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Volume VII Number 3 


The Status Line 


Formerly The New Zork Times Fall 1988 


BattleTech: Lots of Meching around 



Check out that ‘Mech—A detailed scan of a WASP BattleMech is just one of 
the features in this action-packed role-playing game based on the popular 
BattleTech role-playing and strategy board-game series. 


He cursed himself for what felt like 
the 15th time in the last hour. The 
inside of his neuro-helmet was slick 
with sweat, making matters even 
worse now that there was poor con¬ 
tact with the helmet's electrodes. He 
remembered the message that his 
instructors drilled into his head again 
and again: “Controlling a 'Mech re¬ 
quires patience and above all strate¬ 
gic allocation of resources. ” Funny 
how it was never as easy when the 
trainer 'Mechs were firing back. 

“I cannot let father down, ” Jason 
mumbled to himself as he aligned the 
Chameleon's twin medium lasers on 
the approaching Locust's torso. 
“Cannot let the computer keep fight¬ 
ing for me, especially after last time, " 
Jason thought, ruefully remembering 
how he had caused a critical overheat 
by being careless. 

Slowing his breathing, Jason 


scanned the status report of his 
'Mech’s condition. His concentration 
was broken by alarm bells sounding 
and the warning, “Critical shot to the 
head! Man eject!" blaring into his 
ears. Numb, Jason triggered the eject 
button, blasting the canopy off the top 
of the Mech and causing him to drop 
the 35 feet to the ground, safely 
cocooned within the seat's webbing. 

Dejectedly, Jason detached himself 
from the now useless seat and trudged 
back to the Citadel's training 
grounds, realizing that he now had 
another failure he would have to by 
to live down with the mechanics. 
“They already hate me because of 
their station in life, ” said Jason, real¬ 
izing that tomorrow's training session 
would be just as brutal as today's. 

If Jason thought he had problems 
training to be a 'MechWarrior, he 
Please turn to page 5 


Zork Zero takes you back to the beginning 



The now-famous Zork stone logo appears 
once more, heralding the coming of Zork 
Zero, the prequel to the Zork Trilogy. Game 
writer Steve Meretzky labored nearly 18 
months combining the lore of the Great 
Underground Empire, graphic puzzles and 
his own zany humor to create the latest chap¬ 
ter of the CUE saga. 


• Vn 




Ever since Zork I first appeared on 
home computers, and the Zork Trilogy 
became our best-loved series of inter¬ 
active stories, countless fans have 
begged for Zork IV. Now our Steve 
Meretzky, doing exactly the opposite, 
gives you something even better by 
taking you back to before the begin¬ 
ning. Nearly 18 months in the making, 
we are proud to reveal our most ambi¬ 
tious project ever, Zork Zero. 

Zork Zero: The Revenge of Mega- 
boz takes you back to the last days of 
the Empire. A wizard's curse has de¬ 
stroyed the ruling Flathead family and 
has threatened the kingdom itself. 
Although you are but one of many 
fortune hunters who have flooded the 
capital city of Flatheadia to try to 
claim the huge reward for stemming 
the curse, a carefully guarded family 
secret gives you a big advantage! 

Every corner of the kingdom 

As you begin your quest, you'll 
meet the court jester, whose rhymes 
will leave you laughing, whose tricks 
will leave you cursing, and whose 
rebuses and riddles will leave you 
scratching your head. You'll travel to 
every comer of the kingdom, visiting 
exotic locales from the glaciers of the 
Gray Mountains to the swamps of 
Fenshire, from the placid shores of 
Lake Flathead to the searing heat of 
the Great Underground Desert, from 


the defoliated Fublio Valley to the 
granola mines of Antharia. 

Zork Zero answers many of the 
questions that have tormented Zorkers 
for ages: What is it like to play 
Double Fanucci? Where did gmes 


come from? And finally, most com¬ 
pelling of all, what is the origin of the 
white house where Zork I begins? 

Epic in both size and scope, this 
prequel covers a full century and ex¬ 
plores the collapse of the Great Un¬ 


derground Empire. Straining our new 
"Y" development system to the limit, 
Zork Zero is our largest game ever, 
with more than 200 locations, and as 
many puzzles as all three games of the 
Zork Trilogy combined. To top it off, 
Zork Zero shatters one of computer¬ 
dom's most sacred barriers—the first 
true graphical enhancements to an 
Infocom story. 

Double Fanucci 

Our diehard fans are probably 
mourning the passing of an era; but 
take heart. “Zork Zero has everything 
you've come to expect from us: lots of 
descriptive prose, a ton of puzzles, 
depth and attention to detail; it's a 
well-tested and polished game, all 
served up in a fun, handsome pack¬ 
age,” says author Meretzky. “The 
graphics simply add one more level of 
excellence. I tried to use them in a 
different way; rather than illustrate 
locations, the graphics are integrated 
into the puzzles themselves. I'm really 
pleased with the result.” The graphics, 
created by computer artist James 
Shook, make possible such graphical 
puzzles as Peggleboz, Snarfem, the 
Tower of Bozbar, and Double 
Fanucci. 

But wait—there's more! Zork Zero 
abounds with exciting new features. It 
marks the introduction of our newest- 

Please turn to page 6 


































2 The Status Line Fall 1988 


Good-bye to Status Line, hello to Escape 


The 

Status 

Line 

Mike Dornbrook 
Ruthless Slave Driver 

Stuart A. Kirsch 
TV Game Show Quiz Master 

Hollywood Dave Anderson 
Vacationing Starlet 

Rob Sears 
Noisy Neighbor 

Tomas Bok 

Marketing Switch Hitter 

Lori Hornung 
Mouse Pusher 

Stu Galley 
Scout Master 

Steve Meretzky 
Prom King 

Christopher Erhardt 
Marjorie Gove 
Matt Hillman 
Elizabeth Langosy 
Eileen Milauskas 
Curtis Montague 
Grave Robbers 

(c) 1988 Infocom, Inc. 

125 CambridgePark Drive 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 
02140 

The Status Line is published four, 
sometimes five, times a year by 
Infocom, Inc. Address changes and 
subscriptions should be sent to 
The Status Line, Infocom, Inc. 

125 CambridgePark Drive 
Cambridge, MA 02140, 
Attention Subscriptions Manager. 
The Status Line is an independent 
journal, not affiliated with the New 
York Times and vice versa. 

Cutthroats, Deadline, Enchanter, Infidel, Leather 
Goddesses of Phobos, Planetfall, Seastalker, 
Starcross, Suspect, Suspended, The Status Line, 
The Witness, Trinity, Wishbringer and Zork are 
registered trademarks of Infocom, Inc. 

A Mind Forever Voyaging, Ballyhoo, Border 
Zone, Bureaucracy, Classic Mystery Library, 
Cornerstone [Yeah, a database, wanna make 
something if it?), Fooblitzky, Gamma Force, 
Hollywood Hijinx, Immortal Legends, Infocomics, 
InvisiClues, Lane Mastodon, Moonmist, Nord 
and Bert Couldn't Make Head or Tail of It, Plun¬ 
dered Hearts, Quarterstaff, Science Fiction 
Classics, Sherlock: The Riddle of the Crown 
Jewels, Sorcerer, Spellbreaker, Stationfall, The 
Crescent Hawk's Inception, The Lurking Horror 
and The Tomb of Setmoth are trademarks of 
Infocom, Inc. 

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a trade¬ 
mark of Douglas Adams. BattleTech is a regis¬ 
tered trademark of FASA Corporation. 


Here it is—the 20th edition of The 
Status Line. Well, of course, most of 
those editions were called The New 
Zork Times until a "major metropoli¬ 
tan newspaper" marshalled their cadre 
of lawsuit-thirsty lawyers. 

After 20 newsletters we think we 
have somewhat perfected the medium. 
Our combination of news, features, 
nutty contests and puzzles has been 
praised by many, including our com¬ 
petitors. So as we are reshaping the 
world of interactive fiction and othe 
forms of storytelling, it is time for us 
to push back the publishing envelope 
once again. We have decided to retire 
TSL and replace it with a full color 
magazine called Escape. 

Don't Panic. We will still be the 
same publication we have always 
been, but now in color and with more 
detail about gaming in general. And 


Dear Infocom, 

I like your games. I like your games 
so much that I’ve tried other com¬ 
pany’s games, and realized how much 
better yours are. 

I’ve just finished Beyond Zork. I’ve 
enjoyed previous romps, but BZ —you 
must come out with more games using 
this interface, and I mean yesterday. 
“Define keys”—I didn’t have to type 
“roll onion,” “blow bubble” or “turn 
mirror” 555 times! I never thought I’d 
find a companion to match Floyd (I 
cried when I thought he was dead, just 
ask my roommate), but Spunky the 
minx, Stu the caterpillar, and Phil the 
pterodactyl came pretty damn close. 

I thank you, my mother thanks you, 
and my roommate thanks you for the 
Solid Gold and $14.95 specials (Mas¬ 
tercard and VISA do not). Actually, 
my roommate may be grateful that 
they enable me to pay my rent, but 
she's probably not pleased (or maybe 
she is) that they tend to make me 
somewhat reclusive. And for the love 
of God, don't tell my thesis advisor— 
I’ve missed so many deadlines be¬ 
cause of these things he probably 
thinks I’m out with the reserves a lot 
or suchlike... 

If you ever need testers, or writers, 
or brainstormers, or just generally cute 
people to liven up the joint, say the 
word. 

Saving up another $14.95 (plus 
$2 postage and handling) 
Debby Berry, 
Columbus, OH 

Dear Infocommies, 

Infocom Terms for the Beginner: 
INVENTORY—any necessary items 
such as chips, soda, beer, etc. 



Next stop — Florida! 


don't worry about TSL, it is going to 
Florida to join the NZT at the retire¬ 
ment home for leading-edge publica- 


STATUS LINE—number of hours 
you’ve been working on the same 
puzzle. 

MARITAL STATUS LINE— 
something funny you tell your spouse 
to stop them front leaving because you 
spend all your time at the computer. 

A LINE—something often used at 
single's bars but which has little or no 
meaning to an Infocommie (except 
maybe at the Infocom Friday office 
parties). 

