Skip to main content

Full text of "Sinc Link"

See other formats


GONE 

FISHING 

'92 

page 

2 

Club  Stuff 

page 

3 

Editorial 

page 

4 

NESQLUG  visit 

paqe 

5- 

10 

Bob's  Notebook  (2068) 

page 

11 

-14 

SuperBASIC  Tutorial  2  (QL) 

page 

15 

ZX81  Resources  (ZX81) 

page 

16 

Reader  Writes  (2068) 

page 

17 

-18 

Text87  +4  v2  Review  (QL) 

page 

19- 

-20 

2068  Second  Screen  (2068) 

page 

21 

QL  Ramblings  (QL) 

page 

22 

Mike's  Notebook  (2068) 

page 

23 

-26 

ZX91  Newsletter  (ZX81) 

page 

27 

No.  of  Disks  with  TK2  (QL) 

page 

28 

QLips,  Question  &  Rumours 

TORONTO 


TIMEX- SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


i  m  .i*.'-MfiK':'  tfk 

r+*M  ..i.mii',— ;  ;<fa 

'.!tV''-_l(  v  r."_rV  ' 


JUL Y- AUG  '9£  VOL  10  #4 


SINC-L INK  IS  A  PUBLICATION  OF 
THE  TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS 
CLUB  AND  IS  ISSUED  6  TIMES  A 
YEAR.  COPIES  OF  THE  NEWSLETTER 
ARE  SI. 50  EACH  FOR  NON-MEMBERS. 
CLUB  MEMBERS  RECEIVE  FREE  COPIES 
AS  PART  OF  THE  S20.00  ANNUAL 
MEMBERSHIP  FEE.  A  NEWSLETTER 
SUBSCRIPTION  ONLY  IS  AVAILABLE 
FOR  S12.  00. 

NEWSLETTERS  ARE  EXCHANGED,  FREE 
OF         CHARGE,  WITH  OTHER 

TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  GROUPS. 

PLEASE  CREDIT  THIS  PUBLICATION 
AND  THE  AUTHOR  IF  YOU  COPY 
MATERIAL. 

THE    CLUB     MEETS     ON     THE  FIRST 
WEDNESDAY     OF    EACH     MONTH  AT 
FOREST        HILLS  COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTE,    710  EGLINTON  AVE.    W.  , 
TORONTO. 

SINC-L INK  IS  PRODUCED  ENTIRELY 
ON  SINCLAIR  AND  TIMEX-SINCLAIR 
COMPUTERS. 


t 

a 

i 

i 

l 

I 

i 

2 

l 

I 

3 

/ 

! 

F 

V 

1 

1            A.  ^ 

SEND  CORRESPONDANCE  TO: 

Attention:       SINC-L INK 
TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR 
CLUB,  14  RICHOME 

SCARBOROUGH,  ONTARIO, 
CANADA  M1K  2Y1 

EXECUTIVE  OFFICERS: 

PRESIDENT 
TREASURER 
SECRETARY 
ACTIVITIES : 
QL  CONTACT : 
NEWSLETTER: 
LIAISON  OFFICER: 
(  Qut.-or-'cown  members  ) 


EDITOR 
USERS 
COURT, 


TORONTO  TIttEX-ilNCLAIR 
USERS  CLUB 


(Area  Code  416) 
RENE  3RUNEAU   (   531-9749  ) 
BILL  LAWSON   (   444-8772  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS   (   751-7559  ) 
LOUIS  LAFERRIERE  (  820-3725  ) 
HUGH  HOWIE   (   634-4929  ) 
JEFF  TAYLOR   (   244-8583  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS.    14  RICHOME  COURT 
SCARBOROUGH.   ONTARIO.  M1K  2Y1 
(   416-751-7559  ) 

TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 

SINC-LINK 


EDITORIAL 


EDITING  OR  CENSORING? 

I've  been  asked  to  bite  my  literary  tongue.  I  had  intended  to  publish  a  rather 
biting  and  pointed  editorial  aimed  at  editors  of  newsletter  who  "edit"  or  change 
writers  articles  to  suit  their  tastes  or  particularly  to  promote  products  they 
sell.  Remember,  editors,  your  job  is  to  correct  raispelled  words  not  put  words 
in  other  writers  articles.  If  you  rewrite  a  piece  the  way  you  want  it,  then  it 
is  YOUR  article  not  the  original  authors',  so  don't  put  his  name  to  it  because 
that's  not  what  he  wrote. 

BYE  SMUG  BYTES 

Sorry  to  see  that  the  newsletter  of  SMUG  is  going  to  cease  publishing.  The 
Milwaukee  group  has  put  a  lot  of  good  stuff  out  over  the  years  and  Bill  Heberlein 
deserves  a  lot  of  credit  for  his  efforts.  Bill,  if  you  still  want  a  place  to 
print  your  views  or  info,  Sine-Link  will  be  happy  to  supply  a  platform  for  free. 

YO!  AMERICAN  READERS 

When  you  mail  stuff  to  George,  please,  please  fill  in  the  customs  declaration 
listing  your  package  as  a  gift  and/or  with  "no  commercial  value".  Otherwise 
George  must  pay  our  GOODS  &  SERVICES  TAX  on  whatever  value  you  assign  if  he  is 
to  retrieve  it  from  customs.  Recently  he  had  to  pay  over  $5.00  GST  to  get  a  box 
of  disks  that  had  been  mailed  to  him. 

NESQLUG  VISIT 

Saturday,  June  27th,  turned  out  to  be  a  perfect  day  for  a  barbegue  as  four 
members  of  NESQLUG  visited  with  TTSUC  members  at  Hugh  Howie's  house  in 
Burlington.  Joyce  Blaho,  Al  Boehm,  his  wife  Dorothy  and  their  friend  Gary  all 
made  their  way  from  the  Boston  area  for  an  informative  afternoon  meal  and  bull 
session.  Particularly  interesting  was  Al's  CST  Thor  QL  clone  with  its  built-in 
drives  and  memory  and  his  graphic  demonstration  of  a  program  called  "Molecules" 
not  to  mention  a  game  or  two  of  his  own  design. 

Thanks  to  Hugh  and  his  wife  for  the  hospitality.  See  photos  next  page. 

That's  all  for  now. . . 

J.T. 


PRINT  FACTORY©  graphics 
More  Pics  &  Lower  P rices If 

ifeS2i  ^sss*  &ks«a£ 

Mao/Boys  Funny         Famata  Faomw 

Womn/Oirk  Transportation  Mala  Fmemm 
Dtfttlaaa  MW         Sport*  Funny 


Holiday* 


Holidays 
s^dafaV    XVa^)  Food 

Xmu 

M4/-J  NEW  COLLECTIONS!]  u* 

fifljtecttanyji  CjajtaHgaas  rnag££p** 


Dit*t*»*«  Mian  WonWGMi 
MalaFi 
Snort* 
FtimJ*  Fa 
Holidays 
Omr  130  nWocatc  Won  -  1077  Moskial ! 
Only  #7.95  pod.  for  men  ooOawtaon. 
A-raUabla  on  tan*  or  5  1/4"  DSHD  LAJUOEN 
or  OLIGEH  cttafc  -  pi— —  •pnotfy. 

D       Saad  oaaak  or-  moaty  omW  toi  LsJ 
John  MeMfahaai  1710  Palmar  Or. 

WY  82070 


SINC-LINK 
PRINTS 
YOUR  ADS 
FOR  FREE! 
contact  us 


SINC-LINK 


3 


Fine  fixin's  in  the  Howie  backyard. 


4 


SINC-LINK 


SINC -LINK  CONTENTS 


1988 


S1NC-L1NK  CONTENTS 

Each  entry  is  prefixed  with  the  year  and  first  month  of  issue  (eg,  8501  =  Jan/Feb  1985,  9203  =  Mar/Apr  1992); 
and  with  the  volume  &  number  (eg.  3/1  =  volume  3  number  1)  .  These  are  usually  followed  by  the  (  first  ) 
page  number  of  the  entry. 

8801  6/1  p.3  Bob's  Notebook  Profile  2068  revisited.  SAVE  routine  saves  DATA  only.  Array  size  can  be 

changed.  Sort  without  holding  the  ENTER  key 

8801  6/1  p.4  SincBits  by  Ian  Robertson  Updates:  Spectrum:  2068:  QL 

8801  6/1  p.5  Coloured  printouts  with  Mscnpt  By  Jeff  Taylor.  Also  autoload  directory  program  by  Renato 
Zannese 

8801  6/1  p.7  ZX81  EPROM  board 

8801  6/1  p.8  Our  computers  in  Portugal  K5XY 

8801  6/1  p. 9  QL  tip  re  chassis  grounding 

8801  6/1  p. 9  Disk  driving  with  a  joystick  by  Renato  Zannese 

8801  6/1  p  9  QL  advice  from  David  Sullivan 

8801  6/1  p.  10  Bob's  Notebook  Machine  code  for  loading  and  saving  tracks.  By  Bob  Mitchell.  For  old  LDOS 
8801  6/1  p.1 1  Items  from  other  newsletters  2068  repairs  Running  ZX81  programs  on  IBM  PC  NVRAM  board 
by  Tom  Woods.  Pixel  Print  Press  by  Stan  Lemke 

8801  6/1  p.1 2  Repair  a  messed  up  disk  directory  OK  with  LKDOS  for  5090  bytes/track 
8803  6/2  p.3  Mterm  II  Modifications  by  George  Chambers.  Listing  and  details  of  POKEs 
8803  6/2  p.4  Repair:  A  Larken  Utility  Errata  to  listing  in  8801  6/1 

8803  6/2  p.5  Bob's  Notebook  Comparison  of  some  printer  interface  codes.  Also  more  PEEKing  and  POKEing 

about  (in  compiled  programs  using  Timachine) 

8803  6/2  p.6  Poking  around  by  Doug  Jeffery  Some  useful  POKES 

8803  6/2  p.7  Z88  review  translated  from  the  French  by  L  Chavarie 

8803  6/2  p. 9  Screen  copy  for  Gemini  1 0X  printer  by  Renato  Zannese 

8803  6/2  p.  10  Game  Hacks  by  Doug  Jeffery 

8803  6/2  p.10  Sinclair  Monitor  Battery  Source  WA6DU  using  Polaroid  600  cartridges 

8803  6/2  p.  1 1  Meetings,  news  and  notes  from  Ottawa  Hull  TSUG  2  pages 

8803  6/2  p. 13  Banners  in  Colour  by  Jeff  Taylor  Also  some  questions  to  be  answered  later 

8805  6/3  p.2  Ad  for  Larken  256K  Ramdisk.  Also  a  2068  Disk  Interface  standard  by  Bill  Ferrabee 

8805  6/3  p.3  QL  Wayfarer  by  Reg  Cottle.  Also  QL  tips  by  Joe  Jenkins 

8805  6/3  p.4  Re-inking  Printer  Ribbons  Details  and  drawing  by  George  Chambers 

8805  6/3  p.5  SincBits  by  Ian  Robertson  2068.  Spectrum,  QL 

8805  6/3  p.6  Cartooning  with  2068  by  Greg  Robins  Artworx  and  Byte  Power  used 

8805  6/3  p.7  Bob's  Notebook  Tasword  Patched  (Again?) 

8805  6/3  p.  10  Larken  Repair  B1  Program  Stephen  Gunhouse  suggests  some  changes  Also  a  Calendar 
program  idea  by  George  Chambers 

8805  6/3  p.  1 1  TS2068  Larken  Disk  Copy  Utility  (copy12.B1)  uses  Moved  from  Larken 
8805  6/3  p. 13  Disk  Droppings  by  Greg  Lloyd.  Review  of  Ramdisk  by  Larken 
8805  6/3  p.13  Larken  Erase  Utility  by  George  Chambers 

8805  6/3  p.1 4  Review  of  PC-DRAW  v  3.0by  Renato  Zannese.  Used  to  design  printed  circuit  boards 
8805  6/3  p.1 5  Letter  from  J  Vander  Stel  with  some  programming  tips 

8805  6/3  p.1 6  New  locations  for  m/c  routines  in  a  64K  Rampack  for  ZX81  Wiring  diagram  and  details 


Prepared  by  Bob  Mitchell  920307 
SINC-LINK 


SINC-LINK  CONTENTS 


8805  6/3  p.1 7  Larken  cased  by  Mel  Richardson  for  ZX81  Disk  Interface.  Also  ZX81  EPROM  board  continued 
from  8801  6/1.  diagrams  and  listings;  parts  list.  Rene  Bruneau 
8805  6/3  p.1 9  Answers  to  questions  in  8803  6/3 
8805  6/3  d.20  Fractal  plots  by  J.  McMichael 

8807  6/4  p.2  Formation  of  SNUG  Sinclair  Northamerica  User  Group  details  and  contacts 
8807  6/4  p.3  Bob's  Notebook  Disk  Management  Utilities  Rename;  Doctor:  Copydog:  Copy.  Listings  included 
for  some  of  the  above  which  are  for  the  original  version  of  LKDOS  with  1 960  bytes/track 
8807  6/4  p.7  Game  Hacks  by  Douglas  Jeffery  Also  Game  POKEs  by  Renato  Zannese 

8807  6/4  p.8  PC8300  ROM  Upgrade  by  Rene  Bruneau.  Also  Addendum  =  a  simple  EPROMER  and  diagram 
for  converting  Junder  Board  to  program  the  52B13  EEPROM 
8807  6/4  p.9  Larken  RAMDISK  for  TS2068  Experiences  of  George  Chambers 
8807  6/4  p.  10  Colour  Printouts  using  VIC1520  printer/plotter  John  McMichael 
8807  6/4  p.  1 3  An  ON/OFF  switch  for  the  QL  by  John  Riley 

8809  6/5  p.3  Bob's  Notebook  OPEN#  CLOSE*  Channels  Streams,  Listing  to  analyze  these.  Effect  of  Larken 
DOS  on  these 

8809  6/5  p.4  Larken  EPROM  version  3  review  by  George  Chambers 

8809  6/5  p .5  Big  Copy  by  Renato  Zannese  Makes  a  large  shaded  copy  on  aTS2040  in  Spectrum  mode 

8809  6/5  p.8  Simple  SOUND  port  wiring  diagram  and  instructions  by  Renato  Zannese 

8809  6/5  p.9  Improved  label  maker  for  Larken  by  George  C  ambers  Uses  Iprint.CI  by  Hacksel 

8809  6/5  p.  10  LKDOS  first  impressions  of  version  3  by  Bol  vtitcheil.  Also  listings  for  using  Sequential  filing 

system  in  v3  to  convert  a  program  listing  to  ASCII  and  load  it  into  Tasword 

8809  6/5  p.  1 1  Pascal  Disk  Handler  for  LKDOS.  by  David  Solly.  More  info  available  from  George  Chambers 
8809  6/5  p.  12  Vera  Cruz  on  Larken.  a  game  converted  to  LKDOS 

8809  6/5  p.  1 2  Larken  RAMDISK  experiences  of  George  Chambers  and  Richard  Hurd.  Also  a  File  Recovery 
listing  by  George  Chambers 

881 1  6/6  p.3  Software  Review  Mscript  v5.3  by  Bob  Mitchell 

881 1  6/6  p.4  Letters  from  our  readers  on  Larken  and  Quad  drives.  Programming  SIPs  (Single  Inline  Plastic) 
package  resistor  network  Sequential  Filing  Deeks.  Etc 
8811  6/6  p  5  Data  Acquisition  System  for  the  QL 
881 1  6/6  p  5  Errata  drawing  for  Larken  interface  originally  in  8809  6/5 
881 1  6/6  p  5  Program  to  pick  lottery  numbers  by  Renato  Zannese 
881 1  6/6  p.7  QL  Beginners  Section  by  Bill  Lawson 
881 1  6/6  p  8  Hacker  by  Greg  Robins  Software  Review 

881 1  6/6  p.8  Disk  drive  problem  and  cure  (?)  by  Larry  Crawford.  Also  Unusual  disk  drive  problem  and  cure  by 
Bob  Mitchell  and  George  Chambers 

881 1  6/6  p.9  Programming  tips  by  George  Chambers.  Buried  colour  codes  in  listings.  Switching  between  disf 
and  tape  saving  and  loading  Using  more  than  one  drive.  Also:  Scrabble  and  the  Larken  System 
8811  6/6  p.  10  Projects  for  TS  Computers  by  Rene  Bruneau.  Number  1:  Mini  Mother  Board 
881 1  676  p  1 1  Larken  Disk  Library  A  proposal  by  George  Chambers.  Also:  Larken  RS232  Printer  Driver  by 
Larry  Kenny;  for  use  with  Ed  Grey's  RS232C  Interface  Z-SI/O 
881 1  6/6  p.  1 2  First  class  fonts  (Byte  Power)  Review  by  Jeff  Taylor 
881 1  6/6  p.  12  Newsletter  blurb  by  Jeff  Taylor.  A  BASIC  listing 

881 1  6/6  p  1 3  Tasword  and  the  Larken  Printer  Driver  by  George  Chambers  Tasword  modified  for  Larken 
Version  3  EPROM.  ___ 

1989 


8901  7/1  p.2  Editorial:  new  cover  design,  modems;  Syncware  alive 

8901  7/1  p.3  History  of  TTSUG  aka  TTSUC  akaToronto  Tirnex  Sinclair  Users  Group/Club  by  George 
Chambers  Also  list  of  magazine  clippings  available  from  George 
8901  7/1  p .5  Bob's  Notebook:  Renumber  to  10000+Tasort 
8901  7/1  p.7  QL  info  by  Bill  Lawson  super  BASIC  tips  DEFine  FUNction 

8901  7/1  p.9  2068  and  Power  Supply  by  Larry  Crawford  London  Ont  circuit  diagrams  and  instruction  details 
8901  7/1  p. 11  Modemming  by  G.  Robins  experiences  in  getting  going 
8901  7/1  p.1 1  RLE  graphics  examples  from  Jeff  Taylor 


Prepared  by  Bob  Mitchell  920307 
SINC-LINK 


SINC-LINK  CONTENTS 


8901  7/1  p.  12  Larken  and  the  large  printer  by  George  Chambers,  Using  streams  and  channels  to  distinguish 
among  screen,  2040  and  wide  printer 

3901  7/1  p  13  Larken  Disk  Library  being  established.  Summaries  of:  Larken  Utilities:  Doctor;  Format  Labels; 
Rename:  Repair:  Recover:  Erase;  Reader:  Loader:  Tape  Save 
3901  7/1  p  14  Mini-mother  board  by  Rene  Bruneau  (continued  from  881 1  676) 

8903  7/2  Out  of  town  newsletter  dated  Jan  8. 1989.SNUG  has  a  Larken  Disk  Library  He  is  Tim  Wood  of 
Vachon  Island  S/T  Club.  Toronto  BBS  has  a  Larken  section  and  is  called  Phoenix  at  41 6-458-5850.  Ramdisk 
can  be  operated  with  a  third  AAA  battery  boosting  the  voltage  to  4.5.Grand  &  Toy  has  a  rack  useful  for  holding 
disks:  seven  slots:  costs  $6.75  more.. 

8903  7/2  Out  of  town  news  by  George  Chambers.  JDR  dropped  their  INWATS  number  for  Canadian 
customers!  Remote  keyboard  project  on  hold.  Details  on  CNIB  modems  and  $145  RGB  monitors,  and  much 
much  more.. 

