business"  cards  for 
members  going  to  a  convention  or  show  or 
whatever.  The  cards  could  also  be  pinned 
to  the  lapel  for  identification  purposes. 
If  the  owner  got  lost  you  always  knew 
where  to  send  him/her. 

Anyway,   to  make  those  cards  was  not  that 
easy,    as   the   paper   I  used  was   a  little 
bit    glossy,     the    friction    feed    had  no 
friction,     and    it    did    not    have  those 
little  holes  in  the  side  of  the  paper  t 
help    it    to    run    properly    through  th 
printer.    But  I  got  an  idea    *  FLASH  * 
and  my  problem  was  pretty  well  solved. 

I  use  those  3  1/2  inch  address  labels  in 
sheets  with  holes  at  the  edges,  (gee 
thanks  -  I  know  they  are  called 
perforations)  so  I  saved  the  strip  after 
the  labels  had  been  removed,  and  taped  a 
piece  of  cardboard,  cut  to  the  required 
width,  to  the  strip,  fed  it  through  the 
printer  from  the  front,  and  I  have  no 
more  of  this  slipping  and  sliding  and  and 
funny  type  as  the  paper  goes  through  the 
printer. 

This  works  fine  with  my  Panasonic  1124  as 
it  has  front  loading,  but  is  no  good  with 
my  Seikosha  1600  as  the  rollers  make  the 
cardboard  bend  too  much. 

Well  that  is  how  I  did  it,  you  do  it  your 
own  way. 

I   started   with  nothing   to   write  abou*- 
and  I  have  ended  up  the  same  way.  And 
have  filled  a  page  with  nothing. 
So  There!     (Tip  of  tongue  is  shown) 


SINC-LINK 


TANK  VOLUME 

Bob  Nil  son 


Here  is  a  TS1000  program  listing  written  by 
the  depth  of  fluid  in  the  tank.  It  is  a  good 
user. 

llREM   **  TANK   UOLUME  ** 
**   BOB   UILSON  ** 
10  PRINT  TRE   li;  "TANK  UOLUME:: 
15  PRINT 
20  PRINT 


30  PRINT  ; 

V 

40  PRINT  ; 

V 

50  PRINT  .; 
6S  PRINT  ; 


70  PRINT 


I 

V 


90  PRINT 
100  PRINT   "         >B  <>  L 

<  >B  <  11 
110  PRINT 

115  REM   **    INPUT  ** 
120  PRINT   " INPUT  DIMENSIONS  IN 
INCHES" 
130  PRINT 

14-0  PRINT   "TANK   DIAMETER    "  "D 
150   INPUT  D 

150  PRINT  AT  14- ,27  ;"=■*;  D 
170  PRINT   "CYLINDRICAL  PPRT  LEN 
6TH   " "L 
180  INPUT  L 

190  PRINT  AT  15.27; "=";L 

200  PRINT  "BULBOUS  PPRT  ■•»B""!! 

210  INPUT  B 

220  PRINT  AT  15  .27 ;  " =" ; B 
230  PRINT      HEIGHT   OF  LIQUID 


one  of  our  club  leibers  to  calculate  tne  volute  of  a  tank  based  on 
exaiple  of  the  kind  of  programs  that  can  simplify  the  vork  of  the 

R.  Bruneau 

390  REM   **   UOLUME   CALCULATION  * 

4-00  LET   X=PCS  Cl-t2*H/D)) 

4-10  LET  A5=D**2*X/4 

4-20  LET  AT=D/2*A55  (D/2-M;*SIN 

"'  430  IF  H<=D/2  THEN  LET  U=CAS-RT 
)  *L 

^40   IF   H>D/2  THEN  LET  U=  £flS+flT3 
±L 

450  LET   U=P5N    t  CH-D/2J  /  (D/2'H 
450  LET   U=D**2*B/24* >4*C05  U*CO 

S    U*COS   U*SIN   Li  +  6*(U*5IN    (2*U)  /2 

)  -!-3*PI) 

470  LET  UI=INT  t (U+U) /£77*100+ . 
5  3 /I 00 

430  LET  UU=INT  [ CU+UJ /230 . 64959 
*100* . 5) /130 

490  LET  UL=INT  ( (V+U) /6 1.03*100 
4.53  .-100 

500  RETURN 


240  INPUT  H 

250  PRINT  PT  17.27: "=".H 
25©  GOSUE  400. 
270  PRINT 

280  PRINT  "TANK  UGL  .  IN  IMP 
L .  ="  ;  ui 

290  PRINT  U.S 
L.  =".;  vU 

300  PRINT  - 
ES=" ; UL 

310  STOP 


H 


.  GP, 
.  GP 
LITP 


TANK  UOLUME 

if 


:  B  .  >  L 

INPUT  DIMENSIONS    IN  INCHES 


B  < 


TANK   D IP METER    "D"  =£4 

CYLINDRICAL   PART  LENGTH  "L!I=48 

BULBOUS   PART   "B"  =b 

HEIGHT  OF  LIQUID   "H"  =12 

TANK   UGL.    IN   IMP.    GAL . =44 . 1 
U.S.    GAL. =52.95 
LITRES =200 . 14 


SINC-LINK  ADVERTISES  FDR  FREE 
PLACE  YOUR  AD  HERE 
AND  GET  RESULTS! 


SINC-LINK 


Photocopied  fro.  tkt  Harch  1986  issue  of  Practical  Electronics,  an  english  P""""* 
1932.  Thoujh  the  article  taroets  the  Spectrui,  it  should  uork  on  the  2068  and  the  ZX81/TS  1000. 


Spectrum  _ 

Hardware 

RESTART 


R.Macfarlane 


THIS  board  is  designed  to  plug  into  the  Spectrum  edge 
connector  and  will  allow  the  user  to  escape  from  any  running 
program  without  losing  the  memory  contents.  The  action  is 
similar  to  the  BREAK  key  on  the  keyboard  which  jumps  to  a 
routine  within  the  Spectrum  ROM,  prints  BREAK  and  eventually 
returns  to  the  <K)  cursor.  However,  if  the  BREAK  key  has  been 
disabled  then  the  only  recourse  is  to  remove  the  bower  plug  and 
reset  the  system  which,  of  course,  clears  the  memory  contents.  It 
can  also  be  extremely  annoying  if  during  the  development  of  a 
machine  code  program  the  computer  enters  a  loop  from  which 
there  is  no  escape.  With  this  circuit  the  Z80  processor  can  be 
forced  to  jump  to  any  address  within  the  Spectrum  ROM  or  RAM. 

When  running  BASIC  programs  the  address  of  the  Auto  List 
routine  in  ROM  was  chosen  as  the  restart  address.  Executing  a 
hardware  restart  therefore  produces  an  automatic  listing  of  the 
first  few  lines  of  the  program  and  then  returns  to  the  (K)  cursor. 
Further  Basic  commands  can  now  be  entered  and  run,  eg.  Lib.. , 
SAVE,  PRINT,  etc. 

When  running  machine  code  the  address  EOOOH  was  chosen. 
This  is  the  start  address  of  the  ZEUS  Assembler  program  wh.ch  is 
used  to  develop  machine  code  programs.  Again,  executing  a 
hardware  restart  produces  the  ZEUS  copyright  symbol  and  by 
using  0  for  OLD,  the  original  source  file  can  be  recovered  intact. 

However,  any  restart  address  may  be  chosen  to  meet  the  needs 
of  the  individual  user. 

SYSTEM  OUTLINE 

When  the  Spectrum  is  first  switched  on  the  reset  line  to  the  £bu 
processor  chip  is  held  low  for  a  few  milliseconds  by  the  action  of 
Ra  and  Ca  (Fig.  1).  This  ensures  that  the  supply  rails  are  given  time 
to  reach  their  operating  voltage  and  that  the  CPU  is  properly 
initialized. 

The  initialisation  includes: 

1)  Forcing  the  program  counter  to  zero. 

2)  Disabling  the  interrupts. 

3)  Setting  the  interrupt  register  to  OOH. 

4)  Setting  the  refresh  register  to  OOH. 

5)  Setting  interrupt  MODE  0. 

During  reset  time  the  address  bus  and  the  data  bus  go  to  a  high 
impedance  state  and  all  control  output  signals  go  to  the  inactive 
state.  No  refresh  of  the  dynamic  memory  occurs  so  that  all 
memory  contents  are  lost. 

When  the  reset  line  eventually  goes  high  the  CPU  executes  the 
instruction  found  at  address  OOOOH  which  is  the  start  of  the 
initialisation  procedure  for  the  Sinclair  Basic  in  ROM. 

In  order  to  restart  the  system  at  a  different  address  two 
conditions  must  be  met.  The  reset  line  must  be  held  low  for  as 
short  a  period  as  possible  so  that  the  memory  refresh  cycles ;  are 
maintained  and  memory  contents  are  not  lost.  When  the  CPU 
addresses  location  OOOOH  it  must  find  a  different  set  of  instruc- 
tions to  the  ones  held  in  the  Sinclair  BASIC  ROM.  To  achieve  these 
conditions,  therefore,  the  external  circuit  operates  in  the  following 

™  A  short  50uS  pulse  is  applied  to  the  reset  line  of  the  Z80  CPU. 
This  is  of  sufficient  duration  to  properly  initialize  the  CPU  but  have 
no  effect  on  the  memory  contents.  Coincident  mththis  pulse  he 
Spectrum  BASIC  ROM  is  deselected  using  the  ROMCS  line  on  the 
edge  connector  and  an  external  ROM  selected  in  its  place 

The  CPU  will  then  run  the  program  within  this  new  ROM  which  in 
fact  holds  a  jump  instruction  to  another  address.  When  the  jump 
is  completed  the  external  ROM  must  be  deselected  and  replaced 
by  the  Spectrum  BASIC  ROM. 


To  understand  how  the  ROMs  are  selected  and  deselected  an 
explanation  of  the  Z80  Ml  output  is  required. 

The  Ml  (Machine  Cycle  One)  is  an  active  low  output  which 
indicates  that  the  CPU  is  currently  executing  an  operating  code 
fetch  cycle.  The  OP  Codes  can  be  any  one  of  the  1 58  different  in- 
structions that  the  Z80  can  execute,  eg.  LOAD.  ROTATE.  CALL. 
JUMP,  HALT,  etc. 

Examination  of  the  Jump  instruction  is  shown  in  Table  1 . 

This  is  a  three  byte  instruction,  the  first  byte  containing  the  OP 
Code  for  JUMP,  the  following  two  bytes  holding  the  address  to  be 
jumped  to.  However,  only  when  fetching  the  OP  Code  from 
memory  will  the  CPU  issue  an  Ml  cycle  output  signal.  The  CPU 
knows  that  the  following  two  bytes  must  form  an  address  and  tne 
Ml  output  stays  high. 


OP  CODE 

C3 

Low  Order  Address 

A2 

High  Order  Address 

12 

Table  1. 

JUMP  Instruction 


Aner  a  reset  puis>e  un>  ^<  <->  —          "...  ,    , . 

zero.  The  address  bus  is,  therefore,  OOOOH  and  the  CPU  is  looking 
for  its  first  instruction.  The  Ml  output  goes  low  as  the  CPU 
executes  an  OP  Code  fetch  cycle.  The  falling  edge  of  the  Ml  output 
is  used  to  switch  from  internal  to  external  ROM  and  control  can  be 
handed  back  to  the  internal  ROM  at  the  next  occurrence  of  an  Ml 
cycle. 

SPECTRUM  KEYBOARD 

As  stated  earlier,  when  the  CPU  is  reset  the  interrupts  are 
disabled  end  the  MODE  is  set  to  0.  Without  wishing  to  delve 
deeply  into  the  interrupt  structure  of  the  Z80  CPU  it  is  sufficient  to 
say  that  the  Spectrum  Keyboard  operating  system  requires  the 
CPU  to  be  in  MODE  I  and  that  the  interrupts  are  enabled.  Before 
jumping  to  the  new  address,  therefore,  two  extra  commands 
must  be  executed.  These  are  IM  I  and  El. 


RESTART 
PULSE 


ICSb 
PIN  S,  0 


ICSo_ 
PIN  6,  Q 


lC6b 
PIN  I.  Q 


ICSb 
PIN  9,0 


i 


L 


PROMCS 


gnus*  i 


Fig.  1.  Timing  diagram  showing  the  Ml  cyclas 


SINC-LINK 


COMPUTING 


IO-ICS  PI  N  7  *  ov 

PINUx+SV 


IC1o 

7tlSU 


mTo— ^^o- 


IN4HI 

— w— 


-OR0MCS 


330  r 
■  9  r  i  i-1— i   


M    *l  > 

e 

*l 

o» 

»* 

01 
0| 

»t 

IC7 

01 

N«  IS  123 

Bt 

Dl 

»0 

n 

tb 

741SU 


ice 

7«05 


Fig.  2.  Complete  circuit  diagram  of  the  Hardware  Restart 


IM  I  is  a  two  byte  OP  Code  and  El  a  single  byte  OP  Code.  This 
brings  the  required  number  of  OP  Code  fetch  cycles  to  be 
executed  in  external  ROM  to  four,  ie,  IM  I,  El.  JP. 

