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SINC-LINK  IS  A  PUBLICATION  OF 
THE  TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLA IR  USERS 
CLUB  AND  IS  ISSUED  6  TIMES  A 
YEAR.  COPIES  OF  THE  NEWSLETTER 
ARE  $1.50  EACH  FOR  NON-MEMBERS. 
CLUB  MEMBERS  RECEIVE  FREE  COPIES 
AS  PART  OF  THE  $20. 00  ANNUAL 
MEMBERSHIP  FEE.  A  NEWSLETTER 
SUBSCRIPTION  ONLY  IS  AVAILABLE 
FOR  $12.00. 

NEWSLETTERS  ARE  EXCHANGED,  FREE 

OF         CHARGE,  WITH  OTHER 

TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  GROUPS. 

PLEASE  CREDIT  THIS  PUBLICATION 
AND  THE  AUTHOR  IF  YOU  COPY 
MATERIAL. 

THE     CLUB     MEETS     ON     THE  FIRST 
WEDNESDAY    OF    EACH    MONTH  AT 
FOREST        HILLS  COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTE,    7 JO  EGLINTON  AVE.    W.  , 
TORONTO. 

SEND  CORRESPONDANCE  TO: 

Attention:       SINC-LINK  EDITOR 
TORONTO     TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS 
CLUB,         14         RICHOME  COURT, 
SCARBOROUGH,  ONTARIO, 
CANADA  M1K  2Y1 


Z288/ZS81 

TS1888/I588 

PC8388 

TS2868 

SPECTHIH 

PL 

LABEES  1/1 


iiiMii 


T0R0IT0  TIHX-SIICLAIB 

USEES  CLUB 


ENORHOUS  WINTER  ISSUE 

THIS  ISSUE  CONTAINS  ARTICLES  ON 
MODEMS,  RS232  I/F's,  MIDI  I/F's, 
RLE  GRAPHICS,  GAMES,  PROGRAMS 
FOR  ZX81,  TS2068,  SPECTRUM  ft  QL 
USERS  PLUS  SO  MUCH  MORE  THAT  WE 
CAN'T  LIST  IT  ALL  HERE! 


EXECUTIVE  OFFICERS: 


PRESIDENT, 
TREASURER 
SECRETARY 
ACTIVITIES: 
TAPE  LIBRARIAN  ZX81: 
TAPE  LIBRARIAN  2068: 
TAPE  LIBRARIAN  QL: 
PAPER  LIBRARIAN: 
NEWSLETTER: 
LIAISON  OFFICER: 
(  Out-of-town  members  ) 


JEFF  TAYLOR  (  244-6583  ) 
BILL  LAWSON  (  444-8772  ) 
GEORGE  CHAMBERS  (  751-7559  ) 

RENE  BRUNEAU  (  531-9749  ) 

it  ii  M 

RENATO  ZANNESE  (  635-6536  ) 

HUGH  HOWIE  (  634-4929  ) 

GREG  ROBINS  (  920-7747  ) 

JEFF  TAYLOR  (  244-8583  ) 

GEORGE  CHAMBERS ,   14  RICHOME  COURT, 

SCARBOROUGH,  ONTARIO,  M1K  2Y1 

(  416-751-7559  ) 


TORONTO  TIMEX-SINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 


14  RICHOME  COURT,    SCARBOROUGH,    ONTARIO,    CANADA  M1K  2Y1 


Editorial 


I  should  threaten  you  readers 
with  my  prose  more  often!  Last 
issue  I  warned  that  you  would  be 
forced  to  read  lots  of  my  stuff 
if  I  didn't  get  a  few  articles 
from  you,  the  readers.  Well,  the 
thought  of  more  of  of  my  wit  in 
print  seems  to  have  struck  fear 
in  the  hearts  of  quite  a  few 
writers.  I  have  never  seen  so 
much  new  material  available  at 
one  time! 

Of  course,  you  readers  are  the 
beneficiaries  of  these  writers' 
efforts  because  this  is  the 
largest  Sine-Link  produced  in  at 
least  the  last  three  years.  To 
the  writers,  thanks  and  keep  up 
the  good  work.  This  doesn't  let 
anyone  off  the  hook,  though,  I 
still  want  more  material  and  if 
I  don't  get  it,  you  will ! 

QLers  Rejoice! 

I  am  happy  to  announce  that 
our  club  has  a  QL  librarian 
again!  It  seems  Hugh  Howie  took 
exception  to  a  comment  that  QL 
interest  was  all  but  dead  in  the 
club.  He  protested  vigorously 
and  for  his  efforts  George  and 
I  asked  if  he  would  take  over 
the  QL  side  of  the  club.  Hugh 
accepted  and  has  many  new  ideas 
for  the  QL  group.  To  this  end 
Hugh  has  started  a  regular 
column  in  this  issue  called 
QLips.  He  has  also  written  a 
special  questionnaire  which  is 
found  on  the  last  two  pages  of 
this  issue.  Take  the  time  to 
fill  it  out  and  mail  it  in. 
Welcome  Hugh. 

Newsletter  Format 

Several  people  have  asked  how 
I  would  like  articles  to  be 
submitted.  Ideally  I  would 
prefer  two  columns  per  page 
similar  to  this  page.  If  you 
cannot  supply  two  columns,  just 
send  one  and  I  will  do  the 
cutting  and  pasting.  As    I  have 


the  board  and  copying 
facilities,  it  would  be  better 
if  I  do  it  than  for  you  to  try 
it  at  the  kitchen  table  and  risk 
ruining  your  work  (  let  me  ruin 
it!  ). 

If  you  do  not  have  a  printer 
but  would  still  like  to  send 
material  then  why  not  send  it  on 
tape  or  Larken  disk?  We  are 
familiar  with  &oth  Tasword  and 
Mscript  word-processors  so  you 
could  just  send  your  article  as 
a  text  file.  In-town  members  can 
use  their  modems  to  transmit 
text  files. 

Lastly,  if  you  have  neither 
printer  or  word-processor,  write 
out  your  article  longhand  and  we 
will  type  it. 

All  material  submitted  at 
least  seven  days  prior  to  issue 
will  be  published  (  though  the 
entire  article  may  not  appear  in 
that  issue  ) . 

The  purpose  of  all  this  is  to 
make  the  issue  a  little  easier 
to  read  and  to  make  it  appear 
more  uniform.  I'm  only  trying  to 
make  Sine-Link  the  best 
Timex-Sinclair  newsletter 
available.  I'm  not  asking  for 
too  much  am  I?  (  What  a  snob, 
eh?  )  . 

Tidbits 

We  are  no  longer  being  charged 
a  fee  to  use  the  classroom  at 
Forest  Hills  Collegiate  for  our 
meetings.  The  group  governing 
non-profit  community  clubs  felt 
that  we  should  be  allowed  to  use 
the  room  for  free.  I  won't 
argue . 

TTSUC  members  voted  at  the 
February  meeting  to  take  out  a 
club  membership  with  the 
Sinclair  NorthAmerican  Users 
Group  (SNUG) .  For  more  info 
about  SNUG  read  George's  blurb 
in  this  issue. 

Keep  those  cards    and  letters 

coming  ...  or  else!    'Nuff  said. 

J.T. 


SINC-LINK 


SOB'S  NOTEBOOK 


be 


\0 


If  you  use  a  disk  drive  with  your  TS2068,  you  will  probably 
-ady  use  disk  menus  to  facilitate  accessing  the  files  on  -your 
disks.  However,  there  is  often  a  need  or  an  opportunity  tc  add  a 
'Status  Report'  to  such  menus  to  display  current  disk  or  prograa 
information. 

In  this  article,  I  shall  describe  some  ways  of  gathering 
snd  displaying  such  data  for  programs  in  general  and  for  the 
Larken  Disk  Drive  system  in  particular. 

These  will  include  the  following: 

1)  Printer  Status  On/Off  Wide/2040 

2)  Printer  Driver  On/Off 

3)  Printer  Driver  Settings:  Margin,  Width,  Line  Feed 

4)  Drive  Selected 

5)  File  Norn  Loaded 

6)  Byte  Length  k  Tracks  Used 

7)  Disk/Tape  Mode 

PRINTERS,  PRINTER  DRIVER  AND  SETTINGS  AND  SELECTED  DRIVE 


this  and  note  the  results?  do  this  again  with  the  2040  turned 
on.  Repeat  the  process  for  your  wide  printer  changing  251  to 


Tansider  the  following  extract  f-ra  a 


M5DU.      .hl3  'dill 


:he  aoove  categories. 


Etrve  to  illustrate  the  first  four  oi 
TS2040  ON   Wide  Printer  ON 
PD  0FFLL=64LM=QLF  ON  ERV=2 


Here  are  the  program  lines  that  procuceo  this  data  display: 

<INT  PAPER  1{  INK  9?  AT  17,2;,TS204Q  VCON"  AND  IN  25K 
i26)+(,0FF,  AND  IN  251>=126)?"   Wide  Printer  ' ? ("ON"  AND 
IN  127=237)+ ("OFF'  AND  IN  1270237) ?TAB30 

16  PRINT  AT  18,2?  PAPER  6;'PD  'JCON  '  AND  lpdJ+COFF"  AND  NOT 
Ipd? 

17  PRINT  14:  POKE  8200,16090:  LET  b=USR  110 
13  PRINT  'LL=';b+l? 

19  PRINT  14:  POKE  8200,16094:  LET  b=USR  HQ 
_:o  PRINT  PAPER  6?'ui=,;b; 

21  PRINT  #4:  POKE  3200,16092:  LET  b=t*SR  110 

22  PRINT  'LF  'jCON'  AND  b)+C0FP  AND  NOT  b) 

23  PRINT  #4:  POKE  8200,8195:  LET  b=USR  110 

24  LET  b=<4  AND  b=12S)+UNT  (SQR  (b-2)  AND  b<128); 
PRINT  AT  18,25?  INVERSE  i;"DRV="?b 


feed 

Reefed 


And  here's  the  explanation: 

15  Print  on  blue  PAPER  with  contrasting  INK  at  line  17  col  2 
<JS2Q40>  followed  by  <0N>  if  IN  251  gives  a  value  less  than 
126  or  <0FF>  if  it  gives  a  value  greater  than  or  equal  to 
126!  then  <Uide  Printer>  followed  by  <0N>  if  IN  127  equals 
237  or  <0FF>  if  it  does  not  give  237;  TAB  over  to  col  30  to 
complete  the  colour  arrangement.  One  caveat  here:  I  aa  told 
that  all  TS2068s  do  not  give  the  same  values  for  these  IN 
coarands  so  try  yours  out  and  if  necessary  substitute  the 
:ues  you  find  to  be  correct.  Here's  how:  turn  off  your 
=2040  and  TYPE  (FOR  i=l  TO  100:  PRINT  IN  251:  NEXT   i>?  run 


127  in  the  FOR.... NEXT 
values: 


loop,   fly  2068  gave  the  following 


2040 
wide 


58  or  59 

-237- 


OFF 
126 

-333- 


229  ZV6 

16  Print  at  line  18,  col  2  on  Yelloa  PAPER  <PD>  for  Printer 
Driver;  followed  by  <0N>  if  Ipd  is  1  (or  higher)  or  <0FF>  if 
Ipd  is  equal  to  zero.  The  variable  <lpd>  for  Larken  Printer 
Driver  is  changed  elsewhere  in  the  program  to  the  value  1  if 
it  is  turned  ON  and  to  0  if  it  is  turned  off.  I  have  shown 
the  routine  for  controlling  the  Printer  Driver  at  the  end  of 
this  sect  ion. 

17-22  These  lines  do  the  following:  Using  a  Larken  extended 
BASIC  coanand,  an  address  in  the  LKDOS  cartridge  is  poked 
into  LKDOS  address  8200  and  a  Larken  routine  returns  the 
value  in  that  address  as  the  variable  <b>.  The  first  case 
gives  the  line  length  (ie,  width)  currently  set  either  on 
power  up  default  or  as  changed  elsewhere  in  the  program.  The 
second  case  does  the  same  for  Left  Margin  setting  and  finally 
the  status  of  Line  Feed  is  PEEKED  and  presented?  (in  the  last 
one,  if  the  variable  <b>  is  zero  then  the  Line  Feed  is  OF, 
else  it  is  ON). 

23-24  This  routine  is  similar  to  the  previous  three  and  using 
the  same  Larken  command  gets  the  value  of  variable  <b>  and 
changes  it  to  <4>  if  b=128,  to  the  integer  of  the  square  root 
of  b-2  if  b  is  less  than  123.  This  calculation  is  required  to 
decode  the  number  of  the  drive  currently  selected  froa  the 
value  stored  in  LKDOS  address  3195  (ie,  drive  0=2?  drive  1=4; 
drive  2=8?  drive  3=16  and  drive  4  (raadisk)=128). 

The  arrangeaent  of  colours  in  screen  line  18  is  necessary  to 
allow  all  the  data  to  be  presented  on  the  one  line  and  still  be 
readable. 

The  Larken  Printer  Driver  can  be  turned  on  and  off  and  its 
settings  altered  using  the  following  program  lines. 
240   IMPUT  "1=0N  0=0FF  'ilpd:  IF  NOT  Ipd  THEN  PRINT  #4:  CLOSE  # 
3:  GO  TO  40 

PRINT  #4:  OPEN  13,  '1p' 

OUT  127,18:  INPUT  'line  length?  ';a:  PRINT  #4:  POKE  16090: 
a-i:  INPUT  'linefeed  (0=no:    10=yes)  '?a:   PRINT  #4:  POKE 
16092,a:  INPUT  'left  margin?  *;a:  PRINT  #4:  POKE  16094,a 
IF  a+l>79  THEN  OUT  127, 15 
LPRINT:  GO  TO  40 

CONT. 


241 
242 


243 

244 


SINC-LINK 


3 


Explanation: 

240  You  are  prompted  to  turn  the  printer  driver  ON  or  OFF.  By 
the  way,  this  is  very  useful  if  the  printer  driver  is  ON 
and  you  wish  to  print  to  the  TS204Q;  you  simply  enter  <0> 
and  Larken  channel  3  is  closed.  Then  the  2040  will 
function.  60  TO  40  is  just  my  may  of  going  back  to  the  disk- 
menu.  In  all  these  examples  you  will  put  in  your  cut  line 
numbers  to  suit. 

141  So  if  Ipd  is  not  zero  then  the  Larken  Channel  2  is  opened 
to  the  large  printer,  le,  <lp>. 

242  OUT  127,13  resets  the  Centronics  dot  matrix  printer  I  use 
to  noriai  PICA  size  printing.  This  may  not  suit  your 
printer  but  it  should  work  with  most.  Then  there  is  a 
series  of  prompts  to  tailor  the  printer  driver  settings. 
Remember  to  sake  the  line  length  exactly  what  you  want.  The 
routine  will  poke  in  a  value  one  less  than  that,  which  is 
the  way  the  Larken  command  works.  Line  feed  is  straight 
forward;  C  for  no  line  feed  and  10  for  one  line  feed.  It  is 
usual  to  use  10.  Left  Margin  is  also  straight  forward;  but 
member  to  make  the  sum  of  the  left  margin  setting  and  the 
line  length  a  value  not  greater  than  the  printer  maximum 
iiidth  (for  the  print  size  selected). 

_+3  However,  with  a  dot  matrix  printer  you  can  usually  go  to 
condensed  print  allowing  a  line  length  in  excess  of  120 
characters.  If  your  lone  length  is  greater  than  SO  then 
this  line  switches  over  to  condensed  print. 

244  This  line  does  an  LPRINT  to  clear  the  printer  buffer  and 
then  returns  action  to  the  menu. 

FILE  LOADED,  BYTE  LENGTH  AND  TRACKS  USED  AND  DISK/TAPE  MODE 

I  have  added  some  information  to  the  Tasword  menu  which  gives 
the  name  of  the  currently  loaded  file  and  its  byte  length  and 
tracks  used.  Here  are  the  lines  to  add  or  change  to  do  this: 

28   PRINT  "save  text8'  TAB  t;s[s;a;e  bytes ]8;TAB  thi's' 

■'?   PRINT  TAB  ti't'1  INT  (a/5D90)+l!'  tracks]' 

30  DIM  n$(6):  FOR  i=l  TO  bi  LET  n$(i)=CHR$  PEEK  ( 1+33279):  NEXT 

32  PRINT  "load  text  now*)*;  INVERSE  l;n$i  INVERSE  0?TAB 

th?'l" 

Explanations: 

28  The  variable  <a>  is  already  used  by  Tasword  and  is  updated 
constantly  as  the  text  length  is  altered. 

2?  The  variable  ia>  is  divided  by  5090  (the  length  of  a  Larken 
track);  <1>  is  added  to  the  integer  of  the  result. 


30  An  array  n$(6)  is  created  and  is  filled  with  the  contents  of 
the  first  six  bytes  of  the  Tasword  text  area.   This  me' 
that  you  should  enter  the  file  name  as  the  first  line  of  ■ 
text  of  each   file  and   it   can   be  anything   up   to  six 
characters  in  length.  In  this  example,  I   have  entered  the 
file  name  inane*. 

32  The  current  file  name  is  printed  in  INVERSE  characters. 

The  affected  menu  lines  should  lock  something  like  this: 

save  text  [7744  bytes!  s 

[2  tracks] 

load  text  noa=>name  1 

My  disk  index  program  has  a  menu  with  some  status  reports: 

The  loader  (for  the  TIMACHINE  compiled  version)  indicates 
whether  it  is  in  the  DISK  or  TAPE  mace  for  loading  and  saving, 
'his  choice  was  added  when  I  decided  to  isaice  tape  back-ups;  if 
you  do  that  sort  of  thing,  snow  the  current  status  on  your 
menus.  In  the  case  of  index,  it  was  cone  this  way: 

Index  called  for  pressing  <6>  to  toggle  between  DISK  ana  TAPE 
mode.  The  variable  'sS>  was  initialized  as  <4>  early  in  the 
loader  and  pressing  <6>  activated  the  following  line:  <IF  d$=,6' 
THEN  LET  5=  ABS  (s-6)>. 

So,  if  s=4i  then  it  becomes  2  and  vice  versa.  The  ABS  cancels 
out  the  resulting  negative  sign  in  each  case.  Then  variable  's> 
is  used  with  the  SAVE  and  LOAD  commands  to  direct  action  } 
either  the  ROM  or  LKD0S  SAVE  or  LOAD  routines,   eg;   <PRINT  #Si 
SAVE  n$C0DE  29000,28066). 

If  s=2,  then  the  line  does  a  TAPE  SAVE  because  PRINT  #2  is 
the  same  as  it  not  being  there  and  the  normal  TS2Q68  ROM  routine 
is  called. 

If  s=4,  then  the  command  is  preceded  by  PRINT  14  and  this 
activates  the  LARKEN  DOS  and  does  s  DISK  SAVE.  This  technique 
can  be  used  in  many  other  programs,  of  course,  and  really  speeds 
up  the  switching  back  and  forth  between  the  two  modes.  Your 
program  must  have  activated  channel  4  for  the  Larken  command 
PRINT  #4  to  work,  ie,  (RANDOMIZE  USR  100:  OPEN  #Vdd'>. 

The  way  ABS  is  used  in  this  example  can  be  adapted  to  other 
uses,  too.  For  example,  if  you  want  to  toggle  between  a  black 
and  a  white  PAPER  screen,  <LET  s=7>  and  use  <IF  d$='A'  THEN  LET 
s=  ABS  (s-7):  PRINT  PAPER  s;  AT  etc....  You  can  see  that  if  s=7 
(which  will  print  on  white  PAPER),  it  changes  to  0  which  will 
make  the  PAPER  black.  Of  course,  make  INK  9  for  contrast. 