8903  7/2  Out  of  town  newsletter.  Sam's  Photofacts  has  set  of  sheets  on  the  TS2068:  #CC1 9  Computerfacts. 
George  can  supply  a  copy  (1 7  sheets). Bill  Harmer  has  a  document  on  using  the  ZX81  with  Larken. Z88  users 
on  the  increase  and  a  MacPack  is  available  that  allows  data  to  be  transferred  from  and  to  Mackintosh  QL 
repairs  via  Schennelly  Stoughton.  191  William  St.  N  Lindsay  Ont  K9V  4B8 

8903  7/2  p  2  Editorial:  newsletter  format  QL  librarian  is  Hugh  Howie;  TTSUC  is  a  member  of  SNUG-Sinclair 
NorthAmencan  Users  Group 

8903  7/2  p  3  Bob's  Notebook  Printer  and  Drive  Status  Reports  Details  on  putting  data  onto  menus,  etc.  Also 
File  loaded.  Byte  length  and  tracks  used.  Disk/Tape  mode  for  Saves  and  Loads 

8903  7/2  p  5  Larken  Lines  by  Rod  Gowan  Questions  and  answers  1  Format  and  Move  2.  Sequential  Filing. 
3  Any  new  stuff?  4  Version  3  news.  Larken  Notes.  Using  channel  5  for  wideprinter  and  channel  for  TS2040. 
Channel  2  stays  as  screen  display,  (by  George  Chambers) 

8903  7/2  p.6  Info  from  Steve  Gunhouse:  Joysticks-  use  of  OUT  commands.  Quad  Density  Drive.  Conserving 
Memory  tips  Plotting  functions 

8903  7/2  p.7  ZX81  MIDI  project  by  Lou  Champagne.  Design  and  construction  details  in  a  series  of  articles 
starting  with  this  issue.  Diagrams  included 

8903  7/2  p.1 1  Larken  Disk  Library  George  Chambers  describes  one  of  the  disks  in  the  library:  Omnibus 
8903  7/2  p.1 1  RLE  Graphics  by  Jeff  Taylor.  RLE  (Run  Length  Encoded)  graphic  pictures  can  be  obtained  on 
TS2068,  Needed  is  a  Modem  which  supports  Xmodem  protocol  (eg,  Maxcom  by  Larken).  Also  a  BBS  with  an 
RLE  section,  many  of  the  IBM  boards  will  do.  Finally,  an  RLE  decoder  (see  TDM  Jan-Feb  87)  is  available  from 
the  TTSUC  library 

8903  7/2  p  1 2  Wordsquare  by  George  Chambers.  Handles  up  to60  words.  Program  in  club  library  as  tape  #61 
8903  1(2.  p.1 3  Aligning  Numbers  by  Mel  Richardson.  ForZX81  but  would  work  onTS2068  too 
8903  7/2  p.  13  Hard  Copy  of  MDV  Cartridge  used  with  QL 

8903  7/2  p.1 4  Larken  Tip  on  Disk  Drives  by  George  Chambers.  Terminating  Resistor 

8903  7/2  p.1 4  Easy  Keyboard  Fix  by  Dick  Wagner  of  CCATS  Used  on  TS2068  space  bars  where  pressing 
right  hand  end  does  not  make  a  space 

8903  7/2  p.  15  SNUG  News  Sinclair  Northamerica  Users  Group:  1  formed  a  public  domain  software  library.  2. 
magazine  plans  being  formulated 

8903  7/2  p  16  Snodgits  and  the  Larken  System  Saving  to  Disk  by  GChambers.  This  is  a  game  program;  a 
who  done  it  mystery.  George  describes  how  he  saved  it  using  the  NMI  button  and  the<A>  key 
8903  7/2  p.  17  Larken  Maxcom  BBS  Software 

8903  7/2  p.  17  RS232  Interfaces  by  Rene  Bruneau.  Definitions:  RS232;  serial  vs  parallel;  Centronics  port 
asynchronous.  Also,  using  32k  memory  chips  to  get  256k  of  bank  switched  memory— the  cost  is  $141 .96  Can 
8903  7/2  p.1 8  QLips  by  Hugh  Howie.  Tips  for  Quill,  Abacus.  Also  a  tip  for  marking  clippings  using  a  three  hole 
punch 

8903  7/2  p.  18  Regulator  for  QL.  by  S.  Stoughton  Lindsay  Ont.  with  diagrams 
8903  7/2  p  1 9  Bill  Lawson  writes  a  column  of  tips  etc  for  QL  users 

8903  7/2  p.20  Member  J  Vander  Stel  writes  some  tips  when  using  theTS2068.  INKEY$,  PAUSE  0,  etc 
8903  7/2  p.21  Technician  Ted  and  the  Larken  by  G.  Chambers  Some  thoughts  on  an  old  game  Also  a  book 
to  read  called  <Mismatch  by  Lloyd  Pye>  .  System  15000  on  the  Larken  Disk  System:  another  game  with  some 
deep  thoughts 

8903  7/2  p.23  EMY  Extn  basic  Multi-tasking  for  Spectrum  modified  by  R.  Zannese 

8903  7/2  p. 24  A  mod  for  the  2050  by  Rene  Bruneau..  One  chip  used  to  generate  a10v  suppiy 


Prepared  by  Bob  Mitchell  920307 
SINC-LINK 


SiNC-UNK  CONTENTS 


8903  7/2  p.27  A  speshul  hear  this  report  for  QLers  from  Hugh  Howie 

8905  7/3  p.2  Editor's  Remarks  CATS  Fest:  Newsletter:  QLers  Note  Non-Canadian  Readers  Note 
8905  7/3  p.3  Bob's  Notebook  Printing  Disk  Index  on  widepnnter  in  condensed  font.  Mscnpt  Sort  Utility 
Change  ot  line  spacing  crams  more  print  lines  onto  one  sheet  of  paper 
8905  7/3  p.5  Modifying  Artist  II  for  Larken  TT  7/3  o  5  bv  Renato  Zannese 

8905  7/3  p.6  QL  News  by  Bill  Lawson  RGB  monitor  acjustments  etc.  Tip  re  using  Keyword  LIST  to  get  a  hard 
copy  of  a  listing 

8905  7/3  p.7  Larken-  Cracking  Spectrum  Programs  by  Geo  Chambers  Two  utilities  to  simplify  the  process 
8905  7/3  p.7  Z88  User  Group  Magazine  EPROM  put  out  by  UK  club 

8905  7/3  p.8  Interface  for  RAM  in  TS2068  I/O  Ports  by  Larry  Crawford  Bank  switching;  EXROM;  Chunks: 
Expansion  Banks:  diagrams 

8905  7/3  p.9  Care  and  Feeding  of  Disk  Drives  Review  of  two  manuals  by  G.Cary.  Disk  Service  Manual  III  and 
Disk  Drive  Tutorial  both  by  John  J  Williams  MSEE 

8905  7/3  p.10  QLTips  by  H  Howie  Slowdown  hints  at  shortage  of  memory.  Other  tips,  too 

8905  7/3  p.  11  Predicting  Lunar  Eclipses  on  theZX81  by  Mel  Richardson  including  the  listing  and  an  example 

8905  7/3  p.1 1  A  Novelty  Program  for  TS  2068  Puts  a  title  on  the  screen  at  top  left  corner.  By  David  Solly 

8905  7/3  p  13  Digital  Clock  from  SIN  newsletter  translated  from  the  French  by  Louis  Laferriere 

8905  7/3  p.1 4  Product  Info  Surge  Protector  $6.50  US3  1/2  "  Disk  Drive  $60  US5  1/4  "  Disk  Dr.ve  $50  US  DSQD 

addresses  included 

8905  7/3  p.1 5  RLE  Graphics  by  Rene  Bruneau  Product  Review  of  TEC  200  Film.  Can  be  used  for  PCBs 
8905  7/3  p  16  Software  Review  of  Larken  Sequential/Random  File  Utility.  By  Bob  Mitchell 
8905  7/3  p.  1 6  Wordwrap  by  Steven  Gunhouse 

8905  7/3  p.1 7  LKDOS  advertisement  Maxcom.  Disk  Editor;  Sequential  Random  Access  Files;  Coming  soon 
DeskTop  Publisher;  Spell  Checker 

8905  7/3  p.1 8  CATS  Computer  Fest  1 989  Review  by  G.  Chambers 
8905  7/3  p.1 9  Playing  with  sound  For  QLers  by  Senen  Racki 

8905  7/3  p.20  Excerpts  from  other  newsletters  by  G.  Chambers:  Non-flashing  prompts  (Gunhouse);  Larken 

Ramdisk  bug  alert  (Earl  Dunnington);  CRC  ERRors  (Chambers);  MODEMs  (Chambers) 

8905  7/3  p.21  Time  Designs  Magazine.  Will  it  survive?  Where  is  it?  News  by  Geo  Chambers 

8905  7/3  p.21  Bob's  Notebook  Jumping  Backwards  Relatively  Speaking.  Listing  to  make  a  table  of  jumps 

8905  7/3  p.22  Larken  Disk  Library  Disk  4  Astronomy  Disk  5  Music  and  Sound  Disk  6  Adventures  by  G 

Chambers 

8905  7/3  p.22  Larken  Disk  Drive  Info  by  G.  Chambers,  copy  available  for  $2  incl  post 
8905  7/3  p  23  VAL  for  QL  by  Senen  Racki  compares  with  2068  method 

8905  7/3  p.24  Larken  Product  Info  LKDOS  Extended  BASIC  Cartridge  400 K  2068/Spectrum  Disk  Interface 
DSK  400.  256K  Ramdisk  Kit 

8907  7/4  p.2  Toronto  BBS  for  TS  users  TIBM  WIZARD  BBS  743-6703;  300  RLE  files  Message  service 
8907  7/4  p.5  Insomniac  Electronics  Update  Slow  orders 

8907  7/4  p.5  Larken  Index.  B1 A  printer  fix.  By  Chambers:  Some  POKES  to  adapt  code  to  different  printers 
8907  7/4  p.5  Tip  by  Mel  Richardson  on  saving  magazines  using  plastic  sleeves 
8907  7/4  p.6  Latest  from  SNUG 

8907  7/4  p.6  RAMDISK  to  DISK  Backup  by  Larken.  Different  approach  to  R.  Hurd's 

8907  7/4  p  7  QLIPs  Tips  for  QLusers  Also  Spreadsheet  keypresses  reduced  by  listing  from  Real  Gagnon 
8907  7/4  p.8  SCREENS  copy  by  Renato  Zannese:  double  strike, 7  widths  and  4  heights 
8907  7/4  p.9  Amazing  Digi-Dubber  by  Fred  Nachbaur.  Details  on  how  to  copy  ZX81  tapes 
8907  7/4  p.1 1  QL  Cures  by  Bill  Lawson.  Dealing  with  crashes 
8907  7/4  p.1 4  LKDOS  Tools  by  Bill  Jones  Update  Magazine 

8907  7/4  p.1 7  Trip  to  England  notes  by  Geo  Chambers.  Also  Larken  Disk  Library  Notes  and  comments  on  our 
newsletter 

8907  7/4  p.1 8  QL  Battery  Backed  Clock  and  some  books  available  for  QL 
8907  7/4  p.1 9  QL  and  RGB  Monitor  by  Pierre  Goudet 

8907  7/4  p  20  Hacker's  Haven  Pt  2  ZX81  and  MIDI  interface  project  by  Lou  Champagne 

8907  7/4  p.24  Fastext  80  Crib  Sheet  by  Bob  Mitchell 

8907  7/4  p.24  Data  creator  from  ZX  Computing  2/86  mod  by  S  Gunhouse 

8909  7/5  p.3  Bob's  Notebook;  Make  a  calendar 


Prepared  by  Bob  Mitchell  920307 
SINC-LINK 


SINC -LINK  CONTENTS 


8909  7/5  p. 6  QL  utility  to  provide  accents  for  vowels  in  French  text.  By  Real  Gagnon  translated  by  Louis 
Laferriere 

6909  7/5  p  7  ZX81  Digi-Dubber  revised  schematic  by  Fred  Nachbaur 

8909  7/5  p  8  Letter  from  R.  Hurd  on  3-1/2drives:  MODU  connector:  Quad  to  DSDD  utility  on  update  disk 
provided  to  club 

8909  7/5  p  9  TSMON;  a  direct  video  output  circuit  for  TS1 000  by  Chuck  Kereluk 

8909  7/5  p.  10  MODEM  notes  by  L  Laferriere,  also  assistance  among  club  members  a  major  benefit:  QL  notes 
on  SuperBasic  and  QL  DOC  copies 

8909  7/5  p  1 1  LKDOS  Disk  Utility  Double  to  Quad  by  R  Hurd.  Converts  a  DSDD  disk  to  Quad  for  those  without 
standard  5..25"drive 

8909  7/5  p.  12  Renaming  an  LKDOS  disk  by  Geo  Chambers.  This  explains  how  to  use  Disk  Doctor  to  change 
the  title  on  a  disk 

8909  7/5  p  13  Programming  the  TS2068:  Opening  Larken  Sequential  files 

8909  7/5  p.1 3  QLIPS  by  Hugh  Howie,  Some  notes  on  Abacus  and  greedy  Psion  Four  QL  SS 

8909  7/5  p  1 4  Aerco  LKDOS  system  CALLs  to  LKDOS  ROM  listed  by  Steven  Gunhouse 

8909  7/5  p.1 7  Full  Window  Directory  for  QL  by  Mike  Ferris 

8909  7/5  p  20  Bob's  Notebook  A  Pixel  Print  demo  column 

8909  7/5  p.20  TIBM  Wizard  BBS  info 

8909  7/5  p  21  HI-REZ  Graphics  Dump  by  Rene  Bruneau.  For  7X&MTS  1000 

8911  7/6  p  03  Bob's  Notebook  Another  Disk  Rename  routine  for  LARKEN  LKDOS  users.  Listing  &  explanation. 
8911  7/6  p  05  Larken  news  by  Geo.  Chambers.  X-Y-Z  CAD-CAM  drilling/routing  requires  RS232  interface.. 
LARKEN  ELECTRONICS. 

891 1  7/6  p. 05  Some  excerpts  from  VISTA  newsletter  3/4  including:  Russell  Electronics.  Maxell  Amdisk  III 
disks.  Disks  in  bulk  lots  (cheap),  Books  on  servicing  drives,  printer  &  plotter  repairs,  ribbon  re-inking.  RMG 
Enterprises  goodies.. 

891 1  7/6  p. 06  QL  Library  by  H.  Howie  Notes  re  RGB  monitors  vs  TV  with  QL  Also  problems  with  51 2 
expansion  and  program  for  unexpanded  QL  Programming  QL  to  get  rid  of  bugs  Plug  for  Update  Mag.  Also 
one  QLIP  same  page. 

391 1  7/6  p  07  Pixel  Print  Plus  3  Column  modification  by  Steve  Spalding.  Z88  ad  by  Sharp's. 

891 1  7/6  p  08  TS1 000  Video  Driver  by  Rene  Bruneau.  Gets  rid  of  Crawlies  on  VHF  TV  Circuit  diagram  & 

details 

891 1  7/6  p .08  Index.  B1 A  printer  fix  by  Geo.  Chambers  Also  some  ads  by  Ed  Grey  for  LARKEN.  Specterm.  Z- 
Sl/O  and  MAXCOM  Ed  also  has  modems  &  printers. 

391 1  7/6  p. 09  Hardware  Review  on  Data-Skip  Videoface  by  Dan  Pinko.  Does  a  SCREENS  SAVE  of  a  TV  or 
VCR  frame.  Costs  $93  US..  From  Gouda  Holland. 

8911  7/6  p.  10  Ad  for  OKIMATE  TS2068  printer.  Two  workshop  hints  from  Larry  Crawford    Grounding  Strap 
made  for  less  than  $5.  How  to  make  a  fine  soldering  iron  tip  from  1 2  gauge  wire 

891 1  7/6  p.1 1  Ads  from  Byte  Power  marketing  software  for  TS2068  and  Spectrum  LARKEN  MAXCOM,  Disk 
Editor  and  Random/Sequential  Filing  Also  an  LKDOS  Share-ware  disk  which  requires  original  programs  to 
work  Art  Studio.  Specterm.  TASWORD.  Mike's  QL  Hot  Tips  from  TDM  Magazine.  RMG  Catalog  on  LKDOS 
disk. 

8911  7/6  p.  12  QLIPS  by  Howie,  Multi-tasking:  requires  you  have  Task-Master  Also  an  ad  from  Bill  Cable  for 
QL  software  DB  Tutor  which  uses  Archive 

8911  7/6  p.  13  NEC  FD1035  Disk  Drive  Review  by  Richard  Hurd.  Tips  on  connecting  it  to  TS2068  Also  notes 

on  Fujitsu  drive  and  Compower  1 30  watt  power  supply  for  $12  US.  Addresses  given 

891 1  7/6  p.1 4  Excerpts  from  Steven  Gunhouse  letters  by  Geo  Chambers  AUTOSTART  and  Joystick  not 

compatible:  fixes  given.  Using  joystick  as  a  mouse.  Interrupt  Modes  IM1  and  IM2  are  explained. 

891 1  7/6  p.  16  Bob's  Notebook  gives  two  cards  from  his  Cardexfile:  on  LARKEN  Graphics  characters  and 

Profile  keyboard  legend. 

8911  7/6  p.1 7  More  ads  on  Graphics.  QL  software.  Printers,  Computer  repairs/upgrades  etc.  Graphit  Software. 
U.S.  Tax  Return  software  from  Herb  Bowers  Sr.  ZEBU  utilities  inc.  Fast  DELETE  key  and  Restore  EDIT  line  at 
anytime.  Hi-Res  Plotter. 

8911  7/6  p  17  Ads  for  Graphics  A  to  Z  for  ZX81  TS1000  &  TS1500.  QL  software;  Mailbag.  Tax-I-QL 
QLANDLORD.  Printers  from  RMG  Enterprises.  Repairs  to  printers  computers,  monitors.  Graphit  software  for 


Prepared  by  Bob  Mitchell  920307 
SINC-LINK 


SIN  C-LINK  CONTENTS 


TS2068.  US  Tax  Return  program.  ZEBU  software  makes  DELETE  key  faster,  restores  EDIT  line  anytime,  etc. 
Hi-Res  Plotting. 

891 1  7/6  p .1 8  Print  Factory  review  by  Tom  Skapmski  from  Byte  Power.  Generally  favourable.  QL  Printers  and 
QUILL  from  SMUG  Jul  89  issue  by  Geo  Chambers.  TIMEX  Computer  fest  1 990  to  be  held  June  1  -3  in  Holiday 
Inn  Wakes  ha.  Milwaukee  area. 

891 1  7/6  p.  19  Disk  Drive  Repairs  by  Don  Lambert:  a  must  for  those  interested  in  doing  their  own. 
891 1  7/6  p  20  The  low  down  on  Time  Designs  Magazine  A  real  tear-jerker. 

End  of  Part  2  of  3  parts. 

This  file,  comprising  1 7  pages,  can  be  provided  on  an  IBM  compatible  disk  in  Word  Perfect  5.1  format  or 
straight  text  format  It  could  be  downloaded  to  a  TS  2068  on  request 
Bob  Mitchell  920307 


10 


SINC-LINK 


3UPERBAS [C  -  YOUR  POWERFUL  FRIEND 


Page  1 


An  occasional  series  for  the  occasional  programmer. 
Copyright  Q  Alan  Pywell  1991. 
PART  TWO. 


