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Minnesota 
Atari 5T 



In this issue: 

1 General Information (SPACE) 4 

1 January SPACE DOMs 4 

2 January MAST DOMs 4 

3 JR1 J.A.T.O. accelerator board review 5 

3 Mini MIDI lessons (part 2) by G. Miller 6 


From the editor 

How to tell when you should renew your membership: 

The mailing label looks like this: 

SPACE/MAST exp 9001 (message) 

Your Name 

Your Address 

Your City, ST ZIP## 

If the expiration date is 9001, then January 1990 is your last issue, and it's time to renew. If the date is 8912 or earlier, you are past due and 
should renew immediately. Currently there are 22 members who need to renew for another year and 21 members who are past due in 
membership renewal. So, check your label! 

-- David Paschall-Zimbel 


From the editor 
Treasurer’s report 
News from the Pres (SPACE) 
SPACE: November minutes 
SPACE: December minutes 


Treasurer’s report by Allan Frink 


Correction for December 1989: 

MAST welcomed Greg Peasley as a renewed member and not Steven Pauley as written in the newsletter for December. 

Bank balances as of 5 Jan 1990 
SPACE: $210.17 
MAST: $285.75 

(ed. note: Allan wrote that the bank balances remained the same as those published in the last newsletter because there were no deposits or 
payments made during the month of December. Room rental for December and January, and newsletter costs for the January and February 
issues, as well as DOM costs for December and January will come out of /he current balances plus deposits made in January. So, buy those 
DOMs so we may make operating costs!!] 

Membership counts are: 

SPACE: 37 
MAST: 78 
Both: 10 


February newsletter articles are due the week of 29 January! 







SPACE / MAST * January 


Page 2 

News from the Pres 
By Jim Schulz 

First off, a happy new year to all as we enter a 
new year and a new decade in 1990. The 
overil outlook looks good for the ST and 
MAST in the coming year. This month, we will 
look at a number of current issues, what's 
behind, what's current, what's ahead, some 
news and some miscellaneous stuff as well 

First up, a reminder!!!! About 75% of MAST 
members memberships are up for renewal in the 
first three months of 1990. With Christmas new 
system purchases and the MAST annual 
birthday party, this seems to be the time of 
choice to sign up for MAST. Please check your 
label on the back of your newsletter. If you are 
up for renewal in February, please think about 
renewing early. Each year, Allan gels buried tor 
quite a while with renewals at the birthday 
party. Help us and Allan, renew early. Also, if 
you can't make it to the meetings, use the 
membership form in the newsletter and send it to 
the SPACE/MAST post office box. I pick up 
the mail weekly and your membership renewal 
will be recorded. MAST has quite a bit planned 
tor the year to come, Don’t get left out!!!! 

Next, two old topics, Z*Net and AIM. I have 
written both of these companies in the last 
week so that for once and for all we can settle 
the situation. Z*Net did arrive just in time for 
the December issue, but because of non¬ 
payment of $90.00 in back priming charges, it 
was not printed. If we get the printing charges 
reimbursed and the address corrected so that 
we actually get it on time, it will more than likely 
return next month. If not, we will once and for ail 
put Z*Net to rest and continue to go along 
without it. The latest issue of Z'Net has gotten 
quite newsy since the last printing covering the 
recent COMDEX show, three pages of news 
Items from both the US and Europe, a close up 
look at the Turbo 816 upgrade for the 8 bit, a 
Portfolio review, and a look at the latest public 
domain and shareware software. I have not 
heard back from them so I don’t have anymore 
news. This issue will be put to rest at the end of 
the month. For new members, Z*Net is an Atari 
newsletter supplement which is 12 pages with 
news and ads. And for publishing it, we gel 
reimbursed based on the number of issues 
printed. The overall cost to SPACE/MAST is 
small for this because the money reimbursed just 
about pays for the extra printing and postage. 

Now on to AIM, AIM is a magazine similar to the 
Current Notes magazine which is being sold as a 
user group newsletter replacement. AIM was 
discussed in a couple of meetings and then we 
had trouble getting hold of the AfM editors so 
things have been in limbo over the last few 
months. This past week, I got a copy of the 
latest issue and wrote them to see what we can 
do with them, AIM has three options for user 
groups. Option 1 is a complete replacement of 
your current newsletter for a cost of $0.50 an 
issue to the members. Option 2 is a second 


newsletter for all members at the same cost. In 
both option 1 and 2 , the user group get about a 
page each month inside the magazine to tell 
what's going on, similar to this column. Option 3 
is to offer the AIM magazine as a subscription 
at a discount. Under this option, AIM is $15.00 a 
year vs. the subscription price of $18.00 a 
year. This is the information which I received 
from talking to the editors. Newsletters and the 
cost to produce them has become a hot issue 
among user groups over the last few months. 
The user group from Duluth has recently 
replaced their newsletter with AIM. Based on 
some of the user group newsletters, a number 
of other groups are joining up as well. AIM told 
me that five new groups were added in the 
January issue and the magazine has been 
added more pages to accommodate the new 
groups. We have discussed in the past 
continuing this newsletter and the response has 
been overwhelming to keep if going. Dave is 
doing an excellent job and it is showing by your 
support. So option 1 is out. Option 2 looks 
enticing and looked like the best option, but the 
kicker which I wasn’t tofd about in the past was 
that all members need to get the AIM magazine. 
If we go this route, all membership fees would 
have to be increased up to $6.00 a year to 
support the added cost. So it looks like option 
3 is our best bet. This is similar to the current 
situation with Current Notes, I have a couple of 
issues of AIM coming in the mail so you can look 
them over at the meeting. We will make the 
final decision on this at the meeting. 

