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SHARI SHEET - Version i,Q by ken ShTO 












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Y ALL PROGRAM 


ATARI ST 


BOX 
CORNWAL 
TEL: (0726) 68020 




SSass 































Editor & Publisher 
Les Ellingham 

Correspondence 
PA C } t 6 Mg gozi n e 
P.O.Box 54 
Stafford 
Slid WR 

Editorial and Advertising 
0785 213928 

Printed by 
Stafford Reprographics Ltd. 

0785 3533 

Typeset by 
Budget Typeseftrng Ltd 

0634 41878 


PAGE 6 is published bi-monthly 


PAGE 6 it d u^jr's magazine and rete 
entirety on readers' support in sobmining, 
drtides and programs The- asm ih 1o explore 

ATARI compiling through ihe exchange ui 

iniionnation and knowledge, We will endea¬ 
vour la pay Igt artides and programs where 
appropriate and we dope ihat you will gain 
satisfaction from seeing ^our wcnk published 
In turn we hope that you will learrl from 
article?, submitted hy Dlher readers All pub¬ 
lished material ineligible for awards in Shi? 
.Annual Readers' Poll and may receive add¬ 
itional Editorial awards as announced From 
Hme to time in the magazine. 


All original articles, programs and 
other material in PAGE A is copyright of 
she author a* credited All uncredited 
material is copyright PAGE 6 Unless 
containing the byline'All Rights 
Reserved' any material in PAGE b may 
be re-used by User Groups and other 
non-profit making organisations without 
permission. Permission to ugv maieruii 
elsewhere should he obtained from 
PAGE 6 or the authoT Editors of 
newsletters reproducing ntalerifl] are 
requested lo send a copy of the relevant 
issue to the Editorial address oi 
PAGE b. 

Whi 1st we take whatever steps we can 
to ensure the accuracy of articles and 
program's and the contents of 
advertisements PAGE 6 cannot be held 
liable for any errors or claim;, made by 
advertisers 


LISTINGS 

BLOCKBREAKER Revisited by Dave Hit diem 6 

SMARTSHEET by Ken Shiu 31 

TRICKY CUBES by Peter and Stephan Ohlmeyer 40 

HIDDEN DEPTHS by Philip Dennis 62 


FEATURES 

A GUIDE TO ERROR CODES Pt.2 by Steve Pedkr 10 

FRACTALS by Peter Coates 16 

TAPE PROBLEMS by Derryck Croker 37 

FIRST STEPS by Mark Hutchinson 50 

ADVENTURE - DRAGON QUEST and STONEQUEST 

by Garry Francis 52 

REVIEWS 

SHORT REVIEWS 57 

PAPERCLIP 66 

ST SECTION 

NEWS 21 

TIME BANDIT - review 21 

ST SPRITES by Chris Darkes 22 

PRO-FORTRAN 77 by Matthew Jones 24 

VIP PROFESSIONAL by Les Rllingham 26 

The ATARI ST EXPLORED - review 29 

Editorial 4 

News 5 

Letters 8 

Listing Conventions 65 

Contact 68 

Crossword 70 

GOTO DIRECTORY 49 

BACK ISSUES 61 


Subscription rates annual {6 issues) 

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Europe £10.50 

Elsewhere - Surface £10.50 

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Single copies and back issues at 
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Disk Subscriptions 

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Elsewhere Please enquire 


Please make cheques payable to 
PAGE 6, 

Copy date for the next issue is 
21st July. Publication date is 1st 
September 1986. 

ATARI" is a registered trade 
mark of ATARI C0RR All 
references should be so noted. 















Editorial 


HOLDING ITS OWN 

Are you an 8-bit user feeling a little dispirited by all the 
publicity that the ST is getting? Well, let me give you a few words 
of comfort. 

It is true that the ST can do many powerful things that are 
outside the scope of any 8-bit machine but there are also many 
applications where the good old Atari can hold its own. Take word 
processing. I fully intended to transfer the make up of PAGE 6 to 
the ST but at present, out of the dozen or so word processors 
available, there are none that are a significant improvement over 
Superscript or PaperGlip to warrant changing. Indeed the 
majority of those available are significantly inferior and the 
remainder all seem to have their own peculiar formats making 
each incompatible with anything else. So, for the foreseeable 
Tuiure PAGE 6 will continue to be produced on a 130XE using 
Superscript (I am too used to it to change, despite my comments 
on PaperGlip) and any 8-bit owners can continue to feel proud 
that they have a machine that can still hold its own in many 
circumstances. 

An editorial in another magazine recently bemoaned the fact 
that although tens of thousands of STs have been sold finding 
those owners and gathering all-round concerted support of the 
machine was, strangely, very difficult Don't tell us, we have lived 
with this problem for three years! The fact is, as all readers will 
know, that Atari has never had widespread popular support from 
the trade in this country and possibly never will In hundreds of 
towns and cities up and down the country you can walk into a 
computer shop and find software for half a dozen machines (even 
extinct ones) and nothing for Atari. That’s a fact of life, and 
despite the eternal optimistic comments from Atari, it is a 
situation that is not likely to change dramatically because without 
widespread outlets software companies will not produce the 
software and without the software there will be no widespread 
outlets. What happens is that you get (hundreds of) thousands of 
Atari owners who do little with their machines and seldom make 
contact with others. 

That is the situation so what can be done? Well Alan 
themselves arc the only people capable of redressing the situation 
and they could do it quite simply. One problem with the way Atari 
operate is that by farming out warranty repairs to retailers and 
distributors they do not have any sort of record of who buys the 
machines and consequently, unlike with other manufacturers, 
they have a huge user base which they cannot identify. Fair 
enough if they want others to do repairs but if they simply put a 
card in each box inviting purchasers to complete and return it to 
receive information about their machine in the f uture, they could 
build up a mailing list of virtually all the users of their machines. 
This mailing list could then be rented out to interested parties 
who provide support for Atari machines (can 1 be first in the 
queue please!) and the whole Atari market could rc veeive a much 
needed boost. Software producers would be able to reach a much 
wider market, magazines would be able to obtain more readers 
and retailers would be encouraged to stock Atari titles as more 
became available. Pipe dreams? I don’t think so. And what’s more, 
bv renting out the mailing list, Atari could maintain records of all 
their customers without it costing them a penny. 


Out competitors] 
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Feature* 

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more. 

« Sampling rate selectable from 6KHz io 21 KHz. 

* Allows samples to be used in your own Basic programs. 

* REPLAY hardware plugs into cartridge slot requires no user 

memory. 

* Cartridge required for recording only, not playback. 

* Records Irom a casselte recorder or hifi. 

* Software supplied Oh disc or cassette. 

* Also included in the REPLAY package 

(also available separately); 

1. DIGIDRUM - Digital Drum sequencer (no hardware 
required), uses real drum samples. 8 realistic drum sounds 
are provided and the program allows you to make your own 
rhylhms using all of the drums. 

2- DIGISYNTH Simple sample sequencer {no hardware 
required), allows tunes to be made from your own samples, 
{play tunes with dogbarks, guitars, voices etc), 

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A PAGE * - Issue 12 




























































THE ARIOLASOFT SPOT! 


OUT OF THE FIRE! 


You might be forgiven for feeling that wo have some connection with 
Ariolasoft for every issue seems to mention them. The fact is that they are one 
of the few companies to have a regular schedule of releases for Atari and to let 
people know u r hat they are doing. Good for them, they will continue to get 
our support and deserve yours. 

This issue brings news of a cassette version of Arehon II priced at £9.95, 
Archon has already been reviewed by PAGE 6 and Arehon II is reported to be 
better although we have not yet seen it. 

On disk priced at £14.95 is Racing Destruction Set, a computerised 1 or 2 
player slot-car racing game. The game features a split screen with 50 of the 
world’s top racing circuits and a choice of ten different vehicles, 14 gravity 
settings^) and four backgrounds. Circuits and vehicles can be customised 
and you can drive Grand Prix, motoeross, roadrace, dirt track and more. Lots 
more options, sounds like great fun] 

Continuing with their excellent Home Productivity 1 range May saw r the 
release of B/Graph on two disks at £29,95, Aside from being the only serious 
graphing package available for the Atari, B/Graph received rave reviews 
when it was first released by Batteries Included a couple of years ago. 
Anyone interested in putting their Atari to serious use should look out for 
this. Pie graphs, bar charts, line and area graphs each with up to three factors 
and 100 data points and a lot more besides. 



QUi/t* 


‘You find yourself in a smoke filled 
shop. Your task is to rescue as much 
software as possible and start trading 
again in the shortest time possible] 1 . 
That was the real life situation con¬ 
fronting John Spring of The Atari 
Center in Broad Street, Birmingham 
just as we delivered the last issue of 
PAGE 6! The people next door were 
not doing too well so decided to let the 
insurance company provide the 
profits! They were carted off by the 
police but not before a huge pall of 
smoke and soot descended on a lot of 
Atari software. Undaunted, John 
Spring and his st aff set a bou t s trippi ng 
out the shop, re-decorating and re¬ 
stocking, just three days later they 
were back in business. 

The enforced lay-off gave them a 
chance to re-evaluate and John Spring 
now claims that The Atari Center is 
‘stronger than ever 5 and even more 
firmly committed to provide on going 
support for the 8-bit and VCS Ataris, 


PAWN FOR 8-BIT? 



For all those hooked on Mercenary, Novagcn are offering a unique 
enhancement to the game in the form of the Targ Survival Kit, a unique 
package of a poster, fact sheets, a booklet and Mercenary badge. Very nicely- 
produced and costing just £3.95 mail order direct from Novagen. 

Due for imminent release is a second data set for Mercenary entitled THE 
SECOND CITY. Using the load game feature of the original game a whole 
new scenario is presented which the authors claim will provide a really tough 
chal tenge for a 11 thosc who have escaped from Targ. THE SECOND CITY is 
available on cassette at £5.95 or disk at £9,95. 

Mercenary II is scheduled for the end of the year if you are still 
hooked] 


BACK TO TARG? 


The highly praised ST Adventure, 
The Paw n will reportedly be available 
on the 400/800/130XE later this year 
with L no compromises on quality 1 . 
Hard to believe after seeing the ST 
version but if .Magnetic Scrolls pull 
out all the stops for the 8-bit machines 
you could be playing the new definitive 
Adventure by Christmas. 


DIGICOMM MIDI 
SYSTEM 

Fancy a synthesiser? We recently 
received from DigiComm compre¬ 
hensive details of Lheir MIDI music 
system for the 400/800/XL or XE 
computers. Featuring a MIDI inter¬ 
lace and 16 track Recorder software it 
enables you to hook up a synthesiser to 
your Atari and do whatever it is that 
computers and synthesisers do 
together! It is hard to comment on the 
system as four pages of printed infor¬ 
mation don't sound the same as Rick 
Wakeman{]) but if you w r ant more 
details drop a line to DigiComm, 170, 
Brad well Common Boulevard, Milton 
Keynes, Rucks, MK13 8BG. 


PAGE 6 - Issue 22 5 


























Games 


BLOCKBREAKER 


In response to a request from the editor 1 present a joystick version 
of the game Blockbreaker which was published in issue 20♦ As. a 
bonus, or maybe to frustrate those of you who can’t get past level 
2(!), 1 have also included an auto-play modification so you can see 
just how the game should be played, 

THE MISSING HIGH SCORE FEATURE 

Before wc begin, however, a correction.to the original program. 
Blockbreaker was written on a 32k Atari 4U0 and until very recently 
I was unable to test it on the XL or XE. Unless you also use a 32k 
machine you will find that the high score feature is not displayed 
between games. Fortunately the correction is a very simple one. 
Referring to the original listing in Issue 20, line 155 should be 
modified by changing the *120’ in the fourth statement to TMB’ as 
follows. 

TO 155 0=310:00588 30O:A=USRCMC+72ii I POKE 
PH+286j PMB:GOSUB 400+ (PEEK(16801=0) 

PLUG IN THAT JOYSTICK! 

I did not include a joystick routine with the original version 
because 1 felt that the use of a joystick made the game virtually 
unplayable since it lacks the precision of the analogue input which a 
paddle provides. I suppose, to some degree, it will depend on the 
individual's dexterity and reaction time so I've listed the modified 
lines below for you to try for yourself 

Type in the original program from Issue 20, or load it if you have 
already typed it in, and then modify it as follows. 

Change the following lines 

MA 1340 DATA 24,144,26^73,255,201,64,176, 
2,169,64,281,181,144,2,169,181,141,0,2 
88,141,5,6 

EU 1543 FOR 14 = 0 TO 22 : REAP D:PQKE 1716+11, 
D:NEHT N 

YU 1546 DATA ±62,96,169,11,157,66,3,169,0 
,157,72,3,157,73,3,152,32,86,228,32,24 
3,0,96 

HZ 1722 DATA 173,7,6,208,07,173,132,2,208 
,82,160,50,140,1,6,169,128,145,203,141 
,6,6,141,173,6,169,2,141,8,6 

Now add 

OZ 1547 POKE 1737,MCB+2 

5J 1948 DATA 198,7,200,27,173,120,2,201,7 
,2 0 8,3,238,5,6,201,11,208,3,206,5, 6,17 
3,5,6,141,0,208,169,4,133,7, 96 

The 29lh DATA statement in line 1940 controls the sensitivity of 
(he joystick. Change its value (4) to alter the speed of your bat- Since 
it controls the delay loop, increasing its value will slow down the 
bat. 

'Hie code in line 1940 causes the bat to move at a constant speed, I 
have not experimented with an accelerating bat since I felt that this 
would cause further frustrations during play but if anyone wishes to 
dabble with the routine, ensure that your machine code fits into the 
listing between lines 1930 and 1950 and [hat it ends with an R ] S 
(I've used location 7 as the delay variable). 


New Routines 


by Dave Hitchens 

SIT BACK AND WATCH 

If you would like to see (he game demonstrated then make the 
following changes and additions to the original (i.e. paddle) version 
of the game. Now sit hack aid watch Atari do all the work Of course 
you could always plug in a paddle and pretend you arc a real 
champion \ 

Change [he following lines 

AH 1340 DATA 32,243,0,24,144,17,64,176,2, 
169,64,201,181,144,2,169,181,141,0,208 
,141,5,6 

Cft 1722 DATA 173,7,6,208,87,234,234,234,2 
34,234,160,50,140,1,6,169,±28,145,203, 
141,6,6,141,173,6,169,2,141,8,6 

Now add 

SE 1547 POKE 06+246,1160+2 

0H 1940 DATA 173,1,6,201,103,176,15,173,3 
,6,56,233,4,141,0,208,141,5,6,24,144,2 
3 

HZ 1945 DATA 173,18,210,41,7,133,7,173*3, 
6,56,233,2,56,229,7,234,141,0,208,141, 
5,6,96 

Blockbreaker will play forever in this mode (and introduce a 
minor bug at the higher levels!) so you may like to make the Atari a 
bit more 'human' by modifying the above version as follows. 

Change these lines 

FK 1150 POKE 756,CH8iA=U5R(PM+3O0J:FOR N = 
1 TO 2!POKE PM+615+H,248:HEHT W:POKE 7 
04,136:POKE 53256,1 

JM 1945 DATA 173,10,210,41,7,133,7,173,3, 
6,56,233,3,56,229,7,234,141,0,208,141, 
5,6,96 

The Auto routine is again situated between BASIC lines 1930 
and 1950 and machine code freaks will be able to decipher the 
routine given the following information. 

Location 1537 - the ball’s (Player 2) vertical position in the PMG 
table. 

Location 1539 - the ball’s horizontal position. 

Location 1541 - the bars {Player 0) horizontal position (left 
edge). 

Location 7 - the "random’ variable. 

The bat is either 12 or 8 colour clocks wide in the Auto mode. 

So there you have it. Blockbreaker playable with paddles, joystick 
or even a Touch Tablet! If you get hooked on it you may find that you 
want to go and get some paddles after all, especially if you wan t to get 
as good as that Auto mode! • 


6 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 












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7 and ENJOY YOURSELVES ^ 


SOFTWARE 


If it's available, 

we have it it! 

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All latest titles ^ 


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check our prices M 

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Readers write 


Dear I ,es., 

I would like lo thank all of the readers 
who voted for‘FIRST STEP’S*. While it is 
nice to win a prize for all the work put into 
the column, it brings me greater pleasure 
to know that the column is appreciated by 
so many people. I hope that it has helped to 
increase your knowledge and fun when 
using your ATARI computer and I hope to 
continue to help beginners through this 
column for the forsceable future. 

Please remember that I can be contacted 
directly by beginners for answers to any 
questions you may have. The only rule is 
that you enclose an SAP if you want a 
written reply. 

Once again, thank you lor all the voles, 
Mark Hutchinson 


Dear Sir, 

1 recently bought a 1050 disk drive for 
my 800XL. 1 have about 20 pieces of 
software on cassette all of which are 
double loaders. They arc all originals 
which I have bought over the last couple of 
years. Have you a program which would 
translate my tapes to disk? 

B. Hurst, 

Hull 

77? is is representative of about a dozen 
letters received recently and is becoming & 
more common problem as more users up¬ 
grade to a disk drive , The short answer to 
the problem is no. As far as. / can gather 
there are no programs currently available 
which will translate multi-loading tapes to 
disk. It is not that easy to do as each 
program needs to be individually interpreted 
and many cassette programs use the area of 
memory that is used by DOS in a disk based 
system. This means that certain programs 
would have to be disassembled and virtually 
re-written. /I couple of years ago several 
programs were advertised which claimed to 
transfer tape to disk, and indeed a few still 
are, but many of these failed to do what they 
claimed . lam afraid that there is no easy 
answer to this problem. You may just have 
to learn to put up with that long load from 
lime to time. 



Let J s hear from you! 


Other readers want to share 
your views or read about your 
problems. Drop a line to 
READERS WRITE, PAGE 6 , 
RtXBOX 54, STAFFORD, STI6 
IDE, Do it now! 


Dear Les, 

My friend Elizabeth Barlow who is 
Headteacher at the Royal Liverpool 
Children’s Hospital has asked me to appeal 
to all generous Atari owners for software 
for the children at the hospital. The hos¬ 
pital were given a 13GXE by the TV 
program Scramble but they arc having 
difficulty in finding any educational soft¬ 
ware, The children’s ages range between 5 
and 15 and any commercial or BASIC 
programs on disk or tape would be grate* 
fully received. Would any software com¬ 
panies like to donate something? They are 
particiarly interested in LOGO but even 
programs typed in from magazines would 
be helpful. 

Anything your readers or advertisers 
would care to donate would be gratefully 
received. Please ask them to send items 
direct to Miss Elizabeth Barlow, Royal 
Liverpool Children’s Hospital, Hospital 
School, Myrtle Street, Liverpool, L7 7DG. 

Thank you. 

Linda Tinkler, 

Liverpool 


Dear PAGE 6 5 

I am a newcomer to computing and am 
still very much feeling my way. I have 
typed in Train Crazy from Issue 21 but 
have been unsuccessful with lines 40 and 
45. It is very difficult to decipher some of 
the symbols used for example on the 
second line of line 40 is that a small r or a 
CTRL-Q? 

I would also like to comment on the 
timing of the contents of the magazine. As 
the March issue was published laic I was 
unable to get it on the 1st March and so I 
had to collect it on Saturday 8th March, a 
little late for the Exhibition. 1 suspect also 
that the Carols program in Issue 13 was a 
little late for Xmas 1985, 

I am contemplating purchasing a disk 
drive and notice that you do a disk subs¬ 
cription, Can I buy this locally or do I have 
to obtain it direct from yourselves? 

J. Ford, 

Hornchurch 

Firstly let's deal with the."late'publication. 
PAGE 6 has NEVER been published late, 
it is always published on the last Thursday 
of the month proceeding publication date 
which, in theory, gives plenty of time for it to 
reach the shops and subscribers. Unfortun¬ 
ci teiy from then on it is in the ha mis of the 
Post Office. I worth put into print my 
opinion of the Post Office! 

Getting the listings right comes with 
experience but we provide as muck help as 
we can to our readers. A Listing Conventions 
page is published in each issue so th at every 
character in a listing can he compared and. 
of course, we use TYPO 3 for error checking. 
I can 't see any lower case r in the line you 
mention, check each character against the 
table of listing conventions and you will 


soon see what is required. And make sure 
you use TYPO 3! The disks from each issue 
are only available directly from ourselves 
either on subscription or they can be 
purchased indivtduaily. 


Dear IjcS, 

In reply to the letter from R. Holmes in 
Issue 21 regarding connecting his computer 
1.0 the Scart socket of his television, this 
can certainly be done and is relatively 
simple. 

You will require a blank Scart plug, a 5 
pin DIN plug and a length of twin screened 
lead. The connections are as follows (DIN 
to Scart) 

Pin 4 - Composite Video to Fin 20 - C VBS 

Input 

Pin 3 - Audio to Pin 6 - Audio left or Pin 2 - 
Audio Right 

Pin 2 - Ground to Pin 17 - CVBS Earth 

If the TV has stereo capability then 
select mono mode to get the sound to come 
from both channels or strap Pins 2 and 6 
together on the Scart plug. 

The resulting improvement in picture 
quality by using the monitor output of the 
computer through the Scart input on the 
TV is well worth the effort, 

Wilf Harrison, 

Wigan 

Many thanks also to all the many other 
readers who wrote with advice on this. 
Several readers advised that ready made 
leads were available from Silica Shop and 
we received a Tele message from Advance 
Computer dr Software Ltd. to say that they 
can supply a ready made / metre lead for 
£10 fully inclusive with extra length to 
order at £L20 per metre , They will also 
make up any leads to order for connecting 
videos, computers etc. where the TV has a 
Scan connector , Contact them at P.O.Box 
2, Marks Tey, Colchester, Essex, CO6 
IN W 


Dear Sir, 

I recently purchased an 800XL and 
1050 disk drive which came w ith DOS 3 
and Home Filing Manager, As instructed I 
backed up the DOS 3 using the ‘duplicate* 
routine but could not copy the Home 
Filing Manager which kept giving an 
Error 176- Quite by chance I then read the 
April edition of ANTIC magazine which 
had a letter from a reader complaining that 
DOS 3 would not copy certain of his disks. 
In reply the editor said ‘ANTIC has 
consistent recommended readers not to 
use DOS 3. It is incompatible with pract¬ 
ically everything. Trade it in for DOS 
2,5 s . 

Is this problem a common one and if so 
where can 1 purchase a copy of DOS 2.5? 
Will I need to reformat the half a dozen or 


ft PAGE 6 - Issue 22 















so disks that I have formatted with DOS 
3? 

I hope that you can help and that this 
letter may be of service to other readers. 

N.R.Fairclough, 

Kidderminster. 

PAGE 6 fully endorses ANTIC's com¬ 
ments about DOS 3! You should be able to 
get A copy of DOS 2.5 from your local A tari 
dealer. Alternatively send £3.95 to PA GE 
6 and ask for THE XL/XE KIT disk which 
contains a full copy of DOS 2.5 with 
instructions along with several other excel¬ 
lent utilities. 

You will need to con vert all of your files 
from your DOS 3 disks to DOS 2.5 bm 
there is a program with DOS 2,5 to do this 
for you. Once you have copied the programs 
across t your original disks can be re¬ 
formatted ustng DOS 2.5. Even with DOS 
2.5 however you may not be able to copy 
The Home Filing Manager as it is likely that 
Atari have copy-protected the disk as a 
precaution against illegal copying and 
distribution. 


Dear Sir, 

I would like to say something about 
TYPO 3, To my mind there are two great 
disadvantages and for this reason I am 
therefore still faithful to TYPO II. Firstly 
when TYPO 3 is l up and running* pressing 
SYSTEM RESET' erases it from memory. 
Second I y, and more important, to obtain 
the correct code with TYPO 3 one has to 
type in the line exactly as it stands putting 
in all spaces and not using abbreviations. 
This is tedious to say the least. Is there any 
way of rectifying it? 

N.H.Thistleton-Smith 
Dear Sir, 

After reading the letter from A. Joyce in 
the last issue, 1 wish to slate that I prefer 
TYPO II to TYPO 3. If the program is not 
typed in one sitting TYPO II is CSAVEd 
wi th I he program and when i L is CLO ADcd 
next time TYPO II is recalled with GOTO 
32000 and typing can be continued. When 
the typing is finished and CSAVEd with 
IYPO then CLOADed, TYPO can be 
erased by typing END then the program 
checked then CSAVEd without TYPO. 

G.F. Brad well, 

Solihull 

Each to his own l suppose but it seems 
that many readers- do not seem to understand 
how to get the best from TYPO 3. Firstly on 
the question of abbreviations. If you wish to 
abbreviate fine, just USE the fine after you 
have finished typing if, or list a batch of 
lines, place the cursor on each line and then 
hit RETURN. The correct code will be 
shown, SYSTEM RESET does not delete 
TYPO 3 it merely disables it. To get it back 


again just type A=USR(1536). Finally, 
there is no reason why you can’t type a 
listing in several goes, just CLOAD TYPO 
3, R UN it and then CLOAD your listing. 
Save your listing whenever you like and 
bad whenever you like ; just make sure that 
you load and R UN TYPO 3 first. 


Dear PAGE 6, 

Could you please tell me where I could 
obtain the components required to build a 
speech synthesiser as detailed in issue 19? 
Are they obtainable through the post? 

Eamott Roche, 

Ireland 

/ am surprised how many people keep 
asking us questions like this , I thought 
ez*reyone had heard of Maplin Electronics? 
Map fin Electronics address is P. 0. Box 3 + 
Rayleigh, Essex and their phone number is 
0702 55291L They have a comprehensive 
catalogue On sale in W.ld. Smith which gives 
full details of their products which are all 
available by mail order. An alternative 
source is one of the many Tandy shops 
around the country. 


Dear Les, 

Regarding the comments in the intro¬ 
duction to Blockbreakcr in Issue 20 about 
clearing RAM, I thought you might like to 
know of a very easy way for a program to 
clear RAM. In the Blockbreaker program 
change line 10 to line 15 and delete the 
GRAPHICS 17 saiemem and then add the 
foliownng line 


JL in graphics ir:»ttnj-i :dih as cm r as 

<11 =■■*«■ : ro) r“r l ;fl5lZI=fl)tCLR 

The character inside the quotes is 
CTRL-,. In the program this clears approx¬ 
imately 20k of memory in about 0,5 
seconds] 

Fred Ross, 

Ware, Herts 


Dear Les, 

Your readers might be interested to 
know that the standard D type 9 way 
connectors have metal bits on that prevent 
them from fitting Atari joystick ports 
correctly, Tandy do sell replacement cables 
with, slimline 9 way connectors but at a 
price! 

The solution is to use a Moles connector. 
The part numbers needed are Model A- 
7298 Plug (inner) order code 15-24-4025, 
Model A-7298-2A (top backs hell) order 
code 15-24-4026 and Model A-7293-2B 
(lower backs hell) order code 15-24-4027. 
You will also need the metal pins but I am 


afraid I don’t have the details of these at 
present. Molex can be contacted at Molex 
Electronics Ltd. F am ham Road, Rordon, 
Hants, Cxi 135 GNU. Telephone 04203 
7070. 

John J. Smith, 

Merseyside 


Dear Sir, 

I am a new subscriber to your excellent 
magazine which I have already found to be 
superior to many others, TYPO 3 is a 
godsend for correcting programs such as 
Colour Palette from Issue 20. Even so, it 
took my wife and I several evenings to spot 
the error. Other readers may like to note 
that in line 1160, just before the reversed 
capital F there appears to be a space. In 
fact this is a CONTROL-B. This makes all 
the difference! 

I was disapponted not to find Atari Art 
and ST Gallery in I ssue 21, Please consider 
this as a regular feature as l am sure that 
many readers would welcome this along 
with captions stating w r hich programs and 
hardware were used for the creations. 

Brian Perries 
Dundee 

Thanks also to Cliff Winship for this tip 
on Colour Palette. That one foxed a lot of 
people' This gives an opportunity for some 
tips on solving some qfth ese problems. If you 
take a look at lines 1160 and 1170 in 
Colour Palette you will see setter al Inverse 
capital letters. Find those with spaces to the 
left of them and you will see that the left side 
of the Capital is very * think. Now compare 
the Capital F on the second line of 1160. h 
doesn't look the same does it? The ‘space’ to 
the left of this cannot therefore be a space. 
Check the listing conventions on page 12 
and the only thing it is likely to be is a 
CTRL-8 Replace the space with CTRE E 
and you will find that TYPO pops up with 
Cl instead of CO , Solved? When you get 
problems with other listings, that’s how 
closely you have to check them! 

We would love to feature Atari Art in 
every issue but it is expensive to print colour 
features so they will at present appear only 
once in a while, besides which nobody has 
sent us any good pictures lately! 


Dear Les, 

Here's a quick tip for readers who have 
gone over to DOS 2.5 from DOS 3, If you 
are using an 850 interface make sure that 
you have all the files from DOS 2.5 on your 
master disk. It was not until I got a full 
DOS 2.5 disk that I found that the SETUP. 
COM file enabled an AUTORUN SYS to 
be created which will bool the interface. 
DOS 3 used to do it automatically. 

MJ.Orme, 

Burton-On-Treni 


PAGE t> - Issue 22 9 






Error codes from 128 onwards are not specific to any 
one language, since they are codes generated by the 
Operating System (O.S.) following an input/output (I/O) 
operation. To fully understand these codes, a working 
knowledge of the I/O subsystem is necessary, lliere is 
insufficient space in an article intended to be a reference 
guide to go into this in detail, but further information can 
be obtained from the sources listed at the beginning of 
part 1 of this article. I have however found it necessary to 
review certain aspects of the I/O system when discussing 
the various error codes and I hope that more experienced 
programmers will forgive any generalisations I have made 
in the interests of clarity and simplicity. 

Beginners should remember that most of the work in 
setting up IOCBs and calling the OS is done for you by 
BASIC/ Many of these errors will not be seen until you try 
to access peripherals directly by using BASIC's file 
handling commands (OPEN, CLOSE, PUT, GET, XIO, 
etc.), or by setting up the 10CB and calling the operating 
system routines directly. 

Error-128 BREAK abort 

If you press the BREAK key during an I/O procedure, 
the operation is aborted and this status code returned. 
Therefore, never press BREAK during I/O unless you 
mean to stop the operation. 


If you are still tearing your hair out because that error 
was not covered in the first part of Steve Pedlers article, 
fear not, the concluding part of this article brings you all the 
other error codes you are likely to encounter on your Atari 

A Guide to Atari 
Error Codes 

Pt.2 

by Steve Pedler 


Error-129 IOCB already open* 

See error 134 lor a brief explanation of the IOCBs, Any 
given IOCB can only be open for one purpose at any lime. 
If you try to open an IOCB that is already in use, this 
error code is returned, even if the second operation is 
identical to the first Always CLOSE an IOCB before 
using it again. (Note that trying to CLOSE an already 
closed IOCB does not generate an error.) 

Error-130 Nonexistent device* 

After setting up an IOCB (see error 134) the Central 
Input/Output utility (ClG)determmes from the data in the 
IOCB the nature ofthe device you wish to use. It then 
looks up the address of the device handler (the software 
which actually performs the operation) in an area of RAM 
called the Handler Table (38 bytes starling at location 
794). Each entry in the table consists of three bytes {two 
additional bytes are unused), the identifier code for the 
device concerned (C for cassette, E for screen editor etc.) 
plus the address in low and high byte format of the 
handler software. 

On powerup five handlers (the "resident’ handlers) are 
specified in the table (Cassette, Editor, Screen, Keyboard 
and Printer). These handlers are located in the OS ROM* 
Others (the non-resident handlers) are cither booted in 
(such as Disk or RS232-C handlers) or can be added later. 
CIO searches the table for the appropriate device, but if 
the handler is not present in the table error 130 is 


10 PAGE* Issue 22 










returned. To see this* try the following. POKE 797>65 will 
replace the identifier for the cassette handler with the 
ATASCII value for the letter A, Now try a CLOAD, Error 
130 will be displayed as CTO thinks the cassette handler is 
not present in memory. 

Error-131 IOCB write only. 

Before you can do anything with a peripheral* you must 
first OPEN a channel (IOCB) to it. The OPEN command 
will specify whether data is to be read from or sent to the 
device. (This is of course done automatically with certain 
BASIC commands such as SAVE, LOAD, LPRTNT etc.) 

If you OPEN a device to send data to it and then try to 
read data from it, this error results. You will then have to 
CLOSE the channel, and reOPLN it for read or read/ 
write (update). 

Error-13 2 Invalid command. 

On setting up an IOCB, one of the necessary pieces of 
information you must supply is a command code which 
indicates the type of action you w ish CIO to take. All 
peripherals share a scries of common codes for open, close, 
put/get bytes, etc. (although not all functions are available 
for each device - see error 146), In addition, there are a 
number of‘special* codes which are specific to certain 
devices, such as the disk drive and screen handler. Error 
132 occurs when either the common code is incorrect, or 
you have issued a ‘special* command to a device which 
doesn't have any special commands. 

If this error occurs from BASIC, you should check the 
command POKEd into the IOCB, or the XIO command 
number (the number immediately following the XIO 
statement). 

Error-133 Device or file not open. 

'This error occurs when trying to access a file or device 
that has not been OPENed* A common cause of this is a 
mistake in your file specification, either on OPEN or when 
trying to access the device. 

Error-134 Bad IOCB number. 

The Atari maintains a series of eight Input/Output 
Control Blocks (lOCBs) in RAM, commencing at location 
832, Each IOCB (numbered from 0 to 7) is 16 bytes long, 
and into this area is placed the information needed by the 
O S. to perform the required action. This includes a 
command code indicating the operation that is required, 
the source or destination of the data to be transferred, how 
much data to transfer, and any information that may be 
specific to the device concerned. BASIC sets up an IOCB 
automatically when performing I/O operations* but you 
can also set them up yourself from BASIC or assembly 
language. Once the IOCB is ready, a single machine 
language call to the Central Input/Output Utility (CIO) 
will pass control to the O.S. for the procedure to be 
carried out. CIO wifi in turn call the specific device 
handler. If the I/O procedure uses the serial bus (cassette, 
printer, etc.) the handler will set up another area of RAM 
called the Device Control Block (DCB) and will then call 


the Serial Input/Output Utility (SIO) to do the actual data 
transfer. 

When performing I/O operations therefore you must 
specify the IOCB to be used, BASIC always uses IOCB 6 
for the screen handler, IOCB 0 for the screen editor and 
IOCB 7 for LPRINT. When using OPEN, CLOSE, PUT, 
GET etc. you specify the IOCB in the number 
immediately following the command (e.g. OPEN #1, 
CLOSE #4). With XIO, the first number is the command, 
the second is the IOCB to be used (e.g, XIO 18 #6), 

Since BASIC res eves IOCB 0 for the screen editor, you 
cannot use this from a BASIC program* error 20 (not 
error 134) occurs if you try . You can however use IOCB 0 
from machine code. 

In assembly language, the IOCB number is placed in 
the X-register for use as an index. Because each IOCB Is 
16 bytes long, the IOCB number must be an exact 
multiple of 16 (including 0) and not be greater than 128. If 
this is not adhered to, the TOCB number is w r rong and 
error 134 is the result 

ErrorT35 IOCB read only error. 

This is the exact opposite of error 131. It means that 
you have attempted to read from a device opened only for 
write. You will have to CLOSE the device and re OPEN it 
for read or read/write (update). 

Error-136 End of file* 

Not so much an error as a status code indicating that 
when reading data from a device you have come to the end 
of the file. 

It can be useful to check for this code when you don't 
know precisely how much data is present in the input file. 
You could then instruct CIO to read a block of data you 
know is larger than is actually present in the file and check 
for this error code (using TRAP in BASIC to prevent the 
program from stopping). The actual amount of data 
transferred is recorded in the ninth and tenth bytes of the 
IOCB used (see Mapping the Atari pp. 82-89). 

Error-137 Truncated record. 

The Atari O.S. supports tw r o main types of I/O 
procedure - byte oriented and record oriented. 

With byte oriented transfer* you simply specify the 
memory location where the data to be transferred is 
located (output) or where it is to be stored (input), and the 
number of bytes to be transferred. The operation 
continues until the specified number of bytes is moved, or 
the end of the file is reached, regardless of the nature of 
the data. If you are inputting data and you have not 
reserved a large enough area (buffer) of RAM for the 
incoming data, then data input is not halted - it just 
overwrites whatever follows the buffer (program lines* 
screen memory etc.). 

In record oriented transfer, input or output only 
continues until an ATASCII end-ofrline (EOL) character 
is reached. If on input your allocated buffer size is 
exceeded before an EOL is reached, then only part of the 
data is input and this error is returned, indicating that the 
record is truncated. continued overleaf 


PAGE 6-Issue 22 11 


'iTie BASIC command for record oriented input is 
INPUT. When using this command, BASIC allocates a 
maximum buffer of 119 bytes (according to the DOS 3 
reference manual). If you use INPUT to read a file created 
using byte oriented transfer (PUT in BASIC) you may run 
into this error. 

Error-138 Device timeout 

This is an error generated by SIO following I O which 
uses the serial bus (e.g. printer, disk, cassette). For each 
device the device handler sets a finite amount of time by 
which the device must respond to the command sent - the 
device ‘timeout*. * Intelligent’ peripherals such as the 
printer or disk drive can actively acknowledge the 
command and so the timeout value is short. If this error 
occurs with these devices the usual cause is that the device 
is not connected or switched on, or the printer is not 
switched to on-line. 

Unfortunately, the cassette recorder is not an 
Intelligent 1 device and cannot respond in this way. If you 
try to output to the cassette and it is not connected, or 
Play and Record have not been depressed, then the Atari 
has no way of knowing this and continues to send data 
regardless until it is all sent- This is the reason for the 
audio prompts when using the cassette recorder. When 
inputting from cassette, the Atari waits until the recorder 
starts to send data. If it does not do so within the timeout 
period (about 37 seconds according to Mapping the Atari) 
then this error is generated and the cassette motor is 
stopped. Potential causes for this (other than the obvious 
ones) include excessively long tape leaders or incorrect 
measurement of the baud rate (sometimes seen when 
trying to load progams recorded on another recorder to 
your own). If this persists in happening with programs 
recorded on your own system, then have your recorder 
checked. 

Error-139 Device NAK. 

There arc a number of possible causes of this error 
which is, to a certain extent, dependent on the device. One 
possibility is that an illegal command was sent to the 
device such as trying to access a bad disk sector or one not 
present on the disk (e*g. a sector number greater than 720 
on a single density disk). Check the syntax of the 
command passed to the device. 

This error may also occur during the use of the 850 
interface module, see the 850 Manual for further details. 
The error may be returned when using the printer if the 
printer is not switched to on-line. 

Error-140 Serial bus error. 

The ROM location 53775 (SKSTAT - D20F hex) holds 
the current status of the serial I/O port and keyboard. If 
bit 7 of this register is set it means that data received ifom 
the peripheral has become scrambled, e.g. data bits are 
missing or unwanted ones added. 'ITiis error is then 
returned to the user. 

According to the DOS 3 reference manual, this is a rare 
error. I have only seen it once, when first adding a printer 
to my system, and it occurred due to a bad cable 


connection at the printer end. If this error persists, then 
Atari suggest having the offending peripheral or computer 
checked. 

Error-141 Cursor out of range* 

Each graphics mode has its own particular resolution 
(the number of points which can be plotted on the screen). 
You must stay within the limits of resolution for the mode 
you are using, and if you exceed the limits for that mode 
then error 141 is the result. 

If this seems an unusual error to find amongst the I/O 
error codes, remember that the Atari treats the screen and 
keyboard just as any other peripheral. PRINT and PLOT 
operations are considered to be I/O procedures, and when 
you change graphics modes you are in fact OPENing a 
channel to the screen handler, 

Error-142 Serial bus data frame overrun. 

The Atari serial port receives data one byte at a time, 
with the eight bits of that byte arriving one after the other 
(Lc. in serial fashion rather than parallel tashion, when all 
eight bits arrive together). The incoming byte must be 
processed before the next can be dealt with, but the 
peripheral doesn’t wait for the computer - it sends the next 
byte regardless. If the next byte arrives while the computer 
is still processing the first, then the data is said to have 
‘overrun 1 , and error 142 results. 

Note that SKSTAT (see error 140 above) contains the 
serial port status, and if data overrun occurs then bit 6 is 
set, not bit 5 as stated in the DOS 3 reference manual (see 
the hardware manual p. 10.18), Once again. Atari suggest 
that if this error occurs more than once the computer 
should be checked, 

Error-143 Serial bus data frame checksum 
error. 

When data is sent to the computer from the peripheral, 
a checksum byte is also sent at the end of each block of 
data. This is a single byte consisting of the sum of all the 
other bytes in the data frame. On receipt of the data SIO 
calculates its own checksum and compares it with that 
sent by the peripheral. This procedure is intended as a 
check of the accuracy of the data being sent compared 
with when it w as recorded. If the checksums don’t match 
then this error is returned. 

There are a number of potential causes. The initial 
recording of the data may have been faulty due to a 
defective disk or cassette, or the peripheral itself or the I/O 
connections may be faulty. This error is usually seen with 
the cassette recorder due to the inherently unreliable 
nature of cassette storage. If it persists with data recorded 
and played back on your own system, then have the 
recorder and/or computer checked. 

Error-144 Device done error. 

This error occurs when you have issued a valid 
command to the peripheral but the device is unable to 
carry it out. for example, you may have tried to write to a 
disk that is write-protected, or there may be no disk at all 


12 PAGi': 6 - Issue 22 










in the drive. *Your Atari Computer’ implies that this error 
might also occur if the disk directory was damaged in 
some way. 

The cause of the error depends on the device, so check 
the command given and whether the device is prevented in 
some way from executing it. 

Error-145 Read after write compare error or 
bad screen mode. 

This error has two potential meanings. When the disk 
handler writes a file to the disk, it reads the FiJe after 
writing it as a check of the accuracy of the recording. If 
there is a difference between the file as written and what 
should have been written this error is returned. Possible 
causes would include a detective disk or faulty drive, 
although write errors do occur on occasion for no apparent 
reason. Try resa ving the file onto another disk to see if the 
error recurs. 

The second cause of this error is if you try to choose a 
graphics mode not implemented in your computer. For 
example, the original 400/800 machines have no graphics 
modes from 12 to 15. Selecting one of these modes on a 
400/800 will result in error 145. 

Erroi^l46 Function not implemented. 

As indicated in the explanation of error 132, all device 
handlers share common command codes for a series of 
operations. These include the commands to OPEN, 
CLOSE, get STATUS, PUT/GET RECORD, and PUT/ 
GET BYTE, Clearly, not all of these operations are 
possible with all peripherals, so that (for example) you 
cannot send data to the keyboard or get data from the 
printer. Attempting to do one of"these impossible 
operations will generate error 146. 

Error-147 Insufficient RAM. 

This error code is very similar to BASIC’s error 2 (see 
this error for a brief explanation of how the Atari keeps 
track of memory usage). Whenever you change graphics 
modes, the value in MEMTOP (741,742) is changed 
accordingly, being either increased or decreased depending 
on the memory requirements of the mode selected. If the 
change of mode would lower the value in MEMTOP so 
much that it would be lower than that in APPMH1 (14,15) 
then the screen is returned to graphics 0 and error 147 is 
returned. 

This error is not likely to occur in machines of 48K or 
more, but certainly could occur in 16K machines with a 
large program using high resolution modes such as 
graphics 8-11 and 15. There is only one solution - add 
more memory. 

•f 

Errors 150-154 arc devoted to the use of the 
RS232-C serial ports. 1 have not included explanations 
for these errors here (mainly because I don’t fully 
understand them) but also because anyone using these 
ports would presumably have access to the 850 Interface 
Manual or equivalent. These error codes are hilly 
documented in that manual, to which reference should be 
made. 


Errors 160 Drive number error. 

You can attach up to four disk drives (numbered 1 to 4) 
to your Atari, but with standard DOS 2.5 the delimit 
number that can be hooked up is two. This is because each 
drive in the system needs a 128-byte buffer reserved for it. 
Since the majority of users are unlikely to want (or need) 
more than two drives, the default is two to conserve 
memory. With standard DOS 2,5 then, attempting to 
access a disk file with a drive number that is neither 1 nor 
2 will result in error 160, If you wish to connect up more 
drives, a simple modification to your DOS will be needed. 

Under certain circumstances however, you can use drive 
numbers between 1 and 8 without error. For example, if 
you own a 130XE, you can use the RAMDISK utility of 
DOS 2,5 to set up the extra 64K of R AM for use as a 
virtual disk drive, in which case the t drive + takes on the 
number 8, The point at which this error is generated 
therefore, will to a certain extent depend on your system; 
however, the drive numbers must always be in the range 1 
to 8. 

Error-161 Too many OPEN files. 

DOS 2,5 allows you to have a maximum of three open 
disk Hies at any one time (although you can have files 
open to other devices as well). This is because each open 
file has a 128-byte buffer associated with it, and DOS 2.5 
only provides for three such system buffers. I am not sure 
whether it is possible to modify DOS to allow more open 
files than this. If this error occurs, you should cheek for 
the presence of any file(s) opened unnecessarily, and close 
them to free them for further use. 

Error-162 Disk full. 

This means that there is no further free space on the 
disk for saving programs or data. If this occurs and you 
don’t have another formatted disk with enough free space 
available, the only way out is to use the cassette recorder 
to save your program, format a new disk, then reload the 
program and put it onto the empty disk. Moral: always 
have a ready formatted spare disk or two to hand. 