In  part  one  I  covered  the  basics  of  writing  a  procedure  and  passing  para- 
meters to  it.  I  will  have  a  little  more  to  say  on  the  subject  shortly  but  first 
a  few  observations  (or  warnings  -  call  them  what  you  like) 

From  my  experience  of  programs  it  seems  it  is  all  too  easy  to  fall  into  the 
trap  of  "over-procedurising".     By  this  I  mean  writing  a  procedure  for  every 
little  bit  of  your  program.    This  is  worse  than  writing  no  procedures  at  all. 

A  couple  of  examples  from  a  program  in  our  library  will  illustrate  my  point. 

DEFine  PROCedure  KEY:V$=  I  NKEY$(- 1  ):END  DEFine 

I  fail  to  see  what  this  achieves.    The  program  still  needs  to  check  that  a 

valid  key  has  been  pressed,    -erhaps  there's  a  procedure  to  do  this  

I  daren't  look. 

If  you're  going  to  write  a  procedure  put  something  in  it!.    Another  line 
reads:- 

DEFine  PROCedure  paused:  FOR  j=1  to  500:  NEXT  j:  END  DEFine 

This  really  is  ridiculous  -  what's  wrong  with  PAUSE  X?    The  author  has  re- 
invented the  wheel,  a  common  failing.    PAUSE  is  a  good  keyword,  to  be  used 
in  the  main  body  of  the  program  -  it  is  a  waste  of  time  and  effort  to  write  a 
procedure  to  give  a  delay. 

The  program  is  so  full  of  unnecessary  one-line  procedures  that  is  had  to  be 
compiled  in  order  to  run  about  as  fast  it  would  have  done  uncompiled  if  it 
had  been  written  properly  in  the  first  place.  (I  shall  cover  writing  for  speed 
at  a  later  date) 

All  I'm  saying  is  "Think  a  little  about  what  you're  typing".  You  should  of 
course  break  up  your  program  into  the  jobs  it  has  to  do  and  then  write  a 
procedure  to  do  them  but  this  doesn't  mean  a  procedure  for  every  line. 

It  is  wasting  effort  to  write  a  procedure  for  a  tiny  job  or  a  job  that  will 
only  be  done  once  or  twice.    There  are  no  hard-and-fast  rules  about  this, 
use  your  judgement.    As  a  rough  rule-of-thumb  a  procedure  should  do  more 
than  one  thing,  like  the  procedure  for  getting  user's  input  and  checking  it, 
or  save  a  lot  of  typing. 

The  other  observation  I  want  to  make  is  that  this  series  has  had  little 
forward  planning  and  is  not  meant  to  be  a  definitive  guide  to  SuperBasic. 
I  am  hoping  for  feedback  from  readers  before  I  do  any  planning........ 

I  wrote  most  of  this  whilst  waiting  for  members  to  write  expressing  interest 
after  my  recent  letter  in  QUANTA.  I  am  adding  this  paragraph  after  the 
eagerly  awaited  response  came  flooding  in  from  fellow-members.     I  have 
replied  to  them  both  to  say  that  I  will  not  be  writing  any  more  


SINC-LINK 


SUPERBAStC  -  YOUR  POWERFUL  FRIEND 
PASSING  PARAMETERS  (again) 


Page  2 


You  may  have  noticed  in  the  May  issue  that  when  I  called  the  procedure 
that  the  parameters  sent  to  the  proc  (they  were  called  min  and  max)  were 
not  enclosed  in  brackets  yet  the  recipient  (the  actual  procedure)  had 
brackets  around  them:- 

GETKEY  1,4  blah  blah  blah 

DEFine  PROCedure  GETKEY  (min, max) 

I  suggest  you  get  some  cardboard  and  write  someone  a  stiff  letter  about 
this. 

It's  not  so  bad  really  -  you'll  get  used  to  it. 

Here's  a  bit  of  a  program  for  printing  some  text  on  the  screen:- 

PAPER  6:  INK  0:  AT  10,10:PRINT  "This  is  a  message" 
PAPER  1:  INK  6:  AT  12,10:PRINT  "So  is  this" 

Every  time  you  want  the  program  to  print  something  you  have  to  type 
something  like  the  above.     If  you  decide  to  alter  one  of  them  later  you've 
more  typing. 

It  is  more  convenient  to  call  a  general-purpose  proc  and  to  give  it  the 
information  it  needs  (pass  it  some  parameters) 

1000    WRITE1, 6,7,10,  "Have  you  seen  my  Batman  outfit  darling9" 
1005    WRITE  2,0,8,4,  "It's  in  the  wash  -  wear  your  pajamas" 
1010  some  more  prog  as  usual 

 and  here  is  the  procedure  

10000  DEFine  PROCedure  WRITE  (INK_COLOR,  PAPER_COLOR,  ROW_N UMBER, 

COL UMN_N UMBER,  MESSAGES) 
20005  INK  INK_COLOR:  PAPER  PAPERjCOLOR:  AT  ROW_N UMBER, 

COL U M N_N UMBER:  PRINT  MESSAGES 
2C0*0  END  DEFine 

As  you  can  see  the  passed  parameters  tell  the  procedure  the  ink  and  paper 
colors  to  use,  where  to  print  the  message  and  the  last  but  not  least,  what  to 
print.    Any  place  in  your  program  that  you  want  to  print  something  just  use 
a  line:  WRITE,  followed  by  ink  and  paper  colors,  where  at  and  your  text. 
It's  easier  to  alter  it  later  if  you  should  wish  to,  say,  change  the  ink  color. 

You  could  also  pass  a  channel  number  and  a  FLASH  number  but  I'm  not 
about  to  do  everything  for  you! 

I'm  sorry  but  I  can't  put  it  off  any  longer.    "I'm  throwing  some  new  words 
at  you  and  they're  extremely  erotic,  sorry  exotic. 

GLOBAL  LOCAL  SCOPE 

Normally  you  can  alter  the  value  of  a  variable  anywhere  in  a  program.  Yes, 
I  know  you  know,  give  us  a  chance.    Take  the  previously-used  variables 
min, max.    Please  take  them,  I'm  fed  up  to  the  teeth  with  them. 


12 


SINC-LINK 


SUPERBASIC  -  YOUR  POWERFUL  FRIEND 


Page  3 


They  are  not  terribly  sacrosanct  in  that  it  would  not  matter  if  a  part  of  the 
program  that  is  not  part  of  a  procedure  used  them.    They  could  be  used  in 
any  part  of  a  program.    You  may  want  to  pad  out  a  string  if  it's  length  is 
less  than  min,  for  instance,  by  adding  spaces  or  whatever  until  its  length 
equalled  max.    Or  a  thousand  and  one  uses.    Whatever  you  do  with  min  and 
max,  a  call  to  GETKEY  will  set  them  to  the  desired  values  for  that  particular 
call  to  the  proc.    Their  SCOPE  is  said  to  be  GLOBAL.    Don't  ask  me  why 
"they"  chose  the  word  "global"  which  of  course  means  "world-wide".  Our 
field  of  view  is  somewhat  narrower  -  GLOBAL  simply  means  "use  it  anywhere 
in  the  prog.".    "But  that's  obvious"  you  say.    Watch  it,  clever-clogs,  I'll  be 
asking  questions  later  

I  suppose  you  already  know  that  the  variables  are  stored  in  a  special  area 
of  RAM  which  someone,  in  their  infinite  wisdom,  called  the  variable  area. 
(Area  for  the  variables,  get  it?  No?,  well  it's  an  area..  ) 

Suppose  that,  for  your  own  foul  purpose,  you  had  the  power  to  say  "look 
here,  you,  this  variable  is  to  be  used  only  in  procedure  X."    Have  i  got 
news  for  you!    You  can.    You  simply  tell  QL  that  "this  variable's  SCOPE  is 
LOCAL  to  procedure  X".    Just  another  little  rule  -  you  must  tell  QL  inside 
the  procedure,  hardly  worth  mentioning,  really. 

DEFine  PROCedure  GETKEY  (min, max) 
LOCal  min, max 

REPEAT  LOOP  V$=INKEY$(-1)  etc,etc 

There's  just  one  thing  wrong  with  the  above  -  it  won't  work!    You  cannot 
declare  as  LOCAL  parameters  passed  to  the  procedure.    Think  about  it  - 
they're  not  really  local  are  they?    But  you  can  use  any  other  variables 
inside  a  proc  and  ensure  that  they  are  confined  to  the  proc. 

The  QL  User  Guide  says  "Defining  variables  to  be  LOCAL  allows  variable 
names  to  be  used  within  functions  and  procedures  without  corrupting 
meaningful  variables  of  the  same  name  outside  the  function  or  procedure." 
So  now  you  know.     Up  comes  a  chorus  of  "Can  you  have  two  variables  with 
the  same  name  then,  and  what's  a  function?" 

First  things  first  -  yes  you  can,  as  long  as  one  of  them  is  LOCAL  to  a 
function  or  procedure.    The  LOCAL  one  exists  only  within  its  procedure  or 
any  procedure  called  by  that  procedure.     It  is  lost  when  the  procedure 

ends. 

A  function  is.,  you  don't  really  want  to  know,  do  you?  There's  one  on  next 
week  at  my  local  Town  Hall.     I'll  have  to  leave  the  other  kind  for  another 
day. 

You   ./ill  have  noticed  that  sometimes  I  have  omitted  line  numbers.     If  you 
wrote  a  SuperBasic  program  with  no  line  numbers  you  would  almost  have 
written  a  program  in  Archive.  SuperBasic  is  a  good  language  but  there  are 
many  much  better  and  they  don't  have  line  numbers  at  all.     I'll  have  more  to 
say  about  Archive  and  the  line  numbers  at  a  later  date.    In  the  meantime, 
don't  be  frightened  of  Archive. 


SINC-LINK 


SUPERBASIC  -  YOUR  POWERFUL  FRIEND  ?age  4 

TEST.    Answer  all  questions  as  fully  as  possible. 

1.  Describe  your  reaction  when  told  that  your  Batman  outfit  was  in  the  wash. 
Suggest  three  possible  alternative  activities  to  while  away  Friday  night. 

2.  You  have  just  found  a  QL  on  top  of  the  wardrobe.  It  isn't  yours.  What 
will  you  do  about  it? 

3.  You're  asked  to  make  donation  to  M.A.P.A.R.M.  Will  you?  You  should. 

(the  "Make  Alan  Py well  A  Rich  Man"  fund) 

Sorry  this  episode  is  a  bit  short  and  not  very  informative  -  I  just  feel  that 
I'm  wasting  my  time  

Alan  PyweTI 

13  Sandyfields  Close 

Sea  Lane 

Saltfleet 

Lines.      LN11  7RP  England 


ThJU>  aitlcJle,,   pant  two   o-d   the,  ^ejvte^ ,   6tsu>t  appe,aie,d  In  the, 
AiLgu^t  199  1  -U^ae,  ol   QUANTA,   and  au>  uu>e,d  he.n.e,  by  the.  hind  _ 
pzimi^lon  o£  Alan  Pyuje.ll  who  neJiatn^  the.  Copyright  to  thls> 
^e,n.leJ>. 

ThJU*  an.tJLc.le.  ha^  be,e.n  ie.-type.d  by  me,,   *o  14  theste,  tvie  any 
eji-?L0JL-6  In  typing,    I  alone,  am  to  blame,. 

Tht^  J>esLte^6  wa*  abonJce,d  by  Alan  la^t  yexLA,  a*  he,  4  eAX.  he,  u/cu> 
working  without  any  n,e,c,ognltA,on ,  as>  hX^,  above,  comme,nt^> 
Indtcate,.      So  leJt  uut>  piove,  to  Alan,  that,  the,  SZNC-LlhJlC  ie.ade.su> 
ie.ally  do  appn.zc.tate,  hi*  i^^ont^,   and  that  me.  want,  mote,. 

I   have.  te.aAon  to   be.lle.ve,  that,  thesie,  -L*>  a  Posit  Thsie,e,  tn  the, 
won.h^  and  that  we,  will  ^e,e.  It,  In  thl^  N  zw^le.tt.e.A,  In  dae,  pa^^age, 
o£  ttme,.      So  14   you,  have,  had  plejJU>usie, ,   a-6  weJJL  aA  pio^tt,  &n,om 
th^U,  tatoilal,   plejju,e,  wnJUte,  to  Alan  and  leA.  htm  hnow  how  you. 
wo  old  Itho.  to  4e,e,  the,  *6esU,e^>  contA,nwe,d ,   and  what,  -6ab  j  e,ot  you, 
wo  aid  line,  dlcxu>-6e,d  . 

Otheytwl^e. ,   14   you,  leJt  me,,    on,  the,  S  e,cyLeJLat,y ,   Ge.0A.ge,  Chambeyu, , 
hnow  yoLun,  vteM)<6 ,    I  will  pa^-6  the,  Information  along  to  Alan. 

Hugh  H.  Howie 


SINC-LINK 


ZX81    RESOURCES    -    Moving  RAMTOP 
Rene  Bruneau        21  June  1992 


Noraally,  to  lower  RAMTOP,  you  have  to  poke  values  into 
addresses  15388  and  16389  then  NEW  the  coaputer  to  change 
RAMTOP.  If  you  have  loaded  a  prograa  that  required  PAMTOP  to 
be  lowered  before  starting,  you  end  up  reloading  the  prograi 
because  NEW  also  wipes  the  wenory  clean.  What  is  needed  is  a 
prograi  that  dynamically  shifts  RAMTOP  without  affecting  the 
aeaory  after  a  program  is  loaded.  I  located  this  routine  in 
an  old  issue  of  COMPUTE!  and  fiodified  it  to  use  the  saie 
intonation  transfer  that  was  presented  in  the  last 
newsletter.  The  aachine  code  is  relocatable. 

Enter  Listing  1,  RUN  100  to  input  the  ic  data  in  Listing  2. 
On  completion,  enter  S,  and  confira  that  the  checksua  is 
3099.  You  say  now  delete  line  100  to  the  prograa  end.  Save 
the  prograa  several  tines.  On  running,  the  prograa  asks  you 
for  the  address  where  the  code  will  be  located.  Entering  a 
nuaber  will  relocate  the  ac. 

To  love  RAMTOP  up  or  down  froa  the  original  setting  key  in 

RAND  (New  RAMTOP),  ENTER 

PRINT=USR  lac  location),  ENTER 
To  confirm  that  the  routine  works  type  the  following  line 

PRINT  PEEK  16388  +  256  X  PEEK  16389 

The  nuaber  printed  should  aatch  the  RAMTOP  that  you  set  with 
RAND.  If  you  wish  to  enter  the  routine  in  a  second  REM 
stateaent  after  an  existing  REM  then  disregard  lines  10  to 
80,  and  renumber  the  rest  so  that  you  don't  inadvertently 
over-write  existing  basic  lines.  You  will  also  have  to 


establish  where  the  first  byte  of  the  routine  will  be 
and  revise  line  100  to  suit. 

LISTING  1 

I  REM  —33  SPACES— 
10  PRINT  'ROUTINE  ADDRESS* 
20  INPUT  ADD 
30  FAST 

40  FOR  X=0  TO  32 

50  POKE  ADD+X,  PEEK  (16514+X) 

60  NEXT  X 

70  SLOW 

80  STOP 

100  LET  X=16514 
110  LET  T=0 
120  LET  A$=" 

130  IF  A$="  THEN  INPUT  A$ 

140  IF  A$=*S'  THEN  PRINT  'CHECK  SUM  =  ";T,P 

150  POKE  X,16tC0DE  A$+C0DE  A$(2)-476 

160  LET  T=T+  PEEK  X 

170  IF  PEEK  16442(=2  THEN  SCROLL 

180  PRINT  X;'  *;A$(1  TO  2) 

190  LET  X=X  +  1 

200  LET  A$=A$(3  TO) 

210  60T0  130 

LISTING  2 

16514     2A  04  40  28  ED  58  32  40 

16522    ED  53  04  40  01  30  00  ED 

16530     88  EB  AF  ED  52  54  5D  39 

16538     F9  2A  02  40  19  22  02  40 
16546  C9 


ZX-81    -  SOUND  ANALYSIS 

This  machine  code  program  for  the 
ZX81  draws  graphics  illustrating 
sound.   Sound   is  fed   in  on  the  Ear 
socket.    To   load  the  program,    create  a 
REM   line  H5  characters   long.    Use  any 
Hex  loader  to  enter  the  code.  The 
program   is  executed  by  RAND  USR  16526. 

If  you  want  the  computer  to  draw  one 
graphic  and  then  return  to  Basic 
type: 

POKE  16551,192  (Enter) 
POKE   16552,0  " 
POKE   16553,0  " 


Otherwise  the  computer  will  clear 
the  display  and  draw  again.  The 
program  returns  to  Basic   when  any  key 
is  pressed.      The  sub-routine  at  H082h 
( 1 651 U )  gives,    in  C  register,  the 
frequency  of  the  tone  on  the  Ear 
socket . 

Address       Value  to  be  entered 
(All    val ues   in  HEX ) 

H082  01  00  FF  DB  FE  30  20  01 

H08A  OC  10  F8  C9    16  00  CD  82 

H092  HO  2A  25  HO  2C  CO  H1  HA 

H09A  CB  38  CB  38  D5  CD  B2  OB 

HI  02  D1  1 H  D5  CB  72  CH  2A  OA 

H10A  D1  CB  B2   18  E1 

from   Your  Computer  magazine  May  1983 

GFC 

******************* 


SINC-LINK 


Ronald  M.    Cavin  II 
17  41  Marshlyn  Ct . 
Columbus,    OH   4  3  220  U.S.A. 


Dear  George, 

I  have  been  involved  in  some  very  interesting  things  over 
the  last  several  months  which  might  catch  the  eye  of  some  of 
your  readers.  Many  of  us  in  the  Timex/S inclair  world  have  had 
to  leave  our  beloved  machines  for,  of  all  things  IBM  clones!!  I 
happen  to  be  one  of  those  who  was  pushed  into  this  mode  a  few 
years  back.  I  now  own  a  386DX  clone,  with  70  meg  hard  drive, 
SVGA  monitor,  HD  3  1/2  and  5  1/4  disk  drives,  2400  baud 
internal  modem,  and  merit  mouse.  It's  a  pretty  impressive 
machine,  especially  since  I  put  it  together  with  several 
scrapped  PCB ' s .   My  cost   for   the  system  was  very  little. 

You  might  ask,  "What  is  he  telling  me  this  for?"  Well, 
enter  a  public  domain  program  called  JPP-B2!  This  a  Spectrum 
emulator  written  for  anyone  who  has  a  386  (or  above)  machine, 
with  a  VGA  monitor!  The  program  was  written  by  a  gentleman 
named  Arnt  Gulbrandsen  in  Norway.  You  should  find  a  copy  of  the 
program  enclosed  with  this   letter.    Feel   free  to  distribute  it. 

Basically  the  program  causes  the  386  to  operate  like  a 
Z80.  Before  you  can  fully  utilize  it,  however,  you  must  make  a 
copy  of  the  Spectrum  Rom,  and  get  it  over  to  the  IBM.  There  are 
several  ways  to  do  this.  You  could  enter  the  Spectrum  mode,  and 
write  a  simple  BASIC  program  to  copy  (POKE)  the  rom  code  from  0 
through  16384  into  ram  beginning  at  location  40000.  A  second 
approach  is  to  use  an  assembler  and  write  a  short  machine  code 
routine,  using  the  LDIR  command,  and  copy  it  over.  In  fact, 
some  assemblers  have  the  ability  to  copy  code  between  locations 
with  simple  resident  commands,  thus  eliminating  the  necessity 
for  wr  i  t  i  ng  any  move  routine. 

