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MAY  -  JUNE  »93  VOL  11-3 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


MAY- JUNE  '93  VOL  11-3 


S ISC -LINK  IS  A  PUBLICATION  OF 
THE  TORONTO  TIME! -SINCLAIR  USERS 
CLUB  AND  IS  ISSUED  6  TIMES  A 
YEAR.  CLUB  MEMBERS  RECEIVE  FREE 
COPIES  AS  PART  OF  THE  S20.00 
ANNUAL  MEMBERSHIP  FEE. 

NEWSLETTERS  ARE  EXCHANGED.  FREE 
OF  CHARGE.  WITH  OTHER 
TIMEX -SINCLAIR  USER  GROUPS. 

PLEASE  CREDIT  THIS  PUBLICATION 
AND  THE  AUTHOR  IF  YOU  COPY 
MATERIAL. 

THE  TS2068  &  ZX-81  GROUP  MEETS 
ON  THE  FIRST  WEDNESDAY  OF  EACH 
MONTH  AT  14  RICHOME  COURT, 
SCARBOROUGH.   ONT.    7PM  START. 

THE   QL    SIG  WILL    HEET  WEDNESDAY, 
11  AY    18TH    AT    586    ONEIDA  DRIVE, 
BURLINGTON,  ONT.  7Pf1  START. 
JUNE  DATE  TBA. 


SINC-LINK  IS 
ON  SINCLAIR 
COMPUTERS. 


PRODUCED 
AND  TIMEX' 


SEND  CORRESPONDANCE  TO, 

Atzenziom  SINC-LINK 
TORONTO     TIMEX -SINCLAIR 
CLUB.  14  RICHOME 

SCARBOROUGH.  ONTARIO, 
CANADA  M1K  2Y1. 


EXECUTIVE  OFFICERS : 

PRESIDENT 
TREASURER 
SECRETARY 
ACTIVITIES: 
QL  CONTACT: 
NEWSLETTER: 
LIAISON  OFFICER: 
(  Out-of-town 


ENTIRELY 
SINCLAIR 


EDITOR 
USERS 
COURT, 


MM 


2 


TORONTO  TIHEX-SINCLfllR 

CLUB 


USERS 


(  Area  Code  416  ) 
RENE  BRUNEAU  (  531-9749  ) 
BILL  LAWSON  (  444-8772  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS  {  751-7559  ) 
LOU  LAFERRIERE  (  820-3725  ) 
HUGH  HOWIE  (  634-4929  ) 
JEFF  TAYLOR  (  244-8583  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS,  14  RICHOME  COURT, 
SCARBOROUGH,  ONTARIO  M1K  2Y1 
(  416-  751-7559  ) 


TORONTO  TIMEX -SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


TORONTO     TIMEX-SINCLAIR     USERS  CLUB 


SUMMER'S  COMING  1995 

INDEX  VOLUME  11-3 
Page  2  -  Club  Stuff 
Page  3  -  This  Page 
Page  4  -  Editorial 
Page   5  -  Larken  Disk    Index  (2068) 
Page  6  -  Want  Ads,    Multiplying   by  2 
Page  7  -  QLips  -  Super  Disk    Indexer    ( QL) 
Page  8  -  Gil   Parrish  Writes    (ZX81  &  2068) 
Page  9  -   ZX  Resources  -  A  to  D  Converter    (ZX81   &  2068) 
Page  11  -  Did  You  Know?  continued  (2068) 
Page   15  -  TS2068  Programming   Tip  (2068) 
Page   16  -  Computer  Junkies 
Page   17  -  Gil   Parrish  Writes  More 
Page   19  -  Freenet  Plugs  Ottawa  In 
Page  21   -   ZX   Resources  -  RS232  Revisited    (ZX81   &  2068) 
Page  23  -  Super  Disk   Labeller    ( QL ) 
Page  24  -  An   American  Spectrum 


SINC-LINK 


3 


EDITORIAL 


Well,  the  newsletter  is  definitely  late  this  time.  It's  partly  my 
fault  because  I've  been  so  busy  at  work  (overtime  ad  nauseum).  As 
editor  I  tend  to  be  a  little  proprietary  about  Sine-Link  ("It's  MY 
newsletter  and  I'll  get  it  out  when  I'm  good  and  ready'.")  so 
offerers  of  help  tend  to  get  their  hands  bitten.  I  am  mellowing  a 
little,  though,  and  Pres  Rene  Bruneau  will  take  a  crack  at 
producing  the  July  -  August  issue  (1*11  be  watching  him  like  hawk). 

As  I  said,  I  am  partly  to  blame  for  the  delay  but  the  other 
reason  is  that  in  the  last  couple  of  months  we  have  seen  a  marked 
decrease  in  the  number  of  letters/articles  coming  in.  Why  is  that? 
We  have  more  out-of-town  members  than  ever  but  we're  getting  less 
material  from  them.  Surely  we  can't  have  discovered  everything 
about  our  computers.  There  must  be  something  you've  found  that  you 
haven't  seen  published,   so  why  not  write  about  it. 

Give  it  a  try  and  I'll  try  to  be  more  on  time,  editorially- 
speaking.    'Nuff  said. 

RHODE   ISLAND  UPDATE 

As  mentioned  last  issue,  here  is  more  info  on  the  QL-fest  being 
held  in  Newport,   Rhode  Island. 

The  get-together  will  be  at  the  Salvation  Army  Building  on 
Memorial  Boulevard,  Saturday  June  5th.  Show  times  are  1  PM  to  6  PM. 
Contact  Bob  Dyl   of   IQLR  for  more  info   (401 )-849-3B05. 

Our  own  Hugh  Howie  has  reserved  a  display  table  for  the  Toronto 
Timex-Sinclair  Users  Club.  Hugh  will  be  manning  the  table,  possibly 
with  one  or  two  out— of— town  members,  handing  out  lots  of 
promotional  stuff  about  the  club  and  also  running  an  elaborate 
demonstration  of   the  QL's  abilities. 

Hugh  expects  to  meet  lots  of  new  faces,  including  some  U.K. 
software  and  hardware  vendors,  generate  new  memberships,  attend  all 
the  pre-  and  post-fest  talks  and  dinners  and  find  time  to  run  his 
demonstrations.  Whew,  he'll  need  a  week  to  recover.  Watch  for  his 
impressions  and  articles  of  the  fest  in  the  next  issue. 

BAD  NEWS  FOR  NESQLUG 

Just  prior  to  publishing,  Hugh  phoned  to  inform  me  that  the 
Director  of  the  New  England  Sinclair  QL  Users  Group,  Ernest  Wider, 
died  suddenly  on  May  31st.  Our  condolences  to  his  family  and 
NESQLUG. 

SO  LONG,    SINCLAIR  USER 

Courtesy  of  out-of-town  member,  Robert  Shade,  I  have  included  an 
article  on  the  TS2068  lifted  from  the  pages  of  the  last  issue 
(March  1993),  of  Sinclair  User  magazine  from  the  United  Kingdom. 
This  article  might  explain  how  a  few  U.K.  vendors  (ie  Doctor  Dark, 
PRISM  PD,  etc.)  found  out  about  some  of  the  clubs  on  this  side  of 
the  pond.  Sorry  to  see  another  Sinclair-related  publication  fold. 
To  my  knowledge,  only  Your  Sinclair  remains  in  publication  in  the 
U.K..   Thanks  for  the  info,  Robert. 

That's  all   for  now   ...  J.T. 


SINC-LINK 


INDEX. B1       By  George  Chambers 
TS2068  Larken 

In  our  TS2068  Larken  library,   buried   in  Disks  #02  "OMNIBUS"  and  Disk 
#33  "PULL-DOWN  (Menus)  OMNIBUS"  is  a  utility  called  " index. B1 ".    It  is 
designed  to  maintain  an   index  of  the  contents  of  any  collection  of  Larken 
disks.   One  simply  feeds  the  disks  into  the  program,   one  by  one,   and  it 
reads  and  stores  the  contents  of  the  disks.   One  can  then  search,   sort,  and 
print  out  the  contents  to  screen,    TS2040  printer,   or  to  a  large  printer. 
The  program  was  written  by  Bob  Mitchell  some  time  ago. 

A   later  refined  version  (VI  .11)  is  found  on  Disk  #47  "UNIQUE  PROFRAMS", 
and  the  refinements  described  in  this  article  are  applicable  to  this 
version.  Ask  for  this  disk. 

When  Bob  Mitchell  wrote  this  program  he  incorporated  within   it  the 
ability  to  detect  whether  the  selected  printer,    TS2040  or  large  printer, 
was  ON  or  OFF;  and  to  display  the  cond  it  ion  on  the  screen. 

The  problem  with  this  feature  was  that  not  all  printers  supplied  the 
same  signal    info  as  the  Fastext  80  used  by  Bob.  And   if  the  signal  for  the 
ON  cond  it  i  on  was  not  the  one  Bob  had   incorporated  in  his  program,  one 
could  not  continue  with  the  PRINT  feature  of  the  program. 

There   is  another  feature  of  the  program  which  may  be  customised  to  your 
part  icular  needs.   Many  disks  contain  an  AUTOSTART  file  and/or  a  "menu" 
file.  An  option  was  provided  which  allowed  these  two  filenames  to  be  NOT 
printed  out.   Later,    I  expanded  the  feature  to  include  two  more  f i lenames 
to  be  s  im  i lar 1 y  excluded  from  the  pr intout ;   f i lenames  "taswi",   and  "help". 
The  program  listing  below  does  not  provide  for  changing  the  AUTOSTART 
filename,   since  it  is  so  univerdally  used. 

The  method  used  to  make  these  changes   is  to  POKE  them  into  the 
appropriate  addresses  in  the  " index. Cc"  code.   The  following  listing  will 
do  this  task.  All  you  need  to  do  is  determine  your  printers'  ON/OFF  codes 
and  enter  these  values   in  the  var tables. 
And  to  enter  any  changes   in  the  f  i lenames . 

To  determine  the  printer  ON/OFF  signal  codes,   run  this  short  program: 
10  PRINT  AT   10,10;"  ";   AT  10,10;    IN  127 

20  PAUSE   10:   GOTO  10 

Switch  your  large  printer  into  it's  OFF  and  ON  (ready  to  print)  modes. 
Write  down  the  values,   and  then  enter  these  values  into  the  variables 
LPOFF  and  LPON  in  Line   150  of  the  listing. 

Change  the  IN  127   in  the  above  listing  to  IN  251.    This  will  check  the 
2040  printer.   Probably  this  will  not  need  changing,   but   if  it  does,  then 
do  the  same  thing.  Record  the  values  and  place  them  in  variable  TSOFF  and 
TSON  in  Line  160. 

150  LET  LPOFF =127:    LET  LP0N=108 
160  LET  TSOFF =126:    LET  TS0N=56 

170  LET  a$="menu":   LET  b$="help":   LET  c$="help":   LET  d$="tasw i" :  REM 
Words  you  may  replace 
200  POKE  35484, LPOFF:   POKE  35570, LPOFF 
210  POKE  3551 6, LPON:   POKE  35602,  LPON 
220  POKE  33426,  LPON:   POKE  33526, LPON 
230  POKE  33394,  TSON:   POKE  33494,  TSOFF 

300  LET  x=34207:  FOR  n=1    TO  4:   POKE  (n+x),    CODE  a$(n):  NEXT  n:   REM  To 
replace  "menu"  with  your  word. 


SINC-LINK 


5 


±00  LET  x=3H256:  FOR  n=1  TO  POKE  (n+x),  CODE  b$(n):  NEXT  n:  REM  To 
replace  "help"  with  your  word 

500  LET  x=3U-299:  FOR  n=1    TO  5:  POKE  (n+x),    CODE  c$(n):  NEXT  n:  REM  To 
replace  "taswi"  with  your  word.  Note:   this  word   is  5  characters  in 
length. 