WISHBRINGER—Mailman who 
brings you the Hint Booklet you or¬ 
dered. 

SEASTALKER—one who chooses to 
walk on the beach to work out Info- 
com puzzles. 

WITNESS—some friend you call 
when you are about to solve an in¬ 
credibly difficult puzzle, like the infa¬ 
mous Babel Fish we-have-to-get this- 
slimy-little-fish-in-our-ear puzzle. 
ZORK I, II—planets people might 
think you’re from if you intend to get 
involved with Infocom. 

ZORK III—a good game if you are 
from Zork I or 11. 

ENCHANTER—a friend of the oppo¬ 
site sex who clues you in on how to 
solve a puzzle. 

SORCERER—a friend of the same 
sex who gives you a game or a hint. 
PLANETFALL—what the Earth 
could do, as long as you have your 
computer and your Infocom games. 
CUTTHROATS—what your family 
might do if you don’t quit playing 
those doggarn Infocom games and 
come to dinner. 

SUSPECT—everyone, if your favorite 
Infocom game is missing. 

A MIND”FOREVER VOYAGING— 
your brain when you’re figuring out a 


tions. 

And just think, now you won't have 
to take black and white film on your 
vacations anymore for those Land¬ 
mark Photos! 

Here is a sample of what to expect 
in the first edition of Escape : 

James Clavell's Shogun —Dave 
Lebling's adaptation promises to make 
this one of our most inspiring interac¬ 
tive fiction stories. Incredible graph¬ 
ics, too. 

Marc Blank sends you on a fantas¬ 
tic Journey —the co-author of Zork 
once again creates an entirely new 
way to experience a fantasy adventure 
story on your computer. 

More conversions of Zork Zero and 
BattleTech— the excitement grows as 
our latest releases find their way to 
more and more systems. 

Plus lots more! 


difficult puzzle. 

INFIDEL—someone who interrupts 
your game. 

DEADLINE—what you may look like 
after solving an Infocom game in 3 
days without stopping if you didn’t 
start out with a big enough inventory 
SPELLBREAKER—someone who 
breathes while you are completing a 
very fragile chain of thought that will 
enable you to solve a puzzle. 
STARCROSS—when you stop day¬ 
dreaming about a puzzle and get back 
to work. 

SUSPENDED—the type of animation 
you appear to be in when thinking 
about a puzzle. 

CHESS—a nice relaxing game (of 
course, before you know it, Infocom 
will come out with interactive chess, 
and you’ll have to turn to checkers, or 
marbles to relax). 

Sincerely, 
Ben Holzman 
Roslyn Heights, NY 
[Thanks Ben. We will he adding 
these to our new game manuals —Ed. j 

Dear TSL, 

I need help. I am a junior in high 
school and frankly, I hate History. In 
effect, I am not doing so well in it. 
After a long conference with my 
teacher, we decided that if I could get 
my letter published in any profes¬ 
sional publication, he would raise my 
grade 1/2 a grade. I was just wonder¬ 
ing if you knew of any professional 
publications. 

Pleadingly yours, 
Eric Lee 
San Leandro, CA 
[Eric, have you tried The New York 
Times?—Ed.] 


Letters To The Editor 























Fall 1988 The Status Line 3 


Quarterstaff: Our first role-playing fantasy 


Three months ago, a peaceful colony 
of druids vanished without a trace. As 
their crops lie overgrown and aban¬ 
doned, a crossfire of rumors has de¬ 
scended upon the land, laying blame 
on everything from epidemic to mass 
homicide to demon worship. Scouting 
parties have been frantically assem¬ 
bled and sent forth to bring an end to 
all the hearsay, but none has returned. 
Now the local kingdoms, restless for 
news of the missing sect, have called 
upon you to venture into the depths of 
the lost Tree Druid colony, buried 
deep beneath a great oak tree. You 
must discover whatever foul secret 
lies within. 

Graphics and sound 

Quarterstaff: The Tomb of Set- 
noth — our first entry into the fantasy 
role-playing (FRP) genre and the first 
in our RPG series — is role-playing 
adventure as you’ve never seen it be¬ 
fore on a computer. You’ll read rich 
text descriptions of the places, objects, 
and creatures you come across. High- 
resolution graphics and digitized 
sounds reinforce the text, and your 
moves are tracked by a detailed on¬ 
screen map which your characters 
“draw” as they go. 

You issue commands to your char¬ 
acters in full English sentences. And 
as in any FRP, the characters in your 
party develop and mature in a variety 
of specific skills, and fight according 
to a comprehensive combat system. 

Pervading the Quarterstaff universe 
at all levels is close attention to de¬ 
tail — apparent in everything from the 
weight and bulk of objects they're 
carrying to the complex timetable by 
which hunger and fatigue affect the 
characters in the game. All these ele¬ 
ments weave together into a game 
which is more akin to a “pen and pa¬ 
per" adventure environment than any¬ 
thing previously released on a com¬ 
puter. 

Monsters learn from mistakes 

As the game opens, you stand at the 
entrance to the Tree Druids’ colony, 
ready to begin your underearth quest. 
As you progress, you meet many a 
curious creature. In Quarterstaff 
monsters are not merely "deathbots,” 
whose only purpose in life is to maim 
and destroy, but ordinary living things 
whose actions are guided by real life 
drives such as hunger, anger, and the 
need for friendship. 

Monsters even learn from their 
mistakes and accomplishments 
through an artificial-intelligence 
learning system. Some creatures will 
react negatively to your party, resort¬ 
ing to combat and force. Others, how¬ 
ever, will try to help your party, or 
even join forces with you; and so, 


though you begin the 
adventure with only 
one character, you're 
sure to quickly ac¬ 
quire a formidable 
band of adventurers. 

Quarterstaff pro¬ 
vides a number of 
innovations for ma¬ 
nipulating your party. 

Your characters can 
move about independ¬ 
ently, or as part of a central group that 
moves as a unit. You can even divide 
your party into two or more groups 
that explore different parts of the ge¬ 
ography on their own. This gives you 
unlimited freedom to control your 


party: you could, for 
instance, allow some 
of your group to 
sleep, while two char¬ 
acters stand watch, 
and a scouting party 
probes the nearby 
rooms for action. 

Quarterstaff was 
originally designed, 
written and imple¬ 
mented for the Macin- 
tosh by Simulated Environ¬ 

ment Systems, which released the 
game in 1987. The game immediately 

received rave reviews— MacUser 
gave it a near-perfect rating of four 
mice, while Dragon gave it a perfect 


five stars, saying ‘Quarterstaff... is, in 
our opinion, among the finest fantasy 
role-playing games available for any 
computer system.” Despite reviews 
like these, which reflected impressive 
design and development. Quarterstaff 
ran into marketing trouble, and its 
distribution was limited. We recog¬ 
nized the game’s potential, and 
bought the rights to the product. 

Includes hierarchical menus 

We’ve spent months in collabora¬ 
tion with the game’s authors, Scott 
Schmitz and Ken Updike, and a slew 
of talented artists, writers and pro¬ 
grammers in order to perfect the 
game. The first improvement was the 
implementation of a new Macintosh 
interface — one that allows the user to 
play the game entirely with the 
mouse, or to play entirely using the 
keyboard. Pull-down menus allow you 
to easily point and click your way 
through even complex sentences. 
We’ve included Apple’s hierarchical 
menus, usually found only in top- 
notch business products, to allow you 
easy access to your inventory. Of 
course, any command can be typed in 
via the keyboard. 

Next, Infolmplementor Amy 
Briggs (author of Plundered Hearts) 
reworked and rewrote most of the 
game’s text to provide a greater sense 
of plot and continuity within the story. 
We also corrected a few grammatical 
errors as well. Computer artists were 
brought in to touch up the high- 
resolution graphics and to design a 
special set of gorgeous color graphics 
which the game uses when running on 
a color Mac II. 

New package and manual 

Our infamous testing staff (which 
had recently been genetically altered 
so as to not require sleep) was un¬ 
leashed on the program to perform 
exhaustive bug-whacking. After sev¬ 
eral dozen cases of Jolt cola were con¬ 
sumed over the course of a few 
months, the finished game emerged. 
Finally, a new package was conceived 
and produced featuring beautiful 
cover art by artist Ken Barr. Inside we 
put a brand new user's manual and, as 
is our style, an assortment of mood 
setting pieces: a mystical parchment 
titled “The Path to Enlightenment,” a 
wooden druidic coin and a dazzling 
color poster featuring the cover art. 

The Macintosh version of Quarter- 
staff will be available in October, and 
will include the special color graphics 
for the Mac II. Versions for the Apple 
II GS and IBM will be available in 
spring of 1989. Watch upcoming is¬ 
sues for further information. All ver¬ 
sions will retail for $49.95. 


t. ..I Mil 








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Quarterstaff features Apple’s hierarchical menus for the ultimate Macintosh 
interface, making your adventuring even easier. Your quest is also aided with 
the convenience of on-screen mapping. 



In Quarterstaff we’ve included on-screen room-by-room mapping as well as a 
map of the surrounding geography (shown in the picture above). Digitized 
sounds and high-resolution graphics enhance the mood. 

































4 The Status Line Fall 1988 


Four more popular titles 
reduced to only $14.95 



Convention goers visit the joint FASA-Infocom booth at this year's GEN- 
CON/ORIGINS. Over 10,000 participants packed the MECCA. 

Infocom attends GENCON 
gaming mega-convention 


We at Infocom are offering you, our 
most loyal fans, a special deal, the 
kind of deal that just makes you want 
to cry with joy. Well, get your hankies 
out, because now you can get four of 
our most wildly popular games— The 
Lurking Horror, Stationfall, Nord & 
Bert Couldn’t Make Head or Tail of 
It, and Plundered Hearts —for the 
low, low direct-mail price of $14.95! 

The Lurking Horror 

Since they were released last year, 
each game has received incredible 
reviews. For example, RUN magazine 
game Infocom’s first interactive hor¬ 
ror story, Dave Lebling’s The Lurking 
Horror, a grade of “A,” saying, 
“Whatever it is that alarms, unnerves, 
dismays, startles, or turns blood into 
ice water can be experienced in this 
boundless romp into the unknown.” 
This eerie thriller, which takes you 
through the G.U.E. Tech campus from 
the top of the great dome to the bot¬ 
tom of the elevator shaft, will have 
“your spine tingling and your heart 
beating faster,” promises A+ maga¬ 
zine. 