Error-163 Unrecoverable system data I/O 
error. 

This error appears to act as a catch-all for any I/O error 
not covered by the other I/O error codes, and for which 
the cause cannot be determined. It appears to be a very 
rare error. Suggested causes are malfunctioning 
equipment, corrupted DOS, and damaged disks (though 
there are presumably others). 

Error-164 File number mismatch. 

There are two possible causes of this error. The first 
relates to the use of the POINT statement. Having 
OPE Ned a disk file, you can refer to any byte within that 
file by moving an internal pointer with the POINT 

command. To do this you must specify: the channel 

continued overleaf 

PAG E 6 - Issue 22 ll 


number on which the file is open, the sector number and 
the byte number within that sector. If the sector specified 
by you does not form part of the OPEN file, this error is 
returned to you. POINT can also generate other errors - 
see errors 166 and 171, 

The second cause of this error will hopefully never be 
seen with today’s reliable disk drives. Disk files are stored 
on the disk as sectors of data, each sector holding 128 
bytes. Of these, only 125 bytes are program data, the other 
three hold information needed by the disk drive. This 
includes the file number as present in the directory, and 
the number of the sector holding the nest part of the file 
(Le. the nest sector to be read or written to). When 
moving to the nest sector, the drive checks that the sector 
does indeed belong to the correct file. If the file number 
does not match, then error 164 is returned- This shouldn’t 
be seen with present, day drives, but was apparently a 
fairly common problem with the early 810s. II it occurs 
and you haven't been tampering with the disk structure, 
your drive may need servicing, 

Error-165 File name error. 

The Atari only allows the use of the letters A-Z 
(uppercase) and numbers 0-9 in disk filenames, plus the 
wildcard characters *** and ?\ Any other character in a 
filename will cause this error. 

Although the wildcard characters are legal, they are not 
so when creating a file, only when reading from an already 
existing one. The reason is fairly obvious, you shouldn’ t 
create ambiguous file names, and attempting to do so will 
return this error. 

Error-166 Point data length error. 

See error 164 for a description of the POINT statement. 
When using POINT, you must specify the byte number 
within the indicated sector. This number must be in the 
range 0-125 inclusive. If it is not, then this error is the 
result. See also errors 164 and 171. 

Error-167 File locked. 

Once a disk file is locked, the only thing you can do 
with it is read it. You cannot write to it in any way, delete 
it or change its name. Trying to to do any of these things 
to a locked file generates error 167, You will have to 
unlock the file using DOS 2.5 option G or X1Q 56 from 
PASIG 

Error-168 Command invalid. 

Take a look first at error 132, What is the difference, 
you might ask, between these two errors? Certain device 
handlers, notably the disk drive, RS232-C and screen 
support 'special’ command codes in addition to the 
common codes used by all devices. These are device- 
specific commands, and for the screen handler are draw 
and fill. The disk handler has seven special commands; 
rename, delete, lock, unlock, point, note and format. Error 
132 will occur if you issue a special command to a device 
whch doesn’t have any special commands associated with 
it. Error 168 occurs if the device concerned does have 


special command codes, but the code you used is not 
recognised by the handler. You should check the command 
issued to the device (e.g. via a XIO statement). 

Error-169 Directory full. 

The 810 and 1050 disk drives from Atari only allocate 8 
sectors on the disk for the directory. These 8 sectors allow 
you to make a total of 64 directory entries (Le. 64 separate 
files on the disk). In practice, this should be enough for 
anything, and you are much more likely to fill the rest of 
the disk before you exceed this limit. If you do exceed it, 
error 169 is generated and you will have to use another 
disk. 

Error-170 File not found. 

The file name you use lor any operation must match 
exactly one of the file names on the disk. Even if it differs 
by only one character, if it doesn't match an entry in the 
directory the disk handler will be unable to find the file 
and will return this error. The usual cause is inserting the 
wrong disk in the drive or a typing error when entering 
the file name. 

Error-171 Point invalid, 

'The next step after a POINT (see errors 164 and 166 for 
further details) is usually to read (using INPUT or GET) 
the byte pointed to, or write to it using PRINT or PUT, It 
is clearly not possible to read past the end of the file, and 
attempting to do so w ill cause error 136 (end of file). 

(There is a mistake in the first edition of Your Atari 
Computer p. 262, where attempting to read past the end of" 
the file is given as error 170.) It is quite undesirable to 
write past the end of the file, since you might overwrite 
part of another file. If you try to do this, then error 171 is 
returned. 

Users of DOS 3 should be aware that NOTE and 
POINT are treated differently by this version of DOS, 
since they return a pointer offset from the start of the file 
rather than an absolute location in terms of sector and 
byte numbers. The meaning of the error codes related to 
POINT is however the same. 

CONCLUSION 

There are in addition to the errors listed so far six errors 
identified in the DOS 3 Manual but not in earlier Atari 
publications. 1 presume that these are errors specific to 
DOS 3. I do not intend to deal further with these error 
codes since Atari owners should no longer be using this 
version of DOS,in any case, they are fully documented m 
the above manual, 

I hope you have found this guide useful in interpreting 
the sometimes obscure error codes produced by the Atari 
computers. I would be very interested to hear any 
comments, further information of corrections (I hope 
there won’t be too many of those!) that you may have. 
Further information on the inner workings of the Atari 
resulting in these codes can be obtained from the sources 
listed at the start of this article, # 


14 PAGE 6-Issue 22 











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fractals 


Fractals i -&ems to he the subject that the whole computer world is 
talking about at ihe moment and this article by Peter Coates provides 
you with the background to the fascinating world of fractals and gives 
hints on how you may write your own fractal generating program on 
the Atari 

Readers of Page 6 may have come across graphical representations 
of fractals in a variety of forms - the art ill cal landscapes generated in 
some games programs, trees used as examples of recursion, and the 
colourful and complex patterns employed to demonstrate the 
graphics capabilities of modern micros. In this article J will be 
concerned with the last group, as these have the greatest variety of 
complex and attractive patterns. They arc usually associated with 
the name of Benoit Mandelbrot, who did much to publicise them. 
For some outstanding examples of fractals, the reader is advised to 
beg, borrow or steal (not really!) a copy of his book s Frontiers of 
Chaos'- l will also show you how to program your computer to 
generate these patterns. 

It 18 not generally realised that fractals arose from a branch of 
abstract mathematics which studies the chaotic behaviour of some 
functions. By this I mean that the value of one ofthese functions will 
change dramatically for quite small shifts in the value of one of the 
variables. This behaviour is quite different from that of the classical 
functions of mathematics, whose values in general change smooth ly 
and continuously- A geometrical example of a fractal often quoted is 
the coastline of an island. If asked to determine its length, we might 
take a map of the island and measure the length of the perimeter. If 
we found a map on a larger scale and repeated the exercise, we would 
obtain a greater value, because small inlets and corrugations not 
present on the first map have to be taken into account. As the scale is 
magnified, the length continues to increase, and eventually we have 
to add in the contributions from rocks, pebbles and even grains of 
sand. Moreover, as we do this, we would notice an interesting fact; 
whatever the level of magnification, the sections of coastline being 
measured have similar shapes, with unresolved detail waiting to be 
exposed* 



by Peter Coates 

A coastline is a simple example of a fractal, bin it illustrates the 
point that forms in nature arc often much more complex than the 
simple shapes of classical geometry. However, even the complex 
fractals of Mandelbrot may be generated with a relatively simple 
computer program, and 1 will now describe how to do this* It should 
be emphasized that the technique given is only one example, and 
that there is plenty of scope for experimentation with other 
Functions and methods. 

We consider the effect of a simple process applied repeatedly to a 
complex number which initially represents the position of a pixel 
(L.c. a picture dement) on the screen* A complex number / i$ given 
by 

i — x + i*y 

where x and y are the horizontal and vertical coordinates of the 
point, and i is the square root of-1. If you are not addicted to complex 
numbers, don’t worry, as the ca leu I a lions will a II be give n s n terms of 
the real numbers x and y* The process we shall use here is given 
mathematically by 

z(k-rl) - z(k) 3 + c 
where c is a complex constant 

c = p + i*q 

In words, this equation says that we form the next (k + I )th term 
in the sequence from the preceding one by squaring it and adding the 
constant c. What is likely to happen? Clearly, if both z and c are 
small, successive terms will quickly become very small. Equally, if z 
and c are large, then the terms will increase very rapidly. In the 
regions between, the terms may wander around for some time before 
deciding whether to become small or go off to infinity. The 
magnitude m of a complex number, by the way, represents its 
distance from the origin and is given by 

nri = x 2 + y 2 

To generate a fractal pattern, therefore, we count the number of 
times that the process must be applied to the initial value before m 2 
for the term z(k+1) exceeds a specified value L. As it may be shown 
that, once m has exceeded 2, the magnitude increases rapidly, 
convenient values for L lie between 10 and 100. Also, as some points 
stay small in magnitude and will never exceed the limit, and wc don’t 
want to spend for ever looking at them, we terminate the process 
after a given number of repetitions, k. The number of repetitions 
counted, k, can the retort take values for each point from 1 to the 
upper limit k. To colour the pattern, we relate k to one of the 
available colours on our output device with what we may call a 
colouring rule. For example, we might colour values of 1 to 10 as 
blue, 11 to 20 as orange, and so on. The rule is quite arbitrary, and 


16 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 








may be varied to improve the appearance of the fractal obtained. 
Although the more attractive patterns are obtained with high 
resolution graphics with many colours, such as may be achieved 
with the new Atari ST machines, I hope the examples provided with 
this article, produced on my old 800, show that interesting patterns 
may be generated in black and white. I output the patterns directly 
to my Kaga NLQ printer to achieve higher resolution than that 
available on the screen. 

At this point, I shall complicate the issue a little (or even further, I 
hear you say!) by pointing out that two types of fractals may be 
generated with the procedure described. The Mandelbrot set is 
obtained by setting the first term of the sequence equal to zero, and 
relating the constant c to the point being coloured by 


However, the Julia set possesses a degree of symmetry which 1 find 
attractive, and requires lower numerical resolution. All the examples 
shown come from the Julia set and were plotted using a FORTH 
program with 16-bit fixed point arithmetic, which is considerably 
faster than Atari BASIC, 

The first printout shows the whole of the Mandelbrot set, with a 
horizontal range for -1,7 to 0.5, and -1.1 to +1.1 vertically. The 
colouring rule was very simple; values of k below 12, on the outside 
of the figure, and equal to the maximum, 200, around the centre, 
were left blank, while all points with k between 12 and 199 were 
printed black. The most interesting behaviour ofboth the Mandelbrot 
and Julia sets is found in and around the black area. 


p = x ; q = y 

The Julia set, on the other hand, is obtained by setting the initial 
value 

z(Q) = x + i*y 

and assigning c a value which is fixed for the w r hole pattern. The 
differences between the two in practice are that in the Mandelbrot 
set we may change not only the position but the magnification, and 
this gives a very great variety of complex patterns, while the Julia 
patterns, on the other hand, are plotted over the whole of the range of 
interest, i.e, x, y = -1.5 to +1.5, and only the value e is changed. 


So let’s look at the programs required to generate fractals, As the 
systems available to Atari users will vary, I haven't tried to present a 
complete program, but with the comments provided it shouldn’t be 
difficult to modify these notes to produce a program for your 
computer. 

1) Initial values: ENTER N, M, X0, YO, D 
The plotting area is assumed to contain N pixels horizontally and M 
vertically. XQ and Y0 arc the coordinates of the bottom left-hand 
comer, and D is the interval between pixels in mathematical units. 1 
prefer to keep the spacing constant in both directions, but you can 
change to different values DX and DY if you wish, It follows that the 

continued overleaf 


PAGE 6 * Issue 22 17 











Oriental Design 



Christmas Decorations 



upper values of x and y are 

XM - XO + (N - Jl)*D 

YM = YO + (M - 1)*D 

and these can alternatively be entered and D calculated from 
them. 

2) Other values; ENTER P,Q 

For the Julia set only, we enter the values Tor the complex constant c. 
For all patterns, we set the value K for the maximum number of 
iterations (50 - 1000), and for the maximum amplitude L (10 - 
100), 

3) For each pixel e.g, 

FOR I = 0 TO M - 1 
FOR J — 0 TO N - 1 


Set the loop counter, which gives the value of k, to zero 
COUNTER = 0 

Now set the initial values for z(Q) and l\ 

For the Mandelbrot set; 

XK = 0, YK = 0 
P = X0 + J*l> 

Q = Y0 + I*D 

For the Julia set: 

XK= X0 + J*D 
YK — Y0 + I*D 
(P and Q already set) 

Start the iteration and calculate the next values 

START: XL “ XK J - YK J + P 
YL = 2*XK*YK + Q 

Increment the counter and reset the X, Y values for the next 
stage 

COUNTER - COUNTER + 1 
XK = XL : YK = YL 

Loop back if the magnitude of the new value is less than L, and the 
maximum number of iterations has not been reached 

IF XK 2 + YK Z < L AND COUNTER < K THEN 
GOTO START 

4) Colour pixel (IJ) according to the value of the COUNTER and 
the colouring rule, usually written as a set of IE THEN 
statements. Then move on to the next pixel 

NEXT f:NEXT I 
END 

Be warned that fractals take an enormous amount of computing 
time; s Sea Creatures’ took almost six days to produce, even with the 
faster FORTH programming So it is a good idea to run the program 
first with low resolution (N and M), to see whether it looks 
interesting, and to improve the resolution when you have the 
parameters and the colouring right. It is possible to store the values 
of k for smaller patterns, and to study the effects of dillereni 
colouring rules, but for large patterns the storage required, one byte 
per pixel, becomes excessive. 


IS PAGE 6- Issue 22 






















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Additional software 



HABASPELL 


EI1HABAWR1TER 


Habaspell is a GEM based easy-to-jearn spelling checker, 
Displaying the document or only the errors, Habaspell 
works with Habawriter or other Atari ST word processor 
generated documents. It will check selected pages or a 
whole document. 

It comes with a 20,000 word English dictionary but you 
can create your own for specie purposes, including 
accented characters. You can add or delete words or add 
complete documents to your dictionaries. 

You can replace or ignore mispelled words at your choice 
and look for words in the dictionary window. The 
dictionary can also be printed out for reference. 

£ p.o.a 


The powerful GEM based 
word processor. 

^ Full use of mouse and 
pull down menus, 
multiple windows and 
HELP facility. 

£59.95 


HABAVIEW 


H aba view is a flexible 
memory held database. 
Being GEM based, it is 
intuitive in use and offers 
total freedom of design, 
both at initial set up and 
tor subsequent changes. 


HABACOMM 


Habaeomm is a flexible GEM based asynchronous 
common cations package that Sets you use the ST as any 
one of the following termina types: 

VT100. VT52. CRT, ANSI 520ST, 'Teletype: 

Habacornm is easily configurable to use features including: 
50-19200 bps, 7/8 bit char., E/O/lMo Parity, F/H duplex: 
CTS/RTS or Xon/Xotf control: Varied printing facilities; 
Protocols: Kermit. Xmodem, CIS'B'. ABTF, Sendtext: 
Character filtering available: 

In addition to the above, the package offers user definable 
automatic log on sequences, automatic redial sequences 
for your autodial modem and macro transmission facilities 
to save you retyping often used phrases. f 


HABADISK 

(10 mbyte) 

A 10 megabyte 
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Stores the equiva ent of 
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800k diskettes. 


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hese and other Haba products are available 
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Tel, 01-751 6451 
Tlx. 265871 MQMREFG [WJJ 175) 


Atan 5205T is a trade mark of Atari Corporation. GEM is a trade mark of Digital Research Incorporated 




































































































































































ATARI ST 



REUIEUI 


Magnetic Scrolls, whose first Adventure l"he Fawn set a new 
standard for Adventures on the ST } have reached a distribution 
agreement with British Telecom's Kainblrd Software and 
promise to follow up The Pawn with six new products commenc¬ 
ing with The Guild of Thieves this autumn. ST owning Adventure 
addicts are in for a good time as Rainbird will also be releasing 
titles for Level 9, commencing with a trilogy comprising of a re¬ 
written set of Colossal Adventure, Dungeon Adventure and 
Adventure Quest. Improvements will include the addition of 
graphics and the implementation of Level 9's latest parser. Other 
similar releases are planned for later in the year and Level 9 will 
continue to release other adventures on their own label. 


TIME BANDIT 

Microdeal 

£29.95 

Requires Colour monitor 



Metacomco have re-launched their ST products with upgraded 
versions of Lattice C, Pascal and Assembler which will include a 
new G EM based command shell called Menu+ which is available 
in its own right. Menu f allows programmers to use pull down 
menus and the mouse to control programs without complicated 
command lines and allows single programs or batches to be run. 
Price is just £19.95. 

Hippo Software of California continue to bring forth a multitude 
of software and peripherals for the ST all of which arc mentioned 
in an excellent newsletter released to the trade called HippoNews, 
Hippo have a Black and White digitiser priced at $139,95 with a 
colour version planned. For the same price you can have an 
HPRQM burner or for a little extra you can have a computer 
controlled robot New software includes HippoGoncept, an 'idea 
processor 1 that allows you to organise your thinking and updated 
versions are available for earlier Hippo software. Altogether 
Hippo have 14 software products and 6 pieces of hardware for the 
ST. Availability in the LHC is not known at present but if you 
contact any of the ST advertisers in this issue they may be able to 
let you know. 

Snippets from Atari include ... a PC/MS DOS emulator as an 
add on cartridge for the52DST, 10 i 4QSTand2G8QST(!) and a BBC 
emulator which is claimed to run BBC software as fast as the BBC 
mac hine. Wha t with t h e famed Maci n tosh emulator developed by 
a third party it looks like the ST is the machine to buy if you can T t 
make up your mind! 

Mirrorsoft have announced ST AR T a new painting package 
developed by Andromeda Software which can handle both 
graphics and text, allow A4 print-outs for leaflets etc, and allow 
animation through colour cycling. Scheduled for release in July, 
the provisional price is £29,95, 

Haha Systems say they plan to introduce a new title for the ST 
every month and May saw the release of Haba Spelling Checker 
designed to work with HabaWriter, Also released is a new 
database called Habaview which uses the GEM environment and 
has 'powerful sorting and selection capabilities 1 optimised by the 
large memory available on the ST. Price is £74,95, 

Bros pern Software have added to their range of languages with 
Fro-Pascal, a full and complete standard Pascal Compiler that will 
allow all kinds of applications to be written for the ST. Dr. Mike 
Oakes of Prospero stales that there is a new breed of computer 
owner in purchasers ofihc ST, professional people who want to 
have the machine do useful things. Prospero’s Pascal will allow 
software authors to take advantage of that new market with 
applications, utilities, expert systems and more. g. 


This program comes in an attractive and colourful box with a 
well written booklet which explains some of the basic details of the 
game and starts with a poem. On opening the first page I w r as 
afraid someone had once read the Epic ofGilgamesh, but the 
poem is only one page long, The details are concise and enough to 
get you started and there is nothing complicated beyond the usual 
arcade game rules except that you do have mysteries to sort out as 
well as zapping unfriendly creatures. My only complaint is that 
the book is crudely stapled and the disk is loose in the box. 

It is well worth curbing your impatience to try the game out and 
just let it cycle through its auto Tontine, this way you will get used 
to the inhabitants and not die so quickly!. When 1 played it first, 1 
was so interested in the superb graphics that the game was over 
before T knew it, A lot of time and effort has gone into this game 
and it really shows in the detail as the game progresses. 

Basically Time Bandit is a maze style arcade game, reminiscent 
of'Wizard of Wor 3 . You start of on a planet with around a dozen 
timegates, shaped differently (starship, hotel, pyramid etc), just 
walk through one of the gates and you appear in different lands, 
each more varied and dangerous than the last. To survive you 
must find a key to open the way out, but you will also find some 
valuable treasures as you wander through the locations. These 
add to your score and give you a chance to acquire valuable lives. 
There is a tendancy to play this game in the usual fast and furious 
arcade style. Taking ii easy will not get you a good reputation as an 
adventurer (shown on the screen) but you will last a bit longer. 
The death throes of the enemy have got to he seen to be believed 
and some of the humour is very subtle! 

There is something here for everyone, you can play Pac Man, 
wander around the "Enterprise 5 , bust ghosts, solve mysteries and 
more. The best thing about this game is that you can try pH the 
locations on a simple level by entering them only once, take just 
one level and enter it time after time so increasing the level of 
difficulty, or do a combination of both. Your score will be 
recorded upon your death, and if the disk is protected the error is 
trapped and the game goes on, 'Wizard of Wot* 1 was the only game 
of this style (1 detest the word genre!) I enjoyed until I had the loan 
of this, and Microdeal might have a light on their hands to get it 
back again! 

I would thoroughly recommend this game, and as yet I have 
found no bugs and only one complaint, the hero moves and shoots 
in only four directions. It is well worth getting your local ATARI 
dealer to set up the demo screen, and if he has not obtained it tell 
him to contact the lovely Jenny Tope at 0726 6S020. 

Two small hints, as you stumble through the graveyard and 
you come across an interesting tombstone, think twice about 
digging it up and do not forget to try other exits such as ladders or 
holes. 

Mark Hutchinson 


PAGE 6 - Issue 2Z 2\ 









programming 



r SPRITES 





One thing that helps a games programmer more than anything 
else is sprite capability and the ST is endowed with sixteen bit 
square sprites in the same resolution as that chosen for the screen 
and with any two colours of that available to the screen, i.e. any 
two colours out of the sixteen available for low resolution of 320 x 


Erasing the sprite is done with the SAQflC opcode, it is 
necessary first to load register A2 with the address holding the 
rubbed out area of'the screen, even easier! The amount of RAM 
required for each erased sprite is 74 bytes for mono, 138 bytes for 
medium resolution and 266 for low resolution. 

The sprite definition block starts with five words (2 x byte) 
containing information about the sprite to be drawn and then 
follows 32 words defining the shape e.g. 


2(10 and any two colours out of the four available for medium 
resolution of640 x 200. You could mix sprites to give more colours 
per sixteen bits square and many more things but so as not to 
confuse 1 will endeavour to show the rudiments and leave the 
talented stuff to you. 

For those who want to understand the 68000 listing and are 
used to other microprocessors, remember that the memory for the 
68000 is stored in bytes, words and long words {.B .W and .L). 
Bytes are eight bits long, words arc sixteen bits long and 
longwords arc thirty t wo bits long. Each is stored in memory as in 
any computer but the longword for instance will take up four byte 
spaces (4 x byte—32 bits) and it will be stored in memory in, as I 
would say, the right way round, that is most significant first then 
next significant byte and so on. I think it was done to confuse us 
mere 6502 programmers! Each byte, word or longword can be put 
in the data registers (accumulators), a L) stands for a data register 
and there arc eight of them e.g. DOTH* and soon up to D7. Each of 
these registers is very flexible and can work on up to 32 bit data 
with one operation. Wow! The address registers are not quite as 
flexible and can operate only on words and longwords. There are 
eight of these and they are shown as an A on the listing with a 
number following to signify which register is being used. A7 
registers though are used as the stack pointers by the processor. I 
Say registers because there are two, one for user mode stack 
pointer and one for the supervisor mode stack pointer. 

When the 68000 in user mode reaches opcodes it does not 
understand it enters into supervisor mode and then w r orks on that 
command. If it still does not understand however it will stop the 
user program, litis is how sprites are controlled by the ST, you 
just load the address and data registers with the information and 
then give the correct opcode so as to confuse the 68000 in user 
mode and then it works on the information in supervisor mode. 
Very clever stuff, eh? There are many other special codes 
available to the user, hundreds of 1 ‘em but we will use two, one for 
drawing the sprite and another for clearing it. 

Drawing the sprite is done with the SA00D opcode and it is 
necessary first to load register DO with the horizontal position of 
the sprite and Dl with the vertical position, also you must load the 
register AO with the start a dd re ss of the sprite deli n i tion block and 
A2 with the address for where the rubbed out area of screen will be 
stored so as to be able to redraw it back onto the screen when you 
move the sprite. Then you use the$AG0D opcode to confuse user 
mode and, hey presto, your sprite that was defined is displayed. 
Easy! 


by Chris Darkes 


1st word 
2nd word 
3rd word 
4th word 
5 th word 
6th word 
7 th word 
8th word 
9 th word 


horizontal offset to LX) advised position 
vertical offset to Dl advised position 
? I am not sure, try and see 
background colour of the sprite 
foreground colour of the sprite 
background bit pattern for sprite's top line 
foreground bit pattern for sprite's top line 
background bit pattern for sprite's second line 
foreground bit pattern for sprite’s second line 


The pattern continues now as tar as you wish till the maximum 
of 32 words defining the sprite shape is reached. Each bit that is set 
wilt turn on the corresponding colour for that pixel, one word 
equals 16 bits giving a 16 bit pattern for each line of the sprite. 


Lilt ai ■■iSPCEtfOR. 5«£. 

IE REM 5PR1 TE5 d«*a (flr PA&i 0 iAflAUnt h* Chris Djrksi 
I.B0 BEF SEE-1 

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L?E FOR ftidbbftS 10 4tB?33:ft£A£ BiPOKE A,£iNE*T A 

123 D6F E t li = 8VSftftAT■ 12 3 B EVARR A 7P- I 2AS 

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2£B R£n .. CAR FPCR BAIJC CDNIf (MM**** •*■ ■ »******* 

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MB FEE 2 = L rc I B:FOR P = L TO IL9iPOKE SPHPDB, fli SOUND *.(.«. g ,?? «>T ft i NEKT I 

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jmni BATA Jk.L24 

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111 ERTA 0,T|4B,E 

320 DATA L4B , 12,46,3? 

J30 BFS it err place + Dr harizortil pcsitiir ol' sprit. ■cpLIo^i 
J$1 IJflTfl a,?,37,1 

340 BATA 50.5.7 

558 RES store pia:r Far peiition fiS Sprit. + 0 13 3 >h-s 

351 DATA 8,7,37,? 

308 C'RTR IT, L?4 

5T| R£M sprite data plac* foil cm 
JTl DATA 1,7,32,0 

3B2 BAT A 34,124 

391 REM bicker 1 Cm rid data *L*te lulldal 

391 BA T A £,.7, *3,0 

4PB BATA 141,13,76,117,1,6 

499 REM iillimttHAIIkirMfE BEF1N1!SON ... 

301 REM hcnza-itsL ct + cpt gf sprit. faLLows 

lit 0*1 A 1,1 

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5LL DATA B,£ 

52B ACM FDr.it FLsp. Tc'l i dhs 
SSL DATA 0.E 

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31L DAT* 8.IJ 

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SAL BATA 0,2 

550 A Ed back p round pAtt.rn nf fir.t Lire Gf sprit. Tol laic 
SSL BATA 227,t 

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341 BATA 8,6 

370 RFR i?*cki]round pat turn of liccnd Lire cl ip r :tt- fol I cm 
5?1 CATR 227,0 

590 REH fart-prcuid ostt.rn 3 ■ sre end Ll nr c-f ■sprite folld"* 

5Bl DATA 23,L2E 

576 REM s-ickqround p.tt.rn p f third Imt pf sprjt. lsUe«4 

591 DATA 8,0 

030 REH (grfprpund pitt.rn a- third lanp if sprite iuLLaMS 
All DATA 253,fc2S 

All PEC ind id ah Hath thi rest of the ship* for the Sprite 
428 3ATA 14,0,255.L28,0,0,255,120,227,6,20,120,227,1,E.8,i,0,0 


BASIC listing 


32 I’AGE f> - Issue 22 




























Each line has a background colour pattern of 16 bits and a 
foreground colour pattern, of 16 bits requiring two words per 
pattern line with, naturally, the foreground taking priority. 

Speed of draw and erase is fairly rapid considering each sprite is 
drawn pixel by pixel into the screen RAM area. 1 found more than 
tour hundred sprites per second could be handled, but being 
realistic and tying them into vertical blank, BASK] and Assembler 
program ran 30%, slower when controlling four sprites intelligently. 
Remember that when being controlled by VBL they are being 
addressed every l/5Gth of a second. To put this 30%' slower into 
perspective, the ST Bask would still be running faster than the 
Atari 800 and Spectrum basic’s. 

Now to the listings. The BASIC and Assembler listings are the 
same except tor the routine at address 170000 which is non 
existant in the BASIC listing. Apart from that you can compare 
notes from both listings. I have included many comments (REM 
statements) to enable you to fully understand and have tried to 
keep the commands simple. 

The routines are loaded into the ST'S memory in front of the 
normal screen memory which resides at $78000 to J7FFFF and I 
hope this is the safest place for linking to the Bask program. 
Anyway I had no trouble and it was thoroughly tested, I do foresee 
a possible problem though in line 126 in BASIC and in Assembler 
Iine28, this is where the address for the auto routine is put into the 
vector array which on my ST is the correct address, if you have 
problems check this. At address $456 (1110 decimal) is a longword 
that points to the vector array, so get this and then look at the 
longword addresses of the vector array. You are looking for an 
empty address (a longword thatequalsO). When you find one, that 
is the place to poke or move the auto routine's address into. 

If you do decide to handle multiple sprites, do not forget to erase 
the first drawn sprite last and erase the last drawn sprite first 
otherwise when the sprites merge a mess will result, you can see 
this if you move the mouse cursor into the drawn sprite (the 
mouse cursor is a sprite)* • 


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LDHiD *72200 

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DC, If *A00D 

Ftf 5 

K-SEKA listing 


K-COMM 

Kuma Computers Ltd* 

£39*95 

If you are looking for a straightforward easy to use a 
eomms package for your ST, K-COMM could well provide 
the answer. If all the settings of bits and parity and 
handshaking confuse you don’t worry as everything is 
taken care of with fully mouse selectable menus showing all 
the options available, in using GEM fully Kuma have 
provided one of the easiest to use communications programs 
so far. 

The only file transfer protocols available are straight 
ASCII and XMODEM and, whilst baud raies can be 
chosen from 300 to 9600, split rates are not available. 
Function keys can be defined as can the keyboard layout, 
Parameters set for different systems you wish to access can 
be saved to disk and recalled as required as can printer 
configurations which, as with all of the K-series, can be 
easily user defined. 



K-COMM is not a highly sophisticated package like PC 
InterComm but it provides the basic communications 
software that most people will need in the easiest to use 
fashion. Communications is a complex business (I think 
so!) so the easier to use the software is the better. K-COMM 
scores quite highly here over such 'all embracing' packages 
as PC InterComm. m 


PAGE 6- Issue 22 23 















REUIEUI 

PRO-FORTRAN 77 

Prospero Software 

reviewed by Matthew Jones 


FORTRAN was one of the first high level languages. It was 
designed for engineers and scientists to do fast mathematics 
(hence the name FORmula TRAN si a lion) in a machine inde¬ 
pendent way. A Fortran compiler has been written for just about 
every mainframe computer, and due to its relative portability and 
easy access, a vast amount of scientific and other software has 
been written using it. 

An example of the sort of software that has been written in 
Fortran is a program called COPE, a decision support system, 
which has been under development for over 7 years at the 
University of Bath (where 1 happen to work). Fortran was all that 
was available when the program was started, and now, even with 
more powerful languages around, re-writing 16,000 lines of code 
is hard to justify, so an available Fortran compiler is necessary if ii 
is to be used on a micro. Prospero Software's Pro-Fortran 77 aims 
to fill this role on the Atari ST, 

THE COMPILER 

Pro-Fortran is a full implementation of the ANSI Fortran 77 
standard running on the ST under GEMDOS. In operation the 
compiler is quite simple, and there are several different ways it 
can be used, but generally you specify the source filename and are 
then prompted with each of the various options the compiler has. 
These include echo of error messages to a disk file, range checks 
on subscripts and/or assignments, a line number track for 
debugging, a listing and map facility, and INTEGER means 
IN rEGER*2 switch, and a useful facility to report undeclared 
variables (marvellous for spotting typing mistakes). You can 
accept the defaults or change them (permanently if you want), 
and then the compilation starts. 

Each program module is named as it compiles, and errors arc 
displayed on screen, complete with the text of the erroneous line 
and an indication of the faulty character. This is where I 
discovered how tight to the specification Pro-Fortran sticks, 1 
compiled several of the GOPF source files and discovered that 
Pro-Fortran is very pernickety about getting statements correct, 
whereas the Fortran on the IBM PC where the code came from 
accepts our slight sloppiuess, The particular examples are: that 
Fortran labels (names of subroutines and variables) are only 
significant to six letters, and our code which has several seven and 
eight letter names was throw r n out; and cheating with character 
arrays by comparing them with integers (i.e. IF(D{2).EQ.32)) is 
also illegal and must be done properly {JF(D(2).EQ.CHAR(32}). 
In general such adherance to the specification is a good thing, as it 
encourages good programming practice, something the language 
generally doesn’t do (it is not a structured language). 

Speed-wise the compiler seems quite acceptable in comparison 
with other compilers, and it produces .BIN binary files suitable 
for input to the. GST linkeT w r hieh seems to be becoming the 
standard linker tor the U.K. (and elsewhere I hope). The various 
.BIN files of your program are linked in with the Fortran library 
interface, and can then be run. 


THE LIBRARIES 

The libraries provide all the standard functions, and a few r 
machine specific routines. VC hat really makes the library stand 
out i s the way i t is used. It really is rat her odd, and is the ii rst t ime I 
have ever seen or heard of anything like it. Your code is linked 
with interface code which looks for, then uses, a section of code 
called PRL (Prospero Run-time Library) which is loaded com¬ 
pletely separately. Most other systems include the library (or 
required parts of the library) in with the rest of the program so 
there is only one load. A few systems I have seen load the library at 
run-time from a separate file, but a completely separate load is 
very unusual If PRL is not resident, your code will not run. 

The reason for this behaviour is that, your program can 
automatically run others, and each child program uses the same 
PRL code, thus cutting the memory requirement of each 
program. In principle a sound idea, but such spawning is not 
standard Fortran, and this system is added hassle to the end user . 
Prospero do suggest putting PRL in the AUTO folder, but unless 
you are a regular Fortran user, this seems to be inconvenient as it 
may have side effects in other programs. 

THE MANUAL 

The half-inch thick manual that accompanies the compiler 
comes in a very smart blue ring binder and box. It is written in 
three parts, a general overview, complete language definition, and 
bow to use the various parts of the compiler, The language 
definition will provide a useful reference to Fortran in general, 
but it also covers the additional library functions such as 
GETCOM (get command line), RANDOM, I PEEK, POKE, 
DATE, TIME, EXECPG (the run-another-program facility), a 
TOS call (SYS), and a complete set of GEM AFS and VDI calls. It 
is this latter facility that I think gives Prospero Fortran a great 
bonus. Until now, no Fortran has been designed with a GEM 
interface in mind, and this will prove very tempting to authors. 
What dots put a damper on this though is that Prospero have no 
plans to include GEM libraries in their IBM PC version of 
Fortran. 'Hhs means that applications cannot be ported between 
the two easily which, if possible, would double the market and 
reduce the risk for developers. 

CONCLUSION 

Pro-Fort ran 77 is a good, useable Fortran compiler, and apart 
from my reservations about PRL, is quite suitable for developing 
serious applications with. Those who warn a Fortran on their S I 
will be pleased, but what makes it for me is the GEM interface. 

Finally, the price (approximately L30 pounds) is reasonable for 
a Fortran compiler, but I hope the level of Support matches. 


2i PAGE 6 - Bra 22 








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PAGE 6 .. Issue 22 2$ 





































































from disaster to triumph 



One of the first things to catch my eye tor the ST was VIP, 
Several demos were released which made VIP took to be the 
ultimate spreadsheet program for any of us whose previous 
experience had been with 8-hit machines only. 1 couldn't wait and 
VIP Professional duly became my first software purchase for the 
ST. Boy was I wrong! Thai first release was so bug ridden as to be 
unusable and with TOS in RAM gave you a spreadsheet about the 
size of a sheet of A4! A review began to formulate in my mind 
along the lines of 'VIP - the ultimate con 1 but then Silica 
Distribution came to the rescue with the 'official 5 U.K. version of 
VIP Professional, I booted it up, il worked* and now l am 
completely hooked. From that dreadful beginning came one of the 
most used programs on my ST. 

It is not possible to go into detail in a review of exactly what a 
spreadsheet of this nature can do, much of that is left to the 
imagination of the user, Suffice it to say that ifyou can think of an 
application within the capabilities of the spreadsheet format then 
VIP should be able to do it for you. 

Reviews elsewhere have made much of the slow screen refresh 
on the ST bu t p roper u sc of i he edi t i ng keys can overcome t h is to a 
large degree. The movement around the sheet is comprehensive 
and it is worth spending some time familiarising yourself with all 
the commands available. Almost any part of the worksheet can be 
reached very quickly especially if use is made of the Superb Range 
Name feature where any cell or range of cells can be given a name 
and then accessed immediately via a function key. This Range 
Name feature can also be used when printing out parts of the 
worksheet. 

One of the problems on many spreadsheets is keeping track of 
rows and columns when working on a large template. VIP is a 
delight to use in this respect as columns or rows, or both, can be 
‘frozen 1 as titles and will then remain on screen at all times 
scrolling in conjunction with the remainder of the worksheet. 
Alternatively the screen can be split into two windows at any 
given point and the windows can be synchronised or can be left 
'fixed'. 

Copying formulas Or cells is very easy with automatic re- 
evaluation of cell references as desired. If for example you need to 
total 20 columns (or 100!) then simply define the formula in the 
first column and copy that in one short process to the remaining 
columns. All cell references are automatically adjusted. 

Another area where many spreadsheets become cumbersome 
to use is in placing cell references in formulas. You often need to 
check each part of the worksheet and make notes of the relevant 
cells before entering the formula. VIP allows you to begin defining 
the formula and then use the full cursor movement features to 
find any cell on the worksheet. Hitting Return will then add that 
cell to the formula and then allow you to go and find more cells. 
This works perfectly wdl with ranges also. In fact in all respects 
VIP is very easy to use once you have remembered the keystrokes 
but if you get stuck a help file can be called up at any point and of 
course there is always the 250 page manual! 

One area which I left for some time, feeling it was too involved, 
was the macro facility but with a little practice macros will change 
VIP from a static piece of software to a superb working tool 
designed specifically for your needs. Ifyou purchase VIP, learn 
how to use the macros, you will not regret it. 


Hi: 'CASH KECj TUFD TT 3 TLTj 

MHBAY TUESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY 5ATIKDAY A-CCESS TOTALS 


User defined menus 



IPIStt RECEIVED- 


AID: 


,'.n:b 1. 


Insert iatt -jo disk 


« 17 : 


ana 




RFCFlUFLi 


HFFK: 

27-Jun-afi 


■.gag 


.-did 


Retn 


H«h 

Subs 




, Braun 
. GustLnL 

etc's Computer Stare 
. Dunning 
uper Canputers 
. HcughtMfLS 
. Suabr&uflh 




LG DO 


51. BA 


52. IB 


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IE. OS 
N .15 


THE SEAFRONT CIHEMfl 

Adrusiions 


12 



Dec Jan Feb Mar Bpr Hay Jun Jul Aug Sep Btt Mpu 


Graphing capabilities 


There arc many, many, more features to VIP which it will not 
be possible to cover in this review so I will attempt to give an idea 
of what can be achieved by giving you illustrations of an actual 
template in use involving a fair number of macros. I have set up 
templates which handle self employed accounts, VAT returns, 
household accounts, mortgage analysis and others but the one 
used for illustration is for analysis of daily cash takings. This is set 
up as a seperate worksheet for each working week with columns 
headed by each of the items, in categories, that customers can 
purchase. There are 22 columns with 40 rows for each day of the 
week before everything is totalled, A simple macro allows addit¬ 
ional rows to be inserted should the space become foil and any 
recalculations of cell references are taken care of automatically. 
Payments are simply entered as received and broken down into 
categories. A checksum column is used at the end to ensure that 
entries balance. 


16 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 









































reviewed by Les Ellingham 

When a new week is starred an l auto execute 5 macro checks to 
sec if a week number has. been entered on the worksheet just 
loaded. If not it asks for a week number and the date. All dates for 
the remaining days of the week are calculated automatically from 
this. If the worksheet has already been used during the current 
week, this stage is skipped and the program goes on to present a 
user defined menu allowing the choice of moving to the part of the 
spreadsheet for the appropriate day. By using the Range Name 
feature a single macro keystroke moves the cursor to the 
appropriate part of the worksheet, moves fives lines down, fixes 
the rows above the cursor as titles and waits for you to enter the 
day’s payments. 

Once the day’s receipts have been entered another single 
keystroke will calculate the entire spreadsheet, updating the 
totals for the week. If the checksums do not agree for any row a 
warning is given and you are returned to the worksheet to correct 
the error. Assuming all is well a 11 Print 5 menu is displayed and 
hitting return will prim out a particular day. When priming is 
finished further menus ensure that you Save the worksheet and 
take a backup before quitting or automatically loading another 
worksheet. All of this is accomplished by user defined macros and 
makes VIP easy to use even for an operator who is not used to 
computers. 

Defining the macros themselves does require a little under¬ 
standing of computer programming but will be simple for anyone 
who can understand even limited BASIC. Macros are extremely 
powerful and I keep adding little refinements almost week by 
week to ensure that the program does exactly what I want it to 
do. 

1 haven't touched on the graphing capabilities or data functions 
but any of the information entered can be graphed in several 
different ways quite easily and graphs once defined can be named, 
Saved and recalled at will 

There is no doubt that VIP Professional is a very powerful 
package. It is easy, fun and exciting to use and can do almost 
anything you can think of It is expensive at £194.35 but is a 
fraction of the price your business colleagues will pay for their 1- 
2-Ts and the like and it will do just the same. One initial 
disappointment, by the wav, was that the version 1 have is a text 5 
version in that it does not use GEM. I was upset at this at first but 
having found the program so easy to use I cannot see how a GEAl 
version will improve it. Indeed I feel that the opposite will be true 
and I will not bother to get the GEM upgrade which is promised 
for June release. Funny thing to say, you might think but there are 
some applications where the GEM environment adds nothing to 
the ease of use of the program. 

Finally a couple of criticisms. There are still one or two minor 
bugs in the program so ensure that you have back-ups before 
making any major changes to the structure of a template. 
Secondly, VIP really gobbles up memory in an alarming fashion, 
especially when using a lot of formulas, I have a template set up on 
K-SREAD which uses lots of formulas and takes up 113k. With 
VIP you get an ‘out of mcmory + message on this template when 
only half has been entered, even on a 1Mb 1040ST! # 


Introduction to 


SOUND AND GRAPHICS 
ON THE ATART ST 


Compute! Books 
£14.95 


SOUND 

Q?APH/qs 


r 


! 



* 


ON THE 


A xm 




A number of books are now arriving for the ST but most 
are still very much on a beginners or introductory level. 
This one clearly states that it is "an introduction 5 and 
treated as such is a worthwhile investment. The book is 
dearly aimed at those owners who want to write programs 
for their machines but who have not yet made the decision 
to learn one of the more advanced programming languages. 
It therefore concentrates on the two languages supplied 
with the ST, BASIC and LOGO, with a smattering of 
FORTH thrown in. 

After a brief imroduction about setting up the machine 
the first chapter introduces LOGO from the point of view 
of graphics and gives several basic examples of shape 
drawing and movement of the turtle. Only 25 pages are 
devoted to LOGO and, as can be expected, the coverage is 
fairly rudimentary. BASIC fares much better with the 
substantial portion of the book devoted to this language, 
lliere are many programming examples which are generally 
quite short and thus easily typed which will whet your 
appetite for more advanced techniques later. Again these 
are mainly concerned with producing shapes of various 
sorts but there is plenty to give you ideas of your own. 

The chapter on Sound and Music is more interesting as, 
strangely* hardly anyone seems to have explored the sound 
capabilities of the ST. At least you will be able to start 
producing some music and sound effects with the informa^ 
tion given here which generally has not been easily 
available elsewhere. 

Much of the power of the ST is not accessible from 
BASIC but there are commands which can be used to 
access many of the routines built into the operating system 
and VDISYS is one such, A whole chapter is devoted to this 
command and, for someone who has programmed before, 
this is probably the most valuable chapter in the book 
giving a taste of just what is possible with the ST. The 
remainder of the book, including the chapter on Forth 
seems to be there for the sake of filling up the book but will 
provide interesting information to the first time user. 

Overall very much an introductory book which users 
experienced with 8-bit Ataris might find somew hat dull but 
worthwhile for anyone who has those language disks and 
wants to do something on his ST. * 


PAGE 6 - Issue 22 27 










r 


SOFFWARF FOR FHF AFAR! SF 


>MCC ASSfMBITR Mm* tESOi 


£49.95 

A professional quality macro assembler with 
many useful features for the serious program¬ 
mer. Standard Motorola 68000 mnemonics. 
Macro expansions. Over 160 explicit error mes¬ 
sages. Fully formatted listings. Large range of 
directives. Includes the source of a simple 
debugger. The macro assembler chosen by 
Commodore for the Amiga. 


>MCC PA SC A l 


£89.95 

A powerful Pascal compiler that meets the 
exacting ISO 7185 standard (level 0). A fast, 
single pass compiler, generating native code. 
Comprehensive error handling. 32 bit IEEE for¬ 
mat floating point arithmetic and full 32 bit 
integers. Chosen by Commodore for the Amiga. 