*************************** 


WANTED,,,. A  Larken  disk  system,  preferably  turnkey,  with  drive (s)  and  drive 
power  supply,  for  the  TS2068.  Must  be  the  current  version  LKDOS  v,3. 
Also  wanted,     a  9V,   1  amp  Power  Supply  suitable  for  use  with  the  TS1500, 
Drop  a  line  to  George  Plondke,  243  Berkely,  Elmhurst,   IL  60126, 


WANTED.,.,  Sinclair  Adventure  Users  and  User  Groups'  fanzines,  tapezines,  etc. 
Are  you  interested  in  Adventure- type  Spect rum/TS2068  games? 

Please  drop  a  line  to  DOCTOR  DARK,  c/o  Adventuresof t ,   16  Montgomery  Avenue, 
Bieth,  Ayrshire,  Scotland,  KA151EL 


MULTIPLYING     BY     TWOS  Rene  Bruneau 

Here  is  a  quick  programming  trick  that  I  learned  to  convert 
binary  numbers  to  decimal.  Starting  from  the  most  significant  bit 
( MSB)  -  the  one  on  the  extreme  left  -  multiply  it  by  2  and  add 
the  result  to  the  bit  to  the  right,  then  multiply  the  new  result 
by  2  and  add  to  the  bit  to  the  right,  continuing  the  process 
untill  there  are  no  more  bits  to  process. 

Example:       1001010  =  74 


1 

2 

+ 

0  = 

2 

2 

2 

+ 

0  = 

4 

4 

2 

+ 

1  = 

9 

9 

2 

+ 

0  = 

18 

18 

* 

2 

1  = 

37 

37 

2 

+ 

0  = 

74 

Because  you  double  and  add  to  the  right,  the  arithmetic  is  simple 
and  can  be  done  in  your  head  -  no  need  to  go  looking  for  a 
calculator  or  conversion  tables.  Besides  you  can  always  impress 
your  friends  and  fellow  programmers  with  your  computer-like  brain 
maybe  --. 


6 


SINC-LINK 


Q  L  I  P  S 

by  Hugh  Howie 

SUPER  DISK  INDEXER 


Recently  I  came  across  something  we  could 
all  do  with.     A  program  to  help  us  keep 
track  of  our  disks,  and  what  is  on  those 
disks .     This  program  is  called  SUPER 
DISK  INDEXER,  written  by  Imre 
Dominik,  and  available  from  Dilwyn  Jones 
Computing  at  the  very  modest  cost  of 
£12.00    and  worth  every  penny. 

The  program  will  keep  track  of  all  your 
disks  and  cartridges  by  setting  up  a 
database  of  the  contents  of  your  media. 
You  don't  have  to  type  very  much  as  the 
DISK  INDEXER  reads  the  contents  of  your 
disk  or  cartridge  direct  into  the 
database . 

You  can  then  use  DISK  INDEXER  to  search 
for  a  title  anywhere  in  the  files. 

The  first  thing  to  be  done  is  to  put  your 
disks  in  order  and  give  each  one  a 
number,  and  writing  that  number  on  the 
disk  itself.       Load  up  DISK  INDEXER  and 
follow  the  simple  instructions.     Yes  it 
does  take  time  to  do  all  this,  but  the 
hardest,  part  is  getting  your  disks  in 
order,  and  swapping  them  in  the  disk 
drive.  The  reading  is  doen  so  quickly  you 
are  kept  busy. 

This  program  requires  at  least  256K  extra 
memory,  but  as  most  of  us  now  have  that, 
it  is  really  no  hardship. 

Can  handle  up  to  999  disks  with  up  to  480 
files  to  each  disk  -  now  how  many  files 
is  that?     Of  course  if  you  run  out  of 
space  then  you  can  start  up  another  file 
under  a  different  title.     Have  you  got 
that  many  disk/files?     How  do  you  keep 
track  of  that  number  without  an  indexer 
to  help  you? 

It  is  time  you  had  this  little  beauty,  I 
have  foound  it  of  real  value  in  tracing 
down  exactly  where  a  certain  file  is. 


I  would  not  be  without  it.     Now  here  is 
what  Dilwyn  Jones  has  to  say  about  it  in 
his  catalogue . 

DISK  INDEXER 


A  really  easy  to  use  aid  to  indexing  your 
floppy  disks  and  cartridges.  Sets  up  a 
database  of  the  contents  of  your  media 
(reads  the  contents  directly  from  the 
disk  or  cartridge,  you  don't  have  to  type 
it  all  in)  and  can  handle  thousands  of 
filenames  on  up  to  999  media  (subject  to 
amount  of  free  memory) .  You  can  then 
search,  sort  (filename  or  disk  number 
order)  and  print  the  contents  of  the 
media.  Can't  remember  which  disk  that 
file  is  on?  Search  for  it  using  Disk 
Index  -  if  you  know  the  filename,  do  an 
"exact"  search,  if  you  don't  do  a  "vague" 
search.  Easy  to  update  the  database  if 
the  contents  of  a  disk  is  changed.  Works 
with  numbered  disks  -  you  simply  write 
the  number  of  the  disk  on  the  label  and 
enter  it  when  asked  by  the  program  as  it 
reads  the  directory  automatically.  Can 
give  you  lists  of  disk  contents,  lists  of 
unused  numbers  and  so  on.  This  program 
will  really  help  you  to  get  your  disks 
organised!  Super  Disk  Index  needs  at 
least  256k  extra  memory  on  a  QL.  NB  can 
only  handle  up  to  about  480  files  per 
disk,  so  the  current  version  may  not  be 
adequate  for  cataloguing  ED  disks  if  you 
pack  them  with  larger  numbers  of  files! 
Ideal  for  cataloguing  lower  density  disks 
and  microdrives.  Ideal  companion  program 
is  our  Disk  Labeller  program,  described 
elsewhere  in  this  catalogue. 
DISK  INDEXER  (on  disk  or  mdv)   ...  £12.00 

Dilwyn  Jones  Computing.  41  Bro  Emrys , 
Tal-y-bont.  Bangor.  Gynedd.  UK.  LL57  3YT 

Yep,   that's  Wales,  and  he  takes  plastic. 


SINC-LINK 


7 


Gilliam  Y.  Parrish 

Route  1,  Box  705 
Beggs,  OK.  74421 
USA. 


April  5,  1993 


Mr.  George  F.  Chambers,  Secretary 
Toronto  Timex  Sinclair  Users'  Group 
14  Richome  Court 
Scarborough,  Ontario    M1K  2Y1 
Canada 


I  mentioned  last  time  that  I  had  made  an  offer  for  a  3  00 


baud  modem/serial  interface  from  Byte-Back's  "Make  David  an  Offer" 
sale,  but  hadn't  heard  anything.  Well,  the  package  came  in  the 
mail  the  other  day,  and  believe  me,  it  was  worth  the  wait.  I  had 
asked  David  Leech  in  my  order  if  I  could  get  copies  of  both  2068 
and  1000  terminal  programs  (assuming  he  normally  provided  such 
software  with  the  modem),  since  I  had  both  2068  and  1000  (1500) 
units.  Mr.  Leech  did  indeed  send  both  2068  and  1000  tapes,  not 
only  for  terminal  operations  but  also  for  utilizing  other  serial 
devices  like  a  printer  with  the  serial  interface.  He  replied  in 
the  letter  accompanying  the  order  that  the  modem  was  intended  for 
use  with  either  a  2068  or  a  1000  unit,  but  not  both,  and  had  to  be 
hardware  configured  for  the  appropriate  model.  However,  since  I 
apparently  wanted  to  use  it  with  both  kinds  of  units,  he  had  added 
a  switch  for  me  so  I  could  change  back  and  forth!  I  had  also 
mentioned  in  my  order  that,  when  I  had  gotten  a  parallel  printer 
cable  from  him  a  few  months  earlier,  I  had  not  known  to  request 
1000-specif ic  software  to  accompany  it,  and  as  a  result  he  had  sent 
only  the  software  to  have  the  cable  work  with  my  2068.  In  his 
package,  Mr.  Leech  tossed  in  the  1000  parallel  cable  software  and 
the  instruction  sheet!  This  is  clearly  service  well  beyond  the 
call  of  duty;  the  T/S  world  is  going  to  be  losing  not  only  a  vendor 
but  a  true  T/S  enthusiast  when  the  Mr.  Leech's  closeout  is 
completed.  For  people  who  want  to  get  some  of  the  remaining 
goodies,  his  address  has  changed  very  recently;  it  is  now:  53  6 
Long  Terrace,  Leesville,  SC.  29070  (USA) .  I'd  strongly  urge  anyone 
with  a  need  for  a  peripheral/ interface  to  get  an  order  in  now! 


Re:     Timex/ Sinclair  Computers 


Dear  George, 


Sincerely, 


Gil  Parrish 


SINC-LINK 


ZX8 

ANALOGUE  "to 


1  RESOURCES 
DIGITAL  CONVERTER 

Rent  Bruneau    Hay  1992 


s  analogue  to  digital  converter  is  a  simple  design  based 
..  the  ADC0804.  It  will  convert  voltages  up  to  5v  into  a 
fori  that  your  computer  can  translate  and  display  for  you. 
In  the  present  configuration,  a  LH335  is  used  to  convert 
temperatures  froi  0  to  100  *C  to  a  voltage  that  the  ADC  can 
sample. 

CONSTRUCTION: 

Loading  the  components  on  the  PCB  is  straightforward.  Hake 
sure  that  CI  and  C2  are  installed  correctly  and  note  that 
pin  1  of  U3  faces  pin  1  of  Ul  and  U2.  An  address  block  (P2) 
allows  you  to  tap  the  board  to  port  191  or  127.  The 
temperaiure  probe  is  assembled  using  the  LH335  mounted  in  a 
Bic  pen  tube.  Seal  the  ends  with  epoxy  or  silicon  sealer  to 
protect  the  connections  to  the  LH335. 

CALIBRATION: 

To  calibrate  the  ADC,  you  will  need  a  thermometer,  a  glass 
of  ice  and  water,  and  a  glass  of  freshly  boiled  water. 

Tor  a  2068,  use  the  following  procedure: 

Enter  the  following  program: 

10  OUT  191,0 
20  PRINT  AT  0,0:  '  ' 
30  PRINT  AT  0,0;  IN  191 
40  GOTO  10 

On  running  the  program,  place  the  LH335  in  the  ice 
water  and  after  a  couple  of  minutes,  adjust  RV1 
until  you  read  0  on  the  screen.  This  is  your 
minimum  temperature  setting.  Now,  place  the  probe 
in  the  hot  water  alonq  with  the  thermometer  and 
wait  for  the  readings  to  stabilize.  Adjust  RV2  to 
match  the  reading  on  the  thermometer.  Recheck  the 
probe  readings  in  the  ice  water  and  repeat  the 
calibration  until  you  are  satisfied. 

For  the  ZX81,  you  have  to  install  a  small  machine  code 
routine  to  provide  the  IN  and  OUT  commands.  Use  the  same 
procedure  as  above  to  calibrate  the  ADC. 


Load  the  following: 

1  REM  12345678901234567890 

10  FOR  X  =  16514  TO  16524 

20  INPUT  A 

30  POKE  X,  A 

40  PRINT  X}'     PEEK  X 

50  NEXT  X 

At  the  prompt  enter  these  values: 

62,  0,  211,  191,  201,  219,  191,  79,  6,  0,  201 

Replace  lines  10  -  50  with  the  following: 

10  RAND  USR  16514 
20  PRINT  AT  0,0;  1  ' 
30  PRINT  AT  0,0;  USR  16519 
40  GOTO  10 

Once  the  ADC  is  calibrated,  you  can  embelish  the  program, 
adding  all  the  bells  and  whistles  you  want. 