Stationfall 

“Fall into Stationfall and you’ll 
have trouble climbing back out,” 
warns Analog Computing. The enter¬ 
taining sequel to the ever-popular 
Planetfall, Steve Meretzky's Station- 
fall once again features the lovable 
and hilarious Floyd up to a com¬ 
pletely new set of mischievous antics. 
But this time, he’s paired up with an¬ 
other robot named Plato, becoming 
“what will probably be known as the 
greatest comedy team ever in interac¬ 
tive fiction,” according to Analog 
Computing. MacUser, which gave 
Stationfall four-and-a-half mice, says, 
“Stationfall is one of those rare se¬ 
quels that lives up to the original.” 

As a Stellar Patrol officer, you and 
your beloved Floyd set out to explore 
a deserted space station. What might 
you find? You'll just have to find out 
for yourself, if you can put up with 
Floyd’s habit of reciting multiple dig¬ 
its of pi. In the words of ST X-Press, 
“...if you haven’t ever played Infocom 
games or have just passed them by, 
then this is the one to pick up (along 
with Planetfall).” And now it’s just 
$14.95! 

Nord and Bert 

Do you believe that the pun is 
mightier than the sword? Do you ap¬ 
preciate word plays, puns and other 
linguistic twists? Then get the ball 
rolling, take the bull by the horns and 
try Nord and Bert Couldn’t Make 
Head or Tail of It by Jeff O'Neill. “In 
a world that is hungry for some liter¬ 
ary humor, A+ states, “ Nord and Bert 


is an entertaining and distinctive step 
in the right direction.” 

If you have ever had the itch to 
really make a mountain out of mole¬ 
hill, then put your nose to the grind¬ 
stone with this collection of eight 
short interactive fiction stories. Ob¬ 
serves inCider, “It's perfect for those 
who are clever, intelligent, and quick¬ 
witted. On the other hand, it could be 
a most humbling experience.” In Nord 
and Bert, you learn that the town of 
Punster is undergoing a linguistic cri¬ 
sis so severe that its citizens are un¬ 
able to communicate. It’s up to you to 
save the day. Just watch out for the 
large chocolate mousse standing in 
the aisle of the Shopping Bizarre on 
your way to visiting the Manor of 
Speaking. And if getting the right 
answer is like finding a needle in a 
haystack, then the on-screen hints 
should get you one leg ahead. Indeed, 
as Newsday says, Nord and Bert is “a 
hoot, really,” and as COMPUTE’S 
Gazette confirms, “ Nord and Bert is 
truly different, and that’s as sure as 
little green apples.” 

Plundered Hearts 

And now for something completely 
different—pirates, ripped bodices and 
steamy passion are all yours for only 
$14.95 in Amy Briggs’ 17th-century 
tale of romance, Plundered Hearts. 
The first interactive fiction title to 
feature a woman as the main charac¬ 
ter, Plundered Hearts puts you in the 
middle of a high seas adventure as 
you sail to the West Indies to see your 
ailing father for what might be the last 
time. But can you resist the escalating 
passion that you feel for the dashing 
pirate Nicholas Jamison? 

Men and women alike have hailed 
Plundered Hearts as intriguing and 
enjoyable. Commodore magazine 
praises Amy’s rich storyline and con¬ 
siders her knowledge of the time pe¬ 
riod to be a contributing factor to the 
intricate plot. But it warns, “Don't let 
the fact that the main character is a 
woman scare you away! Plundered 
Hearts won my respect by not relying 
on this gimmick and delivering a 
challenging adventure with which to 
pass the time.” 

Computer Entertainer asserts, 
“While women players of interactive 
fiction have adapted, of necessity, to 
playing male roles in adventures, now 
it’s time for men to show their flexi¬ 
bility and assume a feminine role for a 
change!” And Dan Gutman, syndi¬ 
cated columnist, found Plundered 
Hearts to be “well written and fun to 
play, romance novel or not. But I 
must confess I felt a tad uncomfort¬ 
able kissing Captain Jamison.” 


Hie year 1988 was a banner year for 
the amalgam of companies making 
up the board/strategy/fantasy role- 
playing/war/hobby-gaming industry. 
The two major conventions were, for 
the first time, combined into one 
mega-convention. GENCON, the 
fantasy role-playing convention, 
sponsored by TSR (makers of Ad¬ 
vanced Dungeons and Dragons, 
among others) and ORIGINS, the 
war gaming show, sponsored by 
Avalon Hill (a leader in the field of 
both non-computer and computer 
war gaming) became GENCON/ 
ORIGINS 1988. 

The show attracted over 10,000 
fanatics and first-timers to the 
MECCA in Milwaukee, where for a 
weekend, gaming was king. Over 
125 exhibitors attended, easily mak¬ 
ing this the biggest and the most 
successful convention the industry 
has ever seen. 

While companies like TSR, 
FASA, Avalon Hill, Games Work¬ 
shop, and Ral Partha Miniatures 
ruled the show, strangely different 
banners also adorned the exposition 
hall—names like Infocom. Strategic 
Simulations Inc. (SSI), Electronic 
Arts, Atari, Commodore, Mind- 
scape, New World Computing, Ori¬ 
gin Systems, and Computer Gaming 
World appeared. Yes, computers and 
computer gaming had merged into 
the world of traditional gaming. Said 
one computer professional, “Hey, 
games is games. Whether you play 
them alone, with friends, or on a 
computer is only a difference in the 
method. But in the end, games is 
games.” 

Perhaps the convergence of the 


industries is the proof of this theory. 
Infocom is releasing a computer 
version of BattleTech. SSI has re¬ 
leased computer products for 
AD&D. Origin Systems has its ver¬ 
sions of Auto Duel and Ogre. Gam¬ 
ers gave software products and com¬ 
puter gaming an overwhelmingly 
positive reception. The computer 
rooms were sponsored by Atari, 
Commodore, and the Milwaukee 
Area Commodore Enthusiasts 
(MACE); they were continually 
packed with people playing every¬ 
thing from Might and Magic, Pool 
of Radiance, and Dungeon Master to 
Earl Weaver Baseball, Universal 
Military Simulator, and Jet. 

But for Infocom, not only was the 
convention a new market and a new 
show, but it was also a homecoming 
of sorts. Milwaukee is the original 
home of the Zork User’s Group and 
the birth place of this very magazine 
(then the New Zork Times). Even 
though neither Mike Dornbrook nor 
his parents live there anymore, we 
were received like hometown he¬ 
roes. (Just ask us about the Astor 
Hotel—on second thought, don’t.) 

The response of GENCON/ 
ORIGINS to BattleTech: The Cres¬ 
cent Hawk’s Inception was simply 
stupendous. Crowds gathered from 
aisles around whenever the familiar 
beat of “The BattleBeast” (our pro¬ 
motional video) began. Everyone 
wanted to be the first on their block 
to find out what it would be like to 
be Jason Youngblood. Plans have 
already been made (by MACE) for a 
BattleTech computer competition 
during next year’s Con. 










War is a way of life on 31st-century Pacifica 


Continued from page 1 

didn’t know what fate lay ahead when 
Kuritan forces attacked the planet. 
Now, eighteen years old and totally 
alone, he's adrift within a war-ravaged 
city, undertrained, and with only the 
money he had saved as a student. Add 
to this his being hunted and pursued 
by the occupational forces and you'll 
get the feeling of our new role-playing 
game, BattleTech: The Crescent 
Hawk's Inception. While the above 
text is not from the game, it does give 
you a taste of how you might feel 
when you play it. 

Based upon FASA's popular adven¬ 
ture board games of armored combat 
in the 31st century, you are cast as 
Jason Youngblood. Raised as a court 
favorite (due to father's friendship 
with the local duke), Jason is arrogant, 
egotistical and vain. But suddenly he's 
forced not only to survive on his own, 
but to try to piece together the fate of 
his father... and his father's loyal 
guard. 

While this storyline may seem to be 
a reasonable premise for one of our 
interactive fiction stories, walking into 
BattleTech is a departure for the tradi¬ 
tional Infocom player. This is not an 
interactive fiction story. This is a full- 
fledged computer role-playing game 
(RPG), complete with training and 
experience, armour, weapons and 
equipment acquisition, party building, 
impressive graphics, and lots of com¬ 
bat. And, as an Infocom first, this 
game is not text based! But this is not 
standard RPG experience. 

This is a game with all the depth 
and richness you expect from Info- 
coni, plus all the excitement of the 
BattleTech universe. 

Developed by Westwood Associ¬ 
ates, the wizards behind SSI's Phanta- 
sie III and Epyx's Summer Games and 
World Games, The Crescent Hawk's 
Inception is a unique, animated, and 
richly detailed game. The story in 
BattleTech is more intriguing and 
more in depth than that of any other 
computer role-playing game. 

One of the features that makes this 
game unique is the addition of many 
animated "outtakes" that appear at 
various points throughout the game. 
They are designed in the style of 
"monga" or Japanese, comic books. 
Whether you see the expressive face 
of Jason or the explosive missile 
launch from a Locust, the "outtakes" 
will bring the story even more alive 
and enrich your playing experience. 

But the animated "outtakes" and a 
rich storyline are only part of the ex¬ 
citement of the game. BattleTech: The 
Crescent Hawk's Inception features 
the largest playing area of any com- 



Jason 

Rex 

Victor 
Mansha 1 


Emotive outtakes in the style of Japanese 
"monga" comic books add extra visual ex¬ 
citement to our new role-playing game, Bat¬ 
tleTech: The Crescent Hawk's Inception. 
Should Jason get into trouble you'll see this 
look of fear and surprise in his eyes. The 
artwork on the cover (right) is just part of 
what you'll find inside. 


question on the card inside the pack¬ 
age (and send it to us with shipping 
and handling costs) and we'll send you 
the figure that has been designed and 
created especially for us and The 
Crescent Hawk's Inception. Plus, in 
your BattleTech: The Crescent 
Hawk's Inception package you'll find 
a spectacular poster and official Lyran 
Commonwealth 'Mech and Weapons 
Recognition Guide. And if you're 
among the first to get your copy of 
BattleTech, you'll get another real 
prize: in a limited number of specially 
marked packages, you'll find an au¬ 
thentic Crescent Hawk insignia pin! 
Wear it proudly! 