Enough issues and on to last month,.... Last 
month, we had a cold night for a meeting. We 
had a pretty good crowd, but only two STs for 
MidiMaze. If was just a little too cold to bring out 
the old ST. We did have our news and rumors, 
a goodly number of DOMs at a cheap price, 
and our raffle of the copy of Midimaze. With 
the Christmas music in the background, it was a 
good meeting for all in attendance. 

This month........ This month, we will look at some 

of the new software which has come out over 
the last few months. Some of the demos include 
the new Chaos Strike Back!!!, DC Utilities, 
Hotwire, and Maxifile, More demos are in the 
process of being scheduled. Also lor those of 
you who missed out on the great DOM deal last 
month, we are extending it for one more month. 
Yes, you can get all of the MAST DOMs for 
$4.00 each for one more month!!!! Also we will 
talk about the latest news from this month's CES 
Show, and other late breaking news and rumors. 
Lots of questions and answers as well. It should 
be another great meeting. 

Coming in the months ahead.,,.,. Next month is 
one meeting not to miss! Yes, February marks 
the fourth year of MAST and time for another 
birthday parly. We will have birthday cake, pop, 
and our annual raffle of ST gifts as well. And a 
few surprises????? Stay tuned here next month 
for more information.... The raffle currently 
includes a copy of Pagestream from So ft Log ik, 
a Tweety Board, and the new game Chaos 
Strikes Back for starters. If you have software 


that you aren't using, donate it to the raffk 
others can get good use out of it. Also we i 
volunteers for bringing munchies and helping 
out. See Dave or myself if you would like to 
help. Coming in March is another MAST swap 
meet. In the months to come pending their 
release, an emulator night including PC Ditto II 
and the Spectre GCR and a night of ST utilities 
including UIS HI, Turbo ST, and more. So lots is 
coming in the months ahead. Also Stacys are 
coming very soon as well. As always, keep 
watching here as MAST moves ahead!!! 

Now for some news!!!!!!! First, a time of 
mourning ... Another ST magazine has folded. 
This time, it is ST Xpress. It looks like their 
special issue was their last. It also looks like 
problems are occurring at ANTIC/START as 
well Quite a number of their longtime editors 
are leaving the magazine for other jobs. This 
doesn't bode too well for START, although 
START is proclaiming a bigger and better 
magazine this month, STACYs are coming soon. 
Now that the FCC has given some approval, 
you should see them in your favorite computer 
store in the next few months. Wizard's Works 
has been approved of as a STACY dealer. The 
new STE is also just around the comer as well, 
This computer seems to be stuck in the FCC. It 
is currently available in Canada and is selling 
like hotcakes. The dealers can't keep them En 
stock. One store sold out of 50 STEs in just two 
days!!! Finally, this is a hot off the press rumor 

for the coming CES show. Atari will be 

announcing a new ST package called the "Atari 
Power Pack*, This will include a 520STFM and 
a goodly sum of software for around $400. 

The software lineup looks like Music Studio, 
Neochrome, Planetarium, Maps and Legends, 
Star Raiders, Missile Command, Alien Brigade, 
and FI 5, Also included will be either the 
Timeworks set of Word Writer, Swiftcaic, and 
Data Manager or the set of First Word Plus, 
Phaser, and Informer 13. The three applications 
packages are still in the discussion stage. Either 
way, this sounds like a super package for a new 
user. For complete information on this and other 
ST late-breaking news, don't miss this month s 
MAST meeting. 

Now it's that time for more miscellaneous 

news. We have just recently received two 

copies of Pagestream from SoftLogik. One for 
Dave and the newsletter and one for the 
birthday raffle. We will also be making 
available a demo copy of Pagestream as wett. 
Look for a review of Pagestream in the months 
to come. Also, if any members have any public 
domain fonts, could you please pass these on to 
Dave? The more fonts that we have, the better 
the newsletter will look and we also won't have 
to locate and download the additional fonts. 
(Bruce, are you listening?, please) ..... Also we 
now are associated with Six's user group 
program and information service. Bix 
information is included with this month's issue 
and an additional logo is on the front cover of 
the newsletter. 

Help!!!!!, Could we please get a volunteer who 








E / MAST * January 1990 


/be willing to write up the minutes of each 
/h’s meeting for the newsletter? See Dave 
/myself if you are interested. 

finally.... don’t forget the Sony double-sided 
disks for $0.80 each. We still have them in 
stock at this good low price, but they are going 
fast. Also MAST has two single-sided disks for 
sale for $50.00 each. This is a great way to get 
a second drive!!!! If you are interested, see 
Allan at the next MAST meeting. Don’t forget 
the MAST BBS either run superbly by Tom 
Cook. Give it a call at 472-6582. 

Well, that’s it for January. The envelope has 
opened it flap and says 'Buy Chaos Strikes 
Back!!!" repeatedly. I suppose we should all 
check this out at the next meeting. Also it is 
available now and in quantities, not like two 
years ago when Dungeonmaster came out. So 
until next month, have a Happy New Year. I 
hope to see you all at the January MAST 
meeting and at the MAST+ programmer’s 
meeting the following Tuesday. 

Minutes of the SPACE Meeting 
(NOVEMBER 1989) 
by Larry Vanden Plas 

1. The meeting was called to order November 
10, 1989 at 7:30 PM by President Greg Howell. 

2. The minutes of the October meeting as 
printed in the newsletter were approved. 

3. Larry Vanden Plas reported that SPACE had 
acquired two years of ANTIC magazines with 
disks and they would be rented to members for 
$1 per month. A deposit of $5 would be required 
on each. 

4. The treasurer reported that there is about 
$160 in the SPACE treasury. There is a need to 
buy disks. 

5. Amos Jackson said he was confident that he 
had gotten the bug out of the BBS. The Board 
had had no problems for 56 hrs. He 
recommended that everybody calls at least 
once every 14 days to get their E-Mail. 