COMPONENT  LIST 


74LS30 

Ul 

74LS27 

U2 

ADC0804 

U3 

LH335 

U4 

10UF 

CI 

10UF 

C2 

100N 

C3 

100N 

C4 

100K 

Rl 

680 

R2 

820K 

R3 

100K 

RV1 

100K 

RV2 

SIL-02 

PI 

SIL-04x2 

P2 

DIL-14 
DIL-14 
DIL-20 

Transistor  package 
Electrolytic 
Electrolytic 
Polyester 
Polyester 
1/4  watt  Resistor 
1/4  watt  Resistor 
1/4  watt  Resistor 
Trimpot  -  20  turn 
Trimpot  -  20  turn 

Connector  for  LH355 
Address  block 


Hisc.     ZX81  edge  connector,   coax  or  twisted  wire, 
wire,  BIC  pen  casing 


jumper 


SINC-LINK 


ANALOG  TO  DIGITAL  CONVERTER 


r 


u 


ru 

n 

n 

9 

G 

a 

D 

D 

R3   C 


llllllllll 'V* 

■4  _  Ct  U  (*t*-*-*i 


»91 

re 

117 


L 


ii  iiiiitiiiniiiiiiiii 


ii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii 


J 


or  TUB£ 


COMPONENT  LAYOUT 


10 


SINC-LINK 


continued  from  last  issue 


Dec 

tiex 

Ins tr-Dec 

Remarks     ( 5 ) 

1469 

05BD 

T  f\      f  Oil  >  VI 

temp4 

1472 

05C0 

PAT  T      1  C1C 

CALL.   1  0  J  0 

1475 

05C3 

JR  1567 

.  1  /  "7 7 

il4  /  / 

05C5 

CP  67 

C  code 

1479 

05C7 

JP  NZ,  2299 

ERR  inval  file 

1  too 

14B<£ 

05CA 

LD  HL,  (23645); 

ch  add 

1 AB3 

05CD 

LD  A,  (HL) 

1480 

05CE 

CP  170 

screens 

1488 

05D0 

JR  NZ,  1498 

1490 

05D2 

LD  DE,  16384 

scrn  address 

1493 

05D5 

LD  HL.  6912 

1496 

05D8 

JR  1548 

l  Ays 

05DA 

RST  32 

next  char 

1  ADO 

lAyy 

05DB 

LK  HL,  (23645); 

chadd 

1502 

05DE 

LD  A,  (HL) 

1  crtl 

1  jUj 

0  5DF 

CP  58 

1505 

05E1 

JR  Z,  1541 

1507 

05E3 

CP  13 

ijuy 

05E5 

JR  Z,  1541 

TCI! 

05E7 

CALL  1026 

evalu 

1514 

05EA 

LD  (8243),  BC 

temp4 

1518 

05EE 

LD  HL,  (23645); 

chadd 

1521 

05F1 

LD  A,  (HL) 

1522 

05F2 

CP  44 

1524 

05F4 

JR  NZ,  1536 

1526 

05F6 

RST  32 

next  char 

1527 

05F7 

CALL  1026 

evalu 

1530 

05  FA 

LD  (8241),  BC 

temp  2 

1534 

05FE 

JR  1555 

1536 

0600 

LD  HL,  (8326) 

; 

totlen 

1539 

0603 

JR  1552 

1541 

0605 

LD  DE,  (8316) 

despin 

1545 

0609 

LD  HL,  (8326) 

totlen 

1548 

060C 

LD  (8243),  DE 

temp  4 

1552 

0610 

LD   (8241),  HL 

temp  2 

1555 

0613 

LD  HL,  (8241) 

temp  2 

1558 

0616 

LD  A,  H 

1559 

0617 

OR  L 

1560 

0618 

JR  Z,  1596 

1562 

061A 

CALL  1635 

1565 

061D 

JR  1596 

1567 

061F 

LD  HL,  (8324) 

var  offset 

1570 

0622 

LD  DE,  (23635); 

prog 

1574 

0626 

ADD  HL,  DE 

1575 

0627 

LD  (23627),  HL; 

vars 

1578 

062A 

LD  HL,  (8321) 

linenu 

1581 

062D 

INC  HL 

1582 

062E 

LD  A,  (8322) 

linenu  (hi) 

1585 

0631 

CP  255 

1587 

0633 

JR  Z,  1606 

1589 

0635 

XOR  A 

icon 

i  jyu 

n  c  7  c 
UO  JO 

LD  (23618),  HL; 

newppc 

1593 

0639 

LD  (23620),  A 

nsppc 

1596 

063C 

CALL  1013 

endoln 

1599 

063F 

LD  HL,  23623 

subppc 

1602 

0642 

INC  (HL) 

1603 

0643 

JP  65 

gtout 

1606 

0646 

RST  8  ERR  0 

1608 

0648 

LD  HL,  (8236) 

start 

loll 

AC  [n 

Uo  Ad 

INC  HL 

1612 

064C 

LD   (8236),  HL 

start 

1615 

064F 

LD  A,  249 

1617 

0651 

CP  (HL) 

1618 

0652 

RET  Z 

1619 

0653 

LD  A,  (HL) 

1620 

0654 

LD  (8249),  A 

1623 

0657 

CALL  3807 

nextrk 

1626 

065A 

LD  A,  (8249) 

1629 

065D 

LD  HL,  8221 

curtrk 

1632 

0660 

CP  (HL) 

1633 

0661 

JR  NZ,  1623 

1635 

0663 

CALL  1084 

ldbuf 

1638 

0666 

LD  A,  (8224) 

errnu 

1641 

0669 

CP  25 

1643 

066B 

JP  Z,  2320 

1646 

uoofc. 

LD  HL,  (8318) 

; 

lenth 

1649 

0671 

LD  DE,  5090 

1652 

0674 

OR  A 

1653 

UO  /  3 

SBC  HL,  DE 

1655 

n  A77 

JR  NC,  1677 

i  a  *;  7 

0679 

LD  HL,  (8318) 

lenth 

1660 

067C 

LD  DE,  (8241) 

temp  2 

1664 

0680 

OR  A 

1665 

0681 

SBC  HL,  DE 

Dec 

iOO  / 

UOOJ 

1  AAQ 
IOO? 

n  AS'i 
UOOJ 

1  A77 

10  /  i 

uooo 

1  A7^ 

neon 
UOOD 

10// 

neon 
uoou 

1  DOU 

U07U 

1  Afi  1 
IOO  J 

U07J 

1  AQA 
loot 

(1AQA 
UO  7  A 

looo 

n  AQA 

uoyo 

1089 

uoyo 

i  cat 

ioy  i 

nenn 

uoyo 

1  AOT. 

ioy  j 

U  O  7U 

1  AQA 

1070 

06  AO 

1  /  uu 

n  A  A  A 
UOA*» 

1  7ftO 

i  i\a 

n  AAA 

1  703 

uoAy 

1  /Uo 

UOAV-i 

i  ff\Q 
1  7  Uy 

ha  An 

171ft 
1  /  1U 

n  A  AR 

1  71  1 
1  /  1 J 

n  Am 

1  7  1  k 
1  /  1  A 

I1AR7 

1  71  e 
1/13 

nini 
UODJ 

1  7  1  A 
1  /  ID 

n  ARA 
UODl 

17  7  7 
1  /  1  / 

UODJ 

t  77/1 
1  1  i\J 

n  c  no 
UODO 

1  /  .£  A 

n  abp 

1  71Q 
1  /  iO 

nsrn 

1  7*>n 

1  /  JU 

n  Af  7 

17  7  1 
1  /  J  1 

UDLJ 

17  7  7 
Ll  Si 

n  APA 

1  71C 
1/33 

n  AP7 

UOo/ 

1  7  7  Q 

1  /  Jo 

n  fsC  a 

U  OoA 

1  7  7  O 

l  /  jy 

ntpn 
UOOD 

1  71(1 

l  /  4  u 

r*i  AfP 

1743 

ft£PP 

UOur 

1746 

UOU£ 

1  7  A  Q 

l  /  Ay 

U0U3 

1  7C1 
1/31 

n  An7 
uou  / 

1  7C1 
1  /  JJ 

n  Ana 
uouy 

1  7ce 
1  /  3D 

n  fiiir 

UOUW 

1  7 

1/30 

u  out 

1761 

Uotl 

7  7  £  7 
1  /  0  J 

UOtJ 

1  7Ct 

1/00 

fl  AW  A 
UOE.O 

1  no 
1  /  OO 

UOC3 

1  77f1 

1  /  /u 

n  AF  A 

UOJqA 

17  7  7 

1  /  /  J 

n  Asn 

UOBU 

1775 

n  Ave 
uotsr 

1  77(1 

1  /  /B 

n  AF7 

uor  i 

1  701 

1  /ol 

n  ait  •» 
uor  d 

1  7fl  A 

1  /BA 

UOr  o 

1  7Q7 
1  /  8  / 

n  apr 

U  Of  D 

1  7UQ 

i  /oy 

n  AFT! 

uor  u 

1  7Q7 

i  /y* 

n  7nn 
u  /  uu 

1  7QA 

i  /  yA 

U  /  U  £ 

1  7Q7 

i  /  y  / 

n7n,> 

U/UJ 

i  ann 
1HUU 

u  /  uo 

1  fi(17 

(17nA 
U  /  UA 

iau  j 

U  /  UD 

1  ant 
1BU  A 

U  /  UL# 

1  B(1A 
1BUO 

U  /  UD 

iBuy 

U  /  11 

loiu 

n  7 1  7 

U  /  1  <£ 

1  Q  1  1 

loll 

n7i  ■? 

U  /  1 J 

1  Q  1  7 

IB  13 

nil  c 
U  /  1 3 

l  a  l  A 
IB  1 A 

n  7 1  a 
u  /  io 

1  Q  1  A 

IS  lo 

(171  fi 
U  /  1 0 

1Q1Q 

IB  iy 

fl7  1  R 
U  /  ID 

1  fi  70 

loiu 

n7i  c 

U  /  1  vt 

1  Q  7  1 

lozi 

ri7i  n 

U  /  IV 

1  fi  77 
10  i.  i 

(171  F 
U  /  IE* 

IB  £3 

U  /  i  1 

1  B  7  7 
18  i  1 

(1777 
U  /  tJ 

1  B  70 

is  *y 

(1771 
U  /  «£3 

1  O  7  7 
1  0  3  i 

H77H 

i  on 

IB  J  J 

f177Q 

1  01 A 
IB  JO 

077P 
U  / 

1  B  7  7 
IB  J  / 

1BAU 

U  /  J  u 

1  B  k  7 
IB  A  J 

U  /  J  J 

1  BAA 

0736 

1849 

0739 

1852 

073C 

1853 

073D 

Instr-Dec 


Remarks 


JR  NC,  1677 
LD  HL,  (8318) 
LD  (8241),  HL 
JR  1702 
LD  HL,  (8241) 
LD  DE,  5090 
OR  A 

SBC  HL,  DE 
JR  C,  1702 
LD  (8241) ,  HL 
LD  A,  10 
LD  BC,  5090 
LD  (8318),  BC 
JR  1709 
LD  HL,  (8241) 
LD   (8318),  HL 
XOR  A 
LD  C,  A 
LD  HL,  (8318) 
LD  A,  H 
OR  L 
RET  Z 
LD  A,  C 
LD  HL,  8328 
LD  DE,  (8243) 
LD  BC,  (8318) 
LDIR 
AND  A 
RET  Z 

LD  HL,  (8243) 
LD  BC,  5090 
OR  A 

ADD  HL,  BC 
LD   (8243),  HL 
JP  1608 
CALL  1063 
CP  244 
JR  Z,  1758 
LD  DE,  5968 
JR  1778 
LD  DE,  6632 
JR  1778 
CALL  1063 
CP  244 
JR  Z,  1775 
LD  DE,  4795 
JR  1778 
LD  DE,  5717 
JP  19 

LD  (8240),  A 
LD  HL,  0 
LD  B,  100 
CALL  1804 
LD  B,  10 
CALL  1804 
LD  A,  (8240) 
ADD  A,  48 
RST  16 
RET 

LD  C,  47 

LD  A,   (8240)  ; 

INC  C 

SUB  B 

JR  NC,  1809 
ADD  A,  B 
SRL  (HL) 
LD   (8240),  A 
LD  A,  C 
RST  16 
RET 

LD  A,  (8194) 
CP  1 

JR  NZ,  1832 
LD  SP,  23550 
PUSH  HL 
CALL  1013 
XOR  A 
CALL  3268 
LD  HL,  (23651) 
LD  (23653),  HL 
LD  HL,  (23698) 
LD  (23656),  HL 
POP  HL 
CALL  1922 