LATTICE C 


£99.95 

The well known Lattice C compiler. A full 
Kernighan and Ritchie implementation. Com¬ 
prehensive libraries of UNIX and utility 
functions. Compatible with Lattice compilerson 
IBM-PC, Commodore Amiga, QL etc. Full IEEE 
format floating point arithmetic. Powerful data 
types including pointers, arrays, structures, 
unions, register variables etc; macros, condi¬ 
tional compilation and other pre-processors. 



c 


£19.95 ON ITS OWN 

FREE WITH ANY METACOMCO LANGUAGE* 

MENU + provides ST users with a friendly envi¬ 
ronment to control their programs, using 
pull-down menus and the mouse. Easy-to-use. 
Runs single programs or batches, avoids repeti¬ 
tive command line entry. The user can add his 
own tools, arguments and options. Runs any 
programs - not just Metacomco products. 


ALL METACOMCO PROGRAMMING 
LANGUAGES FOR THE ST HAVE 
THESE ADVANTAGES- 

► INTEGRATED RANGE OF LANGUAGES ON THE ST AND OTHER 
68000s 

Metacomco s range of languages for the ST provides an integrated 
and consistent programming environment for ST programmers, 
Program modules written in different languages can be linked 
together. Metacumco s 5T ianguages are compatible with their lan¬ 
guages for Amiga andQL.Makett easy to port your programs by 
choosing Metacomco. 

► GEM DOS LIBRARIES (Source code provided) 

All Metacomco languages come with a set of GEM DOS libraries, 
m aki ng it easy to program the graphics and the otherfeatures of the 
ST. Full source code of all GEMD0S libraries is provided. altowing 
programmers to modify them The source code is well 
documented 

► CHOICE OF LINKERS 

All Metacomco languages include a linker. Metacomco program 
modules can also be linked using the Digital Research linker. 

► FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT 

All Metacomco languages now include MENU +, an easy-to-use 
programming environment using pull-down menus and the 
mouse. 

► SCREEN EDITOR 

A powerful screen editor for preparing programs is included with 
every language. 

► DETAILED MANUAL 

Every Metacomco language comes with its own detailed manual. 




' EXISTING REGISTERED USERS CAN OBTAIN AN UPGRADE INCLUDING MENU + 
AT A SPECIAL PRICE. PLEASE CONTACT HETACOH CO DIRECT. 

26 PORTLAND SQUARE, BRISTOL BS2 8RZ, UK. 
TELEPHONE: BRISTOL (0272) 428781 

5353E Scotts Valley Drive, California 95066. USA. Tel: 1-800252-6382 


Laflice ■$ itlrarififfl.i-'* ol LATTICE INC GEMDOS* a lrane#na^ol DlGlTA. RESEARCH I NC. U NiX is a Irademark c-* AT» T Sell LaOcratoriea. Amiga is alradcmarK Commodore- Amiga »nc. QL is a telemark ol Smclan Restaid- lid. 


PHONE TODAY, OR POST THIS COUPON TO: METACOMCO, 26 PORTLAND SQUARE, BRISTOL BS2 8RZ. 
PLEASE SEND ME FOR THE ATARI ST: , E jjCLOSE A CHEQUE F0R £ _ 0 R DEBIT 

MY ACCESS/VISA NO. 


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MORE INFORMATION 


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Hncttinckdft VOTimil PAP UK mainland only. Please add t6.0filM.srd5 delivery outside-U. K. Delivery a law up Id 2S days. 


_ p i_l 


28 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 






















































All the well known publishers are working on or have 
released their first ST books but here we have a book 
published by a software company. Can it compete with 
the full time publishers? You bet it can, it is probably 
the best book yet published for the average user oi the 
ST. Whilst it covers the usual introduction to the system, 
and BASIC and LOGO it is full oflittk snippets which 
others have failed to uncover and goes much further 
with good details about aspects of the Operating Systems 
and how to access them via 68000 machine code or C, 
Even if you are already iamiliar with the GEM envir¬ 
onment reading through the introductory chapters of 
this book will probably teach you one or two things you 
did not know such as how to change the names of the 
disk drive icons or properly install applications. Once 
you have read this section you should be quite familiar 
with GEM and will fed quite comfortable in progressing 
through the chapters dealing with the Operating 
System, VDI and BIOS etc. The section on BASIC is 
quite small but does not mess around and goes straight 
into VDI SYS calls from BASIC and is therefore likely to 
be of much more interest to experienced BASIC 
programmers than other "introductory 5 books, LOGO 
receives its usual mention before the book introduces 
68000 machine code via the K-SEKA Assembler 
(published by guess who?) which, as far as I am aware. 


The ATARI ST Explored 

by John Braga 

Rum a Computers Ltd, 

£8.95 


is the first time a book has covered this specifically for 
the ST, From here onwards, the heading of chapter 12 
says it all - Hackers, Start Here! 

Over half of the book is devoted to all those things 
that programmers w ant to know. Bits of code to show 
you how to access windows, menus and the like. This 
section begins with a list of memory addresses in low 
RAM and is followed by details of the BIOS interface 
w ith a list of all the normal BIOS commands and 
examples of how to use them in both C and Assembler. 
Next comes the TOS interface and the GEM interface 
and the "Line A' interface. All these are treated in 
similar fashion with a full list of commands and 
Assembler routines for you to explore and put into your 
own programs. Finally comes four real problems or 
programming projects to show r you how to put all this 
knowledge to good use. 

The projects include how to alter the RAM based 
TOS, how to change the on-screen font, how r to change 
the ‘fixed 1 icon descriptions and how to patch in a 
directory printer. Work through these and you should be 
well on your way to building your own programs. 

The book is rounded off with a discussion of accessing 
the outside w r orld through the serial port which will help 
a lot of people and a round up of software which will 
inevitably become dated but is a good reference for the 
first time buyer. 

In my opinion Kuma have come up with the best 
book so far published on the ST. It covers far more than 
many of the books so far published, which often have 
been just an extension of the manual, and is ideal for 
anyone who has some experience of computing but little 
knowledge of the ST. The only thing that lets the book 
down is lot of'jokey 1 notes such as ‘'This is a diagram of 
a blank page" which tend to make anyone flicking 
through the book think that it is just another worthless 
tome whose author is struggling to fill the pages. Not so* 
A fine book published in Britain and priced at just 
£8.95. If you w r ant to do more than just dick that mouse 
on ready made programs you will find your money well 
spent. 

reviewed by Les Ellingham 


FAG E 6 - Issue 22 29 








t 

he software supplies com 

Specialists for the ATARI ST 

pany 


T3II 5CiPIUARE SUPPLIES CD Li a "ane-ito-p 1 ' supplier oi specialist cciipLCcr lafti^rEj 
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blease note that the list of software here cons!its of both existing, and planned 
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520 ST + SFJS 2 +■ ECliJd + AOffVAtO 
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S20ST ¥ SfJld f EClJid + i-bftWAfa 



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AV.ULAULL hKHH - 

Ipoa 

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HAU 

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?;HL224 12" r,r:d-rc.i qDlqur ranxltqr 

13 7S 

*97 5 

PiilUlp* 

f.HS.5 3.1 cnd.rta., HD2 v Hid 

13 li 


pellveey OXtEPi Prlntar* available also. 


MftEI ST & yTM^ LIST ■;Hasp flii 

O 6 ■inri Fcrive' Vgy*iing..k. l*it gnly 
rnip:ci ■I’jj-Adywigrt [ID I[I5! fI3 

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tJ MS I ALIlr ibtr........ £2(0 

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l! s.hJr2.. .lull serf jrAcAilcf......£tti 

U H^.: in tamer...,,...., M ..,173 

StffibhiimluJ] fwturr «p a'-kh hj-' 

tgatini graphirt *Lth t*xl...l13 I1 

II 1 &srrnafd Tilt,,.....,,...£11 

0 65S HISlHESS SYaTEH....deULLi + [pea 
O Brjt*cH,i,„tNis ilmniur* £32 
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orng r ai f!L5 faith Anj|y?rr [1 
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synthrslftr' c1iKti,..tin 

n Coail .(lb* 

f> Criasai Groom...... M .. .(15 1110) EJJ 

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(I iflD-Jb.. ..Bull ?[■ ^El*'bleed ulc'linj 

fLAtLdn aLth passible ulittLdn...(lb* 

41 'IijLR Otajeit Editor..£]J [£Bi 

a Mi me. (55 

(> falsstAt* £!S 

O Diiflini.., [rtlpfpi Atiinlurf,, .s’Tt.95 
O 1ESAS........ .design 1 eitwr(3in*r-r,ts 

graphic ATlA s P rtri...£33 <(*DJ [IS 

(> (ilii filroL_121.fL 

<> 3rst l|Argr. .iiil WFugratint [!i |[*Cl 
(t A*= r.. 1E** **£LL lj]e trahiftr...[39.fi 

Cl Slit :«L9'...i5.5«IOA.12S l£-Wl 

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ri cUti recskjrv utLLilr..,(IM1 
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41 KLndshadoa...(tba 

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enhanced mil set...£175 IE204' (250 

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4 5 PoHif-Pat llvy.... 

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frga ether| in ipri*e,.,£tU 
O Preipero Frrtran 77,. DIO I CLIO I [ L15 
4) Frni;ire ISO PMCal..£L4D 1IL40? £135 
(? PI LntKeDii 4V15£C *iiLalbrt....£L20 

41 Std War - .... .,...(|hi 

<’/ Rytha.SHiaditadl’-LHiB tiLeuHtar 

deit aarsiary.. .£?? 1(40? (35 
(5 Seaiti5t*r,,.En(BS« Eeit gulp iu'igr 
leva! ifirtnlurt,,,£19,95 


<> Salt SpapLr.,.printer hu-lfir...E12.95 

(? S:rcersr.......1(0 !(451 (30 

(> SpeElbreiter,..,,...fLna? part »( the 
Eachantir tnlggy ie>perii..£4? |£Sfl] 

f> Spellaotr...£» 

[] Star ttidirii.,.iLaist( gin. ....Llfaa 

(> Siar-rpis..mother InfatH 

Aaitrpiect 4ei:«rt)...£45 4(505 (40 

M ilarjlidn ,-El itl hIs? p H»e.£tla 

[3 Stir Struct., ....greatdl iJit pBJIllir 
as Ira chart lyjn COrgn (crilt 5., ,£tla 
O 5**dij; ’The Frnceii Lrgaay..,(37 ![405 
O Suspended.. LnSoeai adv (15 I[(01 £1(2 
45 Systeiil:i£.i Lnt.14raE.rd acccynEs: 

(> Syit InvoLeint...£253 4E20SI £ZSC 

45 Sys t 4k Cuttinp.D75 1(2005 [269 

O EysE Payroll...(275 (£2BI £2tC- 

4) S',st Parham Ledger £315 KM53 E3QD 
(5 Spii Salei Lafl|Bf... h (315 4{345L (300 
45 Sys-t St«k CwilrnL,..£J5o l[1035 [325 
(5 ST flcciunts......lietible and easy Eh 

use aELWinis suiEe. ..£315 [£3501 

[? ST Cabol.....£11 1(50) 

O ST T«lb«.,. r *iciLLint >alue ul 1Lit? 
lorrS count to file ajni[ilaUvi..,£2f.95 
{} [aJtnL REH Diet / &oo3ir, ,,.,.(24.15 
C3 TjI iiain, ,...THL dotatase 1? F the ST, 
full range c( leatures.. ,£B5 'TO'I 
[] Tiurui Acre.nl%..........,f?30 If til I 

1.1 Faurm 1‘Xitlflg ! Order FTnrmjnp - 
itard a]Me or lntefralef. ..£330 [E355J 

(1 Taurus Piyruil....£153 i£IJ3! 

U Taurus PrintEri Estmtu...... I£5301 

U Tour j* Stock Ccntrol...4£l41| 

4) The Final Ha F d. 4 ,.,. .DIO l£L5Ql D35 
4> The faMfi..., .avillAlii HI’n eiralii’t 
graphite, and parser., ,£24,95 

liae tandit...[29.95 

Cl TsaiUnk, ,is»! i*pajgiientfdiiyy...Kfl 

li TranapIviMa.,,...,,.£J7 (£40; 

Cl Treasure bird.... Ettas 

Tl 110-6*9 OicuuntLpg,..C7S 4£B?I 

43 Tyji-iottir... [J7 iflflJ 

0 IflEiat IJ..ro3r-p|lying |aie,... 1.f 15 
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liprFidban igr a;h* I... f 1B0 [£1911 £|75 
Cl Minnie 'he PMh,..greiL 1 p f kidi llba 

'■ } Hi atari njer..(50 1(*0) (35 

Htneis.adveature,, ,£M (£Wl £33 

45 taprj For Hnrs.,,.it last, 1 Scrattaie- 
I ike gaae,. .£IS £43? 

45 Hprdiitt.....155 

(? 2 luI * ues-t.. tvin adventure... C2 <.95 
45 TpaaRk t..........ditabase...ITS 4001 

O Jgrk 1,,teat +j.|ntkrg rlai¥)[ [[9-95 

4? iM’i 13...-._......£43 4£455 (3H 

(> 7drk ELI..M0 IE12I £ffl 


LnkraatLon :aek £5 leaTunfablc First 
order 5 inctudnc Laleit lift I, pt-stciuts, 
remehii iplteare ardthut-ia, etc, ‘laase 
spEctFy intirefts: b.sines-s-, prngraiaiog, 
utilililrii lan;uaget, rKreatlonai. 
Spettfic appltciEtk* ipFlua-'a a Lid 
ariLlatL«i raisuJtancy nrviri and Ideal 
HiPhitraELdm puiftbLii S;ap tausiwsi 
ipFLNart deaq disks also available. 

KflKS 

0 663:: Flllllhly Ling Prog 4H-HjLU E2C< 

<> Atari ST Tipi t Trickp (Fp).(13 

£3 fit ir i Bt User 1 Bind* IH-Mill J., ,,£3t 
(3- Plan 5T Ecapanicn 1 5_iah|r 1 1 ,,(10 

4) £ .friier P]ui 4Pjtian.4Siitt.d.£19 

4> C PrngrjiAtri Library IQue)_,..(L5 

45 £ ■‘■egrjilinc Guide IFurri.ii'fluf! , ,£|5 
(? Caiplet* F0STH LNt0fie347Si5Aal*...(7 
4) Caaju-.r 'i lit Ipak ?F The ST,.,,,£15 
[L £L«ar-tiry ttjri SI (CanpuEell, ...El? 

(3 G£H In The talari ST IFP'I.,,(LJ 

<? lhlroduttiph to FDfilH I tail.'Hi ley f? 
<> Invmduei 1Ln4«pi)...Aath t:ti* £5 
45 InutalLtaP Td FOOTH (Kattani....,.£35 
(? l( 00 P'ogriMinf LHolLer/ft-iesleyt (9 

(3 hoping Tha ST (Coa^uip'!.£S 

(J Mailering FSTH Irrentire Sal 11...(21 
45 Hotula 1 PrpgraAAiag [Rntoit..,,.£14 

<? Paicai Pr-,«r iFLtiaiiSaist...(17 

45 FresinEing Tri Otari ST (AbuuiN.El) 

<7 “Vogranir.; fn f CHlpdin).....£l? 

[] Pr'grilling 3h* ST 4Cpniutl!).»,,. £2S 
[] frcgruiin; The ST -l.dv Slide. .,,..E2Q 
4) Stirling FORT* £Br«die?T-Hillk.. .£22 

4? Starting LffiO kajqh.'Sigia).,..(7 

4) The FiraL Atari ST lagk IFPl.£9 

■:? H* Aulnij 01 1,1. Atiri ST IFPl,,ft} 
45 Orient inding "he asCCO ICinEuryt £0 
<? fcrbjg H: til The Atara SI£!0 

Please a3L:•* 7-IT davi For ■■ -ilgcb henb 5 

HUTEIhPL 

S3 [Dkaulen, ntnar .lardua/f, and 
ptriqherakl are aval table at fircnurt 
prices I'M use please p*ma rdf litnl 
pruEs and aval lata 11 a tp. lieie produ:Li 
an (ullr iu[ [:riet and guar a,i teed L a Lest 
■air*i.3ni. Lgcat deitxry or pencni! 
col I eel t* - be t r ran|ed t* plate o J 
miarrd pa-cel& deiixry. In fttan 
IDJ3ST i.s nk milablt as part n J 
spacciLly fLppqrtrd appLlcatLcoi 
partagriE pIea.Ee r~quire. 


1- 


po box 19, whitstable, kent ct5 ltj 

teh (0227) 266289 tel .gold 72: dtb 10183 


30 PAGE 6 - Issnit 22 












































































Applications 



Muck of the interest in the ST is in the business software available 
but it it quite possible to use the 8 -bit machines for certain business 
applications. Spreadsheets are an example with Visicalc and Syncalc 
available. If you have not tried these on your machine Smartsheet may 
be the ideal introduction. If you have only a limited need for a 
spreadsheet, Smartsheet may well do all you teanL 

Smartsheet is a spreadsheet calculator which is extremely handy 
tor financial forecasting* budgeting or any calculations that involve 
many variables. Due to its need for two buffers* Smartsheet will only 
work on a 32K cassette or 48K disk system as a minimum, 

The on-screen worksheet is divided up into cells or grid co¬ 
ordinates, arranged 15 columns across (A-O) and 40 rows down. 
Examples of cell references are A1, 015, F32, etc. Due to the cell 
format (total of600 cells) it is only possible to display a portion of the. 
worksheet on the screen* so in order to view different areas of the 
worksheet, the screen acts as a scrolling window over the 
worksheet. 

OPERATION 

To attempt to explain how to operate a spreadsheet in a few pages 
is no easy task. I"hose already familiar with spreadsheets (e.g. 
VISICALC, SYNCALC), should feel at home since Smartsheet is 
basically styled after VISICALC. To newcomers, I hope the 
following will be enough to get you started. 

When Smartsheet is run* the screen is divided into two sections. 
The upper blue screen is the input window, which displays different 
menus, input prompts, error messages and the current cell co- 



SMARTSHEET first appeared in Inside Info, the news¬ 
letter of A.C.E* (K'.S.Wj, GT.tt Box 4514, Sydney, 
N.S.W., Australia 2001 


by Ken Shiu 

ordinate. Below, is the grey worksheet screen, the window to the rest 
of the sheet. The black inverse bar is the cursor and is controlled by 
the normal cursor control keys. Its initial position is cell Al. 

Smartsheet recognises three cell types: Labels, Values or 
Formulas. Since Smartsheet only involves itself with number 
calculations, labels are for the users* benefit, similar to REM*s in 
BASIC. They are usually placed in the column left of a value, to 
identify it. e+g*, SALES, COST, PROFIT, etc. Labels are exactly 
like the list of items on a shopping list. To enter a label, position the 
cursor and type in the label, if the label is too long, the cursor will 
automatically be forwarded to the next column. 

Values are numbers you input for the worksheet calculations to 
function properly. Values may take any form - positive, negative* 
decimal, etc. The use of values is similar to the prices, next to items 
on a shopping list. Values are input by typing numbers directly into 
the cell. When the cursor is moved away, the value is moved to the 
right to align the decimal places. 

By pressing OPTION, formulas can by input into the current cell 
or answers to simple equations can be found. Note, values must be 
entered into the appropriate cells in a worksheet for a formula to 
function at all Smartsheet gathers its input from cells nominated 
within a formula and displays the result alter all calculations are 
complete. After pressing OPTION, ‘Formula* appears on the status 
line and on the input line you are asked whether the first number in 
the formula is to ho a cell location or a number. The power of 
formulas in Smartsheet, is the ability to access values from other 
cells, e.g. a formula may calculate a PROFIT figure* and therefore 
will access the values you have input for Sx^LES and COST and will 
make the necessary subtraction. 

Next the desired operation has to be input - addition, subtraction, 
multiplication* division or exponent (power of). Smartsheet is 
limited to one operation per formula. After entering the 2nd number 
as a cell or number the full equation will be seen on the sheet. If'no 
cells have been accessed, the formulas will remain until they are 
calculated after pressing START. 

A subset of the formula is the SUM function, which is accessed by 
typing a colon (:). The SLxM function allows you to total values 
between one cell and another in. a particular row or column. After 
typing a colon* the input line asks "FROM CELL:?"* here you should 
enter the cell where the totalling will begin, e.g. Al . Your input will 
be registered in the brackets in the status line when TO CELL* 
appears. Input the cell, where the totalling will end, e.g. A9. The 
input line will be cleared, and when you move the cursor off the 
formula cell, your From and To cells will be shown* e.g. :A1:A9. 

Once you have finished structuring your worksheet, complete 
with labels, values and formulas, press START to calculate the 
worksheet. The message Calculating,..* will appear while Smart- 

continued overleaf 


PAGE 6-Issue 22 31 





sheet is computing answers. Calculating time depends on the 
number of formulas within the worksheet. When Smansheet has 
finished, the screen will temporarily dear and the final worksheet 
will be seen with all formulas replaced with the results. 

HELP 

Smartsheet also has an optional menu tor aid while developing a 
w orksheet. The menu is accessed by pressing SELECT. The menu 
‘G L E S F IT will appear on the status line, Press the corresponding 
key to obtain these functions, 

G - Global Format: Selects how values are to be formatted when 
input. Choose from Dollar, Normal and Integer formatting. Dollar 
will automatically change your input value to dollar and cent 
format. Normal will leave your value untouched, while Integer will 
round your input to the next whole number. 

L - Load Worksheet: Loads a previously saved worksheet from a 
disk or cassette. Press I > or C to select Disk or Cassette respectively. 

If using cassette follow the same procedure as loading BASIC 
programs. If using disk, you may eilher:- 

L Press the bar to cycle through the Smartsheet vvorkfiles on 
your disk and press RETURN to load the file displayed in the 
input window, 

2, Input a filename directly on the input line and press 
RETURN to load it, 

S - Save Worksheet: Saves current worksheet in memory to either 
disk or cassette. Press D or C to select Disk or Cassette to save on 
respectively, Smartsheet saves the whole sheet, so cassette owners 
make sure you have about 50 counter spaces on the cassette and be 
prepared to wait during saving and loading times! Disk owners have 
two choices (same procedure as Load function):- 

1, Press the space bar to cycle through the Smartsheet files on 
your disk and press RETURN to update or save over the file 
displayed in the input window, 

2. Input a filename (ft letter limit) directly on the input iine 
and press RETURN to save it. Smartsheet uses \SS* as an 
extender on its saved worksheets to identify them. 

E - Erase Worksheet: Clears the current worksheet from 
memory. The program will re-ask whether you wish to erase the 
current worksheet in memory. Type Y to erase, or any other key to 
return to the worksheet. If you type V then the screen will 
temporarily clear and a clean worksheet will appear. 

P - Print Worksheet: Prims the current worksheet to a printer, 
Make s u re your prime r is ON LIN E11 First you w i 11 be asked to inpu t 
the cell at the lower right corner of your worksheet (in order to define 
the bottom and rightmost column). After entering the cell co¬ 
ordinate, you may imbed, printer control codes at the beginning of 
each row in the worksheet. Type Y to imbed control codes e.g. 
double width for headings. If you elect not to use printer codes, press 
RETURN to begin printing- If you type Y for printer codes input the 
row number to imbed the code. The program will send control code 
before printing the row. Next, type the code in and follow the same 
procedure to input more codes. When you have finished press 
RETURN io prim the worksheet, 

H - Home Cursor: Returns the cursor to cell Al. When you are 
moving around the far extremes of the worksheet it is handy to use 
this function instead or repeatedly using the cursor keys. 

? - Help Screen: Calling up this screen lists all the main keys and 
functions of Smartsheet, 

That about wraps up the features of Smartsheet. If you prefer to 
have the cursor move without having to use the CONTROL and 
arrow keys simultaneously, just change the value equal to K in the 
lines 65,70,75 and BO to 61,45,43 and 42 respectively. 


EXAMPLE WORKSHEET 

An actual example would better explain the basics behind a 
worksheet or'template’, as shown in the two sample screens. Screen 
1 shows a template in its raw state with all formulas being 
uncalculated, All headings and item names are examples of labels. 
Any character including numbers may be made into a label by 
typing an apostrophe before entering the label, e.g, the line of minus 
signs beneath the heading. 

The prices of the items are all values and have been Dollar 
formatted. The format has been changed to 'Normal 1 mid-way to 
prevent quantity values being shown in dollar and cent format. 

In the D column, formulas are present. In cell D6 S the value of cell 
B6 (price of chicken) will be multiplied by cell C6 (quantity of 
chicken). The result of this formula will be shown after calculation. 
The same applies to cell D18, where the item total (D15) is 
subtracted from the available cash (I>3). 

Cell D15 (item total) uses the SUM function. Upon calculation, 
Smartsheet will add all values from cell D6 to D13, Smartsheet 
calculates all formulas and sums from left to right, top to bottom on 
the worksheet. 

When START is pressed, Smartsheet will pause to calculate and 
the result will appear as in Screen 2, where all formulas in the D 
column have been evaluated and replaced by a number. From here 
the user may experiment with different cash, price or quantity 
values to view the final outcome on Mrs Jones 1 purse. As can be seen 
in Screen 2, Mrs Jones will have trouble paying the bill with only 
thirty dollars. 

Hopefully, I have made the versatility and applications of the 
spreadsheet more appreciable. The spreadsheet is hv far the greatest 
tool for financial planning. It can definitely save considerable time 
and effort. Smartsheet is by no means as powerful as commercial 
spreadsheets but it does help to fill the business software gap that 
Atari owners have been complaining about tor some time. Maybe 
now you can justify all that money spent on computing! 


STATUS :>*wi G L S E P ft 7 CELt I At 
INPUT : 



. JONES 1 SHOPPING LJSI 


AVAILABLE 

cash ; 

35.55 

I fEItt 

PRICE 

QTY. TOTAL 

CHICKEN 

3,99 

J66*C6 

CHEESE 

1.-B1 

207#C7 

BUT TEH 

1.09 

285«£B 

mi* 

1,59 

3H9NC9 

SOUP 

0.65 

bBiftttcte 

COFFEE 

4,91 

mi lnc ii 

b minis 

6.89 

5812mi 

DRINKS 

0.85 

4&1IMCU 


ITEM 

total :H:tn 


CASH RENAININt DI-DlSi 


Screen I 


Screen 2 


STATUS; Save :QiSk Jsassetl 


ICMTliCEWflr 


CELL f£10 


Wts, JONES' 


■HIP 

SHOPPING. L IST 



30. BB 

TOTAL 

11.97 

3.79 

2,L& 

7,77 

1.99 

4.99 
4.45 
1,40 


32 PAGE f> - Issue 22 

































cs i reh i i i m i n t i muum h n mmumumm mmmwmm 
YH 2 REM tt SMARTSHEET VERSION 1,1 tl 
SJ 3 REM H by Ken Shiu tt 

MC 4 REM tJ First published by atari » 
01 5 REM *1 tonputer Enthusiasts CN.S.M)tt 

5H 6 REM B —----ft 

HE 7 REM H PAGE & MAGAZINE - ENGLAND a 

cz s rem mm . . 


NO 7 REM 

LK 10 DIN OUT$, INS C 4 00 0 3 , 5S C 60B) ,DL 
IS C20),U$(80) ,HS1155,H C4),CELLS(3J f CS t 
«> jAS(111 ,FTSCI4) ,Dl$CZa) f PR$CiZO) 

RU 15 GRAPHICS *3: POKE 557,B;0PEN **2,4,0,“ 
K:":PONE 752ji:POKE 71®,127iPOKE 707,O 
- POKE 712.56:POKE &z,O 
VV ZB DL=PEEK(560J+PEFKC56iJ*Z56:PQKE DL + 

7 M 130: DLlS="H'lHa*Bb ^iMr»*H3hShe" ! A-AD 
RCDLIS):DIM CLSC8) 

Otl Z5 B-INl CA7Z5&) : C = A~B*256 : POKE 512.C:P 
ONE 513,B:P0KE 54206,172:G0SUB 2000 

Han^GHE STATUS ! ! POKE 65.31;? "CELL 

;";CELLS 

HK 35 ? *■ INPUT ;*':? 


EM 40 FOR T = V TO ¥ + 36 STEP 2:? "V'jVSCT, 
T+i):NEXT Tl? "M"; VS CT , T+i) i : POSITION 
4,4:? cS 

C6 45 FOR T=1 TO 4JPOSITION H[I»,S:? NSCT 
j TJ :NEXT T i POKE 764,255:POKE 559,34 
XO 46 IF FL THEN RETURN 

GF SO TRAP SO:POKE 53774,64 :POKE 16,64:17 
PEER£764>O2S5 THEN 60 
WO 5* If PEEK1S3277)=5 THEN POKE 53760,18 
0:GOSU6 960iGOSUB 5O0 


HP 56 IE PEEKC532773=6 THEN POKE 53760,SO 
!GOSUB 76 0 : GOSUB 1200 
AS 57 IF PEEK £53277)=3 THEN POKE 53760,15 
8!GOSUB 760;GOSU6 10B0 
TM 50 GOTO 50 
IK 60 GET 02, K 

FK 65 IF K=2? THEN COSUB 200:Y = Y+±:GOSUB 
100 

HM 78 IF K-20 THEN GQSUB 288:Y=Y-I:GOSUB 
100 


KR 75 IF K = 3B THEN GOSUB 208:H-K-i:GOSUB 
150 

IK ae IF K—31 THEM GOSUB 200:X = X + 1;GOSUB 
150 

NE 85 IF £K>47 AMP K<58) OR K=45 OR K=43 
THEN GOSUB 700 

LP 70 IF CK> 64 AND K<123) OR K = 34 THEN GO 
SUB 220 

EJ 72 IF K-5S THEM GOSUB S SB 

MB 75 POKE 764,255!POKE 702,64;GOTO 50 

RL 100 IF ¥>40 THEN ¥=40:FOR T=1 TO lO:PO 
KE 53761,168:NEXT T:POKE 53761,160:COS 
UB 135:RETURN 

ZO 1®5 IF ¥<1 THEN Y=i:FOR T = i TO IBlPQKE 
53761. , 168 : NEWT T : POKE 53761,160 : GOSUB 


135:RETURN 


KM 110 CELL$=CHR$ CASCCH$CX,X))-12B) ; CELLS 
CLENCCELlSj+U=STR$ C¥> : POSITION 36,1!? 
i" + + +** ; CELLS : YI = Y 

ML 115 CP=CH-13N0+C1Z0*C¥-1T>+1;IF Vl>20 
AND K=27 THEN ¥1=20 

DM 116 IF Vi>=YMIH AND V<=YMAX THEN ¥1=20 


“C20-€¥-tYMiN-i)9 J 


CX 117 IF V < Y HIN THEN ¥1=1 

ZM 120 IF Y> YMAH THEN YMAX=YMAH+1!YMIN-YN 
IN+1: POSITION 0,4!? "El" : POSITION B,23: 
? "■ >i ;V$ (m-i l Y#2) iOUTS CCP,CP+3i) ; 

NI 12S IF Y<YMIN THEN YMIN=YHXN-1:YMAX=YM 
AM-1: POSITION 0,4:? "0“: POSITION 0,4:? 

“M"; MS CY*Z-1, V*2) LOUTS CCP,CP+3i) ; 

AP 135 POSITION HCX1)-3,Yl+3:F0ft F=CP TO 
CP + 7!CStf-CP + l.T-CP+1J=CHRS £A5C(OUTS £T 
,TJJ +1283 !HFMT T 

MH 140 ? CSj:POSITION 8,1!T=15*tY~i)+X;A$ 
-5SCT,TJ :IF AS="±" then ? "LabelI hS 
(CP,CP + 7 J 


LB 144 IF A$="2“ THEN ? “Ua lue:";INSCCP,C 
P+7 J 

IA 145 IF A$ = “ " THEN 7 " 


&E 146 IF AS="3" THEN ? "Form;1 a:";INS TCP 
,CP + 7 J 

AD 146 RETURN 

TH 150 IF K>IS THEN X=15;F0R 1=1 TO 10:PO 
KE 53761,16S:NEXT T;POKE S3761,16&;GOS 
UB 135:RETURN 

VZ 155 IF K<1 THEN H=1:FOR T=1 TO 10:POKE 
53761,166:NEXT T!POKE S1761,168!G0SU6 
135:RETURN 

OH 160 CELLS=CKR$(ASCCHSCK,HJ1-±2®J:CELLS 
CLEN £CELLS)+I)=STRSCYT fPOSITION 36,1;? 
;" +++"*CELLS:XI = H 

PS 165 CP=£N-lJ*a+(120*tv-1J 3 +1 

LR 167 IF Hi> = KMIN AND X1<=MMAK THEN X1=K 
-CXMIH-13;GOTO 170 

AL 170 IF X1<XMIN THEN XI=1;HMIN=KNIN-i :H 
MAH=MMAX-1 

XI 171 IF X1> MKAX THEN XI - 4 ;HMA K = MMA X + 1:X 
MIN=MMIN+l 

MO 172 G=0!FOR T=MMA«-3 TO XMAHi6-G+1IP0S 
ITXON HCGJ.3:? MS CT,TJ :NEMT T:G=0 

HI 173 G=0:TS=CKMIN-lTwa+C12e*|VMIH-l)J+l 
!FOR T=TS TO T5+2280 STEP 120;G=G+1 

EG 174 POSITION 4,G+3:? OUTS£T,T+31Jj:NEH 
I T 

AM 170 POSITION HCHIT-3,¥1 + 3 IFOR T = CP TO 
CP+7:CSCT-CP+1,T-CP+l)=CHRSCASq(OUT$CT 
,TTT +12 8) :NEXT T 

IM 172 ? CS; ;POSITION 8,1:T=15*tY-lT+XI AS 
=SS(T,TJ;IF AS=" 1 " THEN ? “Label:";INS 
CCP,CP+7J 

LL 174 IF AS="2" THEN ? M Value:";lKSCCP,C 
P + 7) 

IN 176 IF AS=" " THEN ? " 


OR 177 IF AS="3" THEN ? "For no I a IMS CCP 

,CP+ 73 

AN 170 RETURN 

FS 200 POSITION H CM1)-3,Vl + 3:CP"tN-lTWS+ C 
120KCV-1IT *1:? OUTS CCP.CP + 7T ; : RETURN 
VZ 205 POSITION 8,1l? " 

RETURN 

TQ 210 POSITION 8,2:? " 

11 1 RETURN 

KU 220 POSITION 8,1:2 “LabeI"JSS£15«C¥-l) 
+ K , 15*£¥-1J +XJ ; T=0 :CP=£X-lJ«0+tl20 

*CV-1J J+1 

LF 222 : OUTS (CP , CP + 7) =CLS : IN 

S CCP,CP + 7)=CLS 

GC 223 IF K=34 THEN T=-liGOTO 235 
IB 2 25 POSITION »+T,2;? CHRSCK1 ;OUTS £CP+T 
, CP + T) =CHflS £K) : CS CT+l.T+U =CHR$ tK + 128) 
ML 226 INS CCP + T,CP + T1 =CHRS CK) 

HB 230 POSITION HtXl)-3,Y1+3;? CSj 
TV 235 GET «2,K!IF K=155 THEN GOSUB 210:R 
ETURH 

KZ 236 IF K>27 AND K<32 THEN GOSUB 210:P0 
P ;GOTO 65 

IH 238 T = T +1:IF T>7 AND K<>126 THEN 275 
Ofl 240 IF K = 126 AND T = B THEN T_-1|CS = '^^H 
^■W^OUTS CCP, CP + 7) =« " i INS CCP 

,CP+7I=" "fGOSUB 210:GOTO 230 

HH 241 IF K=126 THEN T=T^i;IF T<0 THEN T= 
0 

SL 242 IF K = 126 THEN OUT S ICP+ T , CP + T) : 

CS £T +1, T + l) ="(“ : INS CCP + T, CP + T) =■■ " : POS 
ITION e+T,2!? " ":T=T-l:GOTO 230 
ZZ 245 IF «K<32 OR K>122? THEN 235 
PF 250 GOTO 225 

ZR 260 POSITION 6,1;? "Global :C]or» Ont J3o 
11ar"; 

HF 265 GET »2,K 

IV 270 IF K=Z7 THEN GOSUB 2B5:RETURN 

MU 275 IF K = 78 THEN GL=0:GOSUB 2 OS r R FTURN 

UA 260 IF K = 73 THEN GL = l!GOSUB ZB5:RETURN 

WU 262 IF K=60 THEN GL=2:GOSUB 285:RETURN 

OD 205 ? "^'iGOTO 265 . 


PAGE 6 - Issue 22 13 
















JA 2*0 FOR T = 1 TO 2flB!MEKT T : RETURN 
AG 255 GO SUB 210JPQP ! G- K l K = 31!GOSUB ZOO; 

H = H + isG05IJB i50:k~G:POP SGOTQ 65 
IT SOO ? "Sisk Bassette"; 

HI 305 GET 02,K 

(10 310 IF lt-27 THEN GOSUB 205 : POP :GOTO 5 
0 

VE 315 IF K —&7 THEM FI$="Cl l, lG05UB 205(RE 

TURK 

UB 320 IF KOBO THEM ? "□"ItGBTO 305 
IK 321 POSITION 13,i:? •'Input Filename" 

HI 322 GET »2,K:1F K=32 THEN 340 

TH 325 IF K<&5 OR K>*B THEM ? :GOTO 3 

22 

VO 327 T”IJ GOTO 335 

LR 330 GET HZ,K;IF K = 1Z& THEM T^i!A$=CL$! 

POSITION 8,2!? AS:GOTO 322 
1_I 331 IF K = 155 THEM 330 

TS 332 IF (K <40 OR K>*0> OR GK>56 AND K <6 
51 THEM 2 •'□"I : GOTO 330 
BL 335 POSITION S+(T-U,2l? CHR5(K3 !AS IT * 
TJ=CHRSlKJiT-T+l!IF T>6 THEN T=& 

OK 337 GOTO 330 

JG 338 FOR T=i TO LENtAS5(lF ft$CT,TJ=" " 
THEM G-LEM tA$J : AS CT) = *"*: T-G 
RJ 335 MEKT TiFI$="D:":ASILEN1AS5+1*.S5 
":FlSlLENCFTSl+1 *=aS;GOSUB 2O5:G0SUB 2 
10:CLOSE His RETURN 

HI 340 TRAP 2100 ; OPEN HI, 6, O* '*& :** 5S"s TRA 
P 3*0 

BL 344 INPUT »l;DlSiPOKE 54206,1*2;IF LEM 
IDI$J <17 THEN 3*0 

20 345 POSITION 0,2:2 "FILE!"?DlS13 * 10J 
KG 346 GET tt2,K:IF K = 155 THEM AS-D15(3,10 
J:GOTO 336 

FV 347 IF k-27 THEN GOSUB 2IO:POP ;RETURN 
Pk 350 IF K-32 THEM 344 
RM 355 GOTO 345 

HU 3*0 POSITION 8,2!? "Qho MORE SMARTSHEE 
T FILES* 4 : CLOSE W1! FOR T“1 TO 300 : MEKT 
T 

VH 3*5 G OS U B ZIBSGOSUB 205JTRAP 4000OiPOP 
:RETURN 

MO 400 POSITION 0,1:2 "Load! 11 , sGOStlO 300 
02 405 TRAP 2100 S OPEN *81,4 ,120,FIS:TRAP 4 
20: POSITION *,!:? “Loadi og , . . **; 05 : T = 7 
VT 410 A=ADRCINS3:L-4800!GOSUB 570:OUTS = I 

N$ 

F2 415 A=OPRCS£l!L=&00;GOSUB 570[CLOSE t*G 
716 : POKE 54786,1*2 

HC 420 POKE 55*,0:GOSUB 205:TRAP 40000:GO 
SUB 2020;FL—A:GOSUB 30iFL“0:POKE 55*,0 
HH 425 G-O:TS=CWI1lN-ll*O+ti20*E¥HIN-l> J +l 
:FOR T-TS TO TS+228B STEP 120;G-G+1 
OP 43© POSITION 4 * G + 3 ! ? OUTS 11 j T + 31 3 } ! NEK 
T T 

EL 435 POSITION 4,4:F0R T=T5 TO TS+7:C$£T 
-T5+1, T-TS + 1J = (CURS tASC £OUTS CT , T) 5 +1201 
SMEKT T:? C$;SPOKE 55*,34!RETURN 
BN 450 POSITION 8,1! 2 "Save ! " J 1 GOSUB 380 
MO 452 TRAP ZIBBfOPEN 8*1,8,120 , FIS ! POSITI 
ON *,!:? "Ifiting. . ftS:T = ll 

Uft 455 A=AORCINS>iL=4800lGOSUB 570 
GO 45 0 A-ADR CS$1 1 L = 6O0 i GOSUB 570 ; CLOSE «G 
716:POKE 54Z»B,iS2 
TH 450 GOSUB 205 S TRAP 4 0 00© l RETURN 
KG SO© POSITION 8,1:7 "Mertlt! G L 5 E P H 
7 

HK 505 GET DZ,K 

OL 51© IF K—71 THEN 268 

NU 512 IF K-76 THEN 40& 

OU 514 IF K=B3 THEN 450 

TM 516 IF K-6* THEN 55B 

NS 510 IF K-60 THEN 500 

IR 520 IF K —27 THEN G0SUB 205:RETURN 

SS 522 IF K —72 THEN 550 

LT 524 IF K = 63 OR K = 47 THEN 150B 

LH 54 5 ? "Q": GOTO 505 

UT 550 POSITION 8,1:7 "Erast! Sure? CV7N3 

>1 t 

P 

HU 555 GET 812 , K 


PT 560 IF K—6* THEN POKE 55*,0!GOSUB 200O 
i POP :GOTO 30 
LH 565 GOSUB 285:RETURN 

KA 570 G-i&!CS=032+G:POKE CB+2,T:HI=IMTtA 
/25&J:L0=A-HI*256;POKE CB+4,LO:POKE C0 
+ 5, HI 

GB 572 HI=INTCL7256J:LO=L-25feWHI:POKE CB + 
8,LO[POKE C B + * > HI!I~U5RCAPPC " 66 HpL V0* 1 1 
, G 3 

AE 575 RETURN 
OA 560 GOTO 426 

BT goo POSITION 0,1:? ''Print: Lower Corne 
r?" : POSITION &, 2:T”l:AS=* ,M 
GK 60S GET t*2, K ! TF K = 27 THEM GOSUB 205:RE 
TURN 

FH 607 IF K <65 OR K>75 THEN ? l 'Q' i j:G0TO 5 
05 

AN 61® ? CHR$tKJ:;ASCT,TJ=CHR$fKl:T=T+i 
CM 615 GET 882, K! IF K<40 OR K>57 AMO K<>12 
6 ANl> K0155 THEM 2 '•□'*# :GOT0 615 
CO 620 IF T—2 AMO K=40 THEN ? "ffl";!GOTO & 
15 

E0 625 IF K= 126 THEM POSITION 8,2:7 11 * l 
:GOTO 600 

Ffl 630 IF K-155 AND T>1 THEN 645 
VL 635 IF T—4 THEM 2 "Q";:GOTO 615 
OC 640 GOTO 610 

KE 645 IF UAL tftS €21 > >40 THEM ? •'□'*! GOSUB 
21B:GOTO 600 

LG 650 OIS-AS:GOSUB 210:POSITION 0,1:? "P 
rioter Cedes? cv/Mi“i 
DZ 655 GET 882, K! IF K = 76 THEN 70S 
ZE 660 IF K<>6* THEN 7 "[2"j!:G0T0 G58 
OE 662 TRAP &62:G0SUB 218:POSITIOK S,l:7 
"Enter Line Number »;POSITION 8,2; 

INPUT L 

YK 665 TF L<1 OR L>4B THEN ? "Q"JGOTO 662 
MC 667 AS-PRSCL*3^2 F L*31:POSITION 14,1:? 
"Printer Codes * 1 

aa 670 POSITION &, 2 J ? "Line ";L;“ ft'*iA^( 
1, 13 i"t'*i A^ C2,2T t ■*%"! ASC33 : i 4<4 M i 

; T-l 

LO 675 GET «2,K:IF K=I55 THEN 6*0 
J5 680 IF K—126 THEN 670 
LS 682 IF T>3 THEM ? "E":GOTO 675 
YH 685 ? "V'JCHRS tKl ; I AS tT, T»-CHR$CKJ !T = T 
miOTO 675 

EV 6*@ PRS CL®3“2,L*3J —AS:GOSUB 210:POSITI 
ON 14,1:? "More Codes?tV/M>"; 

HN 6*2 GET tt2,KrlF K = 6* THEN 662 
GO 6*5 IF K O 78 THEN ? "H";:GOTO 6*2 
XH 700 TRAP 4OOO0 

UK 70S G^UALCDlStZT*:AS=DISC1,11:FoR T-l 
TO 15:IF ASCCHStT,TI3-I28=ASCCA$3 THEN 
L—T-Kfl ; T—IS 

KO 710 MEKT T;GOSUB 210:GOSUB 205 
SO 720 TRAP 21.00 ! OPEN *11,8, O, *'P POSITIO 
N 8,1!? "Press return to print" 

TP 725 GET **2,ft+IF KOl55 THEN GOSUB 210: 
GOSUB 205:RETURN 

YE 73© Ll=l:FOR T"1 TO GipS^PftStT*3-2,T»3 

> 

HW 735 FOR 2=1 TO 3:IF A$tZ,23=" " THEN N 
ENT Z;GOTO 740 
AN 736 ? 181 i A$ CZ, Z1 : : MEKT Z 

NI4 748 ? m;OUTStLl,LJ !L = L + 120lLl-Ll + 120 ! 
MEKT T!CLOSE ttl 

OC 750 GOSUB 205!GOSUB 216;POKE 54266,1*2 
(RETURN 

MH 800 S5tl5»tV-l» +X Jl 15HCY-lJ+KI="3"*T = 0! 
CP=<K-11M8+(120»CV-1J1+1;POSITION 8,1: 
7 "Sum: C - J ** 

cu 80 S POSITION a, 21 ? "FroB cell: i <4"; 

;INPUT AS 

PE 810 IF LENCAS5>3 OR LENCAS3<2 THEN ? " 
£3";: GOTO BBS 

UE 612 IF ASCCASC1,13J<65 OR ASCCAStl.lll 
>7* THEM ? '•tQ**;iGOT0 BBS 
MT B14 IF UAL CAS C23) <1 OR UAL £A$ <213 >40 T 
HEN ? "U‘ J i GOTO 605 
BA 610 POSITION 13 F 1i7 A$ 


34 PAGE fi - Issue 22 













PD 8 2 0 POSITION 8,2 : ? "T<J Cell ! Hi"} 

: INPUT Dl$ 

©K 822 IF LENCDIS3>3 OR LENCDTS?<2 THEN ? 