6. Dave Cole reported that he has not had time 
to find anything to say so he had nothing to say. 

7. Greg Howell reported on MIDI. He reported 
that AIM, the Atari Interface Magazine, had 
been criticized by CHAOS, a major Michigan 
user group. Greg Peasley said that AIM had 
publicaily quoted informal comments and rumors 
as fact. Some claim the user group had lost 
control of AIM. Others indicated that CHAOS 
never had control of AIM. The owners of AIM 
said if you don’t like it, don’t send your money. 
AIM is no longer a user group magazine. 

8. Ron Van Rossem was nominated for 
Treasurer. There had been an informal 
agreement to rotate the treasurer between 


SPACE and MAST. Questions were raised 
about having a separate treasurer for SPACE. 

9. Hardware Problems. Questions were raised 
about the 410 tape recorder. Error 138 is 
indicated. The recorder plays, but the 
computer has no control of the remote. Other 
people reported similar problems with the 410. 
The recorder first mentioned had previously 
worked with a 400 computer, but did not work 
with the 800XL. Another member reported that 
the values of the resister were too wide and he 
had seen an article suggesting replacement of 
some resistors with more precision resistors. 
Another member reported that if you sent an 
810 diskdrive and $75 to Atari, they would send 
you a 551. Most agreed it was well worth it. A 
question was raised about files on the BBS with 
the suffix ".AMP." I was suggested they were 
for a music player. 

10. Joe Danko, the Disk Librarian, reported that 
he had been on vacation and then became sick 
so there was not an article in the newsletter. 
However the article for November will be in the 
December newsletter. He also provided copies 
of the newsletter article for those who wanted 
them now. The December Disk of the Month will 
have a library and data base. NEW PRICING 
POLICY - All disks will be $3 each. There have 
been steady mail order sales. There is also a 
request to purchase or rent the entire library. 
There are over 100 disks in the library. CHAOS 
has a program to rent, leaving a deposit, or 
purchase. 

11. ELECTION RESULTS - Greg Howell was 
reelected to be president and Nathan Block was 
elected to be vice-president. Allan Frink was 
elected to be treasurer by acclaimation. 

12. There was a discussion about a by-law 
admendment allowing SPACE to have its own 
treasury. A checking account would cost $1 per 
month and ten cents per check. Currently 
printing and mailing costs for the newletter are 
split 50/50 between SPACE and MAST, not 
prorated. MAST has about double the number 
of member that SPACE has. The use of a free 
room at the bank was mentioned as a way to 
conserve money. A motion to pursue a 
separate treasury for SPACE, to continue to 
share the newsletter and explore the use of a 
free room was passed. 

The meeting concluded with a demonstration of 
the DOM and many small discussions. 

Minutes of the SPACE Meeting 
(DECEMBER 1989) 
by Larry Vanden Plas 

1. The meeting was called to order December 8, 
1989 at 7:40 PM by President Greg Howell. 

2. The minutes of the November meeting were 
read because the newsletter was not out yet. 


_ Page 3 

3. Jim Scheib, the paper librarian and reinker, 
reported that the library is looking for 
donations. He also asked that members bring 
their ribbons in for reinking. He wants them to 
trickle in, don’t let them accumulate. Jim will 
reink ribbons for members for only $1 each and 
$2 for wide carriage Epsons. 

4. NEWS AND RUMORS Joe Danko reported 
on a new group: FACE, Federation of Atari 
Computer Enthusiasts. If we became a FACE 
BBS, they would send us a disk each month. To 
qualify the BBS needs 2 meg of space available 
and run at 1200 and 2400 baud. We qualify. It 
we send a stamped, self-addressed envelop, 
they will send a free demo disk. 

5. BBS Amos Jackson reported that he had 
made corrections to the modem. There have 
been some probles with the Y-modem protocol. 
One member logged on with an ID and 
password; then he got hung up. Amos reported 
that you can answer "Y" to skip system news 
and it will skip the news until it is updated. Carl 
reported that a 134 or 135 error occurs when 
an 80 column machine logs off. It runs normal, 
but the error shows up only when the machine 
logs off. Amos said one set of commands will 
disconnect the next caller if he logs on too 
quickly after the previous caller logs off. Amos 
requested that all old E-Mail be deleted 
because it is starting to pilw up. He will delete 
ail E-Mail received. If you want it left on so you 
can print a hard copy, sent the sys op a 
message. 

6. VP’s REPORT Nathan reported that is 
working on a repair special interest group (sig). 
He will have information on a table in the front of 
the room. He had a new catalog of Public 
Domain disks, many of which he had not seen 
before. The answer to the biggest question - 
Where do I buy software in the TC’s? - is 
Computer Station, where they also have the 
lowest prices. A user group and store in Florida 
went under. He got five letters looking for help. 
He also received a letter from a user in France; 
the address is available. 

7. PRESIDENTS REPORT Greg Howell 
reported that we need a secretary. Larry will 
resign in March or sooner if one is available. 

We will have to postpone the vote on a 
separate treasury. There was a discussion that 
we currently have a joint treasury and we would 
more control. Our treasurer would be at 
SPACE meetings. This might separate the 
groups more than they are now. We may have 
to add a member to the board. MAST is a very 
volatile organization in regard to money, e.g. the 
last report put them $300 into the red. SPACE 
was technically solvent, but the account was 
almost broke. Greg does not want to separate 
the groups. Membership is about one third 
SPACE and two thirds MAST. There is a need 
to resolve newsletter costs which are now split 
fifty/fifty. Overall both groups are better off 
sharing a newsletter. Costs are about $90 for 
printing plus 25 cents each for postage. Greg 
will try to get a free room. There was a motion 




to add a SPACE treasurer to the board. 