BattleTech: The Crescent Hawk's 
Inception will be available in Novem¬ 
ber for the IBM and 100% compati¬ 
bles (supports CGA, EGA, VGA, 
MCGA, and Tandy Graphics; 384K 
RAM required), in February for the 
Commodore 64/128, and in the Spring 
for the Apple II series and Amiga. 
Suggested retail price is $39.95 for the 
Commodore 64/128 and $49.95 for all 
other systems. 


puter RPG. With over four million 
(that's right, four million!) locations 
which your party can visit, BattleTech 
offers the player a huge territory in 
which to explore and fight. 

Combat, too, is of a scope befitting 
such an exhilarating game. Whether 
you are in your 'Mech (a 30-foot tall, 
20-ton war-machine) or on foot, alone 
or in the party you've assembled, com¬ 
bat is a frequent test of your skills and 
nerves. Hand-to-hand combat weap¬ 
ons range from longbows and pistols 
to vibroblades and laser rifles. But 
seated in your 'Mech, you can fire off 
laser blasts, infernos, and missiles. 
War is a way of life in the 31st cen¬ 
tury, and armaments of destruction are 
a way to survive in this harsh world. 

If lots of tactical maneuvering and 
strategic planning is not your thing, 
BattleTech has an auto-combat capa¬ 
bility that lets your computer do the 
planning and fighting for you. The 
story, the discovery, the excitement, 
however, are all still there. 

And playing BattleTech couldn't be 
easier on the fingers. Your numeric 
keypad or arrow keys move you 
around both your geography and your 
menu choices. Joystick support will 
be available on some versions. 

There's an added bonus for winning 
the game: should you be skillful 
enough to discover the secretly hidden 
'Mech that we've placed at the end of 
the game, you can send for an exclu¬ 
sive, custom crafted Ral Partha Battle¬ 
Tech lead miniature. Just answer the 



Andrew Speer 












6 The Status Line Fall 1988 



In Zork Zero, the prequel to the Zork Trilogy, you'll finally get a chance to try We've gotten more extravagant than Dimwit Flathead himself with our new 
your hand a Double Fanucci. We have taken computer game graphics a step development system. Ordinary screens of text come to life with graphic 
further by integrating graphic-oriented puzzles into Zork Zero. enhancements like these. 


Computerdom’s most sacred barrier broken 


Continued from page 1 

generation parser, our friendliest ever. 
Now it's easier for a novice to start, 
and powerful enough for the experi¬ 
ence player. 

Zork Zero includes our very popu¬ 
lar on-screen hints. In a development 
made possible by our new graphics 
system, Zork Zero also has complete 
on-screen mapping. The puzzles 
themselves range from simple to bog¬ 
gling. Finally, Zork Zero is laced with 


that famous Meretzky humor you 
loved so much in Planetfall, The 
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy , and 
Leather Goddesses ofPhobos. 

The packaging lives up to our usual 
standards. Start with a scrap of parch¬ 
ment containing a spell from the 
secret notebooks of the great magician 
Megaboz. Then, add a construction 
blueprint from Rockville Estates, the 
cave-bound condo complex that's tar¬ 
geted for Young Underground Profes¬ 


sionals. And top it off with a hand¬ 
some calendar, featuring excerpts 
from "The Lives of the Twelve Flat- 
heads" and illustrations by the great 
painter, Leonardo Flathead. This cal¬ 
endar is from the year 883 GUE, but 
(by an incredible coincidence) it is 
also perfectly usable as a 1989 calen¬ 
dar. 

From the exciting prologue, where 
you come face to face with Lord Dim¬ 
wit Flathead the Excessive, to the 


climactic epilogue, where you meet 
the most powerful wizard ever to set 
foot on the soil of Quendor, Zork Zero 
has something for everyone, and 
promises to be the best offering yet 
from the Master Storytellers. 

Zork Zero will be released in Octo¬ 
ber on the Apple Macintosh, support¬ 
ing both color Mac II and regular 
black and white Macs, and will retail 
for $59.95. Watch upcoming issues 
for details on other computer versions. 


Stuck in the cellar? Frustrated by the Pheehelm? 
After interviews with thousands of Beyond Zork 
players and many days of detailed statistical analy¬ 
sis, we have selected these two puzzles as winners 
of our “Most Likely To Cause Irate Adventurers 
To Axe Their Computers After Endless Hours Of 
Agonized Frustration” Award, By popular demand, 
this issue of The Status Line features these tricky 
puzzles from Beyond Zork. The hints for each puz¬ 
zle slowly lead you through the solution. To read 
the coded portion (in boldface), simply count for¬ 
ward one letter; “A” becomes “B”, “Z” becomes 
“A”, etc. 

The Cellar 

The cellar is a fairly difficult area of the game, 
yet it must be completed early in order to reach 
other areas. The first thing you need is a light 
source. Notice the mzld of the szudqm? Take the 
qtrsx kzmsdqm from the szudqm’r rhfm. 

Can’t get the light to last long enough? If only 
you had some way of recharging it. While holding 
the kzmsdqm, qdzc the Rbqnkk ne 
Qdeqdrgldms, found at the anssnl of the rszhqr. 

Now to explore. You’ll need a weapon to dis¬ 
patch the rat ant and discipline the crab; the dagger 
should do. Jhkkhmf sgd bqza should give you the 
shmx bqnvm. The skeleton should be easy to kill, 
and don’t forget to take its zltkds. Make sure to 
rdzqbg the ohkd ne rdzrgdkkr. 

Hmmm. The stack of barrels looks interesting, 


VisiClues: Hints 
for Beyond Zork 

doesn’t it? If you’re too clumsy to climb it you 
may have a problem. Luckily, there is something in 
the cellar which can hmbqdzrd your cdwsdqhsx. 
Read your Book of Lore. Still stumped? Rptddyd 
the lnrr. 

Okay, you’ve climbed the barrels and gotten the 
vhmd ansskd. Now you just need to get out, but 
someone has shut the door. Fortunately, you have a 
way to get through the door. Have you noticed 
those rsqzmfd fqddm qtmdr on the zlt-kds? They 
are obscured by qdc rvhqkr. You need to find a 
way to ehksdq nts the qdc rvhqkr. Try knnjhmf 
zs sgd zltkds sgqntfg sgd vhmd ansskd. 

Now vdzq the zltkds and qdzc its vnqc ne 
onvdq. What happens? Use that dwsqz rsqdmfsg 
to rlzrg the cnnq and drbzod! 

The Pheehelm 

Getting the Pheehelm is the most difficult puz¬ 
zle in the end part of Beyond Zork. The famed 
Pheehelm is an ancient helmet, rumored to possess 
magic powers of intelligence. It lies north of the 
River Phee, among the ruins. 

However, it’s not easy to find. Perhaps some 


magic would help. Notice the zqbgvzx in the ru¬ 
ined plaza. Have you found any other object which 
has a similar shape? The gntqfkzrr, which can be 
antfgs with the Bqnbnchkd’r Sdzq at the Lzfhbj 
Rgnood, is the key object. Rszmc tmcdq the zqbg 
and ekho the gntqfkzrr. Lo and behold, you can 
now lnud azbjvzqcr zmc enqvzqcr hm shld! Ex¬ 
plore the scenery a little. 

In the era of the battleground, the Pheehelm 
falls off the dying prince’s head and rolls into a 
trench. His horse then falls in, blocking it. Try to 
find a way to lnud sgd gnqrd. Can’t do it? Well, 
don’t worry, because hs’r hlonrrhakd. Maybe you 
can chf hs nts. But you are not very good at 
chffhmf. Perhaps you can ehmc z adssdq chffdq 
to help you. Try the Ihmw. 

So, you brought the lhmw back in time, but she 
didn’t dig up the helmet. Give her some incentive! 
Try putting a xtllx bgnbnkzsd sqteekd in the 
trench too. But the ground is too hard to dig here. 
You’re stuck. But wait! You have the onvdqr ne 
shld! Maybe you could go to a cheedqdms dqz, 
when the fqntmc hr rnesdq. Try the 
Cdrnkzshnm. 

The lhmw still didn’t dig up the Pheehelm? 
Perhaps the sqteekd ldksdc—after all, it’s been a 
few thousand years. You can’t find any bgdlhbzk 
oqdrdquzshudr in this game. But there is a lzfhb 
oqdrdquzshud: the Onnk ne Dsdqmzk Xntsg. 
Cho z sqteekd hm sgd onnk. Then try again. 









Fall 1988 The Status Line 7 


The Governor of Montana 



Montana Governor Ted Schwinden picks up another vote for his 1996 re- 
election by posing with our contest winner, Jordan Anderson. 


Head of State Photo Contest winner 

Since we announced our Great Wall of China Photo Contest, we have re¬ 
ceived over 25 photos of fans holding their favorite games on that famous 
landmark. So we figured we would have no problem with our next photo 
contest, The Head of State. 

We did receive many good gags, but by the time we had to go to press 
we had received only one real photo—this photo of Infocom fan Jordan 
Anderson and the Governor of Montana, Ted Schwinden. Jordan cleverly 
stated in his letter “I Suspect that I’m the only entrant to have a picture 
taken with the Governor of Montana!” 

So we’ll give you another chance. Get out there and find Baby Doc and 
Marcos. Send your entries to Castro Candids, do Infocom, 125 Cam- 
bridgePark Drive. Cambridge, MA 02140. And don’t forget to buy an extra 
roll of film for our Elvis Impersonator Photo Contest. 



How I got the Babel Fish 


Eric Blumrich 


Puzzle Number 19 

And now for something completely different a puzzle that has nothing to do with 
any Infocom games! (Except that it’s similar to the sort of puzzles you might run 
into in one of our interactive stories.) 

The 12 sentences below all share the same unusual feature — except for two 
of them. To answer the puzzle, just give us the two numbers of the sentences 
which don’t fit the pattern. Okay, you’re on your own — and there are no In- 
visiClues to help you out! 