M Q H i sgoto ezo 

G5 824 IF ASC CDIS 11 , 13 3 <65 OR flSCt[>I$ Q,1 

n>7? then ? ’■0* , ;;goto 020 
PU 826 IF VALCDISC23><1 OP UALCDIS<233>4O 
THEN ? "Eh 1 GOTO SZO 

UK 827 IF 0$ (1,13 ODISCI , 13 AND AS 12) <>DI 
£ (?) THEN POSITION 0,2:? pl QCells must 
be 1 inear!": GOSUB 28©:GOSUB 210 : GOTO 8 
OO 

QZ 828 POSITION 17,1s? DI$ 

PP 83© FlS = *'T ,i : AS ILEN C AS3+13 = ,p S M ! ASCLENCA 
Si+11-DISI FIS CLE MCFISJ +13 = A$ 

Nil 835 IF LENCFlS3<0 THEN FI$ tLEN £FIS3 +1) 

FF 040 OUTSCCP,CP+73=FIS:IN$CCP,CP + 7)=FJS 
AH 850 GOSUB 210!GOSUB 205:RETURN 
ZN 800 SS C15M TV —13 +H,15* CY^l) +K1= ,f 2": T = 0 : 
CP=CH^13*8+ T120« tV-11J +1: POSITION 0,1: 
? "Value;"!iNStcP, cp+7) : 1 

IN ?SZ 0=0:GOSUB 210SINS(CP,CP+7J=CLS:OUT 
S CCP,CP+73 =CLS;IF K-126 THEN T=-l:GOTQ 
81© 

TIC 80S POSITION 8 + 1,2:? CHRS<K3!CSCT+1,T+ 
i>-CHRSCK+IZ8) :INSCCP + T,CP + T3 = CHHS CKJ : 
OUTSCCP+T,CP+TJ=CHftSCK) 

UK 81© POSITION HOti)-3 * Vl+3 : ? CS| 

OB 820 GET tJZ,K:T = T + l:IF K = ±55 OR CK>27 A 
ND K < 3 2 3 THEN GOSUB 210: GOTO 940 
YE 822 IF T>7 THEN ? ”Q M JICOTO 820 
GW 726 IF K=126 THEN 700 
OR 720 IF CK > 47 AND K<501 THEN 805 
PI 730 IF K=46 AND G-i THEN 835 
832 IF K = 46 THEN G=l:GOTO 805 
EK 835 ? GOTO 820 

UJ 840 IF K = 155 AND NOT T THEN RETURN 
HH 841 IF HOT T THEN POP sGOTO 65 
HK 842 TRAP 855;A=UAL£INSfCP,CP +731!IF GL 
=0 THEN AS=STftSCA3SGOTO 848 
DC 843 IF GL, = 2 THEM 845 

AT 8*4 A=INTC A + 0.51:AS—STRS(A3:L-0-LENCAS 
3!GOTO 840 

KZ 845 IF A=INTCA) THEN AS=STRSfA>:ASfLEN 
CA$)+13=".0©"iGOTO 840 
ER 846 IF IHTCA»±01=A»1O THEN A$=STRStA); 

AS (LEN (ASl +i>=* , o ,,< : GOTO 840 
FS 847 A=INTC±©0HA+O.53/100;AS=STRStA3 
FJ 840 L-8-LENCAS3: OIIT$ ICP , CP+L) = CLS : OU T $ 
<CP+L,CP+7J=ftSlINS £CP * CP + 7>-OUTSCGP,CP 
+71:TRAP 4000© 

BE 850 IF K=155 THEN RETURN 
KB 85 2 POP :GOT O 65 
HP 855 ? "O'*; :K=±26:G0T0 800 
PO 8510 FOR L = 1 TO 10; POKE 53761,175 ; NEXT 
L:POKE 53761,160 SPOKE 53760,ZOO:RETURN 
¥14 1B00 T-0 J GP= CX-±J«0+ Ci20*C¥-i> 3 +1: POSI 
TION 8,1:? ■‘ForMula:' 1 jINS (CP,CP + 71 :G=0 
50=0 IZ = A 

PR 1004 POSITION 8,2i? "IS? Np.:@ell or □ 
umber 11 ;: GET RZ, K : IF K=27 THEN GOSUB 21 
0:GO SUB 2 05:RETURN 

VK 1O05 INS COP,CP + 71= CL$;IF K=67 THEN G~1 
iGOSUB 1020 1 GOTO 1030 
HC 1006 IF K O 78 THEN ? "G", : G0TO 10O4 
DH 1007 GOSUB 10 O 8! L = A lGOTO 1630 
LE 1008 TRAP 100B:GOSUB 2l0:POSiTION 8,2: 
? "Enter ho INPUT aS:IF len(AS)>4 

THEN ? *■80"; s GOTO 1O08 
DH 1008 POSITION 16+T,l!? AS:K = LENCAS)-1: 
A= UAL (ASi iIF G OR 7 THEN IN$ CCP + T,CP + T 
+ K 3-AS:T = T + K + 1:RETURN 
MT 1010 IF 0=1 THEN A-A+L 
OC 1011 IF 0=2 THEN A=L“A 
NC 1012 IF 0=3 THEN A”A*L 
DH 1013 IF 0=4 THEN A~L/A 
GT 1014 IF 0 = 5 THEN A=INTCCL*A)+0,5) 

NS 1015 INSCCP,CP*7)=ClS:INSCCP,CP+73=5TR 
SCAT : K = 155 $ GOSUB 842 : GOSUB 210 ; S S C .1 5« C 
Y-13 +K, 15»t¥”Xi +MJ = ti 2 il : RETURN 


CA 1020 GOSUB 210 :POSITION 8 , 2 :? "Enter C 
ells";:INPUT AS:IF LENCAST <2 OR LENCAS 

3 > 3 THEN 1025 

El 1021 IF ASCCAStl, 133<65 OR A 5 C(A$C 1,13 
1 ) 8 B THEN 1025 

RH 1022 IF 0 AL(AS (23 3 <1 OR UALCAS 12 31 > 40 
THEN 1025 
RQ 1 D 24 GOTO 1026 
BY 1025 ? "tQ";:GOTO 1020 

PE 1626 K=LENtAS 3 -l:INStCP+T,CP+T+K 3 =AS:P 
OSXTION 16 + 1 , 1 ;? AS:T=T+K+ 1 sRETURN 
KR 1030 SSC 15 NCV- 13 +H, 15 NCV- 13 +K 3 =" 3 "!GOS 
lib 210 sPOSiTiON 8,2;? "Opera!ion:Q S £ 
a E"; 

OH 1031 GET n 2 ,K:IF K = 43 THEN 0 = 1 i AS = i, + ": 
GOTO 1040 

UH 1032 IF K = 45 THEN 0 = 2 !AS = "“":GOTO 104 O 

TI 1033 IF K= 4 Z THEN 0 = 3 : AS = "*■*: GOTO 104 © 

BU 1034 IF K -47 THEM 0 = 4 :AS = "/":GOT 0 1040 

AH 1035 IF K -84 THEN 0 = 5 : AS = ,,A11 :GOTO 104 © 

JU 1036 ? 1 p 0 "} - GOTO 1031 

©L 104 © Z= 0 :INStCP+T,CP+T 3 =AS:P 05 ITI 0 N 16 
+ 1 , 1 :? AS:T=T+i:POSITION 8 , 2 :? " 2 nd No 
. :0e|i or □u«ber ,f j 

DC 1042 GET t* 2 ,K:IF K = 67 THEN GOSUB 1020 ! 
GOTO 1050 

HI 1044 IF K = 7 B THEN GOSUB 1 O 001 GOTO 1058 
LI ±045 ? "[^'JIGOTO ±042 

KO 105 O GOSUB 210 : OUTS CC-P, CP+ 7 ) = INS (CP , CP 
+ 73 :RETURN 

KN 1200 POSITION 8 ,l:? " Calculating,,, 

II ■ 

J 

DL 1202 FOR T =1 TO 600 :IF SS|T,TJ=" 3 " THE 
N GOSUB IZIO 
EL 1205 NEXT T:GOTO 420 

PR 121 © CP= CT-lJ^O + l:AS —CLSiTF INSCCP,CPJ 

them 1400 

FE 1212 FOR A=CP TO tP+ 3 ;L=ASCCINSCA,A> 3 : 
IF L = 42 OR L = 43 OR L = 4S OR L = 47 OR L-8 

4 THEN Z=A-CP+±:A=CP+ 3 ! 0 =L:GOTO 1216 
HU 1214 AStA-CP+ 1 ,ft-CP+ 13 =CHRSCL 1 :NEKT A 
7 U 1216 TRAP 4000 O;IF ASCCAStl, 139>64 AND 

ASCCAS II, 13 J<S 0 THEN 1220 
NK 1213 A= 0 ALCAS 3 :GOTO 1230 

NZ 1220 TRAP ± 22 S:F = A 5 CCAS Cl, 11 J- 64 :G = OAL 
CAS C 23 3 :H=<F^ 13 *B+C 120 *CG “13 1 + 1 :A = MAL C 
INSCH,H+ 733 ;GOTO 1230 
YM ±225 TRAP 1226 :A = UALC 0 UTSCH,H + 713 :GOTO 
1230 

UE 1226 A =0 

YL 1230 AS=CLS:AS=jNSeCP+Z,CP+ 7 J:IF ASCCA 

5 tl ,133 >64 AND ASC IAS Cl, 1 )> <80 THEN 12 

34 

OD 1232 L=UALCAST:GOTO 1240 

MV 1234 TRAP .123 5 : F = ASC CAS Cl ,13 3 —64 : G = U AL 
CAS 12 ? 3 :H=CF- 13 HB+ C 120 *CG- 1 J 3 + 1 ;L=UALC 
INSCH,H+ 733 :GOTO 1240 
HM 1235 TRAP 1236 :L=VALCOUT % tH,H+ 73 >i GOTO 
1240 

WU 1236 L=© 

EB 1240 TRAP 40000 !IF 0=42 THEN A=A*L 

MK 1242 IF 0=43 THEN A=A+L 

PI 1244 IF 0=45 THEN A=A~L 

SG 1246 IF 0=47 THEN A=A/L 

GO 1247 IF 0 = 84 THEN A = INT(C A A L 3 + O .53 

DC 1248 IF GL =0 THEN AS=STRSCA 3 :GOT 0 1270 

EN 1250 IF GL=Z THEN 1260 

ZV 1252 A=IMTCA+O, 53 :AS=STRSCA 3 :L= 8 -LENCA 
S 3 ;GOTO 1270 

YJ 1260 IF A = INT CA 3 THEN AS = STRSCA 3 :ASCLE 
HCA$) + 1 J=". 00 p *:GOTO 1270 
FA 1262 IF INTCA* 103 =A «10 THEN AS=STRSCA 3 
: AS CLENtASS+l) ="O i, :GOTO 1270 
CU 1264 A=IMTClO 0 *A+ 0 , 53 / 100 !AS=STRStA 3 
Oft 127 © L=B-LENCAS 3 :OUT$CCP,CP+LJ=CLS;OUT 
S CCP+L,CP + 7 3 =AS !RETURN 
HP 140 O SUM= 0 ;AS= 1 NSCCP+l,CP+ 33 :H= 3 !IF AS 
T 3 , 3 J=";" THEN AS=INSCCP+ 1 ,CP+ 23 !H =2 
LD 1402 A=A 5 CfAStl, 13 J- 6 *iL=UALCA$C 2 J) 

IM 1404 AS=INSCCP+Z+H,CP+ 73 :F=ASCtAStl ,13 
3 “ 64 :G=UALCASf 213 , 


PAGE 6 - Issue 22 J5 







The 

Midlands 


o. 


'h Jl 212-23 

Tenter BraadStreet 


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Smartsheet continued 


JE 14SS IP (k~r THEN : FOR Z = i_ TO G :TR 

AP 1416:K=l)*fc+ti£fc*l2-Ii*+I ; V-*J(kL tINS t 
H,H+7Ti:GOTO 1420 

00 1410 If 7 l_=G THEN 0 = L;F 0 R Z = A ~1 TO F ! TR 
ftP 1416 :Ht=Z* 8 + £ 120 *CO- 1 J > +i i M=VftL CIN^ C 
H,H+ ?i J lGOTO 1420 

UC 1416 TRftP 1417:y=OOLCOUTStH*h+711SGOTO 
1420 

ZF 1417 U-O 

GE 1470 SUH=5UH+U I NEKT Z : ft = 5IIM : G 0 bUB 1740 
: RETURN 

UG 1500 ? "I":? M 

W 1 J ? : ? 

PH 1505 ? ■■ NORMAL CURSOR ARROW KEYS CON 
TIROL THE"!? M CURSOR (LONG BLACK BAR) 


ftj 1510 ? 
cell as 
cell as a V3lue fl 

RG 1515 ? " ; 

is values"*? ■■ 

or row," 

RK 1520 ? *' OPTION 

ornula' 1 :? ■* SELECT 
use from;- 11 * 
TC ±525 ? " 

ii 


ft , *,Z| M )CKR$tS4);" Marks 
a label":? ■■ 0,,,9, + r Marks 


Sun Formula, lota 
in a colunn 

Harks cell as a f 
Main Menu. Cho 


HE ±530 ? " 

■ » * ? Ji 

CB 1532 ? " 

11 A1) 11 * ? 


G^Globai Fornat* 1 : 
L=Load Worksheet 1 ' i ? 41 
s=saue worksheet" 

P=Print Worksheet 
E-Erase Worksheet*' 
H-homb Cursor,£Ce 
?=Help Screen, 


36 PAGE 6 - Imoc 22 


IK 

R0 

KC 

AT 

UC 

SJ 

CF 

ftP 

KB 

RK 

AM 

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QU 

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1535 ? 41 START Calculate WorkShe 

et" : ? :? :? 4, 1- PRESS ANY KEY TO RET13R 
N ; * GET 1T2 t K : GOT 0 420 
199S STOP 

2000 U$z"B 


12345678 S 10111213141 


51G17181S202122232425267720ZS303132333 


2 0O5 :hcd =?: for t 

=2 10 4:HCT)=H(T-1)+8SNEHT T:POKE 5376 


0 f 200:GL-Q 

2010 0UT?tl)=*' '* : OUTS £43001 = ,f " I 0UT$ t2 
J=OUTS :INS=QUTS; SS C1) :SS £6001 =" "■ 

sS ezi=ss 

2015 PR5U)-" " SPR$ £120) =*' ":PR$t2) = PR 
$ 


2 02 0 M = 1I Y = 1 i = KMIN-K ; YMIN 

-H:Yl = N:Kl = H* KMAK=4 ! YMftH-20 : CELLS-"61 4 * * ' 
! FL = 0 : CLS-'* " 

2050 RETURN 

2100 CLOSE Si I RES TORE 2120:P0KF 54286,, 
192 


2105 REA£> E ,015: IF E = PEEK£195) THEN PO 
SIT10N 0,1:? "BErrorI"*01$:TftftP 40000: 
GOSUB 210:G OIG 50 

2110 IF E--1 THEN POSITION 8,1;? “QErr 
or : No , PEEK (195) i 11 41 : TRAP 40 0O 

o:GOSUB 210 1 GOTO 50 
2115 GOTO 2105 

2120 DATA 130,Device Not On,139,Device 
NAK,14 0,Serial Frame,142,Seria 1 Bus,! 

43,Checksum No,143 

2122 DATA ±44,Write Protected,16Z,Dish 
Full,163,Bad DOS,167,File Locked,170, 

NO SUCH file,-1,a □ 














































Solve those 

TAPE 

PROBLEMS 


Some interest has been shown in a modification to the 410 
recorder published by AN'11C magazine some time ago, known 
as the ‘Hi-ReF modification. No doubt the 1010 unit would 
benefit from the same type of modification, however be warned 
that if your cassette unit is still tinder warranty then you will 
void it if you open up the machine. 

HOW DATA IS SAVED 

To help us to understand the reasoning behind this 
modification it would help us to look at how data is transferred 
to and from the cassette. 

The data to be saved is fed into the tape buffer on Page 4 of 
the computer in blocks of 128 bytes at a umt, and a pointer 
keeps track of when the buffer is full When it is full, it is sent n> 
tape and a further 128 byte block is loaded into the buffer. 
Additional information is added to each block as it is sent out in 
order to help the O.S* with housekeeping, Each block is 
proceeded with two marker bytes. This pair of bytes has a start 
bit, with the remainder set to alternating Ps and 0’s. The byte 
pair is terminated with a stop bit. Following the markers is a 
control byte, and then the data, in 128 byte blocks as you will 
recall. Bringing up the rear is a checksum byte, which is the sum 
of all of the bytes making up this package, including the marker 
bytes. You will see that 132 bytes are thus required to complete 
the transfer of each block of data. 

With our buffer full, we are ready to save it to tape, Each byte 
is examined, and every bit that is set is converted to a tone of 
5327 Hz, and every one that is not set is converted to one of 
39951 !z, both tones supplied courtesy of POKEY', 

So far so good, but w T e require to distinguish each block from 
the next, so a further marker tone is added to each block that is 
sent. You will have noticed this tone particularly when using 
LIST ‘‘Cf\ as the length of the tone is quite long. Long enough 
in fact that when you ENTER the program back, ILASIC has 
time to check each line for correct syntax before the next block of 
data arrives. As the program length grows so the time taken for 
this process increases, until finally the tape motor stops until the 
checking has been completed, The long gap between blocks 
allows the motor to restart when [he next block is requested, and 
the motor has time to run up to speed again before the next block 
arrives. 

So, we have converted our program into two audio tones to be 
recorded on tape, and so far we could have pressed an ordinary 
domestic recorder into service, However, there are no facilities in 
the computer to convert the two tones back into data. Instead 
they are converted back into data in the recorder using a process 
called FSK, or frequency shift keying. This is the reason why wc 
must use the official Atari recorder, or buy an interface to use 
with a domestic recorder. Such an interface will convert the two 
tones for us, usually employing a circuit called a phase locked 
loop, not something we will go into now, but if you wish to buy 
one then make sure that it has facilities for remote control of 
your recorder and that it takes advantage of the 'sound through' 
capability. The recorder will require a remote control socket and 
it must be stereo for these two items to function. 


by Derryck Croker 

WHY A MODIFICATION? 

And now we get to the ANTIC modification. As wc have seen, 
the requirement for converting the two tones (we will call the 
5327Hz tone a ‘mark" and the 3995Hz tone a ‘space’) is met by 
circuitry inside the cassette deck. On playback, the tones from 
the playback head are fed to two filter circuits, each of which is 
designed to pass through only the tone for which it has been 
tuned. The outputs from both filters, of which one will only pass 
a ’mark 1 and the other a ‘space', are then fed to another circuit 
called a comparator, and the output from this is the data, formed 
from l’s and 0's, just as it was inside the computer when w r e 
saved it to tape. 

Assuming, then, that no spurious signals have interfered with 
the tiara to your computer, what happens next? Well, the data, 
now in digital form as we have seen, is received in the tape buffer 
in the same order that it was sent, that is tw r o marker bytes, a 
control byte, the block of data and bringing up the reap, the 
checksum byte. 

The two marker bytes are used by the 0,S. to set the baud rate 
for that block by storing the current VCOUNT value from 
ANTIC when the start bit arrives. The alternating i’s andO's arc 
counted off until the stop bit is reached, whereupon the current 
frame counter is compared w r ith the VCOUNT value previously 
stored. The resulting time elapsed allows the O.S. to determine 
the speed at which the next block is to arrive as it is necessary to 
maintain a pointer to keep track of incoming data to determine 
when ihe buffer is full. You will see that, this calculation is 
carried out tor each block which allows adjustment for stretched 
tape or motor speed (within reason). 

The baud rate has a default setting of 600 by the way, but can 
vary from 318 to 1407. It is possible to change the baud; rate with 
a suitable program, but it is likely that unreliable results will 
occur if speeds above 847 are used due to limitations within the 
system. 

The control byte’s only function is to inform the O.S. that the 
end of the file has been reached, 

The checksum byte, which we have seen is the sum of all the 
bytes in the particular block, completes the procession. It is 
obvious that a single byte cannot possibly store such a targe 
number that usually results, so a complicated formula is used to 
reduce the sum to a reasonable figure, as is done when the figure 
was originally computed. 

This checksum as retrieved from tape is compared with 
another computed from the present contents of the buffer, and if 
there are any disc repen cies due perhaps to spurious data 
introduced in the FSK demodulating process then the loading 
process stops and we get an error, 143, 

That is the theory anyway, Many things conspire against the 
successful retrieval of data. One of them is that Atari used 
components in the filters that were not of the highest tolerance. 

continued overleaf 


PAGH fn ■ issue 22 37 


TAPE PROBLEMS 

continued 

That is to say that the values of the resistors used in tins part of 
the circuit could vary from the designed values by up to 10%. It 
is therefore possible that the response of the filters may then 
become inaccurate and thus pass through the tone designated for 
the other filter. 

The ''Hi Ref modification redresses the problem by the 
replacement of 6 resistors, 3 per filter, with ones of the same 
value but of the much closer tolerance of 1% + 

And the resistors to be changed? Below you will find the 
components involved for both the 410 and 1010 units. If you 
cannot read resistor colour codes or wield a soldering iron then 
you may care check the panel with this article. 

410 1010 


Ref 

Value 

Ref Value 

R10 

68 K 

Rill 68 X 

Rll 

56K 

Rll2 56K 

R12 

7K5 

R113 10k 

RI3 

5K6 

Rll5 6X2 

R14 

330 K 

R149 33OK 

R15 

240 K 

R114 33 OK 


Two of these resistors, R14 and R15 (and the corresponding 
1010 components) are connected in a feedback loop from the 
LM324 LC, from pin 7 to 6 and 1 to 2 respectively. 

The remaining resistors set up IXC. bias levels and input 
levels. Some tracing of the circuit is required to locate these 
components on the 410 board, however the 1010 has the 
reference numbers printed on the board. Look for two pairs of 
capacitors on the 410 board of value 820pf, and you should find 
that each pair is connected across R1.4 and fU5 respectively, You 
should now be able to find R10 and R12 connected to the 


The author jj$ wilting to undertake this modi eat ion and 
some others for a small fee. Please note that this service is 
supplied directly by the author and not through PAGE 6 
which can accept no responsibility for any problems 
which may arise. 

The services offered and costs are as follows. 

410/10II) resistor change inc, components, clean heads 
and pinch wheel £5.50 

410 addition of red LED ‘busy 1 lamp to illuminate when 
drive motor active. Specify left or right hand fitting. 

£1-50 

1010 Rewire present LED to illuminate only when trans¬ 
port controls pressed. £1.00 

Send your cassette unit and power supply only. Please 
note that I cannot undertake to repair faulty units. Terms 
are cheque or postal Order j and you must include return 
carriage. Don’t forget your return address. Make a careful 
note of the seTial number of the machine before you send 
it. 

Please telephone me first with your requirements on 
0923 673719. Derryek Ooker. 


junction L.if one pair of capacitors, and you should find that R12 
is connected to earth; and RU and R13 to the junction of the 
other pair of capacitors. In this case R13 is connected to earth. 

As a further check, the other ends of R10 and R11 are connected 
together, and it is this junction which carries the output from the 
playback amplifier, pin 14 of the LC. 

IDENTIFY YOUR PROBLEM FIRST 

I said that many things conspire against the successful transfer 
of data from tape, and if you arc having difficulties you must 
ascertain whether the problem is due to the one outlined, or 
whether another problem exists. If you find that tapes recorded 
on your machine won T t load, but load correctly on other 
machines ihcn the above fix will probably deal with the problem, 
and no doubt you will have had problems with commercial 
programs loo. Another problem exists if tapes recorded on your 
machine load back but not on other machines, and in this case it 
is likely that the record/playback head requires adjustment. Ibis 
is a job best left to an Atari service centre. 

In out seemingly never-ending mission to achieve good results 
from the cassette recorder we must also service it from time to 
time. No recorder whether digital or Hi-Fi can be expected k> 
give of its best if the heads or the tape transport mechanism are 
dirty. Filthy capstans and pinch-wheels cause tape speed 
variations and caked up heads may prevent the successful 
reading of the tones from tape. 

The technique is simple. Obtain some cotton buds and a can of 
electrical cleaner. Check first that it does not contain any 
lubricant, I use R.S, cleaning fluid. 

Spray the bud and press the ‘FLAY 1 button on the deck to 
make the heads move into a position where they can be cleaned 
with a gentle up-and-down movement with the bud. Work 
quickly as the cleaner rapidly evaporates. You will see the 
capstan and rubber pinch wheel to the right of the heads. Boot 
BASIC and type, in direct mode, FOKB 54018,52 RETURN. 
With the capstan now turning clean it and the pinch wheel with 
the bud. Finally, stop the machine and remove any loose cotton 
wool with your finger nail. You will find that surprising amounts 
of brown tape deposit collects, and often this deposit will be the 
cause of loading errors. 

This cleaning process is also invaluable on plug-in boards such 
as cartridges and edge connectors on memory boards etc, in 
which the. 800 abounds! # 

Good nieuws voor dc Nederlandse lexers van PAGE 6: 

PAGE 6 en bet vulledige service pakket is 

NU VEKKRIJGBAAR IN NEDERLAND 

Yerzeker u van regelmatige toez ending en neem nn 

een abonnement 

ABONNEMENT fi.46 s - 

ABONNEMENT - PLUS listings 
op diskette fl.150,- 

Zend betaalkaart / Eurocheque / Betaalcheque 
of door overmaken op Postgiro 4745457 
. of Rabobank 35-49*52.854 

PANATCO Kamilk 3 

2811 RD Reeuwijk NX._ 


38 PAGES-Issue 22 
















THE SLAVE 


If you ever wondered why it was so difficult to buy an adventure creation system for the 
ATARI computers, wonder no more. THE SLAVE is here. Now look at what The Slave has to 
offer and start to wonder again - about how all these features can possibly be available in a single 
package... 

Your adventure games are written in almost plain English using a truly vast range of 
commands, incorporating everything you could possibly want or need to use now or in the 
future. Save your game in whole or in parts, then use the command compiler to reduce 
everything into a 100% machine code form one-tenth its original size - we challenge you to try 
to run out of memory' against these odds! 

With The Slave you’ll define text, room exits, flags and objects, even sound, from separate 
menu driven programs, allowing The Slave to run on any Atari computer - 400,800,XL or XE - 
in ANY size memory. 

Unlike any other system available. The Slave stores all program text on disk, loading it 
only when it is needed. Even your disk space is expanded with advanced compression 
techniques to enable to to store 30% more information on a disk than normal - up to 170K on a 
single disk! 

With your master disk you’ll also receive the Slave Reference Manual. Containing 
comprehensive step-by-step instructions forming a vital part of your system, the manual is a 
well-bound, easy to follow portfolio which can be used as both tutorial and reference material 
and contains everything you need to know about creating text adventures with The Slave. 

Also included is an example of an adventure game created entirely with The Slave. You will 
be able to examine a fully-documented program and use all the ‘tricks of the trade’ for yourself, 
all of which are fully explained in the manual. 

If you don’t believe what you’ve read you’re underestimating the power of The Slave. Buy it 
and be amazed - The Slave is the first of a new generation of disk-based adventure creation 
systems. You’ll see. Why not sec NOW? 

Send a cheque or Postal Order for £19.95 made out to: 

N.J.GREGORY 
8, AGARD STREET, 

DERBY, DEI 1DZ 

Trade Enquiries are also very welcome 


PAGE 6 - Issue n 31 











fa. 7* 





\ J 


V - t-jt tr, -i* -il 'mmry, !" I . ' I \ 

.-v-.v-.ir : ,^v 




. ; '• 


..t; 


I "he horizontal transition steps to adjacent screens are preset to a ■ V 
value of 1 and the corresponding value for vertical transitions 
TRICKY CUBES does not aim to attract people whose interest in ^ between screens is 2. For these initial conditions} the following 
J!computer gaming is mainly concentrated on increasing their high transitions to adjacent screens are possible with the starting screen V. 

| scores by permanently hitting fast moving and noisy targets, though hV,j always being No, 1: .v;'-- J 

i it requires quite some skill in joystick handling to successfully pass yjy v‘yl 


6 1 
2 3 
4 5 
6 1 


‘V, 




yi through all six screens, The challenge of TRICKY CUBES is more ^r\ 

| in the strategic approach to find the most economic and the least VC 
: time consuming path to reach the final goal of the game. Therefore} 

: people who consider a ‘Fast thumb 3 to be the most desirable attribute 

i for a successful high-score’ should be warned that they may find {£; = h 

j J R 1C KY C1JBES somewhat slow. O t hers th ough will find it quite a i £? fa-w': 

! challenge. This configuration applies only to the first lap after booting the 

^ game. When the l GAME OVER’ display appears after either the 
| THE GAME "q number of lives equals zero or the allowed time has elapsed or when 

T 1 - all cubes have been successfully erased, the next lap is enabled TTrT,',' 
The goal of TRICKY CUBES is quite simply to manoeuvre a through pushing the START key. Then, the horizontal and vertical 
: little character - let us name him Clumsy Pete’ - safely through six ^ screen transition values are randomly chosen allowing for a total of '£/■ 


different screens and to pass and erase all sixty cubes placed oil the ft lb additional variations of adjacent screen configurations. Only the 
screens, in the shortest time possible, 5tariing position ofC1 umsv Pete remains unchanged, it is always on 


.r, 


r - 


This does not sound too exciting nor particularly tricky, but the gf screen No, 1, Each time the game is played therefore, alternative 
secret with these cubes is that some of them, when touched andjjj strategies arc required and consequently the player is forced to 
erased, only increase the score whereas others additionally open fa; memorize the changing screen configurations. - - fa;:- : [ 


and/or close downward chutes. This can either facilitate the straight 


tv- 

■■■■■ 


,V"_ h , 


1 


continuation of Clumsy Pete’s path to reach the next cube or may MOVEMENT 
result in a longer and more risky deviation. Involuntarily falling ggj 

down a chute may force Pete to use a dangerous moving bar to ^ The movements of Clumsy Pete arc easy enough. Movements to faV;;V; 
continue his path. It may even happen that once a chute is opened or y;/ the right or to the left on the girders as well as up and down on the . ' V-jy ■' 
closed it remains so until the end of the game and some of the cubes ^ ladders are enabled by pushing the joystick into the desired fafaV/y, 
will be out of the reach of Pete. This is where the challenge begins direction. The trigger causes Pete to jump for cubes. Cubes touched ■/ V • 
and is why we call those cubes Tricky’. It is unlikely that you will ^ will disappear trom the screens until the end of the game. 
manage to complete all six screens before finding out how some of Upon comae! with a moving bar Fete will be automatically lifted V'V'V 
the cubes influence the entrances of the chutes. This is the way to £)'• up or taken down as long as no joystick signals cause him to leave the ' fa/fayT 
gain experience in leaving certain cubes untouched in the early stage bar. To disembark from this platform requires spilt second timing VfaV yj 
of the game and only erasing them when the most favourable order is V by moving in the direction of an adjacent girder. If you miss that 
evident, j/y fraction, of a second the number of lives will be reduced by one. 

When beginning the game, or upon entering a new lap, the V 
starting position of Clumsy Pete is always situated on screen No. 1. SCORING 
Each screen provides six transitions to adjacent screens that can be ^ 

passed at any time. This is illustrated in the accompanying printout ;V The scoring of TRICKY CUBES is as follows: 
of screen No. 2. 






fa 


cl^. : 

SCOR 


' ^points are awarded for touching and erasing any of the cubes. 

Once all ten cubes arc removed from one screen you are rewarded 


o 




filial :n:ac:ii::ii:ai 


j:ra:ai::ivat:»i: :ll"il* :l 


m 


:.n::u :u: ii 




| ■ :h:iiij:ei: 

n::: ::i i:; 

m 

i: 

| 

i:: 

■ 

inwi:nr;n:ai: 



1 ! 

13 

::: 





with a bonus dependent on the time indicated on the display. This A 

faV time dependent scoring encourages special strategies to complete VVV':| 
: individual screens in the early stages ofa game rather than following 

/•S I the most economic path to remove all bO cubes, 

fa-fa 


l " ■» “ | 

'fafa. 


faV Track of the actual situation is kept by displaying the major features 
at the top of the screens. Upon STARTing a new round, time 


■fa 


yft countdown starts at 2800 time units. The number of lives still left 
£f:l and the actual score are also shown, If you want to know which screen 
.ifa Clumsy Pete is actually moving in you should have a look at the 
upper left corner of the display. Additionally, once you have 
^ removed the last cube from a screen, the number of this screen 
'ft--} together with ail screens completed so far is indicated in the right 


m 


v 


,fafa ;l 
































































by PeteT and Stephan Ohlmeyer 

PLAY Til 

This is almost everything you must know about TRICKY 
CUBES, Now you only have to play it and you will find out for 
yourself whether it really is tricky or not. I hope that you will have as 
much fun trying to solve it as we (the game was programmed 
together with my 16 year old son) had developing it and making it 
tricky* 

When firstly trying to get through to a ‘happy* end you might get 
the impression that it is very unlikely to succeed in erasing all cubes 
before the time has run out. Believe me that it is not impossible (nor 
is it very easy]) to manoeuvre Clumsy Pete through all handicaps 
unlit the screen finally turns into the ‘GREAT SCORE* display. 
When you have succeeded in reaching the GREAT SCORE you 
should try Listing 2. This is the ‘ultimate 1 challenge I 

THE LISTINGS 


There is nothing very particular about the listings, Together with 
the list of variables and the program breakdown they are more or less 
self-explanatory. Just type in listing 1 correctly and save it to disk or 
cassette. If you are using disk use a filename such as 
^DGUBESQNE.BAS”, Now' you simply have to RUN the game as 
described above, 

h'or all those who after some practice have managed to see the 
‘GREAT SCORE’, and then tend to share our opinion that 
TRICKY CUBES really is tricky and challenging enough to deserve 
it’s name, we have added listing 2 which contains six completely 
different and much more sophisticated screens. This advanced 
version is what we consider to be the l real challenge’, 

If you feel encouraged by the initial version to also experience the 
advanced level, take the lime to type in listing 2 as a separate listing 
and save it using the LIST command. If you are using cassette type 
LIST “C:” to save it to tape. If you arc using disk type LIST 
“D:GUBESTWO.B AS rt . Next CLOAD or LOAD Listing 1 and 
then ENTER Listing 2 by typing ENTER “C:* 1 or ENTER 
1L D:CURESTWO.BAS T ’. The two listings will then merge into one 
and you are ready to RUN the advanced version. 

It would be interesting for us to know how long it took until you 
saw the GREAT SCORE’ of this version without changing the time 
units Set at 4000, It is possible, 


PROGRAM BREAKDOWN 


lint 

fiinc Lion 

10-40 

i11 j (i,i 1 Lie If 

50-2 IQ 

nuiin loop 

228*300 

which screen, next 

310-390 

erase cubes and display sctjre 

400-420 

player movement in chutes 

410-490 

player on moving tar 

500-610 

player dead 

£20-800 

open and dose chutes 

810-1470 

mil i n [ilk, game over, once more 

1480-2780 

screens 1 to 6 

2SO0-299O 

prinl cubes and chute opening 

32083250 

display list 

3260-3140 

I'M initialization 

3150-340(1 

character set from ROM lo RAM 

34183460 

positions for cubes and bars. 

3480-4180 

DATA 



EX 1 REM KMttfc l t l t i tMMMKKMMKMKKKMMMKKKMMKMMH 


PH 2 REM * TRICKY CUBFS * 

LR 3 REM * by * 

Ltt 4 REM * PETER and STEPHAN OHLMEYER * 

MP 5 REM * ——---- * 

IZ t> REM * PAGE & MAGAZINE - ENGLAND * 


EO 7 REM KHfcMMMK l t fcWttMHKHHHMKKHKHMKKXKMMM 
NH 8 REM 

ON 10 GRAPHICS 17:POKE 703,10:POKE 710,88 
: POSITION 8,9:? tt6; "LOADING" : POSITION 


TRICKY CUBES 


PX 20 FOR M-l TO 750:NEKT Hi GRAPHICS 0:PO 
KE 712,6:POKE S59,0:G0T0 3210 
YA 30 POKE 756,AC SPOKE 82,0:P0KE 623,C1:P 
OKE 53278,6lYB=77:ZB=4 
YO 40 G5 = i!HS”C1IV5 = C2 l ANZ=9:TIM=2800JGOT 
O 810 

CM 50 REM W+H* MAIN LOOP *** 

OP 80 S=STICKTO?1IE 5TRI6(0)=@ THEN G05UB 
320 

TJ 70 K”H+{C5 —C75 ~C5“C11T>*C4 l IF 5 = C7 THE 
N P05=PR:G05UB 210 

CM 00 IF S=C±i THEN PGS=PL:GOSUB 210 
OC 90 POKE 53Z78,0SGOSUB 398:G06UB ZOOtIF 
K>202 OR H<C4 6 THEN 220 
DO iOO IF PEEKCS32&0J THEN 438 
HO 110 LOCATE tX—C46J/C4,INT t tY —C11J/C8J, 
ZZ:IF ZZ-ill OR ZZ=99 THEN POS^PHsGOTO 
150 

»K 1Z0 IF ZZ =105 THEN 410 
UT 130 IF ZZ~C32 THEN 510 
0D 140 GOSIIB 170 : GOTO 50 

HU ISO S=STICK C0) :V=Y+ C15^013)-C5=C14)5 *C 
8:GOSUB 390;GO5UB ZOO:GOSUH 170:IF S=C 
13 OR S —Cl4 THEN G05U& 210 
UO 155 IF Y<G43 OR V>195 THEN Z20 
XH 160 LOCATE CX-C46>/C4,INTtCY-C11*/CO?, 
ZZ;IF ZZ<>99 THEN 60 
OK 165 GOTO 150 



VARIABLES USEE) 


AN7 

No. ol" lives 

HFi.SCR) 

horizontal position nl moving tars 

COM) 

ilag for opening, and closing chutes 

CHMJ 

routine io move character set 

GS 

flag to print S TART or hoc 

HS, V'S 

screen transition values 

NCB 

new character set base 

MAMS 

title string 

PMOVt 

Tom Hudson’s FM mover 
(ANALOG Computing) 

FOS 

actual player shape 

FRS 

f,tajie of moving bar 

PHI 

player On ladder Or jumping 

FL* 

player moving left 

prs 

player moving right 

PTS 

player in chutes 

SCR 

actual screen No. 

sc 

score 

1TM 

time units actually left 

TSC 

number ot screens completed 

WL(SCR] 

r fUg tbr cube positions 

X, V 

actual player position 

XC, YC 

cube positions 

XL, YL 

[lags for cubes Lo be erased 

YE 

vertical positions of moving bars 

Zfi 

step width for bar movement 


PAG E 6 - Issue 72 41 





















DT 170 TIM—TIM—Cl!POSITION 24,C2:7 06;TIM 
I" "JIF TlM=0 THEN 690 

100 IF TIM<100 THEM SOUND 0 / 4O+TIH j C!4 
, C14 

ZP 190 RETURN 

«R 200 YB=VB+ZB:A^USRCMODE, ±,PMB f PB, BPCSC 
R1,Y8,C31:IF YB>196 OR YB <76 THEM ZB-- 
20 

ZN 206 RETURN 

HM 210 SOUND O , 100,C2,C1Z ! SOUND 0,O,G,0:R 
ETURK 

HY 220 REM *** GOTO SCREEN 

6K 260 IF H>202 THEN SCR—SCR+H5 ;H=C46:GOT 
0 270 

m 248 IF K<C46 THEN SCR=SCR-HS:H=282:GOT 
0 270 

PL 250 IF VCC43 THEN SCR-SCR-05:Y=I95JGOT 
0 270 

DD 260 IF Y>195 THEN SCR-SCR+DS:Y-C43 
Vk 270 IF SCR <Cl THEM SCfl=SCR+C0 
DK 288 IF 5CR>C6 THEN SCR=SCR-C6 
EZ 290 COSUB 39OJP0KE 559,0:POKE 87,0 
RR 608 GQ5IJB SCR*220 + 1260: POSITION £3,Cl: 

7 SCR:POKE 659,62:GOTO 68 
NB 310 REM SCORES N-N-N 

ME 328 PDS=PH:FOR H=C1 TO C®!Y-Y-C2:SOUND 
8,S8-H,C14,C10iGOSUB 390 £ NEKT W:50UND 
0, 0 , 0,0 

EV 330 ZH=CH-C4&J/C4!ZY=tY-1917C8:LOCATE 
ZK,ZV, ZZ :IF ZZ<112 OR ZZ>±2± THEN 380 
OT 640 MLCSCRJ=WLCSCR1+C1JSCsSC+lO:SOUND 
0,120,C14,C14 : POSITION 35,C2:? SC 3 FOR 
M=CI TO C20:NEXT M 

K0 350 SOUND 0,8,8,0:IF HLCSCAJ=C10 THEN 
SC=SC+INTCTIN/31:POSITION 12+SCR,C±:? 
SCR:POSITION 35,CZi7 SCsTSC-TSC+i 
MH 368 IF TSC-C& THEN SC-SG+308:POSITION 
35, C2: ? SC l GOTO 590 

00 370 NLCSCR,WLTSCRJJ=ZK:YLtSCR,WLCSCRJj 
=ZY:POSITION ZH,ZVJ? CHR$tC32l:lF ZZ>1 
17 AND ZZ <127 AND SCR>1 THEN GOSUB 630 
OL 388 FOR H=C1 TO C8!Y-Y+C2!GOSUB 390:Nt 
NT WSIF S<>15 THEN RETURN 
KV 390 A = USRfMOOE,0,PMB J POS,N,Y J C10a ;RETli 
RN 

KW 480 REM *** CHUTE *** 

ML 410 P0S=PT:V=Y+C2:SOUND O,V-50,C14,CIO 
:GOSUB 390:LOCATE CK-C461/C4,TNTttY-Cl 
1) /C83,ZZ:IF ZZ=C32 OR ZZ-105 THEN 410 
FZ 420 SOUND 0,0,0,0 i POS = PR : GOTO 60 
KQ 438 REM MOOING BARS +Hh* 

ZC 440 YB=YB+ZB:Y=YB“C18:K=BPESCR5+C2:A=U 
SRCMODE,1,PMB,PB,BP CSCR] ,Y8,C3> :GOSUB 
390 

SN 450 IF YB>196 OR YB<76 THEN ZB=-ZB 
JH 46© IF STICKE01=C7 THEN N=N*C4!P0S=PR? 