-30- 


4 


SINC-LINK 


LARKEN  LINES 
by  Rod  Gowan 
(excerpts  from  Rod's  column) 
HI  spoke  with   Larry   Kenny   on   May   22,   and  he 
answered  a  few  questions  that  have  been  brought  to  my 
attention  by  many  users.    I   win    try   to   relay  the 
answers  so  that  more  folks  can  be  1n  on  them. 

These  are  the  most  often  asked  questions: 
QUESTION:  Why  did  LARKEN  decide  not   to    include  the 
FORMAT  and  MOVE  commands  in  the  DOS  Eprom  and   put  1n 
EXBasIc  Instead? 

ANSWER:  "I  looked  at  MS-DOS  and  other  'BIG'  computer 
operating  systems  and  found  that  they  all  are  set  up 
with  a  FORMAT  and  COPY  program  on  disk  and 
non-resident.  I  figured  this  was  the  best  way  to  go 
and  1t  would  leave  the  space  free  for  the  extra 
commands  that  I  had  1n  mind  for  the  system,  I  could 
possibly  have  put  the  MOVE  command  In  the  Eprom  but 
decided  against  1t  1t  1n  favor  of  the  other  commands. 
I  had  one  other  thing  1n  mind;  the  various  systems  and 
making  mine  compatible  with  all  of  them  would  have 
been  ten  times  more  difficult  1f  not  impossible  1f  I 
had  tried  to  Incorporate  It  Into  the  Eprom.  I 
recommend  that  the  user  take  that  box  of  10  or  15 
disks  that  they  buy  and  Immediately  sit  down  and  load 
FORMAT  and  proceed  to  do  all  of  them  at  once,  and  then 
not  have  to  do  1t  again  until  the  next  box.  I  might 
also  point  out  that  1f  you  look  REAL  close  at  LKDOS 
and  compare  it  to  the  OUger  DOS,  you  will  find  that  I 
did  In  4K  what  John  OUger  took  8K  to  do,  and  he 
STILL  has  an  Incomplete  DOS.  , 

QUESTION:  When  will  the  new  SEQUENTIAL  FILING  DISK 

be  ready? 

ANSWER:  To  tell  the  truth,  we  are  1n  the  middle  of  the 
planting  season  on  the  farm  and  I  have  not  had  much 
time  to  work  on  1t.  I  do  not  want  to  make  any  promises 
that  I  cannot  keep.  I  will  let  you  know  the  moment  I 
get  1t  finished. 

QUESTION:  Do  you  have  anything  new  1n  the  works? 

ANSWER:  "Not  much.  Just  trying  to  get  caught  up  with 
what  I  have  going  now.  I  may,  possibly  at  some  future 
date,  re-do  the  Aerco  cartridge  Eprom  to  get  rid  of 
the  'bug'  that  1s  in  that  Eprom.  It  does  not  currently 
allow  one  to  save  anything  to  the  buffer  and  then 
bring  1t  back.  I  may  try  to  fix  It  and  1f  I  do  I  will 
recall  all  known  owners  and  let  them  get  an  upgrade." 


In  the  next  Issue  of  the  same  newsletter  Rod 
has  some  more  LARKEN  Info.  Here  it  Is::: 


Gowan 


"Larry  Kenny  phoned  me  a  few  days  ago  and  said  that 
he  had  just  about  completed  what  he  hoped  would  be 
Version  3.0,  AND  the  LAST  version  of  Ms  LKDOS  EPROM. 
One  new  feature  will  be  a  mini -sequential  filing 
command  that  will  allow  the  user  to  LLIST  and  CAT  to 
the  disk.  The  new  EPROM  will  also  have  some 
improvements  on  the  Aerco  and  Tasman  Printer  Drivers 
that  are  built-in. 


"ALERT!!  be  aware  that  1f  you  use  your  LKDOS  system 
with  an  A&J  printer  I/F,  you  must  REMOVE  the  A&J  I/F 
before  you  can  SAVE  to  cassette.  Otherwise  the  system 
will  only  crash  if  you  try  to  do  1t  without  removing 
1t.  No  fix  for  this  problem  1s  expected. 

I  lifted  this  material  from  a  column  called  LARKEN 
LINES  by  Rod  Gowan  which  1s  published  in  the  CCAT/S 
User  Group  newsletter,  THE  PLOTTER., 

Rod  Gowan  1s  the  proprietor  of  RMG  Enterprises,  a 
T1mex  dealer,  who  carry  the  Larken  product  line.  We 
have  an  RMG  catalogue  1n  the  club,  for  anyone  to  see. 

Prepared  by  G.  Chambers. 


LARKEN  NOTES 
by  G.  Chambers 

Sometimes  there  is  an  unawareness  of  the 
flexibility  available  with  the  Larken  Print 
Control  commands,  or  maybe  we  should  say,  how 
to  make  best  use  of  them. 

We  have  found  that  the  best  way  to  handle 
this  matter  is  to  assign  the  large  printer  to 
channel  #5*  That  is  to  say,  use  the  command 
PRINT  USR  100 i  OPEN  #5,"lp",  to  open  a  channel 
to  the  large  printer. 

With  this  in  place  it  is  possible  to  direct 
an  output  to  either  the  screen,  the  TS2040 
printer,  or  to  a  large  printer,  simply  by 
using  the  appropriate  command  in  the  program. 
If  flexibility  to  select  the  output  within  the 
program  is  required  then  the  printer  command 
should  incorporate  a  variable  in  the  command. 
For  example,  use  the  command  'PRINT  #  pr* 
where  the  variable  pr  represents  the  chosen 
output.  If  a  screen  output  is  desired  then 
make  the  variable  'pr'  equal  to  2  s  for  a 
TS2040  output  let  'pr'  equal  3;  for  a  large 
printer  let  'pr'  equal  5.  Your  program  would 
then  have  a  line  in  it  much  like  thisi 

200  INPUT  "Choose  Output  screen(2)  2040(3) 
large (5)  Press  a  key-jpr 
400  PRINT  #  prs-text  to  be  printed" 

The  following  table  will  make  the  options 
more  obvious. 


PRINT  "TEST" 
PRINT  #2 ; "test" 
PRINT  #3s "test" 
PRINT  #5 i "test" 

LPRINT  "test" 
LPRINT  #2} "test" 
LPRINT  #3 i "test* 
LPRINT  #5 J "test1 


comes  out  on  the  screen 

comes  out  on  the  screen 

comes  out  on  the  TS2040 

comes  out  on  large  printer 

comes  out  on  the  TS2040 
comes  out  on  the  screen 
comes  out  on  the  TS2040 
comes  out  on  large  printer 


We  have  made  use  of  the  #5  channel  because 
the  channel  #4  is  reserved  for  use  by  the 
Larken  system  as  optional  to  the  PRINT  USR  100 
command. 

*»♦♦*♦*#*»#*♦*** 


SINC-LINK 


Another  of  our  members,  Steven  Gunhouse,_ 
has  some  interesting  stuff  in  a  couple  of  his 
letters  which  could  prove  interesting  to  some 
of  our  members.  I  shall  quote  selectively  from 
his  letter: 

Topic  JOYSTICKS: 

"  I  was  rooting  through  my  old  stuff,  and 

noticed  you  talking  about  the  2068  joysticks. 
The  TS2068  technical  manual  does  discuss  the 
joystick,  and  says  that  it  is  connected  to  the 
I/O  port  of  the  sound  chip.  That  means  that  if 
you  want  to  read  it  without  using  the  STICK 
function,  you  must  do  a  few  things.  If  you  are 
in  the  Spectrum  mode,  and  possibly  if  you 
aren't,  you  should  make  sure  the  sound  chip 
knows  that  the  I/O  port  is  to  be  used  for 
Input.  This  takes  two  steps,  as  does  any 
access  to  the  sound  chip.  In  BASIC,  it  is  OUT 
245,7:  OUT  246,63.  Then  reading  the  joystick 
port  is  OUT  245,14:  PRINT  IN  (246+256  *  P), 
where  P  is  the  player  number.  Of  course,  all 
of  the  OUTs  could  be  placed  at  the  beginning 
of  the  program.  The  values  for  the  directions 
of  the  joysticks  are  in  the  2068  manual,  the 
FIRE  button  has  a  value  of  128  (nothing  like 
the  Kempston,  I'm  afraid). 

Topic  -  Disk  Drive  definitions 

I  had  mentioned  in  a  letter  to  Steven  that 
I  had  had  some  problems  with  high-jdensity 
disks  on  my  80-track  drive,  which  I  referred 
to  as  a  "quad  density  drive".  This  is  Steven's 
response.  GFC 

".....As  another  note,  quad  density  does 
not  mean  twice  as  many  tracks.  If  it  did,  you 
could  use  a  standard  disk  in  a  quad-density 
drive  with  little  trouble.  Quadrdensity  refers 
to  the  density  of  information  on  the  track, 
not  specifically  the  number  of  tracks.  True, 
most  high-density  drives  are  both  quad  density 
and  twice  as  many  tracks.  Then  again,  it  is 
not  the  quad  density  which  causes  the  problem 
using  these  drives...." 

Topic  -  Conserving  memory: 

"....Oh,  a  few  hints  on  my  own  in  regard  to 
conserving  space  in  listings  using  variables 
and  such.  For  numbers  with  values  between  32 
and  255,  yon  could  use  CODE  of  the 
corresponding  ASCII  character  or  token. 
Actually,  I  would  not  recommend  it  for  codes 
above  127,  as  they  may  be  impossible  to  read. 
For  example,  GRAPHIC  8  is  code  128,  but  it  is 
impossible  to  distinguish  from  a  space  by 
sight.  When  using  variables,  it  might  be 
easier  to  identify  2-?character  variable  names 
with  numbers  if  the  second  character  were  a 
number.  Using  a  two-letter  variable  for  0  or  3 
is  redundant  -  use  NOT  PI  for  0,  and  PI  or  INT 
PI  (if  it  has  to  be  exact)  for  3.  Come  to 
think  about  it  SGN  PI  is  1  as  well.  I  know, 
COS  PI  is  -1,  but  using  a  trancendental 
function  may  slow  things  down  (if  you  are  not 
a  mathamatician,  a  trancendental  function  is 
anything  that  can't  be  written  as  a 
combination  of  fixed  powers,  like  a"x,  LN, 
EXP,  or  any  trig  functions.  Actually,  from  a 
computer  standpoint  SQR  is  one  as  well,  though 
mathamatically"  it  isn ' t ) . 


Topic  -  Plotting  Functions: 

"...You  know,  that's  one  thing  I  really  lik 
about  the  2068.  Some  people  may  complain  about 
it's  non-standard  BASIC,  but  name  one  other 
computer  where  you  could  write  a  program  to 
graph  an  arbitrary  function  in  about  5  lines. 
All  other  current  computers  will  only  take  the 
VAL  of  a  numeric  string  (such  as  "32.1456"), 
whereas  we  can  get  away  with  VAL  (X  +  Y)  -  as 
long  as  X  and  Y  exist. 

My  five-line  program  to  plot  functions?  It 
looks  like  this: 

10  INPUT  **f(x)  -  "i  LINE  fS 

20  LET  x  =  -10:  LET  yO  =  VAL  f$:  LET  xO  =  x 

30  FOR  x  =  9.9  TO  10  STEP  .1:  LET  y  =  VAL  f$ 

40  IF  y  >  -8.5  AND  y  <  8.5  THEN  PLOT  10  *  xO 

+  128,  10  *  yO  +  88t  DRAW  1,  10  *  (y  =  yO) 
50  LET  xO  =  x:  LET  yO  =  y:  NEXT  x 

Oh,  I  did  leave  out  one  thing.  I  checked  to 
make  sure  y  was  on  the  screen  in  LINE  40 j  I 
should  have  checked  yO  as  well. 

Also,  there  is  no  error  checking,  so  don't- 
try  to  PLOT  functions  where  you  divide  by  the 
variable,  or  take  powers  or  roots.  To  plot  a 
parabola,  such  as  y  =  x      2,  use  y  =  x  *  x. 
(Yes,  the  Sinclair  and  Timex  will  not  take  any 
power  of  a  negative  number). 

Anyone  interested  might  write  to: 
Steven  Gunhouse 
28746  Five  Mile  Road, 
Livonia,  Michigan,  48154 

G .  Chambers 


INTERNATIONAL  POST  OFFICE  MONEY  ORDERS 

A  plea  to  all  out-of-town  members  who  live 
in  foreign  parts ! !  Our  banks  charge  us  on  all 
cheques  made  out  to  non-rCanadian  banks.  When  a 
cheque  is  received  for  two  or  three  dollars  we 
find  that  the  bank  charges  can  exceed  this 
amount.  Recently,  with  the  mention  of  our 
newsletter  in  the  TS  UPDATE  magazine  we  have 
been  receiving  cheques  for  $2  (for  a  sample  of 
our  newsletter).  We  have  had  to  return  the 
cheques  for  the  above  reason.  We  also  get 
small  cheques  reimbursing  us  for  postage 
costs  since  club  members  who  live  in  the  USA 
cannot  send  stamps  (I  mean,  we  can't  use  them) 

The  solution  is  to  send  either  cash,  or  if 
that  does  not  appeal  to  you,  get  an  Internat- 
ional POST  OFFICE  Money  Order.  We  can  cash 
these  at  any  of  our  post  offices  with  no 
problem.  Notice  that  I  emphasize  Post  Office. 
Many  countries  belong  to  the  International 
Postal  Union.  The  International  Postal  Union 
has  an  arrangement  whereby  they  will  cash  this 
sort  of  money  order  between  signatory 
countries  with  no  fuss  or  bother.  Our  post 
office  will  cash  money  orders  made  out  in  U 
funds,  or  the  currency  of  any  of  the  signal 
countries. 

G.F.  Chambers 


SINC-LINK 


HACKER  *  S  HAVEN  PRESENTS : 

ZX-81    MIDI    INTERFACE   PROJECT        by   LOU  CHAMPAGNE 

In   the  next  -few   issues   I   will   be  describing   the  design  and  construction 
of   a  ZX-81   computer   inter-face  to  connect   to  MIDI  equipped  musical 
equipment.    Hope-fully  some  members  will   become   involved    in  developing 
software  and  applications  for   this  project. 

I-f   your  using  your   ZX-81   for   a  doorstop,    and   you  have  a  MIDI  equipped 
music   keyboard    {   or  any  MIDI   device  that   is   ),    let's  make  a  MIDI 
inter-face  and  start  making  music. 

MIDI    <   Musical    Instrument  Digital    Inter-face   )    equipped   keyboards  and 
devices  have  been  around   -for   quite  some  time  now.    These  devices  are 
characterized  by  the  presence  o-f  MIDI   IN  and  OUT    (   usually  accompanied 
by  MIDI   THRU   )    jacks  using  a  standard  D.I.N.    5  pin  -female  chassis 
connector.    The   idea  behind   these  jacks   is  that   different  manufacturers 
of   electronic  musical   equipment  have  standardized  on  an  information 
exchange  format.    This  allows  you   to  connect  a  K0R6  synth  keyboard  to 
a  YAMAHA  keyboard  and   the  note  values  played  on   the  KORG  will  activate 
the  YAMAHA. 

This  by  all   means   is  barely  scratching  the  surface  of   what's  possible. 
The  MIDI  standard  allows  for  much  more  than  simple  note  data  exchange, 
it  also   is  used  to  synch  up  drum  machines  and  sequencers  to  play  stored 
rythm  patterms  and  music  previously  entered.    These  devices  are  all 
microprocessor  based  and  connecting  a  computer  up   to  them  reveals  the 
ultimate  music  system,    the  possibility  of   total  control.  Facilities 
exist   in  the  software  protocol    that  standardize  parameters  for  control 
of   the  sounds  the  synthesizers  produce  as  well   as  dumping  this  data  to 
store   it  somewhere  else    (   or    load    it  for   that  matter   ).    Some  manufactur- 
ers have  hinted   that  around   the  corner  are  MIDI    light  shows  and  special 
effect  units  such  as   lasers  and  MIDI  mixers. 

Some  might  say   that   the  ZX-81    is  not  suitable  for   this  application  due 
to  several   disadvantages  such  as  memory  and   speed  constraints.  Expanded 
to  64k  and   running  ML  software  will   yield  a  system  at   least  as  powerful 
as  the  64k  APPLE  system  I've  been  using  for  years.    Even  unexpanded  units 
would  offer  at   least  a  MIDI   scratchpad   to  write  small   sequences  or  send 
specific  MIDI    information    <   such  as  program  editors  for  synth  voice 
creat  ion   ) . 

The   interface  protoco?    as  described   in   the  MIDI   specification   1.0   is  an 
optically   isolated,    serial    (   31.2kBAUD   )    format,    8  bit  data   (    1  start 
bit,    1   stop  bit   )    connected   as  shown   in  diagram  1.    The  MIDI   OUT  jack  has 
pin  2    (note  the  odd  pin  numbering  used  on  D.I.N,    connectors)  connected 
to  ground;    the  shielded   twisted  pair  cable  used   for    interconnection  has 
its  shield  connected   to  this  pin.   Pin  2  on  the  MIDI   IN  jack   has  no 
connection  to  this  pin,    and   since  the   interface   is  optically  isolated 
this  provides  protection  against  ground   loops  that  plagued  earlier- 
systems  of  musical   data  exchange.    Pin  4   is  always  most  positive  and  pin 
5  most   negative.    No  connections  are  made  to  the  other  pins.    The  current 
is   limited   to  a  maximum  of   20  mA.    All    these  specs  are  part  of    the  MIDI 
standard  document   1.0  agreed  upon  by  all    the  major  manufacturers. 


SINC-LINK 


r 


0/)TA    ,  SCOT 


Til  hi  ,  . 


IN 


\oosu 


3l°    0J'  wiiOi  ou.r 


MIDI    IN  3(0    °)  1 


Lr  dfisrni  tter  receiver- 
Diagram   1    :    Electrical    I/O   requirements  of   MIDI  inter-face 


^WAn      /WWH  f^LSOH 


Dl  #- 


070- 

/  J  A. 


A3>  o— 
/fS"  «- 

/47°- 

WR  0- 


XTAL 


'2  MHZ 


■+5  NT 


72 


21 


To 


'6 


I? 


ii 


•ST 


11 


a 


'"I 


7>  4y 
clocK 

t>l 
bl 
D3 

or 

D7 


5 
O 


TjO> 


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KtrL 


10 


14 


rcy  L$  1 1  71  Lin 


71L$o*4 
Z 


23 


4o 

'  /IS 
f  1N3 

•of        ,  . 


Diagram  2   :    The  MIDI    inter-face  using  the  6850  chip 


8 


SINC-LINK 


Obviously,    the  control   system  of   any  one  of   the   instruments    (   or  data 
nfo^1*1*8'    °r  Slave  synths  &tc.    )    would   have   to  be  microprocessor  driven 
UARTs     or  ACIAs    <   chips   that  convert   the  parallel   data  -from  the  CPU  to 
the  serial   data   in   the  MIDI   -format    ).    I   have  chosen   to  use   the  popular 
Motorola  6850  ACIA  which   will    give  us  a  send   and   receive  port    (   MIDI  IN 
MIDI   OUT   ).    The  circuit    is  shown    in  diagram  2, 

The  board  can  be  assembled  on  traditional   perfboard  and  wire-wrap  is 
recommended    in   this  case,    or  more  elegant  and  sturdy,    a  pc  board  could 
be  constructed.    I   hope  to  present    in  a  future   issue  a  PCB   lavout  -for 
this  project. 