My  preference  was  to  enter  this  direct  command:  SAVE 
"SPECTR.C1"  CODE  0,16384.  This  copies  the  rom  to  tape.  (You 
cannot  use  this  method  to  copy  the  Timex  rom,  since  the  first 
8K  of  rom  is  paged.  You  get  8K  of  EXROM  followed  by  8K  of  HOME 
ROM).  When  the  SAVE  is  complete,  rewind  the  tape  and  enter  this 
command:  LOAD  " "  CODE  40000,16384.  This  puts  the  copy  of  rom 
into  ram,   beginning  at   40000,    extending  through  56384. 

The  last  step  is  to  make  a  copy  of  rom  to  disk.  Enter  the 
following  Larken  command:  RANDOMIZE  USER  100:  SAVE  "SPECTR.C1" 
CODE  40000,16334.  Now  we  can  move  full  steam  ahead.  Next  time 
we  will  transfer  the  rom  code  from  the  Timex  to  the  IBM.  I'll 
discuss  this  fully  next  article.  Meantime,  refer  to  NOV-DEC  '91 
and  MAR-APR  '92  issues  of  SINC  LINK  for  a  preview. 
t*y&4 ,  tfo^*rriAn  ft  fee 

be-twee*  comparers 


SINC-LINK 


text87  plus4  version  2 

bj    Hugh  H.  Howie. 


1  guess  I  was  probably  one  of  the  first 
to  get  plus4  which  is  the  updated 
version  of  text87,  which  is  a  vast 
improvement  on  Quill. 

Plus4  (version  1)  as  it  originally  arrived 
crashed  with  great  frequency  especially 
with  the  last  line  erased.  There  were 
other  problems  also,  but  that  was  the 
principal  one.  This  caused  me  to  lose  a 
lot  of  work  which  t  had  spent  a  lot  of 
time  putting  together.  I  was  most 
annoyed  and  got  a  letter  off  to  Software 
in  short  order  with  my  complaints. 

Now  at  this  point  I  would  like  to  make 
something  quite  clear,  when  I  review  a 
program  or  hardware,  I  will  write  of  my 
experiences,  I  will  not  hide  or  gloss  over 
any  fault  I  find  with  the  item  under 
review.  I  feel  that  if  t  find  a  fault  I 
should  mention  it,  then  others  will  know 
what  to  expect  should  they  purchase  that 
item.  I  will  not  at  any  time  make  glowing 
comments  just  to  please  the  purveyor  or 
producer  of  that  item.  Having  made  that 
point,  let's  get  on  with  the  meat  of 
plus4. 

After  my  letter  to  Software  a  reply  was 
not  long  in  coming,  with  VERSION  2.  This 
is  the  version  which  should  have  been 
sent  out  in  the  first  instance.  Not  only 
the  crash  problem  was  solved,  but  also  a 
lot  of  other  little  ones  which  made  Ver  2 
much  slicker  to  work  with.  Some  of  the 
menu  commands  had  been  altered 
slightly,  and  also  some  additions  had 
been  made  for  better  control. 

According  to  the  short  note  which  came 
with  version  2  the  problem  which  caused 

the     crashing     "  also     affected  the 

integrity  of  the  text  formatting  data 
stored  in  _T91  documents'*  What  this 
means  is  that  any  documents  produced 
with  version  1,  are  not  able  to  be  loaded 
into  version  2  other  than  as  an  ASCII 
file;  any  documents  so  made  lose  all 
layout  setup  etc  as  provided  in  the 
original  document. 

Version  1  came  with  a  good  manual.  It 
states  that  the  manual  is  "a  learning  aid 

for   the   use  of  text  87  and   is  not 

meant  to  be  a  specification  for  the  use  of 


text87."  Version  2,  as  I  received  it,  did 
not  have  an  up-dated  manual,  just  a  one 
page  note  that  a  few  changes  had  been 
made.  I  understand  that  Ver  2  as  now 
issued  comes  with  the  Ver  1  manual,  plus 
two  extra  pages.  I  have  not  seen  the 
extra  pages  as  yet,  but  would  like  to. 

One  thing  missing  from  the  manual  is  an 
Index,  I  made  up  my  own  index  from 
reading  the  manual  and  from  the  use  of 
all  the  menus  in  the  program,  so  that  I 
can  refer  to  this  index  and  see  where 
what  is  going  to  lead  me. 

Another  item  missing  from  many  manuals 
are  samples.  Plus  4  has  three,  a  "Sample 
Mail_merge",  "Sample  Document",  and  a 
"Sample  Manual"  All  very  useful  and 
informative. 

Version  2  is  touted  as  not  requiring  the 
aid  of  a  manual  as  there  is  plenty  on- 
screen help  available,  and  that  the  menus 
are  sufficient.  I  find  that  the  manual  is 
of  inestimable  value,  even  altho'  it  is  for 
version  1.  There  are  many  instances 
where  you  must  refer  to  the  manual  to 
get  any  action;  for  example,  try  setting 
the  "layout"  of  a  document  with  headers 
and  footers  (now  known  as  "text 
Sections")  without  using  the  manual!  It 
is  a  complicated  although  very  efficient 
operation  but  the  on-screen  help  is  not 
of  much  value  in  this  particular  instance. 
OH!  yes,  the  on-screen  manual  can  be 
printed  out  for  better  study,  but  it  is 
still  not  as  complete  as  the  original 
version  1  manual.  And  the  slip  of  paper 
which  comes  with  version  2  is  not  as 
complete  as  it  might  be. 

No  doubt  the  later  purchasers  will  be 
given  an  up-dated  manual.  I  intend 
writing  to  see  if  one  is  available. 

Selection  of  type  and  fount  to  use  is 
very  much  simplified.  There  are  lots  of 
Founts  supplied,  and  lots  of  Printer 
Drivers  to  select  from.  There  is  no 
reason  you  will  not  find  a  Driver  and  a 
Fount  to  suit  your  taste. 

When  Loading  a  file,  (and  also  when 
saving  a  file)   when   you   are  asked  for 
the  name  of  the  file,  by  pressing  one  of 


SINC-LINK 


17 


the  Arrow  keys,  a  display  of  the  files  on 
the  default  data  disk  is  displayed. 
Selection  from  this  list  is  by  use  of  the 
Arrrow  keys,  and  then  the  file  is  loaded 
automatically. 

Many  of  us  know  the  frustration  of 
having  a  stack  of  three  or  four  disks 
and  only  being  able  to  save  to  #1  or  #2. 
Version    1    was  one  of  those,   but  ver  2 
will   save  to   whatever   you    wish  almost, 
e.g.  RAM8_.    DEV,  NET,  WIN  etc. 

Speed  of  scrolling  up  or  down  is  really 
fast.  It  is  possible  to  scroll  one  line  at  a 
time,  or  by  paragraph  or  by  page. 
Search  or  Search/Replace  is  equally  fast 
and  efficient.  Found  before  finger  leaves 
key. 

There  is  an  excellent  Spelling  Checker 
available  with  two  English  dictionaries. 
Also  a  French  ,  a  German 
The  '  Q  t  y  p  _d ic tio n ar y '  is  easy  to  use,  but 
there  is  also  a  'bigger'_dictionary  which 
should  just  about  satisfy  the  needs  of 
the  most  fastidious  and  demanding 
writer.  Unfortunately  this  'bigger'  dict- 
ionary takes  up  a  horrendous  amount  of 
memory,  and  is  intended  only  for  those 
with  the  Gold  Card  or  Mega  ST's. 
However,  the  regular  dictionary  is 
adequate.  Replacement  or  amendment  of 
any  given  word  is  at  the  users 
discretion  or  automatically  on  demand. 
Sorry,  it  will  not  correct  typing  errors 
on  its  own!  Should  your  document 
contain  words  which  are  not  in  the 
dictionary  then  it  is  a  simple  operation 
to  incorporate  them  in  the  regular 
dictionary,  or  even  to  make  up  a 
"specialised"  dictionary  of  your  own. 

Any  spelling  checker  is  only  good  to  a 
degree.  Should  you  use  the  word 
"their"  instead  of  "there",  or  "wine" 
instead  of  "whine",  or  if  you  type  i 
instead  of  I,  no  spelling  checker  is  going 
to  get  you  out  of  that  one!  Still,  it  can 
assist  in  pointing  to  real  bloopers.  Yes, 
it  can  be  handy,  but  I  still  prefer  to 
rely  on  my  own  knowledge  such  as  it  is. 

When  you  wish  to  Print  the  document, 
you  are  given  an  option  to  preview  it 
just  as  it  will  go  to  the  printer.  This  is 
an   excellent  feature  as   you   can   see  on 


screen  exactly  how  it  will  appear  on 
paper.  One  serious  flaw  I  came  across  is 
that  I  cannot  find  a  way  to  print  a 
couple  of  lines,  it  has  to  be  the  complete 
page.  With  the  original  text87  you  could 
print  three  or  four  lines  if  so  desired. 

It  is  possible  to  have  more  than  one 
document  in  memory  at  the  same  time, 
and  to  switch  from  one  to  the  other,  and 
also  to  have  a  portion  of  each  document 
on-screen  at  the  same  time.  You  can  have 
parts  of  three  or  four  documents  on 
display!  Alright  it  can  be  a  bit  messy  on 
occasion,  but  it  is  still  very  handy  if 
you  wish  to  work  one  document  and  have 
the  other  there  for  reference. 

text87  in  its  original  form  took  a  lot  of 
work  to  learn  how  to  make  the  most  of 
it.  The  transition  to  plus  4  is  not  too 
hard  to  accomplish.  I  would  imagine  that 
plus  4  is  probably  much  easier  to  learn 
from  scratch  than  text 87. 

The  manual  takes  56  pages  to  tell  you 
how  to  do  what,  so  how  am  I  supposed 
to  do  the  same  thing  in  a  couple  pages? 
There  is  only  one  way  to  evaluate  this 
program,  and  that  is  to  try  it  for 
yourself.  I  am  sure  you  will  not  be  dis- 
appointed 

Plus  4  is  an  excellent  word  processor 
and  I  would  not  like  to  be  without  it. 
This  is  what  the  serious  writer  requires. 
I  can  ask  for  nothing  more  than  what  we 
have  here,  sure  I  have  a  couple  of  beefs 
about  it,  but  those  are  not  really  serious 
beefs,  and  with  more  acquaintance  with 
the  program,  those  should  be  eliminated. 

I  am  sure  glad  I  spent  the  money  getting 
plus4,  I  have  spent  some  time  mentioning 
version  1  and  version  2,  that  is  only  to 
show  you  that  Ver  2  is  all  that  it  should 
be.  I  would  not  be  without  plus  4.  I  am 
not  an  expert  on  word  processors,  but 
this  sure  hits  the  spot  with  me.  I  can 
hardly  ask  for  more.  Plus  4  is  first 
class.  The  way  we  all  like  to  go. 
Expensive- Yes .  Extensive- Undoubtedly . 
If  you  like  to  write  get  plus  4. 

Available  from  EMSOFT,  PO  Box  8763, 
Boston.  MA  02114  (052792) 


18 


SINC-LINK 


2068  &3OTD  BCllEEZI 

(with  a  1000  supplement) 

Dale  Fritz,  SEATUG 

Most  of  us  know  that,  the  2068  has 
a  second  independent  screen  (known  as 
Display  File  2-see  pg  248  of  the  2068 
User  Manual),  but  methods  to  easily 
use  this  screen  are  not  widely  known. 

My  interest  was  in  after  drawing  some 
elaborate  Hilbert  Curves  on  the  main 
screen,  I  wanted  to  print  a  Menu  to 
give  choices  of  Copy  or  continue  in 
various  modes.  The  Menu  would  destroy 
the  main  screen  and  there  wasn't  much 
room  in  Lines  22,  23  for  a  Menu.  How 
could  I  use  the  second  screen  for  my 
Menu  and  then  go  back  to  the  first 
screen  with  my  picture  intact? 

The  2068  Technical  Manual, 
Appendix  C,  has  16  pages  of  machine 
code  concerning  the  second  screen, 
where  one  can  Clear  Screen,  Set 
Cursor,  Print  Character,  Scroll,  etc. 

My  needs  were  much  more  modest. 

Stan  Lemke,  of  Desktop  Publishing 
fame,  published  a  small  program, 
"Blink",  in  SyncWare  News  which 
considerably  simplifies  use  of  the 
second  screen.  There  are  three 
routines : 

A.  Read  a  modest  amount  of  data 
from  a  Data  statement  and  initiate  the 
second  screen. 

B.  Build  a  Menu  (or  whatever)  on 
the  main  screen  and  transfer  it  to 
screen  2. 

C.  Bring  screen  2  back  to  screen  1 
for  editing  and  improvement.  Use 
routine  B  to  return  the  improved 
version  to  screen  2. 

As  one  could  guess,  there  are 
some  limitations.  LIST,  PRINT,  PLOT, 
DRAW,  etc.  will  not  work  in  Display 
File  2.  Even  more  disconcerting,  you 
can't  get  any  messages  from  the 
computer  when  using  the  second  screen. 

All  the  messages  are  being  printed  on 
the  main  screen  and  you  aren't  there. 

The  answer,  say,  in  case  of  a  Menu, 
is  to  provide  safeguards  around  an 
adequate  INPUT  response  and  get  back 
to  the  main  screen. 

OUT  255,0  brings  in  the  main  screen. 
(Display  File  1) 

SINC-LINK 


OUT  255,1  brings  in  the  second 
screen.   (Display  File  2) 


8990  REM  ..SR  A-INIT  2nd  SCN. . 
9000  DATA  46,0,62, 1,211,244,219, 
255 , 203 , 255 , 211 , 255 , 62 , 6 , 245 , 251 
,205,142,14,219,255,203,191,211, 
255,175,211,244,241,254,128,32,4 
, 50 , 91 , 104 , 251 , 201 , 33 , 0 , 64 , 17 , 0 , 
96,1,0,27,237,176,201,33,0,96,17 
,0,64,24,242 

9010  FOR  i=23383  TO  23440:  READ 
a:  POKE  i,a:  NEXT  i:  RANDOMIZE  U 
SR  23383:  OUT  255,0:  RETURN 

9090  REM  . .SR  B-SCN  1  to  SCN  2.. 
9100  RANDOMIZE  USR  23421:  RETURN 

9190  REM  . .SR  C-SCN  2  to  SCN  1.. 
9200  RANDOMIZE  USR  23433:  RETURN 

Here  is  a  short  demo  which  plots  a 
circle  on  screen  1  and  gives  a  COPY, 
CONTINUE  Menu  in  screen  2.  To  improve 
the  Menu,  GOTO  500.  If  you  BREAK 
while  the  Menu  is  on  the  screen,  enter 
OUT  255,0. 

10  REM  . .SCREEN  2  DEMO. . 
20  REM  CODED: Dale  Fritz, SEATUG 
90  REM  ..INITIATE.. 
100  GO  SUB  9000 

110  PRINT  AT  3, 10; "MENU"; AT  5,8 
;"0.  VIEW  SCREEN"; AT  6,8; "1.  COP 
Y",*AT  7,8;"2.  CONTINUE"; AT  18,0; 
"Enter  Choice" 

120  GO  SUB  9100 

190  REM  ..MAIN  PROGRAM.. 

200  CLS:  LET  x=132:  LET  y=87: 
LET  r=5 

210  FOR  i=l  TO  10:  CIRCLE  x,y,r 
220  PAUSE  75:  OUT  255,1 
230  LET  z$=INKEY$:  IF  z$=""  THE 
N  GO  TO  230 
240  IF  CODE  z$<48  OR  CODE  z$>51 
THEN  GO  TO  230 
250  OUT  255,0 
260  IF  z$="0"  THEN  PAUSE  0 
270  IF  z$="l"  THEN  COPY:  GO  TO 
290 

280  IF  z$="3"  THEN  STOP 
290  LET  r=r+5:  NEXT  i 
300  STOP 

490  REM  . .ADD  TO  MENU. . 

500  GO  SUB  9200:  PRINT  AT  8,8;" 

3.  STOP" 
510  GO  SUB  9100:  PAUSE  50:  GO  T 

0  200 

CONT. 
19 


1000  SUPPLEMENT 

One  can  save  and  immediately 
print  back  screens  with  the  1000.  It 
involves  saving  the  screen  in  a 
string,  then  simply  printing  the 
string    to      restore        the  screen. 

Consider  the  main  screen  as  AS  and 
the  second  screen  as  BS .  Using  the 
following  routines  and  PRINT  AS,  PRINT 
B$ ,  a  very'  comparable  demo  to  that 
above  could  be  made. 

8990  REM  . .SAVE  MAIN  SCREEN . . 

9000  DIM  A$(70A) 

9010  FOR  K=0  TO  21 

9020  FOR  L=l  TO  32 

9030  LET  A$(L+32*K)=CER$  PEEK  (P 

EEK  16396+256*PEEK  16397+L+33*K) 

9040  NEXT  L 

9050  NEXT  K 

9060  RETURN 

9090  REM  ..SAVE  SECOND  SCREEN.. 
9100  DIM  B$(704) 


9150  NEXT  R 
9160  RETURN 


Postscript:  Alternately,  there  is  a 
2068  WINDOWS  Demo  in  the  SEATUG 
Library,  which  could  be  studied  and 
used  for  a  Menu  instead  of  the  second 
screen.  However,  if  I  had  remembered 
that  sooner,  we  would  not  have  had 
these  neat  screen  subroutines. 


ZX81    -  SEARCH  AND  REPLACE 

Searce  and  Replace  will  search 
the  screen  for  a  character  you 
specify  and  replace   it  with  any 
other.      Load  this  machine  code 
routine   into  a  REM  staement   in  the 
first   I  ine  of  a  program.    The  I  ine 
should  be  no  shorter  than  23  bytes 
long.    Search  and  Replace  runs   in  a 
16K  ZX  81  only. 

Z-80  Ass ' y  List'g     Hexadec i ma  I  dump 


LD  HL,  (D.FILE) 

2A 

OC  40 

LD  B,  24d 

06 

19 

DEC  HL 

28 

INC  HL 

23 

LD  A,  (HL) 

7E 

CP   1  18 

FE 

76 

JRNZ  *  3 

20 

03 

DJNZ  -  8 

10 

F8 

RET 

C9 

CP  CHRS(n) 

FE 

CHRSf n ) 

JRNZ  -  13 

20 

F3 

LD  (HL),  CHR$(x) 

36 

CHR$( x ) 

JR  -  17 

18 

EF 

When  a  char  act  er   is  to  be 
replaced,   Poke   16530,   CHR$(n)  - 
where  CHR$(n)  means  the  character  to 
be   searched  for,    and  POKE  1653U-, 
CHR$  (x)  -  where  CHR$  (x)  means  the 
char  act  er  to  be  replaced,    then  do  a 
RAND  USR  165 7  4. 

From   Your  Computer  magazine  Aug  '82 
page  85  GFC 


20 


SINC-LINK 


RAMBLINGS 


QL 


Did  anybody  ever  get  a  "  MOUSE  "  going  with  a 
I  understand  that  a  certain    type    of  mouse 
quite  well  with  the  2068. 