8. DEALS Budget Computer is selling 8-bit 
software, magazines and books, 40 to 25% off. 
There is a lot of software, all is original wrap. 
Loderunner Rescue is selling for $4. It is 
located near University and Osborne Road, 
next to U.S. Swim and Fitness. There is a little 
hardware. CMO is clearing out all Atari, a U.S. 
Doubler is selling for $23. There was an ad in 
the November/December Antic. Antic is now bi¬ 
monthly. The SX212 is on sale with SX 
EXPRESS. 

9. WANTED Jim Scheib is looking for Graphics 
8 drawing programs. He believes some are in 
the library. 

10. INFORMATION Nathan has a MIDI 
compatible keyboard. Rainbow Music has a 
MIDI interface for the 8-bit. If you have a 
SF551 - leave the cable in the disk drive once it 
is plugged in. The connection is very weak. 

One of the members is in contact with Roy 
Golden. Daisy Dot III is very nice. It is not know 
whether it will be Public Domain or Shareware. 

It has beautiful fonts. Roy hopes to be able to 
receive some of the more popular word 
processors. It will support underlining and 
micro-spacing. The Atari Portfolio sells for 
$399, offers a very clear 40 column screen, a 
very functional word processor, is Lotus 
compatible, has communications and runs MS- 
DOS. They can not make them fast enough. 
Atari is also offering Lynx, a small game 
machine. Black Box, $200, by CSS picks up 
where the MIO left off and is on sale now. 

11. DISK LIBRARY A Ibrary index disk is 
available for $1. It will give information by 
DOM, category, text file, text file, a synopysis of 
what the program does and can be read on a 
monitor. The DOM has several shareware 
games. The Force of Four is a tatical war 
game. 

12. The meeting concluded with a 
demonstration of the DOM. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 
(SPACE) 

St. Joseph's Home for Children is in need of 
Atari compatible software, monitors, printers 
and disk drives for computer simulation 
exercises used to supplement the children's 
eduction cirriculum. If you can help, please call 
Noah Miller at 827-9318. Thank you. 

The parts to make a Morse Code Receiver that 
takes the code from a shortwave transceiver 
and translates it at up to 70 words per minute 
are available from Larry Vanden Plas. The 
receiver was put together on a bread board 
and worked well. The article appeared in the 
November 1985 Antic. See Larry for more info. 

Members may rent Antic magazines with disks 


for $1 per month. There is a $5 per issue/disk 
deposit. 


SPACE 8 BIT SOFTWARE 
LIBRARY NEWS 
January, 1990 

by Joe Danko, Disk Librarian 

It's 1990 and we are still here, wherever that is, 
those of us that are still here. Well, never mind 
that, we are just taking life with the ATARI 8’s 
one day at a time. Speaking of which, I am really 
short of that precious commodity these days. I 
spent most of the two weeks proior to Christmas 
in Chicago at UNISYS school and gained five 
pounds. Enough of that! 

Software is quite scarce right now but we 
managed to scrape up enough to make the 
DOM interesting at least. 

I would like to mention a few things before we 
get to the DOM. Anyone who cant make it to 
meetings and needs to purchase software is 
encouraged to either call or write directly to me: 

Joe Danko 
2766 Chisholm Av. N. 

North St. Paul, MN 55109 
(612)777-9500 

Current prices: 

All disks are $3, plus: 

$1 for shipping for each 5 disks 


an 

CLOWN.OBJ 
Machine language game that needs a joys\ 

You must make the down jump from ballon t^ 
ballon from one side to the other and pick up\ 
money along the way. \ 

TIEFIGHT.BAS 

Basic space shooting game requiring a joystick. 
Get the enemy in your sight and blow them 
away. 

CARTAG.BAS 

Basic two-player game. Take turns being it and 
chasing each other through the maze. Uses 
joysticks. 

ZIP.BAS 

Basic two player line drawing game, seee how 
long you can draw without touching anything. 
Uses joysticks. 

OLYMPIAD.BAS 

Basic two-player game using joysticks. Navigate 
the maze and try to shoot your opponent. 

OKHOUTIL.DOC 

EJECT.COM PSON.COM PSOFF.COM 
This group of files allows the user to gain more 
control of the OKIMATE 10 printer. 

TIDIER.COM 

A machine language file used mainly to process 
end-of-line codes in text files. 

PERCOM.TXT 

Technical information on the PERCOM disk 
drive. 


PACE / MAST 


If anyone has public domain software that is not 
in the library we will trade disk-for-disk. 


January Disk-Of-the-Month 
SIDE1 


DOS 

SYS 

037 

DUP 

SYS 

042 

>SPACE DOM< 


001 

>01 90 1< 


001 

AUTORUN 

SYS 

001 

MENU 


035 

CLOWN 

OBJ 

027 

TIEFIGHT 

BAS 

055 

CARTAG 

BAS 

061 

ZIP 

BAS 

030 

OLYMPIAD 

BAS 

058 

OKIIOUTL 

DOC 

012 

EJECT 

COM 

001 

PSOFF 

COM 

001 

PSON 

COM 

001 

TIDIER 

COM 

028 

PERCOM 

TXT 

023 

STEREOXL 

TXT 

089 

GUMBY 

ARS 

012 

GUMBY 

BAS 

048 

GUMBY 

COM 

011 

GUMBY 

DOC 

024 

ACTSND 

DOC 

047 

STRSND 

ACT 

008 


054 FREE SECTORS 


STEREOXL.TXT 

GUMBY.* 

ACTSND.DOC 

STRSND.ACT 

This group of files is a set of instructions, 
documantation and software that adds a 
second POKEY chip (called GUMBY) to the 8 
BIT computer allowing true stereo sound. 

SIDE 2 has a new special version of TEXTPRO 
4.0 for MYDOS. This side also includes MYDOS 
4.50. If you are unfamiliar with these programs, 
TEXTPRO is the best text editor for the 8 bit 
ATARI and is available in many forms and 
versions. MYDOS 4.50 is a public domain disk 
operating system that supports all types of disks 
and RAMDISKS, subdirectories and other 
features not available in DOS 2.0/2.5. 