;  lenth 
;  temp 2 

;   temp 2 


;  temp 2 


;  lenth 

;  temp 2 
;  lenth 


;  lenth 


;  terap4 
;  lenth 


temp  4 
temp  4 

1st  byte  inchanls 
spec 

del  rec  (2068) 
del  rec  (spectrum) 
1st  byte  inchanls 
spec 

insert  (2068) 
make  room  (spect) 
tempi 
d 

;  tempi 


tempi 


;  tempi 


;  nmi  flag 


;  endoln 

;  lprint 
;  stkbot 
;  stkend 
;  membot 
mem 

;  print  to 


SINC-LINK 


nane      Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


Remarks     ( 6 ) 


name      Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


Remarks 


1856 
1859 
1861 
1864 
1867 
1870 
1873 
1874 
1877 
1880 
1883 
1886 
1889 
1891 
1894 
1896 
1900 
1901 
1904 
1907 
1910 
1912 
1914 
_1915 
1918 
1919 


PRINTT01922 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1928 
1929 
1930 

 1931 

1933 
1951 
1959 
1974 
1993 
2013 

Vserch  2031 
2034 
2036 
2037 
2039 
2042 
2043 
2044 
2045 
2047 
2049 
2051 
2053 
2055 
2057 
2059 
2061 
2063 
2065 
2067 
2069 
2071 
2074 

 2075 

2077 
2080 

 2081 

2083 
2084 
2086 
2088 
2091 

 2092 

 2094 

2096 
2098 

 2101 

2102 
2103 
2104 
2105 
2106 

 2107 

ERASE  2108 
2111 
2113 
2114 
2117 


0740 
0743 
0745 
0748 
074B 
074E 
0751 
0752 
0755 
0758 
075B 
075E 
0761 
0763 
0766 
0768 
076C 
076D 
0770 
0773 
0776 
0778 
077A 
077B 
077E 
077F 
0782 
0784 
0785 
0786 
0788 
0789 
078A 
078B 
"S 


LD  HL,  23611     ;  flags 
RES  5,  (HL)       ;  key  hit 
LD  HL,  0 

LD  (IY+38),  H  ;  x  ptr  (hi) 
LD  (IY+55),  H  ;  flagx 
LD  (23563),  HL;  defad 
INC  HL 

LD  (23574),  HL;  strms+6 
LD  HL,  4927 
LD  DE,  5808 
CALL  1046 
LD  HL,  23665 
(HL) 
23612 
(HL) 


RES  5, 
LD  HL, 
SET  5, 

LD  SP,  (23613) 
POP  HL 
LD  HL,  3865 
LD  DE,  4937 
CALL  1063 
CP  244 
JR  Z,  1918 
PUSH  HL 
JP  65 
PUSH  DE 
JP  65 
LD  A,  13 
RST  16 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  46  ; 
RET  Z 
RST  16 
INC  HL 
JR  1925 
Protect  Error" 
"CRC  EE" 
"U     Disk  Full" 

File  Not  Found" 
Wrong  File  Type" 
Cat  Data  Error" 
LD  HL,  (23627); 
LD  A,  128 
CP  (HL) 
JR  Z,  2096 
LD  A,  (8247) 
CP  (HL) 
RET  Z 
LD  A,  (HL) 
AND  224 
CP  224 
JR  Z,  2071 
CP  192 
JR  Z,  2077 
CP  160 
JR  Z,  2083 
CP  128 
JR  Z,  2077 
CP  96 

JR  Z,  2088 
CP  64 

JR  Z,  2094 


roms 
flagx 

line  of  prog 
tvflag 
clhs 
errsp 


GTfil 


2068 

spectrum 

1st  byte  inchnls 

spectrum 

gtout 

gtout 


"T 
"V 
"X 
07EF 
07F2 
07F4 
07F5 
07F7 
07FA 
07FB 
07FC 
07FD 
07FF 
0801 
0803 
0805 
0807 
0809 
080B 
080D 
080F 
0811 
0813 
0815 
0817 
081A 
081B 
081D 
0820 
0821 
0823 
0824 
0826 
0828 
082B 
082C 
082E 
0830 
0832 
0835 
0836 
0837 
0838 
0839 
083A 
083B 
083C 
083F 
0841 
0842 
0845 


<pointer  @  2494 
<pointer  @ 
<pointer  g  2424 
<pointer  §  2127 
<pointer  (§  2301 
<pointer  §  2320 
vars 


LD  DE,  19 
ADD  HL,  DE 
JP  2034 
CALL  2102 
INC  HL 
JR  2034 
INC  HL 
BIT  7,  (HL) 
JR  Z,  2083 
LD  DE,  6 
ADD  HL,  DE 
JP  2034 
JR  2077 
LD  A,  128 
LD  (8248),  i 
RET 

INC  HL 

LD  DE,  (HL) 

INC  HL 

LD  D,  (HL) 

ADD  HL,  DE 

RET 

CALL  2158 
LD  A,  32 
LD  (DE),  A 
CALL  2444 
CALL  2307 


cmdck 


;  gtfil 


;  wprot 
;  indir 


2120     0846    LD  A,  (8224) 
2123     084B    CP  10 
2125     084D    JR  NZ,  2133 
2127     084F    LD  HL,  1974 
2130     0852    JP  1822 
"2133     0855     LD  HL,(8241) 

2136  0858     PUSH  HL 

2137  0859    CALL  2711 

2140  085C    POP  HL 

2141  085D     INC  HL 

2142  085E    LD  (HL),  254 
2144     0860     LD  HL,  (8245) 

2147  0863     INC  HL 

2148  0864     LD  (HL),  249 
2150     0866     CALL  3651 
2153     0869    JP  1596 

~2156     086C    LD  HL,  8226 
2159     086F     LD  A,  32 
2161     0871     LD  B,  10 

2163  0873     LD  (HL) ,  A 

2164  0874     INC  HL 

2165  0875     DJNZ  2163 

2167  0877     RST  32 

2168  0878     LD  HL,  7151 
2171     087B     LD  DE,  7308 
2174     087E     CALL  1046 
2177     0881     LD  HL,  (23653) 

2180  0884     DEC  HL 

2181  0885     LD  B,  (HL) 

2182  0886     DEC  HL 

2183  0887     LD  C,  (HL) 

2184  0888     DEC  HL 

2185  0889     LD  D,  (HL) 

2186  088A    DEC  HL 

2187  088B     LD  E,  (HL) 

2188  088C     DEC  HL 

2189  088D     LD  (23653),  HL; 

2192  0890     EX  DE,  HL 

2193  0891     LD  DE,   8226  ; 

2196  0894     PUSH  BC 

2197  0895     LD  A,  B 

2198  0896     OR  C 

2199  0897     JR  Z,  2203 
2201     0899  LDIR 

2203  089B    POP  BC 

2204  089C  LD  A,  34  ; 
2206     089E     LD  (DE),  A 

_2207     089F  RET 

2208  08A0  CALL  2156  ; 
2211  08A3  LD  HL,  8226  ; 
2214     08A6     LD  B,  7 

2216  08A8     LD  A,  (HL) 

2217  08A9     CP  94 
2219     08AB     JR  Z,  2299 
2221     08AD     CP  46 
2223     08AF     JR  Z,  2230 

2225  08B1     INC  HL 

2226  08B2     DJNZ  2216 
_0228     08B4     JR  2299 

2230  0886     INC  HL 

2231  0887     LD  A,  (HL) 

2232  08B8     PUSH  HL 

2233  08B9     LD  B,  A 

2234  08BA  LD  HL,  (23645); 
2237  08BD  CP  65  ; 
2239     08BF     JR  NZ,  2248 

2241  08C1     LD  A,  (HL) 

2242  08C2  CP  228  5 
2244     08C4     JR  NZ,  2301 

 2246     08C6    JR  2280 

2248  08C8  CP  67  i 
2250     08CA    JR  NZ,  2263 

2252  08CC     LD  A,  (HL) 

2253  08CD     CP  175  ; 
2255     08CF     JR  Z,  2280 
2257     08D1     CP  170 

2259     08D3     JR  Z,  2280 

 2261     08D5    JR  2301 

2263     08D7     CP  66 

2265     08D9     JR  NZ,  2299 

2267  08DB     LD  A,  (HL) 

2268  08DC     CP  202 
2270     08DE    JR  Z,  2280 
2272     08E0     CP  58 
2274     08E2     JR  Z,  2280 
2276     08E4     CP  13 

2278     08E6    JR  NZ,  2301 
2280     08C8     POP  HL 


errnu 

"T  File  Not  Found" 
doserr 
temp  2 

zerO 


temp6 

savebf 
prognm 


next  char 

2068  ! 

spec      >  temio 

roms 

s  tkend 


stkend 
prognm 


gtfil 
prognm 


chadd 


data 


code 
screens 

B 

line 


SINC-LINK 


indir 


Fatal 


movdr 


nevet 


Dec 

Hex 

Instr-Dec 

2281 

08E9 

INC  HL 

2282 

08EA 

LD  A,  (HL) 

2283 

08EB 

CP  94 

228S 

08ED 

JR  Z,  2299 

2287 

08EF 

LD   ( 23681 ) ,  A 

2290 

08F2 

INC  HL 

2291 

08F3 

LD  A,  34 

2293 

08F5 

CP  (HL) 

2294 

08F6 

JR  NZ  ,  2299 

2296 

08F8 

LD  (HL),  32 

2298 

08FA 

RET 

2299 

08FB 

RST  8  ERR  15 

2301 

08FD 

LD  HL,  1993 

2304 

0900 

JP  1822 

2307 

0903 

CALL  1212 

2310 

0906 

CALL  1084 

2313 

0909 

LD  A,  (8224) 

2315 

090C 

CP  25 

2318 

090B 

JR  NZ,  2326 

2320 

Q91Q 

LD  HL,  2013 

2323 

0913 

JP  1822 

2326 

0916 

LD  A,  (8195) 

2329 

0919 

CP  128 

2331 

091B 

JR  Z,  2343 

2333 

091D 

LD  A,  (8326) 

2336 

0920 

RRA 

2337 

0921 

RRA 

2338 

0922 

AND  3 

2340 

0924 

LD   (8202),  A 

2343 

0927 

LD  HL,  8328 

2346 

092A 

INC  HL 

2347 

092B 

LD  A,  255 

2349 

092D 

CP  (HL) 

2350 

092K 

JR  Z,  2359 

2352 

0930 

LD  A,  250 

2354 

0932 

CP   ( HL ) 

2355 

0933 

JR  Z,  2386 

2357 

0935 

JR  2346 

2359 

0937 

LD   ( 8241 ) ,  HL 

2362 

093A 

INC  HL 

2363 

093B 

LD  DE,  8226 

2366 

093E 

LD  B,  9 

2368 

0940 

LD  A,  254 

2370 

0942 

CP  (HL) 

2371 

0943 

JR  Z,  2346 

2373 

0945 

LD  A,  (DE) 

2374 

0946 

CP  (HL) 

2375 

0947 

JR  NZ,  2346 

2377 

0949 

INC  DE 

2378 

094A 

INC  HL 

2379 

094B 

DEC  B 

2380 

0940 

JR  NZ,  2373 

2382 

094E 

LD   (8245),  HL 

2385 

0951 

RET 

2386 

0952 

LD  A,  10 

2388 

0954 

LD   (8224),  A 

2392 

0957 

RET 

2393 

0958 

LD  HL ,  (8241) 

2395 

095B 

LD  DE,  8250 

2398 

095E 

LD  BC,  34 

2401 

0961 

LDIR 

2402 

0963 

RET 

2404 

0984 

XOR  A 

2405 

0965 

LD   (8224),  A 

2408 

0968 

LD  HL,  8328 

2411 

0968 

INC  HL 

2412 

096C 

LD  A,  254 

2414 

0965 

CP  (HL) 

2415 

096F 

JR  Z,  2430 

2417 

0971 

LD  A,  250 

2419 

0973 

CP  (HL) 

2420 

0974 

JR  Z,  2424 

2422 

0976 

JR  2411 

2424 

0978 

LD  HL,  1959 

2427 

097B 

JP  1822 

2430 

097E 

LD  DE,  8226 

2433 

0991 

LD  B,  9 

2435 

0983 

LD  A,  (DE) 

2436 

0934 

LD  (HL),  A 

2437 

0985 

INC  HL 

2438 

0986 

INC  DE 

2439 

0987 

DJNZ  2435 

2441 

0989 

JP  2326 

Remarks     ( 7 ) 


WPROt 


invalid  file  name 

"V  Wrong  File  Type 

doserr 

drvO 

ldbuf 

errnu 


"X  Cat  Data  Error" 

doserr   

dvsel 


;  totlen 


;  aspd 


SAVE 
Ssubr 


;   temp 2 
;  prognm 


;   temp 6 


;  errnu 

;  temp 2 

;  directory 


;  errnu 


SMEM 


"U  Disk  Full" 

doserr 

prognm 


Dec 

Hex 

9  AAA 

098C 

9  AA7 

098F 

2449 

0991 

9AST 

JL  H  J  L 

0993 

0995 

9  A  5  S 

0997 

0999 

9  A  CO 

099A 

9A  <in 

099C 

9  Afi? 

£.  *4  V  *. 