The  QL  User  Guide  in  the  concept  section 
TITLE  of  "  JOYSTICK  "  Page  27  says  that  the  two 
and  CTL2  will  accept  two  Joysticks  . 

CTL1 

cursor  up 
cursor  down 
cursor  left 
cursor  right 
space 
work,  I  have  used 
using  a  mouse  .  I 
that  some  software  could  be  obtained  from  Sinclair 
Did  anybody  succeed  in  getting  this  software  ?  did 


QL. 
will 


work 


under  the 
ports  CTL1 


MODE 

UP 

down 
left 
right 
f  i  re 

And  they 
wonder  about 


CTL2 
F4 
F2 
F1 
F3 
F5 

them  before 
remember  reading 


however  I 
at  one  time 
Research  . 
it  work  ? 


Louis  Laf err i ere 

MORE  RAMBLINGS   "  QL 

If  you  have  been  following  the  saga  of 
CARD  here  ,  you  must  have  gone  through  the 
in  reading  the  blow  by  blow  account  of  Hugh 
with  both  of  these  projects. 

However  I  think    the    result  certainly 
effort.  I  haven't    been  convinced  as    yet  to 
but 
the 


text  87  and  GOLD 
same  agony  I  did 
Howie's  struggle 


was    worth  the 
get    a  GOLD  CARD 

I  did  order  and  have  received  "  text87plus4  that  is 
updated  version  of  text  87.  I  must  say  that  the  result  of 


all  the  efforts  of  the  producers  as  well  as  Hugh's 
contribution  to  the  project,  have  ended  up  with  a  worthwhile 
WORD  PROCESSOR  .  Much  easier  to  use  and  with  prompts 
available,  it  is  a  dream  to  load  and  to  start  producing  some 
outputs.  I  have  already  used  the  "  mail  merge  "  option  to 
write  5  letters  (  all  the  same  excepts  for  the  addressees  " 
with  a  minimum  of  bother. 

I    certainly    can      recommend      the      new      version  of 
text87plus4. 


Louis  Laferriere 
QL  -  Ramblings 


Over  the  years  a  steady  contributor  to  our  "  SINCLINK  "  newsletter 
and  cur  QL  library  has  been  Mr.  Swenson.  I  believe  he  now  resides  in 
California,,  Well,  Eome  o-f  his  programs  are  quite  successful,  e.q. 
LISTER,  QLcrypt  II  etc.  .  He  even  dabbled  in  writing  a  new  language  for 
the  QL,  "  small  C  I  am  afraid  that  was  too  much  for  me.  However  he 
also  gave  us  "  MAILLIST  "  which  by  itself  works  quite  well  ,  with  the 
exception  that  the  "  ZIP  "  and  "  STATE*  "  did  not  fit  our  requirements. 
So  I  reworked  the  file  with  the  end  results  that  we  can  now  use  it  far 
our  Canadian  mail  ling  standards.  I  did  not  bother  changing  "  STATE*  " 
for  "  PROVINCE*  "  but  I  did  enlarge  the  display  on  the""  screenl  "so 
that  the  full  name  of  the  province  will  be  shown  =»nd  printed  and  nnt- 
just  the  first  "  TWO  LETTERS  '«  as  in  the  american  system.  Also  our 
postal  code  is  a.  combination  of  diqits  and  letters  therefore  I  Added 
"   *   "   to  the   "    ZIP   "  field. 


T   will      be  giving  a   copy     of  the  revised  program      to  HUGH  HOWIE  to 
include  with  our  library. 

Louis  Laferriere 


SINC-LINK 


21 


by  Michael  J,  Di  Rienzo 

from  SWYM  Newsletter 

NOTE:  REPRINTING  OR  REPRODUCING  THIS 
COLUMN  WITHOUT  THE  EXPRESSED  WRITTEN 
PERMISSION  OF  THE  AUTHOR  IS  HEREBY 
PROHIBITED.  FOR  PERMISSION,  WRITE  THE 
AUTHOR  IN  CARE  OF  THIS  PUBLICATION.) 

One  of  the  "must  have"  utilities 
that  any  self-respecting  software 
"hacker"  needs  in  his/her  arsenal  of 
tools  is  a  DATA  line  maker.  Although 
there  are  several  available , especially 
for  the  Spectrum  ROM,  my  favorite  one 
appeared  in  the  May  1988  Newsletter  of 
the  Capital  Area  Timex  Sinclair  Users 
Group  by  H.E.  Weppler.  I  have 
simplified  it  and  moved  the  CODE  to  a 
safe  area  below  BASIC. 

This  program  performs  the  opposite 
of  POKing  CODE  into  RAM  addresses  from 
a  DATA  line.     It  will    create    a  user 

specified  DATA  line  containing  CODE 
extracted  from  a  user-specified  range 
of  addresses.  For  example,  if  you  have 
some  machine  code,  font  code,  or'  an 
ASCII  text  file  located  somewhere  in 
memory,  and  would  like  to  extract  the 
code  and  place  it  into  DATA  statements 
to  use  in  another  program,  this  simple 
program  can  be  MERGEd  or  LOADED  to  do 
the  job.  Enter  the  following  BASIC 
program  and  be  sure  to  RUN  line  9950 
to  initialize  the  short  machine  code. 
The  program  will  then  automatically 
RUN.  You  will  be  prompted  for  a  line 
number  to  assign  the  DATA  statement. 

Any  line  number  will  do  if  it  is  less 
than  9900.  Next  INPUT  the  starting 
address  of  the  CODE  you  wish  to 
extract.  Lastly  you  will  be  prompted 
for  the  end  address  of  the  range  of 
bytes  you  want  to  extract.  I  recommend 
that  you  don't  extract  more  than  150 
bytes  at  any  one  time.     If        you  do, 


editing  that  DATA  line  will  be 
difficult.  If  your  CODE  is  more  than 
150  bytes  long  then  keep  track  of  the 
line  numbers  and  address  ranges  and 
RUN  line  9900  until  you  have  all  your 
CODE  placed  into  BASIC  lines.  'The 
machine  code  used  in  this  program  is 
completely  relocatable.  To  quickly  see 
how  this  program    works,  try  this: 

RUN  line  9900.  At  the  prompt, 
enter  10  (ENTER.)  .  That  means  we  want 
to  make  a  DATA  statement  at  line  10. 
The  next  prompt  asks  you  to  enter  the 
starting  address  of  the  CODE.  Let's 
extract  the  CODE  from  this  program 
which  begins  at  address  24311,  so 
input  that  number.  Next,  INPUT  the  end 
address  of  the  range  of  addresses  we 
are  extracting,  ie.     24352  (ENTER). 

Now  you're  done.  Compare  your 
result  with  line  9965.  If  your  CODE 
is  lengthy,  break  it  down  into  several 
DATA  statements  by  re-RUNning  line 
9900  several  times. 

Have  fun I 
Happy  TIMEXing. . . 

"MKDATA"  By  Michael  J.  Di  Rienzo 

9900  INPUT  "Input  Line  if  to  put  DATA 

( <9900) " J LL 
9910  INPUT  "Input  CODE  Start 

address  :SS 
9915  INPUT  "Input  CODE  End 

address  ";EE 
9920  LET  R$=STP$  LL+CHRS  228 
9925  FOR  N=SS  TO  EE 
9930  LET  R$=R$+STR$  PEEK  N+"f" 
9935  NEXT  N:  LET  R$=RS(  TO  LEN  R$-l) 
9940  RANDOMIZE  USR  24311 
9945  STOP 

9950  FOR  N=24311  TO  24352 
9955  READ  M:  POKE  N,M:  NEXT  N 
9960  RUN 

9965  DATA  33,19,0,9,229,229,42,97,92, 
43,43,205,99, 19. 14,82,205, 
187 , 44 , 35 , 78 , 35 : 70 , 35 , 229 , 
197,42,89,92,2  .'J,  205  ,187, 
18,209,193,225,237,176, 
205,58, 14,201 

9999  SAVE  "MKDATA"  LINE  9950 


22 


SINC-LINK 


1.1 1  111 

-J  Ml 

'."  iTj 

111 

P  X 
-1  P' 

p 


IJ.I 


fa 


l-J  !-- 

..ti  i:it 

1.1.1  'X 


75  o 

41  nt 


Ci  M  i  H 
U  i.O  CTi 

I)  J. 

U.I  £. 
!~  •  -H  P' 

o  x 

-Tl  O  tU-t 
!-  P'  !~ 

0.1  0.1 

Ml  Cl  JZ 
|Tj  l~  P> 

r:  .rj 


« in 
mi  -.  \  a 

i'l  I  i.'.Ti  rrj 

i  a 

p  ....  oj 
n5  •"-■(  +5 

0.1  75  ■ 

ill  ij.l 

75  W 

P  ri  i.o 

i::  --■( 

41  I...I  != 
I  i'l  \Z  id 
-■i  !.j 

0.1 

>  ijj 

o 

'■"  *"'J  iX 


O  o  o.i 

'7i4-'  m-i 

a  i  ri 

•:+.  . 
O   -■  14.1  75 

P  Xi  iil 

•~i  ri  4-:' 


.vj  I 


!«.  4-'  I/I 

an  '-•» 


il.  i.i.i  i.i.i 
■-  p 

p  +.:> 
■x  o.i 

0  to 

I.' I  P' 
t— I  ill!  -H 

<u  o  3 
en 

41  7^ 
■■h  iTj  ai 
hi  M'j 

«  41 ""' 

1  i  'i  i35  I'j.t  » 

,.i..  .c 

:ri  o 

ifi  4-:'  o  u.i 

-j  >::  p  p 

u.i  G 
...  i.o  u.i 

i~:     75  01 

,   as  = 


3  41  O 

0  SI  X 
P  -7  _  'X 

JZ  CU  it]  41 

1  i'i  x>  x  ~* 

<  -4  p'  O'i  "i 

3  41  O  75 

•—i  G 

H  W  O.  ;H 

O  41  >Ti  M 

i.O  2;  14J 
X  X 

vX  Ci  P  I 


 i  m  i  !■•■■ 

P       111  iTj 

ix 

>Tj 

'•4-       h-'  -— 

O  <— I  111 

O 

X  O  'rj  -til 

Ci  ,-C  !»  i=3 

P1  O  4' 
u  i.o  17"  M'i 

0.1    J   •'-<  M  l 

X  J.™  X  '14' 

•-4  171  O  I 

T3  -i  i,l,l 

...  LO  73 

riS 

1,1.1  ii4' 


I..J  -    +-'  !i„ 

—i  « i~  ai 

■•i  u_  41 

IX  «  M  i  -h 
IX  iX 

41   «  Ci 

ii  I  X!  Cl  « 

X  3  O  4| 
41  d-' 

~\  111     -.  iTj  114' 

a.  4~'  ."-ii  s> 
i=  itj  ■•  i?i 

1.3  41  rl  i.i'i  I— 
P  —i  17"  0.1  'i5 
•  rj  =i  i3S  -I 

o  >  .tj  ri3  f- j 
i.o  :no.i  crix:  uj 

i~h  —4  p     h-  Cl 

iX  O  iTj  O  Qi  I 
fiL-CSO  H 

-  a  p  u_.  x: 


p  H  41  ^ 


Ci  o 

1.0  O  1.0  P 

OJ  C.i  ~ 
!L  O  4-'' 

"tn  x  -  •  ii?! 

•-4  IJJ  I'll  O 

"""  -  ^  .q  a 

iij     >  o 
H  41  2: 

('3 

;r  jx;  i—i  -  • 
41 N  41  i~ 
41     Si  a 

ri  75 

U_  Cl  1.0  iTj 

41  Zti~ 

>  P  O 
41  _HZ! 

ri  b  

Ci  Ci  41 
'Ji    •-!  ri 

&  4™1  ll«- 
41  'Tj  M  l  P  -  • 

>  iL.  rti  P 

iTj  I7>P  Ml  lj| 

!L.  n-j  P  --i 
Q.  '4-  H  '4- 


75  0.1  ill  ij.1  T5  (Z  73 

'  ii  P  P1  P1  O  |3[  ii4 
P  UJ1 

'4.1  IX 

0.1  ill  73  41 

OJ  Ij'i  |r  M'i  iL 
M  i      .  rj  P  iiS  -  •  O 

!~      IJJ  3  ill  ■& 

nS  iL  l- 
O  Ci  ijj  i.H  O 
P     i~  ri     75  mi 

"        P'  75 
17"  Cj  i.     ir  iii 
4-i  >  .tj     rx  Xi 
2      S  41  OJ  O 

:::i  i'"i  Ji  P  .  -•  ijj  o 
P  LU  ri      -    x:  H 

Ii.  2.  Ij'i       Ci  73  4-'1 
OH  .pr-i 
Sj-X:     P  ill  ri  P  41 
iij-     4i  m'i     Ci  ri  ai 
o  i.x  x;  .'d  i„  ij  o  •  ~* 
uj  p  s  4I  i- 

CU  UO         TJ  P  75 

P  S  •'+  iii  ri  -i  Ki 

•Ti  Ci  .£  i.  m  i  >< 

i-     P1  iL.  N 

HI  CTi  m'i      ill  .Tj  ill 

o      x  iii  3  i. 

..^    l'      .  .  ',    "IN  mm! 


■  i'.i  t!i  0.1  0.1  ill 

!■'":  jm  x:  s_ 

.  Tj         P  O 


rri 

i7i  Cl  .tj  i_ 

41  -,.  --ri. 


r  ci 


mi  ai  41  -7i  mi  ir  rri  p 

■ij  .-r  75  p  f~  .ii  i?i-  -i 


IJJ  -5— 1  I —  111 

H  UJ  :=  M'i  ir  s.  75  :L. 

m  i  '-i  o.i  iTj  o  ir  o 

n  'X  75  l'i  'X  .tJ  S. 


-rj  4. 
0.1 


i'U  ta  .j;  ijj  41 
-4  O  P  M'i  0.1 
'IL  X       O  ri  M'i 

Ci  'X  P1  \~ 
O  H 

75  i.o 

..        7*  '.w 

i..i  u.i  n  -< 

3  P  iX75  :::i 

P  P  ri     .7i  4«i 

0.1  O     ijj  u 

\~'->  '~\  iL  H  -C  -i 

m'i  ij'i  i:.I:i     4-'  !,".L 
.rj  3 

l~4  41  M  l  0.1  - 

!•'"  Ii..  1.0  Xi  U.I 

41  41  ri  ir  „c 
X:  i.o  .  rj  .rj  .p 
4~'  i.U  ."i  1.3 

X:  41  75  i.i'i 
75  P'  75  ii  41  d 
41     ir     p  o  , 

iTj  41  l.p,  ClJ 
,_|     -.,--1         .  ^ 

0.1  -  ni  ri  X  •  ~i 

Ci  IX  '>  m'i  41  75  75 
41  C.i  0.1  .Tj      0.1  !'.-: 

LI-h  ijj  iO.  .ij 

E  Ci  i—i  ri  C\ 

0.1  iX      '11.  Ci  '..'!:  H 

>  a  X  X  4-'  # 

'Tj      0.1  0.1  i7i 

"*"  llj  Itj  x!  4-1  it! 

H  X  0.1  rj  .'fj  0J  .  I 
-  CD  73  P  P  K  j 


m'i  X  73 

'7 

.tj  Crli-H 

LU 

U 

Cj 

4J  X 

rrj 

'ir  X*  '•' 1 

tj. 

U  4~' 

Ml  111 

Cl  ~i 

0j  t'4 

r„i 
P 

4  -4  75 

41  X' 

ife 

riS  75 

m,i  ::5 

0.1  OJ  - 

,.i!j  Cj 

i7i  id.  iii 

T3 

111  l« 

uj  .r 

1.  j  •  -1 
>r.i  Ci  P 
■Ti 

p  .;.(.. 

■—I  i.."i 

M  l        .-i  i—l  +-i 
•-I  111  .Tj  ,lj 

-i.il  i—i     o  » 

i..i  Ci  Q  M  i 

p.     ;r  +J.  C3  i. 

■  "4  1 3  •  h     H  41 

4-'  1.0  !7l  i.i'i 

Ci  ri 
-, .-.  '4-  ■  -i  ill 
ill  X  Ci      &  41 

133  111        P  '"4  L. 
iS   Ti"'  'Tj  P  l"l 

Q  —i  OJ  iS 
Cj  I J  ■  -4  ii.  H 
r-  :2i:  £  Cn<0  75 
0.1  ii.     >■■:  ir 
i"  'X  .rj  N  .tj 


p  41  41   »  41  OJ  ill 

••  41  x  ci  £  x:  i: 

!.-  i.O  O  Ci  P  P  P 

73  iS  O 

,  H i  <H  » 

75  «  Ci  !•-  P  ai 

ill  i7i  X  4-i'  •  -i  ri  Ci 

£  ;r  ai         o  >'<S 

H  s     'IS  uX 

p  _£    ~!  P  I  'll         M  l 

O  P  'i:i  P  P 
•     I'd  "•,  0.1  Ci  ri  'X 
i.o  17'  O  l  H  X  41  Ci  '.1 
ri  P  X  03  4-' 

-4  j-;:  i7"  :ui 
X  '.0  N  0.*  a  i.3 
75  iX'  -i  >Tj  i»-  4«i'  'Ti 
ir  m'i  UJ  --I 
h  H  X  ul 
X  Ol  P  X  X  uJ  X 
0.1  75  I  OJ  0J  >  O 
Sa  i~  >•■  'X  3  '  tj  'X 
,rjk|  -|.:t.  _  x! 

O  i..i  XI 

..0  x  ■.  m  i    x:  H  ici 

h  41 H  X      3  •-' 
P      41 H      O  CC 

M'|  4J  >  Ml  Ml  IX 
i~i  .tJ  i?i  41    ••  'X  '~i 

o  xi  .  ri  •  -i  ai  '-(•■  a:  p 
o  iX>--i  n  ri  =i 
>4-  i.o     41  Mi  .Ji   •  O 

- 1  (=  J41  M'I  41  Xl 

M'i  Ci      -4  p  rl  >tJ 

-  P  41     ri  i.o 

i— i  H  Ci  X  1 1 1  O  m  i  ill 

._,        •  <H  Q   -I    }    •  — I  —4 

X    •  X  iH5  X  P  !-i 

ap  a.    4->  i=  P  -i 

'I  '-■<  <ti  115        -I  Ml  P 
ri  X        !—  !i-  ''ti  !-- 

IT  En  <ij  H  Ct.  'Tj 


'X 


H  O 
171 

M 


X  O 

Cj  H  « 

'X  4-.' 

.■ '.  ~i 
!7l  ij.l 

!"•  isii  Ml 

■h  .-1  T3 

P  'Tj 

M'|    •.  41 

I'd  H  X 

i.o  a 

Xi><  i.o 
ir  N 

■  rj  H 

P  ai 
17'  ri  I 
ir  ci  >•: 

■  h  j3  (•••J 

Tj!  .Tj 
111  111  M  l 

'j     CTl  X 

T5  41 

it.  0.1  M'I 

41  ■— <  ~i 
41  3 
:X  Ci  »••< 

ils  .Tj 


LLJ 

LU 

a 

Cl 

LU 

LU 

Cl 

Cl 

UJ 

H 

h 

.j 

rj 

-J 

III 

LU 

h 

a 

i.O 

LU 

LU 

•LU 

G 

IJJ 

LU 

M'j 

i,0 

Zi  LO 

LLJ 

1,0 

LX 

H 

ca: 

cr 

i.O 

LX 

LU 

a: 

iX 

:c 

LU 

□ 

g 

t 

h 

l:,"j 

LU  "I 

h 

rx: 

Q 

b 

LLJ 

m 

z  -o:lo 

r 

Ci 

-j 

i.o 

6ct-G 

M'j 

H 

i.O 

i.i  i 

t'D  o 

H 

1™ 

h- 

h 

"i; 

IX 

CJ  ii  Q." 