MAST Disks of the Month 
By Jim Schulz 

Well, its DOM time again. This month, I will start 
with a rundown of last month's disks and then 
what is in store for this month. With Christmas 
time, things have been a little hectic again. I will 
give you a quick rundown of some of the new 
stuff. I have quite a bit again this month, but I 
haven't had the time to wade through it ail yet. 




/ MAST « January 1990 


ere we go into last month. Last month’s 

:tion included six new disks, five updates, 
i two magazine disks. 


/# 1 - ST Report magazine issues for December 
#2 - ST ZMAG and ST Plug issues for 
December 

#37 - ST Writer V3.4 (Latest version of ST 
word processor) 

#78 - Uniterm 2.0E 009 (Latest version of ST 
communication program 
#326 - NetHack V3.0 (Character graphic 
dungeon game) 

#386 - BSTAT V2.34 (Latest version of ST 
statistical spreadsheet prg) 

#417 - Ani-ST V2.11 (Latest version of ST 
animation program with docs) 

#437 - December DOM #1 (Utilities) 

#438 - December DOM #2 (Applications) 

#439 - December DOM #3 (Games) 

#440 - Music Disk #8 (Christmas Music and 
Pictures) 

#441 - ANALOG Disk #37 (Magazine programs 
from the December ANALOG) 

#442 - ANALOG Disk #37 (Magazine programs 
from the December ANALOG) 

This month's selection included a number of 
good programs. The utilities, applications, and 
games disks sold quite well as well as the 
Uniterm and ST Writer disks. 

This month, there are a number of specials 
again in the DOM world. First off, all DOMs at 
both meetings are again only $4.00 each. This 
includes current and past disks. For those of 
you who didn't brave the cold last month, you 
still have one more chance to get the MAST 
DOMs at this low price. Second, we will be 
selling all four of the volume 4 in the ST News 
series at the meeting. These have been 
promised for who knows how long, but they are 
now done. These are the excellent disk 
magazines from Europe. We will also demo the 
latest issue at the meeting as well. The price is 
only $2.00 with more disks from the past coming 
in the months to come. Finally, the new MAST 
DOC disk is done and available right now!!!! All 
disks now have a one line description as well as 
a directory listing. The doc disk set is $2.00 for 
2 disks or $1.00 for either disk in the set. 

Finally.I am thinking about putting together 

some grab bag disks full of miscellaneous files 
downloaded from the BBSs. These are things 
which too specialized, animations, miscellaneous 
demos, and assorted utilities, applications, and 
games. Just a miscellaneous hodgepodge. 

These will be on double-sided disks and will be 
full of arced files. The disks would sell for $2.00. 
If you are interested in something like this, let 
me know. It's just another cheap way of getting 

more public domain software.One more 

note. Chuck's selection of public domain GNU 
utilities and source code are still available. I 
have had two request for complete sets of 
disks so far. The GNU utilities total over 3 
megabytes and fill 8 ARCed disks and the 
source code fills another 9 ARCed disks. These 
disks are available on a preorder basis for 


$16.00 for the utilities and $18.00 for the 
source. 

Now on to this month’s selection of goodies. 

First off, the new version of Sheet, the 
spreadsheet will see the light of day. This is a 
BASIC language interpreter, a database and a 
graphing program ail built into one. Also this 
month, we have a new and super improved 
version of ARC V6.02. This version will 
automatically ARC directories and is superfast 
as well, in addition, there is a new version of 
ArcShell to support the new features as well as 
better support for LHARC. Also this month, we 
have a new version of LGSELECT, the public 
domain file selector, with a number of new 
features. The Quick ST people are at it again 
with another update with a demo version. We 
have a preview of a forthcoming product from 
DC with DC SHOWIT. This program replaces 
the system file show command for better viewing 
of files. For all you Dungeonmaster addicts, we 
have a saved game organizer which will work 
with Chaos Strikes Back as well. We also have 
an update to the Sozobon C utilities with new 
GEM bindings. Finally, we will have the program 
and instructions to make your own Blitz cable. 
The Blitz program will allow you to copy any ST 
disk, protected or not, with two disk drives and 
a cable. This program wiH format a disk in 18 
seconds per side. It is also the first legitimate 
backup program because only copies made 
from original disks or second generation disks 
are good. Third and later generation disks are 
not usable. Full information is included to make 
your own cable or where to buy one. I 
personally wasn't too hot on this until David 
Small started pumping It up as a "good" backup 
program. When someone of David's reputation 
recommends something, you listen. This is only a 
sample of what I have this month. More is 
coming in daily. And I even started checking all 
of this month’s collection. 

If you cant make the meeting and would still like 
to get ahold of the DOM or would like to get 
ahold of the DOC disk, my new address is 

5900 65th Avenue North #204 
Brooklyn Park, MN 55429 

That's it for January. Please remember that this 
is just the start of some of great programs for 
this month. Come to the January meeting and 
get some great bargain DOM prices again this 
month. Happy New Year and I hope to see you 
all at the meeting. 

JRI's J.A.T.0.16mhz Accelerator 
by Nick Smith 

I recently acquired JRI’s 16mhz accelerator 
board and thought I'd share my impressions of 
the device with those who may have considered 
the possibility of adding one to their ST system. 

Regardless of which of the current boards you 
might consider to enhance your ST with, the first 


_ PaaeS 

hurdle is getting your 68000 socketed. This is 
not a task to be taken lightly by those 
inexperienced in soldering and desoldering - 
you take the risk of totally killing your ST’s 
motherboard. In making phone calls trying to 
locate someone to do the job, I encountered 
many refusals from businesses who wouldn’t 
even attempt it. From others, very high price 
quotes for doing what I saw as a rather 
straightforward task for a competant electronic 
technician. I found Steve Zipf at Alpha Tech 
((612) 524-0424) willing and able to do the job 
for $30. 