099E 

9  Afi«> 

09A1 

9  Afifi 

09A2 

9Afi7 

09  A3 

9  AfiQ 

09A5 

9A7n 

09A6 

9A79 

09A8 

9A71 

09A9 

9A7S 

09AB 

9A77 

09AD 

24  78 

09AE 

9  Ann 

09C0 

9A  R1 

09B1 

9ARA 

09B4 

9  Aflfi 

4400 

09B6 

9  AR7 

09B7 

2489 

09B9 

9AQ1 

Z     7  ± 

09BB 

9  AQ  1 

09BD 

9AQA 

09BB 

2497 

09C1 

9  cnfi 

09C4 

09C7 

9  *.nfi 

09C7 

9  inQ 

09CD 

£.  J  J.  fa 

09D0 

It!  A 

09D2 

09D5 

7C7fl 

fa  3  fa  U 

09D8 

09DB 

9 «;  9fi 

nqnR 

95.9R 

09B0 

9  5.9Q 

09E1 

9  9 
t  J  0  fa 

09E4 

7C11 
4  J  J  J 

09E5 

9«;  ^ 

U7D  / 

? «;  ifi 

&  J  Jv 

09E8 

09EA 

4JJ" 

09EB 

9  s.An 

09EC 

9  ^  A  9 

09EE 

9  ^  A  A 

09F0 

09F2 

09F5 

09F8 

9 «;  5.  t 

£  3  3  J 

09F9 

09FB 

9  ■»  5,7 
ADD  / 

09FD 

09FF 

9  Sfi9 

0A02 

0A03 

9  ■ififi 
£•7  WW 

0A06 

9  570 

0A0A 

9  5,7  1 

fa  J  /  1 

0A0B 

9  5. 7A 

0A0E 

7C7S 

0A12 

95R1 

0A15 

95RA 
(Jul 

0A18 

9  5.R7 

0A18 

9  SQD 

4J7U 

0A1E 

95.  ci"? 

0A21 

9  SQft 

fa  J  7U 

0A24 

9  5QR 

0A26 

9fifl1 

0A29 

2604 

0A2C 

9finfi 

0A2E 

£.  QUO 

0A3O 

9fi1  1 

0A33 

2612 

0A34 

2615 

0A37 

9fi1  s 

0A3A 

9fi71 

0A3D 

2623 

0A3F 

2626 

0A42 

2627 

0A43 

Instr-Dec  Remarks 

LD  A,  (8195)     ;  dvsel 

CP  128 

JR  NZ,  2481 

LD  A,  71 

OUT  7,  A 

IN  A,  244 

LD  C,  A 

LD  A,  240 

OUT  244,  A 

LD  HL,  32770 

LD  (HL) ,  A 

LD  B,  (HL) 

LD  (HL),  0 

LD  A,  C 

OUT  244,  A 

XOR  A 

OUT  7,  A 

LD  A,  240 

CP  B 

JR  NZ,  2494 
RET 

CALL  1212  ;  drvO 

IN  A,  16 

RRA 

JR  C,  2481 
IN  A,  16 
BIT  6,  A 
RET  Z 

LD  HL,  1933 
JP  1822 
CALL  2208 
CALL  2444 
CALL  2307 
LD  A,  (8224) 
CP  10 

CALL  Z,  2404 
CALL  2711 
CALL  3651 
LD  A,  (8194) 
CP  11 
RET  Z 

LD  HL,  8226 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  46 
CP  (HL) 
JR  NZ,  2532 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  65 

JR  Z,  2598 
CP  66 

JP  Z,  2792 
LD  HL,  (23645) 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  170 
JR  Z,  2584 
CP  175 
JP  NZ,  2299 
RST  32 
CALL  1026 
LD  (8243),  BC 
RST  32 
CALL  1026 
LD  (8241),  BC 
CALL  2842 
JP  2958 
LD  HL,  16384 
LD  (8243),  HL  ; 
LD  HL  6912 
LD  (8241),  HL  ; 
JR  2578 
CALL  2623 
LD  A,  (8248) 
BIT  7,  A 
JR  NZ,  2621 
LD  HL,   (8241)  ; 
INC  HL 

LD  (8241),  HL  ; 
CALL  2842 
JP  2958 

RST  8  ERR  2  ; 
LD  HL,  (23645); 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  288  ; 


"S  Protect  Error 
doserr 
cmdck 
wprot 
indir 
errnu 

nevet 
zerO 
savebf 
nmi  flag 


prognm 


save  an  array 
B 

save  basic  program 
chadd 

screens 
save  a  screen 
code 

err  15  invalid  f  n 
next  char 
evalu 
temp  4 
next  char 
evalu 
temp  2 


temp  4 
temp  2 


temp  2 
temp  2 

variable  not  found 
chadd 

data 


SINC-LINK 


13 


name      Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


zero 


2629 

2632 

2633 

2636 

2637 

2638 

2639 

2641 

2643 

2646 

2648 

2651 

2654 

2655 

2657 

2659 

2662 

2665 

2667 

2670 

2671 

2674 

2677 

2678 

2680 

2682 

2685 

2688 

2691 

2694 

2696 

2697 

2700 

2701 

2702 

2703 

2704 

2705 

2706 

_2710 
2711 
2714 
2717 
2720 
2721 
2723 
2726 
2727 
2729 
2730 
2732 
2733 
2735 
2736 
2738 
2741 
2742 
2744 
2747 
2748 
2749 
2752 

_2754 
2756 
2759 
2760 
2762 
2763 
2765 
2766 
2767 
2768 
2770 
2773 
2774 
2775 
2777 
2779 
2781 
2783 
2784 
2785 
2786 
2788 
2790 

_2791 
2792 
2795 
2796 


0A45 

0A48 

0A49 

0A4C 

0A4D 

0A4B 

0A4F 

0A51 

0A53 

0A56 

0A58 

0A5B 

0A5E 

0A5F 

0A61 

0A63 

0A66 

0A69 

0A6B 

0A6E 

0A6F 

0A72 

0A75 

0A76 

0A78 

0A7A 

0A7D 

0A80 

0A83 

0A86 

0A86 

0A89 

0A8C 

0A8D 

0A8E 

0A8F 

0A90 

0A91 

0A92 

0A96 

0A97 

0A9A 

0A9D 

0AA1 

0AA1 

0AA3 

0AA6 

0AA7 

0AA9 

OAAA 

OAAC 

OAAO 

OAAF 

OABO 

0AB2 

0AB5 

0AB6 

0AB8 

OABB 

OABC 

OABD 

OACO 

0AC3 

0AC4 

0AC7 

0AC8 

OACA 

OACB 

OACD 

OACE 

OACF 

OADO 

0AD2 

0AD5 

0AD6 

0AD7 

0AD9 

OADB 

OAOD 

OADF 

OAEO 

0AE1 

0AE2 

0AE4 

0AE6 

0AK7 

0AE8 

OAEB 

OAEC 


JP  NZ,  2299 
RST  32 

LD  HL,  (23645) 
LD  A,  (HL) 
INC  HL 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  36 

2667 
(23681) 


Remarks     ( 8 )  name 

;  err  invalid  file  naae 
;  next  cha 
;  chadd 


Dec      Hex  Instr-Dec 


Remarks 


;  $ 


JR  Z, 
LD  A, 
CP  36 

JP  Z,  2301 
LD  HL,  (23645) 
LD  A,  (HL) 
SET  7,  A 
AND  159 
LD  (8247),  A 
LD  (23662),  A 
JR  2688 
LD  HL,  23681 
CP  (HL) 
JP  NZ,  230 1 
LD  HL,  (23645) 
LD  A,  (HL) 
OR  192 
RES  5,  A 
LD  (8247),  A 
LD  (23662),  A; 
CALL  2031  ; 
LD  A,  (8248) 
BIT  7,  A 
RET  NZ 

LD  (8243),  HL  ; 

INC  HL 

LD  E,  (HL) 

INC  HL 

LD  D,  (HL) 

INC  DE 

INC  DE 

LD  (8241),  DE  ; 
RET 

CALL  2392  ; 

LD  HL,    (8241)  ; 

LD  BC,  11 

ADD  HL,  BC 

LD  (HL),  249 

LD  HL,  8250 

INC  HL 

LD  A,  253 

CP  (HL) 

JR  NZ,  2726 

INC  HL 

LD  A,  249 

CP  (HL) 

JR  Z,  2756 

LD  (8241),  HL 

LD  C,  (HL) 

LD  B,  0 

LD  HL,  8328 

ADD  HL,  BC 

LD  (HL),  C 

LD  HL,  (8241) 

LD  (HL),  0 

JR  2732 

LD  HL,  8250 

INC  HL 

LD  A,  253 

CP  (HL) 

JR  NZ,  2759 

INC  HL 

PUSH  HL 

POP  DE 

LD  B,  21 

LD  HL,  8328 

INC  HL 

LD  A,  (HL) 

CP  255 

JR  Z,  2788 

CP  245 

JR  Z,  2773 

LD  A,  (HL) 

LD  (DE),  A 

INC  DE 

DJNZ  2773 

LD  A,  249 

LD   (DE),  A 

RET 

LD  HL,  (23645) 
LD  A,  (HL) 
CP  202 


;  $ 

;  chadd 

;  oldppc 

;  chadd 


oldppc 
vserch 


temp  4 


temp  2 

movdr 
temp  2 


directory 


temp2 

temp  2 
directory 


;  chadd 
;  line 


2798 
2800 
2801 
2804 
2805 
2809 
2811 
2814 
2817 
2821 
2824 
2825 
2826 
2828 
2831 
2832 
2835 
2838 
2841 
2842 
2843 
2846 
2849 
2852 
2853 
2854 
2856 
_2857 
2860 
2863 
2866 
2867 
2869 
2871 
2874 
2877 
2880 
2882 
2885 
2888 
2891 
2892 
2895 
2898 
2901 
2904 
2907 
2908 
2910 
_2913 
2914 
2917 
2918 
2919 
2921 
2922 
_2925 
2928 
2931 
2934 
2938 
2940 
2943 
2946 
2949 
2952 
2954 
_2957 
2958 
2961 
2962 
2965 
2968 
2970 
2971 
2974 
2975 
2978 
2981 
2984 
2987 
2990 
2993 
2994 
2996 
2998 
3001 
3004 
3007 