Z'J 

cc: 

LJJ 

i-.':i 

•  uj  io  ijj  c:i 

□ 

i-ij 

a:    h  'I 

Zi 

i 

a; 

ti 

Ct  -s+  ii  z 

Ci 

!:; 

Cl 

1,0 

i 

LL 

IJJ 

H 

LL 

ii  CO  G  Cl 

H 

r 

r 

-J 

LL 

a: 

H 

(— 

h 

IJJ 

H 

i.O 

IX 

IX 

I'll 

a: 

iii: 

C 

Ci 

rx 

h 

itiwit  imiiii 


il  mtnnm 


m 


:  rt 


H 

Q 

•a 

i: 

m 
oi 


"T  I'D  CI 

5.'  -b  "J  H 
rt  c+  3" 

'      c+  if 

i~-  Ei'  3" x 

™i  "7  i'f t  n 
-hi  if 

O  "   H  ••- 


Vl 


H  01 . 


,•  +  !X> 

:-c  o  ~r< 

If  If 

if  "5  zi 

t- !»  .:■+ 

•™i  i— 


(ft  itt  ::! 
'if  itt 

!<■.  r;i  s 

oi  t~* 
cii  p  a> 
~i  r+ 
H  O 
»-•  "7 

|Tl  ="! 

s!  it. 

"J  "0 
in  -J 
O 

-b  o  "J 
ci  o  fx; 


rt  if  -j  o  o 

3"  a  t  t-  r.i 
ft  'via  ITH.C 


■0 


U'i  OX  ■•  -H 

i'~  l"l  O  :-'  » 

XJ  =!  £  H 

X  c+  tti  ir+  "ii  -i 

O  ft.'  "7  3"  El' 

;.rj  o  "5  c+ 

H  rt  .r+  l.i'l  _,1  3"  01 

trj     i™i  o  iti  if 

x       3"  i-  o 

0't  r+  O  I"  3" 

■•  3"  in  •**  x 

jf       fj.i  "7  "7 

i—*  17+  o  o 
1-  •     r-,-l  t-  ■  is?  3" 

c+  "   01  "i  Xi '-  • 
»   |_)      ,.-  m 
«  in  t.n 

Ct'i  H  >:  + !'-" 
»   (-..  171  ~i  |ij 

H  i5?  zi  P-' 
«   ro     i™-  O 

;r  %< 
>q  H-  ci  .  r 

"3  Ci  CI  CI  * 
O  O      "5  H 

f=  o  t  q  ■ 
TJ  "   r+  rt  i'..i'i 
O  itt  » 
H 

H     Ei'  ■ 

zl  f"-'  Zl  '- 
O'i  >r+  0. 
Itt  Itt  SX 
if  "7     fi«  :d 

Iti      X  -I 

VI  ft  ft  ft 


■■■■i  r  ■)      r  r-i 


I  I  H 
i.O  i.D  3" 
P  P  Itt 

EU  •=  3 
i"+T?  Itt 
O  C 
•r+  zi  itt 

|f  ~1 
it"  O 

•••1  .Xi  Xi 
jit  p  h 

™!  It'  Xl 

vi 

ft  fl.i 
.;•+  «  '3 
|Tl 

■Hi!  Xi 

It"  VI  El' 


-b  H' 

s$ 

-C  p.< 
O  < 
C  tu 

St- 
(~< 

o  ?r 

O  t— ' 

"0  Itt 

'X*  . 


H  I 
«    1.0  EP 

o't  ^  h' 


— I  r"! 

3J  3' 

|Tl  It"  I'fl 
:|r 

1— '13  "7 

Itl  "J  ft-' 

,■•+  r:t 

rt-i,i:;i  3" 

Iti  !t 

-ij  tj.i  n 

!i!i!  '.'I 


itt  [ft 

".•■i  ir+  E? 
itt  „ 

tti 


3>T5  £• 
•H  3  Itt 
Xi  O  1-- • 

tXi 
i-..  -r 


•T  -b  !!•' 
itt  O  "D 


EE» 


1...  rfi 

:fj"'t  itt 

"II 

t~*  t-  • 

a  lf| 

ft  ft 

Iti  T 
!TJ.  l  b 

'1? 
'Xi 


3"  C 
rfi  ti 


••1  fj 


1    .  r" 
f+  f'1! 

3"  "':r 
p  |tt 

-i  ro  p 

S3  CJt 

it;  O'i  f" 

""  H 

oroi 

O  p.'  • 
O  C+  H 

iji  Li  'li.' 
m  itt 
l/l  Itl 


r  -i  ix;  r  1  fw  a.  tx:  a.  n 

n  n  "''I  O  l"l  XtX! 

1 '  c  ^  c+  ~; :™  r»f  1  '3  h 

i.O     17  t—   -  •   C  i.O  [ft  3 

|~S  :~  !~  VI  ft       !-•  H  It' 

n  ft  ft     -•;  rs     '■*■•■  _ 

IT  O  tX!  1—  —  W 

|Tl  f  t  3 

13     'XI  O 

p.'  >~.  '3  ~l  iX! 

■b  |H  O  O  fJ-' 

-n     i,q  .;•+  T3  P'' 

-b  ?r  H1  rt  '3  3"  S? 
O  itt      9.'  t--     IS.'  1- 


Iti 


+  -t' 


t.C  '3 

o 

it! 
itt 


•t  ?i' 

if  ¥= 
-1  t.n 
ifi  If 


t."i 


iti 


"I  1^3 


rn 

..  1-+  -n 

O      '31  O  H 
-|1i 
if 


!:: B  T l1?  0 

O  X)  I 


t.i<  o 


H  P>-' 

c5  c+  o  I 

ni  ij::  -  sr. 

-w  rtri~-3" 
c+  (ft  i;X  I'fi  "i  t~  ■ 
O 


1.1 1  i_ 

n  rfi  3"  i~  •  rfi  n  3 
i~.  w  S'  ri  In  3"  c+ 
p.*      *!.  3" 
t~»  3"  rfi  it1  O 

i~-     T  c+  t+  "3 
"•i  rt  it"     iX  [fi 
n        Xt  XI  EL* 
0.1  |ti  fi.i  <-)• 


o 


r.i' t—1 
rr  i-t  i— ■  r1  f 
itt  li' 


c+  ft 
Itt  "3 


O  '.'1 

b  c+ 

!!•  O  i  O  p  3" 

ri  o  "3  %<  ti  rl:t 


O't  EE!  rt-t-'E:! 

i;~  ft.'  rn  ~i  itt 
Tit  i—  3"    ~i  i~- 

O  ~i  ~i  ft.'  l~-  ''■"' 

SiS  t^-  b 
ft!       vi  ij.-.  x 

XiXI  Itt  ! 
O'l  "3  ; 
-  O  1 
iXJ  3" 


in  it^i 
c+  ''':i 


T  i-  - 
1.1  t~  • 
Itt 

•+142 


I'fl  (ft  I'fl 

C+  "f  7  ' 


ffi  fr 
s  rfi 


XI  X 
XI 


i--i.Q  3" 
in  -'I  I'i't 

l.i  I  0.' 

p::  EE!  m 
iti  w 


Ifu  "3 
,;■+ 

>■'.  t~  •  'n 

i.O  t—" 
P 


=1  Iti 


t.n 

p.'  Q 
13 

Xt  'n 

i-+      H  ifi  I'fl 

3"t-XP"-'  =i 

iti  :~i  rfi  "3  <:•+ 


n  Xt 
O  13 
13  X  H 


■b  a. 


Iti  p.'  p 


If  IX!  " 

in  o'i 
i— 1  O 
i'fi  ri  !!!r' 

,-+  !-•  |tl 

i-t  a> 

ffi  r+ 
......  u..  ,  , 

!X' 

— j  3"  O 

rn  in  p.' 

XI  ^' 
I —  i.o  In 
O  If 

ft  I -I 

a  i 

"    E5  '13 
If  !— 

If 


n 

0.3 

;d 
o 

:— 

-T| 

s 

'O 

Ti 

hi 

..I..I 

I'D 

™J 

rn 

^5 

o't 

t„>.t 

:|:fc 

„ 

ro 

H 

O 

X 
Xi 
Xi 

m 


O  3  0.iX!  j:- 
t.  ifi  Itt  "3  n 

p.<  o  if  r  i 

f'.J  pl>  i—  «S  "3  ':-" 
V?  ft  Itt  X  "'i  I 

|  i'fi  "3  Vt  a.' 

10  SX  "i  "  i-* 

•  13  -T.  T  I  '3  t-- 
tt  "3  3"  O  1,1 
H  6  O  I  !•- 

Cl      i.O  13  If 

3"    '"  h  "'' 

■r.i>  O  ..-t  i'.*i 

•  <  <:'+  t~-  3"  3" 

,ti  »    I—  (Xi  p.'  p.' 

i~i  m  ~i  :si 
IT  3:.  SXiX! 

if  O  3  •»• 

If  ts:  O  if 

—i  ••■   !'.u>  o  t'  lttX! 

"3  Ci 

i.O  ee<  "i|  i~.  -I 

I'fl  O  ij:  <    ,  If 

-I       iti  »n  i-t: 
c*  ro    sxx'  ''■| 
r-j  if 

C+  X  "3  f  t  If 
fx>  3*  01  I'fi  >•-■  c+ 

»•,'  p.i  |~i  13  fL'  ft 

ci.  —I  '••  i—1 1~"  (ft 
H«C  '3 

ro  ••- 

EE!  I/O  i=? 

O  "'  I  If  "b  >•- 

"i  >•.:  "3  ~i 
ifi  o     O  c+ 

O       :"r?  If  3" 

X  H  "3 

"X<        O  If 

'"i  if  O  H1  H* 
If  t.''t  O  O  ':•+  H 


H 


 H 

H 


•X  fa-  01 

<3  ro 

-3  _roif 

'■'i  IV1  '•'£  if 
c+  T 

n  if  I-- 

I-t-  ~r  "i  ~i 
if  if 

■•I  rx>  o 

•3  n:  !~ 

r~  if  o  itt 

|fl        !~  IT 

>:+  if 

iijj!  |1J  l-.  - 


•~l  o  t  Jt 
O  3" 

:iE:  EE!  :d  Ew 

»  ci 

Vi  EE!  I'fi 

If  <-* 

13  "3  3" 

O  '  i  If 
13 

i~  o  cn 

i— i  c 

p.'  c+  J> 

"3  1.0 
O 

O  Xi  Ei' 

ri  Z' 
If  4i-  0- 

'0 

i-  •  o  \y 

d  "3  If 


T  ri;  3: 

<ic  if  h  rn 

!?C£  r 

n  fri  b  X 
ti'  .;-»• 

=i  ro  ** 

<■+  ro 

X  H?  O 
i~.  O 
n  in 


'  ft 


ri 


in  x  "b 
o  i— ■  t.:;i 

:E  ft.'  !E? 

''  rn 
~i  |~  ru 

fZ  o  o 
ssi  c-i-  3" 

T  O 
Iti  vi  i." 
"3  fJ't 

•    =1  VI 

ft 
X  El' 
T  rt 
I- If 

n  i '1 


F 

vi  O 

If  H 

"1  -I  "*:" 

i-'l  I4i  If 


n  t— • 

C  i"+  "T 
X  "3  If 
iX  "3 

O 

ir+tX!  "3 
O 

f  +  r+  is? 
3"  O 
if  X 
'3  !IX  t-- 
If  O  O 

SP  1-.  i... 

3"  ct  a. 


Ei' 


3"0 
if  3_ 


O  Xt 
O  "!  3" 
5=  tX  O 
i-  T 

a^ 

%'C  "'J 
i.'fi 

13  O 


t-t  r-j 

t~«  x 

if  H 
<  H  vi 
if 

ft  H  ct 
<r+  •-■  3" 
t~-  :?  If 
If  X 

x  :■■<  if 

X 

P.I 

ro  h1  =i 

01  t.'j 

o  o 
o  a  =i 

rt 

13  If 
Q  Xi 

Ei.'  !X' 
ri 

O  13"  Itt 
If 

H 

-H  ':'+ 
3 3" 

o  c;i  Ei' 

13  'V  '' 
-1  if 

I-  -  O  fw 
ri  c+  t--1 
i-t  rfi  t™< 
If  o.  o 

X  s 

...I  '.O 


Ei'  If 


X 
IX 

r 
x 


x 

X 

'Ti 

rn 


if  if 


xi  hi  "b  Ei'  x  rnx 
-3  ro  13  a  Ei'  Ei'  3 

fj.>  O  O    •  +  O  t-  ■  O 
T3      p  p  ft  3"  n  =3 
3"  3"  vi  vi  i'fi  i'fi 
i~.  a>      ft ",:  13 
O  vi      '   ~i  O  O  Ei' 
■TiX.      X  XiXI 
•31  g3  "3  CJt  If 
«    '3  i~.  fZ  Ei'  Ci 
fx1  t.ti  X         ~i  tO 
XI  3"         T  if 

'T  rt  "Pi  i~l  |TI  •  •  t.C 
>-•  ;•■>'  !-•  t-r:  ~!  O 
n  jf  o  i~  •     "O  !~ 

•»!"  vi  i"  tX!  ie:  x:  3" 

H    •„    -1       i-.  Fj.i 

if     i—  p  < 
I"-  n  •••  i.c  t  -*  '!0  If 


ifi  r+  O     143  Xi 

"3  "3      If  C 

01  En  rt-  :;i  3M3 

W  '.'1  N  O  I'fi  '3 

'•-t'  o    "3  ro  o 

ri      Ei'  ESI  i43 

3"        l-t  !!'  i"t  <D  3 

5,1  |  0  Ei>  if  i  n  p.' 
Ii'i      i~i  '3      Q  p=l 
n      (•-■      "3  vi 


"3  « 

i4_ 

p.'  « 

if 

.33  X 

13 

"3 

■r+  Ei' 

'n  3"  X 

1- "  -s 

o 

ri  r~ 

ft  SX 

"3  f.i'J 

1-.., 

!X' 

Ifi  <51  f+ 

t  ft  zi 

■  I'fl 

i  •  i  i 

If  ©  3" 
ri  «  if 

24 


C+  U~  X  0  i 
O  O  t— 4  :K" 

''.-  p.'  i'fi  i"i 
B  =l  p  =i 
p.1  o  itt  'n 
.■'*  Ei'  '."+  t'.3  13 
if  ri  "  zi  Ei' 
"  ij3 
Ei'  E3  01  Iti 

Ci  iX  H 
T  !3_     >r+  01 
i— .   .  i~ 
tXi  Xi  'n 
i,i3  (X  t—  13  '-• 
l"n     ri  t— <  i-t 
"3  'Xij3  O 


i~\  |Ti  i-t  in  I- 

if  T 

-1  13  ill 
■-t  X 


VI 


p' 


jX'  l~"  |tl  I'fl 

i-  .:■-«■  u:: 

»  vi  xi 
13         o  "3 

H  "3  O 
Ei'  — ■  T  u3 
=i  Ei'  f.n  t~  •  "3 
i'fi  SX-  -.  t  Ei' 
c+  SX  O't  EE! 
•    if  - 

SX  "  J 

El'  Xi 

X  '3 
i —  Ei'  <3  O 

itt  si  5 ""' 

SX 

-H 

|.I1  CO  '■- 
i'I'I  ■■-  En  B 


t_.  i—  p  3- 
-l  t~.  (Si  Ei' 

<  ■-+  < 

If  f+  |Tl 

3  i—  c+ 
Vi  i'fi  Ci  "jjl 

|Tl  O 

Ei'  p  '3 
lit--  -.j  n;i 
•    3  i£i 

X-  t-+ 
1 43  l--  (Xi  :t 
X  %'  ~>  I'fi 
p.'  Si  i3-  z> 
XL  if 

.t     X  H4 

C 

O  '  'I  "S. 

~  ,"t 
tS     1-^  3" 

■— 1="  i*n*i  rn 
p-'  f'l  zi 
a " 
if 

c.z;^ 

t— Mil 
|-."H 

ij3  zi  if 

-1  |Tl 

p.'  .:-t 

i3  :y 

3"  H-  If 


X'  t::t  x 
iti  6  — i 

•— 1  143  3" 
O  Ei'  "3  If 

~  SX  jS  zi 

ft       Vl  fill 

if  .;•+  ,4 
i-  •  O  3"  'X 

•-I  P.'  |TI  "T 

vi  zi'  "3 

T+        Xi  i  f 

~3  '3  i~-  if 

in  ~i  Vi 
rt  rt  '13 
I-.I-.  p.' 
O  Z1  O  iX 
zi  zl  I'fi 
vi  p  if  i  In 

Ei'  "  ' 

c+  Ci  t-  •  !'•!■' 

-b  l  ,'t  "3 

i— i  ffi 


:;  zi  [f  Ei- 
rfi  s  zi  o: 


13 


rt  zl  i 

'"TP? 