YtlNTTCY-C4J/C8>*C8+11;GOTO 90 
EH 470 IF STICKC03=Cil THEN H=K-C6:PQ5=PL 
: Y^|;NTC€Y-C4i7C0JNCa + ll : GOTO 98 
OK 490 GOTO 440 
II 5O0 REM WW FAST DAMN *-** 

MD 510 IF PEEKC532603<>0 THEN 430 
BC 520 ANZ-ANZ-C1 

HG 530 IF AHZ-O THEN IF Y-289 THEN 59Q 
YO 540 Y = Y + C2 ; SOUND 0,V,CI4,C18:GOSUB 398 
KR 550 IF V=211 THEN 570 
OR 560 GOTO 530 

YN 570 POKE 559,8iPOSITION C7,CI:7 AHZiSC 
R-l;M = 94iY=67:soUND 0, 0 , 0,0 
OF 580 GOTO 298 

BC 590 SOUND 0,8,O,0:POS=PHiN=1BfljY=185:A 
= U5R CMODE,V, PMB, PB , 0, 8, C31 j A = U5R CHOUE, 

0,PMB,POS,8,0,Cl0} 

HC BOB FOR W= C4 TO 2JUF0R M1=0 TO 39:P0Sl 
TION Ml,Hi? CHR5 CC32J ;NEKT Ml:SOUND 0, 
tW-C31*CL5,C14,C14:NEHT M 
CD 610 SOUND 0,0,0,0:FOR H"C1 TO 2Q0:NEKT 



42 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 


I fj 



M:GOTO 818 

UU 620 REM OPEN CHUTES *** 

DY 630 ON SCR^Cl GOTO 640,670,700,730,7/0 
ZP 64& IF Z Z = 1 IB THEN POSITION C3,C12:? ■« 
*■ 11! POSITION G3, C7i? “i”: RETURN 
AN 658 IF ZZ=120 THEN CC<15-1:PQSITION 27 
,ClSi? "i'*iPO5ITI0« C3, C7 : ? "h 41 ! RETURN 
RZ 660 CC C2) -1 : POSITION 27,Cll:7 ■ , i ii :POSI 
TI ON 27,C 7 » 7 M h M SRE TURN 
RU 670 IF ZZ = 119 THEN CC C3)=1:POSITION 30 
, C 7 ! ? "i" iPOSITION 30 , C15 : ? * , i ,< : RETURN 
TO 680 IF ZZ = 120 THEN POSITION 30jC15i? ■* 
h 11 : RETURN 

ZK 698 CC t4>=i:POSITI0N 38 , CIS : 7 * , i"jRETU 

RN 


OJ 700 IF ZZ=H9 THEN CC C 51 =1 ; P0 SIT ION C3 
,012:7 "h"!RETURN 

HH 710 IF ZZ-128 THEN POSITION Cl8,C7i7 '* 
H ,r ; RETURN 

MZ 728 CC £6) =1: POSITION C10,C7:7 « , i":RETl| 

RN 

IM 730 IF ZZ—118 THEN POSITION C10,C7:? " 
i M i POSITION 010,014:7 '•h” E RETURN 
MK 740 IF ZZ=119 THEN CCC71-1;POSITION Cl 
0, C7 : 7 «'i"i RETURN 

YM 750 IF ZZ”128 THEN CCtOJ=1:POSITION Cl 
0,C14i7 41 i 11 : RETURN 

JF 760 POSITION CIO , C7 : 7 “6 ,r : POSITION C18 

,ci4i? ,, i il i Return 

MH 770 IF ZZ=ii& THEN POSITION CI7,C10:7 
"h H iRETURN 

TH 780 IF ZZ = 119 THEN CC <9l —1 *. POSITION Cl 
7,C1 Bj? "h 1 *; RETURN 

DF 790 IF ZZ -IZO THEN POSITION C17,C±S:7 
"i"!RETURN 


0Z 800 CC CIOS -1 : POSITION Ci7,ClO:7 <l i l4 :RE 
TURN 

00 816 REM *** TITLE *** 

DR 820 POSITION 0,C8:7 '■ bodaaabQdaa 
dabodaaabod "j 


AS 

830 7 41 

ft f 

fc f ec f 

II m 

J 

ec f 

AU 

840 7 *■ 

§c f 

ec f ec f 

■ 1 B 

J 

ecf 

AH 

850 7 “ 

ec f 

ec f ecf 

li . 

* 

ec # 

WF 

860 7 11 

ec f 

ec f doaaa 

Ik ■ 
r 

a aaaa 

NS 

070 FOR 

ec f 

14 ; JNEKT 

W=C13 TO C16 iPOSITION 0,M:? 41 

ec # 

M 

HU 

808 ? 

y hJaoa 

doagkjaaaaaa 

II * 

> 

aaaaaa 

TK 

890 7 11 

ki 1 

ki 1 

*1 h 

J 


ST 

900 ? ■* 

ki 1 

ki 1 

ii * 

9 


CO 

910 POSITION 0,22:? " 

aaaaaboda *■; 

abodaaaaa 

CN 

920 ? “ 

ec f 



ecf 11 ; 

KK 930 POKE 559,62:IF ANZ=0 OR TIM-0 THEN 
1370 

MU 940 IF TSC-C6 THEN 1380 

UD 958 POSITION C14,C12:7 "plqir^sztZOJt 11 : 
FOR H-Cl TO CI5:HEKT M;POSITION C15,Cl 
71? "yiwzviizyz" 

ZT 960 N AM$- 4l 


OHLMtYER 


FO 970 FOR H—Cl TO C15:PQSITIQH C3,Cl:? N 
AMS CM, H + C131 : SOUND O, 250-”M»C14 , CIO, Cl4 
:SOUND Cl,W*C14-C±,C10,C12 
00 980 FOR HI“C1 TO €15!NEM T MliNEHT M:50 
UND 0,8,0,O:SOUND Cl>8,0,8 
AH 990 FOR H—Cl TO 50:NEKT H:POSITION 26, 
C2:7 ttCb ; 11 JAN 1985«*:F0R M=C1 TO 5B: NEK 
T H 





















Do me® x -102 :y=147:p0S=pr:gosub 330 :for 
W=C1 TO 100 ; NEHT 14 

PM 1010 FOR W1-& TO Ci STEP ~1!FOR HZ=Ci 
TO C2iH~H+C4!PQS-PM:GOSUB 330!NEHT H25 
GO SUB 1030 

10 1020 REX'! Ml ; GOTO 1100 

LF 1030 POSITION CH-50JZC4*CY-C11J7C@ 

YW 1040 OH HI GOTO 1850*1060*1078,1080*10 
30 


PRJGOSUB 1420:GOTO 230 
Hh 1420 FOR M=C1 TO C±8:HLtWJs-8:CCCMl=0:N 
EKT H 

00 1430 FOR M-C1 TO C6:F0R WP=C1 TO C10!X 
L CM, MP) —8 » YL CM#HP) —4 1 NEXT HP ; HEHT 14 
IZ 144 0 POSITION C13*C1:? 11 " l POSITI 

ON 35*C2:? 11 « 

KO 1450 MS=JNTCRNDCC11*51+C1!V5=INTlRNDlC 
1)M53FC1:1F HS = US OR HS=C2*U5 OR VS=C2 


nf 

1068 ? p" : GOSUB 1240 ! RETURN 

CN 

1460 

SCR-C1!SC-0iANZ 

- 

3!TSG”0!TIM—2800 

MY 

1070 ? 4' 1 ! GOSUB 1240! RETURN 

BH 

1470 

POSITION 

C3,Cii 


SCR 

i POSITION 

G7* 

L.P 

1080 ? " f GOSUB 1240: RETURN 


Ci:? 

ANZ!POSITION 24 

r 

C2: ? 

TIM:POSITION 

HI 

103O ? “Vi";GOSUB 1240iRETURN 


35,C2:? SCiRETURN 





H>J 

1100 FOR W—Cl TO C±1!X=K*C4!P05=PRSGOS 

IT 

1480 

REM 

SCREEN 

1 





MB 330:NEXT H 

LF 

1430 

POSITION 

0,43? 

If 

X 

ec f 


SM 

1110 FOR H—Ci TO C16!Y=Y-C4!POS=PHi60S 




z ecf 


11 t 

M 




Ufi 338:NEXT H 

DU 

1500 

? 

ec f 





FU 

1120 FOR H=C1 TO C6!K~H-C4!P05~PL!GOSU 


ecf 







B 330:NEXT H 

AY 

1510 

-3 II 

ec f 





CD 

1I30 FOR H—CI TO CB;Y—Y+C4 5 POS-PH:G05U 


ecf 







B 338:NEXT H 

MT 

1520 

? *■ bodaaaoaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaabod 

DO 

1148 FOR H=C1 TO C3:R=H-C4:P0S-PL;G0SU 


ecf 







B 3 9 0 ! N E X T H 

UT 

1530 

? 11 ec f 





ec f 

H5 

1150 FOR HI“Cl TO C6!FOR HZ = C1 TO C2!X 


ec # *■; 







=K-G4?POS=PH:GOSUB 330:NEKT M2:GOSUB 1 

OY 

1540 

? " ec f 

z 



z 

ec f 


160!NEXT Hi!GOTO 1250 


x ecf 






SP 

1160 POSITION CH“C46)/C4* CY“C11»/CS 

UZ 

1550 

? " ec f 





et f 

HP 

1178 ON HI GOTO 1180,1130,1208*1210,12 


ecf l, J 







28,1230 

UC 

1568 

? 11 ec f 





ec f 

KF 

1100 ? M “": GOSUB 1240: RETURN 


ecf “J 






IM 

1130 ? “4":G05UB 1240!RETURN 

VC 

1570 

? T, abcM 

bodaa 



bodaa 

aoa 

GL 

1200 7 "Vi":GOSUB 1248!RETURN 


a aoaboda"; 






FC 

1210 ? GOSUB 1240! RETURN 

XJ 

1588 

? " ecf 

et f 



ec f 


or 

1220 ? " j H";G0SUB 1240!RETURN 



x ecf "j 






MH 

1230 ? "b f 

E Q 

1538 

7 " ecf 

ec f 



et f 


R Ml 

1248 SOUND 8,120—H1N-5 * C14 , C14 : SOUND 1* 



ecf M j 







150-Hi*5 , C10 r C14 : FOR 14=1 T0 20 : NEXT 14: 

DR 

1G08 

7 " ecf 

ec f 



ec f 



SOUND 0*0,0,8:SOUND ±,8,0,0!RETURN 



ecf B, j 






ET 

1250 FOR H-CT TO C4 l H=H~C4!POS=PL!GOSU 

PU 

1610 

7 '*■* ec f 

ec f 



e t f 

X bO 


B 330!NEXT H 


daaa 

ec f “j 






EK 

1268 FOR M=C1 TO C8!Y-Y-C4:P05=P«:GOSU 

BH 

1620 

? " ecf 

aoaaaaaa aabodoa 

ec 


B 3 30!NEXT H 


f 

ec f 






AC 

1278 FOR U=C1 TO CG;X=K-C4!POS=PL!GOSU 

GM 

1630 

? " ecf 




ec f 

ec 


B 330 ! NEXT 14: POS=PH ; GOSUB 388: GOSUB 13 


f 

ecf "i 







30 

D5 

1640 

? M ec f 

z 



aoaaaabddaaao 

GO 

1280 FOR 14“0 TO C17: POSITION H,Cl!? CH 


a 

x ecf "1 







RSCC32) JPOSXTI0N 28+H*G2!? CHR5 tC3Z1 :N 

ND 

1650 

? " ec f 




ec f 



EKT H 



ecf 






JS 

1230 POSITION 8, Cl!? »C6 i "ETTH 

NG 

1660 

? « et f 




ec f 



KM 

JK 

SF 

01 

NO 

TE 


1300 FOR M=Cl TO Ci®:V=Y*C4;G0SUB 330! 
RENT H 

1310 FOR H=CA TO C3 I H“X+C4 T PQS-PR ! GO5II 
B 330?NEHT W 

1320 FOR H=C1 TO C®:V=Y”C2?SOUND 0,58- 
M,C14,C10lP05~PHiG05UB 330!HEMT H3S0UN 
D 0,0,8,0 

1330 POSITION G7 * G17 ! ? ,p i M :FOR H=C1 TO 
C14 : V=V+C4 : PGS-PT i GOSUB 3 30 ! NEXT 14 
1340 POS—PH!GOSUB 330!FOR H-Gl TO CIO I 
NEXT W:FOR H=C1 TO 5*V=V+C4fGOSUB 330: 
NEHT W 

1350 X=74:Y=C43:POKE 553 *O:GOSUB 1468: 


MO 1670 ? M ^paaabod Aaaaa 
aaabodaoa "J 
HI 1680 ? 11 et f 

ecf "j 

IK 1630 GOSUB 2000:RETURN 
IM 1700 REM Wtt* SCREEN 2 *HH* 

PR 1710 POSITION 0,4S? 11 Z 

#cf z*v; 

BF ±72 0 ? !1 ecf 

ecf "j 

BI 1736 7 « ecf 

ecf "j 

IN 1740 ? " agtijaaoasaaaaboda aaaaaaagija 
aaaaoabod M ; 



GOSUB 1480!GOSUB 330!POKE 553*62 

CH 

1750 

? " kil 


z ec f 

z 

kil 

HF 

1360 

FOR 14= Cl TO C6:Y=V + C4 ! GOSUB 338 :N 



ecf ", 






EKT 

M!FOR H=G1 TO C4!K=H*C4!POS=PR:GOS 

FH 

1760 

? 11 2k i 1 


ec f 


eil 


UB 330!NEK T HtGOTO 60 



zeef 





U14 

1370 

POSITION C16, Cfl : ? "\»J J t, r 11 ! P05I 

HY 

1770 

7 11 eil 


ec f 


eil 


TION 

CI6,C12:? "\H s rH":GOTQ 1338 



ecf 





UD 

1388 

position cis*ea:? Hph r:PO 

UL 

1780 

? " e|l 

aaaaaaaaaoaa 

aaaaaaaghti 


SIT ION CIS , Cl 2 i ? i*—fViVJJH* P " 



ecf 





RD 

1330 

position c±5,22:? "*4*h K 1 ":go 

ML 

1738 

? "aagihn 

z 



x kil 


SUB 338: IF PEEK (532733 06 THEN 1330 
HJ 1400 IF G5-1 THEN GS = 01 RETURN 
LV 1410 K=34!Y^67!YB=77!POKE 53270,8:POS= 



boda boda"; 
MN 1808 ? » kil 
ecf ecf "} 




kil 



J PAGE 6 - Issue 22 45 

’ t 





















MO 

1810 

rt i ■ 

hi 1 


kil 



ec f 

il . 

1 




ec f 

ec f 

18 « 

# 



00 

2220 

7 11 


ec f 

kil 

OV 

1870 

7 »> 

hi 1 

aboda 

bod a kil 



ec r 

fl ■ 

# 




ec f 

ec f 

11 * 

J 



LO 

2230 

? "aagij 

aaacf aoaaaa 

kil 

XD 

1030 

7 *! 

ki 1 

ec t 

ec f 


aaaaaaoaa" 1 ; 




ec f 

ec f 

II . 

3 



20 

2240 

7 if 

hi 1 


hi 1 

KG 

1640 

7 11 

k i 1 

ec f 

ec f 




IK i 

J 




ec f 

ec f 

HI ■ 

J 



UB 

2250 

7 »l 

kil 

z 

ki 1 

ss 

1650 

7 it 

hi l 

aob odaaaaaa 

aoaaaaghJ a 



z 

it * 




aaoaa ecf 

li ■ 

J 



ZW 

2260 

7 " 

kil 


ki 1 

KF 

I860 

7 <• 

k i I 

z ecf 

kil 




nil 

# 




Z 

ec f 

11 i 

3 



7.Z 

2270 

7 fl 

ki 1 


k i 1 

MX 

1070 

7 M 


ec f 





lii 

f 





ec f 

1 ■ Bi 

F 



MB 

2280 

7 f 1 

ki 1 

aabod 

kil 

KM 

1600 

7 M 


ec f 



aaaabod 

1 1 m 

J■ 





ec f 

II ii 

M 



MJ 

Z29B 

7 “ 

kil 

ec f 

kil 

OB 

1890 

7 M , 

aaaaaborfaoa 

aaaaaaaaaaa 



ec f 

11 ■ 

* 




aaabodaoa 

li . 

J 



MO 

2380 

7 fi 

kil 

ec f 

kil 

RX 

1900 

7 M 


ec f 




ec f 

II a 

3 




ec f 11 j 

MS 1910 QOS UB 2S8G i RETURN 
KB 1920 REM *** SCREEN 3 iHHf 
KK 1930 POSITION 0,4:? " z ecf 

2 ec f ,p | 


OL 2310 ? ,l ec f 

ec f l ' j 

00 2320 7 " ec f 

ec f M J 

UM 2330 ? If aaaaabodaoaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 


1940 

7 

f f 

ec f 






aabodoa *‘J 





ec f 


■i i 
* 





RV 

2340 

? 14 ec f 




1950 

7 

f V 

ec f 






ec f ■■; 





ec f 


■ i ■ 





HT 

2350 

GOSUB 2800 

:RETURN 




I960 

7 

ft 

aaaaoaaaa 

aaaaaabod aaag 

L5 

2360 

REM N-iHt SCREEN 5 

ftrf 



h jaaoaaa 

■ i * 

i 





KK 

2370 

POSITION 0 

j 4 : ? « 

z ec f 



1970 

7 

« i 



ecf z 

h 


z 


z ec f 

z" J 



i 1 



■ V ■ 

# 





BO 

2360 

? *■ ec f 




1980 

7 

11 

Z Z 


ec f 

k 


ecf M ; 





il 



z ,( i 





BI 

2390 

7 i* et f 




1990 

7 

l ■ 



#c f 

k 


ec f “ j 





i 1 



11 ft 





OV 

2400 

7 u aabodaoagiJaaaaaaaaaa 

aaaa aa a 

2000 

7 

KI 



aeaabod 

k 


aaaaoabod 





i 1 



J 





VC 

2410 

? ” ec f 

h i 1 

z 



2010 

7 

"abod aaaa 

abod 

z 

ecf 

h 



ecf 





i 1 

bodaa'*; 





UV 

2420 

7 “ zeef 

ki 1 




2020 

7 

■4 

ec F 

ec f 


ec f 




et f ,B ; 






ec f 

1 * F 





XH 

2430 

7 “ ecf 

kil 




2030 

7 

ii 

f*C f 

ec f 


ec f 




ecf f ‘; 






ecf 

Bl i 

J 





EH 

2440 

7 " ec f 

kil 

bodaaaaa 

abod 


2040 

7 

flfe 

aob od 

aoaaa 

aoaaaaag 



ecf 





ijaaaaoa 

111 





NO 

2450 

? "aaaaoa 

kif 

ec f 

ec f 

b 

2 050 

7 

IV 

ec f 




k 


adaaaaboda"; 





il 



z M i 





UF 

2460 

2 11 

kif 

ec f 

ec f 

e 

2060 

7 

li 

ec f 


z 


k 


C f 

ec f 





il 



ii » 

F 





MU 

2470 

7 1* 2 

nb jaaaoa 

ec f 

a 

2670 

7 

11 

aoaaaaaaa 

abod 



k 


obod 

ec f "i 





i 1 



ii ■ 

* 





KM 

2480 

7 It 

kil 

2 

ec f 

z 

2080 

7 

11 

z 

et f 


bOd abod 

h 


ec f 

zee f 





il 

aabod 

«■ & 

# 





GO 

2490 

il 

k i ) 


ec f 


7090 

7 

IV 


aobod 

ecf ecf 



ec f 

ec f 







ec f 

IV ft 

J 





OD 

2500 

2 11 aaabod 

kil 


ec f 


2100 

7 

ai 


ec f 

ecf ecf 



ec f 

ec f 







ec f 

■ L ft 





GF 

2510 

7 41 ec f 

k 1 1 

bodaaaaa 

aoaaa 

7110 

7 

i* 

aaabodaaa 

aeaaaaoa aoaaa 


aoaaaecf ■*; 





aaabodaoa 

ii » 

3 





YV 

2520 

2 il ec f 

kil 

ec f 



2120 

7 

11 

ec f 







ecf ; 





ec f 

lla 

3 






RI 

2530 

? " ec f 


ec f 




HJ 2130 GOSUB 2©00 ! RETURMl 
KN 2140 REM *** SCREEN 4 *** 
t>Q 2150 POSITION 0,4:2 2 ecf 

z ecf 11 J 

BG 216 0 7 11 #Cf 

ec f 

2170 T " ecf 

ec f 

JB 2100 1 " aaaaoabodsaaaaghjsabodaaaaa 


ecf "j 

RL 2540 7 ** ecf ec f 

ecf M ; 

PI> 2550 7 “ aaaaobodaaadaaoaa 
aaabodaoa *■; 

SI 2560 ? li ecf 

ec f 1 '; 

ID 2 570 G0SUB 2000 1 RETURN 
MM 2 580 REM *«►* SCREEN 6 +HH* 


aaaaaaa 


aoabod 

IB ft 

3 




JR 

2590 POSITION 

0,4:? " z 

2198 7 14 


ec f 

kil 

et f 


Z 

ecf 

ec f 

11 ft 

3 




0V 

260O 7 ■■ 

ec f 

2200 7 

z 

ec f 

z kil 

ec f z 


ecf 4l ; 


z ec f 

KI -k 

# 




BB 

2610 ? ■■ 

ec f 

2210 ? ■■ 


ec f 

kil 

ec f 


ecf ° j 




44 PAGE ft - Issue 22 

jl/ r v 









































HA 

2620 

? *i 

bodaaaoa 



aaaaaaa a 



aaaaoabOd 

n . 
i 





XL 

2630 

? i« 

ec f 




m 



ec f 

ita 

i 





i-0 

2640 

7 1* 

ecf 




PN 



ec f 

HI * 

J 





UR 

2650 

i ii 

ec # 

bodaaagijaaaaaaaas a 

GO 


abod 

ec f 

11 Hi 

M 





0N 

2666 

2 11 

ec f 

zee f 

kil 




ec f 

ec f 

• 




FC 

cc 

2670 

? "aaoabod 

ec f 

kil 




f 

boda"; 




VH 

5N 

2680 

? ** 

ec f 

ec f 

kil 

z 



ec f 

zee f 

i« ■ 




SS 

OR 

2690 

? M 

aoaaasaoa 

ki 1 




ec f 

ec f 

ii i 

J 




GR 

GN 

2700 

^ H 


z 

kil 




ec t 

ec f 

<p i 

9 




U) 

PV 

2710 

? 11 



ei 1 

aaaaaa 



aoaa ecf 

II ■ 

J 




RH 

MM 

2720 

? ii 



e x I 





ec f 

ftl i 

M 






KU 2730 ? 11 bodaaaaa^aasaaaghn 
ec f 


«cf 


a bodaos *■ 

SS 2700 ? *■ 

ec f"; 

AB 2000 REM *HHf PRIMT CUBE'S *§FK 
IL 2010 FOR HP = Ci TO C10!POSITION KCCSCR, 
MRJ , VC C5CR,MPJ :7 CHR9CIli+HPJ ;KENT HP 
JO Z02O FOII HP=1 TO ML (SCR J : POSITIOM ML tS 
Cft * HPJ , YL (SCR , MP1 % 7 CHR$ (C32) : NEHT HP 
PI 2030 IF SCR = 1 THEM RETURN 
OE 2040 ON SCR—Cl GOTO 2058,2830,2530,294 
0,2570 


■*i" ! POSITIi 
BL 2070 RETURN 


AS 2500 RETURN 


1 i M 


OB 2930 RETURN 


ij.* 


? mi 


BK 2960 RETURN 


: ^ Ml »■ 


BT 2990 RETURN 


IH1*256:POKE 560,&LILO!POKE 5Bi,DLIHI 
HK 3220 SCRMX=INTtSCREEN^256J:SCRLG=SCR£E 
N-SCRHI*256iPOKE 68,SCRLO:POKE 69,SCRH 
I 

ET 3230 RESTORE 41X0:FOR K=DL I TO DLI+331 
REAP BsTF e<0 then b=peekTABS CBJ 3 
IR 3240 POKE H,B:HtWT K:Cl"l:C2 = 2:C3-3:04 


n:pl5 CD =chr 
H !PH$(IJ=CHR 


EL 

2740 

7 ■* ec f Z 

kil z 

HC 

MO 

z 

2750 

z ec f *■s 

7 “ ecF 

kil 

NO 

OR 

2760 

ec f 

7 ’* ec f 

k i f 

TH 



ec f **; 



BH 

2770 

7 11 aoaaabodaa 

aaaaaaaaaaaa a 

EK 


=4:C6=6;C7=7;C0=8!CX0=10:Clt=lliC12=12 
:C13=i3:Cl4=14iC15=I5:C16=16iCl7=1? 
3250 Cl0=18iC20=20:C3Z=32:C43=43JC46=4 
6 

3260 DIM PHS(C10)*PL5CCLO) ( PH$tC103 
$ (Cl 0) , P1400? <100) r PBS C C 3 > ,NAM$ C28T 
3270 RESTORE 4010;MOVE=APR(PMQUSjjFOR 
H=C1 TO 10 0 : REAP N : PH8US 00=CtfR$fN) :NE 
KT M 

32O0 FOR I=C1 TO CIOiREAP N:PR$ (I)= CHR 

$C N) !NEHT I 

3290 FOR I=C1 TO CIO:READ 
% CN> :NEKT I 

33O0 FOR I = C1 TO CIO:REAP 
$CN):NEKT r 

3310 FOR I=C1 TO CIO;REAP N:PTS(I)=CHR 
s no : NEMT r 

3320 FOR r=Cl TO C3:REAP N l PBS(15= CHRS 
CNJ;NEKT I 

3330 PMBASE=PEEKC106J-16:P0KE 54279,PM 
BASE:PMB = PMBA5ER256;PR = APR(PRS J ;PL = A DR 
CPL$):POKE 53277,2 
TH 3340 PK=AOftCPHSl;PT=APRtPTSl:PBSADRCPB 
9) SPOKE 704,44 s POKE 705,126 
3345 FOR 1=203 TO Z09:P0KE I, B :NEKT I 
3350 AC=PEEKC106J-16:NC0=AC*256iPOKE 2 
04,AC;POKE 206,224:POKE 712,1 
3360 RESTORE 4100:PlM GHMS(205:FOR «=C 
1 TO C20:REAO BsCHM^fK,K3=CHRSCB3;NEKT 
K 

3370 0=USR(APRCCHH93T:RESTORE 3490:FOR 
M=NCB+65*CS TO NCB+91#CB—Cl!REAP B:PO 
KE K,B:NEKT H 

3300 FOR H=NC6+97*C8 TO WCB+123»C0-C1! 
REAP B:POKE H, 8 iNEMT K 

3390 POKE 752,1!POKE 02,8:P0KE 700,10: 
POKE 709,119;POKE 710,BO:POKE 67,0:7 C 
HR9 (1253 

3400 FOR H=0 TO 39!POKE SCREEN + H,85:PO 
KE SCREEN+60+K,05:POKE SCREEN+120+H,©5 
:NEKT H 

IM 3410 REM »** CUBE POSITIONS WK* 


LO 

UP 


PH 


THEN POSITION 

27,CIS:? 

UC 

3420 

f,C7:? "6“ 



10J , V 

THEN POSITION 

27,Clli7 

RR 

3430 

r,C7:? f, h“ 



EHT H 



20 

3440 

THEN POSITION 

30,C7:7 


P=C1 

r CIS ; 7 "i'* 



H, HP1 

THEN POSITION 

30,C15J7 

KP 

3450 



EU 

3460 




BP (H) 

THEN POSITION 

C3,C12 : 7 

or 

347 0 



MV 

3460 

THEN POSITION 

CIS,C7:7 

SH 

3490 



HH 

3500 




240 

THEN POSITION 

CIO,C7 :7 

HK 

3510 



NA 

3520 

THEN POSITION 

CIO,Cl4; 

PG 

3530 



IN 

3540 




240 

THEN POSITION 

ci7,cie: 

IK 

3550 



UQ 

3560 

THEN POSITION 

C17,CIO 

JD 

3570 



NY 

3530 



KR 

3590 j 

TIALI2ING 


HJ 

3600 

(106JN256-10B0 

:DLI=SCR 

HP 

3610 1 

CDL1/256J:DLILO=0LI-DL 

SG 

3620 


W 


H 


LN 

CP 


3630 DATA 63,60,60,60,63,60,60,63 
3640 PATA 240,240,240,240,252,00,60,25 


3650 DATA 252,12,0,0,240,0,12,252 
3660 PATA 63,60,60,60,63,0,48,63 
3670 PATA 252,12,0,0,252,60,60,252 
3600 PATA 252,12,8,0,60*12,12,252 



PAGE 6 - Issue 22 4 $ 


M Pi I Pi 





































1 



OR 

3090 

Data 

KH 

3700 

DATA 

CN 

3710 

DATA 

SC 

3720 

DATA 

RF 

3730 

DATA 

AB 

3740 

DATA 

UW 

3750 

DATA 

DZ 

3760 

DATA 

DK 

377® 

DATA 

UZ 

3700 

DATA 

MI 

3790 

DATA 

FJ 

3800 

128 

DATA 

TU 

3810 

DATA 

JT 

3 620 

170 

DATA 

FG 

3 830 

170 

DATA 

YS 

3840 

4 

DATA 

IC 

3850 

DATA 

OU 

3360 

144 

DATA 

HK 

3870 

DATA 

RD 

3880 

4 

DATA 

IJ 

389® 

DATA 

KG 

3900 

8 

DATA 

UO 

3910 

0 

DATA 

RX 

3920 

0 

DATA 

PH 

3930 

0 

DATA 

MO 

3940 

0 

DATA 

JY 

3950 

0 

DATA 

UC 

3960 

0 

DATA 

SM 

3970 

0 

DATA 

SM 

3980 

0 

DATA 

KG 

3990 

0 

DATA 

YK 

4000 

0 

DATA 

PJ 

4010 

DATA 


Z5Z.lt, ±2,12,2 S2,12,12,12 
63151 , 51 , 48 , 40 , 40 , 43,48 
252,204,204,12,12,12,12,12 
252,±2,12,12,12,12,12,252 
50,60,60,60,60,60,15,3 
12,12,12,12,12,50,740 ,192 
05 , 55 , 65 , 05 , 0 , 0 , 0,0 
05,65,55,05,2,2,2,2 
170,0,0,0,170,0,0,® 
05,65,65,05,128,128*126,128 
2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2,2 
120,128,120,126,120,120,120, 


85.69.70.86.6.6.6.6 
255,255,170,170,170,170,170, 

170,170,170,170,170,170,17®, 

05,01,145,14?,144,144,144,14 

6 . 6 . 6 . 6 . 6 . 6 . 6 .6 

144,144,144,144,144,144,144, 

5,5,6,0,6,6,6,6 

00,SO,144,144,144,144,144,14 


05,0,0,05,0,O,O,O 

255.255.255.241.255.255.255, 

255.252.255.255.255.207.255, 

255.252.255.241.255.207.255, 

255.204.255.255.255.204.255, 

255.204.255.243.255.204.255, 

255.204.255.264.255.204.255, 

255.241.255.255.255.243.255, 

255.207.255.243.255.252.255, 

255.243.255.243.255.243.255, 


255,192,204,204,204,192,255, 
192,192,192,192,192,192,192, 
216,104,104,104,133,213,104, 


GN 4 13 0 00 la 11,0,20,0,6,12,5,19,34,9,30, 
4,0,9,1,4,23,12,32,19 
ZU 414® DATA 0,9,3,9,3,19,10,12,30,16,16, 
17,3,4,27,4,25,0,30,9 
HM 4150 DATA 23,19,22,14,37,14,1,9,33,9,1 
4,9,25,4,3,4,26,9,7,14 
UZ 4160 DATA 1,9,1,14,17,0,28,15,34,15,30 
,4,31,4,10,15,2,4,10,4 
AY 417® DATA 22,13,13,15,1,4,0,11,34,13,3 
0,19,23,19,33,19,10,19,21,4 
GR 4100 para 100,116,92,164,132,156 


El 1 REM HtHHMtK NMftWfM f HMtKHMHHHHI IHHHHHHHHW 


MC 2 REM » TRICKY CUBES LISTING 2 * 

DM 3 REK * 1 The UltiMte Challenge 1 * 

E6 4 REM *-—-* 

00 5 REM * COMBINE WITH LISTING 1 * 

UX 6 REM ** see article * 


£8 7 REM HMHHHWMXW N KMKMMM I t l tMltimKKNNK Hl tWH. 
MJ 630 OH SCR —Cl GOTO 64 8,600,720,760,700 
TE 640 IF ZZ-11S THEN CCCi>=1:POSITION 31 
, CIO : ? " i 44 ; RETURN 

CD 650 IF ZZ-119 THEN POSITION 27,917 "h 41 
: RETURN 

FY 660 IF ZZ-120 THEN CCC2J=1!POSITION Cl 
1,9;2 "h":RETURN 

JP 67® POSITION C7,C±6:7 l4 i":RETU«N 
DI 680 IF ZZ=±±8 THEN POSITION C16,C12:7 
" i '* t POSITION Cl! , C7 : 7 l, h* 1 : RETURN 
LB 690 IF ZZ —119 THEN CC C3J =1:POSITION 24 
,C7J? ,r i 111 : POSITION C11,C7!? ,4 h 44 : RETURN 
BL 700 IF 22=120 THEN POSITION 24,C7:7 ,4 i 
41 i POSITION C16,C12:7 "h" I RE TURN 
CJ 710 CC(4J=1 : POSITION 24,C17i? aa h H :RETII 
RN 

10 720 IF 2Z-110 THEN CC€5> -1i POSITION Cl 
0,C7S? "h" ! POSITION 32 , CI3 : 2 ,, i , ‘: RETUR 
N 

OH 730 IF Z Z =119 THEN CCC63 =1!POSITION Cl 
8,0161? 14 i M ! RETURN 

UM 740 IF 22 = 120 THEN POSITION 32, C13 ! ? 14 
!■* 5 RETURN 

UK 750 POSITION 32,C13:7 ■MV 1 RET URN 
UK 760 IF ZZ=1I& OR ZZ=121 THEN CGT73”liP 
OSITIOH 9,C13l? ,, h 1 ' 1 : RETURN 
OB 770 CC CBS =1 * POSITION 30, G7 1 7 4, h‘*:RETUR 

N 


24,105,4,133,206,104,133,205,104,133,2 
04,104,133,203,104,104,133,200 
PZ 4020 DATA 104,104,133,209,104,104,24,1 
01,209,133,207,166,213,240,16,165,205, 
24,105,0,133,205,165,206,105 
TS 4030 DATA 1,133,206,202,200,240,160,0, 
162,0,196,209,144,19,196,207,176,15,13 
2,212,138,168,177,203,164 


IW 780 IF ZZ=11& OR ZZ=±2i THEN CCt?I=liP 
0SITI8N 30 | CIO ; ? ,, i H i RETURN 
WK 790 IF ZZ -119 THEN POSITION 9, Cl©! 7 ,4 i 
41 ; POSITION 3®,CIO!? M h" : RETURN 
HO 000 CCC10>=1 :POSITION 9,CIOi? ,, t ,, :RETU 
RN 

UZ 1360 FOR **=C1 TO C6:Y=Y+C4;GOSUB 390SN 
EXT W: GOTO 6® 


LV 

4040 DATA 212,145,205,232,169,0,240,4, 

UJ 

1460 

SCR=C1!sc=0|ANZ 

= 9 5 TSC = 0: 

! TIM=4O80 



169,0 f 145,205,200,192,0,208,224,166,21 

RR 

1490 

POSITION 0,C4:? 

41 ecf 

Z 



3,165,208,157,0,208,96 


Z 


z 14 ; 



CL 

4050 DATA 40,16,56,44,56,48,56,24,36,5 

AX 

1500 

? " ecf 

11 1 




MD 

4 

4060 DATA 10,4,14,26,14,5,14,12,18,54 

AL 

1510 

? 14 ecf 




RG 

4070 DATA 36,24,60,60,102,60,24,24,36, 



l« m 

F 





102 

DM 

1528 

2 “ saaoaaaaaa 

aaabod 

bodaaag 

CS 

4080 DATA 36,24,24,44,52,60,60,24,24,6 


ijaaboda M ; 





0 

BY 

1530 

'f *i 

ec f 

ec f 

k 

08 

4090 DATA 15,15,15 


i 1 i 

ecf "J 




VD 

4100 DATA 104,162,4,16®,0,177,ZOS,145, 

CB 

1540 

-> ii 

ec f 

ec f 

k 


203,200,203,249,230,206,230,204,202,20 


i 1 - 

ECf "J 





8,242,96 

LB 

1550 

7 " bodabod z 

ec f 

ec f 

k 

XO 

4110 DATA 112,112,77,-88,-09,6,14,6,13 


i 1 

aabod 4I ; 





i112,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4 

01 

1560 

? 14 ec f ec f 

aoaaaaaaaoa 

k 


,4,4*4,4,65,-560,-561 


i 1 

ecf 




D0 

4120 DATA 1*4,29,4,23,9,10,9,5,19,30,9 

VS 

1570 

? 14 ecf ecf 



h 


,33,13,33,19,30,9,25,16 


i 1 

ecf 4 *; 




















MW 

1580 

? "aaoa aoaaaa k 



1 1 i 

# 





i 1 bDdsoaa 11 ; 

KE 

1990 

? 14 ec f 


k i 1 


C5 

1590 

? '* l 1 Ik 



Ll . 

1 





i 1 ec f ,p j 

UC 

2000 

7 11 ec f 


kif 

b D 

EC 

1600 

a i • 


dabodabod "j 





PC f 11 % 

ZY 

2010 

7 ** ec f 

ddaaaaaghjaaa 

kif 

ec 

EF 

1610 

2 11 


f ec f 

ec f 41 j 





PC f "J 

TG 

2020 

? "aaoa 

ki 1 

IM jaaao 

ZM 

1620 

? 11 budaa aaaaaaaoi Jaaaaabod 


a ec f 

ao a a*'; 





aaaaoa "j 

SY 

2030 

? “ 

Z kil 

z kil 


HZ 

16 3 0 

? 11 ec f kil ec f 


ec f 

lib 






H r 

J 

LB 

2040 

? ■■ z 

ki f 

e i 1 


HE 

1640 

7 ,# ec f bodaa 2 kil 2 ecf 


ec f 

11 ■ 

# 






z '■ J 

5C 

2050 

7 ■* 

k i f 

e i 1 

bo 

JY 

16 SO 

? M ecf ecf aob 


daaobod l"i 





od 

14 f 
f 

NB 

2060 

t 11 

abod aaaaaaaagin 

ec 

FC 

1660 

? *' ec f ec f e 


f ecf 





C f 

J 

Kht 

2070 

7 ** bodaaa 

ec f 

kil 

ec 

eg 

1670 

7 ,B aobodaoa aaad aaaaaaa a 


f ecf ,l ; 





naaabodaa *■; 

UZ 

2086 

7 M ecf 

ec f z 

kil 

ec 

J5 

1660 

? ,T ec f 


f aobod 





ec f *■ i 

IF 

2090 

? ■■ ec f 

ec f 


ec 

IK 

1690 

GOSUB 28001 RETURN 


f 

ecf 




xw 

17oa 

REN *** SCREEN 2 *** 

KG 

2106 

7 M ec f 

ec f 


ec 

YE 

1710 

POSITION 0,C4 !7 " ZeCf 


f 

ec f 1,1 ; 






z ecf 2"; 

HS 

2110 

7 “ aobod 

aaaaoaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaao 

L 3 

1720 

? " ec f 


a bodoa 





ec f "{ 

IR 

2126 

7 " ec f 




1_M 

1730 

? 11 PC f 


ec f *'; 





ec f 

H J 

2136 

G0SU6 2800: 

RETURN 



eo 

1740 

7 aaaoabod bodaa aabod 

KN 

2140 

REM -*** SCREEN 4 iHHt 




bodaeaaa 

PL 

2150 

POSITION 0 j 

04j? 41 ecf 


z 

NM 

1750 

? 11 ec f eef ecf 



z 

ecf f"; 




ec f 

11 A 

LK 

2160 

? '■ ec f 




PT 

1700 

? |B aougi jaaoa aoaagi ja 


ecf 14 ; 





aaoa 

n ■ 

i 

LN 

2170 

7 " ec f 




cx 

1770 

? 11 2 kil z z kil 


ecf "Jf 






2 4, J 

HN 

2160 

? *’ bodoa 

z bodaaaagijaaaa ftaaaa 

QK 

1760 

? # * kil kil 


a aobod '*; 






*< i 
# 

OF 

2190 

7 ** ecf 

ec f kil 

Z 


Rft 

1790 

7 '* kil kil 



ecf "j 






41 ■ 

J 

LY 

2200 

? " ecf 

ecf kil 



HU 

1600 

2 li abod kil aaaa aaaa kil 



ecf ,p i 





b o da a a 11 ; 

MB 

2210 

? ■■ aoaabodaaaoa z kil 



UM 

1610 

7 14 ec f 


z 

ecf "j 





ec f 4> ; 

N14 

2220 

7 " ec f 

kil 

aaa 


UP 

1820 

7 11 ec f 



ecf ■■■; 





eel ,B j 

PM 

2230 

? “ ecf 

kil 



K ft 

1836 

? 11 aoaaaghjaaaabod bodaaaa 



ecf »; 





gbjaaoa M ; 

UM 

2240 

7 "abodaaoa 

boda kil 


bOd 

SH 

1846 

7 11 kil ec f ecf 


agh jaaaoaa 11 ; 





kil 

41 ■ 

J 

RN 

2250 

7 " ecf 

ec f 


ec f 

SK 

1850 

7 ** kil ec f ecf 


k i 1 

z 





kil 

11 ■ 

J 

RH 

2260 

? ■■ ecf 

ec f 


ecf 

OB 

I860 

? " z kil bodoa z aobod 


kil 

li w 

F 





kil 

z *'i 

RN 

2 27® 

? " aoaabod 

aobodagh jaaa 

ec f 

EC 

1870 

7 #I ecf ec f 


kil 

■ i . 

* 






i 1 - 

4 

FF 

2280 

7 *' ecf 

ec f kil 


ec f 

EF 

1860 

? 11 ecf ec f 


kil 

abod '*1 






t 

HO 

2298 

7 11 ecf 

ecf kil 

a aaoa 

L V 

1690 

7 11 aabodaaa aoaaaaaa aaaaaaoa 


kil 

ec f 





aaaabodaa 

FY 

2300 

? " bodaaoa 

zbodoa kil 

z 


Jrt 

1908 

7 ,r ecf 


ki 1 

ecf M ; 





ec f ,i ; 

N P 

2 310 

7 “ ec f 

ecf kif 



HS 

1910 

GOSUB 2 8 00:RE TURN 



ecf B, j 




KB 

1920 

REM *** SCREEN 3 *** 

NS 

2320 

7 41 ecf 

ecf kif 



UG 

1930 

position o,C4:? 41 ecf 



ec f 11 ; 





Z 

ecf z 4i ; 

GD 

2330 

? 11 aobodaaaaaaoa aaaaaaa aaaaa 

UT 

1940 

7 " ecf 


aaaabodoa M j 





ec f 41 j 

JB 

2340 

7 " ec f 




LM 

I960 

7 41 ecf 


ec f"; 





PC f 11 1 

HT 

2350 

GOSUB 2800:RETURN 



VP 

i960 

7 "* bodoaa aagi jaaa aaaaaaagh Jaaaa 

LS 

2360 

REM Wtt* SCREEN 5 WHt 




aaaaaoaaa "j 

ML 

2370 

POSITION e. 

C4 : 7 41 zeef 



PR 

1970 

7 11 ecf kil kil 



2 

ecf z"; 




7 

n i 
/ 

Lll 

2300 

7 ** ecf 




FI 

1980 

? 11 ecf kil z z kil 


ecf 



1 



- PAGE 6- Issue 22 

f *y i 


r? 






















LM 

2390 

7 ** ec f 




ecf "{ 




BH 

240O 

7 11 aaaobod zbeda 

aaaaaaaaaag 


i jaaaobDd 41 ; 




HI 

2410 


ec f ec f 


k 


i 1 

ec f ,r i 




MC 

2420 

7 if 

ecf ecf 


k 


i 1 

ecf 4, j 




AI 

2430 

? 11 z 

ecf aaaoa 

aaaabqd 

Ik 


i 1 

bodoa 




AU 

24 40 

7 11 

ec f 

ec f 

k 


i 1 

ec f **; 




AM 

2450 

7 11 

ec f 

ec f 

k 


i 1 

ec f 




PB 

2460 

7 "abod 

aoagijaaaaaaa 

za oaaa 

k 


i 1 

aoaaaa"j 




IK 

2478 

7 " ecf 

kil 


k 


i 1 

*i * 

J 




EU 

2408 

7 " ecf 

kil 


k 


i 1 

at 14 ; 




LX 

2496 

7 *' aobod kil zboda 

a aa a z 

k 


i 1 

J 




FS 

2500 

7 “ ecf kil ec f 


k 


i 1 

ii * 

M 




CG 

2510 

7 « ecf kil ecf 


k 


i 1 

aabod '‘j 




JH 

2520 

7 11 bodoa Kil aaaoa 

aabodaaaa 

k 


i 1 

ecf 




MA 

2530 

7 14 ec f 


ec f 




ecf "i 




HD 

2540 

7 11 ec f 


ec f 




ecf "j 




MK 

2556 

7 44 aobodaaaaaaaaaaaa 

aoaaaaaaa 


aaaabodoa "j 




JL 

2560 

7 41 ecf 




ec f"; 




ID 

2570 

GOSUB 2000:PE TURN 



MH 

2560 

REM **# 

SCREEN 6 *** 



TT 

2590 

POSITIOM 

0 , C4 ! 7 44 zee F 




Z 

ecf z"; 



LC 

2600 

7 ■■ ec f 




ecf •*; 




tF 

2610 

7 14 ec f 





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ecf 

DO 2628 ? " bodoa 
zaobod "j 
HJ 2636 7 " ecf 
etf "j 
KM 2640 7 ■' eg f 
PCf M J 

HO 2650 ? 11 aoaaaaagh ja ec f 
hjaaaadoa 


LE 

2660 

il 

7 ,l 

14 . 

, 

ki 1 

ec f 

01 

2670 

i 1 

7 41 

4t - 

kil 

ec f 

OF 

2660 

il 

7 "abod Z 

zboda 1 *; 

kil 

ec f 

JO 

2690 

i 1 

? 44 ec f 

ecf 

kil 

ec f 

IP 

2700 

i 1 

7 41 ecf 
ecf 41 j 

ki 1 

ec f 

EV 

2710 

7 41 aoaaa 

kil 

aoaa 


zbodaa abodasaaa 
ecf ecf 

ecf ecf 

ec f 
ec f 

aaaoa 


i L saaoa M ; 

00 2 720 ? *' oil 

i f "j 

VG 2730 7 " eil 

if 

WZ 2740 ? 11 bodaaaaaaa z 

aaaaaabod ■*; 

KK 2760 7 " ecf 
ecf 

KM 2760 7 " ecf 
ec f **; 

MU 2770 ? 11 aobodaaaaaaaaaaaa 
aaaabodoa 

JO 2760 7 14 ecf 

4S PAGE 6 - Issue 22 

■ 111 


ag 

k 

k 

z k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

a 


ec f 
ec f 
bodaoa 
ec f 
ec f 

aoaaaaaaa 



ec f 

CF 2660 IF CCtlJ-1 THEM POSITION 31,Ci65? 
"i" 

V6 2660 IF CCt2S=i THEM POSITION Cll,9:7 
"K 11 

FM 28B0 IF C€C3J=± THEN POSITION 24,C7J? 