We’ve left room on the answer form for you to include the reasoning behind 
your answer, but that’s simply for your amusement and ours. Only the two num¬ 
bers will matter toward the correctness of your entry. 

1) The earnest tenant took Karl’s spigot to our ruined dacha. 

2) Five eager runners sent their red designer robes swinging gaily. 

3) My yellow wig gives Sarah horrible earaches. 

4) Dora and Dave evicted Dagbert the elf from my yard. 

5) Mice and cats often race below fleecy clouds. 

6) No one eats Sally's stew without tongs. 

7) Your razor replacement thundered dryly yesterday. 

8) Andrew was singing graceful little enchantments. 

9) The overcoats fret beside badly mangled hooks. 

10) Weather robots stop people even next to oceans. 

11) Never replenish his silver reading glasses. 

12) The ego of frozen Norwegians seems stable. 

r— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —n 

I Puzzle #19 Entry Form | 

| ANSWER: _ | 


YOUR REASONING (optional): 


Name: 

Address: 


• T-shirt size (S, M, L, XL) _ . 

I Rules I 

I 1. All entries must be postmarked by January 31, 1989. (Entries from out- I 
I side the U.S. and Canada must be postmarked by March 31, 1989.) 2. I 
I Entries must be on this form or a photocopy of this form. 3. There is a limit I 
I of one entry per person. 4. Iodized salt helps prevent thyroid problems. 5. I 
I All entries must be mailed separately. 6. Up to 25 prizes will be awarded. If I 
| more than 25 correct entries are received, a drawing will determine the win- | 
| ners. 7. Void where prohibited by law or mother-in-law. j 

j Prize | 

I The New Zork Times Puzzle Winner T-Shirt (The Status Line Puzzle was ! 

I called The New Zork Times Puzzle back when The Status Line was called 1 

| The New Zork Times). j 

j Mail To | 

| Infocom, Inc. j 

I The Awesomely Wonderful Puzzle Editor i 

a 125 CambridgePark Drive i 

j Cambridge, MA 02140 i 

L_ __________________________ _J 
























8 The Status Line Fall 1988 


Customer Support 


In this world of constant change, we 
are forever improving our products to 
adapt to new hardware. We also occa¬ 
sionally find a bug that even gets by 
our super-duper Testing Department. 
The following information might help 
you if your newest game doesn't 
seem to be working right. Send all 
inquiries and disks to: Infocom, 125 
CambridgePark Drive, Cambridge, 
MA 02140, Attention: Customer Sup¬ 
port. Or call us at (617) 576-3190. 

Beyond Zork on the IBM - IBM 
users may be having problems with 
some EGA cards, using a Microsoft 
mouse, or saving and restoring on 
PCjr’s or Tandy's with 256K of 
memory. We have an updated version 
of Beyond Zork which corrects all of 
these problems. Simply send us your 
original disk with a letter explaining 
exactly the problem you’re encoun¬ 
tering and the hardware you're using. 
We’ll have a free upgrade out to you 
in a jiffy. (Sherlock also suffers from 
the same save/restore problem. We’ll 
upgrade that free for you too!) 

Sherlock, Border Zone, Solid 
Gold Zork I, and Solid Gold Hitch¬ 
hiker’s on the Commodore 64/ 128 - 
Many people encountered save/ re¬ 
store problems with our first release 
of these games. We have released a 
new version which will save and re¬ 
store with no problem. Send your 
original disk and a note outlining 
your problem. We’ll send you a free 
upgrade. 


Macintosh and the HFS - All In¬ 
focom games for the Macintosh with 
an interpreter before “G” do not rec¬ 
ognize the hierarchical file system. 
(You can find out which interpreter is 
on your disk by typing: $VERIFY 
while in the game.) Therefore you 
cannot save/restore to the hard disk or 
an 800K disk. In this case you can 
either save to a single-sided disk 
(400K), or send in your original for a 
free upgrade. 

Infocomics - Lane Mastodon on 
the Apple II Series only - Make sure 
your CAPS LOCK key is down to use 
your advance, reverse, and bookmark 
keys. This is not necessary for other 
Infocomics on the Apple. 

Infocomics on the IBM - IBM 
versions of Infocomics are 5 1/4” 
disks and can only be booted from the 
A: drive. They also cannot be copied 
to a hard disk. So if your A: drive is 3 
1/2”, you will NOT be able to run In¬ 
focomics. 

Note to Cornerstone Users - In this 
season of lightning storms make sure 
you always keep a good set of 
BACKUP ALL FILES of your data¬ 
base through Cornerstone’s UTILI¬ 
TIES feature. We’ve had an increase 
in calls about damaged databases due 
to the weather which can only be 
fixed by RESTOREing a good work¬ 
ing BACKUP or starting the database 
over from scratch. Remember, 
BACKUP SINGLE FILE will NOT 
do the trick. 


Egghead eggcerpted our contest 


Eggads! In our Winter/Spring 1988 
issue of The Status Line we requested 
photographs of people at landmarks 
holding one of our games, and we 
even promised a free set of games to 
the first person to send a photo of 
themselves on the Great Wall of 
China. We’ve received over 25 en¬ 
tries. Months later, while flipping 
through the July/August issue of Egg¬ 
head Discount Software's Egghead 
Magazine looking for ideas to steal, 
Infolnformant Lori Hornung discov¬ 
ered they had in fact stolen one of our 
ideas! Glaring at her from page 27 
was their “Eggheads Everywhere” 
contest which asks readers to send 
photos of themselves wearing Egg¬ 
head clothing in “eggzotic” locations. 
And where was the example photo¬ 
graph taken from? That’s right, from 
atop the Great Wall of China. 

Well, to address our retailing 
chums in their own witty diction: 
What’s your eggscuse for this egg- 
cess, this des-egg-cration of that pillar 
of journalism, that media chef- 
d’oeuvre, The Status Line Landmark 
Photo Contest? That’s right, I’m egg- 


cusing you of arregg-ance, of eggbez- 
zling our brain-child, of n-egg-lecting 
to credit our inspiration. Remember, 
it’s just a yolk! 


Rome, Italy 



Throwing Infidel to the lions? Tina Merola of Downers Grove, III. con¬ 
vinced her dad to pose with a copy of Infidel in the Colosseum in Rome. 

Don’t forget the camera and Beyond Zork! 

Planning to visit Mount Rushmore anytime soon? Don't forget to bring 
along a copy of your favorite Infocom game and a camera whenever you go 
on vacation. If we use your photo, you’ll receive a free game. Send your 
color slides or prints (no more black and white—see page 2) to: Landmark 
Photo, Infocom, Inc., 125 CambridgePark Drive, Cambridge, MA 02140. 


inFocom 

P.0. Box 8123 

San Francisco, CA 94128 


BULK RATE 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 15341 
Los Angeles, CA. 
















© BUY 4 


GET 1 FREE! 


BUY ANY 4 TITLES... AND QUALIFY FOR 1 OF J| 
THE “BONUS GIFT” TITLES IDENTIFIED BY THE 


NEW 

BATTLETECH®: THE CRESCENT 
HAWK’S INCEPTION™ 

War is the way of life through¬ 
out the Human Sphere in the 
31st century. You, 18-year-old 
Jason Youngblood, are training 
to be one of the elite warriors, 
waging battle in 20-ton death 
machines called BattleMechs. 

But your education is violently interrupted by an 
enemy invasion, and then you’re on your own to 
save your planet and your life. 

BattleTech challenges your combat strategy 
skills, and lets you explore the more than 4 million 
individual locations of the game. Exciting graphics 
and animation show you everything, from your 
BattleMech s status to your immediate geography 
to closeups of the action, Learn strategy and accu¬ 
mulate supplies at ‘The Arena,” a gladiatorial mod¬ 
ule you can play again and again. BattleTech is a 
fully-integrated part of FASA’s BattleTech universe. 
(Requires CGA, EGA, VGA, MCGA or Tandy graph¬ 
ics and 384K.) 

ITEM #1225 IBM $49.95 

NEW 

QUARTERSTAFF™: 

THE TOMB OF SETMOTH™ 

Enmeshed in the roots be¬ 
neath a large and ancient oak 
tree lies the labyrinth home of 
the peaceful Tree Druids. But 
that quiet colony, now deserted, 
hides the Dreadful secret of the 
Druids' sudden disappearance. 
Parties of brave adventurers have gone in search of 
the key to the mystery—and no one has returned. 
Now you, and anyone you can find to help, are the 
Druids' last hope. It is your turn to descend into 
the dark, twisting underground caverns to discov¬ 
er the fate of the Druids. 

When first developed, this fantasy role-playing 
game received a four-mouse rating from Mac User 
and a perfect five-star rating from Dragon Maga¬ 
zine. Now we've added a little Infocom magic, plus 
a spectacular Macintosh interface with realistic 
sound, sparkling color and black and white graph¬ 
ics, hierarchical menus, context-sensitive on-screen 
hints, and a dynamic map window. (Requires 
MacPlus, SE or II with 1 Meg of RAM. Color re¬ 
quires Mac II with 2 Meg of RAM and 16-color 
Video Card.) 

ITEM #1223 Macintosh $49.95 

NEW! 

ZORK® ZERO 

Travel hack through the mists of 
time to Dimwit Flathead’s court in 
the very last hours of the Great 
Underground Empire, where you 
witness the powerful curse of 
Megaboz. You wake up years later 
as one of your own descendents 
(isn't fantasy wonderful?) and embark on an adven¬ 
ture that tells the story behind the story of the clas¬ 
sic Zork Trilog}!. Larger than any previous Infocom 
story, Zork Zero is bursting with dastardly graphi¬ 
cal puzzles, maniacal riddles, and more challenge 
than the other Zorks combined. An amazing and 
aggravating court jester pops up when least ex¬ 
pected to tease and test you, and he takes your 
gaming skills to the limit in a devilish round of 
Double Fanucci. We keep the adventure going 
with on-screen hints, a friendlier parser, and on¬ 
screen maps. Zork Zero is the creation of the de¬ 
ranged Steve Meretzky. (Supports color on Mac II.) 
ITEM #1224 Macintosh $59.95 





ZORK® TRILOGY™ 


ZORK® I 


Infocom’s 3 most popular sto¬ 
ries together at last! Your quest 
for the fabulous Treasures of Zork 
takes you further and further into 
the Great Underground Empire. 
You’ll come to expect the unex¬ 
pected—such as the Wizard of 
Frobozz who specializes in materializing at odd 
moments and casting bothersome spells. 