OAEE 
OAFO 
0AF1 
0AF4 
0AF5 
0AF9 
OAFB 
OAFE 
0B01 
0b05 
OB08 
0B09 
OBOA 
OBOC 
OBOF 
0B10 
0B13 
0B16 
0B19 
0B1A 
0B1B 
0B1E 
0B21 
0B24 
0B25 
0B26 
0B28 
0B29 
0B2C 
0B2F 
0B32 
0B33 
0B35 
0E37 
0B3A 
0B3D 
0B40 
0B42 
0B45 
0B48 
0B4B 
0B4C 
0B4F 
0B52 
0B55 
0B58 
0B5B 
0B5C 
0B5E 
0B61 
0B62 
0B65 
0B66 
0B67 
0B69 
0B6A 
0B6D 
0B70 
0B73 
0B76 
0B7A 
0B7C 
0B7F 
0B82 
0B85 
0B88 
0B8A 
0B8D 
0B8E 
0B91 
0B92 
0B95 
0B98 
0B9A 
0B9B 
0B9E 
0B9F 
0BA2 
0BA5 
0BA8 
OBAB 
OBAE 
0BB1 
0BB2 
0BB4 
0BE6 
0BB9 
OBBC 
OBBF 


JRNZ,  2811 
RST  32  ; 
CALL  1026  ; 
DEC  BC 

LD  (23662),  HL; 
JP  2817 

LD  HL,  (23621); 
LD  (23662),  HL; 
LD  DE,  (23635); 
LD  HL,  (23641); 
PUSH  DE 
OR  A 

SBC  HL,  DE 
LD  (8241),  HL  ; 
POP  HL 

LD  (8243),  HL  ; 
CALL  2842 
JP  2958 
RET 
XOR  A 

LD  (8247),  A 
LD  HL,    (8241)  ; 
LD  (8196),  HL 
LD  A,  H 
OR  L 

JR  NZ,  2860 
POP  BC 
JP  1596 
LD  DE,  5090 
LD  HL,   (8241)  ; 
OR  A 

SBC  HL,  DE 
JR  C,  2914 
LD  HL,    (8243)  ; 
8328 
5090 


LD  DE, 
LD  BC, 
LDIR 
LD  HL, 


(8243) 


LD  (8236),  HL 
LD  DE,  5090 
ADD  HL,  DE 
LD  (8243),  HL 
LD  HL,  5090 
LD  (8238),  HL 
LD  DE,  5090 
LD  HL,  (8241) 
OR  A 

SBC  HL,  DE 
LD  (8241),  HL 
RET 

LD  HL,  (8241) 
LD  A,  H 
OR  L 

JR  NZ,  2928 
POP  HL  • 
LD  HL,  (8245) 
JP  3114 
LD  HL,  (8243) 


LD  DE, 
LD  BC, 
LDIR 
LD  HL, 


A 
HL 


8328 
(8241) 

(8243) 
LD  (8236),  HL 
LD  HL,  (8241) 
LD  (8238),  HL 
LD  A,  100 
LD  (8247),  A 
RET 

LD  HL,  8261 
LD  A,  (HL) 
LD  (8249), 
LD  (8245), 
LD  A,  249 
CP  (HL) 
JP  Z,  2924 
LD  A,  (HL) 
LD  (8221),  A 
CALL  3571 
CALL  1135 
CALL  3651 
CALL  1084 
LD  A,  (8234) 
AND  A 
JR  Z,  3064 
LD  A,  3 
LD  (8223),  A 
CALL  1121 
CALL  3571 
LD  BC,  (8238) 


next  char 
evalu 

oldppc 

ppc 

oldppc 

prog 

eline 


temp  2 
temp4 


temp  2 


temp2 


temp  4 


temp4 
start 


temp  4 

temp2 

temp  2 
temp  2 


temp6 
temp4 

temp  2 

temp  4 
start 
temp  2 


directory 
temp  6 


curtrk 

trac 

encdbf 

savebf 

ldbuf 

errnu 


attempts  counter 

clrbf 

trac 


14 


SINC-LINK 


TS  2068  PROGRAMMING  TIP 
by  George  Chambers 

The  system  variables  stored  at  addresses  23552  to  23755  are  used  by 
the  computer  to  keep  track  of  it's  operat  ion.   Look  in  the  TS2068  User 
Manual,    "Appendix  D,  System  Variables"  for  a  list  and  short  description. 
These  stored  variables  offer  quite  a  few  programming  poss i b i 1  it ies.  This 
article  will  describe  an  application  for  two  of  them. 

The  var  iables  being  d  i  scussed  are  labelled  SPOSN,  and  are  located  at 
addresses  23688  and  23689.    Together  these  two  variables  store  the 
current  PRINT  position;   that  is,   where  the  next  character  on  the  screen 
will  be  printed.   The  first  address  contains  the  column  number,   while^  the 
second  address  contains  the  line  number.  Well,   not  the  screen  positions 
as  we  understand  them.   We  would  get  the  screen  positions  by  subtract ing 
the  PEEKed  value  in  address  23688  from  2U-  ( for  column  number),   and  in 
address  23689  from  32  (for   line  number). 

In  my  programming  I  did  a  Larken  CATalogue,    followed  by  a  flashing 
message   'Press  a  key  for  menu'.    I  wished  to  remove  the  message  without 
clearing  the  rest  of  the  screen. 

I  could,   of  course,    have  simply  had  the  program   'PRINT  AT  x,y;"  ^ 

"i  to  wipe  out  the  flashing  message.  But   in  this  application 
the  message  could  appear  on  most  any  line;  depending  on  the  size  of  the 
CATalogue  display.    I  made  use  of  the  variables  mentioned  above. 

Figure  1.    is  a  listing  of  a  short  program  to  demonstrate  the 
possibilities.   Let's  discuss  this  listing: 

LINE  5:  We  are  ass  ign  ing  a  random  number  to  each  of     var  i  ables  a  and 
b.    The  numbers  produced  by  the  RND  function  will  be  a  value  always  less 
than  1. 

LINE  10.    The  variables  a  and  b  are  being  used  to  print  "george"  at 
random  locations  on  the  screen.   The   'a*22'  selects  a  random  screen  line 
from  0  to  22.    The   'b*26'  similarly  selects  a  screen  column.   (We  have 
used   'b*26',   rather  than   lb*32',   so  that  the  "george"  will  be  printed  on 
one  line,    i.e.    it  won't  be  wrapped  around  onto  the  second  line.    If  this 
happened   it  would  require  more  complex  programming  to  remove  the 
flashing   'george',   and  tend  to  obscure  the  model. 

Note  also  the  sem /-co  1  on  at  the  end  of   'george'.   Without  this 
semi-colon  the  print  pos i t i on  stored  in  the  variable  would  be  .at  the 
start  of  the  next   line,   and  the   'covered'   would  always  appear  at  the 
beginning  of  the  next   line.    Try  it  and  see. 

LINE  15  Pauses  for  a  moment  so  you  can  see  the   'george'    is  present. 

LINE  20  Overlays  the  flashing   'george'  with  the   'covered'  message. 
Because  of  the  way  the  system  stores  the  informat  ion  we  have  to  subtract 
the  PEEKed  values  from  the  screen  size  values  of  2U-  and  32. 

Note  the   '-6'    in  the   line.    This   is  because  what  we  have   in  the  system 
variable   is  the  present  PRINT  pos  it  ion.  But  we  want  to  start  our 
overlaid  word  'covered '  six  pos  it  ions  back,   to  the  start  of  'george ' . 
LINE  30  Self  explanatory . 

5  LET  a=RND :    LET  b=RND 

10  PRINT  AT   INT  (a*22),INT  ( b*26 ); "george" ; 
15  PAUSE  30 

To  Z'uSE  Yo:VsP:Eao2ToaV'"2-(PeEK  **">-*'™.r~. 


SINC-LINK 


15 


Especially     for  Junkies 

by  Hgk  lo»ie 


(  Hey  Ma!    Sone-one  has  been  talking  about  me  -  I  am  in  the  headlines!  ) 


Are  you  a  Junky? 

Now  don't  get  me  wrong,  there  are  all 
kinds  of  junkies  going  the  rounds . 

There  is  the  old  fellow  who  used  to  go 
round  the  neighborhood  pushing  his  little 
hand  cart  in  front  of  with  his  cry  of 
"Rags  -  Bottles  -  Bones"    Or  does  your 
memory  not  go  that  far  back?    That  guy 
was  called  a  Junky.    He  collected  junk. 
Some  times  he  would  be  called  a  Scrappy. 

Then  there  is  that  other  junkie,  the  one 
on  the  drug  scene,  but  we  are  not 
interested  in  that  so  we  will  let  that 
fly  stick  to  the  wall. 

Now  that  there  is  another  thing.     Do  you 
know  where  that  saying  came  from?  That 
was  another  oldie,  from  the  time  before 
all  those  fancy  bug  killers  in  a  bottle 
where  you  press  a  button  and  the  stuff 
comes  out  with  a  phssst.     It  comes  from 
the  time  when  we  used  the  old  fashioned 
fly-swat;  that  was  a  flat  piece  of 
something  no  matter  what  that  was 
attached  to  a  stick  about  a  foot  or 
fifteen  inches  long.    When  you  smacked  a 
fly  on  the  wall  with  that  -  splat!  -  the 
fly  stuck  there!     (the  fly  swat  was  also 
great  for  juvenile  discipline) 

So  you  just  let  it  stick  there.  After 
all,  can  you  think  of  a  better  way  to 
keep  score  of  the  'bag'  for  the  day,  than 
to  count  the  "splats"  on  the  wall? 

To-day  we  have  different  kinds  of 
junkies,  ourselves  for  example,  we  are 
Sinclair  junkies.    We  collect  Sinclair 
stuff  till  it  is  coming  out  our  ears, 
(watch  it  bub)  and  every  time  Old  papa 
Sine  comes  out  with  something  new  we  all 
rush  out  and  grab  it.     ('cept  the  byke) 

I  am  going  to  ask  you  to  have  a  look  at 
your  collection  of  program  you  have 
stored  away  in  all  those  shoe  boxes  and 
drawers.    Take  'em  out.    Now  I  don't  care 
whether  it  is  Cartridges  or  Tapes  or 
Disks;  treat  them  all  the  same.    And  this 
is  where  things  can  become  very 
interesting,  apart  from  puzzling. 


Clear  all  that  other  "junk"  off  that  &^e 
table,  and  divide  that  table  into  three 
equal  sections .    If  you  want  to  be  sure 
you  have  made  the  division  properly,  and 
want  to  keep  things  looking  neat  and  tidy 
and  not  looking  "junky",  then  draw  a 
pencil  mark  at  the  divisions.    And  label 
the  sections:-  Lots.  Sometimes.  Never. 

Now  comes  the  interesting  part. 

We  take  all  them  programs  and  place  them 
according  to  your  'labels'.  Those 
programs  you  use  a  lot.    Those  programs 
you  use  sometimes.  Those  programs  you 
never  use. 

How  are  you  doing?    Are  the  piles  of 
programs  increasing  evenly?    Don't  get 
dis-heartened,  keep  at  it,  you  are 
learning.    One  thing  you  are  learning  is 
that  there  is  a  whole  stack  of  stuff  you 
NEVER  use  -  and  just  take  a  look  at  that 
pile-  WOW! 

Now  look  at  the  pile  marked  "LOTS" 
Not  too  many  what?    Half  a  dozen?  a  few 
more  perhaps?    Are  there  more  than  dozen. 
Probably  not. 

The  middle  pile  is  a  funny  one;  some  of 
the  stuff  in  that  pile  could  be  in  the 
OFTEN  pile,  but  a  lot  of  it  could  also  be 
in  the  NEVER  pile. 

NOW  -  Who  is  the  "junky"?      You  are. 

I  am.    We  all  is!     That's  right,  did  you 

ever  think  you  could  be  called  a  "Program 

Junky"? 

Why  do  we  spend  so  much  time  and  $$$$$ 
gathering  all  that  stuff  (junk)?  and 
never  use  it. 

Puzzle:-  —  What  to  do  with  that  junk  — 

I  have  the  cure  for  you,  and  if  you 
follow  my  suggestion  you  will  no  longer 
be  a  "program  junky"  and    you  will  get 
rid  of  all  that  "junk"  gathering  dust 
where-ever  it  is  stored. 

Send  it  to  me. 