■       |f  Ml 


1 0  '3 

t.O  tX  If  SX 
•  SX 

!-•  |Z  Xi 

p      ip  t;i 
•1-i      P.'  If 
r+  X 

u:.  u'.".  *~-  ifi 


=*•= 
-■*•= 

"TXI 

:;r.3i 


It^'K 

rt 

it::xii 


•-■#•= 


O  Xt 
tX  Zl 
X  iJ- 
Ei'  Ct 

~i  ffi 

o  If 
O  ' 

Zl  '•'» 

I-t  Itl 
Ei> 

ti  3" 
i-t  a- 


if  zi 
i|3 

.-t 

3" '13 
"3  "3 
rt  ct 
jr.  tr 

if 


X| 

1  t~- 

t.O  C+ 

"-" 

P3~ 

X 
IX 

E>« 

;t; 

■A: 

ff 
X 

O'i 

H 

i"'i 

SINC-LINK 


-  J 

□  HI 

Hi 

ro 

ro 

H1 

I.J1 

-  J 

Li 

ul 

p 

US 

(Si 

Ul  fjl 

0) 

ro 

p 

Zf 

p 

s 

0)  Gi 

ro 

Q 

© 

Q 

I'D  Q 

o 

TJ 

n.:i 

QH 

r 

3] 

r 

X| 

D 

,n 

n 

rn 

O 

□ 

4>'X 

TJ 

H 

H 

XI 

q 

X 

+ 

H 

X 

H4  Z 

H 

li 

T] 

.ti 

Gl 

H 

li 

II 

II 

+  H* 

:d 

II 

p 

s 

oun 

li 

H 

-■  j 

X 

o 

O'i  H 

H 

0'J 

© 

H 

i:..:i 

~i 

□ 

Q 

o 

p 

o 

ro 

TI 

ro 

p 

03 

0.1 

S5  *" 

H4 

:d 

T| 

ii 

u 

i'.0 

fcFh 

ro 

r 

o 

1 

i 

H 

H 

P 

XI 

H 
z 
rn 


ijj 

o 
H 


D 
H 


0'J 

-J 

X 
H4 

Q 

if! 

r.i  i 
n 


O  Zi  If 

O  Xt 
O  c+  c+  "3 

_  ,-, 

fn  O 
T  SX  t~- 
g~  IT  I'fi  SX 

O  I 
O  O  T  3" 
O      !~  »•-■ 
Zl     iX  If 

o  fb  if  zj_ 

S'  t—13  O 
in  In  6  X, 


P  rt 
Xi  Ct 
p  Z'' 

.6-, 


if 

i— ■ 

— |  l~  ■  fU' 

i_.  vi  in 

ffi  if  if 

1 ::  SX  SX 


X 

xi 


71 
X 
Ci  J 

m 


xt  cn 


rn 
ff 


u'i 
rn 


Q 


LU 

LU 
(X 

u 
1.0 


I 

H 


o 


h 

h'.i 
LU 


I.I.J 
IJ.J 
a 

G 
10 


~  n  I'llD 

Mo  +  + 
§N  I  ww 

::  :  CC  III 
II  II  H  II  II 


ill 
Ei  H 

ffl- 

co  o  in 

H  I--  

III  H  IX 


I      »«  II  WWHH  M  HH 
II  ID  H  IX  IK         H  (~ 

h-  ID     Z  h  O 
Z  I —  I —  llcl  I —  ( —  X  'aL  CC  H  X  h  Z 

hi  in  In  o  in  in  111  g  q  a:  w  in  in 
a        ...j  — i  Lt — i  _i  z  a  ll  a  z  g  a: 

Hi  ©  Q  S  Q  Q  Q  Q  ©  ©  GOG 

H  CM  n  ^  U"i  ID  f-  I'D  G  G  H  G 
H  H  H 


I 

I 

CM 
G 


h 
i.i"l 
LU 
!■  


UJ 
UJ 
CC 

o 

1.0 


ro 
t.D 
G  f- 

i:o  o  - 

H  h  :: 

*±    w1"  © 

i.O  H :  r|- 
H  II     I  I  CM 

111     Z  h  O 
£  CC  H  X  h  Z 
Q  ill  IX  111  G  111 

a  u_  a  z  g  cc 

G  G  G  G  G  G 
G  H  CM  CO  ^  G 
0J  0J  CM  CM  OJ  CM 


G 
G 


h 

l.O 
LU 
h 


Uj 
I.U 

CC 
G 
id 


,.|. 

1.0 
G  G 

fO  G 
'H|-~  Ji 

-d-  iiii 

i.O  H  : 
H  II  H 

H(- 
LU     Z  h 

CC  H  X 
O  O  CC  LU 
IX  LL.  a  Z 


G 

III 

hz 

G  LU 
GCC 


G  G  G  Q  G  CO 
G  H  CM  G  G 
CO  G  G  i'O  G  i'Ji 


II 

a 

G 
h 


H  H 


m 


hi 


H  CM 

••1  G        G  H 
II  II  II  II  G  H 


CM  CM  O 

|_  :+: 

(_  s+s  ...       l  l')  -:, 

lu   i.o  i.o  x  > .-    ai  a  h  a 
_j   o  q  a  a  t.o  i.o  +  z  a  a 
a  a  i  i  GGi  nu  g 
z  i.o  x  >-  i.o  i.o  a  a  •-  h  a  i 
HU.JG  II  II  ggx>  n:o 
+  z  a  •-•  •-  li  a  c:j  tii  i.i  . i  a  i.o  o 
a h :?- h cm x >  -  -  IDG  •  z 

G       ••  -  -H  H        iX  1.0  ID  X 

H  g  i.o  a  a  i.o  i.o  i.o  i.o  u  n  u  h 


•  cm  h  a 

Q  G  OJ        1.0  1.0  !>  3  II  h  IX  II  HO O  G  O G  ID  ID  Q.  |~  D>  J> 

h  ii  ii  .:<  a  o  o  g  g  a  i.o  id  a  a  h  h  a  a  a  a  z  co  a  id 
—  x  >  a   lx  a  z  z  id  a  o  o  a  x  -  -  x  v  n  u  m  h  a  z 

|-  Ll  IX     h  X  >  X  >  hJJhO     h  I-  G  iD  a  LD  h  G  G  X 
hZ  hi- 


M  l  ]!_ 

...I  H 

g u jjaajjj 


=  ujlijillljjij_Zilijlijljjlijl^  In 


a 

a 

G 


G  G  G  G  G  L0  G  G  Q  G  G  Q  G  G  G  G  Q  G  G  G  G  G  G  Q  G  G 
H  CM  G     ID  Li"J  G  H  CM  CO  ID  G  G  H  CM  G     ID  G  h  CO  G  G  H  OJ  CO 

•H     H  <H  ri  r-\  CiJ  CM  CM  CM  CM  OJ  CM  CM  CM  OJ  ('">  CO  CO  G  h 

in 


ID  r 


II 

w 


II 

tft- 


*    LU  HI 


H  H 


G     O  O 


O  •-•  O 
Z :  Z : 


to 

a 

J 

ll 

CTl 
I 

a 

G 
h 


iWMHHWWMUMMIM^^ 


OJ 

h 

1.0 

a 
j 

h 


H 
II 
h 
1.0 
ii 
-J 

fc 

J 


G  O 

zza      „.,j .-. 

X  >  D         I  I  H  H  Z 

"I"  -I-  IX   •  +  LU 

i.o  i.o  h  a  h  h  z 
o  a  i.o  h  i.o  i.o  h 
a  a.  ix  g     a  a 

X  >■  ...I  G     UJ . J  ,.J  G 
II  II  II  G     D  w  II  H 
CO  i.O  H  H  G  G  hi- 
G  O  +    G  Z     CO  h 

a  a  a  id  cm  id  h  a  co  z 


h 

LU 
D 

G 

G  h 

1.0 


x  co  >-  i.o  x  >  od  a  g  ..j  a  a 

:      :  h'DG     _J  JD 

h  it  h  "  h  h  G  h  Z  a  h  h 
LU  Will  •Will  LU  Ll.  G  Q  LU  Z  IJJ  ll  ID 

_j>n>  n_jH_  g  a  xi  j  h  a 

G  £  G  ^  G  G  G  LU  G  G  G  G  G  G 
ID  Z  !D  Z  r-  CO  G  Z  G  G  H  CM  CO 
CO  H  CO  H  CO  CO  G  h  ^  G  G  G  Q  Cii 
-•     ■-  H  H     H  H 


IJJ 

—I 

a 
a 

1.0 


ID 
ID 

a 

CJ 
1.0 


IMI)nWMH«WII«WW«IWIIIITO 

S  '0 
i.O 
LU 
D 

G  tO 


cc: 


I  i 


a 


G 

G 

G  h 


i.O 

G 


UJ 
D 

a 
a 

in 


G 
h 
G 
G 

Z  Ci 
W-LU  I 
O  Z  .J 

h 

Z  Ci 
LU:  h 


O  •■ 
h  - 
LU 

a  -• 
 w 

WD 

u 

hD 

a 


a 


in 
h 


«  tfHD  G 
ZHh  -• 
H  II  HH 
g    a  •-.  ID 

cuama  •  og 

MI  HZ 

z  z   g   a  o 

ID     >  h»  Z 

xoa   h:  a 

Hhh  -  ii  • 

O 

acjj  o   co  • 

•+•     Ci  •-  CD  ■■- 

tr  z  z   h  a  co 

ID     Ci  LU 


If 

ill 

a 

i 


i.i 


Ci 

a 
g 

co 

wa 

D  G 
•  -.10 

a 

a 
h  o 

Ci  CO 


u 

J         Hf  !■  ,J  j ....  w1, 

::  Ua  W-::       HHI     Z  LU  h  IX        Q  a 

Ci  •-•  ■"-        |-»  D  CO  h  -  a  I  h  UJ        h  IX     IX  G 

m     (-•  w  z   id  za   •-  GLui-z  co 

111  iD     ID        ID  WIDOW        •-  Jh  "H     Z|       h  + 

Z  ODD  II     D  •  iDZiH.D     HH     H#    ID Z      MX  iID 

:  II  ir-W     ll      ICQ      II  a  H       ».DGD     IX  1 1     H  H.DiD 

:DDWD     i  i  h  C~i     hH-'Whh     Z     LLJ     Hh     h  x. 

UJ  Ct           Z '—"  Z"     H  Xi  Z  CO  IX  H  >- 1.0  O     Z  h  Z     h  O 

3  L_  ct     h  1 0  h  H  W    ah        HQ  G  CO  Z  Xi  h  a  H  X  H  h  X  h  Z 

a  ID  G  LL  ID  .J  LU  IX  Xi :  z  lu  LL  ll  a  z    io  a  a  g  en  CC  UJ  a  LU  UJ  G  LU 

CO     D  LL  H  D  CJ  Da  ■-■  -H  JHHQ  | .-.  H  Z  a  G  LL  a  Z  C|  I  Z  CD  CC 

jjgj   z  a  a  z 

G     H  i  U  f  i     LU  U  i  r  ••  LU     CO  CTl  Q  CM  CO  :      :  G     1.0  f-  d  J  rji  G  H  OJ  G  O'l 
I  (U        H  H  H   ■■  CD   -  G  H  H  H  H  H  CM  0J  0J  0J  CTl 

i.i  cr  -h-h 


in 

H 

G 
D 
J 
CD 
LL 

LU 

:t: 
h 

a 

UJ 

h 


SINC-LINK 


LU 
u 
G 


h 
cj 
LU 

a 

H 
u 


IJJ  H 

10 
ID 
D 
ID 

a 

H 

a 
cr 


...j  a  a 
g  a  .j: 

•  a  a 

h  LLJ  LU 

a  lu  X' 
cj  z  a 

O  CO  ID 

-  "•XI 

auj  - 

LU  i.O  LU 

g  a  i.o 

H  G  Xl 
h  Z  Q 

z  cj:i  ": 

!o  c:i  a 
h  cc  a 
,D  11  UJ 
0.1  "  -  -Ci 

co  cm  h  io  oj  ii  ii  a  - 
ii  ii  ii  ii  ii  wwaiii   f  i 

iX  Z  Ci  a  LU  h  G  ID  D 

ID  h  G 

i —  I —  I —  I —  I —  I —  I —  N  a  h 

I.U  UJ  LU  ID  LU  ID  ID   ;Xi  G 

a  - 

G  K)  G  G  G  G  G  LLJ  h  =  G 
G  H  OJ  CO  LTDD  ID  H  -  r  - 
H  H  H  H  H  H  H    -  [Cj  LU  H 

il  id  a 


25 


i-  >£i  ft'-  «-rg  u.  >  ,-;'  •=.-:        «-'•*  «!  to  Q     fO-  .     =»  to  r~  -4!  :.  f™* 

to  T      HH1  ^  Hr.  U  »  V  JO  "    £_."  L      'u  m  ^13 

%  -  oft  :D  :zu2  uito  7.-2?  titi-h       a?    to  01       4>  01  a  i-1  X*g  --'      ,  s±^ 


rn 


•rifii-  ""I'*''  3        in  rfi  w  «?  '"+-1        Cd»  pi- 

g  «!  •  '5     *Hs*     B??5  •  £1     cf"  ^     ^  5 

:U       ...  IVirt-    -I  fx       ft  -,|i~'S!0  "    •—  C+  P  .  ,.,       '"  ~r  to  OH  '"  '2?  "• 


Xi  to 


PX  n't     to        !■?«•-  ft  .r+        01     <pq        0l"._  "-  m         i.d    TJ        0?        P  —     l?J  r, 

0+X.1        P     X  C2        ,_i        ....j  to'.-:        O     ■"-        ;J         °.  -n  rn 


i     v    s     s  1  1  hi  *  &  1    n  m  I  in  I  % 

s  £S  .3  &        ™       ■-;  o  ..  J:  ~i  a  cp' 


n  r-  $  S  I  &  o-.  oj 


■  •  1  .... 

Itt  p 


cn      ?+  3  v 


O  H*  O  O 

Jit.  t-* 

16  h-1  to  > 

\£l  O 

0 

0  ro  to 

'.''l  0*1 

M.™ 

IpT  - 

I'j'l  0+ 

Cj 

C+  It' 

X 

l£l 
"'4 

"0 
"0 

C*i 

Jit 

1... 

ro 
i'u 

—1 

=i 
h»  ■ 

~l 

<£i 

rji 

O 

O 

i_. 

Iti 

,;■+ 

s~  |-i  1  "1  O  O 

5  oi ' 


ss^1"  Is^r  iW""  SoSCH         s^w^  ^pn  5^ 

SSf?*"=  *SB,=  -ffBS*  5'^-     'SMr  »^KTc  h?*«»« 


Pi  ™l 

0'i 

~i 

rn 

— 1 

Pn 
■4 

i„. 

:xi 

1.11 

en 

i-.n 
••j 

i"~ 
'.''1 

fS 

nil 

1 

XI 

01 

0 

3? 

'X 

■n 
Xi 
Xi 

m 

P 

|r;i 


I.J  I  C'  '>  1 

to  ro  i:~ 

~'  'j>  S 
-T|  |t;i 
"S  H  Ti- 
to to 
~i  "7  rn 

|-|  fLt  l~< 

h-  •  If 
1/1  fJ.'  O 


'i  1. 


•  n 
10 


X' 


P 
1.T1 


O  ^  XJ 

-3  j>  dr 

it"  P  'Ti 
U2  i.D  _ 

o  m 

~-i  p  :si 
\  c+ 

o  n  j 


,4 1 


Cfi  ■*'' 


i;.j  • 

TJ  1 


i.p 


.fa. 
JJ4. 


to 
to 


xi  - 1 : 

to  i:u.  1 

"2. IJ-' : 

it!  :r  i 

"?  t~<  : 

i.i'l  1— •  1 
<'T 

"7  i'j'i 

1  Li  ■:■+ 


tti 
x:  u"j  ' 


ro 

Hi 
I-- 


O'i 
1.0  ' 
■J- 

o 


r.nnr 
p  it' 

f.O  o 
X- 

rnto 


1  to 
1 1~  •  1— ■ 

Xi 
Ji  X< 


r  p  c 

as  fx  rn 

0  0  xi 

to  j  0 

'>:'  O'i 

to  0  =1 

C+  Q 
O  05  "Ti 

*  n  3: 

=S  -  i  ct 

ro  pi 

-  1J1- 

0j 

ft  1.1 

c  71  to" 

i 

1: 0  it' 

0 

"7 

p' 

p 
I 

-J 

O'i 
i-jj 


PXi 


IX 

0  ''"'I 

to 
P  l  'i 


1.  Ji ' 
r.i5 


•;o 

a 


r~05  05 
1 15  OiJ^ 

10  pi- 
'.'•1  rf' 
<  P  1 

t—  h:i  rj-1 


I VI 


».n  <-  - 

05  =' 
'J'  '"■• 


i'™i  r~  ■ 


roua 

O  H 

-  J  lt» 


m 

Xi 

r 
rn 

O'i 


r  ro  0 

xi  tn  c: 

to  0 

It'  013 

i<-i  ro  r- 1 

3:x'& 

01 

O  :■< 

"2  0 

0  It" 

i.D 

O  X1 

oi  x: 

if  '"' 

tj-  to 

<A  Z' 

ft 

Ki 

i-j 

fu.  I-. 

•Xi  ri 

'£1  ft 

-J  - 

■7 

O 

CO 

05 
O 
i"5 

i.i 

O  '35  T) 

to  -•j  x 
3  oi  iti 
er  ro 


iD.  '•'''  o 

i2T  '•••'  +^ 
in  rj--  rj- 

v  to 


.'•1  it> 
0 

;•+  -II 


P2?fr 

05  It'  c+ 
i£5»  1— 
■  O 
™l 


P  T| 

ro  o 
-■ifx 
**■ ... 

ft" 
j>  e 
ifj  '•''' 

O'i  10 
pi- 
.  ,■•+ 

ro 


01 

i,D 

1 

'j* 

Cj 
10 
P 


1  05  O 

■  o  o 
'  17 

'J  5= 
•  O 

cn  ro 

ro  "7 


o 

05 


05  N 

C5  ':■  < 


■<  01  W 

O  O'i  rO 

"7  Q  "7 
_      ;;r  i,., 


Xi 
Xi 

fri 
01 

x 

Pn 

s 

iiji 

R 

H 
H 

rn 
xi 

O'i 


to  ro 

>..*  "7 
1— 1  O 

MiTj 
H 


Xi 
O'I 


•  Cj  O 
XI  X 

ix  to  a 
xi  17 

»  1. 1 1  "7 
H  O 
O  !Z  O 
to  n  if 
1=1  "•' 
to  '•'•' 

fk.  f-H  o 

to  H  "7 


26 


115 
"r  '.'•' 

to  iti 
"7 

iji 

"7  77 
ti>  to 

ij'j! 

in  ro 

I'M 


S  to 
to  a  h 
h  ro  T 
1  ro 

01  'T 

M-  IJ2 
:tt  X 

171  c  to 

-   jfi  77 

L_i  J~|  |_. 

U  T  o 

!-  O 
ji!  O 

fc  "17  C 

:7,  to  * 

<■*+  "0 
ft  1-  X" 


1'"  1  O  7T- 
X. I'O 
-1 

P  to  Si 
U5  =1  ft 
05  54-  &. 
Ml 

.  to 

"0 

XJ  X 
ft  to 
to  i'i 

it' 


ft 


I'D 


sg  !>.  ,    ~n  ,~t 

ft  ::i  X  10  X" 

--I      to  17  Iti  H 

;~t- ,.. .     7  „r 

h_.  Ill        Q  I.' I  CO 

Pi      to  ix.  O 
—I  f=  I—"  PI 

~  1.1 1  \'  \  O  It'  O 
|Ti  O  IT'  ^l 
f'  J,  r~i  17  fx.  O  'X 
>l  pMC      X  It' 

I         i--?  =! 

iD      O  ~l  ft  'X 

I  -  Tf  X.  X 

pi      '17  '.n  O 

"  :£  to  -X  X. 

I  ,  ,       ;y  --j  |_. 

to  ."+17  'X 

X.  ft  -X  7 
~i      iti  r;i  o  iti 

ft         <  X  Xi 

iti  to  ro  r;i 

::i  X  1  -  Xj  10 

to  55.     ::1  XJ  X 

::i     1-  O  "■' 

55.     'X  75 1  5 

pt    x  rn  ro 

to  •-•  6  it  C+ 
— i  i-t  in  t~<  !+:  I'O 

-I  '        I O  "  X 

o 

i»+  pi  "7  H 

x  ro  77  c+  r-  4 

?r  iti  "CT'  X 

ft  55.  "7  a  S  I 

I...  Q  .g-  !Xi  |Q 
1."+  liij-  1  'J.7  P 

i/i     Ft  i*^". 

|H  1-'  |Ti  X  T  ' 

a. ' 1 '  5:1. 1  ui  ro  "1 


MM  WOW 


lUMtlUW 


H 
X 
,-+ 

rn 


-1  "i  pi 

ft  ft  J 
-x  to  ft  x: 
c  v'i  pi  to 
-7  o  ~'~  ^ 
••■ i  - j  in 

~  ~l  Xi 

ij~  to  o  to 

O  0"  X 

i~  !-.-«  I— < 

I'O  pi-  ►■• 
■■•+  •-■  :x  "1 

'X       I'O  T+ 

ft  to 

d  X  O 
3  55.  X  X. 
Iti  i»- 
"7  i.il  pi  :Hn 
Pi  lt»  ft  JX 

,x  3  to 

to  55-  •<  'X 

0.    p.:  U:: 

(.-•  I-+  Q 
'.'•I       lit:  £» 

ro  q  to 
pi  ix  ?+  to 


i£     pi-  • 

n  o  i"i 
ir  to  H 
"7  s"  r' 
v^'.  1^  pi 

P'  55.  to  ix 

ft  ~  Q- 
n  it" 

» '  I-  b" 
1..  .4  ro  r.'1 


1-- 
=5 s:i- 

a:! 