4i i 14 i POSITION Cii,G7:7 "h" 

GJ 2690 IF CC(45=1 THEM POSITION 24,Ci7;7 
4l h t4 

HA 2910 IF CCtSi-1 THEM POSITION 016,C7:7 
“h 14 : POSITION 3Z,C1T!? "i' 1 
LE 2920 IF CCC6)=1 THEN POSITION CIO,C16! 

7 11 j l l 

OL 2940 If CCC75-1 THEN POSITION 9,C13:7 

“h" 

ON 2958 IF CCE81-1 THEN POSITION 30*07:? 
"h" 

HP 2970 IF CC C9>^1 THEN POSITION 30,ClOi? 

1 i £ ■ I 

MS 2960 IF CCC101=1 THEM POSITION 9,C1B:? 
"I" 

FF 4120 DATA 9*4*17*4*37,4,9,16,5,14,16,1 
4*24,14 * 15,19,37*19,23*19 
GT 4130 DATA 1*4*36*4,16*10,22*10,1*19,37 
,19*17,19,1,10,37,10,21,4 
VK 4140 DATA 20*14,20*9,4*15*32,6,36,16,1 
0,14,36*4,15,4,14,9,16*19 
ME 415© DATA 29,4*21*6,7*7,14*10,21*19*9, 
19,30,IB * 3®,4*13* 4,35 * 14 
PH 4160 DATA 1,4*1*10,25*4,36,4*27*10*21, 
13*12,7 * 12,16* 34,±5,26,16 
MV 4170 DATA 1,4*36,4,11,7,32,7,26,13,14, 
19,5,13,27,4,34,13,16,13 
SZ 4100 DATA 66,120*72,140,116,116 Q 


Lz 















































GOTO DIRECTORY 


The GOTO DIR ROTOR Y is a guide to retailers who 
provide product support for ATARI computers. Many 
of these retailers will supply Mail Order so if you have 
problems finding a supplier, turn to the GOTO 
DIRECTORY. 

Retailers who are interested in an entry in this feature 
should contact the Editor on 0785 213928 


A.S.WOOTTON & SONS, 

116, Edleston Road, 

Crewe, 

CW2 7HD 
Tel 0270 214118 

Not king but A TA RI. A nth - 
orised Service Centre with 
fast turnaround of ad repairs, 
AIIA (art stock plus printers, 
joystick inserts and exten¬ 
sion leads at good prices. Try 
us for repairs or purchases. 

COMPUTER CENTRE, 

174, High Street, 
Hornchurch, 

Essex 

Tel. 04024 75613 or 44255 

We have a large range of 
software , hardware, printers, 
interfaces, magazines and 
books. Full support given to 
interfacing, word processing 
etc , Computer repairs. We 
specialise in all home com¬ 
puters. Mail Order or per¬ 
sonal callers welcome. 

BITS AND PIECES, 

10, North Street, 

Strood, 

Rochester, 

Kent 

Tel. 0634 716422 

A NEW Atari only shop in 
the Medway area , XL/XEf 
ST always in stock. We are 
happy to demonstrate the 
latest software and offer (he 
most friendly service, Rem¬ 
ember we are ATARI only. 
We stock the best. 

TELETEX 

(YORKSHIRE) LTD,, 

28, Brooklyn Court, 
Bradford Road, 
Cleekheaton, 

W. Yorks 
BD19 4TJ 
Tel. 0274 875299 

Atari specialist. Atari soft¬ 
ware and hardware at keen 
prices. Free advisor}' service 
for Atari enthusiasts. Mail 
Order division. Full dis¬ 
counted range of software. 
Send s.a. e. or phone for 
Atari list. HQ of West York¬ 
shire Atari Owners Club . 


LADBRQKE 

COMPUTING, 

33, Ormskirk Road, 
Preston, 

Lanes. PR1 2QP 

Tel. 0772 21474 or 0772 

27236 

We offer full service and 
support for any Atari and 
have all peripherals and 
available software in stock. 
Come to the shop for per¬ 
sonal service or try its for 
Mail Order. Either way 
you 7/ be pleased you did. 

INTOTO, 

1, Heat he oat Street, 
Hockley, 

Nottingham, 

NG13AF 
Tel. 0602 410987 

A comprehensive range of 
hardware , software, periph¬ 
erals, joysticks, books and 
magazines etc. Please call or 
ring for helpful, friendly 
support . 

PEATS ELECTRONICS, 

25, Parnell Street, 

Dublin 1, 

Ireland 

Tel (00)01 749972/3, 4 

We stock a full range of 
Hardware, Software, Inter¬ 
faces, Printers and accessor¬ 
ies. The fullest support for 
Atari in Ireland. Mailorder 
throughout the U K. 

FEES 

194, High street, 
Scunthorpe, 

S, Humberside 
Tel. 0724 857652 

Your Atari specialist in 
Humberside for hardware, 
software and publications. 
Open 9.30 a.m. - 5. 30 p.m 
SIX days a week. For per¬ 
sonal attention ask for Nick 
or Frances. 


MICRO BYTE, 

71, Seaview Road, 

Discard, 

Wallasey, 

Merseyside, 145 4Q\Y 
Tel. 051 630 6933 

Tired of high prices , poor 
service and hidden charges 
from other Mail Order 
retailers? Try us for the latest 
titles and U. S. mags. Visitor 
call anytime up to 6 p, m. 

JENNINGS STORES, 

248, Hertford Road, 

(Nr, Green Street), 

Enfield, 

Middx 

Tel. 01 804 1767 

Very large range of English 
and American software 
available as well as the very 1 
latest in hardware, 

SOFTWARE EXPRESS, 

514-516, Alum Rock Road, 
Alum Rock, 

Birmingham 8 
Tel 021 328 3585 

We are a company dedicated 
to supply mg A L L yo ur A l a ri 
needs which also includes a 
PERSONAL IMPORT 
SERVICE and an out of 
warranty repair sendee. 
Phone 021 328 3585 


MICRO-TRONICS 

27a, Market Street, 

T amworth, 

Stall's, 

R79 7LR 
Tel 0827 51480 

Hardware, Software, peri¬ 
pherals , books , magazines, 
accessories etc. etc. We spec¬ 
ialise in ATARI, Amstrad,- 
Commodore, Tatung com¬ 
puters r Pay us a visit OR use 
ou r Mail Order service. 
ACCESS & VISA accepted 


TKIONIC, 

144, Station Road, 

Harrow, 

Middx. HA1 2RH 
Tel. 01 861 0036 

Software,peripherals, books 
and magazines, A compre¬ 
hensive range for Atari r 
Am si rad. Comm- adore and 
Spect ru m. Try ou r la te nigh t 
shopping. Open 10 a. rn. to 8 
p.m. Monday to Saturday. 
Give us a call or pay us a 
visit. 

RADFORD HI-FI LTD., 

52, Gloucester Road, 
Bristol, 

Avon 

Tel. 0272 428247 

We stock and support a 
comprehensive range of pro¬ 
ducts for Atari. Huge range 
ofsoftware from educational 
to small business '’"plus games 
of course,. Word processing 
packages. Printers. All for 
the best computers. Si s 
a va liable from s t oek . 

YORK COMPUTER 
CENTRE, 

7 , S to negate Arcade, 

York, 

Tel, 0904 641862 

Top American and English 
software - over WOO titles! 
Hardware, books, maga¬ 
zines, accessories. If you 
need a ny thing for you r A t art, 
try Yorkshire's widest and 
most comprehensive range of 
p rodu cts for you r ma ch ine. 

MIDLANDS ATARI 
CENTER 

212. Broad Street, 
Birmingham, 

B15 1AY 

Tel: 021 643 9100 

Specialist Atari dealers with 
the biggest display of Atari 
software and hardware out¬ 
side London. Whatever your 
needs - ST, 8-bit or VCS - a 
visit to our large showroom 
will not be wasted. We would 
love to see you! 


PAGE f> - Issue 22 49 














Another look at 



ClifFWmship from Gloucester has been a real eager beaver 
since ‘WRITE-A-GAME* appeared. I have included his 
routine to allow the computer to choose and play. The first 
thing that 1 noted was that he had read my article on Boolean 
algebra (issue 10) and included a sample in line 10020. He 
also made use of the ON GOTO routine instead of separate 
lines using the IF statement (line 10050). 

Unfortunately no-one seems to have tried the'homework*, 
i.e. s toring prev ious c hoice s and comparing t hem, C liff used a 
random routine which will work well but will not give an 
intelligent game. So, in an effort to elicit some reader 
response I will offer a tutorial tape to the person who comes 
up with the best answ r er to this problem by 18th July. I 
would ask that the more experienced programmers leave this 
little problem to the novices, after all this is their column! 
Failing all this 1 guess I will just have to rack my brains and 
come up with some sort of solution - sigh! 

Tape Problems 

I noticed in issue 21 that Nick from South Wirral had a 
faulty 410,1 would like to suggest some possible remedies for 
similar 410 s s (or 1010’s, or even XCs!). The most common 
cause of tape failure concerns the read/write heads. These 
tend to pick up airborn dust and grease as well as the usual 
ferric dust from the tapes. This is easy to cure - just give them 
a wipe with a soft cloth or cotton bud soaked in a proprietary 
degreaser and then wipe dry. Make sure the cotton bud is not 
held on with adhesive! When my brother worked for Grundig 
he used carbon tetrachloride as a cleaner. This is carcinogenic 
(cancer causing) and is now banned, so be careful what you 
use and always wash your hands afterwards. At a pinch, he 
used lighter fuel - the aerosol variety! The heads can be 
cleaned more easily by opening the lid, pushing the little 
silver lever at the left rear of the tape compartment and 
pressing the PLAY button to extend the head platine. 

Tape heads sometimes tend to hold magnetic flux 
(becoming a magnet and thus corrupting tape data). Manu¬ 
facturers deny this with modem materials, but it is known to 
happen - why else can you buy dc-gaussers? The de-gausser, a 
device used to remove the flux, can be a hand held device or 
come in the shape of a cassette. They can be borrowed from 
some hi-fi libraries, but they arc cheap. If you know anything 
about the Philadelphia Experiment please do not panic, de¬ 
gaussing is not so cataclysmic! 

The last item is seldom mentioned but is a contributing 
factor. The 410 is belt driven and the belt will age and stretch 
over a period of years. Belt slippage causes speed fluctuations 


WRITE A GAME 


plus some problems 


and will make the tapes unreadable. Belts are only a few 
pence from most hi-fi or electronic shops (e.g. Maplm). 

Drive Heads 

I was recently asked by Stan Fallaize to recommend a good 
drive head cleaner. This is a real controversial subject, and 
whoever you talk to will have a different opinion on it. 
Although the drive head is extremely close to (but not 
touching) the disk and therefore not picking up ferric residue 
as will a tape head, the casing is open to airborn intrusion of 
dust, grease and other 4 invaders 5 .1 believe that the use of a wet 
cleaner applied for a few seconds, once a month, will not go 
amiss. The only bad bit is the dreadful "snarking* noise your 
drive will make when it looks at the cleaning disk as, 
unforunately, ATARI drives do not have a cleaning cycle. 
(Just to confuse you , / have never cleaned the heads on my 
drives and they probably gel ten times more me than most 
people's do! £d>) 

To end this bout of spring cleaning I would recoin mend 
that the edge terminations of cartridges be cleaned with a 
liquid and soft cloth. Do not use anything abrasive with the 
contacts, they are gold coated to stop contamination and 
corrosive welding. My ATARI WRITER cartridge will some¬ 
times do wierd things and dirty edge connectors are the 
cause. 

Bugs 

As an aside, do you know the origin of the w ords l bug* and 
‘debug*? Well, when computers were in their infancy they 
were room sized and had to be very w T ell ventilated. This left 
them open to various small insects which crawled or flew into 
the computer, landing on terminals and causing short 
circuits. Every so often the engineers had to go inside the 
computer and dust out these hugs. Fascinating stuff 

I look forward to some hints about future editions of this 
column, as well as answers to the above problem. Don’t forget 
you can always write to me at P.O.Box 123, Belfast, BT10 
0DB 


by Mark Hutchinson 


50 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 









Credit Card 
Order Line 

ncnfl 393i£31! 


FIRST STEPS listing 

PP 9 ttEM Conputer playing* 

KI loeoe ? l, Hy turn - genius at work!! 1 " 

UJ 10010 C-INT£RNDEB5*63J+1 

OR 10020 U=£C=6m2#(C = 2l)+J*£C=18)+4#£C = 
5SJ +5*CC = 4 2i +6*(C=56J +7* tC=6l5 + 8#MC=5 7 
5 + 5 #IC=i 31 

IP 10030 ON 11 GOTO 10050,10060,10070,1008 
0 j. 10 09 0 , 1O100,101X0,1012 0, 10130 
Ml 10040 GOTO 10810 

GF 10050 LOCATE 8,3,H:ir M<>216 THEN IF N 
0239 THEN POSITION 8,3:7 116 ; p$ : RETURN 
CQ 10860 LOCATE 10,3,N:IF H0216 THEM IF 
H0 2J5 THEM POSITION 10,3:? »6;QS:RETU 
RN 

IO 18070 LOCATE 12,3,N :IF M<>216 THEM IF 
N<>239 THEN POSITION 12,3S? H6;0$:RETU 

PN 

HP 10080 LOCATE 8 t 5,NjXF N<>2U THEN IF N 
<>239 THEN POSITION 8,5:? H6jOS:RETURN 
JG 10090 LOCATE 10,5,N:IF H<>215 THEN IF 
NO 239 THEM POSITION 10,5:? ttSjO^jRETU 

PM 

NU 1010O LOCATE 12,5, M: IF NO210 THEN IF 
N<>239 THEM POSITION 12,5:? H6;0S:RETU 

PN 

NO 10110 LOCATE 8,7, N : IF If <>216 THEN IF H 
0239 THEN POSITION 8,7:? H6 }OSi RETURN 
OL 10120 LOCATE 10,7,N:IF N<>216 THEN IF 
N O 2 39 THEM POSITION 10,7:? !#£;□$ ;ft£TLJ 

RN 

IfL 10130 LOCATE 12,7,MJIF N(>216 THEN IF 
N O 23 9 THEN POSITION 12, 71 ? «G;0$;RETfJ 
RN 

HO 10148 GOTO 1OO10 ri 



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PAGE 6 - Issue 22 S'! 









































Adventure 




i 


13. Dragon Quesf 

and 


I estimate that there are dose to two hundred Adventures 
available for the Atari. These range from simple BASIC 
listings in books and magazines through to multi-disk, 
machine language epics. Needless to .say, the quality varies 
from lousy through to excellent with price usually being 
indicative of quality. Fortunately for Atari owners, very few 
Atari Adventures fall into the ’lousy’ category, but those in the 
‘excellent’ category tend to be a bit pricey. 

Once in a blue moon, you find something out of the 
ordinary. Something that really makes you sit up and pay 
attention. Something that’s cheap, yet holds its own with the 
mosi expensive commercial Adventures. Dragon Quest and 
Stonequest are two such Adventures. If you've never heard of 
them before, then I'm not surprised. These Adventures cannot 
be bought over the counter at your local computer store. They 
are only available by mail order from the ITS, A. and hence are 
not very well known - although they deserve to he. Both are 
top quality games. Buy them if you can. 1 doubt that you’ll be 
disappointed. 


DRAGON QUEST 

or 

A Twist in the Tail 


Dragon Quest is an illustrated Adventure written in BASIC 
and machine language by Ed Churnsidc, It is just one of the 
many fine programs available from the AFX Classics in Antic 
magazine's software catalogue. Unfortunately, it is the only 

Adventure. 

The game comes on a double-sided disk. You should begin 
by booting side 2 as this contains all the instructions. You will 
be given the option of printing the instructions to the screen or 
a printer. Choose the printer option if you’ve got one as the 
instructions are very lengthy - certainly too much to remember 
in one sitting. They give a brief overview of the game, system 
requirements, loading instructions, very thorough playing 
instructions, technical notes, game playing hints and three 
appendices. It’s a pity that instructions for all commercial 
Adventures aren’t this thorough. Hie playing instructions 
make it obvious that the author has put a lot of effort into 
making the game easy to use. Tor example, you can save up to 
ten games on each data disk and this can be on a second drive 
to avoid disk swaps. You can format a disk or get a directory of 
the saved games and free space available from within the 
game, you can keep a record of your quest on a printer (a la 
Infocom) and even toggle the custom character set on and off 
(a la Scott Adams). 

As if that s not enough, the author even has an answer to 
the ‘sudden death syndrome 1 common in many Adventures, 
When you carry out some action that causes your demise, you 
may be offered a second chance. The program asks u Would 
you like to try that again? 1 ’. If you answer “YES' 1 , you can 
continue on from the previous move as though nothing had 
happened. Great stuff! When you've finished with the 


^ifoneguesf 

instructions, flip the disk to side 1 and bool the main program. 

Dragon Quest begins in a forest. Isn’t it amazing how many 
Adventures start in a forest? I often wonder how you got there 
in the first place. Anyway, this particular forest and all 
subsequent locations are depicted by brightly coloured pictures 
in GRAPHICS 7. The resolution of GRAPHICS 7 is a little 
coarser than what you’re probably used to in an illustrated 
Adventure, but it cJoesn t detract from the game, ihe pictures 
have been drawn using Paint (Reston/Atari) and Draw ItJ 
i,AFX/Antic), and have been saved in a compacted format so 
that they load very quickly. But back to the game.,. 

It just so happens that a sign is roped to a nearby tree in the 
forest. Upon reading the sign, you find that the king is offering 
a large reward for some unspecified task. Now being the 
adventurous type (money hungry?), you set off to see the king 
for more details, Vt hen you find him, he reveals that he and 
the princess were once hunting in the forest when they became 
separated from the main party. Whilst wandering about by 
themselves, a dragon swooped down and carried the princess 
away. The king knows that the princess is dead, but wants you 
to find and kill the dragon and return with the princess’ 
pendant as proof of your success. Only then will he give you 
your reward. However, he is good enough to give you 500 gold 
pieces to use in your quest. 

Now that your aim is clear, you can set off and explore the 
castle and the forest and anything else that pops up along the 
way. Note that important items arc sometimes shown in the 
picture, but not in the description and vice versa, so examine 
everything! Be careful m the forest. It is in fact a maze, but 
one worth exploring. Read the room descriptions carefully as 
each one is unique. 

I he game is absolutely riddled with hints and humour, but 
it s sometimes hard to distinguish between the two. It is 
sometimes only in retrospect that you realise a humourous line 
was actually a subtle clue. Therefore, don’t take anything for 
gi anted. And don t be shy! I alk to anyone and evervone,,.and 
listen too! Most importantly, this game is very logical. There is 
A reason for everything and nothing is random! 

Dragon Quest comes close to the perfect blend of inbuilt 
clues, interesting puzzles, humour and downright fun. It even 
has an element of mystery that I’ve never struck before in an 
Adventure, Just like an Agatha (.hristie novel, there is a twist 
in the ending, hence the sub-title “A Twist in the Tail 11 , 

There’s even a twist in the sub-title! (Say it out loud and 
ignore the spelling. Get it?) I did find a couple of minor bugs, 
but even these were humourous. Can you imagine my surprise 
when a certain save,’restore sequence gave me a picture of a 
dragon superimposed over the king? 

Finally, just to top everything otfr a successful completion of 
the game rewards you with a completely unexpected surprise. I 
won’t reveal the surprise, but it did induce a great feeling of 
pride and achievement unlike anything I’d experienced with 


52 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 


by Garry Francis of Sydney, Australia 


( 













othcr Adventures, I’m just sorry that it’s over, A sequel was 
mentioned in the instructions of another AFX Classic called 
Draw It? Lei’s hope this comes to fruition. Anyway, if you 
warn a refreshingly different Adventure with just the right 
level of difficulty, try Dragon Quest, It’s the best game Fve 
played for ages. 

Dragon Quest costs just US$12.95 plus US$6.00 tor return 
airmail postage. You can pay using VISA, Mastercard or an 
international cheque in IJ.S. dollars payable at a U.S, bank. 
Send your order to Antic Product Catalog, 524 Second Street, 
San Francisco, CA 94107, U.S.A. 


STONEQUEST 

or 

The Quest for the Great Stone of Prosperity 

Stonequest is an all-text Adventure written by David 
Strelitz. It is again written in BASIC which proves that this 
language is more than adequate for a fast executing, complex 
Adventure when placed in the hands of a competam author. 

The six double-spaced pages of instructions for Stonequest 
are nowhere near as thorough as those for Dragon Quest, but 
adequate just the same, They consist of a title page, a lengthy 
background story and helpful playing instructions. The 
background story tells how r a struggling alchemist created a 
stone that magically gave prosperity to w r hoever owned it. He 
gave this to the king of Farnidell, hoping that the kingdom 
would prosper. And it did. Unfortunately, the king did not give 
credit to the alchemist, but claimed that he’d invented the 
Stone himself. The alchemist became angry and bitter and 
soon turned to evil. When the king died, his son Weesey took 
over the throne. Weesey was a good king, but “not well 
endowed in the brains department”. The alchemist was able to 
trick Weesey and steal back the stone, Without the stone, 
prosperity left the kingdom and "the Pamidell stock market 
crashed’". King Weesey summoned the greatest adventurers in 
the land to try and recover the Great Stone of Prosperity (as it 
had become known), but none were successful. In desperation, 
he offered 'the greatest reward imaginable’ 7 for the recovery of 
the stone and this is where you enter the picture. 

Stonequest is actually three games in one. When you first 
boot the disk, you are presented with a simple title screen 
' hich asks you to enter a codeword or press RETURN. The 
first time you play the game you won’t know any codewords, 
so just press RETURN. However, when you later complete 
part 1, you will be given a codeword w r hich you should write 
down for future reference. It will disappear when pari 2 has 
finished loading. Whenever you reboot the disk, you can enter 
this codeword to skip directly to part 2 without having to 
replay part 1. Similarly, when you complete part 2, you will be 
given another codeword which allows you to skip directly to 
part 3, Phis is a novel idea which not only works well from the 
user's point of view, but no doubt allowed the author to 
squeeze a lot more Adventure out of the machine than would 
normally be possible in a single BASIC program. 

Part 1 starts outside the royal palace. From here, you can 
explore the countryside of Pamidell including the lores* (not 
another one?) and the township of Gree. There areift many 
locations, but the descriptions are very lengthy and full of 
atmosphere. Once you've mapped the area and found the only 
object lying around, you may be left wondering what to do 
next. I should warn you that magic is commonplace in this 


kingdom. The puzzles you need to solve and the objects 
needed to solve them are very cleverly concealed all around 
you. Give it some thought and you’ll find that the solution to 
part 1 is actually fairly easy. The last puzzle very cunningly 
forces you to drop all objects so that you can squeeze through 
a trapdoor. This leaves you empty handed when vou start part 
2 . 

Part 2 is set completely underground. Here you will meet 
two particularly nasty characters and some equally nasty 
puzzles. Magic again comes to the fore in more ways than one. 
At one point you find a small metal canister. If you pick it. up 
and repeat your actions, you find another metal canister. If 
you lake one of them to another room, then return and again 
repeat your actions, you’ll find yet another metal canister! Ad 
infinitum. A cynic would say there’s a bug in the program, but 
I know magic when I see it? Anyway, with a little persistanee, 
you’ll eventually find the whirlpool hinted at in the game’s 
instructions and get sucked into the third and final part of the 
game. 

Boy, this game gets harder and harder! Part 3 is set “on a 
dark and foreboding island”. The dominant feature is a huge 
maze. It’s really easy to map as all exits obey the laws of real 
life physics instead of Adventure physics, but it’s HUGE... 
almost 20(1 rooms! Make sure you map it all or you may miss 
some important items. The dosing chapters of the game 
include some more magic and a couple til"riddles before 
entering the Black Fortress for the final showdown with the 
Evil Alchemist and (hopefully) the recovery of the Great Stone 
of Prosperity. Phew! 

Stonequest is another great game for the price. It’s a bit 
harder than Dragon Quest, but takes an equally light-hearted 
and humourous approach which makes it all the more 
enjoyable. If you like text Adventures, give Stonequest a go! 

•Stonequest costs US$14,95 plus US$4.00 for return airmail 
postage. It is available from LotsaBytes, 15445 Ventura 
Boulevard, Suite 10G, Sherman Oaks, CA 91413, U S A. 
Unfortunately, LotsaBytcs will not accept credit cards, so 
you’ll have to send an international cheque in U.S. dollars 
payable at a U.S, bank. (You can obtain an International 
Money Order at any branch of Barclays. Ed.) I notice that 
I.otsaByies haven’t had their usual advertisements in recent 
issues of Antic and ANALOG, so you might be well advised to 
write a letter before sending any money, just to make sure 
they’re still in business. 

Next Issue 

I haven’t made any firm plans for next issue although Pm 
tentatively thinking of a trip to outer space. I’ve completed 
several Adventures recently, but most of them are the sort of 
rare and obscure titles (like Dragon Quest and Stonequest) 
that 1 really relish, yet most people haven’t heard of As usual, 
if you’ve got any criticism, comments or suggestions for future 
columns, fed free to contact me at the address below. 

Finally, my thanks to our regular Adventure reviewer, John 
Sweeney, for helping me out with Asylum (Issue 20), Your free 
disk of Adventures is on the way! 

Garry Francis 

e/o Atari Computer Enthusiasts (N.SfW.) 

Adventure S.I.G. * v 

G.F.Q. Box 4514, Nip , /\ + 

Sydney. N.S.W. Australia 2001 

----HINTS overleaf 


PAGE 6 - Issue 21 53 







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54 PAGE 6-Issue 22 







































































DRAGON 

QUEST: 

1. Can't enter the castle? 

35 50 11 43 

2r Don’t know whether to trust 
the king? 

35 50 1 1 43 35 33 11 36 25 31 4 

17 58 

3, Can't enter the inn? 

67 47 

4, Can’t llnd the wizards hat? 
22 31 4 17 58 

5, Still can’t lind the wizard’s 
hat? 

7049 11 66 II 43 

6, Don’t know whether to trust 
ihe king? 

64 34 12 11 7 18 31 2 

7, Can't open the Jwr to the 
dungeon? 

22 30 4 17 58 

8, Can’t leave the castle with¬ 
out falling into the moat? 

68 23 67 65 51 22 

9, Don't know whether to trust 
the king? 

16 34 9 11 43 

10- Objects disappear when you 
drop them? 

22 31 4 17 58 

11. Can’t find the disappearing 
objects? 

70 49 11 66 11 43 

32, Can't climb the tree? 

45 29 


13. Can't go west from certain 
forest areas without being 
killed? 

22 32 4 17 58 

14. Still getting killed? 

45 42 

15. Can’t see in the cave? 

64 34 41 

16. Missing wood? 

27 43 

17. Missing flint? 

57 34 56 28 

18. Missing steel? 

57 34 7 28 

19. Who or what is Du tin? 

22 32 4 17 58 

20. Can’t gel gold to Dunn? 

62 I 

21. Missing a shield? 

39 15 17 58 

22. Haven’t found the 
woodland shrine? 

35 33 11 36 

23. Still haven’t found the 
woodland shrine? 

54 4 34 58 37 

24. Still haven’t found the 
woodland shrine? 

52 46 44 Ll 3 28 

25. Can’t cross the stream? 

45 61 31 

26. Can't enter the woodland 
shrine? 

10 19 

27. Can’t open the sale? 

15 28 25 28 40 2S 24 58 28 


1 

SHIELD 

19 

WIZARD 

2 

MOVE 

20 

SCROLLS 


WELL 

21 

GAP 

4 

BEER 

22 

DRINK 

5 

RtJft 

23 

MAGIC 

6 

GATE 

24 

REMEMBER 

7 

DUNGEON 

25 

NUMBERS 

a 

AGAIN 

26 

DRAGONS 

$ 

WOMAN 

27 

SEARCH 

10 

HELP 

23 

5 

11 

IN 

29 

WEAPONS 

12 

DOOR 

30 

THIRD 

13 

SUBSTITUTE 

31 

FIRST 

14 

POTION 

32 

SECOND 

15 

WINE 

33 

POSTERS 

. 16 

TALK 

34 

TO 

17 

AT 

35 

READ 

ik 

ON 

U 

COURTYARD 


37 KEEPER 

55 GAN 

38 WORD 

56 SHRINE 

39 BUY 

57 BEEN 

40 LETTERS 

58 INN 

41 SKULL 

59 IS 

42 VALUABLES 

60 DU KIN 

43 FOREST 

61 EVERYTHING 

44 COINS 

62 USE 

45 DROP 

62 SYMBOLS 

46 ARE 

64 LISTEN 

47 CASTLE 

65 OR 

48 FOR 

66 TREE 

49 LIVES 

67 EXIT 

50 SIGN 

m FIND 

51 DON'T 

69 ROCKS 

52 WHY 

70 MAGPIE 

53 SWORD 


54 GIVE 



H mu il l i /m ll l li l M lf|l i n i N! II H ! b f iiil fiiii , | f||iii';!|i!i'" , i fi in ii|iiiiri n i t |i l iiW || n |i ri| ' 1 ’'I' .MV ' 1 

JnviUi‘Mf,"‘i i.iiilmL'ji:-? Mill.lit ill an i iti i j .■> t pi i )'i n ■ 11 . tiLu jj d j M2 J j LULiJJJjlL 


STONEQUEST: 


PART 1; 

1. Can't get past the mad 
lumberjack? 

1 24 46 13 

2. Can’t find anything to trade 
with Ibid? 

3 6 12 64 53 51 

3. Still can’t find anything to 
trade with Ibid? 

3 65 37 3 66 20 

4. Can’t find anything to trade 
with Ivan? 

8 64 69 

5. Haven’t found the trapdoor? 
33 33 IQ 7 22 

6. Can’t open the trapdoor? 

19 45 67 1 68 48 58 15 47 21 

PART 2: 


7. Caji’i make sense of 
the inscription? 

5 1 64 25 34 


S, Can’t get the knife? 

5 162 

9. Stilt can’t get the knife? 

41 45 30 55 

10. Si 111 can’t get the knife? 

41 25 34 70 31 66 22 

11. Can’t open the bird cage? 
36 43 3 59 35 5 13 

12. Can't get past the ogre? 

54 5 49 

13. Can't get past the octopus^ 
41 3 59 39 

14. Can’t keep the matchcy 
dry? 

41 29 3 40 

15. Can’t find anywhere else to 

go? 

44 1 50 13 
PART 3: 


16. Want a quick way 
out of the maze? 

30 3 IS 


17. Can’t find anywhere else to 
go? 

27 42 15 17 

18. Can't answer Ethnor’s first 
riddle? 

60 56 26 32 52 38 

19. Can’t answer lithnor’s 
second riddle? 

9 1 45 11 63 22 1 45 16 

20. Missing a gold coin? 

41 3 42 17 

21. Still missing a gold coin? 

69 2 28 64 57 14 

22. Can't read the tapestry"^ 

8 64 69 

23. Can’t open the great 
wooden doors? 

41 4 49 

24. Can’t defeat the Evil 
Alchemist? 

41 3 42 17 58 15 61 46 

25. Can't find anywhere else to 
go? 

41 29 3 23 


is 

mntm 

the 

READING 

[T 

LtiRn 

SILVER 

HAVE 

SUN 

MAXWELL'S 

DAY 

HAS 

s 

TOUCH 

YOU 

NIGHT 

WELL 

PARCHMENT 
KEY ■ 

IDEA 

PEACE 

FUftNm IKE 
HE 


•rTTnTTn' r D 7 r; 11 r 1 > I . f m irLTra, 11 Hi. I !T T T' ■ 11 1 1 11 i t j i 'i 'i|M 111 n 1 m D ! i >' 1 I 'iI’Ti ' 1, 1 l ,^ Tl l V rrr ^ i!i iJjTi | i iiiii ; rf r iTn ^ ri 


28. Can’t decipher the third 
scroll? 

13 40 48 63 

29. Still can’t decipher the third 
scroll? 

31 38 59 26 

3Q. Can't get the shield out of 
the shrine? 

62 21 11 6 

31. Can’t enter the pit? 

24 50 11 43 28 

32. Can’t untie the rope? 

62 53 

33. Missing a sword 5 
22 32 4 17 58 


34, Can’t find your way IN 
through [he maze of lunnels 5 
35 33 1 1 36 

35. Troll kills vou? 

62 23 53 


36, Missing a magic sword? 
16 34 60 8 


37. C an't afford the magic 
sword? 

27 69 


40. Can’t find the dragon? 
24 20 U 56 28 


41. Can't find your way OUT 
through the maze of tunnels? 
35 33 11 36 


42. Goblins bill you? 

7Q55 10 

43. King throws you in the 
dungeon? 

16 34 26 


25 MAGIC 
lb EYES 
n HERE'S 
FOR 

2? MOVING 
M USE 

31 CENTRE 

32 MOUTH 
n BANG 
.34 WORD 
i5 DO 

3* HOW 
37 HAD 
IB NOSE 
.19 FIRST 

40 KUR8LE 

41 TRY 

42 WISHING 

43 DOES 
+4 WHAT 
45 to 

+5 HUNGRY 

47 DIG 

48 POUND 


49 SOMEiTTING 
5D hi. A MM ABLE 

51 EGG 

52 AND 

53 PRECIOUS 

54 GIVE 

55 MAGNET 

56 OF 

57 MIDAS 

58 IE 

551 OGRE 
60 THINK 
AL ARE 

t2 Metal 

63 AS 

64 A 

155 LUMBERJACK 
45 RIGHT 
67 111E5 
S3 EASILY 
*9 DRINK 

70 TOP 


PAGE 6 - Issue 22 55 


38. Can’t cross the lava flow? 
10 9 11 43 

39. Still can’t cross the lava 
flow? 

S 14 


Francis’ 


HID 


GMS 

















































i 

; 

| 

i 

I 

] 

j 

i 



Monthly Hi-Score 
competition 



Screaming Wings 

Disk Tape t7.$5 

An oil action arcade qarnc* Take off From 
the US carrier and pilot your plane into liottle 
□qainst the air-force of Japan. This. Is the 
South Pacific during World War 11 and the 
enemy are cominq at you thick and foit T 
Squeeze hard on your joystick and blast their 
screaming Zero* from the sky. Scrolling screen, 
wild explosive action I 


Technicolor Dream 

Disk £12.^ Tape 19.95 

Unleash the full potential of your Atari compulei 
with this sensational graphic art Utility. 256 
colours along with 12FJ filters gives over 6 
million possible variations! DcraO pictures 
included. 


Panic Express 

Disk 15.95 Tope £3,?5 

The first of RED RAT's budget *nflwore. 
14 screens of action pocked fun. 


LOOK OUT FOR SOME EXCITING BRAND 
NEW RELEASES IN THE COMING MONTHS!!'! 



Over 70 Different 
Attack Waves! 



Red Rat Software 


15 Fennel Street, Manchester M4 3DU. Tel:061-834 4941 


56 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 





































Jim Short 
reviews 
some recent 
releases 


STEVE DAVIS 
SNOOKER 

CDS Software 
48K cassette £8.95 
48K disk £11.95 
1 Player 
Joystick 


Of all the sports which have been 
turned into computer simulations;, 
snooker has to be the most unrealistic 
conversion of the lot. Fve seen several 
versions on different micros and, to be 
honest, they’re as true to life as an 
episode ol the ‘A-Team\ However, if 
you’re a snooker fanatic and in the 
market for a computer version of your 
favourite sport then this first-time Atari 
release from CDS is the one to buy. It’s 
even endorsed by Steve Davis (not 
exactly the best of recommendations 
when you consider the way he played 
against joe Johnson recently!), which 
probably means that he pockets his fair 
share of the royalties]! 

A good way to assess the game is by 
comparing it with the old Thorn-Emi 
version w hich was re-released a couple 
of months ago as part of their ‘Spot the 
13aIf package. Both are reasonably 
simita r b ut the C DS game has a num ber 
of additional features w r hich gives it the 
edge over it’s only other Atari rival. 

Firstly, the table is black, Yes, I know 
what you're thinking - someone please 
tell this idiot that snooker tables are 
green. Whilst this is unquestionably 
true, it doesn’t alter the fact that, where 
computer snooker is concerned, a black 
table makes lor greater clarity, improved 
colours and enhanced definition. Simply 
compare the two versions - green of 
Thom-Emi against black of CDS - and 
you'll see what I mean. Anyway, what*s 
wrong with being King of the black 
baize for a change? 

The CDS game also offers a greater 



ATARI Disk . : jv 


variety of changeable parameters such 
as table speed and cue-ball spin. All 
moves are via the joystick. You line up a 
small target cursor on the object ball, 
set the desired spin and power of shot 
before letting fly with the firebutton. 
Alter that you hope for the best. If a ball 
drops in the pocket, nine times out of 
ten it’s more by luck than by design. Of 
course, that magical 147 maximum 
break is at least possible in theory, but 
in practice it’s about as likely as Alex 
Higgins refusing a free gin & tonic (Fve 
already upset the Steve 'Interesting' 
Davis fans, so I may as well even things 
up by upsetting the Hurricane Higgins 
fans as well!)* In more realistic terms 
you can consider yourself World 
Champion if you manage to pot three 
balls in a row] 

Normal snooker rules apply and you 
can even force your opponent to play 
again if a ‘foul shot' is committed. Due 
to obvious limitations the ‘Free Ball’ 
rule is not implemented though. 

Incidentally, just in case you were 
wondering, the black ball has a white 
circle around it to help distinguish it 


from the table, but this is also true of the 
green ball in the Thom game, 

STEVE DAVIS SNOOKER can be 
played against a computer or human 
opponent, with selectable skill levels for 
the computer. If you so desire, you can 
choose a double computer option and 
sit back and watch Steve Davis play 
himself. At the highest skill level the 
breaks are likely to approach treble 
figures with some totally unbelievable 
shots taking place - impossible doubles, 
playing oil the cush first to pot the 
object ball which the likes of Jimmy 
White wouldn't attempt, let alone Steve 
DavisJ Yes, the computer does cheat]! 

In the words of a certain popular 
lager ad - STEVE DAVIS SNOOKER 
probably the best snooker game in 
the world (or Great Britain at least). 
Me? I still think it looks and plays more 
like a game of marbles, 



THE LAST V-8 


Mastcrtronic 
48K cassette 
£2*99 
I Player 
Joystick 


Caught on the surface of a nuclear 
devastated planet you have seconds to 
return underground before your radia¬ 
tion shield decays. In any other car you 
would stand no chance - in the LAST V- 
8 survival is possible.Maybe! 

Okay, that takes care of the sales hype 
on the cassette inlay, now let's get down 
to facts. Despite Mastertronic's dynamic 
build-up which makes the LAST V-8 
sound like an introduction to the latest 
Mad Max movie, it’s actually another 
driving game (of sorts) similar to 


PAGE 6 - Issue 22 57 




















Adventure Tmemational’s 'Rally 
Speedway*, 

The screen view is a plan view looking 
down on the action from above and the 
general idea is to try and guide a tiny car 
along a narrow road, heading for base. 
The road starts offstraight enough but* 
inevitably, begins to twist and turn in 
erratic fashion almost before you've 
managed to get the car into it’s stride. 

Time is the single most crucial aspect 
of this game. lake it says in the intro¬ 
duction - you have only seconds to 
reach your underground base before 
disaster strikes and, as you struggle 
violently to keep the car on the track, 
the timer at the bottom of the screen 
ticks away at an alarming rate. 

The control panel is a space-age art 
display in the form of a futuristic car 
dashboard and takes up almost three- 
quarters of the screen. It show r s all the 
required info relative to the game but 
there are also a host of other lights and 
dials which do absolutely nothing and 
are of ornamental value only. The flash 
drawing of the V-8 below the control 
panel is nice to look at but takes precious 
screen space away from the actual 
game. Speaking of drawings, a colourful 
hi-res title screen is incorporated into 
the Commodore & Amstrad versions of 
the game but, for reasons unknown, 
Mastertronic decided to give it a miss on 
the Atari version. 

Scrolling is fast and smooth even by 
Atari standards, but the game is a bit of 
a pig to play. Car control is the main 
problem as the program is over-sensitive 
to joystick commands, A heavy touch in 
the wrong direction will send the car 
spinning out of control. Also, the track 
is far too narrow and it's easy to stray off 
and collide terminally with the trackside 
scenery - oh yes, and you only get one 
Life. No second chances here! 

Graphically, the game is a big imp¬ 
rovement over their previous Atari 
effort - Clumsy Colin the Action Biker - 
but there is a distinct lack of any game 
sounds apart from the haunting theme 
music w r hich plays away incessantly. I 
get the feeling I’ve heard this tune 
before, or something remarkably like it, 
on one of the Synapse games - Dimension 
X, I think? 

So what happens w hen you eventually 
reach the underground base? Answers 
on a postcard please. So far I haven’t 
even managed to negotiate the first TJ- 
bend and it seems the inner delights of 
the LAST V-8 will forever remain a 


mystery to me. 

Despite all this, it’s far from the worst 
Atari game on the market and should 
appeal to anyone who likes a good 
challenge. At the asking price of£2.99it 
must rate as quite a bargain. 

One final point. Mastertronic claim 
the game features voice synthesis, but I 
never encountered any (it's almost as 
rare as Ocean's Atari software]). As far 
as I know, only the Commodore version 
has speech. Seems like Commodore 
owners get an even better deal for their 
£2.99. 


SPRONG 


Bignose Software 
4SK cassette/disk 
1 Player 
Joystick 



i 



jrrint?, stiUuu( 


Author Paul Lay is a regular Page 6 
contributor and was responsible for the 
excellent ‘Freeway Ace’ in Issue 16. 
This time he makes the progression into 
the hard commercial world with an all- 
machine code arcade type game entitled 


SPRONG. 


In SPRONG you must guide a pogo 
jumping character through an incredible 
50 screen adventure to claim the elusive 
‘Golden Pogostick*. You traverse each 
screen from left to right, leaping across 
various assorted platforms of all shapes, 
forms and sizes. 


The game opens up with a neat little 
title screen (which Ihen becomes Screen 
1 of the game itself) accompanied by a 
jazzed-up version of the song ‘Danny 
Boy’ - an unusual but nonetheless well- 
orchestrated musical choice. like all 
theme music it becomes annoying after 
a short while and can be turned oft ii 
desired, 

SPRONG has a certain cartoon feel 
to it with every single screen possessing 
it’s own unique background scenery 
ranging from houses of little towns or 
villages, w r ooded countryside, under¬ 
ground caverns and a host of other 
artistically drawn designs. Obstacles 
include moving platforms, raging fires, 
lava flows, lazer beams, acid rain, light¬ 
ning, helicopters, meteors etc, and 


critical timing is required to jump your 
way past them all. You are limited in 
your jumping ability, but pressing the 
firebutton gives you extra ‘oomph’ to 
leap those long distances. 

If, by some minor miracle, you make 
it through all 50 screens you arc then 
treated to a ‘Graphics Spectacular 1 
depicting that illustrious Golden 
Pogostick. 

SPRONG shares certain similarities 
with English Software’s KJSSIN 5 
KOUSINS* However, I must stress that 
these similarities are only superficial 
and SPRONG boasts vastly superior 
graphics and playability. Paul has made 
exceptional use of the Atari’s colour 
palette and could show many Atari 
programmers a thing or two in this 
respect. Some of them seem to think the 
Atari is limited to it’s four default 
colours! 

I would be lying if I were to say that 
SPRONG was easy to play. It rates 
pretty high in the difficulty league, but 
it's addictive enough to keep you coming 
back for more. Plenty of variety too - 
how many other games have 50 different 
screens? A splendid first-time effort 1 


ARCADE CLASSICS 

Datasoft/US Gold 



Four classic arcade games - POLE 
POSITION, MR DO, DIG-DUG & 
PACMAN - all on one tape is the latest 
offering from US Gold, In actual fact 
this is a compilation of some old Atari 
hits from the past which have been 
reviewed previously in their individual 
form, so only a brief summary is no w 
required, 

POLE POSITION needs no intro¬ 
duction. It's the computer race game 
which sets - the standards for all other 
race games and, with the exception of 
Activision’s brilliant US ROAD RACE, 
still leads the field. However, it’s inclus¬ 
ion in this set may turn out to be a bit of 


5 $ PAGE 6 - Issue 22 











a white elephant as it's given away free 
these days with just about every Atari 
computer package, 

DIG-DUG is identical to the Atari 
Rom - hardly surprising really seeing as 
it is the Atari Rom downloaded onto 
cassette. The forerunner of the popular 
Tunnelling games, it’s an enjoyable 
version of the arcade original but not a 
very authentic conversion. It could 
have been better, I feel. 