On   the  software  side  the  board   appears  as  a  Z30  I/O  port  with  the 

CONTROL  register  at  address  9F  hex  or   159  decimal.    As  the  software  boo 
it  must   reset   the  ACIA  by  writing  a  number  with   the  two   least  significant 
bits  high  as  3    (   hex  or  decimal    >    then   initialize  the  chip  by  writing  a 
56  hex  or  36  decimal    to  this   location    <    this  sets  the  byte  size  and  clock 
d i vi sor   ) . 


The  data  are  sent   at  address  BF  hex  or   191   decimal   and   received  data  are 

^l!,tble  at  address  FF  he*  °r  255  decimal.    In  addition   there   is  an  ACIA 

STATUS  register  that  is  at  address  DF  hex  or  223  decimal.   A  chart  in 

diagram  3  shows  what  should  be  expected  at  each  register-. 


DATA 

BUS 

LINE 


RECV 
AND 
XMIT 
DATA 

REG 


CONTROL 
REG 
WRITE 

ONLY- 


STATUS  REG 
READ  ONLY 


DO 

BIT 

0 

CLOCK  DIV  1 

RECEIVE  REG   IS  FULL 

Dl 

BIT 

1 

CLOCK  DIV  2 

TRANSMIT  REG   IS  EMPTY 

D2 

BIT 

2 

WORD/PARITY 

1 

DCD 

D3 

BIT 

3 

WORD/PARITY 

2 

CTS 

D4 

BIT 

4 

WORD/PARITY 

3 

FRAMING  ERROR 

D5 

BIT 

5 

XMIT  CONTROL 

1 

RECEIVE  REG  OVERRUN 

D6 

BIT 

6 

XMIT  CONTROL 

2 

PARITY  ERROR 

D7 

BIT 

7 

RECEIVE  INT 

INT  REQUEST 

Diagram  3   :    ACIA  register  contents 


SINC-LINK 


As  can  be  seen  by  examining  the  chart  the  transmit   and   receive  registers 
are  pretty  straight-forward  but  one  might  be  confused   looking  at  the 
other  two   lists.    First  of   ai  i  ,    the  CONTROL  registers  parameters  -for  MIDI 
use  have  but  one  possible  setting  as  described  previously  so  understanding 
this   list   is  not   necessary.    However  some  use  might  be  gotten  out  of  the 
STATUS  register,    -for   instance   it  can  be  checked  for  a   "1"   at  DO  to  see 
if   a  data  byte   is  ready  to  be  read    into  the  CPU.    Likewise  a   "1"   at  Di 
indicates  that   the  transmit   register  can  be   loaded  with  another  byte  as 
the  previous  one  has  now  been  sucess-fully  transmitted.    The  rest  o-f  the 
STATUS  register  can  be   ignored    <   perhaps  the  framing  error  can  be  of  some 
use  but  probably  only   in  more  sophisticated  software  >. 

Since  the  2X-81   has  no  IN  or  OUT  commands,    two  short  machine  code 
routines  will    have  to  be  written   to  access  the   interface  from  Basic. 
Also  Basic   is  far  too  slow  for  serious  work  with   the  unit  as  a  dat«* 
recorder  so  most  of   the  real   work  will    have  to  be  done   in  ML  anyway. 
I   hope  to  have  the   interface  working  with   the  Larken  Disk  System  to 
save  and   load  MIDI  files,    I  also  figure  I'll   need  to  use  a  64K  ram 
to  have  enough  room  to  do  serious  work  with  the  system    (   such  as  MIDI 
multitrack  orchestration  etc.    )    the  data  can  simply  be  written  into 
the  upper  32k  area  and  read  by  the  program  running   in  the  "normal 
16k  block  with   the  Larken   interface   inhabiting  the   12-16k  area.  Perhaps 
a  4k  scratch  pad   ram  could  be  allowed  for  medium  res  graphics  for 
music  editing  ? 

In  the  next   installment  of   this  series   I   will   describe  the  MIDI  data 
protocol   and  present  some  short  ML  test   routines  that   run  from  basic. 
Till    then,    I  encourage  the   interested  parties  to  obtain   the  necessary 
parts  and  try  to  wire-wrap  a  prototype.    I   don't  suggest  making  a  board 
yet  because  the  addressing  may  change   if    it   interacts  with   the  Larken 
boards. 

TILL  NEXT  TIME   HACKER'S  HAVEN  LOGGING  OFF  BYE 


SINC-LINK 


RLE  GRAPHICS  by  Jeff  Taylor 

As  promised  last  issue,  I  will 
attempt  to  show  how  you  can 
obtain  Run  Length  Encoded 
graphic  pictures  on  the  TS2068. 

First,  you  need  a  modem  and  a 
software  package  which  supports 
Xmodem  protocols  (  Specterm-64 
and  Larken's  MAXCOM  to  name  a 
couple  ) . 

Second,  you  must  find  a 
bulletin  board  which  has  an  RLE 


nan/ 


boards  have  these.  Once  you  are 
connected  it  is  a  simple  feat  to 
download  and  save  one  of  the 
files  as  long  as  you  do  not 
exceed  your  available  buffer 
space.  The  BBS  file  section  will 
inform  you  of  each  files' 
length . 

Third.  you  require  an  RLE 
decoder  program  which  first 
appeared  in  the  Jan. -Feb.  '87 
issue  of  Time  Designs.  Not  to 
worry  though,  this  program  is 
available  to  club  members  from 
the  disk  or  tape  library. 

Now  the  fun  begins.  Load  the 
decoder  program  and  when 
requested,  load  in  your  RLE 
file.  Your  picture  will  smoothly 
fill  your  screen.  Now  you  have 
the  options  of  inverting  the 
picture  (  ie.  like  a 
negative  ) ,  copying  to 
TS2040  printer  or  saving 
image  as  a  SCREENS .  It's 
simple . 

More  RLE  pictures  next  issue 


film 
the 
the 

that 


LARKEN  DISK  LIBRARY 
by  G.  Chambers 

In  the  last  newsletter  I  described  Disk  #1 
in  the  Larken  disk  library.  I  also  mentioned 
the  programs  had  been  placed  on  singlessided 
42atrack  disks.  Well,  life  is  not  quite  so 
simple  as  that.  The  second  disk  in  our 
library,  "OMNIBUS" ,  illustrates  this. 

OMNIBUS  was  designed  quite  specifically  for 
use  with  an  80otrackBaper3side  drive.  Of 
course,  the  programs  could  be  lifted  from  the 
disk  and  used  independently,  but  then  the 
intent  of  the  disk  is  missed. 

So,  disk  #2  in  the  library,  "OMNIBUS",  is  an 
80  TPS  disk.  I  can  supply  it  also  in  the  form 
of  2  DSDD  disks,  if  you  specify  it.  But  it  is 
not  practical  to  supply  it  in  SS  format. 

Another  thing  has  become  apparent.  In  the 
case  of  the  TS2068  tape  library,  once  a  tape 
had  been  made  up  it  was  impractical  to  revise 
programs  on  the  tape.  With  disks  as  the 
vehicle,  it  is  so  easy  to  incorporate 
revisions  to  a  program ,  or  to  ssodify  a  disk 
make9up,  that  a' new  set  of  problems  arise, 
namely,  how  to  cope  with  program  revisions. 

How  to  handle  it?  I  have  not  really  thought 
this  one  out.  Possibly,  since  the  disk's 
"author"  has  the  most  interest  in  it,  he/she 
would  assume  primary  responsibility/interest 
for  any  revisions  to  the  library  disk.  Say,  by 
supplying  an  upgraded  copy  when  it  was  deemed 
desirable.  Anyone  with  suggestions  for  program 
improvements  could  propose  them  to  the  author. 

I  mention  this  because  Bob  Mitchell  has 
supplied  me  with  an  updated  copy  of  OMNIBUS 
for  the  library  which  now  has  81  files  on  it, 
occupying  122  tracks!  My  thought  is  to  simply 
replace  the  existing  version  with  the  new  one. 
Any  comments. . . .by  the  "authors,  perhaps? 

Anyway,  to  get  back  to  the  OMNIBUS  disk.  The 
simplest  way  to  describe  this  disk  will  be  to 
lift  a  short  section  out  of  the  disk's  "help" 

file.  Here  it  isi 

,  < 

"OMNIBUS  is  designed  to  work  with  RAMDISK  and 
a  DSQD  (quad)  drive.  As  such,  it  appears  on 
RAMDISK  as  an  AUTOSTART  file  and  on  QUAD  disks 
as  AUTOSTART  and  <ombus.Bl>  files.  As 
provided,  this  disk  will  require  RAMDISK  to  be 
equipped  with  four  SRAM  chips  for  a  total  of 
24  tracks.  .  . 

The  version  on  this  disk  is  a  special 
collection  for  general  use  by  club  members  who 
have  a  quad  drive  with/without  a  RAMDISK.  As 
presented,  the  disk  will  work  well  without  a 
RAMDISK  but  the  menus  will  not  appear  on  the 
screen  as  fast. 

The  main  Omnibus  file  comprises  three  menus 
and  the  details  below  are  therefore  divided 
into  those  three  sections. 

The  RAMDISK  files  should  include  the  three 
menus  <rdl.Cl>,  <rd2.Cl>  and  *rd3.Cl>,  each  of 
which  is  compressed  to  below  5000  bytes  by  the 
use  of  a  picture  compression/expansion  program 
called  <pico.Bl>  with  its  code  <pico.Cl>i  the 
last  two  programs  are  contained  in  the  Omnibus 
collection.  Actually,  on  this  disk,  the 
compression  and  expansion  code  is  located  in  a 
REM  statement  in  line  1  and  is  called  from 
several  locations  including  line  9000.  By 
compressing  the  SCREEN? ,  only  three  tracks  are 
used  but  the  RAMDISK  memory  so  used  is  well 
spent  since  the  menus  appear  much  faster  than 
they  would  if  left  in  BASIC.  In  addition, 
there  is  a  substantial  saving  in  memory  space 
in  the  BASIC  program. 

The  RAMDISK  also  contains  two  domestic 
programs  which  I  call  "datebook"  and  "address 
book" i  these  are  identified  on  the  disk  as 
<datebk.C9>  and  <dir.Cc>.  The  first  one  takes 
up  three  tracks  each  while  the  latter  uses 
four.  There  are  still  some  nine  of  24  tracks 
open  for  future  use. 


SINC-LINK 


11 


WORDS  QUARE 


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LIST  OF  WORDS 


AMSTRAD 

MEMORY 

BASIC 

MODEM 

CABLE 

MOUSE 

CAPS 

MSCRIPT 

CASSETTE 

MTERMII 

CATALOG 

NEWSLETTER 

CHANNEL 

OUTPUT 

CLIVE 

OVER 

CLUB 

PASCAL 

CODE 

PIPEDREAM 

COMPILER 

PORT 

CURSOR 

PRINTER 

DATA 

PROGRAM 

DIM 

QL 

DISK 

RAM 

DISKDRIVE 

RAMDISK 

EMULATOR 

RAMTOP 

FORMAT 

RECORDER 

FORTH 

ROM 

GRAPHICS 

SINCLAIR 

INK 

SOFTWARE 

INPUT 

SPECTRUM 

INTERFACE 

SPREADSHEET 

JOYSTICK 

STOP 

KEYS 

TAPE 

LANGUAGE 

TASWORD 

LARKEN 

TERMINAL 

LKDOS 

TIMACHINE 

LOGO 

VARIABLES 

MACHINE 

WORDPROCESSOR 

WORDSQUARE 
by  George  Chambers 

The  wordsquare  puzzle  on  this  page 
was  prepared  with  a  program  from 
tape  #61  in  our  club  2068  tape 
library.  I  mention  this  because  many 
club  members  are  unaware  of  the  many 
good  programs  that  the  tape  library 
contains. 

I  customized  the  program  to  work 
with  my  particular  printer,  however 
it  will  work  with  most  any  printer 
that  has  settings  for  6  lines  per 
inch  and  12  characters  per  inch. 

The  program  will  handle  a  maximum 
of  60  words,  the  actual  number  "~ 
dependant  to  a  large  extent  on  the 
set  of  words  entered  into  the 
puzzle.  If  too  many  words  are 
lengthy  the  program  will  have 
trouble  finding  positions  for  them, 
and  it  will  hang.  However,  as  you 
can  see  with  this  puzzle,  it  can  do 
a  pretty  good  job  of  fitting  them 
in. 

•a-***-********** 


WORDS  QUARE  ANSWERS 

dOXWVHSdH3VaSH33I 
1WiaW0HaiSMHIA3  3W 

aiaovnoNviaN  av 

IQHd  WN  SAIIOHHaiOO 
dOOH0OJOA3HV0IOOM30H 
3SI0VHH     M  SIVfllMSWai 

advoauiHsiiibosiNON 

H01H1     H33S0d     H     V  3  V  V  3 

3  h  n  v  3  o  a  J.  a  h  n    a  >i  UHiS 

ViWWVHiLOlAliHcI  3dVI0HI 
W  3W03TV  VHSHI  33  3N 
1     I  0  I     Ji     W0d3iLSIHH  10 

via  diaovnasivvoMi 

0HISNVI30MD9HJWMIMVIV 
S  INHSSHI  TVWSHIOIOI 
V0     X  31  S  I  H  0     II  I  I  0  3  i  fl  V  I  H 

dwaaowda  saHMUoms 

NOHVdHIDSWVVHWSSOV 
H31HM00Am  009 

avHiswvasnowHiaoj 


SINC-LINK 


For  some  time  I  have  been  looking  for  a 
small  utility  that  would  give  me  a  hard  copy 
of  my  mdv  cartridges,  no  one  seemed  to  have 
one,  or  could  ever  remember  hearing  of  one, 
until  at  the  last  club  meeting  I  mentioned  my 
quest  to  Bill  Lawson  the  Club  Treasurer,  and 
he  let  me  have  a  few  lines  which  would  do  the 
job.   Thanks  Bill. 

So  I  took  those  few  lines  and  gussied  them 
up  a  bit,  and  the  enclosed  programme  is  the 
result.  We  hope  that  it  will  be  of  some  use  to 
someone  somewhere  sometime. 

Not  everyone  will  want    a  hard  copy  of  the 
contents  of  a  cartridge,  but  if  you  consider 
the  advantages,  you  will  see  that  a  small 
utility  of  this  kind  can  be  of  great  value 
when  it  is  rquired. 

For  instance,  all  the  small  bits  of  this 
and  that  are  sent  to  a  file  somewhere  so  that 
they  may  available  as  and  when  required.  Later 
you  decide  that  this  particular  file  or 
cartridge  is  overloaded,  and  that  you  may  not 
require  all  the  contents.  The  problem  is  which 
to  keep. 

The  print-out  gives  you  something  to  lay 
aside  and  think  about,  rather  than  staring  at 
a  screen.   With  a  print-out,  you  can  take  time 
to  edit  that  which  is  required  and  that  which 
can  be  edited.   You  mark  the  hard  copy 
accordingly.  When  you  start  to  edit/delete, 
you  can  go  ahead  in  one  continuous  operation 
rather  than  having  to  re-list  every  time  you 
do  something. 

When  you  load  and  run  the  programme ,  you 
are  asked  for  the  TITLE  of  the  cartridge.  Then 
the  DATE.   RUN  it,  and  you  have  a  list  of  the 
contents. 

Oh!  Make  sure  your  printer  is  loaded  ! 


Hugh  H.Howie 


ALIGNING  NUMBERS 
Mel  Richardson 

The  output  of   any  program 
involving   lists  of   numbers  is 
usually  easier    to   read  and 
better    looking   if    the  numbers 
are    lined   up  from  a  common 
point.      This    is  sometimes 
accomplished    in  other  Basic 
dialects  by   the    "PRINT  USING 
XXXX.XXXX"  function. 

Doing  this   in  2X81  Sinclair 
Basic   can  get  pretty  tangled. 
The   book    "CONVERTING    to  T/S 
BASIC "    by  Stuart   Bird   uses  a 
subroutine  and  becomes  ponderous 
for  short  programs.      An  easier 
way,    I   have   found,    is  to  use  the 
"STR*"   function   to  convert 
numbers   to   "STRINGS"   and  employ 
the  excellent   string  handling 
ability  of   our   computers  to 
control  printing. 

An  example    is   this   -fragment   of  a 
program   that   outputs  a 
"continued   fraction"   from  a 
decimal    input.      Four   numbers  are 
pr  intedlF,  Dl  ,D  tc  R  and   we  wish 
to  align   the  fraction    " D 1 / D M 
so  •  •  • 


QL  Cartridge  Print-out 

Here  is  a  small  utility  which  may  be  of  value 
to  someone  sometime.  It  gives  a  print-out  of 
the  contents  of  a  cartridge,  with  the  date  it 
was  made. 

Bill  Lawson  gave  me  a  few  lines  to  do  the  job, 
and  I  gussied  them  up  a  bit. 

We  all,   I  am  sure,  keep  a  cartridge  with  all 
sorts    of  things  on  it,  some  of  which  are 
never  required,  and  this  cartridge  can  hold  a 
couple  of  dozen  items ,  taking  up  valuable 
space.   To  edit  this  on  the  screen  can  be 
tiresome,  but  if  you  have  a  print-out,  it 
makes  the  task  easier. 

When  you  load  and  run  the  programme,  you  are 
asked  for  the  TITLE  of  the  cartridge.   Then  the 
DATE.   Thats  it,  and  you  have  a  list  of  the 
contents. 


Try  it,. 


H.H.H. 


10  CLS 

20  REMark  by  Hugh  Howie/Bill  Lawson 
3  0  PRINT, "Print _Pir JList" \\ 

40  PRINT  "This  programme  sends  the  Dir_List  " 
50  PRINT  "        of  the  cartridge  in  MDV1_" 
60  PRINT,   "to  the  printer" \\\ 

80  OPEN^tf11*  Cartridge  to  be  listed  in  MDV1"\\\ 

90  INPUT  "Cartridge  Title  ?  ";b$\\\ 

100  INPUT  "Date  ?  " ; a$ 

110  PRINT  #3,b$ 

120  PRINT  #3,a$ 

130  DIR  #3,mdvl_ 

140  CLOSE  #3 


240   LET  N$=3TR*  Dl 

250  PRINT   F | TAB    11-LEN  N*|N*| 

"/"ID! TAB  20JR 

and   the  output   is  shown  below 

3. 1415927 


15 
1 

292 


3/1 


O  -"3  -■ 


333/105 
355/113 
10399  3/33102 
203341/65317 


3. 1423571 
3  -  1415094 
3 . 1415929 
3 . 1415927 
3 . 1415927 


The   "TAB   11"    is  the  key  which 
indicates   the  point    in  this 
example   to  have   the  numbers 
lined   up   at.      -LEN  N*  tells  the 
machine  where  to  start   and  the 
"/"   will    be  at   TAB  12. 

This  example  demonstrates  how 
easily  strings  are  manipulated 
compared   to  numbers  and 
variations  of   string  handling 
and   slicing  should   solve  most 
situations   like  this. 


SINC-LINK 


EASY  KEYBOARD  FIX 
by  Dick  F.  Wagner 

The  TS2068  computer  has  a  poorly  designed 
space  bar,  as  usually  the  rightrhand  end  does 
not  produce  a  space  when  pressed.  I  have^ 
explained  to  users  about  how  to  make  a  fix  by 
disassembling  the  keyboard  and  inserting 
spacers  between  the  hinge  arms  and  the  case  to 
slightly  lower  the  space  bar  and  reduce  it's 
travel.  This  is  not  easy  to  accomplish  and 
requires  removing  the  plastic  keyboard 
overlay. 