Four  Ml  cycles  must,  therefore,  be  counted  before  returning 
control  to  the  Sinclair  BASIC  ROM.  The  timing  diagram  of  Fig.  1 
shows  the  relevant  switching  points. 

CIRCUIT  DESCRIPTION 

IC1a  buffers  and  inverts  the  Ml  signal  from  the  edge  connector 
and  the  output  is  fed  to  the  clock  inputs  of  IC2a  and  IC5a.  The  re- 
set input  to  IC2a  is  held  low  by  the  output  of  IC1b  the  input  of 
which  is  held  high  by  R1,  R2,  CI.  C1  serves  to  debounce  the 
restart  switch  and  R2  limits  the  discharge  current  of  CI. 

When  the  restart  switch  is  pressed  the  reset  on  Pin  1  of  IC2a  is 
removed  and  the  next  negative  going  edge  on  an  Ml  cycle  will 
clock  IC2a  causing  the  Q  output  to  go  high.  Further  incoming 
edges  will  cause  no  change  since  the  D  input  is  tied  to  the  5V  rail 
and  only  when  the  restart  switch  is  released  will  the  Q  output  fall 
to  zero. 

The  positive  going  edge  at  the  Q  output  of  IC2a  triggers  the  one 
shot  IC3  to  produce  a  50uS  positive  going  pulse  at  the  Q  output 
Pin  6,  which  is  in  turn  inverted  by  the  parallel  connected  NOR 
gates  of  IC4.  This  parallel  connection  is  required  due  to  the 
internal  combination  of  Ra  and  Ca  enabling  the  power  up  reset  for 
the  Spectrum.  Using  IC4a,  b,  c,  d  in  this  way  increases  the 
sourcing  and  sinking  currents  and  the  above  timing  requirements 
can  be  met. 

The  second  NOR  input  to  IC4  is  taken  from  the  output  of  IC1c 
whose  input  is  identical  to  IC1b.  This  provides  a  means  of 
resetting  the  Spectrum  without  removing  the  power  plug  and  also 
provides,  due  to  the  action  of  R5,  C3,  an  external  power  up  reset. 

The  output  of  IC 1  a  is  also  fed  to  the  input  of  IC5a  Pin  3.  which  is 
connected  as  a  divide  by  4  counter  The  Q  output  of  IC5b  Pin  9  is 
connected  to  the  clock  input  of  a  further  divide  by  2  stage  IC6a. 
The  reset  inputs  to  the  three  stage  counter  are  taken  low  during 
the  50uS  Restart  pulse  by  Q  on  IC3  pin  1  and  the  first  negative  go- 
ing edge  of  Ml  to  appear  after  the  restart  pulse  will  cause  the  Q 
output  of  IC6a  Pin  6  to  go  low. 

After  four  Ml  cycles  this  Q  output  will  go  high  again  and  is  used 
as  a  clock  input  to  IC6b. 

During  the  50uS  restart  pulse  the  set  input  of  IC6b  Pin  10  goes 
low  causing  the  Q  output  at  Pin  9  to  go  high.  This  deselects  the 


Spectrum  ROM  and  simultaneously  the  0  output  at  Pin  8  selects 
the  external  ROM.  When  the  clock  input  of  IC6b  Pin  1 1  goes  high 
this  state  is  reversed.  Further  clock  inputs  to  lC6b  are  ignored  due 
to  the  D  input  being  tied  to  the  0V  rail  and  can  only  change  state 
after  the  set  input  is  once  again  taken  low  by  another  restart 
pulse. 

IC6b,  therefore,  selects  the  external  ROM  on  the  negative  edge 
of  the  restart  pulse  and  selects  the  internal  ROM  four  Ml  cycles 
later.  Diode,  D 1  is  included  in  the  ROMCS  line  and  this  input  is  con- 
nected in  a  wired  OR  configuration  within  the  Spectrum. 

IC7  is  a  32*8  tri-state  fusible  PROM.  When  the  CS  Pin  1 5  is  high 
the  data  outputs  are  in  a  high  impedance  state  and  do  not  affect 
the  operation  of  the  internal  data  bus  on  the  Spectrum. 

Switch  SW3  selects  one  of  four  8-byte  blocks  giving  a  possible 
four  selectable  restart  addresses.  AO,  A1,  A2  are  connected  to 
the  Spectrum  address  bus  and  select  the  program  data  held  in  one 
of  these  four  blocks. 

The  contents  of  the  PROM  are  shown  in  Table  2. 


Addr 

BLOCK 

SW3 

00H 

ED 

56 

FB 

C3 

00 

EO 

* 

* 

1 

3 

08H 

ED 

56 

FB 

C3 

A2 

12 

* 

* 

2 

2 

10H 

* 

• 

• 

• 

• 

* 

• 

* 

3 

1 

18H 

* 

* 

• 

• 

* 

• 

• 

* 

4 

0 

Table  2.  Contents  of  the  32*8  ♦ri-state  fusible  PROM 

POWER  SUPPLY 

The  internal  5V  supply  from  the  Spectrum  cannot  supply  the 
necessary  current  so  an  onboard  5V  regulator  is  used.  An 
unregulated  9V  from  the  Spectrum  power  pack  is  available  on  the 
edge  connector  and  this  is  used  to  drive  the  external  restart 
circuit. 

CONSTRUCTION 

The  printed  circuit  board  is  double  sided  and  requires  a  number 
of  through  hole  connections  to  be  made  using  linking  pins  (Fig.  3). 

The  resistors  and  capacitors  should  be  soldered  in  place  first, 
remembering  to  solder  on  both  sides  of  the  board  where  required 
as  some  leads  form  necessary  through  connections. 

The  i.e.  sockets,  regulator  and  switches  can  then  be  added 
along  with  the  edge  connector,  being  careful  to  mount  this  on  the 


SINC-LINK 


correct  side  of  the  board.  The  i.c.s  can  now  be  inserted  and  with 
switch  SW3  in  position  2,  the  board  can  be  connected  to  the  rear 
eage  connector  on  the  Spectrum.   


TEST  PROGRAMS 

Test  Program  1 

40  PRINT  "RESTART"; 
50  GOTO  40 

Test  Program  2 

10  POKE  23296.243:  REM  Disable 
Interrupts 

20  POKE  23297,201:  REM  Return 
'  30  RANDOMIZE  USR  23296:  REM  Run 
m/c  and  return  to  Basic 
40  PRINT  "RESTART"; 
50  GOTO  40 

easily  have  been  stopped  using  the  break 
key  itself. 

Running  the  Test  Program  2  will  disable 
the  keyboard  interrupt  and  then  print  a 
continuous  stream  of  RESTARTS.  There 
will  be  no  response  to  the  break  key  and 
eniv  by  use  of  the  RESTART  button  can 
the  listing  be  retrievea. 

It  should  be  noted  that  breaking  into 
commercial  software  is  now  quite  possible 
but  that  the  board  should  not  be  used  for 
the  purpose  of  copying  tapes  as  this  is 
forbidden  by  copyright. 

If  running  the  ZEUS  assembler  program, 
then  pressing  the  RESTART  button,  with 
SW3  in  position  3,  will  immediately  return 
the  user  to  this  program  start  either  from 
BASIC,  without  requiring  the  usual  PRINT 
USR  57344  start  up  command,  or  from  the 
currently  executing  machine  code 
program. 


rig.  3.  The  p.c.b.  design  and  component  layout 


COMPONENTS 


Resistors 

R1.R4 

R2,  R5 
R3 

R6,  R7 


330  (2  off) 
10K  (2  off) 
68K 

47K  (2  off) 


r. 


All  resistors  5%  0*25 W  carbon 


Capacitors 

C2. 

C3     .  ' 
C4,  C5    .  • 
C6-C12  .  , 


10u16VTant 
,1n  Ceramic 
68m  6-3V  Tant 
680n  Polyester  (2  off) 
.  100n  Ceramic  (7  off) 


Semiconductors 


D1 

ICl" 

IC2,  IC5,  IC6 

IC3 

IC4 

IC7 

IC8  .  . 


IN4148 
•74LS14 

74LS74  (3  off) 
^ 74121 

74128 

N82S123  PROM 
7805 


TESTING 

Vith  the  unit  connected,  power  can  now  be  arjoiied.  The 
Soectrum  should  come  up  with  the  familiar  white  screen  and 
3ASIC  ROM  message.  Pressing  the  RESET  button  snould  bring 
;oout  a  similar  result. 

;f  the  small  BASIC  program  (Test  Program  1 )  is  entered  and  run, 
rxecution  can  be  immediately  stopped  by  pressing  tne  RESTART 
mutton  and  an  automatic  listing  of  the  program  will  aooear.  The 
:rogram  can  at  this  point  be  re-run,  listed  or  savea  as  oesired. 

The  significance  of  the  restart  will  become  apparent  only  when 
-ne  break  key  is  disabled,  as  the  above  program  could  just  as 


Miscellaneous 

SW1,.SW2  v:  Min.  p.c.b.  keyboard  (R.S.  334-892) 
SW3  •*■  Horiz.  decimal  switch  (R.S.  334-965) 

14-pin  d.i.l.skt  (6  off)  ,  ,  £f 

'  :1 6-pin  d.i.l.sktjl  off)  ' '  '  ;         ' .  :7$& 

28-way  Double  sided  edge  connector  (Wire  wrap  tags)  I 
P.c.b.  Double  sided  (PE  p.c.b.  508-02) 
Unking  Pins  ^f^tf-v'      ■■  .^ri,.-.     ■  /^'v^^^ 


The  PROM  will  normally  be  supplied  with  the  address  of  the 
Auto  List  routine  in  SW3  position  2,  and  the  start  address  of 
ZEUS  in  SW3  position  3.  The  two  remaining  blocks  can  be 
programmed  to  any  user's  requirements.  "X 


SINC-LINK 


MECHANICAL  AFFINITY  SUMMER  SALE 


This  is  our  Golden  Opportunity 
Sale!  For  a  limited  Time  only,  as 
tue  made  a  great  deal  at 
the  recent  Miracle  in  Newport 
Show  and  are  passing  on  the 
savings  to  upu.    When  this 
special  purchase  sells  out  me 
will  go  back  to  our  regular 
prices  for  these  items.  This 
offer  expires  August  15.  1*1*13 
or  when  supples  run  out.  at 
which  time  prices  will  revert 
to  normal  Cthouqh  we  always 
try  to  have  some  great  prices}. 

MINERVR  MK1  the  ultimate  ROM 
upgrade  for  the  QL  plus  the 
HERMES  884*1  co-processor 
replacement  chip  Cnormally  ^185) 
now  only  ^75! 

MINERVR  MK2  the  same  ROM  chip 
and  board  as  above,  but  with  a 
battery  backed  clock  and  RRM 
plus  the  HERMES  884*1 
replacement  chip  Cnormally  *M43> 
now  only  ^188! 

GOLD  CRRD  running  at  16  mgh 
and  with  2  meg  of  memory  plus 
Slowgold  Software  to  control 
the  speed  of  programs  that  run 
too  fast,  for  only  *368» 

GOLD  CARD  plus  both  the 
MINERVR  MK1  and  the  HERMES  for 
only  53%! 

GOLD  CRRD  and  the  HERMES  for 
only  S375! 

GOLD  CARD  with  the  MINERVR 
MK2  and  the  HEAMES    for  only 
*428! 


UJe  have  also  added  many  new 

Products  to  our  range  of  QL 
ardware  and  software.  At  this 
point  in  time  we  at  Mechanical 


Affinity  feel  we  have  the 
largest  range  of  both  hardware 
and  software  of  any  dealer. 
Please  request  a  copy  of  our 
newest  catalog. 
To  show  you  some  of  the  new 
products  we  are  now  carrying  in 
our  stock,  please  see  below. 

QL  CENTRONICS  INTERFACE  for 
both  SEAI  or  SER2  to  parallel 
printer.  Newly  redesigned  to 
take  up  less  room.  It  defaults 
to  *1688  baud,  but  is  able  to 
switch  baudrate  and  comes  with 
a  3  meter  long  cable.  It  is 
available  for  ^44. 

FALKENBEAG  HAAD  DISK  DAIVE 
CAAD  for  the  QL.  This  will  allow 
you  to  use  a  MFM  or  FHJ_  hard 
drive,  upto  416  meg  with  your 
QL.  For  the  hHDD  interface  with 
either  an  MFM  or  RLL  controller 
the  price  is  ^318.  UJe  also  have 
available  the  HDD  card, 
controller,  case  with  power 
supply  and  48  meg  hard  drive 
for  ^475.  This  inTerface 
requires  that  you  have  a 
separate  BUS  EXTENDER  CARD  to 
allow  you  to  have  more  than  one 
peripheral  out  the  expansion 
slot. 