The exact opposite applies to MR 
DO, This is possibly the best conversion 
of an arcade game that Tve seen so far 
on a home computer. Identical to the 
originals equally as playable and you 
don’t have to keep banging money into 
the machine for the privilege] 

PACMAN rounds off the quartet. To 
put it bluntly, this game is a dinosaur 
and that pesky little dot-gobbler should 
have been pensioned off years ago 
regardless of how r cute some people 
think he is! Old Atari hands will already 
have this game and I doubt if any new 
owners would want it except as a 
collector’s item (or antique more like]!). 
As with DIG-DUG, Datasoft have 
taken the Atari Rom and downloaded it 
onto cassette. It's one redeeming feature 
- purely from a collector’s point of view - 
is that Datasoft have added animated 
sequences between certain rounds of 
play to bring it in line with the version of 
Pacman released for the now defunct 
5200 games machine. Incidentally, all 
pro-Pacman letters should be addressed 
to the editor] 

Four great games in their day then, 
but 1 have a slight suspicion this com¬ 
pilation may struggle to find a market. 
POLE POSITION and maybe even 
MR DO are capable of holding their 
own amongst the mass of new software 
releases but, to my mind, ARCADE 
CLASSICS has been released a year or 
so too late. 


COMING SOON 

HOMEPAK 
CUT & PASTE 
MOVIE MAKER 


ALAN GOLDSBRO 

has the ultimate Dream 


TECHNICOLOUR 
DREAM 
Red Rat Software 
4Sk disk/cassette 


"The Ultimate 256 Colour Graphic 
Art Program’ shouts at you from the 
colourful box with demo pictures dis¬ 
played all over it, and what’s more it 
could be just that depending upon your 
style of graphics. The program is suit¬ 
able for any 48k machine XL/XE inc¬ 
luded and in taking you through both 
the favourable and unfavourable points, 
f m sure you’ 11 be able to decide whether 
Technicolor Dream is for you, 

Technicolor Dream has many excell¬ 
ent features including Help Screen, 256 
Colour Palette, 128 colour Filters, Joy¬ 
stick &/or Touch Tablet con trol, Picture 
Dump to Screen or Printer, Quick 
Colour Selection and High Quality 
Picture Content. The disk version has 
the main program on side one, coupled 
with a selection of picture files on both 
sides. The disk takes approximately one 
minute to bool up owing to the heavy 
protection against copying. From the 
title screen (a Red Rat) it soon slips into 
the help screen which can be recalled at 
any time by pressing [ESC]. XL/XE 
owners can also use the [Help] key to 
access the screen. The help screen 
comprises 11 commands, all of which 
can be used when the picture is 
displayed. 

Selecting a colour is quite good. 
Pressing the Space Bar displays a 256 
palette of colours on the screen and 
moving the cursor via the Joystick (Port 
1) or Touch Tablet (Port 2) to the 
colour of your choice and pressing 
[Start] will select your colour. At the 
bottom of the screen are three boxes, 
the first box displays your selected 
colour, the second shows your mixing 
colour (obtained by using Option & 


Select, more about this later) and the 
third box displays the ‘Mix Mode’ 
colour i.e. alternate pixels from boxes 
one and two. Relow these boxes are 
alphanumeric codes (letters& numbers 
to me & you) signifying the selected 
colour. These codes are important for 
later use. Press the Space Bar to return 
to the drawing screen and start your 
picture. To access the colours again 
press the Space Bar and the palette 
overlays your picture without affecting 
the drawing screen. 

Once you have colours on the drawing 
screen an easy way to select a previously 
used colour is to position your cursor 
over the colour and press [Start], The 
manual also suggests ‘painting* a selec¬ 
tion of colours down the side of the 
screen to 'dip into\ The 16 main colours 
are of a solid construction, whilst the 
brightest are made up from a line of 
luminescence and a thinner line of 
black, thus giving a striped effect, how¬ 
ever this does look effective no matter 
how strange it first seems. 

Drawing is done with only one brush 
size although this moves with speed and 
ease. Alternate changes of colour or 
luminance can be achieved by typing in 
an alphanumeric code and using the 
(Option] key to signify Colour and the 
[Select] key to choose a Luminance. 
Using the 'Mix Mode’ colour can have 
pleasing results. As previously stated 
this gives you a checkerboard pattern. 

You can at any time use either the 
Joystick or Touch Tablet to draw your 
picture and 1 hope that other pro¬ 
grammers will make use of this feature 
more often in the future. On completion 
of your picture, any of 128 different 
filters can be overlayed to give a delicate 
tint. A handy feature is the Temporary 
Storage area in which you can ‘store’ 
your picture in its original format whilst 
you experiment with different colours, 
shades, and designs. Returning to the 
original picture can be achieved quite 
easily. gf 


PAGE $ , Issue- 21 59 








BRIGHTON COMPUTER EXCHANGE 




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SM 124 mono monitor ... .. ... £129,50 

SC 1424 colour monitor ... ... ... ... ... £346.00 
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ALL computer equipment 
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Saving the picture is fairly easy as is 
loading. In each case you need to type in 
the [Device: Filename] but no extender 
is required. This is mainly because the 
file is saved twice, once under 
[Filename:™!] and the other as 
[Filenamedumj. Deleting pictures and 
formatting disks can also be achieved 
from within the program. Pictures can 
also be saved in Compacted or UM- 
Compacted format. All the pictures can 
be loaded onto an autorun file (provided) 
for displaying as a commons show 
without the need for the main 
program. 

A picture dump to printer is included 
on the disk although I couldn’t get this 
to work on my Epson RXBOF/T. A basic 
listing is also included in the manual for 
a printer dump, this does work and 
takes about 8 minutes to print out a 
picture on its side down the paper. 
There is a section entitled 'Advanced 
Effects’ which can be selected by press¬ 
ing [Control] E, whereupon the screen 
will disappear and a small black and 
white miniature is returned in its place. 
From this section you can change a 
colour or luminance, add a luminance 
or create a negative of your picture. 


Most of the effects are obtained by 
typing in commands using the afore¬ 
mentioned alphanumeric codes. 

With basic listings and explanations 
in the sixteen page manual, inclusion of 
pictures into your own programs 
shouldn’t be too much of a problem. 

It’s a shame to have to come to the 
unfavourable parts in any program but 
sometimes there arc definite problems 
with software. In the attempt to be 
completely innovative, the program¬ 
mers have forgotten the simple adage of 
brevity. Many of the commands could 
easily be achieved: by simple keystrokes 
or use of the Joys tick/Stylus, but invari¬ 
ably you have to press a number of keys 
to obtain the desired result, for example, 
to clear the screen there are 8 keys to be 
pressed and to change a colour through 
the‘Effects’ screen can take you up to 21 
key presses! 

You may have noticed no mention of 
standard features such as Circle, Square, 
Line, Point Fill and Zoom etc. These 
are not included in the program with 
the exception of Line which takes so 
long in setting up that you’ll achieve it 
faster manually. The other exception is 
Fill, which I could only get to fill the 


whole screen and not selected parts. 
The other difficulty I encountered was 
when you choose a colour from the 
palette which overlays the drawing 
screen, already foil of colour, discerning 
which colour is which is extremely 
hard. 

Technicolor Dream was originally 
designed to enhance the quality of 
artwork for games software and if this is 
the main reason for buying then you’ve 
made a good choice. On the other hand, 
if you view it as ' Jhe Ultimate 256 
Colour Graphic Art Program’ then it 
falls short of the mark. The demo 
pictures show the obvious quality of Lhe 
program and if you can put up with its 
limitations then, priced at £12-95 for 
disk and £9-95 for cassette, it’s a good 
buy. The package includes a well pre¬ 
sented and Informative manual all boxed 
in a rigid plastic case which should 
survive even the hardest throw the 
postman can give it. 

I hope that future modifications will 
include some of the more easily access¬ 
ible commands and in turn lose some of 
those interminable 21 key presses. 

Alan Goldsbro 


60 PAG E 6 - f ks Lie 12 

































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Flight of The Swa.n 

Chnidot 
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M uni-L Maker 
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PMC !□ Machine Code 
Musk Reviews 
Advtnilirt Column 

* Includes a riuper vcrnJIing ganne 

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Tick Toeh 
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THE BOOSTER 
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issue 20' GRAPHICS SPECIAL 
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Ivi'ii u m 

Shading fi.iLLcry 

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bli ; 1 Cards 

CAS TLE MORGUE 

Mudliuw's l.iitieE Maker 


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Graphics ArL Department 
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11 page ST scciioil 
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The Chase 
Magfilt 
Seclur 14 

Display l.iib PL. I 
Speech Synthesiser 
19S(5 Review 
First ST <Gvet*agt 
Adventure reviews 
.. and much enure 


Flight Situulauc IJ 
Adventure Reviews- 
Guide In Error Cudn 
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Write A Game 
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Lots ut ST reviews 

Lattice C 

... and even more! 


* GREAT MACHINE LANGUAGE ♦ SOLVE YOUR PROBLEMS with, 
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PAGE 6 - Issue 22 61 








































Qumes 



You are part of the crew of one of the few surviving 
submarines following a devastating Nuclear war. Your 
original underwater base is in an area now controlled by 
the enemy. Having found a new base you must try and 
make as many hazardous trips as possible into enemy held 
territory to remove supplies from the shelter in the enemy 
zone (Home 1) to a safer shelter (Home 2) in a non enemy 
controlled zone. Your submarine has a leaking ballast tank 
and can only remain stable by pumping air into this tank. 
As you proceed through each mission the enemy will set 
mines at random heights and later will try to impede you 
by raising nets. There is no limit to how many missions 
you make but it is harder as you progress through each 
skill level. 

PLAYING 

The joystick will control all movement of the 
submarine. Left and right controls the forward and 
backward movement. Moving the joystick up will force air 
into the ballast tanks. Too much air will force the 
submarine to rise loo quickly whilst too little wall cause it 
to sink to the ocean floor. 

You have 3 lives only and must avoid hitting mines, 
nets, rocks or the sides of the screen and must not rise to 
the surface as the air is contaminated. 

SCORE 

You gain points for staying mobile and get 100 points 
extra for each successful mission completed. Your air 
supply is limited so you must strike a balance between 
continual movement and conservation of air 

TO BEGIN 

The opening screen will ask you for a skill level from 1 - 
9. Simply press the appropriate key and the screen will go 
blank for a few seconds before the playfield appears. At the 
end of each game your score will be displayed and you will 
be given an opportunity to select a new skill level. 


by Philip Dennis 


EX 1 REM WWMMMHKMM M KMMKHKWMMMMKMMItMHKKK i t 
EM 2 REM * HIDDEN DEPTHS * 

HJ 3 REM * by> Philip Dennis * 

EH 4 REM * —---— -— — * 

XV 5 REM * PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND * 
EN 5 REM MHHM KM MM H HHMMftMHMKMMmtMKHKWm iHli 
NN 8 REM 

US 333 REM MWTJO :«JJ + f-V, M-T4 :M ■ ■ 

AS 100G DATA 173,36,2,141,193,6,173,37,2, 

141.134.6 

KL 1010 DATA 160,100,162,6,163,7,32,32,22 
0,238 

KZ 1020 DATA 132*6,173,132,6,141,10,212,1 
41,26,206 

DA 1030 DATA 174,252,2,232,240,230,172,13 

3.6.174.134.6 

BG 1040 DATA 169,7,32,32,220,104,36,206,2 
00,2,173,200 

MS 1050 DATA 2,141,132,6,76,38,220 

OK 1200 REM LN4U*Fr.T»-Tri?IiTi 

IM 1205 FOR 1=0 TO 63 

PU 1210 READ A 

EF 1220 POKE 1664+1,A 

FC 1230 NfcHT I 

VO 1235 GOSUB 3000 

TR 1290 SEFCOLDR O,0,8:K-USR(16641 
SZ 2499 REH 


PM 2500 RI5E-73:RASE=45: FLA-10 :Se0=8lSCA- 
0:C0R=0:EMT=D:5HQ1=0 

OH 2510 HP05P0=5324fl:HPdSMO-53252!HP0SP1= 
53243:HP O SMI=5 3253 
XT 2530 FOR 1=0 TO 111:READ A 
■ilL 2540 POKE 15*6+1, A: NEXT I 
05 2550 GOTO 3500 
zf 2333 rem Mi 1 n ■ 

QE 3000 GRAPHICS IBjPOKE lb,64;POKE 53774 
,64 

OK 3010 SOU = 45:POSITION 3,2:? 06 ■ ■■ ED 


JU 3040 POSITION 3,3 S? 06 j "EE W3T 
VS 3050 POSITION 7,5:? 06; " nTHTOTa " 

KD 3060 POSITION 13,7:2 06 !' » ■ :FOR H = 20 
TO 286 STEP 2 

NT 3078 POSITION 1,10:? 06;"progran by p 

dennis" 

SD 3888 POKE 7ie,H:SOUND 1,SOU~10,12,3iPO 
KE 711,H+ll 

MK 3090 SOUND 2,SOU+10,18,3!SOU=S0U+5:SOU 
ND 0,SOU,10,4 

OF 3100 FOR ZR = 1 TO 10:NEXT ZR:NEXT H 
NE 3110 FOR 0=1 TO 100:NEXT V 
00 3120 SOUND 8,O,0,0;SOUND 1,0,0,SOUND 
2,0,0,0 

FR 3125 OPEN ttl, 4,0, “K : ** 

ZV 3130 POSITION 1,9:? 06;" INPUT SKILL L 
EOEL" 

TV 3148 POSITION 1,10:? 06 j" 1 TO 3 


RAW PLAVFIELD and PUT 


NTO SCREEN 


BJ 3145 RETURN 
PI 3498 REM 
MZ 3499 REM 
LM 3500 GET B1 ; K:IF K<49 OR K>57 THEN K=4 
3 

OG 3510 SKI=K-4CiK=49:DF=1;FD=0.4:CQUNT=0 
KP 3520 GOSUB 68QO:GOSUR 8000 
OR 3530 GOTO 4008 
IM 3633 REM 

EK 3700 Z1=0:SM01=SH01+1:IF 5H01>4 THEN « 
ETURN 

NI 3710 M1=X1+1:Z1=Z1+1lPOKE 53249,XI:SOU 
ND 0,208-21,2,10 

Mh 3750 SH1=PEEKC53Z53) ! IF SHlOO THEN HI 
=H0:POKE HP0SP1,HI:GOTO 3016 
RU 3600 GOTO 3710 

rat 3610 Z3—Z1 + X8iIF Z3>199 THEN 3890 
KS 3615 FOR 1=2 TO 8:COLOR I:SOUND 0,10*1 
,0,14 


*2 PAGE 6- Issue 22 


























no 


ND 


FT 

YY 

HZ 

KG 

OC 

YM 

VE 

HA 

0M 

UH 

HM 

F5 

IY 

AM 

IR 

UG 

Gi 

FN 


OB 


BE 

JY 

OL 

OK 


GO 


Zl 


NI 

OG 

WF 

TF 

TK 

SD 

T£ 

BY 

SJ 

YM 

IS 

GK 

VL 

PI 

ov 

HC 

Mm 


DS 

FO 

HH 

ML 

00 

BO 

PH 

TM 


3020 PLOT Z3-44, Z2+71 SDRAMTD Z3-44,Z2+ 
72 ! DR AHT0 Z3-43,Z2+63;DRAHTQ Z3“43*Z2+ 
74 


3830 DRAHTO ZI-42, Z2* 69:DRAWTG Z3-*2,Z 
2 + 74:DRAI4T0 Z3~41,ZZ+7lJ D B A WTO Z3-*1,Z 
2 + 72 

3040 NEHT I 
3850 7 4-SHOJ,; " + 

3890 POKE 53Z70,OfCOLOR 3:RETURN 

3999 REM 1 | M 

4000 LV-1SLM=1 

401O S=0:POKE HP0SP1,5 

4020 SETCOLOR 4,7,5:P0KE 704*±O:P0iCE 7 
OS* 30 

4030 POKE 53270,O:HL-0:HS-O 

4040 FOR K-0 TO HL:IF 5KI<4 THEM GOTO 

4030 

4050 GOTO 7890 
4 0 5 9 REM 

4050 PLOT 110 ,45 1 DRA WTO 110,IMTtRASE +2 
> 

4070 PLOT 73,56:DR fiWTO 78,INTCRASt+lOl 
4080 S-S+O . 05:POKE HPOSMJ*10*9 + 140 
4090 IE RISE <17 THEN RISE=17*2 
4100 IF RASECI5 THEM RAS£=15. 2 
4io3 rem nn?>r«if 

4110 L=PEEK (532521 sIF L<>0 THEN GOTO 4 
500 

41Z0 IF KMOC10O THEM H1"5:PQKE HPD5P1* 
SiSOUND 0>0,0*O:SOUND l,e,O,G:GOT0 416 
a 

4125 POKE 53248 * MO;J—PEEK(6323 
4123 REM * f4 M^iTTnm—— 

4135 IF PEEK (6443=0 THEN GOSUB 3700 
4140 IE J—14 THEM SOUND l,l f 0,6:5OU«D 
0*0*0,O!MMO-KMO-ED:POKE HPOSMO,XMO:5 = 5 
-0*1 

4145 IF J=10 THEM SOUMD 0,123*12,3:500 
MP 1,1,0,6 ;HMO=KH0-FD:POKE HPOSMO, MHO: 

S=S^O.1 


415B IF J = 6 THEM SOUND 0*123,12,3: 50LIN 
P 1 , 1*O,6:MMO-HMO-FD:POKE HPOSMO,HMD:5 
= 5-0 * 1 

416B IF J—4.5 THEN SOU ND O , 0 * O * O ! SOUND 
1,O , 0,O 

4170 M1 = XB!POKE HPOSP1* HU POKE 704,FLA 
!POKE 705*30 

4100 FLA=FLA+16!IF FLA>240 THEN FLA=10 
4190 IF S>0 THEM GOTO 4220 
4200 IF S<0 THEM GOTO 4240 


4210 GOTO 4260 

4213 REM _ 

4228 FOR 1=0 TO S i Z2 = Z2 + 0,5;RE5 = USR(15 


MOVE P/M UP/D0HN 


74,PO,Pl>:Y0=Y0+1:MEKT I 
4230 GOTO 4260 

4240 FOR I=S TO 0JZ2=Z2-0.5:RE5=U5R(15 
36,PO,P15:YG=V0^1:HEKT I 
4250 REM 
4260 MEMT K 

4270 HL"S _ 5*RBSCHS1 :J = PEEK1632J 
42O0 IF PEEK 16441=0 THEN GOSUB 3700 
4265 IF J — 14 THEM SOUND 1*1,0,61 SOUND 
0,0,0,0:GOTO 4330 

4290 TF 1-15 AMP HS>0 THEN HS_HS“O.01i 
SOUND 0,0,0*0!SOUND 1*0,0,0:GOTO 4330 
430O IF J>4 AND lC8 THEN HS=KS+0 * 351PO 
KE HPOSMO,MHO:SOUND O,123* 12 * 8:IF HS>± 
THEM HS-1 


43i@ IF J>3 AND 1<12 THEN HS=H5-B.35:P 

OKE HPOSMO,HMO:SOUND 0*123*12,3 

4315 H1 = HBIP0KE 5 3253* HI 

4320 IF HS<‘I THEM HS=~i 

4330 K0=K0+IMTCHSJ 

4340 GOTO 4040 

4433 REM ^ Jg: ii * M-M11 4TT>Y 

4500 POKE 53270,0 

4510 POKE HP0SP1,5:SOUND 0,0,0* 0iSOUND 


NM 

FV 

OF 

70 
Z J 
SO 
114 


HH 

TV 

GO 

DM 

HP 

PI 


QV 

HM 


AT 

XF 

SK 

BA 

CM 

CZ 

JE 

GP 

HP 

LU 

CF 

EA 

SO 

BH 

YN 

RV 

CX 

Ztl 

YY 

BK 

YY 

MI 

DO 

HH 

HK 

HZ 

PH 

BE 

YY 

LE 

KA 

DM 

ZP 

OK 

CS 

TS 

GK 

PB 

BF 

BR 


MOVE OUT OF START POSITION 


MOVE SUB UP FROM START P05I 


P/M IN HOME POSITION 


1*040,0 

4520 IF LU-1 THEM GOTO 4700 

4529 REM 

4530 J=PEEKC632>:If J=14 THEM GOTO 457 
0 

4540 IF J=6 THEM GOTO 4570 
4550 POKE 16,64:POKE 53774,64 
4560 GOTO 4530 

4569 REM 

utan 

4570 FOR 1=0 TO 1 
4580 RES=USR11536,PO,Pi) 

4590 NEXT I 
4600 GOTO 4010 
4633 REM 

4700 IF M0> 61 AND KO<73 AMP Y0>170 AMP 
5(0,7 THEM POKE 19*0:GOTO 4530 

4799 REM i 1THJgJiU40 tiTT^M 

4800 IF XO>140 AMP K0<171 AND Y0>140 A 
MD SCI THEM SKI=SKI+1:COR=COR+1jGOT0 5 
ZOO 

4310 SC = PEEK (19> : C 0 UNT= C Oil NT t SC \ SHGl-tJ 
5 GOTO 500O 

*320 FOR J=i TO 500:NEXT J1SHO1=0:GOT0 
5500 

*399 REM 

5000 POKE 53243*5;POKE HP0SP1,5iPOKE H 

PO5M0,5iPOKE HP0SM1,5 

5010 FOR 1-0 TO 10 

5020 FOR J = 0 TO 10 

5030 SETCOLOR 4*1*10 

5040 SETCOLOR 2,1,10!SOUND 8*10*1,0,10 
!SOUND 1,5*2,0,10 
5058 NEXT J :NEXT I 
5860 SHOI“0iEMT—ENT + 1 

5070 SOUND 0,O*0,0:SOUND 1,0*O,0sSOUND 
2 ,0,0,0 
5133 rem 
5200 SHOI = 0 

5210 POKE 53248*5:POKE HPOSPI,5:POKE H 
PO5M0,5:POKE HP0SM1,5 
5230 SETCOLOR 2,0,0iSETCOLOR 4*0,0 
5240 SC=PEEK(131 

5250 COUHT-COUNT+SCJIF EKT=3 THEM GOTO 

5500 


5230 GOSUB 6000 i GOSUB 8000:GOTO 4010 

5499 REM M I I'■ T7 ■ 1 ■! Ill 

5500 POKE 53248*5iPOKE HPOSPI,5:POKE K 
P0SM0 , 5:POKE HPCSMi,5 

5510 GRAPHICS 18iSOUND 0,0,0,0:50000 1 
,0,0,0!SOUND 2,0*0*0 

5520 SETCOLOR 0*0,0:POKE 16*64:POKE S3 
774,64 

5530 POSITION 6,1s? 1*6; "YOU HAVE" 

5540 POSITION 4*3i? tf6; "COMPLETED M |C0 
R 

5566 COUKT=€OUNT+CCOR^lOOl 

5570 IF COB=l THEN POSITIOM 6,5:? tt6;*» 

MISSION* 1 :GOTO 5590 

5588 POSITION 6*5:? 06j"MISSIONS" 

5590 POSITION 6,7i? 116; "SCORE-" J COUNT 
560O POSITION 1*91? tt& j "INPUT SKILL LE 
UEL" 

5610 POSITION 1,10:? tt6j" 1 TO 9 

* l :X=U5Rfl6G43 


5620 GET til, K: IF K<49 THEN GOTO 5600 

5630 IF K>57 THEM GOTO 5600 

5640 SKI-K-48:SC = 0:LM=1s COR = 0:EKT“0 

5650 GOTO 3500 

5660 IF SKI<5 THEN GOTO 205 


5999 REM M >1 

6000 GRAPHICS 7:SETCOLOR 2,1,O:SETCOLO 
R 4,7*5:COLOR 2 

6005 RESTORE 9050 

6010 Z 2 = 0 : POKE 559,0: REM kf J 

6020 SOUND 0,O*0,O:SOUND 1* 0*D*O;SOUND 
2 * 0 * 0 * 0 0 


PAOB 6- Issue 22 63 
























1 


YW 6646 PLOT 10,73:DRflHTO 36,73tPLOT i07 f 
6A:t>«AHTD 125,60 
ZH 5050 COLOR 3 

VC 6060 READ nH*QY:lF QX=210 THEN 6150 
AY 6065 IF OX=200 THEM 6100 
KD 6070 PLOT OK, Q V 
70 6075 READ GK,0Y 

JY 5000 IF 0K = 2 2O THEN COLOR Q Y :GOTO 606O 
GC 6005 IF 0)1 = 210 THEM 6i5a 
AM 6090 IF GX=20O THEN 6100 
CF 6095 DRAMTO RK,AY:GOTO 6075 
EM 6100 IF OY-2I0 THEN 6150 

YE 6110 READ OH*OY!POSITION OK,OY:READ OH 
,0Y 

EO 6120 POKE 765 ,DK: HTO 18, tt6, O , B , '*5 : f ' 

SH 6110 GOTO 6060 

AV 6150 COLOR 3: IF 5KIM THEN GOTO 7006 
UN 6160 RI9E=79iR*5E=*5 
PL 6170 POKE 752,1 
HR 6100 L tt-LHi1 
CB 6499 REM 
ZK 6500 7 *'4 T0RPED06. 


RAW WINDOW SCEEN 


HC 651 0 7 

_ HUH 11 

Ro 6520 ? "Ei-naa 

— mm" 

LH 6530 7 — 


t+++“; t PONE 752,2 

DB 5540 COLOR 3 SPOKE 55?,34:RETURN 
TJ 699? REM M4!144 T M:TiT r rBT7U 

RC 7000 MINE—5:N0MINE=4 

UO 7010 NOMINE-N0MINE+C5KI-2JJIF NOMINE>6 
THEN NOMIME =6 

NF 7020 FOR H=! TO NOMINE:ZZ=MINE: ZH— CIO* 
RNDC1J>+30!PLOT ZZ*ZK 
RK 7030 PLOT Z2+2*ZH:RL0T ZZ,ZH+2:PLOT ZZ 
+ 2* 2X + Z 

CK 7040 DRAMTO ZZ+1*ZH+1:DRAHT0 ZZ+1,1 
YE 7050 IF 5KI=2 THEM MlNE=MI«E+45 
AM 7060 IF 5KI>2 AND 5KI<6 THEN NINE=KXNE 
+ 30 

OR 7070 IF 5KI>5 THEN MIME=MIHE+23 
YK 7000 NEXT X!GOTO 6160 

HE 7090 RISE-RISE—0i4:IF SMI>7 THEM RlSE= 
RISE-0.Z 

YU 7100 RA5E=RA5E—0,09;IF 5KI>8 THEN RASE 
—RASE-0.05 

OK 7110 PLOT 32,7?;DRAMTO 37,INTfRISE> 

FQ 7120 IF SKI<5 THEN GOTO 4070 
RM 7130 GOTO 4060 
YN 7 999 REM Wl-B 

AMi 0000 MG - 62 : H1 = 62 : YO-171 5 Y1 — 178 
HU 0O1O YMO = l97 J YM1“207:HUB =130 
HM 0020 POKE 53240,62:POKE HPOSP1,5 l POKE 
HPOSMO,100 

AS 0030 A = PEEK f 106 J — 24- 
EO 8040 POkE 5427?,, A: 01=256*0 
EK 8050 POKE 53277,3:POKE 559,62 
DR 8068 POKE 764,10:POKE 705,30 
MM 0070 O-A+3 
H B 3800 P0 = O+i:Pl = D + 2 
NA 0090 RES = liSRtl612,U3 
MM 8100 RESTORE 191501 

MS 9109 REM ■ I I I ■ I HmfimT A^TfJ^TyT^ 

CE 8110 FOR 1 = 0JL+J.024+YO TO Q1+1032 + YO 
AT 8120 READ A:POKE I,A 
FH 0130 NEXT I 

00 0139 REM TyT MiMiiMJ*■ f iT7I3^ffn 
OC 0140 FOR 1=01+1200+Y1 TO ftl+1281+Yl 
CU 8150 READ A;POKE I,A!NEHT I 
LM 0159 REM ;■ 1 1 j4> 14I MrLI j 

LD 8160 FOR 1=01+768+YMB TO Q1+789+YMO 
DA 8170 READ A S POKE I,AlNEXT I 
56 8100 RETURN 
PY 3999 REM ■»: 


ATA F 


P.F. SOFTWARE ^ 

SMART ART ( 16 k) 

OVER 80 DIFFERENT COLOURS CAN BE 
DISPLAYED AT ONCE 
INTERRUPT DRIVEN CURSOR 
4 BRUSH SIZES 
3 BRUSH SPEEDS 
AIR BRUSH MODE 
PLOT 

AVAILABLE ON CASSETTE FOR 
ALL ATARI S BIT COMPUTERS 
ONLY... £3.50 

(Previous purchasers o( 

Art Atari can upgrade to 
SMART ART lor only £ 1 . 00 ) 


DRAWTO 

FILL 

DRAW BOX 
OR AW CIRCLE 
SAVE PICTURE 


■ LOAD PICTURE 

■ SEPARATE PROGRAM TO DISPLAY 
PICTURE 

■ DEMO PPCTURE 

ALSO AVAILABLE 

BLACKJACK ( 16 K) Realistic card display.El .95 

PICTURE PUZZLE ( 32 K) Two pictures to 

choose from ........... £3.95 

PICTURE TORMENT ( 16 K) Very difficult..£2.95 

FRUIT SALAD ( 16 K) Colourful version 

Of mastermind...... C2.95 

FRUIT PJCKliSI ( 16 K) Arcade action .. £2 95 

(Order both FRUIT SALAD &. FRUIT PlCKIN 

for only ......... £ 4 . 50 ) 




Cheques & PO.'s to: 
(Oversea; orders lor 
single programs 
please add ft) 501 


P.F. SOFTWARE 
14 KIRKSTALL AVENUE 
LITTIEBOROUGH 
LANCS. DU5 9JA JJ 


sz 

DR 

5Z 

EC 

KP 

HG 

DR 

5N 

SD 

CT 

VF 


BC 

CE 

VI 

EE 

Nil 

TP 


9800 DATA 104,104,104,133,205,104,104, 
133,2 07*160,1,169,6,133,204,133, 286,17 
7,204,136,145,204,288,200,283,247,160 
9O10 DATA 1,177,206,136,145,206,200,20 
0,208,247,96,104,104,104,133,205,104,1 
04,133*207,160*254,169 

9028 DATA 0,133,204,133,206,177,204,20 
0,145,204,136,136,203,247,160,254,177, 
206,200,145,206,136,136,708, 2 4 7,96 
903O DATA 104,104,104,133,205,162,0,16 
8,255,169,8,133,204,169*0,145,204,136, 
200 

9040 DATA 24?,232,130,24,169*01,101,20 
5,133,205 ,16a,2 55,224,4,206,234,96 

9049 HEM 

9050 DflTft 159,75,147*73,143,68,132,66, 
125,61.107,61,108,50,129,49,135,48,137 
,42,137,42,135,38,200,8,127,42 

9055 DATA 3*3,20O,0,110, 45 ,3,3,110,4&, 
iOZ,41,200,0,91,44,3,3,91,44,82*42,200 
,0,70,56,3,3,78,56,G4,52,200,O 
9860 DATA 52,56,3*3,52,56,260,0,31,74, 
3,3,31,74,10,74,12,65,16,62,21,56,22,4 

6,6,48,1,32,200,0,1,79,3 

9065 DATA 3*1,79,1,1,159*1,159,79*220, 

1*120,60*12 0,62*107,62,107,61,103* 61,1 

03,59,93,59,163,60,88,68,88 

967© DATA 61*103,61,80,62,187,62,220,1 

,26,74*20,78,20,76*7,76,7,74,3,74,3,75 

*7,75,7,76*3*76,210,210 

9149 REM M | U 

9150 DATA 12*12,12,30*255,255,255*30,0 

9159 REM 

9160 DATA 14,0 
916? REM 

9170 DATA 0,0,0*3,3,3,3,3*3*3,3,12,12* 
12,12 * 12,12,12,12,12 * O * 6 ^ 


DATA TO DRAW TORPEDO 


DA 1 A TO DRAM WINDOW POINTERS 


6+ PAGE 6 - Issue 22 








































































and get them right! 


The program listings In PAGE.G ate prepared carefully to 
ensure that they cart he typed ill as easily as possible. Before 
typing any listings ensure that you ate familiar with the use 
of the Shift and CONTROL and INVERSE keys as outlined 
In your computer manual The listings are prepared to 
match exactly what you see on screen. Every character that 
you m*y see in a listing is Included in the chan below for 
cross reference. By using TYPO 3 you can ensure that you 
iype In the programs EXACTLY as they are printed. Remem¬ 
ber a single typing mistake may mean a program will not 
run. 

WHAT ARE THOSE CODES? 

Each line of a program begins with a special two letter 
code THESE SHOULD NOT BE TYPED IN. They are used 
by the program TYPO to check that you have typed each 
line correctly. IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY TYPED IN 
THE TYPO 3 LISTING PLEASE DO SO NOW. The program 
can be used as you type in each line of a program or to check 
an already typed program. The code for each line will match 
but if you have problems check the listing conventions 
below carefully, you are most probably typing a CONTROL 
character incorrectly. TYPO 3 cannot check If a fine has 
been missed so if you have problems in running a Listing 
count the lines in the program and ensure none are missing. 
If the TYPO codes match and the program still does not run, 
LIST it to cassette ot disk using LIST “G" or LIST 
"D: filename'*, switch off the computer, re-boot and then 
ENTER the program using ENTER **QT or ENTER 
11 D:filename”. Save this version In the normal way. 

HOWTO USE TYPO 3 

1. Type in the listing carefully for although you can use 
TYPO 3 to check itself (see 6 below) it may not work if you 
have made mistakes. 

2. SAVE or CSAVE a copy of the program. 

3. Each time you want to type In a program listing RUN 
TYPO 3 first. The program will install a machine code 
routine in memory and then delete itself. Now type in a line 
as shown in the magazine exclud/ng the first two letter code and 
press RETURN. 

4. A two letter code will appear at the top left of your screen. 
If this code matches the one in the magazine cany on and 
type the next line. Note, the code will not match If you use 
abbreviations. If you prefer to use abbreviations LIST the 
line you have just typed, move the cursor to that line and 
press RETURN. The code should now match. 


5. If the code does not match, use the editing keys to correct 
the line and press RETURN again. Repeat if necessary until 
the codes match. 

6. To check a line you have already typed LIST the line, 
place the cursor on that line and press RETURN. 

7. When you have finished a listing jusl SAVE or CSAVE It 
in the normal way. 

You cantypeina program without uslngTYP03 and then 
check It by SAVEing or CSAVElng a copy of the program, 
running TYPO 3 and ihen LOADlng or CLOADing your 
program and proceeding as in step 6 above. 

Always SAVE or CSAVE a program before running it and 
always use TYPO before telling us that a program will not 
run. 


l fleiN 

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Jgn* nas * 

Hr-Dofrudpr for ANTIC ana # 

* PACE 6 based T Y P D n * 

* published bv antic magazine * 


n * REM N H M N H Ji fc l H Hhh HH WlI mu M A A M l M H AW N N W h M 

SJS 100 GRAPHICS 0 

HO 11b TOE 1=1536 TO 17T1 ! fit AD A : tK-CPT4 G ! 
POKt X . ft :NEWT I 

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statements thee* Typing' 1 : E NO 

y m ire a-ush 

VT NA ? :? "TYPO III i* up *nd running"; 
NEW 

MA 1090 DATA 1*4,160,0,105,26-, 3,20 1,69 
MG 1010 DATA 2*0,8,2*6,2*0.7*0.192,36,208 
DH .1 0ZG DATA 2*2, IS, 208.16?, 79,153,16,3 
RK 1630 DAT ft 260,Ifc.*,6,153,26,3,±62,B 
RR 1046 DAT ft 1O?,0,228,157,7»,6„J42.Z2* 

TO 105* OAT A 15,260,2*5,±6*.03,1*1.83,6 
lit L DATA 165,6,1*1,04,6,173.4,228 
Cl) 107O DATA 1*5,0.1*1,95,6,173,5,226 
BK 1680 DATA ,0,±41,56,€,165,6,1*2 

KK 1*80 DATA 3,1*9,203,262,±6.751,86,0 
7R 1100 DATA 6,0,ft.0.0,0,0,0 
LD 1110 DATA 0,0,0.0,0,0,32,9* 

JH 1120 DftTfl Fi . 8,72,291,155,240,55,230 
TV 1130 DATA 263,13J,20?,138,72,±65,9,If3 
TH 1146 DATA 200,162,0,10,30,206,6.70? 

HF ±156 DATA 144,7,24,101,203,144, 7 ,,239 
RL 1160 DATA 26fl,202,i*ft,73^,i33,207,24,1 
65 

Trt 1170 DATA 2 *4,101,207,13 3,2 64,165,705, 
101 

AW 1160 DATA 298,133,20S,165,206,105,0,13 

3 

hm ii »0 data 205 , 104 , 170 , 10 *, 40 ,?e, 138,72 
HR ±200 RATA 152,72,162,0,134,207,134,206 
fir 1Z10 DATA ±6*.24,6,Z04,30,295,35,206 
EA 1220 DATA 3fl,207,36,20ft,56,165,267 r 233 
TM 1230 OftTA 154,170,15S,700,233,2,14*,4 
5K 1249 DATA 134,207,113,200,136,260,227, 
163 

CB 1250 DATA 0,155,207,133,264.155,209,6 
HH 1260 DATA 20*,*2,261,26.*4*,4,233,26 
MB 127* DATA 230,204,202,705.242.133,205, 
16? 

8t 1260 DATA 12ft,Idft,85,200,192,40.206.24 

9 

WV 1290 DATA 155,294,1*5,1*0.100.3,145,8ft 
GA 13*0 DATA 165,295,24,105,161,200,1*5 .0 

3 

WQ ill* DATA 32,69,6,104,166.76,153,6 


- t ,4 .v 4 






V ? 








<• A 


II 


Q 


ESC 

CTRL " 

CTRL = 

CTRL + 

CTRL * 

SHIFT CLEAR 

DELETE 

TAB 

SHIFT DELETE 
SHIFT INSERT 
CTRL TAB 
SHIFT TAB 
CTRL Z 
CTRL DELETE 
CTRL INSERT 


INVERSE SPACE 


PAGE 6-Issue 22 65 









Review 



PaperClip 

Ariolasoft/Batteries Included 


Ever since Issue 17 when I reviewed Superscript I have been 
using that program to prepare every issue of PAGE 6, 1 
considered Superscript to be the finest word processor available 
for the Atari so I was most interested to have the opportunity 
at last of testing PaperClip* a word processor which has been 
hailed in the States as the ‘definitive* Atari word processor. 
Let’s start out by saying that PaperClip has everything that 
Superscript has, w r ell almost, and a lot more besides. From the 
very start it is evident that this is a fine word processor 
containing virtually everything you would need for any task 
from writing a letter home to producing a fully indexed book 
complete with a table of contents! As with any complex 
program it will take you some time to learn all of the facilities 
available but on-screen Help files are available at the push of a 
button or with a couple of key strokes. If you just want to do 
something simple to begin with, however, just type! 


reviewed by Les Ellingham 

paging’ where odd and even numbered pages can be treated 
differently with margins and headings set to the left or right as 
appropriate. Superscript scores heavily here as it can print odd 


EDITING 

The first thing that strikes your eye is that PaperClip uses a 
re-defined character set. Each character is slightly larger than 
the standard Atari characters and is in a sort of‘old English 1 
style. Quite pleasing on the eye and very easy to read. All of the 
editing commands that you would expect of an advanced word 
processor are available from deleting characters, words or lines 
to defining and mo ving, copying or deleting blocks of text. All 
fairly standard but PaperClip has many little extras such a$ 
character or word toggle. If you make the classic typing 
mistake of transposing two characters, you need only place the 
cursor on the second character and, with one keypress, flip the 
characters. Likewise with any two adjacent words. 

SEARCH and REPLACE 


numbered pages first and allow you to reverse each page and 
then print the even numbered pages on the other side. One 
thing PaperClip does have though and which is very easy to 
implement is double column printing which it achieves in one 
pass i.e. the two columns arc printed at the same time rather 
than reversing the paper as some word processors do. This 
feature is easier to use than on any other word processor 1 
have tried and can produce some excellent professional looking 
results, particularv if the Print Preview option is used first. 

MUCH MORE 

There is even more to PaperClip such as the ability to 
include graphics in a document, do mathematical calculations 
on columns etc., use in 'Typewriter mode’, produce automatic 
tabling of contents, include comment lines and more. It also 
allows you to work on two documents at once in different 


Any word or character can be found quickly and changed if 
required for any other text. Global substitutions are possible, 
but not just over one document. Multiple documents can be 
chained together, in fact as many as your disk will hold, and a 
global search and replace can be performed over every 
chained, or batched, file on the disk! What's more several 
global substitutions can be performed at the same lime. 

PRINT FORMATTING 

Control over the printed output is one of PaperClip’s 
strongest points. The disk comes w r ith dozens of printer 
Configuration files with a utility program to create your own. 
Strangely one or two printer features seem to be missing, such 
as enlarged text, but special user defined printer commands 
can be included or a configuration file can be changed to suit. 
Obvious settings such as margins, page length, line spacing etc. 
are all standard but also included are unusual features such as 
Microspacing. If it works on your printer you can obtain 
superbly justified text with each word evenly spread unlike in 
the conventional way in which extra spaces are added between 
words. I say ‘if it works’ for although my NEC supports 
microspacing. Paperclip tended to split up words and throw 
odd lines out of the margins. Not very useful! 

Headers and footers are available as well as page numbering 
and new page eject One thing not supported is ‘alternate 


windows. And you can do mail merge. And you can define 
keyboard macros. And... 

In tact there is too much to comment on everything so check 
the feature summary to see just what is available. 

CONCLUSIONS 

Paperclip comes with two options, one for the J30XE and 
one for others. The only difference is in the size of the text 
buffer. I could not try the 130XE option as this is supposed to 
be on the reverse of the disk along with several new utilities 
but the reverse of the review copy disk was blank! One of these 
utilities was the automatic indexing which 1 longed to try! 

The disk is not copy protected so can be backed up with 
case. Protection is achieved by means of a dongle which is 
plugged into a joystick port. A much more sensible way to 
prevent illegal use. Superscript is so heavily hacked up that 1 
cringe each time I have to boot it up. 

There have to be one or two criticisms but they arc Limited. 

If you can type fast it is possible to l get ahead 1 of PaperClip 
which can cause problems. Superscript has a superb file 
loading system where all the files on a disk are shown on 
screen and you merely place the cursor over the file you wan! 
and hit Return whereas PaperClip requires you to remember a 
filename. The packaging produced by Ariolasofi is superb, in 
fact probably the best yet seen for this type of software but the 
manual, which by the way is excellent, is almost impossible to 


66 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 
















rtrjid Without using two hands. It should be spiral bound so as 
to lay flat when you are typing. At present you would need to 
weight it down or copy parts of it to use it whUst typing 

THE FINAL OPINION 


I have to admit it PaperClip is probably the finest word 
processor yet produced for the Atari although it does lack a 
spelling checker which many might consider tips the scales 
towards Superscript. Nevetheless Superscript may have to bow 
down! Apart from its features the price, now that it finally has 
LLK. distribution, makes PaperClip one of your best ever buys 
if you need a word processor. It costs £44.95. Still quite a lot of 
money, but w r orth every penny. 

Ariolasoft should feel proud to have a product such as this 
available at a reasonable cost and anyone needing a powerful 
word processor should look to PaperClip as the definitive Atari 
word processor. 


PAPERCLIP FEATURES 

Noi copy protected • Excellent manual • On- screen 
staim and command lines 9 Duk directory display and 
prim * Fite merge * Two text windows 9 
TV.rf scrolling 

OPTIONS 

Cursor movement toggle 9 Screen scroll toggle • Left 
margin 9 Line length 9 Alarm bell toggle • I Window 
size * Auto save of text 9 A ttract mode toggle * Key 
dick toggle 9 Screen colour change • Printer 
configuration * Full DOS options 

EDITING 

Full cursor control • Delete character , word or block • 
Paste buffer 9 Undo * Cut & Paste 9 String search 9 
Text replace • Global substitution • Tags • Caps/ 
lowercase toggle • Insert/Overwrite toggle • Letter 
swap toggle • Word szvap toggle 

PRINT FORMATTING 

Margins • Page length • Line spacing * Block right * 
Centering * Mixed formats * Justification * 
Microspacing • Headers 9 Footers * Page numbering 

* Force new page • Hold * Italic 9 Character pitch 

• Underline 9 Hard spare.!!: • Auto indent 9 Hanging 
indent • Tabs 9 Single sheet pause 9 Multiple copies 
■ Double column printing 9 Print preview 9 Print to 
disk 

SPECIAL FUNCTIONS 

Mathematics 9 Table of Contents 9 Indexing 9 User 
defined print commands • Non printing comment lines 
9 Typewriter mode 9 Include files • Batch files 9 
Global substitution zoxthin batch files * Graphics 
inclusion * Mail merge • Macros 

EXTRAS 

30 plus printer configurations ■ Epson character set load 
9 User defined configuration * Atarmnter converter 9 
Graphics dump for Koala, Atari Artist, BfGraph, Fun 
with An, Paint and more 9 Help files 9 Demo 
documents 



A R O 

software. 


★ STAR CHOICE ★ 


Arch on II 

” Alternate Reality 
A Fantastic Four 
* TAIL OF BETA LYRAE 


D 

£10.95 * 

D 

£16.95 * 

D 

£12.75 * 


C/D £8.S0/£12.75 ★ 


DISKS...DISKS...DISKS...DISKS... 