Bye  !  930126 


SINC-LINK 


Gilliam  Y.  Parrish 

Route  1,  Box  705 
Beggs,  OK.  74421 
UJSA. 


May  10,  1993 

Mr.  George  F.  Chambers,  Secretary 
Toronto  Timex  Sinclair  Users'  Group 
14  Richome  Court 
Scarborough,  Ontario    M1K  2Y1 
Canada 

Re:     Timex/ Sinclair  Computers 
Dear  George, 

I  think  I  found  a  solution  to  my  (possible)  problem  of 
having  too  small  a  power  supply  for  that  ZX  Printer.  The  manual 
says  the  printer  needs  9V,  1.2  amps;  unfortunately,  even  the 
"large"  TS/ZX  standard  power  supply  is  just  1  amp.  My  discovery 
came  in  a  second  hand  shop,  in  the  form  of  the  Mattel  Aquarius  home 
computer.  You  may  never  have  heard  of  them;  they  were  discontinued 
almost  as  soon  as  they  hit  store  shelves  ("One  of  the  shortest 
lifespans  of  any  computer,"  according  to  COMPUTE i  magazine).  They 
were  a  low-end  model,  with  4K,  "chicklet"  keyboard,  sparse  BASIC, 
designed  for  cassette  storage,  etc.  They  utilized  a  one-key  entry 
of  BASIC  commands  (actually,  CONTROL  +  the  needed  key)  just  like 
the  TS/ZX,  but  they  also  allowed  typing  in  the  commands  letter  by 
letter,  a  feature  I  appreciate.  One  unusual  aspect  of  the  model 
was  the  printer  port;  the  computer  was  designed  for  yet  another 
incarnation  of  the  simple  and  cheap  Alphacom  narrow-paper  thermal 
printer  (like  the  T/S  2  040) ,  but  the  connector  is  a  single  mini- 
phono  jack.  How  can  a  printer  get  all  the  signals  it  needs  through 
a  single  line??  Anyway,  the  computer  had  a  cartridge  port  designed 
to  accept  a  couple  of  expansion  boxes  Mattel  had  waiting  in  the 
wings  (to  add  joysticks,  extra  RAM,  improved  sound  capability,  and 
on  the  deluxe  expander,  disk  drives) ,  and  for  that  reason  Mattel 
may  have  given  the  model  a  larger  power  supply  than  it  really 
needed.  The  power  supply,  which  does  not  disattach  (and  hence 
can't  get  away  from  the  unit  in  garage  sales)  states  that  it 
produces  8.8VDC,  1.2  amps  (as  well  as  minor  amounts  of  other 
obscure  voltages,  being  .15  amps  of  16VDC,  and  .01  amps  of  -19VDC)  . 
A  quick  meter  check  reveals  that  amperage  from  the  Aquarius  unit  is 
indeed  significantly  higher  (and  even  voltage  is  a  tad  HIGHER,  not 
lower)  compared  to  a  standard  9V,  1  amp  supply.  So,  it's  an  easy 
solution  to  lack  of  a  1.2  amp  power  supply  to  get  an  Aquarius,  cut 
off  the  power  supply  and  cord,  and  install  the  right  connector  for 
TS/ZX  use;  the  proper  wires  to  solder  to  the  needed  mini-phono  plug 
are  clearly  indicated  on  the  unit  (red  to  center,  black  to  the 
outside) .     It's  also  a  cheap  solution:  since  these  computers  were 


SINC-LINK 


never  popular,  they  might  be  $2-$3  if  you  happen  to  run  across  one, 
and  since  nobody  is  actually  using  these  things,  you  can  likely 
spot  one  up  for  grabs  if  you  know  to  look  for  them.  I  picked  up 
two;  I'm  keeping  an  Aquarius  intact  for  no  particularly  good 
reason,  and  I've  almost  completed  surgery  on  the  other. 

On  a  different  topic,  remember  the  "Hobbit"?  That  was 
the  Spectrum  clone  being  produced  in  the  former  Soviet  Union,  that 
was  supposed  to  be  "available  for  export"  someday.  Well,  the  day 
has  apparently  come.  I  noticed  in  the  April,  1993  edition  of 
Update!  that  the  Hobbit  is  now  available  in  the  UK  through  ADB 
Russian  Services,  17  Stortford  Rd. ,  Great  Dunmow,  Essex  CMS  IDA, 
Great  Britain.  (I  assume  they  must  have  touched  all  the  legal 
bases  with  AMSTRAD  before  they  could  sell  it  there.)  It  is 
supposed  to  be  fully  48K  Spectrum  compatible,  but  it  has  64K  RAM, 
64K  ROM,  a  QWERTY  keyboard  but  with  both  Roman  and  Cyrillic 
characters  on  it,  built-in  CP/M  and  FORTH  as  well  as  BASIC,  and  the 
capability  to  handle  either  5  1/4"  or  3  1/2"  drives  as  well  as  a 
cassette.  (I  doubt  the  extra  RAM  will  get  much  workout;  as  I 
reported  last  year  following  my  trip  to  the  UK,  the  vast  majority 
of  Spectrum  software  remains  48K  compatible  despite  the  sale  of 
many  Spectrum  units  with  128K  by  AMSTRAD  over  the  years.)  The 
Hobbit  is  £79.00  and  the  optional  5  1/4"  drive  is  £59.00;  that 
translates  to  something  like  US  $123.25  (CN  $156.50)  for  the 
computer  and  US  $92.00  (CN  $117.00)  for  the  drive.  The  good  old 
T/S  2068,  which  can  be  picked  up  used  for  far  less  money  and  then 
equipped  with  a  Spectrum  ROM,  remains  a  much  lower  cost  alternative 
for  North  Americans  who  wish  to  try  Spectrum  computing —  and  isn't 
it  nice  to  have  a  computer  that's  so  much  in  demand  that  it's  still 
in  production  in  1993,  rather  than  one  that  was  discontinued  in 

1984? 

By  the  way,  we  had  discussed  whether  I  wanted  to  make  my 
new  term  of  membership  retroactive  to  when  my  last  term  ended  in 
'92,  or  to  make  it  effective  for  the  coming  year.  I  asked  to  have 
it  started  as  of  "now"  (around  the  beginning  of  April)  and  not 
retroactively,  so  I  would  be  paid  up  for  the  coming  12  months.  And 
I  think  that's  what  you  understood  me  to  say,  since  you  (correctly) 
did  not  send  past  newsletters.  However,  whoever  filled  out  my 
membership  card  (your  Treasurer?  I  can't  make  out  the  name) ,  which 
you  forwarded  to  me  last  time,  apparently  did  not  understand  since 
the  card  lists  my  term  as  5/92  to  5/93  instead  of  4/93  to  4/94. 
Please  don't  let  my  membership  expire  on  me  again! ! 


Sincerely, 
Gil  Parrish 


SINC-LINK 


FREENET  PLUGS  OTTAWA  IN 


Starting  today,   anyone  with  a  computer  and  modem 
can  connect  with  a  network  of  databases  -  free 
by  Dominique  Lacasse  -  Citizen  business  writer 

Turn  on,   boot  up,   and  dial  out.    "Community  comput ing"  is  here. 

As  of  today,   Ottawa  becomes  one  of  only  about  a  dozen  cities  anywhere 
in  the  world  to  have  a  non-prof  it ,   community  comput  i  ng  network.  A  phone 
call  to  a  single  Ottawa  number  will  plug  anyone  with  a  computer  and  a 
modem  into  a  network  of  data-bases  and  in  format  ion  prov  iders  from  around 
the  region,   across  the  U.S.,   and  ult  imately,   the  world.  Virtually 
unlimited  two-way  information  -  free. 

The  National  Capital  FreeNet  was  to  make   it's  public  debut  today  with 
a  ceremony  at  regional   government  headquarters  this  morning. 

it  may  not  be  an  "e lectron ic  highway",   but  Ottawa's  FreeNet   is  a 
crucial  fork  in  the  road  to  the  E lectron  ic  Village,   an  interact ive  public 
library  for  the  computer  generation. 

Ottawa's  network  is  modelled  on  successful   experiments  in  community 
computing  in  the  U.S.    It  was  spearheaded  by  a  group  of  parleton  University 
professors  and  the  school's  director  of  computing  and  information  services 
and   is  run  entirely  by  volunteers. 

After  more  than  a  year  of  planning,    fundra  is  ing,   and  scroung ing, 
Ottawa's  FreeNet   is  now  a  reality,    with  a  powerful   host  computer  and  20 
telephone  lines  to  handle  the  expected  rush.     There  are  an  estimated 
100,000  PCs  in  households   in  the  greater  Ottawa  region,   and  likely  just  as 
many   in  bus i ness  and  government  offices. 

The  network  has  already  been  running  experimentally  at  Carleton  for 
several  months  and  has  met  with  wide  acceptance.   Ottawa's  FreeNet  has 
about   1,000  registered  users  now  and  about   100  new  applications  are 
received  every  day,   accord  ing  to  David  Sut her  land,  National  Capital 
FreeNet  chairman  and  director  of  comput  ing  services  at  Car  let  on. 

"This  thing  has  gained  critical  mass",   says  Sutherland,   who  only 
recently  decided  to  double  the  number  of  phone  lines  in  time  for  today's 
launch  as  donations  and   inquiries  poured  in.    "It's  had  an  overwhelmingly 
positive  public  response." 

Sutherland  says  he  expects  registrations  to  mushroom  following  today's 
invitation  to  the  public  to  join  the  network. 

He  says  he  expects  the  FreeNet  will  have  at   least  10,000  registered 
users  by  the  end  of  it's  first  year.    In  C leve land,   Ohio,   where  the  first 
FreeNet  was  launched   in  the  mid-80' s,   there  are  more  than  35,000 
registered  FreeNet  users  and  tens  of  thousands  more  who  occas  ional ly  use 
the  system  as  "guests " . 

"We  keep  hearing  we're   in  the  information  age",   says  Sutherland.  "These 
(networks)  are  the  windows  that  will  allow  it  to  come   into  peoples 
i  ives.  " 

Ottawa's  FreeNet,    which  runs  on  equ  i  pment  donated  by  Sun  M i crosyst ems 
and  Nepean-based  Gandalf  Data,   already  has  a  mix  of  databases,  from 
regional  government  agendas  and  tender  documents  and  community  group 
bul let  ins,   to  exotic   items  such  as  news  reports  from  Radio  Free  Europe  and 
an  "artificial    intelligence"  program  on  epilepsy  from  the  Federal 
Commun icat ions  Research  Centre. 

And  only  recently,    the  (Ottawa)  Citizen  joined  a  growing  number  of 
information  prov  iders  exper iment ing  with  the  system.    The  Citizen's  FreeNet 
offerings  include  brief  guides  to  local  sports,   entertainment  and 
community  events,   as  well  as  capsule  reviews  of  movies,   restaurants,  and 
w ines. 

The  Ottawa  Public  Library's  catalogue  is  also  available  online  through 
the  FreeNet  and  the  library  has  installed  three  terminals  at   its  main 
branch  that  will  allow  people  without  computers  at  home  or  work  to  explore 
FreeNet.  D iscuss ions  are  also  underway     to  put  terminals  in  schools 
throughout   the  region. 


SINC-LINK 


Ottawa's  FreeNet  also  provides  a  gateway  to  other  FreeNets,  i  nc lud  i  ng 
C I  eve  land ' s  and  a  new  one   in  V  ictor  ia,   the  only  other  one   in  Canada. 

Using  Internet,   a  network  that  links  researchers  around  the  world, 
FreeNet  users  can  visit  distant  computer  systems  without   incurr  ing  long 
distance  charges. 

Being  free  has  it's  price,   however.     Because  the  network  only  has  20 
telephone  lines,   users  may  find  logging  onto  the  system  frustrating,  even 
impossible,   at  peak  times.   Sutherland  says  new  lines  will  be  added  if 
demand  warrants  and  sufficient  funds  can  be  found. 

Some  government  funding  has  been  received  and  more  is  expected ,  says 
Sutherland.    The  goal   is  to  eventually  have  one  full-time  paid 
adm in i strator  to  manage  the  network,   as  several  U.S.  FreeNets  have  done. 