QL-BUS-Driver  for  the  Trump 
Card  based  QL.  gives  you  a  5 
slot  expansion  board  that 
follows  the  QL  standards  for 
expansion.  This  is  available  for 
$7b.  The  2  slot  version  for  the 
Gold  Card  is  ^45. 

Also  new  to  our  stock  are  the 
following  items.  The  longer  we 
do  this  the  better  we  seem  to 
get.  UJith  the  support  of  our 
customers  this  is  a  true 
statement. 

QL  KEVBOARD-^S  INTEAFACE  now 


SINC-LINK 


MECHANICAL  AFFINITY  SUMMER  SALE 


QL  KEVBOflRD-^Q  INTERFACE  now 
on  sale  at  ^8.  This  al lotus  you 
to  replace  the  keyboard  thai 
came  with  your  QL  by  using  an 
IBM  XT/RT  keyboard  externally. 
This  is  great  for  those  uiho 
want  to  place  their  QL  in  a 
tower  or  desktop  case,  or  tor 
those  who  have  just  gotten 
tired  of  replacing  membranes 
every  few  years. 

QURLSOFT  TERMINRL  SOFTWARE  is 
the  best  commercially  available 
terminal  program  for  the  QL.  It 
comes  on  disk  or  MDV.  It  can 
multi-task  with  all  popular  QL 
front  end  programs,  it  has  a 
simple  text  editor  to  help  with 
uploads/downloads  and  with  your 
E-mail.  It  allows  you  to  do 
screen  dumps  while  online,  and 
if  you  combine  it  with  a  HERMES 
then  you  can  reliably  use  it 
with  all  known  high  speed  Hays 
compatible  modems  as  well  as 
Tandata,  etc.  UJe  have  it  for 
only  *45. 

QKL  CRRD  for  the  IBM.  This 
simple  plug  in  card  for  the  IBM 
and  compatibles  allows  you  to 
turn  a  mundane  IBM  into  a  full 
blown  super  QL.  This  can  give 
you  from  I  to  8  megs  of 
rr*er?»*?r * « ,  •  mor o ved  rsr anh  i  cs 
capability,  and  more  speed  than 
the  Gold  Card.  Call  us  to 
discuss  your  needs  on  this  and 
let  us  work  out  a  deal  you  can 
be  pleased  with.  This  allows  you 
to  run  the  QL  card  as  a  simple 
application  program  on  the  IBM, 
giving  you  "The  oest  of  two 
worlds.  UJe  have  them  in  stock 
as  of  now. 

Other  new  items  we  have  added 
to  our  inventory  include  the 
following: 
TEXT87  PLUS4,  QL  word 


processor;  2488  DRIVERS  for 
the  24  pin  printers  and 
bubblejefs;  TYPESET^G-OESKJET 
drivers  for  all  HP  deskjets; 
TVPESETTQ—EPSON  drivers  for 
Epson  lasers;  F0UNTEXT88  + 
FDUNTED8^  optional  dot-matrix 
drivers;  PLUS4  PUBLISHER  Cthe 
publisher  pack}  to  allow  you  to 
combine  PLUS4  and  LINEdesign  to 
make  the  best  use  of  texx  and 
graphics;  LINEdesign  and 
□ATRdesiqn  from  PROGS  are  the 
new  top  of  the  line  vector 
drawing  package  for  the  QL  Ca 
massive  new  product  that 
enables  you  to  draw,  print, 
scale,  rotate  any  picture  or 
text,  and  will  look  crisp  and 
sharp},  and  the  newest  version 
of  DHTRdesign  Cwhich  has  been 
completely  rewritten  so  that 
files  can  be  disk  based  and 
larger  than  available  memory, 
with  the  bonus  that  all  files 
are  now  multi-user}. 

UJe  also  now  have  available  for 
sale  the  latest  version  of 
QTOP,  the  program  that  many 
call  the  definitive  front  ena 
for  all  QDOS  compatible 
machines.  It  now  offers  an  icon 
based  FILE-MRNRGER  such  as  is 
found  in  Windows.  UJe  have  it 
for  only  ^52. 

TO  ORDER  FROM  US    SEND   CHECKS , 
MONEY  ORDERS,    CASK  (foreign  add 
$3),     or    C.  O.  D.  ,    PAYABLE  to 
Frank   Davis    or    Paul   Holmgren  to 

MECHANICAL  AFFINITY 
513    EAST   MAIN  ST. 
PERU,     IN  46970 
OR 

MECHANICAL  AFFINITY 

52  31   WILTON  WOOD  COURT 

INDIANAPOLIS,     IN  46254 
317-291-6602    PAULS  PHONE 
317-47  3-80  31   FRANKS  PHONE 


SINC-LINK 


VISIONMIXER-1 

Review  by  Hugh  Howie . 


This  little  gem  is  from  Dilwyn  Jones 
Computing  in  Gwynedd,  which  is  the 
Celtic  name  for  Wales,  the  land  of  great 
Male  Voice  Choirs,  King  Arthur  fable,  and 
Rugby  fame.  It  costs  a  mere  £10.00,  and 
is  worth  every  penny. 

I  used  it  the  other  evening  at  the  QL 
Sector  Meeting  to  give  a  "Slide  Show" 
style  demonstration  of  many  of  the  little 
pictures  I  have  drawn  with  EYE-Q,  and  I 
find  that  VISIONMIXER  1  is  a  wonderful 
program  for  this  purpose. 

It  could  also  be  used  to  run  a  shop 
window  advertising  display,  or  a  running 
display  of  product  and  prices,  or  mixing 
prices  and  pictures  to  attract  the  eye  of 
the  passer-by.  There  are  probably  no 
limitations  in  the  manner  this  program 
can  be  used  other  than  the  minds'  ability 
to  devise  a  reason  for  using  it. 

The  program  is  easy  to  learn  and  to  use. 
The  manual  helps  you  along  stage  by 
stage.  There  is  also  a  demo  sequence 
supplied  to  let  you  see  what  the  program 
can  do. 

After  that,  it  is  a  matter  of  having  a 
number  of  pictures  (screens)  of  your  own 
to  load  into  the  program  when  told  to  do 
so.  Pictures  can  be  made  with  almost 
any  graphics  program  available,  EYE-Q, 
(the  one  I  used),  The  PAINTER,  Picture 
Master  (a  sister  program  I  will  get  into 
another  day),  Page  Designer,  almost  any 
program  capable  of  creating  pictures  or 
screens.  With  very  little  trouble  you  can 
have  a  demo  sequence  up  and  running. 
Up  to  25  pictures  can  be  used  in  a 
sequence . 

The  running  speed  of  the  display,  can  be 
set  at  the  time  of  entering  the  sequence. 
Then  again,  the  sequence  can  be  run 
with  random  timing,  The  pictures  can  be 
displayed  in  a  pre-set  sequence,  or  left 
to  run  with  a  random  selection.  Same 
thing  applies  to  the  effects,  (the  way  the 
pictures  are  changed  on  the  screen) 

If  you  are  not  happy  with  the  display  as 
set,  it  is  easy  to  edit  the  picture 
sequence  and/or  effects  if  you  don't  like 
what  you  have. 


Remember  those  wonderful  things  you  see 
on  TV  where  one  picture  is  merged  with 
another?  Where  the  merging  is  done  in 
101  different  ways?  Well  that  is  what 
this  program  does,  only  instead  of  there 
being  101  ways  to  wipe  a  picture  onto 
the  screen,  there  are  111  ways  to  do  it. 
Wipe  in  from  side,  top,  bottom,  in  bits 
and  pieces,  zigzag,  circles,  squares,  on 
and  on  and  on.  Just  think  of  an  effect 
you  would  like  and  this  program  can 
come  close  to  producing  it.  Place  the 
"box"  over  the  effect  and  press  ENTER. 
When  selecting  the  "effect",  it  is  possible 
to  have  a  preview  of  the  effect  before 
entering  it  into  the  sequence. 

The  display  can  be  set  as  continuous 
running,  or,  if  you  wish  to  conduct  a 
lecture,  the  pictures  can  be  displayed 
and  changed  at  the  touch  of  a  key. 

Would  you  like  to  make  a  scrolling  title 
for  those  video  movies  of  the  kids?  Just 
type  a  few  words  into  your  favorite 
graphics  program,  save  it,  and  it  can  be 
used  in  VisionMixer  1.  Do  it  with  the 
"slide  up"  effect,  start  the  camera,  and 
you  will  now  have  a  scrolling  effect  to 
title  the  credits  on  your  video. 

VISIONMIXER  1  does  require  a  fair  amount 
of  memory,  at  least  512k.  It  will  run 
from  microdrive,  but  it  should  be  stated 
that  this  is  not  the  best  way  to  use  this 
program.  As  each  _scr  picture  uses 
32768  bytes,  (32K)  you  can  only  get  three 
pictures  on  each  cartridge,  so  you  are 
limited  there.  But  in  most  cases  I  find 
that  those  who  have  extra  memory  added  to 
their  QL,  have  also  added  a  disk  system 
at  the  same  time. 

If  you  work   in   graphics,    and  like  slide 
shows,    or   have   a   use    for    this   type  of 
display,  then  VisionMixer  1  is  an  excellent 
program  for  you  to  have. 

Darn  it!  I  got  so  busy  telling  you  what 
the  program  can  do  I  forgot  to  tell  you 
how  to  do  it.  But  then  that  is  what  the 
excellent  manual  does,  it  tells  you  how 
to  use  the  program  -  so  why  should  I  re- 
invent the  wheel? 

A  GREAT  PROGRAM  FOR  DEMOS  AND  DISPLAYS. 

93032  1 

-LINK  15 


Q  L  I 

by  Hugh 

XCHANGE   GOES  PD 

It  has  recently  been  announced  that  Psion 
have  released  the  QL  version  of 
XCHANGE  to  the  public  domain. 

It  has  also  been  announced  that  the 
TSL  (Task  Sequencing  Language)  files  have 
also  been  released  to  the  public  domain. 

Now  I  can  place  XCHANGE  in  our  own 
library.  I  have  had  more  than  one 
version  sent  to  me  in  the  past  but  have 
been  unable  to  place  it  in  the  library  as 
I  try  not  to  use  anything  which  is 
restricted  in  any  way. 

For  those  who  do  not  know  what 
XCHANGE  is,  it  is  a  multitasking  program 
similar  to  Taskmaster.  I  have  never 
tried  too  hard  with  XCHANGE  as  I  have 
always  been  happy  with  Taskmaster.  By 
the  same  token  there  are  many  who  swear 
by  Xchange.  Those  who  do  use  Xchange  say 
that  it  is  more  comprehensive  and  more 
versatile  than  Taskmaster.  I  guess  it  is 
all  amatter  of  what  one  gets  used  to. 

Some  of  the  copies  I  have  are  a  bit  older 
so  if  anyone  has  the  later  version  with 
updates,  I  would  be  only  too  glad  to  use 
that . 

NETWORKING 
DELETING  OF  FILES 
FORMATTING 

Recently  I  came  across  something  in  the 
Network  that  I  had  not  realised 
previously. 

I  had  always  known  that  it  was  not 
possible  to  format  a  disk  in  NET  2  from 
Net  1.  This  is  a  built-in  safety  feature 
to  ensure  that  a  disk  can  not  be  erased 
inadvertantly  from  the  remote  station, 
but  as  I  was  working  I  found  that  I  had 
saved  an  item  to  the  remote  station  in 
error.  It  would  have  been  easy  enough 
for  me  to  go  to  the  remote  and  delete  the 
item  from  there,  but  I  though  I  would  try 
to  erase  it  from  the  master  station 
(Net  1)     and  it  worked! 


P  S 

Howie 

I  can  save  to  the  remote,  I  can  delete  in 
the  remote,  but  I  cannot  format  in  the 
remote  from  the  master.  This  does  not 
appear  to  be  logical. 

To  protect  a  disk,  it  is  not  possible  to 
format  the  remote,  but  it  IS  possible  to 
delete  the  remote  from  the  master.... 

Does  anyone  have  an  explanation?  Please 
drop  a  line  telling  me  more. 

WHAT  USE  IS  DATAJJSE  ? 

At  the  same  time  as  I  was  finding  out  the 
above  delete  procedure,  I  wanted  to 
transfer  files  around  in  different  ways, 
and  also  to  get  print-outs  of  certain 
things,  without  a  lot  of  trouble,  and  I 
reminded  myself  of  this  DATA_USE  thing. 