I also needed to check the speed of the memory 
chips in my ST. Assuming they're pessimistically 
rated, the chips must be 150ns or faster. The 
J.A.T.O. board will not function reliably with 
chips that are slower - a few ST’s were made 
with lower quality chips or with 170ns DRAM's. I 
crossed my fingers and hoped the 150ns chips 
in my 520 were up to the job. 

Both JRI and Steve recommend clipping the old 
68000 for ease of removal, so I obtained a 
replacement 8mhz 68000 ($10) should I want to 
remove the 16mhz board at a later date. The 
J.A.T.O. board comes with a 64 pin, low-profile 
soldertail socket so everything you need for 
installation is included. Other than soldering in 
the socket, no other modifications are required. 
The board itself is the size of a piece of 
chewing gum and comes pre-attached to a 
handful of pins on a 16mhz 68000 chip. 
Connected to the board are two sets of lead 
wires: One for the micro toggle switch included 
to allow you to enable/disable the accelerator, 
and the other attached to a small red LED which 
indicates when the J.A.T.O. is accelerating. 

Installation was a snap. Using a drill with a 3/16" 
bit, I drilled two holes into the case of my 520: 
one near the DMA port for the toggle switch, 
and another atop the case in the corner for 
easy viewing of the LED indicator. The LED fits 
snugly into the hole yet can be easily pushed out 
if necessary to remove the ST’s case. The 
wires are 12" long, allowing you full freedom to 
decide on their placement. After installing these 
and pushing the accelerator chip into the 
socket, I reassembled my ST’s case and was 
ready to give my souped-up machine a test 
drive. 

Problems! In the first 5 seconds it became clear 
that my system would not boot with the 
accelerator enabled - the computer would crash 
with 11 bombs onscreen. I tried it again with the 
switch off and re-enabled it once the desktop 
appeared - everything ran fine. Calls to JRI 
(which were very informative and helpful) 
suggested removal of a 20K ohm resistor on the 
accelerator or replacing it with a 47K ohm 
resistor as a possible solution. 

TOS 1.4 PROMs may be slower than original 1.0 
ROMs and ST's tend to vary in the amount of 
’slop’ in their components timing. The resistor on 
the board attempts to compensate for this. 
Particularly with later revision accelerators, 








SPACE / MAST » Januar 


and drop in one of Fast Technologies Turbo-16 
accelerators to put even more zip in your 
computing trip. 

J.A.T.0.16mhz Accelerator 
John Russel Innovations 
P.O. Box 5277 
Pittsburg, California 94565 
Phone: (415) 458-9577 

List Price: $99.95 
Street Price: $89 


? If the keyboard does not record how 
the note is performed, then it must be a 
the editor. If the keyboard does not respo 
touch sensitivity, it is very probable the 
synthesizer in it also does not. That could be 
more important. Does it have input for foot 
pedals, modulation control, pitch bend (glide 
pitch while playing), or pan (stereo balance). 
Many keyboards and their synthesizers are 
only monophonic (one output, not stereo). 
Examine it carefully. Seek advice and help if 
necessary. 



Pag e £--— 

(currently revision 'C') the J.A.T.O. board is far 
more tolerant and hence compatible with more 
STs than early reviews in magazines had led me 
to believe. After removing the 20K ohm resistor 
with a fingernail clipper, my ST has booted 
flawlessly ever since. More importantly, after 2 
weeks of use I have had NO unexpected 
crashes from using the board. 

I was initially aware of the acceleration just 
manuvering around the desktop: opening, 
moving, scrolling, and resizing windows. Nothing 
breathtaking, but there was a definite and 
perceptabie improvement in display operations. 
It reminded me of a few years ago when I 
replaced the 8088 chip in my PC with one of 
NEC's more efficient V20 chips - and again 
when I recently installed TOS 1.4 in my ST: a 
noticeable, yet subtle overall improvement. 

My second task was to run Quick Index 
benchmarks on it to get some numbers to give 
me a frame of reference. The figures where 
speed improvements were reflected are 
shown in the table below: 


Quick Index 1.6 Benchmarks 
JRI 16mhz - Medium Rez 


======= 

CPU 

CPU 

========= 

BIOS 

Divide 

Shifts 

Text 

182% 

179% 

122% 

BIOS 

BIOS 

GEM 

String 

Scrol 

Draw 

118% 

106% 

115% 


Watching the LED flicker as you mouse about 
your day to day operations of the ST is part 
functional, part novelty. It's interesting to note 
the LED's response to various applications. In 
programs which utilize the CPU divide\shift 
operations - most notably number crunching and 
graphics applications - the LED glows its 
brightest. Timework's Publisher appears to 
make a lot of use of the accelerators abilities, 
making it very responsive to screen scrolling 
and redraws. (Something it's not known for!) 

The J.A.T.O. board's impact on this was very 
noticable, significant to those who work a great 
deal with CAD, EZ-Draw or DTP types of 
applications. The only program I encountered 
which dislikes the accelerated mode is Spectrum 
512, though it runs fine at 8mhz. All the games I 
tried ran without a hitch. Zany Golf in particular 
really benefited from the acceleration as you 
move around the scrolling playfield much more 
smoothly. 

The bottom line: with the JRI accelerator, you 
get appreciable speed improvement for a little 
money and a good value for those wanting 
extra oomph! without a major investment. In the 
sports car world, this board isn't the equivalent 
of a bigger engine but rather, a high 
performance carbueraior that has a 
tachometer thrown in for free. And if even 
higher performance is on your wish-list, you’ve 
already got the socket installed. You can just 
pull out the J.A.T.O. board, pull out your wallet, 


Mini MIDI lessons 
by Morris G. Miller 

part 2 of a series 

WHAT DOES MIDI COST? 