0  " 

~n 

"Tj  r- 
rnit' 
tj  ro 
o 

01  T 
ifi 

1—  i~. 

rn  '•■'' 


I'M 


f"TH 
II 


3z:i" 

iTXXn 


CX11 


Xj 

* 


SINC-LINK 


:'.-  H 

-7  irt 

o 

I'O 

l/l 

o 

Xi  to 

►-.  -(■:< 
ri  x 

Xi  ro 

o  ro 
"i 

=5  i.i'i 
to  iti 
c+  "7 

< 

O 

H  l"l 

ro 

?•+ 

'"'  >x 

n 

,■■+ 


ft 

to  to 

ft  si 

w  to 
<& 

"7 
Iti 

to 
i-  + 


O'i  si  ESI  ■  -;•  ■;"  ■  ' 

ru  fri  to  O  0 1  iti  »•-  • 

-R  s  tb  X'  :b  f  "''  H 

73'7ip..'i  riiiiT'",^'"' 

o  i—  n  to  rn  i  i.p  .,. 


a 

—4  !-(•  —I  O 

m  c+  ft  x 
:ti  ro  "1  ro 
O'i  x 


i~-  S3' 


i-.  o  to 

X  O 

pi  3  ro 

P  1;-+  X 

C  PL'  ''-I 


pi ' 


ft 

.;•+  X 

•r ,-+  i>i 

ft  j  m 
=?  ft  ro 
c+ 
,••+ 

>•-  if 
-1  -7 
i.i-i 

r-4 

!■•+  X 

Xi  to 

I--  i.(3 
in  p  a 


to  rn  1  ro 

■7    to  55.  Xi 

-  55.  ro 

.-.     65.  O 

P  P  X  It" 

Ifl.  -ti  ro  to  i-  • 

l/i  ?.r 

'.I  O  It' 

iXm"  ro  < 

O  O  Si.  I'O  '-  • 


C      to  17  "7 

x  to    I--  p 
•4  a  ft  to 
i_ ,-+    to  c+ 

|0    '  '.''I  f 

rn  r.J 
,-+  to  1  'i  "J 
ro  ':"r 

■•i!  PL'  "b 
,'  ,  -1       '.'  •  "7 

to  17  ro  O 

r+  ft  "I  :? 


,:+ 
c+  it' 


10  7 

™i  ft 

to  s"  X  "17 
53. 10  It' 

53.  'x  .y 

O  Iji 

■17     I  ' 

1:1.1  rn  to  1  i'i 


171 171  x: 

PL'  O  I- 
p  p  ^ 

>X  01 1— 
l_.  I-. 

B  O  Pf 

o  to  5? 

ft  'X  '.  .- 

■•  ft  - 


?? 0 
to  ft 

ro 

B 
p 


3  O'i  iti 
0*  o 
rb  p  c- 
■7  o 

l"-1  ir7  X 

pl>  :r ::! 

-1  i_. 

55-  55.  iX 
.   rr  > 
ft  '-■ 
ijZ  1512 
I'O 

HOX 


171 
ro 
ro 

1  £5 


Xi 

'i'j 

rn 


#  Is 


REDUCE  NUMBER  OF  DISKS  IN  USE  WITH  TK2 


b/  Hugh  H. 

Before  I  get  started  let  me  remind  all  you 
'gurus'  out  there  this  is  not  for  you,  it  is 
for  the  fellow  who  has  not  explored  TK2 
'cause  he  was  put  off  by  tiny  type  and 
Hi-Fi  hype. 

The  first  thing  I  wrote  back  in  January 
on  TK2  was  something  that  made  me  look 
further  into  TK2,  and  the  last  issue, 
(March  92)  expanded  on  that.  I  have  no 
intention  of  getting  in  too  deep,  so  don't 
expect  too  much. 

So  often  we  find  that  things  in  a 
magazine  or  newsletter  are  far  and  away 
beyond  what  we  the  innocent  little  starter 
can  comprehend.  We  read  of  "jobs"  and 
things  like  that;  as  far  as  they  are 
concerned  I  tried  to  forget  that  as  soon 
as  my  kids  were  able  to  look  after 
themselves.  Butt,  to  get  back  to  basics, 
most  of  us  are  only  too  happy  if  we  can 
use  some  simple  little  things  to  show 
others  how  smart  we  are.  And  how  good 
the  QL  is. 

Now  smartness  is  not  always  how  we 
dress,  it  could  be  how  we  ADDRESS  a 
problem. 

Take  the  number  of  disks  we  have  which 
only  have  one  little  teeny  weeny  itsy 
bitsy  program  on  them  and  which  are  not 
often  used,  but  we  still  keep  them  "just 
in  case".  How  do  we  address  the  problem 
of  too  many  disks  doing  too  little. 

Many  disks  contain  programs  of  only  two 
or  three  parts  and  one  is  always  a  'boot', 
and  we  can  have  only  one  boot  on  a  disk. 
So  if  we  wish  to  put  a  lot  of  those 
programs  on  the  one  disk,  we  have  to  do 
it  one  at  a  time,  and  make  a  different 
name  for  the  boot  in  each  case,  which  can 
take  a  long  time.  Or,  we  can  use  the 
WCOPY  command  from  TK2  and  transfer 
those  programs  to  an  omnibus  disk  and 
give  them  all  a  different  PREFIX  at  the 
same  time,  almost  ensuring  immunity  from 
duplicates  occurring.  Still  retaining  the 
integrity  of  the  original  title. 

Say  we  have  a  program  called  'CHUCKLES' 
which  has  three  parts  to  it,  and  it  is  the 
ONLY  program  on  that  disk,  we  would 
place  the  working  disk  in  flpl__,  and  the 
target  disk,  (the  one  we  are  going  to 
copy  to)  in  flp2_  and  type  in:- 


WCOPY  FLP1_/FLP2_CH_  <ENTER> 

This  would  copy  ALL  the  files  on  flpl_  to 
flp2_  and  give  them  the  prefix  of  CH_  so 
CHUCKLES     would  become  CH_CHUCKLES. 

So  a  DIR  on  the  target  disk  (flp2j  would 

look  like:_ 

CH_CHUCKLES 

CH_BOOT 

CH_CHUCKLES_BIN  etc., 

In  the  above  command  I  did  not  give  a 
title  'from',  and  take  special  note  that  I 
did  include  an  _  after  the  prefix  'CH' 

Next  step  is  to  place  small  SPACE  or 
separator  under  this  program,  and  we  do 
this  by  -  watch  the  quotes  -  typing :- 

SAVE  "FLP2_  " 

Note  one  space  after  the  £Lp2_.  The  next 
time  we  do  this  would  require  two  spaces 
after  the  flp2_.  Of  course  you  do  not 
have  to  use  the  SPACE  you  could  use  the 
or  ...  or  ===  or  whatever. 

Next  we  could  send  over  LAUGHTER  with 
LA_  and  GRINS  as  GR_GRINS.  Get  the  idea? 

Now  if  you  wanted  to  remove  the  prefix, 
you  could  use  RENAME,  e.g. 

RENAME  FLP2_GR_GRINS,FLP2_GRINS 

and  GR_GRINS  is  now  plain  old  GRINS 
again. 

If  you  wished  to  change  the  name  on  the 
GRINS    'suite',  you  could  use:- 

WREN  FLP2_GR_,FLP2_ 

You  should  use  a  DIR  or  WSTAT  after  each 
operation  to  see  what  is  happening. 

There  are  many  ways  those  two  commands 
can  be  used,  try  a  few  experiments  on 
your  own.  Just  watch  your  commas  and  '_' 
and  quotes.    All  are  VERY  important. 

If  you  want  more  of  thus,  or  if  I  have 
made  an  error,  please  write  and  tell  me. 

030292 

Hugh  H.  Howie,  c36  Oneida  Dr.  Burlington. 
Ont.  Canada.  L7T  3V3 


SINC-LINK 


27 


Q  L  I  P  S 


I  often  think  we  should  have  more  key-in 
materia]  in  our  Newsletter,  but  I  do  not 
like  to  use  programs  which  have  very 
long  listings  as  we  (I  at  least)  sometimes 
get  tired  when  typing  those  long  listings. 
So  if  anyone  has  a  little  gem  which  could 
be  of  interest,  send  it  in.  This  way  we 
make  the  Newsletter  more  interesting  for 
all,  and  at  the  same  time  we  can  enlarge 
our  QL  Library. 

Come  to  think  of  it,  some  folks  may  like  to 
have  long  listings  to  type  in,  so  if  that  is 
the  case,  let  us  know  and  I  will  dig  out 
some  long  ones  especially  for  you. 

I  must  admit  that  shortly  I  will  run  short 
of  short  listings  to  use,  however  here  is  a 
shorty  which  is  very  colorful  in  color,  but 
still  interesting  in  Monochrome.  Try  it  in 
both  mode  4  and  mode  8. 

This  will  put  on  screen  a  host  of  elipses 
in  a  host  of  different  colors  and  a  host  of 
different  sizes.  (I  had  onions  for  lunch 
therefore  I  tend  to  repeat  myself  today) 

Must  be  getting  near  to  spring,  my  father 
(93  last  December)  is  starting  to  work  in 
the  potting  shed  getting  ready  for  when 
the  snow  goes  away,  not  that  we  have  had 
much  this  year.  Yet.  Here  is  something 
to  brighten  your  day. 

This  comes  from  DEM0_1  disc  in  the  QL 
Library. 

ELIPSES_BAS 

100  SCALE  256,0,0 

110  WINDOW#1,512,256,0,0 

120  PAPER  0:  CLS 

130  REPeat  forever 

140  INK  RND  (1  TO  127) 

150  FILL  1 

160  xpos=RND   (0   TO   511):ypos=RND   (0  TO 
255):size=RND   (1   TO   16):eccen=RND  (1 
TO  4):angle=RND  (1  TO  32) 
170  CIRCLE  xpos,ypos, size, eccen, angle 
180  INK  0:  FILL  0 

190  CIRCLE  xpos,ypos,size,eccen,angle 
200  END  REPeat  forever 

(0220^2) 


Disk  Copy  Problem 

Help  Wanted  . 
(No  -  Not  you  Hama!) 

One  of  my  Disk  setups  is  as  follow  s:- 

5  1/4  80  track     1440  Sectors 

3  !/2  80  track     1440  Sectors 

5  1/4  40  track      720  sectors 

I  am  using  a  TRUMP  CARD  and  the  little 
plug -in  card  to  give  extra  drives  if 
necessary,  using  the  top  port. 

Problem:- 

When  I  try  to  WCOPY  from  flpl_  to  flp2_ 
the  £Lp2_  invariably  continues  to  run  and 
will  not  accept  the  copy.  Sometimes  it 
even  tells  me  "Bad  or  Changed  Mediium" 

When  I  WCOPY  from  £Lpl_  to  Raml_,  and 
then  from  Raml_  to  flp2_,  The  copy  has 
no  problems. 

WHY? 

Hugh  H.  Howie. 

WHISPER  HEARD  ON  THE  WIND  

Through  the  sighing  of  the  trees_ 

* 

QL  -  IBM  Compatibility  CARD? 

1991  -  Miracle  Systems  produce  the  Gold 
Card  which  gives  the  QL  so  much  more 
power  and  speed  and  versatility. 

At  the  same  time  there  are  strong 
rumours  that  Miracle  are  also  working  on 
a  Graphics  Card. 

1991  -  Software  announce  PLUS4,  that 
wonderful  Word  Processor. 

1992  -  Latest  whisper  1  hear  is  that 
Miracle  are  also  working  on  a  card  to 
allow  the  QL  to  be  compatible  with  IBM. 
No  details  available  at  the  moment. 

Look  Out  little  blue, 

The  QL  is  taking  a  Quantum  Leap  at  you! 

Long  Live  the  QL 
The  QUEEN  of  all 


28 


SINC-LINK 


Hugh  H.  Howie 

052792 


July /Aug  1992 


July  20,  1992 


Dear  Out-Of-Town  Members: 

Well,  what  have  we  this  month,  I  mentioned  my  eye  operation  in  the 
last  letter,  Everything  is  fine  now, 

I  know  what  needs  to  be  first  in  this  letter,  A  reminder  to  members 
living  in  the  U,S,  You  must  fill  out  and  attach  one  of  the  green  customs 
forms  when  you  send  me  material,  or  return  club  material,  Jeff  mentions  it 
in  his  newsletter  briefly.  Recently  I  have  recieved  a  couple  of  packages, 
and  have  had  to  pay  GST  (Goods  &  Services  Tax,  for  the  uninitiated!)  on 
their  presumed  value. 

Two  things:  You  should  put  a  rather  nominal  value  on  the  slip,  I  suggest 
50  cents  per  tape/disk,  AND  you  should  tick  off  that  it  is  a  gift  item. 

One  package  was  bulky  and  had  10  disks  in  it.  There  was  no  value 
stated,  so  Customs  valued  it  at  $11,  They  then  charged  80  cents  GST  and 
added  a  $5  service  charge.  Another  package  had  no  indication  it  was  a 
gift,  and  no  value  stated.  Customs  assigned  a  value  of  $50  and  billed  me 
$3.50  GST, 

One  of  our  club  members,  Ronald  Cavin,  has  sent  me  a  suite  of  disks 
which  essentially  are  designed  to  allow  a  Spectrum  to  be  emulated  on  an 
IBM!  He  has  also  written  a  series  of  articles  for  the  newsletter,  about 
this.  The  first  article  is  in  this  issue, 

If  anyone  has  a  PC,  and  is  interested  in  seeing  these  disks,  drop  me  a 
line.  Come  to  think  about  it;   I'll  have  to  get  someone  else  to  make  a 
copy:  I  don't  have  a  PC,  I'll  ask  the  first  member  who  borrows  them  to 
make  up  a  back-up  copy!!  There  are  3  disks,  Ronald  says  you  need  a  386  or 
better,  to  run  this  emulator. 

You  may  notice  that  in  the  newsletter  there  is  a  3-part  listing  of 
newsletter  contents.  Sort  of  an  index  of  contents,  I've  been  asked  how  to 
get  copies  of  some  of  these  articles,  I  had  not  thought  about  this  before, 
but  I  suppose  we  can  supply  members  with  photocopies  of  the  pages  these 
articles  appear  on,  for  5  cents  a  page,  plus  any  postage  if  incurred  in 
mailing  them,  Be  sure  to  mention  article  name,  and  what  issue  it  is  in. 

Or  you  can  order  back  issues  of  the  whole  newsletter  if  you  want,  for 
the  same  5  cents  per  page, 

I  had  a  letter  from  a  non-member  asking  for  some  help  with  the  Larken 
Maxcom  program.  That's  a  BBS  operating  system  for  the  2068,  There  are  two 
versions,  one  for  300  baud  operation  and  the  other  for  1200  baud.  This 
person  sent  me  still  another  version  which  Larry  K,  had  written,  Designed 
to  work  with  two  other  programs  called  I0traj,B1  and  0trajs,B1,   I  have 
done  a  bit  of  work  on  them,  and  have  written  back  for  more  info,  But  have 
any  of  you  heard  of  IOtraj.BI  &  0trajs,B1  programs?  Or  version  of 
Maxcom, B1  that  starts  at  Line  8000,  not  Line  10?        I'll  write  a 
newsletter  article  about  this  matter,  when  it  has  been  resolved, 

Tim  Swenson,  who  is  a  member  of  the  Capitol  Area  Timex  User  Group  and 
who  publishes  a  small  journal/ news letter  called  "QL  HACKER",  has  sent  me 
a  copy  of  two  recent  issues  of  The  Hacker,  and  also  a    QL  disk  that  has 
all  nine  issues  of  this  journal  on  it.  Anyone  interested  can  either  ask 
me,  or  if  you  have  QL  you  can  drop  a  line  to  Hugh  Howie. 

I  received  a  letter  from  a  Don  Lambert,  Editor  of  ZXir  Clive  Alive  and 
a  TTSUC  member. 

He  writes,  "I  don't  know  if  anyone  will  be  driving  or  flying  south  from 


the  TTSUC  to  attend  the  Dayton  ComputerFest  the  29th  and  30th  of  Aug,  but 
T/S  will  be  there,  Frank  Davis  and  Paul  Holmgren  will  have  tables  there, 
Bob  Swoger  has  gotten  a  table  in  my  name  for  T/SNUG  and  CATUG.   I  hear  tha^ 
Andy  Hradesky  or  at  least  someone  from  Colorado  will  be  there,  Frank  Davis 
and  I  will  have  rooms  at  the  RED  ROOF  Inn  (North,   I  think  it  is)  which  is 
nine  miles  from  the  Hara  Arena  where  the  Fest  is  held.  That  place  is 
big!" 

Incidentally,  it  seems  possible  that  two  persons  will  be  there  from 
TTSUC,  That  is  to  say,  Jeff  Taylor  and  Rene  Bruneau  are  talking  about  it, 


I  have  had  two  members  send  me  games  recently,  In  one  case  it  was  on 
tapes,  the  other  on  disks.  Needless  to  say,   I  am  up  to  my  eyeballs  with 
them,  A  couple  of  things  about  them,  though,  The  disks  had  a  menu  program, 
that  I  rather  liked,  I  have  been  refining  it  considerably,  and  I  shall 
make  an  article  for  the  newsletter  giving  the  listing  and  describing  the 
features  of  it,  Interested  in  games,  anyone? 

I  have  been  further  refining  a  program  sent  to  me  by  member  Joan  Kealy , 
which  contains  a  mass  of  information  about  Timex  computers  and  the  Timex 
scene.  The  refinements  make  it  suitable  for  the  Larken  system,  and  I  shall 
put  it  onto  a  disk  in  the  Larken  disk  library.  The  programs  are  called 
TIPSAM,B1  and  TIPSNZ,B1, 

Although  the  tape  libraries  have  not  grown,  the  Larken  disk  library  is 
up  to  disk  #50,  I'll  try  to  get  catalogue  of  the  most  recent  10    disks  off 
to  known  Larken  owners,  with  this  newsletter.  Other  members,  ask  if 
interested , 

We  have  a  new  member  who  writes  me  that  he  is  into  the  hobby  of 
rocketry,  and  uses  the  TS1000  and  2068  to  assist  in  launchings,  thrust 
measurements,  etc,  He  has  offered  to  write  articles  on  the  topic,  if  we 
were  interested.  I  said  we  certianly  were  interested!! 

I'm  delighted  to  see  that  we  have  some  ZX81  stuff  for  our  ZX  members, 
Andre  Baune  has  come  up  with  another  nice  issue  of  ZX-91,  which  we  have 
included  in  our  n/1,  Thank  you  Andre,  Andre  is  also  a  member  of  our  club, 

I  am  behind  again  in  my  communications  with  OOT's,  But  I  shall  try  to 
be  up  to  date  by  the  time  you  get  this  newsletter.  If  you  are  awaiting 
something  from  me,  drop  a  line. 


I'll  close  this 
Since re ly , 
George  Chambers 


off  now,