I  have  mentioned  before  about  the  TK2 
command  "DIR  \SER"  which  will  send  to  the 
printer  a  directory  of  the  disk  in  flpl_. 
It  will  also  send  the  wstat  the  same  way. 
But  ONLY  from  flpl_.  Yes?  NO  and  a  most 
emphatic  NO. 

If   you   use   another  TK2   command   such   as  — 
"DATA_USE    RAM3_"       then   use    "DIR  \SER" 
the  printer  will  give  you  a  copy  of  the 
directory  in  RAM3_! 

Don't  forget  to  go  back  to  the  default  of 
flpl_  by  using  "DATAJJSE  FLP1_" .  Of 
course  if  you  reset  without  saving  the 
defaults  then  the  next  time  you  load  up 
you  will  get  your  original  defaults. 

And  to  remind  you  of  what  your  defaults 
are  just  type  "DLIST" 

You  can  do  the  same  with  PROG_USE,  and 
DATAJJSE,  and  DESTJJSE,  and  SPL_USE. 

Now  I  know  I  have  mentioned  this  before, 
but  it  does  no  harm  to  remind  you,  and 
sometimes  to  remind  myself,  that  those 
things  are  possible.  And  it  sure  can 
save  an  awful  lot  of  heads-cratching  and 
frustration  on  occasion. 

Anyway  the  practice  is  good  for  me! 

930620 


16 


SINC-LINK 


7/1/93 
Tampa,  Fl. 
U.  S.  A. 


A.  E.  Green 

4600  E.  Hillsborough  Ave. 
Tampa,  Fl.  33610 


QL  Contact: 
Hugh  H.  Howie 


Hi  Hugh; 

Well  this  is  the  first  letter  for  this  month.  I  have  been  bending 
George's  ear  for  sometime  now  and  though  I  would  give  you  a  shot. 

Not  to  much  for  the  QL  for  the  last  few  months  been  working  on  the 
2068  and  doing  things  that  I  did  not  think  that  I  could  ever  do 
with  it.  Getting  the  EPSON  T-1000  printer  made  everything  fall 
into  place.  I  even  got  a  copy  of  PRINT  FACTORY,  this  is  a  great 
program.  I  wish  that  all  programs  were  this  good!  Also  a  MIRACLE 
interface  for  the  QL  now  I  can  run  and  print  out  QL-Peintre  and 
FRONT  PAGE,  is's  about  time  because  I  got  this  program  for  about  3 
years  ago  and  just  now  been  able  to  use  it. 

I  just  pick  up  a  new  PSION  ORGANISER  II  model  CM  with  the  RS  232 
interface  and  the  Finance  Pack  &  Oxford  Spelling  Checker 
cartridges . 

I  just  found  out  that  this  thing  can't  spell  "cartridge" I  I  I  i 

The  disk  that  came  with  the  PO  II  is  for  the  IBM,  for  uploads  and 
downloads.  What  about  the  QL?  Can  I  use  this  with  my  machine  and 
the  T/S  2068?  (The  2068  has  2  serial  ports  on  the  Timex  disk 
controller.)  I  also  found  out  that  the  Radio  Shack  Portable  Disk 
Drive  2  will  plug  into  the  PO  II  serial  cable  without  any 
adaptors . 

I  would  like  to  find  out  if  I  can  use  this  drive  like  the  Z88  can. 
If  you  know  of  anyone  that  has  one  and  understands  the  OPL 
language  please  let  me  know.  I  will  need  a  boot  program  to  access 
the  drive.   (Format,  Load,   Save,  etc.)  If  it  can  be  done. 

I  like  this  machine  BUT  if  push  becomes  shove  I  am  considering 
trading  it  of  for  a  Gold  Card.  When  one  has  11  2068's  one  QL,  3 
1500,  1  COCO,  2  Amstrads,  2  Atari's  (8  bit)  and  1  Atari  ST  they  DO 
NOT  need  another  computer. 

All  that  I     use  on  the  QL     is  QUILL  because  I     can't  aford  to  lose 
any  more     programs  because     of  the     microdrives.   I     just  purchased 
Cartridge  Doctor  and  QL-Cavern  and  lost  them  at  the  same  time. 
Rod  Gowen  sent    QSPELL  but     pages  4     and  5     were  missing     from  the 
owners  manual. 


SINCLAIRLY  Yours, 


SINC-LINK 


Photocopied  froa  the  April  1986  issue  of  Everyday  Electronics,  published  in 
irticle  on  this  one  Uter  rnis  fall. 


England.  Watch  for  a  construction 
R,  Bruneau 


STEPPER  MOTOR  DRIVER 


This  month's  constructional  project  fea- 
tures a  Stepper  Motor  Driver  for  use  with 
the  Programmable  I/O  Interface  described 
in  the  February  1986  issue.  The  interface 
can  also  be  used  with  the  simple  Four- 
Channel  Output  Interface  described  in  June 
1985. 

The  complete  circuit  of  the  Stepper 
Motor  Driver  is  shown  in  Fig.  1 .  The  circuit 
is  based  on  a  purpose  designed  driver  i.e. 
(SAA1027)  and  uses  only  a  handful  of  other 
components. 

The  stepper  motor  should  be  a  12V  4- 
phase  (47ohm/400mH  per  phase)  two  stator 
type  providing  7*5  degrees  rotation  per  step. 
Such  motors  are  readily  available  at  reason- 
able cost  from  a  number  of  suppliers  and 
are  capable  of  producing  a  maximum  work- 
ing torque  in  excess  of  50mNm< 

Due  to  the  relatively  large  power  con- 
sumption of  the  stepper  motor,  a  separate 
power  supply  of  1 2 V,  ±  5%  at  500mA  (max) 
will  be  required.  Under  no  circumstances 
should  the  stepper  motor  power  be  derived 
from  the  Spectrum's  own  power  unit! 

Construction 

The  stepper  motor  driver  mav  be  assem- 
:.sd  on  a  piece  ot  Veroboard  measuring 
approximately  lOOmm  x  80mm.  The  pre- 
cise dimensions  of  the  board  are  uncritical 
and  those  quoted  leave  plenty  of  room  for 
the  necessary  input,  output,  and  power 
connectors.  The  use  of  a  low-profile  16-way 
d  l.l.  socket  is  recommended. 

Component  layout  is  uncritical  though 
care  should  be  taken  to  ensure  that  the 
decoupling  capacitors.  CI  to  C3,  are  distri- 
buted around  the  p.c.b.  Links  can  be  made, 
as  necessary,  between  the  components  using 
short  lengths  of  tinned  copper  wire  on  the 
upper  surface  of  the  matrix  board. 

Readers  should  give  some  careful  consi- 
deration to  the  choice  of  connectors  used. 
The  input  connector  should  be  a  four-way 
type  whilst  the  output  should  have  at  least 
five,  and  preferably  six,  ways.  This  latter 
connector  should  be  rated  at  currents  of  at 
ieast  1A. 

Connections  to  the  stepper  motor  are 
depicted  in  Fig.  3.  The  power  connector 
should  be  a  polarised  two-way  type  and  this 
again  should  be  rated  for  currents  of  up  to 
1  A.  If  desired,  this  latter  connection  can  be 
replaced  with  suitably  coloured  flying  leads. 

NEXT  MONTH:  Some  routines  for  driving 
the  Stepper  Motor  Interface  will  be  des- 
cribed and  we  shall  be  taking  a  further  look 
at  FORTH. 


~ET  csPUTIBll  > 

OE  INKUTIMIlT 

:  DERMAL  I  

£1  5tcr  (skill 
-:ondivcc,1|T 

.  •=•.•!  1  iOlijT 

.ciT 


»  i  '.3 

—IX!  COUNT 


T];"il  CUTPUT  . 


Fig.  1.  Complete  circuit  diagram  for  the 
Stepper  Motor  Driver. 


COMPONENTS 


3, 


Fig.  2.  Pinning  details  for  the  BC108  and 
SAA1027. 


=1] 


1 
i  i 


h 

'If 


Resistors 

R1  to  R3 
R4  to  R6 
R7 
R8 


4k7  (3  off) 
2k7  (3  off) 
100 

180  1 W 


Unless  otherwise  SM 
stated  all  resistors 
are  0-25 W  5%  carbon 


paga  208 


Capacitors 

C1  and  C2     100n  polyester 
C3  10p  elec.  16V  p.c. 

Semiconductors 

D1  to  03        1N4148  (3  off) 
TR1  to  TR3  BC108(3off) 
IC1  SAA1027 

Miscellaneous 

Stepper  motor  SM1  (see  text), 
16-pin  d.i.l.  socxet,  connectors 
(see  text).  0-1  in.  matrix  Vero- 
board (or  similar)  measuring 
approximately  100mm  x  80mm. 


Fig.  3.  Stepper  motor  connection  details. 
SINC-LINK 


Approx.  cost 
Guidance  only 


£16 


Index  of  Articles  in  Sine-Link 


Quite  some  time  ago,  one  of  our  original  members  Bob  Mitchell  realized 
that  ?he  11st  of  articles  and  other  items  in  our  newsletter  was  getting 
too  complicated  for  our  limited  human  memory,  so  he  Put  together  a 
database  with  at  that  time  a  complete  listing  of  the  information  in  the 
Sine-Link . 

At  that  time  he  sent  me,  over  my  300  Baud  modem,  that  information  and  he 
has  kept  it  up  till  last  year.  When  he  graduated  to  a  CLONE  I  took 
advantage  of  his  offer  and  obtained  a  copy  of  his  database.  Since  then 
I  have  been  updating  the  file  with  the  end  result  that  it  is  quite 
large  now.  The  edi tor-i n-charge  is  now  publishing  an  index  of  the 
articles  in  each  issue  of  the  Sine-Link,  so  there  is  no  further  need 
for  me  to  keep  it  up  .  . 
This  will  be  my  last  revision  and  an  example  of  the  usefulness  of  this 
file  is  shown  in  the  next  attachment  which  consists  of  a  selection  of 
items  pertaining  to  the  QL. 

Good  luck  Louis  Laferriere 


1993 

9301 

11/1 

p. 6 

Text  87  plus  4  Version  3  H.Howie 

9301 

11/1 

p. 6 

Message  from  P.Hale 

9301 

11/1 

p. 7 

QL  SiQ  meeting  H.Howie 

9301 

11/1 

p. 8 

Some  QL  stuff  H.Howie 

9301 

11/1 

p. 15 

Superbasic  Ramblings  A.Pywell 

9301 

11/1 

p. 17 

QL  Backups  H.Howie 

9301 

11/1 

p. 19  " 

Editor  ?????  H.Howie 

9301 

11/1 

p.  20 

QLips  H.Howie 

9301 

11/1 

p. 21 

Gold  Card  J.Juergens 

9301 

11/1 

p. 26 
p. 27 

QL  Xchange  version  of  Quill  R. Blizzard 

QL  vs  XT     Wordstar  WordPerfect     R. Blizzard 

9301 

11/1 

p. 33 

The  passing  of  EMSOFT  P.Hale 

9301 

11/1 

p. 34 

Get  up  and  Go  H.Howie 

9302 

11/2 

p. 3 

Spring  Ahead   1993  Index 

9302 

11/2 

p. 9 

Slow  Gold  H.Howie 

9302 

11/2 

p.  10 

Notes  on  QL  Lock-ups  H.Howie 

9302 

11/2 

p. 17 

QL  Printing  Databases  P.Hale 

9302 

11/2 

p. 18 

QL  History  H.Howie 

9302 

11/2 

p. 24 

Text  87  +4  vs  Wordstar  R. Blizzard 

9302 

11/2 

p. 27 

QL  Quanta  Index  H.Howie 

9302 

11/2 

p. 29 

QL  Sig  Meeting  March   17  I.Robertson 

9302 

11/2 

p  -  30 

QL  Membership  Drive  H.Howie 

9302 

p. 31 

Sinclair  Prism  PD 

SINC-LINK 


MORE    ON  "SLOWGOLD" 

by  Hugh  Howie 

In  the  last  issue  I  had  some  comments  to  make  about  SLOWGOLD,  a  program  available 
from  Dilwyn  Jones  Computing.  This  program  is  intended  to  slow  the  Gold  Card  down 
to  enable  some  of  the  earlier  QL  programs  to  run  on  the  now  speeded  up  QL. 

At  that  time,  I  mentioned  that  I  had  found  a  couple  of  "peaks"  in  the  operation  of 
SLOWGOLD,  and  although  they  were  there,  they  did  not  in  any  way  detract  from  the 
value  of  SLOWGOLD  as  a  valuable  asset  to  anyones  library,  as  the  amount  of  slow- 
down is  adequate  for  most  applications. 