Here  is  an  extremely  easy  solution  to  the 
problem  that  does  not  require  entering  the 
case,  or  even  disconnecting  the  cables  or 
plugnins.  One  needs  only  a  bright  light, 
scissors,  some  notepaper  in  weight  like  3M 
adhesive  notes,  and  tweezers  or  needler?nosed 
pliers. 

Inspect  the  space  bar  arrangement  with  a 
bright  light  and  see  how  it  moves.  With  the 
computer  on,  try  pressing  slightly  on  the  left 
end  and  at  the  same  time  press  the  right  end. 
The  REPEAT  should  come  on.  Turn  off  the 
computer  and  note  the  gap  between  the  space 
bar  and  the  case,  and  see  the  two  parts  about 
1/8  inch  wide  and  5/8  inch  from  each  end  that 
move  within  the  slots.  This  is  where  the 
improvement  is  made.  The  arms  are  hinged  about 
1  inch  back  of  the  space  bar. 

The  reason  for  the  poor  key  action  is  that 
there  are  two  contacts  under  the  space  bar 
that  are  too  close  together,  plus  the 
flexibility  of  the  arms  that  do  not  force  the 
key  to  move  fully  no  matter  where  pressed.  The 
-springs  under  the  keys  are  just  rubber  dimples 
that  "turn  inside  out"  when  pressed.  A  hard 
button  on  the  top  of  each  makes  the  actual 
switch  contact.  This  is  all  a  one  piece  rubber 
assembly  that  seals  the  contacts  from  dirt. 

The  fix  is  simple ...  just  lower  the  space 
bar  about  15  thousands  of  an  inch.  Cut  some 
1/8  inch  wide  strips  from  the  notepaper, 
which  is  about  0.004  inch  thick    don't  use  the 
adhesive  end  if  3M  paper  is  used).  Cut  2 
lengths  of  about  3/4  inch  long  and  two  lengths 
aboSt  3/8  inch  long.  Fold  the  longer  strips  at 
the  midlength  in  a  tight  fold.  Insert  a  short 
piece  in  each  folded  strip.  At  the  folded  end 
bend  the  three  layer  paper  pieces  in  a  right 
ancle  bend  1/8  inch  from  the  fold.  At  the 
loose  end  bend  very  slightly  in  the  same 
direction  at  a  point  about  1/1 6  inch  from  the 
end. 

With  a  good  light  on,  press  the  space  bar 
fully  and  gripping  the  paper  spacer  (open  end 
down  and  the  right  angle  bent  away  from  you) 
insert  it  between  the  space  bar  and  the  case, 
directly  over  an  arm.  The  slight  bend  on  the 
end  is  to  make  it  easier  to  slide  the  paper 
between  the  arm  and  the  case.  Slide  the  paper 
down  to  the  bend  point,  leaving  the  folded  end 
protruding  slightly  higher  than  the  case 
proper.  This  makes  it  easier  to  retrieve  the 
spacers,  if  necessary.  The  right  angle  bend  in 
the  spacer  keeps  the  spacer  from  slipping  too 
far  and  it  also  keeps  it  from  sliding 
sideways.  If  the  paper  ever  does  slip  inside 
the  case  no  damage  can  occur  as  all  contacts 
are  sealed. 


Warning m  As  the  rubber  "springs"  are  not 
powerful,  try  not  to  bend  the  open  end  of  the 
paper  spacer  very  much,  as  the  spacer  may  not 
flatten  properly  and  the  spacer  will 
effectively  be  too  thick. 

Test  and  see  the  improvement.  If  you  space 
bar  is  not  fully  fixed  and  requires  excessive 
pressure  on  the  end,  remove  the  strips  and  add 
another  3/8  inch  insert.  It  would  be  better  to 
make  a  new  set  than  to  try  to  work  with  the 
old  set,  because  of  the  bends.  One  user  of 
this  fix  found  that  4  thicknesses  worked 
better  than  3.  There  are  differences  in 
hardware  so  try  a  combination  that  works.  It 
takes  only  a  few  minutes. 

From  the  Clackamas  County  Area  T/S  Users  Group 

Retyped  by  G.  Chambers 


LARKEN-A  TIP  ON  DISK  DRIVES 
by  G.  Chambers 

Recently  I  have  been  adding  disk  drives  to 
my  Larken  system.  I  came  across  an  unusual 
condition  which  seems  worth  sharing  with 
others  who  might  encounter  the  same  situation. 

In  the  beginning,  when  I  purchased  my  first 
DS  40-track  drive  (a  new  one)  I  looked  for  the 
terminating  resistor  that  all  instructions 
said  should  be  installed  on  the  endrmost 
drive.  I  could  not  find  the  resistor,  nor  any 
place  to  install  one.  Upon  inquiring  I  was 
told  that  modem  drives  do  not  need  this 
resistor j  that  they  function  quite  well 
without  one.  The  story  becomes  interesting 
because  I  subsequently  forgot  that  fact. 

Later,  I  added  an  DS  80-track  drive,  then 
another  DS  UOrtrack.  Finally  I  bought  still 
another  DS  40-track  drive.  This  drive 
was  a  used  one,  and  it  had  a  terminating 
resistor  installed.  I  decided  to  install  it  as 
the  second  drive  in  my  system  (drive  1).  I 
left  my  original  drive,  the  one  I  mentioned 
as  not  needing  the  terminating  resistor,  as 
drive  0.  Upon  trying  the  system  I  found  that 
I  was  unable  to  FORMAT  a  disk  successfully  in 
any  drive.  There  followed  a  great  deal  of 
shuffling  of  drives  from  position  to  position. 
Eventually  I  found  that  everything  worked  if  I 
made  the  most  recently  acquired  drive,  #o, 
with  the  terninating  resistor  installed,  and 
made  the  original  drive,  #1. 

This  still  puzzled  me  until  I  spoke  to 
another  club  member,  Ian  Robertson,  who 
reminded  me  about  new  drives  not  needing  the 
terminating  resistor.  The  answer  is  that  while 
the  newer  drives  may  not  need  it,  if  you  have 
even  one  other  drive  in  your  system  that 
requires  the  presence  of  a  terminating 
resistor,  then  you  will  have  to  arrange  your 
configuration  so  the  end  drive  IS  equipped 
with  a  terminating  resistor. 

Note  that  when  we  say  the  end  drive  we  mean 
the  drive  that  is  connected  to  the  end  of  the 
ribbon  cable  furthest  from  the  Larken 
interface  board.  Also  note  that  drive 
designation  (i.e.  drive  #0,  drive  #1,  etc.)  is 
done  by  means  of  pins  installed  on  the  drive 
Circuit  board,  not  by  it's  relative  position 
along  the  ribbon  cable. 


SINC-LINK 


SINCLAIR  NORTHAMERICAN  USERS  GROUP 


At  our  last  club  meeting  it  was  proposed 
and  accepted  that  we  should  take  our  club 
-'lould  take  a  membership  in  the  above  group. 

p.U.G.  is  a  new  group  that  has  been  in  the 
^ ocess  of  forming  an  umbrella  group  to  serve 
the  Timex  community. 

Coincident  with  this  action,  we  received  a 
latter  from  S.N.U.G.,  advising  us  on  what 
progress  has  been  made  by  the  group.  Following 
is  a  retyped  copy  of  the  letter. 


S  .  N  .  U  .  G  . 
Sinclair  Northamerica  Users  Group 
7515  Arbordale  Drive 

Port  Riehey,  Florida  3^668 
(813)  863  -  5552 

This  is  a  short  update  to  let  all  of  you 
know  what  has  happened  since  last  you  heard 
from  us.  Since  our  last  Press  Release  we  haws 
received  58  individual  memberships,  and  an 
additional  15  memberships  from  User 
Groups,  (which  represents  about  27%  of  the 
known  users  groups  in  the  North  American 
continent).  We  have  also  received  memberships 
from  Australia  and  Great  Britian.  We  would  be 
extremely  pleased  if  we  could  establish  groups 
to  expand  outside  the  continent! 

So  what  have  we  been  doing  all  this  time? 
Plenty! !  Firstly,  we  drafted  a  charter  that 
was  designed  to  allow  for  most  provisions 
including  expansion.  This  was  a  very  time- 
consuming  task.  The  Charter  has  been  sent  to 

jt  Florida  State  Secretary  of  State,  and  was 
^proved  on  Dec.  27th  1988.  All  funds  up  to 
now  have  been  held  and  were  deposited  into  a 
checking  account  on  Dec  31,  1988. 

We  have  with  the  help  of  the  library 
committee  established  a  format  to  work  with 
the  Public  Domain  Software  Library.  We 
currently  have  set  up  Librarians  for  the 

following  machines  and  formats! 

Head  Librarian. . .Frank  Davis 
Assistant  Head  Librarian. . .Tim  Ward 

ZX81.  TS1000.  TS1500 
Cassette,  Larken  DOS     Tim  Ward,  Tony  Wiling 

Spectrum.  TS2068 
Cassette  n  Frank  Davis 
A&J  Microdrive,  Wafadrive 
Frank  Davis,  Andy  Hradesky 

Larken  -  To  be  Announced 

Oliger  DOS 

Paul  Holmgren,  Willie  Jones,  Gary  Lessenbury 
Portugal  Timex,  Zebra  sj  To  be  announced 
C/PM  3  Paul  Stoddard 


We  are  currently  assessing  what  programs 
qualify  for  Public  Domain  and  we  are  gathering 
programs  at  this  time.  We  cannot  give  an 
accurate  number  of  programs  available,  but  we 
have  conservatively  estimated  to  have  on  hand 
approximately  850  Spectrum  and  TS2068  programs 
and  240  ZX81  and  TS1000  programs  as  of  Jan  1, 
1989.  We  have  been  advised  that  several 
Commercial  programs  have  been  released  into 
thr  Public  Domain.  Once  all  details  are 
arranged,  an  announcement  will  be  made. 

We  have  also  been  trying  to  put  together  a 
Publication  committee  to  determine  how  our 
Magazine  will  look,  and  it's  contents.  Several 
of  our  respondents  expressed  interest  in 
writing  articles,  so  we  should  have  several 
first:? time  writers  with  some  new  applications. 

Included  is  the  Official  Membership  Listing. 
All  members  or  the  list  are  Charter  members, 
and  as  such  are  elegible  for  becoming 
officers.  All  Users  Groups  that  are  members 
need  to  select  a  contact  person.  That  person 
will  act  as  directed  by  their  membership  to 
vote  accordingly.  All  Users  Groups  have  only 
one  vote. 

We  are  requesting  that  the  membership 
respond  with  the  names  of  three  individuals 
for  each  of  the  offices  listed.  The  deadline 
for  nominations  is  Feb  25.  1989.  The  responses 
will  be  tabulated  and  official  Ballots  will  be 
mailed  on  Feb  27th,  1989*  The  results  of  the 
elections  will  be  announced  on  Mar  25 >  1989* 

The  current  officers  aret 
Mel  Nathanson  a  Acting  Chairperson,  Prootem 
Paul  Holmgren  «  Acting  V/Chairperson,  Prontem 
John  "JC"  Cushran  9  Acting  Treasurer,  Pro0tem 

The  offices  that  will  be  voted  on  consist  of 1 
President 

1st  Vice-President 
2nd  Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

There  is  something  special  about  a  person 
willing  to  take  a  chance  of  an  idea  that  has 
nothing  immediately  tangible  to  be  had  for 
their  hard-earned  money.  It  takes  a  person 
with  vision,  courage,  and  some  money  they 
don't  need  right  away!  Ideas  with  as  much 
scope  as  the  one  we're  attempting  are 
difficult  enough  to  pull  off  without 
individuals  such  as  the  Charter  members  and 
without  your  help,  I  really  don't  think  this 
much  could  have  been  accomplished.  Be  proud  3 
there  are  not  many  of  you  out  there.  We  thank 
you. 

We  hope  that  this  announcement  has  proved 
that  we  have  been  working  towards  the  goals 
outlined.  With  the  increased  voluntary  help 
that  we  anticipate,  thr  organization  will 
thrive  and  grow. 


Ramex  SPDOS  ->  To  be  announced 

» 

Quantum  Leap  (QL)  Microdrive.  Floppy  Disk 
Tim  Stoddard 


Cambridge  Z88  Software.  EPROM 
To  be  announced 


(Signed  by)  Mel  Nathanson 


SINC-LINK 


15 


SNODGITS  and  the  Larken  System 

(Saving  to  disk)  g<  k 

by  George  Chambers 

SNODGITS  is  a  whodunit  mystery  game.  It 
seems  that  a  number  of  crimes  have  been 
committed  in  several  mansions  owned  by  Lord  and 
Lady  Snodger.  You  are  assisting  Benton,  the 
butler,  to  solve  them.  The  game  requires  that 
you  move  from  mansion  to  mansion.  There  are  5 
different  mansions,  or  "houses",  as  I  called 
them.  Every  time  that  you  opt  to  move  to  a  new 
house  requires  loading  in  a  section  of  code, 
from  tape  of  course. 

Modifying  this  program  to  run  on  the  Larken 
system  requires  that  it  be  modified  so  as  to 
call  up  the  "house"  data  from  disk.  I  shall 
first  describe  how  I  went  about  it. 

The  program  was  easily  broken  into  after 
loading  from  tape  by  use  of  tha  NMI  button,  and 
pressing  the  A  key.  This  is  not  always  the 
case.  By  changing  the  INK  colour  to  black  I  was 
able  to  list  a  short  Basic  program.  It  showed 
that  there  was  a  CLEAR  24200  instruction,  and 
that  the  program  would  start  with  a  RANDOMIZE 
USR  24663. 

The  "house"  code  that  was  to  be  called  up  was 
in  the  form  of  headerless  files.  This  meant 
that  the  program  did  not  access  the  Spectrum 
LOAD  routine  in  the  ROM  at  address  1 366  j  that 
the  LOAD  routine  was  in  the  body  of  the  program 
itself.  Looking  at  the  "house"  code  with  a  copy 
program  (0MNIR2)  showed  each  of  the  blocks  of 
code  to  be  to  be  608  bytes  long. 

With  the  program  in  the  computer  and  "broken 
into",  a  FOR/NEXT  loop  was  used  to  search  for  a 
value  of  608.  That  is  to  sayf  I  was  looking  for 
a  pair  of  addresses  corresponding  to  the  code 
length.  The  first  address  would  contain  a  96 
and  the  second,  a  2  (96+2*256=608). 

Several  locations  turned  up  and  were  noted. 
Inspection  with  a  disassembler  turned  up  an 
interesting  sequence  starting  at  address 
30691. Sure  enough,  a  RANDOMIZE  USR  30691 
brought  up  a  LOAD  routine.  Another  thing,  the 
disassembly  showed  that  the  code  was  loaded 
starting  at  address  30758. 

Now  that  I  know  the  starting  address  and 
length  of  each  of  the  "house"  code  blocks  I 
loaded  the  "house"  codes  from  tape,  into  the 
computer  in  turn,  using  a  made  up  header, 
saving  them  to  disk  with  the  name  series 
"housel",  "house2",  "house3".  etc. 

I  next  wrote  a  short  m/c  routine  which  would 
call  up  the  disk  drive  and  load  a  block  of  code 
called  "housel. CI".  I  searched  for,  and  found  a 
block  of  empty  addresses  at  5923°  and  placed 
the  subroutine  there.  ; 

Since  the  subroutine  was  constructed  to  load 
a  file  called  "housel. CI",  and  I  wanted  to  be 
able  to  load  all  5  "houses",  the  m/c  subroutine 
was  instructed  to  increment  the  file  name  by  1. 
That  is  to  say,  if  "housel"  was  loaded,  it 
should  then  increment  the  file  name  so  that 
"house2"  would  be  the  next  "house"  loaded. 

Next  thing  to  do  was  to  POKE  some  addresses 
at  30691  to  divert  the  program  from  it's  tape 
load  routine  to  my  new  disk  load  subroutine. 
This  called  for  some  POKES  starting  at  address 
30691. 

THere  was  finally  one    more    thing    to  do. 
Delete  the  instructions  re  tape  loading,  that 
appeared  on  the  screen.  These    were  removed 
with  a  bit  of  POKEing. 


3.  Without  turning  off  the  computer ,  Load  tne 
SNODGITS  program  from  tape,  and  break  into 
it  with  the  NMI  button,  and  the  A  key. 

4.  Enter  the  following  POKES  1  on 
pokp  10691  205i  POKE  30692,94i  POKE  30693.231 

POKE  30698 ,0 i   POKE  30699.0,   POKE  30700,0 

k    TTntfty  the  following  POKE  sequences! 
5P0R  N  =io3oii5  31518.  POKE  N.32s  NEXT  N 
FOR  N  =31617  TO  31640,   POKE  N,32«   NEXT  N 
FOR  N  =  31666  TO  31673,  POKE  N.32,  NEXT  N 
fSr  N  =  31682  TO  31695«  POKE  N.32.  NEXT  N 
(Removes  the  tape  instructions) 

6  Finally  enter  the  command  RANDOMIZE  USR 
24663,  press  the  SPACE  BAR  to  get  a  screen 
display^  and  press  the  NMI  to  save  the 
program.  This  SAVEs  the  main  program. 

7  Now  to  save  the  "house"  codes.  Make  up  a 
7  "false"  header,  as  follows.  Save  to  a  blank 

tape  the  first  part  of  the  following  SAVE. 
SAVE  "house"  CODE  30758,608 
Then  load  this  header  into  the  computer, 
followed  by  the  first  "house"  code  on  the 
SNODGITS  tape.  Save  to  disk  with  the 

PRINT^^loO,  SAVE  "housel. CI"  CODE  30758,608 
Do  the  same  with  the  next  4  code  locks, 
except  save  them  to  disk  as  house2,  house3, 
etc.  That's  it,  you  are  finished!! 


Now  stepjjbynstep  instructions  for  doing 
job,  c 

1.  Get  into  the  Spectrum  mode. 

2.  Load  the  Basic  lisiting    shown  here 

run  it. 


the 


and 


59230 

59231 
59232 
59233 
59234 
59237 
59240 
59243 
59246 
59248 
59250 
59253 
59256 
59259 
59262 
59265 
59268 
59271 
59274 
59277 
59278 
59281 
59282 
59283 
59284 

59285 
59286 
59287 
59288 
59289 
59290 
59291 
59292 
59295 


F3 
00 
00 
00 

CD6200 

2197E7 

112220 

010A00 

EDBO 

3E0B 

320220 

CDC600 

212678 

223320 

216002 

223120 

CDC900 

3A6400 

3A9CE7 

3c 

329CE7 

C9 

4B 

61 

00 

00 

00 

68 

6F 

75 

73 

65 

312E43 
312000 


DI 
NOP 
NOP 
NOP 

CALL  98 
LD      HL, 59287 
DE.8226 
BC.10 


LD 
LD 


LDIR 
LD 

LD 


A, 11 

(8194), A 
CALL  198 
LD      HL, 30758 
(8243), HL 
HL.608 
(824l),HL 
CALL  201 
LD      A, (100) 
LD      A, (59292) 
INC  A 
J±D  L59.292),A 

TeT 


LD 
LD 
LD 


2.5  \ 


LD 

LD 

NOP 

NOP 

NOP 

LD 

LD 

LD 

LD 

LD 

LD 

LD 


L.B 
L,  A 
( HL ) , L 
(HL) ,E 
H,L 

SP, 17198 
SP.32 


10  RESTORE  100,  FOR  n=59230  TO  59299 
20  READ  a,  POKE  n,a,  NEXT  n 
30  STOP 

100  DATA  243,0,0,0,205.98,0,33,151.231.17.34,3 
^ 1 0 1 ^ DATA  0,237.176,62,11,50.2,32,205.198,0,33. 
3?022DATA"  51.32,33.96,2,34,49,32.205.201,0,58.1 

°io3'data  156,231.60,50,156,231.201,75.97.0, 
' io4*  data* 115, 101, 49, 46, 67, 49 .32 .0,0, 0,0, 0,0,0, 

0 


SINC-LINK 


RS232    INTERFACE  BRUNEAU 


LARKEN  "MAXCOMM-  BBS  SOFTWARE 


What     is     an  RS232  interface7 

What  is  the  difference  between  serial  and  parallel 
ports 

What   is  a  Centronics  port? 
What  does  Asynchronous  mean? 