Like watches, MIDI can cost as little or as much 
as you want to put into it. I can give you some 
price ranges, but they are arbitrary. I can give 
you some recommendations, but they are 
generalities. You will still have to evaluate for 
your application and make the final decisions. 

The three basic components, aside from the 
computer, are the sequencer (software), 
keyboard and synthesizers, and the music 
sound system. The first two are most urgent to 
this discussion. 

A starter sequencer is available from the public 
domain for most popular computers. I 
recommend starting with one, even though I did 
not. This allows you to find and settle on a 
keyboard first. Most vendors provide low-end 
versions of their sequencers starting in the $30 
to $60 range. The high-end versions of the 
same programs will be from $300 to $700. 
Accessories can cost up to an additional $500, 
costing $20 to $100 for each added utility. 

Software is expensive, but good programs are 
worth it. The low-end versions will not have all 
the features of the expensive versions, 
naturally, but will possibly have everything you 
need or want. Again, try them first. 

Keyboard selection is more difficult, and should 
come first. As in a previous discussion, decide 
whether you need your emphasis on the 
keyboard or the synthesizer. Don’t be carried 
away by the "local" features, such as rhythms, 
chords and fancy noises the keyboard can 
make while you play it. Most of these things will 
not be recorded on the MIDI. However, if your 
daughter will enjoy playing it live, then consider 
it. New keyboards start about $130 and go to 
$3000 or more. Keep an eye on swap meets, 
yard sales, classified adds and pawn shops. 
Someone gets a good bargain every day, 
somewhere. 

Not all keyboards give the same amount of 
information. If touch sensitivity (how fast and 
hard the key is pressed and released) is 
important, then keep it in mind. The difference 


You can add the sound system and cassette 
recorder as anything from a simple AM/FM 
radio and cassette recorder to a grand home 
music system. It should be stereo. The rest I 
leave to your imagination. 

WHY SHOULD I DO MIDI? 

Maybe I shouldn’t. MIDI is not for everyone 
any more than is rhubarb pie. Ugh ! 

Why would I want to hear Fredrick Chopin’s 
Polonaise played on a synthesizer when I have 
a compact disk of Philippe Entremont in 
performance ? Because 1) I had fun entering 
the music; 2) I gained a lot of understanding of 
both the music and Chopin by doing so; 3) it 
was edited until I had the performance 
interpretation I felt Chopin himself would give it; 
4) I feel it is MY performance - as though I am 
playing it - doing it MY way; 4) It can be 
performed on any of a dozen and a half 
different pianos - my choice; 5) or played by a 
trumpet and bass; 6) or whatever interpretation 
I want to put on it. 

Besides, who says I have to play Chopin ? 

Try your hand at Moonstruck. I’ll bet you 
don’t have that on CD. Put your, own weird 
interpretations of sounds into it. It can sound 
"spaced out", tin-pan, heavy-metal, or 
whatever. Or, very smooth. 

Did you ever want to sing with your own 
orchestra or combo ? You got it! Record it 
and amaze your friends. It's a great way to find 
out just who your friends really are. And, who is 
not! 

Sheet music is in abundance. A lot of it is not on 
CD. Some of it was out of production before 
the record player was invented. You have a 
way of playing it anyway. 

And talk about inventing - that is my main 
interest in MIDI. I write songs, mostly a 
cappella (vocal). I try my songs on MIDI with 
instalments having the range of voices which 
will do the final performance. I can hear my 
songs without having to sing and record all the 
parts myself (which I often do). MIDI allows me 
to edit until I have my song just the way I want it. 

The sequencer I use also has tape sync and 
SEMPTE (another subject). I have an an 8- 
channel recorder which allows me to record 
eight times with all recordings in sync - playing 


/ 


/ MAST User Group members are invited to 
join BIX's flat fee service at 25%off 

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our regular rate of $39 a quarter. 

Now MAST members are invited 
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dial your local Tymnet number; 
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One Phoenix Mill Lane 
Peterborough, NH 03458 
800-227-2983 
In NH, 603-924-7681 


SPACE / MAST » January 


Page 8 _ 

to the same conductor, if you piease. I record 
the strings on one track, the wood winds on 
another, the brass, percussion, reeds and bass 
on other tracks. When I play it back the entire 
orchestra plays. This is accomplished with two 
synthesizers, playing no more than six to eight 
instruments at a time. 

Maybe you should not do MIDI. But, if you like 
to have fun with music, there is no other way 
you can have this much fun with a full 
orchestra from the confines of your own music 
room at home. So, do it! 

WHAT IS A SYNTHESIZER ? 

A sine wave tone at any frequency is the most 
pure and undistorted sound we can make; it 
is much like a bird whistle, when given notes to 
play. Most instruments have some pure 
note characteristics. Only some. There is no 
musical instrument pleasing to the ear which 
produces sound in the purity of a sine wave. It 
is the characteristic distortions of an instrument 
that makes it sound like that instrument and 
none other. 

The trick, then, is to electronically produce 
sound with the proper distortion and harmonic 
characteristics in order to sound like some 
instrument we know and love. Or, for that 
matter, once we learn to create the sounds of 
instruments found naturally, and understand the 
natural laws which govern those sounds, we 
can create by those rules of nature new sounds 
of instruments not yet devised by craftsmen. 

Ain't that exciting ? 

The English prefixes "syn" and "sym" mean, 
simply, Together". The word "synthesis' is 
from the old Greek, meaning To put together". 
One way to create distortion in sounds, 
otherwise pure, is to put two or more of 
them together with varying amplitudes and 
phase relationships - and you have the 
beginnings of a violin, guitar, or piano sound. 
Add to that control over the amplitude 
envelopes and it can be quite good. 