As the force of the Dungeon Master draws you 
deeper into his mysterious inner sanctum, nothing 
is as it seems. You’ll need to summon all your cour¬ 
age and wisdom to prove yourself worthy of the 
Master’s Great Secret—and of life itself. 


ITEM #1356 

C64/128 

$44.95 

ITEM #1357 

Apple II 

$49.95 

ITEM #1358 

IBM 

$49.95 

ITEM #1359 

Amiga 

$49.95 

ITEM #1360 

Macintosh 

$49.95 

ITEM #1361 

Atari ST 

$49.95 

ITEM #1362 

Atari XL/XE 

$44.95 

ITEM #1363 

InvisiClues ™ 

$12.95 


BEYOND ZORK™ 

Dread times have befallen the 
Kingdom of Quendor. The wiz¬ 
ards have mysteriously disappear¬ 
ed and vicious monsters haunt the 
streets and wastelands. Now it 
falls on you, a lowly peasant, to 
unravel the meaning behind these 

ominous events. 

You start by designing your own character, 
blending attributes such as strength, endurance, 
compassion and luck. Your search for the answer 
will lead you deep underground, where unspeak¬ 
able monsters guard the world's most fabulous 
treasure—the fabled Coconut of Quendor. Includes 
on-screen map. Written by Brian Moriarty. (All ver¬ 
sions require at least 128K. Macintosh and Amiga 
versions require 512K. IBM version requires 192K.) 


W Zork I is “the program which all 
other computerized adventures 
are judged.’’—Playboy. In this story, 
a great starting point for first-time 
players, you travel into the Great 
Underground Empire in search of 
the fabulous Treasures of Zork. 

All versions except Atari XL/XE, Atari ST and Amiga 
include on-screen hints. Written by Marc Blank and 
Dave Lebling. (Apple II and IBM versions require 
128K. Macintosh version requires 512K.) 


ITEM #1490 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1491 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1492 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1493 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1494 

Macintosh 

$19.95 

ITEM #1495 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1496 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1497 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 


ZORK® II 

ffltgg Journey to a long hidden region 
ot the Great Underground Empire, 
dominated by the frivolous Wiz¬ 
ard of Frobozz. Exiled years be¬ 
fore, the befuddled Wizard is still 
a force to be reckoned with, mate¬ 
rializing at odd moments to cast 
bothersome spells. There are many curiosities to 
explore in his realm, including the garden of an 
elusive Unicorn and a maze of Oddly-Angled 
Rooms. Written by Dave Lebling and Marc Blank. 


ITEM #1526 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1527 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1528 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1529 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1530 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1531 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1532 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1533 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 






ITEM #1326 

C128 

$44.95 

ITEM #1327 

Apple II 

$49.95 

ITEM #1328 

IBM 

$49.95 

ITEM #1329 

Amiga 

$49.95 

ITEM #1330 

Macintosh 

$49.95 

ITEM #1331 

Atari ST 

$49.95 

ITEM #1222 

Apple II GS 

$49.95 

ITEM #1332 

InvisiClues ™ 

$9.95 


LEATHER GODDESSES OF PHOBOS® 

p “Leather Goddesses ofPhobos is 
*n uproarious role-playing romp 
that heralds a new breed of com¬ 
puter games.”—Newsweek 
How did you, a regular at Joe’s 
Bar in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, end 
up on a Martian Moon? What 
delights await you in the luxurious chambers of 
the Harem? Can you stop the Leather Goddesses’ 
fiendish plot to turn the Earth into their own per¬ 
sonal sex playground? 

Find these answers and more in this titillating 
romp through the solar system. Leather Goddesses 
ofPhobos features three levels of play, (Tame, Sug¬ 
gestive and Lewd) to satisfy all appetites. Written 
by Steve Meretzky. All versions but Atari XL/XE, 
Atari ST and Amiga include on-screen hints. (Apple 
II and IBM versions require 128K. Macintosh ver¬ 
sion requires 512K.) 


ITEM #1364 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1365 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1366 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1367 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1368 

Macintosh 

$19.95 

ITEM #1369 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1370 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1371 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 


ZORK® III 

For the ultimate test of your wis- 
'"¥lom and courage, the Dungeon 
Master draws you into the deepest 
and most mysterious reaches of 
the Great Underground Empire. 
Nothing is as it seems—and the 
Dungeon Master embodies the 
greatest mystery of all. To finish the story, you’ll 
need to discover why you are in the perilous ruins 
of the empire and what you are supposed to be 
doing there. Written by Marc Blank and Dave 
Lebling. 


ITEM #1554 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1555 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1556 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1557 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1558 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1559 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1560 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1561 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 


CORNERSTONE™ 

Control is the key to maximum productivity 
with any information management system and 
Cornerstone gives you full control from start to 
finish. Cornerstone is as easy to learn as it is to 
use. The on-line help system is sensitive to 
your immediate needs and the unique options 
key lets you know what you can do next. “For 
sheer value and power, we have to give the top 
rating to Cornerstone."— InfoWorld. (Requires 
384K Memory, 2 Floppy Disk Drives or 1 
Floppy and 1 Hard Disk Drive, and PC-DOS 2.0, 
2.1, 3.0 or 3.1.) 

ITEM #1416 IBM $29.95 



















































# BUY 4... GET 1 FREE! 


BUY ANY 4 TITLES... AND QUALIFY FOR 1 OF 
THE “BONUS GIFT” TITLES IDENTIFIED BY THE 




INFOCOMICS™ All the Fun of Comic Books on Your Computer! 

This new dimension in entertainment software brings 
comic books to life on your computer. But because 
it’s an Infocomic, there’s much more. The panels of an 
Infocomic use sounds and exciting cinematic effects to 
bring the colorful graphics to life and draw you into 
the action. You’ll even get to see the story unfold from 
the perspective of each of the main characters. (Apple 
II version requires 128K Memory, IBM version requires 
256K Memory and Color 
Graphics Card. Not available for IBM PCjr.) 


LANE MASTODON™ VS THE 
BLUBBERMEN 

Lane Mastodon, accountant turned superhero, 
save humanity from the Blubbermen of Jupiter in 
this cornball spoof of 1930's space operas! 

ITEM #1301 C64/128 $12.00 

ITEM #1302 Apple II $12.00 

ITEM #1303 IBM $12.00 

ZORK® QUEST: 

ASSAULT ON EGRETH CASTLE 

Set in the fabulous world of Zork, a magic amulet 
leads a small caravan of travelers to mysterious 
Egreth Castle, the moldering lair of trolls, hobgob¬ 
lins, night gaunts and a diabolical wizard. 

ITEM #1307 C64/128 $12.00 

ITEM #1308 Apple II $12.00 

ITEM #1309 IBM $12.00 

HOLLYWOOD HIJINX™ 

Your Uncle Buddy Burbank 
^famous Hollywood producer) 
and his wife, Hildegard have 
passed away. And lucky you 
have inherited their mansion, 
filled with a lifetime of Holly¬ 
wood memorabilia. But there’s 
one stipulation—you can only 
claim your booty if you find the treasures hidden 
throughout the sprawling estate in one short night. 

“You can’t help but be entertained.”—Analog 
Computing 





C64/128 
Apple II 
IBM 
Amiga 
Macintosh 
Atari ST 
InvisiClues ™ 


$14.95 

$14.95 

$14.95 

$14.95 

$14.95 

$14.95 

$9.95 


A soldier of fortune by trade, 
you’ve come to the Egyptian 
desert in search of a great lost 
pyramid. Now you’ve been ma¬ 
rooned by your workers and 
must struggle along to locate 
and enter the tomb, decipher its 
hieroglyphics and unravel its mysteries. Death licks 
at your heels as you race to the shattering climax of 
this match of wits between you and the most in¬ 
genious architects, builders and murderers of all 


GAMMA FORCE™ IN THE PIT OF 
A THOUSAND SCREAMS 

This exciting superhero series features a Water- 
beast of indomitable strength, a Human gifted with 
flight and future visions and an elfin Princess of 
unearthly power. See the origins of the trio as they 
team-up to free their planet from an evil overlord 
and his Pit of a Thousand Screams. 

ITEM #1304 C64/128 $12.00 

ITEM #1305 Apple II $12.00 

ITEM #1306 IBM $12.00 

ZORK® QUEST: 

THE CRYSTAL OF DOOM 

The second in this fantasy series. 

ITEM #1562 C64/128 $12.00 

ITEM #1563 AppleII $12.00 

ITEM #1564 IBM $12.00 

BALLYHOO™ 

The circus is a place where 
r dreams come true. At least, that’s 
what you think... until you get 
behind the scenes. Beyond the 
spangles lies a seedy world of 
deception and crime. Exploring 
the tattered corners of the circus 
lot, you learn that the owner's daughter has been 
kidnapped. Good Samaritan that you are, you de¬ 
cide to find her. But watch your step. Or the kid¬ 
napper will set you up for a permanent slot in the 
freak show. A unique puzzle-oriented mystery. 
ITEM #1408 C64/128 $14.95 

ITEM #1409 Apple II $14.95 

ITEM #1410 IBM $14.95 

ITEM #1411 Amiga $14.95 

ITEM #1412 Macintosh $14.95 

ITEM #1413 Atari ST $14.95 

ITEM #1414 Atari XL/XE $14.95 

ITEM #1415 InvisiClues™ $7.95 

SEASTALKER® 

Journey through a suspenseful 
^undersea world in your own 
submarine, the Scimitar. Never 
mind that it hasn’t been tested in 
deep water. As an undersea ex¬ 
plorer and renowned inventor, 
you’re used to taking risks. When 
the alarm sounds at the under sea research center, 
you must learn to operate and pilot the submarine 
in time to save the center from a menacing sea 





THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO 
THE GALAXY™ 

I Who better to guide you 
[trough the Hitchhiker’s Guide 
than the man who created the 
concept and wrote the famous 
books and radio scripts? Douglas 
Adams himself recreates the 
Hitchhiker universe and sets 
you free to roam at will. Of course, once Earth is 
demolished for an interstellar bypass, freedom’s 
just another word for nothing left to lose. But chin 
up, you’re headed for a hilarious series of interga- 
lactic misadventures. So grab a pint of bitter and a 
couple for the road and join Ford Perfect, Trillian 
and friends on a cosmic jaunt into the outer 
reaches where anything can—and does—happen. 
Written by Steve Meretzky. All versions except 
Atari XL/XE, Atari ST and Amiga include on-screen 
hints. (Apple II and IBM versions require 128K. 
Macintosh version requires 512K.) 