Questions,  questions,  questions.  I  often  wonder  how 
many  people  listen  to  our  discussions  and  are 
completly  lost  by  the  slang  ( computerese )  that  we 
use.  If  they  do  ask  questions  how  often  are  the 
answers  clear?  To  answer  the  questions  above  it  is 
necessary  to  give  a  bit  of  background  information. 

RS232  is  a  specification  that  was  developed  in  1969 
by  the  Electronic  Industries  Association.  It  is  a 
standard  that  establishes  how  computers  (data 
terminal  equipment  -DTE—  )  can  communicate  with 
modems  and  serial  printers  (data  communications 
equipment  -DCE-  ).  Over  the  years  many  modifications 
and  manufacturers  preferances  have  made  the  standard 
confusing  but  the  basis  remains  the  same. 

The  RS232  Interface  actually  consists  of   two  items; 

1.  The  Asynchronous     Communications     Adapter  (the 
circui  try ) 

2.  The     Serial   Port   (the  connector  where  you  plug 
the  cable  into. ) 

A  character  (8  bits)  is  transmitted  to  the  adaptor 
by  the  computer  all  at  the  same  time  (parallel  data 
transfer)  and  are  captured  by  the  adaptor.  These  8 
bits  are  then  transmitted  one  at  a  time  by  the  async 
adaptor.  The  parallel  data  has  been  converted  to  a 
serial  stream  of  bits.  The  process  can  take  any 
amount  of  time  and  is  not  governed  by  a  clock  rate 
nense  the  word  asynchronous. 


Larry  Kenny  has  brought  out  a  new 
telecommunications  software  package  for  the 
Larken  Disk  system,  called  MAXCOMM.  It  is  a 
dual^f unction  utility.  That  is,  it  can  be  used 
on  your  computer  in  a  simple  terminal  mode,  or 
you  can  use  it  to  set  up  your  own  Bulletin 
Board  system. 

We  have  not  been  able  to  review  it  properly 
for  this  issue  of  the  newsletter,  due  to  other 
pressing  matters.  Lacking  a  review,  we  shall 
quote  from  the  Clackamas  County  T/S  User  Group 
newsletter,  THE  PLOTTER. 

"...this  should  be  a  great  new  addition  to 
the  list  of  available  telecommunications 
software.  According  to  Larry  this  will  operate 
as  either  a  BBS  or  a  standard  terminal  s/w.  If 
you  are  running  a  BBS  with  it  and  someone 
wants  to  "chat",  you  press  a  key  and  you  are 
in  FULL  TERM  mode.  It  will  operate  at  both  300 
and  1200  baud  (with  an  RS232  and  Hayes 
compatible  modem)  and  will  not  drop  charaters 
at  the  1200  baud  rate.  It  will  have  direct 
"dump  to  disk"  downloading  

"......It  will  be  available  from  Larken, 

Ed  Grey  Enterprises,  and  RMG  Enterprises.  At  a 
price  of  only  $25  (US),  plus  shipping.  It  will 
be  hard  to  beat.  KEEP  WATCHING!...." 

end  of  quote 

We'll  try  to  have  a  proper  review  next 
issue. 

G.F.  Chambers 


At  the  receiving  end,  another  async  adapter 
reconstructs  the  character  by  reversing  the  process. 
Serial  data  is  converted  back  to  parallel  data. 
Serial  data  can  be  transmitted  over  long  distances 
without  detenation  of  the  data. 


A  Parallel  port  simply  presents  all  S  bits  at  its 
output  and  these  are  picked  up  by  the  receiving 
device  at  its  parallel  port.  The  data  present  is 
affected  by  attenuation  over  long  distances  and 
therefore  is  not  suitable  for  communication  over 
long  distances.  By  the  way,  one  of  the  first 
companies  to  provide  parallel  interfacing  to  the 
consumer  was  called  Centronic  and  they  set  the 
standard  that   is  still   being  recognized  today. 


CHECK    IT  OUT 


WANTED!  WANTED!  WANTED ! 

MEM0TEXT,  High  or  Low  memory 
BUGBYTE  64K  memory  w/"gold"  memory  chips  only 
Interfaces,  MEM0TECH  Ser.  or  Par.  ZX81/TS1000 
BUGBYTE  MD-,2 

ROM  or  ULA  Chips,  for  ZX/TS 
Printer,  2040,  for  ZX/TS,  with  paper 
Printer,  Star  Gemini,  10X  or  15X 

All  must  be  in  working  order  with 
instructions,  and  reasonably  priced.  State 
price  including  postage.  Write  toi 

John  G.  Thomas, 
271  Coral  Ave., 
San  Antonio,  TX  78223  USA 


How  would  you  like  to  have  256k  of  banked-swi tched 
memory  and  do  it  with  three  or  four  chips  ?  You  can 
do  it  with  a  static  ram  chip  that  has  128k  of 
memory.  The  chip  is  housed  in  a  32  pin  package  and 
contains  four  32k  memory  modules  and  and  a  decoder 
chip. 


P662Q4L 

1  MES  (128k  x  8)       i  P66304-U 

|  (lime*  -  ia»K*6) 

what's  the  catch?  ...it  retails  at  $141.96  Canadian. 
That's  a  lot  of  green  stuff  going  up  in  smoke  if  you 
Plug   it   in  backwards! 


FOR  SALE!  FOR  SALE!  FOR  SALE! 

-r  ZX81  with  DKTRONICS  case/keyboard 

-  16K  Memotech  RAMpack 
r?  TS2040  Printer 

-  Sound  Generator,  ZONIX^Sl  by 
BIPAK,  uses  a  G.I.  AY8912  chip. 

r,  AGF  Joystick  interface  for  ZX81 
s  Hunter  Board  w/full  complement 
n  Ribbon  connector 
n  Loads  of  good  ZX81  software 

Best  offers 
Write,  or  call  Ricard  Gonzales, 
Apt  6 16... 77  Howard  Street, 
Toronto,  Ont.    M4X  1J9 
Tel.  (416)  921  9580  or  921  3450 


SINC-LINK 


17 


QLips 
by  Hugh  Howie 

Recently  I  was  working  with  ABACUS,  and  as 
so  often  in  the  past,  I  was  unable  to  get  the 
complete  printout  of  the  document  on  one 
page.  I  have  been  left  with  the  last  column 
being  printed  on  the  second  sheet,  and  then 
having  to  paste  the  two  sheets  together  to  get 
a  readable  document.  This  time  I  was  deter- 
mined to  beat  the  system. 

I  knew  that  with  QUILL  it  was  possible  to 
go  'way  past  the  80  column  and  on  up  to  about 
115  or  120,  so  I  felt  sure  there  must  be  a  way 
for  ABACUS  to  work  better  for  me. 

I  printed  the  document  I  was  working  on, 
and  sure  enough  there  was  a  column  missing,  so 
I  adjusted  the  width  of  the  various  columns, 
this  was  OK.  I  then  wanted  to  put  a  line  down 
between  the  columns  to  make  them  easier  to 
read,  this  put  me  back  to  square  one.  Try 
printing  'Condensed',  half  the  page  not  used. 

Went  to  the  'Design •command,  and  there  it 
was  right  in  front  of  me  at  the  bottom  of  the 
menu 1-  Paper  Width (charac tar)  80.  I  changed 
this  to  100,  but  did  not  get  the  requirement  I 
wanted,  but  I  was  interested  by  this  time  to 
see  what  would  happen  if  I  made  this  200.  To 
assist  me  in  my  experiment,  I  put  in  a  few 
more  columns  in  the  document,  right  up  to  'X'. 
Back  to  printer  which  I  set  at  'Condensed  20'. 
Printed  the  document,  and  Presto. . .complete. . . 
right  up  to  'X' . 

There  you  have  it, 

Alter  'Paper  Width'  to  what  you  want. 
Adjust  printer  to  condensed. 
You're  in  business. 

Got  to  admit,  all  my  columns  are  not  full 
width,  most  at  6  or  7  with  every  other  set  at 
1  to  print  the  symbol  '  '  between  columns  to 
give  me  separation  between  columns.  But  I  am 
now  a  lot  happier  than  I  was. 


Try  it! 


H.H.H. 


A  tip  in  a  letter  from  another  one  of  our 
members,  Hugh  Howie.  It  concerns  keeping  track 
of  magazine  clippings.  Here  it  is,  slightly 
•dittedi 

"...How  often  have  you  removed  a  page  from  a 
magazine  or  newsletter  file,  and  when  you  go 
to  replace  the  page,  find  the  file  been  turned 
over,  and  you  don't  know  where  it  goes.  Now, 
if  you  keep  the  articles  in  a  binder,  you  have 
to  go  through  all  the  pages  to  find  the  right 
spot  for  your  page. 

A  simple  solution  I  found  was  to  MARK  the 
pages  of  any  given  date.  The  problem  was  that 
in  an  issue  of  many  pages  it  was  a 
timeconsuming  job. 

Some  time  ago  I  invested  in  a  Three  Ring 
Punch.  I  punched  the  holes  in  the  pages  of 
course  *  but  the  real  treat  is  to  punch  a 
couple  of  holes  along  the  TOP  of  the  page.  Now 
I  know  that  the  Three  Hole  Punch  will  not 
register  all  three  holes,  but  you  will  get 
two,  and  that's  all  you  need  to  handle  many 
documents. 

Each  time  you  use  the  punch,  you  make  a  mark 
with  a  pencil  or  tape,  as  to  where  you  placed 
the  LAST  document,  move  the  paper  one  mark 
over,  press,  and  you  can  mark  a  number  of 
pages  at  a  time.  When  you  put  them  all 
together  you  have  a  Hole-Coded  page.  Match  the 
page  in  your  hand  to  the  holes  along  the  top, 
and  you  have  the  issue.  You  will  find  that  the 
number  of  combinations  of  hole  positions  are 
so  varied,  it  is  almost  impossible  to  get  an 
exact  duplicate. 

If  necessary,  you  only  need  to  use  ONE  hole, 
to  mark  a  document. 


OF  INTEREST  TO  QL  OWNERS 
A  new  regulator  for  your  QL 

one  of  our  members,  Schennelly  Stoughton, 
writes  about  several  items  of  interest  to  QL 
owners.  I  have  selected  parts  of  his  letter  to 
place  in  the  newsletter: 


, I  have  some  good  news  for  QL  owners. 


Pirsti  I  found  a  5-Volt  2  Amp.  voltage 
regulator  that  runs  cooler  than  the  original 
regulator.  You  have  to  do  some  hardware  mods, 
but  it  works  great.  Enclosed  is  a  diagram  for 
anyone  interested.  The  regulator  is  a  3052V. 
Any  of  the  3052  series  will  work  if  wired 
correctly. 

Second  1  Any  hackers  interested  in  good  prices 
should  check  out  ACTIVE  SURPLUS  ANNEX,  at  347 
Queen  Street  W.  (a  block  or  so  east  of 
Spadina).  Phone  416-593  0967 

Third:  Finally  I  can  offer  limited  service  for 
QL  owners. I  am  doing  my  own  business  and  can 
spend  some  time  servicing  our  club  members.  I 
get  the  feeling  from  some  suppliers  of  Ql 
hardware  and  software  that  things  are  looking 
bad  for  us  Sinclair  buffs,  but  I  will  do  what 
I  can  to  help  with  any  problem  that  arises. 

The  hardware  mod  for  the  regulator  is  as 
follows. 


Remove  old  regulator 
£c  heat  sink.  Remove 
fins  on  either  side 
of  old  regulator. 

Remove  enough  aluminum  from  body  of  heat  sink 
to  allow  legs  of  the  regulator  to  fit  where 
old  regulator  legs  turned  down.  Cut  legs  of 
new  regulator  to  approx.  3/8th  of  an  inch. 
Remove  plastic  plug,  but  leave  metal  con.  on 
wires.  Replace  heat  sink,  install  insulating 
hardware  (mica  insulator)  and  heat  sink 
compound.  Install  regulator  and  solder  wires 
to  appropriate  legs  of  regulator.  An  ECG  1934 
regulator  can  be  used  or  any  of  the  3°52 
series  if  wired  correctly.  Wiring  for  ECG  1934 
is  as  follows. ..." 


Shennelly  the  goes  on  to  say  that  the  ECG 
1934  regulator  sells  for  $18.84,  but  that  he 
feels  that  we  should  be  able  to  do  better 
than  that.  He  will  advise  later. 

Schennelly  Stoughton 
191  William  Str.  N. 
Lindsay,  Ont.  K9V  4B8 

Schennelly  does  servicing  of    satellite  TV 
receivers  as  an  occupation. Feel  free  to  call 
him.  1-705-324  4792  should  do  the  trick. 

George  Chambers. 


SINC-LINK 


QL  9L  QL  SL  QL  QL  9L  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL  QL       QL  QL 


AT  THE  JANUARY  CLUB  MEETING  IT  WAS  ANNOUNCED,  AMONG  OTHER  ITEMS,  THAT 
' ACTIVE  SURPLUS'  WAS  SELLING  RGB  MONITORS  UNCASED  O  E  Ms  FOR  A  HUNDRED 
AND  FORTY  FIVE  BUCKS.  MY  EARS  PERKED  UP.  WOULD  THIS  MONITOR  WORK  WITH  A 
QL?,  SURE,  IT  MIGHT  REQUIRE  A  LITTLE  MODIFICATION,  (SOUND  FAMILIAR?) . 
WHAT  *  S  AN   'OEM'    ?.    ORIGINAL  EQUIPMENT  MANUFACTURE,    I  WAS  ADVISED. 

GEORGE     CHAMBERS  WAS  GIVING  ME  A  RIDE  HOME     AND  I  PICKED  HIS  BRAINS  ON  THIS 

APPARENT  FANTASTIC  BUY. 

THE  NEXT  MORNING  I  GOT  MARG,  THE  MRS.,  TO  RESEARCH  THE  PHONE  NUMBER.  ACTIVE 
SURPLUS  SAID  THEY  HAD  FOUR  UNITS  LEFT.  PUT  MY  NAME  ON  ONE  AND  I'LL  BE  IN 
LATER  TODAY.  DID  I  WANT  A  UNIT  WITH  ' CGA*  OR  * IGA' .  WHAT'S  THE  DIFFERENCE? 
HE  DIDN'T  KNOW.  I  THOUGHT  OF  ALL  THE  PEOPLE  IN  THE  CLUB  I  COULD  CALL,  WHO 
MIGHT  BE  AT  HOME,  AND  COULD  ANSWER  THE  QUESTION.  NO  ONE.  I  CALLED  AN  OLD 
COHORT  AT  THE  CNIB  (CANADIAN  NATIONAL  INSTITUTE  FOR  THE  BLIND)  WHO  IS  IN 
CHARGE  OF  ASSISTIVE  DEVICES,  FOR  THE  VISUALLY  HANDICAPPED.  GEOFF  EDEN. 
WHAT  DO  YOU  KNOW  ABOUT  SINCLAIR  QL  COMPUTERS  AND  RGB  MONITORS.  TRY  ME!  WAS 
THE  RESPONSE.  I  AM  ABOUT  TO  BUY  A  14  INCH  RGB  MONITOR  MADE  BY  MITSUBISHI 
AND  THE  DEALER  ASKED  IF  MY  QL  WORKED  ON  CGA  OR  IGA,  AND  I  DIDN'T  KNOW  WHAT 
HE  WAS  TALKING  ABOUT.  GEOFF  SAID,  THE  TERM  REFERRED  TO  THE  NUMBER  OF  PIXELS 
ON  THE  SCREEN  AND  THAT  IT  WAS  HIGHLY  UNLIKELY  THAT  THAT  SET  WOULD  BE 
EQUIPPED  WITH  'IGA'  HOW  RIGHT  HE  WAS.  THE  MANUFACTURE  DATE  ON  THE  SET  IS 
NOV.  1983. 

THERE  IT  WAS,  ENCASED  IN  A  PLASTIC  HOUSING,  I'D  FORGOTTEN  THAT  ONE  OF  THE 
FELLOWS  AT  THE  CLUB  HAD  MENTIONED  THAT  THE  DISPLAY  UNIT  WAS  IN  PLEXIGLASS, 
THE  UNIT  WAS  DISPLAYING  ALL  OF  ITS  COLOURS  IN  AN  ELONGATED  RECTANGLE  FROM 
CENTER  SCREEN  OUT.  AS  MY  GRANDSON  WOULD  SAY  'AWESOME'.  THE  COUNTER  WAS 
QUITE  BUSY.  WHEN  MY  TURN  CAME,  "I'D  LIKE  ONE  OF  THOSE  MONITORS".  I  SAID.  IT 
TOOK  A  WHILE  BUT  I  FINALLY  GOT  TO  TAKE  MY   'FANTASTIC  BUY'  HOME. 

I  CALLED  GEORGE.  "GUESS  WHAT!  I  BOUGHT  AN  RGB  MONITOR".  "WOULD  YOU  LIKE 
SOME  HELP  IN  GETTING  IT  GOING?"  SAID  GEORGE.  I  THOUGHT  YOU'D  NEVER  ASK.  I 
REALLY  MUST  DIGRESS,  TO  SAY  HOW  MUCH  THE  FELLOWS  IN  THE  CLUB  HAVE  HELPED  ME 
IN  SO  MANY  WAYS  IN  THE  FOUR  YEARS  I  HAVE  BEEN  A  MEMBER,  I  COULD  NOT  HAVE 
MAINTAINED  MY  INTEREST  IN  COMPUTING  WITHOUT  THE  CLUB  MEMBERS  AND  THE 
ASSISTANCE  RECEIVED  FROM  ARTICLES  IN  NEWS  LETTERS  FROM  OTHER  SINCLAIR  USER 
GROUPS.    I  TAKE  THIS  OPPORTUNITY  TO  SAY  THANKS     TO  ALL  OF  YOU. 

AS  I  AM  RUNNING  OUT  OF  SPACE  I'LL  TELL  YOU  THE  BAD  NEWS.  SO  FAR,  WITH  THE 
ASSISTANCE  OF  GEORGE  CHAMBERS  AND  RENE  BRUNEAU,  WHOSE  EXPERTISE  IMPRESSES 
ALL  OF  US,  THE  'RGB'  IS  NOT  COMPATIBLE  WITH  MY  QL.  I  HAVE  WRITTEN  TO  MITSU 
BISHI  IN  CALIFORNIA  FOR  A  SCHEMATIC,  HOPEFULLY  I  CAN  WRITE  OF  GOOD  NEWS  IN 
THE  NEXT  ISSUE. 

W  K    (BILL)  LAWSON. 


SINC-LINK 


Dear  George  Chambers, 


I   just  got  a  news  letter  and  from  reading  it,    I  got  the 
impression  that  maybe  I  COULD  offer  something  that  some  of  oar 
members  don't  know  already. 

In  the  process  of  writeing,  re-writeing  and  fiddling  around 
with  a  word  processing  program,   I've  come  across  a  few  things 
tnat  may  be  of  interest  to  some.   The  following  is  a  list  of 
these  things*. 