I  have  received  further  information  from  Dilwyn  Jones  as  to  his  research  of  the 
problem,  and  his  comments  are  so  interesting,  that  I  have  decided  to  reproduce 
them  here,  in  the  hope  they  make  more  sense  to  you  than  they  do  to  me.  I  just 
aint  no  technical  man!  If  you  want  to  completely  understand  what  goes  on,  buy  the 
program  and  try  it  out  for  your  own  self.     You  will  NOT  be  disappointed. 

quote:- 

We  reckon  by  now  that  we  know 
what  causes  the  odd  occurrences  with  some  values  for  slowgold  and  it  is 
very  difficult  to  explain.  It  arises  due  to  interactions  between  the 
length  of  the  interrupt  loop  set  up  by  Slowgold,  the  scheduler  and 
other  'regular'  items  or  interrupts  in  the  QL.  The  values  at  which  the 
effects  occur  varies  depending  what  is  happening  50  or  60  times  a 
second.  A  small  diagram  may  help  to  show  what  I  mean,  the  -  shows  an 
interrupt  or  regular  timed  occurrence,  where  there  is  overlap  there  may 
be  a  clash  or  something  is  missed  or  gueued,  causing  unpredictable 
effects  to  cycle  round  every  now  and  then 

Scheduler 

time  slices  11112231111223111122311112231111223111122311112231111223 

You  can  therefore,  I  hope,  see  that  while  Slowgold  is  in  its  own 

interrupt  shown  by  the    above  (the  on  time  and  off  times  are  not  in 

ratio,  they  will  not  be  50:50  as  shown  above)  the  normal  actions  of  the 
QL  do  not  occur  and  the  time  slices  of  the  jobs  currently  active  don't 
occur  as  expected.  Generally  speaking,  the  bits  chopped  out  of  the  time 
slices  occur  regularly  and  you  get  the  same  slowdown  on  a  regular 
basis.  But  with  some  values  the  length  of  the  interrupt  will  just 
happen  to  make  things  occur  such  that,  for  example,  if  job  1  is  active, 
the  interrupts  could  always  occur  when  the  scheduler  is  mostly 
attending  to  task  2  or  3  (even  if  they  are  suspended) .  I  hope  this  is 
the  real  explanation  for  what  is  happening,  we  have  suspected  it  for  a 
while  but  never  been  able  to  conclusively  prove  it.  Also,  depending  on 
the  speed  at  which  the  machine  is  running,  what  else  there  is  to 
consume  time  and  so  on,  the  slowgold  interrupts  may  actually  overrun 
their  alloted  time  slots  and  strange  effects  such  as  apparently  missed 
interrupts  (leading  to  loss  of  slowdown)  might  theoretically  occur, 
though  we  haven't  been  able  to  prove  this. 


SINC-LINK 


AUTO  FADE  FOR  THE  TS-2068 
by  George  Chambers 
credits  and  copyright  A,  Pennell  1985 

The  April   1986  issue  of  YOUR  SINCLAIR  had  an  article  and  a  program 
listing  for  a  feature  which  provides  for  a  screen  black-out   if  you  don't 
do  anything  for  a  while.    It  has  an  adjustable  time-out   interval  of  up  to 
20  minutes.  . 
/  found  that  the  program  works  equally  well  on  the  TS2068  and  with  the 

Spectrum  ROM. 

The  program  works  as  follows.     After  a  timed  interval   in  which  no  ^ 
computer  keys  are  pressed  the  screen  attributes  are  moved  and  stored  in 
upper  memory,  and  the  attributes  area  of  memory  is  filled  with  zeros, 
giving  a  black  screen.    The  border  is  also  blacked  out.     At  the  same  time 
a  flashing  white  square  located  in  the  lower  right-hand  corner  of  the 
screen  is  d ispl ayed  as  a  reminder . 

Whenever  a  key  is  touched  the  screen  attributes  are  restored  and 
presto,   the  screen  reappears. 

The  code  occupies  a  space  of  about   1200  bytes  of  upper  RAM.    The  code 
itself  is  only  about  120  bytes,   however  space   is  required  to  store  the 
768  bytes  of  the  screen  attr  ibutes. 

This  location  has  been  carefully  chosen  so  that  the   interrupt  mode 
( IM2)  which   it  uses  will  not  be  disturbed  by  computer  per i pheral s.  I 
checked,   and  it's  operation   is  not  affected  by  the  Larken  disk  system. 
Also,   the  code  does  not  affect  the  user-def ined  graphics  area  of  memory. 

The  article  mentions  that  because  of  the  peculiarity  of  the  IM2 
interrupt  mode  only  the  brave,   or  maybe  the  foo I  hardy,   would  attempt  to 
relocate  it. 

The  easiest  way  to  use  this  utility  would  be  to  load  the  Basic  each 
time,   and  have  it  POKE  the  code  into  place.    This  allows  you  to  select 
the  time  delay  interval  desired. 

If  you  can  settle  for  a  standard  time   interval   then  saving  the  code 
and  reloading   it  for  each  use   is  entirely  practical.    In  this  case  you 
would   in  it  ial  ize  the  feature  with  a  RAND  USR  6*967. 

To  turn  off  the  feature  use  RAND  USR  6*99*. 

************************ 


7  REM  Auto  Screen  Fade 
5  RESTORE 
10  CLEAR  64  7  98 
1000  FOR   i =6*967   TO  65023 
1010  READ  a:  POKE  i,a 
1020  NEXT  i 

1030  FOR   i =65281    TO  65365 
10*0  READ  a:  POKE  i,a 
1050  NEXT  i 

1060  INPUT  "Delay  in  sees  ";S 

1070  LET  s=s*50:   LET  t= INT  (s/256) 

1080  POKE  65287, t:   POKE  65286 ,  s-256*t 

1090  RANDOMIZE  USR  6*967 

1100  PRINT  "USR  6*99*  to  switch  off" 

110  STOP 
2000  DATA  33,0,254,6,0,2*3 
2010  DATA  5*,  253,  35,  16,251 ,5* 
2020  DATA  253 ,  62 ,  25*,  237 ,7 1 ,  237 
2030  DATA  9*,  251 ,  33,  1 ,  0 ,  3* 
20*0  DATA  251 ,253,201 ,237 ,86,201 

SINC- 


2050  DATA  255 , 2*3 , 2*5 , 229 , 1 97 ,21 3 

2060  DATA  237 ,91 ,  251 , 253 , 205 , 1 

2070  DATA  255 , 3*, 251 , 253 , 209 t  193 

2080  DATA  225 , 2*1 , 251 , 201 , 2 , 0 

2090  DATA  195,229,253 

2100  DATA   122,  179, *0, 50,33,232 

2110  DATA  3,167 ,237 ,82,  *0 ,  11 

2120  DATA  235,35,253,203,  1 ,  1  10 

2130  DATA  200,  33,1 ,0,201 ,33 

21*0  DATA  0,88,17 ,199,250,1 

2150  DATA  0,3,  126,  18,5*, 0 

2160  DATA  35,  19,  11 ,120,  177 ,32 

2170  DATA  2*5,  21-1-,  25*,  62,18*,  50 

2180  DATA  255,90,33,0,0,201 

2190  DATA  235,253,203,  1 ,  1  10,200 

2200  DATA  33 , 199 , 250 , 17 ,0 ,88 

2210  DATA   1 ,0,3,237, 176,58 

2220  DATA   72,92,230,56,15,15  /vf 

2230  DATA   1 5,21  1 ,25*,  33,  1 ,0,201 ,0,0 

9000  RANDOMIZE  USR   100:   SAVE  "autofd. 

LINK 


DISASSEMBLY  OF 
AUTO  FADE  CODE 


o 1 nnrr 

i  n 

HI  65024 

uouu 

i  n 

L.U 

R  0 

LJ  f  w 

n  Q  7  O 

r  -3 

n  i 

JOr  L/ 

i  n 

( HI  )  253 

0*f  77  (  D 

I NC 

HL 

f^U.97 

1  OFR 

DJNZ 

LJ  w  *  » 

B, 64973 

64978 

3&FD 

LD 

( HL) .253 

64980 

3EFE 

LD 

>4,  254 

64982 

ED47 

LD 

Lm  LS 

64984 

ED5E 

IM 

2 

64956 

FB 

EI 

64967 

210100 

LD 

HL,  1 

64990 

22FBFD 

LD 

( 6501 9 ) ,  HL 

.  -64993 

C9 

RET 

4X3  64994 

ED56 

IM 

7 

=^64996 

09 

RET 

64997 

FF 

RST 

38H 

64998 

F3 

DI 

64999 

F5 

PUSH 

AF 

65000 

E5 

PUSH 

HL 

5500/ 

C5 

PUSH 

BC 

65002 

D5 

PUSH 

DE 

65003 

ED5BFBFD 

LD 

DE ,(65019) 

65007 

CD01FF 

CALL 

65281 

650  7  0 

22FBFD 

LD 

( 65019),  HL 

65013 

D1 

POP 

DE 

6501  4 

CI 

POP 

BC 

650  7  5 

El 

POP 

HL 

650  7  6 

F1 

POP 

AF 

650  7  7 

FB 

EI 

65018 

C9 

RET 

65019 

02 

LD 

(BC),A 

65020 

00 

NOP 

65021 

C3E5FD 

JP 

64997 

65281 

7  A 

LD 

A,  D 

65282 

B3 

OR 

E 

65283 

2832 

JR 

Z,  65335 

65285 

21FA00 

LD 

HL,250 

65288 

A7 

AND 

A 

65289 

ED52 

SBC 

HL,  DE 

65291 

280B 

JR 

Z, 65304 

65293 

EB 

EX 

DE,  HL 

65294 

23 

INC 

HL 

65295 

FDCB016E 

BIT 

5,(  IY+1  ) 

65299 

C8 

RET 

z 

65300 

210100 

LD 

HL,  1 

65303 

C9 

RET 

653014- 

210058 

LD 

HL, 22528 

65307 

1 1 C7FA 

LD 

DE, 64  7  99 

65310 

010003 

LD 

BC, 768 
A, (HL) 

65313 

7E 

LD 

6531  4 

12 

LD 

( DE ),  A 

65315 

3600 

LD 

(HL),0 

65317 

23 

INC 

HL 

65318 

13 

INC 

DE 

65319 

OB 

DEC 

BC 

65320 

78 

LD 

A,  B 

65321 

B1 

OR 

C 

65322 

20F5 

JR 

NZ, 65313 

65324 

D3FE 

OUT 

(2514),  A 

65326 

3EB8 

LD 

A,  7  84 

65328 

32FF5A 

LD 

(23295),  A 

65331 

210000 

LD 

HL,0 

653314- 

C9 

RET 

65335 

EB 

EX 

DE ,  HL 
5,(  IY+1  ) 

65336 

FDCB016E 

BIT 

65314-0 

C8 

RET 

Z 

6534  7 

21C7FA 

LD 

HL, 64199 

65344 

1 1 0058 

LD 

DE, 22528 

65347 

010003 

LD 

BC, 768 

65350 

EDBO 

LDIR 

65352 

3A485C 

LD 

A, (23624) 

65355 

E638 

AND 

56 

65357 

OF 

RRCA 

65358 

OF 

RRCA 

65359 

OF 

RRCA 

65360 

D3FE 

OUT 

(254),  A 

65362 

210100 

LD 

HL,  1 

65365 

C9 

RET 

65366 

00 

NOP 

65367 

00 

NOP 

22 


SINC-LINK 


from  the  I.S.T.U.G.  newsletter 
LETS  READ  T/S  2068  JLO  DISKS  WITH  YOUR  QL 

Well,  here  it  is.  You  can  read  Timex  2068  Oliger  disks  with  a  QL  with 
nothing  more  then  a  disk  interface  and  ToolKit  II.    This  is  made  easy 
due  to  the  simplicity  of  the  methods  used  to  store  information  on  the 
2068  JLO  system.    At  this  time  and  present  configuration  a  "basic"  read 
is  all  this  set  of  procedures  does.   Working  out  a  set  of  "conversions 
for  the  way  Sinclair  Basic  is  stored  becomes  fairly  easy  once  you  can  get 
a  file  into  the  QL. 

Now  for  the  PROCedure  explanations. 

DEF  PROC   QL,    this  let  me  "see"  the  structure  of  a  QL  disk.    Working  with 
ASCII  (text)  files  made  it  somewhat  easy  to  study  the  methods  used  to 
store  files  and  how  they  are  distributed  on  the  side,  track,  and  sectors 
of  a  QL  disk.    I  was  able  to  develop  a  "memory  map"  of  a  QL  disk  this  way. 

DEF  PROC    INN,    this  was  used  in  part  with  the  PROC  QL  to  help  control 
my  peeking  about  the  QL  disks.    I  typed  INN,  answered  the  prompts,  then 
typed  in  QL. 

DEF  PROC   OPN,    this  asks  you  which  drive  to  look  at.    Opens  a  RAM  disk 
file,  and  "OPENs"  the  target  disk.    So  far,  in  all  the  experimentation 
with  this  utility  I  have  NOT  harmed  a  2068  disk  at  all.    But  it  is  best 
to  work  on  a  copy  of  your  disk. 