To give even greater flexibility to the sound 
synthesis, each tone to be combined 
(operators) can be given a distortion. The 
easiest way to do this is to generate the tone in 
various waveforms (shapes). The most 
common such wave forms are sine wave (no 
distortion), square wave (rich in odd numbered 
harmonics), triangle or peaked wave (weak low- 
order odd harmonics), sawtooth (rich in both 
odd and even harmonics), and pulse shapes 
(harmonic content variable). By mixing the 
selected operators to various degree, many 
different sounds can be produced. 

To take this process one step further, allow a 
low frequency operator (LFO), of one of 
these shapes, to determine the amplitude or 
frequency modulation of another (the carrier) at 
the desired note frequency. Add feedback so 
that the modulator can modulate itself to some 
degree. Now combine mixes of these signals in 
various combinations and you have the 


synthesizers available today. 

To make a new voice, select the manner in 
which you want the modulators, carriers and 
feedback loops to be interconnected (the 
algorithm). Set the desired range of control for 
each of the operator parameters, and which 
of the control functions to vary the operator 
effects, if any. Set output envelope shape 
parameters and which of the control functions 
will vary the envelope effects, if any. Then 
play.... 

GLOSSARY 


After touch pressure - The pressure placed 
on a key after the key is down. Often used to 
control tremolo or vibrato in the voice. Not all 
keyboards send after touch information; not all 
synthesizers respond to that information; not all 
sequencers will recognize it. 

Attack velocity (key) - The rate, or how 
quickly, the key is pressed down. Generally 
used to control the volume, or loudness, of 
the tone when played. Not all keyboards send 
attack velocity; not all synthesizers respond to 
that information. 

Audio mixer - A set of low-level amplifiers and 
gain controls (volumes) to combine a number 
of stereo inputs into one stereo amplifier and 
speaker system. Each input level may be 
adjusted separately and a master output level 
may be set for the signal to the amplifier. 

Meters may be provided for monitoring the 
output levels. Headphone jacks allow listening 
to the mixed result. 

Channel - The "address" of a MIDI message. 
Each instrument voice can be set to one of 
sixteen MIDI channels so that only it receives 
the MIDI codes sent to it. See also, Omni. 

Control codes • MIDI codes which duplicate 
the settings of the control devices of the 
keyboard such as the modulation wheel, pitch 
bend, foot switches and pedals, etc. 

Daughter - The person who knows how to play 
a keyboard. 

Drum machine - A special kind of sequencer 
which may be loaded with patterns to play drum 
sounds and rhythms. Very much like the 
rhythm sounds built into many of the low-end 
keyboards, except that you define the drum 
patterns before loading them into the machine. 
Performance of patterns and rhythms may be 
changed during play. In some machines you 
define the sound (type) of the drum. 

Editor - The program, or function module of a 
sequencer, which allows viewing and changing 
of notes, attack velocity, duration, and other 
parameters of a song. The editor will 
generally be a part of the sequencer, and allow 
the entry of notes (writing the song) for 
performance, and possibly printing the song 


score. \ 

Entremont, Philippe - a French pianist wittvs 
his own interpretation of Chopin, no better 
than my own - or yours. 

Envelope - The shape of a note's output, or 
that of the operators which make up the note. 
Portions of the envelope may may be defined 
to control the sound response of the tone, and 
in part the timbre (tone quality) of the sound. 

Exclusive codes - Codes not specifically 
defined by the MIDI standards, used by 
manufacturers to do things Their way". This is 
necessary because no two keyboards are 
exactly the same nor have the same features. 

Glissando - A rapid slide up or down the 
musical scale. See also Portamento. 

Instrument (musical) - Any of the instruments 
which produce musical sounds by MIDI, or 
generate the MIDI signals for control of other 
instruments. Some of the instruments which are 
now equipped to produce MIDI codes are 
keyboards, reed (wood), guitar, piano, and 
horn (brass). 

Key signature - The sharps and flats symbols 
placed following the clef symbol on a musical 
staff. Each sharp or flat adjusts the natural 
pitch of the note indicated by one half-tone. 

Keyboard - A musical instrument with keys 
similar to that of a piano, but used to generate 
the MIDI codes for performance of a song. 
Assumed to reproduce sound by synthesis or 
voice sampling and, thus, may not sound 
anything at all like a piano. 

Librarian - A utility program, generally used 
with the sequencer, to load and store voice 
parameter setups for the synthesizer or 
sampler. As such, it allows new voices to be 
performed, as needed, by each song. 

Local features -Thesounds, rhythms, and 
chords which may be played on the keyboard 
(or other instrument) which do not generate 
MIDI codes for recording and play back. 

Measure (musical) - The time duration 
between two bars of music as indicated by the 
time signature of the song. See also, Time 
signature. 

MIDI - The interface standard for 
interconnecting musical instruments and 
related equipment. What these lessons are all 
about. 

MIDI IN - The MIDI port the instrument "listens" 
on. If the MIDI code channel number matches 
the setting of the instrument voice, the 
instrument will perform by those codes received 
on the MIDI IN port. 

Part 3 (the remainder of the glossary) will 
appear in the February issue . 



// 



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SPACE / MAST NEWSLETTER 


SPACE / MAST Newsletter 
January 1990 


SPACE meeting: 

12 January 1990 

MAST meeting: 

19 January 1990 

SPACE / MAST regular meetings are at the Falcon Heights Community 
Center, 2077 Larpenteur Avenue West (meetings start at 7:30 pm) 

MAST+ Programmers Meeting: 

Tuesday, 23 January 1990 

At First Minnesota Bank Building - second floor, Lexington and Larpenteur, 
in back of building, 7:30 pm 


S»P»A»C»E / M*A* S•T 

P.O. BOX 12016 

New Brighton, MN 55112