1  By  useing  "PAUSE  0"   instead  of   "IF  INKEY*  =  ""  THEN....."  I 
not  only  saved  memory,  but  found  out  that  it  makes  use  of  all 
thl  computer's  normal   keying  characteristics!     repeat  delay 
before  repeating , .  .  .  .   a  VERY  powerful  command !  >    I  don  t  know 
why°  I  just  happened  to  discover  this  by  my  endless  fiddling. 

2  "IF  CODE  I*  =  6  THEN  POKE  23658,    (8  AND  PEEK  23658  =  0)» 
enables  the  caps  lock  key  within  the  program,    (this  one  took 
sCme  research  to  figure  out  how  to  accomplish  useing  little 
memory) 

3  I  used  all   22  lines  for  the  display  in  my  program.   Later  I 
found  that  to  prompt  an  input,    I  would  HAVE  to  use  an  INPUT 
statement  which  would  require  keying   "ENTER"  after  inputing  the 
Sotce?  Thi.  was  bothersome,  so  in  trying  to  solve  this  problem 
I  came  up  with  a  way  to  use  the  INKEY*  function  in  conjunction 
with  an   INPUT  statement.   This  allowed  the  printing  of  a  prompt 
at  the  bottom  of  the  screen  while  the  computer  was  waiting  for 
INKEY*! 

The  following  are  the  program  lines  that  allow  this: 

m  tf  INKEY*  =  ""  THEN  INPUT  "E-DIT/N-EXT  PAGE/P-RIOR  PAGE 
(SPACES  TO  FILL  IN  THE  REST  OF  ONE  LINE  AND  NO  MORE)":    GO  TO  10. 

20  LET   I*  =  INKEY*. 

Notice  that  there  is  no  variable  in  the  INPUT  statement!  For 
some  reason,  this  syntax  is  accepted! 

What  this  does  is  print  the  INPUT  statement  if  no  key  is  being 
pressed;    immediately  erase  it  since  there  is  no  variable  to 
inputs   then  loop  back  around.   When  the  computer  detects  a  key 
being  pressed,   instead  of  re-printing  the  INPUT  statement,  it 
assigns  the  value  of   INKEY*  to  I*. 

So  what  you  get  is  a  very  rapidly  blinking  prompt  to  an  INKEY* 
function. 

Now,  back  to  narrative... 

As  always  I've  got  a  question,  tip  #3  is  only  good  for  short 
prompts.   The  longer  the  written  prompt,  the  harder  the  end  is 
read  since  the  first  characters  remain  on  the  screen  longer  than 
the  last.   Does  anyone  know  of  a  better  way  of  accomplishing  this 
by  way  of  pokes  or  a  machine  code  routine?  My  program  was 
written  to  be  used  with  the  OS-64,  so  my  prompt  is  almost  a 
whole  line  long.    (64  characters  per  line) 

Well,   that's  about  it. 

Until   I  hear  from  you  again, 


John  Vander  Stel 
502  MI  CO,  2ACR 
APO  NY  09093 


John  Vander  Stel 
BOX  535 

NEWAYGO,   MI  49337 


SINC-LINK 


TECHNICIAN  TED  and  the  LARKEN 
by  George  Chambers 

The  Spectrum  game  Technician  Ted  has  been 
around  for  some  time.  It  has  been  a  difficult 
program  to  break  into  because  of  a  combination 
of  double  speed  loading,  some  complex  M/C 
loading  procedures,  and  the  habit  of  crashing 
when  any  attempt  was  made  to  gain  access  to  it. 
There  have  not  been  many  game  POKEs  published 
for  it  for  this  reason.  These  notes  describe 
how  it  was  accessed,  using  the  Larken  NMI 
button,  to  permit  games  POKEs  to  be  made.  This 
same  procedure  is  applicable  to  any  Larken 
NMI-saved  Spectrum  program. 

Some  times  it  is  possible  to  break  into  a 
program  by  trying  an  NMI-type  save  to  a 
protected  disk.  This  will  produce  a  Disk  Full 
error  report,  and  if  youare  lucky  you  will 
find  yourself  in  the  BASIC  mode,  it  is  then  a 
simple  matter  to  save  the  code  to  disk.  I 
suggest  a  save  as  follows i 
PRINT  USR  100iSAVE"prognm.Cl"C0DE  24000,41535 

In  many  cases  this"save  to  a  protected  disk" 
routine  results  in  a  system  crash.  Probably 
because  the  program  poked  a  different  number 
into  addresses  23613  and/or  23659.  The  first 
address  contains  the  stack  pointer  address, 
while  the  second  address  contains  the  number 
of  lines  on  the  screen.     Tampering  with  these 
numbers  will  produce  a  system  crash. 

What  we  need  is  simple.  We  want  a  block  of 
code  that  contains  all  the  code  to  play  the^ 
game.  Also,  equally  important,  we  need  to  find 
the  starting  address  of  the  program.  Finding  the 
starting  address  is  probably  the  hardest  part. 
We  shall  get  into  that  later.  The  first  thing  is 
to  obtain  the  requisite  block  of  code. 

My  first  attempt  at  this  was  unsuccessful.  My 
thought  was  to  delete  the  first  track  of  the 
NMI-saved  program,  in  the  disk  Directory.  This 
was  not  successful.  The  LOAD  itself  was 
succeessful  but  at  the  end  of  the  loading 
process,  some  Larken  NMI  code  appeared  at  the 
bottom  of  the  screen,  and  the  computer  remained 
locked  up. 

I  then  took  a  different  tack.  I  saved  each 
track  in  turn  to  tape  (curiously,  saving  to 
tape,  while  a  longer  process,  is  simpler),  and 
then  loaded  them  back  into  the  computer,  and 
all  was  well.  There  is  actually  more  to  it  than 
that,  and  I  shall  go  into  the  details. 

Firstly,  your  NMInsaved  program  should  be  a 
9rrtrack  SAVE.  That  is  to  say,  the  saved  code 
starts  at  address  22490.  Secondly,  I  used  the 
"doctor. Bl"  program,  which  will  move  a  selected 
track  into  the  computer  starting  at  address 
50000. 

With  "doctor. Bl",  determine  which  tracks  the 
Null  program  (Tech  Ted,  in  this  case)  is  located. 
Makev  a  note  of  them.  Then,  again  using  "doctor. 
Bl",  load  the  highest  numbered  track  into  the 
computer.  Then  save  the  block  of  code  50024, 
5090.  This  represents  the  actual  program  code, 
with  the  Larken  data  removed.  Do  this  sav  to 
tape.  Then  load  the  next  track  (the  one 
immediately  below  the  just^saved  one),  and  save 
it  to  tape.  Continue  this  way  until  you  have 
saved  8  tracks.  You  will  have  to  name  eack  save 
to  tape  and  I  suggest  that  each  SAVE  name 
include  the  track  number,  as  an  aid  to  keeping 
track  of  things  when  you  are  reloading  the 
tape.  For  example  SAVE  "ted  45"  CODE  50024, 
5090;   SAVE  "ted  44"  CODE  50024,5090,  etc. 


The  last  track  to  be  saved  has  to  be  treated 
in  a  special  way.  The  track  contains  the  first 
part  of  the  NMI  program  starting  at  address 
22490.  We  want  to  save  to  tape  only  the  part  of 
this  track  that  starts  above  the  "start  of 
BASIC"  address  of  23755  (Spectrum  mode). 
Actually  we  will  want  to  save  somewhat  above 
this  address.  There  is  a  trade-off  here.  We 
want  to  capture  all  of  the  code  that  is 
necessary  for  program  operation,  but  we  don't 
really  know  where  this  code  starts.  From 
experimenting  it  appears  that  a  good  address  to 
start  the  code  from  is  address  24000. 

This  is  as  low  as  one  can  place  RAMtop,  and 
still  leave  a  bit  of  room  for  entering  a  few 
BASIC  program  lines  (very  few,  to  be  sure).  I 
have  found  that  just  about  every  games  program 
has  a  few  lines  of  BASIC  in  them,  so  the  code 
generally  starts  above  the  address  24000  that  I 
suggest..  ,  — 

What  this  is  leading  up  to  is  this.  The  last 
track  to  be  saved  to  tape,  i.e.  the  one  that 
starts  at  address  22490,  must  be  saved  with  a 
starting  address  of  51534.  and  a  length  of 
3580. 

Now  that  the  code  has  been  saved  to  tape  it 
is  time  to  load  it  back  into  the  computer,  and 
this  time  to  save    the    whole    block    to  disk. 

First  enter  the  direct  command  CLEAR  23999. 
Then,  starting  with  the  first  program  on  the 
tape,  enter  the  command  LOAD  ""  CODE  63210. 
This  will  load  the  first  block  of  code  into 
the  right  location  in  the  computer.  Follow  this 
by  loading  the  next  code  with  the  command  LOAD 
""  CODE  58120,  and  so  on.  You  will  see  the 
merit  of  including  the  track  numbers  in  the 
filename  as  suggested  earlier. 

Here  are  the  correct  loading  addresses  in 
full: 

1. . .63210 
2. . .58120 
3. ..53030 
4. . .479^0 
5... 42850 
6... 37760 
7. ..32670 
8... 27580 
9. . .24000 

Note  that  the  last  one  to  be  loaded  is  a 
smaller  block  of  code,  and  it's  starting 
address  corresponds  to  the  shorter  SAVE 
treatment  that  we  gave  it  earlier. 

Now  that  you  have  all  the  code  loaded  you  may 
save  it.  Use  the  command: 

PRINT  USR  1 00 1  SAVE  "prognm. C 1 "CODE  24000,41535 

Having  saved  the  code  is  one  thing.  The  next 
thing  is  to  look  for  the  correct  starting 
address.  That  is  to  say,  what  RAND  USR  number 
will  start  the  program. 

This  is  the  part  where  a  good  deal  of 
ingenuity  will  be  required.  If  you  are  into 
disassemblers  you  can  load  one  into  high  memory 
and  search  for  some  unconditional  JUMPS.  List 
them  and  try  them  out  systematically.  Sometimes 
you  will  strike  it  lucky  that  way.  Or  you  can 
try  breaking  into  the  BASIC  of  the  original 
urogram  to  find  a  RAND  USR  number.  Sometimes 
the  BASIC  loader  installs  some  M/C  used  to  load 
the  main  body  of  code,  and  it  will  be  necessary 
to  locate  it  and  disassemble  it. 

If  you  are  not  into  disassemblers  and  don  t 
mind  some  bullr,work  then  try  this.  Install  the 
game  code.  Then  write  a  simple  FOR/NEXT  loop  as 
follows,  cmJm 


SINC-LINK 


21 


10  FOR  N  =  23950  TO  65535 

20  IF  PEEK  N  =  195  THEN  PRINT  N,  PEEK  N 

30  NEXT  N 

Run  this  and  you  will  get  several  addresses 
that  contain  a  value  of  195.  This  is  a  M/C 
unconditional  JUMP  command,  and  is  a  good  place 
to  start.  After  you  have  a  list  of  maybe  a 
dozen  or  so  numbers,  terminate  the  FOR/NEXT 
program,  and  start  entering  the  command 
RANDOMIZE  USR  xxxxx,  where  xxxxx  is  one  of  the 
numbers  in  your  list. 

Sometimes  the  command  will  bring  you  back  to 
BASIC,  sometimes  it  will  get  you  into  some 
obscure  part  of  the  program  (often  followed  by 
a  system  crash!).  Mostly  you  will  get  a  system 
crash.  Simply  persevere,  reload,  and  continue 
with  the  next  number.  One  of  them  will  start 
the  game  at  the  proper  place.  Usually  the 
number  is  in  the  lowere  part  of  the  code. 

Incidentally,  the  program  "doctor. Bl" 
mentioned  above  is  one  of  several  utilities 
available  for  Larken  disk    repair.  Any  utility 
that  will  place  a  track  into  memory  will  do  the 
same  task,  though  the  SAVE/LOAD  addresses  given 
above  would  necessarily  have  to  be  changed. 
RANDOMIZE  USR  31^90  will  start  Technician  Ted! 


MISMATCH... A  terrific  read 

A  new  book  is  now  In  the  bookstores  which 
could  be  of  interest  to  club  members.  It  is 
called  MISMATCH.  To  quote  from  a  newspaper 
review t 

"...Lloyd  Pye  is  the  author  of  one  of  the 
latest  forays  into  the  teehnosthriller  field, 
a  thriller  called  "Mismatch"  (Dell,  $3.95). 
Mismatch  takes  as  it's  technological 
foundation  computer  "hacking"  and  phone 
"phreaking"  (tapping  into  Ma  Bell's  lines 
illegally) •  The  novel's  plot  hinges  on  the 
possibilities  for  chaos  inherent  in  a 
situation  in  which  an  extremely  talented 
individual  proficient  in  both  areas  is  capable 
of  bringing  national  communications  networks 
to  a  standstill.'* 

The  author  appears  to  have  written  to  a 
number  of  computer  clubs,  including  ours, 
promoting  his  book.  We  received  his  missive 
this  week.  To  quote  from  his  letters 

"...I  wrote  it  primarily  for  people  like  us, 
people  who  relish  the  lore  and  legend  of  all 
aspects  of  computer/high  technology. 

"....Believe  me  when  I  say  thist  If  you  do 
make  the  effort  to  alert  your  group,  you  won't 
be  doing  me  a  favor  alone.  MISMATCH  is  an 
absolutely  terrific  read,  which  I'm  not  saying 
just  because  I  wrote  it.... So  trust  me,  if  you 
read  it  you'll  be  doing  yourself  a  favor t  and 
if  you  urge  your  group  to  read  it  as  well, 
you'll  be  doing  them  a  favor,  too." 

The  author's  letter  also  contained  two  pages 
of  reviews  of  the  book,  which  made  it  sound 
very  readable.  Interesting  enough  that  I  went 
looking  for  it.  I  have  not  been  able  to  find 
it  yet,  but  I  shall  keep  looking.  For  $4.95 
Can.,  it  seems  worth  taking  a  look  at.  If  you 
come  across  it,  let  us  know  where  you  found 
it.  You  may  need  to  order  it.  The  author  says 
that  it  has  gone  into  2nd  printing. 

G.  Chambers 


SYSTEM  15000  on  the  Larken  Disk  System 
by  George  Chambers 

System  15000  is  a  an  unusual  sort  of 
program,  in  which  you,  a  computer  hacker,  are 
trying  to  break  into  a  large  computer  system 
to  retrieve  money. 

The  program  description  can  be  paraphrased 
as  follows  1 

"Richard's  company  COMDATA  has  been  ripped 
off  by  REALCO  to  the  tune  of  $1.5  million  on 
his  American  order.  The  only  way  to  put  things 
right  is  to  transfer  the  money  back  to 
COMDATA' s  bank  (MIDMINSTER) ,  by  getting  into 
the  appropriate  computer.  Start  by  going  to 
KINGSDOWN  Polytechnic  672  3427.  The  special 
code  list  is  SL312  e  look  for  L.T.Perry  & 
Son. " 

Needless  to  say,  this  game  will  take  several 
sessions  to  complete.  It  has  a  SAVE/LOAD 
routine  so  that  one  can  save  the  key  data  of  a 
game  in  progress.  Problem  is  that  the  save  and 
load  is  to  tape.  What  we  are  going  to  do  is 
break  into  the  program  to  change  the  commands 
to  enable  a  save  to  disk. 

Break  into  the  program  by  attempting  an 
NMIosave  to  a  protected  disk.  This  will. give  _ 
you  a  DISK  PROTECTED  error,  and  you  will  find 
that  you  can  now  list  the  program.  The 
SAVE/LOAD  routine  starts  at  line  330.  Changes 
will  be  required  in  lines  338,  372,  and  390, 
as  followst 

338  RANDOMIZE  USR  100«  GOTO  Ot  RANDOMIZE 
USR  100i  LOAD  "sysdat.Al"  DATA  s() 

372  RANDOMIZE  USR  100 1  GOTO  Oi  RANDOMIZE 
USR  lOOi  SAVE  "sysdat.Al"  DATA  s() 

390  PRINT  AT  12, 6 i "PLACE  DISK  IN  DRIVE 
0"""  PRESS  <ENTER>  WHEN  READY" 

(You  may  use  a  different  drive  number  if  you 
anticipate  saving  an  interrupted  game  to 
another  drive) 

Install  an  unprotected  disk  in  your  chosen 
drive,  point  the  Larken  DOS  to  it  (if 
necessary)  with  PRINT  USR  100«  GOTO  (chosen 
drive  number).  To  save  a  running  program, 
enter  GOTO  5.  The  screen  will  go  dark  for  a 
few  seconds,  then  the  program  logo  will 
appear.  Press  the  NMI  button  to  save  the 
modified  program. 

The  program  has  several  copy  protection 
devices  in  it  which  are  worth  a  note. 

The  first  line  consists  of  a  couple  of 
pokes  which  are  designed  to  corrupt  line  3.  so 
that  the  program  will  not  list  properly.  Also, 
the  first  line  is  line  0,  making  it  impossible 
to  list.  To  make  it  listable,  change  the  line 
number  by  entering  as  a  direct  command,  POKE 
23756,1.  This  will  change  it  to  line  1.  You 
might  be  wise  to  delete  this  line  altogether. 

i:ou  will  also  notice  that  the  screen  listing 
is  only  partially  visible.  This  is  because 
several  of  the  lines  have  "buried"  colour 
codes  in  them.  Eliminate  these  codes  by  using 
the  EDIT  function  to  bring  a  line  down  to  edit 
it.  Move  the  cursor  slowly  across  the  line 
being  editted  until  the  cursor  disappears. 
Then  DELETE  (slowly)  until  the  invisible 
section  of  the  line  reappears.  Personally  I 
find  it  easiest  to  continue  the  ERASE  function 
until  I  have  erased  the  first  character  to  the 
left  of  the  cursor 1  then  I  retype  it  back  in. 
You  will  find  this  program  has  quite  a  few 
"buried"  colour  characters  in  it.  Aside  from 
"copy  protection"  reasons,  you  will  find  these  » 
codes  are  also  used  to  put  colour  onto  the 
screen.  Look  at  line  330  as  an  example. 


22 


SINC-LINK 


EMY  Extnbasic  Multitasking 

This  machine   code  program 
provides  10  new  commands  for 
Spectrum  Basic.   The  program 
is  1413  bytes  long.   The  program 
has  been  saved  under  Larken 
Disk  Commands.   To  load  the 
program  type: 

CLEAR  63000:    PRINT  #4: 
LOAD  "emy.Cl"   CODE  <enter> 

Once  loaded  you  will  have  10 
new  commands : 

AFTER,    EVERY ,    DISABLE,  ENABLE, 
DROP,    ON  ERROR  GOTO,    ON  BREAK 
STOP,    ON  BREAK  GOSUB ,  IGNORE 
BREAK,  RESUME 

Ail  commands  use  a  REM 
statement  to  pass  commands, 
ex.      100  RANDOMIZE  USR  63866 

110   REM   IGNORE  BREAK 

120  GOTO  130 

Command  Functions: 

AFTER  time,    GOSUB  line 
EVERY  time,    GOSUM  line 
time  represents  seconds 
(  1  sec  =  60  ) 
DISABLE  and  ENABLE   turns  on 
and  off   "time"   in  EVERY  and 
AFTER 

DROP  lowers  the   stack  on  the 
spect  rum 

ON  ERROR  GOTO  ex. 