DEF  PROC   TIM,    this  is  meaty.    It  will  read  a  sector  of  the  2068  disk 
and  print  it  to  the  screen.    It  then  asks  if  you  want  to  transfer  the 
material  to  the  ram  disk  file,  if  so,  then  COPY  the  10  sector  block  of 
"data"  to  the  ram  disk. 

DEF  PROC   DISK_IT,    does  the  actual  copying  of  the  track.    Since  I  use  the 
program  "EDITOR  SE"  I  use  line  520  to  print  to  the  ram  file  the  source 
track,  side,  and  sector  I  was  currently  reading.    It  may  be  deleted  if  you 
wish. 

DEF  PROC   AA  &  PDET,    these  just  print  information  to  the  QL  screen. 

DEF  PROC   CLO,    as  far  as  the  QL  and  my  TRUMP  card  are  concerned,  this 
PROC  was  necessary.    When  you  are  done  copying  a  file  to  the  ram  disk,  it 
needs  to  be  closed.    The  TRUMP  card  needs  to  see  that  the  disk  is  "closed" 
the  2068  does  not  care. 

DEF  PROC   REST,    sets  the  drive  heads  to  track,  side,  and  sector  0,  or 
"Parks"  the  drive  heads  if  you  need  it. 

These  are  the  steps  I  use.    So  far,  I  am  toying  around  with  text  files  from 
MSCRIPT  and  TASWORD,  and  data  files  from  PRO-FILE.    For  2068  disks  I  type 
OPN  (enter),  then  type  TIM  (enter),  get  the  file(s)  I  am  interested  in, 
then  CLO  (enter). 

Copy  the  ram  file  to  a  QL  disk.    Then  load  QUILL  of  EDITOR  to  work  on  the 
file  to  clean  up  and  stray  unwanted  contents.    This  method  "gets"  all  of  a 
track  (5120  bytes).    So  the  file  will  have  some  "garbage"  following  any 
useable  data  to  the  end  of  the  file.    Usually  just  spaces  or  some  such. 

Experiment,  use,  enjoy,  or  just  fool  around  with  this.    I  believe  that  this 
can  work  on  AERCO  and  LARKIN  disks  once  you  understand  how  they  write  to 
the  disks.    If  you  try  this,  you  need  to  experiment  with  the  FOR/NEXT  loops 
in  the  PROC  TIM. 


SINC-LINK 


100  DEFine  PROCedure  rest  :  GET  #4\257,a$  :  a$="  :  END  DEFine 
110  : 

120  DEFine  PROCedure  opn 

130  CLS  :  INPUT  \\V Which  drive  ?    (  1/2  )  ';dr 

140  OPEN_NEW  #3,raml_2068_fi1es  :  OPEN  #4, 'f lp'&dr&'_*d2d' 

150  END  DEFine 

160  : 

170  DEFine  PROCedure  do  :  CLOSE  #3  :  CLOSE  #4  :  END  DEFine 
180  : 

190  DEFine  PROCedure  aa  :  PRINT  a$  :  END  DEFine 
200  : 

210  DEFine  PROCedure  ql 

220  LOCal  track  ,  side  ,  sector 

230  inn 

240  FOR  track  =  0  to  trk-1 
250  FOR  side  =  0  to  1 
260  FOR  sector  =  1  to  9 
270  REMark  rest 
280  pdet 

290  GET  #4\sector+side+256+track*65536,a$  :  aa 

300  IF  pause$=="y"  THEN  :  PAUSE(-l) 

310  END  FOR  sector  :  END  FOR  side  :  END  FOR  track 

320  END  DEFine 

330  : 

340  DEFine  PROCedure  tim 

350  REMark  JLO  DOS  uses  track  0,  sectors  1-10  for  CAT  and  LOADER  software 
360  inn 

370    FOR  track  =  0  TO  trk-1 
380     FOR  side  -  0  TO  1 
390       FOR  sector  =  1  TO  2 
400      REM  rest 
410  pdet 

420      GET  #4\sector+side+256+track*65536,a$  :  aa 
430       END  FOR  sector 

440     CLS  #0  :  PRINT  #0  :  INPUT  #0, "Relocate  this  side  and  track  ?  ";ans$ 

450     IF  ans$=='y'  THEN  :  disk.it 

460       END  IF  :  CLS  #0 

470     CLS  :  END  FOR  side  :  END  FOR  track 

480  END  DEFine 

490  : 

500  DEFine  PROCedure  disk_it 

510  FOR  sector  =  1  TO  10 

520  GET  #4\sector+side+256+track*65536,a$ 

530  PRINT  #3, 'sector  '; sector, 'track  ' ;track, ; 'side  ';side\a$ 

540  END  FOR  sector 

550  END  DEFine 

560  : 

570  DEFine  PROCedure  pdet  :  PRINT  'sector  '; sector, 'track  ' ;track, ; ' side 
';side  :  END  DEFine 

5S0  : 

590  DEFine  PROCedure  inn 

600  CLS  :  CSIZE  1,1  DIM(pause$( 1 )  :  INPUT  Y'PAUSE  ?  ";pause$ 

610  INPUT  \  '40  or  80  Tracks?  ';trk 

520     IF  trk  <>  40  AND  trk  <>  80  THEN  :  GO  TO  610 

630    END  IF 

640  CLS  :  CSIZE  0,0 

650  END  DEFine 


SINC-LINK 


puelis 


domain 


Gamer  Designs:  a 
report  on  a  dodgy 

outfit  io  Dunstable!  / 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


Sinclair           123K  ZXSc-ctonW 

■□□DDDDDDnaaaa 
B  aBanananiaatsaii 
B  criHianacianaaatil 
■  msEjaaaaanTTi 

■  BBBBBHHBiaDaB 

IS|S-t<  i  i-IBIIII 

\ 


zx   spectrum  *2 


sincrlsir-  12SK 

ZXSi.*rtiVTH3 

\ 

 i 

m  BE3iiaaaaDDaaaa 

■  anntnacancjaniniaii 

■  rne»raocicanianotar"l 

■  criBE3Qaaaaaiicia 

H  HBiMBM—MiBiHIfci 

128K 

ZX   spectrum  *3 


ISS  1 
VOL  1 


SPDCI  CJQRST  liSMG  ED 

i  —  ii  '--'iu— *i  l — ii — hi'—~v  u  !L5u~TJu--^  ULLii — SLiiiirv  ir^UQilji  5 

rjEE  EHQJH  fflCJBUDOT^ 


E1.5D 
[R.R.P.3 
UK  ED' 


SINC-LINK 


25 


PAGE  3.  NEWS 

PAGE  4:  MORE  NEWS! 

PAGE  5:  SPECTRUM  TECHE  PAGE 

PAGE  6:  OUR.  GUIDE  TO  USING  BASIC 

PAGE  7:  LIST  OF  UThJTIES  &  ART  PACKS 

PAGE  8:  LIST  Or  GAMES,  CLiPART,  DEMOS 

PAGE  9:  ORDER  FORM 

PAGE  10:  UPDATE  ON  NEW  TITLES 

PD  Power  was  originally  ?ctn*  to  be  a  magazine,  but  due  to 
problems  in  finding  regular  contributors,  it  was  decided  that  a 
newszine  was  a  better  option  for  now.  As  time  progresses, 
hopefully  this  publication  wiH  expand  to  the  originaHy  intended 
format. 

NEWSFLASH  Prism  PD  has  now  made  contact  with  a  Canadian 
User  Group  catted  SINC-LINK.  Hopefully  more  contacts  wiB  be  made, 
and  we  are  currently  trying  to  produce  a  TSVCX-SINCLAff*. 
emulator  to  run  American  software.  More  on  this  next  issue. 


Editor:  Martyn  Sherwood 
Design;  Martyn  Sherwood,  Abigail 
Smith 

Technical  Contributer:  MMor 

BRSIC  Contributor:  Graeme  McCai 

+3  Column:  Craw  Elder 

+3  Technical  help:  Craig  Elder 

Publishing  Director:  Martyn 

Sherwood 

Typing  Contributor:  Rajesh  Mbtry 
EDITORIRL,  RDVERTISIHG  fit 
FIRRHETING  OFFICES:  Prism  PD,  13 
Rodney  Close,  Bfton,  Rugby  CV22 
7HJ. 

BUBSCRIPTIDHS:  Martyn  Sherwood, 
Prism  PD,  13  Rodney  dose,  Gttcn, 
Rugby  CV22  7HJ  (enquiries). 
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES  £9  per  year. 
BRCh  ISSUES:  PRISM  PD.  {£230 
including  P&PL 
HDND  DRIGINRTIDH:  Biton 
Pubfishmg 

PRINTING:  Rugby  Community 
Printworks,  92  Lower  Kflmorton  Rd, 
Rugby  CV21  3TE 


v^rXELCLii  lua.1 

Here  it  is,  the  first  issue  of  PD  Power,  bringing  you  the  best  in  news 
from  the  world  of  Public  Domain  and  Spectrum  Computing.  My  name  is 
Martyn  Sherwood,  and  I  am  the  'culprit'  responsible  for  setting  up  Prism 
PD  &  PD  Power. 

1  think  for  this  first  Editorial  Bit,  it  will  be  a  good  idea  to  give  you  a 
run-down  on  the  history  of  Prism  PD  to  date.  It  was  while  working  at 
Rugby  Community  Printworks  (a  local  charity)  in  1992,  as  a  graphic 
designer  using  Apple  Macs,  that  I  thought  it  would  be  nice  to  set  up  a 
service  of  charitable  status  for  the  Spectrum.  The  idea  of  public  domain 
appealed  to  me,  and  in  any  case,  this  was  becoming  weH  established  on  the 
CPC,  so  why  not  the  Spectrum?!? 

Prism  PD  kicked  off  in  February  1992.  Although  the  number  of  titles  was  not  substantial,  we  never  the  less  had  a 

2  cod  response  from  Specchtims  and  over  the  following  7  months  steadily  grew  from  strength  to  strength.  September 
earmarked  a  new  stage  in  the  development.  We  were  offered  the  chance  to  take  over  Total  PD,  and  despite  hitches, 
this  was  completed  by  Christmas.  This  means  that  we  have  now  got  every  type  of  software  on  offer.  We  also  have 
commercial  titles  available.  We  have  established  contact  in  the  U.S.A.  &  Canada  with  Timex  users.  I'm  sure  things  can 
only  get  better,  and  with  your  support  the  Spectrum  wiH  survive. 

Happy  Computing, 


26 


SINC-LINK 


PLEASE  READ  ME 


Instructions  for  US  Be 
CANADIAN  Timex-Sinclair 
osers.  Payment  is  by  postal  money  order  or  send 
English  coinage.  £2  per  set  of  any  18  titles.  Send  a 
C90  tape  (not  the  case  I  with  your  name  on, 
inside  a  jiffy  bag  for  protection  Be  re-use  or  Prism 
PD  will  not  be  responsible  for  damaged  goods. 
Orders  sent  in  6-7  days.  Orders  weighing  over  60g 
then  add  £121  /  each  additional  20g  add  32  pence 
to  avoid  surcharge.  Payable  to  MARTIN 
SHERWOOD  ONLY.  All  titles  transfer  to  disk. 