Sutherland  says  he  hopes  the  FreeNet  will   "make  the  community  work 
better"  by  promoting  the  free  exchange  of  information  and  ideas.  He  says 
he  hopes  the  network  will  make  the  use  of  information  technology  "part  of 
the  county's  culture,   someth  ing  people  are  comfortable  with  for  the  rest 
of  their  I  ives" . 


Logging  on  to  FreeNet 
You  need  a  computer  and  a  modem 
to  gain  access  to  FreeNet.  Use 
these  settings  to  connect: 
Phone  (613)  780  3733 
Modem  Sett ings: r 

-Baud  Rate:  2400,    1200,   or  300 

-Data  Bits:  8 

-Parity:  None 

-Stop  Bits:  1 

Important  notice:  Once 
connection  has  been  established, 
you  may  have  to  hit  the  Return 
or  Enter  key  up  to  FIVE  times. 

Log  on  as  "guest"  the  first 
time.    You  can  become  a 
registered  user  by  following  the 
instructions  available  on-line 
under  the  "Adm in ist rat  ion" 
menu. 


This  material   was  retyped  from  an  article   in  the  Ottawa  Citizen. 

One  of  our  members,   Jacques  Croteau,   writes,    "I   include  an  article  in 
the  Citizen  of  Ottawa,   about  FreeNet.    It  seems  wonderful,   but  I  know  only 
one  person  who  has  succeeded  in  logging  on... at  3  o'clock   in  the  morning, 
before  it  was  advert ised 1 1   It  seems  very  busy. 

He  also  penned  a  note  as  follows:   "New  network  in  Ottawa.   I  hope  you 
have  more  success  than  me   in  reaching  it.    I  have  called  about  50  times 
without  result . " 

"(613)  788  3947  -  This  number  was  given  on  radio  for  the  net  work . ... bu 
a  I  ways  busy. " 


SINC-LINK 


RS 2  3  2     I/O    Rev  is  i ted 

Rene  Bruneau 


A  couple  of  errors  crept  into  the 
schematic  for  the  RS232  article  found  in 
the  last  issue  of  Sine-Link.  The  revised 
circuit  diagram  is  shown  below.  I  also 
ran  into  difficulties  sourcing  the 
9 .8403  MHz  crystal  and  found  that  a 
4.920  MHz  crystal  would  work,  but  the 
PCB  had  to  be  revised  to  get  the  proper 
baud  rates  again. 


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SINC-LINK 


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RS-232  CIRCUIT  DIAGRAM 


SINC-LINK 


SUPER  DISK  LABELLER 


Now  this  little  thing  I  do  not  have,  but  I  include  it  here  just  in  case  someone 
wants  to  get  it  at  the  same  time  as  SUPER  DISK  INDEXER,  and  as  it  is  mentioned  in  my 
QLIPS  message  in  this  issue. 

SUPER      DISK  LABELLER 


Print  neat  labels  for  your  floppy  disks,  showing  the  filenames  present  on  the  disk 
in  columns,  in  small  text,  in  up  to  6  layout  styles.  You  can  edit  and  annotate  the 
text  of  the  label,  add  headings  and  notes  as  required.  The  layout  can  be  previewed 
to  the  screen  before  printing.  Filenames  can  be  sorted  into  order,  or  grouped 
(e.g. Quill  "_doc"  files  together)  for  a  neat,  professional  appearance.  The  printer 
driver  is  fully  reconf igurable  for  different  label  sizes  and  printer  control  codes. 
Drivers  are  supplied  for  9  pin  and  24  pin  dot  matrix  printers.  Suitable  for  use  with 
our  floppy  disk  labels  on  printer  feed  backing,  and  most  disk  label  sizes.  Can  print 
on  label  rolls  up  to  4  labels  wide.     One  of  our  best  selling  programs,  in  fact, 
everyone  should  have  one,  and  no  wonder!  "A  good,  well  thought  out  package, 
representing  excellent  value  for  money"  (QL  World  review,  October  1991).  Needs  at 
least  128k  extra  memory.  Supplied  with  printed  20  page  manual.  Disk  Labeller  is  an 
ideal  companion  program  for  our  Disk  Indexer  program  described  elsewhere  in  this 
catalogue,  so  that  you  can  both  catalogue  your  disks  and  tidily  label  them  too. 
Don't  forget  about  our  quantity  discounts  available  for  buying  more  than  one  program 
at  a  time! 

SUPER  DISK  LABELLER  (on  disk)    ...  £10.00 

Printer  roll  of  100  disk  labels  for  use  with  above  program  £2.50 

(no  extra  postage  to  pay  if  ordering  at  the  same  time  as  other  items,  or  add  £0.50 
postage  if  just  ordering  labels) 


SINCLAIR  CLAN  CREST 


SINC-LINK 


AN  AMERICAN  SPECTRUM 

(THE  TIM  EX  SINCLAIR  TS  2068) 


The  Spectrum  was  launched  here  in  Britain  back  in 
the  spring  of  1982.  It  was  a  massive  advance  over 
its'  forerunner  the  ZX81  and,  for  the  first  time  ever, 
allowed  affordable  home  computing. 

It  really  was  a  complete  breakthrough  Up  until  then  everyone 
thought  of  computers  as  big  mainframe  machines  with  gigantic 
reel  to  reel  storage,  only  for  use  in  government  departments  or 
large  bank  head  offices.  The  Spectrum,  smaller  than  a  hard 
backed  book  and  using  standard  music  cassettes  really  did 
bring  the  computer  age  home  to  a  new  generation. 

Of  course  success  is  nearly  always  imitated.  And  the  Timex 
Corporation,  who  brought  modern  digital  watches  to  the 
masses  with  an  affordable  price  tag  decided  the  the  time  was 
right  to  introduce  the  idea  of  a  small  home  computer  to  North 
America.  Out  of  this  desire  and  a  partnership  with  Sinclair  Re- 
search here  in  old  blighty  a  new  machine,  The  Timex  Sinclair 
TS  2068  was  born  -  well  almost. 

In  1983  the  TS  2068  was  launched  with  the  familiar  Z80A  CPU 
and  the  same  overall  operating  system  as  the  Spectrum  -  with 
equivalent  sound  and  processing  abilities  to  the  48K  version. 
Yet  there  were  differences  which  made  the  TS  8068  unique  to 
the  US  Market. 

ADD  -  ONS 

Because  of  the  pace  of  computer  develop 
ment  in  the  US  the  TS  2068  has  had  a 
very  wide  range  of  peripherals  and  add 
on  features  developed  for  it.  Parallels 
can  be  drawn  between  it  and  the 
Hobbit  •  Russia's  unofficial  Spectrum 
copy,  made  as  a  serious  business 
computer  to  compete  at  a  much 
lower  price  level  with  PCs  and 
4>     thus  equipped  with  facilities  to 
£&t**  ■ .     use  PC  disk  drives,  be 

^ '""*  .  .  linked  up  to  PCs  and  run 

complicated  Databases  and  other 
business  software. 

Although  the  TS  2068 
>.  ✓        .  was  primarily 

designed 


to  run  using  tape  loading  and  saving  like  our  very  own  Speccy, 
rather  than  developing  a  machine  with  increased  memory  cap- 
acity like  the  128K  machine  here,  American  and  Canadian 
boffins  simply  added  on  external  RAM  or  linked  it  up  to  PC  3.5 
or  5.25  disk  drives  allowing  masses  of  extra  memory. 

Our  contact  in  America,  Bob  Shade,  who  runs _a  top  photo- 
graphy outfit  in  Philadelphia  actually  uses  his  TS  2068s  to  oper- 
ate photographic  equipment  for  complicated  still  work,  among 
other  things.  Also,  because  of  the  problems  of  Spectrum  incom- 
patibility Bob  actually  runs  a  Spectrum  Emulator  on  his  TS  2068 
whenever  he  wants  to  run  Speccy  games  or  software.  He,  like 
many  other  North  American  users  have  brought  the  machine  far 
beyond  the  realms  of  the  simple  kid's  'home  computer'  which 
the  Speccy  is  primarily  viewed  as  here. 

Unfortunately  for  the  TS  2068  the  pace  of  PC  technology  far 
outstripped  it  and  as  these  machines  became  more  accessible 
to  the  home  market  as  the  standard  business/home  machine  (if 
you  use  one  in  the  office  why  not  use  it  at  home  too)  the  popu- 
larity of  the  Sinclair  went  out  the  window. 

However,  as  well  as  communicating  with  similar  machines  the 
TS  2068  can  also  reach  out  and  touch  several  other  computers 
like  the  PC  and  Macintosh  using  MACIink  and  PCIink.  This  is 
done  by  running  programs  on  the  host  machine  and  connecting 
it  up  to  the  TS,  in  a  similar  way  to  that  described  for 
linking  up  Hobbits. 


Although  the  TS  2068  has  now 
been  out  of  production  for  quite  a  few  years  there  is  still  a  reas- 
onably strong  user  group  in  both  the  US  and  more  predominantly 
in  Canada.  This  user  group  produces  most  of  the  new  software 
for  the  machine  and  includes  Bob  Shade  himself  who  has  de- 
veloped a  label  maker  program  to  make  his  life  easier  in 
the  photography  business.  A  Canadian  company 
a)   which  supports  the  TS  2068  with  communications 
/'   devices,  memory  upgrades  etc.  is  LARKEN  ELEC- 
/'    TRONICS  who  have  a  bewildering  array  or  peripherals 
/    for  the  machine. 

*  USER  GROUPS 

Addresses  to  contact  user  groups  for  fanzines  and 
information  are:  Toronto  Sinc-Linc,  Editor,  Timex-Sinclair 
Users  Club,  1 4  Richome  Court,  Scarborough,  Ontario, 
Canada  M1 K  2Y1 .  Also:  Update  Magazine  PO  Box  1095, 
Peru,  Indiana,  USA  46970.  They  deal  with  Z88  (QL)  and 
TS  2068.  Or:  Long  Island  Sinclair  Timex  Users  Group, 
C/O  Harvey  Rait.  5  Peri  Ln.,  Valley  Stream,  NY,  USA  1 1581 . 
And  finally  SLIX  -  Sinclair  Information  Exchange,  C/O  William 
W.  Miller,  6675  Clifford  Drive.  Cupertino,  CA  95014-4530  USA. 
Remember  the  Timex/Sinclair  is  not  directly  Spectrum  com- 
patible but  there  are  a  lot  of  similarities.  If  you  want  to  find  out 
more  why  not  write  to  one  of  the  user  groups.  If  you're  a  pro- 
grammer why  not  investigate  writing  something  for  them? 
Wow...  The  Speccy  goes  international) 


24 


SINC-LINK 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 
Hay   14,  1993 

14  Richome  Court. 
Scarborough,   Ont.    H1K  2Y1 

Lbs  Cottrei I 

108  River   Heights  Drive 

Cocoa,    Fl   32922 

Dear  Les? 

Th^vnS--  qou   for   the  $20  cash  for  membership  renewal  ,   And  also 
•[■•hank  uou   for   the  next   few  Pages  of   the  barken  LKDOS  disassembly.   We  are 
psiftino  a   f*w  paqes    in  each   issue  of   the  newsletter.    One  can  have  too 
much  of  a  good  thing!!    I   arn  still   holding  your  most  recent  contribution 
of  the  disassembly,    since  Jeff  has  eunough   to  go  on   for  now. 

Two  of   the  items  you  asked  for   have  been  taken,,    But   I   am  sending  the 

» I  !OUJ  to  Write  your  own  adventure  programs"   book,,    You  may  find  it 

.  int-wpAHna,.    'Rut   if  you.  are  really  serious  about   it,   maybe  you  should 
..,;,:,!,' me  for  "a  copy  of   the  Professional  1  Adventure  Writer,   a  program  put 
out   for  the  Spectrum,,    It  has  very  heavy  documentation    for   it  also,  maybe 
SO  pages. or  bo. 

Sincerel y  ? 


George  Chamber- 


2-5 


3 


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