1000   DEF   FN  v(a;=USR  63872: 
RANDOMIZE  USR   6  3  866 
110  0   REM  ON  ERROR  GOTO   99  0  0 
1200  etc ,,,,,, 

9900  PRINT  "Error    " ; CHR$  FN 
v(10);"in  line    "  ;  FN  v  (8)  ;  "  :  " 
;  FN  v  (9) 

9901  PRINT: LIST   FN  v (8) 
ON  BREAK  STOP  will   stop  the 
program  when  BREAK   is  pressed. 
ex.'lOO   RANDOMIZE  USR  63866 

110   REM  ON  BREAK  STOP 

j.  2  u  etc,,,,,  i 

999  GOTO  110 
ON  BREAK  GOSUB  xxxx  will  cause 
a   jump  to  xxxx  when  BREAK  is 
attempted . 

ON  BREAK   IGNORE  will    ignore  the 
BREAK  attempt. 

RESUME   is  used  with  ON  ERROR 
GOTO  command 

R .    Zannese  Oct. ,23,1988 


lOOO  REM 


EMY  * 
+:  Ex  tnbas  I  c  Mul  t  i  task* 

*  By   L  .  Cal  1  sgar  i  ~A 

*  Spectrum  *  V   1,1  * 

*  7/87  * 


1002  REM 


*  Mod  i  f  i  ed  By  * 

*  R.    Zannese  10/38* 

r-  -+:  *  *     *  *  *  *  * :+:  *  *  *  * : 

1010  RESTORE   :    INK  9:    PAPER  6:  C 

LEAR  62000:    LET  ad =63366:    POKE  2 

3609,22:    BORDER  2:   POKE  23692.-0 

1020  LET  a=10:    LET  b=ll:   LET  c=l 

2:    LET  d=13:    LET  e=14:   LET   f =15 

1030  FOR   j=7000  TO  7036 

1040  LET  ck=0:    READ  a$,ch 

1050  LET  by=VAL  a* ( 2 > + 1 6* VAL  a$ < 

1 ) :    LET  a£=a$ (3  TO  ) 

1060  LET  ch=ch-by:   POKE  ad.- by 

1070  LET  ad=ad+l 


1080   IF  a$ 
1090   IF  c h 
in   line    : ;  ; 
1100  PRINT 
":    NEXT  j 
1110  CLS 
1120  INPUT 
;a* 
1130 
R I  NT 
000 
1 140 


>""  THEN 
>0  THEN 
j :  STOP 
TAB  9; "Li ne 


GO  TO  1050  — 
PRINT  "Error 


;  j  s ,!  Ok 


Save  Program  (Y/N) 


IF  a$="y! 
#4?  SAVE 


OR  a$="Y" 
emygen .Bf ' 


THEN 
LINE 


INPUT   "Save  Code    (Y/N)    " ; a$ 


at="y 
SAVE 


OR  a$="Y"  THEN  F 
"emy.Cl "CODE  63S66 


1150  IF 
RINT  #4 
,  1417 

1160    BTOP   :  STOP 

7000  DATA  " C32 1 FDC3 I AFDC32 1 FBDFC 
D882C3  020CD8D2C3808CD3B2DCD99 1 ED 
FC9237EFE0D230FFE2C280BFE"  ,  4783 

7001  DATA  "21 3SF2CD382C38EBCF0BC 
DB2283S0623CDB433 1 8DBCF0 1 DF 1 AE67 
F4F7E23FE2038FAF620B9200A" , 4577 

7002  DATA  " 1 A131730EC225D5C37C91 
A 1 3 1 730FBB7C96 1 667465F29DFC65766 
572F9A2FC64697361626CE5E2"  ,  4820 

7003  DATA  "FB656E61626CE51CFC726 
573756DE54CFC6F6E206572726F72206 
76F74EF7FFC6F6E2062726561 " , 4837 

7004  DATA  " 6B2073746FF05EFA6F6E2 
06272656 1 6B20676F7375E272FA69676 
E6F72652062726561EB6DFA64" ? 4633 

7005  DATA  "726FF0E5FE00676F7375E 
211 D9F9CDB8F93808 13131 AA720F5CF0 
BEB5E2356EBE92 1 00FF220BFF "  ,  5037 

7006  DATA  "FDCB7656C0220DFFC9210 
0FE18EFCD83F9FE0DC2A9F969601 1 102 
7B7ED52 1 938DCCF0AE7CDBF 16" , 531 1 

7007  DATA  "FD340DDF0600FE0D282EF 
E3A28EE2 1 B5F AE54FE779FEEA2858FEF 
A2862FEFECA56FBFEE8CAD0FD" ?  6070 


SINC-LINK 


""008  >  DA  7  A  "C3441BCDOAFEBFFEOD280 
-FE3A28C6CF0B2A555C3EC0A62302CFF 
-  AFFE01CE0056235EED53455C"  ,  4333 
7009  DA7A  !!235E2356EE192322555CE 
B223D5C37 1 E00FD360AFF 1 3FD720D289 
7  i  4CD8B 1 928BECF 1  6DFFE2A20 " , 3386 
"010  DATA  !l  03E  i  1 8BFFE0DC3C34SFAC 
D82 1 CDFFECBC23A 1 CC 1 EF0233EBC  DE93 
■iDAC3FAC337FA2A0B5C2323CD  " ,  5708 
~011   DATA     B433CD94 1 EFEOB3802CFO 
-FE0830 i  94F3737379 1 6F2600 1 1 OFFF 1 
-•  F34E2746FB23CB46C80 1 0000  M  ,  3765 
""012  DA7A   "  C9FE093005ED4B03FFC9F 
70 A30073A02FF4F0600C93A0 1 FFC631F 
33A38F3C60713EFFFF5C5D5E5n , 4987 
"013  DA7A   " FDCB7646202D060S2 1 OFF 
F E55E235623CB46200E7AB3230A 1 B2B7 
12B737 AB3CC ADFB 1 1 0700E 1 19% 3732 
^014  DATA   " 10E2FDCB007E2004FDCB7 
.-.  C  6  E 1 D 1 C 1F1 C92323E5235E2356D52A0 
-"FFED3B07FFB7ED521 10F00ED"  ,5130 
~:  17  lATA   !! 32D 1 3S0A2A09FF722B732 
22209FFE1CS4EC3E52323235E2356E12 
':  " 123 77C 9DFFE0D23 1 DCD 1 2FC  "  :  4306 
""016  DATA  "FE03302C4F7BFE0DC2A9F 
-798737379 16F26001 1 1 1FF19C3C6C90 
:  0321 11FF11 0700CBC6 191 OFB " , 4207 
""017  DATA  !!C9CD33F95F73A779C3CF0 
ADFFE0D2S 1 DCD 1 2FCFE0330F24F7BFE0 
DC2A9F979373737916F26001 1 " ? 5210 
TO 18  DATA  "11FF19CB86C906032111F 
F 1 1 0700CB36 1 9 1 0FBC9FDCB764E2002C 
F06DFFE0D23 1 3CD33F9FE0DC2 " , 4502 

7019  DATA  "A9F9210F27B7ED4233B1A 
F 1 307EB4B03FF3A02FFFDCB768EED434 
25C32445CC9CD83F9FE0BC2A9" ? 51 19 

7020  DATA  "F9210F27B7ED42333BED4 
703FF 1 1 8BFD2A3D5C732372C9DD2E00 1 
E03DB2E02CB83F9FE2C2302CF" , 4345 
70T1  DATA  M  0BE7C5 1 1 43FACDB8F93E0 
033 1 9CB 1 2FCFE03D2 1 AFCF57BFE2CC2A 
9F9E71 143FACDB8F930DAFlF5n ? 6012 
-022  DATA  "CD33F9FE0DC2A9F9210F2 
737ED42D A 1 AFCF 1 5F378737936F2600 1 
1 OFFF 1 9E56960CD6E 1 9EBE 1 36 " ,5166 

7023  DATA  "0023360023DD7DCB8EB67 
72373237223D 1 7323722B2B2B2B2BF37 
02B~r3FBC9ED7B3D5CC3B8FAFD"  ,  4500 

7024  DATA  " 3676002 1 70FB22FFFE2 1 O 
-FFi 1 10FF0137003600EBB03EFEED47E 
-5E2AB25C232207FF2179F922" , 4260 
"025  DATA  " 09FF2100FF220BFF220DF 
- 1 3C4ED7B3D5CBDE 1 D 1 7 AFE3E2005D5D 
DE5CF06CB7A20 1 23BF 1 DDE5ED " , 5255 

7026  DATA  "733D5CED53425C32445CC 
3B5FACBB AFDCB76962A0BFF220DFF 1 8E 
OFDCB764EC203133A3A5C3201 !! ,  4680 

7027  DATA   !! FFFD3600FFFDCB76S6FDC 

:  16218BFDE52A455C2203FF3A!! ,  4731 


7023  DATA  !!  475C3202FF2A05FF22425 
CFB360A00C3B5FAED5B07FF2AB25C23B 
7ED522002CF06EBCD05FEED53"  ,4612 

7029  DATA  "335CCD05FEED53345CCD0 
5FEED537D5CCD05FEEB53425C2B7E324 
45C2207FFC92B562B5EC9FDCB"  ,  4973 

7030  DATA  !!  7656204D2A0DFF7CFEFE2 
S45FEFF2007CD54 1 F3S3CCF 1 4CD54 1 F3 
335ED7B3D5CDDE 1 ED5B455C3A "  ,4510 

7031  DATA  "475C3CFDCB0A7E2007ED5 
B425C3A445CF533CEFAD5DDE5ED733D5 
C22425CFD360A00FDCB76D621 !!  ,  4805 

7032  DATA  !!  B8FAE52179F9B7F3ED5B0 
9FFED52235AEB235E23562209FFFBED4 
B07FFB7ED42C5010F00ED42C1 !! ,  5336 

7033  DATA  M  334 1 ED7B3D5C6 9 6 0 ED4B4 
55C3A475C3CFDCE0A7E2007ED4B425C3 
A445C77CDBFFEED4B7D5CCDBF !!  ?  4602 

7034  DATA  " FEED4B845CCDBFFEED4B8 
35C-CDBFFE232207FFEBC3C6FA237 1 237 
OC9FBFDCBOA7EC02A425CCD6E" 7 5885 

7035  DATA  " 1 93A443C230C A7C2EC 1 34 
77EE6C078C2B0 1 BC 1 C3CEFA2AB25CED5 
307FF23B7ED522002CF0BEB1 1 " -  4844 

7036  DATA  " 090037ED522207FFC9000 
00000000000000000000000000000000 
0000000000000000000000000" ? 1003 


ONE   CHIP   MOD   FOR  THE  2Q5Q  MODEM     R.  BRUNEAU 

In  the  May /June  1987  issue  of  the  SINCUS  NEWS 
article  was  written  about  adding  a  RS232  port  to  the 
TIMEX  2050  modem  card.  The  integrated  circuits  used 
were  the  MC148S  Driver  and  the  MC1489  Receiver  which 
provide  a  conversion  from  RS232  voltage  levels  (+15 
to  -15)  to  TTL  levels  (0  to  +5).  To  generate  the 
negative  voltage  a  9volt  battery  was  used.  Both  IC's 
have  been  around  for  many  years  and  are  quite  cheap. 

Recently*  a  new  chip  has  come  into  the  market  which 
provides  the  RS232  voltage  levels  from  the 
computer's  5volt  power  supply.  The  chip  is  made  by 
MAXIM  and  is  called  the  MAX232.  It  contains  two 
voltage  converters  to  generate  +10V  and  -lOv.  the 
chip  is  available  from  Active  Components  for  *5.97 
Canadian.  The  figure  below  shows  how  to  connect  the 
circuit.  In  the  next  issue  of  SINK-LINK  we  will 
attempt  to  publish  a  printed  curcuit  to  convert  the 
2050  modem. 


+5v 


24 


SINC-LINK 


DEAR  TIMEX/SINCLAIR  ENTHUSIAST: 

WE  WOULD  LIKE  TO  TAKE  THIS  OPPORTUNITY  TO  INVITE  YOU  TO  ATTEND  THE  UP- 
COMING CAPITAL  AREA  TIMEX/SINCLAIR  CAPITALFEST  ON  MAY  6  AND  MAY  7,  1989. 
BANQUET  FRIDAY  NIGHT,   MAY  5,  1989. 

FEST  TO  BE  HELD  AT  THE  HOWARD  JOHNSON  INN,  ROUTE  450  AND  THE  BELTWAY  (EAST- 
SIDE),   NEW  CARROLLTON,   MD . 

HOWARD  JOHNSON'S  IS  CONVENIENTLY  LOCATED  FOR  EASY  ACCESS  BY  ROAD,  SUBWAY 
(NEW  CARROLLTON,   MD.   STOP),   AMTRAK  FROM  NEW  YORK  AND  BOSTON  TO  THE  NORTH 
AND  ALL  POINTS  SOUTH,   AND  BY  AIR  INTO  WASHINGTON  NATIONAL  AND  BALTIMORE  — 
WASHINGTON  INTERNATIONAL. 

CATS,   OUR  USERS  GROUP,   CURRENTLY  WITH  OVER  100  MEMBERS  WILL  BE  HOSTING 
THIS  AFFAIR. 

SHARP'S,   ZEBRA,  AND  MANY  OTHER  VENDORS  WILL  BE  SPONSORING  AND  ATTENDING. 
SEMINARS,   DOOR  PRIZES,   AND  MANY  SURPRISES  AWAIT  YOU. 

THIS  CAPITALFEST  WILL  BE  FULLY  ADVERTISED  WITH  THOUSANDS  OF  FLYERS  BEING 
SENT  ALL  OVER  THE  COUNTRY. 

HOTEL  ROOM  RATE  IS  $62.00  A  NIGHT  ALONG  WITH  ONE  FREE  ADMISSION  TO  SHOW. 
BANQUET,   FRIDAY  NIGHT  WILL  RUN  AROUND  $17.00. 
TABLES  WILL  BE  $25.00  EACH. 

IF  YOU  ARE  INTERESTED  IN  MORE  INFORMATION,   PLEASE  LET  US  KNOW. 

GET  THE  DETAILS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!*!! 


LOVE  TO  HAVE  YOU  AT  THE  FEST. 


C.A.T.S.  CAPITALFEST 
P.  0.   BOX  24 

Barrett  park,  Maryland  20896-0024 

301-439-8756 


SINC-LINK 


25 


CAPITAL  AREA  TIMEX  SINCLAIR 
USERS  GROUP 


C  •   A  •   T  •   S • 

CAPITOLFEST 


NAME: 


ADDRESS: 
PHONE: 


VENDOR: 


USERS  GROUP: 
BANQUET:  


$17.00  EACH  DINNER.  LIMITED  SEATING 


TABLES:  $25.00  EACH 

ADVANCE  ADMISSION: 
$7.00---2  DAYS 
$5.00  — -1  DAY 

ALL  TICKETS  FOR  ADMISSION  MUST  BE  BOUGHT  BEFORE  4/1/89. 


AT  DOOR: 

$10.00  —  2  DAYS 
$7.00  — -1  DAY 


HOTEL:  $62.00  A  NIGHT  WITH  1  FREE  ADMISSION 

PLEASE  MAKE  RESERVATIONS  AS  SOON  AS  POSSIBLE. 


SINC-LINK 


S PES HDL    SPESHDL  QL  ers    HEAR  THIS  HEAR  THIS    QL  ers  S PES HDL  SPESHOL 


In  the  Jan/Feb  1989  issue  of  SINC-LINK,  it  was  stated  at  the  end  of  the 
History  of  the  Toronto  Timex  Sinclair  Osers  Group,  that  "Only  the  QL  section 
seemed  moribund".    This  chance  remark  was  jumped  on  by  Yours  Truly,  and  I  wrote 
a  letter  saying  that  I  did  not  think  the  QL  section  was  moribund.    The  subject 
was  brought  up  at  the  meeting  on  February  1st,  and  to  cut  a  long  story  short,  it 
was  agreed  that  something  should  be  done. 

My  name  is  Hugh  H.  Howie,  my  Address  is  586  Oneida  Dr,  Burlington.  Ont.  L7T 
3V3.  and  I  have  been  asked  to  try  and  do  something  to  enliven  interest  in  the  QL 

section.  I  am  the  something  that  was  DONE   Shows  it  pays  to  keep  your  mouth 

shut.  Anyway,  here  goes. 

It  is  suggested  that  we  try  and  build  a  QL  library  within  the  Club,  and 
that  we  ask  all  members  to  give  us  support,  by  articles  to  the  NewsLetter,  and 
by  items  for  the  library. 

If  you  have  been  keeping  in  touch  with  some  of  the  developments  South  of  the 
Border,  you  will  know  that  there  appears  to  be,  at  the  very  least,  more  than 
just  a  MINOR  resurgence  in  the  QL.  Many  Magazines  and  Newsletters  are  starting 
beginners  courses  on  the  QL.  There  appears  to  be  a  lot  of  software  being 
produced  for  this  section.  In  fact  the  QL  section  is  NOT  MORIBDND,  it  just  needs 
a  little  bit  of  a  prod  to  come  forward.  Perhaps  that  little  remark  in  the 
News-Letter  was  all  that  was  needed.    Since  that  remark  was  made,  we  have  had 
one  renewal  from  the  Hamilton  area,  and  George  Chambers  has  received  a  PHONE 
CALL  from  NEWFODNDLAND.  Now  if  all  this  is  not  an  indication  of  an  ALIVE 
section,  what  is?. 

OK.  Enough  of  back- ground.  What  do  we  do? 

First  of  all,  we  should  start  a  QL  Library,  but  how  to  do  it,  and  what  form 
it  should  take.    Many  QLers  do  not  have  disc,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  who  needs  it? 
we  have  a  perfectly  good  medium  of  storage  available,  which  not  every  computer 
has.  But  it  is  felt  that  we  should  ask  the  members  what  they  would  like,  and  to 
start  the  nucleus  of  the  library  on  that  precept.  In  fact,  why  not  have  both? 
The  point  is,  as  a  QLer,  which  would  you  PREFER?     Drive?,    or  Disc?,.      We  will 
try  to  accomadate  both.  But  a  preference  would  be  welcomed. 

At  the  back  of  this  Newsletter  is  a  tear-out  page,  with  some  questions  on 
it.  ALL  members,  QLers  or  others  are  asked  to  contribute.  Answer  the  questions, 
make  suggestions,  and  send  it  back  to  us.  To  tear  out  the  page  will  not  destroy 
any  part  of  the  Newsletter,  as  of  itself.  But  please  take  the  time  to  answer  the 
questions  and  make  your  suggestions.  ALL  SUGGESTIONS  ARE  WELCOME.  You  need  not 
put  your  name  or  address  on  the  form  if  you  desire  not  to.  Purely  Voluntary. 
(But    we  do  like  to  know  those  things,  from  members  or  non-members  of  the  Club) 

By  filling  in  this  form  you  are  not,  definately  NOT,  going  to  win  some 
fantabulous  amount  of  money  to  keep  you  in  Computer  Luxury  for  the  rest  of  your 
life.  But  you  will  have  an  opportunity  to  assist  in  the  formation  of  a  Library, 
a  Library  which  is  dedicated  to  give  Y00,  as  QL  members,  access  to  much  more 
information  than  would  be  possible  if  you  were  working  on  your  own.  But  we  do 
need  your  assistance. 

Should  we  make  use  of  the  Quanta  library?    would  you  care  to  contribute  to 
the  purchase  of  Quanta  material  for  donation  to  the  QL  library?.  What  would  you 
like  of  us  ?    Are  you  considerating  the  purchase  of  a  QL  ?    If  you  are  ,  what 
are  you  interested  in?    Those  and  a  hundred  questions  require  an  answer,  and  Y00 
are  the  only  folks  that  know  the  answer.  Let  Toronto  Timex-Sinclair  Osers  Club, 
have  your  observations. 

Please,  take  a  few  moments,  spend  a  copper,  let  us  know    what  you  would 
like. 