fliostrad  AS4/S64./6128 


Sinclair  Spectru 


Prism  PD,  13  Rodney  close, 
Bi  Lton.  Rugby  CUSS  7HJ 


UTILITIES  BUSINESS  Be  EDUCATION:  Ul  Print  daisywheel  pics,  U2  User  definable  grids,  U3  Print  a  LARGE  poster,  U4 
Define  a  key  routine,  US  Weekdays  in  3  languages,  US  PD  database  -  lacks  SAVE/LOAD  routine  -  (please  help!),  U7  Line 
renumber  routine,  U8  Border  colours,  U9  Paper/Ink/Graphics  demo,  U10  ATTR.No.  Ull  Invert  text  effect,  U12  Use  your  own 
art  loading  screens,  U13  Fun  security  system,  U14  Scroller  text  effect,  U15  Vary  your  INPUT  position,  U16  Hex  ist  U17 
Data  Move  (Microdrive),  U18  Posh  CLS,  U19  Screen  flash,  U20  Peek,  U21  Dec-hex,  U22  Large  text,  U23  Menu  U24  Drop 
shadow  text  effect,  U25  Poke,  U26  High  score  table,  U27  Phone  book,  U28  Character  set  designer,  U29  m/c  Break,  U30 
Printer  toolkit,  U31  Cashflow  accounts  prog\  U32  (withdrawn,  will  replace  with  a  WP  soon),  U33  Recover  erased  +D  files 
U34  8yr  Cal,  U35  Perspective  text  effects,  U36  Reflect  text  effects,  U37  multiple  system  save  routine,  U38  Font  1,  U39 
Font  2,  U40  to  U43  =  Scroll  up,  Scroll  down,  Scroll  left,  Scroll  right,  U44  CAT  tape  files,  U45  Disable  the  break  key  - 
46K  only,  U46  64  printer  aide,  U47  Hide  the  screen  display,  U48  See  hidden  messages  in  games,  U49  Zoom  the  screen 
for  editing,  U50  Check  free  memory,  U51  48K  keyboard  buffer,  U52  Read  kempston  joystick  ports  -  48K  only,  U53  128K 
screen  animation  -  needs  U54,  U54  Demo,  U55  Downtown,  U56  ASCII  edit,  U57  Day  convert,  U58  Union  Jack  demo,  Ub'4 
Automatic  hex  saver,  U65  Musical  input  display,  U66  Soundz,  U67  Minstrel  music  maker,  U68  Minstrel  1,  U69  Minstrel 
demo  -  needs  minstrel  1,  U71  Sound  sampler,  U72  Vat  prog",  U73  Accounts  prog',  U74  46K  Toolkit,  U75  Disassembler, 
U76  Hexloader,  U77  Icons  patterns  6c  fonts,  U76  Metric  conversion,  U80  Word  spin,  U81  Pattern  show,  U82  Fake  NEW, 
U63  Unusual  CLS,  U64  Change  the  editor  colours,  U65  Print  inlay  cards,  U86  Use  pokes  on  the  +D,  U67  48K  Data  typer  - 
48K  only,  U88  +D  Gauntlet  2  utility,  U89  Maths  equation  solver,  U90  Screen*  manipulator,  U91  +D  clock,  U92  Spelling  aid, 
U93  Test  your  morse  code,  U94  48K  Soundsytem,  U95  Morse  code  teacher.  U96  Screen  magnifyer,  U97  Find  any  day  in 
the  20thC,  U98  Notebook,  U99  2A  +3  printer  utility,  U100  48  8c  +2  printer  utility,  U101  Comms  prog'  1  for  VTX5000, 
U102  Comms  2,  U103  +D  snap  menu  screen,  U104  +D  adult  jokes,  U105  File  copu/rename  ,  U106  Turbo  tools  for 
programmers.  U107  The  Soroo  -  Various  commands  (extensive),  U106  ASCII  viewer.  U109  Extensive  font  editor,  U110  Normal 
or  headertess  file  viewer.  Ulll  128  DTP  fixer  for  the  grey  +2  -  abort  printing  without  losing  text  files,  U112  Multidump 
1  U113  Multidump  3,  U114  Mousedraw  routine,  U115  Onerror  -  trap  errors,  U116  Catram  128,  U117  ATTR  128,  U118  PFN 
print  system,  U119  Screen  clearer,  U120  Rem-maker,  U121  Dubtex,  U122  Typeliner  double  fonts,  U123  Typeliner  graphic 
~~  — — — —  — -  alphabets>  U124  Headliner  bug  fix,  U125  Deco  fonts  pack  1  -  for 

typeliner,  U126  Deco  fonts  2,  U127  Gamesaid  -  grid  to  design  icons 
etc,  U128  Continue  routine,  U129  Centre  text  routine,  U130  Mouse 
routine,  U131  BASIC  scroller,  U132  Custom  48K  NEW,  U133  Tasword 
file  previewer,  U134  Graphic  window  inputs,  U135  File  Organiser, 
U136  Renumber  PPD,  U137  Alpha  data  sort,  U138  Inlay  card  design 
3.7,  U139  GEstats  -  history  of  elections  1950-92,  U140  DEVAL  - 
remove  hindering  VAL  statements,  U141  Make  REMS  of  any  size, 
U142  MENU  2  -  new  menus  ROM  style,  U143  Streams  -  streams 
menu  style,  U144  DUBTEX  -  mix  double  height  8c  normal  text  in  a 
print  statement,  U145  BAscan  -  search  basic  listings  for  keywords 
8c  variable  names  etc  8c  print  them,  U146  Clear-all!  -  remove  files 
in  Wordmaster  in  one  go  -  brill!,  U147  "CP/M3"  SPECIAL  +3 
COMPILATION  PACK  -  includes  drive  ai  formatter  to  203K  -  32 
progs  +  CP/M  utils  as  well!  Send  £2  +  disk,  U148  HEADREAD  - 
header  reader,  U149  FILECOMPRESSOR  (NOT  +3),  U150  48K  Copier 
(NOT  +3),  U151  Screen  compressor,  U152  128K  file  copier,  U153 
MAD  2  MONITOR  (NOT  +3),  U154  Edit  Sampler  +  demo  file  (NOT  +3), 
U155  Genious  Mouse  Tester  (+3  only),  U156  Histogram  charts  (+3 
only),  U157  Line  Graph  charts  (+3  only),  U158  +3  disk  editor, 
formatter,  etc.  U159  Comms  pack  of  11  progs  £2  +  extra  disk,  U160 
Video  Titling  pack  £5,  U181  Colour  Animator,  U162  Euro  font 
designer,  U163  Hex  loader  II,  U164  +D  to  tape  copier,  U165  +D  file 
tester/cat,  U166  +D  filer,  U167  Memory  resident  coders  aid,  U168 
Border  scroll,  U169  Horizontal  attr'  scroller,  U170  UDG  Designer 


SPECIAL  ART  PACKSi  NOT  3"dlsk  £2  each 
1  Dear  John,  2.  Star  Trek,  3.  Cheers,  4.  Cagney 
8c  Lacey,  5.  Shakespears  Sister,  6.  Bananarama, 
7.  Duran  Duran,  8  Ultravox,  9.  Neighbours,  10. 
Eastenders,  11.  Pet  Shop  Boys 
SPECTRUM  LICENSEWAREi  £5  each 
LW1  -  MULTISTORE  -  store  7K  in  your  multiface 
LW2  PAGE  SYSTEM  WORD  PROCESSOR  -  also  acts 
as  a  database. 


PRISM  PD!  -  INCORPORATING  TOTAL  PD! 


SINC-LINK 


27 


ART  PACKS;  NOT  +3  DISK  £2  each 

1  Spectrums  /  Hardware,  2  Office  Be  Business,  3  Sports, 

,  ,       o  ,   .      ,  «       C1    k    ,         «         4  People,  5  Frames  &  Borders,  6  TV  Celebrities,  7  Pa 

Gl   -  Nellu  128   -   Catch  the   falhno  Elephants-  /  62  ^  ' .    .    n  _  ,        .   ,  ~ 

_  t  u  ,1 —   ,  -—  :  — —   .  r~     nr.        Time,  8  Music,  9  Transport,  10  Announcements,  Cada*. 

Batnball  -    An  addictive  1  or  2  pIaMer  flame  /  G3  -  DT  s  -      i  2.  3.  f3  titles  of  ported  IBM  graphics. 

L8tR  -  Try  and  get  the  highest  score!  /  64  -  Alienatta  1  *>  *  ^  "tleS  01  P0™*3  mM  8  P 

-  Defend  your  ship  against  the  aliens  /  G5  -  Cacapture 

-  Excellent  2  player  stratergy  game  /  G6  -  Brickbat  - 
Colourfull  -  test  your  reflexes!  /  G7  Magicfore  -  A  game  that  uses  logic  -  are  you  up  to  it?  /  G8  MartianKO  -  Left,  right 
aim  -  and  blast  away!  /  G9  SincCS  -  Run  over  the  pedestrians  in  your  C5!  /  G10  -  Skittles  -  How  many  can  you  knocl 
down?  /  Gil  -  Cypher  -  Great  PD  version  of  the  Mastermind  game  /  G12  -  Vouerger  -  A  blast  of  a  PD  game    /  G13  -  Nelli 

-  48K  version  of  the  classic  arcade  game  /  G14  -  Manblitz  -  Bomb  the  Manhatten  skyline!  /  G15  -  Frogger  -  Vert 
colourfull  and  quick  version  of  a  classic!  /  G16  -  Gaiaxydef  -  PD  Space  Invaders  on  your  Spectrum  /  G17  -  Basicbing  -  Plat 

Bingo  to  win!  /  G18  -  Invaders  -  A  great  game  in  true  Invaders  style  /  G19  -  Fishing  -  It  was  this  long  !!!  /  G20  ■ 

Minefield  -  Rescue  the  soldiers  -  watch  out  for  the  mines!  /  G21  -  Spotlight  -  Avoid  being  seen  at  all  costs  /  G22 
German  -  A  German  spelling  game  -  good  fun!  /  G23  -  French  -  Another  spelling  game  /  624  -  Rider  -  Jump  the  buses  likt 

Evil  Kenieval!  /  625  -  Magic  Square  -  A  sliding  puzzle  game  a  delight  /  626  -  Solitair  -  Computer  version  of  the  boan 

game  /  627  -  House  -  Dare  you  enter?!!  /  628  61obular  Troubles  -  our  best  game  -  commercial  standard!  /  629  Maze  -  cai 
you  escape?  /  630  Mission  Collision  -  great  space  blaster  /  G31  -  Xuoor  5  -  space  romp!  /  G32  -  Draughts  -  boardgamt 
classic  /  633  Annagrams  -  puzzle  mania!!  /  634  -  Wordsearch  -  another  classic  /  635  DartsLord  -  Can  you  better  Johi 
Lowe?  /  636  Treasure  Trail  -  get  searching  /  637  "THRASH"  a  commercial  space  game  -  brilliant  £6.99 


Digitize  your  loved  ones!!  Send  a  colour 
photograph  (landscape  format).  Alternatively, 
using  a  video  digitizer,  we  can  save  pictures 
directly  from  a  video  cassette  (VHS).  Indicate 
if  you  want  the  pictures  saved  on  tape  or 
disk  or  printed  out.  £5 

We  can  digitize  famous  British 
TWSPORTS/entertainers  or  even  the  Royal 
Family.  Just  let  us  know  who  you  want 
digitized.  £3  per  pack. 


GAME  POSTERS 

We  can  supply 
posters  depicting 

your  favourite 
game,  £2.99  each. 
SAE  for  our  list. 
There  are  40  to 
choose  from,  on 
glossy  A4  paper. 

Price  includes 
P&P1  New 

posters  can  be 
arranged 


TERMINATOR  2 


Posters  exclusive  to  club  member? 


GRAPHIC  AND  MUSIC  DEMOS  (*]  =  +3  users  load  via  tape/+D 

Dl  Madonna,  D2  Adamski,  D3  Technotronic,  D4  Turkey,  D5  Weird,  D6  Grand 
Prix,  D7  Pepperami  (»),  D8  Axel  F  (»),  D9  MQM,  D10  Shock-Megademo  (•), 
Dll  Grafix  1  (»),  D12  Spectec  3  (•),  D13  Court  2,  D14  PetShop  Boys,  D15 
Bart  Simpson  1  (•),  D16  3D  Show,  D17  Nightfire  (*),  DIB  Vectors,  D19  Lyra  I! 
(#),  D20  Vidi  ZX  Party  (*),  D21  Song  In  Lines  5  (*),  D22  Quinquagesima,  D23 
128K  Only  Screen  (*),  D24  Scrolly  Star  (»),  D25  Demos,  D26  Scanner,  D27 
wicked,  D28  Megaderno  (*),  D29  Red  Sector  (»),  D30  Nanodemo,  D31  Signal  3 
(»),  D32  Hypersonic  2  Preview  (»),  D33  EEL,  D34  Ghaza  1,  D35  Slideshow 
(NOT  +3),  D36  Overscan  (NOT  +3),  D37  Hypersonic  48K  (•),  D38  Prisoner, 
D39  Zaphod  2  (NOT  +3),  D40  NMt  1  (•),  D41  NMI  2,  D42  CIR  demo,  D43  NMI  3 
(»),  D44  NMI  3  NOTE  (»),  D45  Madhouse  (NOT+3),  D46  U.Spirits,  D47  LSD 
(NOT+3),  D48  Hypersonic  2  (*),  D49  MQM  2,  D50  Madness  Remix,  D51 
TerniMADor  (over  18's  only),  D52  CD  Demo,  D53  Interlace,  D54  Crazy  Demo, 
D55  Voyerger  Demo,  D56  Music  Bank  5  (NOT  +3),  D57  Explosion  (•),  D58 
Spirit,  D59  Sound  Tracker,  D60  Compiler,  D61  Virus  II  (•),  D62  Beruska,  D63 
Windows  (*),  D64  Music,  D65  Train  Spottin  (•) 


EXAMPLE  OF  OUR  CUP  ART! 