ITEM #1538 

C64/128 

5 14.95 

ITEM #1539 

Apple II 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1540 

IBM 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1541 

Amiga 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1542 

Macintosh 

$ 19.95 

ITEM #1543 

Atari ST 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1544 

Atari XL/XE 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1545 

InvisiClues ™ 

57.95 



PLANETFALL® 

Award-winning and ever-pop- 
"ular Planetfall, Steve Meretzky’s 
first interactive fiction story, was 
called “just about worth the pur¬ 
chase of a computer” by Mem¬ 
phis Magazine. As the story be¬ 
gins 120 centuries in the future, 
you’re a lowly deck-swabber in the stellar patrol. 
Then your ship explodes and you’re jettisoned on a 
mysterious deserted planet. Luckily you have Floyd, 
a multipurpose robot with the personality of a mis¬ 
chievous 8-year-old who easily takes the prize for 
the best-loved Infocom character. Includes on¬ 
screen hints. (Apple II and IBM versions require 
128K. Macintosh version requires 512K.) 

ITEM #1565 C64/128 $14.95 

ITEM #1566 Apple II $14.95 

ITEM #1567 IBM $14.95 

ITEM #1568 Macintosh $14.95 

A MIND FOREVER VOYAGING™ 

It’s 2031. The world is on the 
brink of chaos. In the United 
States of North America, our lead¬ 
ers have developed The Plan for 
Renewed National Purpose. Will 
The Plan ensure peace and pros¬ 
perity? Or will it set the earth on 
a suicide course to destruction? As the world’s first 
conscious, intelligent computer, only you have the 
ability to enter a simulation of the future and test 
The Plan’s effectiveness. “A.M.F.V. isn't 1984, but 
in some ways it’s even scarier”—Newsweek. Writ¬ 
ten by Steve Meretzky. (All versions require at least 
128K. Macintosh and Amiga versions require 512K.) 



time—the ancient Egyptians. 


monster. 



ITEM #1546 

C128 

5 14.95 

ITEM #1384 

C64/128 

59.95 

“Though pitched to the younger set, Seastalker 

ITEM #1547 

Apple II 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1385 

Apple II 

59.95 

can just as easily enthrall an oldster.” 

—People 

ITEM #1548 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1386 

IBM 

59.95 

ITEM #1447 

C64/128 

59.95 

ITEM #1549 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1387 

Amiga 

59.95 

ITEM #1448 

Apple II 

59.95 

ITEM #1550 

Macintosh 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1388 

Macintosh 

59.95 

ITEM #1449 

IBM 

59.95 

ITEM #1551 

Atari ST 

$ 14.95 

ITEM #1389 

Atari ST 

59.95 

ITEM #1450 

Amiga 

59.95 

ITEM #1553 

InvisiClues ™ 

57.95 


ITEM #1390 Atari XL/XE 
ITEM #7391 InvisiClues ™ 


59.95 

57.95 


ITEM #1451 
ITEM #1452 
ITEM #1453 
ITEM #1454 


Macintosh 
Atari ST 
Atari XL/XE 
InvisiClues ™ 


59.95 

59.95 

59.95 

57.95 


TO ORDER OR ASK A QUESTION, CALL TOLL-FREE 800-227-6900 


SPECIAL OFFER 

Buy Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Planetfall 
and A Mind Forever Voyaging in the Science 
Fiction Classics™ Package for only $29.85. 
(Does not include on-screen hints.) 

A savings of $15.00! 

ITEM #1534 C64/128 ITEM #1535 Apple II 

ITEM #1536 IBM ITEM #1537 Macintosh 












































































© BUY 4 


GET 1 FREE! 


BUY ANY 4 TITLES... AND QUALIFY FOR 1 OF J| 
THE “BONUS GIFT” TITLES IDENTIFIED BY THE 


THE WITNESS* 

February 1938. Los Angeles. 

™ FDR's New Deal is rolling. Hit¬ 
ler’s rolling, too; this time through 
Austria. But as Chief Detective for 
a quiet burgh on the outskirts of 
L.A., you’ve got other fish to fry. 
One gilt-edged society dame is 
dead. And now it looks like some two-bit drifter is 
putting the screws to her multi-millionaire old 
man. Then you step in, and the shakedown turns 
ugly. You're left with a stiff and a race against the 
clock to nail your suspect... unless you get nailed 
first. 



ITEM #1498 

C64/128 

$9.95 

ITEM #1499 

Apple II 

$9.95 

ITEM #1500 

IBM 

$9.95 

ITEM #1501 

Amiga 

$9.95 

ITEM #1502 

Macintosh 

$9.95 

ITEM #1503 

Atari ST 

$9.95 

ITEM #1504 

Atari XL/XE 

$9.95 

ITEM #1505 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 


SUSPECT* 

p|At an elegant costume ball, you 
mingle with bluebloods and 
power brokers. It’s a delightful 
evening —until you go from un¬ 
suspecting newspaper reporter to 
murder suspect. It takes all your 
newspaper skills of observation, 
deduction and interrogation to come up with the 
proof of your innocence. Don't dally over the 
champagne—you only have ‘til morning. Written by 
Dave Lebling. 


ITEM #1506 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1507 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1508 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1509 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1510 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1511 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1512 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1513 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 



MOONMIST™ 

g More ghosts haunt the misty 
^eacoast and stone ramparts of 
Cornwall than any place on earth. 
One such soul roams Tresyllian 
Castle. You arrive at the castle in 
response to an urgent plea from 
your friend. Her life is threatened 
and the culprit seems to be the ghost. You'll meet 
an eccentric cast of characters as you hunt down 
the phantom and search for secret treasures. 
Moonmist has four variations, each with a different 
guilty party, hidden treasure and hiding place. 


ITEM #1514 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1515 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1516 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1517 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1518 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1519 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1520 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1521 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 



SPECIAL OFFER 

Buy The Witness, Suspect and 
Moonmist in the Classic Mystery 
Library™ Package for only $29.85. 

A savings of $10.00! 

ITEM #1534 C64/128 ITEM #1535 Apple II 

ITEM #1536 IBM ITEM #1537 Macintosh 


LOWEST PRICE EVER! 
STATIONFALL™ 

Planetfall has long been a favor- 
**Tte of Infocom fans. Now Floyd is 
back in the boffoid sequel! 

Since your incredible heroics in 
Planetfall, things have hardly 
changed at all. Life in The Stellar 
Patrol is still a bore. Today’s thrill¬ 
ing assignment: travel to a space station to pick up 
some trivial forms. Arriving at the space station, 
you find it strangely deserted with a spooky alien 
ship resting in a dock bay. Luckily, Floyd is on hand 
to help you identify and overcome the dangerous 
forces at work. But then, even he begins acting 
oddly... written by Steve Meretzky 


ITEM #1341 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1342 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1343 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1344 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1345 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1346 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1347 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1348 

InvisiClues ™ 

$9.95 



BORDER ZONE™ 

Where the Iron Curtain divides 
Tiast and West, the frontier is a no¬ 
man’s land between freedom and 
captivity. In Border Zone, you 
cross this barrier not once, but 
three times—as an easy-going 
American businessman, an 
ambitious young American Spy and a and a ruthless 
KGB agent—in this fast-paced story of international 
intrigue. 

The pulse-pounding tension of espionage is 
heightened by the addition of real time, which 
ticks on regardless of your actions. As you race 
against the clock to complete your missions, you’ll 
find yourself caught up in an incredibly suspense¬ 
ful and spine-tingling adventure. Includes on¬ 
screen hints. (All versions except C64/128 require 
at least 128K. Macintosh version requires 512K.) 


ITEM #1322 C64/128 $34.95 

ITEM #1323 Apple II $39.95 

ITEM #1324 IBM $39.95 

ITEM #1325 Macintosh $39.95 


BORDER 

ZONE 

tt 

—E 


SUSPENDED* 


Winner of numerous accolades 
nd awards—your library is in¬ 
complete without this highly 
challenging game. 

You awake from a cryogenic 
suspension when an earthquake 
destroys the systems of the under 
ground complex you inhabit. You’re the only one 
capable of putting things right, but you must do so 
from within your cyrogenic capsule, commanding 
your six robots to perform actions for you. 



ITEM #1439 

C 64/128 

$9.95 

ITEM #1440 

Apple II 

$9.95 

ITEM #1441 

IBM 

$9.95 

ITEM #1442 

Amiga 

$9.95 

ITEM #1443 

Macintosh 

$9.95 

ITEM #1444 

Atari ST 

$9.95 

ITEM #1445 

Atari XL/XE 

$9.95 

ITEM #1446 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 


For your convenience in placing an order or 
asking a question 

CALL TOLL-FREE 
(800) 227-6900 

Monday-Friday 6AM-6PM 
Saturday 9AM-4PM Pacific time 


SHERLOCK: THE RIDDLE OF THE 
CROWN JEWELS™ 

Travel back in time to Victorian 
ondon, where the city is bustling 
with preparations for Her Maj¬ 
esty’s Golden Jubilee. But, unbe¬ 
knownst to the celebrants throng¬ 
ing the city, a crisis has arisen: the 
Crown Jewels have been stolen 
from the Tower of London. If they’re not recover¬ 
ed before the festivities begin, the theft will be 
exposed and the government will fall into interna¬ 
tional disgrace. 

Use your wits, intuition and a myriad of clues to 
solve the riddles and piece together the mystery. 
Includes on- screen hints. (All versions except 
C64/128 require at least 128K. Macintosh and 
Amiga versions require 512K.) 