RESCUE ON FRACTAL US 12 7S 

r, t. A me Rio a n ro race 12,75 

EIDOLAN 12 7S 

REALM OF IMPDSS'J 1 V Id.95 

AXIS ASS A SIX usd 

F-1S STRIKE EAGLE |*95 

A RCHON ia„75 

TIN BAL1. CONSTRUCTION 12 7$ 

MUSIC CONSTRUCTION 12 75 

SUPERSCRIPT sq 94 

MlSitON ASTEROLlI 12 75 

M'IZARD & PRINCESS U7S 

d ahr crystal is ,95 

ULYSSES 16 91 

MR ROBOT 

HftMF.WORD 44 vs 

KOHONIS RIFT IjVf 

GRACH ICS ART DEPT. 26,95 

MOVIE .MAKER 14,95 

tigers in the snom’ 12.75 

SMASH HITS 1-3 each 10.95 

VOICE MASTER 59 94 


ELEKTRA GLIDE 
SMASH HITS 4 
MEDIATOR 
COLOSSUS CHESS 
JUMP JF'T 
ZONE X 

KING OF THE RING 
MERCENARY 
FIGHTER PILOT 
GOON1ES 

KENNEDY APPROAtUI 

Tapper 

spyhunteh 

ULTIMA III EXODUS 
BLUE .MAX 2001 
STRIP POKER 
SUMMER GAMES 
WHIR LI NURD 
Spy v* Spy II 
Run UJcrdnt h H 
Si ev« Hlivii Siicnlti 
Knighia at (hr Divert 


10.95 

10.45 

10-95 

10.95 

9.95 

10.95 
10.45 
10.45 

10.95 

13.75 

14.95 

12.75 
12.75 

16.95 
12.75 

32.74 

12.75 

12.75 

12.75 
12.75 

10.95 
12.74 


CASSETTES...CASSETTES...CASSETTES.,, 


RE SC UK FR ACTALUS 

43k 

8.50 

HALLBLAZEH 

48k 

3.50 

GT A.MFR. RD RACE 

48k 

S.SQ 

HACKER 

48k 

S,5fl 

RIVER RAID 

24k 

8.50 

decathlon 

4hk 

B.fO 

Kill} MOON 

32k 

5.95 

worm in paradise: 

64k 

8.50 

MORDENS QUEST 

43 k 

5-95 

FIGHTER PILOT 

481; 

8.50 

MERCENARY 

48k 

S.5Q 

THUNDER BIRDS 

48k 

3-75 

S.Sfl 

AIR WOLF 

48k 

THEATRE EUROPE 

45k 

8.50 

CHIMERA 

MR HOHOT 

4hk 

3.75 

8.50 

ROMS,**ROMS* 

MINER 2tH9er 

QUEST FOR TIRES 

**RO 

8.50 

B.S0 


ELEkTRA GLIDE 
SMASH HITS 4 
COLOSSUS CHESS 
COLOURSPACE 
ZONE K 
BOUNTY HDB 
FOOTBALL MANAGER 
NLeLcridcr Afdy 
CqIi rn I'owcr/CfamLc 
Spy v» Spy II 
Hau tdtrtfaxh II 
Steve- C>;,v i s Snnphtr 
America n a rn nge each 
The Last VS 
Vegas Jackpot 
Chuckie J-irir 


45 k 
44 k 
48k 
4Nk 
4Sk 
64k 

44k 

4i>k 

4fik 

4Sk 

44k 

i 

4Hk 

4Hk 

4Bk 


ROMS.„ROMS*** 


OILS WELL 
STAR H VIDI HS 


7.40 

4.50 
B-.50 

7.50 
8-50 

5.50 

8.50 

5.95 
5.JS 

4.50 
$.50 
8-50 

2.95 

2.95 

1.95 
4-95 


k.Sfl 

7,50 


ST SOFTWARE*,,ST SOFTWARE**, 


ZKUL & WEST 26.95 

SONDOG 34 95 

WISIJDRINGKR 34,95 

K-SPRKAP 44.95 

K-SEKA 44.95 


Time Bandits 
Lands of Havoc 
The Pawn 
Boffin 
Bratticas 


26.95 

16.95 

21.95 

84.95 

29.95 


HARDWARE/PERIPIIERALS AVAILABLE 

CASSETTES FROM £1.95 ^ DISKS FROM £5,75 

new titles available immediately on 

RELEASE 

TELEPHONE 0625 25228 
Prices include VAT and Postage 
Send cheque/PQ’s l« 

SUNARO SOFTWARE (P6) 

PO BOX 78, MACCLESFIELD, 
CHESHIRE, SK10 3PF 



PAGE6 - Issue22 67 











































Contact 


GRAPHICS ENTHUSIAST; 

enthusiastic user of Graphics utilities,. 
Atari Artist, Fun with Art, Micro Painter 
etc. would like to exchange picture files 
on disk, problems, ideas etc. Also want to 
exchange/part exchange my £00 XL for a 
plotter or dot matrix printer, Keith 
Berry, 50, Brantlev Road, Birmingham, 
B6 7DR. Tel 021 328 6853 

BOOKS FOR SALE: Your Atari 
Computer £12, Compute!^ First Book 
of Atari £6, Basic, 2nd edition, A Self 
Teaching Guide £6, Mastering 
Computers £6, Atari 400/800 Basic 
Reference Manual £6, Atari 400/800 
DOS 2 Reference Manual £6. Will seller 
exchange. Phone J, W, Harrison on 0942 
864732 

BADGES OR BAGS: Wanted urg¬ 
ently, badges or hags with the Atari logo, 
Abo I would like to get in touch with any 
other Atari users in my area, Vincent 
Campion, LisdufT, Emil, Portlaoise, Co. 
Laoise, Ireland, 

SEIKOSHA PRINTER FOR SALE: 

Seikosha GfMOO xMk2 printer complete 
with Blackthorn Centronics interface, 
both boxed as new, £95 the pair. Will 
connect to any Atari. David Walmsley, 
62, Meadow Parle, Galgate, Nr. Lam 
caster. Tel, 0524 751593. 

FRACTAL PROGRAMS: Informa¬ 
tion, help wanted. Does anyone have any 
listings such as shown on Microlive in 
January? Or could anyone convert Spec¬ 
trum or BBC programs to Atari? Any 
mtormation welcome, Don Burley, 177, 
Legsby Avenue, Grimsby, DN32 01,JR, 
Tel, Grimsby 74550 

MERSEYSIDE PEN PALS: Pen pals 
wanted in the Merseyside area to swap 
hints and tips on games and programm¬ 
ing, I own 48k 800 plus 130XE and am 
shortly buying an ST, Please write to 
Mike Lynch, 24, Gakdene Road, Anfield, 
Liverpool, Merseyside, L4 2SR 

BOOKS TO SWAP: Offer - Computer 

Animation Primer - wanted Atari Roots, 
Offer - Computers M/L for Beginners - 
wanted Revised Mapping the Atari or 
Art of Computer Game Design. Also 
does anyone know where I can obtain the 
program disks for Atari Graphics and 
Arcade Design? Paul Marshall, 32 T Blue¬ 
bell Avenue, Moston, Manchester, M10 
9PR 

ATARI BASIC REFERENCE 
MANUAL: Perfect condition £6. Abo 
Sound and Graphics Self Teaching 
Guide in good condition £4. Contact 
Steve, Wrexham 753238 

FrFE USERS GROUP: I am forming 
an Atari User Group in Fife. 1 hope that 
this will encompass both 8-bit and the 
ST, There jg virtually no retail support 
in Fife so come on Atari users phone me 
on 0592 714887 and we will try and get 
that back-up that our computers need 
Lou Singer, Tel. 0592 714887 

ANALOGS WANTED; I would still 
like to obtain ANALOG magazine issues 
26, 2? & 28. Mark Hutchinson, Phone 
0232 621221- evenings. 


BOOKS FOR SALE: Computed 
Machine Language for Beginners and 
Computers Second Book of Machine 
language. Both in excellent condition 
£8 each. Tel D, Harwood on 0923 
54381 

ADVENTURERS OR OTHERS: I 

would like to contact other Atari owners. 
1 have a 130XE and enjoy a good adven¬ 
ture, I have all of Brian Howanh's 
adventures and will gladly swap hints 
with other adventurers. Please write to 
Tony Longworth, 13, Greenfield Road, 
Little Sutton„ South Wirral, Cheshire, 
L66 I PE 

1029 PRINTER: Any information or 
graphics programs for the 1029? Does 
anyone know how to use Printshop on 
the 1029? Please contact Alan Wheatley, 
48, Cameron Crescent, Buckie, Banff¬ 
shire, Scotland 

MIDI INTERFACING: Has anybody 
seen any Midi interfacing or sampling 
projects for the 800XL In any publica¬ 
tions or has anybody designed their own? 
Jim Damill, 559, Henries Road, Sheffield, 
S5 STL 

FOR S ALE: Direct connect modern for 
Prestel, BBS etc. £80, 1020 printer £40. 
410 Recorder £15. Cassette software 
originals, books, magazines going cheap. 
Assembler cartridge and Pilot £10 each. 
Call Ronnie on 01 203 4545 or write. 
A.C.Pere, 67, Church Road, London, 
NW4 4 DU 

PENPALS WANTED; 1 would Like to 
make new friends all around the world to 
write to about my Atari. I have a 520ST 
and 800XL and disk drive. Please write 
to Martin Brad well, 157, Crosby Road, 
Grimsby, South Humberside, DN33 
1LY, England 

ITALIAN ATARI USER GROUP: 

Would like to contact English and foreign 
people to write about Atari matters and 
discuss programming and ideas. Wc own 
Atari 800XL and 1050 disk drive. Please 
write to George Roecardi, 56/12 Cavor- 
etto Street, 10133 TURIN, Italy 

PRINTSHOP: Is it possible to use the 
Atari 1029 printer directly with 
Printshop? If not is there a way to 
configure the printer to run with the 
program? Would a printer driver be of 
use? Any help appreciated. R. Burden, 
105, Duchess Street, Shaw, Oldham, 
OL2 7XK 

DARK CRYSTAL: 1 cannot find 
Aughra, Can anyone help? Please write 
to Nico van den Amede, Schorpioen 40, 
4501 HE Oustburg, Holland 

ARROW OF DEATH Pt, 2 ; I am 

stuck on the part where you are on the 
stone slab with the grill, I can give help 
on Mercenary. Darren Scully, 131, 
Turret Road, Palmerstown, Dublin 20, 
Ireland 

CLASH OF THE KINGS: Can anyone 
let me know how to get a boot copy of this 
program from the March ANALOG to 
work on a cassette, I have checked my 
typing and it is correct but the boot copy 
wilt not load. Steve Asbury, 547, College 
Road, Birmingham, B44 (JAY 


INSIDE ATARI BASIC: Does any¬ 
one have a copy of this book for sale? 
Also can anyone help on using Graphics 
Art Department and Printshop on a 
1029, Advice regarding control codes 
required. A.R.CLarke,25, Holbom View, 
Codnor, Derbys, DE5 9RB. TeL 0773 
44525 

KIT FOR SALE; Atari 400 48k, 1010 
cassette, Indus GT (Brand new), DOS 
XI, with Indus GT Syncromesh, com¬ 
puter housing, holds 400, GT, 1010 all 
power supplies. BASIC cartridge, man¬ 
uals, All for only £280, Phone 0268 
710893 and ask for Mike 

THE LOST KINGDOM BBS: Situ¬ 
ated in the Birmingham area. Name - 
The Lost Kingdom. Baud - 300/300. 
Time - 24 hours. Sysop * Bastable* Td - 
021 353 5486, Running on 130XE, 
WS20QG Modem, two 1050 disk drives 
and 850 Interface. 

DISKDRIVE WANTED: 810 or 1050 
disk drive wanted in goad working order. 
Any reasonable price paid, Stan Graham, 
6, Shefton Fields, Shrewsburv. lei, 
249963 

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: 800XL 

with XC11 data recorder, 9 months old. 
£75, Atari 1029 printer as new, £100. 
Phone George on 0268 743725 

PEN PALS WANTED: I would like to 
make new friends with anyone in the 
UK* US,A,, Europe, Australia, Canada. 
I have a 130XE, 1050 disk drive, 1020 
printer and 410 recorder. Please write to 
David Morgan, 85, Walter Road, 
Ammanford, Dyfed, S* Wales, United 
Kingdom 

1064 RAM PACK: 64 k expansion for 
600 XL £45 o.n.o, 600XL with leads but 
no mains transformer £10. Mike Phillips, 
5, Lewis Place, Forth eawl, Mid- 
Glamorgan, CF36 3 FT. Tel. 065671 
4280 

ARROW OF DEATH Ft. 2: Could 

anyone tell me how to get past the stone 
slab and how to open the grill? Also how 
do you get past the water in the chasm? 
Could the person who sent me a printout 
of hints for Pt.l send me one for Pt. 2. I 
have lost your phone number! Thank 
you. Please write to David Rutter, 30, 
Birchgatc, Bucknalf Stoke-on-Trent, 
ST2 SJT. Tel. 0782 281.599 (after 4 
p.m.) 

BELGIAN PEN PAL: I would like to 
contact Atari users and groups all over 
the world. I’m looking for users who 
want to exchange tips and ideas etc. 
Please write to Mike De Cock, Primeur- 
straat 11, 2100 Dcurnel ANTWERP, 
Belgium 

VARIOUS FOR SALE; Having pur¬ 
chased an 80OXLI now have the following 
surplus items. 16k RAM for400/800,48k 
RAM for 400/800. Dust cover for 400. 
Mains transformer for 400/800 (no 41.0 
outlet). Non-working 400 (ANTIC and 
POKEY chips faulty - no RAM). Working 
400 (intermittent POKEY problems) - 
no RAM. Any serious offers for the above 
items would be greatly appreciated. I can 
be contacted most nights on 0232 621221. 
Mark Hutchinson 


PAGE 6' Issue 22 




















COMPUTE-A-WIN - MKII 

- By Popular Demand - now also on DISK - 
- now includes “ Horses for Courses’ - 

2 COMPLETE PROGRAMS FOR THE PRICE OF 1 
Frog A - FLAT RACING 
Prog. B - N/HUNT RACING 
Each program covers all tracks in England & Scotland 
Each self contained program allows choice of 
1. QUICK selection - using any daily newspaper {no racing 
knowledge required) 

2 SPECIALIST selection - using information given in a popular 
’Racing' paper e.g. past form, weight carried, state of track, 
trainer/jockey ratings, speed ratings, draw position etc. 
CASSETTE £6,95 j 400/600/SCM1 
DISK:- £9.95' XL/13QXE 32K Rc S uircd 
LOWMAC SOFTWARE 

1, MOORE AVENUE-DUNSTON-GATESHEAD NE11 9L’E 


r~ 

JIRUSDFT 83 

5 , 1/4 

SS/DD DISKS WITH HUB RING 

GUARANTEED REPLACEMENT 
10 MINIMUM 

E 9.50 INCLUDING P &, P 
ALSU STORAGE BOXES 

SAE FDR DETAILS 


THE FIRS, RANDS RDM 
CLAYBRDDKE MAGNA 
LUTTERWDRTH LEICS 
LEI7 5AY 


WOOTTON fel, 

COMPUTERS 


ATARI 


10+OSTF 

plus M<i n n .Vlci n LtUI 7 lo 


SMSTM 


£399 


V 1040 STF Tv 

v plus Philip* Mud. Rrt? pinoB 

£ colour monitoh 


It" M.ohq Mftniwr 

.£139: 

Philips 14” M,ed, Res, r'jftn ■X4!4;v 
CO LOCK MONITOR KK’C'ff: 


$ SFW^Mbdith drive i£ 

% .iM»| 

SFJ14 1 Mb "d'i li drive vS® 

£194.00 


lMXE with XC1! cassette vKvXv! 

plus 1 games f 

and fpysiict it AO" vv!;X\\K 

lojodisi drive 

wi,tl BOS 3 AND I>05 2.5 




st software 

ThUTUH Lb1D|[lA| 

YIP 

KaBprad 

RhfLbvia 

ILiMvnc.r 

X-Scti 

MlBUIff 

U* II T^hi 

feL-Hiun 

Lum>bfcW- 

I 1 '" IC-lrr..,| UU | 

fiiT-C 

l.lairil'# c 

MitmcamW PASCAL 
■'taaramw HacrvAM. 
ICippa C 

KA1M datft ffjnlu 


Xkiv-T. khr |[ 
Pipcrfef k 5 F IibJI-bii 
T.- r H.nH M 

Thl Pin 


1 ■ ■ C•>* llBU 


£N.<H 

l 

C-MA 

E ZIP! 
c ».*>; 
£■».« , 
I l*.W l 






£ iv « 

I 

£ ?LW 

£ 21.fJ 

i *■.« 

£ W.fY 
£ W 
£ IftJP 

£ 3?,V5 »T« 


llrimi.-J 4 ^wa 

LMlhma I I 
Flipilda 

&EUULlkM 
r^llh.-rlLr- 

\ £klll A Wr,l 

S M id J rf! 

? HrtiBr.'ftp 
J UfiftdlU* £ LI-., 

J Lvu in Lire toft wt il'jr. fSilH 
pjMint for iafi- iTrill nu4 jiicrd 

All IxhrhHT 16 |v*;|pbilily 


I 


iHLIA 

i I14.LU 
£ 44.41- 
£ ll.1I 

£«« MKvu/Fi'XvXvu;:: 1 : 

r 1 -i oc ■ i ■ ■ i n m # * H i ■ ■ ■ n 

;™ HOME & BUSINESS 
i Z7.W SOFTWARE 

£ t r .,+? V' 

oiftw X , 

£ 17,15 £* T ^P I, “'“ 

£ Mi! X iRPiTKrlpt 

rfc-Eidr-ard 
GnphLca An Ekr|ri 

MICRO Bftit. H.L>S 
| Flume Lilian Mjcup- 

pM:S«SS 

V ACCESSORIES 

■I 1 [Nik Ik'XCT — Iriikj r , JRpn . 

.Jnjrtkkl ... JfojMLiiA Intern 

l Vf VI !' 1 fill Oeltw rHi i ](HD F'»pvr 

£:4 . m J.J Hdl .. IBfl InUMJe* _ I a 29 
" Kitten .. BASIC C CAH- 

I TULHJt: _ XI. IWr ■.■jpf.lirt _ 

vrs |H«fF tuppity... iMt/WW 

|ru »ct iupji||C* ., W0 BM ipmrcr 

supRlf ... 1C) Ir-ui, Duil Gipvcn 
.. l unluLd Paper - DISK 
NDTUUER 

tV.V.V.ViViVtV 


X4 .lt l H rvj r Dr r 

JUWPnl IJriv* 

1 LGM Prill I rr' l r W.i rj 

l*T7 LtClir IJut.!;iy Pm-iH 

II»Fnmu 

Pn»i™ Imbu 

iau-nKff I.Lurr 


£3Lf5 
£U+.*r 
£TP.fi V 

£111 K‘! 

£114 41 , 
£14,4 , 


MXMr4t.suAM rAU.r MTTfi 
PRIMYlKB 
TOUCH TABLET 

,'IViVrVrVkVtViViV 

f 44 n 

(«*;■ H¥Nf.AJ.t 
!a . n V ATAJIIH KTTER 
ft* t‘i VS DOUBLER 
£BJB S SUPEK.-W RIFT 

"jxjv;v;## 


£ ttl if, 

£7» 

mViV: 


C+7.W 
CH.1J ; 
(51.SS ' 
£4P.» 


y \*, ALL ATAM C HRA_\LJ 

soptwahl 

£j iWr 


£ I4.W rr 

I 11.4! V 




mrluflt vat. 

POST Sr PACKlHt EXTH.l. 

Ct:iit.".".*.*.*.*.V,4A4l 


WOOTTON COMPUTERS 

116, Edleston Road, Crewe, CW2 7HD 
Tel. 0270 214118 


ATARI 400/80/600XL/800XL 

HIGH SPEED 

CASSETTE LOADER 

AAMBIT Knlerfacclilted in410^1010, SC11 or Phoncmacfc l-ishii?^ ives 
around 600'i fa&Ltrr Uuidini; n£ eonv-erted standaril Iniaii M code programs, Le. 
321 priKgrpm loads in approx. 90 secands. Normal software loading unaffec¬ 
ted, converter program cun be used with utiliiv cartritip.-. 


Fitted £15 inclusive or kit £18 [suit can. model) 


WORLD CUP im (4SK) 

Manatrif Lhc country and of your 
choice njihii through the Me id L-n Ein;iB, Uaniv 
features include saiuts repons. neaiTi suleL - - 
linn- l'”L"LL taciics ;whac do ^ve Jm 

wuh nur corners, shondd we pLuy ;■ sweq^r, 
how do we defcntl against their fhiLktck.i 
eic j, bookings, sendings uff, suspensions, 
IniuncN. cuhiti lutes, ex.ua Liatie (in ihi knoc- 
koui rounds), |>tnaliy shoor outs, FITI. 
MATCH COMMENT ARY 
and.GOALSf 


LIY r ERPOOL(4SK) 

I Hli iooiball :njnager game ictr Lhe ^tairi, 
taiurirg varying skill and slamina levels, 
sctAtts Tvports, inimHia, ltmm and tactiro, 
sekcuun, full leajpic table, managertaJ raiing 
and save liarne facility 42 gmtie t jrague 
uiiLvin, plus Milk, and European Cups. 

Disk version, hi is 4 divEions, income, 
expenditure, transfer market, pKunoiion, 
relLgunon, U.E.F. A. and Cup Winners Cups 
in addiiicm to the cassene Jiranire-s 


For further details send S,a.e, 

Cheques payable to 

RAM BIT. TOWNING CLOSE, 

DEF.PJNG ST. JAMES, 

PETERBOROUGH, FEi 8HS 

-F:IrI ,b 1 Ml 1$ H'jti-fill I riiL^c-mrii! nt FDpyFiflllEt 


(^SSliTTE: (ATARI A 5PECTRL l ,M;i • £ 7.+S 
Disk (ATARI) - 47,» 


IH5K - £ I4.SS CJASS^TTE - £9.lS 
JiPECTBLVW (Q - £S.ti 


P,M. Corbishl«y T 2 12, Old Walnuraky Knad, Bury, 111.9 6SA 


SABRE SOFT 

SABRE BASE & SABRE LABEL 

Q- Tbfiugjii -fef L-iainpii!4«ji!bin^ a LLdci of your pm^TLim s bvl fonnul datB 
edo expensive 1 or huinl t-o folJw? 

A_ C3r( Siibrcbaw- A S-iiliTLfLuliL-] uni! ypyr prabL-tmx art miIvl-J. 

SABRE BASE 

DaLibiw munagimefit (yiirt,, w enalnpis >our peugrainfi ]>»!a Ur-sk hoids 2SWI 
enlTicv pn disk 6 imertetive |»atp7iiiw Lefiw flaxibOe nmnif ulllion orwurdua. 
l-BTirLiuns include. Rufciity.*li>k jirsFCTirn'i njmu, J Jiltm-ni a-rli--n.ilh Hwopiinn. 
1 Jiiferem wariJirt, pn^ii^r iuupk lo allow hatilcopy i=f nil diiplifod aitormutimi. 
R jmJi'.fc is|ii.ic'i k-.r 1 |J M y. V i.i'a irti :u iptcd inpui al Crrutr kxt I'sk jin-J iyiAm, 
rnur.v more su r^Einiufi 


SABRE LABEL 

I'ciFiLfi lnbrhvn printer. Shy:, laid, deleir md tnUlqgguc labdi an disk «r |n.Tn 
■JiflllftdtekCllOSEonly^ Many user Ebendiv Iniunv in mike ibis pftjgrtiti u 
delight m (iprrple 


titllllt IJUAim 
SOKIWAREAT 
LOW I.trn PH ICES 


£6.95 " DISK 


4SK ATARI WITH DISK DRIVE 400'800 XL JtK COMPATIBLE 


AvtildNentiii unkranly drom: 

SABRE SOFT, 169, CAMFKIN ROAU, C AMBRIDGE. CB24 2LF 



* NOW AVAILABLE FOR YOUR ASK ATARI * 


presents 


mmul 


AS FEATURED IN 
-ATAHl USER’ OCT.'85 


Fur 1 ■ 5 players. 

Smooth, colourful machine code action 
Place Yout Bets Hardily - 10 race cards 
Bankroll Table. , * . 

XL & xe compatible trade Enquiries welcome 

5TUCE £8.99 DISK £7 99 CASSETTE, 0ASJC REQUIRED 
CbeQves/PO s to Anvil Sofbrtrt, 26» Nigh Si, Gt. Wak mnnu, Et»x 


PAGE 6-Issue22 69 
















































PRIZE CROSSWORD 

compiled by Alan Goldsbro 

Several readers have requested a tnwswnrj so here it isl It 
also gives us an opportunity to give away a few remaining 
items of software so if you fancy your chances write down the 
answers on a sheet of paper, add your name and address and 
send it to us by 20th July 1986. Please indicate which of the 
software items you would prefer if you win. There will be 12 
lucky winners in ail and the winning entries will be drawn on 
21st July 1986 from all correct entries received by that date. 

The prizes: Missile Command, Qix, Paint (disk), Galanian, 
Centipede, Music Composer, Defender, Magic Window, Red 
Moon, The Worm in Paradise. 



A hint: One clue gives a clue to all the other clues! 


Could YOU write an article? 
Can YOU write good programs? 



If $o, we would like to hear from you so that 
PAGE 6 can continue to provide the best and 
most interesting programs and articles for 
Atari users everywhere* 

You’ll enjoy writing and what’s more 

WE J U PAY YOU 

Surely that’s an offer you can’t refuse? If you 
have the ability, make it pay. 

Program submissions must be on disk (preferably) or 
tape. Wherever possible, articles should be text files on 
disk (that's what word processors are for!) backed up with 
hard copy. II you carft manage that* get it to us in any 
wav you can. 


ACROSS CLUES 


DOWN CLUES 


1 Oz provides the&e (5) 

4 Just right for beginners (5,i) 

5 Cult following? (3) 

10 Incorrect(5) 

13 A fast one by Ala (12) 

14 They 1 ™ still alive and 
kicking ($4) 

15 Exclamation when seeing 
10 across (6) 

18 Home of Atari? (3) 

19 An opportunity for Lcs(9) 

22 The second part to ibis is 
crazy (5) 

23 Ace is one, aim is two (S) 

24 Our biggest distributor? (6) 

27 To be the best (2) 

28 Uoo mimtro (5) 

3l Christopher Robin knows 
this one (4) 

34 Want a reply? (3) 

35 The srcond ward will get 
you there fast (8) 

37 PACE 6 is always this (4) 

39 Get down to it! (11) 

41 Take ihUoul now!! (12) 

43 There are five pals waiting 
for you on 66 (3) 


2 From 33 down to here (3) 

3 520/1044, need 1 say more? (2) 

4 Goto Nick Or Frances (4) 

5 At last (4) 

6 Keep 'em coming, Jim (5) 

7 Did yon take part? (7,4) 

9 Move to 41 (4) 

11 This one’s an art (J) 

12 Do you believe in magic? (6,9,2) 

16 This company’s on-line (6) 

17 Right or sixteen (3) 

19 Publisher (9) 

24 One word for adventure (7) 

2l Plenty for all levels (8) 

25 Paul is horizontal (3) 

26 Our saviour? (5,4) 

27 Neat one up from 27 across (^) 

29 All the answers are in the 
last one (S) 

30 In and out (2) 

32 The number one magazine (^s^) 

33 No need for batteries here (5) 

36 Small one from the ST 

news section (4) 

38 75^ of the readers use one (4) 

44 Media storage (4) 

42 Home gruwn (2) 


The crossword was compiled on an Atari with the program 
Crossword Magic- This is the only crossword program we 
know of for the Atari but it has always been difficult to obtain. 
Now it is virtually impossible! The copy used for this 
crossword was loaned by Games and Software Club of 
Sunderland. • 


ADVERTISERS INDEX 


Action Software Supplies 
Anvil Software 

Brighton Computer Exchange 

Compumart .. 

Computer Express ......... 

P.M. Corbishley ............ 

Database Publications ...... 

Girosoft S3 ... 

Gregory Software ......... a 

Habn Systems *....., , 

flomcview Video ........... 

Lad broke Computing ....... 

Liam a soft 

Lowmac Software .......... 

Metacomco ................ 

Microdeal ................. 

Midlands Atari Center *.... 

Panatco ............. . 

PF Software ......... . 

Prospero Software ...... _ 

Rambit ... 

Red Rat Software ..... _ 

Sabre Soft . 

Selcc Software . — ......... 

Silica Shop 

Software Express ........... 

Software Supplies Company 
Sunaro Software ........... 

2-Bit Systems _ ........... 

Wootton Computers ........ 


19 
69 
60 
51 

4 

69 

54 

69 

39 

20 
51 

7 

BC 

69 

28 

IFC 

36 

38 

64 

25 

69 

56 

69 

36 

IBC 

15 

30 

67 

4 

69 


70 PAGE 6 - Issue 22 




























































































































































































A- .Mt-vA 




//// / to' W" ■ 

V - 1 ■' ,-Vi-. 't'!-’ i'r v* VV .vV v v>.v 

\ Yfffiiiti . 'LL: 



LS / 

ATARI 


/ / / / / 


J 


ATARI 


Power wmout The Price! 


WPtft you buy one of the new Alar ST computers, Irom Silica 
Shop, you will receive ?. largo and varied sallware package Free 
u J charge This package covers severe! applications ami cc-m- 
pr ses. a tela; &t mne 1 ties All ST's now have TOB.'QEM on 
RDM. and Ihg total list of free soUware s as follows 
11 GEM - DR Desktop anvironmant with WIMP fin ROMt 
21 TOS- Tfsmiei Operating System fin ROM) 

3} 1st WORD - Ward Processor by GST using the Of M 
environment and mttftipfe windows 

4) BAS2G - Persona! BssiC by DR /with manual) 

5) LOGO - i ogo language by DR {with menu at; 

6) COODLb - Simpfe puinbdoodle drawing package (worts on 
mono i.o colour systems) 

?[> VIE;GAHOID5 - Asteroids typegame by Megsmax 
H-! i'COGH ROME - A pmerM cofourpaint and graphic/; 

Decs age ftoniy vs&ubfe with cotour systems) 

3'i C P/M E Mill ATOR A Hows the me of DR's ISO C/PM soit- 
Ji ate to run on any ST system 

3rd PARTY SUPPORT 

Thu power anc potential of ihe ST range pt computers s 
causing a flood oi now software tilths, peripherals anc access¬ 
ories from Ihi/d party manufactorere TJIos range From woird 
processing lo spreadsheet programs. From graphics arp games 
to database management - all with thosE easy drop-down menus 
and w.ndows. W th the list ol companies prodding ST software 
includi r g dozens Ot tup names, you can eapeel Some lirsl class 
titles for the now ST range. The following includes a selection of 
f ie thi rd parly manufacturers who have develc ned. or are w*rk- 
ng on, producls for she ST range 


NEW 312K 520ST-M KtT BOAR D The new S2D5T-M keyboard 
fjf 1 *** '> n ’v LiMb.96 |*PAT-ji'j&sn and is. yet nno1he' pr r-v >reak 
throiigh (Or Atari Corporation. Thu kayhoaro now Incktoeu both 
Mn Hh nvndolatOr and cabin, .iilow ng yam to Ctonnccl il to u- 
nrrliif«ry domeseto lelknriiHnn nor to aOU turn, 1 A» keyboard la 
supplied with PI2K HAM. a -nousb and a Inee set ol O'. o>hAb 
containing apiiliurihunis salrwarg, Ifie TOS operating system 
huo the CiSM gr\ps>hicir packaga are now supplied on 1S0K HOM 
chips wmeh arc- alren.::y tostol od n i-* keyboard. This means 
Ihal -nr: nc-* r^i in B system will automatical Iy oool In what you 
* wi '5 h !-D bbWfit r>n In addition to (he keyboard. you will also 
neaO to purchase) *iili*r a.HMbyte disk drive (fiBP f 'TO ■ Vfl '> or 
a 1 Mbyte disk dnwQ (RflP A174rVATJ. Blhev disk drlvaiwdi urc- 
ynjf you with rest information retrieval and a v( un amounl ni 
slorage »pac«t If ypu prefer net to uea your awn TV nut. vau 
rr>ay cQf5n m r;I your liF «i mohilor. You mn^ p^urcihaM cho Aiwr 

yMl24 monochrome in on Mo# (RRP £rjQ-VAT\. or one or Arnri’s 
tw<i Thomson colour monitors Aiiei’nativeiv. ynn .trifly c-oasr:- 
□nc: or the many 1 h rd pAiry colour monlioiB which are n.v4ilai»l«. 
NEW T03AK E20gT-M» KEYBOARD: In addHuor. rn the sliincnrrt 
j205T-m, we hava a new k*y board whien wv am pairing the 
Alar J20F5T-M . 1 he M* is. e SaOti’ M keyboard which ha? been 
enhanced hy :■ 1<-*ra party RAM wpqyaci« u> 1 meanbyl* rif 
•nen'ory. ’hr- S-?C-3T-tyi ■- is avallah!# I’■urn ki'l r.n ai a retail price 
ol dnly r-'i.ju.y i i -vat f.49^;. i his product will provide y&v with 
sin altamailve to the ltMGST-F. but al a lower price Add harmIIv 
>1 r*C.Hture:. tho .idvflnmge of ihc 5203T-M , py lM in modutalor. 


JiBjtoW 

EXTENDED S W 

ACADEMY 

FIEftlTV 

ACCOLADE 

FIRST em 

ACTION50FT 

FIHST FtlBNC 

ACTlVi&jaN 

FUF N FILE 

ACVEfafalRF rtT 

CLEHTOPFBUQ 

*hnc 

gst sisrems 

QUEaKIAN COVERS HABA 

ARTTaOkJ 

HkODEN 

kEHTOk TATI 

HUFd 

AH 

KiOFT 

AJE- 0 UCKT 

IhFQCOW 

A/TEC 

IhSlGHf 

BATTERIES |MC 

I1S0FT 

EAYVI EM 

IHJJHD LfMIC 

EE MEW EYE* 

kWWLEDDWAFE 

BETTE?) WDHKINC, 

■lllAJ. 

AlueChp 

LABEHSOFT 

BOB 

LEFF^IER 

CASH UN 1! 

LEVEL B 

CHAMC LABS 

LlfiNI^ART 

CHELTEK El'iT 

LlAMlKCf 

CrtlPKFT 

LQKbHIktTEFl 

cnwsrtTf 

NAiNTHIMC CORF 

ciRDissgw mpjsk: 

NAP COMPUTERS 

DkT4BEfcCh 

MARC 41 UMCDSIt 

OkWKJOESYS 

MARC Win ll.MIJ 

dkt* SYSTEMS 

MAfiT.H COkSIJ 

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Foi ifi" busln«m$rttfen and the more ftenmfs ecim user-. Alarl 
hniufl in^roducod ttw* lO^OSl-F. a loih -f.e^i. puwflrhousft iMlijch 
ca" bo Introduced lo a bus ness environinanl a$ ^ etaod-aFons 
Ayvten: or can aijp^yorl -a neintramw cornp«ter as a tfl-rminal The 
new one irieuabytE (OiOFiT-F enhances Atari's ■•■niue far mqn*y' 
repuldlion In the nmrkalplaoe es it is 1h« tint p^rsdr>e« cawpMNrr 
AvrjilabFe w.lh nn« ine^ubyle ol memory lur less than b?(NW You 
edn purchase Ihc- ID40FiT-F -rie a manorhroirie ur colour systAiri 
The price ol (he monochrome syatem s £793 ;*VAT £dlb H'm 
wlIII ihe CDl DIM system el on iy £9!K» (4 VAT j£Tt 4!.t asj The new 
rlDI: Q1l5f twlcn ns i luoti mamary fl:, (he 

BeOST-M but alio IncludoH n o«e nieqabyl« (lr>ubi« sided disk 

drive anc moiriR (r.-iri5lormcr both built nto the ... to give 

a f:(impact and styli^n unit wllh only one mains mod The 
IC1405T-F iy also supplied with a Iraa sohwore ^yckaqa. Unlike 
I 3303-T- M Irie lCAUK-F F WAJ mertufacturad s.ijleiy ‘with bus 
n ieve use in mind ano as such is suppl mU W i 1 h a mon’toi n dues 
"oc Include the m|. tnodulRlor dr lead. Wo row ?i«ve stock ol ihn 
tUALHdr F at .41 lour branch** yT Silica Shop nail n (o your 
riearesl branch (Or a. dernonsi niico 

1.4 The Mews, Halh*t»ay Rtue-d. Sitkc up. K^nt. O Al 4 A □ X 
117 Orpington High Street. Orpington, Kent. SftS ttLG 
I’M House ( 1 st rie>orJ. 227 Tattonhem Court Hd. London Wl 
Self ridges t tsl l(ct»r), Onfurd Street, London, W1A fAB 


THE ATARI EXPLOSION! 

If yuu read the specialist tompuler pressk you will have noticed Lkat Ihrre 
IS one tc.-r.pany which ie gelling n large afice uF eriiignp. space ei ihc 
racmfnt. that admpany is Atar> Ctirparaiioo Atari have been making me 
new:; since (he Huriah of thR,r new 16..'a2 bit rnn^je or ST etunpiitnrs. Letf 
by ihe pawqriui Tigure al Jack Tramiel and uintksr the banner Pbwm 
W'thobi Tim Pr-sec. ftiari are iriaiiiilabiuring new ccmpuHRrs at unheard or 
pricse. w in lire paw^r to.chBHeji$e firmly established market loaders with 
Mm iniroduciiCKi ol ISM cumpalltiilHy, a CP/M nm.j gtor'. a pcwarfui nei- 
working system and a itinimi.ric^tions package fgr iheir new law owl 
powerhouses, it dMan't look as if n will be long betae thare is an 
flsiplosion ol Ihe magnitude Which will sec Aknri pieced hmi y besides ElUflh 
names ns i0m and Oliveiti ir rug personal ebmpurer marketpla^a Read on 
Ioy more data Is ol WhBl Atari arc doing, and Njw they nr® putting Iheir 
Ppwer WiUlCNl The Price' OOtnpulflrs baytjnd Ihe teach uf the compel i|>CN. 

free cp/m emulator 

This newly arnoiTced CP/M Emuiaiicm Package, will enable aortware 
wrinen niH>er Digita fitiseeroh'a zao CP/M opB-rating syaiein \q be run or 
Ilia ST Snmily of computers There are savernl thousand a+vplibatmr.s 
W'itlen lar CP/M In me UK alum;, and several Of (he major CF.'M scHware 
developmeni Houses may convert thair programa lo 3'A" disk forme i ro- 
Inn ST range. The-CP/M emulation packaui: r, supplied FREE OF OHAHGE 
by Silica Shop With All ST compi iMrs 

IBM COMPATIBILITY 

To make the BT availahla to those buSirmssi^s whp currently run I0M 
ayateffls and one lotting far a pw cost expansion mathod Atari haw 
nrnoiineetf a cb-procBs^rf} unit far §T conputara. This probessof will 
upin the ST rangra fa all iRMor IBM COiYipaiioid SGltWftfe applvalinr* THe 
unit, which nli^hes L* (fie ST snmpulera via Ihe D(.1A iD.ftcL Memary 
Acoflsei port, contains en Intel aoaft pnwcse&r with S12K gf Ram and will 
iicrnpt e 5 • disk drivm. Ir Is ST ntCkle, the unit will also Set a-; n sepond 
disk drira, oJfflrinf) the user an additional bdOK of memory. Tlie IBM co 
procassuig unit rnupuid be available' in fats Sununitr t&Sfi. If you would likb 
m ^ nfttrrted when it ■«. released please complete and return ihe coupon 
s«faw we win send you lurth^r details a-s sunn as we have lham. 

20Mbyte HARD DISK £739 

The ngt*f Alari hard disk for the SI range he* juar been released All st 
cumpiutn-rs already have a hard d ak interlace built into them su (hem is no 
estetna interface required. Thu memory sire of the disk i B a massive 20 
mepBbyfafl iunfbrraalle3| with a dala Iransrer tale uf 1.33 Mbyles per 
Si^nnd, At a Utica af £73S |'+VAT=£MB|, the &v." nard disk Cffars, maaBlve 
Storage wilh 1 ?#f sosess al a very maEOnflbte L.ricc. 

HEW ST SOFTWARE PACKAGES 

There are new Hundreds; at snflWBre packages which have been announ- 
ceir tor ihe Atari ST range. Titles avniiabip po# include DR Man a DBase 3 
Clone it well as HAD Hum B DBase 2 r. nrt! In addition, PC Inlsrcttnm is 
a V : lOfJ emulafa.- whiich enables you lu use any ST keyboard as ;i farm ral 
connected to a maintraine cm mini Other programs include a bolus, 1-2 3 
Clone fsee paragraph below). 

VtP PROFESSIONAL - LOTUS 1-2-3™ CLONE 

This is prgbstrfy ihe liicsi i mpmseive program to nave been released so lar 
tor ihe ST rangn VIH PrOleiSiunal is an eAtrematy easy In use. r legraied 
sprchdarteei. dal abase ar? graphics program wb-ch is identin.nl both ip 
Fealurns Rad commands to L(yfus 1-2-3’". ae same spreadsheet analysis. 
■nFuiiri&l'OR marxgeman; and e-xl ranrclt r^iry business graphic* B(S all com- 

s nea in one easy m lesrn. aifordable packaofl What's raurr: viP Froraa- 
sibna 1 n^| only has all ehr leatures -or 1-3-3'* you can ale* (y»re ihc samn 
commands lo do Ihe same things Probably Ihe must surprising feature rv| 
VIP Friilessfanal is not >la (pfal competiblllty wilfi Lutus I nor Us 

e-ise or use bul Is price Lotus --2-3'* Inr cha IBM PCrAT costs E35S 
i.-yATrtAB4.2E|. whereas VIP Pfofesfiicnal tor Ihe ST is a mere Eigg 
C-VAT-£1S4,3Sh Thai's feSs Ilian hall the price 1 If ynki would like further 
ideift'la, bl VIF Prnfassional. Please relurn Ihe CCupCin befaw 


<".A 111 

ZJJ 

WE ARE THE UK'S NOl ATARI SPECIALISTS 



SILICA SHOP LTD, 1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Road, Sidcup, Kent, OA14 4DX 

SEND FOR FREE ATARI ST LITERATURE 


Al S'lica we ha™ h-nnn successfully derhrnfad 10 Atari aver sincu Hmir producta 1i«'-sl sppesrad on ihe UK 
market. We can etiribuip our esc cobs largely in ih^ Aiarl sset aksutfan which we practice and to tba user 
tack up we provide. n«si asstirnd Hiat wTer you buy a pfaefl ol Atari hardware at fi.hca you will be fully 
SuC^nirfed Our mailing* giving news nl soflware releases and dfivr ppmano w II keep you up to with 
the Alan markei and our leshnicai sup|x>n itkam gnd sales siafl are at rip end ol the idepkom iin* :o 
dpal with yq-ji prublnms arc S^jpp-y yCur every nnsd WKh our Specialist hiris we aim to keep slacks nf 
el Ihn available Alan hardware aoltWEfe, parijUiertit and accessories. We also stock a Wide Itmqe uf 
Alan deificatrto books if-iJ Lhruugh us. Ihp owners *4 Our list ran s inscribe to several Amonc-an Atsr. 
(fRd cateiJ rVagai nit* We Ciin piOvide a lull sr:rv co to ell Ami Owners and are now I mnly erstab inhisS a* 
1 ONE A3ari MWClBllBtB. Here Bile fail some ol the Ihkegs we can glfar lor Chi r cjSldmers. 

* S PACKING ON MAIL ORDERS J. 1 you wouref n«r« to be repis/e.'rrfan (my rjtai'Wrj 


B Tb: Silicn Stiqp Ltd, Dcpl PS»K U506. 1-4 The M»wa, Halhefley Hud, SldCUp Kerf DAH ADX 

! PLEASE SEND ME FREE LITERATURE 

OH THE HEBI RANGE OF ATARI ST COMPUTERS 


Mr/Mre/Ms; 


Address: 


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*FREE NEXT DAT DELIVERY 
*INFORMATION MAILING SERVICE 
A TECHNICAL SUPPORT TEAM 
+ HIGHLY COMPEnTfVE PRICES 
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+ REPAIR SERVICE ON ATARI PRODUCTS 


(tat as an Atari cptnputef (kwne/:. or as a pursovr 
imfetoSfed /It Jtoymg an Aferf mflCAifte, fef us 
i n»-. Wq Wtf) be pfeeserf to k ctp ypu up fa dfliir 
WJfA new Atari PffHitopynertfS free at charge. So, 
return tbe CCupcm today flrto be^/rt eapenerrcmg 
a spwjia/isf Artrt aervicc fj»pj is 'second to . 


SILICA 

HOTLINE 




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: ko, which one do you own? 


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presen 


The THIRD GENERATION of Jeff Minter's unique LIGHT SYNTHESISERS 

- MIND/MACHINE SYNERGY - 

COLOURSPACE: allows the user to create dynamic, interactive light displays 
using the Atari's320 x200512-colour graphics. Do itto music... your ears won't 
believe your eyes... 

COLOURSPACE: mouse control, over 100 keyboard commands, compatible 
with NEOchrome images (for foreground and background displays), 20 presets, 
84 definable lightforms, record mode, load and save of performance data from 
disk. 

COLOURSPACE: raw 68000 power harnessed to create a completely new 
artform... the first true light synthesiser... play light like music... 

COLOURSPACE. Discover why you bought your ST, 

1 | 

NOW AVAILABLE at £19.95, from retailers of ATARI software or direct from 
LLAMASOFT 49 Mount Pleasant Tadley Hants 
Tel: 07356 4478 

SEND S.A.E. FOR CATALOGUE & NEWSLETTER