Me, 


we  though  it  best  to  allow  you  to  have  more  titles.  UK  8c  European  custome 
hfij-ja  Ajjr  rjprj^lon  fh?  hi ipfjpn  of  charges  f>n  rh^noino 


NOTES:  As  you  will  only  be  able  to  pay  by 
postal  money  order  or  send  us  englist  w 

i  i  are  only  allowed  packs  of  12  titles  for  £2.  \ 

*ar\r\\  rir  hum  rut  rriAnaii  nrtf-fal  ftrfiarr 


SINC-LINK 


INEXPENSIVE  Z-88 
PARALLEL  TO  SERIAL 
CONVERTER 

j .  shepard 


I  HAVE  MENTIONED  BEFORE  OF  MY 
RESISTANCE  TO  PAYING  MORE  FOR  AN 
ITEM  THAN  I  THINK  IT'S  WORTH. 

I  FEEL  THIS  WAY  ABOUT  THE  PRICE  OF 
CURRENTLY  OFFERED  PARALLEL  TO 
SERIAL  CONVERTORS 

ESPECIALLY,  THOSE  OFFERED  FOR  THE 
Z-88.  SO,     I    WAS    DOING  WITHOUT 

UNTIL  MY  FRIEND,  BOB  SWOGER,  WHO 
FORTUNATELY  DABBLES  IN  OTHER 
COMPUTERS,  LIKE  COCOS,  TOLD  ME  OF  A 
CONVERTOR  FOR  A  COCO  THAT  COULD  BE 
HAD  FOR  $4-0.  I  ASKED  THE  NAME  OF 
THE  FIRM  HANDLING  THIS  JEWEL. 
DAYTON  ASSOC  . ,  964-4  QUAILWOOD  TR  .  , 
SPRING  VALLEY,  OHIO  45370,  PH. 
C513D  885-  5999.  THEY  CALL  IT  THE 
BLUE  STREAK  ULTIMA.  THE  COST  IS 
$29.95  IF  YOUR  PRINTER  PROVIDES  +5 
VOLTS  DC  ON  PIN  18  OF  THE  PRINTER 
CONNECTOR,  IF  NOT  THEN  FOR  $6.00 
MORE,  THEY'LL  INCLUDE  A  WALL  PLUG 
POWER  SUPPLY.  IT  HAS  A  BAUD  RATE 
RANGE  FROM  300  TO  19200,  SELECTABLE 
BY  A  SWITCH !  !  !  IT  COMES  WITH  A  DIN 
PLUG,  WHICH  WILL  HAVE  TO  BE 
CONVERTED  TO  A  DB-9  TO  BE  ABLE  TO 
HOOK  UP  TO  THE  Z-88'S  SERIAL  PORT, 
BUT  IT'S  ONLY  THREE  WIRES,  SO  EVEN 
IF  YOU  DON'T  HAVE  THE  EXPERTISE  TO 
HANDLE  A  SOLDERING  IRON,  YOU  CAN 
FIND  SOMEONE  TO  DO  IT  USING  THE 
FOLLOWING  INSTRUCTIONS  FOR  WIRE 
PLACEMENT. 


SEPERATE  THE  PLASTIC  CASE  BY 
CAREFULLY  PRYING  IT  APART  AT  THE 
SEAM  WITH  SOMETHING  LIKE  A  SMALL 
SCREWDRIVER.  YOU'LL     HAVE     TO  DO 

THIS  BECAUSE  THE  PEOPLE  WHO  PUT 
THESE  TOGETHER  DON'T  OBSERVE  A 
COLOR  CODE  AND  YOU'LL  HAVE  TO 
DETERMINE  WIRE  LOCATION  VISIBLY. 
ONCE  YOU'RE  INSIDE,  HOLDING  THE 
CASE  WITH  THE  PRINTER  CONNECTOR  END 
AWAY  FROM  YOU,  WHICH  IS  THE  SERIAL 
PORT  WIRE  ENTRANCE  END  TOWARDS  YOU, 
YOU'LL  SEE  THE  THREE  WIRES  OF  THIS 
SERIAL  CABLE  SOLDERED  TO  THE  PCB  IN 
A  ROW. 

SINC-LINK 


IF    YOU'LL    NUMBER    THEM    FROM   LEFT  TO 

RIGHT    AWAY    FROM  THE    SCR,    THEN  THEY 

CONNECT  TO  THE  DB-9  CONNECTOR  AS 
FOLLOWS: 

WIRE  #1  -  DB-9  PIN^-2 

2  —        "  "  5 

3  —       "  "  7 

WHEN  THIS  IS  DONE  AND  YOU  PUT  THE 
PLASTIC  CASE  BACK  TOGETHER  WITHOUT 
CATCHING  THE  WIRES  ON  TOP  OF  THE 
BAUD  RATE  SELECTOR,  YOU'RE  IN 
BUSINESS. 

THE  DB-9  CONNECTORS  SOLD  BY  RADIO 
SHACK  C276-1403D  HAVE  GOOD  HARDWARE 
FOR  CAPTURING  THE  WIRE.  YOU  WILL 
HAVE  TO  GET  THE  PIN  CRIMPING  TOOL. 

BEFORE  YOU  TRY  TO  PRINT  OUT  WITH  <> 
PO,  YOU  SHOULD  FIRST  MAKE  SURE  YOU 
SELECTED  THE  9600  BAUD  RATE  ON  THE 
PANEL.  YOU  GET  THERE  BY  KEYING 
CDS.  THEN,  OF  COURSE,  YOU  SELECT 
THAT  ON  YOUR  BLUE  STREAK,  ALSO. 

I  FOUND  THE  WAY  THIS  UNIT  IS  SHAPED 
GETS  IN  THE  WAY  OF  MY  PAPER  PATH  SO 
I  GOT  A  CABLE  EXTENSION  TO  GET  IT 
OUT  OF  THE  WAY.  DO  NOT  USE  AN 
EXTENSION  LONGER  THAN  24  INCHES,  IT 
WILL  DELAY  THE  BYTES  AND  MANY  DROP 
OUT.  I  USE  A  RADIO  SHACK  CAT.  NO. 
26-2867.      ITS   $10.95   IN   THE  STATES. 

OTHER    THEN    THAT    IT    WORKS    AS  IT 
SHOULD, 
SO  ENJOY 


TIMEXERS  C  AN 

SURVIVE  WITH  HELP! 


29 


DAYTON  mCIlCK:OMPUTER  ASSOCIATION  INC 

/^OMFUTERFESrTY 

1993 


SATURDAY 

AUGUST  28  m  W  AUGUST  29 

io am -6pm         m  m  m  m  mm  W  ioam-4pm 


THE  HARA  COMPLEX  1001  SHILOH  SPRINGS  RD  DAYTON  OH 


LARGEST  COMPUTER  SHOW  IN  THE  MIDWEST 


TICKET  INFORMATION 

Purchase  your  tickets  now  for  the  1 8th  annual  Computerfest®,  August  28  and  29,  at  The  Hara  Complex, 
Dayton  Ohio.  Computerfest®  is  the  largest  and  longest  running  computer  show  of  it's  kind  in  the  midwest. 
The  past  few  years  have  seen  tremendous  growth  in  both  vendors  and  attendees.  Last  year,  Computerfest®  92 
drew  over  27,500  people,  nearly  double  that  of  1991 .  This  year's  crowd  is  expected  to  be  even  larger.  Early 
ticket  purchase  will  help  you  avoid  long  lines  at  the  ticket  window  the  day  of  show.  NEW  this  year  will  be  a 
special  SHOWCASE  area  where  manufacturers  will  display  and  present  their  latest  products  This  will  be  a 
non-sales  area,  for  display  and  presentation  only.  On  hand  to  show  their  wares  will  be  represenatives  of 
Microsoft,  IBM,  Wordperfect,  Symantec,  Central  Point,  MediaVision,  and  Clear  Star  International,  along  with 
many  others.  And  as  usual  the  best  prices  of  the  year  will  be  found  at  Computerfest®  93 . 

EVENT  PASS  -  GOOD  FOR  BOTH  DAYS 
$5.00  IN  ADVANCE        $6.00  AT  DOOR 

Or  send  check  for  correct  amount 

and  SASE  to : 

COMPUTERFEST  TICKETS 
PO  BOX  4005 
DAYTON,  OH  45401-4005 


(513)  223  -  FEST 


30 


SINC-LINK 


JULY/ AUGUST  1993 
July  28,  1993 

Dear  Out-of-Town  members, 

Let's  mention  the  news  I etter  first.   Jeff  gave  me  the  PRISM  +D  format  disk 
that  he  mentions   in  his  editorial.   And  he  also   loaned  me  a  3  1/2   inch  drive  to 
try   it  out  and  see  what   I  could  make  of   it.      I  used  the  "doctor.BI"  program 
(on  our  Larken   library  disk  #7 )  to  take  a   look  at    it.    I  found  that   I   was  able 
to   load  the  tracks   into  "doctor"  without  a  CRC  error  appear i ng .    I  saved 
segments  of  the  track  as  code  files,   and  loaded  them  back   into  an  empty  2068. 
But   I  had  difficulty  in  getting  them  properly   i ntegrated   in  the  2068.    I  gave 
up,    because   I  had  seen  the  files  earlier  on  tape,    and  they  were  not  worth 
spending  a   lot  of  time  with.    I'll  maybe  work  on   it  a  bit  more  and  write  an 
article  about   it  for  next    issue  of  the  n/ 1 . 

But   I  have  been  doing  other   interesting  things.   Don  Lambert,    in  the  current 
issue  of  ZXIR  Clive  Alive,   asks  whether  there   is  a  way  to   load  a  test  file 
into  REM  statements   in  a  Basic  program.    That's  a  chal I enge   I  could  not  resist! 
So   I  did  work  up  a  program  and  procedure  to  do  just  that.    I'll  make  an  article 
about    it  for  the  next   issue  of  S INC-LINK . 

Another  project  has   interested  me.   Some  time  ago   I  wrote  a  program  which 
would  load  MSDOS  text  files  on  disk   into  Mscript  files  on  a  Larken  disk.  Look 
at  our  Larken  library  disk  #27.    Well,    I  thought,    if  I  can  load  a  track  of  an 
MSDOS  disk   into  the  2068,    I  should  be  able  to  save  that  track  onto  an  empty 
disk.    If  I  did  that  track  by  track  then  I  would  have  copied  an  MSDOS  disk  to 
a  blank  disk.    I  reworked  the  trusty  "doctor . B1 "  program  a  bit,   and  what  do  you 
know,    I  seem  to  have  succeeded .    The  problem  is,   however,    that  so  far   I  have 
not  been  able  to  change  drives  during  the  process,   so  I  have  to  switch  disks 
back  and  forth   in  one  drive,    for  every  track  that   is  copied.    I  only  did  one 
_d isk,   and  that  meant  two  switches  for  each  of  80  tracks!   Wow,    I'm  not  doing 
that  again  until   I  solve  how  to  change  drives. 

Hugh  Howie  has  several  good,    lengthy  articles   in  the  current   issue  of 
S INC-LINK,   about  his  experiences  at  the  QL  Fest  at  Newport,   R.I.  Very 
interest ing  reading.    In  fact,    if  it  wasn't  for  Hugh's  efforts  in  the 
newsletter,    it  would  be  a  pretty  thin  issue.   Come  on,   out  there;   we'll  fold 
the  news  I etter   if  no  one  writes  material   for   it.   And  I'm  not  kidding,  either; 
not  the  slightest  bit! 

The  Scarborough  Neighbourhood  Watch  managed  to  finagle  a  computer  from  Bell 
Canada.   A  real   oldie,   as  computers  go.    It  has  680K  RAM,   a  360K  Disk  drive, _  a 
20M  hard  drive,   a  printer,   and  colour  monitor.    I've  been  playing  around  with 
it,   since  by  default,    I'm  the   "computer  expert"; Ho  Ho!. 

I've  managed  to   install  a  front-end  menu  system,   an  early-vintage  Word 
Perfect,   and  a  shareware  database.    Installed  programs  have  to  be  really 
simple;   no  room  for  Windows  appl  icat  ions  with  680K  RAM,   20M  drive,   etc.  But 
hey,    that's  enough  for  our  purposes.    It's  an   interest  i  ng  challenge  though.  I'm 
busy  reading  books  called  "Using  MSDOS",    and  "DOS  for  DUMMIES";   and  learning 
about   things   like  AUTOEXEC.BAT",   CONFIG.SYS,    and  EDLIN  (I   told  you    it  was 
old!,    it  uses  a  8088  chip,    not  even  a  80286!).    Sometimes   it's  nice  to  come 
back  to  the  2068,    where   I  know  where  everything  is! 

Tim  Swenson  has  sent  me  several    Timex  simulators.    One  makes  an  MSDOS  think 
it's  a  ZX81 ,    another  makes   it  behave   like  a  Spectrum.    These  seem  to  be 
different   than  others   I  have.   Anyone  for  copies?   They  don't  really  belong  in 
the  Larken  library.    I'm  at  a  slight   loss  how  to  catalogue  them! 

S  i ncere I y, 

George  Chambers 


I