Hugh  H.  Howie. 


SINC-LINK 


NAME   

Address   

City  

Postal  Code  

Do  you  have  a  QL  

List  what  you  DO  have 


Would  you  be  interested  in  a  QL  Library?  

Would  you  contribute  to  a  QL  Library?  

Would  you  be  willing  to  contribute  a  cartridge 
of  your  own  choice,  occasionally,  from  the 
Quanta  library,  to  this  library?  

Should  this  be  on  DISC  or  DRIVE?  

Your  Own  Observations  and  Recommendations  


Please  take  a  few  moments  to  fill  out  the  above. 

Your  name    may  or  may  not  be  given. 

ALL,  not  only  QLers,  are  invited  to  reply. 

Thank  You  from  :- 
Officers  of  Toronto  Timex_3inclair  Users  Club 

Mail  Reply  to:- 

Hugh  H.  Howie 
586  Oneida  Dr 
Burlington.  Qnt 

L7T  3V3 


28 


SINC-LINK 


JAN/FEB  1989 

Jan  8,  1989 

Dear  Out-rOf-Town  Members, 

I  can't  believe  it's  that  time 
again.  So  soon! !  I  seem  to  have  just  got  the 
last  letter  off. 

Well  first  off  all,  I  shall  go  through  some 
old  newsletters  that  we  have  received  from 
other  clubs.  They  have  a  number  of  tidbits  in 
them  which  will  be  of  interest.  We  don't  seem 
to  get  much  gossip  about  Timex  doings,  into 
our  letter,  for  some  reason. 

Bill  Heberlein,  writing  in  the  Sinclair 
Milwaukee  newsletter,  reports  that  a  Mr  Tomex 
Jr.  has  applied  for  bankruptcy  and  will  be 
free  of  debts  after  Feb  6th,  1989.  His  assets 
are  listed  as  .01  cent  and  debts  as  some  $61 
thousand.  That  will  not  mean  much  to  most  of 
you.  However  for  anyone  who  is  waiting  for  an 
order  to  be  filled  from  Quantum  Computing  it 
means  bad  news.  That's  really  Quantum 
Computing,  a  Timex  dealer.  Quantum  Computing 
were  selling  QL  computers,  among  other  things, 
and  if  you  have  not  received  yours,  you  are 
not  likely  to. 

Anyway,  if  you  have  claim  you  can  file  it 
with  Jonathan  Kohn,  1180  Raymond  Blvd., 
Newark,  NJ  07102-4107.  Well,  best  forget  it, 
I'd  say. 

The  Capitol  Area  Timex  Sinclair  club  are 
sponsoring  a  ComputerFest  to  be  held  on  May 
6th  and  7th.  Thats  a  Saturday  and  Sunday. 
Actually  it  starts  going  with  a  Friday  evening 
banquet,  I  think.  The  Fest  is  being  held  in 
Carrolton,  Maryland.  Admission  is  $5/one  days 
$7  for  the  two  days.  Accomodations  are 
possible  at  the  Howard  Johnson's  at  $62/day. 

Some  of  you  may  remember  the  two  dealers, 
EZ  KEY  and  F00TE  SOFTWARE.  They  were  strong 
advertisers  in  the  old  SYNC  magazine.  I  have 
not  heard  much  about  them  lately.  However,  RMG 
ENTERPRISES  have  obtained  the  stock  of  these 
two  companies  and  will  have  the  stuff  ready 
for  sale  as  soon  as  they  have  inventoried  it. 
Anyone  interesed  might  drop  them  a  line.  When 
I  look  at  old  SYNC  magazines  I  see  that  EZ  KEY 
specialized  in  keyboards  for  the  TS1000,  so 
that  might  interest  some  of  you.  In  looking  at 
some  old  TIME  DESIGN  magazines  I  see  that 
FOOTF  wer*>  offering  printer  interfaces,  some 
printers,  some  software,  and  copies  of  "The 
Best  of  SUM"  magazine  compilation. 

Another  Timex  dealer  seems  to  have  closed 
shop.  The  Clackamas  County  newsletter,  the 
PLOTTER,  reports  that  Knighted  Computers  was 
sold  to  WMJ  SYSTEMS,  who  will  now  have  their 
inventory.  Knighted  Computers  offered  quite  a 
large  range  of  software  and  hardware,  so  there 
may  be  things  of  interest  at  WMJ  Systems,  too. 

WMJ  DATA  SYSTEMS 
4  Butterfly  Drive, 
Hauppauge,  N.Y.  11 788  USA 

RMG  ENTERPRISES 
1419  1/2  7th  Str., 
Oregon  City,  Oregon  97045 
phone  (503)  655  7^84 


The  same  newsletter  mentions  that  the 
SINCWARE  and  QUANTUM  LEVELS  magazines  have 
combined  and  that  a  new  issue  is  possibly  in 
the  works. 

Come  to  think  about  it,  I  have  not  seen  a 
TIME  DESIGN  magazine  for  months  and  months. 
Does  that  mean  that  it  is  foundering  also? 

Tim  Wood  of  the  Vachon  Island  S/T  club 
reports  that  he  has  been  appointed  as  the  SNUG 
LARKEN  Disk  PD  librarian.  Just  recently  we 
received  a  request  to  exchange  newsletters 
with  this  group,  so  I  shall  inquire  just  what 
this  Larken  library  is  about  (I  thought  we  had 
the  only  Larken  library!!) 

I  seem  to  have  mentioned  it  once  before 
however  I  shall  say  it  again.  There  is  a  BBS 
in  Toronto  that  has  a  Timex  section  on  it.  At 
our  last  meeting  One  of  our  members  mentioned 
that  he  had  uploaded  some  programs  onto  it.  I 
will  have  him  upload  some  of  the  Larken 
utilities  that  I  have  written.  Any  of  you 
modem  enthusiasts  might  try  it  some  time.  It 
is  the  PHOENIX.  The  phone  number  for  this  BBS 
is  (4l6)  458  5850.  I  must  confess  that  I  don't 
have  the  information  on  how  to  access  the 
Timex  section,  but  I  suppose  you  old  hands 
will  have  no  difficulty  with  that.  You  can  ask 
me  for  more  information,  I  should  have  more 
details  later. 

I  ordered  and  have  received  some  extra  SRAM 
chips  for  my  RAMdisk.  Say,  the  price  on  them 
has  shot  up.  Where  a  few  months  ago  Bob 
Mitchell  bought  some  for  his  system  for  $13  US 
and  we  thought  the  price  was  exorbitant  the 
price  now  is  $18  US.  Each,  that  is!! 

To  add  to  the  aggravation  I  am  going  to  have 
to  return  them  because  they  are  not  doing  the 
job.  What  I  find  is  that  they  will  not 
reliably  retain  the  programs  when  I  shut  off 
the  computer.  I  added  a  third  AAA  battery  to 
raise  the  voltage  to  4  1/5  volts.  This  helped, 
but  I  still  get  CRC  errors  after  a  day  or  so 
when  I  do  a  Verify  routine.  Did  I  mention  this 
VERIFY  routine  before.  It  is  an  undocumented 
routine  in  the  Larken  system.  Enter  the 
command  PRINT  USR  100:  VERIFY  ""  and  the  LKDOS 
will  work  it's  way  through  the  drive  you 
happen  to  be  pointing  to,  checking  each  track. 
Any  CRC  errors  it  encounters  will  appear  on 
the  screen. 

I  have  started  pondering  how  to  remote  my 
keyboard  from  my  computer.  I  think  I  would 
like  to  get  the  computer  proper  and  all  it's 
paraphernalia  down  under  the  desk,  and  have 
just  the  keyboard  on  the  top,  along  with  the 
monitor.  Remoting  the  keyboard,  I  find  is  a 
bit  tricky.  There  does  not  seem  to  be  much 
written  about  this.  I  wonder  why,  is  it  not 
practical.  Should  be  though.  I  thought  with 
all  this  modern  chip  technology,  anything  was 
possible.  I  mean  easy!! 

A  local  surplus  store  has  been  selling  RGB 
monitors  off  for  $145.  They  are  uncased,  14 
inch  size  distributed  in  USA  by  Mitsubishi. 
One  of  our  members  has  bought  one  for  use  with 
his  QL.  I  have  been  helping  him  to  get  it 
going.  We  have  to  make  up  an  interconnect 
cable.  If  we  get  it  going,  I  must  confess  that 


I  am  tempted  to  buy  one  for  myself.  Though  why 
I  need  a  second  one  is  beyond  me.  It's  just 
that  I  paid  close  to  $600  in  total  for  my 
Sears  RGB  monitor  several  years  ago,  and  I 
cannot  resist  the  bargain! !  Does  that  make 
sense? 

Had  a  bit  of  excitement  around  here  a  day 
ago.  A  neighbour  had  a  handbag  stolen  from  he 
car  parked  in  the  driveway.  I  am  a 
neighbourhood  Watch  block  captian,  so  I 
scouted  around  the  area,  talking  to  the 
residents,  and  was  able  to  recover  most  of  the 
money  and  some  credit  cards.  The  story  of 
course  is  much  more  involved  than  that,  but 
the  culprit  has  been  charged  with  the  theft. 
It  was  pleasing  to  have  a  satisfactory 
outcome,  I  must  say. 

Now  it  * s  back  to  mundane  matters  like 
newsletters ! ! 

I  bought  an  interesting  item  to  hold  my 
Larken  disks.  It  looks  very  much  like  an 
oversized  letter  rack.  About  5  1/2  by  4  1/2  by 
8  1/2,  I  have  placed  it  on  top  of  my  drive  and 
the  disks  rest  vertically  in  the  'letter' 
slots.  It  has  7  slots,  each  of  them  can  hold 
about  5  disks.  It  cost  $6.75  at  an  office 
stationary  store.  We  know  them  in  Toronto  as 
Grand  &  Toy.  The  disks  are  exposed  to  dust 
etc.,  but  I  use  the  disks  so  much  that  it  has 
no  real  significance.  Much  handier  than  the 
normal  disk  holders. 

SAM's  PhotoFacts  has  put  out  a  set  of 
sheets  on  servicing  the  TS2068  computer.  It  is 
identified  as  CC19  COMPUTERFACTS .  I  imagine 
that  the  larger  public  libraries  carry  SAM's^ 
material  and  you  can  see  it  there.  However,  if 
any  of  you  are  interested  I  can  send  it  to 
you.  There  are  17  large  sheets  to  it.  Some  of 
the  more  technically  minded  may  be  interested. 

Am  I  up  to  date  with  my  membership  mailings. 
I  think  I  am.  If  you  don't  agree,  drop  a  line 
and  let  me  know.  I  know  I  am  behind  in  some  of 
my  correspondance ,  but  maybe  I  can  get  onto  it 
by  the  time  I  send  out  this  newsletter. 

I  mentioned  in  the  last  letter  that  we 
were  discontinuing  the  club  Box  Number.  Just  a 
reminder,  it  runs  out  sometime  in  March  or 
April.  We  are  going  to  use  my  home  address.  It 
got  to  be  too  much  of  a  hassle  going  to  pick 
up  the  mail  at  a  downtown  Post  Office. 

Bill  Harmer,  a  ZX81  enthusiast  in  Ottawa, 
has  sent  me  a  preliminary  draft  of  a  document 
he  has  been  working  on.  It's  subject  is  the 
ZX81  and  LARKEN.  I  deals  with  the  ZX81  version 
of  the  Larken  disk  system,  and  how  to  make 
best  use  of  it.  I  gave  the  copy  to  one  of  our 
out  of  town  members,  Lou  Champagne,  to 
critique.  We  shall  return  it  to  Bill  Harmer 
with  our  comments.  I  think  it  will  be  a 
worthwhile  manual  for  Larken  enthusiasts  of 
the  ZX81/TS100  stripe. 

I  received  a  postcard  from  a  TOM  PHILLIPS 
2942  Christopher  Road,  Jacksonville,  Florida 
32217.    He  is  offering  a  number  of  items  for 
sale  on  a  first  come,  first  serve  basis.  He 
offers  a  QL,  looks  brand  new,  for  $125i 
plus  $5.  A  TS2050  modem  w/case,  docs  and 
software,  for  $35.  plus  $3.     A  Mathewson 
keyboard  interface,  and  a  66-key  Keytronics 
keyboard.  A  TS2040  printer,  2  Tandon  disk 
drives,  an  8K  Hunter  NVM  board,  a  nine  inch 
monitor.  And  some  other  stuff.  Drop  him  a 
line,  or  you  can  call  (904)  739  2580  after  6pm 


I  have  inherited  a  copy  of  a  portion  of  the 
Spectrum  manual.  The  part  that  I  have  seems  to 
cover  a  lot  of  the  more  advanced  programming 
possibilities  of  the  Spectrum.  More  than  was 
covered  in  the  TS2068  manual.  There  are  28 
sheets,  and  I  can  get  a  copy  for  you  if  you 
are  interested  in  paying  the  postage,  and  the 
copying  cost  of  about  6  or  7  cents  a  page. 

Also  I  have  the  same  sort  of  a  thing  from 
what  is  called  the  HACKER' s  MANUAL.  Full  of 
interesing  but  mostly  useless  tidbits  of 
information  on  hacking!!!  Ask  me  if  you  are 
interested. 

Several  clubs  report  that  they  have  members 
who  have  bought  the  Z88  computer,  and  there 
have  been  how-to  articles  written  in  several 
newsletters  on  it.  If  anyone  is  interested  I 
can  make  copies  of  these  articles  for  you. 

One  of  the  items  available  commercially  is 
called  a  Z88  MacPack.  It  consists  of  a  Z88 
computer  and  a  Z88  MacLink.  It  is  said  to  be 
an  affordable  way  for  Mackintosh  owners  to 
transfer  files  from  a  Mackintosh  so  they  can 
be  worked  on  in  the  Z88,  then  transferred  back 
to  the  Mac. 

For  you  QL  owners,  one  of    our    members  is 
prepared  to  repair  the  QL    computer.     Well,  I 
may  a  bit  premature  about    this,     but     if  you 
have  a  problem  why  not  drop  him  a  line. 
Schennelly  Stoughton, 
191  William  St. ,  N. 
Lindsay,  Ont    K9V  4B8. 
This  would  be  of  particular  interest    to  QL 
owners    living    in    Canada.      Schennelly  is 
involved .workwise ,     in    the    installation  & 
servicing  of  satellite  TV,  and  therefore  seems 
likely  to  be  competent  for  this  sort  of  work. 

Members  in  the  USA  would  probably  prefer  t 
send  defective  units  tot 
Dan  Elliott 

Rt.  //I     Box  117 
Cabool,  MO  65689 

Dan  has  been  repairing  all  Timex  units  for 
some  time  now,  and  I've  heard    no  complaints, 
and  he  seems  reasonable. 

I'll  have  to  close  off  now.  I've  simply  run 
out  of  anything  to  say!!     Don't  say  it!! 

Sincerely , 

George  Chambers 


TORONTO  TIMEXgSINCLAIR  USERS  CLUB 
January  29,  1989 

14  Richome  Court 
Scarborough,  Ont. 

Les  Cottrell  M1K  2Y1 

108  River  Heights  Drive 

Cocoa,  FL  32922 

Dear  Les, 

Received  you  disk  the  other  day*  I  happened  to  have  most 
of  the  programs  on  the  disk.  But  I  did  not  have  ALIEN    8*  Also, 
of  course,  the  LOADER* BL  program.  Thank  you  very  much  for  it. 
Thank  you  also  for  the  $10  which  you  sent  to  cover  postage,  etc. 
I  shall  keep  track  of  it. 

I  am  enclosing  a  tape  that  has  a  great  many  games  on  it.  in 
addition  to  the  games,  on  the  far  end  of  side  B  you  will  find  a 
program.  I  think  I  called  "menu*.Bl",  but  I  can't  be  sure.  It  is 
a  program  which  1  have  been  working  on  recently*  It  is  an 
AUTOSTART  menu  program  which  would  be  very  useful  where  there 
are  more  programs  on  a  disk  than  can  be  shown  on  a  single  menu 
screen*  It  has  quite  a  number  of  features,  and  I  think  I  shall 
publish  it  in  our  newsletter,  so  that  I  can  go  into  more  detail 
about  it's  operation.  But  I  think  you  could  experiment  with  it 
in  the  meantime.. 

I  also  enclose  a  list  of  other  games  tapes  that  I  have,  which 
you  can  borrow,  if  you  are  into  this  sort  of    thing.    1    have  a 
great  many  others  on  disk,  which  are  difficult  to  get  onto  tape* 
'If  this  interests    you  I  can  send  a  list  of  them  also. 
1  guess  you  can  see  that  my  interest  is  not  so  much  in  playing 
them  as  hacking  them! ! 

Did  I  send  you  a  copy  of  the  utility  called  •bopeep.Bl"?  1 
can't  remember.  It  is  a  program  which  allows  you  to  peek  (and  to 
POKE)  into  NMI^type  programs.  Or  any  programs,  for  that  matter* 
Very  useful  to  insert  Game  Pokes  into  Spectrum  programs.  Really 
quite  a  novel  approach,  made  possible  by  using  the  Larken 
system.  If  you  do  not  have  it,  let  me  know* 

I  am  enclosing  a  version  3  LKDOS  EPROM.  You  can  use  it  while 
you  order  one  from  Larry  Kenny*  It  is  an  EPROM  that  Larry  sent 
initially,  and  we  found  a  small  bug  in  it.  You  will  hardly 
notice  the  bug*  What  it  is  is  this;  The  LKDOS  is  supposed  to 
default  to  a  ^character  line,  in  fact,  with  this  copy  it 
defaults  to  65  lines.  That  means  that  if  you  want  to  print  out  a 
TASWORD  file,  for  example  it  will  put  65?character  lines  out  on 
paper  and  look  messy*  Other  than  that,  it  works  perfectly. 
What  you  have  to  do  is  POKE  the  wanted  64  into  the  DOS.  See  the 
instructions  on  making  changes* 

I  do  not  really  know  how  much  Larry  Kenny  charges  for  his  v3 
LKDOS*  I  have  seen  figures  in  newsletters  suggesting  $10,  others 
mentioning  $15*  Without  quoting  me,  try  sending  him  a  Postal 
Money  Order  for  $10,  plus  your  old  EPROM.  I  think  that  should  do 
»it.  Well,  maybe  a  couple  of  dollars  extra  for    postage*  Really, 


it  is  a  good  thing  and  wall  worth  the  money*  You  can  return  the 
EPROM  that  I  am  sending  you,  when  you  get  your  copy  back  from 
Larry*  He  may  take  some  time  to  get  back  to  you*  Don't  worry 
about  that,  but  when  you  do  get  it,  1  would  appreciate  a  prompt 
return  so  that  some  other  member  can  use  it  in  the  same  way* 

Re  your  comments  about  the  similarity  of  "doctor. Bl"  and 
Larry's  Editor.  They  were  developed  independently*  Funny  though, 
how  you  get  used  to  your  own  way  of  doing  things*  i  think  mine 
is  the  better  one!!,  and  I'm  sure  Larry  feels  the  same  way  about 

his* 

Actually,  mine  got  it's  start  from  a  similar  program  written 
for  the  ZX81  Larken  interface,  by  a  former  club  member*  1  took 
the  basic  concept  and  adapted  it  to  the  2068*  THen  I  continued 
to  modify  it  with  experience,  so  that  by  now  there  is  very 
little  resemblance. 

I  see  where  you  want  to  borrow  a  few  tapes  as  well*  1  shall 
put  one  or  two  in  the  package,  so  as  to  fill  it  up.  Ask  again, 
in  your  next  letter  for  more  tapes* 

Sincerely, 

George  Chambers 


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