ITEM #1316 

C64/128 

$34.95 

ITEM #1317 

Apple II 

$39.95 

ITEM #1318 

IBM 

$42.95 

ITEM #1319 

Macintosh 

$39.95 

ITEM #1320 

Amiga 

$39.95 


WISHBRINGER 

“There’s no better introduction 
'*To the richness of adventure¬ 
gaming experience than this beau¬ 
tiful, imaginative game.”—inCider 
When the story begins, your life as 
a postal clerk in the seaside village of 
Festeron, is quite ordinary. But 
when you’re asked to deliver a strange envelope to 
the outskirts of town, things become quite extraordi¬ 
nary. All versions except Atari XL/XE, Atari ST and 
Amiga include on-screen hints. Written by Brian 
Moriarty. (Apple II and IBM versions require 128K. 
Macintosh version requires 512K.) 


ITEM #1400 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1401 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1402 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1403 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1404 

Macintosh 

$19.95 

ITEM #1405 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1406 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1407 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 



CUTTHROATS® 

Hardscrabble Island is a litde seaport that's about 
as picturesque as it sounds. As an expert diver, you 
have agreed to help salvage the sunken treasure 
from one of the four local shipwrecks. The only 
thing between you and the treasure is the gang of 
cutthroat characters you’re working with. Of 
course, the only link between you and the treasure 
is those same cutthroat characters. 


ITEM #1392 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1393 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1394 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1395 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1396 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1397 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1398 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1399 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 


STARCROSS® 

You’re a down-at-the-heels asteroid miner in the 
year 2186. While searching for black holes, you 
find an apparently abandoned spaceship. After you 
succeed in gaining entry to its mysterious interior, 
you find that it contains a community of other 
worldly beings, as well as a challenging puzzle 
whose solution could be the key to the galaxy. 
Written by Dave Lebling. 


ITEM #1431 

C64/128 

$9.95 

ITEM #1432 

Apple II 

$9.95 

ITEM #1433 

IBM 

$9.95 

ITEM #1434 

Amiga 

$9.95 

ITEM #1435 

Macintosh 

$9.95 

ITEM #1436 

Atari ST 

$9.95 

ITEM #1437 

Atari XL/XE 

$9.95 

ITEM #1438 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 


































































© BUY 4 


GET 1 FREE! 


BUY ANY 4 TITLES... AND QUALIFY FOR 1 OF J| 
THE “BONUS GIFT” TITLES IDENTIFIED BY THE 'dP 


LOWEST PRICE EVER! 

PLUNDERED HEARTS™ 

ra In the 17th century, the seas are 
*as wild as the untamed heart of a 
young woman. But as you set out 
for the West Indies, your thoughts 
are only of your ailing father 
awaiting your care. 

Your innocent journey turns 
dangerous as you barely survive an encounter with 
pirates and other obstacles you must overcome 
with your cunning and agility. True, it’s not easy; 
but at least you can control your fate. What you 
cannot control is much more dangerous: your pas¬ 
sion for Nicholas Jamison, the handsome pirate 
captain. 


ITEM #1333 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1334 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1335 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1336 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1337 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1338 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1339 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1340 

InvisiClues ™ 

$9.95 



LOWEST PRICE EVER! 

NORD AND BERT COULDN’T MAKE 
HEAD OR TAIL OF IT™ 

Eight Tales of Cliches, Spoonerisms and 
Other Verbal Trickery 

If you’re looking for a fun way 
To spend an evening alone or 
with friends, Nord and Bert 
could be just the ticket. 

Nord and Bert takes you to the 
mixed-up town of Punster, where 
nothing is quite as it seems. It’s a 
place where you really can make a mountain out of 
a molehill, where “the fur is flying" is taken literally 
and where a happy Sam is transformed to a sappy 
ham. 



Each of the eight short stories involves a differ¬ 
ent type of wordplay. Includes on-screen hints. (All 
versions except C64/128 require at least 128K. 
Macintosh and Amiga versions require 512K.) 


ITEM #1310 C64/128 $14.95 

ITEM #1311 Apple II $14.95 

ITEM #1312 IBM $14.95 

ITEM #1313 Amiga $14.95 

ITEM #1314 Macintosh $14.95 

ITEM #1315 Atari ST $14.95 



TRINITY* 


p It’s the last day of your London 
vacation. Unfortunately, it’s also 
the first day of World War III... 

Author Brian Moriarty has cre¬ 
ated an epic odyssey across the 
borders of reality, in a world remi¬ 
niscent of Alice in Wonderland 


and The Twilight Zone. 

"Trinity mixes logic and magic with history and 
fiction. Often poetic in its imagery, the evocative 
prose is as entertaining to read as the puzzles are 
to solve.”—Family Computing 
(All systems require at least 128K. Macintosh and 
Amiga versions require 512K.) 


ITEM #1417 

C128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1418 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1419 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1420 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1421 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1422 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1423 

InvisiClues ™ 

$7.95 


ENCHANTER* 

Enchanter is the introduction to 
the highly acclaimed Enchanter 
Trilogy which takes you to a world 
of magic, where spells are power 
and magicians rule the land. As a 
novice magician, you are sent to 
do battle with the warlock Krill. 

To succeed in your quest, you’ll need to use all the 
cunning you can muster, along with spells acquir¬ 
ed on the way. By Dave Lebling and Marc Blank. 


ITEM #1459 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1460 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1461 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1462 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1463 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1464 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1465 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1466 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 


SORCERER® 

i Steve Meretzky’s Sorcerer, 
have advanced to the illustri- 
Circle of Enchanters. Now you 
it show an even greater com- 
td of magic as you attempt to 
:ue your mentor Belboz and 
:at the evil demon Jeearr. “The 
world of Sorcerer is rich in detail and wonderment. 


The final solution is like a delicate orchid achiev¬ 
ing full bloom. Long after the game is over, the 
heady fragrance stays with you.”—St. Game. 


ITEM #1467 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1468 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1469 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1470 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1471 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1472 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1473 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1474 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 


SPELLBREAKER™ 

As leader of the Circle of En¬ 
chanters and the most powerful 
magician in the land, you face a 
crisis in Spellbreaker. Magic itself 
is failing, and you must save the 
kingdom even as your own pow¬ 
ers fade. Author Dave Lebling has 
created a complex story with some of the hardest 
puzzles in interactive fiction. Spellbreaker is sheer 
joy... It’s the perfect conclusion for the Enchanter 
Trilogy, which can now join the classic Zork Tril¬ 
ogy as a must-have for all fantasy gamers.”— 
Computer Entertainer. 


ITEM #1475 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1476 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1477 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1478 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1479 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1480 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1481 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1482 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 





FOOBLITZKY™ 

Fooblitzky is a unique graphics strategy game for 
2 to 4 players. It’s a dog-eat-dog world, as you rove 
the crowded streets and busy shops of Fooblitzky, 
trying to deduce and obtain the four objects need¬ 
ed to win the game. Victory depends on how well 


LOWEST PRICE EVER! 

THE LURKING HORROR™ 

Ever since you arrived G.U.E. 
lech, you’ve heard stories about 
the creepy old campus base¬ 
ments and storage rooms. Until 
now, you’ve kept a safe distance. 
But tonight, something draws 
you down into the mysterious 
depths of the institute. Suddenly, you’re in a world 
that rivals your most hideous visions, a realm of 
horror lurking beneath the calm corridors and 
study halls. 

Shapes emerge from dark corners. Eerie sounds 
draw closer. Slimy passageways lead to sights so 
horrifying that they will feed your nightmares for 
weeks. Written by Dave Lebling. 



ITEM #1349 

C64/128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1350 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1351 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1352 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1353 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1354 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1355 

Atari XL/XE 

$14.95 

ITEM #1348 

InvisiClues™ 

$9.95 

DEADLINE® 



A classic! The first computer 
HPrnystery. 

A LOCMB DOORADM) MAN 


As the chief of detectives, 
you’re up against a 12-hour time 
limit trying to solve a classic 
locked-door mystery. A wealthy 
industrialist is dead of a drug 
overdose and you’ve been called in to determine 
whether it’s suicide or murder. To learn “who¬ 


dunit”, you must sift through a myriad of clues and 
motives. No easy feat, for all six of your suspects 
exercise free will—coming and going, scheming 
and maneuvering independently of your actions. 
Written by Marc Blank. 


ITEM #1424 

C64/128 

$9.95 

ITEM #1425 

Apple II 

$9.95 

ITEM #1426 

IBM 

$9.95 

ITEM #1427 

Macintosh 

$9.95 

ITEM #1428 

Atari ST 

$9.95 

ITEM #1429 

Atari XL/XE 

$9.95 

ITEM #1430 

InvisiClues™ 

$7.95 

BUREAUCRACY™ 


Si 



''•'version of Elitchhiker’s Guide to 


the Galaxy was a runaway slic- 


cess. Now the distinctive humor 

iJIEHHuij 

that made Hitchhiker’s a #\ best- 

— 

Bureaucracy. 



Everyone, at one time or another, feels bound 
up in an endless swathe of red tape. In Bureauc¬ 
racy, you’ll find yourself in the midst of a bureau¬ 


cratic muddle so convoluted that you can’t help 
but laugh. 

You’ve just landed a great new job and moved to 
a spiffy house in a nice little town. You’re even 
being sent to Paris this very afternoon for a combi¬ 
nation training seminar and vacation. What could 
possibly go wrong? The answer, of course, is every¬ 
thing. 

(All versions require at least 128K. Macintosh 
and Amiga versions require 512K.) 


you use funds, keep records and outsmart your 
opponents. (Requires 128K, IBM version requires 
Graphics Card with Composite Monitor recom¬ 
mended.) 

ITEM #1455 AppleII $9.95 

ITEM #1456 IBM $9.95 

ITEM #1457 Atari XL/XE $9.95 


ITEM #1379 

C128 

$14.95 

ITEM #1380 

Apple II 

$14.95 

ITEM #1381 

IBM 

$14.95 

ITEM #1458 

Amiga 

$14.95 

ITEM #1382 

Macintosh 

$14.95 

ITEM #1383 

Atari ST 

$14.95 

ITEM #1378 

InvisiClues™ 

$9.95 


TO ORDER OR ASK A QUESTION, CALL TOLL-FREE 800-227-6900